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Full text of "Annual report of the Worcester State Asylum at Worcester"

THIETY-THIED ANNUAL EEPOET 



WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM 



WOECESTEE, 



Year endixg November 30, 1910. 



Digitized by tine Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of IVIassachusetts Amherst 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofwo109worc 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Report of Trustees, 63 

Report of Superintendent, 65 

Report of Treasurer, 74 

Statistics, 81 



OFFICERS OF THE ASYLUM. 



CARRIE B. HARRINGTON, Worcester. 

GEORGIE A. BACON, Worcester. 

SAMUEL B. WOODWARD, Worcester. 

GEORGE F. BLAKE, . . . . . . . Worcester. 

LYMAN A. ELY, Worcester. 

THOMAS H. GAGE, Worcester. 

THOMAS RUSSELL, Boston. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 



ERNEST V. SCRIBNER, M.D., 
H. LOUIS STICK, M.D., . . 
ARTHUR E. PATTRELL, M.D., 
B. HENRY MASON, M.D., 
RANSOM A. GREENE, M.D., . 
JONATHAN H. RANNEY, M.D., 
ABBIE S. FAY, .... 



Superintendent and Treasurer. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Matron. 



NONRESIDENT OFFICERS. 

GEORGE L. CLARK, . Examiner. 

SUSIE G. WARREN, Clerk. 

FREDERICK H. BAKER, M.D., .... Pathologist. 

FOREST A. SLATER, Engineer. 



®l)e Olommontoealtli of illa00ati)usett0. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the Worcester State Hospital, having in charge 
the Worcester State Asylum, respectfully submit their thirty- 
third annual report of the asylum. The annexed reports of the 
superintendent and treasurer contain detailed statements as to 
the condition of the asylum. 

Last year the daily average of patients cared for was 1,062.57, 
this year it has been 1,129.26, — an increase of nearly 67. As 
the asylum on Summer Street was long ago filled to its limit, 
this increase has been cared for at the Grafton colony, so that 
now the number of patients there equals those at the parent insti- 
tution, and from now on the colony will be the greater of the two. 

To provide for a proportion of the annual increase of the insane 
in the State we should have accommodations for 100 more patients. 
To care for these, two new buildings should be constructed, each 
with a capacity for 50 persons, — one for men and one for women. 
These would be for the quieter cases. The buildings would be 
constructed from the same plans as the two now in process of 
erection, and to build and furnish them the trustees ask for $40,000. 

With the increase in patients there must be a proportionate 
addition to the number of employees. To provide for these, a 
nurses' home capable of accommodating 50 female nurses is 
needed, and to erect and furnish this an appropriation of $29,300 
is asked for. 

A new building is also needed at the railroad side track to serve 
as a storehouse and distributing center for the colony supplies. 
There is now no building suitable in size, construction or situa- 
tion to care for the supplies which such a community as the colony 
requires. We ask for an appropriation of $17,100 for such a build- 
ing. 

At the present time there is only one boiler at the Elms. This 
boiler cares for a group of buildings; and in case of accident, or 



64 WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. [Dec. 

if it should be in need of serious repair, grave complications might 
arise. Another boiler should be added as a reserve, and for this 
we ask for an appropriation of $2,000. 

To supplement the medical work an equipment for hydro- 
therapeutic work is needed. To prepare the room, furnish and 
install the apparatus will require $2,400. 

All of the appropriations asked for are for the enlargement and 
betterment of the work at the Grafton colony. If they are 
granted the work of development will be greatly assisted. 

The work authorized by the last Legislature is well along. 
The new dining building is in use, the water supply has been 
increased so that there has been no danger of a shortage this 
year, the filter beds completed and much miscellaneous work 
done. 

Both institutions have been free from epidemic, and there has 
been very little serious illness. 

In the resignation of Miss Frances M. Lincoln the trustees feel 
that they have sustained a great loss. For twenty-six years she 
has shown an unflagging interest in all that pertained to the 
welfare of the institution, and has given generously of her time 
and services. 

Dr. Wood has also resigned during the year. During the thirty- 
four years that he has been treasurer of the asylum he has given 
devoted and eflScient service to the work. 

Dr. H. L. Stick having gone abroad on leave of absence, and 
Dr. W. T. Bailey having resigned, Drs. R. A. Greene and J. H. 
Ranney have been appointed to positions on the ofiicial staff. 

Again the trustees are glad to express the appreciation of the 
faithful services of the superintendent, officers and employees of 
the institution. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CARRIE B. HARRINGTON. 
GEORGIE A. BACON. 
SAMUEL B. WOODWARD. 
GEORGE F. BLAKE. 
LYMAN A. ELY. 
THOMAS H. GAGE. 
THOMAS RUSSELL. 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 65 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Worcester State Hospital, having in Charge the 
Worcester State Asylum. 

I respectfully present, for your consideration, the thirty-third 
annual report of the superintendent of the Worcester State 
Asylum. 

Oct. 1, 1910, there remained in this institution 1,128 patients, — 
544 men and 584 women. There have been received, by transfer 
from other institutions and by return from visit, 66 persons, — 
6 men and 60 women. From these figures it will be seen that 
during the year 550 men and 644 women — 1,194 cases — have 
been cared for at the asylum. Of the 6 men reported as admitted, 
3 were readmissions, making the number of different persons under 
observation for the year 1,191. From this number 3 men and 4 
women have been discharged to the care of relatives and friends, 
to re-enter the life of the community; 3 men and 10 women have 
been transferred to other institutions or to boarding out in families; 
3 men escaped; 4 men and 3 women were allowed to go out on 
visit; 29 men and 34 women died. From these statements it 
will be seen that for various reasons 42 men and 51 women were 
dismissed during the year. On Sept. 30, 1910, there remained 
508 men and 593 women, — 1,101 persons. Of the persons dis- 
charged, 2 women had so much improved as to be considered 
capable of self-support, if placed under favorable conditions; 
2 men and 2 women were improved; 1 man, though not improved, 
was in such mental condition that he could be properly cared 
for by his friends. While the general average numbers of patients 
for the year were considerably in excess of those for the previous 
year, there were 27 less persons at the end than at the beginning 
of the year. 

The general health of the institution has been good. The 
year has been marked by no serious amount of acute disease. 
While the number of our patients has been increasing very rapidly 



66 WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. [Dec. 

during the past few years, the mortaHty ratio has been decreasing. 
For some years the death rate in this institution has been very 
low, considering the character of its inmates. I have repeatedly 
predicted that a higher mortality must sooner or later follow. 
An analysis of the asylum death rate for thirty-three years shows 
a slight increase for the first two decades and a somewhat marked 
general average decline for the remaining period. Owing to the 
discouraging mental condition of the vast majority of the asylum 
inmates, the chief source of the diminution in numbers must come 
from death. With this factor a diminishing ratio, there must 
be a corresponding accumulation of cases. The greater number 
of the insane of the Commonwealth is of the chronic class. As 
our patients are received by transfer from other institutions there 
is no good reason for supposing that they are, as a class, more 
tractable or more vigorous than the average of the chronic insane. 
The opposite is more likely true. If our patients are fairly rep- 
resentative of the great body of the chronic insane, then we must 
conclude that the decreasing death rate is a very important causa- 
tive factor in the accumulation of the insane. That the span of 
human life is increasing in the community the tables of the actu- 
aries would seem to show. The average length of life among 
the inmates of institutions has probably increased in even greater 
ratio. There is every reason to believe that the better housing 
and care given to the insane in this community are very important 
factors in causing their accumulation. 

It can be readily seen that the character of the new patients 
admitted has an important bearing on the comfort and welfare 
of the whole hospital community. The general physical condi- 
tion of the persons admitted during the year has been fairly good. 
When we come to consider mental conditions, however, the situa- 
tion is far from encouraging. In nearly all the cases there is, 
along with the perversion, some dulling of intelligence. In more 
than two-thirds of all the cases admitted during the past year 
dementia masked most other mental symptoms. The hospitals 
receive the failures of the community and the asylum receives 
the failures of the hospitals. From such material our results are 
to be obtained, and it is to this task that we must address ourselves. 

The asylum, to do good work, depends upon its tools as a means 
of obtaining results, just as surely as does the artisan, and if its 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 67 

tools are unfit just so surely does the product of its work deterior- 
ate. During the past year applications for employment here 
have been numerous. From this number, however, it has often 
been difficult to select proper material, and a shortage of help 
has sometimes existed along with an abundance of applications. 
It has ordinarily been more easy to secure competent female 
nurses than male. For the past year the usual situation has been 
reversed. Male applicants have been more abundant, of some- 
what better character than usual and have remained a little 
longer in the service. While for some years a training school 
for female nurses has been maintained here, membership in this 
school has been optional. With the beginning of the new school 
year all female nurses were required to take the training. This 
change caused several nurses to leave the service, either because 
they did not care to enter the school, or felt that their preliminary 
education was not sufficient to enable them to profitably take up 
a new course of study. Wherever these persons seemed desirable 
employees an attempt was made to retain them in some other 
branch of the service, usually, however, with indifferent success. 
Female employees entering the nursing service under the present 
conditions, though less in number, are of a more satisfactory 
class. The present requirements tend towards the elimination 
of the hospital "rounder," from whom the least that you demand 
is always a little more than the most that you can get. The gen- 
eral ward service is tending towards a higher and more satis- 
factory level. Despite the changes in requirements, the average 
stay of the female nurse has been longer than in the previous year. 
The work of caring for the insane is, from its nature, a difficult 
one. The patients, as a rule, do not recognize the necessity for 
detention or treatment; held against their will, they cannot dis- 
tinguish between a hospital and a prison. They are dominated 
by their delusions. They misunderstand the efforts that are 
made in their behalf, and do not co-operate with those attempting 
to care for them. The step from a conflict of views to a physical 
conflict may be precipitated by a thoughtless word or an injudi- 
cious act. How necessary it is, then, that we should have per- 
sons of intelligence and a high conception of duty to assist in 
this work, and how difficult it is to find them. 

The institution owes it to its patients, and to its employees as 



68 WORCESTER STATE ASYI.UM. [Dec. 

well, to make every reasonable effort to stem the tide of change 
which all too rapidly rotates the number of its employees. Hours 
of labor have been lessened; wages have been increased; more 
satisfactory quarters have been provided; the general conditions 
of living have been improved. There has not yet been that im- 
mediate response to these betterments which had been hoped 
for. These efforts, together with an education to higher ideals, 
must, in time, favorably influence the character of those having 
the immediate care of the insane. 

It has long seemed to me that the asylum should come closer 
to the relatives and friends of its unfortunate inmates. An 
effort is being made in this institution to more fully acquaint 
the friends with the occurrences and accidents of hospital life. 
Serious ihness has always been reported. Experience has shown 
that a constitution weakened by the ravages of mental disease 
has a lessened power of resistance to physical disease, and that 
illness of apparently trivial nature sometimes eventuates badly. 
Friends of patients are now notified of the more ordinary forms 
of indisposition, and particularly of accidents or injuries. Possi- 
bly this custom may, in some cases, occasion unnecessary alarm, 
but in its general results it is more satisfactory to the friends and 
to the institution management. The volunteering of information 
and the perfectly open conduct of institutions should do much 
to remove from the public mind that measure of distrust which 
has sometimes obtained in the past. 

No work of reconstruction has been undertaken at the parent 
institution in Worcester, and no special appropriation is sought 
for use there the coming year. At the Grafton colony there has 
been considerable activity in the construction of new buildings 
and in general development. The service building at the group 
for excitable women has been occupied. It provides kitchen and 
dining facilities for 400 patients and the necessary employees. 
It relieves all present overcrowding, and can provide for some 
further increase in numbers. 

One cottage for employees has been finished and is already 
occupied. Two others are nearing completion and will soon be 
ready for use. 

Our large filter beds have been completed and will soon be 
caring for practically all of the sewage of the institution. These 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 69 

beds have been constructed from plans approved by the State 
Board of Health, and all work has been done under the super- 
vision of a competent engineer. Every effort has been made 
to have these beds as efficient as possible, and it is believed that 
their operation will be satisfactory. 

The Legislature of last year authorized the erection at the 
colony of two buildings for quiet patients and an addition to the 
farmhouse at the No. 1 colony. Work on these buildings has 
begun and will be continued during the winter. 

In all of the work of the institution much valuable assistance 
has been given by the labor of patients. This has not only been 
a source of profit to the institution, but has been a most important 
element in the treatment of the unfortunates who have been 
entrusted to our care. The men have worked on the farm, built 
roads, assisted in the construction of our sewage-disposal system, 
in the erection of new buildings, and have taken a vigorous part 
in all of our colony operations. Each year a considerable acreage 
has been added to our tillage lands. The number of our working 
men has been added to every year, largely by the industrial 
education of those formerly unemployed. 

Last year a beginning was made in the effort to interest the 
women patients in out-of-door work. It was thought, at first, 
that the field of operation might be somewhat limited. It has 
been found, however, that it is not necessary to find special work 
for women. Wherever there is work for men there is work for 
women. The women have solved this question for themselves 
by undertaking the care and cleaning up of our grounds and in 
the lighter farm operations. They have done filhng and grading, 
and have become quite expert in the digging out and removal of 
rocks. This crew is recruited from the noisy and excitable, for 
whom no really suitable occupation has hitherto been found. 
Some have become interested in this work who have before re- 
sisted all efforts at employment. 

The time has already been reached when the number of patients 
at the colony is in excess of that at the asylum. From now on 
the asylum is the lesser unit in our organization. The continued 
increase in the visible numbers of the insane in the Commonwealth 
necessitates annual provision for additional accommodation. To 
assist in caring for a part of this increase new buildings are needed 



70 WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. [Dec. 

at the Grafton colony, for the care of patients. I respectfully 
recommend to your Board that an appropriation of $40,000 be 
sought from the Legislature for the erection and furnishing of 
one building for 50 men and one building for 50 women. It is 
proposed to erect these buildings for the quieter class of cases, 
and to follow the plan of the two buildings now under construc- 
tion. 

In the expansion of the institution it has again become necessary 
to provide additional accommodation for employees. I recom- 
mend that your Board ask the coming Legislature for an appro- 
priation of $29,300 to provide for the erection and furnishing of 
a nurses' home for female nurses at the Grafton colony. Although 
this building is designed entirely for nurses, its occupancy will 
release for patients many rooms now occupied by employees. 

Up to the present time the general supplies for the colony have 
been distributed from the storerooms of the asylum in Worcester. 
The time is now here when a storehouse should be provided at 
the colony. I recommend that your Board ask for an appropria- 
tion of $17,100 for the erection of a storehouse at the railroad 
side track. This building is planned to be constructed of brick 
and concrete, the general arrangement being such that at some 
later date a refrigerating plant may be installed there to meet 
such needs as may be demonstrated. 

The Elms is the largest building for the care of men at the 
Grafton colony. This building is heated from a boiler in a de- 
tached building. This boiler also furnishes heat for a cottage 
near by, and will soon be connected with the whole No. 1 group 
of buildings as well. This plant is well situated to supply heat 
for a general group of buildings, which might surround it. This 
heating plant now consists of one 150 horse-power boiler. The 
capacity of this boiler has not yet been exceeded, though subject 
to increasing demands, but no reserve exists upon which we could 
call should it become necessary to make repairs. Failure of 
service here, in the winter season, might occasion serious suffer- 
ing. I recommend that your Board ask for an appropriation of 
$2,000 for the purchase and erection of an additional steam boiler 
for this plant. 

The experience of other institutions has demonstrated that 
hydrotherapy can do much for the relief of mental disease. The 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 7-1 

installation of suitable hydrotherapeutic apparatus at the Grafton 
colony would greatly assist in carrying on the medical work there. 
To provide proper equipment for this purpose, to prepare the 
room and to properly install the apparatus, I recommend that 
an appropriation of $2,400 be asked for. 

I wish to express my personal regret at the withdrawal of Miss 
Lincoln from your Board. All connected with the institution 
will miss her active interest and assistance. 

We shall all miss the pleasant association with Dr. Albert 
Wood, who for so many years served this institution as treasurer, 
and who resigned his position during the past year. 

Several changes have occurred in the official staff. Dr. H. L. 
Stick, who was granted special leave of absence by your Board, 
is now in Europe devoting himself to travel and study. 1 1 is 
expected that he will return to his duties some time next summer. 
Dr. W. T. Bailey resigned his position, expecting to engage in 
general practice in the community. Drs. R. A. Greene and J. 
H. Ranney have been secured to fill the vacancies thus created. 

I wish to again thank your Board for the courtesy and con- 
sideration which you have always shown me. 

As in past years the Hospital Newspaper Society has sent us 
a generous supply of books and papers. The Worcester Employ- 
ment Society has done a large amount of sewing. The "Worcester 
Evening Gazette" has again contributed a copy of their paper. 

E. V. SCRIBNER, 

Superintendeni. 



72 



WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. 



[Dec. 



OFFICERS AND THEIR SALARIES. 



Ernest V. Scribner, M.D., Superintendent and Treasurer, 

H. Louis Stick, M.D., Assistant Physician, . 

Arthur E. Pattrell, M.D., Assistant Physician, 

B. Henry Mason, M.D., Assistant Physician, 

Ransom A, Greene, M.D., Assistant Physician, . 

Jonathan H. Ranney, M.D., Assistant Physician. 

Frederick H. Baker, M.D., Pathologist, 

Abbie S. Fay, Matron, .... 

George L. Clarke, Examiner, 

Susie G. Warren, Clerk, .... 

Forest A. Slater, Engineer, . . . 



$3,000 00 

1,600 00 

1,200 00 

1,200 00 

1,000 00 

800 00 

100 00 

800 00 

50 00 

900 00 

1,000 00 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT - No. 23. 73 



VALUE OF STOCK AND SUPPLIES 

Dec. 1, 1910. 



Food: — 

Provisions and groceries, $7,022 47 

Clothing and clothing material: — 

Undistributed, 4,558 19 

Distributed, ... . 9,223 76 

Furnishings : — 

Undistributed, 2,731 83 

Inmates' department, 30,745 25 

Domestic department, 11,703 79 

Personal property of State in superintendent's department, . 6,760 46 

Heat, light and power: — 

Fuel, 6,648 05 

Sundries, 209 00 

Repairs and improvements: — 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 42,837 80 

Miscellaneous, >. . 11,245 03 

Farm: — 

Produce of farm on hand, . 5,228 33 

Live stock, 17,880 50 

Miscellaneous, 11,535 76 

Miscellaneous: — 

Library, 1,465 00 

Hospital supplies, . . . 1,250 44 

Sundries, 656 49 

$171,702 15 



74 



WORCESTER STATE ASYLUINI. 



[Dec. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Worcester State Hospital, acting for the Worcester 
State Asylum. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of 
this institution for the fiscal year ending Nov. 30, 1910 : — 



Balance Dec. 1, 1909, 



Cash Account. 



$1,736 41 



Receipts, 



Institution Receipts. 




Board of inmates: — 




Reimbursements, . . 


. 


Salaries, wages and labor: — 




Wages not called for, . 


• 


Sales: — 




Food, .... 


$63 24 


Clothing and materials. 


292 54 


Repairs and improvements, . 


42 48 


Miscellaneous, 


160 65 


Farm, stable and grounds: — 




Cows and calves. 


$749 00 


Hides 


76 33 


Miscellaneous receipts: — 




Interest on bank balances, . 


$115 37 


Sundries, .... 


22 62 



$7,659 12 



26 50 



825 33 



137 99 



,207 85 



Receipts from Treasury of Commonwealth. 
Maintenance appropriations : — 

Balance of 1909 $11,239 65 

Advance money (amount on hand November 30) , 15,000 00 
Approved schedules of 1910, . . . 228,591 08 



Special appropriations, 
Total, . 



254,830 73 
57,491 55 



$323,266 54 



1910. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



75 



Payments. 

To treasury of Commonwealth, institution receipts, $9,207 85 

Maintenance appropriations : — 

Balance November schedule, 1909, . . 13,182 01 

Eleven months' schedules, 1910, . . . 228,591 08 

November advances, ..... 10,115 30 

$261,096 24 

Special appropriations : — 

Approved schedules ($57,491.55 less advances of November, 

1909, $205.95) 57,285 60 

Balance Nov. 30, 1910: — 

In bank, ....... $4,567 42 

In office, 317 28 

4,884 70 

Total, $323,266 54 

Maintenance. 

Appropriation, $251,500 00 

Expenses (as analyzed below), ....... 251,320 42 



Balance reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, 



$179 58 



Analysis of Expenses. 



Salaries, wages and labor: — 








General administration, .... $30,525 39 


Medical service, . 






8,935 04 


Ward service (male) , . 






18,338 14 


Ward service (female), 






17,525 43 


Repairs and improvements, . 






13,604 24 


Farm, stable and grounds, . 






15,769 84 




(iM/->/i cno no 


5piU'3:,Dyo Uo 


Food : — 


Butter $11,259 83 


Beans, .... 






1,174 87 


Bread and crackers. 






640,60 


Cereals, rice, meal, etc., 






949 79 


Cheese, .... 






770 82 


Eggs 






1,922 46 


Flour, .... 






9,783 40 


Fish 






2,018 61 


Fruit (dried and fresh) , 






2,507 42 


Meats, .... 






18,522 25 


Milk, .... 






1,914 32 


Molasses and syrup, . 






292 54 


Sugar, .... 






3,288 85 


Tea, coffee, broma and cocoa, 






1,488 54 


Vegetables, 






3,643 32 


Sundries, .... 






1,950 16 


Amount carried forward, 


CO 1 O"? TQ 


v>Z,lZl to 


. $166,825 86 



76 



WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. 



[Dec. 



Amount brought forward, ....... $166,825 86 

Clothing and materials : — 

Boots, shoes and rubbers, .... $1,662 79 

Clothing 7,490 14 

Dry goods for clothing and small wares, . 2,356 29 

Furnishing goods, ..... 14 40 

Hats and caps, ...... 86 61 

Leather and shoe findings, . . . . 117 06 

Sundries 148 36 







11,875 65 


Furnishings : — 






Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., 


$5,692 32 




Brushes, brooms, .... 


826 26 




Carpets, rugs, etc 


281 05 




Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc., . 


692 33 




Furniture and upholstery. 


258 27 




Kitchen furnishings 


880 02 




Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc.. 


97 18 




Sundries 


1,787 11 


10,514 54 


Heat, light and power: — 




Coal, 


$19,967 85 




Freight on coal, 


2,089 82 




Gas 


9 92 




on 


293 59 




Sundries, 


1,074 85 


23,436 03 






Repairs and improvements : — 






Brick, 


$28 75 




Cement, lime and plaster. 


257 35 




Doors, sashes, etc., .... 


18 00 




Electrical work and supplies, 


384 05 




Hardware, 


1,599 51 




Lumber, 


2,135 32 




Machinery, etc., ..... 


55 00 




Paints, oil, glass, etc., .... 


2,313 32 




Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies, . 


1,134 09 




Roofing and materials, 


25 70 




Sundries 


1,474 75 


9,425 84 


Farm, stable and grounds: — 




Blacksmith and supplies. 


$535 29 




Carriages, wagons, etc., and repairs, 


638 67 




Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc., 


2,883 69 




Hay, grain, etc., ..... 


9,872 66 




Harnesses and repairs 


211 22 




Horses, ...... 


865 00 




Cows 


910 00 




Other live stock, .... 


31 07 




Tools, farm machines, etc 


200 40 




Sundries 


1,286 70 


17,434 70 




- 


Amount carried forward, 


$239,512 62 



1910.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



77 



Amount brought forward. 


• 


$239,512 62 


Miscellaneous: — 






Books, periodicals, etc., 


$399 28 




Chapel services and entertainments, 


799 30 




Freight, expressage and transportation, . 


1,769 66 




Funeral expenses, .... 


204 00 




Hose, etc., 


92 10 




Ice 


19 70 




Medicines and hospital supplies, . 


1,616 53 




Medical attendance, nurses, etc. (extra), 


35 00 




Postage, ...... 


230 88 




Printing and printing supplies. 


111 90 




Return of runaways, .... 


40 35 




Soap and laundry supplies, . 


2,088 63 




Stationery and office supplies. 


523 34 




Travel and expenses (officials). 


197 56 




Telephone and telegraph. 


592 55 




Tobacco, 


680 48 




Water, 


1,472 02 




Sundries 


934 52 


11,807 80 






Total expenses for maintenance. 


$251,320 42 



Special Appbopkiations. 

Balance Dec. 1, 1909, $55,497 72 

Appropriations for fiscal year, ....... 51,700 00 

Total $107,197 72 



Expended during the year (see statement annexed) , 
Reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, 



$57,491 55 
21 52 



57,513 07 



Balance November 30, 1910, 



$49,684 65 



Resources and Liabilities. 

Resources. 
Cash on hand, ....... 

November cash vouchers (paid from advance money) , 
Due from treasury of Commonwealth account 
November, 1910, schedule, .... 



Liabilities. 



Schedule of November bills. 



$4,884 70 
10,115 30 



7,729 34 



$22,729 34 
$22,729 34 



78 



WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. 



[Dec. 



gtS 






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1910.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 79 



INMATES' FUND. 



Cash on hand Dec. 1, 1909, $3,278 83 

Received from inmates, 1624 02 

Interest, national bank, .... 20 77 

Interest, savings bank, .... 44 00 

688 79 



13,967 62 
Cash refunded patients, 566 98 



Balance (savings bank, $2,200; national bank, $1,117,83; 

drawer, $82.81), $3,400 64 

WoECESTEH, Dec. 19, 1910. 

I hereby certify that I have made a monthly examination of all bills and pay 
rolls representing the current expenses of the Worcester State Asylum for the 
year ending Nov. 30, 1910 ($251,320.42), and have found them properly scheduled 
and correctly cast. 

I also find in the hands of the treasurer $3,400.64 belonging to patients. 

GEORGE L. CLARK, 

Examiner. 



Statistical tables 

♦ 



[Form peescribed by State Board of Insanity.] 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



1.- 


— General Statistics of the Year. 










Insane. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 



Patients in asylum Oct. 1, 1909, 
Admitted within the year, 
Viz.: by transfer, . 

from visit, . 

from visit, nominally. 
Whole number of cases in year. 
Dismissed within the year, 
Discharged, 



Viz. 



recovered at time of leaving 
asylum, 
as capable of self-support, 
as improved, 
as not improved, . 

Died, 

Transferred, .... 

Escaped, 

On visit Oct. 1, 1910, 
Patients remaining Sept. 30, .1910, 
Viz. : supported as State patients, 
as private patients 
as reimbursing patients 
Number of different persons within the year. 
Number of different persons admitted, 
Number of different persons dismissed. 
Number of different persons recovered, 
Number of different persons discharged, ca- 
pable of self-support, . 
Daily average number of patients. 
Viz.: State patients, 
private patients, . 
reimbursing patients, . 




46.24 



84 



WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. 



[Dec. 



Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 





Cases admitted. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First (to this asylum), 

Second (to this asylum), . . . . 
Third (to this asylum), 


2 
1 


57 
1 


59 
2 


Total cases, 

Total persons, 


3 
3 


58 
58 


61 
61 



— Ages of Insane at First Attack and Death. 









Di 


ED. 








AT I 


■-lEST ATTACK. 


AT TIME OP DEATH. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Congenital, .... 


2 


1 


3 




_ 


_ 


15 years and less, . 


1 


2 


3 


- 


~ 


- 


From 15 to 20 years, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


20 to 25 years, . 


2 


5 


7 


- 


1 


1 


25 to 30 years, . 


3 


1 


4 


2 


2 


4 


30 to 35 years, . 


2 


3 


5 


2 


1 


3 


35 to 40 years, . 


4 


2 


6 


4 


3 


7 


40 to 50 years, . 


4 


1 


5 


5 


5 


10 


50 to 60 years, . 


1 


2 


3 


7 


4 


11 


60 to 70 years, . 


2 


3 


5 


5 


8 


13 


70 to 80 years, . 


- 


1 


1 


- 


7 


7 


Over 80 years. 


2 


- 


2 


4 


2 


6 


Unknown, .... 


6 


13 


19 


- 


- 


- 


Totals, .... 


29 


34 


63 


29 


34 


63 


Total persons. 


29 


34 


63 


29 


34 


63 


Mean known ages (in years), 


36.86 


35.52 


36.22 


52.55 


55.58 


54.19 



1910.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 2.3. 



85 



i 

«5 


•smox 


'--'-;^-"'-"— ' ' ' 


" ! 


■sajBraa^ 


1 1 CO 1 NO!-* 1 1 in-f 1 ^co 1 1 1 


^ 


•saiBM 


ITH— 1 ICMCO,-H|^<NMI-ll 1 1 


2 


1 


•BITJ^OX 


1 ^co 1 cqoio 1 1 OCOCO-H^ 1 1 1 


5! 


•sapaiaj[ 


, ,« ICO^CO, l^^l^c , , 


g 


•saiBH j 1 ^.^ 1 1 ^^, 1 ,«c.co 1^,1, 


S 


1 

ij 

i 
1 


n 


•sib:joj:, 


1 1 1 1 1 1- 1 : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


- 


•sa]Braaj[ 




' 


■sai^M 




-" 


m 
o 


■smoi 


ii-ii-i-iiiiiiiii 


CO 


•sa^Bina^ 


1 1 - 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


-* 


■sai^H 


1 1 1 1 1 -H 1 -H 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


^ 


° o 


■s\nox 


1 1 1 1 1 1- 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




•sajBraaj; 


1 1 1 1 1 1 -H , , 1 , , , 1 , , , 


-- 


•saiBH 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I > 1 1 1 1 


' 




■siB^ox 


1 , 1 I < 1 1 > 1 1 1 I . 1 1 1 1 


' 


•sajButaj 


1 1 1 1 1 , . 1 1 I < 1 < 1 1 . < 


' 


•sapH 


'''''' 1 1 1 .1 1 1 


' 


1 . 

1 H 


•sy-e^ox 


|co-.l^^llra<^^o-l^-H| | |to — .-i,-i 


^ 


1 ^ 
1 1 


•sapraaj 


IM-H<^^w<^>o-H^r-,| i |o-.-i^ 


s 


•sai^H 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 J 1 1 1 1 ; 


' 






Q 

O 


A. — First admitted to any hospital when received 

by institution from which transferred ; — 

Alcoholic insanity, acute, .... 

Alcoholic insanity, chronic 

Chronic delusional insanity. 

Climacteric insanity, 

Constitutional inferiority with dementia, . 
Dementia, chronic, . 

Dementia, primary 

Dementia, primary, catatonic form, . 
Dementia, primary, paranoid form, . 

Dementia, senile, 

Epilepsy, 

General paresis, 

Idiot 

Imbecile with dementia 

Imbecile with epilepsy, .... 

Infectious psychosis, 

Manic depressive insanity 


< 



86 



WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. 



[Dec. 



o 



Q 



Total 
Discharges 
AND Deaths. 


•SIBC^OX 




s g e 


•saiBTna^ 


^—^— " 


S ?§ i§ 


•eai^H 


, 1 ,^, 1 ,^^„^ ,„ 1 


3 S S 


i 

i 

q 


•s^ox 


, ,„«^ ,«^.,„^ ICCO 


i^ S S 


•sa^Btnaj 


, ,« IC^^ 1 , , , ,„ 


°° ^ S 


•saiBM 


, i^^e. , i^c^^ 1^ 1 




1 

§ 

i 

Q 

1 

1 
1 

! 
1 

! 


si 

1 


•siB^ox 




1 ^ ^ 


■saiBmaj[ 


""""""" 




•saiBK 








•SIB^Oi 


1- 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


^ ^ ^ 


•saiBraa^ 


1« 1 1 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




•sajBH 




1 C-l (M 


si 


•siB^ox 


,,,,, ^ ,,,,,,,, ^ c .. 


■sajBuiaj 


1 r i 1 1- 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


-M c<i i^q 


•saiBH 




1 1 1 


i 
% 


•sp^tox 




1 1 1 


•saiBuiaj 




1 1 1 


•saiBM 


!■ ' ' 


Q 

i s 

< 


•siBcjox 


1 «0 1 1 00 1 1 --l-i 1 <M^ 1 <M 


S5 S S 


•sajBraa^ 




s g g 


■saiBH 




« « « 






CO 

<: 

H 

CO 

P 


B. — All other admissions: — 

Alcoholin insanity, acute, .... 

Alcoholic insanity, chronic 

Chronic delusional insanity. 

Dementia, chronic, 

Dementia, primary, 

Dementia, primary, hebephermic form. 
Dementia, primary, paranoid form, . 

Dementia, senile 

Epilepsy, 

Cieneral paresis 

Imbecile 

Imbecile with dementia 

Imbecile with epilepsy, .... 
Manic depressive insanity 


Totals B 

Aggregate cases, 

Aggregate persons 



1910.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



87 



^ 



3 

1 


•SIB^OX 


05 i-H 1 
CO 


^ ^ 


•S91Bm8j[ 


00 1 1 

CO 


^ ^ 


■saivM 


CO 


(M 00 

CO 1-1 


n 

H 




•smox 


CM rH 1 

CD 


2 ^ 


•sajBuie^ 


CO 


CO <M 


•saiBH 


00 1-H 1 
<M 


05 lO 
<M 1-1 




•si^^ox 


^ 1 1 


1—1 1—1 


•sajBtnaj 


1 1 1 


1 1 


•sai^M 


^ 1 1 


^ 


> 


•ei^^ox 


^ 1 1 


TtH CO 


•saiBuiaj: 


(M 1 i 


(N 1-1 


■sai^M 


(N 1 i 


(N <M 




•siB^ox 


C<J 1 1 


(M i-H 


•saiBraaji 


(M 1 1 


cq 1-: 


■sapH 


1 1 1 


1 1 




•siB^ox 


, , , 


1 1 


■sajBina^ 


I 1 1 


, 


•saiBH 


■ ' ' 


1 1 




o 
1 
p 

o 

% 

IS 


1 1 1 

^ ^ ^ 


■ si 1" 

■ m 

1 1« 



WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. 



[Dec. 





•siB^ox 


>"'''- -,,.,,,,, 


,- 


■S81BUI9j[ 


- ' ' ' ,,,-.,,,,,,.,-, 


•saiBM 


'1 1- 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 , 1 1 1 1 1 1 




■eiBioi 


,11,11,11 -,,,,,,.,,,-,, 


■ss^Buie^ 


, , ,,,,,,.,, ,,,,,.,,,,,,, 1 


•saiBM 


, , 1 , , , 1 , 1 , I -1,1,,,,,,,-,, 


5il 


■sib;ox 


' ' ' ' ' ,,,,,,, 


•BGIBinOjJ 


II . , 1 , , 1 , , ,11 11 


•S8IBK 


,,,.,,,,. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,< 


8-& 


•SIB^OX 


- ^ , , ,^, , , , 


•sajBins^ 


1 ' 1 1 ' 1 ' ^ , , ,^ , , , , 


•sapH 


1 , ,,,,,1,1— , , 1 , 1 , , 1 , , 1 , 1 1 


III 


•s^ox 


,1 ,,!,,,,,, , , , 1 I , — 


■sajBrna^ 


, , ,,,,,,11,, , 1 , , I , , 1 , , , 1 1 1 


•saiBM 


, , , , , 1 . , 1 ,- 1 , , , , 1 1 


lit 


•si-B^ox 


' ' 1 . 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 > 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


■sa][Bnia^ 


' ' ' ' ' ' 1 1 1 ■■ 1 1 1 


•gaiBpi 


,1 1 , , 1 1 1 , , 1 , , , , 1 , , 1 , , , , 1 1 




•siB^ox 




cooo 


•saiBuiaj 


II— ' — 1 1 1 1 — 1 1 1- 


•saiBM 


„„ --I I'-l 1 1- „„, , , ,^, , ,^„^, 




o 

to 


.2 

■ ■ " 1 ■ :l 

•• ••l-l 

. . . . s .i-s 

1 11 1 

11 .If 

■■ iillilr 1 ■■.ill It 

:: iiUi: IJftlii 

.. ,|||1|ll.ii llllpMIII. 
,,. jii..-iifii |S..-| i.i|i:.3| 

ill ijiifiiiis Bsii^^iiipii 

ill |lllf|ii|t lllil|g|MI§| 

Z 6 o 


ll 

11 

II 
1^ 



1910. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



- ' 1- 1— 1— ' - 1 , , , , 


S 


" 1 1- I-- I-- 1 1 1 1 , 1 , , , 1 , , 


c 


1 1 1 ' ' ' 1 ' ' 1 - 1 1 ! 1 1 


" 


,-,, ,^, ,,,,,, ,^ , .C^^,^^ 


s 


, < . 1 1 1 < 1 1 1 1 , 1 1 , IC.^^ ,^^ 


CO 


I'll- 1 ' 1- 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


^ 


< 1 > 1 1 < 1 1 I 1 1 I 1 1 ^ ,«,,,, , 


- 


1 1 1 1 ' 1 II „ ,^ , 1 , , 1 


- 


' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 1 1 1 1 ' 1 1 


' 


,,,,,,., 1 ,, 11 , , IC , , , , , 


- 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11-1,111 


CO 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1- 1 1 1 1 1 


c. 


- - -'■■ '! 






-,,,,,,,,,,-,, ,,,-,.,, 




' ' ' ' 1 ' ' . 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 


' ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 . .1,1111, 


1 




s 


--^'-'- ' ■ ' — 


^ 




s 


ystem: — 

broncho, 

broncho, arteriosclerosis, senility, 

broncho, paraplegia, 

double lobar 

double lobar, pulmonary tuberculosis, .... 
hypostatic, cardiac failure, ...... 

lobar, 

lobar, acute cardiac dilatation 

lobar, cerebral meningitis, 

lobar, tertian malaria, 

tubercular 

tubercular, acute enteritis, 

and general tuberculosis 

and intestinal hemorrhage, pulmonary and general tuber- 
hemorrhages, cancer of liver and uterus, .... 

tuberculosis, 

tuberculosis and hemorrhage, 

tuberculosis and pneumonia 

tuberculosis. Pott's disease, fracture of femur, . 

tuberculosis, tubercular meningitis 

tuberculosis, tubercular pneumonia 




Respiratory s 
Pneumonia 
Pneumonia 
Pneumonia 
Pneumonia 
Pneumonia 
Pneumonia 
Pneumonia 
Pneumonia 
Pneumonia 
Pneumonia 
Pneumonia 
Pneumonia 
Pneumonia 
Pulmonary 
Pulmonary 
culosis, . 
Pulmonary 
Pulmonary 
Pulmonary 
Pulmonary 
Pulmonary 
Pulmonary 
Pulmonary 


1 



90 



WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. 



[Dec. 



i 
s 


•smox 


II .1.111,11 , , - 


•B9i'Braaj[ 


, , ,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,-,,,,,, 


•saiBH 


II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 


•11 


•BlB(>Oi 


1 , .,^,,11,, ,, 1 ,^, ,,,,,,, , 


•saiBraa^ 


.1 1 ,-, . , 1 1 -.,,,,,,,,, 


•saiBH 


II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


a 

^ 

1 

s 


•smojL 


■ - . 1 ■ ^, , , , , , ,^, , , 


■saiBuia^- 


II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


•sai^M 


II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 1 




•Sl^^OX 1 1 CO ,11, 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


•sapraa^ 


- 1 . . : 1 1 , ,,,11,1, 


•sai^M 1 CO 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 


i 
1 


•si^iox 


«, ^, , , , , I , , ,^, , , , , ,^, , , , , 


•BaiBiaaji 


, . 1 1 , 1 , 11 11 1 1 1^1 11 1 , 


•sapsH 






•BiB^ox 


II , , ,^^,^^, , 1 1 , , , , , 1 , , 1^1 


•saiBuia^ 




■saiBK 


11 ,,,1^,11, ,,,1,11,1111^, 




Q 

O 
m 

m 

< 


Nervous system: — 

Epilepsy, status, 

General paresis, 

Circulatory system: — 

Acute cardiac dilatation, 

Acute cardiac dilatation, acute nephritis, . . . _ ._ 
Acute cardiac dilatation, chronic myocarditis and endocarditis, . 

Aortic thrombosis, cerebral hemorrhage, 

Arteriosclerosis, cerebral hemorrhage, senile debility. 
Chronic endocarditis, myocarditis, chronic nephritis, cystitis. 

Chronic endocarditis, arteriosclerosis, 

Chronic endocarditis and nephritis 

Erysipelas, exhaustion 

General system: — 

Acute enteritis, arteriosclerosis, senility 

Acute septicaemia, enteritis 

Cancer of stomach and liver, 

Carcinoma of breast and intestines, 

Carcinoma of breast and right lung, 

Chronic interstitial nephritis, endocarditis 

Chronic nephritis, cystitis, 

Catarrhal jaundice, chronic enteritis, exhaustion 

Epilepsy, arteriosclerosis, 

Facial erysipelas, arteriosclerosis, exhaustion, 

General miliary tuberculosis 

Intestinal obstruction, 

Senile debility, asthma 

Uterine cancer, senility, 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



91 





1 1 , , 


1 1 1 1 . . , . 1 , 






1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


- 


" "" " " 


' 


■ 1 ' 1 ' ' 1 ,^, , , , , , 


« 


.,,.,11.1 ,- 


c 




, 


: i . 1 i ' , 1 > 1-" i ■ i '- 


^ 


.,,,,,.,, ,^, , . .,-,,,,. 


CO 


.,,,,,.,.,.. 1 . ,,-,.,,, 


. 


.,,,,,,.,.,.,, . .^, > , , , 


^ 


' ' ' " 


. 


' 1 ,-,,,., 


^ 


' 1- ' ' ' 


- 




- 


''-•''' > ' .. 1 .... 1 


» 


-<- 1 . 1 . ,« 1 1 1 1^ 1 1 1 1 1 1- 1 1 




,-.,,, ,^, .... , , . , , ,^. , o 


- .-. . . ,^. ........ 


^ 


vstem : — 

broncho 

broncho, arteriosclerosis, senility, .... 

broncho, paraplegia 

double lobar, 

double lobar, pulmonary tuberculosis, 

hypostatic, cardiac failure 

hypostatic, chronic interstitial nephritis, . 


III 

ill 


, acute enteritis 

1 tuberculosis, 

tina;l hemorrhage, pulmonary and general 

es, cancer of liver and uterus, 

s, 

s and hemorrhage 

s and pneumonia, ..... 
s. Pott's disease, fracture of femur, . 

s, tubercular meningitis 

s, tubercular pneumonia 






tubercula 
and genera 
and intes 
is, . 

tiemorrhag 
tuberculos 
tuberculos 
tuberculos 
tuberculos 
iuberculos 
tuberculos 


Respiratory s 
Pneumonia 
Pneumonia 
Pneumonia 
Pneumonia 
Pneumonia 
Pneumonia 
Pneumonia 


.s.s.s.s 

dose 

S o g i 

e c c c 


Pneumonia 
Pulmonary 
Pulmonary 
tuberculoE 
Pulmonary 
Pulmonary 
Pulmonary 
Pulmonary 
Pulmonary 
Pulmonary 
Pulmonary 





92 



WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. [Dec. 1910. 



'A 
o 

i 
I 

J 


O o 

is 
zl 

il 


■sib:jox 




1 1 1 1 1 1 THt-COCO 


15 ' 


5' 


•sajBTua^ 




, ,,,,,c... 


. , 


- :■ 


•saiBK 




, ,,,,,. «o. 


^ 1 


i 


2s 

ii 
P 

1^ 


•eiT3:jox 




— - 


CO CO 




•saiBraaj 




, ,,,,,.... 




" 1 


•saiiJK 




1 1 1 1 1 1 rtTj-^M 


en u; 


= 1 


1 

> 

o K 

^§ 
z « 


< 


o 

< 


IS 

O 
K 


■SIB!>0X 




1 1 -H 1 1 1 ooot-oo 


S £i 


^ g 


•sajBraa^ 




1 1 1 1 1 1 ■*CO(MO= 


2 ;: 


2 


•saiBM 




1 1 rt 1 1 1 ,t,oim<M 


Tt< rt 


"5 


g 

a 


•siB:>oi 


1 


5 ' 


« S 


•sa|Bra8j 




, ,,,,,.-.. 


S ' 


Sg 


•saiBH 




, ,.,,,«.o. 


S ' 




pq 2 


•siB^ox 






s 2 


^ 
s 


■saiBniaj[ 




1 coro^ 1 1 -HMcocq 


S 3 


^ z 


•sai^K 




, 0-....C..., 


2 - 


^ 3 






3 


1 

1° 
1 


Totals, 

B. — Died: — 

Under 1 month, .... 
From 1 to 3 months, 

3 to 6 months, 

6 to 12 months, 

1 to 2 years, . 

2 to .5 years, . 
5 to 10 years, . 

10 to 20 years, . 
Over 20 years 




. 1 

s 

■ i 
11 

o