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Full text of "Annual Reports of the Navy Department"

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REPOBT 



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SECRETARY OF THE NAVY, 



AN APPENDIX, 



BUREAU REPORTS, ETC. 



DBCZ>IXB, 1867. 



WASHINGTON: 
BOVXRMVZMT PBINTIVe OFFIUK. 



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INDEX. 



pm*- 

Beport op thb Secbetarv op the Navv— 

iDtrDdDOlor; ,,, , 1 

EiMbitoflbeniiTairarM ] 

GaropeMi aqotdron 3 

Aiialio sqaadroD ... . . . 5 

North Atlantic tqaodron 9 

South Atlcuitic tquadroD II 

North PmiBc sqnadtoii II 

South PociSc sqaadroQ 1. 12 

8p6ci»l wrvico 14 

Loeaof ibe Sacnucento 15 

Iron-clad M[antonamoli . ....- I& 

Now YMselB 16 

Navy-yaid facililiea : H 

Leagua iiland IS 

Site on the Thames rJTer for naval purpotes • -■- 19 

Tnuwrer of ironclad gloameri 20 

The rebel ram Stonewall 2*> 

The Naval Acadvmy , '21 

Naval apprcDtlcM 21 

Seamen 22 

Biafai nation or Tolunteer officers 2U 

Bank of staff co[p9 2U 

Belief for the southern State* - SH 

CWms of coQltaclori 'i4 

Petroleum as fuel for generatiog steam 24 

The steamer Amazon 24 

NaTBlpeo^on fund 'i5 

Naval pensions 25 

Expenses andeslimates 3r> 

Tbebnreaus .- 87 

ConcliKioD 36 

Prom Admiral Farraout— 

His passaffe to Europe 33 

BaccptioD bj (he Empress of France ■ 33 

ViiUtolbeCherboiir);dock-7ard ■•4 

Beception In Kussla 34 

Inspection of Knsnian Iron-clad fleet 35 

Visit to Stockholm 37 

BeceplLou Rt Copenbagcn 3l? 

r ■izcct.GoOglc 



Opkers op heliki' th tub Cbetass— 

Visit of Ihe CanaDdiiLgiia, CnpMm Slroiig, to CandU ■ 

VUit of theSwatsro, ComDiander Jtffere, lo CandU 

Reception op Prikhe Alfred, op Great Britaik, at Eio de Janeiro— 
BepoTt of Kear-Admiral Godon 

Investigation op loss of eiiH> General Skerhah— 

Visit of WHchiiaott, CommanJor Shufeldt, to Corea.-. -. 

KXAMINATION op HARDOR OF PORT HAMILTON, CORBA— 

Report of Coinoiandor Shufeldt 

Skirmish wmi is a v ages at Formosa— 

Report of Renr-Admiral II. H. Bell 

Bepoil of Commander Bellinap, of tbe Hnrlfotd 

Report of Captain Fomo.v, of thomsrioes 

Report uf Liouleoant CommaDder Read, of tlte Harlfoid 

ReportofAsaistanl Surgeon Pa;^: death of Lieuloaaut HacLenzle 

Report of Lleul«D8Dt Suids 

Report ol Fleet Surgeon Beale: casualties 

Voyage of the Miantosomoh to Europe— 

Bosumfi of the voyttj*' reports of Captain Murray 

Abstract of tliecruljo 

Naval Acjdemv— 

Iteport ofenperintondKul, Vice-Admiral PorlOf 

Report of Board of Visitors— laer 

Eilimales for support of , _ 

Kaval Odsebvatory- 

Report of superinieudcnt of 

Eat I mates for ,,, 

Nautical Almanac— 

Report of lupet intend en t of 

Est i males for ,'. 

EsTiJiATEH for lSC7-"ce, Secrbtarys Office, Ac— 

For Hie office of the Secti'laij of the Kbvj—( civil) ; 

■ For theBoutliweflt expcuiivo buildiug— (tivil) 

Suniniar^r eititnute fursulaiioeand cmiiiiigcnt dejiarlmcut and bureaus 

Sumnmij" r»llauile for navj and niarioe corps 

pUHEAU OF Vauds akd Docks— 

Report of the chief of ibe buieau 

Jniprovemenli and repairs nt Puitsmoulh, N. H 

Improvenionia and lepairaSit Boston 

Improvements and repairs at Now York 

Improveinonta and repairs iit Philadelpliia 

Improvements and repairs at Waibiugton 

Improveaenla and repairs *l Norfolk _ _ 

improvements and repairs at PenuHcolu , 

In^covenifiiits and repairs at Uaifl iiland 

ImprovcBietits and repairs at Sackott't Harbor 

ImprovcmoilE and rcpairaat Key West 

Iiaprovomenls «Dd repairs at Mound City 

Affairs at (he Navsi Aaylum, PiOladelphia 



OeoBial Mlimato far Ifaa biirMn—( civil and nava)} 97 

FoT Mtliirles and contiDgent for bureaa 9T 

For civil e[npl'>j&9Bt the Btatioiu 93 

For repairs and improvemeata at tha statioiu 101 

Baiiiii.arj Btaiomeut uf, for ropiiiis oF all kiods at tbo navj jards 106 

Statemeatuf c;i|>eudituro, aud pitimalea for cuDtlugeiit fuod lOT 

Recapilulaiiun ul' estimutps for con tin gent 100 

8uii3lliar7 BtsteniDtlt of citimales under cugnizauce of bureau 109 

Abstract of accppled and rejected oSbrs fur luppliea — 

For tho nuTy jard at Boston 119 

For the navy jard at Biookljii Ill 

For the navy yard at Philadelphia 113 

For tha Naval Afljliim at PliiUdelphia 113 

For lbs iiav; yard ut WMhiiigluQ lU 

For the navy yard at PeiuacoU ■ 116 

Bureau of Equipment and BvcRctriNO — 

Beportof the chief uflho bureau I IT 

Estimates— 

For salaripB and contingent of bureau 119 

For pay of civil officaiB under the bnrMB 190 

For pay of petty officers and seamen I80 

For purcfaaie oF bomp nud otlior malerlali for cordage 

For puifhajeof c>al for tlwnftvj- 

Fur pnicfaa»e of ariiiici foroquipuinutof veaseU 

For contincMQi expeiiien of the luteau 

Becap'tulalion uf estimnlas 

Abstract uf accop'ed and r'jrcted offers for supplies — 

Fur Dft»y yard at PuDstiioulh 122 

For navy jard nt Charlentown I!K 

Furiinvy jaidalNtiy Yoik 123 

Fornayy jaidat Pliilndelpbia 124 

FurnavyjaidaiWa^liin^toc 125 

FornavyymdalNorMk 125 

OBiirs fur anthracite coal 136 

BURBAU or NaVlOATlntt— 

Beportof i'bii>furibe bureau 136 

Bvpiiit ofauperiiileiiduut Ntval Otk-orrato^ . 139 

Bep<>rtur*uperiuDuduDt Nautical Atmauae 134 

En ti males — 

Fur Balarica aud contingent in Ibe burean 135 

For pay and uiiltagouf uffii-eis 138 

For navigation and navigaiioD supplies 130 

For pay of oSior* Hud uiliera at Naval Academy 137 

For couiiueeiit uj;|«iisi'»of Naval Acadi-oiy 138 

I'lt impruvencntn aud iif aiia at Naval Academy 138 

Fur snjipDrtol dcpariiiifntuf steam engineering at Naval Academy 139 

FurBii|puitufNatalUbi«n-aiory 139 

Fur support of Kau ival A'liianiu: 141 

Biimnary Biarcoieutuf rati main 141 

UKapiintaiiiiu of apprupiiaiioiisrrqaired 142 

Bclicdule ofprcposnls fur Btaliuncry I4S 



Bureau op Ordnance— 

Eeport of the cbisf of tjie bnreUQ 142 

Eetimatea— 

For salaries and contiagent ofboTeaD 145 

For ordnonu oad ordnauca Btorss, contingrat. Six 145 

For magMdiieB, additions, and repairs 146 

For pajr of derka, &.C., ordmuice depaitnUDt of yards 146 

Bdkeau of CoNSTRucmaK and Repairs— 

Report of the chief of the bureau 147 

Estimates — 

For salaries aod contingent of bniean 148 

For civil officers Kt the yards and stations 149 

Fornuntenaaceandiep^r of iiavj 149 

gniniiiaiy stalemeiiC of estimates 149 

Offers to faniisb malariola for the navy — 

At the noTj" yard, Portsmouth J50 

At the navy yard, Charlesloirn 154 

At tiie navy yard, Brooklyn 1S8 

At the navy yaid, Philadelphia 163 

At the navy yard, Washington 166 

At the navy yard, Norfolk 168 

BoREAU OF Steam Ekgineerino — 

Beport of the chief of tho bureau 171 

JEstimales- 

For salaries and contingent in the bnreau [») 

For pay of civil officers at the alations...'. 18-2 

For stores, tools, &c 183 

Becapiinlatioa of esUmoles 183 

Scale of bide to furnish materials — 

At the navy yard, Portsmouth \*^ 

At the navy yard, Chsrieslown 1811 

At the navy yard, Brooklyn !()> 

At the navy yard, Philadelphia 191 

At the navy yard, Washington l*i 

At the navy yard, Norfolk lOTi 

Bureau of Provisions and Cloth inu— 

Bepoit oribo chief of the bureau I'.IT 

Estimates — 

For BRlaries and contingent in the bureau 198 

For provisions, commutation of rations, Ac 199 

For conlinj^nt oipecses 199 

For pay of officers and others at the stations 199 

Schedule of proposals fur clothing and clothing materials 301 

Schedule of proposals for navy supplies ,.. 303 

Schedulo of proposals for fresh beef and vegetables 305 

Statement of coQlracIs miiAn hy iliu bnreau !i06 

Bureau of HEuiaNE and ijiiK<;eitk— 

Beport of tho chief of the biirnau !d07 

Estimates— 

For salaries and conliogeot of burcan 'J16 

For pay of employes at hospitals, &c ^10 

For repairs and improre mont of hospitals j^, 319 

r,;ri:cct,G00gIc 



Beport or dbeues and tojiuiM on vesselt dmiDg the rebellioo, tU; 

Polonuc floUlIk 390 

Atlmntic aqaadroD S30 

Noitli AtlBDtic Bqaadron 233 

Sonth Atlautic iqnadron S4S 

Golf sqnadroD 364 

EwtGnlf iquttdroD - 867 

West Gulf sqaadron 378 

Xiuisaippi sqamdron 391 



Hardie Corps — 

Beport oF Ibe commandRBt 305 

Eitimktca — 

For paj uid ■obwiteiice 3(6 

For eipenaea of qaarlennaatei's departmeot. 306 

Abstimct of oflen — 

For fiiniiahiDf; rations 310 

For f uniuhiDg mpplie* - 310 

For famishiDg wood hai fuel 311 



,ab,GoOglc 



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KEPOET 

or 

THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY. 



Navy Department, 

December 2, 1667. 
Sir : Dnring the year our naval force haa been almost exclusively employed 
on foreign etatioaa. But little remained fur it to perform in our own waters, 
and the general peace which haa prevailed throughout the civilized world has 
called for no interposition or active operations on out part for the protection of 
oar commerce abroad. The display of a naval force has been safficieiit to sup- 
preaa threatened difficulties, and in every quarMr American interests have been 
respected and American rights obaerved by commercial nations, and intercourse 
and trade have been fostered. 

KXHIBIT OP THE NAVAL FORCE. 

Daring the year the aggregate naval force has been reduced forty veaseU and 
four hundred and eighty-two gnna. The number of vessels in commission has 
been rednced twelve, and the number on squadron service is thirteen lesa than 
at the date of my last report. The following is a summary of the present con- 
dition of the vessels of the navy : 

No. Gong. 

Yeesels in squadron service 56 507 

Apprentice ships 3 52 

Receiving abipa 8 1^9 

Special and lake service 3 5^ 

Attached to Naval Academy 10 115 

On service at yards and stations, including yard and powder tugs, 

and vessels uaed as barracks and as coal barges 33 41 

Total number of vesaela in us« 103 S98 

Iron-clad vesaela laid up 40 109 

Iron-clad veasela not completed 6 22 

Steam vesaela not completed 21 333 

Sailing vessels not completed, (oM line-of-battle ahipa,) 2 

Other veaseb laid up, repairing, fitting for sea, and for sale 57 508 

Total number of vessels and guns 238 1,869 

Eleven thousand nine hundred men have been employed in the naval and 
eoaet aorvey service doriog the year. >0'Hc 

o 



2 BBPOET OP THE 8ECRETABY OF THE NAVT. 

Bt ROPE AN SQtADRON. 

Ai]roiral Farragut -mat last Bpring designated to commaad the Enropean eqaad' 
ron. He hoisted his flag on the Franklin, at New York, on the 17th of Jane, 
and departed from Saudy Hook on the SStb of that month. Ou the 14tb of 
July he relieved Renr-Admiral Onldi<boroDgb at Cherbourg. 

Q'he reception of our distinguished naval commanderby the people at the differ- 
ent ports he has %'iBited, and bj the sovereigns and authorities of Europe, has 
been of a character gratifying to himself, and to the goveraraeut and people of 
the Uuited Slates. At Gherboui^ the Franklin was visited by the Empreaa of 
France, while Admiral Farragnt was iavited to Paris by the Emperor, who 
tendered to him personal attention and courtesy. 

On the 30th of July he sailed forCronstadt; the Ticonderoga, Canandaigna, 
and Frolic composing, with his flag-ship, the squadron which went up the Bal- 
tic. This was the largest AmeriCiin naval force which had ever visited the 
countries of northern Europe. Highly complimentary and friendly honors, na- 
val aud civil, were everywhere extended. International, official, and honorary 
salutes were given and returned. At Cronstadt the squadron was visited by 
his Highr.efS the Grand Duke Constan tine, the ofBcial head of the Russian navy, 
by Rear Admiral Lessoflsky, and other dignitaries, and by the municipal author- 
ities of St. Petersburg. During their brief stay at Cronstadt our officers experi* 
euced the unbounded hospitality and unwearied courtesy aud attention nf th« 
Russian government aud people, whose friendship and attachment to the United 
States have hein so often and unmistakably mauifested. Many availed them- 
selves of invitations to visit Moscow, the ancient capital, and other parte of the 
empire. Upon leaving Cronstadt, on the 30th of August, the squadron pro- 
ceeded by invitation from the grand duke to visit and inspect the iron-clad fleet 
of Russia at Trongsund Roads, where a grand naval review took place. On 
the 1st of September they proceeded to sea amid cheeting from all the ships 
of the two squadrons, " coocludiug," in the words of Admiral Farragut, "avisit 
which froiu first to last has been marked by the inttrchange of the warmest 
friendliness, and which we sliall always cherish as one of the most pleasant re- 
membrances of onr Uvea," 

The squadron anchored on the 3d of September off Waxholm, below Stock- 
holm. A vessel was placed at the disposal of Admiral Farragnt during bis stay, 
by order of the government, and on reaching the Swedish capital he was pre- 
sented to the King, who expressed the gratification which it gave bim to wel- 
come the vessels of war of the United States once more in the waters of Sweden. 

1'be squadron left Stockholm on the 9th of September, and on the t4th an- 
chored off Copenhagen. During the run to this point, and in a heavy gale, 
the full steaming power of the Frsnklin was tested. Uer performance gave 
general satisfaction, and Admiral Farragut saya that he " can with confidence 
say she steams better nnder full power than any frigate in our service." The 
ministersof war and marine tendered him all the ctvilitiei<in their power daring his 
stay in Copenhagen. On the 19th, by invitation, he dined with the King of 



BBPOBT OF THE BBCRETART OF THE NA7T. i 

Denmark, bit brother, and hii two bods, tbe crown prince, and bis Majesty 
George, tbe King of Greece. 

Admiral Furagut left Oopenbagen on tbe 19th of September, and arrived oE 
Oraveeend, England, oa tbe 26th. The lords commUsionera of the admiralt] 
here tel^r^hed him that they would be happy to render any attenttou to bio 
and hia squadron that might be agreeable. He accompanied them on their an 
nnal tonr (if inspection of the dock-yards of Woolwich, Chattiam, Sbeemest 
and Portemonlh. Great conrtesy was invariably extended to bim and his oS 
cera on these risits. The Prince de Joinville visited tbe Franklin, and the ad 
miral and hie officers accepted tbe cordial invitation of the prince to visit hie 
at bis residence at ^ount Lebanon. Thefiag-ehip having gone to Sheernese 
the admiral joined her at that place on tbe 13th October. On the 14th h 
attended tbe gun target practice at Shoeburynees. 

On the Ifith, Admiral Farragntsailedfor PortsmoDtb, which point he reache< 
the next day. On the 17tb,he entertained the lords of the admiralty, receivini 
them with fwU honon, and on tbe day following made a most interesting visi 
to the dock-yard, the gnnneiy ship, and some of the iron-clads. On the 19tl 
be received bitt bigbness tbe Duke of Cambridge, with yards manned the roye 
standard at tbe main, and a salute of twenty -one guns. During bis entire ata; 
at Portsmouth a email steamer was placed at bis disposal, and the admiral wa 
received with every kindness and hospitality, not only by officers of the armj 
and navy, but also by tbe civil authorities. 

On the SOth, be left Portsmouth, and on tbe next day anchored in Plymoutl 
barbor. At this place there was a repeti^on of (be civilities received at otbe 
points, extending over three days. Tbe admiral sailed on the 24tb, and anchorci 
off Lisbon on the 28tb. 

Tbe dtepatcbes of Admiral Farragut relating to bis public movements, n 
oeived at tbe department prior to November 1, are given in tbe appendix to tbi 
report 

Bear-Admiral Goldaborongh continued in command of the squadron unti 
relieved by Admiral Fanogut. In the month of December, 1866, the Cok 
rado left Liabou for the Mediterranenn, and after passing a few days a 
Port MahoD, proceeded In January to Ville-franche, where she remained uuti 
March, when she left for southern Italy. In May she went fium Naples t 
Trieste, and returned by way of Carthagena to Gibraltar in June. 

In tbe mouth of November, 1866, on a joint applicaUon from Mr. King, ou 
minister at Rome, and Mr. Fox, then one of the Assistant Secretaries of th 
Navy, who was in Rome, urging the immediate presence of one of our ships-of-wa 
at Civiia Veccbia ou a very important matter, tbe Swatara was ordered to procee 
to that place. The object in view was the transportation of John II. Suiratl 
charged with having been implicated in tbe assassination of tbe late Presiden 
Lincoln, to tlie United States. But the prisoner escaped from bis captors ani 
fled from tbe Papal dominions. He was, however, retaken in Alexaoilric 
whither the Swatara followed him, and where Commander Jefferv received hit 
on tbe 2l8t of December, from our consul general ID Egypt, Leavioi^ Alei 

andria, the Swaura, after a ledioua Toyage, toucUng at Nice aud FimcU 



4 KEFOBT OP THE 6KCBETABT OF THE NATT. 

readied Waeliington in Febniaiy, vbere Commatider Jeffers delivered the ptia- 
oner to the marebal of tbe District of Columbia, aud the Swatara immediately 
tbereafter letnraed to Lisbon and rejoined tbe European squadron. 

Earnest appeals inbehalf of tbe suffering Cbristians in Crete have, from time to 
time, been made to our naval officers, nrging tbem to so far depart from the 
principle of non-ialerfereace and thai neutrality wbicb tbe gOTemment of the 
United States has studiously enjoined and observed, as to repair to that island 
and convey to tbe shores of Greece tbe women and children, who were represented 
as houseless and des^tute, tbe results of the iniurrection against the Turkish 
authorities. Bear-Admiral Goldaborougb, to whom application was first made 
for a naval vessel to transport tbe inhabitants from Crete, very properly declined 
ta violate neutral obligations, nor could the department authorize him to employ 
a steamer to convey inhabitants from Turkish territory during civil war without 
the consent of tbe Tnikish government. He was informed that if our minister 
at Constantinople could obtain permission of the government to convey away 
the inhabitants tbe department would interpose no objection to the employment 
of a steamer as requested, though naval vessels are not adapted to transporta- 
tion. 

The Canaadaigua, Captain Strong, was despatched to Crete with full, ex- 
plicit, and guarded instructions from Bear-Admiral Goldsborough to first obtain 
an interview with the chief aulboxity of the island, explain the object of his visit 
to be one of friendship, harmony, and humanity, and if consent could be ob- 
tained, to receive ou board as many Greek women and children as the vessel 
could accommodate, and take them to Greece. Id an interview with Omar Pacha. 
Captain Strong communicated hie instructions, but permission was refused, and 
he was informed it would not be allowed under any circumstances. 

Sabsequently, on the 26th July, Admiral Farragut despatched the Swatara, 
.Commander Jeffers, to Crete. His reports confirm the representations of 
Captain Strong, of tbe Canandaigua, as to the impolicy of any interference on 
our part with either of tbe belligerents. It could not be done withuut violating 
the neutrality which we had always observed, and, whatever may have been our 
sympatliies, we could take no active measures with the insurrectionists without 
an injustice to the Turkish government, wbicb had scrupulously respected our 
national intt^ty and refused recognition of the rebels when other nations gave 
them countenance. At a period when other powers restricted the courtesies which 
belonged to ns, placed us on the footing of belligerents, and extended to the 
rebelsall the privileges that were given to the naval vessels of the United States, 
the Turkish government maintained honorable faith with us, aud gave no en- 
Gonragemeut to the insurrection whicti threatened tbe stability of our Union. 
The despatches of Captain Strong and Commander Jeffers are appended to this 
report. 

The following vessels now compose the European squadron ; 

Franklin, (fiag-ship,) 39 gnus. Shamrock 10 guns. 

Ganandiugua ............. 7 " Frolic 5 " 

Ticonderoga 9 " Guard, (store-ship,) .... 3 " 

Swatara 10 " CjCltlQlc 



BBPORT OF THE 8ECBETART OF THE NATT, 5 

ASIATIC SaUADRON. 

The Asiatic iqnadron is Btill under the command of Hear-Admiral H. H. 
Bell, and has been re-enforced during the year by the addition of the Oneida, 
Iroquois, Aroostook, Unadilla, and the Onward, and conaiats at this time of the 

Hartford, (flag-ship) 21 gnns. Aehuelot 10 gnna. 

Shenandoah 7 " Monocacy 10 " 

Oneida 8 " Arooetook 5 " 

Wactinaett 9 " Unadilla 5 " 

Wyoming " Onward 3 " 

Iroquois 6 " Supply 6 " 

The Piscataqna, one of the steam frigates recently hnilt, will sail in a few 
days to relieve the Uartrord, and carry ont Rear-Admiral 8. 0. Kowan, who 
will succeed Rear-Admiral Bel). 

The Idaho, taken into the service by directioa of Congiess, has been converted 
into a sailing vcbscI by removing the boilers and macbiaery, which were con- 
demned as worthless. She sailed from New York November let, and will be 
stationed at Nagaeuki and be used principally as a hospital and store-ehip. 

The Maumee is now on her way to join the squadi-on, and the Wachusett 
Wyoming, Onward, and Supply are under orders to reLuru to the United States 

In April last, by request of Mr. Van Valkenburgh, the United States minister, 
Rear-Admiral Bell proceeded to Yokohama, having been advised that the foreign 
ministers resident in Japan proposed to visit the Tycoon, who had invited them 
to an interview at his country residence. The occasion being an extraordinary 
one in the history of Japiinese intercourse with foreigners, and the transaction 
one of an important commercial and business character, Rear-Admiral Bell 
deemed it expedient that our minister should be sustained by the display of a 
respectable naval force off the port of Osaka, and that Mr. Van Valkenburgh 
should be conveyed thither in his flag ship, the Hartford. With this intent he 
assembled at Yokohama the Hartford, Slienandonh, and Wyoming, of his 
squadron. Unfortunately the machinery of the Hartford became temporarily 
disabled on her passage from Hong Kong, and she could not therefore discharge 
this duty. The minister was, however, accommodated on board the Shenan- 
doah, which, in company with the Wyoming, proceeded to Osaka, where he was 
landed on the first of May with the usual honors, and escorted by the marine 
guard of both vessels, Rear-Admiral Bell subsequently arrived in tho Hartford, 
and remained with the Shenandoah and Wyoming nntil the object of the mission 
was completed, when the Shenandoah retnrned with the minister to Yokohama, 
and the Hartford and Wyoming proceeded by way of the inland sea to Nagasaki. * 

The Japanese government having, in the interview between the I'yceon and 
the ministers, signified its purpose to open an additional port on the western coast 
to foreign trade, our minister, in pursuance of an arrttngemcut with his colleagues, 
left Yokohama on the 25th of June in the Shenandoah, which had been placed 
at his disposal, with a view of examining the different ports and selecting the 
most suitable one for commercial purposes. Unusnal interest marked this cruise. 
The Shenandoah reached Hakodadi on the S8th of June, and the first salute 



6 BEPOBT' OP THE 8ECEETABT OF THE KAVT. 

that was ever fired there in boaot of a foreign miniater was given on this occa- 
sion. The miniater and the officers of the Shenandoah were received by the 
governor with marked ceremony and politeness. On thelSth-of July the Sben* 
andoah entered the port of Neegatn, where similar courtesies were extended to 
them by the govcror, vice-governor, and a large coDConrBe of officials. Nanon 
was reached on the 13th cf Jaly, no American vessel having ever before entered 
that harbor, and on the 17th of July she visited Hikuiii and also Tsumnga, 
where no foreign vessel of war had ever previonsly anchored. The Shenandoah 
arrived on the SOtli at Miyadsa, the most beautiful of all the bays visited. 

Commodore Goldsborough and the officers under his command made snrveyB 
of most of these new harbors, and prepared sailing directions for their entrance. 

In Gonseqnence of the domestic troubles in Japan, and to prevent interruption 
of our opening commerce with that country, and especially in consideration of 
the national importance of the recently established communication with Asia by 
the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, one or more of the vessels of the Asiatic 
squadron is constantly maiotaiued in the waters of Japan. 

American commerce in the east sufiered some detriment dnring our civil war, 
and others have profited by our misfortune. Prussia has, within a few years, 
become conspicuous as a mercantile power in the east. Sailing vessels under 
her flag are seen in every port, receiving freights at lower rates than are offered 
by either American or British ships, and German merchants are securing a 
thriving business in that Quarter. Apprehensions are expressed that we are not 
destined to recover -the prestigeof our former successful mercantile marine in the 
China seas, unless it be by means of steam vessels built for that trade. The 
arrival of the Pacific Mail fiteamship Company's steamer Colorado, the first of 
that line, at Hong Kong in January last, via Yokohama, twenty-nine and a half 
days from San Francisco, was an event of vast importance in ateam navigation, 
as well as of intense interest to our countrymen in eastern Asia, and was greeted 
by our naval vesseU with a salute of tweiity-one guns, and their mastheads 
were dressed with the American ensign. The establishment of this line of 
steamers is, without doubt, destined to have an expanding and beneficent influ- 
ence on tlie commerce of the world. 

In the autumn of 1866 intelligence reached the squadron that the American 
schooner General Sherman had been wrecked In the Ping Yang river, one of 
the streams of Oorea, and that all of her officers, crew, and passengers were 
mnrdered. fiear-Admiral Bell despatched the Wachusetl, Commander R. W. 
Sbnfeldt, to Cbifa to investigate the circumstances attending the loss of the 
•General Sherman, with instructions to demand of the chief authorities that, if 
there were any survivors of the schooner, they should be delivered on the deck 
of the Wachnsett, whatever might be their nationality, aud to make such fur- 
ther investigation as was practicAble. 

The Wachnsett anchored near the month of the Ta Tong river, on the west 
coast of Corea, on the 23d of January. The pilot secured for those waters did 
not consider it safe, at that season, to take the vosael to the Ping Yang, which 
was some fifty miles to the northward. Commander tihufeldt had, therefore, to 



BEPOET OF THE 8BCEBTABT OF THE NATY. 7 

GOmmnnicste with the Kiog of Oorea by a meBaeoger, eecnred throagh the in- 
etra mentality of the chief of a Qabing village. The object of his visit and his 
demands were thaemade known; but no reply to his coininanicat><fti was received. 
On the 29th of January, however, an officer, who claimed to be from the capital, 
waa presented on lioard the Wachnaett, and liad an interview with her com- 
mander. The resnlt was most nneatisfactory. Oommaader Sbufeldt was unable 
to find any peaceable Bolntion of the difficulty, or that there were any survivors 
of the ill-iated vessel. 

In reference to this affiiir. Rear- Admiral Bell apprehends that, "until the 
government takes efficient at^tion on tbis case, onr conntryroen lawfully navigat- 
ing the seas adjacent to Corea will be in peril of life and liberty of person from 
the barbarities of the people and the anthoritiea of that country, who aim at the 
excln»ioB of strangers." 

No surrey of that part of the coast has ever been made. Commander Sbu- 
feldt, therefore, while waiting a response to his communication to tbe King, 
improved the time in making a partial survey of tbe Ta Tottg river. 

i'iracies have occurred less frequently the curreut year than in some former 
seasons. They do not often take place during the northeast monsoons, that is, 
between Ociober and May. The violence of the winds at that season prevents 
the vessels from being becalmed and drives the piratical junks and row boats 
from tbe sea. It also carries Americau and European ve»sel« off tbe cooHt or 
into ports with too great speed to be boarded. The season for piracies is during 
the southwest monsoonsi when calms and snmmer breezes with smooth seas 
prevail. 

The Monocacy was instructed to proceed in May last to Biuni, Borneo, and 
investigate for the information of the governraeut the circumstances of an alleged 
attack on, and tbe destruction of, tbe residence of tbe American consul at that 
place. On the 27th of that month, the Monocacy, Commander Carter, anchored 
abreast of the sultan's puUce off Brnni, and after executing his mission left on 
the Ist of June. * 

In the early part of the year, information reached the squadron that tbe 
American bark Hover had been wrecked on the southeast end of the island of 
Formosa, and it was rumored that all who were on board had been murdered. 
Commander Febiger, with the Ashuelot, was ordered to proceed to tlie'lncfility 
in quest ii)n, gain what information he could in reference to the oflfair, and rL'scue 
the survivors should any be found. On hia Jtrrival at Tai-wau-IJoo, in April, 
Commander Fubigtir required of the three principal autboritiea of the island an 
immediate invesiigation of the outrage, tie s<jizure and punishment of those 
implicated, and the recovery of any of the shipwrecked crew who survived. 
Tbe aothoritiea expresaed much interest in tbe case, and indicated a desire to 
obtain all information possible, and to punish those who were engaged in it; 
but they claimed to be unable to bring to justice the perpetrators of the crime, 
who belonged to a horde of savages that were not obedient to their laws, TUey 
represented, moreover, that it waa difficult to employ an effective armed force 
against savages who were incapable of holding negotiations with civiliied people. 



8 BEFOBT OF THE 8ECBETAR7 OF THE NATT. 

Ou Tieiting the immediate scene of the outrage. Commander Febiger deemed it 
noadviBable, with bis limited force, to resort to boBtile measnreB. 

Rear-AdmitAl Bell was not disposed that so great a crime ebonld pass onpnn- 
iebed.and be therefore left Shanghai in June, with the Hartford and Wyoming, 
for the purpose of destroying, if possible, the lurking places of the savages who 
had murdered the crew of the Rover. When he reached Tnka, be received on 
board Mr. Pickering, an interpreler, Mr. Taylor, a merchant of that place, and her 
, Britannic Mnjesty's consul, Charles Carroll, esq., who were anzions to accompany 
the expedition. The latter gentleman had, previously, humanely but nnaac- 
ceciefully endeavored to communicate with the savages and ransom any of the 
crew of the Rover who survived. 

Ou the 13th of June the vessels anchored witbin half a mile of the shore, and 
one hundred and eighty-one officers, sailors, and marines were landed, under 
command of Commander George C. Belknap, of the Hartford, accompanied by 
Lieutenant Commander Alexander S. Mackenzie, fleet lieutenant, as second in 
command, be having earnestly sought to go on the expedition. 

Soon afler landing, savages, di-essed in clouts and their bodies painted, were, 
by the aid of glasses, seen aaaembled in parties of ten or twelve on the cleared 
hills about two miles distant, their muskets glittering in the sun. As onr men 
approached the hills, the savages, familiar with the paths, descended to meet 
them, and, gliding through the high graus from cover to cover, displayed a 
strategy and courage equal to Noi th American Indians. Delivering their fire, 
they retreated without being seen by our men, who. charging on their coverts, 
frequently fell into ambuscades. The detachment pursued them in this bar- 
assing miinucr out of eight of the ships until 2 p. m., when they halted to rest- 
While thus resting the savages covertly approached and fired upon the party. 
Lieut. Commander Mackenzie immediately placed himself at the head of the 
company commanded by Lieutenant Sands, of the Hartford, and daringly led a 
charge into the ambuscade. He fell mortally wounded by a musket ball, and 
died while being borne to the rear. His lose was deeply felt by his comrades, 
and his commander, in commnuicating hia death, paya a generous and deserved 
Iribnte to ibis gallant young officer when he says the navy could boast no 
braver spirit and no man of higher promise. He was distiaguiahed for his pro- 
fessional knowledge, aptitude, and tact, and for suavity of manners, which 
inspired the confidence and afieccion of his men, while his impetuous courage 
impelled him ever to seek the post of danger, where he was always seen in the 
advance, a conspicuous mark and an example. 

Sever.il of the oflicera and men experienced severe snn-strokes, the heat 
being intenae ; and as the command was generally exhausted in unavailing efforts 
to get at the enemy, Commander Belknap determiued to return to the ships> 
which were reached at 4 p. in., afler an exhausting march of six hours under a 
triipieal sun. 

The experience obtained demonstrated the inutility of such an expedition 
against a savage enemy in a wild country, by sailors unaccustomed to ambus- 
cades and bush life. No troops could have exhibited more bravery, but the 



BEPOBT OP THE SECBETABf OF THE NATT. 9 

war&re was one to wfaicb stulore are not adapted. Theee conBiderations and 
the proBtrated condition of his men decided Rear-Admiral Bell to make no 
further attempt by again landing bie force. They bad already done all that 
was possible, by burning a number of native but8 and in chasing tbe warriors 
througb coverts of green jungle and green grasa, which are represented as Sre* 
proof at that season. 

Tbe Shenandoah on the way to tbe Asiatic sqnadron tonched at Calcntta and 
remained several days. No American man-of-war having for some twenty-five 
years visited that port, the appearance of the Shenandoah attracted unnsual 
attention. She was warmly welcomed fay our countrymen, and the military 
and civil authorities and inhabitants of the place. 

She left Calcutta December 18, and, touching at Penaog, arrived at SiDgaporo 
the 31st. From Singapore she proceeded to Baokok, iu Siam, and tlie French 
settlement Saigon, iu Cochin China. At Bankok a friondly greeting was re- 
ceived from the King and his ministers. 

On the way to her station, the Ifoqnois touched at St. Augustine hay, Mada- 
gascar, and at Johanna, one of tbe Comoro ielaods in the Mozambique channel. 
At St. Augustine bay his Majesty King Willy, was entertained on hoard. He 
expressed his gratification at tbe arrival of tbe Iroquois, the first American 
man-of-war which bad ever touched there. At Johanna visits were exchanged 
with the Sultan, who was found well disposed to our flag. He complained of 
an indirect slave trade carried on by tbe French, and that some of our own 
merchantmen bad at different times carried his subjects from the island without 
permission. Commander English left a circular addressed to commanders of 
merchantmen toncbing there, rtqueeting ibcm not to ship or receive on board 
sutijects of the Sultan without permission. Tbe Iroquis also touched at Aden, 
Muscat, and Bombay. 

The Aroostook, which a short time previously bad tonched at Johanna, was 
the first American man-of-war that had been iu that port for nine years. It be- 
ing the fourth of July the ship was dressed and tbe flag of the Sultan hoisted 
at tbe fore, for which conrtesy the thanks of the principal minister were sent on 
board, the Sultan being temporarily absent on the other aide of the island. 

NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 

The causes which rendered expedient tbe continuance of a distinct force in 
the Gulf of Mexico ceased when tbe attempt to establish an imperial govirnment 
in Mexico was abandoned. A consolidation of the squadron under Commodore 
Winelow with that of Rear-Admiral Palmer was therefore determined upon in 
April, and, in pursuance of instructions then issued, tbe transfer was made on 
the 22d of May. This transfer disposed of the last of tbe several squadrons 
which our civil war bad called into existence. It had been retained as a distinct 
force two years after all organized resistance to tbe government bud ceased, in 
consequence of the peculiar condition of aSairs in tbe neighboring republic, and 
not from any distnrbance within our own territory. From the date of the trans- 
fer, Bear-Admiral Palmer has had command of tbe whole North Atlantic 
squadron. In consequence of the prevalence of yellow fever, a number of the 



10 HEPOBT OP THE BECRBTABT OP THE NAVT, 

TCBBeb have beeD wilhdniwn. This diaeaae has prevailed to a great exteat thfl 
onrrent year along the Gulf and through a coneiderable |>ortioD of the Weat 
ladies. At this time Rear- Admiral Palmer hae under hie commaud the — 

Sne qnehaun a, (flag-ship) ... . 14gune. Saco 10 gtms. 

De Soto 8 " Shawmut 8 " 

Monongahela 7 '* Marblehead 7 ** 

6Iaegov 8 " Tantic fi " 

Don : 8 " Mahaska. 10 " 

Althongh the operations and movements of the veasela of this squadron have 
been frequently and serioosly interfered with by the prevailing epidemic, I am 
not aware that the interests of our countrymen have Buffered from inattention 
or from the absence of naval protection. The principal foreign ports within 
the limits of the squadron have been visited, some of them repeatedly, and the 
countries affected by domestic disturbance, or where there were foreign enemies, 
have invariably had a man-of-war in port when needed. 

Vera Omz and Tampico, in Sfexico; the ports of Hayti and St. Domingo, 
countries afflicted with perpetual diecontent and revolution ; Aspinwall, Cartha- 
gena, and other places in Colombia, where a revolution of government has taken 
place, have been visited by Bear-Admiral Palmer, and the flag-ship or one of 
the squadron has always been near when the presence of a naval vessel woold 
be likely to exercise a beneficial influence. 

In August last Rear- Admiral Palmer had an interview at Panama with Gen- 
eral Gutierrez, the president of Colombia, who expressed great regard for onr 
eonntry, and especially for American interests on the isthmus, where the faithful 
observance of treaty stipnlations he considered mutually beneficial to his coun- 
try and our own. 

Preceding and attending the surrender of Vera Cruz, great judgment and address 
were exhibited by Commander Roe, the naval commander stationed at that place. 
Repeated negotiations had been opened between the imperial and republican 
commanders, without final resulta. When, at length, through the friendly 
offices of Commander Roe and the American and British consuls, an arrange- 
ment was made for the transfer of the place, it was interrupted by the arrival 
of the steamer Virginia from New York, with General Santa Anna, who pro- 
ceeded at once to the castle, which was in command of one of his friends. Santa 
Anna declared he brought letters from the United States government, and many 
believed he was its authorized agent. Great excitement for a while prevailed, 
and a i-evolntion seemed imminent, but, by prompt and decisive measures, this 
difficulty was disposed of. Santa Anna left the port, and on the 37th of June a 
transfer of the place and the peaceful embarcation of the foreign legion followed. 

Commander Roe is entitled to commendation for the discretion and zeal which 
he manifested. To his good judgment, in concert with that of onr consul, the 
surrender of Vera Cmz without disaster or bloodshed is attributed. 

The naval station at Port Royal has been discontinued, and after shipping to 
other places most of the movable naval property, a sale of the remainder, and 
of the buildings at Bay Point, has been effected. Key West haa been made 
the principal depot for supplies for this squadron. C'dholc 



BEFOBT OF THE SECBETART OP THE HATT. 11 

SOUTH ATLANTIC fiQUADKON. 

The Sontb Atlantic Bqtutdron is composed at this time of the — 

Guerriere, (flagship) 21gna8. Quionebaug . . J 6 gnoB. 

Waflp 3 " Hnron 6 " 

Pawnee 11 " Shamokin 10 " 

Kansas : 8 " 

During the year the Brooklyn, Janiata, Shawmnt, Nipsic, and Onvard have 
returned from this squadron. Bear-Admiral Charles H Davis relieved Rear- 
Adniiral Godou on the 27th of Jnly, and the latter sailed from Bio on the Slst 
and arrived at Philadelphia on the 3d of September, This officer has discharged 
the responsible duties of his command with ability and discretion, and the vessels 
of his squadron have been actively and usefully employed. 

The Shamokin, Commander P. Orosby, received on board Mr. Washburn, 
minister to Paraguay, and arrived at the line of the Brazilian blockading sqnadron 
November 3, 1866. Commander Crosby immediately informed Admiral Tara- 
andar^ of his orders to proceed to Asuncion for the purpose of placing the United 
States minister at his post. 

Objection was made to the passage of the Shamokin through the lines of his 
squadron by the Brazilian admiral, who was without instmctions from his gov- 
ernmenti bnt when informed by Commander Crosby that force alone would pra- 
vent the execulion of bis orders, the Shamokin was allowed to proceed, under 
protest, to Cumpayli, beyond the line of the blockade, from whence, after the 
customary preliminary salutes of the Paraguayan flag, a letter was sent to Presi- 
dent Lopez. Obstructions in the river made it dangerous to proceed further, 
and the minister was there landed. The Shamokin immediately withdrew from 
the line of the belligerents. Although objection was made to the passage of the 
Shamokin, in order that it should not serve as a precedent, tbu most friendly 
relations were maintained by the American and Brasilian officers. 

Bear- Admiral Godon during the month of April visited, in the Wasp, the towns 
on the Uruguay river as far as Concepcion, the capital of the province of Entre 
Rioe. The prevalence of cholera prevented him from carrying out his design of 
proceeding as far at least as Rosario. 

Early in January the Kansas, Commander Wells, left Montevideo for a cruise 
on the west coast of Africa. This vessel visited the Cape of Good Hope, St. 
Paul de Loando, Benguela, and Little Fish bay. No American slavers were 
heard of at any of those points, and from English officers, met with along the 
coast, and from the governors of Loando and St. Helena, iuformation direct was 
received that the shameful traffic has virtually ceased. One vessel, a small brig 
without name or flag, and without human cargo, had been captured by an English 
steamer and sent to St. Helena and condemned. 

NORTH PACIFIC 8UUADRON. 

The Korth Pacific sqnadron remains in command of Rear-Admiral H. K. 
lliatober, aud is composed of the following vessels : 

Fensacola, (flag-ship) 20 guns. Suwanee 10 guna. 

Saranac 11 " Uohongo 10 " 



14 HEPOET OF THE BEORETAET OP THE NATT. 

SPECIAL SBBTECB. 

In my last annuftl report it was stated tliat the Bt«am &igat« SaBqaebanna was 
on special service, having been ordered to convey oar minister and Lieutenant 
General Sherman to Vera Oruz. Tbe then uneettled condition of affairs in 
Kexico, and especially in and about Vera Oruz, prevented the mission from 
landing, and the Susquehanna returned with them to tbe tTnited States. It wae 
deemed important, however, to continue one or more of our naval vessels at 
Vera Gmz until the foreign troops then in that coantiy had embarked and tran- 
quillity was restored to tbe republic. 

Information having been received from Captain W. H. Russell, of the mer- 
chant ship Gnltivator, that his ship had etrnck heavily several times on a shoal 
not Ifud down upon any chart, about twenty miles to the westward of George's 
sbool, bis vessel drawing twenty-two and a half feet of water at the time, the 
department sent the XTnited States steamer Don, Commander Ralph Cbandler, 
to search for, aud, if found, to survey this obatractioa to navigation. The ehoal 
was discovered, and was fonnd to extend about five miles in a southeast and 
northwest direction, and tbe soundings on it to vary from three to nine fathoms. 
The soundings in the vicinity of the shoal change from fifty to fourteen fathoms, 
and its approach is only indicated by the breakers or rips, which in clear weather 
are visible for several miles. As this shoal lies directly in tbe track of vessels 
bound to and from Europe, it is not improbable that s ime of the vessels whose 
fate is nnknown may have here s'ruck, and in heavy weather have goni> to pieces. 
The survey made by Commander Cbandler was published at the bydrographic 
office in June last. 

The Sacramento, Captain Collins, which was mentioned in my last annual 
report as being on special service, and which has been wrecked, as is elsewhere 
noticed, visited tbe Island of Madeira; the Canary islands; the Cape de Verde 
islands; Monrovia; Cape Palmns, Axim; St. George del Mina, Dutch Guinea; 
Accra ; JeJIa Coffy ; Prince's island ; Island of St. Thomas ; St. Paul de Loando ; 
St. Philip de Benguela; Elephant bay; Little Fish bay; Saldanhabay; Gape 
Town ; Mauritius ; Point de Galle and Trincomalie, Ceylon Pondicberry, Goro- 
maudel coast, and Madras. While at Monrovia, Captain Collins, at the request 
of President Warner, of Liberia, called a council of the head men nf certain un- 
friendly tribes in tbe vicinity, and endeavored to persuade them by concessions 
and conciliation to make a lasting peace. 

The graduating class at tbe Naval Academy this year was larger than nsnal, 
and as nearly all tbe vessels needing midshipmen were on foreign service, the Minne- 
sota, Commodore Jnroes Alden, was put in commissi> >n for the purpose of giving 
tbe midshipmen instruction in the first duties of naval officers af^er graduating, 
of enabling them to see foreign dock -yards and naval establishments, and for 
distributioD to the naval vessels to which tbey were to be assigned. The Min- 
nesota sailed from New York on tbe 24th of July, having on board forty-six 
midshipmen, aud she has visited a number of the principal porta on tbe Enropean 
coast, and has passed up the Mediterranean as far as Toulon. She is to return 



;,CJoogIe 



BEPOET OF THE SECBETAET OP THE NAVT. 15 

hj the waj of Aepiawall, where all the midahipmen not aeBigoed to the Enropean 
squadron will be detached and join yeaselB on the Pacific atationa. 
The Uichigan has been emplojred in her naaal duties oa the lakes. 

LOSS OP THB SACBAMRNTO. 

The Sacrameuto, Captain Napoleon Collins, which was performing aa im- 
portant and interesting cruiee, was wrecked on tlie 19tli of June last in the bay 
of Bengal, on the reefs off the inout)i of the Kuthapalem, a branch of the Qoda- 
veiy river, Madras district. Tbe vessel proved a total wreck, but happily no 
lives were lost. Two strong rafts were constructed during the night of the 19tbi 
and on the succeeding morning one of them, with a part of the officers and men, 
was safely towed to the shore. The oilier, having on it twenty-nine officers and 
men, was swept out to sea by the tide and currents, but fortnnntely those upon 
it were rescued the next day, about twelve miles frum the wreck of the ship, by 
the Briiish mail steamer Arabia. Captain Ballantine, who, in order to land them, 
deviated some twenty miles from his course. The remaining officers and men 
safely reached the shore in the boats of the ship and by the aid of other rafta — 
the last man leaving on the morning of the 2Ist. The spot where they landed 
was a sterile beach without water, and the natives could neither supply them 
with food nor render any other aasistance. They worked their way in their 
boats to the French town of Tanaou, and from thence to Madras. Every assist- 
ance was rendered them at these places by the civil officers and citizens, and by 
officers of naval and merchant vessels, and they were not only provided with the 
ueeeasaries, but with the luxuries of life. Captain Collius, wiih his officers and 
the crew of the Sucramento, sailed from Cocanadaou tbe ITth of August, in the 
ship General Caulfield, and arrived in New York on the 19lh of November, As 
is usual in such cases a court of inquiry lias been ordered, and is now in session. 

IRON-CLAD MIAN'I'ONOMOU. 

At the date of my last report, the iron.clad Miantonoinoh was in European 
waters. She passed up the Mediterranean ae far as Naples, visiting several 
intermediate porta, and returning left Gibraltar on the 15th of May, trn route to 
the Uni.ed States. She returned by the way of tbe Canary, Cupe de Verde, 
and Went India islands, and reached Phihidelphia on tbe 23d of July, having 
steamed during her absence from the United States 17,767 miles. 

Tho cruine of the Miant:>nomoh to Europe and her return, and of the Mo- 
nadnock to San Francisco, are the most remarkable voyuges ever undertaken by 
tuireted iron-clad Tessela. These vessels encountered every variety of weatber,and 
under all circumstanceH proved themselves to be staunch, reliable sea-going ships. 
The monitor type of vessel has been constiiicted primarily for harbor defence, 
and it was not contemplated that they would do more than move from port to 
port on OUT own coast. These voyages demonatrate their ability to go to any 
part of die world, and it is believed hy experienced naval officers that with 
■light modificationB above the water-line, in no way interfering with their effi- 
ciency in action, they will safely make the longest and moat difficult voyages 
without convoy. 



16 EEPOKT OP THE BECEETABT OP THE HAVT. 

Steam, tnrreted iron-clade, and fifteen-inch guns have rerolationized naval 
varfare, and foreign governments, becoming sensible of this great change, are 
slowly but surely comiug to the conclusion that tnrreted vessels and heavy 
ordnance are essential pans of an efficient fighting navy. 

NBW TBSSBLS. 

Fonr new vessels have been lannched during the year; theMosholn, of 1,448 
tons, at New York, on the 32d of December; the Minnetonka, S,490 tons, at 
Kittery.on the 3d of July; the Pushmataha, 1,448 tone, at Philadelphia, on the 
17th of July ; and the Naotaeket, 523 tona, at Charlestown, on the Idtb of 



The construction of these vessels was well advanced before the close of the 
war, but their final completion has not been pressed, and work has been done 
npon them only when it could be most economically accomplished. The ma- 
chinery for these vessels is now being placed on board, and they will be ready 
for service in the course of the ensuing year. The Guerriere, a vessel similar 
to the Minnetonka, is the flag-sliip of the South Atlantic squadron, and her per- 
formance under steam and sail, and with both combined, has been well spoken 
of. The Piscataqua, of the same class, is uudcr orders, and will sail in a lew 
days as the fiag-ship of the Asiatic squadron. 

The steam machinery is completed fur seven more vessels of this class, but 
it is not the intention of the deportment to commence their construction at 
present. A smaller vessel is found to be more serviceable and convenient for 
general purposes, and the building of four a trifle larger than the Nantasket has 
been commenced : theAlgoma, atKittery; the Alaska, at Charlestown ; theKeu- 
osha, at New York; and the Omaha, at Philadelphia, These vessels will be 
completed in the fall and winter of the ensuing year. They are necessary to 
replace vessels of the permaneut navy which have been lost or were so much 
damaged during the war that their further repair is inexpedient The machinery 
for these vessels is already completed. 

There are several vessels on the stocks at the different yards, upon which 
work has been wholly suspended, and in all of which some portion of the ma- 
chinery has been placed. At the Kittery yard is the lllinoiB, of 2,490 tons and 
the iron-clad Passaconaway, of 2,127 tons. At the Charlestown yard the Pom- 
panoosuc, of 2,869 tons and the iron-clad Qainsigamond, of 2,127 tons ; also 
the ship-of-the-line Virginia, the keel of which was laid in 1820, and which 
when launched can only be used as a receiving ship. At the New York yard 
the Ontiuio, of 2,190 tons, and the iron-clad Kalamazoo, of 2,127 tone. At the 
Philadelphia yard the iron-clad Shakamazon, of 2,127 tons. Besides these 
vessels upon which no work is being done, there is at the New York yard the 
Java; at the Philadelphia yard the Antietam, and at the Charlestown yard 
the Kewaydin, each of 2,490 tons, which are not under permanent cover, and 
upon which a small amount of work is being done to pat them in condition to 
he at leiiBt partially protected from deteorioration by the weathert as it may be 



.CA>Ot^lc 



BEPOET OP IHB 8ECBETABT OF THE NATT. 17 

man^ years before tbey will be launcbed. Tbe Neabamin; and AmmoDoofluc, 
of 3,019 tODS, are receiriug tbeir macbinery at tbe wborres of tbe eontractoTB 
in New York. 

The appropriation for all of these TeaseU was made prior to tbe close of the 
war, and tbe construction of all bat tbe four small vessels whose keels bave 
recently been laid was commenced montbs before hostilities terminated. 

NAVY YARD FACILITIES. 

Tbe experience of tbe last seven years bas demonstrated tbe importance of 
more extensive areas and greater facilities at tbe navy yards for the construc- 
tion and repair of naval vessels and tbeir machinery. Onr navy yards are 
too circnmscribed in their limits as well as too deficient in their means to 
build and sustain a navy which is at all commensnrate with our position and 
character among nations. More enlarged accommodations, where the work 
required can be better, more reliably, and, so far as repaire are involved, more 
economically executed, abonld be provided. 

Notwithstanding present deficiencies, and the unfinished condition of many 
of tbe shops and buildings. Congress omitted to make appropriations for im 
provemente in any of tbe navy yards for the current year. In consequence of 
this omission tbe estimates herewith presented under that bead for the' ensuing 
fiscal year, which will close on the 30tb of June, 1869, are Decessarily increased. 

Seavy's island, adjacent to tbe Kittery navy yard, is a valaable addition to 
that important station, and when Congress shall bave made appropriation for its 
improvement, accommodations adequate to the public wants at that point may be 
expected to be made. No funds have been supplied by Congress for establish- 
ing any additional works on tbe island, or for extending the yard in that direc- 
tion, consequently nothing bas been done beyond tbe repairs and occupancy of 
the dwellings. Should Congress furnish tbe means, this valuable acquisition 
may be easily made available for usefnl purposes, though the improvements 
must necessarily be tbe work of years. 

The reasons stated in my last annual report for essential improvements at the 
Norfolk and Pensacola navy yards are referred to, without repeating them in 
detail, aa still existing, and every consideration of policy and duty calls for the 
necessary appropriations to place those establishments in a condition of nsefal- 
nesa to the country. In some respects the yard at Norfolk bas advantages 
superior to any other station. Acceesible as the harbor is at all seasons of the 
year, and having a permaaetit stone dry-dock already constructed, there is no 
reason why tbe facilities afforded should not be made available to tbe country. 

The temporary arrangements which were made for the occupancy of the navy 
ysrd at Pensacola still continue, and the buildings which were spared remain in 
a dilapidated and scarcely habitable condition. Kitchens and stables, which 
escaped destruction, are occupied as residences by tbe officers attached to the 
yard, with few of tbe conveoiences and none of tbe comtbrta of home. In 
peaceable times the work at this yard will not be extensive, but being the only 
naval station on tbe gulf of Mexico, and there being no large ports in that section 
where naval vessels can be repaired, it is important in an economical pointiof 



18 BEFOBT OF THE 8ECSETABT OF THE NAVT. 

view, as well as advantageous in many respects, that this yard shonld be placed 
in a proper eondition. 

LBAOUB ISLAND. 

The act of Congress approved February 18, 1S67, authorized the acceptance 
of the title to League island "and adjacent marsh land, incloding the whole of 
the creek known as the back channel, from tut ucbuylkill to the Delaware 
river, and all the riparian rights and privileges of said League island, adjacent 
marsh, and back channel, together with so much of the opposite shore of the 
back channel from the League isliind shore as shall, in the opinion of the Sec- 
retary of the Navy, be ample to enable the government to have the eole and 
exclusive use of said hack channel and both shores therec^," provided "the 
acceptance thereof shall be recommended hy a board of officers to be appointed 
by the President." 

You were pleased to designate as members of the board Rear-Admiral Charles 
H. Davis, United States navy, president j Major General A. A. Humphreys, 
chief of engineer corps United States army ; Commodore James Alden, United 
States navy; Chief Engineer J. W. King, United States navy, and Professor 
J. £. Hilgard, of the Coast Survey. On the 11th of April the board reported 
that it, "had read with scrupulous attention the several reports and opinions 
on tbe subject of League island, and its suitablenesa for naval purpoeea, pro- 
ceeding from commiseiona of ioquiry or from other official authorities; it has 
given a respectful and careful deliberation to the most prominent of the contro- 
versial pamphlets written on this subject ; it has made a complete study of tbe 
original maps and plans of League island and the adjacent property, among 
which are included the early original manuscript topographical sheets of tbe United 
States Coast Survey ; it has investigated the hydrographical featoies of the sor- 
rounding chanucls and basins; it has entered into a thorough peraoual examina- 
tion of League island, of the opposite shore of the back channel, and of the 
channels themselves at different periods of the tide; it has bestowed its careful 
considera^on upon the relation of all the various points and details involved to 
the present and future wauta and purposes of the navy of the United States, 
and especially their relation to the supplies of material, labor, and the sources 
of manufacturing power; and, feoUog assured that these deliberations, examina- 
tions, and studies, added to the knowledge and experience already possessed by 
its members, qualify it to form an opinion on the subject of League island, in 
respect to its geological, topographical, and hydrographical conditions, in respect 
to defence, in respect to the practical business and wants of navy yards, docks, 
and dock-yards for vessels of wood and iron, and in respect to its adaptation 
for all naval purposes whatever, this board does not hesitate to t«commeud with 
entire unanimity, that League island, the adjacent marshes, and back channel, 
together with so mnch of the opposite shore of the back channel from the 
League island sliore as is hereinafter described, be accepted from the city of 
Philadelphia, and be held for naval purposes by the government of tbe United 
States." 

The board also designated the quantity of land on the opposite shore from- 



REPORT OP THE BECEETABT OF THE NATT. 19 

League island which, in its opinion, was necesaaiy to enable the goTemment to 
have the exclnstve ose of the back channel and both shores thereof. A copy 
of this report was commanicated to the mayor of Philadelphia, and he was noti- 
fied that the department was ready to accept the tille to the property whenever 
it was perfe>:ted and offered for that pnrpnse. After oonsidtation, the anthorl- 
ties of Philadelphia decidr ^ "> ^k a modification of the line recommended on 
the shore opposite to Leagne island, as it was their intention to lay out an avenue 
one handred and twenty feet vide, running the entire length of the island. 
Chief Engineer King ^ae directed to co-operate with the city engineer and snr- 
veyor, and a line satisfactory to themselves was agreed upon. This was sub- 
mitted to the board, of which Rear-Admiral Daris was chairman, who recom- 
mended the acceptance of the modification proposed. The board say in their 
report that had they been acquainted with the plan of the city improvementa. 
they would have chosen the same or similar lines, and that "the interposition 
of Delaware avenue, which is one hundred and twenty feet broad, between the 
northern wall bounding the property of the United States and the buildings of 
the city, furnishes that security against nuisances and against accidents by fiie 
which it was tbe first object of the board to provide." 

It is provided by the act of February last that League island eball not be 
accepted until the title to the whole of the land neceasary to enable the govern- 
ment to control both shores of die hack channel is complete and indefeasible. 
As the land on the shore opposite League island belongs to various patties, 
some of whom are minors, and as eomeof it is held in trust, it became neceseary, 
. in order to make perfect titles under the laws of the Stale of Pennsylvania, as well 
as to fix a price, for the city of Philadelphia to call for the intervention of a 
jniy. This jury has not yet reported, but is shortly expected to do so, and I 
am informed by the mayor of Philadelphia that he has teason to believe that 
about the commencement of the enaning year everything will be in readiness to 
complete the transfer from the city to the national government. The city of 
Philadelphia has been ready to trattafer League island proper, on the terms origia- 
ally propoeed, without any delay, and since the designation of the adjoining 
property it has not been negligent in ita efibrts to acquire a legal title, iu order 
to comply with the requirements of Gongreaa. 

61TB ON TUB THAMBS BIVBB FOB NAVAL PUBPOSBS. 

A clanse in the act making appropriations for the naval service, approved 
March S, 1867, authorizes and directs the Secretary of the Navy "to receive 
and accept a deed of gift, when ofiered, by the State of Connecticut of a tract of 
land aituated on the Thames river, near Xew London, Connecticut, with a water 
front of not le^s than one mile, to be held by the United States for naval pur- 
poses " On the 2Sth of September his excellency the governor of Connecticut 
transmitted to the department a copy of an act passed by the general assembly 
of that State, appropriating fifteen thousand dollars to aid tbe city of New 
London in the purchase of the requisite property, and making other necessary 
provisions for carrj'ing the act into effect, and inviting me to designate some one 
tonuitewith the commissioners to he appointed by him in selecting and loeadnfl;l,> 



20 EEPOET OF THE 8ECKETAET OF THE HAYY. 

sncb ft lite as is contemplated in the act. la compliance with the reqaest of 
Governor Eaglieb, Commodore J. P. McEinatiy waa detailed for that piirpose> 
and in the latter part of October be proceeded to New London and examined 
with Meesre. Ingersoll. Blackstone, and Hollister, commiseioners on the part of 
the State, the proposed site. No traoefer of the property has yet been made to 
the government, bnt Oommodore UcKinatry reports to the department that the 
tract of land which it is proposed to cede is ou the east efaore of the Thames 
river, situated partly in the towns of Ledyard and Groton, with a water front of 
one mile, as provided by act of Congress, and a breadth^ varying from aiz hun- 
dred to seven bnodred feet. The soath line of the tract is about two miles 
above New London and five miles north of the light-house at the entrance of 
the Thames. The channel of the river adjacent to the tract of land selected 
has a depth of water of not less than four and a half fathoms. 

TBANSFBB OP IRON-CLAO 8TBAMBRS. 

By an act of March 2, 1867, the Secretary of the Navy was anthorized and 
directed to deliver to George W. Qnintard, of New York, for bis own use and 
behoof, the United Stales iron-clad Onondaga, upon payment by said Qnintard, 
bie heita and assigne, to the treasury of the United States of the sum of seven 
hundred and fifty-nine thousand sii hundred and seventy-three dollars. In pur- 
snance of this act the iion-dad eteuner Onondaga was, on the twelfth day of 
July last, transferred to Mr. Qnintard, that gentleman having deposited the 
amount therein speufied. 

By an act of the same date the Secretary of the Navy was authorized and. 
directed to release to William H. Webb, of New York, all right, title, intereat. 
and demand of the United States in and to the iron-clad steamship Dunderherg 
built by said Webb under contract with the Navy Department, upon payment 
by him into the treaanry of the United States of any and all sums of money paid 
or advanced by the Secretary, or by his order, to said Webb on account of said 
contract. There had been pud to Mr. Webb, on bis contract for this vessel, one 
million forty-one thousand six hundred and sixty-six dollara and sixty-seven 
cents, which amount he deposited in the treasury, and on receipt from the 
assistant treasurer at New York of a certificate to that efiect, a release of the 
vessel took place and Mr. Webb became her owner 

TBB BEBBL BAH 6T0KBWALL. 

The rebel ram Stonewall, which was delivered by the rebels to the Spanish 
authorities at Havana, and by them turned over to the United States, was oa 
the 5th of August transferred to the government of Japan at her appraised value 
of $400,000. Since coming into our possession she had been lying in the waters 
of the Potomac, and aa she waa constructed of wood, and liable to rapid deteri- 
oration if unused, her retention for our service was not deemed adviaablc. The « 
negotiationa for her sale were conducted through the Department of State, and 
were made with the approval of the government 



DigmzedbyGoOgle 



BEPOBT OF THE BEORETABT OF THE HATT. Jl 

TBB NATAL ACADBMV. 

The Naval Academy con tin uea under the able snperintenaence of Vice- Admi- 
ral Porter, whose report, together with that of the Board of Viaitora, is appended. 
Theee papers show that the academy ia satisfactorily fulfilling the work aasigoed 
it in edacating and moulding the character of the future officers of the navy. 
The standard for general instruction will compare favorably with that of other 
educatinnat institutions, and the special training required to prepare the ^tudentB 
for the naval service is thorough and satisfactory. Some additional facilities 
are needed, both in the academic and steam department, for which estimates 
have been submitted. A further purchase of laud aud the erection of additional 
buildings are aW desirable. The departmeut of natural and experimental 
philosophy, especially, needs enlarged and better accommodations, and the dis- 
cipline of the academy would be much bene6ted if all the officers could live 
within the grounds of the institatiou instead of being compelled to occupy very 
indifferent (juarlers outside. Two convenient dwellings have been completed 
during the year at a moderate cost, and the erection of ten more is recommended. 

The superintendent of the Academy, the chief of the BoreAO of -edicine and 
Surgery, and the Board of Visitors call attention to the insafficient arrangements 
for the sick. The hospital will only accommodate twelve, with two in a room, 
and the daily average of sick is very much larger. Humanity requires that a 
Bite remote from disturbing causes should be purchased, and a suitable hnUding 
erected withont delay. 

The new chapel is nearly finished, aud the large building designed for quar- 
ters for the midshipmen is under contract, to be completed in season for occupancy 
at the commencement of the next academic year. 

The graduating class the present year numbered eighty-seven. The under- 
graduates were at sea from two to three mouths for practice iu the sloops-of-war 
Hacedouian, Savannah, and Dale. 

NAVAL APPBBNTICBS, 

The naval apprentice system, to which reference has been made in former 
reports, continues to receive the special care and attentiou of the department, 
and the results thus far have beeo more satisfactory than could have been 
reasonably anticipated at the time the enlistment of apprentice hoys wosrevived, 
about three years since. There are occasionally mistaken ideas on the part of 
parenirt and guardians as to the end to he attained by enlistment, but by far the 
greater proportion, as well as the apprentices themBelires, have a just apprecia- 
tion of the benefits to be received. The education of the boys as seamen does 
not cease with their transfer from the apprentice ships to sea-going vessels. 
Those Id service on board oar men-of-war are being educated and prepared for 
the higher duties of seamanship, and such as identify themselves with the navy 
by twenty years' service, become beueficiaries nuder the act of March 2, 1867, 
aud are provided for in age. By its policy the government is giving a stimulus 
to a long desired and greatly needed improvement in the moral and intellectual 
character of the seamen of the country, and establishing among them an abid- 
ing attachmeut for the naval service. OOqIc 



22 EEPOBT OF THE BECBETAST OF THE Ni.TT. 

Tfae anttiorized annoal nnmber of apprentioea for admisBion to the Naval 
Acridemy, though this 7ear iacreaaed to tea, waa selected vithout difficulty by 
competitive ezainiaation from thoee who were eligible under the law, and several 
otherB, who were nominated from the Bchool-ehip by membera of Congress, 
paeeed the required examination. 

The increasing number of applicants for enlistment Tendered necessary aa 
increase in the facilities for instruction, and accordingly the sloops-of-war Ports- 
mouth and Saratoga have been pat in commission, and, with the Sabine, wilt be 
used exclusively as apprentice ships. The station of the Sabine is at New 
London and vicinity, the Portsmouth will be in Hampton Roads and Gbesapeake 
Bay, and the Saratoga in New fork. 



I have, heretofore, repeatedly invited attention to the importance of legisla- 
tion to improve the condition of onr seamen, both in the naval and mercantile 
service, and I t^in ask a recnrrence to these soggestions, particularly to those 
made in my last annual report. The apprentice ships will gradually furnish a 
class of men edncated to the naval service, and every reasonable inducement 
should be held out to them to continue in that branch of sea life in which they 
have been trained. The longer a seaman continues in the navy the more val- 
uable he becemes, and it is worthy of consideration whether in lieu of the 
bounty now paid for the re-enlistment of those who have been honorably dis- 
charged, or in addition thereto, an increased rate ef monthly wages may not be 
advantageously given for every honorable discharge, so that for those who 
creditably serve their enlistments the inducement to continue in the navy will 
increase with their years of service, nntil finally, when they are entitled to retire 
upon half pay for life, after an eulistment of twenty or more years as now pro- 
vided by law, their compensation will be such that their half pay will give them 
a comfortable support if they choose to accept it in lieu of a home at the Naval 
Asylnm. 

Additional legislation is also needed to retain the services of those who vol- 
untarily enlist. Punishment cannot now reach a deserter except by the tedions 
and expensive process of a cour: martial. It is suggested that a more summary 
way to deal with deserters he authorized, and that they he by law required to 
serve the full term of enlistment exclusive of the time they may have absented 
themselves, as is now provided for the military service, and that they be liable 
to trial by court martial even if not arrested nntil after their term of enlistment 
has expired. 

It is also recommended that for the purposes of the naval service the age of 
enlisted persons, as sworn to at the time of enlistment, shall be held to be their 
true age, and that persons who have declared tbemsetvea to be of the requisite 
age, shall not be discharged by any process of court, either state or federaL 

EXAMINATION OP VOLtTNTBBR OPFICBRS. 

The board for the examination of volunteer officers fur admission into the 
regular navy, in conformity withtheptovisionsof theact of July 25, 1866, has 



BEFOBT OF THE SECBBTABT OF THE KAYT. 33 

been in BeaBion at intervals dnriDg the entire year, and haa submitted its final 
report of officers examined. A very small number on foreign service, and some 
who bave been recommended for admission nnder tbe last clause of the third 
section of tbe act nnder which the board waa convened, bave not been finally 
examined, and for this purpose it will be neceeeary to convene a board of 
officers at somefntnre time. The taw gave the department no antbority to make 
selections or recommendations, but left the whole matter in tbe bands of a 
board, which was to select and recommend tbe authorized number in the several 
grades, provided ao many were found qualified. The report of the board ha? 
not, therefore, receive^ any revision by the department, and the names of the 
several officers found qualified will, in accordance with their recommendation, 
he forwarded to yon at an early day for transmisaion to the Senate for confir- 
mation. 

RANK OP STAFF CORPS. 

The Ghiel^ of the Bureaus of Uedicine and Surgery, of Provisions and Cloth- 
ing, and of Steam Engineering, bring to the notice of the department the claims 
of their respective corps to increased rank. It is urged that by the recent crea- 
tion of the several grades of admiral, of commodore, and lieutenant commander, 
the rank of the staB* corps has, in effect, been reduced. The law now provides 
for tbe appointment of fleet surgeons, fleet paymasters, and fleet engineers, but 
tbe rank is only temporary, ceasing when the officer is detached from fleet duty. 
If these grades were made permanent, and to embrace a sufficient number for 
tbe service required of tbe officers standing at tbe head of their respective lists, 
and the rank now temporarily given to fleet officers and to the other grades 
legalized, it is thought that the staff corps wonld be generally satisfied. It is - 
nnderstood that they propose to bring the matter of increased rank to tbe notice 
of Congress, and sucb legislation as may seem equitable and just is recommended. 

RBLIEF FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 

A joint resolution, approved February 22, 1867, authorized and directed the 
Secretary of tbe Navy, upon application of tbe contributors, to assign a public 
vessel for tbe transportation, under such regulations as he might prescribe, to 
Charleston, Savannah, and Mobile of any supplies of food and clothing that 
might be contributed by the people of (he United States for the use of any por- 
tion of the people of the southern States who were suffering from the failure of 
crops or other causes. 

Id accordance with this resolution two public vessels of tbe navy were put ia 
commission and assigned to tbe purpose indicated. One, tbe Purveyor, was 
placed at tbe disposal of the Southern Relief Commission at New Tork ; the 
other, the Relief, was placed at the disposal of the Southern Relief Association 
at Baltimore. 

Tbe Purveyor made two trips, one in Uarch and one in June, to tbe south, 
as far as Mobile, carrying such provisions and other articles as were placed od 
board by the commission at New York, The Relief sailed from Baltimore in 
May and proceeded to Mobile, where she discharged her cargo and returnedj^T 



24 BEPOBT OP THE 8ECBBTABT OF THE NA7T. 

Ab tbe department boA no enitable resael of light dranglit to enable it to send 
provisionB to Wilmington, Congreea, b; resolatjou approved on the S9tb of 
March, directed it to cbArter a vessel to convey contributiona from Baltimore to 
that point. It was found, however, that the emploTment of the usual freighliD|- 
tines was more economical, and bucu supplies as were offered were in that way 
transported at a cost of Sl,506 89. No appropriation having been made for 
this service, the expense was defrayed from the contingent fnnd of the depart- 

CLAIM8 OF CONTRACTORS. 

An act of CougreBS approved Itfarch 2, 1867, directs the Secretary of the 
Navy to investigate the claims of contractors for vessels of war and steam ma- 
chinery for relief, upon a basis therein named. To give the several claims a 
thorough ezamination it became necessary to convene a board, and Oommodore 
J. B. Marchand, Ohief Engineer J. W. King, and Paymaster E. Foster were 
selected. The sessions of the board commenced on the 8th of July, the several 
contractors having previously been directed to prepare and forward to the 
department a statement in detail of the several claims, fortified by such proofs 
as they could furnish. The board permitted each contractor to appear before 
them in person or by attorney, and gave a patient and searching examination 
to the several claims. Their report will be submitted to Congress at an early 
day. 

PETROLEUM AB FUEL FOR GENERATINO STBAM. 

The act approved Apnl 17, 1866, appropriated five thousand dollars for test- 
ing the use of petroleum as a fuel under marine boilers. An elaborate series of 
.ezperimetlts has been made at the New Tork and Boston nary yards, and a 
very full synopsis of the information gathered is given in the report of the chief 
of the Burean of Steam Engineering. The conclnsion arrived at is that conve- 
nience, comfort, health, and safety are against the use of petroleum in steam 
vessels, and that the only advantage thus far shown ia a not very important re- 
duction in bulk and weight of fuel carried. 

THE STEAMER AMAZO^. 

The attention of the department has been called to the interest and rights of 
the captors in the case of the Amazon. This was an iron steamer captured hy 
the Pontiac, Commander S. B. Luce, on the second of March, 1865. She was 
appraised by order of Rear- Admiral Dahlgren and taken into service, libelled as 
prize in the eastern district of Pennsylvania, but under an order of court was 
surrendered to the claimant, on hie paying into court S8,000. On trial the 
Amazon was condemned as prize, but the Secretary of the Treasury remitted 
the forfeiture, and tl<e $8,000, instead of being paid to the captors and naval 
pension fund, in conformity to law, were repaid to Dillon, the claimant. Of this 
proceeding this department was wholly unadvised, and had no notice whatever 
until after the money bad been paid to Dillon, and the time allowed by law 
for appeal had elapsed. 

Tbe captors who were thus deprived of the share of the prize m6ney to 
which, under tbe capture and condemnation, they consider themselves legally 



REPORT OP THE 8ECRETART OF THE NATT. 25 

entitled, will appeal to GongreBs for the money whicli, by law and the decision 
of the court, they beliere to be due them. The xxval peneion ftind ia also enti- 
tled to itB moiety of the money which has been relinquished. 

NAVAL PBNSION FUND, 

The naval pension fund has been increased during the year one million two 
hundred and fifty thonaand dolUre, making the aggregate at the present time 
thirteen million dollars. This amount having accrued to the United States 
trom the sale of prizes, the public faith is pledged that it "shall be and remain 
forever a fund for the payment of pensions to the officers, seamen, and marines 
who may be entitled to receive the same." It is also provided that if the fund 
shall be more than sufficient, the surplus shall be applied to the making of 
further provision for the comfort of disabled officers, seamen and marines. To 
partially comply with this requirement, the act of March 2, 1867, provides for 
giving a cash pension in Hen of a home at the Naval Asylum t« those who have 
been twenty years in'tbe service, and authorizes relief for a specified time to 
those who have been disabled afler ten years' enlistment. The benefit of this 
act has thus far been given to but seven persons, and though the number may 
be considerably increased, it is probable that a portion only of the surplus 
will be nsed in this way. I recommend, therefore, that the pension laws appli- 
cable to the navy be revised, and such an increase in the rates of pension he 
antborized as the fund will warrant. The entire principal of the fund was 
earned by the officers and men of the navy dnring the recent war, and it is 
eminently proper that its benefitu should be enjoyed by those whom the war 
has deprived of o^er support, as contemplated by the statute. In this revision 
provision should also be made for pensions for the admiral, vice-admiral, rear- 
admiral, commodore, and other grades, both of the line and stafi^, now wholly 
omitted. It may also be well to consider whether the family of a person dying 
in the navy after a specified time of service should not derive some benefit from 
this sorplns fiind, even thoogh the death should not have occurred in the strict 
" line of duty." 

NAVAL PENSIONS. 

During the year ending November 1, 1667, there has been an increase of 
twenty-nine on the invalid pension roll, and of one hundred and eighty-four on 
the widows' and orphans' roll, making a total of two hundred and thirteen, and 
calling for 849,0S9 30 more than the previous year. The number of each class 
on the rolls is as follows : 

1,079 invalids, annually receiving $93,674 25 

1,392 widows and children, annually receiving 226,398 00 

7 invalids under act March 2, 1867, receiving 756 00 

2, 478 persons receiving a total amount of. 319, 828 25 

BXPBNSKS AND B8TIHATBS. 

The available resources of the department for the fiscal year 

ending June 30, 1867, were «117, 944, 060 48 

Expenditnres 31. 034, Oil 04 



Zb BEPORT OF THE 8ECBETABT OF THE KAVT. 

Leaving a balance at the coromencement of the preMut fiscal 

yew of «86. 910, 049 44 

The Hppropriatiena for the current year am onnt to 16,595. 705 25 

Making the total available resources for tbe Hecal year ending 

Jane 30, 1869 103, 46S, 754 69 

There was carried to the sarplns fnnd of the treasnry, on 
the 30th September, 1867, at the reqnest of the depart- 
ment. 65,000,000 00 

Leaving arailable for tbe current fiscal year 38, 46S, 754 69 

The efltimatea for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1869, are as follows : 

Fay of o£Ecer8 and men of the navy 810, 660, 560 00 

Improvements and repairs in navy yards 10, 141,038 00 

Pay of Buperintendence in navy yards ^. 443,773 73 

Ooal, hemp, and equipment of vessels 3,000,000 00 

Navigation, Xaval Academy, Otrservatory, &c 650, 999 40 

Ordnasce, magazineB, &c 2, 343, 335 75 

Construction and repur of vessels 8, 690, 000 00 

Steam machinery, tools, &c 4, 400, 000 00 

Provisions and clothing 3,400,000 00 

Hospitals and naval laboratory 14li 000 00 

Contingent expenses 1,832,500 00 

Support of marine corps 1,614,978 05 

Total 47,317,183 95 

Since the close of the war no approprialions have been require I for the coa- 
Btruction and repair of vessels, for steam macbinery, ordnance, provisions and 
clothing, fuel, hemp, he., the balances under these several heads having been more 
than ample for carxent expenditures. In my last annual report attention was 
called to the eziBtence of large balances nnder these heads, and it was suggested 
that they could be disposed of by Congress in order that future expenditures 
might he mode after specific appropriation following the close scmliny which 
has been deemed essential to correct administraUon. As no action was taken 
by Congress, on the 30th September last, in accordance with the provisions of 
the act approved May 1, 1820, I requested the Secretary of the Treasury to 
cony to the surplus fund appropriations to the amount of 865,000,000, leaving 
under these several heads an amount only sufficient for the expenditures of the 
current fiscal year. In this sum of 865,000,000 are embraced theamonnt received 
horn the sales of vessels and other war property of no service in time of peace ; 
the amount reminded to the government by the builders of the Dnnderberg and 
Onondaga, as well as the balance of appropriations nnder the heads for which 
nothing has been asked for the last two years, not required for the current year. 

In accordance with the views herein expressed, estimates have been submitted 
for the entire expenses of the department for the ensuing fiscal year, which of 
coarse make a larger aggregate than for the past two years, when only partial 



SBFOBT OP TBB 8ECBBTABT OF THE BATT. 27 

estimateB were made. EBlimateB have also boen made for amomita infficient to 
complete the bnildingB and works whicli are unfiniebed, and to place the different 
oavy janU in aa efficient coadition, amonnting to over $10,000,000. This 
expenditaie, should the appropriation be made, would nm through several years ; 
the improvements being of a character requiring time for their completion. 

At the close of the war, in tho spring of 1865. the department had heavy con- 
tracts in the proceaa of fulfillment for TesselB, engines, ordnance. Sec. Good faith 
required that these should be completed, and the expenditures of the department 
for the past two years have, for these reasons, been necessarily large for a peace 
establish raent. Nearly all the irar liabilities are now dosed, arrangements 
having been made with eome of the ntanufacturere of engines for which no. vessels 
have been provided, to take the engines and relieve them irom further responsi- 
bility. The expenditures of the department were over $12,000,000 less during 
the last, year than for the preceding fiscal year. 

To return to the treasury {65,000,000, faesidee meeting the extraordinary 
expenditures of the heaviest branches of the service for three years, must 
be regarded as evideoce that the business of the department has been cob- 
ducted with economy, as well as that care has beau taken by those intrusted 
with the disposition of useless public property to realize the nearest approsima- 
tion to its value ; and is a financial exhibit exceedingly gratifjrmg to the depait- 

THB BITRBAUS. 

The reports of the chiefs of bureaus, and of the commandant of the marine 
corps, contain detailed atatements of the operations of their several depart- 
ments during the year, with anggeBtiona for the future. The principal points 
touched upon are the following : 

The chief of the Bureau of Yards and Docks reports the expenditures for 
improvemeuts and repairs in the several navy yards during the last year, and 
explains in detail the estimates for the euening fiscal year for iraprovementa- 
The immense expenditures for construction, repairs, and for machinery outside 
the yards during the rebelliou, baa shown the necisfity for enlarging the yards 
and incresBiDg the facilities in the government establbhmentB, where the work 
is more reliably and economically done. Nothing was appropriated for improve* 
ments during the nurreot year, and the estimatee are consequently larger than 
usual. For the navy yard at Kittery 3717,S38 ie asked; for the Charlestown 
yard. 92,382,13S ; for the Brooklyn yard, 93,913,714 ; for the care and preser- 
vation of the property in the Philadelphia yard, S88,883 — nothing being asked 
for permanent improvemcnte, in view of the proposed removal of the yard to 
League island ; for the Washington yard the CBtimates amount to 8126,115 ; 
for the Norfolk yard, $646,145; for the Pensacola yard, 81,256,885; for the 
yard at Mare island, California, 8530.433 ; for the stations at Key West, Sackett'e 
Harbor, Mound City, and for the Naval Asylum. 8138,600. 

The chief of the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting reports that, during 
the year, seventy-three veesela have been equipped for service, twenty-three of 
which have been wholly, and several others partially, wire rigged. The gov- 



28 BBPORT OP THE 8ECHETABT OF TEE NATT. 

ernmeDt ropewalk at Cbarleetown bas as heretofore enpplied tbe bemp ri^:tng 
used ID llie navy, couBDming ia its maoufactore four huodfed and tweoty-five 
tons of hemp. The tests of tbe comparative strength of wire and bemp ropet 
and tbe reports of commanders of wire- rigged vessela are bo satisfactory that tbe 
barean recommends the erection of a building and the purchase of suitable ina~ 
cbiuery for tbe manafactnre of wire rigging Attention is called to tbe anggea- 
tioueof tbe chief of tbe bureau relative to offering greater inducements to seamen 
and ordinary seamen to enlist in the navy, and also to tbe necessity for addi- 
tional legislation to prevent desertions, by providing a more effectual ponishment 
for that crime than now exists. 

Tbe chief of tbe Bureau of Navigation reports that the inetntments, nautical 
books, charts, and other navigation sappties issued ia naval vessels, are well 
cared for, and that a strict acconntability is exacted of officers in charge. The 
subject of compass deviations has continued to receive the particniar atteatioa 
of tbe bureau, and it is believed that its efforts wilt resnit in fumiahing a body 
of reliable practical data npon which to base a satisfactory judgment upon the 
quality of the compass and it» use on board modem ships of war. Tbe active 
co-operation of this goverament with European powers in developing tbe dangers 
to navigation in the Pacific and Indian oceans is recommended. Tbe navigable 
waters of Ghina and Japan, and in the vicinity of tbe territory recently acquired 
from Russia, are now visited at considerable risk of both life and property 
and the interests of tbe commerce of all nations require that careful surveys be 
made. The bydrograpbic office has prepared a number of charts for publica- 
tion, some of which have already been issued, and it is steadily progressing in 
the duties for which it was originally designed. The naval apprentice system 
continues to win favor, and tbe results are satisfactory. The new chapel and 
tbe additional quarters for midshipmen at tbe Naval Academy are now under 
construction. The accompanying reports of the superintendent of the Naval 
Observatory and of the Nautical Almanac show in detail their labors during 
the year. 

Tbe chief of the Bureau of Ordnance slates that since tbe date of his last 
report all existing contracts for naval cannon have been completed, and that, 
witb tbe exception of tbe fii^een-incb gnus, tbe stock on band will meet tbe 
wants of the service. There is also a superabundant supply of powder, pro- 
jectiles, &c., to supply current demands. The trials of tbe navy fifteen-inch 
gun in England have fully vindicated the wisdom of the measure of introducing 
this calibre of cast-iron ordnance into onr service. Wrought-imn gon carriages 
are taking tbe place of the old wooden ones, and a steam gnn carriage for tbe 
manipulation of heavy ordnance, the invention of James B. Eads, esq., of His- 
eouri, has been tried during the paatyear with gratifying results. Breecb-load- 
ing small arms, in lieu of muzzle-loaders, are now being introduced into the 
service. Old, nn serviceable, and surplus gnns, powder, projectiles, &c., have 
been disposed of dnring the year, and 9385,941 has been realized to the trea- 
sury from this source. 

The chief of the Bureau of Construction and Repair reports that during the 



RBPOBT OF THB SEOBETABT OF THB NATT. 29 

last yeu tbe work at the navy yards has been moitilj confined to the repair of 
veeeela. The new work haa been limited to the bIow completion of the Bteam 
Tesaela, for the machiuery of which contracta were made with private parties 
before the close of the war. Foor have been lanncbed daring the year, and the 
construction of four of the smaller class has tieen commenced. Additional build- 
ings are needed at the diferent yards for the economical working of the con- 
Btmctor's department. The chief of the burean recommends that steps ba taken 
for the produeional edncatioo of naval coDStmctors. 

The chief of the Borean of Steam Engineering reports that nq new machinery 
has been commenced during the year, and that the work at the different navy 
yards has been limited to repairing and fitting ont, and to the gradual completion 
of the machinery commenced before the termination of the war. The Franklin 
and Guerriere are the only new vessela with recently constracted engines 
that hare made sea voyages, and the reports of the petfonnance of their ma> 
chinery are most saUs&ctory. A summary of the trial of competitive machinery 
erected in other large reasels is given. The machine shops at the different 
yards are ioadeqnate for the operadons which a endden demand for war steamers 
would require, and the chief of the bnreaa earnestly hopes that the estimates 
asked for to put them in efficient condition may receive the &vorable action of 
Congress. 

The chief of the Bureau of Frovieions and Clothing reports that the large 
stock of stores on hand at the close of the war haa been reduced to a standard 
sufficient only to meet the current wants of the service. He recommends that 
the cnstom of the English and French navies, and of onr own army, of pnr> 
chasing the materials and making up a portion of the clothing used, be gradually 
introduced into onr service, and that a part of the sailor's outfit be furnished him 
without charge. 

The chief of the Borean of Uedicine and Surgery presents not only the nsnal 
report of sickness and death in the aa.vy during the year, but gives in addition 
interesting tables ahowiog the number of sick of each squadron engaged on the 
blockade during the war, together with the total of each disease treated, number 
of deaths on the blockade during the rc^ellinn, proportion of deaths to the num* 
ber of cases treated, and the proportion of deaths to the number of ship's com- 
pany. The summary shows that from the commencement of the rebellion to the 
30th of June, 1865, there were under treatment, 114,038 cases; that there were 
2,532 deaths, the proportion of deaths to the number of cases treated being 
.0175. At the close of the year 1865 there remained under treatment 653 
cases ; daring the year 186G there occurred 24.350 cases of disease, injury. Sec., 
making a total of 25,203 cases treated during the year, of which 3 10 died ; 
23,954 were returned to duty or discharged the service, leaving 939 cases under 
treatment at the end of the year 1866. The proportion of ca*es admitted to the 
whole numlier of persons in the service iras about 1.46, or each pereou was on 
the sick list 1 /„*, times daring the year. The proportion uf deaths to tbe whole 
number in service, was 018, and the percentage of deaths to the whole numlx^r of 
cases treated is .012, or less than two per cent. — taking the average sircngih of the 
navy, (officers, seamen, marines, engineer service and coast survey included,) for 



30 BBPOBT OF THB SECBBTABT OP THE NATT. 

the year 1866, to be 17,193. The totalnumberofdeatliBlToniallcsiiBefl, reported at 
the Navy Department from October 1, 1866, to September 30, 1867, is 395. 
Tbe namber of insane of tbe nary oDder treatment in the government asylum 
near Waabington, daring the year ending 30th September, 1867, was 24 ; nnm- 
ber now under treatment, 18. Tbe necesHity for enlai^ng tbe laboratory ac- 
commodation continaee to press itself upon the attention of the bureau, and 
estimates for this pnrpose have again been submitted. 

The commandant of the marine corps reports that at the annnal inspection be 
found tbe troopi in a thorongh state of discipliae and efficiency, and the several 
barracks and quarters in a creditable condition. The men are kept in constant 
readiness for duty at sea or on shore, and at short notice could be concentrated, 
in condition for efiectire aervice, at any point where the presence of troops 
mi^t be required. The nomber of officers and men attached to vessels in com- 
mission is now somewhat less than usual. Tbe new infantry tactics recently 
introduced into the army has been adopted, and the corps is now being instmcted 
in conformity therewith. Two officers and several men have died of yellow 
fever at Pensacola. The commandant of the corps renews the recommeDdation 
of last year that new barracks be erected at Washington, a board composed of offi- 
cers, a civil engineer, and master mechanic, after a thorough examination, having 
reported that it is not expedient to attempt to repair the present Btmctares. 

CONCLUSION. 

In closing this report it is gratifying to state that, while the redaction of 
vessels in commission has st«Bdity progressed, and while our squadrons 
are limited to the smallest number of steamers compatible with tbe require- 
ments of commerce, tbe protection of oar countrymen, and the dignity and power 
of the nation, the vigilance and activity of our naval officers, with their small but 
efficient commands, have been sach as to cause our flag to be exhibited in almost 
every important port on the globe; and it is a satisfaction to know that the 
demonstration of a naval force has everywhere been sufficient to cause it 
to be respected, and to give security to the persons and property of American 
citizens. Our commerce, which was seriously affected during the prevalence of 
civil war, in consequence of the conntenance and encouragement extended to the 
rebels by foreign governments, has not, from the continued unsettled condition 
of our domestic affairs, recovered its former vigor, but the navy has, in guarding 
American interests and maintaining American rights, performed its duty, fostered 
trade, and, with the re-establishment of the Union, will contribute to restore our 
former commercial prosperity and success. If our ships and men in service are 
vastly inferior in numbers to other maritime powers, it is a matter of just pride 
that, for efficiency in guarding the interests of our countrymen, in opening new 
avenues to trade, in exploring and rendering safe the ocean highways traversed 
by adventurous navigators, and for every useful purpose, they are surpassed by 
those of no other nation, and that they continue to assert onr rights and maintain 
the credit and renown which baa ever belonged to the American navy. 

GIDEON WELLES. 
To the PBBS1DB»T. ODqIc 



A.PPENDIX. 



,ab,GoOglc 



,ab,GoOglc 



APPENDIX. 



REPORTS OF OFFICEES. 



admiral fakraqxit's kepoet of passage to etteope. 

Umtbd States Flag-Ship Fbankmn. 

Cherbourg, July 15, 18G7. 
SiK : I bare the hnnor to report to the ilepartment that I aseamed command 
of the European aqnadron yesterday. The paBsnge from New York to this 
place was made in Bixteen days under very favorahle circnmatances. The winds 
were generally light, and when the speed waa reduced to three or four knots, 
we used steam with two boilers, consuming from thirty to thirty-five tons of coal 
per day, making from 7 to 7,6 knots per hour. With steam and sail under the 
most fuTorable circumstances we made as a maximum 11 knots and 2 f. with 
the propeller uncoupled we made 9 knots, and with the propeller hoisted up we 
made 11^ knots. 

I found here Rear-Admiral Goldaborough with his flag-Bhip the Colorado ; 
the Canandnigua, Captain Strong ; the Ticonderoga, Captain Wyman j and the 
Frolic, Commander Upshur. The Shamrock ana Swatara are at Lisbon await- 
ing my orders. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

• D. G. FARRAGUT, 

Admiral, Commanding European Squadron. 
Hon. GiDBON Wellbs, 

Secretary of the Navy.Wathinglou. 



Admiral FarragtU't reception of her ImperM Majetly ike Empreit of France. 

Unitbo States Flao-Ship Franklik, 

Cherbourg, France, Julg 30, 1867. 
Sra : I have the honor to report to the department that while in Paris I 
heard that her Imperial Majesty was to visit Cherbourg on the 26th instant. I 
returned to- tUa port to receive her. Owing, however, to the weather, the royal 
yacht did not arrive, aud having on the evening of the 26th received an invita- 
tion to dine with his Imperial Htyesty the Emperor, I returned to Paris, giving 
direotiona that all due honors should be paid to the Empress on her arrival by 
the vessels of the European squadron. The royal vacht entered the harbor of 
Cherbourg on the'27th instant and was received with all honors. The ships were 
dressed, tbe yards were manned, the men cheered, and the national salutes were 
fired. After the Empress bad been received on board the French fli^-ship the 
Hagenta, tbe senior officer. Captain. Pennock, sent Captain W, E. Le Roy to 
wait upon her Majesty and offer congratulations upon her safe ATTiv^.~ | 

3n • ' ^ 



34 EEPOET OP THE BECBETAHT OF THE NAVT. 

Tbe Empress having expressed a wish to visit the Franklin, the invitation 

»s immediately given, and after a brief interval her Majesty and snite i^me 
board and were received with all doe honors. 

On her departure the national salnte was fired, the yards being manned and 
the men cheering. By the express invitation of the Empress, Captains Pen- 
nock and Le Boy dined with her Majesty on board tite royal yacht la Reioe 
Hortense. 

At night all the ships of my sqnadron united with the French men-of-war in 
a generd iiluminalion, with a display of blue lights, and on the departure of tbe 
royal yacht on the following day we united again with the French squadron in 
manning yards, cheering, and firing the national salute. 

I desire to add that the practice squadron which was detained here joined in 
all the honors. I have to add that with bis excellency John A. Dix I dined 
with the Emperor on the day specified. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

D. G. FAERAGUT, 

Admiral. 
Hon. Gideon Wbllks, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Admiral FarragHt't visit to the Cherbourg dock-yard. 

Umtbd States FLAo-SHrp Franklin, 

OJ Ckerbottrg, July 30, 1867. 
Sir : I have the honor to inform the department that this morning, accmn- 

fanied by my stofT, I visited the dock-yard at this port, where I was teceivtd 
y the Pref^t Maritime Vice- Admiral Beynseux and escorted around the yard, 
and from whom I beg leave to say we have received every facility and courtesy 
during onr stay here. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

D. G. FARRAGUT, 
Admiral Commanding European Squadron. 
Hod. Gideo\ Wbllrs, 

Secretary of the Navy, Washington. 



Admiral Farrqgul'M reception in RutHa. 

United States Flag-Ship Frankli.m, 

OJ" Crorutadt, Russia, August 13, 1867. 

Sir : I have the honor to report my arrival in the Franklin at this place on 
the lOtb instant, after a very pleasant passage of eleven days from Cherbonrg. 
having anchored two nights whilst running through the Great Belt. Our 
reception here by tbe Russian authorities, naval and civil, was most gratifying, 
both nationally and individually. From the time we passed the first vessel we 
were greeted oy cheers and salutes until we anchored, the harbor becoming 
BO dense from smoke that we could no longer distinguish whence the guns were 
fired, whether from forts or shipfe, the Buasiana always taking the initiative. 
We returned in kind in cheers and salutes, cheering when they cheered and 
firing when they fired, but it was one hurst of the most cordial welcome. 

The commanding Admiral Lessofisky called as soon as possible to inform me 
that quarters were prepared for me on shore, yhere it was expected that I 
would take up my abode, and thence visit other points as I felt aieposed. He 



BEPOBT OP THE 8BCBBTABT OP THE HATT. 35 

also notified me that he would bring all the senior officers nader bis commanil 
to eail on me on Monday at imy ttme most agreeable to me. I named one 
o'clock, and at that hour the admiral came on board, accompanied by the port 
adminl and many other officert). 

They were entertained with all the asaal courtesies on ench occasions, and 
spent an hour or two on board, and on their departure received the proper 
salutes. To-day I received tlie mayor and civil authorities of Cronsladt, who 
did me the honor to call and pay their respects. 

It is my purpose to-morrow to visit St. Petersburg and call upon our.miiiiater, 
the Hon. CaSHiuB M. Olay. I am accompanied by the Canandaigfia and Ticou- 
deroga, and am ezpectiog the Fiolic every hour from Stettin. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

D. G. FAREAGUT, 
Admiral Commanding the European Squadron, 
Hod. Gidbon Wkllrs, 

Sed^tary qftke Navy, Wa»kinglon. 



Additional report of reception in Ruttia. 

United States Flah-Ship Fkanklin, » 

Off Crontladt, Augntt 29, 1867. W 
Sir : In my despatch Ko. 17, dated August 13, I had the honor to report 
to the department my arrival here and the reception of the vessels of this aquad- 
Ton by the Russian authorities. 

On the Idth instanl, at the invitation of bis Highness the Grand Duke Cos- 
atantine, in cnmpany of the commanding officers of the vessels under my com- 
mand, I called upon him and was most cordially received. 

On Friday, the 16tb, his Highness, accompanied by his suite, came on board 
tbb ship, and were received with all due honor. 

I have since visited St. Petersburg, Uoscow, and Niiui Novgorod, and every* 

where the most conrteooa civilities have been extended to myself and my ataEf. 

In St. Petersburg and Gronstadt many public works have been thrown open 

for our inspection. Of these the irua-clad batteries of Fort Constantine, off 

Gronstadt, bave iieeu the most interesting. 

Last evening Admiral LeasoSiiky gave a ball to myself and the officers of our 
ships here, and I have to-day returned these civilities by an Atertaiument on 
board the Franklin. 

To-morrow I propose to leave this place for Tranndeund, and thence to pro. 
ceed to Stockholm. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

D. G. FARRAGUT, 
Admiral Commanding European Squadron. 
Hon. GiDRnur Wbllbs, 

Secretary of the Xauy, Wai&ington, D, C. 



Admiral Farragui't intpeelion ^ the Rwtian iron-eladjleet. 

United Stated Flau-ShifFranklik, 

Of Waxholm. bdow Stockholm, Septemher 3, 1867. 

Sir : I have the honor to report that* early on the morning of August 30 I 

left Oronstedt with the Fmklin, Uanandaigua. TiconderogA, and Frolic, and 

proceeded to Troagsund roads. This excursion was made because of a wiBb| 



36 EEPOHT OP THE 8BCBETAEY OF THE NAVY. 

expressed by the Grand Duke Conetantme that I should risit the iron-clad fleet 
assembled there for the purpose of naval exercise dnriue; the summer mouths. 

Ab we entered the sound leading to Trongsuud roads, a sloop of war on the 
lookont met us and saluted ray flag. Some eight miles further up we discovered 
the monitor fleet; ten in number, coming down in line of two abreast, led by 
their commanding officer, Rear- Admiral Popoff. Aa we approached they form^ 
■ in line abreast, flanked by two sloops of war, and fired a salute of seventeen 
guns, each vessel taking part in the salute and firing consecutively from right to 
left. This salute was novel, but the efiect was beautiful. They steamed past 
us in line, tuitied in line by a general movement admirable for its accuracy, and 
followed ^s to the anchorage, where the heavy iron-clads were moored in line, 
and where the station of honor was assigned us in the advance. Vice-Admiral 
Gregory Boutakow.whose flag was flyingfrom the iron-clad frigate Fetropavlosk, 
saluted and the whole Russian fleet cheered. 

After we anchored, each of the monitors constituting the escorting squadron 
rounded under the stern of this ship, and, as she passed, fired her battery, the 
crews cheering, and took position in line in rear of the heavier iron-clads. 
Our rigging was manned, and as each ship passed our crew cheered in turn. 

Vice- Admiral Boutakow, with his admirals and captains, called on me to pay 
his respects, and invited myself and officers to visit Wyborg the next day, and 
afterwards to dine with him on hoard his flag-ship. In the evening we were 
A honored by a novel but beautiful and interesting display. ' All the boats of the 
fleet, fully manned, were formed in two divisions in line ahead, each division 
towed by a small steamer, the men bearing brilliant lights and singing wild 
Bussian peasant songs. 

One division passed our bow and tlie other our stem. We acknowledged the 
compliment with cheering by our crew and our band play ing the Hussian hymn. 

On iLe following day, with my staff and commanding officers, I went on 
board the two-turreted ship Smertcb, under the escort of Vice-Admiral Bouta- 
kow, and steamed to Wyborg. A number of my officers followed in the gov- 
ernment steamer Ylmien. A^er visiting some places of interest and receiving a 
handsome entertainment we returned to our ships. In the evening, accompanied 
by a number of ihe officers of my squadron, I dined on board the Russian flag- 
ship. * * * 'In the evening every vessel of the Russian 
squadron was brilliantly illuminated. 

The next morning, with several officers, I inspected the vessels of the iron- 
clad fleet. At 2 p." m. (September 1st) we got under way and proceeded to 
sea, exchangiu^aiutes with the flag-ship, and thus, amid cheering from all the 
ships or the two squadrons, concluded a visit which from first to last has been 
marked by the interchange of the warmest friendliness, and which we shall 
always cherish as one of the most pleasant remembrances of our lives. A pilot 
was put on board this ship by Admiral Boutakow, and a Russian sloop-of-wai 
accompanied us down the gulf and parted with us the next morning, our crews 
interchangiuR cheers. 

I enclose, for the inspection of the department, a list of the Russian iron-clad 
squadron at anchor in Trougsund roads, and their respective commanders, fam- 
ished to me by Vice- Admiral Boutakow. 

To-day at one o'clock I anchored with my squadron off ,Waxholm, below the 
city of Stockholm, and in my next despatch I shall have the honor to report to 
the depattment my further proceedings. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

D. G. FARRAGUT, 
Admiral Commanding European Squadron. 

Hod. Gideon Welles, 

Stcretary of the Navy. * 

r,;:c. ..Google 



REPORT OP THE SECRETARY OF THE NiVT. 37 

Rustiait imperial iron-clad tquadrtm at TroHgttmd roadt. 

Flag-»hip. — Frigate Petroporloak, Captain Stackelfaerg. 

Batterie*. — Netrone Uinia, Captain SelivanOff; Reai- Admiral Baroa de 
Tambe ; Kremie, CapUtn Pilkin, lat ; Pervenestz, Captain Kopytoff. 

mioopi-of-Kar. — Yachont, Caplain Kazorakotf; (not iron-clad ; J Ueadntck, 
CaptaiQ Afykhailoff, (uot iron-clad ) 

Two-turreted thip. — Smertch, Captain EorDiloff. 

SUamert. — Smelo^, Captain Korchouaoff, (not iron-clad;) Vladimir, Captain 
KondriaToy, (not iron-clad ;) Rear-Admiral Popoff. 

MoniCori. — Ednirog, Captain Baron de Klodt; Lara, Captain Vogack ; 
Bronenoeetz, Captain Kooiprianoff; Curagan, Captain Gevais; Peronn, Cap- 
Uin Karpoff; Latnick, Captain Serkoff; Strelits, Captain Popoff; Typhon, 
CapUin Pilkin, ad ; Coldonn, Captain Klotchkoff j Veetchoun, Captain ScbBmshin. 

GitnhoaU. — Leacliy, Captain Sharwej^z, (not iron-clad ;) Toltschia, Captain 
Valitzky, (not iron-clad.) 

Steam yaeht. — Ilmien, Captain SanoCT, (not iron-clad ;) Vice- Admiral Greg- 
ory Boutakow. 



Admiral Farragut't vint to Stockholm. 

Umtbd Statrs Flag-Ship Franklin, 

OJ Copenhagen, September 14, 1867. 

Sir : Id my despatch No. 24 I had the tionor of reporting my arrival off 
Waxholm, about fifteen miles below Stockholm, on the 3d inawnt On anchor- 
ing we exchanged salutes with the castle at Waxholm, and soon after a Swedish 
gunboat came alongside, having on board our minister. Major General Bartlett, 
and our consul, Mr. Perkins, with whom all the necessary arrangements were 
made incident to my visiting the city of tjcockholm the next morning and paying 
my respects to the Swedish authorities. 

On the following day, Si-ptember 4, accompanied by part of my staff and my 
commanding ofjScers, I called on Count Platen, the minister of a|trine, and on 
the secretary of foreign affairs, by both of whom we were received mth the kindest 
cordiality, and Connt Platen invited myself and a number of tlie officers to dine 
with tira the next day. The invitation was accepted, and w8 were entertained 
in the handsomest manner, the table being graced with the presence of all the 
high officials then in Stockholm and their ladies. 

On the same evening I received an invitation, through Connt Platen, to dine 
the next day with hit) Majesty King Charles XV, at his summer palace, the 
invitation embracing the United States minister, the cofumlinding officers of the 
Teasels, their executive officers, and two officers of my staff. 

At the appointed time we repaired to the palace and were received by Count 
Platen, by whom we were presented to bis Majesty. The King was not only 
courteous but cordial in his manner, and expressed his gratification at ogainhaving 
Teuels of war of the United States in the waters of Sweden. In return I ex- 
pressed the great pleasure it would give me to receive hia Majesty on board my - 
Bliip, if he desired to visit the Franklin, but his Majesty regretted that his health 
wonld not permit him to do eo. 

On Saturday, the 7th instant, I gave an entertainment on board the Franklin, 
retnniing the civilities which had been extended to roe. Connt Platen, the min- 
ister of marine, received the first honors on coming on board, and the Prussian 
minister. Baron Richtbofen, wus saluted on leaving. ' 

During my stay here a gunboat was placed at my disposal, and Captain F. 
MalmlKrg, of the coast artillery, was assigned as my wd> to whose kindnesL 
and conrtesyl have been much indebted. OOQIc 



38 EEPOET OP THE SECaETAEY OF THE NAVT. 

As a Anther act (^courtesy, the hydrographic office, through J. EmU War- 
berg, hydrographer, presented me with a valuable collection of charts. 

On Mooday, the 9th inetaut, at II a. m. the fleet left Stockholm, and after a 
passage of fire days anchored off this place. When off Nyborg the pilot ran 
this ship on a bank, where she remained for several hours before we succeeded in 
getting her off, of which a detailed report will be made by die captain of the 
ship. 

Very respectfully, yoiur obedient servant, 

D. G. FARRAGUT, 
Admiral Commanding European Squadnm. 
Hon. GiDBON Welles, 

Secretary of the Navy, Wathingtoit, D. C, 



Admiral FarragvA'i reception at Copenhagen. 

United States FLAG-Siirp Fbanklin, 

Off Gravesend. Thamet, September 26, 1867. 

Sir : In my despatch No. 25 I had the honor to report my arrival off Copen- 
hagen, Denmark. 

On the morning of the 13th the wind was fresh, and fearing that I might not 
he able to accomplish the trip round to Copenhagen by nigfat without putting 
on full steam, I ordered all the furnaces lighted, being at the same time desirons 
to try the full speed of all the vessels. This I did to my perfect satisfaction, 
this ship steaming eight miles per honr against almost a gale, and proving that 
the Franklin, agaiuft a fresh breeze and a moderate sea, was more than a match 
for either of the other vesseb. Her performance gave general satisfaction, and 
I can with confidence say she steams better under full power than any frigate in 
our service. 

On anchoring off Copenhagen, we exchanged salutes with the authorities, and 
soon after I called upon our United States minister, Mr. Yeaman,and with him 
called upon &*. Kaaaloff, minister of war, and Admiral Socknm, minister of 
marine, the only two ministers then in Copenhagen. 

These gentlemep returned my call and tendered to me all the l^cilities in their 
power; and an aide-decamp was directed to Hbow me all places of public interest 
in Copenhagen, including armoiies and forts. 

The armories were particularly worthy of a visit. I saw there, (hundreds of 
years old,) cannon and every species of small-arms, similar to those now in nse, 
and which claim to be the inventions of the present day — at least, the variations are 
BO trifling, that it is aoubtfnl whether there have been any improvements. 

I have visited armories in France, Russia, and Sweden, where I have also 
seen many of these same cannon and small-arms, bnt nowhere have I seen each 
a complete collection, chronologically arranged, as in Copenhagen. Among other 
cnrions things. I saw an entire battery of breech- loading cannon of wrought iron, 
taken out of a vessel sunk during the seventeenth century, which seemed to me 
'to contain all the essential points of modem breech -loading guns. 

On Monday, the 16tb, the United States minister, Mr. Yeaman, gave a dinner 
to myself and officers, at which were present all the foi'eign ministers then in the 
city. I returned the civilities extended to me by a reception and collation on 
board the Franklin, on the 18th iustant ; and on the name evening, by invitatioo 
of the minister of war, Mr. Raasloff, was agreeably entertained by a supper and 
brilliant fire works. 

On Thursday, accompanied by onr minister, Mr. Teaman, my staff and com- 
manding officers, I was presented at court ; and on the same evening, by invita- 
tion, dined with his Majesty, the King of Denmark, hia brothers and bis two Bons. 



REPORT OF THE SECRETART OF THE KAVT. 39 

Frederick the crown prince, Knd hia Mxjesty George, King of Greece. We were 
received with great kindness and cordialitv. not only by his Majesty, but by all 
the members of the royal family. The King was pleased to drink to the pros- 
perity of onr coantry, aa well as of my^lf individually. 

Oa the next day, Friday, I Utt the anchorage off Copenhagen, bonnd for Eng- 
land, accompanied by the Canandaigua and Ticondero<ra, leaving the Frolic to 
await the arrival of some deserters fram Stockholm. Off the Skaw, the Oanan- 
daigna and Ticonderoga parted company, having been previously directed to 
visit eerbun porta and join me ae;ain at Lisbon. 

On the afternoon of the 2Ist the wind commenced to blow from the westward, 
aod •gradually increased in force during the following Aaj, until on Monday, the 
23d, it became a gale, the wind hauling more to the northward, and blowing with 
forest violence, and so continued until Tuesday night, when the squalls came at 
longer intervals, and hy Weduesday morning the gale whs over. 

The Franklin, although at times she both rolled and plunged violently, did not 
Btrain anything ; not a timber creaked,' and she came out of the gale without any 
other injury than the loss of one of her head-boards, which was knocked out by 
a sea. 

Id a previous despatch I reported to the department that, through the ignor- 
ance of a pilot; this snip was run ashore off Nyborg ; but I am happy to say that, 
BU far as we have been able to judge, she did not anstain the slightest iiyury. 
Very respectfully, your obeaieQt servant, 

D. G. FARRAGUT, 
Adniral Commanding European Squadron, 

Hon. OiDBON Wbllbs, 

Secretary of tht Navy, Waihington, D. C. 



Vitit of Captain Strong, in the JTnited Stale* §kip Cananiaigua, to Candia, 
vjilK ^er* to remooe dettitule Ckriitiani. 

Unitbd States Flao-Shtp Colobado, (istrate.) 

New York, Augiut 29, 186T. 
SiK : I have the honor to enclose herewith the report of die cruise of the United 
States ship Caoandaigua to Candia. Smyrna, Cyprus, Beyrout, Jaffa, &c. 
Very respectfully, your most obedient servant, 

L. M. G0LD3B0R0UGH. 

Rear-Adnt iral, 

HoO-GlDBON WBLLB3, 

Secretary of the Navy, Wathington, D. C. 



Unitbd Statss Ship Cananoaioiia (3d Rate,) 

Liihon. Portugal, June 20, 1867. 
AD.WlfiAL : I have the honor to make the following report : 
In obedience to my instr<iciiona to proceed to Candia, dec, with the United 
States ship Cauandaigua, and on my arrival at Canea to seek an interview with 
the chief authorities of the UUml, and ascertain if it were poseible to remove the 
destitute Christian women and children, &e., I left Port Hahoo on the 10th of 
March fur Candia, tonching at the island of Malta on the 13tb. Remained eleven 
hours to coal ship. Arrived at Canea on the 16th ; but finding that an nosafe 
anchorage, I anchored in Suda bay. I found there the Turkish and Egyptian 
equadroDs, an Aostrian frig-ite, a Russian frigate, and two Italian men-of-war. 

On the day of my arrival I had an interviev with Omir Pd^ha, who is gov- 
ernor, and represented to him the object of the visit of this ship as oae of friend- 



40 BEPOBT OF THE S&CBETABT OF THE NAVT. 

ship and liamionj', or one of humanity, and not in the least of an aggreBBiTe 
nature; and need all the< arguments that I could on the plea of humanity, &c , U> 
induce bis highness to allow me to remove the dietreesed and suHering women and 
children of the island to some place where their sufferings conid be alleviated. 

The Pasha peremptorily refused the 'permission. He said that under no ctr- 
cumstanoea could it be allowed ; that it was a mistake to suppose that these peo- 
ple were not taken care of; that his government provided for the destitute, &c. 

I then asked him if (as be had declined to allow those who bad fled to the 
mountains to be taken off) if he would allow me to take those whom I was informed 
were at Rhitbymno, and anxious to leave. I said, as he had informed me that bis 
government was taking care of the destitute, I presumed he would be glad t« be 
rid of tlie charge of them. But ibat also he refused ; nor would he allow these 
people to be provided With food by private charity. 

Our consul (previous to my arrival) had procured a quantity of bread to send 
them, but it was prohibited. The authorities will allow of no interference wliat- 

A new commanding general had arrived there a day or two before my arrival. 
It was enid that he had orders to prosecute the war with the utmost energy, and 
to crush the rebellion at any cost. 

It was reported there on the 16th that two days before two villages in 
the neighborhood were burned and sacked — men, women, and children being 
murdered. It was very difficult, however, to obtain reliable information as to 
the real tmth. 

Our consul, Mr. Stillman, was not on very friendly terms with the govern- 
ment at Candia. That was evident from what he himself said. I do not think 
it would have been possible to get the authorities to permit the removal of those 
suffering women and children. 

Wishing to get all the information possible in reference to the destitution of 
the Greek Christians there, I ran down to Kbithymno, on the 21st. to see how 
the women and children that are there were provided for. 

There were at that place some two hundred or more, old men, women and chil- 
dren, who had come in from the country for protection after their homes were deso- 
lated. They were placed in small quarters — each room containing about as many 
as could lie on the floor, and the houses surrounded by a guard. They appeared 
to be comfortably clad abd fed ; but, so far as I could lenrn, that was done by 
charitable persons, and without the knowledge of the authorities. Noue were 
allowed to come in but such as could account for their male relations ; if they 
could not do so, it was taken for granted that the male portion of the family wera 
among the insurgents, and they (the women and children) were driven to the 
mountains to starve or freeze, or a worse fate awaited them. 

I again made an attempt to induce the government to allow me to take them 
off; but, at the second interview with the governor, the result was the same as 
before — he peremptorily refused. 

From the Turkish authorities I received no offers of assistance or courtesies ; 
but from the Egyptian admiral (at Suda bay) I received offers of coal, provisions, 
or anything I might require; but fortunately not requiring anything, I had only 
to thank him for nis civilities. 

Finding, therefore, that I could accomplish nothing, I left Suda bay on the 
27th for Smyrna, where I arrived on the 28th — remaining till the 4th <)f April, 
and then left for Cyprus, arriving there on the 8th. I touched at Samoa and 
Khodes on my way down. I was informed at Samoa that we bad not had one of 
our men-of'War at that place for the last twenty-five years. 

There are no lines of steamers that stop there, so that the population of the 
iKland ie in an isolated condition, depending entirely upon chance to get a mail. Sec 

The island appears to be well cultivated and the people iu a prosperous con* 
dition. There are no Americans on the island. 



KBPOBT OF THE 8ECRETABT OF THE NATT. 41 

The RuHBian rice-coneu] had been waiting for more tlian & month for an oppor- 
tnnity to leave the island for the beneilt of hia wife's healib. He made anargeot 
appeal to me to take him and his family to Rhodea, w here he couU take a steamer . 
for Smyrna. I took them on board, and landed them the following day at 
Rhodes. I left Cyprns on the 9th for Beyrout, where I arrived on the lOtb ; 
left again on tbe IStn for Jaffa, and arrived on the 13tb ; touching at Sidon a few 
bonrs oa my way. We have a consular agent SDd two misBionarv families there. 
• • * • « ' 

Ileft Jafia on the ntbfoi; Alexandria, and arrived on tbe 18th; left Alexandria 
again on the aSth for Tripoli, where I arrived May Ist ; only stopping a few hoars, 
and leaving again on the same day for Tunis, where I arrivea on the 3d; left 
Tnniaagainon the 7tb for Algiers. At Algiers, leamingtbat we should be quar- 
antined in any Spanish port, I left ou the 13th for Port Mahou, where we arrived 
on tbe I4th, and rode out three days' quarantine, 

I left Port MaLoD on the 33d for Caithagena, where I arrived on tbe 25tb ; 
stopping there one day, left again for Malaga, and then proceeded to Gibraltar 
on the 30lh, arriving tbe same day. 1 left Gibraltar June Stb, and ran into tbe 
bay of Tangiers ; but finding it impossible to land, anil imprudent to anchor, as 
it was blowing a strong gale of wind at the time, I shaped my course for Cadiz, 
which I reached the eame day, and left agfun on the £>tb for Idsbon, where I 
arrived at 1 1 t>. m. of tbe lOlJi instant. 

Most reipectfully, yoar obedient servant, 

J. H. STRONG, 

* Captain. 

Rear-Admiral L. M. Goldsborough, 

Commanding United Scaiet European Squadron, Lithon. 



Vitit of Commander Seffer* to Candia in the Untied State* steamer Swatara. 

U.MTKD Statks Flag-Ship Fbanklin, (1st rate,) 

Of Copenhagen, Denmark, September 20, 1867. 
Sib : In my despatch No. 14 I bad the honor of informing tbe department 
that tbe Swatara, Commander JefTt^rs, had been ordered to Candia, &c., and 
eocloaed a copy of my instructions to him. 

I have DOW the honor to forward copies of two commanications received from 
Commander Jcffers, dtited reppectively August 19th and 30th, which I am sure 
the department will consider interesting. 

Very reapectfully, your obudient servant, 

D. G. FARRAGUT, 
Admiral Commanding European S^tiadron. 
Hon. GiDiiON Welles, 

Secretaiy of the Navy, Watkington, D. C. 



Umtbd Statks Stbambb Swataba. 

Canta, Candia. Angntt 19, 1867. 
Admiral-: I have the honor to report my arrival at this place. I find that 
we have no interests whatever in tbi^t island, there being no American residents, 
nor trade. The few Cretan products exported to America go from Smyrna. 
Tbe consul states that the insurrection remains In about the same etnte as for 
the past year, but that there is a prospect of its becoming more formidable after 
the women and children are removed, and the whole male popnlatton, thns dia- 
eDcombered of their support and maintenance, left free to prosecute a guerilla 



42 SEPOBT OF THE SECBETAR7 OF THE NATT, 

v&rfare indefinitely, bopiog intervention. The French, Italian and Anstrian 
ehipB and a little Pruasian gunboat are actively engaged in tlii^i work with the 
•connivance bnt not the aeaent of the Turks. The consul is warmly in faror of 
the Greeks, and related to me varioaa instances of Turkish barbarity. These 
do not surpass, however, the tales told by the English and other persons inimi- 
cal to us relative to the condnct of our late war, and by no means equal to those 
published by themselves of the conduct of the British troops in India. They 
are, unhappily, necessary incidents in the prosecution of all wars. Although 
my sympathies are excited in favor of this enSering; population, I do not con- 
sider it consistent with neutrality to tnke part in this exodua, and shall there- 
fore be content to observe events. The consul informs me that when the Gan- 
andaiguB was here tbe.Paaha pointedly failed to return the call of her com* 
mander, having gone over to Suda and called on all the other commanders, sup* 
posed to be occasioned by pique, Oaptain Strong having, in his interview, made 
a request to be permitted to carry off non-combatants ; also, the suhscriptiou 
raised in America for the Cretans, all of which was delivered by running the 
blockade. He bas a further grievance relative to the arrest of his cheons, which 
bas been referred to Constantinople and our minister. Under these circnmstan- 
ces be bas no intercourse witfa the authorities, and of course thinks bis position 
would be strengthened by my not calling oa tbe Pasha, to which X have 
acceded. 

• *«*«*• 

Syra is a central point in tbe levant to which all communications should he 
sent. Ther^ is weekly or serai-weekly communication with all tbe islands, 
Constantinople, Smyrna, and Alexandria. Malta bas little commnoicatiou 
except with Egypt. 

There is no cholera ia any port of the Levant or in Egypt. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WILLIAM N. JEFFERS, 

Commander. 

Admiral D, G. Farraout, 

Untied Statet Navy, Commanding European Squadron. 



Dnitbd Statbb Stbamsb Swatara, 
Piram of Atheni, Greece, Angmt 30, 1867. 
Admiral : After several days stay at Canea, where I lost an anchor ia tbe 
rocky bottom, I went around to Suda bay, where the Turkish fleet was lying. 
I was immediately visited aud tendered the usual offers of service on tbe part 
of Admiral Viziim Pasha, commanding the Turks, and Vice-Admiral Fual 
Pasha, of the Egypticin contiagenCs. When I made the return visit Vizzim 
Pasha was absent, but I had a coarersatiun with Ali Bey, captain of tbe iron- 
clad Ismanie, the flag-ship, relative to the state of the island. He speaks 
English fluently, and has spent some time in the United States. He sua that 
the insarrectjon as an organization was completely put down, but that owing to 
the difficulties of the country a guerilla warfare might he continued indefi- 
nitely, or as long as they received external aid. I made inquiries relative to 
the removal of families, to which be replied that it was not with the consent of 
the government or commander-in-chief, bnt that they were forced to connive at 
the action of the French, Russians and Italians, and spoke with great bitterness 
of their interference. He asked me if I intended to join them, to which I 
replied that if permitted to embark refugees in any opeu port with the consent 
of the government, atid the interests of humanity would be furthered thereby, I 
should do BO, but that I did not intend to infringe tbe strictest neutrality. He 
thanked me and stated that the sufferings of the unfortunate Cretans were lai^y 



REPOBT OF THE BECBETABT OF THE- NATT. . 43 

dne to tboBe who had drawn crowds of women and children to the eea-Bhorea 
under espectatione of immediate trana porta tion to Greece, which expectations 
the veBBele were unable to meet, and some remained weekd before any opportu- 
nities offered. That it waa not tme that these people were driven from theit 
homes fnr the purpose of forcing them to emij^te. That, on the oontrarj, their 
removal would nndoubtedly prolong the insmrrection, and was in opposition to 
the views of the authorities. He admitted various barbarities, whidi ho attrib- 
uted to the feet that this was a religious as well aa a civil war, and Cretan Mus- 
Belmen, who had private quarrels to avenge, took advantage of this opportunity. 
T\iAt tEt,e Musaelmen villagers burned the houses of their neighbors, and toe 
Christians retaliated, and thus nearly all the villages were destroyed. That 
great numbers of Huaselmen, and also Christians, were rationed by the Turkish 
government. When my call waa returned he iaformed me that the admiral 
directed him to express hie thanks for my expresied intentions. 

I came over to the I^rteua. When I called on Rear-Admiral Simon (French) 
be informed me that he had received orders to suspend traueportatjon. In reply 
to my inquiries he stated that he did not consider that the position of the Cre- 
tans was amelioraled by throwing them on the shores of Greece. All were 
women and children absolately without reeonrces ; many without decent cloth- 
ing. The Greek people were poor. The Greek government was poor ; that so 
many had been brocgbt over and diatribated among the sparse population of 
Greece that there was neither shelter, clothing nor food for more. 

Commodore Boutakoff. who has just come in with some 1,400 refngees, in 
two ships, informs me that there are some 8,000 to 10,000 persona near the 
■bores awaiting transportation. 

Rev. Dr. Hill, of Athens, who is a member of the Cretan Aid Committee, 
states that at the present rate of expenditure, about half a franc per head, the 
fund for the relief of refugees will be exhaUHted in ten days, and that he haa 
notified the government that it must then fnmisb funds. The number receiving 
relief is about 26.000. It will then be seen that it is difficult to decide 
between the two shades of misery to which they are exposed. 8o far as I have 
been able to sift the very contradictory statements made to me, the following 
appear to be the fucts of the case. The insurrection in Crete was fomented and 
is kept alive entirely by the aid of the government of Greece— perhaps supported 
pecuniarily by the Russian government. They are so far engt^d in it, both 
■8 a people and a government, that a &ilure to insure the success of the insur- 
rection would bankrupt the entire country, and perhaps create a revolution at 
home. Hence their persistence against all hope unless aided by foreign inter- 
vention. Many of the best officers of the Greek army are or have been on leave 
of absence in Crete, and some thousand (8,000) volunters have openly gone 
there. Uuat of these officers and men have returned, satisfied that the insur- 
rection has simply degenerated into a very desultory guerilla warfare, in which, 
while the Turks suffer continual losses, no real impression is made by either 
party. 

Major DeKay, a young American here in hospital, wonnded by an accidental 
discharge of his own gun white in Crete, informs me tl*t the fighting is the 
most ridiculous thing in the world ; that he has never seen a party of either 
side within a thousand yards of the other ; but as the Turks move in masses 
and are the attacking party, they of course in the defiles and difficult passes of 
the mountains safftr some loss. Great hopes are baaed on the Turkish losses 
by sickness produced by heat, want of water and food, and fatigue, wearing 
them out Theae loast^e ore no doubt great, ae the namerons hospitals show. 
PeKay informed me that the Cretans aid natural causes by destroying most of 
the wells, and poisoning such as are not filled up. 

I had beard this from other sourcea, but had given it little credit as one of 



41 BEPOBT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVT. 

thoae Tflgne ideas not cnpable of being carried out, antil I heard his circumsUn- 
tial accountB. It appears that they have a buBh, the branches of which when 
thrown into water poiaqn or otnpefy fish, causing them to rise tn the surface, hut 
does not injure the flesh. This water produces sickness when drank by men. 
I can readily conceive this to be trae, as I have frequently, when in Central 
America, taken fish from a deep pool by bruising the bark and small branches of 
a email tree resembling the holly, then sinking them to the bottom with a stone. 
In a few minutes the fish come to the surface, darting about as if they wer« in- 
toxicated, and soon turn belly np, stupefied, and are easily caught. 

There is a revolntionary committee in Athens which aids the Cretans in every 
way, and has oi^anized an onthreak in Thessaly and £pirBB, but waits until a 
fitirer opportunity is offered. 

I shall leave here to-morrow for Syra and thence to Smyrna, touching at 
variona points on the way. I have informed Mr. Moi-ria of my presence in these 
waters. 

Very respectfnlly, yonr obedient servant, 

WILLIAM N. JEFFERS, 
Commander United Statet Navy. 
Admiral D. G. Farraout, 

Commanding European Squadron. 



Reception of Prince Aifred, of Great Britain, at Rio de Janeiro, by Bear-Ad- 
miral S. IV. Godon. 

South Atlantic Squadron, 
United Statbs Flag-Ship Brooklym, (2d rate,) 

Harbor of Rio de Janeiro, July 26, 1867. 

Sir ; The arrival here of her Britannic Majesty's steam frigate Galatea with 
his Royal Highness Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, on hoard, has been the 
occasion of considerable excitemenl, and happily has called forth a gt-neral dis- 
play of good feeling, in which the represeotativea of the various foreign naviea 
lai^Iy participated. 

The Galatea had been expected for some time with Prince Alfred in command, 
bnt nntil he arrived off the mouth of the harbor it was not known that he wonid 
hoist the royal standard. 

So soon, however, as it was seen. Admiral Ramsay notified me of the fact. I 
at once followed his movemeuts, and with him .ind all the foreign men-of-war 
present, manned yards and fired a royal salute. 

On the Prince dropping his anchor, I with the other admirals called in fall 
nniform to welcome him in port, and was received by him at the gangway, and 
presented hy Admiral Ramsay. 

The following day the Prince was received by the Emperor, and as he passed 
to the shore in his bai^e with the royal standard flying, he was again saluted hy 
all the fleet with yards manned, &c. 

The second day after his arrival, the Prince, as captain of the Galatea, 
returned the visits of the admirals, and requested that I would assist him in 
receiving the Emperor of Brazil, who was to visit his ship in state and to dine 
with him on board. 

Salutes were fired and yards manned as the Emperor passed the various ves- 
sels. 

The dinner proved a most agreeable occasion for the expression of good feel- 
ing among the foreign representatives afloat. . . 

The British minister was the only diplomat present. zcz -; Cj(H1Q[C 



REFOBT OF THE 8ECBBTABT OF THE NAVT. 45 

The dinner of the Prince was followed by a ball given in hia honor br the 
British reeidenta of Rio, and a dinner at the Emperor*» palace at San ChriBtovao, 
Bt both of which I was present, and was thereby enabled to eatablieh more 



.hereby e 
happilj' I 



firmly those feelings of friendship now so happilj' eziettng between the two 

The Prince Bailed on the following Any, and as he steamed ont of the harbor 
yard&were manned, and a royal salnte was again fired by the varions flag-shipB 
present. 

A message of thanks from the Briljsli admiral for the part taken by the 
Brooklyn in the naval ce^monies induces me to give the department this notice 
of the matter, 

I am, sir, very respectfally, your obedient servant, 

S. W. GODON, 
Rear-Admiral Commanding South Allantie Squadron. 
Hon. GiDsn^ij Wbllbs, 

Seertlart) of the Kaey, Washington, D. C. 



VUU of Commander Skufeldt ia the UiUed State* itcamrr Wachuietl to 
Chi/u and Carta. 

Unitbd States FLAa-Smp Hartford, (2d rate,) 

liong Kong, China, February 16, 18G7. 

Sir : In my despatch nnmbercd 65, series of 1866, and dated December 27, 
1866. I informed the depurtment that I should send Oommander Sliufeldt in 
the Wachusett to Chifu and Corea, to investigate the circumstaRcee of the loss 
of the American schooner General Sherman, and tfae&te of tbo people onboard 
of her. 

1 have now (o submit to the department that Commander Sbufeldt reached 
Chifu on the 1 4th Jannary laxt, and having secured the services of the Chinese 
pilot who was in the General Sherman a few days before her loss, and also of 
Eevercnd Mr. Corbett, an American missionary, to act na interpreter, left there 
on the aist for the northwest coastof Corea, in compliance with hia instructions. 
which were to demand of the chief aath»irities at the Ping- Yang rivei" to deliver 
on the deck of the Wachusett such of the unfortunate men of the schooner 
General Sherman as may have been spared, whether they were American, Port n- 
gesc, British, Malays, or Chinamen ; and to make such further iovestigation of 
the case as was practicable. 

Qommander Sbufeldt has performed that service with commendable zeal, in- 
telligence, and celerity. Uis report, marked A, herewith enclosed, confirms the 
mmora of the wreck of the schooner General Sherman and of the burning of 
that vessel in Ping-Van^ river ; andnf the murder of all onboardof her, numbering 
twenty-aevcn persons, by the Core.ina. The enclosed paper, marked B, is copy 
of letter addressed by CnmmHnder Sbufeldt to the King of Corea; C, ia mem- 
orandum of interview with Corean ofGcial ; D, memoranda regarding the wreck 
of the General Sherman, and of the natural history of Corea. 

In conclusion, I beg to auggest that until the government 'takes efficient action 
on ibis case, our countrymen lawl'ully navigating the seas adjacent to Corea 
will be in peril of life and liberty of person from the bnrbarities of the people, 
and the authorities of that cunntry who aim at the ezclueion of strangers. No 
surveys of that part of the coast have been yet made, and Commander Shnieldt 
employed the four days he was waiting to hear from the King in making a par- 
tial survey of the entrance to the Ta-totig river, which lies in latitude 38° 04' 
north, longitndo 124° StK west, (the chart of which, marked Ea n iinewiUi 



46 BBPOBT OF THE 8GCBETART OF THE HATT. 

enclosed,) and about fift^ miles to the eoathward of the Ping- Yang river, which 
tbe pilot did not consider it safe to approach in the winter months 

As soon as winter breaks np, and I have a gunboat to spare, T shall have tbat 
part of the Corean coast examined, pending the decision of the department. 
I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfn))}', vour obedient servant, 

H. H. BELL, 
Rear- Admiral Commanding U. S. Aiiatic Squadron. 

Hon. OlDBON WBLLB9, 

Secretary of the Navy, Watiinglon, D. C. 



Unitbd States Stbambr Wachusbtt, 

Af tea, January 30, 1867. 
BiR : I have the honbr to report that this ship anchored on the west coast of 
Gorea, latitude' 38° 04' north, longitude 134° 50' west, near the mouth of the 
Ta-tong river, on the 23d instant. 

The Ping- Yang river is the one np which the schooner General Sherman went 
and was destroyed. This river enters the eea £fty miles to northward of the 



above position, a fact which I conld not positively ascertain until our arrival 
somewhere on the Corean coast ; hut as we found, on survey, the Ta-tong river 
to be frozen, and as our Chinese pilot, a man of unusual intelligence and for 
twenty years a trader on this coast, expressed decided reluctance to take the 
ship to the mouth 'of Ping- Yang at thisseasouof theyear, I determined to attempt 
some sort of official intercourse fi'Om onr anchorage, more particularly as the 
Ueen city of Chaag-Yuen was said to be about midway between tbeee two rivers. 
There are no official cities on the seaboard of the west coast ; we found, however, 
quite a number of fishing villages, and after some unsuccesflful efforts,* the 
chief of one of these on Nien-Fo, or Cow island — near which we subsequently 
anchored — was induced to send a messenger with a communication to the King 
of Corea, accompanied by a letter to the official of Chang-Yuen. In the mean- 
while we endeavored to cultivate friendly feelings with the natives. They 
seemed to be kindly disposed, but in g^reai dread of their government, and came 
as little in contact with us as possible.. 

Apparently they arc a rnde and barbarous people — unarmed — and the sea- 
board entirely defenceless. We eaw no iron in nae ; the boats are fastened with 
wooden pegs, or tashed with coarse seaweed cordage. 

They epnke with great reserve when questioned in reference to the General 
Sherman, but every one of them told the same story — which they said g/aa 
known all over the country — viz : that the vessel was hnrned last September 
up the Ping- Yang river, and all of her people, amounting to twenty seven per- 
sons, were killed in a mel^e on shore by the natives, and not by order of the 
mandarins. 

There remains no reasonable donbt of theae facts, and no doubt whatever of 
the locality of that disaster. 

Our messenger was sent on the morning of the 24th instant, and was to have 
returned within two' days, but np to the evening of the 29tl) he had not made 
his appearance. On the morning uf the 29th however, an officer who said that 
he came from Hae-Cbow Poo, the capital city of the province, fifty milea np 
the Ta-long river, was brought on board in one of onr own boats, for whioh they 
had signalled from the shore, and the iulerview with him carried on by writing 
in Chinese resulted in an unsatisfactory manner, as by a memorandum herewith 
enclosed. 

1 Lave no donbt that this man lied aystematically from the beginning to the 



BEPOBT OF THE SBCBETABT OF THE NA7T. 47 

end of oar inteiriew, and that he thb either the governor of Hae-Chow-Poo, or 
some high officer in hii confidence. M.y communication to the King had proha- 
bl^ gone to him, as the official superior of the mandarin at Chang Yuen. . In all 
probability, too, it-went and perhaps will go no farther; at all eventa, it sood 
became evident that tfaia officer waa utterly beyond the reach of reason or argu- 
ment, and farthermore that I need not expect any more intercourse with or 
throagh the natives at that point. Hie presence seemed to inspire the greatest 
dread, and I fear very much that both our old chief and tlie messenger, his son, 
have by this time paid for their friendship towards as by the loss of their heads. 

The manner of this officer waa haughty and imperious, and be preseoted ia 
his person the moat peifect type of a cruel and vindictive savage. The latter 
part of our interview was carried oo on the ialaud, and seeing how fruitless it 
was growing I determined to leave biirf abruptly, with the impression upon his 
mind that the result of the conference was not at all satisfitctory, and that proba- 
bly it would not be the end of the investigation. 

I bad earnestly hoped to have found some peaceable and BatUfactory solution 
for the Sherman afiair, and even to have discovered some of her crew still 
living; it is therefore with great personal regret that I have to report a diffe^nt 
result. 

Very respectfully, 

R. W. 8HUFELDT, 
Commander United States Navy. 
Rear-Adroiral H. H. Bbll, 

Conti^anding Aiiatic Sgitadrm, 



[Traiukted from Chinese document, a copy of which 1i attached to this.] 

United Statss Stbambr Wachusbtt, 
Wachusbtt Bav, near mouth op Tamo\o rivbr, 

January 24, 1867. 
The commander of the American armed vessel Wachosett aeuds greeting to 
the presiding officer of the district of C hang- Yuen -Heea, and wishes to intbrm 
his excellency tliat he has come to the borders of Oorea not to engage in war 
nor any nnlawfal basinesa, bat is anxious that haimony and peace should con- 
tinoe as heretofore betweea America and Corea. 

He respectfully requests tliat you forward the accompanying docameut to 
your King with all due despatch. 

It is hoped that thu aaswer to the accompanying document will be relumed 
without delay, that he aiay depart iu peace from where he ia now lying at anchor 
in the harbor of To-fung, 



[Tianslaled firom Chinese docnmeni, a copy of whldi Is attached to this.] 
Unitbd Statb8 Stbambr Wachusbtt, 
Wachusbtt Bav, nbab tub muuth ok rivbr TAim-ta, 

January 84, 1807. 
To his Majesty the Einq op Corba : 

The commander of the American armed vessel Wachnsett begs to iaform your 
Majesty that he has come to the border of yonr kingdom not to eng«(ce ia war 
Dor any unlawful business, but in obedience to the command of the officer com' 
manding the armed vessels of America stationed in these seas, who has heard 



48 BEPOHT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVT. 

with great pleasure and thaukfulness of tbe kindnees of yonr Mnjeety's o 
and people to the shipwrecked crew of an American vessel in the month of 
June last, on the west coast of Gorea : how yonr Majesty had them transported 
to the confines of China, from whence they safely reached their friends. The 
whole American people ^annot hat feel thankful and praise your nation for this 
act of kindness and brotherly love. 

The officer commanding the armed vessels of America has since heard with 
paiti and surprise that the people of another American vessel, wrecked in the 
Tai-tong river, in the province of Ping-Yaug, in the month of September last, 
were all put to death and the vessel burned, and has ordered me to ask of your 
Majesty if this is true, and if true, to ask of your Majesty what evil these peo- 
ple had done that they should be mode to suffer such cruel treatment. 

But if any or all of these people are*Btilt living, the officer commanding the 
armed vessels of America boa directed me to ask of your Unjesty that they 
may be delivered to me on board the Wachnaett, now lying in the harbor of Ta- 
Fung, near the Neu-to islauda, or at any more convenient port your Majesty 
may select. 

{his is especially desired, that the peace and friendship which has hitherto 
been nniaterrupted for many years may still continue betweea America and Gorea. 

A epeedy answer ia requested to tbia communication, ^n order that I may 
depart in peace. 



Memorandum of an interview between Commander R. W. Schufrldt, of the 
Untied StaU» tframer WacfittitH, and a Corcan official from, ike district city 
of Jiae-C/iow-Foo, on the Tai-tong river. 

At Neu-to Islamd, 

January 29, 1867. 
Commander Shufeldt. Where arc you from and on what business have yon 

Corean official. My name is Le-Ke-Yung; I reside in the district of Hae- 
Chow, at Kee-Gben (village ;) where I am' the ruler ; I have come to see your 
ship. 

Oommander Shnfeldt. -This vessel came here Janoary 24th. and sent a letter 
by the people of Nen-to island to the officer of Ghang-Yuen-Heen, accompanied 
with a communication to the King, from which no answer has yet been received. 
Do yon know anything about this 1 

Corean. I know nothing about it whatever. On what business have yon 

Gommander Shnfddt. An American vessel was wrecked in the Ping-Tang 
river in the month of September, and it ia reported that this vessel was burned 
and all on board put to death by the Corenns. I have come to invctlgale this 
matter, and have sent a despatch to the King to inquire whether the report is 
true or felse, and whether any of the people are etill living. 

Gorean. How many It is it to your country ? As it does not become your 
excellency to remain long at this place, I earnestly hope you will depart speed- 
ily and return to your own country, 
■ Gommander Sbufeldt. The ship b merely awaiting an answer to the despatch. 

Gorean. You ought not to delay, but leave at once. 

Gommander Shnl'eldt. Have yhu heard or do you know anything abont the 
ahip that was wrecked 1 

Corean. I know nothing abont it whatever. I only hope you will imme- 
diately leave and return to your native country. 



SEPORT OP THE flECSETABT Or THE NAVY. 49 

CommMKler Sbnfeldt. I am auxioas to depart iipeedil^, but I wish first to 
HMertaiD the trntb aboDt th% ship wrecked ia the Ping-Yaug river. No aaawer 
hu ytt been received. 

Coreui. I do not know whetber tbie report ie true or &lie. Do not delay ; 
bat leave at once ; by so doing yonr honorable country will have great praise. 

Commander Bhafeldt. What objection can there be to oar waiting T If I am 
obliged to leave without an answer to my despatch, many more armed vessels 
will retnra to yonr conntry. 

Corean. To return with many armed vessels would be exceedingly unjust. 
To retam to your own country wonld be praiseworthy. 

Commander Bhafeldt. To allow yonr conntry to murder oar men without 
caate or provocation cannot be passed over uninvestigated. 

Corean. I do not know anything about this bneiness. 

Commander SbnfiBldt. If yon know nothing, I have nothing more to say to 
yon. 



Memoranda. 

U.NiTBD States Stbambb Wachusbtt, WAciiufiBTT Bay, 

HouTH OF Tai-to.\o Rivbb, Cobba, 

January 25, I867. 

Coreans report abundance at gold in the moantains. Chang>Tuen is thirty 
miles from the sea. 

Ping- Yang will not be clear of ice for two months. This ship cannot ascend 
more Uian half way to Ping-Yang-So at any time. Yon carry five fathoms at 
low water over the bar, and abunt that water thirty miles up. The pilot has 
been no further. The town of Ping-Yang-So is the only one of importance on 
the river. Rise of the tide about eighteen feet. 

The people here (Ta-tong) all say that the crew of the G«neral Sherman 
were all murdered by the people on the river, and not by order of the man- 
daritiB. 

The Coreans report that the Chinese descend npon this coast in junks and 
rob the inhabitanta. Last year six young men were killed by these plunderers 
on the island of Neu-to, opposite our present anchorage. 

The head men of two villages have stated that the General Sherman was 
bnmed in the Ping'- Yang river in the month of September last, and the officers 
and crew, consisting of tweuty-seven persons, were murdered by the people, 
and not by order of the mandarins. This bet, they state, is known all through 
Core*. 

The gold reported is said to be abnndant in the moaataios sonth of Ta-Tnng, 
> on the coast, and is found among the rocks, but the natives have no tools by 
which it can be extracted. 

The Ping. Yang river is reported by the natives as ioacoeasibte at this season 
of the year on account of ice, and cannot be entered till about the 1st of April. 

The city of Uae-Chow-Poo is fifty miles np the Tai-tong river. It is the 
district city of this province, and ie said to be quite a laige town. 

The Coreans say that ten of the crew of the Sherman were Canton China- 
men, and that tfaeoe people have been in the habit, for years, of coming to this 
coast to rob and plunder, to the great dread of the whole seaboard. This is 
confirmed by onr pdot. ' 

Ur. Hogarth, an En^ish subject od board of the Sherman, was known 



50 REPOBT OP TBG 8ECBETARY OF THE MATT. 

throughout Cbias for bis reckless character; and bia acqaaintaneea Boppoce 
that it'riot occDired.hflwonldbe veiy likely to be qpeof theraeaDs crfcaneingiti 
The WachoBett is the first foreign veesel of any description thai ever an- 
cbored on that part of the Gdrcan coast. 



Report of an examiitaiion of the harbor of Fori Hamilton, ( Carta,) Chintt 
ioateri, by Commander bhufeidi, to the WaehtueU. 

United States Flao-ship Hartford, (2d rate,) 

Honfi-Kong,. China, February 16, 1867. 

Sir : I have the honor to inform the department that, in connection with the 
visit of Commander Sbufeldt to Corea, for the pnrpose of inquiring into the out- 
rage upon the people of the General Sherman, I directed bim to examine into 
the advantages and capabililiee of Fort Hamilton, (Nan-Hoo,) situate among 
the islands to the southward of Gorea, and belonging to the King of Corea, as a 
rendezvous and sanitarium for this squadron, and also as a harbor of refuge, in 
times of danger, for American commerce in those seas. 

Bj the report of Commander Shafeldt, herevritb encloeed, marked A, it will 
be seen that this harbor possesses many natural advantages, and it would be 
very valuable as a base in any opcrationa against the Ooreans. 

Its central position wiih regard to the northern porta is, as I informed the 
department in my despatch No. 63, of December 14, 1866, one of ite most im- 
portant advantages, being 150 miles from Nagasaki, SIO from Van Dieman's 
straits, 180 from the btraita of Simonasaki, 300 from the month of the Yang-Tze 
river, 360 from Shanghai, 390 from Ning-po, 315 from the Shantniig promon- 
tory at the entrance to the gulf of Richili, 350 from Chifu, and 350 mtfea from 
the mouth of the Pfaien-Yang river, the scene of tbe disaster to the General 
Sherman. 

I also enclose, marked B, an interesting descriptive sketch of Fort Hamilton, 
made by Mr. Albert S. Bickmore, a naturalist trom Boston, who was on board 
of the Wachnaett. 

Tbe possesaion of ao small a place does not indicate the least ambition fin 
territorial aggrandizement. 

Flans of this harbor are among tbe charts in tbe department. 

Tbe Wacbosett is now in the Yang-Tze river. 

1 have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, voar obedient servant, 
B. H. BELL, 
Rear-Admiral, Commanding U. &. Atiafic ifquadron. 

Hon. Gideon Wbllbs, 

Secretary of the Kavy, Wathington, D. C. 



■A- 
United States Stbambk Wachcsbtt, 

At tea, February 3, 1867. 
Sir: I have the honor to submit the following report npon tbe Nan-Hoo 
islands. (Fort Hamilton,) viaited by this ship in obedience to yonr order of 
December 87, 1866. 

Theae islands aeem to have attracted tbe attention of Gnj^lish naval authori- 
ties as early as 1845, since which tim^ they have been twice anrveyed ; and, 
certainly, as a naval depot for any power they merit attention. 
' For uie hydrographic character of tbe port I refer yon to the pnbliahed plan 
of the harbor, adding only that tbe holding-groond is excellent, and that although 



KEPOKT OF THE 8BCRBTABT OP THE NATT. fil 

there ia k rise of eleven feet tide it produces no perceptible enrrent. The 
entntnces are at right angles to the buin, thus formiog a land-locked harbor 
capableof containing a iiaTj, and fmm its shelving eh ores and smooth water offer- 
ing every opportanity for repairs, Stx. In their physical uinetraction the islands 
form a large nataral fort, with sides on the sea, nearly perpend icalar, irom one 
hundred to two hnndred feet high, afterwards rising to peaks of six hundred to 
eight hundred feet, then gradually sloping inward to the basin in the centre. 
On the outside the water is deep, and steep to, affording no anchorage, except 
on the northern face, where the hills are more sloping, and sboaler water is 
obuioed. 

In a military point of view, if an insnlar post can he made inaccessible to aa 
enemy, this certainly presents the most favorable qualifications. The inlands 
are, in fact, two G-ibraltars tm a small scale, facing each other, and guarding the 
harbor between them. 

As a sanitarium, in addition to their positioUi the foct that the islands separate 
both at the southern and northern points must give a constant current of cool 
breeses in the summer, which, for the very same reason, or ratbw for the 
reason that there are no other openings, are protected in winter from the cold 
northwest and northeast winds. We found the thermometer at thirty-nine 
degrees on February let, though we came iu from eea in a very cold northeast 
storm of snow squalls. Geographically, as the islands are evidently volcanic,- 
they possess a fertile soil, about two-fifths, however, capable of cultivation only. 
Wheat and millet are the principal products. The winter wheat was just 
beciiming green when we were there, showing a state of the season ahont equal 
to the same latitude in our own country. 

The inhabitants live in four villages of about five hnndred sonls each. Their 
oecupation is agricnltore, with a little fishing. They are a rude, barbarous, but 
not unfriendly, people. The islands afford them all they need, hut are not capable 
probably of doing much more. They have no ttniinals of any kind for food, 
tidther bullocks nor sheep, though both would thrive upon the hilUides. Water 
is scarce ; there are but two rivulets, and they depend entirely upon the rains 
to fertiliEe their crops. 

The government is patriarchal, the oldest men being the heads of the villages, 
and each village being distinct frvm the others ; but they pay their taxe^ 
annually by sending to their " Heeu" city, which tbey call Khang-Tein, distant 
two hnndred miles hj water, and which is probably Chosan,* on the main land. 

These islands belong to Corea, and the people resemble in every respect the 
Goreans we saw at Ta-tong. 

Oar intercourse with them at both places was by writing Chinese, which the 
more intelligent men could do readily, although none of them could speak it. 
They say that they have no written Oorean language. 

A few Chinese gardeners, and a stock of cattle imported from California or 
Japan, would soon furnish all the vegetables and stock required for a naval 
station ; and water, the scarcity of which we noticed particularly in the driest 
season, conid be easily remedied by a small condensing apparatus. 

One is impressed with the beanty of Nan-Hoo, even in winter, and fancies 
bow reluctantly he would leave them for the intense heat and sickly climate of 
the coast of China during the summer months. 
I am, air, very respectfully, 

R. W. SHUFELDT, 
Commander, Ctmtmanding U. S. SUamer IVaekutelt. 

Bear-Admiral H. H. Bbll, 

Commanding United States Ariatic Sjuadrom, Sfc 

* Cboiftn it odIj one huodred and ten milei di>taiil, Ktid is held hj the Jspanene. Kbang- 
T^D U probsblj tbe king'i capital, on tbc Seoul ilTer, which t» about two baodred miles 
disluiL— U. H. B. 



52 BEPOXT OF THE 8ECBBTABT OF THE HATT. 

B. 
A ittcriptive tketch of Nan-hu, called by the Englith turtieyor* Port Hamilton, 

Nau-hu is the name of a small gronp of ialands in the archipelago that bdt- 
lonnds the aonthern end of the peninsula of Oorea. It is situated in latitude 
34" 1' 23" north, longitude 127= SC 16" east. It is composed of two long, 
narrow, aod one email, triangular, islands, which together enclose a basin one 
mile wide and two long. This hasin is accessible for ships only through two 
channels on its southeastern side. On its northwesterly side it is also open to 
sea for ten cables' length, but a shallow bar prevents any but small boats from 
passing through, and at the same time breaas up all swell rolling in from the 
ocean. On the outside, these islands rise uu mbruptly from a depth of twenty 
to thirty fathoms, and form perpendicular rocky pre^pices for one and two hun- 
dred feet above the level of the sea. From toe edges of these precipices they 
continue up at the steep angle of 3fi° to a sharp ridge, that has a more gentle 
declivity down the inner side, or towards the centre of the basin. This is more 
clearly eeen in the accompanying vertical section a h, which passes through the 
highest hills on the two principal islands, in a doe easterly and westerly direc- 
tion. The point C is, according to my barometer, 603 feet above half-tide level. 

Id short, the whole is, in my opinion, merely the top of an old extinct vol- 
cano, which is now nearly enhmerged by the sea ; and the basin, where ships 
at present anchor in ten and twelve fathoms of water, was once an active, bam* 
ingcrater. 

Thisasaumption is strengthened by the structure of Qnelpart, which, althongh 
thirty miles long and eighteen wide, is wholly formed of the cone and flanks of 
a Biugle volcano now apparently inactive. On i^ flanks are scores of minor 
cones, in each of which the eruptive force baa found vent for a time, and this 
becoming clogged up, it has broken out in some other place to form another 
similar elevation. 

From a single position I counted forty-six of these miniature volcanoes. 
Their sides are as smooth and regular as if graded by art, and on the tope of 
those near the sea, square, bastion-like lookouts inform the people of approach- 
ing danger. 

montrcssor island, as we saw it in the distance, bos exactly the outline of a 
volcano with a considerable crater, and probably a laige part of the whole 
Oorean archipelago will prove of plutonic orighi, like many of the neighboring 
islands of Japan. 

On account of the steepness of the outer flanks of these monntainous islands, 
onlv their inner declivities, or those that surround the basin, can be brought 
under coltivBlion. The parts that are thus improved form about two-flfths of 
the whole area They are divided into rectangular patebee, which extend two- 
thirds the way up the mountain sides, and are already green with wheat that 
was sowed last autumn. There is but little that can be called terracing, such 
as seen in Ohina and Japan, and consequently no artificial irrigation ; yet the 
people fish but little, and appear to rely chiefly on their crops, which they say 
only "sometimes sufier for want of water." 

The soil is a fine dark loam, and appears extremely fertile. Tbey raise 
wheat, kowliong, (a large species of millet, common in the north of Gbina,) and 
some cotton. 

They have no cattle, horses, sheep, or goats ; yet I am confident the small 
cattle on the promontoir of 8bautung would thrive well here, and perhaps the 
better breeds that could be imported from California and Australia. XArge 
flocks of sheep and goats would find plenty of the richest pasturage on the 
declivities that are too steep for cultivation; and good breeds of both of these 
animals are common in the same latitude in China. . . , 



REPOBT OF THE 8E0RETABT OF THE NATT. 53 

Tbey keep faeuB, bnt do JDcke or ^eee, tfaongh they have every facility for 
raising tbe latter, bnt Dot the inducement of a ready market. 

The only trees I paeaed on roy way to tbe peak were a few email pines, and 
the only Bhrnb that grows on toe mountain sides is a camellia, bearing a rich, 
dark crimson flower. 

In general, the climate and regetatioD may be considered qnite like that of 
Bonthem Japan, and all the many kinds of vegtables and fruits that are raised 
there may, no doubt, be as successrnlly cultivated here. 

Many kinds of fish could probably be taken in tbe immediate vicinity, but 
no men were ont fishing when we were there, though the next day we passed 
several boats off Qnelpart. 

In the basin and along the outer 'shores the sea has a blnish tinge, and is 
remarka^y pare and sparkling. 

The islanas being separated on the northwest and southeast, breezes from tbe 
sea have free access into this basin, and most render the air cool and healthy 
in summer. This, with its isolated position, and its latitude, make it an ad- 
mirable location for a sanitarium, and I suspect that the southern or inner side 
of the eastern island would prove tbe most healthy place, if there is any di&r- 
ence. 

The inhabitants live in four villages, two on the eastern and two on the west- 
em island. Tbey informed us they number four hundred families, and reckon- 
ing five persons to a family this gives two thousand as the total population — a 
rather l')W estimate. 

Their villages are very compact, and each house is anrronnded by a thick, 
high wall of small stones, laid up without clay or cement, A door is made in 
this wall, and a small house built near it, together making a kind of little " com- 
pound," as private grounds are called in the east, when enclosed. Their houses 
are all very low, and have walls built of small stones, or a framework of wood, 
with the interstices plastered with clay. The roof is a coarse thatching of 
straw, fastened down by straw ropes, which cross each other at right angles. 
Tbe rooms have wooden Boors, bnt are so low one cannot stand up in tbem. 
Through tbe open doors, and a few small paper windows, a scanty light is ad- 
mitted, sufficient, however, to show a complete want of any kind of furniture. 
In front there is generally a rude piazza, where the people seem to pass moat of 
their time when at home. 

They dislike to have foreigners even enter their grounds, and when the mag- 
nates of the several villages gave Captain Sbufeldt an audience, we had to sit 
down on mats of coil and straw, while they ranged themoelvos around us in a 
semi-circle, in true Indian style. During this interview they brought ns a fiery 
fermented liquor, probably made from their millet or wheat. The official who 
poured it out invariably tasted it before offering It to any one. to show us, as we 
thought at first, that it contained no poison, but after he must have satisfied all 
on that point be was carefnl not to desist. Instead of cakes to eat with this 
wine, they brought us a kind of dried sea>weed, which completed the list of 
refreshments, and shows what these people esteem special Inxnries. 

Their streets are merely narrow paths, very crooked and abominably filthy. 



Indeed, the whole appearance of their houses and villages bespoke a degree of 
poverty and wretchednesa surpassing anything commonly seen in China. 

They all dress in white. The men wear their hair combed up and twisted into 



a kind of knot on the top of the head. The women part theirs in tbe middle 
and braid it behind. They wear no ornaments, and are mora filthy and stupid 
than the men. 

AH onr conversation with them was carried on by writing in Chinese, but 
they speak a different language. They stated tbey are subjects of Corea, and 
belong to the hilu district of Khan-tsin, (Cbosan.) The officials wore tbe tlun 



54 EEPOET OP THE SECEETAEY OP THE UAVY. 

black Corean hftt, witk a conical crown and broad, stnigbt brim. One di^i- 
taiT only had on a straw hat, of a hemispherical form, fiill two feet acrosa. 

In regard to their religion, we were only able to learn that tbey worshipped 
"idols of clay," aad I bos pect that, tike the Chinese, their ideas oo this subject 
are very' iiidefioite. They bury their dead in moands, frequently high ap 
among the mountains, and, like the Chinese, seem to prefer the head of a valley, 
^r a ^ace sheltered from "the evil influences" by bills on the right and left, 
that rise somewhat higher than the spot where the body is interred. On the 
northerly end of the western island there is a considerable cemetery, and near 
the centre a stone slab stands in front of a mound. The upper part of tfaia 
slab has a slight prolongation to the right, a corresponding one to the left, and 
one upward, so as in some degree to resemble a cross. It is covered with 
Chinese characters. In front of this slab, and at a distance of ten feet on either 
side, there is a small, square, rudely carved idol. These may have been^intended 
for images of Buddha, but such a custom I have never seen in the many conn* 
tries I have visited during my long journeys in China. A little further in Iront. 
and a little further to the right and left, there rises on either side a small etoue 
column. This is a common custom throughout the celestial empire. 



Skirmttk tcUk the tavaget o/" Fm-mota, hy Rear-Admiral H. H. Bell, i» the 
Hartford and Wyoming. 

Ukitbd States Flau-Ship Hartford, (3d rate.) 

Shanghai, China, June 19, 1867. 
Sib : I have the honor to report to the department that in accordance with 
my instmctione. No. 46, current series, under date of 3d June laxt, I left 
Shangbu on the 7th instant, in the Hartford, accompanied by the Wyoming, 
Lientenant Commander Carpenter commanding, for the south end of the island 
of Formosa, to destroy, if possible, the lurking-places of the band of savages 
inhabiting the southeast end or point of that island, and who mnrderod in March 
last the shipwrecked officers and crew of the American bark Rover. On the 
lOth of June, on the passage down, I directed Commander Belknap of the 
Hartford to have forty sailors armed with Plymouth muskets and forty with 
Shaip's rifles and all the marines, with five howitzermen ; and Lieutenant Com- 
mander Carpenter of the Wyoming to have forty Sharp's rifles and her marines 
all properly officered ready to land, provided with forty rounds of ammunition 
and fonr days' rations and water; in all one hundred and eighty-one officers and 
privates. The servjce cannot show a better drilled body than these. I stopped 
on the 12th instant at Takao, on the island of Formosa, to obtain an interpre* 
ter, and Ur Pickering, a Scotchman, who had seen much of the natives, 
volunteered his services ; they were accepted, he declining pay. I also received 
as my guests Mr. Taylor, a merchant at that port, and her British Majesty's 
consul Charles Carroll, esquire, who humanely sent out mesBengers to commu- 
nicate with the savages, with offers of ransom for all the survivors, if any 
remained, of the unfortunate crew of the Rover, and afterward went himself io 
the British gunboat Cormorant, Commander George E. Broad, to the bay in 
question, and was fired upon, when attempting to land there. These geutlemea 
having expressed a desire to be of the expedition, next morning, June 13, at 
half past eight o'clock, we anchored within a half mile of the shore, on the 
southeast side of the large open bay indenting the south end of Formosa, a 
somewhat dangerous exposure at this season of typhoons, though a perfectly 
safe and convenient anchorage durin); the northeast monsoon, from October 
until May. The landing of one hundred and eighty-one officera, sailors, and 
marines, provided with four days' rations and water, was made at half past nine 



BBPOBT OF THE 8ECBETABT OF THE.NATT. 55 

O'clockif under tbe conmaud of Gomouiader G, E. Belknap .of ibe Hartford, ac 
compaBied by Lieutenant Commander Alexander S. Macketuie, fleet lieutenant, 
a second in command, who eameetiy sought to go on the expedition. Soon 
after we anchored, the sarages, dreBsnl in clouts and their bodies painted red, 
were seen, through oar glasses, aasemhiing in parlies of ten or twelre-on the 
cleared hills ahont two miles distant, their muskets glistening In the bud, tndi- 
cating the kind of anus they carried; their moremeulB were risible. to us on 
board during the moat of the day. As our men marched into the hills, the 
Ravages, knowing the paths, boldly decided to meet them, and, gliding through 
the high grass and from cover to cover, displayed a stratagem and courage 
equal to our North American Indian. Delivering their 6re they retreated with- 
out being seen by our men, who, charing upon their covers, freqaently fell 
into ambuscades. Our detachments pursued them, in this harassing manner, out 
of sight of the ships, until two o'clock p, m., when, having halted to rest, the 
savages took the opportunity to creep up and £re upon the party commanded 
by Lieutenant Commander Mackenzie, and that officer, placing himself at the 
head of the company commanded by Lieutenant Sands, daringly led a charge 
into the ambuscade that waa laid for them, and fell, mirtally wounded by a 
musket ball, and died while being carried to the rear. The navy conld boast 
an braver spirit and' no man of higher promise than Lieutenant Commander 
S Hockenzie. He was distingnished Tor professional knowledge, aptitude and 
tact, and suavity of manners which inspired the confidence and affection of the 
men, while bis impetiions courage impelled him along to seek the post of dan- 
ger, where he was always seen iu the advance, both a conspicuous mark and an 
example. Several officers and men having already experienced severe son- 
strokes, and the command being generally exhausted and worn oat by their 
efforts to get at the enemy during four hours' mirching. Commander Belknap 
now thought it expedient to rejoin his picket on the beach, and, during this 
inarch of two or three miles, many of the men got into such a deplorable con- 
dition from the killing heat of the sun that the commander determined to return 
with them on board of the ship, which he reached abont 4 p m., after an 
exhausting march of six hours under the sun at 92'^. That afternoon the fleet- 
anrgeon reported thecasnahies of the day — 1 killed, 14 sun-struck, 4of themdan- 
geronsly. No siulors, indeed no troops unaccustomed to bush life, ever displayed 
better spirit, bnt it was apparent that sailors are not adapted to that kind of war- 
fare against a skilful enemy, and that they conld be fitted for it only by a length- 
ened experience. These considerations, together with the prostrated condition 
of many of the men and officers from snn-stroke, and their inability to stand 
auother sucb day, decided me not to land them again, particularly as they had 
already done all that was practicable for them, namely : burnt a numl>er of 
native huts, and chased their warriors until they could chase them no longer, 
though at a grievous cost of life. Their coverts of green jungle and green 
grass, being in-proot at this season, cannot he destroyed, as I had contem- 
plated. I observed a bamboo bnt on every clearing, and several buffaloes feed- 
ing iu the distance, these indicating that the natives are not so wild and ignorant 
of human comforts as they have beau represented. Tbe only effectual remedy 
against the barbarous outrages on shipwrecked men by this tribe, who are not 
nnmerons, will be for tbe Chinese authorities on tbe islaud to occupy this bay 
with a settlement of their own, protected by a military force, which may be 
effected through the influence of our minister at Pekin. Having accomplished 
all that was possible,! got under wsy at 9 p. m., and returning to Takao on the 
] 4tb instant, there buried the remains of the brave Mackenzie, with the pre- 
scribed honors, in the garden of the British consulate; Mr. Cairoli, the British 
consul, having kindly proffered his garden for the grave, there being no public 
burying -ground at Takao. The consular flags and those of fonr merchant shi^is 
were worn at balf-mast, and all the foreigners present joined iu tbe funeral 



S6 KEPOBT OF THE BECRETISY OF THE NAVT. 

procesBion. At 6 30 p. tn. on tli« 14th instant wnghed anchor, aud airiTed at 
Sbangbai to-dav, expecting to meet the gnnboate coming out to this eqnadmn. 
Please receive berewitb the detailed report of Commander Belknap, marked A, 
with the reports of commaading officers of companies of the occarrencea of the 
ISth of June, marked respectively B, O, D, E, also the report of Fleet-Sorgeon 
Beale. marked ¥, as to casnaltieB. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

H. H. BELL. 
Sear-Admiral, Commanding U, 8. Anatic Squadron. 
Hon, GmBON Wgllbs, 

Seerttary of the Nary, Wathington, D. C. 



Commander Belknap't rtporl. 

United States Flag-Ship Hahtford, (2d rate,) 

Al»ea,Jvme 15, ]8G7. 

Sir : In ohedience to your instructions delivered on the I3th instant, concern- 
ing an attack npon the savage tribes living on the southern extremity of the 
island of Formosa, I proceed^ immediatoly to carry them into execution, so far 
as the character of the country, the nature of its inhabitants, and the extreme 
heat of the climate would permit. On leaving this ship, on the morning of the 
date referaed to, I directed Lieutenant Commander J. H. Read, with a company 
of musketeers, a squad of scouts armed with harp's rifles, coaimanded by Master 
N. M. Folger, and a portion of the Wyoming's detachment, under the command 
of Lieutenant 6. D. D. Olidden, to lotid in one of the bays, about three-quarters 
of a mile to the eastward of the place at which I proposed landing, and, pushing 
forward through the jungle, to make for thehillsbearingaway to the westward, in 
order to flank the enemy and nnitewiib the main body on the summit of the hill. 
I then pulled into the bay to the northward of the chip's anchorage, and effected a 
landing without opposition or difficulty. Lieutenant Commander A. S. Mackeniie 
of yonr staff being the first to jump on shore. The marines were immediately 
thrown out as skirmishers along the edge of the jungle which skirts the coast 
and reaches down to within a hundred yards of the beach, and after securing 
the boats and estahlisbiug a stroDg picket of seamen and marines, provided with 
a light howitzer to protect the flank, all under command of Qnniker Cross of this 
ship, and Gunner Staples of the Wyoming, I moved on through the jangle toward 
the hills, to the right of the large black rock indicated in the accompanying plan . 

This belt of jungle seems to be about a third of a mile in width, and the march 
through was very slow, circnitous, and toilsome. Now and then uaxrow fiiut- 
patha or trails wonld be entered, but they were soon lo«t in a thick undert^rowtb 
of prickly plants and runners, and low branches of a small species of banyan 
tree, and the men were obliged to force their way through as best tbey could. 

As we emeiged from the jungle we entered an open space of some ten acres 
in extent, with afew straggling huts aud clumps of bushes scattered here and there 
over its surface. A little further on, the bills could bo seen risioe from the plain, 
broken into spurs with deep ravines between, filled with rocks ana a thick growth 
of grass and small trees. Having examined the huts, they were fired, and the 
command pushed on up one of the hills to the right of the large rock marked in 
the plan. No enemy could be seen, except at a great distance on the crest of 
the hills aboat as ana toward our right; but a scattering fire was suddenly opened 
upon US from an ambush just below the big rock. We fired a volley in return, 
and halting a few minutes tmder cover of some bushes, 1 divided the command. 



BEPOBT OF THE 8ECRBTAB7 OF THE KAVT. 57 

dJKcting Lieateoant Commander HackeDzie to remain qaiet with bie portion of 
the party antil I codM make a Sank movemeut to the right, when, at a signal 
given by the drum, he would move on np the hill and rejoin me. In the mean 
time, Lieutenant Commander Read had laaded with his detatchment, and could 
now be aeeii on the hille on onr right at a distance of about two miles, and an 
occasional fire of musketry was seen to open on the party from the h ilia above. 

Lieutenaut Commander Mackenzie having rejoined us at the base of the big 
rock, we kept on slowly np the hill, bearing away toward the right, receiving 
now and then a fire from the bushes in all directious, some shots close, others 
fWim a g^at distance. Fortunately the enemy fired too high, and most of the 
bnllets passed over us. At one point a volley wad poured into us at a distance 
of not more than a hundred yards, and Lientenant Commander Mackenzie and 
Lieutenant Sands, advancing with a party of scouts, supported by the main body, 
charged into the ambuah, bat the wily foe had fallen back with wondeifhl rapid- 
ity, and made known their escape by loud halloos from the thickets beyond. 

Only occasional glimpses of the enemy could be caught, their presence being 
generally discovered by sadden shots from the bushes, and nasbes of aun- 
lighc reflected from their bright-barrelled muskets. At nearly all the points from 
WDich we were fired upon, I noticed small bundles of bamboo lashed to the bushes 
at a BDiatI angle, sermingly for protection to our cunning foe, and to serve as 
marks to guide them from one ambuscade to another. As wo advanced, the open 
space on the hill-side became more confined, and rocks, bushes, dense jungle, and 
rngged ravines afforded increasing facility and shelter to the savages, and gave 
ua no hope or chance of getting at ihem. About a mile or more above the big 
rock already mentioned, tlie men had become so much exhausted from the march, 
and the intense heat of the sun, that I ordered a halt, and entered a belt or jungle 
to give them a little shelter and rest. Lieuteuant Commander Mackenzie and 
Lieutenant Sand», with a party of scouts, were posted in a small thicket above, 
and to the left of the main body, and a strong picket of marines occupied another 
clump about one hundred yards below the otner party; these outposts, together 
with the position of the main body, making, as it were, the angles of a triangle. 

Those pickets having been established, I sent for Lieutenant Commander Mac- 
kenzie, the second in command, to consult with him concerning a farther advance. 
He had been with me about twenty minutes when firing was heard in the 
direction of the advance picket, and he hurried back to the front. Meanwhile 
Lieutenant Sands had returned the fire, and was charging toward the spot where 
the enemy lay concealed, when Lieutenant Commander Maekenzie coming up, 
ordered a halt. The moment the latter reached the head of tbe line he ordered 
a fresh advance, himself leading. During the interval the main body had come nnt 
of the jungle, and were pushing on to the support of the picket line, when I 
heard the cry, "A man wounded ; send for the doctor." I called out fur Doctor 
Page, who went to the front and soon after brought Lieutenant Commander 
Mackenzie, lying wounded in a blanket, near the spot where I was standing, 
and by my order carried bim further back to the rear. The spot from which 
these shots came was hacked by a deep ravine, and immediately to the rear the 
jungle came down on all sides, so that further advance to that qnarter would have 
exposed the command to the risk of continued lues without any means or hope of 
retaliating upon the enemy. The men, too, were beginning to show great fatigue 
and symptoms of sun-stroke, and considering the difliculty of moving either way, 
encumbered with sick and wounded men, I determined to fall back. I accord- 
ingly ordered a retreat, sending the main body ahead, and falling back slowly, 
covered by the scoata under command of Lieutenant Sands. A short distance 
down the hill Lieutenant Commander Read joined me with his party, and was 
directed to fall back with the main body, a party of carbineers under Mr. Folger 
remaining with Mr. Sands. Mr. Read had destroyed several hots on the route 
he bad takeu, but failed to accomplish any other object of the expeditioD. We 



58 BEPOBT OF THE SECEBTAST OF THE NAV7. 

were fired at from several places on the w&ydown the hill, bnt happily do other 
shots took effect. Before we reached the plain, word wan seat me of the death 
of the gallant Mackeiisie. Upon entering the jungle fringing the coast the dif- 
ferent squads and companies took different routes to guard against ambush, and 
our progress was slow and faliguing, particularly to the men who earned the 
remainBofthe lamented Mackenzie. Arrivedat the beach I deployed themarines 
alongtbeedgeofthejnngle to guard against surprise, and sent the body onboard 
ebip the moment the boat could be got ready. It had been my intention lo 
remain on shore and attempt an arahuscade in the jungle during the night, but I 
found both officers and men ao worn out from exertion and extreme heat of the 
day, that I concluded to embark the entire command and return to the ship. 

Captain Forney, of the mariaea, and Mate Brownall, of the Wyoming) and a 
dozen or more of the men were alreaily- prostrated with Bun-etroke, and I feared 
other cases might occur Iwfore nightfall. The route over which we passed was 
entirely destitute of cattle, frnit, vegetables, or any other eatable thing ; and we 
had Been only two or three pools of dirty Btagnant water, unfit for any one hut 
a Bavsge to drink. That part of Formosa is extremely well adapted to Indian 
midea of warfare, and the burning beat of the buu at this Beaeon of the year is a 
greater help to the savage even than either bis cunning and cruel method of 
fighting, or perfect knowledge of every foot of ground over which he raogce. 

The officers, one and all, gave me a hearty and efficient support, and the men 
did their duty cheerfully and steadily. The following are the namea of the 
officers who went in the expedition, vi« ; 

Lieutenant Commander A. 8. Mackenzie of your staff. Lieutenant Com- 
mander J. H. Read, Lieutenant J. H. Sands, Master W. M. Folger, Master II. 
£lmer. Captain James Forney, United States marine corps, Assistant Surgeon 
C. H. Page, Gunner B. H. Cross, Admiral's Clerk Lonis Parker, and Com- 
mander'a Clerk A. C. Driggs of this ship, aud Lieutenant 6. D. B. tilidden, 
Mate G. V. Brownell, and Gunner J. L. Staples, of the Wyoming. 

The British consul at Takao, Formosa, Charles Carroll, esq., and Meesre. 
Taylor and Pickering, English aubjects residing at that place, accompanied Uie 
expedition as volunteers and rendered good service, being generally at the front. 
Mr. Taylor went to the aseietance of Lieutenant Commander Mackenzie when 
' cry of " a man wounded !" was beard. The following named men deserve 
:ial mention for the faithful manner in which they remained by the body of 
lamented dead and brought it safely through the jungle to the boats, viz ; 
John Kelly, captain of forecastle ; Robert Knight, armorer ; Jamea Franklin, 
hoatawain's mate ; William While, captain of forelop ; James McGuinnis, ship's 
corporal ; James Cunningham, seaman ; and John M. Small, ordinary seaman. 
One of them, William White, dropped down from exhaustion and san-stroke 
the moment he reached the beach. The gallant dead needs no tribute from me. 
That solitary grave in the grounds of the British consulate at Takao bespeaks 
a language more eloquent and touching than human utterance can express. No 
one knew the worth, the high-toned character, and professional ability of the 
deceased better than yourself, and I but give expression to the general feeling 
when I add that iu him the service loat one of its brightest ornaments, and the 
country one of its most zealous and gallant defenders. I enclose a aketeh of tbe 
routes taken by tbe ezpeditiou; also, reports from Lieutenant Commander J. 
H. Reed, IJentenant Sands, Assistant Surgeon C. K, Page, and Captain For- 
ney. I found the soundings from the ship to the shore to decrease regularly 
and gradually, and the beacb quite Bteep, bio ; bnt large, flat black rocka could 
he seen on the bottom here and there, which would make a dangerous sea for 
boats in a southerly wind. I could discover no traces of human beings or rem- 
nants of clothing worn by civilized people iu any of the huts we destroyed, or 
in any part of the country over which we passed. On our return through the 



Z 



|tEP<»tT OF THE BECBETAKT OF THE NATT. 69 

joagls skirtivg the cotist ve Btraok ioto the b«d of a Ary stream, when nearly 
through, which doubtlesa runs with good water duiiog the northe&at tnoneooa, 
which would be of great advantage to a force operating there during the winter 
months. 

Very reipeetfully, yowc obedient servant, 

GEOKGE E. BELKNAP, 

Commando; 
Bear-Admiral H. H. Bell, 

CommaMding United Statet Aiiatxe S^uadrtm. 



Report of Capiat* Forney 

Unitbd States Flag-Ship Hartford, 

At tea. June 17, 1867. 
Sir : I have the honor herewith to submit a brief report of the part taken by 
the marines on the 13th instant, on the island of Fonnoea. On first lauding, 
by yonr order I took cha^e of twenty mBrines, deploying them forward as 
akirmishers. A. deuBO and almost impenetrable thicket of hush prevented the 
men from advancing v«ry rapidly. I penetrated with them to a creek about 
half a mile from the beach withont meeting with any of the enemy, and was 
then recalled for farther orders. Yon then instructed me to leave a sergeant 
and five men on the beach, and to advance with the main body beaded by yourself. 
In consequence of all further operations coming under your own observations, 
I have nothing further to report, except that the men behaved gallantly, and 
deserve credit for the manner in which they marched over such a rough and 
hilly country and under such intense scorching hent. Ordnance Sergeant Oolter- 
meyer was of great assistance to me during the entire day, and deserves favor- 
able mention. A few of the men were struck down by -the oppressive heat of 
the son, but were not serionsly injured and are now doing their usual duty. 
The entire number of marines on shore was forty-three, thirty-one of whom were 
from tbie ship, and twelve from the Wyoming. 1 have to report the loss of one 
Springfield rifle, (I think this rifle is on board of the Wyoming by mistake,) 
one fife, one musket sllog, and two canteens. 

Very reepectfuliy, your obedient servant, 

JAMES FORNEY, 
Captain Untied Sfatet Marine Corpt. 
Commander G. E. Belknap, 

Q/nmanding U. S. tileamikip Hdr(/brd. 



Report of Lieutenant Commmtder Read. 

Unitkd States Flag-Ship Habtpohd, (Sd rate,) 

At tea, June 17, 1S67. 
Sir : In obedience to your order I have the honor to submit the following 
report of the movements of the men nnder my command at South Cape, island 
of Formosa, on June 13, 1S67. The column consisted of the following detach* 
meats, viz : twenty-two men from the Wyoming, nnder command of Lieutenant 
Glidden ; sixty-two men from the Hartford, under command of Master Horace 
Elmer, and a skirmish parly of ten picked men from the Hartford, under com- 
mand of Master W. N. Folgor ; total ninety-four men, five of tbem being equip- 
ped as pioneers. On reacbmg the place designated by yon for our landing, the 

oogic 



60 SBPOBT OF THE BECBETABT OF THE NATT. 

bokto were beached, and the ekinnishen, under Muter Folger, deployed to the 
front. The line of battle waa qniekly formed, and after mooring the boats two 
hnndred yards from the beach, we took up onr l\ne of march for the interior, 
BtrikiDg for the liigh range of hiUe that lay about two miles from the shore line. 
The march wan painful and tedioae, owing to the dense jungles of cactus and- 
rose-vinee which covered the soil. But after a tramp of two hours we gained 
the hills, and deetroyed several small bouses which bad very lately been aban< 
doned. Shortly afterwards several small parties of savages were seen on the 
hill-tops in our front, who fired at long range upon our skirmish line, bnt quickly 
retreated upon their fire being returned. In this manner they kept up a sort of 
ranniug fight, rttreatiug from one bill-top to another, never allowing our skir- 
misherB to approach nearer than eight hundred yards; for about one hour. But 
this chasing over rugged hills, through almost impassable chaparral, and under 
a scorching tronical sun, aeon told on onr men, and after giving them a short 
rest, I turned the colnmn to the left in order U> join your command, in obedience 
to my original orders. The main body at this time was about one mile distant, 
and onr march to join it was the most painful of any during the day— many of 
the men dropping down with sun-stroke, requiring to be helped along by their 
comrades. Upon coming np with you the commands were consolidated, and 
the rest of the movements took place under your eye. which makes it unneces- 
sary for me to report further. I am happy to be able to say that all the officers 
and men behaved gallantly, the skirmish party, under Master W. N, Folger, 
having the hardest marching, and being the only ones that were anuoyed by 
the savages. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant. 

J. H. READ. 
Lieutenant Commander. 
Commander G. E. Bblknap. 

Commanding United Slatet Steamer Hartford, 



Report of Auitlant Surgeon Page. 

U.NiTED Statbs Flaq-Shif Habtfohd, (2d rate.) 

At tea, June 15, 1867. 
Sib : In accordance with your request. I have to report the circumstance* 
attending the death of Lieutenant Commander A. 8. Mackenzie of the United 
Slates steamer Hartford, during a skirmish with the natives of the southera 
extremity of the island of Formosa, upon the 13th of Jnne, 1867. The main 
body of the troops with which Lieutenant Commander Mackenzie was con- 
nected landed at about ten o'clock a. m. and proceeded into the interior of the 
country about four miles, and bad halted for rest and shade in the border of a 
dense jungle at about two o'clock p. m., with a detachment of ten men, under 
the immediate command of Mr. Mackenzie, thrown oat to one side to watch the 
movements of the enemy, who bad been firing upon us. Soon after halting Mr. 
Mackenzie was called into the jungle by the officer in command for a consulta- 
tion as to movements, and during the consultation, the enemy recommenced 
firing. Mr. Mackenzie rushed to the head of his men, and in about two minutes 
I heard the cry of " Doctor ! doctor I" and immediately proceeded to the front, 
where I found Mr. Mackenzie falling, with his left hand on hi^ right breasL I 
caught him by the coa^colla^, and asked him wlierv he was wounded, at the 
same time with what aid I could procure dragged him to the rear as rapidly as 
possible. In reply he only looked up at me, moved his hand on his breast a 
little higher, and said " Page, Page, Page, I'm dead !" and ceased to lire at 



BEP(HtT OP THS 8ECBBTABT OF THE MATT. 6t 

■bout 2.30 p. m., and ahoat three or four minatM from the time that he wv 
woanded. The wound was roaod, smooth, of about an iach in diameter, pene- 
trating deeplr tlie upper anterior and middle portion of the right cheat just 
below the collar-hone, with no external bemoirliage. of importance. 
Very reapectfally, your obedient servant, 

UHABLES H. PAGE, 

AMttlant Surgeon. 
Commander Gborob £. Brlknap, 

U. S. Havif, Commanding V. S. Sleanttr Ilarifitrd. 



Report 1^ LUutenant Sandt. 

Unitbd States Stbamkr Hartporp, 

Al tea, June 15, 1967. 

Sir: l^e following is a mcmorandnm of the circnmstaacea attending tbe death 
of Lieutenant Commander A. S. Mackenzie, as far sa I am able to state : At 
nbont 2 o'clock p. m., on the ISth instant, Mr. Mackenzie called for volnnteera 
from the Hertford, and I joined him with the ten or twelve meo then under iny 
command, in answer to hia call. We were stationed behind a clump of busbee to 
keep a lookout for the enemy. A few minutes after we bad tiikon our position 
Mr. Mackenzie was sent fur by you and I waa left in chai^ of ihe party. At 
about 24 p. m. we were fired on by the enemy, who had got on our flank 
through the undergrowth, and I ordered a charge and returned their fire. As 
BOOQ as the firing commenced Mr. Mackenete ran np to head the party, and or- 
dered a halt before we had advanced more than thirty yards. Aa soon as he bad 
reached the front he ordered an advance, and was leading the attack when we 
were fired on by ancther party at a distance of about seventy-five yards. The 
enemy fired five or six abots at once, and it waa one of those that struck Mr. 
MackeDEie, I did not know that he was seriously hurt, and K'ft him walking 
to the rear to meet the doctor, who was coming up at the time. We fired two or 
three volleys at the enemy and drove them buck, but bt^f'ire we had advanced 
more than fifteen yard« further I received the order to fall back, and it was not 
until ten minutes after that I learned that Mr. Kackeuiie was mortally wounded. 
To reach the enemy we charged acroes a galley filled with long grass, which im- 
peded our movements, and ahead of ns still there was a ravine bucked by dense 
undergrowth. It waa impoaaible to tell the position of the enemy until we saw 
tlie smoke of his pieces, and we were obliged to fire at the flash. We were in 
plain sight, an open mark for the enemy, while they were hid in this under- 
growth, into which we could not see ten feet. 
Very respectfully, 

J. H. SANDS, LicMtenant. 

Lieutenant Ooinmander Bslknap, 

United S:alei Steamer Harl/ord. 



Report of the Flert Surgeon. 

Unitbd Statbs Flao-Ship Hartpord, (2d rate,) 

SoutU Bay 0/ Formota, June 13, 1867. 
Sir : I bare the honor to report that the following casualties occurred among 
the officers and men of this ship to-day, on shore, in the affair with the savages 
of this part of the island, viz : 

A, 8. Mackenzie, lieutenant commander, killed. 

George E. Belknap, commander, snn-strnck, severely. ^,.,. r,;CoOQ[Q 



REPORT OP THE 8ECHETAST Of THB SATT. 



Jfts. Fnmey, captnin mMrineB, snn-strnck, teverdy. 

Wm. White, capMin fore-top. Hon-Btnick, dangeropBly. 

Wm. Jackson, ordiDary Beaman, BnoBtnick. dangerously. 

Job. Qoiutnn, Beaman, Bun-strnck, dangeroiulj. 

Fbilip WorriBhoffer, Bun-struekt dangerotielj. 

John H. EUrlo, ordinary eeaman, san-Btruck, Hlighlly, 

Edward Forrest. landBmau, Ban-struck, slightly. 
' Martiu Pinuerty, ordinary seaman, suu-atruck, slightly. 

Eugene Sullivan, ordinary aeaman, Bnn-Btmck, alightly, 

Thomas Savage, landsman, sun-strack, slightly. ' 

George K. Utlls, laudsman, sun-struck, elightlr. 

John Hynea, ordinary seaman, sun struck, slightly, 

Wro. Connor, marine, contusion. 

NnmerouB other cases of exhaustion from heat and orer-fatjgue presented 
themselves on the return of the expedition to the ship, but as they went to dnty 
almost immediately, 1 have not thought proper to indnde them in the above list. 
I will remark, however, that the men generally, when they came back to the 
ship, presented a most eshausted and broken-down appearance. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. BEALE. 
SurgeoM of tie FUet. 

Rear-Admiral H. H. Bbll, 

Commanding United State* Aaiatie Sqitadrtm. 

V, 8. — I wonld also state that Mate Brownell, of the Wyoming, was also 
brought on board this ship in a state of deli rinm, following heat and exhaustion, 
but that be recovered sufficiently in the coarse of a couple of hours to be sent 
to his own ship. 



.dbyGoogle 



THE IBON-CLAD MIANTOiSOIOH. 

RESUMfi OF THE TOTAOE OF THE IHON-CLAD MIANTONOMOH TO EUROPE 
AND RETURN TO THE UNITED STATES, ACCOMPANIED BY THE UMTED 
STATES STEAMER AUGUSTA— MAY. 1«66, to JULY, 1867. 

United Statbs Stbambb AttoosTA, (3d rate,) 

Philadelphia, July S3, 1867. 

Sib : Tbe following record of the cruise of this ship, accompaaicd by the 
monitor Mian tonomob, Commander Beaumont, and a portion of it by the double- 
ender Ashnelot, Commander li'ebiger, is respectfully submitted. 

In obedience to your orders of April 16, 1866, I arrived with tbe Angueta 
in New York and reported to Rear-Admlral Belt on the 24tb of same raontb. 

On the 3Dt)i Cnmmanders Beauraoat, of the Miantonomoh, aod Febiger, of 
the Asfanelot, reported to me for service in obedience to your orders of the 28th. 

These orders also infi^rmed me that the Augusta and Miantouomoh would ba 
attached to the North Atlantic squadron. 

On the 3d of May, previous orders were revoked by Bear- Admiral Bell. 

On tlie 5th I received from the rear-admiral an order eucloeiag sealed inetntc- 
tioQB from the departmeni, directing me to proceed to sea with the Augaato, 
Miantonomoh, and Aahuelot. 

On the 8ih I despatched tbe Aahnetot to Boston to wait further orders, and 
opeued those from the depurtment marked " conJidaUial" 

On the 10th of May I reported by telegram our arrival at Halifax, and the 
good behavior of the Miantonomoh dnriag heavy weather; tbia telegram was 
followed by a letter (No. 14.) giving a more detailed account of this, the firat 
itage in the long journey which we have since accomplished 

The naval mind, as well aa the military, joined in the wonderment occasioned 
by the visit of the monitor, and we bad the firat flow of that tide of visitors 
which, wherever we went, overwhelmed ua. 

On tbe 24th of May I reported our arrival at St. John, Newfoundland ; we 
left Halifax ibe afternoon of the 17th, bat in consequence of a thick fog did not 
leave the lower anchorage until tbe morning of tbe 18ib at 5 a. m. ; we encoun- 
tered fogs, easterly winds, with heavy sea, and many icebergs, which are always 
accompanied by fogs ; during the last two days we hoverea about the month of 
the harbor, making many efforts to get in with safety, tbe mouth being blockaded 
by icebergs ; we finally accomplished it by taking advantage of a holiday in 
the fog Bufficient to admit ns, when it again closed and sealed up the harbor for 

On the 30th I reported that both veseels wonld be ready in a week for the 
service indicated in your confidential commtinication of the 14th of May. 

On the 3d of June the Aahuelot arrived, bringing aa pnsaenger Aasiatant 
Secretary (tf the Navy Mr. 0. V. Fox. together with your instmctiona of May 
tbe 28tb. 

Having arrived at a proper nndeistanding with the commanders in relatkm to 
fog and night signals, and every other preparation being made, the Angnats, 
Miantonomoh, and Ashnelot got underway at 8 p. m. tbe evening of the 5tb 
of June, and steamed ont of tbe harbor, Mr. Fox on board the Miantouomoh ; 
the Asbuelot in the narrow passage between the harbor and tlie sea accident- 
ally colliding with and sinking a schooner. Tbia miabap delayed as outside 
nntil midnight. Soon after atartiog, tbe tow-line I hod given the Miantonomoh 
parted, and no attempt waa made to aid her again unlit the 8th at noon, when 



64 REPORT OP THE BECHETABT OP THE NATV. 

we renewed the towing; pn>ceBB and continned it until noon the 15th, tbe monitor 
coiieuming iicr miuimum of coal only, making an average epeed of seven knots, 
the wind varjing from north to northwest, moitly Btrong. with a heavy sea. 
We arrived at Queenstown at 3 p..tn. the 16th, making the paeeage in ten dayd 
and eighteen hours from anchorage to anchon^, the monitor having two days' 
coal remaining, the Augueta ten days'. 

In my letter of that date, reporting our arrival at Qneenstown to the depart- 
ment, I expressed myself in relation to the monitor as follows : 

"A greater portion of the way (1,100 miles) the Miantonomoh was in tow of 
the Augusta, as a matter of convatience and prfcatuion more than necessity ; the , 
Kiantonoraoh eonsaming afair proportion of coal. I think she could have crossed 
over alone." 

I alio expressed myself upon her sea qnalitiee: "Heavy weather does not 
appear to materially afiect the speed or rolling of tbe monitor, for while the 
other vessela were lurching about and their- progress checked by heavy seaa, 
she went along comparatively undisturbed," &c. 

Mr, Fox disembarked here. 

We parted from the Ashuelot at Queenstown, 

We left Queenstown on the SOlh, and I reported our arrival at Portsmouth) 
England, oii the 23d ; we anchored off Spitbead, 

On tbe 39tb Mr. Fox rejoined tbe Miaat^nomob, and at bis truest I de- 
spatcLed her to Cherbourg, appointing Sheemese as our rendezvous. 

The following order was furnished Commander Beaumont for his guidance : 

United States Stbambr Ai:gusta, 

Off Spilhead, June 29, 1S66. 
Sib : Mr. Fox, tbe Assistant Secretary of the Navy, being digpoecd to take 
tbe Miantonomoh under your command to Cherbourg, France, you are author- 
ized to famish bim and any gentleman he may think proper to bring with him 
a passage, with such accommodations and comforts as it may be in your power 
to bestow. When .\fr. Fox notifips you that he no longer requires the services 
of your ship at that place, you will join me at Sheerness, lu the river Thames, 
tbe place selected for our rendezvous. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. MURRAT. 
Commander and Senhr O^cer. 
Commander J. C. Bbaumont, 

Vniled Statet Steamer Miantonomoh. 

The visit of tbe lords of the admiralty was made on the 29th. 

The fourth of July was duly honored by tbe Augusta at Spithead, the forts 
and all the English men-of-war in commission joining us. 

On the 6tb of July I addressed to Mr. Adams, our miniBter at tbe cotirt of 
St. Jaroes, tbe following note : 

United Statiw Strambr ArausTA. 

Off Spithead, Jidy 7, 1866. 
SiH : I am advised by Mr. Pox, tbe AssisUnt Secretary of the Navy, that 
tbe Miantonomoh will leave Oberhonrg, France, for tbe appointed rendezvous 
near Sheerness, to-morrow. 

She will be subject to tbe contemplated visit of the Prince of Wales and 
others at vonr discretion. 
1 would respectftilly request, provided it can be made convenient, that yon 

DigmzedbyGoOgle 



EEPOET OP THE SECBETAEY OP THE MATY. 65 

will fix an early Aaj, as it is desirable to leave for Copenhagen as early aB poa- 
eible. 

I sail to-morrow for same anchorage, and will eudeavor to commaaicate again. 
I am, very respectfully, yoar obedient serTaiit, 

A. MURRAY, 
Cu/nmattder and Satiar Officrr. 

Eon. Chaklks Francis Adams, 

Enron ^^ ^ Court of St. Jama. 

On the 7th joined the monitor in the little Nore, off Sheemess, and on the 
14th I hod the honor to report by letter the visit (aud its details) of the Prince 
of Wales, Dake or Ediuborough. Dukes of Sutherland and Argyle. Lord John 
Hay, the Prince of Leinengen, and other higbofficials, who visited and thoroughly 
inspected the ship. 

I had the honor to report our safe arrival at Copcnhogen on the Slst. We 
stopped here to reeuppty the monitor with coal, the heavy head wind and eea 
in the North sea having exhausted it. 

We ]earned here of tbe prevalence of cholera at Stettin, where I expected and 
bad arranged to meet Mr. Foi. 

I immediately entered into telegraphic communication with him in Paris, 
which resulted in our remaining at Copenhagen. Mr. Fox had anticipated this 
change of programme and arrived here on the 24th. 

I ordered a board of sni^eons to examine statistics and investigate reports 
from all sonrcea in relation to cholera in St, Petersburg' and Croustadt, the 
result of which was the following 

EEPORT OF BOARD OF SURGEONS. 

United 3tate.s Stbamer Augusta, 

Off Copenhagen, July 25, 186G. 
Silt : In obedience to yoor order of this date we have carefully examined tbe 
statistics in reference to the cholera in St. Petersburg, Kassia, as furnished by 
Assistant Secretary G. V. Fox, in hia letter to you of the 24th instalit, and after 
careful consideration, have to report that in our opinion, based upon the above 
information, tbe disease exists in a decidedly epidemic form, and was at tbe time 
(20th of July) increasing rapidly. 

Under such a condi^on of the health of that city, we consider it unsafe to 
go there at present, or at any time dnring the existence of epidemic cholera. 
Very respectfully, &c., 

W. E. TAYLOR, 

SurgeoH United Statet Navy. 
W. K. SCOFIELD, 

Surgeon United State* Navy. 
CHARLES L. GREEN, 

Anittanl Surgeon. 
HENRY STANLY PITKIN, 
Patted AitUtant Surgeon United Statet Navy. 
Commander Albxandbr Murray, United State* Navy, 

Commanding United Statet Steamer Augutta, and Senior 

Officer preienl, Copenhagen, Denmark. 

In my letter to the department of August 3, 1866, I had tbe honor to make 
known to you the visit of hia Majesty the King of Denmark, the royal family, 
and bis chief officials to the monitor on the 27tb of July, also to give you some 
account of tbe dinner at which hia Majesty entertained Mr. Fox and the com- 
manding officers. In. that communication I mentioned tbe compliment paid ua 



by die Bwedish monitor John Ericsson. OOqIc 

5 m ' O 



66 REPORT OF THE RKCBETAEY OF THE NAVY. 

At Copenhagen we received on board tbe property which the Stonewall had 
left, and which wati now being given iip to the United States goverDment. It 
was not inconvenient for the AugoEla to carrj it; it has Biace been sent home 
iu the Ino, storeehip, with the exception of a few shell in bosed, which I have 
retained until this time, as ueeful iu trimming our vessel. 

We left Copenhagen on July the 3Ist ; Mr. Fox again on board the Miau- 
tonomoh. 

In my letter (No. 28) from Cronstadt, I announced our arrival at this place, 
having touched for one day at Heleingfors. 

I also, with much pleasure and more surprise, alluded to the extraordiijaiy 
delight manifested by the people and autlioritiea within tbe Russian dominions ; 
after bestowing the most unbounded hospitality upon us that day, at Helsing- 
fors (the western outpost of the Russian dominions) we were met on leaving by 
the Russian Baltic fleet, under Admirals LikatcbefF and Bnutakoff, tbe flag-sbtp 
Chrabry making the signal " You are welcome." The post of honor wiu 
assigned to na and weproceeded in three columns. That letter also attempted to 
describe oar reception at Cronstadt on the 6th of Angnst, our p'reeentatioa to 
the imperial family on the 8th, on the 9th the visit of tbe Emperor and Grand 
Dukes except the Grand Duke Constantine, our inspection of the Russian fleets 
and forte, the Emperor's dinner and toast on board bis yacht, and I concluded 
by saying : " I perfectly nnderstand that these unusual attentions were bestowed 
upon us in return for the hospitalities received by the Russian naval officers 
while they were in onr country, as well as for the 'resolution of sympathy,' which 
it was our good fortune to bring ; the latter appears to have touched very near 
the Russian heart, which is very generous," 

Under date of September tbe 18tb, at Stockholm, I again addressed tjie de- 
' partment, announcing our official departure from Cronstadt on the 15th, and tbe 
atteudiDg ceremonies with which tbe Russtau authorities chose to honor us and 
our arrival at the Swedish capital ; this letter conlained many enclosures relat- 
ing to our visit to Russia ; everything that profesaiouatly belonged to us I 
reported upon ; to have done more would have treBpas.'-ed on the prerogative of 
another, wb6, I have no doubt, did ample justice to tbe subject. 

Tbe ships and officers received favors which as the senior naval officer I 
acknowledged, (as per enclosures.) 

1 reported to you also from Stockholm the refusal of the Russian naval 
authorities to receive pay for some valuable work done at the uavy yard, Cron- 
stadt, the most important of which was the furnishing of a towiog hawser (13- 
inch) fitted with bridle, shackle, &c., in all about 165 fathoms ; this was a most 
nsefol as well as valuable present and was much needed ; indeed, it appeared to 
be the desire of the Russtans, whether government or people, to anticipate, in a 
spirit of generosity both strange and unexpected, all our wishes. We were tbe 
victims of a hospitality which I did not believe had an existence out of America, 
and the pleased recipients of a generosity which does not oflen fall to the lot of 
navy officers anywhere ; princely presents from tbe Emperor to the commanding 
officers, and souveuirs to all. 

I received at this place through the Russian minister of marine. Admiral 
Crabbe, a communication by telegram announcing tbe regrets of the Grand Duke 
Constantine at not having had the pleasure of receiving the American officers 
personally, wishing us "a happy return and continuation of friendship," and 
some other remarks complimeotary and gratifying to me. 

Other communications passed between Admiral Crabbe and myself, copies of 
which will be supplementary. To this distinguished officer we are indebl«d for 
most of the pleasant days we passed in Russia ; to him asd Hear Admirals 
LesBOJfeky and Gorkovenoff the officers nre specially under obligations for con- 
siderato and kind personal attentions. I should properly inclnde in this expres- 
sion of onr gratitude the High Admiral Nerssilkslc^ , then governor of Orooatadt. 



EBPOBT'OP THE SECBETART OF THE NAVY. 67 

now a councillor of the empire ; hie iige, high rank, nnd heroic career, rendering 
his attentions particularly flattering. 

Rear Admiral Gorkovenoff, to whom we arc indebted for unremitted personal 
attentions, has charge of the hydrography and coaat stirvey, which in Russia, 
and I believe in all maritime countries, is a part of the navy ; he is also the 
intimate friend of the Grand Duke GoDBtaatiDC, and a great favorite with all the 
imperial family. I for one certainly feel under a load of obligationB to him for 
hie personal kindness while he was my travelling companion iuto the interior. 
He has been in the United States, and contemplates an official visit to our navy 
yards very soon. 

A list of officers specially assigned by Admirnl Orabbe for attendants and 
companions to the American officers whilst in Rtissia will be/ound in the sup- 
plement 1 they all or nearly all spoke English, and were untiring in their efforts 
to anticipate onr wants and make everything agreeable. They auccecded, and 
th« officers will ever retain a grateful and pTeasnrable recollection of their pro- 
fessional visit to Bnssia. 

It would he difficnlt to express an idea calcniated to do justice to tho cordial, 
social, and vety friendly way with which the aothoritieB and people of Stock- 
holm welcomed ns when we arrived, and the huepitality which they lavished 
upon ns whilst wo remained. 

The festivities with which the occasion of onr visit to Sweden was honored 
were— 

1st. A water party by the Swedish naval officers, headed by Admiral Lilley- 
book, wheu nil the officers that could be spared from duty visited the castle of 
" Stocklosks," some 70 miles np the river. This castle is famous as containing 
many trophies of the thirty years' war. 

2d. Entertainment of the American Minister Campbell to Mr. Fox, the offi- 
cers, and foreign legations. 

3d. Dinner by his Majesty King Carl, at which the royal family and Prince 
Oscar, American minister, Mr. Fox, and tbe officers and ladies of the household 
and state were entertained. 

4th. Dinner at Count Ptattin's. 

5tb.. Entertainment at the palace of Drottingholm by the Queen Dowager, 
tbe King and royal fkmily being present. The King and Prince Oscar gave as 
much of their pen-ond time, and the King devoted to our nse his barges and 
carriages. A gunboat accompanied ua fitly miles when we left. 

I reported our safe arrival at Kiel on the Ist of October, 1866. We found 
here a great nnmber of the Prussian ships of war, and an entire station. Admiral 
Jackman in command ; we were received very hospitably by the officers, and 
Prince Adalbert, who came from Berlin to visit us. Mr. Fox \e(t us at Kiel. 

We sailed on the 3d, Prince Adalbert and Admiral Jacktnan accompanying 
us down the harbor and returning in their own flag-Kliips and the Coles turretcd 
ship, which also had been with ns. 

On the 6th, in compliance with the spirit of your inetmclions, we arrived at 
Hambnrg ; here we remained a week and experienced the full flood of that tide 
of visitors to tbe " monitor" which had been increasing ever since we left tbe 
United States ; it was very trying to the officers, and to some extent corrupting 
to the cr«w. 

The merchants of Hambnrg gave the officers a public dinner, which went off 
very well — somewhat in New York style. This dinner was intended to express 
their appreciation of the kindness, patience, and politeness of the officers in per-' 
mitting the citizens of their great city to gratify their curiosity in all that con- 
cerned the monitor, in which they felt much interest. 

I had the honor to report to yon from Hamburg under dale of October 6, 
■led[' 



>, (Nos. 33 and 34,) acknowledging receipt of commission as captain 
United States navy, and notifying yon of onr proceedings. OiW 



68 KEPOaX OV THK SKCRETARY OV THE NAVY. 

Rear-Adniirnl Popoff, of the Russian navy, arrived from St. Petersburg with 
letters from Admiral Crabbe requesting that Le atid bia staff be allowed to 
make a »hort voyage in the mnnilor. 1 put him on buard the monitor at the 
mouth of the Elbe on the evening of iho 15th, and we went to sea in heavy 
weather. 

On the 18th we arrived at Cherbourg, Admiral Popoif beiug ddighted with 
his trip and the pcrloimance of the monitor. 

At Cherbourg wc became merged in the European squnclron. 

On the 30th of April, upon receiving orders from Rear Admiral Goldsborough. 
we Bailed for our present anchorage, having visited whilst we formed part of the 
European squadron the following ports, in the order named : 

Brest, Lisbon, Cadiz, Gibraltar, Malaga, Carthagena, Bareelona, Marseilles, 
Toulon, Mahon, Genoa, Spezzia, Leghorn, Civita Veccbia, and Naples. 

At Toulon we had the misfortune to lose dne of our officers, Commander J. 
C. Cornwell, who died suddenly on the 13th of February. He had been a gal- 
lant and faithful officer during the late n-bellion, and the tardy recognition o£ 
his services in the shape of promotion had but recently reached him ; he was 
a good officer and genial companion, and hia !oss was much deplored. 

Here, with the authority of the commander-in-chief, we purchased for the 

use of the monitor " Rouquayrol and Uenayrouze's patent diving apparatus," 

which saved the expense of docking, and may serve a like purpose again and 

. again. The use of it was very simple and was soon familiar to the Miantonomh. 

At Port Mahon, by order of the admiral, we transferred all the volunteer line 
efficera to the aioreehip Guard for a passage to the United States, their places, 
as far as practicable, being filled by the superabundance of the flag and otherships. 

At Leghorn the officers were permitted freely to visit Florence, and at Civita 
Veccbia, Rome. 

On tlie 8tb of May we arrived at Gibraltar, and on the 14th I :iddre»?ed a 
letter to you in relation to our future movements, as follows : 

No. 4.] United Statks Stkamer Aiiulsta, (3n rate,) 

Gibraltar, May 14, JS67. 

Sir ; I have the honor to report that this ship and the monitor Miantoyomoh, 
which arrived here on the Stb instant, will sail to morrow for Philadelphia, the 
route as far as island of Barbadoes, West Indies, being that aelected by the 
department, and embodied in my sailing instructiona from Rear- Admiral Golds- 
borough. 

The port in the Cape de Verdcs to which the anthracite coal has been 
despatched is not stated ; we shall eonsequcnily make the weatherly one, Porto 
Grande, as fiom its superior harbor I suppose it to be the destination which 
would be selected. 

Unless delayed by accident, and I do not apprehend any, these vessels will 
be in Barbadoes .by the 20th of June, and ready for next port by the 35th. 
The propriety of stopping at any other island south of Nassau, New Provi- 
dence, will then be considered, and the decisiod depend in a great degree upon 
the information within our reach regarding their healthfulness. 

In passing through the smooth water to the leeward of the Windward islands, 
and through the Mona passage, en route to Nassau, the monitor could be oesisted 
with a tow-line, and her fuel ppared for tbe rougher weather north, the ccimomy 
in coal compensating for the luaa ia time. Once at Kassau the difficulty, if 
there is any, is over. In case I decide on that route we shall be due in Nassau 
by tbe 5th of July. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. MURRAY, 
Captain and Senior Officer pretent. 

Hon. Gideon Wellgs. (" i \ iI - 

Secretary of the Nary, Washington, D. C. V^.OO^IL 



BEPOET OF THE SECRETAEY OP THE NAVY. 69 

Tho fnllowiug letter addressed to Rear- Admiral Goldiiboroagh cxplnina somQ 
matters which may be intcreeting to the departmeDt, and fills up the narrative 
of our return cruise ns far as Gibraltar : 

United States Steamer Auhusta, 

Gibraltar, May U, 1S67. 

Ad.miral : I have the honor to report my arrival at this port on the evening 
of the 8tb instant. We encountered heavy weather from the westward when off 
the southern part of Sardinia ; rather than exhaust the monitor's coal, 1 anchored 
under the lee of Point Caluuuc, island of San Pietr.i, which made nn excellent 
hnrbor during westerly winds. 

We arrived at Port Miihon on the Ath, and anchored o£F tl)c town in obedi- 
ence to the direction of the boarding officer, who informed me that there was no 
quarantine. After we had been anchored about an hour a boat from the acting 
governor ordered ns into quarjotiae, alleging that we had violated a. regulation 
requiring the Spanish consul's vita from ports visited ; the port alluded to being 
a little village some miles from Point Calonne, (Carlo fort.) a place we had no 
communication wiih. I looked upon it as a pretext, and with toe advice of Mr. 
Robinson, ihe consul, I declined to remain. 

We lowed the monitor here most of the way with perfect ease, nt the rale of 
six and a half knots an hour, (uncoupling her propellers,) the economy of fnel 
being very considerable, about one ton per hour. 

The authorities of Gibraltar have extended to ua with great promptitude the 
hoepitalitiea and servicea which we looked for inPort Mahon. Our " coal racks " 
are "up and the vessels are coaled, and in other veapect^i are ividy for service 
to-morrow ; wind and weather permitting, we anil in continuation of your 
instrucliona of the 30th ultimo. 

With many thanks. Admiral, for the conaideratc manner in which you have 
exercised your authority over ub whilst we have made a part of your squadron, 
and the hope that we may soon meet again on our own blessed soil, 
I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, ■ 

A. MURRAY, Captain. 

Rear Admiral L. M. Goldsborouoh, 

Commanding United States European Squidron. 

Having made eveiy preparatioa on board the monitor commensurate with the 
undertaking before us, we sailed from Gibraltar on the 15th, tonching at Santa 
Cruz, Teneriffe, on the 19tb, where we remained three daya, and arriving at 
Porto Qiande, Cape de Verde?, iin the 27th. We were diaappointed in not find- 
ing a supply of hard coal here, and on the Sth of June, leaving tho monitor at 
Porto Grande, I proceeded in the Augusta to Porto Praya. for reasons staled to 
you in my despatch (No. 8) of Jime 3, 18i37, as follows : 

United States Steamer Auqusta, 
Porta Grande, St. Vincent, Cape de Verde*. June 3, 18C7. 

Sir : I have the honor to report the arrival of thia ship and tbo Miantonomoh 
at this place on the 27th ultimo. The health of both ships is good. There has 
been no arrival of anthracite coal as we were le I to expect, and wo wait on the 
Buppoaition that we are too early. 

In case of there being no arrival of hard coal for tho m,>nilor'« n."o either here, 
where it should eome, or Porto I'myn, where ic might go, it io my intention to 
load up with soft coal, of which I find plenty, and trnsiing to that, our low-line, 
and trade winds, make for Barbndoea in furtherance of instructions. This inove- 
tmcnt, however, will not be inangnrated before the I5lh, leaving ample lime for 
he arrival of a coal vessel if one has been de-<pacched. 

Of courjie I shall not leave without making some arrangement (in caae the 



70 REPOKT OF THE SECEETARY OF THE NAVY. 

.dcpartmcot has not foreseeii that contingency) fur the discharge of a vessel ar- 
riving nfier onr departure, and the safety of the coal. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. MURRAY, 
Captain and Senior Oficer present. 
Hon, Gideon Wklles, 

SrcrelaryofikeKavy, Washington, D. C. 

On the 7th of June I returned and found the coal schooner Freddy Porter 
had arrived in our absence ; we immediately act to work and on the 12th dis- 
charged her and immediately sailed. 

For interesting matter iu connection with this harbor see supplement. Porto 
Grande, in my opinion, should be the seat of oar consulate ; it is very hcaltby, 
and article 196 of " Rules and Regulations for the Navy," in regard to visiting 
the shore after sundown, might be modified. 

The recrossing of the Atlantic was accomplished under the moat favorable 
circumstances as regards weather, but the monitor, in consequence of a foul bot- 
tom, did not behave so well, her average speed being but six and a half knots 
instead of seven, "which we made during the run from St. John's to QneehstowD ; 
she was also a greater part of the time aided by our tow-line, say nineteen ban- 
drcd mWcA. We arrived in Barbadocs on the SSth at 7 p. m., being thirteen 
days and two hours. 

She left Porto Grande with four hundred and seventeen tons of coal in bunkers 
and racks, (upwards of one hundred tons in racks;) these racks are still on her 
and would answer for any other monitor going on a long voyage. When she 
arrived in Barbadoes she had sixty-nine tons of coal on hoard, making a total 
expenditure of three hundred and forty-eight tons, or twenty-fonr tons a day, 
besides the advantages of wind and current ; she also improvised sails with ber 
awnings and boat sails. 

I bad tlie honor, under date of June 2C, 1867, (No. 7,) to report to you 
our arrival at Barbadoes, intrusting the communication to Commodore Bissell 
of the tlonongahcla, who happened to be in port and about to sail for St. Thomas 
when we arrived, 

Ttie coaling process is slow at Barbadoes, and we did not get off until mid- 
night of the 2d of July, instead of the 1st, as I expected. We carried out the 
programme I had notified you of to the letter, the question of time only being 
at fault. We arrived at Nassau on the 10th of July instead of the 5lh, as I 
expected, llie fourth of July for the second tiine this cruise was celebrated by 
ns ; on this occasion ve were in the Caribbean Sea, latitude 15^ 20' 51" north, 
longitude 63° 36' 36" west, weather pleasant, wind fair. We were dressed 
with flags all day, and at meridian fired a national salute, the monitor joiniog 
with ber signal gun. 

At Nassau we also found the coaling slow, which, with some little repairs, 
detained us till the 16th. From Nassau we took the direct route via Abaco; 
at 10 p. m. we passed "Elbow" or Man-of-war cay — there is a fine light 
on this dangerous cay — (latitude 26° 33' 30" north, longitude 7S° 5C' 30" 
west, 123 feet above the sea, a fixed light, visible 1 4 ^^ miles.) I do not find 
it upon any of the charts in our poi^seasion ; it has been in operation for two 
years. I concluded, however, as v/<; have been absent most of the time, that tlie 
alteration baa been effected ; it i^ in case not, that I respectfully make these 
remarks. 

We had fine weather, and, with the exception of one day, favoroble winds, 
from this to the Delaware. Indeed wo Lave been so much I'uvored of late by 
wind and weather that it is worthy of remark. From Naples to Philadelphia, a 
distance of seven thousand five hundred miles, we have ouly in two in^^tancea 
encountered head winds, viz : the second day out of Naples, and the day before 
we arrived in the Delaware. 



BEPOBT OF THE 8ECHETARY OF THE NAVY. 



71 



We sighted Hatteraa light on Ihe 20ih, and on tlie morning of the 22d Ih&d 
the honor to report by telegram from the hreakwater. At 6 p. m. wa anchored 
off the navy yard, Pliiladetphia, the ctcwb of both ships being in excellent 
health, and the vessels themaelvea in such a condition as to be readily enabled 
to repeat the service just performed. 

I am, very reepectfuUy, your obedient eert'ant, 

A. MURRAY, Capeain. 
Hon. GiDROK Wkllbs, 

Secretary of the Navy, Waihinglbn, D. C. 



Ahttracl of the cniie of the United Stales tkipi Augusta 
ending July, 1867. 



nd Mianlonomoh, 





Arrival. 


Diatance. 




















a. JohD. Juuo 5, 1886 
























Holsln^Fors, An^st 3, 1S66 










Stockholm, SeuloiLbei 19, 1H66 


4S0 miles. 








Cbcrbouw. Oolober 18. 1B68 






















Gibraltar, December 14, 1866 




GibraltRr. Decembers:), lt)66 














MaReilles. JBDuarr 17, 1667 








































Civita Veccbia, April 13, 1867 




tHviU VeccW April 18, 1867 

MaplM. April no. lWi7 




















Porto Graodfl, May 37. 1867 








Potto Fraya, Jun« 6, 1H67 








2,100 Qiil«. 


NuMn, July 17. IBii7 












Total 


17,767 milea. 



,ab,GoOgIc 



MVAL ACADEMY. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 

United States Naval Academy, 

Annapolit, Md., July 1, 1867, 

Sir : I have the honor to lay before you my annoal report concerning the 
operations at the Naval Academy for the term ending Jnne 20, 1S67. 

There were one hundred and sixty-five (165) candidates offered for examina- 
tion in July, 1866. Of thcBe eight were rejected by the medical board, forty- 
eight by the academic board, seven were recommended for re-examination, eight 
left during the examination, three were withdrawn, and ninety-one admitted to 
the academy. 

In September, 1866, of the candidates for admission three were rejected by 
the medical board, twenty-five were rejected by the academic hoard, and thirty- 
eight were admitted to the academy, making the whole number admitted during 
the academic year 1866-'67 one hundred and twenty-nine. 

Of the candidateE who offered themselves, it will be perceived that ninety- 
five failed to obtain admission to the academy from various causes. 

The failure of so large a number was dne to their total want of preparation, 
aud even among tboee who entered there were many who barely paased, and 
in whose cases the academic board felt no assurance that they could complete 
the course. 

I am of opinion that the pnrcnte and guardians of candidates cannot fail to 
comprehend from the regulations what the requirements are for admission, and 
if under these circumstances they send boys here so totally unfitted to perform 
the conrse required of them, they have only to blame themselves for any incon- 
venience to which they may be subjected. 

When the government gives a young man an education, such as he can obtain 
nowhere else, an income to support him four or five years while he is pursoin^ 
his studies, and an honorable profession at the end of his academic term, it is aa 
little US can be expected that the candidates should come here prepared in the 
few elementary principles which can be learned at any common echool in the 
United States, and which are within the reach of any mechanic. 

Even some of those candidates who have been selected after passing a com- 

fetitive examination elsewhere have failed at the first term examination here, 
t is with the bone of avoiding the inconvenience that parents and guardians 
are subjected to that I allude to this subject and point out the remedy. . 

In the first place parents and guardians and the commanders of approDtice- 
ships should inform thcmselvett fully with regard to the regulations, and not 
assume that they will not be carried out to the letter. 

The academic hoard lias no discretion granted it. The members endeavor to 
confine themselves to the strict letter of the law. There are cases where can- 
didates show more than ordinary talent, and would in the opinion of the board 
make good scholars and competent officers ; but being wholly unprepared, the 
board cuuld not conscientiously account for their written papers if called upon 
by the department to do so. Consequently, to avoid complications they con- 
fined themselves strictly to their instructions. 

Dniitizc-ctvCioogle 



KEPOET OK THE SECEETAEY OP THE NAVY. 73 

I estimate that tlic parents and guardiana of those caiidldateB who fail are 
enbjected to an expense of five thonsand dollars annually, to say ootbing of the 
unpleasant feelings experienced at the rejection of their sona. This might he 
avoided by a careful study of the regulations, which are so explicit as to leave 
no room for doubt. 

The standard of admission to this institation has been placed so low that any 
buy of moderate ability with n little diligence could pass the eiaminalion. In- 
this respect our government hn.i shown more liberality than any other that has 
a naval school. In the French navy a candidate for a cadetahip has to Icnrn at 
the polytechnic schools what the midshipmen here only know when they leave 
the academy \ that is, they know the elementary branches, and besides these, 
algebra, tiigonometry, descriptive and analytical geometry, astronomy, and 
navigation, integral calculus, drawing, &c., while with us the requirements are 
merely nominal. By oar system wo mast either obhiin an interior order of 
talent, or reject one-half of the candidates sent here. 

The common schools of the United States have the reputation of being the 
best in the world, and in no country is education more widely diffused. The 
conclusion, then, that one would come to is that proper attention is not paid to 
preparing candidates for admission before they come here, and it is not the exac- 
tions of the department that cause their rejection. 

A great improvement has been made this year in tlie office of storekeeper by 
the appointment of a paymaster in the navy to perform that duty. A proper 
system has in the first place been established, hy which there is complete 
responsibility on all sides. 

It ia no longer the custom to encourage midshipmen to mn in debt as heretO' 
fore, and under no circumstances can any one draw a single article from the 
paymaster without the supcriutendcnt's approval. The price of clothing has 
been diminished twenty per cent., and articles of a much better quality arc now 
provided. The result will be that the midshipmen will be much better clad, 
and will be enabled to save enough to give them a good outfit when they leave 
the academy. I beg leave to recommend that two dollars more per mouth be 
rererved from the midshipmen's pay for the purpose of purchasing at the end of 
the course on octant or sextant, and a silver comparing watch, articles with 
which every officer should be provided. This can bo douo without in the least 
interfering with other necessary matters. 

A good paymaster, as storekeeper, will always be an important addition to 
this institution, and I think it indispensable that ho should be provided with 
quarters inside the gi'ounds. The difficulty in procuring board in Annapolis is 
very great, and it is, when procured, not often of a kind to suit officers of the 
navy. The distauces from the academy are also great, and there are no vehi' 
cles in common use to get from place to place. Henco much of the storekeeper's 
time is taken up in goiug from the academy to the boardings house for meals.' 
I wonid therefore recommend that a house for tho storekeeper bo erected out 
of the unexpended appropriations of the year 18C6-'G7. 

I am happy to be able to report an improvement in the progress of the 
midshipmen in theoretical and practical exercises, aud hope at tbe end of 
another year to be able to report a atill further advauceraent, as I am not yet 
aatisGed that the midshipmen do as well as they can. The practical exercises 
this year have been good. The theorelical studies have, I think, been as well 
prosecuted as during any preceding year, if not better. There seems to be a 
growing tendency to excel in all the exercises ; and even noiv, to the uninitiated, 
everything appears to bo done in the best manner. I early adopted the plan of 
putting the new midshipmen through practical exercises on shipboard with yards 
and sails, and in knotting, splicing nud strapping blocks. The.first year the mid- 
shipmen seemed to take much interc.-t in these exercises, and a great spirit of 
emulation grew up among them, but finding that they gained nothiuc hv^it. 



76 RliPOET OF THE SECRETAEY Qt' THE NAVY. 

BesidcB models of all our vpsacla, there are purchaeea of every kind — all the 
blocks and thimbles need ia the navy ; wire and rope rigging of various sizes ; 
, sbi'pB full-rigged, at anchor and under sail; models of ships showing the manner 
of getting in maHts; sheara as used at dificrent navy yards, with purchases 
rigged; models used by the rebels as rams and ciippera. In fact, wo have 
introduced everything in any way bearing on the profession of seaman ship, and 
hope nest year to make still further additions. 

We have made considerable advance in practical seamanship, yet not so mach 
as I could desire The winter has been unusually severe, and so cold that only 
for a short period could practical exercises be successfully caried on. These 
consisted in sending up and down yards and masts, stripping ship, getting ia 
and out bowsprit, sending tops np and down, and fitting standing rigging. 

The exercises in sails have been few, owing to the weather, and the sails of 
the Macedonian having to be sent to Washington for repairs. It is to be hoped 
that the midshipmen will be inetrncted during the summer's cruise in those parta 
of practical seamanship in which I considered them deficient before they sailed. 

On the whole, there has been an improvement in the seamanship department, 
and a desire evinced by the officers acting as instructors to make this branch 
occupy, as it should, the first position in this institution. 

The gunnery department has been provided with almost everything needed 
in the study of gunnery, and there is not now the emallest article used in that 
branch of the naval profession that is not to be found among the colIecUon in 
the department. Indeed, the articles are too numerous for the space allowed 
them, but I hope to remedy this by converting two roomn into one. 

Among the articles alluded to is a complete set of small iron and brass ^nst 
representing every calibre used in the navy, with all the equipments complete. 
There are all the different kinds of torpedoes used by us and by tho rebels dar- 
ing the rebellion, and the various kinds of apparatus used to ignite them. 

Here are to be found all the instruments for testing guns, drawings of ballistic 
pendulums, chronoBCOpc, machine for testiog the velocity of shot, plans of field 
wurks " in alto," all kinds of shells and fuzes cut in Lalf to show the interior 
arrar)g^ment, different kinds of powder used in the navy, and, in fact, everything 
that can be thought of to promote the study of gunnery. 

For all of these we arc much iudebted to the chief of the Bureau of Ordnance, 
who has manifested a lively interest in all that relates tn ordnance matters. 

There has been a very rapid improvement in all the branches of this depart- 
ment, and by the end ot the next term I am confident that the excellence of the 
iustructiou will b" felt by every midshipman who is taught gunnery. 

Great progress has been made in firing at targets since the conversion of the 
United States steamer Santee into a place for practice and exercises. There is 
DO ship afloat that can be more rapidly prepared for battle, or where there is 
more completeness in all the details, than' the Santee. In one miuuto and fifty 
seconds the ship can be got ready for action in all the departments, and the 
management of the guns and precision of fire is admirable. 

Tiiis is the second branch in point of importance in the n ival profession, and 
should have a higher standard in the lift of studies. 

The drill in infantry tactics is well conducted, and 1 tbiuk the midshipmen 
will compare favorably with any military corps in the country. 

The howitzer drill of twenty-four guns is perfect of its kind, and if kept up 

its present style nothing more could be desired. Altogether, this department 

in a high stale of efficiency, though there are yet wanting a few things to 
instruct midshipmen in important matters relating to ordnance. 

The sehool-ahipa Macedonian, Savannah, and Dale sailed on the 12th of June 
for a cruise to Uherbourg, Portsmoutli, and Brest. The Macedonian had oif 
board one hundred and eleven midshipmen, the Savannah one hundred and 
twenlyfour, and the Dale forty three. The Savannah and Dale have been 



HEPOET OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY, 77 

thorougbly repaired luid fitted for the crni«e, and tbe Maccdouian lias been 
docked and put ia good order. 

We have nov a cheap practice e qua dron, compared to tbe one — composed 
of Bteamere and sailing vesaeis combined — that wo bad last year. 

Tbe cost of the steamers then used for three months amounted to a large sum, 
without, in 1117 opiaion, beneficing tho midshipmeu in proportion to ^he cost, 
and creating great confusion in changing tbem from ship to ship and breaking 
tip the spirit of emulatioD that would exist where they were kept on board one 
vessel daring (be entire cruise. 

I^he present Bystera'girea the officem in command an opportunity of showing 
their capacity in instructing midshipmen in seamanship, and at tbe end of tbe 
craise, when the vessels are inspected and exercised together, it can be seen 
which set of midshipmen have been ben<.'fited most during their absence from 
tbe academy. 

Ae I have said in a previous reporl, seamanship in all its Liranches is tbe 
most important thing for a naval officer to know, and without it all other naval 
knowleage is of little avail. I would then, while professing these opinions, 
recommend that the present system of sailing vessels he continued, and that 
steam and sails be not combined during a summer's cruise. 

I recommend, when the number of midshipmen at tbe academy is reduced, 
that a smaller vessel than the Savannah he put in her place. She is rather 
largo for the service required. A ship like the Portsmouth would he much 
better adapted for the duty. 

The department of natural and experimental philosophy, although possessing 
some good inslrumciits, is not provided with a building to do credit lo the sub- 
ject. Tbe experiments to illustrate the studies are most necessary, but I think 
the building, apparatus, and other appliances are totally inadequate to carry on 
the instruction as it should be, and there should be a separate building of a 
proper character ii. which to conduct the duties of this department. 

I beg leave to cull your attentioo again to tbe subject of quarters for officers. 
There arc now over thirty officers of the different branches of the service living 
out in tbe town, where they have much difficulty in obtaining accommodatiouB. 
It would add much to the discipline of the academy if they could live inside, 
and would condnce more to their own comfort and contentment. The small 
sum of fifty thousand dollars, asked for last year, would go far towards provid- 
ing for a majority of cases. Two small houses have been built this year, at an 
expense of eight thousand dollars, viz., four thousand each ; and they aro all 
that could be deshed for an officer — small and comfortable, easily furnished and 
heated, and well anitad for tbe purpose. Fifty thousand dollars would, at the 
present time, build ten more of tiie same kind, iacluding the fitting. We have 
ground for such an improvement near those already built. 

I would also beg leave to call your attention to the inadequate hospital ar- 
rangements, which have been noticed by every board of visitors to the Juatitu- 
tion. The hospital will only accommodate twelve sick persons, with two pa- 
tients in a room, which 1 do not consider a ham^e arrangement. If an epidemic 
of any kind should occur, the academy would necessarily be broken up for want 
of accommodations for the sick. As it is, there is much inconvenience and 
annoyance in attending sick midshipmen in their own rooms, which frequently 
happens for want of hospital accommodations. 

It has been my endeavor to promote the amusement of the midshipmen within 
the grounds, so that they would have no desire to go outside the academy limita. 
I am pleased to say that my effiirts in thia direction have met with great suc- 
cess, (at least in my opinion,) and there seems to he but little disposition to go 
outside the walls to seek amusement, or to indulge in vicious habits. There 
have been so few cases, whore any evil indulgences have come to my notice, 
that 1 like to think there is very little wrong done when the midshipmen are 



78 REPORT OF THE SKCEBTARY OF THE NAVY. 

not ander the restraint of discipline. The young gentlemen arc placed alto- 
gether on their honor not to violate certain regalations of the academy, and I 
believe they commit less wrong llian any other equal number of young men ia 
the country. I think there is a high sense of honor growing up among them. 
They arc eubjected to no espionage, and everything in reason has been done to 
make them happy and contented, and if they do not act honorably under the 
present system, it ia scarcely worth while to expect it nnder any other. I feel 
satisfied myself that there is a great disposition on the part of the roidshipiDen 
to do what is proper, and make this institution a credit to all concerned. 

It could scarcely be expected that there would be no'eiceptions to the role 
among BO large a number of young men, coming from so many different parts of 
the country, but there ate not many exceptions to the general good character, 
and there have been no instances of very flagrant conduct, althongli several have 
been found deficient in respect to their behavior. I trust, for the sake of all con- 
cerned, that the amusements of all kinds, now existing here, may be extended, 
and that all reasonable manly sports may he introduced and enconraged. The 
good efiect resnliing from them is already apparent in the muscular development 
among the mi<lshipmen, and their higher standing in their stndies, which ia a 
natural consequence of strengthening the body to sustain the mental fdcnltiea. 

Nearly all the amusements are supported by private suliscription, or ontside 
aid of friends, whereas all proper means of cultivating manly sports should be 
provided for by appropriation. 

The grounds of the academy are gradually becoming attractive, and all ves- 
tiges of the damage done to them by army occupation has disappeared. Over 
three thousand trees and shrubs have been set out, principally in the lower 
ground, which, before I filled it up, was quite swampy, and no doubt caused all 
the sickness of the first year. When these trees grow to a good size they will 
go far towards preventing sickness by breaking up and keeping off the malari* 
which ia brought from the marshes on the opposite shore. I hope I may meet 
with CDConrogement in the further adornment of the grounds. It tends not only 
to promote health, but to make them attractive to those who spend their four 
years of hard study here, and who should leave with pleasant reminiscences of 
the place where lliey obtained their education. Twenty-five thousand dollara 
were appropriated in 1866-'G7 for the purchase of land adjacent to the academy. 
I have, by your authority, purchased ten acres of land adjoining St. John's 
College, which we needed at once for the purpose of using the earth to fill tip 
and grade the grounds purchased from the State of Maryland. The latter have 
been put in handsome order, and are a great addition to the academy. 

The State of Maryland passed a law, at the last session of the legislature, 
authorizing me to have condemned such property as might be needed for the use 
of the academy, but I have, as yet, found no necessity to proceed with the con- 
demnation. The owners of property have made reasonable offers, and seem 
willing to accede to our terms. 

With the land we have purchased and the land of the gas company, of which 
we have the refusal, we shall have over two-thirds of the land we require. The 
remuning portion has on it a number of frame buildings and shanties, which 
' -e some time to look into ^eir titles and to come to an agreement about their 
; but I shall be able to state, before the December session of CongreBS, 
what the cost will he. The nineteen thousand dollars now remaining will not 
be sufficient to purchase more than a part of the grounds contignous to the 
academy, and further appropriation will liave to be asked for. 

These grounds will have to be purchased sooner or later, and every day that 
the purchase is postponed only increases the value of the property and the 
demands of the owners. 

I am happy to say that the health of the academy has been good daring th& 
year, and there has been no severe sickness among the midshipmen, owing to 



S. 



EEPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THB NAVY. TS' 



tfae improTement io the grounds, and estcnsioa of tbe drainage, which id grad- 
ually going on. 

1 beg leave to etate that the manHgement of tho different departmenta hafr 
met with my spproral, and that tbe heads of departments have been assiduous 
in their endeavors to promote instrnction and keep up discipline. 
I have the honor to be, reapectfnily, your obedient servant, 

DAVID D. PORTER. 
Viee-Admiral, and Superintendent Naval Academy. 
Hon 6iDEo\ Wbllks, 

Secretary of the Navy, Wathington, D. C. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF VISITORS— 1 807. 

United States Naval Academv, 

Annapolu, Md., June 5, 1867. 

The board of visitora appointed by the honorable Secretary of the Navy t«- 
witness the examinations at the Naval Academy in Uay, 1867, and to inquire 
into the state of its discipline and general management, met at Annapolis on 
the SOth, and commenced the duties assigned them, and continued until the 
examinations were completed and the several departmentB of the inatitntion hod 
been fully inspected. As each board of visitors, thus anuiially appointed, dif- 
fers in composition from its predecessors, and emliraces no continuity of BervicOf. 
it is compelled to rely npon its own investigations, and to report the actual con- 
dition of the academy when visited, without that fuller statement of its progress 
ot decline which larger experience. and a critical comparison with other visita- 
tions might afford. If, however, somethiog is lost in this respect, much is 
gained by the advantage which freedom from commitment to any particular 
theories, or to any previously expressed opinions, affords to each board for the- 
exercise of entire independence and impartiality in theircriticismand judgment 
npon whatever subjects come under their observation or discussion. And in 
tnifl connection we take great pleasure in saying that, while tbe superintendent 
and officers of the academy have, witli eagerness and courtesy, extended every 
facility in opening to our view all its departments and details, and in furnishing 
tiie results of their experience and their opinions when desired, there has been 
no effort made to obscure, or to shield from censure, anything faulty in its 
administration or discipline. Indeed, if there be one characteristic of the inati- 
tntion more striking than another, we believe it may be found in the opeur 
honest, and manly spirit which inspires both officers and pupils. 

A proper estimate of the valne and usefulness of such an iuBtilntion as tbi» 
will depend very much upon a right conception of tho object to be obtained, 
and the necessity of tho kind of means employed for securing it. The exist- 
ence and maintenance of this institution, and of the Military Academy at West 
Point; themselves declare the public judgment that ordinary schools and colleges 
do not and cannot furnish the peculiar instruction and training which ore re- 
quired by the military and naval service. Nor is there any thing at all singular 
in maintaining these schools for their special purpose, since we have always 
recognized the necessity and advantage of separate schools for instrucEion in 
Uw, medicine, and theology j and the increase of knowledge and the multiplica- 
tion of educational facilities are also bringing into existence separate schools for 
the study of science and the arts. War is no longer tho contest of brute force 
for the victory on land or sea, but among all civilized nations has been reduced 
to the three elements of science, aptitude, and skill. 

It is to be remembered, however, that all these prcfessional schools contem- 
plate a largo amount of previous study, and demand liberal attainments in their 



50 REPOET Of THE 8BCRETABY OP THE NAVY. 

candidates for admisBiou. Nor does the Military Academy form a complete ex- 
ception, eince ilB members enter at maturcr age than to tlie Naval Academy, and 
few of thi'm can graduate before attaining tbeir majoriiy. The qualificalions 
for adrnission arc placed at a corresponding standard. 

It is a well settled fact that the naval service requires that those wbo shall 
became its officers shall be selected at the earliest practicable age, in early youth, 
-while tlio mind is still impressible and plastic, and before the trusting and 
receptive p(-riod of childhood has wh'olly passed, and that they shall be imme- 
diately subjected to the studies, discipline, traditioos, and associations of the 
service, so as to develop in them such complete taste and preference for as well 
as skill iu their profession as shall secui-e the beet results of well-trained natural 
endowment. This early selection precludes that maturity of preparation which 
is required in candidates for professional schools in general; but it is believed 
that the minimum age now established cannot be materially iucreased without 
impairing the final completeness of the professional education. The board are 
therefore of opinion that this should be recognized as an -important and cooclu- ■ 
sive reason why the course of study iu the Naval Academy should embrace so 
many branches of a good English education as are compatible with the always 
paramount and more absolute claims of professional study. The years spent 
here form so large a portion of the school period of one's life, shutting him out 
from other opportunities for instruction, that failure iu this particular would run 
the hazard of limited and unbalanced development, instead of securing the 
■symmetrical expansion and general culture which form the solid bjjjis for 
responsible service. We are of opinion, however, that neither department of 
instruction need be neglected, but that, with more adequate preparation for 
admission, there is ample time, during the four years' study at the academy and 
the one year of sea service before the final graduation takes place, to accomplish 
all that is necess^try or expedient in the academic education of midshipmen. 
The greatest obstacle to the complete success of tlie institution arises from the 
imperfect and iusufficient preparation of so large a proportion of those who are 
sent here for admission, and the statistics of faUure, ( which Jiave been heretofore 
elaborately collated,) both to enter and to sustain themselves aftnr entering, 
show this evil to be of so grave a character that we respectfully present, wtUi 
camestneas and prominence, the necessity, both that the standard of qnalifica- 
tions be raised and that it be adhered to. In view of the great privileges which 
the academy bestows, and of the small number of the youth of the country, 
compared to the whole, who can under any circumstances eiyoy them, and of 
the more important consideration that to those who are here educated must be 
largely intructed the honor and defence of the nation id futnre conflicts upon 
the seas, the government has a right to expect and, we think, ought to demand 
that no candidate shall be admitted to the academy wlio is not at least thoroughly 
instructed in reading, writing, arithmetic, English grammar, and history of the 
United States, so as to be able to commsnce immediately with algebra and the 
French langnuge. These requirements do not exceed the qualifications for 
entering the ordinary high schools of the country, and are easily attained by boys 
of common intelligence at the age of fourteen years. How limited even these 
requirements are, will be seen in contrast with those adopted at the French Im- 
perial Naval School at Brest, where the minimum age for admission is the same 
as at the Naval Academy, namely, fourteen years; and the maximum one year 
less than here, or seventeen years. There is required for admission into the 
French school a knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, plane trigonom- 
etry, applied mathematics, natural philosophy, chemistry, geography, the 
English language, and drawing. Much has heretofore been said aud written in 
approval of selecting candidates by competitive cxominalion, and conld this be 
nniTersally adopted, it would no doubt operate as a guarantee against absolute 
/ailnre. But owing to the inconvenience of adopting this method in congree- 



REPOET OP THE SECBETART OP THE NAVT. 81 

eional districts which cover lai^ territory, the waat of some nniform atandflrd, 
and of eqnal competency on the part of local examiners, as well aa the fact that 
these appointments form part of tlio political patronage of the country, there is 
little hope that the mode sagi^ested will speedily, if ever, becnma general. 
Moreover, the records of the academy will show that from lack of qualified 
competitors, or from inaptitude or distaste for the service, candidates selected by 
competition have sometimes failed to exceed or even to reach the average of 
success in their respective classes. We are therefore of opinioij that security 
against unfit candidates will soonest be found in the establishment of a proper 
standard of qualifications, and by making the decisions of the examining board 
at tbe academy final. We also recommend that, besides the medical and scho- 
lastic examiners, there shall be added two naval officers, especially to decide 
npon tbe apparent aptitude of candidates for the naval service. A boy may be 
physically qualified, and also be intelligent enough to learn all that is required 
at tbifl inatiiution, and yet lack the essentials to make a good officer. He may 
have no taste for tbe profession, or love for tbe sea; he may be of a nervous 
or timid temperament, both of which are detrimental t« an officer ; and he may 
possess other disqualifications, which would not properly come under the inves- 
tigations of an examining or medical hoard. 

We have given considerable attention to the course of study pursued at the 
academy in respect to the number and variety of the brauches of which it is 
composed ; tlieir order of arrangement, and their relative valuation upon the rolls. 
While it is too full and varied for a portinn of the pupils to learn thoroughly, it 
is easily accomplished by tbe others, and wonld be by all, if all were suitably 
prepared on entering; and we think it embraces no more than ought to be 
required of those who aspire to the privileges which the institution sfibrds. It 
would not be expedient to lessen the amount of study to meet the deficiencies 
of the least competent pupils, hut to insist upon better preparation. The divi- 
sion of the classes into sections for separate instruction, easily accommodates tbo 
course to the different grades of proficiency, tbe higher divisions being carried 
through the entire course and to the maximum attainment, and the lower divisions 
to the maximum required, and as far beyond as they are capable of going. The 
course of study has been somewhat m'ldified during tbe past ye-ar. Descriptive 
and analytical geometry and calculus have been made elective studies; that is, 
not required as essential parts nf tbe course, but are recommended for those who 
have ability to take them; and the same credits are assigned to them as 
heretofore in the department of mathematics. The study of astronomy has been 
reduced to the requirenicnts of practical navigation, and physical geography. 
history, ethics, and political science are taught more in the form of lectures and 
less by text-books than before. We think it expedient that chemistry should be 
tangbt in the department of philosophy, except so much as relates to steam ; 
that more attention shonld be paid to drawing, and that mechanical drawing 
shall be taught by a drawing master. We also think that French should be 
commenced with the fourth class, and Spanish with the third class; and that 
Spanish should be taught throngh the French, and that more time should be 
given to each. 

The department of steam engineering has been greatly amplified during the 
past year, hy the erection and equipment of a large building for illustrating this 
mcreantngly important branch of naval education. 

Id this department three classes of midshipmen are pursuing the study of 
(team, steam macbineir. elementary mechanical drawing, chemistry as involving 
combustion and corrosion, and the elements of iron steamship construction, in aU 
of which, at the examination witnessed, they exhibited commendable proficiency. 
The first class was also exercised in the running and management of the laig« 
gunboat engines erected in the building, and operated them saceeaafiilly. No 

6» ^"'S''-'. 



82 EEPOKT OP THE SECEETiLET OF THE HAVT. 

more seems tohavebeen aimed &t in this department than to instruct tbe mid* 
shipmen in tlie general princitiles and m&nEtgement of the steam euginet bo far 
as to enable them to nnderstand its condition and use, and to afford them the 
nccessaiy information to judge of the competency and fidelity of those who are 
more especially charged with the operations and control uf the machinery of a 
naval steamer. The study of the higiier branches of st«am enginery, including 
the designing, construction and repair of engines, has not been attempted in the 
course of instmction for midsbipmeo. It having been found impossible to obtain 
cadet engineers under the law of 1SG4, a class of sixteen young men, graduates 
of well known scientific schools, were appointed acting third assistant engineers, 
and ordered to tlie academy to receive a two years' course of professional 
and practical instruction in mechanical engineering. The board was preeeut at 
the examination of this class, and was impressed with the great theoretical and 
practical proficiency displayed. It having been proved practicable to induce a 
class of youug men like those above mculioued, possessed of a thorungb scien- 
tific education already obtaiued without expense to the government, to join the 
engineer corps, we are induced to recommend that small classes be formed 
annually in like manner. The relative value assigned to the different branches,' 
we think, must be left for the most part in practical handi). Seamanship, gun- 
nery, navigation, mathematics, and steam, must always be the leading studies 
pursued ; and of these, seamanship must always be at the head ; the equatioa of 
the otbers named, and of the subordinate branches, may be safely left to toe super- 
intendent and tlie academic board. We would, however, suggest that higher 
valuation and more prominence be given to gunnery than at present, and in this 
we believe we shall have their concurrence. The number of midshipmen in the 
academy will now gradually be reduced by operation of the act of Congress of 
Uarcb 2, 1867, to about one-half the present number, and it may then be 
expedient to carry forward the higher divisions of the several classes in some of 
the more important faanches of study, or to afford facilities to individual mem- 
bers who possess genius and uncommon aptitude for any particular branch, to 
pursue its study beyond the limits of the ordinary course. We also thiuk it 
will be found expedient, as changes occur in the academic staff, to fill all such 
places by appointment of navai officers; and that all officers of instruction, if 
found competent for their i^uties, ^hall be appointed for the. term of four years, 
and that their respective terras of service shall be so arranged as to make the 
fewest simultaneous changes. The board, in whole or in part, have attended 
examinations of the several classes in the various studies of the academic course; 
and have aUo witoeesed exercises in handling large guns on shipboard, including 
target practice, in reefing sails and stripping ship, in infantry and howitzer drill, 
fencing, signal practice, practical steam enginery, &c., and the result was geu- 
erally very satisfactory, and in most cases eminently so. 

The officers and Insrrui^tors appear to be admirably qualified for their positions, 
and to be earnestly devoted to their work. We were gratified also to witness 
the alncrityi self-possession and iutelligence of the midshipmen, as showu in the 
clearness, accuracy and promptness of the theoretical examinations, and in the 
ease, versatility, and endurance which they exhibited in manipulation and prac- 
tice. The intercourse and relations of the officers and midshipmen appeared to 
be characterized by respect, confidence and courtesy, and all are animated by a 
Heal bordering upon enthusiasm in whatever is undertaken. Careful inquiry as 
to the moral tone of the academy, and the provisions for religions culture, 
assures us that these interests are sacredly guarded, and that Christiuu principles 
and sentiments are faithfully commended lo the consciences and hearts of the 
y«niig men. Uany midshipmen acknowledge their appreciation of Christian 
obligations, and maintain their religious professions with honor and credit. 

The general appearance of the academy is excellent; the new purchase, em- 
biacing the estate of the government boose of the ijlate of Uaryland, baa been 



BEPOBT OF THE SECBETAET OP THE HAVT. 83 

enclosed witbia tbe walls ; simple and inexpensive bat beaatifbl decorationi in 
the items of shnibs, flowers, Uwdb, and foantaios bave been made nnder the 
dif«ctioa of tbe superintend eat, and good taste and good order render the snr- 
ronndinga of the academy healthy and attractive to tbe midshipmen, and go far, 
as we believe, to increase their contentment and to cnltivate their love of tbe 
beautiful in art and nature. Our attention was called, by the superintendent, to 
tbe neceaeityof additional purchases of land for officers' quarters, a large number 
of the officers being still obliged to reside without tbe walla for want of accom- 
modation withiu. Our attention was also called to the unsuitable and insecure 
qnartem of some of the midshipmen, it having been necessary to provide tempo- 
rary safeguards to prevent them from falling; and also to tbe neceasityfor a prac- 
tical dentist attached ta tbe academy, and a more commodious hospital in a 
location less subject to the confusion and disturbances incident to a naval stalion; 
which subjects are more fully elaborated and enforced in ihe report of the san- 
itary committee of tbis board, which is appended hereto. The Doard commend 
each of these subjects to tbe attention of the honorable Secretary of the Navy. 
We also call attention to tbe opportunity nnw offered to purchase at a low price 
a considerable farm lying beyond the grnve-yard creek and easily put in com* 
mnnication with tha academy. We also think that additional apparatus should 
be purchased for the department <if natural and experimental philosophy; also 
that breech-loading muskets should he fumiahod in place of the old pattern 
now in nse. The board has examined the mess-room, culinary department, 
laundry, bakery, Sec, all of which are in a creditable condition. We have also 
looked into the commiasary department and find that the food supplied is healthy, 
varied and abundani ; not one complaint has reached us from any midshipman 
in respect to this or any other provision or point of discipline or instruction 
during the two weeks and more which we have spent st the academy. Sports 
and games of various kinds, such as bowling, gymnastics, baae-ball, boating, 
dancing, and the drama are provided or allowed, and even many of the practice 
exercises are so conducted as to render them recreative and refreshing. This 
wise and felicitous blending and alternation of duty with diversion, of labor with 
recreation, of confinement to stndy with vigorous exercise in the open air, is the 
end of desire and tbe peifection of discipline in this direction. It sends the glow 
of physical and mental health through this young family, in which is centred so 
much of tbe nation's hope, and purifies the atmosphere in which they dwell by 
causing the base and forbidden pleasures of appetite and indulgence to yield to 
the greater attractions of rational enjoyment. 

The board takes great pleasure, also, in recording its appreciation of the 
hospitable and generous liberality with which it has been entertained while ' 
engaged in this interesting and pleasant duty. Every provision has been made 
for our cr<nvenience and comfort; onr wii>heabavc utlbeen met, and our wants anti- 
cipated and abundantly supplied. We leave the institution not only impressed 
beyond expectation with its value to ibe country, with the completeness and 
thorongbnesB of its instructions and discipline, with tbe noble ambitions which it 
stimnUtes and sustains, but with most agreeable recollections of its personal 
comforts and social joys. 

We should fail in one of our highest duties, as well as in one of our sincerest 
gratifications, if we neglected to congratubite the department, and through it 
the country, upon tbe eminent fitness of the superintendent of tbe academy for 
this commanding and responsible position. His remarkable energy, industry, 
and vitality spread like inspiration among both officers and pupils, rousing and 
impelling them with a kindred zeal and a common purpose. 

If it be an opportunity rarely enjoyed lu mould tbe character and train tha 
handa of those who shull heretUler carry the flag of tbeir country, as tbe repre- 
sentative of its power and protection, alike through the channels of peaceful 
commerce or throngh the perils of future wars and Uie glories of future triumphs. 



84 REPOKT OF THE SECBETABT OF THE NAT7. 

it is equally rare that any country can call to this peetleea task one who from 
his own experience can enforce hU teaching with the splendora of historic 
achievement and challenge the aspiratioa of his pupils to no higher atandard 
than hia own example. 

All of which is respectfully aahmitted. 

G. F. FEAK80N, Rear-Admiral, and Pretident of the Board, 

G. V. FOX, New Hamp^Ure. 

DAN'L B. BIDGELY, Commadm-e United State* Navy. 

ALEX. H. BICE, Ma*$achuietU. 

WM. A. DABLING, New York. 

JNO. N. HAMBLETON, Paymatter United State* Navy. 

W. 0. WHITTEMOBB, Conneetieut. 

NIMAN PINKNEY, Surgeon United State* Navy. 

WM. SALTEB, Iowa. 

3. 0. HOWELL, Captain United State* Navy. 

Wli. BOBEBTS, Chief Engineer United State* Navy. 



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ESTIMATES-1868-'69. 

SECSETASrS OFFICE iHD QENEEAL 8UHUABT. 



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BEPOET OF THE SECBETART OP THE NATI. 



Summary ettimatetjbr talarie* and eoMtiiigent Jbr ike Navy Deparlment and 
bureaw, and nmthvxtt exeattiee bttilding,Jmr thejtteal year ending June 30, 



SecrelBjy'B offica — 

Bolariea .. .......... 

CoDlineent 

Baresn of Yards and Docks — 

Salaries .-. — 

Continpent 

Boiean of Eqaipmenl find SecmiUng — 

Salnries 

Conlm^nE . 

Bureau of Navigation — 

Salaries 

Contingent 

Bureau of Urdnance — 

Salaries 

Contingent — 

Bureau of CouBtrnction and Bepedr — 

Salaries . .- — ... 

Contingent ' 

Bureau of Steam Engineering — 

Salaries , 

Contingent — .. 

Bureau of ProTiilous and Clothing — 

Salaries 

Con&igeiit - .... 

Buieau of Medicine and Snrgery — 

Salaries 

Contingent 

Boothnest ezecuUve bnilding — 

SalBTiea , 

Contingent 

Totd 




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BBPOST OF THE 8l!:CBETA.RY OF THE IfATY. 



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BUREAU REPORTS. 



BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS. 

Navy Dbpartment, Bureau of Yards and Docks, 

Oetoher 1. 1867. 
Sir : Agreebly to your order of the 15tb of Augnst, 1867, 1 have the honor 
to Bubmit a report of work performed at the Beveral navy yardp, with the 
expenditnrea thereon, for the past fiscal year, wit]i eetimatea for improvemeatB, 
iqiaire, and contingent expenses for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1869. 

The amount estimated for the nest fiscal year appears large; but when it ill 
considered that nothing was aopropriated for improvemente fur the present fis- 
cal year, the sum total for all the yards and etatione will not enrprise yoa. 
MoBt of the objects asked foi in this estimate were presented last year and 
rejected by Congress. 

The immense espenditnre for construction, repairs, and machinery performed 
outside of the yards during the rebellioa has shown the necessity of more 
enlarged accommodations in our own eatablishmenta, where the work is more 
reliably done and with less expense. 

Our principal navy yards are too circumscrihed in area for the erection of 
large and expensive improvementa, and it is to be regretted that Congress has 
not heretofore provided for this enlargement. Seavey's island has been added 
to the Portsmouth yard, which will afford extended accommodations for improve- 
menta at that station. 

At Boston Congress has refused to grant appropriations for the porchase of 
important water front to that yard. We ask now for on apprnpriation to extend 
the yard for the purpose of making room for the erection of necessary buildings 
and abating a nuisance of a livery stable adjoining the yard. 

At New York the purchase of the Ruggles property has been consummated 
by virtue of a joint resolution of Con;ireas authorizing payment, without the 
consent of the legislature, that body having in two successive sessions failed to 
grant to the United States jurisdiction over the eame, aa requested. 

No improvementa have been estimated for at Philadelphia, for the reason that 
League island ia under consideration for a naval station. 

Washington aa a manufacturing yard ret^uires more room, and it is hoped 
appropriations will be granted to extend it. 

Norfolk has been, and probably will again be, one of the moat important 
naval stations in this country. It ia presumed that this yard will be re-catah- 
liehed, and it is hoped that appropriations will be granted to build it up as 
speedily as possible. 

Pensacola, the only navy yard or depot in the Gulf, requires much outlay to 
re-eatablisb it for the necessary accommodation of vessels in the Quif. 

Mare island is an importaut station, but the very high price of gold, in which 
BUppties and labor are paid for, is a great drawback to improvements there, and 
renders payment erobarrasaing, as salaries there are appropriated in curruncy, 
and per-diem labor in coin, which at times causes complaints by the salaried 
employes, the disparity in payment being very large. 

For report of the condition and expenditures at the diSerent yards and sta- 
tions, I commence with Portsmontb, N. H. 

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BEPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE HATY. 89 

FOBTSMOUTH. 

The works of improvemeat which h&ve beea completed at this ^ord daritig 
the fiscal year ending 30th Jane, 1867, am i condenser, iroa foundry, plumb* 
ere', coppersmiths' and tin-shops, grading, gutters and drains, siding mill, fitting 
and furnishing plumbers', coppersmiths' and tin shops, enlarging office building, 
ahop for iron-cladding and railway, &c., for floating drj dock. 

'These works have all been completed in a subaUntiu manner and are in snc- 
cessful use. The amount expended upon the eeyeral objects during the fiscal 
jear is,: for materials 95,809 64, and for labor $36,933 06, making an abro- 
gate of (43,741 70. 

The improvements which have been in progress dnring the year, but which 
are not yet completed, are : quay walla, macbiaery and tools, road and timber 
slips, oakum store, and repairs of all kinds, 'rhe amount .expended upon these 
objects during the year is : for materials S2d,013 15, and for labor $54,798 31, 
making an aggregate of S79,8U 46. 

The work upon these objects has progressed in a satisfactory manner, and ae 
' rapidly aa the funds allotted would permit. The work on one of the most 
unportant oljects, the quay wall, has been easpended in conaequeDce of the 
exhaustion of the funds. 

There has been expended at this yard during the fiscal year for objects coming 
under the bead of " contingent " the sum of St23,777 29. 

Estimates are submitted for the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1869, for the 
following objects, for the e'pecial use of the Bnrean of Constmction and Repair, 
viz: ship-house, 350 by 140, over railway, joiners' shop over timber shed Mo. 
27, sawmill 150 by 80 feet, iron-platiog ebop 300 by 100 feet, and timber shed 
215 by 65 feet, amounting in the abrogate to 8293,000, 

For the Bureao of Steam Engineering an estimate is sabrnttted for machine 
shop, fonadry, boiler shop, forge aud amilha' shop, and for grading, amounting 
, to SI 50,000. 

For the Bureau of Tards and Docks, and for general purposes, estimates are 
submitted for timber shed, joiner shop, and storehouse, quay wall, grading, 
gutters and drains, auU for repairs of all kinds, amounting in the aggregate to 
S374.83S. The total amount estimHted for this yard being S717,828. 

Most of the objects estimated for at this yard were asked for last year; the 
necessity for them still exists, and in an increased degree, and therefore the 
estimates are again submitted, and the appropriations are strongly arged. 
Until recently this yard was of very limited area, and great inconvenience and 
loss have been incurred in consequenceof the want of proper workshops and the 
insufficiency of working ground, nut since the enUrg'.'meiit of the yard by the 
purchase of Seavey's island there is ample space for all the requirements of th« 
service at this station, and it is hoped that Congress will famish the means to 
render this valuable addition to the yard available for useful purposes. 



The improrements which have been completed at this yard daring th« fiscal 
year ending the 30th June, 1867, are : paving and draining at new shops, coal 
shed for foundry, smitbery, &c., house foundation and heavy hammer, steam 
fire-engine, addition to stable, and miscellaneoos improvements. The amount 
expended on these objects daring the year is; for materials 921,143 88, and 
for labor 867,406 88, making an aggregate of 988.550 76 

These works have been completed in a sabstantial 'and permanent manner, 
*ad are io successfnl use. 

The works which have been in progress during the fiscal year, but which are 
Mt yet completed, are : topewalk machineiyand spinning preparation, exteur 

oogic 



90 BEFOBT OF THE 8ECBETAKY OF THE NAVT. 

eion of shear wharf, paving and draining around Ary dock, railroad tracks, tools 
and machineBformachineBhop, tilling in portion of timber dock, and repairs of all 
kinds. The amount expended upon these objects during the first fiscal year is : 
for materials t77,731 02, and for labor St33,723 45, making an aggregate of 
*^1 1,454 47. 

Several of these works will probably be completed during the year 1867, and 
the others are well advanced. 

There has been expended at this yard during the year for objects coming 
under the head of contingent the sum of $274,672 60. 

Estimates are submitted for the fiscal year ending 30th Jaue, 1869, for the 
following objects, for the especial use of the Bureau of Oonstraction and Repair, 
viz : iron-plating shop, blacksniitb sliop, iron store, coal shed, paint shop, gal- 
vanizing shop, marine railway and cradle, boom derrick, improvement to joiners' 
shop, saw-mill, ehip-house, two pile wharves, and repairs of buildings, anaonnt- 
ing to $715,000. 

For the Bureau of Steam Engineering estimates are submitted for extension 
of machine shop, extension of foundry, erecting shop, general store, iron and 
metal store, two coal sheds, paving tracks, and water pipes, large crane, filling 
in and foundations, and for repairs, amounting in the a^regate to 8416,850. 

For the Bureau of Kqnipment and Recniiting estimates are submitted for 
completing second story of ropewatk, improvement in tarring house,' and for 
rigging loft, amounting to the snm of S3S0,910. 

For the Bureau of Ordnance estimatea are submitted for smithery, brass 
foundry, tinners' and painters' shop, house for fitting sights and locks to gnus, 
grading and paving, and for fire-proof doors and shutters to ordnance building, 
amounting in the aggregate to the sum of {72,550. 

For the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing estimates are subtnittud for TnEt's 
safety eirvator and boiler, amounting to 84,000. 

For Bureau of Navigation an estimate is submitted for a building for the 
storage otjo\[a, amounting to 315,343. 

For Bureau of Tards and Docks, and for general purposes, estimates are sub- 
mitted for quay wall, entrance gateway, dredging channels, engineer's shop and 
atorebonse, master-office building, extension of storehouse Mo. 15, drains, pav- 
ing, and flagging, filling low places, land fur officers' bouses, seven houses for 
officers, boat landing, filling in timber dock, repairs of dry dock, and for repaira 
of all kinds, amounting in tho aggregate to the sum of 8807,482. 

The total amount estimated for all the bureaus at this yard is tSt.383.135. 

A large nnmber of these objects were estimated for last year, and in the 
bureau's report the especial reasons for each object were given. The appropria- 
tions are still greatly needed. This large and important yard possesses many 
facilities for toe execution of the public work, but is still deficient in many 
important particulars to put it on an equal footing with what might be called a 
first-class establishment. Several large vessels are now building, and a nnmber of 
others are fitting out at this yard, and the extra cost incurred from the want of 
proper facilities and means fur executing the work expeditiously and economi- 
cally would go far towards providing those facilities for future operatrons. 

Ibese buildings and other improvements must be constructed at some period, 
and the sooner it is done the greater will be the saving to the government. 

The events of the last six years have proved that our yard« are tno circum- 
scribed, and how aadly our navy yards are deficient in the means to build and 
sustain a large navy, and it is the part of wisdom to provide them at once before 
the recurrence of similar exigencies. 



The improvements which have been completed at this yard during the fiaeal 
year ending 30th June, 1867, are: hoisting apparatus, new derrick, rebuilding 



BEPOBT OP TEE SECHBTAEY OP THE NAVT. 91 

dry dock, qoay wa]I at aav-mill, railways, filling low places, machinery for pat- 
tern, boiler, and machine shops, repairs of engines in machine shop, eeneral 
increase of machineiy, special repairs, and protecting unfinished baildinin. 
The amonnt expended npon these various objects dnring the fiscal year is ; for 
materials <51,348 73, and for labor $91,311 23, making an aggregate c^ 
tl 42,559 95. 

The works which have been in progress during the fiscal year, bat which are 
not yet completed, are : dredging channela, repairs to ship houses, extension of 
sewer, chain cable shop, quay wall at sewer, improveraents at dry dock, machine 
shop estensioa, iron-plating shop, receiving store, launchiug ways, ship house 
D| launching ways for steamers, large chuck lathe, machinery for iron-plating 
shop, machinery for machine shop extension, addition to joiners' shop, three 
Bleam hammers, moater office addition, and repairs of all kinds. 

Upon these various objects there has been expended during the fiscal year 
for materials {160,654 41, and for labor <265,26D 63, making an aggregate of 
t4S5,9I5 04. ' 

The work upon these numerous objects hae been prosecuted with vigor, and 
the progress made during the year is quite satisfactory. 

The amount eTpended during the year for objects coming under the head of 
"contingent" is 8295,929 51. 

Estimates are submitted for the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1869, for the 
following objects, for the particular use of the Bureau of Construction and 
Bepair : estimates are submitted for iron-plating shop, timber and knee basin, 
■hip house and launching ways, two timber sheds, and paint shop, amounting 
in the aggregate to the sum ot £1,485,870. 

For the Bureau of Steam Engineering estimates are submitted for machine 
shop, main building, boiler sliop, and erecting shop, amounting to 8805,410. 

For the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting an estimate of S7 4,664 is sub- 
mitted for establishing a coal depot. 

For the Bureau of Yards and Docks, and for general purposes, estimates are 
submitted for quay wall towards Vanderbilt avenue, dredging channels, and 
filling low places, drains, paving and flagging, Bulkley's patent lumber dryer, 
four houses for commissioned officers, yard railway, yara wall, police, station, 
fitnr houses for warrant officers, water pipes and hydrants, quay wall at new 
derrick, basin for sectional dock, and for repairs of all kinds, amounting in the 
agnegate to the sum of £1,547,770. 

The total amonnt estimated for improvements and repairs for all the bureaus 
at this ^ard is 83,913.714. 

At this important yard an immense amonnt of work is being done ; the 
wharves are crowded with vessels, and the demands upon the different work- 
shops are greater than can be promptly supplied by the present small and com- 
paratively inefficient shops. 

The naval establishment at this, the largest commercial port of tbe country, 
should be extensive and as complete in its arrangements and facilities as possi- 
ble, and to make it so large appropriations are required. 

Most of the objects above named were estimated for last year, but OoDgreea 
failed to make any appropriations for them ; some of the works had been com- 
menced under former appropriations, but in coneeqnence of the insufficiency of 
tbe funds, their completion is delayed and the work liable to injury. Tbe occa- 
tioutl Buspepdion of operations on these objects greatly increases their cost, and 
it is of the utmost importance that they should be kept steadily in progress 
until finally completed. 

It is hoped that Congress will recognize the necessity fbr putting this import- 
ant station in a proper and efficient condition at aa early day, and will grant 
Hberal appropriations to consummate that object. 

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92 BEPOBT OF THB 6ECRETAST OF THE NATY. 

FHILADBLPBIA. 

The improvementfl wliicb have been completed at thia yard dnring the fiacal 
Tear ending 30th of June, 1867, are: aaw-mill, and ezteneioa of Bonth pier 100 
feet. The amoant expended upon theee objects dnring tbe fiscal year is : for mate- 
rials t2lMi 64, and for labor S3,431 41, making an aggregate of 934.876 05. 

The works which have been in progress, bnt which are not yet completed, are : 
dry dock, dredger, brick wall to new purchase, filling in bulkhead, and repairs 
of all kinds. Tbe amoant expended npon these objects during the fiacal year 
is : for materials $41,867 2S, and for labor t43,677 SI, making an aggr^ate of 
186,564 43. 

The amoant expended darihg the fiscal year for objects coming ander ibe 
head of contingent ia 9113,556 93. 

Estimates for tbe fiscal year ending Jane 30, 1869, are submitted for the fol- 
lowing objects, viz ; for lightning rods to yard buildings, and for repairs of all 
kinds, amounting to the sum of 888,883. , 

In view of the proposed removal of this yard to League island, it ia deemed 
not necessary to ask for any appropriations for permanent improvements at this 
station. The amonnts aeked for are for the proper care and preservation of the 
public property. 

WASHINGTON. 

The improvements which hare been completed at this yard during tbe fiscal 
year ending Jane 30, 1867, are ; extension of copper rolling-mill, new cradle for 
marine railway, paint shop, smithery, and extension of iron fonndry. The 
amount expended during tlie year is ; for materials 829,307 33, and for labor 
130,746 39, making an aggregate of 850,053 71. 

Tbe works which have been iu progress daring the year, bat which are not 
yet completed, are : dredging channels, gas works, machinery and tools, yard 
rail tracks, depot for coal, and repairs of all kinds. 

Upon these objects there has been expended during tbe fiscal year, for mate< 
rials 803,465 73, and for labor 875,344 86, making an aggregate of 8167,610 59. 

The amoant expended at this yard during tbe fiscal year for objects coming 
under head of coatingent is 8178,419 10. 

Estimates are submitted for the fiacal year ending June 30, 1869, for the fol- 
lowing objects for the Bureau of Equipment and Recrniting, for coal depot, and 
bnilding tor manafacturing of wire rope, amounting to SS9.3S4. 

For Bureaa of Ordnance an estimate is submitted for the removal of the ex- 
perimental battery, amounting to 814.900. 

For the Bareau of Tarda and Bocks, and for general purposes, estimates an 
submitted for rail tracks, fiaggint^ and draining, extension of yard west, coal 
wharf, five honsea for officers, and for repairs of all kinds, amounting to the earn 
of 8393,161. 

The aggregate amoant estimated for nil the bureaus is 8426,415. 

A large portion of the amoant asked far this yard is for an extenaion of its 
limits west. On several occasions, heretofore, an appropriation has beeo arg«d. 
bat without success. 

This yard was found to be of immense service during the past six years, and 
the necessity for its eztensioa became more appareut ; there are already a num- 
ber of extensive shops well snpplied with machineir for the mannfactare of 
various important articles for the service, bat very limited area for working 
groaud ontside the buildings, and for sites for other huildinga, is a source tn 
great inconvenience and expense. 

Tbe purchase of this land is very desirable, and indeed without it the yard 
cannot be brought to that atate of nsefulness and efficiency which the necessities 
of the service require. The other objects estimated for are greatly needed, and 
it is earnestly hoped ^at the appropriatioas will be granted. i 



BEPOBT OF THE 8ECBETABT OF THE NATT. 93 



The improvementa which have been completed at tliis yard daring the fiscal 
year ending 30th June, 1867, are ; carpenter's shop, entrance bnildiage Nob. 19 
and 37, building N^o. 11, boat-shed No. 39, timber sheds Noa. 30 and 31, naval 
store No. Ift, and building No. 13. These buildings have, most of them, been 
bnilt by contract, and the amoaat expended npoa them during the year is 
J250.965 81. 

The works which have been id progress daring the fiscal year, but which are 
Bot yet completed, are : stables, dredging, railroad tracks, wharves, machinery 
and tools, and repairs of all kinds. 

^here has been expended npon these objects Aring the year, for materials 
939.608 30, and for labor ¥12,733 64, making an aggregate of 853,330 94. 

The araonnt expended during the year for objects coming under the head of 
contingent is t85,Q55 19. 

Estimates are snbmitted for the fiscal year ending 30th Jane, 1869, for the 
following objects, viz : for the particular use of the Bureau of Construction and 
Repair, timber shed and oakam lufV, storehouse for tar, pitch and rosin, two tim- 
ber sheds, iron-plating shop, storehouse for galleys, iron and plumbing, and 
ship house No. 48, amounting to the sum uf $334,073. 

For the Bureau of Steam Engineering, estimates are submitted for atore- 
bonae for oils, spirits turpentine, &c., amounting to 923,456. 

For the Bureau of Yards and Docks and general purposes, estimates are sub- 
mitted for stables, rail tracks, eight houses for officers, and for repairs of all 
kinds, amonnting to 8386,616. 

The aggregate amount estimated for all the bureaus is $646,145. 

This is one of our most important navy yards, and having been utterly de- 
stroyed daring the war, lat^ appropriations are needed annnally for some time 
to place it in a state of elBciency. Several of the buildiugs have been recon* 
stmcted, and the facilities provided have been such as to enable the department 
to repair and refit a large number of vessels, but still there is a large deficiency 
in workshops, storehonaes, timber sheds, and the various appendages necessary 
to constitute a complete navy yard. Congress at its last session failed to make 
any appropriation whatever for this yard, and consequently the department has 
not the means to provide for the repairs of the existing works or to meet any 
expense for their care and piotection from injury from any cause. In view of 
the very great importance of this yard, it being the only navy yard on the 
Atlantic coast south of that at Washington, it is hoped that Congress will fur- 
nish the means to put it in a condition commensurate with its importance to tha 
service. 



The improvements which have been completed at this yard during the fiscal 
year ending 30tb June, 1867, are : smiths' shop, coal whait, muster otfice, kitch- 
ens Noe. 1, 7, 8, 9 and 10, dwelling at live oak plantation, and rail tracks. 

There has been expended upon these objects during the year, for materials 
(9,127, and for labor C2S,013, making an aggregate of 934,140. 

The works which have been in progress daring the year, but which are not 

fet completed, are ; storehoue No. 25, new gate to dock banin, and repairs of all 
inds. Upon these objects there has been expended during the year, for 
materials t37,344 36, and for labor 975,508 47, making an aggregate of 
9112.652 83. 

The amount expended daring the fiscal year for objects coming under the 
head of contingent is 940,082 71. 

Estimates are submitted for the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1869, for th« 
following objects, for the especial Qse of the Bureau of OouBtmction and Bepaini 



94 EEPOET OP THE 8ECEETABT OP THE NATT. 

mould loft and conatnictor'B workshop, emitliB' and armor-plating shop, spar 
shed and Bhip-joinen>' shop, oakum loft and pitch-boiling house, and sBw-mill 
and block shop, amountiag in the aggregate to S187,653. 

For Bureau of Steam Engineering, eatimates are submitted for smitha' shop 
and fonndiy, and iron and coal house, amoonting to $29,146. 

For Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting, estimates are submitted for coal 
hoaae, limber shed and sail loft, and timher shed and rigging loft, amounting to 
S191,444. 

For Bureau of Ordnance, estimates are submitted for ordnance workshopa 
and storeliiiuses, and for shell house and rail tracks, amounting to 899,337. 

For the Bureau of Yards qjpd Docks and for general purposes, estimates are 
submitted for san-mill and joiners' shop, guardhouse and prison, commtindant's 
and other offices, blacksmiths' shop, three kitchens for officers' quarters, rail 
tracks, grading avenues and laying sidewalks, paint ehop, storehouse, quarters 
for ordinary, commandant's quarters, fourteen houses for officers, four houses for 
warrant officers, care and improvement of live-oak plantation, large iron crane, 
Bulkley's patent lumber drier and patent right, and for repairs of all kinds, 
amounting in the aggregate lo the sum of 8749. 31G. 

The total amount of estimates for all the bureaus at this yard is S1,256,8S5- 

This important yard, the only station on the Gulf of Mexico, was entirely 
destroyed auring the war, and since then but little has been done towards restor- 
ing it to its former condition. It is very desirable that means should be provided 
to place this yard at least iu a condition to supply the wants of the squadron in 
that vicinity, for without fecilities there, all ve-ssels suSeriug damH{;e from storaie 
and other causes must necessarily travel Ion) 
injuries may be repaired and wants suppliei 



No report having been received from this yard, the bureau is unable to state 
the progress made upon the various objects during the year. 

The amount expended upon the improvements and for repairs of all kinds 
during the fiscal yearis, for materiHls «I72,835 17, and for labor «199,2.53 70, 
making an aggregate of «37S,087 87. 

The amount expended during the fiscal year for objects coming under the 
bead of contingent is 8136.646 85. 

Kstimates are submitted for the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1869, for the 
following objects, for the particular use of the Bureau of Construction aud Be- . 
pair : spar and boat house No. 27, commencing timber shed, and for paint shop, 
amounting to the sum of $182,023. 

For Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting, an estimate is submitted for chain- 
cable and anchor sliop, amounting lo ST2.350. 

For Bureau of Yards aud Docks and for general purposes, estimates are sub- 
mitted lor coritiuuation of quay wall, officers' houses Nos. 10 and 13, grading 
and paving, bath-rooms for six officers' honses, and for repairs of all kinds, 
amounting to the sura of 8375.560. 

The total amount of estimates for all the bureaus at this yard is 8530,433. 

This navy yard, being the only station on the Pacific coast, is of much im- 
portance, and it is highly necessary that it sh.mld be brought into a state of 
efficiency to meet the requirements of the service at that distant point. 

Some progress has been made in the construction of the various buildings 
necessary for a navy yard, but many other buildings are needed, and it is bopeid 
that Congress will see the propriety of appropriating the means for their erec- 
tion. The works estimated for have been reported before and appropriations 
asked, but without success. 



Dniitizc-ctvCioogle 



SBPOBT OF THE SBCBKTAKT OF THB NATT. 95 



The amoant expended at tbis etation daring tbe past fiscal year, for th« 
repain nf the wbarrea and botldinge, is (806 59. 

Estimates are eabinitled for ibe fiscal year ending 30th Jane, 1S69, for the 
eonstmctiun of a eoal shed for the Bureau of £i]nipmeut and Recruiting, 
110,000, and fim- tepaiie of ail kinds 16,000, making au a^i^ate for the station 
of tl6,000. 

SACKBTT'S HAitBOR. 

The expenditnrea at this station daring the fiscal year ending the 30th Jitne, 
1867. have been for the usnal and necessary repairs of the buildings, docks, 
roads, and fences, and amoant to the snm of $2,SJ4 43. 

For objects coming under the head of contingent there has been expended 
daring the year tl5U 86. 

For the necessary repairs of bnildings and wharves and the proper care of 
the public property during the liscal year ending 30lb June, 1869, there will 
be re^nired the sum of 84,000. 

MOIiND CITY. 



The only object of improvement completed at this station daring the fiscal 
year ending 30tb Jnne, J 867, is the con.itrnction of a levee in front of the pub- 
lic property ; ihis work has been done by cantract at an expense of SC,500. 

Uuder ttie head of emergeueies at naval stations, there has been expended 
during the liscal year the sum of S7,84S 03. 

The amount expended duriii>r tUe tiscal year for objects coming nnder the 
head of contingent is $11,870 71. 

Estimates are submitted for the repairs of levee, and general care and pre- 
servation of buildiijgs, during the fiscal year ending 30th June, IS(j9, amount- 
iug to the sum of ^5,000. 

At ihid station there are a number of iron-clad vcbbcIs laid up, and some of 
tbem undergoing slight repairs; there are bat few buildings at the tttation and 
those much dsmaged by rt-cent l]ood»,atid the am onnt estimated will be required 
for their repairs and tho proper care and preservation of public property. 

NAVAL ASVLl'M. 

There were on the Ist of July, I8C6, one hnndrrd and fifty-nine persons, 
including officers and attendants, borui: on the rolls of tbi> iisylum. 

Eight bi-ntficiai'ies have been admitted, vix have died, two have been dis- 
missed, auil two bave been seut to tliu insane asylum, duriug tho fiscal year 
ending 30th Jane, 18G7. 

The afiiiirs of the institution have been managed in the usual judicious, eco- 
nomical, and humane manner during tlie fiscal year, and the olHcers in charge 
have exerted theniselvee to render the beneficiaries as comfortable and con- 
tented as possible. 

The beneficiaries generally conduct themselves properly, and set-m to appre- 
ciate the benefits they derive from this comfortable home in their old ago. Cases 
of insubordination sometimes occur, but these art' promptly corrected by the 
rigid enforcement of the mles for the government of tho itiHtitation. 

The amount expended for the usual annual repairs, cleaning and whitewash- 
ing, water and gas, &c., is S9,031 77. 



.dbyCoogle 



96 EEPOET OP THE SECRETABT OF THE NAVI. 

The expenses of the institation for tbe support of the beneficiaries and paj 
of officers and attendants during the fiscal year are aa follows : 

Subsistence $22,037 99. 

Clothing, tobacco, &o :., 7.ft02 31 

Miscellaneoua items 6,042 13 

Officers and attendantfl 25,313 04 

Aggregate - 60,895 47 



The total amonnt expended during the fiscal ^ear ia 869,9S7 S4. 
The amonnt estimated for the support of the institation during tbe fiscal jear 
ending 30tb June, 1869, ia for furniture and repairs of the aame, houBe-cleaning 
and whit«waabiog, fnmaces, grates and ranges, gas and water rent, generd 
improvementa and repairs, and for the suppnrt of tae b en efici drills, S63,60O. 
I have the honor to he, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOS. SMITU. Ckuf of Bureau. 
Hon. GroBON Wbllbs, 

Secretary of the Nary. 



Schedule of paper* accompanying the report of the Chief of the Bureau of 
Yardt and Docki to the Secretary of the Navy, dated October 1, 1867. 
A. — General estimates for yards and docks. 
Mo. 1. — Estimates foi; the support of the bureau. 
No, a. — Estimates for officers and others at yards and stations. 
No. 3. — Statement showing the sums which make up tbe first item of T. 

&D.A. 
No. 4. — Estimate for improvement and repairs at yards and stations. 
No. 5. — Estimate for repairs of all kinds, abowing the sums which make up the 

amounts under this head in Y. &. D. No. 4. 
No. 6. — Statement of expenditures under the head of contingent during the past 
fiscal year, and estimates for the same for tbe fiscal year ending June 
30, 1869. 
No. 7.— Estimates of appropriations under the cognizance of the Burean of 
Yards and Docks, required for tbe service'of the fiscal year euding 
Jane 30, 1869. 
No. 8.— Abstract of offers for supplies for tbe fiscal year ending June 30, 1868 
JOS. SMITH, Chief of Bureau. 
BuBEAD OP Yards and DocRa, October 1, 1867. 



Dniitizc-ctvCoogle 



BEPOfiT OF THE SECBETAEY OP THE NAVY. 









of the seveni 11&V7 ;ards and Navsl Asjlnm, (tee Y, &. D. 


10,141,036 00 
l,23!,o00 00 




2. For the improvements uid repura at the nsvj yardB, Itationi, 
MidN»yBlAay!nm,{iieeY.&D.No.4) 

a For conlinBeDt expenseB thai maj accme daring the fiscal 
jear, for ^e following pnrpoao*, rii : Forfreighl and trana- 
porteUon of maMriab and storea for Boreui of Yaids and 
DoekapnipoMi; fbr printing, atuionetjr, utd •dvertialng 

inn for Bnrenn of Yards ud Docks purposes ; for pnrehaM 
•DO Tepaira of fire engines ; for machinery, and patent right 
to nse the same, for Barean of Yards and Docks purposes ; 

for Bureau of Yards and Docks purposes ; for pnrchose and 

and timbn trbeets for navy yard purposes, and tools and 
repairs of same, tor Bureau of Yards and Docks purposes ; 

fbr coal and other fhel for Bureau of Yards and Docks pnr- 
Docks purpoMi ; for cleaning and clearlog np yard and 

Borean of Yards and Docks purposes ; for water tax, and 
fbr tolls and ferriages for Bareau of Yards and Docks pur- 

inirs, and packing boxes for Bureau of Yards and Docks 


7,712,076 








l],M2.m26 









BuRBAD OP Yards and Docks. 



Y. & D. No. 1. 

flfiwifn eflht amount Ttattirtdfor Ibt tupport o/thtBuTtau BfYardi and Docks far Ikofyeaf 

tear tnding Jmt 30, IB69. 
Toi salary of civil ani^neer, per act of Uarch 3, 1683, Statutes at Large, pamphlet 

«dWoD, chapter IIB, section l.pageSlS |3,000 

For silaiT of chief clerk, fourth class, per act of July &, 1862, Statutes at Large, 

IMaphlet editioD. chapttf 134, section 3, pare 511. 1,800 

Var MUriea of one clerk of clasa four ; two clerks of class three ; one dark of class 

two, and one clark of clau one, per act of July 93, 1866, section 6, and Uarch 

* lem 7,600 

Wat nimrj of dranKhttmu, per act of July 23, 1666, Median 8, and March 2, 



7n 



DigmzedbyGoOgle 



98 REPOET OF THE SECEETAKY OP THE NAVY. 

FoTBalsrj of messMiger, peratt of Jiine25, 1864 $I,00O 

For wBge« of two liibiirers, oae for tha bureau, the otber for tba ofBce of tho engi- 
neer and dranghlsniao, per act of June '25, 1»64 1,M0 

16,64 

For amount respectful 1; submitted as increase of salar; of chief clerk 400 

Total 17,040 

Appropriated for the year ending June 30, J868 116,240 



CONTINflENT E 

For atationeiy. books, plana, drairings, and incidental labor $1,600 

Appropriated for tbe jear ending Juno 30, 1S6S --- tl,M)0 

Bureau of Yards and Docks. 



Y.& D.No. 2. 



enffineer, at $6 per diem $1,678 

I dTaugbtsmnn to civil ougineor .. 1,400 

1 clerk to civil engineer 1,300 

1 clerk of pay-rolls and muHlering clerk 1,400 

1 receiver and inspector of stores --. 1, 40O 

I Tfriter to receiver and ini>pectiir. at $3 per diem 939 

1 clerk to commandant, (acts IT lb April aud !Mth Jalj, 1666) 1,500 

1 clerk (seond) Co conimandant 1,000 

1 chief accountant 1,800 

I clerk to cbief accountant 1,200 

1 pile-keeper and detective.. 1,000 



Total 15,317 

BilSTOH. 

I civil engrineer $2,fi00 

1 Buperinlendent of improvenMnts, at $5 per diem 1,565 

I draughtauiBn to civil enj^neer 1,400 

1 clerk to civil engineer 1,200 

1 clerk of pay -rolls and mnslering cleik 1,500 

1 receiver and inppector of stoies 1,500 

1 wriierto receiver and inspector, at $3 per diem 939 

1 clerk to commandant 1,600 

1 clerk (second) to commandant 1,300 

1 clerk (tfaird) to commandant 1,000 

1 chief accountant 1,800 

1 clerk to chief acoonntant 1,200 

1 gate-keeper and detective 1,000 

I meMsnger flOO 

Total 1B,»M 

NSW YORK. 

1 civil engioeor $2,500 00 

1 assistant civil engineer 1,500 00 

t dranirhtsman to civil engineer 1,400 00 

1 clerk to civil engineer 1,200 00 

1 clerk of pay-tolls and iiiusfering clerk 1,C00 00 

1 receiver and inspector of store i ],&00 00 

1 nriler and weig-her to receiver and inspector, at $3 per diem il39 00 

1 clerk to commandant 1,600 00 

1 clerk (second) to commandant 1,300 00 

1 clerk (third) to commandanl 1,000 00 



BBPOBT OP THE SECSETAEY OP THE NAv/^ oF T-i^^- 

1 chief accoDntant - v^'fl 

1 clerk to chief Kcconnbuit 

I gate-beeper and detective, *t $4 perdiem _, ..„ .. 

1 iDpeiiDtendent and carrier of nuula, at $2 75 per diem - 86U 75 



ToUl 19,951 75 

PHn.ADELPHlA., 

I ■DperintendeDt ofjaid impTOTemeiita, at (6 per diem $1,878 

I draughtemsD to i^vii engineer 1, 4U0 

1 clerk to civil engineer * 1,300 

1 clerk of pa; rolU and miutering cleik 1,500 

1 leaeiver and iniipector of stores.. 1,500 

1 writer to receiver and inspector, at (3 per diem 939 

1 clerk to commandant 1,500 

1 clerk {second) to commaDdant l.SuO 

1 chief acconnlsnt 1,800 

1 clerk to chief accoantant 1,200 

1 gate-keepet and detecUve 1,U00 

1 meesenger 610 

TotaL 15,717 

MAVAL ASYLUM, PHILAOELPHIA. 

I secretary to governor 91,000 

1 slenara to tbeasjlam 750 

I matron 300 

6 washoTB, at|120each 720 

1 cook t(i8 

2 assistant cooks, one at $120 and one at $96 S16 

e lanndresses, at $120 each 720 

8 scmbbert and house cleaners, at $96 each 768 

4 laborers, at $240 each 960 

1 maater-at-arms 300 

1 ship'* corporal 240 

Total 6.148 



1 ciTil eagineer $2,000 

I draQfcbtsman to civil engineer 1,400 

1 derk to civil engineer 1,200 

1 clerk of paj rolls and mnatering clerk-. 1,500 

1 receiver and inspector of stores 1,600 

1 writer to receiver and inspoctor, at $3 per diem 939 

1 weigher to receiver and iospector, at ^ per diem 939 

1 clerk to commandant 1,500 

1 olerk (second) to commaadact 1,200 

1 chief auconntant l.HUO 

1 clerk to chief accountant 1,200 

1 gate-keeper and delecUve .. •■ 1, 000 



1 porter. 

Total 17,778 

NORFOLK. • 

1 civil engineer $3,000 

I dranghuouui to civil engineer J, 400 

I derk to civil on^neer 1.200 

I clerk of paj-rollsaod mneteriag clerk 1,600 

I receirer and inspector of Btotee 1,500 

1 writer to receiver and Inipeclor. at $3 per diem 9W 

1 clerk to commandant 1,500 

I clerk (second) to commandant 1,200 



100 



REPORT OF THE SECBpTABT OF THE NAVY. 



1 cliier ocoiuntaiit |1,800 

1 cteik lo chief occooDtMit 1,S00 

1 gate-keeper and detecUve : 1,000 

1 meMeoger 600 

Tolsl 15,839 

PEK8AC0LA. 

1 civil engineer (2,000 

1 dnagbtsmui lo c!vi] engineer 1,400 

I clerk lo civil engineer 1,300 

1 clerk of psj-rollB and miutering clerk t,GOO 

1 receiver and inspector of stores 1,500 

1 writer lo receiver and inspector, at $3 per diem 939 

1 clerk to commandant - 1,600 

1 derk (second) lo commandant 1,800 

1 gate- keeper and detective 1,000 

Total 1S,S3» 

1 civil engineer (3,200 00 

1 aasiilont civil engineer and dranghtiman -.. 1,600 00 

2 irriterB to dvil engineer, each t:f50 per diem 2,191 00 

1 clerk of-paj-rolU and muBlaring den . 1,875 OO 

1 reoaiverand inepeclor of stores 2,000 00 

1 nrlter to receiver and inspector, at (3 50 per diem 1,095 50 

1 clerk to commandant -- . 1,876 00 

I deik (second) locommaudMit 1,300 00 

1 gat«-keeper and detective -... •■■ - . 1, 000 00 

1 messenger 750 00 

Total 16,986 50 



RECAPITULATION. 



Place. 


As^lnm. 


Civil. 


Aggregate. 






$15,317 00 
18,904 00 
19,951 75 
16,717 00 
17,778 00 
15,830 00 
19,239 00 
16,98160 


115,317 00 
18 904 00 
19,96176 
21,869 0» 
17,77a 00 
16,839 00 
12,239 a» 
16,966 50 












96,143 






















0,142 


133,rja2S 


138,e»S6 





Bureau of Yards and Docks. 



Y. Sl. D. No. 3. 

SttttmtBi liotBtng iXt ttvtrul tiant oKiA mak* t^ tie amoinf of the jinl tl<n> in the general 
««limii(B from At Banau of Yardi untL Dockt for Iht Sieal gear tmding 30lA Jtaie, 1869, 
marJUd -Y.it D., A." 

For the civil blanch at all tfaerardeaiid stationa (132,732 26 

For the Naval A>7liu>i at Pbiladelphia 6,142 00 

Total 138,974 36 

Bureau op Yards and Docks. C ■ I )0'?l 



BEPOBT OP THE 8ECHETABT OP THE KAVT. 101 
Y. A. D. No. 4. 

EMUMlM oflki amoKKit that iri/t it requirtd tatearili tie imiilmtieH and etmplttian ofKorkM 
and llu earrenl mairt M lit ittttal aasa yanfi, hmtoI itatimu, a»d the Kaval Anlim at 
PmadtlpkiA,for Otjitctd gtar tndiwg 30li Jawt, 1S69 : 

POBTSMOUTH, N. H. 

FOR BUREAU OF COXSTRt-CnOH AMD REPAIR. 

For ship house. 350 by 140 feet, over nulwa; $100,000 

joiner's BtuntDTfr timber ahedKo. 87 23,000 

Htrmill, 150 feat by HO reet 60,000 

iron-pluiiif; sbop, 300 by 100 feet 75,000 

timbel abad, SI& by 65 mt 35,000 

$293,000 

FOR UURKAU OF STEAM ENOINEERIKfi. 

For mftcbiDd sbop, fonndiy, boiler abop, forge Mid unith'sahop, and for gnding.. 150,000 
FOR BDRRAU OF TAROS ANP DOCKS, AND QEKERAL PURPOSES. 

For tuDber abed, joioer'a shop and atorebonae $45,078 

fatten tai druna.. 



quT waU 50,000 

KTMing, nitten and druna 110,000 . 

rep^n OIUI hinds 69,750 



Totd 717,888 

BOSTON. 

FOR BUREAU OP COMSTRUCTiON AND REPAIR. 

For iron plating shop, 300 by 70 Teet, 2 atoriea (90,000 

bl»ck»inith% shop. 300 by 70 feet 80,000 

iron store. 300 by 70 feet 35,000 

coal ihed, 125 by 70 feet 15.000 

paiDt shop, 200 by 70 feet, 31 storica 50,000 

b galvaaUing shop 4,000 

marine railway and cradle 100,000 

boom derrick. SO tons. 75 feel lift 100,000 

improTement to joiner's shop 6,000 

saw mill, 250 by 73 feet, 2 stories 65,000 

ahip booaa, 350 by 140 feel 80,000 

two pile wbarrea 60,000 

repdraof bnildlnn 30,000 

9715,000 

FOR BUREAU OP STEAM ENOtNEERINO. 

FarextenaioD of inachiue shop ■ t65,000 

eztonaionof foandry .■ 40,000 

ereciinit shop 28,000 

Mneral atore 65,000 

[nm and metal store 66,060 

two coal sheda 47,000 

paviDK 6,850 

tracks and water pipes 11,500 

lar^ crane 8,500 

fillin); in and foundaliona ... ■ 50,000 

repairs of bnildinfrs 50,000 

418,850 

FOR DUREAU OF EQUIPMENT AND R ECRU [TINti. 

For completing second story of ropewalk (108, ODS 

improvement in tarring honse . . 3.350 

rigging lofl, 350 by 75 feel, a stories 240.466 



\m^c- 



102 BEPOHT OF THE 8ECBETABY OP THE NAVY. 

FOR BUHEAU OF ORDKANCE. 

For atnithery, braog fonndry, &c $49,098 

aif^htiDg house 1,500 

irradiDg^ and pBTioe 6,983 

fire-praof dours and abatteni to orduance buildiar 14,970 

$72,550 

FOR BUREAU OF PROVISIONS AND CLOTHING. 

FoT Tuft's safetj elevator and boiler 4,000 

FOR BUREAU OF NAVIGATION. 

ForbnMingfor Morage of oils 15,343 

FOB BUREAU OF TARDS AND DOCKS, AND FORtlENBRAL PURPOSES. 

For qnaj wall (200,000 

en tiauce gateway 23,353 

dieilging channela 30,000 

eugiueer's sitop aod atorehoiue — 62,348 

muster office building 5,614 

exteDsioD of atorehonse No. 15 70,204 

draiDS, paving and flagging - 26,000 

filling low pUc«B 34,460 

land for oflicefs' booses 32,000 

7ho08es for officers 130,272 

boat landing 4,5^ 

filliug in timber docks 38,766 

ropairsofdcrdtick 6,000 

repairs of all kinds 144,000 

807,482 

Total 2.382,135 

NEW YOEK. 

FOR BUREAU OF CONSTRUtniOM AND REPAIR. 

For iron plating sbop $87, OM 

timber and knee basin 297,465 

sbip bouse and iMinching wajs 753,443 

two limbei sbeda 211,305 * 

paint shop 136,605 

T-»l,485,870 

FOR BUREAU OP STEAM ENGINEERING. 

FoT machine shop, main building.. $336, 193 

boiler sbop 317,662 

erecting shop 261,555 

805, 410 

FOR BUREAU OF EQtnPMENT AND RECRUITINO. 

For coal depot 74,684 

FOR BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS, AND FOR GENERAL FUBPOSES. 

Forquavwall towards Vaoderbilt avenue $263,479 

drsd^ng channels and filling low places 161,000 

drains, pavinj; and flagging 61,559 

Bulkle} s paiunt lumber drier and patent ligbt 46,OC0 

4 linages for coiDmissioned officers 60,000 

jatd railways 48,778 

jaid wall 62,511 

police miion 32,343 

4 booses fur wunant officers 48,000 ' 

water pipes and bjdrants 19,462 

quay wall at new derrick 200,768 

basin for sectional dock 239,630 

T«p^rs of all kinds 304,!^ 

1,547,770 

■ Total .....(^..tx^^^l?.?'* 



KEPOET OF THE 8ECEETABY OP THE NAVY. 103 

PHILADELPHIA. 
FOR BUREAU OF VAR09 AND imCKS, AKD FOR GENERAL PURPOSES. 

For lightaing rods to yard buitdinga $643 

repiuis of bU kinds 88,240 

$88,883 

Total 88,883 

WASHINGTON. 
FOR BUREAU OF EQUIPMENT ADD RECRurnNQ. 

For coal depot (19,354 

building for manufBcture of wire rope 40,1100 

159.354 

FOR BUREAU OP ORDNANCE. 

For lemofiug eiperimenlal batterj 14,900 

FOR BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS, AND FOR GENERAL PURPOSES. 

For rail tracks |7,I50 

flagging and drainage 14,500 

eitenaion of yard weat 166,250 

coal whaif. 16,(fM 

five hoDses for officers 54,411 

repursof all kinds 133,850 

392,161 

Tolal 466,415 

NORFOLK. 

FOR BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIR. 

For l!mb«r abed Bod oakam loft, Ho. 17 131,281 

■tone hoDse for tar, pitcb, and roain, No. 14 31,917 

two limbei sheds, Noa. 32 and 33 93,000 

i:ou plating shop 45,963 

(tone boose for galleys, iron, and ptnmbing 36,278 

■hip bottae No, 48 96,634 

. $334,073 

FOR BUREAU OF STEAM ENSINBERINO. 

For stone house for oils, spirits of turpeoline, &c 25,456 

FOR BUREAU OF YARDS AND. DOCKS, AND FOR GENERAL PURPOSES. 

ForstablBs $34,863 

rail tracks U,988 

eight booses for officers ■ • ■• 93,865 

repairs of alt kinds 145,900 

266,616 

Total 646,146 

PENSACOLA. 
FOR BUREAU OP CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIR. 

For monld loft and constrtictors' workshop ,. $18,581 

smiths andarmor-platingshop 38,373 

apar shed and ship joiners' shop 76,016 

oaknm loft and pilch boiling honse 4,683 

saw-mill and block shop 50,000 

$187,068 

FOR BUREAU OF STEAM BNOINEERIHO. 

For smiths' shop and fotindry ■• $15, t^ 

iron and coal honse 13.41" 



!^AW»^^ 



104 EBPOBT OF THE SBCEETART OF THE KAVY. 

FOR BUREAU OP BQUIFHEKT AND RECRDlTliia. 

ForcoalhouM |50,316 

timber Bb«d «nd saillofc 62,3^6 

timber ahed and lietnng; loft 78,732 

■*" ^ — 1191.444 

eott BUREAU OF ORDNANCE. 

For ordDSDco vrorkahop aod storebooM (&9,6!i2 

shell house &nd rail track 39, 505 

99,327 

FOR BURBAL OF YARDS AKl) DOCKS, AND FOB GENERAL PURPOSES. 

For taw-mill nod joiners' Bbop (37,400 

fuard house and prison '. .•■ .•■.•■ . 11,012 

commandant's and other offices 13,678 

blacksmiths' shop 6,876 

three kitchens for ofBcers' qnarten 6,171 

ndl tntcks 2,456 

gradioe avennet and lajlng sidewalks 7,693 

p^nt Aop 6,915 

storeboose 95,376 

qoarter* for ordinarj 11,681 

commandant's quarters 23,430 

ronrieen bouses for officers 255,460 

foar bouses for warrant officers 24,IK)( 

care and impiovement of liTe-aak plantation -. ■ S5,OO0 

large iron cmne 38,500 

Bulkiej's patent lumber drier and patent right 32, 009 

repairs of all kinds 157, B29 

749,316 

Total „ 1,286,886 

MABE ISLAND. 

FOR BVREAU OF CONSTBUCTIOM AND REPAIR. 

For spar and boat bonse No. 27 |B2,033 

Umber abed 50,000 

paint shop 50,000 

J18S,023 

FOR BUREAU OF EQUIPMBNT AND BECRlTITlKa. 

Fw chain-cable and anchor shop 72,850 

FOR BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS. AMD FOR OEiTBBAL PUHPOSES. 

For conliuuation of qnaj wall (75,000 

officers' booses Nds. 10 and 12 96,965 

gnAiog and paving 60,000 

Batb-rooDia for six officers' bonsea 3,575 

repairs of all kinds 120,000 

275,560 

Total 530,433 

SACEETT'S HABBOB. 

For repairs and general care of public propertj $4,000 

Total 4,000 

MOUND CITY. 

For general repairs of levee and yard buildings 155,000 

Total 55,000 

Digmzed by Google 



EBPOBT OF THE SECHETAEY OF THE NAVY. 105 

KEY WEST. 

For coal shed for Bureau of Equipment and BecrniUng $10,000 

general repairs of wharves andbnlldlD^ 6,000 

Total ]6,UO0 

HAVAL ASYLUM. 

For furniture and repaira of Bime ,,. Jl.OOO 

hoase-cleaniD|ir ^"^ nhitewMbing 800 

fanucea, gTBtse, and mnges 600 

gu and water rent 1,200 

general ioiproTement and repairs 6,000 

snpport of beneficiariee ....... 54,000 

Total 63,600 

EECAPITULATION. 

For navy yard, Portamonth, IT. H $717,828 

navjTftrd, Boetou %3Hi, I3S 

IMV; jard. New York 3,913,714 

iwv7 7ard, Philadalphia 8B,R>J3 

Davy yard, Watbington 41:6,415 

navy yard, Norfolk &46,145 

navy yard, PeoiMola 1,256,885 

navy yard. Hare ieland 530,433 

naval ttallon. SackeU'e Harbor 4,000 

navat station, Monnd Cily 55,000 

□aval atadoD, Key Weet 10,000 

NaviJ A*ytam, Philadelphia 63,600 

Total 10,141.038 

Bureau of Yards ard Docks. 



.dbyGoogle 



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BEPOBT OF THE SECBETABY OF THE NAVY. 



Y. & D. »a 6. 

BaeapU^aliamef otimalafifTcautiHgm far Ikajuealttar ending JaMc30,^Se9, at llu difir- 
ml marji furii and iMIimi. 

Portamontb |I26,000 

BoitoD 190,000 

New York 376,000 

Philrfelpbia 80,000 

VasblDglOD 136,000 

HoTfolk 90,000 

Peoiwolft 104,00i> 

lUraislMd 180,000 

SMkett's Harbor 600 

MomidCiiT 6,000 

H»TBlABjlum,Phil«detphi«, 5,000 

ToUl 1,«M,500 

Bureau of Yards and Docks, 



Y. & D. Ho. 7. 



Bead* or title* of ftppropratioiu. 



Pajof m, 

CoDlingeDt emuiMmed . . 

Vktj yard, Portnixnith, H. I 

Nn7 7Bid, Boston '. 

Kafrrmtd, New York 

y 1 puiBdelphU.... 

WMbinfftoD..... 
] Hoffolk 



] 



Uueiilnd.. 



Han) iWhm, Mound Cty 

Haral station. Ear Wart 

Naval Aflrlnm, PblUdelphia.. 
Support oi b«oefici«riw 




Total 11,512,412 25 I,9W,609 

Bureau or Yards ard Docks. 



],33!j,60 

717,898 00 

2,382,135 00 

3,913,714 00 

88,683 00 

466,415 00 

646,145 00 . 



5 00 
~530;433 00 
4,000 00 
^,000 00 
16,000 00 . 
9,600 00 
54,000 00 



51 

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1,067,000 
67,000 
197,000 
103,000 
61,01ft 
80,000 

"'80^460 
71,i!57 
2,000 
10,000 



.dbyGoogle 



EEPOKT OP THE SECBETAEY OF THE NAVY. 



Y. &. D. No. 8. 

ABSTRACT OF OFFERS (EMBRACING A8 WELL THOSE WHICH ARE BE- 
JBCTED AS THOSE WHICH ARE ACCEPTED) RECEIVED FOE FURNISH- 
INO ARnCLES COMING UNDER THE COGNIZANCE OF THE BUREAU OP 
YARDS AND DOCKS, MADE IN CONFORMITY TO THE ACT OP CONGRESS 
APPROVED MARCH 3, 1843. 



OJir. 



CUaa No. I, bricks : 

Eftmurl Oakman Sl,^ 50 

William A. Wheeler '1,375 00 

Dftvid Bsbcock 1.750 00 

Wdiion &. Pittioger 1 , 750 00 

Clark & Pearson 3,000 00 

Class No. 3, stone : 

Samuel Oakman 6,350 00 

GbIm & Courtney 9,955 00 

David Babcock •5,800 00 

EzraEamea 6,100 00 

ClaM No. 4. yeltoir piue lumber: 

Samuel Oakman 334 00 

Trickey &. Jewett 248 00 

WataoD A. PiLtiagei 500 00 

Clark & Featson '225 00 

Class No. 5, oak and bardn-ood : 

Trickey & Jenelt '307 50 

Watson & PittiDger 570 00 

Clarke& Pearson 242 50 

Samuel Oakman 293 00 

Class No. 6, wbite pine, spruce, 
juniper, and cypress : 

gamnel Oakman! 6,154 00 

Trickey & Jewett '5, 690 00 

Watsou & Pittinger 6,648 00 

Claike & Pearson 6,233 00 

ClassNo.7, lime, hair, and plas- 



- Samuel C 

David Babcock 

W.Pprler&Sons.... 
Watson &. Pillinger.. 
AlonzD A. Foster 

ClauNo. 6,Gcment: 

Samnel Oakman 

William A, Wheeler-. 

Darid Babcock 

W. Porter & Sons... 
Wslson& PIttinger.. 
AlDDXo A. Foster . - . . 



353 60 
417 50 
497 05 
625 00 
■305 00 



274 00 
300 00 
350 00 



Class No. 9, gravel and sand: 

Samuel Oakman '$1,330 00 

C. &. W. Whitehead 4,800 00 

David Babcock 4, 200 00 

KiraEames 1,300 00 

Class No. 91, fire-clay: 

Samnel Oakman 96 00 

David Babcock -66 00 

■sNo. 10, aUtoi 

Samnel Oakman *450 DO 

Class No. II, iron, iron spikes. 



George H. Creed 2,B62 95 

Wheeler & Browning .... 3,I5B K 

John J. Bingham 2,371 98 

Alonzo A, Foster '2,360 17 

Class No. 13, steel: 

William A. Wheeler 350 00 

George H. Creed 338 00 

David Babcock 248 50 

Wheeler &. Browning .... 268 00 

John J. Bingham 1329 00 

Alonzo A. Foster 329 00 



SIS No. 13, pig iron: 

Samnel Oakman 1,315 00 

William A. Wheeler 1,475 00 

George H. Creed 1,175 00 

Wheeler & Browning '1,150 00 

William Porter & Song... 1,366 25 

John J. Bingham 1,443 50 

AloDzo A. lifter 1,355 00 

Class No. 14, files: 

W. A. Wheeler 302 65 

George H. Creed 158 20 

Whceler&Browuing.... 331 60 

John J. Biogbam 177 14 

Alonio A. Fester 180 S3 

Scuilder, Rodgers & Co .. *I36 68 

Hyatt &, Spencer 196 15 

IDseMcdbflot. 

r , .C~,oog[e 



REPORT OF THE SECRETABY OF THE HAVY. 



CIms No. )5, p^ls, oik, and 

0«OT«H.CrMd $988 DO 

David Babcock 9»3 50 

Williaiii Porter &. Sons... 1,329^ 

Akozo A. Foster '916 00 

Clark & Pmtsou ],018 75 

C. M-Clapp&Co 1,041 25 

Clast No. 16, ship-chaiidler;: 

George H. Creed "1,519 40 

Wbeeler&Bron-niDg.... i,84l 45 

W. Porter &SallB 2,284 45 

John J. Binebam 1,770 50 

AlODzo A. Foster 1,635 69 

Clark & Pearson 1,528 94) 

HjaU & Spencer 1,736 64 

Clau No. 17, hardware; 

William A. Wheeler 2,556 04 

Geore:eH. Cieed 2,838 15 

Wbeeler & Browning 2, 737 55 

William Porter &. Sons... 3,100 20 

AlonaoA. Foster '2,202 27 

Scndder, Rodgers & Co . . 2, 358 07 

Hjatt &, Spencer 2,445 25 

Claas No. 18, stationery: 

A. E. Cnttar 1,991 89 

W. C.Kodgers 4, Co tl,438 B7 

William H. Arthur & Co. 1,675 05 

Knight &: Johnson * 1 , 573 93 

Cutler, Tower & Co 1,703 89 

J. H. Whittemoie &. Co.. 1,845 62 

Claai No. 20, haj and straw : 

Samuel Oakman 8,620 00 

George H. Creed 8,580 00 

Uallett&Bradbory 'G,610 00 

Clark &. Pearson 7,434 00 

Claas No. 21, provender: 

W. Porter A. Sons 4,784 05 

Mullet A. Bradburj 3,805 75 

Clark & Pearson '3,739 16J 



William A. Wheeler |2,626 00 

George H. Creed 2 170 00 

William Porter &. Sons. .. 2, 458 50 
Benedict, Tuney & Twom- 

blej 2,278 60 

Alouzo A. Foster '1,707 00 

Clark & PeacBOQ 2,176 40 

C. M. Clapp&Co 1,765 50 

Hjalt & Spencer 1,992 00 

Class No. 24, sperm and labri- 
catiog oils : 

George H. Creed 545 30 

David Babcock '527 00 

JobuJ. Bingham 545 42 

Alonzo A. Foster 523 40 



Class No. 25, ii 
&c.: 



t, piping, 



George H. Creed 1,145 74 

John J. BiDgbiun '440 18 

J. J. Walworth 475 95 

Class No. 26, angers: 

William A. Wbeeter 579 00 

George H. Creed 463 95 

AlonioA. Foster '254 25 

Class No. 27, aotbradte coal: 

Samuel Oakman 2,250 00 

A. R. Bass 2,310 00 

William A. Wheeler '2,070 00 

S. P. Brown d- Son 2,205 00 

Clark & Pearson 3,165 00 

Class No. 29, bituminous coal: 

Samnel Oakman, 990 00 

A.R. Bass 895 00 

William A. Wheeler B20 00 

George H, Creed '790 00 

S. P. Brown &• Son 875 BO 

Clarke & Pearson 1,000 00 

Class No. 32, macbinerj and 



G. &C. Place.. 



QftTi/or Mafplittfar th* navg fan/, Ktu York, mndtr cdBirtiitiiuni dattd June 3, 1867. 



CloasNo. I, brick: 

William A. Wheeler.... 

David Babcock 

WatsoD& Pittinger 

Williain Potter & Son . . 
Clark JfcPearson 



■ jroo 00 

•500 00 
700 00 
875 00 



Class No. 5, oak and bardwood ; 

David Babcock 

WaiBOO A-Pittinger 

Clark & Pearaon 



DigmzedbyGoOgle 



112 



REPORT OP THE 6BCEETARY OF THE NAVY. 



Class Ko. II, iron, iron spikes. 
and nails : 

WmUm A. Whwiar ta,T4& 67 

B7Btt& Spencer 2,597 38 

John J. Bingham 1.898 80 

■WheelBt & Browning.... 2,fi52 « 

George H. Creed "J, Ml 06 

Alonio A. Foster 2,J86 03 

ClBaa No. 13, steel : 

William A. Wheeler 568 50 

Hjatt & Spencer 697 S5 

DavidBabcock 570 00 

John J Bingham 538 50 

Wheeler &. Bron-ning.... 636 00 

George H. Creed 534 00 

AlonzoA Foeler '588 00 

Class No. 14, files: 

Samuel W. Seara &. Co.. . 642 74 

William A. Wheeler 753 97 

Hyatt& Spencer 684 48 

John J. Bingham 586 86 

Wheeler & Browning.... 719 00 

George H. Creed '505 20 

Alonzo A. Foster 568 01 

Class No. 15, paints, oils, and 
glass: 

Hyatt A. Spencer 647 35 

David Babcock 614 45 

Waiiam Porter A, Son.... 579 40 

Clark APeanon 581 15 

George H. Creed ^484 50 

AlonzoA. Foster 519 85 

Class No. 16°, ship chandlet7 : 

Hyatt & Spencer 2,431 38 

John J. Bingham 2,323 15 

Wheeler & Browning.... 2,552 90 

William Porter & Son . . 3,003 85 

Clark A. Pearson- 3,275 78 

George H. Creed 3,318 20 

AlonzoA. Foster 3,377 13 

Class No. 17, hardware : 

William A. Wheeler 593 90 

HrattA. Spencer 442 80 

VnieelerA Browning 498 17 

William Porter & Son.... 793 75 

George H. Creed 466 79 

Alonzo A. Foster '411 06 

Class No. 18, stationery: 

William H. Arthnr & Co. '2, &i8 00 

W. C. Rogers 4. Co 2,800 94 

Cutter, Tower & Co 2,822 65 

JofanH.Wbittemore&.Co. 3,508 66 

P. W. Denham 2,669 37 



ClauN 



20, hay and straw : 



Class No. 21, provender : 

WilliamPorler&aon.... 5,037 60 

William M. Shipman 5,600 60 

Clark & Pearson '4,971 50 



William A. Wheeler TSe 00 

Hyatt & Spencer 1,503 00 

C. M. Clapp &. Co 1,421 50 

William PortMA^ Son.... 1,214 50 

James R. Pngh 1,140 00 

George H. Creed 1,215 00 

Alonzo A. Foster 1,396 00 

ClasK No. 24, sperm and Inbii- 

eating oils : 

DavidBabcock 340 BO 

JuhnJ. Bingham '338 60 

OeorgeH. Creed 430 00 

AlonzoA. Foster 383 00 

ClassNo 35, iron work, ^ping, 
die.: 

William A. Wheeler 2,314 80 

HjaUA Spencer 2,442 37 

John J.Bingham 3,504 60 

Wheeler & Browning.... 3,036 60 

WilUam Porter & Son. ... 3, 361 73 

Joseph Nason& Co tt,723 48 

QeorgeH. Creed 'S.Hl 80 

AloDZO A. Foster 2,623 94 

Class No. 37, anthracite coal: 

A. B. Bass •2,180 00 

William A. Wheeler 3,300 00 

8. P. BrowD A. Son 2,683 00 

W. Porter &, Son 3,100 00 

Clark & Pearson 3,400 00 

George H. Creed 2,380 00 

Class No. 30, semi-bitomlnons 
Broad Top coal : 

A.R.Ba8s 776 00 

William A, Wheeler '671 10 

William Porter & Scm . . . . 938 75 

Clark ipBarson 1,638 50 

George H. Creed 678 30 

Class No. 31, copper and com- 
position nails : 

William A. Wheeler 40C 00 

John J. Bingham 377 60 

WiUlam Porter & Son 413 00 

George H. Creed 365 00 

AlonzoA. FoEira *343 50 

Class No. 32, machinery and 



.G. &C.PIace.. 



°Ko ciratisci awarded lojclui IS. 



KBPOKT OP THE BECEETABT OP THE NATT. 

OfftnfoT npplUi/oT iJkt *aBg tnrd, PMladtlpkia, under advtMUemMU iaUd J 

CluB No, 6, oak and budwood : Claaa No. 17, batdHtue : 



lit 



Oeo^e N. Beale 

Wslsaii &. Peltiag«r . . 
Clark dc Peanon 



Watson & Plttingw 

GKiriBon.GilliBghani&Co. 

Tbomuft, PoEl 

Ctkrk & Pmtsod 



FanlJ. Field 

WillUm Porter & Bon... 

AIoDBO A. FosMr 

Wheeler & Browning 

John J. Bint^ham 

George U. Creed 

CkuNo. 14, file* : 

PanlJ PWd 

William A. Wheeler 

AloDEO A. Foiter 

Wbeeler & BrowDlog ... 

John J. Bingham 

George H. Creed 



J, W. Robbing 

William Porter A Son. . . . 

AJooBoA Foater 

Clark & PeariOD 

David IMicock 

John J. Bingham 

George B. Creed 

CkM No. IS, ship chandlei<r: 

William Porter Jt Son.... 

Boebm. Klee &. Co. 

Alooao A. Foster 

Wbneler &. Browning .... 

Clark &. Pearson 

George H. Creed 



((964 86 
1,103 00 
■701 40 



9,439 00 
2, 161 35 
■2,112 65 
9,341 GO 



906 10 
1,294 00 

eie 40 



95 50 
72 16 
■64 63 



4,293 99 
•3,769 50 
4,242 95 



Pan! J. Field 

Wm. A. Wheeler 

Alonzo A. Foster ......... 

Wheet«r & Browning 

Geo. H. Creed 

Class Ko. 19, sUUonei7 : 

. P. Foster 

W. C. Roger* & Co 

W. H. Arthur & Co 

Knight &, JubnaoD 

Cutter, Tower &. Co 

Class No. 20, hay and straw : 

PaulJ.Reld 

Clark ii. Pearson 

Geo. H. Creed 

Class Ho. 21, provender : 

Paul J. Field 

William Porter 4l Son. .. 
Clark A Pearson 



Cbua Ko. 33, bemng, packing, 
and boee ; 



William A. Wheeler.. 

Atonio A. Foster 

James R. Pngh 

C. M. Clapp&Co .- 
George H. Creed 



J. '^. Robbins 

William A. Wheeler.. 

Alonio A. Poster 

David Babcock..j>... 

Jubn J. Bingham 

George H. Creed 



1,051 81 
1687 50 
964 12 
■867 50 
941 71 



1,674 S3 
•1, 110 00 
1,400 00 



2,397 00 
2,881 20 
•1,9B0 00 



85 83 
187 50 
131 35 
84 41 
90 41 
*78(W 



Class No. 30, seml-bitamlDons 
Broad Top coal : 

PanlJ. Field. 

A. R. Bass 

William A. Wbeekr 



I. Wigt 



George M. Creed . 



OgtnfartmfflutfoTtlit Natal Jt^nm, Pkiiadtlfliia, under adttHitttmiUiMUi ZdJnt, 1867. 



CUu No. 1, clothing : 




Clark & PsaiMD 


-•678 




'»l,712 6ri 
1,813 76 


ClastNo. 3,proyiiioDs: 




Clarke 4 Pearson 




CkM No. S, hats, boota, ud 
■boas: 

TlHHDti UartiD 


683 26 


George and A. Scheldt.. . 
Clark & Pearson 


11,019 

11,319 
•10.386 



BEPOET OF THE SECBETABT OF THE NAVT. 



Clua No. 4, groceriM : 

G.Bojd&Co |7,3 

Crippen &. Moddock *6, 6 

Clark & Pearson 7,2 

Thomas Strickland 6, 9 

A.C.Eoberta 7,U 

CI»B» No. 5, dry goodi : 



Class No. 6, bread : 



Joseph Peten 

John G. Moiej' — 
Clark &, PeareoD . . 
John Ucllwain — 



Class No. T, tobacco : 
O. Boyd A 



Class No. 6, coal : 



Class No. 9, p^nts, oils, and 



Crippen &, Maddock 

Clarke & Pearson 

Alonzo A. FosMr 

Jamea W. Eabbens-..- 
William Porter &, Bod . . 



240 00 
•124 50 
142 80 
135 22 
176 21 



Class No. II, lamber: 



ClaasNo. IS, firewood: 

Crippen &. Maddock.. 

Clark A Peanon 

PanlJ. Field 



Class No. 13, provsnder : 

Crippen Sc Haddock.. 

Clark &. Pearson 

Thomas Strickland 

PaulJ. Field 



Class No. 14, miscdlaneoos : 



_ ,^ m&Maddock- 
Clark & Pearson.... 
Alonto A. Foster 

Class No. 15, hardware : 



Crippen t 
Clark & 



Clark A. Pearson.. 
AloDxo A. Foster -. 
PanlJ. Field 



Class No. 16, itAtionerj: 



Bogers, Jones & Co... 
W. H. Anhnr 4. Co.. 

Clark & Pearson 

Enight & Johnson ... 
Coll*r, Tower & Co.. 
Ferdinand Foster 



Class No. 17°, filling icMiliDu 



240 00 
•152 00 
192 00 



277 50 
•228 00 
245 00 
SSO 00 



558 40 
•303 20 
S35 60 



97 00 
•79 12 
93 49 



176 30 
265 13 
•162 10 
201 06 
225 46 
282 10 



OJtrr far mppliei for thi navf gard, IPiuhiaglim, aider advertiremtnt dated June 3, 1867. 



George N. Beale . . 
Clark* Pearson.. 
David Babcoik... 
W.G. Bidgelj.... 



Watson & PittingOT.. 
8.P.Browii<tBon... 
Cloik dcPvarxon 



George N. Ikaln 

John J. UiDKbam... 
Watson & nuingeT., 

•Ac»pIc<L |De«M*dbJlot. 



*P60 00 


S.P.Brown&8on 

Alonio A. Foster 


/(.MOOO 
600 00 






600 00 
948 00 

1 930 00 

1 628 00 
1 440 00 


George a. Creed 

Class No. 8, cement; 

George N. Beale 

John J. BinBham 

Wataon &. Pittinger 

Wheeler & Browning.... 

William Porter i Son.... 

8. P. Brown & Son 

Alonto A. Fo9t«r 


760 00 

195 00 
•179 00 
350 00 
S75 00 
iWOOO 
235 00 
250 00 








477 00 

1 600 00 


Geor»H.Creed 

WillW A. Weeeler 


300 00 
275 00 



noglc 



B£POBT OF THE 8ECRETABT OF THE NA.TT. 



Clou Ko. 9, gravel aud ami ; 

Gaarg« N. Beale 1300 00 

Wbe«lHr&BroKiiiDK 300 00 

Clarkd^PearaoD *]80 00 

David Babcock 850 00 

ClaM No. II, iTOD, iToa nall^ 
■Jid«pike«: 

JohD J. BiDgbam *63d 00 

WheelerA BrowDinft 730 00 

William Part«r&. Son.... 1,065 00 

AlonioA. Foster 723 SO 

GeoTReH. Creed &*7 50 

WilliiunA. Wheeler 925 00 

Clan No. 13, Bteel: 

JohD J. BiDKham 147 25 

Wbeelerd^ Browning ITS 00 

AlonwA. Foster '137 00 

David Babcock 3fll 50 

GeotmH. Creed 152 00 

William A. Whoelor IM 00 

ClaM No. 13, pig iron: 

JokoJ. BiDgham &40 00 

Wheeler ill Browning 490 00 

WUliam Porter & Soa. ... 640 00 

AionsoA. FoBlar '450 00 

George H. Creed 600 00 

WUUam A. Wheeler 650 00 

Clau No. U, Etea : 

JobnJ. Bingham 100 35 

Wheeler dp Bronrning 140 00 

AloDzuA. Foster 95 69 

Geon«i H. Creed '88 80 

WUliam A. Wbeeler 104 37 

ClBM No. 15, p^nU, oils, and 

glM.= 

John J. Bingham 1,603 50 

WheelelA Browning 1,564 50 

WiliiHin Porter & Son 1,717 75 

AlnnsoA t'osier 1,526 75 

Clwk & I'earflon 1,490 50 

David BitlK'uck 1,546 65 

George K. Creed "1,483 50 

George Ujneal 1,622 60 

Claaa Ho. 16, ship-chandler; : 

Wfaee'er & Browning 1,026 9S 

W. PoneriSon 1,063 35 

Alonso A. Foslar 826 95 

Clark & Pearson 639 87J 

GoorgHH Creed •799 45 

BoehiD, Rice ^ Co 923 S7 

Class No. 17, hardware: 

Wheoler & Browning .... 6H1 95 

William PorterA Hon.... 719 00 

Ak>nao A. Fosler 624 86 



George H. Creed *^19 25 

Will^m A. Wheeler 714 iM 

Class No. 18, statiooer}': 

W.C.Rodg*rs&.Co »■» 41 

W. H. Aithur & Co 1,347 62 

Cutler, Tower & Co 1,194 42 

BIsnchard &, MobOD *l,170 40 

Kuight &. Johnson 1,463 29 

Dompae; & O'Toole tl,033 44 

William A. Wheeler 1,590 :B 

ClttM No. SO, haj and straw : 

Geo^eN. Beale 1,038 05 

C ark & Pearson -940 00 

George H. Creed 1,303 75 

P.W.Dor«ey 1,093 00 

B.C.Hewitt I,('9ti 25 

Class No. 21, provender: 

George N.Beale..-. I,. VIS 50 

Wbeeler&.BrowQlng.... 1,547 50 

William Potter & Son ... . l.'M.'i 25 

Clark & PeaTwn '1,242 00 

GeoveU.Cr«ed 1.754 25 

P.W.Dotsey 1,335 50 

R.C.He«iU 1,431 33* 

Class No. 23, charcoal : 

George N. Beale 75 Oft 

WhUod & Pittinger 450 IH) 

WlieelerA. Browning.... 90 00 

William Porter &. Sun.... £14 0» 

Clark dt Pearson 120 00 

Williaui T. Clark 75 00 

George H. Creed 1%i UO 

P.W-Dorsey *71 25 

Class No, 25, iron work, piping, 
Ac: 

John J. Bingham *I81 00 

Wheeler A. Brownlog.... 37-i 00 

WilliamPortar&San.... 399 00 

Alon«o A. Foster 290 00 

Gwirge H. Creed 318 50 

William A. Wheeler 322 50 

Class Nu. 37, anthracite cual : 

A. R. Bass 3.205 00 

S. I'. Brown & Son 2,046 00 

Ji>hii B. Tniton 1.905 00 

Clsik Ji Pearson 2,4U0 UO 

Gfoice H. Creed 2. lOU 00 

William A. Wheeler. ■|,»57 OU 

Clsss No. 29, bittuninons Cum- 
berland coal: 

George N. Beale 705 00 

P. P. Brown & Son 694 50 

JuhnB. Turton '666 OU 

Clark &. Pearson 975 00 

Ge..rge H. Creed 1,036 00 

WilliiMn A. Wheeler 766 00 



.oog Ic 



116 EEPORT OF THE SECBETiET OF THE HAVT. 

OfftnfoT tufpliafoT lie navy |Wfd, Ptmaeela, u*dtr odTtrtitMnttU dalid Juiu 3, 18S7. 



CIbii No. 6, white pine, Bprace, 
juniper Md cypres* i 

Jno.J.BinEh»in 

WsbioD A^Mingor 

8. P. BrowD & Sod 


$1,196 30 
1,208 00 
1,461 TO 
I,aA3 50 
1,167 50 

■1,133 50 

295 00 
•170 00 
310 OO 
195 00 
325 00 
3H6 00 
300 00 

244 00 

186 05 
ai3 50 
374 50 
)»9 10 
225 70 
313 60 

213 50 

lesoo 
ties 00 

756 IS 
•516 07 
549 21 
597 12 
eoo 05 
580 70 
607 07 

105 75 
97 89 

•«dia 

116 55 
169 20 
96 4fi 
101 52 

109 98 

374 50 

214 50 
176 34 
356 00 
400 50 

'171 50 
184 00 


CUm No. is. paints, oils and 

glass: 

Jno. J.Rngbam 

Alonw A. Foster 

WlieeterA^Browninr..... 

Wm. PortM&San 

J. D. Kenney 

A. L. Avery 


9397 75 

408 66 
414 11 






Swnnel L. CUpp 


450 75 


Clui No. 7, lime, hair and plw- 


Oeo. H. Creed 


439 36 


Jno. J. Binghfun 

AioDzo A. Foster 

Wm. PortOT&Soo 


BaoiLL. Clapp 

Class No. 16, ship chaudleiy : 


474 OS 






2.512 62 




WheeleT&BrowDiiiK.... 
Wm. Porter iSoo!?..... 


Saml. L. CUpp 


3,245 10 
3,487 90 
1,910 94i 
3,191 GO 
1894 75 


CIwsNo. B. Mmenti 

Wm. A. Wbeeler 

Jno.J.Biiighsm 

AlonzoA FoBtof 

Wheeler & Browning.— 


Ciark & Peareon 

Goo. H. Creed 

Saml. L. Clapp 

ClassNo. 17, hardware: 


J. D. Keuney 

8. P. Brown & Hon 


WLeeler &, Browning 

Wm. Porter & Son 

A. L. Avery 

OeaH. Creed 

8aml.L. Ckpp 

Class No. 18, sUUonery : 

W. C.EodKers&Co 

Wm. A. Wteelei 

W. H. Arthur i. Co 

Cniler. Tower A. Co 

Knigbt & Johnson 


1,168 05 
I,I7S71 
1,783 50 




8«d>I.L.Ckpp 

ClMS Ho. 11, iron, iron ipikea 
•ndn»ili: 


951 30 

t43eso 










Whtwier& Browning.... 
A. L, Avery 


•493 78 


H.R. Hallmark &. Co— . 

Class No. 20, hay and straw : 

Jno. J. Bingham 

A.L.ATery 

6. P. Brown & Son 


616 361 




ClMsNo. 12, steel! 


l,9S0O0 




2,070 00 














2,310 00 
1,800 00 


Oeo.H. Creed 

Dnyid Bitbcock 


Saml. L. Clapp 

Wm. A. Wheeler 

Jno. J. Bingham 

Wm. Porter i Son 

A. L. Avery 

8. P. Brown & Son 

Clark &. Pearson 

Geo. H. Creed 


CUu No. M, filet : 

Wm. A. Wheeler 

Jno. J. Bioghsm 

Alonzo A, Foiter 

A. L. Avery 


2.310 00 
2,028 00 
1,620 00 
1,920 00 
1,638 00 

•j,aoooo 

1,560 00 


8aml. L, Clapp 

•AcwptiA 


Saml. L. Clapp 1,350 00 



D.,.Ei.ct,c;oogic 



EEPOET OP THE SECEETAET OP THE NAVY. 117 

au No. 33, belting, pocking Clasa Ko.34, sperm and lobri- 

uidhose: caUogmli: 

Wm. A. Wbeeler (2,005 00 

C.H.Clapp&Co (499 15 Jno. J. Bineham I,ISi 9S 

Wm. A. Wheeler 739 35 Alonio A. Foster tl,076 60 

AloDzo A. Foster 573 00 A.L. Avery 1,2-J4 OU 

Wheeler &, BrowiuDg .... 55 1 50 S. P. Brown & Son 2, 2G9 60 

Wm. Porter Son 629 15 Clark* Pearson 1,513 75 

Clark &. Pearson 668 65 Geo. H. Creed ],U76 60 

Goo. H. Creed 574 00 David Babcock 1.79150 

Saml. L. Clapp '405 00 SomL L. Clapp 1.SI3 00 



BcRBAu or Yards ahd Docks, Ottebtr 1, 1867. 



J0B.8HITH. 



BUREAU OF EQUIPMENT AND RECRUITING. 

BUBEAU OP EaUIPMBNT AND RECRUITING, 

Waikittgton, Otober 18. 1867. 

Sir ! In obedience to your order of the 15th Anguat last, I have the honor 
tn Bubmit the asaat annual report of the Boreau of Equipment and Recruiiinf^, 
with an estimate of the imoust required for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1S69. 

There have been seventy-three vessels equipped for sea service during the 
Lut fisca] year, twenty-three of which have been wire-ri^ed and fifty hemp- 
rigged. Of the wire-rigged TesBela, twelveof claeaeBOue, two.and three have been 
vdoIIt equipped, and eleven of all the clasaee partially equipped. Of the hemp- 
rigsea vessels, six have been wholly, and forty-four of all the claaaea, respect- 
ively, have been partially eonipped. 

The government rope walk at Boston has supplied all the hemp-rig^ug used 
by the navy daring the past year, excepting small supplies required at other 
stations, when the exigencies of the service would not admit of its transporta- 
tion. 

Fotir hundred and fifty-eight tons of hemp have been purchased, at a cost of 
$151, 997 80 — four hundred and twenty-five tons of which have been manufac- 
tured into cordage. 

In the last annual report reference was made to a hoard that had been appointed 
to test the comparative Mtreagth of wire and hemp rope, with a Tiuw of a more 
gen»al adoption of the former for naval purposes ; and although a very eatisfac- 
tor; report has been received eo far as tbe trial has progreeaed, there are etitl 
■ome sizes of rope to be tested before the tables exhibiting the comparative ten- 
sile strength can be perfected. Tbe bureau baa bad thismatter under con eiderati on, 
and from tbe additional information received, is persuaded that wire rigging has 
many advantages over hemp for all daseea of veesels, but more especially for 
steamers. 

Considering these advantages in connection with the favorable reports received 
from commanders of wire-rigged vessels, the bureau would recommend the pnr- 
cbase and patting up of machinery for the mannfactare and test of wire rope, 
and tbe erection of a suitable building at one of our navy yards for tliia purjiose. 

Eleven thousand nine hundred men have been employed in the niival and coast 
survey service. The anticipated difficulty attending the enlistment of seamen and 
ordinary seamen for thi; navy has in some meaHure been realised, though bat one 
veMelhas been detained for any lengthof time for want of men. While the vessel 
referred to was awaiting to complete her complement, the landlords of sailor board- 



118 BEPOBT OF THE 8ECRETABT OF THE NATT. 

iDg-houBeB in New York offered to anpply her deficiencee at once on the payment 
by the government of five doDare for each recruit delivered on board, showing thai 
the influenue of the laodlorde, and not the scarcity of men, wae at that time con- 
trolling the enlistments. 

In 1860 the average monthly enlistments of seamen and ordinary seamen 
were one-third greater than at present, for which varioas reasons may be as- 
signed, all operating in a greater or less degree, and when combined may explain 
the canse. 

The union of the Italian states has created a wonderfiil increase in their com- 
merce, and of course a great demand for seamen; consequently men from the 
Hedilerranean rarely enter oar service. The same will apply to the North 
country seamen from the anion of the North German states, while there are 
comparatively few English seamen who enter out service at all, being absorbed 
by tbeir own commerce. 

The advance paid in the merchant service is greater than that paid by the 
government, and the wages of seamen are one-third higher, aud the men natarally 
seek the beet pay. 

Another known cause is the enlistment of many seamen and ordinary seanoen 
as firemen on account of the higher pay of the latter rating ; a first-elaes fire- 
man receiving $30 per mouth, equalling the pay of seamen in the merchant ser- 
vice, while a seaman in the navy receives but $20 per month. It is also believed 
that the distribution of priEe money since the war has induced many meo' of 
these two classes to invest their gains in farms, the cultivation of wliich a sailor 
regards as his legitimate vocation when he ceasel to make the sea his home. 

The bureau is of the opinion that greater inducements should be offered fof 
seamen and ordinary seamen to enlist, as these are the only grades whose ser- 
vices are not readily obtained 

The most feasible method by which the sailor can be benefited seems to be 
to allow a bounty in clothing to the amount of {30 for all rates except firemea 
and coal-beavers, there always being an ample supply of these latter ratings ia . 
the service under the present system. 

The mode at present adopted of furnishing clothing to the recruit by the gov- 
ernment and charging ten per cent, to protect it from loss, is the cause of mnch 
dissatisfaction among the men, and if aoolished would tend to silence the many 
compkints that are made about clothing, which invariably requires to be altered 
before it cau be worn, which ia an extra tax upon the landsmen, who have not 
the ingenuity to perform the woik for themselves. 

The contrncta for coal for the present fiscal year call for 32,000 tons, of which 
20.000 tons are to be delivered at Philadelphia at 24 43 per ton, and 12,000 
tons at New York at 95 49 per ton. 

The bureau is negotiating for the purchase of a quantity of anthracite coal at 
HoDolnln, Sandwich islands, at a price much lower than the cost of shipment 
from the United States, and authority has been given for the erection of a coal 
shed with a view of establishing a permanent coal depot at that port. Three 
thousand six hundred tons of Cardiff coal have been purchased of Mr. Abecassis, 
at Lisbon, at lower rates than heretofore obtained, and considerably less than 
he cost of shipping anthracite coal from the United States. 

St. Panlde Loando, west coast of Africa, is recommended as a permanent coal 
station, and the bureau has been informed that there will be no difficulty in ob- 
taining a suitable location for its storage on reasonable terms, at or near the 
point where the government coal is now landed ; 1,650 tons have been shipped 
to that place duiing the year. 

The port of Fichilinque, Lower California, has heen selected as a coal depot 
for the North Pacific squadron on account of its central location, accessibility, 
and the local government having offered a site without any pecuniary conaidei- 



BEPOST OF THE SECBETABT OF THE NATT. 119 

aiion for its nae. Fifteen handred tons of anthracite coal hare been landed at 
that port. 

The station at Cape Havtien, Hayti, has been broken np on account of the 
exorbitant charges to which the goverDment iras enbject for Btotage, handling, 
dnties, &c. 

Some legiilation b; Congress is absolntelj necessary to eecore the Bcrvices of 
persouB voluntarily enlisting and provide a more effective punishment for the 
crime of desertion from the navy, Which practice has been so extensively resorted 
to since the termination of ihevar, thattt has become asystematized swindle npon 
the government It frequently happens that a man enlists for three years, 
draws a large advance in money and clothing, and then deserts and enlists under 
another name, drawing another advance and outfit. Although it bas been cus- 
tomary to fomieh the several naval rendezvous with descriptive lists of such 
deserters in order to detect tbem when offering to enlist under another name, the 

EractJce hae raet with no reenlts and has been abandoned, as their office files 
are become so voluminous that they cannot be consulted without subjecting 
all recruits offering themselves to a tiresome and annoying delay, which would 
be a greater detriment to the service than the detection of a few would be bene- 
ficial to the government. 

When a deserter is apprehended his account is taken up from the date of his 
appearance on board, and although he may have been absent eighteen months, 
the term of bis enlistment is not affected by it and be is discharged at its expi- 
ratJon. There is no punishment that can be inflicted upon a deserter without 
trial by a general courtrUiartial, a method too expensive and tedious for general 
adoption. The army regulations require a deserter to serve the government the 
fall term for whicb'he enlisted, and the law also provides that persons of the age 
of eighteen years may be enlisted without the consent of parents or guardians, 
both of which enactments are recommended for the navy. 

An estimate has been made for another clerk in the bureau, as recommended 
in my last report. The labors of the past year have conclusively demonstrated 
that the present force is entirely inadequate to perform the work of the bureau 
properly. Little or no progress has been made towards bringing up the back work 
caused by the insufficiency of the clerical force during the war, and the labors of 
the bureau are greatly increased by Its assignment to the entire charge and 
direction of affairs pertaining to it at the different navy yards, requiring a sys- 
tem of accounts of equipment stores and books never before kept, showing the 
eost of equipping every vessel in the navy and of maintaining her while in 
com mission. 

I have the honor to be, very respeotfully, your obedient servant, 

H. SMITH, Chief of Bureau. 

Hon. GlOBON WSLLBS, 

Secretary of the Navg. 



E. & B. No. I. 

EfHmaU S«r l&< mnumnt nanini for tin txptnJituret of lib Biiniiii o^ Eftufmmtt mud At* 
erniting for Uu fiieal ptmr tmMug Jtnu 30, 1869. 

8alai7 of cM«f dork, aclJuly 5, 1862 $1,900 

Balaij of one fonrth^;lMB clerk J, 8110 

Bal&T7of two ihird-clMii clerks, at|l,600 3, WO 

8«dir7of two »«coDd-clM8 clerki, at |1,4W S.SOO 

SalBTf of thres first-clua clerki, per act Jalj23, 1866 3,600 

Salary of meMenger __ ._ I.IKKI 

Salary of laborer, per act Jolj 3f>, 1964 



CA^oi^ 



120 BEPOST OF THE fiECBBTABY OF THE NATT. 

For ammmt KBpectfollv aabniilted uincreue tosalBiy to chief clerk (40O 

For MUDDiit foi SD addidonsltbird-cluB clerk . 1,600 

16,9SO 

For contiD^eiit ospeiues 1,000 

17,930 

Appiopriationforlbejear ending; Jmie 30, 1666 15,070 

E. & R. No. 3. 

EUimalK of lis Jtay ^ eitil oMctr$ under tkt cog»iia»ct of tkt Bunau of Equimvtt tutd 
Bunitiug at tiavg jfarai and ttatiotu for tlu fiteal gtar tndiug Jutu 30, 1669. 

PORTttMOUTH, K. H. 

Clerk to equipment ofGoer tl,S0O 

Timeoterk , 1,200 

Store clerk ,' 1,000 

B09T0II. 

SuperinlendeDt of rope-walk 1,900 

Clerk lo eqaipmeiit officer J,S0O 

Time clerk 1,200 

Store clerk 1,200 

Storeclerk 1,000 

KKW vcnK. 

Clerk to eqmpment officer 1,500 

Time clerk 1,300 

Two store clerks, at |l,200 .* a,«0 

One atore clerk : 1,000 

pmLADELPRU. 

Clerk to equipment officw 1,600 

Time clerk 1,300 

Store clork 1,000 

WASBISOTOK. 

Cleik to eqaipment officer 1,500 

Time dark 1.30O 

Two store clerks : 2,400 

One masterimith 1,600 

One master galle; nu^er 1,500 

NORFOLK. 

Clerk to equipment officer 1,500 

Time clerk 1,000 

Store clerk 1,000 

PBMSACOLA. 

Clerk to eqnlpment offic«r 1,500 

Store clerk 1,000 



Clerk to equipment officer . . 



HARE ISLAMS. 



. &. R. No. 3. 
I, for tht Jittal gt 



36,000 



Appropriation for the year ending June 30, 1 
Estimate for the yeitT ending June 31 



RBPOBT OF THE 8ECEETART OP THE MATT. 121 

E. & R. No. 4. 

f#r lit fM^duue nfktmp mtdaHtr maUnalt, ke-,fir (Ai ma*»faet»n tf eoriagt.Jor Ihtfiteai 

j/MT tMihng Jmu 30, 1869: 
For tlie pnrchue of 500 tons hemp, Ac, &c 1400,000 00 



E. &. H. No. 5. 



■nd ancbon, fiiniitnre, (rBUe;i, bose, &c., and for the pajmuit of labor, 
Ae., in equipping TMsew uul muinlbctare of article! m the navj yards 
partainiDg to this bttrean , I 



E. &. R. No. 7. 

t of tkt amomil rtamrtd nndtr lia canliuMi fiaid for llu Steal Mar utding 
Juiw 30, \m. 

Appropriation for the ;«ar eudlDf; Jane 30, 1668 (500,000 00 

EttimaU for lAa jrMr tniing Jtutt 30, 1869. 

For ezpeniee that maj accrue for tbe fottowinK pDrpoeet, vis: for freijthi and 
tranipoitation of inaleriali aocl stores for Boreaa or Equipment and Becroit- 
ing, eipenBcs of recTDiling, tranBpoTtation of enlisted men, printiD|r> P<Mtage, 
advertising, telegrapblDg, and gtationer; for Boreaa of Equipment and Be- 
anltlng, apprehensiou of deserters, aisistanoe to vessels in distress (500,000 00 



EECAPITULATION OP ESTIMATES. 

Salaries »16,920 

Contingent .................... .... . . — 1,000 

17,990 

HATAL HBKVtCB. 

Pay of enlisted men »4,5OO,00O 

Pay of civil officers at navy yards 36,000 

Hemp and other materials 400,000 

Coalfbr the nary WW, 000 

Equipment of vessels 1,700,000 

Cfmlioeent 500,000 

Ij, 036, 000 

H 6UITH, CAiV ^ fiMTSM., 
BURBAO OP EamPHEKT AMU BEUKUlTIHa, Sfplenkr 16, 18^. iOOQIC 



122 KEPORT OF THE SECBETABT OF THE NATT. 

E.&B.iro.e. 

ABSTRACT OF OFFERS (EMBRACING AS WELL THOSE WHICH ARE HE. 
JECTED AS THOSE WHICH ARE ACCEPTED) RECEIVED FOtt PUBNISHING 
ARTICLES L'NDER THE COGNIZANCE OK THE BUREAU OF EQUIPMENT 
AND RECRUITING, MADE IN CONFORMITY TO THE ACT OF CONGRESS AP- 
PROVED MARCH 3, 1843. 

OjfcTtfoT lapplietfoT Ae navy j/ard, Eiilerg, JHaim, under ttdvtTtiiKBitnt dattd J^g 9, 1B67. 

Wmum Porter & Son*. . . *279 95 

Wheeler & Browning.,,. 254 0** 

Alonio A. Foster "ISS OO 

John J. Bingham SSI 95 

Williatn A. Wheeler 406 75 

Hfatt & Spencer 280 75 

Class No. 22, etUioaety : 

WiUtam C. RoRsra &, Co. *14I 90 

WmUm A. Wheeler 336 25 

WilUsm H. Arthur &, Co. 170 95 

JohnM. Whittemore 177 30 

CIems Ho. 23, hardware : 

Joseph L. Savage 14S 50 

William Porter &. Sons. . . 174 68 

Wheeler & Browning.... 203 00 

AlonzoA. Fosier 168 90 

John J. BiDghun 144 92 

William A. Wheeler 147 30 

HjattA. Spencer '140 65 

Claas No. 24, ship chandlery : 

Joseph L. Sarage 1,386 00 

WilliamPartor&.Bons... 1,283 m 

Wheeler <& Browning 1,5A2 45 

AlonzoA. Foster *1,004 SI 

John J. Bingbam 1,062 72 

William A, Wheeler 1,167 78 

H^att &. Spencer 1,013 30 

Class No. 33, galls; iron : 

Joeeph L. Savage 1,333 43 

Wheeler A Browning 1,507 16 

AloDBo A. Fosier 1,113 17 

William A. Wheeler '1,016 47 



■De Groot A. Peck |13,394 00 

Joeeph L. Savage 13,144 50 

William A. Wheeler ■11,775 00 

Brand dtGihon 15,650 00 

Benjamin T. Pippj 13, 070 00 

Class No. 3, cotton canvas : 

Joseph L. Savage 3,273 50 

John J. Bingham 3,379 00 

William A. Wheeler 3,237 75 

Theodore Polhemna. "2,917 00 

Benjamin Y.Pippy 3,699 75 

Class So. 7, cooking utensils : 

Joseph L. Savage 115 50 

William Porter &. Sons, . , ST 00 

Wheeler & Browning.... 130 00 

AloDXO A. Foster 51 60 

John J. Bineham '46 93 

William A. Wheeler 64 SO 

Hfatt & Spencer 51 00 

Class No. 10, leather: 

Joseph L, Savage 255 00 

William Porter & Sons... 225 00 

Wheeler & Browning.... SIO 00 

AlonzoA. Foster 240 00 

John J. Bingham 340 00 

William A. Wheeler 373 DO 

C. M. Clapp&Co "IBOOO 

Hyatt & Spencer 300 00 

Class No. 30, brushes : 

Joseph L. Savage 334 35 



Offerl/OT mppliel for tht Koejr fard <U Charleitmeil, Mail,, trndtr adveriittintiU dated Jutf 



Class No. 1, flax i 



Joseph L. Savage "flO, 378 00 

WiUiam A. Wheeler 14,755 00 

Brand &Oihon 16,814 00 

Benjamin T. Pippy 13,205 00 

Class No. 3, cotton canvas i 

Joseph L. Savage 26,325 50 

John J.Bingbatn 36,674 00 



William A. Wheeler $36,238 76 

Theodore Polhemns *33,73S 56 

Benjamin Y.Kppj 28,751 80 

Class No. 3, iron, steel, &o. : 

JosephL. Savage 1.431 45 

Wheeler & Browning.... 1,431 56 

AlonzoA. Foster 1,413 86 

John J. Bingham 1,574 11 

William A. Wheeler 1,537 37 

George Adams *1,378 90 

C.ooylc 



BEFOBT OF THE SECBBTABT OF THE HATT. 



CUw No. 7, cooking atanaib : 

Jomph L. 8>v>K« ll.MOTO 

William Porter & Son*... 1,413 10 

WhwlerA. Browninr 1,713 7S 

AlonioA. Fo«t«r 1,161 75 

John J. Bingham 1,360 80 

William A. Wheeler 1,109 15 

Hyatt Sl Speocer 'iM6 64 

CIms No. to, leather: 

Joeeph L. 8«T«^ 3,060 70 

William Porter &Soiis... 3,106 50 

Wheeler &. Brawning . . . . 4,7S2 30 

John J. BinghaDi 4,083 60 

WUIiam A. Wheeler 4,473 30 

C. M. Clapp&Co '3,077 70 

Oeorge Adiims 3.418 60 

H jatt & SpaDcer 5,014 50 

Clasa No. 14, ox hides for rope : 

Joseph L. Savage S, 000 00 

Williaoi Porter St. 6oiu... 14,400 00 

John J. BiuKhsm *li,eoO 00 

WUIiam A. Wheeler 15,600 00 

C. H. ClappA, Co 9,000 00 

Oeorge Adama 8,880 00 

H;Mt& Spencor 20,000 00 

CUm No. 16, soap and tallow : 

Joaeph L. Bftvagc 366 00 

JohD J. Bimtham 341 75 

WillianiA.Wheolot 362 00 

George Adama 302 50 

Hyati & Spencer 356 50 

Mullet * Ufftdbury '337 75 

CUu No. SO, bnuhes i 

Joseph L. Savage 614 SO 

WilLam Porter & Sods... 559 66 



123 

Aintuo A. Poster ■$4^1 SO 

John J. Bingham 671 ItO 

William A. Wheeler 673 04 

Hyatt <k Spencer 1,833 30 

Class No. S% BtatiMiary : 

William C. Rogers &, Co. 643 30 

Willtam A. W£eeler *61l 50 

WilliamH.ArthurA,Co.. 698 50 

Abram E. Cotter 8G4 38 

John M. Whlttemor A, Co 854 74 

Class No. 83, hardware : 

Joseph L. Savag« 1,741 93 

Wheeler &. Browning.... 1,983 35 

Alouio A. Foster 1,491 18 

John J. Bingham 1,097 42 

William A. Wheeler 1,795 19 

Hyatt & Spencer '1,346 14 

Class No. 24, ship 



Joseph L. Savage 6,708 OS 

William Porter & Sons ... 7, 8()1 DO 

Wheeler & Browolog »,'M3 SO 

AlonioA. Poster "6,090 70 

John J. Bingham 5,»9a 51 

William A. Wheeler 7,009 67 

Hyatt dt Bpencer 7,014 6S 

Class No. 29, firewood: 

S. &,E. Knight 6,307 60 

8. P. Brown & Son ■4,a30 00 

\yilliam A. Wheeler 7,086 00 

Samuel Oakman 5,737 50 

Wataou &. FittlDger 7,215 00 



Oftn for »Hf pig at Uu navy Hard, BToeldpi, N. Y., imdtr advtTli$tmtnl iff Jul) 9, ISffJ. 







Wheeler* Browning.... 


|I,0T4 BO 








1,375 19 






William A. Wheeler 


1,281 7K 


Joseph L. Savage 


|a0,230 00 


Ii566 60 


DeOroot &. Peck 


84,615 50 






William A. Wheeler 


•81,710 00 


Class No. 4, tin, lino, &c: 












BrojaiuiD Y. Pippy 


94,750 00 


Joseph L. Savage 


1,234 60 










ClM* No. 3, couon canvas and 




WlUlam Porter & Sons... 


1,243 11 






AloQEo A. Poster 


1,119 50 






John J. Bingham 

William A. Wheeler 


1,351 HO 


Joseph L, Savage 


77,790 00 


1,303 75 


John J. Bingham 


80,160 00 






William A. Wheeiw 


78,647 50 






Theodore Polbemos 


•71,244 00 


Class Ho. 7. cooking otshsiU: 






&J,922 00 














Class No. 3.t iron, &c: 
















Jossph L. Savage 


1,239 00 


Alonio A, Poster 


7fnX 



t ClSM So. X SI Kiw Toifc, tlinwii <nl oo sesoaot st ImcolaVr • 



bi'VSri 



124 



BBPOBT OF THE SECEETABT OF THE NATT. 



JobD J. BiDfcbHin |94f 

William A. Wheelet 903 

Hyatt &. Spencer *64i 

Class No. 10, leatber, &c.; 

Joseph L. Savaf^ 2,28f 

Wbeeler& Browning-. -, 2,104 00 

Williftm Porter & SonB. - . 2, 070 00 

JohnJ. Bing-ham 3,32^ 

William A. Wheoler 3,084 00 

C. M.Clapp 4, Co '1,93? 00 

Hyatt & SpeDcet 2,910 00 

ClasB So. 16, soap and tallow : 

Joseph L.Savage 765 OO 

WbeelerA Browning.... 790 00 

William Porter & Sons. ., "TIG : 

John J. Bingham 79& 00 

William A. Wbeelet* 750 00 

B7att&. Speucer 810 00 

ClassNo. 20, bnuhM! 

Joseph L. Savage 852 00 

Wheeler & Browning .... 1,535 00 

William Porter*. Sons... l,37f -" 

Alonzo A. Foster "BSi 

JohnJ. Bintuham 1,290 50 

■William A. WWlM 1,384 00 

HjattA Spencer 1,435 00 

ClMs No. 22, stationery: 

William C. Rogers &. Co. 24£ 

William A. WKeelei 335 

Browet Brolbers 3M 85 

William H. Arthni &. Co. -204 75 

JohnM.Whittemore&Co- 33£ 



Class So. S 



, hardware: 



JoeephL, Savage '$1,111 *» 

Wheeler& Browning.... 2,217 60 

Alonio A. Foster 1,256 49 

JohnJ. Bingham 1,284 04 

WilUam A. Wheeler 1,154 10 

Hyatt ASpeoMr 1,204 36 

Class No. 24, ship chandlery : 

Joseph L. Savage *5,349 50 

Wheeler & Browning.... 11,031 50 

William Porter &, Sons... 6,1!19 37 

Alonzo A Foster S.SSr 80 

Jobn J. Bingham 5,403 54 

William A. Wheeler 5,946 75 

ByaU& Spencer 5,3U8 45 

Claas No. 27, dry goods : 

Joseph L. Savage 523 80 

Wheeler A, Browning 833 00 

JohnJ. Bingham 731 60 

William A. Wheeler 650 00 

Hyatt & Spencer '509 40 

Class So. 29, firewood and coal : 

S. RBrowni Son 3,0!0 00 

J. J.Bingham 3,548 00 

William A. Wheeler •2,9m 00 

Watson &. Kttingei 3,398 00 

Class No. 31, neat's-foot and tar 

Joseph L. Savage 1,240 00 

John J. Bingham '1,013 00 

William A. Wheeler 1,055 00 

Hyatt &. Spencer 1,280 00 



Qfenfor tiipplit$ at iHt navjf fard at Pkiladdfkia, Pa. . under adreriUenuat daud July 9, 



William A. Wheeler '18,145 00 

Joseph L. Savage 8,341 50 

Brand &. Qihon It , 448 75 

BeDJamlu T. Pippy 9,155 00 

Class No. 3, cotton caoTU and 

JohnJ. BiDgham 6,318 90 

William A. Wheeler 5,211 85 

Joseph L. Savage 5,118 20 

Theo. Polhemus '4,866 15 

Benjamin Y. Kppy 5,630 90 

Class No. 10, leather: 

William Porter A. Sou.. . t200 00 



John J. Bingham 

William A. Wheeler 

Joseph L. Savage 

Hyatt & Spencer 

Wheeler & Browning 



Class No. 24, ship chandlery : 

William Porter & Sons 

JohnJ. Bingham 

WillUm A. Wheeler 

Joseph L.Savage 

Hyatt & Spencer 

AlODEO A. Foster 

Wheeler &. Browaing 



$340 00 
!W0 00 
200 00 
300 00 
280 00 



"^'oogle 



BEPORT OF THE SECBETAB7 OF THE NATT. 



125 



ClsssNo. 9, coltoQ caiiTaa, &,c.: 

Joseph L.Saviee Ill.SlS 00 

John J.BiDBham .-. 11,135 00 

William A. Wheeler 11,234 00 

Theodoie Polhemiu "9,900 00 

BsDJuniD Y. Pippj 12, :IT5 00 

CImi Ho. 4, tin and doc: 

JoMDhL. S«Ture '358 00 

William Purtet&SoBS... 400 94 

AloDzuA FoRter 380 00 

Wheeler &, Browning 4IS 00 

John J. BiUKbam 43S 00 

William A. Wheeler.... 400 00 

HfaU &. Spencer 400 00 

Clan Ko. 30, hraebea, && : 

JoaepfiL. Savage 114 00 

WillianiPorter&SoDB... g3 46 

Alonzo A. Foeler 96 00 

Wheeler & Browoing.... J53 80 

Jubn J. BlafrhaiD 91 50 

William A. Wheeler 90 90 

BjutA. Spencer '73 BO 

ClMi ITo. 83, itaiiaDerj : 

William C. Bogeri A Co. *347 10 

Wheeler & RroimiDK.-w 316 25 

William A. Wheeler 992 00 

Williiim H. Arthur A, Co. 284 25 

CUm No. 23, hardvrare : 

Joeeph L. SsTage *688 47 

AloDEo A. Foiler 699 19 

Wheeler A BrowDine-... »I3 S5 

John J. Binrham 738 04 

William A. Wheeler 743 W 

HjMiA, Spencer 737 47 

Clas* No. 24, ship chandlery; 

JoMpli L. Sarap 439 6S 

WUUMDporlv&Soot... 71129 



AlonzD A. Foster 1409 50 

Wheeler &. Browning.... 869 25 

John J. BiDBbam 650 54 

Wiltlam A. Wheeler 591 45 

R;att& Spencer 677 48 

Cla«8 No. S9, firewood and coal : 

8. P. Brown & Son '18,369 00 

William A. Wheeler 12,613 00 

WataonA, Pittiujcer 16,350 00 

ClaM No. 32, galley iron and flteel : 

Ja«epbL. Savage 2,327 00 

Wbeeler& Browuing.... 2,483 50 

William A. Wheeler -2,009 00 

ClaM No. 33, pig iron : 

Jo«eph L. Savage '4,200 00 

William Porter & Soni. .. 4,499 00 

Wheeler tc. BrowDing 4, 750 00 

Chartea L. Oude»le;i.... 4,849 00 

John J.Bingham 4,894 00 

William A. Wheeler 4,925 OO 

WataonAi PitLinger 7,500 00 

C1»M No. 34, chuD iron; 

Joseph L. Savage '13,745 60 

WheelerA. Browning.... 16,492 50 

Wyethdi. Bro 13,753 55 

Willuun A. Wheeler 16,773 00 

ClBMNo.36,>and: 

WHlUm A-'Wheeler "472 OO 

Clau No. 36, chaicoat: 

S. P. Brown A. Son '165 00 

William Porter & Hodi... S% 00 

Wheeler & Browning 187 50 

William A. Wheeler 435 00 

WU«oo A. PitUnger 367 50 

Joho L. Uooie 172 00 



Oftr*fartupftUtattlumavfgaT4alNiiT/Blk, Va.,undtr aJvertutnuMtdaUd J^f9, 1667. 



Claae No. 2, Folton canrai and twine : 

Joho J. Bingham |(!,&55 26 

Joseph L. Savage 8,196 &0 

William A Wheeler 8,291 50 

Theodon Polhemiu >7,5I0 34 

Benjamin T. Pippy 6,878 10 

Ctai« No. 3, iron, &«. : 

John J. Kngfaam 537 SO 



Joseph h. SKvage 

Wheeler & Browning.. 

Alonio A. Foster 

William A. Wheeler ... . 



William Portor A, Sou. .. 

John J. Bingham .-.. 

Joseph L. Savage--.--- -■ 

Wheeler &. Browning 

Alonio A. Foster.. 



1577 00 
500 00 

'«)«47 
&30 00 



C^.oot^lc 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OP THE HAVT. 



Williwn A. WheetoT 


1400 00 


HTattA. Spencer 


»1. 142 Sp 


Hyau & Spencer 


417 50 






CIms No. 7, cookiDfT uteiuUa : 
















William Porter&Bon.... 


578 00 




833 74 


Joseph L. Savane 






















Alonio A, Feeler 


•316 25 


William A. Wheeler 


870 20 


William A. Wheeler 


508 50 


Hyatt*; Spencer 


900 77 


HjaM& Spencer 


412 50 


















WiUiamPorter A.Sons... 


•1,048 00 


WUliun Porter & Sons... 


•990 25 


JohD J. Bingham 


1,800 00 


John J. BiDgham 


l,05U 00 


8. P. Brown & Co 


1,S75 00 


Joseph L. Savage - 


i,(mi,o 


Wheeler & Browning 


1,500 00 


Wheeler & BrowninB.... 


1,433 50 


WilUam A. Wheeler 


],9») 00 


William A. Wheeler 


i,a*j65 


Watson & Pittinger 


1,090 00 


CU.Clapp ACo 


1,187 00 







AT HEW YORK. 

& P.Brown & Son 

WUliam A. Wheeler 

Tyler& Co.... 

John Rommel, jr .. 

George C. Milchell 

Albert E.BaM 



%'Ti 


•5 49 


6 tSO 


5 9:H 




5 64 



AT PHILADELPHU. 

S. P. Broim & Son .' 

WUliam A. Wheeler 

John Rommel, jr 

Tyler & Co 

George C. Mitchell 



$H7 
4 51 
4 814 
4 63 

•4 43 



BUREAU OF NAVIGATION. 

BoRBAU OP Navioatio.v, Navy Bbfartmbnt, 

WiuMngtoH, October, 1S67. 
Sir : 1 have the honor to enbmit the following report of this burean, togetlier 
with eetimatea for its eapport, and for the expenditarea that will probably he 
required in that division of the naval service committed to ite immediate charge, 
for the liBcal year ending June 30, 1869. Included in this report, and trans- 
mitted herewith, are the reports of the superintendents of the Naval Observa- 
tory and Nautical Almanac, to which I respectfully invite your attention. 

BURBAD OF NAVIOATIOK. 

The ordinary routine duties of providing, diatribnting, and keeping the Bnp 
plies coming under the cognizance of this bureau, has been satisfactorily per- 
formed at the aeveral naval stationa dming the past year. The supplies of nav> 
igation stores which had accumulated prior to the spring of ltJ65, (to which 
reference was made in the last preceding report,) and which eiili remained 
undisposed of, have been carefally examined, and articles unfit for rei^sao and 
not worth repuring have from time to time been sold at public auction, and the 
proceeds turned into the United States treasury. 

The instruments, nautical books, and other navigation supplies, kept for issue 
to public vessels at the several naval stations, are, in general, conveaiently ai- 



BEPOBT OF THE SECBETABT OF THE NATY. 127 

ranged, alike for QArefnl preeervatioD ond ready diatribntion, as may be required ; 
for all of which a strict accountability is exacted of the officers in charge. 

The charts alone are kept for ieene, as required, at the hydrograpfaic office, 
where tbej are systematicidly arranged, and corrected, or withdrawn, from time 
to time, as new data are obtained, or new editions pablished. 

Tbe rales of all chronometers issaed to vessels of the navy are accurately 
determined at the Naval Observatory, aud when from long nse or injury tbey 
are found to be unreliable, they are condemned aud withdrawn from farther 
issue. 

Tbe subject of compass deviations bad continued to receive tbe particular 
attention of tbe bureau. No pains have been spared to secure tbe most reliable 
iDStmmente, to have tbem properly placed on (>oard ship, and to have careCul 
and frequent determinations of compass errors made, with reports of the aame 
sent to the bureau. The periodical examinations and reports required to be 
made of all the compasses of each vessel, white iu commission, giving in detail 
eetimates of their several characteristics, will, it is believed, result in furnishing 
a body of reliable practical data upon which to base a satisfactory judgment 
hereaher. And it is hoped that, from both classes of these reports, there will 
be something gained in the future for increased confidence, alike in the quality 
of the instrument and in its use on board modem ships of var. 

HYDROOBAPHY. 

The important interests of the United States in the commerce of the Pacific 
and Indian oceans, especially in the increasing trade with China and Japan, 
and the prospective development of our intercourse with the territory recently 
acquired from Russia, would seem to demand the active co-operation of this gov- 
ernment with Great Britain, and with all other European powers, now engaged 
in smoothing the way to the commerce of all nations, by making careful surveys 
of the coasts and harbors bounding and lying upon these waters. The charts 
of tbe coasts of China, Japan, and of the late Rnssian possessioDS in America, 
are far from being complete or reliable ; and, with the present state of our 
knowledge of the navigable waters of those regions, they are visited at very 
considerable risk of bo& life and property. 

Our regular croieere may contribute, and they are even now contributing con- 
siderably to our stock of nautical information in those directions ; and so fiar as 
obtainable this information is being disseminated among navigators. But in 
view of the great extent of coast line of tbe newly acquired territory, tbe laige 
amount of capital invested in the Chinese and Japanese trade, tbe great num- 
ber of snspected dangers, many of which being of doubtful existence, and those 
actually existing seldom correctly placed on the charts, and the fact that large 
portions of these coasts, buth of tbe continents and islands, have never been 
surveyed, it ia believed that no more valuable or ecouomtcal mode of relieving 
commerce of some of its embarraasmentB could be provided, than by at once 
commencing proper nautical surveys and prosecuting them vigorously, wherever 
needed, to render navigation safe, easy, and expeditions. 

HYDROOKAPHIC OFPICB. 

The Hrdrographic Office, the commencement of whose operations was indi- 
cated in tiie report of lust year, has continued tbe routine duties assigned to it, 
as originally designed. All reliable nautical information received at the depart- 
ment is there prepared for publication. Such charts of government surveys as 
are demanded are re-published under its immediate direction; and aU charts de- 
signed for pnblfcation are there prepared for the engraver's hands, the responsi* 
hie cham of which, in all stages of the projecting, drawing, engraving, and 
printing, wing oonunitted to that office. , > i 



128 EEPOET OP THE BECKETAKY OP THE NAVT. . 

The repairing of Dsntical instniiiienta hss been traneferred from the KsTal 
Obeerratory to tba H^drographic Office, where a workshop has been eaitablj' 
fitted ; and good progresB has already been made in refitting, cleaning, and 
ftdjaating the more delicate inatmmenta found, when tnmed in from prertons 
ship's nse, to require this attention, in order to adapt them to further reisaae in 
a serriceable condition. 

The following list of oharts, &c., indicates the work done and in hand, dur- 
ing the past year, in that di<ri£ion of its duties : 

lU-pK^ieationt. 

Wilkes's chart of Sandwich Islands, corrected. 

Harbor chart of Waikea, or Hilo, Sandwich Islands, (Wilkes,) with additions 
and corrections. 

Behring'e sea and Arcdc ocean, (by United States North Pacific snrreyb^ 
expeditiot,) with additions and corrections. 

Neto puhlicatumi. 

Korth Pacific islands (hy United States expedition for the snrrey of the 
ronte between California and China,) comprising the following : Johnson or 
Comwallis island, Qaspar Rico reef, Gardiner's island. Bird island, Necker 
island, Maro reef, French Frigate shoal, and Laysan island. 

Sketch of Cultivator shoal, survey of Commander Chandler, United States 
navy. 

In the hand* of tngraver. 
Aleutian archipelago, sheet No. S, (by United States North Pacific survey- 
ing expedition.) 

Preparing for pmblicalum. 

Aleutian archipelago, sheet No. 3, (by United States North Pacific surveying 
expedition.) 

Madjico Sima group, (hy United States North Pacific surveying expedition.) 

Harbor of Ciara, northeast coast of South America, (Simpson.) 

Tsuruga harbor, west coast of Japan, (by Commodore Ooldsborongb, United 
States navy;) and 

Sailing directions for various places on the west coast of Japan, recently vis- 
ited by the United States steamer tShenandoah, Commodore J. B. Goldsborongh. 

The remaining unreduced work of the late North Pacific survey, under the 
command of Commander (now Commodore) John Rodgers, United States navy, 
has been so nearly finished and placed in the hands cf the engraver, that litde 
is left to be done, beyond some compiling from the moat reliable Russian author- 
ities, to complete the chain of the Aleutian islands and the adjacent coast. 

The surveys made in 1B58~'59. in the United States schooner Fenimore 
Cooper, under the command of Lieutenant J. U. Brooke, United States navy, 
have been reduced and published. 

The United States steamer Lackawanna, Captain William Reynolds, United 
States navy, has reported that a number of supposed dangers in the track of 
vessels from Honolulu to Brooks's island do not exist ; and that officer is now 
engaged in making a careful snrvey of Brooks's island, lying in the track of 
vessels bound from San Francisco to China. The results of preliminary sur- 
veys and examinations of varions places visited by the United States steamer 
Shenandoah, Commodore J. R. 6oldshoroui;h, United States navy, on the coast 
and in die enclosed waters of Japan, have been recently reported by Rear- 
Admiral H. H. Bell, United States navy, commanding tlie Asiatic squadron, and 
will be prepared withont deky and published for the use of navigators. 



HBFOBT QP THE 8ECBETAB7 OP THE NATT. 



The naval apprenliee Sfslem not onlj contiones to win faror, u is shown by 
the increasing unutMT of applicaule for ealistment, bat xu nsefalness becomea 
more apparent ait anfficient time is fbmished for the derelopment of its ednca- 
liunal ttaiaing, and for showing its adaptation to the wants of the naval service. 
^Tid its results to ihe apprentices themselves are already evidenced iu the pro- 
gress made, by a majority of them, in acquirements and general apUtode, of a 
kind to practically fit them for tbe duties of a seaman. 



The annnal report of tbe saperinteDdent of tbe Naval Academy, addressed to 
the Secretary t^ the Navy, exhibits ihe condition of that institntion to the close 
of the last acadeonie year. 

The new cbap«l, aod the additional quarters for midsbipsaen, authorized by 
late acta of Congress, are onder conntmction by contract. 

NATAL OBSKSVATUBY. 

The work done a^ aud snggcstions made in reference to, tbe Naval Observa- 
tory, are folly set forth in the report of the superintendent. 

NACnCAL ALMAKAC. 

The report of tbe superintendent of the Nantical Almanac efaoirs that progress 
has been made, during the pa^'t year, towards a more extended advance publica- 
tion of tbe almanac. Tbe purpose is to have it available for issue to navigators 
at least three years in advance of the time of using it. 

I have tbe honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

THORNTON A. JENKINS, 

CAiff of Bureau. 
Hon. GiDKON Wbllbs, 

Secretary of the Naejf. 



U.NiTBn Statbs Naval Ohsbrvatory, 

Waiiinglon, October 10, 1867. 
Sib : I have the honor to submit (be following report of tbe work of this obser- 
vatory during tbe past year. The eslimaics nave already been handed in, a 
copy of which is hereunto appended. 

ASTBONOMtCAL WORK. 

The routine of work which existed under tbe super! utendency of my prtile- 
cessor, Rear-Admiral U. U. Davis, whom t relieved on tbe 15th of May last, bos 
been continued. 

The Equatorial. — This instrument has been under the charge of Mr. James 
Fergason, assistant astronomer, aided by Professor J. B. Eastman. It has been 
chieUy employed, as usu'l, in the observation of tbe smaller and more recently 
discovered asteroids. Of these, there have been observed Tbisbe, Concordia, 
Niobe, (89), Bel lona, Erato, (sis, Ariadne, and Hpsperia. The number of obser- 
vations of each, except Thisbeand (89), has been lees than during former years ; 
and the observations have been made with the view of identifying the planets 
when they were fuiat, or when the cphemerides were defective. 

AH occultations, when not obscured by cloads, have been observed ; and ihe 
work on tbe Pleiades has been prosecuted whenever an oppottiuity occnired. 

91. ' X.oogTc 



130 ' EEPOBT OF THE SECKETAEY OP THE NAVT. 

The first months of 1867 were unfavorable for obeerving. Several comparisoon 
of stars about (he variable etai' iq Corooa Borealis were made from time to time ; 
aittl in April, observations wore made of tbe angle of positiim of the companiou 
of Sirius. and of its distance from that star. 

A portion of each favorable oight has been devoh^d to searching for comets and 
asteroids, and to general observations; but, owiug to the comparatively sm4ll 
power of this instrument, we have not been as eucceasfnl in the discovery of 
asteroids as other ol)servstories with larger instrnmente. 

All the computations have bi-en made by the assistant astronomer, and the 
work for 1866 is ready for tbe printer. 

Tbe impetus given to scientific inquiry by the recent developments of the 
spectroscope, in regard to the chemical analysis of the heavenly bodies, renders 
it very desirable that this insiituiion should be provided with such an instrument. 
Accordingly, the cost of a spectroscope, to be attached to the equatorial, has been 
introduced into tbe special estimates for the year. 

Tie Tran&it Circ/e. — The work of '• a more accurate determination of the poaU 
tions of the titars in ibc American Ephemeria" takes about half tbe labor of the 
iuatrument, and will be completed with the year 1869 or 1870. 

Tbe work ot determining tbe positions of 350 stars, rei[uired by the Coast Sur- 
vey in determining the latitudes of its stations, is nearly done, and will be finished 
before the close of ihe year. 

1'be observations <>f planets and asteroids have bt'cn continued as during last 
year, except that attention is confined to ibi^se asteroids which, through their posi- 
tion or their minuteness, may escape the scrutiny of Kuiopeikn astronomers. 

l)uriiig 1S6G, 4,470 observations of heavenly bodies were made; besides 650 
observations of ihe nadir point and collimators, fur the determination of tbe zenith 
point of the instrument, and more than a hundred detcnai nations of the level and 
col lima tioD errors. 

Up to tb<- date of this report, tbe number of celestial observations in 1867 ia 
nearly 4,000. The estimated uumber for the year is 5,000 — the determination 
of the Coast Survey stars requiring moie than 1,000 observations. 

As a general rule, reductions kei-p pace with the observations, at an interval 
of a month. The observations for 1866 are ready for tbe printer, except some 
geiierul revision. At tlic [)rci<ent time, however, the reductions have fallen bi-biud 
l»'o montb^, owing to the illne^i; of one of tbe aids, and the prees of extra work. 

Two laborious pieces of extra work have just been completed ; 

1. T/ie ditcrrjilion vflhc Irantit i:ir'Jc, irilh an imetligtition of ilM comtantt — 
The iuvesiigation is believed to be tbe most ebiborale and severe to which an 
aftroniimical iiistnimeut was ever eubjceted It is now passing through the press, 
as an iipp<-ndix tii lliu volume of observations for l&G.'i. 

2. An liirt-ntigHlion of the distujire uf the mn.—'SM only is this distance the 
only element through u htch we know anytliitig of tbe distance of a single body 
beyond tbe moon, but it in a necessary element in the reduciiou of every observed 
declination of the suu or a phmet. It is an element tbe esact value of which 
was nltogeiher in an unsettled state. More than ten years since, tlie startling 
announcement was made by lluusen that the lunar theory indicated an error <tf 
more than one- thirtieth in the value iif the solar parallax, wbich bad, for a gene- 
ration, been received with unqueeiioned coufidence by astronomers. A few years 
afterwards, Le Verrier was led to the same conclusion, by bia invesiigali'ins of 
tbe planetary theories. The cnrreclioii indicated by these lesearches was a reduc- 
tion of the distance by three or four millions of miles. 

li) 186:^, a gc-nerul co-operative effort was made by the principal observatories 
of the world t" fix this important element by corresponding observations of Mars 
in the two hemispheres of the earth. 

Two independent plans of observation were proposed : one by Captain Gillisa, 
&om this establishment; the other by Dr. Wiunecke, from the Central Ku«siaa 



BEPOET OP THE BECBETABY OP THE NAVY. 131 

ObBervutory at Pnlkowa. The latter was more extensively adopted, though a 
sufficient nntnber of observations wen' mide on Cnptaiu Gillisa'a plan to give a 
very valuable reeult. Their reeuU, as deduced by Professor Hall, gave for the 
parallax S".84 ; sbowiog that the supposed diminution of the sun's distance was 
real, bat not as great as Hansen and Le Verrier had indicated. 

Up to last winter, no general diecussioo of the observations, made according 
to the Fulkowa plan, had been attempted. DtscuBBioiis of detached portions of 
the series had, indeed, been made by Mr. Ferguson here ; by Mr. Stone, at the 
Greenwich Observatory, and by Dr. Winnecke himself; but as more than half 
the observations were not employed in either of theso dtscussionB, the rcanlta 
conld not, in any way, be regarded as fioal, 

A definitive value of the parallax being a desideratum, an arrangement was 
last winter made between Admiral Davis and M, Struve, by which the entire 
work of the discussion was placed in the baiidni of Professor Newcomb. Besides 
discussing the Mnra observiitions, the required element was deduced by all tho 
other known methods. The following are the sepirnte results for the sun's mean 
parallax ; 

From Mars observations, by the Pulkown plan 8.852 

From Mam obsurvatioiis, by the Wa:jhiogton plan (ProfetBoi' Hall) S.9i2 

From the parallactic equation of the moon 8.835 

From the lunar equation of the earth 8.809 

From the transit of Venus in 1769 (Powalky) SSCO . 

The concluded value, from a combination of all tho results, is S",8'^, with a 
possible error of not more than two "r thrui; hundredths of a second, correspond- 
ing to a dialiiiice of the sun of 92,300,000 miles. 

In the computations for the solar parallax. Mr. C. Thirinn rendered material 
assistance, in addition to bis other duties as iiid. The observations with the 
transit circle have been made principally by Professors Newcomb and Ilall, and 
Mr. Tliirion. Mr. Rogers assisted in the reductions, and observed during the 
abeence of Professor Newcorhb. The work of copying the observations for the 
press has been done by Captain Whiting and Professor Beecber. 

The mural circle and the transit instrument are in charge of Profesnor Yftrnall, 
assisted by Mr Doolittlo. The former instrument has been employed in d<'ter- 
mining tho declinations of stars, the right aacensioua oF which had .already been 
determined with the ti-nnsit instrument. Considerable progress has heevi made 
towards snpplying thi? co-ordinate ; and in another year the general e'tlalogna 
will be so far ndvjtneed that the piinting of it may be commenced. It is prc>- 
po-iud to oli?er\'c again next ye.ir, with ihe transit instrument, the rijjht usceii- 
sions of a largo number of stars the declinations of which havu been determined 
in past yc.irs. The reduction of tin; murn! circle olisiTvations was made by 
Mr. D<..dit,t!e. Besides the current work, Profi-^sor Yanvill has been di! g<.oitly 
engaged in ihe work of arranging nod preparing the general catalogui' for tho 
press. He also during the year supeviuiended the publication of the obnerva- 
tious made with the transit instrument in 186.'), and prepared tho introduction 
to that work. 

MKTBOnOLOOICAL OBRKHVATtO.VlH. 

This work is under the immediate aujiervision of Professor Euslman, In addi- 
tion to bis astroaomicttl ■lutics. The instruments in use during the year were 
a mercurial barometer; dri/, icei-bu\h, aud suu thermometers ; wiud vane, and 
rain-gauge. Theso instruments, except the rain-gauge, have beeu observed 
every three hours, beginning at midnight, by the watchmen, of whom the utmos 
care is required in the discharge of this portion of their dulies. 

The trauacripts from the journal, and the computation of tesuUe, bave,dll 



132 EEPOET OF THE SECBETABY OP THE NATT. 

been made hy the officer in cbai^, and the results of the obBervationa of 1866 
are ready for tlie press. This officer also compared the Belf-regietering maxi- 
inam and minimum thermometers famiebed from the observatory to our naTkl 
vessels. 

Very much remains to be done that is desirable to accomplish for the advance- 
meat of meteorolo^cal science in this inntitution. 

Correct observntions must first be obtained in order to deduce true meteoro- 
logical laws; and Aourly observations of aimoepheric/>rf«mre and temperature, 
and of the direction and vetocily of the wind, for at least^fe years, are abso- 
lutely essential to the proper determination of the meteorologic^ constants, aod 
the true knowledge of the daily and yearly flnctuatiouH at any station. 

To attain these results with our present system of observation, and with the 
instmments on hand, is almost impossible ; and our only remedy seema to be to 
resort to self- registering instmments. These are being ased with buccsbb in all 
the first-class institutions in Europe, and are beginning to be properly recognised 
in this country 

The naval service of the United States, and the merchant service, are alike 
deeply interested in meteorology and its advancement, as they are in astronomy ; 
and while this is a naval institntion, and the only government institntion of the 
kind in the conntry, it seems most proper, and in keeping with the demands of 
the service, the age, and of science, that the observatory shonld be supplied 
with the latest and most accurate improvements in meteorological as well ss 
astronomical instrnments. 

In view, therefore, of the wants of the observatory, I recommend the pnr- 
chase of suitable meteorological instruments, and have embraced in the estimates 
a list of them, with their cost, and that of a tower for properly mounting them, 

CHRONOMETER ROOM. 

Ten large receiving cases, with the standard mean-lime clock and its tele 
graphic connections, occnpy the chronometer room. 

In the receiving cases are. at this date, one hundred and one (101) chrono- 
meters, running on trial, having been recently examined and cleaned. Two 
thirds-of this namber are ready for immediate service. Careful selections are 
always made with reference to the station to which the vessel to be supplied is 
assigned. 

These instruments are wound and compared with the mean-time standard 
clock daily, and their rates entered on the tomparison papers in the chronome- 
ter journal, every tenth day; and on the "trial" forms, for sis months or a 
year, consecntively, as they are tested for repairs, or are under trial for pur- 
chase. Each receiving case contains a self-registering thei mometer — the error 
of which has been accurately determined — by which the temperature is made 
available as a proof of their reliability. 

The chronometer room has been recently rearranged with regard to light and 
ventilation. The results of "trials," thus far, show that the ipstruments made 
by Messrs. Negus, of New York city, the late Wm. Bond & Son, of Boston, 
and Charles Frodsham. of London, are of superior merit for accuracy and regu- 
larity of performance, under variations of temperature. 

The chronometer room is in chai^ of Commander A. W. Johnson. For the 
past year, this officer has been engaged — in addition to his routine service of 
winding and comparing, selecting chronometers for issue as they are ordered by 
the bureau, and having them cleaned and repaired — in collating the Ijistory of 
each instrnment from the date of its manufacture and purchase. Books are 
being prepared for these entries which when completed will give to each chro- 
nometer its correct valuation. Under this new system of accountability and 
method, eighty-eight (88) chronometers have been condemned as unreliable. 
And. by authority of the bureau, withdrawn from service. 



EEPOET OP THE SECRETARY OP THE NAVY. 133 

Tbe error of the mean-time etandard clock ib obtained by obBcrrations with 
the transit ciicle, every Mth day, weather permittiug; and the time at uood, at 
7 a. m., and at 6 p. m., is transmitted by telegraph to stations in the city ; and 
at noon, by the aifierent lines of wireSi to the northward, eastward, and west- 
ward, and ae far sonthward as Texas. 

The instmment maker, Hr. Wm. F. Gardner, nnder the direction of the pro- 
feBBors obBerving, is charged with keeping in working condition the astronomi- 
cal inetmments, the batteries, &c., and is now engaged in arranging suitable 
tfllegraphic connections for controlling a clock ul the Navy Department, and 
eansing it to beat in unison with the standard time-keeper at the observatoty. 

I have asked, in the estimates, for an appropriation to cover the cost of a 
mean-time clock and a thermo-chronometer, for nse in the chronometer room. 
The latter instmment is compensated to run on mean-time, under a certain 
temperature, and to show, by its gain or loss in any given time, the mean tem- 
perature uf its locality. It fnmiBhes the means of determining daily rates in 
the order of temperature. Such an instrument, it may be remarked, is em^jloyed 
for this purpose at the Greenwich Observatory. 

THB LIBRARY. 

Through the liberality of Mrs. Gilliss, the widow of Captain James M. Gil- 
liss, a former superintendent, thelibrary has bceu since the last report increased 
beyond the additions usually made by purchases and by exchanges of the pub- 
lications of the observatory. This gift has also supplied in several cases vacan- 
cies ID valuable series which could have been with difficulty supplied by inquiry 
and outlay. 

The usual number of volumes of the annual observations have been distri- 
buted. Tliey have been the astronomical and meteorological obBervations for 
1864, and the astronomical fnr 1S51-'SS, recently reduced. The distribution 
has been made partly through the courteous officers of our Department of State, 
and partly by those of the Smithsonian, as well as by mail ; and the endeavor 
has Deen to supply observatoriea, scientific institutions, and men of scientific 
attainment at home and abroad. The list is steadily increasing ; the files of the 
observatory hold flattering acknowledgments from observatoriee as for distant 
even as the Cape of Good Hope and Australia. 

A comprehensive report on interoceanic railroads and canals, called for by 
the resolation of the Senate of the United States of March 19, 1866, was pre- 
pared by my predecessor, Rear-Admiral Dnyls, and transmitted to Hon. Sec- 
retary of the Navy on the 11th of July following. It was accompanied by a 
series of maps, original and compiled, illustrating '' the various proposed lines 
of interoeeanic canals and railroads." 

Professor J. E. Nourse was chained by the late Superintendent with the daty 
of aiding in the investigation of these routes, and in the preparation of his re- 
port and of the distribution of the copies of the same, placed by resolntiou of 
th« Senate at the disposal of the observatory. He has also charge of the library, 
and the distributioD of the annual volumes of the observatory. 

K BO BQ A MZ ATI 0» . 

The seventh section of the act making appropriations for the naval service 
for the year ending 30th June, 1667, approved April 17, 1666, which enacts 
" that hereafter no vacancy in the grade of Professor of Katbematics in the 
Navy shall be filled," will seriously cripple the operations of the observatory 
unleaa some provision be made by law to fill vacancies in that corps occurriag 
among the professors of mathematics employed at this institution. 

I would propose a reoi^nization of the officers who are observers, as follows ; 

lo addition to the Superintendent, the following commissioned officeniOQiC 



1.14 BEPOBT OP THE SECBETAHY OF THE NAVY. 

Oue ftBtroDomer, irith tbe pay aod allovances of a commander in the navy 
on ehore duty. 

Five(f)) aBsistatit aetroiiomers ae obeer vera, and one (1) as librarian, (witb 
aetroDomica] or meteorological duties aa may be reqniied,) with the pay and 
allowances of lientenaut commander on shore duty. 

Four (4) aids for computing and observing, with pay and allowances of master. 

One secretary, with pay of 51,800 per annum. 

Tbis plan does not call for more officers than are now employed at the obper- 
Tatovy, except one additional aid, who was asked for by my two immediate pre- 
dccceaors, and the dniies devolving; apon that class urge mo to repeat the request. 

I take this occasion earnestly to recommend that the pay of the civilians 
engaged in astronomical and other duties at the observatory be increased. The 
salaries now paid to them were fixed several years ago — more than ten years ia 
some instances. The duties performed by most of them are by no means those 
of clerks or computers only, but require no inconsiderable knowledge of astron- 
omy and general science. Some of them have been many years in tbe public 
service. 

On tbe 27[h of September last, I had the sad duty to report to the depart- 
ment the death of Mr. James Ferguson, who had been for almost twenty years 
the assistant astronomer of this observatory. For his scientific ability he stood 
high among astronomers. He was a mopt efficient assistant, and to bis labors 
much of the present high standing of this institution is due. In his death the 
scientific world has lost a bright ornament, tbe observatory a moat able collabo' 
rator, and I a most esteemed personal friend and counsellor in my duties as 
superintendent. 

Veiy respectfully, yonr obedient servant, 

B. r. SANDS, 
Commodore, Superintendent. 

Commodorfi Thornton A. Jenkins, U. S. N.. 

Chief of Bureau nf Navigation and Office <^ Detail, Navy Department. 



Nautical Almanac Office, 

October 10, 1867. 

Silt : Id compliance with yotir order of August 16, 1 have the honor to sub- 
mit the following report of the work of this office during the post year : 

Tbe principal dniies of the office, the chief work to be done, and the methods 
by which it is accompliebed, remain substantially the same from year to year. 
Most of the computers, however, are paid, instead of annual salaries, a stipulated 
price for the portion of each annual ephcmeria prepared by each, and their 
work is subjected to more thorough tests. 

The large volume for 1868, in press at tbe time of my last report, was ready 
for distribution on tbe 3d of November. The small almanac for 1869, prepared 
for the use of navigators, although the greater part was sent to the printer be- 
fore October, 1866, was not printed and ready for distribution until the latter 
part of May. 1867. The delay was incident to the transfer of the printing to 
another office and new compositors, and arrangements arc now made by tbe 
Public Printer which, I trust, will prevent such delay in future. 

The large volume for 1869 is completed and stereotyped. I am awaiting the 
final proofs tmd printing. These should be completed within a fortnight. 

During the year I have been able to gain nearly three mouths in the prepa- 
ration of the ephemerTs, so that nearly all of the complete ephemeris for 1870 
is now ready, and the printer has made some progress on the small almanac. 
All the manuscript of the latter will be in his hands before December, and the 
printing might be completed before January. Considerable progress bas been 
made in the ephemerides of the sun and moon for 1871. 



BEPOBT OP THE 8ECRETABT OP THE NAVY. 135 

Tables fur facilitating tlie redaction of pWes of the fixed etars, which have 
been used for eHveral years in the preparation of the star ephemeria, have been 
completed nnd arranfred for publication. 

Tables of Harmonia have been prepared by Mr. Schubert, who conlinues his 
work on the newly discovered planets as in former years. 

The great work of determining the masses and elements of the principal plnn- 
els> and the revision of the tables of the moon, have been interrupted by the 
appointment of Professor Peirce to the sn peri n tendency of the United States 
Coast Survey. Arrangements for renewing them with more vigor and speedy 
promise of completion, I hope soon to submit to you for approval. A larger 
appropriation than that asked for could be very advantageously employed in 
pushing fiTward this important contribution to astronomy. 

The sale of almiinacs during the year has not exceeded 4,400 copies. The . 
great decrease ie attributable to the depression of the commerce of the country. 

Copies of estimates for the Nautical Almanac Office for the next fiscal year, 
submitted to you August 27, are enclosed herewith. 

I have the honor to he, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 
J. H. C. COTFIN, 
Profettor of Matkemalkt, U. H. N., Stcp't Nautical Almanac. 

Oommodore Thor\ton A. Jbnkins, IT. S. N, 

Chief of Bureau of Naoigatio*. Wathint^tOM. D C. 



KAVIGATION-A. 
Lift of fttftri comfBting tht aiimattt for tliefiieal gear mding Junt 30, 1869. 



Xatigatiem, B. — Eilimate for the rapport of the bnreui. 
FOR THE N*VAI- SERVICE. 

Navigation, iVo. I. — EBtlmate for the pay of coniTniwioDcd and warrant ofGcen of the 
nsTT, au(] for miteaee am] (rasa porta liun oi the aauio. 

ffatigatiaa. No. 'X— EBtimnte for navigatiou and navigalioii silppUes. 

NaneatiOK, No, 3.— Estimale tor suppnrt of the SavaT Ariideiiiy. 

Nangalioa, No. 4. — E»tiiiiHto lor gupputt iif the Naval Ukservatorj. 

Navigalion, No. 5,— EntiniHte fur BUpjiort of the Nuiuirul Alumuac. 

NaeigalioK, No. 6. — Sunnnar}' of ealiiiiales from the ttiiienii of Navi<;ation. 

Navigativn, No. 7. — KocapiluIatJun of appropiialious uudrr the coguiKance of the BiireaD 
of NaTigatioQ. 

BuiBAii.op Navioation, 1IJ67. 



KAVIGATION-B. 

Eilimott of the amaliat rtquirtd for tkt tupporl of ihe Burtau of NaiigalioH Jiirtht Jiaeal yetr 
nJing Junt W, IMI. 

For aalary of chief of bureau, per act of July 5. 18(a. section 3 J:l,r>rK) 

Pornlarjof chief clerk, per act of July o. i(«S. nfHMion :l l.MHl 

Forialary of one clerk, (fourth cliui*,) per act of July "A ''^•''ti. aeriii.u rt l.'-iHt 

For aalary of one clerk, (aerond clatu, ) per act of July Zi. \atit\. ■r'^tiou U 1 , 4iH) 

For aalary of meeieDfter, per act of July 5, 186-J, aud per act of July '23. Jm>6. 

•ecUon 7 1,0(10 

For waRoa of laborer, per act of February '&. Ititili, and per act of July i^t, lr<(<6. 



136 EEPORT OP THE 8ECEETABY OP THE NAVY. 

For amount reBpeutfoll; sDbinittedu increase of salary bf chief clerk — $400 

For contingent expenses of bureau S, 4U0 

For salary of one clerk, (tliird class,) respectfully submitted 1,600 

Total 14,690 

Appropriated for year ending June 30, 1866 ^ $l^,6si0 

Bl'read of Havioatiok, 1867. 

NAVIGATION— No. 1. 

Eitimate nf the amount Ttquind undtr tht head Pay qf tht JVdBjr, for Ihtpafouni of commit- 

liuned a«d warrant offiitrt at tia, on ihore, on special itntte, and of thote on the rtlini 

list and uMimployed, and far mileagt or Iramportation of ojictra traceiling under order*. 

For ths Sscal year ending: June 30, 1869 96,J<iO,!i60 

Amount appropriated for tbe year ending June 30, 1868 ■-. (6, 32(i, 280 

BuKEAU OF Navigation, 1867. 

NAVIGATION— No. 2, 

Eilimate of the amoiait required for navigation and nacigalion lappliri, and for parpotes ia- 
cidenlat to navigalion, for Ike fiual gear ending Jane 30, 1069. 

1. For compass stalious, and for repairs and care of same ^,000 

2. For seivicea and msMrials for correcting coinpasaee on board of vessels, and 

for testine com passes on shore 3,500 

3. For naatical and aatninomical instrumeiits, for nautical books, maps, and 

charts, and suliog directioas, and for repairs of iDslrumeuts for vesaeU of 

war 15,000 

4. For books for libraries for Tessels of war, and for books and stationery for 

naval apprentices 4,500 

5. For biDDactes, pedestaU, and other appurtenances of ships' compasses to be 

made in the yards 6,000 

6. For bunting and other material for flags, and for making «nd repiuring flags 

of all kinds for the navv 7,500 

7. For navy signals other than signal flags, namely, sigual lanterns, lights, 

rockets, and apparatus of all kinds for signal purposes: for drairiogs aud 
cngraTiugs for signal books....- 9,000 

8. For logs, log lines, log reels, log paper, and sand glaseeR : for leads, lead 

reels, lean lines, armings for leads, and other soundiog apparatus, and for 

running lights, (side and head lanCema proactibed by law) 6,000 

9. For musical instruments for vessels of war 2,000 

mandcro' and navigalorfl' stationery for vessels of w 



1 1. 'For oil for vessels of war, other than for engineer department.. 

12. "For local and foreign pilotape for vessels of war 

13. For lamps and lanterns of all kinds; for binnacles, slaudard compasses, and 



tops ; fbr lamps for cabins, wardroom, and other quarters fur officers, and 
for decks, holds, and storerooms ; and for lampnicks, chimneys, shades, and 
other appendages , 13,000 

14. For pay of laborers employed on navigation duty at navy yards ; for freight 

and transportation ol^ navigation materials, instrumenls, books, and ilores; 
fur postage on pnblic letters 1 fortelegraphing on public business: for adver- 
tising for proposals: for packing-bo les and nialeniil; for blank books, forms, 
and stationery at navigatiou ofBces.and for incidental expenses not otherwise 
mentioned 1H,860 

15. tFor purchase of hydrographic building and ground 30,000 

16. For preparing and publishing maps, charts, and nautical books, as per act 

approved Jnne'JI, 186ti, chapter C XXIX 35,000 

IT. For salaries of eight clerks employed od uavigatioD dotj, including one at 
each of the foUowine oavy yards and stations, viz., Porteuiouth, Boston, 
New York, Philadelphia, Washington, Norfulk, Pensacola, and Mare island IS, 000 

Total 319,850 

Appropriated for fiscal year ending June 30, IBOS 9sttS,t£a 

"InatlemS tram Bureae </t Eqalpniwt and BMraitlDf. tBobmltted. *"" 



BEPOBT OF THE 8ECBETASY OP THE HATT. 



137 



NAVIGATION— No. 3. 
EtIimaU of Ihe anunaf n^uirtd far tA« piijr 0^ fTofateiTt, a$ntt»nt fTaftttan, and 
rftff t tht Umiltd Statet NatMi Aca<iema,fiilht^ictl ftamdingJtau 30, 1H69, C 
to iMt apprvjmatienfor Uu $iipyoTt tflke Naval Acadanf. 

1 prorsasor of mathemalica 

7 Maistantprofeasora of mftthemalici 

1 proresRor of sslroDom j, naTigatioQ. and Barrejing 

1 siaiiitant prolewur of astrouooif, aavjgatioii, i.c... 

1 prulraaor ofnataral and experimeutal pbhoeopbj 

2 auislant proreaaors of natural aud eipeTimealal philoaoph]' . . . . . . 

1 professor of etbica and Englisb stadiea 

" laUtant profesBom of pibicg and Englisb atudieg 



s of drawing sod dranghtiug.. 



of tbe Spauith UnRUHfre 
3 aaaistaat professors of the Spaniab language. 
1 professor of drawing and diangbtiog . 
3 aasiiUDt profoaaors of drawing sod dri 

8 assiataot atvoid masters.. 

1 boxing maalei . 

1 Maialaut librariaa 

1 clerk to tbe bd peri en teo dent 

2 clerks (one at *1,UU0 and one at SaOO) 

1 clerk tn tbe commandant of mtdsbipoion -.... . 

1 clerk lo Ihp pay master - 

1 clerk to aid in auditing acconntB of midahipnieQ quartered in schod shlpa. - 

1 clerk to pajmaster in charge uf eioree 

I writer to pajmaxier in cbacge of Htores, at |3 per diem 

1 conimlaaar; to subaiat tbe niidabipmen 

I messenger tu the aaperinEeudenl .' 



$1,600 00 
9,»U0 00 
1.800 00 
1,400 00 
1,800 00 
2,800 00 
1,H00 00 

13,600 00 
l.BOOOO 
7,000 00 
1,600 00 
3,800 00 
1,800 00 
4,300 00 
1,200 00 
1,600 00 
800 00 
1,400 00 



1 gnnuer'a mate 

1 quaner gnnuer .- 

1 Gockawain 

1 Bpotbecarj of the first class 

1 cook for midahipmen'a mesa 

2 aeanipn to assist armorer and attend in department of infiuitry tactics 

1 aeanian to attend in department of aeamanship, and for police duties, &«.. 
I band master ■ ... 

IH muaicians of the first class 

7 musicians of the secoud class 

1 fiferT!?.". ! n"»l«i"M of tbe first class 



i,e 

l.S 

1,800 00 

800 00 

1,000 00 

600 00 

1,000 00 

1,095 00 

S8i4 00 

480 00 

629 60 

469 60 

409 60 

469 60 

750 00 

325 50 

699 00 

349 50 

&M 00 

6,264 00 

2,100 00 

1,044 00 



2,001 00 



Difference reconciM as follows : 

huTtait Ttcommandtd. 

1 aa^stant pTofeasor of oalnral aod experimental pblloaopb;.. 

1 aasistaut profteaor of the Spaniab language 

Increaso to the osaistant libTariao 

1 clerk lo paymaater in charge of slcrrs 

1 writer to pa;maal«r in charge of stores, at |3 per diem 

Total Incnaaa recommanded 



1,400 00 
1,400 00 
400 00 
1,000 00 
1,095 00 



138 EEPOBT OP THE SECBETAET OP THE NAVY. 

Eititnali/ar the aaga ofwatchmtn, allmdatili at the gai and tUam htating viorla, andotitn 
on dvlg ul the Kaeal Academy, Jjt Ihefiscal year eiuUng Jimt 3U, 1869. 

1 CRptain of the watch, at (2 50 pei diem $91'3 50 

4 watchmen, at $2 25 per diem 3,285 00 

1 foremnD at gaa and sieam-tieittiiig works, at (4 per diem I, 460 00 

10 attendantsBt tbeifasand nteam-beatingwDrksnl academjand BCtmol ships, 

one at S3 25, three nt (3, and six at $3 50 per diem 9,946 ^ 

3 joiners, al $3 60 per diem 3,832 60 

2 painters, at 83 50 per diem 2,555 00 

2 masons, at »3 50 per diem 3,555 00 

1 tinner, at $3 jtet diem 1,095 00 

1 eas-fitter, at g3 per diem 1,095 00 

1 blacksmith, «l pi per diem 1,095 00 

I mechanlcnl WD.kabop, att2 06 per diem 821 25 

1 master laborer to keep public gronnds in order, &c., at (3 28 per diem 632 20 

14 laborers to assist in same, three at (2, and eleven at (1 75 per diem 9,216 50 

1 laborer to snporlateQd midshipmen's qnaiters, pnblic Krounds, &c., at 

ja 2aperdiom 832 20 

4 altendiDts for recitation rooms, librarj, chapel, and offices, at $20 per 

month 960 00 

SO serrauta to keep in order and attend to midshipmen's quarters, public 

buildings, dtc, at §20 per month 4,800 00 

46,293 40 

Amoant appropriated for the fiscal 7ear endin^June 30, 1B68 44,837 16 

' Excess 466 25 

Eilimaltfor eonlingent txpenati of the Sural Acadtmg /or Ihe^ical j/tar ending June 30, 1869 

For material for heating and lighting; the academjr and school-ships, bands- 
men's quarters, Ac |lfi.000 00 

For the purchase of books for the library 2, 0<K) 00 

For Btationcrj, blank books, maps and modeLa 3,600 00 

Foreipenseaofboardof visitors ■ 3,000 00 

For poatago on pnblic service 7ri0 00 

For mmi'ure and fixtures for pnblic buildings, new quarters, &e . 2,000 00 

For expenses In the astronomical and philosophical departments, &o 500 00 

For fnmiture and fixtures for additional quarters to be erected for nidshipnieD ■ 1,5U0 00 
For the purchase of slenm machinery, steam pipe, and fixtares, for rent of 
bnildiupB for use of the academy, for freight, cartuge, water, mnucal instru- 
ments, nnifornis for bandsmen, telegraphing, and for the ciinent expeusea 
and repairs of all kinds, and for incidental labor not applicable to any other 

appropriation 36,200 00 

65,450 00 

Amount appropriated for the year ending June 30, 1869 &3,950 00 

Decrease 3,500 00 

Eitimale of Iht amount reqairedfor carioiu purpolei at the NanU Academg/er ihefiteal gear 
endittg Jiaie 30, 1869. 

For finiBbiiig ceolre buildine and west wing of the new quarters fbr nddship- 

men t30,8Ki 00 

For the ereo lion of additional quarters for officer* 45,000 00 

For painting the buildings of the academy 4,000 00 

For repairs of pavements, &c 2,000 00 

For repairs of wharves 500 00 

For rent of quarters for the foreman of the gas and steam-heating works, at 

?]5 per month 180 00 

82, 575 00 

Amount appropriated for the year ending June 30, 1868 33,660 00 

Excess 48,715 M 



BEPOBT OF THE SECBETABY OP THE NATT. 139 

Ettimate of tia amount rt^irtd far ikt tHpfort, Ifc, i^ fit defwriimait of tttam engimerg ia 
lilt Vnittd Statt$ Naval Jtadtrnf for tlit JUeal fear ending June 30, 166C 

For eii([lneera' stores $500 00 

For material (or npeir oT steam machlneiT 1,000 00 

For the extension and completion of the Dnilding for the departmaot of steam 

mgioBTj 6,000 00 

7,500 00 
Amoant ■pproprialed for the Tear ending Jane 30, 1863 17,000 00 

Decrease 9,500 00 

EttimaUfOT tht iBagtt of Iht folloioing ptrtont on dntg in the macliint akop of the itfartmint 
oftltam tngiiwTt in iJia Unittd Stalet Naeat Aeademi for Uitfi$tal year tndiiig Junt 30, 
1H69. 

] machinist, att3 50 per diem $1,277 50 

I machinist, at $3 per diem 1,095 00 

1 blacksmjih, at $3 50 per diem 1,277 50 

1 boiler maker, at $3 SO per diem 1,277 50 

1 pattern maker, at |3 50 per diem 1,277 50 

1 moulder, at $3 50 per diem 1,277 50 

S laborers, at $1 75 per diem - 1,277 50 

«,760 00 

Amonot appropriated for tlie jeai «ndlng Jnne 30, 1868 |8,760 DO 

EECAPITULATION. 

APPROFIUATtUIl, MAVAL ACADBMV. 

Pajof proreasora and others 182,001 00 

Pay of watchmen and others $45,293 40 

Contliigent eipenses 65,450 00 

Addilinnal quarlen, repaira. &c tU,5T5 00 

Support of thedirpanmentof ateamenffinerj 7,500 00 

Par of mechanics and ethers In same 6,760 00 

309,578 40 

Total 291.579 40 

Total appropriated for the year ending Jnne 30, 1868 $283,913 15 

Rcepectfnll* sobmitted : 

DAVID D. PORTEB. 
yiet-Admiral and Saferinttndent Naval Acadanf. 
Natal Acadbmy, 

AnnafoliM, Md., Angntt 22, 1867. 

Approred : 

THOEMTOM A. JEITKINS, 

Clii^ of BMttaa. 
BCKEAD OP IfAVIOATiOS, 1667. 

ESTIMATES FOB THE SUPPORT OF THE UNITED STATES NAVAL OBSEE- 
VATOUV FOB THE FISCAL YEAR ESDLVO JLTiE 30, ]dC9. 



NAVIGATION-No. 4, 

UtT$ on datnt 

\o UU *fprapTiatim 



Eitimata of lis ancwKl Tt^rti for Ht fay of At cinil offiar$ on datf at Ikt CnUtil Stalea 
Natal OburvaUtrffoT lit Jiieal $tar tnding Jnnt 30, leM9, chargtaUt to Ui 



fur tilt tnffort of Ikt JVdpsJ ObttrvatOTf. 

SALARIES. 
For salary of assistant astronomer, per act of March 3, 1855, (Statutes at 

Ijwe,Little Sl Brown's edition, Tolunle X, chapter CXCVIU, section 7, 

pa|^68i) 12,500 00 

Foraalarjofclerk. per actofMarcb 3, lKi5, (Statu lea at Large. Little &, 

Brown's ediUon, TolnmeK, chapter CLXXV, section 10, page 670) 1,500 00 



EBPORT OP THE BBCEETABY OF THE KAVT. 



Totnl 

Appropriated for Ihe jeu endlafi; Jane 3( 



$4.000 00 


e. 000 00 


le.ooooo 



Ettimale of ikt ttmomd remind for the tao/gti of inilrumtrnt vtaluT, vMchmt* and aUurs, 
and far Iht incidtntal .txpenitM of tht VniUd Statci Kaval ObstrraioTji, far Iht j/tar tnding 
Jim 30. 1869. 

For wsgM of one Inilniinent maker, three w&tchiiieii, one measeDger and one 
porter; for keepiup nonnda in order, and repairs to bnildiugs and en- 
cloBnres; for fuel, light and office fnmiture; parchage of books for the 
library ; and for stationerj. cJiemicals for batteries, postage, freight and 
inudentai expenses $13,500 00 

Appropriated for the jesT ending Jon^ 30, 1868 $13,500 00 

Sfecial sstimafs of Iht amount rtguind for tht propoied purclmit of nutcoToljiglcal insfmnuKd, 
■Ac trettion of u hntk toietr for mounting them, and for t)u purdiate of iuitTuaitntM for 
attronomieal pKrpoito, 

1 barometer, (seif-registering) $300 00 

1 thermometer, (seif^registering) 3U0 00 

1 anemometer. (Robinson's) 60 00 

1 wind vane 75 00 

1 registering apparatus for anemometer 76 00 

$800 00 

Erection of bilck tower 1,970 00 

3,770 00 

J mean-Ume clock 400 00 

I thermo-chronometer 600 00 

1 ipectroBCope for equatorial telescope 200 00 

Total 3,870 00 

EECAPITULATIOH. 

APPROPRIATION, NAVAL OBSEBVATORY. 

Salarj of assistant astronomer, clerk and three Mds $8,000 00 

SalHTv of iuntrumeat maker, watchmen and utbers, and contingent 13,500 00 

Pnrcnaseof inatrumeota and erection of tower 3, WO 00 

Tola] 05,370 00 

Appropriated for the year ending June 30, 1868 $21,500 00 

Bespectfniiy submitted : 

B. F. SANDS, 
Connudort, SupttvUtndtnt. 
United States Naval Observatory, 

IFashiagtan, SepttialKr SO, 1867. 
Approved : 

THOBNTON A. JENKINS, 

Bcrrad op Navioatios, 1867. 



.dbyGoogle 



REPOST OF THE SECRETART OF THE KATT. 141 

ESTIMATES FOE THE SXJPPORT OF THE tfAUTICAL ALMANAC FOE THE 
FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1869. 

NAVIQATION— No. 5. 

EitimaUifm lie Amtriemn EphtmerU aad NiKtiad AI»MMae tut tiujitft fMr ndimg Jmh 
30. 1«69. 

For payor compntera (U.OOO 00 

For tbe new piknela discovered cince 1B49 2,000 00 

For revisioD of l&blee of tbe moon (Uid of the Urger ploneU i 2,000 00 

Forcleik 1,200 00 

For continent wip«iis««, Including office expenses, serrant hire, fael, aUtion. 

oiy, eipre»»e«, &c 1,000 00 

81,800 00 

Bespectfullj Hubniitl«d : 

J. H. C. COFFIN, 
ProftMOT of MuOitmatia U. S. N., Swftr't NmaticQl Almmnae. 
Commodore TnORNTON A. jESKina, U. 8. N., 

Ckufi^ BuTfu tf NaBigaliim, Wm$Miiigtim, D. C. 

Approved : 

THORNTON A. JENKINS, 

Cki^f »J B»n9K. 



NAVIGATION-No. 6. 
StimmitTf Iff tttimatufromtht Burcaa of Navifilion for the final year tnding Junt30, 1869. 

FOR SUPPORT or BOREAV. 
SalariM and coDtiDgent, (NttTigalinn— B) (14,630 00 

FUR THE NAVAL SERVIl-E. 

1. For pav of coromiMloned and iranant officers, and for mileage and tmns- 

portationofsarae, (NaviBalion, No. 1> 6,160,560 00 

5. For navigalioD nnd uarigatiou supplies, (Navigation, No. 3) 314,800 00 

3. For soppori of Naval AcaJeniy — 

Pay of civil offiwTs, *;c., (Navigation, No. 3) $82,001 00 

Pnyofwalchmen. Ac, (Navigation. No. 3) 4,i,U93 40 

Contingent Bxpen BOS, (Navlgntiou, No. 3) Ki,4r>0 00 

Additional quarlers, repairs, Slc, (Navigation, No. 3)..,. 82,.'i7o 00 

Support of fnginerj dppBrlment, (NavigalioD, No. 3) 7,500 00 

Pay of mechanics iii enginery dep\ (Navigation, No. 3).. 8,760 UO 

291,579 40 

4. For anpport of Naval Observatory — 

Pay ./civil officers, &c., (Navigation, No. 4) 8,000 00 

Wages and iucideutals, (Navigation, No. 4} 13,500 00 

PurcLa«e of ioslruuienta and erection of tower, (Nnviga- 
liou. No. 4) ■ 3,870 00 

25,370 00 

6. For prcpaiing and pnbiishingthe Nautical Almanac — 

Pay of con.pulerB, d.c , (Navigation, No. 5) 91,300 00 

Total for naval iervice 6,H11,55»40 



.dbyCoogle 



142 EEPOBT OP THE SECEETABT OP THE NAVY. 

NAVIGATION— No. 7. 

Btcapilulaiion of appToprialioni unirrthi cognizana oflkt Bnrean of Sntigalion, required 
forthtfiteal jeur ending Jane SO, 1 B<i9, and lompand tnilh those Made far tht year preceding. 



Title of appropriations. 




1. Pay of the OHvy 

2. Navigation and oavigatioa sappliee 

3. Navul Academy 

4. Naval Olwervalory 

5. Nualical Almanac 

Totals 



5,160,560 OO 
312,850 00 
291,579 40 
as, 370 00 
21,^0 00 



6,326,280 00 
aSi.6-26 (H> 
iI65,913 00 
21,500 OO 
21,0U0 OO 



S, 933, 519 00 



Beapectfully snbmilted : 



Bureau of NATiGATinN, 1867. 



NAVIGATIOS— APPENDIX. 



Name. 


Residence. 


AmonsL 






ea, 482 77 
3,665 50 








Nhv> York and BrooklvD... 




2,298 15 

2,0(« ao 

2,648 00 


















2,2W> a4 







BUREAU OF ORDNANCE, 
Bureau of Ord.nakcb, Navy Depart.me\t, 

Cktol>er 16, 1867. 

Sir : In obi^dieuce to your orders of the 15th Aagust, I §ubmit the folloir- 
ing report of the condilioD of naval ordnance, aod the operations of the bureaa 
uuder my charge, during the paet year. 

Since tlic dnie of my Inet anniinl report, all exiBting contracte for naval caa- 
non have been completed and the guiia delivered. With the exception of the 
15-inch gunM, it is believed tbiit the Dtock on hand will meet the existing wants 
of the BLTvicL-. There is also a saperabundant supply of serviceable projectiles 
of all kiiiiN, together with a sufficiency of gunpowder, to meet th<i current 
demands of our cruisers. 

lleceut iriiils in England of a Id-inch gun of navy pattern, cast on Rodman's 
method, have fully vindicated the wisdom of the measnre of intradncing this 
calibre of cast-iron oidnance into our service. ,-. , 

Dniitizc-ctyCtlOOgle 



BEPOBT OF THE SECBBTABT OF THE NAVT. 143 

In tbe depot at Maiden, near Bnatoo, MaBeacbnaetta, the bureau baa accuma- 
lated a large quantity of nitre, both of foreign and domestic manufacture, as a, 
stock from which to draw in caae of an emergency, and hence no feara need be 
eotertained of a want of this esseatial article. 

In the matter of gnu cairiagefl, thoee of wrought iron for gnu« of broadside, 
continue to be Bnpplied in lieu of the old wooden carriages, and to meet a possi- 
ble contingency in the manipnlation of beitvy ordnance, especially of 20-iQcb 
calibre. A steam gun carriage, the invention of Mr. Bads, of Midsonri, has been 
tried daring the past year with gratifying results, as will l>e seen from the follow- 
ing brief extracts from the official reports made to the bureau of the trials which 
took place on the Hudson river last M>iy, in pieaence of Admiral Farrngiit and 
other distinguished officers, both of the army and navy ; the firing being made 
with charges of cannon powder varying from 35 to 55 pounds, and solid shot : 

" The total time uf firing twelve ( 12) shots in rapid succession was sixteen 
(16) minutes. After the firing was over the gun was run out and in by the 
hand gear, and the whole was performed in one (1) minute and forty-five (45) 
seconds, three men at tbt crank. At [he third (3d) round, with shot, the bead 
' of the shot-lifter broke off, owing to its being made too slightly, and the gun was 
afWrwards loaded by band ; tour men, with a band shot-lifter, purformiug the 
work." 

"The whole length on the elides, exclusive of cuffiirs for recoil, is fire feet ten 
inches. The distance which the gun will recoil depends upon the initial press- 
ure of sienm on the piston and the charges u^ed. The cylinder of this carriage 
is eleven inches in diameter ; tjie preeiture, therefore, waa higher than it would 
be with a largir cylinder. The recoil varied from four feet nIx inches, with 
thirty-five pound charges, to five feel eight inches, with fifty-five pound charges." 
'• • • • • • ' 

And among the advantages which it is claimed this carriage has over others, 
the following are given : 

• • • • • • 

" 1. The number of men seems to be reduced to a minimum. 

" 2. The time required to fire each round is much less than by any other 
method. With four meu properly drilled the operatiou nci;d not exceed forty- 
five (43) seconds. 

" 3. The gun is subjected to less atrnin in recoil than when checked by fric- 
tion, consequently will endure longer, becnusc when fired it stiirts It'im rei-S with 
a slight pressure, which pres-inu is giaiJually increai-cd until brouglit fig.dn to 
rest on an elastic mi-dium. This is not the cafe iu u.'Ual practice. 

" 4. Greater I'iicility in operiiting llie gun in a sea-way j it can be hi^ld in any 
position by the pressure of ste.im when the vci'sel is n)lliug, 

" 5. The ease with which the gun can be moveil, and the rapidity with which 
it can be fired, incrcasce the value or effective power of each gun canii'd on the 

" 6. Reduced number of men necessary to manage a battery, and consequent 
reduction in wages and maintenance." 

• «**** 

The success of this carriage, together with tliat of Mr. Ericsson, a trial of 
which was mentioned in my last annual n-port, makes it certain that we ahall 
be able to handle the very heaviest ordnance, either in pivot or broniliilde, under 
any circnmstancee that can poscitily ari^c. 

Under the sanction of the department the bureau bus continued to dispose of 
the accumulation of old guiiS, powder, projectiles, and small-armn, as mentioned 
in my last report, not necesnary for the public service, and from this source baa 
covered into the treasury since the dat« uf that report the sum of $335,!^4^^qIc 



144 REPOBT OF THE SECEETABY OP THE KAVT. 

In tbia amoDDt is incladed the sale of old and condemned material at tbe 
JefferaoD barrack reserve, near St. Louie, Missouri, where a very large amount 
had accumulated after the war from the supplies collected there for ouc western 
flotilla. The serviceable material had been removed to other stations, the build- 
ings, &c., turned over to the army, and the depot broken up. 

The work upon the ordnance dock at New York is rapidly approaching com- 
pletion, and probably will be finished by the first day of January, 1S68, whea 
all the buildings, workshops, and ordnance materials of every kind may advan- 
tageously be removed there from the navy yard pioper, and the space now occu- 
pied for ordnance in the navy yard be devoted to other purposes for which it ia 
so much needed. The propriety of this removal is earnestly recommended to 
the consideration of the department. 

The experience of our recent civil war, and that of the short conflict in Europe 
last summer between the Pnisaiana and Aust rians, having clearly shown the neces- 
sity of using hereafter breech-loading small-armB in lieu of muzzle-loaders, the 
bureau is now introducing the breech-loading pistol into the service, of which men- 
tion was made in previous annual reports. This system has been approved, by 
the recommendation of the bureau, by the Navy Department, in the introduction 
of a navy carbine, which I trust may eventually result in a good and original 
rifled musket of the same pattern suitable for a standard piece, for shipboard and 
shore, for sailors and the marines of the fleet. 

The eipenditure, however, for these arms will in any event be small, as the num- 
ber required for the equipment of our ships is limited to that necesiiary to supply 
the seamen needed for the navy. 

In the estimates herewith presented are two items to which the attention of 
the department ia respectfully invited, via: One for a new magazine at Kittery, 
Maine, including a site therefor, and the other for quarters for ordnance officers 
on the ordnance dock at New York. 

With regard to the former it is simply necessarr to say that the present large 
magazine ia located inside the Kittery navy yard, and thia alone id certainly a 
sufficient reason for its removal to some other more isolated and safe locality. 
Furthermore, its removal will be a measure of economy, inasmuch as the present 
building would make an excellent metal store, which the bureau nnderstauds is 
much needed there. 

The question of bnilding suitable quarters inside the navy yards for the 
inspectors of ordnance has already been aubmitted in previous reports, and I 
again respectfully and earnestly recommend it to the favorable consideration of 
the department. 

Thfese officers are charged with the immediate custody of very large amounts 
of public property, a great deal of which is also perishable, and must be guarded 
with special care. It is, therefore, manifestly important th^it they shonlH reside 
at or very near the scene of their duty; whereas, at present, there being no 

Suartera for them in the navy yards, they are often compelled to se<k them at a 
iatance. 
In concluding this brief report I desire to remark that during the period [ 
have had the honor and duty of administering affairs of the £nreau of Naval 
Ordnance, my constant aim and object hae been to keep pace with everything 
practical in all that pertains to the varione branches of the ordnance service ; 
and in this view, aided as I have been hy the inventions and applications of 
Mr. Ericsson and Hr. Eade, in civil life, and the knowledge and advice of our 
own experienced ordnance officers of the navy, the results Jbtained have proved 
eminently satisfactory. 

I am, with high respect, your obedient servant, 

H. A. WISE, Chief of Bureau, 
Hon. GiDKON Wbllbs, 



REPORT OP THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVT. 



Heads or lilies of appropriations. 



For civil expoDSfs of bureau, (A) 

Pdi " orduHuce," ( B aud C) 

For pay of cltiiks al uavj jHrds, (D) .. 



818,680 00 

2, Mi, SS 75 

27, SOU HO 



2,*i8.81o 75 



F Ordnance, Ottebtr, 1667. 



M. A. WISE, ChitJ Bf Buttau. 



Euimatt of tSt ammtnt rtqvirtd for ike sapporl of lie Bartau iff Onlnana far the _fiseid gear 

For salary of chief of bureau, por act of July 5, 1 



of Ja1y-A iSm. sec. 8.. 

third-clnjucleika. p^r act of July 23, IMi6, sec. 8.. 

iries of two second-class clerks, por act of July )i3, l&SG, sec. 8 

>ry of one drMU^tsiiiari, p>-r act of Manrb )i, 1867 

tot salary of nifsaeneer, per ai't of June ^, I8'>i 

For salaries of two laborers, per nut ot' July !>, 186^ . 



83,500 00 


l,8(KI 00 


■ 1,W)U 00 


;{,3tMI 00 


a,sio oo 





Appropriated for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1863 $l6,ti-J0 Oil 

CONTINUENT EXPENSES. 

For stationerj and miRcelliineous items gl,0(>0 Wl 

For pay of photographer 3(HJ 00 

i.aoiJ 00 

Appropriated for fiscal year ending June 30, Jfm $i,:m> 00 

Fur smount respectfully suhiuitteil aa increase to salary ofcbief c'erk (Iixt 00 

Bltreal- of Ordsasce, OckjUt, 1967. 



Ettiokatt efamoHutt that aill be rei/iiired for <iril»ance nnH ordnance starts, for tabor and for 
contin^tHl txprnmi, for iSt year cnrfinif Ja»e 30, IfW. 

1. For gu™, Kun carriageF. shot, shell, magazine and laboratoiy stores, and 

fcniipnieuts ol all hliido &;;10,(M>0 00 

2. Forguupowder I,*i(i,0ii0 Oil 

3. Fur Sinn tl-araln, eqnipineiits, and animuailion 300,OIKI HO 

4. Fur fuel anil niHlt-rialB nei'es^ary in carrjiiigou the nieriianical brauchee of 

llie ordnaiiee department at (lie navy yards and eiaiions 281, RW) 00 

5. Fi« labor at nary yai'ls 7l.'i.8!« HO 

6. For eiuoiiuieuiHl purpones in ordiianee ... 50. Ikni iiu 

T. For ordoauce puipooes not above enuinerated BO, 0(NI 00 

2,u77,3JJ 00 

BUHEAUOF OrDXANCE, OUoUr, 18C7. /'"",>..„[., 

10 » D,,„c.ct,l.,OOglC 



EEPOBT OF THE 8ECRETAKY OF THE KAvr, 



Eatimati of ikt omouttlt liat will be Teguind far magazinu, additvmt and repairs thtrtto, fer 
buildiagi atuiide of nuej yixrdt, and Jot machiniry, tfc, requtTcd for ordnamct purpoMet. 

POBTSMOUTlt. 

For^ite for magBjine J5,000 00 

For magazine and gunnsr'a qnartera ,--, 20,000 00 

BOSTON. 

For inBclineTj for proposed smithery 4,000 00 

For nuichiiierj foi piuposed brouze fouudry S,000 00 

* HAOAZIME, CHELSEA. 
For bnildiug brick fire-proof workshop and watch-house, ivith boiler and pipes 

for hsftling the same -... 13,564 73 

For bullditig brick dwelling for gunner - ■-• 5,0U0 OU 

For building briek stable 2.^9 50 

For improving grounds, and repairs of all kinds -. 3,500 00 

NITRE DEPOT AT MAIDEN. 

For repair of dwellinga and improvemsntW grounds 52,000 00 

For necessary repairs to buildings on ordnance d oik and at Ellis's island, dredg- 
ing chaonel, stationary steam fire engine with hone, boiler and boiler house, 
and piping for drjiiigsbcllsand beating buildings on Ellis's island, also repairs 
to lug and ligbters 20,000 00 

For iiuarterB for one iospeulor of ordnance and two assistant inspectors, on the 
ordnance dock 74,638 50 

For repairs of ordnance dock 10,000 00 



For repairs of magazine and care of grounds at Fort Mifflin 5, 000 00 

WASHIKOTON. 

Pormagaiin^sand magazine grounds, including aproper sea wall to the latter.. 50,000 00 

For new shell honas ou magazine grounds 20,000 00 

NORFOLK. 

For fence Ht Si. Helena - 3,311 00 

For repairing crane 1,000 W 

For repairing M barf 3,000 00 

MARE ISLAND. 

For repairs of magazino and caro of grounds 20,000 00 

2ti4,y63 75 
Bureau of Ordnance, October, 1S67. 



Ettimatt'of ikf amounts rtquirtd far the poy of eUrkt and othtra proposed to be emplaged in 
1^ ordnance depattmtnt of ihi nuvji yards for the year ending Jane 30, 1963. 

PORTSMOUTH. 

Principal clerk (1,600 

Time clerk J, 400 

Store clerk 1,400 

Principal clerk 1,600 

Tiiuedork , i,400 

''tore clerk HJl^ 1^,41X1 



EEPOET OF THE SECRET ABT OP THE NATT. 147 

KEW YORK. 

Princip&l clerk $1,600 

Hme clerk I 400 

Store clerk. __ j 400 

PHtLADBLPHIA. 

Priocipal clerk 1,6(10 

Time clerk 1,400 

Store derk 1,400 

WASHIKOTON. 

PriDcipal clerk 1,600 

Time clerk , 1,400 

Store clerk 1,4(H) 

Dranglilsoiaii , 1,600 

NORFOLK. 

One clerk ],400 

PENSACOLA. 

One clerk , 1,400 

MARE lELAKD. 

One clerk 1 1,400 

27,800 
BUREAD or Ordnance, 18G7, 



BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIR. 

Navy Department, 
Bureau op Construction and Repair, 

Oetoher 25, 1S67. 

Sir: Id compliance with your inatractioDB of tbe Idth August Inet, I reepect- 
fully Btate, that for tha purpoBea of this bureau there will be required fur the 
fiacal year eocliDg June 30, 1809, the sum of eight millina eeven hundred and 
eighty-six thousand eight hundred and forty (S,7SG,840) dollnrB, as shown In 
the accompanying papers marked A, B, and C. 

No comparison can be instituted between the expenditures made at thn pres- 
ent time and those made previous to the war, for the cost of labor and materials 
have nearly doubled, while the number of hours worked per day [end to 
decrease. 

During the last year the work at the navy yards has been mainly confined 
to the repair of the older vespcls which had become much decayed, but whose 
use could not be digpeosed with, although continual repairs con scarcely maiu- 
tain them in a serviceable condition; sound economy requires these vessels 
should-be superseded as early as possible with new ones. 

The new work has been limited to the slow completion of the steam vessels, 
for the machinery of which llie department contracted with private establish- 
ments before the (ermination of the war, and to whom it is bound to deliver 
them, for the completion of their contracts, wiibin a reasonable time. Of ths 
larg(,-st of these vessels three have been launched during the present year, and 
also one emall-clHss gnnboat ; the others will be allowed to remain on the stocks 
as long as possible, that the green timber of which they are necessarily com- 
posed may seosoa ; it would have been much more beneficial to have built these 
vessels of seasoned limber in the fit's! place, bnt at the date of their commence- 
ment oooe was to be bad. - Ot)Qlc 



L)t^K 



148 EEPOET OP THE 8ECBETABY OP THE NAVT. 

'Four of the anialler class of veeBels rpfeiTed to in tbe bureau report of the laxt 
year have been comnx^nced ; tbeir machinery haB been coDBtmcted at the dif- 
ferent navy yards, and iB ready for erection in them, but they will not be com- 
pleted until the close of next year. 

The coiiBtruction of buildings, &c., for tbe use of this bureau in the difierent 
navy yards, pointed out in the last report from this bureau, have become 
ni^ently necessary, and a judicious economy requires they should no longer be 
delayed; their total cost, estimated in tlie report of the Bureau of Tarda 
nnd Docks, is three million fifteen thousand five hundred and ninety-fire 
(3,015,595) dollarH, but as their erection would Tinavoidably extend over aeversl 
years, an appropriation of only seven hundred and fifty thousand (750,000) 
dollars will be required for that purpose during the next fiscal year. 

I would respectfully press on the nolice of the department the desirability of 
some efficient measures for tbe professional education of naval constructors. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN LENTHALL. 

Chief of BtirtOM. 
Eon. Gideon Wkllbs, 

Secretary of ike Navy. 



ESTIMATES OF THE AMOUNT REQUIRED FOR THE EXPENDITURES OF 
THE BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION AND KEPAIK FOE THE FISCAL YEAR 
ENDING JUNE ao, ]«69. 

Navy Depabtme.'vt, 
burkau of constbuction and repair, 

September 25, 1867. 
SrB: In compliance with your instructions of the 15th August ultimo I 
herewith respectfully enclose the estimates for the expenditures of this bureau 
for the fiscal year terminating 30th June, 1869. 

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, 

JOHN LENTHALL, 

Chief of Bmreeti. 
Hon. Gideon Wbllbs, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Ettimatt of the amoant rtquirtd for Ihc expcnditurei of the Bureau of ConMtructum and R^ir 
far the fical gtar ending June 3D, 186^. 

For salary of chief of boTHiD, per act July 5, 1862, sections t3,500 

For ealBty of chief clerk, per act July 5, 1862, seoiion 3 J, 800 

For Biliary of One dranghlBinsn, per act March ^, 1867 ],800 

Forealary of one clerk, (follrlb clasa.) per act July 23, 1866, section 6 ' 1,800 

For salary of Iwo clerks, (third cIbsb,) per act July S3, 1866, Bection 8 3,800 

For salary of two clerks, (socoud class.) per act July S3, 1866, secliim 8 ^,800 

For salary of one clerk, (first class,) per act July 23, 1866, Bection 6 ],S00 

For salary of one meafaeuger, per act June 25. IH64, Bection 3 1,000 

For salary ot one laborer, per act June 35, 1864, section 3 720 

17,820 

For amount snbmlttBd as increase in salary of chief clerk 400 

For conlin pent expenses , 1,500 

Total ^ ia.7ao 



REPOBT OF THE 8ECRETAET OP THE NAVT. 



E*tim»U of lUc fdf 0/ mil offctri utider the cogviianct of the BHrtaa of Comlnetiim and 
* Repair ol umn/ yardi aad >lation> for Iht fiiaU ytar ending June W, IdB'J. 

For ele:ht BsaUtant DSTsl conatructorti, M $3,000 each (16,000 

Foi wven iii»p«cMn of tJniber, tbreeat (l.^OOeach, foar at 1 1,250 eacli 9,500 

Fm tix •npennlenaeDtt of dry docks, one' ftt t3,U00, five at |l,OUU each 7,000 

For four dronghUmen to n&vai i^omtnictors, ai $1,400 eacb 5,600 

For eleven clerki of atoiea, five at $1,500 each, tbree at $1,400 each, Itiree at 

$1,140 each 15,120 

For eleven cleriiB tc naval coiistmctora, foni at (1 .400 each, tbree at $l,tj00eacb, 

tbree at $l,14Ueaoh, *one at JUOO 13,520 

For eigbt time clerks, 'one at {1,500, four at $1,320 eacb, three at $], 200 eacb.. 10,380 

Total for dvil officers 77,120 

*AI Uw Han Iglud awrj jKr± 



For the completion of ships on the stocks, and authoKzed, and for which the 
steam machiuei; is under contract, the preserratioD uf irua and wooden vcj- 
sela and ships inordinary, vessels for (he Naval Academy, purchases of mate- 
rials and stores of all kinds, labor in navy yards, tools, transportation of ma- 
tarikls, repair of vessels, and maintenance of Ibe navy afloat .- J4, 690, 000 



Total.. 



90,000 



EECAPITULATION. 



Nae/ Dtfaftrntnl, rt^ind for tht *irtiu of lie M'' r' r tndwg June 2». ISeS. 




iig 

PA 

i - 

III 
m 


m 

lip 


ji 

V 




$19,720 
77; 120 

8,690,000 


























8,786,840 













Tbe increate in the expenses of the bureau arises from the estimated addition to the pajr 
of tba chief clerk, and to tbe eontinf^nt expenses of the bureau. 

The Increase in tbe pay of the civit officers arises from the necessity for the employment 
of two additional assistant naval conslmctors, also froiu a sliKhl increaie io the jMy of Uio 

- ... .... ooqTc 



dimghtamen, store, and time clerks. 



150 



EEPOBT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY, 
BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIR. 







Trickoy&Jewett 


119,040 00 










8. P. Brown & Son 


■114,880 00 


Lathbury, Wickersham &. 




Tiichaj & Jewelt 


15,600 00 








je,iao 00 


Samuel George Hart 






16, MO 00 






■William While 


17, BIO 00 

ia,20o 00 


ClaBuNe 11, white pine logs: 




Samuel George Hart 


18,980 00 




•3,700 00 






Samuel George Hart 








Elliot HarrouQ 


4,000 00 


Ctoxa No. % white oak ke«t 




Wesley Smith 


4,700 00 






James Bieler & Co 

Tricksy £ Jewelt 


4.660 00 






4,900 00 


TtlckeydcJewett 


•1,261 00 


William H. E^le 


6.000 00 




1,300 00 


8. P. Brown & Son 


5,400 00 




1,677 00 






William M.Shakapear.... 


1,950 00 


Class No. 12, white pine mast 




Ssmuel Gborge Hart 






















•2,360 00 
2,400 00 






Trichey &. Jewett 

Samuel George Hart 






2,550 00 






Elliot Harroun 


3,100 00 


Geo^ T. Wallftco 

William Whit* 

Trickey & JewBtt 


1-J9,fi00 00 
19,600 00 
29,000 00 




3,660 00 


Class No. 13, while pine plank, 




William M.8h«ksp*ftr... 


30,000 00 


















Joseph W. Dui7ee 

Samuels. Bigler&Son.. 


•9,756 00 
9.935 00 
10,510 00 


aat!BNo.7,7ellowpln«logi: 




William B. Griffith 


■'12.600 00 


S. P. Brown Jk Son 


11,241 00 


James BiglOT & Co 


13,600 00 


Trickey it Jfwelt 


11,610 00 


Trickey&Jewetl 


13, 160 00 


William H. Eagle 

Samuel George Hart 


11,900 00 


George A. Hammond 

LathBury, Wickereham &. 


13, 4« 00 


13,910 00 




Elliot HaiToun 


14,410 00 




13,440 00 






George T. Wallace 


14,840 00 


Class Ko.l5,whileash,e1m,hmch 












WiliamM.Shakspear.— 


15,400 00 


S. P. Brown & Bon 


•1,452 00 


Wi liani Wbite 






1,858 60 


Ell ot Harroun 


16,800 00 


Trickey & Jewett 


1,910 00 


Samuel Goorg* Hart 


18,200 00 


C1mbHo.16, whiteashoM*! 




ClaM No. B, yellow pine beams : 
















WilliBm B. Griffith 


■•6,000 00 


George T. Vanghan 


760 00 






William Porier& Sons... 




George T. Wallace 


8,280 00 


875 00 


8. P. Brown & Son 


8.760 00 


S. P. Brown & Sea 


960 00 




H,880 00 




960 00 


William M.Shakapear.... 


9,000 00 


John J. Bingham 


960 06 




11,400 00 






Samuel George Hart 

William WhVte 


ClaasNo. 17. hickory; 




12,000 00 






Lathbury, Wickeraham & 




William B. Griffith 


•775 00 




13,680 00 


George A. Hammond 


850 OO 


















timber : 




mahogany, maple, cherry: 












William B. Griffith 


12,1H)0 00 


Joreph W. Dnryee 

Trickey&JeweU 


•4,800 00 


Georg* T. Wallace 


12,720 00 


5,090 00 


•AucpUd. tI>«ll*db7lM- 


1 AwaMed bj nqti.rt of Hr. yniau 



BEPOaX OF THE BECBETAST OF THE NAVT. 



151 



S-pftrawn&Sop 

ClMt No. 22, cypreM, ced»r : 

8.P.Brown& Son 

Triikey & Jeiretl 

Oeorf^ A.. )lBnimoDd --. 

OtoTgeT. Wallace 

William While 

Class No. 33, black spnice: 

George A. Hammoiid 

Joseph WeBcott & Son - . 

Trickey & Jewfllt 

8. F. Brown & Son 



John J. Biagtiam 

William N. Hilla 

Wesley Smith 

Oeorp^ A- HamDiond . 

George T. Wallace 

Watson A^Pittingei — 

Ills No. 35, lig^nmvitie: 

Trickey & Jewett 

John J. Bioicham 

Geor^ A.Hammond... 



John J. Binetiam 

Joaeph L. Savage ■ 

Spalding &. ParroU 

AlouioA. Foater 

Wht^ler & Browning 

William A.Wheeler 

Class No. 33, ivronKhtiron,aat: 

John J. Bingham 

' AlonKo A. FoBipf 

8paldinc& ParrotI 

Jnaepli L. Suvage — 

Whi*ler&. Hrownlng 

■ William A. Wbeeler 

ClaaaNo. 34, ironpUle: 

Jolin J. Bingham 

Ji>Kpph L. Ssra^e 

Rpalding & PHrrott 

William A. Wheeler 

Whreler& BrnwniDg.... 
Alonjio A. Foster 

Cla«)No.35. stMl: 

John P. Lyman 

J«mes Homer 

William A. Wheeler 



•832 00 
], 140 00 
1,2I& 00 
],275 00 
1,665 00 



9IK) 00 
1,200 00 
1,600 00 
1,900 00 



3,006 00 
3,190 00 

3,220 00 



•21,572 86 
21,(i27 iJO 

2i,9;to 00 

22,492 50 

22,<)-28 75 
23,990 00 



Park Brother & Co 12,462 7.'> 

John J. Bingham 2,56r> <>U 

Alonio A. Pouter 3,56S <H> 

Joneph L, Savure 3,5^1 IH> 

David Babcock 3,577 75 

Whreler &. Browning.— 2,712 (Ml 

Spalding & Parrott 2,715 m 

Class No. 37, iion spikes : 

Joseph L.8avage "8,520 00 

JohnJ, Bingham 8,827 50 

Alonzo A. Foster 9,<IS)2 50 

William A.Wheeler 9,ieo 1(0 

Wheeler*. Browning.... 9,520 OO 

Spalding & Parrott 12,100 DO 

Class No. 38, iron wrought naiU: 

Joseph L. Savage ^700 00 

Alonzo A. Foster 713 00 

Wheeler &. Browning POO tNI 

William A.Wheeler 1,150 00 

Class No. 39, iron cnt aaiU : 

HyaU& Spencer 'PSfi «> 

William A.Wheeler P.'>- M 

Joseph L, Savage , '^■i "■> 

.Tohu H. Bailey 8!>2 00 

AIoomA. Foster 805 05 

Wheeler de Browning 904 ;tO 

CluB No. 42, lead pipe, sheet: 

Alonio A. Foster •6,545 m 

John J. Bingham 6,fi(i3 '20 

William A.Wheeler 6,842 5ii 

Wheeler & Browning .... 6,842 5<l 

Joseph L. Savage 6,!Wi im 

John H. Bailey 7,(NtO <«' 

David Bsbtock 7,:t:t5 ItH 

William Porter &. Sons.. . 9,222 50 

Class No. 44, tin: 

David 'Balwock •l.MO 00 

JohnJ. Binghum I,;i71 "0 

Alonxo A. Foster l,;t^ii '«» 

William A.Wheolw I,4y8 'HI 

Jonoph L. Savage I,4:iO 00 

Wheeler^ Browning.... 1, 4:.0 00 

William Porter & Sons... 1,4** "0 

Hjatli Spencer 1,5(n1 iHt 

JoboH. Bailey I.li'JJ (HI 

Class No. 48, locks, hinges, 
bolts of brass and iron : 

JoKepb L. Savam... * 1,316 ATi 

Alonzo A. Foster l,(i(»0 94 

Job" J. BiDKham 2,07.-. (i8 

Wheeler 4 Browning 3,2(W .'lO 

Wiltiflm A. Wheeler 2, :tiKl 4(1 

Hyatt 4. Spencer 2,8.14 54 

Class No. 49, sckwb of brut 

Hyatt 4. Spencer , 'l-caa 11 



152 



EEPOBT OP THE 8ECEETAET OF THE NAVT. 



Alnnio A. FoBter (1,901 Ifi 

■n-illinm A. Wbeelei 1,949 99 

Joseph L. Savage 1,963 74 

JohnH. Bailey S.Oftl 15 

WhpelprA, BronDm^.... 2,aS9 99 

Clark & Pearaon 2,317 95 

ClaM No, 50, filea : 

•Joseph L. Savage "S.eso 3C 

Jobii J. Biuirbam 3,055 66 

Jnmea Homer 3,(193 42 

AI..E.IO A. Foster 3,142 22 

J. K. Hoyt 3.199 2*1 

WilllamA. Wheeler 3,41t; 94 

Wheeler & Browuing .... 4,3»iU 40 

Clark & Pearson 5,133 82 

Cla8sHo.51, augers: 

Joseph L. Savage '3,120 65 

Alonzo A. Foster 3,447 10 

William A. Wheeler 3,Hi»8 97 

Hyatt 4; Spemrer 3,707 00 

Wbeelet A^BrowDinp 4,059 00 

ClasB N. 52, tools for sbipa' atoros : 

Joflppb L.SavaBe '1,902 65 

William A. Wheeler 2,ii5rf 53 

Alonzo A. Fo»ter 2,149 23 

Hyatt & Spencer 2, 157 64 

Wheeler* Browning.... 2,(!65 10 

ClMB Ko. 53, tools for nse in 
yaxie and shopa: 

Aloimo A. Foster '5,235 76 

Wiilinm A. Wheeler 5,4m 41 

■loseph L. Savage 5,536 05 

Wheeler &. Browning .... 6,526 25 

Claaa No. 54, hardware: 

Joseph L.Snva^ "2,534 35 

William A. Wheeler 2,6lff 13 

Alonzo A. Foster 2,700 92 

Hyatt i Spencer 2,7ii5 561 

WheelerdcBruirning.... 3,850 20 

Class No. 56, white lead : 

Atoniso A. Foster '260 00 

JoB^phL. Savage 270 00 

John H. Bailey 276 00 

Wherler &. Browning 3«l 00 

David Babcovk aS5 00 

C. M. Clapp & Co »iu 00 

William A. Wheeler 3(p0 (Kj 

Clark &. Pearson :tiK> (k> 

.lohn J. Bingham 3lKi 00 

WiilianiPoTter&Suni... . 315 00 

Elisiia Tripp 320 00 

CliisB No. 57, line painla: 

David Babcocli '202 50 

C. M. Clapp & Co 220 (HJ 

Ji.aeph L.8avage 220 00 

WaiismA Wheeler 240 00 



Clark & Pearson *)i240 00 

AloDBO A. Piwler 250 00 

John J. Binphum 250 00 

William Potter 4, Sons'. .. 290 00 

John H. Bailey 294 00 

Class No. 56, eolored punts, 
dryers, &c. i 

Alonao A. Foster '1,269 20 

David Bahooolt 1,416 50 

William A. Wheeler 1,642 «> 

Joseph h. Savage 1,593 75 

John J. BiDghB.,1 1,645 80 

CUrki Pearson 1,651) 42i 

John H.Bailey 1,663.50 

Eli«ha Tripp 1,807 75 

Class No. 59, linseed oil : 

Joseph L. Savage '5,935 00 

Judd Linseed Clil Company 6, 023 70 

David Babt^k 6,l'i(J75 

Manhatlsn Oil Company.. 6. 165 IKt 

Clark & Pearson 6,435 00 

EliHhaTripp 6.705 00 

WilliamA. Wheeler 6,750 00 

C. M. Clapp & Co 7,200 (H) 

James M. Shaw 7,515 00 

Class No. 60, varnish, spirits 
turpentine : 

John J. Bingham '•1,479 90 

David B«bco<.k l,4Wi 15 

William A.Wheeler 1,594 15 

John H.Bailey 1,728 20 

Alonzo A. Foster 1,771 60 

.Joseph L- Savafre 2,IKM 00 

Elisha Tripp 2,034 70 

Clark & Pearson 2,040 95 

Class No. 63, sperm and lard oil: 

Sontbard, Herhert & Co.. "4,277 00 

Manhattan Oil Company . 4,419 65 

William H. James 4,440 70 

J-seph L. SavHge 4,450 00 

JiidJ Linseed Oil Company 4, 466 34 

WilliamA. Wbeeler 4,851 50 

JaniesM.Shaw 6,(NM| 50 

David Babcotk &,(W4 00 

Elisha Tripp 0,625 (K) 

Class No. 64, tallow, soap : 

John J. Bingham '546 00 

Al..nio A. Foster 549 00 

N.F.Mathes & Co t592 INI 

George T. Vangban 593 00 

Houthard, Herbert & Co. . 596 00 

John II. Bailey 598 00 

David Babeock (i02 00 

Joseph L. Savage Cm 00 

James U.Shaw 691 OO 

WilliamA. Wheeler 816 00 

Class No. 65, fish oil: 

Jndd Linseed Oil Co '130 00 

I BKclTediAsr time of ap>nln|. 



BEPOKT OF THE SECBETART OF THE NAVT. 



153 



George T. TaDsliu <148 00 

William A. Wheeler 15U 00 

D«Tici B»bcock 156 00 

SoDthard, Herbert & Co.. IRi^ (>0 

Joseph L. Sava^ ISO 00 

Jame» M.Shaw S40 00 

Eliiha Tripp 250 00 

N.F.Matbea&Co. t250 00 

Clasi No. 68, glass : * 

David Bftbcock '1,300 65 

John J. Bingham 1,{><J8 00 

Elisha Tripp 1,800 50 

William PorMr A. Sona. .. 2, 450 50 

Clark & PeartKm 3. 175 S7i 

Joseph L.SiiTage 3,610 TO 

WiUiam A. Wheeler 6,8U7 50 

CUu No. 69, braihet : 

Atonio A. Poller 'TSG PS 

Jowph L. Savage Sii 00 

David Babcock 1,117 75* 

BjiMSl Spencer tl,119 48 

Johu J. Bingham 1, 143 01 

JohnH. BaiTey 1,146 00 

William A. Wheeler 1,441 91 

ClMB No. 70, dry goods for np- 
botsleriog : 

John J. Bingham "e?? 05 

Joseph L. Savage 7:(8 65 

William A. Wh«eler t<16 30 

Hyalt di. Spencer fg<4 36 

Alonio A. Foster 960 90 

Class No. 71, atalionery : 

W. C. Rogers & Co 'SSfi 03 

William A. Wheeler 792 60 

Ctitler, Tower db Co 7>*i 48 

W.H.Arthnr & Co K'.7 26 

Hall L. Davis 8fO 651 

JoboU. Whiltemore&Co. 1,056 I>^ 

Class No. 73, abip cbaudlerj : 

Alonio A. FotWr 'Oae 80 

HyattA. Spencer 961 75 

JdinH. Bailey 1,H89 00 

M. F. MatheB iCo (1,(199 VO 

William A Wheeler 1,236 17 

Joseph L. Savage 1,246 50 

Wheeler &. Browning.... l,Sll 25 



Class Nn. 74, acids: 

Clark & Pearson 

Alonao A. Foster 

Datld Babcock > 

William A. Wheeler 

WiUiam Porter & Song.. 

Jubo J. Biugbam 

E. A. Adams &. Co 



310 10 

223 00 
227 00 



Class No. 75, rosin, pilch, cmde 
Inrpentine : 

William A. Wheeler j*|550 00 

Joseph L. Savage 550 00 

David Babcock 550 00 

John J. Bingham 505 00 

Class No. 77, belting packing: 

C.M.aappdiCo N.KW 05 

Joseph L. Savage 4,344 07 

WilliBTO A. Wheeler 4.603 30 

Wheeler & Browning 4,810 30 

John J. Bingham 4,849 30 

HoylBrolhers 5,031 52 

James R. Pugb 5,035 80 

Hyalt 4. Spencer 6,545 41 

Class No. 78, | leather, pomp, 

rigging, lacing : 

Alonzo A. Foster 5fi5 25 

Joseph L. Savage .. 6T5 50 

John J. Bingham 662 72 

WilliiunForier4.Soiw... 676 50 

William A. Wheeler 695 75 

C.M.CIapp&Co 

Class No. 85. anthracite c«al : 

Samuel Oakman *T, 245 00 

8. P. Brown A Son 7,581 00 

William A. Whoeler 7.496 00 

TyleriCo 7,591 50 

Lewis W.Heil 7,(«54 00 

George W. Tacker 8,400 00 

JamesM. Shaw 9,366 50 



Class No. e 



, sami.hituminous 



WllliaDi A. Wheeler 

A. B. Bass 

Samuel Oakman 

Lewis W. Heil 

S. P. Brown (L Son 

Geoi^ W. Tucker 

JamPB M. Shaw 

R. B. Wigton 

Class No. 67, faitominons coal : 

Samuel Oakman 

William A. Wheeler 

John B. Turton 

S. P. Brown A Bon 

Lewis W. HeU 

James M. Shaw 

George W. Tncker. 

Uampsbire &. Ball. Coal Co 

Class No. 88, charcoal : 

William A. Wheeler 



IB> 



llofonnallij In clui ; no eo 



'759 00 
765 00 
775 00 

822 00 
845 00 
900 00 
910 00 



2,220 00 
2,316 00 
2,340 00 
2.370 00 
2,385 00 
2,592 1)0 
2,700 OO 
2, 175 00 



oogic 









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mw.™-: G««e« ifajt 


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(■••'1' Willw* .... 


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D,„t,z.ctvGoogle 



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BBPORT OF THE BECBETAB7 OF TH£ NATf. 



155 



CIm» No. II, while pine lofcs : 

Samnet Georxfl Halt t'|4,&00 00 

Elliot HarrouQ 4,500 00 

Qeorn A. HammoDd 6,450 00 

Wealey Smith 7,050 00 

Tricke7&.Je«ett 7,200 00 

Jmiim Bighi Sc. Co 7,200 00 

William H Eagle 7,500 00 

8. P. Brona &. Sod 8,100 00 

Clau No. IS, while pine matt 

Ve*le7 Smith "6,620 00 

Trickej & Jewett 8,150 00 

Elliot Harroun 11,400 00 

Samuel George Hart 11,450 00 

Wataoa dt Pittingei 17,300 00 

Clau No. 13, wlute pine plank, 

Samnel S. Bieler&Bon.. "20,066 00 

Trickey&Jewetl 22,170 00 

Samuel Oeorice Hart 24,640 00 

William H-Eaflo 25,270 00 

Elliot Hanrouu 25,460 00 

Clau No. 15, while Mb, eliit, 
btech: 

8. P. Brown & Son '3,165 00 

Trickcydi. Jewett 3,430 00 

ClaM No. IC, while a*h oara : 

Fred. A. SoDlhmajd 1*540 00 

Jo«>-pb L. Ravage 540 00 

William Puner & Sooa.. . 596 GO 

John J. BiDgham 675 00 

8. P. Brown &,th)a 720 00 

Claai No. 17, hickorj : 

William B. Griffith '2,060 00 

Trivkey A. Jewett 3, 150 OO 

Claw No. t", black walnut, ma- 
hogany, maple, cherry : 

Trickfy & Jewett M,!^ 00 

Clau No. 19, Ivcuel timberi 

William B. Griffith •!, IfiO 00 

Oeoilte A. HsQimODd t!.*IO 00 

Trickey & JewBtl 8,9«» 00 

Jam™ Bigler & Co 8,!HII m 

Hiwnuel UeiirKe Hart 3,4"<) W 

a. P. Brawn & Son 3,440 "0 

Elliot HarroQD 3,5(NI IHt 

Wesley Smllh 3,000 00 

William U. Khakapear.... 4.000 tNt 

J. I). Conklio & tiuu .... 4,000 OU 

C1«M No. 20, lociut tieenaiU t 



J. D. Conklin & Son .... |2,389 00 

WUIiam U. Shakapear.. .. 3, 130 00 

TrickeyiJowett 3,210 00 

Claas No. 22, cjpresa, c«daT : 

8. P. Brown 4. Son '1,680 00 

Trickey & JeweU 2,050 00 

George T. Wallace 2, 100 00 

George A. Hammond.... 2,3G0 00 

William White 2,700 00 

Clau No. 83, black tproce : 

George A. Hammond "4, 022 00 

Trickey & Jewell 4,770 00 

8. P. Brown &, Son 5,268 00 

JoMph Weacott &. Son . . . 6, 014 00 

George W. Lawrence .... 6,900 CO 

Claea No. 24, white oak atsTea 



William H. Milli '1.910 00 

John J. Bingham 2,860 00 

George T. Wallace 3,180 00 

Watson & Pitiioget 3,603 80 

William While 3,780 00 

Claee No. 85, Ugntunvits : 

TrickByA Jewett '1,752 50 

John J. Bingham 8,-270 00 

WesIeySmiOi 8.B75 00 

Watson &. Pittinger 4,250 00 

Class No. 32, wrought iron, 
ronnd and square: 

Foller, Dana & Fits '16,677 50 

John J. Bingham 16,954 75 

Jowph L, Savage 17,525 00 

Wheeler ABrowulng.... 18,W0 00 

William H James ltj,699 25 

WiUism A. Wheeler 19,524 00 

ClaasNo. 33,'wroughtiron, flaii 

Itiller. Dana&Fiti "1,607 50 

John J. Bingham 1,657 60 

William H. Jsmee 1,7'« 25 

Wbeelerdc Browning. ... 1,870 00 

JniipphL. 8«*Bire I,tf77 25 

William A. Wheeler 1,942 50 

ClasaNo. 34, iron plate t 

John J. Bingham •3,62rt 50 

William A. Wheeler 4, 604 50 

Jonepb L, Savage 4,6-.i3 50 

Whi«ler & Browning .... 5,421 50 

ClaaaNo. 35,>teel: 

Jam« Homer H,397 00 

Alonio A. Ko«l*r "1,414 50 

Park. Brother &^ Co 1 , 489 50 

Fuller, Uanai Fin 1,437 50 

WUIiam A. Wheeler 1,437 75 



REPORT OF THB SECRETARY OF THE NA.TT. 



George A. Hammond |a,390 00 I 

William Porlei&.8i>itB... 3,175 00 | 
Qaorge W. Tucker 3,650 00 | 



Charles G. Brown HJl.SSO OO 

Class No. 90t , patented articles : 



Opeoed in preseoiw of — 

T. E. Wp.BB, Ainilanl tfaval Comtructor. 

H. A.GDLDSBORnudH, Chief CUrk. 

B, T. Hanlby, Cltrk. 
Navy Depabthent, Baratu af CojutTuaion and Stpair, Julg 10, 1867. 



Class No. 1, while oak logs : 

8. P. Brawn i. Son '|10,800 00 

A. Vinal&Co 11,500 00 

Samuel George Hart 12,000 00 

William Haskins & Bod.. 12,400 00 

William H.Shaktiiiear... 13, "00 00 

Trickej & Jowett 13,000 00 

Elliot Harronn 13,000 00 

William While 13,600 00 

George T. Wallace 14,000 00 

Class No. 2, white oak keel 

A. Vinal&Co '877 50 

William Hashing & Son- 1, 069 75 

Tricke; & Jewptt 1,125 00 

George T. Wallace 1,135 00 

S. P, Brown & Son 1,968 75 

SamUBl Oeoree Hart 1,968 75 

William M. Sbakapear... 2,350 00 

Class No. 3, white oak corved 
limber: 

A. VinalACo "19,000 00 

George T, Wallace 20,000 00 

Willmm White 21,260 00 

William Ha»kiDs & Son.. 32,3.->0 00 

William M Shakapear.... %2,350 00 

Triekey & Jewetl 25,000 00 

WesleySmilb 25,000 00 

SnmnelGeorgeHart 4^,5(10 00 

Elliol Uarroun 43,750 00 

Class No. 4, white oak plank: 

Samnel S: Bigler & Son.. *9,»)0 00 

S. P. Brown & Son. 10,700 00 

Samuel Gporite Hart 10,450 00 

William H. Et^le 11,050 00 

Elliot HaTTonn 11.635 00 

Trickey&Jewett 23,050 00 

William Hankins &, Son.. 33,250 00 

William M.Shakflpear.... 23,250 00 

Class No. 5, white oak boards : 

George T. Wallace 1*975 00 

■Aiicept«d. 4 IDsddvd by lol. 



S. P. Brown &. Son $975 00 

Samnel George Hart 1,000 00 

Tricker & Jewetl 1,095'00 

Elliot HaiToun 1,195 00 

WilliamHaskins&Son.. 1.200 00 

William M.Shakspear.... 1,500 00 

William H. Eagle 1,500 00 

Class No. 7, yellow pioe logs : 

William B. Griffith fll,2G0 00 

James Bigler & Co 11,350 00 

LalhburTi Wickersham &. 

Co 11,750 00 

William Haskins & Son.. 11,500 00 

Elliot Harroun 12,000 00 

Trickey ditJewelt 12,500 00 

William White 13,(M)0 00 

8, P. Brown & Son 13,3.t0 00 

George T. Wallace 13, 500 00 

William M. Shakspear.... 14,500 00 

Samuel George Hart 15,000 00 

Class No. 8, yellow pine beams : 

William B, Griffith '8,152 38 

S. P. Brown & Son 10,365 96 

QwrgeT. Wallace 12,681 18 

Elliol Harroun 12,H:a 45 

William M.8hak«ppRr.... 13,587 30 

William Haskixs^ Son.. 1:1,738 27 

Samuel George Hart 14.342 IS 

William White 14.7!I5 06 

Trickey & jBwetl 15,097 00 

Lathbury, Wickersham &■ ' 

Co 18,871 25 

Class No. 9, yellow pine mast 
timber: 

S. P. Brown & Son '22,949 6.H 

William B. Griffith 2ft, 127 25 

George T. Wallace 31, 4W 82 

William Huikins & Son.. 41.543 72 

WilUamM'.Sh'ikspi'Br.... 41.878 75 
Latbbnry, Wickersham &. 

Co 41,RTe 75 

Elliol Harronn 41,878 75 

Bamnel George Hart 45,2-^ 05 

Trickeydc Jewell C0,354 60 



BEPOBT OF THE SECBBTABT OF THE NATT. 



155 



Claw Vo. 11, whil« pine lofcs : 

8&muel GeoTRe Hut t*t4,600 00 

ElUot Harrouu 4,600 00 

George A. Hammond 6, 450 00 

WesleySmith 7,050 00 

Trickey&Jewelt 7,200 00 

Jsme* Biffler & Co 7,200 00 

'William H Ekgle 7,500 00 

B. P. Brown & Son 8,100 00 

Class No. 12, whiM pine nuut 

Wesley Smith '6,620 00 

TrickeT&JeneU 8,150 00 

ElUutHanoan 11,400 00 

Samnel George Hart 11,450 00 

Wawon & PUtiuger 17,200 00 

aaaa Vo. 13, while pine pluk, 

Samnel 8. Bigler&Son- "20,065 00 

TrJckPT&Jewett 23,170 00 

Satnnel OeoTtte Hart 24,640 00 

William H. Eagle 25,270 00 

Elliot HarrouQ 25,460 00 

Claaa No. 15, while aih, elm, 
biecb: 

8. P. Brown & 8oa '3,165 00 

Tiickej Jli, Jewett ;t,430 00 

Claaa No. 16, while ash oaiB : 

Fred. A. Southmajd i'540 00 

JoM^h L. Savage 540 00 

William Porter Sc Sons.. . 596 50 

Juho J. Bingham STb 00 

8. P. Brown Alton 720 00 

Claai No. 17, hickory : 

William B. Griffith '2,060 00 

Trlckey &. Jewett a, 150 00 

Claa# Nu. I", black watnat, ms- 
bogaiif, maple, cherry : 

Tricksy 4. Jewrtl '4,195 00 

CUm No. 10, locust timber: 

William B. Griffith '1,160 00 

GeoTire A. Hammond 2,rKXI 00 

Trickpy i Jewelt S,9rt0 00 

Jamea Bigler •& Co 2,9r<ll OU 

fteniDel George Hart 3,400 (HJ 

S. P. Browu &.tMa 3,440 00 

Ktliot Harroan 3, 51(0 00 

Wesley Sinilh 3,600 00 

WilllMn U. Shakapear.... 4,000 (K) 

J. D. Cunklin & 8un . . . . 4, 000 00 

Clau No. 20, locnit treenails : 



J. D. Conklio & Son .... |2,389 00 

WUliamH. Shakipear.... 3,120 00 

TrickeyA. Jewett 3,210 00 

Class No. 22, cypreaa, cedar : 

B. P. Brown & Son '1,630 00 

Trickey &. Jewett 3,050 00 

George T. Wallace 2,100 00 

George A. Hammona.... 2,360 00 

WiUiam White 8,700 OO 

Class No. 23, black spmce: 

George A. Hammond "4,022 00 

Trickey A Jewett 4,770 00 

6. P. Brown de Son 5,268 00 

Joseph WescoU« Sou... 6,014 00 

George W. Lawrence .... 6,900 CO 

Class No. 24, white oak itavea 
and beadlDgs : 

William N. MilU '1.910 00 

John J. Bingham 2,260 00 

George T. Wallace 3, 120 00 

Walaan & Pitiinger 3,603 20 

William White 3,780 00 

Class No. 26, lignnmriUB : 

Trickey & JeweU '1,752 50 

John J. Bingham 2.270 00 

WesleySmlth 2,875 00 

Watson & Pittinger 4,250 00 

Class No. 33, wrought iron, 

roaud and sqnaie i 

Fuller, Dana* Fit* '16,677 50 

John J. Bingham 16,954 75 

Jowph L. Savage I7,5ii5 00 

Wheeler & Browning .... 18,070 00 

William H. James m,699 25 

WilUam A. Wheeler 19,584 00 

ClassNo. 33,*wroughl iron, flat: 

Fuller, Dana 4. Fiti ' 1 , 607 60 

John J. Bingham 1,657 60 

William H. Jamoa t,7'*S 25 

Wheeler* Browning .... 1.870 00 

Joseph L. Savage 1.877 25 

William A. Wheeler 1,942 50 

Class No. 34, iron plate: 

John J. Bingham '3,628 60 

William A. Wheeler 4,604 50 

Joseph L. Savage 4,6'.i5 50 

Wheeler * Browning .... 6,431 60 

ClassNo. 35, steel: 

James Homer fl,297 00 

Alonio A. Foster '1,414 50 

Park. Brother * Co 1,429 .W 

Fuller, Uana *. Fill 1,437 60 

WUIiam A. Wheeler 1,437 75 

tDceUtdbrlol. Ot)Qlc 



156 



REPORT OP THE 8ECRETART OP THE NAVT. 



Joseph L. Savage $1,439 50 

DiiTid Babcock 1,519 00 

WlieeW & Browaing .... 1,539 00 

Jolin J. Bingbam 1,539 00 

C1B8S No. 37, iroQ spikea : 

Josepb L. Ssv»ge *2, 4S5 00 

John J. Bingham 2,875 00 

WiUiam A. Wheelw 9,970 00 

Fuller, Dana & Fit* 3,075 00 

Alonzo A. ¥• -eter 3, 090 00 

Wiieeler& Browning 6,600 00 

CUm No. 38, iron wrought 

AIonioA FoBler 'SSe 00 

Joseph L. SavBge 475 00 

Wniiam A. Wheoler 846 00 

Wheeler & Browning .... 1,230 00 

Class No. 39, iron cut naila : 

Aloniso A. FoaWr ■&93 80 

Hyalt & Spenrer 615 00 

William A. Wheeler 63:t 05 

JoHPph L. Savage 643 00 

Wheeler >& Browning 665 25 

Claas No. 42, lend pipe, sheet : 

Alonzo A. Foster "la.TlO 00 

Wiliiam A. Wheeler 12,870 00 

Wheeler & Browning.... 12,915 00 

John J. Bingham ' 13,170 00 

Joseph L. Savage 13,2r>5 00 

C. M. Clapp&Co 13,417 50 

David Bahcock 14,fi9i 50 

William Porter & Sons. . . 17, 257 50 

Class No. 43, zinc: 

John J. Bingham '276 55 

Joseph L. Savage 294 00 

Wheeler & Browning , 306 25 

GeorEeAdams 318 50 

Alonzo A. Foster 3J6 00 

William A. Wheeler 343 00 

William Porter &. Soni. .. 367 50 

CUas No. 44, tin i 

Wheeleri Browning •3,165 00 

Joseph I.. Savage 3,255 00 

AlonioA. Poster 3,2*i 50 

Fuller. Dana&Flte 3,402 50 

David Babcock 3,406 30 

John J. Bingham 3,443 00 

William A. Wheeler 3,690 50 

William Porter & Sons. ,, 3,812 50 



Joseph L. Savage •1,934 50 

William A. Wheeler 1,993 06 

AlonzoA Foster 3,140 98 



John J. Bingliam $2,459 30 

Wheeler & Browning 2,616 00 

Hyatt & Spencer 3,034 08 

Class No. 49, screws of brass 

JosephL. Savage •4,704 81 

William A. Wheeler 4,916 55 

Hyatt iSc Spencer 4,928 57 

Alonzo A. Poster 4,930 22 

Scndder, Rogers & Co . . . 5, 135 33 

Wheeler & Browning .... 5,857 56 

Clark & Pearson 6,064 67 

Class No. 50, files: 

Scndder, Rogers ife Co... '1,756 13 

Joseph L. Savage 1,757 26 

John J. Bingham 1,788 33 

James Horner 1,605 50 

J.K-Hoyt 1,909 27 

William A. Wheeler 2,031 13 

Alonzo A. Foster 2,059 42j 

Hyatt it Spencer 2,144 37^ 

Wheelor& Browning 2,Gr.9 571 

Clark & Pearson 3,090 65 

Class No. 51, augers: 

Alonzo A. Foster ■2,536 57 

Joseph L. Savage 2, 752 55 

Scudder, Rogers & Co .. 2,770 OG 

Hyatt & Spencer 2,894 56 

Wlioeler &, Browning .... 2, 938 00 

William A. Wheeler 3,078 9^1 

Class' No. 52, tools for ships' 

Scndder, Rogers & Co . . . *l , 665 60 

Joseph L. Savage 1,665 35 

William A. Wheeler 1,9G1 42 

Hyatt & Spencer 1,996 90 

Wheeler &. Browning.... 2,247 40 

Alonzo A. Poster S,621 84 

Class No. 53, tools for use in 
yards and shops : 

Alonzo A. Foster '3,595 47 

William A. Wheeler 3,660 29 

Joseph L. Savage.. 4,067 % 

Hyatt & Spencer 4,2;<0 56 

Scudder, Rogers i& Co.... 4,414 40 

Wheeler & Browning .... 4,431 45 

Class No. 54, hardware : 

JosephL. Savage *4,549 85 

William A. Wheeler 4,649 82i 

Hyatt & Spencer ...:.... 4,956 92 

AlonzoA Foster 5,037 99 

Wheeler &. Browning .... 6,009 62 

Class No. 56, white lead: 



Dniitizc-ctvCioogle 



REPOST OF THB 8ECBETABT OF THE NATY. 



157 



Jowpb L. SavBfce (675 00 

D»vid Babcock 697 50 

WinUm A. Wheoler 725 00 

WilJiain Porter & Sons. ,, 750 00 

John J. Biaghkm 750 00 

Clark A Psaraoo 800 00 

CluB Ko. &7, line peiuta : 

C.M.Ctapp&Co •256 25 

Joseph L. SAvagti 2)^ 50 

William A. Wheeler '.iel7 50 

Clark t& Pearson 312 50 

John J. Binftham »I2 50 

David Babc«ck 325 00 

Alamo A.Foater. 337 50 

William Porter &. Song... 337 50 

Class Ko. 58, colored paints, 
dryers, Ac: 

David BabcDck *451 40 

Joseph L. Havage 515 35 

John J. BmEbnm 6V2 30 

William A. Wheeler 614 IH> 

Clarke Pearson 663 tffj 

Class Ko. 59, linseed oil 

Joseph L. Baiage '8 M 0( 

Jvidd Linseed U 1 Co 8 ~(K J( 

William H James 8 71 ) IK> 

David Bibcock 9 100 INI 

Manhattan O I Co 9 J9u 00 

Clark &. Pea son J 4^ Ui 

OeoiRfi Adan s 9 liH) W 

C.M.Ctapp&Co 9 Gr' (H 

William A. ^ heeler 9 T,iO IN 

James M. Shan 10 TJO 00 

Class Vo. GO, Tamisb, spiriU 
tnrpentiiiei 

David Babcotk *i,mi 00 

Josrph L. Suvoire 4,940 00 

William A. Wheeler 5, J79 00 

Alouzo A. Faster 5,:t.'t6 INI 

Ooorge Adanu 5,374 IMI 

John J. Bingham 5,630 00 

C.M.CIappiCo S.W-O Oil 

Clark* Pearson 6,530 00 



Class No. 63, sperm and lard oil : 

Beuthard, Ilirbert ii. Co.. 

Manhatlan Oil Co 

Jo»»plj L, Savud 

JudJ Linneed Oil Co 

James M. Shaw 

William IL James 

David Biib<H>ck -.-. 

William A, Wheeler 

Class Ko. 64, tallow, soap : 

Soatbsrd, Hertwrt A. Co.. 

John J. Bingham 

Alonio A. Foster 



Mnllet &. Bradborr (SIO 00 

David Babcock 315 00 

Joseph L. Savage 230 IN) 

Willmm A. Wheeler 245 00 

George Adams 345 00 

Class No. 68, glass : 

John J. Blnghsm •2,982 27 

DavidBabcock 3,171 79 

William Porter* Sons... 3.415 10 

Clark & Pearson 3,4P« 40J 

Oeorge Adams 3, 513 26 

William A. Wh«eler 'i.TM :!0 

Class No, 69, bmahes : 

Joseph L. Savaf^ *I,3S1 S3} 

David Babcock ],4<iS 43 

Alonio A. Fo«ter 1 , 538 55 

John J Biuf^ham I,ee7 38^ 

Hjail* Spencer 3,130 ll:;( 

William A. Wiieeler 2, 413 53} 

Class No. 7(1, dry-goods for up- 
holstering : 

John J. Bingham '1,299 ]5 

J.iseuhL. Savdge I,3t>7 65 

William A. Wherler 1,405 I2J 

Hyatt* Spencer 1,404 20 

Alunzo A. Foster I,4GS 75 

Class No. 71^ stationery: 

W.C.Eogers&Co '967 88 

WilliamH.Arihur*Co.. ],:i09 3:t 

Ctitter, Tower & Co 1,3.W 51 

William A, Wheeler ],4:t5 30 

Abram E. Cutter 1,500 34 

John H. W hi tie more & Co. l,5o9 45 

CtasaNo.73, ship-chandlerj ; 

William H. Wheeler •1.2:.l 00 

JohnJ. Bingham ],:ir>8 35 

Ilvatt * Speoctr ].;t79 30 

Atouio A Foster t.3*t 30 

Jonph L. Savage 1,493 00 

Class No. 74, acids: 

Clark * Pearson t'laWI 00 

Dnvid Babcock 31(1 00 

Joseph L. tiNvi^p 4115 (HI 

William A. Wheeler iHl 00 

William forter*Suus... 430 IKI 

John J. Bingham 430 (HI 

E. A. Adama * Co 3, 3iiO uO 

Class No. 75, rosin, pitch, crude 
turpentine: 

JohnJ. Binf;ham "I.Oi^ 50 

David Babcoik I, li« 25 

William A. Wheeler 1,131 25 

Joseph L. Savage ,1,375 00 



BEPOET OP THE 8BCEETABT OP THE NAVY. 



Clwa Ho. 77, belting, packlog-. 



Wheeler &. Bruwuiug .. 

Jamea R. Pngb .. .. 

Hyatt & Spenoet 



Joseph L. Sftvag^e 

John J. Bingham 

William A. Wheeler 

William Porter &■ Sona. - 

OeorKB Adams 

C.M.CUppikCo 

CluB No. 85, anlhraciCe coal : 

Samuel Oakman 

Tyler&Co 

A,R.BaM 

William A. Wheeler 

8. P. Brown & Son , 

Lewis W. Heil , 

James M.Shaw 



4,a:!7 S5 

4,297 00 
4,650 00 
4,996 75 



■•9,380 00 
9,772 00 
9,796 00 
9,80ri 00 



Tjler&Co $6,856 00 

William A. Wheeler 6,032 00 

a P. Brown A. Son 6,033 00 

Lewis W.Heil ' 6,376 00 

R.B.WiKlon 6,792 00 

jKneaM.Shaw 7,120 00 

ClaM No. 87, bitaminons coal: 

Samnel Oakman '5,760 00 

William H. James 5, S60 00 

John B.Tunon 5,9-20 00 

William A. Wheeler 6,056 00 

8.P.BrowD A. Son 6.144 00 

LowiaW. Heil 6,248 00 

James M.Shaw..'. 6,880 00 

Hampshire and Baltimore 

CoalCo 45,720 00 

Class No. B3, charcoal : 

Clark &. Pearaon •1,100 00 

Mullet & BraJbtuy 1,250 00 

Samuel Oakmap 1,250 00 

William A, Wheeler 1,300 00 

Alonzo A. FobUt 1,350 00 

Joseph L. Savage 1,600 00 

William Porter 4. Sona... 1,930 00 

Class No. 90, pateuled articles : 



G.&C. Place 

Joseph L. Savage 

FratI, Whitney & Co.. 



Navy Department, Burtau of Conttruetion and Rtyair, Jiilg 10, 1867. 



ass No. 1, white oak logs : 

Elliot Harroun ||*$ 15, 000 00 

Sauiiivl Georgre Hart 

S.P Browu & Son 

Wm, M. Shakspear 

Wesley Smith 

George T. Wallace 

Wm. White 

ass No. 4, white onk plank : 



Elliot Hanruun 

Wm. H. Eagle 

Wesley Smilli 

aP. Brown & Son- 

Geo. T. Wallace 

Wm.M.bhakapear... 



15,600 00 
17,700 00 
18,000 00 
19,200 00 
20,400 00 



700 00 
700 00 
750 00 
800 00 



Class No. 5, white oak boards : 

Fred.A. Sonthmayd 

S. P. Brown & Son 

Watson & PittiDger 

A. A. McCnIlongh 

Elliot Harroun.:. 


•JSfiO 00 
59(1 00 
650 00 
650 00 
700 00 


WtBleySniilh 

Samnel George Hart 

Wm. M. Shakspear 


700 00 
700 OO 

1.000 OO 



Class No. 7, yellow pine logs : 

Wm. B. Griffilh ||'26,400 00 

Elliot Harronn 36.400 00 

Lathbury, Wickersbam &.. 

Co 27,000 00 

James Bigler &. Co 27,000 00 

S. P. Brown & Son 28,800 00 

nnlrkrt madfl. T A moatil D01 canipd Itat. 

HDmIiIhI bj lot. 



KEPOBT OF THE SECBETABT OF THE NATT. 



159 



Wm. While tW,700 00 

G«o.T. Wallace 31,800 00 

S«niu«l Gei<T|rr Hart 31,600 00 

Wm M SLakepear 33,000 00 

Mark W. Downle 34,800 00 

A. A. McCulloDgh 36,000 00 

Weslej Smith «,000 00 

ClsM No. 8, jellow pina beams : 

Wm. B.Griffith '1,898 99 

S. P Uruwn & Son S,4;l6 44 

Wm. M. ShakHpear S,4T2 27 

Gpi).T.WBllaco 2,5lia 10 

Wra. While 2,(W7S» 

Elliot Uarroun 2.866 40 

Ssmnel G«aree Hart 2,86f " 

Lathbniy, Wickershain & 

Co... 4.39! 

MarkW. Downie 4,399 60 

We»Iey Smiih 4,657 90 

WalsoD&Pittmger ■ 5,374 50 

CloM No. 9, yellow pine niaat 

8. P. Brown & Son *6.762 24 

Wro.B. (iriffilh 7,044 00 

Oeo.T. W«llaco S,452 :"■ 

Elliol Hairauii 9,392 ' 

Watson* PittinfT^r 10,7<H! 88 

Samuel Ueoreo Hart 10,800 80 

Lathbary, Wickeriiham &. 

Co 11,740 00 

Wm. M. Shakapear 11.740 00 

Mark W. Dowiiie 11.741 

We«ley Siuitli 15, 490 BO 

Clan Ko. 13, white pins mast 

Wealey Smith '2.320 00 

Elliot Harr^on 3,000 00 

Kumuel Geor)[e Hart 3. 101 

WatsoDdc filtlnger 4,250 00 

Claai No. 13. while pine plonk 

Samuel R Bigler S. Sou.. 'lElieSO 00 

Jonepb W. iJurjee W.'X!', 

Wm. il. KH|r]e 2'>,3(NMN! 

Weairy Siiiilli 31,450 INI 

Waucii & PilliniTor 33,700 00 

Jamtn Biglor & Co 2:),79() < 

8. P. Brown & Son 25,200 ■ 

8amuel flrorge Hart Sfi.lHNI Oil 

Elliol HiirrouD 96,350 00 

ClMi No. 15, white iih, elm, 
beech: 

Fred, A. South may a '460 00 

Joiwph W. Dnryee 470 00 

fl.r. Bn)wn& (ton 496 00 

Watf>c>ii& Piitioftei' Hd" 00 

Jam«B BiRler &. Co 600 00 



Claai No. 16, white aafa eon : 

John J. BiDghsm 'fa. 370 00 

>V(Mi.A.Soutbmajd 2.437 50 

Wm.Poner& Sona 2.831 25 

Geoige H.Creed 3,850 00 

S.P.Brown & Sob 3.000 00 

Watsan& PiUiD^er 4,300 00 

Claai No. 17, hickory : 

Fred. A. Sonlbmayd '442 00 

A. A. McCullough 725 00 

WalBOD i& Peliinger 850 00 

Claas No. 18, black walnut, 
maboguiy, maple, cheny: 

Joseph W. Dnryee '3.013 50 

Watson APiitingeT 4,000 00 

Fred. A. Souibmayd 4,270 50 

ClaM No. 19, lociul timber : 

Wm, B. Griffith '580 00 

A. A. McCulloueb 1,300 00 

Samuel George Hart 1,700 00 

Wesley Smith 1,»I0 00 

Watson &. PittinKer 1,950 00 

Wm.M. Shakapear 3,000 00 

Elliol Harroun 2.000 00 

J.D.ConklinA Son 3,000 00 

Class No. 20, locust treenails ; 

Wm. B. Griffith '1,840 00 

B.P.BrowD &.Son 2,080 00 

J. U. Conklin d: Son 2.140 00 

Wesley Smith 8,340 00 

WalHOD APillinger 2,600 00 

A. A. McColWgb 2.890 00 

Wm. M. Sbakiprar 3,100 00 

Clau No, 32, cypress, cedar: 

S. P. Brown & Son *1,P50 00 

Frrd. A. S<.alhiiiayd 1.995 00 

JaiiiFB Biffler & Co 2,030 00 

Watson £ Pillin^r 8,(165 00 

Joseph W. Ituryea 2,-JOO 00 

A. A. McCnIloufrh *.!,450 00 

GcuTKeT. Wallaro 2,4.'iO 00 

Wm. While 2,800 00 

Class No. S3, black spruce: 

S. P. Brown &. Son '3,202 00 

Jof-eph Wenc^iit ASon... 3,740 00 

Geo. W. I^wrence 4, 3W) 00 

Walaon & PiitLnger 4,750 00 

Class No. 24. white oak stares 
and headings : 

Wesley Smith '3.860 00 

JolinJ. BinKbam 4,145 00 

WaisonA Piliinger 4.450 00 

George T. Wallace 6,560 00 

■izcc ..Google 



EBPOET OP THE BECEETABT OP THE NAVT. 



ClauNa.9S,ligoiu>)vitB: 




Class No. 43. line ! 




Wm.Porler & Sons 


•^25 00 

5i5 00 




•81,068 00 
1.095 00 


George H. Creed 


Walsall & Pi ttiuffer 


700 00 


John J. Bingham 

William A. Wheeler 


1,186 00 




duo 00 


1,300 00 


* Wesley Smith 


800 00 


William Porter*. Sons... 


1,285 00 






Wheeler & Browning 


1,440 00 


Claafl No. 33, wrought iroD, 








TODudaiidsqusra: 












John J. Bingham 

Wheeler & Browning.-. 




John J. BiiiiEbam 


ie,538 m 


4.785 00 




18,Hb7 50 
2(1, 800 00 








George H. Creed 


4,970 00 




22,020 00 




5.057 60 






William A. Wheeler 


5, 330 00 


CtassNo.33,<>rouKht iron, flat: 




Hyatt & Spencer 

William Porter*. Sons... 


5,629 50 






5,540 SO 


John J. BinRham 


■21. 186 50 
















23,550 00 
24, .300 00 






Wheeler & Browning... . 


Atooao A. Foster 


•46 25 






George H. Creed 

Davia Babcack 








130 00 


CluB Ko. 35, Bleel : 




William PorUr*. Sons... 


149 37 






William A. Wheeler 


150 00 


Geo. H. Creed 


•l.ffiO 00 




159 00 




i,;wrt 00 


James M. Shaw 


195 00 


Will. A. Wheeler 


1,402 25 


Hyatt *. Spencer 

Wheeler & Browning.... 


195 IN) 


PBfk, Brother A. Co 


l,4:<5 40 


225 00 










Miller, Barr&Parkin.... 


1,457 (10 


ClftM Ko. 46, locks, hinges. 




Win. H. James 


1,458 50 


bolts of brass and iron: 






I.'s-Jl m 


John J. Bingham 

George H. Creed 




Wh«ler& Browning.... 


■3,K>9 66 


John J. Bingham 


1,538 UO 


3,8B3 OU 








4,91ti BS 
5,171 40 


CIM8K0.37, ItonspikM: 




Wheeler*. Browning.... 






William A. Wheeler 








Hyatt & Spencer 






2,345 00 

2, 3S15 (10 






Class So. 40, screws of brass 




Wm. A. Wheeler 


2,470 00 


and iron : 






7,400 (Kl 






ClusNo. 38, iron wrought nails: 




John J. Bingbnm 

Alonio A. Foster 


•2,075 89 
2,386 90 


AloDio A. Foster 




Hyatt*. Speticer 

W'illiam A. Wheeler 


2.462 6:1 


George H. Creed 




2,503 45 








2,524 75 


Wheeler*. Browning.... 


765 00 




2.828 09 






Clark & Pearson 


2,920 94 






Class Mo, 50, files : 


















HjBtt & Spencer 


6, jaa 60 


Ja™.VHorner 


2,:»4 07 


William A. Wheeler 


0,654 50 


John J. Bingbam 


2.419 10 


Wheeler*. Browning.... 


6,792 50 


J.K. Hoyt 


2,446 81 






Aloiizo A. Fosler 


2, 578 23 


Cliuis Mo. 4S. lead, pipe, sheet : 




William A. Wheeler 


2,66) 119 






Hyatt *. Spencer 


2.H09 71 










George H. Creed 


4,5j^I 25 


Wheeler* Browning.... 


3,418 20 










John J. Bingham 

Wherler & BTowning.... 


4,6!>4 00 






4,730 00 


CImsNo. 51, angers: 




William A. Wheeler 


4.8U7 50 






WiUiam Porter & Sons... 


6,127 50 


George U. Creed 


•978 30 



AloniD A. Poster (1,088 76 

HtbU & SpnncDT 1,102 06 

Willium A. Wheeler 1,289 64 

Wbeeler ^ Brown ing 1,370 00 

Class No. 52, tools Tor ship's 



EEPOET OP THE SECEETART OF THE NAVY. 161 

William A. Wlieelcr $3, 396 60 

AtoDzo A. PoBl^r 3, 529 00 

Willism Porter &. Sons... 3,560 60 

Willi™ Miller 3,957 50 

CUtk &. PeflTBon 4, 067 60 

ClaBsKo.63, sperm aad Inrd oil : 

Southarii, Herbert A. Co . . . 'S, ] f« 00 

George H. Creed 3.360 00 

Jndif Linseed Oil Co 3,:iB7 12 

David Babcock 3,652 00 

William H. James 3,732 00 

William A. WheelSr 3,73K 00 

Jnraes M. 8haw 3,788 00 

Ctass Ho. Gt, tallow, soap : 

John J. Biugbam *602 dO 

David Babcock 611 40 

GeorRoH. Creed 618 00 

Sonthard, Herbert & Co... 639 00 

WilliamMiller 637 00 

William A. Wheeler 651 40 

AloniD A. Poster IBiS 00 

Class No. 65, fish oil : 

Jndd Linseed Oil Co -CGO 00 

David Babcock 700 00 

William A. Wheolot 730 00 

Southard, Herbert & Co. . - 770 00 

Oeorce H. Creed 900 00 

William H. James 930 00 

James H. Shaw 1,240 00 

Close No. GS, glass: 

Oeorgs H. Crepd '982 50 

Jobn J. Bingham 1,033 50 

Williun Porter &. Sons .... 1 , 1'JO 70 

Clark &. Pearson 1,276 10 

David Babcock 1,307 60 

WillUm A. Wheeler 1,442 10 

WillUmUiller 1,588 40 

ClMs No. 69, bnuhea : 

GeorRf H. Creed *l,34i 30 

AloDEo A. Foster 1,665 22 

David Babcock 2,119 50 

John J. BiDKham 8,356 35 

WllliamHiller B, 543 70 

Hyatt Jk Spencer 8,694 82 

William A. Wbeeler 2,9:16 6a , 

Class No. 70. dr; i;oods Tor op- 
bobterlDg : 

George H. Creed *I,69G Ofr 

John J.Bingbam 1,862 17 

William A. Wheeler 2,391 05 

Alonto A. Fosler 2,395 15 

Hyatt & Spencer 2. 596 91 

Class No. 7), stslionery : 

W. C. Rogcru & Co -liUVi 61 

W. A. C-awford A Co...- 1,680 30 

William H. Artbnr A Co.. 1,696 01 



OeoTice H. Creed •423 25 

William A. Wbeeler 440 75 

Alunza A. Fosler 460 10 

Hyatt & Spencer 466 40 

Wheeler &. Bronning .... 466 90 

Class No. S3, tools for use la 
yards and shops -. 

Geoi^ B, Creed '3.316 22 

Alouzo A. Poster 3, 533 76 

HynttA. Spencer 4,049 18 

Williaro A. Wheeler 4, 330 56 

Class No. 54, hardware ; 

William A. Wheelei *4,066 38 

QeoTge H. Creed 4,127 36 

John J. BiQgbam 4,134 69J 

Hyutt dc BMocer 4,483 10 

AlonioA Poster 5, 193 63 

Wheeler & Browning .... 5,623 45 

Class No. 67, zinc paints t 

David Babcock '592 00 

George H. Creed 594 00 

Wiliram Miller 630 00 

John J. Bingbam 686 40 

Alonzo A. FoslST 690 00 

WilliamA. Wheeler 720 00 

Clark JtPearwiD 750 00 

WiUianiPorterABoiu... 780 00 

William H. James 780 00 

Clan Noi 58, c^dored paints, 
dryen, Ac: 

GeornH. Creed *I,472 60 

David Babcock 1,482 40 

Alenio A. Foster 1.485 00 

WllliamHiller 1,566 30 

Clark A Pearson 1,812 60 

WilUam A. Wheeler 1,833 60 

John J. Bingham 1,865 00 

CUm No. 59, Uiueed oil : 

David Babcock '8,925 00 

George H. Craed 9,030 00 

JaddLlnseed Oil Co 9,370 20 

William H. James 9,380 00 

CUtkAPeaTSOn 9,940 00 

William A. Wbeeler 10,220 00 

James M. Shaw 11,4^^1 00 

Class No. 60, varoish, spirits 
torpentine : 

David Babcock "3,077 IM) 

Jobn J. Bingham 3,142 IK) 

George II. Creed 3, :t7p^ 00 

•A 
11 N 



lOOt^lc 



KEPOBT OF THE SECBETABY OF THE MATY. 



P.W.Derham 81,756 20 

William A. Wheeler J. 940 ao 

Cnttsr, Tower, A; Co 2,U50 51 

JohDH. Whiilemore&Cu. '■i,bS>-i 14 

E. M. Whiling, jr 2,777 55 

CtuB No. 73, ship chandlery ; 

AloDEoA. FoBler ■2,526 25 

JnbaJ. Brn^ham 2,5^.121 



2,657 40 
a,6«lH) 



Hyalt & Spencer.. 

George M. Crt^ 

'William A.Wheeler.. 
Class No. 74, acids : . 

David Babcock 

CiBrk& Pearson 

William A. Wheeler 

Hyatt Sl Speocer 

William Purter dc Sons 

Geoigp H. Creed ,. 

William Miller 

John J. Uingham 

AloDzo A. Foster 

E. A. Adams &Co 

Class No. 75, roain, pilch, crude 
turpentiue : 

William A. Wheeler 

Qeortre H. Creed 

David Babcock 

Jobo J. Bingham 

Class No. 77, belliitg, puclting: 

George H. Creed -■ 

CM.Clapp & Co 

John J. Uhigbaiii 

William A. Wlieeler 4, eu6 iiU 

William PorlerA. Sons.... 4,!(G7 50 

Hoyt Itioihera 5,015 00 

JamesR. fugh 5,137 00 

Hjfott&epeucer 5,510 00 

Class No. ~8 bather, pnmp, rig- 
gug, lacing: 
Gporge U. Creed •2,3.-n' 60 



•JJ3 50 
125 U6i 

140 00 
J42 00 
149 00 
15aS5 
]61 00 
173 50 
178 25 
1,20-J50 



273 50 



C.M.CIapp&Co 

Class No. 80, junk : 

John J. Bingham 

John W. Mason & Co.- 

Alonzo A. Foiter 

WilUam A. Wheeler ... 
Oe«rgeH. Creed 

Class No. S2, bcUows : 

Alonzo A. Foster 

George U. Creed 



William Porter & Sons. 
Opened 



ii,724 G 



Class No. 85, anthracite coal: 



William A. Wheeler.. 

Lewis W. Heil 

S. P. Brawn & Son.. 

ass No, 86, scmi-bjtaminons 



Tyler&Co 

William A. Wheeler.. 

A. B. Bass 

LewisW.Iieil 

S,P.Brawn&.8on... 



2,961 60 
3,097 00 
3,349 00 



7.246 50 
7,840 00 
8,500 00 
9,000 00 



•18 00 
48 00 
66 00 
80 40 



'9,810 00 
9,850 00 
10,042 00 
10,404 00 
11,413 00 



•4,792 00 
5,136 00 
6, 176 00 
6,330 00 
5,584 00 



Class No. Sd, cbarcoal: 

William A. Wheeler 

George H. Creed 

Alnnzo A. Foster 

William Porter &, Sons. . . 

ess No. 90, patented articles: 

George &.C. Place 

George K. Creed 

Pratt, Whitnej & Co 



T. E. Wkub, jlsitffant Naval CnttTuctoT. 
H.A. OaLDSKOKOUOH, Chief Clerk. 
B-T.Hanlet, Clerk. 

Navv Department, BMnauofConUniclwn and Kepair, July 10, I 



Class No. 7, jelloiT pine k 



Co .. 

William B. Griffith... 
8. P. Brown &,Son... 
Watson Sc Pittinger . 
OeorgeT. Wallace... 
•Acnpled. 



William M. 8hakap«»r. . 

William While 

A.A.UcCallongb 



95,600 00 
5,500 00 
7,500 00 



! Infarmil i blib Isc odI^ put of 



REFOBT OF THE SECBETABY OF THE NA.rr. 



163 



8.P.Broirii& Son $3,620 76 

William M.ShakBpear 3,521 Ii5 

A.A.McCiilloii^ 3,707 00 

Wkteon & PittiDgei 4,235 93 

Lalbbarr, Wickenhun &, 
Co <,520 54 



8. P. Brown & Son -aSO 00 

WnUon Sl Hltinger 500 00 

CIms No. J3, white pine plank, 

Josepb W. Dur7ee '12, 234 50 

WauoD &Fiain|ier 13,612 50 

James Bigler &. Co 13,889 50 

aP.BrowD &Son U,H19 00 

Hvsiu& Teemyer 15,678 00 

Charles Beaton til, 919 20 

Class No. 17, hickory: 

Wataon & Pittinger '520 00 

Class No. 18, black walnnt, ma- 
hogany, maple, cherry ; 

Josepb W.Duryee '207 00 

Thomas &Pohl 294 00 

Frederick A. SoDthmayd.. :130 00 

WatsoD & I'itlingFr 450 00 

Class No. 33, black apiuco : 

Joavph Westcottdi. Son.. *l,880 00 

WatHon & Pittinger 1,900 00 

a P. Brown & yon 2,11^ <X) 

U«orge W. Lawrence .... 3,220 00 

Clasi No. 24, white oak Btaves 
•nd headings : 

JobnJ. Bincham '140 00 

Owirga T. WalWe SOO 00 

Watson & Pittioger 500 00 

Class No. 32, wronght iron, 
ronad and square: 

Alamo A. Foster '3,095 00 

John J. Bingham 3,13100 

Joseph L. Savage 3,207 60 

WlllUtn U.Jamei 3,412 50 

Pwil J.Field 3,422 50 

Wheeler & Browning 3,660 00 

Lehigh Kolllng Hill Co . . 3, 600 00 

Willuun A. Wheeler 3,820 00 

ClaaaNo.33,wronghtir«n,fiat: 

John J. Bingham '1,406 60 

Joseph L. Savage 1,547 50 

Paul J. Field 1,554 00 

' William H. Jame* t, 661 75 

William A. Wheeler I.6W 00 

Aloaao A. Foster 1,637 00 

WhMlM ^Browning.... 1,664 00 



Class No. 34, iron, plale: 

John J. Bingham |aS2 50 

Joseph L. Savage 254 00 

AloDio A. Foster 378 50 

Paul J.Field 280 60 

WhpBler& BrowniDf.... 297 00 

WLlUam A. Wheeler 514 50 

Class No. 35, steeh 

Alonzo A. Foster '990 00 

Park, BrotheriCo 1,029^55 

John J. Bingham 1,057 50 

Joseph L. Savagre I,05S 50 

Miller, BarrA Parkin.... 1,067 CO 

WillUm A. Wheeler 1,080 25 

David Bubcuck 1, liri 00 

Wheeler & Browning 1,121 00 

PaiilJ.Field 1,178 00 

Class No. 39, Iron ciit niUls: 

Hyatt^ Spencer '498 05* 

Panl J.Field 502 Oi\ 

Alonio A. Foster 5:11 95 

William A. Wheeler 575 17* 

Joseph L.Savage 591 65 

Wheeler &. Browning.... 618 69 

Class No. 41, lead, pig: 

David Bsbcock '2,313 50 

AtoMo A. Foster 3,4;I7 50 

Wheeler & Browning.... 3,437 50 

Joseph L. lavage 3,4:17 50 

John J. BinghaiD 3,486 00 

William Porter &. Sods. . . 3, (^ Sg 

William A. Wheeler 2,687 50 

PaulJ.FicId 2,687 50 

JameaM.Shaw 2,687 50 

Class No. 42, lead, pipe, sbMl : 

David Babcock •7.921 87* 

Alonio A. Foster '. 8,109 37 

John J. Bingham 8,343 50 

WillUm A. Wheeler 8,250 00 

JosepbL. Savage 8,250 00 

PanlJ, Field 9,000 00 

William Porter & Sons... 10,875 00 

Class No. 44, tin : 

Alon»o A. Foster '1,68500 

JosephL. SavoM 1,^0 00 

Wheelertt Browning.... 1,675 00 

JobnJ. Bingham 1,740 00 

Paul J. Field 1,850 00 

Hyatt* Spencer t, 875 00 

WilllamA. Wheeler 1,900 00 

David Babcock 1,900 00 

WUIUmPort(r& Sons... 1,963 60 

CIuiNo. 45, Midei: 

AlonwA. Foster 'l, 004 86 ■ 

JoMoh L. Savsga 9,878 00 

Dkvid Babcock 2,781 00 

t latcnul 1 bkto tor part vf alaail^ ^ Q Q I ^ 



EEPOET OF THE 8ECBETABY OP "KHE NAVY. 



William A. Wheeler S2,98T 110 

William Porter & Sons.. . 3,090 00 

John J. BiDBbam 3,234 20 

PsulJ Field 3,296 00 

JamesM. Shaw 3,502 00 

HjatiA. Spencer 4,120 00 

Wheeler & BrowoiDg 4,635 00 

Claw Ko. 48, locki, bioges, 
faolu of brasB and iron : 

Joseph L. Savage •806 75 

•AloLio A. Fosler S36 20 

John J. Binehnni 876 21 

WheelerA. Btowalxtg.... 1,060 40 

William A. Wbwler 1,111 22 

W. A. Knight 1,357 77 

Hjatl & Spencer 1,551 47 

Class No. 49, sctewg of brass 

AlonsM> A. Foeler -586 8S 

William A. Wheelai 614 79 

Joseph L. Savage 631 20 

Hyatt & Spencer 643 58 

W, A. Knight 670 64 

Clark & Pearson 716 20 

Wheeler & Bruwning 726 10 

PanlJ. Field 750 30 

Class No. 50, files : 

Joseph L. Savage SS5 88 

JohnJ. BlDghara 937 73 

J.K.Hojt W3 eoi 

Alonio A, Foster 9« 16 

William A. Wheder 1,036 75 

W.A.Knight l,J44 38i 

Wheeler & Browning.,,, 1,S57 75 

Clark & Pearson 1,577 33 

CIbm No. 52, tools for ship's 



Wm.A.WheeW 

Wheeler & BrowDhw,,.. 

H7Mt& Spencer 

W.A.KnigVt 

PaalJ. Field 


•71 86 
73 50 
84 70 
84 80 
113 80 
116 30 


CIbmi No. 53, looU for i>go in 
jBid* and shops: 

Wm. A, Wheeler 


•515 48 


W.A.Knight 

Whecler& Bronnbig.... 

Joseph L.Savage 

Hjatt &. Spencer 

Class No. 54, hardware: 

WhcBler& Browning 

Hyatt* Spencer 

Alonio A. foster 


606 77 
620 70 
620 35 
627 04 

•925 05 
1,066 71 
i.VM 50 



Joseph L.t^ava^e tl.lOI 94 

Wm.A. Whraler 1,242 874 

W. A. Knight 1,300 38 

Chws No. 56, white lead : 

Alonzo A, Fosler ^240 00 

Joseph L, Savage 270 00 

David BaUcock 275 00 

Wm. A. Wheeler 290 OO 

James W. Hobbins 299 80 

Wm. Porter & Sons 300 00 

JobnJ. Biiighaai 300 00 

Claik & Pearson 315 00 

Wheeler i Biowning.... 3iO 00 

Class No. 58, colored paints, 
diyers, &o. ; 

David Babcock "TSS 30 

James W. Eohblus 796 43 

Joseph L. Savage 851 60 

John J. Binpfbam STJ 50 

Wm. A. Wheeler 885 50 

Atonzo A. Fosler. 936 50 

Clark & Pearson 942 50 

Wheeler &. Browning.... 1,096 00 

Class No. 59, linseed oil: 

Judd Linseed Oil Co •3:U 65 

Joseph L, Savnge 337 50 

UanhaltanOiICo 342 50 

David Babcovk 343 75 

Clark & Pearson 357 60 

James W. Rohbins 378 50 

Wm. A. Wheeler 3^ 00 

James M.Shaw 435 00 

Class No. 60, varnish, spirits 
turpentine : 

David Bsbcoek •681 30 

John J. Bingham 695 OO 

Clark & Pearxon 706 621 

James W. KobbiDf TiT 45 

William A. Wbeetor TST 80 

JoMphL. Savnf* 999 SO 

Class No. 63, sperm uid hvd oil: 

Joseph L.Savage '448 SS 

JoddLinseed Oil Compfto; 448 51 

Haohattan Oil CompanT . 461 7& 

Southard, Herbert ± Co.. 468 60 

William A. Wheder 489 00 

David Bobcock 497 75 

JamesH.SbBw 596 36 

James W. Eobbma 686 25 

Class No. 64, tallow, soap: 

John J. Bingham *I71 60 

David' Babcock 188 50 

Joseph L. KHvage 199 00 

William A. Wheeler SOO 90 

Aloozo A. Foster 807 60 

Southard, Herbert Jk Co.. 211 00 

Wheeler &. Browning.... 936 00 

t Informil : bidi f'lr psnof dam i 

.oogic 



EEPOET Of THE SECEETABV OF THE NAVY. 



dualfo. 6S, fiihoil: 

Jnild Linseed Oil Companj 

William A. Wheeler 

ManhsKsiI Oil Compan;.. 
Soiilhard, Herbert &, Co.. 

Dttvid Habcovk 

Jowph L. Sitvage 

Jameii U. Shaw 



416 00 
415 00 
450 00 
695 00 



Claaa No. 68, glasa : 

Darid Babcock '298 6 

Williiun A. Wheeler 406 6 

Jobo J. Rinfcbam 407 

Clark & PeanOD 434 * 

Jnmph L. Smviwq 444 T 

William Porter & Sona... 533 7 

Whet'ler &. BrowDioe.... 754 & 

James W. Kobbiua 1,2^7 

Clast No. 69, bmBbea : 

jMepb L, Snvajcv 'J, 487 2 

Wherlerand BrowaiDg... 1,070 5' 

Ullnrora & Flihrc 1,572 2 

' Boehm, Kice A. Co 1.746 4 

David Babcock 1,759 7 

John J. Bingham 2,124 4: 

Jn-nea W. Robblns S, 365 ft 

William A. Wheeler 2,5*! 

Claaa No. TO, dry gooda for np- 
boUteriQ); ; 

John J BiDgbftin '389 8 

William A Wbeeler 409 3 

Joaaph L. Savage i$i A 

Hjail & Spencer 468 2 

CUm No- 71, ataUonei'}': 

W. C. Rofnra&,Co '816 ff 

Knight & JohusoQ 951 2 

Cniur. Tower A- Co 1,009 |: 

William H. AnborACo. 1,039 8 

William A. Wbeelnr 1,191 9 

FerdlDSDd Foater 1,790 G 

CUu Ko. 73, akip chaudloiy : 

Alooio A. Foaler '496 6 

Joeeph L. Savaga 614 2 

Jubn J. Biiigbam K» 9 

HvaU &. Spenrer 656 7 

William A. Wbeeler 632 » 

Wlieetor & Btomaiag.... 662 a 

Claai No. 74, adda : 

Clark A. Peaiaoa "lee 3 

David Babcock 319 

Jamei W. Rubbiiu ^4 9 



OpoDed in presence of- 
'r E We«i 



Hyatt& Speocer tS44 27 

Phillips & Jacob* 253 721 

Willi™ A. Wheeler 356 88 

John J. Biagbam 256 88 

Joseph L. Savape 357 37 

William Porter &, Sons. . - 263 57J 

G. A. Adams & Co 2, 190 60 



Class No. 75, rosin, pilch, crude 

tnrpenliDe : 




William A. Wheeler 


•717 50 


John J. Bingham 

■ Wheeler i Browning .... 
Joeeph L. Savage 


739 00 
605 50 

S33 00 


Class No. 77, bolting, packing : 




John J. Bingham 

C.M.CIapp&Co 

JosepbL Savage 

Hvatt & Spencer 

Wheeler & Browning 

William A. Wheeler 


•93 13 
94 to 

103 90 

104 74 
131 00 
135 00 



Class No. 78, Isathor, pump, 
rigging, lacing: 

Joseph L. Savage '928 00. 

William Porter &, Sons... 1,009 80 

John J. Bingham 1, 025 40 

Wheeler 4. Browning 1.141 60 

C.M.CIapp&Co 1,209 40 

William A. Wheeler 1,229 76 

Class No. 85, anthracite coat : 

A. E. Baas *716 80 

William A. Wheeler 787 20 

Tyler 4: Co 812 80 

Lewis W.Hoil 868 80 

JamosM.Sbaw .>.... 1,113 00 

Class No. 37, bituminous coal : 

A.E.B«as '3,975 00 

John B. Tnrton 3,075 00 

Lewis W. Hell 3,100 00 

WilllamA. Wheeler 3,145 00 

8. P. Brown & Son 3,450 00 

James H Shaw 3,650 00 

Hnmpsbire and Baltimore 

CosICo t3,060 00 

Class No. H^, charcoal : 

William A. Wheaioi '252 50 

PaolJ. Field 316 26 

Joseph L. Savage 360 00 

William Porter & Sods. - W8 75 
I RcrclTcd aftsr tine of apcalnf. 



T. E. Webb, Ai$itUM JVav«J CowUrmctaT. 
H. A. OOLOSBuROUOH, Chitf Clnk. 
B. T. llAKCEV, CUrk. 

Navv DkpahtheNT, BarMa a/ Ciittrtulien and Rrfair, Jatf It), Ir4i7.' 



Caioi^Ic 



KEPOET OF THE 8ECRETAKY OF THE NAVY. 



Class No. 1, wbiteooklogB: 




William H. James 








Wbeeler & Brovming 




S.P.Brown&8oii 


•$4,700 00 


William A. Wheeler 


l,;t27 50 




5,500 00 


Alonso A. Foster 


1,330 00 


GforceT. Wallace 


6,000 00 


Lehigh Rolling Mill Co... 


1,403 75 




6,500 00 






JamesE. Stewart 


7,000 00 


Class No. 33, wrought Iron, flat: 




A. A. McCulloQBh 


■ 7,500 00 






William B. G.iffilh 


8,000 00 


John J, BiDtrham 

William A. Wheeler 


•385 20 


RJ.Barrick 


t4,950 00 


430 00 






Wheeler & Browning.... 


440 00 


CImb No. 7, yellow pino logs r 




Joseph L. Savage 


455 00 










S.P.BtowD&So[i 


■4,400 00 


William H. James 


510 6^4 


Lallibury, Wicker»bam &. 










4,500 00 


Class No. 35, steel : 






4,900 00 






Wataon & Pillinecr 


4,1100 00 


Park. Brother & Co 


•127 eni 


GeoTReT. Wallace 


5,000 00 


Joseph L. Savage 


131 75 










Wi.liamB. G.lffiih 


5,400 00 


Alonzo A. Foster 


136 50 




5,500 00 


Wheeler & Browning 


142 00 










James E. Stewart 


7,000 00 


David Babcock 


145 00 


D.J.Barrick 


N, 950 00 


ClasBNo.4l, lead, pig: 




Class No. 13, wLUe pine planh. 


















•2se 00 

3:l0 00 
450 00 




I4,«a5 00 
14,625 00 
14.925 00 
15,300 00 


S. P. Brown & tjon 

WatMD& PiUineer 


Wheeler & Browning 

Joseph L. Savage 

John J. Bingham 


Clase Xo. 15, wbile asb, elm, 
beevb: 




J>im6sM.SIi«w 

William A. Wheeler 


15,750 00 
16,350 00 




William Porter & Sons... 


16,500 00 










A.A.M-CullonKb 


975 00 






Joseph W. Dutjee 


1,140 00 






Watson &. PiUiuger 


1, 170 00 














Class No. 17, hickory: 




Joseph L. Savage 
















William A. Wheeler 


376 00 






David Babcock 








Wi.liam Porter i Sons. .. 


472 00 


FicderitkA. SouUimayd.. 


301 00 










Class No. 43, einc: 












A. A. McCilloagh 


387 50 


Wlioeler& Browning 




Watson 4. Pitiinger 


500 00 


Jobu J. BiDgham 




D.J.Barrick...:. 


1245 00 




60 00* 


Joseph L. Savage 


Class No. 30, ingot capper : 




William A, Wheeler 




Joseph L. Savage 


■203,375 00 


William Porter & Sods... 


. 75 00 


Ballimore and Onba Smelt- 








ing a od Mining Co 


212,3.10 00 


Class No. 45, solder: 




Sylvester J. Edwards 


220,655 00 






Juhn J. Bingliam 


2:15.500 00 


Alonio A. Fo-ler 


■10 00 






William A. Wheeler 
















Joseph L Savage 


28 00 






John J. lliiigham 








William Hurler Ji. Sons .. . 


35 00 


Jobn .1. Binpliam 

Joseph L (lavage 


•1,190 00 
1,217 50 






Whfoler& Browning 


45 OO 


•ACMplBl. 




t Rtc^Tad an« Urns of openl 


'• 



EEPOBT OF THE SECBETART OF THE NAVY. 



167 



Alonio A. Foster 

John J. Binitham 

JoHeph L. 8&vafte 


•J56 00 
68 40 
74 00 


William A. WheeUr 

Wheeler & Browning 


106 00 

108 00 


Claas No. '49, screws of brass 
and iron : 




J, . g 




Alonao'A. Foster 


142 50 
]«25 


Wheeler & Urowmne 

WilUum A. Wheeler 


jei'oo 

160 00 


Class No. 60, files: 




John J. Bingham 

Joseph L. SftVBgfl 

William A. Wheeler 


•1R2 74 
197 3-i 

S17 16 


Wheeler*. BroivninK 


•iSl 50 


Class No. 5H, tobis for ships' 




Jegeph L. Sftvaco 

William A. Wheeler , 

AloUKO A. Foster 

Ilj' alt & Spencer 

Wheeler&BnJwniOK 


-317 20 

374 7H 
389 50 
4.'5 97 
520 00 


Class No. 53, loola for use in 
yards and shops: 








Joseph L. SBvage 

William A. Wberler 

Wheeler it Brownioe 


' 614 60 

oaoHS 

804 00 


Class No. M, hardware: 




Josoph L. SaVBffo 

Wiliratn A. Wheeler 

Wheeler & Browning 

Alonru A. Foster 


•480 00 

.'-.61 75 
,')90 H5 


Class No. 59, colored painls. 
dryers, &c. : 












(jeorge Ryuexl, jr 

John J. Binjcham 

Wiiliam A. Wheeler 

Joseph L Savage 

Wheeler & Browning 


170 95 
172 20 
174 OU 
179 00 
J82 00 


Ctus No. CO, varnish, spiriLi 




William A. Wheeler 


410 00 



a*rk & Pearson 1430 50 

George R J neal, jr 451 SO 

John J. Bingham 453 50 

Joseph L. Savage 539 00 

Wheeler^ Browning 615 00 

Class No. 63, sperm and lard oil: 

Joseph L. Savaee '3,935 00 

JndJLinseed Oil Co 9.961! 70 

Southard. Herberts Co.. 3,080 00 

William H. James 3.08O 00 

ManhattHD Oil Co 3,0fi5 00 

William A- Wheeler 3,!i75 00 

David Babcofk 3,:KHI 00 

James H. ^haw 3, 395 00 

Wheeler & Browning 3,650 00 



ClassNo. 64, lallow. soap: 








William A. Wheeler 

Joseph L. S.ivH|;o 

Wheeler & Browning.... 


13 25 
16!i5 
16 S5 


John J. BlTigliam 

Southard, Herbert & Co.. 


16 50 

37 50 


Class No. 68, glass : 




WilllBraPorler&SoNs.... 
John J. Bingham 

Joseph L. Snvege 


■531 00 

55«00 
6a7 HO 






Wheeler& Browning.... 
William A.Wheeler 


no 00 

1,110 00 


Class No. 6D, brashes : 




Joseph L. Savsgo 

Wheeler* Browning.... 
Boehm, Hiee&Co 


•648 96 

653 re 

7&J65 


Jubo J. Bingham 

George Kyii.-al.jr 

Ilyiilt & Spncer 

William A. Wheeler 


I,0:i7 C5 
1,072 50 
I.Hii f5 
1,257 25 



Class No. 70, dry goods for 
upholstering : 

Joseph L. Savage "6;i6 P5 

J.ihii J. Bingham 7;iO 75 

William A. Wheeler 808 30 

Hyait & Spencer e&:t 39 

AloDzo A. Fosior 890 80 

Class No. 71, stationery : 

W. C. Hogois i Co *5I0 95 

Blanehard* Mohun 585 90 

KniRhl 4. Joiinson 610 13 

WilliamA. Wh«-ler 675 35 

William ]{. Arthur & Co. 691 65 

Cutter, Tower ip C .ol.'VPc 

plea o 



REPOBT OP TH& SECEErAKT OP THE NAVY. 



- 168 
Claw No. 73, alitp uhandler^ : 

Hjiattdc Spencer 

Alonzo A. FoBler 

JoBppb L. Savain) 

William A. Wheeler 

Boebm, Ric«&Co 

Wbeelrr &. BrowatDg 

Jobu J. Binebani 

Class No. 74, acids: 

Jobn J. Binshani 

William A.Wh«e)er 

Whveler & Brovrnlng 

G.A.Adams & Co 

Jotieph L. Savage 

ClojsNo. 75, rosiu: 

David Babcock 

William A. Wheeler 

Joseph L. Savage 

Wheeler <& Browning 

John J. Bingham '. 

Class No. 77, belling, packing : 

C.M.CIapp&.Co 

■ToaepbL. Savage 

John J. Binghaot 

William A. Wheeler 

Wheeler dc BrowDing 

Hoyt Brothers 



Wbenler & BrcHUiog — 

Joseph L. Savage 

William A. Wheeler 

William Porter & Sons .. . 

C.M.CIappdcCo 

Jobn J. BiDghani 



47 22 
75 fS 

180 80 



•210 00 
250 00 
275 00 
275 CO 
297 50 



•641 52 
(i47 76 
647 m 



3U3 60 
317 50 
336 60 



Class No. 82, bellows: 



William A. Wheeler 

Alonzo A. Foster 

Joseph L. Savage 

Wbeoler&Biwniog.... 
William H. James 


-$170 00 
195 GO 
221 25 
300 00 
300 00 










S. P. Brown & Sons 

JohaB.Tarton 

Williarn A. Wheeler 

A.E. Bass 

Lewis W.Heil 

A.A.MoCullough 

James M. Shaw. 


620 00 
630 00 
632 00 
WO 00 
700 00 
720 00 
664 CO 


Class No. B7, biluminous coali 




S,P. Brownit Son 

JohnB. Turton 

William H, James 

William A. Wheeler 

Lewis W.Heil 

A.A.McCullongh 

Hampshire & Bait. Coal Co 


-12,810 00 
13,OS0 00 
14,145 00 
15,360 00 
16,335 00 
ie,4fl0 OO 

113,950 00 






Wheeler & Browning.... 
P.W.Doraey 


•375 00 
390 00 


William T.Clark......... 

William A. Wheeler 

William PorherA. Sons... 
A. A. McCnIlougb 


4BO0O 

810 00 

1,200 00 

1,500 00 


Class No. 89, wood: 




A.A.McCullongb 

Wheeler &, Browning.... 

Clark i Pearson 

William Foster&Sons... 
William A. Wheeler 


}*650 00 
650 00 
700 00 
775 00 
795 00 



ikH in the presence of— 

T. £. WeIiii, ^inilanl Naval Conitnulor. 
H. A.GoLUsnoRODflH, ChUf Clak. 
U.T.UANLBV, CUtk. 

t DErARTMRNT, Bnrcau n/ ConrtrNCliaR and Repair, Jalg 10, 1867. 



Of9r$tofar»i»h maltrUls for tht itavg, aadir II 
and litpair of Jane 11, 1867, a( (t 

Class No. 1, whito o.ik logs : 

S, P. Brown & Son -IS, &UU 00 

William White 2i,i)W 00 

George T. Wallace ,-- 25,001) 00 

William M. Sbakspear. ... 36, 500 00 

E.J.4. William Keely... 27,500 00 

Samuel George Hart 29,500 00 

EllioUHarronn 30,000 00 

* Acaeplrd. > Betflivrf sfter lii 



Class No. 2, white oak keel 



Georgn T. Wallace 'SS* 96 

Wiuram White 611 04 

William M.Shakspear.... 804 00 

Elliott Harronn i, 608 00 

Samuel George Hart 1 , 608 00 



if?rt^[e 



BEPOBT OF THE SECRETASY OP THE NATY. 



169 



Claas No. 7, yellow piiie Ip^ : 

Wi1U»in White •»15,300 00 

R.J.& WitliHii] Ht^f... 15,1)37 50 

William B. Griffith IU,OOU 00 

S. P. Brnarn & Son 19, OlM) 00 

Oeor^ T. WalUce 1^,350 00 

Samuel George Hwt W.SJO 00 

Elliott Harronn 80,230 00 

Lathburjr, Wicktrsbam &. 

Co W,S50 00 

Watson &. Pittioger 3U,V5U 00 

James Bieler 4, Co . . :. . . 30, 250 00 

AViUiamM.ShalupMr.... 33,850 00 

Clus No. 9, fallow pino mast 

Geori^T. Wallaee. .-.:.. '3,941 00 

William White 3.5!» 30 

S. P. Brown & Son 4, (I5!:l 56 

William B. Griffith 4, 117 4U 

Elliott Harroun 4,705 60 

Samuel Grorge Hart 4,705 60 

H.J.&, W.Nfely 4,999 70 

WatuiD A. Pitlii.eer 5,176 16 

William M.Shakxpeai.... 5,tm7 90 
Lalhbury, WirkerBham & 

Co 7,058 40 

Clsss No. 13, while pine plank, 

E. J. 4, William Keely. . . M4, 60(1 00 

Watson &FitiiDKer 16,H50 00 

Jamea R.Ptfgb IT.ftiO OU 

Joseph W.U-iryee 17,690 00 

8. P. Drown & Bon 18,850 00 

Evana &. Teemyer 18,«5U 00 

James Bicter & Co I9,(H)0 OO 

William H.Eagle 19,751) 00 

Elliott Harroun 33,600 OU 

Samuel George Hart 22, OUO OD 

Qeorge Vf. Lawrence .... 34, 4110 00 

Class No. 17, hickoiy; 

Watson & PiUinger *Ii04 00 

B.J.&WilliamKeely.... 540 00 

Clw* No. 18, black walnut, 
■•ahoptoy, maple, cherry: 

Jompb W.Duryee '180 00 

KvADB & Taemyec, 137 50 

Watsou &. Pittinier 160 00 

R.J.&. William Neely... 160 UO 

CiMt No. 19, locnst timber : 

E.J. * William Neely... '112 00 

Watson & Pittinger 385 00 

ClaM No. 22, cypress, cedar: 

Fn-arrick A. Sontbmayd. t*960 00 

8. P.Brown & Son 9110 00 

George T. Wallace 1,0*10 00 

Wotaund: Pitiinger 1,100 00 

R. J. & Wmiam Neely. . . 1, 100 00 

■ Accepted. I Decided 



James Bielrr &. Co |1,200 00 

Williaui While 1,400 00 

Evans & Teemyer 1,500 00 

Class No. 35,llgDumvilte: 

Walsfin &,PItlinger f570 00 

John J. Bingham 570 00 

Joseph L. Savage 610 00 

Evans& Teemyer 1,000 00 

Class No. 36, steel: 

Alonzo A. Foster '1,858 75 

Paik. Brother & Co 1,860 3Tj 

William A. Wlieelor 1,890 87 

JoHeiih L. Sav^e 1,908 SO 

Whreler &. BruwDioB . ■ - ■ 3, 018 00 

John J. Bingham 3,116 60 

Uavid Babcock 3,3IS 00 

James Uoroer 11,781 00 

Ctoii No. 43, lead, pipe, sheet : 

Wheeler A-Browning.... *1,344 87 

John J. UinEliam 1.279 68} 

Taylui; Manlo & Co 1,392 25 

William A. Wheelet 1,299 00 

Joseph L. lavage I,308 50 

AloDzo A. FcMier 1, 316 124 

David Baltcock 1,444 00 

WilllamPorteriSoM... 1,720 25 

Class No. 44, Un: 

Jowph L. Savage '308 00 

Alouzo A. foster 314 50 

Wherler 3c. Browning .... 317 00 

David Babceck 344 00 

Juhn J Bingham 349 10 

William A. Wheeler 353 50 

Willmm Poller & Sous ... 382 93 

Taylor, Uarlin&Co 450 UU 

Class No. 45, solder: 

Alouzo A. Foster *& 00 

William A. Wheeler 15 00 

Joseph L. Savage 15 00 

David Babuock 18 50 

John J. Bi.>gliam 17 5tt 

Wllllaui P'T'cr &. Sou.. 20 00 

Whtelur & Browning .... 22 50 

Taylor, MurUo & Co :15 00 

Class No. 48, lock*, binges, 
bolts or brass and iron : 

Joseph L. Savage '495 00 

John J. Bingham G29 50 

William A. Wheeler 5G2 00 

WheelerA, BrowDiDir .... 696 00 

AloniuA. K.'ster 671 00 

Taylor. Uarua & Co B16 60 

Clbss No. 49, screws of brass 

Joseph L. Savage •759 60 

Hyatt & Spencer 787 20 

«. ,Iaftrdidl>OQTc 



BEPOET OP TlIE SECRETAEY OP THE NAVT. 





9799 53 


Manhaiun Oil Co 


♦398 00 


Taylor. Martin & Co 


906 78 


Alonao A. Foster 




Wbeeler&BroiTiiiiiK.... 
Clark & PearsoD 








m> 85 


William A. Wheolor 


980 00 


Wmiam A. Wheeler 


91)9 45 


Jamea M. Shaw 




Class No. 51. augers ; 




Class No. C4, talioH'. soap : 




Joseph L. Savage 


•358 10 


John J. Biflgham 


f36 00 










Taylor. Martin & Co 

Wflliuiu A. Wheeler 


41G 40 


AtonioA. Foster 


36 00 


431 a.'i 








459 00 


Joseph L. Savi^ 


42 00 










Class No. 53. tools for uie in 




Sonthard, Herbert & Co.. 


43 00 


yards and shops: 




ClassNo. 68, glass: 




Alonzo A. Foster 


■■1,629 55 






Joseph L. Savage 

William A. Wheeier 








2,056 34 


Clark dt Pearson 


165 00 


Taylor, Martin & Co 


2,078 15 






Whoelerit Browning.... 


2,351 05 


.Joseph L. Savage 


302 50 










ClassNo. M. bardware; 




John J. Binitham 


232 50 






William A. Wheeler 


307 50 


Joseph L. Savage 

AI01.SO A. Foator 


-l,5Sr 00 
1.6J)6 25 


Clasi No. 09, brushes: 




Taylor, Martin & Co 

WfllUm A. Wheeler 


l,Cii5(55 






1.74U 93 


Joseph L. Snvapo 


•504 50 


Whfeler&lJrow..inR.... 


1,832 75 




535 00 


William Porter* Sons... 


2.264 85 


Bcehm. Hico & Co 


C97 65 






John J. Bingham 


828 50 


Class No. 5S, colored points. 




David Babcoek 


8»e 82 


dryers, &c.: 




Whoelor*. Browning.... 


917 50 






William A. Wheelor 




WhtelerA Browning 


•225 00 


l.OSiTS 


C'ark & P*BrKon 








William A. Wheelor 


300 00 


Class No. 70,t dry goods Tor 




B«B«ell & Whito 


375 00 






John J Bingham 










7U0 00 


John J. Bingbam 


798 10 


David Babcoek 


875 CO 


Joseph L. Sav^e 


873 95 






William A, Wheeler 


957 25 


Class No. 50, linseed oil ; 




Alonzo A. Foster 


1,113 35 


JoBpphL Sitvairo 

Ji.ddLiuseedOilCo 


•I,:t40 00 


Class No. 71, stutioupry: 




1,393 00 






aark&Pearson 


1.43 J 00 


W. C. Koprers & Co 


•273 58 


Manhatlan Oil Co 


1,430 00 


Knight & Johnson 


;t53 78i 


David Btthcock 


1,450 00 


William A. Wheeler 


375 25 


William A. Wheeler 


1,600 00 


William K.Arthur&Co.. 


378 624 


B^well & White 


1,750 00 


Coller, Tower&Co 


408 95 


James M. Shaw 


1,790 00 


ClaasNo. 73, sbipelwndlery: 




Class No. 60, vorniHli. spirits 








turpentine: 




Joseph L. Savage 


■186 00 










William A. Wbceler 


•44 00 


John J, Bingham 


199 80 


JuhnJ. Bingham 


56 00 


Hyatt & Spi-n«r 


210 15 


Clark & Pearson 












BcDbm, Hice&Co 


245 70 




70 00 


William A. Wheelor 


251 00 






Wheeler & Browning.... 


295 40 


Chus No. 63, iporm and lard 








oil! 


• 






Judd Linseed Oil Co 


•544-8 


Joseph L. Sava^ 

miliam A. Wheeler 


•10 00 


JoKoph I,. Sivage 

SoDthard, Herbert & Co.. 


830 OU 


IS 50 


aajoo 


Bagwell dc Wliiio 


w 00 


-A«eplrt. ir 


NciJ.diiTtoi, 


tEiToclnnliediite :110 m 


trulnuds. 



REPOET OP THE 8ECEETARY OF THE NAVY. 



Clark & Pmu-sod 

G. A. Adume&Co 

CUs9 No. 75, rosio, pitch, crude 
tuipentino : 

WiliifuD A, Wheeler 

Juhu J. BiDghuai 

Diivid Bftbcock 

WiinsmPortor&SoQS-.. 

Wheeler & Browaiog 

Joseph L. Savage 

ClosB No. 77, belting, packing : 

C. M. Clapp ACo 

Taylor, Hartin & Co 

Hoyl Brothers 

JoHBph L. Savage '. .. 

John J. Bingham 

Wheeler &. Broirniog 

William A. Wheeler 

Hyatt &. epoBcer 



Joseph L. Savage 

John J. Bingham 

William Porter A. Sons... 

Wheeler &. Browuing 

William A. Wheeler 

C. M. Clapp&Co 

ass No. tifi, ontbiacite coat : 

Tyler&Co 

William A. Wheeler 

8. P. Brown & Son 



R. J. &, William Neelj.. . 
30 00 William Porter &. Sons... 
Jamea M Sbatv 

Class No. 66, eeml-bilamiDaas 



1,375 00 
l.iVi 50 
1,414 00 



•1,28( 
l,a97 00 
1,303 00 
1,317 00 
1,337 00 
1,360 00 
1,380 00 
1,495 00 



Tyler&Co 

S, P. Brown & Son 

LewiaW Hell 

William A.Wheeler 

K.B Wigton 

R, J.&WilliamNeoly... 
William Porter & Sons.. . 

James M. Bhaw 

Hampshire and Boltlmora 
Coal Co 



Class No, 67, bituminn 






William H. James 

8. F. Ilrowii df Son 

JolmB. Turlon 

Lewis W. Heil 

William A. Wheeler 

Evans & Teemyer 

K. J. (&. William Neely... 
William Porter &. Sons... 

James M. Shaw 

Hampshire and Ualtimoro 
Coal Co 

ass Ko. 8.'*, charcoal : 

Alonzo A. Fosler 

William A. Wheeler 

Clark & Pearson 

BftBwell & White 

William Porter &Snn8... 
R. ^ &WilllainNeely... 

^ K«iMlvtd uAer tlms oT opening, ' IIDocJdeil br lol. 

Opened in presence of — 

T. E. Webb, Afsiilant Naval ComlrutlOT. 

H. A. GoLDSROROUdii, Chirf Clerk. 

B. T. Hahlbv, CUrk. 
Navv DkPARI-Mbnt, Btnau of CoaUraalon and Htpair. July 10, P^. 



•2,961 00 
3,4:18 00 
3.510 00 
3,786 00 
3,7M 00 
3,900 00 
4,044 00 
4,350 00 
5, 160 00 

43, leo 00 



•p80 Ot> 

leo 00 
2m) uo 

'W5 00 
240 00 
300 00 



BUREAU OF STEAM ENGINEERING. 

Navy Department, Burkau or Steam Enoi\kbri<no, 

October 25, 18C7. 

8iii : I havu the lionor to eiibmit to the department tho annual etatemeut of 
the principal operaiioiiB of tliie burcnu duriug the last twelve months. 

No new machinery haa been ro'mmcnct'd, and the work at the different navy 
yards lian but^n limited to repniring and fitting out, and to tlie slow completion 
of the macliiaery commenced hcfore the termination of tho war. Tho meclianics 
employed hnvo been reduced to tho fewest poBsible for i-opairing, and tlicy have 
been employed an the new miichinery only in tho intervaU of tlie repairing 
work ; as a consequence this machinery hoa been manufactured with the great- 
est economy. 

The new machinery completed in the la.»t twelve monlbs was conetrncted at 



172 EEPOET OF THB 8ECEETABY OP THK NAVY. 

the Waabiogton navy yard, and consista of a pair of geared screw engioes with 
cylinders 100 inches in diameter, and having a 4 feet stroke of piston. These 
engines were deeigned by this bureaa and are the duplicate of ihnse built by 
contract with private establish menta for the fir^t-cluss steamers Wampanoag, 
Nesbaming, Fompanoosuci and AmmonooHur. Their boilers have not yet been 
commenced, and will not bb until the coustraction of the vessel to receive them 
is ordered. At the same navy yard the machinery designed by this burean for 
the Kpervier, a first-class screw gunboat, has been nearly completed. The 
cytinders of the engines have a diameter of 36 inches and a stroke of piston of 
3 feet. 

At the Charlestowu navy yard the work on the machinery designed by this 
bureau for four small screw sloops has been continued ; and at the Brooklyn navy 
yard the work has also slowly progressed on the duplicate machineiy for four 
duplicate vessels. Thecylindersof all these engines have a diameter uf£ incbes, 
and a stroke of piston of 3 feet 6 inches. 

At the Kittery navy yard the work on the machinery designed by this 
bnreau for the Alert and Nantasket, two firal-class screw guaboats,_ is still in 
prognose. The cylinders of tliese engines are 36 inches in diameter,' and have 
a 3 feet stroke of piston. 

Of the twenty pairs of screw engines designed by this bureau, and contracted 
for with private establishments before the termination of tbe war, for first-claas 
steamers, those for the Guerrierc, Fiscataqna, Manitou, and Gontoocook, have 
been completed in the vessels and tried under steam; those for the Pushma- 
taha, Mosnolu, Uinn^tonka, and Java, are being erected in tboee vessels. 

The Guerricrc has made a voyage to Brazil, and tbe reports on the files of 
tbe department concerning tbe performance of her machinery are moat satis- 
factory. All these engines have cylinders of GO inches diameter and 3 feet 
stroke of piston. 

The machinery of the large frigate Franklin, designed by this bureaa and 
constructed by the Atlantic works of Boston, has been completed, and the ves- 
sel has made a voyage to the north of Europe. This frigiUe was designed in 
1852 for auxiliary steam powei^ and is not of the recent type. Her length on 
the load water-line, from the forward edge of tbe rabbet of tlie stem to the after 
side of tbe stern-post, is 2G5 feet ; her extreme breadth on the load water-line 
is 53 feet 8 inches. Her mean draught of water during ber trial was 24 feet 8 
inches, at which draught she displaced 5,298.7 tons, and had a greatest immersed 
transverse section of 1.002.16 square feet. The maximum speed that could be 
sustained in smooth water, uninfluenced by wind or current, was 10}^ geo- 
graphic miles per honr, to produce which the engines developed 2,065.08 indi- 
cated horses power, with a consumption of 7,215 pounds of anthracite per honr. 
The performance of the mscbinery at sea, according to the reports on the files 
of tbe department, has been very satisfactory. The diameter of the cylinders 
is 68 inches and tbe stroke of tbe piston is 3 feet 6 inches. The boilers have 
585 square feet of grate surface. 

The screw machine built in England for the first-class gunboat Qninnebaug 
has been completed iu that vessel and tried. It was designed in competition 
with the machinery designed for the duplicate vessels Reeaca and Swatata by 
this bureau, and consists of two pairs of engines driving twin screws. Tbe 
maximum speed of tbe Qninnebaug was barely 7 geogruphical miles per hour, 
while that of the duplicate vessels in 12 geographical miles. 

The screw steamer Chattanooga, first-rate, the hull and machinery of wbioh 
were contracted for by Cramp Sc Sons, of Fhilndelpbio, has made her final triaL 
The hull on tbe load water-line between tbe forward edge of the rabbet of the 
stem and tbe after side of the stem-post is 315 feet ; the extreme breadth of 
beam on the load water-line is 46 feet. The mean draught of water during tbe 
trial woe 14 feet 11} inches, at which dranght the vessel displaced 3,043 tons, 



EEPOET OF THE SECRET AEY OF THE NAVY. 173 

and bad a greatest immersed transveree eection of 53S sqnare feet. The maxi- 
mum Bpeed that conid be anstaiiied in smooth water, aniofluenced by wind or 
cnrrentB. wna 13,375 geographical miles per honr, to produce which the engines 
developed 1,736.954 indicated horse power, with a couBumption of 10,700 
pounds of anthracite per liour. The cylinders are 64 inches in diameter, and 
tave a 3 feet 6 inches stroke of piston. The boilers have 960 Kquare feet of 
grate eorrace. The machinery was designed and constructed by Merrick & 
Bone, of Philadelphia. 

The screw steamer Madawasca, first rate, has also made her final trial. The 
hull wns designed by naval constructor Delano, It has a length of 335 feet on 
the load-water line, between the forward edge of the rabbet of the stem and the 
after-side of the stern-post, and an extreme breadth of 45 feet 2 inches. The 
mean dranght of water during the trial was 18 feet 8 inches, at which draught 
the vessel displaced 4,105.17 tons, and had a greatest immersed transverse 
section of 725 47 square feet. The maximum speed that could be sustained in 
smooth water, uninflnenced by wind or current, was 12.732 geographical miles 
per hour, to produce which the engines developed 8,143.720 indicated horse 
power, with a consumption of 11,043 pounds of anthracite per hour The 
Cylinders have a diameter of 100 inches, and 4 feet stroke of piston. The 
engines were designed by the contractor, Mr. John Ericsson, and are of the 
vibrating lever kind patented by him. The work waa*exccuted by the Allaire 
Works of New York. The boilers were designed by tbi^ bureau, and have 
1,12S square feet of grate surface. 

The Wampanoag is a duplicate vessel to the Madawasca, and she has dupli- 
oale boilers. Her eni^ines were designed by this bureau. They are geared to 
give two revolutions of the screw to each double stroke of Llie engine piston, aud 
have cylinders 100 inches in diameter, with 4 feet stroke of piston. The pre- 
limiuury trial of this machinery is now being made at the wharf of the Brook- 
lyn navy yard, and in the course of the next month the vessel will make her 
final sea trial. 

Dnpliqate machinery to the Wampanoag is being placed in the first-rate sereir 
•teamers Nesbaming and Ammonoosuc, and they will be ready fur trial early in 
next spring. It is also in progress of construction for the Fompanoosnc. 

The machinery designed on behalf of the contractor, by Mr. John Baird, 
for the large wooden irou-clads Kalamaeoo, Qninsigaroond, Fassaconomy, and 
Sheckamaxin lecompleted as far as the condition of the bulls will allow. In 
the Kalamacoo and Passaconomy it is principally erected. 

Th« tnschiaery of the Idaho, designed by Hr. £. N. Dickerson for the cou- 
traetor, Mr. P. 8. Forbes, having proved a total failure, has been removed from 
tbfl voeael and broken up, and the bull has been converted into a store and 
hospital ship, to be stationed at Nagasaki. The bull of the Idaho is 398 feet 
long on the load-water line, from the forward edge of the rabbet of the stem to 
the after-side of the stem-poet. The extreme breadth of beam is 44 feet 6 
inehes. Daring the trial of the machinery the veeeel's mean draught of water 
was 17 feet 1 inch, at which die displacement was 3,340.58 tone, and the great- 
eat immersed amidihip section 606,44 squaro feet. The machinery consisted of 
two pairs of engines driving twin screws. The diameter of the cylinders was 
30 iuches. and the stroke of the piston 8 feet. The boilers contained 396 sqnare 
feet of grate rurface. The maximum speed which could be permanently sos- 
taincd In smooth water, uninfluenced by wind or current, was 8.37 geographical 
miles per hour, tu produce which the engines developed 015.413 indicated horse 
power, with a consumptioM of 4,905 pounds of anthracite per honr. The guar- 
anteed speed of this vessel, the hull of whicli as well as the machinery was con- 
tracted for by Mr. Forbes, was 15 geographical miles per hour. 

A very complete series of experiments have been made to ascertain tbo value 
of crude petroleum as a ftiel for generating steam in marine boilers, and of tkci 



174 EEPORT OF THE SECBETABY OF THK NAVY. 

metiU of different methodB for. effecting its combuBtion. The Bubject is of geo- 
eral interest, as it affects all who UBe artificial heat for any purpoee ; for, if it 
were proven that the production of lieat by the combustion of petroteam was 
more economical than by tbe combuBtion of coa', the industrial arts would 
everywhere obtain a proportionate extension and mankind a corresponding 
benefit. Tbe substance itself is found in various parts of the world, and could, 
doubtteBs. be procured in quantities sufficiently large to affect commercial values, 
were its production stimulated by demand. Aa in tbe United States it ia abund- 
ant and easily obtainable, we have, in addition to the general interest in its use, 
a very important special one in its ownership. 

The immediate concern of tbe navy iu tbie subject is to know whether the 
substitutioD of petroleum for coal as a fuel on board ita steamers be practicabla, 
and, if practicable, desirable in point of economy. 

With regard to practicability, the numerouSi extended, and varied trials made 
OD tbe three experimental boilers at the Brooklyn uavy yard have demonstrated 
that tbe method invented by First Assistant Engineer Clark Fiaher, United 
States uavy, with which thoae trials were made, ia a complete succees, leaving 
nothing to be desired in simplicity of apparatus, in safety in its use, and in 
facility of management and adjastment. Tbia apparatus can be so cheaply 
mauulkctured und attached, ia of so little bulk and small weight, that there are 
practically no objections to it as regards these important particulars. The 
engineering problem may then be considered as satisfactorily solved, and there 
remains only the commercial one to be examined. 

With Fisher's apparatus it is found that, other things equal, the heat gener- 
ated by the combustion of one pound of crude petroleum vaporizes fifty-two per 
cent, more water than that generated by the combustion of one pound of the com- 
bustible portion of anthracite; by combustible portion ia meant the part which 
remains after deducting tbe earthy matter. To cause the complete combaation of 
tbe petroleum, about one-twelftb of the steam generated by it bae to be used in 
the furnace, leaving the effective vaporisations produced by tbe two fuels to com- 
pareas 1.00 for the anthracite combustible and 1.40 for tbe petroleum. And.as 
tbe earthy matter of good merchantable anthracite is about one-eixth of its 
weight, the eSective vaporization produced by equal weights of anthracite and 
petroleum will compare aa 1.00 for tbe former to L.68 for tbe latter. These fig- 
ures are, of course, for the same weight of anthracite combustible and of petro- 
leum consumed in the same time in the e^me boiler. 

Tbe advantages of tbe substitulion of petroleum for anthracite would then be 
a reduction of forty and a half per centum of the weigbt of fuel now carried in 
tbe veasel; and as tbe cubic foot of petroleum weighs at ordiuary temperatures 
fifty pounds, while tbe cubic foot of anthracite as stowed in bunkers weighs 
fifty-three and one-tbird pounds, there would be a reduction of bulk of thirty- 
six and a half per centum. 

As, however, the iron tanks required to bold tbe petroleum would weigh con- 
' siderably more than the bunkers holding the anthracite, and aa some apace must 
Qeceesaiily be lost in storing them, it may be assumed that the substitution of 
petroleum for anthracite would reduce both tbe weight and space required for 
the latter about onO'third. But if safety required tbe petroleum taoka to be im- 
mersed in water, as at present seems probable, then no saving of weight could 
be effected, but only a saving in the space occupied. Tbe weight of tbe boiler, 
including its water, and tbe space occupied by it and the fire-room, could be 
reduced twenty-eight and a half per centum. Tbe first cost and after repairs of 
the boiler would also be reduced to tbe aame extent. The number of firemen 
required with petrolbum would not exceed one-fourth tbe number required with 
anthracite, leaving their pay and subBistenoe to be saved as well as their weight 
and that of their effects and eubsistence, and tbe space occupied by all three on 
board. The petroleum fire starts into full activity instantaneously, and is u 



BEPOBT OF THE 8ECBETABY OF THE NAYV. 175 

inBtantaoeonsly extiDgaiBhed, while the coal fire reqairee about an hour to attain 
steady action and as lon^ to burn out. Tbeee are very important advantagRs, 
bnt against them are to be placed — 

1st. The danger resulting from the very volatile gases which petroleum emits 
at ordinary otmospheric temperatures, and which, when mixed with air, are 
highly explosive. In the hold of steamers the temperatnre arontid the engine- 
room and boiler-room averages as high as one hundred degrees Fahrenheit, and 
greatly aggravates this danger. Indeed, when it is considered that a medinm- 
sised navy steamer would have to carry about two Lnndrcd and &fiy tons oT 
' petroleum, wliieh, however well protected in tanks, is liable by a single shot to 
be poured in large quantities into the boiler-room, where its gases, mixing with 
the air and ignited by tbe fires of the furnaces, would explode with terrific 
effect, liberating other quantities and destroying almost instantaneously both 
vessel and crew, this objection seems so serious tliat the most overwhelming 
advantages are required to justify the nak of its use. As merchant steamers do 
not engage in battle, this risk would be less for them, but it wonid canse a high 
rale of insurance and the loss of passenger transportation, even if officers and 
crew could be found for excessive pay to brave the danger. 

2d. Owing to the rapid conversion into gases of a portion of it at ordinary 
atmospheric temperatures, the loss of petroleum by volatilization is very gieat, 
and this loss proportionably increases its coat, while it decreases its advantages 
as regards bulk, weight, and evaporative efficiency. 

3d. And, due to the same fact of its easy gasification, it fills the air with a 
noisome stench, which, in tbe confined hold and badly ventilated apartments of 
vessels, would be intolerable. 

4tb. The price of crude petroleum is by weight about eight times that of coal, 
and a largo demand would increase the disparity. 

Prom these considerations it appears thnt the use of petroleum as a fuel for 
stenmcrfl is hopeless ; convenience is against it, comfort is against it, health is 
agaiust it, economy i* agaitisC it, and safety is against it. Opposed to these the 
advantages of the probably not very important reduction in nnlk and weight, 
with their attending economies, cannot prevail. 

Fisher's apparatus is of the nature of n compound blow-pipe, and is composed 
of an outside brass hollow frustum of a. cone, in the interior of which is another 
braas hollow frustum of another cone, the axes of the two cones coinciding, thus 
leaving an annular space between the inside of the larger and the outside of the 
smaller. The smaller ends of both frustums are in the same direction, and 
open ; the opposite end of the larger frustum is closed, and of the smaller frus- 
tum open. A pipe conveying steam from the boiler enters tbe side of the larger 
frustum near its closed end at right angles to its axis, and another pipe, con- 
veying the petroleum from the tank, is attached to the open large end of the 
amaller frustum, which it enters through the closed large end of the larger frus- 
tniD. The larger frustum is enveloped concentrically by a sheet-iron tube of 
tbe form of two frustrnms of cones united at the smaller ends, thus leaving an 
annular air space between the tube and the outside of the larger braes frustum. 
The tnbe projects beyond the diKchnrging end of the frustum. The diameter 
of the mouth of the larger brass frustum is /. of an inch, and of the mouth of 
the smaller brass frustum ^^^ of an inch. The lengths of these frustums is 
about 5 inches, and five of them placed eouidistant, side by side, are required 
for a furnace of 3 feet width and 6} feet length. They are placed in front of 
the boiler between the front end of the grate bars and the front of the furnace, 
and are inclined upwards at an angle of about 45 degrees. The whole appa- 
ratus with tbe connecting pipes does not extend above 5 inches from the boiler 
ironL The operation is ver^ simple. The steam discharging through the an- 
nular space between the two brass frustums induces cununia of the petrolenm 
and air eunaltaoeoaaly, all three entering the fnraace in a tborooghly mixed 



176 REPOBT OP THE 8ECBETAET OF THE SAVT. 

state, the petroleum being broken np into eprny so fine that tlio expreeaion 
atomixei best describes its condition. Tbe only use of the steam is to induce 
these currents ; it is not necessary to the perfect combustion of the petroleum, 
nor does it undergo in tbe furnace decomposition into its constituent gases ; its 
action ie wholly mechanical, atomizing the petroleum and mixing it and the air. 
Ajet of air under the same pressure would doubtless be still more efficient. 

The boilers in which ihe experiments with Fi«hei's apparatus were tried 
were of three kinds, viz : the locomotive type with horizontal fire-tubes im- 
mediately behind the fmnoce ; the ordinary type of marine boiler, with horizon- 
tal fire-tubuB above ihe fiiniact; ; and the marine boiler with vertical water-tubes 
above the furnace. With all these boilers elaborate sets of experiments had 
previously been made with anthracite, with semi-bituminous coal, and with coke, 
and at all rates of combustion, from the minimum with natural draught, to the 
maximum with artificial drsiight, so tbat the data for comparison with the evap- 
orative results of the petroleum was complete. In all the boilers the relation 
hetwet^n the economic evaporation of the petroleum and the anthracite was con- 
stant. The maximum rate of combustion for tbe petroleum was found to he 
about fourteen pounds per square foot of grate surfico per hour, measured by 
tbat surface as in the cose of the anthracite. This rate is about equal to that 
of the combustioQ of aQtbrai:i[« with natural draught iQ the verticil water-tuba 
boiler, and is about equal to twi-tbirda of the rate of cambustioa with natural 
draught in tbe horizontal fire-tube boiler. 

In these same boilers, among other systems of burning petroleum, waa tried 
that of Mr. Simon Stevens. His plan consists of a retort or hollow cylinder 
of six inches diameter and two feet six inches in length, placed at the back of 
the furnace, and into which the petroleum is delivered by an appropriate pipe. 
To this retort is also connected a steam pipe conveying steam from the steam 
room of the boiler into tbe retort. From tbe retort, whtcb lies crosswise the 
fnmace, there extend lengthwise of each furnace twelve tabes, one inch in diam- 
eter and five feet long, perforated on their top with one hundred and eighty 
burner holes of J inch diameter. At these holes the gas generated from the 
petroleum is burned. The pipe conveying the petroleum fmm the tank to the 
retort passes in deeply indented serpentine curves over the tubes coDtainJug 
the burner holes, so as to expose a considerable amount of surface to the action 
of the heat ; in this manner the petroleum is gaseified, and its gases mixing with 
the steam in the retort, are forced by the steam into the twelve straigbt tabes, 
and are consumed at the one hundred and eighty orifices. The two fbmacea 
containing this apparatus were each three feet in breadth and six f«etin lenf^. 
The air supply for famishing the necessary oxygen entered the ash-pit in the 
usual itianner and passed np between the twelve burner tubes. It waa abu 
admitted through tbe usual boles in the fnmace doors. 

It was found that when tbe burner holes were made ^ of an inch in diameter, 
no steam was required for the perfect combustion of the petroleum gasa, 
which then burned with a clear white flame without accompaniment of smoke. 
When, however, the burner holes were enlarged to J of an inch in diameter, 
steam was required to obtain perfect combustion, and if it was shut off and the 
petroleum gases consumed alone, tbey gave off a dense black smoke. Anothtt 
singularity was that if steam waa admitted to the ^ inch burner holes, the 
fires were at once extinguished. It seemed tbat the steam waa detrimental 
when tbe burner holes were so small thai the emerging stream of gas could be 
at once and wholly oxidiied by the surrounding air, but when these holes were 
increased beyond tlint size, the steam waa necessary to break up the larger 
stream of gases and mechaoienlly mix them with |be air, in which case perfect 
combustion ensued. The whole action of tho sUiam was mechanical, not chem- 
)cb1. It served merely to mix the petroleum and air gases, but was not itself 



KEPORT OP THE 8ECEETART OP THE NATT. 177 

decomposed, nor did it la any way assist the combnetion by any change in its 
own conBtitnentB. 

Bcevene's apparatae ikiled utterly from the deposition of solid carbon in the 
pipes and tabes containhie the petroleam, and none of the many modifications 
made with a view to avoid that difficulty was attended with the slightest suc- 
cess. The fact came oat that the petroleum when subjected to the furnace tem- 
perature threw down a portion of its carbou in the solid state aud in safficient 
quantities to close the tubes in about forty-etght hours, and often in much less 
time. The more copious the steam supply, the more retarded was this result ; 
but it was at best a question of only a few hours. The greater tlie tempera- 
tare and the greater the pressure to which the petroleum was subjected, the 
neater, in equal time, was the deposition of its carbon. This result might have 
been aaticipated, for common illuminating gas will rapidly deposit solid curbna 
io pipes, when eabjected to heat aud pressure ; and, measurably, in proportioD 
to iDe temperature and pressure. 

In Fisher's apparatus this difficulty is completely obviated, as it is outside of 
the furnace and not sabjected to heat. The most lengthened experiments do 
Dot show the slightest depositioa of solid carbon or of tar in it. 

While the experiments above referred to were in progress, others were being 
made on the petroleum burning apparatus of Mr. Henry R. Foote, with the 
machinery of the Palos, a first'claes screw tug-boat attached to the Charleston 
navy yard. 

Ur. Foote'fl apparatus coaeists of a large irregularly shaped retort of boiler- 
plate, occnpying nearly the whole of the furnace and ash pit. The general 
croas-section of this retort is an inverted j,; proceeding from it are small pipes 
paasing beneath it and having burner holes along their top ; and from its sides 
an prdected at right angles other small pipes having burner holes along their 
top. The petroleum is supplied to the retort through a pipe, and is gasified by 
the flame jets from the burners beneath the retort's bottom. In each burner 
bole is inserted a cast-iron plug having four notches cut eqai-distant in its sides, 
tbrongh which the mixed gases stream and at which they are ignited. The top 
of the ping is broadened out into a di^k which deflects the gaseons jets. It is 
not known that these plugs, add anythingt) the effect over what can be obtaiaed 
from simple holes of the cross area of the notches. 8team is conveyed (n the 
retnrt from the steam-room of the boiler by a pipe coiled forward and backward 
over the flame jets from the burners in the pipes protruding from the sides of the 
retort, in order to superheat it. An air-pump worktd by the engine foices air 
under an effective pressure of from one to two pounds per square inch through 
ma appropriate pipe into the retort. Wilb the apparatus in operation the retort 
contains liqnid petroleum spread over its bottom in process of gasification, and 
above this liquid a mixture of the petroleum and atmospheric gases and of super- 
heated steam. This mixture flowing tbrongh the burner holes, is there ignited, 
and the heat that remains after the gasification of the petroleum is effected is 
applicable to the generation of steam. From the absolute evaporation, however, 
there most be subtracted the steam used in the mixture and in working the air- 
pump. With the exception of forcing air into the retort by a pump, Foole's 
process is the same as Stevens's, and TmIs from the same reason, namely, the 
deposition of solid carbon. With the actual dimensions given to the two appa- 
ratoaee, Foote's could be operated longer than Stevens's, because his retort and 
pipes being longer as well as his bnmer holes, more time was required to fill 
them with the carbon, hut it was merely a question of time, and neither thevi 
nor any apparatus ia which the petroleum is subjected to heat, cao he made 
■ucceMAil. 

The experiments with Foote's apparatus were made with the vessel secured to 

the wharf of the navy yard, and with it onder way in Boston harbor j and to 

12 N lOOt^lc 



178 EEPOET OF THE 8ECEETARY OP THE KAVY, 

obtftin proper data for comparison with the evaporative results hy anthracite, 
duplicate experimetita were made with that fuel uuder, as nearly as possible, the 
same conditions. The boilers of the PaloB are two in number, of the usual ma- 
rine type, with tnbes retnrned abnve the furnaces ; each boiler has two furnaces, 
and each furnace ia three feet six inches wide, and six feet long. The engine 
had one cylinder forty-four inches in diameter, with thirty inches stroke of piston. 

With Foole's apparatuR the evaporation by the same weights of petroleum ftnd 
of the combustible portion of the anthracite consumed in the same, in the same 
boiler, compares as 1 00 to 1.28 ; from which is to he deducted the steam need 
in the retort and in working the air-pump. 

This quantity could not be eliminated, but was probably about ten per centum 
of the total quantity of steam evaporated in tho boilers, which being deducted, 
leaves the comparison for the effective evaporation by the same weight of petro- 
lenm and anthracite combustible, as 1.00 for the latter, and 1.15 for the former. 

Allowing the incombustible portion of the anthracite to be one-sixth of its 
weight; the comparative effective evaporation of the same weight of anthracite 
and petroleum burned in thesame time, in the same botier, would compare as 1.00 
for the former, and 1.38 for the latter. These results are greatly inferior for th« 
petroleum to those obtained with Fisher's apparatus, which compare as 1.68 for 
the petroleum, to 1 00 for the anthracite. But in die previous summing up of 
the advantages and disadvantages of petroleum, the highest results have been 
taken for it given by any apparatus. 

The results of these petroleum trials and the description of the apparatus with 
which they were made, though given as briefly as possible, necessarily occapy 
considerable space in this report, and the apology must be found in the novelty 
and real importance of the subject, and in the general interest regarding it. 
Technical reports, with tull details and drawings of the boilers and apparatuaes, 
will be made of all these experiments. 

The attention of the department is reFpectfiilly called to tlie subject of in- 
creased assimilated rank for the engineer officers of the highest grade. The late 
action of Congress commissioning lirst assistant and second assistant engineerB> 
and defining their rank, leaves nothing more to ho asked on that subject for the 
engineers of the lower grades. 

The relative status of the line and engineer officers was very different at the 
conclusion of the war from what it was at the commencement. Then tbe high- 
est grade of line officer was captain, while the highest grade of engineer officers 
ranked as commander, the next grade below captain, and such appointment wan 
satisfactory ; bnt one result of tbe war was to entirely change the organization of 
the line officers. 

The old system was found unadapted to the new conditions, and a new ays* 
tem grew np under the force of circumstances, in barmony with the change. Five 
new grades were added to the line, three of which were above the grade of cap- 
tain, leaving the highest engineer rank four grades instead of one below the 
highest line rank. The additional grades for the line are unqnestionably neoea- 
sary for a modernized and extended navy, and the present system has a perfec- 
tion and efficiency which were wanting in the old. The creation of these grades 
was not only a reward to particular officers for services, but was requisite aa a, 
permanent part of an improved organization, Tbe very same reasons apply,aDd 
with eqnal force, for additional rank in the engineer corps, a very uumerous 
body of officers, with duties and responsibilities second in importance to aoae> 
and these duties and responsibilities have been greatly increased as a result of 
the war, not only in quantity but in quality, while the personnel, like that of tlie 
line, has increased with the extension of tlie service. No rccosnition, however, 
thus far has been made of the services of the engineers during the war j but they 
still confidently atVait, hs they have done for the last two years, the action i^ 
the department in extending the same system to the engineer officers which has 



KEPOET OF THE SECRETiET OP THE NAVY. 179 

been accorded to the liDe, boping that ae soon as the an-aagement for the latter 
was tumpleted a nimilar one for the former would bo adopted. As the case now 
stands the chief engineers have been practically reduced in rank, ae the result 
of a war to the success of which, so far as the navy is concerned, they must bo 
allowed to have eminently contributed. For remaining stationary while others 
have been advanced over them is in effect a reduction, and one which is felt 
more keenly, as precisely the same arguments which were found convinciug for 
adding the now grade to the line are just as valid for an increase of rank to the 
engineers. 

It is almoRt unnecessary to call the attention of the department to the fact 
that the navy is now, and must ever continue to be, exclusively a steam navy, 
depending wholly, for all the efficiency to be derived from prompt, certain and 
rapid locomotion, on its engineer corps. The money cost of this locomotion, as 
well as its efficiency, will be in the inverse ratio to the skill of the engineers, and 
the same skill must h(? depended on for the intprovemeots and increase of general 
efficiency which is to he obtained from the application of new discoveries in 
physical science. • 

It is absurd to manufacture complicated and expensive machinery for produ- 
cing both new and increased resnits in economy and power, and then place it in 
the hands of those who are too i^^norant to comprehend, much less to properly 
use it. With each advance in mechanical science, an advance must be had of' 
knowledge and skill in those who are to apply it. nor can the high profc8sionar> 
abilities required be obtained unless adequate position be granted. The proper 
talent for the engineer corps of tlie navy cannot he had so long as the posWon ■ 
e made inferior to its deserts ; and as an evidence of the fact here asserted, the - 
files of the department show that during the first year after the war eighty-tbree 
(83) engineers resigned from the regular corps, embracing thirty'One per centum , 
of the whole number. Among these resignations were many poaacssing the 
highest order of professiomil skill, all or nearly all of whom would have re- 
mained htit for the discouraging prospect of their obtaining a proper position in 
the navy. 

In the best and most scientifically organized navy in the woild, namely, that 
of France,' tlie rank of rear-admiral is given to the inspector geitcral, who cor- - 
responds in I'unctiona with the chief of the Bureau of Steam lilngi nee ring, and 
the rank tieitt after that is given to the senior engineers, and so on down, pari 
patiH. Wliai is suggested is an increase of one rank to the chief engineers, 
making those of between five and ten years standing rank with commanders, 
those of between ten and fifteeu yearn standing rank with captains, and those 
of over fifteen years standing rank with commodores, the chief of the Bureau 
of 8t«am Kngineering ranking as rear-admiral. It is believed this request is so 
nodest and so well snjiported by reason that none can object to it. 

Tb« rate of promotion will hereafter be so flow, that the higher grades will 
be reached by the few only who attain advanced age. 

liet the department consider for a moment what are the duties of its engi- 
neers, and what they performed during the war. In the course of the latter, 
they had ci|nal personal exposure in toe pestilence, the battle, and the wreck 
with the line officers. On them depended the efficiency ofthe nnm^Tous squad- 
rons for service ; for, let it be asked, of what use would the vesBels have been 
with their machiuery unreliable or dii^abled? They had not only to repair and 
opsmte, but to alter and invent and rearrange to meet the continued varyings 
of our unprecedented service, of one, in fact, which maintained a blockade of 
three thonsand miles of the most difficult coast in the world, while all the engi- 
neering talent and material resources of Great Britain were employed in attempts 
to run it ; yet so efficientjy .was it maintained that our final and complete triumph, 
at the early date it took place, will be largely ascribed by the historian of the 
futare, to the gigantic and admirably directed efforts of tba Navy I^p&rtme|it., 



180 BEPOET OP THE 8ECBETAET OP THE NAVY. 

Conid the rcToIted Statea bave Bent their cotton to Europe, and with the pro- 
ceeds of ita sale imported inuDitiona of war, how much longer would the atmg- 
gle hare continued i Who can ea.y when it would have ended, and after what 
ruinous eacriflces of men aTid means t Fortunately, our antagonietB had neither 
euEineering skill nor resources in themeelvea, nor could they, owing to the 
efficiency of our navy, obtain them from othera, and the want was fatal ; they 
had despised the mechanical arts and aciencea, and by those arts and acieuces 
they fell. 

Tbe department dependa upon its engineers for the design, constrnclion, and 



operation of ita ateam macliinery ; tbey conduct the enormoun manufactories ii 
its navy yarda ; they invent and improve ita proceases, try its experiments, am 
determine upon their merits. In their bands rests the yearly expenditure of 



milliona, and on their skill depends whether these milliona are jiidiciaualy' 
expended ; in other words, whether we have a navy aa the result, or a eomething 
wbicli, in tbe event of war, would prove a national calamity. Their pof itioQ 'u, 
in fact, second to none, and in tbe nature of thinga cannot be made aecond to 
any. Why, then, abould not the position eo nomine be made to correspond to 
the position de facto ? No good can possibly result from depressing it below its 
natural level, and much good will aurely result from allowing it to rise there. 

In the event of a another war, tbe department will have to depend on it>t 
corps of engineers for new adaptations of meana to ends, and inferior talent and 
experience are not equal to such eSbrta. That the department ia fully aware 
of this, appears from the qnalilicatione it demands in its engineers, the standard 
of examination haviog been placed at the bigbest attainable limit ; yet the sys- 
tem ia but half perfected, while a commensurate poaition is denied. 

During tbe war it was found indiepensnbir uecesaary that a fleet en^neer 
should be appointed to each squadron. The filea of the department show how 
ably and zealously the very ouerous and responsible duties of those officers were 
performed; yet the lank granted was only that of captaiu, nor was tbe grade 
made permanent ; the engineer officer holding it held it only while acting as 
fleet engineer, andf when relieved, he waa reduced, after all his services, aacri- 
ficea, and responsibilities, to a lower poaition. In fact, he was virtually degraded 
as a consequence of tbe department baring considered him eminently qualified 
for the high duties to which it had temporarily asaigned him. In truih, there 
has not only been no recognition of tbe services of engineer officers during the 
war, but the reverse. This, it is believed, ia not tbe intention of tbe department, 
but a result of circumstances. It is earuestly hoped that the department will 
take up the subject and pvraue it to a satisfactory conclusion. 

There are many other conaiderations that might be urged, hut they are ao 
obvious that your time need not be occupied in enumerating tbem. Tbe war 
and the progress of tbe age bave changed our naval tactics, naval ships, naval 
machinery, aud naval organizations ; tbey bave swept away many of tbe raoiildy 
prqudicea of an effete regime. The navy is no longer what it was ; it baa pro- 
gressed, improved, and enlai^d with tbe times, and if it is to continue in the 
same path it must be by the application of new inventions in mechanism and 
new discoveries in science. Such applications can in the nature of things be 
only made in tbe future aa in the past by engineers, and in proportion to the 
talent fostered in that corps and the inducements made to retain it by proper 
rank and pay, will be its anility to suataiii another contest as ably as it did the 
last. 

During the last year the shops in the different navy yards appertaining to this 
burean have baen supplied with such tools aa were iudispensably necessary, and 
tbe shops, put in aa thorough a state of organization as their size admitted, so 
that not only all the repair but all tbe new work of this bureau that is imme- 
diately required can be done in them. They are, however, much too limited 
for the f^eratioits which a sudden demand for war steamers would reqnuv, and 



HEPOET OP THE 8ECRETABT OP THE SATT. 181 

it is earnestl; hoped that the' estimateB of the Bureau of Yards aod Docks for 
their eulsrgemeDt will receive the favorable action of Congress. These esti- 
mates amount in Ihe aggregate to $1,436,863. The expenditnre of this sum 
would extend over two or three years, eo that no more than about S700,000 
would be required for the ensuing fiscal year. 

It is believed to be the popular impression that in the event of a war with a 
mariUme nation, the government could depend upon private establishments to 
mannfttctnre its steam machinery with sufficient rapidity for its wants. Such 
expectation would prove wholly fallacious. Those eBtablishmente are too few 
to supply the immense demand that would undoubtedly arise for privateers, 
which, Deiag constructed for private parlies jealously watching their own inter- 
ests, would oe completed before anythiug was done for the government, which 
would suffer from the long delays and non-fulfilment of contracts in the same 
mauner as it did daring the late war ; besides paying enormous profits, that iu 
one or two years would of themselves amount to enough to fully equip all the 
na^ yards in the land. 

True economy, as well as good policy, requires the department to be able with 
its own shops to meet all the demands that may be made upon it. 

I'he estimates for the next fiscal year will be found in the accompanying 
papers, marked A, fi. and C ; and for the remainder of the present fiscal year 
in the paper marked D. 

All of which is respectfully submitted by, sir, your qbedient servant, 
, B. F. I8HEBW00D, 

Chief of Bureau 

Hon. Gideon Wki-lbs, ' 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Etlimattoftht amount nmirtd for tht HbU azpme* of lit Banau qf Sttan Eitfinttriitr,for 
Iki Jltcal fiar amding Jmi 30, lHb'9, <u ptr art! ef Jtttu 5, ltJG2, Jidg 23, 1866, aut 
Marck i, \mj. 

Pot Mlarj of chief ofbureaii, (act July 5, 1862, b«c. 2) $.1,500 00 

For Mlnrj of chief clerk, (act July 5, 1^(13, sec ») 1,800 00 

Porulary of one tbinl-closs clerk, (actjnly 23, 1866, rac 8) I,4>U0 00 

I'ortalarjofoDsiecond-claucWk, (itct Alnrch 2, 1867) 1,400 00 

For salary of one drsnKhtsman, (mA of Julj 5, \^'i, sec 3, aaci act March 2, 

1867) J, 800 00 

Forsslaiy ofoneaasLBtantdtaughlsmftii, (act July B, 1862, lec 3) 1,200 00 

For Mlary of ODE mesgengBr, (act July 5, 18(W, sec. 3) $810 00 

For ^ txi' cvDl. additional, legs cxccBSOTor $1,000. (act of June 35, 

I864,.ec3, andactof Julyaj, 1806) 160 00 

1,000 00 

For salary of one laborer, (act July 5. 1802, sec. 3) 600 00 

For30perc«nt. addiiional, (act of Jane 25, 1864, and act of July 23, 

1866) 120 00 

720 00 

For amonnt renpectfully subailtted u Increas? of salary of chief clerk 400 00 

For unouot rtspuetfully subtntttod ai increaae of salary of draiighlsDian 200 00 

For unoant regpeulfully submitted as increase of salary uf stslBtaiit dTaugbts- 

man 200 00 

For oouliDgent expeDses 1,500 00 



Appropriaiod for Ihe fiical year ending JuQC 30, 1668 116, 12v 0<i 

DigmzedbyGoOgle 



BEPOET OP TDE 8ECRETAET OP THE NAVY. 



Eitimalt qfthe pay of cieil offiara under the cogaitance of the Bureau of Steam Engineerixi, 
at miTy yardi and stations, for tktjitcal ircar ending June 30, 1669. 



TH.K.H, 

For salary of oaedranBhtsman $1,600 00 

For salary of cletk to chief engineer 1,400 00 

For salary of store clerk. 1,400 00 

For salary of time clerk 1,200 00 

5,600 00 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Pot salary of one <lmne'bt8man f 1,600 00 

FoT»alHry of cleikio chief engineer 1,400 00 

For aalaiy of store clerk 1,400 00 

For Hftlary of time clerk 1,900 00 

For salary of master maehinist 2,000 00 

7,600 00 

NEW VQRK. 

For salary of one dranelitsmsii ■_ 81,600 00 

For salary of clerk to chief engineer . 1,400 00 

For salary of store clerk 1,400 00 

For salary of time clerk 1,200 00 

, 5,600 00 

For salary of one dmoghlsniftn ...V, .!^^ |1,600 00 

For salary of clerk to chief engineer 1,400 00 

For salary of Bloro clerk 1.400 00 

For salary of lime clerk 1,200 00 

5,600 00 

WASHINQTON, 

For salary of one dranghtaman tl.GOO OO 

For salary of clerk to cliief engineer 1,400 00 

For salary of store clerk 1,400 00 

For salary of ti in B clerk 1,200 00 

For salary of mosler machinist 2,000 00 



NORFOLK. 

Forsalstyof onedraaghtaman tl,600 00 

For salary of clerk to chief engineer 1,400 00 

For salary of store eletk 1,400 00 

For salary of time clerk 1,200 00 

5,600 00 

PBKBACOLA. 

For salary of one draughtsman Jl,600 00 

For salary of clerk to chief engineer 1,400 00 

For salary of store dark 1,400 00 

For salary of time clerk 1,800 00 

5,600 00 

MARE tSLAKD. 

For salary of one draughtsman $1,600 00 

For salary of clerk to chief engineer 1,4U0 00 

For salary of store clerk 1,400 00 

FoTBfilaTyof lime clerk 1,200 00 



.vGoo^fe»«' 



EEPOET OP THE 8ECEETAET OP THE NAVY, 



183 



BBCAPITUUTIOM. 

il officers at 11SV7 yard. Porta moD tli, N. H £5.600 00 

il officers al mtvy yard, BobWd 7,600 00 

il officers at navy yard, New York 5.6(>0 00 

il officers at nary yard, Pbiladelphia 5.6110 00 

i I officers at navy yard, WashingtoD 7,fi00 00 

il officers at uavy yard. Norfolk , 5,600 00 

il officers at oary yard, PgdsbcoIb 5,600 00 

U oticera at Davy yard, Mare Islaud 5,600 00 

4S.8WJ 00 



C. 

Ettimalt of appropriation under the cogniianeetaf the Bureau of Sletm Xarigalion, required 
for lAi ttTvice of thtfiuid year ending Jane 30, 1869. 

Forntores and malerials, tools, ic $1,500,000 00 

For repftira of machinery of steamers, boilers, iiiatnunenta, and labor at navy 
yard, and reuaiis of tlie macbiuery, and purchase of stores and malerials, 

for viwselBot Rquodrons on foreign stations 2,750,000 00 

For tnuiaportaCion of materials, &.c I5U, 000 00 

4.400,000 00 



Eltitnata ofexpendiimn of appropriatutns under the cogniianee tf the Bureau of Steam Engi- 
neeriugifar Ike balance of ihe fiical year ending Jane 3U, IH(>8. 

Civil and contingent exp^nnea of Iho bureau -. $14,320 00 

P«y of civil establishment al the navy yards a4,000 (10 

For repairs of machinery of sfemnerB, boilers, instmmenla, tools, labor, pay- 
menu on eiisiiuK controcia fur mschinery. and for supplies 4,617,000 00 

Pot stores and maleriaU for vessnls of squadrons, aecesBBrily purchased 

abroad, and for repairs of macbinery of Iho vessels on foreign slations.... 700,000 00 

5,355,3-20 00 



RBC-APITt'LATION. 



Heads. 






B,— Pay of civil officers at navy yards and stations 1H68-6U 
C— Eaiiirate of appropriation required for the service of the 


615. 390 00 

iii.tm 00 

4,400,000 00 


$16, 120 00 

a4,t»oo 00 

None reqninrf. 






4,461,iau 00 




D— Elstimote of probable required ripeDditDre for the bal- 


»5, 355, 320 00 






n(y\c 



REPORT OP THE 8ECRET1ET OP THE NAVY. 



C1m« No. 1, boiler iron and liv- 




John J. Bingham 








William Porier* Sobs... 


3,055 00 






WiliramA.Wheel«;!.".;i 


8,&36 Oft 


nsgler A Brolher» 


$30, J93 75 


■2,390 00 


SpaldineJfcPftnroU 


30,645 00 


Wheeler & Browning 


3,181 00 










Joseph L. Savage 


29,700 00 


Class No. 9, tallow and soap ; 






30,055 00 








3], JOT 50 












Cla8BKo.2, pigiron: 




John J. Bingham 


576 80 










Flaglet & Brothers 


44,270 00 


Joseph L. Savage 


632 00 










Francis H. Smith 


40,450 00 








■39, sao 0« 






William Poneri Son.... 


43, (#5 00 


Class No. 10, engineers' stores: 




Joseph L. Savage 


40,440 00 








42,220 00 


Alonzo A. Foster 




Wheeler it BrowniLg 


40, 100 00 


Juhn J. Bini^uun 


15,421 M 






William Porter &. Sons .. . 




Class No. A. gam packing, rub- 
her hose, &c. : 




Joseph L. Savage 


1S,91J7 Gl 




William A. Wheeler 








Wheeler * Browning 




JohD J. Bincham 


•20,543 00 






23,686 00 


Class No. 11, engineers' tools: 






22,763 00 














Wheeler & Browning 


30,380 OO 


William A. Wheeler 








Wheeler & Browning 




ClMB No. 5, sperm oil : 




CUss No. 12, engineen' instm- 














13,S75 00 
12,422 00 






Judd Sperm Oil Co 


American Steam Oange Co 






14,000 00 


Alonzo A. Foster 


3,417 00 


William H.James 


12,200 00 








12,150 00 


William Porter & Sons. .. 




Soatbard, Herbert &. Co.. 


"1),900 00 


Joseph L. Savage 

William A. Wheeler 




JoMphL. Savage 


12,250 00 






13, 150 00 


Wheeler & Browning 


2,6S4 00 


Wheeler & Browning 


15,000 00 


C1as«No.l3,inachinerr: 












penline: 




Pratt, Wbitnev&Co 


t . 






G. &C. Place 


\i, 114 00 


C.M.Clapif&Co 

John H. Bailey 

David Bbbeock 


3,400 00 


Joseph L. Savage 


4,240 00 


2,640 00 




5,300 00 


2,388 00 






AlonzoA.Fo«Wr 


2,460 00 














2,572 00 






Clark & Pearson 


2,710 00 


A.8.T.Sanbom4.Co.... 


20,859 )4 


William Porter* Sons... 


2,080 00 


J.J.4. C.C.Walworth... 


■19,644 5S 


Josrph I.. Savage 


2,570 00 


Alonio A. Foster 


25,535 99 




2.352 00 


John J. Bingham 


20,960 2& 




3,040 00 


Joseph L. SavigB 

William A. Wheeler 


24,538 77 






23,2)6 5& 


Cliiss No. e, leather belllDr, 




Wheeler & Browning 


29,403 44 


hose, &c: 




Class No. 15, brMt and comer 




HoTt Brothers 

C.M.Clapp&Co 








2,512 00 






Josiah Gaws & Son 


2,416 00 


JohnH.Brtley 


7,800 OO 


James B.Pugh 


2,609 00 


Columbia Metal Works... 


6.500 Oft 




2,973 00 


American Tube Woriu.... 


6,840 00 



BEPOBT OF THE 8ECBETABT OF THE NATT. 



Alonzo A. Foster 1)5,450 00 

Joceph L. Savure 5,800 00 

'WUIiun A. Wheeler 5,634 00 

Wbeeler & Browmuir 6,200 00 

CtusNo.16, steel: 

George Adams. 16,160 00 

Spalding & FaiTott 1*1,160 00 

JohnP. LvmaD •14,360 00 

David Bftbcoch 16,000 00 

Miller, Ban- & Parkin.... 15,530 00 

Park, Broiber&Co, 15.100 00 

AloDEo A. Foster 15,080 00 

JohoJ. Bingham 16.560 00 

Joseph L. SsFBgo 15,200 00 

William A. Wheeler 15,000 00 

Wheeler &. Browning 15,360 00 

ClMa No. 17, iron, nadU, bolts, 

John H. Bailey 9,767 40 

Alouzo A. Foster 8, 719 40 

John J. Bingham 9,643 65 

Joseph L. Savage *S,696 40 

WilliamA Wbeeler 9, 4BS 40 

Wheeler dL. Browning 9,9i!2 60 

Clala No. 18, copper: 

JameaM.Shaw 30,243 00 

Kevere Copper Co 25,!K0 00 

Alonzo A. Foster 26,900 00 

JobnJ. Bingham 26,004 00 

Baltimore and Cuba Smelt- 
ing and Mining Co *25,132 50 

WillianiPorter&.8ons... 29,200 00 

Joseph L. Savae« 26,235 00 

William A. Wheeler 25,993 00 

Wheeler &. Biowning 28,840 00 

ClassNo. 19, tin, lead, iin<:,&c : 

JohnH. Bailey 9,595 00 

David Babcock 8.299 75 

AloDEO A. Foster •7,739 UO 

John J. Bingliam 8,426 OU 

William Porter & Sous... 9,551 60 

Jnsepb L.SHVHge 8,163 00 

William A. Wheeler 8,417 50 

Wheeler & Browning 8,610 00 

Class No.SO, white lead: 

C.M.ClappiCo 3,000 00 

JohnH. Buley 2.^50 00 

David Bahcovk 3,^J5 00 

Alunio A. Foeter *2,550 UO 

John J. Bingham S,7tW 00 

Clark dc Pearson 3,200 00 

WiUiam Porter 4( Bona .. . 3,2-J.'') (Ill 

Joseph L.Savage 2,r^U IH) 

William A. Wheeler 2,tJ50 00 

Wheelet^ Browning 3,100 00 

Ctua No. 21, line paint: 

C. M. Clapp & Co 315 00 

JohnH. Bailey 430 00 



DavidBabcock 1290 00 

AloDzo A. Foster 300 00 

JohnJ. Bingham •382 50 

Clark & Pearson 420 00 

William Porter & Bona... 462 50 

Joseph L. Savage 370 00 

WilUftm A. Wheeier 290 00 

Wheeler & Browning 450 00 

Class No. 22, colored p^nts, 

dryers, &.c: 

JohnH. BaUey 2,890 00 

David Babcocb 3,860 25 

Alonio A. Foster •l.SSO 00 

JohnJ. Bingham 3,076 55 

Clark 4. Pearson 4,851 50 

Joseph L. Savage 1,630 50 

William A. Wheeler 3,297 50 

Wheeler & Browning 4,979 75 

Cla»a No. 23, stationery: 

JohnM.Whittemore^Co 1,647 40 

W. C. Rogers & Co '785 09 

Culler, Tower & Co 1.172 26 

WilliamH.Arthur&Co.. 1,426 15 

William A. Wheeler 1,S39 00 

Claa8No.24,^wood: 

George A. Hammond -1,235 00 

George W. Tucker 1,687 50 

JohnJ. Bingham 1.787 50 

Trickey & Jewell 2,0W 00 

William A. Wheeler 1,725 00 

Class No. 25, hickory and ash 
plank, and butts : 

Joseph W. Duryee '305 00 

Ttickcy&Jeweti 330 00 

WilUBm A. WheelBT 375 00 

Class No. 26. wUte pine : 

Samuel Adams & Co 4,170 00 

Joseph W. Dury.'e •3,057 00 

George A. Hammond 3,330 00 

Trickoy & Jewell 3,975 00 

WUIiam A. Wheeler 4,645 00 

Class No. 27, hlack walnut, 
cherry, &c. : 

Joseph W. Duiyee '541 00 

TrickeyiJewett 785 00 

William A- Wheeler 1.000 00 

Class N. 29. laolems, &.c : 

William Porter* Sons... '1,387 00 

WiUiam A. Wheeler 1,719 00 

Class No. 30, lignumvitffi : 

George A. Hammond 95 00 

Wesley Smith 150 00 

John J. Bingham *90 pO 



.oogle 



186 



EEPOHT OP THE SECRETARY OP THE NATT. 



WilliBm Porter & Sons... *I25 00 

William A. Wheeler 115 00 

Cliuis No. 31 , hydraulic jacks, 
&.C.: 

Alonio A. Foster ■1(10 00 

John J. Biughnm 299 UO 

William Porter &. Sona... 320 00 

Joseph L. Savage 1,000 00 

■William A. Wheeler 350 00 

Class No. 32, aonr flour, cruci- 
bltB, &c. : 

David Babcock 1,452 00 

Alouzo A. Poster 1,415 00 

Jobn J. Bingbam I,l>li0 15 

Joseph L. BavHge 1,461 40 

William A. Wbeeler *l,a56 50 

Class No. 33, patented ar^clea: 

AloDzo A. Foster *574 00 

Class No. 34, cotton and hemp 
packing: 

John H. Bailey 249,100 00 

Alonzo A. Foster , 2, 480 00 

John J. Bingham *2,24U 92 

William Porter& Sons.. . 3,2U1 OD 

Joseph L. Savai^ 2,S42 00 

William A. Wheeler 2,716 00 

Class No. 35, anthracite coal : 

Oeor^ W. Tucker 24,412 50 

Tyler&Co ■20,362 60 

Lewis W.Hiel 21,877 00 

8. P. Brown & Son 21,315 00 

JohnB.Turton 3:t,54U 00 

William A. Wheeler 21,517 50 

Clsss No. 3G, bituminous coal: 

Alberts. Bass 2,955 00 

GeorBB W. Tucket 3,120 00 

Franklin A. Hall 3,060 00 



fi. P. Brown & Sou 13,664 00 

John B. Turlon t 

WiUiam A. Wbeeler 3,85S 00 

Class No. 37, EBiid,linie, &ai.: 

Samnel Adams &. ^o 3,957 00 

David Babcock 3,113 00 

Georf-e W. Tucker ■I,a63 00 

William H, JHoies 3,K6 50 

William A. Wheeler 3,638 00 

Class No. 38, brick; 

Samuol Adams & Co •1,360 00 

David Babc»ck I,6O0 00 

Goorffe W. Tucker 1,5.'»0 00 

William A. Wheeler 3,250 00 

Class No. 39, files : 

Scuddor, Rogers &Co. .. 7,059 96 

Alonzo A. Foster '6, 230 01 

John J. Bingham 6,885 64 

Clark & Pearson 10,667 W 

Joseph L. Savage 6,946 48 

William A. Wheelei 7,290 14 

Wbeeler tL Bronning.... 9,423 42 

Class No. 40, charcoal : 

George A. Hammond l,40O 00 

George W. Tucker 2, 250 00 

Charles G. Brown '950 00 

Alonzo A. Foster 1,35U 00 

Clark &. Pearson 1,25U 00 

William Porter &. Sona. . . 1, 950 00 

William A. Wheeler 1,300 00 

Class No. 42, Dudgeon's pomps: 

John H.Bailey 1.580 00 

Alonzo A. Foster. «.'. 1,423 00 

John J. Bingham I,3t>e 00 

William Porter & Sods... l,tJ22 00 

Joseph L. Savage 1,380 00 

William A. Wheeler '1,240 00 

Wheelei & Browning 1,840 00 



Sdudait of prapotaU /or maleriali for Ike : 
meM of the BttTeau of 5ta 

Class No. 1, boiler iron, &c. : 

Flagler &Bro $:(8,044 

Alonzo A. Foster 39,067 

John J. Biugbam ■36,443 

Joseph L. Savage 37,170 

WiUiara A. Wheeler 39,562 

WheelerA. Browning.... 44,040 

CUm No. 8, pig iron: 

Flagler &Bro 24,600 

James M. Shaw 32,750 

Fraocis H. Smith 24,400 

Alonzo A. Foster 2!i,900 

'Aeespted. 



itggardat Charle$lotim, made under the adcertist- 

n Kngintering of June 11, 1867. 

John J. Bingham $23,500 00 

William Porter & Sons. . . 24, 500 00 

Joseph L. Savage '21,250 00 

William A. Wheeler 2.'-),250 00 

WheelerA Browning 23,250 00 



C. M. Clapp &,Co 

John J. Bingham 

Joseph L. Savage..,.., 

WitliamA. Wbeeler.... 

Wheeler & Browning... 

tlntOnniL 



6,050 00 
5,337 50 
7,050 00 
6,500 00 



EEPOET OF THE 8ECRETABT OP 'ITIE NAVY. 



CUm No. 5, Bpenn oil : 

JameeM.ShBW $05, WO 00 

DBTid Habcook W,450 00 

Jndd Sperm Oil Co 24,844 00 

Alooio A. Foster SS, 000 00 

WillUm H. James 2:t,800 DO 

Manhattan Oil Co 2:1,700 00 

Soatiiard, Herbert & Co. . '23, 490 00 

Joseph L. SavBLge 84,000 00 

WiUiam A. Wheeler 25,900 00 

■WbeeletABronvniDg.... 38.000 00 

Clui No. 6, lioaead oil and Int- 
l^entine ; 

CM, Clappik Co 3,095 00 

David Babcock 866 00 

AlonioA, Foslor 1,004 00 

John J.Bingham 891 00 

Manhatiati Oil Co 9:» 00 

Clark dc Pearaoa 9J0 00 

Jo»epb L. SaTage HOO 00 

William A. Wheeler ''tfO 00 

WheelerA. Bronnlng.... 1,225 00 

Clau No. S, leather belling, 

HovlBrolhere 6,042 50 

C.U.CIapp&Co 8.543 50 

Joeiah Gates & Son 8,376 00 

Jaii.eiK.PuKh 9,625 00 

Alonio A. FoBlet 10,648 00 

John J. Binfrbain ; •T.Wi 7b 

Jowph L. l*«v«m 8,:!9«00 

William A. Wh«ler 8,134 00 

Wheeler & Browning B, 388 00 

Clan Hd. 9, talloir end soap : 

Mnlletl 4 Bmdborj 32 50 

Tavid Babcock 30 00 

AlonioaA. FoMcr 120 00 

John J. BInsham 30 00 

Southard, Heibort & Co.. 22 00 

Clark A Pearion 8« 00 

Joseph L. Savage 20 00 

WilUam A. Wheeler 30 00 

Clau No. 10, engineers' itores : 

Alon«o A. Foster 7,609 37 

John J. Bingham *T, 312 71 

Joseph L. Siiva(te 7,436 40 

WilliamA. Wheeler 8,^57 48 

WbeeluT i Browning .... 10,758 50 

Claaa No. 11, engineers' tools : 

Alonio A. Foster *3,842 38 

Joseph L. Savage .1,186 89 

WilliamA. Wheeler 4,577 <I5 

■Wheeler & Browning.... '3,370 10 

Class No. 12, engineera' in- 
•truments : 

American Sleam Gauge Co 3, 450 00 

Alonio A. Foster M,e26 00 

flntonuli Ud IW pan Dt dais 



John J. Bingbanl *2.e41 00 

William Porter & Sons... 3,907 00 

Joseph L. SaTHge 3,233 00 

William A. Wheeler 3,110 00 

Wheeler & Browning .... 3,000 00 

CliiBsNo. 14, wroDght iron pipe, 

8. T. Sftnbom & Co 12, 935 25 

J. J. Walwoith &, C. C. 

Walworth •12,227 00 

Alooio A. Foster 14,423 75 

John J. Bingham 12,743 52 

Joseph L. Savage 14, 4,W 25 

William A.Wheeler 13,576 80 

Wheeler&Browning.... 14,638 25 
Class No. 15, brass and copper 

Columbian Metal Works.. |21,300 00 

American Tube Works... 22,900 00 

AlonioA-FoBter...- 121,300 00 

Joseph L. Savage 23,200 00 

William A. Wheeler 24,230 00 

Wheeler*. Brovining.... 35,000 00 

Clau No. 16,sleel: 

David Babcock 21,293 74 

Park, Brother& Co 19,572 00 

JohnB. Taft 19,493 10 

AlonioA. Fouler 19,487 75 

John J. Bingham 20,778 50 

Joseph L. Savage 19,297 00 

William A Wheeler 19,057 50 

Wheeler &. Browning.-.. '18,098 00 

Class No. 17, iron nails, bolls, 
nul«, &c. : 

Alonio A. Foster '3,^7 40 

John J. Bingham 4,140 24 

Joseph L, Savage 4,*J9 01 

William A. Wheeler 4,340 97 

Wheeler & Browning 6,155 85 

Clau No. 18, copper; 

JameaM.Shaw 50,645 00 

Alonio A. Foster 47,060 00 

John J. Bingham 46,090 00 

Baltimore and Cuba Smelt- 
ing and Mining Co..... '43,825 00 
William Porter*. Sons... 51,000 00 

Joseph L. Savage 44,650 00 

William A. Wheeler 44, 345 00 

Wheeler 4. Browuing.... 47.350 00 
Class No. 19, tin, lead, Bine, 
&c: 

George Adams 14,480 00 

C:M. ClappACo 15,312 SO 

David Babi:ock 13,795 00 

Alonio A. Foster "13,350 00 

John J. Bingham 13,805 00 

William Porter & Sons... 16, 175 00 

Joseph L. Savage 13,155 OO 

William A. Wbt*ler 14,816 00 

Whvler& Browning.... 14,620 00 

Fsrtrd. -Awirttdbjlgt, Ot)Q C 

I [alonnal. c^ 



188 BEPORT OF THE SECBETABT OF THE NA77. 



CImb No. 30, wbite lead : 

C. M. Clapp&Co $775 00 

David Babcock 712 50 

AlODioA. Foster ■650 00 

JobQ J. BiDgbam 722 00 

Clark & Peonou 775 00 

William Porter & Sons... 787 50 

JoBepli L. Savage 725 00 

WillUiD A. Wheeler 725 00 

Whoeler & Browning.... 800 00 

Clow No. S3, colored painU, 
dryers, &,c.: 

David Babuick 2,816 30 

, John J.. BiDgbam 3,194 00 

Clark & Pearson 4,339 00 

Joseph L. Savage '2,796 15 

WilliamA. Wheeler 3,B40 80 

ClasB No. 23, atationerj : 

J. H. Whittemore&Ca.. 2,186 79 

W. C. RogerB&Co '1,543 16 

Cotter, Tower & Co 1, 846 52 

William H. Arthur &. Co 2, 132 38 

Williani A. Wheeler 1,997 25 

Class No. 24, firewood : 

8. &E. Kniebt '1,200 00 

John J. Bingham 1,560 00 

Trickej & Jewett 2,025 00 

William A. Wheeler 1.275 00 

Cla«8 No. 25, bicker; aod asb 
plaak and butts : 

THckey 4. Jewett 200 00 

William A. Wheeler '150 00 

ClaasNo. 26, white pine: 

Joeepb W. Duiyee '8,310 00 

Triekej & Jewett 9,9:M 00 

William A. Wheeler 14,345 00 

CIsAB No. 27, black walnut, 
cbeny, &c. : 

Joseph W. Dnr;ee "435 00 

Tric.key & Jewett 585 00 

WmUm A. Wheeler 1, 200 00 

Cla«s No. 23, mahogany and 
wbile holly : 

Joseph W.Duryee "210 00 

Trickey &• Jeweit 300 00 

William A.Wheeler 675 00 

C1a«s No. 39, laatems, &c. : 



Mulietl & Bradbury 12,025 25 

David Babcock 1,700 75 

Alonio A. PoBWr •1,410 00 

JobnJ.Binpham 1,676 50 

William A. Wheeler 2,830 25 

Class No. 34, cotton and hemp 
pauking; 

David Babcock 2,850 00 

AloDio A.Fosler 3,000 0» 

JohnJ.BiD^ham •2.376 00 

Williani Porter & Sons ... 3, 600 00 

Joseph L.Savage 3,000 00 

William A. Wheeler 2.963 50 

Class No. 35, autbracile coal; 

Albert R. Bass '26,700 00 

Tyler & Co 29,570 00 

I*wlaW. Heil 31,862 00 

8. P. Brown & Sou 30,310 00 

William A. Wheeler 38,280 00 

Class No. 36. bituminous coal : 

8, P. Brown & Son 3,455 00 

JohoB. Torton 2,262 00 

. WilUam A. Wheeler '3, SSI 00 

Class No. 37. Band, lime, &c. : 

James Edmood & Co 2,875 00 

David Babtock 3.250 00 

William H. James '2,855 00 

WilliamA. Wheeler 3,850 00 

Class No. 38, brick : 

James Edmoud 8c Co ''3.525 00 

David Babcofk 3.940 00 

William A. Wheeler 3.5S0 00 

Class No. 39, files : 

AlonzoA. Fosler.. '7,803 56 

JohnJ. Bingham 9,146 80 

Clarke Pearson 14,184 K 

Joseph L. Savage 8.520 30 

William A. Wheeler 9,624 67 

Wbeeler & Browning.... 11,808 50 

Class No. 40, charcoal : 

Mullett& Bradbui7 {3.500 00 

Alonzo A. Foster 2,500 00 

Clark dcPearsou 3,700 00 

WilliamPorter JtSoDs... 3,900 00 

Joseph L. Savage 3,900 00 

William A. Wheeler 3,600 00 

: Awarded by lot. 



D.,.Ei.ct,c;oogic 



BEPOBT OF THE 8ECRETAET OF THE NATT. 



AloDio A. Foster 

John J. Bingham 

Williun Poner it Sam... 

0. H. Creed 

WillUm A. Wheelei 

Wheeler Sl BrowDiDg 



Jftinei M. Shaw 

David Babcock 

Samuel Noble 

Francis H. Smith 

Alnnio A. Foslpr 

John J. Binjihain 

William H. Jaoies 

William Porter & Soni.. 

G. H. Creed 

William A. Wheeler 



Alonio A. t'oBtor... 
Jubn J. Bingham.. 
G. H. Creed 

CUu No. 5, Bpenii oil : 



aO,90ii 50 
•20,350 00 
21,500 00 
31,275 00 



Jamee M. Shaw 

David Babcock 

Lfleg St PolbamQi 

Judd Sperm Oil Co 

Alon«>A. Fouler 

William H.James 

Uanhaltan Oil Co 

Southard, Herbert &. Co.. 

O. H. Creed 

William A. Whealer 



C. H. Clapp&Co 

David Babcock 

AloDKo A. Fonter .... 

•lohii J. Binfham 

UaQbatiao Oil Co 

William Miller 

Clark &. PearMD 

William Porter Sl Sons.. . 

G. H. Creed 

William A. WhMler 



. S, leather belUng, 



. C.M.CIapp&Co 

Josiab Gates St Sana.. 
John J. Biugham 



93,390 00 
94,750 00 

•20,700 00 
22,359 60 
25,200 00 
21,150 00 

ei, lie 00 

21,420 00 
21,510 00 
£1, 130 00 



3,930 00 

3,588 00 
3,636 00 



2,rii <« 
3, 3>« 00 

3, Mao 00 

3,570 00 



1,241 00 
1,U61 00 
1,072 00 
•936 50 



William Porter & Sons.. 

G. H. Creed 

William A. Wheeler 

Wheelci Si Browning. . . . 

Claas No. 9, tallow and soap : 



Alonio A FoBier 

John J. BiaKbara 

William Miller 

Southard. Herbert & Co.. 

O. H. Creed 

William A. Whraler 

Wheeler & Browning 

Class No. 10, engineeia' itorea : 


;t35 75 
313 00 
347 63 
475 00 
319 50 
344 50 
480 60 

•9,650 97 
10,466 IS 
12,846 59 
11,455 85 
10,489 95 
13,017 65 

•2,906 75 
4,001 10 
3,042 65 

3,011 00 
2,792 50 
6,735 00 
•2,775 00 
8,340 00 
3,326 00 
3,297 50 

3.166 00 

16,740 97 
12, 150 00 
14, 146 50 
10, an 20 
•9,742 00 
12,B65 60 
13,266 00 

9,834 70 
9,0S130 

9. 167 80 
8.W5 00 
9,07«00 

•8,570 00 
9,336 95 
8,841 00 
8,829 60 
9,091 60 


John J. BiDKham 

William Poller St&oia... 

William A. Wbeeler 

G. H. Creed 

Wbeeler St BrowniDg 

Class No. 11, engiueers' tools i 

Alonzo A. Foster 


William A. Wbeeler 

Clasa No. 13, eDKioeers' inslnt- 
msnls: 


American Steam Gauge Co. 

AlouEoA. Foster 

John J. Bingham 

William Poner&Sons... 

G; H. Creed 

William A. Wheeler 

Wheeler & Browning.... 

Claas No. 14, wronght-iroo 
pipes, valTOi, Ac: 


Jas. J. & C. C. Walworth 

AJoDio A. Focler 

John J. Bingham 


G.H. Creed. 

William A. Wheeler 

ClasaNo. 16, steel: 


Miller, Barr& Parkin.... 

Park Brother & Co 

Alonso A. Foster 

John J. Bingham 

William H. James'.i."!.- 


William A. Wbeeler 

Wheeler &. Browning.... 



iCkioglc 



BEPOET OF THE SECHETABY OP THE NAVT. 



ClMS Ho. 17, iron n^lB, bolts, 
nnU, Sec. : 

Pollock &. Vna Wagner. . J20, 302 SS 

Alonzo A, Foster 15,217 25 

John J. BinBbam 14,632 00 

G.H. Creed '14,340 00 

Willittm A. WheeW 15,694 00 

Clw» No 1^, copper ; 

AlODZP A. Fuster 11,130 30 

JohnJ. Biiiclinm 'lO.fltPii 14 

Bait. & Cuba SmaltinE &. 

MiniQE Co 10,733 39 

William Porter & Sons... 13,086 15 

G.H.Creed 10,*W 05 

WilliamA. Wboeler 11.045 40 

Wheeler & Browniog.,.. 13,064 00 

Cla3«No.l9,tin,lead,zLnc,4c.: 

C. M. Clapp &.Co 1,539 374 

David BabcMH-k 1,602 00 

AlODZoA. Poator '1,485 50 

John J. Brnghacn 1,513 42 

William Porli>r& Sods... 1,(<47 25 

. G.H. Creed 1,500 50 

William A. Wlieeler 1,585 00 

Wbeeter & Browning..., 1,5K 00 

ClaM No. 22, colored paints, 
dryers, &c. : 

David Babiock 1,149 55 

AlOQio A. FoKtar 1,073 18 

JohnJ. Bingbam "1,(01) 85 

William Millfr 1,193 (W 

Clark 4 Pearson 1,987 37] 

0. H. Creed 1,146 20 

William A. Wheeler 1,311 35 

Wheeler& Browning 1,515 25 

Class No. 23, Htationery: 

J. M. Whitteniore it Co.. 3,919 62 

Sackett^ Maikruy 3,4H6 52 

Cutter, Tower &, Co 3,091 65 

W. C. Kiigers & Co 3,026 68 

William H. Arthur & Co. '2,869 97 

William A. Wliitii-r 3,072 50 

Class No. 25, hickory and a«h 

plank and buiu ■. 

Wataon & PiitiDfrcr....i. '1,300 00 

WilliamA. Wheeler 8,350 00 

ClaM No. 26, white pine : 

Joseph W. Duryee '2,805 00 

David RabcKik 4,()ti0 00 

John J. Biiieham 3,305 00 

Walson & PiltinRer 3,072 00 

B. P. Brown & Sim 3,750 00 

William A. Wheeler 4,845 00 

Class No. 27, black walnut, 
cbeiry, &c. : 

Joseph W. Dnryee '207 00 

John J. Birieliam 277 50 

Walsnn & PitiinuBr 270 00 

William A. Wheeler 600 00 



Class No. 29, lanterns, &c. : 

Alonzo A. Foster (160 00 

William Portent Sons... -95 00 

G.H.Creed lift 00 

William A. Wheeler 96 00 

Class No. 38, sour flour, cind- 

David Babrock 4,749 (W 

Alonzo A. Foster 4,108 00 

John J. Bingham •3',ai3 .10 

William Porter A. Sons... 9,930 50 

G. H. Creed 3,657 50 

William A. Wheeler 4,947 4t> 

Wheeler & Browning .... 7,99ci 00 

Class No. 34, cotton and hemp 
packing, &c.: 

Alonzo A Foster . 125 00 

John J. Binfrham 'lia 50 

WiHiamPorier&Sons... 168 50 

G.H. Ciced 150 (10 

William A. Wheeler lau 00 

Class No. 35, anthracite co«l: 

Alberts. Bass 7,140 00 

Felt A. German 8,970 00 

Tyler&Co •7,098 00 

Lewis W. Heil 7,956 00 

8. P. Brown & Son 6,280 00 

WilliamA, Wheeler 7.163 00 

Class No. 36, bilumlnoos coal : 

Albert R. Ra^s 5,ir,2 00 

Fell 4. German 5.976 00 

Tyler i Co '4,776 00 

Lewis W. Heil 5,336 00 

8. P. Brown &^ Son 5, )@4 00 

JohnB.Turlon 5,4MO 00 

WilliamA. Wheeler 5,016 00 

Class No. 37, sand, time, &c.: 

David Babeock 'a.efie 00 

William H.James 3,161 50 

G, H. Creed 4,317 00 

William A. Wheeler 7,667 SO 

Clasa^o. 38, bHck: 

David Babcock '1,715 00 

Watson & Piltineer 3,405 00 

William A. Wheeler 2,420 00 

Class No. 39, files: 

Alonzo A. Foster '3,927 83 

JohnJ. Bingbam 4,173 68 

James Horner 4,534 93 

Clark & Pearson 7,1*4 57 

G. H. Creed 4,190 95 

William A. Whoeler 4,851 55 

Wheeler & Browning.... 6,322 25 

Class No. 40, charcoal : 

Alonzo A. Foster 1,496 50 

J.ihn J. Bineliam '1,881 00 

Watson dr Piiiingpr 1,943 50 

Clark &. Pearson I,,'t87 50 

William Porter^ Sons... 1,831 50 

G. H, Creed 1,387 50 

William A. Wheeler 1,333 0» 



SEPOBT OF THE BECRETABT OP THE NAVY. 



Class Ko. 1, boQer iron mw 

FanlJ. Field 

Alonzo A. Foster 

John J. BiDgbain 

William Porter & Sooa.. 

Joseph L. SnvBge 

■Williwn A. Wheeler 

Wbeeler &. Browning ... 

Class No. 2, pig iron: 

James M. Shaw 

Francis H. Smith 

PaulJ. Field 

John J. Binghani 



DaTid Babcocb 

John J. Blueham 

Manhattan Oil Co 

Clarki fearson 

William Potier & Sods. . 

Joseph L. Savsfre 

William A. Whteler 

Wheeler & Browning... 



(6, 102 !iO 
5.2<» 00 
5,242 a> 
6,5^0 00 
5,320 00 

•5,0(12 50 
5,762 50 



2,795 00 

3,350 00 
3,450 00 
3,297 00 
a,:i50 00 
•2,ll'0 00 
2, 495 00 
2.25U 00 



CM. CUpp A. Co 

Joeiah Gate* & Sou . 

Paul J. Field 

John J. Bin(;ham 

WilliHmPoner&Sons... 

JoHppb L. Savage 

William A. Wheeler 

Wheeler &, Browuinj; .... 

Class So. to, engineers' slorei : 

AloDio A. Foster 

John J. Bingham 

WiUittiorurtoriSonB... 

Joseph L. Savage 

William A. Wheeler 

WWIer & Browning 

Chtss No. It, engineers' tools: 

AloOKoA. Foster 

h L. SavBge 



CIbm No. 12, engineers' iiutm- 



lfl6 00 
161 50 
•I.W Ki 



Joseph L. Savage 

Wiillam A. Wheeler 

Wheeler A Browning.... 


1150 00 
135 00 
•30 00 


Class No. 16, steel: 








Pan! J. Field 

AlouioA. Foster 

John J, Bingham 

Jo»-eph L. Snvace 

William A. Wheeler 

Wheeler &. Browning.... 


165 75 
m 50 
124 00 
175 00 
•122 00 

laooo 


Class No. 17, iron nails, bolts, 
Qute, &e. 1 








Alonzo A. FoBler 

William Porter&Sons... 

Joseph L. Savsge 

William A. Wheeler 

Wheeler & Browning.... 


205 72 
'231 60 
189 70 
210 30 
226 30 


Class No. 18, copper: 




Alonzu A. Foster 

John J. Bingham 

Baltimoreand Cuba Smelt- 
ing and Mining Company 
William Porter & Soda... 

Joseph L, Savage 

William A. Wheeler 

Wheeler iBrowninK-... 


1,034 50 
•8d» .'14 

898 75 
979 35 
9:M 00 
965 75 
1,377 50 


ClaS8No.l9,tin,lsad.iinc,£e: 






3,972 50 
S.S.WOO 
2,9t0 00 
2,!)93 00 
3,:(07 50 
■2,rt!>0 00 
3, 130 00 
3, '255 00 






.lohn J. Bingham 

William Porter A Sous... 

Joseph L. Savage 

William A. Whreler 

Wheeler & Browning.,.. 


Class No. 20, wliita lead : 




David Bsbeock..* 


140 00 


Johu J- Hingham 

Clark A Pearson 

Williaw Porter* Sons... 

J.»*ph L. Savage 

William A. Whaler 

Wheeler&Uiowniug.... 


154 00 
160 00 
157 50 
150 00 
145 00 
160 00 


CU«s No. 28, colored paints, 
drjreis, &c. : 








John J. Biiigham 

Clark & Pearson 

Joseph L. Savage 

WilliamA. Wheeler 


■199 BO 
307 43* 
245 00 
245 »a 

Ke»7 



(logic 



BEFORT OF THE SECBETAST OF TBE Ni.VY. 



CIbuHo.2 

Ferdinand Foster $193 25 

W.C.EoperB & Co '106 50 

Cutler, Tower &. Co JGl 50 

William H, Arthur & Co. - IBM 50 

WUliam A. Wheeler 155 75 

CIbm No. 36, white pine : 

Joseph W. Dorree 'S, 194 50 

Walson & Piltinger • 2.437 50 

WilUam A. Wheeler 3,668 00 

Clasa No. 27, bUck walont, cbenj', &.c. : 

Joseph W. Darjee '345 00 

Watson & Pittinirer 760 00 

Wiliiaoi A. Wheeler , 850 00 

Clasa No. 32, sour Boor, crad- 



David Babcock 

Paul J.Fiald 

Aloazo A. Foster 

John J. fiinghnm 

WiUiam Porter & Song. . . 

Joseph L. Savage 

Wililam A. Wheeler 

Wheeler &. Browning 

Class No. 34, cotton and hemp 
packing, &c: 

David Babcock 

Paid J. Field 



AloQzo A. Foster 1700 M 

John J. Biuirham 744 50 

Wiltlnm Porter & Sons... 1,300 00 

Joseph L.Savage 950 00 

William A.Wheeler 1,000 00 

Wheeler & Browning 1,000 00 

Class No. 35, anthiadte coal : 

Albert B.Basg '3,340 00 

Tyler&Co 3,710 00 

Lewis W.Hill 3,753 00 

WiUiam A. Wheeler 3,488 00 

CIms No. 37, sand, lime, &c.: 

David Babcock '495 00 

Paul J.Field &04 00 

William H. James 2,6»6 50 

■William A. Wheeler 736 00 

Class No. 38, brick : 

David Babcock 260 00 

PaulJ.Field '260 00 

Watson & fittinger 600 00 

William A. Wheeler 320 00 

Class No. 39, files: 

Alonzo A. Foster 900 36 

John J. Biugham 'USa 49 

Clark & PeaiHon 1,551 91 

Joseph L. Savage 909 56 

William A. Wheeler 1,001 51 

Wbeeler & Browuing .... 1,256 li 



./Ane ij, la 



John J. Bingbam {10,005 

William Porter & 8ons— 24.505 

Joseph L. Savage '1H,952 5 

William A. Wheeler 20,552 5 

WbeelerA Browninfr-... 21,660 

Class No. 3, pig iron : 

JamesM.Shaw 6,950 

Samuel Noble 6,500 

Fraocis H. Smith 5, 600 

JohD J. Bingham 5.480 

William Porter &. Sons-. . 6 500 

Joseph L. Savage 5,900 

Wiilwm A. Wheeler 5,950 

Wbeeler & Browning M.ToO 

Class No. 3, boUer felting: 

GeorgeAdams 2,750 

John J. Bingham '1,590 



Richard Levlck 3,550 00 

C.M.Clapp&Co 3,510 00 

John J. Bini^baiii 3,332 60 

Jo«eph h. Savage '3,200 00 

William A. Wheeler 4, 597 60 

Wheeler & Browning.... 6,312 60 

Class No. 5, sperm oil : 

JamesH.Shaw 18,460 00 

David Babcock 19,460 00 

Lyles & Polhamus 16,870 00 

Jndd Sperm OU Co. 17,390 BO 

Alonzo A. Faster 19,600 00 

William B. James 16,660 00 

Manhattan Oil Co 16,590 00 

Southard, Herbert &. Co.. 17,0MO 00 

Joseph L. Savage 'JO, 310 00 



BEPOBT OF THE 8E0BETABT OP THE NATT. 



193 



WiUiun A. WhMler tie, 130 00 

Wheeler & Browning 81,000 00 

Clan No. 6, linieed oil anci tm- 

a«OTKe AdsniB I,78T 00 

JiDHia H Shaw 3,063 20 

David Babcock 1,590 40 

AioBz^. Foster "1,566 00 

John Jf BiDeham 1,670 00 

HanbattanOii Co 1,71^ SO 

Ct»rk & Pearson 1,793 00 

■Willimn Porter &8oM.,. 1^923 00 

Joseph L. Ssvage 1,616 00 

WillUm A. Wheeler 1.651 00 

Wheeler 4. Browning .... 1,9B5 00 

Clau No. 8, leather beltlDg, 
hose, &0. : 

Hoyt Brothers 1,240 00 

C. M CUpp& Co l,4-i6 00 

Joiiab Gikte« & Son '1,150 00 

AlonioA. Poaler 1,130 00 

William Porter &. Soni ... 1 . 325 00 

Joseph L. Savage 1,160 00 

William A. Wheeler • l,?ro 00 

Wheeler ABronQing ],:)80 00 

ClaM No. 9, tallow and BOap : 

Georre Adams ISO 00 

David Babcock 143 00 

AJoBzo A. Foster "137 00 

John J. Bingham 164 00 

Southard, Herbert &. Co.. I6i 110 

JoBvph-L. ^avsge 160 00 

William A. Wheeler 187 00 

Wheeler & Browning 332 00 

ClMB No. 10, engineers' storea : 

AlonioA. Foster 5,267 77 

John J. Bingham "4,551 47 

William Porter & Sons. .. fJ, U33 65 

JoBspli L. Savtige 5.918 05 

William A. Wheeler 5,565 lU 

Wheeler & Btowning 6,4:t2 35 

ClaM No. 11, engineers' tooli: 

Alonio A. Foster 4,737 00 

Joseph L. Savage '3,779 35 

WillUm A. Wbeeler 4,535 35 

Wheeler i Browning 4,549 75 

Clau No. 13, engiuaen' iustni- 

American Steam GangeCo. *3,7Se 40 

John J. Binghaai 3,893 00 

WlUiam Porter & Sons. . . 9, 338 00 

Joeeph L. Sarue 3.397 75 

Wllikn A. Wheeler 4.399 50 

Wbeeler & Browning 4,397 00 

ChM Ho. 13, itMwblDerj: 

Piatt, WUbWT & Co J 

G.&C.PlaM '1.745 00 

•A«*pl«d. Ilnform^; bUh 

i Ho Bwud of tlltM. 
13 N 



Josnih L. Savage |t,8-25 00 

William A. Wheeler 1,860 00 

CiMaKo. 14, wronghi-iron pipe, 
▼alves, &j:. : 

John Asbcrofl 5,114 99 

Jaa. J. & C. C. Walworth 3.603 71 

John J. Bingham 3.7R8 05 

FrancU McuUn '3,219 94 

Joseph L. Savage 4.066 34 

William A. Wheeler 3.839 93 

Wheeler & Browning 5,972 09 

Class No. 15, brass and copper 

Colnmhian Ustftl Works.. 7,:n5 00 

American Tube Works.... 6,350 00 

Alonio A. Foeter }5,7B0 00 

Joseph L. Savage 6,0UU 00 

William A. Wheeler 6,4^5 00 

Wheeler d. Browning 6,900 00 

ClaaaNo.l6,sleel: 

David Babcock 3,B40 00 

Piirk. Brothers & Co '3.480 00 

Alonzo A. Foster 3.575 00 

John J. Bingham S.mO 00 

Joseph L. Savage 3,530 00 

William A. Wheeler 3,5t0 00 

Wheeler & Browning 3.740 00 

Class No. 17, iron, noilB, bolts, 
nulB, &C1 

AloDio A. Foeter 4,043 00 

John J. Bingham 4,095 75 

Joseph L. Savage •3.6:(5 50 

WillUm A, Wheeler 4,812 50 

Wheeler &. Browning .... 6, 3-^ 50 

ClaiB Ko. 18. copper: 

Jsmee Sbaw 14,000 00 

AluoioA. Foster lTI,5(iO 00 

John J. Blugbam 13,300 00 

Baltimore and Cuba Smelt- 
ing and HiningCo 13,4iH) 00 

Clark& FearROu I4,5i"J 00 

Joseph L. SavKge |ltf, 450 UO 

William A. Wheeler 13.450 00 

Wbeeler& Browning 14,U00 00 

ClasBNo. 19, tin, lead.zinc,4rc: 

David Babcock 2,174 00 

Alon»o A. Poller '3,030 50 

John J, Bingham 3,368 00 

William Porter &. Sons... 3,439 00 

Joseph L Savage 8. MO 00 

WillUm A. Wheeler 2,344 00 

Wheeler &. Browning .... 3,312 00 

CUmNd.30, wUtelead: 

David Babcock .'.... 1,475 00 

AJoncoA-FoBler '1,3B0 00 

-• "iiT.'St..,,* '"— *)oglc 



194 



BBPORT OP THE SEGBETABT OF THE NATT. 



Join J. BlnghBrn #1,6?1 00 

Clark & PmTMin J, 600 00 

WlUiaDi Poner Si. Sous... l.tSDO 00 

JosrphL. Bavaee 1,475 00 

Wmram A. Wbeeler 1,450 00 

Wb«eler&. Browning 1,600 00 

CluB No. SI, lino p^nt : 

Davtd Babeock B5& 00 

. AlonioA-FoiWr '720 00 

John J. BlDgham 810 00 

Clarb& Pearson 780 00 

■Williiim Porter & Bom... 9W 00 

Jowpb L. Savage 780 00 

'Wimam A. Wheeler 750 00 

Wheeler & Browning 840 00 

CI»M No. SS, colored ptdola, 
dr jera, ^c. : 

' David Babcock "J, 833 64 

AlonioA. FMler 1, 865 50 

Jobu J BiDgbam 3,104 35 

Clerk & Pfaraoo 3,867 40 

Jwiepb L. Savage 2,106 !i5 

William A. Wbeeler 1,888 75 

Wheeler &. Brovming 3,581 00 

Claes No. 23, dstionery ; 

W, C. Rogars & Co ■2,037 95 

Cutter, "Swer & Co 2,300 70 

WilliwnH. Arthur & Co.. 8,603 30 

BlsDchfud & Hohnn 2,421 90 

William A. Wheeler 2,528 75 

Claw No. 24, firewood : 

John J. Bingbem 3,296 00 

Walmn & I^tlinger 2,780 00 

Clark & Petuvon 3,200 00 

William A, Wheeler 3. IB6 00 

Wbeeler &. Browning '2,600 00 

ClBM No. 25, hickory and aih 
plank, and batU: 

Walion &PiltiDger 900 00 

S. P. Brown & 8.in "650 00 

William A. Wlieeler 750 00 

Claea No. 26, white pine : 

JowphW. Dnijee '2,354 00 

Evani & Teemyer 3,240 00 

WattoD & Pittioger 3,645 00 

8. P. Brown & Son 2,969 00 

William A. Wheeler 3,895 00 

C1M8 No. 27, black walnnt, 
cherrj, &.c. : 

Jowpb W. Duryee *562 DO 

WaUon Sl Piltbger l,3liU 00 

S. P. Brown &. Son 1,090 00 

WUliam A. Wheeler 1,600 DO 



while holi;: 

JoeephW. Dnryee 

WatMn&Pittineer 

WiUiau A. Wheelei 

Class No. 29, lantemt, &c : 

AloDEO A. Poster 

William Pnner & Sons... 

Jnsppb L. Savage 

William A. Wheeler 

Wbeeler &. Browning 



•$195 00 
310 00 
400 00 



135 00 
135 00 
•115 00 



9 00 



Class Ho. 31, bjdranUc jacks, Ac : 

Alonto A. Foster 1,570 00 

John J. Binghaid "liSiO 00 

Joseph L. Savage 1,806 00 

William A. Wheeler 1,528 00 

Wbeeler & Browning 3,480 00 



David Babcock 

Alonao A. Foster 

John J. Bingham 

William Porter &. Sons. . 

Joseph L. Savage 

William A. Wbeeler 

Wbreler Sl Browning... 



209 00 
213 00 
356 00 



660 DO 
690 00 
'Sg! 00 
670 00 
747 50 
700 00 



Clans No. 34, cotton and hemp 
packing, &c-: 

David Babcock 

Alooto A. Foster 

John J. Bingham 

Joseph L. Savage . . 

WiJliain A. Wheeler 

Wheeler & Bruwuing 

Class No. 35, anthracite coal; 



Albert R. Bass 13,805 tO 

Tylfli & Co....'. 14,*«a5 

Lewis W. Hiet 15,433 76 

S. P. Brown & Son 14.34-J 75 

John B. Turtuu 14, 068 75 

Wiiaam A. Wheeler •13,656 75 

Class No. 36, bitnminoo* coali 

Lewis W. Kiel 16,900 00 

William H. James 14,146 00 

8 P. Brown & Son '13,110 00 

John B.TnrtoD 13,140 OO 

William A Wheeler 14,910 00 

Class No. 37, sand, Ume, Ac; 

David Babcock 1,84250 

8 P.Brown* Son •75IU 00 

William A. Wheeler 1,412 60 



BBPOBT OF THE BBCKEIASY OF THE HITT. 



195 



CUuNo. 38, brick: 

Carid Baboock |l,50b 00 

'WatBOD &PitliDnT 400 00 

8. P. BrowD &. ^Q "340 00 

WiUiam A. Wheeler 650 00 

CIbu No. 39, files: 

Aloiuto A. Foster 3,810 41 

John J. BlDgham 3,964 19 

Clark & Pwirson H,\e7 50 

Joseph L. SttTue *3,79d 70 

William A. Wheelar 4,138 36 

WheeleiA Browning.... 5,669 00 



CIms No. 40, ehareoal : 

AlonsEO A. Foiler |590 00 

WbUod ft nuinger 400 00 

P. W. Dorsey 260 00 

Clark & Pearson :t20 00 

William Porier & Sons. .. 800 00 

William A. Wbeelot 640 00 

Wheeler & BrowiUng.... "250 00 

Claat No. 41, Iron tabes : 

Flagler dc Brothers t 

Alonio A. Foster 5,000 00 

John J. Bingham 3,394 00 

Joseph L. aavage 4,»0U 00 

WillUra A. Wheeler "3,150 00 

WheelerA BrowDing.... 1I,0U0 00 



Class No. 5, sperm oil : 

Jamea H. Shaw t2,184 00 

David Babcock 8,240 00 

Jodd Spenn Oil Co 1,967 52 

Alonio A. Foster 2,200 00 

WilliamH James 1,984 00 

Manhnttan Oil Co 1,976 00 

Southard, Herbert & Co.. 1,992 00 

Jo»eph L. SHTage 'UdVi 00 

William A. Wheeler 2, 096 00 

Wheeler &. Browolng.... 2,400 00 

CIms No. 8, leather belting, 
hoM, &c.: 

Hoyt Brothers 8,308 00 

CM, Clapp&Co 2.314 00 

Josiah Gates & Son *3,l;« 00 

JamesR. Piieh 8,520 00 

John J. BiDKham 2,233 00 

Tarlor, MartiD &. Co.... 2,313 00 

William Porter & Sons. . . 2, 876 00 

Jo-eph L. Savaco 2.229 00 

William A. Wheeler 2,100 IIO 

Wheeler A. BrowDing.... 3,370 UO 

Class No. 10, engineers' stores : 

Alonao A. Foster '93^ m 

John J. Blnrham I,0-.M 69 

William Porier &. Sons. . . 1, 094 32 

William A. Wheeler 1,027 07 

Wheeler A, Browning.... ),24] 60 

CIms No. tl. enKineers' Urals : 

AloDso A. Foster 681 63 

Taylor, Uaitin & Co 633 06 

Joseph L. Savage '563 15 

William A. Wheeler 706 82 

Wheeler &. Browning.... 720 76 



Class No. 16, steel; 

David Babcock fsn 00 

Park, Brother &. Co 653 37 

AloQio A. Foster 667 75 

John J. Biaghaii] 611 00 

Tajlor, Martin & Co 592 00 

Joseph L Snvage 572 00 

WilliftmA. Wheeler 579 50 

Wheelei & Browning.... '549 00 



AloDso A. Faster 1.441 73 

John J. Biotrbam 1,353 81 

Taylor, Marlin * Co 1,706 07 

Joseph L. SuTage 't.ltJi 05 

Willmm A. Wheeler 1,484 04 

Wheeler& Browning.-.. 1.704 87 



Class No. IB, copper: 

Alonxo A. Foster 

John J. Bingham 

Taylor, Martin & Co 

William Porter ft Sods... 

Joseph L. Savage 

William A. Wheeler 

' Wheeler ft Browning 

Clan No. 19 tin, lead, slncftc: 

David Babcock 

Alonio A. Foster 

John J. Bingham 

Taylor, Maitm ft Co 

William Porter ft Sons... 

Jossph L. Savage .. .. 

William A. Wheeler 

Wheeler ft Browning.... 



306 fiO 
30r> 60 
■191 60 
306 50 
210 00 
263 50 
245 00 



130 00. 
114 00 
■103 40 
160 00 
129 00 



160 



4 00 



;,CAiog[e 



BEPOBT OF TBB SECKETABT.OF THE HATT. 



John J. BinriiBm .... 

.T»ylor, Martin & Co 

^illiain Porter A. Sont... 

Jmiepb L. Savafte 

WUlUmA. WbMlet 

CIms No. 36, uithracita coftl : 

Albert R. Bum 

B. J. AWiUiamNMlr... 

Tyler&Co 

Lewis W, Heil 

S. P. BrowD &, Son 

John B.Turton 

William Poiter &. Boot--. 
Willi»ir A. Wheeler 



Clw No. 22, mlond pdnto, 




drjew,&c: 








Bagwelt&White 


42 00 


AloDzo A. FMter 


27 75 






Clark >&. Pearson 


83 50 


William Porter&SoM... 


38 50 


JowphL.8aT.ge 


33 50 




32 00 


Wheeler &, Browning 


B5 00 


CUssNo. 23, stationery: 




W. C. RodgsrsiCo.... 


•M6 70 


Cutter, Tower & Co 




WilliBmH.ArtliuriCo.. 


463 90 


WUliam A. Wheeler 


446 50 



CImb No. 24, firewood: 

E. G. & William Neoly .. t375 00 

David Babcock 750 00 

Jchn J. Bingbam 375 00 

Wateon & PitUnger 431 25 

CUik & Pearson 6^ 50 

William Porter & Sons... 412 50 

William A. Wheeler 662 60 

Class No. 26, white pine : 

Joseph W. Duryeo 'J, 100 00 

R. J. &. Williain Neelj.. . 1,225 00 

DftTld Babcoek 1,616 00 

EvaoB ATeemyer 1,176 00 

Watson & Piitiuger 1,175 00 

8. P. Brown & Sun 1,^99 00 

William Porter & Sons. . . 1, 572 60 

William A. Wheeler 1,666 00 



ClMS No. 27, black walnut, 
cberty. Ac: 




Joseph W. Dnrjee 

R. J, & William Neely -. 

Evans ATeemyer 

WalBon & Pittinger 

8. P. Brown & Son 

William Porter &. Sons.. . 
William A. Wheeler 


•180 00 

150 00 
135 00 
826 00 
178 00 

450 00 
180 00 


Class No. 32, sonr Sour, cmcl- 
bloi, Ac: 








AloMO A. Foster 


■367 50 



$48B6« 
700 00 
643 76 
Bttl 00 
486 3S 



1,590 00 
1,650 00 
1,351 00 



Class No. 36, bittuninons coal : 

R. J. A William Neely ... 6, 740 00 

Jjewis W. Heil 5,9li0 00 

William H. James 5,935 00 

8. P. Brown &. Son '"SiBiO 00 

JohnB-Tnrton 5,900 00 

William Porter & Sons. , . 7, 500 00 

WllUaio A. Wheeler 6,170 00 

ClassNo. 37, sand, lime, Ac: 

R. J. & Willjam Neely. . . 1 , 200 00 

David Babcoek 1,300 00 

William H.James '900 DO 

William Porter A Sons,, . 1,200 00 

William A. Wheeler 1,600 00 

Class No. 39, files : 

Alonzo A. Foster 8,S68 60 

John J. Bingham 2,396 35 

Taylor, Martin A Co 2,400 33 

Clark A Pearson 3,642 30 

Josepb L, Savage *2,389 63 

William A. Wheeler 8,476 55 

Wheeler A Browning 3,388 60 

Class No. 40, chanwal : 



Taylor, Hartln A Co.... 

Bagwell A White 

Aloiizo A. Foster 

Wataon A Pitlinger 

6. P. Brown A Son.!... 

Clark A Pearson 

William Porter A Sons. . 

Williain A. Wheeler 

Wheeler A Browning ... 



7N>00 



450 00 
5Sa 00 
420 00 
*180 00 



tAwartodbrlM. 



Opened July 10 and 1 1, 1867, In presence of— 

B. F. IsHERWooD, Chit/ rf Banan. 
William H. Allvh, Ckitf CUrk. 
WU.UAU H. H. SuiTH, CUrlt. 



.dbyGoogle 



' T^ 



8BCBBTABT OF TOE HATT. 197 



BUEEATJ OP PROVISIOKS AND CLOTHING. 
Navv Dbpartmskt, 
Bdkbad of Fkovisions and Clothino, 

October S3. 1867. 
Sift ; In compliance with yonr iDBtructione, I have the honor to submit eeti- 
BUitea and etatements, marked A to H inclusive. During the last year the 
(n»eratioDB of the bureau ha?e been conducted with the greatest economy con- 
sistent with the efficient management of its concerns. 

The large stock of stores on hand at the close of the war has been rednced 
to a standard sufficient only to meet the current wants of the service, and the 
final accounts of the great number of naral pay-officers who were temporarily 
employed bare been settled. In accomplishing these resnlis the bureau has 
been ably and zealously seconded by its own clerks, by the paymasters and 
inspectors of provision and clothing at the various stations, and by the clerks 
of tboae officers. 

paymasters' clerks. 

In this connection I beg leave respectfnlly to call your attenUon to the com- 
pensation of decks to paymasters end inspectors at navy yards and stations. 
Their pay is manifestly too small for the laborious and responsible duties per- 
formed by them ; and this is made the more striking by the fagt that other 
clerks and writers at the same navul stations — with duties not more arduoos nor 
responsible — receive mnch hightT pay. Thus, at the Kittery, Gofporl, aad 
Fensacola yards, the clerks of paymasters and inspectors receive but $1,000 
per annum, while at the same yu^s tbe pay of first clerks to commandants and 
of first clerks to storekeepers is tl,S0O. 

Even the mustering clerks, the second clerks to commandants, and tbe clerks 
to constructing engineers receive S1,E00 each. At the largest yards tbe high- 
est pay given to a paymaster's or inspector's clerk is (1,200 per annum. 

I earnestly recommend that the pay of clerks to paymasters at yards, and 
inspectors in charge of provisions, &c., be made eqnal to that allowed by law 
to first clerks to commandants and to clerks to storekeepers at tbe different 
yards. 

BANK. 

There appears to be a marked difference between the line officers of the army 
and navy in one point very essenliol to harmony in a military organization. 

In the army tbi're is no nnwillingness on the port of the Hue to allow fair 
relative rank to staff officers, whilst in the navy tliere seems to be a traditional 
di«Ad of granting any but the lower grades of rank to tbe staff. 

In the navy, as heretofore, there exists the dissension which mnst always 
prevail BO lonir as this illiberal spirit continues to show itself, and in the opin- 
loQ of the staff, as well as in that of a few of the more liberal and leading spirits 
of the line, there will be no improvement in this regard until the well-tried army 
system shall be accepted in the navy. 



As DMt nniform clothing is requisite in tbe naval service, it is desimble to 
mpply tbe sailors with it as cheaply as practicable, especially as their pay is 
mnch lets than they would receive in the mercantile marine, where tbe absence 
of r^inlatioa enables tbera to clothe themselves at much less expense. 

In the English and French navies, and in our own army, it is the custom to 
porehase tbe materials and make up a portion of the clothing used. In my 
opinion this practice might be gradually introduced into tbe naval service with 
nau^ advantage. )0Q|C 



198 BEPCHtT OF- THE SEOBETAST^F TH£ HATT. 

No additional baildings woold bo reonirpd to teat the benefits of this plan, n 
it could be carried out on a sufficiently Urge scale in rooms at navy yards wbkh 
could be spared ftom other purposes ; and the small expenditure for prepan- 
tiona could be made from the unexpended appropriation for clothiog. Tbe 
simplfst comfortable outfit for a sailor's clothing and bedding costs him not lea 
than $85, which, with bis cash advance, brings him heavily in debt and indoM 
frequent desertions. 

I would recommend that tbe nsnal advance of money now made to aailon 
on shipping be materially decreased, and that a portion, at least, of die fint 
outfit required be anpplied withont charge. 

COOPBRAOB AT CHABLBSTOWN. 

A cooper's shop at the (ilharleatown navy yard is much needed- 
The coopering at that yard is now carried on in the building where the nt 
nable stores of provisions and clothinr are inspected and kept. Aside from A* 
inconvenience incident to the relinquishment of the room tdus used, tbe storei 
are greatly endangered, and it is very desirable that a separate building b« 
provided for a cooperage. 

I am, air, veiy respectfully, your obedient anrvaut, 

H. BRIDGE, Chief of Bireau. 
Hon. 6iDBo> Wblles, 

Seeretary of the Navy. 

SrJtedtde of the papers accompanying the report <f the chief of the Bureau of 
ProviHoiuaHd Clothing to the Secretary of the Navy, dattd (^o£er 33, 1967. 
A. — Estimate of the expenses of the bureau. 
'B. — Estimate of the bureau for proviaiona. 
C. — Estimate of tbe bureau for contingent. 
I). — Estimate of tbe bureau for the pay of officers and others at navy yari" 

and shore stations. 
E. — Schedule of proposals received for clothing, 
F. — Schedule of proposals received for navy snppUee. 
G. — Schedule of proposals received for fresn beef and vegetablea. 
H. — Statement of contacts made by the bureau. 



EttimOe oftkt exHMies af tfu Bunaa of ProeiiionM and Cletkimgfor tkt Steal tuarendiMt 
Ji«w30, 1869. 

For the 8»lM7 of one chief clerk $1,SOOOI) 

FortbeBalarvofoDedeikofclaMroar 1,800 W 

For the lalarieB of Ihrea clerks of dus thrae 4>^^ 

Forlh8eiiIarie»ofBixcl«rk»of class two S'*'*^ 

For theMlBrimofthreeclA-kBofclBHoiic 3,600 00 

For tbe salary' of one messenger 1,000 W 

For the Mlar; of one laborer, (per act of Congress of July S3, 1S66) 780 00 

93,130«i 

For blank books, stationeiy, and miscellaiwoiu items 1,600 00 

a3l6t»W 

Ippniprialed for the fiscal jear ending June 30, 1868 1^3,^0 0'' 

Asked to be appropriated lor the fiscal year ending JnnaSU, 1869 S3,6S0 00 

H. BRIDGE, CkUif o/ Bmrf. 
' HaVT DBPARTHEirr, 

Burfu ef Prtmtimu and Clothing. 



BBPOBT OF THE SEOBETAST OF THE NATY. 



H. BBIDOE, CM^ </ Bmt,». 



Eilimate q^ tlu lum uAtcA mil bt requirtd by ihe Burtau nf PrBviiioiu and Ctathiuf, nuder 
lU htttd ofantingtnl./or the fiscal gear emltiig June 30, 1869. 

To meet the demuidB apoD the bureau for frei)(h( nud traDaportat[oi] of atorea ; 
for c&ndlea; Tor fuel i Ibr Interior alterHtions and fixtarea in iospoctioD 
buildinge; fortoolgaud repairing^ same at eif(ht iniipectioDs ; for special 
watchmen In same ; for books and blaoks, Btatiooer; ; for furniture and 
repairs of same <n office* of pajmaaters aod losprctors ; for t«legraina aud 
posta^, toll*, car hire, and ferriage ; for ice r &ad for lacldeutal labor not 
chargeable to other appropriation! $200,000 00 

H. BBIDOE, Ckirf ^ amrttn. 



iMoMta ej t^ ^f of offieen andaUitrt mnder the e«ginatmct iif tht Bttrean of Ptoviiiom and 
Clothing, at natg iard$ and Uation$, for Utt Uteal year tndinf June 30, ItJtS. 

KITTERr. 
KAVAL. 

For clerk to paTmaater, (actofMaySe, 1864) fl.OOO 00 

For amoant submitted m increue of aaUij of clerk 500 0(1 

CIVIL. 

For clerk to Inspector of proriiiona and clothing, (act of Hay !i6, 1864) 1, 000 00 

For amonnt anbmitled a* increase of salary of clerk 5U0 00 

For receiver of pro'ulona, clothing, and small stoiei 939 <N) 

3,939 00 
CHARLESTOWN. 

For dark to pavmaster, (tctofHajSG. 1864) |1,S00 00 

For amount submitted on increase of ealarj of clerk 300 00 

For two writers at three dollars per day 1,K78 00 

For one writer 750 00 

CIVIL. 

For clerk to Inspector of provlsloDi and clulhing, (actof MajSS, 1861) 1,300 00 

For amonnl snbioilted oa Increase of salarj of clerk 300 00 

For one receiver of provjpiona 939 00 

For one receiver of clolbing and small store* 939 00 

For one aMl*ianl receiver of provision* 6f*3 BO 

For one wsiBiMit receiver ofclothing and small stores brti ho 

For one writer 939 00 

9.610 00 



200 BEPOBT OP THE 8E0RETART OP THE NAVT. 

BROOKLYN. 

For clerk to payniMler, (»ctofMa7 26, 1864) 91,200 00 

For amount submitted as luereAse of eiiutj of cl«rk 300 00 

For two writort, M 1939 Mcb 1 876 00 

For one writer 750 00 

CIVIL. 

Forclerk to Inspector of proTisioDB and clatbiDjc, (sclorMay26, 1364) 1,300 00 

Fur (niouiit submiited aa incieaM of Milar; of ulerk 300 00 

For one asalMsat inspertot 1,254 00 

For three writers, at 4939 each S,HI7 00 

For oue eesUtant superintendent of mllU 93S DO 

10,636 00 
PHILADELPHIA. 
MAVAL. 

Forelerktopajniaster, (artofMaj26. 1864) |1,200 00 

For amount submitted aa increase uf salary of clerk 300 00 

For one writer 939 00 

For one writer 750 00 

CIVIL. 

Forclerk toinspeclor ofprovisionBBndclothinft, (act ofMay26, 1864) 1,900 00 

For anioiiDt sobmitted as increase of salary of clerk SOO 00 

Fur paymaster's asaislant at Kaval Asylum 1,000 00 

For one writer 939 00 

6, 028 00 

WASHINGTOJr. . 

NAVAL. 

For clerk topaTmaater, (act of Hay 36, 1864) $1,300 00 

For amount submitied as inciease of salary of clerk 300 00 

. For two writers, at J939 each 1,878 00 

Foronewriter 760 00 

For clerk to Inspector of provisions and clolhlng, (act of May 26, 1864) 1,000 00 

Far amount submitted as increase of salary of cletk 500 00 

5,628 00 

GOSPOBT. •=^ 
KAVAL. 

For clerk to paymaster, (act of May 26. 1864) $1,000 00 

For amoant submitted as increase a( salary of clerk 50U 00 

For one writer 939 00 

For one writer 750 00 

CIVIL. 

For cleik to intipector of provisions and dotbinK, (actof M*y36, 1864) 1,000 00 

Far amount submitied as increase of sal aij of clerk 500 00 

For one writer 939 00 

S,69g00 
PENSACOLA. 

Fnrclerk to paymaster, (act of May 26. 1864) $1,000 0* 

For amount submitted as increase ot salary of clerk fi'V 00 

For one writer 750 00 



EEPOBT OF THE BECBETABT OF THE KAVT. 



HABE ISLAND. 



For dctk to payiiufltor and tnapector of provijuoiw uid elotlitiuF, (act of July 

», 1662) 7:. 11,600 00 

For oiM writer 750 00 

For one writer 1,096 60 

3,346 60 

MOUND crrr. 

Foiclerktop&Tmuter, (MtofUftyje, 1864) (1,000 00 

FoTBDioiintiubaiitteduiiiciMaeof salary of cleric 600 00 

For one writer 939 00 

8,439 00 

EBCAPITDLATION. == 

KiltMy 13.939 00 

Cbulcatnwn 9,610 00 

Brooklyn 10,636 00 

PhiWelpbia -■ 6,628 00 

WMhlngwn 5.6i8 00 

Ooepoft 5,628 00 

PeoMCola 3,750 00 

Uareblaad 3,345 60 

MowiaCltj S.439 00 

Total 51,603 50 

E. BBIDOE, Ciatf of Bnraa. 

Navt DEPiUtTMEirr, 

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BEPOKT or THE flECBBTABT OP THE NATT. 



giattmtM £.— Continneil, 



NuDfl. 


Beiidence. 


10,000 pur. 
bine BBtmet 
tiowsen. 


10,000 blae 
flannel over- 
■hiru. 






•$8 77 
3 78 
393 


•»3 55 








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ftBFOBT OV THE 8E08ETABT OF TOE HATT. 



CM^g durimg tlitJUfl yur «Uli»g June 30, 1667. 


Name. 


Date of »d- 


Where to be de- 
livwed. 


Beef. 


Vegetable*. 




1666. 
July 13 
July 13 
July 13 
July 13 
July 16 
July 16 
OcL 10 
OcU 10 
D*c 18 
Dec. le 

1667, 
Jan. 7 
Jao. 7 
Feb. 14 
Feb. 14 
April 20 
April 20 
April 20 
April 24 
April 84 
April 24 

ii 


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do 

do 

do 


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."• 
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.12 

.13 

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.105 

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.12 

.14 

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:i? 

.1347 

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do 

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XSPOBT OP THB BBOBBTABT OT THB HATT. 



BUREAU OF MEDICINE AND SUBQERT. 

NaVV DbFASTHHNT, BoBRAD of MbDICINB and StROBRY, 

October 2fi, 1867. 

Sib : In compliance with fonr [natnictioiu of the I5th August last, I bare 
the honor to snoniit herewith estimatea of the amount required for the Bureaa 
of Medicine and Surgery for the fiscal year ending Jnne 30, 1869. 

The unexpended balances of the appropriations for " surgeons' necessaries and 
appliances," and for " contingent," are deemed sufficient for ihe probable wants of 
toe navy for the period named; no additional appropriaUons nnder these heads 
are therefore necessary. 

I submit tabular statemeftts of sick, &c., compiled from the reports of sick 
from the different naval stations within the United States, and from vessela on 
borne and foreien stations, for ihe year ending December 31 , 1866. 

I also append interesting tables, showing the number of sick of each squad- 
ron engaf^a on ^e blockade during the war, together with the total of each 
disease treated, number of deaths on the blockade during the rebellion, propor- 
tion of deaths to number of cases treated, proportion of deaths to number of 
ship's company, and proportion of sick to number of ship's company. 

SiaUment of lick, compiled Jrom rtporU oftxrk Jroi» the *aval ttatioma in tie 
United State*, and from vuiel* in eommutitm on home and foreign ttaliont, 
for lie gear endtng December 31, 1866. 



CbeIsM 

New Turk.... 
PbiladelpbU . 



P 



15 



2,2:25 I 2,149 



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BKPOBT OF THE SBCIOiTABT Of TB.K VATT. 



BtattmeiU oftieie, Ifc. — OontiDued. 



BettMag ship*. 


It 

V 


1 

is 

p 


i 

1 

a 

5 


3 
Q 


3 

1 


.a 

1 




1 




126 
384 
781 

390 
94 


6 
7 
14 
11 

1 
5 

7 


iw 

392 
671 
192 
177 
216 
262 
119 
48 


167 
382 
663 
193 
169 
214 
258 
114 
46 


...... 

6 

4 

2 

...... 

2 

1 


171 
399 
685 
203 
178 
221 
262 
126 
48 


4 

16 
16 
6 

7 
7 

3 

10 




Naw York 

Philadelphia 








MonnaCity.IU... 
MitrelBlaD3.Cal.. 


ao3 

35 
72 




Toul 


3,065 


50 


2,243 


2,206 


17 


2,893 


70 


.X 



Statement of tick, ifc. — OoDtinued. 



Portsmimtb, N. H.... 

New York. v.. I."."'"' 

Philitdelpbift 

Waihlngton 

Norfolk 

Monod City, III 

Uue hluid, C«l 

Naval Academy 

Naval Obiarvalory 

Bay Point, 8. C 

Pensacola 

ToW 



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Ksspoar or ise raioBETutT of tbb natt. 



Summary of vatdt m committuHt at tea, 1 



AvMTwa nnmber on board dnriDg the jwu 1866 

BemainlDg sick December 31, 1866 

Admitted In 1866 

DiKbarged in 1966 

Diedia 1866 

Total treated ia 1866 

Bemaiuiuf sick December 31, 1866 

Fioportiou of cases to Dumber of persons onboard 

Proportion of deaths to number of persons on board . . 
PerMiitageofdeaths to nnmber of cas«« treated 



HECAPITULATION. 







i< 


1 


i 

a 


i 

3 


1 

a 


1, 


2g 


P 


1 






1' 


1 


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SI,S*3 


3.308 


17 


8,393 


TO 


1.09 


.006 


.007 




iMoe 


3IH 


IS, 603 


15,343 


m 


15,831 


3M 


1.08 


.013 


.011 


ToMd 


IT. 11(3 


893 


U350 


a3.«M 1 310 


39,303 


xa 


I.<8 


.018 


013 







At the close of the year 1865 there remained nnder treatment 853 caeea ; 
during the year 1866 there occnrred 34,350 casea of disease, injury, &c., mak- 
ing a total of 25,203 cases treated daring the year, of which number 310 died; 
23,9A4 were returned to duty or discharged the service, leaving 939 cases under 
treatment at the end of the year 1866. 

The average strength of the navy, (officers, seamen, marines, engineer ser- 
vice and coast survey included,! for the year 1866, as nearly as can be ascer- 
tained, was about 17,193. 

The proportion of cBsee admitted to the whole number of persons in the 
service was about 1.46, or each person was on the sick-list If*^ times during the 
year. The proportion of deaths to the whole number in the service was .018, 
and the percentage of deaths to whole number of cases is .012, or less than two 
per cent. 

The total number of deaths from all causes reported at the Navy Department 
from October 1, 1666, to SepUmber 30, 1867, is 395. 

UN 



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SEPOBT OF THE 8ECEETAKT OF THXI KATT. 211 

The foregoing tabnlftr etBtemeats are baaed upon the reports of sick (torn all 
naval Etatioos and vesselB during the year. 

Reports of 117 vesselB, with an aggregate of 1IS,106 officers and mm, are on 
file in this office for the year 1866. 

NAVAL LABORATORY. 

The necessity for enlacing the lahoratory accommodation continnes to press 
itself upon the attention of &e bnreau. , 

In a recent commanication upon the subject, the director of the naval labora- 
torj observes : " The space sapplied by the laboratory building ia quite insuffi- 
cient fcr the work required. The store-rooma are so stowed aa to tender it very 
difficult to get at the articlea. The apparatus is crowded into e, space too fltnall 
for its proper working. The attic is filled with atorea, and notwithstanding the 
large amount and bulk of aupplies recently issued, we have on hand more than 
a tbwuaad cubic feet of stores, which it' is impossible to accommodate in the 
laboratory." 

It should be borne in mind that when this establishment was originally organ- 
ixed the navy consiated of some forty (40) vessels, and perhaps about 8,000 
men. 

An unoccupied buildiug attached to the naval hospital. New York, was found 
Hofficient to accommodate the macfaiaery, apparatus, manufacturiug department, 
alor&rooma, diepeneiog rooms, &c.. Ice; but the great increase of the navy 
since that day makes more ample accommodations alisolutely necessary. 

It is fonnd well nigh impossible to conduct properly the duly operations of 
the establishment within the present contracted limits, f have therefore again 
submitted an estimate for the coostruction of additional laboratory accommo* 
dations. 

For current repairs of the establishment and appendages, purchase and repairs 
of machinery, furniture, &c.i ice., there will he required $2,500. 

IN8ANB OP THB NAVY. 

On the 30th September, 1866, there remained under treatment in the 
government asylum for the insane near this city. 6 officers, 1 marine, 
4 seamen, 4 laudsmen, and 3 beneficiaries — total 18 

During the year ending September 30, 1867, there were admitted 1 
officer, 1 petty officer, 2 marines, and 2 seamen— total 6 

Total number under treatment daring the year 24 

The discharges in the course of the year were, by recovery, 1 seaman 

and 1 landiiman 2 

By death, I officer, 1 seaman and 1 beneficiary 3 

By impmvement, 1 officer 1 

TotJ..., 6 

Leaving in the institution ou the 30tb September, 1867, S officers, 1 
petty officer, 3 marines, 4 seamen, 3 landsmen, and 2 beneficiaries— 



ToUl.. 



NAVAL HOSPITAL FDND. 



Naval hospitals are supplied excluaively from this fund, which is maintuued 
by a montlily deduction of twenty (20) cents from the pay of officers, seamen 
and mariDee, the transfer of the pensions of such persons aa commute their 



212 BEPOBT OF THE SECSETiitT OF THE NAVT. 

pensioDB for support in the Naval Asylum, and of tbe cost price of the raliotu of 
sick Bubaieted in hospitals. 

Its condition is represented as follows : 

Balance on hand October 1, 1866 $307,672 86 

TraiiBferred to the fond hj the Fonrth Andilor, in settlement of 

accounts &o., from October 1, 1866, to October 1, 1867 177,867 58 

Transferred to the tund on scconnt of suppUes from the naval 

Isboratoiy to vessels and navy yards, from October 1, 1866, 

to October 1,1867 28,906 64 

508,416 38 
Deduct amount expended from October 1, 1866, to October 1, 

1867 110, 719 61 

a hand October 1, 18C7 397,786 77 



PorUmouth, N. H. — The sick quarters at this station continue to answer tiie 
immediate wants of the navy, 

CheUea, Mat: — Dnring the past year a great deal of labor has been performed 
in and around this establishment. A snbataatial fence, about twelve hundred 
(1,300) feet in length, has been built on the northern side of the grounds. A 
new gate-house and porter's lodge, with necessary appurtenance b, have beea 
completed. A nuraery has been laid out, and about three thousand five hundred 
(3,500) trees and shrubB have been set in. These have been procured from the 
adjacent country, and are intended to be used for avenues and hedges. 

About eighteen (!8) tona of hay have been cut from the place. 

The crop of potatoes will not be far from one thoneand (1,000) bushels, and 
tbe crop of the usual garden vegetables has been sufScient to supply the wants 
of the noapital and to feed tbe milcb cows of the establishment dnring the winter. 

Tbe work of laying out a new cemetery, to take tbe place of the present 
inconvenient and unsichtly burying ground, has been commenced. 

Tbe total nnmber o7 sick treated during the year was 453 ; the daily avenge 
sick, 48j|x. 

For repairs and improvements of all kinds,, in eluding improving and cnltivs- 
tion of hospital farm, and grounds ; laying out cemetery ; painting, glazing, and 
' whitewashing; blacksmiths', plumbers', and masons' work ; repairs on steam- 
heating apparatus and laundry, &c., &c., &c-, there will be reqnired 911,000. 

Ntw York. — During the current year the grounds generally, including roads, 
paths, &c., &c., have been put in proper condition. The field formerly occn- 

fiied as a gun-ground having been cleared of the Btones used for gnu-beds, tbe 
and was put under cultivation ; and since the commencement of the year, from 
this source and from the kitchen garden, vegetables to the valne of over two 
thousand dollars ($2,000) have been used in the hospital. 

The work of repairing the interior of the hospital, suspended during tbe war 
in oonsequeuce of tbe crowded state of the wards, was commenced as soon as 
the condition of affairs would permit. 

Al l repairs of vital necessity in the first and second storiea have already been 
accomplished. The plastering of the walla and ceilings has been thoroughly 
seraph and smoothed. On the first story the ceilings were calcimined, and the 
whole surface of the walls thoroughly painted. In tbe second story the pas- 
sages and wards had their walls painted to the height of seven feet, and the 
rest caldmined with the ceilings. 

The fnmitnre has been thoroughly repaired, and one hundred and fifty neir 



BEFOBT OF THE SECBBTARY OF THE If ATT. 213 

Iron bedflteada of improred etnictare were BubstitQted iar those that irere old 
and worn out. 

Host of the carpetfli matting, and oil-clothe were condemned m nCterlj' unfit 
for further ubo, and new ones eubetituted. 

The water fixtures and gas pipes, which had follen into deca^, have been 
thoroagbly repaired. 

The boiler supplying the heating apparatus has been repaired, but is deemed 
by the State inspector unsafe for use after the coming winter. 

The roof of the hospital requires complete repairs. The macbinety of the 
laundry and drying room requires thorough overhauling, and many parts now 
worn should be replaced. 

In the basement, the plastering, wood work, and floors are insecnre and re- 
quire repura. 

A great deal of paving requires resetting, and it is feared that the underground 
gas-pipes are rusted through in many places. 

The cemetery will require a wall or strong fence two-thirds of its extent, now 
completely exposed to treBpoesers trom the streets. 

The total number of sick treated during the year 1S66 was 1,187 ; the daily 
average sick, 167j|4. 

To complete repairs of obvious necessity, including roof, heating and laundry 
uparatne, plastering, wood work and floors of bsaement, pavements, painting. 
gloKing, whitewashing, plumbers' work, &c., &c., &c.> there will be required 
«15,000 

Navu-l A*ylmm, Philadelphia. — The work on the new naval hospital, on the 
Naval Asylum grounds, continues'to progress favorably, and there is every pros- 
pect of the building being ready for use by the lat of April next. ' 

The total number of sick treated daring the year was 351 ; the daily average 
eick, 31JIJ. 

For laying out the grounds ; building stable, fence, and necessary outhouses ; 
and for current repairs of all kinds, there will be required $19,000. 

Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. — In my last annual report I had the honor 
of calling your attention to the insufficient accommodations for the sick at this 
institution, and stated that although the daily average sick was over fifty, (50,) 
yet the hospital crowded to its utmost capacity could receive but twelve (13) 
inmates. I urged that an appropriation be asked, wherewith to purchase a 
pri^>er site, oad erect a hospital for the present and probable future ueceseities 
of the institution. In calling your attention to this matter again, I beg to 
remind you of the urgent appeal mode by the recent board of visitors in favor 
of early congressional action on behalf of the object indicated. 

The board of visitors also recommended the employment of two or three 
practical dentists, to be permanently located at the academy, that the midship- 
men who are unable to leave the institution might have their teeth properly 
cared for, and I cannot too earnestly indorse this recommendation. 

W<uhinglon, D. C. — This establishment was opened on the 1st October last, 
and answers all the requirements of the navy on this station. 

The total number of sick treated daring the year was 181 ; the daily average 
aick, 17J«. 

Korfolk, Va. — The following are the principal Improvements and repairs that 
bave been carried on at this station since my Inst report : 

The road from ihe hospital to the bridge leading to Portsmouth has been 
filled up and graded ; galleries bave been repaired wnere rotted ; several wards 
have been partially floored ; hanging copper gutters have been put on outer 
«avcs of wings of hospital and connected with tanks in rear of bnilding ; the 
hospital walla have been partially scraped and whitewashed ; the garden walls 
bave been repaired, and the flagging of basement has been nlaid ; a brick 
ze&tgerator has been put up in the steward's store-room; a brick pavement has 



214 BEPOET OF THE SECBETARY OP THE NATT. 

been laid in front of tlie hospital, and from tbence to front of enrgeon'e boase; 
a new stable has been bnilt ; tbe stable-yard fence and sbed has been reoiOTed 
to new stable and repaired ; the boat-boase, float, and part of the fences bave 
been repaired. 

Tlie remaining fences require to be repaired. The bridge and batb-bonae, in 
front of surgeons' bouse, require repairing. Tbe boat-house bridge and the 
main vrhfut and bridge, being thorongbly rotten, require to be replaced wilhont 
delay. The pest-honae rests on wooden posts, and requires to be nnderpinned 
with stone or brick. 

For these and other necessary, incidental, and current repairs, the evm of 
$7,500 is asked. 

The total number of Mvk treated during the year waa 368 ; tbe daily avera^ 
sick, 20§Jf. 

Fensacola, Fla — Early in the montli of Angnst the yellow fever made its 
appearance at tbia station, and continued to rage with violence to the first of 
tbia month. 

Doctor Aberaethy, tbe surgeon in charge, makes the following return : No(d- 
ber of CBECS treated, 116; died, 18; cured or convalescent at date of report, 98. 

Of those who died were one captain United States marine corps, one assist* 
ant snrgeon, one second lieutenant United States marine corps, one apothecary, 
three corporals United States marine corps, one fifcr United States maritw 
corps, seven privates United States marine corps, one second-class fireman, ooe 
coal-heaver, one ship's cook. 

It is my grateful dnty to bring to tbe notice of the department the niedical 
officers of tbe navy attached to this station, who, in time of general panic and 
excitement, continued faithfully and cheerfully at tfaeir posts, discharging, with- 
out a murmur, all tbe accumulated labor imposed by so violent an epidemic. 

Surgeon J. J, Abemethy, Acting Assistant Surgeon T. M. Drummond, and 
Assistant Surgeon Augustus Theodore Piek were on dnty at tbe commencement 
of tbe epidemic. 

Acting Passed Assistant Surgeon N. L. Campbell, Passed Assistant Surgeon 
John D. Murphy, and Acting Passed Assistant Surgeon .William Gale were 
added to the hospital stafi', as the number of sick increased. 

Of this number. Doctors Mnrpby and Piek, young officers of great promise 
and merit, nnfortnnately fell victims to the disease, and Doctors Campbell and 
Gale were seized with the fever soon after joining tbe station. At the last 
report they were, I am happy to say, convalescent. 

The total number of sick treated dnriog the year was 531 ; the daily average 
sick, 64il}. 

Mare Uland, Cal. — Congress has appropriated 9120,000 for the erection of 
a naval hospital at this place. 

The civil engineer of the naval station, Mare island, OaIiforoia,|baa been fur- 
nished with tracings, and requested to execute the necessary plans, elevations, 
and sections, with specificatious of material and workmanship, and forward them 
to this bureau. When received and approved, meaaorea will be taked to coid- 
mence the erection of tbe building without delay. 

For furnishing tbe new bnilding when completed, and for general outfit, there 
will be required 910,000. 

MEDICAL CORPS OP TUB NAVV. 

At this time there are forty-eight (48) vacancies in tbe medical corps of the 
Davy, which it is almost impossible to fill properly. 

These vacancies have existed ever since the close of the war, and bo far as can 
reasonably be anticipated will not only continue to exist, but will be increased 
to such a degree as to endanger the integrity of this branch of the public ser- 
vice, uulees steps are taken to prevent such a result. 



BEPOBT OF THE aBORKTABT OF THE NA7T. 215 

The reasona for this condition ara manifeat and perfectly natnral. Toung 
gentiemen fitted by their abilitj and uiformatiou to enter the medical corps are 
unwilling to join a hody offering in letnra do adequate remuneration iu pay, 
rank or promotion. Talent, skill and profeaBional knowledge will sei'k their 
reward through the most speedy and desirftble channels. So long as civil 
practice is more remunerative, and holds out greater inducements and quicker 
promotion, the medical man cannot be expected to subject himself to the disci- 
pline and hardahipa of the service; it might ai well be expected by a polilicul 
economist that a commodity would seek a market where there was no adequate 
demand for it. It is clear, that, ntiless some compensation is to he found in the 
emolaments and rank of the position, the medical man will nut give up the 
comforts of a home and the freedom of civil duties to undergo the confinement 
and annoyances of sea-life. 

As at present organised, the pay is altogether inadequate ; and as to promo- 
tion, the staff corps of the navjf have seen their more fortunate brethren of the 
line rapidly promoted for their services during the war, whilst they themselves 
have been left to soeh rewards as a good eouecience and the honest and faithful 
dischaige of their dangerous and important duties furnish. 

These may be consolaiioas to those who expected and deserved better things, 
but they are not inducements that will prevent the disintegration of this branch 
of the service. I therefore earnestly repeat that prompt legislation on the part 
of Congress is imperatively required, and I am sure that that body wiU not 
hesitate to follow any suggestions you may see fit to make, when they properly 
understand the present critical position of the medical department of the navy. 

Since 1862, six g^rades of commiseioned officers have been added to the liae, 
whilst the medical corps stands as it stood forty years ago, its pay but slightly 
■dvanced, notwithstanding the enormous increase in the price of everything 
uound us : its relative rank left for in the rear by the promotion of its brethren 
of the line. 

Why the heroism and fidelity of its members during the great rebellion, 
which they so materially aided in bringing to a successful conclusioa, shoald be 
that repaid by the government, it is difficult to imagine. 
Very respecffoUy. yosr obedient servant, 

P. J. HOBWITZ, 

Cki^^ Bureau. 

fioD. GiDBo\ Wbllbs, 

Secretary oftkt Aoey. 



RBCAPfTOLATlOM OP BSTIMATBa. 

FornpportafUieBnresDofUediciDeuidBnrirery, (icIirdDle A) $13,230 

For pay of «>np1oj^ of hospitals and dispeuMriBs of oavj fkrda, (B) T3,36& 

For repair* and inprorsineDtsof bosidiali, (C) 61,IHI0 

For Naval Laboratnr;, (C) eu.OOO 

Toa) 225,565 



Dniitizc-ctvCoogle 



BEPOBT OP THE 8E0BETABT OF THE NAVT. 



EtiimaU of appropriationt tender tfu cognizance of the Bureau ofMeiKine and 
Surgery for the tupport oftaid bureau, reguired/or the terviee oftheJitetJ 
year ending June 30, 1869. 






111 



510. ._ 

For sslaiy of sssiBtaut to borMO^per act of Jul/ 16, 1862, 
Statutes at Large, 2d seMioQ 3!rth Congreu, Bection, Id, 
page 586 -. 

For salary of ooe clerk, per act of July 33, 1806 .••.. 

For lalary of one clerk, per act of Jul j 23, 1666 

Fdi salary of meseengrer, per act of June 29; 1864, SlAtutes 

at Large, p&ge 16U, 1st sesBion 38th Cod gress 

For ialarf of laborer, per act Jane 25, 1864, Ststntes at 

I^ge, page 160, Ist seBaiou 38lb Congi'esg 

CONTIKOEttT EXPENSES. 

Blanks, Btationerj, and miscellaiieom items 



(3,600 00 

2,800 00 



1,000 00 
720 00 



Estimate of the pay of employei at naval hotpitah and dupauariet <^ navy 
yard* Jot the Jiical year ending June 30, 1869, included in the apprapruUum * 
civil ettaUithmmt Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. 

HOSPITALS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 

1 apothecary, inl clats fphO 

1 Apothecary, second class 480 

1 carpenter 380 

1 chief cook 240 

3 cooks, gieSeach 336 

1 eiigineer 600 

Ifcrmer 480 

2 firemen, 8360 each 780 

1 gardener 300 

4rabofers, $340 each 960 

3 washers, |168 each 504 

a 360 

ngei JMO 

1, f240each , TfiO 

1 painter aod glazier 360 

1 gate-keeper 300 

3 watchmen, }3fl0 each 1,080 

Total 6.790 



OF THE 8BCBBTABT OF THE HATT. 217 

HBW yORK, K. V. 

1 apotheewj, Bnt elwt (760 

1 ftpothecMj, second cltita . 480 

1 apothecary, third cIms... .... ...... 360 

1 oupeater ....... ............. 600 

1 chief cook . . . . ..... . 840 

5 cooks, $168 each 336 

1 BOfrinoer ; .,,, 730 

4 firemeD, $360 each , 1,440 

1 (fartener Bad fanner , ;,,. 480 

6 Uborarg, $340 each: 1,440 

5 Unndrawea and chambennaids, $144 each 720 



Snnrsea, $340 each -, 1,440 

1 painter and glasier 360 

1 porter, (main entrance ^le-keepei) i 360 

I porter, (raar jjate-keeper) ,,.. S40 

1 watchman for (reneral police datiea . ...... iSO 

2 watchman, $300 each 600 

1 ambnlance driver and stable-keeper 360 

Total 14,076 

NAVAL LABORATORY. 
Kf w rotii, M. r. 

J maanfaetarer $860 

1 BMistant nuumfaetDrcr GOD 

1 ehief packer 650 

3 assistant packers, $300 each 900 

1 engineer 850 

I fireman 360 

1 Clark 850 

1 tbipplDg porter 500 

Iperter 350 

Total 6,000 

PHILADELPHIA, PA, 

1 ■pfltbecarj', fir«t class $750 

1 apothecary, third class 3<jO 

1 matroD 360 

1 carpenter 360 

1 chief cook 340 

SassistaDt cooks, $163 each 336 



i,$360 each 730 

1 nrdeoer 300 

3 laborers, $340 each 720 

3 washers, $168 each 504 

SDunea, tMO each 730 

I gat»-keeper 300 

3 watchmen, $360 each l,oeo 

Total 7,590 

AMMAPOUS, UD. 

S apothecaries, first class, ^60 each $1,500 

Simnea, $180 each 360 

1 mewenger 340 

Ilaborsr 160 

1 washer 109 

I cook 160 

Total S,B09 



218 



BEPOHT OP THE SECEETABT OPTHB NATT. 



WJtSBtHGTbtf, D. C. 

1 BpothecATy, first dsaa 

1 Bpolhecary, second class 

1 wBtchtnan far general police dntie* 

4 nunea, (340 each 

1 laundresB ....... ........ 

2 eook», $1G8 each 

3 laborers, $144 each , 



3 waabers, (144 each.. 

1 watchman 

1 engineer 

S firemen, (360 each.. 



1 apothecary, first class... 
1 apothecarj, third class.. 

1 engineer 

1 carpenter 



NOR POLK, TA. 



1 gMdener 

1 chief uook 

2 mesd-room attendants, (16S each.. 



S aasigtaot Dorses, $166 

2 laundresses, $144 eoc 
4 boatmen, $I(^ each.. 
4 laborers, $192 each . . . 

3 watcbmen, $3110 each. 



apothecary, first class 

apothecary, second class 

matron 

nurses, $364 each 

assistant nurses, $316 each 

watchman 

mesE-roomatteadanta, $168 each., 
woaheis, $180 each 



FENSACOLA, FLA. 



6 laborers, f 144 ei 
Total 



1 apothecary, first class.. 



NAVY YARDS. 

FOBT8MOUTH, N. H. 



noSTON, HA8B. 



BEPOBT Oe THE 8ECBETABY OF THE NATT. 



1 Bpctbecwy, firel due $750 

1 laborer, M j^ per day J30 

Total 1,480 

PHtLADELPRIA, PA. 

1 apothecary, fint clau . $750 

. Aborer, at (2 pel day 730 

TotiJ 1,480 

WASHINOTON, D. C. 

1 apo^eeary, first clasa (750 

1 laborer, at |2 per day 730 

Total 1,460 

NORFOLK, TA. 

1 apothecary. Brat clau $790 

1 laboror, at (2 per day 730 

Tot4a 1,480 

MARE ISLAND, OAL. 

lapolbecvy, fint dan %l,OWr 

leook 540 

Icook 480 

4nar»e«, J480 each 1.930 

4 washer*, W80 each l,ftM 

2 laborer*, 1360 each 720 

1 watchman 360 

2 neaa-rooiii alteedants, $210 each 432 

Total r,3J3 



Ettimattt far hotpitaU, Ifc. 

For T«p«tn and improremants of hospltala and append«g«e, Inclndln^ roada, 
wbarrea, nalli, oat-hougea, lidewalks, fsncea, eardong, fannt, painting, 
-' -'--■-—' -J ' -fork, fumiinre, 4.C., dtc 



glasing, blackimithi', plum ben', and a. 
For Dava] laboratory.. 



»eo,ow) 

P. J. HOBWrrZ, Cki'fofBtnau. 



.dbyGoogle . 



BBPOBT OF THE 8ECBBTART OF THE HA.yT. 



Report of diteatet and tnjuriet on hoard oe»*elt in the navy of the United Statet 
tehiJtt engaged in mpprening the TtheUioa,fTirm April, ,1861, to June, 1865, 
arranged in tke following ordtr,eiz : \.. FotonuLc fiotMa ; 2. Atlaxtir iquad- 
ron; 3. North Atlantic squadron; 4. South Atlantic tquadron; 5. Out/ 
equadran; G. Eatt Gulf iquadron ; 7. We»t Gulf tguadrmt ; 8. Mittieeippi 
equadron. 

POTOMAC FLOTILLA. 

Fnibncing tbe Potomac river and ita IributaiisB, from Apiit 1, 1861, to December 31, ld6). 

1 1 1 .i.A__i ■_, eo-. ■ ital munbor of TMseU, 10. 



Average nnmber of ahips' companies, 5) 















n-'i^-^^v; 
















Clui a.— Dficuu of lb Dtgatin Sfilat. 
























































































































CLA99 1— DueuH ^ CfnuUurj Stfrn. 




"■as 








Ougs S.— DfnucJ of lii Brain mi «tr- 




^sisr" 













IMMgiBtniuDi 







.(fil 


.OOIT 










.S 


.0017 














» 




























1 














































» 










> 


































* 










» 






















1 






.133 


.0017 








































1. 


.0017 
















.a 


.0017 



KCPORT OF TBK 8B0KBTi.BT OF 1 

Potomac fiotilla, from April I, 1861, to Deeembtr 



:he natt. 221 

31, 1861 — CoDtianed. 





!■ 


j 




1 


1 
1 


1 


i, 


1 


ill 


• '£¥=7. 




34 
3 

1 
9 

7 

a 

1 

3 
1 


18 
3 

» 
3 

e 

? 


E 


34 
10 

10 

10 

3 

« 

1 

3 
S 








.OOIT 
• OOH 












l^imMOlM 




1 














&oi::;:::::::::::::::::;:::::. 


...... 






.SSS 


LOnvd.* 












.017 


"■asi 










"£=; 










Ol.ua*.— JNHuan/iili OnUo-lfriMrT 
Miphrlito 
















t 










0034 

Oil 
0017 


lt,lSSS:5?^::::::::::::-.:;::::: 












M 










CLau ia-C«*tii-, tmiMtUf*^ 

DUmtm. 

AdjT.UU« 










.017 
.0017 


CLIH 11— DiMMH ^U< .^ n^ <B. 




1 










> 

1 

3 
S 
< 


E 




.0034 


'^Ss;:;;:::::::::;::: !:= 
















C^w—oe-rtrl 










VtalTi^ta- 





....J. 








Oil 

on 


FmetBTB 





19 

J 


:;::: 


3 








Conluto 






AbndD 


:;:::: 


ones 


TaMi 





B48 


■ 19 


"'.'j-i^ 


•|-"» 


.«» 


144 



























BEPOBT OP THE 8ECEETAKY OP THE KATT. 



POTOMAC FLOTILLA. 







1 

11 
83 

i 

1 

« 

13! 
5 

: 










JL /iMMli-maU! 












Cliu 3.— Dfoeuu (ETlAa DtstfUn Butum. 




























































A.«™. ^"^ 














1 




















L Oncnt: 


°-a?K 




Cum 3.-IHKW. ./ Ik, BrmlK and fli.- 
Epl.ep...r".r"^ 




















CLAU&— THuoni D/Ili CiiUiiawind 




a.Piumar~ 





















..... 


.OIB 


.OWI 










































» 


















































































































































































.0017 










































































^ 








1 









BEPOBT or 'the SECKETART or THB HATT. 288 

PoUmae^iOa, fnm Janmary 1, 1862, lo December 31, 1862— Continned. 





1 


! 


1 


t 


1 

1 


1 


1 


1 


'B'S . 






11 

33 

1 
5 

i 

1 

a 

i 
'! 

t 
1 


15 

33 
I 

e 




a 

16 

33 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 












































Clus l.—Ditaf of Wan<u. Mtcular. 
'-^^ 




































n. o/a^: 












m. O/jBinU: 














1 




















S,Mtm. 




. 












1 

1 

■ 
1 

1 

9 
1 
3 


...... 

...... 






























































































CLin 1 X.—VUfua t/tlu Eyt nd Mar. 




































a.OfXmrt 










































.H 


.oou 




C«Jj-«-lo«r.bn 




































1 












.)« 


.COOT 


















































1 










1 












:;:::::: 


■.■6iii- 










KSi;™,;v«bi;;;i;:::::;:::::.. 






Toul 




ero 




, 


BT5 




.Km 


.010 


■.41 



















;,CJoogIe 



224 BBPOET OV THE BSCftETASY OF THE NATT. 

POTOMAC FLOTILLA. 

From J»DtiU7 ], 1863, to December 31, 1863. ATcrage niunbeT «f Bbipe' eompaniea, 61 
nnmber of veaseU, 17. 










3 












" 


.0034 


























1 
























































































































.10 


.DOU 























































































BEPOBT OF THE 8ECRETABT OF THE NATT. 225 

PoUmcx jUtUla, Jrom January 1, 1863, lo Deeetnher 31, 1863 — GontJnneil. 





1 

r 


1 


^ 


1 


1 


1 

1 = 


1 


it 

as 


» 

1 


CL>ia«-CoiiUni»d. 




9D 

as 

6 
9 

13 

I 

a 

3 
3 

\ 


90 

as 

« 

9S 
1 

IS 

a* 

1 
s 

3 
3 

1 


:::::: 
:::::: 


1 
1 
90 
9S 

1 

ia 
as 

1 










*. VitioilT^ 
























"■^SHil^Jla. 




























































I. Ontr*i: 
























lLttfBo*u^ 
























OLO/Mm,: 


























, 
























' 






























rrolftR •tricrani 










oS? 


eyvWlM prtnuJT 














1 


13 
H 




















Cum la— CMk<i<A ml Itallgt-a 
























CUM IL-DtHuao/Of X^«4 br. 




































°'%£x 
























r-w.»- 






































» 














.195 


.0017 






















s^r^- 










DOM 




1 


















































L 








• 


909 


TS-,— 


•10 


~" 


.OOM 


.01 


LOO 






















' 





. 226 REPOBT OF THE SECBBTAST OF THE NATT. 

POTOMAC FLOTILLA. 

From Jannai7 1, 1664, to December 31, 1864. AverBee nnmbm of shipi' compuuM, 9 
nnmbsr of veMob, la. 




S8 

* 

B 

m 
es 

B 
S3 

* 

1 
11 

3 

5 

8 

9 


.;;;;; 


96 

1 
17 

SO 
83 

J 

fi 

3J 
63 
IS 

3 

B 
6 

S 


} 


























































.M 


.6017 






























































1 






















s 


















I 































































































BEPOBT OF THE 8ECKETABT OF THE NAVY. 227 

Potomac _flotiUa, from Janitary 1, 1864, to December Z\, 1864 — Continned. 





1 

li 

f 


1 


j 


1 


i 


i-' 


I 

■8 

ill 




It 
Ill 


CLIU e-CooUimed. 
n. CMtiat, 




3 

1 
< 

J 

a 

1 

6 

4 

4 

10 

'i 


33 
13 

6 




36 
3 

33 

S 

30 

« 

3 

10 

9 

10 














































Cum l.—Difta of Fibnmi, JtfwcHlar. 
»d Ohhh SfUm,. 




































n. O/Bo-u,: 












in. Of jBinu: 












Clau B.— CJwriH* i^r lit Oniur-tMnBy 

Syium. 


























1 












1 












at 

3 

1 

I 
1 

! 

10 . 
1 . 


"a 








































Cl.AUll)L-C!utui««ditf>f(r»uZMi- 




































CLIU U,—DUtfHn ^tlHSfami Jhr. 

■■gf.,S.;,.,,. 




. 






























n. O/Sv: 
















































(-■11.11.— 








































1 


.a 


.oojs 






































J 
















































* 


eee 


na 


» 


BTU 


— ^] 


.103 






1 


1 





,ab,GoOgIc 



REPORT OP THE SECRETARY OF THE HAVJ. 
POTOMAC FLOTILLA. 



From Jaanllij 1, 1665, to Jnne 3( 






II. Efm^c 

Urlieapls 

Ci-i9a 3.— DlHOHiii/itf Digalivi , 



Hmnon-hoi. .. 
Vbiijagnii... 
CubbS.— Duwi 



Htesioptytii . 



PDenn 



I^llilali puliDonslU 

CLASS 1.— />t>cuEi nfMu drculatary 
11 Of Blood yaiiU t 



VbtLi. 



LIU 5.— Due 

EpUepilB 

Nonraigi* 

IrrilatlnlpinBUg.. 



}f At Brain and Ko~ 



' i.Inipttlgo.- 



( 


1 


lit 


'■I 

1 

"a 








s 














































































































1 






















* 






























1 






















































1 






























1 




















































































„ 








(MM 



SEPOBT OF THE SECBETASf OP THE NATT. 



Potomac fiotiUa,Jrom January 


1, 1865, 


to Jmu 30, 1865— Conlinuea. 






1 

r 


i 

I 


1 


1 


3 
& 


1 


; 


1 

I" 


It 

il! 


OLA»<-C<nUiu>d. 




ID 
> 

1 

a 

1 

3 
9 

1 

a 

3 


33 
B 

* 

I 
3 

3 

I 

» 
3 

3 


:::::: 


3S 
S 

I 

3 

I 

% 

1 

1 
3 








































» 


















mmiOittmatifmi. 














I""' 










□. OfJMtiu: 














































Cum 8.— IHhub g/ Aniit, Atatoii^ 
























Gum S^IMmm ^ >1< AalUhlMufv 








































1 






















9 
































































■■«&;„ 


. 



























'^S^'A 
























r.j.w- 














I 
























» 




.39 


.0013 










1 






















































MM 




























" 


» 


la 


• 


Tsa 


" 


.00133 


.00.31 











BEPOBT OF THE 8ECSETABT OF THE KATT. 

ATLAMTIC SQUADRON. 



of Bhips' companies, 4,167; total Dumber of veiidB iuaquadro: 



CLAM 1.— JMrtt. 



Cl.ita&.—DiMt44toflAtPiguliii§agium. 



Hcpatllli chronica . . 

SplenlllV'."'.^ !".*." 

Enlerilli 

CninOpHlla 



GLABI 3. — DilHH 



BroDcUttaeh 



v/tjti Raplralorj 



*i tf Am Chatatari 



BjpertrolAlK 

AnKina pflctoria , . , 
L QfBlcai Vuidi: 















10 


!na 


! 00047 


















» 










1 




























s 










..... 


.333 


.ooon 










B 






















9 






















■■^^ 



















I 






.07« 

.om 


.00033 
.00023 



























































BEFOBT OF THE 8ECBBTAUT OF THE NATT. 2S1 

Atlantir. »^uadr<m,Jrom April 1, 1B61, to September 30, ]86> — Continued. 



MealDdtK... 
Cnnbrttli . . . 



CLin fl.— D<n«H tf Of GUaium and 



ClahT.— TNi 



■ ■d Atmrttml iftumi. 



C\.Iitl 9^ DiMiasa of lilt anIla-Ur 



3 


:::::; 


9 
S 

1 
3H 
3 




»1 


:::::: 






.OOOtT 
.000*7 



J32 EEPOET or THE SBCEETikBY OP THE NAVY. 

Atlantic tgtuidrtm,/rom AprU 1, 1861, lo September 30, 1861 — Continued. 





1 

f 


1 
1 


1 


1 


1 


1 

■s 


1 




ii 

ii 


Ol.*»a S-ConUnned. 




10 

.8 

1 

T 

IS 
13 

10 

i 

3 


31 




IS 

<; 

1 
1 

7 
13 

1 

« 

1 


J 


































S 
S 


:;;;;; 




















CLAU la— OuAolri aiuf MoHgwol 




I 






























CLUa It— SfHOM B/IIUIftamd Ear. 














1 


























"■is:!"*!::^:::::::::::::: 
















I 
1 












8 
K 

41 
S 


::^ 












































..." 












.8 


.OOWT 














? 


.m 


.oooio 




























CM 














1 






















1 






ooosB 






I 
























i.307 


MM 


i« 


i.3tl7 


173 


.om 


.0083 













D.,.Ei.ct,Googlc 



REPORT OF THE 8ECBBT&BT OF THE NATT. 
HOBTH ATLAJSTIC SQUADRON. 






234 EEPOST OP THE SECRETABr OP TBE KATT. 

Norlk Atlantic »quadro», from Oct. I, 1861, to Dtc. 31, 1861 — Continned, 





1 

F 


. 


t 


t 


1 


1 


■sS 


If 

pi 
p 


lit 


OUU \-DUmK, If Uu Brain ami 




! 

8 

1 
39 

,! 

3 

1 
3t 

..... 
8 

4 

J 

10 
10 


...... 


I 


1 

J 

1 
1 

n 
a 

a 
» 

i 

e 

4 
B 
B 




1. 


.oom 


























1 












8 


:::::: 


























































































'■h-ssr. 




J 








3. C«Jn.lar— 


1 


3 

S 

s 
s 

3 

J 

« 

n 


;;;;;; 


















""riStSd 




\ 




t:.z:: 






s 




































CLUB l.—DtMltt Of FOnui, MtaCHlar, 
















A 




















s 






.008 


^^^0^; 








1 






























m. O/Joinif: 
















e 


















—a AinriM SfUMM. 












CLUS V.-IHHiua nf tU OniUVrlMan 




i 












































1 


a 


















1 





















































SEPOKT OF THE SBCRETABT OF THE NATT. 

North Atlantic iquadnm,Jrom Oct. 1, 1861, to Dtc. 31. 1S61— 4 



235 

■OoDtiDaed. 





1 

H 
1 

1 


J 


I 


^ 


1 

1 


■s 

i 

i' 


I 


1 


= "8 . 


Cum Uk-Ca^a^jnd MmUgntKI 


, 


1 

10 

1 
1 

St 


i 
i 




i 

3 












> 


















CLAW 11.— OfHuu a/dUXiltaiBt^. 














I 


s 








































"■SCJ"' 




i 










1 




















1 

96 

J 

f 












1 


fl 


















* 




























■ 


















5 




















9 




















> 


a 


""i 












1. 


.ooon 












01 I 3IS 


,m 


w 


,4M 


M 


■""' 


OOM 













,ab,GoOglc 



BEPOST OF THE SECBETABT OF THE NA.TT. 
HOBTH ATLAHTIC SQUADRON. 



Cum 3.— DtHuo e/litl>if—tff§9fmem. 



Oamdnii. . . 

ParotlUa....I. 






FUmliHil... 

GdIIca plctanb 
CLAUS.— iHiai 



Bnnebltli elimi 






n. Of Hiant 

PalpHUio 



3 




. 


•s's . 


.01 


.000,9 




on- 




.078 


^ooia 


r* 










1 




.000!4 


su 




































* 














1 














:? 


DOOM 

onoM 


oil 
ocet 


1 














3 

1 








































1 














































1 


.OS 


.OOOM 




«« 








16 








.on 


.OOOM 


ocei 


3 








:w9 


looow 


oil 


3 




























ma 






























1. 


ooosi 


nfSri 








COU 



BEPOBT OF THE 6&CBBTABT OF THE NAVT. 
North AtlaiUM iquadrm.from Jan. 1, 1863. to Dee. 31, 1862— 



237 

■CoQtianed, 





1 

1'' 

1 


1 

1 




i 


1 


i 


1 


it 


■S-B 


Cutsl-ConUimed. 
m. Of aiMl ya«U! 


J 


1 
9 
J7 

3 
3S 

13 
S7 
B 


] 
f 

1 

a 

» 
w 

14 

Ul 

1 

a 


;:::;: 


' 9 
9 

ae 

1 

3 

* 

i 

! 

SI 
IS 

a 

TO 




















A™«^«. 


















.s 


.DOOM 
.DOOM 


















> 


..... 


;iJ 


.00024 

.00024 










1 












H«il« 










.oriw 






























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North Atlantic f^adrm,Jrim Jan. 1, 1862, to Dec. 31, 1862— Continoed. 





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241 



North Atlantic gquadron, from Jan. 1> '. 



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Zili BEPORT OP THE SECRETARY OP THE NAVT. 

NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 

From Jannaij 1, 1664, to December 31, 1664. Areragenamberofibipe'coaipaiues, 10,99 

Dumber of vMseli, 56. 





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IfmiA Atlantic iqua^rom, Jrom Jan. 1, 1864, to Dec. 31, J864— Continnea. 



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North AtitaUic »quadnm,Jrom Jan. 1, 1864, te Dec, 31, 1864 — GontinDed. 





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North Atlantic tquadron, from Jan. 1, 1865, to June 30, 1S65— Continued. 









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BEPOBT OF THE SBCRBTABY OF THB NAVT. 247 

North Atlantic tqtuidttm, from Jan. 1, 1865, to Ane 30, 18S5 — Gondnned. 



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Establiohed tn October, 1861, embradng the coasts of Sonth Carolina, Oeorgift, and tlu 
eastern part of the Florida peninsula. From October 1, 1861, toI>M8mber 31, 1861) 
average nnmberof sbips' companies, 5,693; total nnmber of Tesaels iu sqaadron, 31. 



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250 ■ EBPOET OP THE 

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8ECKETART OF THE VXTf. 

Oct. 1, X861, to Dee. 31, 1861— Continued. 





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262 EEPOBT OP THE 8ECEETABT OF THB NAVY. 

South Atlantic iquadroK, from Jan. 1, 1862, to Dec. 31, 1862 — Gontiaaed. 

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REPORT OP THE 8ECBETAHY OP THE NAVT. 257^ 

South Atlantie tguadrm, from Jan. 1, 1863, to Dee. 31, 1863 — Gontinned. 





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From Jannai? 1, 1864, b 



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258 BEPOBT OP THE 8BCBBTAHT OF THE NAVT. 

South Atlantic »quadrtM,/Tom Jan. 1, 1864, to Dee. 31, 1864~Contiaaed. 





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RBPOET OF TUB 8ECRBTABY OP THE NAVY. 259 

South Atlantic squadron, from Jan. 1, 1664, t9 Dee. 31, 1864 — Cantinned. 



Class 6— Coallnaed. 



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h.Rnpln 

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260 BEPORT OF THE SEOBETABY OF THE NAVY. 

South AdanHc i^adrm./rom Jan. 1, 1864, to Dec. 31, 1864 — Continnei. 





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EBPOBT OF THE 8ECHETABT OF THE NATT. 



80UTH ATLANTIC 8QUADE0N. 









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262 EEPOET or THE SECBETABT OP TBE NATT, 

SoutA Atlantic tquadrom, from Jan. 1, 1865, to June 30, 1365 — ConUnaecl. 





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BEPOBT OF THE SEOBBTABT OF THE SAVY. 263 

South Atlantic tquadroK, Jram Jan. 1, 1865, to June 30, 1865 — GoDtinaed. 





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BEPOBT OF THE SECBETARy OF THE NATV. 



GULF SQUADRON. 

ComprUinKBlI the coaat Ijiog betwesu Cape Canaveral aud the Rio Grande. From April 1, 
1B6I, to December 3J, 1861. Average-namber of abipa' companiea, 2,702 1 total nnmber 
of veisels in squadron, 31. 



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EEPOET OF THE 8ECEETAEY OF THE NATT. 2( 

Gulf tquadrim, from April 1, 1861, to Deeemher 31, 1861~-^ontinned. 



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266 BEFOBT OF TEB 8BCRETART OF THE NAT7. 

Gidf *quadro»,/roin April 1, 1861, to Decemher 31, 1861 — Gontinned. 





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BEPOBT OF THE SECBETAST OF THE NAT7. 



EAST GULF 8QUADB0N. 



267 



in iquadron, 21. 




1 

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268 EEPOET OP THE SECEETAEY OP THE HATT. 

Eatt Gulf tquadron, from January 1, 1862, to December 31, 1862 — Continued. 



Cuu 5. — IHiem 



Epll«|Hlii 



MoMalgtn... 
CLtsa 6.—Duta 



b.TJuw 

cEclhrm.-. 

' >.F>orluii 



Ct.Aal^.—D^^a•a^fFibm^, MucMlar, 



IL Of Bona: 
OdoDUlglB. 

IlL Q/" Ataiii" 



CUSi EL— CUHtm d/ Senrut, Sxtalaat, 
a%d AbtoTbtnt Sftinu. 

Bydropi — a. AnMsr™ 

Clam 9. — ZKhohi nf lAt OnlU-UrinaTf 

Hephrilli 

iK-boFtHreDBlla 

AlUnmlnorls 

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BEPOET OP THE 8ECEETART OP THB NAVT. 
Eatl Gidf »quadron,jTom Janttary 1, 1862, to Der.rmher 31, 1802- 



269 
I— CoDtinued. 





1 


1 
1 




1 


3 


1 

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It 

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EEPOET OP THE SECRETAfeT OF THE NAVY. 
EAST GULF 8QDADB0K. 




1 










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1 

































































BBPOET OF THE 8ECBETABY OF THE NAVT. 271 

Eoit Gulf t^adrom, Jrom January 1, 1S63, to December 31, 1863 — CoDtiDoed. 



EpIlcpnU VJ 

Keonlgla... 



Dollrtum tnni<ni 

IrrluUa iplniilbi 



1. Pnwiitar— " 



PhLaimou....... ..,..._ 

L<l» T,— IM»«tcj nf Fliroui. llnteuUir, 



Ul.O/JiiInu: 

BritrDpi— ft. A> 

Si 

((•phHII. 

iKbDrill renaKa 



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272 KEPOBT OP THE 8ECBETART OP THE NAVY. 

Eatt Gulf squadron, from January 1,1863, to DecemlerZl, 1863 — Contioned. 





1 

u 

jl 


t 
1 


i 


1 


J 
1 
1 

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1 

r 


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1 


1 
1 


Class S-CooUoDed. 




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1 
1 

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39 

IS 


28 
9 

T 
1 

a 

M 
15 
IS 


c 


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REPORT OP THE SECRETARY OP THE NAVT. 
EAST OULF SQUADRON. 





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274 BEPOET OP THE 8ECEETAET OP THE SAVT. 

Eatt Gvlf tquadron, from Janvary 1, IS&i, to December 31, 1864 — Contmned. 



HtnBHt 3fittm. 



InmUtlo* 

Manlngltia .... 
OapbBlaltla .. 
Apoplvxjs *., 

Fudftla 

Eplleprin 

MenrHlgU 






Porrtgo.... 



B-Patnidilgu... 

b-Bapb 

!!. CWItiiar.- 

FnmiiciilDA -,.- 



Ulciu.. 

Trnngr 

CtAM l.—Dittuatf FOmu, Uuti 
and OrnoM Sttltmt. 

RhcamaUusai ■cntu 

tLOf Bma^™ 

OdonialglB.— 

Neciwh 

BjowtIm '.'.V.V.'.V. '."'.'".'.'.'.'.'.'. 



CL1S3 B,— CfHOIH Iff Smrni, Xikolu. 
and Ahtrlml Sttumt. 

Hjdrapi — 1. Allium 

b.AKllM 

CiMa^—Dittatacftkt Onbs-IMu 



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BEPOBT OF THE 8E0BETABT OF THE NATT. 275 

Eait Gulf *qiiadrm,Jrom January 1, 1864, to Deeemier 31, 1864— Continiied. 





1 

H 

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1 


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276 BEFOBT OF THE SECBETAaY OF TRE KAVT. 

EA8T GULF SQUADEON. 

From Jaiiaai7 I, 1865, to June 30, IS65. Average Dumber of ships' companies, 2,195: 

number of Tessefi, 30. 







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3 

3 

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9 
3 

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f 










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BGPOBT OF THB SECBETAJtT OF THE NATT. 



277 



Eatt G^f iquairo», Jrom January 1 


1865, to 


Am 


30, 


865-Contmued. 




1 

n 

r 

1 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 

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f 


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a 
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3 


















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9 






































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BEPORT OF THE SECBBTABT OF THE NAVY. 



East Gulf tquadrm,Jrom Jan. 1, 1 



i, to June 30, 18G5 — ConUnned. 





1 


! 




1 


1 

I 


1 




111 


it 

pi 






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36 




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WEST aULF 8QUADEO». 

Commencing' at and iuelnding Pensacolo, and extending weatward b 
horn Jiinuar; 1, 1862, to Decsmber 31, 1862. ATOrage number » 
7,371 ; total number of veMela in squadron, 69. 



































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REPOKT OF THE SBCRETABY OF THE NATT. 



Wiut Gitl/igMadrontjTom Jan. 1, 1 



!, to-Dee. 31, 1862— Oontiaaed. 





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280 EEPORT OF THE 8ECBBTABT OF THE NAVT. 

Wett Gidf squadron, from Jam. 1, 1862, to Dee. 31, 1663— ContinoeJ. 



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B£PORT OF THE SECHBTABY OP THE NATT. 28t 

We*t GmI/ tquadron,Jrf>m Jan. 1, 1S6S, to Dee. 31, 1863— Gon^nned. 





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EEPOET OP THE BECBETABY OP THE HATT. 

WEST GULP SQUADRON. 

7 1, ]863, to December 31, 1863. Aversn nnmber of ilupa' compsnies, 6,469; 
tnimber of YenelB, 64. 



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PertlonlUa... 

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BEFOBT OF THE SECHETARY OF THE NATT. 21 

WeH Gulf iquadron, from Jan. 1, 1863, to Dec. 31, 1863 — Gontinned. 



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EEFOBT OF THE SECBETABY OP THE NATT. 



Weit Gulf tquadrim, Jrom Jan. 1 



o Dec 31, 1863 — Continned. 





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EEPOET or THE SECRETAEY OP THE NAVY. 
WEST OULF SqUADBON. 





1 


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96 SEFOET OF THE 8ECBETART OF THE KATT. 

Wett Gulf tquadron, frvm Jant 1, 1864, to Dec. 31, 1864 — Gonliiiued. 



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BEFOBT OP THE BBCBETABY OF THE NAVY. 



Weit Gulf t^nadron, Jivm Jan. 1, ] 



I, to Dee. 31, 1864— Continued. 





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REPOBT OF THE SECBETABT OF THE ITATT. 



From Janaaiy 1, IS65, t 



WEST GULF 8QUADE0H 

reraze nam 
□umbei of Teaaali, 77. 




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BEPOKT OP THE 8BCBETABT OF TEE NAVT. 289 

Wett Gulf t^airm, from Jan. 1, 1865, to June 30, 186S— Continned. 



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290 BBFOBT OP THE 8EGRETAST 0¥ THE HATT. 

Wat <hi}f*q%adrcn,jT(m Jam. 1, 1865, to Jvme 30, 1865 — Ckmtiiitied. 





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BBPOBT or THB BBCSIEUXT OF THB HATT. 291 

1IIS8I8SIFPI 8QUADB0M. 

EmbrkditK tin HiwiHlppi liTetand Its tribnUriM ; trantreired from the United SlalM armj 
Id OeMtet, 1862. From October ], 1S62, to DeMmbar 31, 1862. A-ftnge number of 
dllpe' compentee, 2,049 ; total nombar of Teeaela in sqiudroii, 27. 





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92 EEPOBT OF THE SECBETABY OF THE NAVT. 

MuMtippi iquadron, Jrom Oct. 1, 1862, to Dee. 31, 1862— Continued. 





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REPOST OF THE SECSBTiity OF THE NATT. 293 

BUSSISSIPFI SQUADRON. 

From Jaaaai7 1, 1663, to December 31, 1863. Average nntnbet of ships' compunies, 4,379; 

Dumber of Teasels, 54. 





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MUtitiippi tgvadTM, Jrom Jan. 1, 1863, to Dee. 31, 1863— Continned. 

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BBPOBT OF THE SBCBBTABT OV THE MAVT. 296 

Mutiuippi iqmadron, Jrom Jan. t, 1863, to Dee. 31, 1863 — Cantinaed. 





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HEPOET OF THE SECKETAET OP THE NAVY. 



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BEPOBT OF THE 8ECBETART0F THE NAVT. 297 

Mimtrippi tquadron, Jrom Jan. 1, 1864, to Dee. 31, 1864 — Contianed. . 





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18 REPORT 07 THE SECBETABT OF THE HATT. 

Miuiuippi tgvadron, from Jan. 1, 1864, to Dec. 31, 1864 — Contiiined. 





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BEPOBT OF THE SECRETABT OF THE NATT. 299 

MUtutippi tguadmt, Jrom Jan. 1, 1864. to Dee. 31, 1864 — Condnned. 





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BU8SIS8IPFI SQUADRON. 



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Cum t.— CIhbk* ^ lb Difimim 



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.100 


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;ooo7i 































300 BEPOBT OF THE 8ECBETABY 

Mi$*U$ippi iquadrtm, from January 1, 1866, 



OP THE NAVY. 

to June 30, 1865 — Contiiined. 





1 

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1 


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1 

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11 






















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REPORT OP THE SECBETABT OF THE NAVT. 301 

Muuittippi tquadranijrom January 1, 1865, to June 30, 1866 — Continaed. 





5 






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1 






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302 



BBPOKT OP THE BECBETAET OF THE NA.TT. 





amittt 


11 


1S65, to Jmc 30, 1865— 










1 


j 


1 


1 


1 
1 


1 
I' 


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49 

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49 


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31 

a 

37 
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.00014 














1 

3 


1 

a 

i 


























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31 


.0041 












934 


»,01S 


»,O0fl 


an 


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333 


.l«7S 


.<»> 











BECAPITULATION. 













i 


1 












gc 


s' 












s 


■s 










1 


1 


1 




1 


1 




M 






J 


1 


'i 


1 


s 




4,189 


4,099 


ir. 


4,169 


14 


.016 




3,307 






2,307 








30,003 


29,605 


335 


30,003 


63 


.011 




27,766 


27,336 


380 


27,766 


50 


.013 


















6 leo 














3St,620 


31,806 


671 


32,680 


141 


.03 




36,856 


34,975 


050 


36,258 












144,038 


140,863 


8,538 


144,038 


643 









,ab,GoOgIc 



HAKINE C0EF8, 



Hbadqcartbbs Habinb Corps, 

WathingUm, October 14, 1867. 

8lB : I IiAve the bokor to leptwt that I reeeatlj paid a visit of iQspectioii to 
the marine Btktione at PortBrnoath, New Hampataire, Boston, New York, Phil- 
adelphia, and Norfolk, Virginia, and was gratified to find the tioopa in a 
thorongh state of diadpline and efficient, and the Beveial barracka and qoar- 
tera in a very creditable condition of cleanlinees and good order. 

There are at preoent aboat aixteea hundred officere and men at the several 
statione, ezdnsive of thooe at the distant posts of California, Pensacola, and 
Uonnd City. The aereral commands are foll^ equipped and in constant readi- 
ness for active dntv at sea or on shore, and at present are osefully employed 
in guarding the public property at the navy yards, magazines, &:c., and in fnr- 
Dishing guards for vessek placed in commiseiou. In addition to ibis, their legiti- 
mate duty, this force, in case of emergency, could be concentrated in a veiy 
brief period at any point where the services of troops might be required ; and 
I hssard nothing in saying that in an event of this aind they would be found 
as efficient and reliable as any troops the goTeroment could call into service. 
The entire force on shore is now being instructed in the new infuntry tactics, 
recAnlly adopted in the anny, and in a short time the system will be in general 
use in the entire corps, both at sea and on shore. 

The number of officers and men attached to vessels in commission is at pres- 
ent somewhat leas than nsual. The complement of marines to each vessel is 
very small, and in case it should become necessary at any time to concentrate 
the mannee of our distant squadrons for duty on shore, their number, I fear, 
would be too limited to render that effective service which would be desired and 
expected. This conld be remedied in some d^ree by detailing a small addi- 
tional number of marines to each vessel, with a view to supply the casualties 
of the service during a long cruise, so that at all times the toll complement 
would be available for active service. 

I regret to report that the efficiencT of the command at the Pensacola navy 
yard Ims been temporarily impaired by the prevalence of yellow fever at that 
station. A luge number of the force has b€^ prostrated, and Cuptain Hale, 
Lieutenant Olisson, and about six of the rank and file have died. 

Captain Hale, the commanding officer, entered the service at the commence- 
ment of the late rebellion^ and served with credit in the first battle of Bull Run. 
where be was badly wounded, and snbsequently in the Uissiesippi squadron, at 
the capture of New Orleans, and was ever ready and prompt in the perform- 
ance of duty. In his death the corps has sustained the loss of a very valuable, 
ezperiencea, and reliable officer. 

Upon the abatement of the fever immediate measures will be taken to restoie 
the command to its proper footing. 

I would again earnestly call the attention of the department to the condition 
of the barracks at this station, and would renew the recommendations made in 
my last annual report, for their entire reconstmction. A board of officers, ac- 
companied by the dvil enj^neer and two master mecbanica of tfae navy yard, 
hare recently made a thorough re-examination of the quarters, and ^re of opin- 
ion it would be a useless expenditure of money to attempt their repiur. The > 



304 HBPOET OP THE 8ECBETAEY OF THE NAVT. 

qnartermaBter of the corps has therefore again sabmitted eatimalee for their 
recoDBtruction, of which I wonld reepectfnllf a«k your approTal. And in view 
oT the fact mentioned in his letter, that the sum required for the erection of one 
wing (which is all that w desired at present) will not increase the expenditures 
beyood the amonnt appropriated for the BUpport of his department last year, I 
sincerely tmst that Congress ma; be induced to grant the sum desired. 

In conclusion, it affords me pleasure to report that during the past year both 
officers and men hav« .been zealous and energetic in the perfonnance of their 
allotted duty, and that nothing has occnrred to impair, in any degree, the disci- 
pline or usefulness of the corps. 

To the several staff departments of the corps I am indebted fo[ a cheerfal 
and earnest co-operation, and I feel assured that in the discharge of their vari- 
ous and important duties, the interests of the government have oeen most care- 
fully guarded. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. ZEILIN, 
Brigadier General and Commandant. 
Hon. Gideon Welles, 

Secretary of the Navy. 



Hbarquabtbrs Marinb Gobps, 

FaymaiUr'i 0$ce, September 24, 1867. 
Sir : I submit herewith estimates for pay and subsistence of officers and pay 
of non-commissioned officers, musicians, prirates, &c., of the United States 
maiine corps for the fiscal year ending Jnne 30, 1869. These estimates are 
840,476 60 more in the aggregate than those presented last year being an ad- 
dition of $35,000 for the payment of the third instalment of bounty due men 
for enlistment, and $5,476 50 for payment of increase of pay to mounted officers, 
and longevity rations to retired officers, authorized by an act approved March 2, 
1867. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. 0. CASH, 
PaymaUer Marine Gorpt 
Brigadier General Jacob Zbilin, 

Commandant United Statet Marine Corpt, Head^artere. 



.dbyGoogle 



KKPOltT OF THE BECBETARY OP THE KAVV 305 

Dttatl raltmatc of pay and suhsi$lence of officers, and pay of noM-comnusumed 
o0ccrt. miuiciana, prlvatet, !fc., of the United Sfalet marine corp»,froat July 
I, 1SG8, to JMtte 30, 1869. 



Kuik and grai]<-. 



AdJDUnl tai 






imnipn anil flfiTM, J»i 






iV. 

■SS I 



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1 lE 




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sss 


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. li.SS'J 64 



t. miwlrlplila. 



llRAnm^ARTKRfl Makinb Corps 
Quartermaiter't Ofii'-e, Waikinsii'i, Septemlier a J, 1SG7. 

Sir: I linvi- the honor to tran fin it li'Tcwitli trj|ilicali< csiimntt'R for the sup- 
port of iho (juartRnnaKtiT'M ilppnrtmciit of th(( iimrinr coi|iaforono year from 
July J. 1W8, lo Juno ao, 18(1!), nmounliiiK in tin- n^Rri'galc to ihe Bum of 
S007,.'')(JO NS, hciuE 5:.'0,710 4G l.w llian tho-c mihiiiitliii for fiscal year enclinf; 
Jmifl .'10, ISliS. Tln-np cMiwuir* vnry from ihnei- of iho current fiscal yonr iu 
tho followin)* [>articuliirs, vix : 

Chlhinii halt bioii iT»luci'(l from S:i!i2,lSG Kl Ui S:.'02.ICi» Srf.atitl w cnu«pil 
by the decline iu the price of material n» per contrnctH ol last fall. 

Furl hns hern reiluctd from S30.1 17 lo lO.l.'iG, it hcjoj: eupposcil ihM at the 
cloBc of the current fiscal year there will bit ?*>O,0(lll of ilint approi>nuion un- 
expended, and hi-nce that amount hni been deiluctd from the u.-i»al K'liraatc for 
luel. 



306 KErOUT OF THE SECRETARY OP THE NAVY. 

Conlingenr.iei has been iocrcnsed from SSO.OOO to S100,000. This i: 
is made nccesflary by the increase in the coat of all nrttcles paid for out of this 
appropriation, and the fact that tliis office has not during the past five years aaked 
for a proportionate iucreaae, thus leaving a deficit at the close of the last fiscal year, 
and to meet tbe payment of accounts for commutation of quarters aboard ships. 

Sixty-nine thousand four hundred and fifty dollars is asked to rebuild one-half 
of the marine barracks, Washington, D. C. 

These buildings have been condemned by a board of survey, as entirely on- 
suited for quarteiing masses of men, and an estimate of the cost of rebuilding, 
amounting to S13S,900, has been Bubmitted by a competent architect, but as only 
one-half of tlie barracks can conveniently be constructed at a time, only half the 
entire appropriation is asked for at this time. In connection with this estimate 
the report of the board of survey and the estimate of the architect are submitted. 

It will be noticed that natwithstanding 320,000 has been asked as an increase 
to the contingent appropriation, and S69,4.'i0 for rebuilding one-half of the bar- 
racks, yet the entire estimates are 520,710 46 less than called for last year. 

I also transmit triplicate abstracts of proposals received for fuel, rations, and 
eupplicj, to clnse of iiscal year, June 30, 1868. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. B. SLACK. 
Quarlermaiter Marine Corp*. 

Brigadier General -Tacub Zkilin, 

Commandant Marine Corpt, HeadqiiarUrs, Washington. D. C. 



Estimate of the expenies of the quartermaster's dcjmrtmfnt of the marine corpt 
for one year from July 1, 1868, to Jane 30, 1S69. 

Tliero Hill he required tor the support of the quartorm eater's dopartment of the marine 
corps for one year, commencing ou the lat July, ISGH, in addition to (he balances then 
reniiuiiiiig on hand, the sum of ^07,5041 8ti. 

For provisioiia f 169, 725 00 

For clothing 202, 169 88 

For fuel 10, 156 00 

For militsij stores, vis ; Fay of mechanics, repair of tirms, purchase of ac- 
coutrements, ordnnoce stores, flags, drums, fifes, and other inairumeuti.. . 16, 000 00 
For transportation of officers, tbeir servants, troops, and for expeoses of re- 
cruiting 35,000 00 

For repair of barracks, and rent of offices where there are do public buildicf^ 15,000 00 
For contingencies, viz: Freight, ferriage, toll, cartage, whutlsgn, purcbase 
aod repair of boats, compenBAliOQ to judges aiivocate, per diem tur atte tiding 
courts-tnartini, courts ol inquiry, and for couslaat Inbor. hou;ie rout in lieu of 

Junrlcrs. and coDimutation for quarters to officers on ship-board, burial of 
eceasod marines, priuling, stationery, posl^o, telcgmpliing. upprehenslou 
of deserteis. oil, candles, gas. repairs of gas uod water GxtuiOK, water rent, 
forago. straw, barrack furniture, furulture lor officers' quartera, bedsacks, 
wrappiiij; paper, oilcloth, crash, rope, twine, spades, bIiuvcIh, nxea, picks, 
carpenter's tools, keep of a horse fur tbe tnesseuger, repairs to flre-cngine, 
purchase and repair of engine hose, purchase of lumber fur benchi-s. mess 
tables. biink«, &c,, repairs to public carrj'all, purchase and repair uf haruess, 
purchase aod repair ot handcarts nud wheelbarrows, scavenger! nc, purchase 
and repair of gaileya, cooking stoves, ranges, Ac., stoves wKcic ibere are an 
grates, gravel, &(;., for parade grounds, repair of puniiis, furuiture fur staff 
and cunimanding officer's offices, brushes, brooms, buckets, puviug, aud lOr 
other purposes 100,000 00 

For rebuildiug maiino liarraclis, headquarters, WosbinetoD, D. C, as recom- 
mended by report of board of survey liereto anuexcd; cost of sauie as per 
estimate of architect heicto appended, $1.<lj,90l>. 

For building one-half of ilie above contemplated work, that being all that could 
conveniently be done in one season 69,450 00 

ToUl amount required 607, 500 «8 

Respeclfullj suhmitled; W. B. SLACK, Quartennaiter Marlnt CorpM. 



KKPOBT or THE .--ECKKTARY OV THE NAVY. 307 

PUOVISIONS. 



For whom required. 






For whom required. T Amounl. 

I ^ 

Non-coin miiaioDcd officera, mUBicians, and privates, at (49 22 per '■ 

Rnnnm, actual cost per controclB 3,654 $179,849 8a 

2.1MNIwBfcb-coaW, M tn ISeath I 22,380 UO 

Amount required i 202,160 BS 

FUEL. 



For brigadier general and commnndant 

For colonels 

For I ieateoant colonel 

For ^Tm^on 

For itaff captaint 

For capiaina 

For lieulenanta, lit and 2d 

For non-com Diiuioned officers, mniidaDi, privalea, 

wuhetwamGn, and lorvanta 

For liMpJta], headquarter* { 

For hospitals at other post* I 

For srmorjr I 

ForiDeM-rooTnB for officers ' 

For officei, commandant and staff and commanding offi- i 

For officer of day's rooms ' 

Pot gnard-rooms at barracks and navj yards 

For stores for clothing and other Hupplics 

For one-fonrtb additional on C<NI curds, qoautitj sup- 
posed to be required in latitude north of J!l^ 

Amounting to 

Which, atlG per cord, is JiWi. Ifitt I 

Deduct supposed surplus ou hand 2<>. INMI ' 



I,::: ::,Go6g\c 



30H REPORT OV THB SECRLTAIIY OF THE NAVY 

[Ordere.] 

HtiADULARTEItS MaHIXE CoHPS, 

Washington, Srplember aO, 1867. 
A board of eurvey, consistiug of Major G. R. Grabam, First Lieiitennot R. S. 
Colliim, and First Lieutenant nod Brevet Captain William Wallace, will con- 
vene at 10 a. m., on Friday, September C, 1&67, for tbe purpose of making* 
thorough examination of tlie marine barracks, Washington, D. C., as to its acttul 
condition and suitablenesa for quartering masses of men, and recommending wlisl, 
ID their opinion, is best to bo done with these buildings in view of the wants of (be 
service, and the health and comfort of the troops. The boai'd will be assisted in 
their examination by a practical carpenter and mason, to be design iiled by the 
quartermaster. 

J. ZEILTN, 
Brigadier General and Commandant 

MAiiliSii Bakracks, 

'Friday, Sepfcm/ier IS, 1867. 
The board toot in compliance to foregoing ordej-, and were assisted by Mr.F. 
A. iStratton, civil engineer, uavy yard, Messrs. .lohn E. Herrell, master mason, 
and J. M. Downing, master carpenter, all of the navy yard. They made a 
thorOQgh examination of the barracks, and beg leave to report that tliey foaad 
as follows : 

The buildings in an old and dilapidated condition, both from age and the very 
bad material of which they were originally constructed, they having been bnilt 
of salmon bricks of very inferior quality, covered with rough-cast. The qaarlers 
are badly constructed, being damp, insufficiently lighted and ventilated, all ol 
which materially affi^ct the health and comfort of the men quartered in then. 
The roof being entirely rotten is not susceptible of repair, and the floorings are 
mostly gone from age and dampness; the only place we find fit to quarter tbe 
troops boing the old hospital building, which is mom modem in its construction, 
and Duilt of better material, but of very small capacity. 

The board have delayed their report until this dale, (September 18,} in oa- 
sequence of waiting for the report of the gentlemen assisting in the survey, which 
is herein enclosed, {marked A,) and with which report the hoard have the honor 
to state they fully concur. 

GEORGE It. GRAHAM, 

Major United Slatet Marine Corvt. 
RICHARD S. COLLUM, 
Firtt Lieulenant United States Marine Corpt. 
WILLIAM WALLACE, 
First Lieutenant and Brenet Captain United Stales Marine Corps. 



United Statks Navy Yabd, 

Washinglon, S>-ple>nl»er J 6, IS60. 

Gentlrmen': Having, iti accordance with your request, made a thorough ex- 
amination of the marine barracks, Washington, D. C, as to their actual condition 
and suitableness for quartering masses of men, and what, in our opinion, is best 
to be done with those buildings in view of the wants of the service, and the beallb 
and comfort of 'the troops, we beg leave to present the following rjport : 

The buildings occupied by the raun, constructed at a very e»rly date in 
an indifferent manner, have, throagh long use and injulBcient repairs, beome 
very much dilapidated and deciyed,and cannot longer be considered as being in 



BBPOBT OF THE SECEETAEY OF THE KAVT, 309 

any manner suitable for quartetiDg troops. The dormitories and other apBrtments 
are low, gloomy looma, badly lighted and badly ventilated ; the ceilinga are leaky 
and the floors decayed from dampness. These ill-constructed and inconreDteot 
buildings being of only one story, the floors nearly on a level with the gronnd, 
and damp, dark, and close, as stated, must be very uncomfortable and unhealthy 
for the occupancy of any human beings, and especially so for " quartering masses 
of men" oa rendered necessary by the wants of the service, and in onr opiuioa 
will become a disgrace to the government if longer retained in their present con- 

Thc central building occupied as officers' quarters is better conslructcd and in 
better repair, hut is, notwithstanding, wholly unfit for its purpoaea without ex- 
tensive alterations and repair?, and its capacity is too small to properly accom- 
modate the number of officers usually in garrison at this post. 

Taking these facts into consideration it is our opinion that the best and the 
only proper course to he pursued in regard to these buildings '■ in vie* of the 
wants of the service, and the health and comfort of the troops," is to remove 
them altogether and replace them with buildings suitable for their object. 

The plana already prepared for this purpose by the architect we believe upon 
examination lo he generally well designed, and if carried out would make build- 
ings convenient and suitable for their contemplated use. The only alterations 
we would suggest in the plans are the following : First, the removal of the guard 
rooms and prison cells from the main central building, designed for officers' 
quarters, to a separate bailding to be constructed for the purpose on the opposite 
side of the gTOunds. Second, tlie entire, instead of partial, reconstruction of the 
central buildiug, it being unadvisable in our opinion to attempt to include it within 
the walls nf a new building. Third, the substitution of pressed brick and iron 
for the principal front and common brick for the inner front in place of the pro- 
posed rough-cast work, which is not as durable as brick. 

Wc have examined the estimates of the architect and believe them to be correct. 
Very respectfullv, your obedient servants, 

FRANKLIN A. 8TRATT0N, 

Civil Enginetr. 
JOHN E. HEBBELL, 

Matter Maton. 
J. M. DOWNING, 

Matter Carpenter. 

Major G. R. Graham, ) 

Fiiet Lieut. R, 8. Colll'm, > Board of Surtcy. 

First Lieut. andBvl. Capt. Wm. Wallace, ) 

The coal of (he propossd improvementa ia ; 

EiovHtinfr, difcginir and traospoit of groand |j,400 

FoandatioD atODea of blue rock 5.000 

Brickwork 411,000 

Brick paTinft - - 1,500 

Cut nloDe slops, window and door ailla, coping It, 500 

Studdi-d psrtiiionaof centre bailding 1,500 

Carpenter's work, inclndinf; material nf floora uid roof. 30,000 

Flooring, doors and >ub H, 000 

aiale roof and ahealhing «,000 

Gutten and spouling 1,500 

Iron cotumns. brack''U, ffirdt-r* and base platea for arcades 7,500 

PJumbini; and Kaa-fitline - ■ 5,000 

Vemndalis 2,000 

Plastering and painling 7,000 

Hisccllaueoiu expenses, auperinlendence, plana and apeciGcationa 6,000 

8 leam -beating apparatus in round sum 10,000 

^ tt38,900 

Digitized by *^jOOyltL 



BEPOST OF THE SECBETABY OF THE SAW. 



ABSTRACT OF OFFERS RECEIVED FOE FURSISHISG FUEL. RATIONS AND 
SUPPLIES TO THE UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS, L"XDER THE COGNI- 
ZANCE OF THE QUARTERMASTER'S DEPARTMEKT. 

OffiTt for raliomt mnder adrtTtUcKuM dtUtd Oc-oitr 19, ldG6. 



At Portimcatb, N. H.: 

N, F.Malhra 

Alex. CoDTery 

Wm. U. Otis 

At CharleBtowti, Mw*. : 

Peter HiKgina 

Alei. Convery 

E. A. Grab&ni 

Wm- H. Otia 

AlBrookljD, K. Y.: 

J. H. Jewitt &Co... 
Eimberly Brotben... 

John C. Gilbert 

N. F.Mathea 

Alex. CoDveiT 

Samuel Reckless 

B. A. OrobsiD 

Wm-H. OlU 

At PbiUulelpliia, Penn. : 

J.H.JeHiltA Co.. 
Kiiiiber)j Brotben... 

N. F. Mstbea 

Alex. Conveiy , 

tbimael Recktess 

E. A.Giahun 

Wm. H. OUb 

At WaehingtoD, D. C. : 

J. H. Jewitt A Co... 

B. F. Moraell 

Hfti1&.Huine 



FvrhgndnA 

rbDiidnd J, B. WilHjII S23 75 

•(2Sfi2 Kimberly Brotben 36 00 

•i^m BarncbUBll 24 13 

:5 25 John C.Gilbert "23 OB 

s.F.Mwbes ar. 70 

D.F.KeeliDg W 99 

Alei CouTery SS 97 

•iil^ HoseaHjdc 25 90 

»^ SJ A. GaddU.jr-'tCo 23 95 

•Hi *V Samoel BecklesB % 10 

:!4 75 E.A.Grabam 99 7* 

Wm. H. Otis 34 K 

' At Gospoit, Va.; 
a 70 

27 00 1 J.H.Jewirt ACo 30 00 

•2564 Kimberly Brotben 23 75 

25 80 JoboC. Gilbert '23 73 

25 67 N. F. Hatbes 27 00 

2566 D.F. Keeling 40 90 

27 67; A.L.HiIl K 00 

3125 Wm. H. Otii 42 50 

NalhaoBsom 17 50 

25 70 i 

27 00 I At Peiuacola, Fla. : 
•25 67 I 

25 91 N.F.Mathes 65 00 

25 69 1 Wm.H.Oti» tW 25 

26 48 j £. Swaioe '47 W 

33 50 ! 

At HoQod City, 111. : 

J. H. Jewitt &.Co 34 00 

K70| N.F.Matbes '33 WJ 

35 00 Wm. H. Olia 47 75 

23 10, G.F.Meyer 33 00 



OfftTMfoT $applU 

Claia No. t, keneji, &c. : 

H. B. Fsirman 

Peler Hig^ui 

D. Spiiffg Hall 

John W. Cox 

Wm, HathewE 

Perry *Co 

Watiiutinakcr &. Brown. . . 

CImm No. 3, flanneli, &.c. : 

H. B. Vaitman 

D.SpriMHBll 

Jobu W.Cox 

Wm-Hathewg 

Peny&Co 

Waanamaker &, Brown. . . 



andtT adtertiitment dated Oelobir 20, 1866. 
CLau No. 3, lioeiiB, &c. : 



'$68,470 no 
75,670 00 
108,855 00 
j59,240 00 
91,795 00 
149,050 00 
106, 100 00 



32,870 00 
•29,953 00 

:e,:{25 00 

36,765 00 
75,050 00 
42,iHl5 00 



«30,!I»S 00 
31,250 00 

•30. 112 50 

33,000 DO 

455 DO 



H.B. Fairmaii..- 
D. SpriKK HalL. 
Cbaa. BamW... 
Jobn W. Cox... 
Wm. Matbewa... 

PenyA Co 48,400 00 

Ricbard H. BaUter 34,tfS0 00 

I ClaiB No. 4, uaifonn caps, &c. : 

John W. Cox 11,000 00 

Tho8.R. Glenn 12,505 00 

Baker & McKenny 13.761) 00 

HoiBtmann Brotben & Co. 13,9^ 00 

Wilson A.HiitcbinBon.... 14,794 00 

Bent& Bosh "lO.Tga 00 



.dbyCoogle 



REPORT OK 
CImi Ko. fi, mUilsry c<|Uipmful 

JobaW.Coi 

Henry EjrEnlinp 

HorslmiDi ltr(ilti<.Ta & Ci>. 
BenlA: Biiah 

CtaiB No. G, brogans : 

J.M.B. Rrjnolds 

CLsrles B. licDD}- 

C. R. WillUiiisoQ 

Wm. H. Barbour 



T[[E SECRETARY OK THE NAVY. 



SloauA Wnfcr 

]tak«r A McKcDny 

Heur^r A. Din;re<> 

HoTBlmun Bcolhera &■ Cu. 
WjlM>D& HuU'biiisoD 

m* No. t'. knapKBcka: 

JohnW.Cox 



Perry &, Co 

Samuel M. Duffield.. 
Geor)^ F. Rocilel . . . . 

CJomKo. 7, bolls, &c. : 

John W. Cos 



CLarloB BBmnm 

Saniui:! B. Noo 

Jacob Kcecl 

Perry &. Co 

AVauDBmakpr il llrowu .. 



•7 671 
■>l 70 

7 Ha 



OffenfoT iceod and coal 
At PoTUmouth, N. H. : 

Riisaell A Odion 

N. F. Hathea 

G. A. Hammond 

Chi] 

a p. Brawn A. Sod 

Alei. Convery 

Goonro \V. Tucker 

W.lF.SiM 

RuMoll &. OdioD 

A( ChsrluloHn, Hmi. : 

Woodp 

e.&E. Knight 

Saoiuel Uakinan 

8»bin M.Smith 

Cool I 

8. P. llrowQ A Son 

8. A E. Kni^bl 

Samuol Oakinan 

AIph CoLTery 

Sabin U. Saiiih 

At Brooklyn, N. Y. ; 

S.Tul(loA.Son 

Fell A Uertiiaii 

CoiUl 
8. P. Brown 4 Son 

S.Tullle AtMn .'.'. 

Beapectfully lobitiiued : 



\t doled Mag ^^f, IHu7. 



12 00 



Fell A German 

At PbiladelphU, Penn. : 



Alex. Con very 

B.Mi<]dleton & Co.. 
John W. Ryan 

At Wsshiogton. D. C. : 



,j:v"i 



W. H. Burbonr 

8. P. Brown A Son.. 

Alox. Convery 

Wm.Omnaud, 

At (ioipoTl, Vn. : 

John F. Dnnielv 



At PeniHcola, Fla. : 



7 37 

•7 aa 

CoaJ p«r Ma. 
•6 TO 

an 



,ab,GoOglc