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Full text of "Annual report of the Water Commissioner, for the year ending .."

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 




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FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



WATER COMMISSIONER 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING JANUARY 31, 1910 



printed for tbe 2)epartment 




9J 

CITY OF BOSTON 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT 

1910 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Blacksmith shop 

Concrete boxes 
Carpenter shop 
City Engineer, Report of 
Contracts . 
Construction, Cost of 
Consumption of water 

Distribution Division, Report of Superintendent 

Expenditures . 
Electrolysis 

Fountains 

General statistics 

Hydrants . 

Hydrants, blow-off and reservoir pipes 

Income Division, Report of General Superintendent 
Ice for drinking fountains 

Length of main lines and connections 

Main pipe work. Cost of 
Mains laid and relaid 
Machine shop . 
Maintenance . 

Meters .... 

Organization of department 
Off and On Force . 

Property and plant . 
Plumbing shop 
Pattern shop . 
Paint shop 

Receipts . 

Service pipes . 

Waste detection 

Water at annual rates 

Water debt 

Water loans outstanding 

Water posts 

Water, sinking fund 

Tables : 

Abatements . . . 
Cost of Boston Waterworks 
Fixtures in use December, 1909 
Fixtures, defective and waste . 

Meters 

Miscellaneous work 

Pipes, elevator, motor and service 

Waste inspection .... 

Water rates 

Water, turning off and on . . 

Water, comparative table of receipts and expenditures 



Page 

79,80 

79 

72-77 

98-100 

10-23 

5 

102 

35-89 

2-4 

71, 72 

68-71, 96, 97 

101, 102 

57-60, 94 
93 

24-34 
3 

90 

42-47 
37-42 

72-77 
2, 3, 48 
28-34, 65, 66 

35, 36, 103-106 
64, 65 

83-89 

80, 81 

81, 82 

82 

1,2-4 

60-64, 95, 96 

71,98 
24 

5,9 

5,6 

66-68 

5,7,8 



25 

between 4 and 5 

25 

26 

28-34, 65, 66 
78, 79, 81-83 
25-27 
26 
24 
26 
4 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofwa151910bos 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

FOR THE YEAR 1909-10. 



Office of the Water Commissioner, 
City Hall, Boston, February 7, 1910. 

Hon. John F. Fitzgerald, 

Mayor of the City of Boston: 

Sir, — I submit herewith the fifteenth annual report 
of the doings of the Water Department covering the 
year ending January 31, 1910. 

The receipts and disbursements of the department for 
the year were as follows: 

Total receipts from all sources $2,897,635 48 

Total expenditures for all purposes . . . . . . $2,897,635 48 

Total Receipts of the Year by Sources. 

Sales of water 

Service, elevator, fire and motor pipes and repairs, labor, 

materials, etc 

Sale of old materials . . 

Fees for summonses 

Shutting off and letting on water on account of repairs . 
Shutting off and letting on water on account of nonpayment 

of bills 

Use of West Roxbury pumping plant 

Difference on cost of laying main pipe 

Board of City Engineer's horse 

Carried forward $2,677,948 00 



$2,609,102 39 


56,155 


02 


4,858 


25 


2,904 


52 


1,994 


00 


1,468 


00 


794 


82 


359 


00 


312 


00 



2 



City Document No. 40. 



Brought forward 
Interest on deposits 
Sale of merchandise 
Sale of horses 
Conscience money- 
Rents 
Sale of hay . 



Credited from taxes 
Transfer by City Auditor 



Expenditures. 



Current expenses and extensions 
Metropolitan water assessment 
Interest on funded debt 
Refunded water rates . 



$2,677,948 00 
296 50 
282 49 
275 00 
155 00 
100 00 
15 00 

$2,679,071 99 

159,000 00 

59,563 49 

$2,897,635 48 



$871,367 43 

1,862,823 42 

161,963 39 

1,481 24 

;2,897,635 48 



Details of expenditures under the appropriation for 
current expenses, etc., for the fiscal year ending January 
31, 1910. (From revenue.) 

Salaries and wages : 

William E. Hannan, commissioner . . $5,000 00 
Isaac Rosnosky, assistant commissioner to 

February 12, 1909 350 00 

Walter E. Swan, chief clerk .... 3,00000 

Employees 481,627 12 

Water pipes and other castings . 

New meters ' . $65,014 25 

Repairs and extra parts 2,360 56 



Blasting and excavating pipe trenches and lay 

water pipes . 
Stable: 

Board, feed, etc. _ . 

Vehicles and repairs 

Horseshoeing . 

Horses, purchase of . 

Harnesses and repairs, etc. 

Veterinary services, etc. . 



$489,977 12 
128,460 33 



ing and relaying 



$10,618 
3,651 
2,538 
1,510 
1,359 
626 



67 
32 
11 
00 
30 
75 



Repairs and alterations of buildings, repairs of streets and 
structures 

Tools and machinery and repairs of same, iron, steel, hard- 
ware and small supplies 

Lead and lead pipe 

Lumber 

Automobiles : 

Two emergency cars, $2,000 each . . . $4,000 00 

One Corbin runabout 1,400 00 

Repairs, supplies and care . . . . 4,551 66 



67,374 81 
57,460 91 



20.304 15 

19.305 57 

16,504 96 
14,556 15 
11,348 35 



9,951 66 



Carried forward 



,244 01 



Water Department. 



employees 



Brought forward 
Printing 

Traveling expenses and transportation of 
Fuel .... 
Gravel and crushed stone 
Teaming, freight and expressage 
Telephones . 
Salt . 
Stationery, etc. 
Rents 

Cement, lime and sand 
Drinking fountains 
Oils 

Postage 
Brick 
Insurance 
Gas 

Taxes . 
Furniture 
Electric lighting . 
Advertising . 
Waterproof clothing 
Salt hay 

Professional and expert services 
Drain pipe 
Ice .... 
Recording papers 
Premium on surety bonds 



Damages . . . ... 

Payment to widow of employee killed (chapter 
141, Acts of 1909) . , 



$7,979 98 
2,000 00 



$845,244 


01 


4,527 


03 


3,792 


76 


2,388 


11 


1,920 


40 


1,899 


09 


1,813 


14 


1,705 


00 


1,554 


89 


1,252 


00 


787 


92 


769 


32 


670 


33 


419 


69 


368 


15 


340 


00 


309 


77 


299 


25 


290 


07 


281 


50 


220 


94 


213 


91 


135 


34 


50 


00 


47 


00 


37 43 


25 


40 


25 


00 



$861,387' 45 



9,979 98 
^871,367 43 



There was also expended by the Water Department, 
under an appropriation of $5,000 from the Reserve 
Fund, for ice for drinking fountains (order of City 
Council, approved May 26, 1909) : 



Ice . 
Advertising 



J,592 63 
12 10 

5,604 73 



For comparative table of receipts and expenditures, 
condition of water debt, etc., see statements annexed. 

Reports of work performed in the Income and Dis- 
tribution Divisions and the Engineering Department 
will be found in the appendices annexed hereto. 

Respectfully, 

William E. Hannan, 

Water Commissioner. 



4 



City Document No. 40. 



Comparative Table of Receipts and Expenditures. 

Receipts. 



1905-06. 



1906-07. 



1907-08. 



1908-09. 



1909-10. 



Sales of water. 
Other receipts . 



Loan, extension of mains . . 

Credited from taxes 

Transfers by City Auditor. 



,400,764 31 
58,315 50 



,459,079 81 
330,000 00 
200,000 00 



,989,079 81 



,471,726 19 
80,118 91 



,551,845 10 
300,000 00 
120,000 00 



,971,845 10 



,558,614 34 
67,975 43 



,626,589 77 



35,878 85 



$2,662,468 62 



$2,626,564 59 
52,509 31 



2,679,073 90 



16,687 10 



,695,761 00 



,609,102 39 
69,969 60 



,679,071 99 

159,000 00 
59,563 49 



,897,635 48 



Balance beginning of year. 



Balance end of year. 



$23,727 34 

$17,540 97 
t 9,460 67 



$27,001 64 



f * $17,540 97 
t 9,460 67 



$27,001 64 

* $16,365 90 

t 54,739 39 



$71,105 29 



$16,365 90 
t 54,739 39 



$71,105 29 



Expenditures. 



1905-06. 



1906-07. 



1907-08. 



1908-09. 



1909-10. 



Current expenses 

Metropolitan water assessment 

Interest 

Refunded water rates 

Extension of mains : 

From loans 

From appropriation from revenue, 



$541,375 59 

1,758,635 00 

348,188 36 

1,420 19 

336,186 37 



,985,805 51 



$544,769 54 

1,822,556 33 

257,764 85 

1,475 66 

301,175 07 



,927,741 45 



),191 07 

1,726,588 68 

178,217 66 

1,210 60 

16,365 90 
165,000 00 



$2,733,573 91 



$$729,677 14 

1,789,315 84 

175,010 17 

1,757 85 



t $871,367 43 

1,862,823 42 

161,963 39 

1,481 24 



J,695,761 00 



$2,897,635 48 



* Loan. t Taxes. 

t Amount expended for current expenses and extensions, there being one appropriation only. 



COST OF BOSTON WATERWORKS. 



Cochituate supply . . $1,715,950 73 

Sudbury supply 9,267,367 04 

Mystic supply . . 1,806,316 72 

Distribution system , , 13,196,885 49 

Total cost, January 1, 189S $27,986,519 98 

Cost of portion taken by the state .... 14,717,009 30 

Cost of portion remaining - SIS, 269, 510 68 

Cost of portion taken by the state . , $14,717,009 30 

Total payments by state 13,685,766 84 

Excess of cost over amount paid $1,031,242 46 

Cost in detail of portion of original works, exclusive 
of state taking: 



Brookline Reser\-oir 
Beacon Hill Reservoir 
South Boston Reservoir 
Jamaica Pond Aqueduct 
East Boston Reservoir 
Parker Hill Reservoir 
Fisher Hill Reservoir 
Roxbury high sei-vice 
Brighton high service 
East Boston high service 
West Roxbury high service 
Pipe yards and buildings 
Engineering expenses 
Distribution . . . . 

Cochituate works 
Mystic works (distributic 

Cost, January 31, 1898 . 

Carried fonmrd 



$200,077 21 
363,533 21 
90,908 10 
88,417 20 
66,103 09 
205,793 81 
191,135 35 
103,829 53 
7,745 00 
30,208 12 
22,346 56 
94,832 16 
57,873 58 
10,871,844 18 



$13,269,610 68 



Brought forward 



$13,269,510 68 



Additions to cost on account of extension 
of mains, etc. (eleven years to January 31, 
1909), viz.: 



Year ending January 31, 1899 
" 31, 1900 
" 31, 1901 

31, 1902 

31, 1903 
" 31, 1904 
" 31, 1905 

31, 1906 
" 31, 1907 
"31, 190S 

31, 1909 



$411,910 26 
446,120 35 
364,604 08 
259,228 99 
125,705 99 
117,501 25 
221,595 49 
313,465 41 
293,734 68 
220,239 57 
182,602 70 



Cost represented on waterworks ledger January 31, 1909, $17,257,461 89 
Cost represented by above statement on same date . 16,226,219 43 



Excess of cost represented over amount paid by state, $1,031,242 46 

The following is a statement of the cost of the exist- 
ing works on January 31, 1910: 



East Boston Reservoir . 

Parker Hill Reservoir 

Fisher Hill Reservoir 

East Boston high service 

West Roxbury high servii 

Pipe yards and buildings 

Engineeiing expenses 

Distribution (additions during the year, $203,369.28) 

Total 



866,103 09 
205,793 81 
191,135 35 
24,173 26 
22,348 56 
94,832 16 
57,873 58 
14,931,685 79 

$15,593,943 60 



Water Department. 



COST OF CONSTRUCTION AND CONDITION OF 
THE WATER DEBT. 

Cost of construction of waterworks to February 1, 1909,* $15,390,574 32 
Cost of construction of waterworks to February 1, 1910 . 15,593,943 60 

Increase during the year . $203,369 28 



The outstanding water loans February 1, 1909, were 
The outstanding water loans February 1, 1910, were 

Decrease during the year .... 



^4,249,500 00 
3,696,500 00 

$553,000 00 



The Water Sinking Fund February 1, 1909, was 
The Water Sinking Fund February 1, 1910, was 

Decrease during the year . . . . 



^3,637,956 71 
3,205,159 65 

$432,797 06 



Net water debt February 1, 1909 
Net water debt February 1, 1910 

Decrease during the year 



$611,543 29 
491,340 35 

$120,202 94 



Stock on hand February 1, 1909 
Stock on hand February 1, 1910 

Increase during the year 



$129,578 98 
137,876 08 

$8,297 10 



The outstanding water loans on February 1, 1910, 
were as follows: 



Date of 












Loans. Maturity. Amount. 


4 per cent loan, due April, 


1910 $135,000 00 


4 " " " April, 


1912 . 








324,000 00 


4 " " " October, 


1913 . 








50,000 00 


4 " " " January, 


1914 . 








459,000 00 


4 " « " April, 


1914 .. 








9,500 00 


4 " " « October, 


1914 . 








10,000 00 


4 " " " April, 


1915 . 








32,700 00 


4 " « " October, 


1915 . 








17,000 00 


4 " « " January, 


1916 . 








8,000 00 


4 " " " April, 


1916 . 








18,500 00 


4 " " " October, 


1916 . 








11,300 00 


4 " « « January, 


1917 . 








8,000 00 


31 " « " April, 


1917 . 








275,000 00 


4 « « « April, 


1917 . 








6,000 00 


4 " " " October, 


1917 . 








128,700 00 


4 " « « January, 


1918 . 








13,000 00 


4 « " « April, 


1918 . 








300 00 


3| « " « July, 


1918 . 






- 


100,000 00 


Carried forward . 










$1,606,000 00 



*See revised statement of cost of works in last annual report. 



6 



City Document No. 40. 





Date of 












Loans. Maturity. Amount. 


Brought forward . 


$1,606,000 00 


4 per cent loan, due October, 


1918 . 








95,000 00 


4 


" April, 


1919 . 








200,000 00 


3i " 


" October, 


1919 . 








2,000 00 


4 


' " October, 


1919 . 








164,000 00 


3i " 


' " November, 


1919 . 








106,000 00 


3i " 


' " January, 


1920 . 








70,000 00 


4 


' " October, 


1920 . 








163,500 00 


4 


" April, 


1921 . 








100,000 00 


4 


" October, 


1921 . 








140,500 00 


4 


' * " January, 


1922 . 








40,000 00 


4 


" April, 


1922 . 








75,000 00 


4 


" October, 


1922 . 








193,000 00 


4 


" October, 


1923 . 








18,275 00 


4 


" October, 


1924 . 








436,225 00 


3i " 


' " July, 


1929 . 








287,000 00 


Total . 




$3,696,500 00 




\ 


SUMMAKY. 


3| per cent lo 


ans 


$840,000 00 


4 


u 


2,856,500 00 


Total 


. 


■ 








$3,696,500 00 



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Water Department. 



9 



Cochituate Water Debt, Gross and Net. 

At the Close of each Fiscal Year. 



Fiscal Yeak. 



Gross Debt. Sinking Funds. Net Debt 



1847-48.. 
1848-49.. 
1849-50.. 
1850-51.. 
1851-52.. 
1852-53.. 
1853-54.. 
1854-55.. 
1855-56.. 
1856-57.. 
1857-58.. 
1858-59.. 
1859-60.. 
1860-61.. 
1861-62.. 
1862-63.. 
1863-64.. 
1864-65.. 
1865-66.. 
1866-67.. 
1867-68.. 
1868-69.. 
1869-70.. 
1870-71.. 
1871-72.. 
1872-73.. 
1873-74.. 
•1874-75.. 
1875-76.. 
1876-77.. 
1877-78.. 
1878-79.. 
1879-80.. 
1880-81.. 
1881-82.. 
1882-83.. 
1883-84.. 
1884-85. . 
1885-86.. 
1886-87.. 
1887-88.. 
1888-89.. 
1889-90.. 
1890-91.. 
1891-92.. 
1892-93.. 
1893-94.. 
1894-95.. 
1895-96.. 
1896-97.. 
1897-98.. 
1898-99.. 
1899-1900 
1900-1901 
1901-1902 
1902-1903 
1903-1904 
1904-1905 
1905-1906 
1906-1907 
1907-1908 
1908-1909 
1909-1910 



3 

4 
4 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2, 
3 
3 
3 
5 
5 
6 
6 
6 
7, 
8 
9 
11, 
11, 
11, 

ii: 
11 
11, 
11, 

12 
13 
13 
14 
14, 
14 
15, 
16, 
16 
16, 
17, 
17 
18, 
18, 
17, 
17, 
17, 
11, 
11, 
9, 



11 
11 
11 
11 
11 



,129,056 32 
,787,328 98 
,463,205 56 
955,613 51 
,209,223 26 
,972,976 11 
,432,261 11 
,403,961 
,230,961 
,031,961 
,724,961 
,754,461 
846,211 
,455,211 
012,711 
992,711 
992,711 
942,711 
152,711 
370,711 
867,711 
107,711 
731,711 
482,711 11 
812,711 11 
912,711 
863,711 
123,711 
735,711 
548,711 
545,273 98 
753,273 98 
697,273 98 
631,273 98 
631,273 98 
955,273 98 
882,273 98 
045,473 98 
491,473 98 
142,273 98 
741,273 98 
941,273 98 
696,273 98 
267,773 98 
423,773 98 
758,773 98 
055,273 98 
761,273 98 
261,273 98 
261,273 98 
911,273 98 
121,273 98 
306,273 98 
960,273 98 
351,917 28 
501,000 00 
227,000 00 
224,000 00 
671,250 00 
562,500 00 
531,500 00 
249,500 00 
696,500 00 



$1,100 
1,185 
1,268 
1,372 
1,533 
1,560 
1,709 
2,043 
2,143 
1,771 
1,989 
2,281 
2,607 
2,746 
3,106 
3,385 
3,947 
4,373 
4,864 
5,440 
5,979 
6,471 
7,019 
7,649 
8,444 
9,099 
9,704 
9,852 
9,487 
9,870 
10,144 
10,422 
8,893 
7,337 
7,600, 
5,943, 
3,697, 
3,794, 
3,637, 
3,205, 



,000 00 
,049 67 
,234 97 
,952 62 
,890 28 
,917 83 
,492 60 
,764 73 
,847 85 
,692 92 
300 88 
857 89 
768 46 
505 58 
323 82 
201 26 
616 92 
304 09 
092 54 
819 47 
297 80 
,545 34 
,058 38 
,504 87 
,773 55 
,966 39 
,387 99 
,760 01 
,119 88 
,223 90 
,647 08 
,449 77 
,615 94 
,902 79 
,689 44 
222 39 
913 53 
779 37 
956 71 
159 65 



.$2,129 
3,787 
4,463 
4,955 
5,209 
5,972 
5,432 
5,403 
5,230 
5,031 
4,724 
4,754 
3,846 
3,455 
3,012 
2,992 
2,992 
2,942 
3,152 
3,370 
3,867 
5,107 
5,731 
5,382 
5,627 
5,644 
6,490 
6,589 
8,174 
9,839 
9,501 
9,609 
9,925 
9,641 
9,349 
9,347 
10,135 
9,939, 
10,106 
10,194 
10,367, 
10,077 
10,255 
10,288, 
9,9.52 
9,739, 
9,405, 
9,316 
9,161, 
8,556, 
8,058, 
7,634, 
7,436, 
1,815, 
929, 
607. 



11 
11 
11 



623 
728, 
864, 
736, 
611, 
491, 



,056 32 
,328 98 
,205 56 
i,613 51 
,223 26 
,976 11 
,261 11 
:,961 
,961 
,961 
,961 11 
,461 11 
,211 11 
,211 11 
,711 11 
1,711 11 
,711 11 
,711 11 
,711 11 
1,711 11 
,711 11 
,711 11 
,711 11 
:,711 11 
,661 44 
,476 14 
,757 49 
^820 83 
,793 28 
,218 51 
,509 25 
,426 13 
,581 06 
,973 10 
,416 09 
,505 52 
,768 40 
,150 16 
,272 72 
,657 06 
,969 89 
,181 44 
,454 51 
,476 18 
,288 64 
,715 60 
,769 11 
,500 43 
307 59 
,885 99 
513 97 
154 10 
050 08 
626 90 
467 51 
384 06 
097 21 
310 56 
027 61 
586 47 
720 63 
543 29 
340 35 



iNo account taken of amounts borrowed temporarily from 1846 to 1852 and afterwards 
funded by the issue of water bonds that figure in this statement. 



10 



City Document No. 40. 



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16 



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Water Department. 



17 




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18 



City Document No. 40. 



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Water Department, 



19 



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City Document No. 40. 






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Water Department. 



21 



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22 



City Document No. 40. 



















1 


•(M0T30 


1 -lOiC-rtO 


1 


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03 
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03 


CO 




rk con 
1 e t e d 
311.3 


aid, $15 
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or 6 
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rk con 
1 e ted 
170.0 

aid, $7 


eing hel 
or 6 

ays. 


rk corr 
1 e t ed 
396.6 
aid, $10 
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or 6 
ays. 


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fpipes in L 
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D-inch wat 
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Water Department. 



23 



1 'COiOTJO 
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c m- 
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CO 





H 


OOr-H 


C^ 


O^ 


rH 




(M 


Q , 




-" a 




c 

4. 






< 


D 




C 

OJ 


( 


4^ 
ft 
0) 

02 





24 



City Document No. 40. 



REPORT OF INCOME DIVISION. 



Office of General Superintendent, 

City Hall, Boston, February 1, 1910. 

William E. Hannan, Esq., 

Water Commissioner: 

Dear Sir, — I submit herewith the annual report of 
the Income Division, Water Department. The report 
of the Meter Service Division, also the statement of 
water rates, covers the financial year ending January 
31, 1910; the remainder of the report is rendered for 
the calendar year ending December 31, 1909, it being 
impracticable, owing to the nature of our accounts, to 
render it for the financial year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. H. Caldwell, 
General Superintendent Income Division. 



TABLE I. 

Statement of Water Rates, January 31, 1910. 



Account of 
Year, 


Amount 
Assessed. 


Amount 
Abated. 


Amount 
Collected. 


Balance 
Outstanding. 


1895 


$2,266,519 08 
2,568,246 04 
2,630,413 37 
2,342,804 58 
2,414,731 72 
2,197,026 64 
2,264,845 26 
2,327,996 91 
2,386,428 02 
2,391,751 16 
2,446,978 39 
2,524,105 25 
2,619,031 00 
2,645,888 58 
2,693,634 16 
1,206,566 80 


$55,510 53 

* 95,162 39 

53,864 09 

t 235,414 43 

t 258,449 66 

46,873 45 

46,713 28 

43,706 89 

58,050 51 

38,290 92 

36,093 08 

37,599 28 

34,959 33 

35,674 96 

30,696 28 

1,613 19 


$2,211,008 55 
2,473,083 65 
2,576,549 28 
2,107,390 15 
2,156,282 06 
2,150,153 19 
2,218,131 98 
2,284,290 02 
2,328,347 51 
2,352,679 94 
2,410,871 31 
2,486,505 97 
2,584,071 67 
2,608-,402 32 
2,624,390 53 
91,661 65 




1896 




1897 




1898 




1899 




1900 




1901 ........ 




1902 . 




1903 

1904 


$30 00 
780 30 


1905 

1906 


14 00 


1907 




1908 


1,811 30 


1909 

1910$ 


38,547 35 
1,113,291 96 







The above amounts for the years 1895, 1896 and 1897 include both Mystic supply and 
Cochituate accounts. The contracts to supply Chelsea, Somerville and Everett with 
Mystic water were abrogated by the Metropolitan Water Act of January 1, 1898. 

* This amount includes certain city department accounts, abated by order of the Mayor. 

t These amounts include abatements of city department accounts, under order of the 
City Council, approved by the Mayor on March 5, 1900, said order also abolishing all 
charges for water used by city departments. 

JThe statement of water rates for the year 1910 represents annual accounts only; the 
quarterly meter accounts can only be estimated at this time. 



Water Department. 



25 



TABLE II. 

Kind and Number of Fixtures in use December, 1909. 



Number. 



Bath tubs 

Bowls 

Foot tubs 

Sinks 

Taps 

Urinals, automatic 
Urinals, otherwise. , 

Wash tubs 

Water-closets 

Total 



95,144 

130,567 

271 

200,450 

37,803 

5,067 

571 

156,992 

196,308 



823,173 



TABLE III. 

Number and Amount of Abatements Allowed During Year. 



On Account op Assessments foe Year. 


Number. 


Amount. 


1906 


2 

141 

1,743 

3,102 


$65 00 


1907 


2,314 38 


1908 


15,656 30 


1909 


29,425 80 






Totals 


4,988 


$47,461 48 







TABLE IV. 

Applications for New Pipes, 

Elevator pipes 

Fire pipes 

Service pipes 

Total 



14 

71 

1,495 



1,580 



26 



City Document No. 40. 



TABLE V. 

Turning Water Off and On. 



For complaints 

For repairs of services ^ 

For nonpayment of water bills 

For waste 

Turned on first time 

Vacancies 

Total 



765 
3,800 
2,609 

120 
1,370 
2,062 



10,726 



TABLE VL 

Off and On Receipts. 



Received for turning off and on for repairs, and deposited with City Collector. 



$1,947 



TABLE Vn. 

WASTE DETECTION. 
Water Inspection. 



Waste reports 

First examination and found repaired. . 
Second examination and found repaired 
Third examination and found repaired . 
Fine notices issued 



13,390 

7,236 

3,342 

1,341 

249 



TABLE VI I L 

Defective Fixtures and Waste. 



Tank fixtures leaking 

Faucets leaking 

Bursts inside 

Bursts outside , 

Hopper-cocks leaking 
Water-closets leaking 
Wilful waste 



12,964 

6,761 

274 

. 59 

68 

59 

30 



Water Department. 



27 



TABLE IX. 

Elevator Service for the Year Ending December SI , 1909. 



Under supervision December 31, 1908 

Discontinued during the year 

Changed to electric 

New elevators accepted during the year 

Under supervision December 31, 1909 

Changed to tank and metered water and now under supervision 

Registered inaccurately and repaired by owners 

Clock cord broken and repaired by owners 

Clock hands broken and repaired by owners 



584 

9 

4 

12 

583 

69 

62 

53 

13 



TABLE X. 

Motor Service for the Year Ending December SI, 1909. 



Under supervision December 31, 1908 

Discontinued during the year 

Under supervision December 31, 1909 
Motors on meter 



118 

1 

117 

16 



TABLE XL 

Fire Pipe Service for the Year Ending December SI, 1909. 



Premises under supervision December 31, 1908 

Supervision discontinued during the year 

Premises equipped during the year 

Under supervision December 31, 1909 

Premises inspected 

Total number of inspections of outlet valves 

Total number of hydrant inspections 

Total number of valves sealed and resealed 

Total number of hydrant valves sealed and resealed . . 
Meter by-passes under supervision December 31, 1908 

Discontinued 

By-passes, additional 

Under supervision December 31, 1909 

Inspections made of by-passes 

By-passes resealed 



552 

11 

19 

560 

3,936 

47,428 

1,069 

4,345 

201 

37 

2 

1 

36 

288 

12 



28 



City Document No. 40. 



TABLE XII. 

METERS. 
General Statement of Work Performed During Year Ending January 31, 1910. 



Meters. 



Boxes. 



Applied 

Discontinued 

Changed 

Changed location. . . 

Tested 

Repaired at shop . . . 
Repaired at factory. 
Repaired in service . 

Examined 

Lost (in service) . . . . 

Hayed 

Condemned 

Purchased 

In service 

In service (private) . 
At department shop 



6,959 

290 

1,221 

166 

11,300 

987 

96 

654 

7,206 

4 

2,168 

246 

8,888 

12,049 

133 

2,330 



887 



142 



TABLE XIII. 

Statement of Meters for the Year Ending January 31, 1910. 

Meters belonging to the department January 31, 1909 5,741 

Purchased 8,888 

Condemned during year 246 

Lost (in service) 4 

Belonging to department January 31, 1910 

Distribution of Meters January 31, 1910. 

In service "'^ o' otn 

In shop 2,330 



14,629 

250 
14,379 



14,379 



Water Department. 



29 



TABLE XIV. 

Meters Owned by Department January SI, 1910. 









Diameter in 


Inches. 






m 




6 


4 


3 


2 


n 


1 


f 


f 


o3 
O 


Crown 


14 


52 
12 
20 


90 
26 
51 


163 

96 

154 

1 

7 


215 
80 

174 

6 

86 


418 
304 

278 

18 

237 


559 

136 

381 

176 

1,391 

21 

124 

249 

2 


1,210 

3 

20 

4,150 

331 

413 

6 


2,721 


Worthington 


657 


Hersey 


12 


1,090 


Metropolitan 


201 


Hersey disc 


1 




7 


5,879 


B. W. W 


21 


Lambert 




2 


3 


2 


14 
44 


75 
127 


548 


Nash 




836 


Thomson 






8 


Gem 


7 


6 


4 


2 






19 


Empire . . 


7 


5 

2 

22 

6 


2 
5 

87 
45 


205 
188 
169 


14 


Trident 










212 


Keystone 






2 


1 
18 


2 


302 


Worthington disc 






238 


Torrent 


1 






1 


Standard .- 








1 






15 


16 


W^orth turbine . 




1 










1 


American 












520 


1,095 


1,615 


















Totals 


35 


93 


183 


444 


629 


1,492 


3,698 


7,805 


14,379 







30 



City Document No. 40, 



TABLE XV. 

Meters at Department Shop January 31, 1910. 









DiAMETEIi 


. IN Inches. 






m 




6 


4 


3 


2 


li 


1 


3 

1 


s 

8 


(A 




2 


3 


6 


33 


7 


9 


25 
1 
2 
9 

39 
1 
4 
2 
6 
5 
3 


37 

4 

11 

59 

11 

8 

6 

6 
2 


122 




1 
















6 












6 


3 


29 












98 


Trident 












1 
2 
1 

5 
9 


13 


Lambert • 




2 




1 
2 
1 
10 
5 
1 


1 

4 
1 


17 


"Wnr+.Ti c{\ro. - . ? 




11 












Hersey 


1 


2 

1 


3 
3 
4 


34 


W nrf.Vi 1 n crton 


25 


rijpm 


1 


7 










1 
1,083 


1 


'FTpT'qfiv fiiflO 






1 


2 


2 


52 


818 


1,958 










Totals 


4 


8 


17 


55 


21 


82 


915 


1,228 


2,330 







TABLE XVL 

Private Meters in Service January' SI, 1910. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Totals. 


— - 


6 


4 


3 


2 


n 


1 


3 

4 


5 

8 








2 
2 
2 


5 
5 

1 


3 8 


3 

4 


11 

32 
1 


32 




6 


3 
3 


19 
2 


9 
4 


80 




13 


rjpm . . 


2 


2 


B w w 












1 


1 






























1 
1 


























"Roll Jir TTittci 








1 










Tnrrpnt " .... 




1 
































Totals 


8 


7 


6 


12 


26 


21 


8 


45 


133 







Water Department. 



31 



TABLE XVII. 

Meters in Service January 31, 1910. 



, 


DiAMETEK IN INCHES. 


Totals. 




6 


4 


3 


2 


1| 


1 


3 

1 


5 
8 


Crown 


12 


49 
10 
20 


84 
23 
48 


130 

91 

144 


208 

79 

170 

5 

84 


409 
295 
273 
18 
185 


534 
133 
376 
170 
573 
21 
120 
240 
2 


1,173 

2 

14 

3,066 

323 

402 

6 


2,599 


Worthington 


jg.-..- :^ 

633 


Hersey 


11 


1,056 
193 


Metropolitan 


Hersey disc 


1 




6 


5 


3,920 
21 


B. W. W 










1 


14 
38 


73 
124 


531 


Nash 






3 


807 


Thomson 






8 


Gem 


6 


5 




1 






12 


Empire 


7 


5 

1 

22 

5 


1 

4 

85 

43 


194 
184 
163 


13 


Trident 










199 


Keystone 






2 


1 
16 


2 


296 


Worthington disc 






227 


Torrent 


1 






1 


Standard 








1 






14 


15 


Worth turbine 




1 










1 


American 












481 


1,036 


1,517 


/ 
















Totals 


31 


85 


166 


389 


608 


1,410 


2,783 


6,577 


12,049 



TABLE XVIH. 

Meters Purchased. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Totals. 




6 


4 


3 


2 


n 


1 


3 

1 


1 


Nash 










38 
11 


40 

160 

20 


130 

1,280 

60 


387 

4,015 

185 

15 


595 

5,466 

265 

16 

53 

23 

210 

483 

160 

1 

1,616 


Hersey disc 










Keystone 










Standard 










1 
14 


Crown 


2 


1 
2 


11 

7 


25 
14 






Hersey 








Trident 








5 
95 
15 


205 
325 
145 


Lambert 




2 






11 


50 


Worthington disc 








Worth turbine 




1 










American 












520 


1,096 
















Totals 


2 


6 


18 


39 


75 


270 


2,105 


6,373 


8,888 





32 



City Document No. 40. 



TABLE XIX. 

Meters Condemned During Year. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Totals. 




6 4 

1 


3 


2 


H 


1 


3 

4 


f 


Crown 














1 

60 
75 

1 
1 
1 


3 


4 


Worthington 




6 


2 


18 


14 
3 


45 
15 


145 


Metropolitan 




93 


Ball & Fitts 









1 


2 


B W. W 












1 


Rogers 















1 


















Totals 




6 


2 


19 


17 


60 


139 


3 


246 













TABLE XX. 

Meters Repaired in Service. 

Cause of Repairs. 

Clock broken 

Glass broken 

Cover broken 

Spindle leaking 

Coupling leaking 

Stopcock leaking 

Leak at joint 

Relocated 

Total 



Number. 



50 
40 
19 

76 
317 

17 

4 

131 



654 



TABLE XXI. 

Meters Repaired at Factory. 





Diameter in Inches. 






- 








6 


4 3 


2 


n 


1 


1 


5 
8 


Totals. 






2 
1 


1 


3 

1 


3 
6 
2 


15 
5 


14 
9 

1 


31 
1 

1 


68 


Hersey 




24 






4 














Totals 




3 


1 


4 


11 


20 


24 


33 


96 









Water Department. 



33 



TABLE XXH. 

Meters Changed. 



Cause. 



Number. 



Test 

Not registering . . 

No force 

Stoppage 

Enlarged 

Leak at spindle . . 
Leak at coupling. 
Leak at stopcock 
Set backward . . . . 

Relocated 

Defaced 

Frost 

Total 



401 
437 
76 
29 
50 
33 
47 
2 
43 
35 
33 
35 



1,221 



TABLE XXI H. 

Meters Discontinued During Year. 



Sizes. 


Number. 


f -inch 


176 


f -inch 


51 


1-inch 


17 


1 f-inch 


27 


2-inch 


13 


3-inch 


3 


4-inch 


3 






Total 


290 







34 



City Document No. 40. 



TABLE XXIV. 

Meters Applied During Year. 



Sizes. 



Number. 



f-inch. . . 
f-inch. . . 
1-inch. . . 
l^-inch. . 
2-inch. . . 
3-inch. . . 
4-inch. . . 
6-inch. . . 

Total 



5,421 

1,190 

218 

74 

31 

16 

6 

3 



6,959 



Water Department. 35 



REPORT OF DISTRIBUTION DIVISION. 



Office of the Superintendent, 
710 Albany Street, February 1, 1910, 

William E. Hannan, Esq., 

Water Commissioner: 

Sir, — Following is the annual report of the Distribu- 
tion Division for the year ending January 31, 1910. 

Organization. 

From February 1, 1909, to March 1, 1909, the division 
was in charge of Chief Clerk George H. Finneran, who 
had been acting as ^'Official in Charge" since March 26 
of the preceding year. On March 1, 1909, he was 
made superintendent of the Distribution Division, which 
office he now holds. The present organization is as 
follows : 

Superintendent. — George H. Finneran. 

Assistant Superintendent (Northern Division). — Adam McClure. 
Assistant Superintendent (Southern Division). — John W. Leahon. 
Chief Clerk. — George A. Pratt. 

8 clerks. 

1 switch board operator. 

2 messengers. 
2 janitors. 

Machine Shop. — Foreman, Edward J. Bachelder. 

21 machinists, helpers, etc. 

5 blacksmiths and helpers. 
1 accountant. 

1 engineman. 
1 fireman. 
1 patternmaker. 
/ 1 patternmaker's helper. 

Carpenter Shop. — Foreman, Richard F, Neagle. 

9 carpenters. 

1 laborer. 

Plumbing Shop. — Foreman, B. F. Rogers. 

13 plumbers, electricians and helpers. 

2 laborers (trough cleaners). 
Storeroom. — Storekeeper, John W. Sullivan. 

2 assistants. 
Main Yard (Albany street). — Foreman, John J. Maguire. 
37 yardmen, 

22 teamsters, drivers and chauffeurs. 
11 stablemen. 

6 painters. 

8 concrete box makers and helpers. 
5 men in yard storehouse. 
Gate Inspection. — Foreman, Samuel J. Hallett. 

7 men. 



36 City Document No. 40. 

General Inspection. 

7 inspectors. 
Main Pipe Gangs. 

Foreman Doherty and 24 men. 
Foreman Durand and 20 men. 
Central District (Repairers and Service Pipe Men). — Foreman, William 
T. Lenehan. 
2 subforemen. 
39 repairers. 

15 service pipe men. 

16 off-and-on men. 

12 watchmen and emergency men. 
Brighton District. — Foreman, Thomas Neville. 

16 men in Brighton yard. 
4 men at Fisher Hill Reservoir. 
Charlestown District. — Foreman, Patrick Kelly. 

22 men. 

Dorchester District. — Foreman, Timothy Casey. 

23 men. 

East Boston District. — Foreman, Dennis Regan. 

19 men. 
West Roxbury District. — Foreman, Thomas C. McDonald. 

23 men, 
Parker Hill Reservoir. 

2 men. 
Unattached. 

6 men. 

It is, of course, impracticable to maintain throughout 
the year an organization corresponding exactly to the 
foregoing. For the months of December, January and 
February a special force of hydrant inspectors is drafted 
from the various gangs of the division to maintain the 
hydrants in the central district in a condition for 
immediate use. There are at the present time 30 men 
so engaged. They include the gate inspection force, 
which cannot be employed to advantage in its regular 
line during the cold weather. Transfers of men from 
one class of work to another are made as required, but 
in the main the distribution of employees is as outlined. 

There are now 435 men in the Distribution Division. 
One year ago the total number was 421. During the 
year 26 men were transferred from the Income Division 
to the Distribution Division because of the assumption 
by the latter division of the work of shutting off and 
letting on service pipes; 8 men were transferred for 
various reasons from the Income Division to the Distribu- 
tion Division; 6 men were reinstated; 30 new men were 
employed; 32 men were transferred for various reasons 
from the Distribution Division to the Income Division; 
10 men died; 4 men resigned to accept other positions; 
and the names of 10 men were dropped from the rolls 
because of long continued absence. 



Water Department. 37 

The average number of men at work daily during the 
year was 381. The average number of men absent 
daily during the year was 33. The lowest number of 
men in the force during the year was 408. The highest 
number was 436. The number of men 10 years or longer 
in service is 363; 15 years or longer, 158; 20 years or 
longer, 120; 25 years or longer, 42; and 30 years or 
longer, 21. The maximum length of service is 56 years. 
163 men entered the department at the age of 40 years 
and older; 103 at the age of 45 years and older; 58 at the 
age of 50 years and older; 25 at the age of 55 years and 
older; and 8 at the age of 60 years and older. 

Main Pipe Laying. 

During the year 63,327 linear feet of mains were laid, 
relaid and relocated, and 20,781 linear feet were aban- 
doned and either taken from the ground or left therein, 
as conditions warranted. Gate valves, air valves and 
blow-offs were established and abandoned, as stated 
in Table No. 1, appended to the text. The total mileage 
of mains now owned and operated by the department is 
761.23, consisting almost entirely of cast-iron pipe, 
there being but 4,985 feet of 30-inch and 6,180 feet of 
20-inch wrought-iron cement-lined pipe in the system. 

Of the total amount laid, 1,170 feet of 6-inch, 14,788 
feet of 8-inch, 6,995 feet of 10-inch, 11,437 feet of 12-inch 
and 359 feet of 16-inch were laid to supply new buildings 
in streets where water mains had not been laid and high 
service to buildings in the business section. 

To improve the general supply in the South Boston 
district, 1,645 feet of 16-inch, 377 feet of 24-inch and 
6,478 feet of 30-inch were laid. 

In replacing old and inadequate mains there were laid 
1,629 feet of 6-inch, 3,877 feet of 8-inch, 4,210 feet of 
10-inch, 3,302 feet of 12-inch and 2,848 feet of 16-inch. 

On account of the construction of sewers, streets and 
bridges, the abolishment of grade crossings, the laying 
of street car rails and other public works it was neces- 
sary to relocate the following lengths of main pipe: 
10 feet of 4-inch, 127 feet of 6-inch, 441 feet of 8-inch, 
1,414 feet of 10-inch, 1,509 feet of 12-inch, 238 feet of 
16-inch, 122 feet of 20-inch, 35 feet of 24-inch and 313 
feet of 36-inch. 

The most important pipe laying of the year was 
as follows : . The 30-inch line in Northern avenue, C 

9 



38 City Document No. 40. 

street and Sleeper street; the 30-inch line in Congress 
street, between Atlantic and Dorchester avenues; the 
24-inch and 16-inch lines upon the trestle at Congress 
street pipe tunnel; the 16-inch line in Granite street; 
the 12-inch line in Northern avenue; the 12-incli line 
in Old Colony avenue; the 12-inch line in Charles River 
Embankment; the 12-inch and 10-inch lines in St. 
Mary's and Mountfort streets; the 10-inch line in Park 
street, Longwood; and the replacement of old and in- 
adequate mains in Chelsea street, East Boston; Wash- 
ington and Morton streets. West Roxbury; G street. 
South Boston; Norway, Seneca, Exchange, Malcolm, 
Ivanhoe, Trumbull, Newland, Harris, Clark and Morton 
streets, Cleveland place, Greenough lane, Hanover, 
Franklin and Webster avenues, city proper; Bellevue 
and Autumn streets, Roxbury; and Bunker Hill, Edge- 
worth and Ferrin streets, Charlestown. 

For some years past South Boston has had but one 
supply main with a capacity of anything like present 
day requirements, viz., the 30-inch main that enters the 
district by way of Massachusetts avenue, Southampton 
street, Dorchester avenue and D street. The only 
other feed mains were the old 20-inch entering through 
Dover and Fourth streets and the 20-inch leading from 
the Dudley street 24-inch main at Columbia road, 
through Columbia road, Boston and Dorchester streets. 
Should any accident have happened to the 30-inch 
main • South Boston would have been in a bad way, 
especially the new section in the vicinity of Summer 
street extension and he Commonwealth docks, now 
rapidly being developed. It was considered desirable 
to have an additional supply main enter the district by 
way of Congress street, leading from the 30-inch main at 
Franklin and Congress streets easterly through Congress 
street to Fort Point channel, under the channel and 
thence into South Boston. A portion of this work had 
been done, — the 30-inch main in Congress street, between 
Franklin street and Atlantic avenue, — and a pipe tunnel 
had been built under the channel and two lines of pipe 
laid therein, viz., 24-inch and 20-inch. During the 
past year the 30-inch main has been continued from 
Congress street at Atlantic avenue, through Congress 
street to Dorchester avenue, thence to the pipe trestle 
approaching the tunnel shaft, where it was reduced to 
24-inch, across the trestle to the tunnel shaft, through 
the tunnel, across the easterly trestle and connecting 



Water Department. 39 

upon land with the 24-inch laid a few years ago in Con- 
gress street, South Boston. This piece of main extended 
but a short distance to Sleeper street, where it was 
capped after a connection had been made with the 
16-inch Congress street distribution pipe. Starting at 
the cap mentioned we resumed, laying a 30-inch line 
through Sleeper street to Northern avenue, through 
Northern avenue to C street, through C street to Danby 
street, where the line ended, connecting with the 30- 
inch line that enters South Boston by way of Massa- 
chusetts avenue and Southampton street and continues 
through Dorchester avenue, D street and Danby street 
to the point mentioned at C street. When the water 
is turned on through this line South Boston will be 
much better than ever supplied. 

The new portion of South Boston north of First street 
is without- high service, and as many large buildings of 
mercantile character have been erected therein the 
extension of the high service from the city proper is an 
imperative requirement. During the year the depart- 
ment laid about 422 feet of 16-inch main upon and near 
the pipe trestle approaching the Congress street tunnel, 
thus leaving but 100 feet approximately to connect with 
the existing main in Summer street, city proper. When 
this is laid and some changes and connections made in 
South Boston it will be possible to introduce the high 
service to that district. 

As a part of the plan for a high service system in 
South Boston we have for the past few years laid addi- 
tional mains in Congress street, A street, Mt. Washing- 
ton avenue and other streets where required. These 
mains will be used for the low service and the existing 
low service mains utilized for high service. Following 
along this line during the past year the department laid 
a 16-inch main in Granite street, between Mt. Wash- 
ington avenue and Baldwin street and transferred the 
many large connections supplying the sugar refinery 
from the old to the new main in anticipation of the 
future high service. This main will be extended during' 
the coming year to Second street and thence to Dor- 
chester avenue, where it will connect with the 16-inch 
main in that street, making a very efficient connecting 
line between the 20-inch Dover street South Boston 
supply and the 30-inch trunk line entering South Boston 
by way of the Congress street tunnel and Massachu- 
setts avenue and Southampton street. 



40 City Document No. 40. 

In Northern avenue advantage was taken of the new 
30-inch main to lay a 12-inch distribution main connect- 
ing at two points with the same. This enabled us to 
establish a number of hydrants in Northern avenue and 
provide something like an adequate fire service, which 
that important district was lacking. 

The construction of Old Colony avenue caused the 
department to lay about 2,500 feet of 12-inch main 
therein and connect with the Dorchester street and 
Dorchester avenue mains. This work was principally 
of value as a means of abolishing dead ends in Gustin, 
Lark, Cottage, E, Amxcs and Earl streets and equalizing 
the general supply in that section of South Boston. 

The construction of the Charles River Embankment 
between Back street and the Cambridge Bridge enabled 
us to lay a very valuable line of 12-inch pipe, con- 
necting with the 16-inch in Charles street and picking 
up the dead ends in Chestnut, Mt. Vernon, Pinckney 
and Revere streets. This will greatly improve the fire 
protection in a district that was very poorly supplied. 

A similar improvement was made in the new Back 
Bay district bordering on the Brookline line by the lay- 
ing of a 12-inch line in St. Mary's street from Beacon 
street to Mountfort street and picking up the dead end 
in Mountfort street. This district contained much 
valuable property that did not have proper fire protec- 
tion, due to unconnected ends in a remote part of the 
system. 

In the Longwood district bordering on the Parkway 
a number of buildings used as hospitals, sanatoriums and 
other public purposes have been erected during the last 
few years. By reason of small sized mains and the 
arrangement of the same the district could not be termed 
as adequately supplied for fire protection. A 10-inch 
main was therefore laid through Park street, from Brook- 
line avenue to Autumn street, connecting there with a 
main coming from Longwood avenue by way of River- 
way and Park street. The 4-inch main in Autumn 
street was increased to 8 inches, the 6-inch main in a part 
of Bellevue street was increased to 8 inches, and hydrants 
were established. This work will do much for the 
district, but in the near future the remainder of the 
Bellevue street main between Francis street and Brook- 
line avenue should be relaid with larger pipe, as the 
district is growing and buildings of size and importance 
are being erected. 



Water Department. 41 

In Chelsea street, East Boston, about 1,500 feet of 
12-inch main was replaced by 16-inch between Maver- 
ick square and Brooks street. With what was laid in 
1908, there is now a continuous line of 16-inch main 
in Chelsea street from Maverick square to Brooks street. 
During the coming year it is hoped to connect the end 
at Brooks street with a new 30-24-inch line from Chelsea 
under Chelsea creek. This will bring an ample quantity 
of water to the southern end of the island, where it is 
required by reason of railroad and dock development 
at that end. 

In Washington street, Forest Hills, there was formerly 
a 6-inch main in the easterly side of the square leading 
from Morton street and dead-ending at Tower street. 
This was replaced by a 16-inch main and connected with 
the 12-inch main in Hyde Park avenue. The 8-inch 
Morton street main was increased to 16 inches from 
Washington street to South street, where it receives its 
supply from the 24-inch West Roxbury main. The dis- 
trict in general south of Forest Hills square is thereby 
provided with a much improved supply. 

The 6-inch main in C street. South Boston, from First 
street to Seventh street, was replaced by a 12-inch main. 
This was a very desirable piece of work, crossing the 
peninsula from north to south and reinforcing the 
many mains running east and west. Much more work 
of this nature will be required to thoroughly distribute 
the supply in South Boston. 

In Norway street, between Huntington and Massachu- 
setts avenues, the old 6-inch main was replaced by a 
10-inch and 12-inch main. An improved supply in a 
congested section thereby results. 

In Bunker Hill, Ferrin and Edgeworth streets, 
Charlestown, old and small sized mains were replaced 
with pipes of 10-inch and 12-inch diameter. The 
large bakery of George Fox Company in a congested 
section of wooden buildings was the immediate cause 
of this work. Its benefits, however, will be realized 
for some distance beyond. 

The work of replacing the very old and small sized 
mains in Seneca, Exchange, Malcolm, Ivanhoe, Trum- 
bull, Newland, Harris, Clark and Morton streets, Cleve- 
land place, Greenough lane, Hanover, Franklin and 
Webster avenues was greatly needed. The pipes in 
these streets were about fifty years old and so coated 
with rust and the accumulated matter peculiar to cast- 



42 City Document No. 40. 

iron water pipes as to be of an efficiency of less than 
one-half their original diameter. The water delivered 
by these mains was of course more or less discolored 
and it was because of complaints on this score that we 
took up the work. 

A new style blow-off was used in the system the 
past year. It was designed by our Engineering Depart- 
ment and is intended to be placed upon the ends of 
street mains as a means of blowing off dead water. 
Heretofore Boston Lowry hydrants have been used 
for this purpose as well as for fire protection, but as it 
is our present policy to establish post hydrants wherever 
possible, Boston Lowry hydrants will not be used to 
the same extent as formerly. It was therefore neces- 
sary to devise a means of blowing off ^'dead end" 
mains, and the result was the new fixture called a 
^^ hydrant blow-off.'^ It consists of a piece of 3-inch 
iron pipe, to be set vertically in a well or box, the top 
of which is flush with the surface of the street. The 
lower end of the pipe approaches the horizontal plane 
of the street main by means of a long easy curve. A 
3-inch flanged gate valve is bolted to the end of the curve 
and the end of the street main enters the bell of the gate 
valve. If the street main is larger than 3 inches, 
reducers are used. A 2J-inch hose nipple is fitted 
into the upper end of the 3-inch pipe and a cap is 
screwed on to this nipple when not in use. When in 
use the female end of a 2J-inch fire hose coupling is 
connected with the nipple, and the 3-inch gate valve 
is operated by a gate wrench. The water is blown off 
through the hose into sewer, catch-basin or wherever 
convenient. No chuck is used as in the case of a Boston 
Lowry hydrant and the flow is much freer by reason 
of the easy curve. 

Eighty-three petitions for main pipe to be laid in 
various streets were investigated and the required lengths 
measured, and seventy-five petitions were granted and 
the pipe laid. 

Cost of Main Pipe Laying. 

The following statements will show in tabulated 
and classified form the cost of main pipe laying 
during the year. The first table shows the prices upon 
which the costs are based, and the second table gives 
the costs of the work classified by sizes, nature of work 











Tabi 


ilated and Classified Statement Showing in 


Detail the Cost of 


Main Pipe Laying During the Year 1909-10. 




Diameter 
o( Pipe 
Laid. 


Length 
Laid. 
(Feet.) 


Cost peb Lineab Foot of Various Elbmbntb of Wobk. 




WOBK. 


Main 
Pipe. 


Specials, 
Valvea 

and 
Boxes. 


Lead 

and 

Gnsltet. 


Department 
Labor and 
Inapection. 


Contract 
Labor. 


Teaming. 


Hydrant 
Cost. 


Repaving. 




Total. 


Rbuabkb. 




a-lnch 


89 


$0,651 JO. 108 




$0,130 




$0,049 










$0,84 


Department work; uncongested section, lead pipe, excavation partly done by Sewer Division. 


New msins 














New main. 

New main. 

Now mains 


6-inch 

e-incb 

6-inch 


800 
74 
290 


tO.352 
.178 
.398 


80.251 
.780 
.253 


JO. 052 
.139 
.077 


JO. 776 
3.517 
.116 




$0,053 
.577 
.041 


$0,134 






80.010 
.175 
.010 


$1,632 
6-650 


Department work; no obstructions over or under ground. Conditions good. 

Department work; business section, pavement, narrow street, congestion ovet and under ground. 

Cold and stormy weatber, frost in ground. Very unfavorable conditiona. 
Contract work: no obstruction, over or under ground. Conditions generally good. 




$1,281 




$0,518 
















1,170 


to. 353 


JO. 285 


JO. 064 


J0.783 


JO. 131 


to. 083 


$0,091 


^$0,081 




J0.021 


$1,894 










New mains 

New main. 

New main. 

New mains 

New mains 

New main. 

New mains 


8-inch 

8-inch 

8-inch 

8-inch 

8-inch 

8-inch...... 

S-inch 


319 

1.092 

148 

575 

329 

7.977 

3,748 


S0.5S8 
..563 
.671 

' .502 
.554 
.675 
.584 


JO. 135 
.253 
.031 
1223 
.272 
.237 
.179 


JO. 061 

.074 
.085 
.100 
.083 
.073 


10.890 
,801 
1.323 
2.282 
1.615 
.088 
.110 




$0,042 
.083 
.150 
.115 
.228 
.061 
.050 




JO. 355 




JO. 041 
.030 
.022 
.026 
.056 
.013 
.012 


$2,113 
2-163 
2.661 
3.816 
3.426 
1.857 
2,183 


Department work; busmeas section, block pavement, much congestion over and under ground One 

of two liiic. laid in same trench. Labor item less on that account. 
Department work: uncongested section. Conditions good. 

Department work; uncongested section; very hard digging. Considerable soft rock. 

Department work; rock. Otherwise good conditions. 

Department work; uncongested sections; cold weather, frost in ground; small jobs averagin- 55 feet 

each. 
Contract work; uncongested section. Conditions good. 

Contract work; uncongested section; rock. Conditions otherwise good. 




80,358 
.487 
,520 
.000 

.212 






















to. 531 
.961 


















14,788 


10.576 


JO. 220 


JO. 079 


$0,324 


SO -529 


$0,067 


JO. 277 


$0,007 




$0,016 


$2,100 


Average cort of total 8-i&ch new mains. 






New main. 


10-inoh 

10-inch 

10-inch 

10-inch 

10-inch 

10-inch 


345 
091 
139 
209 
4.243 
1,368 


10.751 
.783 
.700 
.007 
.770 
.771 


JO. 345 
.273 
.705 
,402 
.257 
.*168 


JO. 065 
.072 
.158 
.153 
.075 
.083 


JO. 793 
1.242 
2.172 
1.922 
.065 
.079 




$0,108 
.054 
.132 
.153 
.058 
.068 


$0,316 
.217 






10.014 
.032 
.121 
.075 
.011 
.013 


J2 , 395 
2,675 
3.996 
4.271 
1.937 
2,272 


Department work; uncongested section. Conditions good. 

Department work; uncongested section; cold weather, frost in ground. 

Department work: uncongested section: interference from building operations. 

Department work; budness section: expensive pavement; congestion over and under ground; over- 
tune work; branches for prospective services inserted. Conditions unfavorable. 
Contract work; uncongested section. Condition, good. 

Contract work: uncongested section, rock. Conditions otherwise good. 


New mains 


















- 




$0,841 






SO. 523 
.963 


.174 
.124 




















6,995 


TO.767 


JO. 261 


JO. 080 


'JO. 317 


to. 605 






$0,025 




$0,018 


J2.200 


Average cost of total 10-inch new mains. 










12-inch 

12-inch 

12-inch 

12-inch 

12-inch 


486 

981 

2,007 

7,491 

462 


10.930 
.910 
.680 
1.012 
.982 


JO. 096 
1.021 
.203 
.200 
.241 


to. 089 
.211 


tl.151 
2.053 
.025 
.055 
.092 




$0,129 
.146 


$0,575 
.001 
.475 
.328 
.115 






$0,021 
.089 


J2.995 
5.492 
2.144 
2.191 
2.373 


Department work; uncongested section. Conditions good. 

Department work; business section: block pavement: car rails; generally congested. Unfavorable 
condition.. 

Contract work; uncongested section; block pavement: conditions good: contractor furnished team- 
ing, lead, gasket, etc.. and made connections. 

Contract work; uncongested section. Conditions good. 

Contract work; uncongested section; rock. Conditions otherwise good. 






JO, 990 
.093 






SO. 666 
.427 
.686 




Now main. 


.104 
.145 


.053 
.102 




.010 
.006 


New m»ins 
















11.427 


<0.941 


10.268 


to. 096 


$0,270 


$0,425 


$0,058 


$0,333 


JO. 101 




$0,015 


$2,508 


Average cost of total 12-inoh new mains. 






New mains 


16-inoh 

10-inch 

10-inch..!.. 

16-inoh 

Ifl-inch 


178 

' 148 

422 

43 
1,127 


«1.467 
1.3C1 
1.512 

1.525 
1.532 


10.157 
.215 
.671 

2.609 
.479 


to. 100 
.151 
.233 


Jl .339 
1.477 
4.104 

.241 
.965 




JO. 183 
.126 
.193 


$0,443 






$0,029 
.015 
1.852 


J3.787 
4.188 
8.472 

5,200 
5,301 


Department work; uncongested section; complicated with services. Conditions good otherwise. 
Department work; business section; pavement; congestion over and under ground. Conditions bad. 

Department work; laid on trestle over water and housed with double box: pipes strapped; box 
painted, air and drip-cock, established, tunnel and shafts pumped out; unusual and extraordmary 
Job done under most unfavorable conditions. 

Contract work; uncongested section; conditions good: contractor furnished teaming, lead, 
gasket, etc. 

Contract and department work: business section; congestion overground; block pavement; many 
service and fire pipe, of large diameter encountered: the .ame lowered or connected with new 
main; hydrant, also transferred to new main; branch openings in old main made up with straight 
pipe. Water service maintained for consumers: extra gates inserted in line: large brick gate cham- 
ber built. Unusual job. involving many difficulties. Department work done mostly during cold 


New mains 




to. 840 




New mains 








New main. 


to. 770 
.680 








New mains 


.152 


.185 


.637 


.432 


to. 358 


0.035 






1,918 


J1.608 


10.409 


JO. 168 


J1.468 


t0.416 


$0,166 


$0,357 


to. 319 


t0.210 


$0,289 


$5,404 


Average cost of total 16-inoh new mains. 









Tabulated and Classified Statement Showing i 


n Detail 


the Cost 


of Main 


Pipe Laying During the Year 1909-19.^ Continued. 




Diameter 
of Pipe 
Laid. 


(Feet.) 


Cost per Linear Foot of Variodb Elements of Work. 




Natoke of 
Work. 


Main 
Pipe. 


Spooials. 
Valves 

Boxea. 


Lead 

and 

Gasket. 


Department 
Labor and 
Inspection. 


Contract 
Labor. 


Teaming. 


''Sir' >^p™^- 


Service 
Pipe 
Stook. 


Miacel- 


TotaL 


Reuarsb. 


New mains 


24^inch 


377 


S2.805 


$1,438 


$0,258 


$4,772 




SO. 232 






$2,125 


$11,631 


Deptirtoient work: laid on trestle over water and housed with double box: pipes strapped; box 
painted, air and drip-cocks established; tunnel and shafts pumped out; unusual and extraoidiaary 
job done under most unfavorable conditions. 












30-incb 


711 
6.767 


J3.945 
4,209 


$1,312 
0-292 


$0,593 


$1,514 
0.065 




$0,480 
007 




$1,355 
347 




$0,846 
0.018 


$13,050 
6.924 


Department work; business section; expensive pavement; ear rails; great congestion over and under 
ground, old stone sea wall of about 80 cubic yards taken apart and removed; mains to three 
side streets lowered; sewer connections temporarily removed; wire conduits and manholes encoun- 
tered; ingress and egress to and from abutting buildings maintained throughout the work. 
An extraordinarily ditScult job. 

Contract work; uncongested section, pavement, dock mud. ground water, loose soil. Conditions 
hardly favorable. Contractor hauled pipe and supplied lead, gasket, blocking, etc. 




1.982 






1 












, „ 


S4.180 


$0,404 


$0,065 


$0,553 


$1,765 


$0,059 




$0,458 




$0,109 


87.596 
















30-inch 


313 


$5,795 




$0,257 


$0,336 


$4,684 


$0,227 








$0,431 


$11,731 


Contract work; uncongested section. Conditions good. 












Replacement of old 
Replacement of old 


6-inch 

0-ineb 


58 
1.554 


$0,411 
.348 


$1,192 
.1.57 


$0,246 
.061 


$1,613 
.218 




$0,131 
.041 








$0,030 
.013 


$3,624 
3.619 


Department work; uncongested section. Cold weather, frost in ground. 

Contract work; greatl.v congested district, unusually narrow streets, expensive pavement, many 
service connections, unfavorable conditions. 


$1,184 


$0,170 


$1,317 


80.106 






1.612 


$0,350 


$0,196 


$0,068 


$0,268 


$1,141 


80.044 


$0,164 


$1,270 


$0,102 


$0,013 


$3,619 


.4verage cost of total 6-inch replacement. 


Re lacement of old 


8-inch 

8-incli 

S-inch 

8-inch 

8-inch 


151 

306 

613 

1.206 

1,601 


$0,593 
.251 
.516 
.486 
.514 


$0,121 
.362 
.2.89 
.227 
.324 


$0,088 
.097 
.082 
.080 
.115 


$1,110 
.985 
1.492 
.146 
.190 




$0,083 
.072 
.106 
.067 
.063 






80.038 
.024 
.089 
.033 
.086 


$0,040 
.017 
.037 
.014 
.019 


$2,077 
2.293 
3.227 
1.759 
3.107 


Department work; uncongested section. Conditions good. 

Department work; uncongested section. Cold weather, frost in ground. 

Department work; greatly congested section, many service connections, unusually narrow streets. 

expensive pavement; overtime necessary. Gooerall.v unfavorable conditions. 
Contract work; uncongested section. Conditions good. 

Contract work; greatly congested section; many service connections, unusually narrow streets, 
expensive pavement. Generally unfavorable conditions. 






$0,482 
.101 
.129 
.191 








$0,511 




$0,573 


Krpl!.',4'i,„,nt of old 


.623 






3.877 


$0,488 


$0,283 


$0,097 


$0,481 


$0,580 


$0,074 


$0,173 


$0,338 


$0,063 


$0,021 


$2,602 


Average cost of total S-inch replacement. 




10-inch 

10-inch 

10-inch 

10-inch 

10-inch 

10-inch 

10-iacb 


172 

350 
40 

130 
2,004 
1.328 

186 


$0,315 
.590 
.528 
.573 
.668 
.706 
.034 


$0,450 

.462 
1.083 
.385 
.350 
1.987 


$0,114 
.086 
.149 
.215 
.122 
.108 
.279 


$1,350 
1.069 
1.505 
1.937 
.109 
.195 
.094 




$0,064 
.080 
.043 
.107 
.077 
.057 
.075 








$0,069 
.020 
.012 
.139 
.015 
.020 
.023 


$2,364 
2. 586 
2.719 
4.745 
2.123 
3.079 
3.271 


Department work; business section, congestion above and under ground, pavement and overtime 

work. 
Department work; uncongested section, many service connections, pavement. Conditions other- 
Department work; uncongested section, cold weather, frost in ground. Conditions otherwise good. 

Department work; uncongested section, many special castings inserted. Conditions otherwise 
good. 


Replacement of old 




$0,113 


$0,088 


$0,082 
.018 
.0.30 
.039 
.099 










.658 
.119 
.365 




Replacement of old 


$0,588 
.851 
.577 




Replacement of old 
Replacement of old 


.325 
.202 


Contract work; business section, many service connections, pavement, car rails; congestion over 

and under ground. Conditions generally unfavorable. 
Contract work; uncongested section, many special castings inserted, pavement. Conditions other- 


mama. 










4,210 


$0,627 


$0,476 


$0,124 


$0,336 


$0,573 


$0,071 


$0,200 


$0,118 


$0,058 


$0,023 


$2,611 


Average cost of total 10-inch replacement. 


Replacemeot of old 


12-inch 

12-inch 

12-inch 


162 
1.143 
1.997 


$0,676 
.952 
.885 


$2,077 
.734 
.380 


$0,370 
.184 
.066 


$2,055 
.223 
.374 




$0,240 
.123 
.099 


$0,961 
.462 
.147 


$1,883 
.112 
.235 




$0,094 
.026 
.037 


$8,958 
3,670 
3,006 


Department work: short jobs, business section, pavement, congestion over and under ground, many 
special castings inserted. Conditions unfavorable. 

Contract work; business section, many services, pavement, car rails. Conditions generally un- 
favorable. , 

Contract and department work; uncongested section, pavement, many services and side con- 
nections. Cold weather during part of job. frost in ground. Contractor failed to finish job. 
Trench had to be kept safe during winter. 


Replacement of old 
Replacement of old 


$0,785 
.699 


$0,068 
.081 






3.302 


$0,898 


$0,586 


$0,120 


$0,434 


$0,694 


$0,114 


$0,296 


80.274 


80.072 


$0,036 


$3,523 


Average cost of total 12-inch replacement. 











Tabulated and Classified Statement Showing 


in Detai 


the Cost of Main 


Pipe Laying Duri 


ng the Year 1909-10.— Condudml. 




Diameter 
of Pipe 
Laid. 


LeaEth 
Laid. 
(Feet.) 


Cost per Lineab Foot of Vabiods El&msntb of Work. 




Work. 


Main 
Pipe. 




Department 
Ls1>or and 
Inspection. 


Contract 
Labor. 


Teaming. 


Hydrant 
Cost. 


Repaving. 


Service 
Pipe 
Stoclt. 


Miacclla- 


Total. 


ItBMARKft. 


Replacement of old 
Replacement of old 
Replacement of old 


10-inch . 

IS-JDch 

16-inch 


1.013 

1.401 

68 


SI. 423 
1.336 
.359 


$0,221 


SO 070 
.346 


$1,609 
.109 
.257 




80.204 
.158 


$0,292 
.274 




80.033 
.017 
.022 


$4,360 
3.300 
6.297 


Department worl^; uncongested section, pavement. Cold weather, frost in ground. Many 

services and otlier connections. Cleaning up on unfinished contract work. 
Contract work; uocongeated section. Conditions generally good. 

Contract work; uncongested section, pavement. Conditions good. 


80.407 
.580 




.050 


.563 






j 


2.1S2 


81.348 


$0,575 


$0,140 


$0,725 


$0,245 


80.174 


80.274 


80.166 


$0,084 


80-024 


$3,760 


Average cost of total 10-inch replacement. 


Mains relocated 4-inch 


10 


80.075 


80.611 


$0,187 


$0,766 




$0,283 








80.142 


82.064 


Department work; excavation and backfilling by Sewer Division. Short job. 










■ 


6-inch 


99 


80.377 
.217 


$1,029 
.958 


$0,338 
.295 


80.754 
1.492 




$0,245 
.077 








$0,096 
.061 


82.840 
3.510 


Department work; excavation and backfilling done by Sewer Division, gas company and 

others. Short job. 
Department work; excavation and backfilling done partly by department and partly by Sewer 

Division at Water Department's expense; considerable congestion. 


^ . ^ 








80.407 
















SO. 327 










80.192 






80.127 


$0,085 


$3,050 


Average cost of total 6-inch relocation 




1 














Mains relocated 


^inch 

S-inch 

8-inch 


13S 
176 


80.166 
.566 
.159 


80.685 
.327 


$0,246 
.053 






80.142 
.045 
.209 






80.014 
.153 
.153 


$0,061 
.021 
.016 


$1,800 
2.710 
3.382 


Department work. Excavation and backfilling done by Boston Transit Comroission. Sewer Division 
and others. 


Mains relocated 


.464 
.714 


80.969 
1.648 






Mains relocated 


80.428 




Contract and department work; uncongested section, rock; generally unfavorable condition. 








^ 






$0,278 


$0,308 


$0,145 


$0,670 


80.936 


80.140 


80.170 




SO. 110 


$0,032 


82.693 


Avera e cost of total 8-inch relocation 




" 








10-inch 

10-inoh 

10-inch 

10-inch 


280 
355 
109 
670 


80.646 
.490 


80.814 
.375 


$0,233 
.139 
.238 
.123 


80.582 

2.883 
.322 




80.110 
.062 
.162 
.081 


80.155 
.453 




$0,020 
.130 


.064 
.047 
.122 
.034 


82.626 
4 228 
4.618 
3.428 


Department work; excavation and backfilling done by Boston Transit Commission. Sewer Division 
and others; work involved with building of Beacon Hill tunnel; delays and obstruction thereby. 
Department work; pavement, car rails; congestion underground. 

Department work; business section; much congestion over and under grotind; overtime work; con- 
ditions unfavorable. 

Department and contract work; uncongested section. Sewer Division at work in street; work done 
in instalments; many difficulties eocountered; very unfavorable condition. 






$0,594 








.054 


.183 




.611 










1,4U 


80.694 


80.633 


$0,158 


80.870 


$fl.452 


80.088 


SO 231 


$0,149 


80.326 


80-050 


83.562 


Average cost of total 10-inch relocation. 




12-iach 

12-inch 

12-inch 

12-inch 

12-inch 


14 
364 
247 
752 
142 


80.534 
.903 
.090 
1.123 


$1,200 
1.452 
.196 
.039 
1.189 


80.260 
.380 
.112 
.069 
.401 


$1,095 
1.265 
.143 
1.470 
.897 




80.156 
.192 
.075 
.167 
.309 








80.150 
.120 
.036 
.102 
.231 


$2,866 
3,945 
3.106 
2-983 
6-159 


Department work; uncongested section, cold weather, frost in ground. 

Department work; excavation and backfilling done by Sewer Division and others; delay caused 
in some of the jobs by waiting for excavation; overtime rates paid m other jobs. 












Mains relocated. . . . 


80.461 
.865 
1.895 


$0,864 
.146 




$0,313 
.042 
.111 


Mains relocated. . . . 




connections and much work done therewith. 
Contract and department work; uncongested section, rock: pipe lowered; services reconnected 
and relaid. very bard job. interference from other work in progress at same time. 


Mains relocated 
















1.519 


80.424 


80.521 


80.183 


81 . 148 


80.680 


80.166 


$0,213 




80.082 


$0,108 


$3,630 










Mains relocated.... 


Ifr-inch 

16-inch 


119 
485 


$1,460 
1.396 


80.211 
1.162 


$0,177 
.323 


$1,785 
.813 




$0,185 
.104 








80.064 
.069 


83.873 
3.87T 




Mains relocated. . . . 








80.008 


movements necessary. . . 
Department work; excavation and backfilling done by Sewer Division; delay caused by waiting 












- 


604 


$1,406 


$0,975 


$0,294 


81.005 




80.120 






80.006 


$0,068 


$3,877 














Mains relocated 


ao-inch 


122 


81.907 


$0,575 


$0,271 


81.741 




$0,181 








$0,059 


$4,736 














movements necessary. 


Mains relocated 


24-miih 


35 


82.013 


$11,772 


80.605 


86.355 




80.131 








82.132 


823.060 


Department work; assisted somewhat by Boston Elevated Railway Company, on whose account 
work was done; overtime rates paid; working in rails delayed by Boston Elevated Railway 
Company; 24-meh gate established and abandoned; condition generally unfavorable. 













Water Department. 43 

and conditions obtaining. Incidental expenses, such as 
supervision, clerical work, holidays, injuries to men, 
tools, cost of plant, depreciation, interest on money 
invested, etc., are not included in these costs. They 
represent the direct cost of the work with the exception 
of articles manufactured in the shop and the teaming. 
Those items include an additional amount covering 
the immediate incidental expenses in the shop and 
stable respectively. 

In grouping the jobs with reference to conditions 
considerable generahzation had to be made. A broad 
standard had to govern the selection for the various 
groups, as otherwise the subdivision would be almost 
interminable. This can readily be understood when 
one considers the variety of conditions encountered in 
underground work and the modifications of the same 
in different jobs. 

Much apparently unwarranted variation in costs is 
encountered in a study of the table, but in every case 
there is an explainable and reasonable cause. 

One of the disturbing factors in the ratio of costs 
with stated conditions is the number of special castings 
used. The more special castings (gates, valves, branches, 
offsets, curves, sleeves, blow-offs, etc.) there are in a 
given length of main the greater the cost of labor, lead, 
teaming and miscellaneous per foot. 

Short lengths of main as a rule cost proportionately 
more per foot than long lengths. 

In contract work the variable prices bid by success- 
ful bidders are disturbing factors. Two sets of bids 
on two different jobs where conditions are practically 
alike will vary to a considerable extent. 

As the department makes the connections in contract 
work and as the cost of the connection work varies in 
accordance with the number and difficulty of the same, 
the proportion of increase or decrease in the cost per 
foot is thereby varied. 

The item of old pipe taken from the ground in replace- 
ment and relocation work is a considerable factor in 
reducing the cost per foot of main pipe and lead used, 
inasmuch as its value as junk and in some cases as good 
pipe is credited .against the cost of the new pipe used, 
and the old lead joints recovered from the old pipe are 
remelted and used to run the joints in the new work. 
On the other hand, the labor item is increased by reason 
of the breaking and handling and loading of the old pipe. 



44 



City Document No. 40. 



The more hydrants there are included in a job the 
greater the cost per foot of the main pipe labor, inas- 
much as the fitting of hydrant branches into the line 
causes cutting of pipe, extra joints, etc., and although 
the hydrant is supposed to bear this extra cost, yet it is 
difficult to correctly separate it from the main pipe 
work. 

Service pipe connections in replacement and reloca- 
tion work are a very important influence in the 
cost of jobs. They introduce the plumber, helper 
and driller into the work with their attendant expense. 
Service pipe fittings and variable lengths of lead pipe 
also add to the cost, also extra digging and delay in 
backfilling. 

The foregoing are some of the causes that produce an 
irregular scale of costs in the work. Sometimes they 
appear singly in a job and sometimes several are found 
in the same job, operating in conflict with each other 
and against favorable factors that may also exist in the 
same job. The effect is to neutralize either the good 
or bad conditions and produce costs different from what 
the salient factors of the job lead us to expect. These 
factors, which are present in all jobs, are the size of pipe, 
whether it is a new main, replacement or relocation, 
the nature of the soil, the amount of congestion under 
and over the surface, the weather and the kind of pave- 
ment to be replaced. 



Prices upon which Costs of 


Main Pipe Laying 


are Based. 


Main pipe, 


3-inch to 12-inch, inclusive, at . 


$0.01165 lb 


u 


16-inch to 24-inch, inclusive, at 






.01151b. 


(I 


30-inch to 60-inch, inclusive, at . 






, .01181b. 


u 


specials, small, at . 






.02581b. 


a 


" large, at . 










.0251b. 


Air valves, 


1-inch, at 










2.08 each. 


u 


IJ-inch, at 










4.82 each. 


u 


2-inch, at 










6.91 each. 


Gate valves, 3-inch, at . 










12 . 82 each. 


(( 


• 3-inch (B. 0.), at 










14.82 each. 


u 


4-inch, at . 










15 . 95 each. 


u 


6-inch, at . 










22 . 55 each. 


u 


6-inch (B. P.), at 










25.42 each. 


u 


8-inch, at . 










30 . 14 each. 


u 


10-inch, at . 










50.46 each. 


u 


12-inch, at . 










57 . 77 each. 


li 


16-inch, at . 










104.89 each. 


li 


20-inch, at . 










297.29 each. 


(I 


24-inch, at . 










328.27 each. 


u 


30-inch (with 6-inch by-pass) , at 




564.37 each. 


u 


36-inch (with 6-inch \ 


)y-p£ 


iss). 


at 




806 . 28 each. 



Water Department. 



45 



Hydrant barrels, Boston post, 


at . . 








$49.82 each. 


" " ordinary post, at . 






44.78 each. 


" " Boston Lowry, at 






23.28 each. 


" " Lowry, at 






28.37 to 32.49 each. 


" specials, at 






.02581b. 


Gate valve boxes, small, concrete, at 






6.22 each. 


« " " iron, at . 






5.28 to 7.78 each. 


« « " wood, at . 






3.73 each. 


" " large, wood, at . 






4.68 each. 


Hydrant boxes, post, concrete, at . 






6.21 each. 


« " " wood, at 






4 . 19 each. 


" " Boston Lowry, wood, at 






6.11 each. 


" " Lowry, concrete, at 






6.41 each. 


wood, at . 






4.40 each. 


Box frames and covers, at 








.0221b. 


Pig lead, at (average) 










.043851b. 


Lead pipe, at . . . 










.0437 to .0532 1b. 


Gasket or yarn, at 










.061b. 


Blocking, at . . . 










.02 foot* 


Lumber, at (average) 










27.00 M. feet.* 


Clay, at ... . 










.0032 1b. 


Firewood, at . . . 










.77 foot. 


Cartage, short haul (2| miles), at 








. 75 ton. 


Cartage, long haul (2| miles), at 








1.40 ton. 


Single team (department), at . 








5.00 day. 


Double team (department), at 








7.00 day. 


" (hired), at . 








5.50 and 6.00 day. 


Laborers, at . . , 










2.25 day. 


Calkers, at . 












2.25 and 2.50 day. 


Pipe layers, at . 












2.50 day. 


Plumbers, at 












3.00 day. 


Drillers, at . 












. 2.25 and 2.75 day. 


Foreman, at 




^ 






3.00 day. 


Inspectors, at 


, 








. 2.75 and 3.00 day. 


Cost of block paving with gravel bed and joints 


.65 sq. yd. 


" " " " concrete base and pitc' 


1 


joints . . 


. 2.90 and 3.25 sq. yd. 


Cost of asphalt paving 


. 3.25 and 3.50 sq. yd. 


" wooden block paving with concrete base 


and cement joint 


s 




. 






5.00 sq. yd. 



Exclusive of the main pipe work covered in the pre- 
ceding table, the following gate valves, air valves and 
blow-offs were established, the valves on old mains and 
the blow-offs on the ends of new mains: 



Gate Valves. 



4 16-inch, at total cost of 

15 12 " 

4 3" « « 

6 6" " 

1 4 « « « 



1 l|-inch, at total cost of 
12" " " 



Air Valves. 



$743 


83 


1,564 


31 


242 


77 


303 


75 


47 


06 


$21 49 


39 


09 



* Board measure. 



46 City Department No. 40. 









Blow- 


■offs. 




1 3-inch 


on 12-inch 


main 


Sit total cost of . . . 


$50 10 


7 3 « 


" 8 " 


« 


Cl 


a 


357 56 


6 3 " 


" 6 " 


u 


(( 


a 


364 55 


1 3 " 


" 4 « 


u 


(I 


a 


. . 57 43 


1 1 " 


a g « 


(( 


u 


u 


20 17 



The most expensive job per foot performed by the 
department during the year was the laying of the 16-inch 
and 24-inch Hnes upon the pipe trestle at Congress street 
tunnel and the 30-inch line from the trestle to Atlantic 
avenue. The conditions were extremely difficult. It was 
necessary to roll the pipes upon the trestle one by one. 
They were jointed a few at a time, and great care with 
slow movements on the part of the men were necessary 
because of the limited space and dangerous situation. 
Both lines of pipe were tied to the manhole branches in 
the shaft openings with l|-inch and 2-inch Bessemer 
steel rods joined with turn-buckles. The tops of the 
manhole branches were flanged and the cover plates 
were bolted to the flanges with sheet lead packing. 
The bolts were red-leaded. Air valves were placed in 
the cover plates, and 2|-inch hose nipples with caps 
screwed on were inserted in the cover plate of each 
branch to permit of pumping out the siphons to a point 
below the salt water line, if deemed necessary. The 
vertical pipes in the shafts are also tied with rods and 
turn-buckles from the manhole branches at top to the 
curves at the bottom of the shaft where the pipes enter 
the tunnel. These rods had become detached and it 
was necessary before letting the water into the pipes to 
make them fast. It was also considered desirable to 
observe the joints for leaks when the water was turned 
into the pipes. To do this the salt water which had 
percolated into the tunnel and filled it and the shafts to a 
point within a few feet of the shaft openings had to be 
removed. This was quite a job, inasmuch as the shafts 
are 63 feet deep and 7 feet 4 inches in diameter and the 
tunnel is 1 12 feet long and 8 feet in diameter. After many 
small difficulties were overcome the water was removed 
by means of a No. 5 pulsometer pump. The steam 
to operate the same was generated by an upright port- 
able boiler set upon the bridge pier near the westerly 
shaft. The pulsometer was suspended by a tripod and 
lowered as the water receded in the shaft, the steam pipe 




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Water Department. 47 

and discharge hose being lengthened correspondingly. 
The weather was very cold and it was difficult to main- 
tain a sufficient head of steam in the pulsometer, due to 
radiation in the long length of steam pipe from the boiler 
to the pulsometer down near the bottom of the shaft. 
The discharge and suction connections had to be abso- 
lutely air-tight and every assistance given the pump 
under the trying conditions. A few leaking joints were 
discovered and easily repaired by calking. The two 
lines on the trestle were housed by a double box with 
pitched roof. This was a somewhat extensive job 
and beyond the capacity of our carpenter shop. Extra 
help was furnished by C. H. Belledue, carpenter con- 
tractor, on a day labor basis. The box is about 413 feet 
long, 8| feet wide and 4 feet high to the eaves and 6^ 
feet to the ridgepole. Suitable coverings were built 
over the shafts. The entire structure was given two 
coats of paint. 

In laying the pipe from the trestle to Atlantic avenue 
by way of Dorchester avenue and Congress street all 
kinds of adverse conditions were encountered. The 
locality is a very busy one and the great amount of 
teaming, together with the accommodation given to the 
occupants of buildings along the line, tended to delay us 
and prevented economical methods in executing the 
work. Tide water, conduits, sewer connections, catch- 
basins, old timbers, manholes and a large sea wall of 
heavy granite blocks lay in our path. There were 
about 75 cubic yards of granite in the sea wall. The 
blocks had to be cut so as to handle them and were 
removed piecemeal. The dock timbers were large and 
tough. The sewer connections were many and had to 
be broken and relaid at suitable grades to admit the 
laying of our pipes. The work had to be done when 
there was the least amount of discharge from the build- 
ings, some of which were occupied by manufacturers 
employing large numbers of help. Water mains cross- 
ing the line of the pipe had to be raised or lowered and 
when we approached the middle of Atlantic avenue we 
were obliged to offset both ways because of manholes 
and junction boxes that could not very easily be moved. 
The job with its continual obstruction impresses one 
with the trying conditions to be met with in laying a 
large sized main through the city's congested streets. 



48 



City Document No. 40. 



Maintenance of Main Pipe. 

Following is a table showing the nature of the work, 
the number of times the work was done and the cost: 



Nature of Wobk. 



Number 
of Jobs. 



Cost of 
Material. 



Cost of 

Labor, 

Teaming 

and Car 
Fares. 



Total Cost. 



Leaking joints repaired. 



Leaks due to settlement and other causes 
repaired 



Repairs caused by operations of Sewer 
and Street Departm.ents, Boston Con- 
solidated Gas Company and other cor- 
porations 



Pipes on bridges repaired and reinforced, 

Gate valves renewed 

Gate valves repaired 

Gate valves repacked 

Gate valves marked. 

Gate valves inspected and tested 

Gate valve boxes renewed 

Gate valve boxes repaired 

Gate valve boxes raised and lowered . . . . 

Gate valve boxes cleaned out 

Gate valve boxes inspected 

Gate valve box covers cleaned off 

Gate valve box covers salted 

Frames and covers renewed 



Streets repaved (including contractor's 
work) 



Dead end blown off 

Bridge boxes painted 

Bridge boxes repaired 

Brick chambers, two built and two re- 
paired 



High service lines tested 

Abandoned blow-off removed. 



Sign posts erected for marking gate 
valve locations 



Siphons pumped out 

Main pipes located 

Signs on islands repaired and painted . . . 
Gate valve boxes abandoned and filled in. 



148 
25 

18 

3 

6 

50 

271 

1,971 

4,861 

270 

79 

452 

1,577 

33 

2,003 

5,947 

39 

402 

1,363 

35 

43 

4 
1 
1 

14 
2 
3 

7 
3 



$367 66 
280 26 

63 89 
258 43 
550 98 
200 66 

11 78 
2 10 

25 22 
1,537 19 

53 42 
316 25 



161 43 
86 95 

738 85 

7 18 

281 61 

432 64 

67 67 



Totals. 



9 68 



127 81 



$5,581 66 



$1,977 80 
1,806 86 

297 61 

535 17 

260 28 

519 28 

470 71 

325 45 

3,625 78 

2,269 79 

284 19 

1,244 62 

1,434 20 

6 75 

228 13 

973 67 

146 09 

6,266 75 
904 20 
475 67 
923 81 

313 25 

9 07 

15 32 

93 39 
91 50 

26 88 

275 97 

21 60 



$25,823 79 



»2,345 46 
2,087 12 

361 50 

793 60 

811 26 

719 94 

482 49 

327 55 

3,651 00 

3,806 98 

337 61 

1,560 87 

1,434 20 

6 75 

228 13 

1,135 10 

233 04 

7,005 60 
911 38 
757 28 

1,356 45 

380 92 

9 07 

15 32 

103 07 
91 50 
26 88 

403 78 
21 60 



$31,405 45 




BREAK IN 30-INCH MAIN^ TREMONT STREET, OPPOSITE SEAVER PLACE, JAN- 
UARY 3, 1910; REPAIRED BY PIECE OF PIPE AND TWO SLEEVES. ON THE 
LEFT IS SEEN ROOF OF SUBWAY AND WESTERLY 30-INCH MAIN RESTING 
UPON IT. EDISON CABLES AND DUCTS ARE SUSPENDED OVER EASTERLY 
MAIN. (See Page 49.) 



Water Department. 49 

It will be seen in the foregoing table that the total 
cost of main pipe repairs and maintenance for the year 
was $31,405.45, an amount considerably in excess of 
that for the year previous. This may be accounted 
for by the unusually large cost of repaying streets, 
renewing, regulating and repairing gate valve boxes, the 
maintenance of pipes on bridges and the expensive 
leaks that occurred during the year. 

It is to be expected that as the system grows older the 
maintenance item will increase accordingly. In addi- 
tion to this is the fact that repairs are yearly increasing 
in cost by reason of increasing congestion under and over 
the surface, the high class of pavement to be encountered 
and replaced and the more exacting demands of the 
public, to whom deference must be given in the matter 
of shutting off water and interfering with street traffic; 
overtime work with a greater wage cost results in the 
one case and delay in the other. 

During the past year a large amount of repaving was 
done in the downtown section where this department 
had made openings. In most of the cases the openings 
had been made in previous years, but the burden of cost 
is placed upon the year just passed. Although the 
department has three patch paving gangs it is necessary 
to let out much of the work to contractors. The large 
number of boxes that are in the streets are a cause of 
much expense. As most of them are made of wood they 
are continually deteriorating and as a matter of safety 
have to be renewed. We are substituting concrete 
boxes in most cases and before long we hope to realize 
good results in a lessened number of decayed boxes. 

The work of the Street Department is a source of 
expense to this department, changes in grade and street 
repairs causing us to either lower or raise our boxes. 

The worst leak that occurred during the year hap- 
pened at 6.25 p. m., January 3, 1910, in Tremont street, 
opposite Seaver place, when the easterly 30-inch low 
service main laid in 1848 broke upon a mass of concrete 
upon which it was resting. Before the line was shut 
down a very large quantity of water escaped and flowed 
through Tremont street to La Grange street, through 
Eliot and La Grange streets to Washington street, and 
northerly in Washington street as far as Boylston square. 
It also flowed into Van Rensselaer place. About every 
basement or cellar on both sides of the streets named 
was flooded and in places where the cellars were extra 
deep, as in the cases of the Majestic, Globe and Gaiety 



50 City Document No. 40. 

Theaters, the water accumulated to depths of from 
two to five feet. The performances at all three theaters 
were prevented, and it was only by the most energetic 
work on the part of the department that the water 
was removed and conditions improved so as to allow 
a resumption of business. At the time the depart- 
ment received notice of the break the emergency auto- 
mobile and its crew was out answering another call; a 
delay of about eight minutes occurred on this account, 
but once upon the spot the gates were closed as quickly 
as possible. Two 30-inch and one 16-inch gates are all 
that are necessary to control the line at this point, but 
as the westerly 30-inch line runs parallel within a few feet 
distant it was necessary to close the gates on that line 
before it could be determined which line was broken. Two 
additional 30-inch gates, therefore, were operated. All 
this was done in eighty minutes from the time the notice 
was received at department headquarters. It was a 
bitter cold night and succeeding day, and the work of 
removing the water from the cellars and making repairs 
proceeded with difficulty. We were handicapped by a lack 
of efficient pumping apparatus, and I wish to say here that, 
if the department expects to cope successfully with breaks 
of a similar nature, it will have to provide itself with an 
equipment of power pumps. The ordinary hand dia- 
phragm pump is practically of no value in emergencies 
of this nature. The cause of the break was the concrete 
placed over a sewer and under our pipe. This faulty 
condition was created when the pipe was shifted to the 
east in 1896 to make room for the arch of the subway. 
The concrete was not laid for the entire distance under 
our pipe. It was placed just at the point of fracture 
and it was the uneven resistance combined with natural 
settlement that produced the break. 

The morning after the break a number of clerks were 
sent into the buildings of the district affected by the 
leak and a thorough examination of each place and a 
schedule of all property found damaged was made. 
This was of great value in the settlement of the claims 
filed. It helped greatly to controvert the exaggerated 
statements of the claimants. Furthermore, an experi- 
enced adjuster and appraiser, Mr. John B. Graham, 
was engaged to make quick settlement of all claims 
possible without resort to the courts. I find from 
experience, in matters of this kind, that immediate 
settlements usually result to the advantage of the 




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Water Department. 



51 



department. Upon the basis of settlements thus far 
made I should estimate the total damage at $23,000. 
The cost of repairing the break was $885.66. The cost 
of pumping out and cleaning the cellars and clerical 
expense was $438.65. 

Many leaks and breaks have occurred in this part 
of Tremont street since the subway was built in 1896, 
all due more or less to the same cause, viz., uneven 
resistance of the pipe bed, this in turn being due to the 
disturbance caused by the building of the subway and 
the shifting and laying of pipes in unsuitable locations. 
Following is a list of the important ones and the cost 
of repairs. No mention is made of the damages paid 
by the department for loss to property. This item in 
many cases was large, and in one case in particular, 
that of August 8, 1900, when the 30-inch main broke 
at Hotel Touraine, was very large, running into thou- 
sands of dollars. 



N 



Date. 



Location. 



Cause. 



Cost of 
Repairs. 



May 14, 1897. 

Aug. 11, 1898. 

May 5, 1899. 

Aug. 30, 1899. 

Aug. 8, 1900. 



Sept. 5, 1900. 

Nov. 23, 1903. 

Mar. 29, 1904. 

Mar. 1,1907. 

May 13, 1907. 



Tremont street, at Common 
street, easterly 30-inch 
main. 

Tremont street, near Hollis 
street, westerly 30-inch 



Tremont street, at Pleasant 
street, 30-inch main. 

Tremont street, opposite 
Common street, easterly 
30-inch main. 

Tremont street, at Hotel 
Touraine, easterly 30-inch 



Tremont street, at Hollis 
street, 30-inch main. 



Tremont street, opposite 
Hollis street, 30-inch main. 

Tremont street, opposite 
Common street, westerly 
30-inch main. 

291 Tremont street, 30-inch 
main. 

Tremont street, at Hollis 
street, Hollis street' 16- 
inch main. 



Broken, % rigid bearing on 
subway roof. 



Pipe split. Sewer manhole 
built over main, % sub- 
way. 

Joint leaking, % settlement. 



Split, % settlement, rigid 
bearing on subway. 



Pipe broken by settlement. 
Rigid bearing on side of 
subway; piers supporting 
it improperly. 

Cost of stripping and 
strengthening with brick 
piers; raising and moving 
laterally 192 feet. 

Split, % settlement. Rigid 
bearing. Subway tim- 
bers left in ground. 

Joint leaking, % settlement. 



Split, % settlement. Rigid 
support resting on roof of 
subway. 

Joint leaking, % settlement. 
Pulled out. 

Broken by settlement. Rigid 
support resting on roof of 
subway. 



$189 64 

153 41 

17 36 
358 52 

2,204 52 

5,182 89 

435 10 

20 55 
307 00 

56 97 
157 93 



52 City Document No. 40. 

After the break at Hotel Touraine in August, 1900, 
an attempt was made to give the easterly 30-inch main 
a better bed with more uniform support, and it was 
stripped from Boylston street to a point near La Grange 
street and raised and moved laterally and brick piers 
built under it. The work was stopped, however, at the 
point mentioned and nothing has been done since. I 
would advise continuing the work of stripping, examin- 
ing, raising, supporting, etc., in a southerly direction as 
far as the point in Tremont street north of Hollis street 
where the pipe crosses to the westerly side of the street. 
If this is not done we shall have repetitions of these 
sometimes disastrous breaks. 

Another point in the system that needs attention ere 
something serious happens is the northerly abutment of 
the Castle Street Bridge, where the two 30-inch mains 
descend into Tremont street. The curve of the pipes is 
both vertical and horizontal and the vibration due to 
passing trains, together with the loose nature of the 
soil, has tended to work the joints apart and many 
times in the last few years we have been called upon to 
make repairs. The lines will have to be broken out 
and made up again, using new castings, as we have no 
duplicates of the extra long curves used. This cannot 
be done too soon as the result of a break at this point 
would be of serious consequence. 

The department is quite often called upon to remove 
the boxes covering our pipes on bridges. This work is 
occasioned through no fault of the box but because 
the Bridge Division or the railroad wish to redeck the 
bridge. If that part of the decking under the box were 
independent of the rest, or, better still, if the pipe were 
carried under the decking, some expense might be 
spared the department. 

In pursuance of a plan to uncover all pipes at bridge 
abutments, examinations were made of the pipes at 
Brookline Avenue, Commonwealth Avenue and Beacon 
Street Bridges. At the two former places they were 
found to be all right, but at the Beacon Street Bridge 
a serious condition was exposed. Two 36-inch wrought- 
iron pipes cross this bridge and at both abutments 
converge underground into Y-branches, the single ends 
of which are 48 inches in diameter. The joint connect- 
ing the easterly end of the southerly wrought-iron pipe 
to the cast-iron pipe of the Y-branch was drawn out 




PIPE TAKEN FROM CORNER OF WALTHAM AND WASHINGTON STREETS, 

MARCH 25, 1909. A GOOD EXAMPLE OF THE EFFECT 

OF ELECTROLYSIS. (See Page 53.) 



Water Department. 53 

about 3 inches and very near the point of separation. 
The pipe was broken out and relaid iron to iron and the 
joints re-run and tightly calked. The ends of the 
wrought-iron pipes underground were found to be in a 
fairly good condition, due no doubt to the dry, gravelly 
soil, but as there was some rust and pits they were 
scraped, painted with red lead and covered with a 
3-inch jacket of cement mortar. This last precaution 
is more or less experimental. The conditions found in 
this case prove the necessity of examining all bridge 
pipes at the abutments. 

At Waltham and Washington streets the 12-inch 
Waltham street main was exposed to repair a leak 
caused by electrolysis. A section of the pipe was dis- 
integrated by electrical action. Incidentally unusual 
conditions were disclosed. The water main was found 
resting on a sewer at one point and upon an abandoned 
gas drip box at another. A conduit for electric 
wires rested on top of the water pipe. Here was a 
threefold violation of the rules of pipe laying, which 
might have been prevented by proper inspection and 
supervision. 

"•In Harrison avenue, opposite No. 1115, while search- 
ing for a supposed leak, a private pipe sewer was found 
running along over our main in such a manner as to 
cover our corporation cocks and prevent their operation 
in the usual way from above. The sewer was suspended 
by wires from an electric conduit. Several of the wires 
had broken and allowed the sewer to drop upon our 
main. This caused the sewer house connections to 
break and the sewage to escape and the connections 
to become stopped. All this trouble was caused by the 
improper way in which the sewer was constructed. 
That it was done knowingly was evidenced by the fact 
that the main uprights or tubes on our corporation cocks 
were removed. 

In Callahan place, off Western avenue, Brighton, a 
very peculiar condition was found in our 6-inch main at 
the end of the place. Two perfectly round holes about 
IJ inches in diameter and directly opposite each other 
were found in the pipe. The holes were in all prob- 
ability the work of electrolysis, as a large power house 
is on the opposite side of the river and the returning 
current traveled along the pipe to the end whence it 
went into the ground and across the river to the dynamo 



54 City Document No. 40. 

where it started. There was nothing to indicate how long 
the pipe had been leaking thus. The escaping water prob- 
ably found its way to Charles river, not very far distant. 

The 20-inch pipe crossing under the tracks in the rail- 
road yard at South Boston still continues as a source 
of trouble, leaks occurring from time to time due to 
vibration. Just as soon as the water is turned on 
through the new line entering South Boston by way of 
Congress street tunnel this pipe should be abandoned, 
the department thereby being saved further expense 
and the railroad further inconvenience. 

No serious leaks have occurred during the year in the 
pipes crossing Charles river at Warren Bridge. An 
examination of the 30-inch line at one of the quarter 
bends on the Boston side of the siphon revealed a sleeve 
joint almost entirely pulled out. A very good job of 
putting the pipe together, tightening the tie rods and 
running new joints was done by our Charlestown foreman 
and the pipe has not troubled us since. The fact remains, 
however, that these pipes should be carried across the 
river in a tunnel and not in the present precarious way. 

In Trumbull street the 4-inch main was found split 
in a catch-basin through which it was laid. About 
10,000 gallons an hour had been running into the basin 
for an indefinite period. This was quite a considerable 
item in waste and it was due to the Deacon meter system 
that it was found. The main was relaid properly. 

In Lake street, Brighton, where the 12-inch main 
crosses a culvert, about one and one-half inches of a joint 
had '^ blown out," and water escaped at the rate of about 
5,000 gallons an hour. How long this had been going 
on is unknown. The Deacon meter system was respon- 
sible for the location of this leak also. 

In the early fall of the year it was necessary, on 
account of the rebuilding of the Huntington Avenue 
Bridge over the Boston & Albany Railroad, to remove 
the old 16-inch and 20-inch wrought-iron pipes that 
have done service there for many years and replace 
them with cast-iron pipes of the same sizes in slightly 
different locations. The old wrought-iron pipes were 
very much worn and eaten by locomotive gases, and it 
was well that they were removed before they failed. 
The insides were very much corroded and coated to a 
thickness of almost two inches. 

A 42-inch pipe on the westerly side of the bridge was 
supported by the bridge builders during the rebuilding 



Water Department. 55 

of the structure. The large old main girders were 
placed parallel to both sides of the pipe and were sup- 
ported by blocking and timbers. Crosspieces of timber 
were placed upon the tops of the girders and iron straps 
or yokes, at short spaces apart, held the pipe suspended. 
The ends of the straps or yokes passed through the 
crosspieces of timber and were held in proper adjust- 
ment by means of large nuts moving on threads and 
turn-buckles. This arrangement proved a very good 
support, and the line was maintained in service 
throughout the progress of the work, with practically 
no settlement or movement of the joints. New girders 
were placed in position, a special bay for our pipe 
was, provided, and cast-iron crossbeams, with the ends 
resting on the bottom flanges of the girders, supported 
the pipe. The ends of the crossbeams where they 
rested on the flanges of the girders were covered with 
concrete to protect them from the locomotive gases, 
and the pipe was wedged with oak wedges upon each 
crossbeam to prevent a lateral movement. The whole 
bay, which runs under the sidewalk of the bridge, is 
covered by reinforced concrete slabs. They can be 
removed any time it is necessary to approach the pipe 
from above. An air valve is placed in the pipe to be 
operated through a manhole in the sidewalk above. 
All expense to this department was charged to the cost 
of rebuilding the bridge. 

The work of inspecting, testing and oiling gates was 
continued by the gang especially detailed for that class 
of work, with good results. The gang consists of seven 
men and two teams, and since it was organized, August 
24, 1908, it has worked upon gates as follows: From 
August 24, 1908, to December 3, 1908, and from 
March 12, 1909, to December 7, 1909, or 306 working 
days. The remainder of the time was spent in hydrant 
work, the weather not being suitable for gate inspection. 
During the time engaged in inspection the following 
work was done: 

Seven thousand and ninety-five gates tested, oiled 
and packed, if necessary, in the city proper. South 
Boston, Roxbury and Back Bay districts. The large 
gates were gone over several times and received special 
attention. A considerable number of small gates have 
been gone over twice. In connection with the work of 
testing, etc., 1,952 boxes have been cleared of mud, 
water, tin cans, stones, dead animals, etc. 



56 City Document No. 40. 

The locations of all gates have been marked on 
buildings, poles or some stationary object. Poles 
holding signs indicating the distances and directions 
of gates at points where there are many gates located 
within a small area have been erected. Other similar 
signs have been attached to trolley poles. Such work 
has been done in about sixteen or eighteen cases. About 
200 gate covers that were worn out or marked incor- 
rectly have been replaced or exchanged. 

One hundred gates were found to be either missing 
on the plans, or else upon the plan but not in the 
ground. 

Found twelve gates that required repairs to the extent 
of replacing them with new ones. 

Two hundred decayed boxes and tops were found 
and reported. 

One 36-inch box at Brookline avenue and Beacon 
street found packed solidly with dirt, where some one 
had used it as a dumping place. At Beacon and Exeter 
streets a large chamber on the 40-inch line was found 
filled in the same way, except that it contained crushed 
stone and was more difficult to remove. 

A gear upon a 24-inch gate, near South and Walter 
streets. West Roxbury, was found broken where a 
steam roller had crushed into the box and pressed it. 

Most important of all, one 6-inch division gate, 
between the high and low service in South Boston, was 
found open, allowing a very large quantity of water 
daily to flow from the high to low service. 

Twenty-nine high service and twenty low service gates 
of various sizes, ranging from 4-inch to 20-inch, were 
found closed and impeding the circulation. About 300 
gates of all sizes in both the high and low service systems 
Vfere found partially closed. 

An interesting fact in connection with these closed 
gates was that about 24 of them were located within an 
area of about one-sixth of a square mile. Four thousand 
three hundred, cards have been made out and filed, giving 
data concerning each gate, the idea being that eventually 
we shall have a complete card system of the gates con- 
taining all necessary data, the system to be maintained 
and used as a part of the gate inspection system. On 
account of lack of clerical help it is impossible to record 
every movement of each gate in the department. This, 
however, should be done as we could then know who 



Water Department. 57 

operated a gate last, and responsibility for negligence or 
improper operation could be placed. 

While operating a large gate more men are required 
than at other times. In the congested parts of the 
city, men with signal flags are used to keep vehicles 
and pedestrians from going into the manholes. 

A considerable amount of lost time is caused by the 
repairing or packing of a gate, as the gang as a whole 
'cannot move faster than its slowest man, which is the 
repairer at work upon the gate. We of course try other 
gates in the vicinity while the repairer is at work, but 
if they are found to need attention it means that the 
gang with its tools and team must remain within a 
limited distance. Another impediment is the entering 
of buildings to ascertain whether or not pipes that show 
in the streets are in service or not. It is not unusual to 
find a fire or elevator gate in the street which to all 
appearances controls a pipe that is in service, when in 
reality it is cut off in the foundation wall and some- 
times not even plugged or capped. The consequences 
may readily be imagined should we open the gate on 
such a pipe. Furthermore, the building has to be 
notified of our intention to lower the gate, as even a 
momentary interruption in the supply sometimes causes 
inconvenience and alarm, and it is not unusual that 
upon lowering the gate it is impossible through some 
defect in its mechanism to raise it again, hence the build- 
ing is without water and without notice. This spells 
trouble in large type. 

Our investigations in this line have revealed conditions 
that are surprising. Fire pipes that were supposedly 
protecting buildings from fire, and thereby affording the 
owner a basis for a reduction in his insurance rate, have 
been found shut off, sometimes without the knowledge 
of the owner and at other times with his knowledge and 
with his indifference as to whether or not they are turned 
on. 

Hydrants. 

During the year 256 public and 2 private hydrants 
were established, and 151 public and 3 private hydrants 
were abandoned, making a total number of 8,024 public 
and 307 private and suburban hydrants connected with the 
system January 31, 1910. This work comprised not only 
the establishment of additional new hydrants, but also 
the changing of the style and location of old hydrants. 



58 



City Document No. 40. 



Following is a statement of hydrant work performed 
during the year and cost of same: 

HYDRANTS.— ADDITIONAL AND CHANGES IN STYLE AND LOCATION. 



NXTMBEB. 



Cost of 
Material. 



Cost of 

Labor, 

Teaming, 

etc. 



Total 
Cost. 



115, additional 


$9,687 94 
6,758 25 


$1,446 02 
3,735 67 


$11,133 96 


154, changes in style and location 


10,493 92 






269 total 


$16,446 19 


$5,181 69 


$21,627 88 







Note. — The changes include eleven hydrants abandoned which were not replaced. 

HYDRANT REPAIRS. 



Nature of Work. 



Number. 



Cost. 



Barrels changed 

Barrels cleaned out 

Barrels repaired for various causes 

Blown off 

Boxes cleaned out 

Boxes inspected 

Boxes pumped out 

Boxes raised and lowered 

Boxes renewed 

Boxes repaired 

Chains inspected and repaired 

Covers cleaned of snow 

Frames, covers and bonnets renewed 

Hydrants raised and lowered 

Inspected on account of cold weather 

New branch 

Oiled 

Painted 

Relocated. , 

Repaired on account of operations of Sewer Division 

Streets repaved on account of hydrant work 

Tested 

Thawed out 

Wasted 



107 

2 

225 

3 

1,298 

354 

190 

117 

263 

123 

1,844 

150 

47 

22 

34,223 

1 

487 

5,007 

34 

1 

156 

2 

21 

937 



$2,091 56 

3 51 
583 42 

4 14 

506 46 
54 87 

110 61 

483 11 

3,934 92 

507 28 
281 43 

15 75 

231 90 

630 33 

7,329 11 

31 85 

141 35 

1,402 87 

958 33 

2 77 

767 04 

4 50 

19 59 

48 88 

$20,145 .58 



Water Department. 59 

From the foregoing it may readily be seen that the 
hydrants are quite an expense to the department. 
Nothing is received from the Fire Department for their 
use nor for the water used at fires. It is therefore 
apparent that the Water Department is contributing 
in large measure to the work and cost of extinguishing 
fires out of a special tax (water rates), while the general 
presumption holds that fire protection is supported by 
the general tax levy. 

The largest item in hydrant maintenance is ^^inspec- 
tion. '^ This always will be a necessary work, as in our 
cold and variable climate it is almost impossible to 
have hydrants in a condition for quick use without 
inspection. This is especially the case since hydrants 
have been used to such an extent by the Sewer, Street 
Cleaning, Street Watering and Highway Divisions of 
the city and numerous contractors. The men in the 
employ of the aforesaid are either ignorant or indifferent 
as to the proper manner in which to operate the hydrants, 
and as a result serious defects occur which have to be 
first located and then remedied. It is necessary in cold 
weather to follow the Fire Department closely and 
examine every hydrant that has been opened by that 
department. This, of course, might be obviated if the 
Fire Department saw that every hydrant which was 
opened was left in proper condition, but they do not do 
so and cannot be depended upon for that service. 
Around the wharves and in the outlying districts there 
are boxes which have to be pumped out every day or else 
the water accumulating in them from the tide and springs 
will freeze and at the same time freeze the hydrant. 

One cannot plan upon any particular economy in the 
inspection of hydrants, as the winter it is intended to 
carry it out may be a severely cold one and a most 
thorough and continuous inspection will be imperative. 
In this climate of ours we may have two or three weeks 
of mild weather and feeling presumptions as to the 
necessity of inspection lay off the men, only to find it 
necessary a few days afterward to recall them. 

The renewal of boxes is a matter of much importance 
and expense. Of the several thousand in the streets there 
is always a certain number collapsed or so near that 
state as to be dangerous and require immediate attention. 
It is not unusual to have suits for damages grow out 
of these cases. The use of concrete boxes is expected 
to prevent occurrences of this nature within a few years. 



60 



City Document No. 40. 



The Boston post hydrant is used by the department 
wherever practicable and is giving thorough satisfaction. 

I must again urge the restriction of the use of hydrants 
to the Fire and Water Departments. No others should 
operate them unless it is considered desirable that a 
large percentage of them should be more or less defective 
all the time. 

Tables III. and IV. appended show the number of 
each style of hydrant, public and private, established 
and abandoned during the year, the districts in which 
they are located and the total number in the system 
January 31, 1910. 

Service Pipes. 

Thirteen hundred eighty-one service pipes, of diam- 
eters varying from f inch to 16 inches, were laid dur- 
ing the year, and 377 were abandoned. The net 
increase for the year was 1,004. The total number of 
service pipes in the system is 96,049. The term ^'service 
pipe" includes not only those pipes supplying water to 
premises for strictly domestic purposes, but also fire, 
motor and elevator pipes. Tables V. and VI. appended 
give details as to number, size, length in feet, etc. All 
f-inch pipes are made of lead. Those ranging from 
f -inch to 2-inch, inclusive, are of lead and lead-lined iron. 
Pipes of 3 inches and upward are of cast iron. 

The cost of laying and abandoning service pipes 
during the year may be found in the tables following: 

COST OF LAYING NEW (OR ADDITIONAL) SERVICE PIPES. 



Size. 



Number. 



Length 
in Feet. 





Labor, 






Total 
Cost. 


Average 


Material. 


Teaming, 


Repaying. 


Blasting. 


Cost per 




etc. 






Service. 



Average 

Cost per 

Linear 

Foot. 



16-inch 

10-inch 

6-inch 

4-inch 

3-inch 

2-inch 

1 §-inch 

li-inch 

1 f-inch 

|-inch 

f-inch 



1 

2 

2 

65 

27 

8 

16 

7 

55 

81 

999 



86 
17 
34i 
1,3111 
5691 
179i 
354 
259i 
1,249 
2,007i 
22,5071 



$251 24 
75 30 
63 66 

3,136 11 

1,194 73 
185 24 
317 66 
143 13 
683 36 
857 97 

7,507 93 



$68 97 

85 52 

55 88 

1,979 93 

794 93 

99 30 

219 64 

111 39 

676 70 

878 34 

9,898 63 



$309 76 
91 61 



68 97 



26 64 
75 80 



$9 50 
50 00 



1,121 00 



$320 21 

160 82 

119 54 

5,425 80 

2,081 27 

284 54 

606 27 

264 02 

1,410 06 

1,762 95 

18,603 36 



$320 21 


80 


41 


59 


77 


83 


47 


77 


08 


35 


57 


37 


89 


37 


72 


25 


64 


21 


76 


18 


62 



B3 72 
9 46 

3 46 

4 14 
3 65 
1 58 
1 71 
1 01 
1 13 

88 
83 



Water Department. 



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62 



City Document No. 40. 



COST OF SERVICE PIPES ABANDONED AND PLUGGED INDEPENDENTLY OF OTHER WORK. 



Size. 



IB 
CD 

a 
,^ 




3 

'u 

o 


1 

a 

O M 

■^ 9 

K-1 


. a 


o 
U 

"3 
o 


Credit 

(Stock Re- 
covered). 


02 
O 

O 

-(J 
o 


o1 



=3 t. O 
j; 5 O 



6-inch . 
4-inch . 
3-inch. 
2-inch . 
1 |-inch 
1 i-inch 
1-inch, 
f-inch. 
f-inch. 
5-inch, 



1 

2 
3 
3 
5 
1 
6 
12 
198 
1 



30 


$2 29 


$17 88 




$20 17 


$12 40 


$7 77 


$7 77 


18 


17 19 


28 78 




45 97 


8 09 


37 88 


18 94 


167 


1 67 


35 18 




36 85 


8 98 


27 87 


9 29 


151 


2 06 


36 05 




38 11 


16 19 


21 92 


7 31 


120 


1 12 


25 73 




26 85 


14 30 


12 55 


2 51 


3 


23 


3 44 




3 67 


3 34 


33 


33 


88 


1 04 


45 98 


$9 34 


56 36 


11 00 


45 36 


7 56 


346§ 


2 48 


78 34 


9 02 


89 84 


8 68 


81 16 


6 76 


4,145 


43 72 


1,213 89 


166 16 


1,423 77 


143 36 


1,280 41 


6 46 


50 


14 


7 82 




7 96 


58 


7 38 


7 38 



$0 26 
2 10 
17 
1 41 
10 
11 
52 
23 
31 
15 



As stated in last year's report the demand for larger 
service pipes is yearly increasing, due to the require- 
ments of modern plumbing, the erection of larger build- 
ings and the installation of the automatic sprinkler 
system of fire protection. The extension of the high 
service system is a resultant of these new conditions. 
The present capacity of that system is limited, however, 
and if the demands made upon it continue to grow at 
their present rate provision for a larger supply ought to 
be made very soon. As at present situated not over 
one day's supply is available in the event of a crippling 
of the pumping machinery at Chestnut Hill. The 
standpipe at Mt. Bellevue is also inadequate for the 
demand made upon it. The higher parts of the West 
Roxbury district which it supplies are being rapidly 
populated. Conditions are such now that when any 
unusual draft is made upon the system during the 
day the pumps ''race" in their efforts to keep the tank 
filled. 

In the work of maintaining the service pipe system 
the following statement will show the variety of work 
done, the causes, number of jobs and the total cost: 



Water Department. 



63 



Kind of Work and Causes. 



Number 
of Jobs. 



Total Cost. 



Repaired leaks caused by: 

settlement 

defective pipe 

defective cock 

defective coupling 

defective joint 

pick hole 

electrolysis 

operations of Sewer Department 

worn packing 

operations of Edison Company 

loose coupling 

steam roller 

broken gate screw 

subway construction 

defective gate valve 

cock turned wrong way 

chemical action of lime 

broken connection 

broken valve stem 

operations of meter service 

worn washer 

gate improperly shut 

operations of contractor '. 

blasting 

gate left open 

Repaved — settlement 

Repaired — no force 

Shut-off and let on — repairs and nonpayment 

Investigations where no action by department was required. 

Regulated uprights above and below grade 

Repaired defective service uprights 

Frozen pipes thawed out 

Service pipes relocated 

Decayed boxes renewed 



283 
280 
86 
86 
35 
84 
14 
34 
14 
3 
12 
5 
2 
2 
1 
5 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
661 
434 
866 
718 
2,990 
86 
14 
27 
13 



$3,668 08 

" 2,681 31 

676 11 

630 33 

443 72 

280 53 

192 82 

177 80 

130 33 

89 76 

70 62 

56 37 

40 71 

32 62 

27 54 

27 02 

25 96 

19 30 

11 57 

10 59 

6 03 

3 31 

2 60 

1 46 

1 41 

4,822 72 

3,473 68 

1,736 68 

1,687 51 

935 23 

409 51 

225 61 

224 46 

129 73 



Carried forward. 



6,768 



$22,953 03 



64 



City Document No. 40. 



Kind of Work and Causes. 



Number 
of Jobs. 



Total Cost. 



Brought forward -. . 

Regulated gate boxes to grade 

Cut out dead pipes 

Relocated uprights out of place 

Established new sidewalk cocks 

Cleared uprights filled with dirt 

Established new sidewalk uprights, missing 
Established new flange boxes, improyement 

Dirty water blown off 

Repaired broken frames 

Repaired defective box 

Pumped out manhole 

Established new gate box 

Cleaned gate boxes 

Replaced stolen service pipe 

Replaced upright tops, missing 

Replaced box cover, misplaced 

Repaired loose gate bolts 

Removed plugs 

Replaced missing sidewalk nuts 

Cleaned iron box filled with dirt 

Repaired rusted cock 

Tested service for pressure 

Cleaned up after repairs 

Established new combination top 

Totals 



6,768 

56 

10 

24 

39 

12 

11 

6 

9 

3 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

4 

1 

1 

2 

4 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 



$22,953 03 

233 15 

102 74 

143 37 

78 11 

75 02 

56 37 

38 20 

23 31 

19 73 

15 86 

10 68 

10 01 

6 71 

6 26 

4 62 

3 49 

3 21 

3 19 

3 13 

2 56 

2 32 

1 51 

91 

74 



6,962 



},798 23 



On January 21, 1910, the ^^off-and-on" force of the 
Income Division was transferred to the Distribution 
Division. Twenty-five men were thereby brought into 
the service of the Distribution Division to perform the 
work of shutting off and letting on water for repairs, 
nonpayments, vacancies, etc. Under this arrangement 
the work can be done more expeditiously and econom- 
ically, as when pressed with an unusual number of 
orders the regular repair force of the Distribution Divi- 
sion may help out, and when work is slack the ^^off-and- 
on" men can be used in repair work. Furthermore, 
two men for each outlying district were selected from 



Water Department. 65 

the force to serve permanently in those districts as ^^off- 
and-on" men. A saving of time and car fares is thus 
effected, as heretofore the men started on their jobs 
from a common center — 710 Albany street. When 
bound for remote places in Dorchester, West Roxbury 
or Brighton much time was consumed in going to and 
from the jobs. The money received for letting on is 
forwarded daily to the Income Division, City Hall. 

Tables V. and VI., appended, show the number, size 
and length of service pipes laid and abandoned during 
the year and the total number of each size and aggre- 
gate length in the system January 31, 1910. 

Meters. 

Chapter 524 of the Acts of 1907 requires all cities 
and towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board to meter all new services and 5 per cent 
yearly of all old services, except those used for fire or 
public purposes. Chapter 177 of the Acts of 1909 
places a penalty upon the nonobservance of the law 
of 1907. It was therefore incumbent upon this depart- 
ment to increase its equipment so as to comply with the 
demands of the law. An arrangement was made so 
that the Distribution Division assumed the work of 
installing all outside meters and all repairs on outside 
meters and meter boxes. This allowed the Meter 
Department of the Income Division to devote its entire 
force to the installation of inside meters and the testing 
and repairing of meters in the shop. 

Following is a statement of new meters installed by 
the Distribution Division and the cost of the work, 
exclusive of the cost of the meters, also a statement of 
repairs on outside meters and the cost of same: 



66 



City Document No. 40. 



NUMBER AND SIZES OF NEW METERS INSTALLED AND COST OF SAME 
(COST OF METER NOT INCLUDED). 



NuMBEK Set. 


Size. 


Cost of 
Material. 


Labor, 

Teaming, 

Car Fares, 

etc. 


Total Cost. 


Outside. 


Inside. 


700 




1 

|-inch 

|-inch 

f-inch 

f-inch 

1-inch 

1 1-inch 

2-inch 

3-inch 

4-inch 

6-inch 


$5,612 32 

12 69 

641 20 

6 15 

408 85 

110 80 

68 13 

8 99 

26 10 

22 30 


$5,873 11 

34 70 

663 49 

11 25 

498 76 

108 90 

90 65 

28 25 

24 07 

40 32 


$11,485 43 


74 


16 


47 39 
1,304 69 


48 


5 


17 40 
907 61 


9 




219 70 


6. . . . . 




158 78 


1 




37 24 


1 




50 17 


1 




62 62 








840 


21 




S6,917 53 


$7,373 50 


$14,291 03 









METER REPAIRS, CAUSES, NUMBER OF JOBS, AND COST OF SAME. 



Causes. 



Number of Cost of 
Jobs. Material. 



Labor, 

Teaming, 

Care Fares, 

etc. 



Total Cost. 



Decayed box 

Settlement of paving 

Defective box. 

Leak, defective pipe . 

Abandoned 

Frame broken 

Change 

Boxes inspected , 

No force 

Stoppage 

Coupling loose 

Cover of box off ... . 
Box pumped out . . . , 

Totals 



81 
116 

38 

25 
1 
2 
1 

18 
4 
2 
2 
1 
1 



$447 44 
62 73 
29 46 
17 59 



5 09 

84 



$636 68 

434 66 

126 29 

103 92 

11 49 

6 29 

9 98 

5 63 

4 00 

3 03 

1 64 

1 13 

85 



,084 12 

497 39 

155 75 

121 51 

11 49 

11 38 

10 82 

5 63 

4 00 

3 03 

1 64 

1 13 

85 



292 



$563 15 



L,345 59 



$1,908 74 



Water Posts. 

During the year one water post for street sprinkling 
carts was established and four abandoned, leaving a 



Water Department. 



67 



total number of 516 connected with the system January 
31, 1910. The total cost of the work was $62.41, with 
a credit of $74.45 realized from reclaimed stock. The 
excess of this credit over the cost of work was applied 
on bills for repairs which are continually being rendered 
by this department to the Street Cleaning and Watering 
Division of the Street Department for the care and main- 
tenance of the posts. Formerly these posts were 
entirely in our charge, but since 1906 we have simply 
executed orders to do work as issued by the Street 
Cleaning and Watering Division and charged the 
expense to that division. Following is a statement of 
repairs performed by this department on water posts 
during the year, the number of jobs, the causes and 
the cost: 



WATER POST REPAIRS, CAUSES, NUMBER OF JOBS, AND COST OF SAME. 



Causes. 



Number of 
Jobs. 



Cost of 
Material. 



Labor, 

Teaming, 

Car Fares, 

etc. 



Total Cost. 



Leaking valve 

Pipe rusted out 

Standpipe leaking 

Post hit by team 

Post arm broken 

Box decayed 

Broken valve 

Broken waste cock 

Paving settled 

Shut off for winter 

General overhauling 

Main cock broken 

Gate broken at main 

Post arm leaking 

Hard to operate 

Leaking waste cock 

Post in way of setting edgestoue 

Coupling leaking 

Pipe in way of conduit 

Waste cock broken 

Nipple broken 

Carried forward 



78 
7 

14 
6 

17 
5 

28 

18 
5 

51 
2 
2 
1 
5 

10 
7 
1 
4 
1 
1 
3 



$8 33 
27 45 
6 73 
9 23 
15 70 
31 45 



16 


23 


2 


71 


3 


30 


10 


56 


7 


62 


1 


45 





33 

2 84 

3 80 
74 
61 



$173 84 
83 07 
81 07 
70 07 
60 74 

44 21 
69 27 
38 07 
48 09 

45 11 
27 58 
17 86 

9 68 

14 81 

15 06 
14 59 

9 25 
6 41 

5 05 

6 78 
6 62 



$182 17 

110 52 

87 SO 

79 30 

76 44 

75 66 

69 27 

54 30 

50 80 

45 11 

30 88 

28 42 

17 30 

16 26 

15 06 

14 59 

9 58 

9 25 

8 85 

7 52 

7 23 



266 



$149 08 



$847 23 



$996 31 



68 



City Document No. 40. 



Water Post Repairs, Causes, Number of Jobs and Cost of Same. — Concluded. 



Causes. 







Labor, 


Number of 


Cost of 


Teaming, 


Jobs. 


Material. 


Car Fares, 
etc. 



Total Cost. 



Brought forward . . . . 

Broken frame 

Box top piece decayed 
Waste cock left open. . 

Joint loose 

Dirt in stop cock box . 
Not shut off properly. 

Elbow broken 

Testing 

Main cock leaking. . . . 

Pick hole in pipe 

Base loose , 

Inspection 

Box full of water 

Totals 



266 


$149 08 


$847 23 


1 


4 59 


2 16 


3 


1 49 


4 76 


1 
3 




5 75 

5 44 


24 


3 

4 
2 




4 78 
4 42 
3 25 




43 


4 
1 

1 




3 00 

2 57 
1 97 




10 


1 
1 
1 




1 44 

85 
66 








292 


$155 93 . 


$888 28 



$996 31 
6 75 
6 25 
5 75 
5 68 
4 78 
4 42 
3 68 
3 00 
2 57 
2 07 
1 44 
85 
66 



,044 21^ 



Fountains. 

During the year nine drinking fountains were estab- 
lished, seven for horses and two for the general public. 
Sixteen were abandoned; they were mostly of the old fash- 
ioned type of combination fountains for man and beast. 
It is the policy of the department at present to do away 
with these fountains, as the part for man is out of date 
from a sanitary standpoint, and the part for beasts — a 
low stone trough — is exposed to abuse from unthinking 
and malicious persons. In replacing them circular iron 
bowls with continuous flow of water are erected in the 
center of squares or street intersections. They are 
away from the path of those who would abuse them and 
the bowls are sufficiently high to allow a horse to drink 
without being unchecked. This last feature is the 
means of providing many a horse with a drink that would 
go thirsty in the case of a low stone trough, where the 
driver is too lazy to descend and uncheck. By locating 
the new fountains at central points a lesser number was 



Water Department. 



69 



necessary. Take, for instance, the fountain erected at 
the intersection of Columbus avenue and Tremont street. 
This replaced three of the old style located on Columbus 
avenue at Whittier street, Columbus avenue opposite 
Police Station 10, and Columbus avenue at Centre street. 
The traffic passing any of these points is in most cases 
likely to pass the point where the fountain is now located. 
One fountain is doing the work of three. Other cases 
were the same. 

The cost of the work of erecting new fountains and 
removing old ones was as follows : 



Stock. 


Labor, 
Teaming, etc. 


Total. 


Credit by- 
Removed Stock. 


Net Cost. 


$1,535 83 


1 
$1,458 13 $2,993 96 


$1,520 82 


$1,473 14 



The work of maintaining the fountains was carried 
on as usual. In addition to the many repairs necessi- 
tated by the wear and tear and abuse of the fixtures 
the troughs were cleaned daily. Two men are thus 
employed daily in the central district, and one man in 
each of the suburban districts makes the round of troughs 
three times a week. The water is drained off and the 
inside surface thoroughly scrubbed and periodically 
burned out with a plumber's torch. The work of main- 
tenance also includes the inspection of cold water foun- 
tains throughout the summer, the taking of temperatures 
and checking the amounts of ice placed in the box by 
the ice companies under contract. It is my opinion 
that better results would be realized if the ice were placed 
in the box in a shaved state, instead of in large cakes as 
at present. Furthermore, I think that better satisfac- 
tion would be had in the matter of ice distribution if it 
were delivered by one or two teams of the ice company, 
upon which a representative of this department could 
ride and observe at first hand the amount of ice placed 
in the box. As an alternative, the department might 
distribute the ice itself from various supply points. 

Following is a statement of fountain repairs and 
maintenance, with number of jobs performed, causes and 
cost of same. Table VII., appended, shows locations 
of fountains established and abandoned and total number 
and different styles in service. 



70 



City Document No. 40. 



FOUNTAIN REPAIRS AND MAINTENANCE. 

Causes, Number of Jobs and Cost of Same. 



Causes. 



Number 
of Jobs. 



Cost of 
Material. 



Cost of 

Labor, 

Teaming, 

etc. 



Total 

Cost. 



Inspection, taking temperature, etc. . . 
Inspecting and cleaning horse trough . . 
General overhaiiling Brewer fountain 

Struck by team 

Equippingfor summer use 

Leak in supply pipe 

Fountain reset 

Drainpipe plugged 

Fountain painted 

Paving settled 

Dipper stolen 

Faucet broken 

Cock broken 

Waste pipe plugged (dirt, etc.) 

Boxed over for winter 

Ice box cover broken 

Defective ice box 

Broken coupling 

Nipple broken 

Dipper worn out 

Grate broken 

Faucet leaking 

Leaking coupling 

Waste pipe broken 

Shut-off 

Shut off for winter 

Let on 

Faucet stolen '. 

S. C. box cover broken 

Upright filled with dirt 

Ornamental ball missing 

Plug stuck in waste pipe 

Pipe frozen 

Water dirty 

Carried forward 



2,153 

1,023 

1 

4 

51 

23 

1 

14 



73 

25 
8 

21 
1 
1 
5 
1 
3 

36 
2 
8 
7 
1 
5 
6 
6 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 



3,505 



$107 45 
38 57 
63 89 
11 49 

16 69 
7 33 

17 41 
16 71 
19 80 
31 07 
16 55 



6 98 
16 81 

4 21 

5 20 
53 

3 59 

8 38 

1 02 

13 

14 



1 70 

2 26 



86 



5657 73 

481 50 

152 43 

105 33 

79 49 

97 62 

59 43 

64 57 

50 95 

43 04 

33 32 
20 40 

34 84 
27 95 
19 83 

2 13 
13 16 
10 67 
13 64 
17 07 

1 37 
8 70 
7 87 
5 75 
5 85 
5 36 
5 18 

2 85 

1 36 

3 56 

2 70 
2 63 
2 60 
1 88 



77 



J,042 76 



$657 73 

481 50 

259 88 

143 90 

143 38 

109 11 

76 12 

71 90 

68 36 

59 75 

53 12 

51 47 

51 39 

27 95 

26 81 

18 94 

17 37 

15 87 

14 17 

20 66 

9 75 

9 72 

8 00 

5 89 

5 85 

- 5 36 

5 18 

4 55 

3 62 

3 56 

3 56 

2 63 

2 60 

1 88 



J,441 53 



Water Department. 



71 



Fountain Repairs and Maintenance. — Concluded. 



Causes. 







Cost of 


Number 


Cost of 


Labor, 


of Jobs. 


Material. 


Teaming, 
etc. 



Total 
Cost. 



Brought forward 

Pumping out water in ice box 

Door broken 

No force 

Leak in waste pipe 

Stop cock leaking 

Pipe plugged 

Broken elbow 

Totals 



3,505 


$398 77 


$2,042 76 


2 




1 74 
1 21 


49 




1 10 


50 
1 51 
1 50 
1 13 




14 




15 


1 10 


3,513 


$400 65 


$2,051 45 



,441 53 
1 74 
1 70 
1 60 
1 51 
1 50 
1 27 
1 25 



,452 10 



Waste Detection. 

The waste detection service was transferred to the 
Income Division early in the year. In connection with 
the matter of waste it is interesting to note that the 
daily per capita consumption during the year just passed 
was 149 gallons against 158 gallons the previous year. 
It is estimated that more than one-half of this decrease 
was due to the repair of large leaks located by the 
Deacon meter system. The balance was due to the 
restriction of general waste, brought about by the knowl- 
edge that meters were being applied throughout the 
city. 

The Deacon meter in Harvard street, near Washington 
street, city, abandoned when Washington Street Tunnel 
was built, was re-established at No. 21 Harvard street 
during the past year at a cost of $304.64 exclusive of 
the meter. 

Twelve Deacon meter boxes were renewed at a total 
cost of $137.05 and two Deacon meters were repaired 
at a total cost of $13.16. 



Electrolysis. 

This matter is now attended to by the City Engineer's 
staff. It is growing in importance, and some time in the 
near future the process of disintegration now going on 
in the pipes at various points will reach the point of 
failure or destruction with serious results. While con- 
ditions exist as they are in the street railway system 



72 City Document No. 40. 

nothing can be done except to localize the trouble by 
insulation and inform the street railway company of 
its presence wherever manifested, so that the company 
may take steps to recover its stray current and keep it 
in its proper place. 

Shop Work. 

Reference to the statements of the work done by the 
various shops in the department will give an idea of the 
variety and extent of the same. 

In the power plant there was used during the year 
471,200 pounds of coal as against 497,000 pounds in 
1908-09 and 671,200 pounds in 1907-08. The per- 
centage of ash and clinker was 9.61 as against 10.16 in 
1908-09 and 13.5 in 1907-08. Coal on hand February 
1, 1910, 26,000 pounds. About 50 gallons each of 
cylinder and engine oil were used during the year. 

The machine and carpenter shops are engaged in the 
regular manufacture of fixtures used by the department 
in its work. In every shop or factory there are certain 
fixed charges, or plant costs, which should be added to 
the direct cost of the output in order to produce the 
real cost of the articles manufactured. In the case of 
our carpenter shop this ^' plant cost'' was calculated at 
about 15 per cent of the labor cost of the boxes and 
other articles manufactured, and in the case of the 
machine shop 90 per cent of the cost of the labor was 
added. This extra is added only to the work done in 
the shop, and which requires the existence of a shop to 
facilitate it. All work done by the carpenter and 
machine shops on the , outside does nob include, this 
additional factor. 

In 1908-09 the '^ plant cost" of the carpenter shop was 
20 per cent and that of the machine shop 70 per cent. 
The changes in these figures are not due to increased 
or decreased cost of plant. They are made because we 
consider the figures of this year as more accurate. 

The average cost of the output of the machine shop 
was about 4 per cent less than that of last year. It 
should be considered, however, on one side that the 
costs of the iron and brass castings were about 10 per 
cent and 2 per cent, respectively, less than they were 
last year, and on the other side that the percentage for 
^' plant cost," added to the labor, is 20 per cent more this 
year than last. 



Water Department. 73 

Aside from the fact that it is a difficult matter to get 
men in municipal employ to produce the same output 
as those in private service, there are other conditions 
that tend toward an increased cost. For instance, dur- 
ing the year one man in the shop was absent about 
fourteen weeks on account of sickness; another was out 
almost the same length of time, due to sickness and jury 
duty; and another has been absent off and on for some 
time past, due to sickness also. Men are also frequently 
called to work on outside work. All this interferes with 
the uniformity and regularity of the shop work and the 
output is lessened while the ^' plant cost" remains the 
same. Furthermore, the shop might be run at a greater 
capacity. Several more first-class machinists could be 
employed and thus the unused power and facilities of 
the shop utilized. It is of course more economical to 
run a shop at full capacity than at any less rate. The 
administration and power costs are practically the same 
in either case, but in the event of running at full capacity 
each article of the output bears a lesser proportion of 
the running cost of. the plant. The idea is illustrated 
by a train of cars running with full load of passengers 
or half load, in either case the carrying cost is the 
same. 

Another matter that we have to contend with is the 
difficulty of getting rough stock in sufficient quantity to 
proceed on different lines of work without the proba- 
bihty of being held up by a lack of stock. Under the 
present system of buying both iron and brass castings 
a year's contract is made, and if a new bidder secures 
the contract, as has been the case each of the last few 
years, it requires about one-half the year for the foundry 
to get accustomed to our class of work, and it is only 
during the latter part of the year that the stock arrives 
with any uniformity and regularity. It would seem as 
if the remedy for this was to ^^ stock up" or else have 
the contract run for a longer period. The first proposi- 
tion is a most desirable one, as nothing would be of 
greater assistance than to have a large reserve stock of 
rough castings to draw from, but our system of yearly 
appropriations prevents this. The idea of making a 
long term contract is not desirable because of the usually 
unsettled condition of the iron and metal markets. 
Some effort, however, should be made to better con- 
ditions in this respect. 



74 



City Document No. 40. 



In the concrete shop an electric motor was installed 
to operate the cube mixer. This assists materially, as 
the mixer when filled with a batch of concrete was very 
hard to revolve. 

Following are statements of the work performed by 
the various shops and the costs of the same: 



MACHINE SHOP. 

STOCK MANUFACTURED FROM THE ROUGH. 



Number. 



Labor. 



90 

Per Cent 

Added. 



Stock. 



Cost 
Each. 



Total 
Cost. 



3-inch gate valves 

4-inch gate valves 

6-inch gate valves 

8-inch gate valves 

10-inch gate valves 

12-inch gate valves 

16-inch gate valves 

6-inch by-pass gate valves 

Boston post hydrants 

Lowry hydrants, 3 feet 9 inches 

Lowry hydrants, 4 feet 

Lowry hydrants, 4 feet 3 inches 

Blow-off hydrants, 3 inches 

2-inch air cocks 

2-inch air cock bolts 

1-inch sidewalk cocks 

f -inch sidewalk cocks 

1-inch sidewalk cocks 

1-inch sidewalk cocks (iron pipe). . . . 

|-inch corporation cocks 

f -inch corporation cocks 

l|-inch corporation cocks 

|-inch stop and waste cocks 

f-inch stop and waste cocks 

1-inch stop and waste cocks 

|-inch combination couplings 

1-inch combination couplings 

2-inch combination couplings 

1-inch combination bent couplings . . 
IJ-inch combination bent couplings. 
2-inch combination bent couplings . . 



16 
69 
82 
98 
42 
53 
19 
11 

172 

5 

13 

4 

48 

23 

36 

1,033 

116 
25 
51 
1,857 
33 
77 

426 

149 

47 

1,436 

386 
60 

131 
50 
50 



$3 89 

4 63 

5 43 

6 80 

10 95 
12 25 
27 71 

7 14 

11 20 
5 16 
5 16 

5 16 

6 06 
1 46 

22 
27 
• 40 
50 I 
50 
26 
50 
65 
42 
63 
69 
12 
14 
24 
20 
25 
29 



$7 39 

8 80 

10 32 

12 92 

20 80 
23 28 
52 65 

13 57 

21 28 

9 80 
9 80 
9 80 

11 51 
2 77 

42 
51 
76 
95 
95 
49 
95 
1 23 
80 
1 19 
1 31 
22 
26 
45 
38 
47 
55 



$4 65 


$12 04 


6 03 


14 83 


10 93 


21 25 


16 45 


29 37 


25 18 


45 98 


31 82 


55 10 


45 24 


97 89 


10 48 


24 05 


25 51 


46 79 


16 08 


25 88 


17 52 


27 32 


17 75 


27 55 


10 64 


22 15 


3 91 


6 68 


24 


66 


25 


76 


40 


1 16 


55 


1 50 


77 


1 72 


27 


76 


45 


1 40 


1 27 


2 50 


27 


1 07 


36 


1 56 


62 


1 93 


18 


41 


27 


53 


75 


1 21 


38 


76 


71 


1 18 


98 


1 53 



$192 64 

1,023 27 

1.742 50 

2,878 26 

1,931 16 

2,920 30 

1,859 91 

264 55 

8,047 88 

129 40 

355 16 

110 20 

1,063 20 

153 64 

23 76 

785 08 

134 56 

37 50 

87 72 

1,411 32 

46 20 

192 50 

455 82 

232 44 

90 71 

588 76 

204 58 

72 60 

99 56 

59 00 

76 50 



Water Department. 

stock Manufactured from the Rough. — Concluded. 



75 



Number. 



Labor. 



90 

Per Cent 

Added. 



Stock. 



Cost 
Each. 



Total 
Cost. 



Female couplings: 

f-inch coupling nuts . . . . 

f -inch coupling nuts 

1-inch coupling nuts 

Ij-inch coupling nuts 

f-inch coupling tubes 

f-inch coupling tubes 

1-inch coupling tubes 

l|-inch coupling tubes 

2-inch coupling tubes 

1-inch meter coupling nuts 

f-inch male couplings 

f-inch male couplings 

1-inch male couplings 

IJ-inch meter nipples 

2-inch meter nipples 

Nipples for Doherty cocks 

Nuts for Doherty cocks 

|-inch solder nipples 

f-inch solder nipples 

1-inch solder nipples 

Ij-inch solder nipples 

1-inch by f-inch meter bushings 

f-inch by f-inch meter bushings 

1-inch meter bushings 

f-inch meter bushings 

f-inch iron plugs 

5-inch set screws 

1-inch set screws 

Sidewalk uprights, bushed and fitted . . . 

Hydrant wastes 

4-inch jointers 

6-inch jointers. . . . ; 

8-inch jointers 

10-inch jointers 

12-inch jointers 

16-inch jointers 

30-inch jointers 



16,169 

3,698 

263 

200 

15,431 

1,862 

758 

313 

112 

441 

792 

500 

99 

231 

50 

15 

30 

56 

501 

179 

150 

106 

250 

372 

165 

398 

2,695 

72 

2,034 

154 

5 

10 

13 

5 

11 

2 

2 



Total. 



$0 01 
02 
04 
06 
01 
02 
02 
03 
07 
04 
02 
025 
05 
08 
115 
125 
05 
03 
03 
035 
09 
09 
04 
06 
04 
045 
06 
25 
03 
14 
14 
14 
18 
20 
23 
27 
40 



019 

038 

076 

114 

019 

038 

038 

057 

133 

076 

038 

047 

095 

15 

22 

24 

095 

057 

057 

067 

17 

17 

076 

11 

076 

085 

IL 

47 

057 

266 

26 

26 

34 

38 

44 

51 

76 



$0 04 
07 
11 
22 
03 
06 
08 
19 
27 
11 
07 
12 
14 
20 
34 
10 
06 
05 
06 
10 
18 
13 
09 
15 
07 
01 
018 
036 
43 
19 
42 
53 
64 
75 
1 03 

1 33 

2 47 



$0 059 
108 
186 
334 
049 
098 
118 
247 
403 
186 
108 
167 
235 
35 
56 
34 
155 
107 
117 
167 
- 35 
30 
166 
26 
146 
095 
132 
506 
487 
456 
686 
79 
98 
1 13 
1 47 
1 84 
3 23 



$953 97 

399 38 

48 92 

66 80 

756 12 

182 48 

89 44 

77 31 

45 14 

82 03 
85 54 

83 50 

23 27 
80 85 

28 00 
5 10 

4 65 

5 99 
58 62 

29 89 
52 50 
31 80 
41 50 
96 72 

24 09 
37 81 

355 74 

36 43 

990 56 

70 22 

3 43 

7 90 

12 74 

5 65 
16 17 

3 68 

6 46 

.f 32. 171 08 



76 



City Document No. 40. 



STOCK REPAIRED AND RENOVATED. 



Number. 



Total 

Cost* 


$5 


83 


38 


35 


51 


57 


15 


62 


7 


33 


6 


55 


19 


47 


50 


72 


96 


76 


106 


81 


131 


29 


60 


13 


2 


28 


4 


32 




62 




45 




85 




25 


6 


50 




31 




31 




31 




63 


3 


61 




31 




31 




16 




31 




16 




14 




31 


3 


63 


4 


47 


4 


75 



3-inch gate valves 

4-inch gate valves 

6-inch gate valves 

8-inch gate valves 

10-inch gate valves 

12-inch gate valves 

16-inch gate valves 

Boston post hydrants 

Bachelder post hydrants 

Post hydrants 

Lowry hydrants 

Boston Lowry hydrants 

f-inch sidewalk cocks 

f-inch corporation cocks 

|-inch corporation cocks 

1-inch corporation cocks 

1 5-inch corporation cocks. . . . 

f-inch angle cocks 

f-inch coupUng nuts 

f-inch coupling nuts 

1-inch coupling nuts 

1 5-inch coupling nuts 

2-inch coupling nuts 

f-inch coupling tubes 

f-inch coupling tubes 

1-inch coupling tubes ....... 

1 5-inch coupling tubes. . . . . . 

2-inch coupling tubes .^ 

5-ineh coupling tubes 

Lowry hydrant bolts 

Boston Lowry hydrant bolts . 

Hydrant wastes 

Corporation padlocks 

Smith gate 



3 

10 

17 

6 

2 

2 

3 

7 

15 

30 

46 

24 

57 

108 

13 

9 

17 

5 

1,300 

38 

29 

18 

41 

722 

38 

40 

13 

11 

6 

7 

14 

121 

14 

1 



Total . 



$625 42 



* 90 per cent is included. 



Water Department. 



77 



MISCELLANEOUS WORK. 



Number. 



Cost. 



Drilling, — gates, curves, reducers, offsets, caps, branches, 
hydrant pots, 16-inch pipe, gate covers, oil cans, flanges 
for meter department 



Installed heating apparatus in East Boston yard 

Installed heating apparatus in stable, 710 Albany street. 

Reamers made 

New tools made 

Wagons repaired 

Tools repaired 

Air cock covers planed 

Dipper handles made 

Put covers on siphon pipes 

Boiler in engine room repaired 

Gates consigned to junk 

Stretching bolts (1 inch) 

Labor on defective castings 

Hydrant barrels consigned to junk 

Made gate sign brackets (pairs) 

Made stretching bolts (f inch) 

Made stretching bolts (f inch) 

Made pump handles .' . . . . 

Yard gate repaired 

Two diaphragm pumps repaired 

Meter valve repaired 

Made bolt for East Boston yard 

Axle pins made 



737 



6 
13 

9 
110 

2 
300 

2 



13 



12 

16 

6 

6 

16 



77 

276 74 

75 70 

73 33 

69 65 

69 46 

51 83 

22 80 

18 65 

18 35 

17 57 

12 85 

11 16 

10 77 

10 77 

7 15 

5 19 

5 18 

4 75 

4 67 

3 63 

3 00 

2 06 

1 30 



Total 



$1,159 33 



CARPENTER SHOP. 

STOCK MANUFACTURED. 



310 small wooden gate valve boxes at $3.73 . 
30 large wooden gate valve boxes at $4.68 . 
91 wooden post hydrant boxes at $4.90 
36 wooden Lowry hydrant boxes at $4.42 . 
44 wooden Boston Lowry hydrant boxes at 
6 wooden Boston hydrant boxes at $4.14 
6 wooden Deacon meter boxes at $4.68 
755 wooden meter boxes at $4.25 . 
5 wooden blow-off boxes at $5.40 . 









$1,156 30 








140 40 








445 90 








159 12 


1 






268 84 








24 84 








28 08 








3,208 75 








27 00 



Carried forward 



),459 23 



78 



City Document No. 40. 



Brought forward 

117 wooden tops for small gate valve boxes at 50 cents 

24 wooden tops for large gate valve boxes at 55 cents . 

50 wooden tops for post hydrant boxes at 61 cents 

57 wooden tops for Lowry hydrant boxes at 61 cents . 

30 wooden tops for meter boxes at 61 cents .... 

2,041 inches in pieces for raising small gate boxes at 9 cents 

225 inches in pieces for raising large gate boxes at 10 cents . 

1,158 inches in pieces for raising hydrant gate boxes at 10 cents 

3,064 inches in pieces for raising meter boxes at 10 cents . 

60 new t ools 

12 reservoir covers 

1,768 wooden paving blocks 

10,704 wedges for concrete boxes and main pipe work 

5,845 shelves for meter department 

174 chocks ' . 

204 6-foot pickets 

34 wooden horses 

Cut 14 ground boxes and stands for meter department 



Total Cost. 

$5,459 23 
58 50 
13 20 
30 50 
34 77 
18 30 
183 69 

22 50 
115 80 
306 40 
278 77 

49 41 

38 41 

113 78 

161 57 

4 49 

15 66 

23 11 
9 96 

$6,938 05 



MISCELLANEOUS WORK. 

Remodeled East Boston pumping station, to be used as yard 

headquarters 

Remodeling and repairing paint shop 

Tool repairs (2,171), filing saws, setting handles, etc. 

Repairs in stable 

Repairs in yard 

Fitting up and repairs in concrete shed 
Repairs (47) on wagons, (3) on buggies, (5) on automobiles 
Repairs in commissioner's office .... 
Repairs on building, 710 Albany street 

Repairs in machine shop 

Repairs on account of 30-inch leak, January 3, 1910 
Repaired scales . . . . . 
Repairs at Mt. Bellevue, West Roxbury 

Repairs at Dorchester yard 

Repairs in clerk's office 

Fencing off plot with wire. East Boston Reservoir 

Turned out 524 hammer and chisel handles . 

Repairs in superintendent's office 

Repairs at Charlestown yard 

Labor on account of milling stock 

Repairs at Brighton yard 

Repairs at Parker Hill Reservoir 

Repairs on fence around East Boston Reservoir 

Made 61-foot box for thawing pipes 

Repairs on account of Engineering Department 

Repairs in electric shop 

Repairs on superintendent's automobile 
Made oak box for emergency automobile 
Made tank for meter room .... 
Made runs to clean out East Boston Reservoir 
Cutting stock for electrician . 
Made box for storeroom . 
Repairs on launch ''Water Witch" 
Repaired oil shed .... 
Made 6 book rests for office . 

Carried forward 



Total Cost. 


$2,658 


11 


957 


62 


720 


95 


685 


33 


526 


18 


441 


84 


335 


32 


251 


87 


124 


45 


87 


75 


86 


68 


57 


84 


42 


45 


40 


28 


35 


82 


35 


17 


34 


72 


33 


33 


29 


42 


28 


93 


24 


57 


23 


38 


22 


37 


19 


60 


19 


20 


15 


12 


14 


49 


13 


38 


11 


83 


8 


76 


8 


20 


7 


27 


7 


06 


7 


62 


6 


75 



^423 66 



Water Department. 



79 



Brought forward .... 
Repairs on tool house .... 
Made sign for East Boston headquarters 
Made 400 feet half-round molding . 
Made 3 gate location signs 
Made 2 settees for Doherty's tool house 
Repairs at Fisher Hill Reservoir . 
Cut stock for box cover at Long Island 
Put new belt on circular saw . 
Repairs on desk, East Boston district . 











Total Cost. 


$7,423 66 










5 94 










5 85 










4 27 










3 93 










3 86 










3 28 










3 03 










2 71 










1 36 




$7,457 89 



CONCRETE BOX SHOP. 

STOCK MANUFACTURED. 





Labor. 


Stock. 


Cost 
Each. 


Total 
Cost. 


338 post hydrant concrete boxes, IJ inches thick. . 

312 small gate valve concrete boxes, If inches 
thick 


$4 66 

4 66 
4 66 

4 66 

4 80 


$1 42 

1 29 
1 38 

1 87 

1 61 


$6 08 

5 95 

6 04 

6 53 

6 41 


$2,055 04 
1,856 40 


224 meter concrete boxes, IJ inches thick 

37 hydrant blow-off concrete boxes, If inches 


1,352 96 
241 61 


13 Lowry hydrant concrete boxes. If inches 
thick 


83 33 






924 


$5,589 34 



BLACKSMITH SHOP. 
STOCK MANUFACTURED AND MISCELLANEOUS WORK. 



Sharpened 9,587 picks, 1,269 bars, 3,956 chisels, 49 wedges 

Made 547 new tools . 

Repaired 1,605 tools 

Made 3,397 dowels . ... 

Repaired 44 wagons . 

Made 986 post hydrant bolts 

Installed motor, gearing, etc., for concrete mixer 

Repairs on emergency automobile 

Made 12 pairs straps .... 

Repaired shop machinery 

Repairs in yard, 710 Albany street 

Made 228 Lowry hydrant bolts 

Repairs in stable 

Repairs in East Boston yard . 

Repaired roaster 

Put rings and chains on 241 hydrant caps 
Made 2 seals for gate covers . 
Made 12 brackets for gate chambers 
Made 80 expansion bolts .... 
Made 14 |-inch eyebolts 
Made 40 Boston Lowry bolts 

Carried forward .... 



Total Cost. 


$1,098 87 


567 


04 


393 


55 


,309 


65 


136 


47 


98 


60 


72 


18 


59 


57 


46 


17 


42 


55 


35 


92 


34 


02 


33 


23 


26 


06 


25 


25 


22 


92 


14 02 


12 


78 


9 


02 


7 


29 


6 


47 



5,051 63 



80 



City Document No. 40. 



Brought forward .... 
Made 256 post hydrant keys . 

Made 4 plates 

Made 8 pairs 4-inch pipe bands 

Repaired 2 buggies 

Made 200 S hooks 

Made 230 hammer wedges 

Made special pair 12-inch puddling head straps 

Made 2 26-inch eyebolts 

Made 10 clamps for main pipe repairs . 

Made 61 wedges 

Made 7 rings for whiffletrees . 

Made 1 set straps for East Boston yard 

Repairs in Charlestown yard . 

Repaired tool box for West R^oxbury yard 

Made 54 staples . ■ . 

Repaired 1 harness 

Repairs in engine room .... 
Made 2 bolts for machine shop 
Repaired office chair .... 



Total Cost. 

$3,051 63 
5 
5 

4 
4 
4 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 



71 
15 
65 
11 
10 
04 
78 
42 
20 
11 
10 
09 
78 
18 
13 
81 
78 
75 
67 



?,099 19 



PLUMBING SHOP. 

ELECTRICAL WORK. 

Electric lights installed in stable . .... 

Electric lights installed in concrete shed 

Electric lights installed in wagon shed .... 

Electric lights installed in yard shed ('' senate ") 

Electric lights installed in driveway .... 

Electric lights installed in first, second and third floor, 710 

Albany street 

Electric fights installed in clerk's ofiice 

Electric lights installed in meter office 

Electric lights installed in superintendent's toilet 

Electric lights installed in plumbing shop . 

Electric lights installed in hallway, 710 Albany street 

Electric lights installed in storeroom .... 

Electric lights installed in meter room 

Electric lights installed in Brighton yard . 

Electric lights installed in Fisher Hill Reservoir 

Electric lights installed in emergency automobile 

Electric lights installed in superintendent's automobile 

Electric fights installed in new headquarters, East Boston 

Applying electrical power to concrete mixer 

Installed horse clipper in stable 

Moved indicator. East Boston yard, from old to new head 

quarters 

Wired commissioner's automobile for fights 
Alterations in wiring commissioner's office 

Nineteen batteries renewed 

Installed private telephone in commissioner's office . 
Installed telephone between main office and garage . 
New cable on standpipe, Orient Heights . 
Installed private telephone in superintendent's office 
Installed microphane set in machine shop . 
Installed storage battery in garage .... 

Repaired 4 indicators 

Repairs, East Boston Reservoir 

Carried forward 



Total Cost. 


$131 


29 


48 


04 


50 


70 


28 


59 


15 


36 


94 


95 


110 


17 


* 72 


38 


20 


30 


79 


24 


23 


87 


157 


53 


56 


82 


94 


01 


91 


55 


42 


61 


54 


55 


227 


82 


136 


16 


113 


50 


109 


86 


50 


26 


40 


90 


40 


48 


37 


44 


35 


10 


34 04 


33 


80 


32 


95 


22 


93 


16 


73 


14 


56 



.118 49 



Water Department. 



81 



Brought forward 
Adjusted 4 transmitters 
Rewired commissioner's automobile 
Installed electric bells in stable 
Renewed batteries .... 
Repairs, Parker Hill Reservoir 
Installed extension lights in garage 
Installed press button in plumbing shop 
Repairs on superintendent's automobile 
Inspected 2 indicators . . . 
Installed extension hghts in paint shop 
Installed binding posts, Post Office Building 
Installed indicator, East Boston yard 
Installed extension lights in Dorchester yard 
Installed extension lights in stable 
Repaired switch in concrete shed 
Labor, delivering horn signal to East Boston yard 
Placed new receiver and rubber cushion on office telephone 



MISCELLANEOUS WORK. 

Plumbing work in new headquarters, East Boston 

Repairs in stable 

Repairs in main building, Albany street yard 

Repairs in paint shop 

Repairs on automobiles . 

Repairs in concrete shed 

Repaired 30 tools .... 

Made 600 nipples for concrete boxes 

Made 17 tools ... 

Repairs in brass finishing room 

Repairs in machine shop . 

Locating pressure gauge . 

Repairs in meter room 

Repairing washbowl in upper office 

Repairs in office .... 

Repairs in engine room . 

Cut and bent wire for concrete boxes 

Repaired radiator .... 

Soldered 25 2-inch air cocks . 

Made 125 iron nipples for rammers 

Repaired sink in " senate " 

Repairs in Dorchester yard . 

Pumping sediment out of pipe in office 

Repairs in blacksmith shop . 

Repairs in carpenter shop 

Repairs in electric shop . . - . 

Repaired pipe for testing 

Soldered Deacon meter wires 

Made oil can for automobile 



Total Cost. 


$2,118 


49 


12 


87 


12 


23 


12 


06 


11 


28 


10 


63 


8 


19 


7 


02 


6 91 


6 


00 


5 


96 


4 


03 


3 


84 


2 


11 


1 


92 


1 


32 


1 


31 


1 


06 


$2,227 23 


Total Cost . 


$278 23 


69 


95 


49 


03 


36 


96 


30 


27 


28 


70 


23 


85 


21 


60 


20 


82 


19 


64 


13 


63 


12 


69 


10 


64 


8 


72 


8 


27 


7 


58 


7 


50 


5 


82 


5 


60 


5 


35 


3 


68 


3 


00 


2 


63 




97 




44 




44 




37 




40 




40 



PATTERN SHOP 



Made 203 patterns . 
Repaired 108 patterns 
Shellacked 76 patterns 
Labor, storing patterns 

Carried forward 



$677 18 

Total Cost. 

$1,029 77 

597 24 

28 13 

18 71 

$1,673 85 



82 



City Document No. 40. 



Brought forward . . 
Made case of drawers for shop 
Repairs in shop .... 
Labor, account cleaning two lathes 
Repaired 6 tools .... 
Labor, account putting in lumber 
Labor, account taking stock 
Labor, account carrying patterns to foundry- 
Labor, account filing saws .... 



PAINT SHOP. 

MISCELLANEOUS WORK. 

Painted stable and emergency room 710 Albany street 
Painted new headquarters, East Boston yard . 
Painted fence and buildings, Charlestown yard 

Painted 12 wagons and buggies 

Painted, varnished, etc., in superintendent's office, 710 

Albany street 

Painted in main building (hallways, etc.), 710 Albany 

street 

Setting glass in main building, 710 Albany street 

Painted commissioner's office 

Pa,inting in yard, main gate, etc., 710 Albany street 
Painted gates, sleeves and branches (stock) 
Painted pattern room, 710 Albany street . 
Painted motor boat (Engineering Department) 

Painted 19 tools (derricks, etc.) 

Painted 9 gate signs . 

Painted annex to concrete shed, 710 Albany street . 

Painted 2 tool houses 

Set glass in tower, Mt. Belle vue. West Roxbury 
Painted superintendent's automobile .... 
Painting in Dorchester yard (painted sign) 
Setting large light of glass at 18 Howard street 
Cleaned and shellacked chairs and desks in storeroom 
Painted standpipe door. Orient Heights, East Boston 
Lettered large light of glass at 18 Howard street 
Set glass in tool house 



Total Cost. 

$1,673 85 

16 21 

12 38 

10 13 

9 00 

7 53 

6 23 



50 
16 



;i,743 99 



otal Cost. 


S605 


33 


553 


38 


401 


65 


303 


56 


184 89 


164 61 


88 


96 


87 


32 


49 


67 


47 


54 


38 


22 


34 


30 


33 


27 


30 


78 


25 


79 


20 


16 


14 


39 


13 


97 


13 


14 


6 


00 


5 


45 


4 


31 


1 


46 


1 


43 



1,729 58 



MISCELLANEOUS WORK. 

1,026 inspections of patch paving 

Portion of yard at 710 Albany street paved .... 
Masonry work of all kinds, account of fitting up new headquar- 
ters at East Boston _ . 

Laboring work, removing old pumps and foundations and 
doing a variety of things in connection with fitting up new 

headquarters at East Boston 

343 inspections of corporation work underground 

2 pressure gauges established in West Roxbury 

5 sets of test holes dug for Engineering Department 

Cleaned sidewalks of snow and ice at East Boston Reservoir, 

New brickwork in engine room, Albany street .... 

105 inspections of department street openings .... 

Watching pipes account of sewer construction .... 

Carried forward 



Total Cost. 

$844 21 

747 51 

665 6.4 



334 


24 


250 


99 


174 


29 


143 


82 


95 


08 


91 


54 


84 58 


84 00 



J,515 90 



Water Department. 



83 



Total Cost. 

Brought forward . . . $3,515 90 

Installed heating apparatus in paint shop (work by Engineer 

Abbott) 78 21 

Labor, delivering water from hydrants 62 15 

Built new fence at new East Boston headquarters ... 57 38 
Extended steam pipe underground to paint shop (work by 

yard men) 30 58 

Labor, investigating pipes crossing bridges .... 30 25 

Cleaned out East Boston Reservoir 26 93 

Cleaned snow from sidewalks. East Boston yard . . . 24 19 

Cleaned snow from sidewalks, Charlestown yard ... 24 63 

Accommodation work 21 59 

Labor, account taking stock 19 25 

Put composition footboard on step of emergency car No. 72, 17 86 
Extended heating apparatus in storeroom (work by Engineer 

Abbott) 7 31 

Equipment for engineer's launch, "Water Witch" ... 6 60 

Labor, testing tools for Engineering Department ... 2 95 

Abandoned pressure gauge 1 83 

Stable repairs . 84 

$3,928 45 

Property and Plant. 

Albany Street Yard. — Another slice was taken off 
our yard during the past year when the City Hospital 
built a large chimney thereon and enlarged their boiler 
and engine room. This restricts us more than ever 
and tends to prevent free movement and accommoda- 
tion for stock. We are often compelled to allow a good 
bargain on lumber to pass by for want of storage space. 

The work of renovating the paint shop started last 
year and was continued and finished in the spring. This 
once old building is now practically made over and is 
well fitted for its purpose. Electric lights were installed, 
and steam heat substituted for stoves which were a 
constant source of danger in a building containing 
paints and oils. A slate roof replaced the old shingled 
one, thus giving further protection from fire, as in dry 
weather, when the wind was in a certain direction, 
sparks from the old wheelwright furnace, now used to 
melt out old joints and burn up the yard rubbish, would 
fall upon the shingles and ignite. A platform was built 
around the paint shop and castings rearranged upon it. 
Bins were built to hold small castings like caps, tubes, 
sidewalk tops, etc. They were covered and suitably 
marked and are a great improvement on the old broken- 
down stalls that allowed the rain and snow to beat 
upon the castings. Other platforms were built upon 
which to pile castings. The work of enlarging the 
concrete box shop was continued and finished. More 



84 City Document No. 40. 

drying racks were built and an electric motor with 
gearing installed to turn the mixer. Wide platforms 
of stout build were placed outside the new concrete 
ageing and storage shed to further extend its capacity. 
The old '^ senate" (ir tool room and lead shed was rebuilt 
and much improved. Electric lights were installed 
throughout the yard in all the buildings, and are a 
great convenience and improvement over the ancient 
lantern. The main gate to the yard was taken down 
and rebuilt and a new sign placed over it. The old 
gate was in a dangerous condition and liable to col- 
lapse. A granite block pavement was laid in the 
driveway, between the main gateway and the stable 
entrance, and from that point easterly to a point 
in front of the concrete box shop, in all about 400 
square yards. This was a much needed improvement, 
as in winter and in rainy weather the driveway was a 
mass of mud. I think that each year a little paving 
should be done until eventually all the driveways of 
the yard will be paved. It will save the horses, the 
wagons, the expense of patching, and the dust that is 
blown about on windy days. The large yard scales 
was rebuilt and other minor improvements made. In 
the main building electric lights were installed in all 
except a small portion of the building. The hallways 
were whitewashed and painted. The superintendent's 
office was renovated and painted, new lower window 
sashes put in and telephones to various parts of the 
building installed. Many windows in the main build- 
ing, of which there are about 225, were reglazed. Much 
more of this work will be required, as they are in bad 
condition. Two automobiles were purchased and fitted 
up for use as emergency cars. The old emergency 
wagon was assigned to other use and the quarters of the 
old wagon were entirely rebuilt and fitted as a garage 
for the emergency cars. Steam heat was introduced, 
electric lights and a new artificial stone floor with drain 
in center and running water with sink and hose attach- 
ments put in. These cars are simply what has been 
needed for some time past and will enable the depart- 
ment to cope with the demands of the times. An 
automobile was purchased for the superintendent to 
enable him personally to keep in touch with all parts 
of the department. Four old and disabled horses were 
humanely killed, three were sold for cash, one sold in 
trade and seven purchased. In March a colt was born 




3 
O 

UJ 



Water Department. 85 

of a mare purchased in the latter part of last year. 
As it shows signs of becoming a good horse the depart- 
ment will keep it and try to raise it. Thus far it is 
thriving. The horses generally are in good condition, 
as shown by the fact that at the last work horse parade 
all our horses that were entered — about a dozen — • took 
prizes for condition and good qualities. The depart- 
ment now owns 58 horses, 4 automobiles, 36 wagons, 
single and double, 18 carriages of all kinds, 23 sleighs 
and pungs, 3 road rollers and 13 portable tool houses. 
During the year such of these wagons and carriages 
that required it were overhauled, repaired and painted. 
Two old wagons beyond repair were sold in trade for 
new ones, and three old carriages, also too far gone, 
were sold by auction. The result of the thorough work 
in this line begun in the previous year is being felt in the 
better condition generally of the rolling stock and the 
lesser number of repairs required. Old harnesses that 
were too far gone to repair were sold or exchanged in 
part for new ones. A harness repairer's kit was pur- 
chased and considerable small repair work was done 
by ourselves with economy to the department. Oiled 
duck covers were purchased and are worn by the horses 
on rainy days, saving the harnesses and the horses from 
the effects of the weather. A clipping machine run by 
electric power was installed in the stable, and will tend 
to make the work easier and quicker. The outside 
stable walls were pointed and the roof repaired. Stalls 
were repaired and the interior of the stable painted and 
whitewashed. In general, the yard and buildings are 
now in better condition than at any time for years, and 
it is our aim and hope to keep them so. 

The following old material was sold during the year: 

696,627 pounds cast-iron junk. 
18,948 pounds brass junk. 
8,875 pounds composition turnings. 
1,052 pounds lead dross. 
496 pounds old hard rubber. 
235 pounds old rubber boots. 
210 pounds old automobile tire cases. 

13 pounds old automobile inner tubes. 
738 pounds old fire hose. 
454 pounds old rope. 

2 lots wrought-iron junk. 

1 old 16-inch wrought-iron pipe. 
1 old 20-inch wrought-iron pipe. 

3 old horses. 

1 Democrat body and seat. 
1 old Concord buggy. 

4 old carriage tops. 



86 City Document No. 40. 

1 pair heavy wagon shafts (new). 
1 pair hght wagon shafts (old). 

1 pair carriage shafts. 
4 carriage wheels. 

2 axles and boxes. 
2 new tailboards. 

1 old lead furnace. 

1 old Concord buggy. 

1 old tripod. 

1 old fall for same. 

1 old lead furnace, pot and ladle. 

1 old 8-inch jointer. 

1 old wagon. 

Dorchester Yard. — As this yard was placed in first- 
class condition during the previous year there was not 
much to be done during the year just past. A new sign 
was erected over the gate in Gibson street, and the 
foreman has planted flowers and shrubbery in a space in 
the center of the yard, thus improving the looks of 
things generally. 

Charlestown Yard. — The several buildings in this 
yard were painted outside and inside, the windows 
reglazed, a large wooden platform for unloading and 
loading stock built, and a general finishing up of the 
extensive repairs started in the previous year. A new 
sign was hung upon the building, and the property may 
be said to be in first-class condition. 

West Roxbury Yard. — Practically nothing of impor- 
tance was done here. The yard and building are not 
owned by the city. Larger and more central quarters 
should be secured, as this district is rapidly growing in 
extent and importance. We are so limited for space 
that we are now stabling one of our horses in an adjoining 
building owned by the man of whom we rent the yard. 
All our wagons, tools and stock are exposed without 
shelter in the yard and something should be done at 
once towards improving conditions. 

Brighton Yard. — There is no ''yard" in its stricter 
sense in this district, nothing but a stable, a wagon shed 
and a small office. As this district will be a very 
important one before long something should be done at 
once towards securing proper quarters. Electric lights 
were installed during the year and this makes the build- 
ing a little more habitable. Previously the dim light 
of a lantern was the only illumination. It is hoped that 
a move into a better place will occur before a great 
while. 

East Boston Yard. — For some time past the old brick 
pumping station in Condor street, opposite Brooks 
street, was unoccupied, as the introduction of the high 



Water Department. 87 

service into Breed's Island by the Metropolitan Water 
Board rendered pumping unnecessary. The building 
was well made and had a commodious yard in its rear, 
while the regular district headquarters, located upon 
the Brooks street side of the reservoir in a small space 
between the foot of the reservoir bank. and the street 
fence, was wholly inadequate and furthermore could 
not be approached from any side without climbing a 
hill. It was therefore considered as a good move to 
abandon the quarters at the reservoir and move into 
the old pumping station. This was done September 16, 
1909. Considerable work was necessary, however, be- 
fore the station was fit to be occupied. The former 
coal pocket, underground on the street side, but at grade 
with the yard in the rear, was sheathed and made into a 
first-class stable with four stalls and up to date sanitary 
features; the pumps and pump foundations were removed 
from the main room, toilets and modern plumbing put 
in; a floor built half way up in the ell and a shop and 
storeroom thus provided; windows built into the brick 
walls to light this room and others glazed and fitted with 
new sashes; a chain hoist set up; the tall chimney that 
formerly served the boilers taken down and removed; 
the two old boilers sold and removed; a steam heating 
plant installed; a new iron smokestack erected; a cess- 
pool built in the rear to serve as drainage for the stable 
and washstand, they being below the grade of the street 
sewer; a large shed built in the yard to serve as a shelter 
for wagons and stock; the office provided with furniture; 
electric lights installed throughout; the large mercury 
and recording gauge moved from the old building to the 
new; the whole place painted, varnished and shellacked; 
the roof repaired; the brick work pointed and painted; 
conductors attached; a new high fence built around the 
yard, and a general fitting up, so that at the present 
time we have a model district headquarters that will 
serve for many years. The work was all done by the 
department employees, except the smokestack and roof- 
ing and some pointing. More than all, by filling in 
from time to time, we shall finally have a wharf property 
abutting on Chelsea creek. This will be a valuable 
asset to the department. The old buildings on the 
reservoir site were sold and removed. The department 
will fill in the foundations, build a fence in the gap left 
where the buildings were, spread loam, grade and seed 
the soil as soon as the weather permits. The total cost 
of the transfer to, and fitting up of, the new headquarters. 



88 



City Document No. 40. 



with the exception of a little more work to be done on 
the shed in the yard, is as follows: 



Carpenter work 










$2,663 96 


Mason's work . 




^ 






665 64 


Painting work . 










553 38 


Electrical work . 










341 52 


Plumbing work . 










278 23 


Steamfitting work 










276 74 


New heater and fitting 










116 80 


Blacksmith's work . 










30 21 


Laborers' work in building fence 






57 38 


Miscellaneous .... 






334 24 




$5^318 10 



East Boston Reservoir. — In the early part of the year 
the reservoir was emptied and the bottom and sides 
cleaned. Considerable mud and foreign matter were 
found and removed. However closely it is watched, 
mischievous people will throw things into the water. 
The water may never be used; yet that cannot be 
decided upon with certainty until a new and inde- 
pendent supply enters the island. 

Fisher Hill Reservoir. — Although small for present 
demands made upon it, it is in generally good condition. 
Electric lights were installed in the gatehouse during 
the year. 

Brookline Reservoir. — This reservoir is of no further 
use to the department and should be disposed of. 

Parker Hill Reservoir. — This reservoir and grounds 
should be transferred to the Park Department and thus 
relieve the Water Department of its care and mainte- 
nance. It is of no value as a reservoir. 

Mt. Bellevue Standpipe, West Roxhury. — Some re- 
pairs will be necessary here soon. The tank leaks 
slightly in the seams at one or two places — not seriously, 
however. A little painting will have to be done. If 
possible the tank should be drained off and an internal 
examination made. It would be well to know whether 
or not deterioration of the iron is progressing too fast. 
The grounds around the standpipe are cared for by the 
Park Department. 

West Roxhury Pumping Station. — Although this sta- 
tion is owned by the Boston Water Department it is 
occupied and maintained by the Metropolitan Water 
Board. 

Orient Heights Standpipe, East Boston. — This tank is 
in practically the same condition as the one at Mt. 
Bellevue, with probably a few more slight leaks in the 
seams. It should be examined and repaired the com- 
ing spring. The windows in the building surrounding 
the tank have been completely demolished by mis- 



Water Department. 



89 



chievous boys and should be replaced by wooden shutters. 
Much trouble is experienced by the failure of the float and 
indicating apparatus to work at all times. During such 
times the water in the tank has to be watched, else it 
will overflow without being known until damage had 
been done. Occasionally it does overflow, but upon each 
occasion it has been discovered in time. The wires con- 
necting the apparatus in the tank with that in the 
office at East Boston headquarters very often break or 
become detached and ground. They are subject to the 
same troubles as all overhead wires and have to be 
examined and repaired frequently. 

Recording Pressure Gauges. — Gauges were established 
during the year in the quarters of Engine Company No. 
45 at Washington street, at Poplar street. West Roxbury, 
and in those of Engine Company No. 30, Centre street, 
at Bellevue street. West Roxbury. The total cost of 
the work was $174.29. 

The following recording pressure gauges are the 
property of the department. They were installed and 
are maintained by this division, and the readings 
recorded by the Engineering Department. They are all 
in good working order: 



Location. 



Service. 



Grade of 

Gauge 

Above 

City 

Base. 



Normal Pressure in 
Pounds Per Square Inch. 



9 a. m. 


1 p. m. 


17 


17 


36 


36 


41 


41 


44 


44 


48 




41 


41 


30 


30 


42 


42 


40 


41 


48 


48 


54 


54 


34 


35 


56 




58 




90 




70 


' 


57 




68 




30 




68 




28 




70 




53 




60 





5 p. m. 



Chestnut Hill Pumping Station. . . . 

Boston Common 

Salem street, Engine 8 

East street, Engine 7 

Milk street, Post Office Building. . . 

Congress street, Engine 38 

Fourth street, at O street. Engine 2 

710 Albany street 

Gibson street, Water Department . 

Western avenue, Engine 34 

Bunker Hill street, Engine 32 

Marion street. Engine 5 

City Hall 

Quincy street. Engine 24 

Walnut street. Engine 20 

Norfolk street, Engine 19 

Chestnut Hill avenue. Engine 29 . . 

Centre street. Engine 28 

Centre street. Engine 30 

Washington street. Engine 45 

Deer Island 

Moon Island 

Long Island 

Fort Warren 



Low 
Low 
Low 
Low 
Low 
Low 
Low 
Low 
Low 
Low 
Spot Pond 
Spot Pond 
High 
High 
High 
High 
High 
High 
High 
High 
Spot Pond 
High 
High 
High 



127.5 
48.4 
27.2 
22.7 
20.9 
21.1 
51.8 
24.0 
29.3 
27.5 
36.0 
64.3 

105.1 
98.3 
20.8 
79.1 

111.5 
82.9 

172.0 
84.4 
35.5 
33.0 
65.8 
25.0 



6 
40 

45 
48 
48 
46 
33 
50 
46 
49 
56 
39 
62 
64 
97 
72 
60 
72 
33 
71 
28 
78 
63 
78 



14 
37 
42 
45 

42 
31 
43 
41 
48 
54 
35 



Following are appended tables and statements of 
department statistics. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George H. Finneran, 

Superintendent. 



90 



City Document No. 40. 









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Pages 91 and 92 have been eliminated. 



Water Department. 



93 



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94 



City Document No. 40. 



TABLE III. 

Hydrants Established and Abandoned during the Year. 



City Proper (public) . . , 

Roxbury (publicj 

West Roxbury (public) 

Brighton (public) 

Brighton (private) .... 
Dorchester (public) . , . 
Dorchester (private) . . . 
South Boston (public) . 
East Boston (public) . . 
Charlestown (public) . . 

Quincy 

Brookline 



Established. 



i- 

o 


03 
O 


■is 




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o 




1— 1 


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a 


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d 


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^ 


m 


pq 



1 

3 

8 
4 

'14' 



38 
35 
31 
11 



38 
1 

31 
9 

13 



47 
42 
41 
15 

1 
55 

1 
31 
11 
14 



Abandoned. 



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5 
3 



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6 

10 

3 



14 



4 
11 

4 



12 



37 

25 

20 

3 



26 
1 

19 
8 

13 
1 
1 



Total number of public. 
Total number of private , 



11 



32 



206 
1 



256 
2 



41 



37 
1 



38 
1 



20 
1 



15 



151 
3 



TABLE IV. 

Total Number of Hydrants in System, January 31, 1910. 





>> 

% 


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03 

o 


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ffl 



City Proper (public) 

" (private) 

Roxbury (public) 

" (private) 

West Roxbury (public) 

" (private) 

Brighton (public) 

" (private) 

Dorchester (public) 

" (private) 

South Boston (public) 

" (private) 

East Boston (public) 

" (private) 

Charlestown (public) 

" (private) 

Deer Island (private) 

Long Island (private) 

Thompson's Island (private) . 

Gallop's Island (private) 

Rainsford Island (private) . . . 

Quincy 

Brookline 



599 
4 

465 

2 

99 



74 
'385' 



177 
3 

107 
8 

161 
14 



49 



1 

224 



93 



232 

1 

33 



33 



45 
1 



247 

9 

421 



648 

16 

391 

8 

949 

3 

135 

15 

170 

7 

31 

37 

21 

6 

2 

1 

3 

10 



496 
5 

334 
3 

206 



46 

'386' 

8 

239 



119 

ios' 



94 
39 
37 
10 
25 

1 
18 

2 
27 

4 
28 
28 

6 
25 

2 

6 



1,485 

57 

1,345 

16 

1,202 

17 

622 

10 

1,979 

16 

612 

46 

435 

40 

344 

58 

21 

6 

2 

2 

4 

11 

1 



Total number of public hydrants 

Total number of private and suburban 
hydrants 



2,067 
31 



797 
5 



2,992 
138 



1,931 
16 



237 

117 



8,024 
307 



Water Department. 



95 



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96 



City Document No. 40. 



TABLE VI. 

Total Number and Aggregate Length of Service Pipes of Various Sizes Connected v ith System, 

January 31, 1910. 



Sizes. 


Total Number. 


Aggregate Length. 


16-inch 


2 
14 

4 
26 

147 
1,165 

748 
1,849 
1,304 • 

339 

2,411 

2,582 

78,478 

6,980 


95 


12-inch 


3,542 


10-inch 


1,366 


8-inch 


2,751 


6-inch 


21,654 


4-inch 


46,490 


3-inch 


22,303 


2-inch 


59,539 


li-inch 


39,827 


IJ-inch 


10,944 


1-inch 


132,151 


f-inch 


94,633 


f-inch 


2,216,814 




159,954 






Totals 


96,049 


2,812,063 







Style. 

B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
B. 
E. 
H. 



A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
A. 
B. 
D. 
E. 
F. 
F. 
F. 
F. 
F. 



TABLE VH. 
Fountains. 

Established during the Year. 

Junction of Columbus avenue and Tremont street, Roxbury. 
Junction of Hancock and Pleasant streets, Dorchester. 
Junction of Washington and River streets, Dorchester. 
Junction of Blue Hill avenue and Washington street, Roxbury. 
Forest Hills square, West Roxburv. 
Haymarket square, city proper. 

Junction of Old Colony and Dorchester avenues, South Boston. 
Bowdoin square, at Revere House, city proper. 
Bainbridge street, corner of Dale street, Roxbury. 

Abandoned during the Year. 

Haymarket square, city proper. 

Columbus avenue, at Washington street, Roxbury. 

Columbus avenue, at Whittier street, Roxbury. 

Columbus avenue, at Roxbury street, Roxbury. 

Columbus avenue, at Centre street, Roxbury. 

Junction of Blue Hill avenue and Washington street, Roxbury. 

Western avenue, at North Harvard street, Brighton. 

Washington street, at South street, West Roxbury. 

Forest Hills square, West Roxbury. 

Blue Hill avenue, near Glenway street, Dorchester. 

Hudson street, at Quincy Schoolhouse, city proper. 

Upham's Corner, Dorchester. 

Freeport street, at Beach street, Dorchester. 

Washington street, at River street, Dorchester. 

Pierce square, Dorchester. 

Adams street, at Minot street, Dorchester. 



Water Department. 



97 



Number of Fountains in Service January 31, 1910. 



Districts. 


Style 
A. 


Style 
B. 


Style 
C. 


Style 
D. 


Style 
E. 


Style 
F. 


Style 
G. 


Style 
H. 


Totals. 


City Proper 


8 
3 
4 
4 


6 
4 
1 

5 
2 
4 
3 


7 
1 

1 

2 
4 
3 


1 


12 
5 
2 








33 






1 


14 


West Roxbury 






8 








5 








1 


1 




9 




1 




4 
4 
4 


11 


East Boston 








11 




1 








8 
















Totals 


21 


25 


18 


1 


31 


1 


1 


1 


99 







Style. 



Note. 



A. 

B. 
C. 

D. 

E. 



G. 
H. 



Indicates fountain for man and beast, with automatic fixtures for man and beast in 
warm weather and a continuous flow of water for beasts in cold weather. 

Indicates fountain for beasts only. Continuous flow of water during the year. 

Indicates fountain for man only. Automatic fixtures. In service during warm 
weather only. 

Indicates fountain for man and beast. Automatic fixtures for both. In service 
during warm weather only. 

Indicates cold water fountain for man only. Automatic fixtures. In service during 
warm weather only. 

Indicates fountain for man and beast, with automatic fixtures for man in warm weather 
and a continuous flow of water for beasts all the year. 

Indicates fountain for man and beast. Hygienic "bubble" fixtures for man. Con- 
tinuous flow of water for man and beast all the year. 

Indicates fountain for man only. "Bubble" fixtures controlled by self-closing cocks. 
In service during warm weather only. 



98 City Document No. 40. 



REPORT OF ENGINEER. 



Boston, February 1, 1910. 

Mr. William E. Hannan, 

Water Commissioner: 

Dear Sir, — The work of the Engineering Depart- 
ment in 1909 was of the usual varied character. 

The past year saw the completion of the improved low 
service supply for South Boston, work on which began 
in 1904 when the tunnel was built under Fort Point 
channel at the draw on Congress street. In this con- 
nection the following work was done during the past 
year: The 30-inch main in C street. South Boston, 
was extended in C street, C street extension. Northern 
avenue and Sleeper street to a junction with the 24- 
inch main in Congress street, a total distance of about 
5,750 feet; the 30-inch main in Congress street, city 
proper, was extended from Atlantic avenue to Fort Point 
channel; 24-inch pipe was laid on the trestles built 
in 1907 over Fort Point channel from the ends of the 
tunnel to the Boston and South Boston shores, and 
connection was made with the 30-inch pipe previously 
laid in the tunnel, thus completing the line between 
the city proper and South Boston. At the same time a 
16-inch high service pipe was laid on the trestles and 
connected with the 20-inch high service pipe in the tun- 
nel in anticipation of future extension of this service. 
This new low service line both greatly strengthens the 
supply to South Boston and affords a new '^feed" for 
the city proper. 

The Deacon meters were operated to detect waste 
from April 8 until November 24 in the residential dis- 
tricts of the city proper, in Charlestown, South Boston, 
Roxbury and Jamaica Plain; the saving of water 
effected was approximately two and one-half million 
gallons per day, or about four gallons per capita for 
the entire population of the city. The cost of the work 
was $3,546. Of the waste found, 1,720,000 gallons 
per day was in service pipes in the streets; 430,000 
gallons per day in broken main pipe; 206,000 gallons 
per day in defective joints in main pipe, and about the 
same amount in hydrants and watering posts. The 
result represents a part only of the waste existing in 



Water Department. 



99 



the territory tested, as no inspection was made inside 
of buildings, while the outside inspection was incomplete, 
the larger leaks only and those most easily found being 
located. Although the saving made was comparatively 
small, yet it is an earnest of what might be accomplished 
in restricting waste if the Deacon meter readings were 
followed up by thorough inspection both outside and 
inside of buildings. The meter simply locates waste 
within certain limits and measures its amount; to 
definitely locate that waste is the duty of the inspector, 
a duty demanding honest and intelligent work. 

On January 3 of this year a break occurred in the 
easterly 30-inch main in Tremont street, opposite 
Seaver place, with a large resulting damage to property 
in the vicinity. The cause of the break was the rigid 
bearing of the pipe at one point upon the concrete 
reinforcement of a pipe sewer built by the Transit 
Commission in 1897, immediately outside of the wall 
of the subway and directly under the water pipe; 
the sewer was rigidly supported upon piers, extending 
down to the bottom of tha side wall of the subway, 
and was evidently designed with a safe clearance 
between its concrete covering and the bottom of 
the pipe. Where the break occurred this design had 
not been followed, the concrete being found hard up 
against the pipe for a distance of about six inches. The 
pipe, laid in 1847, was found to be in excellent condi- 
tion, practically the only deterioration discovered being 
on the inside under the tubercles. The following is 
an analysis of the metal: 



Silicon 


. 1.70 


Sulphur 


, 0.094 


Manganese 


. 0.82 


Phosphorus 


. 0.79 


Combined Carbon 


. 0.60 


Graphitic Carbon 


. 2.98 



This is the eighth break which has occurred in the 
large water pipes in Tremont street, between Boylston 
and Common streets, since the construction of the 
subway under them. The apparent cause in each case 
was identical with that of the recent break, viz., a rigid 
bearing at one point with opportunity for a slight settle- 
ment in the adjacent pipes. 

The following is a memorandum of the breaks that 
have occurred, with a statement of the condition found 
in each case: 



100 City Document No. 40. 

1897, May 12. Easterly, SO-inch main opposite Common 
street. Rigid bearing on subway roof. 

1898, August 11. Westerly, 30-inch main opposite Children's 
Mission. Rigid bearing on manhole over subway. 

1899, September 1. Easterly, 30-inch main opposite Common 
street. Rigid bearing on subway roof. 

1900, August 8. Easterly, 30-inch main at Hotel Touraine. 
Rigid bearing on subway wall. 

1900, September 5. Easterly, 30-inch main at Hollis street. 
Rigid bearing on wooden post supported from subway roof. 

1904, March 23. Westerly, 30-inch main opposite Common 
street. Rigid bearing on subway roof. 

1907, May 13. Sixteen-inch main at Hollis street. Rigid 
bearing on subway roof. 

1910, January 3. Easterly, 30-inch main opposite Seaver 
place. Rigid bearing on concrete over sewer. 

A gauge has been installed in the office of the Engi- 
neering Department in City Hall, which registers 
the pressure in the low service system at a point about 
1,200 feet distant; it has not been possible heretofore 
to obtain such a record, the City Hall being situated 
in the high service area. The operating mechanism of 
the gauge is located in the basement of the Post Office 
and consists of a diaphragm connected with the low 
service main in Milk street by a small pipe, a lever 
and transmitter; the varying pressure on the main 
is electrically registered at City Hall, where it is both 
indicated on a dial and recorded in permanent form 
on a chart. 

I renew the following recommendations, made in 
last year's report, viz., that a standpipe be built on 
the northerly portion of the ''double-high" system in 
West Roxbury, and that additional storage be pro- 
vided at Mt. Bellevue on the same service. That a 
storage reservoir or reservoirs be built on the high 
service system, large enough to hold at least six days' 
supply for the entire high service of the city. That 
a tunnel be built under the Charles river at Warren 
Bridge to insure a safe connection between the large 
mains in Boston and Charlestown and to safeguard 
the high service supply of Charlestown. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William Jackson, 

City Engineer. 



Average Mon 


thly Heights 


, in Feet, Above Boston City Base, to which 


Water Rose 


at Different Stati 


ons or 


the Boston 


Waterworlts 












SouTHBHN High Sehvice. 












Northern High Service. 


1409. 


City Hall. 


Engine House 

No. 24. 

CJuiney and 

Warreo Streets. 

Roxbury. 


EoKine House 

No. 20. 

Walnut Street, 

Neponset. 


Engine House 

No. 19. 

Norfolk Street. 

Mattapan. 


Engine House 

No. 28. 
Centre, near 
Green Street. 
Jamaica Plain. 


Engine House 

No. 30. 
Centre, near 
Bellevue Street. 
West Roxbury. 


Engine House 

WashiDgtoQ and 

Poplar Streets. 

Roslindale. 


Engine House 

No. 29. 
Chestnut Hill 

Brighton. 


Engine House 

No. 32. 

Bunker Hill 

Street. 

Charleatown. 


Engine House 

No. 5. 
Marion Street. 
East Boston. 




a..„. 


9 a. m. 


3 a. m. 


9 a. m. 


3a.„.j9..„.. 


3a.„. 


9a.n,. 


3a.n.. 


9a.„. 


3a.,n. 


Oa.n,. 


3a.n..J9a.„3. 


3..n,. 


9a.n,. 


3 a. m. 


9a.„. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


" 


240 

240 




































150 
160 
153 


139 
139 
142 


FobnjBry 
Marcli 
April 
Miiy 




243 
































23 






























155 


240 
240 




242 


229 




























159 


231 


242 


229 


242 


227 


246 


230 


248 


241 


247 


238 


240 


238 


240 


242 


103 


158 


166 


144 


Juur 


247 


232 


244 


231 


244, 


227 


240 


236 


248 


240 


247 


238 


247 


238 


246 


243 


166 


169 


156 


144 


July 


247 


232 


247 


234 


244 


229 


246 


237 


248 


241 


247 


238 


246 


238 


246 


242 


163 


166 


166 


142 


Austut 


247 


234 


248 


237 


246 


231 


247 


230 


248 


242 


247 


239 


240 


239 


246 


242 


164 


168 


150 


144 


Soptcmbnr. . 


247 


233 


249 


237 


246 


232 


247 


239 


248 


242 


247 


239 


247 


240 


247 


243 


163 


157 


156 


144 


October 


248 


234 


260 


230 


246 


233 


248 


239 


249 


243 


247 


240 


249 


240 


247 


244 


163 


156 


166 


144 


Novombor 


248 


230 


260 


240 


246 


234 


248 


240 


249 


244 


248 


240 


249 


241 


247 


241 


162 


150 


156 


143 


December 


247 


237 


249 


240 


246 


234 


247 


241 


248 


244 


247 


241 


247 


242 


246 


244 


162 


156 


154 


144 



Average Monthly Heights, in Feet, Above Boston City Base, to which Water Rose at Different Stations on the Boston 

Waterworlts. 















' 






Low Service. 


















1909. 


Choatnut Hill 
PumpinK 
Station, 
Brighton. 


Engine House 
^0. 34. 
Wostern 
Avonuo. 
Brighton. 


Boston 
Common. 


Engine House 

No. 8, 
Salem Street, 
City Proper. 


Engine House 

No. 7, 
East Street, 
City Proper. 


Engine House 

No. 38. 
Congress and 
Farnswortli 

Streets. 
South Boston. 


Engine House 

No. 2, 

Fourth and 

Streets, 

South Boston. 


Water Depart- 
ment Yard. 
710 Albany 
Street. 
Roxbury. 


Water Depart- 
ment Yard. 

Gibson Street, 
Dorchester. 




3 a.m. 


a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


.Iftnunry , - , 


141 


105 


1.34 


136 


131 


125 


120 


118 


128 


121 


122 


113 


122 


112 


125 


.119 


122 


113 


FL'bniar.v 


HI 


100 


133 


134 


131 


120 


126 


113 


127 


118 


121 


109 


123 


109 


125 


115 


124 


HI 


Marcli 


141 


105 


132 


134 


133 


127 


129 


121 


132 


124 


127 


118 


130 


119 


130 


124 


130 


120 


April 


141 


160 


131 


132 


134 


127 


131 


121 


133 


125 


128 


119 


132 


120 


130 


125 


130 


120 


May 


141 


166 


132 


132 


137 


129 


132 


124 


136 


128 


131 


120 


133 


121 


132 


128 


132 


122 


Juno. 


140 


105 


132 


133 


137 


129 


133 


124 


130 


127 


131 


120 


133 


120 


133 


127 


131 


122 


July 


141 


160 


135 


130 


137 


130 


133 


120 


136 


128 


131 


121 


133 


121 


133 


129. 


132 


123 


AuBUBt.. 


144 


160 


141 , 139 


142 


133 


138 


127 


140 


131 


134 


123 


136 


124 


137 


132 


136 


126 


Soptombrr. 


141 


160 


139 1 138 


140 


134 


139 


129 


139 


132 


133 


124 


135 


125 


141 


137 


135 


126 


Ootobir ,, 


142 


168 


140 


143 


141 


130 


140 


130 


142 


135 


135 


126 


138 


127 


143 


139 


137 


128 


November, 


145 


167 


144 


141 


145 


136 


141 


131 


146 


135 


138 


125 


141 


128 


147 


138 


140 


128 


Doccmbor. . . 


141 


168 


139 


141 


140 


136 


136 


130 


139 


134 


132 


124 


134 


126 


141 


139 


133 


127 



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102 



City Document No. 40. 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 



Boston Water Department. 

Daily average amount used during 1909 (gallons) 94,029,900 
Daily average amount used through meters during 1909 

(gallons) . ^ 22,768,700 

Number of services February 1, 1910 97,194 

Number of meters in service February 1, 1910 . . . 12,048 

Number of motors under supervision February 1, 1910 . 117 

Number of elevators under supervision February 1, 1910 . 583 
Length of supply and distributing mains in miles, February 

1,1910 761.2 

Numberof public hydrants in use February 1, 1910 . 8,024 

Yearly revenue from annual water rates (assessed) . . $1,411,156.63 

Yearly revenue from metered water (assessed) . . . *S1, 285,477. 63 

Percentage of total revenue from metered water . . . 47.7 

Yearly expense of maintenance $654,493.49 



* No revenue of any amount was received from the new meters set during the year 1909, 
all of the services metered during 1909 being assessed on the annual rate. The number 
of meters from which this revenue was derived was 5,500. 



Water Department. 103 



CIVIL ORGANIZATION OF THE WATERWORKS, FROM 
THEIR COMMENCEMENT TO FEBRUARY 1, 1910. 



Water Commissioners. 

Nathan Hale,* James F. Baldwin,* Thomas B. Curtis.* From 
May 4, 1846, to January 4, 1850. 

* 

Engineers for Construction. 

John B. Jervis, of New York, Consulting Engineer. From May, 
1846, to November, 1848.* 

E. S. Chesbrough, Chief Engineer of the Western Division. From 
May, 1846, to January 4, 1850.* 

William S. Whitwell, Chief Engineer of the Eastern Division. From 
May, 1846, to January 4, 1850.* 

Engineers Having Charge of the Works. 

E. S. Chesbrough, Engineer. From November 18, 1850, to October 1, 
1855.* 

George H. Bailey, Assistant Engineer. From January 27, 1851, to 
July 19, 1852.* 

H. S. McKean, Assistant Engineer. From July 19, 1852, to October 1, 
1855.* 

James Slade, Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to April 1, 1863.* 

N. Henry Crafts, Assistant Engineer. From October 1, 1855, to 
April 1, 1863. 

N. Henry Crafts, City Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to November 
25, 1872. 

Thomas W. Davis, Assistant Engineer. From April 1, 1863, to Decem- 
ber 8, 1866.* 

Henry M. Wightman, Resident Engineer at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 
From February 14, 1866, to November, 1870.* 

A. Fteley, Resident Engineer on construction of Sudbury river works. 
From May 10, 1873, to April 7, 1880.* 

Joseph P. Davis, City Engineer. From November 25, 1872, to March 
20, 1880. 

Henry M. Wightman, City Engineer. From April 5, 1880, to April 3, 
1885.* 

William Jackson, City Engineer. From April 21, 1885, to present 
time. 

Desmond FitzGerald, Resident Engineer on additional supply. 
From February 20, 1889, to January 1, 1896. 

After January 4, 1850, Messrs. E. S. Chesbrough, W. S. Whitwell 
and J. Avery Richards were elected a water board, subject to the direc- 
tion of a joint standing committee of the City Council, by an ordinance 
'passed December 31, 1849, which was hmited to keep in force one year; 
and in 1851 the Cochituate Water Board was established. 

* Deceased. 



104 City Document No. 40. 



CocHiTUATE Water Board. 
Presidents of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, elected in 1851, and resigned April 7, 1856. | 
John H. Wilkins, elected in 1856, and resigned June 5, 1860. | 
Ebenezer Johnson, elected in 1860, term expired April 3, 1865.$ 
Otis Norcross, elected in 1865, and resigned January 15, 1867.$ 
John H. Thorndike, elected in 1867, term expired April 6, 1868. j 
Nathaniel J. Bradlee, elected April 6, 1868, and resigned January 4, 

1871.1 
Charles H. Allen, elected January 4, 1871, to May 4, 1873. J 
John A. Haven, elected May 4, 1873, to December 17, 1874.*J 
Thomas Gogin, elected December 17, 1874, and resigned May 31, 1875. | 
L. Miles Standish, elected August 5, 1875, to July 31, 1876. J 

Members of the Board. 

Thomas Wetmore, 1851, 52, 53, 54 and 55. J 

John H. Wilkins, 1851, 52, 53, *56, 57, 58 and 59. | 

Henry B. Rogers, 1851, 52, 53, *54 and 55. J 

Jonathan Preston, 1851, 52, 53 and 56.$ 

James W. Seaver, 1851.$ 

Samuel A. Eliot, 1851.$ 

John T. Heard, 1851.$ 

Adam W. Thaxter, Jr., 1852, 53, 54 and 55.$ 

Sampson Reed, 1852 and 53.$ \ 

Ezra Lincoln, 1852.$ 

Thomas Sprague, 1853, 54 and 55.$ 

Samuel Hatch, 1854, 55, 56, 57, 58 and 61.$ 

Charles Stoddard, 1854, 55, 56 and 57.$ 

William Washburn, 1854 and 55.$ 

TiSDALE Drake, 1856, 57, 58 and 59.$ 

Thomas P. Rich, 1856, 57 and 58.$ 

John T. Dingley, 1856 and 59.$ 

Joseph Smith, 1856.$ 

Ebenezer Johnson, 1857, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63 and 64.$ 

Samuel Hall, 1857, 58, 59, 60 and 61.$ 

George P. French, 1859, 60, 61, 62 and 63.$ 

Ebenezer Atkins, 1859.$ 

George Dennie, 1860, 61, 62, 63, 64 and 65.$ 

Clement Willis, 1860.$ 

G. E. Pierce, 1860.$ 

Jabez Frederick, 1861, 62 and 63.$ 

George Hinman, 1862 and 63. 

JohnF. Pray, 1862.$ 

J. C. J. Brown, 1862. 

Jonas Fitch, 1864, 65 and 66.$ 

Otis Norcross, *1865 and 63.$ 

John H. Thorndike, 1864, 65, 66 and 67.$ 

Benjamin F. Stevens, 1866, 67 and 68.$ 

William S. Hills, 1867. 

Charles R. Train, 1868.$ 

Joseph M. Wightman, 1868 and 69.$ 



* Mr. John H. Wilkins resigned November 15, 1855, and Charles Stoddard was elected 
to fill the vacancy. ISIr. Henry B. Rogers resigned October 22, 1865. Mr. Wilkins was re- 
elected February, 1856, and chosen president of the Board, which office he held until his 
resignation, June 5, 1860, when Mr. Ebenezer Johnson was elected president, and July 2, 
Mr. L. Miles Standish was elected to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. 
Wilkins. Otis Norcross resigned January 15, 1867, having been elected mayor of the city. 
Benjamin James served one year, in 1858, and was re-elected 1868. Alexander Wadsworth 
served six years, 1864-69, and was re-elected in 1872. Thomas Gogin resigned May 31, 
1875. Charles E. Powers was elected July 15, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resigna- 
tion of Mr. Gogin. 

JDeceased. 



Water Department. 105 

Benjamin James,* 1858, 68 and 69. t 

Francis A. Osborn, 1869. 

Walter E. Hawes, 1870. t 

John O. Poor, 1870. 

HoLLis R. Gray, 1870. 

Nathaniel J. Bradlee, 1863, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70 and 71.$ 

George Lewis, 1868, 69, 70 and 71. t 

Sidney Squires, 1871. J 

Charles H. Hersey, 1872. 

Charles H. Allen, 1869, 70, 71 and 72.t 

Alexander Wadsworth, *1864, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69 and 72. J 

Charles R. McLean, 1867, 73 and 74. | 

Edward P. Wilbur, 1873 and 74. J 

John A. Haven, 1870, 71, 72, 73 and 74.t 

Thomas Gogin, 1873, 74 -and 75.*$ 

Amos L. Noyes, 1871, 72 and 75. 

William G. Thacher, 1873, 74 and 75. t 

Charles J. Prescott, 1875.| 

Edward A. White, 1872, 73, 74, 75 and 76.J 

Leonard R. Cutter, 1871, 72, 73, 74, 75 and 76.tt 

L. Miles Standish, 1860, 61, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 74, 75 and 76.tt 

Charles E. Powers, *1875 and 1876. fj 

Solomon B. Stebbins, 1876. f 

Nahum M. Morrison, 1876.t| 

Augustus Parker, 1876. ft 

*See note on preceding page. 

tServed until the organization of the Boston Water Board. 

JDeceased. 



1 BOSTON WATER BOARD. 

ORGANIZED JULY 31, 1876. 



*Timothy T. Sawyer, from July 31, 1876, to May 5, 1879; and from 

May 1, 1882, to May 4, 1883. 
*Leonard R. Cutter, from July 31, 1876, to May 4, 1883. 
*Albert Stanwood, from July 31, 1876, to May 7, 1883. 
*Francis Thompson, from May 5, 1879, to May 1, 1882. 
William A. Simmons, from May 7, 1883, to August 18, 1885. 
George M. Hobbs, from May 4, 1883, to May 4, 1885. 
John G. Blake, from May 4, 1883, to August 18, 1885. 
*William B. Smart, from May 4, 1885, to March 18, 1889. 
*HoRACE T. Rockwell, from August 25, 1885, to April 25, 1888.^ 
Thomas F. Doherty, from August 26, 1885, to May 5, 1890; and from 

May 4, 1891, to July 1, 1895. 
Robert Grant, from April 25, 1888, to July 17, 1893.^ 
Philip J. Doherty, from March 18, 1889, to May 4, 1891. 
*JoHN W. Leighton, from May 5, 1890, to July 1, 1895. 
William S. McNary, from August 15, 1893, to November 5, 1894.^ 
Charles W. Smith, from January 23, 1895, to July 1, 1895. 

1 Under chapter 449 of the Acts of 1895 the Boston Water Board was abolished, and 
the Water Supply and Water Income Departments consolidated and placed under the 
charge of one Water Commissioner. 

*Deceased. 2 Died in office. 3 Resigned. 



106 City Document No. 40. 



1 WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Charles W. Smith, from July 1, 1895, to January 20, 1896.^ 
Jeremiah J. McCarthy (Acting), from January 20 to February 1, 1896. 
John R. Murphy, from February 1, 1896, to October 17, 1899.^ 
Benjamin W. Wells (Acting), from October 17, 1899, to December 28, 

1899. 
*AuGUSTUs P. Martin, from December 28, 1899, to March 13, 1902.2 
James Donovan (Acting), from March 14, 1902, to March 17, 1902. 
Eugene S. Sullivan, from March 17, 1902, to January 11, 1906.^ 
William Jackson (Acting), from January 11, 1906, to March 1, 1906. 
William J. Welch, from March 1, 1906, to April 27, 1908.^ 
William E. Hannan, from April 27, 1908, to present time. 

Assistant Water Co7nmissioners. 

Jeremiah J. McCarthy, from July 1, 1895, to January 20, 1896. 
Edward C. Ellis, from February 17, 1896, to November 1, 1900. 
*Melvin p. Freeman, from February 7, 1900, to March 9, 1902.^ 
William H. Oakes, from November 1, 1900, to March 9, 1902.^ 
Eugene S. Sullivan, from March 10 to March 17, 1902. 
John J. Leahy, from March 21, 1902, to March 1, 1906. 
Isaac Rosnosky, from March 10, 1902, to present time. 
Joseph J. Norton, from March 1, 1906, to March 26, 1908. 
James P. Lennon, from March 1, 1906, to March 26, 1908. 

Chief Clerk of the Department. 
Walter E. Swan. 

General Superintendent Income Division. 
Joseph H. Caldwell. 

Superintendent of Distribution Division. 
George H. Finneran, from March 1, 1909, to present time. 

City Engineer and Engineer of the Department. 
William Jackson. 

1 See note on preceding page. ^ Died in office. ^ Resigned. 

* Deceased. 






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