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Full text of "Annual report of the Water Commissioner, for the year ending .."

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In the general in- 
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will become finable 

if detained beyond 

that period. 

B. P. L. Form No. 2gi. 



FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



WATER COMMISSIONER 



YEAR ENDING JANUARY 31, 1899 



Jrraieb for % <§i$mtxa£nt 




BOSTON 

MUNICIPAL PRINTING OFFICE 

1899 






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Office of the Water Commissioner, 
City Hall, Boston, February 1, 1899. 

Hon. Josiah Quincy, Mayor: 

Sir, — I submit a report of the doings of the Water De- 
partment for the year ending January 31, 1899. 

The net income of the department shows a decrease as 
compared with last year. This is due to the taking of a 
portion of our system by the State. 

The work of the department has been of a more varied 
nature than in previous years. In addition to the usual de- 
tail work thirty-three and six-tenths (33.6) miles of main 
pipe were laid, eight (8) miles of which were relaid. 

The extension of our distribution service has so improved 
the supply in the Dorchester district that the Wayne-street 
pumping station at Elm Hill has been abandoned. 

The laying of pipes in Columbia road has progressed 
favorably, and the new line of pipe for supplying the islands 
in the harbor has been almost laid to the sea-wall on Moon 
Island opposite Long Island. 

The water service in West Roxbury and other portions of 
the city has been materially improved by the extension of 
mains in those localities. The system of salt-water mains 
(as an auxiliary fire service) has been extended so as to 
enable tlxe fire-boats to make connections with the system, 
and its success thoroughly demonstrated by tests. 



2 City Document No. 38. 

The relaying work costs higher year by year, owing to 
the more crowded condition of the streets. 

The apparatus for taking frost out of the ground that was 
used in the department last winter has been much improved. 
We are now able to lay main pipe in the winter as well as in 
the summer. 

We have changed our method of excavating main pipe 
trenches. It was the practice to dig the whole length of 
the main pipe trench as wide as it must necessarily be at the 
bell-holes. Under the new system the portions of the trench 
between the holes are made just wide enough to enable the 
pipes to be laid. The trench also narrows as it tends toward 
the bottom. A saving is expected from this change, not 
only in the first cost of the work, but in the maintenance of 
streets after the pipe is laid. 

A system of numbering hydrants throughout the city has 
been adopted, so that hereafter they will be known by their 
numbers, and the record of each is kept, showing the cost of 
maintenance, when and by whom inspected, etc. In addi- 
tion, in order to show what gates are division gates, and 
what gates' control main, service, fire, motor and elevator 
pipes, all gates are to be marked and numbered. It will be 
possible by this plan of numbering to keep a proper super- 
vision of the hydrants and gates, and to locate them quickly. 

There were established during last summer ten cold water 
fountains, so that water could be furnished to the public in 
summer weather at a temperature pleasant for drinking pur- 
poses. This was accomplished by chilling the water by run- 
ning it through small reservoirs and pipes surrounded with 
chopped ice, the ice and the pipes being enclosed in a box 
insulated on the outside by a patent material. The cost of 
supplying these fountains with ice was nominal, as they con- 
sumed less than 500 lbs. each per day. On warm days 
the average number of people supplied per hour was over 
600 for each fountain in the congested parts of the city. 
These fountains were found to be very acceptable to the 
public, and their patronage was so great as to create a de- 
mand for the extension of the system. It is the intention 
of the department to increase the number of cold-water foun- 
tains in the coming summer. In order that this may be 
done at a minimum of cost, we have cut more than suffi- 
cient ice from our reservoirs in Brookline and East Boston 
to supply our fountains for the coming season. The 
ice is stored in houses constructed on the grounds. We 
estimate that it will be possible to supply at least forty cold- 
water fountains. Through the courtesy of the Eastern 



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Water Department. 3 

Cold Storage Company, Walter L. Hill, president, plans for a 
cold water fountain connected with their pipe line have been 
prepared, and the fountain will be located in Faneuil Hall 
square, and in use during the coming summer. If it works 
successfully — and I have no doubt it will — it is proposed 
to still further utilize the cold-storage system in connection 
with our cold-water fountains. The drinking fountain which 
has been adopted and will be in use hereafter is artistic 
in its construction, and has received the approval of the 
Art Commission. 

Owing to the establishment of the Metropolitan Water 
System the department will not hereafter maintain the 
pumping stations at West Roxbury and East Boston. 

The Deacon service has been transferred from the Distri- 
bution to the Income Division. The methods in practice in 
the Meter Division, to which allusion was made in last years' 
report, have been changed, and the accounts there, as well 
as in the rest of the department, are now being kept cor- 
rectly. The improvement in keeping records and accounts 
can be best realized from the fact that previous to February 
1, 1896, the reports which formed the basis of the records 
and the accounts of the department were mostly unsigned, 
and were not made upon the ground where the work was 
done, but were transmitted by word of mouth to a foreman 
stationed in the yard at Albany street. Their accuracy de- 
pended wholly upon the memory of those who made them, 
and their knowledge of what was required for the basis of a 
proper record. 

We now have a system of individual and original reports. 
These reports are signed by some employee of the depart- 
ment who has personal supervision of the work. Since the 
inauguration of this system the utter inadequacy of the old 
system has been forcibly demonstrated, and it is easy to 
understand why, previous to February 1,1896, the records were 
not correctly kept. I submit the reports of Andrew Stewart, 
Examiner of Accounts, showing the changes and improve- 
ments that have been made in the records and accounts of 
the department, and the present condition of the same. (See 
Appendix A.) 

The department has paid constant attention to electrolysis, 
and in the Engineer's report will be found the facts in 
detail. 

Under the head of the pressing needs of the department, 
I would again respectfully call your attention to the crowded 
condition of the vard of the Distribution Division at 710 



4 City Document No. 38. 

Albany street, where there is a lack of sufficient area to 
perform the work in an economical manner. All castings, 
pipe, lumber, etc., used by the department are received in 
this yard and thence distributed wherever the work may 
require. A year ago a part of this yard was transferred to 
the City Hospital. This transfer has increased the expense 
of handling our pipe and stock of all kinds. I am of the 
opinion that our present wharf facilities should be increased 
at least one-half. 

It is essential to completely modernize the machinery of 
our present machine shop. By the adoption of new and im- 
proved machinery the work can be done at a great deal less 
cost than at the present time. 

The style of post hydrants in use in the department 
should be replaced by more modern hydrants. Now when 
an engine attaches to a post hydrant it is necessary to shut 
down the hydrant, in order that another engine can attach 
to the same hydrant. A few of our hydrants, however, are 
arranged with independent shut-offs to each outlet, which 
does away with the necessity of shutting down the hydrant 
as each engine attaches to it. The general adoption of this 
latter system of hydrants is the one which I recommend. 
This can be done gradually at a cost of about $8,000 to 
$10,000 a year. 

To meet the needs enumerated above, 1 would recommend 
the making of a special appropriation. 

On February 1, 1896, I qualified as Water Commissioner. 
On the department roll dated January 80, 1896, there were 868 
men eligible for employment, and of these about 600 were 
at work. Commencing with the latter part of December, 
1895, the balance had been suspended from time to time, 
in accordance with the yearly practice of the department. 
These suspensions did not reach all grades of labor ; they 
affected only those who were least able to bear it and whose 
services the department is least able to dispense with, viz.: 
the laborers on trench work and main pipe laying. 

For the last three years all the men of the department 
have been employed in winter as well as in summer, and not 
laid off on two-thirds, one-half or one-quarter time, as was 
the practice previous to your administration. On January 
26, 1899, the last pay-day of the fiscal year 1898-99, there 
were on the pay roll 885 men, or every man who was able to 
work. In order that the full force might be employed con- 
tinuously, more day work has been done by our own em- 
ployees in each of the three years of your administration 
than in 1895. It would be natural to expect that under these 



Water Department. 5 

conditions the yearly expenses of the department would be 
increased, but such is not the fact. The amount of money 
expended during each of the fiscal years 1896, 1897 and 
1898 is less than that expended in 1895, and the character 
and the amount of work done during any one of the years 
1896, 1897 and 1898 will compare more than favorably with 
that done during 1895. The appended statements of money 
expended and work done during the years in question will 
substantiate this statement. 

Expenditures of the Boston Water Department. 
1895-96 to 1898-99, inclusive. 

1895-96. 

Current expenses (Auditor's Report, pp. 137, 138) . . $610,101 70 
Extension of Mains, etc. (Auditor's Report, p. 141) . . 251,984 94 
Additional Supply (Auditor's Report, p. 140) . . . 382,819 01 



$1,244,905 65 
Paid on account of work done for corporations, etc. . 18,648 71 



Total $1,226,256 94 

1 896-97. 

Current expenses (Auditor's Report, p. 151) , . . . $591,550 42 

Extension of Mains, etc. (Auditor's Report, p. 153) . . 232,142 98 

Additional Supply, (Auditor's Report, p. 153) ... 217,070 45 

$1,040,763 85 
Paid on account of work done for corporations, etc. 

(Second Annual Report Water Commissioner, pp. 11-13) 17,366 14 



Total $1,023,397 71 

1897-98. 

Current expenses (Auditor's Report, p. 164) . . . $623,476 51 

Extension of Mains, etc. (Auditor's Report, p. 165) . . 281,782 32 

Additional Supply, (Auditor's Report, p. 165) . . . 179,879 01 



$1,085,137 84 



Paid on account of work done for corporations, etc. 

(Third Annual Report Water Commissioner, pp. 13, 14), 13,300 73 



Total $1,071,837 11 

1898-99. 

Current expenses and Extension of Mains — one appropria- 
tion— (Auditor's Exhibit, January 31, 1899, p. 19) . $808,582 59 

From loan of $200,000, issued November, 1898, for exten- 
sion of mains (Auditor's Exhibit, January 31, 1899, 
p. 17) 152,601 63 



$961,184 22 
Paid on account of work done for corporations, etc. . 47,798 94 



Total $913,3S5 28 



6 



City Document No. 38. 



The amounts expended during the above years upon por- 
tions of the Water Department system now held by the State, 
estimated as closely as possible, are as follows : 



1895-96 
1896-97 
1897-98 
1898-99 



$233,482 98 

200,608 84 

168,862 83 

14,557 91 



The amount for the year 1898-99 ($14,557.91) subtracted 
from the total amount as stated ($913,885.28) would leave 
$898,827.37 as the net expenditure for that year. 

The total amount for the year 1897-98, that is, including 
the amounts paid on account of portions taken by the State, 
was $1,071,837.11, showing a difference of expenditure be- 
tween the two years of $173,009.74, caused by the loss to 
the city of those portions of the department taken by the 
State. 

Miles of Pipe Laid by Day Labor. 
1895-96 to 1898-99, inclusive. 





1895-96. 


1896-97. 


1897-98. 


1898-99. 




23.1 
4.9 


33.4 
3.0 


28.04 
0.16 


32.0 


By other than employees . . . 


1.6 


Total 


28.0 


36.4 


28.2 


33.6 







The work of pipe laying in the heart of the city is diffi- 
cult and very costly. Of the total mileage of pipe laid 
during each of the last four years the amount of main pipe 
laid in the downtown streets was far less in the year 
1895-6 than in either of the three subsequent years, as the 
following comparative statement shows : 



1895-96. 
5,722 feet. 



1896-97. 
19,197 feet. 



1897-98. 
20,763 feet. 



1898-99. 
14,721 feet. 



Relaying pipe, no matter in what part of the city, is always 
difficult work, and expensive compared with ordinary pipe 
laying, as the house connections, hydrants, etc., have to be 
transferred from the old to the new mains. When the re- 
laying is in the City Proper, added to the usual cost is the 
expense of night and Sunday work. This means extra cost 
in the way of compensation to the men and other incidental 
expenses. Very little relaying was done previous to 1896, 
and, as a consequence, work which should have been done 



Water Department. 7 

then was begun and completed during the years 1896, 1897 
and 1898. This work should never have been delayed as 
long as it was, as the pipes were found in a poor condition 
and a source of danger to the community. 

The following is the amount of pipe relaid for the last 
four years : 

1895-96. 1896-97. 1897-98. 1898-99. 

15,840 feet. 45,408 feet. 36,960 feet. 42,240 feet. 

The amount of this relaying that was done in the down- 
town streets is as follows : 

1895-96. 1896-97. 1897-98. 1S98-99. 

4,000 feet, 15,840 feet. 13,200 feet. 7,920 feet. 

The work in the machine, carpenter and blacksmith shops 
in each of the past three years was very much more than it 
was in 1895, and the same is true of the general work of 
the department, such as establishing and abandoning gates, 
hydrants, air-cocks, water posts, etc., the increase in some 
instances being from 100 to 200 per cent, over the year 1895. 
Again, the work has been more varied during the last three 
years, especially during 1898. In this latter year we built 
two ice-houses, one at East Boston and the other at Brook- 
line, and cut and stored the ice needed to supply the foun- 
tains next summer, built and macadamized roads, established 
nineteen fountains and abandoned eight. Of the nineteen 
fountains, eight were cold-water fountains, and two were 
old fountains to which cold-water attachments were made. 
In addition to maintaining these cold-water fountains, we 
have performed a variety of work which the department 
has not done heretofore. 

I am of the opinion that the doing of so much day work 
has been beneficial to the city, as the work done was of the 
best quality. This is illustrated by the laying of the salt- 
water mains for the extra tire service. The department laid 
about one mile, which, at completion, was tested under a 
pressure of 180 to 220 pounds to the square inch, and no 
leak was shown. 

The receipts and disbursements of the department for the 
year were as follows : 

Total receipts of the Water Works, from all sources, for 
the year ending January 31, 1899 : 

Sales of water $2,124,514 30 

Shutting off and letting on water and fees . 6,776 75 



Carried forward $2,131,291 05 



City Document No. 38. 



Brought forward 

Elevator, fire and service pipes, sale of old 

materials, etc. 

Boston and Albany R. R. Co., on account of 

change of road-bed at Lake Cochituate . 
1 Interest on water works fund 

Total receipts ..... 

Less refunded water rates .... 

Net receipts 



$2,131,291 05 

67,819 53 

32,998 00 
72,962 16 

$2,305,070 74 
4,209 93 



$2,300,860 81 



Total expenditures of the Water Works, from revenue, for 
the year ending January 31, 1899: 



2 Current expenses 

3 Extension of mains, etc. 



$554,959 72 
253,622 87 



Interest on funded debt . . . . 
Sinking-fund requirement, 1897-98 
Metropolitan water assessment . 
Amount paid Chelsea, Somerville and Ever- 
ett, under contracts . 
Balance to general revenue account of city . 



$808,582 59 
841,792 52 
193,395 00 
285,600 54 

9,088 07 
162,402 09 



2,300,860 81 



COST OF CONSTRUCTION AND CONDITION OF THE 
WATER DEBT. 



Cost of construction of Water Works to February 1, 
1898 

Cost of construction of Water Works to February 1 
1899 



4 Decrease during the year ..... 

Stock on hand February 1, 1898 

Stock on hand February 1, 1899 

Decrease during the year 

The outstanding Water Loans February 1, 1898, were 
The outstanding Water Loans February 1, 1899, were 

Decrease during the year ..... 

The Water Sinking-Fund February 1, 189S, was 
The Water Sinking-Fund February 1, 1899, was 

Decrease during the year 



126,831,753 14 

22,243,663 40 

$4,588,089 74 

$152,665 07 
137,755 55 

$14,909 52 

$17,911,273 98 
17,121,273 98 

$790.000 00 

$9,852,760 01 
9,4S7,119 88 

$365,640 13 



1 Under order of City Council, approved September 16, 139S. 

2 One appropriation was made, covering current expenses and extension for the 
year 1898-99 from revenue. From the amount of $80S,582.59, should he deducted the 
sums of $47,798.94, expended for work done for corporations, etc., and $14,557.91 ex- 
pended upon portions of system now held by the State, leaving $746,225.74 as the 
actual amount expended for current expenses and extension of mains, etc., from 
revenue. Details will be found on pages 16 and 17. 

3 The total amount expended for extension of mains, etc., for the year was 
$406,224.50, from which $152,601.63 was transferred to a new loan of $200,000 issued in 
November. 

4 Decrease due to crediting amount paid by the State on account of taking by Met- 
ropolitan Water Board $5,000,000, and amount received from sale of land on South 
Boston reservoir site to School Committee, $23,S93.86. 



Water Department. 



Net Water Debt February 1, 1898 
Net Water Debt February 1, 1899 

Decrease during the year 



18,058,513 97 
7,634,154 10 

$424,359 87 



SUMMARY OF COST OF WORKS TO FEBRUARY 1, 1899. 



Cochituate supply : 
Lake Cochituate . 
Compensating reservoirs 
Land and water damages 
Engineering expenses to Jan 

uary 1, 1852 
Cochituate aqueduct 

Sudbury supply : 

Reservoir No. 1 . 

" " 2 . 

" " 3 . 

a "4 

" " 5, to date 

" " 6 . 

Whitehall pond 
Cedar swamp 
Work about Farm pond 
Roadway in Framingham 
Land damages, not otherwise 

specified . 
Water damages 
Temporary connection with 

Lake Cochituate 
Investigations of Shawshine 

and Charles rivers, etc. 
Protection of supplies . 
Engineering and engineering 

expenses . 
Office expenses, travelling 

etc. .... 
Miscellaneous 
Conduit and connections at 

Chestnut-Hill Reservoir 

Distributing reservoirs and dis- 
tribution : 
Brookline Reservoir 
Beacon-Hill " (net cost) 

Chestnut-Hill" . 
South Boston" (net cost) 

East " " . 

Carried forward 



$291,838 35 

66,859 80 

248,827 34 

40,000 00 
1,068,425 24 



$257,143 81 

465,954 11 

419,402 72 

813,846 38 

1,114,752 43 

911,752 33 

333,967 57 

33,599 21 

17,297 94 

23,947 32 

348,346 38 
559,190 64 

75,611 73 

27,646 59 
364,120 82 

300,371 22 

80,594 74 
40,388 76 

3,082,661 95 



),077 21 

363,533 21 

2,284,115 33 

67,014 24 

66,103 09 



$1,715,950 73 



9,270,596 65 



!, 980, 843 08 $10,986,547 38 



10 



City Document No. 38. 



Brought forward 
Distributing reservoirs and clis 

tribution. — Continued. 
Parker-Hill Reservoir . 
Fisher-Hill " 

Roxbury high service . 
Brighton « " 

East Boston high service 
West Roxbury high service 
Chestnut-Hill purnping-station 
Jamaica-pond aqueduct 
Pipe-yards and buildings 
Engineering expenses . 
Distribution 



$2,980,843 08 $10,986,547 38 



205,793 81 

191,135 35 

103,829 53 

7,745 00 

30,208 12 

22,346 56 

525,195 46 

88,417 20 

94,832 16 

57,873 58 

11,297,346 29 



15,605,566 14 



Total cost of Sudbury and Cochituate Works, $26,592,113 52 
Cost of Mystic Works to February 1, 1899 



Land damages 
Dam 

Grubbing at lake 
Lowering Mystic 
river . 

Conduit . 
Engine-houS': 
Engines . 

Reservoir 

Distribution 
Buildings 
Engineering, inspection and sal- 
aries .... 
Mystic-valley sewer 
Miscellaneous . 



.$17,167 

. 9,393 

c 

. 3,012 


26 

26 

06 


. $83,388 
.213,834 


75 
72 







$153,211 63 



29,572 58 
129,714 30 



297,223 47 

141,856 26 

874,863 58 

18,603 05 

53,216 27 
83,608 70 
24,446 88 



Total cost of Mystic Works 
Total cost of combined supplies 



$1,806,316 72 



$28,398,430 24 



Credit by amount received from the State 
on account of takings (January 4, 1896, 
and January 1, 1898) .... 6,154,766 84 



}, 243, 663 40 



Water Department. 



11 



The outstanding Water 
1899, are as follows : 



Loans on this date, February 1, 







Date of 








Loans. 


Maturity. Amount. 


er cent. Currency, 


Due April, 1899 . . . $250,000 00 


k ii u 


" Jan., 1901 






625,000 00 


it it ii 


" April, 1901 
" July, 1901 






688,000 00 
330,000 00 


ii ii a 


" July, 1902 . 






100,000 00 


" " Sterling Loan, 










(£399,500) 


" Oct., 1902 






1,947,273 98 


" " Currency, 


" April, 1903 






905.000 00 


u u ii 
ii u ii 


" Jan., 1904 . 
" April, 1904 






8,000 00 
38,000 00 


a ii ii 
ii K ii 


" Jan., 1905 
" April, 1905 . 






161,000 00 
142,700 00 


ii ii u 


" July, 1905 






44,000 00 


ii ii ii 


" Oct., 1905 . 






6,000 00 


" '' Gold Loan, 


" Oct., 1905 






1,000,000 00 


" " Currency, 

ii ii ii 


" Jan., 1906 . 
" April, 1906 . 






82,550 00 
8,750 00 


" " Gold Loan, 


" April, 1906 






552,000 00 


it ii ii 


" Oct., 1906 . 






2,000,000 00 


" " Currency, 

ii ii ii 

ii it ii 


" Oct., 1906 . 
" Jan., 1907 
" April, 1907 






4,000 00 
8,000 00 
5,000 00 


ii ti ii 


" July, 1907 






1,000 00 


" " Currency Loar 


i," Oct., 1907 






1,000 00 


ii ii ii ti 


" April, 1908 






12,000 00 


u ii ii 


" April, 1908 






588,000 00 


" " Loan, 


" July, 19C9 






82,000 00 


ii ii i 




" Oct., 1909 






268,000 00 


ii ii i 




" April, 1910 






280,000 00 


ii ii i 

u ii i 




" April, 1912 
" July, 1913 






324,000 00 
111,000 00 


it ii i 




" Oct., 1913 






336,000 00 


ii ii i 
ii it i 
u ii i 
u ii i 

ii ii i 

ii ii i 

u ii i 




" Jan., 1914 
" April, 1914 
ft Oct., 1914 
" Jan., 1915 
" April, 1915 
" April, 1915 
" Oct., 1915 
" Oct., 1915 
" Jan., 1916 
" Jan., 1916 
" April, 1916 
" July, 1916 
" Oct., 1916 
" Oct., 1916 
" Jan., 1917 






466,000 00 
18,500 00 
16,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 

145,700 00 
50,000 00 
23,000 00 

100,000 00 
58,000 00 

128,500 00 
75,000 00 
25,000 00 

286,300 00 
21,000 00 


ii ii t 
ii ii i 
ii ii i 
ii ii i 

ii ii i 

ii it i 




" April, 1917 
" April, 1917 
" April, 1917 
" July, 1917 
" Oct., 1917 
" Jan., 191S 
" April, 191S 
" July, 191S 
" Oct., 1918 






200,000 00 
275,000 00 
161,000 00 

7,000 00 

160,700 00 

20,000 00 

6,300 00 
100,000 00 
100,000 00 


Carried forward, 




$13,451,273 98 



12 



City Document No. 38. 









Date of 




Loans. 




Maturity. 




Brought forward, 




4 


per cent. 


Loan, Due April, 1919 


3| 


41 41 


(4 


' Oct., 1919 


4 


41 il 


44 


' Oct., 1919 


3i 


" " 


" 


" Nov., 1919 


3* 


(4 u 


14 


' Jan., 1920 


4 


(1 44 


*' 


' Oct., 1920 


4 


44 LI 


44 


' April, 1921 


4 


4. U 


" 


' Oct., 1921 


4 


14 (4 


44 


' Jan., 1922 


4 


44 44 


44 


' April, 1922 


4 


44 44 


44 


4 Oct., 1922 


4 


44 44 


4 4 


' Oct., 1923 


4 


" " 


" 


' Oct., 1924 


Si- 


44 44 


" 


' Oct., 1927 


Si 


44 44 


44 


' Oct., 1928 



Amount. 
$13,451,273 98 
200,000 00 
145,000 00 
300,000 00 
130,000 00 
220,000 00 
384,000 00 
100.000 00 
162,500 00 
100,000 00 
75,000 00 
283,000 00 
576,275 00 
644,225 00 
150,000 00 
200,000 00 





Total 












Summary. 




3 p 

H 

4 

4* 

5 
5 
5 
6 


er ce 

i 

i 

4 


nt. Loans . 

1 (4 

' Currency Loans 
' Gold 

' Sterling " 
' Loans . 






$200,000 00 
1,520,000 00 
6,214,000 00 
268,000 00 
13,000 00 
3,552,000 00 
1,947,273 98 
3,407,000 00 




To 


tal 








. $17,121,273 98 



Water Department. 



13 



Cochituate Water Debt, Gross and Net, 
At the Close of Each Fiscal Year. 



Fiscal Year. 



Gross Debt. 



Sinking-Funds. 



Net Debt. 



1847-48 
1848-49 
1849-50 
1850-51 
1851-52 
1852-53 
1853-54 
1854-55 
1855-56 
1856-57 
1857-58 
1858-59 
1859-60 
1860-61 
1861-62 
1862-63 
1863-64 
1864-65 
1865-66 
1866-67 
1867-68 
1868-69 
1869-70 
1870-71 
1871-72 
1872-73 
1873-74 
1874-75 
1875-76 
1876-77 
1877-78 
1878-79 
1879-80 
1880-81 
1881-82 
1882-83 
1883-84 
1884-85 
1885-86 
1886-87 
1887-88 
1888-89 
1889-90 
1890-91 
1891-92 
1892-93 
1893-94 
1894-95 
1895-96 
1896-97 
1897-98 
1898-99 



,129,056 32 i 


,787,328 98 


,463,205 


56 


,955,613 


51 


,209,223 


26 


,972,976 


11 


,432,261 


11 


,403,961 


11 


,230,961 


11 


,031,961 


11 


,724,961 


11 


,754,461 


11 


,846,211 


11 


,455,211 


11 


,012,711 


11 


,992,711 


11 


,992,711 


11 


,942,711 


11 


,152,711 


11 


370,711 


11 


867,711 


11 


107,711 


11 


731,711 


11 


482,711 


11 


812,711 


11 


,912,711 


11 


863,711 


11 


123,711 


11 


735,711 


11 


,548,711 


11 


545,273 


98 


753,273 


98 


697,273 98 


631,273 98 


631,273 


98 


955,273 


98 


882,273 


98 


045,473 98 


491,473 


98 


142,273 


98 


741,273 


98 


941,273 


98 


,696,273 


98 


267,773 98 


423,773 


98 


758,773 


98 


055,273 


98 


,761,273 98 


,261,273 98 


,261,273 


98 


,911,273 


98 


,121,273 


98 



$1,100,000 00 
1,185,049 67 
1,268,234 97 
1,372,953 62 
1,533,890 28 
1,560,917 83 
1,709,492 60 
2,043,764 73 
2,143,847 85 
1,771,692 92 
1,989,300 88 
2,281,857 89 
2,607,768 46 
2,746,505 58 
3,106,323 82 
3,385,201 26 
3,947,616 92 
4,373,304 09 
4,864,092 54 
5,440,819 47 
5,979,297 80 
6,471,545 34 
7,019,058 38 
7,649,504 S7 

' 8,444,773 55 
9,099,966 39 
9,704,387 99 
9,852,760 01 
9,487,119 88 



$2,129,056 32 
3,787,328 98 
4,463,205 56 
4,955,613 51 
5,209,223 26 
5,972,976 11 
5,432,261 11 
5,403,961 11 
5,230,961 11 
5,031,961 11 
4,724,961 11 
4,754,461 11 
3,846,211 11 
3,455.211 11 
3,012,711 11 
2,992,711 11 
2,992,711 11 
2,942,711 11 
3,152,711 11 
3,370,711 11 
3,867,711 11 
5,107,711 11 
5,731,711 11 
5,382,711 11 
5,627,661 44 
5,644,476 14 
6,490,757 49 
6,589,820 83 
8,174,793 28 
9,839,218 51 
9,501,509 25 
9,609,426 13 
9,925,581 06 
9,641,973 10 
9,349,416 09 
9,347,505 52 
10,135,768 40 
9,939,150 16 
10,106,272 72 
10,194,657 06 
10,367,969 89 
10,077,181 44 
10,255,454 51 
10,288,476 18 
9,952,228 64 
9,739,715 60 
9,405,769 11 
9,316,500 43 
9,161,307 59 
8,556,885 99 
8,058,513 97 
7,634,154 10 



'No account taken of amounts borrowed temporarily from 1816 to 1852 and after- 
wards funded by the issue of the water bonds that figure in this statement. 



14 



City Document No. 38. 











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15 



16 



City Document No. 38. 



DETAILED EXPENDITURES UNDER THE SEVERAL 
APPROPRIATIONS. 

February Draft, 1898, to February Draft, 1899. 

Current Expenses, Extension of Mains, etc. (from Revenue). 

Salaries : 

Commissioner . . . . $5,000 00 

Assistant Commissioner . . 3,000 00 

Secretary . . . . 3,000 00 

Employees .... 631,230 77 

8642,230 77 

151,759 15 
'. 23,854 51 



Water-pipes and castings . 

Lead and lead pipe ..'.... 

Travelling expenses and transportation of em- 
ployees ....... 

Blasting and excavating trenches 

Tools, machinery, iron, steel and other materials 

for repairs and furnishing . 
Horses, purchase of . . . . $475 

Feed and board . . . .5,191 

Shoeing and veterinary services . 2,808 

Wagons, etc., and repairs of same . 2,620 
Harnesses and repairs . . . 2,102 



00 
37 
97 
68 
32 



Teaming and freights 

Land damages .... 

Repairs of buildings, streets and other structures 

Fuel . . . 

New meters and repairs . 

Lumber ...... 

Printing ...... 

Services and expenses of counsel in connection 

with settlement of claim against the State 
Damages ..... 

Professional and expert services 
Gravel and crushed stone 
Inspection of castings at foundries . 
Report on property taken by the State 
Stationery and postage 
Sanitary at Chestnut Hill reservoir . 
Telephone service .... 

Salt ...... 

Bricks ...... 

Board of injured man 

Oils 

Covering water-pipes with felting 
Rents . . . . ' . 



17,334 95 

15.391 64 

14.392 54 



13,198 34 
8,635 76 

8,288 
8,127 
7,533 
7,224 
6,223 
5,726 



4,662 
3,837 
2,648 
2,279 
2,189 
2,000 



1,348 
1,314 
1,054 

787 
782 
728 
707 
675 



51 

27 
70 
46 
71 
53 



51 
61 

57 
05 
83 
00 



1,428 50 



00 
73 
67 
13 
17 
48 
50 
00 



Carried forward 



•56,365 59 



Water Department. 



17 



Brought forward ..... $956,365 59 

Manure 533 00 

Removing water-pipes from Federal street . 528 00 

Furniture 502 20 

Cement and sand ...... 500 69 

Gas 496 53 

Taxes 479 98 

Water-proof clothing ..... 335 34 

Advertising 301 20 

Examination of accounts ..... 300 00 

Electric lighting 275 50 

Town of Brookline, temporary supply of water 

for West Roxbury 244 00 

Suffolk Registry, recording papers . . . 148 85 

Drain-pipe ....... 75 41 

Ice 57 20 

Salt hay 21 25 

Water-rates, Framingham and Medford . . 19 48 



Less amount transferred to new loan, Exten 
sion of Mains, etc. .... 



Refunded water-rates .... 
Sinking-fund payment .... 
Interest on loans ..... 
Metropolitan water assessment . 
Proportion of water-rates paid under contract 



$961,184 22 


152,601 


63 


$808,582 


59 


4,209 


93 


193,395 


00 


841,792 


52 


285,600 


54 


9,088 


07 


$2,142,668 


65 



From the above amount of $961,184.22 should be deducted 
$47,798.94, expended for corporations, etc., and $14,557.91, 
expended upon portions of the system now held by the State, 
leaving the amount of $898,827.37 as the total actual expend= 
iture for current expenses and extension of mains, etc. 

Extension of Mains, etc. (from Loans). 
Amount transferred from expenditures from 

revenue, as above ..... $152,601 63 



Additional Supply of Water. 
Land damages on account of Whitehall pond 



$2,992 11 



The balance of the appropriation for Additional Supply of 
Water on February 1, 1898, was $300. To this balance was 
added a transfer of $2,692.11 from the appropriation for Mystic 
Water Works, Land, etc. The balance of the latter appropriation, 
amounting to $951.64, was transferred to the appropriation for 
Playground, North End. 



18 



City Document No. 38. 



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24 City Document No. 38. 

In the appendices annexed hereto are submitted the re- 
ports of the City Engineer and the superintendents of the 
department. They furnish full details of the present condi- 
tion of the works and what has been accomplished. 

Respectfully, 

John R. Murphy, 

Water Commissioner. 



Water Department. 25 



APPENDIX A. 



I. 

Boston, February 27, 1896. 

Hon. John R. Murphy, 

Water Commissioner of Boston ; 

Dear Sir, — As requested by you, we have made an ex- 
amination of the cash transactions of the Water Depart- 
ment of the city of Boston, and have reached the following 
conclusions. In the first place it may be well to give the 
reasons for the receipt and payment of money in the office 
of the Water Commissioners, and to describe as briefly as 
possible the methods pursued in the handling of it. 

The system of " Money Deposits " in your department 
originated (by vote of the Water Board) because of losses 
incurred by the city through furnishing labor and material, 
and afterwards not being reimbursed for the outlay. The 
amount of money in each instance required for deposit is 
governed by rules made by the Water Commissioners — a 
fixed sum being required in some cases, in others the amount 
of work and material furnished forming the basis for the 
charge. These sums of money are held by the Water De- 
partment as security, 'pending the execution of the various 
jobs. Upon the completion of the work, and the payment of 
the bills therefor, the amounts which have been advanced are 
refunded upon application. For instance, to be more explicit, 
for " Service Pipes " (until recently) a deposit of $20 has 
been required ; for elevators, motor pipes, repairs of service 
pipes between street mains and street lines, and for sales of 
old materials, deposits have been required according to esti- 
mates. Recently the rule in regard to furnishing £ -service 
pipes has been changed, so that all that is now required is a 
deposit of $10, for which amount the city guarantees to do 
the necessary work. The greater part though of the " De- 
posit Money " has been, and is, obtained from deposits upon 
" Main Pipes." In all instances before the main pipes are 
laid in a street the cost of the work is determined, as nearly 
as possible, and if the income will not equal 5 per cent, 
for five years, or 25 per cent, of the amount invested 



26 City Document No. 38. 

by the city, the applicant is obliged to deposit the differ- 
ence between the income assured and 5 per cent, for five 
years on the investment. As soon as the amount required 
is being guaranteed the city by increase of income, the 
amount of the deposits is refunded. If at the expiration of 
five years the amount received has not equalled the 5 per 
cent, necessary, the deficit is forfeited to the city. In addi- 
tion to the sums derived from deposits as above stated, money 
is received from rents of houses and pastures, and from sales 
of grass and certain other odds and ends. This money, 
together with the balances of deposits on main pipes, and the 
money now received from service pipes, is turned over to the 
City Collector from time to time. As nearly as it was pos- 
sible for us to determine, up to 1892, the average amount of 
money held by the Water Board was about $5,000. Since 
that time the amount has averaged about $15,000. The bulk 
of the money has been kept in either the First or the Central 
National Bank of this city, but no interest has been obtained 
upon it at any time from either of these banks. Upon an 
average balance of $5,000 kept during the past year with the 
Beacon Trust Company, interest has been allowed, but we fail 
to see why interest was not secured by the Commissioners 
from the other banks, as it is the common custom to require 
interest on all funds of the city deposited in banks. 

As the consequence of this neglect the city is poorer by 
many hundreds, if not some thousands of dollars. 

The cash accounts of the Water Department have been 
kept by the Clerk of the Board, and he has had the entire 
care of the moneys, subject to the orders of the Commis- 
sioners. The bank deposits stand in his name as clerk, and 
he alone has the power to draw checks. Of his absolute 
fidelity we have, after close scrutiny, no question, but of the 
discretion of the members of the Water Board for the past 
twenty years, we have some. Only the faithfulness of the 
custodian of these funds has stood between the city and pos- 
sible heavy losses, for at times the balance in his hands has 
been as large as $25,000, and his accounts, until now, have 
not been audited for thirteen j^ears. Furthermore, these 
funds, which should have remained untouched, except for the 
purposes for which they were established, have been used by 
the members of the Board for payment for current expenses. 
To be sure, the money so taken was afterwards returned at 
intervals by its repayment by the City Treasurer on vouchers, 
but the practice is pernicious and fraught with danger, and 
should be immediately discontinued. Doubtless some money 
is needed in the office for petty expenses, but a small contin- 



Water Department. 



27 



gent fund would serve all purposes. The easy accessibility of 
so much ready money has apparently had a tendency to waste- 
fulness, and a decided extravagance in expenditure has been 
the rule during the past few years. The deposit money 
should be used for no purpose whatever but for the redemp- 
tion of the receipts outstanding against it. 

The following table shows the amounts spent year by year 
since 1889 by the Water Boards for travelling and miscel- 
laneous expenses, and are instructive by way of comparison. 
The miscellaneous expenses are chiefly for entertainment and 
expenditures in connection with trips to the water works : 





Travelling. 


Miscellaneous. 


Total. 


1889-90 

1890-91 

1891-92 

1892-93 

1893-94 

1894-95 

1895-96 


$1,599 40 
976 93 

1,982 72 
2,332 08 
2,486 54 
3,988 83 
2,288 35 


$1,156 32 
1,129 39 
792 09 
1,077 70 
3,868 81 
4,300 48 
4,046 02 


$2,755 72 
2,106 32 
2,774 81 
3,409 78 
6,355 35 
8,289 31 
6,334 37 




$15,654 85 


•$16,370 81 


$32,025 66 



Our examination of Mr. Swan's accounts has covered a 
period of about five years, and has been thorough, and we 
have adjusted and balanced his books up to the present time. 
We found very few errors, and everywhere indications of care 
and painstaking. He has in his possession all the money his 
books call for, and $27.'02 to spare. To be sure that all the 
money received from rents and sales of materials and for- 
feited balances on main pipe deposits, etc., had gone into the 
City Treasury, we checked all the items of such character 
for a period of three years from the books of the Clerk of the 
Water Department to the books of the City Collector, and 
found that every sum had been properly accounted for in that 
office. There are improvements that can and ought to be 
made in the methods of transacting this money deposit busi- 
ness and in the way of keeping the accounts, and about those 
matters, as you have requested, we will make suggestions 
later. 

Our time has been so occupied with the investigation of 
the cash transactions, hereinbefore alluded to, that the thor- 
ough examination in the methods of the general books, which 
involve no money matters, directly, has been held in abey- 
ance. We will look into that and report specifically. The 



28 City Document No. 38. 

subject matter of these books is mainly the recording of bills 
of all material purchased for the department — all bills being 
rendered in duplicate, one of which, approved by the Board, 
goes to the City Auditor, and being, in due course, paid by 
the Treasurer. 

Our opinion is that these books and methods can be 
abridged, much in the direction of simplicity, perspicacity 
and economy. 

The methods of the " Income Division " will be looked into 
with the view of criticism, abridging, altering or improving, 
if such seems to be necessary. It would have been done this 
week, but the rush of business always attendant upon the 
last week in February, when the sixty days' grace expire, 
rendered the books practically inaccessible. 

Very respectfully, 

(Signed) R. McLaughlin and 

Andrew Stewart. 



II. 



Boston, March 11, 1896. 



Hon. John R. Murphy, 

Water Commissioner of Boston : 

Dear Sir, — Having completed our investigation of the 
cash transactions of the Income Division of the Water De- 
partment, formerly known as the Water Registrar's Depart- 
ment, we respectfully submit to you our report as follows : 

The period covered by this examination began about the 
time the Water Department was divided by ordinance in 
1890. By this division two departments, known respect- 
ively as the Water Income Department and the Water 
Supply Department, were created. The Water Board had 
charge of the Supply Department, and the Income Depart- 
ment was under the control of the Water Registrar, and thus 
the two distinct departments existed up to July 1, 1895, 
when the act consolidating the departments under the control 
of one Water Commissioner took effect. 

Under date of February 27, we reported our conclusions as 
to the management of the cash affairs of the Supply Depart- 
ment, and the present report has reference only to the cash 
transactions of the Income Department. 



Water Department. 29 

At the time our investigation began, and up to June, 
1892, Mr. Davis was Water Registrar, and the purposes for 
which deposits of money were received in his department 
were almost identical with those of the Supply Department, 
which were set forth in detail in our other report. The sys- 
tem and methods used in conducting this business during 
the above period were, in our opinion, very inadequate and 
most unbusinesslike. The balances of deposits due the city, 
and the balances due the depositors, should have been 
kept entirely separate, the former eventually to be sent to 
the City Collector's, and the latter held in the control of the 
Registrar, to be paid the holders of receipts upon application. 
Instead, the method pursued was to send the balances due 
the depositors — if they delayed at all about calling for them 
— as well as the amounts due the city, to the City Collector, 
and when the owners of the balances so treated, subsequently 
from time to time presented their receipts at the Registrar's 
office for redemption, they were paid apparently out of the 
money which the Registrar at the time happened to have on 
hand — funds really applicable, of course, to later deposits. 
At the conclusion of Mr. Davis's incumbency all the money in 
the office, which was composed chiefly of amounts, the final 
disposition of which had not at the time been determined, 
was dumped into the Collector's instead of being turned over 
to the incoming Registrar. The result of this was that 
all the balances due depositors at that time were tied up 
in the Treasurer's hands, their final resting place probably 
having been in the Sinking Fund. Thus Mr. Doherty began 
his term completely handicapped, with no money at all on 
hand to meet the claims of the holders of receipts with 
balances due them. In that condition the matter has re- 
mained to the present day, resulting of course in reproach 
being cast upon the department because of receipts presented 
not being honored, and in the loss, so far, to the depositors 
of the sums due them. To adjust these accounts accurately 
would require certainly weeks of time, and the amount 
involved is not large enough to warrant the required expend- 
iture upon the part of the city. We think, though, that 
some arrangement should be made so that outstanding re- 
ceipts could be redeemed upon presentation, and would 
suggest that the simplest way would be to have the holders 
of these old receipts render bills for the amounts due them, 
these bills to be paid out of the Water Department appro- 
priation. We saw no evidence whatever of any dishonesty, 
and have reason to believe there was none, but the methods 



30 City Document No. 38. 

pursued were such that confusion and annoyance were 
inevitable. 

After Mr. Doherty became Registrar, which was in July, 
1892, the question arose as to which department ought to 
receive deposits for pipes, etc., other than main pipes, and 
the matter was finally decided by the Water Board assuming 
control of these funds, so that from January, 1893, to July, 
1895, all deposit moneys were received in the office of the 
Water Commissioners, and the moneys received by the Water 
Registrar were confined to amounts paid for the letting on 
and shutting off of water, and occasional sums for the use of 
water from hydrants for contractors or for travelling shows. 
For the six months or so that Mr. Doherty had the charge of 
the general money deposits of the Registrar's Department — 
though he had to begin under great disadvantages, as stated 
— there was an improvement in the system, and it was pos- 
sible for us to prove the accuracy of his accounts to our 
entire satisfaction. Since July, 1895, when the Water 
Registrar's Department became the Income Division of the 
Water Department, there have been no receipts of money in 
that division except for letting on and shutting off water. 
For the six months ending December 31, 1895, the total 
amount received from these sources was only about $1,000. 
The custom is to turn over these receipts to the City Col- 
lector once a week. Owing to the peculiar nature of this 
income we see no better way of collecting it than that now 
in operation, but would suggest that the money received in 
these ways be paid to the City Collector daily instead of 
weekly, and thus any danger of loss to the Water Depart- 
ment from the handling of it would be infinitesimal. 

We will continue our examination into the other branches 
of the Water Department, as arranged, as rapidly as possible, 
and report our findings to you at our earliest convenience. 

Very respectfully, 
(Signed) R. McLaughlin and 

Andrew Stewart. 



III. 

Boston, May 21, 1896. 

Hon. John R. Murphy, 

Water Commissioner : 

Dear Sir, — We present you herewith our final report of 
the investigation of the book-keeping and accounting affairs 



Water Department. 31 

of the Water Department of the city of Boston, the same 
being supplementary to our reports to you of the twenty- 
seventh of February and eleventh of March, 1896. 

General Office. 

The scheme of the books kept in the office of the Water 
Commissioner is very good, though it impressed us as being 
somewhat over-elaborated, yet as no information is furnished 
by the books that may not be desired at some time, we did 
not think it best to suggest much here in the way of change. 
These are the central books of the system of accounts of the 
Water Department, the books elsewhere being tributary to 
them, so that all matters pertaining to the finances of the 
department converge here. We made an audit of them for 
the period of one year, and were able easily to prove their 
correctness, one with another, and all with the Auditor. The 
work has been and is being admirably done. There is every 
evidence of this, and no evidence of anything else. 

Income Division. 

We found the general system of work in this office satis- 
factory, but the application of it not altogether so. The books 
were more than sufficiently expansive in some ways, and yet 
lacked very desirable detail. Not enough attention had been 
paid, either, to the necessity of having the accounts tally with 
those of the Collector. The mass of detail in this office is 
something enormous, the books and papers dealing largely 
with matters of record and reference and schedules. We 
have made a careful survey of all things pertaining to this 
office, and feel satisfied that when the changes in methods 
and books contemplated by the Superintendent are made, — 
all of which have our hearty approval, — all necessary in- 
formation will be easily obtainable. We think that the 
meter books kept by Mr. Freeman are not at all indispen- 
sable, as there are regular department books which deal with 
the same subject in an adequate manner. 

Eastern Division. 

At the headquarters of this division on Albany street, 
some of the most essential clerical work of the department is 
performed. The necessity for efficient service there is very 
great, and for this reason, and also because we soon discerned 
that important matters — especially during the past year — 
had been conducted in an unsatisfactory manner, we made a 
careful and critical examination. 



32 City Document No. 38. 

The cause of the trouble, we think, was two-fold. First, 
an inadequate and clumsy system of keeping the stock ac- 
count; and second, the removal or transfer of the chief clerk 
of the division. While Mr. Donnelly remained in charge no 
trouble occurred, on account of his special knowledge and 
skilful management ; but the advent of an inexperienced man 
presaged the confusion of the past year. When one takes 
into consideration that the stock kept at the Albany-street 
yard is not only promiscuous, but so great in quantity as to 
be worth at the present time considerably over $100,000, one 
sees readily that a good system steadily adhered to is indis- 
pensable. We have given much thought to this subject, and 
feel assured that if the methods formulated and explained by 
us are carried out there will be no more trouble about this 
matter, or it will certainly be reduced to a minimum. We 
have confidence in the ability and faithfulness of the new 
chief clerk and his assistants, and will be surprised if our 
prophecy is not speedily realized. As to the other matters at 
issue, we think it is only necessary to state that we have 
advised changes which will consolidate the accounts, and 
which will prevent needless repetition of work performed at 
the general office ; thus saving valuable time and causing 
better service to be rendered. The system of keeping the 
pay-rolls not only in this division, but throughout the Water 
Department, we consider well conceived and well executed. 

Mystic Division. 

This division having been recently absorbed by the Eastern 
Division — and being conducted at present as a branch of it 
— the conditions being similar, the same methods will apply. 
The amount of stock to be taken into consideration is com- 
paratively small, amounting at present to about $4,000 worth. 
We have made suggestions to the book-keeper in regard to 
the necessary changes, so that his books will be uniform with 
those of the Eastern Division, and having entire confidence 
in him, believe that in a short time he will have things in 
satisfactory shape. 

Chestnut Hill. 

At Chestnut Hill is the headquarters of the Western 
Division, and the system of book-keeping there is similar to 
that used in the other offices of the department, with such 
variations as are made necessary by some additional require- 
ments. The accounts of the pumping- stations are kept there 
also, and much work in the way of tabulation of statistics is 



Water Department. 33 

required by the engineer for comparison and estimation. The 
amount of detail is considerable, but all clerical work is per- 
formed in a manner both conscientious and creditable. We 
saw little to criticise and much to commend. 

In conclusion, we wish to say that we are satisfied that 
the changes you have personally made in the methods of 
transacting business, and which you requested us to examine, 
are all in the direction of increased efficiency, and will 
bear good results. We also think it only fair to say that, 
without exception, during this investigation, we have been 
treated with the utmost courtesy by the clerks of the Water 
Department, who have been more than willing, at all times, 
to render us all assistance in their power. 

Yours respectfully, 

(Signed) Rodney McLaughlin and 

Andrew Stewart, 

Examiners of Accounts. 



IV. 

28 State Stbeet, Boston, 
May 15, 1897. 

Hon. John R. Murphy, 

Water Commissioner of the City of Boston : 

Dear Sir, — In compliance with your request I have made 
recently a survey of the books and accounting affairs of the 
Boston Water Department; this examination being supple- 
mentary to that made at your desire shortly after you became 
Commissioner. In a city department of such magnitude, 
with ramifications so numerous and extensive, no complete 
audit could be accomplished except by one with nothing but 
that to do. Therefore, my aim has been to see, so far as 
possible under the circumstances, if the accounting matters 
of the department were being conducted faithfully and hon- 
estly, to ascertain if the improvements suggested a year ago 
were being carried forward, and to discover the remaining 
imperfections in the system. 

I am pleased to be able to say that I found a decided im- 
provement all along the line, both as to methods pursued and 
the execution of them. In our report to you of the 27th of 
February, 1896, we said in regard to the use of money received 
from charges on account of service pipes, and deposits on 
account of main pipes, for current expenses, that " the 



34 



City Document No. 38. 



deposit money should be used for no purpose, whatever, but 
for the redemption of the receipts outstanding against it." 
This dangerous abuse, which had continued for years, has 
been abolished. The fund on the first day of May, 1897, 
amounted to $21,913.37, which amount I found to be 
deposited in bank to the credit of the Water Department. 
In the past, interest on this fund had not been required of 
the banks holding it, but now is required, and about $400 
has been received from this source since you made that rule. 
A year ago we called attention also to the great increase 
in the expenditures of money by the department for travel- 
ling and miscellaneous matters during the past few years, and 
by way of comparison I submit the following figures taken 
from the books : 



Travelling. 



Miscellaneous, 



Total. 



1892-93 
1893-94 
1894-95 
1895-96 
1896-97 



$2,332 08 

2,486 54 

3,988 83 

2,288 35 

320 80 



$1,077 70 
3,868 81 
4,300 48 
4,046 02 
2,520 94 



53,409 78 
6,355 35 
8,289 31 
6,334 37 
2,841 74 



We said in our report to you of the 21st of May, 1896, in 
regard to the Income Division, that " we found the general 
system of work in this office satisfactory ; but the application of 
it not altogether so." This criticism could not be made at the 
present time, for there have been many improvements in- 
troduced, which have been intelligently designed, and are 
being faithfully carried out. For instance, now all applica- 
tions for service pipes must be filed at the office of the gen- 
eral superintendent, and these applications must be made 
either by the owners of property or their authorized attorneys. 
Heretofore contractors, plumbers or any one could make appli- 
cations, which system resulted in duplicate entries and con- 
sequent confusion. 

Now all entries of assessments, abatements and rebates 
are footed up on the ledgers, and carried forward continu- 
ously, and may be very easily compared with the figures of 
the City Collector, and the meter accounts are so arranged 
that the quarterly accounts committed to the Collector can be 
quickly examined. 

New books have been provided for the recording of nec- 
essary data in connection with the - elevators and motors in 
service, and also new records of all fire pipes connected with 



Water Department. 35 

the water works, and a book has been opened which gives a 
summary of assessments, abatements, collections and out- 
standing balances. These are only some of the excellent 
improvements which have been made, resulting in placing 
this division upon a very satisfactory basis. 

There is a question inherited from former administrations 
which, I am convinced, demands speedy settlement. For 
years it has been customary, if not obligatory, for the Water 
Department to do considerable work for other city depart- 
ments, and also for corporations, in the way of laying water 
pipes and making changes in the locations of pipe lines, etc., 
the expense of the work performed belonging properly to the 
corporations and other city departments, whose operations 
necessitated these changes. Prior to 1894 the cost of such 
work was charged to the Water Department appropriation, 
and bills were rendered to the parties for whom the work 
had been done, and the amounts due having been paid to the 
City Collector, were credited to the Water Department, but 
were used for the benefit of the water sinking fund, and 
were, consequently, valueless thereafter, so far as application 
to the general work or maintenance of the department was 
concerned, for which purposes the moneys would have been 
used had they not been diverted on account of this work 
done outside the Water Department. Thus the cost of main- 
taining the department from year to year appeared to be 
greater than it really was because of these methods. In the 
year 1 894 a large amount of this outside work having been 
done, particularly for the Park Department, some one whose 
stock of ingenuity was greater than his knowledge of book- 
keeping conceived the idea of having the bills for the work 
done offset by the payment of Water Department pay-rolls 
by the debtors from time to time to the amount of their 
obligations. While this scheme has had the desired effect 
of saving the appropriation from its former losses, it has 
been the cause of so impairing the accounts of the Water 
Department that they are absolutely misleading in certain 
ways. I believe these troubles can be remedied — and 
remedied they should be without question — by the passage 
by the City Council each year of an order allowing the 
moneys received by the city for outside work done by the 
Water Department to be appropriated and expended for the 
general uses of that department. I think this would reach 
the root of all the trouble, having not only the effect of 
keeping the appropriation intact, but also of making it possi- 
ble to keep the books so that they shall show the exact 
transactions of the department. The only other alternative 



36 City Document No. 38. 

I can think of would be a refusal to do any work not purely 
departmental work. 

In reviewing the work of the year nothing has pleased me 
so much as the great reform in the important matter of the 
keeping of the stock account. In our report to you of May 
21, 1896, we said that we found at Albany street "an inade- 
quate and clumsy system of keeping the stock account." 
The truth of this statement had been completely demon- 
strated when, at our suggestion, you had an account of stock 
on hand taken shortly after you became Commissioner. The 
revelation made by this was almost startling, for while the 
books called for $62,529.54 worth of stock, there was found 
to be on hand $114,040.89 worth, — a difference of 
$51,511.35. We formulated a system for keeping this 
account, and that it has been faithfully executed is proved 
by the fact that when account of stock was taken at the 
close of the fiscal year, $120,485.81 worth of stock was 
found to be on hand, while the books called for $119,912.77 
worth, — a difference of only $573.04. Further comment 
would be superfluous, I think, in the light of these figures. 

Certain improvements ascertained to be essential have 
been made in the system of meter accounting. The old 
ways were well enough, so far as they went, but specific 
information about meters could not be obtained without 
much trouble and delay. The system has been expanded so 
as to cover these deficiencies. Take, for instance, the matter 
of repairs of meters. Meter repairs should be divided into 
three classes, — repairs in service, in the shops of the depart- 
ment, and in the factories of the makers. No correct nor 
satisfactory statement of the ultimate cost or the relative 
merits of meters could be obtained from the meter books, 
because of the absence of these vital details which could be 
obtained only by taking these divisions into consideration 
always. In the future, because of methods recently devised, 
it will be possible to give at short notice a complete record 
of every meter which may be owned by the department from 
the time of its purchase to the time of its condemnation. 
Furthermore, the correctness of all repair bills rendered by 
the meter companies will have to be vouched for by the 
foreman of the meter department, one of whose duties will 
be to know definitely the details of those repairs. 

I notice that there is no " holiday " account kept upon the 
books, and as I do not think that the money paid on account 
of holidays should be charged to main pipe laying, or some- 
thing else of that sort, just the same as if there had been no 
holidays, I would advise the opening of an account with 



Water Department. 37 

holidays on the maintenance book, so that their cost can be 
shown the same as the cost of anything else. 

In the matter of work done for the department by outside 
teamsters I find improvements have been made which will 
serve as checks to dishonesty, should any be attempted. 

For instance, heretofore, no record was kept of the outside 
teams employed on work for the department, except whatever 
memoranda the superintendents in charge kept for their per- 
sonal use, they having had to vouch — and they alone — for 
the amount of bills rendered for outside teaming. Instead 
of this free-and-easy arrangement, it is necessary now for the 
driver of each team, in every instance, to secure a ticket 
from the foreman of the job where his team is employed, 
giving the particulars of the work performed. When the 
owners of the teams present their bills for payment, these 
tickets must be presented with the bills as vouchers, and in 
addition to this, as a further safeguard, the foreman must 
render a daily report to the department in which is given an 
account of what he has done, and among the different items 
of information which he furnishes is a statement of the 
number of hired teams used, and this also must correspond 
with the bill rendered. So, should fraudulent practices be 
attempted, they would be much more certain of quick detec- 
tion. This is a fair sample of many improvements which 
have been made here and there, where there were weak spots, 
which it is not necessary for me to describe in detail. Un- 
necessary books have been eliminated and necessary books 
and papers have been added. Accounts have been condensed 
where practicable, but where greater detail seemed essential 
they have been amplified without hesitation, for there was 
too much trusting altogether to the hazard of people's 
memories heretofore. 

Yours very respectfully, 

(Signed) Andrew Stewart. 



V. 

28 State Street, Boston, 

September 10, 1898. 

Hon. John R. Murphy, 

Water Commissioner of the City of Boston : 

Dear Sir, — In accordance with your desire, I have care- 
fully reviewed the clerical work of the Water Department 
for the year 1897-98, and have also studied the operation of 



38 City Document No. 38. 

the methods introduced by you to promote the efficiency of 
the book-keeping and general accounting of the department, 
and have the honor to report as follows : 

I found on hand April 1, the amount of money — 
$21,135.72 — required by the books for the redemption of the 
receipts given to people on account of deposits made by them 
for main and service pipe laying. This fund is not now, and 
has not been, used during your tenure of office for any pur- 
pose but the legitimate one for which it was created. 

I said to you in my last report, under date of May 15, 
1897, that "I notice that there is no 'holiday' account kept 
upon the books, and as I do not think that the money paid 
on account of holidays should be charged to main pipe lay- 
ing, or something else of that sort, just the same as if there 
had been no holidays, I would advise the opening of an ac- 
count with holidays on the maintenance book, so that their 
cost can be shown the same as the cost of anything else." 
This has been done as suggested. 

I also said in the same report : " There is a question in- 
herited from former administrations which, I am convinced, 
demands speedy settlement. For years it has been custom- 
ary, if not obligatory, for the Water Department to do con- 
siderable work for other city departments, and also for 
corporations, in the way of laying water pipes and making 
changes in the locations of pipe lines, etc., the expense of the 
work performed belonging properly to the corporations and 
other city departments, whose operations necessitated these 
changes. Prior to 1894 the cost of such work was 
charged to the Water Department appropriation, and bills 
were rendered to the parties for whom the work had been 
done, and the amounts due having been paid to the City Col- 
lector, were credited to the Water Department, but were 
used for the benefit of the water sinking fund, and were, 
consequently, valueless thereafter so far as application to the 
general work of maintenance of the department was con- 
cerned, for which purposes the moneys would have been 
used had they not been diverted on account of this work 
done outside the Water Department. Thus the cost of 
maintaining the department from year to year appeared to be 
greater than it really was, because of these methods. In the 
year 1894, a large amount of this outside work having been 
done, particularly for the Park Department, some one whose 
stock of ingenuity was greater than his knowledge of book- 
keeping, conceived the idea of having the bills for the work 
done offset by the payment of Water Department pay-rolls by 
the debtors from time to time to the amount of their obliga- 



Water Department. 39 

tions. While this scheme has had the desired effect of saving 
the appropriation from its former losses, it has been the cause 
of so impairing the accounts of the Water Department that 
they are absolutely misleading in certain ways." These 
crude and unsatisfactory practices have been abolished, and 
the matter is now treated in a straightforward and business- 
like way. 

The general clerical work of the Commissioner's office I 
found to have been conducted as heretofore in a creditable 
manner. 

At the office of the Distribution Division, formerly the 
Eastern Division, on Albany street, the accounting affairs 
have been further systematized, so that now there is order 
and method and discipline where I found two years and a 
half ago certain conditions bordering on the chaotic. 

The gain noted last year in the keeping of the complicated 
stock account has been held ; and, indeed I saw no sign of 
any backward step in any direction. 

As to the Income Division of the Water Department, I 
wish to say that the changes and new methods initiated last 
year have all proved to be practicable and in the line of 
progress. The gain, though, in the keeping of the meter 
accounts has been really noteworthy. 

On August 28, 1897, the Meter Service was consolidated 
with the Income Division, thus bringing under the charge of 
this division all work of setting, repairing, taking out, chang- 
ing and testing of meters. In order to bring the Meter 
Service branch of the department to a proper degree of effi- 
ciency it was necessary to make a number of changes in the 
methods of handling the business, a few of which I mention 
below. 

A competent man was placed in full charge of field work, 
such as applying, changing, repairing in service and taking 
out of meters, and the same sort of man was placed in full 
charge of all shop work, provided with the necessary authority 
and assistance to procure good repair work and accurate 
tests. 

A system of thorough examination of all meters coining 
into shop, both from factory and from service, was established, 
also a system of thorough examination, repairing and clean- 
ing of meter registers in shop, thus reclaiming a large num- 
ber of registers that had been thrown aside. 

A system of repairing meter register boxes, glasses and 
seals and of keeping the same hi proper repair was organized, 
thus insuring meters against improper interference either by 
persons connected or not connected with the service, and also 



40 City Document No. 38. 

a system of checking the readings of meter registers going to 
or coming from service, thus assuring accuracy in water 
takers' bills. 

The capacity of the shop for repairing, testing and adjust- 
ing meters was enlarged, and meters are now repaired in shop 
at less cost than was involved by the old method of sending 
them to the factory, and many meters have been reclaimed 
that had been condemned. 

These are illustrations of the improvements made during 
the past year in the working of the Meter Service, and 
will convey some idea of the great gain made during that 
period. 

As to the card system of meter accounting, instituted some 
months ago, I have nothing to say, after a careful inspection 
of it, but words of commendation. It has already proven 
itself to be a great advance upon the former method of book 
accounting. 

As an effect of the improved systems, it soon became 
evident that the hydraulic elevators and motors in use in 
this city had been running for some years practically unsu- 
pervised, with defaced clocks, leaky joints, valves and cylin- 
der heads neglected, and, futhermore, that nothing was being 
done towards verifying the accuracy of the clocks. Accord- 
ingly, during the past year, a complete inspection of all 
elevators in use in the city was made, and it was found that 
the elevator cylinders were of varying dimensions and numer- 
ous in character and make ; that many of the attached clocks 
were of obsolete patterns, and were located often in inaccessi- 
ble places, and that the clocks were constantly breaking 
down^by reason of long service and crude repairs, thus caus- 
ing them to become inoperative. Of these facts no records 
were formerly kept, and so far as known the owners were 
never requested to make repairs. 

In order that the department might possess positive 
knowledge of the actual condition of affairs, all data obtained 
through the above-mentioned inspection was recorded in a 
book provided for that purpose. The displacement of each 
elevator cylinder was carefully computed and the registration 
of the clock compared therewith, and out of some 465 eleva- 
tor cylinders in the city only four were found to be correct, 
all others showing either gains or losses to the department. 
In cases where the registration of a clock was found to be 
incorrect the owners were requested to have the same adjusted, 
and all defective clocks have been replaced by new ones, also 
leaks and defects in mechanism have been remedied, thus 
preventing waste of water. At present, for the first time in 



Water Department. 41 

the history of the Boston Water Department, there is in the 
possession of the city a complete record of each elevator and 
the displacement of its cylinder, and all elevator clocks have 
been adjusted to practical accuracy. 

Then, as to fire-pipes, it was found that the records 
relating to the fire-pipe service of the city were about worth- 
less as records. If any inspection of the numerous systems 
and their valves and outlets was made, no record was kept of 
it. There has been established a system of inspection of fire- 
pipes by which some 5,000 valves and hydrants are regularly 
inspected and kept sealed and tagged, and something 
resembling a recognition of the rules of the Water Depart- 
ment by property-holders is now observable. A system of 
permits for breaking seals on fire-pipes, requiring that no 
seal be broken without first obtaining a permit, has been 
adopted, and the department is thus enabled to follow all 
cases of unsealed valves until they are again resealed. 

That so much has been accomplished in so short a space 
of time is abundant testimony to the willingness and faith- 
fulness of the emyloyees of the Water Department, when 
properly and intelligently directed. And in this connection I 
trust that you will permit me to say, what I very much desire 
to say, that in the two years and a half that I have been 
going in and out of your department, consulting with you as 
to its needs and making suggestions as to the improvement 
of its accounting transactions, I can think of no reform 
suggested that you have not had executed in its letter and 
spirit. That the books and accounts of the Water Depart- 
ment are to-day in a condition so admirable is owing solely to 
your resolution to have them placed upon a businesslike 
basis, regardless of all difficulties in the way. 

Yours respectfully, 
(Signed) Andrew Stewart, 

Examiner of Accounts. 



VI. 

28 State Street, Boston, October 10, 1898. 

Hon. John R. Murphy: 

Dear Sir, — As requested by you, I have looked into the 
matter of dispensing with books relative to the keeping of 
the meter accounts of the Water Department, at the office of 
the General Superintendent of the Income Division, and 



42 City Document No. 38. 

would say that I think the card system at the Distribution 
Division on Albany street yields all of the information neces- 
sary, and that the keeping of books for this purpose at the 
office in City Hall would be a work of supererogation. 
Furthermore, I think it would be well to test the card system 
fully, and that can be done best by letting it stand alone. 
Should it prove in any way unequal to what is expected of 
it, we could then take into consideration the keeping of sup- 
plementary books, but my own opinion is that the card system 
will prove sufficiently elastic to meet any reasonable expec- 
tation. 

Yours very truly, 

(Signed) Andrew Stewart. 



VII. 

28 State Street, Boston, April 15, 1899. 

Hon. John R. Murphy, 

Water Commissioner of the City of Boston : 

Dear Sir, — At your request I have made an examination 
of the expenditures of the Water Department for the fiscal 
years 1895-96 to 1898-99, inclusive, the figures for the pur- 
pose having been obtained from the reports of the City 
Auditor and the Water Department reports for the above- 
mentioned period. I submit to you herewith my finding in 
the matter : 

Expenditures of the Boston Water Department. 
1895-96 to 1898-99, inclusive. 

1895-96. 

Current expenses (Auditor's Report, pp. 137, 138) . . $610,101 TO 
Extension of Mains, etc. (Auditor's Report, p. 141) . . 251,984 94 
Additional Supply (Auditor's Report, p. 140) . . . 382,819 01 

$1,244,905 65 
Paid on account of work done for corporations, etc. . 1S,648 71 



Total $1,226,256 94 



Water Department. 43 



1896-97. 



Current expenses (Auditor's Report, p. 151) 
Extension of Mains, etc. (Auditor's Report, p. 153) 
Additional Supply (Auditor's Report, p. 153) . 



Paid on account of work done for corporations, etc. 
(Second Annual Report Water Commissioner, pp. 11-13) 

Total 

1897-98. 

Current expenses (Auditor's Report, p. 164) 
Extension of Mains, etc. (Auditor's Report, p. 165) . 
Additional Supply (Auditor's Report, p. 165) . 



Paid on account of work done for corporations, etc. 
(Third Annual Report Water Commissioner, pp. 13, 14), 



$591,550 42 
232,142 98 


217,070 


45 


.$1,040,763 


85 


17,366 


14 


$1,023,397 


71 


$623,476 51 
281,782 32 
179,879 01 


$1,085,137 84 


13,300 


73 


$1,071,837 


11 


$808,582 59 


152,601 


63 


$961,184 22 
47,798 94 



Total . . . 

1898-99. 

Current Expenses and Extension of Mains — one appro- 
priation — (Auditor's Exhibit, January 31, 1899, p. 19), 

From loan of $200,000, issued November, 1898, for Exten- 
sion of Mains (Auditor's Exhibit, January 31, 1899, 
P- 17) 

Paid on account of work done for corporations, etc. 

Total $913,385 28 

The amounts expended during the above years upon por- 
tions of the Water Department system now held by the State, 
estimated as closely as possible, are as follows : 

1895-96 $233,482 98 

1896-97 200,608 84 

1897-98 168,862 83 

1898-99 14,557 91 

The amount for the year 1898-99 ($14,557.91) subtracted 
from the total amount as stated ($913,385.28) would leave 
$898,827.37 as the net expenditure for that year. 

The total amount for the year 1897-98, that is, including 
the amounts paid on account of portions taken by the State, 
was $1,071,837.11, showing a difference of expenditure be- 
tween the two years of $173,009.74, caused by the loss to 
the city of those portions of the department taken by the 
State. 

Yours very truly, 

(Signed) Andrew Stewart. 



44 City Document No. 38. 

VIII. 

28 State Street, Boston, Mass., May 22, 1899. 

Hon. John R. Muephy, 

Water Commissioner of the City of Boston : 

Dear Sir, — In accordance with your desire, I made 
during the past weeks a survey of the accounting affairs 
of the Water Department for the fiscal year 1898-99, and 
herewith submit to you my report of the same. 

I found on hand the amount of money — $18,114.74 — 
required by the books for the redemption of the receipts 
given to people on account of deposits made by them for 
main and service-pipe laying. 

This fund is not now, and has not been, used during your 
tenure of office for any purpose but the legitimate one for 
which it was created. 

The general clerical work of the Commissioner's office I 
found to have been conducted as heretofore in a creditable 
manner. 

At the office of the Distribution Division on Albany street 
the accounting affairs have been still further systematized, 
and the business of the division is being conducted in a very 
orderly and methodical manner, all of the improvements 
which I noted in my report to you last year having been 
held and many others having been consummated, some of 
which, as follows, are worthy of specification. 

The system of accounting for the expenditure of the yearly 
appropriations in vogue heretofore, consisted in charging the 
money expended in labor and stock to one or more of the 
many subdivisions into which the work of the department is 
classified. These subdivisions were not specific enough to 
give one a comprehensive idea of the cost of certain kinds of 
work ; for instance, the main pipe work was formerly sepa- 
rated into three subdivisions, viz., Extension, Relaying and 
Repairs. Originally the term "relaying" was intended to 
cover the work of renewing mains worn out in service, but 
for want of a broader term it became the custom to charge 
under this heading, not only the work of renewing the old 
mains worn out in service, but also the replacing of mains 
insufficient to supply the demand made upon them by those 
of a larger diameter, relocating mains in the way of some 
public improvement, and raising or lowering mains to conform 
with new grades. Now these different kinds of work are 
provided for under the heading " Changes, Renewals and 



Water Department. 45 

Improvements," which give opportunity for proper and cor- 
rect analysis. 

Furthermore, the term " extension " now represents upon 
the books of the department what it was meant to represent, 
namely, the linear extension of the system, and not in any 
way the diametrical extension. 

All kinds of hydrant work were formerly designated by the 
title " Hydrant Repairs ; " now this work is classified under 
the headings " New Hydrants," " Changes in Style and Loca- 
tion" and "Repairs." When water was delivered through 
hydrants to contractors the labor was charged wrongly, for 
want of a proper subdivision, to " Hydrant Repairs." The 
labor should have been charged to the " Collection of Water 
Revenue," and that is what is being done now. 

Service-pipe work was formerly divided into two classes, 
viz., "New Services" and "Service-Pipe Repairs," and a 
most important element of service-pipe work, namely, the 
changing of size and location, was not accounted for sepa- 
rately, but was included in one or the other of these two sub- 
divisions. A subdivision covering this sort of work is now 
provided. 

Work done on water-posts was formerly charged under 
" New Services " or " Service-Pipe Repairs." It is now ac- 
counted for in a class by itself, and the considerable amount 
of work done on this order of fixture is properly exhibited. 

The accounts necessary because of fountains were imper- 
fect, for the indefinite term " Fountain Repairs " had to cover 
everything. Now the divisions comprise "New Fountains," 
" Changes in Style and Location," " Furnishing Ice for 
Fountains " and " Fountain Repairs." 

As to the expenditures of the department on account of 
holidays, sickness, etc., much has been accomplished in the 
right direction. 

Each foreman is now supplied with a time-book containing 
all the subdivisions, so arranged as to allow of his charging 
the smallest fraction of a day to any particular kind of work. 
Formerly, outside of the Yard, nothing but a plain time-book 
was used, showing only whether a man worked or not, and 
giving no idea as to the kind of work on which he was em- 
ployed. 

Overtime was formerly given to men on their simple state- 
ment that they had worked so many hours overtime, said 
statement, of course, approved by some one in authority, who 
must have depended upon his memory largely as to the cor- 
rectness of the same. Now, before payment, the charges are 
checked with a report of the work done, and must correspond 



46 City Document No. 38. 

with the labor on the report. This method not only checks 
the overtime, but also insures a correct report, that is as far 
as the labor is concerned. It was not uncommon heretofore 
to have the overtime paid omitted from the report of the work, 
and if the work was chargeable the charge, based upon the 
report, was, as a matter of course, insufficient, and the de- 
partment was underpaid for its work. 

As to the stock accounts, which in the past were the pro- 
lific cause of untold annoyance and anxiety, the gain noted 
last year has been more than held. 

Heretofore the teamsters were not obliged to show a re- 
ceipt for the stock which they took from the Yard. Now 
they are given a blank receipt, which must be returned signed 
by the foreman in charge of the work for which the stock is 
intended, which certifies to the receipt of the stock. The 
time that the teamster leaves the Yard is noted by the Yard- 
master on the blank. The time that he arrives with the 
stock where the work is being done, and the time he leaves 
there to return to the Yard, is noted by the foreman of the 
job, and the time he finally arrives in the Yard is noted by 
the Yardmaster, thus giving a correct record of his move- 
ments and showing the total amount of time consumed in de- 
livering the goods, thus making it easy to discover any at- 
tempt on the part of the teamster to kill time. 

Those in charge of the outlying yards have been given re- 
ceiving and delivery books in which they are to record the 
receipt and delivery of everything going in or out of their 
yards. This makes it possible to check the statement of 
" stock used " on their reports of work done. A special 
stock account with each of the outlying yards and the " ser- 
vice-pipe gang" is being kept, and at the end of the year it 
will be possible to tell just how much stock on hand each 
should have. 

Heretofore the work of the carpenter and machine shops 
was reported in a rather general way, which gave no idea of 
the cost of any particular job. Now the almost innumerable 
jobs, varying in magnitude from the construction of a build- 
ing complete to the sharpening of a knife or the driving of a 
nail, is reported in detail, showing the exact cost of each. 
This, of course, entails considerable work and greatly in- 
creases the amount of record matter. 

Up to the present year the records of the different kinds of 
work performed by the department were crowded into about 
five books, and to one unacquainted with these books it was 
a difficult matter to find the details of work done. During 
the past year the records have been classified and books made 



Water Department. 47 

that are adapted in every particular to each class of work. 
This elaborate system was formulated as a result of a thorough 
investigation and progressive treatment of the requirements 
of the department. 

I think it nothing but just to say here that for the good 
work accomplished in the Distribution Division, as stated, 
the Chief Clerk and his assistants are deserving of great 
credit, for without their earnest and intelligent diligence and 
faithfulness but a very small part of the things done in such 
a short time could have been done. 

As to the Income Division, including the Meter Service 
Division of the Water Department, I found that the improve- 
ments in methods and systems noted in my report to you of 
10th of last September had all been adhered to and are prov- 
ing satisfactory. 

Yours very truly, 
(Signed) Andrew Stewart. 

Examiner of Accounts. 



48 



City Document No. 38. 



APPENDIX B. 



REPORT OF THE INCOME DIVISION. 



City Hali,, Boston, February 1, 1899. 

Hon. John R. Murphy, 

Water Commissioner : 

Sir, — Herewith please find annual report of the Income 
Division, Water Department. The reports of the Meter 
Service and the Deacon Service cover the financial year 
ending January 31, 1899 ; the balance of the report is ren- 
dered for the calendar year ending December 31, 1898, it 
being impracticable, owing to the nature of the accounts, to 
render an entire report for the financial year. 

The contracts to supply water to the cities of Chelsea, 
Somerville and Everett were annulled by the Metropolitan 
Water Act on January 1, 1898, which fact necessarily 
reduces the grand totals representing the work performed by 
the Income Division, as compared with former years. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. H. Caldwell, 
Q-eneral Superintendent Income Division. 



INDEX TO TABLES. 

Water-takers, number of 

Fixtures in use January 31, 1899 

Annual rates, assessment, etc. 

Meter rates, assessment, etc. . 

Abatements, number and amounts 

Pipes, new elevator, motor, fire and service 

"Water turned off and on .... 

Receipts for turning water off and on for repairs 

Elevator, motor and fire-pipe service 

Meters, January 31, 1899, statement of . 
" January 31, 1899, distribution of 
" General statement of work performed on 
" condemned ..... 

" applied ....... 

" " private ..... 



Table. 

I. 

II. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 

XII. 

XIII. 

XIV. 

XV. 



Water Department. 



49 



Meters, discontinued ...... XVI. 

purchased ....... XVII. 

sold XVIII. 

repaired at factory ..... XIX. 

" in service ..... XX. 

changed ....... XXI. 

in service January 31, 1899 . . . XXII. 

" " January 31, 1899, private . . XXIII. 

at factory for repairs, January 31, 1899 . XXIV. 

at department shop, January 31, 1899 . XXV. 

Waste inspection ....... XXVI. 

Waste re-examination, previous to repairs . . XXVII. 

Defective fixtures and waste ..... XXVIII. 

Table I. 

Showing Number of Water-takers during 1898. 





Number. 




99,835 




5,650 








105,485 







Table II. 

Showing Kind and Number of Fixtures in use January 31, 1899. 



Bath-tubs 

Bowls 

Foot-tubs 

Sinks 

Taps 

Urinal, automatic 
" otherwise. 

Wash-tubs 

Water-closets 

Total fixtures . . 



Number. 



65,391 

103,754 

356 

170,087 

25,438 

5,001 

586 

100,598 

146,510 



617,721 



50 



City Document No. 38. 



Table III. 

Water by Annual Rates. 



Style of Premises. 



Number of 
Premises. 



Amounts 

Assessed. 



Armories 

Bakeries 

Bath-houses 

Building purposes 

Cemeteries 

Churches 

Clubs 

Depots 

Disinfectant , 

Dwelling-houses 

Fire Department: 

Chemical engines 

Combination wagons 

Hydrants and reservoirs 

Ladder companies 

Steam fire-engines 

Hose companies 

Water towers 

Filling tanks (special) 

Flooding rinks 

Fountains 

Freight-houses 

Green-houses 

Gymnasiums 

Halls 

Hand-hose 

Hospitals 

Hotels 

Laundries 

Libraries and museums 

Manufactories 

Model houses 

Morgue 

Motors 

Offal stations - 

Offices 

Photograph rooms 

Police stations 

Public buildings 

Public institutions 

Puddling trenches 

Restaurants and lunches 

Saloons 

Schools 

Sewers (building), account 1897 
Sewers (building), account 1898 

Sewers (flushing) 

Shops 

Shipping 

Stables 

Steam-engines 

Steam-rollers 

Steam-crushers 

Stores 

Theatres (special) 

Urinals (public) 

Carried forward 



4 

273 

5 

1,210 

12 

245 

162 

46 

1 

54,829 

12 

6 

7,066 

17 

43 

1 

1 

2 

2 

33 

15 

67 

2 

142 

8,680 

58 

5 

578 

1 

15 

9,467 

1 

10 

2 

1,621 

37 

7 

9 

5 

41 

490 

572 

131 

1 

1 

1 

3,042 

33 

4,021 

161 

6 

5 

6,590 

5 

15 



$152 00 

■ 3,617 42 

191 50 

11,750 03 

160 00 

2,868 33 

2,316 79 

913 51 

25 00 

791,941 40 

180 00 

83 33 

105,990 00 

255 00 

1,075 00 

15 00 

15 00 

212 37 

65 86 

555 08 

143 50 

1,201 50 

544 00 
2,128 12 

43,400 00 

4,210 00 

596 00 

10,713 42 

10 00 

425 86 

200,584 79 

10 00 

110 00 

225 00 

14,516 16 

720 11 

130 00 

408 00 

8,682 00 

754 33 

7,815 73 

21,286 20 

1,882 50 

1,780 38 

5,196 18 

500 00 

26,223 57 

1,525 47 

27,959 72 

5,145 01 

150 00 

125 00 

65,648 45 

204 12 

545 00 



99,807 



,377,882 74 



Water Department. 



51 



Table 111.— Concluded. 



Style of Premises. 



Number of 
Premises. 




Amounts 

Assessed. 



Brought forward 

Ward-rooms 

Wasliing-carts 

Watering streets .... 

Totals 



$1,377,882 74 

90 00 

100 00 

50,879 89 



$1,428,952 63 



Table IV. 

Water by Meter Bates. 



Style of Premises. 



Number 

of 
Premises, 



Quantity of 

Water Consumed. 

Cubic Feet. 



Amount 

Assessed. 



Bakeries 

Bath-houses 

Boarding-houses 

Bottling 

Breweries 

Cemeteries 

Chemicals 

Club-houses 

Chutes 

Distilleries 

Electrical companies 

Elevators and motors 

Factories 

Fish-houses 

Gasworks 

Greenhouses 

Halls 

Hospitals 

Hotels 

Iron-works ., . . . . 

Laundries 

Markets 

Mills and engines 

Model houses 

Navy Yard and barracks 

Offices, stores and shops 

Oil-works 

Parks 

Police stations 

Public institutions 

Saloons and restaurants 

Schools 

Slaughtering houses 

Stables 

Steam and street R.K. companies 

Stone-works 

Sugar refineries 

Tanneries 

Theatres 

Warehouses 

Wharves and shipping 

Totals 



17 

17 

67 

55 

29 

1 

9 

28 

1 

5 

18 

515 

241 

28 

14 

11 

17 

12 

122 

47 

26 

5 

76 

1,045 

4 

1,263 

8 

11 

16 

29 

331 

150 

4 

343 

71 

6 

1 

3 

14 

14 

76 



4,750 



1,371,000 

2,306,000 

4,193,000 

4,302,000 

30,618,000 

313,000 

1,371,000 

5,016,000 

638,000 

1,055,000 

24,013,000 

52,002,000 

52,105,000 

1,528,000 

13,384,000 

701,000 

2,269,000 

11,871,000 

56,189,000 

7,249,000 

7,674,000 

249,000 

10,652,000 

68,953,000 

6,115,000 

117,474,000 

641,000 

2,037,000 

1,820,000 

21,120,000 

26,081,000 

14,232,000 

1,610,000 

15,255,000 

139,048,000 

1,285,000 

25,571,000 

265,000 

2,856,000 

2,507,000 

26,959,000 



764,898,000 



$1,782 20 

2,932 50 

5,386 60 

5,270 70 

37,714 10 

398 60 

1,742 60 

6,356 60 

789 60 

1,331 80 

29,798 05 

66,965 71 

57,497 55 

2,056 20 

14,331 20 

973 90 

2,873 70 

13,761 70 

69,620 60 

9,370 00 

9,977 80 

367 10 

16,092 60 

89,815 26 

6,729 00 

152,879 20 

840 90 

2,590 60 

2,491 80 

25,861 40 

34,685 90 

20,307 70 

2,031 70 

21,263 96 

131,113 90 

1,598 50 

22,080 80 

356 00 

3,649 40 

3,279 20 

33,694 70 



$912,667 33 



52 



City Document No. 38. 



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Water Department. 

Table VI. 

New Elevator, Motor, Fire and Service Pipes 

Elevator pipes 

Motor pipes 

Fire pipes 

Service pipes 

Total 



53 



19 

8 

29 

2,038 



2,094 



Table VII. 

Turning Water Off and On 

For repairs in mains 

" " " services 

" non-payment of water bills 

' ' waste 

Turning on first time 

Vacancies 

Total 



1,207 

3,827 
3,307 
21 
1,804 
3,587 



13,753 



Table VIII. 

Off and On Receipts. 



Received for turning water off and on for repairs, deposited 
with City Collector 



$1,842 00 



54 



City Document No. 38. 



Table IX. 

Elevator, Motor and Fire Pipe Service, for Year ending 
December 31, 1898. 

Elevators. 

Total number of hydraulic elevators in 

service December 31, 1898 . . . 505 

Elevators in service operated by steam or 

electricity . . . . . . 37 

Total number of elevators under supervision of 

Water Department, December 31, 1898 . . 542 

New elevators inspected, measured and accepted . 23 
Elevators changed from water to electric power . 19 
Elevators discontinued, owing to buildings being de- 
molished ........ 6 

Elevators discontinued, owing to vacancies * 44 

Elevator cylinders measured and clock compared . 199 

" clocks readjusted to accuracy ... 133 

" clocks and cords repaired .... 54 

Elevator clocks specially inspected after realtera- 

tions . . . . . . . ... 80 

Elevator cylinders exchanged for other makes . . 3 
Elevator cylinders or valves found leaking and re- 
paired ........ 23 

Motors. 

Total number of hydraulic motors in service . . 113 

New motors applied to service during 1898 . . 5 

Motor clocks repaired ...... 3 



Fire Pipes. 

Buildings equipped with fire-pipe service 

Visits made to premises . 

Fire outlet valves inspected 

Fire outlet valves sealed and resealed 

Hydrants inspected 

Hydrants resealed .... 



408 

954 

4,004 

2,375 

126 

51 



Mbteh Service. 

Realizing that the condition of the meters in service is a 
matter of vital importance, both to the department and to the 
water-taker, a great amount of careful work has been done 
by the Meter Service during the past- year. The amount of 
work performed upon meters is much increased over former 



Water Department. 55 

years, which fact is not shown by a greater number of opera- 
tions, but rather by the quantity and quality of the work 
performed upon each meter undergoing repairs at the De- 
partment shop being greatly increased and improved. Meters, 
when prepared for service are much more accurate than 
formerly, and then condition is such that they will not need 
repairs nor adjustment for years, barring unpreventable acci- 
dents. 

The effect of the present methods of examinations, tests 
and repairs is already apparent, and will increase as the pres- 
ent system embraces all the meters in service, and the 
efficiency and accuracy of meters in service will then be 
advanced to a degree which has heretofore been deemed 
unattainable. 

The work of the Meter service is set forth in the follow- 
ing tables : 

Table X. 

Statement of Meters for Year ending January 31, 1899. 

Meters belonging to department, January 31, 1898 
Purchased during year ..... 
In stock, not reported last year 



Condemned during year 
Lost in service during year 
Sold . . . . 



Meters belonging to department, January 31, 1899, 

Table XI. 

Distribution of Meters, January 31, 1899. 

In service ........ 4,752 

At department shop ...... 31 

At factory for repairs ...... 495 

5,278 





5,300 


. 


25 




8 




5,333 


33 




5 




17 




— 


55 


)9, 


5,278 



56 



City Document No. 38. 



Table XII. 

General Statement of Work Performed on Meters during Year ending 
January 31, 1899. 



Meters. 



Boxes. 



Applied 

Discontinued 

Changed 

Changed locations . 

Tested 

Repaired at shop . . . 
" " factory 
" in service. 

Abandoned 

Examined 

Hayed boxes 

Lost in service 



Sold. 



Condemned 

Meters at factory 

" In service 

Purchased 

Meters at department shop 

" in stock, not reported last year 

Private meters applied to department service 

" " in department service 



411 
593 

1,176 
31 

3,160 

1,095 
462 

1,442 



541 



5 
17 
33 

31 

4,752 

25 

495 

8 

18 
71 



167 
33 

1,429 



Table XIII. 

Meters Condemned. 





Diameter in Inches. 






3 


2 


1* 


1 


1 


& 


Totals. 




l 


5 


1 


13 


6 

2 


2 
1 


28 
2 












1 


B. W. W 










2 


2 
















l 


5 


1 


13 


10 


3 


33 



Water Department. 



57 



Table XIV. 

Meters Applied. 





Diameter in Inches. 






4 


8 


2 


lh 


1 


1 


i 


Totals. 




5 

10 


1 

8 


7 
9 


13 

13 

2 

6 


30 
33 

7 
6 


24 
36 
36 
7 
3 
4 
2 


133 

3 

4 


80 
242 




45 








3 


22 








6 














4 










1 


2 


9 




1 






1 












2 




2 
















Totals 


16 


9 


19 


35 


78 


114 


140 


411 







Table XV. 

Private Meters Applied to Department Service. 





Diameter in Inches. 






6 


2 


1J 1 


a 


t 


Totals. 










1 


1 


1 


2 




l 


4 


6 
1 


12 




1 






1 








1 




2 










2 
















Totals 


8 


5 


7 


1 


1 


1 


18 







58 



City Document No. 38. 



Table XVI. 

Meters Discontinued. 







Diameter 


in Inches. 






Totals. 




6 


4 


3 


2 


1* 


1 


1 


I 




1 


5 
9 


6 
12 


31 

14 


14 
14 

2 
8 


81 
43 

22 
9 


52 
54 
66 
13 
5 


124 
1 


1S9 




262 




90 








4 


6 


41 


B. W. W 






5 






3 










3 


Ball & Fitts 




1 


1 










2 














1 


1 




















Totals 


1 


17 


23 


52 


38 


146 


190 


126 


593 



Table XVII. 

Meters Purchased. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Totals. 




4 


3 


2 


H 


1 


i 


f 




l 


1 












2 




2 


3 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


4 

2 


2 


13 


Nash 






4 












2 

















2 
















<> 


















Totals 


1 


1 


2 


3 


10 


6 


2 


25 







Table XVIII. 
Meters Sold. 





Diameter in 


Inches. 


Totals. 




2 


1* 


1 


a 


f 




2 
1 


3 


2 


4 


2 
2 


13 


Worthington 




1 




1 














Totals 


8 


3 


3 


4 ■ 


4 


17 



Water Department. 



59 



Table XIX. 

Meters Repaired at Factory. 







Diameter in 


Inches. 




Totals. 




4 


3 


2 


14 


1 


1 


§ 






1 
1 

2 


8 
5 


3 

4 
5 
3 


25 

12 

5 

43 


1 

22 

7 

213 


97 

1 


38 




3 


144 




19 






260 


Ball & Fitts 




1 




1 


















Totals '. 


3 


5 


13 


15 


85 


243 


98 


482 







Table XX. 

Meters Repaired in Service 

Cause of Repairs. 

Cap broken 

Glass broken 

Leak at spindle 

" " stop-cock 

" " coupling 

" " body 

" on pipe 

Bolts loose 

Spindle stuck 

" broken '. 

Hands stuck 

Retapped for cap screws 

Clock defaced 

Cover loose 

Pawl stuck 

Not registering 

Hands loose ' , 

Gears loose 

Hands broken 

Counter-box loose 

Clock condemned 

" pin broken 

" loose 

Hands untrue 

Piston stuck , 

Ratchet out of order 

Carried forward 

9 : 



Totals. 



734 

266 

177 

7 

48 

3 

5 

3 

3 

12 
7 
2 
34 
2 

2 
6 
3 
5 

76 
1 

14 
4 
4 
2 
2 
5 



1,427 



60 City Document No. 3: 

Table XX. — Concluded, 

Cause of Repairs. 

Brougt forward 

Meter insecure 

Set backwards 

Clock train broken 

Lever stuck 

Fish in meter 

Intermittent 

Total 



Totals. 



1,442 



Table XXI. 

Meters Changed. 



Cause. 



Totals. 



For test 

Not registering (cause unknown) 

No force (cause unknown) 

Leak at body 

Leak at spindle 

Spindle broken 

Ratchet broken 

Glass broken 

Rust „ 

Enlargement 

Gears loose 

Frost 

Heat 

Stoppage (cause unknown) 

Gears did not mesh 

Intermediate train worn 

Intermediate train broken 

Piston stuck 

Clock train broken 

Lever broken 

Piston broken 

Intermediate shaft broken 

Gasket 

Solder 

Rods broken 

Lever detached 



Carried forward 



397 
70 
39 
19 
22 
34 
7 

22 

63 

36 

10 

21 

20 

21 

17 

53 

34 

16 

3 

6 

2 

3 

1 

4 

2 

3 



Cause. 



Brought forward 

Hands broken 

Piston rod short 

Piston rod bent 

Hands stuck 

Clock broken , 

Cap broken 

Location changed 

Pawl detached 

Gravel 

Fish 

Cylinder dented 

Plate broken 

Clock defaced 

Screws loose 

Leak at connections 

Pawl stuck 

Valves worn 

Gear lost 

Set backwards 

Clock detached 

Cylinder points broken — 

Service reduced 

Intermediate train stuck. . . 

Pawl worn 

Applied counter extension. 



Totals. 



Total. 



925 

52 

3 

1 

12 

21 

85 

11 

2 

10 



10 
3 
4 
4 
1 
1 
4 
2 
1 
2 
5 
1 
3 

1,176 



Water Department. 



61 



Table XXII. 

Meters in Service January 31, 1899. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Totals. 




6 


4 


3 


2 


1* 


1 


1 


1 




2 

7 


20 

44 

5 


30 
52 
11 


136 
81 
19 
4 


124 

157 

39 

15 


585 
370 
78 
102 


404 
461 
176 
484 
1 
36 


4 

1,247 

16 

1 

8 


1,305 

2,419 

344 










606 










9 


B. W. W 














36 




1 


3 










4 












1 




1 




1 












1 








2 


3 


2 
1 
2 
2 

2 


3 
2 

2 


4 
2 


14 










3 














6 














2 


















2 




















Totals 


11 


72 


93 


242 


338 


1,144 


1,570 


1,282 


4,752 





Table XXIII. 

Private Meters in Department Service, January, 31, 1899. 









Diameter 


in Inches. 






Totals. 




6 


4 


3 


2 


li 


1 


! 


i 








1 
2 
1 


4 
4 
1 


2 
12 

3 

1 


6 
5 


l 

2 


5 
12 






1 


3 


41 




5 














I 


B. W.W 












1 






Ball & Fitts 








1 






1 




2 














2 








1 






























Totals 


3 


3 


4 


11 


18 


11 


4 


17 


71 





62 



City Document No. 38. 



Table XXIV. 
Meters at Factory for Repairs, January 31, 1899. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Totals. 




3 


2 


1-i 


1 


t 


* 






1 


1 


7 
1 


4 
2 


14 


20 




1 


10 








1 


















l 


1 


1 


8 


6 


14 


31 







Table XXV. 
Meters at Department Shop, January 31, 1899. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Totals. 




6 


4 


3 


2 


1* 


1 


I 


1 






4 
2 
1 


3 
3 

2 


25 
5 
4 


4 
5 
3 
5 


37 
8 
1 

30 


54 
12 
8 
154 
4 
1 
4 


2 
78 

2 

1 

2 


129 






113 






21 






191 


B. W. W 










4 
















2 


Ball & Fitts 






1 
4 


1 

2 






8 




l 


1 












1 






1 














1 


4 
o 

1 
1 
1 

1 


5 
















2 














1 




2 














1 


















1 
















1 


1 


Beck & Co 














1 














1 




1 
















1 

1 


1 


















1 
















1 


1 


Smith 












1 


1 






















1 


S 


13 


37- 


17 


80 


240 


99 


495 







Water Department; 63 

Deacon Service. 

The Deacon Meter Service was transferred from the Dis- 
tribution Division to the Income Division on December 9, 
1898 ; the following report, however, covers the work of the 
entire year, ending January 31, 1899. 

The Deacon meters were placed in operation for the year 
on March 30, 1898, and their work ceased November 28, 
1898. During this period 63 meters were operated, from 
which 717 diagrams were obtained, being 349 readings of 24 
hours each and 368 night tests, giving the results of readings 
and tests of 152 sections. These diagrams were delivered to 
the City Engineer for compilation. 

The Deacon meters in Charles town could not be operated, 
on account of the high service having so many dead ends that 
it was impossible to work a section without interfering with 
the water supply of surrounding streets. 

A second operation of the meters in South Boston could 
not be made, owing to the delay in the changing of pipes and 
connections from the Cochituate to the Metropolitan supply. 

The construction of Columbia road prevented the use of 
the Columbia street and Boston street meters early in the 
year, hence second readings in Dorchester meters could not 
be obtained. 

The work of the inspection corps in detecting waste was 
confined to sections of the city where the meters had 
indicated excessive waste of water, excepting during the 
months of December, 1898, and January, 1899, when the men 
were working in sections of the city where the meters could 
not be operated. 

The following tables 'cover the work of the Deacon service 
for the year : 



Table XXVI. 

Waste Inspection. 



Number. 



Houses inspected . . . 
Waste reports made 
Re-examinations 



54,007 
11,051 
13,779 



64 



City Document No. 38. 



Table XXVII. 

Waste Re-examination Previous to Repairs 



Number. 



Not repaired from 1897 inspection 

Re-examined once and repaired 

" twice " " 

" three times and repaired. 

" four " " 

« flye <. <■ 

" six " " 

" seven " " 



687 

8,588 

1,299 

310 

125 

63 

21 

5 



Table XXVIII. 

Defective Fixtures and Waste. 



Number. 



Tank fixtures leaking 
Faucets leaking . . — 

Closets " 

Pipes burst 

Wilful waste cases. . . 



7,110 

4,655 

1,080 

413 

164 



Water Department. 65 



APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF THE DISTRIBUTION DIVISION. 



Office of the General Superintendent, 

710 Albany Street, February 1, 1899. 

Hon. John R. Murphy, 

Water Commissio?ier : 

I herewith submit the annual report of the Distribution 
Division for the year ending January 31, 1899. 

Main Pipe. 

There were laid during the year 33.6 miles of main pipe. 
This amount includes 3,220 feet of private mains laid for 
various parties, 3,273 feet of hydrant, blow-off, and reser- 
voir pipe, 44 feet of Deacon meter pipe, and 1,806 feet of 
main pipe lowered, raised, and moved laterally, which do 
not affect the length of the distribution system. 

Nine and one-tenth miles of pipe were abandoned, making 
the total length of our distribution system 689.2 miles. 

Of the 33.6 miles laid, 8 miles were relaid. 

The 30-inch high service main for the Dorchester Dis- 
trict was continued from the point in Geneva avenue, near 
Blue Hill avenue, where we stopped last year, through 
Geneva avenue, Bowdoin and Washington streets, to a point 
in Washington street, near Bowdoin street, and there capped. 
During the coming year it will be extended further in a 
southerly direction, thus giving a much better service 
throughout the Dorchester District. The small portion of 
this line at the junction of Columbus avenue and Centre 
street, referred to in last year's report as not being laid, was 
laid during the early part of the past year, and gave the 
Elm Hill District a direct supply that allowed the abandon- 
ment of the Wayne-street Pumping Station. 

In Columbia road, from Blue Hill avenue to Edward 
Everett square, 24-inch, 20-inch, 16-inch, 12-inch and 6-inch 
lines have been laid, which will give, when connected, to this 



66 City Document No. 38. 

boulevard and the territory adjacent to and connected by, a 
most sufficient supply. 

The West Roxbury high service was extended by a 24- 
inch line from the Forest Kills Station, through South street, 
to the Arnold Arboretum, and there connected to a piece 
previously laid. The line was then carried through Walter 
and South streets to Roberts street and there temporarily 
ended. Connections were made at the junction of Walter 
and Weld streets and at the junction of South and Roberts 
streets, thereby permitting the substitution of the Fisher 
Hill high service for the tank service on Skinner Hill. At 
the present writing we are engaged in extending this 24-inch 
line to give to the district an ample supply. 

A 16-inch main was taken off the above mentioned 24- 
inch main and laid in Roberts street as far as Corinth street 
and there temporarily capped. This is to supplement the 
supply of the eastern portion of West Roxbury. 

A 16-inch line was laid from Ashmont street at Train 
street, through Ashmont street to Neponset avenue, and 
there reduced to 12 inches and continued through Neponset 
avenue, across the bridge, through Hancock street, Quincy, 
to Atlantic street, through Atlantic and Squantum streets 
to Beach road, through Beach road to Moon Island road, 
and through Moon Island road to the sea-wall on Moon 
Island, opposite Long Island, where at some later date it will 
be continued under water to Long Island. This line will 
give to the various islands in the harbor a much needed 
supply for tire protection and domestic use. 

A 12-inch main was laid in Mt. Vernon street, West Rox- 
bury, from Temple to Baker streets, giving an additional feed 
to that extreme portion of West Roxbury and reinforcing 
the service in that section that was previously wholly de- 
pendent upon Centre street for its supply. 

A 20-inch line has been laid in Third street, between Dor- 
chester street and Q street. This is a great step towards 
the completion of a connecting loop in the low service sup- 
plies of South Boston and Dorchester. 

The 8-inch low service main in Summer-street extension 
was relaid with 12-inch and extended from its former end at 
Gilbert place to Dorchester avenue, and in that street for a 
distance of about 1,500 feet towards the bridge. The 8-inch 
high service main in Summer-street extension was relaid 
with 12-inch and extended from its former end at Gilbert 
place with 10-inch pipe to Dorchester avenue, and in that 
street for a distance of about 1,400 feet towards the bridge. 
A 12-inch private line was laid across the yard of the new 



Water Department. 67 

terminal and connects the above mentioned 12-inch low 
service in Dorchester avenue with the 16-inch low service in 
Atlantic avenue. 

About 680 feet of 12-inch salt water main was laid in 
Central Wharf, from Atlantic avenue to the water front. 

Prominent in the relaying work performed during the 
year was that in Shawmut avenue, where the 6-inch main 
was relaid with 12-inch from Newton street to Massachusetts 
avenue, and with 16-inch from Massachusetts avenue to 
Vernon street ; in Guild street, Roxbury, where the 4-inch 
main was replaced by a 12-inch; and in Heath street, 
Parker street, Bromley Park, Wensley street and Bickford 
avenue, where the old mains have been relaid with larger 
ones. All this work considerably increases the efficiency of 
the fire service in the vicinity of these streets. 

A great deal of complicated work was carried on in the 
West Roxbury District, where, on account of the abolition of 
grade crossings along the line of the N.Y., N.H. & H. R.R., 
our system had to be adjusted to the new conditions. 

In Sterling, Weston, and Newbern streets, Roxbury, 
about 900 feet of old Jamaica pond aqueduct pipe was 
abandoned and replaced with larger sized modern pipe. We 
hope in the near future to remove the remainder of this 
objectionable system. 

Where desirable and practicable, dead ends were abolished 
by connecting, thus giving better circulation and preventing 
pollution of the water at those points. 

Unusual precautions have been taken against freezing in 
mains laid in exposed places, principally on bridges. 

In Francis street, Brookline avenue, and Washington 
street, near Arnold street, we found blow-offs that were not 
connected with the sewer, but opened into private property, 
thus exposing the same to damage. This dangerous and 
useless arrangement constructed in former years has been 
remedied in these instances, and we are now investigating 
similar defects at other points. 

During the year 2,503 feet of abandoned 12-inch pipe 
were taken from the ground and being in good condition 
have been utilized again in place of new pipe. This 
resulted in a saving to the department. 

Gates or Stop-Cocks. 

Six hundred and sixteen gates were established and 173 
abandoned ; of the former 16 were " blow-off " and 23 were 
private gates, and of the latter 4 were "blow-off" gates. 



68 City Document No. 38. 

This makes the total number of gates in use, exclusive of 
"blow-off" and private gates, 8,339. The gates have been 
thoroughly looked after, as will be seen by reference to our 
statement of miscellaneous work performed, wherein it is 
stated that 16,250 gate inspections have been made, 8,791 
locations of gates marked and remarked, 219 gates oiled and 
cleaned in service, 7,220 salt deposits made on gate covers to 
prevent freezing, 824 boxes repaired in service, and 291 
boxes renewed in service. During the coming year the 
covers to all gates will be so marked as to show at a glance 
whether or not the gate is a division gate, or if it controls a 
main, service, fire, motor, or elevator pipe. In some sections 
of the city there is a complex arrangement of pipes and 
gates, and in order to facilitate a correct operation of the same 
they are to be numbered on the box covers correspondingly to 
numbers of the same gates represented on plans in our office. 
Thus by consulting the plans one can get the numbers of the 
gates to be operated in order to achieve certain desired results 
and when upon the ground he can by simply referring to the 
numbers on the covers locate these gates and carry out his 
purpose with no delay and considerable certainty. We have 
already numbered in this way the gates at Roxbury 
Crossing. 

Air-Cocks. 

During the year 17 air-cocks were established and two 
abandoned in various parts of the city. 

Blow-off Cocks. 
Ten of various sizes were established and one abandoned. 

Deacon Meters. 

One was established at Long Island ; one was abandoned 
at Castle street, corner of Tremont street, and one was 
abandoned at Columbia road, corner of Sayward street. 

Hydrants. 

Five hundred and thirty-three hydrants were established 
and 388 abandoned. Of the number established, 12 were 
salt-water hydrants and have no connection with our system. 
The total number of hydrants connected with our system up 
to date is 7,368. During the year we abandoned 150 Boston 
hydrants, and in almost every case replaced them with 
either Lowry's or Post's. This is a distinct gain to the fire 
service of the city, as the Boston hydrant is of insufficient 



Water Department. 69 

capacity, and very rarely used by the Fire Department. The 
usual attention was given the hydrants during the year. A 
glance at our schedule of miscellaneous work performed will 
show that 150,000 hydrant inspections were made during 
cold weather and 7,014 repairs of a miscellaneous character 
made on the hydrants. Three thousand one hundred and 
thirty-three bags of salt were purchased by this department 
and delivered to the Fire Department, to be used on hydrant 
covers during the cold weather. 

Water Posts. 

During the year sixty water posts were established and 
thirteen abandoned, making a total now in use of 455. 
This surpasses all previous records of the number established 
and abandoned in one year. The customary attention was 
given to their proper maintenance. 

Fountains. 

Nineteen drinking fountains were established and eight 
abandoned. The total number in use is 96. A table giving 
the number, style, and location of each is attached. Of the 
number established 10 were cold water fountains. We also 
fitted two ordinary fountains with cold water attachments. 

In connection with the cold water fountains we cut and 
stored, for use during the coming summer, about 1,700 tons 
of ice in Brookline and East Boston Reservoirs. 



Service Pipes. 

Two thousand three hundred and sixty-six service pipes 
(52,866 feet) have been laid during the year, and 263 
(7,006 feet) abandoned, showing a net increase of 2,103 
service pipes (45,859 feet) for the year, and making the 
total number of pipes now in use 84,129, with a length of 
2,343,425 feet. 

Under the law governing the laying out of new streets, 
we were obliged to lay to vacant lots 589 service pipes, from 
which no revenue is at present derived. 

It has frequently happened that in laying mains in private 
ways or in streets that were formerly private ways, we have 
met with service pipes laid irregularly, i.e., from a point not 
directly opposite the premises they supply, and when it was 
practicable to do so we relaid them in a regular manner free 
of charge. We shall continue to do this in all similar cases. 



70 



City Document No. 38. 



Shops. 

The following statement will show the amount of work 
performed by the different shops during the year : 



Machine Shop — Manufactures 

Gates of various sizes (mostly large sizes) 

Cocks of various sizes 

Nipples of various sizes . 

Coupling nuts, various sizes 

Coupling tubes, various sizes 

Male couplings, various sizes 

Plugs, various sizes 

Air-cocks, various sizes . 

Hydrants, various styles . 

Hydrant wastes, large 

Hydrant wastes, small 

Set screws 

Hydrant bolts 

Sidewalk tops 

Jointers, various sizes 

Puddling heads 

Thimbles, various sizes . 

Lowry hydrant chucks 

Lamp-post nuts 

Repairs were made on the following 

Hydrants, various styles 
Gates, various sizes 
Hydrant wastes 
Cocks, various sizes 
Couplings, various sizes 



467 

4,693 

1,001 

8,984 

9,506 

1,568 

485 

12 

374 

452 

30 

1,792 

2,761 

1,504 

46 

19 

67 

2 

33 



179 
72 
145 
107 
488 



Carpenter Shop — Manufactures. 
Hydrant, gate, and meter boxes 



1,519 



Blacksmith Shop. 



Picks pointed . 
Picks re- steeled 



10,524 
323 



An idea may be had of the widely diversified nature of the 
work performed by our mechanics and artisans by examining 
the following statement. The work compares with similar 
work performed by outsiders making a specialty of the same. 
A most important feature of the year was the establishment 
of a wheelwright plant. We now perform all repairs to our 
rolling-stock and even manufacture wagons when required. 



Water Department. 71 

Ice-house built at East Boston, dimensions forty by eighty. 

Ice-house built at Brookline, dimensions forty by sixty-five. 

1,700 tons of ice cut and stored. 

1,150 feet of Fisher avenue roadway macadamized. 

Street built through Fisher Hill Reservoir grounds — about 800 

feet long. 
Stone wall, sixty-nine feet long and three feet nine inches high, 

built at Brookline Reservoir. 
Stone wall, 600 feet long, rebuilt at Brookline Reservoir. 
Manufactured the following office furniture : 

One cabinet. 

Two desks. 

One card holder. 

One large oak cashier's desk. 

One combination counter and cabinet. 

One file case. 
Erected stable at Brookline Reservoir, dimensions thirty by fif- 
teen. 
Erected house at Brookline Reservoir for storage purposes. 
Graded driveway and cleaned grounds at Brookline and Fisher 

Hill. 
Repaired and painted fence at Parker Hill Reservoir. 
Built new fence, 1,468 feet long, at Brookline Reservoir. 
Repaired old fence, for a distance of 1,071 feet, at Brookline 

Reservoir. 
Made hay at Brookline and Fisher Hill Reservoirs (twenty tons). 
Built bulkhead at Long Island. 

Maintained buildings in outside yards in good order. 
Fertilized grounds at the Brookline and Fisher Hill Reservoirs. 
Straightened and painted fence around East Boston Reservoir. 
Made sewer connections at Charlestown stable. 
Fitted up four thawing boilers and made apparatus to be used in 

connection with the same. 
Made two derricks. 

" twenty-four plumbers' furnaces. 

" sixty-two wrenches. 

" three iron crowbars. 

" seven jacks. 

" six patterns. 

" large tool-house. 

" fifteen copper shafting pans. 

" 539 tools of various kinds. 

" one pantograph, 

" thirty- four sets of calking tools. 

" five step ladders. 

" one flag-pole. 

" one express wagon. 

" ventilators for office. 

" one pipe truck. 

" one ice-wagon. 



72 City Document No. 38. 

Made four small buildings in yard for charcoal, sand and junk. 

" and fitted up twenty-six lead pots. 

" brick furnace for use of wheelwright. 

" forty-four repairs on office furniture. 

" eleven repairs on steam pipes and fixtures. 

" thirty-one repairs to pumps. 

" ninety-seven repairs on wrenches. 

" twenty repairs on tool-houses. 

" sixteen repairs on patterns. 

" nine repairs on derricks. 

" 228 repairs on tools. 

" 135 repairs on wagons. 

" one repair on gas fixtures. 

" ninety-three repairs on stable. 

" ninety-two repairs on carriages. 

" sixty-nine repairs on buildings. 

" two repairs on engine. 

" two repairs on large platform scale. 
Repaired and painted gate at entrance to yard. 
Remodelled hot water apparatus in stable. 
Extended steam heating apparatus three times. 
Put in two new hoppers in toilet-room. 
Extended gas fixtures five times. 
Made fifteen repairs on sleighs. 
Lettered the stock boxes in storeroom. 
Painted buildings outside and inside. 
Inspected shafting by order of State Inspector. 
Replaced ninety-one panes of window glass. 

Maintenance. 

We have made 3,432 repairs on pipes of all sizes during 
the year, for causes of which see table appended. We have 
had more stoppages by fish this year than for several years 
previous. They have been especially prevalent in the 
Charlestown and East Boston Districts. Steps should be 
taken to eliminate these animals from our supply, as they are 
a source of inconvenience to consumers and are certainly not 
agreeable things to associate with our drinking water. 

The statement of miscellaneous work performed represents 
a vast amount of work of a miscellaneous character necessary 
to the maintenance of our system. 

Attention has been given this year, as usual, to the opera- 
tions in the public streets of corporations, etc., to protect 
our interests if necessary. Alterations of advantage to us 
were made by said corporations, contractors, etc., in their 
original plans, which would not have been made but for 
vigilance upon our part. 



Water Department. 73 

Harbor Service. 

The mains in the harbor and on various islands located 
therein have been looked after with that care that is most 
necessary with this branch of our service. We have re- 
peatedly replaced bulkheads and earth material washed away 
from our pipes by the heavy seas. A sea-wall is now being 
built at Moon Island and when completed it is expected to 
serve as a protection against heavy weather, and to render 
the continual replacing of the covering of our pipes laid in 
the shore of the island, unnecessary. On Long Island a four- 
inch private main 731 feet long was laid for the Pauper In- 
stitutions from the reservoir to the piggery and ice pond. 
Services were also laid to the various institutions and to the 
fortification on the island. 



Reservoirs and Stand-pipes. 

East Boston. — This reservoir is in good condition. A 
most substantial building for the storage of ice was erected 
here the past winter by the department. It has a capacity 
of about 875 tons. 

Parker Hill. — This property is in first-class condition. 

Fisher Hill. — The buildings here have been thoroughly 
overhauled and repaired, and the grounds graded, fertilized 
and put in good condition. A road about 800 feet long has 
been built by this department through the grounds, thus 
giving vehicles an opportunity to approach the reservoir 
and the buildings located about it, without driving over the 
lawn as was heretofore the case. 

Brookline Reservoir. — A new wooden fence 1,468 feet 
long was built on the Walnut street side of the reservoir. 
The fence on the Boylston street side was repaired for a dis- 
tance of 1,071 feet. The stone wall on this side was repaired 
for a distance of about 600 feet and on Warren street a wall 
69 feet long and 3 feet 9 inches high was erected. Upon the 
grounds a stable, an ice-house, and several small buildings for 
storage purposes were erected. Two wooden bridges were 
built across the brook. The gate-house was painted inside. 
The ground was fertilized and two crops of hay raised and 
harvested. A considerable quantity of property which the 
Metropolitan Water Board refused to take with other things 
transferred to their keeping upon January 1, 1898, had to 
be removed from Chestnut Hill Reservoir to Brookline and 
Fisher Hill Reservoirs for storage until we can dispose of it 
to advantage. 



74 City Document No. 38. 

Mi. Bellevue Stand-jnjie. — This building is in good con- 
dition. During the year 5,180 people visited it for observa- 
tion purposes, it being located on the highest land in the city 
of Boston. 

Fire Reservoirs. 

During the year the reservoir at the corner of Pearl and 
Franklin streets was abandoned on account of the operations 
of this department. The reservoirs connected with our 
system were maintained in the usual manner. 

Pumping Stations. 

West Roxbury. — During the year this station was kept in 
good order, repairs of minor importance being made from 
time to time. The steam supply pipe to the pumps was en- 
larged, thereby increasing the efficiency of the same. This 
station was to-day transferred by lease to the Metropolitan 
Water Board, who take it as part of their supply system. 

Wayne street. — This station was rendered unnecessary 
by the completion of the 36 -inch high service line through 
the Elm Hill District and was accordingly abandoned. 

East Boston. — This station was rendered unnecessary by 
the increased supply given East Boston during the year. It 
has been put out of use, but is still held by the department 
until a permanently satisfactory supply is assured. 

Yards. 

Albany street. — As this yard was in good condition at the 
beginning of the year nothing of importance has been done 
since. There still exists the necessity for more room. The 
steam heating system formerly confined to the offices is now 
being extended throughout the shops. The various outbuild- 
ings situated in the yard have been painted and one was re- 
modelled into a wheelwright shop and a wheelwright's furnace 
constructed adjacent thereto. A hospital stall was built in 
the stable and a larger hot water boiler substituted for the 
old one. 

Oharlestown, West Roxbury, Brighton, Dorchester and East 
Boston. — With the exception of certain sanitary improve- 
ments made in the Charlestown yard nothing of importance 
was done in these yards, as they were in good condition at 
the beginning of the year. 



Water Department. 75 

Electrolysis. 

Electrical tests upon the water pipe system throughout the 
city have been continued this year. Tests have been made 
upon hydrants and upon service pipes. During the fine 
weather the hydrants have been tested to determine the elec- 
trical potential difference between them and the surrounding 
earth, and also to ascertain the direction of the tendency of 
electrical flow. Plans are being prepared showing the results 
of the tests made at each hydrant. These plans will show 
the changes in the electrical conditions from time to time, will 
enable us to determine the points of danger, and will assist 
in the study of the elimination of the trouble. 

Improvements in Keeping Records and Accounts. 

As an indication of the thorough manner in which the 
records and accounts of the department are now kept, as com- 
pared with previous years, I need only state that in 1898 
61,834 reports of various kinds were made, as against 18,105 
in 1895. 

Appended you will find tables showing details of the work 
performed. 

Yours respectfully, 

Hugh McNulty, 

General Superintendent Distribution Division. 



76 



City Document No. 38. 



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80 



City Document No. 38. 



Statement of Location, Size and Number of Feet of Main 
Pipe Relaid during the Year ending January 31, 
1899. 

Note. — C. P. indicates City Proper; Rox., Roxbury; W. R., West Roxbury; Bri., 
Brighton; Dor., Dorchester; So. B., South Boston; E. B., East Boston; 
Chsn., Charlestown. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


s 


a5 
33 


J3 
SO 

a 


■ g CO 

O 






C. P. 


30-in. 

20-in. 
16-in. 

12-in. 


12 

300 

312 

884 

4 

888 

3 

500 
231 
4 
50 
2,990 
360 
647 

450 
11 
30 

246 

28 

3075 
421 

8 


30-in. 










Total 30-inch 




Huntington ave 


Edward Everett sq. and Dudley st. . 


Dor. 
C. P. 


20-in. 


Total 20-inch 




Beverly st 

Commercial st . . . 




C. P. 

Dor. 

So. B. 

Rox. 

Rox. and 
C. P. 

W. R. 

Chsn. 


16-in. 
12-in. 
6-in. 






16-in. 




At Walk Hill st 




Neponsetave 




6-in. 




12-in. 


Columbia road 

Columbia road (con- 
Congress st 


Washington st. and Geneva ave 


12-in. 
16-in. 










New Heath st 




6-ln. 


Shawmut ave 


Massachusetts ave. and Vernon st. . 
Brookfleld and South Walter sts 


" 




„ 






<( 




Total 16-inch 






9,061 








C. P. 






20 
36 
20 


12-in. 




West Newton and Rutland sts 


6-in. 










76 















Water Department. 81 

Statement of flain Pipe Relaid. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



West Newton st. . . 
Pleasant st 

"Worcester st 

South Margin st. . 

Shawniut ave 

Columbus ave 

Northampton st. . . 

Hull st 

Commercial st. . . . 
Massachusetts ave 
Huntington ave. . . 
Harrison ave 

Harvard st 

Way st 

Fleet st 

Tremont st 

North st 

Court st 

Hanover st 

Prince st 

Leverett st 

Snow Hill st 

Albion st 

Paul st 

Castle st 

Berkeley st 

Canal st 

Kneeland st 

Dartmouth st 



Brought forward 

Shawmut ave. and Tremont st 

Opp. Melrose st 

Tennyson st 

At " " 

Opp. Piedmont st 

At Shawmut ave 

Pitts and Staniford sts 

Rutland st. and Massachusetts ave. 
June. Grenvillepl.and Ferdinand st, 

At Shawmut ave 

Salem and Snowhill sts 

15 ft. south of No. 445-7 

At Dundee st 

" Dartmouth st 

" Randolph st 

" Genesee st 

Near No. 17 

Harrison ave. and Albany st 

At Moon st 

Pleasant and Warrenton sts 

At Castle sq , 

Junction Lewis st 

Hanover st. and Cornhill 

North of Court st 

At Bennett ave 

" Causeway st 

Opp. Sheafe st 

Castle and Paul sts 

Albion and Tremont sts , 

West line of Middlesex st 

Chandler st. and bridge 

Near Travers st , 

Across Atlantic ave 

Columbus ave. and bridge 

Carried forward , 



C. P. 



12-in 



76 




12 


12-in. 


7 


" 


3 


" 


5 


" 


4 


« 


12 


6-in. 


543 


« 


995 


" 


4 


12-in. 


24 


" 


541 


6-in. 


5 


12-in. 


4 




25 




3 




3 




4 




480 




4 




205 


8-in 


87 


12-in 


5 




220 




4 




4 




9 




3 


6-in 


82 




165 




5 


12-in 


263 




9 




76 


6-in 


185 


" 


4,076 





City Document No. 38. 
Statement of Main Pipe Relaid. — Continued. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


.2 

'u 
m 

5 


53 




"3 

S« 

&.S 

"BOD 

o 










4,076 
20 
34 

840 

567 
4 
3 

466 
14 
2S 

348 

545 

766 

733 
1,585 

145 

47 

5 

15 

12 

506 
60 

112 
37 
12 
12 

277 
12 

120 
5 
12 
60 

147 
15 

418 






Harrison ave. and Albany st 


C. P. 

Dor. 


12-ln. 


12-in. 


Berkeley st 






8-in. 






Washington st 




12-in. 








„ 






,; 






6 -in. 


Columbia road 




12-in 










I( 






,, 




Edward Everett sex. and Dudley at.. 


6-in 






12-in 


East Cottage st — 
Erie st 








,, 






„ 




6-in 




12-in 






6-in 




At " " 


8-ln 




" York st 


12-in 












„ 


At Mill st - 


,, 


a a 




6-in 


Norfolk st 


Dorchester ave. and Geneva ave 

Columbia road and Stanley st 


12-in 


Park st 






8-ln 






12-in 






6-in 










12,058 















Water Department. 83 

Statement of Haiti Pipe Relaid. — Continued. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


u 

OQ 

s 


a3 

N 

02 


i 

a 

Hi 


* . 

'a.a 
•a co 

o 










12,058 

40 

339 

212 

1,332 

364 

229 

43 

7 

23 

34 

14 

328 

767 

9 

33 

20 

10 

121 

913 

479 

25 

965 

257 

220 

IS 

16 

10 

13 

23 

3 

48 

240 

11 








Dor. 
Rox. 

W.R. 

Bri. 

Chs'n. 


12-in. 




Westville st 


Dorchester ave. and Duncan st 


6-in. 


















8-in. 














New Heath and Old Heath sts 


« 




Washington st. and Lambert ave. . . 
Buena Vista and Rockland sts 


6-in. 

4-in. 
12-in. 

6-in. 
12-in. 


Guild st 


Walnut ave 












Centre st. and N.Y..N.H. & H.R.R.. 


12 & 10 




Washington st. and N.Y..N.H. & 
H. R.R 






12-in. 
















8-in. 
12-in. 






Florence st 




Park st 




















Parsons st. and Barker's lane 


•' 






8-in. 
6-in. 




Charles River ave.. 










19,224 















84 City Document No. 38. 

Statement of flain Pipe Relaid. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 





a 














02 


© 
A 



Water st 

Byron st 

Gove st 

Haynes st 

Chelsea st 

London st 

Chelsea st 

Saratoga st. . . . 

Bremen st 

Webster st 

Saratoga st 

Byron st 

Sumner st 

Minot st 

Norman st 

Medway st. 

Sterling st , 

La Grange st. . 

Gove st , 

Chelsea st 

Webster st 

Brookline ave.. 

Brattle st 

Franklin ave. . . 

Avonst 

Court sq. (east) 

Gilbert pi 

Nightingale st.. 



Brought forward 

Warren ave. and Charles River ave., 
At Wapping st 

" Saratoga st 

Chelsea and Bremen sts 

Orleans and Marginal sts 

Opposite Wesley st 

At Porter st 

North of Marion st 

At Curtis st 

" Swift st 

" Gove st 

" Cottage st 

" Trumbull st 

Saratoga and Bennington sts. . . . 

At Jeffries st 

Total 12-inch 



Chs'n. 



E. B. 



Opposite Wall st 

Green and Merrimac sts 

Over railroad bridge 

Cabot and Tremont sts 

Centre and Jordan sts 

Centre st. and N.Y., N. H. & H. R.R. 

Chelsea and Bremen sts 

North of Marion st 

At Cottage st 

Total 10-inch 



C. P. 

Dor. 

Rox. 

W. Rox. 



Over Railroad bridge. 
At Court st 



C. P. 



Washington and Chauncy sts. 

At Court st 

From Summer st 

Bicknell and Wales sts 

Carried forward 



8-in. 



19,224 

248 

34 

5 

206 
8 
6 
6 
4 

585 
3 
6 
8 
6 
40 

138 



20,527 



12 

600 

26 

230 

280 

40 

14 

15 

2 



1,219 



2-1 <; 



8-in. 



12-in. 



10-in. 

6-in. 
10-in. 

3-in. 
12-in. 
10-in. 



4-in. 
6-in. 
4-in. 
6-in. 



Water Department. 85 

Statement of Main Pipe Relaid. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



a a} 
"So.2 



Saxton st 

Ballouave 

Bosseter st 

Holden st 

Clifton st 

Bromley pk. (north 
side) 

Bryant st 

Boylston ave 

Powell st 

Summer st 

South Walter st 

Morton st 

Englewood ave 

Chiswick road 

Charles River ave. . 

Water st 

Meadst 

Bunker Hill st 

Charles River ave.. 

Princeton st 

Chelsea st 

Fayette st 

Melrose st 

Springfield st 

Tennyson st 

Winchester st 



Brought forward. 

At Romsey st 

From Jones ave 

At Bullard st 

" Columbia road 
From Dudley st 



Bickford and Albert sts 

Parker and St. Stephen sts 

Porter and Cornwall sts 

Spring and Summer sts 

At Powell st 

South Fairview and Roberts sts. 
At Forest Hills st 

Strathmore road 

Commonwealth ave 

Near corner of Water st 

At Gray st 

Opposite Bunker Hill st 

North of Short st 

At Short st 

Water st. and City sq 

At Marion st.' 

Near Curtis st 

Total 8-inch 



Dor. 



Rox. 



W. R. 



Bri. 



Chs'n. 



E. B. 



Corner Church st 

200 feet from Pleasant st. . 

Corner Pleasant st 

At Shawmut ave 

Corner Church st 

Junction of Church st 

Cor. Church st 

Westerly line of Church st. 
Easterly line of Church st. 

Junctiofl of Church st 

Carried forward 



C. P. 



6-in 



246 

78 

50 

4 

26 

380 

661 
25 
80 

152 

30 

8 

10 

15 

18 



6-in. 



6-in. & 
4-in. 

4-in. 

6-in. 

8-in. 



1,895 



6-in. 



6-in. 



City Document No. 38. 
Statement of flain Pipe Relaid. — Continued. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


3 


o5 

03 


to 

05 


'3 J 
"See 
O 










52 
63 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 

276 
4 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
9 

245 
5 
4 
6 
4 
4 

351 
28 








C. P. 


6-in. 








6-in 


(i ii 


" " 690 




., 


210 feet west of Harrison ave 

Opp. No. 677 


'< 


,, 




'< 


ii ii 


Opp. No. 563 


(< 


11 u 


" " 527 


,, 






t( 




200 feet from Ferdinand st 


„ 


ii ii 




„ 






(l 


Columbus ave. and Church st 

Commercial st. and Ferry-house 

Opp. No. 536 






6-in. 




100 feet east of No. 536 








(( 






lt 


Berkeley st 




„ 


" No. 558 


(1 


Hanover st 


190 feet west of Shawmut ave 

Mechanics ct. and Board alley 


" 




" " 21 


,, 






([ 


Tyler st 




,, 




At Tyler st 


,, 






,, 






„ 






,, 






(( 


Hull st 


Snowhill and Commercial sts 


1( 




,, 










1,137 















Water Department. 87 

Statement of flain Pipe Relaid. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



■6 



North Hudson st. 
St. James ave — 



Margaret st. 



Cortes st.. 
Sheafe st. 



Moon st 

Snowhill st. 



Tileston st. 
Fulton st. . 
Clark st. . . . 



North Bennet St., 

Haverhill st 

Ferry st 

Fulton st 



North Bennet st. 
North Centre st. . 

Wall st 

South Market st. . 



North 

Commerce st. 
Chatham st. . . 
Bumsteadct.. 
Blackstone st. 

Sheafe st 

Castle st 

Market st 

Friend st 



Brought forward 

At Snowhill st 

Clarendon and Dartmouth sts. 

At Clarendon st 

Cor. Sheafe st 

At Sheafe st 

Ferdinand and Berkeley sts. . 
Snowhill and Margaret sts. . . . 

Cor. Snowhill st 

At Fleet st 

Junction North Hudson st. 
Cor. " " " ... 

Wiggin and Hanover sts 

Cor. Lewis st 

Hanover and North sts 

Cor. North st 

" Hanover st 

200 feet north of Travers st 

At Fulton st 

" Ferry st 



C. P. 



At Bennet ave 

Hanover and North sts 

Minot and Causeway sts 

At Commercial st 

Commercial st. and Merchants row . 
At Commercial st 



From Boylston st .... 

At Hanover st 

Snowhill and Salem sts.. 
Tremont and Albion sts. 

At Merrimac st 

175 feet from Market st. . 
Carried fonvard 



1,137 
4 
6 
4 
5 
4 

14 
3 
4 
3 

20 
4 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 

10 

19 

6 

4 

5 

4 

700 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

130 

4 

470 

90 
4 
4 



2,707 



6-in. 



4-in. 
6-in. 



4-in. 
6-in. 



4-in. 
6-in. 



4-in. 
6-in. 



12-in. 
6-in. 



City Document No. 38. 
Statement of Main Pipe Relaid. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Friend st 

Court sq. (west) — 

Lucas st 

Bay st 

Jefferson st 

Pitts st 

Harwich st , 

Concord st 

Cumston st 

Estes pi , 

Massachusetts ave 
(south side) 

Chester pi 

Camden st 

Lenox st 

Sawyer st 

Woodbury st 

Kendall st , 

Hammond st 

Ball st 

Windsor st 

Madison st 

Sterling st 

Williams st 

Willow pk 

Winthrop pi 

Shawmut ave 

Notre Dame st 

Harold st 

Wayne st 

Miles st 

Ernst st 



Brought forward 

North side of Market st 

South " " " 

At Court st 

Shawmut ave. and Washington st. 
At Fayette st 



C. P. 



At Pitts-street ct. 

" Dartmouth st. 
Near Cumston st. 
At James st 

" Concord st 

From Summer st. 

At Shawmut ave. 



Rox 



At Vernon st — 

Bragdon and Dimock sts — 
Walnut ave. and Munroe st. 

At Blue Hill ave 

" Bragdon st 



Carried forward. 



6-in. 



1,707 

4 

4 

35 

46 

32 

16 

3 

12 

6 

3 

24 

3 



5 
6 
19 
14 
3 
9 
5 
5 
,043 



Water Department. 89 

Statement of Main Pipe Relaid. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



S».S 



Newbern st 

Penryth st 

Decatur ave 

New Heath st 

Bromley pk. (south 
side) 

Bromley st 

Bickfordave 

Bickford ave 

Bickford Av e n u e 
Pi 

Water st 

Chapin ave 

Pleasant st 

Springvale ave.. 

Brookfleld st. . . . 

So. Fairview St.. 

Arborway 

Selkirk road 

Etna st 

Sidlawroad 

Henshaw st 

Albert st 

Seaver st 

Granger st 

Jones ave 

Centre st 

Greenwich st 

Belfort st 

Columbia road. . 

Devon st 

Bellevue st 

Bodwell st 

Columbia road. . 

Bird st 

Say ward st 



Brought forward. . . . 
Weston and Sterling sts. 
At Columbus ave 



Parker st. 



Bickford and Albert sts. 

At Bromley pk 

Heath and Wensley sts.. 
At Wensley st 



Box. 



" Bickford ave. 

" Keyes st 

From La Grange st 

At 

From Spring st 

At Roberts st 

South and Roberts sts 

Across Morton st 

At Chiswick road 

" Maple ave. and Garden st 

" Chiswick road 

Market and Bgntley sts 

At Adams st 

Columbia road 

Near Duncan st , 

White terrace and Ballou ave 

At Adams st 

" Clayton st 

" Saxton st 

Blue Hill ave. and Washington st. 

West of Columbia road 

From " " 



W. R. 



Bri. 



Dor. 



Glendale and Davenport sts. 
From Columbia road 



Carried forward, 



3,04i 

300 

7 

31 
16 

65' 

25 

331 

28 

11 

10 

207 

8 

2 

1 

331 

1 

15 

S 

10 

76 

5 

7 

4 

72 

72 

15 

3 

1,056 

30 

44 

20 

770 

24 

24 

7.314 



4-in. 
6-in. 



4-in. 



4-in. 
6-in. 



12-in. 
6-in. 



90 City Document No. 38. 

Statement of flain Pipe Relaid. — Concluded. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Hamlet st 

Eastman st.. 

Gold st 

Net 

Say ward pi. . 
Glovers ct. . . 

Fifth st 

Third st 

Sixth st 

Sixth st 

Seventh st. . 

B st 

Third st 

Second st.... 

I st 

Cottage st. . . 

Mead st 

Warren ave. 
Haynes st. . . 
Bremen st.. . 

Princeton gt, 
Maverick sq 
Bremen st... 

Sumner st. . 
Webster st. . 
Princeton st 
Chelsea st. . . 
Gove st 

Fulton pi.... 

Arnold st 

Adams pi — 
Arnold st 



Brought forioard . 
From Columbia road . 



A and B sts 

At Broadway — 
" Woodward st. 



O st. 



Mst 

st 

Mst 

Third st 

C st 

B st 

1 st 

Second st 

Bunker Hill st. 



Front st. and City sq 

Orleans and Marginal sts. 
North corner of Gove st. . , 
South " " " " . 
At Prescott st 

" Henry st 

" Porter st 

" Brooks st 

" Jeffries st 

" Cottage st 

" Marion st 

" Wesley st 

Chelsea and Bremen sts... 

Total 6-inch 

North and Fulton sts 

At Shawmut ave 

Near Williams st 

At Shawmut ave 

Total 4-inch , 



Dor. 



So. B. 



Chn. 



C. P. 



4-in, 



7,314 

22 

23 

320 

4 
30 
12 
12 

6 
24 
24 
12 
12 
21 
21 
28 

6 

54 

27 

15 

653 

6 

3 
12 
11 

8 

5 
12 

o 

13 



8,735 



6-in. 

4-in. 
6-in. 
4-in. 

6-in. 



6-in. 
4-in. 
6-in. 



4-in. 



35 



Water Department. 



91 



Statement of Location, Size and Number of Feet of 
Main Pipe Extended During the year ending January 
3 1, i899. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


s 


03 
N 

S3 


to 

a 


Geneva ave. (contract) 


Columbia road and Washington st 


Dor. 
Box. 


36-in. 


1,441 

64 




771 






31 




Total 36-inch 


2,307 






Dor. 


30-in. 


2,270 




154 




Total 30-inch 


1,700 








4,124 






Dor. 
W. B. 


24-ln. 




1,778 
550 










6 




Morton st. and Arnold Arboretum — 


1,533 




420 


■< <■ 




1,792 

3,248 




Total 24-inch 








9,327 
689 






Dor. 

So. B. 
W. E. 


20-in. 


" " (contract) 




76 




1,005 


ii it 




474 


Edward Everett sq... 
Third st 




6 




3,014 
55 








Total 20-inch 






5,319 






C. P. 

Dor. 


16-in. 




16 






677 


Edward Everett sq.. . 


Blue Hill ave. and Washington st 


1,443 

88 




2,224 













92 City Document No. 38. 

Statement of flain Pipe Extended. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Columbia road . . . 

Wensley st 

Roberts st 

Corinth st 

Pearl st 

Devonshire st 

Private way 

Dorchester ave. . . 

Blackstone st 

Huntington ave. . . 

Berkeley st 

Hillsdale st 

Dorchester ave. . . 
Hamilton st 

Bay st 

Fairmountst 

Geneva ave 

Park st 

Massachusetts ave 

Welles ave 

Hewins st , 

Geneva ave 

Millst 

Normandy st 

Homes ave 

Hamilton st , 

Morton st 

Hewins st 

Seaver st 

Proposed st 

Hamilton st 



Brought forioard 

O and P sts 

Across Heath st 

Brandon and South sts. 
Across Brandon st 



Total 16-inch. 



Franklin and Milk sts , 

Spring lane and Milk st 

Off Dorchester ave , 

Summer st. and bridge , 

At Clinton st < 

At Dartmouth st 

Chandler st. and R.R 

From Richfield st 

Edwin and Lonsdale sts , 

Speedwell and Stonehurst sts. 

" " Homes ave 

Auckland and Leeds sts 

Milton ave. and Morton st 

Bowdoin and Holiday sts 

Waldeck and Greenbrier sts.. . 

Clapp st. and R.R 

Carlisle st. and Talbot ave 

Erie st. and Columbia road 

From Bowdoin st 

Neponset ave. and Train st 

At Devon st 

Topliff and Draper sts 

At Homes ave 

From Blue Hill ave 

". Columbia road 

At Columbia road 



So. B. 
Rox. 
W. R. 



C. P. 



12-in. 



Dor. 



2,224 
180 
109 
913 
51 

3,477 

292 

95 

63 

1,470 

4 

12 

66 

329 

382 

176 

176 

137 

1,438 

84 

365 

300 

149 

640 

226 

233 

51 

926 

28 

140 

26 

66 

72 

SO 



Carried forward 



7.976 



Water Department. 93 

Statement of Haiti Pipe Extended. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Columbia road . . . 

Edward Everett si 

Bowdoin st 

Clayton st 

Columbia road 

Draper st 

Norfolk st 

Spencer st 

Columbia road 

Hamilton st 

Glendale st 

Birdst 

Quincy st 

Magnolia st 

D st 

Private way 

Sleeper st 

A st 

Summer-st. bridge 

Third st 

Wensley st 

Heath st 

Columbus ave 

Ritchie st 

Brookline ave 

Calumet st , 

Francis st 

Terrace st 

Jersey st 

Lawn st 



Brought forward 

Glendale and Hancock sts 

Across Columbia road at Bird st. 

At Columbia road 

At Washington st 

Fenton st. and Freeport st 

Wales place and R.R 

Robinson and Westville sts 

At Morton st 

Wheatland and Talbot aves 

Geneva ave. and R.R 

At Columbia road 



Dor. 



Columbia road and Stanley st. 
Lawrence ave. and Quincy st.. 

First and Bullock sts 

A and Sleeper sts 



S. B. 



Sleeper st. and Harbor Commissioners' 
Line 



Between above mentioned private 
ways 



At Summer-st. bridge 

At abutment wall 

Dorchester and I sts 

Heath st. and Bickford ave 

At Wensley st 

Centre and Dimock sts 

Across Columbus ave 

Francis st. and Kenwood road.. 
Iroquois st. and Parker Hill ave. 
Brookline and Huntington aves. 

At Tremont st 

Across Peterborough st 

" Queensbury st 

Heath and Ellingwood sts 

Carried forward 



Rox. 



7,976 

717 

71 

58 

17 

309 

30 

14 

15 

211 

690 

30 

77 

40 

114 

250 

7S4 

500 

134 

30 

27 

6 

18 

4S0 

11 

829 

112 

201 

868 

1,101 

43 

70 

57 

223 



16,113 



94 City Document No. 38. 

Statement of flain Pipe Extended. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Ipswich st... 
Atkinson St. 
Roberts st. . . 
Centre st. . . . 



Maple st 

Mt. Yernon st. 



Baker st 

La Grange st. 
Penfleld st.... 

Catalpa st 

Hamilton st. . . 

Gould st 

Montclair ave. 
Gardner st — 

Weld st 

Belgrade ave. 
Jamaicaway . 



Arborway 

Angell st 

Park st 

Williams st. . . . 
Forest Hills st. 

Selwyn st 

Corey road — 

Litchfield st 

Kenrick st 

Water st 



Byron st 

Frankfort st. 
Marginal st.. 



Brought forward 

Boylston st. and Charlesgate East . . 

From Swett st 

At South st 

At Congreve st 

Hastings and Park sts 

From W eld st 

Libby and Potomac sts 

Temple and Baker sts 

At Mt. Vernon st 



Birch and Amherst sts 

Across Perkins st 

Gould and Billings sts 

Spz-ing and Hamilton sts 

South from Fletcher st 

Spring and Baker sts 

At Walter st 

Lorraine and Montello sts 

At Pond st 

" Perkins st 

" Forest Hills st 

Blue Hill ave. and Canterbury st. . . . 

Montview and Corey sts 

Washington and Stedman sts 

From Morton st 

Mozart ave. and Walter st 

Summit ave. and Washington st 

Ascot and Dumas st 

Foster st. and Lake st 

Warren ave. and Charles River ave. 

At Wapping st 

Saratoga and Bennington sts. 

Off Maverick st 

East of Jeffries st 

Carried forivard 



Rox. 



W.R. 



Bri. 



Chs'n. 



E.B. 



Watee, Depaktment. 95 

Statement of flain Pipe Extended. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Squantum at 

Atlantic st 

Hancock st 

Moon Island road 
(contract) 

Summer st 

Dorchester ave 

Capen st 

Roxton st 

Normandy st 

Saxton st 

Normandy st 

Sterling st 

Brandon st 

Westbourne road 

Colberg ave 

Fairbanks st 

Webster st 

Chelsea st 

St. James ave 

Avon st 

Proposed street 

Waldeck street 

Carlisle st 

Greenwood st 

Nightingale st 

Carlisle st 

Fenton st 

Duncan st 



Brought forward 

Atlantic st. and Moon Island road 

Hancock and Squantum sts 

Atlantic ave. and drawbridge 



Qulncy. 



Between Squantum and Moon Isl- 
and 



Total 12-in. 



Gilbert pi. and Dorchester ave. 

Summer st. and bridge 

From Fairmount st 

Glenway and Greenwood sts. . . . 

From Columbia road 

Hartland and Romsey sts 

From Columbia road 

Ti-emont and Newbern sts 

Dudley ave. and Penfleld st. ... 

Beech and Cornell sts 

Arden and Rexham sts , 

Washington and Faneuil sts. 

At Cottage st 

North of Marion st 



Total 10-inch. 



From Dartmouth st 

Washington and Chauncy sts. 

From Fairmount st 

At Alpha road 

Brent st. and Welles ave 

May and Roxton sts 

Bicknell st. and Talbot ave 

Centre and Brent sts 

Brent st. and Welles ave 

Duncan and Clayton sts 

Granger and Fenton sts 

Carried fortvard 



C. P. 



Dor. 



24,042 
7,950 
3,178 
1,545 



42,717 



Rox. 
W. R. 



Bri. 

E. B. 



C. P. 



-in. 



96 City Document No. 38. 

Statement of flain Pipe Extended. — Continued. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


p 

CO 

s 


03 

53 


be 

a 










2,108 
100 






Dor. 

S. B. 
Rox. 

W. R. 


S-in. 






120 






180 






24 






181 


York st 




290 






198 






175 






195 






286 






773 






20 






167 






11 






282 






94 






500 




At D st 


10 






10 






313 






6 






712 


West Walnut pk. and Columbus ave. . . 


296 




1,009 
229 




St. Stephen st. and Huntington ave. . . 




363 


Vila st 


52 






58 


New street off Peter- 
borough st. (next to 




51 


New street off Queens- 
bury st. (next to 


Audubon road and Audubon road — 


1,799 
55 






381 










11,048 











Water Department. 97 

Statement of flain Pipe Extended. — Continued. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


5 


6 

N 
OS 


u 

a 










11,048 
352 
156 
213 
176 
230 
727 
50 






W. R. 

Bri. ' 

E. B. 

Quincy 


8-in. 


Clifford st 
























South Walter st 








318 
50 

957 

237 
57 

152 




















Oak ave. and Powell st 






63 
150 














221 

9 

730 

606 

10 

285 

2 

21 












Chestnut HiH ave. and Sidlaw road. . . 


"Wirt st 














Total 8-inch 




17,591 

8 

377 

63 

173 

293 

4 

3 

164 


Charlesgate East 




C. P. 

Dor. 


6-in. 




Massachusetts ave. . . 

Trinity pi 

Stuart st 


At N.Y., N.H. & H. R.R 








Springfield st 




Bellevue st 










1,085 











98 City Document No. 38. 

Statement of Main Pipe Extended. — Continued. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


s 


6 


"§3 

a 
o 










1 085 




Milton ave. and Washington st 


Dor. 


6-in. 


300 








143 






21 






12 






154 






165 






333 






293 


New street off Leeds- 




23 






27 






93 


Alpha road 




160 




32 






76 






52 


Joseph st. 




23 


" Park st 


345 






36 






48 




Freeport st. and Dorchester ave 


90 




85 


Whitby terrace 




225 




46 






368 






119 






298 






232 




Lauriat and Jones aves 


87 


Johnston terrace 


170 


Sawyer ave. and Pleasant st. 


126 




270 






52 




Columbia road and Blue Hill ave 


260 




274 






6,123 















Water Department. 99 

Statement of Main Pipe Extended. — Continued. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


1 

s 


6 

N 
CO 


bo 

a 

4 










6,123 
3 


St. Gregory's ct 




Dor. 


6-in. 




129 






283 






502 








112 




Percival ave. and Mt. Ida road 


384 




604 






25 


Pinckney road 

Michigan ave 




25 

27 




58 




From east side of Columbia road 

" west " " " " 


17 




18 




24 






1780 






27 




Off west side of Columbia road be- 
tween Brunswick st. and railroad. .. 

Off west side of Columbia road be- 
tween Brunswick st. and railroad. . . 






18 




18 
23 






550 






698 


ii tt 




154 


Edward Everett sq. . . 
Mt. Everett st 


Edward Everett sq. and Holden st. . . . 


947 

8 




23 






105 






307 




505 






213 


Columbia road 


Blue Hill ave. and Washington st 
Geneva ave. and Washington st 


400 
658 
265 










15,516 











100 City Document No. 38. 

Statement of flain Pipe Extended. — Continued. 



In What Street. 



Between What Streets. 



Brunswick st 

Magnolia sq 

Dean ave 

Dudley st 

W. Cottage st 

Half Moon st 

Wales pi 

Columbia road (con- 
tract) 

Gold st 

Peters st 

I st 

O st 

Bast Broadway 

Dove ct 

Wabcno st 

Ball st 

Waunibeck st 

Penryth st 

Culbert pi 

Decatur ave 

Cherokee st 

Astor st 

Whipple st 

Columbus ave 

Madison st 

Ernst st 

Miles st 

Arklow st 

Kenwood road 

New st. off Kenwood 
road, 1st from Hun- 
tington ave 

New st. off Kenwood 
road, 2d left from 
Huntington ave — 



Brought forward 

At Columbia road 

From Magnolia st 

Howard ave. and Judson st 

Howard ave. and W. Cottage st. 

From Dudley st 

From Magnolia st 

At Columbia road 



Dor. 



6-in. 



Dudley and Pond sts 

A and B sts 

Sixth and Seventh sts 

At Second st 

" Columbia road 

N and O sts 

From Dove st 

Wabon and Wyoming sts 

At Shawmut ave 

Humboldt ave. and Harold st. 
Across Columbus ave 



So. B. 



Rox. 



Hillside and Pontiac sts 

Massachusetts ave. and Hemenway st 

At Astor st 

Centre and Dimock sts 

At Shawmut ave 

W. Walnut pk. and Bragdon st.. 



Walden and Round Hill sts 

Brookline and Huntington aves. 



Across Kenwood road. 



Carried forward 



Water Department. 101 

Statement of flain Pipe Extended. — Continued. 



In What Street. 



Between what Streets. 



New st. off Francis st., 
1st from Huntington 
ave 

New street off Fran- 
cis St., 2d right from 
Huntington ave — 

Binney st 

St. Stephen st 

New St., off St. Ste- 
phen st., 1st left 
from Bryant 

New St., off St. Ste- 
phen st., 1st right 
from Bryant 

New St., off St. Ste- 
phen st., 2d left 
from Bryant 

Harold st 

Stony Brook pi 

Newbury st 

Bray st 

Bragdonet 

Peterborough st 

Brookledge st 

Hartwell st 

Greenville st 

Potomac st 

Otis pi 

Durant st 

Woodman st 

St. Joseph st 

Sylvia st 

Francis st 

Rhoda st 

Newberg st 

Congreve st 

So. Conway st 

So. Fairview st 

Alaric st 



Brought forward 



Across Francis st. 



Box. 



Across Francis st 

Bryant and Gainsboro sts. 



Across St. Stephen st. 



Munroe st. and Walnut ave 

Columbus ave. and Centre st 

Across Brookline ave 

Columbus ave. and Washington st. . . . 

" " " Amory st 

Audubon road and Audubon road — 

Humboldt ave. and Elm Hill ave 

Georgia and Schuyler sts 

Dudley and Winthrop sts 

Mt. Vernon and Torktown sts 

Off Norfolk st 

Off Baker st 

St. Joseph and Jamaica sts 

Woodlawn and South sts 

Forest Hills and Washington sts 

At Mt. Vernon st 

From Central st 

Berry and Cornell sts 

South and Centre sts 

At So. Fairview st 

So. Walter and Roberts sts 

Across Spring st 

Carried forward 



W 



22,739 

53 

13 
14 

843 

37 



37 

397 

107 

42 

328 

635 

1,883 

305 

533 

4 

917 

133 

592 

72 

160 

100 

4 

172 

204 

312 

28 

34 

55 

30,773 



102 City Document No. 38. 

Statement of Main Pipe Extended. — Continued. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


.2 


a 


"Sj 






5 


OD 


1-3 










30,773 






W.R. 


6-in. 


329 






•' 


" 


48 






275 






154 




,, 


(< 


175 






,, 


,, 


13 






,, 


,, 


272 






lt 


„ 


86 






(1 


„ 


120 






Bri. 


u 


239 








" 


171 






178 


Beacon st 


Chestnut Hill ave. and Brookline line, 


68 






„ 


,, 


180 


Willard pi 




„ 


„ 


354 






« 


» 


66 






37 






" 


« 


5 






5 




it << (i 


(l 


„ 


5 






„ 


„ 


354 






„ 


« 


136 






(1 


u 


226 






,, 


[( 


339 


Ridge road 




,, 


t, 


3 






" 


" 


264 






210 




Commonwealth ave. and Charles river, 


" 


" 


3 


Oak Square ave 


997 






,, 


„ 


78 






u 


1( 


335 






it 


,, 


345 


Shelby st 




E. B. 


<( 


154 








« 


36 










37,033 













Water Department. 103 

Statement of flain Pipe Extended. — Concluded. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


o 

5 


6 

N 
03 


"5: 
a 










37,033 
6 






E. B. 

Quincy. 


6-ln. 






144 






10 






10 




11 14 <i 


8 






2 






2 






667 






9 




Total 6-inch 






37,891 
18 




Commercial st. and ferry -house 


C.P. 

Dor. 


4-in. 


Court, off Leonard st., 


6 


Total 4-inch 






24 

















Statement of Private Mains Laid during the Year 
ending January 31, 1899. 



For whom Laid. 



Where Laid. 



Boston Fire Dept. (salt- 
water main) 

Boston Terminal Co 

Insane Hospital Trustees 



Pauper Institutions Trus- 
tees 



Central wharf, between Atlantic ave. and 
water front 

In yard, between Dorchester and Atlantic 
aves 



In yard, between Dorchester and Atlantic 
aves 



Austin Farm, between Harvard and Can- 
terbury sts 



Austin Farm, between Harvard and Can- 
terbury sts 



Austin Farm, between Harvard and Can- 
terbury sts 



2-in. 


680 


" 


562 


6-in. 


24 


8-in. 


1,195 


6-in. 


22 


4-in. 


6 



Long Island, from reservoir to piggery and 
ice pond 



Total number of feet. 



731 



3,220 



104 



City Document No. 38. 



Statement of Main Pipe Raised, Lowered, and Moved 

Laterally. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


o 

m 

s 


c3 

S3 

53 


03 
Hi 


Raised, 
Lowered 

or 
Moved. 






C.P. 

Dor. 
Bri. 
C.P. 

W.R. 

C.P. 
W.R. 
C.P. 


12-in. 

8-in. 
6-in. 


200 

375 

145 

449 

12 

82 

57 

86 

163 

141 

96 




Walk Hill st 

North Beacon st 






Norfolk and Blue Hill aves 

Parsons st. and Barker's lane. . . 


" 


South Walter st 


Across B. & A. R.R. bridge 

South and South Fairview sts 


Moved. 
Raised. 








Springvale ave 
















1,806 
















"— " 





Statement of Main Pipe Abandoned. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Tremont st 

Columbia road. 
Huntington ave 

Beverly st 

Tremont st 

Blue Hill ave. . . 
Columbia road. 

Congress st 

Dorchester st.. . 
Warren ave. . . . 
Chelsea st 



At Common St.. 

" Castle sq. ... 

Total 30-inch 



Edward Everett sq. and Dudley st. 

At Dartmouth st 

Total 20-inch 



Opp. Fitchburg depot 

School st. and Scollay sq 

At Walk Hill st 

Dudley and Edward Everett sqs 

At railroad tracks 

" railroad bridge 

Front st. and City sq 

Cor. of City sq 

Total 16-inch 



C.P. 



Dor. 
C.P. 



C.P. 



Dor. 



So. B. 



Chn. 



16-in 



12 

300 



4 

888 



3 

4 

50 

478 

11 

30 



Watee Department. 105 

Statement of Main Pipe Abandoned. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Blackstone st 

West Newton st. . . 
Pleasant st 

st a 

Columbus ave 

Commercial st 

Massachusetts ave 
Huntington ave. . . 
Harrison ave 

Harvard st 

Way st 

Fleet st 

North st 

Court st 

Hanover st 

Prince st 

Leverett st 

Commercial st 

Castle st 

Federal st 

Berkeley st. . . 

Tremont st 

Atlantic ave 

Canal st 

Washington st 

Way st 

Berkeley st 

Tremont st 

Northampton st 

Columbia road 

Ashmont st 



At Clinton st 

Shawmut ave. and Tremont st 

Opp. Melrose st 

Opp. Tennyson st 

At " " 

Opp. Piedmont st 

June. Grenville pi. and Ferdinand st. 

15 ft. south of No. 445-7 

At Dundee st 

" Dartmouth st 

" Randolph st 

" Genesee st 

Near No. 17 

Harrison ave. and Albany st 

At Moon st 

Junction Le wis st 

Hanover st. and Cornhill 

East of Court st 

At Bennet ave 

" Causeway st 

State and Clinton sts 

Tremont and Albion sts 

West line of Middlesex st 

Kneeland st. and bridge 

Chandler " " " 

At Castle st 

" Summer st 

Near Travers st 

Opp. Jordan, Marsh & Co 

Harrison ave. and Albany st 

Chandler st. and bridge 

A.t Castle sq 

" Shawmut ave 

Glendale and Davenport sts 

Neponset ave. and Train st 

Carried forward 



C. P. 



12-in 



Dor. 



5 

4 

4 

5 

4 

25 

3 

3 

4 

4S0 

4 

5 

220 

4 

4 

9 

500 

153 

5 

1,056 

263 

50 

4 

9 

3 

20 

34 

70 

24 

770 

360 

4,142 



106 City Document No. 38. 

Statement of Main Pipe Abandoned. — Continued. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


.2 
'u 

5 




to 

a 

Hi 










4,142 
650 
466 




"Washington st. and Geneva ave 


Dor. 

Rox. 
W. R. 


12- 


In. 






348 






15 






14 






12 






5 






20 






12 






12 




" Millst 


12 




12 


Washington st 




40 




60 






545 






766 


ii (i 




733 




Edward Everett sq. and Dudley st. . . . 


1,585 
47 






5 




277 






20 






10 






12 




" Old Heath st 


12 




" New Heath and Old Heath sts 


30 

8 




13 






695 




Centre st. and N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R.. 

Washington st. and N. Y., N. H. & H. 
R.R 


309 




476 






3 






20 




956 










12,342 











Water Department. 107 

Statement of Main Pipe Abandoned. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



South st 

Florence st 

Park st 

Market st 

North Beacon st... 

Brooks st 

Charles River ave 

Haynes st 

Byron st 

Gove st 

Chelsea st 

London st 

Chelsea st 

"Webster st 

Saratoga st 

Sumner st 

Saratoga st. 

Bremen st 

Minot st 

Medway st 

La Grange st 

Byron st 

Gove st 

Chelsea st 

Webster st 

Brookline ave. . . . 

Tremont st 

Brattle st 

Furnace st 

Cove st 



Brought forward 

Brandon and Conway sts 

Ashland and Sycamore sts — 

At Centre st 

" North Beacon st 

Parsons st. and Barker's lane. 

At Market st 

" Faneuil Station 

Water st. and City sq 

Orleans and Marginal sts 

At Saratoga st 

Chelsea and Bremen sts 

At Wesley st 

" Porter st 

North of Marion st 

At Cottage st 

" Trumbull st 

" Jeffries st 

" Swift st 

" Gove st 

Total 12-inch 



W.R. 



Bri. 



Chs'n. 
E.B. 



Opp. Wall st 

Over railroad bridge 

Centre st. and N.Y., N.H. 

At Saratoga st 

Chelsea and Bremen sts. 

North of Marion st 

At Cottage st 

Total 10-in 



H. R.R. 



C. P. 
Dor. 
W.R. 

E. B. 



10-in 



On B. & A. R.R. bridge 

Pleasant and Warrenton sts. 

At Court st — 

Federal st. and Cove pi 

Cove pi. and Kneeland st 

Carried forward 



C. P. 



12,342 
183 
18 
16 
10 
21 
12 
26 
11 
8 



12,705 

12 

26 

320 

5 

3 

15 

2 

383 

15 

205 
37 

215 
85 



108 City Document No. 38. 

Statement of Main Pipe Abandoned. — Continued. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 




6 
55 


"So 

n 










557 






C.P. 
Dor. 

Rox. 
W. R. 

Bri. 

Chs'n. 

E. B. 

C.P. 


8-in. 
6-in. 


572 






565 






147 






37 






60 






26 






4 






50 


Nightingale st 




60 




43 






80 




135 






19 


South Walter st 




8 
235 




At Forest Hills st 


10 


Englewood ave 




12 


Chiswick road 




16 


Water st 




56 


Mead st 


At Bunker Hill st 


3 


Water st 


Warren and Charles River aves 

Water st. and City sq 

At Wapping st 


248 


Charles River ave 

Water st 


4 
34 




6 


CC CC {( 


At " " 


6 


Princeton st 




14 






3 




Total 8-inch 






3,010 










150 






12 




Washington st. and Shawmut ave. . . . 
Washington st. and Harrison ave 


300 




200 


Massachusetts ave. 


15 






677 













Water Department. 109 

Statement of Main Pipe Abandoned. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Chester pi 

Camden st 

Sawyer st 

Lenox st 

Woodbury st 

Kendall st 

Hammond st 

Shawmut ave 

Fayette st 

Melrose st 

Worcester st 

Norman st 

Avon st 

Springfield st 

Tennyson st 

Corte6 st 

Winchester st 

South Margin st. . 

Kneeland st 

Winchester st 

Shawmut ave 

Massachusetts ave 



Piedmont st. 



Brought forward. 
At Shawmut ave 



C. P. 



West Newton and Rutland sts 

Cor. Church st 

200 feet from Pleasant st 

Cor. Pleasant st 

At Shawmut ave 

Green and Merrimac sts 

Washington and Chauncy sts 

At Shawmut ave 

Cor. Church st 

Junction Church st 

Ferdinand and Berkeley sts 

Corner Church st 

Westerly line of Church st 

Easterly , " " " " 

Pitts and Stamford sts 

At Whitmore st 

J unction Church st 

Rutland st. and Massachusetts ave 

Opposite No. 621 

" 690 

210 feet west of Harrison ave 

Opposite No. 677 

450 feet west of Harrison ave 

Near No. 545 

Opposite No. 563 

" " 527 

Ahout 50 feet easterly from Church st. 
Carried forward 



110 City Document No. 38. 

Statement of Main Pipe Abandoned Continued. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


o 


a 


a 






5 


s 












3,089 


Piedmont st 




C.P. 


6-in. 


4 










4 






( 




4 






, 




(< 


4 




About 100 feet east of No. 536 


, 




(( 


3 






, 




(t 


4 






( 




„ 


4 






« 




'< 


4 
4 


Massachusetts ave.. . . 


No, 558 


, 




„ 


4 




190 feet west of Shawmut ave 


, 




fi 


4 






, 




,, 


25 


Oxford st 


Near No. 17 


, 




,< 


4 




" " 21 


• 




•' 


4 






9 






245 




At Tyler st 






4{ 


5 


Fulton st 




( 




( , 


10 






, 




Cl 


4 






« 




" 


6 






4 




Between Harvard and Kneeland sts.. 


, 




,, 


4 


Hullst 




, 




,, 


541 






, 




,, 


351 






• 




" 


30 






4 






, 




„ 


5 


<> ii 


At " " 






„ 


4 












3 






■ 




■' 


4 






4 






60 




At Fleet st 


« 




» 


3 






4 








4,465 











Water Department. Ill 

Statement of flain Pipe Abandoned. — Continued. 



In what Street. 


Between what Streets. 


5 


6 
tn 

03 


60 










4,465 
3 






C. T>- 


6-in. 








4 


Clark st 




4 




Cor. of North st 


4 






4 






4 




200 ft. north of Travers st 

Federal st. and bridge 


10 


Mt. Washington ave. . 


450 

40 






5 






4 






6 




Commercial st. and Merchants row 


6 




6 






g 




i< H ii 


6 






4 


Pitts st 




3 






476 






3 






4 






4 






4 


ii <■ 




4 






231 






82 






165 






65 




Federal st. and Atlantic av. (Cove st.) 
Columbus ave. and R.R. bridge 


260 




185 




12 






g 






3 






24 












6,562 













112 City Document No. 38. 

Statement of flain Pipe Abandoned — Continued. 



Iu what Street. 



Bstes pi 

Gilbert pi 

Neponset ave... 

Geneva ave 

Westville st 

Draper st 

Greenwich st... 

Spencer st 

Neponset ave... 

Glendale st 

Clayton st 

Saxton st 

Columbia road. 

Devon st 

Bellevue st 

Bodwell st 

Bird st 

Sawyard st 

Hamlet st 

Eastman st 

Albert st 

Seaver st 

Granger st 

Jones ave 

Centre st 

Greenwich st. . 

Belf ort st 

Columbia road 
Mt. Vernon st. 

Bellevue st 

Glendale st. ... 

Bodwell st 

K. st 

N st 



Between what Streets. 



Brought forward . 
From Summer st 



Ashmont st. and bridge 

Blue Hill ave. and Wilder st 

Bowdoin st. to Bowdoin sq 

Robinson and Westville sts , 

Dorchester ave. and Duncan st — 

Wheatland and Talbot aves 

At Neponset bridge 

East of Columbia road 

At Freeport st 

Belf ort and Romsey sts 

Blue Hill ave. and Washington st. 

West of Columbia road 

From Columbia road 



At Adams st 

" Columbia road 

Near Duncan st 

White ter. and Ballou ave. . 

Near Adams st 

At Clayton st 

" Saxton st 

Wolcott and Blue Hill aves. 

AtN.Y., N.H. &H. RR 

From Columbia road 

East of Columbia road 

From Columbia road 

South of Ninth st 

At Broadway 

Carried forivard 



C.P. 



Dor. 



So. B. 



Water Department. 113 

Statement of Main Pipe Abandoned. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Fifth st 

Third st 

Sixth st 

Seventh st. ... 

B st 

Third st 

Second st 

1st 

New Heath st. 

Terrace st 

Parker st 

Decatur ave. . 
Bickford ave. 

Wensley st 

Ball st 

Windsor st 

Madison st 

Sterling st 

Williams st. . . . 

Willow pk 

Clifton st 

Winthrop pi. . . 
Shawmut ave. , 

Centre st 

Bryant st 

Notre Dame st 

Wayne st 

allies st 

Ernst st 

Harold st 

Francis st 

Roherts st 



Brought forward. 
At O st 



.15. 



" Mst 

" Ost 

" Mst 

" Third st 

" Cst 

" B st 

" I st 

" Second st 

Columbus ave. and Parker st. 

At New Heath st 

New Heath and Centre sts 

Across Columbus ave 

At Wensley st 

Heath st. and Bickford ave. . . 
At Shawmut ave 



Rox. 



From Dudley st 

At Shawmut ave 

Massachusetts ave. and Vernon 



At Columbus ave 

Parker and St. Stephen sts.. 
Bragdon st. and Dimock st. 

At Blue Hill ave 

At Bragdon st 



Walnut ave. and Munroe st 

Brookline ave. and Binney st 

Brookfleld and South Walter sts. 
Carried forward 



C. P. and 
Rox 



Rox. 



W. R. 



6-in. 



13,939 

12 

6 

24 

24 

12 

12 

27 

21 

28 

6 

626 

28 

1,332 

31 

28 

229 

2 

12 

2 



5 

100 
6 

3,157 
15 

25 

12 

63 

5 

5 

3 

328 

421 

20,560 



114 City Document No. 38. 

Statement of Main Pipe Abandoned. — Continued. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 





















as 




N 


p 


03 



Brookfleld st 

Springvale st 

Cliapin ave 

Water st 

South Fairview st. . . 

Pleasant st 

Arborway 

Selkirk road 

Etna st 

Sidlaw road 



Gardner st. . 
Henshaw st. 



Charles River ave. . . 

Warren ave 

Charles River ave. . . 
Bremen st 



Gove st 

Chelsea st — 
Princeton st. 



Chelsea st 

Webster st. . . 
Bremen st. . . 
Maverick sq 
Bremen st. .. 

Byron st 

Sumner st. .. 



North Hudson st... 

Arnold st 

Massachusetts ave . 

Battery st 

Ferry st 



Brought forward 

At Roberts st 

At Spring st 

From La Grange st 

At Keyes st 

South and Roberts sts 

At La Grange st. 

Across Morton st 

At Chiswick road 

" Maple ave. and Garden St.. . 

" Chiswick road 

" Malvern st 

Market and Bentley sts 

Corner of Water st 

Front st. and City sq 

AVater st. and City sq 

North corner of Gove st 

South corner of Gove st 

Chelsea and Bremen sts 

At Wesley st 

" Marion st 

" Prescott st 

" Curtis st 

" Cottage st 

" Porter st 

At Henry st 

" Brooks st 

Saratoga and Bennington sts. 

At Jeffries st 

Total 6-inch 



From Snowhill st. 
At Shawmut ave. 



Commercial st. and Ferry-house. 

At Fulton st - 

Carried forioard 



W. R. 



Chsn. 



E.B. 



C. P. 



4-in. 



20,560 

12 

39 

235 

23 

329 

7 

15 

13 

8 

6 

3 

76 

68 

280 

250 

4 

6 

216 

5 

13 

12 

585 

2 

8 

11 

5 

40 

140 



22,971 



63 

294 

19 



Water Department. 115 

Statement of Main Pipe Abandoned. — Concluded. 



In what Street. 



Between what Streets. 



Snowhill st 

Fulton pi 

Bennet ave 

Wall st 

Arnold st 

Bumstead ct 

Franklin ave 

Court sq. (east) 

" " (west) 

Lucas st 

Bay st 

Jefferson st 

Cove pi 

Ashtonpl 

Goldst 

Sayward pi 

Glover's ct 

Newbern st (J. P. A.) 
Weston st. " 

Bromley pk. (so. side) 

" " (no. side) 

st 

Orchard st 

Bickford ave 

" Pi 

Adams pi 

Guild st 

Clifton st 

Cottage st 

Mead st 

Haynes st 

Sterling st. (J. P. A.). 
Moon Island 



Brought forward 

Junction of North Hudson st. 

North and Fulton sts 

Prince and North Bennet sts. 

Minot and Causeway sts 

At Shawmut ave 

From Boylston st 

At Court st 



Washington st. and Shawmut ave. 
At Fayette st 



From Cove st 

From Charles st.. 

A and B sts 

At Woodward st. 



Weston and Sterling sts . 
Cabot and Tremont sts. . . 
Bickford and Albert sts. 



At Bromley pk 

"Orchard " 

Heath and Wensley sts 

At Bickford ave 

Near Williams st 

Washington st. and Lambert ave. 

From Dudley st 

At Bunker Hill st 



Orleans and Marginal sts. 
Total 4-inch 



Cabot and Tremont sts 

On beach opp. Long Island. 



C. P. 



S. B. 



Rox. 



Chs'n. 



E. B. 



Rox. 



3-in 
2-in 



412 

20 

4 

227 

700 

8 

220 

4 

35 

35 

46 

32 

16 

330 

50 

320 

30 

12 

300 

350 

657 

661 

25 

6 

331 

11 

11 

763 

2S0 

54 

27 

653 

6,630 

230 

250 



116 



City Document No. 38. 



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<s 




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ffl 


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a 


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eg 


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Water Department. 



117 



Blow-off Gates Established and Abandoned during the 

Year. 





DlAMETEBj|IN INCHES. 


Totals. 




4-in. 


6-in. 


12-in. 




9 
2 


6 
2 


1 


16 




4 








7 


4 


1 


12 







Private Gates Established and Abandoned during the 

Year. 





Diameter in Inches. 


Totals. 




3-in. 


4-in. 


6-in. 


8 -in. 


12-in. 




1 


2 


*16 


2 


2 


23 


















1 


2 


16 


2 


2 


23 







* Twelve of these gates were established] in connection with the salt-water hy- 
drants, and have nothing to do with our system. 



118 



City Document No. 38. 



Hydrants Established and Abandoned during the Year. 





ESTABLISHED. 


3 
O 


Abandoned. 


"3 

o 


CO 

CO 

03 

a 
s- 
o 

a 

H 






o 

1-3 


o 
ffl 


CO 

O 


a 
o 

m 

o 
M 


o 


o 
W 


"to 

o 

On 


a 

o 

O 

n 


CO 

CS 

ca 

o 

OJ 

R 


City Proper (Public) 

" (Saltwater), 
South Boston (Public)... 
East Boston (Public) 

Dorchester (Public) 

West Roxbury (Public) . . 


56 


1 


25 

12 

20 

32 

63 

119 

45 

2 

4 

32 

1 

5 




82 

12 

28 

44 

82 

151 

85 

2 

4 

37 

1 

5 


28 


4 


3 


72 


• 

107 


12 
4 

33 

59 

38 

1 

20 

4 


25 


4 

10 
6 
3 
3 


4 

2 

13 

29 

37 


3 
6 

20 
30 
4 


1 




20 
38 
9 
6 
5 


24 

44 

49 

92 

47 

1 

5 

17 

1 

1 




16 
33 
32 


4 

23 
6 
1 










5 
1 




1 


Brighton (Public) 




5 


8 


8 
1 
1 
































Total Public 


82 


91 


340 

8 
12 




513 

8 
12 


97 


94 


44 
3 


150 


385 
3 


154 

5 

12 


?6 


Total Private and Subur- 





























Water Department. 



119 



Total Number of Hydrants Connected With Distribution 
System, January 31, 1899. 





o 


o 


u 

O 

M 


a 
o 

o 
pq 


o 


Notes. 




Tib 


329 
10 

146 
13* 

166 

7 

416 


53 

28 
27 
84 


294 

45* 
165 

33* 

40 

25* 

55 

10* 

44 
5* 

35 
1 

27 
2* 
4 
6* 


1,451 

55 

568 

48 

384 

40 

1,182 

11 

1,687 

7 

989 

15 

521 

8 

286 

57 

18 

6 

2 

5 
2 
8 
7 
11 






*27 not for Are. 


" " (Private) 


229 

151 
8 

627 
1* 

537 


*2 Bostons) tffl 
*4 Posts jnotiornre. 


" " (Private) 


*7 not for fire. 




SJffiH*"**- 




863 

1* 

600 

14 

350 

6 

45 

36 

18 

6 

2 

1 

1 


243 
1 

226 

70 

37 

1 




^ Bostons } notforflre . 


West Roxbury (Public) 


12S 




74 

200 
14 






*2 not for fire. 


" (Private) 


*1 not for fire. 












Thompson's Island (Private). 
Rainsford Island (Private) . . . 
Gallop's Island (Private) — 


5 








3 


1* 
1* 

3 

7 


*1 not for Are. 
*1 not for fire. 














11 
















Total Number, Public Hy- 


2,721 

30 


2,915 
126 


768 
5 


664 
139 


7.06S 
300 




Total Number, Private and 





Note. — The salt water hydrants are not included in above as they are not con- 
nected with our system. 



120 



City Document No. 38. 





Water Posts. 












Number 


Established 


Abandoned Number 


District. 


in use 


during 


during 


in use 




Jan. 31, 1898. 


the Year. 


the Tear. Jan. 31, 1899. 




55 


16 


1 


70 


South Boston 


28 


7 




35 


East Boston 


32 

69 


8 
6 




40 




1 


74 




83 
76 


14 

4 


8 
3 


89 




77 


Brighton 


45 


5 




50 


Charlestown 


20 






20 










Totals 


408 


60 


13 


455 






Causes of Repairs on Pipes of all Sizes. 




Abolishment of grade crossings .... 


12 


Blasting • . . . . 








43 


Broken by pile-driver . 








1 


Broken by steam-roller . 








10 


Broken in foundation wall 








34 


Defective couplings 








29 


Defective joints 








159 


Defective pipes 








71 


Defective packing . 








144 


Defective stop-cocks 








196 


Eaten by soil 








16 


Frozen ..... 








57 


Gnawed by rats 








9 


In way of various corporations 








129 


Main cocks renewed 








167 


New sidewalk cocks put in 




. - 




6 


New main uprights put on 








70 


On account of Sewer Department 








89 


Pipe stolen .... 








1 


Settling of earth . 








415 


Sidewalk cocks renewed 








311 


Sidewalk uprights raised or lowered 






381 


Sidewalk uprights moved on account of e 


dgestone 




51 


Stopped by dirt .... 






101 


Stopped by fish 








176 


Stopped by gasket 








11 


Stopped by rust 








566 


Struck by pick 








129 


Widening of streets 








37 


Worn out 


• 






11 




3,432 



Water Department. 



121 



Statement of Miscellaneous Work Performed during the 

Year 1898. 

Boxes over bridges repaired 

Dead ends blown off . 

Examinations caused by false reports 

Fountains repaired .... 

Gates salted on account of cold weather 

Gates inspected .... 

Gates oiled and cleaned in service 

Hydrant barrels changed for repairs 

Hydrant boxes repaired in service 

Hydrant boxes renewed 

Hydrant boxes cleaned out 

Hydrant inspections made on account of co 

Hydrants oiled in service . 

Hydrants painted .... 

Hydrants repaired in service 

Leaks found inside building line for owner 1 

Locations of gates marked and remarked 

Meter boxes repaired in service . 

Putting hay in hydrant boxes 

Stop-cock or gate boxes repaired in service 

Stop-cock or gate boxes renewed in service 

Streets repaired ..... 

Taking hay out of hydrant boxes 

Taking hay out of meter boxes . 

Water posts repaired 

Water turned on and off for repairs 



, . 


40 


. 


1,247 


. . . 


894 




252 


. , 


7,220 




16,250 




219 




235 


. . . 


515 




110 




2,269 


id weather 


150,181 




952 




2,610 




323 


o repair 


356 




8,791 




12 




537 




824 




291 


. 


1,463 




594 




893 




979 


. . . 


244 



122 



City Document No. 38. 



Number of Repairs Made on Pipes of all Sizes from 1850 

to U 



Year. 



Number. 



Number. 



1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 



104 
237 
323 
345 
354 
294 
307 
363 
311 
531 
592 
508 
490 
494 
489 
607 
675 
609 
531 
489 
864 
1,565 
1,647 
1,229 
2,594 



1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
18S8 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 



928 

948 

910 

1,237 

1,206 

1,064 

1,028 

1,418 

953 

1,380 

749 

875 

1,041 

1,356 

1,032 

898 

952 

1,444 

1,882 

1,703 

1,535 

2,796 

2,781 

3,432 



Drinking Fountains. 

Number, Style, Location. 

(a) Indicates automatic fixtures for man and beast in warm weather, 
and a continuous flow of water for beasts in cold weather. 

(b) Indicates automatic fixtures for beasts only. Continuous flow 
of water all the year. 

(c) Indicates automatic fixtures for man in warm weather only. 

(d) Indicates automatic fixtures for man and beast in warm weather 
only. 

(e) Indicates cold water fountains with automatic fixtures for man 
in warm weather only. 



City Proper. 



43 
42 

47 
27 
25 
40 
51 



a — Albany street, at Union Park street. 

a — Albany street, at Lehigh street. 

a — Albany street, opposite Concord street. 

a — Atlantic avenue, at Rowe's wharf. 

a — Atlantic avenue, junction Commercial street. 

a — Beacon street, corner Charles- street. 

b — Beacon street, junction Commonwealth avenue. 



Water Department. 123 

36 c — Boston Common, corner Beacon and Charles streets. 
35 c — Boston Common (Park square) . 

33 c — Boston Common (near old elm). 
32 c— Boston Common (West street) . 

34 c — Boston Common (near band stand). 

31 e — Boston Common (corner Park and Tremont streets). 

38 e — Bowdoin square. 

21 c — Causeway street, at Union Station. 

22 a — Causeway street, junction Merrimac street. 

39 a — Charles street, between Beacon and Boylston streets. 
41 a — Columbus avenue, opposite Church street. 

96 c — Copp's Hill terrace, opposite Charter street, North End 

park. 

26 b — Custom House square. 

29 a — Fort Hill square. 
24 a — Haymarket square. 

37 e — Hanover street, opposite Police Station No. 1. 

23 a — Leverett street, at Craigie's bridge. 

44 a — Maiden Street, junction Wareham street. 

50 a — Massachusetts avenue, near Westland avenue. 

20 c — North End park, at men's bath-house. 

18 e — North End park, at women's bath-house. 

19 e — North End park, rear band-stand. 
28 b — Post Office square. 

45 a — Tremont street, at Clarendon street. 

46 a — Washington street, at Blackstone square. 
95 e — Washington street, at State street. 

30 a — Winthrop square. 

East Boston. 

12 b — Bennington street, junction Chelsea street. 

14 b — Central square. 

16 c — Lewis street, at Webster street. 
94 e — 120 Marginal street. 

15 b — Maverick square. 

17 c — Maverick street, corner Cottage street. 
11 c — Neptune road, at Wood Island Park. 

13 c — Prescott street, at Bennington street. 
10 c — Saratoga street, junction Pope street. 

9 b — Square at Winthrop junction. 



South Boston. 

14c a — A street, near First street. 

81 b — Andrews square. 

82 c — Andrews square. 

73 d — Foundry street, opposite First street. 

75 c — Fourth street, corner Dorchester street, 

77 a — Fourth street, junction Emerson street. 



124 City Document No. 38. 



- Independence square. 

Q street, at Fifth street. 

■ Sixth street, near P street. 
Thomas park. 

Roxbury. 

Albany street, junction Dearborn street. 

■ Columbus avenue, near Whittier street. 
Dale street, near Bainbridge street. 

•Eliot square. 

-Eliot square. 

-Eustis street, junction Washington street. 

-Heath street, at Huntington avenue. 

-Junction Columbus avenue and Centre street. 

■Hanley square (Columbus avenue, opposite Roxbury 

street). 
-Tremont street, junction Cabot street. 

■ Walnut avenue, opposite Circuit street. 

West Roxbury. 

■ Centre street, junction Day and Perkins streets. 

- Centre street, junction South street. 

- Centre street, opposite Spring street. 
-South street, junction Morton street. 
-Washington street, junction South st. 
-Washington street, opposite Forest Hills Station. 

Brighton. 

- Barry's corner. 

-Beacon street, opposite Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 
-Market street, Cattle Fair Hotel. 
-Union square. 

- Western avenue, Charles River Hotel. 

- Washington street, at Oak square. 

Dorchester. 

-Adams street, opposite Minot street. 
-Blue Hill avenue, junction Washington street. 
-Blue Hill avenue, opposite Franklin park. 
-Eaton square (granite bowl). 
-Freeport street, opposite Beach street. 
-Clover's corner. 

-Junction Washington, Centre, Norfolk streets and Tal- 
bot avenue. 
-Neponset avenue, opposite Walnut street. 
-Pierce square (Milton Lower Mills). 

- River street, junction Blue Hill- avenue. 

- Upham's corner. 



78 


a 


80 


c- 


79 


c- 


76 


c- 


48 


a- 


55 


a- 


59 


c- 


53 


c- 


52 


b- 


49 


a- 


60 


a 


57 


a- 


56 


a- 


54 


a 


58 


a 


61 


a- 


62 


a- 


66 


a 


63 


d- 


65 


a 


64 


b 


68 


a 


72 


c- 


71 


a 


67 


a 


69 


a 


70 


a 


88 


a 


93 


a 


92 


d 


84 


b 


86 


a 


85 


a 


91 


a 


87 


a 


89 


a 


90 


b 


83 


a 



Water Department. 125 

Charlestown. 

5 d — Austin street, near Main street. 

7 d — Chelsea street, opposite Mystic playgrounds. 

8 e — City square. 

6 e — Junction Vine and Bunker Hill streets. 
4 a — Kutherford avenue, at Dunstable street. 

1 b — Sullivan square. 
3 c — Sullivan square. 

2 e — Sullivan square. 



126 City Document No. 88. 



APPENDIX D. 



REPORT OF THE ENGINEER. 



Engineering Department, 

50 City Hall, February 1, 1899. 

Hon. John R. Murphy, 

Water Commi8sio?ier : 

Sir, — I hereby submit the following report of the work 
done and records kept during the past year : 

On January 1, 1898, the Metropolitan Water Board, under 
the provisions of chapter 488 of the Acts of 1895, made 
takings of the entire Boston Water Works system westward 
of Chestnut Hill Reservoir; of Chestnut Hill Reservoir and 
that part of the adjoining lands included within the road en- 
circling the reservoir; of Chestnut Hill Pumping Station 
and a portion of the land easterly of the Pumping Station ; 
of the Mystic system west of and including Mystic Reservoir 
on College Hill, Medford, and a portion of the mains of the 
Mystic System. On the same date water from the Metropol- 
itan System was supplied to the City of Boston, and Mystic 
Lake as a source of water supply was abandoned. On April 
21, 1898, the Metropolitan High Service was supplied to East 
Boston, and the local pumping station was abandoned. On 
Febuary 1, 1899, the Metropolitan Water Board began the 
operation of the pumping station, supplying the double high 
service in West Roxbury. 

Distribution. 

During the past year 33.6 miles of water pipes were laid 
and 9.1 miles were abandoned, making a total of 689.2 miles ; 
this total length includes mains belonging to the city of 
Boston only, and does not include the systems of Chelsea, 
Somerville and Everett, and that portion of the Boston 
system acquired by the Metropolitan Water Board, all 
of which were formerly included in the reports of the 
City Engineer under the heads of Cochituate and Mystic 
Divisions. 



Water Department. 127 

The changed conditions occasioned by the Metropolitan 
supply caused some anxiety in regard to the safety during 
the winter season of the large mains supplying Charlestown 
and of those over Warren bridge ; where formerly a well 
denned current had existed it was thought that the present 
slow movement of water in the pipes might be insufficient to 
prevent freezing, and some of the lines were shut off and 
emptied during the cold weather. Daily determinations 
were made of the temperature of the water in all mains 
where danger was supposed to exist and thermophone read- 
ings were taken in the bottoms of siphons on lines that had 
been emptied. These readings were plotted daily and 
afforded opportunity for careful study of the existing condi- 
tions. When the readings became dangerously low, means 
were taken to increase the circulation in the pipe in danger. 

The year has been an active one, as the record of pipe 
laid shows ; for all work done plans have been made and 
lines and grades have been furnished where necessary. 

The Dorchester high service line was completed to Wash- 
ington street, via Geneva avenue and Bowdoin street, at 
Columbia road, the size being reduced to 30 inches ; connec- 
tions were made with 24-inch and 16-inch lines in Columbia 
road, with a 12-inch line hi Bowdoin street and with a 
12-inch line in Washington street. The 36-inch pipe in 
Geneva avenue from Grove Hall to Columbia road was laid 
under contract by H. P. Nawn. 

The 24-inch high service in West Roxbury was extended 
from Forest Hills through South street to the Arnold Arbore- 
tum, and thence through Weld street to South street, con- 
necting with the 8-inch line in Weld street and the 16-inch 
in Roberts street; sufficient increase of pressure resulted 
from this extension to allow the Skinner Hill district to be 
taken off the supplementary high service. 

A large amount of work was done in Columbia road ; new 
service mains were laid on each side of the road for practically 
the entire distance from Blue Hill avenue to Edward Everett 
square ; a 24-inch high service main was laid (with the 
exception of a gap at the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad) from Geneva avenue easterly ; at Quincy street it 
reduces to 20-inch and so continues to Upham's Corner. 
A large portion of the 20-inch and 16-inch mains were relaid 
from Upham's Corner to Edward Everett square. 

In Roberts street a 16-inch main was laid, designed for 
future extension easterly to Dorchester. 

In South Boston the 20-inch low service main was carried 
to City Point by way of Dorchester and Third streets, giving 



128 City Document No. 38. 

an abundant supply of water for fire purposes in a district 
where the protection had been inadequate. Connections were 
made with the pipes in Dorchester, L., P. and Q. streets. 

The water supply at Thompson's, Long, Rainsford's and 
Galloup's Islands and at Fort Warren has been unsatisfactory 
for several years ; this fact, added to the possibility of the 
batteries on Long Island and Fort Warren being called upon 
for service against a Spanish fleet, called for prompt action, 
and a 16-inch pipe was laid in Ashmont street and Nepon- 
set avenue to the Neponset River, replacing a 12-inch pipe, 
and a 12-inch was laid from the river to Moon Island in 
addition to the 6-inch in service. A connection was also 
made with the Quincy system on Hancock street for use 
in an emergency. 

The most important piece of relaying was on Harrison 
avenue, where the old 6-inch pipe was replaced with a 12-inch 
from West Newton street to Massachusetts avenue and with 
a 16-inch from Massachusetts avenue to Vernon street. 

In all 8.0 miles of old and small pipe have been relaid. 

It is the practice of the Street Department to notify the 
different departments of the city of its intention to build or 
rebuild streets ; in all cases the pipes, hydrants, etc., upon 
such streets were adjusted. This practice caused a large 
amount of work, particularly in the city proper. 

During the year an effort has been made to abolish " dead 
ends " with a resulting improvement both in the domestic and 
fire service. One hundred and fifty Boston hydrants have 
been taken out. In this connection I would urgently recom- 
mend the adoption of an independent valve post hydrant 
with two large steamer outlets running parallel with the line 
of the street. Such a hydrant would prove much better 
adapted to the needs of the Fire Department than the type 
of post hydrant in service. 

The Corrosion of Pipes by Electrolysis. 

There has been no marked change in electrical conditions 
in the water pipes during the past year. Serious damage from 
electrolysis is undoubtedly a possibility and safety can be 
hoped for only through systematic and continued investiga- 
tion. The protective measures employed in the past have 
in a measure proved effectual ; yet it is very possible that 
more radical steps must be taken in the near future to guard 
against disaster. The subject has been carefully studied 
during the year by Messrs. Stone & Webster, by whom many 
observations were made throughout -the city. The following 
is their report : 



Water Department. 129 

Stone & Webster, Electrical Experts and Engineers, 

4 Post Office Square, Boston, February 1, 1899. 

William Jackson Esq., 

City Engineer, Boston, Mass. : 

Dear Sir, — At your request we have made during 1898, 
as in previous years, electrical surveys in all parts of the city 
of Boston covered by the electric car tracks, in order to deter- 
mine the progress of electrolytic corrosion of water pipes. 

Heretofore we have relied upon readings taken between 
the water pipes (at lire hydrants) and the ground as the 
most accurate index to the locality of trouble. In 1897 we 
also took readings between hydrants and rails, but used only 
the hydrant-to-ground readings in comparing the conditions 
of 1897 with those of 1896. In 1898, however, we confined 
ourselves almost entirely to readings between hydrants and 
rails, as we believe them more reliable for studying the situ- 
ation as a whole. For particular localities, as in the neigh- 
borhood of Freeport street power station, we took ground 
readings also. 

In other cities we have obtained hydrant-to-rail measure- 
ments in investigations made during the year, and find the 
only objection to the method is that the size of the single 
reading is not always a criterion of the amount flowing be- 
tween the points at which the measurement is made. Very 
reliable data can, however, be obtained if hydrant-to-rail 
measurements are made in connection with other reading's in 
the same locality, taken under various conditions. The 
objection to the hydrant-to-ground system, formerly used, is 
that the readings vary with the condition of the soil and are 
therefore not as trustworthy for general comparison, as 
hydrant-to-rail readings. 

In diagram I. we give the maximum value of readings 
taken between hydrants and rails. On this diagram we have 
divided the city into convenient sections, shown by the red 
lines. The figures in red give the average voltage through- 
out the various sections for 1897 and 1898. The plus read- 
ings (indicated by + sign) show that the current flows from 
pipes to rails, the minus readings (indicated by O) show the 
reverse. As might be expected, many of the readings are 
fluctuating, and are so indicated on the diagram by a cross 
within a circle. Where no number accompanies a cross or a 
circle the reading was less than one quarter (|) of a volt. 
We have recorded on the diagram readings of one quarter (A) 
of a volt and up to three quarters (|) as if they were one 
half (£) volt, and readings of three quarters (|) up to one 
and one quarter (1^) as if they were one (1) volt; and so 



130 City Document No. 38. 

with still higher readings ; that is, we have recorded the 
nearest even half (i) volt, our purpose being to simplify the 
figures and make it easy to compare them, extreme accuracy 
being neither essential nor possible in an investigation of 
this kind . We have not given the readings where they were 
sometimes positive and sometimes negative. Readings were 
taken between pipes and ground in the neighborhood of the 
Dorchester power station (i.e., on Freeport and Park streets). 
These are not given on the diagram, but only the signs indi- 
cating the direction of the flow of the current. 

It will be seen that on the average the conditions for the 
past two years have been about the same, the difference being 
slightly in favor of 1897. The general averages are as 
follows : 

Av. positive readings, 1898 +1.4 Av. negative readings, 1898 ■ — 1.4 
1897 +1.3 " " " ' 1897 —1.2 

We wish to call attention to the positive readings along 
Dorchester and Neponset avenues and also along Harrison 
avenue, and to the negative readings along Centre street, 
near the Roxbury boundary, as well as along Centre street 
in the West Roxbury and Roslindale loop, and also on Bunker 
Hill street in Charlestown. 

Large positive readings as shown at the former places 
indicate that much current is flowing off the pipes to the 
rails. This flow will be only increased by improving the rail- 
return system in a district where the readings are positive. 
The source of trouble will be found at some point more or 
less distant, where the track-return system is insufficient, so 
that the current leaves the tracks, seeking a path of less re- 
sistance by the pipes. Therefore, in a "positive" district 
the only direct remedy that can be applied is to make the 
piping system itself a better conductor so as to keep the cur- 
rent from leaving it and flowing through the earth to the 
rails. This remedy, however, should be considered as only 
a temporary expedient since it causes a large flow of current 
through the pipes, thus exposing them to an added danger of 
corrosion at the joints wherever the electrical connection is 
imperfect. It may, however, be resorted to in cases where 
the real source of trouble cannot be immediately located and 
where the continual passage of current from pipes to ground 
is causing deterioration. 

With this in mind we advised bonding the water main to 
the return feeder in the power station on Freeport street, 
and also to the underground return feeder near by on Park 



- 







ELECTRICAL SURVEY OF CITY OF BOSTON 
0>W£DST£R 



c 












I 



Water Department. 131 

street. These connections were made November last. Be- 
fore we can be certain that similar connections should be 
made on Harrison avenue or the Central Power Station dis- 
trict, the results of the bonding in the Dorchester district 
will have to be carefully studied. 

Large negative readings, as observed in some of the sections 
above mentioned, indicate that considerable current is flowing 
on to the water pipes. In these sections better bonding, or 
a more effective return conductor of some sort, should be 
provided. 

On diagram II. are shown the readings taken in the out- 
skirts of the city between hydrants of the Boston system 
and those of adjacent places. We spoke in our last report 
of the advisability of making a special study of this current 
flowing across the border of the city. We have found a 
greater tendency to flow off the Boston pipes in 1898 than in 
1897. The detail results of the 1898 test are shown on 
Diagram II. We expect to give this matter more particular 
attention and hope to be in a position to submit a more 
definite report with regard to it during the coming year. 

For the purpose of investigating the general efficiency of 
the rail-bonding we took several readings along sections of 
track from 1000 to 1800 feet in length, and the figures given 
on the diagram show the fall of potential per 100 feet as 
computed from the data obtained. There was no indication 
of very defective rail-bonding thus revealed, but the readings 
will be of use in giving a standard for comparison on other 
occasions. The variations in the figures are largely due to 
varying numbers of cars^n the different sections of the street 
railway system. 

We reported last year that the underground return-feeder 
system of the Dorchester District threatened to cause trouble 
in the service pipes before long, and our investigations since 
then tend to confirm this opinion. Our attention was called 
on March 21 of this year to a broken service on Park 
street, and examination shows that electrolysis is undoubtedly 
the cause of the break. A section of the pipe has been re- 
turned and is kept for exhibit. The readings between this 
pipe and the ground were as high as -^ of a volt, which is 
unusual for a ground reading. 

In general we think there is much likelihood that electro- 
lytic corrosion is going on in the two danger districts above 
mentioned and to a smaller degree in one or two other places 
where positive readings are shown. Another place in partic- 
ular to which we would call attention is on Hyde Park 
avenue between Walk Hill street and Forest Hills station. 



132 City Document No. 38. 

Careful watch should be kept of all localities where trouble 
is indicated lest the conditions change for the worse. Occa- 
sional bursting of pipes from single leaks is not to be feared 
so much as the continual wasting that may go on from current 
escaping over large sections. 

Yours very truly, 

(Signed) Stone & Webster. 

Salt- Water Fire System. 

A salt-water system for fire protection was established under 
a special appropriation granted to the Fire Department. It 
consists of a 12-inch pipe, extending from Central Wharf 
through Central and Exchange streets, Post-office square 
and Congress street to Congress street bridge, a total dis- 
tance of about one mile. At Central Wharf the line divides 
into two 10-inch pipes, to each of which is attached a special 
casting, fitted with six 3i-inch outlets, with check valves on 
each outlet. This design enables one or both fireboats to 
connect with the pipe through lines of 3^-inch hose, varying 
in length from fifteen to thirty feet. A similar boat connec- 
tion will be established at Congress-street bridge. 

With the exception of a short exposed piece of pipe at 
each end of the line the system is maintained full of water 
from a check-valve to Central Wharf to a similar valve at 
Congress-street bridge, pressure being maintained up to check- 
valves and to foot-valves of hydrants by means of a 1-inch 
pipe connecting with a tank in the Post-office building, which 
is fed directly from the city mains. Check-valves in this 
connecting pipe close when fire pressure exceeds the ordinary 
domestic pressure. 

Six-inch relief valves are set on the main pipe to prevent 
the maximum pressure exceeding 200 pounds per square inch. 
In service, when the first hose connection has been made 
between the fireboat and the end of the pipe, the former can 
begin to pump slowly, expelling the air from the empty end 
near the boat through an air-cock provided for the purpose. 
When the requisite number of connections have been made, 
the air has been driven out and the boat is ready to respond 
to a signal from a hydrant to " go ahead." Hydrants are es- 
tablished about 300 feet apart, each gated off from the main 
line. The hydrant used was the Bachelder (so called from 
the name of the inventor and patentee, E. J. Bachelder, mas- 
ter mechanic of the Boston Water Department). It is a post 
hydrant of unusually heavy design,' with three 3-inch outlets, 



Water Department. 133 

each controlled by an independent valve. The waste is posi- 
tive and is operated by a wrench from the street surface. A 
hole is cored out in the side of the hydrant for an electric 
cable, terminating in a recess at the top, forming a signal-box, 
thus affording means of electrical connection in the hydrant 
itself and avoiding the necessity of an independent post for 
that purpose. 

The pipe used was cast-iron, of the general Boston Water 
Works pattern, with the innovation of two lead scores in the 
bell. It was unusually heavy, being one inch thick, and 
weighing 1,704 pounds per length laying twelve feet. 

Owing to the fact that the system was to be kept full of 
salt water it was decided that the ordinary type of valves built 
of iron and composition were not suitable, as a destructive 
galvanic action would result. The valves adopted were of 
composition throughout, with flanged ends, and were separated 
from the adjoining cast-iron pipes by heavy rings of pure rub- 
ber. The precautions taken in the case of the hydrants, which 
are empty when not in use, were to separate the composition 
valve-seat from the iron hydrant-pot by a lead joint, also to 
protect the end of the iron valve stem by a composition cap, 
making a tight joint with the rubber-foot valve. 

An electrical duct, laid in the main pipe trench, carries a 
five conductor cable with connections to each hydrant ; two 
of these conductors are utilized, forming part of the regular 
electrical system of the Fire Department. Each hydrant is 
equipped with a break key, whereby the code signals can be 
transmitted to the fireboat; portable instruments, consisting 
of Morse key and sounder, can also be connected into circuit 
at all hydrants and bbat stations ; thus, communication is 
possible at will between the hydrants, boat stations and cen- 
tral office. Two of these portable instruments are carried on 
each fireboat, for use at the boat and at the hydrant in 
service. 

A trial made at a distance of one-half mile from the 
water front, with one boat in service, conclusively proved that 
the system is a valuable addition to the equipment of the Fire 
Department ; with an unlimited water supply and with a nomi- 
nal pumping capacity of 6,000 gallons per minute when one 
fireboat is in service, or double that amount when both 
boats are used, the system can be depended upon to furnish 
a number of streams equal in power to those from the largest 
" Steamers," and, when necessary, streams of unusual power 
are available, e.g., at the trial mentioned two streams each of 
1,500 gallons per minute were played simultaneously through 



134 City Document No. 38. 

2i-inch nozzles with a nozzle pressure of fifty pounds ; three 
lines of 3-inch hose, each 300 feet long, were siamezed in this 
test. 

All the work of establishing the salt-water system was done 
by the Water Department, with the exception of the electrical 
service, which was installed by the Fire Department. 

Yours respectfully, 

William Jackson, 

City Engineer. 





















SALT 


WATER 


FIRE-PIPE 


TEST 




NOVEMBER 


13 


1898 














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Water Department. 135 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 
BOSTON WATER DEPARTMENT. 



Daily average amount used through meters, gal- 
lons 15,717,100 

Number of services ...... 84,114 

Number of meters and motors .... 4,865 

Length of supply and distributing mains, in 

miles 689.2 

Number of public fire-hydrants in use . . 7,068 

Yearly revenue from water-rates . . . $2,318,296 74 

Yearly revenue from metered water . . . $909,196 35 

Percentage of total revenue from metered water, 39.2 

Yearly expense of maintenance . . . . $ 543, 390 77 



136 



City Document No. 38. 



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Water Department. 



137 



Statement of Operations at the East Boston Pumping Station for the 

Tear 1S98. 





ENGINES NOS. 1 AND 2. 


Engine No. 3. 


03 

o 
o 

<H 
O 

c ■ 
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a o 
5 s 

|§ 
o « 
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CD 

CO 


1898. 


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P 

o ** 

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o u 

& o > 

-Is 

* g © 

H 


CD 
bC 

03 
u 

CD 

t> 
Q 


.9 

a 

ftai 
H 


Total amount 
pumped to 
tank, Breed's 
Island. 


cd 
bO 
°3 
cd 
> 

OS 

'5 
A 


© CD 

M 

•S-S 
cd"o 

°« 

<s * 
CM 


Month. 


Hrs. 


M. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


Hrs. 


M. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


Lbs. 


Per 

cent. 


January 

February 


357 
345 
303 
189 


15 
45 
15 
45 


15,682,660 

15,103,200 

12,375,300 

7,609,980 


505,892 
539,400 
399,203 
380,499 


182 
172 
175 
170 
172 
183 
214 
185 
158 
157 
153 
15S 


45 
45 
00 
15 
00 
45 
30 
00 
15 
00 
15 
15 


2,S35,000 
2,815,680 
2,873,040 
2,639,280 
2,392,200 
2,564,400 
3,169,080 
2,640,840 
2,221,380 
2,253,480 
2183,100 
2,201,160 


91,452 
100,560 
92,678 
87,976 
77,168 
85,480 
102,228 
85,189 
74,046 
72,693 
72,770 
73,372 


63,540 
61,670 
54,870 
38,600 
20,520 
17,110 
19,270 
15,970 
15,280 
16,680 
18,300 
20,450 


20.2 
20.3 
19.5 
19.5 
19.9 












19.6 


July 










19.9 












19.2 












18.3 












18.7 












18.5 












18.4 














Totals and 
Averages . . 


1,196 




50,771,140 


457,39S 


2,082 


45 


30,788,640 


84,817 


362,260 


19.6 



On April 22 all of East Boston (except what tank supplies) supplied from Metropolitan. 



138 



City Document No. 38. 



Statement of Operations at the West Roxbury Pumping Station for the 

Year 1898. 



1898. 


a 
p. 

a 

» 

0-J3 


+a 

a 
1ft 

«3g 

3ft 

o 

H 


<*p 

>>3 


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<D . 

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c3 © 

3 a 


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3 3 
O tn 

1*3 


02 
© 

§£ 

© a 

So 

£<« 
Ph 


60 

a 
>- 


Month. 


Hours. 


Min. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


Gallons. 


Lbs. 


Per ceni. 


Feet. 


January 

February .. 

August 

September.. 
October — 
November. . 
December.. 


671 

595 
659 
631 
658 
697 
753 
694 
660 
694 
638 
497 


00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
30 
00 
00 
30 
00 
00 
00 


9,517,620 

8,263,928 

S,598,938 

8,253,563 

9,367,988 

9,627,901 

10,455,638 

10,019,738 

10,184,813 

8,435,962 

7,322,363 

7,102,501 


307,020 
295,140 
277,385 
275,118 
302,193 
320,930 
337,279 
323,217 
339,494 
272,128 
244,079 
229,113 


181.6 
167.2 
171.0 
179.5 
188.5 
187.3 
175.3 
173.4 
179.2 
171.9 
180.2 
170.5 


52,385 
49,400 
50.275 
45,975 
49,700 
51,400 
59,625 
57,800 
56,850 
49,075 
40,625 
41,650 


17.7 
17.9 
16.7 
16.5 
16.5 
16.7 
16.9 
16.4 
15.9 
15.8 
15.9 
16.6 


154.1 
151.3 
148.2 
148.3 
143.7 
146.1 
147.0 
144.1 
144.8 
138.5 
131.9 
126.2 


Totals and 
Averages, 


7,848 


00 


107,150,953 


293,564 


177.2 


604,760 


16.6 


143.7 



Water Department. 



139 



C-1 


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IO 






140 City Document No. 38. 



BOSTON WATER BOARD. 

OKGANIZED JULY 31, 1876. 



Timothy T. Sawyer, from July 31, 1876, to May 5, 1879; and from 

May 1, 1882, to May 4, 1883. 
Leonard K, Cutter, from July 31, 1876, to May 4, 1883. 2 
Albert Stanwood, from July 31, 1876, to May 7, 1883. 2 
Francis Thompson, from May 5, 1879, to May 1, 1882. 2 
William A. Simmons, from May 7, 1883, to August 18, 1885. 
George M. Hobbs, from May 4, 1883, to May 4, 1885. 
John G-. Blake, from May 4, 1883, to August 18, 1885. 
William B. Smart, from May 4, 1885, to March 18, 1889. 
Horace T. Kqckwell, from August 25, 1885, to April 25, 1888. 
Thomas F. Doherty, from August 26, 1885, to May 5, 1890; and from 

May 4, 1891, to July 1, 1895. 
Kobert Grant, from April 25, 1888, to July 18, 1893. 
Philip J. Doherty, from March 18, 1889, to May 4, 1891. 
John W. Leighton, from May 5, 1890, to July 1, 1895. 2 
William S. McNary, from August 15, 1893, to November 5, 1894. 
Charles W. Smith, from January 23, 1895, to July 1, 1895. 



1 Water Commissioners. 
Charles W. Smith, from July 1, 1895, to January 20, 1896. 3 
Jeremiah J. McCarthy (Acting), from January 20 to February 1, 1896. 
John K. Murphy, from February 1, 1896, to present time. 

Assistant Water Commissioners. 
Jeremiah J. McCarthy, from July 1, 1895, to January 20, 1896. 
Edward C. Ellis, from February 17, 1896, to present time. 

Chief Clerk and Secretary. 
Walter E. Swan. 

General Superintendent Income Division. 
Jos. H. Caldwell. 

General Superintendent Distribution Division. 
Hugh McNulty. 

City Engineer and Engineer of the Department. 
William Jackson. 

i Under Chap. 449 ol the Acts of 1895, the Boston Water Board was abolished, and 
the Water-Supply and Water-Income Departments consolidated and placed under 
the charge of one Water Commissioner. 

2 Deceased. 

3 Resigned; 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Abatements 

Accounts, Examiner of 

Additional supply of water 

Albany-street yard 

Brookline reservoir 

City Engineer, Report of 

Contracts made and pending 

Cost of construction . 

Deacon and waste service 

Distribution Division, Repor 

East Boston pumping station 

Electrolysis 

Employees 

Expenditures 

Extension of mains 

Fire reservoirs . 

Fisher-Hill reservoir . 

Fountains . 

Frost, apparatus for taking 

General Statistics 

Gates and stop-cocks . ' 

Harbor service . 

High service 

Hydrants . 

Income Division, Report of 

Machine shop, etc. 

Mains laid and relaid . 

Main pipe trenches 

Maintenance 

Meters 

Meter service 

Metropolitan Water Board 

Organization of department 

Rainfall 

Receipts 

Reservoirs and standpipes 

Salt-water fire service 

Service-pipes 

Water-debt 

Water-loans, outstanding 



t of General Superintendent 



75 



out 



PAGE 

52 
3, 25, 47, 75 
17 
3, 4, 74 
73 
126, 134 
18, 23 
8, 9, 10 
3, 63, 68 
65, 75 
3 
128, 132 
4 



5,6, 



2, 69 



General Superintendent 



i, 16, 17 

17 

74 

73 

122, 125 

2 

135 

2, 67, 68 

1, 73, 128 

127 

2, 4, 68, 128 

48, 64 

4, 7, 70 

1, 6, 7, 65, 126 

2 

8, 72 
54, 55, 56, 57, 62 

3, 54 

126 

140 

139 

7,8 

73, 74 

132, 134 

69 

9, 13 
8, 11, 12 



1, 7 



142 



Table of Contents. 



Water-posts ..... 
Water-sinking fund .... 
Wayne-street pumping station abandoned 
West Roxbury pumping- station . 
Yards ...... 



69, 120 

8, 14, 15 

1, 74 

3, 74 

74 



Tables : — 



Abatements ...... 

Amounts assessed by annual rates 

Amounts assessed by meters 

Average maximum and minimum heights to which 

water rose ...... 

Blow-off gates established and abandoned 

Fixtures in use, January 31, 1899 

Gates established and abandoned, and number in 

use, January 31, 1899 .... 

Hydrants established and abandoned . 
Hydrants in use, January 31, 1899 
Location, size and length of mains abandoned 
Location, size and length of mains extended 
Location, size and length of mains relaid 
Meter, elevator, motor and fire-pipe service . 
Meters applied ...... 

Meters condemned ..... 

Meters discontinued ..... 

Meters in service January 31, 1899 

Meters purchased ..... 

Meters repaired . . . . . 

Miscellaneous work performed in Distribution 

Division for year ..... 
Off and on service ..... 
Private gates established and abandoned 
Private mains laid ..... 
Purposes, water taken by annual rates . 
Purposes, water taken by meters . 
Service-pipes laid and abandoned in 1898-99 
Statement of operations at East Boston pumping 

station for 1898 

Statement of operations at West Roxbury pumping 

station for 1898 . . . . . 
Waste inspection ..... 

Water takers ...... 



52 

50, 51 
51 

136 
117 

49 

116, 117 

118 

119 

104-115 

91-103 

80-90 

53, 54 

57 

55, 56 

58 

55-61 

58 

59 

121 

53 

117 

103 

50 

51 

78, 79 

137 

138 

63, 64 

49