(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Worcester State Asylum at Worcester"

:i 






THIETY-FIFTH ANNUAL EEPORT 



WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM 



WORCESTER, 



FOB THE 



Year ending November 30, 1912. 



CONTENTS, 



Repokt of Trustees, 69 

Report of Superintendent, . 75 

Report of Treasurer, 88 

Statistics, 95 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of IVIassachusetts Amherst 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofwo113worc 



OFFICERS OF THE ASYLUM. 



TRUSTEES. 

SAMUEL B. WOODWARD, Wokcestee. 

GEORGE F. BLAKE, Woecester. 

LYMAN A. ELY, Woecester. 

THOMAS H. GAGE, Woecestee. 

THOMAS RUSSELL, ........ Boston. 

CARRIE B. HARRINGTON, Woecester. 

GEORGIE A. BACON, Worcester. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 



H. LOUIS STICK, M.D., . . 
B. HENRY MASON, M.D., 
ARTHUR E. PATTRELL, M.D., 
DONALD R. GILFILLAN, M.D., 
HIRAM L. HORSMAN, M.D., . 
EFFIE A. STEVENSON, M.D., 



Superintendent and Treasurer. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician, 



NONRESIDENT OFFICERS. 

GEORGE L. CLARK, .... Examiner. 

SUSIE G. WARREN, .... Clerk. 

FREDERICK H. BAKER, M.D., . Pathologist. 

FOREST A. SLATER, .... Engineer. 



CONSULTING SURGEON. 

LEMUEL F. WOODWARD, M.D., . . 



Woecestee. 



®l)e Commontxjealtt) oi ittassacljUBettB, 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the Worcester State Hospital, having in 
charge the Worcester State Asylum, herewith respectfully pre- 
sent their thirty-fifth annual report. 

Eor details of the finances and of the health, admission, trans- 
fer and discharge of inmates they refer to the reports of the 
superintendent and treasurer hereto appended. 

The asylum has continued to care for its full quota of pa- 
tients, and has been, as heretofore, the administrative headquar- 
ters of the colony, which now equals it in population, while its 
laundry and bakery have supplemented the colony facilities, 
never extensive and now entirely inadequate. 

By legislative act the Worcester buildings are to be vacated 
before Jan. 1, 1915. During the last ten years, and, at an ex- 
pense of over $100,000, the institution has been thoroughly 
modernized and brought to a high state of efficiency, and it will 
be necessary to expend very little here during the limited time 
that still remains before the removal to Grafton. 'No special 
appropriation is asked for in Worcester. 

At Grafton much work has been done during the year. The 
home for female nurses has been completed and is now occu- 
pied. Two dormitories for 50 patients each, partially occupied 
last year, are completed and ready for use. Two similar build- 
ings, authorized in 1911, are nearly completed, and still another 
two, authorized this year, are in process of construction. These 



70 WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. [Dec. 

six buildings will, wlien finislied, add 300 beds to tbose already 
provided. Tbe cold-storage building has been finished and is 
in use. An addition made to the old farmhouse at 'No. 2 pro- 
vides a commodious kitchen and serving room, while 4 employees 
find quarters in the second story, and 25 additional patients are 
served in the old kitchen, transformed into a dining room. A 
short stretch of public road has been built, the capacity of the 
ice pond doubled, and some 10 acres or more of wild land re- 
claimed. The house at Valley farm has, by building a small 
addition and by making slight interior changes, been fitted to ac- 
commodate two families of employees, and is now thus occupied. 
Much grading and excavating has been done and the usual farm 
work carried on. 

As far as possible patients have been employed, and were 
there sent to this colony a larger number of physically healthy 
men of sufficient mentality their labors could be profitably 
utilized. 

The benefit of outdoor work to those otherwise condemned to 
useless inactivity cannot be too much insisted on, and the value 
of working off surplus energy in manual labor as a means of 
quieting excitement and producing healthy sleep is great indeed. 

Under advice of the State Board of Insanity the trustees have 
yearly asked for more dormitories to house the State's constantly 
increasing number of insane, and it now becomes necessary to 
materially enlarge the other facilities for their care. The pro- 
spective addition of the 300 patients, for whom buildings are 
now going up, to those at present there finds the colony inade- 
quately provided with housing facilities for employees and at- 
tendants, and also deficient in heat, light, power, water supply 
and drainage; and to provide for these essentials large appro- 
priations are needed. It will also be impossible to feed the pa- 
tients in buildings now being erected unless new kitchens and 
dining rooms are furnished. 

To retain efficient help proper quarters must be provided, par- 
ticularly when an institution is situated remote from even a 
small country town. Many of the male nurses are sleeping in a 
building occupied by a most turbulent and untidy class of pa- 
tients and, partially for this reason, it is impossible to retain 



1912.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 71 

them for any length of time. The trustees ask for an appropria- 
tion of $49,000 to build and equip a home for 60 male nurses. 

The building lately erected for female nurses is already com- 
pletely occupied, and nurses are quartered in other buildings, as 
space can be found. The development of subcolony 'No. 2, 
where three new buildings will soon be ready for 150 patients, 
also demands provision for its nursing staff, and $36,300 is 
therefore asked for with which to erect a home for 44 female 
nurses. 

Two hundred and five male patients are being fed in crowded 
quarters in the basement of the building at IsTo. 4 ; no more can 
be cared for here. A building for 50 patients is being erected 
in the vicinity, and further development of this group must 
soon be looked for. To provide for these new patients, free the 
basement of the present building for industrial purposes, and 
relieve the overcrowded JSTo. 1 dormitories in the immediate 
vicinity, the trustees ask for $48,000 to erect a central kitchen, 
service building and dormitory; the dining room to accommo- 
date 450 patients and 20 nurses and employees, and the dor- 
mitory to furnish quarters for 21 employees. 

At No. 2 a kitchen has already been added to the old farm- 
house, the story over the same providing rooms for 4 employees ; 
the trustees now ask for $3,300 to make over the main building, 
the lower story to be a dining room for 50 employees, while in 
the second story Y will find quarters. 

Also at No. 2 a new kitchen, dining room and dormitory is 
proposed, by making additions to and alterations in a building 
now existing, and for this purpose $23,000 is asked. The din- 
ing hall at the Pines is not available, as it is even now crowded, 
and it is increasingly evident that three buildings, now in course 
of construction, cannot be occupied unless some such provision 
as the one above suggested is made. 

The trustees desire to buy the Sinclair farm of 83 acres for 
the following reasons : — 

The colony horses are, at present, housed in a patched-up 
annex to the cow barn at ISTo. 1. This is no longer adequate, 
and is also in a dilapidated condition. A new horse barn would 
cost about $7,000. For $10,000 the Sinclair farm can be pur- 



72 WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. [Dec. 

chased, witli 83 acres of good land worth about $3,000, a house 
in excellent condition, which is capable of caring for from 22 
to 24 persons with very slight changes, and an excellent barn 
suitable for 22 horses. To care for 22 employees buildings cost- 
ing approximately $14,000 would be needed. This land was 
desired, largely on account of its buildings, by the trustees at the 
time the colony was established, but the owner refused to sell at 
any price. In accordance with the above the trustees ask for 
$10,000 to purchase these buildings and the land as described. 

The cow barn at No. 1 has reached the limit of its usefulness 
and must be either abandoned or repaired at large expense, 
and it is also not large enough for the constantly increasing 
herd; $8,500 is asked for to build a barn for 60 head of cattle. 

The addition of one boiler of 150 horse power to the present 
battery will provide for all buildings now erected or in process 
of construction; $2,000 is needed for this purpose. 

The colony possesses no reserve electric power. With the 
completion of buildings now under construction, both dynamos 
will be constantly in use. The trustees ask, therefore, for 
$5,900 to purchase and install one motor generator. 

Tor new filter beds $25,000 is needed. A portion of the sew- 
age (that from 'No. 1) is still unprovided for. The present beds 
can care for no more and are even now insufficient, the number 
of inmates having nearly doubled since filter beds were laid out. 
Incidentally it may be said that after the removal to the colony 
of the patients now in Worcester, still further extension will 
become necessary. This sum of $25,000 is asked for, after 
consultation with the engineer of the State Board of Health, 
under whose supervision the present beds were planned. The 
necessity of constructing beds far from proper filter rnaterial 
adds much to the cost, — the gravel banks lying in the Assabet 
drainage basin, while it is necessary to carry the sewage into 
that of the Quinsigamond River. 

The water supply is again a source of anxiety. The wells 
now driven are used to their capacity, and more are needed. 
There is but one water tower with a capacity of 60,000 gallons, 
while the daily use of water is over 150,000 gallons. A new 
water tower of the cheapest construction, to hold 250,000 gal- 



1912.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 73 

Ions, would cost $9,000, and there would then be but two days' 
supply. By buying a certain tract of land, consisting of 14 
acres, suitably situated, and at a sufficient height to give a 
proper head, a reservoir holding 2,000,000 or more gallons can 
be constructed. To drive additional wells, lay pipe and con- 
struct such a reservoir an appropriation of $16,000 is therefore 
asked. 

It is only after the most careful consideration that the trus- 
tees have asked for these various appropriations. The act which 
provides that before Jan. 1, 1915, 400 of the patients in the 
Worcester Asylum shall be transferred to the colony makes im- 
perative each and every one of these improvements. The colony 
has grown far faster than was expected. In 1903 there were 
50 patients in the old buildings which were bought with the 
land; there are now 588, while, when all buildings now under 
construction are filled, there will be over 900. Unless the colony 
is fully equipped to care for those up to that time within its 
limits, it will be utterly impossible to make the transfer ordered, 
for none of the money appropriated for that purpose can be 
used to provide for any other than the 400 that are to be 
brought to Grafton. 

An administrative building must be built and accommoda- 
tions provided for more than 30 employees who now live at 
home, but who can then no longer do so ; laundry, bakery, car- 
penter and paint shops enlarged or rebuilt, as well as buildings 
erected for the 400 transfers and the necessary attendants, and 
to accomplish this work with the sum appropriated will require 
the most rigid economy. 

On April 1, Dr. E. V. Scribner, who has served as superin- 
tendent since 1891, resigned to accept a position as superintend- 
ent of the Worcester State Hospital, and Dr. H. L. Stick, for 
six years first assistant physician, was appointed in his place. 
The loss of Dr. Scribner was greatly regretted. To him was 
due the whole plan of the colony, so soon to house all remaining 
inmates of the old asylum, and to him the trustees wish to ex- 
press their appreciation of all the faithful work he has done in 
this and other directions during the many years of his service. 

Dr. Stick undertook his duties at a most critical time, as in 



74 WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. [Dec. 

addition to the routine work, and tlie extensive development 
work of the colony, mucli of the labor of preparing plans for 
the pending removal has devolved upon him. To him and to 
his assistants, nurses, attendants and employees the trustees 
wish to tender their thanks for labor faithfully performed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SAMUEL B. WOODWARD. 
GEORGE E. BLAKE. 
LYMA:^ a. ELY. 
THOMAS H. GAGE. 
THOMAS RUSSELL. 
CARRIE B. HARRINGTOIST. 
GEORGIE A. BACOK 



1912.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 75 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Worcester State Hospital, acting for the Worcester 
State Asylum. 

I respectfully present, for your consideration, the thirty-fifth 
report of the Worcester State Asylum. 

At the beginning of the statistical year, Oct. 1, 1911, 1,189 
persons were inmates of this institution; of this number, 568 
were men and 621 women. During the year there were ad- 
mitted but 45 cases, — 16 men and 29 women, — making a 
total number of 1,234 under treatment for the year, — 584 men 
and 650 women. Of this number 9 men and 5 women were 
discharged into the community ; 4 men and 6 women were trans- 
ferred to other institutions ; 5 men escaped ; 2 men and 5 women 
went out on visit; 18 men and 30 women died. On Sept. 30, 
1912, there remained in this institution 546 men and 604 
women, — 1,150 persons. The total number leaving the insti- 
tution by death, transfer and discharge was 84, 10 more than 
last year. Of this number but one left to resume her household 
duties with her husband. Four were discharged as improved, 
and 9 not as improved, yet able to get along well in their differ- 
ent homes. 

Of the different forms of mental disease, primary dementia 
stands first, followed by epilepsy, imbecility, alcoholism, chronic 
delusional and manic-depressive insanity, and senile dementia, 
in the order named. In this series epilepsy, mostly in imbeciles, 
stands second, but if imbecility with epilepsy could be classed 
as one form of mental defect, it stands first. But few of the 
number admitted can be expected to recover, as most of them 
were born with some mental defect which renders recovery prac- 
tically impossible. 

The death rate has been the lowest in the history of the insti- 
tution. Of the whole number of patients treated 3.89 per cent. 



76 WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. [Dec. 

have died, while of the daily average number of patients, 4.06 
per cent., which is .33 per cent, less than at any time since 1877. 
Tuberculosis stands first as the cause of death this year, while 
pneumonia takes second place; of the former disease 3 more 
died, and of the latter 7 less, than last year. 

We had one suicide by hanging, which took place on the fe- 
male wards at the asylum. The patient, a constitutional defec- 
tive with hysterical manifestations, had been slightly depressed 
for some few days previous, although this condition was not 
noticed, as she was constantly occupied in the congregate dining 
room. In April one of the male patients, a case of primary 
dementia, but on an open ward, attempted suicide by digging a 
hole in his neck with an old knife blade, through all the append- 
ages into the trachea. When found in his room he had lost 
much blood and was in a deep state of shock. After surgical 
treatment and stimulation he made an uneventful recovery and 
now seems as well physically as usual, but is more demented than 
he was previous to making this attempt. 

In June one of our cases of senile dementia, while going to 
the dining room, slipped and fell on the stairs, falling to the 
landing below. She was instantly picked up, but she soon be- 
came unconscious and on examination it was found that she 
had sustained a basilar fracture ; she died that night. 

The general health of the institution has been good. We had 
several cases of erysipelas, but all made an uneventful recovery. 
In March we had two cases of diphtheria. Both patients were 
immediately treated with diphtheria antitoxin and sent to the 
Worcester Isolation Hospital. One made an uneventful recov- 
ery, while the second case, an imbecile, died after a few days, 
her infection having been more virulent. About 20 nurses and 
patients who came in immediate contact with these cases were 
treated with immunizing doses of diphtheria antitoxin, and no 
other cases followed. ISTo adequate reason could be found for 
this sporadic outbreak, although there were quite a number of 
cases of diphtheria in the city, and not very far distant from 
the institution. 

This institution has no social worker, but during the year we 
have placed several of our cases in private families. These 
places are first inspected by one of our physicians, who makes a 



1912.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 77 

report as to its fitness. Visits are made at irregular intervals 
to see how tlie patient is getting along and how well he is cared 
for. In this way we have been able to follow a small number, 
though we hope for an increased number next year. 

During the past year the rotation of our employees has been 
about the same as the previous year, — a little over twice. We 
have improved their general surroundings, given them shorter 
working hours, made the course of training more varied, and 
yet this has not helped to lessen the rotation over that of pre- 
vious years. I believe that if the compensation for attendants 
and nurses was made more uniform in the different institutions, 
and possibly a little higher in the asylums and the hospitals, this 
constant change from one place to another might be decreased. 

During the year we had 45 admissions. Many of these cases 
were brought to us from " boarding out " by the State Board of 
Insanity, and usually were excited or deeply demented and 
enfeebled so that institution care rather than family care was 
necessary for a shorter or longer time. This necessarily gave 
us a very small number to choose from for our occupation de- 
partments, but by a more vigorous canvass among our older 
patients these departments were partly filled. The result has 
been gratifying. Last year and the year previous the total num- 
ber of inmates employed with some occupation or other was but 
60 per cent, of the whole, — 73 per cent, of the males and 47 
per cent, of the females, — while this year 74.11 per cent, were 
employed, — 70.56 per cent, of the males and 77.66 per cent, 
of the females, — showing an increase of 14 per cent, over that 
of last year. 

The outdoor work at the colony has steadily grown, and the 
women workers, who have been mostly recruited from the dis- 
turbed and turbulent class, have .become more proficient under 
competent nurses. Our aim has been to get this excitable class 
of patients from the wards and have them spend their energy 
on some wholesome and profitable work, whereby they will not 
only become quiet and peaceful when on the wards after work- 
ing hours, but will be a less disturbing element in causing the 
intentional excitement usually so prevalent. A small garden 
was started in the spring by allotting a certain sized plot to 
each patient. As this ground was very rough much had to be 



78 WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. [Dec. 

done before it could be brougbt to a state of cultivation, yet 
several patients of the incorrigible imbecile type did good work. 
The coming year it is planned to give a certain amount of land 
to the nurses, and to encourage this kind of outdoor garden 
culture; all the vegetables which they raise will be used by 
them and the patients who assist them in these undertakings. 
In this way I believe we may greatly increase the number of 
female patients engaged in out-of-door work. During the year 
much grading and filling has been done about the old buildings 
and the new nurses' home by this female crew. 

While in the male department much more work has been done 
in the line of grading, filling and road and stone wall building, 
the main feature has been to encourage the patient to do this 
work under as little restraint as possible ; to appeal to his better 
manhood and to teach him that life is worth while. In this 
way we get many of our patients from the wards, and when 
they have become trustworthy and shown some initiative in the 
work they are taken into the older farm crews and finally sent 
to our farm industrial colony, where they remain on open 
wards, which many of them enjoy. With the construction of 
the many new buildings at the colony much grading has to be 
done. A considerable amount of this work will necessarily have 
to be done by these patient crews. In this way we have en- 
larged our ice pond at ISTo. 2 colony, so that this year the capac- 
ity will be almost double that of last year. With some slight 
changes about the pond we will be able to enlarge this space 
still more, so that we can produce at least quadruple the amount 
we had last year. 

Most of the industrial work done by the female patients has 
been done at the asylum, but this fall we were able to open a 
new sewing-room in the Larches basement, which was con- 
structed with this object in view. We now have 3 power ma- 
chines in use and about 10 patients working in this department. 
It fills a long-needed want. In this way much work can be 
done on the wards by having it supervised from this place rather 
than from the asylum. On the wards other industrial work has 
been going on for some time, and all the nurses give assistance 



1912.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 79 

in teaching and encouraging tlie patients to occupy themselves. 
At the asylum we have started an industrial room for male pa- 
tients, where mats and baskets are made, chair-caning and other 
work is done. A room for the female patients has been fitted 
up at the asylum in the middle center portico, and at the colony 
in the north end of the Larches basement, where much interest- 
ing work is being accomplished. These places are in charge of 
two nurses who have had special training for this work. We 
hope to demonstrate the therapeutic value of work or occupation 
in cases that apparently have been either too demented or ex- 
citable and who are the disturbing factors on the wards. This 
work has been of the greatest value in lessening the amount of 
destruction, as well as noisiness and excitement, on the wards. 

During the year about 10 more acres of land have been re- 
claimed by the aid of our patients and 5 more added to our pas- 
turage. It is our aim to reclaim 20 or more acres yearly. 
Much more would be desirable because we need more hay and 
pasturage if we would produce all of the milk that will be re- 
quired by the institution. 

The farm productions this year have been large, although the 
acreage has not materially been larger than the previous year, 
yet the land has, by more extensive cultivation, produced more 
to the acre than at any time since the colony has been open. 

Though profitable, our poultry raising has not been as suc- 
cessful as we hoped it would be. However, for most of the year 
we produced all the eggs used in the institution. We found 
during the early spring and midsummer months that we were 
losing many of our small chickens, and on investigation learned 
that the cause was white diarrhoea. The Amherst State College 
and Connecticut State Agricultural College at Storrs have be- 
come interested in the study of this disease, and we have fur- 
nished the latter place with hens for further study. By their 
assistance we hope to eradicate this disease. Many of the hens 
became infrequent layers, if not stopping entirely; more died. 
It was found on autopsy that the yolk sack was much affected, 
many of the ova having undergone a marked pathological 
change ; the liver was much enlarged, darker in color, and some- 
what disorganized; and invariably hemorrage in the different 



80 WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. [Dec. 

lobes of the liver was noted. This coming year we shall dis- 
pose of all affected hens and attempt to secure eggs from other 
sources or use those of our own that are found to be healthy. 

We have made it a matter of regular routine to annually test 
our cows for tuberculosis. During our last test in the early 
part of the year 20 of them reacted to this test. They were 
then inspected and condemned by an agent of the State Cattle 
Bureau, who removed them to Brighton, where it was demon- 
strated that the tests were correct, although several of them had 
but a slight cervical glandular involvement. Host of these cat- 
tle were bought in the open market. All of our calves are im- 
munized with Bovovaccine at an early age. Of a series of 18 
tested last December and January, 9 reacted. These calves were 
later turned loose into the open pasturage, remaining there all 
the year. All of them appeared healthy and in excellent condi- 
tion. This fall a tuberculin test was made, when a negative 
reaction was obtained from all. This, no doubt, demonstrates 
the wisdom of open-air treatment with younger animals and 
should be continuously practiced. 

During the months of May and June we lost about 400 small 
pigs and about 35 hogs from what apparently was an attack of 
pneumoenteritis. As soon as the disease was noted those appar- 
ently unaffected were removed from the former location onto 
new ground and but a few more died. The old place was 
cleansed and ploughed, previously having been treated with 
lime. ISTo more cases followed. 

Many improvements have been made, with all the other work 
that has been done. At the asylum little has been done other 
than to finish the stairway from L. S. W. to the congregate 
dining room and complete the dispensary, while at the colony 
we have made an addition to the farmhouse at Valley Farm, 
which has been a vast improvement and made it easier to keep 
it occupied by employees. The barn has been shingled and a 
new entrance built. At colony ]^o. 1 we have rearranged the 
entrance to the kitchen,, making an enlarged hall, and completed 
the telephone booth, which will soon be in use, and a bathroom. 
At colony 'No. 2 a new kitchen, with rooms on the second floor, 
was added to the old farmhouse. This relieves the congestion 
of the dining room for patients by the removal of the kitchen, 



1912.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 81 

pantry and scullery into the new addition. By this arrange- 
ment we shall be able to take care of at least 25 to 30 more 
patients in this dining room. A new hogpen has been put up 
at the foot of the hill not far distant from the old pens. We 
can take care of about 200 or more pigs in these new quarters, 
while the old places have been renovated and made serviceable 
for still more. 

The two dormitories of 1910, for 50 patients each, at colo- 
nies 'No. 2 and ISTo. 3 have been completed and are now occupied. 
The two dormitories of 1911, at ISTo. 2 and No. 3, are rapidly 
nearing completion and could partly be occupied if it were nec- 
essary. The nurses' home has been opened and is now occupied. 
This fills a long-desired want. The heating of this building, 
directly from the power house, is very successful. The cold- 
storage building has been finished by the contractor, the ele- 
vator installed, and it is now used for storage purposes to a 
large degree. A new subway from the Larches to the service 
building has been built. This is a very necessary improvement, 
as the saving of heat is noticeable. The walls of the two dormi- 
tories for 50 patients each, authorized by the last Legislature, 
are completed, and the superstructure is ready for the roof of 
the one at colony No. 2, so that work may be carried on during 
the winter months. Much more will have to be done. 

ISTo appropriations will be asked for this year at the asylum 
other than that for maintenance. I would recommend your 
Board to ask for appropriations this year to bring the equip- 
ment of the institution up to date, so that we may be able to 
relieve the congested condition of the wards by removing the 
employees to buildings specially constructed for them, and fa- 
cilitate a greater return from the farm by more vigorous and 
intensive farming. 

It has been estimated for a number of years by the State 
Board of Insanity that this institution should make provision 
for a certain yearly increase in the number of patients at the 
Grafton colony. The buildings now under construction will 
provide dormitory space for this increase up to the year 1914. 

Because of an overcrowded condition of the dining room 
space at our colony ISTo. 4, and to provide for those who will 
occupy the new buildings now under construction, a new 



82 WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. [Dec. 

kitchen, service room and dormitory for employees should be 
erected in the center of the JSTo. 4 group, to care for not less 
than 450 patients, with dormitory space for 21 employees in 
the attic. Eor this purpose I would respectfully recommend 
that your Board ask the Legislature for an appropriation of 
$48,000 to build and furnish the same. 

As the new dormitories at our colony ISTo. 2, the Willows, 
are nearing completion (where at least 150 patients will be 
located during the next year), and as the present dining space 
will become more than overcrowded, though a temporary pro- 
vision has been made ; and to care for the increased number of 
patients and employees that will occupy two of the present 
dormitories, — one completed and a second about to be finished ; 
and for the future development of this colony, there should be a 
service building with kitchen and dining-room space for at least 
250 patients, and dormitory for 22 employees, this building to 
be attached to the oldest dormitory of this colony. I would re- 
spectfully recommend that your Board ask for a sum of $23,- 
000 to build and furnish this addition. 

The female nurses' home, now occupied, will fill a long-needed 
want, but the male nurses should be given additional accommo- 
dations, as they are now rooming at colony ISTo. 4 in rooms which 
should be used for patients; and on account of the increased 
number of nurses and employees to care for the increased num- 
ber of patients, I respectfully recommend that your Board ask 
for an appropriation of $49,000 to build and equip a home for 
60 male nurses, to be located at the Elms group. 

As our colony 'No. 2 becomes further developed I find that 
the accommodations for the female nurses will be inadequate, 
as the home just completed will be too small when we add more 
buildings to this colony. To provide for this accommodation 
when this expansion is made, I recommend that your Board 
ask the Legislature for a sum of $36,300 to build and furnish a 
home for 44 female nurses. 

As our farm work increases, and the number of employees 
necessary to care for the increased number of patients that will 
be working out of doors becomes larger, it will be necessary to 
build a cottage or make more room for them. If we could pur: 
chase the adjoining Sinclair farm we would get accommodations 



1912.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 83 

in the house for at least 24 persons, and also pro-vide a horse 
barn to replace the old one at colony ISTo. 1, which is in a de- 
plorable condition. This farm is in the center of our colony and 
is almost surrounded by our land. In addition to these accom- 
modations the farm would give us a ready and valuable pas- 
turage and hay land, which is very necessary at present. This 
would not only relieve us from building new cottages and a 
horse barn, but would save the State quite a number of thou- 
sands of dollars. 'For this purpose I recommend that your 
Board ask for an appropriation of $10,000. 

The present lighting facilities at the central power station 
will be inadequate when the new buildings completed and under 
construction are ready for lighting, and to take care of this in- 
crease it will be necessary to add a third motor generator to this 
group. In case we should have a breakdown of one of our mo- 
tors we would be unable to produce the proper amount of light 
and. power. I therefore recommend your Board to ask for the 
sum of $5,900 to purchase, install and attach a new generator 
in the power house. 

With the present changes in the old farmhouse at colony 'No. 
2 it will be necessary to repair and change this building to a 
dormitory and dining room for employees of the domestic de- 
partment. I respectfully recommend your Board to ask for a 
sum of $3,300 for this purpose. It is intended that this should 
care for 14 people instead of 7, as at present. 

The old cow barn at our colony No. 1 has about served its 
usefulness and is in a deplorable condition. It has been re- 
paired several times to tide us over from year to year, but now 
it is beyond repair imless a larger sum of money be expended 
than is justifiable. A new and modern structure should be 
erected at some distance from the present farm buildings. The 
present structure is too small to care for the number of cows nec- 
essary to produce the required amotint of milk. I therefore rec- 
ommend your Board to ask the Legislature for the sum of 
$8,500 to erect and equip this barn according to the plans and 
specifications used in the erection of the cow barn at our colony 
jSTo. 3, in 1906, but to accommodate 60 instead of 50 cattle. 

The present boiler capacity at our central heating plant is 
inadequate to heat the new buildings, — completed and now 



84 WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. [Dec. 

under construction in this and the colony IsTo. 2 group, — and 
to give us the caj dcity necessary a new 150 horse j)ower boiler 
must be added. To meet this need I respectfully recommend 
that your Board ask for an appropriation of $2,000 to buy and 
install this additional steam boiler. 

Our sewage disposal plant has been too small for some time, 
so that we are unable to give the proper care to the individual 
beds before they must be used. At present these beds are taking 
care of about one-half of the sewage. To comply with a request 
made by the State Board of Health, we have been compelled to 
change our filterage from the Assabet valley to that of the Quin- 
sigamond. This change has not been completed. We find it is 
necessary now to change the sewage of our colony 'No. 1 group, 
which is at present taken care of by surface drainage in the 
Assabet valley; also that of most of the ISTo. 2 group (as but 
one of the present buildings feeds into the new system, the 
others having been taken care of by surface drainage ; besides, 
we have added three more new buildings to this group) ; the 
new nurses' home ; the new building at IsTo. 4 or Elms group ; 
and two new buildings at our colony ISTo. 3 or Oaks group. We 
are now using a little more than 160,000 gallons of water a 
day, which is more than the present beds can care for. Because 
of these changes, and the addition of the new bnildings this and 
next year, we must enlarge this system by adding ten sections, 
which will increase the capacity of the present beds twice and a 
half. To do this I recommend that your Board ask the Legis- 
lature for the sum of $25,000 to purchase piping and build, and 
complete ten sections according to specified plans and estimates. 

The water supply at the colony has been adequate to the 
present time, but now must be enlarged. The supply at ^alley 
Earm can be increased still further by sinking new wells beyond 
the old ones now in use. By developing this place we can use 
the present pumps with but slight alteration in piping and sand 
chamber, and by the addition of a fourth transformer, which 
would make it possible to use both pumps in unison when 
necessary. 

At no time have we had an adequate storage capacity. The 
present tower holds but 60,000 gallons or about a third of a 
day's supply. Whien the buildings just finished and those under 



1912.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 85 

construction are completed we will have less than a fifth of a 
day's supply on hand. Should the pumps be f .topped by a break- 
down it would materially enhance the danger to many lives. 
l^ov would we have any in reserve for fire-fighting purposes, 
which risk is growing yearly as we are erecting wooden con- 
structed colony type of buildings. The erection of a stand pipe 
was thought of, but in a few years this would be too small to 
give us a day's supply, and would cost about the same amount 
as it would to build a permanent reservoir not far distant from 
our present tower. The latter plan would necessitate the pur- 
chase of about 14 acres of land near the colony 'No. 2 and close 
to the ice pond, which would give us an elevation equal to our 
present tower or higher, should we discontinue the use of the 
same. The present supply is already connected with the ice 
jjond, only 900 feet away, which would materially lessen the 
cost. This would make it possible to build a reservoir of almost 
any storage capacity required. For present needs a reservoir 
of at least 2,000,000 gallons should be constructed and so ar- 
ranged that it could be enlarged at any time. I would recom- 
mend that your Board ask the Legislature for the sum of $16,- 
000 to purchase the land, piping and cement to build this reser- 
voir, dig the wells and make the necessary changes at the pump- 
ing station at galley Farm. 

This year v^e had 9 graduates from our training school. Of 
this number, 3 are left in the service, 2 have gone home and 4 
are taking a six months' course at the Boston City Hospital. 
We have changed the graduation time from June to October. 

During the year a number of changes have taken place on our 
staff. Dr. Lemuel F. Woodward has been added to it as con- 
sultr jg surgeon. The position made vacant by my appointment 
as superintendent was filled by the promotion of Dr. B. H. Ma- 
son, and his position was filled by Dr. D. E. GilfiUan. Dr. Ean- 
som A. Greene, who was at the colony, resigned in June in order 
to enter the service of another institution. Dr. John B. Mac- 
donald's services were secured to fill this vacancy, but he, too, 
resigned in October to accept an appointment as first assistant 
in another institution. Dr. H. L. Horsman was appointed to 
fill this last-m_ade vacancy. 

The ofiicers of the institution have rendered me cordial assist- 



86 WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. [Dec. 

ance and support. The employees, as a rule, have been faithful 
in the performance of their duties. There has been, however, 
some difficulty in procuring the desired kind of efficient help. 
I am especially indebted to your Board for your kindness and 
assistance to me in my duties. 

During the year we have had our usual number of entertain- 
ments and weekly dances, and we now have a regular monthly 
entertainment at the asylum and colony, usually by local talent. 
This work is being stimulated by both nurses who have charge 
of the industrial work of the wards. A large number of pa- 
tients attended the circus and the 'New England Agricultural 
Eair. Several berrying parties of patients went from the 
asylum to the colony during the summer. 

We are indebted to the publishers of the " Worcester Evening 
Gazette " for a copy of their paper ; to the Hospital Society for 
books, pamphlets, magazines and Christmas cards ; to the 
Worcester Employment Society, who have again done a large 
amount of sewing for the institution; to Miss Erances Lincoln 
for books, magazines and papers; and to the members of your 
Board, who have made generous contributions. 

H. LOUIS STICK, 

Su-perintendent. 
WoECESTEE, Mass., Nov. 30, 1912. 



1912.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



87 



VALUE OF STOCK AND SUPPLIES. 





Main 
Buildings at 
Worcester. 


Colony. 


Total. 


Food, 


$2,082 27 


$1,717 32 


$3,799 59 


Clothing and clothing material, . 


3,873 99 


4,892 50 


8,766 49 


Furnishings, 


31,851 33 


27,403 25 


59,254 58 


Heat,'^light and power, . 


3,395 39 


8,287 81 


11,683 20 


Repairs and improvements, . 


3,655 29 


8,181 82 


11,837 11 


Farm, stable and grounds, . 


318 07 


26,483 79 


26,801 86 


Miscellaneous, .... 


4,783 03 


720 23 


5,503 26 


Total, 


149,959 37 


177,686 72 


$127,646 09 



88 



WORCESTER STATE ASYLUiM. 



[Dec. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Worcester State Hospital, acting for the Worcester 
State Asylum. 

I respectfully submit tKe following report of the finances of 
this institution for the fiscal year ending ISTov. 30, 1912: — 



Balance Dec. 1, 1911, 



Cash Account. 



$4,856 98 



Institution Receipts. 
Board of inmates : — 

Reimbursements, insane, 



Receipts. 



$6,859 49 



Sales: — 
Food, 

Clothing and materials. 
Repairs and improvements, 
Miscellaneous, 
Farm, stable and grounds: — 
Cows and calves, 
Hides, 
Sundries, 

Miscellaneous receipts : — 

Interest on bank balances. 
Sundries, 



$252 57 

354 12 

9 15 

144 73 

1,066 50 

29 10 

8 00 



$170 60 
250 62 



1,864 17 



9,144 88 



Receipts from Treasury of Commonwealth. 
Maintenance appropriations : — 

Balance of 1911, $6,905 67 

Advance money (amount on hand Novem- 
ber 30) 18,000 00 

Approved schedules of 1912, $250,716 44 

Less returned, ... 23 92 

250,692 52 

275,598 19 

Special appropriations, ......-• 87,267 57 

Total $376,867 62 



1912. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



89 



To treasury of Commonwealth, institution receipts, 
Maintenance appropriations : — 

Balance November schedule, 1911, 

Eleven months' schedviles, 1912, 

November advances, ..... 

Special appropriations : — 

Approved schedules, . . $87,267 57 
Less advances, last year's re- 
port 1,230 39 



November advances, 



$12,993 04 

250,692 52 

3,717 19 



$86,037 18 
713 48 



86,750 66 



Balance Nov. 30, 1912: — 

In bank $13,168 65 

In office, 400 68 

13,569 33 

Total $376,867 62 

Maintenance. 

Appropriation, . . • $269,500 00 

Expenses (as analyzed below), ....... 269,491 81 



Balance reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, 



$8 19 



Analysis of Expenses 



Salaries, wages and labor: — 










General administration $36,354 70 




Medical service, . 






9,347 14 




Ward service (male) , . 






20,113 19 




Ward service (female) , 






19,619 31 




Repairs and improvements, . 






9,197 67 




Farm, stable and grounds, . 






17,184 14 








$111,816 15 




Food: — 




Butter $12,979 10 




Beans 






1,362 37 




Crackers, .... 






632 86 




Cereals, rice, meal, etc.. 






1,574 75 




Cheese, .... 






677 63 




Eggs 






862 94 




Flour, * . . . . 






10,223 38 




Fish 






2,079 65 




Fruit (dried and fresh) , 






2,766 64 




Meats 






19,181 65 




MUk 






2,336 82 




Molasses and syrup. 






334 25 




Sugar 






3,810 02 




Tea, coffee, broma and cocoa, 






2,332 52 




Vegetables, 






6,814 81 




Sundries, .... 






1,776 06 








69,745 45 




Amount carried forward, 


$181,561 60 



90 



WORCESTER STATE ASYLUIM. 



[Dec. 



Amount brought forward, ....... $181,561 60 

Clothing and materials : — 

Boots, shoes and rubbers, .... $1,427 49 

Clothing 7,491 33 

Dry goods for clothing and small wares, . 1,430 24 

Hats and caps, 133 08 

Leather and shoe findings, .... 159 55 

Sundries, . 225 60 



10,867 29 



Furnishings : — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., 

Brushes, brooms, 

Carpets, rugs, etc., 

Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc., 

Furniture and upholstery. 

Kitchen furnishings, 

Wooden ware, buckets, paUs, etc., 

Sundries, .... 



Heat, light and power 
Coal, . 

Freight on coal, 
Gas, . 
OU, . 
Sundries, 



$5,737 51 

725 35 

70 93 

701 22 

2 00 

1,087 76 

74 06 

2,129 17 



$18,654 60 

7,536 44 

12 25 

198 19 

497 53 



10,528 00 



26, S 



Repairs and improvements: — 
Cement, lime and plaster. 
Doors, sashes, etc.. 
Electrical work and supplies, 
Hardware, .... 
Lumber, .... 
Paints, oil, glass, etc., . 
Plumbing, steam fitting and suppliei 
Roofing and materials. 
Sundries, .... 



$165 31 

32 35 

660 48 

1,439 03 

1,462 35 

1,605 73 

1,422 60 

64 60 

2,139 41 



Farm, stable and grounds : — 
Blacksmith and supplies. 
Carriages, wagons, etc., and repairs. 
Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc.. 
Hay, grain, etc., . 
Harnesses and repairs 



Cows, 

Other live stock, . 

Tools, farm machines, etc., 

Sundries, 



$532 25 
524 49 

1,761 72 

11,397 11 

130 10 

1,175 00 
466 GO 
236 90 
166 57 

1,017 97 



Amount carried forward, 



$256,255 ST 



1912. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



91 



Amount brought forward, 


. 


$256,255 87 


Miscellaneous: — 






Books, periodicals, etc., 


$357 05 




Entertainments, ..... 


492 50 




Freight, expressage and transportation, . 


2,521 58 




Funeral expenses, .... 


238 00 




Hose, etc., 


131 45 




Ice, V 


7 59 




Medicines and hospital supplies, . 


1,128 86 




Medical attendance, nurses, etc. (extra). 


49 28 




Postage, 


243 81 




Printing and printing supplies. 


64 19 




Printing annual report. 


115 28 




Return of runaways, .... 


110 11 




Soap and laundry supplies, . 


2,759 02 




Stationery and office supplies. 


393 53 




Religious service, .... 


508 10 




Travel and expenses (officials) , 


325 75 




Telephone and telegraph, 


525 99 




Tobacco, 


887 92 




Water, . . . . . 


1,491 60 




Sundries, 


884 33 


13,235 94 




- 


Total expenses for maintenance. 


$269,491 81 



Special Appropriations. 

Balance Dec. 1, 1911, $99,669 95 

Appropriations for fiscal year, ....... 440,000 00 

Total, $539,669 95 

Expended during the year (see statement annexed), $87,267 57 

Reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, . . 3 17 

87,270 74 



Balance Nov. 30, 1912. 



$452,399 21 



Resources and Liabilities. 
Resources. 
Cash on hand, ....... 

November cash vouchers (paid from advance 
money: — 

Maintenance, . . . $3,717 19 

Specials, .... 713 48 



Due from treasury of Commonwealth account 
November, 1912, schedule, .... 



$13,569 33 



4,430 67 
799 29 



$18,799 29 



Liabilities. 



Schedule of November bills. 



$18,799 29 



92 WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. [Dec. 



PjER Capita. 

During the year the average number of inmates has been, 1,173 85. 

Total cost for maintenance, $269,491.81. 

Equal to a weekly per capita cost of $4,390. 

Receipts from sales, $1,864.17. 

Equal to a weekly per capita of $0,030. 

All other institution receipts, $7,280.71. 

Equal to a weekly per capita of $0.1185. 

Industries Fund. 
Appropriation, ........... $300 

Receipts credited. .......... - 

$300 
Expenditures. ........... - 

Balance Nov. 30, 1912, . . $300 



1912. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



93 



W 3 



M lOOO 00 

c:> (M TjH t^ 



CO o 
lO o 
00 o^ 

CO o 



OIOS-^OOiOCOt-IOSi— I 



lO'-lfOCOOT-Mt^cDCO 
C01>"(M<M00OtH05-* 
-^ r-( 05 05 05 CD O) 1-1 

^^ co"io~,-rc<f,-ri>r 



oooooooo 
oooooooo 

O^O^iq_0^co_^0_T-H^O 
io~oo"co"o"aro~t>r(M' 



oo 
oo 
o o 



(M(MC<)i005050i05(M05 

c^tNCQCfl-^i^-^'^coi:^ 

lL0»O»Oi-HT-l,-4rH,— Ir-lO 

oooooooooo 
oT cT cT o^ i-T T-T T-T T-T cq" cq" 

OOO^^t-iT-i,-i,-i,-H 
O^ O 05 Oi O Oi 02 Ot> O^ 05 



oooooooooo 

<^ <Ii ^ <J <1 -^ ^ «< <1 <- 




. S ^ £- ^ 5 ^ o 



?^ S ^eS 



- ^1 
WHO 



S 



P3 s. 



Pi 

Pi 



P^ 



94 WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. [Dec. 1912. 



INMATES' FUND. 



Cash on hand Dec. 1, 1911, 13,830 70 

Received from inmates, 1687 07 

Interest, Worcester Trust Company, . . 25 57 

Interest, savings bank, 94 30 

806 94 

S4,637 64 
Cash refunded patients, 807 22 



Balance (Worcester Trust Company, $1,384.48; Mechanics 

Savings Bank, $2,428.94; drawer, $17), .... $3,83042 

WoECESTEK, Dec. 13, 1911. 

I hereby certify that I have made a monthly examination of all bills and pay 
rolls representing the current expenses of the Worcester State Asylum for the j^ear 
ending Nov. 30, 1912 ($269,491.81), and have found them properly scheduled and 
correctly cast. 

I also find in the hands of the treasurer $3,830.42 belonging to patients. 

GEORGE L. CLARK, 

Examiner. 



Statistical Tables 



[Form presceibed bt State Board of Insanity.] 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



General Statistics of the Year. 



Patients in asylum Oct. 1, 1911 
Admitted within the year, 
Viz : by transfer, . 
from visit, 

from visit, nominally, . 
from elopement, . 
Whole number of cases in year, 
Dismissed within the year, 
Discharged, .... 
Viz : as recovered at time of leaving 
asylum, 
as capable of self-support, 
as improved, 
as not improved, . 

Died, 

Transferred, .... 

Escaped, 

On visit Oct. 1, 1912, 
Patients remaining Sept. 30, 1912, 
Viz : supported as State patients, 
as private patients, 
as reimbursing patients. 
Number of different persons within the year 
Number of different persons admitted. 
Number of different persons dismissed. 
Number of different persons recovered, 
Number of different persons discharged, ca- 
pable of self-support, . 
Daily average number of patients, 
Viz.: State patients, 

private patients, . 
reimbursing patients, . 



568 
16 
15 



1 
584 



2 
546 

528 

18 

584 

16 

38 



558.18 
538.40 

19.78 



621 
29 

27 
1 
1 

650 

46 

5 



5 
604 
580 

24 

649 

28 

45 



1 
622.90 
598.79 

24.11 



1,189 

45 

42 

1 

1 

1 

1,234 

84 

15 



5 

7 
1,150 
1108 

42 

1,233 

44 

83 



1,181.08 
1,137.19 

43.89 



WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. 



[Dec. 



B. — Received on First and Subsequent Admissions. 




NUMBER OF ADMISSIONS. 


Cases admitted. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


First (to this asylum), . . . . 
Second (to this asylum), . . . . 
Third (to this asylum), 


14 
1 


25 
1 

1 


39 
2 

1 


Total cases, 

Total persons, . . . 


15 
15 


27 
27 


42 
42 



S. — Ages of Insane at First Attack and Death. 





Died. 




AT FIRST ATTACK. 


AT TIME OF DEATH. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Congenital, .... 


1 


3 


4 


_ 


_ 


_ 


15 years and less, . 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


From 15 to 20 years, . 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


20 to 25 years, . 


2 


1 


3 


- 


- 


- 


25 to 30 years, . 


3 


3 


6 


1 


1 


2 


30 to 35 years, . 


1 


3 


4 


- 


5 


5 


35 to 40 years, . 


1 


2 


3 


3 


2 


5 


40 to 50 years, . 


- 


3 


3 


2 


1 


3 


50 to 60 years, . 


4 


2 


6 


4 


4 


8 


60 to 70 years, . 


- 


2 


2 


5 


9 


14 


70 to 80 years, . 


- 


1 


1 


3 


6 


9 


Over 80 years. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Unknown, .... 


4 


9 


13 


- 


- 


- 


Totals, .... 


18 


30 


48 


18 


30 


48 


Total persons, 


18 


30 


48 


18 


30 


48 


Mean known ages (in years). 


32 


33.38 


32.82 


55.22 


57.5 


56.64 



1912. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



m 


•siB^ox 


'-'-'--'—«'--"— 


^ 


•saiBinaj 


'"'^'^"" ' — 1-— 1 1 


S 


•saiBH 


.-I , . 1 , l^^c^c, ,«„,«^ 


2 


d 

IS 

P 


•SIB(>0i 


•-'-'--' ' •--' >«",,, 


^ 


•eaiBOTa^ 


"^"^'""" ' '-^' '--' ' ' 


S 


•saiBpi 


'■''''''''"'' "^" '' ' 


o 


< 


i 


•smox 






1 1 1 1 




•saiBoiaj 




- 


•sai^H 


1^ 1 1 , 1 , ,„„ ,„ 1 , 1 , ,^ , 


^ 


Q 

1 


•siB^ox 


IIIIIIIIIII'HI^II^I^ 


^ 


•saiBraaj 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r-, 1 1 « 1 1 


- 


•sai^H 


1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 « 1 1 1 1 I 1 « 


^ 


§ 


•SIB^OX 




'^ 


•saiBmaj 


1 1 i- 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




■•sai^pi 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 


' 


g 
g 


•siB^ox 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


' 


•sai'BTOaj[ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 


1 


•eai^K 


1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 


< 


■bIb:>ox 


1 „rt„rt 1 ^rt 1 1 rtt-^rtCO 1 1 -H 1 


S3 


•saiBuiaj 


,^,„^ '^-1 ,-,-««, ,-H, 


t^ 


•sai^K 


1 ,-,,,.,,, ,W, ,,,,, , 


cc 






s 

o 


A. — First admitted to any hospital'when received 
by institution from which transferred: — 

Alcoholic insanity, acute 

Alcoholic insanity, chronic 

Arteriosclerotic insanity, .... 
Chronic delusional insanity. 
Constitutional inferiority, .... 

Dementia, chronic 

Dementia, primary 

Dementia, primary, Huntington's chorea, . 
Dementia, primary, hebephrenic form. 
Dementia, primary, paranoid form, . 

Dementia, senile, 

Epilepsy, 

Imbecile 

Imbecile, moral, . - 

Imbecile, with dementia 

Manic-depressive insanity, .... 
Manic-depressive insanity, mixed. 

Syphilitic insanity 

Toxic insanity 





100 



WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. 



[Dec. 







■smox 


IrHO -HCOM I^Ttlrtdl— -HCO-^NI 


S § g 




•saiBraaj 


1 1 (M «« 1 1 1 CT-H-H 1 «-H« 1 (M 1 


S S ^ 




■sai^K 


1 —CO 1 NM 1 — -H 1 rt 1 1 1 (M« 1 1 


s §§ s 




P 


■sxnoj, 


1 1 TJI rnmCO 1 1 -^r^Cq 1 -HTlMrHfM 1 


.., 




•saiBoiaic 


1 1 <M M-H 1 1 1 M—,-1 1 «-H-H 1 eq 1 


3 g g 




•sai^H 


1 l« l«« 1 , „ ,- 1 , ,«_ 1 , 


s s s 




% 

s 

5 


it 


•sib:>ox 


1-H- III 1 - 1 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 1 1 


" s s 




•sarBraa^ 


III III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 M M 




•eai^H 


1 -^« III 1 - 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


CO 00 CO 




1 


■si'B^ox 


III (II 1 1 1 1 1 1 i t 1 1 1 1 


, ^ ^ 




•BaiBtnaj 


III III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 eg (M 




•saiBH 


III 111 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 <M (M 






•si«:jox 


III 1.1 1 . 1 , 1 1 1 1 1 . 1 1 


1 -, - 




•eaiBraaj 


, , 1 . . 1 1 . 1 , 1 


1 - -, 




•saiBjn 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 




a 


■ei^^ox 


' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' 


1 1 1 




•sai^taa^ 


' 1 1 1 1 ' 1 ' ' ' ' 1 ' 


1 1 1 




•sai^H 


111 111 . 1 1 1 I 1 1 . 1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 




i 


•srB:jox 


'-- ' '- -"' I--I-I— 


i^ 5S S 




•eaiBTna^ 


1 e<,_H 1 1 « «co 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 -H — 


S S ?J 




■Bai^H 


1 <M 1 1 1 -H 1 1 L 1 «« ( -H 1 ,-. 1 1 


t~ >0 U5 








CO 

QQ 
P 

g 


B. — All other admissions: — 

Alcoholic insanity, acute, .... 
Alcoholic insanity, chronic, .... 
Chronic delusional insanity. 
Constitutional inferiority, hysterical epi- 
lepsy 

Dementia, chronic, 

Dementia, primary, 

Dementia, primary, with constitutional in- 
feriority, 

Dementia, primary, paranoid form, . 

Dementia, senile, 

Dementia, senile, Huntington's chorea, 

Epilepsy, 

Epilepsy with dementia, .... 

Imbecile, 

Imbecile with dementia, .... 

Imbecile with epilepsy 

Manic-depressive insanity, .... 
Puerperal insanity, toxic 


Totals B, " 

Aggregate cases, 

Aggregate persons 



1912. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



101 



^ 



2 

1 


•SlB^Oi 


t. ^ ^ 


(M CO 

CO CO 


•saiBtna^ 


^ o, ^ 


^ C^ 


•saiBH 


o ^ , 


S5 s 




S 


•sinox 


^ ^^ -- 


^ g5 


•sai^raa^ 


t. o, ^ 


^ s 


•saiBH 


CO (M 1 


00 CO 




•smox 


O 1 1 


o t- 


•saiBraaiC 


(N 1 1 


(M e<j 


•S91BK 


00 1 1 


00 lO 


1 
1 


•smox 


TtH 1 1 


Tt< rjl 


■eai^uia^ 


c^ 1 1 


(M C^ 


•sat^K 


(N 1 1 


(N (N 




•eiB^ox 


"—I 1 1 


^ 


•saiBraaj[ 


- 1 1 


1—1 1— 1 


■sai^M 


, , , 


1 1 




•sib:jox 


, , , 


' 


•S3iBuiaj[ 


, , , 


1 1 


•saiBH 


1 1 1 


I 1 




Izi 

o 

1 

Q 

O 
P^ 

w 

CQ 


^ 1 1 
1 1 g 


Total cases, 

Total persons first admitted to any 
hospital when received by insti- 
tution from which transferred. 



102 



WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. 



[Dec. 



ii 

i| 


•SIB^OX 


' ' ' ' -- ,,.,-.> 


•saiBuia^ 


1 1 1 1 ^ 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


•eaiBH 


1 1 1 1 1 -H 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 T^ 1 1 


o 


•Bmox 


1 1 1 1 III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


•saiBuia^ 


1 1 1 1 III 1 1 1 1 1 II 


•saiBH 


1 1 1 1 III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


5|| 


•8IB:>0i 


1 1^1 , , , ^ , , 1^ 1 1 l-l 1 1 


•saiBraa^ 


1 l-l 1 1 ., 1 1 1 1 ,1,^,1. 


•saiBpi 


1 1 1 1 1,1^,1,^ 1 1 1 1 1 , 1 


a z o 

O -! K 

115 


•eiBC^ox 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


•saiBraa^ 


1 1 1 1 Ill 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


•saiBM 


1 1 1 1 III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


ill 


•s^Oi 


1 1 1 1 III 1 1 1 1 1 II 


•saiBuiaj 


' " ■ ' ■ ' 


•saiBH 


1,11 ,11111,1 , 1 1 1 1 1 . 


1 

O 


•sp^ox 


" -- — — 


•saiBcaa^ 


-I-.-H 1 ,^ 1 .M 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 ,H^.-< 1 ,-lrt 


•eaiBpi 


(M 1 1 rt 1 rt , rt T^rt 1 r-, -H 1 1 ^rt 1 ^ 




H 
P 

O 


Nervous system:— 
Cerebral hemorrhage, arteriosclerosis, . 
Cerebral hemorrhage, epilepsy, . . _ . 
Cerebral thrombosis, chronic endocarditis, . 
Epilepsy, 

Circulatory system : — 

Cardio renal, arteriosclerosis 

Endocarditis, acute, 

Endocarditis, chronic, 

Endocarditis, chronic, arteriosclerosis, acute en- 
teritis, 

Endocarditis, chronic, arteriosclerosis, chronic 

nephritis, 

Myocarditis, arteriosclerosis 

Myocarditis, broncho-pneumonia, . . 
Myocarditis, chronic, rheumatoid arthritis, 

General system: — 

Acute gastroenteritis, 

Cancer of stomach and intestines, broncho-pneu- 
monia, 

Carcinoma of right and left breasts, . 

Carcinoma of stomach 

Chronic dysentery, 

Diphtheria 

Enteritis, acute, chronic endocarditis, 



1912. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



103 



"- ' --' ' 


» 


' --' ' 


K5 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 


CO 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 '-• 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


- 


.,,,,,,, ,^, ,,,,,.,,, 


- 


,,,,,,,,,,, .,,,,,,, 


' 


- " " - ' " ■ 


. 


..,,,,,-.,., ,,<.,<,. 


„ 


' ' " 


- 


i .-1 . 1 1 1 . 1 1 II. 


- 


' '- ,,,,., 


- 


' ' ' ' ' 


' 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


' 


III Ill 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


' 


III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


' 




^ 


-I-- 1-.^,^^^, 


g 


1 ^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1-11 r-I.H 1 ,1 1 _! 


2 






Enteritis, chronic bronchitis, arteriosclerosis, de- 
cubitus, . . . ,. 
Enteritis, general septicsemia, arteriosclerosis, 
Exhaustion, fracture of femur, senility, 

Fracture of skull, 

Inanition, exhaustion 

Interstitial nephritis, pulmonary tuberculosis. 

Intestinal obstruction, 

Rheumatoid arthritis, chronic nephritis, . 
Senility, exhaustion, arteriosclerosis, . 

Suicide by hanging, 

Tuberculosis, general, 

Respiratory system: — 

Pneumonia, broncho, 

Pneumonia, hypostatic, . ' . 

Pneumonia, lobar, 

Pneumonia, lobar, chronic nephritis, . 
Pulmonary and general tuberculosis, . 

Pulmonary tuberculosis 

Pulmonary tuberculosis, arteriosclerosis. 
Pulmonary tuberculosis, endocarditis. 


1 



104 



WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. 



[Dec. 



M 


•STOox 


1 ! 1 1 III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


•saiBuiaj[ 


1 1 1 1 III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


•saiBK 


1 1 1 1 III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




•BIB^OX 


"III III 1 I-HII ^ llll -Hrt 


•saiBuia^ 


1 1 1 1 III 1 llll 1 1 1 1 1 'H 1 


•sai^M 


-Hill III 1 l->ll T^ lllll-H 


S s S 
-J s -^ 


•si^iox 


III -1^1 1 1 


•saiBuiaj[ 


,1,1 1 1 1 , , , 1 , , ", 1 , , 1 


•saiBjv 


'1 1 -II' 


2 

1 


•si^^oi 


1^1" III I llll 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


•eaiBtna^ 


1 <-l 1 1 III 1 llll 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


•saiBH 


1 1 1 '^ III 1 llll 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




•eiB:>ox 


- " 1 "1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I-. 


•saiBuia^ 


., , , 1 ,. 1 , , , , ,111,1. 


•sai^H 




i 


•siB(>ox 


1,1, , , , 1 1 1 -H J 1 1 rt 1 1 1 1 


•eaiBuiaj 


1,1, ,11 , , 1 " , 1 1 -< 1 1 1 1 


•saiBK 


, , , 1 III 1 ,1,1 1 ,1,111 




i 

o 


Nervous system: — 
Cerebral hemorrhage, arteriosclerosis, . 
Cerebral hemorrhage, epilepsy, .... 
Cerebral thrombosis, chronic endocarditis. 
Epilepsy, 

Circulatory system: — 
Cardio renal, arteriosclerosis, .... 

Endocarditis, acute, 

Endocarditis, chronic, ...... 

Endocarditis, chronic, arteriosclerosis, acute en- 
teritis, 

Endocarditis, chronic, arteriosclerosis, chronic 

nephritis, 

Myocarditis, arteriosclerosis 

Myocarditis, broncho-pneumonia, 
Myocarditis, chronic, rheumatoid arthritis. 

General system : — 

Acute gastroenteritis 

Cancer of stomach and intestines, broncho-pneu- 
monia, 

Carcinoma of right and left breasts, . 

Carcinoma of stomach 

Chronic dysentery 

Diphtheria, 

Enteritis, acute, chronic endocarditis, . 



1912. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 23. 



105 



II , , , , ,^, , 


" 




.1 1 I-1 1 


'^ 


" ' ■ 


1 


, , , , , 1^1 , ,^ ,,,,,,,- 


00 


1 ' ' ' ' '-' 1 '- 


« 


II - 


Iffl 


, , , ,^^, , , , , , .^, , , , , 


>o 


' 1 ' I--I ' ' ' ' 


" 


' 1 ' ' i ' ^1,1.1 


- 


1 1 1 '-I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


CO 


111-11 


- 


'-"'""" ' " 


- 


--,-,., 1^1 , ,,<>,,>, 


Oi 


-' l-l ' 1 l-l 1 III 


to 




" 


' ' ' ' 1 ' I-' 


t^ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 -H^ 1 1 1 ^ 1 


l» 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 ^ 1 1 1 1 


. 


Enteritis, chronic bronchitis, arteriosclerosis, de- 
cubitus, 

Enteritis, general septicaemia, arteriosclerosis, . 
Exhaustion, fracture of femur, senility. 

Fracture of skull, 

Inanition, exhaustion 

Interstitial nephritis, pulmonary tuberculosis, . 

Intestinal obstruction, 

Rheumatoid arthritis, chronic nephritis, . 
SeniUty exhaustion, arteriosclerosis, . 

I Suicide by hanging 

Tuberculosis, general, 

Respiratory system : — 

Pneumonia, broncho, 

Pneumonia, hypostatic, 

Pneumonia, lobar 

Pneumonia, lobar, chronic nephritis, . 
Pulmonary and general tuberculosis, . 

Pulmonary tuberculosis, 

Pulmonary tuberculosis, arteriosclerosis, . 
Pulmonary tuberculosis, endocarditis. 







106 



WORCESTER STATE ASYLUM. [Dec. 1912. 





i 

o 

i 



< 
« 

1 


o g 

1 


•si^^Oi 




, ,,,,,, =00- 


g ' 


.: 

S 




•saiBmaj 




. .,,,,, .^-=0 


-; ■ 






•S31BH 




, ,,,,,,«.« 


- ' 




^ 


2« 


•si^^ox 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 (MJ2 


t- CB 


CO ^ 


s 


•saiBmaj 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 —t- 


00 «o 


^ s 


1 


•sai^K 




, .,,,,, ,^. 








O 
ii 

a 

1 

M Z 

g 

i 


1 

CI 

i 


■siB^ox 




1 1 1 1 1 1 ^tOIr~-* 


oo -* 






•saiBraaj 




1 t 1 1 1 1 -H.OM-* 


CO C<5 


^1 


•saiBH 




, , , , , , 1-^, 




CO m 


•■S 


m 



i 

K 

J 
■< 


•si'b:>ox 




--»-" 


?5 ' 


CO 

^ 5 


•sajBraa^ 




1 1 1 1 1 .-<OJCOt)HM 


o 1 


2 2 


i 


•saiBK 




, ,,,,,c.,., 


to 1 


" 1 


1 


i 


•siB^ox 






2 ^ 


^ S' 


•saiisniaj 






s « 


^-i 


g 


•saiEpi 




, «.,,,,.,, 


lO >-< 


CO "^ 


1 




c 

c 
p 




il 

II 

1 

< 


J- a s s ^ >^ >> >. . 

-d'fl 2 ? 
Q 
1 


1 1 

|3 


s 

li 

1