(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual Reports of the President of Bryn Mawr College, 1911-1915"

Bryn Mawr 
College 
Library 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportsofp04bryn 



/ of 10 

ANNUAL REPORT 



THE PRESIDENT 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



1911-12. 



Philadelphia: 

the john c. winston co. 

1912. 



W'K 00L( 



^n 



Corporation. 



Academic Year, 1912-13. 



Asa S. Wing, 

Treasurer. 

Albert K. Smiley.* 
James Wood. 
RiTFus M. Jones. 

AXEXANDER C. WoOD. 

M. Caret Thomas. 
Francis R. Cope, Jr. 



James Wood, 

President. 



Charles J. Rhoads, 

Secretary. 

Asa S. Wing. 
Charles J. Rhoads. 
Thomas Raeburn White. 
Frederic H. Strawbridge. 
Abram F. Huston. 
Anna Rhoads Ladd. 



Board of Directors. 



Academic Year, 1912-13. 



Asa S. Wing, 

Treasurer. 

Albert K. Smilet.* 
James Wood. 
RuFus M. Jones. 
Alexander C. Wood. 
M. Carey Thomas. 
Francis R. Cope, Jr. 
Asa S. Wing. 



James Wood, 

Chairman. 



Charles J. Rhoads, 

Secretary. 



Chakles J. Rhoads. 
Thomas Raeburn White. 
Frederic H. Strawbridge. 
Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride. 
Mary E. Garrett. 
Anna Rhoads Ladd. 
Abram F. Huston. 



Executive Committee. 



RuFUS M. JON-ES. 

M. Carey Thomas. 
Francis R. Cope, Jr. 



James Wood 

Anna Rhoads Ladd. 

Thomas Raeburn White. 



Committee on Buildings and Grounds. 

Alexander C. Wood. Mary E. Garrett. 

Asa S. Wing. Frederic H. Strat^^bridge. 

M. Carey Thomas. Abram F. Huston. 



Charles J. Rhoads. 
Alexander C. Wood. 



Finance Committee. 



Asa S. Wing. 
Mary E. Gaerett. 
Frederic H. Strawbridge. 



Library Committee. 



Thomas Raeburn White. 
Rufus M. Jones. 



Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride. 
Charles J. Rhoads. 



Rufus M. Jones. 



Religious Life Committee, 

James Wood. 
Asa S. Wing. 



*Died, December 2nd, 1912. 
(iii) 



Officers of Administration. 
Academic Year, 1912-13. 

President, 

M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D. 

Office: Taylor Hall. 

Dean of the College, • 

Marion Reilly, A.B. 

Office: Taylor Hall. 

Recording Dean and Assistant to the President, 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D. 

Office: Taylor Hall. 

Secretary, 
Edith Orlady, A.B. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Recording Secretary, 
Abigail Camp Dimon. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Wardens of the Halls of Residence, 
Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., Pembroke Hall. 
Mabel Harriet Norton, A.B., Denbigh Hall. 
Edith Buell Wright, A.B., Merion Hall. 
Katherine Everett, Ph.D., Rockefeller Hall. 
SusANNE Carey Allinson,' A.B., Radnor Hall. 
Annie Louise Macleod, Ph.D., Assistant Warden, Pembroke Hall. 

Co7nptroller, 
James G. Forrester, M.A. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Business Manager, 
Maria Wilkins Smith, A.B. Office: Tajdor Hall. 

Junior Bursar, 
Margaret A. Proctor, B.A. Office: Rockefeller Hall. 

Librarian, 
Mary Letitia Jones, B.L., B.L.S. Office: The Library. 

Director of Athletics and Gymnastics, 
Constance M. K. Applebee. Office: The Gymnasium. 

Physician in Chief, ' 

Thomas F. Branson, M.D. Office hours, 8 to 9.30 and 2 to 3 daily, 
Rosemont, Pa. 

Assistant Physician, 
Makianna Taylor, M.D. Office houi's, 2 to 3 daily except Monday, 
7 to 8 daily, St. David's, Pa.; Merion Hall, Bryn Mawr College, 
4 to 6 daily except Sunday. 

Examining Oculist, 
Helen Murphy, M.D. Office hours, 2 to 4 daily, 1433 Spruce Street, 
Philadelphia. 



Report of the Recording Dean and Assistant to thb 

President. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit to you a statistical report on 
the students of Bryn Mawr College for the academic year 
1911-12, a statistical report of the workings of the regulations 
of the directors and faculty, and an account of matters which 
were administered through my office. 

The entire number of students enrolled during the year was 
4:52. There were 76 graduate students, including fellows. 
The number of graduate students was about 17 per cent of 
the whole number of students. 



I. Comparative Table of Numbers of Graduate and Under- 
graduate Students from 1885 to 1912. 



Under- 

Graduate graduate 

Year. Students. Students. 

1885-86 8 36 

1886-87 10 54 

1887-88 8 70 

1888-89 16 100 

1889-90 22 100 

1890-91 12 120 

1891-92 27 142 

1892-93 34 168 

1893-94 43 200 

1894-95 49 234 

1895-96 52 246 

1896-97 46 243 

1S97-98 49 275 

1898-99 67 287 



Under- 
Total Graduate graduate Total 
Number. Year. Students. Students. Number. 

44 1899-1900... 53 334 387 

64 1900-01 48 348 396 

78 1901-02 53 383 436 

116 1902-03 70 377 447 

122 1903-04 62 384 446 

132 1904-05 63 378 441 

169 1905-06 79 377 456 

202 1906-07 75 ' 362 437 

243 1907-08 72 348 420 

283 1908-09 86 334 420 

298 1909-10 87 337 424 

289 1910-11 84 342 426 

324 1911-12 76 376 452 

354 

(1) 



Statistics of Graduate Students in 1911-12. 

//. Geographical Distribution of Graduate Students. 

The 76 graduate students enrolled during the year came 
from the following states and countries : 

State Number of Per- 

or Countrj'. Students, centage. 

Pennsylvania 20 

New York 6 

Ohio 6 

Iowa 4 



New Jersey 4 

California 3 

Rhode Island 3 

Indiana 2 

Kansas 2 

Massachusetts 2 

Michigan 2 

Missouri 2 

Nebraska 2 



26.3 
7.9 
7.9 
5.3 
5.3 
3.9 
3.9 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 



State 
or Country. 

Wisconsin 2 



Number of Per- 
Students. centage. 



2.6 

Connecticut 1 1.3 

Illinois 1 1.3 

Minnesota 1 1.3 

Mississippi 1 1.3 

North Carolina .... 1 1.3 

Texas 1 1.3 

England 5 6.6 

Germany 3 3.9 

Ireland 1 1.3 

Canada 1 1.3 

76 100. 



These 76 graduate students may be classified as follows : 

Non-resident, holding Em'opean fellowships and studying abroad 3 

Resident f eUows 12 

FeUows by com-tesy 7 

Graduate scholars, British 4 

Graduate scholars, German 3 

Graduate scholars (excluding two who were also fellows by courtesy) . . 24 

Members of coUege staff 4 

Graduate students 19 

76 

Of the 76 graduate students 59 lived in the halls of resi- 
dence, 14 lived in Philadelphia or the neighborhood, and 3 
were studying abroad. 



III. Denominational Affiliations of Graduate Students. 



Episcopalian 16 

Presbyterian 16 

Congregational 9 

Methodist 5 

Friends 4 

German Reformed 4 

Baptist 3 

Lutheran 3 



Chi-istian Chmxh 

Liberal Protestant 

Moravian 

Unitarian 

No denominational affiliation . 



Not stated 8 



76 



IV. Number of Years of Graduate Study. 

In first year of graduate study, 33 In sixth year of graduate study, 4 

In second " " " " 20 In tenth " " " " 1 

Inthii-d " " " " 9 

In fourth " " " " 8 76 

In fifth .." " " " 1 



V. Studies Elected by 73 Graduate Students in Residence. 

Under each subject all the graduate students attending 
courses in that subject are counted. 



Students. 

Enghsh 24 

Philosophy and 
Psychology 13 

Biblical Literature 
and Semitic Lan- 
guages 12 

Economics and Poli- 
tics 12 

Comparative Lit- 
eratvire 12 

German 12 

Art and Archaeol- 
ogy 10 



Percentage 

of Number 

of Graduate 

Students. 

32.9 
17.8 



16.4 

16.4 

16.4 
16.4 

13.8 



Students, 

Greek 9 

Education 8 

Latin 8 

Mathematics 8 

Biology 7 

Chemistry 7 

Physics 7 

French 6 

Italian 6 

History 4 

Teutonic Philology 4 

Geology 2 

Spanish 1 



Percentage 
of Number 
of Graduate 

Students. 

12.4 
11.0 
11.0 
11.0 

9.6 

9.6 

9.6 

8.2 

8.2 

5.5 

5.5 

2.7 

1.4 



VI. Major Studies of 73 Graduate Students in Residence. 

Each student entered under a subject is doing full graduate 
work and devoting half or more of her working time to the 
study of that special subject. 



Enghsh 11 

Philosophy and Psychology .... 7 

German and Teutonic Philology 6 

Greek 5 

Biology 4 

Chemistry 4 

Economics and PoUtics 4 

Classical Archaeology 3 



Latin 3 

Mathematics 3 

French 2 

Geology 2 

History 2 

Physics 2 

Semitic Languages 2 



VII. Occupations of 76 Graduate Students. 

Of the 76 graduate students 36 have already taught or are 
teaching, and 12 of these have taught, assisted, or demonstrated 
in colleges and universities; 1 is a social worker, 2 are college 
wardens, 1 a secretary, 1 has assisted in a college office, 2 have 
been assistant curators of a geological museum. The remaining 
34 have held no position. 

VIII. Examinations for Higher Degrees. 

At Commencement, June, 1912, the degree of Master of 
Arts was conferred on 8 graduate students, belonging to the 
following classes: 

Class of 1904, 1 ; Class of 1908, 1 ; Class of 1909, 2; Class of 
1910, 1; Class of 1911, 3. The principal subjects of study were 
Greek 1, Latin 1, French 1, Semitic Languages 1, Economics 
and Politics 1, Physics 2, Chemistry 1. 

During the year 9 graduate students presented themselves 
for examination for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The 
candidates were graduates of the following colleges and univer- 
sities: Bryn Msbwr College, 2; Mt. Holyoke College, 2; BroAvn 
University, 1; University of Indiana, 1; University of Michi- 
gan, 1; Vassar College, 1; University of Wisconsin, 1. 
The major subjects of the candidates were Greek 1, Latin 1, 
English Philology 1, English Literature 1, German 1, Classical 
Archaeology 1, Chemistry 1, Geology 2. 

Statistics of Undergraduate Students in 1911-12. 
IX. Geographical Distribution of Undergraduate Students. 

The 376 undergraduate students enrolled during the past 
year came from the following states and countries: 

Students. Percentage. Students. Percentage. 

Pennsylvania 123 32.71 Indiana 6 1.60 

New York 62 16.49 Missoiu-i 6 1.60 

Illinois 40 10.63 Rhode Island. ... 6 1.60 

Massachusetts... 27 7.18 Wisconsin 5 1.33 

Maryland 20 .5.32 Texas 4 1.06 

New Jersey 17 4.53 Minnesota 4 1.06 

Ohio 14 3.72 Alabama 3 0.80 

Connecticut 7 1.86 California 3 0.80 



Students. Percentage. * Students. Percentage. 

Delaware 3 0.80 Maine 1 0.27 

Virginia 3 0.80 Mississippi 1 0.27 

District of Colum- North Carolina. . . 1 0.27 

bia 2 0.53 South Carolina. . . 1 0.27 

Michigan 2 0.53 Tennessee 1 0.27 

Nebraska 2 0.53 Japan 2 0.53 

New Hampshire.. 2 0.53 Canada 1 0.27 

Oregon 2 0.53 England 1 0.27 

Arkansas 1 0.27 France 1 0.27 

Georgia 1 0.27 

Kansas 1 0.27 376 100.0 

These 376 undergraduate students are classified as follows: 
345 resident, 31 non-resident; 367 candidates for a 
degree, 9 hearers. Of the 367 candidates for a degree 66 
were seniors of whom 58 graduated in June, 2 graduated in 
February and 6 did not complete the work for a degree; 72 
were juniors, 101 were sophomores, and 128 were freshmen. 

In addition to those who graduated 49 undergraduate 
students left the college, 10 during the year and 39 at its close, 
for the following reasons : 

During the year: 

On account of illness 4 

Excluded by the Senate 1 

Excluded by the President 1 

To be married 1 

To travel 1 

To study music 1 

On account of financial diflSculties 1 

—10 

At the end oj the year: 

On account of illness ; 5 

Came for one, two, or three years only 14 

To be married 1 

To travel 2 

Excluded by the Senate 4 

To attend another college or university nearer home ... 6 

To attend another college 1 

Disliked college life 1 

On account of financial reasons 1 

On account of low grades 3 

Not stated 1 

—39 

49 



6 

The students who left were members of the following 
classes: juniors 9, sophomores 18, freshmen 22. 

X. Denominational Affiliations of Undergraduate Students in 

1911-12. 

Episcopalian 115 Dutch Reformed 4 

Presbyterian 91 Swedenborgian 3 

Unitarian 27 Evangelical 2 

Methodist 23 Ethical Culture 2 

Congregational 21 German Reformed 2 

Jewish 14 Jewish Reformed 1 

Friends 13 Theosophist 1 

Roman Catholic 13 No denominational affiliation. 13 

Baptists 11 Not stated 6 

Christian Science 9 r 

Lutheran 5 376 



Statistics of Senior Class (Class of 1912). 

At Commencement, June, 1912, the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts was conferred on 60 students, 2 of whom completed the 
requirements in February, 1912. The courses may be analyzed 
as follows: 



XI. Length of Course of Senior Class. 

Number 
Length of Graduated 
Date of Entering College. Course. in 1912. 

October, 1909 3 years 1* 

October, 1908 4 years 56 

October, 1907 4 years 1 f 

October, 1907 4| years IJ 

October, 1907 5 years 1 

Of the 92 students who entered the college in October, 1908, 
56 or 60.9 per cent have therefore graduated after the regular 
four year course. 



♦Entered with advanced standing on honourable dismissal from the University of 
Nebraska. 

t Out of college for one semester. Completed work for degree in February, 1912. 
X Completed work for degree in February, 1912. 



XII. Age of Senior Class. 

Class graduating in June, 1912: 

Average age 22 years, 7 months 

Median age 22 years, 3 months 

Class graduating in February, 1912: 

Average age 22 years, 7 months 

Median age 22 years, 7 months 

The average age at graduation of the classes since 1907 ia 
as follows: 

1907 . 22 years, 7.6 months 

1908 22 years, 6.6 months 

1909 22 years, 8.0 months 

1910 . 22 years, 7.4 months 

1911 22 years, 1.9 months 

XIII. Groups Elected by the Senior Class. 



History and Economics 


and 




Latin and Spanish 1 


PoUtics 




24 


English and German 1 


Latin and German 




5 


German and Italian and Spanish 1 


Latin and French 




4 


French and Spanish 1 


Enghsh and Comparative Litera- 




French and Itahan and Spanish . 1 


ture 




3 


Economics and Politics and Phil- 


English and Philosophy. . . 




3 


osophy 1 


Mathematics and Physics . 




3 


Philosophy and Mathematics ... 1 


English and French 




9 


Philosophy and Physics 1 


German and French 




?, 


Mathematics and Chemistry ... I 


Chemistry and Biology . . . 




2 


Physics and Chemistry 1 


Greek and Latin 




1 
1 




Latin and Enghsh 




60 


Arranged in order the major subjects chosen are as follows: 


Number. 


Per cent. 


Number. Per cent. 


Economics and poli- 






Chemistry 4 3.3 


tics 25 


20.8 




Comparative Litera- 


History 24 


20.0 




ture 3 2.5 


Latin 12 


10.0 




Italian and Spanish . . 2 1.6 


EngUsh 10 


8.3 




Spanish 2 1,6 


French 10 


8.3 




Biology 2 1.6 


German 9 


7.5 




Greek 1 .8 


Philosophy 6 


5.0 







Mathematics 5 


4.2 




120 100.0 


Physics 5 


4.2 







Results of Oral Examinations in French and German 
Translation, Class oj 1912. 

_. _ . . French. German. 

Fxrat Examtnatwn. . Number. Per cent. Number. Per cent. 

High Credit 

Credit 4 8 3 6.24 

Merit 3 6 7 14.89 

Passed , 21 42 21 44.68 

Failed _22 44 16 34.04 

Total 50 47 

Second Examination. 

Credit 1 3.2 

Passed 25 80.6 18 66.6 

Failed _5 16.2 _9 33.3 

Total 31 27 

Third Examination. 

Passed 5 83.33 3 30 

Failed J. 16.66 J7 70 

Total 6 10 

Fourth Examination. 

Passed 1 100 7 100 

Statistics of the Freshman Class (Class of 1915). 

The freshmen entering in October numbered 125; 123 
entered on examination and 2 on honorable dismissal from other 
colleges or universities; 3 freshmen entered in Februarj'", 1912; 
117 lived in the halls of residence and 11 lived at home. 

XIV. Conditions oj Freshman Class. 



Clear 48 

Clear except for punctuation or spelling . . 13 

Conditioned in 1 section 12 

Conditioned in 2 sections 13 

Conditioned in 3 sections 16 

Conditioned in 4 sections 8 

Conditioned in 5 sections 13 

123 
Honorable dismissal from other colleges . 2 

125 



October. 

r. Percentage 


February. 
Number. 


39.02 


1 


10.56 


2 


9.75 




10.56 




12.98 




6.49 




10.56 





Freshmen conditioned in spelling 7, conditioned in punc- 
tuation, 18, freshmen entering on examination with no con- 
dition except in punctuation or spelling, 49.58 per cent. 



XV. Comparative Table of Percentage of Freshmen Entering 

Without Matriculation Conditions, October, 1890 — 

October, 1911. 

This table includes only those entering in October of 
each year and- takes no account of conditions in punctuation 
and spelling. Up to 1897 the proportion of students entering 
free from conditions to all the entering students, including 
honorable dismissal students, was taken. After 1897 the 
students who entered on honorable dismissal were not counted 
in taking the percentage. It is therefore misleading to com- 
pare the two sets of percentages. 

In 1890 25.0 % In 1901 40.52% 

In 1891 22.8 % In 1902 37.97% 

In 1892 32.0 % In 1903 . . . .• 35.29% 

In 1893 23.1 % In 1904 50.00% 

In 1894 19.3 % In 1905 54.81% 

In 1895 19.0 % In 1906 53.48% 

In 1896 21.8 % In 1907 56.48% 

In 1897 31.8 % In 1908 66.29% 

In 1898 26.9 % In 1909 53.00% 

In 1899 31.73% In 1910 53.63% 

In 1900 38.78% In 1911 49.58% 



XVI. Removal of Matriculation Conditions. 

Omitting conditions in punctuation and spelling, 102 con- 
ditions were incurred of which 92 were passed off during the 
college year as follows : 

23 were passed off in November, 1911 
6 were passed off in February, 1912 
26 were passed off in March, 1912 
12 were passed off in May, 1912 
25 were passed off in September, 1912 

92 



10 

Ten were not passed off before the beginning of the sopho- 
more year. Four students with entrance conditions amounting 
to 7 sections not passed off left college at the close of their 
freshman year. 



XVII. Table of Preparatory Schools that Prepared 
123 Freshmen. 

Arranged according to sections of country in which the 
college offers matriculation scholarships. Two Freshmen 
entered by honorable dismissal from other colleges. 

New England Stales: 

Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn 5 

The Winsor School, Boston, Mass 3 

The Misses May's School, Boston, Mass 3 

The Misses Allen's School, West Newton, Mass 2 

The High School, Bridgeport, Conn 1 

Miss Low's and Miss Hayward's School, Stamford, Conn . . 1 

Moses Brown School, Providence, R. 1 1 

The High School, Portsmouth, N. H 1 

The High School, Rockland, Mass 1 

Rogers Hall, Lowell, Mass 1 

Walnut Hill School, Natick, Mass 1 

Miss Wheeler's School, Providence, R.I 1 

21 

First matriculation scholarship won by pupil of the 
Misses May's School, Boston, Mass.; second matriculation 
scholarship won by pupil of Miss Wheeler's School, Providence, 
R.I. 

New York, New Jersey and Delaware: 

The Veltin School, New York City 6 

The Brearley School, New York City 3 

Dwight School, Englewood, N. J 2 

Hawthorne School, New York City 2 

Miss Bang's and Miss Whiton's School, New York City . . 

The Girls' High School, Brooklyn, New York City 

Gordon Winston School, New York City 

Heathcote Hall, Scarsdale, N. Y 

Horace Mann School, New York City 



11 

Normal College of City of New York 1 

The High School, Schenectady, N. Y 1 

The High School, Southampton, N. Y 1 

St. Agnes School, Albany, N. Y 1 

Wadleigh High School, New York City 1 

The High School, Yonkers, N. Y 1 

24 

First matriculation scliolarship won by pupil of the 
Charlton* School, New York City; second matriculation 
scholarship won by pupil of the Horace Mann School, New 
York City. 

Western States: 

The University School for Gii'ls, Chicago, 111 4 

Columbus School for Girls, Columbus, O 2 

The College Preparatory School, Cincinnati, O 1 

Central High School, Detroit, Mich 1 

Ivens Lys, St. Louis, Mo 1 

Kemper Hall, Kenosha, Wis 1 

Loring School, Chicago, 111 1 

Lowell High School, San Francisco, Cal 1 

Mary Institute, St. Louis, Mo 1 

Milwaukee-Downer Seminary, Milwaukee, Wis 1 

The Shortridge High School, Indianapolis, Ind 1 

Stanley Hall, Minneapolis, Minn 1 

Tudor Hall, IndianapoUs, Ind 1 

West High School, Cleveland, O 1 

18 . 

First matriculation scholarship won by pupil of the Univer- 
sity School for Girls, Chicago; second matriculation scholar- 
ship won by pupil of Kemper Hall, Kenosha, Wis. 

Pennsylvania and Southern Stales: 

The Girls' High School, Philadelphia 9 

The Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa 6 

The Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md 5 

The Misses Shipley's School, Br3m Mawr, Pa 5 

The Friends' Central School, Philadelphia 3 

St. Timothy's School, CatonsviUe, Md 3 

''The candidate did not enter the college; therefore the school ie not enumerated above. 



12 



The Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa 2 

Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa 2 

The Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Pa 2 

Miss Sayward's School, Overbrook, Pa 2 

Thurston-Gleim School, Pittsburgh, Pa 2 

The High School, Bedford, Pa 2 

Allegheny County Academy, Cumberland, Md 

Barrington School, Harrisburg, Pa 

The High School, Birmingham, Ala 

The High School, Clifton, England 

The High School, Coatesville, Pa 

The Friends' School, Germantown, Philadelphia 

Miss Hills' School, Philadelphia 

The High School, Johnstown, Pa 

Lucy Cobb Institute, Athens, Ga 

The High School, Narberth, Pa 

The High School, Pittsburgh, Pa 

The High School, Pottsville, Pa 

Stevens High School, Lancaster, Pa 

St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C 

The High School, West Chester, Pa 

The Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa 

The High School, Woodbury, Pa ^ 



60 



First matriculation scholarship won by pupil of the Girla' 
High School, Philadelphia; second matriculation scholarship 
won by pupil of the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 



Admitted on Honorable Dismissal: 
University of Nebraska . . . 
University of Wisconsin . . , 



Preparation Received in Private or Public Schools: 

Class entering in Class entering In 
October. February. 

Number. Per cent. Number. Per cent. 

Private schools 85 69.1 2 66.6 

Public schools 34 27.6 1 33.3 

Private and public schools 4 3.3 



123 100.00 



3 100.00 



13 



XVIII. A Comparative Table of the Geographical Distribution 
of the Freshman Class, 1904 to 1911. 



States and 
cotjntries. 



Pennsylvania. . . . 

New York 

Illinois 

Maryland 

Massachusetts. . . 

New Jersey 

Ohio 

Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Dist. of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire . 
North Carolina . . 

Oregon 

Rhode Island. . . . 
South Carolina . . . 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

France 

Hawaii 

Japan 

England 

Canada 



Per cent of Freshman Classes in 



1904. 



35.4 
16.7 
6.3 
2.1 
4.2 
2.1 
3.1 



2.1 

2!l 
1.0 



2.1 
2J 



3.1 
3.1 
1.0 



1.0 



2.1 

2^1 
3.1 
2.1 



1.0 
1.0 
1.0 



1906. 1907. 1908. 1909. 1910 



33.0 
18.2 
10.6 
3.2 
7.4 
4.4 
5.3 



1.1 
1.1 

2!2 



1.1 
1.1 



2.2 



1.1 
1.1 
2.2 



1.1 
1.1 

i.l 
1.1 



1.1 



29.2 
17.7 
13.5 
4.2 
6.3 
3.1 
3.1 



1.0 
1.0 

1.0 
2.1 



1.0 
1.0 



1.0 



1.0 

3^1 
1.0 
2.1 

1^0 
1.0 

i!o 

2.1 
2.1 



27.7 
16.0 
14.9 
9.6 
1.1 
1.1 
3.2 



1.1 

l!l 

2.2 

LI 

1^1 

2^2 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 

2^2 
1.1 



1.1 



1.1 



1.1 
3.2 



1.1 



1.1 
1.1 



35.9 
18.9 
9.0 
5.0 
7.0 
4.0 
2.0 

2.0 



2.0 
1.0 
1.0 

LO 



1.0 



1.0 
2.0 

2^0 



1.0 

i!o 



3.0 
1.0 



1.0 
1.0 

LO 



28.6 
14.8 
9.5 
8.7 
12.2 
7.8 
1.7 



.9 

1.7 

1.7 



2.6 



.9 
.9 

2^6 



1911. 



30.1 
19.5 
7.3 
4.9 
7.3 
4.1 
6.5 

1.6 

1^6 
L6 



.8 
1.0 



.8 
1.6 

".% 

'.% 

".S 
.8 

4!l 

.8 

".% 

.8 

1.8 



In 1911, 24 states are represented. 



14 



XIX. Denominational Affiliations of the Freshman Class. 



Episcopalian 28 

Presbyterian 24 

Unitarian 12 

Methodist 12 

Congiegationalist 9 

Friends 7 

Roman Catholic 5 

Jewish 4 

Baptist 3 



Lutheran 3 

Christian Scientist 3 



Dutch Reformed 

Ethical Culture 

Theosophist 

Swedenborgian 

No denominational affiliation. 
Not stated 



1 
, 1 
. 1 
. 1 
10 
. 1 

125 



XX. Average and Median Age of the Freshman Class. 

Years. Months. 

Average age of the class entering in October 18 6.5 

Median age of the class entering in October 18 7 

Average age of the class entering in February 22 8 

Average age (excluding honorable dismissal stu- 
dents) 18 5 

Median age (excluding honorable dismissal students) 18 3 



XXI. Average Ages of Entering Classes Since 1886. 



Year. 


Average Age. 


Median Age. 


Year. 


Average Age. 


Median Age. 


1885 


22.03 


18.87 


1899 


18.75 


18.58 


1886 


18.31 


18.00 


1900 


19.00 


18.91 


1887 


19.24 


19.00 


1901 


18.58 


18.58 


1888 


19.02 


18.20 


; 1902 


18.83 


18.62 


1889 


19.19 


18.10 


! 1903 


18.50 


18.50 


1890 


19.35 


18.11 


: 1904 


18.92 


18.92 


1891 


19.46 


18.07 


' 1905 


18.66 


18.66 


1892 


19.54 


18.11 


: 1906 


18.75 


18.50 


1893 


19.78 


19.00 


! 1907 


18.66 


18.33 


1894 


19.28 


19.01 


! 1908 


18.50 


18.33 


1895 


19.44 


18.08 


1 1909 


18.58 


18.58 


1896 


18.97 


18.10 


1910 


18.50 


18.42 


1897 


18.90 


18.75 


1911 


18.54 


18.58 


1898 


19.08 


19.58 









XXII. Occupations of Parents of the Freshman Class. 

Professiotis: 

Lawyers (2 Judges) 16 

Teachers 12 

Physicians (1 Surgeon) 7 

Technical Engineers 7 



15 

Clergymen . . 3 

Architects '. 3 

Editors 2 

Oculist 1 

Army Officer 1 

Naval Officer 1 

53 

Business: 

Merchants 21 

Business Managers, Officials and Employees 16 

Manufacturers 11 

Bankers 6 

Stock Brokers, Bond and Mortgage Brokers and Com- 
mission Merchants ' 6 

Pharmacists and Druggists 3 

Real Estate Dealers 2 

Mine owners 2 

Farmer 1 

Publisher 1 

Designer 1 

Dentist 1 

Not stated 2 

72 

125 

Working oj the Merit Law. 

As reported in October, 1911, 5 students of the Class of 
1912 were placed on probation in June, 1911; 2 of these 
left college, but 1 returned for the second semester of 1911-12. 
In February, 1912, no additional students came under the five- 
year rule. In June, 1912, 1 of the 4 students on probation 
left college without taking any examinations, and another 
who had returned merely for the second semester also left 
college. Two students of the Class of 1913 received grades in 
the May examinations which gave them more than half their 
hours below merit, and these were placed on probation leaving 
A students, 2 of the Class of 1912 and 2 of the Class of 1913, 
on probation for the year 1912-13. No student was ex- 
cluded from a degree during the year. 

Since the five-year rule came into operation for the Class 
of 1907, 32 students have been placed on probation; of these 



16 

9 have graduated, 3 have been excluded from a degree, 16 
have left college and 4 remain on probation. In the six 
classes, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1911 and 1912, 410 students 
have graduated. The number of students placed on probation 
forms about 8 per cent of these classes; 4 per cent have 
left college, probably on account of being placed on proba- 
tion, and less than 1 per cent have been excluded from a 
degree. In June, 1912, 30 freshmen and 20 sophomores had 
received examination grades below merit in more than half 
the hours they had offered for the degree. Of these 23 
freshmen and 15 sophomores have returned for the year 
1912-13, and are consequently unable to take part in any 
college entertainments requiring preparation, to serve as officers 
of any clubs or associations or to hold paid college positions. 



Registration of Attendance on the First Day of each Semester and 
Before and After Vacations. 

Students are required under penalty of having some of their 
examinations deferred to register 8 times in the college year as 
shown by the following table; this registration is prescribed in 
order to ensure regular attendance before and after the vaca- 
tions. 



XXIII. Table of Cases of Failure to Register. 

Number failing to register: 

Excuse, Excuse judged Excuse judged 

illness. adequate. inadequate. 

Beginning of the coUege year 2 1 2 

Before the Thanksgiving vacation . . . S 3 

After the Thanksgiving vacation .... 1 1 1 

Before the Christmas vacation 5 2 

After the Chi-istmas vacation 10 6 3 

Beginning of the second semester ... 6 3 1 

Before the Easter vacation 9 1 

After the Easter vacation 3 26* 3 

Total 54 40 12 



• 23 of these were on train delayed by fog. 



17 



Fines. 

Fines are imposed for failure to register courses in the 
appointed period, and for failure to return course books to 
the office fully signed at the required time at the end of each 
semester. 

In the first semester 2 students and in the second semester 
4 students did not register their courses during the appointed 
period and were fined $30. Course books were handed in late 
by 1 1 students who were fined $55. A fee of one dollar is charged 
for each change a student makes in her course after she has 
definitely registered it; 91 students made such changes in their 
courses and were fined $112. The above fines amounting to 
$197 were expended for books for the college library. 

College Puhlications. 

The College has issued during the year 1911-12 the follow- 
ing publications : 
Bryn Mawr College Calendar. 

Academic Buildings and Halls of Residence, Plans and 
Descriptions. Volume IV, Part 4. pp. 42. Novem- 
ber, 1911. 
Register of Alumnse and Former Students. Volume 

V, Part 1. pp. 144. January, 1912. 
Graduate Courses. Volume V, Part 2. pp. 122. March, 

1912. 
Undergraduate and Graduate Courses. Volume V, 

Part 3. pp. 190. 2 inserts. May, 1912. 
Supplement, Competitive Matriculation Scholarships, pp. 
11. November, 1911. 
Bryn Mawr College Finding List. pp. 32, November 1, 1911. 
Bryn Mawr College Class Lists, First Semester, pp. 27, 

December 5, 1911. 
Bryn Mawr College Class Lists, Second Semester, pp. 27. 

March 15, 1912. 
Bryn Mawr College, Annual Report of the President, 1910-11. 

pp. 99. December 18, 1911. 
Bryn Mawr College, Pamphlet of Matriculation Examination 
Papers, Spring, 1912. 



18 

Bryn Mawr College, Pamphlet of Matriculation Examination 

Papers, Autumn, 1912. 
Circulars in regard to Fellowships and Scholarships. 
Miscellaneous Circulars, Notices, Blanks, etc. 
Not published through the publisher's office : 

Bryn Mawr College, Financial Report, pp. 29. Novem- 
ber, 1911. 
Summary of the Account of the Treasurer of the Trustees 
of BrjTi Mawr College for the year ending ninth month 
30, 1910. pp. 15. October, 1911. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Isabel Maddison, 
Recording Dean and Assistant to the President 



Report of the Acting Dean of the College. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to present the following report for the 
academic year 1911-12: 

With very few changes the work of the Dean's office 
has proceeded as in the previous year, connecting itself with 
the advising of students, the Health Department, and the 
Bureau of Appointments. All undergraduates have come to 
the office for advice in registering their work. I have further 
seen by special appointment once a month during the first 
semester all Freshmen and all Sophomores still carrjdng 
entrance conditions; once a month during the second semester 
those Freshmen whose work was not entirely satisfactory, and 
once in two weeks all students who had failed in five or more 
hours of work at the midyear examinations. An endeavour 
was made to carry out the ruling of the Health Department 
that all matters concerning the health of the students in 
general or as individuals should pass through the Dean's 
office; all letters to parents in regard to their daughters' 
health, to home physicians and to specialists, as well as all 
illness excuses, were sent out from the Dean's office. The 
reports of the Health Department and of the Bureau of 
Appointments are presented separately. 

The record of the attendance of the students on their 
classes is given below as calculated by the Recording Secretary. 
Students are excused from attending their classes by the 
Dean of the College in case of illness certified to by one of the 
college physicians and also in special cases when called home on 
account of serious illness in their families. 



(19) 



20 



Record oj Attendance. 



Number of cuts 
per student. 



None 

One 

Two 

Three 

Four 

Five 

Six 

Seven 

Eight 

Nine 

Ten 

Eleven 

Twelve 

Thirteen 

Fourteen 

Fifteen 

Sixteen 

Seventeen. . . . 

Eighteen 

Nineteen 

Twenty 

Twenty-one . . 
Twenty-two. . 
Twenty-three. 
Twenty-four . 
Twenty-five . . 
Twenty-six. . . 
Twenty-seven 
Twenty-eight . 
Twenty-nine. . 



Number of 
students 
with cuts. 



Sem. Sem. 
I. II. 



12 
14 
23 
17 
29 
22 
27 
25 
24 
18 
11 
20 
19 
13 
9 
4 
15 
8 

10 
6 
5 
3 
4 
3 
2 
1 



5 
1 
9 
15 
15 
12 
15 
10 
19 
16 
IS 
18 
20 
19 
18 
10 
9 
13 



10 
9 
5 

5 
4 

7 



Number of 

students 

with unex- 

cused cuts. 



Sem. Sem. 
I. II. 



13 

21 

24 

20 

37 

32 

36 

30 

20 

14 

13 

17 

16 

IS 

7 

7 

9 

5 

4 

4 

2 

3 

3 

1 



6 
1 

12 
20 
19 
15 
18 
14 
27 
24 
25 
24 
19 
22 
16 
15 

7 
11 

9 



Number of cuts 
per student. 



Number of 
students 
with cuts. 



Thirty 

Thirty-one . . . 
Thirty-two. . . 
Thirtj'^-three . . 
Thirty-four . . . 
Thirty-six. . . . 
Thirtj^-seven . 
Thirty-nine . . . 
Forty-one .... 
Forty-two .... 

Forty-six 

Forty-eight . . . 

Fifty ' . . 

Fifty-two .... 
Fifty-four. . . . 

Fifty-six 

Sixty 

Sixty-two .... 
Sixty-four .... 
Sixty-five .... 
Sixty-seven . . . 
Seventy-one. . 
Seventy-four . 

Eighty 

One Hundred 
forty-one . 



Total number 
of students 



Sem. 

I. 



362 



Sem. 
II. 



351 



Numberof 

students 

with unex- 

cused cuts. 



Sem. Sem. 
I. II. 



362 



351 



Sem. I. Sem. II. 

Aggregate number of cuts 3820 5556 

" " " unexcused cuts 2877 3991 

Average number of cuts per student 10.6 15.8 

" . " " " " " cutting 10.9 16.1 

" " " unexcused cuts per student 7.9 11.4 

" " " " ■ " " " cutting... 8.2 11.6 

Average number of cuts pei year per student 26 . 4 

" " " " " " " cutting 27.0 

" " " unexcused cuts per year per student 19.3 

" " " " " " " " cutting... 19.8 



21 





Percentage of Students Cutting. 








Cuts excused and 1 


Unexcused outs. 


Percentage of total number of students. 


unexcused. 1 








Sem. I. 


Sem. 11. 

3.6 

28.2 


Sem. 1. 

1.4 
11.4 


Sem. n. 


With no mita . . 


3.3 


1.7 




' 1 or more, but under 5 cuts. 


. 22.9 


14.8 




' 5 " " " " 10 " 


. 32.0 


36.5 


20.5 


27.9 




' 10 " " " " 15 " 


. 19.9 


19.6 


26.5 


30.2 




' 15 " " " " 20 " 


. 11.9 


8.0 


13.7 


12.8 




' 20 " " " " 30 " 


5.8 


3.0 


15.7 


10.5 




< 3Q u u .< u 40 <, 


. 2.8 


0.8 


5.1 


1.4 




' 40 " " ■' " 50 " 


. 0.3 


0.0 


1.7 


0.6 




' 50 " " " " 60 " 


0.0 


0.0 


2 6 


0.0 




' 60 or more cuts 


1.1 


0.3 


14 


0.0 


Pa 


'centage of students with 10 or mo 


re 




cuts 


. 41.8 


31.7 


66.7 


55.5 



The average number of cuts per student is 26.4 per year, or 13.2 
per semester. As there are 13| weeks of lectures in each semester, the 
average number of cuts per student is one lecture a week. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marion Edwards Park, 

Acting Dean of the College. 



Report of the Secretary of the Faculty. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to report that during the academic 
year 1911-12 the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College has taken 
action in matters not of a routine character as follows: 

January 11, 1912. Voted to change the schedule of en- 
trance examinations so as to give the examinations in Minor 
Latin, Solid Geometry, and Trigonometry after the beginning 
of the academic year. 

January 11, 1912. Voted to amend the rule so that 
probation students with large arrears of work may be required 
to return to college for more than one additional year. As a 
rule, such students will be assigned not more than 12 hours of 
work each semester. Of this amount, 7| hours (as nearly as 
possible) will be chosen from the remaining hours of the 120 
needed. 

April 29, 1912. Voted to revise the regulations concerning 
the passing off of matriculation conditions and to adopt the 
following new regulations : 

"All conditions incurred by a student in the twenty 
sections of the entrance examination must be passed off before 
she may be admitted to the college for a second year. 

''The matriculation examinations in September may not 
be taken to remove conditions by a student having more than 
one condition (see below)." 

"a. Limitation of work on account of entrance conditions. 

"If a student fail to pass off her matriculation conditions 
before the beginning of the second semester after entrance, 
she must curtail her college work during this second semester 
by dropping one hour of college work for each section of the 
matriculation examination in which she has a condition. She 
will also be required to take an approved tutor or tutors in 
the matriculation subjects for as many hours each week as 
are dropped from college work. 

(22) 



23 

"b. Exclusion on account of entrance conditions. 

" If a student at the end of her second semester have failed 
to pass off all her entrance conditions she is excluded from the 
college for at least one year, except that a student having 
only one condition, i. e., in a single section of the entrance 
examinations, may try to remove this condition in the Sep- 
tember examinations before the exclusion becomes effective. 
Admission to the examinations in September shall not be under- 
stood to carry any privileges in the matter of the reservation 
of rooms. 

"Students thus excluded may not make any further 
attempt to remove entrance conditions before the time of the 
midyear examinations for matriculation in the year of exclu- 
sion." 

Voted to change the first part of the rule on Absences 
so as to give the Faculty power to require a student to drop all 
her hours of work if absent for a number of consecutive working 
days in one semester. 

Voted to continue the trial of the fixed quizzes for the 
year 1912-13, the rule being changed as follows: 

Courses covering five hours shall have three quizzes each 
semester. There shall be two quizzes only in three hour 
courses and one quiz only in two hour and three hour recitation 
major courses or in other two hour and three hour major 
courses containing ten or less students. 

May 6, 1912. Informed that new courses of instruction 
would make such groups possible, the Faculty voted as 
follows : 

To separate art and archaeology hitherto united to form 
a group subject and to permit as groups combinations of 
classical archaeology with Greek and Latin and ancient history 
and of history of art with German or French or Italian or 
Spanish. 

To establish as groups the combination of ancient history 
with Latin or Greek; of modern European history with German 
or French; and of mathematics with biology. 

In the matter of making a group of history of art with 
modern European history, it was voted to permit a trial of 



24 

this combination for two years with the understanding that 
at the end of this period either department shall be free to ask 
the Faculty to reconsider its action. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William Bashford Huff, 

Secretary of the Faculty. 



Report of the Secretary of the College. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honor to present the following report for the 
academic year 1911-12. 

Three hundred and ninety-two students were assigned 
to rooms in the halls of residence, November 1, 1911, and six 
graduate students were given rooms in Dolgelley and two in 
Cartref, making a total of four hundred students in residence. 

The following table shows the number of students of each 
class in each hall as well as the non-resident students : 

1911-12. 
1912. 1913. 1914. 1915. Hearer. Graduate. Total. 

Merion 16 18 17 51 

Radnor 11 6 14 19 7 . 57 

Denbigh 13 10 13 16 17 69 

Pembroke East 15 10 15 20 9 69, 

Pembroke West 12 11 16 18 9 66 

RockefeUer 12 13 21 24 1 9 80 

Dolgelley and Cartref 8 8 

Non-resident 3 5 3 11 4 11 37 

66 71 100 125 5 70 437 

Non-resident Fellows . . . . . . . . . . 3 

440 

The matriculation examinations were held in the spring 
of 1912 in 26 centres as well as at Bryn Mawr College. In each 
centre the examinations were proctored by an alumna appointed 
by the college. 

The number of candidates examined in each centre was: 

Altoona 1 Chicago 8 

Baltimore 38 Cincinnati 4 

Berlin 1 Cleveland 3 

Boston 20 Columbus . 1 

Bryn Mawr 81 Cumberland 1 

Catonsville 8 Denver 3 

(25) 



26 

Fond du Lac . '. 4 Pittsburgh 5 

Greenwich 44 Providence 3 

Indianapolis 4 Richmond 19 

Keokuk 1 Santa Barbara 2 

Louisville 1 Washington, Conn 16 

Milwaukee 1 Wilkes Barre 3 

MinneapoHs 3 

Munich 9 Total 330 

New York 46 

Passed. Per cent. 

Candidates taking finals 117 95 81.11 

Candidates taking preUminaries 213 168 78.84 

330 

Forty-seven candidates took the College Entrance Exami- 
nation Board examinations and applied for admission to Bryn 
Ma"^T:" College in June, 1912. 

In November of 1908 plans of the college buildings and 
the competitive entrance scholarship circular were sent to 
about five hundred high schools in the United States that had 
never sent any students to Bryn Mawr College. They were 
also sent to about four hundred girls' preparatory schools. 
They were sent again in November, 1910, to the girls' prepara- 
tory schools. A great many inquiries were received from 
teachers and pupils of these schools and in the last five years 
one hundred and ten new schools have been added to the list 
of schools sending students to Bryn Mawr College. There 
are students registered for rooms for the year 1920-21 and one 
student registered for 1929-30. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Anna Bell Lawthee, 
Secretary of the College. 



Report of the Bureau of Appointments. 
To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit the following report on the 
work of the Bureau of Appointments for the academic year 
1911-12. 

The following positions have been secured through the 
Bureau of Appointments: 

Teachers in private schools and colleges 10 

Tutors and temporary positions 10 

Secretaries 3 

Total number of positions secured 23 

The above positions have been secured by members of the 
following classes: 

1912 3 1903 1 

1911 3 1896 1 

1910 . 4 1895 1 

1908 2 1892 1 

1907 1 Former graduate students 3 

1905 1 Undergraduate still in college ... 1 

1904 1 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marion Edwards Park, 
Acting Dean of the College. 



(27J 



Report of the Librarian. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to present the annual report of the work 
of the Hbrary for the year ending September 30, 1912. 

The following table shows the additions made from various 
sources and the total present extent of the library, with a state- 
ment of the condition of a year ago for purposes of comparison : 

Accessions. 

Number of volumes October 1, 1911 63,666 

Number of volumes added : 

1910-11. 1911-12. 

By purchase 1,256 2,360 

By binding 558 593 

By gift and exchange 456 657 

By replacement 8 27 

Unknown sources. . . .• 29 4 

Christian Association 5 " 16 

Total additions 2,312 3,657 

Volumes withdrawn 36 114 

Net gain 2,276 3,543 

Maps and charts 115 7 

♦Pamphlets added 301 292 

*Pamphlets withdrawn 25 27 

Net gain 276 265 

Total volumes September 30, 1912 67,209 

Total maps and charts 2,101 

Total accessioned pamphlets 2,627 

These accessions are distributed hy classes as follows: 

1910-11. 1911-12. 

General works 134 280 

Philosophy 169 246 



* These numbers represent catalogued pamphlets only. There is also in the library a 
growing collection of several thousand pamphlets arranged alphabetically by author. 
Pamphlets when bound are withdrawn and again accessioned as books. 

(28) 



29 



1910-11. 1911-12. 

Religion 193 128 

Social Science 361 487 

PhUology 155 155 

Science 328 466 

Useful Arts 41 31 

Fine Arts 46 78 

Literature 632 1,102 

History, etc 253 684 



Total 2,312 3,657 

A list of donors to the librar}^ with titles of the books and 
pamphlets presented is appended. Books purchased from the 
gifts of money mentioned later under the financial statement 
are not included in this list or in the table of accessions under 
the head of Gifts and Exchanges, because all such books were 
bought through the library. 

Cataloguing. 

1910-11. 1911-12. 

Titles catalogued 2,250 2,692 

Continuations, etc., added 1,226 1,277 

Cards added to main catalogue 7,503 10,141 

Cards added to departmental catalogues 414 405 

The statistics for 1911-12 show an increase in the number 
'of volumes catalogued which nearly corresponds to the increase 
in the number of volumes added compared with the number 
in the preceding year. The number of cards written is some- 
what greater owing to the fact that during the past year all 
cards added to the catalogue have been counted while formerly 
only the first card of a set was noted. 

The recataloguing of the following classes has been com- 
pleted: philosophy from 100-170; geology, 550, except the 
periodicals; the periodicals in biology, 570.5, and the literature 
of the minor languages, 890-891. In addition, work has been 
continued on the long sets in science, only a few of these sets 
now remaining uncatalogued. 

The cataloguing department has undertaken to check 
the proof sheets of the printed cards of the Harvard College 
Library. As these comprise only such cards as are not dupli- 



30 

cated among the printed cards of the Library of Congress they 
will in time prove of valuable assistance. Especially is this 
true in the classics in which Harvard College is notably 
strong. Fortunately this portion of our library has not yet 
been recatalogued, but recataloguing will be commenced as 
soon as the progress of the Harvard printing will justify 
undertaking it. 



Binding. 

1910-11. 1911-12. 

Volumes at binderies, October 1 44 136 

Volumes sent during year 1,039 1,046 

Volumes at binderies, September 30. . 136 176 

Total bound during year 947 1,006 



Circidation. 

1910-11. 1911-12. 

October . . 2,843 3,721 

November 2,017 2,488 

December 1,280 1,335 

January 1,841 2,077 

February 2,218 2,593 

March 1,648 2,832 

April 1,779 1,808 

May 1,720 2,243 

June 739 668 



16,085 19,765 

The circulation which fell off last year has more than 
recovered its loss, being for the past five years as follows: — 

1907-08 16,600 

1908-09 17,586 

1909-10 17,082 

1910-11 16,085 

1911-12 19,765 

It would be interesting, were it feasible, to compare the 
use of books within the library for the same number of years. 
The increasing number of books placed on reserves as noted 
below indicates the increasing use of books within the library. 



31 

Reserves. 

1909-10. 

October 1,216 

November 355 

December 211 

January 434 

February 459 

March 258 

April 264 

May 160 

Jime 



1910-11. 


1911-12. 


1,142 


1,701 


407 


586 


202 


193 


242 


249 


523 


457 


226 


527 


342 


304 


184 


181 


1 





3,357 3,269 4,198 

Inter-library Loans, 

During the past year we have borrowed from other hbraries 
185 volumes as follows: 

Boston Public Library 7 

University of Chicago 1 

Columbia University 13 

Library of Congress 13 

Free Library of Philadelphia 11 

Harvard University 41 

Haverf ord College 3 

Johns Hopkins University 2 

Library Company 37 

Mercantile Library 1 

Universit}^ of Pennsylvania 39 

Princeton University 12 

Protestant Episcopal Divinity School 1 

Surgeon General's Library 3 

Union Theological Seminary 1 

185 

Books have been lent to other institutions as follows: 

University of Chicago 21 

Harvard University 1 

University of Pennsylvania 3 

25 

Financial Statement. 

The sums available for the purchase of books and periodi- 
cals together with the expense of binding and general library 
supplies are as follows: 



32 

Library appropriation apportioned as follows: 

Library Expenses S800.00 

Biology 150.00 

Chemistry 150.00 

Comparative Literature 150.00 

Economics 150.00 

English 150.00 

French 150.00 

German 150.00 

Greek 150.00 

History 150.00 

Latin 150.00 

Mathematics 150.00 

Philosophy 150.00 

Physics 150.00 

Psychology 150.00 

Reference Books '. 100.00 

$3,000.00 

Appropriations made from fees paid by students for con- 
dition, deferred, and advanced standing examinations and as 
fines as follows: 

Regular appropriations: 

Art and Archeology $100.00 

Botany 30.00 

Comparative Philology 30.00 

Continuations of serial publications 100.00 

General literature 75.00 

Geology 75.00 

International Catalogue 100.00 

Italian 75.00 

Special : 

English philology to be purchased abroad by 

Dr. Brown 100.00 

Dr. L^pham's course in eighteenth century 

literature 150.00 

Dr. Hatcher's course in comparative literature 75.00 

Scientific books of general interest in connection 
with the free elective courses in 

Historical physics 25.00 

Astro-physics 25.00 

Geology 25.00 

Theory of evolution 25.00 

For the purchase of a set of Supreme Court 

Reports 230.00 

Dr. Randolph's course on birds 25.00 



3.3 



To meet overdrafts : 

Art and Archaeology $50.00 

Biology 100.00 

Chemistry 90.00 

Geology 46.66 

Religious books 9.25 

Semitic literature 23.02 

Miscellaneous 74.56 

$1,658.49 

The income on invested funds has been as follows: 

Dr. Rhoads Memorial Fund $67.71 

Class of 1902 (devoted to Economics) 20.92 

Lois Meta Wright Memorial Fund 5.20 

Rose Chamberlin Fund 44.55 

There was also spent for books from the Phoebe Anna 

Thorne Fund 254.86 

From special f imds : 

Sale of books and library fines 481.75 

HaU libraries 234.33 

Geology fund spent for books 101.34 

Gifts. 

From the Class of 1901 $200.00 

to be spent for books in economics 
to be chosen by Dr. Marion Parris 
Smith. 

From the Class of 1906 in memory of 

Frances Simpson Pfahler 1,000.00 

to be spent for books in history as follows: 

For Mr. Haring's courses $400.00 

For Mr. Cleveland's courses 500.00 

For Dr. Ferguson's courses 100.00 

From the Class of 1908 100.00 

expended as follows: 

Greek Sculpture $25.00 

Modern Drama 25.00 

History (Mr. Cleveland) 50.00 

From the Alumnae: 

The balance on the Michi Matsuda scholarship fund 

to be spent for books in economics and history 159.87 



34 

Contributions through the Bryn MavsT Alumnse 

Quarterly $30.53 

From Mrs. Alba B. Johnson 60.00 

to be spent for books in biology. 

■ From a member of the Class of 1897 35.00 

to be spent for books in chemistry. 

From the Philadelphia Branch of the Alumnse Asso- 
ciation 187.00 

From the Alumnse Association 194.61 

The last two named have been appropi-iated 
as follows: 

Modern art (Miss King) $100.00 

Shakespeare (Dr. Hatcher) 181.00 

Literary criticism (Dr. Upham) 100.00 

From individuals the following gifts have been 
received : 

Miss Garrett $147.54 

expended as follows: 

English philology (Dr. Moore) $100.00 

Books of current interest 9.53 

Hygiene 9.27 

President's office 2.30 

Suffrage 1.44 

Duplicates in Economics 25.00 

From Mr. Charles James Rhoads 500.00 

expended as follows: 

ItaUan Art $75.00 

Greek (Dr. Sanders) 25.00 

Greek (Dr. Wright) 50.00 

Latin (Dr. Frank) 50.00 

Sanskrit 20.00 

History (Mr. Cleveland) 100.00 

Enghsh Literature (Dr. Hatcher) . . 80.00 

Literary Criticism (Dr. Upham) .... 100.00 

From Mr. Alba B. Johnson, 

to be spent for books in biology 50.00 

in general literature 100.00 

From Mrs. F. L. Wesson, 
expended as follows: 

Itahan 300.00 

French (M. Cons) 200.00 

Professor Rufus M. Jones 

to be spent by the Christian Association . 25.00 

Total resources $9,174.66 



35 

The above statement applies to money received. Not 
all of this has been spent as the majority of the gifts were made 
late in the year. But from the record of money actually spent 
the following summary may be of interest : 

For books $4,645.84 

For periodicals and continuations 2,205.58 

For binding 521.93 

For supplies 256.17 

For postage, express and freight 79.86 

Total $7,709.38 

Inventory. 
Books missing from the library previous to the inventory 
of 1905 have been withdrawn from the records and the number 
deducted from the total noted earlier in the report. Since 
1905 an inventory has been taken every two years up to 1911, 
when the work was postponed from the summer until the 
Christmas holidays, the change being made because of the 
fact that the electric light cannot be used in the day time during 
the summer vacation. As a result of the inventory the follow- 
ing books are i-eported missing: 

From the inventory of 1905 : 

Main library 21 

From the inventory of 1907: 

Main library 15 

Halls... 17 

32 

From the inventory of 1909: 

Main library 18 

Departmental libraries 10 

Seminary libraries 3 

HaUs 15 

46 

From the inventory of 1912: 

Main library 60 

Seminaries 6 

Departmental libraries 17 

HaUs 42 

125 

Total volumes still missiag 224 



36 

Administration. 

The library has suffered a great loss in the resignation of 
Miss Mary E. Baker, the head cataloguer. Miss Baker has 
held this post for four years, during which time not only was 
the current cataloguing carried through expeditiously but the 
recataloguing commenced some years ago was most satisfac- 
torily advanced. Miss Baker resigned to accept a similar 
post in a large university. Her place was filled by the appoint- 
ment of Miss Helen Corey Geddes, who commenced her duties 
September 1st. 

Another loss to the library was the resignation in June of 
Mrs. Cassandra U. Warner, for two years in charge of the 
loan desk. During this time the position has been changed 
from that of a mere record keeper to a post of material assistance 
to students and faculty in the use of the library. All who 
use the library have appreciated this approach to a reference 
librarianship. Mrs. Warner resigned to accept the post of 
reference librarian in an important public library. Her posi- 
tion has been filled by Miss Sara Wooster Eno, who has had 
some years' experience in other college libraries. 

Miss Helen Shoemaker has also been added to the staff 
to take the place of certain student assistants and to meet the 
additional demand created by replacing student assistants 
at the loan desk in the evening by members of the regular staff. 
This change to be made at the opening of the coming college 
year it is hoped will mark an advance in the efficiency of the 
library. 

To the faithful co-operation of the members of the library 
staff is due such success as has attended the efforts of the 
librarian during the past year, and I am glad of this opportunity 
to express my appreciation of their services. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary L. Jones, 

Librarian. 



Gifts to Bryn Mawr College Library, 1911-12. 

Gifts from Individuals. 

In addition to the exceptionally large gifts of money 
already reported, 657 volumes were presented to the library. 
The most notable of these, the gift of Miss Sophie and Miss 
Abby Kirk, comprised the library of the late John Foster Kirk, 
author of The History of Charles the Bold. It consists of the 
following 147 volumes, chiefly on the period covered by this 
notable work. 

Recherches sui' I'Histoire de Liege, 2v.; B. Y., Promenades historiquea 
dans le Pays de Li^ge; Gerlache, Histoire de Liege; Polain, Esquisses ou 
Recits historiques siir I'ancien Pays de Liege; Wierstraat, Reimchronik 
der Stadt Neuss; Gollut, Memoires historiques de la Republique Sequa- 
noise; Jeune, Histoire de la Guerre de Lorraine; Commynes, Memoires, 
2v. ; Academic de Besangon, Memoii'es et Documents inedits, 3v. ; Boyve, 
Annates historiques du Comte de Neuchatel et Valangin, 2v.; Bussierre, 
Histoire de la Ligue formee contre Charles le Temeraire; Code historique 
et diplomatique de la Ville de Strasbourg, 2v.; Palacky, Geschichte von 
B5hmen, 2v.; Basin, Histoire des Regnes de Charles VII et de Louis XI, 
2v.; Mohr, Die Regesten der xArchive in der schweizerischen Eidgenos- 
senschaft; Barante, Histou-e des Dues de Bourgogne; Courtepee, Des- 
cription du Duche de Bom-gogne, 4v.; Laborde, Les Dues de Bourgogne, 
Seconde Partie, 3v.; Tillier, Geschichte des Freistaates Bern, 5v.; Ochs, 
Geschichte der Stadt und Landschaft Basel, 8v.; Lokrer, Geschichte der 
Stadt Neuss; Stalder, Versuch eines schweizerischen Idiotikon; Ram, 
Documents relatifs aux troubles du Pays de Liege; Mignet, Charles-Quint; 
Polain, Liege pittoresque; Archiv fiir schweizerische Geschichte, 3v.; 
EJiebel, Chronik; Fredericq, Essai sm- le Role politique et social des Dues 
de Bourgogne; Gingins La Sarra, Depeches des Ambassadeurs milanais; 
Chmel, Geschichte Friedrichs IV, 2v.; DuClercq, Memoires sur le Regne 
de PhiUppe le Bon, 4v.; Dewez, Histoire du Pays de Liege, 2v.; Dewez, 
Histoire particuliere des Provinces belgiques, 3v.; Bourasse, Abbayes et 
Monasteres; Rodt, Die Feldziige Karls des Kiihnen, 2v.; Lopez, Les 
Races aryennes du P^rou; Strobel, Vaterlandische Geschichte des Elsasses, 
6v.; Revolutions de Li^ge; Oudegherst, Annales de Flandre, 2v.; Lenfant, 
Geschichte des Hussitenkrieges, 4v.; Edlibach, Chronik; Schilling, Schwei- 
zer-chronik; Jager, Geschichte Carls des Kiihnen; Alaman, Historia de 
M6jico, 3v.; Lanz, Correspondenz des Kaisers Karl V, 3v.; Buchon, 
Collection des Chroniques nationales frangaises: Lalain, Chastellain, 2v.; 
Moliaet, v. 1-5; Hisely, Frederic de Gingins- La-Sarra; Faber, De Carolo 
Bellicose; Haynin et de Louvegnies; Memoires; Societe d'Histoire de la 

(37) 



38 

Suisse romande, Memoiies et Documents, v. 8; Kriitli, Amtliche Sammlung 
der altern eidgenossischen Abschiede, Vol. 2, 3, Part 1; Stettler, Chronicon, 
2v.; Wurstisen, Bassler Chronik; Plancher, Histoire Generale et Particuliere 
de Bourgogne, 4v.; Miiller, Des heiligen romischen Reichs, teutscher 
nation, reichs tags theatrum; Herzog, Chronicon Alsatiae; Stumpf, 
Gemeiner lobHcher Eydgnoschafft, Stetten, Landen, voelckeren chronick 
wirdiger Thaaten, 2v.; Meyer, Commentarii ; Etterlin, Kronica von der 
loblichen Ej^dtgnoschaft; Chastellain, Oeuvres historiques inedites; 
Schilling, Beschreibung der burgundischen Kriegen; Chronique ou Dialogue 
entre Joannes Lud et Chretien; Alberi, Relazioni degli Ambasciatori 
Veneti al Senato, llv.; Comines, Memoires, Godefroy, ed., 4v. ; Comines, 
Memoires, Dupont, ed., Vol. 3; Dunod, Histoire de I'Eglise, Ville et 
Diocese de Besangon, 2v.; Pelzel, Kaiser Karl der Vierte, 2v.; Lebens- 
geschichte des Koenigs Wenceslaus; 2v.; Konigshoven, Die alteste 
teutsche . . . elsassische und strassburgische Chronicke; Memoires 
pour servir h I'Histoire de France et de Bourgogne; Souvenirs et Monu- 
ments de la Bataille de Nancy; Bullinger, Von den Tigurineren und der 
Stadt Ziirich Sachen; Bullinger, Historia; Polain, Histoire de I'ancien 
Pays de Liege. 

Of unusual interest to the college is the gift to the library of the 
books belonging to Carola Woerishoffer presented as a memorial to her by 
her mother Mrs. Woerishoffer. Among these is a set in twelve volumes of 
II Breviario Grimani della Bibliotheca di S. Marco in Venezia, a rare and 
very beautiful collection of fac-similes, a special case for which has been 
built in the Art Seminary. The following is a list of the books : 

A Beckett, Comic History of Rome; Ady, Beatrice d'Este; American 
Scenic and Historic Preservation Society, Annual Report, 1911; Aristotle, 
Politics; v.l; Baird, Huguenots and Hemy of Navarre, v.l; Baird, 
History of the Rise of the Huguenots of France, 2v.; Bolles, Pennsylvania, 
Province and State, 2v.; II Breviario Grimani della Bibliotheca di S. 
Marco in 'Venezia, 12v.; Brigham, Guatemala; Brocklehurst, Mexico 
To-day; Burgess, Political Science and Comparative Constitutional Law, 
Vol. 2; Carlyle, Reminiscences; Catlin, Illustrations of the Manners, 
Customs and Condition of the North American Indians, 2v. ; Charnay, 
Ancient Cities of the New World; Chateaubriand, Les Natchez, Vol 1; 
Clark, Philosophy of Wealth; Cook and Tinker, Select Translations from 
old English Poetry; Cox, Diversions of a Diplomat in Turkey; Curtis, 
Capitals of Spanish America; Castillo, Historia verdadera de la Conquista 
de la Nueva Espana; Drake, Aboriginal Races of North America; Eastman, 
Taxation for State Purposes in Pennsylvania; EsquemeUng, Buccaneers 
of America; Exposition Meissonier, 24 Mai — 24 Juillet, 1884; Foster, 
Text Book of Physiology; Ghent, Mass and Class; Gomara, Histoire 
Generale des Indes Occidentales; Gomara, Historia de Mexico; Gomara, 
La Historia General de las Indias; Griggs, Moral Education; Gutenberg, 
Gesellschaft, Jahresbericht, 1902-08; Gutenberg-Gesellschaft, Veroffent- 
lichimgen, 1902-08; Hoyt, Cyclopaedia of Practical Quotations; Hugo, 



39 

Theatre; Jarvis, Planting of the Church, Vol.. 1; James, Tragic Muse, 
Vol. 1; Kant, Critique of Pure Reason; Lanciani, Ancient Rome; Laugh- 
hn, Latter-day Problems; Lilley, Modernism; Low, American People; 
MacLean, De Jure Emigrandi; Malthus, Parallel Chapters from the 1st 
and 2d Editions of An Essay on the Principle of Population; Meredith, 
Ordeal of Richard Feverel; Manly, Specimens of the Pre-Shakesperean 
Drama, Vol. 1; Mill, On Liberty; Monahan, Benigna Vera; Morgan, 
Catalogue of the Art Collection Formed by the late Mrs. Mary J. Morgan; 
Miinsterberg, Die Ainerikaner, 2v.; Palou, Relacion Historica de la Vida 
& Apostolicas Tareas del Padre Fray Junipero Serra; Pietsch, Die Malerei 
auf der Miinchener Jubilaums-Kunst-Ausstellung. 1888; Plato, Republic; 
RawHnson, Five Great Monarchies of the Ancient Eastern World, 3v.; 
Rawlinson, Seventh Great Oriental Monarchy; Rawlinson, Sixth Great 
Oriental Monarchy; Reinsch, World Politics; Ribot, Psychology of the 
Emotions; SchmoUer, Mercantile System; Schwabe, Richard Cobden; 
Smith, Select Chapters and Passages from The Wealth of Nations ; Squier, 
Nicaragua; Squier, Notes on Central America; Squier, Peru; Stephens, 
Incidents of Travel in Yucatan, 2v.; Stephens, Incidents of Travel in 
Central America, Chiapas and Yucatan, 2v.; Thomson, Brain and Per- 
sonality; Thompson, Mental Traits of Sex; Thorndike, Educational 
Psychology; Turgot, Reflections on the Formation and the Distribution 
of Riches; U. S. Congress, Memorial of Joseph Henry; Veblen, Theory 
of the Leisure Class; Vega, La Florida del Ynca; Wells, Explorations 
and Adventures in Honduras; Windelband, History of Philosophy; Woods, 
Mental and Moral Heredity in Roj'^alty. 

Miss Grace Albert has presented to the library a collection of booka 
on history, fifty volumes of which are duplicates to be sold and the proceeds 
devoted to the library; the remaining volumes have been accessioned and 
are noted in the accompanying list. 

The gift of a set of the great work, The PhiUppine Islands, edited by 
Blair and Robertson, in 55 volumes, by Miss Mary Peirce of the Class of 
1912, calls for special mention. 

The Class of 1913 presented to the library a group of 21 volumes on 
music, a gift which has been greatly appreciated by students using the 
library. The titles are named in the list of gifts. 

Other gifts to the Hbrary are as follows: 

Mr. Henry Adams: Mont St. Michel and Chartres. 

Miss Grace Albert: Arnold, Celtic Literature, Culture and Anarchy, 
Essays in Criticism, First and Second Series, God and the Bible; Bruce, 
Economic History of Virginia, 2v.; Channing, Guide to American History; 
Andrews, Colonial Self-Government ; Egerton, Origin and Growth of 
English Colonies; A Short History of British Colonial Policy; Ferrero, 
The Women of the Caesars; Greene, The Provincial Governor; James, 
Pragmatism; Lucas, Historical Geography of the British Colonies; Hart, 
The Southern South; WiUiams, History of China; Zimmei-n, Home Life 
of the Greeks. 



40 

Mr. A. Piatt Andrew: Andrew, The Purpose and Origin of the Pro- 
posed Banking Legislation. 

Mrs. Julia A. Balbach: Balbach,,Cupid Intelligent, 2 copies. 

Miss Cora A. Benneson: American Association for the Advancement 
of Science, Proceedings, 1910; Science. 

Hon. Jonathan Bourne, Jr.: Bourne, Popular versus Delegated Gov- 
ernment. 

Mr. Charles A. Brewster: Marvin, Love and Letters. 

Dr. Carleton F. Brown: Brown, Shakespeare and the Horse. 

Dr. Thomas C. Brown: 2 Reprints. 

Hon. James Bryce: Statement Exhibiting the Moral and Material 
Progress and Condition of India During the Year 1910-11. 

H. M. Byllesby & Company: 6 Pamphlets. 

Mr. Edward C. Chickering: Chickering, An Introduction to Octavia 
Praetexta. 

Hon. Joseph H. Choate: Choate, American Addi-esses. 

Mr. Frederick A. Cleveland: Garrison, Joseph Mazzini: His Life, 
Writings, and Political Principles. 

Dr. Elie de Cyon: Cyon, La Guerre ou la Paix?; Oil la Dictature de 
M. Witte conduit la Russie; M. Witte et ses Projets de Faillite; Les 
Finances Russes; M. Witte et les Finances Russes; Histoire de I'Entente 
Franco-Russe, 1886-1894. 

Miss Eleanor Deming: Adams & Stephens, Select Documents of 
English Constitutional History; Colquhoun and Colquhoun, The Whirl- 
pool of Europe; Stubbs, Select Charters Illustrative of English Constitu- 
tional History. 

Hon. Chauncey M. Depew; Depew, Recent Speeches. 

Hon. Robert E. Difenderfer: Congressional Record, 1911-12; Con- 
gressional Record, Vol. 47, Pts. 1-5; Yearbook of the Department of 
Agriculture, 1911. 

Mrs. L. B. Dudley: Dudley, A Writer's Inldiorn. 

E. P. Dutton & Company: Dictionary Catalogue of the Fir.st .505 
Volumes of Everyman's Library. 

Mr. Albert J. Edmunds: Buddhist Loans to Christianity. 

Mr. Henry C. Ehlers: Ehlers, The Mechanism of Nature. 

Dr. Clarence E. Ferree and Miss Gertrude Rand: Ferree and Rand, 
The Spatial Values of the Visual Field Immediately Surrounding the Blind 
Spot and the Question of the Associative Filling In of the Blind Spot. 

Dr. Simon Fiexner: Barus, Production of Elliptic Interferences in 
Relation to Interferometry; Churchill, Beach-La-Mar; Lloyd, Guaj'ule; 
Parker, Calendar of Papers in Washington Archives Relating to Terri- 
tories of the U. S.; Sommer, Le Livre de Lancelot del Lac, Vol. 5, Pts. 2-3. 

Miss Mabel Foster: Carola Woerishoffer, her Life and Work, 2 copies. 

Miss Violet Bacon Foster: Foster, Early Chapters in the Develop- 
ment of the Potomac Route to the West. 

Miss Florence W. Fulton: Fulton, Laws of Marriage. 

Hon. Augustus P. Gardner: Gardner, The Recall of Judges and 



41 

Judicial Decisions; Investigation of the U. S. Steel Corporation, Minority 
Report. 

Mr. Frederick T. Gates: Gates, The Truth about Mr. Rockefeller 
and the Merritts. 

Dr. Anson R. Graves: Graves, The Farmer Boy who Became a Bishop. 

Mr. Job E. Hedges: Hedges, Common Sense in Politics. 

Hon. Weldon B. Heyburn: Heyburn, Protection which Protects. 

Dr. Richard T. Holbrook: Holbrook, Portraits of Dante; Serrill, 
Historical Addresses delivered on the 150th Anniversary of the Founding 
of the Darby Library Company, 1S93. 

Mr. Henry Howson: Journal of the Franldin Institute. 

Mr. Robert U. Johnson: Johnson, Poems. 

Miss Dora Keen: Ciencias Pedag6gicas y Filosofia, Vol. 12, Trabajos 
del Cuarto Congreso Cientifico, Vol. 9; Ciencias Econ6micas y Sociales, 
Vols. 10-11. 

Miss Helen M. King: Programme of the Coronation of H. M. Vajira- 
vudh, King of Siam. 

Miss Abby Kirk and Miss Emily L. Bull: Kirk and Bull, First Latin 
Book. 

Mr. Theodore W. Koch: Koch, Suggested Readings for Library 
Assistants in the New Encyclopa?dia Britannica. 

Dr. Agathe Lasch: Lasch, Geschichte der Schriftsprache in Berlin. 

Messrs. Lemcke and Buechner: Hinrichs, Halbjahrs' Katalog, 1911, 
Pts. 1-2. 

Miss Blanche G. Loveridge: Loveridge, Appreciation of Art. 

Hon. P. J. McCumber: McCumber, The Judicial RecaU. 

Miss Margaret McKiUop and Miss Mabel Atkinson: McKillop and 
Atkinson, Economics, Descriptive and Theoretical. 

Mrs. Anna B. McMahan: McMahan, Shakespeare's Christmas Gift 
to Queen Bess; Shakespeare's Love Story. 

Dr. E. L. Mark and Mr. J. A. Long: Mark and Long, Contributions 
from the Zoological Laboratory of the Museum of Comparative Zoology 
at Harvard College, No. 225. 

Messrs. E. Merck and Company: Merck, Priifung der chemischen 
Reagenzien auf Reinheit; E. Merck's Annual Report, Vol. 24. 

Mr. George W. Neville: The New York Cotton Exchange in its 
Relations to Merchandising Cotton. 

Dr. Charles Peabody: La Chronique des Arts; Gazette des Beaux- 
Arts. 

Miss Mary Peirce: Blair and Robertson, The Philippine Islands, 55v. 

Hon. Samuel W. Pennj^Dacker: Penn3^acker, The Desecration and 
Profanation of the Pennsylvania Capitol. 

Messrs. Rand, McNally & Company: Patriotic and Folk-lore Songs. 

Mr. Reginald C. Robbins: Robbins, Love Poems, Second and Third 
Series. 

Mrs. Alfred B. Robinson: Robinson, The Religion of Joy. 



42 

Dr. Albert Schinz: Plea for an International Language; Schinx, 
Essai sur la Notion du Miracle. 

Mr. Arthur Searle: Searle, Essays I-XXX. 

Mr. Hubert G. Shearin: Shearin, British Ballads in the Cumberland 
Mountains; Shearin and Combs, A S5'llabus of Kentucky Folk-Songs. 

Hon. Isaac R. Sherwood: Sherwood, Judicial Tyranny and the 
Remedy. 

Mr. Wilbur H. Siebert: Siebert, The Flight of American Loyalists 
to the British Isles. 

Dr. Marion Parris Smith: Taylor, Principles of Scientific Management. 

Dr. J. E. Spingarn: A Question of Academic Freedom. 

Mrs. Harriet Prescott Spofford: Prescott, Poems. 

Dr. Augustus H. Strong: Miscellanies, 2v. 

Mr. J. J. Taubenhaus: Taubenhaus, A Study of Some Gloeosporiums 
and their Relation to a Sweet Pea Disease; Taubenhaus and Cook, Tricho- 
derma Koninge the Cause of a Disease of Sweet Potatoes. 

Mr. Max Thelen; Report on Leading Railroad and Public Service 
Commissions. 

Dr. J. Maitland Thomson: Dowden; The Bishops of Scotland. 

Mr. Henry R. Towne: Letters and Diary of Laura M. Towne. 

Dr. E. Raymond Turner: Det Kongelige Fredriks Universitet 1811- 
1911, 2v.; Universitets-Bibliothekets Festskrift, 2v.; Vort Universitet 
Gjenoem 100 Aar; Norges Universitet. Professorer, Docenter, Amanuenser, 
Stipendiater samt Ovrige Laerere og Tjenestemaend, 1911; University 
Royale Frederic de Christiania; Delegerte for Utenlandske Universiteter 
og Akademier ved det Kongelige Frederiks Universitets Hundredaara- 
jubilaeum; Morgenbladet, 9de August, 191]. 

Mr. William H. Wetherill: Bomberger, A Book on Birds. 

Mrs. Odgen B. Wilkinson: Wilkinson, In Vivid Gardens. 

Misses Williams: Konkle, Life and Speeches of Thomas Wilhams, 2v. 

H. W. Wilson Company: Hohnes, Address Delivered at the Dedica- 
tion of the Hall of the Boston Medical Library Association. 

Anonymous: Huntington, Cui Bono? 



Gifts and Exchanges from Institutions, Societies, Etc., 1911-12. 

Academy of Natm-al Sciences: Proceedings, Vol. 63, Pt. 2, Vol. 64, 
Ft. 1. 

Alabama, Geological Survey: Bulletin, Nos. 10-12. 

American Association for International Conciliation: Bulletin, 
October, 1911— September, 1912; Pubhcations, Nos. 1-4, 1911-12. 

American Association of Public Accountants, Educational Committee: 
Report. 

American Jewish Historical Societj^: Publications, No. 20. 

American Marathi Mission: Report, 1911. 

American Philosophical Society, Proceedings; Transactions. 



43 

American Tcl(>|)lu)iio and Tele,a,raph CompHny: 'reI(>])hone Statistics 
of the World. 

Arkansas Geological Survey: Annual Report, 1892; Purdue, Slate, 
Bibliography, 1909; Gladson, Water Power. 

Association of American Universities: Journal of Proceedings and 
Addresses, No. 13, 1911. 

Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools of the Middle States 
and Maryland: Proceedings, Nos. 20, 21, 23, 24, 25. 

Australia, Commonwealth Statistician: Official Yearbook, No. 4, 
1901-10. 

Barnard College: The Installation of Virginia Crocheron Gildersleeve, 
Ph.D., as Dean of Barnard College. 

Bodleian Library: Staff Kalendar, 1912; Wilson, The Importance of 
the Reign of Queen Anne in English Church History; Galbraith, The 
Abbey of St. Albans; Annual Report of the Cm'ators, 1911; Chancellor's 
Prize, Latin Prose; Newdigate Prize Poem; Gaisford Prize, Greek Prose; 
Gaisford Prize, Greek Verse. 

Boston Museum of Fine Arts: Annual Report, 1911; Bulletin, Nos. 
53-9. 

Boston Public Library: List of Books on the Operas. 

Boston, Social Research Council: Bulletin, No. 1. 

Boston University: Inauguration of Lemuel Herbert Murlin, D.D., 
LL.D., as President of Boston University, October 20, 1911. 

Brown University: Contributions From the Biological Laboratory, 
Vol. 7, 1911; Weeden, The Women's College in Brown University. 

Bryn Mawr College, Class of 1907: Carola Woerishoffer, her Life 
and Work, six copies. 

Bryn Mawr College, Class of 1913: Davidson, Two Hundred Opera 
Plots; Stories from the Operas; Apthorp, Musicians and Music Lovers; 
Annesley, Standard Opera Glass; Dickinson, Education of a Music Lover; 
Elson, Curiosities of Music; Finch, Chopin and Other Musical Essays; 
Grieg and his Music; Godda^■d, Rise of Music; Rise of the Opera; Hender- 
son, How Music Developed; Johnstone, Modern Tendencies and Old 
Standards; Krehbiel, How to Listen to Music; Mason, Orchestral Instru- 
ments; Seymom-, How to Think Music ; Symons, Plays, Acting and Music; 
Upton, Musical Memories; Standard Cantatas; Standard Concert Guide; 
Standard Musical Biographies; Standard Oratorios; Standard Symphonies; 
Wagner, Judaism in Music. 

California Academy of Sciences: Proceedings, Ser. 4, Vols. 1, 3. 

California, Bureau of Labor Statistics: Second Special Report. 

California, State Library: Proposed Amendments to the Constitution 
of the State of California. 

University of California: Wheeler, Charter Day Address; Commence- 
ment Address; Bulletin, Ser. 3, Vol. 5, No. 3; Publications, Pathology, 
Vol. 2, Nos. 4-8; Physiology, Vols. 8-15; Zoology, Vol. 5, No. 4, Vol. 6, 
Nos. 2, 14, 15, Vol. 7, Nos. 9, 10, Vol. 8, Nos. 8, 9, Vol. 9, Nos. 1-5, Vol. 10, 
Nos. 1-8. 



44 

Canada, Department of Agi-iculture : Report of the Work of the 
Archives Branch for the Year 1910. 

Canada, Department of Labour: Robertson, The Macdonald College 
Movement; Educational Cultui'e for the People of Manitoba; Movement 
of Population, 1911-12; Illustration Farms of the Commission on Lands; 
Annual Report of the Macdonald Consohdated School, Hillsboro, 1910; 
Sherwood, Children of the Land. 

Canada, Department of Mines: Bulletin, No. 6; Annual Report on 
the Mineral Production of Canada, 1910; Investigation of the Coals of 
Canada, Vols. 1, 2; Memoirs, Nos. 9-E, 16-E, 24-E, 15-P, 27, 28; Pre- 
limrnar}' Report on the Mineral Production of Canada, 1911; Publications, 
Nos. 104, 118, 1064; Maps, Nos. 13A, 14A, 1066; Report on the Molyb- 
denum Ores of Canada; Report on the Gypsum Deposits of the Maritime 
Provinces; Summary Report of the Mines Branch, 1910. 

Canada, Royal Society: Proceedings and Transactions, Ser. 3, Vol. 5. 

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace: Report of the Director 
of the Division of Economics and History Year Book for 1911. 

Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: Annual 
Report, No. 6, 1911; Bulletin, No. 6. 

Carnegie Institution of Washington: Classics of International Law, 
Vols. 1-2; Publications, Nos. 27, Vol. 2; 74, Vol. 5; 85, Vols. 1-2; 88, 
Vols, 1-2, Atlas; 140, 145-47, 149, Vol. 2; 150, 152, 153, 155, 156, Vol. 2; 
157, 158, 160, 162, 164, 166, 167; 10th Anniversary; Year Book, No. 10. 

Central Conference of American Rabbis: Year Book, 1910, Vol. 20; 
1911, Vol. 21. 

Chicago, Municipal Com-t: 4th Annual Report, 1909-10. 

Chicago School of Civics and Philanthropy: Bulletin, Nos. 13, 16. 

University of Chicago : The WiUiam Rainey Harper Memorial Library. 

Cincinnati, Smoke Abatement League: Annual Report, 1911; The 
Civic News, Vol. 1, No. 6. 

L'^niversity of Cincinnati: Studies, Ser. 2, Vol. 7, Nos. 1-4. 

College Settlements Association: Denison House Report, 1911. 

Colombo Museum: Administration Reports, 1910-11, Pt. 4, Educa- 
tion, Science and Art; Marine Biology; Spolia Zeylanica, Vol. 7, Pt. 28, 
Vol. 8, Pts. 29-30. 

University of Colorado: Studies, Vol. 9, Nos. 1-3. 

Columbia University: Reader's Manual, 1911-12; Report of Librar- 
ian, 1911; University Bibhography, 1911. 

Columbia University, Teachers' College: Bulletin, Ser. 3, No. 3. 

Congi-es Geologique International: Xlle Session, Canada, Ottawa, 
1913, Circular and Maps. 

Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences: Memoirs, Vol. 3; Trans- 
actions, Vols. 14-17. 

Connecticut, State Geological and Natural History Survey: Bulletin, 
Nos. 18-19. 

Cornell University: 17 Dissertations; Report of Librarian, 1910-11. 

Dante Society: Annual Report, No. 29, 1910. 



45 

Douai, Bibliotheque Communale: Riviere,' Catalogue m6thodique 
des Imprimes de la Bibliotheque — Histoire de France, Vol. 5. 

Dublin, Royal Society: Economic Proceedings, Vol. 1, Nos. 3-4; 
Scientific Proceedings, Vol. 13, Nos. 11-23. 

Elektroteknisk Forening: S^ren Hjorth, Inventor of the Dynamo- 
electric Principle. 

FideUty and Casualty Company: Bulletin, Vol. 16, Nos. 10, 12. 

Christiania, Kongelige Frederiks Universitet: University Royale 
Frederic a Christiania; Norges Universitet, Professorer, Docenter, Amanu- 
enser, Stipendiater samt Ovrige Laerere og Tjenestemaend, 1911. 

Free Speech League: Freeman, The Fight for Free Speech; Post, 
Our Despotic Postal Cen.sorship; Post; Our Advancing Postal Censorship: 
Schroeder, "Due Process of Law." 

Georgia, Geological Survey: Handbook of Mineral Resources of 
Georgia; Preliminary Report on the Geology of the Coastal Plain of 
Georgia. 

Germanistic Society of America: Richard, History of German Civili- 
zation. 

University of Groningen: 8 Dissertations; Jaarboek, 1910-11. 

Harvard University Library: Bibliographical Contributions, No. 60; 
Report, 1911. 

Heidelberg, Grossherzogliche Universitatsbibliothek: 12 Disserta- 
tions. 

Hobart CoUege: Francis Philip Nash. 

Illinois, Board of Administration: The Institution Quarterly, Vol. 2, 
Nos. 2-3, Vol. 3, Nos. 1-2, 

lUinois, Bureau of Labor Statistics: Annual Report, No. 13; Labor 
Legislation — 47th General Assembly; Industrial Opportunities; Industrial 
Accidents, Report, No. 5. 

Illinois, State Historical Society: Joiu-nal, Vol. 4, Nos. 3-4, Vol. 5, 
Nos. 1-2. 

lUinois, State Historical Library: Biennial Repoi't, 1908, 1910; Trans- 
actions, 1910. 

Illinois, State Laboratory of Natural History : Bulletin, Vol. 6, No. 1 
and Index, Vol. 7, Nos. 1-3, Vol. 9, Nos. 1-4. 

Illinois, State Mming Board: Annual Coal Report, No. 30. 

University of Ilhnois: Bulletin, Vol. 6, No. 1, Vol. 7, No. 26, Vol. 8, 
No. 1, Vol. 9, Nos. 2, 7, 12, 19; Studies, Vol. 4, No. 2. 

Indiana, Academy of Science: Proceedings, 1910. 

Indiana University: Studies, Vol. 10, No. 2. 

International Association for Promoting the Study of Quaternions 
and AlHed Systems of Mathematics: Bulletin, Jmie, 1912. 

International Phonetic Association: 1 Reprint. 

Iowa, Geological Survey: Supplementarj^ Report, 1903, Pt. 2; 
Bulletin, Nos. 2-3; Annual Report, No. 20. 

Johns Hopkins University: 19 Dissertations. 



46 

University of Kansas: Bulletin, Vol. 13, Xos. 2-3. Geological Sur- 
vey: Publications, No. 10. 

Kyoto Imperial University, College of Science and Engineering: 
Memoirs, Vol. 3, Nos. 7-8. 

University of La Plata: Bibliografia de Sarmiento. 

Lake Forest College: Bross Library, Vols. 5-6. 

Lake Mohonk Conference of Friends of the Indian : Annual Meeting — 
Proceedings, No. 29. 

Lakeside Company: Schuette, Athonia; or The Original "400." 

Leiand Stanford Junior University: University Series, Searles, ed., 
Chapelain; Boezinger, Das historische Prasens; Matzke Memorial Volume; 
Slonaker, The Effect of a strictly Vegetable Diet on the Activity, Growth, 
and Longevity of the Albino Rat; Trustees' Series, No. 20. 

Liverpool Biological Society: Proceedings and Transactions, Vol. 25. 

Los Angeles, Auditor: Report, 1911. 

Louisiana State University: Bulletin, Vol. 3, Nos. 5, 7; Vol. 11, No. 
10, Pt. 2. 

Louisville Free Public Library: Children's Books for Christmas 
Gifts. 

Maine, State Board of Health : Annual Report, No. 7. 

Maine, Agricultural Experiment Station: Bulletin, Nos. 195-96, 200. 

Manila Merchants Association : Reciprocity and the Philippine Islands. 

Maryland, Geological Survey: Cretaceous Lower; Geology of Prince 
George's County; Annual Report, Vol. 9. 

Maryland, Bureau of Statistics: Annual Report, No. 20. 

Massachusetts, Bureau of Labor Statistics: Annual Report, No. 40, 
No. 41; Annual Statistics of Manufacturers, Vol. 25, 1910, Vol. 36; Annual 
Report on Strikes and Lockouts, No. 11; Labor Bulletin, Nos. 83-93; 
Living Conditions of the Wage-Earning Population in Certain Cities. 

Massachusetts, Bureau of Statistics: Aimual Report on the Statistic^ 
of Municipal Finances, No. 3. 

Massachusetts, Civil Service Reform Auxiliary: Documents, Nos. 3, 
5-6, 12, 23, 29, 30. 

Massachusetts, State Board of Charity: Annual Report, No. 33. 

Massachusetts, State Free Employment Offices: Annual Report^ 
No. 5. 

Meadville Theological School : Quarterly Bulletin, Vol. 6, Nos. 1-2, 5. 

Metropolitan Museum of Art: Annual Report, No. 42; Bulletin, 
Vol. 6, Nos. 10-12, Vol. 7, Nos. 1-8. 

Miami University: Bulletin, Ser. 6, No. 10; The Laws of Miami 
University for the Government of the Faculty and Students, 1843; A 
Catalogue of the Books Contained in the Library, 1833. 

Michigan, Geological and Biological Survey: Pubhcations, Nos. 
4-5, 7. 

Michigan, State Board of Health: Annual Report, No. 38; Public 
Health, Vol. 6, No. 4, Vol. 7, No. 1-2. 

Michigan, Department of Labor: Annual Report, No. 29. 



47 

University of Michigan: 9 Dissertations; Hedrick, History of Rail- 
road Taxation; Library Staff Manual; Report of the Michigan Academy 
of Science, No. 13; University Bulletin, Vol. 8, Nos. 5-6. 

Milwaukee, Bureau of Economy and Efficiency: Bulletin, Nos. 6-10, 
12-15, 17. 

University of Minnesota: Freeman, Minnesota Plant Diseases; 
Minnesota Botanical Studies, Vol. 4, Pts. 1-2; Minnesota Plant Studies, 
Nos. 1-4. 

University of Missouri: Bulletin, Education Series, Vol. 1, Nos. 1-2; 
Engineering Experiment Station Series, Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Nos. 1-2; Literary 
and Linguistic Series, Vol. 2; Philosophy and Education Series, Vol. 1, 
No. 3; Science Series, Vol. 2, Nos. 1-2; Non-Technical Series, Vol. 1, 
Series 1, Nos. 1-4. 

Missouri Botanical Garden: Annual Report, No. 22. 

Mimich, Koniglich Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften : Ab- 
handlungen, Mathematisch-physikahsche Klasse, Band 25, Abt. 6-7, 
Sitzungsberichte, 1911, Hefte 1-3, 1912, Hft. 1; Abhandlungen, Philo- 
sophisch-philologische u. historische Klasse, Band 25, Abt. 3-4, Band 26, 
Abt. 1-2, Sitzungsberichte, 1911, Abt. 5-14, Schlussheft, 1912; Abt. 1; 
HeigeljUeber die Bedeutungswandel der Worte Akademie und Akademisch. 

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People: Wendell 
Phillips Centenary, 1911. 

National Child Labor Committee : Child Labor and the Republic. 

National Irrigation Congress: Proceedings, No. 19. 

National Lumber Manufacturers' Association: The Trust Question. 

Nebraska, Geological Survey: Publications, Nos. 2, 3. 

University of Nebraska: Studies, Vol. 11, Nos. 1-2; Bulletin, Vol. 5, 
Nos. 4-6. 

Universitj'- of Nevada: Bulletin, Vol. 5, Nos. 4-6. 

New England Society of the City of New York: Anniversary Cele- 
bration, No. 106; Bay Psalm Book. 

New Jersey, Agricultural Experiment Stations: Bulletin, No. 242. 

New Jersey, State Geologist: Annual Report, 1910; Final Report 
Series of the State Geologist, Vol. 7. 

New Jersey, Bin-eau of Labor Statistics: Annual Report, No. 34. 

University of New Mexico: Bulletin, Educational Series, Vol. 1, No. 4, 
Sociological Series, Vol. 1, No. 2. 

New York, Association for Tuberculosis Clinics : Annual Report, No. 4. 

New York, Bureau of Municipal Research: Six Years of Municipal 
Research for New York City, 1906-11 ; Training School for Public Service, 
1911. 

New York, Bureau of Industries and Immigration: Annual Report, 
1911. 

New York, Department of Labor: Annual Reports of Department 
Bureaus, Vol. 1; State Labor Bulletin, Nos. 48-51. 

New York, State Commissioner of Labor: Annual Report, 1911. 



48 

New York, State Bureau of Labor Statistics: Annual Report, 1910; 
Bulletin, Nos. 49-51. 

New York School of Philanthropy: Bulletin, Vol. 5, No. 4. 

New York Society Library: History of the New York Society Library, 

New York University: 20 Dissertations; Eckelmann, Schillers Ein- 
fiuss auf die Jugenddramen Hebbels; Hock, Griinde flii- die Entstehung 
der Messianischen Weissagung in Israel; Klein, Literarj' Criticism from 
the Elizabethan Dramatists. . . 

Newberry Library: Materials for the Study of the English Drama. 

Norfolk, Va.; Industrial Commission: Agriculture and Food Pro- 
duction. 

North German Lloyd Steamship Company: Bulletin, Vol. 32, Nos. 
3-6, Vol. 33, Nos. 1, 3-5, Vol. 34, Nos. 2-4. 

Oklahoma, Geological Survey: Bulletin, No. 8. 

Omaha, Neb.: Municipal Statistics, Nos. 8-11, 13. 

Oregon, State Library Commission : Pamphlets on Initiative, Referen- 
dum and Recall. 

Academie de Paris, Conseil de i'Universite de Paris: Rapport sur la 
Situation de I'Enseignement superieur. 

Paris, Ministere de 1' Instruction pubUque: Universite de Paris, 
Bibliotheque de la Faculte des Lettres, Vols. 28-30; Catalogue des Theses, 
1910-11, No. 27. 

Pennsylvania Esperanto Association: Report of the Commissioner 
from Pennsylvania to the 7 th Annual International Congress of Esperanto, 
Antwerp, 1911. 

Pennsylvania Conference of Charities and Corrections, Proceedings 
Third Annual Session. 

Pennsylvania Chestnut Blight Commission, Conference. 

Pennsylvania Board of Education: Report of Commission on Back- 
ward Children. 

Pennsylvania Prison Society: Journal of Prison Discipline and Phil- 
anthropy, New^ Series, No. 50. 

Pennsylvania Society: Ferree, William Penn Memorial, 1911. 

Pennsylvania Society of Colonial Governors: Charter, By-laws, 
Officers, Members, List of Colonial Governors. 

Pennsjdvania, State Library: Adjutant General, Annual Report, 
1908; Attorney General, Annual Report, 1909-10; Auditor General, 
Annual Report, 1910; Banking Commission, Annual Report, 1909, Pt. 2, 
1910, Pts. 1-2; Factory Inspector, Annual Report, 1910; Department 
of Fisheries, Annual Report, 1909, 1910; Department of Forestry, Annual 
Report, 1908-09; History of the 17th Pennsylvania Regiment; History 
of the 52nd Pennsylvania Regiment; History of the 22nd Pennsylvania 
Cavalry; History of the 61st Pennsylvania Volunteers; Department of 
Internal Affairs, Annual Report, 1909, Pts. 1-2, 1909-10, Pt. 4, 1910, 
Pts. 1-3; Laws of Pennsylvania, 1911; Department of Mines, Annual 
Report, 1909, Pt. 1, 1910, Pts. 1-2; Board of Commissioners of Public 
Charities, Annual Report, 1909; Superintendent of Public Instruction, 



49 

Annual Report, 1910; Department of Public Printing, Annual Report, 
1910, 1911; Railroad Commission, Annual Report, 1910; School Laws, 
1911; Commissioner of Sinking Fund, Annual Report, 1910; SmuU, 
Legislative Hand Book, 1911; State College, Annual Report, 1909-10; 
State Highway Department, Annual Report, 1909; State Librarian, 
Annual Report, 1909, 1910; State Treasurer, Annual Report, 1910; 33 
Miscellaneous state publications. 

University of Pennsjdvania : Kerr, Influence of Ben Jonson on English 
Comedy; Root, The Relations of Pennsylvania with the British Govern- 
ment, 1696-1765; Contributions from the Zoological Laboratory, Vol. 17; 
Coulomb, The Administration of the English borders during the reign of 
Ehzabeth. 

Philadelphia, Commercial Museum: Annual Report, 1904, 1908, 
1910, 1911; Schoff, The Philadelphia Museums, The Periplus of Hanna; 
The Commei'cial Mu.seum; Scientific Bulletin, No. 1. 

Philadelphia, First Church of Christ Scientist: Editorial Comments 
on the Life and Work of Mary Baker Eddy. 

Philadelphia Maritime Exchange: Annual Report, 1912. 

Philippine Islands, Bureau of Education: 11th Annual Report. 

Pratt Institute Library: Technical Books of 1911. 

Princeton Universitj^ Library: 3 Dissertations. 

Queen's LTniversity: Bulletin of the Departments of History and of 
Political and Economic Science, Nos. 1-4. 

Bureau of Railway News and Statistics: Railway Library 1910. 

Rhode Island, Factory Inspection: Annual Report, 1911-12. 

Sagamore Sociological Conference; 5th Conference. 

Saint Louis Pubhc Library: The Public Library of the City of St. 
Louis; Addresses at Opening Exercises of the New Central Library Build- 
ing, January, 1912; A List of Books and Articles on Child WeKare. 

St. Petersbui'g, Academie Imperiale des Sciences: Bulletin de la 
Classe Historico-Philologique, Tomes 2-5, 11-16. 

Strassburg, Universitats und Landes-bibliothek : 36 Dissertations. 

Tennessee, Geological Survey: The Resources of Tennessee, Vol. 1, 
Nos. 1-2, 5-6, Vol. 2, Nos. 1-3, 5, 7, 8. 

Toronto University: Studies, Biological Series, No. 9; Chemical 
Studies, Nos. 90-91, 93. 

Tufts College: Studies, Vol. 3, No. 2. 

Union League, Philadelphia: Annual Report, 1911. 

LTnion Theological Seminary: The Dedication of the New Buildings, 
1910. 

University of Washington: Bulletin, Nos. 10-11, 60. 

Wellcome Chemical Research Laboratories: Papers, Nos. 126-34. 

West Virginia University: Bulletin, Series 9, No. 9; Series 10, No. 6; 
Studies in West Virginia History, Nos. 1-2; Bibliography of West Virginia 
University; Bulletin, Series 12, No. 6. 

Western Theological Seminary: Bulletin, Vol. 4, Nos. 1, 3-5. 



50 

# 

Wisconsin Academy of Science, Ai'ts, and Letters: Transactions, 
Vol. 16, Pt. 2, Nos. 1-6." 

Wisconsin, Industrial Commission: Bulletin, Vol. 1, Nos. 1-3A. 

Wisconsin, Library Commission: Comparative Legislation Bulletin, 
Nos. 22-24. 

Wisconsin, Railroad Commission: 3 Pamphlets. 

University of \^'isconsin : Memorial Service in Honor of John Bascom 
at the University of Wisconsin;' Bulletin, Engineering Series, Vol. 7, No. 1; 
Vol. 4, No. 6, Vol. 5, Nos. 1-6; Vol. 6, Nos. 1-7; Economics and Political 
Science Series, Vol. 4, No. 3, Vol. 5, No. 3, Vol. 6, Nos. 1-2, Vol. 7, Nos. 1-2; 
General Series, No. 331; History Series, Vol. 2, Nos. 1-2, Vol. 3, No. 1; 
Philology and Literatm-e Series, Vol. 5, Nos. 1-2; Science Series, Vol. 3, 
Nos. 3, 9-10, Vol. 4, Nos. 1-4; University Extension Series, Vol. 1, Nos. 
1-2. 

Workmen's Compensation Service and Information Bureau: Friedens- 
burg, The Practical Results of Workingmen's Insurance in Germany. 

World Peace Foundation: Pamphlet Series, No. 1, Pts. 1, 3-4, No. 2, 
Pts. 1-2, No. 3, Pts. 1-5, No. 4, Pts. 1-3, No. 5, Pts. 1-5, No. 6, Pts. 1-3, 
5; Concord, Vol. 29, Nos. 3-4, 7-8. 

Yale University Library: Bulletin, Nos. 946, 949, 952; Arrhenius, 
Theories of Solutions; Catalogue of an Exhibition of Books in Com- 
memoration of Anniversary of King James' Version; 1 Dissertation; 
New Haven in 1641 ; Milford in 1646; 9 Reprints. 

Periodicals, the Gift of Publishers. 

Advocate of Peace; Alaskan Churchman; Amherst Graduates' 
Quarterly; Book News Monthly; Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly; Bulle- 
tin of the Pan-American LTnion; California University Chronicle; City 
Club Bulletin; Child- Welfare Magazine; Columbia University Quarterly; 
The Common Cause; Deaconess Advocate; Hartford Seminary Record; 
Indian's Friend; Journal of Prison DiscipUne; Journal of the Elisha 
Mitchell Scientific Society; Lantern; Pennsylvania Magazine of History 
and Biography; Public Service; Revue Critique des Livres Nouveaux; 
Southern Workman; Spirit of Missions; Technology Review; Tipyn 
o'Bob; Vedanta Monthly; Visiting Nurse Quarterly ; Washington Chapel 
Chronicle; Woman's Missionary Friend. 



Report of the Health Committee. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit the following report of 
the Health Committee for the year 1911-12. The report 
has been taken from records left in my office by Miss Marion 
Edwards Park, Acting Dean of the College for the year 1911-12, 

The Health Committee met regularly once a week through- 
out the year with the wardens of the halls. The health of the 
individual students was discussed and a careful system of super- 
vision was instituted by Miss Applebee, Director of Athletics 
and Gymnastics. The students on the supervision list and on 
the doctors' special lists were placed under Miss Applebee's care 
in order that she might follow their general condition and require 
them to observe the regimen prescribed by the doctor. In 
June two students were asked not to return to college on account 
of their general physical condition and their very poor academic 
records. Two students who broke down during the year and in 
consequence failed badly in their examinations were allowed 
to return on probation. The records of illness will be found in 
detail in the reports of the Physician-in-Chief and the Director 
of Athletics and Gjnimastics which follow. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marion Reilly, 

Dean of the College. 



(51) 



Report of the Physician in Chief of the College, 
AND OF the Assistant Physician. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit on behalf of Dr. Marianna 
Taylor and myself the following report of the cases attended 
at Bryn Mawr College from October 1, 1911, to September 
30, 1912. 

The report of the medical work for the year is peculiarly 
uneventful and satisfactory. Prompt and efficient care of the 
small ailments resulted in a much smaller number of students 
requiring prolonged infirmary care. 

The careful physical examinations revealed a startling 
number of cases of thyroid enlargement, the larger percentage 
being simple goitre, although a goodly number showed early 
symptoms of exophthalmic change. An effort to co-operate 
with the parents and family physicians of these students met 
with small response. It is most gratifying to state that the 
case of Hodgkin's disease included in this report has been pro- 
nounced cured. 

We thank each and ail of those working with us for full 
and sympathetic assistance. 

I. Medical Cases. 

Acute infectious diseases. Respiratory system. 

Influenza 10 Pharyngitis 121 

Scarlet fever 1 Naso-pharyngitis 95- 

Rubella 1 Coryza 9,3 

Circulatory system. Trachitis 46 

Vahiilar heart conditions ... 34 Tonsils, chronic hypertrophy 4,5 

Acute dUatation of heart .... 1 Laryngitis 37 

Myocarditis 1 Rhinitis 21 

Paroxysmal tachycardia .... 2 Bronchitis 15 

Varicose veins 1 Tonsilitis 9 

Digestive sj^stem. Asthma 4 

Indigestion 125 Pneumonia 2 

Stomatitis 11 Vincent's angina 1 

Appendicitis, chronic 2 Nervous system. 

Hemorrhoids 2 Headaches 22: 

Dilatation of stomach 1 Exhaustion 21 

(52) 



53 



Nervousness 19 

Insomnia 14 

Neuralgia 9 

Hysteria 2 

Neuritis 2 

Hystero-epilepsy 1 

Menstrual disturbances. 

Dysmenorrhoea 25 

Metrorrhagia 17 

Delayed menstruation 16 

Amenorrhoea 6 

Uterine displacements 4 

Uterine fibroid tumor 1 

Skin. 

Acne 12 

Furunculosis 9 

Verucca 7 

Callosities 5 

Ivy poisoning 5 

Urticaria 5 

Frost bite 4 

Eczema 4 



Clavus - , 3 

J3ermatitis 1 

Chilblains 1 

Ear. 

Deafness 7 

Impacted cerumen 5 

Otitis 4 

Abscess 2 

Furuncle 1 

Eye. 

Eye strain 22 

Foreign body in eye 13 

Conjunctivitis 11 

Hordeolum 5 

Blepharitis 1 

Miscellaneous. 

Enlargement of thyroid 50 

Rheumatism 19 

Adenitis 6 

Anaemia 3 

Malingering 1 

Hodgkin's disease 1 



//. Surgical Cases. 



Trauma and Bone and Joint condi- 
tions, etc: — 

Bruises 53 

Sprained tendons 49 

Sprains : . . . . 23 

Sprained arches, flat feet. ... 16 

Infected finger, toe, etc 16 

Incised wounds 14 

Toothache 13 

Burns 7 



Dislocations, subluxations . . . 

Bursitis 

Foreign body in throat, thigh 

Cellulitis 

Rectal fistula 

Torn ligament 

Periostitis 

Necrosis of jaw 

Eruption of wisdom tooth . . . 
Nasal fracture 



Statistics of Attendance. 
Dr. Branson. 

Infirmary and Hall visits . . . 523 Consultations 5 

Special Exams, for sports . . . 158 Minor operations 3 

Dr. Taylor. 

Physical examinations 421 Office visits 2072 

Vaccinations 47 Hall visits 105 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas F. Branson, 

Physician in Chief. 



Report of the Director of Athletics and Health 
Supervisor. 

To the President: Madam., 

I have the honour to submit the following report on 
such work of the Health Department as has been under my 
charge during the year 1911-12. 

Heart Examinations. 

Three hundred and sixty-five students were examined at 
the beginning of the year by Dr. Marianna Taylor, the Assist- 
ant Physician of the College, as to the condition of the heart 
and lungs, with the following results: 

Normal 268 j No restrictions in athletics or 

SUght irregularity 42 \ gymnastics. 

/ Athletics restricted or for- 

Abnormal condition 55 \ ,■■, , 

[ bidden. 

Eighty-nine students were re-examined by Dr. Thomas 
F. Branson, Physician in Chief of the College, for cardiac irregu- 
larities, thyroids, tonsils and other abnormal conditions noted 
at the physical examination. The final results of these exam- 
inations were not returned to the Director's office so caimot 
be reported upon. 

Oculist^ s Examinations. 

Two hundred and eleven undergraduates and three gradu- 
ates were examined by Dr. Helen Murphy, the Examining 
Oculist of the College, with the following results: 

■ Condition. ^'c°asls°* Treatment. 

Normal 69 

Glasses satisfactory 43 

Further examination and treat- 
ment necessary 48 40 re-examined and treated. 

Further examination if symp- J 12 re-examined and glasses pre- 

toms increased 54 [ scribed or changed. 

(54) 



55 

Defective Physical Conditions. 

Defective physical and health conditions noted during the 
October examinations and under supervision or referred to 
physicians during the year: 

_, ,. . Number of 

Condition. Cases. 

General debility 41 

Appendicitis 2 

Tumour 1 

Digestive disturbances 11 

Menstrual disturbances 12 

Cardiac irregularity 4 

Nervousness 7 

Neuritis 3 

Recovering from opei'ations 3 

Hodgkin's disease 1 

Defective physical conditions noted during the October 
examinations and treated during the year by special exercises 
given by Miss Anna Branson or prescribed in the gymnasium: 

^ ... Number of Correc- Im- 

Condition. Cases. ted. proved. 

Scoliosis 145 29 55 

Lordosis 5 . . 2 

Flat or pronated feet 35 ' . . 12 

General weakness 5 . . 3 

Cases treated by special exercises and massage by Miss 
Anna Branson: 

. . Number of Correc- Im- 

Condition. Cases. ted. proved. . 

Scoliosis 25 3 20 

Backache 3 3 relieved 

Strained muscles 3 3 cured 

General debility 3 3 

Neurasthenia 1 No results 

Prominent vertebrae 2 2 

Miss Branson also had a special weekly class paid for 
by the gymnasium fines fund for four students with marked 
scoliosis who were unable to afford private work. 

Health statistics of the Senior Class (19 IS) . 

Students leaving college with health imchanged 30 

Students leaving college with health improved 28 

Students leaving college with health worse 5 



56 

Hygiene Lectures. 
Four lectures on practical personal hygiene were given in 
November by the Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. Four 
lectures on personal, community and sex hygiene and social 
diseases were given during the second semester by Dr. Lilian 
Welsh, Professor of Physiology in Goucher College, and a 
practising physician in Baltimore, Md. These lectures were 
open to all students; attendance at the three lectures by 
Miss Applebee and at one by Dr. Welsh was compulsory for 
the freshman class. Respectfully submitted, 

Constance M. K. Applebee, 
Director of Athletics and Supervisor of Health. 

Report of the Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 
To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit the following report on the 
work of the department of Athletics and Gymnastics for the 
year of 1911-12. 

Physical Examinations. 

In October, 1911, 364 students were examined; of these 

21 were excused the full strength tests. In May, 1912, 355 

students were re-examined; of these 23 were excused the full 

strength tests. These examinations gave the following averages. 

College Averages. 



Weight, 
kg. 


Height, 
cm. 


Expansion, 
Chest, 9th Rib. 


Strength, 
kg. 


Lung 
Capacity, 






cm. 


cm. 




cu. in. 


Sem. 1 57.85 


162.94 


5.83 


6.01 


316.76 


183.15 


Sem. II 58.25 


163.08 


5.66 


5.84 


335.38 


186.11 


American average as stated by Dr. Dudley Sargent : 










235.00 


132.00 




Class Averages. 








Class of 1912: 












Sem. 1 56.52 


162.45 


5.61 


5.92 


326.12 


178.03 


Sem. II 55.55 


161.05 


5.68 


5.96 


340.58 


180.71 


Class of 1913: 












Sem. 1 58.32 


163.85 


5.71 


5.95 


321.58 


189.28 


Sem. II 58.04 


163.73 


5.80 


5.83 


329.27 


191.08 


Class of 1914: 












Sem. 1 58.89 


163.26 


5.84 


5.92 


324.93 


188.52 


Sem. II 58.77 


163.44 


5.47 


5.70 


342.50 


186.48 


Class of 1915: 












Sem. 1 57.66 


162.20 


6.14 


6.26 


294.43 


181.75 


Sem. TI 59.64 


164.09 


5.69 


5.86 


329.14 


186.18 



57 



Strength Tests. 
Table showing the number of students above and below 
the average in strength tests at the first and second physical 
examinations, according to classes. 



Strength 
Test. 


October 
1912 


, 1911. 
1913 


1914 


1915 


1912 


May, 
1913 


1912. 

1914 


1915 


Average 500 kg. 








1 





1 








1 


400 " 


8 


4 


4 





10 


3 


9 


8 


375 " 


4 


4 


11 


3 


6 


9 


9 


8 


350 " 


4 


7 


12 


7 


5 


7 


19 


16 


325 " 


13 


13 


13 


22 


8 


12 


17 


29 


Average 300 " 


13 


12 


20 


23 


18 


10 


20 


30 


275 " 


14 


13 


18 


28 


8 


14 


13 


15 


250 " 


7 


10 


8 


23 


5 


5 


3 


9 


225 " 


3 


1 


4 


10 


2 








3 


200 " 











5 














175 " 











1 





C 









Lung Capacity. 
Table showing the number of students above and below 
the average in lung capacity at the first and second physical 
examinations, according to classes. 

October, 1911. May, 1912. 



Lung 
Capacity. 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


Above 260 cu. in. 





1 


1 








1 


1 


1 


240 ••' " 


2 


1 





2 


3 


2 





3 


220 " " 


1 


4 


3 


6 


2 


5 


3 


5 


210 " " 


3 


5 


3 


8 


4 


5 


9 


9 


200 " " 


5 


9 


8 


13 


4 


7 


13 


14 


190 " " 


10 


10 


18 


16 


13 

7 


10 
12 


14 

18 


19 


Average 180 " " 


11 


12 


18 


25 


17 


170 " " 


12 


6 


20 


13 


6 


5 


12 


18 


160 •' " 


8 


10 


12 


16 


9 


7 


16 


19 


1.50 '■ " 


5 


2 


2 


15 


10 


4 


2 


10 


140 " " 


3 


4 


4 


7 


1 


2 


1 


3 


130 " " 


5 





2 


1 


3 





2 





120 " " 


1 























110 " " 














1 












Percentage of students above and below the average in 
strength at first and second examinations: 

October, 1911. May, 1912. 

Above average 40 per cent 52 per cent 

Average 20 " " 23 " " 

Below average 40 " " 25 " " 



58 

Percentage of students above and below the average in 
lung capacity at first and second examinations: 

October, 1911. May, 1912. 

Above average 38 per cent 45 per cent 

Average 19 " " 16 '" 

Below average 43" " 39" " 

The three highest and three lowest tests in streng-th and 
lung capacity were: 







Strength 


Tests. 






October, 1911. 
Highe.st. Lowest, 
kg. Clas.s. • kg. Class. 


May, 
Highest, 
kg. Class. 


1912. 

Lowest, 
kg. Class. 


516 1914 


213 


1915 


521 


1914 


258 1914 


479.5 1912 


201 


1915 


520 


1912 


236 1915 


443 1912 


190 


1915 


495 


1912 


231 1912 






Lung Capacity. 






Highest, 
cu. in. Class. 


Lowest, 
cu in. Class. 


High 
cu. in. 


lest. 
Class. 


Lowest, 
cu. in. Class. 


264 1914 


131 


1912 
[1912 


272 


1914 


131 1912 
[1912 


261 1913 


130 


- 1914 
1915 


267 


1913 


130 \ and 
[1914 


258 1913 


124 


1912 


260 


1915 


112 1912 



Gymnasium Report. 

Trial drills for freshmen and for students not taking part 
in any athletics were held during November. The regular 
gymnastic season began December 4th and ended March 29th. . 

Weekly classes were held as follows: 

Number of Number of 
Classes. Students. 

Floor work 6 308 

Apparatus work 8 287 

Fencing 2 23 

Classic dancing 3 122 

For graduate students 1 25 

Special class for students having weak hearts, 
under Miss Anna Branson; paid for from the 

gymnasium fines fund 1 4 

Students substituting special exercises or massage 

for gymnastics 5 

Students excused gymnastics or massage 5 



59 



Swimming. 



The swimming pool was open all the year. 
Number of students: 



Authorized 

Class as expert 

swimmers. 


Passed the 

swimming 

test. 


Unable 
to pass. 


Excused. 


Taking 
lessons. 


Nuniber of 
lessons 
given. 


1912.... 40 


23 







5 


1 


4 


1913 .... 52 


12 







4 








1914 .... 70 


23 







2 


6 


28 


1915.... 71 


42 




2 


11 


34 


175 


Total ... 233 


100 




2 


22 


41 


207 


Graduate students: 














15 


6 








8 


16 



A gymnastic contest between the sophomores and fresh- 
men was held March 29th. The championship shield was 
awarded to the class of 1914. 

^ , Maximum p .^^ p .^^ 

Events Number ^g^^ 19^5 
ot Points. 

Marching Tactics 30 25 17 

Indian Club Drill 30 27 22 

Wand Drill 30 27 20 

Rope Climbing 30 24 21 

Vaulting Horse 30 22 24 

ParaUelBars 30 25 22 

Total 180 150 126 

The judges were Miss Adela Adams, Miss Stone and Mr. 
P, Bishop. 



Three hundred and seventy students registered exercise; 
one hundred and ninety-eight students had no excuses from 
exercise; one hundred and seventy-two had occasional excuses. 



Causes of Excuses 
from Exercise. 



Number of 
Students Excused. 



Abscess (ear) : 1 

Absent from College 29 

Appendicitis 1 

Asthma 1 

Backache 4 

Boils 2 

Bronchitis 6 



Causes of Excuses 
from Exercise. 



Number of 
Students Excused. 



Bunion 1 

Burnt hand 2 

Bursitis 1 

Cellulitis 2 

Chicken pox . 1 

Cold 37 

Cohtis 2 



60 

Causes of Excuses Number of Causes of Excuses Number of 

from Exercise. Students Excused. from Exercise. Students Excused. 

Conjunctivitis 5 Neuritis 2 

Exhaustion 11 Nosebleed 1 

Eye strain 2 Otitis 1 

Frosted feet 4 Quarantine 1 

Grippe 8 Recovering from operations .... 3 

Headache 3 Rheumatism 6 

Hysteria 2 Sinusitis 1 

Infected finger 1 Strained muscles 3 

Infected toe 1 Tonsilitis 5 

Infected tooth 2 Toothache 2 

Indigestion 12 Vaccine infection 1 

Ivy poisoning 1 Varicose veins 1 

Jaundice 3 Wart on foot 9 

Nervousness 7 Weak lungs 1 

Neuralgia 3 



Table of Accidents, 1911-12. 

Causes. 

8 sprained ankles 2 hockey. 

5 walking. 

1 gymnastic class. 
3 sprained knees 2 basket ball. 

1 dancing. 
2 broken noses 1 walking. 

1 hockey. 

2 strained backs 2 fall on ice. 

3 severe abrasions 1 walking. 

2 track practice. 
1 sprained coccyx 1 fall on ice. 

1 strained side 1 fall on stage. 

Fines. 

Five students failed to have their physical examinations 
within the required time; twenty students failed to register 
the required number of gynmastic drills; sixteen students 
failed to register the required number of periods of exercise. 

The fines imposed were as follows: 

Physical examinations $8.00 

Gymnastic drills 106.00 

Exercise 43.50 

Total $157.50 



61 

Athletics. 

Calendar of Athletics for the Year 1911-12. 

October 6th First hockey practice. 

October 10th First Athletic Association meeting held. 

October 16th Tennis singles began. 

October 28th Hockey Varsity matches began. 

November 13th Class hockey matches began. 

January 12th Swimming meet — Preliminaries. 

January 20th Swimming meet — Finals. 

March 11th Water polo matches began. 

April 1st Fencing tournament, Varsity vs. Alumnse. 

April 1st Basket ball practice began. 

April 27th Track meet — Preliminaries. 

May 3rd Tennis tournament, Varsity vs. Phila- 
delphia Cricket Club. 

May 4th Tnter-class tennis doubles. 

May 8th Basket ball matches began. 

May 11th Track meet — Finals. 

June 4th Tennis tournament. Varsity vs. Alumnse. 

June 5th Basket ball — Varsity vs. Alumnae. 

Athletic Statistics. 
Percentage of students taking part in athletics: 

Basket- xj „i „ Authorized Water 'ti„„„. rp^„„7 

ball, Hockey, g^ii^mers. Polo, tennis, Track, 

per cent. per cent, per cent, per cent, per cent, per cent. 

Class 1912 49 63 60 30 88 21 

1913 47 70 72 20 88 27 

1914 53 79 75 37 91 27 

1915 61 71 60 21 86 21 

College 53 72 67 27 88 24 

Number of students taking no part in athletics : 

Class of 1912 2 

1913 1 

1914 

1915 2 

College 5 

Tennis. — The cla»s championship was won by 1915. The 
college championship was won by 1915 also. The captains 
were: E. Faries, 1912; A. Patterson, 1913; E. Dunham, 
1914; R. Harrington, 1915. 



62 

Hockey. — The class championship was won by 1912. 
The captains were: C. Chase, 1912; A. Hearne, 1913; L. 
Cadbury, 1914; M. C. Morgan, 1915. Each class had one 
first, one second, and one third team, with substitutes. An 
average of one hundred and thirty students practiced daily 
during the season. 

Swimming. — The class championship was won by 1914. 
The captains were: C. Terry, 1912; Y. Stoddard, 1913; A. 
Miller, 1914; L. Mudge, 1915. The events at the contest 
were as follows : , 

68 foot swim on front 17 4-5 seconds. 

68 foot swim on back 21 4-5 seconds. 

Plunge for distance 49 feet, 7 inches. 

136 foot swim on front -42 2-5 seconds. 

136 foot swim on back 54 seconds. 

Dive for form. 
Fancy dive. 
Class relay race. 

One college record was broken: 

Plunge for distance. 

One college record was equalled: 

68 foot swim on front. 

Water Polo. — The class championship was won by 1914. 
The captains were: C. Terry, 1912; Y. Stoddard, 1913; A. 
Miller, 1914; L. Mudge, 1915. Each class had one first and 
one second team, with substitutes. 

Track Athletics. — On the decision of President Thomas, 
the Students' Self Government Association and the Athletic 
Association the Track Meet was held out-of-doors this year. 
The class championship was won by 1912. The individual 
championship was won by F. Crenshaw, 1912. The captains 
were: F. Crenshaw, 1912; L. Haydock, 1913; T. Cox, 1914. 
I. Zeckwer, 1915. The events at the contest were: 

n 

75-yard dash 9 1-5 seconds. 

Running high jump 4 feet, 4 inches. 

100-yard hurdles 16 seconds. 

Standing high jump 3 feet, 7 inches. 



63 

Throwing base ball 161 feet, 11 inches. 

100-yard dash 12 seconds. 

Running broad jump 15 feet, 3 inches. 

Hop, step, jump 31 feet, 1 inch. 

Standing broad jump 7 feet, 6 inches. 

Throwing basket ball 61 feet, 8 inches. 

60-yard hurdles 9 1-5 seconds. 

Shot put. 25 feet, 10 1-2 inches. 

50-yard dash 6 1-5 seconds. 

Class relay races 39 4-5 seconds. 

Eight college records were made: 

75-yard dash. 
100-yard hurdles. 
Throwing base ball. 
100-yard dash. 
Throwing basket ball. 
60-yard hurdles. 
50-yard dash. 
Class relay race. 

Four college records were broken : 

Running high jump. 
Standing high jump. 
Running broad jump. 
Running hop, step, jump. 

Fencing. — The tournament — Varsity vs. Alumnae — was 
won by the Alumnae. 

Basket Ball. — The class championship was won by 1913. 
The captains were: W. Scripture, 1912; M. Dessau, 1913; 
E. Baker, 1914; S. R. Smith, 1915. Each class had one first, 
one second, and one third team, with substitutes. From sixty 
to seventy students played daily during the season. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Constance M. K. Applebee, 
Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 



Appendices. 



Protnotions, Reappointments, and Changes in the Academic 
and Administrative Staff for the Year 1912-13. 

Joseph W. Warren, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology, granted 
leave of absence for one year. 

Elmer P. Kohler, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry, resigned to accept a 
Professorship of Organic Chemistry in Harvard University. 

Albert Schinz, Ph.D., Professor of French Literature, returned after one 
year's leave of absence on account of illness. 

Tenney Frank, Ph.D., promoted to be Professor of Latin. 

David Hilt Tennent, Ph.D., returned after one year's leave of absence 
and promoted to be Professor of Biology. 

Nettie Maria Stevens, Ph.D., Associate in Experimental Morphology, 
died May 4, 1912. 

Carleton Fairchild Brown, Ph.D., Professor of Enghsh Philology, 
returned after one year's leave of absence. 

Marion Reilly, A.B., Dean of the College and Reader in Philosophy, 
returned after one year's leave of absence. 

Frederick Hutton Getman, Ph.D., Associate in Chemistry, granted 
leave of absence for one year. 

Clarence Errol Ferree, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate Professor of 
Experimental Psychology. 

Orie Latham Hatcher, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate Professor of 
Comparative Literature. 

Chester Albert Reeds, Ph.D., Associate in Chemistry, resigned to be- 
come Assistant Curator in the Department of Geology and Inverte- 
brate Palseontology of the American Museum of Natural History in 
New York City. 

Agathe Lasch, Ph.D., reappointed Associate in Teutonic Philology. 

Clarence Henry Haring, A.B., B. Litt., appointed Associate in History. 
Mr. Haring received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Harvard 
University in 1907. He was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship and studied 
at the University of Oxford, England, from 1907 to 1910. In 1909 he 

(64) 



6-5 

received the degree of Bachelor of Letters from Oxford University. 
In 1910-11 he held the Austin Teaching Fellowship in Harvard 
University and in 1911-12 the Bayard Cutting Travelling Fellowship. 
He studied at the University of Berlin and in Spain. 

Loins Cons, promoted to be Associate in French. 

James Fulton Ferguson, Ph.D., appointed Associate in Ancient History 
and in Latin. Dr. Ferguson received the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
from Monmouth College in 1903, and from Yale University in 1906; 
the degree of Master of Arts from Yale University in 1907, and the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1912. He held a Fellowship in 
Yale University from 1906 to 1909; from 1909 to 1910 he was Instruc- 
tor in Wilhams College and from 1910 to 1912 Instructor in Greek and 
Latin in Yale University. 

Thomas Clachar Brown, Ph.D., appointed Associate in Geology. Dr. 
Brown received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Amherst College 
in 1904, the degree of Master of Arts from Columbia University in 
1905, and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1909. From 1905 to 
1907 he was Assistant in Palaeontology in Columbia University; 
from 1907 to 1909 he was geologist to the Board of Water Supply of 
New York City, fi-om 1909 to 1911 he was Assistant Professor of Geol- 
ogy in Middlebury College and in 1909 Non-resident Lecturer in 
Geology in Norwich University; from 1911 to 1912 he was Assistant 
Professor of Geology in Pennsylvania State College. 

James Ryals Conner, Ph.D., appointed Associate in Mathematics. 
Dr. Conner received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from the University 
of Georgia in 1898 and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Johns 
Hopkins University in 1909. From 1906 to 1907 he was a graduate 
student and from 1907 to 1909 a Fellow in Johns Hopkins University; 
from 1909 to 1911 he was a Carnegie Research Assistant, and from 
1911 to 1912 Johnson Scholar and Fellow by Courtesy in Johns 
Hopkins University. 

Roger Frederic Brunel, Ph.D., appointed Associate in Chemistry. 
Dr. Brunei received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Colby Uni- 
versity in 1903 and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Johns 
Hopkins University in 1906. From 1905 to 1906 he was Lecture 
Assistant in Chemistry at Johns Hopkins University; from 1907 to 
1910 Instructor in Chemistry in Syracuse University, and from 1910 
to 1912 Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Don Roscoe Joseph, M.D., appointed Associate Professor of Physiology. 
Dr. Joseph received the degree of Bachelor of Scien.ce from the Uni- 
versity of Chicago in 1904, the degree of Master of Science from St. 
Louis University in 1906, and the degree of Doctor of Medicine from 
St. Louis University in 1907. He was Assistant in Physiology in St. 
Louis University from 1904 to 1907; FeUow in the Rockefeller Insti- 



66 

tute for Medical Rci?earch in New York City from 1907 to 190S, 
Assistant from 1908 to 1910 and Associate of the Rockefeller Institute 
from 1910 to 1912. 

Marion Edwards Park, A.M., Acting Dean of the College as Substitute 
for Dean Marion Reilly, time expired. 

Samuel Arthur King, M.A., reappointed Non-resident Lecturer in 
English Diction. 

Georgiana Goddard King, A.M., Lecturer in the Historj' of Ai't and 
Comparative Literature, returned after one year's leave of absence. 

Harry Bateman, M.A., Lecturer in Mathematics, term expu-ed. 

Samuel Moore, Ph.D., Lecturer in English Philology to serve during the 
absence of Professor Carleton Fairchild Brown, term expired. 

Elwood Austin Welden, Ph.D., Lecturer in French and Sanski-it, term 
expired. 

David M. Robinson, Ph.D., Non-resident Lecturer in Classical Ai'chse- 
ology, term expired. 

Dorothy Lamb, appointed Lecturer in Classical Archaeology. Miss Lamb 
was a student of Newnham College, University of Cambridge, England, 
from 1906 to 1910. She took the Classical Tripos, Part I in 1909 and 
Part II, Section D, in 1910, obtaim'ng first class honours in the second 
part. From 1910 to 1911 she held a Special Scholarship at the 
British School of Archaeology in Athens, and in 1911 won the Creighton 
Memorial Post-graduate Essay Prize at Newnliam College. 

Roland G. Kent, Ph.D., appointed Non-resident Lecturer in Sanskrit. 
Dr. Kent acted as Non-resident Lecturer in Sanskrit in Bryn Mawr 
College in the year 1909 to 1910. 

Harriet Randolph, Ph.D., reappointed Demonstrator in Biology and 
Reader in Botany. 

Regina Katharine Crandall, Ph.D., Reader in Enghsh, returned after 
one year's leave of absence. 

Abby Kirk, A.B., reappointed Reader in Elementary Greek. 

Emma Haeberli, Ph.D., Reader in Elementary French, term expired. 

Mary Jeffers, A.M., reappointed Reader in Elementary German and 
granted leave of absence for one year. 

Margaret Grace Skinner, M.A., Reader in English, term expired. 

Edna Aston Shearer, A.B., reappointed Reader in English. 

Lily Ross Taylor, A.B., Reader and Demonstrator in the History of 
Art and Classical Archaeology, term expired. 

Abigail Camp Dimon, A.M., Reader in Biology as Substitute for Professor 
David Hilt Tennent, term expired ; appointed Recording Secretary. 



67 

E. Beatrice Daw, A.M., reappointed Reader jn English. 

Mary Ruth Ethelwyn George, A.B.., Assistant Reader in English, 
term expired. 

Cornelia Catlin Coulter, Ph.D., Reader in Latin, term expired. 

Mary Hamilton Swindler, A.M., reappointed Reader in Latin and 
appointed Demonstrator in Art and Archaeology. 

Helen Schaeffer Huff, Ph.D., reappointed Reader in Mathematics 
• and resigned. 

Helen Estabrook Sandison, A.M., reappointed Reader in English. 

Amelia Elizabeth White, A.B., Assistant Reader in English, term 
expired. 

Marion Delia Crane, A.B., appointed Reader in English and Secretary 
to the Dean of the College. Miss Crane received the degree of Bache- 
lor of Arts from Bryn Mawr College in 1911. From 1911 to 1912 she 
was Secretary of the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 

Marie Marguerite Louise Hopp, appointed Reader in Elementary 
French. Miss Hopp holds the Brevet of the Ecole Superieure, Paris. 
From 1904 to 1908 she was Senior Modern Language Mistress in the 
Girls' High School, Lincoln, England, and from 1911 to 1912 Teacher 
of French in Ashley Hall, Charleston, S. C. 

Bertha Sophie Ehlers, A.B., appointed Reader in Elementary German 
in the absence of Miss Mary Jeffers. Miss Ehlers received the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr College in 1909 and from 1910 
to 1912 has taught German in the Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia. 

Ida Langdon, Ph.D., appointed Reader in English. Dr. Langdon received 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr College in 1903, 
the degree of Master of Ai'ts from Cornell University in 1910 and the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Cornell University in 1912. 

Mabel Kathryn Frbhafer, A.M., reappointed Demonstrator in Physics. 

Jessie Williams Clifton, A.B., Demonstrator in Chemistry, term 
expired. 

Annie Louise Macleod, Ph.D., appointed Reader and Demonstrator in 
Chemistry and Assistant Warden of Pembroke Hall. Dr. Macleod 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from McGill University in 1904, 
the degree of Master of Science in 1905 and the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy in 1910. From 1905 to 1908 she was Demonstrator in 
Chemistry in McGill University; from 1908 to 1909 Assistant in 
Chemistry in Barnard College; from 1909 to 1910 FeUow in Chem- 
istry in Bryn Mawr College and from 1910 to 1912 Research Fellow 
in Chemistry in Bryn Mawr College. 

Anna Bell Lawther, A.B., Secretary of the College, resigned. 



68 

Edith Orlady, A.B., promoted to be Secretary of the College. 

Abigail Camp Dimon, A.M., appointed Recording Secretary. 

Maktha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., reappointed Warden of Pembroke Hall. 

Helen Remington Calder, Warden of Radnor Hail, resigned on account 
of her marriage. 

Mabel Harriet Norton, A.B., reappointed Warden of Denbigh Hall. 

Edith Btjell Wright, A.B., reappointed Warden of Merion Hall. 

Jai^e Righter, Warden of Rockefeller Hall, term expired. 

Alice Hill Byrne, A.B., Assistant Warden of Pembroke Hall, term 
expired. 

Katherine Everett, Ph.D., appointed Warden of Rockefeller Hall. 
Dr. Everett received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Brown 
University in 1908 and the degree of Master of Aj-ts in 1910. In 
1912 she received the degree of Doctor of Pliilosophy from Cornell 
University. 

SusANNE Carey Allinson, A.B., appointed Warden of Radnor Hall. 
Miss Allinson received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr 
College in 1910. 

Maria Hawes Albee, resigned as Business Manager, March 1, 1912, 
on account of her marriage. 

Maria Wilkins Smith, A.B., appointed Business Manager to fill the 
unexpired term of MariaHawes Albee from March 1, 1912. Miss Smith 
received the degree of Bachelor of Ai'ts from Bryn Mawr College in 
1906. From 1907 to 1912 she conducted a class of girls in Philadelphia 
and from 1908 to 1909 attended Bryn Mawr College as a graduate 
student. 

Margaret A. Procter, A.B., reappointed Junior Bursar. 

Mary Letitia Jones, B.L., B.L.S., reappointed Librarian. 

Constance M. K. Applebee, reappointed Director of Athletics and 
GjTunastics. 

Elizabeth Lawrence Gray, reappointed Assistant Director of Athletics 
and Gymnastics. 

Mary Ellen Baker, A.B., B.L.S., Head Cataloguer, resigned. 

Helen Corey Geddes, A.B., B.S. appointed Head Cataloguer. Miss 
Geddes received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Radchffe College 
in 1905 and the degree of Bachelor of Science from Simmons College 
in 1910. From 1910 to 1912 she was Assistant in the Library of the 
University of lUinois. 

Bessie Homer Jennings, reappointed Assistant Cataloguer. 



73 
Ida Lela De Long, Earlham College Scholar. 

Hudson Falls, N. Y. A.B., Earlham College, 1912. Teacher in Public Schools, Washing- 
ton County, N. Y., 1907-08. 

Cassie Corina Mendenhall, Guilford College Scholar. 

High Point, N. C. A.B., Guilford College, 1912. 

Rose Valere Johnson, Penn College Scholar. 

Oskaloosa, la. A.B., Penn College, 1912. 

Elizabeth Betterton Forman, Graduate Foundation Scholar. 

Haverford, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1902. Tutor in the Bryn Mawr School, Balti- 
more, 1902-03; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08, 1911-12. 

Leah Tapper Cadbxjry, Foundation Scholar. 

Haverford, Pa. Prepared by the Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa. Foundation 
Scholar, 1910-12. 

Anna Wilkins Roberts, Foundation Scholar. 

Moorestown, N. J. Prepared by the Friends' Academy, Moorestown, and by the West- 
town Boarding School, Westtown, Pa. Foundation Scholar, 1911-12. 

Anna Sears, First New England States Matriculation Scholar. 

Framingham, Mass. Prepared by Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. 

Helen Calder Robertson, 

Second (equal) New England States Matriculation Scholar. 
Providence, R. I. Prepared by Miss Wheeler's School, Providence, R. I. 

Frances Witherbee, 

Second (equal) New England States Matriculation Scholar. 

West Newton, Mass. Prepared by Miss Haskell and Miss Dean's School, Boston, Mass. 

Thalia Howard Smith, 

First New York, New Jersey and Delaware Matriculation Scholar. 
New York City. Prepared by the Hawthorn School, New York City. 

Louise Dillingham, 

Second New York, New Jersey and Delaware Matriculation Scholar. 
Millburn, N. J. Prepared by Short Hills School, Short Hills, N. J. 

Adeline Agnes Werner, First Western States Matriculation Scholar. 

Columbus, O. Prepared by the Columbus School for Girls, Columbus, O. 

Clara Wallace Heydemann, 

Second Western States Matriculation Scholar. 
St. Paul, Minn. Prepared by Mrs. Backus's School, St. Paul, Minn. 

Lois Estabrook Sandison, 

First Pennsylvania and Southern States Matriculation Scholar. 

Terre Haute, Ind. Prepared by the Willard School, Berlin, Germany. 

Eleanor Marcella Clinton, 

Second Pennsylvania and Southern States Matriculation Scholar. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls High School, Philadelphia. 

Rachel Ash, Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1911-12. 

Janet Baird, Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Sharon Hill, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadel- 
phia Girls' High School Scholar, 1910-12. 

Grace Bartholomew, . . Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1909-12. 






74 

Eva Alice Worrall Bryne, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School tScholar. 

Philadelphia Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Marie Ottilie Keller, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1911-12. 

Marion Clementine Kleps, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Adelaide Douglas Simpson, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1909-12. 

Miriam Elsie Ward,. . .Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1910-12. 

Frances Macdonald, Trustees' Lower Merion High School Scholar. 

Ardmore, Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore. Trustees' Lower 
Merion High School Scholar, 1911-12. 

Janet Baird, James E. Rhoads Junior Scholar. 

.Sharon Hill, Pa. Prepared bv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadel- 
phia Girls' High School Scholar, 1910-12. 

Merle D'Aubigne Sampson, James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholar. 

Charlottesville, Va. Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Zena Jennie Blanc, . . . .Additional James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of Charles E. 
Ellis Scholarship, 1911-12. 

Helen Walkley Irvin, Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of Bryn Mawr 
School Scholarship, 1911-12. 

Katharine Snodgrass, ; Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar. 

Indianapolis, Ind. Prepared by the Shortridge High School, Indianapolis. 

Dorothy Wentworth Skerrett, Mary E. Stevens Junior Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls* High School, Philadelphia. Holder of the Second 
Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1910- 
11; Holder of Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholarship, 1911-12. 

Eleanor Bontecou, . . . Maria L. Eastman Brooke Hall Memorial Scholar. 

Orange, N. J. Prepared by Miss Beard's School, Orange. Holder of First Bryn Mawr 
Matriculation Scholarship for New York, New Jersey, and Delaware, 1908-09. 

Marion Dorothea Cilnton, Anna M. Powers Memorial Scholar. 

Portland, Ore. Prepared by the Lincoln High School, Portland, and by Portland Academy. 
Holder of the First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for the Western States, 1909- 
10; Holder of the James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship, 1910-11, and of the James 
E. Rhoads Junior Scholarship, 1911-12. 

Josephine Chapin Brown, Thomas H. Powers Memorial Scholar. 

Ogdensburg, N. Y. Prepared by the Ogdensburg Free Academy and by private tuition. 
Holder of Maria Hopper Scholarship, 1907-08; Teacher of Latin in Mrs. Barker's School 
for Girls, St. Paul, Minn., 1910-11. Holder of Thomas H. Powers Memorial Scholar- 
ship, 1911-12. 

Margaret Adelaide Munroe, L. C. B. Saul Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of the L. C. B. 
Saul Memorial Scholarship, 1909-12. 



75 
Edna Margaret Potter, Elizabeth Duane Gillespie Scholar. 

Detroit, Mich. Prepared by the Eastern High School, Detroit, and by the Mt. Ida School 
for Girls, Newton, Miss. Elizabeth Duane Gillespie Scholar, 1911-12. 

Eleanor Louisa Hellings, Elizabeth Duane Gillespie Scholar, 

Devon, Pa. Prepared by Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private tuition. 

Dorothy Stulb Stokley, . . Minnie Murdoch Kendrick Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Juliet Capers Branham, Bryn Maivr School Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 

Ramona Beatrice Miller, Simon Muhr Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of Simon Muhr 
Scholarship, 1909-12, and of First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Penn- 
sylvania and the Southern States, 1909-10. 

Marguerite Daisy Darkow, Simon Muhr Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. First Bryn Mawr 
Matriculation Scholar for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1911-12. 

LuciLE Thompson, George W. Fetter Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. George W. Fetter 
Memorial Scholar, 1910-12. 

Cleora Sutch, Charles E. Ellis Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Charles E. Ellis Scholar, 
1911-12. 

Jeannette Keefer Greenewald, Charles E. Ellis Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Mildred Haenssler, Anna Hallowell Memorial Scholar. 

St. Charles, Mo. Prepared by the High School, St. Charles. Holder of the James E. 
Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship, 1911-12. 

Eleanor Marcella Clinton, 

Frances Marion Simpson Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Second Matriculation 
Scholar for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1912-13, and City Scholar, 1912-13. 

Irene Angell Paddock, 

Additional Frances Marion Simpson Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by Miss Roney's School, Bala, Pa., by the Misses Kirk's School, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private tuition. 

Cecelia Irene Baechle, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1909-12. 

Mildred B.\ird, City Scholar. 

Sharon Hill, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1910-12. 

Eleanor Marcella Clinton, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Second Matriculation 
Scholar for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1912-13, and Frances Marion Simpson 
Memorial Scholar, 1912-13. 

Cecile Adler Goldsmith, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1908-12, 

Sara Marion Halpen, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1909-12. 

Anna Caroline Lee, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Dora Clara Levinson, '. . . .City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1911-12. 



76 

Mary Arleville Lobdell, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1911-12. 

Margaret Louise Loudon, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Dorothy Wentworth Skerrett, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of the Second 
Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1910- 
11; Holder of Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholarship, 1911-12; City Scholar, 1910-12. 

Elsie Steltzer, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1911-12. 

Zena Jennie Blanc, Special Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Charles E. Ellis Scholar, 
1911-12. 

Josephine Chapin Brown, Special Scholar. 

Ogdensburg, N. Y. Prepared by the Ogdensburg Free Academy and by private tuition. 
Holder of Maria Hopper Scholarship, 1907-08; Teacher of Latin in Mrs. Barker's School 
for Girls, St. Paul, Minn., 1910-11. Holder of Thomas H. Powers Memorial Scholar- 
ship, 1911-12. 

Grace Turner, Special Scholar. 

Berwyn, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Pauline Ida Clarke, George W. Child^ Prize Essayist. 

New York City. Prepared by the Balliol School, Utica, N. Y. Holder of the James E. 
Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship, 1909-10, and of the James E. Rhoads Junior Scholar- 
ship, 1910-11; and of Special Scholarship, 1911-12. 

Helen Dorothy Barber Mary Helen Ritchie Memorial Prize. 

Portland, Ore. Prepared by Portland Academy. 

Winifred Goodall, Shrigley Peace Essay Prize. 

Cincinnati, O. Prepared by the Bartholomew-Clifton School, Cincinnati, by the Misses 
Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by the College Preparatory School, Cincinnati. 



III. 

Degrees Conferred during the Academic Year 1911-12. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. 
9 

Eleanora Frances Bliss of Pennsylvania. 

A.B. and A.M., Bryn Mawr College, 1904. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1904-05, 1911-12; Graduate Scholar in Geology, Bryn Mawr College, 1905-06, and 
Assistant Curator of Geological Museum, 1908-09; Graduate Student in Geology, 
University of California, 1910-11. Subjects; Geology, Palaeontology, and Inorganic 
Chemistry. Thesis: Crystalline Rocks of the Doe Run Region, Pennsylvania. 

Helen Cox Bowerman of New Jersey. 

A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1901; A.M., University of Rochester, 1903. Teacher of 
English and Latin in the High School, Macedon, N. Y., 1903-05; Instructor in Latin, 
Western College for Women, Oxford, Ohio, 1905-07; Associate Professor of Latin, 
1907-08; Graduate Scholar in Archaeology, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09, and Fellow 
in Archseology, 1909-10; Student in Rome, 1910-11; Fellow by Courtesy in Bryn 
Mawr College, 1911-12. Subjects: Classical Archaeology and Latin. Thesis: Roman 
Sacrificial Altars, an Archaeological Study of Monuments in Rome. 

Minnie Almira Graham of New York. 

A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1900, and A.M., University of Michigan, 1906. Fellow in 
Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07, 1910-11; Teacher in the High School, Hancock, 
N. Y., 1900-01, and in Braintree, Mass, 1901-02; Instructor in Chemistry, Mount 
Holyoke College, 1902-05; Holder of the '86 Mount Holyoke Fellowship, and Graduate 
Student, University of Michigan, 1905-06; Professor of Chemistry, Lake Erie College, 
1907-10; on leave of absence, 1910-12; Fellow by Courtesy and Graduate Scholar in 
Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 1911-12. Subjects: Physical Chemistry, Organic 
Chemistry, and Physics. Thesis: A Study of the Change from Violet to Green in 
Solutions of Chromium Sulphate. 

Esther Harmon of Ohio. 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1906. Graduate Scholar in Teutonic Philology, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1906-07; Holder of the President's European Fellowship and Student, LTni- 
versity of Berlin, 1907-08; Fellow in German, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09; Otten- 
dorfer Memorial Research Fellow in Teutonic Philology and Student, University of 
Munich, 1909-10; Teacher in the High School, Toledo, 1910-12. Subjects: German 
Literature, Teutonic Philology and Modern History. Thesis :5.Johanna Schopenhauer als 
Schriftstellerin. 

Anna Isabel Jonas of New Jersey. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904, and A.M., 1905. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1904-05, 1910-12; Graduate Scholar in Geology, 1905-06; and Assistant Curator of 
Geological Museum, 1908-09. Subjects: Geology, Palaeontology and Inorganic Chemis- 
try. Thesis: The Geology of the Avondale District, a Key to the Relations of the 
Wissahickon Mica-gneiss and the Shenandoah Limestone of the Piedmont of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Louise Baggott Morgan of Rhode Island. 

A.B., and A.M., Brown University, 1907. Graduate Scholar in English, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1907-10, 1911-12. Subjects: English Literature, English Philology, and 
Italian. Thesis: An edition of a MS. play of 1636, "Love's Hospital," by George 
Wilde, with an introduction and notes. 

Mary Caroline Spalding of Washington, D. C. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1901. Graduate Student, Brvn Mawr College, 1906-08, Graduate 
Scholar, 1908-10, Fellow in English, 1910-11, and Fellow by Courtesy in Enghsh, 1911- 
12; Teacher in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 1906-10. Subjects: English 
Philology, English Literature, and French Philology. Thesis: The Middle English 
Charters of Christ. 

(77) 



Mary Hamilton Swindler of Indiana. 

A.B., University of Indiana, 1905, and A.M., 1906. Graduate Scholar in Greek, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1906-07, and Fellow in Greek, 1907-09; Mary E. Garrett European 
Fellow and Student, Universities of Berlin, and Oxford and the American School of 
Classical Studies in Athens, 1909-10; Teacher in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 
1910-11; Reader in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1911-12. Subjects: Greek, Latin, 
and Archajology. Thesis: Cretan Elements in the Cults and Ritual of Apollo. 

LlLY Ross Taylor of Illinois. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1906. Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07; 
Fellow in Latin, 1907-08; Reader in Latin and Graduate Student, 1908-09; University 
of Chicago, Summer Quarter, 1907; University of Bonn, Summer Semester, 1909; Ameri- 
can School of Classical Studies in Rome, 1909-10; Reader and Demonstrator in the 
History of Art and Classical Archseology, Bryn Mawr College, 1910-12. Subjects: 
Latin and Classical Archseology. Thesis: The Cults of Ostia. 

MASTER OF ARTS. 
8 

Angela Charlotte Darkow of Philadelphia. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1911. Graduate Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1911-12. 

Margaret Doolittle of New York. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1911. Graduate Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1911-12. 

Elizabeth Hill Gerhard of Pennsylvania. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904. Substitute Teacher in the High School, Harrisburg, Pa., 
1904-05; Teacher of Mathematics and Science, Allentown College for Women, 1905-06; 
Teacher of German, English and Mathematics in the Misses Sergeant and Miss Bent's 
School, Harrisburg, 1906-07; Teacher of Science in Lancaster College, Lancaster, Pa., 
• 1907-08; Graduate Student in French and Italian, Bryn Mawr College, 1911-12. 

Helen Turnbull Gilroy^ of Philadelphia. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. Graduate Student in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 
1909-10, and Fellow in Physics, 1911-12. 

Mary Merrick Goodwin of Philadelphia. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. Teacher in the Preparatory School for Boys and Girls, 
Bryn Mawr, 1910-11; Susan B. Anthony Memorial Scholar in Political Theory, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1911-12. 

Emily Elizabeth Howson of Philadelphia. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1910. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1910-11, and 
Graduate Scholar in Physics, 1911-12. 

Louise Pettibone Smith of Connecticut. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908. Instructor in Hardin College, Mexico, Mo., 1908-11; 
Graduate Scholar in Semitic Languages, Bryn Mawr College, 1911-12. 

Helen Tredway' of Iowa. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1911. Bryn Mawr European Fellow, and Graduate Scholar 
in Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 1911-12. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS. 
60 

Esther Stuart Cornell of Coraopolis, Pa. 

University of Chicago, 1906-07. Group, History and Economics and Politics. The work 
for this degree was completed in February. 1912. 

Ruth Roberts of Decatur, 111. 

Prepared by the High School, Decatur, and by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 
Pa. Group, History and Economics and Politics. The work for this degree was com- 
pleted in February, 1912. 

Mary Bogue Alden of Rochester, N. Y. 

Prepared by the High School, Rochester, and by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Holder of the Elizabeth Duane Gillespie Scholarship in American History, 1911-12. 
Group, History and Economics and Politics. 



79 
Ann Catharine Arthurs of Baltimore, Md. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 
1908-10. Group, History and Economics and Politics. 

Helen Dorothy Barber of Portland, Ore. 

Prepared by the Portland Academy. Group, Mathematics and Physics. 

Jane Beard wood of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Group, History and Economics and 
Politics. 

Sadie Beliekowsky of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' 
High School Scholarship, 1908-12. Group, Greek and Latin. 

Zelda Madison Branch of Kansas City, Mo. 

University of Texas, First Semester, 1906-07; University of Nebraska, 1907-09. Holder 
of Anna M. Powers Memorial Scholarship, 1911-12. Group, Philosophy and Physics. 

Laura Laurenson Byrne of Ellicott City, Md. 

Prepared by St. Timothy's School, Catonsville, Md. Holder of the Mary E. Stevens 
Junior Scholarship, 1910-11. Group, History and Economics and Politics. 

Norah Cam of Bishop's Stortford, England. 

Prepared by private tuition. Holder of Maria Hopper Scholarship, 1909-11. Holder of 
Maria L. Eastman Brooke Hall Memorial Scholarship, 1911-12. Group, Mathematics 
and Physics. 

Gladys Elizabeth Chamberlain of Portland, Me. 

Prepared by the Wayneflete School, Portland. Holder of Second Bryn Mawr Matricula- 
tion Scholarship for the New England States, 1908-09. Group, Latin and German. 

Carmelita Chase of Omaha, Neb. 

Prepared by Brownell Hall, Omaha. Group, German and French. 

Dorothy Chase of Chicago, 111. 

Prepared by the Kirkland School, Chicago, and by the Lakeview High School, Chicago. 
Group, Latin and French. 

Pauline Ida Clarke of New York City. 

Prepared by the Balliol School, Utica, N. Y. Holder of the James E. Rhoads Sophomore 
Scholarship, 1909-10, and of the James E. Rhoads Junior Scholarship, 1910-11; and of 
Special Scholarship, 1911-12. Group, English and German. 

Margaret Trumbull Corwin of New Haven, Conn. 
Prepared by the High School, New Haven. Group, German and French. 

Fanny Graves Crenshaw of Richmond, Va. 

Prepared by Miss Ellett's School, Richmond. Group History and Economics and Politics, 

Gladys Edgerton of New York City. 

Prepared by Mrs. Merrill's School for Girls, Oaksmere, N. Y. Group, History and Eco- 
nomics and Politics. 

Gertrude Marie Elcock of Glenside, Pa. 

Prepared by the Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia. Holder of Maria Hopper Scholarship, 
1909-10; Holder of Special Scholarship, 1910-11. 

Elizabeth Faries of Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Wissahickon Heights School, Chestnut Hill. Group, History and Eco- 
nomics and Politics. 

Mary Gertrude Fendall of Baltimore, Md. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Group, Mathematics and Physics. 

Florence Martha Glenn of Johnstown, Pa. 

Prepared by the High School, Johnstown. Group, Latin and German. 

Julia Loring Haines of Indianapolis, Ind. 

Prepared by the Shortridge High School, Indianapolis, bj' the Misses Shipley's School, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private tuition. Group, History and Economics and Polities. 



80 
Christine Potts Hammer of Pottstown, Pa. 

Prepared by Dana Hall, Wellesley, Mass. Group, History and Economics and Politics. 

Anna Hartshorne of Brighton, Md. 

Prepared by the Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa. Foundation Scholar, 1908-12. 
Group, Latin and German. 

Anna Constance Heffern of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' 
High School Scholarship, 1908-12. Group, English and Comparative Literature. 

Ai HosHiNO of Tokio, Japan. 

Prepared by Miss Tsuda's School, Tokio, by the Stevens School, Germantown, Pa., and 
by the Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, Chemistry and Biology. 

Julia Taylor Houston of Pine Bluff, Ark. 

Prepared by the High School, Pine Bluff, by Elizabeth College, Charlotte, N. C, and by 
private tuition. Group, English and French. 

Beatrice Howson of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Friends' Central School, Philadelphia. Group, History and Economics 
and Politics, 

Elizabeth Henrietta Johnston of Carlisle, Pa. 

Prepared by the High School, East Orange, N. J., and by Metzger College, Carlisle. Group, 
Mathematics and Chemistry. 

Louise Emerson Lamb of Baltimore, Md. 

Prepared by Ecole Vinet, Lausanne, Switzerland, and by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 
Group, French and Spanish. 

Helen Sophia Lautz of Pekin, 111. 

Prepared by the High School, Pekin, and by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Group, Latin and French. 

Florence Stein Leopold of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Group, Philosophy and Economics 
and Politics. 

Rebecca Renshaw Lewis of Baltimore, Md. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Holder of Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 
1908-12. Group, Latin and Spanish. 

Gertrude Llewellyn of Evanston, HI. 

Prepared by the Girton School, Winnetka, 111., and by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, 
Pa. Group, History and Economics and Politics. 

Katherine Cavenagh Longwell of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Prepared by Frankby House School, Hoylake, England, and by Miss Gleim's School, 
Pittsburgh. Group, Latin and German. 

Leonora Lucas of Evanston, 111. 

Prepared by the Academy of the University of Illinois. University of Illinois, 1905-06. 
Group, French and Italian. 

Marion Loraine Mead of Evanston, 111. 

Prepared by the Girton School, Winnetka, 111., and by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Group, History and Economics and Politics. 

Pearl Boring Mitchell of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of the Minnie Murdoch Ken- 
drick Scholarship, 1908-12. Group, History and Economics and Politics. 

Hazel Margaret Montgomery of New York City. 

Prepared by the Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., by the Brearley School, New York 
City, and by private tuition. Group, English and Comparative Literature. 

Mary Alden Morgan of Chicago, 111. 

Prepared by the LTniversity School for Girls, Chicago, and by private tuition. Group, 
English and Philosophy. 



81 
Agnes Elizabeth Morrow of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Group, History and Economics and 
Politics. 

Margaret Winthrop Peck of Bristol, Conn. 

Prepared by the High School, Bristol, and by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, 
Latin and German. 

Mary Peirce of Haverford, Pa. 

Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by the Agnes Irwin School, Phila- 
delphia. Group, Latin and French. 

Elizabeth Finney of New Brighton, Staten Island. 

Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City. Group, History and Economics and 
Politics. 

Mary Etta Scribner of Chicago, 111. 

Prepared by the Kenwood Institute, Chicago, and by Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. 
Group, History and Economics and Politics. 

Winifred Scripture of New York City. 

Prepared by Luisen Schule, Berlin, and by Siebertsche Institute, Munich, Germany, and 
by Chappaqua Mountain Institute, Chappaqua, N. Y. Group, Chemistry and Biology. 

Lou May Sharman of Reading, Pa. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Reading. Group, German and Italian and Spanish. 

Katharine Lydia Shaw of Glenshaw, Pa. 

Prepared by Preparatory School of Pennsylvania College, by Miss Gleim's School, Pitts- 
burgh, and by private tuition. Group, Physics and Chemistry. 

Gladys Spry of Evanston, 111. 

Prepared by the High School, Evanston. Northwestern University, 1907-08. Group, 
History and Economics and Politics. 

LoRLE Ida Stecher of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Manual Training High School, Indianapolis, Ind., by the Girls' High School, 
Philadelphia, and by private tuition. Holder of City Scholarship, 1908-12. Group, 
English and Philosophy. 

Jean Wedderburn Stirling of Chicago, 111. 

Prepared by the Dearborn Seminary, Chicago, and by the LTniversity School for Girls, 
Chicago. Holder of Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for the Western 
States, 1908-09. Group, Enghsh and Philosophy. 

Catherine Louise Terry of New York City. 

Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City. Group, History and Economics and 
Politics. 

Catherine Reichenbach Thompson of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Prepared by the High School, Pittsburgh, and by Dilworth Hall, Pittsburgh. Group, 
Latin and English. 

Marjorie La Monte Thompson of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by Miss Gordon's School, Philadelphia. Group, English and Comparative 
Literature. 

Isabel Darlington Vincent of Chicago, 111. 

Prepared by the University High School, Chicago. Group, English and French. 

Marjorie Fannie Walter of New York City. 

Prepared by St. Mary's School, New York City, and by private tuition. Group, History 
and Economics and Politics. 

Louise Watson of Portsmouth, Va. 

Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, Mathematics and Philosophy. 



82 
Carlotta Welles of Paris, France. 

Prepared by Villa Dupont, Paris, and by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Holder of 
Second Bryn iVIawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and the Southern 
States, 1907-08. Group, Latin and French. 

Dorothy Sybil Wolff of New York City. 

Prepared by the Finch School, New York City. Group, History and Economics and 
Politics. 

Agnes Penman Wood of Wayne, Pa. 

Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private tuition. Group, 
History and Economics and Politics. 



IV. 



College Pj'eachers for the Year Wll-lS. 



October 8th. The Rev. George A. Johnston Ross, M.A., Professor 

of Practical Theology in the Presbyterian College, 
Montreal, Canada. 

October 15th. Professor Caspar Rene Gregory, D.D., Professor of 
Theology in the University of Leipsic. 

October 22nd. Professor George A. Barton, of Bryn Mawr College. 

October 29th. The Rev. Henry Lubeck, LL.D., D.C.L., Rector of 
the Church of Zion and St. Timothy, New York City. 

Novembfisr 5th. The Rev. George A. Johnston Ross, M.A., Professor 
of Practical Theology in the Presbyterian College, 
Montreal, Canada. 

November 12th. The Rev. H. Roswell Bates, D.D., Pastor of the 
Spring Street Presbyterian Chm-ch, New York City. 

November 19th. The Rev. Francis Higgins, of Minnesota. 

November 26th. The Rev. Andrew Mutch, D.D., of Perthshire, 
Scotland, Acting Pastor of the Bryn Mawr Presby- 
terian Church. 

December 10th. The Rev. William Herbert Perry Faunce, D.D., 
LL.D., President of Brown University. 

December 17th. Dr. Wilfred Thomason Grenfell, C.M.G., of the 
Labrador Mission. 

January 7th. The Rev. Hugh Black, M.A., Litt.D., Jesup Pro- 

fessor of Practical Theology in Union Theological 
Seminary. 

January 14th. The Rev. Father Hutchinson, D.D., Rector of St. 
Clement's Church, Philadelphia. 

January 21st. The Rev. Shailer Mathews, D.D., Dean of the 
Divinity School, University of Chicago. 

January 28th. The Rt. Rev. William F. McDowell, D.D., Bishop 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Chicago. 

February 11th. The Rev. Howard Agnew Johnston, Pastor of the 
Presbyterian Church of Stamford, Conn. 

February 18th. The Rev. George Calvert Carter, D.D., Rector of 
the Church of the Redeemer, Bryn Mawr. 

(83) 



February 25th. Mr. Robert Elliott Speer, Secretary of the Presby- 
terian Board of Foreign Missions. 

March 3rd. Professor Edward A. Steiner, Professor of Applied 

Christianity in Grinnell College, Grinnell, Iowa. 

March 10th. Professor Rufus M. Jones, Ph.D., of Haverford 

College. 

March 17th. The Rev. William Beatty Jennings, Pastor of the 

First Presbyterian Church of Germantown, Phila- 
delphia. 

March 24th. The Rev. Terrot Reaveley Glover, M.A., Fellow 

and Lecturer, St. John's College, Cambridge, England. 

March 31st. Professor Edward Caldwell Moore, Parkman 

Professor of Theology in the Divinity School of 
Harvard University. 

April 21st. President Charles A. Richmond, D.D., President of 

Union College. 

April 28th. The Rev. Henry Sloane Coffin, D.D., Pastor of the 

Madison Avenue Presbvterian Church, New York 
City. 

May 5th. The Rev. William Mansfield Groton, D.D., Dean 

of the Divinity School, Philadelphia. 

May 12th. The Rev. Frank L. Janeway, D.D., Pastor of the 

Brick Presbyterian Church, New York City. 

May 19th. The Rev. Hugh L. Burleson, D.D., Secretary of the 

Home and Foreign Missionary Society of the Prot- 
estant Episcopal Church. 

May 26th. The Rev. Howard C. Robbins, Rector of the Church 

of the Incarnation, New York City. 

June 2nd. Baccalaureate Sermon. The Rev. Hugh Black, M.A., 

Litt.D., Jesup Graduate Professor of Practical 
Theology in Union Theological Seminary. 



Addresses and Entertainments given during the year 1911-12. 



ADDRESSES. 

Commencement Address: 

June 6th. Miss Jane Addams, LL.D., Head of Hull House, 

Chicago. "The Civic Value of Higher Education 

for Women." 



Founder's Lecture: 
April 2nd. 



College Lectures: 
October 12th. 



January 10th. 
January 27th. 
February 9th. 

March 1st. 

March 15th. 



April 24th. 



Mr. Terrot Reaveley Glover, M.A., Fellow and 
Lecturer in Classics, St. John's CoUege Cambridge, 
England. "The Quaker and the Christian Past." 



Mr. William Butler Yeats of London. "The 

Twentieth Century Revival of Irish Poetry and 

Drama." 
Lady Augusta Gregory. "Irish Drama and How to 

Write Plays." 
Mr. Joseph LiNDON Smith of Boston. " The Discovery 

of the Tomb of an Egyptian Queen." 
Dr. Stanton Coit, Chairman of the West London 

Ethical Society. "The Modern Development of 

Socialism." 
Mr. Cecil Delisle Burns, M.A., of the University of 

Cambridge, England. "The Philosophy of Hemi 

Bergson." 
Miss Jane Addams, LL.D., Head of Hull House, 

Chicago; The Rev. Anna Howard Shaw; Dean 

SoPHONisBA P. Breckenridge, of the University of 

Chicago. Brief addresses to after morning chapel 

servif"" ">n Woman's Suffrage. 
Professor Wilhelm Paszkowski, Head of the Akade- 

mische Auskunf tsteile and of the Bottinger Studien- 

haus. "Education in Germany." 



Before the Christian Association: 

February 25th. Dean Walter T. Sumner, Dean of the Episcopal 
Cathedral, Chicago. Address at the Vesper service. 

(85) 



86 

March 8th. Miss Louise Lewis, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-04. 

"The Work of the Lighthouse Settlement, Phila- 
delphia." 

March 29th. Dr. George Wharton Pepper of Philadelphia. 

Address. 

May 4th and 5th. Week End Conference. The Rev. J. H. Jowett, M.A., 
Pastor of the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church of 
New York City ; Miss Ruth Rouse, General Secretary 
of the Students' Volunteer Movement. Addresses. 

Before the Consumers' League: 

November 25th. Miss Florence Sanville of Philadelphia and 

Miss Ethel Louise Richardson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 

College, 1911, Factory Investigator. "The Work of 

the Consumers' League." 
April 19th. Miss Florence Kelley, General Secretary of the 

National Consumers' League. Address. 

Before the English Club: 

February 10th. Professor George Pierce Baker, Professor of Dra- 
matic Literatui'e in Harvard University. "Contem- 
porary Drama." 

March 30th. Mr. Norman Hapgood, Editor of C oilier'' s Weekly. 

"Good Books and Practical Life." 

Before the Graduate Club: 

November 17th. President M. Carey Thomas. "Vocations Open to 

College Women." 
February 23rd. Professor Alfred Horatio Upham. "The Growth 

of the Literary Coterie m England." 
March 15th. Professor Paul Shorey, Professor of Greek in the 

University of Chicago. "The Case for Euripides." 
April 26th. Miss Grace Strachan of Brooklyn, New York City. 

"Equal Pay for Equal Work." 

Before the College Chapter of the College Equal Suffrage League: 

October 28th. Mrs. Emmeline P.-lnkhurst of Manchester, England, 

President of the Woman's Social and Political Union. 

"The Triumph of Woman's Suffrage in England." 
May 3rd. Mrs. Donald Russell Hooker, A.B., Bryn Mawr 

College, 1900. "The Relation of Woman's Suffrage 

to Social and Community Hygiene." 

Before the History and Economics Club: 

February 22nd. President Charles A. Richmond of Union College. 
"Democracy and Education." 



87 



Before the Philosophical Club: 

December 9th. Professor Ralph Barton Perry, Assistant Professor 

of Philosophy in Harvard University. "A Reahstic 

Philosophy of Life." 

Before the Science Club: 

February 24th. Miss Dora Keen, A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896. 

"The Lure of the Peaks; Climbing the Aiguilles at 

Chamonix." 

Joint Meeting of the Philosophical and Science Clubs: 

April 19th. Dr. Edward A. Scripture. " Dreams, Their Analysis 

and Interpretation." 

Vocational Lectures: 

February 17th. Dr. Marion Parris, of Bryn Mawr College; Miss 
Frances Cummings, of the New York Intercollegiate 
Bureau of Occupations for Women, and Miss Alice 
Barrows, Manager of the Vocational Guidance 
Survey. "Vocations for Women." 

March 2nd. Mrs: Vladimir G. Simkhovitch of Greenwich House, 

New York City, and Miss Elsa Denison, A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College, 1910, of the Bureau of Municipal 
Research, New York City. "Social Work for 
Women." 

March 9th. Dr. Alice Hamilton of Hull House, Chicago, and Miss 

Bertha Rembaugh, A.M., Bryn Mawr College, 
1898. "Medicine and Law as Professions for 
Women." 



ENTERTAINMENTS AND ACADEMIC EVENTS. 

October 6th. Christian Association reception to entering class. 

October 11th. President Thomas's reception and address to the 
graduate students. 

October 12th. President Thomas's reception and address to the enter- 
ing class. 

October 13th. Faculty reception to the graduate students. Denbigh 
Hall, 8.30 p. m. 

October 14th. Senior reception to the entering class. 

November 3rd. Lantern Night. 

November 7th. Faculty Tea for graduate students. Radnor HaU, 
4 to 6 p. m. 

November 11th. Banner Night. 

November 18th. Sophomore Play. "The Taming of the Shrew." 

November 20th. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 
Senior Class. 



88 



November 24th. First of series of concerts by Mr. Arthur Whiting. 

Corelli, Bach, Handel and Purcell. Violin, Miss 

Constance Edson; Flute, Mr. George Barrere; 

Viola Da Gamba, Mr. Paul Kefer; Harpsichord, 

Mr. Arthur Whiting. 
November 27th. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 

graduate students. 
December 4th. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 

Senior Class. 
December 6th. Faculty Tea for graduate students. Denbigh Hall, 

4 to 6 p. m. 
December 15th. Second of series of concerts by Mr. Arthur Whiting. 

Schubert Programme. Contralto, Miss Christine 

Miller; Bass, Mr. Horatio O. Connell; Pianoforte, 

Mr. Arthur Whiting. 
December 18th. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 

graduate students. 
January 11th. Faculty Tea for graduate students. Rockefeller Hall, 

4 to 6 p. m. 
January 15th. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 

Senior Class. 
January 19th. Third of series of concerts by Mr. Arthur Whiting. 

Mozart and Brahms. Violin, Mr. F. B. Grimson; 

Viola, Mr. O. K. Schill; ViolonceUo, Mr. Bart Wirtz; 

Pianoforte, Mr. Arthur Whiting. 
January 20th. Swimming Meet. 
February 3rd. Meeting of the Alumnae Association. Luncheon in 

Pembroke Hall. 
February 9th. Faculty Tea for graduate students. Denbigh Hall, 

4 to 6 p. m. 
February 16th. Fourth of series of concerts by Mr. Arthur Whiting. 

Franck, Debussy, Chopin, Whiting. Pianoforte, 

Mr. Arthur Whiting. 
February 19th. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 

Senior Class. 
February 26th. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 

graduate students. 
March 8th. Track Meet. 

March 11th. Faculty Tea for graduate students. Radnor Hall, 

4 to 6 p. m. 
March 16th. Freshman Show. "Peace-Meal," a comedy with a 

prologue and four acts. 
March 18th. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 

Senior Class. 
March 22nd. Fifth of series of concerts by Mr. Whiting. Song 

quartette. Brahms. Soprano, Mrs. Charles Rabold; 

Contralto, Mrs. Anna Taylor Jones; Tenor, Mr. 



89 



William Wheeler; Bass, Mr. Edmund A. Jahn; 
Pianoforte, Mr. Arthur Whiting. 
March 25th. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 

graduate students. 
March 29th. Gymnasium Contest. 4 p. m. 

April 15th. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 

Senior Class. 
April 16th. Faculty Tea for graduate students. Merion Hall, 

4 to 6 p. rn. 
April 22nd. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 

graduate students. 
April 27th. Glee Club Concert. 

May 3rd. Dance under the auspices of the Consumers' League. 

May 6th. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 

Senior Class. 
May 10th. Sophomore Supper. Junior-Senior Supper. 

May 11th. Junior-Senior Supper Play. "The Little Minister," 

by J. M. Barrie. 
May 15th. Faculty Tea for graduate students. Rockefeller Hall, 

4 to 6 p. m. 
May 17th. Graduate Club reception to the Faculty. Rockefeller 

Hall, 8 p. m. Freshman Supper. 
May 18th. Senior Play. "If I were King." 

May 20th. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 

graduate students. 
May 27th. Recital of English, Irish and Scotch Folk Songs by the 

Misses Fuller of Dorsetshire, England. 
June 1st. Senior reception to the Faculty. The Campus, 4 to 6 

p. m. 
Performance of Moliere's "Les Femmes Savantes" 
by the Plays and Players Club of Philadelphia, under 
the auspices of the Students' Building Committee. 
The Cloister, 8 p. m. 
June 4th. President Thomas's luncheon for the Senior Class, 1 p. m. 

Christian Association reception to the Alumnse. The 

Gymnasium, roof, 4.30 p. m. 
Senior Bonfire. Athletic Field, 8 p. m. 
June 5th. College Breakfast. The Gymnasium, 12 m. 

Senior Garden Party. The Campus, 4 to 7 p. m. 
June 6th. Conferring of degrees, 11 a. m. 

Luncheon for Guests of the Senior Class. 1 p. m. 

Alumnae Meeting. 3p.m. 

Laying of the Corner Stone of the new Infirmary. 

5 p. m. 
Alumnae Supper. Pembroke Hall, 7 p. m. 



VI. 



Gifts Received by the College during the Year 1911-12. 

Our sincere gratitude is due for the following gifts which have been 
received during the past year, in addition to gifts of special books to the 
Library which are enumerated and acknowledged in the report of the 
librarian. 

Carola Woerishoffer Bequest of $750,000. For details see the intro- 
ductory report of the President of the College. 

Mrs. Anna Woerishoffer in memory of her daughter, Carola Woeris- 
hoffer of the Class of 1907, the furniture and books of her study in New 
York. 

Class of 1905 gift of $25,000 for building an infirmary. For details 
see the introductory report of the President of the College. 

Mr. Alexander Simpson, Jr., in memory of his daughter Frances 
Simpson Pf ahler of the Class of 1906, to found four free tuition undergrad- 
uate scholarships, $20,000, and for a special scholarship, $200. 

Miss Mary E. Garrett, a Director of the College, $10,000 for the 
following purposes: for fellowships and graduate scholarships, $6,028.70; 
for competitive entrance scholarships, $1,500; for publication of college 
monographs, $1,569.44; for lectures, $536.07; for plans for planting 
grounds, $361.99; for apparatus for physical chemistry, $189.08; for books 
$198.11; for subscription to the American School of Classical Studies in 
Athens, $250; for annual subscription to the Woman's Table at Naples, 
$50; for miscellaneous purposes, $195.14. 

For Scholarships: 

Alumnaj Association of the Girls' High ajid Normal School of Phila- 
delphia for the L. C. B. Saul Memorial Scholarship, $100. 

Anonymous donor for a special scholarship, $130. 

Anonymous donor for a special scholarship, $150. 

Anonymous donor for a special scholarship, $260. 

Board of Education of the City of Philadelphia for ten city scholar- 
ships, $1,000. 

Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md., for two Bryn Mawr School 
Scholarships, $1,000. 

Charles E. Ellis estate for two scholarships, $400. 

Mr. Archibald Freer for a special scholarship, $100. 

In memory of Anna Hallowell from her f amilj' for founding an under- 
graduate scholarship, $2,500. 

Mr. George W. Kendrick, Jr., for the Minnie Murdoch Kendrick 
Memorial Scholarship, $200. 

(90) 



91 

Simon Muhr estate for three scholarships, $1,085. 
Miss Aristine Pixley Munn for special scholarship, $100. 
Mrs. Thomas Shallcross for a scholarship in memory of George W. 
Fetter, $200. 

For Books: 

Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College for books, from the 
Michi Matsuda fund, $159.87; from the "Alumnaj Quarterly" Fund, 
$30.53; from a member of the Class of 1897, $35; from the Philadelphia 
Branch of the Alumnae Association, $187; from the Alumnae Association 
of Bryn Mawr College, $194.61. 

Rose Chamberlin Memorial Fund, additional subscriptions for books 
for the Department of German, $144.47. 

Class of 1901 for books in economics, $200. 

Class of 1906 for books in history in memory of Frances Simpson 
Pfahler, $1,000. 

Class of 1908 foy books, $100. 

Mrs. Alba B. Johnson for books on biology, $50. 

Mr. Alba B. Johnson for books on biology and general literature, $150. 

Professor Rufus M. .Jones for books for the Christian Association, $25. 

Mr. Charles J. Rhoads for books, 

Mrs. F. L. Wesson for books. 



For miscellaneous purposes: 

Athletic Association for carving wood in the trophy room, $9.25. 

Class of 1897 for balance of cost of a limestone double seat in memory 
of Elsie Sinclair Hodge^ placed on the Dalton green, $65. 

Ruth Emerson Fletcher Bequest for department of Art and Archae- 
ology, $448.33. 

Miss Ethel Parrish, for expenses of lecturer, $5. 

Mrs. Charles Roberts for subscription to the American School of 
Oriental Research in Palestine, $100. 

In memory of Elizabeth Swift of the Class of 1911, from some of her 
classmates and friends, rhododendrons planted under the windows of her 
room in Pembroke East. 

Students of Radnor Hall, present and former and alumnae, for chairs 
for Radnor Hall, $371.91. 

Miss Cynthia Maria Wesson, for improvement of gymnasium windows, 
$7.40. 

Professor Arthur Leslie Wheeler for teaching salaries, $100. 



VII. 



Titles of Scientific Publications of the Faculty Which Appeared 
in the Year 1911-12. 

Dr. George A. Barton, 

"The Heart of the Christian Message." New edition, revised and 
enlarged, pp. xii+218, 8vo. The Macmillan Company, New York; 
Macmillan & Company, Ltd., London; The Macmillan Company of 
Canada, Toronto, 1912. 

"Corners," in Basting's Encyclopedia of Religion and Ethics, Vol. IV, 
pp. 119-121. Edinburgh and New York, 1911. 

"Demons and Spirits (Hebrew)," Ibid., pp. 594-601. 

"On the Etymology of Ishtar." Journal of the American Oriental 
Society, Vol. XXXI, pp. 355-358. 

"The Expression SA-DUG in Sumerian." American Journal of Semi- 
tic Languages and Literatures, Vol. XXVIII, pp. 63-65. 

"Another Babylonian Ledger Account of Reeds and Wood." Ibid., 
pp. 207-210. 

"One of the Oldest Babylonian Tablets in the World." The Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania Museum Journal, Vol. Ill, pp. 4-6. 

"Moses and the Covenant with Yahweh." Biblical World, Vol. 
XXXIX, pp. 17-26. 

"The Pre-prophetic Period in Canaan." Ibid., pp. 88-98. 

"The Prophets of the Eighth Century." Ibid., pp. 157-166. 

"Deuteronomy and Jeremiah." Ibid., 268-275. 

"From Ezekiel to Nehemiah." Ibid., 307-314. 

"From Nehemiah to Christ." Ibid., 396-402. 

"The Original Home of the Story of Job." Journal of Biblical lAt&ra- 
ture. Vol. XXXI, pp. 63-68. 

Book Reviews: 

Lagrange's "Conferences de Saint Etienne." Bibliotheca Sacra, 
Vol. LXXXI, pp. 721-722. 

Jastrow's "Aspects of Religious Belief and Practice in Babylonia and 
Assyria." Biblical World, Vol. XXXIX, pp. 140, 141. 

Olmstead, Charles, and Wrench, "Studies and Travels in the Nearer 
East." Vol. I, Part II, "Hittite Inscriptions." American Journal of 
Semitic Languages and Literatures, Vol. XXVIII, pp. 215, 216. 

Dr. Florence Bascom, 

"The Petrographic Province of Neponset Valley, Massachusetts." 
Journal of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, Vol. XV, 

(92) 



93 

Second Series, pp. 131-161, folio size. PublishBd in Commemoration of 
the 100th Anniversary of the Founding of the Academy of Natural Sciences, 
March 21, 1912. 

Mr. Harry Bateman, 

"On a Set of Kernels whose Determinants form a Sturmian Sequence." 
Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society, pp. 179-182. January, 
1912. 

" Notes on Integral Equations." Messenger of Mathematics. October, 
1911, April, 1912. 

"Some Geometrical Theorems Connected with Laplace's Equation 
and the Equation of Wave Motion." American Journal of Mathematics. 
Vol. XXXIV, July, 1912. 

"Some Equations of Mixed Differences Occurring in the Theory of 
Probability and the Related Expansions in Series of Bessel's Functions." 
Cambridge Mathematical Congress. August, 1912. 

Dr. Carleton Fairchild Brown, 

"Another Contemporary Allusion in Chaucer's Troilus." Modern 
Language Notes, Vol. XXVI, pp. 208-211, November, 1911. 

"The Pride of Life and the Twelve Abuses." Archiv fiir das Studium 
der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen, Vol. CXXVIII, pp. 72-78, April, 1912. 

" Lydgate s Verses on Queen Margaret's Entry into London." Modern 
Language Review, Vol. VII, pp. 225-234, April, 1912. 

"Shakespeare and the Horse." The Library, Vol. Ill, Third Series, 
pp. 152-180. April, 1912. 

"The Fifteen Conditions of a Good Horse." Modern Language 
Notes, Vol. XXVII, p. 125, April, 1912. 

Book Reviews: 

A. J. Barnouw's " Schriftuurhjke Poezie der Angelsachsen," G. Binz's 
" Untersuchungen zum altenglischen sogenannten Crist,'' and K. Jansen's 
"Die Cynewulf-forschung von ihren Anfangen bis zur Gegenwart." 
Englische Studien, Vol. XLV, pp. 90-101, July, 1912. 

Dr. Roger Frederic Brunei, 

"Zum Verlauf der intramolekularen Umlagerung zwischen Iso- und 
Tertiarbutylbromid, und zur Kenntniss der dabei ins Spiel kommenden 
katalysischen Wirkungen." Liebigs Annalen der Chemie, Vol. 384, pp. 245- 
271, October, 1911. 

Mr. Frederick Aldrich Cleveland, 

"Cavour and a Famous Phrase." The Dial, Vol. 52, No. 621, May, 
1912. 



94 

Dr. James Ryals Conner, 

"Note on a plane configuration obtainable from the complete six- 
point in four dimensions by projection and section." Johns Hopkins 
University Circulars, February, 1912. 

"Note on the determination of rational curves by a single binary 
form." Ihid., February, 1912. 

"Multiple correspondences determined by the rational plane quartic 
curve." Transactions of the American Mathematical Society, Vol. XIII. 
April, 1912. 

Dr. Clarence Errol Ferree, 

"The Spatial Values of the Visual Field Immediately Surrounding 
the Blind Spot and the Question of the Associative Filling in of the Blind 
Spot. " American Journal of Physiology, Vol. XXIX, No. IV, pp. 398-418. 
1911. 

"Ueber die Bestimmung der Sensibilitat der Retina fiir farbiges 
Licht in radiometrischen Einheiten." Zeitschrift fiir Psychologic und 
Physiologic der Sinnesorgane, Bd. 46, Abth. II, pp. 225-229, 1911. 

"An Optics Room and a Method of Standardizing its Illumination." 
Psychological Review, Vol. XIX, No. 5, pp. 334-347, September, 1912. 

"The Effect of Change in the General Illumination of the Retina on 
its Sensitivity to Color" (communicated). Psychological Review, Vol. 
XIX, No. 6, pp. 463-491, November, 1912. 

"A Note on the Determination of the Retina's Sensitivity to Colored 
Light in Terms of Radiometric Units." American Journal of Psychology, 
Vol. XXIII, No. 2, pp. 328-332, April, 1912. 

"Colored After Image and Contrast Sensations from Stimuli in 
which no Color is Sensed." Psychological Review, Vol. XIX, No. 3, pp. 195- 
239, May, 1912. 

"Description of a Rotary Campimeter." American Journal of 
Psychology, Vol. XXIII, No. 3, pp. 449-454, July, 1912. 

"The Determination of the Sensitivity of the Retina to Colored Light 
in Terms of Radiometric Units," (Abstract of paper read at the twentieth 
annual meeting of the American Psychological Association) . Psychological 
Bulletin, Vol. IX, No. 2, pp. 70-72, February, 1912. 

"Vision — Peripheral, Foveal, etc." Psychological Bulletin, Vol. IX, 
No. 3, pp. 107-113, March, 1912. 

Dr. Orie Latham Hatcher, 

"Aims and Methods of EUzabethan Translators." Englische Studien, 
pp. 170-192, Leipzig. January, 1912. 

Dr. William Bashford Huff, 

"Reflection of /8 Rays by Thin Metal Plates." Physical Review. 
Vol. XXXV, 9 pp. September, 1912. 



95 

Dr. Don Roscoe Joseph, 

"Contributions to our Knowledge of the Action of Sodium and Cai- 
cium upon the Direct and Indirect IrritabiUty of the Muscles of the Frog." 
By Don R. Joseph and S. J. Meltzer. American Journal of Physiology, 
Vol. XXIX, pp. 1-31, 1911. 

"On the Convulsant Action of Acid Fuchsin upon Frogs Deprived of 
their Cardiac Circulation." By Don R. Joseph and S. J. Meltzer. Ameri- 
can Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Vol. Ill, pp. 
183-204, 1912. 

"A Quantitative Study of the Effects of Adrenalin on the Pupils of 
Rabbits after Removal of a Superior Cervical Ganglion." Journal of Ex- 
perimental Medicine, Vol. XV, pp. 644-658, 1912. 

Dr. Theodore de Leo de Laguna, 

"The Externality of Relations." Philosophical Review, Vol XX, 
pp. 610-621, November, 1911. 

"Opposition and the Syllogism." Journal of Philosophy, Psychology, 
and Scientific Methods, Vol. IX, No. 15, pp. 393-401, July IS, 1912. 

Book Reviews: 

A. W. Moore's, "Pragmatism and its Critics." Philosophical Review, 
Vol. XXI, No. 2, pp. 234-238, March, 1912. 

A. Fouillee's, "La pensee et les nouvelles ecoles anti-intellect ualistes." 
Journal of Philosophy, Psychology, and Scientific Methods, Vol. IX, No. 18, 
pp. 498-500, August, 1912. 

Dr. Ida Langdon, 

" Materials for a Study of Spenser's Theory of Fine Art," lxiii+115 pp. 
R. Wagner Sohn, Weimar, Germany, December, 1911. (Dissertation.) 

Dr. Agathe Lasch, 

"Zur Chronologie von tk and tt in der mecklenburgisch vorpommer- 
schen Mundart." Zeitschrift filr deutsche Mundarten, No. 2, pp. 166-173, 
April, 1912. 

"Zur Diminutivbildung in der mecklenburgisch- vorpommerschen 
Mundart." Niederdeutsches Jahrbuch, Vol. 38, pp. 81-104, September, 
1912. 

Dr. James H. Leuba, 

"A Psychological Study of Religion, Its Origin, Function and Future." 
371 pp., 8vo. Macmillan and Company, 1912. 

"Rehgion and Discovery of Truth." Journal of Philosophy, Psychol- 
ogy and Scientific Methods, Vol. IX, No. 15, pp. 406-410. July 18, 1912. 

"Dynamism, the Primitive Nature Philosophy and its Relation to 
Rehgion and Magic." Journal of Religious Psychology, Vol. V, pp. 305- 
316, July, 1912. 



96 

"The Varieties, Classification and Origin of Magic." American 
Anthropologist, Vol. 14, No. 2, pp. 350-367. April-June, 1912. 

"The Development of Emotion in Religion." The Harvard Theo- 
logical Review, Vol. V, pp. 524-543. October, 1912. 

"The Definition of ReUgion: Apropos of Mr. W. K. Wright's Defini- 
tion." The American Journal of Theology, Vol. XVI, No. 4, pp. 642-645. 
October, 1912. 

"Psychotherapic Cults, Christian Science, Mind Cure, New Thought," 
Monist. pp. 348-360, July, 1912. 

"La Religion comme type de conduite rationnelle." Revue Philoso- 
phique, pp. 321-337. October, 1912. 

"The Several Origins of the Ideas of Unseen Person Beings." Folk- 
lore, Vol. XXIII, No. 2, pp. 148-171, London, June 30, 1912. 

Dr. Samuel Moore, 

"The New Chaucer Item." Modern Language Notes. Vol. XXVII, 
No. 3, pp. 79-81, March, 1912. 

"The Death of Lydgate." The Nation. Vol. XCIV, No. 2437, p. 260, 
March 14, 1912. 

"Patrons of Letters in Norfolk, c. 1450, Part I." Publications of 
the Modern Language Association. Vol. XXVII, No. 2, pp. 188-207, 
June, 1912. 

Dr. Albert Schinz, 

"Les universites americaines." Mercure de France, pp. 449-481, 
October, 1911. 

"Les accents dans I'ecriture frangaise. Etude critique de leurs diverses 
fonctions dans le passe et dans le present." Serially in Revue de Philo- 
logie frangaise, 3 numbers, 1911-12, then published separately by H. 
Champion, Paris. 81 pp. 

"Co-education in America." The New Age, pp. 175-177, London, 
December 21, 1911. 

"La notion de vertu dans le Premier Discours de J. J. Rousseau." 
Mercure de France, pp. 532-555, June, 1912. 

"Rousseau Romantique et Rousseau Calviniste." La Revue du Mais, 
pp. 685-715, June 10, 1912. 

"Modern French Poets." Modern Language Notes, April, 1912. 

"The Bicentenary of Rousseau in Geneva." The Nation, pp. 53-54, 
July 18, 1912. 

Various reviews in various journals. 

Dr. Nettie Maria Stevens, 

"Supernumerary Chromosomes and Synapsis in Centhophilus." 
Biological Bulletin. Vol. XXII, March, 1912. 

" Further Observations on Supernumerary Chromosomes and Sex 
Ratios in Diabrotica Soior." Biological Bulletin. Vol. XXII, March, 
1912. 



97 

Dr. David Hilt Tennent, 

"The Correlation between Chromosomes and Particular Characters 
in Hybrid Echinoid Larvae." American Naturalisl, Vol. XLVI, February, 
1912. 

"The Behaviour of the Chromosomes in Cross Fertilized Echinoid 
Eggs." Journal of Morphology, Vol. 23, No. 1, March, 1912. 

"Studies in Cytology." (I) "A Further Study of the Chromosomes 
of Toxopneustes variegatus." (II) "The Behaviour of the Chromosomes 
in Arbacia-Toxopneustes Crosses." Journal of Experimental Zoology, 
Vol. 12, No. 3, April, 1912. 

Dr. Alfred Horatio Upham, 

Review of "The Cambridge History of English Literature," Vols. 
Ill and IV. Journal of English and Germanic Philology, Vol. XI, i. pp. 
128-135, January, 1912. 

"Lucy Hutchinson and the Duchess of Newcastle." Anglia, Vol. 
XXXVI, ii. pp. 200-220, July, 1912. 

Review of "The Influence of Moliere on Restoration Comedy," by 
D. H. Miles. Journal of English and Germanic Philology, Vol. XI, iii. 
pp. 471^76, July, 1912. 

Dr. Arthur Leslie Wheeler, 

Reviews, 

"Syntax of Early Latin," by C. E. Bennett, Vol. I "The Verb," 
Classical Weekly. Vol. V, No. 1, pp. 6-7, and Vol. V, No. 2, pp. 12-15. 

Occasional Reports on literature dealing with Greek and Roman 
numismatics. American Journal of Archceology. 

Dr. Wilmer Cave Wright, 

Reviews in the Nation. 



VIII. 

Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1911-12. 



Department 



Sanskeit . 
Greek. . . 



Latin . 



Course 



Elementary Sanskrit 

Elementary Greek, Grammar, 
Composition and Reading . . . 

Plato and Composition, minor . 

Euripides and Composition, mi- 
nor 

Homer, miinor 

Demosthenes, major 

Thucydides, major 

Aristophanes, major 

Sophocles, major 

History of Greek Literature, 
major 

Sophocles, post-major 

Plato, post-major 

Greek Composition, post-major 

Euripides 

Graduate Courses 
Seminary in Attic Tragedy . 
Seminary in Plato 

Cicero and Composition, minor, 
Div. A 

Cicero and Composition, minor. 
Div. Bi 

Cicero and Composition, minor, 
Div. B2 

Terence and Composition, mi- 
nor, Div. B 

Terence and Composition, mi- 
nor, Div. Ai 

Terence and Composition, mi- 
Div. A2 

Horace, minor, Div. B, A 

Horace, minor, Div. Ai, Bi. . . . 

Horace, minor, Div. A2, B2. . . . 

Tacitus, major 

Latin Comedy, major 

History of Latin Literature 
major 

Roman Life, elective 

Roman Satire, post-major 

Roman History, post-major. . . 

Csesar and Cicero, post-major . . 

Advanced Latin Prose Compo- 
sition 

Lucretius, post-major 

Plautus, post-major 

Graduate Courses 
Seminary in Roman Elegy .... 
Seminary in Roman Literature . 
Latin Journal Club 







No. IN 


Class 


Instructor 


Hours 
weekly 






1st 
Sem. 


2nd 
Sem. 


Dr. Welden 


2. . 


.. . 1. . 


... 1,. 


Miss Kirk 
Dr. Sanders 


.. . 5. . 
... 3. . 


.. . 6.. 
.. . 4. . 


. . . 6.. 


Dr. Wright 
Dr. Sanders 


... 3.. 
... 2.. 
. . . 2. . 
.. . 2. . 
.. . 1. . 
.. . 1. . 


... 5. . 
'.'.'.'5.'. 


... 4.. 
.. . 3.. 

'.'.'. '4.'.' 

'.'.'.' i'.'. 


Dr. Wright 
Dr. Sanders 


.. . 2. . 
... 1.. 
.. . 2. . 
.. . 1. . 
... 2.. 


.. . 5. . 
.. . 1. . 
.. . 2. . 


... 5.. 

'.'.'.'2.'. 
... 2.. 


Dr. Wright 


.. . 3. . 

... 2.. 


.. . 7.. 
... 7.. 


... 7.. 

... 7.. 


Dr. Wheeler 


... 3.. 


.. .50.. 




Dr. Coulter 


... 3. . 


...29.. 




Miss Swindler 


... 3.. 


...28.. 




Dr. Wheeler 


... 3. . 




...56. . 


Dr. Coulter 


... 3.. 




...25.. 


Miss Swindler 
Dr. Frank 

Dr. Coulter 
Miss Swindler 

Dr. Wheeler 


... 3. . 
.. . 2. . 
... 2. . 
.. . 2. . 
.. . 3.. 
.. . 3.. 


'.'.'.hi'.'. 

...27.. 
...27.. 
...22.. 


...23.. 
...49.. 
...23. . 
.. .25.. 

'.'.'.22.'. 


Dr. Frank 

Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Frank 


.. . 2. . 
... 1. . 
... 2. . 
... 3. . 
... 3.. 


...23.. 
.. .15. . 
... 6.. 
...10.. 


.. .23.. 
... 8.. 
... 6. . 
...11.. 
...11.. 


Dr. Coulter 


... 1.. 
... 2. . 
... 2. . 


... 3.. 
... 4. . 


... 3.. 
'.'.'.'2.'. 


Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Frank 
Dr.Wheelerand 
Dr. Frank 


... 3. . 
... 2. . 

li fort- 
nightly 


... 4. . 
... 3. . 

... .5.. 


... 4. . 
... 3.. 

... 5. . 



(98) 



99 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
191 1-12.— Continued. 



Department 



English . 



German. 



Tetjtonic 
Philology . 



Course 



History of English, Literature, 
First Year, required 

Elocution, First Year, required . 

English Composition, First 
Year, required 



History of English Literature, 
Second Year, required 

Elocution, Second Year, re- 
quired 

English Composition, Second 
Year, required 



English Critics of. the Nine- 
teenth Century, minor 

Spelling Class 

English Drama, minor 

Anglo-Saxon, minor 

Middle English Poetry, minor. 

Classical and Romantic Prose 
major 

Descriptive Writing, elective . . 

Narrative Writing, elective. . . . 

Argumentation, elective 

Reading of Shakespeare, elective 

Seminary in English Literature 
Seminary in Middle English . . . 
Seminary in ElizabethanDrama 
English Journal Club 



Elementary German, Grammar 

and translation 

Critical Reading and Grammar 

and Composition, minor .... 
History of German Literature, 

minor 

History of German Literature 

and Selected Reading, major 

Faust (2d part), major 

Prose Composition, major 

German Literature, post-major 



Instructor 



Graduate Courses 

Seminary in German Literature 

German Literary Criticism .... 



Teutonic Seminary 

Middle High German 

Introduction to Teutonic Phil- 
ology 

Old Norse 

Gothic 



Miss Donnelly 
Mr. King 

Miss Shearer 
Miss Skinner 

Miss Daw 

Miss Sandison 

Miss White 

Miss Donnellj' 

Mr. King 

Miss Shearer 
Miss Skinner 

Miss Daw 
Miss Sandison 

Dr. Upham 

Miss Daw 

Miss Donnelly 

Dr. Moore 



Dr. Upham 

Miss Donnelly 

Miss George 

Miss Shearer 

Mr. King 

Dr. LTpham 

Dr. Moore 

Dr. Hatcher 

Miss Donnelly 

Dr. Upham 
Dr. Hatcher 

Dr. Moore 



Miss Jeffers 
Dr. Lasch 



Dr. Jessen 



Dr. Lasch 
Dr. Jessen 



Dr. Jessen 



Dr. Lasch 



Hours 
weekly 



. . . li 
fort- 
nightly 



No . IN Clabs 



Ist 
Sem. 



.107. 
.124. 



.109. 



.90. 

20. 
11. 
10. 

7. 
2. 



.10. 



2nd 

Sem. 



.109. 
.130. 



.87. 



.18. 

.25. 

.12. 
.11. 
.12. 
. 4. 



100 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1911-12. — Continued. 



Department 



Course 



Instructor 



Hours 
weekly 



No. IN Class 



1st 
Sem. 



French. 



Elementary French, Grammar 

and Translation 

History of French Literature 

and Collateral Reading, minor 
French Critical Reading and 

Composition, minor. ... 
History of French Literature 

and Collateral Reading, maj or 
French Critical Reading and 

Composition, major 

French Drama, post-major. . . . 
The Short Story, post-major. . 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in French Literature. 

Old French Philology, First 

Year Course 

Old French Readings 

Romance Languages Journal 

Club 



Italian . 



Italian, minor. 



Graduate Courses 
Advanced Italian. 



Spanish . 



Spanish, minor 

Spanish, Literary History,Com- 
position and Critical Reading, 
major 



Graduate Courses 
Advanced Spanish . 



Comparative 
Literature 



Semitic Lan- 
guages AND 

Biblical Lit- 
erature .... 



The Epic, minor .... 

The Lyric, minor 

The Drama, major. . 
Romanticism, major. 



Oriental History, minor 

New Testament Biography, 

elective 

Old Testament Canon, elective . 

Graduate Courses 
New Testament Greek semi- 
nary 

Semitic Seminary, Hebrew .... 
Elementary Semitic Languages 
Hebrew Literature 



Histort . 



History of Europe from 1648 to 
1799, minor 

History of Europe from 1799, 
minor 

History of Europe from 1648 to 
1815, major 



Dr. Haeberli 

Dr. Welden 

M. Cons 

Dr. Welden 
M. Cons 

M. Cons 
Dr. Holbrook 



Dr. DeHaan 
Dr. Holbrook 

M. Cons 
Dr. Welden 

Dr. Holbrook 



Dr. Holbrook 
Dr. DeHaan 



Dr. Hatcher 



Dr. Upham 



Dr. Barton 



Dr. Smith 

Mr. Cleveland 

Dr. Smith 



. 5. 

. 3. 

. 2. 

. 3. 

. 2. 
. 2. 
. 2. 



.. . li 

fort- 
nightly 



2. . 
1. . 



. 1. 
. 2. 
,. 2. 
. 1. 



. . 2. 
.. 3. 
.. 3. 



. 5. 

.30. 

.24. 

.16. 

.18. 
. 2. 



.19. 
.12. 



.. 3. 
,. 1. 
.. 2. 
. 2. 



,.74. 
,.74. 
,.28. 



101 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1911-12 . — Continued. 



Department 



Economics AND 
Politics. . 



Philosophy . . . 



Education . . . . 



Course 



History of Europe from 1815, 
major 

American Constitutional His- 
tory, post-major 

History of England since 1714, 
post-major 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in American History 

History Journal Club 



Introduction to Economics, 

minor 

Introduction to Politics, minor. 
History of Political Thought, 

major 

History of Economic Thought, 

major 

Social Research, elective 

Sociology, post-major 

Government and Civil Liberty, 

post-major 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Politics 

Economic Journal Club 

History of Philosophy, required 

Psychology, required 

Elementary Ethics, minor 

Elementary Ethics, minor 

Psychology of Instinct, Emo- 
tion and Will, minor 

Experimental Psychology , minor 

Empiricism and Rationalism 
major 

Empiricism and Rationalism 
major 

ExperimentalPsychology.major 

Animal Psychology, major. . . 

Logic, elective 

Advanced Experimental Psy 
chology, post-major 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Ethics 

Metaphysical seminary 

Philosophical Journal Club . . . 

Seminary in Psychology 

Systematic Psychology 

Psychological Journal Club . . . 

Education, elective 



Instructor 



Mr. Cleveland 

Dr. Smith 
Mr. Cleveland 



Dr. Smith 
Dr. Smith and 
Mr. Cleveland 



Dr. Parris 
Mr. Hudson 



Dr. Parris 



Mr. Hudson 



Mr. Hudson 

Dr. Parris and 

Mr. Hudson 



Dr.T.deLaguna 

Dr. Leuba 
Dr.T.deLaguna 
Dr.G.deLaguna 

Dr. Leuba 
Dr. Ferree 

Dr.G.deLaguna 

Dr.T.deLaguna 
Dr. Ferree 
Dr. Leuba 

Dr.T.deLaguna 

Dr. Ferree 



Dr.T.deLaguna 

Dr.G.deLaguna 

Dr.T.deLaguna 

and Dr. G. de 

Laguna 

Dr. Leuba 

Dr. Ferree 

Dr. Leuba and 

Dr. Ferree 

Dr. Leuba 



Hours 
weekly 



. 2. 
. 3. 
. 2. 



2 
fort- 
nightly 



...3 
.. . 2 

fort- 
nightly 

...3. 
.. . 2. 
...3. 



. .. li 
fort 
nightly 
.. . 3 
.. . 3 



No. IN Class 



1st 
Sem. 



.61. 
.27. 
.23. 



.103. 
.101. 
..17. 



. 5. 
.26. 



2nd 
Sem. 



.32. 
.22. 
. 9. 



.102. 



.21. 
.21'. 



. 6. 
.34. 



102 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
191 1-12.— Continued. 



Department 



Course 



Instructor 



Hours 
weekly 



History of 

Art and 
Classical 

ARCHiB- 
OLOGY .... 



Mathematics 



Physics . 



Graduate Courses 

School Hygiene 

Principles and Methods 
Teaching 



Greek and Roman Sculpture 
minor 



Graduate Course 
Seminary in Archseology . 



Analytical Conies and Theory 
of Equations, minor 

Differential and Integral Calcu 
lus, minor 

Advanced Algebra and Trigo 
nometry, minor 

Differential and Integral Calcu 
lus, Theory of Equations and 
Differential Equations, major 

Analytical Geometry, History 
of Mathematics, major 

Graphic Mathematics, elective 

Descriptive Astronomy, elec- 
tive 

Mathematics Preparatory to 
Science, elective 

Modern Analytical Geometry 
post-major 

Analysis, post-major 



Graduate Courses 

Plane Algebraic Curves 

Integral Equations 

Mathematical Journal Club . 



Heat, Sound and Properties of 
Matter, minor 

Light, Electricity and Magne- 
tism, minor 

Laboratory Work, minor 



Laboratory Work, minor 

Theory of Light, Mechanics, 
major 

Heat, Electricity and Magne- 
tism, major 

Laboratory Work, major 



Laboratory Work, major. 



Historical Development of 
Physics, elective 

Astro-physics, elective 

Electricity and Magnetism 
post-major 



Dr. Leuba 



Miss Taylor 

Dr. Robinson 

Dr. Scott 
Mr. Bateman 



Dr. Scott 

Mr. Bateman 

Dr. H. S. Huff 

Dr. Scott 
Mr. Bateman 



Dr. Scott 
Mr. Bateman 
Dr. Scott and 
Mr. Bateman 



Dr. W. B. Huff 

Dr. Barnes 
Dr. W. B. Huff 
and Miss Fre- 

hafer 

Dr. Barnes and 

Miss Frehafer 

Dr. Barnes 

Dr. W. B. Huff 
Dr. Barnes and 

Miss Frehafer 
Dr. W. B. Huff 

and Miss Fre- 
hafer 

Dr. W. B. Huff 
Dr. Barnes 

Dr. W. B. Huff 



103 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1911-12. — Continued. 



Department 



Course 



Graduate Courses 

Theoretical Optics 

Physical Journal Club . 



Instructor 



Introduction to General Chem- 
istry, minor 

Introduction to Organic Chem- 
istry, minor 

Laboratory Work, minor 



Laboratory Work, minor. 



Theoretical Chemistry, major 
Organic Chemistry, major. . . . 
Laboratory Work, major 



Laboratory Work, major. . . 

Organic Chemistry, post-major 

Graduate Courses 
Seminary in Physical Chemis- 
try 

Chemical Journal Club 



Physiography, minor 

Historical Geology, minor. . 

Field Work and Laboratory 
Work, minor 

Field Work and Laboratory 
Work, minor 

Megascopic Petrology, major. . 

Glaciology and Structural Ge- 
ology, major 

Field Work and Laboratory 
Work, major 

Field Work and Laboratory 
Work, major 

Paleontology, post-major. . . 

Topographic Mapping, post- 
major 



Graduate Courses 
Petrology 



General Biology, minor 

Plants, minor 

Vertebrates and Embryology . 

Laboratory Work, minor 



Animal Psychology, major. . . . 

General Zoology, Anatomy, 

Theoretical Biology, major. . 



Dr. Barnes 
Dr. W. B. Huff 
and Dr. Barnes 



Dr. Kohler 

Dr. Getman 

Dr. Kohler and 

Miss Clifton 

Dr. Getman 

and 
Miss Clifton 
Dr. Getman 
Dr. Kohler 
Dr. Getman 

and 

Miss Clifton 

Dr. Kohler and 

Miss Clifton 

Dr. Kohler 



Dr. Getman 

Dr. Kohler and 

Dr. Getman 

Dr. Bascom 
Dr. Reeds 

Dr. Bascom 

Dr. Reeds 

Dr. Bascom 

Dr. Reeds 

Dr. Bascom 
Dr. Reeds 

Dr. Bascom 



Miss Dimon 
Dr. Randolph 
Dr. Warren and 
Miss Dimon 
Dr. Warren, 
Miss Dimon 
and Dr. Ran- 
dolph 
Dr. Warren 

Dr. Warren 

and Miss 

Dimon 



Hours 
weekly 



No. IN Class 



let 
Sem. 



.18. 



,18. 



. . . 25 . 
. . . 25 . 



.62. 
.62. 



2nd 
Sem. 



.17. 



104 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1911-12. — Continued. 



Department 



Course 



Laboratory Work, major 

Birds, elective 

Physiological Chemistry, post- 
major 

Laboratory Work, post-major. 

The Nervous System, post 
major 

Experimental Morphology, 
post-major 

Graduate Courses 

Physiology 

Cytology 

Advanced Experimental Mor 

phology 

Biological Journal Club 



Instructor 



Dr. Warren 

Miss Dimon 

and Dr. 

Randolph 

Dr. Randolph 

Dr. Warren 



Dr. Warren 
Dr. Stevens 



Dr. Warren 
Dr. Stevens 



Dr. Warren 
and Dr. 

Stevens 



Hours 
weekly 



No. IN Class 



1st 
Sem. 



2nd 

Sem. 



X. 



Comparative Table of Graduate and Undergraduate Students 
in the Different Departments of the College in 1911-12. 



Department. 



Greek 

Latin 

English 

English omitting required English 

German 

French 

Italian 

Spanish 

Comparative Literature 

Semitic Languages and Biblical Literature 

History 

Economics and Politics 

Philosophy and Psychology 

Education 

Art and Ai-chseology 

Mathematics 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Geology 

Biology 



o| 


Q <U 

^■o2 


Number 
Undergradu 


Per cent, of 

Number 

Undergrad 

(376) 


17 


4.5 


163 


43.4 


234 


62.2 


38 


10.0 


45 


12.0 


62 


16.5 


12 


3.2 


13 


3.5 


9 


2.4 


49 


13.0 


127 


33.8 


100 


26.6 


141 


37.5 


29 


7.7 


21 


5.6 


28 


7.4 


67 


17.8 


21 


5.6 


30 


8.0 


80 


20.0 






24 

24 

12 

6 

6 

1 

12 

12 

4 

12 

13 

8 

10 

8 

7 

7 

2 

10 



el S 3 



12.3 

11.0 

32.9 

32.9 

16.5 

8.3 

8.3 

1.4 

16.5 

16.5 

5.5 

16.5 

17.9 

11.0 

13.7 

11.0 

9.7 

9.7 

2.7 

13.7 



(106) 



XI. 



Grades Received in certain Undergraduate Examinations. 

Classes of over 50 students. 
Semester I, 1911-12. 





Number 
in Class. 


Per cent. 

of 

High 

Credit. 


Per cent. 

of 

Credit. 


Per cent, 
of 

Merit. 


Per cent. 
Passed. 


Per cent. 
Failed. 


Latin. Minor: 


105 
104 

98 

105 

106 

107 

83 

85 
84 

68 
71 
59 
97 
91 
61 


5 
4 

7 

4 
12 

4 
13 

12 

41 

15 

9 

5 

2 


24 
27 
28 

20 
23 

2 
18 
35 

8 

34 
33 

49 
26 
32 
18 


38 
33 
33 

49 
42 
28 
49 
40 
36 

37 

18 
27 
45 
30 
43 


28 
26 
26 

16 
16 
62 
23 
8 
49 

12 
7 
9 
15 
20 
31 


5 




10 




6 


English. General: 

First Year Literature . . . 

First Year Elocution. . . . 

First Year Composition. 

Second Year Literature.. 

Second Year Elocution . . 

Second Year Composition 
HiSTOKY. Minor: 

(1648-1799) 


11 
7 
8 
6 
4 
7 

5 


(since 1799) 

Economics. Minor 

Philosophy. General. . . . 

Psychology. General 

Biology. Minor 


1 

5 

13 

6 







Classes of 80 or over, but under 50 students. 



Physics. Minor. 



38 



15 



32 



24 



Classes of 20 or over, but less than 30 students. 



Latin. Major: 

Tacitus 

Literature 

German. Minor: 

Reading and Compo- 
sition ■. . . 

Literature 

French. Minor: 

Literature 

Reading and Compo- 
sition 

History. Major: 

(1648-1815) 

(since 1815) 

Economics. Major. 

Education 

Geology. Minor. . . 



22 


14 


27 


45 


14 


23 


13 


35 


30 


22 


21 




19 


29 


38 


27 


7 


11 


26 


45 


29 


3 


17 


24 


45 


21 


14 


38 


29 


5 


26 


19 


46 


35 




24 


21 


58 


21 




27 


63 


30 


7 




21 


5 


57 


14 


14 


24 


8 


50 


25 


17 



10 



(107) 



108 



Grades Received in certain Undergraduate Examinations. 

Classes of orer SO students. 
Semester II, 1911-1912. 





Number 
in Class. 


Per cent. 

of 

High 

Credit. 


Per cent. 

of 
Credit. 


Per cent, 
of 

Merit. 


Per cent. 
Passed. 


Per cent. 
Failed. 


Latin. Minor: 


100 
100 
95 

108 

106 

106 

82 

82 

81 

74 
73 
60 
97 
92 

61 
62 


7 

4 

11 

3 
12 



4 
12 

1 

12 
15 
23 

10 

8 

14 
6 


21 
26 
22 

22 
22 
10 
21 
35 
14 

39 
38 

50 
28 
32 

39 
21 


43 
35 
37 

44 
42 
45 
49 
39 
49 

38 
30 
20 
29 
29 

34 

52 


24 
27 
27 

23 
17 
31 
24 
10 
35 

7 
14 

5 
26 
22 

S 
19 


5 


Composition 


8 
3 


English. General: 

First Year Literature . . . 

First Year Elocution . . . 

First Year Composition. 

Second Year Literature. 

Second Year Elocution . . 

Second Year Composition 
HisTOEY. Mine-: 

(1648-1799) 


8 
7 
14 
2 
4 
1 

4 


(since 1799) 


3 


Economics. Minor 

Philosophy. General.... 
Psychology. General .... 
Biology, Minor: 


2 
7 
9 

5 




2 







Classes of 30 or or.er. but under 50 students. 



Economics. Major 

Physics. Minor 


32 
33 


35 
16 


53 

25 


9 
28 


3 

25 



6 







Classes of SO or orer, but less than SO students. 



Latin. Major: 

Comedy 

Literature 

German. Minor: 

Literature 

French. Minor: 

Literature 

Oriental History 

New Testament Biog- 
raphy 

History. Major: 

(1648-1815; 

(1815 to date) 

History of Education. . . 
Greek and Roman 

Sculpture 

Geology. Minor 



21 
22 


24 
23 


22 


13 


22 
20 


4 
5 


23 


35 


28 
25 
27 


18 
12 
11 


20 
26 


15 




19 
31 

23 

23 
55 

35 

61 
56 
48 

30 
62 



43 

27 



55 
30 

26 

18 
20 
25 

40 
38 



18 
10 



3 

8 
15 

15 




XII. 



Group Subjects Selected by the Students Graduating in the 
Years 1906-12. 



Number in class 

Greek 

Latin 

English 

German 

French 

Italian and Spanish. . . . 

Spanish 

Comparative Liter at m-e. 

History 

Economics and Politics . 

Philosophy 

Mathematics 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Geology 

Biology 



1906. 


1907. 


, 1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


56 


71 


81 


70 


69 


59 


8 


4 


10 


10 


8 


9 


26 


24 


31 


26 


27 


19 


14 


22 


17 


18 


9 


11 


6 


11 


10 


11 


11 


7 


11 


22 


17 


• 10 


7 


11 


3 


2 


4 


2 


1 










2 


2 


2 


15 


'8 


io 


17 


20 


15 


18 


12 


23 


19 


23 


17 


5 


12 


12 


5 


5 


5 


3 


9 


8 


9 


9 


6 


2 


3 


2 


4 


5 


8 


1 


7 


5 


4 


5 


4 






1 




1 


3 




6 


3 


3 


5 


1 



1912. 

60 

1 

12 
10 

9 
10 

2 

2 

3 
24 
25 

6 

5 

5 

4 



(109) 



XIII. 

Resolutions in Memory of Howard Comfort, President of the Board 
of Trustees and Board of Directors. 

Died, April 12, 1912. 

Minute adopted by the Trustees of Bryn Mawr College 
at a special meeting held April 19, 1912: 

"The Trustees of Bryn Mawr College wish to place on 
record their sense of profound loss in the death, on the 12th 
inst., of their friend and co-trustee Howard Comfort, the Presi- 
dent of the Corporation, in the sixty-second year of his age. 
Howard Comfort was elected a Trustee Third month 11th, 1892, 
to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Francis T. King, 
first President of the Board. He was a member of the Execu- 
tive Committee from this time and its Chairman from 1906 
until his death. He was a member of the Library Committee 
from 1893 to 1910. He was elected Vice-President of the 
Trustees Twelfth month 6th, 1907, and President Twelfth 
month 4th, 1908, serving in the latter position until his death. 

"He was unremitting in his attention to the interests of 
the College which profited much from his broad and liberal 
guidance. He never missed a meeting of the Board, or of a 
committee of the Board, except on account of absence from 
home, or illness. He spared neither time nor effort in the 
service of the College. His best judgment was brought to 
bear on all its complicated problems of government and 
administration. His clear insight, his singularly well balanced 
mind, his broad educational views, his constant courtesy and 
gentle firmness, his upright and lovable nature, his noble 
Christian character, qualified him in an unusual degree for his 
responsible positions as chairman of the committee in charge 
of the academic interests of the College and as presiding officer 
of the corporation. 

"We his friends who have been closely associated with him 

(110) 



Ill 

in the performance of our work as Trustees of Bryn Mawr College 
wish to unite in heartfelt recognition of his truly remarkable 
Christian graces of mind and heart which made him a power- 
ful influence for good in moulding the policies of our Board, 
and our grateful thanks for his life of Christian service. We 
wish to express our deep sense of personal loss in his death in 
the maturity of his powers. We further wish to extend to his 
widow and his son our sincere sympathy in their great sorrow 
which is shared by every member of our Board." 



Minute adopted by the Board of Directors of the Trustees 
of Bryn Mawr College at a meeting held April 19, 1912: 

"The Board of Directors has heard with deep sorrow of 
the death on the 12th instant of Howard Comfort, Chairman 
of the Executive Committee since the creation of the Board 
of Directors in 1906 and President of the Board since 1908, 
and desires to give expression to its appreciation of his high 
qualities of mind and character and his efficient service as a 
member of this Board. 

"Howard Comfort was an example of the best type of 
Quaker gentleman. Although actively engaged in business 
throughout his life, he gave much of his time to self-sacrificing 
work for educational and charitable institutions, especially 
for Bryn Mawr College. His unflagging devotion to the 
arduous duties of presiding officer and chairman of the com- 
mittee of the Board entrusted with all the collegiate interests 
of the College commanded the admiration and gratitude of 
his fellow Directors. His extraordinary combination of well 
balanced judgment, good-natured courtesy, and unswerving 
purpose fitted him in a peculiar manner to harmonize the 
different elements in our governing Board. He was an admi- 
rable administrative officer. His policy was progressive and 
enlightened. He believed in trusting to expert advice and in 
upholding the authority of the college officials appointed to 
carry out the policy of the Directors while at the same time 
he examined with the most scrupulous conscientiousness the 
problems in regard to which he thought the Directors should 



112 

properly legislate. He gave his confidence unreservedly and 
when results seemed to him to justify it he was generous in 
the expression of his appreciation. He pursued a perfectly 
consistent policy in dealing with the affairs of the College and 
was heartily in sympathy with the maintenance of the highest 
academic standards of college teaching, even during the years 
of financial depression before the Endowment Fund was raised 
when the continuance of such a policy meant facing large 
annual deficits. He had developed to an unusual degree a 
sense of due proportion. He never wasted time on details 
but saved it for really important matters. As President of this 
Board he will be profoundly missed. As Chairman of the 
Executive Committee, in which capacity he had worked in 
close co-operation with the President of the College for eighteen 
of the nineteen years of her administration, his loss seems 
irreparable. 

"We his fellow Directors wish to unite in this expression 
of our appreciation of his noble Christian character and his 
exceptional moral and intellectual qualities which he put so 
generously at the disposal of our Board to be used in the ser- 
vice of the College. We believe that his work for Bryn Mawr 
College will be continued long after his death in the usefulness 
of a great institution of learning, and we rejoice that its early 
development has been guided by men such as Howard Comfort 
and the other Trustees and Directors who have passed away 
and who like him have given to the College invaluable service." 



Resolutions passed by the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College: 

Whereas, the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College has learned 
with sincere sorrow of the death at Germantown, on the 12th 
of April, 1912, of Howard Comfort, a Trustee of Bryn Mawr 
College since 1891 and President of the Corporation and Chair- 
man of the Board of Directors during the past three years. 

Resolved, that we, the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College, 
desire to record our recognition of the great value of his unceas- 
ing efforts in behalf of the College, of the zeal with which he 
entered upon the work of the important committees of which 



113 

from the first he was a member, and of the kindly interest which 
he manifested in all our affairs. We particularly regret that 
his mature judgment and wise counsel are lost to the College 
at a time when the enlargement of its resources would make 
such powers doubly useful. 

Resolved, that a copy of this resolution be sent to the family 
of Mr. Comfort and to the Board of Directors. 



Resolutions in Memory of Edward Bettle, Jr., Secretary of the 
Board of Trustees and of the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr 

College. 

Died, April 8, 1912. 

Minute adopted at a special meeting of the Trustees of 
Bryn Mawr College held April 19, 1912: 

"The Trustees of Bryn Mawr College have learned with 
deep sorrow of the death of their friend and co-trustee Edward 
Bettle, Jr., in the seventy-first year of his age. 

"Edward Bettle, Jr., was elected a Trustee to fill the 
vacancy caused by the resignation of Samuel Morris before the 
organization of the Board under the will of the Founder of the 
College and has consequently been a member of the Cor- 
poration since Third month 31st, 1882. He has served as a 
member of the Executive Committee since 1892, as Chairman 
of the Library Committee since 1894, and as Secretary of the 
Corporation since 1895. In all his varied work for the College 
he has been unsparing of himself and beyond praise in the 
scrupulous performance of all the duties of a Trustee. He 
was a most painstaking and competent Secretary and gave 
the time required to prepare his admirable minutes with the 
most unstinted generosity. His deep interest in all that con- 
cerned the College, his warm-hearted discussion of its problems, 
and the critical and yet truly sympathetic spirit in which he 
handled them made him a most helpful member of committees. 
His sympathetic nature, his lovable personality, his acute 
and cultivated intelligence, his truly religious character, made 



114 

him much loved. The College and we his fellow members 
of the Corporation owe much to his long years of honorable 
and disinterested service as Secretary and as Trustee. We feel 
a profound sense of loss in his death and we wish to express 
to his widow and children and to his sister our deep sympathy 
in their grief and our high appreciation of his thirty years 
of devoted service for Bryn Mawr College." 



Minute adopted by the Board of Directors of the Trustees 
of Bryn Mawr College at a meeting held April 19, 1912: 

"The Directors of the Trustees of Bryn Mawr College 
desire to express the deep sorrow with which they have learned 
of the death of Edward Bettle, Jr., on the 8th instant. Secre- 
tary of the Board of Directors, Chairman of the Library Com- 
mittee, and member of the Executive Committee from the time 
when the Directors were created into a separate Board in 1906. 

"Edward Bettle was a very highly valued and influential 
member of our Board. He performed the onerous duties of 
his office as Secretary with the most conscientious exactitude. 
He was before all else the faithful scribe of the Directors and 
never allowed his personal opinions to colour in the minutest 
degree his carefully prepared minutes. His literary taste made 
him a lover of English style and he spared no time or trouble 
to make his minutes perfect in expression. He was also a 
lover of good books and a man of wide reading which he util- 
ized for the Board by serving as Chairman of the Library 
Committee. He loved the College with a true and constant 
affection and watched its development with the most sym- 
pathetic interest. He believed in its liberal organization. He 
rejoiced in its high standards of scholarship. He assumed 
full responsibility for their maintenance when it meant in- 
curring serious financial deficits, and no one of the Directors 
was more deeply moved than he when the Endowment Fund 
and the Carola Woerishoffer legacy put the college he loved on 
a firm financial foundation. He had a mind which saw all 
sideis of a question and a highly developed critical faculty 
which made him a very useful member of our Board. It was 



115 

manifest in all his discussions of college problems that the best 
interests of the college were very near to his heart. His lovable 
personality, his eager interest, his keen intelligence, his deep 
Christian faith impressed themselves deeply on his fellow 
Directors. 

"We wish to unite in this loving tribute to his truly Chris- 
tian spirit, his devotion to the College, and his broadminded 
views which enabled him to be of lasting service as Secretary 
of the Board and as Director. We are deeply grateful for the 
long years of self-sacrificing work which Edward Bettle gave 
to the great cause of women's education and we unite in hon- 
ouring his memory." 



Resolutions passed by the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College: 

Whereas, the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College has learned 
with sincere sorrow of the death at Haverford, on the 8th of 
April, 1912, of Edward Bettle, Jr., a member of the Board of 
Trustees from the very opening of the College and Secretary 
of that body since 1894, as also of the Board of Directors from 
the time of its establishment. 

Resolved, that we, the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College, 
desire to record our hearty appreciation of the unwavering 
devotion with which he served the college and our grateful 
recollection of the kindly personal interest he ever manifested 
in our relations to the College. 

Resolved, that a copy of this resolution be sent to the family 
of Mr. Bettle and to the Board of Directors. 



Resolutions passed by the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College in memory 

of Nettie Maria Stevens, Ph.D., Associate in Experimental 

Morphology. 

Born, July 7, 1861. Died, May 4, 1912. 

Whereas, the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College has heard 
with sincere sorrow of the death of Nettie Maria Stevens, A.B. 



116 

and A.M. of Leland Stanford Junior University, Graduate 
Scholar in Biology in Bryn Mawr College 1900-01, President's 
European Fellow 1901-02, Resident Fellow in Biology 1902-03, 
Doctor of Philosophy of this College in 1903, sometime Research 
Fellow in Biology, Carnegie Research Assistant, and Alice 
Freeman Palmer Research Fellow, and since 1904 as Reader 
and then as Associate in Experimental Morphology, a member 
of the teaching staff and of the Faculty. 

Resolved, that we, the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College, 
desire to record our appreciation of her talent for research, of 
the skill and assiduity with which she carried on difficult 
investigations, achieving a success that placed her in the very 
front rank of students of science and gave her a world wide 
reputation among workers in biology. No less would we 
recognize the faithfulness with which as a member of the Faculty 
she responded to every call for her services in teaching or in 
any general work of the College. AVe deplore her loss. We 
honor her memory. 

Resolved, that copies of these resolutions be sent to the 
relatives of Dr. Stevens, to the Board of Directors, and to 
''Science." 



Resolutions passed June 6, 1912, by the Alumnae Associa- 
tion of Bryn MaAvr College. 

Whereas, In the death of Nettie Maria Stevens, Doctor 
of Philosophy of Bryn Mawr College, and Associate in Experi- 
mental Morphology, the Alumnse Association has lost one of 
its most distinguished members, and the College a faithful 
and inspiring teacher and a brilliant investigator, therefore 
be it 

Resolved, That the Alumnse Association record its deep 
sense of loss and express its grateful appreciation of her services 
to the College. And be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to her 
family, to the Directors and to the Faculty of Bryn Mawr 
College, and be inserted in the records of the Alumnse Associa- 
tion. 



117 

Minute adopted by the Board of Directors of the Trustees 
of Bryn Mawr College in Memory of Carola Wo erish offer : 

Born, August, 1885. Died, September 11, 1912. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the 
Trustees of Bryn Mawr College, held January 19, 1912, the 
following minute was adopted, and was directed to be spread 
on the records, to be sent to the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College, 
to the Alumnge Association of Bryn Mawr College, and to Mrs. 
Woerishoffer, as an expression of sympathy in her bereavement : 

The Board of Directors has learned with deep regret of the 
death of Carola Woerishoffer, a graduate of Bryn Mawr College, 
in the twenty-seventh year of her age, and wishes to place on 
record its high appreciation of her qualities of mind and heart 
which make her a strong influence for good among her fellow- 
students in Bryn Mawr College, a power for righteousness in 
her home, in the City and State of New York, and would have 
made her, had she lived to reach the full development of her 
wonderful personality, an ideal citizen of our republic. 

The Board of Directors further wishes to place on record 
its opinion that it is an encouragement to the Board in its 
work for Bryn Mawr College, and a happy augury for the 
future of the College, that Carola Woerishoffer received her 
preparation for service at Bryn Mawr. 

During her lifetime Carola Woerishoffer gave abundant 
proof of her loyalty and devotion to her Alma Mater by gener- 
ous expenditure of time and money to improve the material 
equipment and broaden the scholarly work of the College. 
By her noble generosity after her death she stands next to its 
founder in giving the college power to improve the quality of 
its teaching and extend its influence for good. Through her 
great gift the future of the college she loved is assured. 

The Board of Directors wishes to include in this minute 
the expression of its full approval of the action of the Board 
of Trustees, at its annual meeting, held December 1, 1911, in 
regard to the legacy of Carola Woerishoffer, to wit: 

Attention was called to the bequest of Carola Woerishoffer by the 
Third Item in her Will, which reads as follows : 



118 

"Third: I bequeath unto the Trustees of Bryn Mawr College, a cor- 
poration organized and existing under the laws of the State of Pennsyl- 
vania, the sum of seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars." 

On motion, the Treasm-er, Asa S. Wing, was authorized on behalf of 
the Trustees of Bryn Mawr College to receive and receipt for the above 
bequest. The Treasurer was also authorized to attach the corporate 
seal to a copy of this minute. 

On consideration of the above, it was, on motion, unanimously decided 
that the principal sum, when received, be set aside as a permanent endow- 
ment, to be known as "The Carola Woerish offer Endowment Fund," 
and the incom^e thereof only to be spent for such collegiate purposes as 
this body, or its Board of Directors, may from time to timie direct : 

and to place on record its sense of deep responsibility in admin- 
istering the Carola Woerishoffer Endowment, its full recogni- 
tion that such a gift from such a donor carries with it a binding 
obligation to use it for the highest good of the College, and 
its satisfaction that Carola Woerishoffer has been commemorated 
by the setting apart of this legacy, under the name of the Carola 
Woerishoffer Endowment, so that her name may always be 
associated with her gift to Bryn Mawr College. 

The Board of Directors directs that, in order further to 
perpetuate her life as a student and her public work after gradu- 
ating from Bryn Mawr College, a room in the College Library 
shall be set aside for the use of students in her chosen field of 
work, economics and social service, equipped with books on these 
subjects, and named the Carola Woerishoffer Memorial Room, 
and that the offer of Mrs. Woerishoffer to furnish this room 
with the furniture of the study used by Carola in her New York 
home be gratefully accepted; and that a special bronze tablet 
be placed in the cloister of the library, commemorating her 
gifts to the College and the achievement of her brief life of 
public service, in order that her name may forever be honored 
by Bryn Mawr College. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



THE PRESIDENT 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



1912-13. 



PHILADELPHIA: 
THE JOHN C. WINSTON CO. 

1913. 



Corporation. 
Academic Year, 1913-14. 



James Wood, 

President . 



Asa S. Wing, 

Treasurer. 

James Wood. 
RuFus M. Jones. 
Alexander C. Wood. 
M. Carey Thomas. 
Francis R. Cope, Jr. 
Asa S. Wing. 



Anna Rhoads Ladd, 

Secretary. 

Charles J. Rhoads. 
Thomas Raeburn White. 
Frederic H. Strawbridge. 
Abram F. Huston. 
Anna Rhoads Ladd. 
Arthur Henry Thomas. 



William C. Dennis. 



Board of Directors. 

Academic Year, 1913-14. 

James Wood, 



Chairman . 



Asa S. Wing, 

Treasurer. 

James Wood. 
RuFus M. Jones. 
Alexander C. Wood. 
M. Carey Thomas. 
Francis R. Cope, Jr. 
Asa S. Wing. 
Charles J. Rhoads. 
Thomas Raeburn White. 



Anna Rhoads Ladd, 

Secretary. 

Frederic H. Strawbridge. 
Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride. 
Mary E. Garrett. 
Anna Rhoads Ladd. 
Abram F. Huston. 
William C. Dennis. 
Arthur Henry Thomas. 
Elizabeth Nields Bancroft. 



ExECUTiA^E Committee. 



RuFus M. Jones. 
M. Carey Thomas. 
Francis R. Cope, Jr. 



James Wood. 
Anna Rhoads Ladd. 
Thomas Raeburn White. 



William C. Dennis. 



Committee on Buildings and Grounds. 

Alexander C. Wood. Mary E. Garrett. 

Asa S. Wing. Frederic H. Strawbridge. 

M. Carey Thomas. Abram F. Huston. 

Arthur Henry Thomas. 



Charles J. Rhoads. 
Alexander C. Wood. 

Frederic H 



Finance Committee. 

Asa S. Wing. 
Mary E. Garrett. 
Strawbridge. 



Library Committee. 
Thomas Raeburn White. Charles J. Rhoads. 

Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride. 



Religious Life Committee. 

Rtjfus M. Jones. James Wood. 

Asa S. Wing. 

(iii) 



Officers of Administration. 

Academic Year, 1913-14. 

President, 

M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D. 

Office: Taylor Hall. 

Dean of the College, 

Marion Reilly, A.B. 

Office: Taylor Hall. 

Recording Dean and Assistant to the President, 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D. 

Office: Taylor Hall. 

Secretary, 
Edith Orlady, A.B. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Recording Secretary, 
Abigail Camp Dimon, A.M. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Wardens of the Halls of Residence, 
Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., Pembroke Hall. 
SusANNE Carey Allinson, A.B., Radnor Hall. 
Eleanor Bontecou, A.B., Denbigh Hall. 
Ruth Babcock, A.B., Merion HaU. 
Hilda Worthington Smith, A.M., Rockefeller Hall. 
Frances Allen Foster, A.B., Assistant Warden, Pembroke Hall. 

Comptroller, 
Sandy L. Hurst. Office : Taylor Hall. 

Business Manager, 
Miriam Margaret Hedges, A.B. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Junior Bursar, 
Margaret A. Proctor, B.A. Office: Rockefeller Hall. 

Librarian, 
Lois Antoinette Reed, A.B., B.L.S. Office: The Library. 

Director of Athletics and Gymnastics and Supervisor of Health Department, 
Constance M. K. Applebee. Office: The Gymnasium. 

Physician in Chief, , 

Thomas F. Branson, M.D. Office hours, 8 to 9.30 and 2 to 3 daily, 

Rosemont, Pa. 

Assistant Physician, 

Frances R. Sprague, M.D. Pembroke Road, Bryn Mawr; Office hours, 

The Infirmary, Bryn Mawr CoUege, 4 to 6 daily except Simday. 

Examining Oculist, 
Helen Murphy, M.D. Office hours, 2 to 4 daily, 1433 Spruce Street, 

Philadelphia. 



Academic Appointments. 

Academic Year, 1913-14. 

M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the College and Professor 
of English. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1877; studied at the Johns Hopkins University, 1877-78; 
University of Leipsic, 1879-82; Ph.D., University of Zurich, 1882; Sorbonne and 
College de France, 1883; Dean of the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College and Professor 
of English, 1885-94. 

Charlotte Angas Scott, D.Sc, Alumnce Professor of Mathematics. 

Lincoln, England. Graduate in Honours, Girton College, University of Cambridge, 
England, 1880; B.Sc, University of London, 1882; Lecturer on Mathematics in Girton 
College, 1880-84; lectured in connection with Newnham College, University of Cam- 
bridge, England, 1880-83; D.Sc, University of London, 1885. 

George A. Barton, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Literature and Semitic 
Languages. 

A.B., Haverford College, 1882, and A.M., 1885; studied under the direction of the American 
Institute of Hebrew, 1885-86; Harvard University, 1888-91; Thayer Scholar, Harvard 
University, 1889-91; A.M., Harvard University, 1890; Ph.D., Harvard University, 
1891; Director of the American School of Oriental Study and Research in Palestine, 
1902-03. 

Florence Bascom, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1882, B.Sc, 1884, and A.M., 1887; Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1891-93; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1893; Assistant in Geology and 
Instructor in Petrography, Ohio State University, 1893-95. 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D., Recording Dean and Assistant to the 
President. 

Reading, England. B.Sc, University of London, 1893; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, 
and B.A., Trinity College, Dublin, 1905; Girton College, University of Cambridge, 
England, 1889-92; Graduate in Honours, First Class, in the Cambridge Mathematical 
Tripos, 1892; Graduate in Honours, Final Mathematical Schools, LTniversity of Oxford, 
1892; Graduate Student in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-93, and Fellow in 
Mathematics, 1893-94; Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship, and 
Student in Mathematics, University of Gottingen, 1894-95. 

WiLMER Cave Wright, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Shrewsbury, _ England. Girton College, University of Cambridge, England, 1888-92; 
Graduate in Honours, Cambridge Classical Tripos, 1892; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 
1895; Fellow in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-93; Fellow in Latin, University of 
Chicago, 1893-94, and Fellow in Greek, 1894-95; Reader in Greek and Latin, University 
of Chicago, 1895-96. 

James H. Leuba, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Education. 

Neuchatel, Switzerland. B.S., University of Neuchatel, 1886; Ph.B., Ursinus College, 
1888: Scholar in Psychology, Clark University, 1892-93; Fellow in Psychology, Clark 
University, 1893-95; Ph.D., Clark University, 1896. 

FoNGER DeHaan, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish. 

Leeuwarden„ Holland. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins LTniversitj', 1895; Instructor in Modern 
Languages, Lehigh University, 1885-91; Fellow in Romance Languages, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1893-94, Assistant in Romance Languages, 1893-95, Instructor in Romance 
Languages, 1895-96, and Associate in Romance Languages, 1896-97. 

Arthur Leslie Wheeler, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

A.B., Yale University, 1893; Scholar and Student in Classics, Yale College, 1893-96; 
Ph.D., Yale University, 1896; Instructor and Tutor in Latin, Yale College, 1894-1900. 

Henry Nevill Sanders, Ph.D., Professor of Greek. 

Edinburgh, Scotland. A.B., Trinity University, Toronto, 1894, and A.M., 1897; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1903; Fellow in Greek, Johns Hopkins University, 1897-98; 
Lecturer in Greek, McGill University, 1900-02. 

(v) 



William Bashford Huff, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1889; A.M., University of Chicago, 1896; Pii.D., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1900; Lecture Assistant in Physics, Johns Hopkins University, 
1899-1900, Assistant in Physics, 1900-01, and Instructor in Physics, 1901-02. 

William Roy Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

A.B. .^University of Texas, 1897, and A.M., 1898; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1903; 
Acting Professor of History and Political Science, University of Colorado, 1900-01; 
Lecturer in History, Barnard College, 1901-02. 

Lucy Martin Donnelly, A.B., Professor of English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1893; University of Oxford, England, and University of Leipsic, 
1893-94; Sorbonne and College de France, and University of Leipsic, 1894-95. 

Karl Detlev Jessen, Ph.D., Professor of German Literature. 

Winnemark, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. A.B., University of Chicago, 1896, and 
Fellow in German, 1897-98; Ph.D., University of Berlin, 1901; University of Chicago, 
1895-98; University of Kiel, 1899; University of Berlin, 1898-1901; Acting Professor 
of Modern Languages, Eureka College, 1896; Instructor in German, Iowa State Univer- 
sity, 1897; Instructor in German, Harvard University, 1901-03, and Lecturer on German 
Literature and Aesthetics, 1904. 

Tenney Frank, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

A.B., University of Kansas, 1898, and A.M., 1899; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1903; 
Fellow, University of Chicago, 1899-1901; Assistant and Associate in Latin, University 
of Chicago, 1901-04. 

David Hilt Tennent,* Ph.D., Professor of Biology. 

S.B., Olivet College, 1900; Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1902-04; Bruce Fellow, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1904; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1904. 

Carleton Fairchild Brown, Ph.D., Professor of English Philology. 

A.B., Carleton College, 1888; A.M., Harvard University, 1901, and Ph.D., 1903. Shat- 
tuck Scholar, Harvard University, 1901-03; Instructor in English, Harvard University, 
1903-05. 

James Barnes, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Halifax, Nova Scotia. B.A., Dalhousie University, Honours in Mathematics and Physics, 
1899, and M.A., 1900, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1904. Holder of 1851 Exhibi- 
tion Science Research Scholarship, 1900-03; Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1903-04, 
and Assistant in Physics, 1904-06. 

Richard Thayer Holbrook, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French Phil- 
ology and Italian. 

A.B., Yale University, 1893; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1902. Sorbonne, College de 
France, Ecole des Chartes, 1893-94, 189.5-96; Student in Italy and L^niversity of Berlin, 
1894-95; Student in Spain, 1901; Tutor in the Romance Languages and Literatures, 
Yale University, 1896-1901, and Columbia University, 1902-06. 

Theodore de Leo de Laguna, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

A.B., University of California, 1896, and A.M., 1899; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1901. 
Teacher in the Government Schools of the Philippine Islands, 1901-04; Honorary 
Fellow and Assistant in Philosophy, Cornell University, 1904-05; Assistant Professor 
of the Philosophy of Education, University of Michigan, 1905-07. 

Marion Reilly, A.B., Dean of the College and Reader in Philosophy. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-02, 1903, 
1903-06; Newnham College, University of Cambridge, Spring, 1907; Universities of 
Rome and Sienna, 1911-12. 

Marion Parris Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901, and Ph.D., 1909. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1902-05. Fellow in Economics and Politics, 1905-06; Bryn Mawr College Research 
Fellow and Student in Economics and Politics, University of Vienna, 1906-07. 

Frederick Htjtton Getman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins L^niversity, 1903. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1893-96; 
University of Virginia, 1896-97; Fellow in Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University. 
1902-03, and Fellow by Courtesy, 1903-04; Carnegie Research Assistant in Physical 
Chemistry, 1903-04; Lecturer in Physical Chemistry, College of the City of New York, 
1904-05, and Lecturer in Physics, Columbia University, 1907-08. 

* Granted leave of absence from October 1, 1913, to December 31, 1913. 



Clarence Errol Ferree, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Experimental 
Psychology and Director of the Psychological Laboratory. 

B.S., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1900, A.M., 1901, and M.S., 1902; Ph.D., Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1909. Fellow in Psychology, Cornell University, 1902-03; Assistant in Psychology, 
Cornell University, 190.3-07. 

Orie Latham Hatcher, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Comparative Litera- 
ture arid Elizabethan Literature. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1888; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 190.3. Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago, 1901-03, and Fellow in English, 1903-04. 

Agathe Lasch, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Teutonic Philology. 

Berlin, Germany. Ph.D., University of Heidelberg, 1909. Student, University of Halle, 
1906-07; University of Heidelberg, 1907-10. State Examination pro facultate docendi, 
Karlsruhe, 1910. 

Grace Mead Andrus de Laguna. Ph.D., Associate in Philosophy. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1903, and Ph.D., 1906. Sage Scholar in Philosophy, Cornell 
University, 1903-05; Alice Freeman Palmer Fellow of Wellesley College, 190.5-06; 
Reader in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08. 

Regina Katharine Grand all, Ph.D., Director of English Essay Work 
and Reader in English. 

A.B., Smith College, 1890; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1902. Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago, 1893-94, and Fellow in History, 1894-96; Assistant in History, 
Smith College, 1896-99; Instructor in History, Wellesley College, 1899-1900. 

Kate Gordon, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1900, and Ph.D., 1903. Scholar in Pedagogy, University 
of Chicago, 1900-01, and Fellow in Philosophy, 1901-03; European Fellow of the 
Association of Collegiate Alumnae, 1903-04; Instructor in Ethics and Psychology, Mt. 
Holyoke College, 1904-05, and in Teachers' College, Columbia University, 1906-07; 
Substitute Professor of Philosophy, Mt. Holyoke College, Second Semester, 1911-12. 

Clarence Henry Haring, A.B., B.Litt., Associate in History. 

A.B., Harvard University, 1907; B.Litt., University of Oxford, 1909. Rhodes Scholar, 
University of Oxford, 1907-10; .John Harvard Fellow of Harvard University, 1908-10; 
Austin Teaching Fellow in Harvard College, 1910-11; Bayard Cutting Travelling 
Fellow in History, Harvard University, and Student, University of Berlin, 1911-12. 

James Fulton Ferguson, Ph.D., Associate in Ancient History and Latin. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1903; A.B., Yale University, 1906, A.M., 1907, and Ph.D., 
1912. Fellow, Yale University, 1906-09; Instructor in Williams College, 1909-10; 
Instructor in Greek and Latin, Yale College, 1910-12. 

Louis Cons, Associate in French. 

Lyons, France. Bachelier-es-lettres, Lyons L'niversity, 1896, and Licencie-es-lettres, Univer- 
sity of Paris, 1899. The Sorbonne, 1901-04; Certificat d'Etudes Scientifiques, Uni- 
versity of Grenoble, 1902; Assistant in French, University of Berlin, 1906-08; French 
Tutor in the Royal Court of Prussia, 1906-08; Ecole des Hautes-Etudes, Paris, 1909-10. 
Officier d'Academie, 1905. 

Thomas Clachar Brown, Ph.D., Associate in Geology. 

A.B., Amherst College, 1904; A.M., Columbia University, 1905, and Ph.D., 1909. Assist- 
ant in Palaeontology, Columbia University, 1905-07; Geologist to the Board of Water 
Supply of New York City, 1907-09; Assistant Professor of Geology, Middlebury College, 
1909-11; Non-resident Lecturer in Geology, Norwich L^niversity, 1909; Assistant 
Professor of Geology, Pennsylvania State College, 1911-12. 

James Ryals Conner, Ph.D., Associate in Mathematics. 

A.B., University of Georgia, 1898; Ph.D.. Johns Hopkins University, 1909. Johns 
Hopkins University, 1906-12, Fellow, 1907-09, Carnegie Research Assistant, 1909-11, 
Johnston Scholar and Fellow by Courtesy, Johns Hopkins University, 1911-12. 

Roger Frederic Brunel, Ph.D., Associate in Chemistry. 

A.B., Colby University, 1903;_ Ph.D., Johns Hopkins Lfniversity, 1906. Lecture Assistant 
in ChemLstry, Johns Hopkins University, 1906-07; Instructor in Chemistry, Syracuse 
University, 1907-10, and Assistant Professor of Chemistry, 1910-12. 



Matilde Castro, Ph.D., Director of the Phebe Anna Thome Model School. 

A B , University of Chicago, 1900, and Ph.D., 1907. Fellow in Philosophy, University of 
Chicago, 1900-01, 1903-04, 1905-06. Principal of the Morris High School, Chicago, 
1901-03. Instructor in Philosophy, Mt. Holyoke College, 1904-0.5; Instructor in 
Philosophy, Vassar College, 1906-09; Professor and Head of the Department of Philos- 
ophy, Rockford College, 1910-13. 

Arthur Russell Moore, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

A.B., University of Nebraska, 1904; Ph.D., University of California, 1911. Assistant 
in Physiology, University of California, 1909-11, and Assistant Professor of Physiology, 
1911-13. 

Samuel Arthur King, M.A., Non-resident Lecturer in English Diction. 

Tynemouth, England. M.A., University of London, 1900. Special Lecturer in Elocution, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1901; Special Lecturer in Elocution, University of California, 
1902. 

Georgiana Goddard King, A.M., Lecturer in the History of Art and Com- 
parative Literature. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1897. Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1896-97, and Fellow in English, 1897-98. College de France, First Semester, 
1898-99. 

Sydney D. M. Hudson, Ph.B., Lecturer in Political Science. 

Ph.B., University of Syracuse, 1907. President's University Scholar, Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1909-10, and George William Curtis Fellow in Political Science, 1910-11. 

Roland G. Kent, Ph.D., Non-resident Lecturer in Sanskrit. 

A.B., Swarthmore College, 189.5, B.L., 1896, and A.M., 1898; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1903. Student, Universities of Berlin and Munich and the American 
School of Classical Studies at Athens, 1899-1902; University of Pennsylvania, Second 
Semester, 1902, Harrison Fellow in Classics, 1902-03, Harrison Research Fellow in 
Classics, 1903-04, Instructor in Greek and Latin, 1904-09, and Assistant Professor of 
Comparative Philology, 1909-13. 

Donald Fisher, Ph.D., Lecturer in Philosophy. 

A.B., Western Reserve University, 1908; A.M., Harvard University, 1909, and Ph.D., 
1913; Travelling Fellow in Philosophy, Harvard University and Student, Universities 
of Graz, Berlin, and Freiburg, 191CH12; Assistant in Philosophy, Harvard University, 
1912-13. 

Frederick Archibald Dewey, S.B., Lecturer in Economics and Sociology. 

S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1910. University of Grenoble, Autumn 
Semester, 1904; University of Michigan, 1905-06. Graduate Student in Sociology, 
Columbia University, 1911-12, and University Fellow in Sociology, 1912-13. 

Paul Van Brunt Jones, Ph.D., Lecturer in History. 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1906, A.M., 1908, and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 
1912. Assistant in History, University of Michigan, 1907-10; Harrison FeUow in 
History, University of Pennsylvania, 1910-12, and Harrison Research Fellow, 1912-13. 

Rhys Carpenter, A.B., Lecturer in Classical Archaeology. 

A.B., Columbia LTniversity, 1911, and B.A., University of Oxford, 1911; Rhodes Scholar 
and Student, Balliol College, University of Oxford, 1908-11; Drisler Fellow in Classics, 
Columbia University, 1911-12; Student, American School of Classical Studies in Athens, 
1912-13. 

Florence Peebles,* Ph.D., Lecturer in Biology. 

A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore, 1895, and Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1900. Grad- 
uate Scholar in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1895-96; Fellow in Biology, 1896-97, 
and Graduate Student, 1897-98, 1903-04, 1906-11; Holder of the Mary E. Garrett 
European Fellowship, Scholar of the Woman's Table and Student in Biology, Zoological 
Station, Naples, Universities of Munich and Halle, 1898-99; Instructor in Biology, 
Woman's College of Baltimore, 1899-1902, and Associate Professor of Biology, 1902- 
06; Student, University of Bonn, summer, 1906; Teacher of Science in Miss Wright's 
School, Bryn Mawr, 1906-11; Holder of American Woman's Table in Zoological Sta- 
tion, Naples, spring, 1907; Assistant Demonstrator in Biology, Bryn MaA\T College, 
1907-10, and Private Tutor, 1907-12; Fellow of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae, 
Boston Branch, and Student and Research Worker, Germany and France, 1912-13. 



* Appointed as substitute for Professor David Hilt Tennent during his absence from 
October 1, 1913, to December 31, 1913. 



Abby Kirk, A.B., Reader in Elementary Greek. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1892. Reader in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-98. 

Mary Jepfers, A.M., Reader in Elementari/ German. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1895, and A.M., 1897. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1895-98, 1903-04, 1906-07; Teacher of Latin in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn 
Mawr, 1895-98; Student at the Universities of Munich and Halle, 1898-99; Teacher 
of Latin and History in the Girls' Latin School, Baltimore, Md., 1900-01; Head of the 
Latin Department in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 1899-1907; Student, 
University of Bonn, Summer of 1905; Private Tutor, 1892-1912; Supervisor of College 
Preparatory Department, Brantwood Hall, Bronxville, Lawrence Park, N. Y., 1905-07; 
Lecturer on European Travel, Miss Wright's School, 1904-12, and "Teacher of Latin, 
1911-12. 

Edna Aston Shearer, A.B., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904; Junior Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 1904- 
05; Holder of the President's Fellowship and Student, Universities of Edinburgh and 
Aberdeen, 1905-06; Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07; Teacher of 
English in the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1907-09, and Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1907-08. 

E. Beatrice Daw, A.M.. Reader in English. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1909, and A.M., University of Pennsylvania, 1910. 

Mary Hamilton Swindler, Ph.D., Reader in Latin and Reader and 
Demonstrator in Classical Archaeology. 

A.B., University of Indiana, 1905, and A.M., 1906; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 191.3. 
Graduate Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07, and Fellow in Greek, 1907-09; 
Mary E. Garrett European Fellow and Student, Universities of Berlin and Oxford and 
the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, 1909-10; Teacher in the Misses 
Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 1910-11, and in Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, 1911- 
12. 

Marion Delia Crane, A.B., Assistant in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1911. Secretary, the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, 1911-12. 
Reader in English and Secretary to the Dean of the College, 1912-13. 

Ida Langdon, Ph.D., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1903; A.M., Cornell University, 1910, and Ph.D., 1912. Cor- 
nell University, 1909-12. 

Annie Louise Macleod, Ph.D., Reader in Physiological Chemistry and 
Demonstrator in Chemistry. 

A.B., McGill University, 1904, M.Sc, 1905, and Ph.D., 1910. Demonstrator in Chem- 
istry, McGill University, 1905-08; Assistant in Chemistry, Barnard College, 1908-09; 
Fellow in Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 1909-10, and Research Fellow in Chemistry, 
1910-12. 

Christine Potts Hammer, A.B., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1912. 

Gertrude Rand, Ph.D., Reader in Educational Psychology and Demon- 
strator in Experimental Psychology. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1908; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1913. Graduate Scholar in 
Psychology, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09, 1911-12, Fellow in Philosophy, 1909-10, 
Fellov/ in Psychology, 1910-11 and Sarah Berliner Research Fellow, 1912-13. 

Eunice Morgan Schenck, A.B., Reader in French. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1909, Graduate 
Scholar, 1909-10, and Fellow in Romance Languages, 1912-13; President's European 
Fellow and Student, the Sorbonne, College de France, University of Grenoble and in 
Madrid, 1910-12. 

Maud Elizabeth Temple, Ph.D., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904, and A.M., 1905; Ph.D., Radcliffe College, 1913. Grad- 
uate Scholar in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1904-05; Graduate Scholar, Radcliffe 
College, 1909-10; Research Student, College de France and the Sorbonne, 1910-11; 
Fellow of the Women's Education Association of Boston, 1911-12. 

Mabel Kathryn Frehafer, A.M., Demonstrator in Physics. 

A B , Bryn Mawr College, 1908; A.M., University of Wisconsin, 1909. Graduate Student, 
University of Wisconsin, 1908-09; Fellow in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1909-10. 



Mary Edith Pinney, A.M., Demonstralor in Biology. 

A.B., Kansas State University, 1908, and A.M., 1910. Teaching Fellow in Zoology, 
Kansas State University, 1909-10, and High School Instructor, Alma, Kan., 1908-09; 
Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1910-11; President's European Fellow and 
Student, Universities of Bonn and Heidelberg and Zoological Station, Naples, 1911-12; 
Instructor in Zoology, Kansas State University, 1912-13. 

Helen Strong Hoyt, A.M., Quiz Assistant in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, and George W. Childs Prize Essayist, 1897, A.M., 1898. 
Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1897-99, and Reader in English, 1898-1907; 
Teacher of English in Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn., 1908-09. 

Jeannette Cons, A.M., Assistant in French and French Oral Tutor. 

A.B., Swarthmore College, 1907, and A.M., 1909. 

Phebe Anna Thorne Model School. 

Matilde Castro, Ph.D., Director and Teacher of English, History, and 
Science. 

A.B., University of Chicago, 1900, and Ph.D., 1907. Fellow in Philosophy, University of 
Chicago, 1900-01, 1903-04, 1905-06. Principal of the Morris High School, Chicago. 
1901-03; Instructor in Philosophy, Mt. Holyoke College, 1904-05; Instructor in 
Philosophy, Vassar College, 1906-09; Professor and Head of the Department of Philos- 
ophy, Rockford College, 1910-13. 

Kate Gordon, Ph.D., Teacher of Mathematics, Drawing, and Modelling. 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1900 and Ph.D., 1903. Scholar in Pedagogy, University 
of Chicago, 1900-01, and Fellow in Philosophy, 1901-03; European Fellow of the 
Association of Collegiate Alumnse, 1903-04; Instructor in Ethics and Psychology, Mt. 
Holyoke College, 1904-05, and in Teachers' College, Columbia University, 1906-07; 
Substitute Professor of Philosophy, Mt. Holyoke College, Second Semester, 1911-12; 
Associate Professor of Education, Bryn Mawr College. 

Samuel Arthur King, A.M., Teacher of Reading. 

Tynemouth, England. M.A., University of London, 1900. Special Lecturer in Elocu- 
tion, Johns Hopkins University, 1901; Special Lecturer in Elocution, University of 
California, 1902; Non-Resident Lecturer in English Diction, Bryn Mawr College. 

Eunice Morgan Schenck, A.B., Teacher of French. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1909, Graduate 
Scholar, 1909-10, and Fellow in Romance Languages, 1912-13; President's European 
Fellow and Student, the Sorbonne, College de France, LTniversity of Grenoble and 
Madrid, 1910-12. Reader in French, Bryn Mawr College. 

Placido de Montoliu, J aques-Dalcroze Eurhythmies. 

Graduate of the Jaques-Dalcroze College of Rhythmic Training, at Hellerau, Germany. 

Constance M. K. Applebee, Out-of-door Sports and Games. 

Director of Gymnastics and Athletics, Bryn Mawr College. 

Cynthia Maria Wesson, Out-of-door Sports and Games. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909; Graduate of Dr. Sargent's School for Physical Educa- 
tion, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1913. 

Executive Staff. 
Edith Orlady, A.B., Secretary of the College. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1902. Warden of Pembroke Hall West, 1903-05, and Warden 
of Rockefeller Hall, 1905-06; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1903-06, 1907-09; 
Recording Secretary, 1910-12. 

Abigail Camp Dimon, A.M., Recording Secretary. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1899. Vice-Principal of the High School, 
Clinton, N. Y., 1896-97; Assistant Teacher of English in the Utica Academy, 1897-98; 
Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99; Tutor, 1900-01; Graduate Student 
and Warden of Radnor Hall, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-04; Teacher of Science in the 
Balliol School, Utica, 1904-05, and of Science and Mathematics, 1905-08; Teacher 
in the New School, Utica, 1908-09; Demonstrator in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1911, 
and Reader in Biology, 1911-12. 

Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., Warden of Pembroke Hall. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1889. 



SusANNE Carey Allinson, A.B., Warden of Radnor Hall. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College. 1910. 

Eleanor Bontecou, A.B., Warden of Denbigh Hall. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1913. 

Hilda Worthington Smith, A.M., Warden of Rockefeller Hall. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1910, and A.M., 1911. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1910-11; Student, New York School of Philanthropy, 1912-13. 

Ruth Babcock, A.B., Warden of Merion Hall. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1910. Teacher in Deerfield Academy, Deerfield, Mass., 1910-13. 

Frances Allen Foster, A.B., Assistant Warden of Pembroke Hall. 

A.B., Brown University, 1909. Scholar in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1909-11, and 
Fellow in English, 1911-12; Mary E. Garrett European Fellow and Student in the 
British Museum, 1912-13. 

Marian Delia Crane, A.B., Senior Graduate Student of Cartref. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1911. Secretary, the Bryn Mawr School. Baltimore, 1911-12; 
Reader in English and Secretary to the Dean of the College, 1912-13; Assistant in 
English and Graduate Scholar in English, 1913-14. 

Sandy L. Hurst, Comptroller. 

Miriam Margaret Hedges, A.B., Business Manager. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1910. Secretary of Wykeham Rise, Washington, Conn., 1910- 
11, and Secretary and Teacher of Geometry, 1911-12; Secretary of the Baldwin School, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1912-13. 

Margaret A. Proctor, A.B., Junior Bursar. 

A.B., University of Toronto, 1906. Laboratory Assistant in Physiological Chemistry 
and Bacteriology, University of Toronto, 1906-08; Dietitian, Department of Public 
Charities, New York City, 1908-09; Assistant Manager, Whittier Hall Dining Rooms, 
Barnard College, 1909-10. 

Lois Antoinette Reed, A.B., B.L.S., Librarian. 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1909; B.L.S., New York State Library School, 1904. Libra- 
rian, The Western College, Oxford, Ohio, 1905-07; Cataloguer and Order Department 
Assistant, Library of the University of Illinois, 1907-10; Assistant Librarian, University 
of Rochester, 1910-13. 

Constance M. K. Applebee. Director of Athletics and Gymnastics and 
Supervisor of Health Departinent. 

Licentiate, British College of Physical Education, 1898, and Member, 1899. Gymnasium 
Mistress, Girls' Grammar School, Bradford, Yorkshire, 1899-1900; in the Arnold Foster 
High School, Burnley, Yorkshire, 1899-1901; in the High School, Halifax, Yorkshire, 
1900-01; Head of Private Gymnasium, Ilkley, Yorkshire, 1899-1901; Harvard School 
of Physical Training, Summer, 1901; Hockey Coach, Vassar College, Wellesley College, 
Radcliffe College, Mt. Holyoke College, Smith College, Bryn Mawr College, Boston 
Normal School of Gymnastics, 1901-04; Hockey Coach, Harvard Summer School of 
Gymnastics, 1906. 

Mary Wagner Anderson, Assistant to the Director of Athletics and Gym- 
nastics. 

Simmons College, 1909-10. Graduate of the Sargent School for Physical Education, 
Boston, 1913. 

Cynthia Maria Wesson, A.B., Assistant in Athletics and Gymnastics. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. Graduate of the Sargent School for Physical Education, 
Boston, Mass., 1913. 

Helen Corey Geddes, A.B., B.S., Head Cataloguer. 

A.B., Radcliffe College, 1905; B.S., Simmons College, 1910. Library Assistant, University 
of Illinois, 1910-12. 

Bessie Homer Jennings, Assistant Cataloguer. 

Graduate, Drexel Institute Library School, 1900. 

Sarah Wooster Eno, A.B., Circidation and Reference Librarian. 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1908. Cataloguer, Library of the University of Pennsylvania, 
1909-10; Librarian, Stetson University, 1910-12. 



Marian Price, A.B., Assistant to the Librarian. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1910. Drexel Institute Library School, 1910-11. 

Helen Rothrock Shoemaker, A.B., Assistant to the Circulation and 

Reference Librarian. 
A.B., Vassar College, 1910. Drexel Institute Library School, 1911-12. 

Mary Warren Taylor, Secretary to the Department of Athletics and 
Gymnastics and Recording Secretary to the Health Department. 

Genevieve Estelle Potter, Bookkeeper and Assistant to the Comptroller. 

Mabel Gray Thomas, Stenographer and Assistant Bookkeeper in the 
Comptroller's Office. 

Thomas F. Branson, M.D., Physician in Chief. 

A.B., Haverford College, 1889; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1892. Attending 
Physician, Bryn Mawr Hospital. 

Frances R. Sprague, B.L., M.D., Assistant Physician of the College. 

B.L., University of California, 1886; M.D., Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 
1891. Visiting Physician and Surgeon, Children's Department, Children's Hospital 
of San Francisco, 1898-1910; Visiting Surgeon, Woman's Hospital of Pennsylvania, 
and Consulting Surgeon, West Philadelphia Hospital for Women; Practicing Physician, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1910-12. 

Helen Murphy, M.D., Examining Ocxdist. 

M.D., Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1893; Assistant Demonstrator in 
Histology, Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1894-96; Instructor in Materia 
Medica, 1896-1902; Instructor in Diseases of the Eye, Philadelphia Polyclinic and 
College for Graduates in Medicine, 1895-97. 

The following physicians have consented to serve as consultants: 

Thomas McCrae, M.D., F.R.C.P., 1627 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, 

Consultant Physician. 

George de Schweinitz, M.D., 1705 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Con- 
sultant Oculist. 

Robert G. Le Conte, M.D., 1625 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Consultant 
Surgeon. 

Francis R. Packard, M.D., 304 S. Nineteenth Street, Philadelphia, 
Consultant Aurist and Laryngologist. 

James K. Young, M.D., 222 S. Sixteenth Street, Philadelphia, Consultant 
Orfhopcedist. 



Report of the Recording Dean and Assistant to the 

President. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit to you a statistical report on 
the students of Bryn Mawr College for the academic year 
1912-13, a statistical report of the workings of the regulations 
of the directors and faculty, and an account of matters which 
were administered through my office. 

The entire number of students enrolled during the j^ear 
was 459. There were 83 graduate students, including fellows. 
The number of graduate students was about 18 per cent of 
the whole number of students. 



/. Comparative Table of Numbers of Graduate and Under- 
graduate Students from 1885 to 1913. 



Year. 


Under- 
Graduate graduate 
Students. Students. 


Total 
Number. 


Year. 


Under- 
Graduate graduate 
Students. Students. 


Total 
Number. 


1885-86 . 


. ... 8 


36 


44 


1899-1900 


. . . 53 


334 


387 


1886-87 . 


. . . . 10 


54 


64 


1900-01 . . 


. .. 48 


348 


396 


1887-88 . 


. . .. 8 


70 


78 


1901-02 . . 


...53 


383 


436 


1888-89 . 


. . . . 16 


100 


116 


1902-03 . . 


. .. 70 


377 


447 


1889-90. 


22 


100 


122 


1903-04 . . 


. . . -62 


384 


446 


1890-91 . 


. . . . 12 


120 


132 


1904-05 . . 


. .. 63 


378 


441 


1891-92 . 


. . . . 27 


142 


169 


1905-06 . . 


. .. 79 


377 


456 


1892-93 . 


. . . . 34 


168 


202 


1906-07 . . 


. . . 75 


362 


437 


1893-94. 


. . . . 43 


200 


243 


1907-08 . . 


. . . 72 


348 


420 


1894-95 . 


. . . . 49 


234 


283 


1908-09 . . 


. .. 86 


334 


420 


1895-96 . 


. . . . 52 


246 


298 


1909-10 . . 


...87 


337 


424 


1896-97 . 


. . . . 46 


243 


289 


1910-11 . . 


. .. 84 


342 


426 


1897-98 . 


. . . . 49 


275 


324 


1911-12. . 


...76 


376 


452 


1898-99 . 


. . . . 67 


287 


354 


1912-13 . . 


...83 


376 


459 



(1) 



Statistics of Graduate Students in 1912-13. 



//. Geographical Distribution of Graduate Students. 

The 83 graduate students enrolled during the year came 
from the following states and countries: 



State 
or Country. 


Number of 

Students. 


Per- 
centage. 


State 
or Country. 


Number of 
Students. 


Per- 
centage. 


Pennsylvania . . . 


.... 18 


21.7 


Delaware 




1.2 


New York 


.... 6 


7.2 


Minnesota 




1.2 


Rhode Island . . 
Illinois 


. . .. 5 
4 


6.0 

4.8 
4.8 


New Jersej^ .... 
North Carolina. 
Texas 




1.2 

1 2 


Indiana 


.... 4 


1.2 


Iowa 


3 


3.6 
3.6 
3.6 
2.4 

2.4 


Vermont 

West Virginia . . 

Germany 

England 


... 6 

... 5 


1.2 


Massachusetts. 

Michigan 

California 


.... 3 
.... 3 
.... 2 
.... 2 


1.2 

7.2 
6.0 


Kansas 


Canada 


... 3 


3.6 


Missouri 


.... 2 


2.4 


Scotland 


... 2 


2.4 


Nebraska 

Ohio 


.... 2 

2 


2.4 
2.4 


Japan 

Belgium 


2 
... 1 


2.4 
1.2 


Connecticut . . . . 


.... 1 


1.2 


Total. . . 


...83 


100.0 



These 83 graduate students may be classified as follows: 

Non-resident, holding European fellowships and studying abroad 3 

Resident fellows 14 

Graduate scholars, British 4 

Graduate scholars, German 6 

Graduate scholars 27 

Members of college staff 11 

Graduate students 18 

83 

Of the 83 graduate students 60 lived in the halls of resi- 
dence, 20 lived in Philadelphia or the neighborhood, and 3 
were studjdng abroad. 

///. Denominational Affiliations of Graduate Students. 

Episcopalians 21 

Presbyterians 16 

CongregationaUsts 8 

Friends 6 

jMethodists 5 

German Reformed 3 

Christian Chm'ch 2 

Lutherans 2 

Roman Catholics 2 

Baptists 1 



Ethical Culture 

Evangelical 

Jewish 

Moravian 

Unierte Landeskirche, Preus- 

sen 

Unitarian 

No denominational affiliation . 1 



83 



IV. Number of Year.s of Graduate Study. 



In first year of graduate study, 34 
In second " " " 24 

In third " " " 12 

In fourth " " " 6 

In fifth " " " 5 



In sixth year of graduate study, 1 
In eighth " " • "1 

S3 



V. Studies Elected by 80 Graduate Students in Residence. 

Under each subject all the graduate students attending 
courses in that subject are counted. 



Students 

English 25 

History 19 

French 14 

Philosophy and 

Psychology 12 

History of Art and 

Archaeology 12 

Comparative Lit- 
erature 11 

Greek 10 

Latin 10 

Economics and 

Politics 9 

German 8 



Percentage 

of Number 

of Graduate 

Students. 

31.3 

23.80 
17.5 

15.0 

15.0 

13.7 
12.5 
12.5 

11.25 
10.00 



Percentage 
of Number 
of Graduate 
Students. Students. 



Mathematics 7 

Italian 5 

Physics 5 

Spanish 5 

Semitic Languages 
and Biblical Lit- 
erature 4 

Chemistry 4 

Education 3 

Teutonic Philology 3 

Geology 2 

Biology 2 

Sanskrit 1 



.75 
3 
3 
3 






75 

75 

5 

5 

25 



VI. Major Studies of 80 Graduate Students in Residence. 

Each student entered under a subject is doing full graduate 
work and devoting half or more of her working time to the 
study of that special subject. 



English 9 

Mathematics 6 

French 5 

Historj' 5 

Greek 4 

Latin : . . . 4 

Philosophy and Psychology .... 4 
German and Teutonic Philology 3 



Economics and Politics 3 

Geology 2 

1 

.... 1 



Biology 

Classical Archaeology 

Comparative Literature 1 

1 

1 



Physics 

Semitic Languages. 



4 



VII. Occwpations of 80 Graduate Students. 

Of the 80 graduate students 40 have already taught or are 
teaching, and 15 of these have taught, assisted, or demonstrated 
in colleges and universities; 1 is a social worker, 1 has been 
acting dean of a college, 3 are college wardens, 3 are secretaries, 
2 are librarians, 1 has assisted in a college office. The remain- 
ing 28 have held no position. 

VIII. Examinations for Higher Degrees. 

At Commencement, June, 1913, the degree of Master of 
Arts was conferred on 6 graduate students, belonging to the 
following classes: 

Class of 1912, 4; Class of 1911, 1; Class of 1902, 1. The 
principal subjects of study were Latin 2, Romance Languages 
1, Philosophy 1, Psychology 1, Mathematics 1. 

During the year 3 graduate students presented themselves 
for examination for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The 
candidates were graduates of the following colleges and univer- 
sities : Bryn Mawr College, 1 ; Brown L^niversity, 1 ; University 
of Illinois, 1. The major subjects of the candidates were 
English Philology 1, Political Economy 1, Modern French 
Literature 1. 

Statistics of Undergraduate Students in 1912-13. 

IX. Geographical Distribution of Undergraduate Students. 

The 376 undergraduate students enrolled during the past 
year came from the following states and countries: 



Pennsylvania . . . 
New York 


Students. 
... Ill 
... 62 


Percentage. 
29.5 

16.5 

8.5 
7.9 
5.9 
5.3 
5.1 
2.4 
1.9 


Missouri 

Rhode Island . 

Indiana 

Alabama 

District of Cc 

bia 

Kentucky 

California 

Delaware. . . . . 


Stude: 


nts. 
6 
6 
5 
4 

4 
4 
3 
3 


Percentage. 

1.6 
1 6 


Illinois 

Massachusetts. 
Marjdand 


... 32 
. . . . 30 

22 


ilum- 


1.3 
1.1 


Ohio 

New Jersey . . . . 


... 20 
... 19 


1.1 
1 1 


Connecticut . . . . 
Minnesota 


... 9 

7 


0.8 
O.S 





0.3 




0.3 




0.3 




0.3 




0.3 




0.3 


2 


0.5 


'6 


100.0 



Students. Percentage. Student.s. Percentage. 

Kansas 3 0.8 Arkansas 

Nebraska 3 0.8 Georgia 

Texas 3 0.8 Oregon 

Virginia 3 0.8 South Carolina. . . 

Wisconsin 3 0.8 Vermont 

Michigan 2 0.5 Canada 

New Hampshire ... 2 0.5 Japan 

North Carolina. ... 2 0.5 Total .~376 

These 376 undergraduate students are classified as follows : 
339 resident, 37 non-resident; 368 candidates for a degree, 
8 hearers. Of the 368 candidates for a degree 66 were seniors 
of whom 59 graduated in June, 1 graduated in February and 
6 did not complete the work for a degree, of these 2 failed in 
the German senior oral examination, 1 was placed on pro- 
bation under the merit law and 1 was out of college for one 
semester on account of illness and 2 preferred to take an extra 
semester; 86 were juniors, 105 were sophomores, and 111 were 
freshmen. 

In addition to those who graduated 41 undergraduate 
students left the college, 7 during the year and 34 at its close, 
for the following reasons: 

. During the year: 

On account of illness 5 

Needed by her family ' 1 

Disliked college life 1 

At the end of the year: 

On account of illness 2 

Came for one, two, or three years only 7 

To be married 1 

To travel 2 

Excluded by the Senate 5 

To attend another college 4 

Needed by family 3 

Died 1 

On account of low grades • 2 

To study architecture 1 

To study music 1 

. To study art 1 

To teach 2 

Not stated 2 

—34 
41 
The students who left were members of the following 
classes: juniors 8, sophomores 11, freshmen 22. 



6 



X. Denominational Affiliations of Undergraduate Students in 

1912-13. 

Episcopalian 120 Swedenborgian 3 

Presbyterian 84 German Reformed 2 

Methodist 28 Ethical Culture 

Unitarian 27 Evangelical 

Congregationalist 19 Jewish Reformed 

Baptist 14 Reformed 

Friends 13 Reformed Presbyterians .... 

Roman Catholic 12 Universalist 

Christian Science 11 No denominational affilia- 

Jewish 11 tion 17 

Lutheran 5 

Dutch Reformed 4 376 



Statistics of Senior Class (Class of 1913). 

At Commencement, Jmie, 1913, the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts was conferred on 60 students, 1 of whom completed the 
requirements in February, 1913. The courses may be analyzed 
as follows: 



XI. Length of Course of Senior Class. 

Number 
Length of Graduated 
Date of Entering College. Course. in 1913. 

October, 1906 4 years 1 

October, 1908 4 years 2* 

October, 1908 5 years 3 

October, 1909 4 years 54 

Of the 103 students who entered the college in October, 

1909, 54 or 52.4 per cent have therefore graduated after a 

consecutive four year course. 

XII. Age of Senior Class. 

Class graduating in June, 1913: 

Average age 22 years 3 months 

Median age 22 years 3 months 

Class graduating in February, 1913: 

Average age 24 years, months 

Median age 24 years, months 

* Of these one ■nas out of college for one semester; completed work for degree in 
February, 1913. 



The average age at graduation of the classes since 1907 is 
as follows: 

1907 22 years, 7 . 6 months 

1908 22 years, 6.6months 

1909 22 years, 8.0 months 

1910 22 years, 7 . 4 months 

1911 22 years, 1 . 9 months 

1912 . 22 years, 7.0 months 

XIII. Groups Elected by the Senior Class. 



History and Economics and 

Pohtics 

Latin and German 

Greek and Latin 

Latin and French 

French and Spanish 

Chemistrj^ and Biology 

French and Modern Histoiy . . 

Latin and English 

Mathematics and Physics .... 

Physics and Biology 

Greek and German 



Latin and Italian and Spanish 

20 Latin and Spanish 

5 Latin and Mathematics 

4 English and French 

4 English and Philosophy 

4 German and French 

4 German and Spanish 

3 German and Modern History . 

2 Economics and Politics and 

2 Philosophy 1 

2 — 

1 60 



Arranged in order the major subjects chosen are as follows: 



Number. Per cent. 

History 24 20.0 

Economics and poli- 
tics 21 17.5 

Latin 18 15.0 

French 13 10.8 

German 9 7.5 

Biology 6 5.0 

Spanish 6 5.0 

Greek 5 4.2 



Number. Per cent. 

English 4 3.3 

Physics 4 3.3 

Chemistry 4 3.3 

Mathematics 3 2.5 

Philosophy 2 1.6 

Italian and Spanish 1 0.8 

120 100.0 



Results of Oral Examinations in French and German 
Translation, Class of 1913. 

French. German. 

First Examination. Number. Per cent. Number. Per cent. 

High Credit 1 2.04 

Credit 1 2.04 

Merit 6 12.24 3 60.00 

Passed 20 40.82 13 32.50 

Failed 21 42.86 24 7.50 

Total 49 40 



Second Examination. Number. Percent. 

Merit 2 

Passed 20 

Failed 11 

Total ... 33 

Third Examination. 

Passed 10 

Failed 2 

Total 12 

Fourth Examination. 

Passed 3 

Failed 

Total 3 



Germ.\n. 
Number. Per cent. 



6.06 
60.60 
33.33 



83.33 
16.66 



100 




24 
20 

44 



17 
5 




45.45 
54.54 



77.27 
22.72 



60.00 
40.00 



Statistics of the Freshman Class (Class of 1916). 

The freshmen entering in October numbered 107; 98 
entered on examination and 9 on honorable dismissal from other 
colleges or universities; 1 freshman entered in February, 1913; 
97 lived in the halls of residence and 10 lived at home. 

XIV. Conditions of Freshman Class. 

October. 
Number. Percentage. 

Clear 46 46 . 94 

Clear except for punctuation or spelling 11 11.22 

Conditioned in 1 section 8 8 . 16 

Conditioned in 2 sections 7 7 . 14 

Conditioned in 3 sections 13 13 . 26 

Conditioned in 4 sections 6 6.12 

Conditioned in 5 sections 7 7 . 14 

98 
Honorable dismissal from other colleges 9 



107 



Freshmen conditioned in spelling 6, conditioned in punc- 
tuation, 26, freshmen entering on examination with no con- 
dition except in punctuation or spelling, 58.16 per cent. 



9 

Xy. Comparative Table of Percentage of Freshmen Entering 

Without Matriculation ConditionH, October, 1890 — 

October, 1912. 

This table includes only those entering in October of 
each year and takes no account of conditions in punctuation 
and spelling. Up to 1897 the proportion of students entering 
free from conditions to all the entering students, including 
honorable dismissal students, was taken. After 1897 the 
students who entered on honorable chsmissal were not counted 
in taking the percentage. It is therefore slightly misleading 
to compare the percentages before 1897 with those after 1897. 

In 1890 25.0 % In 1902 37.97% 

In 1891 22.8 % In 1903 35.29% 

In 1892 32.0 % In 1904 50.00% 

In 1893 23.1 % In 1905 54.81%, 

In 1894 19.3 % In 1906 53.48% 

In 1895 19.0 % In 1907 56. ^ 



In 1896 21.8 % In 1908 66.29% 

In 1897 31.8 % In 1909..... 53.00% 

In 1898 26.9 % In 1910 53.63% 

In 1899 31.73% In 1911 49.58% 

In 1900 38.78% In 1912 58.16% 

In 1901 40.52% 



XVI. Removal of Matriculation Conditions. 

Omitting conditions in punctuation and spelling, 69 con- 
ditions were incurred of which 68 were passed off during the 
college year as follows: 

Passed off in November, 1912, 34 

Passed off in February, 1913, 15 

Passed off in March, 1913, 12* 

Passed off in May, 1913, 5 . 

Passed off in September, 1913, 2 

Not passed off, student left college, 1 

69 

One student with one entrance condition amounting to two 
sections not passed off left college early in her freshman year. 



10 

XVII. Table of Preparatory Schools that Prepared 
98 Freshmen. 

Arranged according to sections of country in which the 
college offers matriculation scholarships. Nine freshmen 
entered by honorable dismissal from other colleges. 



-Number oj Freshmen prepared by schools in New England: 

Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn 7 

Miss Haskell and Miss Dean's School, Boston, Mass .... 2 

Dana Hall, Wellesley, Mass 

Milton Academy, Milton, Mass 

The High School, Plymouth, Mass 

Miss Porter's School, Farmington, Conn. 

The High School, Rockville, Conn 

Miss Wheeler's School, Providence, R. I 

15 



First matriculation scholarship of .$300 won by pupil of Rosemary 
Hall, Greenwich, Conn.; second matriculation scholarship of $200 
divided between two pupils of equal grade of Miss Wheeler's School, Provi- 
dence, R. I., and of Miss Haskell and Miss Dean's School, Boston, Mass. 

Number of Freshmen prepared by schools in New Yoi'k. New Jersey and Dela- 
ivare: 

The Brearley School, New York City 2 

The Misses Rayson's School, New York City 2 

The Veltin School, New York City 2 

Miss Bangs and Miss Whiton's School, Riverdale on 

Hudson, N. Y 

Columbia Preparatory School, Rochester, N. Y 

Hawthorne School, New York City 

Heathcote Hall, Scarsdale, N. Y 

The Horace Mann School, New York City 

Kent Place School, Summit, N.J 

The High School, Mt. Vernon, N. Y 

The High School, Pittsburgh, N. Y 

Short Hills School, Short Hills, N.J 

Miss Spence's School, New York City 

The High School, Yonkers, N. Y 

17 



11 

First matriculation scholarship of $300 won by pupil of the Hawthorne 
School, New York City; second matriculation scholarship of $200 won 
by pupil of the Short Hills School, Short Hills, N. J. 

Number of Freshmen prepared by schools in the Western States: 

College Preparatory School for Girls, Cincinnati, Ohio. . . 2 

. University High School, Cincinnati, Ohio 2 

Mrs. Backus' School, St. Paul, Minn 1 

Columbus School for Girls, Columbus, Ohio 1 

Monticello Seminary, Godfrey, 111 1 

The Rayen School, Youngstown, Ohio 1 

Shortridge High School, Indianapolis, Ind 1 

Stanley Hall, Minneapolis, Minn 1 

Wolcott School, Denver, Col 1 

11 

First matriculation scholarship of $300 won by pupil of the Columbus 
School for Girls, Columbus, Ohio; second matriculation scholarship of 
S200 won by pupil of Mrs. Backus' School, St. Paul, Minn. 

Number of Freshmen prepared by schools in Pennsylvania and Southern 
States: 

The Girls' High School, Philadelphia 10 

The Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa 8 

The Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md 8 

The Misses Kirk's School, Bryn MawT, Pa 6 

Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa 3 

Kentucky Home School, Louisville, Ky 2 

The Misses Shipley's School, BrjTi Mawr, Pa 2 

St. Timothy's School, CatonsviUe, Md 2 

Allegany County Academy, Cumberland, Md 1 

Dilworth Hall, Pittsburgh, Pa 1 

Fairmount School, Birmingham, Ala 1 

Friends' Central School, Philadelphia 1 

The Holman School, Philadelphia 1 

The High School, Narberth, Pa 1 

National Cathedral School, Washington, D. C. 1 

The High School, Sewickley, Pa 1 

Stuart Hall, Staunton, Va 1 

Sweet Briar College, Sweet Briar, Va 1 

Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa 1 

Wilkes Barre Institute, Wilkes Barre, Pa 1 

Willard School, Berlin, Germany 1 

.54 



12 

First matriculation scholarship of $300 won by pupil of the Willard 
School, Berlin, Germany, second matriculation scholarship of $200 won 
by pupil of the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Adynitted on Honorable Dismissal: 

University of Nebraska 1 

University of Minnesota 1 

University of Chicago 2 

North westei'n University 3 

Oberlin College 1 

Vassar College 1 . 

9 



Preparation Received in Private or Public Schools, 

Class entering in 

October. 

Number. Per cent. 

Private schools 75 76.6 

Public schools 19 19.4 

Private and public schools 3 3.1 

Private tuition 1 1.0 

98 100.00 



13 



XVIII. A Comparative Table of the Geographical Distribution 
of the Freshman Class, 1904 to 1912. 



States and 
Countries. 



Pennsylvania 

New York 

Illinois 

Maryland 

Massachusetts. . . . . 

New Jersey 

Ohio 

Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut , . 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire. . . . 
North Carolina .... 

Oregon 

Rhode Island 

South Cai'olina 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

France 

Hawaii 

Japan 

England 

Canada 



Per cent of Freshman Classes in 



35.4 
16.7 
6.3 
2.1 
4.2 
2.1 
3.1 



2.1 

2.1 
1.0 



2.1 
2.1 



3.1 
3.1 
1.0 



1.0 



2.1 

2.1 
3.1 
2.1 



1.0 
1.0 
1.0 



1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. j 


37.8 


33.0 


29.2 


27.7 


35.9 


28.6 


30.1 


12.6 


18.2 


17.7 


16.0 


18.9 


14.8 


19.5 


5.4 


10.6 


13.5 


14.9 


9.0 


9.5 


7.3 


8.1 


3.2 


4.2 


9.6 


5.0 


8.7 


4.9 


6.3 


7.4 


6.3 


1.1 


7.0 


12.2 


7.3 


3.6 


4.4 


3.1 


1.1 


4.0 


7.8 


4.1 


1.8 


5.3 


3.1 


3.2 


2.0 
2.0 


1.7 


6.5 
1.6 


1.8 






1.1 








.9 


1.1 


1.0 
1.0 


1.1 




.9 


1.6 


1.8 


1.1 


1.0 


2.2 


2.0 
1.0 


.9 
1.7 


1.6 


.9 


2.2 


2.1 


1.1 


1.0 


1.7 




.9 






1.1 


1.0 




'.8 


1.8 


1.1 
1.1 


1.0 
1.0 


2.2 




2.6 


1.6 


.9 




1.0 


1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 


1.0 


'.9 


.8 


.9 


2.2 






1.0 




.8 


1.8 






2.2 
LI 


2.0 


.9 


1.6 


1.8 


1.1 
1.1 


1.0 




2.0 


.9 


.8 


.9 


2.2 


3.1 
1.0 
2.1 


1.1 


1.0 




.8 

'.8 
.8 


.9 




1.0 


1.1 


i.o 








1.1 


1.0 






.9 


4.1 




1.1 


1.0 






.9 


.8 




1.1 




1.1 


3.0 


.9 


.8 


.9 


1.1 


2.1 


3.2 


1.0 




.8 


.9 




2.1 


1.1 




2.6 


1.8 


.9 


1.1 




1.1 
1.1 


1.0 
1.0 

1.0 


.9 





25.5 
17.4 
3.1 
9.2 
7.1 
3.1 
8.2 

1.0 
1.0 



3.1 
2.0 

3.1 

1.0 
4.1 

4.1 
1.0 
1.0 

1.0 
1.0 

2.0 



1.0 



In 1912, 19 states, the District of Columbia and Japan 
are represented. 



14 



XIX. Denominational Affiliations of the Freshman Class. 



Episcopalian 43 

Presbyterian 17 

Unitarian 6 

Methodist 6 

Congregational ist 4 

Friends 2 

Roman Catholic 3 

Jewish 4 

Baptist 7 

Lutheran 3 



Christian Scientist 3 

Dutch Reformed 2 

Reformed Presbyterian 1 

Reformed 1 

Swedenborgian 1 

Universalist 1 

No denominational affiliation . 3 

107 



XX. Average and Median Age of the Freshman Class. 

Years. Months. 

Average age of the class entering in October 18 9 

Median age of the class entering in October 18 6 

Average age of the class entering in February 18 

Average age (excluding honorable dismissal stu- 
dents) 18 8 

Median age (excluding honorable dismissal students) 18 5 



XXI. Average Ages of Entering Classes Since 1885. 



Year. 


Average Age. 


Median Age. 


Year. 


Average Age. 


Median Age. 


1885 


22.03 


18.87 


1899 


18.75 


18.58 


1886 


18.31 


18.00 


1900 


19.00 


18.91 


1887 


19.24 


19.00 


1901 


18.58 


18.58 


1888 


19.02 


18.20 


1902 


18.83 


18.62 


1889 


19.19 


18.10 


1903 


18.50 


18.50 


1890 


19.35 


18.11 


1904 


18.92 


18.92 


1891 


19.46 


18.07 


1905 


18.66 


18.66 


1892 


19.54 


18.11 


1906 


18.75 


18.50 


1893 


19.78 


19.00 


1907 


18.66 


18.33 


1894 


19.28 


19.01 ; 


1908 


18.50 


18.33 


1895 


19.44 


18.08 


1909 


18.58 


18.58 


1896 


18.97 


18.10 


1910 


18.50 


18.42 


1897 


18.90 


18.75 


1911 


18.54 


18.58 


1898 


19.08 


19.58 


1912 


18.75 


18.50 



15 

XXII. Occupations of Parents of the Freshman Class. 

Professions: 

Lawyers (2 Judges) 13 

Teachers (1 College President) 7 

Physicians (1 Surgeon) 6 

Clergymen (1 Bishop) 6 

Civil Engineers 2 

Architects 2 

Army Officers 2 

Artist 1 

Author 1 

Foreign Correspondent 1 

Governor 1 

—42 
Business: 

Merchants 17 

Manufacturers 15 

Business Managers, Officials and Employees 8 

Bankers 7 

Stock Brokers, Bond and Mortgage Brokers and Com- 
mission Merchants 4 

Real Estate Dealers 2 

Auditor of Accounts 1 

Advertising Manager 1 

Contractor 1 « 

County Supervisor 1 

Farmer. 1 

Machinist 1 

Publisher 1 

Theatre Ticket Agent 1. 

Weaver 1 

No occupation 3 

—65 

107 
XXIII. Ijiientions of Freshman Class in Regard to Graduating. 

Number. Per cent. 

Intend to stay four years and graduate 88 82 . 2 

Uncertain as to graduation 13 12.1 

Will remain one year only 2 1.9 

" " one and a half years 1 0.9 

" " two years 2 1.9 

Intention not stated , 1 0.9 

107 100.0 



16 

XXIV. Decision in Regard to Attending College. 

On entering college each freshman was asked by whom it 
was decided that she should take a college course. The 
answers tabulated are as follows: 

Decision made by ' Number. Per cent. 

Student herself 39 36.5 

Family and student 15 14.0 

Family 14 13.1 

Mother 6 5.6 

Father 6 5.6 

School mistress 5 4.7 

Mother and student 4 3.7 

Father and student 4 3.7 

Sister 3 2.8 

Brother 3 2.8 

Friend 2 1.8 

Grandfather 1 0.9 

Not stated 5 4.7 



107 100.0 



XXV. Number of Years oj Definite Intention to Attend College. 

Intended to come to college Number. Per cent. 

Always 30 28.0 

Several years before entrance 2 1.8 

Ten years 2 1.8 

Nine years 1 0.9 

Eight 3 2.8 

Seven 1 0.9 

Six 1 0.9 

Five :... 3 2.8 

Four 19 17.8 

Three 7 6.5 

Two and a half years 1 0.9 

Two years 6 5.6 

One and a half 1 0.9 

One 5 4.7 

One-half 3 2.8 

A few weeks 1 0.9 

Not stated .21 19.6 

107 100.0 



17 

XXVI. Reasons why Bryn Mawr College was Selected by the 
Members of the Freshman Class. 

The following reasons were given by the Freshmen when 
asked why they selected Bryn Mawr College in preference to 
any other college. 

Number. Per cent. 

Family selected it 14 13.1 

Sister at Bryn Mawr now or formerly 14 13.1 

Recommended by school 13 12.1 

The high standard 11 10,3 

Friendship with alumnse or former students 9 8.4 

Situation near home 4 3.7 

High standard and near home 4 3.7 

Small college near home 3 2.8 

Small college 3 2.8 

Liked the college 3 2.8 

Had seen and liked the college 2 1.9 

High standard and small college 2 1.9 

" " " swimming pool. 1 0.9 

" " " recommended by school 1 0.9 

"friends here 1 0.9 

Liked description in Calendar 1 0.9 

To be near her brother 1 0.9. 

Sent to college by a friend 1 0.9 

English course good. 1 0.9 

College for women only 1 0.9 

Father wanted her to take examinations 1 0.9. 

Not stated 16 14 . 9 

107 100.0 

XXVII. Object in Coming to College. 
Only forty-seven answered this question as follows: 

Number. Per cent. 

To obtain a general education 22 46.8 

To prepare to teach 12 25.6 

To fit themselves for life , 3 6.4 

To prepare for social work 2 4.3 

" " to teach or write 2 4.3 

To study Greek ... 1 2.1 

" English 1 2.1 

To be able to support herself 1 2.1 

To prepare herseK to study abroad 1 2.1 

To meet other girls 1 2.1 

For the independence of college life 1 2.1 



18 
XXVIII. Professions Planned by Freshman Class. 

Number. Per cent. 

Intend to teach 20 18.7 

Plan no profession 14 13 . 1 

Law". 3 2.8 

Social work 3 2.8 

Medicine 2 1.8 

Art 2 1.8 

Law or medicine 1 0.9 

Ai-chitect 1 0.9 

Archajologist 1 0.9 

Teaching or writing 1 0.9 

Nursing 1 0.9 

Surgeon 1 0.9 

Executive work 1 0.9 

Writer 1 0.9 

Librarian 1 0.9 

Business 1 0.9 

Teaching or secretarial work 1 0.9 

Undecided 52 48.6 



XXIX. Favorite Studies of the Freshman Class. 
In some cases one student has mentioned several subjects. 

Enghsh 24 

French 17 

Latin 16 

German 14 

History 10 

Science 10 

Languages 8 

Mathematics • 9 

Economics 6 

Philosophy 4 

Greek 3 

Biology 3 

Music 2 

Chemistry 1 

Physics 1 

Art 1 

Psychology 1 

No special interest 3 

Choice not stated 25 



19 

XXX. Nationalities of the Freshman Class. 

Number. Per cent. 

American for 3 generations 29 27 . 1 

" 2 " only 28 26.2 

"1 " " 31 28.9 

One parent American, 2 generations 8 7.4 

" " " all grandparents foreign 2 1.8 

Parents both English 1 0.9 

" " Armenian 1 0.9 

" " Japanese 1 0.9 

" one German, one Portuguese 1 0.9 

Not stated 5 4.7 

107 

XXXI. Numbers of Brothers and Sisters of the Freshmen. 

Only child 11 

1 brother or sister 8 

2 brothers or sisters 11 

3 " " " 7 

4 " " " 1 

5 " " " 6 

6 " " " 6 

8 " " " 1 

Not stated 59 

107 

1 brother 13 1 sister 15 

2 brothers 6 2 sisters 8 

3 " 6 3 " 5 

4 " 1 4 " 2 

5 " 1 



XXXII . Health of Freshmen. 

The following statements were made as to their health 
by the students themselves: 

Number. Per cent. 

Good health 90 84.0 

Fair " 10 9.4 

Bad " 6 5.6 

Not stated 1 0.9 

107 100.0 



20 



Working of the Merit Law. 

The Report for 1911-12 stated that 4 students were 
placed on probation for the year 1912-13, 2 of the Class of 1912 
and 2 of the Class of 1913. Of these 1 graduated and 3 remain 
on probation for 1913-14. No new cases occurred in February 
but in June, 1913, 3 students of the Class of 1914 received 
grades in their final examinations which gave them more 
than half their hours below merit; one of these was excluded 
from the college by the Senate and the remaining 2 were 
placed on probation. This leaves 5 students on probation for 
the year 1913-14. 

Since the five-year rule came into operation for the Class 
of 1907, 35 students have been placed on probation with the 
following results: 10 graduated, 3 lost their degrees under the 
merit law, 1 excluded from the college, 16 left college and 5 still 
on probation. In the seven classes, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, 
1911, 1912 and 1913, 470 students have graduated. Of these 
about 7 per cent have been placed on probation, of whom less 
than 4 per cent have left college, probably on account of being 
placed on probation, and less than 1 per cent lost their degrees 
under the merit law. In June, 1913, 31 freshmen and 17 sopho- 
mores had received examination grades below merit in more than 
half the hours they had offered for the degree. Of these 25 
freshmen and 13 sophomores have returned for the year 1913- 
14, and are consequently unable to take part in any college 
entertainments requiring preparation, to serve as officers of 
any clubs or associations or to hold paid college positions. 



Registration of Attendance on the First Day of each 
Semester and Before and After Vacations. 

Students are required under penalty of having some of 
their examinations deferred to register 8 times in the college 
year as shown by the following table ; this registration was pre- 
scribed by the Faculty after a prolonged trial of the voluntary 
system in order to ensure regular attendance before and after 
the vacations. 



Ixcuse judged 
adequate. 


Excuse judged 
inadequate. 





3 





3 


11* 


1 


9 


2 


lot 


6 


7 


2 


4 


3 


20t 


1 



21 
XXXIII. Table of Cases of failure to Register. 

Number failing to register : 
Excuse, 
illness. 

Beginning of the college year. ... 3 

Before the Thanksgiving vacation 

After the Thanksgiving vacation 5 

Before the Christmas vacation . . 9 

After the Christmas vacation .... 22 

Beginning of the second semester 12 

Before the Easter vacation 5 

After the Easter vacation 25 

Total 87 61 21 

Fi7ies. 

After a prolonged trial of other methods fines, are imposed 
for failure to register courses in the appointed period, and for 
failure to return course books to the office fully signed at the 
required time at the end of each semester. A fee of one dollar 
is charged for each change a student makes in her course after 
she has definitely registered it. 

Six students did not register their courses during the 
appointed period and were fined $30. Twelve students handed 
in course books late and were fined $60. Seventy-six students 
made changes in their registered courses and were fined $117. 
These fines amounting to $207 were expended for books for the 
college library. 

College Publications. 

The College has issued during the j'^ear 1912-13 the follow- 
ing pubhcations: 
Bryn Mawr Calendar. 

Academic Buildings and Halls of Residence, Plans and 
Descriptions. Volume V, Part 4. pp. 42. Novem- 
ber, 1912. 
Register of Alumnae and Former Students. Volume 
VI, Part 1. pp. 299. January, 1913. 

* 10 of these were on train delayed by fog. 
t 9 of these were on train delayed. 
X Delayed by serious floods. 



22 

Graduate Courses. Volume VI, Part 2. pp. 131. March, 

1913. 
Undergraduate and Graduate Courses. Volume VI, 

Part 3. pp. 204. 2 inserts. May, 1913. 
Supplement, Competitive Matriculation Scholarships, pp. 
11. November, 1912. 
Bryn Mawr College Finding List. pp. 35. November 1, 1912. 
Bryn Mawr College Class Lists, First Semester, pp. 30. 

December 10, 1912. 
Bryn Mawr College Class Lists, Second Semester, pp. 30.. 

March 15, 1913. 
Bryn Mawr College, Annual Report of the President, 1911-12. 

pp. 118. December 18, 1912. 
Bryn Mawr College, Pamphlet of Matriculation Examination 

Papers, Spring, 1913. 
Bryn Mawr College, Pamphlet of Matriculation Examination 

Papers, Autumn, 1913. 
Circulars in regard to Fellowships and Scholarships. 
Miscellaneous Circulars, Notices, Blanks, Examination papers, 

etc. 
Not published through the publisher's office: 

Bryn Mawr College, Financial Report, pp. 27. Novem- 
ber, 1912. 
Summary of the Account of the Treasurer of the Trustees 
of Bryn Mawr College for the year ending ninth month 
30, 1912. pp. 18. October, 1912. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Isabel Maddison, 
Recording Dean and Assistant to the President. 



Report of the Dean of the College. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour of submitting the following report of 
the work of my ofRce for the year 1912-13. 

Upon my return in September, 1912, after a year's leave 
of absence, I found the work of my office very much simplified 
and systematized owing to Dean Park's careful attention to 
the details and organization of the work. The new files and 
office furniture have greatly improved the appearance of the 
office and facilitated the careful keeping of records. 

As usual the work of my office has consisted mainly in 
advising the undergraduates in the registration of their courses, 
and in the general supervision of the health and well-being of 
the students. The details of the health statistics and the 
excuses given for illness will be found in the reports of the 
college physicians and in the records of attendance for the 
year. Owing to the careful supervision of illness the college 
has been extraordinarily free from contagious diseases during 
the past year, although there have been unusually severe 
epidemics in the neighborhood. To the personal attention 
given by Miss Applebee, the Director of Athletics, to each 
individual student is due the increasing vigour and physical 
activity of the students. 

I have given four addresses during the year before the 
following schools and societies: The Alumnae of the Girls 
High and Normal Schools of Philadelphia; The Stevens School 
for Girls, Philadelphia; The Clio Club of Williamsport ; and 
the Stanton Branch of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae. 

The record of the attendance of the students on their 
classes is given below as calculated by i he Recording Secretary. 
Students are excused from attending their classes by the 
Dean of the College in case of illness certified to by one of the 
college physicians and also in special cases when called home on 
account of serious illness in their families. 



(23) 



24 



Record of Attendance. 



Number of cuts 
per student. 



None 

One 

Two 

Three 

Four 

Pive 

Six 

Seven 

Eight 

Nine 

Ten 

Eleven 

Twelve 

Thirteen 

Fourteen 

Fifteen 

Sixteen 

Seventeen. . . . 

Eighteen 

Nineteen 

Twenty 

Twenty-one . . 
Twenty-two . . 
Twenty-three. 
Twenty-four . . 
Twenty-five. . 
Twenty-six . . . 
Twenty-seven 
Twenty-eight . 
Twenty-nine. . 

Thirty 

Thirty-one . . . 
Thirty-two . . . 
Thirty-three. . 
Thirty-four . . . 
Thirty-five . . . 
Thirty-six. . . . 



Number of 
students 
with cuts 


Sem. 
I. 


Sem. 
II. 


11 


5 


12 


8 


16 


9 


18 


8 


15 


12 


19 


14 


21 


13 


23 


15 


22 


16 


22 


9 


19 


20 


18 


22 


18 


13 


10 


10 


13 


8 


9 


12 


9 


11 


12 


13 


8 


17 


5 


12 


6 


4 


5 


5 


9 


7 


2 


2 


2 


8 


4 


6 


2 


4 




6 


3 


6 


6 


1 


1 


7 


2 


4 


3 


4 


5 


2 




3 


i 


3 


1 


2 



Number of 

students 

with unex- 

cused cuts. 



Sem. Sem. 
I. II. 



12 

21 

17 

25 

24 

32 

30 

29 

31 

23 

15 

18 

15 

7 

11 

4 

8 

11 

5 

6 

3 

1 

7 



9 
8 
14 
11 
21 
16 
17 
23 
27 
16 
22 
25 
15 
15 
11 
19 
14 
5 

10 
11 
2 
10 
3 
4 
3 
3 
7 
3 
2 

2 
1 
2 



Number of cuts 
per student. 



Thirty-seven 
Thirty-eight . 
Thirty-nine . . 

Forty 

Forty-one. . . 
Forty-two . . . 
Forty-three . . 
Forty-four . . 
Forty-five. . . 
Forty-six .... 
Forty-seven . 
Forty-eight . . 
Forty-nine. . 

Fifty 

Fifty-one .... 
Fifty-three. . 
Fifty-five. . . 
Fifty-seven . . 
Fifty-nine . . . 

Sixty 

Sixty-one. . . 
Sixty-four. . . 
Sixty-five . . . 
Sixty-six .... 
Seventy-four. 
Seventy-six . . 

Eighty 

Eighty-three. 
Ninety-six . . . 
Ninety-seven 
One Hundred 

three. . . 
One Hundred 

thirty-five 

Total number 
of students . 



Number of 
students 
with cuts. 



Sem. Sem. 
I. II. 



365 



36 



Number of 

students 

with unex- 

cused cuts. 

Sem. Sem. 
I. II. 



365 



361 



25 



- "* Sem. I. Sem. II. 

Aggregate number of cuts 4417 6709 

" " unexcusedcuts 3112 4366 

Average number of cuts per student 12 , 10 18. 58 

" " " " cutting 12.47 18.84 

" " " unexcused cuts per student 8.52 12.09 

" " " cutting.... 8.81 12.40 

Average number of cuts per year per student 30 . 68 

" " " " " " cutting 31.31 

" " unexcused cuts per year per student 20.61 

" " " " " cutting.. 21.21 



Percentage of Students Cutting. 





Cuts excused and 


Unexcused cuts. 


Percentage of total number of students. 


unexcused. 








Sem. I. 


Sem. II. 


Sem. I. 


Sem. II. 


With no cuts 


3.0 
. 16.7 


1.3 
10.2 


3.2 

23.8 


2 4 


With 1 or more, but under 5 cuts. . 


14.6 


u 5 a u u u iQ 




. 29.3 


18.5 


39.7 


27.4 


" 10 " " " " 15 




. 21.3 


20.2 


18.0 


24.3 


« 15 u u u u 20 




. 11.7 


18.0 


9.3 


16.3 


u 20 " " " " 30 




. 10.6 


13.5 


4.3 


10.2 


U 3Q U U U U 4Q 




. 5.2 


8.3 


1.3 


1.9 


U 4Q U « U U 5Q 




1.3 


5.0 




1.6 


" 50 " " " " 60 " .. 


. 


1.9 






" 60 or more cuts 


0.5 

e 


2.8 




5 


Percentage of students with 10 or mor 




cuts 


50.6 


69.7 


32.9 


54.8 



The average number of cuts per student is 30.68 per year, or 15.34 
per semester. As there are 13§ weeks of lectures in each semester, the 
average number of cuts per student is 1.1 lectures a week. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marion Reilly, 

Dean of the College. 



Report of the Secretary of the Faculty. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to report that during the academic j^ear 
1912-13 the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College has taken action 
in matters not of a routine character as follows: 

Election of Secretary. 
October 7, 1912. Dr. Joseph W. Warren having been 
granted leave of absence, the Faculty elected Dr. William B. 
Huff as secretary for the year 1912-13. This election was con- 
firmed by the Board of Directors w^ho voted to attach to the 
office a honorarium of S250. 

French and German Oral Tutoring Classes. 

November 19, 1912. The departments of French and 
German recommended the adoption for four years of a plan 
to form small, one-hour classes for students preparing for 
senior orals, and President Thomas stated that the Board of 
Directors had voted to meet the expense of tutoring such 
classes. 

The Faculty voted to approve the recommendation. 

Amendment to Quiz Rule. 
January 28, 1913. Voted to adopt for the second semester 
of the current year the quiz rule amended as follows: 

Except as noted below, the number of announced written 
quizzes shall be one in one-hour courses and two in two-hour 
and three-hour courses and three in five-hour courses. 

The following two-hour and three-hour courses shall have 
but one written quiz, which will be given during the first quiz 
period: recitation courses, courses with laboratory work, 
lecture courses requiring reports, and major courses with not 
more than ten students. 

There shall be but two announced written quizzes in the 
following five-hour courses: recitation courses, courses with 
laboratory work, and courses requiring reports. 

(26) 



27 



Examinations in Private Reading. 

January 28, 1913. Voted to adopt the following rule for 
examinations in private reading: 

"Examinations in private reading will be held but once 
in each semester, and will come after the last quiz, viz., in the 
13th, 14th and 15th weeks." 

"Students conditioned in private reading may take con- 
dition examinations during the second week of the next 
semester." 

"Seniors conditioned in private reading will be given 
special condition examinations before the final examination 
period." 

Revision of Rule Regarding Registration before and after 
Vacations. 

February 13, 1913. Voted to adopt the following revised 
form of the rule concerning registration: 

"Before the Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter vaca- 
tions every undergraduate .student, except as noted below, 
must register at the last lecture at which she is due by signing 
a class list to be passed around dur ng the last quarter of an 
hour of the ecture period." 

"After these vacations and on the first day of the second 
semester every undergraduate student must register at the 
first lecture at which she is due, by signing a similar class list 
to be passed around during the first quarter of an hour after 
the lecture has begun." 

GronTJS. 

Apr 1 30, 1913. It was voted to recommend to the Board 
of Directors the separation of Philosophy and Psychology and 
the recognition of each as an independent group subject. 

It was also voted to recommend that the following groups 
should be formed: either Philosophy or Psychology with any 
subject that may now be combined with Philosophy; also 
Philosophy with Psychology, Philosophy with Latin, Psychology 
with Biology. 

The Board of Directors approved the recommendation of 
the Faculty and the above groups were established. 



28 

The Second Year of Science. 

February 13, 1913. "Students taking group work in 
Modern History and desiring to offer History in lieu of a second 
year of science will be required to offer five hours of post- 
major work in this subject." 

April 17,1913. "A full minor course in either Philosophy or 
Psychology may be offered in lieu of the second year of science." 

The Examination of Theses. 
Apri 17, 1913, Voted to adopt for the current year the 
following rule for the examination of theses 

(1) After a thesis has been approved by the department, 
it shall be submitted to a special committee. 

This committee shall consist of the President or the Secre- 
tary of the Graduate Committee as Chairman; the director 
of the thesis as Secretary; and three other members chosen 
from faculty or staff by the Graduate Committee. 

After a period not to exceed two weeks, during which each 
member of the above committee of five will examine the thesis, 
the committee will meet, 1 sten to reports from each member, 
and vote on the question of approving the thesis. At least 
four votes shall be necessary for approval. 

(2) In addition to the above special committee chosen 
for each thesis, the Graduate Committee will select not more 
than five other members of the faculty or staff to read the 
thesis after it has been approved by the committee of five. 

The thesis will be sent to each member of this second 
committee by the office, and sent for after three days. 

(3) Finally, each member of the faculty will be notified 
by the office that the thesis has been placed in charge of the 
librarian. For one week it may be examined under the rules 
governing the use of books of reference. 

When the question of accepting the thesis is brought before 
the faculty, members of both committees will be asked to give 
reports. The question will then be put to vote, as usual. 

Request for Additional Felloivships. 
April 30, 1913. That it might be possible to offer each 
year a resident fellowship in Psychology and also one in Philos- 



29 

ophy, it was voted to request the Board of Directors to estab- 
lish a new resident fellowship. 

It was also voted to request the Board of Directors to 
establish a resident fellowship in Spanish. 

The Board of Directors informed the Faculty that much 
to its regret it seemed inadvisable at present to appropriate 
the money necessary to establish these fellowships. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William Bashford Huff, 

Secretary of the Faculty. 



Report of the Secretary, 1912-13. 

To- the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to present the following report for the 
academic year 1912-13. 

Three hundred and ninety-four students were assigned to 
rooms in the halls of residence. Dolgelly and Cartref were 
not opened, as a few graduate students were given vacant 
undergraduate rooms. 

The method of assigning undergraduate rooms adopted 
in May, 1911, is now in complete operation. The old method 
of dividing the number of undergraduate rooms by four so 
that each hall might have an equal number of every class 
resulted in few juniors and no seniors remaining in the smaller 
halls. The proportion of the number of undergraduate rooms 
in each hall to all the undergraduate rooms on the campus 
is now used as the basis of the percentage of every class allowed 
to reserve rooms in each hall. Every hall has now its full 
Cjuota of all four classes. 

The following table shows the number of students in 
each class in each hall and also the number of non-resident 
students : 

1912-13. 

1913. 1914. 1915. 1916. 1917. Graduates. Hearers. Total. 

Merion 15 11 9 14 1 50 

Radnor 6 11 15 15 8 1 66 

Denbigh : 9 12 16 15 1 17 70 

Pembroke East 10 15 18 17 10 70 

Pembroke West 10 14 15 17 11 67 

Rockefeller 12 17 21 22 9 81 

Non-residents 4 6 11 10 24 7 62 



66 86 105 110 1 80 8 456 

Non-resident Fellows . . . . 3 

Total number of students 459 

The matriculation examinations were held in the spring 
of 1913 at Bryn Mawr College and at twenty-seven other 

(30) 



31 

centres, the examinations in each centre being proctored by an 
alumna appointed by the College. The number of candidates 
examined in each centre was: 

Baltimore 48 Munich 2 

Bellefonte 1 New York City 33 

Bonita 1 Omaha 1 

Boston 23 Pittsburgh 2 

Bryn Mawr Ill Princeton 2 

Catonsville 14 Providence 4 

Chicago 11 Richmond 11 

Cincinnati 3 Rosemary Hall 41 

Cleveland 8 St. Louis 1 

Indianapolis 1 Washington 4 

Johnstown 2 Waterbury, Conn 1 

London 1 Wilkes Barre 2 

Louisville 1 Wykeham Rise 15 

Milwaukee 1 

Minneapolis 6 Total 351 

Obtained 
Certificate. Per cent. 

Candidates taking preliminaries . 198 163 82.32 

Candidates taking finals 153 116 75.81 

Thirty-one candidates took the College Entrance Exami- 
nation Board examinations in June. 

Obtained 
Certificate. Per cent. 

Candidates taking preliminaries 22 15 68.18 

Candidates taking finals 9 6 66 . 66 

The freshman class in 1912-13 were prepared by fifty-two 
different schools, eighteen of which sent students for the first 
time to Bryn Mawr. 

Plans and circulars have been sent as usual to schools 
in different parts of the country and each year more applica- 
tions for rooms are being received for longer periods in advance 
of date of candidates' entrance to college. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edith Orlady, 

Secretary. 



Report of the Bureau of Appointments. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit the following report on the 
work of the Bureau of Appointments for the Academic year 
1912-13. 

The following positions have been secured through the 
Bureau of Appointments: 

Teachers in schools and colleges 15 

Tutors and temporary positions 5 

20 

All applications for non-teaching positions have been 
referred to the Bureau of Occupations for Trained Women in 
Philadelphia, and to the Collegiate Bureau in New York. 

The above positions have been secured by the members 
of the following classes: 

1913 3 1907 

1912 2 1904 

1911 4 1894 

1910 4 Former graduate student 

1909 1 Undergraduate still in college . . . 

1908 1 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marion Reilly, 
Dean of the College. 



(32) 



Report of the Librarian. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to present the annual report of the work 
of the Hbrary for the year ending September 30, 1913. 

The following table shows the additions made from various 
sources and the total present extent of the hbrary, with a state- 
ment of the condition of a year ago for purposes of comparison: 

Accessions. 

Number of volumes October 1, 1912 ' ' 67,209 

Number of volumes added: 

1911-12. 1912-13. 

By purchase 2,360 3,543 

By binding 593 562 

By gift and exchange 657 446 

By replacement 27 10 

Unknown sources 4 1 

Christian Association 16 28 

Total additions 3,657 4,590 

Volumes withdrawn 114 48 

Net gain 3,543 4,542 

Maps and charts 7 26 

*Pamphlets added 292 341 

*Pamphlets withdrawn 27 44 

Net gain 265 297 

Total volumes September 30, 1913 71,751 

Total maps and charts 2, 127 

Total accessioned pamphlets 2,924 

These accessions are distributed by classes as follows: 

1911-12. 1912-13. 

General works 280 207 

Philosophy 246 198 

Religion 128 187 

* These numbers represent catalogued pamphlets only. There is also in the library a 
growing collection of several thousand pamphlets arranged alphabetically by author. 
Pamphlets when bound are withdrawn and again accessioned as books. 

^33) 



34 



1911-12. 1912-13. 

Social science 487 664 

Philology 155 280 

Science 466 533 

'^ Useful Arts '. 31 71 

Fine Arts 78 315 

Literature 1,102 1,245 

History, etc 684 890 



Total 3,657 4,590 

A list of donors to the library with titles of the books and 
pamphlets presented is appended. This list does not include 
books purchased from the gifts of money mentioned later under 
the financial statement, nor are the books bought from gifts 
of money included in the table of accessions under the head of 
Gifts and Exchanges, because all such books were bought through 
the library. 

Cataloguing. 

1911-12. 1912-13. 

Titles catalogued 2,692 3,060 

Continuations, etc., added 1,277 1,716 

Cards added to main catalogue 10,141 10,668 

Cards added to departmental catalogues 405 252 

The statistics for 1912-13 show an increase in the number of 
volumes catalogued which nearly corresponds to the increase 
in the number of volumes added as compared with the num- 
ber added in the preceding year. Philosophy from 170-199 
has been recatalogued, which completes this class. In addition, 
the periodicals in chemistry and geology, also a few other 
periodical sets in science have been recatalogued. 

Binding. 

1911. 1912. 
Volumes at binderies, October 1 136 176 

1911-12. 1912-13 

Volumes sent during j^ear 1,046 813 

1912. 1913. 
Volumes at binderies, September 30 176 173 

. 1911-12. 1912-13. 

Total bound during year 1,006 816 



35 

Circulation. 

1911-12. 1912-13. 

October 3,721 4,015 

November 2,488 2,660 

December 1,335 1,662 

January 2,077 2,320 

February 2,593 3,326 

March 2,832 2,491 

April ] ,808 3,096 

May 2,243 2,591 

June 668 876 



19,765 23,037 

The circulation for the past year shows a decided gain over 
that of the previous year. 

The number of books placed on reserves, as noted below, 
indicates somewhat the use of books within the library. 

Reserves. 

1910-11. 

October 1,142 

November 407 

December 202 

January 242 

February 523 

March 226 

April 342 

May 184 

June 1 



1911-12. 


1912-13. 


1,701 


1,399 


586 


377 


193 


196 


249 


240 


457 


565 


527 


312 


304 


372 


181 


253 



3,269 4,198 3,714 

Inter-library Loans. 

During the past year we have borrowed from other libraries 
volumes as follows: 

American Philosophical Society 1 

Boston Public Library 2 

Columbia University 22 

Library of Congress 4 

Free Library of Philadelphia 4 

Harvard University 24 

Haverford College 5 

Johns Hopkins University 2 



36 

Library Company 82 

Mercantile Library 10 

Mount Airy Theological Seminary 6 

University of Pennsylvania 36 

Princeton University 14 

Sui-geon General's Library 1 

Yale University 3 

216 

Books have been lent to other institutions as follows: 

University of Chicago 1 

Haverford College 6 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 1 

University of Pennsylvania 1 

LTniversity of Syracuse 1 

10 

Financial Statement, 1912-13. 

The sums available for the purchase of books and periodicals 
together with the expense of binding and general library supplies 
were as follows: 

Library appropriation apportioned as follows: 

Ancient History $150.00 

Ai'chaeology 150.00 

Art 150.00 

Biblical Literature 150.00 

Biology 300.00 

Chemistry 200.00 

Comparative Literature 150.00 

Comparative Philology 30.00 

Continuations 100.00 

Economics 300.C0 

English 300.00 

French 150.00 

German 150.00 

Geology 150.00 

Gre^k 150.00 

History , 250.00 

International Catalogue 100.00 

Italian 75.00 

Latin 250.00 

Mathematics 1.50.00 



37 

Philosophy . ". 150.00 

Physics 150.00 

Psychology 150.00 

Reference 100.00 

Library Expenses 800.00 

General Literature 165.00 

$4,920.00 

Appropriations were made from fees received for condi- 
tion and advanced examinations and from fines received for late 
registration and changed courses, to the amount of $1,855.35, 
as follows: 

Chemistry $200.00 

EngHsh philology (Dr. Brown) 400.00 

EngUsh philology (Dr. Brown), additional 50.00 

Nineteenth centur}^ literature (Dr. Upham) .... 200.00 

General literature 450.00 

French, Course on Montaigne (Dr. Schinz) 250.00 

Latin (Dr. Frank) 100.00 

John Foster Kii-k Library binding 80.35 

Supplementbande to Jahrbuch fiir klassische 

Philologie 25.00 

Dictionaries for seminaries 100.00 

$1,855.35 

The income on invested funds has been as follow^s: 

Dr. Rhoads Memorial Fund $67.71 

Class of 1902 (devoted to Geology) 28.93 

Lois Meta Wright Memorial Fund 5.20 

Rose Chamberlin Fund 47.93 

Spent for books from the Phebe Anna Thorne Fund .... 154.66 
Spent for books from the Carola Woerishoffer Endow- 
ment Fund 219.25 

From special funds: 

Sale of books 64.65 

Hall libraries 291.64 

For the purchase of duplicate books, to be spent for books 

in History 200.00 

It was decided this year to appropriate $200 to be spent 
for duplicate books to be used in connection with lecture courses, 
and further voted that for next year and succeeding years $400 
is to be spent for this purpose. This appropriation takes the 
place of the class collections by the professors. 



38 



Gifts. 

From the Class of 1897 $25.00 

to be spent for books in History. 

From the Class of 1897 200.00 

to be spent for books in Biology. 

From the Science Club 15.00 

to be spent for scientific books of a general 
character. 

From the Quarterly Fund 10.00 

From the Alumnse come the following gifts: 

From the Alumnse Association 557.05 

distributed as follows : 

Latin (Dr. Frank) $50.00 

Latin (Dr. Wheeler) 50.00 

Greek (Dr. Sanders) 50.00 

Greek (Dr. Wright) 50.00 

German (Dr. Lasch) 150.00 

Physiology (Dr. Joseph) 157.00 

One hour scientific courses: 

Geology (Dr. Bascom) 12.50 

Geology (Dr. Brown) 25.00 

Physics (Dr. Huff) 12.50 



$557.00 



From the Boston Branch of the AlumuiE Asso- 
ciation 222.00 

From Elizabeth Caldwell in memory of John Cald- 
well for the New Book Room 25.00 

From Jean W. Stirling for the New Book Room . . . 15.00 

From individuals have been received the following gifts: 

From Miss Garrett $477.40 

spent as follows: 

Geology — Lethaca Geognostica $85.00 

Physiology 42.32 

Marcel Schwob facsimile of Villon 20.00 

Archaeology 50.00 

The New Book Room 100.00 

English Magazines (Dr. Upham) 100.00 

French (Dr. Schinz) 50.00 

President's Office 30.08 



39 



From Dr. Rufus M. Jones 25.00 

to be spent for religious books. 
From anonymous donor for the New Book Room 50.00 

From Dr. Richard T. Holbrook 6.77 

to be spent for Itahan books. 



Total of gifts $1,628.22 

The following summary of mone.y spent from all sources 
may be of interest: 

1911-12. 1912-1.3, 

For books $4,645.84 $6,778.47 

For periodicals and continuations 2,205.58 2,568.44 

For binding 521.93 688.50 

For supplies 256.17 214.72 

For postage, express, and freight 79.86 69.60 

$7,709.38 $10,319.73 

The Building. 
A few changes have been made in the arrangement of 
rooms. The Italian and Spanish Seminary has been combined 
with the French, and the Semitic Seminary moved to the room 
formerly occupied by Italian and Spanish, thus leaving the room 
at the north end of the stack free to be used as a New Book 
Room. It is proposed to use this room to display all new books 
added to the library and also for a collection of books of interest 
in general reading, which will be changed from time to time. 

A dministration. 
The library staff has remained the same throughout the 
year, except for the resignation, in June, of Miss Mary L. 
Jones, the head librarian, who left in order to be nearer her 
home, Los Angeles, California. Her position has been filled 
by the appointment of Miss Lois A. Reed, who commenced 
her duties September 1st. 

It is of great assistance to the new librarian to have so 
efficient a staff, and I wish to acknowledge my indebtedness to 
them for their help. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lois A. Reed, 

Librarian. 



40 



Gifts. 

Among the gifts especially noteworthy are the books from 
the Hispanic Society. The gift consists of the following 79 
volumes : 

Account of the Departure of the Prince of Wales; Ars Moriendi; 
Glosa a la Obra de Don Jorge Manrrique; AngeUca de Luys; Mme. 
Aulnoy; Silvia de Lysardo; OsLusiades; Cancioneiro General de Resende ; 
Cancionero General; Cancionero llamada Danca de Galanes; Cancionero 
llamada Vergel de Amores; Cid (Poena of the), 3 vols.; Cartilla para 
ensenar; Catalogi librorum reprobatorum ; Catalogus librorum repro- 
batorum; Mandamet der Keyserlijcker Maiesteit; Censura generalis 
contra errores; Cathalogus librorum; Catalogue of Ferdinand Columbus 
Library; Galatea, 2 vols.; Cid (Chronicle of the); Cid (Coronica); 
Ai-acauna, 2 vols.; Historia de la Virgen Madre de Dios Maria; Gar- 
cilasso de la Vega, Obras; Figueroa (Francisco de), Obras; Rimas varias 
enalabanga; Aluaro de Bazan; Initials and Miniatui-es; Exposition de los 
siete psalmos; Exposition del miserere; Curioso tratado de tres romances; 
Arrepentimiento ; Conversion y arrapentimiento; Passo Honroso (Libro 
del); Juhanas (Las); Maravillas del Parnaso; OHveros de Castilla; 
Romancero General; Bias contra Fort una; Veneris tribunal; Romances 
nueuamente sacados de historias antiguas ; Spanish Documents (Collec- 
tion of) ; Cartilla y Luz ; Villete de Amor ; Tirant lo Blanc ; Torre (Fran- 
cisco de la), Obras; Romancero Espiritual; Rimas de Lope de Vega; 
Reportorio de todos los caminos de Espana; Celestina (Burgos, 1499); 
Bibhotheca Hispanica; Comedia de CaUsto y Melibea; Miguel de Castro; 
Lazarillo de Tormes; Penitencia de amor; Manrrique (Jorge), Coplas 
por la muerte de su padre; Commedia de Calisto y Mehbea (Burgos, 
1499); Commedia Tibalda; Libro de los engailos y de los assay amientos 
de las mugeres; Carcel de amor; Bibliographie Hispanique, 1905, 1906, 
1907, 1908, 1909; Eight Essays on Joaquin SoroUa y Bastida; Chapters 
on Spanish Literature; Five Essays on the Art of Ignacio Zuloaga; Islands 
of Titicaca and Koati ; Mexican Maiolica Catalogue ; Las Treinta of Juan 
Boscan; El Romancero Espanol; Canerio Map and Text; Hondius Map 
and Text; MaioUo Map; Genoese World Map, 1457, and Critical Text; 
Atlas of Portolan Charts; Portolan Charts, their Origin and Characteiistics. 

The library of the late Dr. Nettie Maria Stevens has 
been presented to the library and deserves special mention. 
It consists of the following 51 volumes: 

American Association for the Advancement of Science, Proceedings, 
Vols, 55, 59-61; Andrews, Practical Com'se in Botany; Bateson, Materials 
for the Study of Variation, Boyer, Laboratory Manual in Elementary 
Biology; Catkins, Protozoology; Campbell, Elements of Structural and 
Systematic Botany; Campbell, Lectures on the Evolution of Plants; 



41 

Castle, Heredity in Relation to Evolution; Cattoll, American Men of 
Science; Colton, Elementary Course in Practical Zoology; Comstock, 
Manual for the Study of Insects; Cornell University — Medical College, 
Studies from the Department of Anatomy; Darwin, Descent of Man, 
2v.; Darwin, Formation of Vegetable Mould; Darwin, Insectivorous 
Plants; Darwin, Origin of Species; Davenport, Experimental Morphology, 
2v.; Davenport, Heredity in relation to Eugenics, 2 copies; Davenport, 
Statistical Methods; Dugdale, The Jukes; Frost, Text-book of general 
Bacteriology; Galton, Essays in Eugenics; Galton, Memoirs of my Life; 
Geddes and Thomson, Evolution of Sex; Gray, New Manual of Botany; 
Guyer, Animal Micrology; Halleck, Education of the Central Nervous 
Sj'stem; Hunter, Essentials of Biology; Huxley, Life and Letters, 2v.; 
Jennings, Behavior of the Lower Organisms; Johannsen, Elemente der 
exakten Erblichkeitslehre ; International Zoological Congress, 7th, Pro- 
ceedings; Jordan and Kellogg, Evolution and Animal Life; Lee, Microt- 
omist's Vademecum; Liverpool Marine Biological Committee, Annual 
Report, Vols. 21, 24; Loeb, Dynamics of Living Matter; Metcalf, Out- 
line of the Theory of Organic Evolution; Morgan, Experimental Zoology; 
Morgan, Regeneration; Morgan, Regeneration iibersetzt von Moszkowski; 
Payne, Manual of Experimental Botany; Sanford, Elements of Physics; 
Sharpe, Laboratory Manual for the Solution of Problems in Biology; 
Spalding, Guide to the Study of Common Plants; Vries, Species and 
Varieties; Weismann, Beitrage zur Naturgeschichte der Daphnoiden; 
Wilson, Cell in Development and Inheritance; Yerkes, Dancing Mouse; 
Yule, Introduction to the Study of Statistics; Miscellaneous unbound 
matter. 

Other gifts to the Hbrary are as follows: 

Gifts from Individuals. 

Mr. Thomas W. Balch: Oppenheim, Panama Canal. 

Miss Martha Balz: Balz, Die Brendanlegende des Gloucesterlegendars. 

Hon. J. H. Bankhead: Brown, Conservation of Water Powers. 

Dr. George A. Barton: Barton, The Origin and Development of 
Babylonian Writing; Numismatic and Antiquarian Society of Phila- 
delphia, Proceedings, Vol. 26. 

Mr. Friedrich M. Bayer: Bayer, Die wahre und reine Demokratie. 

Miss Cora A. Benneson: Peabody Institute, Memoirs, Vol. 6, Papers, 
Vol. 3, Pt. 5; Science. 

Miss Helen M. Bley: Hess, to rjpwov tov dywi/os. 

Mr. Johnson Brigham: Brigham, A Library in the Making. 

Mr. James W. Bright: Weeks, Raymond & Grandgent, The N. E. A. 
Phonetic Alphabet. 

Dr. Carleton F. Brown: Booker, A Middle English Bibliography. 

Miss Mary C. Burchinal: Burchinal, Hans Sachs and Goethe. 

Hon. T. E. Burton: Andi-ew, Some Facts and Figures Relating to 
the Money Trust Inquiry. 



42 



Miss Helen M. Cam: Cam, Local Government in Francia and 
England. 

Miss Eleanor Deming: Mill, International Geography. 

T. S. Denison and Company: Denison, Mexican Linguistics. 

Hon. Chauncey M. Depew: Depew, Later Speeches. 

Mrs. Edwin Dodge: Stein, Three Lives. 

Professor Lucy M. Donnelly: Beerbohm, The Poets' Corner; Weekley, 
Romance of Words; Alexandre, Les mots qui restent; Rodin, L'art. 

Messrs. Doubleday, Page and Company: Van Antwerp, Stock Ex- 
change From Within; Gilliss, A Printer's Sundial. 

Dr. Carl H. Eigenmann: Carnegie Museum, Memoirs, Vol. 5; Index 
to Catalogue of the Freshwater Fishes of Tropical America; 3 Reprints. 

Mr. Clarence C. Ferris: A new Plan for Direct Nominations. 

Dr. Simon Flexner: Journal of experimental Medicine, Vols. 7-16. 

Mr. William D. Foulke: Foulke, Maya; Foulke, Protean Papers. 

Mr. Albert Gehring: Gehring, Basis of Musical Pleasure; Gehring, 
Racial Contrasts. 

Dr. F. H. Getman: Journal of Physical Chemistry, Vol. 15, Pts. 1-9, 
Vol. 14, Pts. 1-9. 

Miss Mary A. Gleim: Isthmian Canal Commission, Maps. 

Miss Josephine C. Goldmark: Goldmark, Fatigue and Efficiency. 

Mr. John E. Goodwin: Baskerville, Early English Elements in Jon- 
son's Early Comedy. 

Mr. James Green: Garver, Edward H. Hall. 

Mr. FoUett L. Greeno: Greeno, Obed Hussey. 

Dr. William E. Griffis: Griffis, A Modern Pioneer in Korea. 

Mr. Sidney Gunn: Gunn, A Triple Rhyme Translation of the Divine 
Comedy, Inferno, Canto 1. 

Mr. Charles H. Haile: Haile, Uses of Shall and Will; Haile, ShaU 
and Will and the English Subjunctive. 

Mrs. Charles F. Harrison: Harrison, A Whisper of Destiny. 

Dr. John W. ,Harschberger: Harschberger, The Botanists of Phila- 
delphia. 

Mr. Frederick C. Hicks: Hicks, Inter-library Loans. 

Dr. Isaac A. Hourwich: Hourwich, Immigration and Labor. 

Miss Mary I. Hussey: Hussey, Some Sumerian-Babylonian Hymns 
of the Berlin Collection. 

Mr. Joseph P. Iddings: 3 Reprints. 

Mrs. William F. Jenks: Egypt Exploration Fund, Memoir. 

Mrs. J. E. Johnson: Philadelphia, Collegiate Institution for Young 
Ladies, Annual Catalogue, 1832. 

Miss Georgiana G. King: American Anthropologist, Vol. 12, Pts. 
1, 4; Vol. 13, Pts. 1-4; Vol. 14, Pts. 1-3, Vol. 15, Pt. 1; 2; Cm-rent 
Anthi'opological Literature, Vol. 1, Pts. 1-3; International Studio, Vol. 
42, No. 168; Vol. 43, Nos. 169-172, Vol. 44, Nos. 174-176, Vol. 45, Nos. 
177-179; Enlart, Le musee de sculpture comparee du Trocadero. 



43 

Dr. Theodore W. Koch: Kocli, The Four Needs of the University 
Library. 

Messrs. Lemcke and Buechner: Hinrichs' JIuIbjahns-Katalof^, Part 
1, 1912. 

Miss Emily S. Lewis: Lewis, The Little .Singer. 

Mr. Harlow Lindley: Lindley, The Quakers in the Old Northwest. 

Hon. Henry C. Lodge: Palmer, Sugar at a Glance. 

Dr. R. C. Lucas: Lucas, Bradshaw Lecture on Home Points in 
Heredity, 1911. 

Mr. Logan G. McPherson: 1 Reprint. 

Mr. R. B. Moffat: Moffat, Pierrepont genealogies, 1913. 

Mr. J. P. Morgan: Harris, The Man Shakespeare. 

J. P. Morgan and Company: Letter to Sub-Committee of the Com- 
mission on Banking and Currency of the House of Representatives. 

Hon. Henry McMorran: McMorran, Minority Report upon the 
Money Trust Inquiry. 

Mr. J. J. Munro: Newton, Catalogue of old Ballads. 

Hon. Runle Nelson: Thayer, Recall of judicial decisions. 

Mr. H. T. Newcomb: Newcomb, Railway CapitaUzation and Traffic. 

General Richard H. Pratt: Pratt, American Indians Chained and 
L'nchained; Pratt, The Solution of the Indian Problem. 

Dean Marion Reilly: Bollettino di bibliografia e storia delle scienze 
matematiche, 1903, 1907; Nietzsche, Gesammelte Brief e. Vol. 3, Pts. 
1-2; Gookin, Japanese Colour-prints and their Designers; Newbolt, 
Poems New and Old; Rolland, Jean-Christophe, lOv.; James, A Small 
Boy and Others; Gosse, Portraits and Sketches; Pinero, Preserving Mr. 
Panmure; Galsworthy, The Eldest Son; Brieux, Les avaries; Brieux, 
Les trois fiUes de M. Dupont; Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov. 

Mr. Albert G. Robinson: Robinson, Sugar. 

Hon. William A. Rodenberg: Rodenberg, Remsen Referee Board and 
the Pure Food Law. 

Mrs. Mildred C. Sawyer: Conway, My Pilgrimage to the Wise Men 
of the East; Conway, Addresses and Reprints, 1850-1907. 

Miss Nancy E. Scott: Scott, The Limits of Toleration Within the 
Church of England from 1632 to 1642. 

Dr. Otto Seidl: Seidl, Der Schwan von der Salzach. 

Miss Helen R. Shoemaker: College Settlements Association Report, 
1910, 1911; Vassarion, 1910. 

Miss Margaret Skinner: Catalogue of Objects Exhibited at South- 
ampton, N. Y., 1897. 

Mrs. Elwood B. Speer: Wilder & Taylor, Self-help and self -cure. 

Hon. H. D. Stephens: Report of Commission to Investigate the Con- 
centration of Control of Money. 

Dr. Augustus H. Strong: Strong, Miscellanies, 2v.; Strong, One 
Hundred Chapel-talks; Strong, Union with Chi-ist. 

Mr. John Tatlock: Airy, Gravitation; Appalachia, Vols. 1-8; Burn- 
ham, Double Star Observations; Corbaux, On the Natural and Mathe- 



44 



matical Laws Concerning Population; Hardy, Elements of Quaternions; 
Herschel, Treatise on Astronomy; Hipsley, Equational Artithmetic; 
Lobatschewsky, Geometrical Researches on the Theory of Parallels; 
Loomis, Introduction to Practical Astronomy; Loomis, Treatise on 
Astronomy; Merriman, Figm-e of the Earth; Newcomb, Elements of the 
Four Inner Planets; Rogers, Magnetism of Iron Vessels; Rupert, Famous 
Geometrical Theorems; Ursinus, Logarithmi; Warner & Swasey, A Few 
Astronomical Instruments; Watson, Theoretical Astronomy. 

Dr. Alfred H. Upham: Upham, Old Miami. 

Dr. Charles R. Van Hise: Report of the Board of Arbitration in 
Controversy Between Eastern Railroads and Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Engineers. 

Mr. Max Werner: Werner, Das Christentum und die monistische 
Religion. 

Dr. Talcott Williams: New York (State) Public Service Commission, 
1st District, Annual Report, Vols. 1-3; Proceedings, Vol. 6; New Jersey 
Geological Survey, Final Report, Vol. 1; Annual Report, 1881; Maps, 
1868; New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Stations, Bulletin, No. 202; 
Charities Review, Vol. 2, No. 5, 7 copies; Comstock, Notes on European 
Surveys; Congres geologique international, 1891; Hayden, Atlas of 
Colorado; Ohio — Chief Inspector of Mines, Annual Report, 1904; 
Climatology of Pennsylvania; Testimony Before the Joint Commission 
of Signal Service, 1886. 

Miss Dorothy S. Wolff: Brooks, Social Um-est; Devine, Social 
Forces; Devine, Misery and its Causes; Steiner, Against the Current; 
Steiner, Immigrant Tide. 

Mrs. J. Edmund Wright: Publications de I'institut Nobel norvegien, 
Vol. I. 

Gifts and Exchanges from Institutions, Societies, etc., 1912-13. 

Academy of Natural Sciences: Proceedings, Vol. 64, Pt. 2, 3, Vol, 
65, Pts. 1, 2. 

Alabama, Geological Survey: Bulletin, No. 8; Index to Mineral 
Resources; Report on the Geology of the Coastal Plain of Alabama; 
Map of the Coosa Coal Field; Phillips, Iron Making in Alabama. 

American Academy of Arts and Science: Proceedings 13v. 

American Anti- Vivisection Society: Annual Report, 1912. 

American Association for International Conciliation: Bulletin, 
January-July, 1913; Pubhcations, Nos. 58-69, 1912-13; D'Estournelles 
de Constant, Les Etats-Unis d'Ameiique. 

American Federation for Sex Hygiene: Report of the Special Com- 
mittee on the Matter and Methods of Sex Education. 

American Iron and Steel Institute: Monthly Bulletin, 1913; Year- 
book, 1912. 

American Jewish Committee: Sulzberger, Is Immigration a Menace? 

American Marathi Mission: Report, 1912. 



45 

American Medical Association: List of Books on the Prevention of 
Disease. 

American Peace Society: Report, 1912. 

American Proportional Representation League: Hogg, The Repre- 
sentative Council Plan of City Government. 

American Telephone and Telegraph Company: Annual Report, 1912. 

Amherst College Library: Loomis, Hunting Extinct Animals in the 
Patagonian Pampas. 

Association of American Universities: Journal of Proceedings and 
Addresses, Vol. 14. 

Association of Collegiate Alumnaj: Journal, Vol. 6, No. 1. 

Association of Life Insurance Presidents: Proceedings of Sixth 
Annual Meeting; Rankin, Influence of Vital Statistics on Longevity; 
Need for Better Vital Statistics; Birth and Death Boolckeeping. 

Australia, Commonwealth Statistician: Official Yearbook, No. o, 
1901-11. 

Bodleian Library: Staff Manual, 1913; Annual Report of the 
Curators, 1912; Sadler, The Political Career of Richard Brinsley Sheri- 
dan; Lothian Historical Essay, 1912; Chancellor's Piize, Latin Prose; 
Chancellor's Prize, Latin Verse; Gaisford Prize, Greek Prose; Gaisford 
Prize, Greek Verse; Newdigate Prize Poem. 

Book Association of Friends: Bartlett, John H. Dillingham. 

Boston Children's Aid Society: Annual Report, Vol. 48. 

Boston Museum of Fine Arts: Annual Report, 1912. 

Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences: Bulletin, Vol. 2, Nos. 1-2. 

Bryn Mawr College Alumnge Association: Annual Report, Vol. 21. 

Bureau of Railway Economics: Bulletin, Nos. 45, 48-51; Sayings 
and Writings About the Railways. 

California Academy of Sciences: Proceedings, Vols. 1, 3. 

CaUfornia, Bureau of Labor Statistics: Biennial Report, 1911-1912. 

University of California: 14 Reprints; Publications, Education, 
Vol. 3, Nos. 3-4; Pathology, Vol. 2, Nos. 9-11; Philosophy, Vol. 2, No. 5; 
Physiology, Vol. 4, No. 17; Psychology, Vol. 1, No. 2; Zoology, Vol. 9, 
Nos. 6-8, Vol. 8, No. 3; Vol. 10, No. 9, Vol. 11, Nos. 1-6. 

Canada, Office of Archivist: Publications of the Canadian Archives, 
Nos. 5, 7, 8; Catalogue of Pamphlets, Journals and Reports in the Domin- 
ion Archives, 1611-1867; Martin, Red River Settlement; Report of the 
Work of the Archives Branch, 1908, 1909. 

Canada, Geological Survey: Summary Report, 1911. 

Canada, Department of Mines: Summary Report, 1911; Summary 
Report of the Anthropological Division, 1910-11; Report on the Build- 
ing and Ornamental Stones of Canada, Vol. 1 ; Preliminary Report on the 
Mineral Production of Canada, 1912; Annual Report on the Mineral 
Production of Canada, 1911; Memoirs, Nos. 13, 21, 17-E; Publications, 
Nos. 145, 154, 167, 170, 227; Bulletin, No. 8. 

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace: Carnegie, Latest 
panacea. 



46 

Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: Annual 
Report, Vol. 7. 

Carnegie Institution of Washington: Yearbook, Vol. 11; Publi- 
cations, Nos. 170, 174, 90-A, 171, 176, 159, 746, 175, 168, 177, 543, 169, 
173, 178, 186, 181, 747; Bibliography of the Department of Economics 
and Sociology; Publications of the Carnegie Institution of Washington; 
Classics of International Law, Ayala, 2v.; Grotius, De Jure Belli, Vol. 1. 

CathoUc University of America: 3 Dissertations. 

Chicago First National Bank: Chicago Fu'st National History, 1863- 
1913. 

Chicago, Municipal Court, 5th Annual Report, 1910-11. 

Chicago, Special Park Commission: Annual Report, 1911. 

Cliildren's Country Week Association: 35th Annual Report. 

Cincinnati, Smoke Abatement League: Annual Report, 1912. 

University of Cincinnati: Studies, Vol. 8, Nos. 1-2. 

College Settlements Association: Reports, 1895, 1903-1911. 

Colombo Museum: Spolia Zeylanica, Vol. 8, Nos. 31-32, Vol. 9, 
No. 33. 

Columbia University: A Contribution to a Bibliography of Henri 
Bergson; University Bibliography, 1912; General Catalogue, 1754-1912. 

Columbia University, Teachers' College: Bulletin, Ser. 4, No. 3. 

Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences: Transactions, Vol. 17. 

Connecticut, Geological and Natural History Survey: Bulletin, No. 
21; Abstract of 5th Biennial Report. 

Cornell University: 21 Dissertations. 

Daughters of the Revolution: 21st Annual Meeting, 1912. 

Dayton, Biu-eau of Municipal Research: Proposed Charter for 
Dayton. 

Democratic National Committee: Democratic Text-Book, 1912. 

Des Moines Public Library: Plan of Commission Government; 4th 
Annual Report of City of Des Moines. 

Dropsie College: 1 Dissertation. 

Dublin, Royal Society: Economic Proceedings, Vol. 2, No. 5; Scien- 
tific Proceedings, Vol. 13, Nos. 24-37. 

Eugenics Record Office: Humphrey, Parenthood and the Social 
Conscience. 

Federal Council of the Churches of Chi-ist in America: 16 Pamphlets. 

Free Speech League: 11 Pamphlets. 

Georgia, Geological Sm-vey: Bulletin, Nos. 27, 28. 

L^niversity of Groningen: 4 Dissertations; Roos, Catalogus der 
Incunabelen van de Bibliotheek; Jaarboek, 1911-12. 

Harvard ITniversity Library: Massachusetts, Report of Commission 
on the Support of Dependent Minor Children of Widowed Mothers. 

Harvard University, Jefferson Physical Laboratory: Contributions, 
Vols. 8-10. 

Hawaii Promotion Committee: Pamphlets. 

Honolulu Chamber of Commerce: Annual, 1912. 



47 

Hull House: Yearboook, 1913. 

Illinois, Board of Administration: The Institution Quarterly, Vol. 3, 
No. 4, Vol. 4, No. 1. 

Illinois, State Charities Commission: 1 Reprint; Bowen, Some of 
the Problems of the State Charitable Institutions; 3d Annual Report, 
1912. 

Illinois, State Geological Survey: Bulletin, Nos. 17-19; Geologic 
Map of Illinois. 

Illinois, Bureau of Labor Statistics: 14th Annual Report. 

Illinois State Historical Library: Transactions, Vol. 8; The Lincoln 
Way. 

Illinois, State Mining Board: 31st Annual Coal Report. 

University of Ilhnois: Bulletin, Vol. 10, Nos. 12, 19; 1 Dissertation; 
4 Pamphlets; Studies in Social Sciences, Vol. 1, Nos. 1—4, Vol. 2, No. 1. 

Indiana Academy of Sciences: Proceedings, 1911. 

International Institute of Agriculture: The Way out of the Rut. 

Iowa, Geological Survey: Annual Report, Vol. 21. 

Iowa, Bureau of Labor Statistics: 15th Report. 

University of Iowa: Bulletin, N. S., No. 53; No. 74. 

University of Jena: 314 Dissertations. 

John Crerar Library: List of Current Medical Periodicals and Allied 
Serials. 

John Rylands Library: Analytical Catalogue of "An English Garner; " 
Tercentenary of the "Authorised Version" of the English Bible, A. D. 
1611-1911; Catalogue of an Exhibition of Original Editions of the Prin- 
cipal English Classics; A Brief Historical Description of the Library and 
Its Contents; Catalogue of an Exhibition of Mediaeval MSS. and Jewelled 
Book Covers. 

Johns Hopkins University: 28 Dissertations. 

University of Kansas: Bulletin, Vol. 14, No. 1. 

Kentucky, Department of Education: Bulletin, Vol. 5, No. 10, 
Vol. 6, No. 3; Elementary Course of Study. 

Kyoto Imperial University: Memoirs, Vol. 3, Nos. 4-6, 9-12, Vol. 4, 
Nos. 1-2; Vol. 5, Nos. 1-5. 

Lake Mohonk Conference on International Arbitration : ' ' Inter- 
national Peace" — winning Essays in Black Prize Contest, 1911-12, 1912- 
13; Report of Annual Meeting, Vols. 18, 19. 

Leland Stanford Junior University: Trustees' Series, Nos. 21-22; 
McFarland, In Memoriam, Nettie Maria Stevens; Dudley Memorial 
Volume; Starks, Fishes of the Stanford Expedition to Brazil. 

University of London: Calendar, 1912-13; Regulations for External 
Students, 1912; Regulations for Internal Students, 1912-13; Historical 
Record, 1836-1912. 

London and North Western Railway: 19 Pamphlets. 

Los Angeles, Auditor: Report, 1912. 

Louisville Free Public Library: Books for Boys and Girls; Gardens 
and Gardening. 



48 



Maine Agricultural Experiment Station: Bulletin, Nos. 202-203, 
207, 210-211, 213. 

Universitj' of Manchester: Dehn, German Cotton Industry. 

Maryland Peace Society, Maryland Quarterly, No. 12. 
■ Massachusetts, Commission on Compensation for Industrial Acci- 
dents: Report, 1912. 

Massachusetts, Bureau of Labor Statistics: 12th Annual Report on 
Strikes and Lockouts; 4th Annual Report on Labor Organizations; Annual 
Report, Vol. 42; Annual Report on the Statistics of Municipal Finances, 
Vols. 4, 5; 12th Annual Directory of Labor Organizations; Directory of 
Mas.'^achusetts Manufactures; Collective Agreements Between Employers 
and Labor Organizations, 1911; The Immigrant Population of Massa- 
chusetts; Special Report on Municipal Debt in Massachusetts, 1912; 
Labor Bulletin, Nos. 94-95; Annual Statistics of Manufactures, Vol. 26. 

Ma.ssachusetts Civil Service Reform Auxiliary: Documents, Nos. 
31-32; 2 Pamphlets. 

Massachusetts, State Board of Charity: Annual Report, Vol. 34. 

Massachusetts, State Free Employment Offices: Annual Report, 
1912. 

Michigan, Board of Health: Annual Report, Vol. 39; Public Health, 
Vol. 7, Nos. 3-5, Vol. 8, Nos. 1-2; N. S., Vol. 1, No. 1. 

LTniversity of Michigan: Koch: Some Phases of the Administrative 
History of College and University Libraries; Michigan Association for 
the Prevention and Relief of Tuberculosis, 1911; New Testament MSS. 
in the Freer Collection, Pt. 1; Facsimile of the Washington MSS. — The 
Gospels; 11 Dissertations; 4 Reprints; Historical Studies, No. 3; Human- 
istic Series, No. 2. 

Michigan, Schoolmaster's Club: Proceedings, Vol. 47. 

Milton Public Library: Kirk, Charles the Bold, 2v. 

University of Minnesota: Studies in Economics, No. 1; Studies in 
Chemistry, No. 1; Zoological Series, No. 5; Extra Series Bulletin, No. 1, 
Vol. 16, No. 1; Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin, No. 132. 

Missouri, Bureau of Geology and Mines: Publications, 2d Series, 
Vols. 10-11. 

University of Missouri: Biennial Report of the Board of Curators; 
Bulletin, Education Series, Vol. 1, Nos. 4, 6; Library Series, Vol. 1, No. 
4, Vol. 2, No. 1; Mathematics Series, Vol. 1, No. 1; Medical Series, Vol. 1, 
Nos. 1-2; Science Series, Vol. 1, No. 7. 

Missouri Botanical Garden: Annual Report, Vol. 23. 

Munich, Koniglich Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaf ten : Biss- 
ing, Der Anteil der agyptischen Kunst am Kunstleben der Volker; Linde, 
Physik und Technik auf dem Wege zum absoluten Nullpunkte der Tem- 
peratur; Abhandlungen, Mathematisch-physikalische Klasse, Band 25, 
Abt. 9-10, Band 26, Abt. 1-4; Sitzungsberichte, 1912, Abt. 2-3, 1913, 
Abt. 1; Abhandlungen, Philosophisch-philologisch und historische Klasse, 
Abhandlungen, Band 26, Abt. 3-4, Band 27, Abt. 1-2, Sitzungsberichte, 



49 

1912, Abt. 2-3, Schlussheft, 1913, Abt. 1-2, Registerheft 1860-1910; 
Jahrbuch, 1912. 

National Child Labor Committee: Proceedings, 1908-11. 

National College Equal Suffrage League: Franklin, The Case for 
Woman's Suffrage. 

National Woman's Trade Union League: 4th Biennial Convention. 

National Ice Association of America: 4th Annual Meeting. 

University of Nebraska: Studies, Vol. 11, Nos. 1-4, Vol. 12, Nos. 
1-3; Publications, Nos. 589, 590, 592, 593. 

New England Society of the City of New York: 107th Annual 
Anniversary Celebration; The Puritans' Farewell to England. 

New Jersey, Agricultural Experiment Stations : Report of the Botan- 
ical Department, 1911. 

New Jersey, Geologist: Bulletin, Nos. 6-7. 

New Jersey, Bureau of Statistics: 35th Annual Report. 

New York, Association for Tuberculosis Clinics: 5th Annual Report; 
Crowell, Adequate Clinic Control. 

New York, Charity Organization Society: Annual Report, 1903-12. 

New York, Consumers' League: Report, 1911-13. 

New York, Public Library: Memorial Meeting, Dr. John Shaw Bill- 
ings. 

New York, Tenement House Department: Report, Vol. 6. 

New York, Education Department: Annual Report, 1911; State 
Museum Report, 1910; Annual Report, 1912. 

New York, Commissioner of Labor: Annual Report, 1912. 

New York, Department of Labor: Annual Reports of Department 
Bureaus, 1911. 

New York, Bureau of Labor Statistics: Annual Report, 1911, Pt. 2. 

New York, University Club: Annual, 1912, 1913. 

Newark, Shade Tree Commission: 8th Annual Report. 

Newberry Library: Publication, No. 3. 

University of North Carolina: Studies in Philology, Vol. 10. 

Ohio University: Bulletin, Vol. 10, No. 2. 

Oklahoma, Geological Survey: Bulletin, Nos. 9-10, 15-16; Circular, 
Nos. 4-5. 

Omaha, City Comptroller: Annual Report, 1910-11, 1912; Muni- 
cipal Statistics, Nos. 17-18; Jan.-May, 1913. 

Oregon, State Immigration Commission: Oregon Almanac. 

Paris, Ministere de 1' Instruction publique: Rapport sur la situation 
de I'enseignement superieur, 1911-12; Catalogue des theses, Vol. 28; 
Artonne, Le mouvement de 1314 et les chartes provinciales de 1315. 

Pennsylvania, Chestnut Tree Blight Commission: Bulletin, Nos. 1-2. 

Pennsylvania, State Library: Department of Agricultui-e, Report, 

1910, 1911; Auditor General, Report, 1911; Banking Commission, Report, 

1911, Pt. 1; Factory Inspector, Annual Report, 1911; Department of 
Fisheries, Report, 1911; Department of Forestry, Report, 1910-11; 
Insurance Commissioner, Annual Report, Vol. 39; Department of Inter- 



50 



nal Affairs, Report, ,1911, Pts. 1-4; Legislative Joui-nal, Vols. 1-3, 1911; 
Department of Mines, Report, 1911, Pts. 1-2; Board of Commissioners 
of Public Charities, Annual Report, 1910, 1911; Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, Report, 1911; Railroad Commission, Annual Report, 
191 1; Regimental Histories, 45th Pennsylvania Regiment, 140th Pennsyl- 
vania Regiment, Pennsylvania at Salisbiu-y, N. C; Commissioner of 
Sinking Fund, Report, 1911; State College, 1910-11; Topographic and 
Geologic Sm-vey, Report, 1908-10, Report, Nos. 4-5; Smull's Legislative 
Handbook, 1912; 38 Pamphlets; State Treasurer, Report, 1911. 

Pennsj'lvania, Republican State Committee: Tentative Draft of an 
Act Establishing a Department of Charities. 

University of Pennsylvania: Gerson, Vaughn, and Deardorff, Studies 
in the History of English Commerce in the Tudor Period; Contributions 
from Zoological Laboratory, Vol. 18. 

Philadelphia, Committee of Seventy: Report of the Executive Board 
of the Committee of Seventy, February, 1913. 

Philadelphia, Office of the Mayor: Real Estate and Its Taxation in 
Philadelphia. 

Government of the Philippine Islands, Bureau of Education : Bulletin, 
No. 46. 

University of Pittsburgh: Celebration of the 125th Anniversary. 

Portici, R. Scuola superiore d'agricoltura: Bollettino del laboratorio 
di zoologia generale e agraria. Vol. 6. 

Princeton University: 2 Dissertations; Bibliography of Woodrow 
Wilson; Contributions from the Biological Laboratories, Vol. 3. 

Progressive Party: Campaign Literature. 

Prudential Insurance Company of America: In Memoriam John 
Fairfield Dry den. 

Queen's University: Bulletin of the Departments of History and of 
Political and Economic Science: Vol. 1, Nos. 5-8. 

Rhode Island, Factory Inspection: Annual Report, 1913. 

Rhode Island School of Design: Bulletin, Vol. 1, Nos. 1-3; Yearbook, 
1913. 

Sagamore Sociological Conference: 6th Conference. 

St. Louis Public Library: Books I Like and Why I Like Them. 

Scribner's Magazine International Travel and Shopping Bureau: 
Paris, London. 

Strassburg, Universitats und Landes-Bibliothek : 30 Dissertations. 

Tennessee, State Board of Entomology: Annual Report, Vol. 1, 
No. 4; Bulletin, Nos. 9-10. 

Tennessee, Geological Survey; The Resources of Tennessee, Vol. 
2, Nos. 11-12, 14, Vol. 3, No. 3. 

Tokyo, Imperial University, College of Agriculture: Journal, Vol. 1, 
No. 4, Vol. 3, No. 2, Vol. 4, Nos. 2-4, Vol. 5, Nos. 1-2. 

University of Toronto: Studies, Biological Series, Nos. 10-14; Chem- 
ical Series, Nos. 94-98; Geological Series, No. 8; Philological Series, 
No. 2; Phj'sical Series, Nos. 37-46; Physiological Series, Nos. 8-9. 



51 

Union League, Philadelphia: Annual Report, 1912; Index to Cur- 
rent Fiction in the Library. 

Washington University: Record, Series 1, Vol. 8, No. 6. 

University of Washington: Occasional Papers, Nos. 2-3; Studies, 
No. 5. 

Wellcome Chemical Laboratories: Papers, Nos. 139-150. 

Western Theological Seminary: Bulletin, Vol. 5, Nos. 1-4. 

Williams College: McClellan, Smuggling in the American Colonies. 

Wisconsin, Industrial Commission: Bulletin, Vol. 1, Nos. 5A, 5, 6; 
Vol. 2, Nos. 1-9. 

Wisconsin Library Commission: Comparative Legislation Bulletin, 
No. 25. 

Wisconsin, Railroad Commission: Erickson, Depreciation. 

Wistar Institute of Anatomy: Journal of Morphology, Vols. 18-23. 

Workmen's Compensation Service and Information Bureau: Otis, 
Workmen's Compensation. 

World Peace Foundation: Concord, Vol. 29, Nos. 9-11, Vol. 30, 
Nos. 5-7; Impudence of Charlatanism; Hull, The Two Hague Con- 
ferences; Scott, Texts of the Peace Conferences at The Hague; Pamphlet 
Series, Vol. 3, Nos. 1-8. 

Yale Peruvian Expedition: Vitcos, the Last Inca Capital; Foote 
and Buell, Composition, Structure and Hardness of Some Peruvian Bronze 
Axes. 

Yale University Library: Yale University Bulletin, 1912-13; Ver- 
worn. Irritability; Campbell, Stellar motions. 

Periodicals, the Gift of Publishers. 

Advocate of Peace; Alaskan Churchman; Amherst Graduates' 
Quarterly; Book News Monthly; Bryn Mawr Alumnse Quarterly; Bul- 
letin of the Pan-American Union; California University Chronicle; City 
Club Bulletin; Columbia University Quartei-ly; Common Cause; Dea- 
coness Advocate; Hartford Seminary Record; Indian's Friend; Journal 
of the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society; Lantern; Pennsylvania Mazagine 
of History and Biography; Public Service; Revue Critique des Livres 
nouveaux; Southern Workman; Spirit of Missions; Technology Review; 
Tipyn o'Bob; Washington Chapel Chronicle; Woman's Missionary 
Friend. 



Report of the Health Committee. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit the fohowing report of the 
Health Committee for the year 1912-13. 

The Health Committee met regularly once a week through- 
out the year with the wardens of the halls. The health of the 
individual students was discussed and a careful system of 
supervision was enforced by Miss Applebee, Director of 
Athletics and Gymnastics and Supervisor of Health. The 
students on the supervision list and on the doctors' special lists 
were placed under Miss Applebee's care in order that she might 
follow their general condition and require them to observe the 
regimen prescribed by the doctor. Six students left college 
during the year on account of illness. The records of illness 
will be found in detail in the reports of the Physician-in-Chief 
and the Director of Athletics and Gymnastics which follow. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marion Reilly, 

Dean of the College. 



(52) 



Report of the Physician in Chief of the College, 
AND OF the Assistant Physician. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit on behalf of Dr. Marianna 
Taylor and myself the following report of the cases attended 
at Bryn Mawr College from October 1, 1912, to September 
30, 1913. 

The report of the medical work for the year is peculiarly 
uneventful. Our freedom from contagious diseases while 
epidemics were all about us is great cause for congratulation. 
To do good work in our new Infirmary is our hope for 1913-14. 

The resignation of Dr. Marianna Taylor, for two years 
assistant physician, is greatly regretted. Her medical skill 
and her cheerful and sympathetic spirit, given so freely to her 
work, make her withdrawal a great loss. 



I. Medical Cases. 



Acute infectious diseases. 

German measles 3 

Influenza 6 

Measles 1 

Mumps 1 

Typhoid fever 1 

Circulatory System. 

Irregular heart 19 

Irritable heart 29 

Tachycardia 7 

Varicose veins 3 

Valvular heart disease 36 

Digestive System. 

Appendiceal colic 5 

Appendicitis, chronic 8 

Auto-intoxication 1 

Colitis 1 

Constipation 35 

Fissure ani 1 

Hemorrhoids 1 

Indigestion 90 

Jaundice 3 

Stomatitis ■ 6 



Ear. 

Deafness 12 

Impacted cerumen 11 

Myringitis 5 

Otitis 5 

Eye. 

Blepharitis 2 

Conjunctivitis '. 8 

Eye strain 20 

Foreign body in the eye 15 

Hemiopia 1 

Hordeolum 9 

Ingrown eyelash 1 

Menstrual disturbances. 

Acute suppression of menses 2 

Delayed menses 24 

Dysmenorrhea 64 

Menorrhagia 8 

Metrorrhagia 18 

Uterine displacement 4 

Nervous system. 

Exhaustion 32 

Headaches 46 



(53) 



54 



Hysteria 4 

Insomnia 16 

Nervousness 21 

Neuralgia 9 

Neuritis 1 

Respiratory system. 

Asthma 3 

Bronchitis 5 

Coryza 86 

Chronic hypertrophy of ton- 
sils 39 

Grippy cold 9 

Laryngitis 32 

Naso-pharyngitis 89 

Peritonsillar abscess 1 

Pharyngitis Ill 

Rhinitis ; . . . 27 

Tonsilitis 7 

Tracheo-bronchitis 2 

Trachitis 82 

Skin. 

Acne 36 

Alopecia 1 

Callosities 5 



Clavus 1 

Comedo 1 

Eczema 10 

Frost-bite 1 

Fm-uncle 9 

Herpes 2 

Infected pimple 1 

Moles 4 

Pitja'iasis 1 

Rhus poisoning 15 

Urticaria 2 

Verucca 9 

Miscellaneous. 

Adenitis 16 

Cystitis 1 

Enuresis 1 

Epistaxis 5 

Gout 1 

Incipient tuberculosis 2 

Lumbago 1 

Malaria 2 

Muscular rheumatism 18 

Thyroid derangement 61 



II. Surgical 

Trauma, Bone and Joint Condi- 
tions, etc. 

Abrasions 21 

Abscess 1 

Bunions 2 

Burns 6 

Cleft palate 1 

Concussion 1 

Contused wounds 35 

Dislocations and subluxa- 
tions 11 

Dog-bite 1 

"Dry-joint" 5 

Erupting wisdom tooth, 
tooth-ache, exposed nerve, 

etc 23 



Cases. 

Fallen arches, strained 

arches, etc 17 

Floating cartilage of knee ... 1 
Foreign body in foot and hand 2 

Incised wound 10 

Infected arm, finger, foot ... 14 

Ingrown nail 1 

Lacerated woimds 3 

Relaxed ligament 1 

Spinal ciu'vatm-es 136 

Sprains and strains 57 

Synovitis 2 

Trichter brust 7 



55 

Statistics of Attendance. 

Dr. Branson. 
Infirmary and Hall visits 531 Special Examinations for sports 135 

Dr. Taylor. 

Physical examinations 413 Office visits 2169 

Vaccinations 110 Hall visits 169 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas F. Branson, 
Physician in Chief. 



Report of the Director of Athletics and Gymnastics 
AND Health Supervisor. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit the following report on such 
work of the Health Department as has been under my charge 
during the year 1912-13. 

In October, in accordance with the requirements of the 
Health Department, three hundred and sixty-nine students 
were examined by the Director of Gymnastics and Athletics 
and by Dr. Marianna Taylor, the Assistant Physician of the Col- 
lege; of these forty-one were referred to Dr. Thomas F. Bran- 
son, Physician in Chief of the College, for further examination. 

These examinations gave the following results: 

286 students passed the health requii-ements. 
83 students failed to pass the requirements and were put 
under general supervision, or where necessary, under 
the care of the College Physician, or referred to 
specialists. 



Supervision List. 

^ j.^. Number of 

Condition. C^ggg^ 

General debility 22 

Appendicitis 2 

Digestive disturbances 10 

Menstrual disturbances 15 

Cardiac irregularities 3 

Nervousness 8 

Enlarged thyroid 15 

Recovery from operations 4 

Parents' request 4 

Total 83 



(56) 



Slight 
Deviation 

from 
. Normal. 


Marked 

Deviation 

from 

Normal. 


54 


36 


30 


16 


17 


11 


110 


31 


48 


38 


64 


84 



57 

Table of Physical Conditions. 



Normal 

Hearts 279 

Thyroids 323 

Tonsils 341 

Spinal column 228 

Menses 284 

Weight 221 

Table of orthopedic defects noted and treated during 
the year by special exercises prescribed by the Director of 
Gymnastics and Athletics or by Miss Anna Branson. 

T-» t „*o Total Cor- Im- 

"^'^°*^- Number, rected. proved. 

Scoliosis 150 32 31 

Flat or pronated feet 43 1 15 

Postural defects 12 1 7 

Kyphosis 2 . . 2 

Cases treated by medical gymnastics by Miss Anna Bran- 
son, in all cases with marked improvement. 

Scoliosis - . 13 

General debility and nervousness 6 

Constipation 2 

Feet 3 

Injui-ies 3 

Postural defects 2 

Total 29 

Miss Branson also gave ten special weekly class treat- 
ments to eight students with marked scoliosis who were unable 
to afford private treatment. This class was paid for from the 
money received from gymnasium fines fund. The work was 
done by the students in addition to their regular gymnastic 
classes. 

Sports List Classification. 

Class A. 307 students. Authorized to enter all sports, matches and 
contests and under no restrictions except the general health rules of 
the Athletic Association. 

Class B. 45 students. Authorized to enter sports on probation and 
under the restrictions noted on the Authorization card. 13 of these 
students improved during the year and were promoted to Class A. 



58 



Class C. 17 students. Forbidden all sports except such as may be 
specified on the Authorization card. Of these: 
7 students — no sports allowed. 
10 students— certain specified sports allowed. 
During the year two of these students were promoted to 
Class A, and four to Class B. 



Vaccination Requirements. Class of 1916. 

Vaccination certificates satisfactory 78 

Vaccinated at time of examination or later 29 

Oculist's Examinations. 
Dr. Helen Murphy, the Examining Ocuhst of the College, 
examined 195 undergraduates, members of the freshmen and 
junior classes, with the following results: 

Number 
Condition. of Ca.ses. Treatment. 

Normal 64 None. 

Glasses satisfactory 38 None. . 

Further examination and treatment neces- 
sary 65 45 re-examined and 

treated. 
10 re-examined and 

not treated. 
10 not re-examined. 
Further examination if symptoms increase . . 28 25 no further trouble. 

3 re-examined and 
treated. 

Anthropometric Statistics. 
College Averages. 

■nr • V.4. TT • Ui Expansion, ^^ . Lung 

Weight, Height, chest, 9th Rib, Strength, Capacity, 

kg. cm. gjjj pjQ kg. p^j j[j 

October 58.44 163.63 5.63 5.72 316.46 184.00 

April 58.69 163.56 5.62 5.72 313.45 186.34 

American average as stated by Dr. Dudley Sargent: 

235.00 132.00 

Class Averages. 
Class of 1913: 

October 57.51 164.01 5.53 5.55 319.88 187.22 

April 56.81 163.95 5.76 5.68 310.69 191.74 

Class of 1914: 

October 59.13 164.00 5.67 5.77 333.23 184.44 

April 59.37 164.54 5.54 5.70 322.38 186.66 



59 



164.23 


5.80 


5.82 


312.25 


185.04 


164.43 


5.54 


5.80 


315.66 


186.53 


162.27 


5.60 


5.72 


300.49 


179.31 


162.30 


5.58 


5.70 


305.11 


179.89 



Class of 1915: 

October 60.11 

April 60.00 

Class of 1916: 

October 56.99 

April 58.58 

Strength Tests. 
Table showing the number of students above and below 
the average in the strength tests at the first and second phys- 
ical examinations, according to classes. 

October, 1912. 



Strength 



April, 1913. 



Test. 
Above 400 kg. 
375 " 


1913 
3 

7 


1914 
11 

9 


1915 
2 

8 


1916 


5 


1913 

3 


1914 

3 

8 


1915 
1 

7 


1916 
3 
5 


350 " 


5 


10 


13 


10 


8 


6 


14 


6 


325 " 


12 


11 


15 


8 


8 


18 


17 


12 


Average 300 '" 


9 


17 


26 


29 


13 


14 


24 


24 


275 " 


12 


10 


16 


25 


13 


17 


17 


18 


250 " 


7 


11 


12 


15 


7 


8 


9 


17 


225 " 


4 


1 


11 


S 


2 


1 


6 


5 


200 " 





1 





1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


175 " 











1 











1 



Lung Capacity. 
Table showing the number of students above and below 
the average in lung capacity at the first and second physical 
examinations, according to classes. 



( 

Lung 
Capacity. 


October, 
1913 


1912. 
1914 


1915 


1916 


1913 


April 
1914 


1913. 
1915 


1916 


Above 260 cu. in. 1 


2 


1 





1 


1 


1 





240 " ' 


1 





2 


1 


1 





4 





230 " ' 


4 


1 


3 


2 


4 


3 


1 


2 


220 " ' 


1 


2 


5 


2 


2 





6 


2 


210 " ' 


' 3 


8 


4 


3 


3 


5 


4 


7 


200 " ' 


7 


9 


13 


10 


8 


11 


13 


8 


190 " ' 


' 8 


12 


16 


12 


7 


14 


13 


10 


Average 180 " ' 


' 11 


16 


20 


21 


9 


15 


13 


15 


170 " ' 


' 12 


16 


18 


18 


6 


13 


21 


18 


160 " ' 


' 5 


10 


11 


21 


8 


5 


8 


17 


150 " ' 


' 3 


1 


9 


8 


5 


5 


8 


10 


140 " ' 


' 2 


4 


1 


2 





3 


4 


2 


130 " ' 


1 











1 


1 








120 " ' 























1 


110 " ' 


' 


1 





















60 

Percentage of students above and below the average in 
strength and lung capacitj^ at the first and second examinations. 

Strength Tests. 

October, 1912, April, 1913. 

Above average 38 per cent 37 per cent 

Average 24 " " 23 " " 

Below average 38 " " 40 " " 

Lu7ig Capacity. 

October, 1912. April, 1913. 

Above average 39 per cent 42 per cent 

Average 20 " " 17 " " 

Below average 41 " " 41 " " 

The three highest and the three lowest tests in strength 
and lung capacity were: 









Strength Tests. 






kg. 


October, 
Highest. 
Class. 


1912. 

Lowest, 
kg. Class. 


April, 1913. 
Highest, 
kg. Class. 


Lowest, 
kg. Class. 


480 


1914 


220 


1916 


445 1914 


208 


1914 


465 


1914 


216 


1914 


438 1914 


206 


1915 


441 


1914 


185 


1916 


424 1914 


189 


1916 






Lung Capacity. 






cu. ir 


October, 
Highest. 
1. Class. 


1912. 

Lowest, 
cu. in. Class. 


April, 1913. 
Highest, 
cu. in. Class. 


cu. in. 


Lowest. 
Class. 


270 


fl914 
\1915 


140 


1914 
1915 


268 1914 


132 


1913 


268 


1913 


130 


1913 
1916 


265 1913 


130 


1914 


251 


1916 


110 


1914 


260 1915 


122 


1916 



Health Statistics of the Senior Class (1913). 
Shown by the Health Department Records: 

Health improved during the four j'ears 25 

Health remains the same 32 

Health not so good 5 

Hygiene Lectures. 
Three lectures on personal and one on race and sex 
hygiene were given by Miss Applebee. These lectures were 
open to all students, attendance was compulsory for fresh- 



61 

men. Professor H. E. Jordan, of the University of Virginia, 
gave one lecture on Eugenics. 

During the year 1912-13 the work of the Health Depart- 
ment has been more thorough and systematic than in former 
years, partly owing to the fact that its organisation is more 
firmly established, but also to the active co-operation of the 
Head Nurse in following up the cases and making a definite 
connection between the medical and hygienic sides of the 
health department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Constance M. K. Applebee, 

Director of Gymnastics and Athletics 

and Supervisor oj Health. 



Report of the Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit the following report on the 
work of the Department of Athletics and Gymnastics for the 
year 1912-13. 

Gymnasium Report. 

Trial drills for the Freshmen and for students not taking 
part in. any athletics were held during November. The regular 
gymnastic season began on December 2, 1912, and ended on 
March 18, 1913. 

Table of Gymnastic Classes. 

Type of Class. 
For Resident and Non-Resident Number of Number of 

Students. Classes per Week. Students. 

Drill 8 294 

Apparatus 8 306 

Fencing 2 20 

Classic dancing 4 145 

For graduate students 1 35 

Six students substituted special exercises for the regular classes. 
Ten students substituted lying down for the regular classes. 

Swimming. 
The swimming pool was open during the whole college year. 

Number of students: 

Authorised Passed the Unable Taking Number of 

as Expert Swimming to Pass. Excused. Lessons. Lessons 
Swimmers. Test. Given. 

1913 52 12 4 

1914 61 20 1 2 1 12 

1915 72 29 6 4 13 

1916 57 36 6 4 28 212 

Total 242 97 7 16 33 237 

Graduate 
students: 14 .. .. .. 5 , 15 

(62) 



63 

Gymnastic Contest. 

A gymnastic contest between the Freshmen and Sopho- 
mores was held on March 18, 1913. The championship shield 
was awarded to the class of 1915. 

Maximum 
Events. Number Points, Points. 

of Points. 1915. 1916, 

Marching tactics 30 25 19 

Dumbbell drill 30 25 20 

Indian club drill 30 25 20 

Rope climbing 150 119 85 

Vaulting horse 300 265 226 

Parallel bars 180 152 137 

Original exercise 30 24 29 

Total. . .750 635 506 

The judges were Miss Hawkins, Miss Stone and Mr. P. 
Bishop. 

Statistics of Exercise. 

Exercise registered by 367 students; no excuse from 
exercise, 200 students; occasional excuses, 167. 

Causes of Excuses Number of Causes of Excuses Number of 

from Exercise. Students Excused, from Exercise. Students Excused. 

Absent from College 39 Infected fingers or toes 7 

Appendicitis . 2 Indigestion 12 

Backache 6 Jaundice 7 

BUster on heel 1 Measles 1 

Bronchitis 4 Malaria 2 

Bunion 1 Neuralgia 2 

Burnt hand 1 Nosebleed 1 

Chicken pox 2 Poisoning — 

Cold 25 Ivy 1 

Colic 1 Ptomaine 2 

-Colitis 2 Quarantine 3 

Conjunctivitis 1 Recovery from operations. ..... 11 

Earache 1 Rheumatism 6 

Exhaustion 14 Sore throat 5 

Eyestrain 1 Strained muscles 11 

Fallen arches 2 Tonsiliris 4 

German measles 2 Vaccine infection 3 

Grippe 22 Warts on feet 5 

Headache 1 

Hemoptysis 1 Total number of excuses given . . 212 



64 

Table of Accidents, 1912-13. 

Causes. 

3 sprained knees 1 walking. 

1 roller skating. 
1 fall down stairs. 

1 dislocation of elbow 1 roller skating. 

2 sprained ankles 2 walking. 

1 cornea of eye scratched 1 hit with brush. 

Fines. 

Failed to have their physical examinations within the 
required time, 5 students; failed to register the required 
number of gymnastic drills, 30 students; failed to register the 
required number of periods of exercise, 15 students. 

The fines imposed were as follows: 

Physical examinations $10.00 

Gymnastic drills , 178 . 00 

Exercise 53 . 00 

Total $241.00 

Athletics. 

Calendar of Athletics for the Year 1912-13. 

October 3rd First hockey practice. 

October 9th First Athletic Association meeting held. 

October 16th Tennis singles began. 

October 26th Hockey Varsity matches began. 

November 11th Class hockey matches began. 

December 2nd Water polo practice began. 

Januarj^ 11th Soccer practice started. 

February 24th Water polo matches began. 

February 28th Swimming meet — Preliminaries. 

March 7th Swimming meet — Finals. 

March 27th Basket-ball practice began. 

April 19th Track meet — Preliminaries. 

April 23rd Tennis touriiament — Doubles. 

April 26th Track meet — Finals. 

May 5th Basket-ball match games began. 

May 10th Basket-ball game — Varsity vs. Alumnae. 

May 31st Tennis tournament, Varsity vs. Phila- 
delphia. 

June 2nd Basket-ball game, Varsity vs. Philadel- 
phia. 

June 3rd Tennis tournament, Varsity vs. Alumnae. 

June 4th .Basket-ball game — Varsity vs. Alumnae. 



65 

Athletic Statistics. 
Percentage of resident students taking part in athletics: 

Basket- Authorized Water 

ball, Hockey, Swimmers, Polo, Tennis, Track, 
percent, percent, percent, percent, percent, percent. 

Class of 1913.... 47 63 80 30 88 12 

1914.... 58 72 76 22 87 13 

1915.... 57 67 69 22 93 12 

1916.... 73 79 58 26 81 27 

Total 59 70 58 26 87 16 

Number of resident students taking no part in athletics: 

Class of 1913 3 

1914 

1915 

1916 

Total 3 

Tennis. — The class championship won by 1913. The 
college championship won by 1913 also. The tennis doubles 
won by 1914. Captains: A. Patterson, 1913; E. Dunham, 
1914; E. Rapallo, 1915; E. B. Kirk, 1916. 

Hockey. — The class championship won by 1914. Captains: 
L. L. Haydock, 1913; L. Cadbury, 1914; C. Head^ 1915; 
M. G. Branson, 1916. Each class had one first, one second 
and one third team, with substitutes. An average of one hun- 
dred and thirty students practiced daily during the season. 

Swimming. — The class championship won by 1915. Cap- 
tains: Y. Stoddard, 1913; L. A. Cox, 1914; E. Dessau, 1915; 
M. Dodd, 1916. 

The swimming meet was held in March, and the follow- 
ing records were broken: 

68 foot swim 15 3-5 seconds. 

68 foot swim on back 18 2-5 seconds. 

136 foot swim 37 seconds. 

136 foot swim on back 41 4-5 seconds. 

Other events at the meet: 

Plunge for distance 48 feet, 8 inches. 

Fancy dive. 
Dive for form. 
Class relay race. 



66 

Water Polo.— The class championship won by 1913. 
Captains: Y. Stoddard, 1913; L. A. Cox, 1914; E. Dessau, 
1915; M. Dodd, 1916. Each class had one first and one second 
team with substitutes. Practices were held t^vice a week; 
about forty-two students practiced each week. 

Outdoor Track Meet. — The outdoor track meet was held 
in April. Events at the meet: 

7.5-yard dash 8 3-5 seconds. 

Running high jump 4 feet, 2 inches. 

100-j'ard hurdles 16 seconds. 

Standing high jump 3 feet, 5 inches. 

Throwing baseball 148 feet, 10 inches. 

100-yard dash 12 seconds. 

Running broad jump 14 feet, 11 1-2 inches. 

Hop, step, jump 29 feet, 9 1-2 inches. 

Standing broad jump 7 feet, 9 1-2 inches. 

Throwing basket-ball 72 feet, 2 1-2 inches. 

60-yard hm-dles 9 2-5 seconds. 

Shot put 25 feet, 8 1-2 inches. 

50-yard dash 6 2-5 seconds. 

Class relay race 40 seconds. 

Two college records were broken. 
75-j'ard dash. 
Running broad jump. 

Basket Ball.- — The class championship won by 1914. 
Captains: F. M. Dessau, 1913; E. Baker, 1914; S. R. Smith, 
1915; E. Hill, 1916. Each class had one first, one second and 
one third team, with substitutes. An average of eighty students 
practiced daily during the season. 

During the winter the Athletic Association Board started 
some unorganised games of association football, which were 
much enjoyed by the students. 

Graduate Students. — Athletics for the graduate students 
included hockej^ basket ball, s"uimming, and tennis teams. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Constance M. K. Applebee, 

Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 



Appendices. 



I. 

Promotions, Reappointments, and Changes in the Academic 
and Administrative Staff for the Year 1913-14. 

WiLMER Cave Wright, Ph.D., reappointed Associate Professor of Greek. 

Albert Schinz, Ph.D., Professor of French Literature, resigned to accept 
the Professorship of French in Smith College. 

David Hilt Tennent, Ph.D., Professor of Biology, granted leave of 
absence from October 1 to December 31, 1913, to collect material for 
Carnegie research in Thm'sday Island. 

Marion Parris Smith, Ph.D., reappointed Associate Professor of Eco- 
nomics. 

Frederick Hutton Getman, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate Professor 
of Chemistry. 

Alfred Horatio Upham, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English Lit- 
eratui'e, resigned to accept the Professorship of English in Miami 
University. 

Agathe Lasch, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate Professor of Teutonic 
Philology. 

Don Rosco Joseph, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology, resigned 
to accept a Professorship of Physiology in the Medical School, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

Grace Mead Andrus de Laguxa, Ph.D., reappointed Associate in 
Philosophy. 

Regina Katharine Grand all, Ph.D., reappointed Director of English 
Essay Work and Reader in English. 

Arthur Russell Moore, Ph.D., appointed Associate Professor of 
Physiology. Dr. Moore received the degree of Bachelor of Ai-ts 
from the LTniversity of Nebraska in 1904 and the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy from the University of California in 1911. From 
1909 to 1911 he was Assistant in Phj^siology in the University of 
California and from 1911 to 1913 Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

Samuel Arthur King, M.x\., reappointed Non-resident Lecturer in 
English Diction. 

Sydney D. M. Hudson, Ph.B., reappointed Lecturer in Political Science. 

(67) 



68 

Frederick Aldrich Cleveland, A.B., Lecturer in History, granted 
leave of absence for one year on account of illness. 

Dorothy Lamb, Lecturer in Classical Archaeology, term expired. 

Amy- Maud Burt, Ph.D., Lecturer in History, as substitute for Mr. 
Frederick Aldrich Cleveland, term expired. 

Roland G. Kent, Ph.D., reappointed Non-resident Lecturer in Sanskrit. 

Donald Fisher, Ph.D., appointed Lecturer in Philosophy. Dr. Fisher 
received the degi-ee of Bachelor of Arts from Western Reserve Univer- 
sity in 1908, the degree of Master of Arts from Harvard University 
in 1909, and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Harvard 
University in 1913. From 1910tol912he held a travelling fellowship 
from Harvard University and studied at the Universities of Graz, 
BerUn and Freiburg. From 1912 to 1913 he was Assistant in Philos- 
ophy in Harvard LTniversity. 

Frederick Archibald Dewey, S.B., appointed Lecturer in Economics 
and Sociology. Mr.' Dewey received the degree of Bachelor of 
Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1910. 
From 1911 to 1912 he was a Graduate Student in Sociology in 
Columbia University, and from 1912 to 1913 University Fellow in 
Sociology. 

Paul Van Brunt Jones, Ph.D., appointed Lecturer in History. Dr. 
Jones received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from the University 
of Michigan in 1906, the degree of Master of Arts in 1908, and the-- 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Pennsylvania 
in 1912. From 1907 to 1910 he was Assistant in History in the 
University of Michigan; from 1910 to 1912 he was Harrison Fellow 
in History in the University of Penn.sylvania, and from 1912 to 1913 
he was Harrison Research Fellow in History. 

Rhys Carpenter, A.B., appointed Lecturer in Classical Archaeology. 
Mr. Carpenter received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Columbia 
LTniversity in 1909 and from the LTniversity of Oxford in 1911. He 
studied at Balliol College, University of Oxford as Rhodes Scholar 
for the State of New York from 1908 to 1911; from 1911 to 1913 he 
was Drisler Fellow in Classical Philology at Columbia University 
and from 1912 to 1913 resident member of the American School of 
Classical Studies at Athens. 

Florence Peebles, Ph.D., appointed Lecturer in Biology as substitute 
for Professor David Hilt Tennent during his absence from October 1 
to December 31, 1913. Dr. Peebles received the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts from the Woman's College of Baltimore (Goucher College) 
in 1895 and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Bryn Ma\vr 
College in 1900. She held a graduate scholarship in Biology at 
Bryn Mawr College from 1895 to 1896, the fellowship in Biology 
from 1896 to 1897 and was a graduate student from 1897 to 1898, 



69 

1903 to 1904, and from 1906 to 1911. From 189S to 1899 she held 
the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship and studied at the Univer- 
sities of Munich and Halle and the Zoolofrical Station. Naples; from 
1899 to 1902 she was Instructor in Biology and from 1902 to 1906 
Associate Professor of Biology in Goucher College. She was Teacher of 
Science in Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, from 1906 to 1911 and 
Assistant Demonstrator in Biology in Bryn Mawr College from 1907 
to 1910; in 1906 she studied in the University of Bonn; in the Spring 
of 1907 at the Zoological Station, Naples, and in 1912 to 1913 in 
France and Germany as P'ellow of the Association of Colleg,iate 
Alumnae, Boston Branch. 

Harriet Randolph, Ph.D., Demonstrator in Biology and Reader in 
Botany, resigned. 

Abby Kirk, A.B., reappointed Reader in Elementary Greek. 

Mary Jeffers, A.M., Reader in Elementary German, returned after 
one year's leave of absence. 

Edna Aston Shearer, A.B., reappointed Reader in English. 

E. Beatrice Daw, A.M., reappointed Reader in English. 

Mary Hamilton Swindler, Ph.D., reappointed Reader in Latin and 
Demonstrator in Classical Archaeology and appointed Reader in 
Classical Archaeology. 

Helen Estabrook Sandison, Ph.D., Reader in English, resigned. 

Marion Delia Crane, A.B., re-appointed Assistant in English. 

Marie Hopp, Reader in Elementary French, term expired. 

Bertha Sophie Ehlers, A.B., Reader in Elementary German as substi- 
tute for Miss Mary Jeffers, term expired. 

Ida Langdon, Ph.D., reappointed Reader in English. 

Annie Louise Macleod, Ph.D., reappointed Reader in Physiological 
Chemistry and Demonstrator in Chemistry. 

Christine Potts Hammer, A.B., reappointed Reader in English. 

Gertude Rand, Ph.D., appointed Reader in Educational Psychology 
and Demonstrator in Experimental Psychology. Dr. Rand received 
the degree of Bachelor of Ai-ts from Cornell University in 1908 and 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Bryn Mawr College in 1913. 
She studied at Bryn MawT College from 1908 to 1909 and from 
1911 to 1912 as Graduate Scholar in Psychology, from 1909 to 1910 
as FeUow in Philosophy, from 1910 to 1911 as Fellow in Psychology 
and from 1912 to 1913 as Sarah Berliner Research Fellow. 

Eunice Morgan Schenck, A.B., appointed Reader in French and Teacher 
of French in the Phebe Anna Thome Model School. Miss Schenck 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Ma\\T College in 



70 

1907. She studied at Bryn Mawr College as a Graduate Student in 
1909, as a Graduate Scholar from 1909 to 1910, and as Fellow in 
Romance Languages from 1912 to 1913. In 1910 she held the Presi- 
dent's European Fellowship and studied from 1910 to 1912 at the 
Sorbonne, College de France, University of Grenoble and in Madrid, 

Maud Elizabeth Temple, Ph.D., appointed Reader in English. Dr. 
Temple received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr 
College in 1904, the degree of Master of Arts in 1905, and degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy from Radcliffe College in 1913. She studied 
at Bryn Mawr College as Graduate Scholar in English from 1904 to 
1905 and at Radcliffe College as Graduate Scholar in English from 
1909 to 1910; from 1910-11 she studied in the Sorbonne and College 
de France and in 1911-12 held the Fellowship of the Women's Educa- 
tion Association of Boston. 

Mabel Kathryn Frehafer, A.B., reappointed Demonstrator in Physics. 

Mary Edith Pinney, A.M., appointed Demonstrator in Biology. Miss 
Pinney received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Kansas State 
University in 1908 and the degree of Master of Arts in 1910. From 
1909 to 1910 she was Teaching Fellow in Zoologj^ in Kansas State 
University, from 1910 to 1911 Resident Fellow in Biology in Bryn 
Mawr College, from 1911 to 1912 President's European Fellow and 
Student in the Universities of Bonn and Heidelberg and the Zoolog- 
ical Station, Naples. From 1912 to 1913 she was Instructor in Zool- 
og3^ in Kansas State University. 

Phebe Anna Thorne Model School of the Phebe Anna Thorne 
School of Education. 

Samuel Arthur King, M.A., Non-Resident Lecturer in English Diction, 
appointed Teacher of Reading in the Phebe Anna Thorne Model 
School. 

Eunice Morgan Schenck, A.B., Reader in French, appointed Teacher 
of French in the Phebe Anna Thorne Model School. 

Placido de Montoliu, appointed teacher of Jaques-Dalcroze Eurhyth- 
mies in the Phebe Anna Thorne Model School. Mr. de Montoliu is a 
graduate of the Jaques-Dalcroze College of Rhythmic Training at 
Hellerau, Germany. 

Constance M. K. Applebee, Director of Athletics and Gymnastics, 
appointed Teacher of Out-of-door Sports and Games in the Phebe 
Anna Thorne Model School. 

Cynthia Maria Wesson, A.B., appointed Teacher of Out-of-door Sports 
and Games in the Phebe Anna Thorne Model School. Miss Wesson 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr College in 
1909, and graduated from Dr. Sargent's School for Physical Educa- 
tion in Cambridge in 1913. 



71 



Executive Staff. 

Edith Orlady, A.B., reappointed Secretary of the College. 

Abigail Camp Dimon, A.M., reappointed Recording Secretary. 

Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., reappointed Warden of Pembroke Hall. 

SusANNB Carey Allinson, A.B., reappointed Warden of Radnor Hall. 

Mabel Harriet Norton, A.B., Warden of Denbigh Hall, term expired. 

Edith Buell Wright, A.B., Warden of Merion Hall, term expired. 

Katharine Everett, Ph.D., Warden of Rockefeller Hall, term expired. 

Eleanor Bontecou, A.B., appointed Warden of Denbigh Hall. Miss 
Bontecou received the degi-ee of Bachelor of Art.s from Bryn Mawr 
College in 1913. 

Hilda Worthington Smith, A.B., ajjpointed Warden of Rockefeller Hall. 
Miss Smith received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawi- 
College in 1910 and the degree of Master of Arts in 1911. From 
1912 to 1913 she was a student in the New York School of Philan- 
thropy. 

Ruth Babcock, A.B., appointed Warden of Merion Hall. Miss Babcock 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr College in 
1910. From 1910 to 1913 she taught in Deerfield Academy, Deer- 
field, Mass. 

Frances Allen Foster, A.B., appointed Assistant Warden of Pembroke 
HaU. Miss Foster received the degxee of Bachelor of Arts from 
Brown University in 1909. From 1909 to 1911 she studied at Bryn 
MawT College as Scholar in English and from 1911 to 1912 as Fellow 
in English; from 1912 to 1913 she held the Mary E. Garrett 
European Fellowship and studied in the British Museum. 

James G. Forrester, M.A., resigned as Comptroller, March, 1913. 

Anna Bell Lawther, A.B., appointed Acting Comptroller, from April 
23, to June 21, 1913. 

Sandy Lee Hurst, appointed Comptroller in July, 1913. From 1897 to 
1900 Mr. Hurst was assistant bookkeeper for Mr. Gideon Sibley, 
Manufacturer and Dealer in Dental Supplies; from 1900 to 1901 
he was chief bookkeeper and from 1901 to 1903 office manager and 
accountant for Messrs. Schaum and Uhhnger, Manufacturers of Textile 
Machinery; from 1903 to 1912 he was employed by Francis Brothers 
and Jellett, Inc., as auditor, office manager and purchasing agent 
and later as assistant manager and assistant treasurer; in the year 
1912 he practised public accounting and in 1913 became Treasurer 
of the Philadelphia Iron Works, which position he resigned to accept 
the Comptrollership at Bryn MawT College. 

Maria Wilkins Smith, A.B., resigned as Business Manager. 



72 

Miriam Margaret Hedges, A.B., appointed Business Manager. Miss 
Hedges received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr 
College in 1910. From 1910 to 1912 she was Secretary of Wykeham 
Rise, Washington, Conn.; from 1912 to 1913 she was Secretary of 
the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr. 

Margaret A. Proctor, A.B., reappointed Junior Bursar. 

Mary Letitia Jones, B.L., B.L.S., resigned as Librarian. 

Lois Antoinette Reed, A.B., B.L.S., appointed Librarian. Miss Reed 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from the University of Illinois 
in 1909 and the degree of Bachelor of Library Science from the New 
York State Library School in 1904. From 1905 to 1907 she was 
Librarian of the Western College, Oxford, Ohio; from 1907 to 1910 
Cataloguer and Order Department Assistant of the Library of the 
University of Illinois; and from 1910 to 1913 Assistant Librarian 
of the University of Rochester. 

Mary Wagner Anderson, appointed Assistant to the Director of 
Athletics and Gymnastics. Miss Anderson graduated from the 
Sargent School of Physical Education in 1913. 

Cynthia Maria Wesson, A.B., appointed Assistant in Athletics and 
Gymnastics. 

Helen Corey Geddes, A.B., B.S., reappointed Head Cataloguer. 

Bessie Homer Jennings, reappointed Assistant Cataloguer. 

Sarah Wooster Eno, A.B., reappointed Circulation and Reference 
Librarian. 

Marian Price, A.B., reappointed Assistant to the Librarian. 

Helen Rothrock Shoemaker, A.B., reappointed Assistant to the Circu- 
lation and Reference Librarian. 

Mary Warren Taylor, reappointed Secretary to the Department of 
Athletics and Gymnastics and Recording Secretary to the Health 
Department. 

Genevieve Estelle Potter, reappointed Bookkeeper and Assistant to 
the Comptroller. 

Mabel Gray Thomas, reappointed Stenographer and Assistant Book- 
keeper in the Comptroller's Office. 

Marianna Taylor, M.D., resigned as Assistant Physician of the College 

Frances R. Spragxje, M.D., appointed Assistant Physician of the 
College. Dr. Sprague received the degree of Bachelor of Literature 
from the University of California in 1886, and the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine from the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania in 
1896. From 1898 to 1910 she was in active practice in San Francisco 
and Visiting Physician and Surgeon of the Children's Hospital, San 
Francisco, and since 1910 has held the positions of Visiting Surgeon 
of the Woman's Hospital of Pennsylvania and Consulting Surgeon 
of the West Philadelphia Hospital for Women. 

Helen Murphy, M.D., reappointed Examining Oculist. 



II. 

Fellowships and Scholarships Conferred for the Year 1913-14- 
Yvonne Stoddard, Bryn Mawr European Fellow. 

Boston Mass. Prepared by Miss Haskell and Miss Dean's School, Boston. First Bryn 
Mawr Matriculation Scholar for the New England States, 1906-07. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1913. 

Mary Alice Hanna, Mary E. Garrett European Felloiv. 

Trenton, Mo. A.B., University of Missouri, 1909, and B.S., 1911. Teacher in the High 
School, Vandalia, Mo., 1909-11; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1911-12, and 
Fellow in History, 1912-13. 

Helen Huss Parkhurst, President's European Fellow. 

Englewood, N. J. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1911. Teacher in the Dwight School, 
Englewood, 1911-12. Graduate Scholar in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13. 

Adah Blanche PlOE, 

Ottendorfer Memorial Research Fellow in Teutonic Philology. 

Omaha, Neb. A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore, 1909. Scholar in German, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1909-11; Ottendorfer Memorial Research Fellow in Teutonic Philology, 
and Student, University of Berlin, 1911-12; Fellow in German, Bryn Mawr College, 
1912-13. 

Janet Tucker Howell, 

Helen Schaeffer Huff Research Fellow in Physics. 
Baltimore, Md. Holder of Bryn Mawr School Scholarship, 1906-08. A.B., Bryn Mawr 

College, 1910. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1913. Graduate Student in Physics, 

Johns Hopkins University, 1910-13. 

Angela Charlotte Darkow, Fellow in Greek. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1911. Graduate Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1911-12, and Fellow in Greek, 1912-13. 

Lena Belle Salisbury, Fellow in Latin. 

Oswego, N. Y. A.B., Syracuse University, 1910, and A.M., 1913. Teacher, Chittenango, 
N. Y., 1910-11; Weedsport, N. Y., 1911-12; Goodyear-Burlingame School, Syracuse, 
N. Y., 1912-13. 

Gertrude Hildreth Campbell, Fellow in English. 

Providence, R. I. A.B., Brown University, 1911, and A.M., 1912. Tutor in English, 
Brown University, 1912; Graduate Scholar in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13. 

June Christina Eddingfield, Felloiv in German. 

Mace, Ind. A.B., University of Indiana, 1906. Student, University of Indiana, Summer 
Semesters, 1908, 1910, 1911, 1912. Assistant Principal of the High School, Swayzee, 
Ind., 1906-08; Head of German Department in the High School, Elwood, Ind., 1908-12; 
Graduate Scholar in German, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13. 

Vera Lillian Parsons, Felloiv in Romance Languages. 

Toronto, Canada. B.A., University of Toronto, 1911, and M.A., 1912. Graduate Scholar 
in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13. 

Louise Maudsley Sumner, Fellow in History. 

St. Paul, Minn. A.B., University of Minnesota, 1912, and A.M., 1913. 

Byne Frances Goodman, Fellow in Economics. 

Champaign, 111. A.B., University of Illinois, 1912, and A.M., 1913. 

Marion Almira Bills, Fellow in Psychology. 

Allegan, Mich. A.B., University of Michigan, 1908. Teacher in the Public School, 
Allegan, 1909-11, Graduate Scholar in Psychology, Bryn Mawr College, 1911-13. 

(73) 



74 
Mary Gertrude Haseman, Fellow in Mathematics. 

Linton, Ind. A.B., University of Indiana, 1910. Professor of Mathematics in Viacennes 
University, 1910-11. Graduate Scholar in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1911-13. 

Katherine Melvina Downey, Fellow in Physics. 

Wheaton, Minn. A.B., University of Minnesota, 1910, and A.M., 1913. Teacher in 
Luverne, Minn., 1912-13. 

Julia Peachy Harrison, Fellow in Chemistry. 

Richmond, Va. A.B., Richmond College, 1906, and A.M., 1907, B.S., 1909; PhD., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1913. Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins University, 1909-12, 
Teacher in the High School, Richmond, 1907-08; Carnegie Research Assistant, Johns 
Hopkins University, 1912-13. 

Grace Medes, Fellow in Biology. 

Kansas City, Mo. A.B., Kansas State University, 1904, and A.M., 1913. 

Agnes Borthwick, Special British Graduate Scholar. 

Greenock, Scotland. M.A., Glasgow University, 1910. Graduate Student, Glasgow 
University 1910-12; Honours in English, 1912. British Graduate Scholar, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1912-13. 

Eleanor Shipley Duckett, Special British Graduate Scholar. 

T"rome, Somerset, England. B.A., University of London, 1902, and M.A., 1904. Girton 
College, University of Cambridge, England, 1908-11; Classical Tripos, Part 1, 1911. 
Classical Mistress in the High School, Sutton, Surrey, 1905-07; British Graduate 
Scholar, -Bryn Mawr College, 1911-12, and Fellow in Latin, 1912-13. 

Elizabeth Mary Edwards, Special British Graduate Scholar. 

Liverpool, England. A.B., LTniversity of Liverpool with Honours in Economics, 1910; 
M.A. and Diploma in Education, 1912. Student, University of Berlin, 1910-12; 
Assistant in the Potsdam Hoheren Madchenschule, 1910-11, and in the Chamissoschule, 
Berlin, 1911-12; British Graduate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13. 

Agnes Murray Macfadzean, Special British Graduate Scholar. 

Glasgow, Scotland. B.A., University of Glasgow, 1910, and M.A., 1911. Student, Uni- 
versity of Gottingen, 1910-11; British Graduate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13. 

Margaret Amiss, British Graduate Scholar. 

Bromyard, England. B.A., University of Wales, 1908. Teacher in Intermediate School 
for Girls, Hengoed, Wales, 1909-13. 

Alice Mary Ashley, British Graduate Scholar. 

Edgbaston, England. Newnham College, Cambridge, England, 1910-13. Classical 
Tripos, Part I, 1913. 

Christine Gwendoline Mary Roberts, British Graduate Scholar. 

Aberystwyth, Wales. B.A., University of Bristol, 1911 and M.A., 1913. Teacher in 
Northumberland House School, Bristol, England, 1911-12, and in Royal Park School, 
Clifton, England, 1912-13. 

LiLLi Auerbach German Graduate Scholar. 

Berlin, Germany. University of Berlin, 1912-13; University of Freiburg, Summer 
Semester, 1913. 

Margarbte Friede Bertha Beyfuss, German Graduate Scholar. 

Bournemouth, England. University of Berlin, Winter Semester, 1911-12; University of 
Freiburg, 1912-13. 

Martha Ewerth, German Graduate Scholar. 

Zoppot bei Danzig, Germany. University of Konigsberg, 1912-13. 

Hildegard Kleine, German Graduate Scholar. 

Berlin, Germany. University of Berlin, 1911-13. 

Juliette Michel Galabert, French Graduate Scholar. 

Frontignan, France. Ecole normale supSrieure, Fontenay aux Roses, 1909-12. 

Mary Elizabeth Barnicle, Graduate Scholar in Philosophy. 

Providence, R. I. A.B., Brown University, 1913. Teacher in Evening School, Provi- 
dence, 1910-11. 



75 



Sadie Beliekowsky, Graduate Scholar in Archaeology. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1912. Graduate Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1912-13, 

Martha Betz, Graduate Scholar in German. 

Kansas City, Mo. B.S., in Education, University of Missouri, 1910; A.B., 1911, and 
A.M., 1913. 

Belle Douglass Boysen, 

Siisan B. Anthony Scholar in Political Theory. 
Knoxboro, N. Y. Ph.B., Syracuse University, 1911. Teacher in the Knoxboro Union 

School, 1904-05; Susan B. Anthony Scholar in Political Theory, Bryn Mawr College, 

1912-13. 

Clarissa Beatrice Brockstedt, Graduate Scholar in Philosophy. 

St. Louis, Mo. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1913. 

Elizabeth Cable Brook, Graduate Scholar in History. 

Lawrence, Kans. A.B., Kansas State University, 1912, and A.M., 1913. 

Vera Lee Brown, Graduate Scholar in History. 

New Brunswick, Canada. B.A., McGill University, 1912, and M.A., 1913. 

Marion Delia Crane, Graduate Scholar in Philosophy. 

Providence, R. I. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1911. Secretary in the Bryn Mawr School, 
Baltimore, Md., 1911-12; Reader in English and Secretary to the Dean of the College, 
and Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13. 

Charlotte D'Evelyn, Graduate Scholar in English. 

San Francisco, Cal. B.L., Mills College, 1911; University of California, Summer, 1912. 
Teacher in the Public Schools, Bloomington, Idaho, Jan.-Jun., 1912, and in Sanger, 
Cal., 1912-13. 

Frances Allen Foster, 

Research Scholar and Fellow by Courtesy in English. 

Providence, R. L A.B., Brown University. 1909. Scholar in English, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1909-11, and Fellow in English, 1911-12; Mary E.Garrett European Fellow 
and Student in the British Museum, 1912-13. 

Marjorie Lorne Franklin, Graduate Scholar in Economics. 

New York City. A.B., Barnard College, 1913. 

Mildred Hardenbrook, Graduate Scholar in Greek. 

Valatie, N. Y. A.B., Vassar College, 1908, and A.M., 1909. Graduate Scholar in Greek, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1911-12. 

Jane Annetta Harrison, 

Graduate Scholar and Fellow by Courtesy in German. 

La Plata, Mo. A.B. and B.S., University of Missouri, 1906 and A.M., 1907. Scholar in 
Germanic Languages, University of Missouri, 1906-07, and Graduate Student, 1908-09; 
Teacher in the High School, Sedalia, Mo., 1907-08; Fellow in German, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1909-10; Ottendorfer Memorial Research Fellow, and Student, University 
of Berlin, 1910-11; Teacher in the High School, St. Charles. Mo., 1911-13. 

Angie Lillian Kellogg, 

Graduate Scholar and Fellow by Courtesy in Philosophy. 

Watertown, N. Y. A.B., Vassar College, 1903, and A.M., 1904. Teacher in the High 
School, Schenectady, N. Y., 1904-10, and in the High School, Hasbrouck Heights, 
N. J., March to June, 1911; Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 1911-13. 

Mildred West Loring, Graduate Scholar in Psychology. 

Seattle, Wash. A.B., University of Washington, 1912, and A.M., 1913. 

Winifred Robey, Graduate Scholar in Mathematics. 

Davidson, Okla. A.B., University of Oklahoma, 1913. 

Lorle Ida Stecher, Graduate Scholar in Psychology. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1912. Graduate Scholar in Psychology, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1912-13. 



76 
Helen Rebecca Steward, Graduate Scholar in History. 

Carlinville, 111. A.B., Blackburn College, 1908. Teacher in Blackburn Academy, 
1911-12. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13. 

Ottilie Theobald, Graduate Scholar in Romance Languages. 

Columbu.9, O. A. B., Ohio State Universitv, 1911. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1911-12. Graduate Student, Ohio State University, 1912-13. 

Marguerite Thiebaud, Graduate Scholar in English. 

Connersville, Ind. A.B., Earlham College, 1912. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1912-13. 

Cynthia Maria Wesson, Graduate Scholar in Biology. 

Boston, Mass. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. Student in Dr. Sargent's School for 
Physical Education, Cambridge, Mass., 1910-13. 

Marguerite Willcox, Graduate Scholar in Che7nistry. 

Oxford, N. Y. A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1913. 

Anna Laura Davis, Guilford College Scholar. 

Guilford College, N. C. A.B., Guilford CoUege, 1913. 

Florence Long, Earlham College Scholar. 

Pierceton, Ind. A.B., Earlham College, 1913. 

Mamie Marshall, Penn College Scholar. 

Union, Iowa. A.B., Penn College, 1913. 

Leah Tapper Cadbury, Foundation Scholar. 

Haverford, Pa. Prepared by the Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa. Foundation 
Scholar, 1910-13. 

Anna Wilkins Roberts, Foundation Scholar. 

Moorestown, N. J. Prepared by the Friends' Academy, Moorestown, and by the West- 
town Boarding School, Westtown, Pa. Foundation Scholar, 1911-13. 

Ryu Sato, Foundation Scholar. 

Tokyo, Japan. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Eleanor Lansing Dulles, 

First New England States Matriculation Scholar. 

Auburn, N. Y. Prepared by Wykeham Rise, Waterbury, Conn. 

Jeannette Ralston Hollis, 

Second New England States Matriculation Scholar. 
Cambridge, Mass. Prepared by the Cambridge School for Girls, Cambridge. 

Katharine Burr Blodgett, 

First New York, New Jersey, and Delaware Matriculation Scholar. 
New York City. Prepared by the Misses Rayson's School, New York City. 

Janet Randolph Grace, 

Second Neiv York, New Jersey, and Delaware Matriculation Scholar, 

New York City. Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City. 

Majorie Josephine Milne, . . . First Western States Matriculation Scholar. 

Duluth, Minn. Prepared by the Central High School, Duluth, Minn. 

Mary Frances Colter Second Western States Matriculation Scholar. 

'Cincinnati, O. Prepared by the Bartholomew-Clifton School, Cincinnati, O. 

Ryu Sato, 

First Pennsylvania and Southern States Matriculation Scholar. 
Tokyo, Japan. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Dorothy Macdonald, 

Second Pennsylvania and Southern States Matriculation Scholar. 
Ardmore, Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore. 



77 

Rachel Ash, Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1911-12; 
Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar, 1912-13. 

Janet Baird, Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Sharon Hill, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadel- 
phia Girls' High School Scholar, 1910-13. 

Doris Marie Bird, .... Trustees' Philadelplda Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Eva Alice Worrall Bryne, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1912-13. 

Rebecca Elizabeth Joachim, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Marie Ottilie Keller, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1911-13. 

Marion Clementine Kleps, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1912-13. 

Miriam Elsie Ward, Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1910-13. 

Frances Macdonald, Trustees' Lower Merion High School Scholar. 

Ardmore, Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore. Trustees' Lower 
Merion High School Scholar, 1911-13. 

Marguerite Daisy Darkow, James E. Rhoads Junior Scholar, 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. First Bryn Mawr 
Matriculation Scholar for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1911-12, and Simon 
Muhr Scholar, 1911-13. 

Marion Clementine Kleps, James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1912-13. 

Eva Alice Worrall Bryne, James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1912-13. 

Juliet Capers Branham, Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Bryn Mawr School 
Scholar, 1912-13. 

Agnes Wells Grabau, Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar. 

Plattsburgh, N. Y. Prepared by the High School, Plattsburgh. 

Zena Jennie Blanc, Mary E. Stevens Junior Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Charles E. Ellis 
Scholar, 1911-13. 

Katharine Dodd, Maria L. Eastman Brooke Hall Memorial Scholar. 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. Prepared by Miss Haskell and Miss Dean's School, Boston, Mass. 
First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholar for the New England States, 1910-11. 

Janet Baird, An7ia M. Powers Memorial Scholar. 

Sharon Hill, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Phila- 
delphia Girls' High School Scholar, 1910-13, and James E. Rhoads Junior Scholar, 
1912-13. 



Helen Walkley Irvin, Thomas H. Powers Memorial Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Bryn Mawr School 
Scholar, 1911-12; Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar, 1912-13. 

Esther Johnson, L. C. B. Saul Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Mildred Baird, Elizabeth Duane Gillespie Scholar. 

Sharon Hill, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. First Bryn Mawr 
Matriculation Scholar for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1910-11, and City 
Scholar, 1910-13. 

Mary Sylvester Cline,. . .Minnie Murdoch Kendrick Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Constance Sidney Hall, Bryn Maivr School Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. 

Marguerite Daisy Darkow, Simon Muhr Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. First Bryn Mawr 
Matriculation Scholar for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1911-12. Simon 
Muhr Scholar, 1911-13. 

LuciLE Thompson, George W. Fetter Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. George W. Fetter 
Memorial Scholar, 1910-13. 

Cleora Sutch, Charles E. Ellis Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared bv the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Charles E. Ellis Scholar, 
1911-13. 

Jeannette Reefer Greenewald, Charles E. Ellis Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Charles E. Ellis 
Scholar, 1912-13. 

Elizabeth Cheney, Charles E. Ellis Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Katharine Snodgrass, An7ia Hallowell Memorial Scholar. 

Indianapolis, Ind. Prepared by the Shortridge High School, Indianapolis. Maria Hopper 
Sophomore Scholar, 1912-13. 

Eleanor Marcella Clinton, Frances Marion Simpson Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Second Matriculation 
Scholar for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1912-13, City Scholar, 1912-13, and 
Frances Marion Simpson Memorial Scholar, 1912-13. 

Helen Marie Harris, 

Special Frances Marion Simpson Memorial Scholar. 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr. 

Dorothy Macdonald, Frances Marion Simpson Memorial Scholar. 

Ardmore, Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore. 

Clarissa Smith, Mary Anna Longstreth Memorial Scholar. 

West Medford, Mass. Prepared by the Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mildred Baird, City Scholar. 

Sharon Hill, Pa. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 
1910-13. 

Anna Caroline Lee, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1912-13. 

Dora Clara Levinson, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1911-13. 

Mary Arleville Lobdell, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1911-13. 



79 
Margaret Louise Loudon, Ciiy Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1912-13. 

Dorothy Wentworth Skerrett, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of the Second 
Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1910- 
11; Holder of Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholarship, 1911-12; City Scholar, 1910-13. 

Elsie Steltzer, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1911-13. 

Zena Jennie Blanc, Special Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Charles E. Ellis Scholar, 
1911-13. 

Sophie Katharine Forster, Special Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Special Scholar, 
1910-13. 

Clara Wallace Heydemann, Special Scholar. 

St. Paul, Minn. Prepared by Mrs. Backus's School, St. Paul. Second Bryn Mawr 
Matriculation Scholar for the Western States, 1912-13. 

Helen Reed Kirk, Special Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Combined School, Germantown, Philadelphia,- and by the 
Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar, 1911-12. 

Marian Clementine Kleps, Special Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1912-13. 

Virginia De Macedo, Special Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Catherine Lillie Westling, Special Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Helen Josephine McFarland, Woods Holl Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Friends' Preparative Meeting School of Germantown, 
Philadelphia. 

Mary Van Arsdale Tongue, George W. Childs Prize Essayist. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School Baltimore. Bryn Mawr School 
Scholar, 1909-10. 

Marjorie Frances Murray, Mary Helen Ritchie Memorial Prize. 

Delhi, N. Y. Prepared by Delaware Academy, Delhi, and by St. Agnes School, Albany, 
N. Y. Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar, 1910-11; Mary E. Stevens Junior Scholar, 
1911-12. 



III. 

Degrees Conferred during the Academic Year 1912-13. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. 
3 
Frances Allen Foster of Rhode Island. 

A.B., Brown University, 1909. Graduate Scholar in English, Bryn Mawr CoUegei 
1909-11; Fellow in English, 1911-12; Mary E. Garrett European Fellow and Student, 
British Museum, London, and Bodleian Library, Oxford,'(1912-13. Subjects: English 
Philology, English Literature and Old French. Thesis: The Northern Passion. 

LoRiNDA Perry of Illinois. 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1909, and A.M., 1910. Radcliffe Fellow, Women's Educa- 
tional and Industrial Union, Boston, Mass., 1910-11; Fellow in Economics and Politics, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1911-13. Subjects: Political Economy, Political Science and 
American History. Thesis: The Millinery Trade in Boston and Philadelphia. A 
Study of Women in Industry. 

Eunice Morgan Schenck of Philadelphia. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09, and 
Graduate Scholar in French, 1909-10. President's European Fellow and Student, 
Sorbonne and College de France, and Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, and in Madrid, 
1910-12; Fellow in Romance Languages, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13. Subjects: 
Modern French Literature, Old French and Spanish. Thesis: La part de Charles 
Nodier dans la formation des id6es romantiques de Victor Hugo jusqu'4 la Preface de 
Cromwell en 1827. 

MASTER OF ARTS. 

6 
Sadie Beliekowsky of Philadelphia. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1912. Graduate Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College' 
1912-13. 

NoRAH Cam of Towcester, England. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1912. Bryn Mawr European Fellow and Graduate Scholar 
in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13. 

Elizabeth Chandlee Forman of Pennsylvania. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1902. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08, 
1911-12, and Graduate Foundation Scholar, 1912-13. 

Katherine Cavenagh Longwell of Pittsburgh. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1912. Graduate Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13. 

Helen Huss Parkhurst of New Jersey. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1911. Teacher in the Dwight School, Englewood, N. J., 
1911-12; Graduate Scholar in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13. 

LoRLE Ida Stecher of Philadelphia. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1912. Graduate Scholar in Psychology, Bryn Mawr College, 
1912-13. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

60 

Gladys Jones of Hazelton, Pa. 

Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, Modern History and Eco- 
nomics and Politics. The work for this degree was completed in February, 1913. 

Sarah Henry Atherton of Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

Prepared by the Wilkes Barre Institute, Wilkes Barre. Group, Modern History and Eco- 
nomics and Politics. 

(80) 



81 

Cecelia Irene Baechle of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by Notre Dame Academy, Hamilton, O., and by the Girls' High School, Phila- 
delphia. City Scholar, 1909-1.3. Group, Latin and German. 

Dorothea de Forest Baldwin of New York City. 

Prepared by Rye Seminary, Rye, N. Y., by Mrs. Merrill's School for Girls, Oaksmere, 
N. Y., and by private tuition. Group, German and Modern History. 

Helen Juanita Barrett of Glenolden, Pa. 

Prepared by the Friends' Central School, Philadelphia. Group, Modern History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Grace Bartholomew of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High 
School Scholar, 1909-13. Group, Greek and German. 

Marguerite Gold Bartlett of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the High School, Chester, Pa., and the by Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 
Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics, 

Margaret Graham Blaine of Taunton, Mass. 

Prepared by the High School, Taunton, and by Miss May's School, Boston, Mass. Group, 
Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Dorothy Turner Blake of Boston, Mass. 

Prepared by Miss Haskell and Miss Dean's School, Boston. First Bryn Mawr Matricula- 
tion Scholar for the New England States, 1909-10. Group, French and Modern History. 

Eleanor Bontecou of Orange, N. J. 

Prepared by Miss Beard's School, Orange. First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholar for 
New York, New Jersey, and Delaware, 1908-09, and Brooke Hall Memorial Scholar, 
1912-13. Group, Latin and Spanish. 

Clarissa Beatrice Brockstedt of St. Louis, Mo. 

Prepared by the Yeatman High School, St. Louis. Group, Economics and Politics and 
Philosophy, 

Josephine Chapin Brown of St. Paul, Minn. 

Prepared by the Ogdensburg Free Academy, Ogdensburg, N. Y., and by private tuition. 
Holder of Maria Hopper Scholarship, 1907-08; Teacher of Latin in Mrs. Backus's 
School for Girls, St. Paul, Minn., 1910-11; 'Thomas H. Powers Memorial Scholar, 
1911-13; Special Scholar, 1912-13. Group, Physics and Biology. 

Mary Wilmarth Brown of Chicago, 111. 

Prepared by the University High School, Chicago. Group, Chemistry and Biology. 

Jessie Crow Buchanan of Trenton, N. J. 

Prepared by the State Model School, Trenton. Group, Latin and Italian and Spanish. 

Marion Dorothea Clinton of Portland, Ore. 

Prepared by the Lincoln High School, Portland, and by Portland Academy. First Bryn 
Mawr Matriculation Scholar for the Western States, 1909-10; James E. Rhoads 
Sophomore Scholar, 1910-11, and James E. Rhoads Junior Scholar, 1911-12; Anna 
M. Powers Scholar, 1912-13. Group, Greek and Latin. 

Josephine Eleanor Cockrell of Dallas, Tex. 

Prepared by St. Mary's College, Dallas, and by the Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Group, Latin and French. 

Dorothy Livingston Davis of New York City. 

Prepared by the Le Baron Drumm School, New York City, and by the Gordon- Winston 
School, New York City. Group, Modem History and Economics and Politics. 

Rosalie Day of Catskill, N. Y. 

Prepared by Wykeham Rise, Washington, Conn. Group, French and Spanish. 

Agathe Deming of New York City. 

Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City. Group, Modern History and Economics 
and Politics. 



82 
Florence Maud Dessau of New York City. 

Prepared by the Le Baron Drumm School, New York City, and by the Gordon-Winston 
School, New York City. First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholar for New York, New 
Jersey and Delaware, 1909-10. Group, Latin and Mathematics. 

"Elizabeth Storks Fabian of Evanston, 111. 

PreparM by the High School, Evanston. Group, Modern History and Economics and 
Politics. 

Ellen Faulkner of Keene, N. H. 

Prepared by the High School, Keene, by the MacDuffie School, Springfield, Mass., and 
by private tuition. Group, Chemistry and Biology. 

Clara Jane Francis of Martin's Ferry, O. 

Prepared by the High School, Martins Ferry. Group, Modern History and Economics 
and Politics. 

Louise Isabel Gibson of Birmingham, Ala. 

Prepared by the Margaret Allen School, Birmingham. Group, Physics and Mathematics. 

Cecile Adler Goldsmith of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1909-13. Group, Ger- 
man and French. 

Sara Marion Halpen of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1909-13. Group, Latin 
and German. 

Louisa Low Haydock of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Friends' School, Germantown, Philadelphia, by the Agnes Irwin School, 
Philadelphia, and by the Low-Heywood School, Stamford, Conn. Group, Chemistry 
and Biology. 

Alice Hearne of Wayne, Pa. 

Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, Modern History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Gertrude Mary Hinrichs of Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Prepared by the High School, Glen Ridge, and by private tuition. Group, Modern His- 
tory and Economics and Politics. 

Marian Irwin of Tokyo, Japan. 

Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, Chemistry and Biology. 

Laura Elizabeth Kennedy of Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

Prepared by the High School, Saratoga Springs. Group, French and Spanish. 

Edna Sophie Levy of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Prepared by the High School, Pittsburgh. Group, French and Spanish. 

Rosa Vedder Mabon of New York City. 

Prepared by St. Agnes School, Albany, N. Y., and by the Brearley School, New York 
City. Group, Latin and French. 

Elizabeth Yarnall Maguire of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Holman School, Philadelphia, and by the Agnes Irwin School, Philadel- 
phia. Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Ruth Coe Manchester of Winsted, Conn. 

Prepared by the Gilbert School, Winsted, Conn. Second Brvn Mawr Matriculation 
Scholar for the New England States, 1909-10; Maria Hopper Scholar, 1910-11. 
Group, Greek and Latin. 

Lucinda Poillon Menendez of Greenwich, Conn. 

Prepared by Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. Group, Modern History and Economics 
and Politics. 

Ramona Beatrice Miller of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. First Bryn Mawr Matriculation 
Scholar for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1909-10, and Simon Muhr Scholar, 
1909-13. Group, Mathematics and Physics. 



Margaret Adelaide Munroe of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. L. C. B. Saul Memorial Scholar, 
1909-13. Group, Latin and English. 

Marjorie Frances Murray of Delhi, N. Y. 

Prepared by Delaware Academy, Delhi, and by St. Agnes School, Albany, N. Y. Maria 
Hopper Sophomore Scholar, 1910-11; Mary E. Stevens Junior Scholar, 1911-12. 
Group, Physics and Biology. 

Clara Marie Owen of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Group, Latin and German. 

Katharine Alice Page of New York City. 

Prepared by the Dwight School, Englewood, N. J. Group, Latin and French. 

Alice Dudley Patterson of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Wissahickon Heights School, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia, and by the 
Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia. Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholar for 
Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1909-10. Group, Latin and German. 

Lucile Perkins of Dallas, Texas. 

Prepared by St. Mary's College, Dallas, by Madame Yeatman, Paris, France, by the 
Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by private tuition. Group, French and 
Modern History. 

Edna Margaret Potter of Detroit, Mich. 

Prepared by the Eastern High School, Detroit, and by the Mt. Ida School for Girls, 
Newton, Miss. Elizabeth Duane Gillespie Scholar in American History 1911-13. 
Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Gwendolyn Rawson of Cincinnati, O. 

Prepared by the College Preparatory School, Cincinnati. Group, Modern History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Helen Ruth Richter of New York City. 

Prepared by the Gardiner School, New York City, and by the Benjamin Deane School, 
New York City. Group, German and .Spanish. 

Emma Sellers Robertson of Bala, Pa. 

Prepared by All Saints School, Germantown, Philadelphia, and by Miss Roney's School, 
Bala, Pa. Group, Latin and French. 

Frances LtJBBE Ross of Conshohocken, Pa. 

Prepared by the Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia, and by the Baldwin School, Bryn 
Mawr, Pa. Group, English and French. 

Mary Sheldon of Chicago, 111. 

Prepared by Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn., and by Miss Spence's School, New York 
City. Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Mary Elsie Shenstone of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 

Prepared by Miss Veal's School, Toronto. University of Toronto, 1908-09. Group, 
French and Modern History. 

Adelaide Douglas Simpson of New York City. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High 
School Scholar, 1909-13. Group, Greek and Latin. 

Edith Rachael Steele of Pittston, Pa. 

Prepared by the High School, West Pittston, Pa., and by Wyoming Seminary, Kingston, 
Pa. Group, Latin and German. 

Yvonne Stoddard of Boston, Mass. 

Prepared by Miss Haskell and Miss Dean's School, Boston. First Bryn Mawr Matricula- 
tion Scholar for the New England States, 1906-07. Group, Latin and English. 

Keinath Stohr of Chicago 111. 

Prepared by the Chicago Latin School, Chicago. Group, Modern History and Economics 
and Politics. 



84 
Nathalie Swift of New York City. 

Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City. Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation 
Scholar for New York, New Jersey and Delaware, 1909-10. Group, Modern History 
and Economics and Politics. 

Alice Marion Taylor of New York City. 

Prepared by the Willard School, Berlin, Germany. Group, French and Spanish. 

Apphia Stanley Thwing of Cleveland, O. 

Prepared by the Laurel School, Cleveland. Group, Modern History and Economics and 
Politics. 

Mary Van Arsdale Tongue of Baltimore, Md. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Bryn Mawr School Scholar, 1909-10. 
Group, English and Philosophy. 

Grace Turner of Berwyn, Pa. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Special Scholar, 1912-13. Group, 
Greek and Latin. 

Mary Durham Vennum of Onarga, 111. 

Prepared by Grand Prairie Seminary, Onarga, by Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 
and by private tuition. Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 



IV 



College Preachers for the Year 191S-13. 

October 6th. Professor George A. Barton, Ph.D., of Bryn Mawr 

College. 

October 13th. The Rev. Robert Johnston, D.C.L., Rector of the 
Church of the Saviour, Philadelphia. 

October 20th. The Rev. Hugh L. Burleson, D.D., Secretary of the 
Home and Foreign Missionary Society of the Prot- 
estant Episcopal Church. 

The Rev. H. Hensley Henson, D.D., Canon of 
Westminster Abbey, London, England. 

The Rev. H. Roswell Bates, D.D., Pastor of the 
Spring Street Presbyterian Church, New York City. 

The Rt. Rev. Philip M. Rhinelander, D.D., Bishop 
of Pennsjdvania. 

Mr. Robert Elliott Speer, Seci'etarj^ of the Presby- 
terian Board of Foreign Missions. 



October 27th. 
November 3rd. 
November 10th. 
November 17th. 
November 24th. 

December 8th. 

December 15th. 

January 5th. 
January 12th. 
January 19th. 
January 26th. 
February 9th. 



The Rt. Rev. Arthur Selden Lloyd, D.D., Bishop 
Coadjutor of Virginia and President of the Board 
of Missions of the Protestant Episcopal Church. 

The Rev. Julius August Bewer, Ph.D., Associate 
Professor of Biblical Philology in Union Theological 
Seminary, New York City. 

The Rev. George A. Johnston Ross, M.A., Professor 
of Practical Theology in Union Theological Seminary, 
New York City. 

The Rev. Francis Brown, D.D., President of Union 
Theological Seminary, New York City. 

The Rev. Henry Van Dyke, D.D., LL.D., Professor 
of English Literature in Princeton University. 

The Rev. William Van Allen, D.D., Rector of the 
Church of the Advent, Boston, Massachusetts. 

President Charles A. Richmond, D.D., President 
of Union College. 

The Rev. Sydney H. Cox, D.D., Pastor of the Central 
Congregational Church of Philadelphia. 

(85) 



86 



February 16th. The Rev. George Hooper Ferris, D.D., Pastor of 
the First Baptist Church, Philadelphia. 

February 23rd. Professor Edward A. Steiner, Professor of Applied 
Christianity in Grinnell College, Grinnell, Iowa. 

March 2nd. The Rev. Hugh Black, M.A., Litt.D., Jesup Pro- 

fessor of Practical Theology in Union Theological 
Seminary, New York City. 

March 9th. The Rev. Father Hutchinson, D.D., Rector of 

St. Clement's Church, Philadelphia. 

March 16th. Professor Rufus M. Jones, Ph.D., of Haverford 

College. 

March 30th. The Rt. Rev. F. J. Kinsman, D.D., Bishop of Delaware. 

April 6th. The Rev. Stewart P. Keeling, Rector of St. Peter's 

Church, Germantown. 

April 13th. The Rt. Rev. Ethelbert Talbot, D.D., Bishop of 

Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 

April 20th. The Rev. William Pierson Merrill, D.D., Pastor 

of the Brick Presbyterian Church, New York City. 

April 27th. The Rev. Henry Lubeck, LL.D., D.C.L., Rector of 

the Church of Zion and St. Timothy, New York 
City. 

May 4th. The Rev. Shailer Mathews, D.D., Dean of the 

Divinity School, University of Chicago. 

May 11th. The Rev. Charles R. Erdman, D.D., Professor of 

Practical Theology in Princeton Theological Seminary. 

May 18th. The Rev. Ulysses G. P. Pierce, D.D., Rector of 

All Souls' Church, Washington, D. C. 

May 25th. The Rev. Father Harvey Officer, of the House 

of the Holy Cross, West Park, New York. 

June 1st. Baccalaureate Sermon. The Rt. Rev. William 

Lawrence, LL.D., D.D., Bishop of Massachusetts. 



V. 



Addresses and Entertainmeiits given during the Year 1912-13. 

ADDRESSES. 
Commencement Address: 
June 5th. President Charles Frederick Thwing, S.T.D., 

LL.D., President of Western Reserve University. 

"The Scholar and His Times." 



Founder's Lecture: 
May 7th. 



College Lectures: 
January 11th. 



February 28th. 

March 4th. 
March 6th. 

March 7th. 
March 8th. 



March 12th. 
March 29th. 



Professor Rufus M. Jones, Ph.D., Litt.D., Pro- 
fessor of Philosophy in Haverford College. "Four 
Quaker Innovations." 



Dr. Howard *A. Kelly, Professor of Gynecology in 
the Medical Department of the Johns Hopkins 
University. "The Social Evil and The White 
Slave Trade and How to Deal with It." 

Mr. Cecil Delisle Burns, M.A., of the University 
of Cambridge, England. "The Philosophy of Rudolf 
Eucken." 

Miss Annie Russell, Actress. "Playgoers as seen 
by Players." 

Miss Georgiana Goddard King, A.B., Lecturer in the 
History of Art and Comparative Literature in 
Bryn Mawr College. "The Intention of Modern 
Painting as Exemplified at the International Exhibi- 
tion in New York." 

Professor Julius Petersen, Professor of German 
Philology in the University of Munich. " Das 
Deutsche Theater der Gegenwart." 

Professor Rudolf Eucken, Professor of Philosophy 
in the University of Jena. "Philosophy and 
Religion." 

Miss Beatrice Harraden, Novelist. "Militantism." 

Professor Wilfred P. Mustard, Professor of Latin 
in Johns Hopkins University. "Roman Buildings 
in Southern France." 

(87) 



April 7th. Professor Joseph Bedier of the College de France. 

"Les Chansons Frangaises au Quinzieme Si^cle." 
April 9th. Mr. Alfred Notes, Enghsh Poet. "The Great 

Green Table: A Discussion of Militarism." 
April 11th. Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton, leader of recent 

British Antarctic Expeditions. "An Account of his 

Journey in Search of the South Pole in 1909-11." 
April 22nd. M. Firmin Roz, Assistant Editor of the Revue Bleue. 

"La Deviation du Realisme depuis Flaubert." 
May 17th. Professor H. E. Jordan, Professor of Anatomy in 

the University of Virginia. "Eugenics." 

Before the De-partment of Art and Archaeology: 

February 14th. Miss Hetty Goldman, A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 
1903, and A.M., Radcliffe College, 1910. "Exca- 
vations at Haloe." 

March 14th. Mr. E. Torday. "The Culture of the Bushongo." 

Before the Christian Association: 

March 1st & 2nd. Week End Conference. Miss Hilda W. Smith, 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1910; Miss Kate E. 
Chambers, A.B., Bryn MawT College, 1911; Miss 
Ann Catherine Arthurs, A.B., Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1912; Miss Elizabeth Faries, A.B., Bryn 
Mawr College, 1912; Deaconess Goodwin. Ad- 
dresses. 

March 10th. Dr. Norman Thomas, Pastor of the Settlement 

House in New York City. "The Church and 
Social Service." 

Before the College Chapter of the College Equal Suffrage League: 

March 14th. Mr. Max Eastman, Secretary of the Men's Equal 

Suffrage League in New York State. "Woman 

Suffrage." 

Before the College Settlement Association. 

April 11th. Dean Walter T. Sumner, Dean of the Episcopal 

Cathedral, Chicago. "The Dawning Conscious- 
ness of Woman's Sex Loyalty." 

Before the English Club: 

November 16th. Mr. Walter H. Page, Editor of the World's Work, 

New York City. "Women in Journalism." 
April 9th. Mr. Alfred Noyes. Reading of selections from his 

own poems. 



89 

Before the Graduate Club: 

December 6th. President Thomas. "Marriage." 

January 24th. Mr. William H. Allen, Director of the Bureau of 

Municipal Research, New York City. 

February 15th. Dr. Don Rosco Joseph, Associate Professor of 
Physiology in Bryn Mawr College. "The Filter- 
able Viruses, with special reference to Poliomyelitis 
(Infantile Paralysis)." 

March 28th. Professor Mary Whiton Calkins, Professor of 

Philosophy and Psychology in Wellesley College. 
"The Vocation of a Scholar." 

Before the History Club: 

May 9th. Professor Michael Idvorsky Pupin, Professor of 

Electro-Mechanics in Columbia University. "The 

Balkan Situation." 

Political Convention: 

October 28th. Miss Jessie Ashley of New York City, representa- 

tive of the Socialist Party; Miss Layyah Barakat, 
representative of the Prohibition Party; Miss 
Mary Hall Ingham, of Philadelphia, Chairman 
of the Women's Progressive Organisation in Penn- 
sylvania, representative of the Progressive Repub- 
lican Party; Miss Florence Sunderland, of the 
Women's Wilson and Marshall Organisation of 
New York, representative of the Democratic Party; 
Miss Mary Wood, Secretary of the Department 
of Woman's Work of the Republican National 
Committee, New York City, representative of the 
Taft Republican Party. 

Before the Science Club: 

February 14th. Professor Clarence Erwin McClung, Professor 

of Zoologj', University of Pennsylvania. "Sex 

Determination." 

Vocational Conference: 

April 4th and 5th. Mrs. L. W. Prince of the Union School of Sales- 
manship of Boston, Massachusetts. "Business 
Opportunities for Women." 
Dr. Evelyn Nagle of Boston, Massachusetts. 

"Biology and Chemistry as Vocations." 
Mrs. H. H. Moore of the advertising department 
of John Wanamaker's Store, Philadelphia. "Busi- 
ness Opportunities for Women, especially in Ad- 
vertising." 



90 



ENTERTAINMENTS AND ACADEMIC EVENTS. 

October 3rd. President Thomas's reception and address to the 

entering class. 

October 5th. Christian Association reception to the entering class. 

October 14th. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 

Senior Class. 
October 18th. Senior reception to the entering class. 

October 19th. President Thomas's reception and address to the 

graduate students. 
October 25th. Faculty reception to the graduate students. Den- 

bigh Hall, 8.30 p. m. Trophy Club reception to 

the entering class. 
October 26th. Lvmcheon in Pembroke Hall for the Alumnse of the 

Philadelphia Girl's High School. 
November 2nd. Lantern Night. 
November 4th. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 

Senior Class. 
November 5th. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 

graduate students. 
November 8th. Concert under the auspices of the Music Committee. 

Song Recital. Miss Susan Metcalfe. 
November 9th. Banner Night. 
November 11th. Faculty Tea for graduate students. Denbigh Hall, 

4 to 6 p. m. 
November 15th. Dance vmder the auspices of the Consumers' League. 
November 23rd. Sophomore Play. "The Road to Yesterday." 
December 2nd. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 

graduate students. 
December 6th. Debate. 
December 9th. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 

Senior Class. 
December 10th. Facultj^ Tea for graduate students. Merion Hall, 

4 to 6 p. m. 
December 13th. Concert under the auspices of the Music Committee. 

Violin Recital. Mr. and Mrs. David Mannes. 
December 14th. Sophomore Dance for the entering class. 
January 6th. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 

graduate students. 
January 13th. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 

Senior Class. 
January 15th. Facultj^ Tea for graduate students. Radnor Hall, 

4 to 6 p. m. 



91 



January 17th. Debate. 

February 1st. Meeting of the Alumnae Association. Luncheon 

given by President Thomas and Miss Garrett. 

February 7th. Celebration of the twenty-first anniversary of the 

foundation of the Bryn Mawr Self-Government 
Association. Tea in Pembroke Hall at 4.30 p. m.; 
speeches in the Chapel at 8.00 p. m. by former 
presidents of the Self-Government Association. 

February 10th. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 
Senior Class. 

February Uth. President Thomas and Miss Garrett at home to the 
graduate students. 

February 13th. Faculty Tea for graduate students. Rockefeller 
Hall, 4 to 6 p. m. 

February 21st. Concert under the auspices of the Music Committee. 

Song and Pianoforte Recital. Mr. Selden Miller 
of Philadelphia. 

February 22nd. Entertainment for the benefit of the Students' Build- 
ing by Alumnse and Former Students. "The 
Importance of Being Earnest." 

February 27th. Debate. "Resolved that the Irish should have Home 
Rule." 

February 28th. Swimming Meet. 

March 7th. Faculty Tea for graduate students. Denbigh Hall, 

4 to 6 p. m. 

March 15th. Freshman Show. "Totem's Taboo." 

March 18th. Gymnasium Contest. 

April 5th. Senior reception to the graduate students. 

April 7th. Faculty Tea for graduate students. Meriori Hall, 

4 to 6 p. m. 

April 12th. Performance of the Morality Plays, "Noah's Flood" 

and "The Nice Wanton," by the Plays and Players 
Club of Philadelphia for the benefit of the Students' 
Building. 

April 18th. Graduate Club reception to the Senior Class. Fresh- 

man Supper. 

April 19th. Concert under the auspices of the Music Committee 

for the benefit of the Music Committee. 

April 25th. Sophomore Supper. Junior-Senior Supper. 

April 26th. Junior-Senior Supper Play. "Cyrano de Bergerac." 

May 1st. May-Day Celebration. 

May 3rd. Glee Club Concert. 



92 



May 6th. Faculty Tea for graduate students. Radnor Hall, 

4 to 6 p. m. 

May 10th. Senior Play. "David Garrick." 

May 16th. Debate. 

May 31st. Senior reception to the Faculty. 

June 2nd. Senior Supper. 

June 3rd. Senior Bonfire. Athletic Field, 8.00 p. m. 

June 4th. College Breakfast. The Gymnasium, 12 m. Senior 

Garden Party. The Campus, 4 to 7 p. m. 
Performance of Rostand's ''The Romancers" by the 
Frank Lea Short Company in the Cloister, 8 p. m., 
under the auspices of the Students' Building Com- 
mittee. 

June 5th. Conferring of degrees. 11 a. m. Alumnae meeting. 

2.30 p. m. Alumna; supper. Pembroke Hall, 
7.00 p. m. 



VI. 

Gifts Received by the College during the Year 1912-13. 

Our sincere gratitude is due for the following gifts which have been 
received during the past year, in addition to gifts of special books to the 
Library which are enumerated and acknowledged in the report of the 
Hbrarian. 

Miss Mary E. Garrett, a Director of the College, $10,820.41 for the 
following purposes: for fellowships and graduate scholarships, $6,015.72; 
for competitive entrance scholarships, $1,600; for publication of college 
monographs, $297.76; for lectures, $413.02; for plans for planting grounds, 
$191.88; for apparatus for physical chemistry, $110.11; for psychological 
laboratory, $15.57; for books, $787.40; for subscription to the American 
School at Jerusalem, $75; for annual subscription to the Woman's Table 
at Naples, $50; for memorial tablets in the Library Cloister, $1,164.75; 
for miscellaneous purposes, $99.20. 

For Scholarships : 

Alumnae Association of the Girls' High and Normal School of Phila- 
delphia for the L. C. B. Saul Memorial Scholarship, 

Anonymous donors for a special scholarship, $2C 

Anonymous donors for a special scholarship. 

Anonymous donor for a special scholarship, $30. 

Anonymous donor for a special scholarship, $50. 

Board of Education of the City of Philadelphia for eleven city scholar- 
ships, $1,100. 

Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md., for Bryn Mawr School Scholar- 
ship, $500. 

Charles E. Ellis estate for two scholarships, $400. 

Mrs. J. Campbell Harris for two scholarships, $400. • 

Mr. George W. Kendrick, Jr., for the Minnie Murdoch Kendrick 
Memorial Scholarship, $200. 

Simon Muhr estate for two scholarships, $400. 

Mrs. Thomas Shallcross for a scholarship in memory of George W. 
Fetter, $200. 

For Books: 

Alumnse Association of Bryn Mawr College for books, from the 
"Alumnae Quarterly" Fund, $10; from the Boston Branch of the Alumnae 
Association, $222; from the Alumnae Association of BrjTi Mawr College, 
$557.05. 

(93) 



94 

Anonymous donor for the New Book Room, $50. 
Anonymous donor through Professor Holbrook for books in Italian, 
$6.77. . 

Class of 1897 for books in biology, $200. 
, Class of 1897 for books in history, $25. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Caldwell Fountain for the New Book Room, $25. 
Professor Rufus M. Jones for books for the Christian Association, $25. 
Science Club for books, $15. 
Miss Jean W. Stii-ling for the New Book Room, $15. 

For miscellaneous purposes: 

Class of 1907 for memorial tablet for Carola Woerishoffer, $90. 

Miss Jeanne Kerr, for memorial tablet for Elizabeth Swift, $35. 

Mr. Charles J. Rhoads for subscription for the American School at 
Jerusalem, $25. 

Students of Radnor and Merion Halls, present and former, and 
alumnse and friends, for chairs for Radnor and Merion Halls, $420.38. 

Mr. Frederic H. Strawbridge for furniture for the new infirmary, $500. 

Miss Cynthia Maria Wesson for gymnasium apparatus, $500. 

In memory of Mary Worthington of the Class of 1910, from her class- 
mates and a few friends, for rhododendron bed planted under the windows 
of her room in Pembroke West, $81.93. 



VII. 

Titles of Scientific Publications of the Faculty Which Appeared 
in the Year 1912-13. 

Dr. James Barnes, 

"The Spectrum of Magnesium." Physical Review II, Vol. 1, pp. 476- 
477. June, 1913. 

"Band Spectra of Aluminium, Cadmium and Zinc." By James 
Barnes, Ph.D., and Miss Emily E. Howson, A.B. Astrophysical Journal, 
Vol. 36, pp. 286-293. November, 1912. 

Reviews in the Journal of the Franklin Institule. 

Dr. George A. Barton, 

"The Origin and Development of Babylonian Writing." Part I, "A 
Genealogical Sign List with Indices." pp. xxiv+296 autographed plates, 
large 8vo. Leipzig, J. C. Hinrichs'sche Buchhandlung; Baltimore, The 
Johns Hopkins Press, 1912. 

"Yahweh before Moses" in "Studies in the History of Religions," 
presented to C. H. Toy by Pupils, Colleagues and Friends, pp. 187-204. 
The Macmillan Company, New York, 1912. 

"Still Another Babylonian Ledger of Reeds and Wood." American 
Journal of Semitic Languages, Vol. XXIX, pp. 138-142. January, 1913. 

"The Babylonian Collection of George Vaux, Jr." American Journal 
of Semitic Languages. Vol. XXIX, pp. 126-137. January, 1913. 

"The Origin of the Names of Angels and Demons in the Extra Canon- 
ical Apocalyptic Literature to 100 A. D." Journal of Biblical Literature, 
Vol. XXXI, pp. 156-167. December, 1912. 

"TheHittites." Sunday School World, Nol.lAll, pp. bb, b^. Feb- 
ruary, 1913. Reprinted in the Australian Sunday School Teacher, 
Vol. XXIV, No. 4, pp. 137, 138. Melbourne, AustraUa, April, 1913. 

"A Text from the Oldest Period of Babylonian Writing." Orien- 
talische Literaturzeitung , Vol. XVI, cols. 6-12. Leipzig, January, 1913. 

"Joseph Smith as a translator." Desert Evening News. Salt Lake 
City. Part of a symposium of Oriental scholars arranged by Bishop 
Spaulding of Utah. Part 5. March 7, 1913. 

"Some Reflections on Christian Worship." Friends Fellowship 
Papers, Vol. VII, pp. 47-54. Birmingham, England. March, 1913. 
Reprinted in the American Friend, new series, Vol. I, pp. 194, 295. 

"Note on the Inscription of Enkhegal." American Journal of Arch- 
cBology, Vol. XVII, pp. 84, 85. April, 1913. 

"Recent Excavations in Palestine." Journal of the Numismatic 
and Antiquarian Society of Philadelphia, Vol. XXVI, pp. 205-216. 1912. 

"Recent Researches in the Sumerian Calendar." Journal of the 
American Oriental Society, Vol. XXXIII, pp. 1-9. January, 1913. 

(95) 



96 

"The Historical Value of the Patriarchal Narratives." Proceedings 
of the American Philosophical Society, Vol. LIII, pp. 184-200. Re- 
printed in abstract in Science, Vol. XXXVII, pp. 721, 722. May, 1913; 
in the New York Outlook, June 6, 1913; in Rural Manhood for September, 
1913; and the Sunday School World for October, 1913. 

"The Tablet of the Enkhegal." Museum Jouryuil of the University 
of Pennsylvania, Vol. IV, pp. 50-54. June, 1913. 

Book Reviews: - 

Podechard's "L'Ecclesiaste." American Journal of Theology, Vol. 
XVII, pp. 115-117. January, 1913. 

Hussey's "Sumerian Tablets in the Harvard Semitic Museum," 
Part 1. Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly, Vol. VI, p. 221. January, 1913. 

Macalister's "History of Civilization in Palestine." American Journal 
of Semitic Languages, Vol. XXIX, pp. 225-227. April, 1913. 

Vincent's "Jerusalem," Tome I, livraison 1. American Journal of 
Semitic Languages, Vol. XXIX, pp. 227-229. April, 1913. 

Hehn's "Die Biblische und Babylonische Gottesidee." American 
Journal of Theology, Vol. XVII, pp. 417-419. July, 1913. 

Dr. Carleton Fairchild Brown, 

" Ve7ius and Adonis, The Rape of Lucrece and other Poems." Edited 
for the "Tudor Shakespeare," pp. XXVI +200, 12mo. New York, 1913. 

"Caiphas as a Palm-Sunday Prophet." Kittredge Anniversary 
Papers, pp. 105-117. Boston, 1913. 

"Lydgate and the Legend of Good Women." Englische Stvdien, Vol. 
XLVl, pp. 59-62. 

Patterson's "The Middle English Penitential Lyric." 1911. Modern 
Language Review, Vol. VIII, pp. 215-218. 1913. 

Dr. Thomas Clachar Brown, 

"Notes on the Silurian Linestones of Milesburg Gap, near Belief onte, 
Pennsylvania." American Journal of Science, Fourth Series, Vol. XXV, pp. 
83-89, 3 figures. January, 1913. 

"Notes on the Origin of Certain Paleozoic Sediments. Illustrated by 
the Cambrian and Ordovician Rocks of Center County, Pennsylvania." 
Journal of Geology, Vol. XXI, No. 3, pp. 232-250. April-May, 1913. 

"Is the College Maldng Good? The Right Kind of Efficiency." 
Outlook, Vol. 104, pp. 993-995. August 30, 1913. 

Mr. Louis Cons, 

Translation of Professor James H. Leuba's "Psychology of Religion" 
into French, pp. 427. Alcan's, Paris. October, 1912. 

"Identification du continuateur inconnu du Cinquieme Livre de 
Rabelais." To be read November, 1913, at session of the Institut de 
France: Academic des Inscriptions et Belles Lettres. pp. 10. 



97 

"Essai d'identification de I'auteur inconnu de la Farce de Pathelin." 
Revue du Seizieme Siecle. pp. 12. 

Dr. Clarence Errol Ferree, 

"The Fluctuation of Liminal Visual Stimuli of Point Area." Ameri- 
can Journal of Psychology, Vol. XXIV, pp. 378-409. 1913. 

"Tests for the Efficiency of the Eye under Different Systems of Illumi- 
nation and a Preliminary Study of the Causes of Discomfort." (Paper 
read before the Sixth Annual Convention of the Illuminating Engineering 
Society.) Transactions of the Illuminating Engineering Society, Vol. VIII, 
pp. 40-61. 1913. 

"The Efficiency of the Eye Under Different Systems of Illumination." 
(Paper read at the Fourth International Congress on School Hygiene, 
August 29, 1913.) In press, Proceedings of the Fourth International Con- 
gress on School Hygiene. Abstract of this paper Electrical Review and 
Western Electrician, Vol. LXIII, pp. 478-481. 1913. Editorial, ibid., 
pp. 449-450. Abstract, Public Health Reports, Vol. XXVIII, No. 40, p. 
2035. 1913. Abstract, Literary Digest, Vol. XLVII, No. 15, p. 629. 1913. 

"The Problem of Lighting in its Relation to the Efficiency of the Eye." 
(Paper read before the American Philosophical Society of Philadelphia, 
April 4, 1913.) In press Science.. 

"The Efficiency of the Eye Under Different Systems of Lighting. 
The Effect of Variations in Distribution and Intensity." (Paper read at 
the Seventh Annual Convention of the Illuminating Engineering Society, 
held at Pittsburgh, September 22-26, 1913.) In press. Transactions of the 
Illuminating Engineering Society. Editorial, Electrical Revieiv and West- 
ern Electrician, Vol. LXIII, No. 14, p. 650. 1913. 

"The Efficiency of the Eye under Different Systems of Lighting." 
Mind and Body, Vol. XX, No. 223, pp. 280-287; Vol. XX, No. 224, 1913. 

"Illumination and Eye Strain. A Discussion." Transactions of the 
Illuminating Engineering Society, Vol. VIII, pp. 141-149. 1913. 

"Some Home Experiments in Illumination from Light Sources of Large 
Area. A Discussion." Transactions of the Illuminating Engineering 
Society, Vol. VIII, pp. 255-259. 

"A Note on the Rotary Campimeter." Psychological Review, Vol. 
XX, pp. 373-377. 1913. 

"The Effect of Changes in the General Illumination of the Retina 
upon its Sensitivity to Color." A discussion. Psychological Bulletin, 
Vol. X, pp. 366-374. 1913. 

"Vision — Peripheral and Foveal." Psychological Bulletin, Vol. X, 
pp. 95-101. 1913. 

"The Influence on Vision of the Brightness of the Surrounding Field." 
A discussion. In Press, Transactions of the Illumiyiating Engineering 
Society. 



98 

Dr. Donald Fisher, 
Translation, 

''Outlines of the History of Psychology," by Max Dessoir, Professor 
in the University of Berlin. Authorized translation by Donald Fisher, 
pp. \'xix+278, 8vo. New York, The Macmillan Company. 1912. 

Dr. Tenney Frank, 

Marginalia: Emendations of Horace, Epode 2, 26; Cic. ad Ait. 7, 2; 
Senaca <S«as, 6, 22; Ennius, Medea, 259-61; Cic. Verr. 4, 163. American 
Journal of PhUology, Vol. XXXIV, pp. 322-28. 

"The Import of the Filial Law." Classical Philology, Vol. VII, pp. 
335-342. 

"Mercantilism and Rome's Foreign Policy." American Historical 
Review, Vol. XVIII, pp. 233-252. 

Dr. Frederick Hutton Getman, 

"Outlines of Theoretical Chemistry." pp. lx+467, 8vo. John Wiley 
& Sons. 

"Potentials of Zinc in Alcoholic Solutions of Zinc Chloride." (With 
Miss Vernette L. Gibbons.) American Chemical Jow7ial, Vol. XLVIII, 
pp. 124-138. 1912. 

"Study of the Refractive Indices of Cadmium HaUdes." (With 
Miss Helen T. Gih-oy.) American Chemical Journal, Vol. XLVIII, pp. 
138-146. 1912. 

"Absorption Spectra of Solutions of Some Periodides." Abstract 
Proceedings of the 8th International Congress of Chemistry, Vol. XXVI, p. 
569. New York. 1912. 
Reviews, 

J. N. Poring's "Laboratory Exercises in Physical Chemistry." Ameri- 
can Chemical Journal, Vol. XLVIII, p. 265. 1912. 

J. F. Eijkman's "Tafeln zum Gebrauche bei der Bestimmung von 
Brechungsindices." American Chemical Journal, Vol. XLVIII, p. 551. 
1912. 

H. C. Jones's "The Freezing Point, Boiling Point and Conductivity 
Methods." American Chemical Journal, Vol. XLIX, p. 340. 1913. 

J. Y. Buchanan's "Experimental Researches on the Specific Gravity 
and the Displacement of Some Saline Solutions." American Chemical 
Journal, Vol. XLIX, p. 528. 1913. 

Mr. Clarence Henry Haring, 

"Espana y el Canal de Panamsi." Hispania, p. 390. Hispania, Ltd., 
London, December, 1912. 

Dr. Orie Latham Hatcher, 

Report of the Committee on Standardization as adopted by the 
Virginia Association of Colleges and Schools for Girls, pp. 8. Privately 
printed. Harrisonburg, Va. June, 1913. 



99 

Dr. Roland G. Kent, ' "' 

"Zu den orthographischen Rcgeln dcs Lucilius." Gloila, Vol. IV, 
pp. 299-302. Vandenhoeck and Ruprecht, Gottingen. September, 
1912. 

"Latin Mille and Certain Other Numerals." Transactions of (he 
American Philological Association, Vol. XLII, pp. 69-89, Ginn & Co., 
Boston, October, 1912. 

"Notes on malis ridentem, alienis." Horace, Sat. II, 3, 72. Pro- 
ceedings of the American Philological Association, Vol. XLII, pp. xxx- 
xxxii, Ginn & Co., Boston, October, 1912. 

"Rejoinder to Mrs. Fuller's Reply to a Review of Burton's Latin 
Grammar." Classical Weekly, Vol. VI, pp. 37-8. New York. November 
2, 1912. 

"Article on Indo-European Philology." American Year Book, 1912, 
pp. 769-771. Appleton & Co., New York. February, 1913. 

"The Oscan Slingshot of Ssepinum." Indogermanische Forschungen, 
XXXII, 1-2, pp. 196-202. Triibner, Strassburg. April, 1913. 

"Stories from the Far East." (With I. Freeman Hall.) pp. 153. 
Merrill, New York. June, 1913. 

"The Vedic Path of the Gods and the Roman Pontifex." Classical 
Philology, Vol. VIII, pp. 317-26. University of Chicago Press, Chicago. 
July, 1913. 

"Again Lucilius of EI and I." American Journal of Philology, 
Vol. XXXIV, pp. 315-321. Baltimore. July-September, 1913. 

Miss Georgiana Goddard King, 

Editorials. 

"Facing the Year." Harper's Weekly, January 11, 1913. 
"In Spain." Harper's Weekly, January 18, 1913. 
"Imagination and the Flux of Things." Harper's Weekly, January 
25, 1913. 

"The Passions of the Soul." Harper's Weekly, February 8, 1913. 
"Traveller's Joy." Harper's Weekly, February 15, 1913. 
"Humane Lives." Harper's Weekly, February 22, 1913. 
"The Family of Philip." Harper's Weekly, March 22, 1913. 
"Minor Interests." Harper's Weekly, March 29, 1913. 
"Crossways." Harper's Weekly, May 3, 1913. 
"The Day's Work." Harper's Weekly, May 10, 1913. 
Several reviews in The North American Review. 

Dr. Agathe Lasch, 

"'Tonlange' Vokale im Mittelniederdeutschen." Beitrage zur Ge- 
schichie der deutschen Sprache und Literatur, Vol. XXXIX, p. 116-134. 
Halle a. S. September, 1913. 



100 



Dr. James H. Leuba, 

"I/a Psychologie de la Religion." Bibliolheque de philosophie 
conlemporaine. pp. iv+444. Alcan & Co., 1913. (Translated from the 
English by M. Louis Cons.) 

"Sociologie et Psychologie." Revue Philosophique, Vol. 75, pp. 337- 
357. 1913. 

"Can Science Speak the Decisive Word in Theology." Journal 
of Philosophy, Psychology, and Scientific Methods, Vol. X, pp. 411-414. 
1913. 

"An Answer to Professors Shotwell and Hocking." Ihid., Vol. X, 
pp. 634-637. 1913. 

"Sociology and Psychology." American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 
XIX, pp. 323-342. 1913. 

Dr. Arthur Russell Moore, 

"Negative Phototropism in Diaptomus by means of Strychnine." 
University of California Publications in Physiology, Vol. IV, pp. 185-6. 
November 8, 1912. 

"Concerning Negative Prototropism in Daphnia pulex." The 
Journal of Experimental Zoology, Vol. XIII, pp. 573-5. November, 1912. 

"Edema and Nephritis, Experiments proving the invalidity of the 
Colloidal-Chemical Theory of." Journal of the American Medical 
Association, Vol. LX, pp. 345-8. February, 1913. 

"The Negative Phototropism of Diaptomus through the Agency of 
Caffein, Strychnine and Atropin." Science, N. S., Vol. XXXVIII, pp. 
131-3. July, 1913. 

"Further Experiments in the Heterogeneous Hybridization of Echino- 
derm." Archiv filr Enlwicklungsmechanik. Bd. 37, S. 433-39. Septem- 
ber, 1913. 

Dr. Florence Peebles, 

"Regeneration acoler Plattwiirmer." Bulletin de VInstitut Ocea.no- 
graphique. No. 263, pp. 1-5. May 1, 1913. 

Dr. Gertrude Rand, 

"The Factors that Influence the Sensitivity of the Retina to Color. 
A Quantitative Study and Methods of Standardizing." Psychological 
Review Monographs, Whole number 62, 179 pp. March, 1913. 

"The Effect of Changes in the General Illumination of the Retina 
upon its Sensitivity to Color." Psychological Review, Vol. XIX, pp. 463- 
490. November, 1913. 

"Colored After-image and Contrast Sensations from Stimuli in 
Which no Color is Sensed." Psychological Review, Vol. XIX, pp. 195- 
239. 1912. 

"The Efficiency of the Eye under Different Systems of Illumination, — 
The Effect of Variations in Distribution and Intensity." Transactions 
of the Illuminating Engineering Society, Vol. VIII. (In press.) 1913. 



101 

Dr. Albert Schinz, 

"La Question du Contrat Social." Revue d'Histoire Litteraire de la 
France. October-December, 1912. 

"Histoire de I'lmpression et de la Publication du Discours sur I'lne- 
galite de J. J. Rousseau." Publications of the Modern Language Associa- 
tion. June, 1913. 

Articles on "French Literature," and on "International Language." 
International Y ear-Book for 1912. March, 1913. 

"Some remarks concerning the Romance Department at Bryn Mawr 
College." Bryn Mawr Quarterly, January, 1913. 

"Abdallah ou Le Trefle a quatre feuilles" par Laboulaye. Edited 
with introduction and notes by A. Schinz and a vocabulary by Helen 
Maxwell King. Oxford French Series. New York, 1913. 

Various reviews in various periodicals. 

Dr. Mary Hamilton Swindler, 

"Cretan Elements in the Cults and Ritual of Apollo." Bryn Mawr 
Monographs, Monograph Series, Vol. XIII, pp. 77. Baltimore, Lord 
Baltimore Press. March, 1913. 

Dr. Maud Elizabeth Temple, 

"The New Classicism and French Literature." Bryti Mawr Lantern. 
1913. 

Dr. M. Carey Thomas, 

"The Future of Woman's Higher Education." Address delivered 
at the Seventy-fifth anniversary of Mt. Holyoke College, October 9, 
1912. Mount Holyoke College. Seventy-fifth Anniversary Memorial 
volume, pp. 101-105. South Hadley, Mass., 1913. 

"What College Women mean to a Community, What Goucher 
College means to Baltimore." Address delivered at McCoy Hall, Balti- 
more, on behalf of the, Goucher College Fund. December 3, 1912. 16 pp. 
Printed by Goucher College, December, 1912. 

"Report of the Committee on the Reorganization of the Association 
of Collegiate Alumnte." Journal of the Association of Collegiate Alumnse 
Vol. VI, No. 2, pp. 51-54. March, 1913. 

Dr. Arthur LesUe Wheeler, 

"Satura as a Generic Term." Classical Philology, Vol. VII, No. 4, 
October, 1912. 

Dr. Wilmer Cave Wright, 

"The Works of the Emperor Julian." Edited with revised text and 
translation in three volumes. Vol. I, pp. 511, 8vo. Heinemann, London. 
Loeb Classical Library. April, 1913. 

Several reviews in the Nation. 



VIII. 

Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1912-13. 



Department 



Sanskrit. 
Greek. . . 



Latin . 



Course 



Elementary Sanskrit 

Elementary Greek, Grammar, 
Composition and Reading. . . 

Plato and Composition, minor. 

Euripides and Composition, mi- 
nor 

Homer, minor 

Demosthenes, major 

Thucydides, major 

Aristophanes, major 

Sophocles, major 

History of Greek Literature, 
major 

Aeschylus, post-major 

Pindar, post-major 

Aeschylus, post-major 

Theocritus, post-major 



Graduate Courses 
Seminary in Attic Orators. . 

Seminary in Menander 

Seminary in Homeric Question 



Cicero, minor, Div. A 

Cicero, minor, Div. B 

Cicero, minor, Div. C 

Terence, minor, Div. B . . . . 

Terence, minor, Div. C. . . . 

Terence, minor, Div. A . . . . 

Horace, minor, Div. B, C. . 

Horace, minor, Div. C, A. . 

Horace, minor, Div. A, B . . 

Tacitus, major 

Latin Comedy, major 

History of Latin Literature, 
major 

Roman Life, elective 

Roman Elegy, post-major 

Vergil, post-major 

Roman Prose of Empire, post- 
major 

Advanced Latin Prose Compo- 
sition, post-major 

Roman Empire, post-major. . . 



Instructor 



Graduate Courses 
Seminary in Latin Comedy . . . . 
Seminary in Roman History. . . 
Latin Journal Club 



Dr. Kent 



Miss Kirk 
Dr. Sanders 

Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Wright 
Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Sanders 

Dr. Wright 
Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Wright 
Dr. Wright 



Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Wright 
Dr. Wright 

Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Ferguson 
Dr. Swindler 
Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Ferguson 
Miss Swindler 
Dr. Frank 
Dr. Ferguson 
Miss Swindler 
Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Wheeler 

Dr. Frank 
Dr. Frank 
Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Frank 

Dr. Frank 

Dr. Frank 
Dr. Ferguson 



Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Frank 
Dr.Wheelerand 
Dr. Frank 



Hours 
weekly 



... 3.. 
. .. 2.. 

li fort- 
nightly 



No. IN Class 



1st 2nd 

Sem. Sem. 



14 



12. 



(102) 



103 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1912-13.— Continued. 





Course 


IN.STRUCTOR 


Hours 

weekly 


Nn. IN Class 


Department 


1st 
Eeni. 


2nd 

Sem. 


English 


History of English Literature, 
First Year, required 

Elocution, First Year, required. 

English Composition, First 
Year, required 


Miss Donnelly 
Mr. King 

Dr. Crandall 

Miss Shearer 
Miss Daw 
Miss Sandison 
Dr. Langdon 
Miss Hammer 
(2d Sem.) 

Miss Donnelly 

Mr. King 

Dr. Crandall 
Miss Shearer 
Miss Daw 
Miss Sandison 
Dr. Langdon 
Miss Hammer 

(2d Sem.) 
Miss Daw 

Dr. Upham 
Dr. C. F. Brown 
Miss Donnelly 

Dr. C.F.Brown 
Miss Donnelly 
Dr. Crandall 
Dr. Crandall 
Miss Shearer 
Miss King 
Mr. King 

Dr. C.F.Brown 

Miss Donnelly 
Dr. Upham 
Dr. Upham 
Dr. Hatcher 
Dr. C. F. Brown 
Miss Donnelly 
Dr. L^pham 
Dr Hatcher 

Miss Ehlers 

Dr. Lasch 

Dr. Jessen 

Dr. Jessen 
Dr. Jessen 
Dr. Lasch 
Dr. Lasch 
Dr. Jessen 
Dr. Jessen 

Dr. Jessen 
Dr. Jessen and 
Dr. Lasch 


... 2i. 

... ^. 

... 2.. 

... 2|. 
... i.. 

. .. 2. . 
. . . 1. . 

... 3.. 
2. . 

2. . 

. .. 3.. 

2. . 

. . . 2. . 


..114.. 
..132.. 

..113.. 
...96.. 
...92, . 

...96.. 
...18.. 

... 6.. 
... 3.. 

. ..27.. 

. ..22. . 
. ..11. . 


..111. . 
..130.. 




History of English Literature, 

Second Year, required 

Elocution, Second Year, re- 


..109.. 
...94.. 
. . .90. . 




English Composition, Second 
Year, required 

Spelling Class 


...96.. 
. . .12. . 




English Critics of the Nine- 
teenth Century, minor 

Anglo-Saxon, minor 

English Poetry, major 

Middle English Romance, 
major 

Descriptive Writing, elective . . 

Narrative Writing, elective. . . . 

Daily Themes, elective 

Argumentation, elective 

Verse Composition, elective . . . 

Reading of Prose, elective 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Middle English . . . 

Seminary in 18th Century 


. .. 5. . 
... 6.. 
...28.. 

...22.. 




2 
2. . 

'.'.'. 2.'.'. 

. .. 1. . 

... 3. . 

... 2.. 
... 2.. 
... 3.. 
... 3. . 

li fort- 
nightly 

... 5.. 

... 3.. 

... 2.. 

. .. 3. . 
. .. 1. . 
... 1. . 
... 1. . 
... 2.. 
... 1.. 

... 2.. 

li fort- 
nightly 


...23.. 
. .. 4. . 
... 2.. 
. ..14.. 

... 6, . 

... 1. . 
... 4. . 

. .. 7.. 
, .. 2.. 

...11.. 

...12.. 

...17. . 

...13.. 

... 5.. 
... 6.. 
... 5. . 
... 3.. 
... 8.. 
... 5.. 

... 4.. 

... 3.. 


... 3.. 
. ..15. . 

... 6.. 
... 1. . 




Modern Literary Criticism .... 

Seminary in Romanticism 

Seminary in Shakspeare 


. .. 4. . 
. .. 7.. 
... 2.. 


German 


Elementary German, Grammar 


...12.. 
. ..13. . 




Critical Reading and Grammar 

and Composition, minor .... 

History of German Literature, 


...18.. 
...12.. 




History of German Literature 
and Selected Reading, major 

Faust (2d part), major 

Prose Composition, major 

Prose Composition, elective . . . 
German Literature, post-major 
German Reading, post-major. . 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in German Literature 

German Journal Club 


. .. 5. . 
... 6.. 
... 5.. 
... 4.. 
... 8.. 
... 5.. 

... 3.. 

... 3.. 



104 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1912-13.— Continued. 



Department 



Teutonic 
Philology . 



French . 



Italian 



Spanish. 



Comparative 
Literature . 



Course 



Teutonic Seminary 

Middle High German 

Introduction to Teutonic Phil- 
ology 

Old Norse 

Gothic 

Elementary French, Grammar 
and Translation 

History of French Literature 
and Collateral Reading, minor 

French Critical Reading and 
Composition, minor 

History of French Literature 
and Collateral Reading, major 

French Critical Reading and 
Composition, major 

French Lyric Poetry, post- 
major 

Women Writers of the Renais- 
sance, post-major 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in French Literature, 

Montaigne 

Seminary in French Literature, 

Rabelais 

Old French Philology, First 

Year Course 

Old French Seminary 

Romance Languages Journal 

Club 

Italian, minor 

Italian, major 

Graduate Courses 

Advanced Italian 

Spanish, minor 

Spanish, Literary History, Com- 
position and Critical Reading, 
major 

Spanish, post-major 

Graduate Courses 

Spanish Seminary 

The Drama, minor 

Culture of the Renaissance, 

minor 

Renaissance Lyrics, major .... 

Graduate Courses 
Seminary in Comparative Lit- 
erature 

Modern Literary Criticism. . . . 



Instructor 



Dr. Lasch 
Dr. Lasch 

Dr. Lasch 
Dr. Lasch 
Dr. Lasch 



Miss Hopp 
Mr. Cons 
Dr. Schinz 
Dr. Schinz 
Mr. Cons 
Dr. Schinz 
Mr. Cons 

Dr. Schinz 

Mr. Cons 

Dr. Holbrook 
Dr. Holbrook 

Dr. Schinz 
Dr. DeHaan 
Dr. Holbrook 
Mr. Cons 



Dr. Holbrook 
Dr. Holbrook 



Dr. Holbrook 
Dr. DeHaan 



Dr. DeHaan 
Dr. DeHaan 



Dr. DeHaan 



Dr. Hatcher 



Miss King 
Dr. Hatcher 



Dr. Hatcher 
Dr. Upham 



Hours 
weekly 



. .. 1*. 
fort- 
nightly 



No. in Class 



1st 
Sem. 



. 3. 
.61. 
.56. 
.19. 

.18. 
. 7. 



,. 3. 
.. 1. 



.. 3. 
..16. 



.13. 



..19. 
.. 2. 



2nd 

Sem. 



. 2. 
.62. 
.51. 
.21. 
.20. 
. 9. 
. 5. 



.. 3. 
.. 1. 



.. 2. 
..15. 



.12. 



105 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instrudioti given in 
1912-13.— Continued. 



Department 



Course 



Instructor 



Hours 

weekly 



No. IN Class 



lat 
Sem. 



2nd 
Sem. 



Semitic Lan- 
guages AND 

Biblical Lit- 
erature. 



History . 



Graduate Courses 
New Testament Greek semi- 
nary 

Semitic Seminary, Hebrew . . . . 

Seminary in Aramaic 

Hebrew Literature 



History of Europe from 1799, 
minor, Div. A 

History of Europe from 1799, 
minor, Div. B 

History of the Reformation, 
minor 

History of England since 1066, 
minor 

History of England since 1066, 
minor 

History of Europe in the 
Period of the Renaissance, 
major 

History of the French Revolu- 
tion, Napoleon, major 

History of the French Revolu- 
tion, Napoleon, major . . . . 

History of the United States, 
1865-1912, major 

History of British Imperialism, 
major 

Ancient History, Oriental His- 
tory, minor 

Ancient History, Classical His- 
tory, minor 

Ancient History, Age of 
Pericles, major 

Ancient History, Augustan 
Age, major 

American Constitutional His- 
tory, post-major. . 

History of England since 1714, 
post-major 

History of England since 1714, 
post-major 



Economics and 
Politics . 



Graduate Courses 
Seminary in English and Euro- 
pean History 

Seminary in American History 
History Journal Club 



Introduction to Economics 
minor 

Problems in Politics, minor. . . . 

Social Politics, major 

History of Economic Thought 
major 



Dr. Barton 
Dr. Barton 
Dr. Baiton 
Dr. Barton 



Mr. Haring 
Mr. Cleveland 
Dr. W.R.Smith 
Mr. Cleveland 
Miss Burt 

Mr. Haring 

Mr. Cleveland 

Miss Burt 

Dr. W.R.Smith 
I 

Dr.W. R. Smith 
Dr. Barton 
Dr. Ferguson 
Dr. Ferguson 
Dr. Ferguson 
Dr. W.R.Smith 
Mr. Cleveland 
Miss Burt 



Mr. Haring 
Dr.W. R.Smith 
Mr. Haring 
Dr. W.R.Smith 
Mr. Cleveland 
Miss Burt 



Dr. M.P.Smith 
Mt. Hudson 
Mr. Hudson 

Dr. M.P.Smith 



,. 3. 



... 2. . 
fort- 
nightly 



. 3 
.2.. 
. 3 



.40. 
.41. 
.34. 
..40. 



.32.. 
,.22.. 
..15.. 
..17.. 
.. 4.. 



..82. 
..74. 
..33. 



.34. 



..78. 



.37. 



..40. 
..17. 



..17. 
..34. 
..29. 
..19. 
..14. 



.81. 
.77. 
.32. 



.33. 



106 



Tabular Statemejit of Courses of Instruction given in 
1912-13. — Continued. 





Course 


Instructor 


Hours 

weekly 


No. IN Class 




1st 
Sem. 


2nd 

Sem. 




Social Research, elective 

Sociology, post-major 

Modern Democracy, post-major 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Economics 

Seminary in Politics 


Dr. M.P.Smith 
Dr. M. P. Smith 
Mr. Hudson 

Dr. M.P.Smith 
Mr. Hudson 
Dr. M. P. Smith 
and Mr. Hudson 

Dr.T.deLaguna 
Dr. Leuba 
Dr.T.deLaguna 
Dr.G.deLaguna 

Dr. Leuba 
Dr. Ferree 

Dr.G.deLaguna 

Dr.T.deLaguna 
Dr. Ferree 
Dr. Leuba 
Dr.T.deLaguna 

Dr. Ferree 

Dr.T.deLaguna 
Dr.G.deLaguna 
Dr.T.deLaguna 
and Dr. G. de 
Laguna 
Dr. Leuba 
Dr. Ferree 
Dr. Leuba and 
Dr. Ferree 

Dr. Leuba 
Dr. Leuba 

Miss I,amb 

Miss Lamb 

jNIiss King 
Miss King 

Miss I^amb 
Miss Lamb 


2 
'.'.'. 2.'. 
... 3. . 

... 2. . 
... 2.. 
... 2. . 

fort- 
nightly 

... 3.. 
. .. 2.. 
... 3.. 
... 3.. 

... 2.. 
... 2. . 

... 3. . 


...1.5.. 
... 4. . 
... 6.. 

... 2.. 
... 3.. 

... 4.. 

. ..92.. 
...96.. 
. ..11. . 

...13.. 


...18.. 
... 5. . 
... 5.. 

... 3.. 
4 


Philosophy . . . 


Economic Journal Club 

History of Philosophy, required 


... 4.. 

...92.. 
98 




Problems in Philosophy, minor 

Elementary Ethics, minor 

Psychology of Instinct, Emo- 
tion and Will, minor ....... 

ExperimentalPsyehology, minor 
Empiricism and Rationalism, 


!;;i6.'.' 

'.'.'.17.'. 




Philosophy in the 19th Cen- 


... 3. . 
... 2.. 


. .. 3. . 


7 




ExperimentalPsychology.maj or 
Animal Psychology, major. . . . 

Pragmatism, elective 

Advanced Experimental Psy- 








... 3 . . 




... 1. . 
... 3.. 

... 3.. 

9 

::: 1^: 

fort- 
nightly 
... 2. . 
... 3.. 

... 1.. 

... 2. . 

... 2.. 

... 3.. 

... 1.. 

... 3.. 
2. . 

. .. 2.. 
1^ fort- 
nightly 


... 4. . 
... 1. . 

... 3.. 
... 5.. 
... 3.. 

... 7.. 
. .. 3. . 

. .. 4. . 

...10.. 

... 3.. 

. .. 7.. 

... 2.. 

...52.. 
. ..28.. 

. .. 3.. 
. .. 1. . 


. .. 5. . 
... 1 




Graduate Courses^ 


3 




Metaphysical seminary 

Philosophical Journal Club. . . . 

Seminary in Psychology 

Systematic Psychology 

Psychological Journal Club 


... 5. . 
... 3.. 

. .. 6. . 
... 4.. 

. .. 4. . 

20 




Graduate Course 


2 


History of 

Art and 
Classical 
.Archae- 
ology 


Greek and Roman Architecture, 


. . 5 




Introduction to Classical Arch- 


. . 2 . 




Italian Painting of the Renais- 


51 




Renaissance Sculpture, minor. . 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Archaeology 

Archseological Journal Club . . . 


...22.. 

. .. 2. . 
. .. 1.. 



107 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1912-13.— Continued. 



Department 



Mathematics 



Physics. 



Chemistry. . . . 



Course 



Analytical Conies and Trigo- 
nometry, minor 

Differential and Integral Calcu- 
lus, minor 

Theory of Equations, minor. . . 

Differential and Integral Calcu- 
lus, Theory of Equations and 
Differential Equations, major 

Analytical Geometry, History 
of Mathematics, major 

Modern Pure Geometry, post- 
major 

Differential Equations, post- 
major 



Graduate Courses 

Special Algebraic Curves . . . . 

Theory of Numbers 

Mathematical .Journal Club. 



Heat, Sound and Properties of 
Matter, minor 

Light, Electricity and Magne- 
tism, minor 

Laboratory Work, minor. . . . 



Instructor 



Laboratory Work, minor. 



Theory of Light, Mechanics, 
major 

Heat, Electricity and Magne- 
tism, major 

Laboratory Work, major 



Laboratory Work, major. 



Physical Basis of Music, elec- 
tive 

Optics, post-major 

Electricty and Magnetism, 
post-major 



Graduate Courses 
Physical .Journal Club . 



Introduction to General Chem- 
istry, minor 

Introduction to Organic Chem- 
istry, .minor 



Laboratory Work, minor. 
Laboratory Work, minor. 



Theoretical Chemistry, major. 

Organic Chemistry, major 

Laboratory Work, major 

Laboratory Work, major 



Dr. Scott 



Dr. Conner 
Dr. Conner 



Dr. Conner 
Dr. Scott 
Dr. Scott 
Dr. Conner 



Dr. Scott 
Dr. Conner 
Dr. Scott and 
Dr. Conner 



Dr. Huff 

Dr. Barnes 
Dr. Huff and 
Miss Frehafer 
Dr. Barnes and 

Miss Frehafer 

Dr. Barnes 

Dr. Huff 
Dr. Barnes and 
Miss Frehafer 
Dr. Huff and 
Miss Frehafer 

Dr. Huff 
Dr. Barnes 

Dr. Huff 



Dr. Huff and 
Dr. Barnes 



Dr. Brunei 

Dr. Brunei and 
Dr. Macleod 
Dr. Brunei and 
Dr. Macleod 
Dr. Brunei and 
Dr. Macleod 
Dr. Macleod 
Dr. Brunei 
Dr. Macleod 
Dr. Brunei 



Hours 
weekly 



No. IN Class 



. .. 1. . 

fort-, 

nightly! 



Ist 
Sem. 



.10. 



.32. 



.32. 



2nd 
Sem. 



.21. 



.21. 



.31. 
'.'6. 



108 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1912-13. —Continued. 



DfePAHTMENT 



COUBSE 



Geology. 



Biology. 



Physiography, minor 

Historical Geology, minor 

Field Work and Laboratory 

Work, minor 

Field Work and Laboratory 

Work, minor 

Megascopic Petrology, major. . 
Glaciology and Structural Ge- 
ology, major 

Field Work and Laboratory 

Work, major 

Field Work and Laboratory 

Work, major 

Cosmogony, elective 

Evolution of Vertebrates, elec 

tive 

Stratigraphic Geology, post 

major 



Instructor Hours 
weekly 



Dr. Bascom 
Dr. T.C.Brown 



Dr. Bascom 



Dr. T.C. Brown!. ..4. 
Dr. T.C.Brown ... 5. 



Graduate Courses 

Mineralogy 

Petrology 

Topographic and Geologic Map- 
ping 

Invertebrate Paleontology . . . . 
Geological Journal Club 



General Biology, minor 

Vertebrates and Embryology . 

Laboratory Work, minor 



Physiology, major. 

General Zoology, 

major 



Anatomy, 



Laboratory Work, major. 



Dr. Bascom 
Dr. T.C. Brown 



Dr. Bascom 
Dr. Bascom 



Dr. T.C. Brown 
Dr. T.C.Brown 



Theoretical Biology, elective. . . 

Embryology of Vertebrates, 
post-major 

Central Nervous System, post- 
major 

Physiological Chemistry, post- 
major 



Graduate Courses 
Embryology of Invertebrates. 

Physiology 

The Nervous System 

Biological Journal Club 



Dr. Bascom 
Dr. Bascom 

Dr. Bascom 
Dr. T. C. Brown 
Dr. Bascom 
Dr. T.C. Brown 

Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Tennent 
and Dr. Joesph 
Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Joseph and 
Dr. Randolph 
Dr. Joseph 

Dr. Tennent, 
and Dr. Joseph 
Dr. Tennent 
;Dr. Joseph and 
jDr. Randolph 
Dr. Tennent 

Dr. Tennent 

Dr. Joseph 

Dr. Joseph 

Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Joseph 
Dr. Joseph 
Dr. Tennent 
and Dr. Joseph 



No. IN Class 



1st 2nd 
Sem. Sem. 



..16. 
..16. 



.. 2. 
.. 2. 



. 2. 
.46. 



..46. 
..10. 



...10. 

... 7. 



.15. 



..15. 
.. 3. 



... 3. 

... 7. 



..47. 

..47. 



109 



<50 



00 



;s3 



■A3o[oia 


O (M o b- o o o) c^ t^ « -t o o » c-i 1^ 'M o a -^ oc >o c-) <r. X c c CO 

i-H N C^ O « N ■* rt< -i< lO 00 O CO iC -O t^ -.C -.O -j; O O O t> '-" 'O CC 31 o 


•j{3o[oao 


' '. '. ' ' .* ,' ■ c: fO t^ CO OO O n" C'J CO CO CD ^1 »o ^ C O C-I CO 

: : : . : . . : ; . -h M<.-irt-HT»<r»<coiMc-)(M coco coco 




•jCj}8imaijQ 


OcOCDO<-l-*^iCiOr-iCOa3>OCO'.0>0'-i^CJ02COO'H01COCC(/)C! 

i-H l-^r-(l-lc^^co■*Tf^^t^T^^fOT}<^^lOLOcocO'Hcococoeoco'^^ol^5 


■SDisXqj 


:-^Ot^Ol^t^OO5C00OM-^t>.-t-<O>nc<lt^.-C000-'Tfi0 
. .'-1^ (NC^M^rtNcOCOCO^iOCOCOMCOCOCOCO-^t^cO 


•SDi^Binaq^Bj^ 


(NCSlNCOOOLO^t>.(MTt(T)<cOOOCOCOTl<003-*OOOCOCOMCOOOO 
COC^t-<CqC^COIMC>)COCOCOCOTl<^CO-*CO<MCOTt<COT»(TfOCOCOCO(N 


•XSoioajqDjy 


; ; ! ; .' : m © : : lo tt< ^ lo o -- » o o : ic t^ o lo im co -h -.ji 

^--H . .t^COOJCOLOCOCOOO .TfC0!Dt^O-*C0t~ 


•uorjBonpa 




-# .COlOOO-^lCO^tNCDU^OO'-t^Cl 

CO. co<N(Ncoro-Hoic>jMcoc^ 




•Aqdosojiqj 


,rt^^cgrt(MiN"niOOt-000:OOOOCOO-*-*OCO-;f-*.r»<ici-0 


•MB'J 




CO C<1 CO 1-0 OC . CO CO 00 o . . . . 






•aouapg reoiiijoj; 


: !cOI>Tt<00-i'OCOOCO-*OOI^C:t^t^C0 1Ct^03lOOOI^(MO 
. .rtrtlNC0-*l0t^lCrJ<C000OI>OO00r-i-<0it-.05XO0)^lO 


■ 


ooio :coT»HTfOt>coo";o30i-ooo'^r~cocoNC-<oOLO'-iTt< 

1-1 .C0C0iOTlHiOiO00tZ)0:XO(M^C0-*O(M'H^^oo— 'COCO 


•aiiUBja^tifj jBojiqig 
pnB saSBnSnBT; ot^tniag 


^ r^ ^ ,-^ ,~t ,^ ,-< .T)<MC0lOlO^C0-*<tO 


■am^Bja}!']; 
aAiiBJBdraoQ 




!".''t^ct^ 








•qsiuBdg 


.'oj-^-H-H-M^-^ino ;«)-*.-iTt<-jin-Htoco CD ■*'^'^~ ;*"*"** 


■nmv.%1 


(N :(M i^-iTf iOODOOOOO-*OOGSOOO:DCS050t^cOCOt^— IQC00C5 

-1 ,-lr-lrt rtrtCOlM-* Tji IM rH IM T-l rt 


•i{3oiO[Tq(j aouEtnoy; 


'-<<N(N : ; i^T-i^ioOrii-^COlM :(N(N i*! ; "C CO lO CO tJ< CO CO 


•qonaj^ 


OC0'O<O'-iC0C0OOC0iOmOTjfTl<ioO(MC0tDO05C0^OO00O 
"-l lN(NlMM(NCO"-OOOt>LOt>OI>00000005'-H05t>t^MCSCO'-< 


•iCSo[OiTqj; orao^nax 




•nBmja£) 


t»r-NO^cDcoO'Hi-oco-*-oc<icooco"0^cDl>i>'^t^coc:t^o 
■-i-*iOTl<-*-^col>t>COt>CDC^(XICZ)05l>C5mcDOOOcDcD-.DOT)f 


•noxBg-o[3uy 


: :cOt^OJCDCOOi-OOt^C»uOiOLOCOr|-OCOiOio^C<1000COI>^ 


•ajTUBja^il qst]§ng 


(N0105t^CDCOC-)mcOOC3i-OThTHTt<LOCOOC005-Ht^uOCOCOCOXCD 
«,-rt,-H«.^(N(NC>)(MCqNN0Q!NCv)(NC^C^05!N 


•Ul'^B^ 


rtiMcocoioi-oi>Tt<MC3C;ooO(Nrr<cococDTjHT(fcocococooar~^ 


•^laajr) 


OOOOOCDlMOOO-#i-H>>OCDiOt>Ot^05(MC5CD^-*COt~:DOCO 
C0C^lC>l'*-*"JlC0C0TmOTt<Tt<lOC0-*TtHCOC0Tt(C0TtHT}iTjlT«C0C)0«CO 


•A3o]0[iqj aAi^ 
-BJBduiog puB ^ixsjs'nBg 


;THT-l(M;OTHNT^TtiOCOOO(NiH(MCO'HC<l ^IMOJIM ; [^ i-ni-i 


•s^napTUg 
JO laqum^ jb^ox 


'*(rtiOOcOCqiMC:(NCOCOOOC»'*T!<0<r)C01>CO'-icOt^OOTHOC<10 
■*COt~'-llMCOCOO^QO©COC<H-0 0003CO^Tt<Tt<lOCOCqiM(MC<li'3lO 

rtl-lrtr-l(M!MINC<lC^lC0COCOCOTjflTtHTtlT)(TtlTt<Tf-i'Tt(Tj<'j(-S( 








ot^ooc!0-ic<ico-*LO-^t^cooo-Hcqco3;igjgt;;ooc:20.-HC-ico 

0000X0000O050iO05O0i05C50>OOOOOOOOOO--i"-^ 



Com'parative Table of Graduate and Undergraduate Students 
in the Different Departments of the College in 1912-13. 



Department. 



1 


Ho S 


c S 


t3 


Per cent, of 

Number 

Undergradi 

(376). 


SI 3 

2;o 


23 


46.2 


10 


106 


28.2 


10 


251 


66.7 


25 


27 


7.2 


17 


44 


12.3 


8 


106 


28.2 


14 


4 


1.1 


5 


19 


5.1 


5 


21 


5.6 


11 


17 


4.5 


4 


159 


42.3 


19 


141 


37.5 


9 


135 


35.9 


12 


25 


6.7 


12 


20 


5.3 


3 


64 


17.0 


12 


14 


3.7 


7 


30 


8.0 


5 


35 


9.3 


4 


31 


8.2 


2 


66 


17.6 


2 



E-ioS 



"^1 



Greek 

Latin 

English 

English omitting required English 

German 

French 

ItaUan 

Spanish 

Comparative Literatm^e 

Semitic Languages and Biblical Literature. . 

History 

Economics and Pohtics 

Philosophy and Psychology 

Philosophy and Psychology omitting re- 
quired courses 

Education 

Art and Archgeologj' 

Mathematics 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Geology 

Biology 



12.5 

12.5 

37.3 

21.3 

10.0 

17.5 

6.3 

6.3 

13.8 

5.0 

23.7 

11.2 

15.0 

15.0 
3.8 

15.0 
8.8 
6.3 
5.0 
2.5 
2.5 



(110) 



XL 



Grades Received in certain Undergraduate Examinations. 



Classes of over 50 students. 
Semester I, 1912-13. ■ 





Number 
in Class. 


Per cent. 

of 

High 

Credit. 


Per cent. 

of 
Credit. 


Percent. 

of 

Merit. 


Per cent. 

of 
Passed. 


Percent. 

of 

Failed. 


Latin. Minor: 

Cicero's Letters 

Horace 

English. General: 

First Year Literature .... 

First Year Composition. . 

Second Year Literature . . 

Second Year Composition 
French. Minor: 


59 
65 

106 
102 
93 

85 

57 
54 

79 

77 
69 
87 
93 


5 

8 

2 

2 


14 
6 

10 

9 
23 
15 

6 


32 
23 

4 
3 
6 
2 

26 
26 

30 

52 
38 
30 
35 


25 
35 

34 
29 
37 
41 

44 
35 

35 

34 
28 
32 
32 


24 
23 

52 
58 
51 
47 

16 
24 

16 

3 

10 
14 
13 


14 
11 

8 

10 

4 

9 




Reading and Composition 
History. Minor: 

Europe since 1799 

Economics. Minor: 

Introduction to Eco- 


9 

8 

3 


Problems in Politics 

Philosophy. General. . . . 
Psychology. General.... 


1 
9 
13 



Classes of SO or over, but under 50 students. 



History. Minor: 

Reformation 

England since 1066 

Economics. Major: 

History of Economic 
Thought 

Social Politics 

History or Art. Minor: 

Italian Renaissance 

Painting 

Biology-. Minor 



34 

38 



32 
31 



38 
43 



18 



28 
35 



41 
32 



59 
45 



24 
26 



42 
56 



12 
29 



37 
21 



Classes of 20 or over, hut under SO students. 



English. Minor: 














Romantic Poets 


21 


5 


43 


29 


24 





Middle English Ro- 














mances 


20 


10 


20 


45 


20 


5 


History. Major: 














United States, 1865-1912 


25 


20 


44 


32 


4 





British Imperialism 


20 


25 


50 


20 


5 





History of Art. Minor: 














Renaissance Sculpture . . . 


23 


4 


22 


48 


26 







21 

28 


19 
18 


33 
18 


24 
25 


19 
29 


5 


Chemistry, Minor 


11 



(111) 



112 



Grades Received in certain Undergraduate Examinations. 
Continued. 

Classes of 50 students or over. 
Semester II, 1912-13. 





Number 
in Class. 


Per cent. 

of 

High 

Credit. 


Per cent. 

of 
Credit. 


Per cent. 

of 

Merit. 


Per cent. 

of 
Passed. 


Per cent. 

of 
Failed. 


Latin. Minor; 


57 
63 

104 
111 
103 
92 
89 
95 

53 
50 

77 

77 
71 
89 
96 


5 
10 

3 

15 

1 

2 

12 


13 

18 

9 

13 

15 
12 
4 


25 
25 

12 

28 

if 

26 

4 

26 
36 

21 

32 
32 
26 
33 


47 
40 

48 
27 
26 
53 
40 
45 

49 
30 

35 

39 
37 
38 
38 


19 

24 

30 
16 
58 
25 
11 
48 

11 

14 

29 

12 
13 
13 

18 


4 


Horace 


3 


English. General: 

First Year Literature .... 

First Year Elocution .... 

First Year Composition . 

Second Year Literature. . 

Second Year Elocution . . 

Second Year Composition 
French. Minor: 


8 
14 
10 

2 
10 

2 




Reading and Composition 
History. Minor: 

Europe since 1799 

Economics. Minor: 

Introduction to Eco- 


2 
6 

4 


Problems in Politics .... 
Philosophy. General .... 
Psychology. General 


1 
10 

7 



Classes of SO or over, but under 60 students. 



History. Minor: 

History of the Reforma- 
tion 

History of England since 

1066 

Economics. Major: 
History of Economic 

Thought 

Social Politics 

History op Art. Minor: 
Italian Renaissance 

Painting 

Chemistry. Minor: 

Organic Chemistry 

Biology. Minor: 

Embryology 

Vertebrates 



35 


17 


43 


29 


10 


36 


8 


36 


36 


19 


33 
31 


12 
29 


51 
42 


33 

29 


3 



39 


5 


18 


46 


31 


30 


7 


20 


37 


20 


45 
45 


7 
7 


51 
69 


36 
22 


7 
2 



Classes of 20 or over, hut under 30 students. 



English. Major: 
Romantic Poets. . . 

French. Major: 
Literature 

History. Major: 

United States, 1865-1912 
British Imperialism .... 

Education. Elective .... 

History op Art. Minor 
Renaissance Sculpture . . 

Physics. Minor 

Chemistry. Minor 
Qualitative Chemistry. 



21 


19 


38 


33 


10 


21 


14 


52 


29 


5 


27 
26 
20 


26 

31 

5 


41 
35 
60 


30 
23 

25 


4 
8 
10 


20 
21 


15 
24 


20 
38 


40 
10 


25 

24 


26 


27 


11 


15 


31 



XII. 

Group Subjects Selected by the Students Graduating in the 
Years 1906-13. 





1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


Number in class 


56 


71 


81 


70 


69 


59 


60 

1 

12 

10 

9 

10 

2 

2 

3 

24 

25 

6 

5 

5 

4 

'2 


60 






Greek 


8 
26 
14 

6 
11 

3 

15 
18 
5 
3 
2 
1 


4 
24 
22 
11 
22 

2 

'8 
12 
12 

9 
3 

7 

6 


10 
31 
17 
10 
17 
4 

19 
23 
12 
8 
2 
5 
1 
3 


10 
26 
18 
11 
10 
2 
2 

17 
19 
5 
9 
4 
4 

3 


8 
27 
9 
11 
7 
1 
2 

20 
23 
5 
9 
5 
5 
1 
5 


9 
19 
11 

7 
11 

2 

15 
17 

5 
6 
8 
4 
3 
1 


5 


Latin 

English 

German 


18 
4 
9 


French 


13 


Italian and Spanish 


1 


Spanish 


ft 


Comparative Literature 

History 

Economics and Politics 

Philosophy 


24 

21 

2 


Mathematics 


3 


Physics 

Chemistry 

Geology 

Biology 


4 
4 

6 



(113) 



XIII. 

Resolution in Memory of Helen Schaeffer Huff, Ph.D., Reader 
in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1909-10, 1911-12. 

Died January 19, 1913. 

Minute adopted by the Faculty of the College at a 
meeting held January 28, 1913: 

Whereas, The Faculty of Bryn Mawr, College has learned 
with sincere regret of the death on the nineteenth of January, 
1913, of Helen Schaeffer Huff, who came to Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege as a Graduate Scholar in Mathematics in 1903, winning 
distinction as student, Fellow and European Fellow and investi- 
gator in her chosen field of physics and mathematics in which 
she received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1908, and 
later giving proof of her clear intellect and most exceptional 
abihty as a teacher when she held the position of Reader in 
Mathematics in 1909-10 and in 1911-12, 

And Whereas, As the wife of a member of our Faculty 
she endeared herself to us by a nature of singular directness 
and generosity, and by her loyalty in friendship and constant 
devotion to the interests of the College community. 

Resolved, That we place on record our deep sense of sor- 
row at her untimely death and our sympathy with Professor 
Huff in his great loss. 



(114) 



ANNUAL REPORT 



THE PRESIDENT 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



1913-14. 



PHILADELPHIA; 
THE JOHN C. WINSTON CO. 

1914. 



Corporation, 
Academic Year, 1914-15. 



James Wood. 

President, 



Asa S. Wing, 

Treasurer. 

James Wood. 
RuFus M. Jones. 
Alexander C. Wood. 
M. Carey Thomas. 
Francis R. Cope, Jr. 
Asa S. Wing. 



Anna Rhoads Ladd, 

Secretary. 

Charles J. Rhoads. 
Thomas Raeburn White. 
Frederic H. Strawbridge. 
Abram F. Huston. 
Anna Rhoads Ladd. 
Arthur Henry Thomas. 



William C. Dennis. 

Board of Directors. 

Academic Year, 1914-15. 
James Wood, 



Chairman. 



Asa S. Wing, 

Treasurer, 

James Wood. 
RuFus M. Jones. 
Alexander C. Wood. 
M. Carey Thomas. 
Francis R. Cope, Jr. 
Asa S. Wing, 
Charles J. Rhoads. 
Thomas Raeburn White. 

Executive 

RxjFus M. Jones. 
M. Carey Thomas. 
Francis R. Cope, Jr. 
James Wood, ex officio. 



Anna Rhoads Ladd, 

Secretary. 



Frederic H. Strawbridge. 
Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride. 
Mary E. Garrett. 
Anna Rhoads Ladd. 
Abram F. Huston. 
William C. Dennis. 
Arthxtr Henry Thomas. 
Elizabeth Nields Bancroft. 

Committee. 
Anna Rhoads Ladd. 
Thomas Raeburn White. 
Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride. 
William C. Dennis. 



Committee on Buildings and Grounds. 
Alexander C. Wood. Mary E. Garrett. 

Asa S. Wing. Frederic H. Strawbridge. 

M. Carey Thomas. Abram F. Huston. 

Arthur Henry Thomas. 

Finance Committee. 

Charles J. Rhoads. Asa S. Wing, 

Alexander C. Wood. Mary E. Garrett. 

Frederic H. Strawbridge. 

Library Committee. 

Thomas Raeburn White. Elizabeth Butler Kirkbride. 
Charles J. Rhoads. Elizabeth Nields Bancroft. 



Religious Life Committee, 
Rufus M, Jones, James Wood, 

(iiJ) 



Asa S, WjNe. 



Officers of Administration. 
Academic Yeab, 1914-15. 

President, 
M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D, 
Office: Taylor Hall. 

Dean of the College, 

Marion Reilly, A.B. 

Office: Taylor Hall. 

Recording Dean and Assistant to the President, 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D. 

Office: Taylor Hall. 

Secretary, 

Edith Orlady, A.B. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Recording Secretary, 

Abigail Camp Dimon, A.M. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Wardens of the Halls of Residence, 
Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., Pembroke Hall, 
Ruth Babcock, A.B., Merion Hall. 
Margaret Bontecou, A.B., Denbigh Hall. 
Mary Frances Nearing, A.B., Rockefeller Hall. 
Bertha Sophie Ehlers, A.B., Radnor Hall. 
Elizabeth Evans Lord, A.B., Assistant to the Warden of Pembroke Hall. 

Com-ptroller, 
Sandy L. Hurst. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Business Manager, 
Miriam Margaret Hedges, A.B. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Assistant Business Manager, 
Louise Watson, A.B. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Junior Bursar, 
Margaret A. Proctor, B.A. Office: Rockefeller Hall, 

Librarian, 
Lois Antoinette Reed, A.B., B.L.S. Office: The Library, 

Director of Athletics and Gymnastics and Supervisor of Health Department, 
Constance M. K. Applbbee. Office: The Gymnasium. 

Physician in Chief, 

Thomas F. Branson, M.D. Office hours, 8.30 to 9.30 and 2 to 3 daily, 

Rosemont, Pa. 

Assistant Physician, 

Frances R. Sprague, M.D. Pembroke Road, Bryn Mawr; Office hours, 

The Infirmary, Bryn Mawr College, 4 to 5.30 daily except Sunday. 

Examining Oculist, 

UniM^ MuRPBY, M.D, Office hours, 2 to 4 dmly, 1433 Spruce Street, 
■ ' ." Philadelptiia, • ' 



Academic Appointments. 

Academic Yeae, 1914-15. 

M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the College and Professor 
of English. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1877; studied at the Johns Hopkins University, 1877-78; 
University of Leipsic, 1879-82; Ph.D., University of Zurich, 1882. Sorbonne and 
College de France, 1883; Dean of the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College and Professor 
of English, 1885-94. 

Charlotte Angas Scott, D.Sc, Alumnae Professor of Mathematics. 

Lincoln, England. Graduate in Honours, Girton College, University of Cambridge, 
England, 1880; B.Sc, University of London, 1882; Lecturer on Mathematics in Girton 
College, 1880-84; lectured in connection with Newnham College, University of Cam- 
bridge, England, 1880-83; D.Sc, University of London, 1885. 

George A. Barton, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Biblical Literature and 
Semitic Languages. 

A.B., Haverford College, 1882, and A.M., 1885; studied under the direction of the American 
Institute of Hebrew, 1885-86; Harvard University, 1888-91; Thayer Scholar, Harvard 
University, 1889-91; A.M.. Harvard University, 1890; Ph.D., Harvard University, 
1891. Director of the American School of Oriental Study and Research in Palestine, 
1902-03; LL.D., Haverford College, 1914. 

Florence Bascom Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1882, B.Sc, 1884, and A.M., 1887. Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1891-93; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1893. Assistant in Geology and 
Instructor in Petrography, Ohio State University, 1893-95. 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D., Recording Dean and Assistant to the 
President. 

Reading, England. B.Sc, University of London, 1893; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, 
and B.A., Trinity College, Dublin, 1905; Girton College, University of Cambridge, 
England, 1889-92; Graduate in Honours, First Class, in the Cambridge Mathematical 
Tripos, 1892; Graduate in Honours, Final Mathematical Schools, University of Oxford, 
1892; Graduate Student in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-93, and Fellow in 
Mathematics, 1893-94; Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship and 
Student in Mathematics, University of Gottingen, 1894-95. 

WiLMER Cave Wright, Fh.D., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Shrewsbury, England. Girton College, University of Cambridge, England, 1888-92; 
Graduate in Honours, Cambridge Classical Tripos, 1892; Ph.D., University of. Chicago, 
1895. Fellow in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-93; Fellow in Latin, University of 
Chicago, 1893-94, and Fellow in Greek, 1894-95; Reader in Greek and Latin, University 
of Chicago, 1895-96. 

James H. Leuba, * Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Education. 

Neuchatel, Switzerland. B.S., University of Neuchatel, 1886; Ph.D., Ursinus College, 
1888; Scholar in Psychology, Clark University. 1892-93; Fellow in Psychology, Clark 
University, 1893-95; Ph.D., Clark University, 1896. 

FoNGER DeHaan, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish. 

Leeuwarden, Holland. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1895. Instructor in Modern 
Languages, Lehigh University, 1885-91; Fellow in Romance Languages, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1893-94, Assistant in Romance Languages, 1893-95, Instructor in Romance 
Languages, 1895-96, and Associate in Romance Languages, 1896-97. 

Arthur Leslie Wheeler, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

A.B., Yale University, 1893; Scholar and Student in Classics, Yale College, 1893-96; 
Ph.D., Yale University, 1896. Instructor and Tutor in Latin, Yale College, 1894-1900. 

Henry Nevill Sanders, Ph.D., Professor of Greek. 

Edinburgh, Scotland, A.B., Trinity University, Toronto, 1894, and A.M., 1897; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1903. Fellow in Greek, Johns Hopkins University, 1897-98; 
Lecturer in Greek, AIcGill University, 1900-02. 

* Granted leave of absence for the year 1914-15. 

(v) 



William Bashford Huff, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1889; A.M., University of Chicago, 1896; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1900. Lecture Assistant in Physics, Johns Hopkins University, 
1899-1900, Assistant in Physics, 1900-01, and Instructor in Physios, 1901-02. 

William Roy Smith, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

A.B., University of Texas, 1897, and A.M., 1898; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1903. 
Acting Professor of History and Political Science, University of Colorado, 1900-01; 
Lecturer in History, Barnard College, 1901-02. 

Lucy Martin Donnelly, A.B., Professor of English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 189.3. University of Oxford, England, and University of Leipaic, 
1893-94; Sorbonne and College de France, and University of Leipsic, 1894-95. 

Karl Detlev JesseN, Ph.D., Professor of German Literature. 

Winnemark, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. A.B., University of Chicago, 1896, and 
Fellow in German, 1897-98; Ph.D., University of Berlin, 1901. University of Chicago, 
1895-98; University of Kiel, 1899; University of Berlin, 1898-1901; Acting Professor 
of Modern Languages, Eureka College, 1896; Instructor in German, Iowa State Univer- 
sity, 1897; Instructor in German, Harvard University, 1901-03, and Lecturer on German 
Literature and Aesthetics, 1904. 

Tenney Frank, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

A.B., University of Kansas, 1898, and A.M., 1899; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1903. 
FeUow, University of Chicago, 1899-1901 ; Assistant and Associate in Latin, University 
of Chicago, 1901-04. 

David Hilt Tennent, Ph.D., Professor of Biology. 

S.B., Olivet College, 1900; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1904. Fellow, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1902-04; Bruce Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1904. 

Carleton Fairchild Brown, Ph.D., Professor of English Philology. 

A.B., Carleton College, 1888; A.M., Harvard University, 1901, and Ph.D., 1903. Shat- 
tuck Scholar, Harvard University, 1901-03; Instructor in English, Harvard University, 
1903-05. 

James Barnes,* Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Halifax, Nova Scotia. B.A., Dalhousie University, Honours in Mathematics and Physics, 
1899, and M.A., 1900; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1904. Holderof 1851 Exhibi- 
tion Science Research Scholarship, 1900-03; Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1903-04, 
and Assistant in Physics, 1904-06. 

Richard Thayer Holbrook, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French Phil- 
ology and Italian. 

A.B., Yale University, 1893; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1902. Sorbonne, College de 
France, Ecole des Chartes, 1893-94, 1895-96; Student in Italy and University of Berlin, 
1894-95; Student in Spain, 1901; Tutor in the Romance Languages and Literatures, 
Yale University, 1896-1901, and Columbia University, 1902-00. 

Theodore de Leo de Laguna,* Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

A.B., University of California, 1896, and A.M., 1899; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1901. 
Teacher in the Government Schools of the Philippine Islands, 1901-04; Honorary 
Fellow and Assistant in Philosophy, Cornell University, 1904-05; Assistant Professor 
of the Philosophy of Education, University of Michigan, 1905-07. 

Marion Reilly, A.B., Dean of the College and Reader in Philosophy. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-02, 1903, 
1903-06; Newnham College, University of Cambridge, Spring 1907; Universities of 
Rome and Sienna, 1911-12. 

Marion Parris Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

A.B.. Bryn Mawr College, 1901, and Ph.D., 1909. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1902-05, Fellow in Economics and Politics, 1905-06; Bryn Mawr College Research 
Fellow and Student in Economics and Politics, University of Vienna, 1906-07. 

Frederick Hutton Getman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1903. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1893-96; 
University of Virginia, 1896-97; Fellow in Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, 
1902-03, and Fellow by Courtesy, 1903-04; Carnegie Research Assistant in Physical 
Chemistry, 1903-04; Lecturer in Physical Chemistry, College of the City of New York, 
1904-05, and Lecturer in Physics, Columbia University, 1907-08. 



* Granted leave of absence for the year 1914-15. 



Clarence Errol Ferree, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Experimental 
Psychology and Director of the Psychological Laboratory. 

B.S., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1900, A.M., 1901, and M.S., 1902; Ph.D., Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1909. Fellow in Psychology, Cornell University, 1902-03; Assistant in Psychology, 
Cornell University, 1903-07. 

Orie Latham Hatcher, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Comparative Litera- 
ture and Elizabethan Literature. 
A.B., Vassar College, 1888; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1903. Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago, 1901-03, and Fellow in English, 1903-04. 

Agathe Lasch, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Teutonic Philology. 

Berlin, Germany. Ph.D., University of Heidelberg, 1909. Student, University of Halle, 
1906-07; University of Heidelberg, 1907-10. State Examination pro facultate docendi, 
Karlsruhe, 1910. 

Grace Mead Andrus de Laguna,* Ph.D., Associate in Philosophy. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1903, and Ph.D., 1906. Sage Scholar in Philosophy, Cornell 
University, 1903-05; Alice Freeman Palmer Fellow of Wellesley College, 1905-06; 
Reader in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08. 

Regina Katharine Crandall, Ph.D., Director of English Essay Work 
and Reader in English. 

A.B., Smith College, 1890; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1902. Graduate Student. 
University of Chicago, 1893-94, and Fellow in History, 1894-96; Assistant in History, 
Smith CoUege, 1896-99; Instructor in History, Wellesley College, 1899-1900. 

Kate Gordon, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1900, and Ph.D., 1903. Scholar in Pedagogy, University 
of Chicago, 1900-01, and Fellow in Philosophy, 1901-03; European Fellow of the 
Association of Collegiate Alumnae, 1903-04; Instructor in Ethics and Psychology, Mt. 
Holyoke CoUege, 1904-05, and in Teachers' College, Columbia University, 1906-07; 
Substitute Professor of Philosophy, Mt. Holyoke College, Second Semester, 1911-12. 

Clarence HeNry Haring, A.B., B. Litt., Associate in History. 

A.B., Harvard University, 1907; B. Litt, University of Oxford, 1909. Rhodes Scholar, 
University of Oxford, 1907-10; John Harvard Fellow of Harvard University, 1908-10; 
Austin Teaching Fellow in Harvard College, 1910-11; Bayard Cutting Travelling 
Fellow in History, Harvard University, and Student, University of Berlin, 1911-12. 

James Fulton Ferguson, Ph.D., Associate in Ancient History and Latin. 

A.B., Monmouth CoUege, 1903; A.B., Yale University, 1906, A.M., 1907, and Ph.D., 
1912. FeUow, Yale University, 1906-09; Instructor in WUliams CoUege, 1909-10; 
Instructor in Greek and Latin, Yale College, 1910-12. 

Thomas Clachar Brown, Ph.D., Associate in Geology. 

A.B., Amherst College, 1904; A.M., Columbia University, 1905, and Ph.D., 1909. Assist- 
ant in Palseontology, Columbia University, 1905-07; Geologist to the Board of Water 
Supply of New York City, 1907-09; Assistant Professor of Geology, Middlebury College, 
1909-11; Non-resident Lecturer in Geology, Norwich University, 1909; Assistant 
Professor of Geology, Pennsylvania State College, 1911-12, 

James Ryals Conner, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

A.B., University of Georgia, 1898; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1909. Johns Hop- 
kins University, 1906-12, FeUow, 1907-09, Carnegie Research Assistant, 1909-11, 
Johnston Scholar and FeUow by Courtesy, Johns Hopkins University, 1911-12. 

Roger Frederic Brunel, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B., Colby University, 1903; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1906. Lecture Assistant 
in Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, 1906-07; Instructor in Chemistry, Syracuse 
University, 1907-10, and Assistant Professor of Chemistry, 1910-12. 

Matilde Castro, Ph.D., Phebe Anna Thome Associate Professor of 
Education and Director of the Phebe Anna Thome Model School. 

A.B., University of Chicago, 1900, and Ph.D., 1907. FeUow in Philosophy, University of 
Chicago, 1900-01, 1903-04, 1905-06. Principal of the Morris High School, Chicago, 
1901-03; Instructor in Philosophy, Mt. Holyoke College, 1904-05; Instructor in 
Philosophy, Vassar College, 1906-09 ; Professor and Head of the Department of PhUos- 
ophy, Rockford CoUege, 1910-12. 

* Granted leave of absence for the year 1914-15. 



Arthur Russell Moore, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

A.B., University of Nebraska, 1904; Ph.D., University of California, 1911. Assistant 
in Physiology, University of California, 1909-11, and Assistant Professor of Physiology, 
1911-13. 

Donald Fisher, Ph.D., Associate in Philosophy. 

■A.B., Western Reserve University, 1908; A.M., Harvard University, 1909, and Ph.D., 
1913; Travelling Fellow in Philosophy, Harvard University, and Student, Universities 
of Gl-az, Berlin, and Freiburg, 1910-12; Assistant in Philosophy, Harvard University, 
1912-13. 

Gertrude Rand, Ph.D., Associate in Experimental and Educational 
Psychology. 

A.B.. Cornell University, 1908; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr CoUege, 1913. Graduate Scholar in 
Psychology, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09, 1911-12, Fellow in Philosophy, 1909-10, 
Fellow in Psychology, 1910-11, and Sarah Berliner Research Fellow, 1912-13. 

Eunice Morgan Schenck, Ph.D., Associate in French. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907, and Ph.D., 1913. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1909, Graduate Scholar, 1909-10, and Fellow in Romance Languages, 1912-13; Presi- 
dent's European Fellow and Student, the Sorbonne, College de France, University of 
Grenoble, and in Madrid, 1910-12. 

Samuel Claggett Chew, Jr., Ph.D., Associate in English Literature. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1909, and Ph.D., 1913. Fellow, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1910-12; English Master, Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn., 1913-14. 

Jean Baptiste Beck, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Medioeval French 
Literature. 

Guebwiller, Alsace. Baccalaureate in Rhetoric, Sorbonne, 1900; Baccalaureate in Philoso- 
phy, Sorbonne, 1901; Ph.D., University of Strassburg, 1907; State Examination pro 
facultate docendi, 1908. Professor of Latin and German in the Ecole Alsacienne, Paris, 
1909; Director of Advanced Courses for Teachers in Gymnasia, University of Vienna, 
1910; Professor of French Literature, Wiener Handels-Akademie, 1910; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Romance Languages, University of Illinois, 1911-14; Instructor in Romance 
Languages and Literatures, University of Chicago, Summer Quarter, 1912. 

Samuel Arthur King, M.A., Non-resident Lecturer in English Diction. 

Tynemouth, England. M. A., University of London, 1900. Special Lecturer in Elocution, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1901 ; Special Lecturer in Elocution, University of California, 
1902. 

Georgiana Goddard King, K.M.., Lecturer in the History of Art. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1897. Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr 
CoUege, 1896-97, and Fellow in English, 1897-98; College de France, First Semester, 
1898-99. 

Frederick Archibald Dewey, S.B., Lecturer in Economics and Sociology. 

S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1910. University of Grenoble, Autumn 
Semester, 1904; University of Michigan, 1905-06; Graduate Student in Sociology, 
Columbia University, 1911-12, and University Fellow in Sociology, 1912-13. 

Rhys Carpenter, M.A., Lecturer in Classical Archoeology. 

A.B., Columbia University, 1911; B.A., University of Oxford, 1911, and M.A. 1914. 
Rhodes Scholar and Student, BaUiol College, University of Oxford, 1908-11; Drisler 
Fellow in Classics, Columbia University, 1911-13; Student, American School of Classical 
Studies in Athens, 1912-13. 

Emil Carl Wilm,* Ph.D., Lecturer in Philosophy. 

A.B., Southwestern University, 1902; A.M., Vanderbilt University, 1903; Ph.D., Cornell 
University, 1905. Professor of Philosophy, Washburn College, 1905-11; Assistant and 
Decent in Philosophy, Harvard University and Radcliffe College, 1911-12; Professor of 
Philosophy and Education, Wells College, 1912-14. 

Janet Tucker Howell,! Ph.D., Lecturer in Physics. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1910; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1913. Helen Schaeffer 
Huff Research Fellow in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1913-14. 

- * Appointed as substitute for Professor Theodore de Leo de Laguna in 1914-15. 
t Appointed as substitute for Professor James Barnes in 19 J4-15. 



Chester Elijah Kellogg,* Ph.D., Lecturer m Psychology. 

A.B., Bowdoin College, 1911; A.M., Harvard University, 1912, and Ph.D., 1914. Assistant 
in French and Psychology, Bowdoin College, 1910-11; Austin Fellow, Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1912-13, and Graduate Student, 1913-14. 

Charles Ghequiere Fenwick, Ph.D., Lecturer in Political Science. 

A.B., Loyola College, 1898; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1912. Student of Political 
Science, Johns Hopkins University, 1909-11; Law Clerk, Division of International Law 
in the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 1911-14; Lecturer on International 
Law at the Washington College of Law, 1912-14; University of Freiburg, Summer. 1913. 

James Miller Leake, Ph.D., Lecturer in History. 

A.B., Randolph-Macon College, 1902; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1914. Instructor 
in French and English, Randolph-Macon College, 1901-03; Principal of Ashland High 
School, Ashland, Va., 1909-11; Johns Hopkins University, 1911-14; University Fellow, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1913-14. 

Pierre Francois Giroud, D.L., Licenci^-es-Lettres, Non-resident Lec- 
turer in French. 

Lyons, France. Bachelier-ks-letires, University of France, 1874, and Licencie-ks-lettres, 1881; 
D.L., Temple University, 1914; Officier d'Acad6mie, 1904; OfEcier de I'lnstruction 
publique, 1905. Ecole des Hautes-Etudes, Chartreux, Lyons; Sorbonne, College de 
France, 1881-1885; Director, Ecole Ste. Marie, Chalon, 1886-1888; Teacher of French 
in the Delancey School, 1889-96, and in the Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia, 1889-1915; 
in Girard College, Philadelphia, 1896-1912; Special Lecturer on French Literature, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1907-11; University of Pennsylvania, 1912-15; Cornell 
University (Summer School), 1913-14. 

Abby Kirk, A.B., Reader in Elementary Greek. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr CoUege, 1892. Reader in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-98. 

Mary Jeffers, A.M., Reader in German and Oral Examiner in French 
and German. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1895, and A.M., 1897. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1895-98, 1903-04, 1906-07; Teacher of Latin in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn 
Mawr, 1895-98; Student at the Universities of Munich and Halle, 1898-99; Teacher 
of Latin and History in the Girls' Latin School, Baltimore, Md., 1900-01; Head of the 
Latin Department in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 1899-1907; Student, 
University of Bonn, Summer of 1905; Private Tutor, 1892-1914; Supervisor of College 
Preparatory Department, Brantwood Hall, Bronxville, Lawrence Park, N. Y., 1905-07; 
Lecturer on European Travel, Miss Wright's School, 1904-14, and "Teacher of Latin, 
1911-14; French and German oral ex3,miner, 1909-14. 

Edna Aston Shearer, A.B., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904. Junior Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 1904-05; 
Holder of the President's Fellowship and Student, Universities of Edinburgh and 
Aberdeen, 1905-06; Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07; Teacher of 
English in the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1907-09, and Graduate Student, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1907-08. 

Mary Hamilton Swindler, Ph.D., Reader in Latin and Reader and 
Demonstrator in Classical Archaeology. 

A.B., University of Indiana, 1905, and A.M., 1906; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1913. 
Graduate Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07, and Fellow in Greek, 1907-09; 
Mary E. Garrett European Fellow and Student, Universities of Berlin and Oxford and 
the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, 1909-10; Teacher in the Misses 
Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 1910-11, and in Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, 1911- 
12. 

Ida Langdon, Ph.D., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1903; A.M., Cornell University, 1910, and Ph.D., 1912. Cor- 
nell University, 1909-12. 

Christine Potts Hammer, A.B., Reader in English. 

A.B.. Bryn Mawr College, 1912. 

Esther Cloudman Dunn, A,B., Reader in English. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1913. 

* Appointed as substitute for Professor James H. Lei^ba in 1914-15. 



Julia Peachy Harrison, Ph.D., Reader and Demonstrator in Chemistry. 

A.B., Richmond College, 1906, and A.M.. 1907, B.S.. 1909; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1913. Graduate Student, Johns Hoplcins University, 1909-12; Teacher in the 
High Scliool, Richmond, Va., 1907-08; Carnegie Research Assistant, Joims Hopl<ins 
University, 1912-13; Fellow in Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 1913-14. 

Dorothy Brewster, Ph.D., Reader in English. 

A.B., Columbia University, 1906, A.M., 1907, and Ph.D., 1913. Assistant in English 
Barnard College, 1908-11; Special Fellow in English, Columbia University, 1911-12 
Assistant in English, University Extension Department, Columbia University. 1913-14 
Assistant in the Summer School. Columbia University, 1914. 

Ellen Thayer, A.B., Reader in French. 

A.B.. Bryn Mawr College. 1907. The Sorbonne, Paris, 1909-11. Teacher of French in 
Wolfe Hall, Denver, Colo.. 1911-12. 

Clara Whitney Crane, A.B., Reader in English. 

A.B., Radcliffe CoUege, 1914, 

Mary Edith Pinney", A.M., Demonstrator in Biology. 

A.B., Kansas State University, 1908, and A.M., 1910. Teaching Fellow in Zoology, 
Kansas State University. 1909-10, and High School Instructor, Alma, Kan., 1908-09; 
Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1910-11; President's European Fellow and 
Student, Universities of Bonn and Heidelberg and Zoological Station, Naples, 1911-12; 
Instructor in Zoology, Kansas State University, 1912-13. 

Helen Turnbxjll Gilroy, A.M., Demonstrator in Physics. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909, and A.M., 1912. Graduate Student and Student Assistant 
in the Physical Laboratory, Bryn Mawr College, 1910-11; Fellow in Physics, 1911-12; 
Instructor in Physics, Mt. Holyoke College, 1912-14. 

Dorothy Ochtman, A.B., Demonstrator im, the History oj Art. 

A.B., Smith College, 1914. 

Phebe Anna Thorne Model School. 
Matilde Castro, Ph.D., Director and Teacher of English and History. 

A.B., University of Chicago, 1900, and Ph.D., 1907. Fellow in Philosophy, University of 
Chicago, 1900-01, 1903-04, 1905-06. Principal of the Morris High School, Chicago, 
1901-03; Instructor in Philosophy, Mt. Holyoke College, 1904-05; Instructor in 
Philosophy, Vassar College, 1906-09; Professor and Head of the Department of Philos- 
ophy, Rockford College, 1910-12. Phebe Anna Thorne Associate Professor of Education, 
Bryn Mawr College. 

Kate Gordon, Ph.D., Teacher of Mathematics. 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1900, and Ph.D.. 1903. Scholar in Pedagogy, University 
of Chicago, 1900-01, and Fellow in Philosophy, 1901-03; European Fellow of the 
Association of Collegiate Alumnse, 1903-04; Instructor in Ethics and Psychology, Mt. 
Holyoke College, 1904-05, and in Teachers College, Columbia University, 1906-07; 
Substitute Professor of Philosophy, Mt. Holyoke College, Second Semester. 1911-12; 
Phebe Anna Thorne Associate Professor of Education, Bryn Mawr College. 

Samuel Arthur King, M.A., Teacher of Reading. 

Tynemouth, England. M.A.. University of London. 1900. Special Lecturer in Elocu- 
tion, Johns Hopkins University. 1901; Special Lecturer in Elocution, University of 
California, 1902; Non-Resident Lecturer in English Diction, Bryn Mawr College. 

Eunice Morgan Schenck, Ph.D., Teacher of French. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907, and Ph.D., 1913. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1909, Graduate Scholar, 1909-10, and Fellow in Romance Languages, 1912-13; Presi- 
dent's European Fellow and Student, the Sorbonne, College de France, University of 
Grenoble and Madrid, 1910-12. Associate in French, Bryn Mawr College. 

Placido de Montoliu, Teacher of Jaques-Dalcroze Eurhythmies (Singing, 
Dancing) . 

Graduate of the Jaques-Dalcroze College of Rhythmic Training, Hellerau, Germany. 

Constance M. K. Applebee, Teacher of Gymnastics cind Sports and Games. 
pijrector o^ Athletics and Gymnastics, Bryn Mawr College, 



Makt Hamilton Swindler, Ph.D., Teacher of Latin., 

A.B., University of Indiana, 1905, and A.M., 1906; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1913. 
Graduate Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07, and Fellow in Greek, 1907-09; 
Mary E. Garrett European Fellow and Student, Universities of Berlin and Oxford and 
the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, 1909-10; Teacher in the Misses 
Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 1910-11, and in Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, 
1911-12. Reader in Latin, Bryn Mawr College. 

Frances Browne, A.B., Teacher of English, History, and Geography. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. Teacher in the Psychological Clinic and in Orange 
Settlement, New York City, 1911-12; Teacher in the Organic School of Education, 
1913-14. 

Anna Whitman Clark, A.B., Teacher of Elementary Science and Arith- 
metic. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1898. Private Assistant to Professor Brookover in Biological Labora- 
tory, Colorado College, 1899-1900; Teacher of Science and Mathematics in Miss Butt's 
School, Norwich, Conn., 1906-11, and in Miss Walker's School, Lakewood, N. J., 1911-14; 
Summer Session, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1914. 

Virginia Wright Garber, Teacher of Drawing and Modelling. 

Student, the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, the Philadelphia Academy 
of Fine Arts, and Pupil of Jules Lefebre, Benjamin Constant, Professor Charles Roth, 
WilUam M. Chase, Childe Hassam, and Howard Pyle. 

Gertrude Rand, Ph.D., Psychologist to the Phebe Anna Thome Model 
School. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1908; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1913. Graduate Scholar in 
Psychology, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09, 1911-12, Fellow in Philosophy, 1909-10, 
Fellow in Psychology, 1910-11, and Sarah Berliner Research Fellow, 1912-13. Associate 
in Experimental and Educational Psychology, Bryn Mawr College. 

Florence Nice Beckley, A.B., Secretary to the Director. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1907. Simmons College, 1909-10. Secretary to the President, 
Newton Theological Institution, 1910-14. 

Executive Staff. 
Edith Orladt, A.B., Secretary of the College. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1902. Warden of Pembroke Hall West, 1903-05, and Warden 
of Rockefeller Hall, 1905-06; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1903-06, 1907-09; 
Recording Secretary, 1910-12. 

Abigail Camp Dimon, A.M., Recording Secretary. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1899. Vice-Principal of the High School, 
Clinton, N. Y., 1896-97; Assistant Teacher of English in the Utica Academy, 1897-98; 
Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99; Tutor, 1900-01; Graduate Student 
and Warden of Radnor Hall, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-04; Teacher of Science in the 
Balliol School, Utica, 1904-05, and of Science and Mathematics, 1905-08; Teacher 
in the New School, Utica, 1908-09; Demonstrator in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1911, 
and Reader in Biology, 1911-12. 

Lenore Millicent Little, A.B., Stenographer to the President. 

A.B., Smith College, 1911. Clerk to the State Board of Education, Hartford, Conn., 
1911-14. 

Maud Agnes Titus, A.B., Stenographer to the Dean of the College. 

A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1911; Teacher of English, Watertown High School, Water- 
town, New York, 1911-12; Assistant to the Supervising Principal of Schools, Roselle, 
N. J., 1912-14. 

Eleanor Karsten, Ph.B., Secretary to the Recording Dean. 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1910; Secretary to the Chief Investigator of the Bureau 
of Industries and Immigration, Department of Labor of the State of New York, 1911-12; 
Secretary to the Librarian and Lecturer in the Library School, University of Illinois, 
1912-14. 

Ellen Beulah Lewis, A.B., Stenographer to the Secretary of the College. 

A.B., Swarthmore College, 1906; Assistant to the Editor at the Commercial Museum, 
Philadelphia, 1906-13. 



Lois Antoinette Reed, A.B., B.L.S., Librarian. 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1909; B.L.S., New York State Library School, 1904. Libra'- 
rian, The Western College, Oxford, Ohio, 1905-07; Cataloguer and Order Department 
Assistant, Library of the University of Illinois, 1907-10; Assistant Librarian, University 
of Rochester, 1910-13. 

"Helen Corey Geddes, A.B., B.S., Head Cataloguer. 

A.B., Radcliffe College, 1905; B.S., Simmons College, 1910. Library Assistant, University 
of lUinois, 1910-12. 

Bessie Homer Jennings, Assistant Cataloguer. 

Graduate, Drexel Institute Library School, 1900. 

Sarah Wooster Eno, A.B., Circulation and Reference Librarian. 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1908. Cataloguer, Library of the University of Pennsylvania, 
1909-10; Librarian, Stetson University, 1910-12. 

Marian Price, A.B., Assistant to the Librarian. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1910. Drexel Institute Library School, 1910-11. 

S. Helen Burns, A.M., Assistant to the Circulation and Reference 

Librarian. 
Ph.B., Dickinson College, 1912, and A.M., 1914. Drexel Institute Library School, 1913-14. 

Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., Warden of Pembroke Hall. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1889. 

Ruth Babcock, A.B., Warden of Merion Hall. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1910. Teacher in Deerfield Academy, Deerfield, Mass., 1910-13. 

Margaret Bontecou, A.B., Warden of Denbigh Hall. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. Bryn Mawr European Fellow, 1909-10; Student, 
Universities of Munich and Oxford, 1910-11; Settlement Worker, Orange Social Settle- 
ment, 1912-13; Private Tutor and Secretary, 1913-14. 

Mart Frances Nearing, A.B., Warden of Rockefeller Hall. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. Teacher of English in St. Margaret's School, Waterbury, 
Conn., 1910-11; Secretary and Athletic Director, Miss Walker's School, Lakewood, 
N. J., 1911-13; Social Service Worker, Philadelphia, 1913-14. 

Bertha Sophie Ehlers, A.B., Warden of Radnor Hall. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. Teacher of German in the Agnes Irwin School, Philadel- 
phia, 1910-14; Reader in German, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13. 

Elizabeth Evans Lord, A.B., Assistant to the Warden of Pembroke Hall. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1914. 

Margaret A. Proctor, A.B., Junior Bursar. 

A.B., University of Toronto, 1906. Laboratory Assistant in Physiological Chemistry 
and Bacteriology, University of Toronto, 1906-08; Dietitian, Department of Public 
Charities, New York City, 1908-09; Assistant Manager, Whittier Hall Dining Rooms, 
Barnard College, 1909-10. 

Sandy Lee Hurst, Comptroller. 

Genevieve Estelle Potter, Bookkeeper and Assistant to the Comptroller. 

Mabel Gray Thomas, Stenographer and Assistant Bookkeeper in the 
Comptroller's Office. 

Miriam Margaret Hedges, A.B., Business Manager. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1910. Secretary of Wykeham Rise, Washington, Conn., 1910- 
11, and Secretary and Teacher of Geometry, 1911-12; Secretary of the Baldwin School, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1912-13. 

Louise Watson, A.B., Assistant Business Manager. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1912. Teacher in Marshall College, Himtington, W. Va., 1913- 
14. 

John J. Foley, Superintendent of Mechanical Equipment. 

Thomas F. Foley, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 



Edith Sherwood, Stenographer in the Business Manager's Office. 
Drexel Institute Secretarial Scliool, 1911-12. 

Janet B. Houtz, Stenographer in the Business Manager's Offiice. 

Drexel Institute Secretarial School, 1913-14. 

Bertha Shortland, Telephone Clerk. 

Constance M. K. Applebee, Director of Athletics and Gymnastics and 
Supervisor of Health Department. 

Licentiate, British College of Physical Education, 1898, and Member, 1899. Gymnasium 
Mistress, Girls' Grammar School, Bradford, Yorkshire, 1899-1900; in the Arnold Foster 
High School, Burnley, Yorkshire, 1899-1901; in the High School, Halifax, Yorkshire, 
1900-01; Head of Private Gymnasium, Ilkley, Yorkshire, 1899-1901; Harvard School 
of Physical Training, Summer, 1901; Hockey Coach, Vassar College, Wellesley College, 
Radcliffe College, Mt. Holyoke College, Smith College, Bryn Mawr College, Boston 
Normal School of Gymnastics, 1901-04; Hockey Coach, Harvard Summer School of 
Gymnastics, 1906. 

Cynthia Maria Wesson, A.M., Assistant to the Director of Athletics and 
Gymnastics. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909, and A.M., 1914. Graduate of the Sargent School for 
Physical Education, Boston, Mass., 1913. 

Mart Warren Taylor, Secretary to the Department of Athletics and 
Gymnastics and Recording Secretary to the Health Department. 

Thomas F. Branson, M.D., Physician in Chief. 

A.B., Haverford College, 1889; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1892. Attending 
Physician, Bryn Mawr Hospital. 

Frances R. Sprague, B.L., M.D., Assistant Physician of the College. 

B.L., University of California, 1886; M.D., Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 
1891. Visiting Physician and Surgeon, Children's Department, Children's Hospital 
of San Francisco, 1898-1910; Visiting Surgeon, Woman's Hospital of Pennsylvania, 
and Consulting Surgeon, West Philadelphia Hospital for Women; Practicing Physician, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1910-14. 

Helen Murphy, M.D., Examining Oculist. 

M.D., Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1893; Assistant Demonstrator in 
Histology, Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1894-96; Instructor in Materia 
Medica, 1896-1902; Inductor in Diseases of the Eye, Philadelphia Polyclinic and 
College for Graduates in Medicine, 1895-97. 

The following physicians have consented to serve as consultants: 

Thomas McCrae, M.D., F.R.C.P., 1627 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, 

Consultant Physician. 

George de Schweinitz, M.D., 1705 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Con- 
sultant Oculist. 

Robert G. Le Conte, M.D., 1625 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Consultant 
Surgeon. 

Francis R. Packard, M.D., 302 S. Nineteenth Street, Philadelphia, 
Consultant Aurist and Laryngologist. 

James K. Young, M.D., 222 S. Sixteenth Street, Philadelphia, Consultant 
Orthopaedist. 

G. G. Davis, M.D., 1814 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Consultant 
Orthopaedist. 



Report of the Recording Dean and Assistant to thE 

President. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit .to you a statistical report on 
the students of Bryn Mawr College for the academic year 
1913-14, a statistical report of the workings of the regulations 
of the directors and faculty, and an account of matters which 
were administered through my office. 

The entire number of students enrolled during the year 
was 472. There were 85 graduate students, including fellows. 
The number of graduate students was about 18 per cent of 
the whole number of students. 



I. Comparative Table of Numbers of Graduate and Under- 
graduate Students from 1885 to 1914- 



Year. 


Graduate 
Students. 


Under- 
graduate 
Students. 


Total 
Number. 


Graduate 
Year. Students. 


Under- 
graduate 
Students. 


Total 

Number 


1885-86 


... 8 


36 


44 


1900-01 . . 


. 48 


348 


396 


1886-87 


... 10 


54 


64 


1901-02 . . 


. 53 


383 


436 


1887-88 


... 8 


70 


78 


1902-03 . . 


. 70 


377 


447 


1888-89 


... 16 


100 


116 


1903-04.. 


. 62 


384 


446 


1889-90 


... 22 


100 


122 


1904-05 . . 


. 63 


378 


441 


1890-91 


... 12 


120 


132 


1905-06.. 


. 79 


377 


456 


1891-92 


... 27 


142 


169 


1906-07.. 


. 75 


362 


437 


1892-93 


... 34 


168 


202 


1907-08. . 


. 72 


348 


420 


1893-94 


... 43 


200 


243 


1908-09 . . 


. 86 


334 


420 


1894-95 


... 49 


234 


283 


1909-10. . 


. 87 


337 


424 


1895-96 


...52 


246 


298 


1910-11. . 


. 84 


342 


426 


1896-97 


... 46 


243 


289 


1911-12. . 


. 76 


376 


452 


1897-98 


... 49 


275 


324 


1912-13 . . 


. 83 


376 


459 


1898-99 


. ... 67 


287 


354 


1913-14. . 


. 85 


387 


472 


1899-19( 


)0 . . 53 


334 


387 











^) 



Statistics of Graduate Students in 1913-14. 
JI. Geographical Distribution of Graduate Students. 
The 85 graduate students enrolled during the year came 
from the following states and countries : 

State or Number of 

Country. Students. 

Florida 1 

Iowa 

Nebraska 



Number of 
Students. 



State or 
Country. 

Pennsylvania 17 

New York 7 

Massachusetts 5 

Missouri 5 

Rhode Island 5 

Indiana 4 

Kansas 3 

Ohio 3 

Illinois 2 

California 2 

Michigan 2 

Minnesota 2 

New Jersey 2 

Texas 2 



Per- 
centage. 

20.0 

8.2 

5.9 

5.9 

5.9 

4.7 

3.5 

3.5 

2.3 

2.3 

2.3 

2.3 

2.3 

2.3 



North Carolina. 

Oklahoma 

Virginia 

Washington .... 
West Virginia . . 

England 7 

Germany. . .- 4 

Canada 2 

Scotland 2 

France 1 

Total 85 



Per- 
centage. 

1.2 

1.2 

1.2 
1.2 
1.2 
1.2 
1.2 
1.2 
8.2 
4.7 
2.3 
2.3 
1.2 



100.0 



These 85 graduate students may be classified as follows : 

Non-resident, holding European fellowships and studying abroad 5 

Resident fellows 13 

Graduate scholars, British 7 

Graduate scholars, German 4 

Graduate scholars, French 1 

Graduate scholars 25 

Members of college staff 10 

Graduate students 20 

"85 

Of the 85 graduate students 60 lived in the halls of resi- 
dence, 20 lived in Philadelphia or the neighborhood, and 5 
were studying abroad. 

III. Denominational A filiations of Graduate Students. 



Episcopahan 23 

Presbyterian 10 

Methodist 9 

Congregationalist 6 

Friends 5 

Roman Cathohc 3 

Unitarian 3 

German Reformed 2 

Evangelical 2 

Jewish 2 



Baptist 

Dutch Reformed 

Ethical Culture 

Christian Church 

Lutherans 

Unity 

No denominational affiliation . , 
Unknown 



13 
1 

85 



iV. Number of Years of Graduate Study of Graduate Students. 



In first year of graduate study, 33 
In second " " " " 27 

In third " " " " 12 

In fourth " " " " 7 



In fifth year of graduate study, 
In sixth " " 



5 
1 

85 



V. Studies Elected hy 80 Graduate Students in Residence. 

Under each subject all the graduate students attending 
courses in that subject are counted. 



Students. 

Enghsh 26 

History 14 

German 11 

Psychology 10 

History of Art and 

Archaeology .... 10 

French 9 

Philosophj^ 9 

Economics and 

Pontics 9 

Latin 8 

Education 8 

Chemistry 8 

Greek 7 



Percentage 
of Total 
Graduate 

Students. 

32.5 
17.5 
13.75 
12.5 

12.5 

11.25 

11.25 

11.25 
10 
10 
10 

8.75 



Students. 
Comparative I^it- 

erature 7 

Spanish 7 

Mathematics 

Biology 6 

Semitic Languages 
and BibUcal Lit- 

eratm'e 6 

Physics 6 

Teutonic Philology 4 

ItaUan 2 

Sanslirit 1 

Geology 1 



Percentage 
of Total 
Graduate 
Students. 



8.75 
8.75 
7.5 
7.5 



7.5 

7.5 

5.0 

2.5 

1.25 

1.25 



VI. Major Studies of 80 Graduate Students in Residence. 

Each student entered under a subject is doing full 
graduate work and devoting half or more of her working time 
to the study of that special subject. 



English 11 

German and Teutonic Philology 5 

Latin 5 

Philosophy 5 

Economics and Politics 4 

Greek 4 

History 4 

Psychology 4 

Chemistry 3 



Mathematics 3 

Biology. 2 

French 2 

Physics 2 

Classical Archasology 1 

Comparative Literature 1 

Geology 1 

Semitic Languages 1 



Vll. Occupations of 80 Graduate Students in Residence. 

Of the 80 graduate students 33 have already taught or are 
teaching, and 8 of these have taught, assisted, or demonstrated 
in colleges and Universities; 1 has been acting dean of a college, 
4 are college wardens, 2 are librarians, 1 has acted as curator 
of a geological museum, 1 has been a research assistant. The 
remaining 39 have held no positions. 

VIII. Examinations for Higher Degrees. 

At Commencement, June 1914, the degree of Master of 
Arts was conferred on 4 graduate students belonging to the 
following classes: 

Class of 1913, 1; Class of 1911, 1; Class of 1909, 1; Class 
of 1897, 1. The principal subjects of study of these students 
were Latin 1, Philosophy 2, Biology 1. 

During the year 7 graduate students presented themselves 
for examination for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The 
candidates were graduates of the following colleges and univer- 
sities; Bryn Mawr College, 2; University of Toronto, 1; 
Woman's College of Baltimore, 1; Girton College, Cambridge, 
and London University, 1; Vassar College, 1; Mt. Holyoke 
College, University of Chicago, and University of Cape of 
Good Hope, 1. The major subjects of the candidates were 
Philosophy 2, Greek 1, Latin 1, German 1, Mathematics 1, 
Chemistry 1. 

Statistics of Undeegraduate Students in 1913-14. 
IX. Geographical Distribution of Undergraduate Students. 

The 387 undergraduate students enrolled during the past 
year came from the following states and countries: 

students. Percentage. Students. Percentage. 

Pennsylvania .... 1 13 29 . 2 Connecticut 9 2.3 

New York 61 15.9 Minnesota 8 2.1 

Massachusetts ... 33 8.6 Rhode Island .... 8 2.1 
Illinois 30 7.8 District of Co- 
Maryland 27 7.0 lumbia 6 1.6 

Ohio 22 5.7 Virginia 5 1.3 

New Jersey 18 4.7 Alabama 4 1.0 



Students. Percentage. Students. Percentage. 

Indiana 4 1.0 Michigan...' 2 0.5 

Missouri 4 1.0 New Hampshire . 2 0.5 

Wisconsin 4 1.0 Arkansas 1 0.3 

California 3 0.8 Georgia 1 0.3 

Delaware 3 0.8 South CaroUna . . 1 0.3 

Nebraska 3 0.8 Vermont 1 0.3 

North Carolina . . 3 0.8 West Virginia ... 1 0.3 

Florida 2 0.5 Japan 2 0.5 

Kansas 2 0.5 — 

Kentucky.. 2 0.5 Total 387 100.0 

Texas 2 0.5 

These 387 undergraduate students are classified as follows: 
353 resident, 34 non-resident; 381 candidates for a degree, 
6 hearers. Of the 381 candidates for a degree 82 were seniors 
of whom 75 graduated in June, 3 graduated in February and 
4 did not complete the work for a degree, of these 1 failed in 
a final examination, 1 was excluded from a degree under the 
merit law, 1 was placed on probation under the merit law and 
1 was out of college for one semester on account of illness; 
97 were juniors, 89 were sophomores, and 113 were freshmen. 

In addition to those who graduated 46 undergraduate 
students left the college, 2 during the year and 44 at its close, 
for the following reasons: 

During the year: 

Financial reasons 1 

By request of the President 1 

— 2 

At the end of the year: 

lUness 3 

Planned to study one or two years only 4 

To be married ' 1 

By request of the Senate 10 

To attend another coUege 3 

Needed by family .'. 5 

Unsatisfactory conduct 1 

To study dramatic dancing 1 

To study art 2 

Failure in final examination (Senior) 1 

Examinations cancelled by Senate 1 

To come out in society 1 

Probation under merit law 2 

Loss of degree under merit law J 



6 



Financial reasons 1 

To attend a college nearer home 3 

To attend a college farther from home 1 

Change in plans of guardian 1 

.Withdrawn for a year 1 

To be with family and study music 1 

— 44 

Total 46 

The students Avho left were members of the followmg 
classes: seniors 2, juniors 7, sophomores 20, freshmen 17. 

X. Denominational Affiliations of Undergraduate Students in 

1913-U. 

Episcopalian 129 Lutheran ' 5 

Presbyterian 87 Dutch Reformed 4 

Unitarian 33 Swedenborgian 3 

Methodist 29 German Reformed 1 

Congregationalist 19 Ethical Culture 1 

Friends 15 Reformed 1 

Jewish 13 Reformed Presbyterian 1 

Baptist 12 Universalist 1 

Roman Catholic 11 No denominational affiliation. . 16 

Christian Science 6 

387 

Statistics of Senioes (Class of 1914), 

At Commencement, June, 1914, the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts was conferred on 80 students, 3 of whom completed the 
requirements in February, 1914. The courses may be analyzed 
as follows: 

XI. Duration of Course of Seniors. 

Number 
Length of Graduated 
Date of Entering College. Course. in 1914. 

October, 1903 6 years 1 

October, 1909 4 years 4* 

October, 1909 4| years 2 

October, 1909 5 years 2 

February, 1910 4| years 1 

October, 1910 4 years 70 

*Of these one was absent from college for one semester and cornpleted her work jii 
fejjruary, 191^. 



Of the 115 students who entered the college in October, 
1910, 70,. or 60.9 per cent, have therefore graduated after a 
consecutive four year course. 

XII. Age of Seniors. 

Seniors graduating in June, 1914: 

Average age 22 years, 3 months 

Median age 22 years, 1 month 

Seniors graduating in February, 1914: 

Average age 23 years, months 

Median age 23 years, 4 months 

The average age at graduation of the classes since 1907 is 
as follows: 

1907 22 years, 7.6 months 

1908 22 years, 6.6 months 

1909 22 years, 8.0 months 

1910 22 years, 7.4 months 

1911 22 years, 1.9 months 

1912 22 years, 7.0 months 

1913 22 years, 3.0 months 

1914 22 years, 3.0 months 

XIII. Groups Elected by the Seniors. 

History and Economics and Latin and Ancient History 1 

Politics 32 Latin and Mathematics. 1 

Latin and French 5 EngUsh and French 1 

EngUsh and Comparative German and Modern History ... 1 

Literature 5 French and ItaUan and Spanish . 2 

English and Philosophy 4 French and Spanish 1 

Chemistry and Biology 4 Italian and Spanish and History 

French and Modern History ... 3 of Art 1 

Economics and Politics and Modern History and History of 

Philosophy 3 Art 1 

Greek and English 2 Philosophy and Psychology and 

English and German 2 Biology 1 

French and History of Ai-t 2 Mathematics and Physics 1 

Philosophy and Physics 2 Physics and Chemistry 1 

Greek and Latin 1 Chemistry and Geology 1 

Latin and English 1 

Latin and German . . .- 1 80 



The major subjects chosen, arranged in order of frequency, 
are as follows: 

Number. Per cent. Number. Per cent. 

Modem History 37 23.1 Physics 4 2.5 

Econoiliics and Poli- German 4 2.5 

tics 35 21.9 History of Art 4 2.5 

EngUsh 15 9.4 Greek 3 1.9 

French 14 8.7 Mathematics 2 1.3 

Latin 10 6.3 Italian and Spanish .3 1.9 

Philosophy 9 5.6 Spanish 1 .6 

Chemistry 7 4.4 Ancient History .... 1 .6 

Biology 5 3.1 Geology 1 .6 

Comparative Litera- 



ture 5 3.1 160 100.0 

Results of Oral Examinations for Seniors in French and 
German Translation. 

„ . . T-T • J • French. German. 

Inrst Examination. Number. Percent. Number. Percent. 

Credit , 1 1.58 

Merit 4 6.55 

Passed 41 67.21 35 55.55 

Failed 16 26.23 27 42.85 

Total 61 63 

Second Examination. 

Passed 16 50.00 25 59.52 

Failed 16 50.00 17 40.47 

Total 32 42 

Third Examination. 

Passed 14 87.50 14 77.77 

Failed 2 12.50 4 22.22 

Total 16 18 

Fourth Examination. 

Passed 2 100.00 4 100.00 

Total 2 4 

An analysis of the language courses taken by seniors in 
connection with the results of the oral examinations for seniors 
gives the following results: A similar analysis for juniors and 
sophomores is given in Appendix XIII. 



Oral Examinations in French for Seniors, held October, 1913. 





Number 

taking 

exa,mina- 

tion. 


Passed. 


Failed. 




Number. 


Per cent. 


Number. 


Per cent. 


Total number taking exami- 
nation 


61 


45 


73.77 


16 


26.22 


Had taken minor French in 
College 


11 
15 

35 


8 
12 

25 


72.72 
80.00 

71.43 


3 
3 

10 


27.27 


Had taken some major lan- 
guage in College 


20.00 


Had not taken a major lan- 
guage or minor French in 
College 


28.57 







Oral Exaviinations in German for Seniors, held October, 1913. 





Number 
taking 
examina- 
tion. 


Passed. 


Failed. 




Number. 


Per cent. 


Number. 


Per cent. 


Total number taking exami- 
nation 


63 


36 


57.14 


27 


42.85 


Had taken minor German in 
College 

Had taken some major lan- 
guage in College 

Had not taken a major lan- 
guage or minor French in 
College 


6 

16 

41 


6 
11 

19 


100 
68.75 

46.34 




5 

22 


31.25 
53.66 



Statistics of Freshmen (Class of 1917). 

The freshmen entering in October numbered 110; 105 
entered on examination and 5 on honourable dismissal from other 
colleges or universities; 104 lived in the halls of residence and 
6 lived at home. 

XIV. Conditions of Freshmen. 

October. 
Number. Percentage. 

Clear 38 36.2 

Clear except for punctuation or spelling 17 16. 1 

Conditioned in 1 section 13 12 . 4 

Conditioned in 2 sections 13 12.4 

Conditioned in 3 sections 16 15 . 2 

Conditioned in 4 sections 4 3.8 

Conditioned in 5 sections 4 3.8 

105 

Honourable dismissal from other colleges 5 



10 

Freshmen conditioned in spelling 10, conditioned in punc- 
tuation 23, conditioned in punctuation and spelling 2; fresh- 
men entering on examination "v\'ith no condition except in 
"punctuation or spelling, 52.38 per cent. 

XV. Comparative Table of Percentage of Freshmen Entering 

Without Matriculation Conditions, October, 1890 — 

October, 1913. 

This table includes only those entering in October of 
each year and takes no account of conditions in punctuation 
and spelling. Up to 1897 the proportion of students entering 
free from conditions to all the entering students, including 
honourable dismissal students, was calculated. After 1897 the 
students who entered on honourable dismissal were not counted 
in calculating the percentage. It is therefore slightly mis- 
leading to compare the percentages before 1897 with those 
after 1897. 

In 1890 25.0 % In 1902 37.97% 

In 1891 22.8 % In 1903 35.29% 

In 1892 32.0 % In 1904 50.00% 

In 1893 23.1 % In 1905 54.81%, 

In 1894 19.3 % In 1906 53.48% 

In 1895 19.0 % In 1907 56.48% 

In 1896 21.8 % In 1908 66.29% 

In 1897 31.8 % In 1909 53.00% 

In 1898 26.9 % In 1910 53.63% 

In 1899 31.73% In 1911 49.58% 

In 1900 38.78% In 1912 58.16% 

In 1901 40.52% In 1913 52.38% 

XVI. Matriculation Conditions Passed by Freshmen. 

Omitting conditions in punctuation and spelling, 81 con- 
ditions were incurred, of which 79 were passed off during the 
college year as follows: 

Passed in November, 1913, 35 

Passed in January, 1914, 27 

Passed in April, 1914, 14 

Passed in May, 1914, 3 

Not passed, students left college, 2 



11 

XVII. Table of Prejmratory Schools that Prepared 
105 Freshmen. 

This Table is arranged according to sections of country 
in which the college offers matriculation scholarships. Five 
freshmen entered by honourable dismissal from other colleges. 

Number of Freshmen prepared by schools in New England: 

Winsor School, Boston, Mass 5 

Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn 4 

Wykeham Rise, Washington, Conn 2 

Cambridge School, Cambridge, Mass 

Miss Cummings' School, Boston, Mass 

Lincoln School, Providence, R. I 

Macduffie School, Springfield, Mass 

Misses May's School, Boston, Mass 

St. Margaret's School, Waterbury, Conn 

High School, Rockland, Mass 

Miss Wheeler's School, Providence, R.I 

19 

First matriculation scholarship of $300 won by pupil of Wykeham 
Rise, Washington, Conn.; second matriculation scholarship of $200 won 
by pupil of the Cambridge School for Girls, Cambridge, Mass. 

Number of Freshmen prepared by schools in New York, New Jersey and 
Delaware: 

Brearley School, New York City 3 

Veltin School, New York City 3 

Miss Chapin's School, New York City 

High School, East Orange, N. J 

Ethical Culture School, New York City 

Miss Fine's School, Princeton, N. J, 

Hawthorne School, New York City 

Horace Mann School, New York City 

Packer Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y 

Misses Rayson's School, New York City 

High School, Rockaway, N.J 

Staten Island Academy, Staten Island, N. Y 

High School, Woodbury, N.J 

17 

First matriculation scholarship of $300 won by pupil of the Misses 
Rayson's School, New York City; second matriculation scholarship of 
won by pupil of the Brearley School, New York City. 



12 



Number of Freshmen prepared by schools in the Western States: 

Latin School for Girls, Chicago 3 

Laurel School, Cleveland, Ohio 3 

Bartholomew-Clifton School, Cincinnati, O 

Central High School, Duluth, Minn 

Girton School, Winnetka, lU 

Lutheran Ladies' Seminary, Red Wing, Minn 

Stanley Hall, MinneapoUs, Minn 

University School for Girls, Chicago 

12 



First matriculation scholarship of $300 won by pupil of the Central 
High School, Duluth, Minn.; second matriculation scholarship of $200 
won by pupil of the Bartholomew-Clifton School, Cincinnati, O. 

Number of Freshmen prepared by schools in Pennsylvania and Southern 
States: 

Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md 9 

Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa 9 

Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa 7 

Girls' High School, Philadelphia 7 

The Misses Ku-k's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa 6 

Friends' Central School, Philadelphia 3 

Friend's School, Germantown, Philadelphia 2 

Miss Wright's School, BrjTi Mawr, Pa 2 

Thurston-Gleim School, Pittsburgh, Pa 2 

High School, JohnstowTi, Pa 

Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Pa 

Miss Virginia Randolph Ellett's School, Richmond, Va . . 

Miss Madeu-a's School, Washington, D. C 

Central High School, Pittsburgh, Pa 

High School, Reading, Pa 

Seller School, Harrisburg, Pa 

St. Timothy's School, Catonsville, Md 

Stevens School, Germantown, Philadelphia 

Western High School, Washington, D. C 

57 

First matriculation scholarship of $300 won by pupil of the Misses 
Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa.; second matriculation scholarship of 
'won by pupil of the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Pa, 



13 



Admitted on Honourable Dismissal: 



University of Wisconsin 3 

University of Chicago 1 

Northwestern University 1 

5 



Preparation Received in Private or Public Schools. 

Number. Per cent. 

Private schools 75 71 .4 

Public schools 17 16.2 

Private and public schools 9 8.6 

Private schools and private tuition 4 3.8 



105 100.00 



14 



XVIII. 



A Comparative Table of the Geographical Distribution 
of the Freshmen 1904 to 1913. 



States and 








Per cent of Freshmen in 


























1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


Pennsylvania 


35.4 


37.8 


33.0 


29.2 


27.7 


35.9 


28.6 


30.1 


25.5 


24.5 


New York 


16.7 
6.3 
2.1 


12.6 
5.4 
81 


18.2 

10.6 

3 2 


17.7 

13.5 

4 2 


16.0 

14.9 

9 6 


18.9 
9.0 
5.0 


14.8 
9.5 

8,7 


19.5 

7.3 
49 


17.4 
3.1 

9?, 


18.1 


Illinois 


86 


Maryland 


76 


Massachusetts 


4.2 


6.3 


7.4 


6.3 


1.1 


7.0 


12.2 


7.3 


7.1 


8.6 


New Jersey 


2.1 


3.6 


4.4 


3.1 


1.1 


4.0 


7.8 


4.1 


3.1 


4.8 


Ohio 


3.1 


1.8 


5.3 


3.1 


3.2 


2.0 
2.0 


1.7 


6.5 
1.6 


8.2 
1.0 


48 


Alabama 


1.0 


Arkansas 




1.8 






1.1 








1.0 




California 


2.1 


.9 


Y.i 


1.0 
1.0 


1.1 




.9 


1.6 




1.0 


Colorado 




Connecticut 


2.1 


1.8 


1.1 




2.2 


2.0 


.9 


1.6 


3.1 


2.9 


Delaware 


1.0 


".9 


2.2 


1.0 

2.1 


Y.I 


1.0 
1.0 


1.7 
1.7 




'2.0 




District of Columbia 


1.9 


Florida 




.9 
















1.9 


Georgia 










1.1 


1.0 




.8 






Indiana 


2.1 


1.8 
".9 


1.1 
1.1 


1.0 
1.0 


'2.2 
1.1 




2.6 


1.6 

".8 


3.1 
I'.O 




Iowa 




Kansas 






Kentucky 


?1 








1.1 


1 


q 




4.1 




Louisiana 








1.0 


1.1 












Maine 










1.1 












Michigan 


3.1 
3.1 
1.0 


.9 
1.8 


2.2 




2.2 
1.1 


1.0 
2.0 


'".9 


.8 
1.6 


4.1 




Minnesota 


'^q 


Mississippi 




Missouri 




1.8 


1.1 


1.0 




2.0 


.9 


.8 


1.0 




Montana 






1.1 
















Nebraska 




.9 


2.2 


3.1 


1.1 






.8 


1.0 


1.0 


Nevada 








1.0 




. 






, , 




New Hampshire .... 


1.0 






2.1 




1.0 




.8 




1.0 


North Carolina 
















.8 


1.0 


1.9 


Oregon 




.9 




1.0 


1.1 


1.0 










Rhode Island 






1.1 


1.0 






.9 


4.1 


1.0 


1.9 


South Carolina 


2.1 




1.1 










.8 






Tennessee 








1.0 






.9 








Texas 


2.1 




1.1 




1.1 


3.0 


.9 


.8 


2.0 


1 


Vermont 


1.0 


Virginia 


3.1 


.9 


1.1 


2.1 


3.2 


1.0 




.8 


. . 


1 q 


West Virginia 


1.0 


Wisconsin 


2.1 


.9 




2.1 






2.6 


1.8 






Wyoming 




France 


1.0 
1.0 
1 


'".9 






1.1 

Vi 


1.0 
1 






Vo 




Hawaii 




Japan 


1 


England 






1.1 




1.1 




.9 








Canada 












1.0 








•• 



In 1913, 20 states, the District of Columbia and Japan 
are represented. 



15 



XIX. Denominational Affiliations of the Freshmen. 



Episcopalian 41 

Presbyterian 26 

Unitarian 13 

Baptist 5 

Methodist ; 5 

Congregationalist 4 

Friends 4 

Jewish 4 



Roman Catholic 3 

Lutheran 2 

Christian Scientist 1 

Dutch Reformed 1 

No denominational affiliation . 1 

110 



XX. Average and Median Age of the Freshmen. 

Years. Months. 

Average age of the class entering in October 18 3 

Median age of the class entering in October 18 2 

Average age (excluding honourable dismissal stu- 
dents) 18 3 

Median age (excluding honourable dismissal stu- 
dents) 18 2 

XXI. Average Ages of Entering Classes Since 1885. . 



Year. 


Average Age. 


Median Age. 


Year. 


Average Age. 


Median Age. 


1885 


22.03 


18.87 


1899 


• 18.75 


18.58 


1886 


18.31 


18.00 


1900 


19.00 


18.91 


1887 


19.24 


19.00 


1901 


18.58 


18.58 


1888 


19.02 


18.20 


1902 


18.83 


18.62 


1889 


19.19 


18.10 


1903 


18.50 


18.50 


1890 


19.35 


18.11 


1904 


18.92 


18.92 


1891 


19.46 


18.07 


1905 


18.66 


18.66 


1892 


19.54 


18.11 


1906 


18.75 


18.50 


1893 


19.78 


19.00 


1907 


18.66 


18.33 


1894 


19.28 


19.01 


1908 


18.50 


18.33 


1895 


19.44 


18.08 


1909 


18.58 


18.58 


1896 


18.97 


18.10 


1910 


18.50 


18.42 


1897 


18.90 


18.75 


1911 


18.54 


18.58 


1898 


19.08 


19.58 


1912 


18.75 


18.50 






1 


1913 


18.25 


18.16 



XXII. Occupations of Parents of the Freshmen. 

Professions: 

Lawyers (1 Judge) 18 

Physicians (3 Surgeons) 11 

Teachers. 7 

Clergymen 5 

Architects 3 

Technical Engineers 3 

Army Oncers ....,.......,,., 2 



16 



Biisiness: 

Business Managers, Officials and Employees 14 

Merchants 13 

Manufactiu-ers 12 

Stock and Bond Brokers 5 

Bankers 3 

Farmers 2 

Insurance Agents 2 

Accountant 

Cloth Finisher 

Government Official 

Inventor 

Japanner 

Journahst 

Real Estate Agent 

Not stated 

No occupation. 2 

—61 

110 

XXIII. Intentions of Freshmen in Regard to College Course. 

Number. Per cent. 

Four years and graduation 95 86.4 

Uncertain as to graduation 2 1.8 

One year only 2 1.8 

Two years only 7 6.4 

Intention not stated 4 3.6 



110 100.0 

XXIV. Decision of Freshmen to Attend College. 

On entering college each freshman was asked by whom it 
was decided that she should take a college course. The 
answers tabulated are as follows: 

Decision made by Number. Per cent, 

Student herself 31 29.5 

Family and student 15 14.3 

Family 14 13.3 

Mother 13 12.3 

Father.., 9 8.6 

School Teacher 3 2.9 

Father and student 3 2.9 

^jstier.... 3 2.9 



17 

i^eciBion made by ^ Number. Per cent. 

Family and school 2 1.9 

Mother and student 2 1.9 

Aunt and student 2 1.9 

Grandfather and student 2 1.9 

Uncle 1 1.0 

Brother 1 1.0 

Cousin (alumna) 1 1.0 

Not stated 3 2.9 



105 100.0 
XXV. Time of Decision of Freshmen to Attend College. 

Intended to come to college Number. Per cent. 

Always 42 40.0 

Several years before entrance 1 1.0 

Fourteen years 1 1.0 

Ten years 1 1.0 

Eight years 2 1.9 

Seven years 1 1.0 

Six years 3 2.9 

Five years 6 5.7 

Four years 12 11.4 

Three years 15 14.3 

Two years 8 7.6 

One year 8 7.6 

One-half year 2 1.9 

Not stated 3 2.9 



105 100.0 

XXVI. Reasons why Freshmen Selected Bry7i Mawr College. 

The following reasons were given by the Freshmen when 
asked why they selected Bryn Mawr College in preference to 
any other college. 

Number. Per cent. 

Sister at Br3ai Mawr now or formerly 14 13 . 3 

Best college 14 13.3 

Recommended by school 13 12 . 3 

Selected by family 11 10.4 

Friendship with alumnae or present students 10 9.5 

High standard 7 6.7 

Liking for the college 7 6.7 

Small college 4 3.8 

Vicinity to Philadelphia 4 3.8 

High standard and near Philadelphia 2 1.9 



Number. Per cent. 

Mathematics not requii-ed in course 2 1.9 

Wanted to be away from home 2 1.9 

High standard and English courses good 1 1.0 

High standard and sister at Bryn Mawr 1 1.0 

High standard and near home 1 1.0 

Liked small college and mother advised Bryn Mawr 1 1.0 

" " " " near home 1 1.0 

Visited May Day F^te and liked college 1 1.0 

Liked the gymnasium and had friend at college 1 1.0 

Mother an alumna of the college 1 1.0 

School prepared for Bryn Mawr and near home 1 1.0 

Liked the English atmosphere 1 1.0 

Favourable report of the college 1 1.0 

Liked the grounds 1 1.0 

Liked a coUege not admitting on certificate and near home 1 1.0 

Had always had a close affiliation with the college 1 1.0 

Not stated 1 1.0 

105 100.0 



XXVII. Object of Freshmen in Attending College. 
Only sixty-five answered this question as follows: 



Number. 

To prepare to teach 31 

To obtain a general education 6 

To prepare to write 4 

" " for social work 3 

medical work 3 

To prepare to be a trained nurse 2 

" " " " " scientific worker 2 

" " " "translator 

" " " "decorator 

" " " " " journalist and social worker 

" " " secretary 

" " " an architect 

" " to learn agriculture 

"study art 

" " " study art criticism 

" " " do something 

" " " support herself 

For pleasure 

No object 3 



Per cent. 

47.7 
9.2 
6.1 
4.6 
4.6 
3.1 
3.1 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
4.6 



65 



100.0 



1^ 



XXVIII. Occupations Planned by Freshmen. 

Number. Per cent. 

Teaching 31 54.4 

No profession 3 5.3 

Social work 2 3.5 

Medicine 4 7.0 

Architecture 1 1.8 

Painting 2 3.5 

Writing 3 5.3 

Nxirsing 2 3.5 

Secretary 1 

Decorator '. 1 

Scientist 1 

Ethnologist (Indian) 1 

Agriculturist 1 

JournaUst 1 

Journahst and Social Worker 1 

Art critic 1 

Undecided 1 

57 100.0 



XXIX. Favorite Studies of Freshmen. 

In some cases a single student has mentioned several 
subjects. 

Languages 20 

English 18 

Science 13 

Mathematics 9 

History 8 

Latin 4 

Economics 3 

Art 2 

French 2 

Classics 

Archaeology 

Chemistry 

German 

Horticulture 

Indian History and Ethnology 

Medicine 

Psychology 

Preference not stated 26 



20 
XXX. Nationalities of Freshmen. 

Number. Per cent. 

American on both sides for 3 generations 36 34 . 2 

" " " " " 2 " only 27 25.7 

" " " " " i " " 28 26.7 

One parent American, 3 generations 1 1.0 

2 " 1 1.0 

" " " 1 generation 3 2.9 

Parents both English 2 1.9 

" " German 3 2.9 

" " Japanese 1 1.0 

" Scotch 1 1.0 

Not stated 2 1.9 



3 




4 




5 




6 




7 





105 100.0 

XXXI. Size of Family of the Freshmen. 

Only child 10 

1 brother or sister 34 

2 brothers or sisters 19 

14 

9 

5 

1 

1 

Not stated 12 

105 

Numbers of Brothers and Sisters of the Freshmen. 

1 brother 31 1 sister 28 

2 brothers 17 2 sisters 21 

3 " 2 3 " 6 

4 " 1 4 " 4 

7 " 1 

XXXII. Health of Freshmen. 

The following statements were made as to their health 
by the students themselves: 

Number. 

Good health 88 

Fair " 15 

Bad " 

Not stated 2 

105 100.0 



Per cent. 


83 


8 


14 


3 







1 


9 



21 

Working of the Meeit Law. 

The Report for 1912-13 stated that 3 students of the 
Class of 1914 were placed on probation for the year 1913-14. 
Of these 1 left college; 1 was excluded from a degree under 
the merit law by the grades she obtained in February, 1914; 
and 1 remains on probation for 1914-15. No new cases 
occurred in February, but in June, 1914, 8 students of the 
Class of 1915 received grades in their final examinations which 
gave them more than half their hours below merit; 4 of these 
have left college and the remaining 4 were placed on proba- 
tion. Thus 5 students are on probation for the year 1914-15. 

Since the five-year rule came into operation for the. Class 
of 1907, 43 students have been placed on probation with the 
following results: 12 graduated; 4 lost their degrees under the 
merit law; two were excluded from the college, 1 by the Presi- 
dent and 1 by the Senate; 20 left college, and 5 are still on pro- 
bation. In the eight years, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1911, 
1912, 1913 and 1914, 548 students have graduated. The 43 
who have been placed on probation amounted to 8 per cent 
of the number 548 who graduated; the 4 who were excluded 
from a degree under the merit law amount to .8 per cent of 
the number who graduated, and the 22 who have left or been 
excluded from the college amount to 4 per cent of the number 
who graduated. In June, 1914, 39 freshmen and 20 sopho- 
mores had received examination grades below merit in more 
than half the hours they had offered for the degree. Of these 
25 freshmen and 11 sophomores have returned for the year 
1914-15, and are consequently unable to take part in any 
college entertainments requiring preparation, to serve as 
officers of any clubs or associations, or to hold paid college 
positions. 



Registration of Attendance on the First Day of each 
Semester and Before and After Vacations. 

Students are required under penalty of having some of 
their examinations deferred to register 8 times in the college 
year as shown by the following table; this registration was pre-? 



22 

scribed by the Faculty after a prolonged experience of the 
failure of the voluntary system in order to ensure regular 
attendance before and after the vacations. 

XXXIII. Table of Cases of Failure to Register. 

Number failing to register: 
Excuse Excuse judged Excuse judged 
illness. adequate. inadequate. 

Beginning of the college year 7 5 4 

Before the Thanksgiving vacation 2 3 

After the Thanksgiving vacation . . 5 3 

Before the Christmas vacation .... 8 2 

After the Christmas vacation 15 16* 1 

Beginning of the second semester .9 1 4 

Before the Easter vacation 12 1 3 

After the Easter vacation 23 4 2 

Total 81 29 20 

Fines. 

After a prolonged trial of other methods, fines are now 
imposed for failure to register courses in the appointed period; 
and for failure to return course books to the office fully signed 
at the required time at the end of each semester, A fee of 
one dollar is charged for each change a student makes in her 
course after she has definitely registered it. 

One student did not register her courses in the required 
period and was fined $5. Four students handed in course 
books late and were fined $20. Seventy students made changes 
in their registered courses and were fined $98. These fines 
amounting to $128 were expended for books for the college 
library. 

College Publications. 

The College has issued during the year 1913-14 the follow- 
ing publications: 

Bryn Mawr Calendar. 

Academic Buildings and Halls of Residence, Plans and 
Descriptions. Volume VI, Part 4. pp. 42. Novem- 
ber, 1913. 

* 15 of these were pn a dejayed train, 



23 

Register of Alumnae and Former Students. Volume VII. 

Part 1. pp. 178. January, 1914. 
Graduate Courses. Volume VII, Part 2. pp. 136. 

4 pp. tables. March, 1914. 
Undergraduate and Graduate Courses. Volume VII, 

Part 3. pp. 196. 2 inserts. May, 1914. 
Supplement, Competitive Matriculation Scholarships, pp. 
11. November, 1913. 
Bryn Mawr College Finding List. pp. 39. November 1, 1913. 
Bryn Mawr College Class Lists, First Semester, pp. 32. 

December 1, 1913. 
Bryn Mawr College Class Lists, Second Semester, pp. 31. 

March 14, 1914. 
Bryn Mawr College, Annual Report of the President, 1912-13. 

pp. 114. December 17, 1913. 
Bryn Mawr College, Pamphlet of Matriculation Examination 

Papers, Spring, 1914. 
Brjm Mawr College, Pamphlet of Matriculation Examination 

Papers, Autumn, 1914. 
Circulars in regard to Fellowships and Scholarships. 
Miscellaneous Circulars, Notices, Blanks, Examination papers, 

etc. 
Not published through the publisher's office : 

Bryn Mawr College, Financial Report, pp. 65. Novem- 
ber, 1913. 
Summary of the Account of the Treasurer of the Trustees 
of Bryn Mawr College for the year ending ninth 
month 30, 1913. pp. 18. October, 1913. 
Tipyn o' Bob, published monthly from November to June 
inclusive, by the Students of Br3Ti Mawr College, 
8vo. Illustrated. Vol. XI, 1913-14. Philadelphia. 
The Lantern, published annually by the Students of Bryn 
Mawr College, pp. 65. 4to, Illustrated. May, 
1914. Philadelphia. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Isabel, Maddison, 

Recording Dean and Assistant to the President. 



Report of the Dean of the College, 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour of submitting the following report of 
the work of my office for the year 1913-14. 

No radical changes have been made in the work of my 
office during the year. I have continued to advise the under- 
graduate students in the registration of their courses, and to 
exercise a general supervision over their health. The students 
on the whole seemed to me to show a greater seriousness of 
purpose and a more intelligent interest in their work than 
during the previous year. An attempt was made to give the 
students a greater feeling of responsibility in regard to their 
health by not accepting illness excuses for lectures except in the 
case of serious and prolonged illness and only requiring, as 
Usual, the doctor's certificate as an excuse for absence from a 
quiz or examination. The result seemed to be an increased 
vigour and independence on the part of the students. 

During the second semester I spoke at Radcliffe and 
Wellesley Colleges on vocational work for college women. 

The record of the attendance of the students on their 
classes is given below as calculated by the Recording Secretary. 



(24) 



25 



Record of Attendance 1913-14- 



Number of cuts 
per student. 



None 

One 

Two 

Three 

Four 

Five 

Six 

Seven 

Eight 

Nine 

Ten 

Eleven 

Twelve .... 
Thirteen . . . 

Fourteen 

Fifteen 

Sixteen 

Seventeen. . . . 

Eighteen 

Nineteen 

Twenty 

Twenty-one. . 
Twenty-two. . 
Twenty-three. 
Twenty-four. . 
Twenty-five. . 
Twenty-six. . . 
Twenty-seven 
Twenty-eight . 
Twenty-nine. . 

Thirty 

Thirty-one. . . 
Thirty- two . . . 



Number of 
students 
with cuts. 



Seni. Sem. 
I.. II. 



13 

8 

20 

29 

31 

20 

27 

25 

21 

21 

15 

21 

17 

13 

13 

8 

4 

7 

7 

7 

5 

3 

8 

5 

2 

6 

4 

4 
1 
2 
3 



2 

5 

8 

14 

13 

14 

18 

11 

13 

12 

13 

16 

12 

19 

20 

13 

9 

8 

IS 

11 

10 

10 

5 

3 

12 
7 
6 
8 
S 
8 
4 
3 
5 



Number of 

students 

with unex- 

cused cuts. 



Sem. Sem. 
I. II. 



14 

8 

24 

31 

33 

25 

33 

28 

22 

21 

14 

21 

18 

11 

11 

7 

11 

5 

4 

5 

4 

5 

4 

2 

1 

3 

2 

1 

2 
1 
2 



2 
6 
10 
16 
15 
19 
20 
19 
18 
18 
17 
22 
16 
21 
21 
15 
14 
4 
15 
12 



Number of cuts 
per student. 



Thirty-three.. 
Thirty-four. . . 
Thirty-five . . . 
Thirty-six. . . . 
Thhty-seven . 
Thirty-eight.. 
Thirty-nine. . . 

Forty 

Forty-one. . , . 
Forty-two .... 
Forty-three. . . 
Forty-four. . . . 

Forty-six 

Forty-seven. . 
Forty-nine. . . 

Fifty 

Fifty-one 

Fifty-two .... 
Fifty-three . . . 
Fifty-nine. . . . 
Sixty-four .... 

Sixty-six 

Sixty-seven . . . 
Sixty-eight . . . 
Seventy-one. . 
Seventy-three. 
Seventy-four . 
Seventy-six . . . 
Eighty-one. . . 
Eighty-eight. . 

Total number 
of students 



Number of 
students 
with cuts. 



Sem. Sem. 
I. II. 



380 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

376 



Number of 

students 

with unex- 

cused cuts. 



Sem. Sem. 
I. II. 



380 



376 



Sem. I. Sem. II. 

Aggregate number of cuts 4021 5677 

" " " unexcused cuts 3510 5176 

Average number of cuts per student 10 . 58 15 . 09 

" " " •" cutting 10.95 15.17 

" " " unexcused cuts per student 9.23 13.76 

" " " " " " cutting. 9.59 13.83 

Average number of cuts per year per student 25 . 67 

" " " " " " cuttmg 26.12 

" " " unexcused cuts per year per student 22.99 

" " " " " " " " " cutting 23.42 



26 





Percentage of Students Cutting. 






Percentage of total number of students. 


Cuts excused and 
unexcused. 


Unexcused cuts. 




Sem. I. 


Sem. II. 


Sem. I. 


Sem. II. 


Witli no eut.s 


3.4 
23.1 
30.0 
20.7 

8.6 
10.2 

2.8 
.5 
.5 

0.0 

49.7 


.5 
10.6 

18.0 

21.2 

15.7 

20.4 

6.9 

2.6 

1.8 

2.1 

77.4 


3.6 

25.2 

33.9 

19.7 

8.4 

6.3 

2.1 

.2 

.2 

0.0 

43.7 


.5 




' 1 or more but under 5 ci 
' 5 " " " " 10 
' 10 " " " " 15 
' 15 " " " " 20 
' 20 " '■' " " 30 
' 30 " " " " 40 
' 40 " " " " 50 
' 50 " " " " 60 
' 60 or more cuts 


its.. 


12.5 

25.0 

25.7 

15.9 

13.8 

4.9 

.2 

.7 

.5 


Pe] 
c 


'centage of students with 8 or more 
uts 


71.5 







Percentage of Students Cutting Arranged by Classes. 
Semester I, 1913-14. 







Class. 




Total 












number 












of under- 




1914. 


1915. 


1916. 


1917. 


graduates 


Numb er in Class 


82 


97 


89 


112 


380 


Number with 8 or more unex- 












cused cuts 


42 


44 


40 


40 


166 


Percentage with 8 or more 












unexcused cuts 


51.21 


45.36 


44.94 


35.71 


43.68 


Number with 8 or more ex- 




cused and unexcused cuts. . . 


45 


50 


47 


47 


189 


Percentage with 8 or more ex- 












cused and unexcused cuts . . 


54.87 


51.54 


52.80 


41.96 


49.73 



Semester II, 


1913-14. 










Class. 




Total 












number 












of under- 




1914. 


1915. 


1916. 


1917. 


graduates 


Number in Class 


79 


96 


89 


112 


376 


Number with 8 or more un- 












excused cuts 


59 


78 


61 


71 


269 


Percentage with 8 or more 












unexcused cuts 


74.68 


81.25 


68.53 


63.39 


71.54 


Number with 8 or more ex- 












cused and unexcused cuts . . 


63 


86 


66 


76 


291 


Percentage with 8 or more ex- 












cused and imexcused cuts . . 


79.74 


89.58 


74.15 


67.85 


77.39 



27 



For a greater number of cuts the statistics in the first semester are as 
follows: 

From 11 to 13 unexcused cuts 50 students 

From 14 to 16 29 " 

From 17 to 19 14 " 

From 20 or over 34 " 

That is 127 students out of 376 took 11 cuts or more in the semester. 

The average number of cuts per student cutting is 26.12 per year, 
or 13.06 per semester. The regular number of lectures is 15 per week 
or 204 in the first and 207 in the second semester, that is 411 per year per 
student. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Marion Reilly, 
Dean of the College. 



Report of the Secretary of the Faculty. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to report that during the academic year 
1913-14 the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College has taken action 
in matters not of a routine character as follows: 

Election of Secretary. 

October 1, 1913. Dr. William B. Huff, acting secretary 
during the year 1912-13, was elected permanent secretary of 
the Faculty. This election was confirmed by the Board of 
Directors. 

Quiz Rule. 

October 1, 1913. The quiz rule, as amended January 28, 
1913, was adopted for the first semester of the year 1913-14. 

January 19, 1914. The committee appointed to consider 
the formulation of a quiz rule recommended that the rule 
reported and adopted for the first semester of the current year, 
be adopted for the second semester also. 

This recommendation the Faculty voted to approve. 

Students Completing Undergraduate Work in February. 

January 19, 1914. Voted that in the assignments of 
fellowships, prizes, and other honours, undergraduates taking 
degrees in February of any year shall be counted as belonging 
to the class graduating in the following June; and that the 
grades of such students shall be calculated on their marks for 
the first seven semesters. 

Examination of Dissertations. 

March 19, 1914. Voted to adopt for the current year as 
the rule prescribing the mode of examining dissertations the 
plan approved by the Faculty April 17, 1913. 

f28) 



29 

Method of Nominating Bryn Mciwr European Fellows. 

March 19, 1914. Voted to eliminate the preliminary 
voting for Bryn Mawr European Fellows, and to direct the 
Secretary of the College to send to members of the Faculty the 
records of the ten students of highest rank in each senior class. 

Amendment to Rule Concerning Examination of Auditors. 

May 25, 1914. Voted to amend the rule concerning 
examinations of auditors: 

"If a Junior is compelled to become an auditor because of 
extended absence due to her own illness, she may take her 
auditor's examinations during the advanced standing examina- 
tion period of the second semester of her senior year." 

Appointments to Committee on Athletics. 

April 29, 1914. Voted to approve the plan of appointing 
to the Committee on Athletics members of the college staff, in 
case such appointments should be deemed advisable. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William Bashford Huff, 

Secretary of the Faculty. 



llEPOiRT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE SeNATE. 

To the President: Madam, 

The Senate in performing the duty of maintaining the 
academic standards of the College, requested the President 
to exclude ten students from the College at the end of the last 
academic year. In order to coordinate the regulations with 
reference to honesty in college work and to guard against 
cheating in essay work and reports, the Senate adopted the 
following regulations, viz : 

The Senate of Bryn Mawr College to which is entrusted the academic 
discipline of the College has formulated and adopted the following regu- 
lations, a copy of which will be sent to every member of the teaching 
staff at the beginning of each academic year. 

Any member of the teaching staff or any proctor in charge of an 
examination who has reason to believe that there has been any infrac- 
tion of the regulations shall at the conclusion of the examination (or in 
other cases at the earhest practicable moment) at once inform the Senate 
through its Chairman, the President of the College, or in the absence of 
the President through the Acting Chairman or the Secretary of the Senate. 

This preliminary notification must be followed by a signed statement 
giving the facts in the case. 

I. Examinations and Written Quizzes: 

(i) Students are expected to occupy the seats prepared for them and 

designated by the examination books, 
(ii) The use of blotters or loose papers other than those provided by 
the College will invalidate the examination. The insertion of 
leaves in the examination book is forbidden and such leaves will 
not be coimted in grading the book, 
(iii) No student may take into an examination or written quiz any 
book or paper; and no student, during an examination or written 
quiz, may hold any communication with another student. The 
penalty for the technical offence involved in the violation of this 
rule shaU be suspension from the college for a definite number of 
semesters, or cancellation of a certain amount of college work, or 
forfeiture of the semester's examinations, the penalty depending on 
the ascertained facts of the case. This rule shall be publicly 
annoimced before each semi-annual examination, 
(iv) The penalty imposed on a student obtaining assistance from any 
source, oral or written, in an examination or a written quiz, shall 
(30) 



31 

be dismissal from the college. A like penalty shall be imposed 
on any student giving, or by carelessness or intention furnishing 
the occasion for the obtaining of, such assistance by another stu- 
dent. The Senate will regard as sufficient cause for imposing 
this penalty the fact that such assistance has been given or 
received, irrespective of the motive of the students involved. 

II. Written Work: 

(i) It is imperative that all written work handed in by any student 
be work done by herself without assistance from any other per- 
son excepting only the instructors by whom the work is assigned, 
and with only such degree of assistance from written or printed 
material or from any other source as they expressly authorize. 
Giving, asking for, accepting, employing, or in any way utilising 
such prohibited assistance is a technical offence without regard to 
motives or circumstances. 
(ii) Assistance given or received. For the technical offence committed 
by a student, graduate or undergraduate, in giving assistance to 
another student in work that is to be handed in, whether essay, 
criticism, report, translation, composition, solution of a problem, 
or other exercise, or by a student in asking for or accepting as- 
sistance in such work from any person whether student or not 
except only as authorized by the instructors who have assigned 
the work, the penalty shall be dismissal from the college, or sus- 
pension from the college for a definite number of semesters, or 
cancellation of a certain amount of college work, always including 
the course in which the offence is committed, the penalty depend- 
ing on the ascertained facts of the case. 

(iii) Essays and Critical Papers. The incorporation without specific 
acknowledgment in any essay or critical paper of any written or 
printed work of any other person, or of any previously used work 
of the student herself, whether by actual quotation, by substantial 
incorporation of argiunent, or by borrowing of illustrations or 
phraseology, is expressly forbidden. The infraction of this regu- 
lation shall constitute a technical offence the penalty for which 
shall be dismissal from the college. 

If however so small a part of the essay or critical paper is 
involved that the plagiarism may fairly be ascribed to inadvert- 
ence, the penalty may be reduced by the Senate to suspension 
from the college for a definite niunber of semesters, or cancella- 
tion of a certain amount of college work including the course in 
which the offence is committed. 

(iv) Written Reports. When a report of a critical or constructive 
nature is required it is imperative that due acknowledgment be 
made of criticisms and theories of others that have been incor- 
porated or adopted. Even when a report is expected to be a 



32 



purely narrative statement compiled from various sources it is 
necessary that the authorities used be indicated. The infraction 
of this regulation constitutes a technical offence the penalty for 
which shall be dismissal from the college, suspension from the 
college for a definite number of semesters, or cancellation of a 
certain amoimt of college work including the course in which the 
offence is committed, 
(v) Other Written Work. For the technical offence committed by a 
student in handing in a written translation, composition, solution 
of a problem, or other exercise, which she has obtained from any 
written or prmted source or which is simply an unacknowledged 
reproduction of work that she has already handed in here or else- 
where, the penalty shall be dismissal from the college, suspension 
from the college for a definite nmnber of semesters, or the can- 
cellation of a certain amount of college work including the course 
in which the offence is committed, depending on the ascertained 
facts in the case. 

III. Any offence against the integrity of written work that may arise, 

whether in examination, quiz, or ordinary college work, and whether 
the offence be technical or otherwise, if not expressly provided for 
in these regulations, will be dealt with on the same general lines. 

IV. Any penalty imposed under these regulations shall be pubUcly an- 

nounced; the name of the student, the offence committed, and 
the penalty imposed, shall be posted on the official bulletin board, 
and notice of the action taken shall be sent to her parents or her 
guardian. 

V. Every student when she registers at the beginning of her freshman 

year and also at the beginning of her first j^ear of graduate study 
shall be required to sign in dupUcate a slip containing these regula- 
tions and the statement that she has carefuUy read them, one signed 
copy to be kept on file by the college, the other to be an integral 
part of the student's course-book. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George A. Barton, 
Secretary of the Senate, 



Report op the Segeetary. 
To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to present the following report of the 
academic year 1913-14. 

Four hundred and two students were assigned to rooms 
in the halls of residence November 1, 1913. Seven graduate 
students and two hearers were given rooms in Cartref and two 
graduate students in Dolgelly, making a total of 413 students 
in residence. 

The following table shows the number of students in each 
class in each hall and also the number of non-resident students. 

1914. 1915. 1916. 1917. Hearers. Graduates. Total. 

Merioii 11 

Radnor 9 

Denbigh 11 

Pembroke East 16 

Pembroke West 14 

Rockefeller 14 

Cartref 

Dolgelly 

Non-resident 7 10 

Non-resident Fellows 



1915. 


1916. 


1917 


12 


13 


22 


11 


10 


21 


14 


11 


17 


16 


15 


13 


16 


15 


12 


18 


IS 


22 





58 


6 


57 


18 


71 


9 


69 


10 


67 


8 


80 


7 


9 


2 


2 


20 


54 


5 


5 



82 97 89 113 6 85 472; 



The matriculation examinations were held in the spring of 
1913 at 25 centres as well as at Bryn Mawr College, the 
examinations at each centre being proctored by an alumna 
or former fellow appointed by the College. The number of 
candidates examined at each centre was : 

Athens, Georgia 8 Louisville 2 

Baltimore 41 Minneapolis 4 

Bryn Mawr. 101 New York 36 

Boston 12 Oxford, Pennsylvania 1 

Catonsville, Maryland 17 Paris, France. 2 

Chicago 12 Portland, Maine 1 

Cincinnati 1 Portland, Oregon 1 

Cleveland 2 Providence 4 

Columbus 3 Richmond 8 

Dallas, Texas 1 Rosemary HaU, Greenwich 50 

Davenport, Iowa 5 St. Louis 8 

Detroit 1 Wykeham Rise, Washington ... 16 

Denver 1 

Indianapolis 7 Total 345 

(33) 



34 



Candidates taking preliminaries 221 

Candidates taking finals 124 

Forty candidates took the College Entrance Examination 
Board examinations in June. 



Obtained 
certificate. 


Per ceni. 


166 


82.32 


94 


75.80 



Obtained 
certificate. 


Per cent. 


23 


82.14 


11 


91.66 



Candidates taking preliminaries 28 

Candidates taking finals 12 

Matriculation examinations are always held at the col- 
lege in the autumn and winter of each year. 

Forty-five candidates took the examinations in September, 
1913, as follows: 



Obtained 
certificate. 


Per cent. 


14 


66.66 


14 


58.33 



Candidates taking preliminaries 21 

Candidates taking finals 24 

Sixteen candidates took the examinations in January, 
1914, as follows: 

Obtained 
certificate. Per cent. 

Candidates taking preliminaries 9 8 88 . 88 

Candidates taking finals 7 6 85 . 71 

The Freshmen entering in 1913-14 were prepared by 73 
different schools. Of these 18 prepared candidates for the 
first time for Bryn Mawr College. 

Plans and circulars have been sent as usual to schools in 
different parts of the country and an effort is made to induce 
more schools each year to prepare their students for the 
matriculation examinations. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edith Orlady, 

Secretary. 



Report of the Bureau of AppoiNTME]SfTg. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit the fohowing report of the 
work of the Bureau of Appointments for the year 1913-14. 

The fohowing positions have been secured through the 
Bureau of Appointments: 

Teachers in schools and colleges 14 

Tutors and temporary positions 5 

19 

The above positions have been secured by the members of 
the following classes: 

1914 3 1910 3 

1913 3 1909 1 

1911 2 Graduate students 7 

All applications for non-teaching positions have been 
referred to the Intercollegiate Bureaus of Occupations for 
Trained Women in Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and 
Chicago. 

A committee of the Christian Association has taken charge 
of the employment work for undergraduate students. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marion Reilly, 
Dean of the College. 



(35) 



Report of the Librarian. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to present the annual report of the 
work of the College Library for the year ending September 
30, 1914. 

Accessions. 

The following table shows the additions made from various 
sources and the total present extent of the library, with a state- 
ment of the condition of a year ago for purposes of comparison. 
It will be noted that the number of volumes added during the 
year is less than the number for the previous year, due to a 
decrease in the Library appropriation for the year 1913-14. 

Number of volumes October 1, 1913 71,751 

Number of yolumes added: 

1912-K. 1913-14. 

By purchase 3,543 1,520 

By binding 562 647 

By gift and exchange 446 392 

By replacement 10 14 

From unknown sources ■ 1 5 

From Christian Association 28 6 

4,590 2,584 

Volumes withdrawn 48 42 

Net gain 4,542 2,542 

Maps and charts 26 5 

Pamphlets added* 341 373 

Pamphlets withdrawn* 44 7 

Net gain 297 366 

Total volumes September 30, 1914 74,293 

Total maps and charts 2,132 

Total accessioned pamphlets 3,290 

* These numbers represent catalogued pamphlets only. There is also in the library 
a growing collection of several thousand pamphlets arranged alphabetically by author. 
Pamphlets when bound are withdrawn and again accessioned as books. 

(36) 



37 

These accessions are distributed by classes as follows: 

1912-13. 1913-14. 

General works 207 188 

Philosophy 198 198 

Religion 187 103 

Social Science 664 458 

Philology 280 160 

Science. 533 484 

Useful Arts 71 34 

Fine Arts 315 81 

Literature 1,245 624 

History, etc 890 254 

Total 4,590 2,584 

A list of donors to the library with titles of books and 
pamphlets presented is appended. This list does not include 
books purchased from the gifts of money mentioned below 
under the financial statement; moreover books bought from 
gifts of money are not included in the table of accessions under 
the head of by gift and exchange, because all such books were 
bought through the library. 

Cataloguing. 

1912-13. 1913-14. 

Titles catalogued 3,060 2,477 

Continuations, etc., added 1,716 1,694 

Cards added to main catalogue 10,668 10,149 

Cards added to departmental catalogues. 252 1,983 

The decrease in the number of new books added to the 
library during the year has given the catalogue staff more time 
for re-cataloguing. The archaeological periodicals and the 
remainder of the scientific sets in Dalton Hall have been 
finished. The class of Fine Arts has also been completed; 
the section done this year, 700-750, includes the books on 
aesthetics, architecture, sculpture, drawing, and painting. A 
good start has been made in re-cataloguing the works on 
philology. Class 400-428, namely, comparative, general, and 
English philology, has been completed. 

During the year a duplicate catalogue was made to analyze 
various sets which are kept in the English Seminary. It con- 
sists of about 1800 cards, — author, title, and subject entries^—' 



38 



and has proved to be of great benefit to the students who use 
this seminary room. The following are the sets which have 
been analyzed: Anglistische Forschungen, 44 volumes; Chaucer 
Society, Publications, 1st series, 95 volumes; 2d series, 47 
volumes; Early English Text Society, Original series, 144 
volumes; Extra series, 111 volumes; Palaestra, 115 volumes; 
Studien zur englischen Philologie, 50 volumes; Wiener Beitrage 
zur englischen Philologie, 40 volmnes. 

It has been decided to discontinue buying and checking 
the proof sheets of the printed cards of the Harvard College 
Library. In the two years that we have been getting the 
proof sheets we have found that there are comparatively few 
cards listed that we can use. The benefit we derive from the 
few cards we order is not in proportion to the time and labor 
spent by a member of the cataloguing staff in checking up the 
sheets, together with the expense of paying for them. 

Bindmg. 

1912. 1913. 

Volumes at binderies, October 1 176 173 

1912-13. 1913-14. 

Volumes sent dm-ing year 813 846 

1913. 1914. 

Volumes at binderies, September 30 173 136 

1912-13. 1913-14. 

Total bound during year 816 883 

Circulation. 

1912-13. 1913-14. 

October 4,015 4,016 

November 2,660 2,348 

December 1,662 2,554 

January 2,320 2,408 

February 3,326 3,415 

March 2,491 3,082 

April 3,096 2,284 

May 2,591 2,082 

June 876 735 

July 282 346 

August 226 317 

September '. 963 1,061 



Total 24,508 24,648 



Three thousand five hundred and sixty-eight volumes of 
the total circulation were in the Reserve Book Room and 
Seminary rooms, which indicates somewhat the use of books 
within the building. The remainder were taken out for study 
or general reading. The following table shows the use of 
books by subjects, it does not include the use made of those 
placed on reserve. 

Bibliography, General Periodicals (bound) 153 

Philosophy and Psychology 1,042 

Religion and Church History 703 

Economics, Sociology, Education 2,359 

Philology 604 

Natural Science* 331 

Useful Arts 67 

Fine Arts 779 

Literature 12,539 

History and Biography 2,503 

In order to obtain some idea of the percentage of books 
taken out by members of the faculty or staff, and the students, 
the following record was kept for a few months. It shows a 
gratifying use of the library by the students: 

Total 
circulation. 

March 3,082 

April 2,284 

May 2,082 

The use of the library and the work at the loan desk has 
steadily increased year by year, so that the present desk has 
become too small for our needs. To handle the increased 
circulation in the most efficient manner a new desk should be 
provided which would give more desk space, more shelves, 
and more charging trays. (A satisfactory desk can be fur- 
nished in quartered white oak, to correspond with the card 
catalogue cases which stand near it, for $212.00.) It is becom- 
ing a problem how to handle all the books at certain rush 
times, and this new desk is our most imperative need. 

* Science books taken from Dalton Hall libraries not included. 



Reserve. 


Faculty 
or staff. 


Students. 


328 


697 


2,057 


201 


429 


1,654 


202 


412 


1,468 



40 

Inter-Library Loans. 

During the past year we have borrowed from other libraries 
volumes as follows: 

Columbia University Library 18 

Harvard College Library 25 

Haverford College Library 1 

Johns Hopkins University Library 2 

Library Company of Philadelphia 19 

University of Michigan Library 1 

University of Pennsylvania Library 22 

Philadelphia Episcopal Divinity School Library 1 

U. S. Surgeon General's Library 1 

U. S. Library of Congress 15 

Total 105 

Books have been lent to other libraries as follows: 

University of Chicago Library 1 

Haverford College Library 1 

University of Pennsylvania Library 1 

Princeton University Library 1 

Syracuse University Library 1 

Yale University Library 1 

Total 6 

Financial Statement 1913—14- 

The sums available for the purchase of books and period- 
icals together with the expense of binding and general library 
supplies were as follows: 

Library appropriation apportioned as follows: 

Ancient History $100.00 

Archaeology 150 . 00 

Art 150.00 

Bibhcal Literature 90.00 

Biology 300.00 

Botany 30.00 

Chemistry 200.00 

Comparative Literature 150 . 00 

Economics 300.00 

English 300.00 



41 



French $150.00 

Geology , ,. 150.00 

German . ! 150.00 

Greek 150 . 00 

History 250.00 

International Catalogue 100.00 

Italian 75 .00 

Latin 250.00 

Mathematics 150 . 00 

Philosophy 150.00 

Physics 150.00 

Psychology 150.00 

Reference 100.00 

Library Expenses 800 . 00 

Total ' •. $4,545.00 

Additional appropriations as follows: 

To Mr. Frederick Archibald Dewey $50 . 00 

For books on Sociology. 

To Mr. Rhys Carpenter 55 .00 

For the purchase of Hermann : 
Denkmaler der Malerei des Alter- 
tums. 

To Professor Carleton Fair child Brown 10.00 

For the purchase of volumes of 
Migne: Patrologia Latina. 

To Professor Wihner Cave Wright ' 10.00 

For books to be used in connec- 
tion with Seminary work in 
Greek, 

To Dr. Annie Louise McLeod 50.00 

For books on Physiological Chem- 
istry. 

For the purchase of dictionaries for the Enghsh Seminary, 

and to replace worn-out copies 40 . 00 

For the purchase of catalogue cards and case for English 

Seminary 25 . 00 



Total $240.00 



42 



To pay off the indebtedness of various departments: 

To the Department of Biology $240.63 

To the Department of Chemistry 31 .30 

To the Department of German 26 . 09 

Ta the Department of Psychology 13 . 82 

Total $311 . 84 

Statement of Library Appropriation. 

Library appropriation for 1913-14 $5,000.00 

Unapportioned balance from Library appropriation, 

1912-13 70.00 

Unapportioned balance from examination fees and 

course book fines, 1912-13 __ 35 . 65 

Total $5,105.65 

Regular apportionments to departments for 1913-14 .'$4,545.00 

Additional apportionments 240 . 00 

To pay indebtedness of four departments 311 . 84 

Total apportioned $5,096.84 



Unapportioned balance to be carried forward $8 .81 

The income on invested funds has been as follows: 

President James E. Rhoads Memorial Fund $67 . 72 

Class of 1902 (spent for books on Chemistry in 1913-14) 43 . 54 

Lois Meta Wright Memorial Fund 5.20 

Rose Chamberlin Memorial Fund 47.93 

Spent for books from the Phebe Anna Thorne Fund 141 . 83 

Spent for books from the Carola Woerishoffer Endowment 

Fund 65.06 

From special funds : 

Sale of books 27.00 

Duphcate book fund 400.00 

Gifts. 

From the Class of 1911 $102.50 

in memory of Frances King Carey, 
to be spent for books on Phys- 
iology. 

From the Class of 1914 40. OQ 

in memory of Ruby Leora Waller, 
to be spent for books on Art. 



43 

From the Philadelphia Branch of the Alumnae Association. . $115.00 
for the New Book Room. 

From the Chicago Bryn Mawr Club 50. 00 

for the New Book Room. 

From Several Alumnae 8 . 00 

for the New Book Room. 

From Mr. Samuel M. Vauclain 50.00 

for the New Book Room. 

From Miss Mary Elizabeth Garrett 50.79 

spent as follows: 

Economics (Mr. Dewey) $25.00 

Social Psychology (Professor James H. 

Leuba) 18.09 

President's Office 7.70 

Total of gifts $416.29 

The following is a summary of money spent from all 
sources: 

1912-13. 1913-14. 

For books $6,778.47 $3,187.33 

For periodicals and continuations. .. . 2,568.44 2,379.40 

For binding 688.50 776.65 

For supplies 214.72 295.94 

For postage, express, freight 69 . 60 64 . 51 

$10,319.73 $6,703.83 



Inventory. 

An inventory of the library has been taken during the 
year. The main stacks were examined during the Christmas 
vacation; the seminaries, the science libraries in Dalton Hall, 
and the Hall libraries, were examined during the summer. 
As a result the number of books missing was found to be as 
follows: 

From the inventory of 1905: 

Main library 21 volumes missing. 

From the inventory of 1907: 

Main library 18 " " 

tiall libraries 12 " ^f 



44 



From the inventory of 1909: 

Main library 24 volumes missing. 

Departmental libraries 20 

Hall libraries 11 

From the inventory of 1912: 

Main Ubrary 35 

Departmental hbraries 9 

Hall libraries 20 

From the inventory of 1914: 

Main library 78 

Departmental libraries 12 

Hall libraries 27 

The total number of volumes missing from all libraries at 
the present date is therefore 287. It is probable that some of 
these recently lost volumes may be temporarily misplaced and 
search is made for them as the staff has time from the regular 
routine duties. Considering the fact that there can be very 
little supervision of the various libraries and that this list of 
missing books extends over a period of nearly ten years, the 
number lost is not great. 



A dministration. 

A change has occurred in the library staff on account of the 
resignation of Miss Helen R. Shoemaker, who left us to take 
charge of one of the branch libraries of the Philadelphia Free 
Library. Miss Shoemaker has been an able assistant, both at 
the loan desk and in the cataloguing department, and her 
efficient services were appreciated by all. Miss S. Helen 
Burns, a graduate of Dickinson College and of the Drexel 
Library School, has been appointed to fill Miss Shoemaker's 
place. 

In closing I wish to express my grateful thanks to my 
colleagues on the library staff for their willing help during my 
first year with them. That the year has been so successful 
is largely due to their assistance and I wish to take this oppor- 
tunity to express my appreciation of their services. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lois A. Reed, 
Librarian, 



45 

Gifts from Individuals. 

Mr. J. W. Alexander: U. S. Committee on Merchant Marine and 
Fisheries, Report on Steamship Agreements. 

Anonymous: Bates, Enghsh Rehgious Drama. 

Dr. William H. Appleton: Appleton, Greek Poets in EngUsh Verse. 

Mr. Joshua L. Baily: Friends' Witness to Scriptural Truth, 
Vols. 1-6. 

Professor George A. Barton : Numismatic and Antiquarian Society of 
Philadelphia, Proceedings, Vol. 26, Part 2; Haverford Library Collection 
of Cuneiform Tablets, Part 3. 

Miss Cora A. Benneson: Peabody Institute, Memoirs, Vol. 5, Part 3; 
Science. 

Mr. Frederick S. Bigelov/: Strindberg, Plays; Galsworthy, Eldest 
Son; Hauptmann, Dramatic Works, Vol. 1; Ditchfield, Old EngUsh 
Customs; Minor, Notes on Government. 

Miss Eugenia Blount: Blount, American Occupation of the Philip- 
pines. 

Mr. Giles B. Bosworth: Sutherland, IdyUs of Greece, 

Professor Carleton F. Brown: Brown, Poems by Sir John Salusbury 
and Robert Chester. 

Mr. Rome G. Brown: Brown, The Minimum Wage. 

Mr. Andrew Carnegie: Schermerhorn, Sacred Scriptures of World- 
Religion; Schermerhorn, Hynms and Prayers of World-Religion. 

Hon. Robert E. Difenderfer: Senate Document 301, 62d Congress, 
2d Session; Report on Strike of Textile Workers in Lawrence, Mass. 

Mr. Charles G. Fall: Fall, Soul of the East; Fall, Patriot or Traitor. 

Mr. Edward C. Farnsworth: Farnsworth, Three Great Epoch- 
Makers in Music. 

Mr. Frank J. Firth: Fkth, The Holy Gospel. 

Mr. Alfred H. Fried: Fried, Der Weg ziun Weltfrieden im Jahre 1913. 

Professor Frederick H. Getman: Getman, OutUnes of Theoretical 
Chemistry. 

Mr. Stanley A. Hunter: Hunter, Religious Ideals of a President; 
Lectures of President Woodrow Wilson in Princeton, 1909-10. 

Mr. Charles Janet: Janet, Le Volvox; France-Amerique, Juillet- 
Decembre. 

Mrs. WiUiam F. Jenks: Egypt Exploration Fund, Memoir, No. 35. 

Mr. Richmond L. Jones: Jones, Life of J. Glancy Jones, 2 volumes. 

Miss Georgiana G. Iving: American Anthropologist, 5 numbers; 
Current Anthropological Literature, 2 nimibers. 

Professor Agathe Lasche: Lasch, Mittelniederdeutsche Grammatik. 

Mrs. Morris Loeb: Scientific Works of Morris Loeb. 

Mrs. Anna B. McMahan: McMahan, Florence in the Poetry of the 
Brownings; McMahan, With Byron in Italy. 

E. Merck and Company: Annual Report, Vol. 26. 



46 

Mrs. George B. Mifflin: Ariosto, L'Orlando Furioso, 2v.; Arrivabene, 
II Secolo di Dante, 2v.; Bdchi, Grammar; Boccaccio, II Decamerone, 
2v.; Cantu, Margherita Pusterla, 2v.; Chiavacci, Guida dell' . . . 
Galleria . . . Pitti; CoUetta, Storia' del Reame di Napoli, 2v.; Dante, 
Divina, Commedia, 2 copies; Grossi, Marco Visconti; Machiavelli, II 
Principe; Manzoni, I Promessi Sposi; Manzoni, Opere Varie; Ouiseau, 
Italian and English Dictionary; Petrarca, Le Rime di Petrarca, 2v.; 
Tasso, La Gerusalemme Liberata. 

Misses Miller: Miller, Was Christ in Adam? Are Souls Immortal?; 
The Old Chm-ch Creed, 

Mr. Ralph H. Moore: Flandrau, Viva Mexico. 

Mr. Samuel Rea: Ross, The God we Trust; Ross, Universality of 
Jesus; Ross, Personal Power. 

Dean Marion Reilly: Masefield, Tragedy of Pompey; Galsworthy, 
Fugitive; Chesterton, Flying Inn; Lee, Crowds; Cabot, What Men 
Live By. 

Miss Carohne M. Rhoads: Constitutions of the Several States of the 
Union, 1858. 

Hon. John H. Rothermel: Fur-Seal Hearings and Report, 1914. 

Dr. Eunice M. Schenck: Millevoye, (Euvres, 4v. 

Mr. H. Scholfield: Scholfield, Doctrine of Mechanicalism. 

Dr. Augustus H. Strong: Strong, Popular Lectures on the Books of 
the New Testament. 

Mrs. Henry C. Swords: Leach, Philadelphia Branch of the Clarkson 
Family. 

Mr. Samuel Untermyer: Argument before Senate Committee on 
Banking, March 16, 1914. 

Mrs. Huntington Wilson: Eugenics, Twelve University Lectm-es. 

Professor Wilmer Cave Wright: Royal Belfast Academical Institution, 
Centenary Volume, 1810-1910. 

Gifts and Exchanges from Institutions, Societies, Etc., 1913-14. 

Academy of Natural Sciences: Proceedings, 3 nos. 

Alabama, Geological Sm-vey: Bulletin, 2 nos. 

John P. Altgeld Memorial Association: Altgeld, Cost of Something 
for Nothing. 

American Association for International Conciliation: Bulletin, 4 nos; 
Publications, 12 nos.; Angell, Great Illusion; Sherrill, South American 
Point of View. 

American Jewish Historical Society: Publications, No. 22; Index, 
Nos. 1-20. 

American Peace Society: Report, 1913. 

American Society for the Judicial Settlement of International Dis- 
putes: Publications, No. 14. 

American Telephone and Telegraph Company: Annual Report, 
1913; Brief of Arguments against Pubhc Ownership, 3v. 



47 

Association of American Universities: Journal of Proceedings and 
Addresses, 1913. 

Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools of the Middle States 
and Maryland: Proceedings, Vol. 26. 

AustraUa, Commonwealth Statistician : Official Yearbook, No. 6. 

Bodleian Library: Staff Manual, 1914; Annual Report of the 
Curators, 1913; Arnold Prize Essay, 1913; Stanhope Essay, 1913. 

University of Bonn: 26 dissertations. 

Boston Children's Aid Society: 49th Annual Report, 

Boston Museum of Fine Arts: Annual Report, 1913. 

Boston, Old Colony Trust Company: Analyses of Railroad Cor- 
porations. 

Boston, Social Research Council: Bulletin, No. 2. 

Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences: PubUcations, 1 no.; Year- 
book, 23rd-25th. 

Buenos Aires — Facultad de Filosofia y Letras: Documentos para la 
Historia Argentian, 2v. 

Bureau of Railway Economics: Bulletin, 11 nos. 

California Academy of Sciences, Proceedings, Vols. 2, 3, 4. 

University of California, Publications, Education, 1 no.; Pathology, 
4 nos.; Physiology, 2 nos.; Zoology, 22 nos. 

Canada, Office of Ai'chivist: Documents Relating to Constitutional 
History of Canada, 1791-1818. 

Canada, Geological Survey: Victoria Memorial Museum, Bulletin, 
No. 1. 

Canada, Department of Mines: Summary Report, 1912; Preliminary 
Report on the Mineral Production of Canada, 1913; Annual Report on 
the Mineral Production of Canada, 1912; Guide Books, 8 nos.; Smith, 
Archaeological Collection from the Southern Interior of British Columbia; 
Prospectors' Handbook, No. 1; Sessional Paper, No. 26; Museum 
Bulletin, No. 2; Memoirs, 21 nos.; Pubhcations, 4 nos.; Maps, 2. 

Canada, Royal Society: Proceedings, Ser. 3, Vols. 6, 7. 

Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: Annual 
Report, 1913; Bulletin, No. 7. 

Carnegie Institution of Washington: Yearbook, No. 12; Publica- 
tions, 24 nos. 

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh: Monthly Bulletin, 1913-14. 

Catholic University of America : Jenkins, Collection of Works on the 
History of Maryland; 3 dissertations. 

Chicago Municipal Court: Annual Report, 1911-12, 1912-13. 

Chicago School of Civics and Philanthropy: Bulletin, 2 nos. 

Christiania — Kgl. Frederiks Universitet : Hundredaarsjubilaeum, 1911. 

Cincinnati, Smoke Abatement League: Annual Report, 1913. 

University of Cincinnati: Studies, 2 nos. 

Clark University: Behavior Monographs, Vol. 2, No. 2; 24 disser? 
j^ations. 

Qojombo Museum; Spolja Zeylanjca, Vol. 9, 2 nos, 



48 

University of Colorado: Studies, 9 nos. 

Columbia University : 11 dissertations. 

Committee on the Prevention of Tuberculosis: Report, 1911-13. 

Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences: Transactions, Vol. 18. 

Connecticut, Commission to Investigate the Conditions of Wage- 
Earning Women and Minors: Report. 

Cook County, Illinois — Coroner's Office: Biennial Report, 1912-13. 

Cornell Association of Class Secretaries: de Forest, Class Secretaries 
and their Duties. 

Cornell University: 32 dissertations. 

Cumberland County Chapter D. A. R. ; Guida degli Stati Uniti per 
ITmmigrante Italiano; Guide to the U. S. for the Jewish Immigrant. 

Dante Society: Annual Report, 1911. 

Daughters of the Revolution: 22d Annual Meeting. 

Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society: Newbold, Hon. Little 
Miss Love; Jefferys, Jas. Addison Ingle; Sugiura, They That Sat in 
Darkness; Burleson, Conquest of the Continent; Japan Advancing — 
Whither? 

Dublin, Royal Society: Economic Proceedings, 2 nos.; Scientific 
Proceedings, 17 nos. 

Florida, Geological Survey: Annual Report, Nos. 2-5. 

Free Religious Association of America: 2 Pamphlets. 

Free Speech League: Edward Bond Foote; Wakeman, Addresses at, 
and Report of. First Monist Congress; Schroeder, Methods of Constitu- 
tional Construction. 

Georgia, Geological Survey: Bulletin, No. 29. 

Greece, Legation Royale de; University of Athens, Crimes of Bulgaria 
in Macedonia. 

University of Groningen: Jaarboek, 1912-13; Catalogus der afdeel- 
ing Duitsche Letterkunde; Roos, Geschiedenis van de Bibliotheek der 
Rijks-Universiteit; 5 dissertations. 

Harvard University: Harvard Psychological Studies, Vol. 3. 

Harvard University — Bureau of Business Research: Bulletin, 3 
nos. 

Harvard University — Zoological Laboratory of the Museum of Com- 
parative Zoology: Contributions, 19 nos. 

Hispanic Society of America: de Salazar, Cr6nica de la Nueva 
Espana; Vignaud, Histoire Critique de la Grande Enterprise de Chris- 
tophe Colomb, 2v. 

Houghton, MifHin Company: Tompkins, History of the Boston 
Theatre, 1854-1901. 

Illinois, Board of Administration: Institution Quarterly, 4 nos. 

Illinois, Geological Survey: Bulletin, 2 nos. 

Illinois, Bureau of Labor Statistics: 15th Annual Report. 

Illinois State Historical Library: Transactions, 1911, 1912; CoUecr 
tions, Vol. 9. 

JUinois State Mining Board; 32d Annual Coal Report. 



University of Illinois: Bulletin, 2 nos.; Alumni Record, iOiS; 6 dis' 
sertations; Studies in Social Sciences, 6 nos. 

Indiana Public Service Commission; Report of the Public Service 
Commission in Proceedings Between Indianapolis Traction and Terminal 
Company and its Employees. 

Indiana, State Superintendent of Public Instruction: Bulletin, 2 nos. 

Indiana University: Studies, 3 nos. 

Intercollegiate Bureau of Occupations: Report, 1911-13. 

International Institute of Agriculture: Proposal for an International 
Conference on the Regulation and Control of Ocean Carriage. 

Investment Bankers' Association of America: Proceedings, 1912. 

Iowa, Geological Survey: Bulletin, 1 no.; Bibliography, 1912; 
Annual Report, 1913. 

University of Iowa: 4 dissertations. 

University of Kansas : Bulletin, 7 nos. • 

Jewish Agricultural and Industi-ial Aid Society: Annual Report, 
1902, 1903, 1904, 1906, 1910, 1912. 

Johns Hopkins University: Lectures Delivered in May, 1914: 30 
dissertations. 

Kansas City, Humane Society: Reports, 1913. 

University of Kansas: Bulletin, 2 nos. 

Kentucky, Commissioner of Agriculture: Report of the Commission 
to Investigate the Conditions of Working Women in Kentucky. 

Kentucky, Department of Education: Elementary Course of Study; 
Biennial Report, 1911-12, 1912-13. 

Kyoto Imperial University, College of Science and Engineering: 
Publications, 5 nos. 

Lake Mohonk Conference of Friends of the Indian: 31st Annual 
Meeting, Proceedings. 

Lake Mohonk Conference on International Arbitration: Report, 
1913. 

Leland Stanford Junior University: Bulletin, 7 nos.; 8 dissertations; 
2 reprints. 

Library Company of Philadelphia: The Library Company of Phila- 
delphia, 1731-1912. 

Litchfield Coimty University Club: Litchfield County Choral Union, 
2 vols. 

Liverpool Biological Society: Proceedings, Vol. 27. 

University of London: Regulations for External Students, 1913-14; 
Regulations for Internal Students, 1913-14; Calendar, 1913-14, 17 
Pamphlets. 

McGiU University: Studies from the Royal Victoria Hospital, 1 no.; 
Royal Society of Canada, Publications, 2 nos.; 11 reprints; Department 
of Applied Science, 1 no.; Department of Botany, Papers, 9 nos.; 
Departments of Chemistry and Mineralogy, Papers, 5 nos.; Department 
of Classics, Papers, 1 no.; Department of Engineering, Papers, 8 nos.; 
Department of Geology, Papers, 19 nos.; Department of Ophthalmology, 



50 

Papers, 1 no.; Department of Pathology, Papers, 3 nos.; Department of 
Philosophy, Papers, 4 nos.; Department of Physiology, Papers, 2 nos.; 
Department of Physics, Papers, 9 nos.; Department of Zoology, Papers, 
3 nos. 

Maine, Agricultural Experiment Station: Bulletiu, 3 nos. 

Maryland, Geological Survey: Devonian, 3 vols. 

Massachusetts, Institute of Technology: 4 Abstracts of Theses. 

Massachusetts, Bureau of Statistics : Labor Bulletin, 1913-14; Labor 
Bibliography, 1912; 13th Annual Report on Strikes and Lockouts; 5th 
Annual Report on Labor Organizations; 27th Annual Report on Statistics 
of Manufactm-es; 13th Annual Directory of Labor Organizations; 7th 
Annual Report on State Free Employment Offices; Statistics of Municipal 
Finances, 1911. 

Massachusetts, State Board of Charity: Annual Report, 1913. 

Metropolitan Museum of Art: Catalogue of a Loan Exhibition of 
Paintings by Old Dutch Masters. 

Michigan, Geological and Biological Survey, Publications, 7 nos.; 
Maps, 2. 

Michigan, Board of Health: Annual Report, 1912; Public Health, 
1913-1914. 

Michigan, Department of Labor: 31st Annual Report. 

Michigan, Schoolmaster's Club: Proceedings, Vol. 48. 

University of Michigan: Bulletin, 3 nos.; Michigan Academy of 
Science, Report, 1912, 1913; 2 dissertations. 

University of Minnesota: Current Problems, 1 no.; Experiment 
Station Bulletin, 9 nos.; Botanical Studies, 1 no.; Studies in the Physical 
Sciences, 1 no.; League of Minnesota Mimicipalities, 1st Annual Con- 
vention, Proceedings. 

Missom-i, Bureau of Geology and Mines: 47th Biennial Report, 

University of Missouri: BuUetia, Education Series, 2 nos.; Extension 
Series, 1 no.; General Series, 2 nos.; Library Series, 1 no.; Mathematics 
Series, 2 nos.; Medical Series, 5 nos.; Science Series, 2 nos. 

Montana, Bureau of Agriculture, Labor and Industry: Montana, 
1914. 

Munich, Koniglich Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaf ten : Jahr- 
buch, 1913; Register zu den Abhandlungen; Festreden, 2 nos.; Abhand- 
lungen, Mathematisch-physikaUsche Klasse, 6 nos.; Sitzungsberichte, 
Mathematische-physikalische Klasse, 3 nos.; Abhandlungen, Philoso- 
phisch-philologische u. historische Klasse, 8 nos.; Sitzimgsberichte, 
Philosophisch-philologisch u. historische Klasse, 5 nos. 

National Child Labor Committee: Clopper, Child Merchants of the 
Streets; Pamphlets, 5 nos. 

National Committee for Mental Hygiene : Proceedings of the Mental 
Hygiene Conference, 1912; Handbook of the Mental Hygiene Movement 
and Exhibit. 

University of Nebraska: Studies, 9 nos. 

University of Nevada: Bulletin, 3 nos. 



51 

New England Society of the City of New York: 108th Annual 
Report, 

New Jersey, Agricultural Experiment Stations: Report of the Botan- 
ical Department, 1912. 

New Jersey, State Geologist: Bulletin, 3 nos,; Annual Report, 1912. 

New Jersey, Bureau of Statistics: 36th Annual Report. 

New York, Association for Tuberculosis Clinics: 6th Annual Report. 

New York, Charity Organization Society: 31st Annual Report. 

New York, State Board of Charities: Bulletin, 1 no. 

New York, Education Department: Handbook for Readers: 

New York, Factory Investigating Commission: Andrews, Minimum- 
wage Legislation. 

New York, Commissioner of Labor: Annual Report, 1913. 

New York, Bureau of Labor Statistics: Annual Report, 1912; Work- 
men's Compensation Law, 1913; Labor Bulletin, 1913-14. 

New York, State Library: Report, 1911. 

New York, State Museum: Report, Vol. 65. 

New York Short Ballot Organization: Proceedings of the Conference 
for the Study and Reform of County Government. 

New York Stock Exchange: Goldman, Handbook of Stock-Exchange 
Laws; Brief Submitted on Behalf New York Stock Exchange to Senate 
Committee on Banking and Currency, March, 1914. 

New York Training School for Deaconesses: Yearbook, 1913-14. 

New York University Club : Annual, 1914. 

Norristown, Chamber of Commerce: Heysham, Norristown, 1812- 
1912. 

University of North Carolina: Journal of the Elisha Mitchell Scien- 
tific Society, 1913-14; Studies in Philology, 1 no. 

University of North Dakota: Geological Survey, Biennial Report, 
2d-6th. 

OberUn College: Papers of the Ohio Church History Society, Vols. 
1-12; Laboratory Bulletin, 9 nos.; Wilson Bulletin, 10 nos.; Library 
Bulletin, 4 nos. 

Ohio, Industrial Commission: Bulletin, 2 nos.; Wages and Hours 
of Labor of Women and Girls Employed in Mercantile Establishments 
in Ohio in 1913. 

Ohio State University: Bulletin, 8 nos.; Contributions from the 
Department of Zoology, 1 no.; 9 dissertations. 

Ohio University: Bulletin, 1 no. 

Oklahoma, Geological Survey: Bulletin, 2 nos. 

Omaha: Municipal Statistics, 10 nos.; City Comptroller, Annual 
Report, 1913. 

Omaha, Pubhc Library: Sliields, Foreign Literature in Translation. 

Academic de Paris: Rapport sur la Situation de I'Enseignement 
Superieur, 1912-13; Universite de Paris, Livret de I'Etudiant. 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Catalogue, 2 nos. 



52 

Pennsylvania, State Library: Department of Agriculture, Report^ 
1912; Attorney General, Report, 1911-12; Auditor General, Report, 
1912, 1913; Banking Commission, Report, 1912, 1913, Part 1; Chestnut 
Tree Blight Commission, Bulletin, 1 no.; Factory Inspector, Report, 1912; 
Department of Fisheries, Report, 1912, 1913; Governor, Vetoes, 1913; 
Department of Internal Affairs, Report, 1912, 1913, Part 4; G. A. R. 
Encampment, Proceedings, Vol. 47; Department of Mines, Report, 1912; 
Board of Commissioners of PubUc Charities, Report, 1912; Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction, Report, 1912, 1913, Pamphlets, 4 nos.; 
Department of Public Printing, Report, 1913; Railroad Commission, 
Report, 1912; Commissioner of Sinking Fund, Report, 1913; State High- 
way Department, Report, 1911-13; State Library, Report, 1912, 1913; 
State Treasurer, Report, 1912, 1913; Topographic and Geological Survey, 
Report, 1910-12, 2 nos.. Maps; Laws of Pennsylvania, 1913; Bureau of 
Medical Education and Licensure, Bulletin, 1 no. ; Life Insurance, Report, 
1912; Fire and Marine Insurance, Report, 1912; Legislative Journal, 
1911; School Laws of Pennsylvania, 1913; SmuU's Legislative Handbook, 
1913; Taylor, Philadelphia in the Civil War. 

University of Pennsylvania: 15 Dissertations; Boardman Lecture- 
ship, Mabie, Ethics and the Larger Neighborhood. 

Philadelphia, Commercial Museum: Report, 1913. 

Philadelphia, Maritime Exchange, Report, 1914. 

Portici, R. Scuola Superiore d'Agricoltiu-a: BoUettino del Laboratorio 
di Zoologia Generale e Agraria, Vol. 7. 

Princeton University Library: 12 dissertations. 

Queen's University : Departments of History and PoUtical Economy, 
Bulletin, 4 nos. 

Bureau of Railway News and Statistics: Railway Library, 1912, 1913. 

Rhode Island, Factory Inspection: Report, 1913. 

Rhode Island School of Design: Bulletin, 3 nos.; Yearbook, 1914. 

Rockefeller Sanitary Commission: PubUcations, 5 nos. 

Rome, Institut International d' Agriculture : pamphlets. 

Sagamore Sociological Conference: 7th Conference. 

University of Southern California: Publications, 1 no.; Bulletin, 
Inc. 

Strassburg, Universitats- u. Landes-BibHothek : 28 dissertations. 

Tennessee, Geological Survey: Resources of Tennessee, 3 nos. 

University of Texas: Bulletin, 28 nos.; Record, 1 no. 

Imperial University of Tokyo, College of Agriculture: Bulletin, 2 nos. 

Tufts CoUege: Studies, 2 nos. 

United States Steel Corporation, Bureau of Safety, Relief, Sanitation 
and Welfare: Bulletin, 1 no. 

Washington University: Publications, 15 nos. 

University of Washington : Studies, 3 nos. ; Bulletin, 2 nos.; Publica- 
tions, 2 nos.; Seattle, Report of Board of Park Commissioners, 1910. 

Wellcome Chemical Research Laboratories: Papers, 7 nos.; Power, 
Influence and Development of Some of the Researches of Daniel Hanbiu-y. 



53 

Wisconsin, Industrial Commission: Bulletin, 3 nos.; Workman's 
Compensation, 2nd Annual Report; Child Labor Law, 1913; Shop 
Lighting. 

Workmen's Compensation Service and Information Bureau: Pam- 
phlets. 

World Peace Foundation: Concord, 10 nos.; Mead, The United 
States and the Third Hague Conference; Mead, The American Peace 
Party and its Present Aims and Duties; Pamphlet Series, 9 nos. 

Yale University Library: Bateson, Problems of Genetics; Reed, 
Lyra Yalensis; Bacon, Christianity Old and New; Hubbell, Influence of 
Isocrates on Cicero; Smith, Life and Letters of Nathan Smith; Stokes, 
Memorials of Eminent Yale Men; University Bulletin, 1913-1914. 

Periodicals, the Gift of Publishers. 

Advocate of Peace; Amherst Graduates' Quarterly; Book News 
Monthly; BrjTi Mawr Alumnae Quarterly; Bulletin of the New York 
Public Library; Bulletin of the Pan-American Union; University of 
California Clironicle; Columbia University Quarterly; Edison Monthly; 
Die Friedenswarte ; Hartford Seminary Record; Journal of the Illinois 
State Historical Society; Johns Hopkins University Circulars; Lantern; 
Midland Naturalist; North German Lloyd Bulletin; La Paix par le 
Droit; Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography; Public Health 
Nurse Quarterly; Southern Workman; Technology Review; Tipyn 
o'Bob. 



Report of the Health Committee. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit the following report of the 
Health Committee for the year 1913-14. 

The Health Committee met regularly once a week through- 
out the year with the wardens of the halls. The system of 
supervision, put into operation last year, was carried on as 
before by Miss Applebee, Director of Athletics and Gymnastics 
and Supervisor of Health. The record of this work will be 
found in her report. The records of illness will be found in 
detail in the reports of the Physician in Chief of the College 
and of the Assistant Physician. 

The new College Infirmary was completed and opened 
for the students in the autumn of 1913. The academic year 
1913-14 is therefore the first full year for the Infirmary. We 
have sent to the Infirmary for care and treatment all stu- 
dents who were ill even in a slight degree. We found that 
it was possible to give them much better care in the Infirmary 
than in the halls and the rest and quiet for even a day was 
very advantageous in minor cases of illness. It has also been 
possible to prevent in a greater measure than ever before the 
spread of contagion in the College, not only in the case of the 
serious contagious diseases but also for slightly contagious 
colds and influenza. 

The following figures show that only 147 students out of 
a student body of 467 had illnesses of sufficient severity to be 
sent to the Infirmary. - Several members of the Staff were 
taken care of in the Infirmary and it was a great convenience 
to be able to get them out of the faculty buildings in order 
to prevent the spread of contagion among the Faculty, which 
is always more disastrous to the College than an epidemic 
among the students. On the whole I think that the Infirmary 
Report shows that the students last year were in very good 
condition. We had very few serious illnesses and very few 
students who had to be sent repeatedly to the Infirmary. 

(54) 



55 

Number of students sent to the Infirmary and the duration of each illness. 

Undergraduates. No. of Undergraduates No. of 

No. of days. Students. No. of days. Students, 

1 22 8 5 

2 42 10 5 

3 28 11 2 

4 21 12 2 

5 3 14 1 

6 2 18 1 

7 2 43 1 

Total number of undergraduate students treated in the Infirmary . . 137 
Total number of days of treatment in the Infirmary 526 

Graduates No. of Graduates No. of 

No. of days. Students. No. of days. Students. 

2 2 6.... 1 

3 2 7 1 

4 1 39 1 

5 2 

Total number of graduate students treated in the Infirmary 10 

Total number of days of treatment in the Infirmary 76 

Patients neither undergraduates nor graduates: 

No. of days 

2 1 (member of staff of Model School.) 

4 1 (member of teaching staff of the College.) 

5 1 (Warden of Rocliefeller HaU.) 

11 1 (member of management of the College Inn.) 

37 1 (alumna talven ill in hall.) 

Total number of patients neither undergraduates nor graduates ... 5 
Total number of days of treatment 59 

In all 152 patients were admitted and were nm-sed for a total of 661 
days. 

Number of students sent to the Infirmary more than once during the year. 
Admitted to the Infirmary twice. 

No. of days No. of No. of days No. of 

in all. Students. in all. Students. 

3 3 8 2 

4 5 12 1 

5 5 19 1 

7 2 — 

Total 19 



56 

Admitted to the Infirmary three times during the year: 

No. of days No. of No. of days No. of 

in all. Students. in all. Students. 

11 1 17 1 

13 1 24 1 



15 2 



Total 6 



The average number of days of treatment per patient was 4.35 days. 
The number of students who were in the Infirmary for 5 days or less 
than 5 days was 123. The number exceeding 5 days was 24. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marion Reilly, 
Dean of the College. 



Report of the Physician in Chief of the College 
AND of the Assistant Physician. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit on behalf of Dr. Frances R. 
Sprague and myself the following report of the cases attended 
at Bryn Mawr College from October 1, 1913, to September 
30, 1914. 

As shown by the number of visits and examinations, the 
college work was heavy. It was greatly facilitated by the 
splendid equipment of our new Infirmary and its competent 
corps of nurses. 

Following the vacation, we had brought to us a case of 
scarlet fever, and by one of the graduates of the college of the 
class of 1908 a malignant case of diphtheria. Our success in 
isolating not only the patients but the students with whom 
they had associated, thus reducing to a minimum the chances 
of spreading these virulent diseases among our student body, 
shows the great value of our new isolation ward. TJiat we 
had no secondary cases is cause for gratification. 

My profound thanks are due to Dr. Sprague for her 
careful, painstaking work. 

Total number of students in College: 

Undergraduates 387 

Graduates ' 80 

Total 467 

/. Medical Cases. 

Acute infectious diseases. Digestive System. 

Diphtheria (Visiting alumna) 1 Appendiceal catarrh. 2 

La Grippe .- 28 Constipation 5 

Scarlet fever 1 Diarrhcsa 7 

Tonsihtis 24 Dizziness 2 

Circulatory System. Headache 7 

Brachycardia 1 Indigestion 27 

Irregular heart 12 Stomatitis 4 

Tachycardia 1 Ear Conditions. 

Valvular lesions 18 Earache § 

(57) 



58 



Deafness 1 

Furuncle 1 

Impacted cerumen 10 

Eye Conditions. 

Eye strain 10 

" Conjunctivitis 8 

Foreign body 4 

Hordeolum 2 

Infected Meibomian gland. . 1 

Menstrual Disturbances. 

Amenorrhoea 8 

Dysmenorrhoea 6 

Dysmenorrhoea with head- 
ache 2 

Menorrhagia 6 

Nervous System. 

Exhaustion 4 

Hysteria 1 

Nervousness 5 

Insomnia 3 

Respiratory Tract. 

Acute rhinitis 106 

Acute pharyngitis 73 

Bronchitis 24 



Chronic pharyngitis 7 

Enlarged tonsils 4 

Grippy colds 14 

Laryngitis 28 

Skin Conditions. 

Acne 5 

Callosities 4 

Dermatitis 1 

Eczema 2 

Furunculosis 9 

Poison ivy 5 

Pruritis 1 

Urticaria 2 

Verrucca 2 

Miscellaneous. 

Adenitis 1 

Enlarged thyroid (treated) . . 10 

Epistaxis 4 

Myositis 1 

Rheumatism 3 

Sinusitis 7 

Visceroptosis 3 

Total 536 



II. Surgical Cases. 



Trauma, Bone and Joint Condi- 
tions. 

Abrasions 3 

Bruises 34 

Burns 5 

Diaphragmatic abscess 1 

Dislocations 5 

Incised wounds 2 

Infected toe or fingers 13 

Penetrating wounds 2 



Pronations (treated) 15 

Periostitis 3 

Sprains 10 

Splinters 7 

Strains ' 28 

Synovitis 2 

Fracture of nose 2 

Fracture of toe 1 

133 



Dr. Sprague: 

Physical examinations 497 Office visits 1235 

Vaccinations 64 HaU visits 106 

Dr. Branson: 
Infirmary and Hall visits 796 Special examinations for Sports 191 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas F. Bkanson, 
Physician in Chief. 



Report of the Director of Athletics and Gymnastics 
AND Health Supervisor, 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit the following report on such 
work of the Health Department as has been under my charge 
during the year 1913-14. 

In October, in accordance with the requirements of the 
Health Department, three hundred and eighty-one students 
were examined by the Director of Athletics and Gymnastics 
and by Dr. Frances R. Sprague, the Assistant Physician of the 
College; of these twenty-three were referred to Dr. Thomas 
F. Branson, Physician in Chief of the College, for further 
examination. 

These examinations gave the following results: 

307 students passed the health requirements. 
74 students failed to pass the requirements and were put under 
general supervision, or, where necessary, under the care of 
the College Physician, or were referred to specialists. 

Supervision List. 

Number of 
Condition. Cases. 

General debiUty 27 

Enlarged thyroid 11 

Cardiac irregularities 9 

Anaemia. 8 

Menstrual distui-bances 7 

Recovery from operation or illness 6 

Digestive disturbances 3 

Appendicitis 2 

Paralysis 1 

Total 74 

Table of Physical Conditions. 

Slight Marked 

deviation deviation 
Normal. from from 

normal. normal. 

Hearts '. 155 100 126 

Weight 293 66 22 

Thyroids 229 131 21 

TonsUs 324 31 26 

Menses 307 46 28 

Spinal colunm 160 219 2 

(59) 



60 



Cases treated by medical gymnastics by Miss Anna 
Branson, in all cases with marked improvement: 

Number. Number. 

.Scoliosis 7 Muscular contraction 1 

Genera-l debility 5 Posture 1 

Injuries 5 Ptosis 1 

Asymmetry, neck 1 — 

Lumbago 1 Total 22 

Miss Branson also gave ten special weekly class treatments 
to four students with marked scoliosis who were unable to 
afford private treatment. This class was paid for from the 
gymnasium fines fund. The work was done by the students 
in addition to their regular gymnastic classes. 

Sports List Classification. 

Class A. 56 students. Authorized to enter all sports, matches, and 
contests and under no restrictions except the general health rules of the 
Athletic Association. 

Class A — . 14 students. A special class. Authorized to enter all 
sports included under Class A, but required to report at stated periods to 
the Assistant Physician. 

Class B. 251 students. Authorized to enter sports on probation and 
under the restrictions noted on their Authorization Cards. 

Class C. 46 students. Forbidden all sports except such as may be 
specified on their Authorization Cards. 

Class D. 14 students. Allowed no sports at all. 

As the result of a conference between the Health Department and the 
Athletic Board held at the end of October 279 re-examinations were made 
during the autumn with the following results: 

Re-examinations by the Assistant Physician: 

6 B changed to A 
98 B " ", A- 

16 B unchanged 

1 C changed to A 

1 C unchanged 

1 D changed to A 
32 re-examinations for special permission to 
play in games on certain occasions. 

Total = 155 re-examinations. 



61 

Re-examinations by the Physician in Chief: 
19 B changed to A 
10 B " " A- 

29 B unchanged 

7 C changed to A 

3 C " " A- 

14 C " " B 

19 C unchanged 

2 D changed to A 

2D " " B 

ID " " C 

18 re-examinations for special permission to 
play in games on certain occasions. 

Total = 124 re-examinations. 

Later during the year 96 re-examinations were held with the follow- 
ing results: 

Re-examinations by the Assistant Physician : 
1 B changed to A 

8 B " " A- 
1 B unchanged 

1 D changed to A 
37 re-examinations for permission to play in 
various games. 

Total = 48 re-examinations. 

"e-examinations by the Physician in Chief: 
16 B changed to A 
7 B " " A- 

5 B unchanged 
1 C changed to A 
7 C " " A- 

1 C " " B 

1 C unchanged 
1 D changed to A 

9 re-examinations for permission to play in 

various games. 

Total = 48 re-examinations. 

Vaccination Requirements. Class of 1917. 

Vaccination certificates satisfactory 83 

Vaccinated at time of examination or later 26 

Excused, having had varioloid or small-pox 2 

Total Ill 



62 

Oculist's Examinations. 

Dr. Helen Murphy, the Examining Oculist of the College, 
examined 216 undergraduates and 3 graduates with the follow- 
ing results: 

Number of 
Condition. cases. Treatment. 

Undergraduates. 

Normal 61 

Glasses satisfactory 55 

Further examination and treat- 
ment necessary 60 34 re-examined and new glasses 

given. 
12 re-examined, glasses not changed. 
9 re-examined by Dr. Murphy, 

condition improved. 
5 not re-examined. 
Further examination if symp- 
toms increase 40 38 no fui-ther trouble. 

2 re-examined and glasses pre- 
scribed. 
Graduates. 

Further examination and treat- 
ment necessary 3 3 re-examined and treated. 

Anthropo7netric Statistics. 
College Averages. 





Weight. 


Height. 


Chest. 


Expansion, 
9th Rib. 


Strength. 


Lung 
Capacity. 




kg. 


cm. 


cm. 


cm. 


kg. 


cu. in. 


October 


... 58.48 


162.93 


6.02 


5.71 


308.21 


184.65 


May 


. .. 59.04 


163.25 


7.69 


6.95 


323.36 


190.14 



American average as stated by Dr. Dudley Sargent, 

235.00 132.00 

Class Averages. 
Class of 1914: 

October 58.31 163.79 6.34 5.83 334.86 186.73 

May 58.35 163.54 7.53 7.00 333.87 190.14 

Class of 1915: 

October !. 59.87 163.44 6.14 6.05 313.75 187.52 

May 60.79 164.28 7.82 6.85 318.99 191.60 

Class of 1916: 

October 58.51 162.17 6.04 5.76 304.08 181.51 

May 59.01 162.49 7.65 6.74 320.16 186.58 



63 



Class of 1917: 

October 57.25 162.35 5.56 5.20 280.18 182.82 

May 57.99 162.67 7.77 7.22 320.43 190.16 



Strength Tests. 

Table showing the number of students above and below 
the average in the strength tests at the first and second phys- 
ical examinations, according to classes. 



strength 
Tests. 


Oct 
1914 


aber, 1913. 
1915 1916 


1917 


1914 


May, 
1915 


1914. 
1916 


1917 


Above 400 kg. 


7 


3 


2 


5 


6 


6 


3 


8 


375 " 


11 


3 


4 


2 


8 


3 


5 


8 


350 " 


9 


8 


9 


6 


12 


6 


15 


13 


325 " 


12 


18 


12 


9 


12 


18 


11 


13 


Average 300 " 


15 


19 


19 


11 


12 
15 


24 
16 


15 
21 


16 


275 " 


7 


24 


18 


19 


22 


250 " 


9 


8 


10 


23 


6 


7 


7 


16 


225 " 


2 


4 


4 


12 





4 


2 


2 


200 " 





1 


3 


11 











2 


175 " 








1 


6 











1 


150 " 











1 















Lung Capacity. 

Table showing the number of students above and below 
the average in lung capacity at the first and second physical 
examinations, according to classes. 



Lung 
Capacity. 



October, 1913. 
1914 1915 1916 1917 



May, 1914. 
1914 1915 1916 1917 



Above 240 cu 


in. 





4 





3 





4 


1 


4 


220 " 


" 


6 


6 


4 


3 


4 


7 


7 


7 


210" 


ti 


5 


6 


3 


10 


7 


8 


1 


13 


200 " 


u 


14 


9 


8 


9 


15 


10 


8 


7 


190 " 


n 


5 


14 


9 


15 


12 


13 


19 


22 


Average 180 " 


(( 


17 


11 


21 


21 


11 


15 


13 


14 


170" 


tl 


9 


18 


12 


12 


12 


11 


15 


11 


160 " 


11 


10 


11 


18 


14 


5 


9 


12 


16 


150" 


tl 


5 


5 


4 


12 


3 


4 


1 


4 


140" 


(f 


1 


4 


3 


4 


1 


3 


1 


1 


130" 


tl 











1 








1 


1 


110" 


11 











1 


1 








1 



64 



Percentage of students above and below the average in 
strength and lung capacity at the first and second examinations. 



Strength Test. 

October, 1913. May, 1914. 

Above average 36 per cent 44 per cent 

Average : 19" " 20" " 

Below average 45" " 36" " 

Lung Capacity. 

October, 1913. May, 1914. 

Above average 38 per cent 50 per cent 

Average .' . . 21 " " 16 " " 

Below average 41" " 34" " 

The three highest and the three lowest tests in strength 
and lung capacity were: 









Strength 


Tests. 








October, 1913. 
Highest. Lowest. 
kg. Class. kg. Class 


May, 
Highest, 
kg. Class. 


1914. 

Lowest, 
kg. Class. 


534 


1914 


185 


1917 


495 


1917 


221 


1917 


480 


1915 


183 


1917 


483 


1914 


202 


1917 


479 


1914 


169 


1917 


476 


1917 


195 


1917 






- 


Lung Capacity. 








Highest, 
ou. in. Class. 


Lowest, 
cu. in. Class. 


Highest, 
cu. in. Class. 


Lowest, 
cu. in. Class. 








[1915) 










276 


1917 


140 ■ 


1916 • 
1917 


260 


1915 


132 


1917 


254 


1915 


132 


1917 


256 


1917 


130 


1914 


252 


1917 


112 


1917 


252 


1917 


110 


1917 



Health Statistics of the Senior Class {1914). 

31iown by the Health Department Records. 

Health improved during the four years 24 

Health remained the same 61 

Health ngt go good % 



65 

Hygiene Lectures. 

Three lectures on personal and one on race and sex hygiene 
Were given by Miss Applebee. These lectures were open to 
all students, attendance was compulsory for Freshmen. 

The Health Department has received valuable assistance 
from Miss Cynthia M. Wesson, Graduate Scholar in Physiol- 
ogy, who has carried on research work in blood pressure and 
its relation to exercise during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Constance M. K. Applebee, 
Director of Athletics and Gymnastics and Supervisor of Health. 



Report of the Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit the following report on the 
work of the Department of Athletics and Gymnastics during 
the year 1913-14. 



Gymnasium Report. 

The following new regulations were made in regard to the 
registration of exercise: 

1. Three periods of exercise required each week instead 
of four with the condition, however, that they be taken in 
some form of organized athletics or gymnastics. 

2. Exercise to be registered each week and, if unregis- 
tered, to be made up on the following Thursday evening in a 
penalty class with a fine for each unregistered period. 

3. Excuses were to be accepted for Infirmary cases of ill- 
ness only. 

4. Three cuts were allowed every four weeks. 



Table of Gymnastic Classes. 

Type of Class. 
For Resident and Non-Resident Number of Number of 

Students. Classes per week. Students. 

Di-m 14 228 

Classic dancing 8 140 

Fencing 3 16 

For graduate students 1 16 

Five students substituted medical gymnastics under Miss 
Branson for the regular classes. Eight students substituted 
lying out of doors on the gymnasium roof for the regular 

classes. 

(66) 



67 

Swimming. 

The swimming pool was open during the whole college 
year. 

Undergraduate students: 



Authorized 
Class. as expert 
swimmers. 


Passed the 
swimming 

test. 


Unable 
to swim. 


Excused. 


Taking 
lessons. 


Number of 
lessons 
given. 


1914 60 


18 





2 








1915 66 


27 


2 


3 


2 


23 


1916.... 52 


31 


5 


3 


5 


51 


1917 76 




28 


7 


34 


295 


Total ... 254 


76 


35 


15 


41 


369 


Graduate students : 












16 


, , 


, , 


, , 


6 


16 



Authorization was substituted for the passing test for the 
class of 1917. 



Gymnastic Contest. 

A gymnastic contest between the Sophomores and Fresh- 
men was held on March 27, 1914. The championship shield 
was aw^arded to the class of 1917. 

Maximum number 
Events. of points. 

English country dances 30 

Free movements . 30 

Indian club drill 30 

Rope climbing 30 

Vaulting horse 30 

Parallel bars 30 

Pyramid 30 

Total... 210 1771 178 

The judges were Miss Stone, Miss Napier and Mr. P. 
Bishop. 



Points. 
1916 


Points. 
1917 


25^ 


29 


27 


23 


28 


21 


21 


27 


22 


30 


28 


23 


26 


25 



Statistics of Exercise. 

JExercise was registered by 381 students; 269 students had 
no excuse from exercise; 112 students had occasional excuses. 

Causes of Excuses Number of Number of 

from Exercise. Students Excused. Causes of Excuses. Students Excused. 

Absent from College 32 Lumbago 1 

Abscesses 2 Measles 4 

Accidents 7 Poison ivy 1 

Appendicitis 1 Quarantine 4 

Broncliitis 4 Rheumatism 2 

Colds 29 Scarlet fever 1 

Conjunctivitis 4 Sinusitis 3 

Earache 2 Tachycardia 1 

Fatigue 7 Tonsilitis 16 

Furuncle 1 Vaccination 2 

Grippe 13 

Herpes simplex 1 Total number of excuses 146 

Indigestion 8 



Table of Accidents, 1913-14. 

Causes. 

2 periostitis Hockey (1), Coasting (1). 

1 strained back Fall from chair. 

1 fractured toe Swimming. 

1 fractured wrist Coasting. 

1 dislocated knee cap Fall down stairs. 

1 burn Laboratory. 



Fines. 

Three students failed to take their physical examinations 
within the required time; one hundred and thirty-eight stu- 
dents failed to register the required number of periods of 
exercise. 

The fines imposed were as follows: 

Physical examinations $6 . 00 

Exercise 173 . 75 

Total $179.75 



69 



Athletics. 
Calendar of Athletics for the Year 1913-14. 

October 2nd First hockey practice. 

October 8th First Athletic Association Meeting. 

October 16th Tennis Singles began. 

October 18th Hockey Varsity matches began. 

November 10th Class hockey matches began. 

December 1st Water polo practice began. 

January 10th Swimming meet — Preliminaries. 

January 16th Swimming meet — Finals. 

February 23rd Water polo match games began. 

March 28th First track practice. 

March 30th ? First basket-ball practice. . 

April 18th Track meet — Preliminaries. 

May 2nd Track meet — Finals. 

May 5th Election of officers. 

May 11th Basket-ball match games began. 

May 12th Tennis tom-nament — Doubles. 

May 13th Basket-ball game — Varsity vs. Phila- 
delphia. 

May 16th .Basket-ball game — Varsity vs. Alumnse. 

May 20th Basket-ball game — Varsity vs. Alumnse. 

May 23rd Tennis tournament — Varsity vs. Phila- 
delphia. 

June 2nd Tennis tournament — Varsity vs. Alumnse. 

_ „ , f Presentation of Athletic Trophies. 

\ Basket-ball game — Varsity vs. Alumnae. 

Athletic Statistics. 
Percentage of resident students taking part in athletics. 

Basket- Authorized Water 

ball, Hockey, Swimmers, Polo, Tennis, ' Track, 

per cent. per cent. per cent. per cent. per cent, per cent. 

Class 1914. . . 50 63 79 31 77 15 

1915... 35 56 70 20 73 27 

1916... 49 69 61 25 92 30 

1917... 59 70 70 28 88 30 

College 49 65 70 26 83 26 

Nupaber of resident students taking no part in athletics. 

Class 1914 2 

1915 Q 

1916 2 

1917.. 1 

Total 6 



70 

Number of non-resident students taking part in athletics. 





Basket- 
ball. 


Hookey. 


Authorized 
Swimmers. 


Water 
Polo. 


Tennis. 


Track, 


Class 1914. 


.. 2 





1 





2 


1 


1915. 


.. 





4 





7 





' 1916. 


.. 2 


1 


1 





6 





1917. 


.. 1 





2 





4 


2 


Total 


.. 5 


1 


8 





19 


3 



Tennis — ^The class championship was won by 1915. The 
college championship was won by 1917. The tennis doubles 
were won by 1914. Captains: E. Dunham, 1914; E. Rapallo, 
1915; E. B. Kirk, 1916; C. Stevens, 1917. 

Hockey — The class championship was won by 1914. Cap- 
tains: L. Cadbury, 1914; M. Morgan, 1915; M. Branson, 
1916; M. Thompson, 1917. Each class had one first, one 
second and one third team, with substitutes. An average of 
one hundred and twenty students practiced daily during the 
season. 

Svoimming — The class championship was won by 1917. 
Captains: K. Shippen, 1914; E. Dessau, 1915; M. Dodd, 
1916; M. Scattergood, 1917. 

The swimming meet was held in January. Events at the 
meet: 

68-foot swim 17 1-5 seconds. 

68-foot swim on back 19 2-5 seconds. 

136-foot swim 40 seconds. 

136-foot swim on back 45 4-5 seconds. 

Plunge for distance 47 feet. 

Fancy dive. 
Dive for form. 
Class relay race. 

Water Polo — The class championship was won by 1915. 
Captains: K. Shippen, 1914; E. Dessau, 1915; M. Dodd, 
1916; M. Scattergood, 1917. Each class had one first and 
one second team with substitutes. Practices were held twice 
a week; about forty-two students practiced each week. 



71 

Outdoor Track Meet — The outdoor track meet was held in 
April and May. Events at the meet: 

75-yard dash 9 seconds. 

Running high jump 4 feet, 1 1-4 inches. 

100-yard hurdles 15 2-5 seconds. 

Standing high jump 3 feet, 4 1-2 inches. 

Throwing javelin 61 feet, 5 1-2 inches. 

Throwing baseball 181 feet, 10 inches. 

100-yard dash 12 1-5 seconds. 

Running broad jump 13 feet, 7 3-4 inches. 

Running hop, step, jump 31 feet, 2 1-2 inches. 

Standing broad jimap 7 feet, 6 inches. 

Basket-ball throw 68 feet, 7 3-4 inches. 

60-yard hurdles 9 3-5 seconds. 

Hurl ball 83 feet, 3-4 inches. 

50-yard dash 6 2-5 seconds. 

Class relay race 38 2-5 seconds. 

One world's record was broken: 
Rimning hop, step, jump 31 feet, 2 1-2 inches. 

Three college records were broken: 

100-yard hurdles 15 2-5 seconds. 

Class relay race 38 2-5 seconds. 

Baseball throw 181 feet, 10 inches. 

Two college records were established: 

Javelin throw 51 feet, 5 1-2 inches. 

Hurl ball 83 feet, 3-4 inches. 

Basket Ball. — The class championship was won by 1914. 
Captains: E. Baker, 1914; S. R. M. Smith, 1915; E. HiU, 
1916; M. Wahl, 1917. Each class had one first, one second, 
and one third team with substitutes. An average of eighty 
students practiced daily during the season. 

Archery. — Miss Wesson gave lessons in archery three times 
a week in the fall and a number of students practiced daily. 

Graduate Students. Athletics. 

Reported by Cynthia M. Wesson, Athletic Representa- 
tive of the Graduate School. 

Hockey. — Captain: A. M. Macfadzean. Practices held 
Wednesdays and Saturdays. Matches were played against 



n 

a mixed undergraduate team, a Freshmen team and a Sopho- 
more team. About twenty graduates played. 

Tennis — Tournament, singles, in October and Novemberi 
There were twenty-six entries. 

Basket Ball — Captain: M. W. Loring. No regular 
practices. 

No graduate students entered the swimming meet. Two 
graduate students entered the track meet. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Constance M. K. Applebee, 
Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 



Appendices. 



I. 

Promotions, Reappointments, and Changes in the Academic 
and- Administrative Staff for the Year 191Jf.-15. 

James H. Leuba, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Education, granted 
leave of absence for the year 1914-15. 

William Roy Smith, Ph.D., promoted to be Professor of History. 

James Barnes, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics, granted leave of 
absence for the year 1914-15. 

Richard Thayer Holbrook, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French 
Philology and Italian, engagement extended. 

Theodore de Leo de Laguna, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy, granted 
leave of absence for the year 1914-15. 

Frederick Hutton Getman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry, 
engagement extended. 

Clarence Errol Ferree, Ph.D., reappointed Associate Professor of 
Experimental Psychology and Director of the Psychological Labora- 
tory. 

Grace Mead Andrus de Laguna, Ph.D., reappointed Associate in 
Philosophy and gi'anted leave of absence for the year 1914-15. 

Regina Katharine Crandall, Ph.D., reappointed Du-ector of English 
Essay Work and Reader in English. 

Louis Cons, Associate in French, term expired. 

Thomas Clachar Brown, Ph.D., reappointed Associate in Geology. 

James Ryals Conner, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate Professor of 
Mathematics. 

Roger Frederic Brunel, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate Professor 
of Chemistry. 

Matilde Castro, Ph.D., promoted to be Phebe Anna Thorne Associate 
Professor of Education and reappointed Dkector of the Phebe Anna 
Thorne Model School. 

Gertrude Rand, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate in Experimental and 
Educational Psychology. 

Eunice Morgan Schenck, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate in French, 

(73) 



74 

Sydney D. M. Hudson, Ph.B., Lecturer in Political Science, term 
expired. 

Roland G. Kent, Ph.D., Non-resident Lecturer in Sanskrit, term expired. 

Samuel Claggett Chew, Jr., Ph.D., appointed Associate in English. 
Dr. Chew received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Johns Hopkins 
University in 1909 and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1913. 
From 1910 to 1912 he held a Fellowship in Johns Hopkins University; 
from 1913 to 1914 he was English Master in the Hotchkiss School, 
Lakeville, Conn. 

Jean Baptiste Beck, Ph.D., appointed Associate Professor of Mediaeval 
French Literature. Dr. Beck is a native of Guebwiller, Alsace. He 
received the Baccalaureate in Rhetoric from the Sorbonne in 1900 and 
the Baccalaureate in Philosophy in 1901; ia 1907 he received the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Strassburg, and 
passed the State examinations pro facultate docendi in 1908. In 1909 
he was Professor of Latin and German in the Ecole Alsacienne, Paris; 
in 1910 Director of the Advanced Com-ses for Teachers of French in 
connection with the department of Romance Philology in the Uni- 
versity of Vienna, and also Professor of French Literatvire in the 
Wiener Handels-Akademie; from 1911 to 1914 he was Assistant 
Professor of Romance Languages in the University of Illinois and in 
the summer quarter of 1912, Instructor in Romance Languages and 
Literatures in the University of Chicago. 

Georgiana Goddard King, A.M., title changed to be Lecturer in the 
History of Art instead of in the History of Art and Comparative 
Literature. 

Paul Van Brunt Jones, Ph.D., Lectiu-er in History, term expired. 

Florence Peebles, Ph.D., Lecturer in Biology as substitute for Profes- 
sor David Hilt Tennent, October 1 to December 31, 1913, term expired. 

Emil Carl Wilm, Ph.D., appointed Lecturer in Philosophy as substitute 
for Professor Theodore de Leo de Laguna for the year 1914-15. Dr. 
Wilm received the degree of Bachelor of Ai'ts from Southwestern 
University in 1902, the degree of Master of Ai-ts from Vanderbilt 
University in 1903, and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Cor- 
nell University in 1905. From 1905 to 1911 he was Professor of 
Philosophy in Washburn College; from 1911 to 1912 he was Assistant 
and Docent in Philosophy in Harvard University and Radcliffe 
College, and from 1912 to 1914 he was Professor of Philosophy and 
Education in Wells College. 

Janet Tucker Howell, Ph.D., appointed Lecturer in Physics as 
substitute for Professor James Barnes for the year 1914-15. Dr. 
Howell received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr 
College in 1910 and thp degree of Doctor of Philosophy from John§ 



75 

Hopkins University in 1913. From 1913 to 1914 she held the Helen 
Schaeffer Huff Memorial Fellowship in Bryn Mawr College. 

Chester Elijah Kellogg, Ph.D., appointed Lectui-er in Psychology 
as substitute for Professor James H. Leuba for the year 1914-15. 
Dr. Kellogg received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bowdoin 
College in 1911, the degree of Master of Arts from Harvard University 
in 1912, and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Harvard Univer- 
sity in 1914. He held the Austin Fellowship in Harvard University 
from 1912 to 1913. 

Charles Ghequiere Feistwick, Ph.D., appointed Lecturer in Political 
Science. Dr. Fenwick received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from 
Loyola College in 1898 and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from 
Johns Hopkins University in 1912. From 1909 to 1911 he was a 
student in Johns Hopkins University; from 1911 to 1914 Law Clerk 
in the Division of International Law of the Carnegie Endowment for 
International Peace; he was a Student in the University of Freiburg 
in the simimer of 1913. 

James Miller Leake, Ph.D., appointed Lecturer in History. Dr. 
Leake received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Randolph-Macon 
College in 1902 and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Johns 
Hopkins University in 1914. From 1901 to 1903 he was Instructor 
in French and English in Randolph-Macon College; from 1909 to 1911 
he was Principal of the High School in Ashland, Va.; from 1911 to 1913 
he was a graduate student, and from 1913 to 1914 University FeUow, 
in Johns Hopkins University. 

Pierre Franqgis Girotjd, D.L., appointed Non-resident Lecturer in 
French. Dr. Giroud received the degree of Bachelier-es-lettres 
from the University of France in 1874 and the degree of Licencie-bs- 
lettres in 1881, the honorary degree of Doctor of Letters from Temple 
University, Philadelphia, in 1914, and was made Officier d' Academie 
in 1904 and Officier de V Instruction publique in 1905. From 1881 to 
1885 he studied at the Sorbonne and College de France; from 1886 
to 1888 he was Director of the Ecole Ste. Marie, Chalon; he was 
Teacher of French in the DeLancey School from 1889 to 1896; in the 
Agnes Irwin School from 1889 to 1914 and in Girard College, Phila- 
delphia, from 1896 to 1912. From 1907 to 1911 he was Special 
Lecturer on French Literature at Johns Hopkins University, and 
at Cornell University Summer School in 1913 and 1914; and since 
1912 he has been Special Lecturer on French Literature at the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 

Abby Kirk, A.B., reappointed Reader in Elementary Greek. 

Mary Jeffers, A.M., reappointed Reader in German and Oral Examiner 
in French a,nd German. 



76 

Edna Aston Shearer, A.B., reappointed Reader in English and appointed 
Reader in Philosophy for the year 1914-15. 

E. Beatrice Daw, A.M., Reader in English, term expired. 

■ Mary Hamilton Swindler, Ph.D., reappointed Reader in Latin and 
Reader and Demonstrator in Classical Archaeology. 

Marion Delia Crane, A.B., Assistant in English, term expired. 

Ida Langdon, Ph.D., reappointed Reader in English. 

Annie Louise Macleod, Ph.D., Reader in Physiological Chemistry and 
Demonstrator in Chemistry, term expn-ed. 

Christine Potts Hammer, A.B., reappointed Reader in English. 

Maud Elizabeth Temple, Ph.D., Reader in English, resigned, November 
14, 1913, on account of illness. 

Esther Cloudman Dunn, A.B., Reader in EngUsh, appointed in Novem- 
ber, 1913, as substitute for Dr. Temple and reappointed Reader in 
English. Miss Dunn received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from 
Cornell University in 1913. 

Julia Peachy Harrison, Ph.D., appointed Reader and Demonstrator 
in Chemistry. Dr. Harrison received the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts from Richmond College in 1906, the degree of Master of Arts in 
1907, the degree of Bachelor of Science in 1909, and the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy from Johns Hopkins University in 1913. Dr. 
Harrison taught in the High School, Richmond, from 1907 to 1908; 
from 1909 to 1912 she was a graduate student in Johns Hopkins 
ITniversity, and from 1912 to 1913 Carnegie Research Assistant in 
Johns Hopkins University; from 1913 to 1914 she was Fellow in 
Chemistry in Bryn Mawr College. 

Dorothy Brewster, Ph.D., appointed Reader in English. Dr. Brewster 
received the degree of Bachelor of Ai'ts from Columbia University 
in 1906, the degree of Master of Arts in 1907, and the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy in 1913. From 1908 to 1911 she was Assistant in 
Enghsh in Barnard CoUege; from 1911 to 1912 she was Special 
Fellow in Enghsh in Columbia University; from 1913 to 1914 she was 
Assistant in English in the University Extension Department, Coliun- 
bia University, and in the summer of 1914 Assistant in Enghsh in 
the Summer School. 

Ellen Thayer, A.B., appointed Reader in French. Miss Thayer received 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr College in 1907. From 
1909 to 1911 she studied at the -Sorbonne; from 1911 to 1912 she 
taught French in Wolfe Hall, Denver, Colorado. 

Clara Whitney Crane, A.B., appointed Reader in Enghsh. Miss Crane 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Radcljffe College in 1914, 



77 

Mabel Katherine Frehaper, A.M., Demonstrator in Physics, term 
expired. 

Mary Edith Pinney, A.M., reappointed Demonstrator in Biology. 

Helen Turnbull Gilroy, A.M., appointed Demonstrator in Physics. 
Miss Gih-oy received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr 
College in 1909 and the degree of Master of Ai-ts in 1912. From 1910 
to 1911 she was' a graduate student and Student Assistant in the 
Physical Laboratory, Bryn Mawr College; from 1911 to 1912 she 
was Fellow in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, and from 1912 to 1914 
Instructor in Physics, Mt. Holyoke College. 

Dorothy Ochtman, A.B., appointed Demonstrator in the History of Art. 
Miss Ochtman received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Smith 
College in 1914. 

Phebe Anna Thorne Model School. 

Samuel Arthur King, M.A., reappointed Teacher of Reading. 

Eunice Morgan Schenck, Ph.D., reappointed Teacher of French. 

Placido de Montoliu, reappointed Teacher of Jaques-Dal croze Eurhyth- 
mies. 

Constance M. K. Applebee, reappointed Teacher of Out-of-Door Sports 
and Games. 

Mary Hamilton Swindler, Ph.D., appointed Teacher of Latin. 

Frances Browne, A.B., appointed Teacher of English, History, and 
Geography. Miss Bro^vne received the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
from Bryn Mawr College in 1909. From 1911 to 1912 she taught in 
the Psychological Clinic and in the Orange Settlement, New York 
City; from 1913 to 1914 she taught in the Organic School for Educa- 
tion. 

Anna Whitman Clark, A.B., appointed Teacher of Elementary Science 
and Arithmetic. Miss Clark received the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
from Vassar College in 1898. From 1899 to 1900 she acted as private 
assistant to Professor Brookover in the Biological Laboratory, Colo- 
rado College; from 1906 to 1911 she taught Science and Mathematics 
in Miss Butt's School, Norwich, Conn., and from 1911 to 1914 she 
taught Science and Mathematics in Miss Walker's School, Lakewood, 
N. J. In 1914 she attended the summer session in Teachers College, 
Columbia University. 

Virginia Wright Garber, appointed Teacher of Drawing. Miss Garber 
has studied at the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial 
Art and at the Philadelphia Academy of Fine Ai'ts. She has also been 
a pupil of Jules Lefebre, Benjamin Constant, Professor Charles Roth, 



78 

William M. Chase, Childe Hassam and Howard Pyle. She has been 
Head of the White Gate Studio Bryn Mawr since 1905. 
Florence Nice Beckley, A.B., appointed Secretary to the Director. 
Miss Beckley received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Vassar 
College in 1907. She studied at Simmons College from 1909 to 1910. 
From 1910 to 1914 she acted as Secretary to the President of Newton 
Theological Institution. 

Executive Staff. 
Edith Oelady, A.B., reappointed Secretary of the College, 
Abigail Camp Dimon, A.M., reappointed Recording Secretary. 

Lenore Millicent Little, A.B., reappointed Stenographer to the Presi- 
dent. 

Maude Agnes Titus, A.B., appointed Stenographer to the Dean of the 
college. Miss Titus received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from 
Mt. Holyoke College in 1911. She was Teacher of English in the 
High School, Watertown, N. Y., from 1911 to 1912 and Assistant to 
the Supervising Principal of Schools, RoseUe, N. J., from 1912 
to 1914. 

Eleanor Karsten, Ph.B., appointed Secretary to the Recording Dean 
and Assistant to the President. Mrs. Karsten received the degree 
of Bachelor of Philosophy from the University of Chicago in 1910. 
She was Secretary to the Chief Investigator of the Bureau of Indus- 
tries and Immigration, Department of Labour, State of New York, 
from 1911 to 1912, and Secretary to the Librarian and Lectm-er in 
the Library School, University of Illinois, from 1912 to 1914. 

Ellen Beulah Lewis, A.B., reappointed Stenographer to the Secretary 
of the College. 

Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., reappointed Warden of Pembroke Hall. 

Ruth Babcock, A.B., reappointed Warden of Merion Hall. 

Susanne Carey AllinsoN, A.B., Warden of Radnor Hall, term expired. 

Eleanor Bontecou, A.B., Warden of Denbigh Hall, term expired. 

Hilda Worthington Smith, A.M., Warden of Rockefeller Hall, term 
expired. 

Margaret Bontecou, A.B., appointed Warden of Denbigh Hall. Miss 
Bontecou received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from BrjTi Mawr 
College in 1909. In 1909 she was awarded the Bryn Mawr European 
Fellowship and from 1910 to 1911 she studied at the LTniversities of 
Munich and Oxford; from 1912 to 1913 she worked in the Orange 
Social Settlement, and from 1913 to 1914 was a private tutor and 
secretary. 

Mary Frances Nearing, A.B., appointed Warden of Rockefeller Hall. 
Miss Nearing received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr 



79 

College in 1909. From 1910 to 1911 she taught English in St. Mar- 
garet's School, Waterbury, Conn. ; from 1911 to 1913 she was Secretary 
and Athletic Director in Miss Walker's School, Lakewood, N. J.; 
from 1913 to 1914 she has done social service work in Philadelphia. 

Bertha Sophie Ehlers, A.B., appointed Warden of Radnor Hall. Miss 
Ehlers received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr 
College in 1909. From 1910 to 1914 she taught German in the Agnes 
Irwin School in Philadelphia; from 1912 to 1913 she was Reader in 
Elementary German in Bryn Mawr College. 

Frances Allen Foster, A.B., Assistant to the Warden of Pembroke 
Hall, term expired. 

Elizabeth Evans Lord, A.B., appointed Assistant to the Warden of 
Pembroke Hall. Miss Lord received the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
from Bryn Mawr College in 1914. 

Sandy Lee Hurst, reappointed Comptroller. 

Miriam Margaret Hedges, A.B., reappointed Business Manager. 

Louise Watson, A.B., appointed Assistant Business Manager. Miss 
Watson received the degree of Bachelor of Ai-ts from Bryn Mawr 
CoUege in 1912. From 1913 to 1914 she taught Latin, Mathematics 
and Athletics in Marshall College, Huntington, W. Va. 

William H. Foley, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, died 
May 1, 1914. 

Thomas F. Foley, appointed Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 

Edith Sherwood, reappointed Stenographer in the Business Manager's 
Office. 

Janet B. Houtz, appointed Stenographer in the Business Manager's Office. 

Margaret A. Proctor, A.B., reappointed Junior Bursar. 

Lois Antoinette Reed, A.B., B.L.S., reappointed Librarian. 

Constance M. K. Applebee, reappointed Director of Athletics and 
Gymnastics and Supervisor of Health Department. 

Mary Wagner Anderson, Assistant to the Director of Athletics and 
Gymnastics, term expii-ed. 

Cynthia Maria Wesson, A.M., promoted to be Assistant to the Director 
of Athletics and Gymnastics. 

Helen Corey Geddes, A.B., B.S., reappointed Head Cataloguer. 

Bessie Homer Jennings, reappointed Assistant Cataloguer. 

Sarah Wooster Eno, A.B., reappointed Circulation and Reference 
Librarian. 

Marian Price, A.B., reappointed Assistant to th§ Librarian. 



80 

Helen Rothrock Shoemaker, A.B., Assistant to the Circulation and 
Reference Librarian, term expired. 

S. Helen Burns, A.M., appointed Assistant to the Circulation and 
Reference Librarian. Miss Burns received the degi-ee of Bachelor 
of Philosophy from Dickinson College in 1912 and the degree of Master 
of Arts in 1914. From 1913 to 1914 she studied in the Drexel Insti- 
tute Library School. 

Mart Warren Taylor, reappointed Secretary to the Department of 
Athletics and Gymnastics and Recording Secretary to the Health 
Department. 

Genevieve Estelle Potter, reappointed Bookkeeper and Assistant to 
the Comptroller. 

Mabel Gray Thomas, reappointed Stenographer and Assistant Book- 
keeper in the Comptroller's Office. 

Frances R. Spragtje, M.D., reappointed Assistant Physician of the 
College. 

Helen Murphy, M.D., reappointed Examining Oculist. 



n. 

Fellowships and Scholarships Conferred for the Year 1914--iS. 
Kathaeine Dodd, Bryn Mawr European Fellow. 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. Prepared by Miss Haskell and Miss Dean's School, Boston, Mass. 
First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholar for the New England States, 1910-11; Brooke 
Hall Memorial Scholar, 1913-14. 

Gertrude HiLimETH Campbell, Mary E. Garrett European Fellow. 

Providence, R. I. A.B., Brown University, 1911, and A.M., 1912. Tutor in English, 
Brown University, 1912; Graduate Scholar in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13; 
FeUow in English, 1913-14. 

Vera Lee Brown, President's European Fellow. 

New Brunswick, Canada. B.A., McGill University, 1912, and M.A., 1913. Graduate 
Scholar in History, Bryn Mawr College, 1913-14. 

June- Christina Eddingfield, 

Ottendorfer Memorial Research Felloiv in Teutonic Philology. 

Mace, Ind. A.B., University of Indiana, 1906. Student, University of Indiana, Summer 
Semesters, 1908, 1910, 1911, 1912. Assistant Principal of the High School, Swayzee, 
Ind., 1906-08; Head of German Department in the High School, Elwood, Ind., 1908-12; 
Graduate Scholar in German, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13; and Fellow in German, 
1913-14. 

Vernette Lois Gibbons, 

Helen Schaeffer Huff Research Fellow in Physics. 

Upton, Mass. Sc.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1896, and A.B., 1899; M.Sc, University 
of Chicago, 1907; M.Sc, University of the Cape of Good Hope, 1908. Teacher in the 
High School, Bernardstown, Mass., 1896-97; Assistant in Chemistry, Mt. Holyoke 
College, 1897-99, and Instructor in Chemistry, 1899-1901; Instructor in Chemistry 
and Mineralogy, Wells College, 1902-04, and Associate Professor of Chemistry, 1905-06; 
Lecturer and Head of Department of Chemistry, Huguenot College, Wellington, South 
Africa, 1907-11, and on leave of absence, 1911-12; Fellow in Chemistry, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1911-12; President's European Fellow and Student, University of Munich, 
1912-13; and Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1913-14. 

Mildred Haedenbrook, Felloiv in Greek. 

Valatie, N. Y. A.B., Vassar College, 1908, and A.M., 1909. Graduate Scholar in Greek, 
Bryn Mawr CoUege, 1911-12, 1913-14. 

Mary Amelia Grant Fellow in Latin. 

Topeka, Kans. A.B., University of Kansas, 1913, and A.M., 1914. 

Elizabeth Beatrice Daw, Fellow in English. 

Spottswood, N. J. A.B., Vassar College, 1909, and A.M., University of Pennsylvania, 
1910. Reader in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-14. 

Alice Philena Felicia Hubbard Fellow in Romance Languages. 

Austin, Tex. B.S., University of Texas, 1900, and A.M., 1902. University of Chicago 
Summer School, 1904, 1905. Fellow in Spanish, University of Texas, 1899-1902; Tutor 
in Spanish, University of Texas, 1902-08, and Instructor in Spanish, 1908-13; Graduate 
Student, Bryn Mawr CoUege, 1913-14. 

Louise Pettibone Smith Fellow in Semitic Languages. 

Winchester Centre, Conn. A B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908. Instructor in Hardin College, 
Mexico, Mo., 1908-11. Graduate Scholar in Semitic Languages, Bryn Mawr CoUege, 
1911-12. Fellow in Semitic Languages, 1912-13; Thayer FeUow and Student, Ameri- 
can School of Oriental Studies, Jerusalem, 1913-14. 

Lily Frances Trevvett, Fellow in History. 

Glen Allen, Va. A.B., Richmond CoUege, 1909; A.M., Johns Hopkins University, 1913. 
Teacher of Mathematics, High School, Barton Heights, Va., 1909-11; Graduate Student, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1911-13; Teacher of History and Mathematics, Lee-Maury 
High School, Bowling Green, Va., 1913-14. 

(81) 



82 

Marjoeie Lorne Franklin, Fellow in Economics. 

New York City. A.B., Barnard College, 1913. Graduate Scholar in Economics, Bryn 
Mawr CoUege, 1913-14. 

Helen Huss Paekhtjest, Fellow in Philoso-phy. 

Englewood. N. J. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1911, and A.M., 1913. Teacher in the Dwight 
School, Englewood, 1911-12. Graduate Scholar in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 
1912-13; President's European Fellow and Student, University of Cambridge, 1913-14. 

Marion Almira Bills, Fellow in Psychology. 

AUegan, Mich. A.B., University of Michigan, 1908. Teacher in the Public School, 
Allegan, 1909-11; Graduate Scholar in Psychology, Bryn Mawr CoUege, 1911-13, and 
Fellow in Psychology, 1913-14. 

Fern Helen Rusk, Fellow in Archaeology. 

Columbia, Mo. A.B., University of Missouri, 1913; Graduate Student, University of 
Missouri, 1913-14. 

Mary Gertrude Haseman, Fellow in Mathematics. 

Linton, Ind. A.B., University of Indiana, 1910. Professor of Mathematics in Vincennes 
University, 1910-11; Graduate Scholar in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1911-13, 
and Fellow in Mathematics, 1913-14. 

Marguerite Willcox, Felloio in Chemistry. 

Oxford, N. Y. A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1913, Graduate Scholar in Chemistry, Bryn 
Mawr CoUege, 1913-14. 

Martha Deete Rolfe Fellow in Geology. 

Champaign, lU. B.S., University of Illinois, 1900, and A.M., 1904. Instructor in Science 
in Illinois Woman's CoUege, 1905-10, and Professor of Physiography, 1908-10; Grad- 
uate Student, University of Illinois, 1913-14. 

Grace Medes, Fellow in Biology. 

Kansas City, Mo. A.B., Kansas State University, 1904, and A.M., 1913. FeUow in 
Biology, Bryn Mawr CoUege, 1913-14. 

Eugenie Beermann, German Graduate Scholar. 

Munster in Westfalen, Germany. Student, University of Munich, Summer Semester, 1913! 
University of Marburg, 1913-14. 

Yvonne Tertois, French Graduate Scholar. 

Paris France. Student in the Lyc6e Victor Hugo, 1901-07, and in the Lyc6e F6nelon, 
Paris, 1907-11. Certificat d' aptitudes k I'enseignement des sciences, 1902. Professor 
of Science in the CoUege of Armentieres, 1913-14, on leave of absence, 1914-1.5. 

Mart Elizabeth Barnicle, Graduate Scholar in English. 

Providence, R. I. A.B., Brown University, 1913. Teacher in Evening School, Provi- 
dence, 1910-11; Graduate Scholar in EngUsh, Bryn Mawr CoUege, 1913-14. 

Marguerite Gold Bartlett, Graduate Scholar in History. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr CoUege, 1913. Head of Department of EngUsh, Dar- 
lington-Seminary, West Chester, Pa., 1913-14. 

Ruth Elizabeth Bauer, Graduate Scholar in English. 

Topeka, Kans. A.B., Washburn CoUege, 1913. Assistant in EngUsh and Graduate 
Student, Washburn CoUege, 1913-14. 

Rose Brandon, Graduate Scholar in Geology. 

Butler, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr CoUege, 1914. 

Dorothy Miles Brown, 

Susan B. Anthony Memorial Scholar in Political Theory 
and Graduate Scholar in Economics. 

East Lansing, Mich. A.B., University of Michigan, 1911, and A.M., 1914. Teacher of 
English in the High School, Portland, Mich., 1911-12, and in the High School, Sault Ste. 
Marie, Mich., 1912-13; Graduate Student, University of Michigan, 1913-14. 

Vera Lee Brown, .... Graduate Scholar and Fellow by Courtesy in History. 

New Brunswick, Canada. B.A., McGiU University, 1912, and M.A., 1913. Graduate 
Scholar in History, Bryn Mawr College, 1913-14. 



83 

Alice Hill Byrne, Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

Lancaster, Pa. A.B., Wellesley College, 1908. Teacher of Latin and Greek in the Union 
High School, Coleraine. Pa., 1894-96, and Principal. 1899-1900; in Mrs. Blackwood's 
School, Lancaster, 1896-99, and 1900-01; Associate Principal and Teacher of Latin and 
Greek in Miss Stahr's School, Lancaster, 1901-05; Principal of the Sliippcn School, Lan- 
caster, 1905-09; Teacher of Latin and Greek in Miss Hills's School, Philadelphia, 1909- 
11; Graduate Student Bryn Mawr College, 1908-10, 1911-14, and Graduate Scholar in 
Greek, 1910-11; Teacher of Latin and Greek in the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, 1911-12, 
1913-14, and in charge of the Lower School, 1912-13. 

Gertktjde Hildreth Campbell, 

Graduate Scholar and Fellow by Courtesy in English. 

Providence, R.I. A.B., Brown University, 1911, and A.M., 1912. Tutor in English, 
Brown University, 1912; Graduate Scholar in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13, and 
FeUow in English, 1913-14. 

Elsie Deems, Graduate Scholar in Italian and Comparative Literature. 

Pocantico Hills, N. Y. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1910. Teacher and Vice-Principal in 
the Union Free School, Pocantico HiUs, N. Y., 1911-13; Teacher of English in the 
Brearley School, New York City, 1913-14. 

Charlotte D'Evelyn, Graduate Scholar in English. 

San Francisco, Cal. B.L., Mills College, 1911; University of California, Summer, 1912. 
Teacher in the Public Schools, Bloomington, Idaho, Jan.-Jun., 1912, and in Sanger, 
Cal., 1912-13; Graduate Scholar in EngUsh, Bryn Mawr College, 1913-14. 

Helen Mary Donnelly, Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

St. Louis, Mo. A.B. Washington University, 1914. 

Caroline Austin Duror, Graduate Scholar in Geology. 

New York City. B.S., Barnard CoUege, 1914. 

Helen Clare East, Guilford College Scholar. 

Eastport, N. Y. A.B., Guilford College, 1914. 

Sarah Newton Hallett, Graduate Scholar in History. 

Providence, R. I. A.B., Brown University, 1901. Graduate Student, Brown University, 
1905-06; 1909-10. 

Mary Alice Hanna, Graduate Scholar and Fellow hy Courtesy in History. 

Trenton, Mo. A.B., University of Missouri, 1909, and B.S., 1911. Teacher in the High 
School, Vandaha, Mo., 1909-11; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1911-12, and 
FeUow in History, 1912-13; Mary E. Garrett European Fellow and Research Student 
in the British Museum, 1913-14. 

Virginia Hardin, Graduate Scholar in Psychology. 

Denver, Colo. A.B., University of Colorado, 1914. 

Florence May Harper, Graduate Scholar in Romance Languages. 

Seattle, Wash. B.L. MiUs CoUege, 1913. 

Dorothy Palmer Hull, Graduate Scholar in Greek. 

Providence, R. I. A.B., Brown University, 1914. 

Elizabeth Henrietta Johnston Graduate Scholar in Chemistry. 

Carlisle, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr, College 1912. Teacher of Mathematics and Chemistry in 
Penn Hall, Chambersburg, Pa., 1912-14. 

Jeannette Ivearney, Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

Racine, Wis. A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1914. 

Bertha McCracken, Penn College Scholar. 

Holquin, Cuba. B.S., Penn CoUege, 1914. Teacher of Domestic Science in the Penn 
CoUege Summer School, 1914. 

Jessie Elizabeth Minor, Graduate Scholar in Chemistry. 

Springfield, Mo. B.S. Drury CoUege, 1904. Graduate Student University of Chicago, 
Summer 1906, 1907, and University of Pennsylvania, 1908-10. Substitute Professor 
of Chemistry, Drury CoUege, 1906-08; Professor of Chemistry, Huguenot CoUege, 
WeUington, S. Africa, 1911-14. 



84 

Gladys Opal Parks, Earlham College Scholar. 

Eaton, O. A. B., Earlham College, 1914. 

Ruth Perkins, Graduate Scholar in Gertnan. 

Abington, Mass. A.B., Wellesley College, 1912; A.M., RadcMe College, 1913. Assistant 
in German and Latin in the High School, Belchertown, Mass, 1913-14. 

Jessie Ltjnt Preble, Graduate Scholar in Philosophy. 

Berkeley, Cal. A.B., University of California, 1913. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 
College. 1913-14. 

Eleanor Ferguson Rambo, Graduate Scholar in Archceology. 

Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1908, A.M., 1909. Scholar in Greek, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1908-09; Graduate Student in Latin, 1909-10, and in Archaeology, 
1911-12; Teacher of Mathematics in the Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, 1909-10; 
Private Tutor, 1910-11; Teacher of Latin in Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, and 
Private Tutor, 1911-13. 

Josephine Dunlap Sutton, Graduate Scholar in English. 

New London, Conn. A.B. and B.S., University of Missouri, 1913. Teacher of English, 
Ancient History, and Geography in the Free Academy, Norwich, Conn., 1913-14. 

Grace Medes, Graduate Wood's Hole Biological Station Scholar. 

Kansas City, Mo. A.B., Kansas State University, 1904, and A.M., 1913. Fellow in 
Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1913-14. 

Mary Edith Pinney, . . . Graduate Wood's Hole Biological Station Scholar. 

Wilson, Kans. A.B., Kansas State University, 1908, and A.M., 1910. Teacher in High 
School, Alma, Kans., 1908-09, Teaching Fellow in Zoology, Kansas State University, 
1909-10; Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1910-11; President's European Fellow 
and Student, Universities of Bonn and Heidelberg and Zoological Station, Naples, 1911- 
12; Instructor in Zoology, Kansas State University, 1912-13; Demonstrator in Biology, 
and Fellow by Courtesy in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1913-14. 

Anna Wilkins Roberts, Foundation Scholar. 

Moorestown, N. J. Prepared by the Friends' Academy, Moorestown, and by the West- 
town Boarding School, Westtown, Pa. Foundation Scholar, 1911-14. 

Ryu Sato, ■ Foundation Scholar. 

Tokyo, Japan. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Foundation 
Scholar, 1913-14. 

Katharine Truman Sharpless, Foundation Scholar. 

Haverford, Pa. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by the 
Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa. 

Laura Hildreth Pearson,. . .New England States Matriculation Scholar. 

Lowell, Mass. Prepared by the High School, Lowell and by the Rogers HaU School, 
Lowell. 

Virginia Kneeland, 

New York, New Jersey and Delaware Matriculation Scholar 

New York City. Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City. 

Theresa Mathilde Born, Western States Matriculation Scholar. 

Indianapolis, Ind. Prepared by Tudor Hall, Indianapolis. 

Frances Cooper Richmond, 

Pennsylvania and Southern States Matriculation Scholar. 

Schenectady, N. Y. Prepared by the Academy for Girls, Albany, N. Y., and by St. 
Timothy's School, Catonsville, Md. 

Rachel Ash, Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1911-12; 
Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar, 1912-14. 

Gladys Mary Baknett. Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 



85 

Doris Marie Bird Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1912-14. 

Eva Alice Worrall Bryne, 

Trustees' P hiladelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1913-14. 

Gladys Hagy Cassel. .Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Rebecca Elizabeth Joachim, 

Trustees ' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1911-14. 

Marie Ottilie Keller, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1912-14. 

Marion Clemen1:ine Kleps, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1912-14. 

Frances Macdonald, Trustees' Lower Merion High School Scholar. 

Ardmore, Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore. Trustees' Lower 
Merion High School Scholar, 1911-14. 

Eva Alice Worrall Bryne, James E. Rhoads Junior Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1912-14. 

Thalia^Howard Smith, James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholar. 

New York City. Prepared by the Hawthorne School, New York City. First New York, 
New Jersey and Delaware Matriculation Scholar, 1912-13. 

Ryu Sato, Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar. 

Tokyo, Japan. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Foundation 
Scholar and First Pennsylvania and Southern States Matriculation Scholar, 1913-14. 

Constance Sidney Hall, Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Bryn Mawr School 
Scholar, 1912-13. 

Zena Jennie Blanc, Additional Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Charles E. Elhs 
Scholar, 1911-12; additional James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholar and Special Scholar, 
1912-13; Mary E. Stevens Junior Scholar and Special Scholar, 1913-14. 

Mary Monroe Harlan, . . .Additional Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar^ 

Bel Air, Md. Prepared by the High School, Bel Air, and by the Bryn. Mawr School, 
Baltimore, Md. Special Scholar, 1912-13. 

Agnes Pickett Smith, Mary E. Stevens Junior Scholar. 

Winchester, Va. Prepared by Stuart HaU, Staunton, Va., and by private tuition. 

Marguerite Daisy Darkow, 

Maria L. Eastman Brooke Hall Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. First Bryn Mawr 
Matriculation Scholar for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1911-12, and Simon 
Muhr Scholar, 1911-14; James E. Rhoads Junior Scholar, 1913-14. 

Helen Burwell Chapin, Anna M. Powers Memorial Scholar. 

St. David's, Pa. Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Amelia Kellogg MacMaster, . . . Thomas H. Powers Memorial Scholar. 
Elizabeth, N. J. Prepared by the Battin High School, Elizabeth, and by private tuitiop, 
■ l^inaergarten Teacher, Newark, N. J., 1905-U, 1913-13, 



86 

Esther Johnson, L. C. B. Saul Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. L. C. B. Saul Memorial 
Scholar. 1913-14. 

Mary Brooks Goodhue, 

Elizabeth Duane Gillespie Scholar in American History. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa., and by the 
Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mary Sylvester Cline, . . Minnie Murdoch Kendrick Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Minnie Murdoch 
Kendrick Memorial Scholar, 1913-14. 

Louise Tunstall Smith, Bryn Mawr School Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. - 

Marguerite Daisy Darkow Simon Muhr Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. First Bryn Mawr 
Matriculation Scholar for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1911-12. Simon 
Muhr Scholar, 1911-14; James E. Rhoads Junior Scholar, 1913-14. 

Cleora Sutch, Charles E. Ellis Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Charles E. Ellis Scholar, 
1911-14. 

Jeannette Reefer Greenewald, Charles E. Ellis Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the .Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Charles E. EUis Scholar, 
1912-14. 

Marian Clementine Kleps, Anna Hallowell Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1912-14. 

Eleanor Marcella Clinton, . Frances Marion Simpson Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Second Matriculation 
Scholar for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1912-13, City Scholar, 1912-14 and 
Frances Marion Simpson Memorial Scholar, 1912-14. 

Helen Marie Harris, Frances Marion Simpson Memorial Scholar. 

Brjm Mawr, Pa. Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr. Special Frances Marion 
Simpson Memorial Scholar, 1913-14. 

Dorothy Macdonald, Frances Marion Simpson Mernorial Scholar. 

Ardmore, Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore. Frances Marion 
Simpson Memorial Scholar, 1913-14. 

Mary Cecilia Miller, Frances Marion Simpson Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Ella Mary Rosenberg, Mary Anna Longstreth Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Eleanor Maecella Clinton, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Portland Academy, Portland, Ore., and by the Girls' 
High School, Philadelphia. Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholar for Pennsyl- 
vania and Southern States, 1912-13; Frances Marion Simpson Memorial Scholar and 
City Scholar, 1912-14. 

Anna Caroline Lee, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1912-14. 

Dora Clara Levinson, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1911-14. 

Mary Arleville Lobdell, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1911-14. 

Margaret Louise Loudon, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepare^ by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1912-14. 



87 

Anna Ethel Lub ar, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Ella Mary Rosenberg, City Scholar. 

prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Elsie Steltzer City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1911-14. 
Addie Cleora DeVenish, Special Scholar- 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Hannah More Academy, Reisteretown, Md., by the Girls' 
High School, Philadelphia, and by private tuition. 

Mary Mitchell Chamberlain, . . Wood's Hole Biological Station Scholar. 

West Raleigh, N. C. Prepared by St. Mary's School, West Raleigh. 

Winifred Goodall, George W. Childs Prize Essayist, 

Cincinnati, O. Prepared by the Bartholomew Clifton School, Cincinnati, by the Misses 
Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by the College Preparatory School, Cincinnati. 

Amy Gordon Hamilton, 

Honorably mentioned for George W. Childs Essay Prize. 
Tenafly, N. J. Prepared by the Dwight School, Englewood, N. J. 

Helen Hastings Shaw, 

Honorably mentioned for George W. Childs Essay Prize. 

Brookline, Mass, Prepared by Miss May's School, Boston, Mass. 

Laura Delano, Mary Helen Ritchie Memorial Prize, 

Chicago, 111. Prepared by the Francis W. Parker School, Chicago, and by Miss Wright's 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 



III. 

Degrees Conferred during the Academic Year 1913-14- 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. 

7 
Louise Duffield Ctjmmings of Canada. 

A.B., University of Toronto, 1895, and A.M., 1902. Fellow, University of Pennsylvania, 
1896-97; Examiner in Mathematics, University of Toronto, 1897; Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago, 1897-98; Fellow in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99, 
and Fellow by Courtesy, 1900; Instructor in Mathematics, St. Margaret's CoUege, 
Toronto, Ont., 1901-02; Graduate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, First Semester, 1905-06, 
Second Semester, 1912-13; Instructor in Mathematics, Vassar College, 1902-14. Dis- 
sertation: On a Method of Comparison for Triple Systems. Subjects: Mathematics, 
Applied Mathematics, and Physics. 

Angela Charlotte Darkow of Philadelphia. 

Holder of First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for Pennsylvania and the Southern 
States, 1907-08, and of Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholarship, 1907-11; 
Holder of the Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholarship, 1908-09. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 
1911, group, Greek and Latin, and A.M., 1912. Graduate Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr 
CoUege, 1911-12, and Fellow in Greek, 1912-14. Dissertation: The Spurious Speeches. . 
in the Lysianio Corpus. Subjects: Greek and Sanskrit. 

Eleanor Shipley Duckett of England. 

B.A., University of London, 1902, and M.A., 1904. Girton College, University of Cam- 
bridge, England, 1908-11; Classical Tripos, Part I, 1911. Classical Mistress in the 
High School, Sutton, Surrey, 1905-07; British Graduate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 
1911-13; Fellow in Latin, 1912-13, and Special British Graduate Scholar, 1913-14. 
Dissertation: Studies in Ennius. Subjects: Latin and Greek. 

Vernette Lois Gibbons of Massachusetts. 

Sc.B., Mt. Holyoke CoUege, 1896, and A.B., 1899; M.Sc, University of Chicago, 1907; 
M.Sc, University of the Cape of Good Hope, 1908. Teacher in the High School, Bernards- 
town, Mass., 1896-97; Assistant in Chemistry, Mt. Holyoke CoUege, 1897-99, and 
Instructor in Chemistry, 1899-1901; Instructor in Chemistry and Mineralogy, Wells Col- 
lege, 1902-04, and Associate Professor of Chemistry, 1905-06; Lecturer and Head of 
Department of Chemistry, Huguenot College, Wellington, South Africa, 1907-11, and 
on leave of absence, 1911-13; Fellow in Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 19li-12; 
President's European Fellow and Student, University of Munich, 1912-13; Fellow by 
Courtesy in Chemistry, 1913-14. Dissertation: The Potentials of Silver in Non-Aqueous 
Solutions of Silver Nitrate. Subjects: Inorganic and Phvsical Chemistry, Organic 
Chemistry, and Physiology. 

Angie Lillian Kellogg of New York. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1903, and A.M., 1904. Teacher in the High School, Schenectady, 
N. Y., 1904-10, and in the High School, Hasbrouck Heights, N. J., March to June, 1911; 
Fellow in PhUosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 1911-13; Lydia Pratt Babbott Fellow of 
Vassar College, Graduate Scholar and Fellow by Courtesy in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1913-14. Dissertation: The Theory of Punishment. Subjects: PhUosophy, 
Psychology, and Education. 

Adah Blanche Roe of Omaha, Nebraska. 

A.B., Woman's College of Baltimore, 1909, Scholar in German, Bryn Mawr College. 
1909-11; Ottendorfer Memorial Research FeUow, 1911-12, 1913-14, and Student 
University of Berlin, 1911-12, University of Leipsic, 1913-14; FeUow in German, 
Bryn Mawr CoUege, 1912-13. Dissertation: Anna Owena Hoyers. A Poetess of the 
Seventeenth Century. Subjects: German Literature, Teutonic Philology, and Old 
Norse. 

Edna Aston Shearer of Pennsylvania. 

Holder of City Scholarship, 1900-04; Holder of Maria Hopper Scholarship, 1901-02, of the 
James E. Rhoads Junior Scholarship, 1902-03, and of the Anna Powers Memorial 
Scholarship, 1903-04. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904, group, English and Philosophy. 
Junior FeUow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 1904^5; Holder of the President's 
Fellowship, and Student, Universities of Edinburgh and Aberdeen, 1905-06; Fellow in 
PhUosophy, Bryn Mawr CoUege, 1906-07; Teacher of EngUsh in the Baldwin School, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1907-10, and Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr CoUege, 1907-08; Reader 
in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1910-14. Dissertation: Hume's Place in Ethics, 
Subjects: Ethics, History of PhUosophy, and Psychology. 

(88) 



89 



MASTER OF AllTS. 



Clarissa Beatrice Brockstedt of Missouri. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1913. Graduate Scholar in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 
1913-14. 

Marion Delia Crane of Rhode Island. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1911. Secretary in the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md., 
1911-12; Reader in English and Secretary to the Dean of the College, and Graduate 
Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13; Assistant in English and Graduate Scholar in 
Philosophy, 191.3-14. 

Mary Agnes Gleim of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B.,BrynMawrCollege,1897. Teacher in the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1892-97; 
Teacher and Associate Principal in the Gordon School, Philadelphia, 1897-1902; Princi- 
pal of Miss Gleim's School, Pittsburgh, 1902-09, and of the Thurston-Gleim School. 
Pittsburgh, 1909-12; Graduate Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13, and 
Graduate Student, 1913-14. 

Cynthia Maria Wesson of Boston, Mass. 

A.B., Brjrn Mawr College, 1909. Student in Dr. Sargent's School for Physical Education, 
Cambridge, Mass., 1910-13; Graduate Scholar in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1913-14. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS. 
78 

Amy Gordon Hamilton of Tenafly, N. J. 

Prepared by the Dwight School, Englewood, N. J. Group, Greek and English. The work 
for this degree was completed in February, 1914. 

Olga Elizabeth Bredow Kelly of Baltimore, Md. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Group, Greek and English. The work 
for this degree was completed in February, 1914. 

Beatrice Cornelia Nathans of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by Miss Keyser's School, Philadelphia, by Miss Gordon's School, Philadelphia, . 
and by private tuition. Group, English and Comparative Literature. The work for 
this degree was completed in February, 1914. 

Eleanor Bradford Allen of Bonita, Cal. 

Prepared by the High School, National City, Cal., and by the Bishop's School, San Diego, 
Cal. Group, Chemistry and Biology. 

Martha Montgomery Arthurs of Baltimore, Md. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Group, Chemistry and Biology. 

Elizabeth Ayer of Boston,^ Mass. 

Prepared by the Winsor School, Boston, Mass., and by Miss Porter's School, Farmington, 
Conn. Group, Modern History and Economics and PoUtics. 

Janet B,\ird of Sharon Hill, Pa. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High 
School Scholar, 1910-14, James E. Rhoads Junior Scholar, 1912-13. Anna M. Powers 
Scholar, 1913-14. Group, English and Comparative Literature. 

Mildred Baird of Sharon Hill, Pa. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. First Bvya Mawr Matriculation Scholar 
for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1910-11, and City Scholar, 1910-14; Elizabeth 
Duane Gillespie Scholar, 1913-14. Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Eugenia Griffin Baker of New York City. 

Prepared by Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. Group, English and Philosophy. 

Elizabeth Grecian Balderston of Baltimore, Md. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Bryn Mawr School Scholar, 1910-13. 
Qroup, English and Comparative Literature. ' ' 



90 

Elizabeth Ford Baldwin of New York City. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md. Group, French and Modern History. 

Jean Muriel Batchelor of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Group, English and Philosophy. 

■Dorothea Bechtel of Carpenter, Del. 

Prepared by the Friends' School, Wilmington, Del. Group, English and French. 

Isabel Hopkins Benedict of New York City. 

Prepared by the Misses Rayson's School, New York City. Group, Modern History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Mary Isabel Bering of Decatur, 111. 

Prepared by the High School, Decatur, and by the Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Group, Economics and Politics and Philosophj'. 

Rbna Catherine Besler of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Prepared by the Stuart Mitchell School, Pittsburgh, and by the Winchester School, Pitts- 
biu'gh. Group, Philosophy and Physics. 

Margaret Terry Blanchard of New York City. 

Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City. Group, Economics and Politics and 
Philosophy. 

Wynanda Koechlin Boaedman of Troy, N. Y. 

Prepared by Miss Knox's School, Briarcliff Manor, N. Y., and by Rosemary Hall, Green- 
wich, Conn. Group, French and History of Art. 

Jessie Boyd of New York City, 

Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City. Group, Modern History and Economics 
and Politics. 

Elizabeth Braley of Concord, Mass. 

Prepared by the High School, Concord. Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar, 1911-12. 
Group, Latin and French. 

Rose Brandon of Butler, Pa. 

Prepared by the High School, Butler, and by private tuition. Group, Modern History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Christine Brown of Springfield, lU. 

Prepared by Stuart School, Springfield, by the Monticello School, Alton, 111., by Rosemary 
Hall, Greenwich, Conn., and by private tuition. Group, Modern History and Economics 
and Politics. 

Elizabeth Sohier Bryant of Cohasset, Mass. 

Prepared by the Winsor School, Boston, Mass. Group, Modern History and Economics and 
Politics. 

Leah Tapper Cadbury of Haverford, Pa. 

Prepared by the Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa. Foundation Scholar, 1910-14. 
Group, Latin and French. 

Marion Merrill Camp, of Milwaukee, Wis. 

Prepared by Milwaukee-Downer College Seminary and by Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, 
Conn. Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Frank Marcella Capel of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Prepared by the Misses Mitchell's School, Pittsburgh, and by the Misses Shipley's School, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Helen Eraser Carey of New York City. 

Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City, and by Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. 
Group, French and Italian and Spanish. 

Marjorie Childs of Norristown, Pa. 

Prepared by the High School, Norristown, and by the Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, 
Pa. Group, Mathematics and Physics. 



91 
Elizabeth Fitzhugh Colt of Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Prepared by the Dearborn-Morgan School, Orange, N. J., and by Dana Hall, Wellesley, 
Mass. Group, French and Spanish. 

Mary Lowell Coolidge, 2nd, of Boston, Mass. 

Prepared by Miss White's School, Concord, and by the Winsor School, Boston, Mass. 
Group, English and Philosophy. 

LiLLiEN Adele Cox of Milburn, N. J. 

Prepared by the Dearborn-Morgan School, Orange, N. J., and by Dana Hall, Wellesley, 
Mass. Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Catherine Creighton of Evanston, 111. 

Prepared by Miss Kelly's School, Scituate, Mass. Group, Modern History and Economics 
and Politics. 

Jean Scobie Davis of Princeton, N. J. 

Prepared by Deutsche Landerziehungsheim, Sieversdorf, Germany, and by the Princeton 
School, Princeton. First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholar for New York, New Jersey, 
and Delaware, 1910-11. Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Laura Delano of Chicago, 111. 

Prepared by the Francis W. Parker School, Chicago, and by Miss Wright's School, Bryn 
Mawr, Pa. Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Katharine Dodd of Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Prepared by Miss Haskell and Miss Dean's School, Boston, Mass. First Bryn Mawr 
Matriculation Scholar for the New England States, 1910-11; Brooke Hall Memorial 
Scholar, 1913-14. Group, Chemistry and Biology. 

Ethel Collins Dunham of Hartford, Conn. 

Prepared by Miss Porter's School, Farmington, Conn. Group, Chemistry and Biology. 

Marion Annette Evans of Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

Prepared by the Wilkes Barre Institute. Group, French and History of Art. 

Madeleine Wolf Fleisher of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, Physics and Philosophy. 

Sophie Katharine Forster of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Special Scholar, 1910-14. Group, 
German and Modern History. 

Eleanore Edwards Gale of Washington, D. C. 

Prepared by the National Cathedral School, Washington, and by the Misses Kirk's 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Winifred Goodall of Cincinnati, O. 

Prepared by the Bartholomew-CUfton School, Cincinnati, by the Misses Shipley's School, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by the College Preparatory School, Cincinnati. Group, English 
and Comparative Literature. 

Mildred Haenssler of St. Charles, Mo. 

Prepared by the High School, St. Charles. James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholar, 1911-12; 
Anna HaUowell Memorial Scholar, 1912-13. Group, Modern History and Economics 
and Politics. 

Mary Troth Haines of Moorestown, N. J. 

Prepared by the Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa., and by the Friends' Select 
School, Philadelphia. Group, English and German. 

Martha Barbour Hobson of Chicago, 111. 

Prepared by the University School for Girls, Chicago. First Bryn Mawr Matriculation 
Scholar for the Western States, 1910-11. Group, Latin and English. 

Mary Dorothy Hughes of Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Prepared by the High School, Wilkinsburg, and by private tuition. Group, Latin and 
French. ' -■ ^ ■ 



92 

Katharine Huntington of Princeton, N. J. 

Prepared by the Princeton School. Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholar for New 
York, New Jersey, and Delaware, 1910-11. Group, Modern History and Economics and 
Politics. 

Floeence Catherine Irish of Norristown, Pa. 

Prepared by Miss Roney's School, Bala, Pa. Group, Modern History and Economics and 
Politics. 

Eugenia Louise Jackson of Wilmington, Del. 

Prepared by the Misses Hebb's School, Wilmington. Group, Modern History and Econom- 
ics and Politics. 

Helen Reed Kirk of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Combined School, German town, Philadelphia, and by the Girls' High 
School, PhQadelphia. Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar, 1911-12; Special Scholar, 
1913-14. Group, Latin and Ancient History. 

Helen Lee of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by Milwaukee-Downer College. Group, Latin and French. 

Frances Elizabeth Livingston of Lawrence, Long Island, N. Y. 

Prepared by St. Mary's Hall, BurUngton, N. J., and by Miss Mary Jeffers and Miss Florence 
Peebles, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Elizabeth Evans Lord, of Plymouth, Mass. 

Prepared by Miss Wheeler's School, Providence, R. I. Group, Economics and Politics 
and Philosophy. 

Margaret MacElree of West Chester, Pa. 

Prepared by the High School, West Chester, and by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Group, Latin and Mathematics. 

Alice Chapman Miller, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Prepared by Milwaukee-Downer College and by Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn. Group, 
Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Josephine Niles of Baltimore, Md. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Group, Modern History and Economics 
and Politics. 

Ella Oppenheimer of Washington, D. C. 

Prepared by the Central High School, Washington, and by private tuition. Group, Physics 
and Chemistry. 

Clar.\ Penniman Pond of State College, Pa. 

Pennsylvania State College, 1907-09. Travelling in Europe, 1912-13. Group, Chemistry 
and Biology. 

Helen Louise Knickerb acker Porter of Montclair, N. J. 

Prepared by the Kimberley School, Montclair. Group, Italian and Spanish and History 
of Art. 

Ida Williams Pritchett of New York City. 

Prepared by Miss Lowe's School, Stamford, Conn., and by the Brearley School, New York 
City. Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Dorothea Robins of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, and by private tuition. Group, Latin and French. 

Clegs Lepha Rockwell of Kenilworth, 111. 

Prepared by the High School, West Chester, Pa., and by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, 
Pa. Group, French and Modern History. 

Margaret Sears of Framingham, Mass. 

Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, Modern History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Katharine Sergeant of Brookline, Mass. 

Prepared by the Winsor School, Boston, Mass. Group, English and Philosophy. 



93 

Evelyn Wells Shaw of Lake Forest, 111 . 

Prepared by the University School for Girls, ChicSgo. Group, Modern History and 
History of Art. 

Helen Hastings Shaw of Brookline, Mass. 

Prepared by Miss May's School, Boston, Mass. Group, English and Comparative Litera- 
ture. 

Katharine Binney Shippen of Hoboken, N. J. 

Prepared by the Hoboken Academy. Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Dorothy Wentworth Skerrett of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Second Matriculation Scholar for 
Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1910-11; City Scholar, 1910-14; Maria Hopper 
Sophomore Scholar, 1911-12; Mary E. Stevens Junior Scholar, 1912-13. Group, 
Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Mary Christine Smith of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia. Group, French and Modern History. 

Marjorie Wright Southard of New Brighton, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Prepared by the St. Agnes School, Albany, N. Y. Group, Modern History and Economics 
and Politics. 

Julia Buchanan Tappan of Baltimore, Md. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Group, Modern History and Economics 
and Politics. 

Lucille Thompson of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Holder of the George W. Fetter Memo- 
rial Scholarship, 1910-14. Group, Latin and German. 

Ruth Coons Wallerstein of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Stevens School, Germantown, Philadelphia. Group, Greek and Latin. 

Miriam Elsie Ward of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High 
School Scholar, 1910-14. Group, Chemistry and Geology. 

Mary Edwina Warren of Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Prepared by the Misses May's School, Boston, Mass. Group, Modern History and Eco- 
nomics and Politics. 

Catherine Lillie Westling of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Special Scholar, 1913-14. Group, 
English and German. 

Dorothy Vivian Weston of Weston's Mills, N. Y. 

Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, Modern History and Economics 
and Politics. 

Anne Lindsay White of Evanston, 111. 

Prepared by the Township High School, Evanston. Northwestern University, 1909-10. 
Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Margaret Sanderson Williams of Baltimore, Md. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Group, Modern History and Economics 
and Politics. 



IV. 



College Preachers for the Year 1913-14- 

October 5th. Professor George A. Barton, Ph.D., of Bryn Mawr 

College. 

October 12th, The Rev. Father Hutchinson, D.D., Rector of St. 
Clement's Church, Philadelphia. 

October 19th. The Rev. Robert Johnston, D.D,, Rector of the 

Church of the Saviour, Philadelphia. 

October 26th. The Rev. George A. Johnston Ross, M.A,, Professor 
of Practical Theology in Union Theological Seminary, 
New York City. 

November 2nd. Mr. Dan Crawford of England, Missionary from 
Africa. 

November 9th. The Rev. Francis Lindey Patton, D.D., President of 
Princeton Theological Seminary, formerly President 
of Princeton University. 

November 16th. President Charles A. Richmond, D.D., President of 
Union College, Schenectady, New York. 

November 23rd. Mr. Robert Elliott Speer, Secretary of the Presby- 
terian Board of Foreign Missions. 

December 7th. Professor Julius August Bewer, Ph.D., Associate 
Professor of Biblical Philology in Union Theological 
Seminary, New York City. 

December 14th. The Rev. Kerr Botce Tupper, D.D., former Pastor 
of the First Baptist Church, Philadelphia. 

December 21st. The Rev. Henry Lubeck, LL.D., D.C.L., Rector of the 
Chiarch of Zion and St. Timothy, New York City. 

January 11th. The Rev. Father Huntington, of the House of the 
Holy Cross, West Park, New York. 

January 18th. The Rev. John Macdonald, Pastor of the Park 
Presbyterian Church, Newark, New Jersey. 

January 25th. The Rev. Charles Morris Addison, Rector of St. 
John's Church, Stamford, Connecticut. 

February 8th. The Rev. Frank L. Janeway, D.D., of the Brick 
Presbyterian Church, New York City. 

(94) 



95 



February 15th. The Rt. Rev. Arthur .Selden Lloyd, D.D., of the 
Church Mission House, 251 Fourth Avenue, New 
York City. 

February 22nd. The Rev. John Timothy Stone, D.D., Moderator of 
the Presbyterian General Assembly, Chicago, Illinois. 

March 1st. Professor Edward Alfred Steiner, B.D., Professor 

of Applied Christianity in Grinnell College, Grinnell, 
Iowa. 

March 8th. The Rev. Charles R. Erdman, D.D., Professor of 

Practical Theology in Princeton Theological Seminary. 

March 15th. The Rev. William Pierson Merrill, D.D., Pastor 

of the Brick Presbyterian Church, New York City. 

March 22nd. The Rt. Rev. Philip M. Rhinelander, D.D., Bishop 

of Pennsylvania. 

March 29th. The Rev. Chakles Wood, D.D., Pastor of the Church 

of the Convenant, Washington, D. C. 

April 5th. The Rev. Hugh Black, D.D., Jesup Professor of 

Practical Theology in Union Theological Seminary, 
New York City. 

April 19th. The Rev. C. Silvester Horne, M.A., Minister of the 

Whitefields Congregational Church, Tottenham 
Com-t Road, London. 

April 26th. The Rev. William Douglas McKenzie, D.D., LL.D., 

President of the Hartford Theological Seminary, 
Hartford, Connecticut. 

May 3rd. The Rev. William Muir Auld, Pastor of the Calvary 

Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia. 

May 10th. The Rev. Ulysses G. P. Pierce, D.D., Rector of All 

Souls' Church, Washington, D. C. 

May 17th. The Rev. John Haynes Holmes, of the Church of the 

Messiah, New York City, 

May 24th. The Rev. Edmund S. Rousmaniere, D.D., Dean of 

St. Paul's Cathedral, Boston. 

May 31st. Baccalaureate Sermon. The Rev. Albert Parker 

Fitch, D.D., President of Andover Theological 
Seminary, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 



V. 



Addresses and Entertainments given during the Year 1913-14. 



ADDRESSES. 



Commencement Address: 



Jvine 4th. President Henry Smith Pritchett, Ph.D., LL.D., 

Sc.D., President of the Carnegie Foundation for the 
Advancement of Teaching. "The Critics of the 
College." 



Founder's Lecture: 



May 13th. 



Professor Francis Greenwood Peabody,D.D.,LL.D., 
formerly Dean of the Divinity School of Harvard 
University. "Mysticism and Modern Life." 



College Lectures: 
October 1st. 
October 17th. 



November 15th. 



April 17th. 



President M. Carey Thomas. Opening Address. 

Mr. Bernard Noel Langdon-Davies of England, 
Lectm-er for the American Association for Inter- 
national Conciliation and the Garton Foundation of 
London. "The Great Illusion." 

Mrs. S. Arthur Strong (Eugenie Sellers), LL.D., 
Litt. D., Assistant Director of the British School of 
Ai'chseology in Rome. "Art and Empire. The 
Influence of Roman Imperialism on Later Antique 
Sculpture." 

Mrs. Jean Foulke. "Openings for Women in Scien- 
tific Agriculture." 

Mrs. Julius Smith. "The Need of Social Work in the 
Country." 

Meeting of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae at Bryn Mawr College: 

April 14th. Open Conference of Deans. Miss Elsie Seelye Pratt, 

Vice-President at Large of the Association of CoUegiate 
Alumnae; Mrs. Gertrude Shorb Martin, Adviser 
of Women, Cornell University; Miss Lid a Shaw 
King, Dean of Women, The Women's CoUege in 
Brown University; Miss Mary B. Breed, Dean of 
Margaret Carnegie College; Miss Eleanor L. Lord, 
Dean of Goucher College; Miss Ada L. Comstock, 
Dean of Smith College; Miss Cora H. CooLiDoii, 

(96) 



9? 

t)ean of the Pennsylvania College for Women ; Miss 
Ella McCaleb, Dean of Vassar CoUege; Miss Mary 
Ross Potter, Dean of Women, Northwestern Univer- 
sity; Miss Alice V. Waite, Dean of WcUesley 
College; Miss Florence Purington, Dean of Mt. 
Holyoke CoUege. Subject: Should existing under- 
graduate courses be so related to later vocational 
work that credit may be given or the period of 
apprenticeship shortened. 

Before the Christian Association: 

October 10th. Miss Ume Tstjda of Tokyo. "Women's Education in 
Japan." 

March 14th. Conference. Mr. George Wharton Pepper of 

Philadelphia. "The Religion of Humanity." 

March 15th. Conference. Mrs. E. W. K. Bradford of the Light- 

house Settlement, Philadelphia. "Manifestation of 
the Spirit of Social Service." 

Before the College Chapter of the College Equal Suffrage League: 

April 4th. Dr. Anna Howard Shaw, President of the National 

American Woman Suffrage Association. "Woman 

Suffrage: Before and After." 

Before the College Settlement Association: 

May 2nd. Mr. Rot Smith Wallace of the Philadelphia Society 

for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. "The 
Work of the Vice Cornmission in Philadelphia." 

Before the Consumer's League: 

November 8th. Professor Carl Kelset, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology 

in the University of Pennsylvania. "The Cost of 

Progress." 

Before the English Club: 

December 12th. Professor Lane Cooper, Ph.D., Associate Professor 

of English in Cornell University. "The Significance 

of the Classics." 
February 27th. Miss Edith Wyatt of Chicago, Bryn Mawr CoUege 

1892-94. "Democracy in EngUsh Prose." 

Before the Graduate Club: 

December 19th. Dr. Gregory Dexter Walcott, Professor of Philoso- 
phy in HamUne University. "The Point of View in 
Philosophy." 

January 9th. Professor William Morris Davis, formerly Sturgis 

Hooper Professor of Geology in Harvard University. 
"Theories of Coral Reefs." 



98 

February 28th. Professor Enest von DobschuTz, Exchange Professor 

from the University of Halle to Harvard University. 

"ReUgious Conditions in the Roman Empire in the 

First Century." 
March. 20th. Professor Charlotte Angas Scott of Bryn Mawr 

College. "The Nature of Mathematical Reasoning." 

Before the History Club: 

May 15th. Professor William Rayner Kelsey of Haverford 

College. ' ' The Situation in Mexico." 

Before the Philosophy Club: 

January 9th. Professor William Ernest Hocking, Ph.D., Assistant 

Professor of Philosophy at Yale University. "A 
Philosopher's Interpretation of Christianity." 

Before the Science Club: 

December 13th. Professor Ulric Dahlgren, Professor of Biology at 
Princeton University. "The Phenomena of Light 
in Deep Sea Animals." 

March 6th. Professor John Brashear. Professor of Astronomy 

and Special Lecturer of the University of Pittsburgh. 
"Modern Study of the Stars by Means of Photo- 
graphs." 

Before the Class for the Study of Social Problems: 

March 7th. Dr. Scott Nearing, Instructor in Economics in the 

University of Pennsylvania. "The Causes of the 

Present Social Unrest." 
April 18th. Professor Franklin H. Giddings, Professor of Soci' 

ology in Colmnbia University. "Social Revolutions.'- 

Vocational Conference: 

April 19th. Miss Abigail Camp Dimon. — "Secretarial Work." 

Miss Theodora Butcher. — "Bureau of Occupations." 

Miss Helen Glenn, — "Social Work." 

Miss Rose Weston. — "Journalism." 

Mrs. E. G. Kleinsorge. — "Advertising." 

Miss Lois A. Reed. — "Library Work." 

Dr. Alice Tallant. — "Medical Work," 

Before the Mission Study Class: 

November 5, 12, 19, December 3, 10. Mission Study conducted by Dr. 

Stanley White, President of the Board of Foreign 

Missions, New York City. 



99 



ENTERTAINMENTS AND ACADEMIC EVENTS. 

October 2nd. President Thomas's reception and address to the 

entering class. 
October 3rd. President Thomas's reception and address to the 

graduate students. 
October 4th. Christian Association reception to the entering class. 

October 18th. Senior reception to the entering class. 
October 24th. Faculty reception to the graduate students. 
October 25th. Bucknell Alumnae Association luncheon at the College 

Inn and visit to the College. 
October 31st. Lantern Night. 

November 7th. Debate. Subject: Resolved that a National law for 

Woman's Suffrage would make for better government 

in the United States. 
November 14th. Senior reception to the graduate students. 
November 17th. Faculty tea for graduate students. Rockefeller HaU. 
November 22nd. Banner Night. 
December 5th. Concert under the auspices of the Music Committee. 

The Rich Quartette. 
December 13th. Two one-act plays given by some members of the 

Alumnse Association for the benefit of the Students' 

Building. "Ten minutes in a Cottage" and "A 

Question of Inheritance." 
December 16th. Faculty tea for gi-aduate students, Merion Hall. 

Debate. Subject: Resolved that the United States is 

justified in not recognizing Huerta as President of 

Mexico. 
December 19th. Sophomore Dance for the entering class. 
December 20th. Hall dances. 
January 10th. Swimming meet. 
January 16th. Swimming meet. 
January 17th. Concert under the auspices of the Music Committee. 

Song recital. Mr. Horatio O. Connell. 
January 28th. Faculty tea for graduate students, Radnor Hall. 
January 31st. Meeting of the Alumnae Association. Luncheon for the 

Alumnse Association in Pembroke Hall. 
February 6th. Dramatic Monologues by Miss Ruth Draper, under the 

auspices of the Students' Building Fund Committee. 
February 13th. Concert under the auspices of the Music Committee. 

Piano Recital, by Mr. Harold Bauer. 
February 21st. Skating Carnival. 



100 



February 26th. Faculty tea for graduate students, Denbigh Hall. 
March 2nd. President Thomas at home to the graduate students. 

March 13tli. Graduate Club reception to the Senior Class. 

March 20th. Announcement of the European Fellowship awards and 

Fellowship dinners. 
Freshman reception to the Sophomore Class. 
March 23rd. President Thomas at home to the Senior Class. 

March 24th. President Thomas at home to the graduate students. 

March 27th. Faculty tea for graduate students, Radnor Hall. 

Gymnasium Contest. 
March 28th. Debate. Subject: Resolved that immigi-ation to the 

United States should be restricted. 
April 3rd. Concert under the auspices of the Music Committee. 

Violin recital: Mr. and Mrs. David Mannes. 
April 14th. Meeting of the Association of Collegiate Almnnse at 

Bryn Mawr College. Luncheon in Pembroke Hall. 

Tea in the Deanery Garden as guests of President 

Thomas. Dinner in Pembroke Hall and Denbigh 

Hall. Conference of Deans at Penygroes and supper 

as guests of Dean Reilly. 
April 24th. Junior-Senior Supper. 

Sophomore Supper. 
April 27th. Faculty tea for graduate students, Merion Hall. 

President Thomas at home to the Senior Class. 
AprU 28th. President Thomas at home to the graduate students. 

May 8th. Vacation. Dress rehearsal for the May Day Fete. 

May 9th. May Day Fete. Elizabethan May Festival. Pageant, 

dances and plays. The Campus, 2.30 p.m. — 7 p.m. 
May 22nd. Graduate Club reception to the Faculty. Rockefeller 

HaU. 
May 25th. President Thomas at home to the Senior Class. 

May 26th. Faculty Tea for graduate students. Rockefeller Hall. 

President Thomas at home iso the graduate students. 
May 30th. Senior reception to the Faculty. The gjrmnasiuna roof. 

June 1st. Senior Supper. 

June 2nd. President Thomas's luncheon for the Senior Class. 

College Bonfire. Athletic Field, 8 p.m. 
June 3rd. College breakfast, 12.30 p.m. 

Senior Garden party, 4 to 7 p.m. 

Performance of "Master Pierre PateUn," by the Plays 

and Players of Philadelphia in the Cloister of the 

Library at 8 p.m., for the benefit of the Students' 

Building Fiuid. 



101 



Deanery Garden Kghted up for Faculty and Staff, 
Seniors, and their guests, 8 to 10 p.m. 
June 4th. Conferring of degrees and close of the academic year. 

The Gymnasium, 11 a.m. 

President Thomas's limcheon for Directors and Faculty 
and Staff and invited guests. The Deanery, 1 p.m. 

Luncheon for the guests of Seniors. Radnor Hall, 1 p.m. 

Alumnse Supper. Pembroke Hall, 7 p.m. 



VI. 

Gifts Received hy the College during the Year 1913-14- 

Our sincere gratitude is due to the following donors for gifts which 
have been received dui-ing the past year, in addition to gifts of special 
books to the Library which are gratefuUy acknowledged in the report 
of the librarian. 

From Directors of the College: 

Miss Mary Elizabeth Garrett, Director of the Col- 
lege, Fellowships and graduate scholarships, 
$7,321.87; Competitive entrance scholarships, 
$2,300.00; Research fellowship, $51.67; Pub- 
lication of college monographs, $903.32; Books, 
■ $166.86; Astro-physical apparatus, $7.25 $10,750.97 

Mr. Frederic H. Strawbridge, Director of the Col- 
lege, for furniture for the 1905 Infirmary 500.00 

$11,250.97 

Students' Buildhig Committee (composed of former 
and present students and alumnse) for Stu- 
dents' Building Fimd No. 2 $18,980.79 

Students' Building Committee (proceeds sale of 

song books) for Students' Building Fund No. 1 70 . 40 

$19,051.19 

Alexander Simpson, Jr., third payment to found 
foiu- Frances Marion Simpson Undergraduate 
Scholarships 5,000. 00 

Gifts for Undergraduate Scholarships: 

From the Board of Education of the City of Phila- 
delphia, eight scholarships $800 . 00 

From the Estate of Charles E. Ellis, three scholar- 
ships of $200 each 600.00 

From the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, one 

scholarship at $500 500.00 

Anonymous per Dean ReUly for special scholarship 

for Marion D. Crane 400.00 

From the Estate of Simon Muhi', for one scholar- 
ship of $245 245.00 

Anonymous per Dean ReUly for special scholarship 

for A. C. DeVenish 200.00 

From Mrs. J. Campbell Harris for Thomas H. 

Powers Memorial Scholarship 200,00 

(103) 



103 



Anonymous per Eugenia Jackson, for special 

scholarship for Helen R. Kirk $200. 00 

Anonymous per Eugenia Jackson, for special schol- 
arship for Sophie K. Forster 200.00 

From George W. Kendrick, Jr., for the Minnie 

Murdoch Kendrick Memorial Scholarship 200 . 00 

From Mrs. Thomas Shallcross for the George W. 

Fetter Memorial Scholarship 200 . 00 

From Alexander Simpson, Jr., for scholarship 200 . 00 

Anonjonous per Dean Reilly for special imder- 

graduate scholarship 175 . 00 

From the Alumnae Association of the Girls' High 

and Normal School, one scholarship 100 . 00 

From the Chicago Bryn Mawr Club for scholarship 100 . 00 



1,320.00 



Undergraduates and Graduates in residence in 1913- 
14, net profits of May Day, 1914 ($1,000 of 
same given to Wellesley Fire Loss Fund) to 
General Endowment of the College 2,670 . 41 

Gifts to increase Salaries of Associate Professors of Bryn 
Mawr College: 

Mr. WiUiam Mcllvaine, father of an vmdergraduate 
student, to increase salaries of Associate Pro- 
fessors of Bryn Mawr College $211 .00 

Mr. Horace E. Smith, father of an midergraduate 
student, to increase salaries of Associate Pro- 
fessors of Bryn Mawr College 200 . 00 

Mr, Willis H. Tuttle, father of an undergraduate 
student, to increase salaries of Associate Pro- 
fessors of Bryn Mawr College 100 . 00 

Mr. Archibald Freer, father of an undergraduate 
student, to increase salaries of Associate Pro- 
fessors of Br3ai Mawr College 100 . 00 

Mr. Richard Robertson, father of an undergraduate 
student, to increase salaries of Associate Pro- 
fessors of Bryn Mawr College 100.00 

Mr. J. L. Hornberger, father of an undergraduate 
student, to increase salaries of Associate Pro- 
fessors of Bryn Mawr College 50 . 00 

Mr. Percival Tattersfield, father of an undergrad- 
uate student, to increase salaries of Associate 
Professors of Bryn Mawr College 50 . 00 

Mr. F. S. Chase, father of an undergraduate stu- 
dent, to increase salaries of Associate Pro- 
fessors of BrjTi Mawr College 50 . 00 

$861 . 00 



104 

Class of 1902 (decennial gift) to increase Principal 
of 1902 Fund for books for the college library. 
(Principal of Fund with above gift $1,627.64) $800.00 

Anonymous Donor for the Helen Schaeffer Huff 

Memorial Research Fellowship 750 . 00 

Miss Ella Riegel, Class of 1889, for the purchase of 
photographs, slides, and books for the Depart- 
ment of Modern Art 525.00 

Dean Marion Reilly for photographs, slides, and 

books for the Department of Modem Art $100.00 

Dean Marion Reilly for Concert of January 17, 

1914 100.00 

Dean Marion Reilly for Woods Hole Marine Bio- 
logical Laiboratory Undergraduate Scholarship , 50 . 00 

$250.00 

Members of the Class of 1889 to meet Olmsted 

Brothers' bill for preparing plans for Out-of- 

Door Auditorium 279 . 90 

New Book Room: 
Chicago Bryn Mawr Club for New Book Room in 

the coUege library $50.00 

Mr. Samuel M. Vauclain for New Book Room in 

the coUege library 50 . 00 

Alumnaj Association: 

Philadelphia Branch 115 .00 

Per E. Bontecou 8.00 

$223.00 

Pembroke Hall Improvement Fund (present and 

fornier students resident in Pembroke Hall) 

for Mercer tiles for front hall, Pembroke West $153 . 28 

Memorial Gifts: 
From Cass of 1911 in memory of Frances King 

Carey, for books in physiology $102 . 50 

From Class of 1914 in memory of Ruby Waller 40.00 

$142.50 

Mrs. Huntington Wilson for lectiu-e on Eugenics by 

Professor Harvey E. Jordan of the University 

of Virginia 100.00 

Various donors for three College Concerts, sums amounting 

to about $500.00. 
Dr. Thomas F. Branson, Physician of the College, sterilizing 

plant for the 1905 Infirmary, value $89.50, bought by 

donor. 
Mr. A. Merritt Taylor, a Gatch bed for the 1905 Infirmary, 

value about $60.00, bought by donor. 

$46,476.46 



VII. 

Titles of Scientific Publications of the Faculty Which Appeared 
in the Year 1913-14. 

Professor George A. Barton, 

"The Origin and Development of Babylonian Writing." Part II, 
"A Classified List of Simple Ideographs with Analysis and Discussion," 
pp. vi+295+4 plates, 8vo. Leipzig, J. C. Hinrichs'sche Buchhandlung, 
1913. 

"The Haverford Library Collection of Cuneiform Tablets or Docu- 
ments from the Temple Archives of Telloh," Part III, pp. 62+55 auto- 
graphed plates, 4to. Philadelphia, The John C. Winston Company, 1914. 

"The Names of Two Kings of Adab." Journal of the American 
Oriental Society, Vol. XXXIII, pp. 295-96. 8vo. New Haven, Conn., 
November, 1913. 

"Kugler's Criterion for Determining the Order of the Months m the 
Earliest Babylonian Calendar." Journal of the American Oriental Society, 
Vol. XXXIII, pp. 297-305, 8vo. New Haven, Conn., November, 1913. 

"Hierodouloi, Semitic and Egyjitian." Hastings' Encyclopcedia of 
Religion and Ethics. Vol. VI, pp. 672-676, 4to. Edinbiirgh and New 
York, 1913. 

" Higher ArchEeology and the Verdict of Criticism." Journal of Biblical 
Literature. Vol. XXXII, pp. 244-260, Svo. Boston, December, 1913. 

"The Hermeneutic Canon, 'Interpret Historicallj^ ' in the Light of 
Modern Research." Journal of Biblical Literature. Vol. XXXIII, pp. 
56-77, Svo. Boston, March, 1914. 

"The Exegesis of iviavTovs in Galatians 4:10 and its Bearing on the 
Date of the Epistle." Journal of Biblical Literature. Vol. XXXIII, pp. 
118-126, Svo. Boston, June, 1914. 

"An Attempt at a Scientific Classification of Bibhcal Literature." 
Biblical World. Vol. XLIII, pp. 251-257, Svo. Chicago, April, 1914. 

"The Burning Bush: an Epitome of a Great Religious Experience." 
Present Day Papers. Vol. I, pp. 103-106, Svo. Haverford, Pennsyl- 
vania, April, 1914. 

"The Excavations at Jericho and Samaria." Sunday School World, 
Vol. LIV, pp. 52-54, Svo. Philadelphia, February, 1914. 

"Recent Excavations at Beth-Shemesh and Jerusalem." Sunday 
School World, Vol. LIV, pp. 147-149, Svo. Philadelphia, April, 1914. 

Book Reviews: 

Clay's "Personal Names from Cuneiform Inscriptions of the Cassite 
Period." Yale Review, new series, Vol. Ill, pp. 622-623, Svo. New 
JIaven, April, 1914. 

ao5) 



106 

Clay's "Babylonian Records in the Library of J. Pierpont Morgan." 
Yale Review, new series, Vol. Ill, pp. 623-624, 8vo. New Haven, 
April, 1914. 

Puchstein's "Boghaskoi," American Journal of Semitic Languages, 
Vol. XXX, pp. 147-148, 8vo. Chicago, January, 1914 

Montgomery's "Aramaic Incantation Texts from Nippur." American 
Journal of Semitic Languages. Vol. XXX, pp. 231-232, 8vo. Chicago, 
April, 1914. 

SeUin and Watzinger's "Jericho." American Journal of Semitic 
Languages. Vol. XXX, pp. 292-293, 8vo. Chicago, July, 1914. 

Jastrow's "Hebrew and Babylonian Traditions." American Journal 
of Theology. Vol. XVIII, pp. 425-427, 8vo. Chicago, July, 1914. 

Gray's "Commentary on Isaiah." Present Day Papers. Vol. I, pp. 
28-31, 8vo. Haverford, Pennsylvania, January, 1914. 

Loof's "What is the Truth about Jesus Christ?" Present Day Papers. 
Vol. I, p. 32, 8vo. Haverford, Pennsylvania. 

Moffatt's "The Theology of the Gospels." Present Day Papers. 
Vol. I, p. 32, 8vo. Haverford, Pennsylvania. 

Batten's "Commentary on Ezra and Nehemiah." Present Day 
Papers. Vol. I, pp. 146-154, 8vo. Haverford, Pennsylvania, March, 1914. 

Moore's "History of Religions." Present Day Papers. Vol. I, p. 
154, 8vo. Haverford, Pennsylvania, March, 1914. 

Von Dobschiitz's "Influence of the Bible on Civihzation." Present 
Day Papers. Vol. I, p. 183, 8vo. Haverford, Pennsylvania, June, 1914. 

Begbie's "The Ordinary Man and the Extraordinary Thing." 
Present Day Papers. Vol. I, p. 183, 8vo. Haverford, Pennsylvania, June, 
1914. 

J. M. P. Smith's "Commentary on Amos and Hosea." Present Day 
Papers. Vol. I, p. 184, 8vo. Haverford, Pennsylvania, June, 1914. 

Toy's "Introduction to the History of Religion." Present Day 
Papers. Vol. I, p. 244, 8vo. Haverford, Pennsylvania, August, 1914. 

Smith's "The Bible in the Making in the Light of Modern Research." 
Present Day Papers. Vol. I, p. 246, 8vo. Haverford, Pennsylvania, 
August, 1914. 

Hodges's "Everyman's Religion." Sunday School World. Vol. 
LIV, p. 95, 8vo. Philadelphia, February, 1914. 

Weaver's "Religious Development of the Child," Sunday School 
World. Vol. LIV, p. 191, 8vo. Philadelphia, April, 1914. 

Begbie's "The Ordinary Man and the Extraordinary Thing." Sun-' 
day School World. Vol. LIV, p. 335, 8vo. Philadelphia, July, 1914. 

Blanchard's "Talks on the Book of Revelations." Sunday School 
World. Vol. LIV, p. 335, 8vo. PhUadelphia. 

Thompson's "English Monasteries." Sunday School World. Vol. 
LIV, p. 385, 8vo. Philadelphia, August, 1914. 

Dr. Dorothy Brewster: 

"Aaron Hill: Poet, Dramatist, Projector." pp. xiii+300, portrait, 
Igmo. Columbia University Press, New York City. October, 1913. 



107 

Professor Carleton Fairchild Brown: ■ "* 

"Poems by Sir John Salusbury and Robert Chester." With an 
Introduction by Carleton Brown. Bryn Mawr Monographs, Vol. XIV, 
pp. lxxiv+86, 8vo. Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Penna. December, 
1913. 

"Chaucer's Serpent-Pit." Modern Language Notes. Vol. XXIX, pp. 
198-199. June, 1914. 

"Manuscripts of "William Lichfield's Complaint of God." Englische 
Studien. Vol. XLVII, p. 317. December, 1913. 

"A Textual Correction." Modern Language Notes. Vol. XXIX, 
pp. 60-61. February, 1914. 

Book Reviews: 

John M. Booker's "Middle English Bibliography." Modern Lan- 
guage Notes. Vol. XXIX, pp. 153-156. May, 1914. 

Dr. Thomas Clachar Brown: 

"The Shawangunk Conglomerate and Associated Beds near High 
Falls, Ulster County, New York." American Journal of Science. Vol. 
XXXVII, 4th series, pp. 464-474. New Haven, Connecticut. May, 
1914. 

Mr. Rhys Carpenter: 

"The Sun-Thief and Other Poems." pp. vi+152, 8vo. Oxford 
University Press, London. 

Dr. Samuel Claggett Chew, Jr. : 

"The Relation of Lord Byron to the Drama of the Romantic Move- 
ment." 42 pp., 8vo. Vandenhoeck imd Ruprecht, Gottingen, 1914. 

"Bj^ron and Croly," Modern Language Notes. Vol. XXVIII, pp. 201- 
203. November, 1913. 

"The English Novel." Modern Language Notes. Vol. XXIX, pp. 
89-90. March, 1914. 

"Lyric Poetry." Modern Language Notes. Vol. XXIX, pp. 173- 
178. June, 1914. 

"The Manuscript of Sir Walter Scott's Willia7n and Helen." The 
Nation. Vol. XCVIII, p. 497. April 30, 1914. 

"Notes on Byron." Modern Language Notes. Vol. XXIX, pp. 105- 
107. April, 1914. 

Dr. Charles Ghequiere Fenwick: 

"The Neutrality Laws of the United States." pp. xii-|-201. Car- 
negie Endowment for International Peace, Washington, D. C, 1913. 

"The Authority of Vattel, Part II." American Political Science 
Journal, pp. 375-392. August, 1914. 

"Two Representatives of the Grotian School." Arnerican Journal of 
International Law. January, 1914. 



108 



Dr. James Fulton Ferguson: 

"Characterization in Tacitus." Classical Weekly. Vol. VII, No. 1, 
pp. 2-5. 

"A Roman Solution of the Cost of Living." Moody's Magazine, 
Vol. XVII, No. 6, pp. 297-300. 

Book Reviews: 

Trimble's "Juvenal and the Roman Emperors." Classical Weekly. 
Vol. VII, No. 4, pp. 31-32. 

Webster's "Ancient History" and "Readings in Ancient History." 
Classical Weekly, Vol. VII, No. 6, pp. 46-47. 

Professor Clarence Errol Ferree: 

A Discussion of Mr. J. R. Cravath's Paper on "^ome Experiments 
with the Ferree Test for Eye Fatigue." In Press. Transactions of the 
Illuminating Engineering Society. 15 pp. 1914. 

"The Efficiency of the Eye under Different Conditions of Lighting." 
In Press. Proceedings of the New York Academy of Science, 8 pp. 1914. 

"The Efficiency of the Eye under Different Conditions of Lighting, 
the Effect of Varying the Distribution Factors and Intensity." In Press 
Transactions of the Illuminating Engineering Society. 56 pp. 1914. 

"The Efficiency of the Eye under Different Systems of Lighting." 
Ophthalmology. 16 pp. July, 1914. 

"The Efficiency of the Eye imder Different Systems of Lighting — 
the Effect of Varying Distribution and Intensity." (With Dr. Gertrude 
Rand.) Convention Papers of the Seventh Annual Convention of the Illumi- 
nating Engineering Society. 20 pp. 1913. 

"Further Experiments on the Efficiency of the Eye under Different 
Conditions of Lighting." (With Dr. G«rtrude Rand.) Convention Papers 
of the Eighth Annual Convention of the Illuminating Engineering Society. 
56 pp. September, 1914. 

"A Note on the Rotary Campimeter." Psychological Review. Vol. 
XX, pp. 372-377. September, 1913. 

"A Preliminary Study of the Deficiencies of the Method of Flicker for 
the Photometrj' of Lights of Different Color." (With Dr. Gertrude Rand.) 
InPress. Transactions of the Illuminating Engineering Society . 50pp. 1914. 

"The Problem of Lighting in its Relation to the Efficiency of the Eye." 
Science, Vol. XL No. 1020, 16 pp. 1914. 

"Vision: Peripheral and Foveal." Psychological Bulletin. Vol. xi, 
pp. 87-94. February, 1914. 

Dr. Donald Fisher: 

"The Problem of the Value-Judgment." Philosophical Review. Vol, 
XXII, pp. 623-638. 1913, 



m 

Professor Tenney Frank : 

"Roman Imperialism." pp. xiii+365. Macmillan, New York. 

"The Background of the Lex Manilla.'" Classical Philology. Vol. 
IX, pp. 191-193. 

"A Rejected Poem and a Substitute: Catullus lxvih, A and B." 
American Journal of Philology. Vol. XXXV, pp. 67-73. 

"Representative Government in the Macedonian Republics." Class- 
ical Philology. Vol, IX, pp. 49-59. 

Book Review :s 

Lagueur's "Polybius." Classical Philology. Vol. IX, p. 335. 

Reid's " MunicipaUties of the Roman Empire." Classical Philology. 
Vol. IX, pp. 451-452. 

Professor Frederick Hutton Getman: 

" ReproducibiHty of the Copper Electrode." Paper presented at the 
meeting of the American Electrochemical Society, Niagara Falls, October, 
1-3, 1914. Proceedings of the American Electrochemical Society. Vol. 
XXVI, 9 pp., 8vo. 

Book Reviews : 

H. C. Jones' "A New Era in Chemistry." Journal of the Franklin 
Institute. 1 p., 8vo. December, 1913. 

Dr. Orie Latham Hatcher: 

"Report of the Committee of Standardisation of the Virginia Associ- 
ation of Colleges and Schools for Girls." pp. 10. Harrisonburg, Va. 

Dr. Richard Thayer Holbrook: 

"Master Pierre Patelin: A Farce in Three Acts." Composed anony- 
mously about 1464 A.D. Englished by Richard T. Holbrook. Illustrated, 
pp. li+121, 12mo. Popular edition. Walter H. Baker & Company, 
Boston, Mass., 1914. 

Dr. Janet Tucker HoweU: 

"The Fundamental Law of the Grating." Astrophysical Journal. 
Vol. XXXIX, pp. 230-243. University of Chicago Press, Chicago. 
1914, 

Miss Georgiana Goddard King: 

Street's "Gothic Architecture in Spain." Edited by G. G. King. 
2 vols., pp. 356+352, 8vo. Dent & Co., London. (E. P. Dutton, 
New York.) 



110 

Professor Agathe Lasch: 

" Mittelniederdeutsche Grammatik (Sammlung kurzer Grammatiken 
germanischer Dialekte IX)," pp. viii+286, 8vo. Verlag von Max Nie- 
meyer, Halle a. S. April, 1914. 

Dr. Gertrude Rand: 

"The Efficiency of the Eye under Different Conditions of Lighting — 
the Effect of Varying the Distribution Factors and Intensity" (with Dr. 
C. E. Ferree). Transactions of the Illuminating Engineering Society. 
In Press. 56 pp. 1914. 

"Further Experiments on the Efficiency of the Eye under Different 
Conditions of Lighting" (with Dr. C. E. Fenee). Convention Papers of 
the Eighth Annual Convention of the Illuminating Engineering Society. 
66 pp. September, 1914. 

"A Preliminary Study of the Deficiencies of the Method of Flicker for 
the Photometry of Lights of Different Color" (with Dr. C. E. Ferree). 
Transactions of the Illuminating Engineering Society. In Press. 50 pp. 
1914. 

Book Review: 

B. S. Morgan's "The Backward Child." Bryn Mawr Ahimnce 
Quarterly. Vol. VIII, p. 120, 4to. Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, 
Pennsylvania, July, 1914. 

Dr. Eunice Morgan Schenck: 

"La Part de Charles Nodier dans la Formation des Idees Romantiques 
de Victor Hugo jusqu'a la Preface de Cromwell." Monographies de Bryn 
Mawr College. Vol. XVI, pp. x + 149, 8vo. Librairie Ancienne Honore 
Champion, Paris, 1914. 

President M. Carey Thomas: 

"Address at the opening of the twenty-ninth year of Bryn Mawr 
College, October 1, 1913." pp. 103-105. Bryn Mawr Alumnse Quarterly. 
Vol. VII, No. 4. January, 1914. 

"Address at the Supper of the Bryn Mawr Alumnae Association in 
Pembroke Hall, June 4, 1914." pp. 75-77. Bryn Mawr Alumnce Quarterly, 
Vol. VIII, No. 2. July, 1914. 

Professor Arthur Leslie Wheeler : 
Book Review: 

Kirby Flower Smith's edition of "The Elegies of Albina TibuUus." 
American Journal of Philology. Vol. XXXIV, pp. 461-470. 1913. 



Ill 

Dr. EmilCarlWilm: 

"Henri Bergson; A Study in Radical Evolution." pp. xv + 193, 
8vo. Sturgis and Walton Company, New York City. 1914. 

Professor Wilmer Cave Wright: 

"The Works of the Emperor Julian." Edited with revised text and 
translation in three volumes. Vol. II, pp. 519, 8vo. Heinemann, London. 
Loeb Classical Library. (The Macmillan Company, New York.) 

Book Reviews : 

Foerster's "Libanii Opera, Vol. VII." Classical Philology. Vol. IX, 
pp. 464-466. October, 1914. 

Two reviews in The Nation. 



VIII. 

Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1913-14. 



Department 



Course 



Instructor 



Hours 
weekly 



No. IN Class 



1st 
Sem. 



2iid 
Sem. 



Sanskrit . 
Greek 



Latin . 



Elementary Sanskrit 

Elementary Greek, Grammar, 
Composition and Reading. . 

Plato and Composition, minor 

Euripides, Herodotus and Com- 
position, minor 

Homer, minor 

Demosthenes, major 

Thucydides, major 

Aristophanes, major 

Sophocles, major 

History of Greek Literature, 
major 

Attic Orators, post-major 

Sophocles, post-major 

Melic Poets, post-major 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Greek Historians . . 

Seminary in Aristophanes 

Greek Journal Club 

Cicero, minor, Div. A, B 

Cicero, minor, Div. B, C 

Cicero, nainor, Div. C, A 

Terence, minor, Div. B, C 

Terence, minor, Div. C, B 

Terence, minor, Div. A, B 

Horace, minor, Div. A, C, B. . . 

Horace, minor, Div. C, B, A. . . 

Horace, minor, Div. B, A, C. . . 

Tacitus, major 

Latin Comedy, major 

History of Latin Literature, 
major 

Roman Life, elective 

Roman Satire, post-major 

Lucretius and Catullus, post- 
major 

Cicero and Caesar, post-major. 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Latin Lyric 

Seminary in Epigraphy 

Latin Journal Club 



Dr. Kent 



Miss Kirk. . . 
Dr. Sanders 

Dr. Sanders . 
Dr. Wright 
Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Sanders 

Dr. Wright 
Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Wright 



Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Wright 
Dr. Sanders and 
Dr. Wright 



Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Ferguson 
Dr. Swindler 
Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Ferguson 
Dr. Swindler 
Dr. Frank 
Dr. Ferguson 
Dr. Swindler 
Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Wheeler 

Dr. Frank 
Dr. Frank 
Dr. Wheeler 

Dr. Frank 
Dr. Frank 



Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Frank 
Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Frank 
Dr. Ferguson 
Dr. Swindler 



.. 3 
.. 2 

14 fort- 
nightly 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 

2 
1 
2 

3 
3 



. 3 .. 

. 2 .. 



IHort- 
nightly 



12 



im 



113 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1 91 3-14- — Continued. 



Department 


COUKSE 


Instructor 


Hours 
weekly 


No. IN 


Class 


Ist 
Sem. 


2nd 

Sem. 


English 


History of English Literature, 
First Year, required 

Elocution, First Year, required . 

English Composition, First 
Year, required . 


Miss Donnelly 
Mr. King 

Dr. Crandall 
Miss Shearer 
Miss Daw 
Dr. Langdon 
Miss Hammer 
Miss Dunn 

Miss Donnelly 

Mr. King 

Dr. Crandall 
Miss Shearer 
Miss Daw 
Dr. Langdon 
Miss Hammer 
Miss Dunn 
Miss Hammer 
Dr. C. F. Brown 
Dr. C. F. Brown 
Dr. C. F. Brown 
Miss Donnelly 
Dr. Langdon 
Dr. Crandall 
Dr. Crandall 
Miss Shearer 
Miss King 

Mr. King 

Dr. C. F. Brown 
Miss Donnelly 
Dr. C. F. Brown 

Dr. Hatcher 
Dr. C. F. Brown 
Miss Donnelly 
Dr. Hatcher 

Miss Jeffers 

Dr. Lasch 

Dr. Jessen 

Dr. Jessen 
Dr. Jessen 
Dr. Lasch 

Dr. Lasch 
Dr. Jessen 
Dr. Jessen 

Dr. Jessen 
Dr. Jessen and 
Dr. Lasch 


..2f .. 

.. f .. 

.. 2 .. 
.. 2 .. 


-.108.. 
. .135. . 

. . 27 . . 


..108.. 
..131.. 

. . 10 . . 




History of English Literature, 

Second Year, required 

Elocution, Second Year, re- 


. . 14 . . 




.. 2 .. 
.. 2 .. 
.. 2 .. 
.. 2 . . 

..2f .. 

i 

2 


.. 21 .. 
.. 16 .. 
. . 22 . . 
. . 20 . . 

..102.. 

. . 92 . . 


.. 21 .. 

. . 20 . . 
. . 22 . . 
. . 20 . . 

..100.. 

91 .. 




English Cornposition, Second 


. . 7 .. 






.. 2 . . 
. . 2 .. 
.. 2 .. 
.. 2 .. 
.. 2 .. 
.. 1 .. 
.. 3 .. 
. . 3 . . 


. . 30 . . 
.. 17 .. 
. . 17 . . 
.. 15 .. 
. . 20 . . 
.. 19 .. 
.. 8 .. 


. . 19 . . 
. . 16 . . 
. . 20 . . 
. . 15 . . 
. . 20 . . 
21 . . 




Middle English Poetry, major . 


11 .' . 






. . 2 .. 
.. 2 .. 
.. 2 .. 
. . 2 .. 


. . 15 . . 
.. 17 .. 
.. 6 .. 


. . 1.5 . . 




English Drama, major 

Descriptive Writing, elective . . 
Narrative Writing, elective. . . . 

Daily Themes, elective 

Argumentation, elective. 

Verse Composition, elective . . . 
Reading of Shakespeare, elec- 


. . 16 . . 

'. '. 15 '. '. 




.. 2 .. 
.. 2 .. 
.. 2 .. 


. . 28 . . 
.. 7 .. 


W'k".'. 

.. 8 .. 




.. 1 .. 

.. 3 .. 
.. 2 .. 
.. 2 .. 

.. 3 .. 

If fort- 
nightly 

.. 5 .. 

.. 3 .. 

.. 2 .. 

.. 3 .. 
.. 1 .. 
.. 1 .. 

.. 1 .. 
.. 2 .. 
.. 1 .. 

.. 2 .. 

If fort- 
nightly 


. . 20 . . 

.. 6 .. 
.. 9 .. 
.. 3 .. 

.. 4 .. 

.. 11.. 

.. 5 .. 

. . 19 . . 

. . 18 . . 

.. 9 .. 
.. 9 .. 
.. 9 .. 

.. 3 .. 
.. 7 .. 
.. 3 .. 

.. 5 .. 

.. 5 .. 


.. 13 .. 




Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Middle English. . . 

Seminary in Shelley and Byron 

Cynewulf and Caedmon 

Seminary in Elizabethan Lit- 


.. 5 .. 

.. 8 .. 
.. 4 .. 

.. 3 .. 








German 


Elementary German, Grammar 


.. 9 .. 
. . 5 .. 




Critical Reading and Grammar 

and Composition, minor. . . . 

History of German Literature, 


. . 14 . . 
. . 15 . . 




History of German Literature 
and Selected Reading, major 

Faust (2d part), major. 

Prose Composition, major 

Advanced Prose Composition, 


. . 10 . . 
.. 9 .. 
.. 9 .. 

.. 4 .. 




German Literature, post-major 
German Reading, post-major. . 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in German Literature 

German Journal Club 


.. 5 .. 
.. 3 .. 

.. 4 .. 

.. 5 .. 



lU 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1913-14.— Continued. 



Dbpabtment 



Teutonic 
Philology. 



French. 



Italian . 



Spanish. 



Comparative 

LiTERATDRE 



Course 



Instructor 



Teutonic Seminary 

Old High German 

Comparative Teutonic Gram- 
mar 

Old Norse 

Gothic 

Old Saxon 



Elementary French, Grammar 
and Translation 

History of French Literature 
and Collateral Reading, minor 

French Critical Reading and 
Composition, minor, Div. 

A, B 

French Critical Reading and 

Composition, minor, Div 

B. A 

History of French Literature 

and Collateral Reading, major 
French Critical Reading and 

Composition, major 

French Reading, elective. . . 
French Short Story, post-major 
Modern Literary Schools, post- 
major 



Graduate Courses 

Seminary in French Literature, 

Moliere 

Old French Philology, First 

Year Course 

Old French Seminary 

Romance Languages Journal 

Club 



Italian, minor . . . . 
Italian, major. . . . 

Graduate Courses 
Advanced Italian . 



Spanish, minor 

Spanish, Literary History, Com- 
position and Critical Read 
ing, major 

Graduate Courses 

Spanish Seminary 

Spanish Literature 



Renaissance Lyrics, minor. . 
Italian Models in Renaissance 

Literature, minor 

The Pastoral, major 

Victorian Poets, major .... 



Graduate Courses 
Seminary in Comparative Lit- 
erature 



Dr. Lasch 
Dr. Lasch 

Dr. Lasch 
Dr. Lasch 
Dr. Lasch 
Dr. Lasch 

Miss Schenck. 
Mr. Cons 

Mrs. Cons 

Miss Schenck 

Mr. Cons 

Mr. Cons 
Miss Schenck 
Miss Schenck 

Mr. Cons 



Mr. Cons 

Dr. Holbrook 
Dr. Holbrook 

Dr. DeHaan 
Dr. Holbrook 
Mr. Cons 
Miss Schenck 

Dr. Holbrook 
Dr. Holbrook 

Dr. Holbrook 
Dr. DeHaan 



Dr. DeHaan 



Dr. DeHaan 
Dr. DeHaan 



Dr. Hatcher 

Miss King 
Dr. Hatcher 
Miss King 



Dr. Hatcher 



Hours 
weekly 



fort- 
nightly 

.. 5 
.. 2 



. 2 



No. IN Class 



Ist 
Sem. 



4 .. 
3 .. 



2 .. 
2 .. 
1 .. 



.. 4 . 
. . 40 . 

..17. 

..18. 

. . 25 . 

. . 24 . 
.. 5 . 
.. 9 . 



.. 3 
.. 1 



. 11 
. 2 



. 1 , 

. 20, 



4 

6 , 
23 



.. 1 



115 



Tabular Statement of Courses of Instruction given in 
1913-14.— Continued. 



Depabtment 



Semitic Lan- 
guages AND 

Biblical. Lit- 
erature .... 



History . 



Economics and 
Politics . . 



Course 



History of Christian Doctrine, 
elective 

New Testament Canon, elective 

Graduate Courses 
New Testament Greek Semi- 
nary 

Semitic Seminary, Hebrew .... 
Elementary Semitic Languages 

Hebrew Literature 

Beginning Hebrew 

History of Europe from 1815, 
minor, Div. A, B 

History of Europe from 1815, 
minor, Div. B, A 

History of the Reformation, 
minor 

History of England since 1066, 
minor 

History of Europe in the 
Period of the Renaissance, 
major 

History of the French Revolu- 
tion, Napoleon, major 

History of the United States, 
1865-1913, major 

History of British Imperialism, 
major 

Ancient History, Oriental His- 
tory, minor 

Ancient History, Classical His- 
tory, minor 

Ancient History, Fifth Century 
Athens, major 

Ancient History, First Century 
Roman Empire, major. . . . 

Ancient History, Historians of 
Rome, major 

American Constitutional His- 
tory, post-major 

History of England under the 
Stuarts, post-major 

Ancient History, Roman Em- 
pire, post-major 

Graduate Courses 
Seminary in English and Euro- 
pean History 

Seminary in American History 
History Journal Club 

Introduction to Economics, 
minor, Div. A 

Introduction to Economics; 
minor, Div. B 

Problems in Politics, minor 

Sociology, minor 

History of Economic Thought 
major 



Instructor 



Dr. Barton 
Dr. Barton 



Dr. Barton 
Dr. Barton 
Dr. Barton 
Dr. Barton 
Dr. Barton 



Mr. Haring 
Dr. Jones 
Dr. W.R.Smith 
Dr. Jones 

Mr. Haring 
Dr. Jones 
Dr. "W.R.Smith 
Dr. W.R.Smith 
Dr. Barton 
Dr. Ferguson 
Dr. Ferguson 
Dr. Ferguson 
Dr. Ferguson 
Dr. W.R.Smith 
Mr. Haring 
Dr. Ferguson 



Mr. Haring 
Dr. W. R. Smith 
Mr. Haring 
Dr. W. R. Smith 
Dr. Jones 



Dr. M. P. Smith 

Mr. Dewey 
Mr. Hudson 
Mr. Dewey 

Dr. M. P. Smith 



Hours 
weekly 



3 . 
3 . 

2 . 

2 . 

3 . 
3 . 
2 . 

2 . 

3 . 

2 . 

3 . 
3 . 

1 . 
3 . 

2 . 
1 . 



No. IN Class 



1st 

Sem. 



.. 2 .. 
fort- 
nightly 



.. 3 



34 , 
32, 
39 , 
25. 

17 , 
IS , 
26 , 
22, 
10, 



2 , 
7 , 
10, 
2 , 



,23, 

,27, 

34, 

,40, 

,38 



2nd 

Sem. 



32 

38 
42 

28 

17 

18 
27 
29 
10 
9 

2 

4 
7 
9 
2 



. 23 

. 25 
. 33 

, 27 

. 38 



116 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1913-14. — Continued. 



Depahtment 


COUBSE 


Instructor 


Hours 
weekly 


No. in Class 


1st 
Sem. 


2nd 
Sem. 






Mr. Hudson 
Mr. Dewey 

Dr. M. P. Smith 

Mr. Hudson 
Mr. Dewey 

Dr. M. P. Smith 
Mr. Hudson 
Dr. M.P.Smith 
Mr. Hudson 
and Mr. Dewey 

Dr.T. deLaguna 
Dr.G.deLaguna 
Dr. Fisher 
Dr.T. deLaguna 
Dr.T. deLaguna 
Dr. Fisher 

Dr. Fisher 
Dr.T. deLaguna 
Dr. Fisher 
Dr.T. deLaguna 
Dr. Fisher 

Dr.T. deLaguna 
Dr.G.deLaguna 
Dr.T. deLaguna 
Dr.G.deLaguna 
and Dr. Fisher 

Dr. Leuba 

Dr. Leuba 
Dr. Leuba 
Dr. Ferree 
Dr. Leuba 
Dr. Gordon 

Dr. Ferree 

Dr. Leuba 
Dr. Ferree 

Dr. Leuba 
Dr. Leuba and 
Dr. Ferree 

Dr. Gordon 

Dr. Gordon 
and Dr. Castro 
Dr. Gordon 
Dr. Gordon 
and Dr. Castro 


.. 2 .. 
.. 2 .. 

.. 2 .. 

.. 3 .. 
.. 2 .. 

.. 2 .. 
.. 2 .. 
.. 2 .. 
fort- 
nightly 

.. 3 .. 
.. 3 .. 
.. 3 .. 
.. 3 .. 
.. 2 .. 


. . 24 . . 
.. 11 .. 


34 




Industrial History, major 

Economic and Social Legisla- 
tion, post-major 

American Constitutional Law, 






. . 18 . . 

.. 11 .. 
.. 3 .. 

.. 4 .. 
.. 4 .. 
.. 4 .. 

. . 36 . . 
. . 40 . . 
.. 31 .. 
. . 22 . . 


.. 15 .. 
..10 . 






2 




Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Economics 


.. 5 .. 
4 


Philosophy . . . 


Economic Journal Club 

History of Philosophy, required, 

Div. A, C 

Div. B,A 

Div. C. B 

Philosophical Problems, minor. 

Elementary Logic, minor 

Descartes and Hume, minor. . . 

Modern Philosophical Theories, 


.. 4 .. 

.. 31 .. 
. . 35 . . 
. . 38 . . 

! ! 9 !! 




.. 2 .. 
. . 3 . . 


.. 8 .. 








. . 22 . . 




German Idealism, major 

Plato and Aristotle, major 

James and Bergson, major. . . . 
Comte, Mill and Spencer, major 

Graduate Courses 


.. 2 .. 
.. 3 .. 
. . 3 .. 


. . 5 . . 






.. 6 .. 








. . 6 .. 




. . 2 . . 




. 4 . 




.. 3 .. 

.. 2 .. 
. 1 h. 
fort- 
nightly 

.. 2 .. 

.. 2 .. 
.. 2 .. 
.. 3 .. 
.. 3 .. 
.. 2 .. 

.. 1 .. 

.. 2 .. 
.. 3 .. 

.. 1 .. 

.. 1 .. 

.. 2 .. 

.. 2 .. 

.. 2 .. 
.. li .. 
fort- 
nightly 


.. 4 .. 

.. 4 .. 
.. 4 .. 

..108.. 
. . 33 . . 

'. '. '19 ; '. 
. . 10. . 

.. 8 .. 
.. 2 .. 

.. 3 .. 
.. 3 .. 

. . 1 . . 


.. 4 .. 


Psychology. . . 


Metaphysical Seminary 

Philosophical Journal Club .... 


.. 4 .. 
.. 4 .. 

. . 106 . . 




Psychology of Instinct, Emo- 
tion and the Will, minor .... 
Animal Psychology, minor .... 
ExperimentalPsychology, minor 

Social Psychology, major 

Educational Psychology, major 
Experimental Psychology, elec- 


; ; 33 ." .' 
. . 20 . . 

.. 8 .. 

.. 5 .. 
.. 3 .. 




Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Psychology 

Systematic Psychology 

Psychology of Unusual and 


.. 3 .. 
.. 3 .. 


Education. . . . 


Psychological Journal Club 


.. 3 .. 

. . 14 . . 

.. 6 .. 
. . 3 . . 


.. 3 .. 
. . 11 .. 




Graduate Course 

Seminary in Methods of Teach- 


.. 7 .. 




Theories of Education 

Education Journal Club 






.. 3 .. 


.. 2 .. 



117 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1913-14.— Continued. 



Dbpaetment 



History of 

Akt and 

Classical 

Arch^e- 

OLOGT .... 



Mathematics . 



Physics. 



Course 



Greek and Roman Sculpture, 
minor 

Greek Painting, minor 

17th and 18th Century Paint- 
ing, minor 

Gothic Architecture, minor. . . . 

Life and Art in Hellenistic 
Towns, elective 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Archseology. . . , 

Archaeological Journal Club . 

Analytical Conies, minor. . . 

Differential and Integral Calcu- 
lus, minor 

Trigonometry, minor 

Theory of Equations, minor. . , 

Differential and Integral Calcu 
lus, Theory of Equations and 
Differential Equations, major 

Analytical Geometry, History 
of Mathematics, major. . . 

Graphic Mathematics, elective 

Descriptive Astronomy, elec- 
tive 

Modern Analytical Geometry, 
post-major 

Theory of Functions, post- 
major 

Graduate Courses 

Theory of Surfaces 

Theory of Groups 

Mathematical Journal Club . . . 



Heat, Sound and Properties of 
Matter, minor , 

Light, Electricity and Magna 
tism, minor , 

Laboratory Work, minor 



Instktjctor 



Mr. Carpenter 
Dr. Swindler 

Miss King 
Miss King 

Mr. Carpenter 



Mr. Carpenter 
Mr. Carpenter 



Dr. Scott 



Conner 

Scott 

Conner 



Dr. Conner 



Scott 
Scott 

Conner 

Scott 

Conner 



Laboratory Work, minor. . . 

Theory of Light, Mechanics, 
major 

Heat, Electricity and Magne- 
tism, major 

Laboratory Work, major 



Laboratory Work, major. 



Astro-Physios, elective 

Electricity and Magnetism, 
post-major 



Dr. Scott 
Dr. Conner 
Dr. Scott and 
Dr. Conner 



Dr. Huff 

Dr. Barnes 
Dr. Huff and 

Miss Frehafer 
Dr. Barnes and 
Miss Frehafer 

Dr. Barnes 

Dr. Huff 
Dr. Barnes and 
Miss Frehafer 
Dr. Huff and 
Miss Frehafer 
Dr. Barnes 

Dr. Huff 



Hours 
weekly 



. . 2 .. 
II fort- 
nightly 




.. 6 

.. 1 

.. 2 

.. 2 

.. 2 

.. 2 

.. 2 

.. 1 

fort 
nightly 

. 5 

. 5 

. 4 

. 4 



No. in Class 



1st 
Sem. 



. 28 
. 18 



. 4 
. 2 
. 4 
. 2 



42 



42 



2nd 

Sem. 



16 



32 
16 



42 



42 



118 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1 91 3-1 4.— Continued. 



Department 



Course 



Instructor 



Hours 
weekly 



No. IN Class 



1st 
Sem. 



Chemistry . . . . 



Geology. 



Biology. 



Graduate Courses 

Optics, post-major 

Physical Journal Club 

Introduction to General Chem- 
istry, minor 

Introduction to Organic Chem- 
istry, minor 

Laboratory Work, minor 

Laboratory Work, minor 

Theoretical Chemistry, major. . 

Organic Chemistry, major 

Laboratory Work, major 

Laboratory Work, major 

Physical Chemistry, post-niajor 

Micro-organic Chemistry, post 
major 

Inorganic Chemistry, post- 
major 

Graduate Courses 
Seminary in Organic Chemistry 
Seminary in Inorganic Chem- 
istry 

Chemical Journal Club 

Physiography, minor 

Historical Geology, minor 

Field Work and Laboratory 
Work, minor 

Field Work and Laboratory 
Work, minor 

Megascopic Petrology, major. . 

Glaciology and Structural Ge- 
ology, major 

Field Work and Laboratory 
Work, major 

Field Work and Laboratory 
Work, major 

Evolution of Vertebrates, elec- 
tive 

Petrography, post-major 

Graduate Courses 

Mineralogy 

General Biology, minor 

Vertebrates and Embryology, 

minor 

Laboratory Work, minor 

Physiology, major 

General Zoology, Anatomy, 
major 

Laboratory Work, major 



Dr. Barnes 
Dr. Huff and 
Dr. Barnes 



Dr. Brunei 



Macleod 

Brunei and 

Macleod 

Macleod 

Getman 

Brunei 

Getman 

Brunei 

Getman 



Dr. Macleod 
Dr. Getman 

Dr. Brunei 

Dr. Getman 
Dr. Brunei 
Dr. Getman 
and Dr. Mac- 
leod 



Bascom 
T. C.Brown 



Dr. Bascom 



T. C. Brown 
T. C. Brown 

Bascom 

T. C. Brown 

Bascom 

T. C. Brown 
Bascom 



Dr. Bascom 

Dr. Tennent 

Dr. Tennent 
and Dr. Moore 
Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Moore and 
Miss Pinney 
Dr. Moore 

Dr. Tennent 
and Dr. Moore 
Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Moore and 
Miss Pinney 



1 .. 
3 .. 



. 28, 



28. 



2 •. . 

3 .. 

1 .. 

2 .. 
1 .. 

3 .. 
9 



10 



119 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1913-14 — Continued. 



Department 



Course 



Theoretical Biology, elective . . . 

Protoplasm and the Cell, post- 
major 

ExperimentalMorphology, post- 
major 

The Special Senses, post-major 

Physiological Chemistry, post- 
major 

Graduate Courses 

Evolution of Organisms 

Physiology 

Biological Journal Club 



Instructor 



Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Tennent 



Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Moore 



Dr. Moore 



Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Moore 
Dr. Tennent 
and Dr. Moore 



Hours 

weekly 



No. IN Class 



1st 
Sem. 



2nd 
Sem. 



120 



X 



•I 

-i 

'^ • 



?5, 



•2 -^ 

■is Oo 
Co 



•^ CO 



s ? 






^ 



55, 



O 



•Xaoioig 


O(Mi«t^«3tOIMNt~C0-*Oai00e<lt~C<lCD05«300mlNc3i00OO00e<l 


•ASoiosj) 


■ • j 1 j j j j j jo>e<3t~00C0OTl<(MC0«ltDC^ira>-lOO=^Mt~- 


•Xjjsnnaqg 


OtOtOO'-lTlHr-1.0>OT-IMOO>OCO>r5io,-l^(M05COO'-IIM«)OOOOOirt 
■1 i-H ,-( ,-1 (M M ^ ^ t^ t^ Tjl c<5 TfH CS U5 lO CO m r-( CO TO CO CO CO 1>) <M CO ■>!< 


•mrq/Cnj • •'-'Ot^«ot-t^oocDoococQt-tt^-^T-ioiocqr^r-(oooo»-"-.jH»oos 


•SDi^Braaq^Bj^ 


<MO<MC000iOTlHC^C^a-*'^C000C0C0"rJ<<y305Tt<O00e0C0C^C0COCOO'^ 
COC^)»-l(MCqcO<N(r^COCOCOCO'*"*=D'<*COC<lCO-<^CO'*-^":jCOCOCOC>JCO 


■A3o[oa3tjoxv 

pnB ^jy {BDISSEIQ 


; i ; i i icqoj • : ito T}i .-1 >o o -H 00 CO in i ira t~ to lo c-q co -^ ■* co 

»-Ht-* • ■ !>• so CCI CO kC CO CO O CO • Tf CO CO t^ O -^ CO t^ t* 


•noi!jB3npg 




Tin . CO in CO CO -<** lo (M (M CO ic o o «-H r^ e<) c^ 

CO • CO (M CO CO CO rt cq (M (M CO <M c<q 


•ASojoqoAsj 




o 

CO 


•Aqdosojiqj 


• ai>ocoocOQOoo<Mt^t^cft»nT-irtOC»c»t^-r-coiraoc<i-<*i(M-*o>o 

■r-4TiHrHC<Ii-l(M(N»r3iOCOt^OOOSOOOCZ)COCD-.*H-<S1COCO-*Ttl'^W5»0-^ 


•MBfJ 




cococo"5cX) -eocoooo 

COlMlNrtC^ -(MIMIO-* 


puB soiuionoog 


. .CO t^'^ OOtJH oco osco-^cot^ost^t^coiot^osiococot^cq O 00 
• • *-H f-t cs CO -<i^ lo t^ lo -^ CO CO CO t^ CO o 00 1-t ^ 05 r^ cj) 00 o cq ^ lo CO 


•jfjO;STJJ 


ooira ;co-i>-*tor~co.co>oc33 0ioococoi:~coco(MO--io2cDior-iT)<t~ 


pwB saSEnSuBfj oi^i'raag 


:::::: >^?2°=2i=3S23 j^SSiSSSSSS^S 


aAi^BJBClinoo 




\\::\]\\\\:\\]\\\\\l\\\\ 1"^°^^ 


•qSITIBdg 


i <M Tl< 1-1 rH >-l ,H ■* lO OJ )cO^.-(^i-i>0-<COCDCOt}iO(MCO^t1<^CO 


•nw['Bjj 


CM .N .rt^ioooooooo-s<ooo3ooocooroot^cDcot~t-(oooooin< 


•ASopiiqj aonBHioy 


,-icqcq • '■ ; .-H .-H r-( ira lo Tji -# CO <N :<mc<i -cq ^ in co >o co tH co co ^n 


•qonsj^ 


ocoiocoT-<cococ>oco»ratno-^^»noc^cocooo3co*-HOOoo»ncq 


•ASoiojiqj orao:jnax 


:rt^Tj(Tjicoi-i<McocOrtknr-n:^i?qcqcoco>nco>nco>n(Mco(McDT)(«5 


•nBcnjar) 


l>.t^(MO^COCDCZ>*-*u:)CO':J<COCqcOOCOiO^^COI:^t^i-Ht^COCnt^OiOS 


•noxBg-o[Sny 


• -co t^c3ico ooo »oot^03»o»o»ocot^ocOin»o^-t cqo 0000 t^coco 


•9jn^BJ3:)i'j qsijSug; 


cqcnoai^^cococqiocoooiOTfiTf-ch'OcooooorHir-iococooooocOQO 

CO(MCOCOt~OOC3sc0.01:^r^oOCT.COiocOOJCOI>-t-f~t^^CM^C<linl:^00 

^^^^rt^cq<^^(^^.^^c^J(^^cqc^c^^^<^qc^cs,cq^^cq 


•nijBi 


oO'*cDu3oocnira>nOrtOO'#ocD05cnt~^ira-!t<>nco>oaiio.-iTi<'* 




•2J38jr) 


OOOOOCO(MCOOO^i-(l>.OiCO»or^cOt^Oicq05CDr-lT^COt^cOCOC0 01 


•jtSojonqj aAt; 
-EJBdraoQ puB iixusijBg 


: rt — i(M CO i-H N Tj( -* in CO 00 cvi .-1 cq CO .-1 (M -cqccicci '■ -i-i '.,-1,-,^ 


•s:^U3pn'}g 
JO laqranjsi I^^OX 


^^OOCO(M«01C<lCOC00003'*-#t^cOCOt:^CO.-lcol:^OOrtlcOCqa>(M 

^col:~-Hcqcocoo-*oooioocqlooocncort^^-*lnco<M<^^<^qccllnln^- 

i-H^^»-trHC^CqC<J<MC^lCOCOCOCO^^'<*lTtH-^^-^-<J<-<}*^TjH-^-^ 




S85-1886 

■•'6-1887 

887-1888 

888-1889 

889-1890 

891-1892 

892-1893 

893-1894 

894-1895 

895-1896 

896-1897 

897-1898 

898-1899 

899-1900 

900-1901 

901-1902 

902-1903 

1903-1904 

1904-1905 

905-1906 

1906-1907 

907-1908 

908-1909 

909-1910 

910-1911 

911-1912 

912-1913 

913-1914 


' 



Comparative Table of Graduate and Undergraduate Students 
in the Different Departments of the College in 1913-14' 



Department. 



P 



o id"2P 
■ •^ Sao 

■g a WIS. 



:3o 



2^ 



Greek 

Latin 

Latin omitting requii-ed* Latin 

English 

English omitting required English 

German 

French 

Italian 

Spanish 

Comparative Literature 

Semitic Languages and Biblical Literature 

History 

Economics and Politics 

Philosophy 

Philosophy omitting required course 

Psychology 

Psychology omitting required course 

Education 

Art and Archaeology 

Mathematics 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Geology 

Biology 



22 

126 

36 

262 

56 

50 

93 

12 

19 

30 

27 

183 

130 

136 

29 

150 

42 

14 

63 

28 

53 

33 

16 

76 



5.7 

32.6 

9.4 

67.7 

14.5 

12.9 

24.0 

3.1 

4.9 

7.8 

7.0 

47.3 

33.6 

35.1 

7.5 

38.8 

10.9 

3.6 

16.3 

7.2 

13.7 

8.6 

4.1 

19.7 



26 

18 

11 

9 

2 

7 

7 

6 

14 

9 

9 

9 

10 

10 

8 

10 

6 

6 

8 

1 

6 



10 
10 

32.5 
22.5 
13.8 
11.2 
2.5 



7.5 
17.5 
11.2 
11.2 
11.2 
12.5 
12.5 
10 

12.5 
7.5 
7.5 
10 
1.3 
7.5 



* Minor Latin is required except for the 22 students who take Greek or for the students 
who entered with matriculation Greek. 



(121) 



XI. 



Grades Received in certain Undergraduate Examinations. 



Classes of over SO students. 
Semester I, 1913-14. 







Per cent. 














of 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 




Number 


High 


of 


of 


of 


of 




in Class. 


Credit. 


Credit. 


Merit. 


Passed. 


Failed. 


Latin. Minor: 














Cicero's Letters 


79 


1 


23 


34 


29 


12 


Horace 


83 


2 


28 


34 


26 


9 


English. General: 




First Year Literature . . . 


103 


1 


14 


39 


37 


10 


First Year Composition . 


99 








23 


57 


19 


Second Year Literature. . 


97 


4 


19 


52 


26 





Second Year Composition 


90 





8 


29 


52 


11 


History. Minor: 














Europe since 1815 


63 


14 


32 


35 


14 


5 


Philosophy. General .... 


101 


9 


34 


43 


11 


4 


Psychology. General 


105 


6 


28 


32 


25 


10 


Biology. Minor 


55 


1 


29 


47 


15 


7 







Classes of SO or over, but under 50 students. 



French. Minor: 














Literature 


39 


13 


28 


36 


21 


3 


Reading and Composition 


35 


9 


20 • 


17 


31 


23 


History. Minor: 














Reformation 


39 


18 


41 


21 


10 


10 


Economics. Minor: 




Introduction to Econom- 














ics 


46 
30 


9 
17 


41 

37 


39 
30 


9 
17 


2 


Problems in Politics 







37 


22 


27 


32 


16 


3 


Economics. Major: 




History of Economic 














Tliought 


35 


17 


31 


37 


11 


3 


Psychology. Minor: 




Psychology of Instinct, 














Emotion and Will .... 


31 


10 


26 


48 


10 


6 


Physics. Minor 


42 


21 


14 


40 


12 


12 







Classes of 20 or over, but under SO students. 



Latin. Major: 
Tacitus 


25 
25 

26 

24 

22 

24 
25 

24 

20 
26 


12 
16 

12 

8 
14 

13 

16 

21 

10 
23 


60 

48 

19 

38 
23 

42 

52 

50 

25 
31 


28 
32 

38 

50 
60 

33 

20 

29 

35 
31 




4 

31 

4 
14 

13 

12 



30 

12 





Latin Literature 

English. Elective: 

Daily Themes 






French. Major: 

Literature 





Reading and Composition 
History. Minor: 

England since 1066 

History. Major: 

British Imperialism 

Economics and Politics. 
Major: 

Social Politics 

History op Art. Minor: 

17th and 18th CenAury 











Chemistry. Minor 


4 



(122) 



123 



Grades Received in certain Undergraduate Examinations. 
Continued. 

Classes of SO students or over. 
Semester II, 1913-14. 



Latin. Minor: 

Terence 

Horace 

English. General: 

First Year Literature. . . 

First Year Elocution. . . 

First Year Composition 

Second Year Literature . 

Second Year Elocution . 

Second Year Composition 
History. Minor: 

Europe since 1815. . . 
Philosophy. General. 
Psychology. General. 
Biology. Minor: 

Embryology 

Vertebrates 





Per cent. 












of 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Per cent. 


Number 


High 


of 


of 


of 


of 


in Class. 


Credit. 


Credit. 


Merit. 


Passed. 


Failed. 


70 


7 


34 


39 


16 


4 


71 


6 


28 


39 


21 


6 


103 


2 


8 


51 


34 


5 


112 


25 


38 


30 


7 





98 





2 


23 


69 


16 


91 


3 


26 


46 


21 


3 


90 


31 


40 


28 


1 





88 





8 


35 


55 


2 


69 


13 


30 


35 


17 


4 


101 


9 


28 


41 


17 


6 


103 


6 


25 


35 


17 


17 


52 


4 


42 


42 


12 





62 


4 


27 


33 


31 


6 



Classes of SO or over, but under 60 students. 



French. Minor: 

Literature 

Reading and Composition 
History. Minor: 

History of the Reforma- 
tion 

Economics. Minor: 

Introduction ' to Eco 

nomics 

Economics. Major: _ 

History of Economic 
Thought 

Social Politics , 

Psychology. Minor: 

Animal Psychology 

Physics. Minor , 



39 
33 



15 


38 
12 


51 

21 


10 
33 


40 


18 


45 


23 


10 


44 


9 


34 


48 


9 


35 
35 


20 
31 


37 
49 


37 
20 


6 



31 

42 


23 
19 


61 

24 


13 
31 


3 

17 




18 




10 



Classes of SO or over, but under SO students. 



Latin. Major: 

Comedy 

Literature 

French. Major: 

Literature 

Reading and Composition 
History. Minor: 

History of England since 

1066 

History. Major: 

British Imperialism 

Economics. Minor: 

Problems in Politics 

Sociology 

Philosophy. Minor: 

Philosophical Theories . . 
History op Art. Minor: 

17th and 18th Century 

Painting 

History OF Art. Elective: 

Life and Art in Hellen- 
istic Towns 

Chemistry. Minor: 

Chemistry of Metals. 

Organic Chemistry . . . 



25 
24 



22 
22 



28 
23 



28 
26 



26 



21 



24 
24 



16 
21 



14 

14 



14 
30 



25 
16 



20 



14 



52 
54 



45 
41 



32 

30 

64 
28 

45 

16 

57 
17 



32 
26 



36 
45 



43 
39 



21 

32 



20 



46 



24 



33 
21 





24 



10 
23 



25 
38 



12 



25 
33 



XII. 



Group Subjects Selected by the Students Graduating in the 
Years 1906-14. 





1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910, 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


1914. 


Number in class 


56 


71 


81 


70 


69 


59 


60 


60 


78 






Greek 


8 
26 
14 

6 
11 

3 


4 
24 
22 
11 

22 

2 

's 

12 
12 

9 
3 

7 

'6 


10 
31 
17 
10 

17 
4 

i9 

23 
12 

's 

2 
5 
1 
3 


10 
26 

18 
11 
10 

2 
2 

17 

19 

5 

'9 

4 
4 

'3 


8 
27 

9 
11 

7 
1 
2 

26 

23 
5 

'9 
5 
5 

1 
5 


9 
19 
11 

7 
11 

"2 

is 

17 
5 

(3 
8 
4 
3 
1 


1 

12 

10 

9 

10 

2 

2 

3 

24 

25 
6 

'5 
5 

4 

'2 


5 
18 
4 
9 
13 
1 
6 

24 

21 

2 

'3 

4 
4 

6 


3 


Latin 


10 


English 


15 


German 


4 


French 


13 


Italian and Spanish 

Spanish 


2 
1 


Comparative Literature . . 
History 


15 

18 
5 

3 

2 

1 


5 
36 


Ancient History 


1 


Economics and Politics . . 
Philosophy 


34 
9 


History of Art 

Mathematics 


4 

2 


Physics 


4 


Chemistry 


7 


Geology 


1 


Biology 


5 









(124) 



XIII. 



Trial Orals in French, Held October, 1913. 





Num- 
ber 
taking 
Exami- 
nation. 


Passed. 


Failed. 




Num- 
ber. 


Per 

Cent. 


Num- 
ber. 


Per 

Cent. 




95 


72 


75.7 


23 


24.2 






■ 


21 
18 

56 


20 
15 

37 


95.2 
83.3 

66.0 


1 
3 

19 


4.7 


Had taken some major language in college. . . . 
Had not taken a major language or minor 


16.6 
33.9 







Sophomores, total 

Had taken minor French in college 

Had taken some major language in college. . . . 

Had not taken a major language or minor 
French in college 



82 


61 


74.3 


21 


28 


26 


92.8 


2 


2 


1 


50. 


1 


52 


34 


65.3 


18 



25.6 



7.1 
50. 

34.6 



Trial Orals in German, Held October, 1913. 





Num- 
ber 
taking 
Exami- 
nation. 


Passed. 


Failed. 




Num- 
ber. 


Per 
Cent. 


Num- 
ber. 


Per 

Cent. 




90 


55 


61.1 


35 


38.8 








9 

17 

64 


8 
11 

36 


88.8 
64.7 

56.2 


1 
6 

28 


11.1 


Had taken some major language in college. . . . 
Had not taken a major language or minor 


35.2 
43.7 









77 


59 


76.6 


18 


23.3 








9 

1 

67 


8 

1 

50 


88.8 
100. 

74.6 


1 


17 


11.1 


Had taken some major language in college 

Had not taken a major language or minor 


25 3 







(125) 



ANNUAL REPORT 



THE PRESIDENT 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



1914-15. 



PHILADELPHIA: 

THE JOHN C. WINSTON CO. 

1915. 



Officers of Administration. 

Academic Year, 1915-16. 

President, 

M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D. 

Office: Taylor Hall. 

Dean of the College, 

Marion Reilly, A.B. 

Office: Taylor Hall. 

Recording Dean and Assistant to the President, 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D. 

Office: Taylor Hall. 

Secretary of the College, 
Edith Orlady, A.B. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Recording Secretary, 
Abigail Camp Dimon, A.M. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Wardens of the Halls of Residence, 
Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., Pembroke Hall. 
Margaret Bontecou, A.B., Denbigh Hall. 
Mary Frances Nearing, A.B., Rockefeller Hall. 
Bertha Sophie Ehlers, A.B., Radnor Hall. 
Leonora Lucas, A.B., Merion Hall. 
Sarah Newton Hallett, A.B., Assistant to the Warden of Pembroke Hall. 

Comptroller, 
Sandy L. Hurst. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Busi7iess Manager, 
Louise Watson, A.B. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Assistant Business Manager, 
Clara Regina Stahl, A.B. Office: Taylor Hall. 

Junior Bursar, 
Josephine Lemmon, A.B. Office: Rockefeller Hall. 

Libraria7i, 
Lois Antoinette Reed, A.B., B.L.S. Office: The Library. 

Director of Athletics and Gymnastics and Supervisor of Health Department, 
Constance M. K. Applebee. Office: The Gymnasium. 

Physician in Chief, 
Thomas F. Branson, M.D. Office hours, 8.30 to 9.30 and 2 to 3 daily, 
Rosemont, Pa. 

Assistant Physician, 

Frances R. Sprague, M.D. Pembroke Road, Bryn Mawr; Office hours. 

The Infirmary, Bryn Mawr College, 4 to 5.30 daily except Sunday. 

Examining Oculist, 
Helen Murphy, M.D. Office hours, 2 to 4 daily, 1433 Spruce Street, 

Philadelphia. 

(iii) 



Academic Appointments. 

Academic Year, 1915-16. 

M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the College and Professor 
of English. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1877; studied at the .Johns Hopkins University, 1877-78; 
University of Leipsic, 1879-82; Ph.D., University of Zurich, 1882. Sorbonne and 
College de France, 1883; Dean of the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College and Professor 
of English. 1885-94. 

Charlotte Angas Scott, D.Sc, Alumnoe Professor of Mathematics. 

Lincoln, England. Graduate in Honours, Girton College, University of Cambridge, 
England, 1880; B.Sc, University of London, 1882; Lecturer on Mathematics in Girton 
College, 1880-84; lectured in connection with Newnham College, University of Cam- 
bridge, England, 1880-83; D.Sc, University of London, 1885. 

George A. Barton, Ph.D., Professor of Biblical Literature and Semitic 
Languages. 

A.B., Haverford College, 1882, and A.M., 1885; studied under the direction of the American 
Institute of Hebrew, 1885-86; ■ Harvard University, 1888-91; Thayer Scholar, Harvard 
University, 1889-91; A.M., Harvard University, 1890; Ph.D., Harvard University, 
1891. Director of the American School of Oriental Study and Research in Palestine, 
1902-03. 

Florence Bascom,* Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1882, B.Sc, 1884, and A.M., 1887. Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1891-93; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1893. Assistant in Geology and 
Instructor in Petrography, Ohio State University, 1893-95. 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D., Recording Dean and Assistant to the 
President. 

Reading, England. B.Sc, University of London, 1893; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, 
and B.A., Trinity College, Dublin, 1905; Girton College, University of Cambridge, 
England, 1889-92; Graduate in Honours, First Class, in the Cambridge Mathematical 
Tripos, 1892; Graduate in Honours, Final Mathematical Schools, University of Oxford, 
1892; Graduate Student in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-93, and Fellow in 
Mathematics, 1893-94; Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship and 
Student in Mathematics, University of Gottingen, 1894-95. 

Wilmer Cave Wright, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Greek. 

Shrcv/sbury, England. Girton College, University of Cambridge, England, 1888-92; 
Graduate in Honours, Cambridge Classical Tripos, 1892; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 
1895. Fellow in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-93; Fellow in Latin, University of 
Chicago, 1893-94, and Fellow in Greek, 1894-95; Reader in Greek and Latin, University 
of Chicago, 1895-96. 

James H. Leuba, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Education. 

Neuchatel, Switzerland. B.S., University of Neuchatel, 1886; Ph.D., Ursinus College, 
1888; Scholar in Psychology, Clark University, 1892-93; Fellow in Psychology, Clark 
University, 1893-95; Ph.D., Clark University, 1896. 

FoNGER DeHaan, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish. 

Leeuwarden, Holland. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1895; Instructor in Modern 
Languages, Lehigh University, 1885-91; Fellow in Romance Languages, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1893-94, Assistant in Romance Languages, 1893-95, Instructor in Romance 
Languages, 1895-96, and Associate in Romance Languages, 1896-97. 

Arthur Leslie Wheeler, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

A.B., Yale University, 1893; Scholar and Student in Classics, Yale College, 1893-96; 
Ph.D., Yale University, 1896. Instructor and Tutor in Latin, Yale College, 1894-1900. 

Henry Nevill Sanders, Ph.D., Professor of Greek. 

Edinburgh, Scotland. A.B., Trinity University, Toronto, 1894, and A.M., 1897; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1903. Fellow in Greek, Johns Hopkins University, 1897-98; 
Lecturer in Greek, McGill University, 1900-02. 

* Granted leave of absence for the year 1915-16. 



William Bashford Huff, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1889; A.M., University of Chicago, 1S9G; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University, 1900. Lecture Assistant in Physics, Johns Hopkins University, 
1899-1900, Assistant in Physics, 1900-01, and Instructor in Physics, 1901-02. 

William- Roy Smith, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

A.B., University of Texas, 1897, and A.M., 1898; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1903. 
Acting Professor of History and Political Science, University of Colorado, 1900-01; 
Lecturer in History, Barnard College, 1901-02. 

Lucy Martin Donnelly,* A.B., Professor of English. 

A.B.. Bryn Mawr College, 189.3; LTniversity of Oxford, England, and University of Leipsic, 
1893-94; Sorbonne and College de France, and University of Leipsic, 1894-95. 

Karl Detlev Jessen,* Ph.D., Professor of German Literature. 

Winnemark, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. A.B., University of Chicago, 1896, and 
Fellow in German, 1897-98; Ph.D., University of Berlin, 1901. University of Chicago, 
189.5-98; University of Kiel, 1899; University of Berlin, 1898-1901; Acting Professor 
of Modern Languages, Eureka College, 1896; Instructor in German, Iowa State Univer- 
sity, 1897; Instructor in German, Harvard University, 1901-03, and Lecturer on German 
Literature and Aesthetics, 1904. 

Tenney Frank, Ph.D., Professor of Latin. 

A.B., University of Kansas, 1898, and A.M., 1899; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1903. 
Fellow, University of Chicago, 1899-1901; Assistant and Associate in Latin, University 
of Chicago, 1901-04. 

David Hilt Tennent, Ph.D., Professor of Biology. 

S.B., Olivet College, 1900; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1914. Fellow, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1902-04; Bruce Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1904. 

Carleton Fairchild Brown, Ph.D., Professor of English Philology. 

A.B., Carleton College, 1888; A.M., Harvard University, 1901, and Ph.D., 1903. Shat- 
tuck Scholar, Harvard University, 1901-03; Instructor in English, Harvard University, 
1903-05. 

James Barnes, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

HaHfax. Nova Scotia. B.A,, Dalhousie Univorsitv, Honours in Mathematics and Physics, 
1899, and M.A., 1900; Ph.D.. Johns Hopkins University, 1904. Holder of 1851 Exhibi- 
tion Science Research Scholarship, 1900-03; Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, 1903-04, 
and Assistant in Physics, 1904-06. 

Richard Thayer Holbrook, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Italian. 

A.B., Yale University, 1893; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1902. Sorbonne, College de 
France, Ec.ole des Chartes, 1893-94, ]89.'J-96; Stvident in Italy and University of Berlin, 
1894-95; Student in Spain, 1901; Tutor in the Romance Languages and Literatures, 
Yale University, 1896-1901,. and Columbia University, 1902-06. 

Theodore de Leo de Laguna, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 

A.B., University of California, 1896, and A.M., 1899; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1901. 
Teacher in the Government .Schools of the Philippine Island.s, 1901-04; Honorary 
Fellow and Assistant in Philosophy, Cornell University, 1904-05; Assistant Professor 
of the Philosophy of Education, University of Michigan, 1905-07. 

Marion Reilly, A.B., Dean of the College and Reader in Philosophy. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-02, 1903, 
1903-06; Newnham College, University of Cambridge, Spring, 1907; Universities of 
Rome and Siena, 1911-12. 

Marion Parris Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901, and Ph.D., 1909. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1902-05, Fellow in Economics and Politics, 1905-06; Bryn Mawr College Research 
Fellow and Student in Economics and Politics, University of Vienna, 1906-07. 

Clarence Errol Ferree, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Experimental 
Psychology and Director of the Psychological Laboratory. 

B.S., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1900, A.M., 1901, and M.S., 1902; Ph.D., Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1909. Fellow in Psychology, Cornell University, 1902-03; Assistant in Psychology, 
Cornell University, 1903-07. 

* Granted leave of absence for the year 1915-16, 



Agathe Lasch, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Teutonic Philology. 

Berlin, Germany. Ph.D., University of Heidelberg, 1909. Student, University of Halle, 
1906-07; University of Heidelberg, 1907-10. State Examination pro facultate docendi, 
Karlsruhe, 1910. 

Grace Mead Andrus de Laguna, Ph.D., Associate in Philosophy. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1903, and Ph.D., 1906. Sage Scholar in Philosophy, Cornell 
University, 1903-05; Alice Freeman Palmer Fellow of Wellesley College, 1905-06; 
Reader in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08. 

Regina Katharine Crandall, Ph.D., Director of English Essay Work 
and Reader in English. 

A.B., Smith College, 1890; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1902. Graduate Student, 
University of Chicago, 1893-94, and Fellow in History, 1894-96; Assistant in History, 
Smith College, 1896-99; Instructor in History, Wellesley College, 1899-1900. 

Edith Orlady, A.B., Secretary of the College. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1902. Warden of Pembroke Hall West, 1903-05, and Warden 
of Rockefeller Hall, 1905-06; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1903-06, 1907-09; 
Recording Secretary, 1910-12. 

Kate Gordon, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Ph.B.. University of Chicago, 1900, and Ph.D., 1903. Scholar in Pedagogy, University 
of Chicago, 1900-01, and Fellow in Philosophy, 1901-03; European Fellow of the 
Association of Collegiate Alumnae, 1903-04; Instructor in Ethics and Psychology, Mt. 
Holyoke College, 1904-05, and in Teachers' College, Columbia University, 1906-07; 
Substitute Professor of Philosophy, Mt. Holyoke College, Second Semester, 1911-12. 

James Fulton Ferguson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Ancient History 
and Latin. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1903; A.B., Yale University, 1906, A.M., 1907, and Ph.D., 
1912. Fellow, Yale University, 1906-09; Instructor in Williams College, 1909-10; 
Instructor in Greek and Latin, Yale College, 1910-12. 

Thomas Clachar Brown, Ph.D., Associate in Geology. 

A.B., Amherst College, 1904; A.M., Columbia University, 1905, and Ph.D., 1909. Assist- 
ant in Palaeontology, Columbia University, 1905-07; Geologist to the Board of Water 
Supply of New York City, 1907-09 ; Assistant Professor of Geology, Middlebury College, 
1909-11; Non-resident Lecturer in Geology, Norwich University, 1909; Assistant 
Professor of Geology, Pennsylvania State College, 1911-12. 

Roger Frederic Brunel, Ph.D., Associate Professor in Chemistry. 

A.B., Colby University, 1903; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1906. Lecture Assistant 
in Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, 1906-07; Instructor in Chemistry, Syracuse 
University, 1907-10, and Assistant Professor of Chemistry, 1910-12. 

Matilde Castro, Ph.D., Phebe Anna Thome Associate Professor of Edu- 
cation and Director of the Phebe Anna Thome Model School. 

A.B., University of Chicago, 1900, and Ph.D., 1907. Fellow in Philosophy, University of 
Chicago, 1900-01, 190.3-04, 1905-06. Principal of the Morris High School, Chicago, 
1901-03; Instructor in Philosophy, Mt. Holyoke College, 1904-05; Instructor in 
Philosophy, Vassar College, 1906-09; Professor and Head of the Department of Philos- 
ophy, Rockford College, 1910-12. 

Arthur Russell Moore, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

A.B., University of Nebraska, 1904; Ph.D., University of California, 1911. Assistant 
in Physiology, University of California, 1909-11, and Assistant Professor of Physiology, 
1911-13. 

Gertrude Rand, Ph.D., Associate in Experimental and Educational 
Psychology. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1908; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1913. Graduate Scholar in 
Psychology, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09, 1911-12, Fellow in Philosophy, 1909-10, 
Fellow in Psychology, 1910-11, and Sarah Berliner Research Fellow, 1912-13. 

Eunice Morgan Schenck, Ph.D., Associate in French. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907, and Ph.D., 1913. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1909, Graduate Scholar, 1909-10, and Fellow in Romance Languages, 1912-13; Presi- 
dent's European Fellow and Student, the Sorbonne, College de France, University of 
Grenoble, and in Madrid, 1910-12. 



Samuel Claggett Chew, Jr., Ph.D., Associate in English Literature. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1909, and Ph.D., 191.3. Fellow, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, 1910-12; English Master, Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn., 1913-14. 

Jean Baptiste Beck, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mediaeval French 
Literature. 

Guebwiller, Alsace. Baccalaureate in Rhetoric, Sorbonne, 1900; Baccalaureate in Philoso- 
phy, Sorbonne, 1901; Ph.D., University of Strassburg, 1907; State Examination -pro 
facultate docendi, 1908. Professor of Latin and German in the Ecole Alsacienne, Paris, 
1909; Director of Advanced Courses for Teachers in Gymnasia, University of Vienna, 
1910; Professor of French Literature, Wiener Handels-Akademie, 1910; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Romance Languages, University of Illinois, 1911-14; Instructor in Romance 
Languages and Literature, University of Chicago, Summer Quarter, 1912. 

Susan Myra Kingsbury, Ph.D., Carola Woerishoffer Professor of Social 
Economy a?id Director of the Carola Woerishoffer Department of Social 
Research. 

A.B., College of the Pacific, 1890; A.M., Leland Stanford Jr. University, 1899; Ph.D., 
Columbia University, 1905. University Fellow, Columbia University, 1902-03; Holder 
of the European Fellowship of the Women's Education Association, Boston, Mass., 1903- 
04; Instructor in History, Vassar College, 1904-0.5; Director of Investigation, Massa- 
chusetts Commission on Industrial and Technical Education, 190.5-06; Instructor in 
History and Economics and Head of Departments, Simmons College, 1906-07; Assistant, 
Associate and Professor in Economics, Simmons College, and Director of the Depart- 
ment of Research, Women's Educational and Industrial LTnion, Boston, 1907-15. 

Albert Edwin Avey, Ph.D., Associate in Philosophy. 

A.B., Yale Univer.sity, 1908, A.M., 1909, and Ph.D., 1915. Graduate Student, Yale Uni- 
versity, 1908-09, 1913-15; University of Berlin, 1912-13: Assistant in Psychological 
Laboratory, Yale Univer.sity, 1913-14, and Lecturer in Elementary Logic, Yale Uni- 
versity, Spring Term, 191.3-14. 

Georgiana Goddard King, A.M., Associate Professor of the History of 
Art. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1897. Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1896-97, and Fellow in English, 1897-98; College de France, First Semester, 
1898-99. 

Rhys Carpenter, M.A., Associate Professor of Classical Archaeology. 

A.B., Columbia University, 1911; B.A., University of Oxford, 1911, and M.A., 1914. 
Rhodes Scholar and Student, Balliol College, University of Oxford, 1908-11; Drisler 
Fellow in Classics, Columbia University, 1911-13; Student, American School of Classical 
Studies in Athens, 1912-13. 

Charles Ghequiere Fenwick, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political 
Science. 

A.B., Loyola College, 1898; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1912. Student of Political 
Science. Johns Hopkins University, 1909-11; Law Clerk, Division of International Law 
in the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 1911-14; University of Freiburg, 
Summer, 1913; Lecturer on International Law, Washington College of Law, 1912-14. 

James Miller Leake, Ph.D., Associate in History. 

A.B., Randolph-Macon College, 1902; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1914. Instructor 
in French and English, Randolph-Macon College, 1901-03; Principal of Ashland High 
School, Ashland, Va., 1909-11; Johns Hopkins University, 1911-14; University Fellow, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1913-14. 

Howard Levi Gray, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

A.B., University of Rochester, 1897; A.B., Harvard University, 1898, A.M., 1900, and 
Ph.D., 1907. Instructor in History, Harvard University, 1909-13, and Assistant Pro- 
fessor of History, 1914-15. 

James Llewellyn Crenshaw, Ph.D., Associate in Physical Chemistry. 

A.B., Centre College, 1907, and A.M., 1908; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1911. Assistant 
Chemist in the Geo-Physical Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution, Washington, D. C, 
1910-15. 

Samuel Arthur King, M.A., Non-resident Lecturer in English Diction. 

Tynemouth, England. M.A., University of London, 1900. Special Lecturer in Elocution, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1901; Special Lecturer in Elocution, Univer.sity of California, 
1902. 



Pierre FRANgois Giroud, D.L., Licencic-es-Lettres, Non-resident Lec- 
turer in French. 

Lyons, France. Bachelier-es-letlres, University of France, 1874, and Licencie-hs-lettres, 
1881; D.L,, Temple University, 1914; Officier d'Acad6mie, 1904; Officier de I'lnstruc- 
tion publique, 1905. Ecole des Hautes-Etudes, Chartreux, Lyons; Sorbonne, College 
de France, 1881-85; Director, Ecole Ste. Marie, Chalon, 1886-88; Teacher of 
French in the Delancey School, 1889-96, and in the Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia, 
1889-1915; in Girard College, Philadelphia, 1896-1912; Special Lecturer on French 
Literature, Johns Hopkins University, 1907-11; University of Pennsylvania, 1912-15; 
Cornell University (Summer School), 1913-14. 

Howard James Savage,* Ph.D., Lecturer in English Literature and 
Rhetoric. 

A.B., Tufts College, 1907; A.M., Harvard University, 1909, and Ph.D., 1915. Instructor 
in English, Tufts College, 1908-11; Instructor in English, Harvard University, 1911-1.3 
and at Radcliffe College, 1911-15; Graduate Student, Harvard University, 1908-09; 
1913-15; Instructor in the Harvard Summer School, 1912, 1913, 1914, 1915. 

Benjamin Franklin Wallis,! Ph.D., Lecturer in Geology. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1910, and Ph.D., 1915. Instructor in Science in the High 
School, Clifton, N. J., 1912-13; Instructor in Mineralogy and Petrology, Northwestern 
University, 1913-14; Hopkins Scholar, Johns Hopkins University, 1911-12, 1914-15. 

Charles Clinton Bramble, A.M., Lecturer in Mathematics. 

Ph.B., Dickinson College, 1912, and A.M., 1913. Assistant in Physics, Dickinson College, 
1911-12; Instructor in Montclair Academy, 1912-13; Hopkins Scholar, Johns Hopkins 
University, 1913-15. 

Oscar F. W. Fernsemer,J Ph.D., Lecturer in German Literature. 

Munich, Germany. Ph.D., University of Munich, 1912. Head of Modern Language 
Department in the High School, Cranford, N. J., 1913-14. 

Abby Kirk, A.B., Reader in Elementary Greek. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1892. Reader in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-98. Asso- 
ciate Principal and Teacher of English and Classics in the Misses Kirk's School, Bryn 
Mawr, 1899-1915. 

Mary Jeffers, § A.M., Reader in German and Oral Examiner in French, 
and German. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1895, and A.M., 1897. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1895-98, 190.3-04, 1906-07; Teacher of Latin in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn 
Mawr, 1895-98; Student at the Universities of Munich and Halle. 1898-99; Teacher 
of Latin and History in the Girls' Latin School, Baltimore, Md., 1900-01; Head of the 
Latin Department in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 1899-1907; Student, 
University of Bonn, Summer of 1905; Private Tutor, 1892-1914; Supervisor of College 
Preparatory Department, Brantwood Hall, Bronxville, Lawrence Park, N. Y., 1905-07; 
Lecturer on European Travel, Miss Wright's School, 1904-15, and Teacher of Latin, 
1911-15; French and German oral examiner, 1909-14. 

Edna Aston Shearer, Ph.D., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1904, and Ph.D., 1914. Junior Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1904-05; Holder of the President's Fellowship and Student, Universities of 
Edinburgh and Aberdeen, 190.5-06; Fellow in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr College, 1906- 
07; Teacher of English in the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1907-09, and Graduate 
Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1907-08. 

Mary Hamilton Swindler, Ph.D., Reader in Latin and Reader and 
Demonstrator in Classical Archaeology. 

A.B., University of Indiana, 1905, and A.M., 1906; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1913. 
Graduate Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07, and Fellow in Greek, 1907-09; 
Mary E. Garrett European Fellow and Student, LTniversities of Berlin and Oxford and 
the American School of Classical Studies in Athens. 1909-10; Teacher in the Misses 
Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 1910-11, and in Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, 1911- 
12. 

Ida Langdon, Ph.D., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1903; A.M., Cornell University, 1910, and Ph.D., 1912. Cor- 
nell University, 1909-12. 

* Appointed as substitute for Professor Lucy Martin Donnelly in 1915-16. 
t Appointed as substitute for Professor Florence Bascom in 191.5-16. 
X Appointed as substitute for Professor Karl Detlev Jessen in 1915-16. 
§ Granted leave of absence for the year 1915-16, 



Esther Cloxjdman Dunn, A.B., Reader in English. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1913. 

Ellen Thayer, A.B., Reader in French. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. The Sorbonne, Paris, 1909-11. Teacher of French in 
Wolfe Hall, Denver, Colo., 1911-12. 

Clara Whitney Crane, A.B., Reader in English. 

A.B., Radcliffe College, 1914. 

Edith Chapin Craven, A.B., Reader in English. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1899. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1899-1900. 

Elly Wilhelmina Lawatschek,* A.B., Reader in German. 

Teplitz, Austria. A.B., University of Washington, 1913. Teacher of German, Univer- 
sity of Washington, 1911-14; Teacher of German in the Walnut Hill School and 
Graduate Student, Wellesley College, 1914-15. 

Mary Edith Pinney, A.M., Demonstrator in Biology. 

A.B., Kansas State University, 1908, and A.M., 1910. Teaching Fellow in Zoology, 
Kansas State University, 1909-10, and High School Instructor, Alma, Kan., 1908-09; 
Fellow in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1910-11; President's European Fellow and 
Student, Universities of Bonn and Heidelberg and Zoological Station, Naples, 1911-12; 
Instructor in Zoology, Kansas State University, 1912-13. 

Dorothy Ochtman, A.B., Demonstrator in the History of Art. 

A.B., Smith College, 1914. 

Edith Hamilton Lanman, A.M., Demonstrator in Chemistry. 

A.B., Radcliffe College, 1914; A.M., University of California, 1915. Graduate Student, 
University of California, 1914-15. 

Sue Avis Blake, A.M., Demonstrator in Physics. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1898, and A.M., 1900. Demonstrator and Graduate Student 
in Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99, and 1904-06, and Fellow in Physics, 1906-07; 
Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, and Teacher of Mathematics and Science in the 
Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 1899-1900; Assistant in Physics, Smith College, 
1900-02, 1903-04; Fellow in Physics, University of Pennsylvania, 1907-08; Instructor 
in Physics, Smith College, 1910-15. 

Lucia Helen Smith, A.B., Demonstrator in Physics. 
A.B.. Vassar College, 1915. 

Lois Antoinette Reed, A.B., B.L.S., Librarian. 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1909; B.L.S., New York State Library .School, 1904. Libra- 
rian, The Western College, Oxford, Ohio. 1905-07; Cataloguer and Order Department 
Assistant, Library of the LTniversity of Illinois, 1907-10; Assistant Librarian, University 
of Rochester, 1910-13. 

Helen Corey Geddes, A.B., B.S., Head. Cataloguer. 

A.B., Radcliffe College, 1905; B.S., Simmons College, 1910. Library Assistant, University 
of Illinois, 1910-12. 

Sarah Wooster Eno, A.B., Circulation and Reference Librarian. 

A.B., University of Illinois, 1908. Cataloguer, Library of the University of Pennsylvania, 
1909-10; Librarian, Stetson University, 1910-12. 

Mary Louise Terrien, A.B., Assistant to the Circulation and Reference 

Librarian. 
A.B., Smith College, 1905. Simmons College Library School, Boston, Mass., 1914-15. 

Constance M. K. Applebee, Director of Athletics and Gymnastics and 
Supervisor of Health Departmeyit. 

Licentiate, British College of Physical Education, 1898, and Member, 1899. Gymnasium 
Mistress, Girls' Grammar School, Bradford, Yorkshire, 1899-1900; in the Arnold Foster 
High School, Burnley, Yorkshire, 1899-1901; in the High School, Halifax, Yorkshire, 
1900-01; Head of Private Gymnasium, Ilkley, Yorkshire, 1899-1901; Harvard School 
of Physical Training, Summer, 1901; Hockey Coach, Vassar College, Wellesley College, 
Radcliffe College, Mt. Holyoke College, Smith College, Bryn Mawr College, Boston 
Normal School of Gymnastics, 1901-04; Hockey Coach, Harvard Summer School of 
Gymnastics, 1906. 

* Appointed as substitute for Miss Mary Jeffers in 1915-16. 



Cynthia Maria Wesson, A.M., Assislanl lo the Director of Athletics and 
Gymnastics. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909, and A.M., 1914. Graduate of the Sargent School for 
Physical Education, Boston, Mass., 1913. 



Administrative and Executive Appointments. 

M. Carey Thomas, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the College and Professor 
of English. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1877; studied at the Johns Hopkins University, 1877-78; Uni- 
versity of Leipsic, 1879-82; Ph.D., University of Zurich, 1882. Sorbonne and College 
de France, 1883; Dean of the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College and Professor of English, 
1885-94. 

Marion Reilly, A.B., Deaii of the College and Reader in Philosophy. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1901. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-02, 1903, 
1903-06; Newnham College, University of Cambridge, Spring 1907; Universities of 
Rome and Siena, 1911-12. 

Isabel Maddison, B.Sc, Ph.D., Recording Dean and Assistant to the 
President. 

Reading, England. B.Sc, University of London, 1893; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, 
and B.A., Trinity College, Dublin, 1905; Girton College, University of Cambridge, 
England, 1889-92; Graduate in Honours, First Class, in the Cambridge Mathematical 
Tripos, 1892; Graduate in Honours, Final Mathematical Schools, University of Oxford, 
1892; Graduate Student in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1892-93, and Fellow in 
Mathematics, 1893-94; Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship and 
Student in Mathematics, University of Gottingen, 1894-95. 

Edith Orlady, A.B., Secretary of the College. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1902. Warden of Pembroke Hall West, 1903-05, and Warden 
of Rockefeller Hall, 1905-06; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1903-06, 1907-09; 
Recording Secretary, 1910-12. 

Abigail Camp Dimon, A.M., Recording Secretary. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, and A.M., 1899. Vice-Principal of the High School, 
Clinton, N. Y., 1896-97; Assistant Teacher of English in the Utica Academy, 1897-98- 
Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1898-99; Tutor, 1900-01; Graduate Student 
and Warden of Radnor Hall, Bryn Mawr College, 1901-04; Teacher of Science in the 
Balliol School, Utica, 1904-05, and of Science and Mathematics, 1905-08; Teacher 
in the New School, Utica, 1908-09; Demonstrator in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1911 
and Reader in Biology, 1911-12. 

Sandy Lee Hurst, Comptroller. 

Louise Watson, A.B., Business Manager. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1912. Teacher in Marshall College, Huntington, W. Va., 1913- 
14. 

Clara Regina Stahl, A.B., Assistant Business Manager. 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1915. Welfare Worker, 1909; Registrar, Greensboro College, 
1910-12, and Bursar, 1913. 

John J. Foley, Superirdendent of Mechanical Equipment. 
Thomas F. Foley, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 



Halls of Residence. 
Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., Warden of Pembroke Hall. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1889. 

Margaret Bontecou, A.B., Warden of Denbigh Hall. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. Bryn Mawr European Fellow, 1909-10; Student, 
Universities of Munich and Oxford, 1910-11; Settlement Worker, Orange Social Settle- 
ment, 1912-13; Private Tutor and Secretary, 1913-14. 



Mary Frances Nearing, A.B., Warden oj Rockefeller Hall. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. Teacher of English in St. Margaret's School, Waterbury, 
Conn., 1910-11; Secretary and Athletic Director, Miss Walker's School, Lakewood, 
N. J., 1911-13; Social Service Worker, Philadelphia, 1913-14. 

Bertha Sophie Ehlers, A.B., Warden of Radnor Hall. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909. Teacher of German in the Agnes Irwin School, Philadel- 
phia, 1910-14; Reader in Elementary German, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13. 

Leonora Lucas, A.B., Warden of Merion Hall. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1912. Graduate Student, Northwestern University, 1912-13; 
Professor of Romance Languages, Brenau College, Gainesville, Ga., 1913-15. 

Sarah Newton Hallett, A.B., Assistant to the Warden of Pembroke 
Hall. 

A.B.. Brown University, 1901. Graduate Student, Brown University, 1905-06, 1909-10; 
Graduate Scholar in History, Bryn Mawr College, 1914-15. 

Josephine Lemmon, A.B., Junior Bursar. 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1880. Proprietor of Berkeley Inn, Pooantico Hills, 1900-05; 
Superintendent of the Summer Home of the New York Association for the Blind, Corn- 
wall-on-Hudson, 1912-15. 



Health Department Appointments. 

In cooperation with the President of the College, the Dean of the 
College and the Supervisor of the Health Department. 

Thomas F. Branson, M.D., Physician in Chief. 

A.B., Haverford College, 1889; M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1892. Attending 
Physician, Bryn Mawr Hospital. 

Frances R. Sprague, B.L., M.D., Assistant Physicia?!, of the College. 

B.L., University of California, 1886; M.D., Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 
1891. Visiting Physician and Surgeon, Children's Department, Children's Hospital 
of San Francisco, 1898-1910; Visiting Surgeon, Woman's Hospital of Pennsylvania, 
and Consulting Surgeon, West Philadelphia Hospital for Women; Practicing Physician, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1910-15. 

Helen Murphy, M.D., E.vamining Oculist. 

M.D., Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1893; Assistant Demonstrator in 
Histology, Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania. 1894-96; Instructor in Materia 
Medica, 1896-1902; Instructor in Diseases of the Eye, Philadelphia Polyclinic and 
College for Graduates in Medicine, 1895-97. 

The following physicians have consented to serve as consultants: 

Thomas McCrae, M.D., F.R.C.P., 1627 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, 
Consulting Physician. 

George de Schweinitz, M.D., 1705 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Con- 
sultant Oculist. 

Robert G. Le Conte, M.D., 1625 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Co7i- 
sultant Surgeon. 

Francis R. Packard, M.D., 302 S. Nineteenth Street, Philadelphia, 
Considtant Aurist and Laryngologist. 

James K. Young, M.D., 222 S. Sixteenth Sti'eet, Philadelphia, Consultant 
Orthopaedist. 

G. C. Davis, M.D., 1814 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Consultant 
Orthopcsdist. 



Administrative and Executive Managers and 

Assistants. 
Bessie Homer Jennings, Assistant Cataloguer. 

Graduate, Drexel Institute Library School, 1900. 

Mertie Watson, Assistant to the Librarian. 

Frieda Segelke Miller, A.B., Statistical Secretary to the Director of the 
Carola Woerishoffer Department of Social Research. 

A.B., Milwaukee-Downer College, 1911. Graduate Student, University of Chicago, 
1911-15. 

Ellen Elisabeth Hill, B.L., Secretary to the President. 

B.L., Smith College, 1891. 

Mary Warren Taylor, Secretary to the Department of Athletics and 
Gtjmnastics and Recording Secretary to the Health Department. 

Genevieve Estelle Potter, Bookkeeper and Assistant to the Comptroller. 

Mabel Gray Thomas, Stenographer and Assistant Bookkeeper in the 
Comptroller'' s Office. 

Helen Magee, A.B., Stenographer to the President. 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1914. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1915. 

Frances E. Colbourne, Stenographer to the Dean of the College. 

Eleanora Iredale, Stenographer to the Recording Dean and Assistant to 
the President. 

Ellen Beulah Lewis, A.B., Stenographer to the Secretary of the College. 

A.B., Swarthmore College, 1906; Assistant to the Editor at the Commercial Museum, 
Philadelphia, 1906-13. 

Edith Sherwood, Stenographer in the Business Manager'' s Office. 

Drexel Institute Secretarial School, 1911-12. 

Nancy C. Crist, Stenographer in the Business Manager's Office. 
Bertha Shortland, Telephone Clerk. 

Department of Education. 
Phebe Anna Thorne Model School. 
Matilde Castro, Ph.D., Director and Teacher of English and History. 

A.B., University of Chicago, 1900, and Ph.D., 1907. Fellow in Philosophy, University of 
Chicago, 1900-01, 1903-04, 1905-06. Principal of the Morris High School, Chicago, 
1901-03; Instructor in Philosophy, Mt. Holyoke College, 1904-05; Instructor in 
Philosophy, Vassar College, 1906-09; Professor and Head of the Department of Philos- 
ophy, Rockford College, 1910-12. Phebe Anna Thorne Associate Professor of Educa- 
tion, Bryn Mawr College, 

Kate Gordon, Ph.D., Psychologist to the Phebe Anna Thorne Model 
School. 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1900, and Ph.D., 1903. Scholar in Pedagogv, University 
of Chicago, 1900-01, and Fellow in Philosophy, 1901-03; European Fellow of the 
Association of Collegiate Alumnse, 1903-04; Instructor in Ethics and Psychology, Mt. 
Holyoke College, 1904-05, and in Teachers' College, Columbia University, 1906-07; 
Substitute Professor of Philosophy, Mt. Holyoke College, Second Semester, 1911-12; 
Phebe Anna Thorne Associate Professor of Education, Bryn Mawr College. 

Samuel Arthur King, M.A., Teacher of Reading. 

Tynemouth, England. M.A., University of London, 1900. Special Lecturer in Elocu- 
tion, Johns Hopkins University, 1901; Special Lecturer in Elocution, University of 
California, 1902. Non-Resident Lecturer in English Diction, Bryn Mawr College. 



Eunice Morgan Schenck, Ph.D., Teacher of French. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907, and Ph.D., 1913. Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 
1909, Graduate Scholar, 1909-10, and Fellow in Romance Languages, 1912-13; Presi- 
dent's European Fellow and Student, the Sorbonne, College de France, University of 
Grenoble, and Madrid, 1910-12. Associate in French, Bryn Mawr College. 

Placido de Montoliu, Teacher of Jaques-Dalcroze Eurythmics (Singing, 

Dancing) . 
Graduate of the Jaques-Dalcroze College of Rhythmic Training, Hellerau, Germany. 

Constance M. K. Applebee, Teacher of Gymnastics and Sports and Games. 

Director of Gymnastics and Athletics, Bryn Mawr College. 

Mary Hamilton Swindler, Ph.D., Teacher of Latin. 

A.B., University of Indiana, 1905, and A.M., 1906; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1913- 
Graduate Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1900-07, and Fellow in Greek, 1907-09; 
Mary E. Garrett European Fellow and Student, Universities of Berlin and Oxford and 
the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, 1909-10; Teacher in the Misses 
Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, 1910-11, and in Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, 
1911-12. Reader in Latin, Bryn Mawr College. 

Anna Whitman Clark, A.B., Teacher of Elementary Science and Arith- 
metic. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1898. Private Assistant to Professor Brookover in Biological Labora- 
tory, Colorado College, 1899-1900; Teacher of Science and Mathematics in Miss Butt's 
School, Norwich, Conn., 1906-11, and in Miss Walker's School, Lakewood, N. .1., 1911- 
14; Summer Session, Teachers College, Columbia LTniversity, 1914. 

Virginia Wright Garber, Teacher of Dixiwing and Modelling. 

Student, the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, the Philadelphia Academy 
of Fine Arts, and Pupil of Jules Lefebre, Benjamin Constant, Professor Charles Roth, 
William M. Cha.se, Childe Hassam, and Howard Pyle. Head of the White Gate Studios, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa., 1911-1.5. 

Gertrude Rand, Ph.D., Psychologist to the Phebe Anna Thome Model 
School. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1908; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1913. Graduate Scholar in 
Psychology, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-09, 1911-12, Fellow in Philosophy, 1909-10. 
Fellow in Psychology, 1910-11, and Sarah Berliner Research Fellow, 1912-13. Associate 
in Educational and Experimental Psychology, Bryn Mawr College. 

Florence Nice Beckley, A.B., Secretary to the Director. 

A.B., Vassar College, 1907. Simmons College, 1909-10. Secretary to the President, 
Newton Theological Institution, 1910-14. 

Ellen Thayer, A.B., Teacher of French. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1907. The Sorbonne, Paris, 1909-11. Teacher of French in 
Wolfe Hall, Denver, Colo., 1911-12; Reader in French, Bryn Mawr College. 

Ethel Virginia Hunley, A.B., Teacher of History. 

A.B., Barnard College, 1915. 

Louise May Tattershall, A.B., Teacher of Mathematics. 

A.B., Barnard College, 1908. Assistant Principal of the High School, White Haven, Pa., 
1909-11; Student, Teachers College Summer School, 1914; Teacher of Mathematics, 
Wykeham Rise, 1914-15. 

Marion Alcott Ballou, A.B., Teacher of English. 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1910. Teacher of English and Latin in the High School, 
Sanford, Mass., 1910-11; Teacher in the Perkins Institute for the Blind, 1911-13; and 
Teacher in Miss Gilbert's School, Woonsocket, R. I., 1913-15. 



Report of the Recording Dean and Assistant to the 
President. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit to you a statistical report on 
the students of Bryn Mawr College for the academic year 
1914-15, a statistical report of the workings of the regulations 
of the directors and faculty, and an account of matters which 
were administered through my office. 

The entire number of students enrolled during the year 
was 445. There were 77 graduate students, including fellows. 
The number of graduate students was about 17 per cent of 
the whole number of students. 



I. Comparative Table of Numbers of Graduate and Under- 
graduate Students from 1885 to 1915. 



c 

Year. !; 


Graduate 
tudents. 


Under- 
graduate 
Students. 


Total 
Number. 


Year. 


Graduate 
Students. 


Under- 
graduate 
Students. 


Total 

Number 


1885-86 . . 


. 8 


36 


44 


1900-01 . 


. .. 48 


348 


396 


1886-87 . . 


. 10 


54 


64 


1901-02 . 


... 53 


383 


436 


1887-88. . 


. 8 


70 


78 


1902-03 . 


. .. 70 


377 


447 


1888-89.. 


. 16 


100 


116 


1903-04. 


... 62 


384 


446 


1889-90. . 


. 22 


100 


122 


1904-05 . 


...63 


378 


441 


1890-91 . . 


. 12 


120 


132 


1905-06 . 


...79 


377 


456 


1891-92 . . 


. 27 


142 


169 


1906-07 . 


...75 


362 


437 


1892-93 . . 


. 34 


168 


202 


1907-08 . 


...72 


348 


420 


1893-94.. 


. 43 


200 


243 


1908-09 . 


. .. 86 


334 


420 


1894-95 . . 


. 49 


234 


283 


1909-10. 


...87 


337 


424 


1895-96 . . 


. 52 


246 


298 


1910-11 . 


...84 


342 


426 


1896-97 . . 


. 46 


243 


289 


1911-12. 


...76 


376 


4.52 


1897-98 . . 


. 49 


275 


324 


1912-13. 


...83 


376 


459 


1898-99 . . 


. 67 


287 


354 


1913-14. 


...85 


387 


472 


1899-1900 


. 53 


334 


387 


1914-15. 


...77 


368 


445 



(1) 



Changes in Fees jor Tuition, Board and Residence, Shoimi as 

Affecting the Numbers of Undergraduate Students, 

1885-1915. 



Year. 


Number 
of Under- 
graduate 
Students. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Increase in Fees. 


Minimum 
Fees for 
Board, 

Residence, 

and 
Tuition. 


1885-80 


36 
54 
70 
100 
100 
120 
142 
168 
200 
234 
246 
243 
275 
287 
334 
348 
383 
377 
384 
378 
377 
362 
348 
334 
337 
342 
376 
376 
387 
368 


18 

16 

30 



20 
22 
26 
32 
34 
12 

32 
12 
47 
14 
35 

7 

3 
5 

34 


11 


-3 

-6 

-6 

-1 

-15 

-14 

-14 

-19 




$350 


1880-87 




350 


1887-88 




350 


1888-89 




350 


1889-90 
1890-91 


Board and room-rent increased $25 


375 
375 


1891-92 




375 


1892-93 




375 


1893-94 




375 


1894-95 




375 


1895-96 




375 


1896-97 




375 


1897-98 




375 


1898-99 




400 


1899-1900 




400 


1900-01 
1901-02 


Board increased $25; tuition increased $25 


450 
450 


1902-03 




450 


1903-04 




500 


1904-05 




500 


1905-06 




500 


1900-07 




500 


1907-08 




525* 


1908-09 




525 


1909-10 




625 


1910-11 




525 


1911-12 




575 


1912-13 




575 


1913-14 




575 


1914-15 




600 









* Rent of sixty rooms reduced in order that total for board, residence, and tuition shall be $500 for 
students unable to pay a higher price. 



Statistics of Graduate Students in 1914-15. 



//. Geographical Distribution of Graduate Students. 

The 77 graduate students enrolled during the year came 
from the following states and countries: 



State or 
Country. 


Number of 
Students. 


Per- 
centage. 


State or 
Country 


Number of 
Students. 


Per- 
centage, 


Pennsylvania . . 
New York 


22 
... 9 


28.6 
11.7 


Ohio 

Texas 




1.3 
1.3 


Massachusetts. 


... 5 


6.5 


Vermont 




1.3 


Missouri 

Connecticut . . . 
Rhode Island . . 


. .. 5 
... 4 
... 4. 


6. ,5 
5.2 
5.2 


Virginia 

Washington . . 
Wisconsin .... 




1.3 
1.3 
1.3 


Illinois 


... 3 


3.9 


Cuba 




1.3 


New Jersey . . . . 

Kansas 

California 


... 3 
... 3 

2 
. .. 2 


3.9 
3.9 
2.6 
2.6 


Germany 

Canada 

England 




1.3 
1.3 
1.3 


Indiana 


France 




1.3 


Michigan 

Colorado 


2 
... 1 


2.6 
1.3 


Total.... 


. ... 77 




100.0 


Minnesota .... 


... 1 


1.3 









These 77 graduate students may be classified as follows: 

Non-resident, holding European fellowships and studying abroad 1 

Resident fellows 15 

Graduate scholars, German 1 

Graduate scholars, French 1 

Graduate scholars 27 

Members of college staff 18 

Graduate students 14 

77 

Of the 77 graduate students 54 lived in the halls of resi- 
dence, 22 lived in Philadelphia or the neighborhood, and 1 
was studying abroad. 

III. Denominational Affiliations of Graduate Students. 



Episcopalian 21 

Presbyterian 11 

Congregationalist 9 

Methodist 7 

Roman Catholic 5 

Friends 4 

Unitarian 3 

German Reformed 2 



Baptist 

Christian Church 

Lutheran 

Universalist 

No denominational affiliation . 



1 
1 
1 

10 

77 



IV. Number of Years of Graduate Study of Graduate Students. 



In first year of graduate study, 40 
In second " " " " 16 

In third " " " " 10 

In fourth " " " " 7 



In fifth year of graduate study, 3 
In seventh" " " "." 1 

77 



V. Studies Elected hy 76 Graduate Students in Residence. 

Under each subject all the graduate students attending 
courses in that subject are counted. 





Students. 


Percentage 
of Total 
Graduate 
Students. 


EngHsh 


23 


30.2 


French 


13 


17.1 


History 


12 


15.8 


Physics 


11 


14.5 


Chemistry 


10 


13.2 


Education 


9 


11.7 


Greek 


8 


10.4 


Latin 


. . . . . 8 


10.4 


Economics. . . 


8 


10.4 


Biology.. 


8 


10.4 


Archseology . . . 


7 


9.2 


Philosophy . . . 


6 


7.9 



Students. 

Psychology 6 

Semitic Languages. 5 

History of Art 5 

Mathematics 5 

Spanish 4 

Geology 3 

German 2 

Teutonic Philology . 2 
Comparative Lit- 
erature 2 

Italian 1 



Percentage 
of Total 
Graduate 
Students. 

7.9 
6.6 
6.6 
6.6 
5.2 
3.9 
2.6 
2.6 

2.6 
1.3 



VI. Major Studies of 76 Graduate Students in Residence. 

Each student entered under a subject is doing full 
graduate work and devoting half or more of her working time 
to the study of that special subject. 



English 9 

Latin 7 

History 6 

Mathematics 4 

Chemistry 4 

Psychology 3 

Geology 3 

Greek 2 



Economics and Politics 2 

Classical Archaeology 2 

Biology 2 

French 1 

German and Teutonic Philology 1 

Spanish 1 

Semitic Languages 1 

Philosophy 1 



VII. Occupations of 76 Graduate Students in Residence, 
Of the 76 graduate students 41 have already taught or arc 
teaching, and 12 of these have taught, assisted, or demonstrated 
in colleges and universities ; 1 has been acting dean of a college, 
3 are college wardens, 3 are librarians, 1 has acted as demon- 
strator, 1 has done social service work. The remaining 26 have 
held no positions. 

VIII. Examinations for Higher Degrees. 

At Commencement, June 1915, the degree of Master of 
Arts was conferred on 4 graduate students belonging to the 
following classes: 

Class of 1910, 1; Class of 1912, 1; Class of 1913, 1; Class 
of 1914, 1. The principal subjects of study of these students 
were Comparative Literature 1, History 1, Geology 1, 
Chemistry 1. 

During the year 2 graduate students presented themselves 
for examination for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The 
candidates were graduates of Brown University and Mt. 
Holyoke College. The major subjects of the candidates were 
English Philology and French Literature. 

Statistics of LTndergraduate Students in 1914-15. 
IX. Geographical Distrihution of Undergraduate Students. 

The 368 undergraduate students enrolled during the past 
year came from the following states and countries: 

Students. 

Pennsylvania.... 108 

New York 59 

Massachusetts... 31 

Illinois 24 

Ohio 23 

Maryland 21 

New Jersey 14 

Minnesota 12 

Connecticut 8 

Rhode Island 8 

Indiana 7 

Virginia 6 

Delaware 4 



Percentage. 




^itudents. 


Percentage. 


29.3 


Nebraska 


4 


1.1 


16.0 


North CaroUna . . 


4 


1.1 


8.4 


Texas 


4 


1.1 


6.5 


Alabama 


3 


0.8 


6.3 


Cahfornia 


3 


0.8 


5.7 


District of Co- 






3.8 


lumbia 


3 


0.8 


3.3 


New Hampshire . 


3 


0.8 


2.2 


Vermont 


3 


0.8 


2.2 


Michigan 


2 


0.5 


1.9 


Missouri 


2 


0.5 


1.6 


Arkansas 


1 


0.3 


1.1 


Florida 


1 


0.3 



Studonts. Pcroentfigo. Students. Pprcpntago. 

Georgia 1 0.3 Wisconsin 1 0.3 

Kansas 1 0.3 Panama Canal 

Kentucky 1 0.3 Zone 1 0.3 

South Carolina . . 1 0.3 Japan 1 0.3 

Tennessee 1 0.3 Canada _i^ 0.3 

West Virginia. . . 1 0.3 Total 368 100.0 

These 368 undergraduate students ars classified as follows : 
335 resident, 33 non-resident; 366 candidates for a degree, 
2 hearers. Of the 366 candidates for a degree 92 were seniors 
of whom 83 graduated in June, and 9 did not complete the work 
for a degree, of these 1 failed in a final examination, 2 were 
placed on probation under the merit law and 1 was out of 
college for one semester on account of illness; 74 were juniors, 
97 were sophomores, and 103 were freshmen. 

In addition to those who graduated 45 undergraduate 
students left the college, 10 during the year and 35 at its close, 
for the following reasons: 

During the year: 

To be married 2 

Needed by family 2 

Illness 3 

By request of the Senate: 

On account of unsatisfactory work 1 

On account of cheating in essay work 1 

On account of loss of scholarship due to cheating in tutoring 
to work off condition in matriculation English composition 1 

— 10 
At the end of the year: 

To attend another college 7 

Needed by family 6 

By request of the Senate 5 

Planned to stay one or two years only 3 

On probation under the merit law 3 

Financial reasons 2 

Heavily conditioned 2 

To be married 2 

Illness 1 

Failure in final examinations (senior) 1 

To come out in society , 1 

To attend a school of gymnastics 1 

Not stated 1 

— J5 

Total 45 



The students who left were members of the following 
classes: seniors 4, juniors 7, sophomores 16, freshmen 18. 

X. Denominational Affiliations of Undergraduate Students in 

1914-15. 

Episcopalian 121 Dutch Reformed 3 

Presbyterian ; . . . 74 Reformed 2 

Unitarian 29 Swedenborgian 2 

Methodist 24 Universahst 2 

Friends 19 Dunkard 1 

Congregationahst 18 Ethical Culture 1 

Jewish 16 Reformed Episcopalian 1 

Baptist 14 No denominational affiliation . . 18 

Roman Catholic 13 ■ 

Christian Science 5 368 

Lutheran 5 

Statistics of Seniors (Class of 1915). 

. At Commencement, June, 1915, the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts was conferred on 84 students, 1 of whom completed the 
requirements in February, 1915. The courses may be analyzed 
as follows: 

XI. Duration of Course of Seniors. 

Number 
Length of Graduated 
Date of Entering College. Course. in 1915. 

October, 1908 4 years 1 

October, 1910 4^ years 2* 

October, 1910 5 years 1 

October, 1911 4 years 80 

Of the 125 students who entered the college in October, 
1911, 80, or 64 per cent, graduated after a consecutive four 
year course. 

- XII. Age of Seniors. 

Seniors graduating in June, 1915: 

Average age 22 years, 3 months 

Median age 22 years, 3 months 

Seniors graduating in February, 1915: 

Average age 23 years, 8 months 

Median age 23 years, 8 months 

* Of these one was absent from college for one semester and completed her work in 
February, 1915. 



The average age at graduation of the classes since 1907 is 
as follows: 

1907 22 years, 7.6 months 

■ 1908 22 years, 6 . 6 months 

1909 22 years, 8.0 months 

1910 22 years, 7.4 months 

1911 22 years, 1 .9 months 

1912 22 years, 7.0 months 

1913 22 years, 3.0 months 

1914 22 years, 3.0 months 

1915 22 years, 3 . months 



XIII. Groups Elected by Seniors. 



History and Economics and 

Politics 14 

Chemistry and Biology 9 

Latin and French G 

French and Modern History .... 6 
Economics and Politics and 

Psychology 5 

Latin and English 4 

Latin and German 3 

Economics and Politics and Phil- 
osophy and Psychology 3 

Philosophy and Psychology .... 3 

Mathematics and Physics 3 

Latin and Ancient History 2 

Latin and Mathematics 2 

English and French 2 

English and ItaUan and Spanish 2 
English and Comparative Litera- 
ture 2 

German and French 2 



German and Modern History. . 2 

Psychology and Biology 2 

Greek and Latin 1 

Greek and English 1 

Greek and Ancient History 1 

Latin and Archaeology 1 

English and German 1 

Enghsh and Philosophy and 

Psychology 1 

French, Italian and Spanish .... 1 

French and Spanish 1 

French and Comparative Litera- 
ture 1 

Philosophy and Psychology and 

Mathematics 1 

Physics and Chemistry 1 

Chemistry and Geology 1 

84 



The major subjects chosen arranged in order of choice are 



as follows: 



Number. 


Per cent. 


Modern History . . . 


22 


13,. 1 


Economics and Poli- 






tics 


22 


13.1 


Latin 


19 


11.3 


French 


19 


11.3 


English 


13 


7.7 



Chemistry 11 



6.5 



Number. Per cent. 

Biology 11 6.5 

Psychology 10 6.0 

German 8 4.8 

Mathematics 6 3.6 

Philosophy and Psy- 
chology 5 3.0 

Physics 4 2.4 



Number. Per cent. Number. Per cent. 

Greek 3 1.8 Spanish 1 0.6 

Italian and Spanish. 3 1.8 Archaeology 1 0.6 

Comparative Lit- Geology '. . . 1 0.6 

erature 3 1.8 



Ancient History... 3 1.8 168 100.0 

Philosophy. 3 1.8 

Degrees with Distinction. 

In June, 1915, by vote of the Faculty approved by the 
Directors the degree of Bachelor of Arts was given for the first 
time with distinction, the degree being conferred summa cum 
laude for an average grade of 90 per cent or over on the whole 
work of the college course, magna cum laude for an average 
grade of 85 per cent to 90 per cent, and cuin laude for an 
average grade of 80 per cent to 85 per cent. 

Out of the 84 students in the class of 1915, 

1 or 1.2 per cent received the degi'ee summa cum laude 
3 or 3.6 " " " " magna cum laude 

17 or 20.2 " " " " cum laude 

Comparison of the percentages of students prepared in 
public or in private schools who gained distinction: 



Preparation obtained in 

Total number in class 28 

Number of honour students .... 
Percentage of honour students. . 



Results of Oral Examinations of Seniors in French and 
German Translation. 

ri- . rt • 1- French. German. 

ttrst Examination. Number. Per cent. Number. Per cent. 

High Credit 1 1.22 

Credit 1 1.22 2 2.59 

Merit 2 2.43 2 2.59 

Passed 33 40.25 39* 50.64 

Failed 45* 54.88 34 44.15 

Total 82 100.00 77 100.00 

* One examination cancelled later because the student did not graduate. 



Public 
Schools. 


Private 
Schools. 


PubHc and 
Private 
Schools. 


Total. 


28 


49 


7 


84 


6 


14 


1 


21 


21.4 


28.4 


14.3 


25 



10 



Second Exatnination. 

French. 

Number. Per cent. 

Merit 

Passed 30 62.5 

Failed 18 37.5 

Total...., 48 100.00 

Third Examination. * 

Merit 1 5.00 

Passed 10 50.00 

Failed.. 9 45.00 

Total 20 100.00 

Fourth Examination. 

Passed 8 100.00 

Total 8 





German. 




>^um 


)er. Per cent 


1 


2 


32 


17 


39 


53 


25 


58 


13 



43 



27 



100.00 









22 


81.48 


5 


18.51 



100.00 



5 100.00 
5 



A comparison of the language courses taken by seniors 
with the results of the oral examinations of seniors gives the 
following results. A similar comparison for the trial orals of 
juniors and sophomores is also given. 



Oral Examinations of Seniors in French, held October, 1914. 





Number 
taking 
examina- 
tion. 


Passed. 


Failed. 




Number. 


Per cent. 


Number. 


Per cent. 


Total number taking exami- 
nation 


82 


37 


45.12 


45 


54.88 


Had elected minor French in 
College 

Had elected some major lan- 
guage in College 

Had not elected a major lan- 
guage or minor French in 
College 


13 

37 

32 


6 
23 

8 


46.15 
62.16 

25.00 


7 
14 

24 


53.84 
37.83 

75.00 



* Two students who expect to graduate in February, 1916, tried this exanainatiou. 



11 



Oral Exandnalions of Seniors in German, held October, 1914. 





Number 
taking 
examina- 
tion. 


Passed. 


Failed. 




Number. 


Per cent. 


Number. 


Per cent. 


Total number taking exami- 
nation 


77 


43 


55.84 


34 


\ 

44.15 


Had elected minor German in 
College 

Had elected some major lan- 
guage in College 

Had not elected a major lan- 
guage or minor German in 
College 


4 
34 

39 


3 
20 

20 


75.00 

58.82 

51.28 


1 
14 

19 


25.00 
41.18 

48.71 



Trial Orals of Jufdors and Sophomores in French, held October, 1014- 





Nurnber 
taking 
examina- 
tion. 


Passed. 


Failed. 




Number. 


Per cent. 


Number. 


Per cent. 


Juniors, total 


67 


53 


79.10 


14 


20.89 






Had elected minor French in 
College 


16 
23 

28 


14 
20 

19 


87.50 

86.95 
67.85 


2 
3 

9 


12.50 


Had elected some major lan- 
guage in College 

Had not elected a major lan- 
guage or minor French in 
College 


13.04 
32.14 






Sophomores, total 


90 


80 


88.88 


10 


11.11 






Had elected minor French in 
College 

Had elected some major lan- 
guage in College 

Had not elected a major lan- 
guage or minor French in 
College 


17 


73 


16 


64 


94.11 


87.67 


1 


9 


5.88 


12.32 











12 



Trial Orals of Juniors and Sophomores in German, held October, 1914. 





Number 
taking 
examina- 
tion. 


Passed. 


Failed. 




Number. 


Per cent. 


Number. 


Per cent. 


Juniors, total 


62 


41 


66.12 


21 


33.87 






Had elected minor German in 
College 


4 
21 

37 


4 
15 

22 


100.00 
71.41 

59.45 



6 

15 





Had elected some major lan- 
guage in College 


28 57 


Had not elected a major lan- 
guage or minor German in 
College 


40.54 


Sophomores, total 


85 


70 


82.35 


15 


17 65 






Had elected minor German in 
College 


11 


74 


11 


59 


100.00 


79.72 





15 





Had elected some major lan- 
guage in College 

Had not elected a major lan- 
guage or minor German in 
College 



20.27 



Statistics of Freshmen (Class of 1918). 

The freshmen entering in October numbered 102; 99 
entered on examination and 3 on honom-able dismissal from 
other colleges or universities; 91 lived in the halls of residence 
and 11 lived at home. 



XIV. Conditions of Freshmen. 

October. 
Number. Percentage. 

Clear 47 47.5 

Clear except for punctuation or spelling 12 12. 1 

Conditioned in 1 section 11 11.1 

Conditioned in 2 sections 9 9.1 

Conditioned in 3 sections 7 7.1 

Conditioned in 4 sections • 5 5.1 

Conditioned in 5 sections 8 8.1 

99 100.0 
Honourable dismissal from other colleges .... 3 

102 



13 

Freshmen conditioned in spelling 3, conditioned in punc- 
tuation 20, conditioned in punctuation and spslling 2; fresh- 
men entering on examination with no condition except in 
punctuation or spelling, 58.56 per cent. 

XV. Comparative Table of Percentage of Freshmen Entering 
in October Without Matriculation Conditions, 1890-1914. 

This table includes only those entering in October of 
each year and takes no account of conditions in punctuation 
and spelling. Up to 1897 the proportion of students entering 
free from conditions to all the entering students, including 
honourable dismissal students, was calculated. After 1897 the 
students who entered on honourable dismissal were not counted 
in calculating the percentage. It is therefore slightly mis- 
leading to compare the percentages before 1897 with those 
after 1897. 

In 1890 25.0 % In 1903 3.5.29% 

In 1891 22.8 % In 1904 50.00% 

In 1892 32.0 % In 1905 54.81% 

In 1893 23.1 % In 1906 53.48% 

In 1894 19.3 % In 1907 56.48% 

In 1895 19.0 % In 1908 66.29% 

In 1896 21.8 % In 1909 53.00% 

In 1897 31.8 % In 1910 53.63% 

In 1898 26.9 % In 1911 49.58% 

In 1899 31.73% In 1912 58.16% 

In 1900 38.78% In 1913 52.38% 

In 1901 40.52% In 1914 58.56% 

In 1902 37.97% 

XVI. Matriculation Conditions Passed by Freshmen. 

Omitting conditions in punctuation and spelling, 70 con- 
ditions were incurred, of which 65 were passed off during the 
college year as follows: 

Passed in November, 1914 41 

Passed in January, 1915 13 

Passed in March, 1915 8 

Passed in May, 1915 3 

Not passed, students left coUege, 5 

70 



14 



XVII. Table of Preparatory Schools that Prepared 
99 Freshmen. 

This Table is arranged according to sections of country 
in which the college offers matriculation scholarships. Three 
freshmen entered on honourable dismissal from other colleges. 

Number of Freshmen prepared by schools in New England: 

The Misses May's School, Boston 5 

Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn 4 

Miss Wheeler's School, Providence, R. 1 2 

The Winsor School, Boston, Mass 2 

Wykeham Rise, Washington, Conn 1 

Brookline High School, Brookline, Mass 1 

Cohasset High School, Cohasset, Mass 1 

Miss Haskell's School, Boston, Mass 1 

Lowell High School, Lowell, Mass 1 * 

Milton Academy, Milton, Mass 1 

Rogers Hall School, Lowell, Mass 1 

Rutland High School, Rutland, Vt 1* 

Walnut Hill School, Natick, Mass 1* 

Total, excluding duplicates 19 

Matriculation scholarship of $100 won by pupil of Rogers Hall School, 
Lowell, Mass. Honourable mention won by pupil of Miss Wheeler's 
School, Providence, R. I. 



Number of Freshmen prepared by schools in New York, New Jersey and 
Delaware: 

The Misses Hebb's School, Wilmington, Del 3 

The Brearley School, New York City 1 

The Girls' High School, Brooklyn, New York City 1 

Cathedral School of St. Mary, Garden City, Long Island . 1 

Miss Chapin's School, New York City ; . . . . 1 

Dearborn Morgan School, Orange, N.J 1 

Goodyear-Burlingame School, Syracuse, N.Y 1 

Hamilton Institute for Girls, New York City 1 

Horace Mann School, New York City 1 

Ossining High School, Ossining, N.Y 1* 

Miss Spence's School, New York City 1 

State Model School, Trenton, N. J 1 

* This student received her final preparation from another school and is counted only 
once in the total under the school from which she entered. 



15 

Veltin School, New York City 1 

Wadleigh High School, New York City 1 

" WaUcourt," Aurora, N. Y 1* 

Total, excluding duplicates 15 

Matriculation scholarship of $100 won by pupil of the Brearley School, 
New York City. Honourable mention won by pupil of Miss Chapin's 
School, New York City. 



Number of Freshmen prepared by schools in the Western States: 

Central High School, Minneapolis, Minn 2 

Tudor Hall, IndianapoHs, Ind 2 

University School, Cincinnati, O 2 

Albert Lea College, Albert Lea, Minn 

Bradley Institute, Peoria, 111 

Brownell Hall, Omaha, Neb 

National City High School, National City, Cal 

Central High School, Grand Rapids, Mich 

Kenwood Institute and Loring School, Chicago, 111 

Knox High School, Knox, Ind 

Miss Lander's School, Indianapolis, Ind 

Laurel School, Cleveland, Ohio 

Mary Institute, St. Louis, Mo 

Milwaukee-Downer Seminary, Milwaukee, Wis 

Rochester High School, Rochester, Minn 

New High School, Springfield, Ohio 

West High School, Minneapolis, Minn 

University School for Girls, Chicago, 111, 

Total, excluding duplicates , 16 

Matriculation scholarship of $100 won by pupil of Tudor Hall, 
Indianapolis, Ind. Honourable mention won by pupil of Tudor Hall, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



Number of Freshmen prepared by schools in Pennsylvania and Southern 
States: 

The Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa 8 

Girls' High School, Philadelphia 8 

The Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa 6 

St. Timothy's School, Catonsville, Md 4 

* This student received her final preparation from another school and is counted only 
once in the total under the school from which she entered. 



16 



Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa 3 

Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md 3 

Friends' School, Germantown, Philadelphia 3 

Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr 3 

Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia 2 

Wilkes Barre Institute, Wilkes Barre, Pa 2 

Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa 1 

Galveston High School, Galveston, Tex 1 

Gordon School, Philadelphia 1 

Hahfax Ladies' College, Halifax, N. S 1* 

Miss Madeira's School, Washington, D. C 1* 

Narberth High School, Narberth, Pa 1 

Girls' High School, Reading, Pa 1 

Stevens School, Germantown, Philadelphia 1 

Tredyifrin-Easttown High School, Berwyn, Pa 1 

WilUamsport High School, WiUiamsport, Pa 1 * 

Total, excluding dupUcates 49 

Matriculation Scholarship of $100 won by pupil of St. Timothy's 
School, Catonsville, Md. Honoiu'able mention won by pupil of St. 
Timothy's School, Catonsville, Md. 



Admitted on Honourable Dismissal: 

Barnard College 2 

University of Illinois 1 



Preparation Received in Private or Public Schools. 

Number. Per cent. 

Private schools 63 63 . 6 

PubUc schools 21 21 .2 

Private and pubhc schools 7 7.1 

Private schools and private tuition 6 6.1 

Public schools and private tuition 2 2.0 

99 100.0 

* This student received her final preparation from another school and is counted only 
once in the total under the school from which she entered. 



17 



Preparation Received in Private or Public Schools. 
Freshmen Entering in October. 





Percentages for the Years 1900-14. 




1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


1914. 




46.8 
17.0 
4.3 
18.1 

3.2 
2.1 

8^5 


51.1 
16.0 
4.3 
9.6 

2.1 
6.4 
1.1 
9.6 


58.7 
13.1 
3.3 
12.0 

2.2 
3.3 

2.2 
5.4 


57.3 
17.5 
2.9 
14.6 

2.9 

1.9 
2.9 


60.9 
16.5 
4.4 
6.1 

.9 
7.0 

4^4 


68.0 
27.2 
3.2 

i.Q 


70.1 
17.7 
2.8 

'^9 
8.4 


68.2 
15.5 
8.2 
3.6 

4!5 


61.7 




20.6 


Private and public schools 

Private schools and private tuition . . 
Public schools, private schools and 


6.S 
5.9 


Pubhc schools and private tuition. . 


2.0 




2.9 







Numbers of Schools Preparing Freshmen Compared for the 
Years 1907-14 for Different Sections of the Country. 





Number of Schools Preparing. 




1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


1914. 




10 
14 
14 
21 


8 
11 
13 
22 


11 
14 
11 

24 


12 
13 
9 

18 


12 
15 
14 
29 


8 
14 

9 
21 


11 
13 

8 
19 


10 


New York, New Jersey and Delaware 

Western States 

Pennsylvania and Southern States 


13 
15 
16 



Percentage of the Freshmen Entering by Examination in Each 

Year fro7n 1907 to 1914, Prepared by Schools in the 

Differe?it Sections of the Country. 





1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


1914. 


New England States 


13.7 
20.5 
16.7 
49.0 


8.6 
16.1 
17.2 
58.0 


21.5 
18.7 
11.2 
48.6 


25.4 
13.6 
10.0 
50.9 


17.1 
19.5 
14.3 
48.8 


15.4 
17.6 
11.3 
55.6 


18.1 
16.2 
11.4 
54.3 


19 2 


New York, New Jersey and Delaware 

Western States 


15.2 
16 2 


Pennsylvania and Southern States 


49.5 



18 

XVIII. A Comparative Table of the Geographical Distribution 
of the Freshmen 1904 io 1914. 



States and 
Countries. 



Pennsylvania 

New York 

Illinois 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

New Jersey 

Ohio 

Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire. ... 

North Carolina 

Oregon 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

France 

Hawaii 

Japan 

England 

Canada 



Per cent of Freshmen in 



1904. 1905. 1906 



35.4 
16.7 
6.3 
2.1 
4.2 
2.1 
3.1 



2.1 



33.0 
18.2 
10.6 
3.2 
7.4 
4.4 
5.3 



2.2 



1.1 



1907. 



29.2 
17.7 
13.5 
4.2 
6.3 
3.1 
3.1 



1908. 



27.7 
16.0 
14.9 
9.6 
1.1 
1.1 
3.2 



1909. 1910. 1911. 1912. 1913. 1914. 



35.9 
18.9 
9.0 
5.0 
7.0 
4.0 
2.0 

2.0 



30.1 
19.5 
7.3 
4.9 
7.3 
4.1 
6.5 

1.6 

1^6 

'h6 



25.5 
17.4 
3.1 
9.2 
7.1 
3.1 
8.2 

1.0 
1.0 



24.5 
18.1 
8.6 
7.6 
8.6 
4.8 
4.8 

1.0 

LO 

2^9 

1.9 
1.9 



1.0 



1.9 



31.3 
15.2 
2.0 
3.0 
11.1 
2.0 
5.1 



1.0 

i!o 

3.0 
1.0 



1.0 
5.1 

i.'o 
i.o 

LO 
1.0 

\.o 

1.0 

2^0 
2.0 

2.0 

i.o 



In 1914, 23 states, the District of Columbia and Canada 
are represented. 



19 



XIX. Denominational Affiliations of the Freshmen. 



Number. 

Episcopalian 37 

Presbyterian 19 

Jewish 7 

Friends 6 

Unitarian 6 

Baptist 4 

Methodist 4 

Roman CathoHc 4 

Congregationahst 3 



Per 




cent. 


Numl 


36.3 


Lutheran 1 


18.6 


Reformed 1 


6.9 


Reformed Episcopahan . 1 


5.9 


Swedenborgian 1 


5.9 


Universahst 1 


3.9 


No denominational affili- 


3.9 


ation 6 


3.9 




2.9 


102 



Per 
cent, 

1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 

1.0 

5.9 



Dunkard . 



1 



1.0 



Comparative Table of the Denominational Affiliations of the 
Freshmen, 1906-14-. 



Episcopalian 

Presbyterian 

Unitarian 

Methodist 

Congregationalist 

Jewish 

Friends 

Roman CathoUc 

Baptist 

Christian Science 

Lutheran 

Reformed Episcopahan 

Reformed Presbyterian 

Swedenborgian 

Universalist 

Dunkard 

Reformed 

Dutch Reformed 

Union Evangelical 

Reformed Jewish 

German Reformed 

United Presbyterian 

Ethical Culture 

Evangelical 

Theosophist 

Not stated , . 

No denominational affiliation . 



1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


35.1 


39.6 


29.8 


40.4 


32.2 


22.5 


40.2 


37,3 


25.5 


26.0 


27.6 


14.4 


31 


3 


19.2 


16 





23.6 


8.5 


8.3 


2.1 


6.7 


7 


8 


9.6 





6 


11.8 


5.3 


2.1 


4.2 


3.9 


6 


1 


9.6 


5 


6 


4.5 


2.1 


3.1 


6.4 


3.9 


2 


6 


7.2 


3 


7 


3.6 


8.5 


3.1 


8.4 


2.9 


4 


4 


3.2 


3 


7 


3.6 


2.1 


3.1 


2.1 


3.9 


2 


6 


5.6 


1 


9 


3.6 


2.1 




5.3 


1.0 


1 


7 


4.0 


2 


8 


2.7 


3.2 


1.0 


4.2 


5.8 






2.4 


6 


6 


4.5 






3.2 


4.8 




9 


2.4 


2 


8 


.9 






1.0 


1.9 




9 


2.4 


2 


8 


1.8 




1.0 








7 


.8 




9 
9 




1.0 
















9 
9 




2.1 


1.0 


2.1 






9 


.8 


1 


9 


.9 


1.0 


I'O 
1.0 
1.0 


LO 


i!o 

1.0 

lio 




9 
9 


■^8 

".8 
.8 








3.2 


8.3 


3.2 


7.8 


5 


2 


8.0 


2 


8 


.9 



1914. 

36.3 
18.6 
5.9 
3.9 
2.9 
6.9 
5.9 
3.9 
3.9 

i!o 

1.0 

i'o 

1.0 
1.0 
1.0 



5.9 



XX. Average and Median Age of the Freshmen. 

Years. Months. 

Average age of the class entering in October 18 6 

Median age of the class entering in October 18 5 

Average age (excluding honourable dismissal students) .... 18 5 

Median age (excluding honourable dismissal students) 18 5 



20 



XXI. Average Ages of Entering Classes Since 1886. 


Year. 


Average Age. 


Median Age. 


Year. 


Average Age. 


Median Age. 


1885 


22.03 


18.87 


1900 


19.00 


18.91 


1886 


18.31 


18.00 


1901 


18.58 


18.58 


1887 


19.24 


19.00 


1902 


18.83 


18.62 


1888 


19.02 


18.20 


1903 


18.50 


18.50 


1889 


19.19 


18.10 


1904 


18.92 


18.92 


1890 


19.35 


18.11 


1905 


18.66 


18.66 


1891 


19.46 


18.07 


1906 


18.75 


18.50 


1892 


19.54 


18.11 


1907 


18.66 


18.33 


1893 


19.78 


19.00 


1908 


18.50 


18.33 


1894 


19.28 


19.01 


1909 


18.58 


18.58 


1895 


19.44 


18.08 


1910 


18.50 


18.42 


1896 


18.97 


18.10 


1911 


18.54 


18.58 


1897 


• 18.90 


18.75 


1912 


18.75 


18.50 


1898 


19.08 


19.58 


1913 


18.25 


. 18.16 


1899 


18.75 


18.58 


1914 


18.50 


18.42 



XXII. Occupations of Parents of the Freshmen. 

Professions: 

Lawyers 14 

Physicians (1 Surgeon) 10 

Teachers (3* College Presidents) 7 

Technical Engineers 5 

Clergymen 3 

Artists and Musicians 3 

Army Officers 1 

—43 

Business: 

Business Managers, Officials and Employees 11 

Merchants 13 

Bankers 7 

Manufacturers 5 

Brokers and Commission Merchants 5 

Insurance Agents 5 

Farmers 3 

Real Estate Agents 3 

Journahsts 2 

Coachman 1 

Pubhsher 1 

Surveyor 1 

Trustee 1 

No occupation 1 

—59 



102 



21 



Comparative Table of the Occupations of the Parents of 
Freshmen, 1906-14- 



1906. 1907. 



1908. 



1910. 1911. 



1912. 



1913. 



1914. 



Professions. 

Lawyers 

Physicians 

Teachers 

Clergymen and Missionaries .... 
Engineers, Civil and Technical . . 

Artists and Musicians 

Army and Navy Officers 

Actors 

Architects 

Authors 

Dentists, Oculists 

Diplomat : 

Governor of State 

Inventors 

Scientists 

Business. 

Business Managers, Officials, Em- 
ployers 

Merchants 

Manufacturers 

Bankers 

Brokers and Commission Mer- 
chants 

Real Estate dealers, Builders 
Contractors 

Insurance Agents 

Publishers 

Farmers 

Editors and .lournalists 

Auditors, Accountants 

Capitalists, Mine owners 

Advertising Agents 

Proprietor of Theatre 

Consul 

sr 

Cloth-finishers 

Surveyor 

Coachman 

Machinist, Japanner 

Trustee 

Not stated 

No occupation 

Deceased* 

Total 

Per cent in Professions 

Per cent in Business 



41.5 
58.5 



115 



46.1 
53.9 



43.6 
56.4 



40.6 
59.4 



39.1 
60.9 



125 



107 



42.3 

57.7 



39.4 
60.6 



46.7 
53.3 



102 



42.6 
57.4 



'' After 1909 the occupation of the parent during his life time was entered. 



22 

XXIII. Intentions of Freshmen in Regard to College Course. 

Number. Per cent. 

Four years and graduation 62 60 . 8 

Uncertain as to graduation 7 6.7 

One year only 5 4.9 

Two years only 8 7.8 

Intention not stated 20 19.6 



102 100.0 



Intentions stated by Freshmen in Regard to Length of College 
Course Cofnpared for 1912, 1913, 191^. 

1912. 1913. 1914, 

Per cent. Per cent. Per cent. 

Four years and gradual ion 82 . 2 86 . 4 60 . 8 

Uncertain as to graduation 12.1 1.8 6.7 

One year only 1.9 1.8 4.9 

Two years only 2.8 6.4 7.8 

Intention not stated 9 3.6 19.6 



XXIV. Decision of Freshmen to Attend College. 

On entering college each freshman was asked by whom 
it was decided that she should take a college course. The 
answers tabulated are as follows: 

Decision made by Number. Per cent. 

Student herself 28 27 .4 

Mother 16 15.7 

Family 14 13.7 

Family and student 5 4.9 

Father and student 4 3.9 

Mother and student 4 3.9 

Father 3 2.9 

School Teacher 1 1.0 

Sister 1 1.0 

Aunt and father 1 1.0 

Stepfather 1 1.0 

Guardian 1 1.0 

Brought up with the idea 3 2.9 

Not stated 20 19.6 

102 100.0 



23 



Decisions of Freshmen to Attend College Compared for 
1912, 1913, 1914. 



1912, 1913, 

Decision made by Per cent. Per cent. 

Student herself 36.5 29.5 

Family and student 14.0 14.3 

Family 13.1 13.3 

Mother 5.6 12.3 

Father 5.6 8.6 

School Teacher 4.7 2.9 

Father and student 3.7 2.9 

Sister 2,8 2.9 

Family and school 1.9 

Mother and student 3.7 1.9 

Aunt and student 1.9 

Grandfather and student 1.9 

Uncle 1.0 

Brother 2.8 1.0 

Cousin (alumna) 1.0 

Aunt and father 

Grandfather 0.9 

Stepfather 

Guardian 

Friend 1 

Brought up with the idea 

Not stated. 4.9 2.9 



1914, 
Pet cent. 

27.4 

4.9 

13.7 



3.9 



1.0 



2.9 
19.6 



XXV. Time of Decision of Freshmen to Attend College. 

Intended to come to college Number. Per cent. 

Always 31 30. 4 

Several years before entrance 6 5.9 

Six years 2 1.9 

Five years 4 3.9 

Four years 14 13.6 

Three years 5 4.9 

Two years 2 1.9 

One year 1 1.0 

One-half year 3 2.9 

Not stated 34 33.3 



102 



100.0 



24 

Time of Decision of Freshmen to Attend College Compared for 
1912, 1913, 1914. 

1912, 1913, 1914, 

Iiit-ended to come to college. Per cent. Per cent. Per ceat. 

Always 28.0 40.0 30.4 

Several j^ears before entrance 1.8 1.0 5.9 

Fourteen years 1.0 

Ten years 1.8 1.0 

Nine years 0.9 

Eight years 2.8 1.9 

Seven years 0.9 1.0 

Six years : 0.9 2.9 1.9 

Five years 2.8 5.7 3.9 

Fouryears 17.8 11.4 13.6 

Three years 6.5 14.3 4.9 

Two years 6.7 7.6 1.9 

One year 0.9 7.6 1.0 

One-halt year 2.8 1.9 2.9 

A few weeks , , 0.9 

Notstated 19.6 2.9 33.3 



XXVI. Reasons why Freshmen Selected Bryn Mawr College. 

The following reasons were given by the Freshmen when 
asked why they selected Bryn Mawr College in preference to 
any other college. 

Number. Per cent. 

Vicinity to Philadelphia 12 11.9 

Sister at Bryn Mawr now or formerly 7 6.8 

Recommended by school 7 6.8 

Selected by family 12 11.9 

High standard 6 5.9 

Friendship with Alumnaj or present students 11 10.2 

Considered it the best college 3 2.9 

Bi-ought up to go to Bryn Mawr 2 1.9 

Visited and liked the college 2 1.9 

Mother an Alumna 2 1.9 

Cousin an Alumna 2 1.9 

Because not admitted on certificate 2 1.9 

Small college 1 1.0 

Small college with high standard not co-educational ... 1 1.0 

Small college near home 1 1.0 

Father considered Bryn Mawr the hardest college 1 1.0 

Interested to see if she could pass examinations 1 1.0 

Friends at school taking examinations , 1 1.0 



25 



Number. Per cent. 

On account of the mathematics courses 1 1.0 

Father a Quaker 1 1.0 

Always interested in Bryn Mawr and in President 

Thomas 1 1.0 

Not stated 25 24.5 

102 100.0 



Reasons why Freshmen Selected Bryn Mawr College Compared 
for 1912, 1913, 1914. 



1912. 
Per cent. 

Family selected it 13 . 1 

Thought it best coUege 

Sister at Bryn Mawr now or formerly 13 . 1 

Recommended by school 12.1 

The high standard 10.2 

Friendship with alumnse or present students 8 . 4 

Vicinity to Philadelphia 3.7 

Small college near home 2.8 

Small college 2.8 

Liked the coUege 2.8 

Had seen and hked the college 1.9 

High standard and small college 1.9 

swimming pool 0.9 

recommended by school . 9 

friends here 0.9 

English courses good 

sister at Bryn Mawr 

near home 3.7 

Liked description in Calendar 0.9 

To be near her brother 0.9 

Sent to college by a friend 0.9 

Enghsh courses good 0.9 

College for women only 0.9 

Father wanted her to take examinations. . . 0.9 

Mathematics not required in course 

Wanted to be away from home 

Liked small coUege and mother advised 

Bryn Mawr 

Visited May Day Fete and liked college . . . 
Liked the gymnasium and had friend at 

college 

Mother an alumna of the college 



1913. 
Per cent. 

10.4 

13.3 

13.3 

12.3 

6.7 

9.5 

3.8 

1.0 

3.8 

6.7 



1.0 



1914. 
Per cent. 



26 



1912. 



School prepared for Bryn Mawr and near 
home 

Liked the English atmosphere 

Favourable report of the college 

Liked the grounds 

Liked a coUege not admitting on certificate 

Had always had a close affihation with the 
college 

Cousin an alumna 

Brought up to go to Bryn Mawr 

Small college, high standard not coeduca- 
tional 

Father considered Bryn Mawr the hardest 
college 

Father a Quaker 

Friends at school taking examinations 

On account of the mathematics courses .... 

Always interested in Bryn Mawr and in 
President Thomas 

Not stated 14 



1913. 



1914. 


























1.9 









1.9 




1.9 



1.0 



1.0 

1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 

1.0 

24.5 



XXVII. Occupatiojis Planned by Freshmen. 

Number. 

Teaching 18 

Social Worker 9 

No profession 5 

Journalist 4 

Writer 3 

Nurse. 3 

Housekeeper 3 

Agriculturist 2 

Artist 2 

Musician 2 

Physician 1 

Architect 1 

Clergyman 1 

Librarian 1 

Insurance 1 

Research Worker 1 

Lawyer 1 

Undecided 44 



102 



Per cent 


17 


.6 


8 


.8 


4.9 


3 


9 


2.9 


2 


9 


2.9 




9 




9 




9 





































43 


1 



100.0 



27 



Occupations Planned by Freshmen Compared for 
1912, WIS, 1914. 



1912, 1913, 

Per cent. Per cent. 

Teaching 18.7 54.4 

No profession 13.1 5.3 

Social Worker 2.8 3.5 

Medicine 1.8 7.0 

Architecture 0.9 1.8 

Painting 3.5 

Writing 0.9 5.3 

Nursing 0.9 3.5 

Secretary 1.8 

Decorator 1.8 

Scientist 1.8 

Ethnologist (Indian) 1.8 

Agriculturist 1.8 

Journalist 1.8 

Journahst and Social Worker 1.8 

Art critic 1.8 

Law 2.8 

Art 1.8 

Law or Medicine 0.9 

Archaeologist 0.9 

Teaching or wi-iting 0.9 

Surgeon 0.9 

Executive work 0.9 

Librarian 0.9 

Business 0.9 

Teaching or secretarial work 

Housekeeping 

Musician 

Clergyman 

Insurance 

Research Worker 

Undecided 48.6 



1914, 
Per cent. 

17.6 
4.9 

8.8 
1.0 
1.0 

2.9 
2.9 



1.9 
3.9 



1.0 
1.9 



1.0 



2.9 
1.9 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
43.1 



28 



XXVIII. Favorite Studies of Freshmen. 
In some cases a single student has mentioned several 
subjects. 

EnglisK 27 

Latin 20 

Science 19 

History 15 

Modern Languages 14 

Mathematics 13 

Economics 8 

Greek 5 

Psychology 5 

French 4 

Domestic Science 1 

Philosophy 1 

Medicine 1 

Preference not stated 12 

No preference 4 

Favorite Studies of Freshmen Compared for 1912, 1913, 1914- 

1912. 1913. 1914. 

EngUsh 24 IS 27 

Languages 8 20 14 

Science 10 13 19 

Mathematics 9 9 13 

History 10 8 15 

Latin 16 4 20 

Economics 6 3 8 

Art 1 2 

French 17 2 4 

Classics 1 

Archaeology 1 

Chemistry 1 1 

German 14 1 

Horticulture 1 

Indian History and Ethnology 1 

Medicine 1 1 

Psychology 1 1 5 

Greek 3 . . 5 

Domestic Science . . 1 

Philosophy 4 . . 1 

Biology 3 

No preference 1 

Music 2 

Physics 1 

Preference not stated 25 26 12 



29 



XXIX. Nationalities of Freshmen. 

Number. Per cent. 

American on both sides for 3 generations 42 41 .2 

" " " " " 2 " only.„ 12 11.8 

" " " " 1 generation " 18 17.7 

One parent American, 3 generations 10 9.8 

" " '< 2 " 4 3.9 

" " " 1 generation 6 5.8 

Parents both Enghsh 1 1.0 

" German 3 2.9 

" Russian 3 2.9 

" Irish 1 1.0 

one English one Canadian 1 1.0 

one English, one Swedish 1 1.0 

102 100.0 

Nationalities of Freshmen Compared for 1912, 1913, 1914- 



1912. 1913. 

Per cent. Per cent. 

American on both sides for 3 generations 27 . 1 34 . 2 

" " " " " 2 " only.. 26.2 25.7 

" " " " " 1 generation " ..28.9 26.7 

One parent American, 3 generations 1.0 

2 " 7.4 1.0 

" " " 1 generation 1.8 2.9 

Parents both Enghsh 0.9 1.9 

" " German 2.9 

" " Japanese 0.9 1.0 

" " Scotch 1.0 

" " Irish 

" " Armenian 0.9 

" " Russian 

" one German, one Portugese 0.9 

" " Enghsli, one Canadian 

" " Enghsh, one Swedish 

Not stated 4.7 1.9 



1914. 
Per cent. 

41.2 

11.8 

17.7 

9.8 
3.9 
5.8 
1.0 
2.9 



1.0 
2.9 



1.0 
1.0 



XXX. Size of Families of the Freshmen. 

Only child 17 

1 brother or sister 30 

2 brothers or sisters 22 



Not stated . 



10 

6 

12 

2 

1 

2 

1l02 



30 



Numbers of Brothers and Sisters of the Freshmen. 



1 brother 37 

2 brothers 12 

3 " , 9 

4 " 4 

5 " 2 



1 sister 26 

2 sisters 20 

3 " 4 

4 " 4 



*Sz2e oj Families of the Freshmen Compared for 1912, 1913, 1914- 

1912. 
Only child 11 

1 brother or sister 8 

2 brothers and sisters 11 

3 brothers or sisters 7 



1913. 


1914 


10 


17 


34 


30 


19 


22 


14 


10 


9 


6 


5 


12 


1 


2 


1 


1 



Not stated 59 



12 



Total 107 



105 



102 



XXXI. Health of Freshmen. 

The following statements were made as to their health 
by the students themselves: 

Number. Per cent. 

Good health 86 84.4 

Fair health . 3 2.9 

Doubtful health 4 3.9 

Not stated 9 8.8 



102 



100.0 



Statements of Freshmen as to Health Compared for 1912, 
1913, 1914. 

1912. 1913. 1914. 

Per cent. Per cent. Per cent. 

Goodhealth 84.0 83.8 84.4 

Fair health 9.4 14.3 2 9 

Bad or doubtful health 5.6 0. 3.9 

Not stated 0.9 1.9 8.8 



31 

Working of the Merit Law. 

The Report for 1913-14 stated that 4 students of the 
class of 1915 were on probation for the year 1914-15. Of 
these, 1 was excluded by the Senate for unsatisfactory work; 
one student of the class of 1914 was on probation and grad- 
uated in 1915; and 3 remain on probation for 1915-16. No 
new cases occurred in February, but in June, 1915, 5 students 
of the class of 1916 received grades in their final examinations 
which gave them more than half their hours below merit; all 
of these have left college. 

Since the five-year rule came into operation for the class 
of 1907, 48 students have been placed on probation with the 
following results: 13 graduated; 4 lost their degrees under the 
merit law; 3 were excluded from the college, 1 by the Presi- 
dent and 2 by the Senate; 25 left college, and 3 are still on pro- 
bation; that is 13, or only 27 per cent of those placed on 
probation have graduated, 3 or 6.1 per cent may still graduate, 
3 or 6.1 per cent were dismissed from the college and 52.1 
per cent left the college. In the nine years, 1907, 1908, 1909, 
1910, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1914 and 1915, 632 students have 
graduated. The 48 who have been placed on probation 
amounted to 7.6 per cent of the number 632 who graduated. 
In June, 1915, 38 freshmen and 19 sophomores had received 
examination grades below merit in more than half the hours 
they had offered for the degree. Of these 29 freshmen and 
15 sophomores have returned for the year 1915-16, and are 
consequently forbidden to take part in any college enter- 
tainments requiring preparation, to serve as officers of any 
clubs or associations, or to hold paid college positions. 

Registration of Attendance on the First Day of each 
Semester and Before and After Vacations. 

Students are required under penalty of having some of 
their examinations deferred to register 8 times in the college 
year as shown by the following table; this registration was pre- 
scribed by the Faculty after a prolonged experience of the 
failure of the voluntary system in order to ensure regular 
attendance before and after the vacations. 



32 



XXXII. Table of Cases of Failure to Register. 



Number failing to register: 

Excuse Excuse judged Excuse judged 

illness, adequate. inadequate. 

Beginning of the college year 2 3 

Before the Thanksgiving vacation 4 1 3 

After the Thanksgiving vacation 4 1 1 

Before the Christmas vacation 3 3 3 

After the Christmas vacation 7 1 2 

Beginning of the second semester 8 6 

Before the Easter vacation 13 2 

After the Easter vacation 21 2 3 

Total 62 11 20 

Comparative Table of Cases of Failure to Register Before and 
After Vacations for the Years 1906-14. 





1906 
-07. 


1907 
-08. 


1908 
-09. 


1909 
-10. 


1910 
-11. 


1911 
-12. 


1912 
-13. 


1913 
-14. 


1914 
-15. 


Excused on account of illness 

Failed to Register for other reasons: 
Excused 


81 

17 
14 


58 

11 

8 


42 

12 
10 


83 

7 
23 


63 

58 
8 


54 

40 
12 


87 

61 
21 


81 

29 
20 


63 

11 
20 







Fines. 

After a prolonged trial of other methods, fines are now 
imposed for failure to register courses in the appointed period; 
and for failure to return course books to the office fully signed 
at the required time at the end of each semester, A fee of 
one dollar is charged for each change a student makes in her 
course after she has definitely registered it. 

Two students did not register their courses in the required 
period and were fined $10. Five students handed in course 
books late and were fined $25. Fifty-three students made 
changes in their registered courses and were fined $71. These 
fines amounting to $106 were expended for books for the 
college library. 

College Publications. 
The College has issued during the year 1914-15 the follow- 
ing publications : 
Bryn Mawr College Calendar. 

Academic Buildings and Halls of Residence, Plans and 
Descriptions. Volume VII, Part 4. pp. 42. Novem- 
ber, 1914, 



33 

Register of Alumnse and Former Students. Volume VIII. 

Part 1. pp. 336. January, 1915. 
Graduate Courses. Volume VIII, Part 2. pp. 152. 

8 pp. tables. March, 1915. 
Undergraduate and Graduate Courses. Volume VIII, 

Part 3. pp. 200. 12 pp. tables. May, 1915. 
Supplement, Competitive Matriculation Scholarships, pp. 
11. November, 1914. 
Bryn Mawr College Finding List. pp. 40. November 1, 1914. 
Bryn Mawr College Class Lists, First Semester. pp. 32. 

November 15, 1914. 
Bryn Mawr College Class Lists, Second Semester, pp. 32. 

March 15, 1915. 
Br^ai Mawr College, Annual Report of the President, 1912-13. 

pp. 125. December 16, 1914. 
Bryn Mawr College, Pamphlet of Matriculation Examination 

Papers, Spring, 1915. 
Bryn Mawr College, Pamphlet of Matriculation Examination 

Papers, Autumn, 1915. 
Circulars in regard to Fellowships and Scholarships. 
Miscellaneous Circulars, Notices, Blanks, Examination papers, 

etc. 
Not published through the publisher's office: 

Bryn Mawr College, Financial Report, pp. 54. March 

• 10, 1915. 
Summary of the Account of the Treasurer of the Trustees 
of Bryn Mawr College for the year ending ninth 
month 30, 1913. pp. 20. October, 1914. 
Tipyn o' Bob, published monthly from November to June 
inclusive, by the Students of Bryn Mawr College, 
8vo. Illustrated. Vol. XII, 1914-15. Philadelphia. 
The Lantern, published annually by the Students of Bryn 
Mawr College, pp. 92. 4to. Illustrated. May, 
1915. Philadelphia. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Isabel Maddison, 
Recording Dean and Assistant to the President: 



Report of the Dean of the College. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit the following report of the 
work of my office for the year 1914-15. 

As in previous years I have advised the undergraduate 
students in the registration of their courses. The rule adopted 
by the faculty requiring attendance at classes made it neces- 
sary to administer more strictly the requirement of a physician's 
excuse for illness. The number of illness excuses for the year 
increased very markedly while the total number of absences 
from classes decreased. 

As a representative of the faculty I attended the inau- 
guration of the President of the Western College for Women, 
Oxford, Ohio, and of the President of the University of North 
Carolina. During the year I spoke at the following schools: 
The Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Penna; The Irwin 
School, Philadelphia; The Halstead School, Yonkers, New York; 
Highland Hall, Hollidaysburg, Penna. 

The record of the class attendance of students is given 
below as calculated by the Recording Secretary from the records 
in her office. 



(34) 



35 



Record of Attendance, 1914-15. 



Number of cuts 
per student. 



None 

One 

Two 

Three 

Four 

Five 

Six 

Seven 

Eight 

Nine 

Ten 

Eleven 

Twelve 

Thirteen 

Fourteen 

Fifteen 

Sixteen 

Seventeen . . . . 

Eighteen 

Nineteen 

Twenty 

Twenty-one . . 
Twenty-two . . 
Twenty-three. 
Twenty-four. . 
Twenty-five. . 
Twenty-six. . . 
Twenty-seven 
Twenty-eight . 



Number of 
students 
with cuts 



Sem. 
I. 



63 

45 

36 

35 

32 

18 

23 

15 

9 

6 

9 

5 

11 



Sem. 
II. 



/ 

14 

26 

22 

21 

19 

20 

19 

25 

12 

10 

11 

9 

8 

11 

13 

7 

7 

5 

5 

9 

6 

8 

10 

7 

3 

5 

3 

3 



Number of 

student.'* 

witli unex- 

cused cuts. 



Sem. 
I. 



97 

70 

61 

46 

33 

23 

15 

10 

3 

3 

2 



Sem. 
II. 



13 
25 

45 

38 

36 

36 

55 

35 

24 

18 

12 

6 

3 

6 

4 

2 

2 



Numljer of cuts 
per student. 



Twenty-nine 

Thirty 

Thirty-one. . 
Thirty-two. , 
Thirty-three 
Thirty-four . 
Thirty-five . 
Thirty-six . . 
Thirty-eight 
Thirty-nine. 

Forty 

Forty-one. . 
Forty-two. . 
Forty-four. . 
Forty-six . . . 
Forty-seven 

Fifty 

Fifty-one . . . 
Fifty-four. . 
Fifty-six . . . 
Fifty-seven . 
Fifty-nine . . 
Sixty-one. . 
Sixty-two . . . 
Seventy-four. 

Total numbei" 
of students. 



Number of 
students 
with cuts. 



Sem. 
I. 



364 



Sem. 
II. 



361 



Number of 

students 

with unex- 

cused cuts. 



Sem. Sem. 
I. II. 



364 



361 



Sem. I. Sem. II. 

Aggregate number of cuts 2296 4779 

" " " unexcused cuts 824 1918 

Average number of cuts per student 6 . 30 13 . 23 

" " " " " cutting 7.62 13.50 

" " " unexcused cuts per student 2.26 5.31 

" " " " " " " cutting.. 3.08 5.51 



Sems. 
I and II. 

Average number of cuts per year per student 19 . 53 

" " " " " " " '• cutting 21.12 

" " " unexcused cuts per year per student 7.57 

" " " " " " " " cutting... 8.59 



36 



Percentage of Students Cutting, 1914--15. 





Cuts excused and 


Cuts unexcused. 


Percentage of total number of students. 


unexcused. 








Sem. I. 


Sem. II. 


Sem. I. 


Sem. II. 


With no cuts 


17.30 
40.65 


1.93 
22.99 


26.64 
57.69 


3.60 


With 1 or more, but under 5 cuts . . . 


39.88 


" 5 " " " " 10 " ... 


19.50 


26.31 


14.83 


46.53 


" 10 " " " " 15 " ... 


11.26 


13.57 


.54 


8.58 


u 15 u u u u 20 " ... 


3.84 


10.24 


.27 


1.38 


" 20 " " " " 30 " ... 


5.21 


15.51 






" 30 " " " " 40 " . . . 


1.37 


5.81 






" 40 " " " " 50 " ... 


.54 


1.38 






" 50" " " " 60 " ... 


.27 


1.38 






" 60 or more cuts 




.83 






Percentage of students with 10 or more 










cuts 


22.49 


48.72 


.81 


9.96 



Com'panson of Percentages of Students Cutting from 1909 to 1916. 



Year. 


1909-10. 


1910-11. 


1911-12. 


1912-13. 


1913-14. 


1914-15. 


Percentage of total number of students taking 
8 or more unexcused cuts: 

Semester I 


56.4 
68.3 

29.6 

22.3 

6.0 

9.3 
12.7 


44.5 
66.9 

33.4 

32.2 

3.9 

8.4 
12.2 


40.6 
70.1 

25.4 

21.1 

2.0 

8.2 
11.6 


47.9 
67.0 

30.7 

29.5 

4.2 

8,5 
12.1 


48.4 
71.5 

36.2 

28.5 

6.4 

9.2 
13.8 


2 5 




21 6 


Percentage of total number of students taking 
15 or more unexcused cuts: 


1 .4 


Percentage of total number of students taking 
22 or more excused or unexcused cuts: 





Percentage of total number of,' students taking 
30 or more unexcused cuts: 





Average number of unexcused cuts per 
student per semester: 


2.3 




5 3 







3? 

Percentage of Students Cutting Arranged by Classes. 
Semester I, 1914-15. 





Class. 


Total 
number 
of under- 




1915. 


1916. 


1917. 


1918. 


gradu- 
ates. 


Number in class 

Number with 8 or more unex- 
cused cuts 


92 

2 

2.17 
25 
27.17 


73 

1 

1.36 
22 
30.13 


97 

3 

3.09 
20 
20.61 


102 

3 

2.94 
30 
29.41 


364 
9 


Percentage with 8 or more un- 
excused cuts 


2.47 


Number with 8 or more ex- 
cused and unexcused cuts . . 

Percentage with 8 or more 
excused and unexcused cuts 


97 
26.64 



Semester II, 1914-15. 



Number in class 

Number v/ith 8 or more un- 
excused cuts 

Percentage with 8 or more 
unexcused cuts 

Number with 8 or more ex- 
cused and unexcused cuts. . 

Percentage with 8 or more ex- 
cused and unexcused cuts . . 



1915. 



93 

27 
29 . 03 

58 



62.36 



Class. 



1916. 



1917. 



72 ! 95 

13 i 17 

18.05 i 17.89 

47 I 53 

65.27 i 55.78 



1918. 



101 
21 

20.79 

55 

54.45 



Total 
number 
of under- 
gradu- 
ates. 



361 

78 

21.60 
213 

59.00 



Excessive Cuts, lOl^-l^- 





Number of Students. 




Semester I. 


Semester II. 


From 11 to 13 unexcused cuts 




1 





15 


From 14 to 16 " " 


8 


From 17 to 19 " " 


1 


20 or more " " 










38 



That is, in the first semester 1 student out of 364, and in 
the second semester 24 students out of 361 took 11 unexcused 
cuts or more in the semester. 

The average number of cuts per student cutting is 21.12 
per year, or 10.56 per semester. The regular number of lect- 
ures is 15 per week or 204 in the first and 207 in the second 
semester, that is 411 per year per student. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marion Reilly, 
Dean of the College. 



Report of the Secretary of the Faculty. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to report that during the academic year 
1914-15 the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College has taken action 
in matters not of a routine character as follows: 

Attendance Ride. 

September 30, 1914. At this meeting it was suggested 
that some plan be adopted that would tend to reduce the 
number of absences from lectures. The Faculty voted that a 
committee of five members, including the President, should be 
appointed and that the report of this committee should be 
taken up at a meeting to be held on October 7th. 

October 7, 1914. The Faculty voted to adopt for two 
years the following attendance rule: 

"Unexcused cuts of undergraduates up to the number of 
eight in a semester shall be punished by the deduction of one 
point* per cut from the grades of the courses in which the 
cuts are taken. Of these cuts, not more than one may be taken 
in a one-hour course, two in a two-hour or three-hour course, 
and three in a five-hour course. Cuts which exceed this 
number, or which are not distributed as specified in this rule, 
shall reduce the grade for the course in which they are taken 
by two points for each cut, with the proviso that, when the 
cuts in any course amount to one-fifth of the semester's lectures 
of that course or major fraction thereof (the fraction one-half 
being counted as an additional cut) the number of points per 
cut shall be doubled. 

"The computation of the penalties to be inflicted under 
this rule, and the consequent reduction of the grades, shall be 
done by the college office. 

''This rule shall go into operation immediately upon the 
completion of the present semester's registration." 

* A point is 1-100 of a perfect grade. 

(39) 



40 

In this connection, it was voted to instruct the office to 
post the officially corrected numerical grades. 

November 3, 1914. At a special meeting, the Faculty 
considered a petition received from the Undergraduate Asso- 
ciation. This petition, containing 313 signatures, stated the 
objections of the Association to the attendance rule, asked 
that the rule be repealed, and requested a period of probation 
during which the undergraduates might demonstrate their 
ability to regulate cutting. 

The Faculty voted to modify the rule (substantially 
as agreed upon at a conference of the full professors of the 
college) so as to allow, without officially imposed penalty, 
a certain number of unexcused absences if these were distributed 
in a prescribed way, as follows: 

"The following rule relating to attendance shall be in opera- 
tion during the year 1914-15, and shall apply to the class-work 
of all undergraduates: 

"There will be no stated penalty for the first eight unex- 
cused cuts in a semester, provided not more than one is taken 
in each one-hour course, two in each two-hour or three-hour 
course, and three in each five-hour course. 

"Cuts which exceed these limits, either in number or distri- 
bution, shall reduce the grade for the course in which they are 
taken by two points for each cut, with the proviso that when 
in any course the unexcused cuts exceed twenty per cent of the 
semester's scheduled lectures of that course, the penalty shall be 
four points for each additional cut. 

"In computing the percentage of cuts, the fraction one-half 
or over shall be counted as one. 

"The computation of the penalties to be inflicted under this 
rule, and the consequent reduction of grades, shall be made by 
the college office." 

It was voted to send the following reply to the Under- 
graduate Association: 

"The Faculty, after carefully considering the petition of 
the Undergraduate Association, continues of the opinion that it 
is inexpedient to leave the regulation of attendance at classes 
to the student body. 



41 

"The Faculty, however, for the year 1914-15, modifies 
its rule to read: (See rule relating to attendance for 1914-15 
as above page 40) ; but in the hope that no large percentage 
of the undergraduate body will avail itself of the number of 
cuts mentioned." 

December 9, 1914. The Faculty received from the Under- 
graduate Association a request (dated November 9, 1914) 
to explain the meaning of the expression, ''no stated penalty." 
The Faculty directed its secretary to "state to the secretary of 
the Undergraduate Association in writing, that no penalty 
was prescribed by the Faculty and that each member of the 
faculty and staff was to deal with cuts of this character as if 
there were no rule." 

Also at this meeting of the Faculty a petition was received 
dated November 17, 1914, and signed by 115 of the 116 mem- 
bers of the Undergraduate Association present at the meeting. 
This petition stated objections to the new rule; asked that 
undergraduates be given a period of probation in' which to 
prove themselves capable of having the regulation of attend- 
ance at lectures in their own hands, since they now under- 
stood the Faculty's attitude regarding cutting; and requested 
that the Faculty's reasons for thinking it ''inexpedient to 
leave the regulation of attendance at classes to the student 
body" be communicated to the Association in writing. 

The Faculty voted to send the following reply to this 
second petition: 

"The Faculty having listened to the petition of the Under- 
graduate Association adopted at a meeting held November 17, 
1914, instructs its secretary to reply, that final action having 
been taken, the Faculty has no further communication to make 
in regard to the rule regulating attendance at classes." 

December 21, 1914. The Faculty received a communica- 
tion from the Board of Directors as follows: 

"At a stated meeting of the Directors of Bryn Mawr 
College, held December 18, 1914, a petition was read addressed 
to the Board of Directors by the Undergraduate Association 
of Bryn Mawr College, stating the position of the undergrad- 
uates with regard to the recent regulation of the attendance at 



42 

lectures. The undergraduates ask that the Directors give 
careful consideration to the advisability of repealing the rule 
regarding attendance at lectures, and of giving the undergrad- 
uates a period of probation during which they may show that 
they themselves can regulate cutting. 

"It was voted to authorize the President of the College 
to inform the undergraduates that their petition has received 
a full and sympathetic discussion. It was the judgment of the 
Board that this was not a matter for the action of the Directors, 
and the petition was, therefore, referred to the Faculty for its 
consideration." 

The petition of the Undergraduate Association to the Board 
of Directors restating the position of the Association signed 
by 354 of the 365 undergraduates Avas then read and after a 
full discussion, the Faculty voted to make the following reply 
to the Board of Directors: 

"At a meeting of the Faculty held December 21, 1914, the 
petition of the Undergraduate Association to the Board of 
Directors, dated December 17, 1914, which was referred by the 
Directors to the Faculty for its consideration, was read. 

"After further consideration the Faculty re-affirmed its 
vote of December 9, 1914, to the effect that final action having 
been taken, the Faculty has no further communication to make 
to the Undergraduate Association in regard to the rule regulat- 
ing attendance at classes. 

"The rule in question has been placed in operation for the 
present academic year. At the end of the year, the subject 
will be given further consideration." 

April 28, 1915. The Faculty authorized the appointment 
of a committee to formulate an attendance rule. It was 
agreed that the membership of this committee should be the 
same as that of the original committee (authorized September 
30, 1914) except that the Petition Committee should be repre- 
sented by its then chairman. 

May 28, 1915. The Committee presented the following 
draught of an attendance rule: 

"Every undergraduate student may have the privilege of 
choosing by which of the following ways she shall regulate her 
attendance at classes. 



43 

"Plan A. The present attendance rule. 

"Plan B. Students will be expected to maintain standards 
of attendance substantially equivalent to those of Plan A. 
The cases of students failing to maintain these standards will 
be individually considered by the Senate. 

"Students absent without excuse from fifteen per cent of 
the scheduled lectures of any course will be required to do extra 
reading on which they will be examined as a part of the course. 
Students absent without excuse from twenty per cent of the 
scheduled lectures of any course will not be entitled to have 
their course books signed by their instructors and must cancel 
the course. 

"Students desiring to regulate their attendance under 
Plan B must register their choice at the Secretary's office not 
later than the last date for returning course books at the begin- 
ning of each semester." 

After full discussion of the desirability of an attendance 
rule the Faculty voted, "that the cut rule shall be abolished 
and that the attendance at lectures shall be regulated by the 
instructor, with the understanding that the Senate shall 
suspend or exclude from college any student guilty of excessive 
cutting." It was agreed informally, however, that further 
consideration of the Committees' report and this vote of the 
Faculty should be given at a meeting to be held on June 1st. 
It was agreed later, on May 29th, that two additional plans as 
to an attendance rule which had been proposed should be 
forwarded to members of the Faculty before the meeting of 
June 1st. 

June 1, 1915. At this meeting there was a full discussion 
of the question as to the desirability of having an attendance 
rule and also of the various plans that had been proposed. 

The Faculty voted to approve the following plan: 

"Resolved, That beginning with October, 1915, attendance 
at classes shall be regulated by each instructor, or when desired 
by all its members, by each department, in whatever way or 
ways may seem advisable by assignment of extra work, deduc- 
tion of academic grade, refusal to sign course books, or by any 
other method including reference of students for more serious 
discipline to the Senate, 



44 



"That it shall be made clear to the students in each class 
by announcement by the instructor at the beginning of each 
semester and otherwise that the Faculty desires regular attend- 
ance at classes and to secure such attendance all students shall 
be definitely informed by their instructors that their recitations, 
answers to questions, informal quizzes, and when it seems 
advisable participation in class discussions will be considered 
in assigning final examination grades, 

"That in the above individual regulation of attendance 
each instructor or department shall be at liberty to decide 
what weight shall be given to illness excuses received from the 
Dean's office. 

"Resolved, That as the above individual and informal 
method of securing attendance at classes cannot succeed without 
the cordial and continuous co-operation of the undergraduates 
the Faculty accepts the offer of the Undergraduate Association 
to assist the Faculty in making sure that all present and future 
undergraduate students understand the Faculty's attitude 
toward regular attendance at classes by means of a formal 
announcement each semester at meetings of the Undergraduate 
Association and of the four College classes and by formal 
individual statements made by older students to those entering 
the College. 

"Resolved further, That a copy of the above resolu- 
tions be transmitted to the Senate and that the Senate be 
requested to make provision for dealing with cases of excessive 
cutting." 

June 2, 1915. A copy of the above resolutions was sent 
to the Undergraduate Association. To this communication 
the following reply was received: 

"At a meeting of the Undergraduate Association of Bryn 
Mawr College, held in the chapel on Thursday, June 3, 1915, 
the following resolutions were passed: — 

"Resolved, That the faculty be informed that the Under- 
graduate Asssociation considers the recent action of the Faculty 
in regard to the rule for attendance at lectures an adequate 
solution of the difficulty of regulating attendance; and that 
the Association will gladly co-operate with the faculty in keep- 



45 

ing before the undergraduates the Faculty attitude with regard 
to attendance at classes; also be it 

"Resolved, That the Secretary of the Association express 
to the faculty that the students truly appreciate the considera- 
tion that the faculty have given to the undergraduate point 
of view in regard to the rule for attendance at lectures." 

Tardiness and Absence for Part of a Lecture Hour. 

June 1, 1915. The Faculty voted approval of these 
regulations : 

"Absence from a class for not more than five minutes 
after roll call shall be reckoned as tardiness only. 

"Absence in excess of the above five minutes at whatever 
time during the class exercise shall be reckoned as follows: 
up to fifteen minutes, one-half an absence; fifteen minutes or 
over, one whole absence. 

"A student tardy or absent for a part of the class exercise 
shall, upon entering or leaving, place on the instructor's desk 
a WTitten statement giving her name, the date, and the time of 
entering or leaving the room. 

"Students doing work other than that pertaining to the 
class shall be counted as absent. Students not occupying their 
regular seats will be counted absent unless the change of seats 
is made by the permission of the instructor." 

Official Proctonng of Examinations. 

October 7, 1914. The Faculty made the following recom- 
mendation in regard to the proctoring of examinations: 

"In the opinion of the Faculty it is desirable to establish 
uniformity in the mode of conducting all matriculation and 
collegiate examinations, and to do this by establishing an 
official system of proctoring. 

"Therefore, if the Board of Directors should find it possible 
to provide for such a uniform mode of conducting examinations, 
the Faculty believes that the results would be advantageous 
to the College." 



46 

October 21, 1914. The Faculty received through the 
President of the College a minute of the Board of Directors 
stating that on October 2, 1914, the Board of Directors had 
received the above recommendation of the Faculty and had 
voted "to authorize the President of the College to introduce 
an official system of proctoring examinations." 

December 9, 1914. The matter of official proccoring was 
discussed at this meeting. It developed that at least some 
members of the Faculty had not understood that the word 
"examinations" in the Faculty's request to the Board of 
Directors was meant to include quizzes. It was voted to adopt 
the following: 

"Agreed that on (and after) December 14, 1914, the action 
of the Faculty, taken October 7, 1914, regarding a uniform 
system of conducting examinations, shall apply only to condi- 
tion, deferred, and advanced standing examinations; and that 
the regular college examinations and quizzes shall be conducted 
by the instructors, according to the rules and schedules adopted 
by the Faculty." 

Final Collegiate Examinations. 

December 9, 1914. It was voted to empower the President 
to appoint a committee of five members, this committee to 
consider methods of conducting final term examinations. 

January 14, 1915. As a result of the report of the com- 
mittee, the faculty adopted these regulations: 

"1. Every collegiate examination held during a final 
examination period shall be conducted according to one of the 
following plans. 

" (1) The examination may be conducted by the 

instructor, with assistance (as specified below) in case the 

class contains more than 30 students. 

"(2) The examination may be conducted by the 

office, as specified below. 

"2. Two weeks before the beginning of each final examina- 
tion period, the Office shall request every instructor to inform 
the Secretary of the College which of the above plans shall be 
followed in each of the instructor's courses. 



47 

"This information for each course shall be sent to the 
Secretary's Office in no case later than one week before the 
examination in the course. 

"An instructor who has not given such information to the 
Secretary of the College one week before the time set for the 
examination shall conduct the examination. 

"3. If the instructor chooses to conduct an examination, 
assistance shall be provided by the Office if there are more than 
30 students in the class. The number of assistant proctors 
shall be determined thus: except for the first 30 students, one 
assistant proctor for each 30 and final fraction of 30. 

"During an examination, every assistant proctor shall be 
under the direction of the instructor. 

"A demonstrator may act as assistant proctor if the 
instructor desires. 

"4. If the Office conducts an examination, this examina- 
tion shall be under the direction of a head proctor appointed 
by the Office. Assistance shall be provided by the Office if 
there are more than 30 students in the class. The number of 
assistant proctors shall be determined exactly as if the instructor 
were conducting the examination, thus: except for the first 
30 students, one assistant proctor for each 30 and final fraction 
of 30. 

"During an examination, every assistant proctor shall be 
under the direction of the head proctor." 

Quiz Rule. 

December 9, 1914. The committee appointed to consider 
the matter of Final Collegiate Examinations was also directed 
to formulate a new quiz rule. The Faculty adopted the follow- 
ing rule: 

"Quiz Rule: The Faculty places no restrictions on the use 
of 'drop quizzes.' In the following rule, 'quiz' means an 
announced written quiz in an undergraduate course. 

"Every quiz must be held during a regular lecture hour of 
the course and, except as noted below, must be taken by every 
student regularly registered for the course. (This includes 
graduates but excludes auditors. A hearer may be admitted 
to a quiz if the instructor consents.) 



"A quiz may be omitted by a student if she has an excuse 
that would allow postponement of an examination; and no 
deduction shall be made from the final grade on account of a 
quiz so excused. 

"In all cases except that of an excused absence, the weight 
to be given to a quiz in reckoning the student's mark for 
the course shall be left entirely to the judgment of the 
instructor. 

"The quiz paper should be returned to the student not 
later than one week after the quiz. It shall contain an estimate 
of the value of the paper, shown by a numerical mark or by one 
of the grades Merit, Credit, etc. If possible, a numerical 
mark should be given in case the rating of the paper is below 
Passed. 

"In post-major courses, quizzes may be omitted at the 
discretion of the instructor. 

"In all other cases, any question as to omitting or adding 
a quiz, or changing the time at which it is to be given shall be 
brought before the Committee on Examination and Quiz 
Schedules at least one week before the announced date of the 
quiz ; and the quiz shall be omitted or its time changed only by 
action of this committee. 

"The times for holding quizzes shall be shown on a printed 
schedule to be prepared and sent out, early in each semester, 
by the Committee on Examination and Quiz Schedules. 

"The number of quizzes per semester in each course shall 
be in accordance with the following plan and shall not be 
changed except by the Committee on Examination and Quiz 
Schedules. 

"One-hour courses shall have one quiz. Two-hour and 
three-hour courses shall have two quizzes, except that there 
shall be only one quiz in the following two-hour and three-hour 
courses: major courses, recitation courses, courses requiring 
laboratory work, and lecture courses requiring reports during 
the semester. 

"Five-hour courses shall have three quizzes, except that 
there shall be only two quizzes in the following five-hour courses : 
recitation courses, courses requiring laboratory work, and 
lecture courses requiring reports during the semester. 



49 

"It was voted to discontinue the regular Committee on 
the Omission of Quizzes, and to confer on the Committee on 
Examination and Quiz Schedules authority to act on questions 
involving a modification of the quiz rule. 

Time of Hatiding in Written Work. 

April 28, 1915. It was voted as follows: 

"All written reports, essays, critical papers, etc., shall be 
handed in to the instructors not later than on the date of the 
final examination on the course in which such reports, etc., are 
due. In special cases, with the permission of the instructor, 
the handing in of such work may be deferred, but not longer 
than until the end of the examination period." 

Report of Examination Grades. 

January 14, 1915. The Faculty voted to re-affirm the 
original rule (of 1887) requiring examination grades to be 
reported to the Secretary's office within one week after the 
examination. 

Semester Hours of Credit Assigned to Laboratory Work. 

The general question of dividing between class and labora- 
tory the semester hours of credit at that time assigned to the 
class work only was discussed at a conference held early in the 
Spring of 1914. The results of a second conference were 
reputed to the Faculty by William B. Huff as acting secretary 
at the meeting of April 28, 1915, and approved as follows: 

"Representatives of the scientific departments of the 
College met in conference with President Thomas on Monday, 
January 18, 1915. 

"President Thomas acted as chairman and the following 
representatives were present: Bascom, T. C. Brown, Brunei, 
Ferree, Gordon, Huff, Moore, Rand. 

"The conference discussed possible modes of dividing 
between class and laboratory the semester hours of credits 
allowed to courses in which both methods of instruction are 
followed; also, as regards laboratory courses, questions as to 
failure, attendance, and other related matters. 



50 



"Having reached agreements as formulated below, the 
conference adjourned. 

"The following rules apply to undergraduate courses in 
science in which the work consists partly of lectures and partly 
of laboratory work, it being understood that the latter term 
includes recitations and demonstrations. 

"1. In post-major courses a student will be given but 
one mark and this will be based on the entire work of the 
course. 

"2. In five-hour minor and major courses and also in 
two-hour and three-hour courses (post-major excepted) the 
work in class and in laboratory will be credited separately 
and a mark given for each. 

" (a) The work in five-hour minor and major courses 

includes three hours of lectures per week and six hours 

given to laboratory and other work counted as laboratory. 

In these courses class work will count as three hours; 

laboratory as two hours. 

"(6) In the three-hour courses, class work will count 

as two hours; laboratory as one hour. In the two-hour 

courses, class work and laboratory will count one hour each. 

"3. Every student failing in laboratory must enter the 
corresponding laboratory course the following year and repeat 
the course, or such part of it as may be prescribed by the depart- 
ment. 

"A senior failing in a laboratory course may make through 
the office special arrangements for private instruction, if the 
department approves. 

"4. A student absent from laboratory without excuse will 
not be permitted to make up the work by putting in time 
outside the regular laboratory hours of the course. 

"5. A record of laboratory attendance will be kept. In 
the minor and major courses, six hours are required in a two- 
hour laboratory course. Accordingly, in these courses three 
hours of non-attendance will count as one absence. For the 
other laboratory courses, the number of absences will be 
computed in an analogous manner." 

The Faculty voted to put in operation the above plan 
subject to the approval of the Directors which was duly given. 



51 

Senior Honours. 

October 7, 1914. Voted to authorize the appointment of a 
committee of five members to consider the question of grading 
the degrees conferred upon seniors and to present plans for 
granting special honours for work of a high character along 
special lines. The Faculty voted to adopt the report of this 
committee, subject to approval of the Directors, which was 
duly given, as follows: 

"The committee recommends that the A.B. degree be 
conferred by Bryn Mawr with distinction — the degree to be 
conferred : summa cum laude for an average grade on the whole 
work of the college course of ninety per cent or over; magna 
cum laude for an average grade of eighty-five per cent to 
ninety per cent; and curn laude for an average grade of eighty 
to eighty-five per cent. 

''The committee recommends that these distinctions be 
printed on the commencement programme and entered on the 
diplomas." 

Plans as to special honours have not yet been presented. 

Examinations of Graduate Students. 

At the Faculty meeting of September 30, 1915, the Secre- 
tary read and was directed to incorporate in the faculty min- 
utes the following: 

''New Rule of the Council. Adopted May 29, 1914. It 
is the sense of the Council that during the midyear examination 
period the graduate students are expected to attend regular 
sessions of the graduate courses or to be occupied with definite 
assignments of work; that during the final examination period 
of the year they shall be required either to take an examination 
upon their courses or do special work assigned for the period and 
that a final grade shall be reported to the office for each graduate 
student; also that graduate students taking undergraduate 
courses shall be required to take the regular examinations of 
such courses unless granted permission by the Graduate Com- 
mittee to pursue the course as an auditor; that, however, the 
grades of the graduate students shall be reported separately 
from those of the undergraduates." 



52 

Reports on Work of Graduate Students. 

January 14, 1915. In the matter of making reports on 
. the regular work of graduate students, the President called 
attention to the importance of having on file in the office such 
reports as are designated in the faculty rules (p. 53); these 
reports being supplementary to those required under the coun- 
cil rule as to examinations of graduate students. 

New Committees. 

October 7, 1914, At this meeting the Dean of the College 
called attention to the need of more definite information as to 
the qualifications of students seeking positions and asked the 
Faculty to authorize the creation of a regular committee of 
three members to assist in securing such information. The 
following committee was voted. Committee of four with the 
Dean of the College as chairman and three members of the 
Faculty. One of the three Faculty members to retire each 
year and the new member to be appointed for three years. 

January 14, 1915. The Faculty voted to authorize the 
creation of a regular committee on the conduct of examinations. 
The committee to consist of three members, one to retire at 
the end of each year. New members to be appointed for 
three years. 

Forfeiture of Scholarship or Fellowship. 

April 28, 1915. The President announced to the Faculty 
that the Board of Directors had authorized the forfeiture of any 
scholarship or fellowship, graduate or undergraduate, at any 
time by bad academic work or because of misconduct. 

Red Cross and Belgian Relief Work. 

December 9, 1914. On invitation of the Undergraduate 
Association to co-operate in Red Cross and Belgium Relief 
Work the Faculty voted that the Chair appoint a committee of 
three members to investigate the matter; this committee was 
given power to communicate directly with individual members 
of the Faculty. 



53 

December 21^ 1914. The committee reported that it had 
fomid at least three reliable modes of sending aid and stated 
that further information would be sent to members of the 
Faculty, 

Motions in Writing. 

January 14, 1915. Voted: ''That it be the procedure 
at Faculty meetings that at the request of the Chair a motion 
or amendment be put in writing." 

Respectfully submitted, 

William Bashford Huff, 

Secretary of the Faculty. 



Report of the Secretary of tpie Senate. 

To the President: Madam, 

As Secretary of the Senate of Bryn Mawr College I have 
the honour to report that during the year ending September 
30, 1915, the Senate requested the President of the College to 
exclude two students, and disciplined twelve others by putting 
them on probation or suspending them. 

On October 27, 1914, the Senate appointed an Executive 
Committee to deal with cases arising under the Senate rules 
against cheating in written work. This Committee consists of 
the President and Dean of the College, ex-officio, and three 
members elected by the Senate. After the first three years 
each member so elected will serve for three years, and one 
new member will be elected every year. The Senate also 
adopted rules of procedure to guide its Executive Committee 
in the investigation of alleged infraction of the rules. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Geo. a. Barton, 

Secretary of the Senate. 



(54) 



Report of the Secretary of the College. 



To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to present the following report for the 
academic year 1914-15. 

Three hundred and eighty-five students were assigned to 
rooms in the halls of residence November 1, 1914. 

The following table shows the number of students in each 
class in each hall and also the number of non-resident students 
for the academic year: 



Merion 

Radnor 

Denbigh 

Pembroke East . 
Pembroke West 

Rockefeller 

Non-Resident . . 













Grad- 


1915. 


1916. 


1917. 


1918. 


ers. 


uates. 


13 


10 


17 


13 








10 


7 


14 


11 





8 


14 


9 


13 


16 





17 


16 


15 


16 


13 





10 


15 


10 


12 


20 





8 


17 


16 


19 


19 





8 


7 


7 


6 


11 


2 


26 


92 


74 


97 


103 


2 


77 



Total. 

53 
50 
69 
70 
65 
79 
59 



445 



The matriculation examinations were held in the spring 
of 1915 at Bryn Mawr College and also in 31 other centres 
being conducted at each centre by an alumna or former fellow 
appointed by the college. The numbers of candidates examined 
were: 



Athens, Ga 

Baltimore 

Bay City, Mich . . 

Boston 

Bryn Mawr 

Catonsville 

Charleston 

Chicago 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Davenport, Iowa. 

Detroit 

Harrisburg 

Houghton, Mich. 

Indianapolis 

Lancaster 

Louisville 



1 

43 
1 

24 
118 

13 
1 

10 
1 
3 
3 
1 
1 
4 
1 
2 
3 
1 



Minneapolis 2 

New York . 38 

Piedmont 2 

Pittsburgh 2 

Princeton 1 

Providence 5 

Richmond 7 

Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, 

Conn 36 

Saratoga Springs 1 

Seattle 1 

St. Louis 8 

Washington, D. C 3 

Wilkes-Barre 2 

Wykeham Rise, Washington, 

Conn 16 



355 



(55) 



56 



Obtained 
Certificate. Per cent. 



Candidates taking preliminaries 204 160 78 . 43 

Candidates taking finals 151 114 75.49 

In June, 1915, 29 candidates took the College Entrance 
Examination Board examinations with the following results: 

Obtained 
Certificate. Per cent. 

Candidates taking preliminaries 24 20 83 . 33 

Candidates taking finals 5 2 40.00 

In September, 1914, 63 candidates took the matriculation 
examinations held at Bryn Mawr with the following results : 

Obtained 
Certificate. Per cent. 

Candidates taking preliminaries 36 28 77 . 77 

Candidates taking finals 27 20 74.07 

In January 1915, 19 candidates took the matriculation 
examinations held at Bryn Mawr with the following results: 



Obtained 
Certificate. 


Per cent. 


12 


80 









Candidates taking preliminaries 15 

Candidates taking finals 4 

In September, 1915, 61 candidates took the matriculation 
examinations held at Bryn Mawr with the following results: 

Obtained 
Certificate. Per cent. 

Candidates taking preliminai'ies 37 25 67.51 

Candidates taking finals 24 22 91.66 

The Freshmen entering in 1914-15 were prepared at 66 
different schools. Of these 18 prepared candidates for the 
first time for admission to Bryn Mawr College. 

In addition to the usual plans and circulars sent to schools 
on the regular office mailing list, a new 12-page calendar sup- 
plement giving statistics of the Freshman Class (1917) was 
sent to more than 600 schools for girls or both girls and boys 
that prepared candidates in 1914 for the College Entrance 
Examination Board examinations but had never prepared for 
the Bryn Mawr College examinations. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edith Oelady, 
Secretary of the College. 



Report of the Bureau of Appointments. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit the following report of the 
work of the Bureau of Appointments for the year 1914-15. 

The following positions have been secured through the 
Bureau of Appointments : 

Teachers in schools and colleges 11 

Tutors and temporary positions 5 

Non-teaching positions 1 

17 

The above positions have been secured by the members 
of the following classes : 

Teachers. Tutors.. 

1915 6 1914 2 

1912 1 1913 1 

1910 1 1906 1 

Graduate 3 1902 1 

Non-Teaching. 
1915 1 



The total number of students who applied to the bureau 
was 124; of these 64 already had positions and applied only for 
positions paying a larger salary or in a more desirable location 
than the post already held. Forty-one applicants were recom- 
mended for positions; 75 recommendations were made. They 
were distributed as follows : 



No of 


No. of 


Students. 


Recommendations . 


26 


1 


5 


2 


6 


3 


1 


4 


2 


5 


1 


7 



(57) 



58 



Of the applicants registered 3 married, 1 died and 1 with- 
drew during the year; 24 have not reported any position. 

An Advisory Committee composed of three members from 
the faculty and the Dean of the College ex-ojflcio was appointed 
in November to aid in the work of the bureau. Upon the 
recommendation of the Committee the Board of Directors 
consented to drop the fees which had formerly been charged 
for the services of the bureau. At the suggestion of the Com- 
mittee a list of all applicants for positions was sent to the mem- 
bers of the faculty and staff with a request for recommendations 
from the departments in which the applicant had taken major, 
post-major or graduate courses. A number of recommendations 
were received and filed. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Marion Reilly, 
Dean of the College. 



Report of the Librarian. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to present the annual report of the work 
of the College Library for the year ending September 30; 1915. 

Accessions. 

The following table shows the additions made from various 
sources and the total present extent of the library, with a state- 
ment of the condition of a year ago for purposes of comparison. 

Number of volumes October 1, 1914 74,293 

Number of volumes added: 

1913-1-1. 1914-15. 

By purchase 1,520 1,798 

By binding 647 588 

By gift and exchange 392 427 

By replacement 14 8 

Unknown sources 5 2 

Christian Association 6 1 

From Model School 173 

Total additions 2,584 2,997 

Volumes withdrawn 42 69 

Net gain in volumes 2,542 2,928 

Maps and charts 5 19 

* Pamphlets added 373 347 

* Pamphlets withdrawn 7 32 

Net gain in pamphlets 366 315 

Total volumes September 30, 1915 77,221 

" maps and charts 2,151 

" accessioned pamphlets 3,605 

* These numbers represent catalogued pamphlets only. There is also in the library 
a growing collection of several thousand pamphlets arranged alphabetically by author. 
Pamphlets when bound ire withdrawn and again accessioned as books. 

(59) 



60 

These accessions are distributed by classes as follows: 

1913-14. 1914-15. 

General works 188 218 

Philosophy 198 126 

Religion 103 128 

Social Science 458 634 

Philology 160 153 

Science 484 514 

Useful Arts ; 34 103 

Fine Arts 81 116 

Literature 624 530 

History, etc 254 475 

Total 2,584 2,997 

A list of donors to the library with titles of books and 
pamphlets presented is appended. This list does not include 
books purchased from the gifts of money mentioned under the 
financial statement, nor are the books bought from gifts of 
money included in the table of accessions under the head of 
gift and exchange, because all such books were bought through 
the library. 

Cataloguing. 

1913-14. 1914-15. 

Titles catalogued 2,477 2,459 

Continuations, etc., added 1,694 2,316 

Cards added to main catalogue 10,149 13,390 

Cards added to departmental catalogues 1,983 503 

The classes of German, French, Italian and Spanish phil- 
ology have been recatalogued, also about half the German 
literature. This includes the following sets which were fully 
analyzed: Ausgaben und Abhandlungen aus dem Gebiete der 
Romanischen Philologie, 98 volumes; Bibliothek des Littera- 
rischen Vereins in Stuttgart, 261 volumes; Deutsche Dichter 
des 16. Jahrhunderts, 18 volumes; Deutsche Dichter des 17. 
Jahrhunderts, 15 volumes; Deutsche Litteraturdenkmale, 149 
volumes; Forschungen zur neueren Litteraturgeschichte, 48 
volumes; Neudrucke Deutscher Litteraturwerke, 245 volumes; 
Quellen und Forschungen zur Sprach- und Culturgeschichte 
der Germanischen Volker, 122 volumes; Theaiergeschichtliche 
Forschungen, 28 volumes. 



61 

Binding. 

1913. 1914. 

Volumes at binderies, October 1 173 136 

1913-14. 1914-15. 

Volumes sent during year 846 762 

1914. 1915. 

Volumes at binderies, September 30 136 

1913-14. 1914-15. 

Total bound during year 883 898 

Circulation. 

1913-14. 1914-15. 

October 4,016 3,898 

November 2,348 2,779 

December 2,554 2,255 

January 2,408 2,585 

February 3,415 3,229 

March 3,082 2,895 

April 2,284 2,279 

May 2,082 2,079 

June 735 1,022 

July 346 435 

August 317 322 

September 1,061 1,708 



24,648 25,486 

Four thousand three hundred and thirty-three volumes of 
the total circulation were placed in the Reserve Book Room 
and Seminary rooms, Avhich indicates somewhat the use of 
books within the building; the remainder were taken out for 
study or general reading. The following table shows the use 
of books by subjects, it does not include the use made of those 
placed on reserve. 

Bibliography, General Periodicals (bound) 142 volumes. 

Philosophy and Psychology 967 

ReUgion and Church History 764 

Economics, Sociology, Education 2,316 

Philology 637 

Natural Science* 331 

* Does not include the science books taken from Dalton Hall libraries, 



62 



Useful Arts 89 volumes. 

Fine Arts 1,031 

Literature 12,097 " 

History and Biography 2,779 " 

Of the total circulation, the students drew out 65 per cent, 
the faculty and staff 18 per cent, and 17 per cent were placed 
in the Reserve Book Room. This shows a gratifying use of the 
library by the students. 

Inter-Library Loans. 

During the past year we have borrowed volumes from 
other libraries as follows: 

University of Chicago Library 1 

Cornell University Library 2 

Columbia University Library 8 

Harvard College Library 22 

Haverf ord College Library 3 

Johns Hopkins University Library 1 

Library Company of Philadelphia 37 

Mercantile Library of Philadelphia 1 

University of Pennsylvania Library 42 

Philadelphia Free Library 5 

Princeton University Library 5 

U. S. Library of Congress 15 

U. S. Surgeon General's Library . 1 

Total .143 

Books have been lent to other libraries as follows: 

Haverf ord College Library 1 

Smith College Library 9 

Vassar College Library 6 

Yale University Library 1 

Total 17 

Financial Statement, 1914-15. 

The sums available for the purchase of books and peri- 
odicals together with the expense of binding and general library 
supplies were as follows: 



63 



Library Appropriation. 

Library appropriation for 1914-15 $5,000.00 

Receipts from examination fees and course 

book fines, 1914-15 1,724.29 

Total income $6,724 . 29 

Regular appropriations to departments for 

1914-15 $5,000.00 

Additional appropriations 1,426.37 

Total appropriated $6,426 .37 

Unappropriated balance to be carried forward $297 . 92 

Regular A ppropriaiions . 

Ancient History $100.00 

Archaeology 150 . 00 

Art 150.00 

Biblical Literature 150.00 

Biology 400.00 

Botany 30.00 

Chemistry 200.00 

Comparative Literature 150 . 00 

Comparative Philology 30 . 00 

Economics 300.00 

English 300.00 

French 200.00 

General Literature 100 . 00 

General Library Expenses 560 . 00 

General Periodicals 240 . 00 

Geology 150.00 

German 200.00 

Greek 150.00 

History 250.00 

History of Education 65 . 00 

International Catalogue 100.00 

Italian 75 .00 

Latin 250.00 

Mathematics 150 . 00 

Philosophy 150.00 

Physics. 150.00 

Psychology 150.00 

Reference 100.00 

Total appropriated $5,000.00 



64 



Special appropriations 

Books for general reading in connection with 
five laboratory courses: 

Department of Biology $100.00 

Department of Chemistry 100 . 00 

Department of Geology 100 . 00 

Department of Physics 100 . 00 

Experimental Psychology 100.00 

$500.00 

Mr. Rhys Carpenter 55 . 00 

To continue Hermann ; Denkmaler der Malerei des 
Altertums. 

Mr. Clarence Henry Haring 300.00 

For books to be used in graduate history course. 

Professor Wilmer Cave Wright 50 . 00 

For books to be used in graduate Greek course. 

Professor Tenney Frank 50.00 

For books to be used in graduate Latin course. 

Professor Arthur Russell Moore 34 . 07 

For Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vols. 1-15. 

Professor Roger F. Brunei 48.50 

For Journal of the American Chemical Society, 
Vols. 20-34. 

Department of Psychology 34 . 17 

General Continuations 100.00 

Wales Adding Machine 254.63 

Total $1,426.37 

The income on invested funds has been as follows: 

President James E. Rhoads Memorial Fund $74.48 

Class of 1902 (spent for books on Biology) 64 . 14 

Lois Meta Wright Memorial Fund 5.20 

Rose Chamberlin Memorial Fund 47 . 93 

Dr. Nettie Maria Stevens Memorial Fund 4.80 

The expenditure on other funds has been as follows : 

Phebe Anna Thorne fund $322.60 

Carola Woerishoffer endowment fund 79 . 13 

DupUcate book fund 258.71 

Sale of books fund 58 . 60 



65 

Gifts. 

From the Class of 1898 $300.00 

For the Department of English. 

From the Bryn Mawr Club of Washington 30 . 00 

For the New Book Room. 

From several Alumna^ 30 . 00 

For the New Book Room. 

From the Class of 1911, in memory of Isabel Buchanan . 58 . 50 
For the New Book Room. 

From the Philadelphia Branch of the Alumnae Associa- 
tion 100.00 

For the Department of Art. , 

From the Class of 1900 100 . 00 

For the Department of History. 

From the Class of 1903 316.20 

Total of gifts $934 .70 

The following is a summary of money spent from all 
sources : 

1913-14. 1914-15. 

Books $3,187.33 $3,727.96 

Periodicals and continuations 2,379 . 40 2, 109 . 05 

Binding 776.65 832.83 

SuppUes 295.94 283.53 

Adding machine 254 . 63 

Postage, express, freight 64.51 65.98 

$6,703.83 $7,273.98 

The Building. 

In order to provide a suitable place in which to keep and 
consult the plans of the college buildings and grounds, a room 
has been utilized in the basement. A temporary room has 
been built in the basement of the stack room in which English 
essays can be stored and the room formerly used for this pur- 
pose has been taken for the plans. A large fire-proof filing 
case has been purchased and the plans have been carefully 
filed under the direction of the librarian. 



66 



A dministration . 

In order to keep an accurate record of the schedules of the 
members of the hbrary staff, an electric time clock has been 
installed. It has been of help to the librarian also and has 
given general satisfaction. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation for the 
continued support which the library staff has given throughout 
the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lois A. Reed, 

Librarian. 



Gifts from Individuals. 

Mr. William S. Auchincloss: Auchincloss, Standard Chronology of 
the Holy Bible. 

Professor George A. Barton: Relations Between Laws of Babylonia 
and the Laws of the Hebrew Peoples. 

Miss Cora A. Benneson: American Association for the Advancement 
of Science; Proceedings, Vols. 6.3-66, 1915. 

Mr. James S. de Benneville: Benneville, Tales of the Samurai Oguri 
Hangwan Ichidaiki. 

Miss Mary Miles Blanchard : Blanchard, Basketry Book. 

Mr. Woodbmy Blair: Lowery, The Spanish Settlements, 1513-1561; 
The Spanish Settlements, Florida, 1562-1574. 

Mrs. J. Crosby Brown : Practical Thoughts of a Mother. 

Mr. Edward P. Buffet: Buffet, Layman Revato. 

Mr. M. B. Cloussen: Austro-Hungarian Red Book. Two copies. 

Honourable Chauncey M. Depew: Some Views on the Threshold of 
Fourscore. 

Miss Abigail Camp Dimon: Biological Bulletin, Vols. 10-22. 

Professor Lucy Martin Donnelly: Remember Louvain; Songs and 
Sonnets for England in War Time; Poems of the Great War; France, La 
Revolte des Anges; Milton, Poetical Works; Dickinson, The Single 
Hound; Murray, The Foreign Policy of Sir Edward Grey; Cannan, 
Windmills. 

Miss Elizabeth Eastman: Plutarch, Plutarchi Opera Moralia, 7 vols. 

The late Mr. Albert J. Edmunds: Edmunds, Editor, Vision of the 
World War Seen, by Tolstoy; Edmunds, F. W. H. Myers, Swedenborg, 
Buddha. 

Mr. William Dudley Foulke: Paul the Deacon, History of the Lan- 
gobards. 



67 



President Harry A. Garfield: Sturges, Amcrioan Chambers of 
Commerce. 

Mr. Stephen Gaselee: Carmen Anglosaxonicum; The Hind and the 
Panther. 

Dr. Frederick P. Gay: 5 Reprints. 

Mr. Frits V. Holm: Nestorian Monument. 

Mr. Ford Madox Hueffer: Hueffer, When Blood is Their Argument; 
Between St. Dennis and St. George. 

Mrs. William F. Jenks: Egypt Exploration Fund, 19th General 
Meeting, 1904-1905; Archaeological Report, 1911-1912; Egypt Explora- 
tion Fund, Memoir, Nos. 33-34. 

Mr. Edmond Kelly: Kelly, Elimination of the Tramp. 

Professor Georgiana Goddard King: American Anthropologist, 5 nos. 

Mrs. Thomas S. Kirkbride: American Journal of the Medical Sci- 
ences, 58 vols. 

Miss Pauline Leavens: Leavens, Pilgrimage to Haunts of Browning; 
Browning. 

Mr. Albert Leffingwell: Leffingwell, An Ethical Problem. 

Mr. Wickham Legg: Inventories of Christchurch, Canterbury, Tran- 
scribed and Edited by W. Legg. 

Mr. Ralph H. North: North, First Official Pistol Maker. 

Mrs. S. L. Oberholtzer: Thrift Tidings. 

Miss Henrietta Raymer Palmer: Sedgwick, The Encounter; Davis, 
With the Allies; Roosevelt, America and the World War; Sukloff, Life 
Story of a Russian Exile; Loti, Les Desenchantees; Angellier, A I'Amie 
Perdue; Le Chemin des Saisons; Verhaeren, Les Heures Claires; Bierce, 
In the Midst of Life; Noble, Web of Indian Life; German War Book; 
Kropotkin, Memoirs of a Revolutionist; Claudel, L'Otage. 

Sir Gilbert Parker: Britain and the European Crisis; 20 Pamphlets; 
Report on Alleged German Atrocities; Parker, World in the Crucible; 
India and the War; The Treatment of Prisoners of War in England and 
Germany; Lavisse and Andler, German Theory and Practice of War; 
Morgan, A Dishonored Army; Headlam, The History of Twelve Days; 
Masterman, After Twelve Months of War; Parker, Is England Apathetic? 
Fisher, The British Share in the War; Balfour, The Navy and the War. 

Mr. Samuel L. Parrish: Catalogue of Objects Exhibited at Southamp- 
ton Art Museum, Southampton, New York. 

Honourable Boies Penrose: United States Government Publications, 
25 vols. 

Mr. Casper L. Redfield: Redfield, Great Men and How They Are 
Produced. 

Dean Marion Reilly: Wells, Wonderful Visit; Brinkley, History of 
the Japanese People; Ibsen, Robert Frank; Strindberg, Growth of a Soul; 
Partheneia, 1915, The Queen's Masque. 

Mr. Lindsay Russell: Masaoka, Editor, Japan to America. 

Dr. Eunice Morgan Schenck: Sainte Bible. 

Mr. John R. Scott: Scott, Technic of the Speaking Voice. 



68 

Miss Annie Hai'din Sherman: D'Ancona and Bacci, Manuale della 
Letteratura Italiana; Fogazzaro, Piccolo Mondo Antico. 

Mr. Henry W. Shoemaker: Shoemaker, Wolf Days in Pennsylvania; 
Black Forest Souvenirs. 

Miss Kate Stephens: Kellogg, A Young Scholar's Letters. 

Mr. Slason Thompson: Thompson, The Railway Library and Statis- 
tics, 1914. 

Mrs. T. B. Walker: Catalog of the Art Collection of T. B. Walker. 

Mr. Andrew Dickson White: White, Fiat Money Inflation in France. 

Miss Marguerite Wilkinson: Wilkinson, The Passing of Mars. 

Mr. W. H. Wilhams: Williams, Present Financial Situation of the 
American Railroads. 

Mrs. J. H. Woods: Baldwin, The World War. 

Gifts and Exchanges from Institutions, Societies, Etc., 1914-15. 

Academy of Natural Sciences: Proceedings, 4 nos. 

Alabama, Geological Survey: Bulletin, 1 no. 

American Association for International Conciliation: Publications, 
19 nos; D'Estournelles de Constant, America and her Problems. 

American Association on Unemployment : A Practical Program for the 
Prevention of Unemployment. 

American Institute of Electrical Engineers: Weaver, Catalogue of 
the Wheeler Gift of Books, Pamphlets and Periodicals in the Library of 
the American Institute of Electrical Engineers. 2 vols. 

American Iron and Steel Institute: Monthly Bulletin, 9 nos. 

American Peace Society: Report, 1914, 1915. 

Arnei'ican Philosophical Society: Proceedings, 5 nos. 

American Society for the Judicial Settlement of International Dis- 
putes: Pubhcations, Nos. 15-16, 18. 

American Telephone and Telegi-aph Company: Directories of New 
York, Chicago, Baltimore, Washington; Annual Report, 1914; Brief of 
Arguments Against Public Ownership, Supplements, 28-29. 

Amerika-Institut : The Great War in Pictures, Nos. 1-6. 

Amherst College Library: Loomis, Deseado Formation of Patagonia. 

Association of Life Insurance Presidents: Proceedings, 8th Annual 
Meeting. 

Australia, Commonwealth Statistician: Year Book, No. 7. 

Austro-Hungarian Consulate General; Austria-Hungary and the 
War. 

Bermuda Government: Bermuda Official Tourists' Guide Book. 

Bodleian Library: Black, Elizabeth and Henry IV; Rice-Oxley, 
Memoirs as a Source of English History; Gladstone Essay, 1914; Chan- 
cellor's Prize: Latin Verse; Matthew Arnold Memorial Prize Essay, 1913; 
Gaisford Prize, Greek Prose, 1914; Gaisford Prize, Greek Verse, 1914; 
Senior, Pisgah; Sterling, Burial of Sophocles; Staff Manual; Annual 
Report of the Curators, 1914. 



m 

Boston Children's Aid Society: 50th Annual Report. 

Boston Museum of Fine Arts: Annual Report, 1914. 

Boston Public Library: Book of Common Prayer and the Catalogue 
of the Collection of Josiah Henry Benton. 

Boston School Committee, Department of Educational Investigation : 
School Document, No. 10. 

Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences: Museum Quarterly, 5 nos; 
Science Bulletin, 2 nos. 

Buenos Aires-Facultad de Filosofia y Letras: Documentos Para la 
Historia Argentina, Vol. 3. 

Bureau of Railway Economics: Bulletins, 67-84. 

California Academy of Sciences: Proceedings, Vols. 2, 4, 5. 

CaUfornia, Bureau of Labor Statistics: Biennial Report, 1913-14. 

University of California: Publications, Physiology, 3 nos; Zoology, 
12 nos. 

Cambridge University Library: Report of the Library Syndicate, 
1914. 

Canada, Office of Archivist: Oliver, Canadian Northwest, Vols. 1, 2. 

Canada, Geological Survey: Museum Bulletin, Nos. 3-5. 

Canada, Department of Interior: 21st International Irrigation 
Congress. 

Canada, Department of Mines: Memoirs, No. 21; Report on the 
Building and Ornamental Stones of Canada, Vol. 2; Summary Report, 
1913-14; Researches on Cobalt ; Economic Minerals; Preliminary Report 
on the Mineral Production of Canada; Geology of the Victoria and 
Saanich Map-Areas, Vancouver Island, B. C; Bulletins, 9-13; Museum 
Bulletin, Nos. 15-18; Report on Salt Deposits. 

Canada, Royal Society: Proceedings, Series 3, Vols. S-9. 

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace: Year Book, 1913-14; 
The Report of the International Commission to Inquire into the Balkan 
Wars; 20 Pamphlets; Butler, United States of Europe; Preparedness of 
America; Enquete dans les Balkans; Coastwise Exemption; Bourdon, 
German Enigma. 

Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: Annual 
Report, 1914; Bulletin, No. 8. 

Carnegie Institution of Washington: Publications, 22 nos. 

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh : Monthly Bulletin, 1914-1915; 18th 
Annual Report ,1914; 19th Annual Report, 1915. 

Catholic University of America: 2 Bulletins. 

Central Conference of American Rabbis: Year Book, Vol. 24. 

Chicago House of Correction: Bulletin, No. 1. 

University of Chicago, Library: Henry Durrett Collections. 

University of Cincinnati: Studies, 2 nos. 

Colombo Museum: Catalogue of Coins, Part I, Muhammadan and 
European; Spoha Zeylanica, No. 36. 

The Colonnade: Vol. 7, 2 nos., Vol. 10, 6 nos., Vol. 9, No. 3. 

University of Colorado: Studies, 4 nos. 



70 

Columbia University: Annual Report, 1914; Kahn Foundation for 
Foreign Travel, Vol. 3, No. 2. 

Conference for Better County Government in New York State: Pro- 
ceedings of the First Conference, Schenectadj'^, 1914. 

Connecticut State Geological and National History Survey: Bulle- 
tins, 20, 23-25. 

Consumers League of Eastern Pennsylvania: 14th Annual Report; 
Condition of Women in Mercantile Establishments in Philadelphia. 

Cornell University: 29 Dissertations. 

Dante Society: Annual Report, No. 31, 1912. 

Royal Society of Dublin: Economic Proceedings, Nos. 8-9, 17-23. 

Florida, Geological Survey: 7th Annual Report, 1915. 

General Education Board, Bulletins, 1902-1914. 

Georgia, Geological Survey: Bulletin, No. 30. 

University of Groningen: Jaarboek, 1913-1914; 7 Dissertations. 

Harvard University, Editorial Committee: Semitic Series, Vol. 4. 

Harvard University, Library: Report, 1914. 

Harvard University, Bureau of Business Research : Bulletin, No. 4. 

Harvard University, Department of Social Ethics: Bulletin, No. 2. 

Haskins and Sells: Sells, A Plan for International Peace. 

Hervas Laboratories of American Linguistics: Bulletins, Nos. 4-5. 

Illinois, Board of Administration: Institution Quarterly, 3 nos. 

Illinois, Geological Survey: Bulletin, 5 nos. 

Illinois State Historical Library: Transactions, 1913; Biennial 
Report, 1914; Pubhcation, No. 18; Collections, Nos. 10, 12. 

University of Illinois: 8 Dissertations. 

University of Illinois, School of Education: Bulletin, Nos. 12-13. 

University of Illinois: Studies in Social Science, No. 3. 

Indiana Academy of Science: Proceedings, 1913. 

Indiana Bureau of Legislative Information: Bulletin, No. 4. 

Indiana University: Bulletins, 4 nos. 

Indiana University, Library: 3 Reprints; Leonard, Some Facts 
Concerning Hammond. 

Investment Bankers' Association of America: Bulletins, 3 nos. 

Iowa, State Board of Education: 3rd Biennial Report, 1914. 

Iowa Geological Survey: Vols. 23-24; Bulletins, 2-3. 

Iowa, Bureau of Labor Statistics: 16th Report. 

Iowa, Public Instruction: Biennial Report, 1912-1914. 

University of Iowa: 6 Dissertations; Bulletins, 91-92, 95. 

Japan Society: Hobson and Morse, Chinese, Corean and Japanese 
Potteries; Millis, Japanese Problem in the United States; Bulletins, 23, 24. 

John Crear Library: Annual Report, 1914. 

John Rylands Library: Peake, Bible Notes for Students of the New 
Testament; Bulletin, 2 nos.; Thumb, The Modern Greek; Johns, Short 
Bibliography of Works on Babylonian Stories of Creation. 

Johns Hopkins University: 11 Reprints; 15 Dissertations; 1 Circular. 

University of Kansas: Humanistic Studies, Vol. 16, No. 4. 



71 

Kyoto Imperial University, College of Science and Engineering: 
Memoirs 1-5. 

Lake Mohonk Conference of Friends of the Indian and Other Depend- 
ent People: Report, No. 32. 

Lake Mohonk Conference on International Arbitration: Report of 
Annual Meeting, 1915. 

Leland Stanford Junior University: Lima, Evolution of Brazil; 
Meyer, Hemolymph Nodes of the Sheep; Schafer, Introduction to Study 
of Endocrine Glands; Stephenson, Some Aspects of the Dramatic Art of 
Aeschylus; Trustees' Series, 1914, 1915; Kennedy, The Pronoun of 
Address in English Literature of the Thirteenth Century; Kellogg & 
Ferris, The Anoplura and Mallophaga of North American Mammals; 
1 Thesis; Rashdall, Is Conscience an Emotion? 

Liverpool Biological Society: Proceedings and Transactions, Vol. 28. 

London, Royal Society of Arts: Great Britain and the European 
Crisis. 

University of London: Calendar, 1914-1915; Regulations for Stu- 
dents, 1914-1915. 

Longmans, Green and Company: Shadwell, Drink, Temperance and 
Legislation. 

Los Angeles, Auditor: Report for 1914. 

Maine Agricultural Experiment Station: 2 Bulletins. 

University of Manchester: Church, American Verdict on the War. 

Massachusetts, State Board of Charity: Annual Report, 1915. 

Massachusetts, State Board of Health: Annual Report for 1909, 1913. 

Massachusetts, Secretary of the Commonwealth: 71st Report of 
Births, Marriages, 1912. 

Massachusetts, Bureau of Statistics: History, Organization and 
Functions. 

Massachusetts, Bureau of Statistics of Labor: Annual Report, 1912, 
1913, 1914; Annual Report on the Statistics of Municipal Finances, 
November, 1912, to August, 1913; Annual Report on the State Free Em- 
ployment Offices; Massachusetts Bureau of Statistics, 1869-1915; 8 
Bulletins. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology: 3 Abstracts of Theses. 

Michigan, Geological and Biological Survey: Pubhcations 14, 16, 17. 

Michigan, State Board of Corrections and Charities: 22nd Biennial 
Report. 

Michigan, State Board of Health: Public Health, 8 nos. 

Michigan, Department of Labor: 32nd Annual Report. 

Michigan, Department of State: 46th Annual Report by the Secre- 
tary of State. 

University of Michigan: Fairbanks, Athenian Lekythoi; Memorial of 
the 75th Annual of the Founding; 4 theses; 22nd Annual May Festival; 
Sources of the Synoptic Gospels. 

University of Michigan, Library: 9 Theses; 2 Reprints; Taylor, 
Principles of Economics; Sheppard, Circulation and Sleep. 



72 

University of Michigan, Physical Laboratory: Bulletin, No. 2. 

Michigan, Museum of Zoology: Occasional Papers, Nos. 5-10. 

Minnesota Historical Society: 2 Bulletins. 

University of Minnesota: Current Problems, Nos. 2-3; Studies in 
Language and Literature, No. 1; 3 Bulletins; Proceedings of 2d Con- 
vention, League of Minnesota Municipalities; Experiment Station Bulle- 
tins, 10 nos.; General Extension Division Bulletins, 3 nos.; Studies in 
Engineering, 1 no.; Studies in Social Sciences, 4 nos.; Minnesota Geo- 
logical Survey, 1 no. 

Missouri, Bureau of Geology and Mines; Bulletin, No. 3. 

University of Missouri: General Series, 8 Bulletins; Journalism 
Series, 1 no.; Medical Series, 2 nos.; School of Mines and Metallurgy, 
2 nos. 

National Academy of Sciences: Biographical Memoirs, Vol. 7; 
Memoirs, Vol. 12; Proceedings, Vol. 1, Nos. 2-9. 

National American Woman Suffrage Association: Harper, Life and 
Work of Susan B. Anthony, Vol. 3. 

National Association of Manufacturers: Annual Convention, 1913. 

Natural Ice Association of America: Proceedings of Special Meet- 
ing, 1913. 

University of Nebraska: Studies, Vol. 14, No. 4. 

New Jersey, Bureau of Industrial Statistics: Industrial Directory, 
1915; 37th Annual Report, 1914. 

University of New Mexico: Chemistry Series, Vol. 1, No. 2. 

New York City Charity Organization Society: 32nd Annual Report. 

New York, Board of Education: Report of the President, 1914. 

New York, Public Library: Reading Lists. 

New York, Police Department: Annual Report, 1914. 

New York, Department of Public Charities: Annual Reports, 1910, 
1911, 1913. 

New York, State Board of Charities: Eugenic and Social Wellfare 
Bulletin, No. 4; Annual Reports, 1912, 1913, 1914. 

New York, State Charities Aid Association: 21st Annual Report, 
1912; 22d Annual Report, 1913. 

New York, State Education Department: State Museum Report, 
1912; 10th Annual Report, 1914. 

New York, Commissioner of Labor: Annual Report, 1914. 

New York, Department of Labor: Industrial Directory, 1913; Labor 
Bulletin, 4 nos. 

New York, State Library: Report, 1912. 

New York, Society Library: Annual Report, 1915. 

New York Stock Exchange, Committee on Library: Noble, New York 
Stock Exchange in the Crisis of 1914. 

New York University: 17 Dissertations; Howell, Foundational 
Study in the Pedagogy of Arithmetic. 

New York, State University: Proceedings of the 50th Convocation, 
1914; Annual Report, 1914. 



73 

North Carolina, University Library: 3 Reports. 

North Dakota, Geological Survey: 6th Biennial Report. 

Northwestern University: 1 Bulletin. 

Ohio, Industrial Commission: 1 Bulletin. 

Ohio, State University: 4 Bulletins. 

Oklahoma, Geological Survey: 4 Bulletins. 

Omaha, Department of Accounts and Finance: Annual Report, 1914. 

Omaha, Municipal Statistics: 9 Bulletins. 

Paris, Chambre de Commerce: Miscellaneous Pamphlets; Durk- 
heim. Who Wanted War?; Weiss, Violation of Neutrahty of Belgium; 
Bedier, German Atrocities. 

Paris, Bibliotheque de la Faculte des Lettres: Artonne, Mouvement 
de 1314; University of Paris, Livret de I'etudiant; Mohnier, Les " Maisons 
Sacrees" de Delos; Blart, Louis., Les Rapports de la France et de I'Es- 
pagne. 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts: 1 Circular; 1 Catalogue.' 

Pennsjdvania, State Library: Adjutant General, Report, 1910; 
Department of Agriculture, Report, 1913, 8 Bulletins; Banking Com- 
mission, Report, 1913, Part 2, 1914, Part 1; Educational Association, 
Report of 63d Meeting, 1912; Epileptic Hospital and Colony Farm, 18th 
Annual Report, 1914, 19th Annual Report, 1915; Department of Forestry, 
Report, 1912-13, Bulletins, 11-12; Governor, Vetoes, 1915; Grand Army 
of the Republic Encampment, Proceedings, Vol. 48; 50th Anniversary of 
the Battle of Gettysburg; Board of Health, Report, 1911; Insurance 
Commissioner, Annual Report, 1913; Department of Intei'nal Affairs, 
Report, 1913; Commissioner of Labor and Industry, 1st Annual Report; 
Department of Labor and Industry, 5 Bulletins; Department of Mines, 
Report, 1913; Public Charities Association, 1st Annual Report, 1913, 
Pamphlets; Board of Commissioners of Public Charities, Annual Report, 
1913; Report of ttie Alleghany County Committee, 1915, 2 Publications; 
Superintendent of Pubhc Instruction, Report, 1914; Public Service Com- 
mission, Annual Report 1914; Commissioner of Sinking Fund, Report, 
1914; State Highway Department, Report, 1913-1914; Statutes at Large, 
Vols. 15-16; Topographic and Geologic Survey, Report, 1911-1914, 3 nos.; 
Water Supply Commission, Report, 1913. 

Pennsylvania Historical Society: Dreer Collections of Autographs, 
2 vols. 

Pennsylvania Railroad Company: New Case for Increased Rail- 
road Rates. 

Pennsylvania Society for Organizing Charity: Annual Report, 1901, 
1904. 

University of Pennsylvania: 17 Dissertations; 2 Bulletins; Astro- 
nomical Series, 2 Pubhcations; The Museum Journal, Publications of the 
Babylonian Section. 

Philadelphia, Maritime Exchange: Annual Report, 1915. 

Portici, R. Scuola Superiore d'Agricoltura in Italy: Publication, 
Vol. 8. 



74 



Princeton University: 10 Dissertations; Vanuxem Lectures, 1912, 
1913. Contributions from the Biological Laboratories. 

Queen's University: Departments of History and Political Economy, 
Bulletin, 3 nos. 

Rhode Island, Factory Inspection: Annual Report, 1914. 

Rhode Island School of Design: Bulletin, 3 nos. 

Rockefeller Sanitary Commission: Publications, No. 9. 

Royal Colonial Institute: Grant, Our Just Cause. 

Russell Sage Foundation Library: Amsterdam, Bureau Municipal 
de Statistique, Communications Statistiques ; Atlantic City Conference on 
Workmen's Compensation Acts, Report, 1909; Boston, Associated Chari- 
ties, Publication, No. 8; Address of R. T. Paine, Jr., 1879; Gurtccn, 
What is Charity Organization?; Charity Organization Society, New 
York City, Tenement House Committee, Condensed Report, Trinity 
Tenements, 1909; Chicago, Mayor's Commission on Unemployment; 
Conference of Mayors of the Cities of New York State; Federation of 
Day Nurseries, 5 Bulletins; First Cooperative Safety Congress, Proceed- 
ings, 1912; First National Conference on Race Betterment, Proceedings, 
1914; Great Britain, Commissioners of Prisons and Directors of Convict 
Prisons, Report, 1913-1914, 2 Parts; Statistics of Compensation and of Pro- 
ceedings Under the Workmen's Compensation Act, 1906; Local Govern- 
ment Board for Ireland, Appendix to the Report of the Departmental 
Committee to Inquire into the Housing Conditions in Dublin; London 
County Council, Employment of Children Out of School Hours, 1900; 
National Association of Manufacturers of the United States, Commission 
on Industrial Indemnity Insurance, Prehminary Report, 1910; National 
Civic Federation, Social Insurance Department, Report of the Company 
on Preliminary Foreign Inquiry, 1914; National Association for Improving 
the Condition of the Poor, Annual Report; New York City, Committee 
for Vocational Scholarships; Directory of the Trades and Occupations 
Taught at the Day and Evening Schools in Greater New York, 1913; 
New York City, Department of Public Charities, Annual Report, 1907- 
1909; New York State, Charities Aid Association, Publications, 18, 39, 
53; Probation Commission, Report, 1906; Rochester, 4th Ward Survey; 
Spender, State and Pensions in Old Age; United States Senate, 63d Con- 
gress, 1st Session, Bulletin, No. 214; Wales, United School of Social Ser- 
vice, Social Problems in Wales, 1913; Winnipeg, University Women's 
Club, Civic Committee, Work of Women in Department Stores; New 
York State, Conference of Charities and Corrections, Proceedings, 1903, 
4 vols. 

Rutgers College: T. John Bogart Letters, 1776-1782. 

Sagamore Sociological Conference: 8th Conference, 1914. 

St. Louis, Public Library: Proceedings of the Conference of Cities, 
1914; Annual Report, 1914-1915; 2 Bulletins. 

Seybert Institution: Report, 1913-1914. 

Smithsonian Institution: Annual Report, 1914; Miscellaneous 
Collection, 10 Publications. 



75 

Stewart and Company: Judson, Songs Toward the Sunliglit. 

Tennessee, Geological Survey: Bulletin, 4 nos. 

Testimony Publishing Company: The Fundamentals, Vols. 11, 12. 

University of Texas: 10 Bulletins. 

Tokyo Imperial University, College of Agi'iculture : 5 Journals. 

Toronto University Studies: Biological Series, No. 16; Papers from 
the Chemical Laboratories, Nos. 101-107; Philological Series, No. 3; 
Armstrong, Light from the East. 

Trustees Under the Will of Mary Baker Eddy: Eddy, Science and 
Health, with Key to the Scriptures; Miscellaneous Writings, 1883-1896; 
The First Church of Christ Scientist and Miscellany; Unity of Good; 
Retrospection and Introspection; Pulpit and Press; Christian Healing; 
Rudimental Divine Science; Rudimental Divine Science, in New York 
Point System, For the Blind; No and Yes; Christian Science Versus 
Pantheism. 

Tufts College: Stiidies, Science Series, 2 nos. 

Ukrainian National Council of America: Rudnitsky, Ukraine; Step- 
ankovsky, Russian Plot to Seize Galicia. 

Union League, Philadelphia: Annual Report, 1914. 

University Club, New York: Annual Report, 1915-1916. 

Vassar College Library: 2 Reprints. 

Veiller: 7th Annual Report of the Association of Tuberculosis Clinics, 
New York City, 1914. 

Vermont, Commissioner of Taxes: Biennial Report, 1914. 

Washington University: 1 Bulletin; Mathematical and Physical 
Sciences, 1 no. 

Western Reserve Liniversity: 1 Bulletin. 

Western Theological Seminary: 1 Bulletin. 

Westinghouse, Department of Publicity: George Westinghouse, 
1846-1914. 

Wisconsin, Academy of Sciences, Arts, and Letters: Transactions, 
12 nos. 

University of Wisconsin: 3 Bulletins; 4 Dissertations. 

World Peace Foundation: Concord, January-June, 1915; War 
Zones, August, 1915; 1 Pamphlet; Pillsbury, Arbitration Treaties; Cum- 
mings, Arbitration Treaties and our Religious Duty; Mr. Bryan's Peace 
Plan; President Wilson to College Students; President Wilson on the 
United States; Proper Attitude of the Hague Conference; Concord, 
November-December, 1914; Mead, Educational Organizations: The 
Grange and Peace. 

Yale University: Bulletin, 13 nos. 

Yale University Library: Iddings, Problem of Volcanism; Rice, 
Problems of American Geology. 

Periodicals and Newspapers, the Gift of Publishers. 
Advocate of Peace; Amherst Graduates' Quarterly; Blatter fiir 
Zwischenstaatliche Organization; Book News Monthly; Boston Tran- 



76 

script; Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly; Bulletin of the New York Public 
Library; Bulletin of the Pan-American Union; University of California 
Chronicle: Christian Science Journal; Christian Science Monitor; Chris- 
tian Science Sentinel; College News; Columbia University Quarterly; 
Edison Monthly; Hartford Seminary Record; Journal of the Illinois 
State Historical Society; Johns Hopkins University Circulars; Lantern; 
Midland Naturalist; North German Lloyd Bulletin; Public Health; 
Nurse Quarterly; Southern Workman; Spirit of Missions; Technology 
Review; Tipyn o'Bob. 



Report of the Health Committee. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit the following report of the 
Health Committee for the year 1914-15. 

The Health Committee met regularly once a week through- 
out the year with the wardens of the halls. Miss Applebee, 
Director of Athletics and Gymnastics and Supervisor of Health, 
reported on the students placed by her on the supervision 
list. The record of this work will be found in her report. 
The records of illness will be found in detail in the reports of 
the Physician in Chief and the Assistant Physician. 

Infirmary Statistics, 1914-~i5. 

Number of students sent to the hifirmanj and the duration of each illness. 

Undergraduates. No. of Undergraduates No. of 

No. of days. Students. No. of days. Students. 

1 33 8 1 

2 29 9 2 

3 31 10 3 

4 10 12 1 

5 10 14 1 

6 9 19 1 

7 5 32 1 

Total number of undergraduate students treated in the Infirmary . 137 
Total number of days of treatment in the Infirmary 496 

Graduates No. of Graduates No. of 

No. of days. Students. No. of days. Students. 

1 3 6 1 

2 3 7 2 

3 3 11 1 

5 4 

Total number of graduate students treated in the Infirmary 17 

Total number of days of treatment in the Infirmary 69 

Patients neither undergraduates nor graduates: 

No. of days. 

62 1 (member of staff of Model School.) 

In all 155 patients were admitted and were nursed for a total of 627 
days. 

(77) 



78 



Number of students sent to the Infirmary more Dion once during the year. 
Admitted to the Infirmary twice: 

No. of days No. of No. of days No. of 

in all. Students. in all. Students. 

3 2 9 2 

4 4 10 1 

5 3 12 1 

6 2 13 1 



3 



Total 19 



Admitted to tlie Infirmary three times during the year: 

No. of days No. of No. of days No. of 

in all. Students. in all. Students. 

8 1 .13 2 

11 2 — 

Total.. 5 

The average number of days of treatment per patient was 4.05 days. 

The number of students who were in the Infirmary for 5 days or less 
than 5 days was 126. The number exceeding 5 days was 28. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marion Re illy, 
Dean of the College. 



Report of The Physician in Chief of the College 
and of the assistant physician. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit on behalf of Dr. Francis R. 
Sprague and myself the following report of the cases attended 
at Bryn Mawr College from October 1, 1914, to September 
30, 1915. The year on the whole has been very uneventful 
and there is nothing special to call attention to except the 
smooth working of the Department of Health. By careful 
attention to slight ailments we have been able in most cases 
to prevent any serious trouble from developing. 

Total number of students in College: 

Undergraduates 368 

Graduates 77 



Total 445 

/. Medical Cases. 



Acute Infectious Diseases. 

Grippe 13 

Mumps 2 

Tonsilitis 6 

Circulatory System. 

Hyperthyroidism 1 

Eodema of legs 1 

Syncope 2 

Tachycardia 2 

Digestive System. 

Appendicitis subacute 3 

Colitis 1 

Constipation 9 

Diarrhoea 4 

Indigestion 33 

Jaundice 1 

Ptosis 3 

1 

4 



Pylorospasm . 
Stomatitis. . 
Ear. 

Myringitis . . 
Otitis media . 



Eye. 

Blepharitis 2 

Conjunctivitis 4 

Conjunctivitis infection 3 

Eye strain 17 

Foreign body in the eye 2 

Meebromian cyst 3 

Menstrual Disturbance. 

Amemorrhoca 4 

Delayed menstruation 2 

Dysmenorrhoea 1 

Menorrhagia 2 

Metrorhagia 3 

Nervous Disturbance. 

Headache 12 

Overtire 22 

Nervous 10 

Neuralgia 3 

Respiratory Disturbance. 

Asthma 1 

Bronchitis 5 

Grippy cold 7 



(79) 



80 



Laryngitis 11 

Pharyngitis 97 

Rhinitis 78 

Sinusitis 11 

Trabhitis 5 

Skin. 

Acne 2 

Callosites 4 

Chilblains 1 

Eczema 6 

Erythema 2 

Herpes 3 



Psoriasis 1 

Rhus poisoning 1 

Urticaria 1 

Miscellaneous. 

Adenitis 3 

Abdominal adhesions 1 

Arthritis 1 

Epistaxsis 1 

Muscular rheumatism 3 

Muscular spasm 2 

427 



//. Surgical Cases. 



Acute appendicitis 2 

Abrasions 9 

Blisters 1 

Burns 5 

Contusions 13 

Dislocations 1 

Erupting wisdom tooth, tooth- 
ache 11 

Fallen arches, strained arches, 

etc 24 

Foreign body in foot and hand. . 2 

Fractures 2 

Furuncle 13 



Hemorrhage from gum 1 

Hernia 1 

Incised wound 8 

Ingrown nail 2 

Infected finger and toes 12 

Lacerated wounds 3 

Penetrating wounds 1 

Periostitis 2 

Sprains and strains 37 

Synovitis 7 

157 



Dr. Sprague: 
Physical examinations 359 Office visits 905 



Vaccinations . 



60 Hall visits 357 



Dr. Branson: 

Infirmary visits 724 Special examinations for Sports 119 

HaU visits 32 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas F. Branson, 

Physician in Chief. 



Report of the Director of Athletics and Gymnastics 
AND Health Supervisor. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit the following report on such 
work of the Health Department as has been under my charge 
during the year 1914-15. 

In October, in accordance with the requirements of the 
Health Department, 365 students were examined by the Direc- 
tor of Athletics and Gymnastics and by Dr. Frances R. Sprague, 
the Assistant Physician of the College; of these 76 were re- 
ferred to Dr. Thomas F. Branson, Physician in Chief of the 
College for further examination. 

These examinations gave the following results: 

317 students passed the health requirements. 

48 students failed to pass the health requirements and were 
put under general supervision, or when necessary under the 
care of the College Physician, or referred to specialists. 

Supervision List. 

Number of 
Condition. Cases. 

General debility 29 

Recovery from operations or illnesses 7 

Cardiac irregularities 5 

Menstrual disturbances 4 

Digestive disturbances 1 

Headaches 1 

Paralysis 1 

Total 48 

Table oj Physical Conditions. 

Slight Pronounced 

deviation deviation 

from from 

Normal. normal. normal. 

Thyroids 114 198 53 

Hearts 121 191 53 

Weight 272 60 33 

Menses 310 35 20 

Spinal column 59 247 49 

(81) 



82 

Medical Gymnastics. 

Number of 
Condition, cases. 

Scholiosis 16 

-General debility 2 

Paralysis 1 

Obesity 2 

Posture 4 

Total 25 

The above cases were treated by Miss Anna Branson with marked 
improvement in all cases. 

Miss Branson also gave thirty special' weekly classes to eight students 
with pronounced scholiosis who were unable to afford private treatment. 
This class was paid for from the gymnasium fines. The w"ork was done 
by the students in addition to their regular gymnastic classes. 



Sports List Classification. 

Class A and A — . 248 students. Authorized to enter all sports, 
matches and contests and under no restrictions except the general health 
rules of the Athletic Association. 

Class B. 67 students. Authorized to enter sports on probation and 
under the restrictions noted on their authorization cards. 

Class C. 7 students. Forbidden all sports except such as may be 
specified on their authorization cards. 

Off Sports List. 4 students. No sports at all allowed. 

No rating. 39 students. 

76 Re-examinations by Dr. Branson. 

45 students rated A. 
17 " " B. 

12 " " C. 

2 "off Sports List. 



Oculist's Examinations. 

Dr. Helen Murphy, the Examining Oculist of the College, 
examined 187 undergraduates, 1 graduate and 1 hearer with 
the following results: 



83 



Number 

of Cases. 



Condition. 
Undergraduates . 

Normal 72 

Glasses satisfactory 63 

Further examination and treat- 
ment necessary 27 



Further examination if symp- 
toms increase 25 



Graduate and Hearer. 
Further examination and treat- 
ment necessary 2 

Total 189 



16 re-examined and new glasses 
given. 
1 re-examined and glasses ad- 
justed. 
4 re-examined, no change in 
glasses. 

6 not re-examined. 

18 no further trouble. 

7 re-examined and glasses pre- 
scribed. 



2 re-examined and treated. 





A 


nthropom 


etric Statistics. 










College Averages. 








Weight, 
kg. 


Height, 
cm. 


Expansion. 

Chest, 9th Rib. 

cm. cm. 


Strength, 
kg. 


Lung 

Capacity, 

cu. in. 


October. . . 


. . , 58.65 


163 . 16 


5.81 6.74 


300.31 


190.28 


May 


. .. 59.38 


163.48 


7.33 6.96 


313.98 


192.72 



American average as stated by Dr. Dudley Sargent: 

235.00 
Class Averages. 



Class of 1915: 

October 59.98 

May 60.14 

Class of 1916: 

October 58.49 

May 59.12 

*Classof 1917: 

October 58.27 

May 58 . 18 

Class of 1918: 

October 57.87 

May 60.00 



132.00 



163.65 


5.90 


5.68 


306.68 


189.98 


164.12 


7.27 


6.77 


303.88 


191.06 


162.23 


6.03 


5.80 


310.39 


186.15 


162.66 


7.09 


6.56 


314.39 


189.56 


162.88 


6.32 


6.10 


318.89 


194.27 


162.92 


7.61 


7.10 


330.06 


190.00 


163.89 


5.00 


5.40 


275.34 


190.74 


164.24 


7.36 


7.32 


307.71 


200.25 



84 



Strength Tests. 

Table showing the number of students above and below the average in 
the strength tests in the first and second physical examinations according 
to classes. 



Strength 
Tests. 



October, 1914. 



191.5 191G 1917 



May, 1915. 
1916 1917 



191S 



Above 


400 k 


g. 2 


2 


10 


2 


3 


2 


11 


S 




375 ' 


5 


5 


9 


6 


2 


7 


5 


4 




350 ' 


9 


9 


9 


4 


10 


9 


8 


10 




325 ' 


12 


12 


12 


7 


13 


7 


16 


10 


Average 


300 ' 


18 


13 


9 


10 


14 


11 


12 


16 




275 ' 


14 


5 


.16 


16 


8 


10 


13 


7 




250 ' 


11 


9 


11 


11 


14 


6 


9 


18 




225 ' 


7 


6 


6 


18 


12 


4 


3 


9 




200 ' 


3 


4 


2 


12 


1 


3 


3 


5 




175 ' 


1 





3 


6 
















150 ' 











2 











1 



Lung Capacity. 

Table showing the number of students above and below the average in 
lung capacity at the first and second physical examinations according to 
classes. 



October, 
Lung 
Capacity 1915 


1914. 

1916 


1917 


1918 


1915 


May, 
1916 


1915. 
1917 


1918 


Above 240 cu. in. 4 


1 


5 


3 


4 





5 


3 


220 " ' 


' 5 


4 


11 


10 


7 


5 


14 


12 


210 " ' 


' 4 


7 


10 


9 


2 


8 


9 


13 


200 " ' 


' 12 


9 


11 


16 


8 


8 


9 


13 


Average 190 " ' 


' 13 


9 


10 


10 


14 


10 


11 


15 


180 " ' 


' 17 


11 


15 


17 


20 


9 


13 


10 


170 " ' 


' 13 


9 


11 


11 


10 


7 


7 


9 


160 " ' 


' 9 


8 


8 


10 


6 


8 


9 


11 


150 " 


3 


4 


3 


2 


4 


2 


1 





140 " ' 


' 2 


2 


1 


3 


2 


2 


1 





130 " ' 


' 


1 


1 


1 














120 " ' 


' 





1 


1 














90 " ' 


' 








1 








1 


1 



Percentage of students above and beloiv the average in strength and lung 
capacity at the first and second examinations. 

Strength Tests. 

October, 1914. May, 1915. 

Above average 36 per cent 42 per cent. 

Average 16 " " 17 " " 

Below average 48 " " 41 " " 



85 

Lunq Capacilij. 

October, 1914. May, 1915. 

Above average 36 per cent 39 per cent. 

Average. . ■. 13 " " 17 " " 

Below average 51 " " 44 " " 

The three Idqlwsl and Uic tliree lowest tctils in slrcngiJi and lung cajxicilij. 
Strength Tests. 



October 
Highest, 
kg. Class 


, 1914. 

Lowest, 
kg. Class. 




kg. 


May, 
Highest. 

Class. 


191.1. 

Lowest, 
kg. Class. 


522 1917 


181.5 


1917 




558. 


5 1917 


201 1918 


481 1918 


171 


1918 




496 


1917 


200 1918 


472 1915 


166 


1918 




467 


1917 


158 1918 






Limg 


Capacity. 






Highest, 
cu. in. Class. 


Lo\\ 
cu. in. 


,'est. 
Class. 




Highest, 
cu. in. Class. 


Lowest, 
cu. in. Class. 


270 1915 


124 


1918 




274 


1915 


118 1918 


258 1917 


120 


1917 




270 


1917 


116 1917 


254 |1917 
11918 


116 


1918 




264 


1917 


90 1918 















Health Statistics of the Senior Class (1916). 

Shoum by the Health Departinent Records. 

Health improved during the four years 24 

Health remained the same 61 

Health not so good 5 

Respectfully submitted, 

Constance M. K. Applebee, 

Director of Athletics and Gymnastics 
and Supervisor of Health. 



Report of the Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 

To the President: Madam, 

I have the honour to submit the following report on the 
work of the Department of Athletics and Gymnastics during 
the year 1914-15. 

Gymndsiiim Report. 

Trial drills for the Freshmen and for students not taking 
part in any athletics were held in November. The regular 
gymnastic season began on Noveml^er 30, 1914, and ended 
on March 26, 1915. 

Table of Gymnasiic Classes. 

Type of Class. 
For Resident and Non-Resident Number of Number of 

Students. Classes per week. Students. 

Drill 11 212 

Classic dancing 8 142 

Fencing 4 15 

Three students substituted medical gymnastics under Miss Branson 
for the regular classes; 13 students substituted lying out of doors on the 
gymnasium roof for the regular classes. 

Swimming. 
The swimming pool was open during the whole college year. 

Undergraduate Students: 

Authorized Passed the Unable Taking Number of 

as expert swimming to swim. Excused. lessons. lessons 

swimmers. test. given. 

1915 62 26 5 2 3 36 

1916 44 23 5 1 4 33 

1917 73 .. 19 5 21 200 

1918 83 .. 15 1 24 281 

Total... 262 4D 44 9 52 550 

Graduate students: 

12 .. .. .. 1 1 

Authorization was substituted for the passing test for the classes of 
1917 and 1918. 

(86) 



87 

Gymnastic Contest. 

A gymnastic contest between the Sophomores and Fresh- 
men was held on March 26, 1915. The championship shield 
was awarded to the Class of 1917. 

Maximum 
Events. number Points, Points, 

of points. 1917. 1918. 

Wand drill 30 27 21 

Indian club drill 30 24 21 

English country dances 45 27 36 

Apparatus: Rope climbing 45 37 31 

Vaulting horse 60 51 42 

Parallel bars 60 54 51 

Pyramid 30 23 30 

Total 300 243 232 

The judges were Dr. R. Tait Mackenzie of the University of Penn- 
sylvania, Mr. P. Bishop of the Haverford Grammar School, and Miss 
Elizabeth Burchenal, Executive Secretary of the Girls' Branch of the 
Pubhc School Athletic League of New York. 



Statistics of Exercise. 

Exercise was registered by 365 students; 233 students 

had no excuses from exercise; 132 students had occasional 
excuses. 

Number of Number of 

Causes of excuses students Causes of excuses students 

from exercise. excused. from exercise. excused. 

Absent from college 67 Grippe 17 

Abscesses, teeth 1 Headache 4 

Accidents 14 Hyperthyroidism 1 

Appendicial irritation 4 Indigestion 7 

Asthma 1 Jaundice 2 

Backache 1 Lumbago 1 

Bronchitis 3 Measles 1 

Cholecystitis 2 Mumps 1 

Laryngitis, Pharyngitis, Rhinitis 48 Neuralgia 1 

Conjunctivitis 6 Quinsy 1 

Cystitis 1 Rheumatism 1 

Fatigue, Nervousness 11 Sinusitis 2 

Feet : Wart, Pronation, Ope- Tonsihtis 8 

ration 3 Vertigo ,.,...,....,.. I 



88 
Table of Accidents, 1914.-15. 

Causes. 

2 periostitis Hockey (2). 

1 incised wound, face Coasting. 

1 displaced nasal septum Hockey. 

1 displaced nasal cartilage Basket-ball. 

5 strained ankles Basket-ball (1)^ Walking (1), 

Playing in the gymnasium 
(1), Hockey (2). 

2 strained knee Track (1), Football (1). 

1 fractured elbow Hockey. 

1 strained back , Fall from horse. 

Fines. 

Eight students failed to take their physical examinations 
within the required time; one hundred and fifty- two students 
failed to register the required number of periods of exercise. 

The fines imposed were as follows : 

Physical examinations $16 .00 

Exercise 200.00 

Total $216.00 



Athletics. 
Calendar of Athletics for the Year 191 4-15. 

September 30th .... First hockey practice. 

October .5th First Athletic Association meeting. 

October 15th Tennis singles began. 

October 17th Hockey Varsity matches began. 

November 5th Class Hockey matches began. 

December 1st Water polo practice began. 

February 6th Swimming Meet — Preliminaries. 

February 13th Swimming Meet — Finals. 

February 22nd. . . .Water polo match games began. 

March 27th First track practice. First Basket-ball practice. 

April 10th Basket-ball game — Varsity vs. Goucher College team. 

April 15th Fencing tournament — Varsity vs. Alumnse. 

April 24th Track Meet — Preliminaries. 

May 1st Track Meet — Finals. 

May 3rd Election of officers. 

Basket-ball match games began. 
May 15th Basket-ball game — Varsity vs. Philadelphia, 



89 



May 22nd Tennis tournament — Doubles. 

June 1st Tennis tournament — Varsity vs. Alumnae. 

June 2nd Ground broken for new athletic field. 

No basket-ball game, on account of rain. 



Athletic Statistics. 
Percentage of resident students talcing part in athletics. 





Basket- 
ball, Hockey, 
per cent. per cent. 


Authorized 
Swimmens, 
per cent. ] 


Water 

Polo, 

per cent. 


Tennis, 
per cent. 


Track, 
per cent. 


Class 1915. 


. ... 28 


48 


70 


21 




77 


16 


1916. 


. ... 50 


68 


67 


29 




95 


21 


1917. 


. . . . 53 


65 


83 


42 




84 


30 


1918. 


. . . . 52 


83 


89 


43 




89 


39 


College .... 


. . . . 46 


66 


77 


34 




86 


27 


Number of 


resident students taking no part in athletics. 






Class 1915, 








3 








1916, 








1 








1917, 








2 








1918 

















Total 








6 






Number of 


non-resident students taking part in 


athletics. 






Basket- 
ball. 


Hockey. 


Authorized 
, Swimmers. 


Water 
Polo. 




Tennis. 


Track. 


Class 1915. 








2 







6 





1916. 








1 







4 





1917. 








2 







6 





1918. 





3 


4 







8 


1 


Total 





3 


9 







24 


1 



Tennis. — The class championship was won by 1918. The 
college championship was won by 1918. The tennis doubles 
were won by 1917. Captains: E. Rapallo, 1915; C. Fuller, 
1916; C. Stevens, 1917; M. Winsor, 1918. 

Hockey. — The class championship was won by 1917. Cap- 
tauis: R. Tinker, 1915; M. G. Branson, 1916; M. Thompson, 
1917; H. Alexander, 1918. Each class had one first, one 
second, and one third team, with substitutes. 1917 and 1918 
had also fourth teams. An average of one hundred and thirty 
students practiced daily during the season. 



90 



Swimming. — The class championship was won by 1917. 
Captains: E. Dessau, 1915; F. Kellogg, 1916; M. Scatter- 
good, 1917; T. Howell, 1918. The swimming meet was held 
in February. 

Events at the meet: 

68 foot swim 16 1-10 seconds. 

68 foot swim on back ., 20 1-10 seconds. 

136 foot swim 39 4-10 seconds. 

136 foot swim on back 47 seconds. 

Plunge for distance 46 feet, 10 1-2 inches. 

Fancy dive 
Dive for form. 
Class relay race. 

Water Polo. — The class championship was won by 1917. 
Captains: E. Dessau, 1915; F. Kellogg, 1916; M. Scatter- 
good, 1917; T. Howell, 1918. Each class had first and second 
teams; 1917 and 1918 had third, fourth and fifth teams as 
well. Practices were held twice a week; about fifty students 
practiced each week. 

Outdoor Track Meet. — The outdoor track meet was held 
in April and May. 

Events at the meet: 

75-yard dash 9 4-5 seconds. 

Running high jump 4 feet, 1 inch. 

100-yard hurdles 16 2-5 seconds. 

Standing high jump 3 feet, 5 inches. 

Throwing javehn 68 feet, 3 inches. 

Throwing baseball 172 feet, 1-2 inch. 

100-yard dash 12 4-5 seconds. 

Running broad jump 13 feet, 3 inches. 

Running hop, step, jump 30 feet, 6 3-4 inches. 

Standing broad jump 7 feet, 1-2 inch. 

Basket-ball throw 69 feet, 11 inches. 

60-yard hurdles 9 3-5 seconds. 

Hurl ball 85 feet, 4 1-2 inches. 

50-yard dash 6 4-5 seconds. 

Class relay race 39 2-5 seconds. 

Two college records were broken: 

Javelin throw 68 feet, 3 inches. 

Hurl ball 85 feet, 4 1-2 inches, 



91 

Basket Ball. — The class championship was won by 1917. 
The captains were: S. R. Smith, 1915; M. G. Branson, 1916; 
M. J. Pauhng, 1917; L. T. Smith, 1918. 1915 had one team 
only. 1916, 1917 and 1918 had first, second and third teams; 
1917 and 1918 had also fourth teams. An average of eighty 
students praticed daily during the season. 

Graduate Students, Athletics. 

Reported by C. D'Evelyn, Athletic Representative of 
the Graduate School. 

The graduates have done little in the way of organized 
athletics. They have, however, made especially good use 
of the swimming pool for private exercise. They were success- 
fully represented in both the swimming meet and track meet 
by one of their members, who took first place in the fancy 
dive, second place in the 68-yard front swim, and second place 
in the javelin throw. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Constance M. K. Applebee, 
Director of Athletics and Gymnastics. 



Appendices. 



Promotions, Reappointments, and Changes in the Academic 
and Administrative Staff for the Year 1915-16. 

Florence Bascom, Ph.D., Professor of Geology, granted leave of absence 
for the year 1915-16. 

Lucy Martin Donnelly, A.B., Professor of English, granted leave of 
absence for the year 1915-16. 

Karl Detlev Jessen, Ph.D., Professor of German Literature, granted 
leave of absence for the year 1915-16. 

Richard Thayer Holbrook, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Italian, 
term of appointment extended for one year. 

Frederick Hutton Getman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry, 
term expired. 

Orie Latham Hatcher, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Comparative 
Literature and Elizabethan Literature, term expired. 

Regina Katherine Crandall, Ph.D., reappointed Director of English 
Essay Work and Reader in EngUsh. 

Edith Orlady, A.B., reappointed Secretary of the College. 

Clarence Henry Haring, A.B., B.Litt, Associate in History, term 
expired. 

James Fulton Ferguson, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate Professor of 
Ancient History and Latin. 

James Ryals Conner, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics, 
granted leave of absence for the years 1915-17. 

Donald Fisher, Ph.D., Associate in Philosophy, term expired. 

Susan Myra Kingsbury, Ph.D., appointed Carola Woerishoffer Professor 
of Social Economy and Director of the Carola Woerishoffer Depart- 
ment of Social Research. Dr. Kingsbury received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts from the College of the Pacific in 1890, the degree of 
Master of Arts from Leland Stanford University, in 1899, and the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Columbia University in 1905. 
From 1902 to 1903 she was University Fellow in Columbia University, 
from 1903 to 1904 she held the European Fellowship of the Women's 
Education Association, Boston; from 1904 to 1905 she was Instructor 
in History in Vassar College, and from 1905 to 1906 Director of Inves- 

(92) 



93 

tigation in the Massachusetts Commission on Industrial and Technical 
Education. In 1906 she went to Simmons College as Instructor in 
History and Economics and Head of Departments and from 1907 to 
1915 was successively Assistant, Associate in, and Professor of Eco- 
nomics in Simmons College and Director of the Department of 
Research in the Women's Educational and Industrial Union, Boston. 

Albert Edwin Avey, Ph.D., nppointed As.sociate in Philosophy. Dr. 
Avey received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Yale University in 
1908, the degi-ee of Master of Arts in 1909, and the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy in 1915. From 1908 to 1909 and from 1913 to 1915 he 
was a graduate student in Yale University; from 1912 to 1913 he 
studied at the University of Berlin; from 1913 to 1914 he was Assist- 
ant in the Psychological Laboratory and in the spring term he was 
also Lectui'er in Elementary Logic in Yale University. 

Georgiana Goddard King, A.M., promoted to be Associate Professor of 
the History of Art. 

Frederick Archibald Dewey, S. B., Lecturer in Economics and Sociology, 
term expired. 

Rhys Carpenter, M.A., promoted to be Associate Professor of Classical 
Archaeology. 

Emil Carl Wilm, Ph.D., Lecturer in Philosophy as substitute for Pro- 
fessor Theodore de Laguna, term expired. 

Janet Tucker Howell, Ph.D., Lecturer in Physics as substitute for Dr. 
James Barnes, term expired. 

Chester Elijah Kellogg, Ph.D., Lecturer in Psychology as substitute 
for Professor James H. Leuba, term expired. 

Charles Ghequiere Fenwick, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate Professor 
of Political Science. 

James Miller Leake, Ph.D., promoted to be Associate in History. 

Howard Levi Gray, Ph.D., appointed Professor of History. Dr. Gray 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from the LTniversity of 
Rochester in 1897 and from Harvard University in 1898; in 1900 he 
received the degree of Master of Arts from Harvard University, and in 
1907 the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. From 1909 to 1913 he was 
Instructor in History in Harvard University and from 1914 to 1915 
Assistant Professor of History. 

James Llewellyn Crenshaw^, Ph.D., appointed Associate in Physical 
Chemistry. Dr. Crenshaw received the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
from Centre College in 1907, the degree of Master of Arts in 1908, and 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Princeton University in 1911. 
He was Assistant Chemist in the Geo-Physical Laboratory of the 
Carnegie Institution, Washington, D. C, from 1910 to 1915, 



94 



Pierre Francois Giroud, D.L., reappointed non-resident Lecturer in 
French. 

Howard James Savage, Ph.D., appointed Lecturer in English Literature 
and Rhetoric as substitute for Professor Lucy Martin Donnelly. Dr. 
Savage received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Tuft's College in 
1907, the degree "of Master of Arts from Harvard University in 1909 
and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1915. He was Instructor in 
English in Tuft's College from 1908 to 1911, in Harvard University 
from 1911 to 1913, and in Radcliffe CoUege from 1911 to 1915. He 
was Instructor in the Harvard Summer School in the summers 1912 
to 1915 and from 1908 to 1909, and 1913 to 1915 he was a graduate 
student in Harvard University. 

Benjamin Franklin Wallis, Ph.D., appointed Lecturer in Geology as 
substitute for Professor Florence Bascom. Dr. Wallis received the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts from Johns Hopkins University in 1910 and 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1915. He was Instructor in 
Science in the High School, CHfton, N. J., from 1912 to 1913, Instructor 
in Mineralogy and Petrologj^ in Northwestern University from 1913 
to 1914, and Hopkins Scholar in Johns Hopkins University from 1911 
to 1912 and from 1914 to 1915. 

Oscar F. W. Fernsemer, Ph.D., appointed Lecturer in German Litera- 
ture as substitute for Professor Karl Detlev Jessen. Dr. Fernsemer 
received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from the University of 
Munich in 1912. From 1913 to 1914 he was Head of the Department 
of Modern Languages in the High School, Cranford, N. J. 

Charles Clinton Bramble, A.M., appointed Lecturer in Mathematics 
as substitute for Dr. James Ryals Conner. Mr. Bramble received the 
degree of Bachelor of Philosophy from Dickinson College in 1912 and 
the degree of Master of Arts from Dickinson College in 1913. He was 
Assistant in Physics in Dickinson College from 1911 to 1912; In- 
structor in Montclair Academy from 1912 to 1913, Hopkins Scholar in 
Johns Hopkins University from 1913 to 1915, and resigned a Fellow- 
ship in Mathematics in Johns Hopkins University to accept the 
Lectureship in Bryn Mawr College in 1915. 

Abby Kirk, A,B., reappointed Reader in Elementary Greek. 

Mary Jepfers, A.M., Reader in German and Oral Examiner in French and 
German, granted leave of absence for the year 1915-16. 

Edna Aston Shearer, Ph.D., Reader in Enghsh, reappointed. 

Mary Hamilton Swindler, Ph.D., Reader in Latin and Reader and 
Demonstrator in Classical Archaeology, reappointed. 

Ida Langdon, Ph.D., Reader in English, reappointed. 

Christine Potts Hammer, A.B., Reader in English, term expired, 



95 

Esther Cloudman Dunn, A.B., Reader in English, reappointed. 

Julia Peachey Harrison, Ph.D., Reader and Demonstrator in Chemistry, 
term expired. 

Dorothy Brewster, Ph.D., Reader in English, term expired. 

Ellen Thayer, A.B., Reader in French, reappointed. 

Clar*. Whitney Crane, A.B., Reader in English, reappointed. 

Edit^ Chapin Craven, A.B., appointed Reader in Enghsh. Mrs. Craven 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr College in 
1899. 

Elly Wilhelmina Lawatschek, A.B., appointed Reader in German. 
Miss Lawatschek received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from the 
University of Washington in 1913. She was Instructor in German 
Grammar and Literature in the University of Washington from 1911 
to 1914, and from 1914 to 1915 taught German in the Walnut Hill 
School, Natick, Mass., and studied at Wellesley College. 

Maky Edith Pinney, A.M., reappointed Demonstrator in Biology. 

Helen Turnbull Gilroy, A.M., Demonstrator in Physics, term expired. 

Edith Hamilton Lanman, A.M., appointed Demonstrator in Chemistry 
and Manager of Dalton Hall. Miss Lanman received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts from Radcliffe College in 1914 and the degree of 
Master of x\rts from the University of California in 191.5. 

Dorothy Ochtman, A.B., reappointed Demonstrator in the History of 
Art. 

Sue Avis Blake, A.M., appointed half time Demonstrator in Physics. 
Miss Blake received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Br3Ti Mawr 
College in 1898 and the degree of Master of Arts in 1900. She was 
Demonstrator and Graduate Student in Physics in Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege from 1898 to 1899 and from 1904 to 1906. She was a Teacher 
in the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, from 1899 to 1900, and 
Assistant in Physics in Smith College from 1900 to 1902 and from 
1903 to 1904, and Instructor in Physics from 1910 to 1915. She 
held a Fellowship in Physics in Bryn Mawr College from 1906 to 
1907 and in the University of Pennsylvania from 1907 to 1908. 

Lucia Helen Smith, A.B., appointed half time Demonstrator in Physics. 
Miss Smith received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Vassar Col- 
lege in 1915. 

Lois Antoinette Reed, A.B., B.L.S., reappointed Librarian. 

Helen Corey Geddes, A.B., B.S., reappointed Head Cataloguer. 

Sarah Wooster Eno, A.B., reappointed Circulation and Reference 
Librarian. 



96 

Mary Louise Terrien, A.B., appointed Assistant to the Circulation and 
Reference Librarian. Miss Terrien received the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts from Smith College in 1905 and studied in the Simmons College 
Library School, Boston, Mass., from 1914 to 1915. 

Cynthia Maria Wesson, A.M., reappointed Assistant to the Director 
of Athletics and Gymnastics. 

Administrative and Executive Appointments. 

Abigail Camp Dimon, A.M., re'appointed Recording Secretary. 

Sandy Lee Hurst, reappointed Comptroller. 

Miriam Margaret Hedges, A.B., Business Manager, term expired Jan- 
uary 15, 1915. 

Louise Watson, A.B., reappointed Business Manager. 

Laura Laurenson Byrne, A.B., appointed Assistant Business Manager 
February 23, 1915, term expired, July 3, 1915. 

Clara Regina Stahl, A.B., appointed Assistant Business Mainager. 
Miss Stahl received the degi-ee of Bachelor of Arts from the Univer- 
sity of Michigan in 1915. She was Registrar of Greensboro College 
from 1910 to 1912 and Bursar in 1913. 

Halls of Residence. 

Martha Gibbons Thomas, A.B., reappointed Warden of Pembroke Hall. 

Margaret Bontecou, A.B., reappointed Warden of Denbigh Hall. 

Mary Frances Nearing, A.B., reappointed Warden of Rockefeller Hall. 

Bertha Sophie Ehlers, A.B., reappointed Warden of Radnor Hall. 

Leonora Lucas, A.B., appointed Warden of Merion Hall. Miss Lucas 
received the degi'ee of Bachelor of Arts from Bryn Mawr College in 
1912. From 1912 to 1913 she studied as a graduate student jn North- 
western University; from 1913 to 1915 she was Professor of Romance 
Languages in Brenau College, Gainesville, Ga. 

Sarah Newton Hallett, A.B., appointed Assistant to the Warden of 
Pembroke Hall. Miss Hallett received the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
from Brown University in 1901. She was a Graduate Student in 
Brown University from 1905 to 1906 and from 1909 to 1910, and 
Graduate Scholar in History in Bryn Mawr College from 1914 to 1915. 

Margaret A. Proctor, A.B., Junior Bursar, term expired. 

Josephine Lemmon, A.B., appointed Junior Bursar. Miss Lemmon 
received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Waynesburg College in 
1880, From 1900 to 1905 she was Proprietor of the Berkeley Inn, 
Pocantico Hills, N. Y.; from 1912 to 1915 she was Superintendent of 
the Summer Home of the New York Association for the Blind at Corn- 
wall on Hudson. 



97 

Health Department Appointments. 

Thomas F. Branson, M.D., reappointed Physician in Chief of the College. 

Frances R. Sprague, B.L., M.D., reappointed Assistant Physician of the 
College. 

Helen Murphy, M.D., reappointed Examining Oculist. 

Administrative and Executive Managers and 

Assistants. 

Bessie Homer Jennings, reappointed Assistant Cataloguer. 

Mertie Watson, appointed Assistant to the Librarian. 

Frieda Segelke Miller, A.B., appointed Statistical Secretary to the 
Director of the Carola Woerishoffer Department of Social Research. 
Miss Miller received the degree of Bachelor of Ai'ts from Milwaukee- 
Downer College in 1911. She attended the University of Chicago 
as a graduate student from 1911 to 1915'. 

Ellen Elizabeth Hill, B.L., reappointed Secretary to the President. 

Mary Warren Taylor, reappointed Secretary to the Department of 
Athletics and Gymnastics and Recording Secretary to the Health 
Department. 

Adelaide Hart, A.B., Stenographer to the Dean of the College, term 
expired. 

Eleanor Karsten, Ph.B., Secretary to the Recording Dean resigned. 

Frances E. Colbourne, appointed Stenographer to the Dean of the 
College. 

Eleanora Iredale, appointed Stenographer to the Recording Dean 
and Assistant to the President. 

Janet B. Houtz, Stenographer in the Business Manager's Office, term 
expired. 

Nancy C. Crist, appointed Stenographer in the Business Manager's 
Office. 

Department of Education. 

Eunice Morgan Schenck, Ph.D., reappointed Teacher of French. 

Placido de Montoliu, reappointed Teacher of Jaques-Dalcroze Euiyth- 
mics (singing, dancing). 

Constance M. K. Applebee, reappointed Teacher of Gymnastics and 
Sports and Games. 

Mary Hamilton Swindler, Ph.D., reappointed Teacher of Latin. 



98 

Frances Browne, A.B., Teacher of History, term expired. 

Anna Whitman Clark, A.B., reappointed Teacher of Science. 

Virginia Wright Garber, reappointed Teacher of Art. 

Florence Nice Beckley, A.B., reappointed Secretary to the Director. 

Ellen Thayer, A.B., appointed Teacher of French. 

Louise May Tattershall, A.B., appointed Teacher of Mathematics. 
Miss Tattershall received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Barnard 
College in 1908. From 1909 to 1911 she was Assistant Principal of 
the High School in White Haven, Fa.; from 1914 to 1915 she taught 
Mathematics in Wykeham Rise. In the summer of 1914 she was a 
student at Teachers' College, New York City. 

Ethel Virginia Hunley, A.B., appointed Teacher of History. Miss 
Hunley received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Barnard College 
in 1915. 

Marion Alcott Ballou, , A.B., appointed Teacher of English. Miss 
Ballou received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Mt. Holyoke 
College in 1910. From 1910 to 1911 she taught in the High School, 
Sanford, Mass.; from 1911 to 1913 she taught in the Perkins Insti- 
tute for the Blind, and from 1913 to 1915 in Miss Gilbert's School, 
Woonsocket, R. I. 



n. 

Fellowships and Scholarships Conferred for the Year 1915-16. 
Gertrude Hildreth Campbell, Mary E. Garrett European Fellow. 

Providence, R. I. A.B., Brown University, 1911, and A.M., 1912. Tutor in English, 
Brown University, 1912; Graduate Scholar in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13; 
Fellow in English, 1913-14; Graduate Scholar and Fellow by Courtesy, 1914-15; 
Student in the British Museum, London, 1916-16. 

Charlotte D'Evblyn, Mary E. Garrett European Fellow. 

San Francisco, Cal. B.L., Mills College, 1911; University of California, Summer, 1912. 
Teacher in the Public Schools, Bloomington, Idaho, Jan.-Jun., 1912, and in Sanger, 
Cal., 1912-13; Graduate Scholar in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1913-15; Student 
in the British Museum, London, 191,5-16. 

Fern Helen Rusk, Special European Fellow* 

Columbia, Mo. A.B., University of Missouri, 1913; Graduate Student, University of 
Missouri, 1913-14, 1915-16; Fellow in Archaeology, Bryn Mawr College, 1914-15. 

Caroline Austin Duror, President's European Fellow* 

New York City. B.S., Barnard College, 1914. Graduate Scholar in Geology, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1914-15; Graduate Student, University of Chicago, 1915-16. 

Marguerite Daisy Darkow, Bryn Maivr European Fellow * 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. First Bryn Mawr 
Matriculation Scholar for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1911-12, and Simon 
Muhr Scholar, 1911-15; ,Iames E. Rhoads Junior Scholar, 1913-14; Maria L. Eastman 
Brooke Hall Memoj-ial Scholar, 1914-15. Teacher of Mathematics and Science in 
Tudor Hall, Indianapolis, 1915-16. 

Lillian Rosanoff, Helen Schaeffer Huff Memorial Fellow. 

New York City. A.B., Barnard College, 1908; A.M., Columbia University, 1911; Ph.D., 
Clark University, 1914. Teacher of Mathematics in Hunter College, 1908-10, and in 
New York City" High Schools, 1910-12, and 1014-15. 

Agnes Carr Vaughan, Felloto in Greek. 

Tampa, Fla. A.B., Galloway College, 1907; A.M., University of Michigan, 1910. Fel- 
low, University of Michigan, 1910-11. Associate in Greek and Latin, Hardin College, 
Mexico, Mo., 1911-15. 

Elizabeth Louise Davis, Fellow iii Latin. 

Jeffersonville, Ind. A.B., Indiana University, 1910, and A.M., 1914. Assistant Principal 
of the Second High School, Gaston, Ind., 1910-11, and Principal of the High School, 
1911-12; Teacher of Latin and Ancient History in the High School, Jeffersonville, Ind., 
1913-15. 

Mary Elizabeth Barnicle, Fellow in English. 

Providence, R. I. A.B., Brown University, 1913. Teacher in Evening School, Provi- 
dence, 1910-11; Graduate Scholar in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1913-15. 

Ruth Perkins, Fellow in German. 

Abington, Mass. A.B., Wellesley College, 1912; A.M., Radcliffe College, 1913. Assist- 
ant in German and Latin in the High School, Belchertown, Mass., 1913-14; Graduate 
Scholar in German, Bryn Mawr College, 1914-15. 

Gretchen Todd, Fellow in Romance Languages. 

Milburn, N. J. A.B.', Smith College, 1913. Student in Madrid, Spain, 1913-15. 

Amy Blanche Greene, 

Fellow in Semitic Languages and Biblical Literature. 

Cincinnati, O. A.B., Miami University, 1907; A.M., University of Chicago, 1914. Teacher 
of Bible in Cincinnati Missionary Training School, 1911-15. 

* Fellowship deferred. 

(99) 



100 

Jeanette Unger, Fellow in Economics. 

New York City. A.B., Barnard College, 1914, and A.M., Columbia University, 1915. 
Graduate Student, Columbia University, 1914-15. 

Elsa May Butler, 

Carola Woerishoffer Fellow in Social Economy and Social Research. 

St. Louis, Mo. A.B., Vassar College, 1905, and A.M., University of Washington, 1914. 
Teacher in the High School, Neligle, Neb., 1905-06; in Akeley Hall, Grand Haven, 
Mich., 1906-08, and in Hasmer Hall, St. Louis, Mo., 1908-12. Assistant Head Worker 
of the Social Service Department of St. Louis Children's Hospital, 1912-15. 

Cora Louise Friedline, Fellow in Psychology. 

Lincoln, Neb. A.B., University of Nebraska, 1913, and A.M., 1915. Scholar in Phil- 
osophy, University of Nebraska, 1914-15. 

Helen Morningstar, Fellow in Geology. 

Columbus, O. A.B., Ohio State University, 1913, and A.M., 1915. Teaching Fellow in 
English, Ohio State University, 1913-15. 

Jane Marion Earle, British Scholar. 

Croydon, England. Newnham College, Cambridge, 1907-10; Mathematical Tripos, 
Part 1, 1908, Part 2, 1910. Training College for Women, Cambridge, 1910-11. Teacher 
of Mathematics in the Girls' High School, Leeds, 1911-15. 

GwEN Ann Jones, British Scholar. 

Bala, Wales. B.A., University College of Wales, 1909, and M.A., 1914. Teacher in the 
Girls' Intermediate School, Pontypool, Wales, 1910-15. 

Mary Rhys, British Scholar. 

Blandford, Dorset, England. M.A., with Honours in English, Glasgow University, 1915. 

OcTAViA Elfrida Saunders, British Scholar. 

Mayfield, Sussex, England. M.A., St. Andrews University, 1910-14, with Honours in 
Modern Languages. Assistant Lecturer in German, St. Andrews University, 1914-15. 

Frida Margarete Clara Hoehne, ■ German Scholar. 

Berlin, Germany. Student, University of Berlin, 1913-14, and University of Jena, 1914-15. 
Teacher in the English School for Girls, Dresden, 1906-08, and in the Lyceum, Berlin, 
1911-13. 

Elizabeth Darlington Adams, Scholar in English. 

New London, Conn. A.B., Va-ssar College, 1915. 

Louise Elizabeth Whetenhall Adams, Scholar in Greek, 

A.B., Barnard College, 1914, and A.M.,- 1915. Graduate Student, Columbia University, 
1914-15. 

Beatrice Allard, . . . Scholar in Semitic Languages and Biblical Literature. 

Boston, Mass. A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1915. 

Hazel Katherine Barnett, Scholar in Psychology. 

Bedford, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1915. 

Margaret Saeger Bradway, Scholar in Romance Languages. 

Haverford, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1915. 

Marguerite Jennie Breckenridge, Scholar in Mathematics. 

Grove City, Pa. A.B., Grove City College, 1913. Teacher in the High School, Center- 
vUle, Pennsylvania, 1913-15. 

Alice Hill Byrne, Graduate Scholar in Latin. 

Lancaster, Pa. A.B., Wellesley College, 1908. Teacher of Latin and Greek in the Union 
High School, Coleraine, Pa., 1894-96, and Principal, 1899-1900; in Mrs. Blackwood's 
School, Lancaster, 1896-99, and 1900-01; Associate Principal and Teacher of Latin and 
Greek in Miss Stahr's School, Lancaster, 1901-05; Principal of the Shippen School, Lan- 
caster, 1905-09; Teacher of Latin and Greek in Miss Hills's School, Philadelphia, 1909- 
11; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1908-10, 1911-14, and Graduate Scholar in 
Greek, 1910-11, and in Latin, 1914-15; Teacher of Latin and Greek in the Baldwin 
School, Bryn Mawr, 1911-12, 1913-15, and in charge of the Lower School, 1912-13. 

Marguerite Jozelle Cowan, Penn College Scholar. 

Oskaloosa, La. Ph.B., Penn College, 1915. 



101 
Elizabeth Beatrice Daw, .... Felloiv hy Courtesy and Scholar in English. 

Spottswood, N, J. A.B., Viissar College, 1909, and A.M., University of Pennsylvania, 
1910. Reader in Engfeh, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-14; Fellow in English, 1914-15. 

Mary Doan, Guilford College Scholar. 

Indianapolis, Ind. A.B., Guilford College, 1915. 

Helen Genevieve Fuller, 

Carola Woerishoffer Scholar in Social Economy and, Social Research. 
Amesbury, Mass. A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1915. 

Florence May Harper, Scholar in Romance Languages. 

Seattle, Wash. B.L., Mills College, 1913. Graduate Scholar in Romance Languages, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1914-15. 

Helen Frances Harvey, Scholar in Biology. 

Oberlin, O. A.B., Oberlin College, 1915. 

Alice Philena Felicia Hubbard, 

Fellow hy Courtesy and Scholar in Romance Languages. 

Austin, Tex. B.S., University of Texas, 1900, and A.M., 1902. University of Chicago 
Summer School, 1904, 1905. Fellow in Spanish, University of Texas, 1899-1902; Tutor 
in Spanish, University of Texas, 1902-08, and Instructor in Spanish, 1908-13; Graduate 
Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1913-14; and Fellow in Romance Languages, 1914-15. 

Mildred Lewis Justice, Scholar in Education. 

Narberth, Pa. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1915. 

Mary Barbara Kolars, Scholar in English. 

Le Sueur Center, Minn. A.B., University of Minnesota, 1913. 

Edith Rebecca Macauley, Scholar in English. 

Medina, N. Y. A.B., University of Michigan, 1915. 

Janet Malcolm Macdonald, Scholar in Archwology. 

Fort Dodge, la. A.B., Morningside College, 1910. A.M., University of Illinois, 1013. 
Assistant Principal in the High School, Aurelia, la., 1911-12; Instructor in I^atin, 
Morningside College, 1913-15. 

Ruth Coe Manchester, Scholar in Latin. 

Winsted, Conn. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1913. Teacher of Languages and History 
in the High School, Canaan, Conn., 1913-15. 

Jessie Elizabeth Minor, Scholar in Chemistry. 

Springfield, Mo. B.S., Drury College, 1904. Graduate Student, University of Chicago, 
Summer 1906, 1907, and University of Pennsylvania, 1908-10. Substitute Professor of 
Chemistry, Drury College, 1906-08; Professor of Chemistry, Huguenot College, Welling- 
ton, S. Africa, 1911-14; Graduate Scholar in Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 1914-15. 

Hazel Grant Ormsbee, 

Carola Woerishoffer Scholar in Social Economy and Social Research. 
Ithaca, N. Y. A.B., Cornell University, 1915. 

Lillian Soskin, Scholar in Economics. 

New York City. A.B., Barnard College, 1915. 

Elise Tobin, Scholar in Chemistry. 

Brooklyn, New York City. B.S., Barnard College, 1915. 

Helen Loring Tufts, Earlham College Scholar. 

Vernon, N. Y. A.B., Earlham College, 1915. 

Beulah Louise Wardell, Scholar in English. 

Columbus, O. A.B., Ohio State University, 1913, and A.M., 1915. Fellow in English, 
Ohio State University, 1913-14, and Graduate Assistant in English, 1914-15. 

Dorothy Vivian Weston, 

Carola Woerishoffer Scholar in Social Economy and Social Research. 

New York City. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1914. 



102 

Margaret Woodbury, Scholar in History. 

Columbus, O. A.B., Ohio State University, 1915. 

Ryu Sato, ^ Foundation Scholar. 

Tokyo, Japan. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Foundation 
Scholar, 1913-15, First Pennsylvania and Southern States Matriculation Scholar, 1913- 
14; Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar, 1914-15. 

Katharine Truman Sharpless, Foundation Scholar. 

Haverford, Pa. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and by the 
Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa. Foundation Scholar, 1914-15. 

Anna Thorndike, New England States Matriculation Scholar. 

Boston, Mass. Prepared by The Misses May's School, Boston. 

Eleanor Marquand, 

Neiv York, New Jersey and Delaware Matriculation Scholar. 
Princeton, N. J. Prepared by Miss Fine's School, Princeton. 

Anna Rubenia Dubach, Western States Matriculation Scholar . 

St. Louis, Mo. Prepared by the Mary Institute, St. Louis. 

Ernestine Emma Mercer, 

Pennsylvania and Southern States Matriculation Scholar. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Gladys Mary Barnett, Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1914-15. 

Doris Marie Bird, .... Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1912-15. 

Eva Alice Worrall Bryne, 

Trustees' Philadclplda Girls' High School Scholar. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1913-15. 

Gladys Hagy Cassel, . . Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1914-15. 

Rebecca Elizabeth Joachim, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1913-15. 

Marion Clementine Kleps, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1912-15. 

Marie Lubar, Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Ernestine Emma Mercer, 

Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar. 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Anna Agnes Reilly, Trustees' Lower Merion High School Scholar. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Pa. 

Thalia Howard Smith, James E. Rhoads Junior Scholar. 

New York City. Prepared by the Hawthorne School, New York City. First New York, 
New Jersey and Delaware Matriculation Scholar, 1912-13; James E. Rhoads Sophomore 
Scholar, 1914-15. 

Jessie Mebane, James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholar. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Prepared by the Wilkes-Barre Institute and by private tuition. 



103 

Ella Mary Rosenberg, Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Mary Anna Long- 
streth Scholar and City Scholar, 1914-1,5. 

Louise Tunstall Smith, Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar. 

Baltimore, Md. Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Bryn Mawr School 
Scholar, 1914-15. 

Rebecca Elizabeth Joachim, Mary E. Stevens Junior Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1913-15. 

Marian Clementine Kleps, 

Maria L. Eastman Brooke Hall Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High Sfhool, Philadelphia, and by private tuition. 
Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar, 1912-14; James E. Rhoads Sopho- 
more and Special Scholar, 1913-14; Anna Hallowell Memorial Scholar, 1914-15. 

Eva Alice Worrall Bryne, Aniia M. Powers Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1912-15; .James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholar, 1913-14; 
James E. Rhoads Junior Scholar, 1914-15. 

Amelia Kellogg MacMaster, . . . .Thomas H. Powers Memorial Scholar. 

Elizabeth, N. J. Prepared by the Battin High School, Elizabeth, and by private tuition. 
Kindergarten Teacher, Newark, N. J., 1905-11, 1912-13. Thomas H. Powers Memorial 
Scholar, 1914-15. 

Esther Johnson, L. C. B. Saul Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. L. C. B. Saul Memorial 
Scholar, 1913-15. 

Florence Elizabeth Iddings, 

Elizabclh Duane Gillespie Scholar in American History. 
North Platte, Neb. Prepared by the High School, North Platte, and by the Misses Kirk's 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mary Sylvester Cline, . . . Minnie Murdoch Kendrick Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Minnie Murdoch 
Kendrick Memorial Scholar, 1913-16. 

Jeannette Reefer Greenwald, Charles E. Ellis Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Charles E. Ellis Scholar, 
1912-15. 

Katharine Reeves, Charles E. Ellis Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, West Philadelphia. 

Ryu Sato, Anna Hallowell Memorial Scholar. 

Tokyo, Japan. Prepared by the Misses Shipley's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Foundation 
Scholar 1913-15, and First Pennsylvania and Southern States Matriculation Scholar, 
1913-14. Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar, 1914-15. 

Eleanor Marcella Clinton, Frances Marion Simpson Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Second Matriculation 
Scholar for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1912-13, City Scholar, 1912-15 and 
Frances Marion Simpson Memorial Scholar, 1912-15. 

Helen Marie Harris, Frances Marion Simpson Memorial Scholar. 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr. Special Frances Marion 
Simpson Memorial Scholar, 1913-15. 

Dorothy Macdonald, Frances Marion Simpson Memorial Scholar. 

Ardmore, Pa. Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore. Frances Marion 
Simpson Memorial Scholar, 1913-15. 

Catherine Arms Everett, . . . .Mary Anna Longstreth Memorial Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia. 

Georgette Omega Moses, Chicago Bryn Mawr Club Scholar. 

Mt. Vernon, N. Y. Prepared by the High School, Mt. Vernon, and by private tuition. 



104 

Agnes Pickett Smith, Austin Hall Norris Memorial Scholar. 

Winchester, Va. Prepared by Stuart Hall, Staunton, Va., and by private tuition. Mary 
E. Stevens Junior'Scholar, 1914-15. 

Mabel May Broomfield, City Scholar. 

Philadeljjhia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, West Philadelphia. 

Eleanor Marcblla Clinton, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Portland Academy, Portland, Ore., and by the Girls' 
High School, Philadelphia. Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholar for Pennsyl- 
vania and Southern States, 1912-13; Frances Marion Simpson Memorial Scholar and 
City Scholar, 1912-15. 

Anna Caroline Lee, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1912-15. 

Edith Mary Howes, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, West Philadelphia. 

Mabel Lafferty, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Margaret Louise Loudon, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1912-15. 

Anna Ethel Lubar, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1914-15. 

Ella Mary Rosenberg, City Scholar. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1914-15. 

Alice Miriam Snavely, City Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 

Helen Burn Zimmerman, Special Scholar. 

Eberly's Mill, Pa. Prepared by the Seller School, Harrisburg, Pa., and by private study. 

Gladys Hagy Cassel, Special Scholar. 

Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia 
Girls' High School Scholar, 1914-15. 

Helen Herron Taft, George W. Childs Prize Essayist. 

Cincinnati, O. Prepared by the National Cathedral School, Washington, D. C, and by 

the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. First Matriculation Scholar for Pennsylvania 

and the Southern States, 1908-09. 

Florence Gage Hatton, 

Honorably 7nentioned for George W. Childs Essay Prize. 
Columbus, O. Prepared by the Columbus School for Girls. 

Harriet Bradford, Mary Helen Ritchie Memorial Prize. 

San Francisco, Cal. Prepared by the Lowell High School, San Francisco. 



III. 

Degrees Conferred during the Academic Year 1911^-15. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. 
2 
Gertrude Hildreth Campbell of Rhode Island. 

A.B., Brown University, 1911, and A.M., 1912. Tutor in English, Brown University, 
1912. Graduate Scholar in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13, and Fellow in Eng- 
lish, 1913-14; Mary E. Garrett Fellow, Fellow by Courtesy and Scholar in English, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1914-1.5. Dissertation: Tractatus de Custodiendo Castro Morali- 
tatis with Introduction and Notes. Subjects: English Philology, English Literature 
and Philosophy. 

Florence Donnell White of Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1903, and A.M., 1907. Student, University of Paris, 1903- 
04; Graduate Scholar in Romance Languages, Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07, and Fellow 
in French, 1907-08; Instructor in French, Vassar College, 1908-15. Dissertation: 
Voltaire's Essay on Epic Poetry, a Study and an Edition. Subjects: French Litera- 
ture, Old French Philology and Spanish. 

MASTER OF ARTS. 
4 

Marguerite Gold Bartlett of Philadelphia. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1913. Teacher of Enghsh and Athletics in the Darlington 
Seminary, West Chester, Pa., 1913-14; Graduate Scholar in History, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1914-15. 

Rose Brandon of Pennsylvania. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1914. Graduate Scholar in Geology, Bryn Mawr College, 
1914-15. 

Elsie Deems of New York. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1910. Teacher and Vice-Principal in the Union Free School, 
Pocantico Hills, N. Y., 1911-13; Teacher in the Brearley School, New York City, 
1913-14; Scholar in Comparative Literature, Bryn Mawr College, 1914-15. 

Elizabeth Henrietta Johnston of Pennsylvania. 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1912. Teacher of Mathematics and Chemistry in Penn Hall, 
Chambersburg, Pa., 1912-14; Graduate Scholar in Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 
1914-15. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS. 
84 

Florence Rosamond Abernethy of Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore, Pa. Group, Latin and Ancient 
History. 

Mary Albertson of Magnolia, N. J., cum laude. 

Prepared by the Friends' Central School, Philadelphia. Group, Modern History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Rachel Ash of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1911-12, and Trustees' 
Philadelphia Girls' High School Scholar, 1912-15. Group, Chemistry and Biology. 

Hazel Kathryn Barnett of Bedford, Pa. 

Prepared by the High School, Bedford. Group, French and Modern History. 

(105) 



106 
Zena Jennie Blanc of Philadelphia, cum laude. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Charles E. Ellis Scholar, 1911-12; 
additional James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholar and Special Scholar, 1912-13; Mary 
E. Stevens Junior "Scholar and Special Scholar, 1913-14; Special Maria Hopper Scholar, 
1914-15. Group, Mathematics and Philosophy and Psychology. 

Frances Elizabeth Boyer of Pottsville, Pa. 

Prepared by the High School, Pottsville, and by the Dwight School, Englewood, N. J. 
Group, Latin and Classical Archseology. 

Harriet Bradford of San Francisco, Cal., magna cum laude. 

Prepared by the Lowell High School, San Francisco. Group, Latin and English. 

Margaret Saeger Bradway of Haverford, Pa. 

Prepared by the Moses Brown School, Providence, R. I. Group, French and Modern 
History. 

Susan Brandeis of Boston, Mass. 

Prepared by the Winsor School, Longwood, Mass. Group, Modern History and Econ- 
omics and Politics. 

Laura Elizabeth Branson of Coatesville, Pa., cum laude. 

Prepared by the High School, Coatesville. Group, Latin and Mathematics. 

Anna Haines Brown of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by Miss Sayward's School, Philadelpliiu, and by pjivate tuilioii. Group, Modern 
History and Economics and Politics. 

Mary' Gertrude Brownell of Providence, R. I. 

Prepared by Miss Wheeler's School, Providence, by St. Timothy's School, Catonsville, 
Md., and by private tuition. Group, English and Italian and Spanish. 

Catharine ReQua Bryant of Chicago, 111. 

Prepared by the Loring School, Chicago. Group, Modern History and Economics and 
Politics. 

Ethel Buchanan of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the High School, Bridgeport, Conn. Group, Latin and French. 

Agnes Elizabeth Burchard of New York City. 

Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City. Group, French and Spanish. 

Mary Mitchell Chamberlain of West Raleigh, N. C, magna cum laude. 

Prepared by St. Mary's School, West Raleigh. Group, Chemistry and Biology. 

Helen Burwell Chapin of St. David's, Pa. 

Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Anna M. Powers Memorial Scholar, 
1914-15. Group, Chemistry and Biology. 

Phyllis Collins of Cincinnati, O. 

Prepared by the National Cathedral School, Washington, D. C, and by the Baldwin 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Marguerite Daisy Darkow of Philadelphia, summa cum laude. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. First Bryn Mawr Matriculation 
Scholar for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 1911-12, and Simon Muhr Scholar, 
1911-15; James E. Rhoads Junior Scholar, 1913-14; Maria L. Eastman Brooke Hall 
Memorial Scholar, 1914-15. Group, Mathematics and Physics. 

Enid Dessau of New York City. 

Prepared by the Gordon- Winston School, New York City, and by the Hawthorne School, 
New York City. Group, French and Comparative Literature. 

Catherine Prescott Elwood of Minneapolis, Minn., cum laude. 

Prepared by Stanley Hall School, Minneapolis, and by " Les Marronniers," Paris, France. 
Group, French and Italian and Spanish. 

Gertrude Canterbury Emery of Boston, Mass. 

Prepared by the Misses May's School, Boston. Group, French and Modern History. 



107 

Olga Helen Clara Erbsloh of New York City, cuni, laude. 

Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City. Group, Economics and Politico und 
Psychology. 

Helen Everett of Providence, R. I. 

Prepared by St. Agnes School, Albany, N. Y., and by Miss Wheeler's School, Providence. 
Holder of the Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholarship for the New England States, 
1911-12; Brown University, 1912-13. Group, Economics and Politics and Psychology. 

Isabel Foster of Portsmouth, N. H. 

Prepared by the High School, Portsmouth. Group, English and Philosophy and 
Psychology. 

Margaret Louise Free of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Prepared by Dilworth Hall, Pittsburgh, and by the High School, Pittsburgh. Group, 
Economics and Politics and Psychology. 

Eleanor Freer of Chicago, 111. 

Prepared by the University School for Girls, Chicago. First Bryn Mawr Matriculation 
Scholar for the Western States, 1911-12. Group, Latin and French. 

Florence Marjorie Fyfe of Winnctka, 111., ciwi laude. 

Prepared by Kemper Hall, Kenosha, Wis. Second Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholar 
for the Western States, 1911-12. Group, Mathematics and Physics. 

Ruth Glenn of Johnstown, Pa. 

Prepared by the High School, Johnstown. Group, Modern History and Economics and 
Politics. 

Mary Brooks Goodhue of Phiiadcl])hia. 

Prepared by the Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa., and by the Misses Shipley's 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Elizabeth Duanc Gillespie Scholar in American History, 
1914-15. Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Anne Frances Hardon of New York City. 

Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City, and by Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, 
Conn. Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Mary Monroe Harlan of Bel Air, Md., cum laude. 

Prepared by the High School, Bel Air, and by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore, Md. 
Special Scholar, 1912-13; Special Maria Hopper Scholar, 1914-15. Group, Latin and 
Mathematics. 

Florence Gage Hatton of Columbus, O., cwn laude. 

Prepared by the Columbus School for Girls. Group, Philosophy and Psychology. 

Maud Wislizenus Holmes of St. Louis, Mo. 

Prepared by The Mary Institute, St. Louis. Second Bryn Mawr ^Matriculation Scholar 
for the Western States, 1909-10. Work for this degree was completed in February, 
1915. Group, Physics and Mathematics. 

Louise Walker Hollingsworth of Athens, Ga. 

Prepared by Lucy Cobb Institute, Athens, Ga. Group, Latin and German. 

Ruth Warren Hopkinson of Lakewood, O. 

Prepared by the West High School, Cleveland, O. Group, Physics and Chemistry. 

Agnes Warren Hornberger of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Prepared by the Thurston-Gleim Preparatory School, Pittsburgh. Group, Chemistry and 
Biology. 

Ruth Hubbard of Fort Moultrie, S. C. 

Prepared by the Misses Allen's School, West Newton, Mass. Group, Latin and French. 

Alice Robbins Humphrey of New York City. 

Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City. Group, Economics and Politics and 
Psychology. 

Helen Walkley Irvin of Baltimore, Md., cum laude. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Bryn Mawr School Scholar, 1911-12; 
Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar, 1912-13; Thomas H. Powers Scholar, 1913-14. 
Group, Greek and English, 



108 
Elizabeth Schofield Ivory of Claymont, Del. 

Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1909-10. Hearer, 1911-13. Group, English 
and Comparative Literature. 

Mildred Lewis Justice of Narberth, Pa. 

Prepared by the High School, Narberth. Group, Psychology and Biology. 

Marie Ottilie Keller of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' High 
School Scholar, 1911-15. Group, English and German. 

Adrienne Kenyon of New York City, cum laude. 

Prepared by Miss Schoonmaker's School, New York City, and by the Horace Mann 
School, New York City. Second (equal) Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholar for New 
York, New Jersey and Delaware, 1911-12. Group, Economics and Politics and Phil- 
osophy and Psychology. 

Dora Clara Levinson of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1911-15. Group, Chem- 
istry and Biology. 

Mary Arleville Lobdell of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1911-15. Group, Latin 
and Ancient History. 

Mary Parke London of Birmingham, Ala. 

Prepared by the Margaret Allen School, Birmingham, and by the Misses Shipley's School, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, Philosophy and Psychology. 

Frances Macdonald of Ardmore, Pa. 

Prepared by the Lower Merion High School, Ardmore. Lower Merion High School 
Scholar, 1911-15. Group, Latin and French. 

Helen MacElree of West Chester, Pa. 

Prepared by the High School, West Chester. Group, Latin and English. 

Amy Lawrence Martin of Chicago, 111. 

Prepared by the Kenwood Institute, Chicago, and by the Universit.y School for Girls, 
Chicago. Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Helen Josephine McFarland of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Friends' Preparative Meeting School of Germantown,' Philadelphia. 
Woods Hole Scholar, 1913. Group, Chemistry and Biology. 

Dorothea May Moore of Cambridge, Mass., cum laude. 

Prepared by the Gilman School, Cambridge, and by the Misses May's School, Boston, 
Mass. First New England States Matriculation Scholar, 1911-14. Group, Modern 
History and Economics and Politics. 

Ruth Newman of Bridge Hampton, N. Y. 

Prepared by the Public Schools of Bridge Hampton and Southampton, N. Y. Group. 
iVlodern History and Economics and Politics. 

Susan Farley Nichols of New York City. 

Prepared by the Brearley School, New York City. Group, Economics and Politics and 
Philosophy and Psychology. 

Emily Gifford Noyes of Providence, R. I. 

Prepared by Miss Wheeler's School, Providence. Group, Latin and French. 

Dagmar Perkins of New York City. 

Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City. Group, Economics and Politics and 
Philosophy and Psychology. 

Edna Rapallo of New York City. 

Prepaied by the Brearley School, New York City. Group, Italian and Spanish and 
English. 

Myra Stephannie Richards of South Norwalk, Conn., cum laude. 

Prepared by the Normal College of the City of New York, and by the High School, Nor- 
walk, Conn. Group, Latin and German. 



109 

Anna Wilkins Roberts of Moorestown, N. J., cum laude. 

Prepared by the Friends' Academy, Moorestown, and by the Westtown Boarding Scliool, 
Westtown, Pa. Foundation Scholar, 1911-15. Group, German and French. 

Ethel Fern Robinson of Detroit, Mich. 

Prepared by the Central High School, Detroit, and by the Liggett School, Detroit. Group, 
French and Modern History. 

Miriam Rohrer of Schenectady, N. Y. 

Prepared by the High School, Schenectady. Group, Philosophy and Psychology. 

Merle D'Aubigne Sampson of Charlottesville, Va. 

Prepared by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholar, 
1912-13. Group, Latin and English. 

Cecilia Vennard Sargent of Wenonah, N. J. 

Prepared by the High School, Woodbury, N. J. Group, Greek and I>atin. 

Jean Sattler of Madisonville, O., cum laude. 

Prepared by the College Preparatory School, Cincinnati, O. Group, English and Com- 
parative Literature. 

Atala Thayer Scudder of Brooklyn, New York City, cum laude. 

Prepared by the Veltin School, New York City. Group, Psychology and Biology. 

Katherine Elizabeth Sheafer of Pottsville, Pa. 

Prepared by the High School, Pottsville, and by private tuition. Group, Chemistry and 
Biology. 

Harriet Sheldon Sheldon of Columbus, O. 

Prepared by the Columbus School foi Girls. Group, Latin and French. 

Clarissa Smith of West Medford, Mass. 

Prepared by the Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, Chemistry and Biology, 

Elizabeth Baldwin Smith of Cincinnati, O. 

Prepared by Miss Wright's School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, Latin and English. 

Isabel Smith of Los Angeles, Cal. 

Prepared by the Polytechnic High School, Los Angeles, and by the Misses Kirk's School, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. Group, Chemistry and Geology. 

Sara Rozet Mather Smith of Chicago, 111. 

Prepared by Miss Madeira's School, Washington, D. C, and by St. Timothy's. School, 
Catonsville, Md. Group, English and French. 

Katharine Snodgrass of Indianapolis, Ind., cum laude. 

Prepared by the Shortridge High School, Indianapolis. Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholar, 
1912-13; Anna Hallowell Memorial Scholar, 1913-14. Group, English and French. 

^Angeleine Benedicta Spence of Rockland, Mass. 

Prepared by the High School, Rockland. Group, German and Modern History. 

Elsie Hannah Steltzer of Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. City Scholar, 1911-1.5. Group, Latin 
and German. 

Katherine Maynadier Streett of Cumberland, Md. 

Prepared by the Western High School, Baltimore, and by Allegany County Academy, 
Cumberland, Md. Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Cleora Sutch of Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Charles E. Ellis Scholar, 1911-15. 
Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Carlotta Lowell Taber of Worcester, Mass. 

Prepared by Rosemary Hall, Greenwich, Conn., and by private tuition. Group, German 
and Modem History. 



no 

Helen Hereon Taft of Cincinnati, O., magna cum laude. 

Prepared by the National Cathedral School, Washington. D. C, and by the Baldwin 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. First Matriculation Scholar for Pennsylvania and the South- 
ern States, 1908-09. Group, Modern History and Economics and Politics. 

Mary Marjory Thomson of Yonkers, N. Y. 

Prepared by the High School, Yonkers. Group, Economics and Politics and Philosophy 
and Psychology. 

Ruth Tinker of Stamford, Conn. 

Prepared by Miss Low and Miss Heywood's School, Stamford. Group, French and 
German. 

Ruth Alden Tuttle of Canandaigua, N. Y. 

Prepared by the Gordon-Winston School, New York City. Group, Modern History and 
Economics and Politics. 

Emily Ellison Van Horn of Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Prepared by the Lockwood Collegiate School, Scarsdale. Second (equal) Matriculation 
Scholar for New York, New Jersey and Delaware, 1911-12. Group, French and 
Modern Histoiy. 

Elizabeth Waldron Norman Weaver of Newport, R. I. 

Prepared by the Rogers High School, Newport, and by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, 
Pa. Group, Gicek and Ancient History. 

Mallory Whiting Webster of Baltimore, Md. 

Prepared by the Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Group, French and Modern Histor.v. 

IsoLDA Therese Zeckwer of Philadelphia, cum laude. 

Prepared by the Friends' Crntial School, Philadelphia. Group, Chemistry and Biology. 



IV. 



College Preachers for the Year 1914-15. 

October 4th. Professor George A. Barton, Ph.D., of Bryn Mawr 

College. 

October 11th. The Rev. Samuel Higginbottom, Head Worker in 

Leper Colony in Allahabad, India. 

October 18th. The Rev. Robert Johnston, D.C.L., Rector of the 

Church of the Saviour, Philadelphia. 

October 25th. The Rev. Wilford Lash Robbins, D.D., LL.D., 

Dean of the General Theological Seminary, New 
York City. 

The Rev. George Black Stewart, D.D., LL.D., 
President and Professor of Practical Theology in 
Auburn Theological Sminary, Auburn, N. Y. 

The Rev. William Pierson Merrill, D.D., Pastor 
of the Brick Presbyterian Church, New York City. 

The Rev. Henry Lubeck, LL.D., D.C.L., Rector of 
the Church of Zion and St. Timothy, New York City. 



November 1st. 

November Sth. 
November 15th. 
November 22nd. 
December 6th. 

December 13th. 
December 20th. 
January 10th. 
January 17th. 
January 24th. 
February 7th. 



The Rev. Francis E. Higgins, Missionary to the 
Lumber Camps of Minnesota. 

The Rev. George A. Johnston Ro.ss, M.A., Professor 
of Practical Theology in Union Theological Seminar}^ 
New York City. 

President Charles A. Richmond, D.D., President of 
Union College, Schenectady, New York. 

The Rev. Father Officer of the House of the Holy 
Cross, West Park, N. Y. 

The Rev. Anson Phelps Stokes, Jr., D.D., Secretary 
of Yale University. 

The Rt. Rev. Philip M. Rhinelander, D.D., Bishop 
of Pennsylvania. 

The Rev. Father Huntington of the House of the 
Holy Cross, West Park, New York. 

The Rev. Charles R. Erdman, D.D., Professor of 
Practical Theology in Princeton Theological Semi- 
nary. 

(Ill) 



112 



February 14th. The Rev. Albert Parker Fitch, D.D., President of 
Andover Theological Seminary, Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts. 

February 21st. The Rev. Francis Brown, D.D., D.Litt., LL.D., 
President of Union Theological Seminary. 

February 28th. The Rev. Theodore Frederick Herman, D.D., Pro- 
fessor of Systematic Theology in the Theological 
Seminary of the Reformed Church of the United 

States in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 

March 7th. The Rev. Anna Garlin Spencer, Professor of Soci- 

ology and Ethics in Meadville Theological College, 
Meadville, Pa. 

March 14th. The Rev. J. Valdemar Moldenhatjer, D.D., Pastor 

of the Second Presbyterian Church, Albany, N. Y. 

March 21st. Mr. Robert Elliott Speer, Secretary of the Presby- 

terian Board of Foreign Missions. 

March 28th. The Rev. J. Ross Stevenson, D.D., President of 

Princeton Theological Seminary. 

April 11th. The Rev. Edward Alfred Steiner, Ph.D., Professor 

of Applied Christianity in Grinnell College, Grinnell, 
Iowa. 

April 18th. The Rev. George William Douglas, D.D., Canon of 

the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, New York City. 

April 25th. The Rev. Henry Hallam Tweedy, D.D., Professor 

of Practical Theology in Yale University. 

May 2nd. Rabbi Stephen Samuel Wise, Ph.D., Rabbi of the 

Free Synagogue of New York City. 

May 9th. The Rev. John Haynes Holmes, S.T.B., Pastor of 

the Church of the Messiah, New York City. 

May 16th. The Rev. Alexander McColl, D.D., Pastor of the 

Second Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia. 

May 23rd. The Rev. Washington Gladden, D.D., Pastor of the 

First Congregational Church of Columbus, O. 

May 30th. Baccalaureate Preacher, The Rev. Francis Green- 

wood Peabody, D.D., Dean of the Divinity School 
of Harvard University. 



Addresses and Entertainments given during the Year 1914-15. 



ADDRESSES. 



Commencement Address: 



June 3rd. 



College Lectures: 

September 30th. 
November 6th. 



December 5th. 
February 19th. 

March 4th. 
March 13th. 
March 17th. 

May 7th. 
May 14th. 

May 15th. 



The Honourable William Howard Taft, LL.D., 
D.C.L., Former President of the United States. 
"A Permanent Basis for International Peace." 



President M. Carey Thomas. Opening Address. 

Madame E. Guerin (Sarah Granier) of Lyons, 
France. Dramatic Lecture: "Marie Antoinette." 
The lecture was deUvered in French and illustrated 
with lantern sUdes, costumes of the period being 
worn. 

Mrs. Elise J. Blattner, "The Classic Drama of 
Japan, The No," followed by a performance of the 
"No" Classical Dances by Miss Clara Blattner. 

Dr. George Grant MacCurdy, Curator of the 
Anthropological Section of the Peabody Museum of 
Natural History, Yale University. "The Dawn of 
Art." 



Madame Slavko Grouitch. 
Servia." 



"Present Conditions in 



Mr. Frank Harris of London. "The Man Shake- 
speare and the Lady of the Sonnets." 

Mr. Reginald Wright Kaxjffman. "Experiences 
in Belgium and England During the War." For 
the benefit of the Belgian ReHef Fund. 

Professor Charles Upson Clarke, Ph.D., Professor 
of Latin in Yale University. "Spanish Painters." 

Mr. George Macauley Trevelyan of England, 
formerly Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. 
"Servia and Southeastern Europe." 

Miss Dora Keen, A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1896, 
F.R.G.S., 1914. "The Bryn Mawr and other 
Alaskan Glaciers in Relation to the New Govern- 
ment Railway." 

(113) 



114 

Before the Christian Association: 

November 18th, December 16th, January 6th, January 13th, February 3rd. 
Mr. Charles Deems, Assistant Manager of the 
Seaman's Institute of New York. Addresses before 
the Bible Study Committee. 

February 10th, 17th, 24th. Mrs. Dwight Potter and Deaconess 
Henrietta R. Goodwin. Addresses before the 
Federation Committee. 

March 12th. Professor George A. Johnston Ross, M.A., of 

Unioii Theological Seminary. Christian Associa- 
tion Conference. 

Before the College Chapter of the College Equal Suffrage League: 
January 9th. Madame Rosika Schwimmer of Hungary. "Women 

and War." 

April 10th. Mrs. Beatrice Forbes Robertson Hale of England. 

"The Awakening of Women." 

Before the Department of Latin: 

May 7th. Professor Charles Upson Clark, Ph.D., Professor 

of Latin in Yale University. "Latin Palaeography." 

Before the English Club: 

January 15th. Mrs. Katherine Fullerton Gerould. "Imagina- 

tion and the Short Story." 

Before the Graduate Club: 

December 7th. President M. Carey Thomas. "The Difference 
between Men and Women Scholars." 

February 27th. Professor Harry Allen Overstreet, Professor of 
Philosophy in the College of the City of New York. 
"Immortality." 

April 16th. Mr. Rhys Carpenter of Bryn Mawr College. "New 

Greece for Old." 

Before the History Club: 

March 26th. Mr. Paul Douglas of Columbia University. "The 

Labour Movement in the United States." 

Before the Liberal Club: 

November 20th. Mr. Norman Hapgood, Editor of Harper's Weekly. 
"Some Lessons of the War." 

February 20th. Mrs. Charlotte Perkins Gilman. "Woman and 
Economics." 



115 



Before the Philosophical Club: 

March 5th. Professor Charles Montague Bakewell, Ph.D., 

Professor of Philosophy in Yale University. 

"Nietzsche and Latter-day Stoicism." 

Before the Science Club: 

March 19th. Mrs. Frances Eleanor Mason Manierre, A.B., 

Bryn Mawr College, 1905. "The Painted Desert 

Country." 

Vocational Conference: 

March 27th. Miss Elizabeth Leighton Lee. "Landscape Gar- 

dening and Architecture." 
Mrs. Martha P. Falconer. "Social Work." 
Dr. Gertrude Walker. "Medical Work for 

Women." 
Miss Bertha Rembaugh, A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 

1897 and A.M., 1898. "Law." 
Miss Rose Wiston. "Journalism." 
Mrs. H. H. Moore. "Advertising." 
Mrs. Edwin S. Kelly. "The Commercial Secre- 
tary." 
Miss Theodora Butcher. "The Bureau of Occu- 
pations." 

Vesper Service Speakers: 

March 14th. Miss Anne Wig^gin of the Spring Street Mission, 

New York City. 

March 28th. Miss Marie Spahr of the College Settlement, New 

York City. 

May 9th. Miss Kelsey of the Student Volunteer Movement. 

Memorial Service for Mary Elizabeth Garrett: 

May 5th. Addresses by Dean Marion Reilly, Mrs. Anna 

Rhoads Ladd, Professor Charlotte Angas 
Scott, Professor Lucy Martin Donnelly, 
Dr. Eunice Morgan Schenck, Mr. Thomas 
Raeburn White, Dr. Anna Howard Shaw. 

ENTERTAINMENTS AND ACADEMIC EVENTS. 

October 3rd. Christian Association reception to the entering class. 

October 8th. President Thomas's reception and address to the 

entering class, 3 p. m. 
President Thomas's reception and address to the 
graduate students, 8 p. m. 



116 



October 10th. 
October 17th. - 
October 23rd. 
October 30th. 
November 7th. 
November 13th. 

November 14t]i. 

November 16th. 
November 21st. 
December 7th. 
December V2th. 
December 14th. 
December 15th. 
December 16th. 

December 18th. 
December 19th. 

December 30th. 

January 11th. 
January 13th. 
January 15th. 



January 18th. 
January 30th. 



February 8th. 
February 12th. 
February 15th. 



Philanthropic Committee party. 

Senior reception to the entering class. 

Faculty reception to the graduate students. 

Lantern Night. 

Banner Night. 

Debate, 1915 vs. 1916. Resolved that the United 
States should increase her armament. 

Tea in Pembroke Hall for the wives of the Mayors 
attending the conference in Philadelphia. 

Faculty Tea for graduate students, Merion Hall. 

Sophomore Play. "Mice and Men." 

President Thomas at home to the Senior Class. 

Senior reception to the graduate students. 

President Thomas at home to the graduate students. 

Faculty Tea for graduate students, Radnor Hall. 

Debate. Resolved that Intercollegiate debates are 
desirable. 

Sophomore Dance for the entering class. 

Concert arranged by the Music Committee for the 
benefit of the American Red Cross. 

Tea for the wives of the Geologists attending the 
meeting of the American Society for the Advance- 
ment of Science. 

President Thomas at home to the Senior Class. 

Faculty Tea for graduate students. Rockefeller Hall. 

Sketches in a new art, dramatic dancing, by Miss 
Eleanor Dougherty. For the benefit of the Ameri- 
can Red Cross. 

President Thomas at home to the graduate students. 
Meeting of the Alumnae Association. President 

Thomas's luncheon for the Alumnae Association, 

in The Deanery. 
Celebration of twenty-first birthday of Pembroke 

East and West. 

President Thomas at home to the Senior Class. 
Trophy Club reception for the entering class. 
President Thomas at home to the graduate students. 



117 



February 17th. Debate, 1915 vs. 1916. "Resolved that immigrants 
to the United States should be subject to a Hterary 
test." 

February 25th. Faculty Tea for graduate students, Denbigh Hall. 

February 26th. Dramatic Recital by Mr. Samuel Arthur King for the 
benefit of the Belgian Relief Fund. 

April 9th. Lecture by Dr. Pierre Francois Giroud and song 

recital by Signora G. Di Vincenzo. Richepin's 
"The Songs of Miarka." For the benefit of the war 
victims in France. 
Faculty Tea for gi-aduate students, Radnor Hall. 

April 17th. Glee Club Concert. Performance of "H. M. S. 

Pinafore," by Gilbert and Sullivan. 

April 23rd. Junior-Senior Supper Play. W. S. Gilbert's "En- 

gaged." 
Sophomore Supper. 
Freshman Supper. 

April 24th. Junior-Senior Supper Play repeated. 

April 26th. Faculty Tea for graduate students, Merion Hall. 

April 28th. Semi-final Debates: 1915 vs. 1918. Resolved that 

the United States should increase her armament. 
1916 vs. 1917. Resolved that the United States was 
justified in allowing coastwise traffic to pass through 
the Panama Canal without paying tolls. 

April 30th. Fellowship dinners. 

Graduate reception for the Senior Class. 

May 1st. Performance of "The Yellow Jacket," by the Coburn 

Players. 

May 3rd. President Thomas at home to the Senior Class. 

May 8th. Senior Play. "The Dark Lady of the Sonnets" and 

"The Critic." 

May 11th. President Thomas at home to the graduate students. 

May 13th. Final Debate: 1915 vs. 1917. Resolved that the 

United States should abandon the Monroe Doctrine 
as part of its foreign policy. 

May 14th. Junior Supper. 

May 22nd. Graduate reception for the Faculty. 

May 29th. Senior reception for the Faculty. 

May 31st. Senior Supper. 



118 

June 1st. President Thomas's luncheon to the Senior Class. 

College Bonfii-e. Athletic Field, 8 p. m. 

June 2nd. College breakfast, 12.30 p. m. 

Senior Garden party, 4 to 7 p. m. 

Performance of "Love's Labour's Lost," by the 
Browning Society of Philadelphia in the Gymnasium 
at 8 p.m., for the benefit of the New Athletic Field. 

June 3rd. Conferring of degrees and close of the academic year. 

The Gymnasium, 11 a.m. 
President Thomas's luncheon for Directors, Faculty, 

Staff and invited guests. The Deanery, 1 p.m. 
Luncheon for the guests of Seniors. Radnor Hall, 

1 p.m. 
Alumnse Supper. Pembroke Hall, 7 p.m. 



VI. 

Gifts Received by the College during the Year 1914-15. 

Our sincere gratitude is due to the following donors for gifts which 
have been received during the past year, in addition to gifts of special 
books to the Library which are gratefully acknowledged in the report 
of the librarian. 

Athletic Association (subscribed by former and present students 
and alumnae and friends of the college) for a new athletic 

field $3,954. 18 

Bequest under the will of EHzabeth Swift Shippen, deceased . . . 10,000 . 00 
Alexander Simpson, Jr., fourth payment to found four Frances 

Marion Simpson Undergraduate Scholarships 5,000.00 

Gift for Graduate Fellowship: 
Anonymous donor for Helen Schaeffer Huff Memorial Research 

Fellowship 750.00 

Gifts for Undergraduate Scholarships: 
From the Board of Education of the City of Philadelphia, 

eight scholarships $800.00 

PVom the Estate of Charles E. Ellis, three scholarships 

of $200 each 400.00 

From the Bryn MawT School, Baltimore, one scholarship 

at $500 300.00 

Anonymous per Dean Reilly for special scholarships for 

Gladys Hagy Cassel and Helen Burn Zimmerman . 300 . 00 
From the Estate of Simon Muhr, for one scholarship . . 400 . 00 
From Mrs. J. Campbell Harris for Thomas H. Powers 

Memorial Scholarship 200 . 00 

From George W. Kendrick, Jr., for the Minnie Mur- 
doch Kendrick Memorial Scholarship 200 . 00 

From Alexander Simpson, Jr., for scholarship 200.00 

From Mary Rachel Norris for Austin Hull Norris 

Memorial Scholarship 200 .00 

From the Alumna? Association of the Girls' High and 

Normal School, one scholarship 100.00 

From the Chicago Bryn Mawr Club for scholarship. . . . 100.00 

— 3,200.00 

(119) 



120 



Gifts to increase Salaries of Associate Professors of Bryn 
Mawr College: 

Mr. William Mcllvaine, father of an undergraduate 
student, to increase salaries of Associate Professors 
of Bryn Mawr College $211 .00 

Mr. Albert Strauss, father of an undergraduate student, 
to increase salaries of Associate Professors of Bryn 
Mawr College 200.00 

Mr. Willis H. Tuttle, father of an undergraduate stu- 
dent, to increase salaries of Associate Professors of 
• Bryn Mawr College 100.00 

Mr. S. W. Smith, Jr., father of an undergraduate stu- 
dent, to increase salaries of Associate Professors of 
Bryn Mawr College 100.00 

Mr. James Timpson, father of an undergraduate stu- 
dent, to increase salaries of Associate Professors of 
Bryn Mawr College 250.00 

Mr. F. S. Chase, father of an undergraduate student, to 
increase salaries of Associate Professors of Bryn 
Mawr College 22.50 



Bryn Mawr Club of Washington for books $30.00 

Class of 1900 for books 100.00 

Class of 1903 for books 317.20 

Class of 1908 for books for English department 300.00 

Class of 1911 for books for new book room in memory 

of Isabel Buchanan 58 . 50 

Philadelphia Alumnaj for books on the History of Modern 

Art , . 100.00 

Several Alumnae for the new book room 30 . 00 



Class of 1911 for rhododendron bed in memory of Mary 

Hamot Higginson $85 . 00 

Students in residence for motor for organ 71 .00 

Proceeds of entertainment for Students' Building Fund 62 . 18 
Alumnae and Former Students of Pembroke Hall for new 

alumnae rooms 769 . 62 

Undergraduate Association, balance of May Day ac- 
count 13 . 25 



883.50 



935.70 



998.05 

From Mr. William Ellis Scull of Overbrook, Philadelphia, marble 
bust of his father, David Scull. 

From the Hispanic Society of America, 34 photographs of the paint- 
ings and sculptures in the collection of the Hispanic Society of America. 



VII. 

Titles of Scientific Publications of the Faculty Which Appeared 
in the Year 1914-15. 

Professor James Barnes: 

"The High-Frequency Spectrum of Tungsten." Philosophical Maga- 
zine, Vol. XXX, pp. 368-370. September, 1915. 

"Efficiency of Production of X-E,ays from a Coolidge Tube," by Sir 
Ernest Rutherford, F.R.S., and Prof. J. Barnes, Ph.D. Ihid., pp. 361- 
367. September, 1915. 

"Maximum Frequency of the X-Rays from a Coolidge Tube for Dif- 
ferent Voltages," by Sir Ernest Rutherford, F.R.S., Prof. J. Barnes, Ph.D. 
and H. Richardson, M.Sc. Ihid., pp. 339-360. September, 1915. 

"The Spectra of Magnesium, Calcium, and Sodium Vapors." Aslro- 
physical Journal, Vol. XXXIX, No. 4, pp. 370-372, PI. vi. May, 1914. 

Professor George A. Barton: 

"Sumerian Business and Administrative Documents from the Earhest 
Times to the Dynasty of Agade," pp. 36+lxiv autographed and x 
photographic plates 4to. ' Volume IX of The University of Pennsylvania, 
The University Museum, Publications of the Babylonian Section. Phila- 
delphia, The University Museum, 1915. 

"A New Account of the Creation." Sunday School World, Vol. 
LIV, p. 485. Philadelphia. November, 1914. 

"Deciphering the Hittite Inscriptions." Ibid., p. 485. 

"The Life of Christ in Recent Research." Friends' Quarterly Ex- 
aminer, pp. 477-496. London. October, 1914. 

"Incarnation (Mushm)." Hastings' Encyclopcedia of Religion and 
Ethics, Vol. VII, pp. 197, 198, 4to. Edinburgh and New York. 

"Incarnation (Semitic)." Ibid., pp. 199, 200. 

"Religious Conceptions Underlying Sumerian Proper Names." 
Journal of the American Oriental Society, Vol. XXXIV, pp. 315-320. 
New Haven, Conn. 1914. 

"New Light on the Flood and the Antediluvian Patriarchs." Sunday 
School World, Vol. LV, pp. 200-202. Philadelphia. May, 1915. 

"Albert J. Edmunds and the Buddhistic and Christian Gospels." 
Journal of Biblical Literature,, Yol. XXXIII, p. 244. Boston, Mass. 

"Kings before the Flood." The Museum Journal, Vol. VI, pp. 55- 
58. Philadelphia. March, 1915. 

"A New Apocalypse." Present Day Papers, Vol. II, pp. 175-178. 
Haverford. June, 1915. 

"Spiritual Life and Expanding Knowledge." Ibid., Vol. II, pp. 275- 
278. September, 1915; reprinted in The Friend, Vol. LV, pp. 729-730. 
London. September 24, 1915. 

(121) 



122 



Book Reviews: 

Vincent's ".Jerusalem," Tome II, Fascicules I and II, American 
Journal of Semitic Laiiguages, Vol. XXXI, p. 88. Chicago. October, 
1914. 

Poebel's "Historical and Grammatical Texts," being volumes IV-VI 
of the Publications of the Babylonian Section of the University Museum. 
Ibid., pp. 223-225. April, 1915. 

MacFadyen's "Davidson's Introductory Hebrew Grammar." Ibid., 
pp. 227, 228. 

Kaiser, "Cuneiform Bullae of the Third Milennium B. C." Ibid., 
p. 228. 

Poebel's "Historical and Grammatical Texts." Evening Bulletin, 
Philadelphia, Vol. LXVIII, No. 282, p. 10. March 6, 1915. 

Galloway's "Philosophy of Rehgion." Present Day Papers, Vol. I, 
p. 310. Haverford. October, 1914. 

Wood and Grant's "The Bible as Literature." 76id., p. 337. Novem- 
ber, 1914. 

Skinner's "The Divine Names in Genesis." Ibid., p. 338. 

Briggs' "Theological SymboUcs." Ibid., p. 368. December, 1914. 

Montefiore "Judaism and St. Paul." Ibid., Vol. II, p. 34. January, 
1915. 

Robertson's "Grammar of the Greek New Testament in the Light 
of Historical Research." Ibid., p. 68. February, 1915. 

Souter's "Canon and Text of the New Testament." Ibid., p. 101. 
March, 1915. 

Sanders' "History of the Hebrews." Ibid., pp. 131, 132. April, 
1915. 

Painter's "Philosophy of Christ's Temptation." Ibid., p. 166. 
May, 1915. 

Kent's "Songs, Hymns and Prayers of the Old Testament." Ibid., 
p. 194. June, 1915. 

WooUey and Lawrence's "Wilderness of Zin." Ibid., p. 195. 

Plummer's "Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Second 
Epistle of St. Paul to the Corinthians." Ibid., p. 196. 

Lyon's "Christian Equivalent of War." Ibid., p. 229. July, 1915. 

Wild's "Geographic Influences in Old Testament Masterpieces." 
Ibid., p. 229. 

Burkitt "Jewish and Christian Apocalypses." Ibid., p. 229. 

Wasson's "Religion and Drink." Ibid., p. 258. August, 1915. 

Johns' "Relation between the Laws of Babylonia and the Laws of 
the Hebrew Peoples." Ibid., p. 259. August, 1915. 

Ramsay's "Bearing of Recent Discovery on the Trustworthiness of 
the New Testament." Ibid., p. 259. 

McGiffert's "Rise of Modern Religious Ideas." Ibid., p. 289. Sep- 
tember, 1915. 

Warren's "Earliest Cosmologies." Sunday School World^ Vol. LIV, 
p. 576. Philadelphia. December, 1914. 



123 

Clark's "Holy Land of Asia Minor." Ibid., Vol. LV, pp. 142, 143. 
March, 1915. 

Robertson's "Grammar of the Greek New Testament in the Light of 
Historical Research." Ibid., p. 296. June, 1915. 

Clough's "Social Christianity in the Orient." Ibid., p. 247. May, 
1915. 

Lyon's "Christian Equivalent of War." Ibid., p. 438. September, 
1915. 

Professor Florence Bascom: 

Abstract of paper on " Pre-Cambrian Igneous Rocks of the Pennsyl- 
vania Piedmont." Bulletin of the Geological Society of America, Vol. 
XXVI, No. 1, pp. 81-82. Washington, D. C. March, 1915. 

Abstract of paper on "Magnetic Assimilation." Ibid., Vol. XXVI, 
No. 1, p. 82. 

Professor Jean Baptiste Beck: 
Book Reviews: 

Duriez's "La Theologie dans le drame reUgieux en AUemagne au 
Moyen age," and Duriez's "Les apocryphes dans le drame religieux en 
AUemagne au Moyen age." Journal of English and Germanic Philology, 
Vol. XIV, No. 2, pp. 312-321. April, 1915. 

Mr. Charles Clinton Bramble: 

"A Symbolic Proof of Cayley's Identity." Johns Hopkins Circular. 
July, 1915. 

Professor Carleton Fairchild Brown: 

"Poems by Sir John Salusbury and Robert Chester." Re-edited for 
the Ear'y Engli h Text Society. Extra series. Vol. CXIII, pp. lxxiv+86. 
1914. 

"A Homilectical Debate between Heart and Eye." Modern Language 
Notes, Vol. XXX, pp. 197-198. June, 1915. 

Book Review: 

Blanche C. Williams's "Gnomic Poetry in Anglo-Saxon." Nation, 
Vol. C, pp. 716-717. New York. June 24, 1915. 

Dr. Thomas Clachar Brown: 

"Origin of Oohtes and the Oolitic Texture in Rocks." Bulletin of the 
Geological Society of America, Vol. XXV, pp. 745-780, pi. 26-28. New 
York, N. Y. December 16, 1914. 

"The Development of the Mesenteries in the Zooids of Anthozoa 
and its bearing upon the systematic position of the Rugosa." American 
Journal of Science, 4:th ser., Vol. XXXIX, No. 34, pp. 535-542, 11 figs. 
New Haven, Conn. May, 1915. 



124 

Professor Roger F. Brunei : 

"A Criticism of the Electron Conception of Valence." Journal of the 
American Chemical Society, Vol. XXXVII, pp. 709-722. 1915. 

Dr. Samuel C. Chew, Jr.: 

"The Dramas of Lord Byron — A Critical Study." Hesperia Ergdn- 
zungsreihe, No. 3, pp. vi, 182. Gottingen, Vandenhoeck und Reynecht, 
Baltimore, The Johns Hopkins Press. 1915. 

"Peter's Quotations." Nation, pp. 404-405. New York, N. Y. 
October 1, 1914. 

Book Review: 

"The Cambridge History of English Literature, Vol. XI." Modern 
Language Notes, pp. 182-186. June, 1915. 

Dr. James Llewellyn Crenshaw: 

"The Stokes Method for the Determination of Pyrite and Marcasite," 
by E. T. Allen and J. L. Crenshaw. American Journal oj Science, 4th 
ser., Vol. XXXVIII, No. 227, pp. 371-392. New Haven, Conn. Novem- 
ber, 1914. 

"Effect of Temperature and Acidity in the Formation of Marcasite 
and Wurtzite (ZnS); A Contribution to the Genesis of Unstable Forms," 
by E. T. Allen and J. L. Crenshaw. Ibid., pp. 392-431. 

Dr. Grace de Laguna: 

"The Psychological Element." Philosophical Rcvieio, Vol. XXIV» 
No. 4, pp. 371-384. July, 1915. 

Professor Theodore de Leo de Laguna: 

"Introduction to the Science of Ethics." Pp. xi, 414, 8vo. The 
Macmillan Company, New York, N. Y. December, 1914. 

"The Postulates of Deductive Logic." Journal of Philosophy, 
Psychology and Scienfijic Methods, Vol. XII, No. 9, pp. 225-236. April 
29, 1915. 

"The Logical- Analytic Method in Philosophy. Ibid., Vol. XII, 
No. 17, pp. 449-462. August 19, 1915. 

Book Review: 

F. H. Bradley's "Essays on Truth and Reahty." Ibid., Vol. XII, 
No. 13, pp. 358-361. June 24, 1915. 

Professor Charles Ghequiei'e Fenwick: 
Book Reviews: 

C. H. Stockton's "Outlines of International Law." American Polit- 
ical Science Review, Vol. IX, No. 1, p. 177-178. February, 1915. 

"Die Judikature des Standigen Schiedhofs von 1899-1913." Ibid., 
pp. 178-179. 



125 

Raymdnd Gaudu's' "Essai sur la legitimitc des gouvernements dans 
ses rapports avec les gouvernements de fait." Ibid., pp. 185-187. 

Also notes and shorter reviews in the American Political Science 
Review, Vol. IX, No. 1, 2 and 3. February to August, 1915. 

Professor Clarence Errol Ferrec: 

" Untersuchungsmethoden fiir die Leistungsfahigkeit des Augcs be 
verschiedenen Beleuchtungssystemen, und eine vorlaufige Untersuchung 
iiber die Ursachen unangenehmer optischer Empfindungen." Zeitschrift 
fiir Sinnesphysiologie, Vol. XLIX, pp. 59-78. 1915. 

"A Preliminary Study of the Deficiencies of the Method of Flicker 
for the Photometry of Lights of Different Color." Psychological Review, 
Vol. XXII, pp. 110-162. 1915. 

"The Efficiency of the Eye Under Different Conditions of Lighting: 
The Effect of Varying the Distribution Factors and Intensity." Trans- 
actions of the Illuminating Engineering Society, Vol. X, pp. 407-448. 1915. 

"Further Experiments on the Efficiency of the Eye Under Different 
• Conditions of Lighting." Ihid., pp. 449-504. 

"Some Experiments on the Eye with Inverted Reflectors of Different 
Densities." Series of Convention Papers, Ninth Annual Convention of 
the Illuminating Engineering Society, 35 pp. 1915. 

"Resume of Experiments on Efficiency of the Eye Under Different 
Conditions of Illumination." Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and 
Scientific Methods. (In Press, submitted June, 1915, will appear November 
11, 1915.) 

"A. New Method of Heterochromatic Photometry." Psychological 
Review. (In Press, submitted. June, 1915). 

"The Method of FUcker for the Photometry of Lights of Different 
Color, I." Pkilosophical Magazine. (In Press, submitted September 20, 
1915.) 

"The Method of Flicker for the Photometry of Lights of Different 
Color, II." Philosophical Magazine. (In Press, submitted September 20, 
1915.) 

"A Spectroscopic Apparatus for the Investigation of the Color Sensi- 
tivity of the Retina, Central and Peripheral." Journal of Experimental 
Psychology. (In Press, submitted September, 1915.) 

"A Substitute for an Artificial Pupil." Journcd of Experimental 
Psychology. (In Press, submitted September, 1915.) 

"The Deficiencies of the Method of Flicker for the Photometry of 
Lights of Different Color." Transactions of the Illuminating Engineering 
Society. (In Press, submitted April, 1915.) 

Discussion — "The Retinal Sensibilities Related to Illuminating 
Engineering." Transactions of the Illuminating Engineering Society. (Sub- 
mitted September, 1915.) 

Discussion. — "Vision and Brightness of SuiTOundings." Transactions 
of the Illuminating Engineering Society. (Submitted September, 1915.) 



126 

Discussion. — "A Method for Studying the Behavior of the Eye Under 
Different Conditions of Illumination." Transactions oj the Illuminating 
Engineering Society. (Submitted September, 1915.) 

Answer to Discussions. — "Some Experiments on the Eye with In- 
verted Reflectors of Different Densities." Transactions of the Illuminating 
Engineering Society. (Submitted September, 1915.) 

Professor Frederick Hutton Getman: 

"The Reproducibility of the Cadmium Electrode," with Vernette 
Lois Gibbons. Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. XXXVII. 
pp. 953-970. 1915. 

Professor Georgiana Goddard King: 

"French Figure-Sculpture on Some Early Spanish Churches." Amer- 
ican Journal of Archaeology, 2nd Ser., Vol. XIX, No. 3, pp. 250-267. 

Professor Susan Myra Kingsbury: 

"Industrial Home Work in Massachusetts." Department of Research. 
Women's Educational and Industrial Union. Boston. Preface by Susan 
M. Kingsbury, pp. xxxi, 191, 8vo. Boston, 1915. 

"The War." The Simmons Quarterly, November, 1914. 

Professor Agathe Lasch: 

"Die Mittelniederdeutsche Zei'dehnung." Beitrdge zur Geschichte 
der deutschen Sprache und Literatur, pp. 304-330, 8vo. Halle. 1915. 

Book Review: 

H. Brandes's "Dat Narrenschip von Hans von Ghetelen." Modern 
Language Notes, pp. 186-189, 4to. Baltimore. The Johns Hopkins 
Press. June, 1915. 

Professor James H. Leuba: 

"William James and Immortality." Journal of Philosophy, Psy- 
chology and Scientific Methods, Vol. XII, pp. 409-416. 1915. 

"The Task and the Method of Social Psychology." Psychological 
Bulletin, Vol. XI, pp. 445-448. December, 1914. 

Professor Arthur Russell Moore: 

"An Analysis of Experimental Edema in Frogs." A7nerican Journal 
of Physiology, Vol. 37, pp. 220-229. Baltimore, Md. May, 1915. 

"On the Rhythmical Susceptibility of Developing Sea Urchin Eggs 
to Hypertonic Sea Water." Biological Bulletin, Vol. 28, pp. 253-259. 
Lancaster, Pa. May, 1915, 



127 



Dr. Gertrude Rand: 

"A Preliminary Study of the Deficiencies of the Method of Flicker 
for the Photometry of Lights of Different Color." Psychological Review, 
Vol. XXII, pp. 110-162. 1915. 

"The Efficiency of the Eye Under Different Conditions of Lighting: 
The Effect of Varying the Distribution Factors and Intensity." Trans- 
actions oj the Illuminatinc/ Engineering Society, Vol. X, pp. 407-448. 1915. 

"Further Experiments on the Efficiency of the Eye Under Different 
Conditions of Lighting." Ibid., pp. 449-504. 1915. 

"Some Experiments on the Eye with Inverted Reflectors of Differ- 
ent Densities." Series of Convention Papers, Ninth Annual Convention 
of the Illuminating Engineering Society, 35 pp. 1915. 

"Resume of Experiments on Efficiency of the Eye Under Different 
Conditions of Illumination." Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and 
Scientific Methods. (In Press, submitted June, 1915, will appear Novem- 
ber 11, 1915). 

"A New Method of Heterochromatic Photometry." Psychological 
Review. (In Press, submitted June, 1915). 

"The Method of Flicker for the Photometry of Lights of Different 
Color, I." Philosophical Magazine. (In Press, submitted September 20, 
1915.) 

"The Method of Flicker for the Photometry of Lights of Different 
Color, II." Philosophical Magazine. (In Press, submitted September 
20, 1915.) 

"A Spectroscopic Apparatus for the Investigation of the Color Sen- 
sitivity of the Retina, Central and Peripheral." Journal of Experimental 
Psychology. (In Press, submitted September, 1915.) 

"A Substitute for an Artificial Pupil." Journal of Experimental 
Psychology. (In Press, submitted September, 1915.) 

"The Deficiencies of the Method of FHcker for the Photometry of 
Lights of Different Color." Transactions of the Illuminating Engineering 
Society. (In Press, submitted April, 1915.) 

Dr. Eunice Morgan Schenck: 

"French Verb Forms." 32 pp., 12mo. D. C. Heath & Co. Boston. 
1915. 

Dr. Edna Aston Shearer: 

"Hume's Place in Ethics." Bryn Maivr College Monographs, Mono- 
graph Series, Vol. XVII, 86 pp., 8vo. Bryn Mawr, Pa. 1915. 

Professor William Roy Smith: 

"Suffrage in the South." Studies in Southern History and Politics, 
pp. 229-256. Columbia University Press. New York, N. Y. 1914. 



128 

Dr. Benjamin Franklin Wallis: 

"The Geology and Economic Value of the Wapanucka Limestone of 
Oklahoma." Bulletin of the Oklahoma Geological Survey. (In Press, 
■accepted July 1, 1915.) 

Professor Arthur Leslie Wheeler: 

"Catullus as an Elegist." American Journal of Philology, Vol. 
XXVI, pp. 155-184. 1915. 

Book Review: 

C. E. Bennett's "Syntax of Early Latin," Vol. II. Classical Weekly, 
Vol. VIII, pp. 213-215.^ 1915. 

Publications by Students. 
Gertrude Hildreth Campbell: 

"Chaucer's Prophecy in 1586." Modern Language Notes, Vol. XXIX, 
pp. 195-196. 1914. 

"The Swinish Multitude." Ibid. Vol. XXX, pp. 161-164. 1914. 

"The Middle EngMsh Evangelie." Publications of the Modern Lan- 
guage Association, Vol. XXX, pp. 529-613. 1915. 

Charlotte D'Evelyn: 

"Bede's Death Song." Modern Language Notes, Vol. XXX, p. 31 
1915. 

"Sources of the Arthur Story in Chester's Love's Martyr." Journal 
of English and Germanic Philology, Vol. XIV, pp. 75-88. 1915. 

Eleanor Shipley Duckett : 

"Studies in Ennius." Dissertation. Bryn Mawr Monographs, Mono- 
graph Series, Vol. XVIII, 78 pp., O. Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. 1915. 

Edith Fahnestock: 

"A Study of the Sources and Composition of the Old French Lai 
D'Haveloc." Dissertation. 138 pp., 8vo. The Marion Press, Jamaica 
Queensborough, N. Y. 1915. 

Vernette Lois Gibbons: 

"The Reproducibility of the Cadmium Electrode," with Professor 
Frederick Hutton Getman. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 
Vol. XXXVII, pp. 953-970. 1915. 

Janet Tucker Howell: 

"The Index of Refraction of Gases." Physical Review, N. S., Vol. 
VI, No. 2, pp. 81-93. August, 1915. 



129 



Gertrude Longbottom: 

The Secular Acceleration of the Moon's Mean Motion as Determined 
from the Occupations in the Almagest. By J. K. Fotheringham, M.A., 
D.Litt., and Gertrude Longbottom. Monthly Nolices oj the Royal 
Astronomical Society, Vol. LXXV, No. 5, pp. 377-394. March, 1915. 

Adah Blanche Roe: 

" Anna Owena Hovers, a poetess of the seventeenth century." Disser- 
tation. Bryn Mawr College Monographs, Monograph Series, Vol. XIX, 
128 pp., O. Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. 1915. 

Edna Aston Shearer : 

"Hume's Place in Ethics." Dissertation. Bryn Mawr College 
Monographs, Monograph Series, Vol. XVll. 86 pp., O. Bryn Mawr, 
Pennsylvania. 1915. 

Florence Donnell White: 

"Voltaire's Essay on Epic Poetry. A Studj^ and an Edition." Dis- 
sertation, vii, 168 pp.. Svo. Albany, N. Y. 1915. 



VIII. 

Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1914-15. 



Department. 



Greek. 



Latin . 



Course. 



Elementary Greek, Grammar, 
Compcsition and Reading. . . 

Plato and Composition, minor. 

Euripides, Herodotus and Com- 
position, minor 

Homer, minor 

Demosthenes, major 

Thucydides, major 

ArLstophanes, major 

Sophocles, major 

History of Greek Literature, 
major 

Euripides, post-major 

Sophocles and Bacchylides, 
post-major 

Herodotus, post-major 

Greek Prose Composition 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Attic Tragedy .... 

Seminary in Plato 

Greek Journal Club 



Cicero, minor, Div. A, B 

Cicero, minor, Div. B, C 

Cicero, minor, Div. C, A 

Terence, minor, Div. B, C . . . . 

Terence, minor, Div. C, B. . . . 

Terence, minor, Div. A, B. . . . 

Horace, minor, Div. A, C, B. . . 

Horace, minor, Div. C, B, A. . . 

Horace, minor, Div. B, A, C. . . 

Tacitus, major 

Latin Comedy, major 

History of Latin Literature 
major 

Roman Life, elective 

Roman Elegy, post-major 

Life and Works of Vergil, post- 
major 

Roman Prose of the Empire, 
post-major 

Latin Prose Composition . . . 



Graduate Courses 
Seminary in Roman Elegy . 



Seminary in Roman Literature 
Latin Journal Club 



Instructor. 



Miss Kirk 
Dr. Sanders 

Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Wright 
Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Sanders 

Dr. Wright 
Dr. Sanders 

Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Sanders 



Dr. Sanders 
Dr. Wright 
Dr. Sanders and 
Dr. Wright 



Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Ferguson 
Dr. Swindler 
Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Ferguson 
Dr. Swindler 
Dr. Frank 
Dr. Ferguson 
Dr. Swindler 
Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Wheeler 

Dr. Frank 
Dr. Frank 
Dr. Wheeler 

Dr. Frank 

Dr. Frank 
Dr. Frank 



Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Frank 
Dr. Wheeler 
Dr. Frank 
Dr. Ferguson 
Dr. Swindler 



Hours 

weekly. 



If fort- 
nightly 

3. . 
3.. 
3. . 
3. . 
3.. 
3.. 
2. 
2.'. 

2. . 
3.. 

3. . 



IHort 
nightly 



No. IN Class. 



1st 
Sam. 



2nd 
Sena. 



(130) 



131 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1914-15. — Continued . 



Department. 



COOUSE. 



Instructor. 



Hours 

weekly. 



No. IN Class. 



1st 
Sem. 



2nd 
Sem. 



German . 



History of English Literature, 

First Year, required 

Elocution, First Year, required 

English Composition, First 

Year, required 



History of English Literature, 
Second Year, required 

Elocution, Second Year, re- 
qviired 

English Composition, Second 
Year, required 



Spelling Class 

Nineteenth Century Critics 
minor 

Middle English Romances 
major 

Anglo-Saxon, minor 

English Poetry, minor 

English Drama, major 

Descriptive Writing, elective . . 

Narrative Writing, elective. . . , 

Daily Themes, elective 

Argumentation, elective 

A Study of Poetics, elective . . , 

Reading of Prose Authors, elec- 
tive 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Middle English. . . 

Seminary in Donne and Mil- 
ton 

Beowulf 

Seminary in Elizabethan Lit- 
erature 

Seminary in English Literature 

English Historical Grammar. . 

English Diction 

English Journal Club 



Miss IDonnelly 
Mr. King 

Dr. Crandall 
Dr. Langdon 
Miss Hammer 
Miss Dunn 
Dr. Brewster 
Miss Crane 

Miss Donnelly 

Mr. King 

Dr. Crandall 
Dr. Shearer 
Dr. Langdon 
Miss Hammer 
Miss Dunn 
Dr. Brewster 
Mi.ss Hammer 

Dr. Chew 

Dr. C.F.Brown 
Dr. C. F. Brown 
Dr. Chew 
Dr. Chew 
Dr. Langdon 
Dr. Crandall 
Dr. Crandall 
Miss Shearer 
Dr. Langdon 

Mr. King 



Dr. C. F. Brown 

Miss Donnelly 
Dr. C. F. Brown 

Dr. Hatcher 
Dr. Chew 
Dr. C. F. Brown 
Mr. King 
Dr. C. F. Brown 
Miss Donnelly 
Dr. Hatcher 
Dr. Chew- 



Elementary German, Grammar 

and Translation 

Critical Reading and Grammar 

and Composition, minor. . . . 
History of German Literature 

minor 

History of German Literature 

and Selected Reading, major 

Faust (2d part), major 

Prose Composition, major 

Advanced Prose Composition, 

elective 



Misi 

Dr. 

Dr. 

Dr. 
Dr. 
Dr. 



3 JefTers 

Lasch 

Jessen 

Jessen 
Jessen 
Lasch 



Dr. Lasch 



U fort- 
nightly 



100. 



.22. 
.14. 
.16. 
.19. 
.17. 
.10. 

.87. 

.97. 



.19. 
.14. 
.18. 
.17. 
.18. 
.14. 



.15. 
. 9. 
.21. 
. 5. 

. 7. 



,. 9. 



132 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1914-15. — Continued. 



Department. 


Course. 


Instructor. 


Hours 
weekly. 


No. I^ 


Class. 


1st 
Sem. 


2nd 
Sem. 




German Oral Reading for Se- 


Miss Jeffers 
Dr. Jessen 
Dr. Jessen 

Dr. Lasch 

Dr. Jessen 
Dr. Jessen and 
Dr. Lasch 

Dr. Lasch 
Dr. Lasch 
Dr. Lasch 

Dr. Lasch 

Miss Thayer 
Dr. Beck 

Dr. Schenck 

Miss Thayer 

Dr. Giroud 
Dr. Beck 
Dr. Giroud 
Dr. Schenck 
Dr. Beck 

Dr. Schenck 

Dr. Beck 

Dr. Holbrook 
Dr. Holbrook 

Dr. DeHaan 
Dr. Holbrook 
Dr. Beck 
Dr. Schenck 

Dr. Holbrook 
Dr. Holbrook 

Dr. DeHaan 

Dr. DeHaan 
Dr. DeHaan 

Dr. DeHaan 
Dr. DeHaan 


... 1. , 
... 2. . 
... 1. . 

... 1. . 

... 2.. 

iHort- 
nightly 

2. . 
'.'.'. 1.'. 
... 2. . 

. .. 1.. 

. .. 5.. 
... 2.. 

... 2i, 

... 2.. 
. .. 1. . 
... 2.. 
. .. 1.. 
... 3. . 

. .. 2. . 

... 3.. 

. . . 3. . 
. .. 2, . 

. . . 11. 
fort- 
nightly 

... 5. . 
... 2 . .• 

. .. 5. . 

... 5. . 
... 3. . 

. ,. 2. . 
... 3.. 


... 4. . 
... 5.. 
... 2. . 

... 3.. 

... 1.. 
... 1. . 

2. . 
'.'.'. l'.'. 
... 1. . 

. .. 1. . 

... 1. . 

...28.. 

...28.. 

...28. , 

. ..17. , 
...21.. 
...19.. 
... 7.. 
. . .11. . 

. .. 5. . 

... 5.. 

. .. 4. . 
. .. 4. . 

. . . 4. . 

...10.. 
. .. 4. . 

...19.. 

. .. 4.. 

. .. 3.. 
. .. 1. . 


1 . 




German Literature, post-major 
German Reading, post-major. . 
Middle High German, post- 


... 5.. 
... 1. . 

... 3.. 




Graduate Courses 

Seminary in German Literature 


... 1.. 


Teutonic 




... 1. . 






... 1. . 




Old Norse 


1 




History of Modern High Ger- 


... 1. . 


French 


Elementary French, Grammar 


... 1. . 




French Essayists, minor 

French Reading and Composi- 


...27.. 
. . .27. . 




French Phonetics Practise, 


. ..27. . 




History of French Literature 

and Collateral Reading, major 

French Composition, major. . . 

French Drama, major 

French Phonetics, elective 


...19.. 
...20.. 
...22.. 
... 5.. 
. .. 9.. 




French Lyric Poetry, post- 
major 






Graduate Courses 

Seminary in French Mediaeval 


... 7.. 




Old French Philology, First 


. . . 2.. 






. . . 3. . 




Romance Languages Journal 
Club 




Italian 




... 4.. 
. . . 9.. 




Italian, major 


. . . 3.. 






. . . 20 . . 




Spanish, Literary History, Com- 
position and Critical Read- 
ing, major 

Spanish, post-major 

Graduate Courses 

Spanish Grammar 

Spanish Literature 


... 4.. 
... 2.. 

... 2.. 

... 1.. 













133 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1914-15.— Continued. 



Department. 



Comparative 
Literature . 



Semitic Lan- 
guages AND 

Biblical Lit- 
erature .... 



The Pastoral, major 

Forms of the Drama, elective . 



Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Comparative Lif 



History 



Course. 



New Testament Biography 

elective 

Old Testament Canon, elective 

Graduate Courses 
Comparative Semitic Grammar 
Semitic Seminary, Hebrew .... 
Semitic Seminary, Epigraphy. . 

Hebrew Literature 

Assyrian, Aramaic and Ethiopic 

Palestinian Geography and 

Archaeology 



History of Europe from 1815, 
minor, Div. A, B 

History of Europe from 1815 
minor, Div. B, A 

History of the Reformation 
minor 

History of the Middle Ages, 
minor 

History of Europe in the 
Period of the Renaissance, 
major 

History of the French Revolu- 
tion, Napoleon, major 

History of the United States, 
1865-191.3, major 

History of British Imperialism, 
major 

Ancient History, Oriental His- 
tory, minor 

Ancient History, Classical His- 
tory, minor 

Ancient History, Fifth Century 
Athens, major 

Ancient History, First Century 
Roman Empire, major. . . 

Ancient History, Historians of 
Rome, major 

American Constitutional His- 
tory, post-major 

History of England under the 
Tudors, post-major 

England since 1714, post-major 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in English and Euro- 
pean History 

Seminary in American History 

Historical Method and Bib- 
liography 



Instructor. 



Hours 

weekly. 



Dr. Hatcher 
Dr. Hatcher 



Dr. Hatcher 



Dr. Barton 
Dr. Barton 



Dr. Barton 
Dr. Barton 
Dr. Barton 
Dr. Barton 
Dr. Barton 

Dr. Barton 



Mr. Haring 
Dr. Leake 
Dr. W.R.Smith 
Dr. Leake 

Mr. Haring 

Dr. Leake 

Dr. W.R.Smith 

Dr. W.R.Smith 

Dr. Barton 

Dr. Ferguson 

Dr. Ferguson 

Dr. Ferguson 

Dr. Ferguson 

Dr. W.R.Smith 

Mr. Haring 
Dr. Leake 



Mr. Haring I . . . 3 . 
Dr. W.R.Smith I. .,2. 



No. in Class. 



1st 
Sem. 



Dr. Leake 



..30. 
.32. 
.52. 
.22. 



.27. 
.24. 
.15. 
.19. 
. 3. 



2nd 
Sem. 



.33. 



.27. 
.51. 
.22. 

.23. 
.11. 
.25. 

.28. 
.18. 
.14. 



134 



Tahular Statement of Courses of Instruction given in 
1914-15. — Continued. 









No. in 


Class. 


Department. 


Course. •■ Instructor. 

1 


Hours 






weekly. 


1st 


2nd 










Sem. 


Sem. 




Ancient History, The Hellen- 












istic Age Dr. Ferguson 


... 2.. 


... 1. . 


... 1.. 




History Journal Club 


Mr. Haring 
Dr. W. R. Smith 












Dr. Leake 


... 2. . 
fort- 
nightly 


... 6. . 


. .. 6. . 


Economics and 












POMTICS .... 


Introduction to Economics, 












minor, Div. A, B 


Dr. M.P.Smith 


... 3.. 


...28.. 


. ..24.. 




Introduction to Economics, 












minor, Div. A, B iMr. Dewey 


... 3.. 


...23.. 


...30.. 




Political Practice, minor JDr. Fenwick 


. .. 2.. 


...39.. 


...39.. 




Sociology, minor Mr. Dewey 


... 2.. 


...24.. 


...22.. 




History of Economic Thought,! 










major .Dr. M. P. Smith 


... 3.. 


...16. . 


. ..17.. 




Political Theory, major Dr. Fenwick 


... 2.. 


. . .21 . . 


. . .22. . 




Private Law, elective 


Dr. Fenwick 


... 1.. 




...19.. 




American Social Problems, 












post-major 


Dr. M. P. Smith 


... 2. . 


... 6. . 


... 6.. 




International Law, post-major. 


Dr. Fenwick 


... 3.. 


... 9.. 


... 9.. 




Statistics, post-major 


Mr. Dewey 


. .. 3.. 


2. . 


2. . 




Graduate Courses 












Seminary in Economics 


Dr. M.P.Smith 


... 2.. 


... 3.. 


... 3.. 




Seminary in Politics 


Dr. Fenwick 


. .. 2. . 


... 6. . 


. .. 5. . 




Economic Journal Club 


Dr. M.P.Smith 
Dr. Fenwick 
and Mr. Dewey 


. .. 2.. 
fort- 
nightly 


... 3. . 


... 2. . 


Philosophy. . . 


History of Philosophy, req\iired, 












Div. A, B 


Dr. Wilm 


... 3. . 


....33.. 


...34.. 




Div. B, C 


Dr. Fisher 


... 3.. 


. ..34. . 


. ...32. . 




Div. C, A 


Dr. Shearer 


... 3.. 


. . .34. . 


...33.. 




Modern Philosophical Classics, 












mmor 

Elementary Logic, minor 

Philosophical Problems, minor . 


Dr. Wilm 
Dr Wilm 


,3 


. . .12 






. . 2. . 




. ..11. . 




Dr. Fisher 


. .. 2. . 


...10.. 






Modern Philosophical Theories, 












minor 


Dr. Fisher 


... 3.. 




. ..11. . 




German Idealism, major 

Plato and Aristotle, major. . . . 


Dr Wilm 


. . 2 


9 






Dr. Fisher 


... 3.. 


... 4. . 






Elementary Ethics, major 

Comte, Mill and Spencer, major 


Dr Wilm 


3 








Dr. Fisher 


... 2.. 




... 9.. 




Graduate Courses 












Seminary in Philosophical 












Systems 


Dr. Wilm 


... 3.. 


... 3.. 


... 3.. 




Ethical Seminary 


Dr. Fisher 


... 2.. 


... 3.. 


... 2.. 




Philosophical Journaj Club. . . . 


Dr. Wilm 

Dr. Fisher and 

Dr. Shearer 


... u. 

fort- 
nightly 


. .. 3. . 


... 3.. 


Psychology . . . 


Psychology, required 

Psychology of Instinct, Emo- 


Dr. Wilm 


. .. 2. . 


..105.. 


..105.. 








2 




. ..24. . 




Animal Psychology, minor .... 
ExperimentalPsychoIogy, minor 


Dr. Kellogg 
Dr. Ferree 


. . 2. . 


. . .30. . 






. .. 3. . 


...29.. 


...27.. 






and Dr. Rand 








■ 


Applied Psychology, major. . . . 


Dr. Kellogg 


... 3.. 


...19.. 


...18.. 




Educational Psychology, major 


Dr. Gordon 


. . . 2. . 


. ..12. . 


. ..11.. 




Experimental Psychology, elec- 












tive 


Dr. Ferree 


... 1. . 


.. .. 1. . 


. . . 2. . 



135 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1914-io- — Continued. 



Dep.^rtment. 


Course. 


Instructor. 


Hours 
weekly. 


No. IN Class. 


1st 
Sem. 


2nd 
Sem. 




Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Psychology 

Systematic Psychology 

Psychological Journal Club .... 

Education, elective 

Graduate Course 
Seminary in Methods of Teach- 
ing 


Dr. Kellogg 
Dr. Ferree 
Dr. Kellogg 
Dr. Ferree 
and Dr. Rand 

Dr. Gordon 

Dr. Gordon 
and Dr. Castro 
Dr. Gordon 
Dr. Rand 
Dr. Gordon 
and Dr. Castro 

Mr. Carpenter 

Mr. Carpenter 
Dr. Swindler 
Mr. Carpenter 

Dr. Swindler 

Mr. Carpenter 
Mr. Carpenter 

Miss King • 
Miss King 
Miss King 

Miss King 

Dr. Scott 

Dr. Conner 
Dr. Scott 
Dr. Conner 

Dr. Conner 

Dr. Scott 

Dr. Scott 

Dr. Conner 

Dr. Scott 
Dr. Conner 

Dr. Scott 
Dr. Conner 


. . . 2. . 
.3 


. . . 1. . 

4 


. . . I. . 
,3 


Education .... 


. .. 1. . 
2. . 

2 . . 

2 
'.'.'. 2.'. 
... 1. . 

. . . 3. . 

2 

'.'.'. 2.'. 
... 2. . 

9 


. . . 5. . 
. ..16. . 

... 5. . 

. .. 3. . 
. .. 2. . 
... 2. . 

. ..10. . 
. .. i. . 


... 5.. 
...13.. 

... 5.. 
. 4 






1 


Classic.\l 
Arch.k- 

OLOGY 


Education Journal Club 

Greek and Roman Architec- 
ture, minor 

Greek and Roman Minor Arts, 
minor 

Greek Painting, minor 

Roman World, minor 

Rome, Its Buildings and Art, 
minor 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Archaeology 

Archaeological Journal Club . . . 

Italian Renaissance Painting, 

minor 

Gothic Architecture, minor. . . . 
Renaissance Sculpture, major. . 

Graduate Courses 

Seminary in Modern Painting . 

Analytical Conies, minor 

Differential and Integral Calcu- 
lus, minor 

Trigonometry, minor 

Theory of Equations, minor. . . 

Differential and Integral Calcu- 
lus, Theory of Equations and 
Differential Equations, major 

Analytical Geometry, History 
of Mathematics, major 

Fundamental Theorems of 
Mathematics, elective 

Descriptive Astronomy, elec- 


. .. 1.. 

...20.. 
...13.. 




. .10. . 


. ..17 


Hl.STORY AND 

Art 

Mathematics . 


. . . 2. . 
li fort- 
nightly 

. .. 3.. 
... 2.. 
... 2.. 

2. . 
... 3.. 
. . . 3. . 


. .. 4. . 
. . . 2. . 

. ..24.. 
. .. 6. . 
. .. 1. . 

... 2.. 
. . . 19 . . 


... 5. . 
... 2.. 

...24.. 
... 7.. 
... 1.. 

. .. 2.. 
. . .13. . 




... 2. . 
... 2. . 

... 5. . 
... . . 
... 1. . 

... 2. . 

... 2. . 
... 2. . 

2 
'.'.'. 2.'. 


. ..20.. 

... 7. . 

... 6.. 

... 3.. 

... 5. . 
... 2.. 

... 1. . 

... 2. . 


;:;i3;! 

...10.. 
. .. 8.. 
... 2. . 




Special Topics in Geometry, 


... 5. . 




Theory of Numbers, post-major 

Graduate Courses 

Topology of Plane Curves 

Differential Geometry 


... 1.. 

... 1. . 
... 2.. 



136 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1914-15. — Continued. 



Department. 



Physics. 



Chemisthy. 



Geology. 



COUBSE. 



Heat, Sound and Properties of 
Matter, minor 

Light, Electricity and Magnet- 
ism, minor 

Laboratory Work, minor 



Laboratory Work, minor. 



Theory of Light, Mechanics 
major 

Heat, Electricity and Magnet- 
ism, major 

Laboratory Work, major 



Laboratory Work, major 

Spectroscopy, post-major 

Graduate Courses 
Radioactivity and Electron 

Theory 

Physical Journal Club 



Introduction to General Chem- 
istry, minor 

Chemistry of Metals, minor. . . 
Laboratory Work, minor 



Instructor. 



Laboratory Work, minor 

Theoretical Chemistry, major. . 

Organic Chemistry, major 

Laboratory Work, major 

Laboratory Work, major 

Inorganic Chemistry, post- 
major 



Graduate Courses 

Advanced Organic Chemistry . . 

Seminary in Inorganic Chem- 
istry 

Seminary in Physical Chem- 
istry 

Physical Chemistry 

Chemical Journal Club 



Physiography, minor 

Historical Geology, minor. . . 

Field Work and Laboratory 
Work , minor ' 

Field Work and Laboratory 
Work, minor 

Geologic and Geographic Con- 
trol, elective 

Meteorology, elective. 

Petrography, post-major. . . . 

Mineralogy, post-major 

Invertebrate Palaeontology, 
post-major 

Vertebrate Palaeontology, post- 
major 



Dr. Huff 



Dr. Howell 

Dr. Huff and 
Miss Gilroy 
Dr. Howell and 
Miss Gilroy 

Dr. Howell 

Dr. Huff 
Dr. Howell and 
Miss Gilroy 
Dr. Huff and 
Miss Gilroy 
Dr. Howell 



Dr. Huff 
Dr. Huff and 
Dr. Howell 



Dr. Brunei 
Dr. Harrison 
Dr. Brunei and 
Dr. Harrison 
Dr. Harrison 
Dr. Getman 
Dr. Brunei 
Dr. Getman 
Dr. Brunei 

Dr. Getman 



Dr. Brunei 

Dr. Getman 

Dr. Getman 
Dr. Getman 
Dr. Brunei 
Dr. Getman 
and Dr. Harri- 
son 



Bascom 
T. C. Brown 

Bascom 

T.C.Brown 

T. C. Brown 
T.C.Brown 
Bascom 
Bascom 

T.C.Brown 

T.C.Brown 



Hours 
weekly. 



. 3. 



No. IN Class. 



1st 
Sem. 



.38. 



.38. 



.20. 



.20. 

Ah'. 

.15'. 



.23. 
.23. 



137 



Tabular Statement of the Courses of Instruction given in 
1914-15. — Concluded. 



Department. 


Course. 


Instructor. 


Hours 

weekly. 


No. IN 


Class. 


1st 
Sem. 


2nd 
Sem. 




Graduate Courses 


Dr. Bascom 
Dr. Bascom 
Dr. T.C.Brown 

Dr. T.C.Brown 
Dr. T.C.Brown 
Dr. Bascom 
and Dr. T. C. 
Brown 

Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Moore 
Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Moore and 
Miss Pinney 
Dr. Moore 

Dr. Tennent 
and Dr. Moore 
Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Moore and 
Miss Pinney 
Dr. Tennent 

Dr. Tennent 

Dr. Tennent 

Dr. Tennent 

Dr. Moore 

Dr. Moore 

Dr. Tennent 
Dr. Moore 
Dr. Tennent 
and Dr. Moore 


... 3.. 
... 2., 
... 3.. 

... 1. . 
... (5. . 

... 1. . 

... 3 . . 
3 


... 1.. 
... 1. . 
... 1.. 

... 1.. 
... 3. . 

... 3.. 

...47.. 


1 






. 1 






. . . 1 . 




Seminary in Stratigraphic Geo- 


... 1. . 


Biology 


Topographic Mapping 

Geological Journal Club 

General Biology, minor 

General Biology, minor 

Laboratory Work, minor 


... 3.. 
... 3.. 

45 




... 6.. 
. .. 3.. 

... 3.. 

. .. 6. . 

... 3.. 

. .. 2. . 

. .. 1.. 


. ..47. . 
. . .12 


...45.. 




General Zoology, Anatomy, 
major 


. ..12. . 
... 4. . 

... 8.: 
... 1. . 
. .. 1. . 

. .. 4. . 
... 6.. 

. .. 1. . 
. . . 3 . , 

... 2.. 






Laboratory Work, major 

Theoretical Biology, elective . . 
Embryology of Vertebrates, 


...13.. 

. ..13.. 
... 3.. 

. . . 8 




Special Laboratory Work in 

Embryology, post-major. . . . 

Special Laboratory Work in 


. .. 1. . 
. . . 1. 




The Central Nervous System, 
post-major 


. . 3 




Physiological Chemistry, post- 


. . 6 




Graduale Courses 

Cytology 

Physiology 

Biological Journal Club 


. .. 1. . 
... 3.. 

... 2.. 



138 






CO 



5S 

•2 to 



<» 



Co 
00 



^'-^ 



02 ^ 



s ^ 



CO ^S; 



00 



B 




•A3o[0!a 


oc<ii.C)t^<y3soc<ic^i^-cO'*oc:coc<it^<N':DC5:oQO»ir?'C^ooooooo(Mt^ 


■XSoioar) 














•Aj^simaijQ 


0'XJcoO'-H■<:J4rH^ou^l-Hcoco»Ol^OlO"0^'rt^c^lOl'r)Ol-^^^^ccccoool.-(^ 




•cjinpniaTiiPTAT c^icsc^c<:ico>o-^r^c<i-^Ti<cocccoco**coos**oaocoec(Mcccocoo-*Oi 






•^jy JO AlDJSIJJ 












puB 'jjv iBoissBjo 1 : : : : : ■'^^ : -SSSmSTOcSoS jiSMotSoSSS^KS 












CO ■ CO CN CQ CO CO T-i (M (M CS CO (N CVJ (M 










■A§o\o\\3As^ 






^H 1—1 


•Aqdosoitqj 


.cn»ocoocoooooc<jt^t^csio^'-iOOiOit^r^oo».oOM'<*<c^'^o»oCi 
■ i-iTj<r-(csi'-tcsic^»o»ocot--ooojcooo<C'<r>'*'*<C)cO"*"»*«'*iou^'*cvi 


•AVB^J 






::::::::::::::^^^^'^:'^^'^^:::::: 


pu.soSaa .; :2^^gS:SggSSSSfi§|5S2feKg§§g2gg^ 


■Xio^siH "12 :SSS^feSSgi?§S§^§g§g222-S2Sgg2 


put: sdSunSuB^ oi^iraag 


^ rt^rtrt^T-H ■ rt< CS) CO »C »0 -^ CO •* CMCO 






aAi^BJUclnioo 










•ilsiuBdg 


■ CM TtH tH i-H 1— 1 i-H ^ lO 05 ■ 50 '^ ^ Tf< ^H iO ■^ CO CD CD 'rt< CM CD -* -rj^ '<t< CO GO 


•UBIIB^J 


CM ^CM ii-HTHtOOOOOOCO-^OOOsOOOcDOSCnOt^cOeOt^t-lOOGOOS''*'* 


•ASoiO[!qd: aQOTUloy; -'^'n ; ; --h^^o wtc^oc^ -c^ci -(N • us m « <m Tt< « co rj. us 


•qouaaj 2"SSS?5gggSgt2SgSSS§g§S2ggn§§S2§S 


•XaoiOIiqd araO!jn3X 1 |'-'^-»<-»<M-icqeo«=-.«-Ht:^cci<rqrocowm«5to>ocqtDcci<c-).mcq 


•nBuuaQ 


|>.C^CMO'rt<CDCDOi— liOeO'^cOCMCOOCOiO'— "COt~^I>.i— i|>-C005t^05CSCO 
^'rJ4»0-*-^-*C0l:-t-C0(:^ccH:^0000OI:-O0icDcD00cDcDcDi0-*OC0 


■uoxBg-oiSny 


■C0l>-0iC000Oii0Ot^Ci»0»O»OC0t^OC0i0i0'-iCSlOQ0a0[^CCC0^ 


■a.n;..o,nw3ua ??g^fegs§sggg§S|S|mggg|msS|| 


■ni^-B^ 


CO'*0»OCC05iO»-0 0'^00'rJ^OiC0050ir^'*»«-rt^iOCDi005tO^'*'*CO 
^CslCOCOtOiOt^'^OOasOlOOOCM-rt^COCOCOTf^COCOCOCOCMt^^CO'^ 




■5199JO 


oocoococ^icoooTt<»-ii:^oia:^ior^cDi>-crscMCsco^-^cot^<ccDcooi-<** 

COCMCM-^'^TfCOCOTt*iO'»*''^iOCO'^'^COC0"^00-^"^'***'<:J^C0CMCMC0CM'^ 


-i3J'BdaiOQ pa's 'luii^suBg 


:rt^CM CO'-iCM'*Ttl»OCO00CM ^CMCO^CM • C<1 C<1 CM ■ -^ ! rH rH ^ i 


■s^U9pn;g 
JO jaqnmj^ {b;ox 


-r*<'-*t00CDCMCM0iC^C0C0G00l'^Tt^r^C0cDr-cDwOI>-OO'*CDCq0sCM»O 

-rJHCDt^'^CMCOCDO'^OOaiOOCMtOOOascO-^'*'*»OCOCMCMC<)CMW3iiOt^Tt" 

.^r-ii-H^CMCMCMCMCVlcOCOCOCO-^'rJ^'^JI-^Tt*-^'^'*'*'*'^"*'*'* 














cor-^oooso-HOicoTt^iocor^oociO'-HCMco'^tccor^cooiO'^cMcoTt'io 

COOOOOOOCncnoOiCDOiaiOSC?iOOOOOOOOOOO'-''^'-H-HW— 1 
COGOCOCOOOOOOOC»OOaOQOCttC»CreOiODOi ajOsOiOiOlOiOlClOTOlOSClOS 


1885- 
1886- 
1887-] 
1888- 
1889- 
1890- 
1891- 
1892- 
1893- 
1894- 
1895- 
1896- 
1897- 
1898- 
1899- 
1900- 
1901- 
1902- 
1903- 
1904- 
1905- 
1906- 
1907- 
1908- 
1909- 
1910- 
1911- 
1912- 
1913- 
1914- 



X. 



Comparative Table of Graduate and Undergraduate Studenta 
in the Different Departments of the College in 1914-15. 



Depaktment. 



S M 

C 


Per cent of Total 

Number of 
Undergraduates. 

(368). 




36 


9.8 


8 


135 


36.7 


8 


47 


12.8 


8 


257 


69.9 


23 


60 


16.4 


23 


30 


8.2 


3 


67 


18.2 


11 


13 


3.5 


1 


25 


6.8 


3 


4 


1.1 


2 


27 


7.4 


6 


145 


39.4 


10 


106 


27.8 


6 


123 


33.4 


6 


22 


6.0 


6 


157 


42.7 


6 


52 


14.1 


6 


14 


3.8 


9 


39 


10.6 


7 


26 


7.1 


2 


34 


9.2 


5 


40 


10.9 


10 


32 


8.7 


9 


32 


8.7 


3 


69 


18.8 


8 



c S g 



Greek 

Latin 

Latin omitting required * Latin 

English 

English omitting required English 

German 

French 

Itahan 

Spanish 

Comparative Literatiu'e 

Semitic Languages and Bibhcal Literature 

History 

Economics and Pohtics 

Philosophy 

Philosophy omitting required course 

Psycholog}^ 

Psychology omitting required course 

Education 

Archaeology 

History of Art 

Mathematics 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Geology 

Biology 



10.3 

10.3 

10.3 

29.9 

29.9 

3.9 

14.3 

1.3 

3.9 

2.6 

7.7 

12.9 

7.7 

7.7 

7.7 

7.7 

7.7 

11.6 

9.0 

2.6 

6.4 

12.9 

11.6 

3.9 

10.3 



* Minor Latin is required except for the 36 students who take Greek or for the students 
who entered with matriculation Greek. 



(139) 



XI. 



Grades Received in certain Undergraduate Examinations. 



Classes of 60 students or over. 
Semester I, 1914-15. 



Latin. Minor: 

Cicero's Letters 

Horace 

English. General : 

First Year Literature .... 

First Year Composition . . 

First Year Diction 

Second Year Literature . . 

Second Year Composition 

Second Year Diction .... 
History. Minor: 

Europe since 1815 

The Reformation 

Philosophy. Required ... 
Psychology. Required. . . 





Per 








Num- 




Per 


Per 


Per 


ber 


of 


cent 


cent 


cent 


Class. 


High 
Credit. 


of 
Credit. 


of 
Merit. 


of 

Passed. 


80 


7.5 


16.2 


37.5 


32.5 


79 


5.0 


18.9 


40.5 


22.7 


95 


0.0 


11.5 


31.5 


41.0 


93 


0.0 


1.0 


21.5 


51.6 


90 


20.0 


36.6 


27.7 


10.0 


82 


2.4 


10.9 


43.9 


39.0 


80 


0.0 


2.5 


21.2 


53.7 


88 


22.7 


44.3 


28.4 


4.5 


61 


6.5 


36.0 


36.0 


14.7 


50 


12.0 


38.0 


34.0 


12.0 


99 


4.0 


37.3 


31.3 


21.2 


98 


8.1 


37.7 


33.6 


18.3 



Classes of SO or over, but under 60 students. 



Economics. Minor: 

Introduction to Economics 

Politics 

Physics. Minor: 

Mechanics, etc 

Laboratory 

Biology. Minor: 

General Biology 

Laboratory 



49 
39 


10.2 
12.8 


51.0 
43.5 


30.6 
38.4 


6.1 
5.1 


36 
36 


5.5 
2.7 


25.0 
25.0 


33.3 
38.8 


27.7 
33.3 


43 
44 


4.6 
13.6 


41.8 
22.7 


32.5 
31.8 


16.2 
31.8 



Classes of 20 or over, hut under SO students. 



Latin. Post-Major: 

Vergil 

English. Minor: 

Poetry 

French. Minor: 

Essayists 

Reading and Composition 
French. Major: 

Composition 

History. Minor: 

Mediseval History 

History. Major: 

Renaissance 

British Imperialism 

United States 

Economics. Minor: 

Sociology 

Economics. Major: 

Politics 

Psychology. Minor: 

Experimental Psychology . 

Laboratory 

Animal Psychology 

Geology. Minor: 

Physiography 

Laboratory 



21 


23.8 


57.1 


19.0 


0.0 


21 


4.7 


33.3 


42.8 


19.0 


28 
27 


7.1 
14.8 


53.5 
29.6 


25.0 
22.2 


10.7 
25.9 


20 


0.0 


20.0 


25.0 


50.0 


22 


9.0 


36.3 


22.7 


18.1 


23 
22 
25 


0.0 
31.8 
20.0 


17.3 
40.9 
48.0 


69.5 
27.2 
32.0 


13.0 
0.0 
0.0 


22 


13.6 


68.1 


18.1 


0.0 


21 


42.8 


52.3 


4.7 


0.0 


25 
23 
29 


40.0 
30.4 
20.6 


36.0 
56.5 
41.3 


12.0 

8.6 

31.0 


12.0 
4.3 
6.8 


23 
23 


4.3 
0.0 


65.2 
8.6 


13.0 
82.6 


13.0 
4.3 



(140) 



141 



Grades Received in certain Undergraduate Examinations. 
Concluded. 

Classes of SO students or over. 
Semester II, 1914-15. 



Latin. Minor: 

Terence 

Horace 

English. General: 

First Year Literature 

First Year Composition . . . 

First Year Diction 

Second Year Literature . . . 

Second Year Composition. 

Second Year Diction ..... 
History. Minor: 

Europe since 1815 

Economics. Minor: 

Introduction to Economics 
Philosophy. Required. ... 
Psychology. Required. . . . 



Num- 


Per 


Per 


Per 


Per 


ber 


of 


cent 


cent 


cent 


m 

Class. 


High 
Credit. 


of 
Credit. 


of 

Merit. 


of 
Passed. 


76 


5,2 


17.1 


42.1 


28.9 


72 


8.3 


19.4 


33.3 


30.5 


90 


0.0 


13.3 


37.7 


34,4 


91 


0.0 


8.7 


31.8 


47.2 


90 


20.0 


36.0 


27.7 


8.8 


78 


3.8 


12.8 


67.0 


24.3 


7G 


0.0 


7.8 


36.8 


52,6 


88 


21.5 


45.4 


29.5 


3.4 


57 


3.5 


35.0 


36.8 


19.2 


54 


3.7 


35.1 


51.8 


3.7 


95 


4.2 


22.1 


36.8 


28.4 


106 


8.4 


54.7 


27.3 


9.4 



Per 

cent 

of 

Failed. 



6.5 
8.3 

14.4 
12.0 
6.0 
1.2 
2.0 
0.0 

5.2 

5.5 
8.4 
0.0 



Classes of 30 or over, but under 50 students. 



History. Minor: 

Thie Reformation 

Economics. Minor: 

Politics 

Physics. Minor: 

Electricity, etc 

Laboratory 

Biology, Minor: 

Vertebrates and Embryology 

Laboratory 



49 


10.2 


57.1 


28.5 


4.0 


37 


10.8 


56.7 


24.3 


8.1 


35 
35 


5.0 
5.0 


31.4 

22,8 


54.2 
51.4 


8.5 
20.0 


40 
45 


8.0 
0.6 


30.9 
33.3 


32.0 
28.8 


21.7 
31.1 



0.0 
0.0 



0.0 
0.0 



0.0 
0.0 



Classes of 20 or over, hut under 30 students. 



Latin. Post-Major: 

Prose of the Empire 

English. Minor: 

Poetry 

French. Minor: 

Essayists 

Reading and Composition. . . 

Phonetics 

French. Major: 

Romantic Drama 

Spanish. Minor 

History. Major: 

Renaissance , 

British Imperialism 

United States 

Economics. Minor: 

Sociology 

Economics. Major: 

Politics 

Psychology. Minor: 

Experimental Psychology. . . 

Laboratory 

Psychology of Instinct 

History of Art, Minor: 

Italian Renaissance Painting 
Geology. Minor. 

Historical Geology 

Laboratory 



21 


23.8 


38.0 


38,0 


0.0 


20 


5.0 


45.0 


50,0 


0.0 


26 
20 
26 


23.0 
15.3 
15,3 


38.4 
30.7 
23.0 


26.9 

, 30.7 

42.3 


11.5 
7.0 
3.8 


21 
20 


9,5 
30,0 


60.6 
40.0 


19,0 
25.0 


4.7 
5.0 


22 
24 
25 


4,5 
12,5 
24,0 


31.8 
62,5 
48,0 


59.0 
25.0 
28.0 


4.5 
0.0 
0.0 


20 


10,0 


50,0 


40.0 


0.0 


21 


28,5 


42,8 


19.0 


9.5 


25 
22 
23 


10.0 
13,0 
13,0 


52.0 
50.0 

47.8 


28.0 
30.3 
34.7 


4.0 
0.0 
4.3 


21 


0.0 


47.6 


38,0 


14.2 


23 
23 


8,0 
17.3 


52.1 
52.1 


21.7 
26.0 


13.0 
4.3 



0.0 

0.0 

0.0 
15.3 
15.3 

0.0 
0.0 

0.0 
0.0 
0.0 

0.0 

0.0 

0.0 
0.0 
0.0 

0.0 

4.3 
0,0 



XII. 



Group Subjects Selected by the Students Graduating in the 
Years 1906-15. 





1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


1914. 


1915. 


Number in class . . . 


56 


71 


81 


70 


69 


59 


60 


60 


78 


84 


Greek 


8 


4 


10 


10 


8 


9 


1 


5 


3 


3 


Jjatin 


26 
14 


24 


31 
17 


26 
18 


27 
9 


19 
11 


12 
10 


18 
4 


10 
15 


19 


English 


13 


German 


6 

11 

3 


11 

22 
2 


10 
17 

4 


11 

10 

2 


11 

7 
1 


7 

11 




9 

10 

2 


9 

13 

1 


4 

13 

2 


8 


French 


19 


Italian and Spanish 


3 


Spanish 











'^ 


M 


2 


M 


6 


1 


1 


Comparative Lit- 






















eratm-e 




















3 





5 


3 


History 


15 


8 


19 


17 


20 


15 


24 


24 


36 


22 


Ancient History . . . 


























1 


3 


Economics and 






















Politics 


18 


12 


23 


19 


23 


17 


25 


21 


34 


22 


Philosophy and 






















Psychology 


5 


12 


12 


5 


5 


5 


6 


2 


9 


5 


Philosophy 





U 























3 


Psychology 





























10 


Archaeology 


























U 


1 


History of Art .... 


























4 





Mathematics 


3 


9 


8 


9 


9 


6 


5 


3 


2 


6 


Physics 


2 


3 


2 


4 


5 


8 


5 


4 


4 


4 


Chemistry 


1 


7 


5 


4 


5 


4 


4 


4 


7 


11 


Geology 








1 1 





1 


3 








1 


1 


Biology 





6 


1 3 

1 


3 


5 


1 


2 


6 


5 


11 



(142) 



XIII. 

Resolutions in Memory of Mary Elizabeth Garrett, Member of 
the Board of Directors from 1906 to 1915. 

Born March 8, 1854. Died, April 3, 1915. 

The resolutions on Miss Garrett's death passed by the Directors, 
Faculty, Graduate Association and Undergraduate Association of Bryn 
Mawr College are printed below. The resolutions of the Trustees of the 
Johns Hopkins University and the Board of ManagCx-s of the Bryn Mawr 
School, the two educational institutioiLS with which, in addition to Bryn 
Mawr College, Miss Garrett was most closely connected, are also printed. 
The Bryn Mawr Clubs of Philadelphia, New York and Baltimore also 
passed resolutions. 

Minute adopted by the Board, of Directors of the Trustees of 
Bryn Mawr College, April 16, 1915. 

"The Directors of Bryn Mawr College, with deep regret 
and with a keen appreciation of their loss, make record of the 
death of Mary Elizabeth Garrett, which occurred on the 
third of the present month at the Deanery on the college 
campus. She had been a member of the Board since 1906 
and by the dignity and attractiveness of her personality, 
her sound judgment and deep interest in the College commanded 
the personal esteem of each member, while her many bene- 
factions, both in gifts for specific purposes and her unique 
annual contributions, added greatly to the college's efficiency 
and to the practical convenience of its administration. She 
served upon the Committee on Buildings and Grounds and 
the Committee on Finance. She was buried from her former 
residence in Baltimore on the sixth instant. The funeral 
was attended by a majority of the members of the Board, 
including all its officers. 

"Beside Miss Garrett's important gifts and services to 
Bryn Mawr College she was conspicuous as a promoter of 
higher education in other fields. In co-operation with the 
President of the College she was one of the founders of the 
Bryn Mawr School for Girls in the city of Baltimore; and she 

(143) 



144 

made possible the opening of the Medical College of Johns 
Hopkins University by her contribution to its endowment, 
with it stipulating that it should always be open to women 
on equal terms with men and requiring conditions of admission 
higher than those of any other similar institution. 

"Beyond Miss Garrett's benefactions and services mention 
should be made of the marked influence for intelligence and 
refinement which always accompanied her. She was a true 
gentlewoman. 

"The Board expresses to the President of the College 
its sympathy with her in the loss of her most intimate friend 
and companion." 

Resolutions passed by the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College at a 
Meeting held April 9, 1915. 

"Whereas, The Faculty of Bryn Mawr College has 
learned with sincere sorrow of the death at Bryn Mawr on 
the third of April, 1915, of Mary Elizabeth Garrett, a friend 
of the College since its opening in 1885 and a member of the 
Board of Directors since its organization, 

^^ Resolved, That we, the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College, 
place on record our deep appreciation of the unfailing kind- 
ness and devotion with which Miss Garrett gave her time, 
her taste and her judgment to the service of the College and 
our grateful recognition of the generous and wisely admin- 
istered gifts with which she furthered the cause of women's 
education and research in general and aided Bryn Mawr 
College in particular. 

^'Resolved, That a copy of this resolution be sent to Presi- 
dent Thomas, to Miss Garrett's family, and to the Board of 
Directors." 

Resolutions passed by the Graduate Association of Bryn Mawr 
College at a Meeting held April 12., 1915. 

"Whereas, In the death of Mary Elizabeth Garrett, 
Bryn Mawr College sustains the loss of a large-hearted bene- 
factor, and the Graduate School the loss of a friend whose 
thought and aid have done much for the furtherance of gradu- 
ate study among women, and 



145 

''Whereas, In the death of Mary Elizabeth Garrett 
the advancement of women has lost one of its most loyal 
supporters, be it 

"Resolved, That we, the members of the Graduate School 
of Bryn Mawr College, express to President Thomas, to the 
Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College, and to the members 
of Miss Garrett's family our appreciation of Miss Garrett's 
great generosity in behalf of women and our common sense 
of loss, and be it 

"Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be presented 
to President Thomas, to the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr 
College, and to the members of Miss Garrett's family and be 
inserted among the records of the Graduate School." 

Resolutions passed by the Undergraduate Association of Bryn 
Mawr College, at a Meeting held April 9, 1915. 

"Whereas, The death of Mary Elizabeth Garrett has 
deprived Bryn Mawr College of a wise Director and the Under- 
graduate Association of a loyal friend; and 

"Whereas, Her death is fel