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Full text of "Annual Reports of the President of Bryn Mawr College, 1935-1942"

Bryn Mawr 
College 
Library 



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rP 



REPORT 

to 

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

of 
BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

for the year 
1935-36 



Published by Bryn Mawr College 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

May, 1937 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 



Report by the President of the College 5 

With Changes in the Academic Staff Appended 21 

Report by the Dean of the College 25 

Report by the Dean of the Graduate School 33 

Report by the Librarian * 41 

Report by the College Physician 51 

Report by the Director of Publication on Official Pub- 
lications 60 

On Faculty Publications • 61 

On Lectures and Entertainments 6S 

Report by the Director of the Bureau of Recommenda- 
tions 77 

Report by the Secretary and Registrar 79 

Report on the Summer School for Women Workers in 
Industry Made by the Chairman of the Summer 
School Board 82 



REPORT BY THE PRESIDENT 
OF THE COLLEGE 



The year 1935-36 included several events which will seem impor- 
tant in the history of the college. For one of these, the Fiftieth 
Anniversary, it was necessary for me to go through many early 
papers relating to the founding of the college and also to read through 
the president's reports which exist for each year of President Rhoads 1 
term, 1885-1894, and for the first eleven years of President Thomas's 
term, 1895-1906. After that time, as the Directors probably know, 
she ceased to present any narrative account of the year and the 
president's reports as annually published consisted only of statistics 
tabulated by the various offices. The tabulations were not published 
in 1915-21, but they were published in 1921-22. 

Since I became president I also have written down and pre- 
sented to the Directors no history of the current year, nor have I 
resumed President Thomas's published compilations of figures. This 
defection was intentional. The frequent meetings of the Board, held 
eight times a year until 1929 and four times since, combined with 
the high proportion of members of the Board attending regularly, 
made the verbal reports presented at the beginning of each meeting 
by the president seem to me also adequate to keep the Directors in 
close touch with all important facts in the college's quiet history. On 
the other hand, I felt that the statistical tables made up by the 
college offices covered in many cases unimportant areas of information 
and were as a whole dull. I saw no reason for the expense of their 
publication. 

My work of last autumn, however, has brought about my conver- 
sion. I see that for the sake of those who are interested in American 
education or in colleges for women or in Bryn Mawr College in 
particular, a running history of each year may be valuable. Explicit 
comment on current history seems to me less valuable. The small 
college does not offer to the commentator the wide field of the 
university; within the limits of the institution itself neither variety 
of subject matter nor useful comparison is ordinarily possible. Time, 

m 



6 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

however, gives the necessary variations of experience and comment 
can profitably accompany the summing-up of several years. 

I have now the seal of the convert and my plan is to repair my 
mistake as far as possible. I present this year a brief report of the 
events of the year as seen from my office and that of the Dean of 
the College and the Dean of the Graduate School. Together with 
these I present the reports of the Librarian, the College Physician, 
the Director of Publication, the Director of the Appointment Bureau 
and a few lists which seem to me useful as information for the 
Board and as material for a historian. This form of report I expect 
to lay before the Board annually. 

Within the next year I propose to prepare the manuscript of a 
larger report covering the years 1922- 193 5. This will be primarily 
a narrative, but the period covered is long enough and important 
enough to make effective a certain amount of comment on the facts. 
This report will be accompanied by a compendium of statistics for 
the thirteen years covered. 

I cannot at present promise to supply similar historical narrative 
records of the years 19064922. Raw material is present in the 
minutes of the trustees and of the faculty, many of President 
Thomas's speeches at the opening and close of the year and on 
other special occasions are in print in the Alumnae Bulletin and 
elsewhere, and I think at some time and by some one a running 
chronicle can be prepared. 

Each college year grows indirectly out of its predecessors but for 
several reasons 1935'36, the fifty-first year of the college, more than 
most sums up the past and stands for it. But each year again affects 
those that follow and in 1935-36 changes in college conditions 
occurred which will give a new color to the next period of college 
history. In consequence, the year seems to us who have just lived 
through it an unusually important one, but its special events took 
place in the course of the usual college routine and a report of that 
must be first set down. It mainly concerns faculty, students and the 
work done by them jointly. 

The College Year 1935-36 

Faculty 

In the Bryn Mawr faculty there were fewer new appointments 
than usual this year and the simultaneous entrance of two new 



Report by the President of the College 7 

assistant professors into the Greek Department was the only spec- 
tacular change. In four out of the five cases of sabbatical leave 
(Professors King, Wheeler, Herben, Rogers and Robbins), the work 
was carried by teachers already in the departments and known to 
the students. Such arrangements within departments are tempting 
because they are safe for the substitute as a risk is avoided; adjust- 
ments of salary are also easier. Nevertheless I am inclined to think 
that where the faculty is limited in numbers the substitution of a 
new instructor can be used to vary the academic menu and now and 
then increase the choices of the students. With such variety in view, 
an attempt has been made of late years to connect the actual six 
weeks' teaching of the Flexner and Shaw lecturers with the advanced 
and graduate courses of the year, and this teaching has been, I 
think, even more useful to the college than the public lectures. Thus 
Mr. Richards met both advanced undergraduate and graduate classes 
in English for six weeks this year and a similar arrangement will be 
made for courses to be taught for six weeks in the departments of 
Social Economy and Economics by Mrs. Barbara Wootton, Shaw 
lecturer for 1936-37. 

In contrast to the happily static year, two major faculty changes 
took place at its close in the retirement of Professor Lucy Martin 
Donnelly and Professor Susan M. Kingsbury. Except President 
Thomas herself, I think no one is so completely built into the picture 
of the college in the minds of the graduates as Miss Donnelly. It is 
very hard to speak of her! Richness of mind and character cannot 
be set down briefly. If I speak of the distinction of her teaching, the 
taste, the instant sense for Tightness, I must in the same breath speak 
of her boldness, her independence, her power to fire her students. 
And outside the classroom she has been to many of them a wise 
adviser, because she has taken time to know them, and for life a 
charming friend. She has taught almost every Bryn Mawr under- 
graduate since 1896 and many graduate students, and in particular 
she has trained a long series of instructors in the English Department 
who come to Bryn Mawr, as she herself came, to begin a professional 
career. And in faculty matters she has borne always, formally and 
informally, her full share, always to be reckoned on the side of 
wisdom and of boldness. 

Miss Kingsbury came to Bryn Mawr in 1915 to open the Depart- 
ment of Social Economy and Research made possible by the recent 
bequest of Carola Woerishoffer. In the twenty years in which she 



8 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

has been the head of the department she has trained or helped to 
train 219 young graduate students for certificates, master's and doc' 
tor's degrees and has seen them in positions which when she began 
her department hardly existed. Time has created some of them but 
Miss Kingsbury has created others. For she has increasingly been 
able to convince private employers, Young Women's Christian AssO' 
ciations, Red Cross and other agencies, settlements, city, state and 
national departments and bureaus that their important work should 
be done by thoroughly prepared women. She and they have been 
pioneers, not only in the field but in getting standards and values 
established in the courses themselves — here and elsewhere. Only 
Miss Kingsbury's vigor and hopefulness could have made her dream 
with Miss Thomas of opening this new field to women and indeed 
to men; only her will and her humor could have kept her at it. Now 
she sees her own work growing at home and many times determining 
the policies and programs of other newer schools of social work. I 
hope the research work done in the Susan M. Kingsbury Institute, 
which Miss Kingsbury's friends are hoping to add to the Carola 
Woerishoffer Department, will always keep the flavor of her vigor, 
honesty and good sense. 

The appointments to replace the hours of instruction offered by 
Professor Donnelly and Professor Kingsbury are included in the list 
of faculty appointments appended. 

I shall speak in another connection both of the difficult conditions 
under which the steady and excellent work directed by the teaching 
staff has been done this year, and of the increasing demands on them 
which their own decisions on undergraduate and graduate curriculum 
are making. In spite of these, the list of faculty publications is 
satisfactory and much admirable work not ready or not appropriate 
for publication is being carried on. A few small stipends for research 
have been received from outside associations and as an indication of 
the importance I set on such resources I have announced that $1000 
of the annual income of the President's Fund left to the college by 
Madge D. Miller will be awarded to members of the faculty by a 
committee (Professors Gray, Taylor and Tennent) on the basis of 
research projects presented. I hope this small sum may be increased 
by gifts from others with like convictions. 

The cut in faculty and staff salaries in 1934-35 made in accordance 
with the scale proposed in May 1934 was in part restored by vote 
of the Directors at the December meeting 1935, when the surplus of 



Report by the President of the College 9 

the year was divided pro rata among all those affected by the cut. 
Sixty-eight per cent of the original cut was thus returned. The 
budget for 1935-36 contained a provision for a cut based on the 
same scale and the faculty and staff salaries were reduced accordingly. 

Students 

The college opened this fall with a number of students (509) 
exceeded only once in Bryn Mawr's history. The number of resident 
students, graduate and undergraduate, in any one year has had an 
immovable upper limit, the number of rooms in the college halls. 
The non-resident students provide an uncertain factor. This year 
the maximum number of the first was reached. All undergraduate 
halls were full and the resident graduate students filled Radnor Hall 
and overflowed into Low Buildings, where four lived throughout the 
year. Thirty-six undergraduate students lived in their own homes. 
Of the non-resident graduate students, a few fended for themselves 
outside the college, many others are part-time students only whose 
living arrangements do not depend on us. The Low Buildings innova- 
tion may be a first step toward regular use of the central part of Low 
Buildings as a second graduate residence house instead of a boarding 
house for the members of the faculty. The number of applications 
for rooms in Low Buildings from the latter group decreases and 
apparently an increasing number of graduate students prefer to live 
on the campus rather than in the few boarding and lodging houses 
in the village. 

Both psychologically and practically the large numbers have been 
advantageous to the college; morale has soared and income increased. 
Only one extra section of an undergraduate course (elementary 
German) had actually to be added with a new instructor. But class- 
rooms, laboratories, dining rooms and all public rooms in the halls 
have been uncomfortably crowded and, even more important, an 
increasingly heavy load is being laid on the teaching staff. As the 
Directors know, the college curriculum has steadily moved in the 
direction of more elasticity and scope for the individual student, 
graduate and undergraduate. Practically this has meant greatly 
increased demands on the time and energy of the teaching staff and 
a capacity college brings this out clearly. The latest change, not yet 
in effect, providing for final examinations for all candidates for the 
A.B. degree can not be put successfully into effect without adding 
hours of instruction which the present departments can not offer. 



10 Report to Board of. Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

I shall soon be obliged to propose those and defy the annual budget! 
This early necessity makes such alternatives as those which Dean 
Schenck mentions for exchange of work with other institutions 
worthy of attention. 

The new undergraduate students were in general of a piece with 
those of the last thirteen years as the appended statistics show. 
Their geographical provenance does not change*; they continue to 
enter slightly younger than the freshman classes before 1930 and 
the number prepared by public high schools slightly increased since 
1930 maintains itself. For this last the depression is in part respon' 
sible, in part the information about the college given in many high 
schools by the alumnae committees who are seeking regional scholars. 

The Academic Wor\ 

For an account of the undergraduate work of the year the 
report of the Dean of the College must be consulted. Its outer 
aspect as seen from the President's Office was always reassuring 
although it was carried on while many of the students as well as 
the faculty and staff were engaged in the preparations for the 
Fiftieth Anniversary in the fall, the rehearsals and the performances 
of The Messiah in December and the preparation for May Day in 
the spring. The last involved in one way or another all the under- 
graduates in college and many of the graduate students. The smallness 
of the student body makes the burden of such extra demands fall 
heavily on individuals and the standard of public performances at 
Bryn Mawr is high. I am torn between pride that such excellent 
"shows" are put on by a small college which offers no work in 
dramatic production or pageant and anxiety lest competent and 
responsible students overdo or that the college should seem to 
emphasise these public appearances too much in comparison with 
the academic work which it always actually sets first. A fiftieth 
anniversary can perhaps be allowed to make demands on the college 
year but recurring May Days are a recurring problem. Two adjust- 
ments in academic work were made with this year's May Day in 
sight. By recommendation of the faculty, the Directors voted to add 
five days to the second semester and Commencement was postponed 
from June 3rd to June 8th. In this way the actual week of May 
Day was in part cleared from academic work; 'afternoons were 

* I have omitted the usual "racial stock" statistics which seem to me 
interesting but unreliable. 



Report by the President of the College 11 

entirely free and no classes held on Friday morning. The Faculty 
also voted to postpone the coming into effect of the final examination 
for all candidates for the A.B. degree until 1937 so that the first 
members of a senior class to meet this requirement should not find 
themselves involved both in May Day preparation and a new 
academic routine. Before the next May Day year comes around 
in 1940 this routine will be established and the additional work, if 
any, which it puts on the students estimated. 

I have spoken of the academic work in general. The records of 
individual students were excellent, good, and average in about the 
usual proportions and at the low end of the scale the College 
Senate dealt in June with no more than the usual number of unsatis' 
factory records. 

Dean Schenck has presented an analysis of the students of the 
graduate school which needs no comment. For obvious reasons the 
work of the school reflected our unusual calendar of events less 
than the undergraduate. I should like to call special attention in 
Miss Schenck's account to the second year's successful experiment 
with a special research project in a single department. I believe 
that there is a certain advantage both for faculty and for students 
in a dramatization of the varied possibilities and advantages of 
advanced work and in a small college with limited resources this 
has always seemed difficult. The present rotating plan has been 
successful in calling to the attention of the whole college the interest 
and the stimulation to the individual of combined effort. If in the 
immediate future with the completion of the science building a 
similar pooling of knowledge and of resources on a greatly increased 
scale in all the departments of natural science can be set on foot, 
the endowment gift of the Carnegie Corporation being its basis, all 
the advanced work, graduate and undergraduate, of the college will, 
I believe, take a great step forward. 

I hope I have made clear that the routine work of the year was 
no negative affair. Two conspicuous prizes were won by Bryn Mawr 
students in open competition. Jean Holzworth of the senior class 
was awarded the prize offered by the University of Cincinnati 
in an intercollegiate contest held in celebration of the Horace 
Bimillenium, and Dr. Melba Phillips, Helen Schaeffer Huff Memorial 
Research Fellow, the Margaret E. Maltby Fellowship by the American 
Association of University Women. 



12 Report to Board op Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Special Events of the Year 

Fiftieth Anniversary 

The great single event of the past year was the celebration of the 
Fiftieth Anniversary of the College on November 1st and 2nd. This 
anniversary had long been in the minds of the alumnae. As early 
as 1930 at their request a joint Committee of Directors and Alumnae 
had drawn up an elaborate and in my opinion a remarkable plan 
for the future of the college. In this plan the attention of Bryn 
Mawr's friends was directed to our greatest needs, on the academic 
side an increase of faculty salaries and the addition to our material 
resources of more library space and of adequate buildings for the 
sciences and for art and archaeology. An attempt was made to 
suggest how the funds for these and other necessities could be 
obtained and during the following years a good deal of preliminary 
and in some part discouraging investigation was done, concluding in 
1935 with the formation of a Fiftieth Anniversary Committee by the 
alumnae headed by Caroline McCormick Slade which courageously 
undertook to raise a million dollars as a gift to the college. 

Side by side with this, preparation for the actual celebration of 
the opening of the college proceeded. During the spring of 1935 
a central committee was appointed jointly by the Board of Directors 
and the Executive Board of the Alumnae. By this committee all 
general plans were made. A Friday evening and Saturday morning 
in October or early November and exercises for two sessions were 
decided on, the first to be historical in character and the second a 
formal gathering of delegates and guests with President Emeritus M. 
Carey Thomas as a speaker and three others representing the colleges 
and universities connected most directly with Bryn Mawr's past. 
The central committee also agreed that the colleges and learned 
societies invited to send delegates should be limited to those which 
had an immediate connection with Bryn Mawr: that the women's 
colleges throughout the country, the heads of schools sending stU' 
dents to Bryn Mawr, the colleges and universities in the State of 
Pennsylvania, the coeducational institutions and the colleges and 
universities for men in the east with which Bryn Mawr had academic 
connections, together with a few in America outside this area and 
in Europe should be invited. The recommendations of the Executive 
Board of the Alumnae Association were followed in inviting repre' 
sentatives of the alumnae to the Friday evening and Saturday 



Report by the President of the College 13 

morning sessions. The central committee further approved the sug' 
gestion that the M. Carey Thomas Award should be given for the 
second time in connection with the celebration of the Fiftieth 
Anniversary, and asked the Executive Committee of the Alumnae 
Association to unite with it in the appointment of active committees 
on hospitality and transportation, on publications, on invitations, on 
the academic procession and seating of delegates (done by a committee 
of the Bryn Mawr faculty) and on the programme for the historical 
evening. The month of October preceding the days of the celebration 
was a heavy one for all these committees. The outcome of their 
work was, I think, however, extremely satisfactory. The four 
speakers for the general exercises originally suggested by the central 
committee, President Emeritus Thomas, President Conant of Harvard, 
President Bowman of Johns Hopkins and President Comstock of 
Radcliffe, all accepted the invitation; the date chosen was the only 
one on which they could all be present. The President of the 
College, the alumnae, notably Miss Cornelia Skinner, and the 
students combined in the programme of the historical evening and 
in order that all alumnae and undergraduates as well as the guests 
of the college might hear it, it was repeated on Saturday evening. 
The M. Carey Thomas Award Committee reported as its choice 
Dr. Florence Sabin and suggested Dr. Simon Flexner as the speaker 
and the afternoon of Saturday as an appropriate time for the giving 
of the award. 

The invitations sent out by the college were widely accepted. The 
speakers of the two days were entertained in the Deanery and other 
guests were housed in Rockefeller which the students magnanimously 
vacated for Friday night or in the houses of faculty or alumnae or 
our nearby neighbors. Everything can be praised but the weather 
and that was good in spots. In the beautiful programmes appear 
the various committees, the list of delegates, the details of order and 
arrangement and they need not be repeated here or commented on. 
The exercises of Saturday morning and Saturday afternoon were 
broadcast by courtesy of the N.B.C. network. The introductions 
and speeches were published by vote of the Directors in a later 
pamphlet. The culmination of the celebration must, however, have 
a place in this account. At the close of the exercises on Saturday 
morning came the presentation to the President of the College by 
Mrs. Slade, the director of the Alumnae Drive Committee, of the 
sum of $700,000. with the assurance of the completion of the million 



14 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

dollar gift before the close of the anniversary year. This extraor' 
dinary gift, made in years of scarcity by members of a small group, 
helped to its goal by only two large gifts, represents a warmth of 
affection for the college and a generosity toward it which cannot 
easily be matched elsewhere. There must also, I think, go down 
in the record the impression both of the distinction and of the 
pleasantness of Bryn Mawr's anniversary, an impression repeated 
from many quarters. The former was in part due to the keen 
interest of the different programmes, admirably varied and each 
excellent of its kind, and in part to the fine proportions and the 
dignity of Goodhart Hall and the beautiful academic procession 
headed by alumnae from the fifty classes, the latter to the faultless 
arrangements for the several occasions but still more to the generous 
cooperation and friendliness of the Bryn Mawr faculty, alumnae 
and students and their clear desire to communicate this to all the 
guests. The emotion which was at its height in the appearance of 
President Thomas on Saturday morning will not be easily forgotten 
by anyone who was present. 

The entire expenses of the anniversary fell within the limit of 
the appropriation voted by the Directors last year, a feat on the 
part of the committees who made the plans. The only miscarriage 
was the moving picture film which unfortunately for future celebra- 
tions was poor. 

The Messiah 

It has been usual in a year which closes with the pageant of 
May Day to omit formal performances of plays in the second 
semester and the Gilbert and Sullivan opera. An unusual opportunity 
for the College Choir was offered this year, however, in a proposal 
by Mr. Downes, director of the Princeton College Choir, and Mr. 
Willoughby of our own faculty to give at Christmas time a joint 
performance of The Messiah with soloists added to the two choirs. 
A generous gift made through an alumna covered a great part 
of Bryn Mawr's share of the expenses, Mr. Willoughby gave his 
own time without limit and following the Princeton performance 
in the University Chapel The Messiah was given on December 16th 
at Goodhart Hall filled to overflowing with guests of the choir and 
the college. An orchestra composed of members of the Philadelphia 
Symphony Orchestra assisted and Mr. Willoughby conducted. The 
soloists left something to be desired but no one who heard the 



Report by the President of the College 15 

oratorio will forget the freshness and vigor of the choruses and their 
intelligent understanding of the great music. It was for them a great 
experience, both in the prolonged practice and the actual performance. 
I greatly hope that a similar opportunity may be given the Depart' 
ment of Music and the Choir again before long. 

Lectures 

For the six weeks between February 10th and March 16th Mr. 
I. A. Richards, Fellow of Magdalene College, Cambridge, gave the 
six Mary Flexner lectures as the choice of the English Department. 
They were attended by many of the faculty and students of nearby 
colleges as well as our own. Of Mr. Richards' teaching I have 
already spoken. 

The Ann Sheble Lecture in English was given by Major Bonamy 
Dobree, O.B.E., the Mallory Whiting Webster Lecture in History 
by Dr. Wallace Notestein of Yale and the lecture in honour of the 
bimillenium of Horace by Professor M. Rostovtzeff of Yale. 

A list of all other speakers invited by the college this year is 
included in this report. You will notice that they are few and that 
few lectures of a general character or concerts are provided. This 
is because in this year as in those that preceded it the budget item 
for public lectures has been discontinued. Generous gifts through 
an alumna of the college and often the courtesy of the speakers 
themselves made possible an unusual succession of speakers and 
musicians in the series given by the Entertainment Committee of the 
Deanery on Sunday afternoon and with them the college somewhat 
consoled itself for a shorter list than usual in Goodhart Hall. 

May Day 

The May Day pageant in its preparation filled much time after 
the first of March and its two performances took place in fine, hot 
weather on May 8th and 9th. Mrs. Chad wick- Collins was director 
of the entire pageant. The plays given for the first time for many 
years without the direction of Mr. Samuel Arthur King were directed 
by Mr. Alexander Wyckoff and Miss Ethel Chouteau Dyer, Bryn 
Mawr 1931. Miss Petts had charge of the Masque, Miss Grant of the 
Green, Mr. Willoughby of the music, Miss Helen Grayson, Bryn 
Mawr 1926, of the costumes. Active committees of undergraduates 
and alumnae helped with the varied business and practically all the 
residents of the college took part in the final days. There was little 



1 6 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

difference of opinion that the May Day of 1936 was more beautiful, 
especially in perfection of detail and in color, than its predecessors. 
The charming programmes and the moving pictures taken for the first 
time in color will hand on its careful plan and the beauty of the 
plan put into life. I have spoken of certain hesitations in regard 
to it but I must honestly add that no hesitations rise to my mind as 
I see the actual sight and I think that is the experience of our many 
thousand guests. 

The cost of the pageant was met by the sale of tickets, and 
$1100.00 turned into the Alumnae Drive Fund. 

Commencement 

The exercises of Commencement were of such unusual excellence 
that they will be long remembered. Mr. Rufus Jones accepted the 
invitation of the Senior Class to preach the Baccalaureate Sermon 
and spoke on a philosophy for the times to an audience which filled 
Goodhart Hall. He met the questioning individual with a bold and 
logical scheme put with the simplicity and sincerity which Bryn 
Mawr students associate with him. [The same qualities were present 
in the address on Commencement Day of Dr. Alice Hamilton who. 
spoke on the possibility of meeting problems of war unitedly/' patiently 
and intelligently as the Health Committee of the League of Nations 
had met disease. 

I can not close this brief account of the special events of the 
year without mentioning the great addition to our comfort in 
entertaining which the easy use of the Deanery has made. Many 
guests come and go from it informally every day with an increasing 
sense of satisfaction, but the larger events of the year could hardly 
have taken place as they did without its ample rooms and convenient 
service. It is appropriate I think that the Board of Directors at its 
last meeting voted to include the Deanery Committee, all Alumnae 
members of the Board, as one of its standing committees. 

Two deaths occurred during this year which affected the college 
deeply, that of President Emeritus M. Carey Thomas on December 
2nd and that of Mr. Samuel Emlen, Chairman of the Buildings and 
Grounds Committee, on April 20th. 

No single figure in the picture of Bryn Mawr which lives in the 
minds of its alumnae or of the public compares with that of Miss 
Thomas. Though when she left the presidency in June 1922 she 
ceased active part in the administration of the college and meticulously 



Report by the President of the College 17 

avoided anything that could be interpreted as an attempt to keep 
her hand on its affairs, yet her continued membership on the Board 
of Trustees, her occasional public appearances and her many personal 
friendships with the alumnae kept her a reality and never merely a 
memory. It is a subject for great satisfaction that she could take 
a full part in all the exercises of the Fiftieth Anniversary and that 
the many guests and members of the college as well as the graduates 
of her own time could carry away an illuminating picture of her as 
she had long reigned at Bryn Mawr. 

Her death occurred with no suffering and indeed no warning four 
weeks after the anniversary. It was announced by the president to 
the assembled college at a specially called chapel. The funeral took 
place at the Deanery in the presence of her personal friends, her 
ashes were placed in the cloister in the place she had designated, 
and a memorial service was held on December 19th at which the 
President of the College presided and three speakers named by Miss 
Thomas herself, Mr. Jones, Mrs. Manning and Mrs. Slade, spoke, 
and the College Choir sang. A pamphlet containing the addresses 
was published by the Board of Directors. 

Among the various resolutions framed in memory of Miss Thomas 
I repeat here that of the Board of Directors presented at the meeting 
of December 19th, 1935: 

"Be it Resolved that we, the Trustees and Directors of 
Bryn Mawr College, with full appreciation of all that must 
here remain unsaid, put on formal record our gratitude to 
M. Carey Thomas, dean, president, president emeritus, 
trustee and director of Bryn Mawr College. Her contribu- 
tion to the college began before it was actually opened. 
Those who up to this time had been making its plans were 
all men, many of them already in middle life or older, 
and without recent academic training. She brought to their 
councils an experience in the most advanced academic dis- 
cipline then available in America and in Europe, the personal 
interest of the woman in her own education and in the 
active life for which it was to prepare her, and the fire of 
youth. To her were in large part due the decisions which 
gave the college character and maturity, and made it at 
once an institution to be reckoned with. There was no 
weakening as she and the college grew older. Her convic- 
ticns and her courage made her look unceasingly to the 
ultimate good of the college and from day to day demand 
from herself and from faculty and students a high measure 
of accomplishment. She wished to see women who could 



1 8 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

work side by side with men in exacting tasks and who 
equally with men could contribute both ideas and practical 
administration. To this end she worked for a high standard 
in girls' schools as defined by the college requirements for 
entrance, for a closely knit and rigorous undergraduate 
curriculum, and for graduate work leading to a Doctor's 
degree of high standard. She early determined that this 
task should be carried on in beautiful surroundings, and to 
the buildings and grounds of the college she gave endless 
attention. She recognised the close relation between inteh 
lectual and actual independence, and agreed enthusiastically 
to a bold experiment in student freedom in the halls of 
residence. Her work was done with such energy, such 
boldness and such intelligence that for many years the 
character of the college could remain unchanged and its 
work and its life proceed with little variation. Yet as late 
as the last year of her term she created the plan for a 
Summer School for Women Workers in Industry to be held 
on the Bryn Mawr campus, thus opening to a new group 
of women a possibility of educational training. 
. "The same broad and vigorous interests in education and 
in women she maintained in her connections outside Bryn 
Mawr and wherever she represented the college. They 
brought her recognition as one of the outstanding Americans 
of her generation, and this reputation in turn did much to 
strengthen general interest in the college whose administra' 
tion was her life work. We record our gratitude for our 
association with her both as an individual and as a public 
figure; we repeat our belief in the excellent and the 
permanent quality of her achievement." 

On April 20th Samuel Emlen, a member of the Board since 
May 1929, died suddenly at his home in Germantown. His loss 
was a great one to the Board and to the President personally for 
in the nature of things the Chairman of the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee is a frequent visitor to the campus and our responsibilities 
lie close together: 

The Board of Directors at its meeting on May 21, 1936, adopted 
the following resolution. 

'The Directors wish to set on record their sorrow and 
loss in the death of Samuel Emlen on Monday, April 20th, 
1936. 

"He was elected a Trustee and a Director on May 17th, 
1929, and was immediately made chairman of the Committee 
on Buildings and Grounds. His unusual experience in build' 
ing construction and in the care of property and his natural 



Report by the President of the College 19 

good judgment made it possible for him to acquaint himself 
quickly with the routine problems of the Committee and 
also to meet with particular ability the many emergencies 
calling for immediate decision without opportunity for 
committee discussion and action. His response to all ques' 
tions arising at the college was immediate and adequate; 
he spent many hours of his time in consultation on its 
affairs, and he never hesitated to assume the difficult and 
trying work inherent in the chairmanship of the Committee 
on Buildings and Grounds. 

"In all matters of college policy and administration out' 
side of the province of this committee, he was, both as 
Trustee and Director, always interested and helpful, liberal' 
minded and considerate of the opinions of others." 

Mr. Strawbridge generously agreed to take on temporarily the 
chairmanship of the committee. At the meeting of May, the name 
of Francis J. Stokes was presented by the Nominating Committee 
as successor to Mr. Emlen on the Board of Trustees; he was elected 
and asked to serve immediately on the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee with the hope that in the autumn he might be willing 
to be chairman. 

At the beginning of this report I set down my feeling that 1935'36 
pointed to an uncommon degree toward the future. I meant this 
in no negative sense. The absence from now on of President Thomas 
from the councils of the college, the withdrawal of Professor Donnelly 
and Professor Kingsbury from the academic work are, indeed, evident 
and striking losses. Yet the college goes on not only steadily but 
with new confidence and spirit. This confidence and courage have 
a solid basis. The reports of the two deans point to actual and 
important changes made or determined on in the curriculum of the 
two schools. We believe those changes will be fruitful in ways 
we already see and also in ways as yet unforeseen which will develop 
in the college. But the great push ahead begins this year with 
the enlargement of our resources by the alumnae gift reported as 
partially completed in November and as a million dollars in June 
at Commencement. 

It is true that the use of this money is not immediate. It was, I 
believe, in the minds of the committee in charge of the Alumnae 
Drive that of the million dollars which was their goal, approximately 
$600,000 should be used for the Science Building, its equipment 
and its maintenance, approximately $300,000 should pay to the 
college the amount of the debt incurred in buying Wyndham 



20 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

in 1926 and $100,000 should remain for other alumnae interests. 
Actually as the difficulty of the task the alumnae had set themselves 
became clearer, by my suggestion they reckoned toward the sum 
total all gifts and legacies coming to the college from the alumnae 
within the period of the drive, and it goes without saying that 
money for various purposes was offered by donors and accepted by 
the alumnae. The list of the gifts appears in the Treasurer's Report. 
At Commencement when the goal was actually reached about 
$335,000 was available for a Science Building, including $50,000 
for the Marjorie J. Wagoner Library; $150,000, the gift of the 
Carnegie Corporation, for endowment, interpreted by me on the 
basis of various interviews and letters as destined to endow the 
science plan made in 1934 by the science faculty headed by Dr. 
Tennent; about $170,000 for the wing to the library to be named 
in honor of Quita Woodward, including $90,000 from Dr. and 
Mrs. George Woodward, $50,000 from Miss Ella Riegel of the Class 
of 1889 and $10,000 from Dr. and Mrs. Henry B. Bigelow for a 
special reading room to be named for Elizabeth Bigelow of the Class 
of 1931. The gifts also included $25,000 raised by the Class of 1901 
in memory of Marion Reilly, about $25,000 from the Master School 
of Music Association for the work of the Music Department and 
$26,500 from Miss Fanny Travis Cochran of the Class of 1904 
for the Susan M. Kingsbury Research Institute of the Carola 
Woerishoffer Graduate Department of Social Economy and Social 
Research. 

I do not have to describe minutely the changes in the college 
which these additions foretell. The fact that careful planning and 
perhaps a resumption of effort to add to the separate amounts will 
be necessary will not blind us to our good fortune or discourage us 
too much. Our crying need, the Science Building, must be attacked 
first but the building itself, I felt, had to wait for a maintenance 
fund before it could be started. Not much later the Library wing 
will follow. The actual delay, so trying this spring, will seem to us 
as the second fifty year period unrolls, of far less account than the 
fact that a great change in material equipment more far-reaching 
than anything since the founding of the college itself actually started 
with this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARION EDWARDS PARK 



CHANGES IN THE ACADEMIC STAFF 
OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

October 1935 to October 1936 

Faculty Returned from Leaves of Absence 

The following members of the faculty and teaching staff, absent 
in 1934-35, returned to continue their teaching at Bryn Mawr 
in 1935-36: 

Lily Ross Taylor, Ph.D., Professor of Latin 
Ilse Forest, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education 
Clara Marburg Kirk, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 
Enid Glen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English 
Berthe-Marie Marti, M.A., formerly Instructor in Latin and 
French, returned as Assistant Professor 

Leaves of Absence 1935-36 

Six members of the faculty and teaching staff were on leave of 
absence in 1935-36: 

Georgiana Goddard King, M.A., Professor of History of Art 
Anna Pell Wheeler, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 
Agnes Low Rogers, Ph.D., Professor of Education and Psy- 
chology 
Stephen Joseph Herben, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 

Philology 
Caroline Robbins, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History 
Hortense Flexner King, MA., Instructor in English 

Promotions 1935-36 

Promotions of the following members of the faculty and teaching 
staff took effect in 1935-36: 

Madeleine Soubeiran, Agregee, promoted from Assistant Pro- 
fessor to Associate Professor of French 

Harold E. Wethey, Ph.D., promoted from Instructor to Lecturer 
in History of Art 

Mary Katharine Woodworth, Ph.D., promoted from Instructor 
to Assistant Professor of English 

Katharine E. McBride, Ph.D., promoted from Demonstrator to 
Lecturer in Education 

[21] 



22 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

New Appointments 1935-36 

The following new members were added to the faculty and 
teaching staff in 1935-36: 

Alister Cameron, M.A., Assistant Professor of Greek. 

A.B. Union College 1926; M.A. Princeton University 1927. Instruc- 
tor in Classics, St. John's College, 1927-28; Instructor in Classics, 
Union College, 1928-30; Student at Edinburgh University '1930-31 
and at the University of Munich 1931; Graduate Student, Columbia 
University, 1931-32; Resident Scholar 1932-34 and University Fellow 
1934-35. 

Richmond Lattimore, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Greek. 

A.B. Dartmouth College 1926; M.A. University of Illinois 1927; 
B.A. Oxford University 1932; Ph.D. University of Illinois 193 5. 
Assistant in Classics, University of Illinois, 1926-27, and Assistant in 
English, 1927-28; Assistant Professor of Greek, Wabash College, 
1928-29; Rhodes Scholar from Indiana to Christ Church 1929-32; 
Assistant in Philosophy, University of Illinois, 193 3-34; Classical 
Fellow at the American Academy in Rome 1934-3 5. 

Jean William Guiton, Licencie-es-lettres, Assistant Professor of 

French. 

Baccalaureat, Latin, Grec, Philosophic, Paris, 1923-24, Licence-es- 
lettres, University of Paris, 1929; Diplome d'Etudes superieures 
(Lettres) 1931. Teacher, College de Domfront, 1929-30, and College 
de Nogent-le-Rotrou, 1930-31; Assistant Professor of French, Middle- 
bury College, 1931-32, and Instructor at Middlebury Summer School, 
1932; Member of Literature Division, Bennington College, 1932-3 5; 
Visiting Professor, Mills College Summer School, 193 5. 

Nathan Jacobson, Ph.D., Lecturer in Mathematics. 

A.B. University of Alabama 1930; Ph.D. Princeton University 1934. 
Assistant at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey, 
1933-34; Procter Fellow at Princeton University 1934-3 5. 

Elizabeth Kraus, M.Sc, Instructor in Psychology. 

Ph.B. Pembroke College 1931; M.Sc. Brown University 1932. Anne 
Crosby Emery Fellow, Brown University, 1931-32; Marion A. Curtis 
Fellow, Radcliffe College, 1932-34, and Assistant in Psychology, 
Radcliffe College, February to June 1934; holder of Miss Abbott's 
School Alumnae Fellowship from Pembroke College at the Eldridge 
Reeves Johnson Foundation, the School of Medicine, University of 
Pennsylvania, 1934-35. 

Hazel Dorothy Burwash, M.A., Instructor in History. 

B.A. Somerville College, Oxford, 1931; M.A. Mount Holyoke College 
1933. Graduate Student, Mount Holyoke College, 1932-33; Graduate 
Scholar in History, Bryn Mawr College 1933-34 and Fellow in 
History 1934-3 5. 



Changes in the Academic Staff 23 

Mary Sturm Chalmers, M.A., Instructor in German. 

A.B. Oberlin College 1930; M.A. Northwestern University 1931. 
Part'time Instructor in German and Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1931-32; Graduate Scholar in German 1932-33 and Fellow 
in German 1933-34; Exchange Fellow, University of Vienna, 1934-3?. 

Lydia Whitford Mason, M.A., Instructor in Italian. 

A.B. Pembroke College 1931; M.A. Brown University 1933. Assistant 
to the Registrar, Pembroke College, 1931-33; Fellow in Italian, Bryn 
Mawr College, 193 3-3 5. 

Florence Whyte, Ph.D., Instructor in Spanish. 

A.B. University of California 191?; MA. University of Oregon 1924; 
Ph.D. Bryn Mawr College 1930. Professor of Modern Languages, 
Linfield College, 1919-20; Instructor in Spanish and Graduate Student, 
University of Oregon, 1920-24. Graduate Scholar in Spanish, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1924-2? and Fellow in Romance Languages, 192?-26; 
Helene and Cecil Rubel Foundation Fellow in Europe 1926-27; 
Assistant Professor of Spanish, Milwaukee-Downer College, 1927-29; 
Professor of Modern Languages, Queens College, 1929-30; Instructor 
in Spanish, Mount Holyoke College, 1931-33. 

Madeleine Hunt Appel, M.A., Instructor in Education. 

A.B. Vassar College 1917; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1934. Social 
and Industrial Worker, 1917-24; Teacher, Nursery School, 192?-26, 
1929—. 

Helmut von Erffa, M.A., Instructor in History of Art. 

A.B. Harvard University 1931 and M.A. 1933. Assistant in the 
Department of Art and Tutor in the Department of Fine Arts, 
Harvard University, 193'l-33; Sheldon Fellow from Harvard University, 
studying in the Near East, 193 3-34; Graduate Scholar, New York 
University, 1934-3?. 

Dorothy Anne Buchanan, M.A., Reader in English. 

A.B. Smith College 1930; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1931. Scholar 
in English, Bryn Mawr College 1930-31 and Instructor in English 
1931-32; Teacher at The Buckingham School, Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts, 1932-33, and Instructor in English, Vassar College, 1933-34; 
Fellow in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1934-3?. 

Elizabeth Isabel Jones, M.A., Reader in Philosophy. 

A.B. H. Sophie Newcomb College 1934; M.A. Mills College 193?. 
Graduate Student, Mills College, 1934-3?. 

Elizabeth Hazard Ufford, M.A., Demonstrator in Biology. 

A.B. Bryn Mawr College 1929 and M.A. 1934. Technical Assistant, 
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, 1930-33; Graduate Scholar 
in Biology, Bryn Mawr College, 1933-34, and Fellow in Biology, 
1934-3?. 

Selma Halle Blazer, A.B., Demonstrator in Physics. 

A.B. New York University 1934. Graduate Student, University of 
Virginia, 1934-35. 



24 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Elizabeth Wyckoff, M.A., Demonstrator in Physics. 

A.,B. Wellesley College 1933; M.A. Columbia University 1934. 
Teacher in the High School, Hightstown, New Jersey, 1934-3 ?. 

Alice Mary Dowse, M.A., Demonstrator in Geology. 

A.B. Tufts College, 1930; M.A. Rad'cliffe College 1934. Teacher, 
State Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster, Massachusetts, '1.9 3 1 to 
February 1933; Graduate Student, Tufts College, Semester II, 1932-33, 
and Radcliffe College, 1933-34; Fellow in Geology, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1934-3?. 

Esther Abbott, M.A., Demonstrator in Psychology. 

A.B. University of Nebraska, 1932; M.A. University of Southern 
California 193 5. 

Retirements 1936 

The following members of the faculty retired at the end of the 
year 1935-36: 

Lucy Martin Donnelly, A.B., Professor of English 
Susan Myra Kingsbury, Ph.D., Professor of Social Economy 
and Social Research 



Resignations and Expirations June 1936 

Agnes Low Rogers, Ph.D., Professor of Education and Psychology 
Jane Mary Dewey, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics 
Clara Marburg Kirk, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 
Enid Glen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English 
Almena Dawley, M.A., Lecturer in Social Economy 
Nathan Jacobson, Ph.D., Lecturer in Mathematics 
Hazel Dorothy Burwash, M.A., Instructor in History 
Florence Whyte, Ph.D., Instructor in Spanish 
Lydia Whitford Mason, M.A., Instructor in Italian 
Helmut von Erffa, M.A., Instructor in History of Art 
Mary Sturm Chalmers, M.A., Instructor in German 
Martha Cox, M.A., Demonstrator in Physics 
Selma Halle Blazer, M.A., Demonstrator in Physics 
Alice Mary Dowse, M.A., Demonstrator in Geology 
Elizabeth Wyckoff, M.A., Demonstrator in Physics 
Esther Abbott, M.A., Demonstrator in Psychology 
Dorothy Anne Buchanan, M.A., Reader in English 



REPORT BY THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE 

Curriculum Changes 

The academic year 1935-1936 does not stand out as important in 
the history of the curriculum of the college. The celebration of the 
Fiftieth Anniversary in the fall and the celebration of the Bryn Mawr 
May Day in the spring would have made it impossible to put into 
effect any extensive changes in the college work such as are taking 
place during the present year and such as took place in the year 
19304931. Since it was, however, the year in which the plans for 
the Final Examination would have gone into effect had it not been 
for the occurrence of May Day, it offers a good point at which to 
review the changes in curriculum which have taken place since 
President Park's inauguration and which have for the present culmi- 
nated in the requirement of a Final Examination in the major field 
in the senior year. Although many changes made have been suggested 
and worked out in the Curriculum Committee of the Faculty without 
any immediate consciousness of their relation to each other, it is 
easy in looking back to see the connection between the principal 
developments of the last fourteen years and to feel that there has 
been a steady progress along definite lines. 

The curriculum of the college, while it was constantly expanding 
in the administration of the late President Thomas, retained in 1922 
essentially the same structure it had since the opening of the college. 
Required courses which usually filled a student's time for the first 
two years of college, and a group system which called for the pursuit 
of two related subjects for at least two years, gave a somewhat rigid 
pattern to the Bryn Mawr undergraduate course. The first objective 
of the Faculty in making changes in the curriculum was to reduce 
the total amount of required work in order to allow somewhat more 
space and time for amplification of the major work. The next step 
was to give some variety of opportunity to the better students in 
their major field through the introduction of Honours work. This 
type of work, which was first given at Bryn Mawr in the year 
1928-1929, has resulted in much greater freedom and flexibility in 

[25] 



26 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

the work of the last two years of college, even in the case of some 
students who are not listed as Honours students. It has also given 
to departments a much needed opportunity to experiment with the 
kind of work which can be done profitably by the more advanced 
undergraduate students, the development being along two main lines; 
that of wider reading and review leading toward a final and more 
or less comprehensive examination over the field, and that of 
independent research of an elementary kind, the results of which 
have been summarized by each student in a report or essay. In the 
case of the science students, several of the undergraduate Honours 
reports have been of enough merit and originality to be published 
in scientific journals. 

The break-up of the old five-hour block which resulted from the 
reduction of the credit given for required courses and also from 
the introduction of new subject matter into the courses given by a 
single department made it necessary soon after the introduction of 
Honours work to attempt a general course reorganization with the 
purpose of establishing a more satisfactory unit for undergraduate 
work and a more flexible schedule for the course given. In the year 
1930-1931 the present system of units of credit was worked out 
under which an undergraduate is expected to carry four courses, 
with ten hours of work a week as the standard for each course. This 
arrangement has resulted in the standardization not only of the credit 
but of the type of course which serves as the introduction to further 
work in the subject. The number of required courses was cut down, 
but several which were retained were amplified, and the work in 
Required Freshman English, in Latin Literature, in English Literature, 
and in the History of Philosophy have gained in interest and value 
because of the additional material which could be introduced. The 
content of the First Year science courses, on the other hand, had to 
be somewhat reduced in order to bring it within the requirements 
of the new unit of work, but there seems reason to think that the 
lessening of the amount of work in the First Year science courses 
has actually increased the number of elections in science. 

The work of the first two years at Bryn Mawr seems now to rest 
on a satisfactory basis, although there is still some feeling on the 
part of the undergraduates that there should be a further reduction 
in the number of required courses in order to give more time for 
free electives. The work of the freshman and sophomore years being 
necessarily diffuse and varied in its nature, it seems important that 



Report by the Dean of the College 27 

the work of the last two years of college shall have unity and 
definite direction. In the winter of 1933 the Curriculum Committee 
of the Faculty considered the desirability of requiring a comprehensive 
examination in the major field, either of all the Honours students or 
of all candidates for the A.B. degree. Such an examination has been 
introduced in many of the leading American colleges, and the 
committee in reaching its conclusions was guided by the experience 
of Harvard and of Radcliffe, of Smith and of Swarthmore Colleges. 
Even more valuable, however, was the experience of the various 
departments at Bryn Mawr, and especially of the English department, 
which had been requiring a general examination of all major students 
in English since 1930. In other departments such an examination 
had been required of candidates for degrees with distinction, and 
certain conclusions could be reached, based upon this experience, as 
to how far such an examination should attempt to link together all 
branches of the major subject. As a result of the study made in the 
winter of 19334934 the plan for the Final Examination was drawn 
up which is being put into effect this year. 

The purpose of this Final Examination in the major subject is 
to give unity and integration to the work of the junior and senior 
years, at least in the major field. While it is of course desirable that 
such an examination should be based on as broad a view of that 
field as possible, it has seemed better not to make it cover the whole 
territory or even all of the territory which has previously been 
covered in course examinations. Whatever the undergraduates them- 
selves may call it, therefore, the Final Examination at Bryn Mawr 
will not really be a "comprehensive examination 11 as that term is 
generally used. Departments have been asked to set definite limits 
to the scope of the examination papers so that they may test a 
student's power to handle different kinds of material and reason 
about it rather than her memory for scattered details. Three examina- 
tion papers will be taken by all seniors and in most cases each of 
these papers will deal with a different branch or aspect of the major 
subject. Since it is sometimes more valuable, however, that students 
should have the opportunity of reviewing and enlarging their acquaint- 
ance with a field which is closely allied to the major rather than 
that they should narrow their study to the work of one department, 
one of the three papers will often be set by an allied department. 

One general conclusion drawn by the committee from the past 
experience of our own departments was that a final examination 



28 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

would be of very little use without provision for a special type of 
preparation comparable to the tutorial system at Harvard. If the 
main purpose of the examination were to give the student an oppor- 
tunity to take a broader or a better grounded view of the major 
field which she had elected, then it is clear that she must have both 
time and opportunity for reading and for mature discussion with 
her instructors. At Harvard and at Radcliffe tutors are assigned to 
all students in their sophomore year, and although no time allowance 
is made for work outside of the course work it is expected that 
students will have guidance in general reading and opportunity for 
discussion. At Bryn Mawr the small number of students and the 
more intimate contacts between faculty and students in Second Year 
and Advanced work probably make it unnecessary that there should 
be specially assigned tutors to guide a student through three years of 
work. Instead, a generous allowance of time has been made in the 
senior year (one-quarter of the working time of each student), and 
departments are expected to assign extensive reading and to hold 
conferences with the seniors either individually or in groups in order 
to make that reading more profitable. Another device by which 
special time is allowed for such work in our short academic year is 
by excusing seniors to a very large extent from their course examina- 
tions. • A reading period is thus cleared for them when other students 
are taking mid-year examinations, and the final examination period 
is reduced to one week, in which the three examination papers which 
make up their final examination can be completed. Actually, there- 
fore, the seniors will devote less time than other students to being 
examined, and it is hoped that by this arrangement they may be 
enabled to carry one or two Elective courses if they wish to do so, 
without creating any serious conflicts with the arrangements of their 
major department. 

The most important part of any plan for a final examination, 
however, must necessarily be the examination itself. By its character 
the value of the senior year will be largely determined, since, if the 
examination does not really test the progress they have made, the 
students will be quick to sense the fact. The ever present perils for 
such an examination are that it may be too factual, requiring only 
a good memory and the diligent assimilation of information, and on 
the other hand that it may too broad and vague, calling forth only 
the expression of superficial opinion to which the undergraduate 
mind is all too prone. The first mentioned danger is probably the 



Report by the Dean of the College 29 

more real one at Bryn Mawr. We are all agreed that the ideal 
examination is one which enables the person examined to show how 
far she has mastered the method and technique of the subject, how 
far she is able to reason about it, and to use accurately and intelli' 
gently the information which she possesses. Probably the best method 
by which this can be ascertained is to give a considerable choice of 
questions, all of which are searching in the sense that the answer 
demands background and the ability to reason as well as a knowledge 
of facts. The experience of Smith College in examining its Honours 
students, as well as the experience of the Bryn Mawr Faculty in the 
preparation of Bryn Mawr entrance examinations many years ago, 
led us to believe that a central committee whose function should be 
advice and criticism to the departments might help in setting a good 
standard for the examination and in finding the best types of question 
for such examinations. Such a committee has therefore come into 
existence and will begin its work next spring. 

The Honours work as arranged for the better students in the senior 
class is organized this year as it has been in the past, with the stress 
on independent research of an elementary kind. No student will 
receive the degree with distinction in the subject, however, unless 
she attains a grade of eighty in the Final Examination. 

The Advising of Students 

While the changes in the curriculum which affect the academic 
work of every undergraduate in the college are always the most 
important and interesting part of the business of the Dean of the 
College, there are other changes, especially in the advising of students, 
which in the last few years have been taking place gradually and 
without attracting much general attention. The Director of Admis- 
sions and I have been conscious for many years that we were in 
need of expert assistance in dealing with students who were having 
difficulties in adjusting to college work. There are in every year 
cases requiring the help of a psychologist who is able to handle the 
educational tests which in recent years have been brought to a high 
degree of efficiency and who can make a diagnosis of the source of 
a girl's difficulties and advise her and us of possible remedies. We 
have been very fortunate for the last two years in having the assist' 
ance of Dr. Katharine McBride, of the departments of Psychology 
and Education, who is, I believe, ideally fitted to understand the 
personal as well as the intellectual problems of the younger students 



30 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

and to give them more expert advice as to the remedying of their 
defective study habits than either Miss Ward or I can possibly do. 

Last year Miss McBride worked with six freshmen and one sophc 
more who were in academic difficulties. These students took a reading 
test at the beginning of the work with her and another when they 
had finished. All of them showed an increase in speed of reading 
and in power of comprehension. One student who had made in 
October a score which placed her in the thirtieth percentile of the 
college group throughout the country achieved in the spring a score 
which raised her to the eightieth percentile. That these figures were 
not due to any accident was proved by the fact that this same 
student, who had one of the least promising examination records, 
rated in the upper half of the freshman class by the end of the 
year. This year Miss McBride has tested all the freshmen, and began 
in October working with a selected group whose scholastic aptitude 
test and reading test taken together seemed to indicate that they 
might have special difficulties in adjusting to college. I believe that 
this work is now well established and should continue to be a regular 
part of the freshman program. 

Another form of special advising which the Dean's Office has 
never been in a position to give very effectively is that which is 
handled by the personnel bureaus of many of the larger colleges 
with the purpose of guiding students toward the kind of work for 
which they will be best suited when they leave college. While it 
is not essential, perhaps, that every undergraduate should devote 
attention during her college course to an analysis of her own abilities 
in order to determine the kind of work for which she is fitted, there 
is no question that many girls save much time and effort if they are 
able to face the problem intelligently before they graduate. Our 
Bureau of Recommendations has always collected information as to 
the openings available for women, but expert advice can be given 
only by some One who has made a study of the adjustment of young 
men and young women in their jobs. As in the case of the special 
advice to be given to the weaker freshmen, it is of the utmost impor- 
tance that vocational advice should be offered by a woman who 
fully understands what college students are like and how fluid their 
ideas often are. She must have the power of catching their imagina- 
tion and holding their interest while she makes them see the grim 
realities of the situation as far as jobs are concerned and curbs their 
flights of fancy about attractive careers in the theater and the 



Report by the Dean of the College 31 

diplomatic service. We have been very fortunate for the last few 
years in having with us for brief visits Mrs. Lillian Gilbreth, whose 
experience as the head of a firm which gives expert advice 
on problems of efficiency management and personnel has made her 
acquainted with a very wide range of positions in industry and 
business and whose acquaintance with young people, gained through 
her own children and through many contacts at educational institu- 
tions, gives her real insight into their problems. I hope that for the 
next few years Mrs. Gilbreth can pay us visits long enough in 
duration to enable her to meet the students in groups and individually 
from year to year so that she may direct their attention to possible 
sources of information about jobs and to those opportunities which 
often exist for making valuable contacts and gaining experience 
during the college years. 

The Bryn Mawr May Day 

This summary of some of the developments which have been 
going on in recent years and which connect themselves with the 
office of the Dean of the College does not, as will be readily seen, 
form a chronicle of the year 19354936. In closing, however, I 
would like to mention one feature of the past year which deserves 
to go on record. The presentation of the May Day has always 
created problems for the Dean of the College which do not occur 
in other years, and it was as a result of the experience of the 1932 
May Day that the suggestion was made that the college year be 
extended by five days in order to avoid the danger of a general 
breakdown of college work as a result of the presentation of May 
Day. I am happy to be able to report that the schedule as it was 
worked out last year did give the students sufficient time to make 
a good recovery between the presentation of May Day and the final 
examination period. The casting and rehearsal of the plays went 
through more smoothly than I remember at any time in my previous 
experience of May Day, and except for a certain amount of last- 
minute rush on the costumes all the preparations for the performance 
seem to have passed off without too great a burden on any of the 
undergraduate performers. I believe that the undergraduates them- 
selves have expressed doubts, as they often have in the past, as to 
whether the game is quite worth the candle, but I think that from 
the point of view of the Dean of the College and the Faculty an 
acceptable working program has now been put into practice for the 



32 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

presentation of May Day. Whether the students will be sufficiently 
courageous to carry out such a schedule in a year when the seniors 
are facing the Final Examination in the major field remains to be 
seen; but I myself believe that with three years of experience behind 
us, the preparation for that examination should not be any more of 
a tax on the energy and physical strength of the students than the 
former academic program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HELEN TAFT MANNING 



REPORT BY THE DEAN OF THE 
GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Registration 

The Graduate School of 1935-36 numbered 114* students, includ- 
ing the following significant groups: 

3 European Fellows studying abroad: 

Elizabeth Monroe, A.B. Bryn Mawr College 193 5. Bryn 

Mawr European Fellow, Shippen Foreign Scholar, Newnham 

College, Cambridge University, 1935-3 6. 

Josephine Justice Williams, A.B. Bryn Mawr College 

1933. Bryn Mawr European Fellow, Shippen Foreign Scholar, 

University of Hamburg, 1935-36. 

Isabel Scribner Stearns, A.B. Smith College 1931; MA. 

Bryn Mawr College 1933. Mary Elizabeth Garrett European 

Fellow, University of Oxford, 1935-36. 

I Exchange Scholar studying abroad: 

Catherine Palmer Robinson, A.B. Bryn Mawr College 
1920 and M.A. 1921. Franco-American Exchange Scholar, 
University of Paris, 1935-36. 

20 Resident Fellows: 

(1 graduate of Bryn Mawr and 19 graduates of 16 different 
colleges or universities.) 

27 Resident Scholars 

6 T^lon-Resident Scholars: 

(2 in the Department of French, 1 in the Department of 
Biology, 1 in the Department of Education, 1 in the Depart- 
ment of History, 1 in the Department of Social Economy.) 



* Registration of the Graduate School in the last nine years (not including 

members of the Graduate School studying abroad) : 

1926-27 — 101 1929-30 — 102 1932-33 — 106 

1927-28—113 1930-31 — 104 1933-34—112 

1928-29 — 108 1931-32 — 106 1934-35 — 100 

The registration in 1936-37 is 129, including 8 graduate students studying 

abroad. 

[33] 



34 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

4 Foreign Students studying at Bryn Mawr on Scholarships given 
by Bryn TsAawr: 

Mary Paul Collins Scholar in Biology: 

Hedvig Margareta Nordenskiold, Filosofie Kandidat, Uni- 
versity of Stockholm, 1934. 

Franco-American Exchange Scholar: 

Paquerette Nasse, Baccalaureat, Latin, Langues, Philoso- 
phic, 1928 and 1929; Licence es-Lettres, University of 
Bordeaux, 1934. 

Chinese Graduate Scholar (Scholarship awarded by the Bryn 

Mawr Chinese Scholarship Committee) : 

Grace Lillian Chin Lee, A.B. Barnard College 1935. 

Grace X)odge Scholar in Social Economy: 

Isabel Janet Blain, M.A. Glasgow University 1932. 

1 student from the University of Pennsylvania under our Co* 
operative Plan:* 

, A. Williams Postel, A.B. University of Pennsylvania 1931 
and M.S. 1935. Studying in the Department of Geology. 

8 students holding awards from outside institutions: 
Sara Anderson 

A.B. Mount Holyoke College 193?. Scholar in Classical Archaeol- 
ogy, Semester I, 1935-36, Bryn Mawr College. S\inner Fellowship 
in Art and Archaeology from Mount Holyo\e College. 

Barbara Eleanor Brown 

B.A. Queen's University 1934 and M.A. 1935. Scholar in 
Classics, Queen's University, 1934-3 5; Scholar in Latin, Bryn 
Mawr College, 193 5-36. Arts Research Travelling Fellowship 
from Queen's University. 

Grace Carolyn Carter 

A.B. Mount Holyoke College 1935; Scholar in French, Bryn 
Mawr College, 193 5-36. Frances Mary Hazen Fellowship from 
Mount Holyo\e College. 

Elizabeth Ruth Hosmer 

A,B. Mount Holyoke College 193 5; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 
1936. Graduate Student in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1935-36. 
Bordwell Memorial Fellowship from Mount Holyo\e College. 



* 1 student in the Bryn Mawr Graduate School was registered in the 
Course in Selected Topics on the History of Tudor England at the University 
of Pennsylvania. (In 1936-37, 6 students from the University of Pennsylvania 
and Haverford College are studying in the Bryn Mawr Graduate School and 
3 Bryn Mawr students are studying at the University of Pennsylvania.) 



Report by the Dean of the Graduate School 35 

Daphne Hughes 

A.B. University of Oregon 1931. Fellow of the Philadelphia 
Young 'Women's Christian Association, studying in the Depart- 
ment of Social Economy. 

Marion Monaco 

A.B. New Jersey College for Women 193 5; M.A. Bryn Mawr 
College 1936. Graduate Student in French, Bryn Mawr College, 
1935-36. Voorhees Fellowship from 7\[eu> Jersey College for 
"Women. 

Thelma Chiquita Wilhelmy 

A.B. Beaver College 193 5; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1936. 
Graduate Student in French, Bryn Mawr College, 193 5-36. 
Scholarship for Graduate Study from Beaver College. 

Margaret Dorothy Wood 

A.B. University of Rochester 1934. Scholar of the Philadelphia 
Young "Women's Christian Association, studying in the Depart- 
ment of Social Economy. 

The distribution through the departments of the 110 graduate 
students at Bryn Mawr was as follows: 

Department of Biology, 8 Department of History, 7 

Department of Chemistry, 2 Department of History of 
Department of Classical Archae- Art, 4 

ology, 8 Department of Italian, 1 

Department of Economics and Department of Latin, 5 

Politics, 4 Department of Mathematics, 4 

Department of Education, 8 Department of Philosophy, 4 

Department of English, 14 Department of Physics, 5 

Department of French, 12 Department of Psychology, 4 

Department of Geology, 3 Department of Social Econ- 
Department of German, 2 omy, 9 

Department of Greek, 3 Department of Spanish, 3 

Academic Activity 

The Degree of Master of Arts 

At Commencement in June 1936, the degree of Master of Arts 
was awarded to eighteen candidates in fourteen departments. Although 
the M.A. degree has been under fire in American universities and 
colleges, and has received its full share of criticism on the Bryn Mawr 
campus, this wide distribution of candidates through a large number 
of departments shows the significance attached to it in the minds of 
the students of this year. 



36 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy was awarded to: 
Ona Meigs Fowler 

A.B. Hillsdale College 1918; M.S. University of Michigan 1949. 
Subjects: Morphology and Biochemistry. Dissertation: The Inflw 
ence of Extracts Obtained from Different Regions and Different 
Ages of Chic\ Embryos on the Growth of Fibroblasts. 

Madeline Levin 

A.B. Hunter College 1932; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1933. Subject: 
Mathematics. Dissertation: An Extension of the Lefschetz Inter' 
section Theory. 

Katharine Shepard 

A.B. Bryn Mawr College 1928 and M.A. 1929. Subjects: Classical 
Archaeology and Greek. Dissertation: Sea Monsters in Gree\, 
Etruscan and Roman Art. 

The number of doctors was unusually small, explainable by the 
unusually large number, fourteen, awarded in 1935 and the still 
larger number, eighteen, at the present estimate, that may be 
expected in 1937. 

Special Research Project 

Upon the recommendation to the Trustees by the President, the 
Department of Biology was chosen as the second Department to 
receive the award of the Mary Paul Collins Scholarship for Foreign 
Women and of two Special Scholarships in the furtherance of a 
research project.* 

A very gratifying number of applications was received for the 
Mary Paul Collins Scholarship, from candidates in Argentina, England, 
Germany, Hungary, Italy, Mexico, Roumania, Scotland, Sweden and 
Turkey. The award was made to Hedvig Margareta Nordenskiold, 
of Sweden, Filosofie Kandidat, University of Stockholm, 1934. 

The research project of the Department of Biology was announced 
in the following terms on the poster offering the Mary Paul Collins 
Scholarship : 

"The research program for the year will deal with the 
subject Cell Division and Its Experimental Control. The 
research will be based on both animal and plant material 
and will be pursued from biological and biophysical points 
of view. All work on the effects of radiation will be done 
with the collaboration of the Department of Physics. Candi' 
dates should have had training in Cell Physiology and must 
be able to use English and read French and German. The 

* The Department of Mathematics was the first department named under 
this rotating plan. 



Report by the Dean of the Graduate School 37 

holder of the scholarship will work under the supervision 
of Professor David Hilt Tennent, who will offer a seminary 
in Cytology. Professor Walter Michels, of the Department 
of Physics, will offer a course in Light adapted to the needs 
of students of Biology." 

Of the actual year's work, the Department reports: 

"In the development of the program for the year Dr. 
Tennent gave a seminary meeting twice every week, in 
which he reviewed the literature on the effects of radium 
and Roentgen irradiation, of narcotics, of vital dyes and of 
other chemical substances on cell division. He also presented 
the results of his own work on the photodynamic action 
of vital dyes. 

"In the laboratory Miss Hedvig Nordenskiold, Mary Paul 
Collins Foreign Scholar in Biology, made a study of the 
photodynamic action of neutral red on cells of the root 
of Phleum pratense, or Timothy grass; Miss Mary Alice 
Cunningham, Special Scholar in Biology, worked on the 
photodynamic effect of - brilliant cresyl blue, and Miss 
Carolyn Anne Hierhoker, Special Scholar in Biology, on 
that of neutral red on the dividing cells of the leaves of 
Elodea canadensis; Dr. Gardiner carried on experiments 
on the photodynamic effect of neutral red on the develop- 
ment of fish eggs, and Dr. Michels and Dr. Tennent collabo- 
rated in work on the effect of high speed electrons on the 
cells of amphibian larvae. 

"The results of these investigations will be published 
when the work is completed.' 11 

Academic Cooperation with Neighboring Institutions 

The exchange of seminaries in the Departments of Mathematics 
of the University of Pennsylvania and Bryn Mawr has continued 
this year, Professor Hedlund lecturing at the University of Pennsylvania 
and Professor Kline at Bryn Mawr. Professor E. A. Speiser, of the 
University of Pennsylvania, spoke in December before the Joint Bryn 
Mawr Archaeological and Classical Journal Clubs on the excavations 
at Ras Shamra and the new discoveries made there and elsewhere 
by the French in Syria, affecting our ideas about the Phoenicians 
and the alphabet. The passage of graduate students between the 
various institutions is in operation and requires no formalities beyond 
presenting a letter from the Home Dean and securing the permission 
of the professor to enter the course desired in the cooperating 
institution. 



38 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Foreign Language Exchange 

The successful work of Mademoiselle Nasse, Foreign Fellow from 
France, both with the undergraduate students whom she taught in 
connection with the work of the first year French, and the graduate 
students in French whose comrade she was in the graduate hall, 
makes the possibility of further foreign exchanges with the other 
countries (Germany, Italy, Spain) whose languages are taught at 
Bryn Mawr seem highly desirable. 

European Fellowships 

On March 19, 1936, the Faculty voted to recommend to the 
Trustees as Mary E. Garrett European Fellow 

Dorothy Anne Buchanan 

A.B. Smith College 1930; MA. Bryn Mawr College 1931. Scholar 
in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1930-3 1; Instructor in English, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1931-32; Teacher at The Buckingham School, 
1932-33; Instructor in English, Vassar College, 1933-34; Fellow 
» in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1934-3?; Warden of Wyndham 
and Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1935-36. 

Of Miss Buchanan, Professor Chew, her director, wrote: 

"Her first year of graduate work here (during which she 
began, at the suggestion of Professor Osgood, the piece of 
research which is developing into her dissertation) was one 
of notable promise, as is indicated not only by the fact that 
in spite of her youth she was appointed an instructor here 
for the following year but by the lasting impression which 
she made upon so exacting a scholar as Professor Osgood. 
Thereafter, while teaching in a secondary school, she con- 
tinued her studies in the Widener Library. Then followed 
a year as an instructor at Vassar, where she made the best 
of impressions upon her colleagues, some of whom have 
expressed to me their wish to recall her to a permanent 
position on their faculty when she has obtained the doctor's 
degree. 

"I have the highest confidence in this candidate — the best 
candidate I have ever commended to the Committee. She 
came to us from Smith full of promise that has been more 
than realised. She has held to her course in spite of 
difficulties of the most serious kind. She has courage, 
determination and dignity. Her work has been uniformly 
excellent, showing not merely the industry to be expected 
of every graduate student but power of organisation, a 
clear-sighted critical faculty, and calm judgment. The sub- 
ject of her thesis was suggested to her by one of the two 



Report by the Dean of the Graduate School 39 

foremost specialists in Spenserian scholarship in this country. 
Of its value Dr. Osgood is the best judge, but I may say 
(since I took over from him the duty of directing it and 
have followed its progress step by step) that I fully 
agree with him." 

Residence 

Radnor Hall had a full house in 1935-36 with Jeannette LeSaulnier 
as Senior Resident, replacing Catherine P. Robinson, who had so 
admirably filled the position since the opening of the graduate hall 
and who went to Paris to do research for her doctor's thesis as the 
first Franco-American Exchange Scholar for Bryn Mawr. In addition, 
4 graduate students were in residence in Low Buildings. 

The Graduate School, thanks to the generosity of the Trustees, 
the President and the Alumnae Association, felt itself an integral 
part in the festivities of the Fiftieth Anniversary and took especial 
satisfaction in the honourable places allotted to the representatives of 
the Doctors of Philosophy and Masters of Arts at the celebration 
in Goodhart Hall on November second. The students of Radnor 
Hall were also deeply moved by the gift made by President Emeritus 
Thomas, a few weeks before her death, of the pictures from her old 
office for the walls of the Radnor dining room. 

Entertaining in the Graduate Hall takes the form of weekly teas 
for students, faculty and outside friends, and an occasional dinner 
with guest-speakers. At one of these dinners, Dean H. Lamar 
Crosby, of the Graduate School of the University of Pennsylvania, 
and Mrs. Crosby were the guests. Dean Crosby is Chairman of the 
Joint Committee organized for academic cooperation by the University 
of Pennsylvania, Swarthmore, Haverford, the Franklin Institute and 
Bryn Mawr, and he spoke as to future members of college faculties 
on the actual cooperation in our neighborhood and the great principle 
at issue of having institutions of higher learning use to the full the 
human and material resources within their reach. Professor Erika 
von Erhardt-Siebold, who, since her first American year as one of 
Bryn Mawr's foreign fellows, has been on the Mount Holyoke faculty 
and a Guggenheim Fellow and is now a member of the Vassar 
Department of English, made a very gracious gesture in the direction 
of her old Graduate School by bringing to a much interested group 
of faculty and students, forming a cross-section of Bryn Mawr's 
philological activities, an illustrated lecture on her research (both 
philological and archaeological) on Anglo-Latin Riddles. 



40 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

The Immediate Future 

Revision of the M.A. Requirements 

The successful operation of the new requirements for the Ph.D. 
degree has been one factor in the increasing dissatisfaction of faculty 
and students alike with the present requirements for the M.A. degree. 
The Bryn Mawr Academic Council voted at its May meeting to 
instruct the Graduate Committee to proceed with a revision of the 
requirements in effect at Bryn Mawr. The Graduate Office spent 
the summer collecting data on practices elsewhere. Two committees, 
one of the young faculty, and one of students, are preparing reports. 
The Graduate Committee hopes to bring a plan to the Council in 
January, 1937. 

Extension of Residence 

The increasing demand for residence makes possible the hope that 
Low Buildings, so admirably adapted for our purposes, and as it 
appeals, less needed by the faculty than in the past, may become 
a second graduate hall.* 

Respectfully submitted, 

EUNICE MORGAN SCHENCK 



* At the time of the writing of this report, December 1936, there are 
10 graduate students in Low Buildings. 



REPORT BY THE LIBRARIAN 

I have the honour to present the annual report of the work of the 
College Library for the year ending June 30, 1936. 

Size and Growth of the Library 

The following table shows the additions made from various sources 
and the total present extent of the library. The corresponding table 
for the year 1934-35 is given for purposes of comparison. 

Number of volumes June 30, 1935 150,244 

Number of volumes added 1934-35 1935-36 

By purchase 2,317 2,653 

By binding 661 713 

By gifts and exchange 600 776 

By replacement 127 70 

Total additions 3,705 4,212 

Volumes withdrawn 481 346 

Net increase 3,224 3,866 

3,866 

Total volumes June 30, 1936 154,110 

Pamphlets added 422 361 

Pamphlets withdrawn 63 272 

Net gain 3 59 89 

Total accessioned pamphlets June 30, 1936 8,979 

These figures represent catalogued pamphlets which are unbound. 
When pamphlets are bound they are withdrawn and again acces- 
sioned as books. There is also in the library a growing collection 
of several thousand pamphlets, for the most part uncatalogued dis- 
sertations from foreign universities, which are alphabetically arranged 
by author. So many of these dissertations deal with some minor 

[41] 



42 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

and obscure point in German history, philosophy, finance or medicine 
that they are not of sufficient importance to us to catalogue but are 
available if needed. 

The volumes added were distributed by classes as follows showing 
that the relative rate of increase by subject matter remains about 
the same. 

1934-35 1935-36 

Class General works 206 204 

Class 1 Philosophy and Psychology 240 197 

Class 2 Religion 129 73 

Class 3 Economics, Sociology, Education 778 710 

Class 4 Philology \ 193 170 

Class 5 Science , 463 478 

Class 6 Applied Arts 62 210 

Class 7 Fine Arts 296 312 

Class 8 Literature 840 1,178 

Class 9 History, Biography, etc 498 680 

Total '. 3,705 4,2 1 2 

The library has received by gift and exchange from societies, 
institutions and government bureaus, over one thousand books and 
pamphlets. From individual donors more than 500 volumes have 
been received. All of these gifts are appreciated and have been 
acknowledged by the library on behalf of the college. A few are 
of such significance as to deserve brief mention here. 

Miss S. Frances VanKirk, '93, presented 121 volumes dealing with 
the Elizabethan drama which greatly augmented the library's collec- 
tion in that field. Many early and limited editions of the works of 
Jonson, Heywood, Lyly, Dekker, Middleton, Marlowe and others 
were included, and are of particular value to scholars working in 
English drama. A number of titles duplicated those already in the 
library and these were put in the English seminary to facilitate the 
work of the graduate students. 

In memory of Marjorie Jefferies Wagoner, class of 1918, and 
from 1924 until her death in June 1934, physician to the college, 
her husband, Dr. George Wagoner, has presented the library with 
a collection of 175 medical and scientific books. A number of the 
books are on clinical and theoretical medicine; many of them she 
herself had collected and used as a student and as a practicing 



Report by the Librarian 43 

physician, while others are from Dr. Wagoner's own library. These 
have been placed in the doctor's office in the Infirmary where they 
will be invaluable to the doctor and staff, for they include not only 
classic medical and surgical texts but also those on the most modern 
theory and practice. In addition there are books on the medical 
sciences and mental hygiene, the latter being her particular interest. 
The gift as a whole is a valuable contribution to the scientific 
branches of the college. 

The Italian department was augmented by the gift of 41 volumes 
from the library of Mrs. Beulah Brylawski Amram, class of 1902, 
through her daughter, Mrs. Elinor Amram Nahm. The group com' 
prised books of verse and prose by many Italian authors, as well as 
critical works on Italian literature. 

In response to the Librarian's plea for books for the students for 
general reading to add to the Infirmary collection, Mr. and Mrs. 
Frederick Johnson Manning sent 85 volumes of novels and detective 
fiction. These greatly increased the selection available for entertaining 
convalescent students. 

Miss Caroline Newton presented the library with Sigmund Freud's 
"Collected Papers," in four volumes, N. Y. 1924-34, and the 
Psychoanalytic Quarterly. These are important additions to the 
library's collection of psychological books. 

From the Bodleian Library, Oxford, we received the "Catalogue 
of the Sutherland Collection," in two volumes published in 1837. 
The Sutherland collection comprises a large series of historical prints 
and drawings mainly contained in Clarendon's History of the Rebel- 
lion, Clarendon's Life and Burnet's History of his own times. The 
catalogue is valuable as a historical reference work. 

Mr. James Louis Garvin presented the library with a subscription 
to "'The Observer," London, at the suggestion of his daughter, Miss 
Katharine Garvin, who was formerly associated with the Bryn Mawr 
faculty. Another valuable gift of this type is the subscription to 
Fortune which Mr. Frederick Johnson Manning has sent to us for 
several years. Through the anonymous gift of an alumna the library 
received a membership in the Museum of Modern Art entitling us 
to receive its catalogues and bulletins. 

The First Year History Class, division II, purchased a second set 
of the eight volume Cambridge medieval history, N. Y. 1926-36. 
Duplicates of this type aid materially in serving the needs of many 
students. 



44 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Exchange relations were started during the year with a new 
library, the Goteborgs Stadsbibliothek, sending us 24 volumes of the 
Goteborgs Hogskola, Arsskrift, 1912-1935. This brought down to 
date a serial which we had lacked for many years. From various 
foreign universities 475 dissertations were received by exchange 
through the Smithsonian Institution. 

From the Fiftieth Anniversary Drive $300.00 was received for 
Archaeology and $37.35 for Psychology. Mrs. Learned Hand, '98, 
gave $50.00 for Biology. 

Dr. Rufus Jones presented a check for $100.00 to be used for 
books in any department where needed. 

Miss Ella Riegel, '89, continued her generous support of the 
library by a gift of $100.00 to Archaeology, $50.00 to Biology and 
several books for the New Book Room. 

While books bought during the year have been, for the most part, 
current publications, suited or necessary to the requirements of under- 
graduate instruction, we can report the purchase of a few outstanding 
works for research in several departments. 

Art and Archaeology. 

Acta archaeologica. 5 vols. Kobenhavn, 1930-34. 

Bollettino d'arte. 29 vols., Rome, 1907-3 5. 

Madrid. Junta superior de excavaciones y antigiiedades. Memorias. 

18 vols. Madrid, 1916-34. 
Liverpool University. Institute of archaeology. Annals of archaeology 

and anthropology. 22 vols. Liverpool, 1908-3 5. 
Swedish Cyprus expedition; finds and results of the excavations in 

Cyprus, vol. 2. Stockholm, 1934. 
Evans, Sir A. J. Palace of Minos, vol. 4. London, 193 5. 
Duran y Sanpere, Agustin. Los retablos de piedra. 2 vols. Barcelona, 

1932-34. 

Hautecoeur, Louis 6? Wiet, Gaston. Les mosquees du Caire. 2 vols. 

Paris, 1932. 
Henry, Franchise. La sculpture irlandaise pendant les douze premiers 

siecles de Tere chretienne. 2 vols, in 1. Paris, 1933. 
Vitry, Paul & Briere, Gaston. Documents de sculpture francaise. 

3 vols. Paris, 1906-13. 

Classics. 

Steffens, Franz. Lateinisches palaographie. 2 verm. aufl. Berlin, 1929. 

Dimitrakos, D. Mega lexikon tes Hellenikes glosses, vols. 1-2. Athens, 
1933-36. 

Diels, Hermann, ed. Die fragmente der Vorsokratiker — 5 aufl., hrsg. 
von Walther Kranz. 2 vols. Berlin, 1934-3 5. 



Report by the Librarian 45 

French. 

Bainville, Jacques. Histoire de France. 2 vols. Paris, 1926. 

Gide, A. P. G. Oeuvres completes, ed. — par L. Martin-ChaufEer. 

vol. MO. Paris, 1932-36. 
Le Theatre anglois. 8 vols. Translated by Pierre Antoine de La Place. 

London, 1746-49. 

History. 

Scriptores rerum germanicarum in usum scholarum ex Monumentis 
Germaniae historicis. 24 vols. Hannoverae, 1839493?. 

Mathematics. 

From the library of the late Dr. Emmy Noether 20 volumes of rare 
and out of print mathematical works were purchased for the 
department. 

Philosophy. 

Hegel, G. W. F. Samtliche werke, hrsg. von Herman Glocker. 23 vols. 
Stuttgart, 1927-3 5. 

Science. 

Beilstein, F. K. Handbuch der organischen chemie, und Erzangungswerk. 

Berlin, 193 5-36. 8 volumes to bring our get up to date. 
Handbuch der physik — hrsg. von H. Geiger und Karl Scheel. 24 vols. 

Berlin, 1926-33. 

Spanish. 

Garcia Icazbalceta, Joaquin. Bibliografia Mexicana del siglo XVI. 

Primera parte. Mexico, 1886. 
Medina, J. T. Biblioteca hispano-chilena (1523-1817). 3 vols. Santiago 

de Chile, 1897-99. 

Catalogue Department 

The year ended with no arrears of current cataloguing, and with 
substantial progress made in the recataloguing of the books imperfectly- 
listed in earlier years. The lengthy and difficult task of recataloguing 
the Greek and Latin classical literature was finally completed after 
having been carried on intermittently since 1918. In addition to this, 
the recataloguing of the library's religious books was started; those 
covering general works, Biblical texts and criticism being completed 
during the year. 

Mrs. Craig continued to devote considerable time to helping com- 
plete the "Classified list of 4800 serials," started last year by four 
college and university libraries in this area. She spent many hours 
in checking references and in reading proof for the book which 
has since been published. 

After our catalogue cards were copied for the Union catalogue 
project (which is explained later in this report), we agreed to make 



46 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

an extra author card for all new titles added to the library in order 
to keep our holdings up'to-date. This involved much extra clerical 
work. The changing of location marks on the catalogue cards for 
those books moved to Taylor in the spring and the withdrawals of 
duplicate copies from the stacks, meant that many cards had to be 
removed from the catalogue and the information on them corrected. 
The statistical summary of the work of the department for the 
year is as follows: 

1934-35 1935-36 

Titles catalogued 2,552 2,844 

Volumes, copies and editions added 2,713 3,223 

Cards added 16,995 18,748 

Cards added to department catalogues 408 431 

Recataloguing 1 ,600 1,542 

Binding and Periodicals 

On July 1st, 1935, there were 707 volumes at the binders. 1581 
volumes were sent during the year of which 1731 were returned 
bound,' leaving 557 at the binders June 30th, 1936. Of the volumes 
which were bound, 265 were new books supplied unbound, 942 
were volumes of periodicals and 524 were old books needing rebinding. 

Circulation and Reference 

Record of volumes circulated: 1934-35 1935-36 

July 84 1 581 

August 1,038 465 

September 1,856 3,148 

October 6,204 6,487 

November 4,447 3,175 

December 3,626 3 ,489 

January 4,568 5,03 1 

February 4,9 3 2 4,927 

March 5,018 4,65 3 

April 4,3 37 4,473 

May 4,28 1 3,222 

June 1,032 1,537 

42,180 41,188 

Of the total circulation, 8,796 volumes were placed on reserve in 
the Seminaries and in the Reserve Book Room. Statistics show that 
the Faculty and Staff borrowed 17% of the total, the Students 62%, 
and the Reserves account for .the remaining 21%. 



Report by the Librarian 47 

My last report showed a decrease in withdrawals by the students, 
and last year there was a still further decrease of 992 loans. In the 
former instance, the absence of the Summer School made a slight 
difference. However, we feel that the situation is in reality due to 
the new system inaugurated two years ago by the Circulation 
Librarian of allowing all Honour Students, as well as any under- 
graduates who are working on a semester report, to keep the books 
which they need for their special work indefinitely without renewal. 
This decreases the circulation figures appreciably, since there is a 
record of one charge for each book, where, formerly, under the old 
system, a book was returned at the end of two weeks, discharged, 
left for three days on the shelves and taken out again by the same 
borrower. 

The following table indicates the circulation of books by classes, 
excluding the books sent to the reserves: 

Bibliography and General Periodicals (Bound) 503 Volumes 

Philosophy and Psychology 2,352 

Religious and Church History 867 

Economics, Sociology, Education 3,634 

Philology 614 

Natural Sciences* 578 

Applied Arts 202 

Fine Arts 2,027 

Literature 16,467 

History and Biography 5,148 



32,392 
No figures are available of the use of the libraries in Dalton Hall, 
the Halls of Residence, or the Reserve Book Room, after the books 
have once been sent there. 

At the beginning of the year, the incoming undergraduate and 
graduate students were given preliminary instruction in the use of 
the library in general and of the reference books in particular. 
Throughout the year, the Reference Librarian has helped the students 
increasingly with their special bibliographical problems. There is a 
growing need for her presence at her desk during the day hours, 
instead of the present day and evening schedule. 

Appeal to the Reference Department by the students in the case 
of extra curricular activities, such as drama and the May Day Pageants 
has always met with an immediate and sympathic response. This 
* Dalton Hall science books are not included. 



48 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

attitude in recent years has been a great influence toward the acquisi- 
tion of a remarkable collection of books which makes the production 
of a play virtually independent of other libraries. The library now 
owns, to mention only a few of this group: the 3 volume set of 
P. Mercurfs Costumes historiques; John Nichols 1 The progresses and 
public processions of Queen Elizabeth in 3 volumes; 4 volumes of 
the Album historique of A. Parmentier; J. B. Planche's Cyclopaedia 
of costume in 2 volumes, with its beautiful illustrations in color; 
the standard 6 volume set of Le Costume historique by A. Racinet; 
the Dictionnaire raisonne du mobilier frangais by Viollet le Due 
in 6 volumes. 

Inter-library Loan 

We are deeply indebted to the various libraries which have sent 
as inter-library loan the many volumes which we cannot purchase 
and especially are we indebted to the libraries in the vicinity 
for their many courtesies. The number of books indicated here as 
borrowed only partially shows the amount of our indebtedness. Many 
of our 'students go to the libraries to work and some bring back 
books of which we have no record. These figures indicate the books 
sent and returned by mail, and represent a considerable expenditure 
of time in correspondence. 

During the year 197 books have been borrowed from other libraries 
and institutions and 34 books have been lent to other colleges and 
universities. 

Union Catalogue 

In 1933 a proposal was made to combine the catalogues of some 
seventy libraries of the Philadelphia metropolitan area into one great 
Union Catalogue which would indicate the location of any desired 
book. A number of unavoidable delays were encountered in the 
early stages of the undertaking and more than a year was spent in 
the investigation of methods. Finally funds were raised to make a 
test not only of methods but to demonstrate whether the proposed 
catalogue would be practical, and to provide a basis for an approxi- 
mate estimate of the cost of compiling it. When the test proved 
successful and the Committee had definite information to present 
to the Works Progress Administration a request was made for 
Government funds to finance the undertaking, which was granted as 
it was one which would give employment to a number of unemployed 



Report by the Librarian 49 

clerical workers. The plan adopted was to photograph the holdings 
of each library on 16 mm. cinema film with a Recordak camera, to 
assemble the films in a central workshop and copy them on to 
standard size- cards and file them in catalogue drawers with the 
holdings of all other libraries in the area. Early in 1936 a camera 
and two operators were sent to Bryn Mawr and they worked in the 
basement of the Stacks for three months filming the cards in our 
catalogue. Only the main entry card was used and it took consider- 
able time to go through the catalogue selecting the 108,329 author 
cards from the title and subject cards which comprise a dictionary 
catalogue such as ours. We have cooperated in every way with the 
Committee in this work, having one of our cataloguers oversee 
the filming operation and assist with advice. We have also undertaken 
to furnish the Union Catalogue with an extra card for all accessions 
and withdrawals since the film record was finished in April 1936 
in order to keep our holdings strictly up to date. When completed 
the catalogue will enable us to locate books which we need to borrow 
with a minimum amount of time and labor. 

Inventory 

During the year the search for missing volumes was continued but 
few were found. It is therefore safe to assume that those not located 
since the last inventory are permanently lost. In accordance with 
the established plan of taking an inventory of the Stacks every five 
years, the work will be done through the coming winter. 

Financial Statement 

The financial situation of the library continues about the same. 
The twenty-five per cent discount on German books and periodicals, 
established by the German government during the year, has lessened 
the strain on the Science departments' budgets and enables them to 
reorder some of the titles which had to be discontinued. 

The interest and activities of the alumnae and friends of the 
college continued to be engaged in the drive to raise funds for the 
Science Building and other needs of the college so gifts to the library 
have been few. Our annual expenditures have always exceeded our 
budgetary appropriation and we have missed the extra funds for 
books which we formerly received from individuals and class reunions. 
We are eagerly awaiting the day when the Million Dollar Drive will 
be completed and the library again the recipient of financial aid. 



50 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Regular Library Fund 

Library appropriation for 1935-36 $14,500.00 

Receipts from examination fees, late regis- 
tration, course book fines and academic 
records 344.85 

$14,844.85 
Less amount over-appropriated last year 85.26 

Total income $14,759.59 

Appropriations were made as follows: 

Regular appropriations to departments $12,975.00 

Special appropriations to Art and 

Archaeology '. 225.00 

Special appropriations to departments 1,680.00 

Total appropriated $14,880.00 

Over-appropriated $120.41 

Special Library Funds 

Receipts for the year 1935-36 from special library funds were as 
follows : 

Invested Funds* $1,650.18 

Gifts* 701.35 

Duplicate Book Fund and Sale of Books 440.47 

■ $2,792.00 

Summary of Expenditures 

1934-35 1935-36 

For books $7,522.16 $9',940.42 

For periodicals and continuations 3,945.09 7,373. 92f 

For binding 2,072.10 2,478.62 

For supplies 556.22 709.43 

For postage, express, freight 115.06 76.94 

$14,210.63 $20,579.33 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOIS A. REED 

* Listed in Treasurer's Report. 

f Includes payment of bills for two years for German pefiodicals and 
continuations as the bills for 1934-3 5 were not paid until after July 1st, 193 5. 



REPORT BY THE COLLEGE PHYSICIAN 



There has been more illness during the past year than during the 
preceding one. This may be attributable, in part at least, to the 
unusually severe winter, with long continued cold and grey weather. 
Comparison of infirmary admissions for corresponding months of the 
two years shows that the increase in illness was especially noticeable 
in April and May. Whether this rise in admissions was related to 
the extra exertion required by preparations for May Day is very 
difficult to say. In any case, the students seemed to feel that May 
Day was worth whatever fatigue it caused. Only one student, who 
had acute appendicitis requiring immediate operation, was forced to 
miss May Day because of illness. 

A type of gastro- enteritis was prevalent in the surrounding com- 
munity throughout the year, and a large number of students had it 
in a mild form. In those who were incapacitated by it, the disability 
usually lasted about three days. 

There have been no cases of contagious diseases among students 
during the past year. 

Staff 

The infirmary staff for the year was as follows: 
Miss Mary Slavin, B.S., B.N., Head Nurse 
Miss Minnie Greene, R.N., General Duty Nurse 
Miss Myrtle Bitting, R.N., Second General Duty Nurse 
Miss Dorothy Hadley, A.B., Technician 
The above members of the staff will all return next year and 
will hold the same positions. A change has been made, however, by 
which Miss Hadley will be put on an annual salary instead of a 
weekly salary for part-time work. In the coming year Miss Hadley 
will do full-time work at the very busy seasons of the year, as in 
the first two weeks of college. 

Infirmary 

Thirty-nine more students were admitted to the infirmary during 
this year than during the preceding one. There were twenty-eight 



52 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

more cases of gastritis and gastroenteritis, thirteen more cases of 
exhaustion, and twenty more cases of common colds this year than last. 
The new arrangement, by which resident students received seven 
days' care in the infirmary for payment of the annual fee, worked 
out admirably. The average stay in the infirmary this year was only 
6.9 hours longer than last year, but the available seven days was a 
great benefit to the few students who had prolonged illnesses. 

Dispensary 

Six hundred and ninety-one more dispensary visits were made this 
year than last. The visits for treatments of common colds increased 
by two hundred and thirteen. 

The fact that ultra-violet light treatment was given without charge 
this year necessitated very careful supervision of the students who 
received it. Since the number of treatments was increased up to our 
capacity to give them, the policy was adopted of restricting such 
treatment to those students who clearly needed it most. 

Senior Interviews 

The seniors were not called to the infirmary for final medical 
interviews this year because it seemed impossible to fit the interviews 
in between May Day and examinations. It is hoped that these 
interviews can be resumed next year. 

Hygiene Course 

The hygiene course was given in the first semester. Sixty-seven 
students took the final examination and fifty-three passed it. 

The mannikin loaned by the Biology Department proved very 
valuable for teaching purposes. 

Criticisms of the course were requested from students at the end 
of the semester. Some of these were very helpful and the suggestions 
made will be put into effect. 

Employees 

The health of the employees was good throughout the year. Only 
two employees are now receiving active anti-syphilitic treatment. 
Treatment has been suspended for the time being for the remainder 
of those under supervision for syphilis. 



Report by the College Physician 53 

Records 

An effort has been made during the current year to have the 
diagnostic terms used conform to the Standard Classified J^omenclature 
of Disease, compiled by the National Conference of Nomenclature of 
Disease. Records so kept are increased in value as comparison from 
year to year is facilitated. We have not completely succeeded in 
obtaining conformation of the terms used, but the first steps have 
been taken. In the appended infirmary and dispensary reports 
diseases are grouped according to the J^lomenclature. 

New Equipment 

A mechanical stage for the microscope has been purchased from 
the vaccination fees and the purchase of a plaster cast of a hemisected 
head for the hygiene course is contemplated. 

In the budget for the coming year a sum is included for the 
purchase of a machine to determine basal metabolism. Previously, 
students requiring this determination have been sent to the Bryn 
Mawr Hospital and have been charged a fee of ten dollars. It is 
proposed to charge students a fee of five dollars for determinations 
made at the infirmary. Miss Hadley is competent to carry out these 
tests and to care for the machine. The addition of this piece of 
equipment should make it possible to carry out indicated tests on 
students more frequently than in the past. 

Tuberculosis Survey 

A tuberculosis survey was carried out on all students for the first 
time last fall. It involved the use of a two-dose tuberculin test with 
Purified Protein Derivative tuberculin and X-rays with paper plates 
by the Powers Company. X-rays were made of those students having 
positive tuberculin tests. The X-rays were read by Dr. Marion Loew 
of New York. The students who were X-rayed were each charged 
one dollar for this service. As a result of the survey, four students 
and four employees were found who had pulmonary shadows which 
required follow-up. Check X-rays were made and were read by 
Dr. F. Maurice McPhedran. At the present time two students and 
two employees are still under supervision and will require further 
X-rays. No cases of tuberculosis of sufficient seriousness to require 
withdrawal from college were found. 

It is believed that this case-finding survey was of great importance 
not only because of the individuals with pulmonary shadows found 



54 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

and put under supervision, but also because it afforded an excellent 
demonstration of the methods of public health work and of preventive 
medicine. The students expressed great interest in the survey and 
asked many questions concerning it. 

This survey is to be carried out annually and the graduate students 
will be included in coming years. All new students and all those 
with previous negative tuberculin tests will be tuberculin tested. Any 
then found to be positive, and all positive reactors from preceding 
years, will be X-rayed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

OLGA CUSHING LEARY, M.D. 

Infirmary Report, 1935-36 

Semester I 

Admissions Days Hours 

October 23 68 8 

November 27 54 2 1 /£ 

December 35 101 19 

January 29 85 



Total 114 309 Days V/i hours 

Employees : 

November 1 1 8]/2 

January 2 15 21 J/2 

Total 3 17 Days 6 hours 



Grand Total, Semester 1 117 326 Days llj/j hours 

Semester II 

February 30 147 2]/ 2 

March 31 90 lV/ 2 

April 43 107 1 

May 33 56 22 

Total 137 401 Days 13 hours 

Employees : 

February 11 Yl 

March 1 2 21 

May 2 7 15 

Total 4 11 Days 12|^ hours 



Report by the College Physician 



55 



Grand total admissions: 

Students 251 710 W/ 2 

Employees 7 28 18 ] / 2 

Total 258 739 Days 13 hours 

1936 1937 1938 1939 Graduates Faculty Staff 

Semester I 23 22 27 33 8 1 

Semester II 34 23 35 31 9 1 4 

57 45 62 64 17 1 5 



Semester I Semester II Total 

Diseases of the body as a whole: 

Exhaustion 11 14 25 

Influenza 112 

Mononucleosis — acute infections 112 

Rheumatic Fever 1 1 

Mental Disorders: 

Depression 3 3 

Manic-Depressive Psychosis — Manic Type 1 1 

Diseases of the Skin and Mucous Membranes : 

Cellulitis — Foot 1 1 

Dermatitis Venenata 2 2 

Feruncle 1 1 

Herpes Zoster 1 1 

Laceration — Face 1 1 

Lacerated Wound, Leg 1 1 

Paronychia 1 1 

Diseases of the Musculo- Skeletal System: 

Dislocation — Shoulder 1 1 

Sprain — Ankle 1 1 

Knee 2 2 

Wrist 1 1 

Diseases of the Respiratory System: 

Common Cold 50 67 117 

Laryngitis — Acute 5 16 

Sinusitis 1 1 

Diseases of the Cardio- Vascular System: 

Rheumatic Valvulitis, Inactive 1 1 

Diseases of the Digestive System: 

Appendicitis — Acute 1 1 

Appendicitis — Chronic Recurrent 5 2 7 

Constipation 1 1 

Enteritis — Acute 1 1 

Gastritis — Acute 12 5 17 

Gastro-enteritis — Acute 10 22 32 



56 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Intestional Obstruction — Acute — (from 

adhesions) 1 1 

Jaundice — Acute Catarrhal 1 1 

Tonsillitis — Acute Follicular 1 1 

Diseases of the Genital System: 

Dysmenorrhea — Primary 12 3 

Diseases of the Nervous System: 

Neuralgia 1 1 

Diseases of the Eye: 

Iritis — Syphilitic 1 ■ 1 

Diseases of the Ear: 

Otitis Media 2 2 

Undiagnosed : 

Diagnosis deferred 1 

Headache 2 

Shock 

Nondiagnostic terms for record: 
Convalescent Care 

Abscess incised 

Appendectomy 

Concussion 1 

Fracture — Medial Epicondyle of 

Humerus 

Neck of Humerus 1 

Skull 1 

Lacerated Wound with Infection 1 

Quarantine — Scarlet Fever 1 

Dispensary Report, 1935-36 

Cases Visits 

Diseases of the body as a whole: 

Exhaustion 19 25 

Overstimulation (tea and coffee) 1 1 

Diseases of the Skin and Mucous Membranes: 

Abrasions 14 34 

Acne 6 1 8 

Avulsion of Nail 2 6 

Bites and Stings 6 9 

Blisters 16 21 

Burns :.. 24 90 

Callus 2 2 

Clavus 1 1 

Cyst, Sebacious 1 . 1 

Dermatitis 9 13 

Dermatitis Venenata 33 78 

Dermatophytosis 27 29 



4 


5 


1 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 




1 




1 




1 




1 



Report by the College Physician 57 

Eczema 4 9 

Fibroma — finger tip 1 7 

Foreign body in skin 16 17 

Feruncles 13 46 

Herpes Labialis 1 1 

Herpes Zoster 1 2 

Impetigo Contagiosa 2 14 

Infection, local 14 27 

Ingrown Nail 1 1 

Lacerations 10 39 

Paronychia 8 29 

Pustule 5 1 1 

Reaction to Inoculation, local 2 2 

Urticaria 4 4 

Verruca Plantaris 5 6 

Verruca Vulgaris .". 3 4 

Wounds, Incised 2 10 

Wounds, Puncture 4 10 

Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System : 

Arthritis ..". 5 23 

Bursitis 1 1 

Contusions 25 61 

Dislocations 7 18 

Fractures : 4 12 

Hallux valgus 1 1 

Lordosis _.... 1 1 

Metatarsal arches, weakness of 4 10 

Myositis 8 22 

Sprains 52 176 

Strains 26 36 

Torticollis : 3 3 

Diseases of the Respiratory System: 

Allergic Rhinitis 2 3 

Common Colds _ 395 778 

Epistaxis 2 2 

Laryngitis 2 4 

Septum, Deviation of 1 1 

Ulcer, Nose .• 1 1 

Diseases of the Haemic and Lymphatic System : 

Anemia 8 51 

Adenitis 1 2 

Diseases of the Digestive System : 

Alveolar abscess 4 8 

Appendicitis, chronic recurrent 5 5 

Broken tooth 1 1 

Caries — incisor _ 2 2 

Constipation 15 16 



58 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Fissure — Anal 1 1 

Fistula — Anal 1 5 

Foreign body in stomach (jelly fish) 1 2 

Gastritis, acute 19 27 

Gastroenteritis, acute 30 40 

Haemorrhoids 3 3 

Stomatitis . 1 1 

Ulcer, Mouth 7 1 1 

Unerupted, or partially erupted, third molar 9 16 
Diseases of the Genital System: 

Amenorrhea 1 1 

Dysmenorrhea 62 65 

Menorrhagia 1 32 

Metrorrhagia 4 20 

Oligomenorrhea 2 2 

Vulvitis 2 3 

Diseases of the Nervous System: 

Concussion of brain 1 1 

Neuralgia „ 5 12 

Diseases of the Eye: 

Abscess of eyelid 1 8 

Chalazion 1 7 

Conjunctivitis 12 27 

Foreign body in eye 23 29 

Hordeolum 9 12 

Strabismus 1 2 

Diseases of the Ear: 

Impacted Cerumen 16 25 

Otitis Media _ 1 6 

Undiagnosed Diseases — Classified by Symptoms: 

Coccygodynia 1 3 

Dysphagia 1 1 

Endocrine Dysfunction 1 5 

Eye Strain 21 28 

Headache 27 34 

Insomnia _ 6 8 

Leukorrhea 1 1 

Mastitis 1 1 

Oedema of hand _ 1 8 

Pain — Abdominal 1 1 

Back 2 2 

Ear 6 6 

Eye 1 1 

Groin _ 1 4 

Heel 1 1 

Knee 1 6 

Vertigo 1 1 



Report by the College Physician 59 

Nondiagnostic Terms for Record: 

Excuse cards signed 79 ■ 82 

Medical Certificates filed 29 29 

Health Certificates given 24 24 

Medical Supervision 152 192 

Postoperative Care 5 18 

Prophylactic Injections : 

Allergic Rhinitis 3 41 

Asthma 4 28 

Colds 9 6 1 

Dermatitis Venenata 1 10 

Ferunculosis 1 9 

Typhoid Fever 21 52 

Referred for treatment to: 

Bryn Mawr Hospital, X-Ray 7 8 

Dentist 12 15 

Dermatologist : 4 6 

Gynecologist 1 1 

Oculist 2 2 

Optician 4 4 

Orthopedist 3 3 

Otolaryngologist 4 4 

Ultra- Violet Treatment for: 

Acne 18 223 

Anemia 1 6 

Colds 15 136 

Tonic _ 8 22 

Wound healing 1 8 

Total 1539 3248 



REPORT BY THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLICATION 

Official Publications 

Annual Publications 

The Bryn Mawr College Calendar, Vols. XXVIII and XXIX 
The Library and Halls of Residence, Plans and Descriptions, 
Vol. XXVIII, No. 4, October, 1935. 

Carola Woerishoffer Graduate Department of Social Economy 
and Social Research, Vol. XXVIII, No. 3, December, 1935. 
Undergraduate Courses, Vol. XXIX, No. 1, May, 1936. 
Graduate Courses, Vol. XXIX, No. 2, June, 1936. 
Bryn Mawr College Finding List, November, 1935 
Bryn Mawr College Commencement Programme, June, 1936 

Special Publications 

Regulations of the Academic Council of Bryn Mawr College 
Concerning the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy and Master of 
Arts, October, 1935. (Pamphlet.) 

Bryn Mawr College Fiftieth Anniversary 
Programme, November, 1935. 

Addresses and Historical Sketches, including the addresses in 
connection with the M. Carey Thomas Prise Award, published 
February, 1936. 

In Memory of M. Carey Thomas 

Addresses delivered at a Memorial Service held in Goodhart 
Hall, Bryn Mawr College, December Nineteenth, 1935, pub' 
lished February, 1936. (Pamphlet.) 

In Memory of Emmy Noether 

Abstract of Address delivered by Professor Hermann Weyl of 
the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, N. J., and Copy 
of Letter of Professor Albert Einstein, published March, 1936. 
(Pamphlet.) 

May Day, Bryn Mawr College, 1936 

Programme of "Revels and Plays given by the Schollers of 
Bryn Mawr College," May 8th and 9th, 1936. 

Fiftieth Anniversary Fund 

News-sheets: Million Dollar Minimum, No. 3, October, 1935; 
No. 4, April, 1936. 

[60] 



Report by the Director of Publication 61 

Faculty Publications for the Year 
October 1935-October 1936 

This report is based on questionnaires sent out in October 1936. 

Richard Bernheimer, Ph.D., Lecturer in History of Art 

"Vor Karolingische Sarkophage," A\ten des Internationalen 
Kunsthistorischen Kongresses, August, 1936. 

Ernest Wesley Blanchard, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology 
"Effect of Adrenalectomy on Blood Cholesteral," Anatomical 
Record, Vol. LXIV, December, 1935 (abstract). 
ibid., American Journal of Physiology, in press (complete). 

Marna V. Brady, M.A., Assistant Director of Physical Education 
Tumbling for Girls, Lea and Febiger, Philadelphia, March, 1936. 

T. Robert S. Broughton, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Latin 

"Some Non-Colonial Coloni of Augustus in Asia," Transactions 

of the American Philological Association, Vol. LXVI, pp. 18-24, 

1935. 

"On Two Passages of Cicero Referring to Local Taxes," 

American Journal of Philology, Vol. LVII, pp. 173-176, April, 

1936. 

"Ancient History News," American Historical Review, Vol. 

XLI, Nos. 1-4, passim, 1935-1936. 

Rhys Carpenter, Ph.D., Professor of Classical Archaeology and 
Greek 

The Defenses of Acrocorinth and the Lower Town, Vol. Ill 
in the series CORINTH: Result of the Excavations, Harvard 
University Press, Cambridge, for the American School of 
Classical Studies at Athens, 1936. 

Book Reviews, American Journal of Archaeology, Vols XXXIX 
and XL, passim, 193 5-1936. 

Samuel Claggett Chew, Ph.D., Professor of English Literature 
Lord Byron: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage and other Romantic 
Poems, edited with introduction and notes, Doubleday, Doran 
and Co., Garden City, L. I., N. Y., 1936. 

Arthur Clay Cope, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

"The Preparation of Dialkylmagnesium Compounds from 
Grignard Reagents," Journal of American Chemical Society, 
Vol. LVII, pp. 2238-2240, 1935. 



62 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

1 'Products of the Reaction of Ethyl Dichloracetate with Alcoholic 
Sodium Ethoxide, 11 op. tit., Vol. LVIII, pp. 570-572, 1936. 

Charles Wendell David, Ph.D., Professor of European History 
De Expugnatione Lyxbonensi; The Conquest of Lisbon, Columbia 
University Press, New York, 1936. 

"American Historiography of the Middle Ages, 1884- 1934, " 
Speculum, Vol. X, pp. 125437, 1935. 

"The Proposed Union Catalogue of the Philadelphia Area, 11 
University of Pennsylvania Library Chronicle, Vol. Ill, pp. 
67-71, 1935. 

Grace Mead Andrus de Laguna, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy 
"Being and Knowing: A Dialectical Study, 11 Philosophical Re- 
view, Vol. XLV, pp. 435-456, 1936. 

Ernst Diez, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History of Art 

"Mibrab, 11 "Minbar, 11 "Mughamat, 11 "Kubba, 11 "Musalla," 
Encyclopedia of Islam, Leiden, 1936 (not issued). 

Max Diez, Ph.D., Associate Professor of German Literature 

"The Principle of the Dominant Metaphor, especially in Goethe's 
'Werther 1 ," Publications of the Modern Language Association, 
Vol. LI, p. 21, September, 1936. 

Lincoln Dryden, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology 

"A Statistical Method for the Comparison of Heavy Mineral 
Suites, 11 American Journal of Science, Vol. XXIX, pp. 393-409, 
1935. 

"Structure of the Coastal Plain of Southern Maryland, 11 op. cit., 
Vol. XXX, pp. 321-342, 1935. 

"Spiral Concretions and Boring Organisms: a Discussion, 11 
Geological Magazine, London, Vol. LXXIII, pp. 47-48, 1936. 
"The Calvert Formation in Southern Maryland, 11 Proceedings 
of the Pennsylvania Academy of Science, Vol. X, pp. 42-51, 1936. 
Reviews of 12 articles which originally appeared in various 
German, Swiss, Danish, Roumanian and other periodicals and 
books, Journal of Sedimentary Petrology, passim, 1935-1936. 

Mildred Fairchild, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Social Economy 
and Social Research 

"Educational Methods in Teaching Workers, 11 Proceedings, 
Rational Conference of Social Wor\, 62nd annual session, pp. 
323-330, 1935. 



Report by the Director of Publication 63 

Charles Ghequiere Fenwick, Ph.D., Professor of Political' Science 
"Neutrality and Responsibility," American Journal of Inter- 
national Law, Vol. XXIX, pp. 663-665, 1935. 
"Denunciation of Disarmament Clauses of Treaty of Versailles," 
op. at., Vol. XXIX, pp. 675-679, October, 1935. 
"The Relation of the Franco' Soviet Pact to the Locarno Treaty," 
op. cit., Vol. XXX, pp. 265-270, April, 1936. 
"The 'Failure 1 of the League of Nations," op. cit., Vol. XXX, 
pp. 506-509, July, 1936. 

Ilse Forest, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education 

The School for the Child from Two to Eight, Ginn and 
Company, Boston, 193 5. 

Grace Frank, A.B., Non-Resident Professor of Old French Philology 
"The Authorship of 'Le Mystere de Griseldis'," Modern 
Language TSjotes, Vol. LI, pp. 217-222, April, 1936. 
"The Beginnings of Comedy in France," Modern Language 
Review, Vol. XXXI, pp. 377-384, July, 1936. 

Joseph Eugene Gillet, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish 

"A Note on Bartolome Aparicio," Hispanic Review, Vol. IV, 

pp. 272-277, July, 1936. 

"The Date of Torres Naharro's Death," op. cit., Vol. IV, pp. 

41-47, January, 1936. 

"Note sur Rabelais en Espagne," Revue de Litterature Com' 

paree, Vol. XVI, pp. 140-144, 1936. 

"Le Transitif Espagnol 'Quedar'," Archivum Romanicum, Vol. 

XIX, pp. 441-442, 1935. 

Margaret Gilman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French 

"Baudelaire and Thomas Hood," Romantic Review, Vol. XXVI, 

pp. 241-244, July- September, 1935. 

"Le Cosmopolitisme de Baudelaire et L'Espagne," Revue de 

Litterature Comparee, Vol. XVI, pp. 91-97, January-March, 

1936. 

Gustav A. Hedlund, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics 
"A Metrically Transitive Group Defined by the Modular 
Group," American Journal of Mathematics, Vol. LVII, pp. 
668-678, 1935. 



64 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

"Two-Dimensional Manifolds and Transitivity," Annals of 
Mathematics, Vol. XXXVII, pp. 534-542, 1936. 
"Fuchsian Groups and Transitivety Horocycles, 11 Du\e Mathe^ 
matical Journal, Vol. Ill, pp. 530-542, 1936. 

Harry Helson, Ph.D., Professor of Experimental Psychology 

"Demonstration of Pupillary Accommodative and Consensual 
Reflexes through Changes in Apparent Size of a Pin-Hole, 11 
Journal General Psychology, Vol. XIII, pp. 186-188, 1935. 

Stephen Joseph Herben, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 
Philology 

"Heorot," Publications of Modern Language Association, Vol. 
L, p. 933 ff., December, 1935. 

"The Helmet in Beowulf, 11 Modern Language T^otes, Vol. LI, 
October, 1935. 

Nathan Jacobson, Ph.D., Lecturer in Mathematics 

"Rational Methods in the Theory of Tie Algebras, 11 Annals of 
Mathematics, Vol. XXXVI, pp. 875-881, 193 5. 
"On Pseudo-linear Transformation, 11 Proceedings of the Rational 
Academy of Sciences, Vol. XXI, pp. 667-670, 1935. 
"Totally-disconnected Locally-compact Rings, 11 American Journal 
of Mathematics, Vol. LVIII, pp. 433-449, 1936. 

Myra Richards Jessen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of German 

Review: A History of the German l^ovelle from Goethe to 
Thomas Mann, by E. K. Bennett, Cambridge University Press, 
1934; Journal of English and Germanic Philology, Vol. XXXV, 
pp. 440-443, July, 1936. 

Susan Myra Kingsbury, Ph.D., Carola Woerishoffer Professor of 
Social Economy and Social Research and Director of the Carola 
Woerishoffer Graduate Department of Social Economy and Social 
Research 

Records of the Virginia Company of London, Vol. IV, Library 

of Congress, Washington, 1935. 

Clara Marburg Kirk, Ph.D., Margaret Kingsland Haskell Associate 
Professor of English Composition 

Mr. Pepys and Mr. Evelyn, University of Pennsylvania Press, 
Philadelphia, H. Milford, Oxford University Press, London, 1935. 



Report by the Director of Publication 65 

Agnes Kirsopp Lake, Ph.D., Instructor in Latin 

"Lapis Capitolinus," Classical Philology, Vol. XXXI, pp. 72-73, 

January, 1936. 

Editor: Essays in Honour of Kirsopp La\e. 

Angeline Helen Lograsso, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Italian 
Review: La Divina Commedia di Dante Alighieri, edited by 
C. H. Grandgent, Modern Language l^otes, Vol. LI, p. 46 &., 
January, 1936. 

Helen Taft Manning, Ph.D., Dean of the College 

"James E. Rhoads," Dictionary of American Biography, Charles 
Scribner's Sons, New York, Vol. XV, pp. 530-531, 1935. 
"Joseph Wright Taylor; 1 op. cit., Vol. XVIII, pp. 336-337, 1936. 

Katharine Elizabeth McBride, Ph.D., Lecturer in Education 
Adult Intelligence, in collaboration with T. Weisenburg and 
A. Roe, Commonwealth Fund, New York, February, 1936. 

Cornelia Lynde Meigs, A.B., Assistant Professor of English 

"Fox and Geese," 1 Child Life, Child Life Prise Story Contest 
Award, April, 1936. 

"Mark Twain," St. Tiicholas, Vol. LXIII, pp. 14-16+, Novem- 
ber, 1935. 
Short stories in various magazines: American Girl, St. Js{icholas, 
The Portal, etc., all stories historical in content. 

Fritz Mezger, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Germanic Philology 
"Gotisch Sokois — Lateinisch Sagis?," Zeitschrift fur Vergleichende 
Sprachforschung, Vol. LXII, 1935. 

"Der Germanische Kult and die Alttenglischer Feminina auf 
-icge und -estre," Archiv fur das Studium derl<[eueren Sprachen, 
Vol. CLXVIII, pp. 177-184, 1936. 

Walter C. Michels, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics 

"The Thermal Conductivity of Tungsten," in collaboration with 
Martha Cox, Physics, Vol. VII, pp. 153-155, April, 1936. 

Valentin Muller, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Classical Archae- 
ology 

"The Beginnings of Monumental Sculpture in Greece," 
Metropolitan Museum Studies, Vol. V, pp. 157-169, 1936. 
Book Reviews, American Journal of Archaeology, Vols. XXXIX 
and XL, passim, 1935-1936. 



66 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Milton Charles Nahm, B.Litt., Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Philosophy 

Review: T. V. Smith's Creative Sceptics, Philosophical Review, 
Vol. XLV, No. 1, pp. 93-94, January, 1936. 

Marion Parris Smith, Ph.D., Professor of Economics 

"Job Roberts," Dictionary of American Biography, Charles 
Scribner's Sons, New York, Vol. XVI, pp. 8-9, 1935. 
"Joseph Trimble Rothrock, ,, op. cit., Vol. XV, p. 188, 1935. 
"Marion Reilly," op. cit., Vol. XV, pp. 488-489, 1935. 
"William Rittenhouse, ,, op. cit., Vol. XV, p. 632, 1935. 
Book Reviews, Saturday Review of Literature, passim, 1935-1936. 

William Roy Smith, Ph.D., Professor of History 

"On Guard in Mexico,'" The American Historical Scene as 

Depicted by Stanley Arthurs, University of Pennsylvania Press, 

Philadelphia, 1935. 

"Caleb Pusey," Dictionary of American Biography, Charles 

Scribner's Sons, New York, Vol. XV, pp. 273-274, 1935. 

"Francis Rawle," op. cit., Vol. XV, pp. 399-400, 1935. 

"Edward Shippen, 1st and 2nd," op. cit., Vol. XVII, pp. 

115-117, 1935. 

"George Thomas," op. cit., Vol. XVIII, p. 431, 1936. 

Book Reviews, American Historical Review, Vol. XL, pp. 752- 

753; Vol. XLI, pp. 147-149; Vol. XLI, pp. 810-811. 

K. Laurence Stapleton, A.B., Instructor in English 

Book Review: Days of Wrath, Saturday Review of Literature, 
Vol. XIV, No. 5, May 30th, 1936. 

Mary Hamilton Swindler, Ph.D., Professor of Classical Archae- 
ology 

Editor: American Journal of Archaeology. 

Lily Ross Taylor, Ph.D., Professor of Latin 

"The Publii Lucilii Gamalae of Ostia," American Journal of 
Philology, Vol. VLII, pp. 183-189, April, 1936. 
"Recenti Studi Americani sulla Religione e sulla Antichiuta 
Romane," Studi Romani nel Mondo, Vol. Ill, p. circa 10, 1936. 
Book Reviews, American Journal of Archaeology, Classical 
Philology, American Journal of Philology, passim, 1935-1936. 



Report by the Director of Publication 67 

David Hilt Tennent, Ph.D., Professor of Biology 

"Investigations on the Photodynamic Properties of Vital Dyes, 11 

Tear Boo\ of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, p. 91 ff., 

1935. 

"The Photodynamic Effects of Vital Dyes on Fertilized Sea 

Urchin Eggs, 11 Science, Vol. LXXXII, p. 621, December, 1935. 

Dorothy Walsh, Ph.D., Part-Time Instructor in Philosophy 

The Objectivity of the Judgment of Aesthetic Value, Lancaster 
Press, Lancaster, 1936. 

"Ethics and Metaphysics, 11 Journal of Ethics, Vol. CLVI, pp. 
461-472, July, 1936. 

Edward H. Watson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology 

"Summary of the Geology of the Philadelphia Area, 11 Annual 

Guide Boo\s Field Conference of Pennsylvania Geologists, 5th 

meeting, pp. 1-48, 193 5. 

"Emplacement of Granite at Springfield, near Philadelphia, 11 

Proceedings, Geological Society of America, p. 57, 1935 

(abstract) . 

"Alteration of Gabbro near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 11 op. 

cit., 1935 (abstract). 

Paul Weiss, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy 

Editor: Collected Papers of C. S. Peirce, in collaboration 

with C. Hartshorne, Vol. VI, Scientific Metaphysics, Harvard 

University Press, Cambridge, 1935. 

"A Memorandum for a System of Philosophy, 11 American 

Philosophy Today and Tomorrow, Lee Furman and Company, 

pp. 481-498, 1935. 

"The Self -Contradictory, 11 Journal of Symbolic Logic, Vol. I, 

No. 2, p. 62, July, 1936 (abstract). 

Roger Hewes Wells, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science 

"The Liquidation of the German Lander," American Political 

Science Review, Vol. XXX, pp. 350-361, April, 1936. 

"The New Local Government of Germany : Municipal Economy, 11 

J^ational Municipal Review, Vol. XXV, pp. 514-516, September, 

1936. 

Book Reviews, American Political Science Review, passim, 

1935-1936. 



68 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Harold E. Wethey, Ph.D., Lecturer in History of Art 

Gil de Siloe and his School, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 
February 6th, 1936. 

Mary Katharine Woodworth, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
English 

The Literary Career of Sir Samuel Egerton Brydges, Basil 
Blackwell, Oxford, 1935. 



Lectures and Entertainments by Other Than 
Members of the College 1935-36 

Goodhart Hall 

Fiftieth Anniversary Celebration 

President James Bryant Conant of Harvard University, 
President Ada Louise Comstock of Radcliffe College, President 
Isaiah Bowman of Johns Hopkins University and the late President 
Emeritus M. Carey Thomas were the speakers at the Fiftieth 
Anniversary Celebration ceremonies at 11.30 on Saturday morning, 
November 2nd. President Marion Edwards Park presided and 
Mrs. F. Louis Slade, Chairman of the Fiftieth Anniversary Fund, 
made the presentation of the Alumnae gift. 

President Park made the address on the history of the college, 
illustrated by lantern slides and movies, at the programme of Historical 
Sketches on Friday evening, November 1st. Cornelia Otis Skinner, 
an alumna of the college, wrote and presented A Campus Idyll and 
a group of undergraduates sang college songs. The programme was 
repeated on Saturday evening, November 2nd, but through the 
inability of Miss Skinner to be present, the monologue was presented 
by Magdalen Hupfel Flexner, an alumna of the college. 

Dr. Simon Flexner, retired head of the Rockefeller Institute for 
Medical Research, made the address at the M. Carey Thomas Prize 
Award held on Saturday afternoon, November 2nd. President Park 
presided and presented the award to Dr. Florence Rena Sabin of 
the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research who made a speech 
of acceptance. 



Report by the Director of Publication 69 

Memorial Service 

A memorial service for M. Carey Thomas was held on December 
19th; the speakers were President Park who gave a brief biographi- 
cal sketch, Dr. Rufus M. Jones who spoke as a Director, Dean 
Manning who spoke as a member of the Faculty and Mrs. Slade 
who spoke as an Alumna. 

Commencement 

Dr. Alice Hamilton, Assistant Professor of Industrial Medicine 
at the Harvard Medical School, 1920-35, Special Consultant in the 
United States Department of Labor and the United States Public 
Health Service, made the Commencement address on Monday, 
June 8 th. 

Endowed Lectures 

Major Bonamy Dobree, O.B.E., author of Restoration Comedy, 
Restoration Tragedy, Essays in Biography, Modern Prose Style, etc., 
gave the Ann Elizabeth Sheble Memorial Lecture in English Literature 
on the subject, "Restoration Drama," on December 9th. 

I. A. Richards, MA., Litt.D., Fellow of Magdalene College, 
Cambridge, author of Principles of Literary Criticism, Science and 
Poetry, Coleridge on Imagination, etc., gave a series of six lectures 
under the Mary Flexner Lectureship on the general subject, "The 
Interpretation of Prose/ ' on Monday evenings in February and 
March. From Bryn Mawr, Dr. Richards went directly to China to 
confer on the problem of Basic English. 

Dr. Wallace Notestein, Sterling Professor of English History 
at Yale University, gave the Mallory Whiting Webster Memorial 
Lecture on the subject, "The Use of Imagination in History, 1 ' on 
April 18th. 

Department Lectures 

Dr. Dietrich Gerhard of the University of Berlin spoke on 
"Catherine the Great, 1 ' on December 2nd, under the auspices of the 
History Department. 

Dr. Edmund Horace Fellowes, Canon of St. George's Chapel, 
Windsor, gave a lecture on Elizabethan madrigals accompanied by 
the lute and victrola records, on January 16th, under the auspices 
of the Music Department. 



70 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Dr. Michael Rostovtzeff, Professor of Ancient History and 
Archaeology at Yale University, gave a lecture in honour of the 
bimillenium of the poet Horace on "Horace as I See Him," on 
March 13th, under the auspices of the Latin Department. 

Dr. Wolfgang Kohler of Swarthmore College, spoke on "New 
Aspects of Memory," on March 25th, under the auspices of the 
Psychology Department. 

Undergraduate Association Lecture 

Sir Norman Angell, author of The Great Illusion, The Unseen 
Assassins, etc., recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1933, gave a 
lecture on "What Must We Pay for Peace?" on November 26th. 

Informal Lectures 

Dr. R. Kroner (formerly Professor of Philosophy at Kiel 
University and Editor of the magazine Logos), Research Professor 
at Berlin University, gave the second of a series of three lectures at 
Haverford College and at Bryn Mawr on a historical survey of Kant 
and Hegel, on January 7th, before the major Philosophy students. 

Mr. Donald B. Watt spoke on experiments in international 
living, illustrated by colored movies, on February 13 th. 

Dorothy Pilley (Mrs. I. A. Richards) , President of the Pinnacle 
Club, Member of the Ladies' Alpine Club and author of Climbing 
Days, gave a talk on "Alpine Mountaineering," illustrated by lantern 
slides, on March 8th. 

Mr. Charles Kenworthy of Bryn Mawr, member of the General 
Lawyers Committee of the Liberty League, discussed the place of 
the League and its methods of operating, sponsored by the Bryn 
Mawr Chapter of the Liberty League, on April 29th. At this meeting 
Mr. Beauvais Duffey described the organization of the Princeton 
chapter and Mr. Dreiser and Mr. Krolleck spoke for the University 
of Pennsylvania. 

Dr. George Wagoner spoke to the advanced Geology students 
on "paleopathology," with particular attention to skeletal evidences 
of disease in ancient man and in fossil animals, illustrated by 
lantern slides. 



Report by the Director of Publication 71 

Industrial Group 

Mr. John Edelman, delegate to the American Federation of 
Labor Convention in Washington, spoke on November 17th about 
the convention. 

Miss Hilda Smith, an alumna of the college, Director of the 
Federal Workers 1 Educational Bureau in Washington, traced the 
history of education for workers and discussed Government educa- 
tional projects in a series of talks on December 5th, 6th and 7th. 

Miss Schermerhorn, Secretary of the Pennsylvania Security 
League, gave a talk on December 11th. 

Mr. Joseph Burge, ex-Communist and member of the Hosiery 
Workers 1 Union, spoke on the question of the Labor Party on 
February 26th. 

International Relations Club 

Mr. Frank Fetter, Professor of Economics at Haverford College, 
spoke on December 18th, on the 'International Silver Situation. 11 

Sjt. P. Kodanda Rao, Secretary of the Servants of India Society, 
associate of Mahatma Ghandi, spoke on "Civilization : Occident versus 
Orient, the Nature and Diffusion of Culture, 11 on February 4th. 

The Honorable Charles E. Fox, former Assistant District 
Attorney of Philadelphia, spoke on April 22nd (in Taylor Hall), 
to the first-year Politics group on "The United States Criminal Rate. 11 

Miss Helen Dorio, of the League Against War and Fascism, 
was one of the speakers (the others were undergraduates) at a mass 
meeting for peace held on Peace Day, April 22nd, under the joint 
auspices of the American Student Union and the International 
Relations Club. 

Vocational Teas 

Miss Katherine Taylor of the Shady Hill School in Cambridge, 
spoke on November 7th, on 'Teaching in the Progressive Schools," 
describing the training for apprentice teachers given by the school. 

Mrs. Lillian M. Gilbreth, President of Gilbreth, Inc. (consult- 
ing engineers), Professor of Management at Purdue University, 
spoke on November 22nd. 

Mr. Frank Arnold, former Director of Commercial Development 
of the National Broadcasting Company, spoke on December 6th, on 
the possibilities of positions on the executive side of broadcasting work. 



72 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Dr. Margaret Janeway, an alumna of the college, practicing 
physician in New York City, spoke on January 10th. 

Miss Ida Pritchett, an alumna of the college, spoke on February 
17th, on photography as a profession. 

Miss Mabel Williams of the New York Public Library spoke 
on February 27th. 

Music 

The Bryn Mawr Choir and The Princeton University Choir, 
assisted by soloists and thirty-one members of The Philadelphia 
Orchestra, presented Handel's Messiah on December 16th. The 
first performance was given at Princeton University on' December 1 5 th. 

The London Madrigal Group, directed by Mr. T. B. Lawrence, 
presented a programme of madrigals, folk-songs and carols on 
January 18th. 

The Hampton Quartette gave its annual recital of Negro 
spirituals on January 20th. 

Entertainment 

The Latin Classes presented Plautus' Menaechmi (translated by 
Margaret Lacy, 1937 and Josephine Ham, 1937) on November 25th. 

The French Players of New York City, under the auspices 
of the Bryn Mawr French Club, presented Son Mari, by Paul 
Geraldy, on February 28th. 

The Varsity Players of Bryn Mawr College and The Cap 
and Bells of Haverford College presented The Swan by Ferenc 
Molnar, on December 6th and 7th. 

The Undergraduate Association, with the cooperation of The 
Haverford College Film Society, presented in the second semester 
a series of five film showings from the Film Library of the 
Museum of Modern Art. 

Exhibitions 

The exhibitions held in the Common Room included twenty-three 
oil paintings by Miss Margaret Chrystie of Bryn Mawr for the 
week of March 12th and a group of water-colors by Miss Mary-Lou 
Burnham of Chicago for the week of April 15th. The exhibitions 
were sponsored by the Art Club. 



Report by the Director of Publication 73 

Deanery 

A special gift of $1,000 made possible the speakers brought to the college 
by the Entertainment Committee of the Deanery. 

George Rowley, M.F.A., Curator of Far Eastern Art and 
Associate Professor of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University, 
who lectured at Bryn Mawr in 1934, returned to give a series of 
three lectures on Chinese Painting on November 17th, 18th and 
19th, the first and second illustrated by lantern slides, the third by 
original Chinese paintings from the DuBois Morris Collection, the 
series under the joint auspices of the Chinese Scholarship Committee 
and the Entertainment Committee of the Deanery. 

Mr. Clifton Fadiman, book critic of The l^ew Tor\er (formerly 
Editor-in-Chief), now Consulting Editor of Simon and Schuster, 
spoke on December 8th on "Why Best Sellers Sell Best." 

Mr. Henry Hensche, head of the Cape Cod School of Art, 
gave a lecture on December 14th (in the Common Room) which 
he illustrated by actually painting a portrait. 

Mrs. Harrison Eustis, who started the School L'Oeil qui Voit 
at Vevey and founded the American school at Morristown for 
training dogs to guide the blind, gave an illustrated talk on January 
9th on "The Seeing Eye," with movies taken at the school in 
Morristown. 

Mr. John Mason Brown, dramatic critic of The Klew Tor\ 
Evening Post, gave a talk on "Broadway in Review" on January 
11th, under the joint auspices of the Varsity Players and the 
Entertainment Committee of the Deanery. 

The Yale Puppeteers presented "Mister Punch at Home," with 
songs by Forman Brown, on January 12th. 

Miss Kay Swift, pianist and composer and member of the staff 
at Radio City, gave a lecture-recital on January 26th on the score 
of Porgy and Bess, a few days before the Philadelphia engagement 
of the Porgy and Bess Company. 

Mr. Irving Stone, author of Lust for Life, gave a talk on 
February 6th on Van Gogh during the Van Gogh exhibition in 
Philadelphia. 

An exhibition of Roumanian Folk Arts and Crafts and a 
programme of ritual dances, with playing of the cymbalon and 
singing, under the direction of Madame Anistora Stan, was held 
on February 9th. 



74 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Mr. Louis Untermeyer, poet and critic, essayist, anthologist, 
gave a talk on February 23rd on "A Critic's Half Holiday. 1 '' 

Dr. Max Wertheimer (formerly Professor of Psychology at 
the University of Frankfort), of the University in Exile in New 
York and founder of the Gestalt movement in Psychology, gave 
two lectures on "The Psychology of Thinking and the Gestalt 
Investigations of Logic''' on February 28th and 29th for the depart' 
ment faculties of Bryn Mawr, Swarthmore and the University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Dr. Walter Friedlander, Visiting Professor of Fine Arts at 
New York University and at the University of Pennsylvania (formerly 
at Freiburg, Germany) spoke on March 1st on "The Landscape 
Painting of Nicholas Poussin and Claude Lorraine, Their Drawings 
and Pictures." 

Sir Arthur Willert, K.B.E., diplomat and publicist, for fifteen 
years head of the Publicity Department of the British Foreign Office 
and former Correspondent for the London Times in Washington, 
spoke on March 15th on "The Present Crisis in Europe." His talk 
at Bryn Mawr immediately followed his stay with both the British 
and French ambassadors in Washington. 

Dr. Alan J. B. Wace, Fellow of the Society of Antiquarians, 
Fellow of Pembroke College, Cambridge and Professor of Archaeology 
at Cambridge, former Director of the British School of Archaeology 
in Athens, gave a talk on March 22nd, on "The Ancient Ivory 
Trade," illustrated by lantern slides. 

Sir Arthur Salter, noted British economist, during a visit at 
Swarthmore College, gave an informal talk on the events taking 
place in Europe, at tea on April 11th. 

Nancy Wilson of New York City, an alumna of the college, 
student of Lieff RosanofF in New York, of Pablo Casals in Spain 
and of Dirian Alexanian at the Ecole Normale de Musique in Paris, 
gave a violoncello recital on April 19th. 

Carola Gitana gave a programme of Spanish dances (as presented 
by her in December 193 5" at the Youth Concert of the Philadelphia 
Orchestra, with Leopold Stokowski conducting) on April 25th. 
(This recital was held in Goodhart Hall.) 

A farewell dinner in honour of Professor Donnelly was held 
on May 16th at which time Chauncey Brewster Tinker, Ph.D., 



Report by Director of Publication 75 

Litt.D., Sterling Professor of English Literature and Keeper of Rare 
Books in the Yale University Library, was the speaker. 

A farewell dinner in honour of Professor Kingsbury was held 
on May 23rd when the speakers included Dr. Alice Hamilton 
and Secretary of Labor Perkins. 

Awards 

Miss Sophie Kirk was decorated on November 25th by the 
French Government for her work in spreading a knowledge and 
appreciation of the French language in America. She was given 
the "palme d'officier de FAcademie" from the hands of M. Leon 
Strauss, French Vice-consul at Philadelphia, now Acting Consul. 

Miss Alicia Stewart was the winner of the Concours Oratoire, 
competition for a French Medal offered by the Comite France- 
Amerique, held on May 14th, at which the judges were Mrs. Frank 
D. Pavey, Chairman, Madame Paul Cret, and Dr. Edith Philips 
of the French Department of Swarthmore College. 

The Graduate School 

Dean Henry Lamar Crosby of the Graduate School of the 
University of Pennsylvania, Chairman of the Joint Committee 
organized for academic cooperation by the University of Pennsylvania, 
Swarthmore, Haverford and Bryn Mawr colleges, spoke at a dinner 
in Radnor Hall as to future members of the college faculties on the 
actual cooperation in the neighborhood and the great principle at 
issue of having institutions of higher learning use to the full the 
human and material resources within their reach. 

Professor E. A. Speiser of the University of Pennsylvania spoke 
in December before the joint Bryn Mawr Archaeological and Classical 
Journal Clubs on the excavations at Ras Shamra and the new dis- 
coveries made there and elsewhere by the French in Syria. 

Professor Erika von Erhardt-Siebold who since her first 
American year as one of Bryn Mawr's foreign fellows has been on 
the Mount Holyoke faculty and a Guggenheim Fellow and is now 
a member of the Vassar Department of English, gave an illustrated 
lecture on her research (both philological and archaeological) on 
Anglo-Latin Riddles. 

Sir Wilfred and Lady Grenfell talked informally on Labrador 
at one of the forum dinners. 



76 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

May Day 

The quadrennial May Day Fete was held on May 8th and 9th. 

Sunday Evening Services 

The Reverend John W. Suter, Jr., D.D., Rector of the Church 
of the Epiphany, New York City, opened the series of Sunday 
evening services, sponsored by the Bryn Mawr League, with a series 
of four services in October and he returned to the college to conduct 
a series of three services in April and May. 

The Reverend William Pierson Merrill, Rector of the Brick 
Presbyterian Church, New York City, conducted a service on 
November 17th and returned to conduct a series of two services in 
February. In Dr. Merrill's unavoidable absence on February 23rd, 
the service was conducted by The Reverend Louis Pitt, Rector 
of St. Mary's Church, Ardmore. 

Dr. Rufus M. Jones, President of the Board of Directors, con' 
ducted a service in November. 

The Reverend Alexander C. Zabriskie of the Theological 
Seminary, Alexandria, Virginia, conducted a series of three services 
in March. 

Dr. Rufus M. Jones gave the Baccalaureate Sermon on 
June 7th. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CAROLINE CHADWICK-COLLINS 



REPORT BY THE DIRECTOR OF THE 
BUREAU OF RECOMMENDATIONS 

Total Calls to the Bureau 284 

Calls for Teachers 144 of which 27 were from col- 
leges and 117 from schools. 
21 of the school positions 
were apprentice ones. 

Full-time or steady positions 87 permanent or for the summer. 

Small or temporary posi- 
tions 53 substitute teaching, tempo- 



rary positions in stores, typ- 
ing, etc. 



284 



Placements made by the Bureau 

Positions offered but refused by the candidate.. 



Total 76 

Teaching positions 12 1 in college, 9 regular school 

positions, 2 apprentice posi- 
tions. 

Teaching positions offered 

but refused by candidate 5 all in schools. 



Total teaching positions 17 

Miscellaneous positions 16 of which 3 were summer 

positions. 

Miscellaneous positions of- 
fered but refused by the 
candidate 3 



Total miscellaneous positions 19 

Small or temporary positions 40 

Total 76 

This year there were 27 calls from colleges, as against 30 of last 
year. Only one placement was made. 

The comparison of the records of the bureau in 1934-3 5 and 
1935-36 is as follows: 

[77] 



78 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

1934-35 1935-36 

Calls Placements Calls Placements 
Teaching — 

Colleges 30 1 27 1 

Schools 95 13 117 11 

125 14 144 12 

Miscellaneous — - 

Full time or regular 72 9 84 16 

Small or temporary... 68 37 52 40 

140 46 136 56 

Totals 265 60 284 68 

The number of calls to the bureau was approximately the same 
this year as last. The percentage of placements was about the same. 
There was an increase in the number filled of the full time positions 
other than teaching. Again the big increase in placements was in the 
small or temporary positions. 

The, bureau had twenty- five calls for secretaries in the course of 
the year, some of them quite interesting positions; it filled none of 
them. The demand for alumnae with business training still far 
exceeds the supply. 

An account of what the 1936 seniors are doing in 1936-37, as 
far as the bureau knows, is added. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUISE F. H. CRENSHAW 

Members of Class of 1936 who Corresponding 

have positions 1936-37: figures for 1935 

Teaching 15 13 

Of the seniors teaching, more of them 
have apprentice positions than those of 
last year's class. Eight of the 15, we 
believe, are entirely unsalaried and one 
gets only her living expenses. The other 
six have small salaries. 

Miscellaneous 13 6 

Members of Class of 1936 taking Business 

Courses 1936-37 2 9 

Members of Class of 1936 doing Graduate 

Work 1936-37 19 15 



REPORT BY THE SECRETARY AND REGISTRAR 

Statistics of Undergraduate Students, 1935-36 

Enrollment 

1934-35 students who did not return in the autumn of 1935: 

Senate (poor academic work) 8 

Finances _ 7 

Self Government (conduct) 3 

Temporarily 3 

Health 2 

Miscellaneous (marriage, etc.) 18 

Total 41 

Summary of registration by classes 1935-36: 

Class of 1936 73 

1937 (includes 5 "junior year abroad" students) 97 

1938 1 1 

1939 124 

( 

Total 404 

Average age of graduating class June 1936: 21 years 8 months 

Denominational Affiliations : 

Episcopalian 4 3 % 

Presbyterian 1 8 % 

No affiliation 9% 

Other denominations 3 % 

Geographical Distribution : 

New England _ 14% 

Home Quadrangle (New York City and its suburbs 
on the north, Washington on the south, Paoli on 

the west) 46% 

Pennsylvania (not included in quadrangle) 8% 

New York (not included in quadrangle) 8% 

Middle West 16% 

South 5% 

Far West 1% 

Coast _ 1% 

Foreign 1% 

[79] 



80 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Occupations of Parents: 

Professional Men 44% 

Business Men 49% 

Miscellaneous 7% 

Statistics of the entering class: 

Plans of entrance: A 10% 

B _ 5 1 % 

C 34% 

D 3 % 

Regents _.... 2% 

Four of this class entered on transfer from the following institutions: 
Duke University, Leland Stanford University, University of 
Pennsylvania and Vassar College. 

Preparation: Private Schools 81% 

(7% of these had some public school 
training) 
Public Schools _ 19% 

Average Age: 17 years 10.5 months 

Denominational Affiliations : 

Episcopalian 47% 

Presbyterian 18% 

No affiliation .„ 9% 

Other denominations 26% 

Geographical Distribution : 

Home Quadrangle 41 % 

Pennsylvania (not included above) 7% 

New York (not included above) 6% 

Middle West 19% 

New England , 14% 

South 4% 

Far West 3 % 

Coast 3% 

Foreign 3% 

Occupations of Parents: 

Professional Men 44% 

Business Men 49% 

Miscellaneous 7% 

College training of parents: 

Both parents with degrees or some college training 33% 
One parent with a degree or some college training 5 1 % 
Both parents without degrees or any college 

training 16% 

(29 Bryn Mawr alumnae daughters in entering class) 



Report by the Secretary and Registrar 81 

Racial Stock of entering class: 

Paternal — The British Dominion contributed 77% 

Remaining stock: Austrian, Chinese, Danish, 
French, German, Lithuanian, Polish, Swiss. 

Maternal — The British Dominion contributed 85% 

Remaining stock: Chinese, French, German, 
Hungarian, Lithuanian, Polish, Russian 

Residence in the United States: 

Last 3 generations American citizens .' 88% 

Last 2 generations American citizens 10% 

Preceding generations citizens of foreign countries 2% 

Respectfully submitted, 

BARBARA GAVILLER 



REPORT ON THE SUMMER SCHOOL FOR 

WOMEN WORKERS IN INDUSTRY MADE BY 

THE CHAIRMAN OF THE SUMMER 

SCHOOL BOARD 

Before the year 1935-36 began the members of the Board of 
Directors appointed to represent the college in conferences with the 
Summer School for Women Workers in Industry (Mr. White, Mr. 
Rhoads, Mr. Scattergood, Mrs. Hand, Mrs. Leach and Miss Park) 
had reported that two prolonged sessions had been held at which 
the history of the school and matters at issue between school and 
college were discussed in detail and that the conferences had adjourned 
with the understanding that each group would discuss the conditions 
of a possible agreement in accordance with which the college might 
again offer its buildings for the use of the school. At the beginning 
of this year this was done and at a joint meeting held November 8th, 
1935, an agreement was drawn up and submitted by each group to 
its own Board for discussion and action. Slight changes were pro- 
posed by both Boards and the following agreement was accepted by 
the Summer School Board at a meeting on November 9th, 1935, and 
by the Bryn Mawr Board at a special meeting on November 22nd, 
1935: 

1. That there shall be a Board of Directors of the Summer School 
made up of six representatives of Bryn Mawr College; six 
representatives of the Summer School groups (four women 
in industry, one representative of the faculty, one representative 
of the students) ; that in addition there shall be a chairman, 
the President of Bryn Mawr College or in her absence a vice- 
chairman chosen by the Summer School Board from its own 
members. 

2. That the Director of the School shall be selected by the Board 
of Directors of the Summer School and approved by the 
College. The Director shall be an alumna of Bryn Mawr 
College if possible. 

3. That the Director shall have charge of publicity for the School, 
under the general direction of the Board of Directors of the 
School. 

4. That the term of the School shall be for eight weeks. 

[82] 



Report on the Summer School 83 

5. That all matters of school policies shall be left to the decision 
of the Board of Directors of the School, when this Board is 
elected. 

6. That there shall be an experimental period of two years if 
the School returns to the Bryn Mawr campus; that after the 
first year the College or the School may ask for a review of 
the situation and may recommend changes in the above plan. 
If such a review is not requested, the plan shall continue for 
a second year. 

In accordance with this agreement the Board of the College named 
as its representatives on the new Summer School Board the President 
as chairman, Mrs. Leach, Miss Hilda Smith and the four alumnae 
elected on the Summer School Board of 1934-3 5, Miss Josephine 
Goldmark, Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft, Dr. Eleanor Lansing Dulles and 
Mrs. Rustin Mcintosh. These representatives met with the six cor- 
responding representatives of women workers in industry, of the 
Summer School faculty and students on February 14th, 1936, and 
went through the legal process of reorganization. This done, the 
necessary meetings of the new Board were held, at the second 
of which the appointment of a Director, Miss Jean Carter, for the 
summer session was announced. The necessary plans for the appoint- 
ment of standing committees, the raising of money, the appointment 
of a faculty and the choosing of students were put in operation and 
completed and the session of the school was begun on June 12th. 

A report of this session was prepared at its close for the Directors 
of the College by the chairman of the Summer School Board. It 
belongs appropriately, I believe, in the record of 1935-36 and is 
here appended. 

"On the Saturday following the Bryn Mawr Commence- 
ment the Summer School opened with a pleasant informal 
meeting in the Music Room and on August 8th it closed 
with the lantern ceremony in the cloister. Preparation for 
the work of the School had gone at top speed following 
the reorganization of the Board and the appointment of 
the Director in March. Faculty appointments were made 
as rapidly as possible by the Director, and confirmed by 
the Board. The Curriculum Committee worked over a 
general and as far as possible a specific program. The many 
district admissions committees recommended seventy-two 
women who seemed to the central admissions committee 
acceptable. At the opening of the School this high pressure 
work came to a focus. All faculty and staff places were 
filled. Fifty-nine of the seventy-two students succeeded in 



84 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

getting time off from their jobs and appeared at Bryn Mawr. 
The British Workers Education Committee sent two young 
industrial workers from England, but to our regret there 
was not time to complete similar arrangements for a 
Scandinavian student. At the earnest request of an alumna 
of the School interested in the newly organised unions 
among women in industry in Puerto Rico, two Puerto Rico 
students were accepted. Among the American students 
fifteen states and eighteen industries were represented, with 
Colorado the furthest west and garment and textile workers 
the largest groups. 

"The school had a new look. Without giving up its 
two traditional groups, experienced union members and 
unorganised workers, the Board had decided in the spring 
to make a special attempt to offer what educational help 
it could to women in the recently organized unions. 
Roughly speaking, these three groups divided the students 
into thirds but as a result of the new third group the 
student body was — and looked — younger than ever before, 
more largely American born, and with more formal educa- 
tion. Fourteen students were actual high school graduates. 
The problem . of the curriculum was thus in many ways 
a new one. 

"Miss Jean Carter, the Director, brought to the concen- 
trated work of the school session the skill, experience, 
common sense and gentleness which I had remarked earlier 
in the preparatory Board meetings. From the beginning to 
the end of the summer session I felt the reins firm in her 
hands. Of the faculty, Dr. Amy Hewes, Professor of 
Economics and Sociology at Mount Holyoke, who has been 
connected with the School from the beginning, shared the 
economics sections with Dr. Earl Cummins of Union and 
Dr. Robert Brooks of Yale. Miss Ellen Kennan, who taught 
for her fourth summer in the School, Miss Bettina Linn, 
Instructor in English at Bryn Mawr, and Dr. Card of the 
University of Wisconsin, both of whom had taught in the 
Wisconsin Summer School, took the three English sections. 
Dr. Oliver Loud, who goes this winter from the Ohio State 
University High School to Sarah Lawrence College, taught 
the course in general science for the third time, recom- 
mended enthusiastically by the faculty and students of last 
year, increased in time allowance and required for all. 
Classes met in the mornings. The afternoons were in 
general free for recreation or special interests, and work 
again — supervised study, tutoring, discussion groups, out- 
side speakers — filled the evenings. Talking, one gathered, 
filled the nights. 



Report on the Summer School 85 

"After the first two weeks, during which no visitors went 
to any classes, I became a reasonably frequent attendant in 
the various regular classes and the discussion groups. With 
all the differences of the instructors' skill and experience in 
this much debated form of teaching, with the unequal 
preparation of the students assigned to each section, all 
the classes conveyed a first impression of informality and 
directness, and a second of genuine and concentrated atten- 
tion to the matter in hand, increasing as the hour went on 
and, indeed, as the summer went on. One noticed as 
difficulties the lack of preparation, the cruel pressure of the 
short session and the necessary absence of that leisurely 
thinking over of difficult and complicated subjects which 
adds so much to final grasp of them. On the other hand, 
on the part especially of the alert-minded students, it was 
fine to see the advantage taken of the exchange of experi- 
ence and illustration, of question, answer and comment. 
Informal conversations, talks and conferences with the 
faculty and the assistants obviously did much to bring along 
the girls less experienced in their thinking or those to whose 
slower reactions the limited class time offered less oppor- 
tunity. Outlets for individual interests, such as practice in 
creative writing and in parliamentary law, eased the pressure 
also, I thought; a member of the faculty regularly discussed 
Marxism with volunteers who were interested; another 
group tackled the difficult problems of the women in 
domestic service. Miss Hilda Smith came from Washington 
to conduct three leisurely, profitable discussions on Workers 
Education in general, its purposes and methods and possi' 
bilities. 

"The main work and the main interest lay for the great 
majority, however, in the regular, daily progress of the 
economics, English and science classes on which the pro- 
gramme was concentrated. The students, as a group, left 
the campus only once, then to see the Planetarium in 
connection with Mr. Loud's lecture on the universe. The 
smaller groups which in the past have sometimes gone to 
visit or investigate industrial situations in the neighborhood 
worked at their programme with strict attention, voting for 
instance to ask a member of the faculty to investigate and 
report on a strike situation in which they were deeply 
interested. The steering committee, representing faculty and 
students, attempted to take a middle course between too 
few and too many outside speakers and to space those who 
came. They often spoke in the regular classes or in the 
assembly rather than in the "free" time; they were invari- 
ably presenting questions connected with and interesting to 



86 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Labor but they were of all schools of opinion. Among them 
was Mrs. Barbara Wootton of the British Committee who 
comes to the college in the spring as Anna Howard Shaw 
Lecturer. 

"Surrounding and relieving this intense and demanding 
occupation of learning was a pleasant atmosphere of com- 
mxinity life in the free and beautiful surroundings of a 
green summer on the campus. Denbigh Hall was used for 
students, Radnor for the faculty, Taylor and the campus 
for classrooms, the gymnasium for the daily assembly. 
Bryn Mawr contributed Miss Ferguson, the house manager 
of Pembroke, to take charge of all housekeeping arrange 
ments, and Dr. Leary of our winter staff, who gave the 
medical and physical examinations and the weekly hygiene 
lectures and looked after the medical needs of the students. 
Mrs. Peterson, who for three years has been in charge of 
the recreation, reigned over the fields of tennis, swimming 
and games, of folk dancing, and of singing and acting as 
well. She had skillful help from the faculty and the five 
undergraduates, and the Saturday evening parties were not 
only varied and charming, but a lesson in the quick and 
good effect of informal singing, acting and dancing to pre- 
sent a picture or convey an idea. Miss Smith trained the 
School for the Lantern Ceremony and herself took part in it. 

"Except for one of the English students, who was ill 
when she arrived and had to spend much time in the 
Infirmary, and one emergency operation for appendicitis, 
horrifying but successful, in the last twenty four hours, the 
School had an excellent health record, and the students' 
food and exercise and sleep, the latter of which they took 
rather reluctantly, carried them well through the heat of 
the summer and the excitement and pressure of the work. 
Underweights gained, overweights lost, many went off 
brown and vigorous. 

"The morale of the school seemed to me excellent. Living 
closely together were sixty young women, strangers to each 
other, coming directly in most cases from hard work into 
a hot summer and living through an intellectual and com' 
munity experience totally new to them. As assets they had 
youth and eagerness, a common experience, in many cases 
courage and high spirit, in almost all a deep interest 
in their own economic experience easily transferred into 
interest in each other's problems, and so to the problems 
of all workers and of America. They were able to listen 
to speakers of whom they disapproved, to discuss hot prob' 
lems, to meet disagreements, to suffer reluctant conversions. 
Science proved almost as startling a field as economics. 



Report on the Summer School 87 

Their regulation of their school life — democratic to the 
last crossing of a "t" — was carefully thought out, applied 
with justice, and I thought on the whole with wisdom. 

"The intensely serious attitude of the students can't be 
mistaken. They believe that they and others like them are 
to take a great part in the America of the future; they look 
forward to social and political responsibility such as workers 
have not had in any American past; they regard the Bryn 
Mawr Summer School as a place where a direct, if brief, 
preparation for such responsiblity can be acquired. 

"The time given the finance committee for its work was 
as brief as that of the other committees but by its remark' 
able exertions the expenses of the summer budget were 
completely met and half the winter budget provided. All 
groups, faculty, students and the director, are recommend- 
ing to the Summer School Board more careful, hence more 
prolonged, preparation for another session. The director, 
they think, should visit district communities, arrange winter 
classes, select teachers, report the School to its friends. I 
hope continued generosity may make this immediately 
assured. A winter's work on the part of the director and 
the several committees will make the work of the finance 
committee next summer far easier and the school more 
interesting and valuable." 

MARION EDWARDS PARK 



REPORT BY THE PRESIDENT 

to 
THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

of 
BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

for the year 

1936-37 



Published by Bryn Mawr College 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

December, 1937 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 



Report by the President of the College 5 

With Changes in the Academic Staff 19 

Report by the Dean of the College 24 

With Statistics of Undergraduate Students 24 

Report by the Dean of the Graduate School „ 29 

With Statistics of Graduate Students 29 

Report by the Director in Residence and Editor of Pub- 
lications 

On Official Publications 43 

On Faculty Publications 43 

On Lectures and Entertainments 50 

Report by the Librarian _ 61 

Report by the College Physician 72 

Report by the Director of the Educational Clinic 81 

Report by the Director of the Bureau of Recommenda- 
tions _ 83 

Report on the Madge Miller Research Fund 86 

Report on the Excavation at Tarsus 88 

Report on the Summer School for Women Workers in 
Industry 89 



REPORT BY THE PRESIDENT 
OF THE COLLEGE 

To the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic 
year 19364937: 

The record of last year was easy to write. On one occasion after 
another the college seriously and affectionately recalled its history and 
we found in it a genuine emotion, widespread and reassuring. This 
year's atmosphere has been not reassuring so much as exciting. We 
are not counting our successes but venturing them again. And this 
year's history is at many points incomplete; the final steps await the 
report of next year or of years much later still. 

Last year I spoke of the routine of the year as continuing quietly 
beneath a surface of successive special events. The routine itself this 
year supplies the interest; its significant changes, its new turns and 
adaptations seem to me as interesting as last year's celebrations, and 
certainly they are more important to the essential college. 

Changes on the Board of Trustees and Directors 

At the annual meeting in December, Rufus Jones, a trustee of the 
college since 1898 and President of the Board since 1916, while 
retaining his membership on the Board resigned from the presidency. 
In term of service Mr. Jones holds the longest record on the Board, 
and more than any other of the present members he is connected with 
the trustees who in the early years of the college guided its plan. He 
has been in especially close relation with the organisations of Friends 
in Europe and America, especially with those concerned in education. 
He has himself been a distinguished student and teacher of a subject 
which is at the heart of the college curriculum. Yet it is perhaps his 
personal qualities that will make his presidency of the Board for twenty 
years memorable. His fairness, his serenity, his wisdom have shown 
themselves in complicated discussion and difficult situations. He has 
brought to the meetings the authority of the realist who gets quickly 
to the questions at issue and of the idealist who refuses to consider 
makeshift remedies. His wise counsels and his fine humour have often 

m 



6 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

cleared away the fog of disagreement. The Directors voted to express 
their regret that Mr. Jones felt he must resign the presidency of the 
Board and their pleasure that he is willing to continue as a member and 
to contribute to their meetings without the responsibilities of presiding. 

At the same meeting Charles J. Rhoads, the son of President James 
E. Rhoads and himself a member of the Board since 1907 and First 
Vice' President since 1916, was elected President, an election which 
at once assured continuity of attitude and policies and gave the utmost 
confidence for the future to the Directors, the alumnae and all friends 
of the college. Thomas Raeburn White and Caroline McCormick Slade 
were elected vice'presidents of the Trustees and Directors respectively. 

The chairmanship of an important committee has also been filled 
during the year. After the death of Samuel Emlen in April 1936, 
Frederic Strawbridge agreed to act as Chairman of the Buildings and 
Grounds Committee temporarily; at the first meeting of the fall he 
nominated as permanent Chairman Francis J. Stokes. The heavy 
responsibilities of the committee were at once and vigorously taken 
over by Mr. Stokes, and his energy and experience applied to that 
important part of the college plans later to be discussed which fell 
under the jurisdiction of his committee. 

Among the Board members one annual change and one of a very 
special kind have taken place. The term of Florance Waterbury, 
Alumnae Director from 1931 to 1936, closed in December and 
Adelaide Neall (1906), nominated by the alumnae for a five'year 
term, took her place. And in the late winter Caroline Morrow 
Chad wick- Collins (1905) was elected to the place among the 
Directors'at'large which has never been filled. This election formed 
an integral part of the plans for the future of the college set in 
motion by the Directors at their December meeting. Mrs. Chadwick' 
Collins is to have more definite responsibilities than the other Direc' 
tors. She will directly assist the Board and the President in whatever 
concerns its needs, general and particular, for financial help, especially 
in those long'range plans for building up its resources on which we 
are inevitably dependent. Her title is Director in Residence. 

The Composition and Work of the Faculty 

The changes in the Faculty are presented in a formal list and 
conclude this report, but to several of them I must call your special 
attention. Few years have seen such deep 'going change within our 



Report by the President of the College 7 

small numbers. The color of our meetings and discussions seemed at 
once different in the absence of three veterans, Professors Donnelly, 
Kingsbury and King, whose vigorous opinions have for many years 
helped frame academic policy. All new members of the Faculty are 
naturally watched with special interest but one appointment drew 
double attention because its field lay outside any now represented in 
the curriculum. Dr. Eva Fiesel's appointment in June 1936 as Visiting 
Professor of Linguistics for a three-year term was made possible by gifts 
from the Rockefeller Foundation, the Emergency Committee in Aid 
of Displaced German Scholars and a group of private donors, many 
of them her colleagues during a preceding term at Yale University. 
A teacher of distinction and a scholar of international reputation, 
thoroughly trained in Indo-European Philology, she was devoting 
herself at the moment to important studies in the Etruscan language. 
She offered in the graduate school two courses of which one on Etruscan 
Inscriptions was attended by five members of the Bryn Mawr Faculty, 
one from Haverford and one from the University of Pennsylvania. 
These courses proved of remarkable interest and importance and there 
was keen regret when Dr. Fiesel's illness brought them to an end in 
February. Her death followed in late May. A sensitive, unworldly, 
gentle human being, happy in her devotion to her field of learning, 
courageous in her determination to root herself in a land to which she 
came a stranger, her early death is a tragic loss to Bryn Mawr and to 
erudition in America. An attempt to raise a fund for a chair of 
linguistics at Bryn Mawr, forwarded by a widely known group of 
linguistic scholars had been started and if Dr. Fiesel had lived I think 
her position at Bryn Mawr would have been a permanent one. 

There were as usual a number of absences on leave which are duly 
listed, among them that of the Dean of the Graduate School for the 
second semester. Professor G. G. King of the Department of History 
of Art had fully expected to return to Bryn Mawr this year after her 
sabbatical leave in 1935-36, but serious illness which caught her in 
Portugal last winter made her doctor advise her against coming back 
into regular work which she could never bring herself to take easily or 
lightly. To the pleasure of everyone and the profit of her students she 
spent the month of February 1937 at the college lecturing and holding 
conferences with advanced undergraduate and graduate students. At 
the close of the year she retired from the Faculty. She had completed 
thirty-one years of teaching at Bryn Mawr. Like some of the best 
teachers and scholars, she came to her own field by an indirect road; 



8 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Fellow in Philosophy, then Fellow and Instructor in English, she finally 
at the suggestion of President Thomas began to give courses in the 
History of Art. And she trained herself so well, her common sense 
and her industry came to the aid of her sharp mind so admirably that 
she made for herself a scholar's name which was everywhere recog- 
nized. She taught her students with singular effectiveness in the letter 
and the spirit of art. Her sympathy was as quick and genuine as her 
wit and both were honest and instant. They make her stand out 
among paler human beings, to remain a fine figure to the many 
generations of her students. On Commencement Day I announced a 
gift to her of a fund "from her students who wished to express their 
regard for her as a person, their respect for her as a scholar and their 
appreciation of her as a teacher." 

At the December meeting of the Board of Directors a letter from 
Samuel Arthur King was presented resigning the lectureship in English 
Diction which he had held since 1902. The Directors accepted his 
resignation with regret and at his request withheld announcement of 
it until the end of the year. Just before Commencement the college 
was shocked to hear of his death in California where he had been 
attacked by sudden pneumonia. Trained carefully in the classic English 
stage tradition, definite always as to what he wanted of himself and 
his students, Mr. King battled for his art in his long term with class 
after class of undergraduates and in a surprising number of cases he 
reformed us. And no one left his classes without knowing her sins; 
if she persisted in them she did it wilfully or perhaps hopelessly. 
To Mr. King May Day owes the beautiful tradition of its plays and 
his work in schools in the east and middle west has made him known 
by many outside this college. He was devoted to Bryn Mawr, and 
Mrs. King telegraphed me that one of his last broken sentences 
repeated twice its name. 

Professor Madeleine Soubeiran, Associate in French from 1929 to 
1935 and Associate Professor from 1935 to 1937, absent on leave 
1936-37, died in France on July 9, 1937. Mademoiselle Soubeiran 
had become so ill during the second half of her year of absence that 
her return to her work was out of the question, but I was shocked by 
the news of her death. She was a gifted scholar and a wonderfully 
effective teacher, as much at home in art, music and modern literature 
as in her own field of the Sixteenth Century — gay, brilliant, full of 
sensitiveness and life. 



Report by the President of the College 9 

The communal contribution, if I may call it so, of the Faculty to 
the academic year appears everywhere in the reports of the graduate 
and undergraduate schools by Dean Schenck and Dean Manning. 
The individual contributions of its members are in part recognized in 
the list of Faculty publications, in part appeared under cover in the 
long row of candidates for the Doctor's degree which presented itself 
on Commencement Day. Probably the most important part of all which 
cannot be specifically set down, which is as intangible as it is important, 
is done in the quiet routine of class-room, laboratory and conference. 

For the first time in the history of the college the research work of 
the Faculty has an official status. The Chairman of the Faculty 
Committee to award the Madge Daniels Miller Fund for Research 
makes a first report this year. From outside sources Professors Tennent, 
Watson, Michels, Cope and Nahm have received subsidies in aid of 
research. The Group Research project initiated in 1934 fell this year to 
the Faculty and graduate students of the Department of Archaeology 
and you will be interested and pleased to read Professor Carpenter's 
report on it quoted in the report of the Dean of the Graduate School. 
Most important of all, however, a gift of $5000 a year for five years 
has been made to the college, making possible for the first time in the 
history of Bryn Mawr a full-time research professorship with no 
teaching duties connected with it. Beginning in September 1938, 
Professor David Hilt Tennent has accepted this five-year appointment 
in Biological Research. The college hopes to add to the gift a fund 
which will not only equip but maintain his special laboratory in 
Dalton and provide him with the assistance he needs. Dr. Tennent's 
work is in the field of experimental cytology and concerns especially 
problems of cell division and cell growth. It is evident how much the 
college will profit by the inclusion in its Biological Department of 
Dr. Tennent's research laboratory. It will profit directly in another 
way. For the same five-year period Dr. Tennent will act as Director 
of the Plan for the Joint Teaching of the Sciences for which he is 
in large measure responsible and which will formally begin with the 
completion of the new building for Chemistry and Geology in 
September 1938. His advice and his support of the Plan as it unfolds 
will give the scientific faculty and the students the utmost confidence 
in it and will clarify the problems of those who actually conduct the 
courses offered. 

I should like again to call special attention not only to the list of 
Faculty publications during the year but to the unusual length of the 



10 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

list of Ph.D. degrees awarded by the college in June; each thesis 
here implies a considerable expenditure of research time on the part 
of the director of the thesis as well as of the student. 

Several members of the faculty have done conspicuous work outside 
the college. Professor Fenwick served as a delegate to the Inter- 
American Peace Conference in Buenos Aires in November and 
December; Professor M. P. Smith as a member of the State Council 
of Education; Professor Fairchild as chairman of the committee 
appointed by the Governor to report on the Merit System. Professor 
David has been chairman of the committee in charge of the great 
Union Library project of the Philadelphia district. At the Centenary 
of Mount Holyoke College the degree of Doctor of Science was 
conferred on Professor Wheeler and in June the degree of Doctor of 
Laws on Dean Manning by George Washington University. 

The cut in Faculty and staff salaries of 1935-36 made in accordance 
with the scale proposed in May 1935 was in part restored by the vote 
of the Directors at the October meeting 1936, when the surplus of 
the year was divided pro rata among all those affected by the cut. 
Seventy-seven and a half per cent of the original cut was thus 
returned. The budget for 1936-37 was based on income which would 
meet expenditures and no recourse was had to a cut in Faculty 
salaries which have thus been paid in full during the year. 

A report is duly presented of the lectures, concerts and entertain- 
ments of the year. But two items in this list should also, I think, be 
connected directly with the teaching offered by the college to its 
students. In February three members of the Faculty calling in the aid 
of one outside scholar presented to the college eight lectures on 
"Man 1 ' from the combined points of view of the psychologist, the 
anthropologist and the philosopher. These lectures were regularly 
attended by from 100 to 150 students and Faculty members and the 
discussions which followed them were lively and instructive. Such 
cooperative plans for the benefit of us all I hope will be taken up by 
other groups of departments; they along with the Joint Plan for the 
Teaching of the Sciences may guide us toward similar inter-depart- 
mental alliances. The second extra piece of teaching of the year was 
done by Mrs. Barbara Wootton in connection with her six Anna 
Howard Shaw lectures on Social Trends in Contemporary England. 
Mrs. Wootton met graduate and undergraduate classes and students 
regularly during the six weeks of her residence. Her presentation of 



Report by the President of the College 11 

her special field was prepared for in advance by the Bryn Mawr depart- 
ments associated with it and its subject matter was included in the final 
tests or examinations. She was thus for all intents and purposes a mem- 
ber of the Bryn Mawr Faculty for half a semester. I cannot be apprecia- 
tive enough of this annual extension of our teaching possibilities which 
the Mary Flexner Lectureship and Shaw Foundation make possible. 

Students 

The Directors of the College can be well content this year with the 
numbers and with the accomplishments of the student body, graduate 
and undergraduate. 

The graduate school registered 127, a figure higher than ever 
before. When the year opened the resident graduate students had 
overflowed from Radnor to Low Buildings where ten lived. Their 
provenance is given in Dean Schenck's report. You will notice that 
eight foreign students have lived at Radnor Hall and can guess at 
their lively contribution to the hall life. To two other groups I should 
like to draw special attention: first, the young women who are 
recipients of scholarships from other institutions and are working at 
Bryn Mawr, and second, the registration under our local cooperative 
agreements of three Bryn Mawr graduate students for courses at the 
University of Pennsylvania and of seven students of the neighboring 
institutions for courses at Bryn Mawr — four from the University of 
Pennsylvania and one each from the Academy of Natural Sciences 
and Swarthmore taking graduate work in Geology, and one from 
Haverford College working in Biology. 

The number of undergraduate students, 405, was approximately 
the same as that of last year, and was actually surpassed only by the 
registration of 411 in 1929. The report of the College Physician 
shows the unusual amount of rather serious illness, especially of 
operative cases of appendicitis, which fell on us from some evil 
quarter during the winter. A number of students were forced to 
leave college permanently or temporarily and due to this disagreeable 
cause the overcrowding of the early weeks in the class rooms and 
laboratories and especially in the public rooms of the halls seemed 
somewhat less. I cannot say too often that the residence halls, all 
completed before 1904, were planned in an era when the individual 
apparently used her own quarters more and the public rooms of the 



12 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

hall less. With the change of ways of living, the crowding, especially 
of the original "students' 1 parlors, 11 now the smoking rooms, has 
become very trying and in the case of the undergraduates I am 
increasingly anxious to be able to transfer to a new residence hall 
several students from each of the older ones and to use the single 
rooms thus left vacant for the common good of the whole population. 

As the report of the Dean of the College shows, the freshman 
class of 115 showed no marked differences as individuals from the 
three classes now in college. One figure has, however, reached a new 
high; the percentage of students prepared completely by public 
schools is this year 23% as compared with an average of 13% from 
1922 to 1931 and 19% from 1932 to 1935. One entirely new form 
of admission was used this year for the first time. Eight candidates 
were accepted from the group of thirty schools registered in the 
Progressive Education Experimental Group. This is the first year of 
five during which the college has agreed to accept "a small quota 11 of 
such candidates into its entering class. Their school curriculum varies 
considerably, but so far not radically, from that of the ordinary 
student's, and they offer no examination records but a plentitude of 
varied intelligence tests. The schools represented are old friends: the 
Baldwin School, the Beaver Country Day School in Boston, the 
Dalton School in New York City, the Germantown Friends 1 School, 
and Milton Academy. I should like to remind you that three kinds 
of information offer to the Admission Committee a general field of 
comparison for all candidates. Each one accepted, including the last 
group, has a Scholastic Aptitude Test record, a detailed record for 
the last three years of her school work and an estimate of her abilities 
in a direct letter from the principal to the college. Many of all the 
various types of schools also report the rank of their students in the 
school classes. 

In the midst of the figures which show the relatively small changes 
in the Bryn Mawr student body, graduate and undergraduate, is one 
small but startling one. Nine men zxz this year enrolled for work at 
the college. Five of these are graduate students in the departments of 
Geology and Biology and four Haverford undergraduates taking the 
second year Geology at Bryn Mawr. I have no reason to think that 
these numbers will increase or that men will present themselves for 
Bryn Mawr degrees. It is, however, a fact that the college is 
empowered to give its three degrees with no restriction as to the sex 
of its candidates. 



Report by the President of the College 13 

The Academic Work: Its Important Changes 

The reports of Dean Schenck and Dean Manning make good 
reading for all those who are interested in the academic work of the 
college. I content myself with a few underlinings and comments. 

The academic work of the graduate school closed with the 
presentation of an unusually large number of candidates for the 
M.A. and a longer list of candidates for the Ph.D. degree than ever 
before. What is for these young women perhaps equally important, 
the appointments of recent Masters of Arts and Doctors of Philosophy 
to teaching and research positions are increasing in number. The 
Bryn Mawr record of employment has always been and certainly is 
at present an encouraging one. 

We believe we have made an excellent practical contribution to 
this end and at the same time eased our academic consciences by the 
changes in the M.A. curriculum recommended by the Graduate 
Committee to the Academic Council and passed by the latter in 
January. They are described in the report of Dean Schenck. Of the 
three usual liberal arts degrees the M.A. has seemed to most of us 
the least standardised and the least valuable, yet no graduate school 
can ignore it. At Bryn Mawr each year about a quarter of the total 
number of graduate students wish to work toward it, either as an 
end in itself or as a trial flight for the Ph.D. degree. The careful and 
time' consuming work of Dean Schenck and two special committees, one 
of the younger Faculty and one of students, produced for the Graduate 
Committee a plan which recognizes the more expert individual work 
now being done by the undergraduate student everywhere in her 
advanced courses and ventures to build on that a serious and integrated 
first graduate year carrying further her experience of correlation of 
fields, presentation of results and independence. Students unprepared 
for such academic responsibility will need more than one year for the 
completion of the new M.A. work; the good student with her new 
undergraduate training can, I believe, accomplish the work in a single 
year and with profit to herself and great interest. 

A change equally radical in itself and affecting not a part of the 
undergraduate body but all of it was actually put into effect this year. 
Dean Manning reports in detail on the result of her close and 
sympathetic direction of the final examination requirement made this 
year for the first time of all candidates for the A.B. degree. The 
day-by-day problems of the year have been indubitably increased by 



14 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

it, for the Faculty and students as well as for the Dean and the 
Curriculum Committee of the Faculty. And not only our time but 
our emotions have been involved! That period of unbalance has now 
been passed. Once tried, and successfully tried, everyone can suggest 
improvements in details, readjustments, especially new time schedules 
which a Faculty and a class both inexperienced in practical handling 
of a rather complicated experiment failed to manage perfectly last 
year. I thought myself — from the vantage point of neither giving 
nor taking the examination — that the whole college work was jacked 
up, that Faculty and students found themselves thinking in fresher 
and wider ways on subjects which had seemed familiar or limited. 
I shall expect an increased number of bullVeyes this year or at least a 
decreased number of errors when our practice is on grounds of actual 
experience and not fluttering with apprehensive uncertainty. Of my 
confidence in the solid growth of undergraduate work and the new 
point of view which it introduces into Bryn Mawr I have spoken 
often. Dean Manning, on whose shoulders fell the practical problems 
of its difficult insertion into the college requirements and the student 
and Faculty mind, agrees with me. 

In general I have felt that the undergraduate work of the year was 
well and soundly done. The records of the three lower classes which 
are reviewed each June in the Dean's office are of a piece with the 
senior records which are given sudden publicity at Commencement 
and stand for all to see on the Commencement programme. I remind 
you that out of 87 A.B. degrees conferred in June 1937, two were 
granted summa cum laude, twelve magna cum laude and twenty 
cum laude. In addition degrees with distinction in the major subject 
were given to twenty-seven. Their younger fellow students are 
moving toward somewhat the same good showing. 

One change recommended by the Faculty and accepted by the 
Directors in May will affect the undergraduate curriculum of next 
year. We add for the first time in many years a new major. The 
Department of Social Economy and Social Research will offer in 
1937-38 the first full year of a major in Sociology and two further 
years, in which either anthropology or sociology may be emphasised, 
will follow the first and entail the appointment of an anthropologist, 
probably part-time at first, to the Faculty in 1938. This addition was 
made in answer to the request of the student Curriculum Committee 
and a number of individual students, and the department eagerly 
cooperates. The Faculty vote confirming this addition was unanimous 



Report by the President of the College 15 

and I highly approve it. I believe too that at the moment when the 
college numbers and so the number of students choosing major 
subjects is growing, the addition of a new major, and especially a 
major which is professionally useful, is a wise step. 

A second venture for the coming year, underwritten with warm 
approval by the Departments of French and German and of Miss 
Howe, the Director of Halls, is the opening of two houses left vacant 
by members of the Faculty on leave for a few students who wish to 
have practice in spoken French and German. This plan has the 
further advantage of permitting the immediate increase of the student 
body by a small number without waiting for the completion of the 
new dormitory. 

The College Buildings and Grounds 

The years since 1929' 30 have been hard sledding for every 
university, college and school. They have forced us — and this is to 
our advantage — into a cut-to-the-bone estimate of what is valuable 
or necessary, but they have also meant for all concerned a tedious 
day'by-day casting up of accounts and a constant watch on the 
insidious small expenditure. I cannot thank too warmly the members 
of the Bryn Mawr staff, preeminently Mr. Hurst, Mr. Foley and 
Miss Howe, who have carried out this full duty of watchfulness 
during these years. 

The increased surplus of this year made possible not only a more 
generous expenditure on general maintenance but two larger projects, 
long thought of and often put aside in favor of uses of our income 
which seemed more important : increased lighting facilities all through 
the college and the painting of the corridors and dining room of 
Pembroke Hall. Under the direction of the Chairman of the Buildings 
and Grounds Committee additional cables from the Power House to 
every college building have been laid this summer and a new dynamo 
installed. All student rooms may now have at least two sixtywatt 
electric bulbs or their equivalent in wattage and the amount of 
lighting in the public rooms is proportionally increased. The painting 
in both Pembrokes has also been done this summer. The lighter color 
of the walls, whose earlier deep red was further darkened by years 
of use, makes a far pleasanter background actually and psychologically 
for the students who live there. 

A gift to the college from the friends of Dean Schenck, who begins 
this year her twenty-fifth year of teaching at Bryn Mawr, made 



16 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

possible the enlargement of the windows in the dining room of Radnor 
Hall and their resetting with leaded panes. 

The care of the grounds has been much on my mind for with the 
appallingly rapid development of the land surrounding the holdings 
of the college we are clearly to be in future more dependent than 
ever for a sense of space and a country look on the small landscape 
we can ourselves provide. Our increasing need to use to its full 
extent all the college property, especially to bring the lovely green 
Wyndham acres into actual daily use, joined with the increased 
danger from the many fast-moving cars to all who crossed the road 
from the upper campus to the college property on the other side, 
made us ask the Lower Merion Township for permission to close 
to automobile traffic Merion Avenue between Rockefeller and Dalton 
Halls. At this point the street runs wholly through college property 
and we believe is used by the college and its visitors far more than 
by others. The Township Commissioners felt themselves unable to 
grant this permission. At present we are attempting to prevent 
accidents at the most crowded times of the day by keeping a man 
there to' direct traffic. The problem is, however, in no way solved. 

The Plans for the Future of the College 

Along with these concerns of the moment and of the immediate 
future, however, many of those most deeply interested in Bryn Mawr, 
members of the Board, Faculty, Staff, students and alumnae, have 
been involved with its long-distance plans. What has been done 
toward them this year with such seeming despatch was in large part 
laid down in 1930 in that remarkable report to the Board by a 
Committee of Directors and alumnae headed by Louise Fleischmann 
Maclay. The variations from these recommendations were necessary 
not because of change of point of view or of emphasis but because 
resources on which we had ventured to depend some years ago had 
shifted or failed and the present Board, face to face with the same 
necessities, must find its solution of them with other devices. I began 
my report by saying that the history of the year would be at many 
points incomplete. In this all-important part of the history that 
incompleteness is especially and necessarily in evidence. 

At the Commencement in June 1936, Caroline McCormick Slade, 
the Chairman of the National Committee of the Bryn Mawr College 
Fiftieth Anniversary Fund, made the formal presentation of a million 



Report by the President of the College 17 

dollars to the college. Of that incredible sum, a definite amount 
($325,000) was available for a new Science Building, and a definite 
amount ($180,000) for a wing of the library. The earlier bequest of 
Sophie Boucher had been set aside for some use connected with the 
facilities for the Science Departments, the gift of $150,000 of the 
Carnegie Corporation for "endowment" had been likewise set aside 
for the inauguration of the Joint Plan for the Teaching of the Sciences 
proposed by the Science Departments and the Department of 
Mathematics. These actual resources were considered by the Board 
at its meeting in December in connection with the various points laid 
down in the 1930 plan for the college and a special committee 
appointed to investigate them further and report at a special meeting 
of the Board. As part of the general plan, Mrs. Chadwick-Collins was 
immediately elected a Director of the college with the duties which I 
have already mentioned. Before the special meeting took place the 
death of Ella Riegel (1889) had occurred and the college had been 
informed of her generous bequest which included not only amounts 
for special purposes but also a general fund of considerable size 
restricted only to endowment. 

The Special Committee reported to the Board in February its rec- 
ommendation that a building to house the Departments of Chemistry 
and Geology should be put up on a site, "the upper hockey field, 11 
between Radnor Hall and Low Buildings, at a cost of not more than 
$325,000, and that approximately $50,000 of this should be set aside 
for equipment. A maintenance fund for the building the Committee 
hoped might be provided by the bequest of Miss Riegel. It recom' 
mended that in the summer following the completion of the Science 
Building, Dalton Hall should be made over for the uses of the Depart- 
ments of Biology and Physics; these would in the end, we hoped, be 
provided for in additions to the new building for which space and 
connections are to be left in the plans. 

This recommendation was accepted and Mr. Sydney Martin asked 
to prepare plans for the building. The architect, the Chairman, and 
the Buildings and Grounds Committee and the members of the 
Chemistry and Geology Faculty were in consultation throughout the 
spring; the contract was authorised on May 11th, and ground broken 
on May 29th in a pleasant ceremony at which many interested diggers 
and a large audience of alumnae and undergraduates took part. 

At the March meeting of the Board the Finance Committee was 
asked to consider a sum from the college funds which it would be 



18 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

willing to invest in a dormitory for one hundred new students, and 
the same Special Committee was authorised to report on a site and 
probable costs for such a building. The Board took this action with 
the understanding that in this way an ultimate increase in the income 
of the college would be applied to an increase in Faculty salaries. 
A further and later increase of $ 1 00 in the tuition of all undergraduate 
students would be applied to the same end. 

The Committee reported at the May meeting of the Board that it 
seemed possible to erect on a site below the Deanery and back of 
Goodhart Hall a dormitory for 110 students at a cost of from $4500 
to $5000 per student; that on its completion ten students could be 
transferred from the other halls in order to free one or two rooms in 
each hall for general hall uses. The Board then authorised the 
Committee to ask Mr. Martin to prepare plans for such a building 
and to proceed with all necessary preliminaries. The architect, the 
President of the Board, the Chairman of the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee, Miss Howe, Director of Halls, and Miss Ward, Director 
of Admissions, consulted unendingly throughout the summer on a 
series of plans and they were accepted in final form by the Com- 
mittee in late August. It is worth mentioning that they represent 
the wishes not only of the officials of the college but so far as possible 
also of the undergraduate students who have been consulted constantly 
through two successive presidents of the Undergraduate Association 
and who have made excellent suggestions. 

The question of the most effective use of the $180,000 which was 
reported as available for the library wing was discussed at the May 
meeting of the Board and action deferred until more information was 
on hand. Mr. Martin's earlier and well advanced plans were available 
and it seemed certain that the building of the wing could be started 
with little loss of time whenever the Board was ready to move. The 
Committee hoped that a maintenance fund for this building might be 
provided from Miss RiegeFs bequest as in the case of the new 
Science Building. 

In addition, two other projects were set in motion, the Mrs. Otis 
Skinner Theatre Workshop in cooperation with the Baldwin School, 
and squash courts, a much needed addition to the winter sports of 
the students. 

It was, I am sure, impossible even for a casual visitor to be on the 
college campus this winter, spring and summer and not to feel the 
stir and excitement which rose from this suddenly quick realisation of 



Report by the President of the College 19 

old plans. The early trustees and friends of the college must have 
known somewhat the same atmosphere, and I like to think that in a 
generation from us again the Directors and the alumnae may 
affectionately and thoughtfully plan some great step forward for 
Bryn Mawr and see their dreams also come into reality. 

The college has had this year among other gifts the completed 
Emmy Noether Fund of $10,000 whose income is at the disposal of 
the Department of Mathematics. This fund was raised by a committee 
outside the college headed by Dr. Florence Sabin and reinforced by 
an honorary committee of mathematicians. The loss of Dr. Noether 
to science in general and to Bryn Mawr loses none of its tragedy as 
time passes. I am glad that with this fund and the room in the final 
quarters of the Mathematics Department which we intend to name 
for her, her connection with us will far outlast the generation which 
saw her here. 

A new undergraduate scholarship fund of $5000 has been given 
by an anonymous donor to be called by two Pennsylvania names, 
the Shippen-Huidekoper Scholarship. The award is to be in the 
hands of the President. 

I have spoken in another connection of the bequest of Ella Riegel 
to the college. Her special interest in archaeology she gratified by 
establishing outright a generous travelling fellowship in archaeology 
which was available for use in 1937-38. Further than that, the college 
is to be the residuary legatee of Miss Riegel, who limits the use of 
the bequest only to endowment. 

Miss Riegel was a woman of affairs. She worked hard and con- 
stantly for the cause of women and she threw her influence in their 
behalf in all national and international connections. She was also 
genuinely interested in Bryn Mawr and in its place as a woman's 
college. A large gift made during her lifetime in honour of President 
Thomas will help build the library wing; the shelves of the archaeology 
library are filled with books which she gave. Her choice of Bryn 
Mawr as the recipient of a large part of her property only continues 
and strengthens our debt to her. 

I present this report to a Board whose interest and belief in the 
college I have felt this year more clearly than ever before. Its 
sympathy has made the complicated questions which have arisen 
easier to solve for everyone actively connected with the college and 
its actual help has made the solution, I hope, more satisfactory. 



20 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Changes in the Academic Staff of Bryn Mawr College 
October 1936 to October 1937 

Faculty Returned from Leaves of Absence 

Four members of the Faculty and Teaching Staff, absent in 1935-36, 
returned to continue their teaching at Bryn Mawr in 1936-37: 

Anna Pell Wheeler, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 
Stephen Joseph Herben, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 

Philology 
Caroline Robbins, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History 
Hortense Flexner King, M.A., Instructor in English 

Leaves of Absence 

The following members of the Faculty and Teaching Staff were on 
leave of absence in 1936-37: 

Eunice Morgan Schenck, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School 

and Professor of French (absent semester II., 1936-37) 
Georgiana Goddard King, M.A., Professor of History of Art 
Lincoln Dryden, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology (absent 

semester I., 1936-37) 
Milton Charles Nahm, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy 
Madeleine Soubeiran, Agregee, Associate Professor of French 
Edward H. Watson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology 
(absent semester II., 1936-37) 

Promotions 

Promotions of the following members of the Faculty and Teaching 
Staff took effect in 1936-37: 

Max Diez, Ph.D., promoted from Associate Professor to Professor 

of German Literature 
Fritz Mezger, Ph.D., promoted from Associate Professor to 

Professor of German Philology 
Katharine E. McBride, Ph.D., promoted from Lecturer to 

Assistant Professor of Education and Psychology 
Harold E. Wethey, Ph.D., promoted from Lecturer to Assistant 

Professor of History of Art 
D. T. Veltman, Ph.D., promoted from Research Associate to 

Lecturer in Philosophy 



Report by the President of the College 21 

?\Jeu> Appointments 

The following new members were added to the Faculty and 
Teaching Staff in 1936-37: 

Eva Fiesel, Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Linguistics 

Ph.D. University of Rostock 1921. Lecturer in Etruscology, University 
of Munich, 1930-33; Research Assistant, Department of Linguistics, 
Yale University, 1933-36. 

Hertha Kraus, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Social Economy 

Ph.D. University of Frankfort 1919. Research Assistant on Social 
Projects, University of Frankfort 1917-19; Field Director for Organiz- 
ing Child Feeding and Health Programs for Children, American 
Friends Service Committee, Germany, 1920-23; Director of Public 
Welfare Department, Cologne, Germany, April 1923 -April 1933; 
Consultant on Community Activities and Housing, Family Welfare 
Association of America, October 1933-October 1934; Research 
Worker, Russell Sage Foundation, New York City, 1934; Consultant, 
Division of Subsistence Homesteads, Department of the Interior, 
Washington, D. C, 1934; Research Worker, T. E. R. A. Committee 
on Planning, New York State, 1934; Professor of Social Work, 
Margaret Morrison Carnegie College of the Carnegie Institute of 
Technology, May 1934-June 1936. 

Arthur Colby Sprague, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 

A.B. Harvard University 1921; M.A. 1922 and Ph.D. 1925. Instruc- 
tor in English, Harvard University 1925-30 and Assistant Professor 
1930-36; Chairman of the Tutorial Board, Division of Modern Lan- 
guages, 1930-3 5. 

Arthur Lindo Patterson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.Sc. McGill University 1923; M.Sc. 1924 and Ph.D. 1928. Lecturer 
in Physics, McGill University 1928-29; Lecturer in Biophysics and 
Fellow in Medical Physics, Johnson Foundation for Medical Physics, 
University of Pennsylvania, 1931-33; Research in Crystal Analysis, 
Physics Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 193 3-36. 

Germaine Bree, Agregee, Lecturer in French 

Licence h'lettres University of Paris 1930 and Agregation de VUni- 
versite, 1932; French Scholar, Bryn Mawr College 1931-32; Professeur 
au Lycee de Jeunes Filles, Oran, Algeria, 1932-36. 

Robert E. Lee Collins, Ph.D., Lecturer in Geology 

A.B. Johns Hopkins University 1921 and Ph.D. 1928. Assistant, 
U. S. Geologic Survey in northern Colorado and central Wyoming, 
May and June 1922; Assistant on the Tennessee Geologic Survey, 
summers of 1923-25; exploratory work in central Tamaulipas, Mexico, 
March-April 1924; Assistant State Geologist of Tennessee Geologic 
Survey, 1925-26; Acting State Geologist of Tennessee, 1926-27; 
Instructor in Paleontology, Johns Hopkins University 1928-36. 

Betsey Libbey, A.B., Non-Resident Lecturer in Social Economy 

A.B. Smith College 1908. Case Worker and District Secretary, Family 
Welfare Society, Boston, 1908-13; Staff Lecturer, Chicago School of 
Civics and Philanthropy, summer 1915; Supervisor of Districts, Family 
Society of Philadelphia 1913-30 and General Secretary 1930-. 



22 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Beth Cameron Busser, M.A., Instructor in German 

A.B. Bryn Mawr College 1933 and M.A. 193 5. Exchange Fellow, 
University of Munich, 193 3'34; Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1934-3 5, and Fellow in German, 193 5-36. 

Elizabeth Cook, M.A., Instructor in Italian 

A.B. Wheaton College 1922; MA. Radcliffe College 1934. Teacher 
of English and French, Arlington Hall, Washington, D. C, 1934-36. 

Mary Henderson, A.B., Instructor in English 

A.B. University of Colorado 1927. Principal, Atalaya Day School, 
Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1928-29; Literary Associate of Elisabeth 
Marburg Literary Agency, 1930-32; Assistant in the English Depart- 
ment, Barnard College, and Graduate Student, Columbia University, 
1935-36. 

Eleanor Seraphim O'Kane, M.A., Instructor in Spanish 

A.B. Trinity College 1927; M.A. University of Pennsylvania 193 3. 
Teacher of English, Public Schools of Puerto Rico, 1928-31; Graduate 
Student, University of Pennsylvania, Semester I., 1931-32 and 
Scholar in Romance Languages, Semester II., 1931-32; Fellow in 
Romance Languages, Bryn Mawr College, 1932-33 and Graduate 
Scholar in Spanish 1933-34; Teacher of English, Residencia des 
Senoritas, Madrid, Spain, 1934-36. 

Edith Cumings Wright, Ph.D., Instructor in French 

A.B. Indiana University 1927; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1928 and 
Ph.D. 1934. Instructor in French, Mount Holyoke College 1931-32; 
Instructor in French, Lake Erie College 1932-34 and Assistant Pro- 
fessor 1934-3 5. 

Louise Fowler Anderson, M.A., Reader in Economics and Politics 

A.B. Wellesley College 1928; M.A. Radcliffe College 1935. Research 
Assistant, Committee on Research in the Social Sciences, Harvard 
University 1930-3 3. 

Katrina Van Hook, M.A., Reader in History of Art 
A.B. Smith College 1933; M.A. Radcliffe College 1934. 

Mary Louise Carll, A.B., Demonstrator in Physics 

A.B. Goucher College 1932. Graduate Student, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity 1932-36. 

Mary T. Henle, M.A., Demonstrator in Psychology 

A.B. Smith College 1934 and M.A. 193 5. Graduate Student, Smith 
College 1934-36. 

Sarah Grace Hower, A.B., Demonstrator in Geology 

A.B. Barnard College 1933. Graduate Student, Columbia University, 
1933-35; Fellow in Geology, Bryn Mawr College 1935-36. 

Lois M. Schoonover, M.A., Demonstrator in Geology 
A.B. Oberlin College 1934; M.A. Cornell University 1936. 

Hodee Waldstein, A.B., Demonstrator in Physics 
A.B. Radcliffe College 1936. 



Report by the President of the College 23 

Retirements 
One member of the Faculty retired at the end of the year 1936-37: 
Georgian a Goddard King, M.A., Professor of History of Art 

Resignations and Expirations June 1937 

Ernest Wesley Blanchard, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

Biology 
Madeleine Soubeiran, Agregee de VUniversite, Associate Pro- 
fessor of French 
Samuel Arthur King, M.A., Non-Resident Lecturer in English 

Diction 
Robert E. Lee Collins, Ph.D., Lecturer in Geology 
Beth Cameron Busser, M.A., Instructor in German 
Barbara Goldberg Raines, M.A., Instructor in Physics 
Edith Cumings Wright, Ph.D., Instructor in French 
Elizabeth Isabel Jones, M.A., Reader in Philosophy 
Sarah Grace Hower, A.B., Demonstrator in Geology 
Hodee Waldstein, A.B., Demonstrator in Physics 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARION EDWARDS PARK 



REPORT BY THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic 

year 19364937: 

Registration 

The following report on statistics of Undergraduate Students is 
submitted by the Secretary and Registrar: 

1935-36 students who did not return in the autumn of 1936: 

Senate (poor academic work) 7 

Health 4 

Finances 3 

Self Government (conduct) 1 

Temporarily 8 

Miscellaneous (marriage, travel, etc.) 15 

Summary of registration by classes 1936-37: 

Class of 1937 92 

1938 86* 

1939 112 

1 940 1 1 5f 

Hearers 2 

Total 407 

Undergraduate Statistics 

Denominational affiliation : 

Episcopalian 44% 

Presbyterian 16% 

Other denominations 3 1 % 

No affiliation 9 % 

Geographical Distribution : 

New England 1 5 % 

Home Quadrangle (New York City and its suburbs on 

the north, Washington on the south, Paoli on the west) 42 % 

Pennsylvania (not included above) 7% 

New York (not included above) 10% 

Middle West 1 7 % 

South 4% 

Far West 2% 

Coast 2% 

Foreign 1% 

* Includes 7 junior year abroad students. 

f Includes 1 student who entered in the autumn of 1935, withdrew at 
the end of the first semester and re-entered in the autumn of 1936. 

[24] 



Report by the Dean of the College 25 

Occupations of Parents: 

Professional Men „ 45 % 

Business Men 48 % 

Miscellaneous 7% 

Average age of graduating class June 1937: 21 years 6 months 
Entering Class Statistics 

Plans of entrance:* A 6% 

B 43 % 

Modified B 7% 

C ; 29 % 

D _ 3% 

Regents 4 % 

Progressive Education Experimental 

Group _ 8 % 

Preparation : Private Schools 77 % 

(5% of these had some public school 
training) 

Public Schools 23% 

Average age: 17 years 11.9 months 

Denominational Affiliation : 

Episcopalian 3 5 % 

Presbyterian 1 4 % 

Other denominations 39 % 

No affiliation 12 % 

Geographical Distribution : 

Home Quadrangle 39 % 

Pennsylvania (not included above) 11% 

New York (not included above) 8% 

Middle West 17 % 

New England 1 6 % 

South 3% 

Coast 3% 

Far West 2 % 

Foreign 3% 

Occupations of Parents: 

Professional Men 50 % 

Business Men 43 % 

Miscellaneous 7% 

* Eight members of the class entered on transfer from the following insti' 
tutions: Denison University, Swarthmore College, Vassar College, Universities 
of California and Michigan, Washington University and Wellesley College. 



26 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

College Training of Parents: 

Both parents with degrees or some college training 35% 

One parent with a degree or some college training 44% 

Both parents without degrees or any college training 21% 
(20 Bryn Mawr alumnae daughters in entering class) 

Respectfully submitted, 

BARBARA GAVILLER. 

Final Examination 

The most interesting changes in the routine of the Dean's office 
during the past year have connected themselves naturally with the 
arrangements for the final examination in the major subject, which 
for the first time was required of candidates for the A.B. degree. 
In arranging for the examination the most difficult of the adjustments 
to be made were in the academic schedule in order to give the seniors 
time both for the preparation and for the writing of the final 
examination. As was to be expected, the Faculty were faced with 
many new problems in teaching and in estimating the work of seniors 
because of the omission of other course examinations. While no very 
serious crises arose during the past year, it will be advisable to discuss 
once again all the arrangements involved when the Faculty have 
gathered sufficient experience to form a judgment as to how far the 
seniors may be exempt from other long examinations during the year. 
A questionnaire was sent to all members of the senior class and in 
general it shows approval of the arrangements for the reading period at 
mid-years and of the omission of examinations in the spring. More time 
for review in the spring was very strongly urged by the great majority 
of the class and a good many other constructive suggestions were 
offered, some general and some applying to individual departments. 

In the work of the Dean's office the preparation for the examination 
raises new problems in advising. There seems to be some tendency on 
the part of departments to put pressure on their major students to 
take considerably more than the minimum number of courses within 
the department. Miss Ward and I have tended to advise the students 
against specialisation, especially in the first two years of college, and 
have attempted to arrange for the preparation in the three fields to 
be examined so that it can be sufficiently covered without sacrificing 
electives even in the junior and senior year. Most of the departments 



Report by the Dean of the College 27 

are showing every willingness to allow their students to offer one 
examination in an allied field and it is to be hoped that by making 
this arrangement and by allowing for at least one elective course in 
the senior year, any tendency toward over-specialisation in the 
undergraduate work will be checked. 

The class of 1937 may be said to have come through the final 
examination with flying colors, although the individual performances 
were none of them outstandingly brilliant. Only two of the seniors 
received a grade above ninety for the examination as a whole, but on 
the other hand there was only a small percentage of grades below 
seventy, 8% of those who took the examination or 7 out of 88, and 
only one grade below sixty. The one student who conditioned the 
examination was not a candidate for the A.B. degree in 1937 but had 
been given special permission to take the examination because she had 
completed four years of study and all of her major work. The correla- 
tion of the grades received in the final examination with the students 1 
general average seems to be high, and there were not many serious 
disappointments. The seniors themselves found the examinations 
easier than they had feared and their reaction was undoubtedly 
reassuring to the other classes in college. 

Lack of Classroom Space 

In view of the increase in the number of students entering next fall 
it is important to call your attention at this time to the lack of class- 
room space in Taylor Hall. One room will be added to the general 
use next year by the new arrangements which are being made for the 
work in speech. It has always been necessary to reserve the large 
room in Wyndham for Mr. King's visits, making it impossible to 
assign it to other classes. Since the arrangements made with Professor 
Greet will involve class meetings only in the afternoons, it will be 
possible to schedule large classes, especially classes for freshmen and 
sophomores, in this room in the morning. Even with this accommoda- 
tion, however, the morning hours in Taylor will be very much 
crowded and it is to be hoped that when the Chemistry and Geology 
Departments move into the new Science Building some extra class- 
room space can be furnished in Dalton Hall for classes now meeting 
in Taylor and in the library. The need for additional space for 
indoor games and dancing in winter is equally urgent and must be 
kept in mind, not only in any building schedule but in the remodelling 
of the present dormitories. 



28 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Mental Hygiene 

In connection with the work of the Health Department I wish to 
report that new arrangements for the medical care of the students 
who are in need of mental hygiene will, it is hoped, be put into 
practice next year. With the death of Dr. Marjorie Wagoner, who 
had been given special opportunities by the college to equip herself 
for the work in mental hygiene, the question again arose whether it 
is better for the College Physician to attempt to carry all the medical 
interviews in mental hygiene, calling in an outside consultant when- 
ever necessary, or whether it is better to arrange for office hours on 
the campus for the Consulting Psychiatrist. The latter is the practice 
followed at the present time in most colleges where any regular work 
in psychiatry is attempted at all. It seems best to arrange for such 
regular office hours next winter through the Institute of Mental 
Hygiene in Philadelphia and to accustom the students who are in 
need of this kind of advice to go directly to a person well qualified 
to give it. Bryn Mawr has been very fortunate in its freedom from 
serious tragedies due to acute depression and other psychoses, which 
have occurred in other colleges. That this is so is probably due to the 
fact that the living arrangements on the Bryn Mawr campus permit 
the Wardens of the Halls and the members of the Faculty to be aware 
sooner than in most colleges if a student is suffering from any serious 
psychological disturbance. Nevertheless, the difficulties involved in 
giving such a student the advice and treatment which she needs are 
still very great and it is to be hoped that the regular visits to the 
campus of a psychiatrist who is experienced in dealing with the 
special problems of the post-adolescent period will be an additional 
safeguard as well as a constructive help to students suffering from 
these difficulties. 

I am very happy that during my leave of absence next year the 
work of the Dean's office will be carried on by Miss Julia Ward, 
whose experience as Director of Admissions and adviser to freshmen 
has made her thoroughly familiar with every phase of the college 
curriculum and that she will have as her assistant Miss Dorothy 
Walsh, who as the Warden of Pembroke Hall West has shown 
unusually good judgment and understanding of student problems. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HELEN TAFT MANNING 



REPORT BY THE DEAN OF THE 
GRADUATE SCHOOL 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College : 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic 

year 19364937: 

Registration 

The Graduate School of 1936-37 numbered 13 5* students: 

Resident in Radnor Hall 59 

Resident in Low Buildings 10 

Non-Resident 66 

(Including 8 students studying abroad) 

The following groups of students are noteworthy: 
3 European Fellows studying abroad on European Fellowships: 
Elizabeth Porter Wyckoff, A.B. Bryn Mawr College 
1936. Bryn Mawr European Fellow, Shippen Foreign Scholar, 
Newnham College, Cambridge University, 1936-37. 
Dorothy Anne Buchanan, A.B. Smith College 1930; MA. 
Bryn Mawr College 1931. Mary Elizabeth Garrett Fellow, 
University College, University of London, 1936-37. 
Emily Randolph Grace, A.B. Bryn Mawr College 1933 and 
M.A. 1934. Special Travelling Fellow, American School of 
Classical Studies, Athens, Greece, 1936-37. 
5 Exchange Scholars studying abroad: 

Caroline Cadbury Brown, A.B. Bryn Mawr College 1936. 
Exchange Scholar in Germany. 

Catherine Fehrer, A.B. Vassar College 1934; M.A. Bryn 
Mawr College 1935. Exchange Scholar in France. 
Mary Pauline Jones, A.B. Bryn Mawr College 1935. Ex- 
change Scholar in France. 

Lena Lois Mandell, A.B. Boston University 1929; M.A. 
Bryn Mawr College 1930. Exchange Scholar in France. 
Emily Katherine Tilton, A.B. Wellesley College 1928; 
M.A. Radcliffe College 1931. Exchange Scholar in Italy. 

* Registration of the Graduate School in the last ten years (not including 
members of the Graduate School studying abroad): 

1926-27 — 101 1929-30—102 1932-33 — 106 

1927-28—113 1930-31 — 104 1933-34—112 

1928-29—108 1931-32—106 1934-35 — 100 

1935-36—110 

[29] 



30 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

5 Foreign Students studying at Bryn Mawr on Scholarships 
awarded by Bryn Mawr: 

Mary Paul Collins Scholar in Classical Archaeology: 

Edith Eccles, B.A. Royal Holloway College, University of 

London, 1931. 

Exchange Scholars: 

Paquerette Nasse, Baccalaureat, Latin, Langues, Philosophie, 

1928 and 1929; Licence es-Lettres, University of Bordeaux, 

1934; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1937. Exchange Scholar 

from France. 

Paola Franchetti, Laurea in Lettere, University of Rome, 

1936. Exchange Scholar from Italy. 

Erika Margarete Annemarie Simon, student, Universities 

of Frankfurt, Lausanne and Edinburgh, 1934-36. Exchange 

Scholar from Germany. 

Chinese Graduate Scholar (Scholarship awarded by the Bryn 
Mawr Chinese Scholarship Committee) : 

Ch'en Fang-Chih, A.B. Yenching College for Women 1935. 

20 Resident Fellows: 

20 graduates of 16 different colleges and universities 

27 Resident Scholars 

3 ~Npn'Resident Scholars 

1 1 Students holding awards from outside institutions: 
European 

Mary Stewart Soutar 

B.A. Girton College, Cambridge University 1936. Cairnes 
Scholar of Cambridge University in Social Economy and Social 
Research. 

Madeleine Sylvain 

Licence en' droit, University of Puerto Rico 1936. Latin- Amen' 
can Fellow of the American Association of University Women in 
Social Economy and Social Research. 

Canadian 

Margaret Annette Harvey 

B.A. University of British Columbia 1936; M.A. Bryn Mawr 
College 1937. Carola Woerishoffer Scholar in Social Economy, 
1936-37. Carnegie Post'Graduate Scholarship from the University 
of British Columbia. 



Report by the Dean of the Graduate School 3 1 



American 

Sara Anderson 

A.B. Mount Holyoke College 193 5; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 
1937. Scholar in Classical Archaeology 1936-37. Scholar of the 
Society of Pennsylvania Women in N.eu; Tor\. 

Lena Ferrari 

A.B. University of Rochester 193?. Scholar in Italian, Semester 
I., 1936-37. Grant from the University of Rochester. 

Janet Flanigan 

A.B. Vassar College 1936; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1937. 
Scholar in French, 1936-37. Fellowship from Vassar College. 

Blanche Fulton 

A.B. Beaver College 1936; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1937. Non- 
Resident Scholar in French and Spanish. Grant from Beaver 
College. 

{Catherine Lever 

A.B. Swarthmore College 1936; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1937. 
Scholar in Greek, 1936-37. Lucretia Mott Fellowship from 
Swarthmore College. 

Marion Monaco 

A.B. New Jersey College for Women 1935; M.A. Bryn Mawr 
College 1936. Voorhees Fellowship from 7<(_ew Jersey College 
for Women. 

Edith Ford Sollers 

A.B. Goucher College 1931; M.S. University of Pennsylvania 
1934. Alice Freeman Palmer Fellowship from VJellesley College. 

Eleanor Weston 

A.B. Vassar College 1936. Special Scholar in Classical Archaeol- 
ogy, 1936-37. Louise Hart VanLoon Fellowship from Vassar 
College. 

The distribution through the departments of the 127 graduate 
students at Bryn Mawr was as follows; for purposes of comparison, 
the distribution of the 110 graduate students of the year 1935-36 is 
added : 

1936-37 1935-36 

Department of Biology _ 7 8 

Department of Chemistry 3 2 

Department of Classical Archaeology 11 8 

Department of Economics and Politics 4 4 

Department of Education 9 8 

Department of English 10 14 

Department of French 13 12 

Department of Geology 6 3 

Department of German 1 2 

Department of Greek 5 3 

Department of History 6 7 



32 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Department of History of Art 5 4 

Department of Italian 4 1 

Department of Latin _ 6 5 

Department of Mathematics 5 4 

Department of Philosophy 4 4 

Department of Physics 5 5 

Department of Psychology 4 4 

Department of Social Economy 18 9 

Department of Spanish 1 3 

Academic Activity 

Degrees 

At Commencement in June 1937, the Degree of Master of Arts 

was awarded to 23 candidates distributed as follows among the 

departments : 

Biology 1, Classical Archaeology 2, English 3, French 5, French and 
Spanish 1, Greek and English 1, Latin and English 1, Philosophy 1, Philos' 
ophy and Psychology 1, Psychology and Education 1, Social Economy 4, 
Social Economy and Economics and Politics 2. 

The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy was awarded to the following 
16 candidates: 

Isabel Ross Abbott 

A.B. Brown University 1922 and MA. 1923. Subjects: European 
History, American History and Politics. Dissertation: English 
Finance in the Early Tears of Henry IV., 1399-1402. 

Pauline Relyea Anderson 

A.B. Smith College 1924 and MA. Bryn Mawr College 1930. Sub- 
jects: European History and Politics. Dissertation: Party Politics 
and Public Opinion in Germany, 1890-1902; A Study in Anglo- 
German Relations. 

Rosamund Esther Deutsch 

A.B. Flora Stone Mather College, Western Reserve University 1933 
and MA. Western Reserve University 1934. Subjects: Latin and 
Greek. Dissertation: The Pattern of Sound in Lucretius. 

Elizabeth Ross Foley 

A.B. Oberlin College 1929 and MA. Bryn Mawr College 1930. 
Subjects: Social Economy, Social Theory and Education. Disserta- 
tion: Leisure and the Depression: A Study of Leisure Conditions 
and Resources in a Small Industrial Community during the Period 
1929-1932. 

Joan Mary Vassie Foster 

BA. McGill University 1923 and MA. 1925; B.A. Oxford Uni- 
versity 1927 and M.A. 1931. Subjects: American History and 
European History. Dissertation: Reciprocity in Canadian Politics 
from the Commercial Union Movement to 1910. 

Anna Margaret Catherine Grant 

B.A. Dalhousie College 1925. Subject: Mathematics. Dissertation: 
Asymptotic Transitivity on Surfaces of Variable J<[egative Curvature. 



Report by the Dean of the Graduate School 33 



Leslie Alice Koempel 

A.B. University of California 1929. Subjects: Social Economy and 
Sociology. Dissertation: Measurement of Changes in the Standard 
of Living During the Depression: A Study of Wor\ers' Families 
in a Small Industrial Community. 

Honor McCusker 

A.B. Pembroke College in Brown University 1930 and M.A. Bryn 
Mawr College 1931; M.A. University of London 1934. Subjects: 
English Philology, English Literature and Greek. Dissertation: 
John Bale: Controversialist, Antiquarian, Dramatist. 

Helen Muchnic 

A.B. Vassar College 1925 and M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1927. 
Subjects: English Literature and French Literature. Dissertation: 
Dostoevski's English Reputation. 

Margaret Anchoretta Ormsby 

B.A. University of British Columbia 1929, Teacher's Training Cer- 
tificate 1930 and M.A. 1931. Subjects: American History, Euro- 
pean History and Economics. Dissertation: The Relations between 
British Columbia and the Dominion of Canada, 1871-1885. 

Barbara Goldberg Raines 

A.B. Hunter College 1929 and M.A. Columbia University 1931. 
Subjects: Physics and Mathematics. Dissertation: Heat Losses from 
a l<[ic\el Wire. 

Sylvia Butler Rouse 

A.B. Mount Holyoke College 1931 and M.A. Brown University 
1934. Subjects: Physiology and Cytology. Dissertation: The 
Influence of Calcium and Potassium Salts on Uterine Contractions 
in ?<[ormal and Adrenalectomized Rabbits. 

Beatrice Nina Siedschlag 

A.B. Lawrence College 1930 and M.A. University of Minnesota 
1932. Subjects: European History and American History. Disserta- 
tion: English Participation in the Crusades, 1150-1220. 

Edith Ford Sollers 

A.B. Goucher College 1931 and M.S. University of Pennsylvania 
1934. Subjects: Chemistry and Physics. Dissertation: The Dissocia- 
tion Pressures of Potassium Deuteride and Potassium Hydride. 

Annita Tuller 

A.B. Hunter College 1929 and M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1930. 
Subject: Mathematics. Dissertation: The Measure of Transitive 
Geodesies on Certain Three-dimensional Manifolds. 

Eleanor Hugins Yeakel 

A.B. Bryn Mawr College 1933 and M.A. 1934. Subjects: Biochem- 
istry, Physiology and Organic Chemistry. Dissertation: The Effect 
of Adrenalectomy upon Blood Phospholipids and Total Fatty Acids 
in the Cat. 



34 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Special Research Project 

Upon the recommendation to the Trustees by the President, the 
Department of Classical Archaeology was chosen as the third Depart- 
ment to receive the award of the Mary Paul Collins Scholarship for 
Foreign Women and of two Special Scholarships in the furtherance 
of a research project.* 

Eight applications were received for the Mary Paul Collins Scholar- 
ship from candidates in Austria, Chechoslovakia, England, Holland, 
Italy and Sweden. The award was made to Edith Eccles, of England, 
B.A. Royal Holloway College, University of London, 1931. 

The Research Project of the Department of Classical Archaeology 
was announced in the following terms on the poster offering the Mary 
Paul Collins Scholarship: 

"In the hope of evoking from a more intimate collabora- 
tion of teachers and students new and publishable material 
in an important and fruitful field of research, the Depart- 
ment during 1936-37 will converge its seminaries and grad- 
uate courses upon the single topic of Early Gree\ Civiliza* 
tion. Dr. Carpenter will deal with the tribal migrations and 
epichoric alphabets; Dr. Swindler will study the vases of the 
geometric and early orientalizing periods; Dr. Miiller will 
trace the influence of the adjacent oriental civilizations upon 
Greek architecture and sculpture; general departmental 
conferences will focus upon specific opportunities for 
research in the proto-archaic period." 

Of the actual year's work, the Department reports: 

"The results of the collaborative project were highly 
encouraging and should serve to commend this method of 
departmental research to others in the future. By attacking 
the same period from entirely different aspects and com- 
paring the various results, it was possible to reach the con- 
clusion that the Mycenean culture was not suddenly 
annihilated by Northern invaders, producing a complete 
discontinuity between the preclassical and the classical civili- 
sations, but rather that it disintegrated internally, more and 
more sloughed off its pseudo-Minoan imposed traits, and 
finally fused with invading elements into a more purely 
native Greek type, out of which the classical civilisation 
could develop consistently and logically. An entire period 
of Greek history from 1100 to 700 B. C, for which there 
are no historical records, could be reconstituted on archaeo- 
logical lines; and although Bryn Mawr was here merely 

* In 1934-35, the Department of Mathematics was named under this 
rotating plan, and in 1935-36, the Department of Biology. 



Report by the Dean of the Graduate School 35 

following the most popular trend of modern archaeological 
research in the classical field, the net results due to depart' 
mental collaboration were sufficiently new to insure further 
inquiry and publication by the staff and students of the 
department. 

"The fortunate appointment of Miss Edith Eccles to the 
Mary Paul Collins Fellowship brought a mature scholar 
trained in the Cretan field by no less an authority than Sir 
Arthur Evans himself and added not merely a Minoan 
expert but an invaluable example in methods and standards 
for the graduate students with whom she worked. 11 

Academic Cooperation with T^eighboring Institutions 

Under our Cooperative Plan, six students from the University of 
Pennsylvania and one from Haverford College were studying in the 
Bryn Mawr Graduate School. Five Bryn Mawr graduate students 
were taking courses at the University of Pennsylvania. 

European Fellowships 

On March 17, 1937, the Faculty voted to recommend to the 
Trustees as Mary Elizabeth Garrett European Fellow 

Marion Monaco 

A.B. New Jersey College for Women 193 5 and M.A. Bryn Mawr 
College 1936. Voorhees Fellow from New Jersey College for 
Women and Graduate Student in Romance Languages at Bryn 
Mawr College, 193 5-37 

and as Fanny Bullock Workman Fellow 

Jane Isabella Marion Tait 

B.A. University of Toronto 1934 and M.A. 193 5. Fellow in 
Classics, University of Toronto, 1934-3 5; Fellow in Latin, Bryn 
Mawr College, 193 5-37. 

In 1937 for the first time, the bequest of Ella Riegel of the Class 
of 1889, made possible the award of a new graduate fellowship to 
be known as the Ella Riegel Fellowship and to be awarded annually 
upon the recommendation of the Department of Archaeology. The 
Faculty at the meeting of March 17, 1937, voted to recommend for 
this award the student chosen by the Department of Archaeology: 

Frances Follin Jones 

A.B. Bryn Mawr College 1934 and M.A. 1936. Graduate Student 
in Classical Archaeology and Greek, 1934-35 and Graduate Scholar 
in Classical Archaeology 193 5-36; Warden of Denbigh Hall and 
Graduate Student, 1936-37. 



36 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

The New Plan for the Degree of Master of Arts 

With the passage on May 6, 1937, by the Academic Council, of 
a new plan for the degree of Master of Arts, we believe that the 
work of the first and second year graduate students will be more 
effectively organised than ever before. The improvement in the 
preparation of students for graduate work which has been marked 
in recent years is undoubtedly due to the coherent programmes of 
advanced work that have been established at the undergraduate level 
through honours work and comprehensive examinations. The com- 
mittee of Faculty and students that worked on the new Bryn Mawr 
plans for the M.A. degree held* in mind the experience of those 
candidates who come with the best possible equipment and attempted 
to outline a course of work that might be expected to carry them 
along as far as the best of them could go in one year's time. Candi- 
dates less well prepared or less well endowed would be expected to 
spend more time before presenting themselves for examination. 

The New Plan carries over certain principles of the Old: 

1. The insistence on a reading knowledge of French and Ger- 
man, which are recognised as indispensable for proper 
documentation in most fields. A new provision allows, how- 
ever, in the place of one of these languages, the substitution 
of another language or of a technique where departments so 
desire: Statistics, for instance, in the Departments of 
Psychology and Social Economy. 

2. The satisfactory completion by each candidate of three 
courses or units of work. 

The New Plan differs from the Old fundamentally, however, in 
placing upon each department the responsibility of organising and 
supervising programmes of study in its own and allied fields suited 
to the individual needs of its candidates. Another radical change 
affects the system of examination. For the routine course examina- 
tions of the Old Plan the New Plan substitutes a special examination 
intended to test the candidate's knowledge of the general background 
of her major field and her ability to carry on an independent investi- 
gation in a limited part of it. With these two objectives in view 
each candidate must present at the end of the year a paper, the 
subject and character of which have been decided upon by December 
first, and must present herself for an examination, oral or written 
or both, at the option of the department, to test her ability to place 



Report by the Dean of the Graduate School 37 

the limited field, in which she has been preparing her paper, in a 
more general background. 

The whole attempt of the New Plan is to move the welbequipped 
student as quickly as possible into independent research without 
losing sight of the importance of extending and consolidating her 
background. We believe that it will furnish the best training for 
future Ph.D. candidates and will also give to the student who is 
going out after this degree to teaching or other activities both an 
increased experience in her field and new methods of work. The 
departmental supervision gives to the degree a professional quality 
which should be an asset to the holder seeking a position. 

Recent Ph.D. Dissertations 

A very gratifying result has been secured from the change in 
policy concerning the publication of Ph.D. dissertations adopted by 
the Council in June 1932. Up to that date, a requirement had been 
rigidly enforced by which Ph.D. dissertations must be published in 
the exact form in which they had been accepted. It became increas' 
ingly evident that this policy was working a hardship to Bryn Mawr 
students and was not in line with the best practice in the country. 
In scientific departments in particular, our candidates were unable to 
bring the results of their research before the readers of the best 
Journals, since these Journals accepted for publication dissertations in 
summary form only. In certain other departments also, it was felt 
that the publication of complete monographs was often less satisfac- 
tory than publications in modified form in special series or scholarly 
reviews. To these considerations were added the very great financial 
burden placed upon candidates during the years of depression by our 
publication requirement. The new policy, while still insisting upon 
publication in some form, allows "publication in part, in revised 
form, or as part of a larger work." 

During the four years, 1932-1936, of the 45 candidates who have 
received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, 33 have already pub' 
lished their dissertations: 

1932 — ■ 9 degrees awarded — 9 dissertations published 

1933 — ■ 8 degrees awarded — 7 dissertations published 

1934 — 11 degrees awarded— 9 dissertations published 

19 3 5 — 14 degrees awarded — 7 dissertations published 

1936 — 3 degrees awarded — 1 dissertation published 



38 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

These dissertations were published as follows: 

Published as presented 26 

As a book or monograph 17 

In a scholarly Journal 9 

Published in part (In Journals) 4 

Published in a revised form based upon the dissertation 2 

As an article in a Journal presenting results of the dis' 

sertation 1 

As an article under joint authorship of professor and 
student according to the usage of the Chemical journal 1 

Published as part of a larger work 1 

Dissertation incorporated in a book of joint authorship 
with an outside scholar 1 

Appended is a list of the above dissertations arranged according to 
departments and giving full information in regard to publication: 

Department of Biology 
Ona Meigs Fowler 

The Influence of Extracts Obtained from Different Regions and 
Different Ages of Chick Embryos on the Growth of Fibroblasts. 
Reprint from Journal of Experimental Zoology, Vol. 76, No. 2, 
'July 1937. 

Katharine Rosetta Jeffers 

Staining Reactions of Protoplasm and Its Formed Components. 22 
p., O. Reprint from Journal of Morphology, Vol. 56, No. 1, lune, 
1934. 

Department of Chemistry 

Marion H. Armbruster 

A Thermodynamic Study of Liquid Potassium Amalgams. 10 p., 
O. 1934. Reprint from Journal of the American Chemical Society, 
56, 2525 (1934) (with J. L. Crenshaw). 

Department of Classical Archaeology 

Virginia Grace 

The Stamped Amphora Handles Found in the American Excava- 
tions in the Athenian Agora, 19314932. 310 p., Q., 2 pi. Har- 
vard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 1934. 

Lucy T. Shoe 

Profiles of Greek Mouldings. Two Vols. Text, 185 pp. Plates 
LXXIX. Published for The American School of Classical Studies 
at Athens. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 
1936. 

Department of Economics and Politics 
Grace Evans Rhoads, Jr. 

Amendments of the Covenant of the League of Nations Adopted 
and Proposed. 201 p., O. Philadelphia. 193 5. 



Report by the Dean of the Graduate School 39 

Department of Education 
Olivia Futch 

A Study of Eye-Movements in the Reading of Latin, pp. 434-463, 
O. Offprinted from The Journal of General Psychology, 193 5, Vol. 
XIII., No. 2. 

The Reliability and Validity of Photographic Eye-Movement Records 
in the Reading of Latin, pp. 620-629. Warwick & York, Inc., 
Baltimore. Reprinted from The Journal of Educational Psychology, 
November, 1934. 

Department of English 

Mary Katharine Woodworth 

The Literary Career of Sir Samuel Egerton Brydges. Printed in 
Great Britain for Basil Blackwell 6? Mott, Ltd., by the Kemp Hall 
Press, Ltd., in the City of Oxford. 193 5. 161 p. O., 31 p. 
Appendix, Bibliography and Index. 

Department of French 

Edith K. Cumings 

The Literary Development of the Romantic Fairy Tale in France. 
100 p., O. Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. 1934. 

Edna C. Fredrick 

The Plot and Its Construction in Eighteenth Century Criticism of 
French Comedy. A Study of Theory with Relation to the Practice 
of Beaumarchais. 128 p., O. E. L. Hildreth & Co., Inc., Brattle- 
boro, Vermont. 1934. 

Kathryn L. Wood 

Criticism of French Romantic Literature in the Gazette de France, 
1830-1848. 139 p., O. Philadelphia. 1934. 

Edith A. Wright 

The Dissemination of the Liturgical Drama in France, 168 p., O. 
29 p. Appendix. Allen, Lane & Scott, Philadelphia. 1936. 

Jean Gray Wright 

A Study of the Themes of the Resurrection in the Mediaeval 
French Drama. 149 p., O. George Banta Publishing Company, 
Menasha, Wisconsin. 1935. 

Department of Geology 

Dorothy Wyckoff 

Geology of the Mt. Gausta Region in Telemark, Norway. 72 p., O. 
Reprint from 7<iors\ geologis\ tidss\rift, bind XIII., hefte 1, pag. 
1-72, Oslo. 1933. 

Department of German 
Margaret Jeffrey 

The Discourse in Seven Icelandic Sagas. 100 p., O. George Banta 
Publishing Company, Menasha, Wisconsin. 1934. 



40 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 
Myra Richards Jessen 

Goethe, als Kritiker der Lyrik. Beitrage zu Seiner Asthetik und 
Seiner Theorie. 162 + 10 p., O. H. Laupp, Jr., Tubingen. 1932. 

Department of History 

Josephine McCulloch Fisher 

Francis James Jackson and Newspaper Propaganda in the United 
States, 18094810. 20 p., O. 1935, published in Maryland Histori- 
cal Magazine. Complete text of the dissertation on file in the Bryn 
Mawr College Library under the title of "Some Aspects of British 
Diplomacy and Propaganda in the United States before the War 
of 1812." 

Elizabeth Kissam Henderson 

The Attack on the Judiciary in Pennsylvania, 1800-1810. Offprint 
from The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, April 
1937. 

Department of Latin 

Aline L. Abaecherli 

The Institution of the Imperial Cult in the Western Provinces of 
the Roman Empire. Estratto da Studt e Materiali di Storia delle 
Religioni, Vol. XI (193 5), pp. 153486, O. Bologna, Nicola 
Zanichelli, 193 5-xiii. 

Charlotte E. Goodfellow 

Roman Citizenship. A Study of Its Territorial and Numerical 
Expansion from the Earliest Times to the Death of Augustus. 
124 p., O. Lancaster Press, Inc., Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 1935. 

Agnes Kirsopp Lake 

Campana Supellex: The Pottery Deposit at Minturnae. 15 p., Q. 
XXIII. pi. Reprint from BoIIettino DelV Assaciazione Internazionale 
Studi Mediterranei, Anno V., Num. 4-5, 1934-35. Paper on Archac 
ological Evidence for the Tuscan Temple, published in the Memoirs 
of the American Academy in Rome, Vol. XII., 193 5, pp. 89-149. 

Irene Rosenzweig 

Ritual and Cults of Pre-Roman Iguvium (Studies and Documents 
edited by Kirsopp Lake and Silva Lake, IX.). 117 p., O. 35 p. 
Appendix. Waverly Press, Inc., Baltimore. 1937. 

Department of Mathematics 
Olive Margaret Hughes 

A Certain Mixed Linear Integral Equation, pp. 861-882, O. 1935. 
Reprinted from The American journal of Mathematics, Vol. LVIL, 
No. 4. 

Ruth Stauffer 

The Construction of a Normal Basis in a Separable Normal Exten- 
sion Field, pp. 585-597, O. 1936. Reprint from The American 
Journal of Mathematics, Vol. LVIIL, No. 3. 



Report by the Dean of the Graduate School 41 

Department of Philosophy 
Dorothy Walsh 

The Objectivity of the Judgment of ^Esthetic Value. 52 p., O. 
The Lancaster Press, Inc., Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 1936. 

Helen Hawthorne Young 

The Writings of Walter Pater. A Reflection of British Philosophical 
Opinion from 1860 to 1890. 137 p., O. Lancaster Press, Inc., 
Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 1933. 

Department of Psychology 
Elizabeth V. Fehrer 

An Investigation of the Learning of Visually Perceived Forms. 
Offprinted from The American Journal of Psychology, April, 1935, 
Vol. XLVIL, pp. 187-221 O. The American Journal of Psychol- 
ogy, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York. 193 5. 

Katharine Elizabeth McBride and 
Theodore Weisenburg, M.D. 

Aphasia, A Clinical and Psychologial Study. New York, The 
Commonwealth Fund, London, Humphrey Milford, Oxford Univer' 
sity Press. 601 pp., 0., 3 3 p. Bibliography and Index. 

Dorothy Shaad 

Binocular Summation in Scotopic Vision, pp. 39L413, O. Off' 
printed from The Journal of Experimental Psychology, Vol. XVIII. , 
No. 4, August, 193 5. 

Department of Social Economy 
Belle Boone Beard 

Juvenile Probation. An Analysis of the Case Records of Five 
Hundred Children Studied at the Judge Baker Guidance Clinic and 
Placed on Probation in the Juvenile Court of Boston. 220 p., O. 
American Book Company, New York. 1934. 

Leah H. Feder 

Unemployment Relief in Periods of Depression. A Study of 
Measures Adopted in Certain American Cities, 1857'1922. 353 p., 
O. Russell Sage Foundation, New York. 1936. 

Anne Hendry Morrison 

Women and Their Careers. A Study of 306 Women in Business 
and the Professions. 197 p., O. National Federation of Business 
and Professional Women's Clubs, Inc., New York. 1934. 

Department of Spanish 
Edith Fishtine 

Don Juan Valera, the Critic. 121 p., O. Bryn Mawr, Pennsyh 
vania. 1933. 



42 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

In concluding this report for the year 193 6' 37, I wish to express 
my appreciation of the able conduct of the affairs of the Graduate 
School, during my absence in the second semester, by Professor Lily 
Ross Taylor, who consented to serve as Acting Dean. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EUNICE MORGAN SCHENCK 



REPORT BY THE DIRECTOR IN RESIDENCE 
AND EDITOR OF PUBLICATIONS 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic 
year 1936-1937: 

Official Publications 

Annual Publications 

The Bryn Mawr College Calendar, Vols. XXIX. and XXX. 

The Library and Halls of Residence, Plans and Descriptions, 

Vol. XXIX., No. 4, November, 1936. 

Carola Woerishoffer Graduate Department of Social Economy 

and Social Research, Vol. XXIX., No. 3, January, 1937. 

Undergraduate Courses, Vol. XXX., No. 1, May, 1937. 

Graduate Courses, Vol. XXX., No. 2, June, 1937. 
Bryn Mawr College Finding List, November, 1936. 
Bryn Mawr College Commencement Programme, June, 1937. 
Report to the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College, 

for the year 1935-36, published May, 1937. 

Special Publications 

The Proposed Chair of Linguistics at Bryn Mawr College 
Showing the value of the appointment of Dr. Eva Fiesel as 
Visiting Professor of Linguistics, the importance of scholarly 
cooperation between linguists and archaeologists and the need 
of a permanent chair of linguistics at Bryn Mawr, published 
November, 1936. (Pamphlet.) 

Bryn Mawr College 

Life on the campus, the history of the college and the under- 
graduate school, published June, 1937. (Illustrated Pamphlet.) 

Faculty Publications for the Year 
October 1936-October 1937 

This report is based on questionnaires sent out in October 1937. 

Karl L. Anderson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics 

'Tariff Protection and Increasing Returns," Explorations in 
Economics, a volume of notes and essays in honor of F. W. 
Taussig, pp. 157-169, 1937. 

[43] 



44 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Richard Bernheimer, Ph.D., Lecturer in History of Art 

Review: A Catalogue of German Paintings, by Charles Kuhn, 

American Journal of Archaeology, Vol. XLL, p. 173, 1937. 

Review: Byzantinische Buchmalerei, by K. Weit2;man, op. cit., 

Vol. XLL, pp. 349-350, 1937. 
Maurine Boie, M.A., Part-time Assistant in Social Economy 

"The Integration of Family Case Work and a Science of Human 

Relations," The Family, Vol. XVIIL, pp. 156-165, July, 1937. 

"The Case Worker's Need for Orientation to the Culture of 

the Client," op. cit., Vol. XVIIL, pp. 196-204, October, 1937. 
T. Robert S. Broughton, Ph.D., Professor of Latin 

"Was Sallust Fair to Cicero,'''' Transactions of the American 

Philological Association, Vol. LXVIL, pp. 3446, 1936. 

"A Significant Break in the Cistophoric Coinage of Asia," 

American Journal of Archaeology, Vol. XLL, pp. 248-249, 1937. 

"Ancient History Notes," American Historical Review, Vol. 

XLIL, pp. 165-169, 380-381, 581-583, 818-820, 1936-1937. 
Rhys Carpenter, Ph.D., Professor of Classical Archaeology and 
Greek 

Book Reviews, American Journal of Archaeology, Vols. XL. 

and XLL, passim, 1936-1937. 
Samuel Claggett Chew, Ph.D., Professor of English Literature 

The Crescent and the Rose, Oxford University Press, New 

York, 1937. 

Book Reviews, K[ew Tor\ Herald-Tribune, passim, 1936-1937. 
Arthur Clay Cope, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

"Condensation Reactions. I. The Condensation of Ketones 

with Cyanoacetic Esters and the Mechanism of the Knoevenagel 

Reaction," Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 

LIX., pp. 2327-2330, 1937. 
Ernst Diez, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History of Art 

"A Stylistic Analysis of Islamic Art," Ars Islamica, Vol. III., 

pp. 201-212, 1936. 

"Simultaneity in Islamic Art," op. cit., Centenary of Michigan 

University, pp. 185-190, 1937. 
Max Diez, Ph.D., Professor of German Literature 

"The Principle of the Dominant Metaphor in Goethe's 

'Werther'," Publications of the Modern Language Association, 

Vol. LI., pp. 821-841, 985-1006, 1936. 



Report by the Director in Residence 45 

Lincoln Dryden, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology- 
Review: Ein Versuch, Geschiebmergel nach dem Schwer- 
mineraliengeha.lt stratigraphisch zu gliedern, by Viktor Leiru, 
Journal of Sedimentary Petrology, Vol. VI., No. 1, 1936. 
Review: Geologie der Bauen-Brisen-Ketten . am Vierwaldstdt- 
tersee, by H. J. Fichter, op. cit., Vol. VI, No. 1, 1936. 
Review: Eine Methode zur exa\ten Sedimentationsmessung, by 
Niels Nielsen, op. cit., Vol. VI, No. 2, 1936. 
Review: Investigaciones sobre el material clastico en formaciones 
del J^orte Argentina, by Tor H. Hagerman, op. cit., Vol. VII, 
pp. 85-86, 1937. 

Stratigraphy and Structure of the Calvert Formation in South- 
ern Maryland, summary of dissertation of June 1930, 1936. 

Mildred Fairchild, Ph.D., Grace H. Dodge Associate Professor of 
Social Economy and Social Research 

"The Russian Family Today, 1 '' address before the National 

Council of Parent Education, Chicago, November 11, 1936, 

Journal of the American Association of University Women, 

April, 1937. 

"The Family in the Soviet Union, 1 ' American Sociological 

Review, October, 1937. 

"Economic Planning in Soviet Russia, 11 Bulletin of American 

Russian Institute, August, 1937. 

Charles Ghequiere Fenwick, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Political 
Science 

"The New Status of the Dardanelles, 11 American Journal of 
International Law, Vol. XXX., pp. 701-706, October, 1936. 
"The Inter- American Conference for the Maintenance of Peace, 11 
op. cit., Vol. XXXI, pp. 201-225, April, 1937. 
"The Question of Canadian Participation in Inter-American 
Conferences, 11 op. cit., Vol. XXXI., pp. 473-476, July, 1937. 
"The Inter- American Conference for the Maintenance of Peace, 11 
Proceedings of the American Society of International Law, pp. 
34-35, April, 1937. 

"Neutrality and International Responsibility, 11 Annals of the 
American Academy of Political and Social Science, July, 1937. 
"The United States and Conflicting World Forces, 11 Proceedings 
of the Academy of Political Science, Vol. XVII, pp. 53-57; 62, 
May, 1937. 



46 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

"Political Disputes in International Law," Essays in Political 

Science in honor of W. W. V^illoughby, Johns Hopkins Press, 

Baltimore, pp. 289-306, 1937. 

"The Buenos Aires Conference: 1936,'" Foreign Policy Reports, 

July, 1937. 

Book Reviews in Legal Periodicals, passim, 1936-1937. 
Josephine McCulloch Fisher, Ph.D., Part-time Instructor in 
History 

"The Loyalists in Strafford, Vermont, 1 '' Proceedings of the 

Vermont Historical Society, September, 1937. 
Grace Frank, A.B., Non-resident Professor of Old French Philology 

Proverhes en rimes, in collaboration with Dorothy Miner, Johns 

Hopkins Press, Baltimore, 1937. 

"The Authorship of Le Mystere de Griseldis,'" Modern Language 

Xotes, Vol. LI., pp. 217-222, 1936. 

"The Beginnings of Comedy in France," Modern Language 

Review, Vol. XXXI., pp. 377-384, 1936. 

Book Reviews, Modern Language J^otes, passim, 1936-1937. 
Joseph Eugene Gillet, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish 

Associate Editor: Hispanic Review. 

Postscript to "A Note on Bartolome Aparicio," Hispanic 

Review, Vol. V, pp. 180-181, 1937. 

"Torres Naharro and the Spanish Drama of the Sixteenth 

Century (II.)," op. cit., Vol. V., pp. 193-207, 1937. 

Review: EI teatro de J^ueva Espana en el sigh XVI., by D. 

J. J. Rojas Garciduenas, op. cit., Vol. V., pp. 87-92, 1937. 

"Farsa Hecha Por Alonso de Salaya," Publications of the 

Modern Language Association, Vol. LIL, pp. 16-67, 1937. 
Howard Levi Gray, Ph.D., Marjorie Walter Goodhart Professor of 
History 

Book Reviews, American Historical Review, Vols. XLI. and 

XLIL, passim, 1936-1937. 
Gustav Arnold Hedlung, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathe- 
matics 

24 Reviews, Zentralhlatt fur Mathemati\, Vols. XIII., XIV., 

XV, passim, 1936-1937. 
Harry Helson, Ph.D., Professor of Experimental Psychology 

"On statistical methods of comparing heavy mineral suites," 

American Journal of Science, Vol. XXXII., pp. 392-395, 1936. 



Report by the Director in Residence 47 

"An experimental and theoretical study of changes in surface 
colors under changing illuminations," in collaboration with 
D. B. Judd, abstract, Psychological Bulletin, Vol. XXXIII. , pp. 
740-741, 1936. 

"Prediction and control of Judgments from tactual single-point 
stimulation," in collaboration with R. H. Burgert, American 
Journal of Psychology, Vol. XLVIIL, pp. 609-616, 1936. 
"Siz;e-Constancy of the projected after-image," op. cit., Vol. 
XLVIIL, pp. 638-642, 1936. 

"A self-calibrating time-control for multiple circuits," in col- 
laboration with N. Powell, op. cit., Vol. IL., pp. 109-113, 1937. 
"Tri-dimensional analysis and the non-film modes of color 
appearance," abstract, Journal of the Optical Society of Amer- 
ica, Vol. XXVII., p. 59, 1937. 

Stephen Joseph Herben, B.Litt., Ph.D., Professor of English 
Philology 

"Arms and Armour in the Works of Chaucer," Speculum, 
October, 1937. 

Louise W. Adams Holland, Ph.D., Lecturer in Latin, Semester 
IL, 1936-1937 

"Herodotus L, 94: A Phocaean Version of an Etruscan Tale," 
American Journal of Archaeology, Vol. XLL, pp. 377-382, 1937. 

Georgiana Goddard King, M.A., Professor Emeritus of History 
of Art 

"Mathia Preti," Art Bulletin, 1936-1937. 
"Virgin of Humility," op. cit., 1936-1937. 

Kathrine Roller, Ph.D., Instructor in English 

"A Source for Portions of the Witch of Atlas," Modern Lan' 
guage Kotes, Vol. LIL, pp. 157-161, March, 1937. 

Hertha Kraus, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Social Economy 

"Lay Participation in a Public Welfare Department," Proceed- 
ings of the J^ational Conference of Social \S/or\, 1936. 

Agnes Kirsopp Lake, Ph.D., Instructor in Latin 
Editor: Essays in Honor of Kirsopp La\e. 

"An Interpretation of Propertius IV., 7," The Classical Review, 
Vol. LI., pp. 53-55, May, 1937. 

"Supplicatio and Graecus Ritus," Quantulacumque: Essays in 
Honor of Kirsopp La\e, 1937. 



48 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Richmond Lattimore, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Greek 

Review: Sofocle, by M. Untersteiner, American Journal of 
Philology, Vol. LVIIL, No. 3, pp. 369-370, July, 1937. 

Betsey Libbey, A.B., Non-resident Lecturer in Social Economy 

"Family Social Work," Social Wor\ Tear Boo\, pp. 146-151, 
1937. 

Berthe Marie Marti, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Latin and 
French 

"Proskynesis and Adorare," Language, Vol. XII., No. 4, pp. 
272-282, October, 1936. 

Cornelia Lynde Meigs, A.B., Margaret Kingsland Haskell Asso- 
ciate Professor of English Composition 

Railroad West, a novel, Little, Brown and Company, Boston, 

July, 1937. 

Short Stories in various magazines for children. 

Fritz Metzger, Ph.D., Professor of Germanic Philology 

"ae. eart, eard, ard. 'du bist 1 und got. sijum, wir sind," 

Zeitschrift fur Vergleichende Sprachforschungm, Vol. LXIV., 

pp. 137-141, 1937. 

"Zu den ablautend-redupliz;ierenden Verben im Germanischen," 

Archiv fur das Studium der *Neueren Sprachen, Vol. CLXXI., 

pp. 66-68, 1937. 

"Zur Ineinanderbildung der verschiedenen Wur^eln und 

Formen im Prasens Indie, des verbum substantivum im West- 

germanischen," op. cit., Vol. CLXXI., pp. 145-149, 1937. 

Review: Widsith, London, 1935, by Kemp Malone, American 

Journal of Philology, Vol. LVIIL, pp. 374-379, 1937. 

Herbert Adolphus Miller, Ph.D., Lecturer in Social Economy 
Chapter: "Second Generation Immigrants," Our Racial and 
Rational Minorities, Prentice Hall, New York, August, 1937. 

Valentin Muller, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Archaeology 

"Studies in Oriental Archaeology and Plano-convex Bricks," 

Journal of the American Oriental Society, Vol. LVIL, pp. 84-87, 

1937. 

"The Roman Basilica," American Journal of Archaeology, Vol. 

XLL, pp. 250-261, 1937. 



Report by the Director in Residence 49 

Milton Charles Nahm, B.Litt., Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Philosophy 

Review, Anfronicus Commenius, by John Wilson, Review of 
English Studies, 1937. 

Arthur Lindo Patterson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics 
"The X-ray Determination of Particle Size," in collaboration 
with G. H. Cameron of Hamilton College, Symposium on 
Radiography and X-ray Diffraction Methods: Philadelphia: 
American Society for Testing Materials, pp. 324-338, 1937. 

Marion Parris Smith, Ph.D., Professor of Economics 

Book Reviews, Saturday Review of Literature, passim, 1936- 
1937, unsigned. 

.William Roy Smith, Ph.D., Professor of History 

Book Reviews, American Historical Review, Vols. XLI. and 
XLIL, passim, 1936-1937. 

K. Laurence Stapleton, A.B., Instructor in English 

"The Experience Curriculum in English,''' Report of School and 
College Conference, 1937. 

Mary Hamilton Swindler, Ph.D., Professor of Classical Archae- 
ology 

Editor: American Journal of Archaeology. 

Lily Ross Taylor, Ph.D., Professor of Latin 

"Tiberius' Ovatio and the Ara Numinis Augusti," American 

Journal of Philology, Vol. LVIIL, pp. 185-193, 1937. 

"M. Titius and the Syrian Emmard, ,, Journal of Roman Studies, 

Vol. XXVI, pp. 161-173, 1936. 

"On the Chronology of Cicero's Letters to Atticus, Book XIII.," 

Classical Philology, Vol. XXXIL, pp. 228-240, 1937. 

Book Reviews, American Journal of Archaeology, American 

Journal of Philology, passim, 1936-1937. 

David Hilt Tennent, Ph.D., Professor of Biology and Holder of 
a Julius and Sarah Goldman Grant 

"The Effect of Irradiation of Eggs of Lytechinus with Sun- 
light during Development in Various Dyes," Tear Boo\ of the 
Carnegie Institution of Washington, Vol. XXXV., p. 4, Decem- 
ber, 1936. 



50 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Dorothy Walsh, Ph.D., Part-time Instructor in Philosophy 

"Philosophical Implications of the Historical Enterprise, 1 '' 
Journal of Philosophy, Vol. XXXIV., pp. 57-64, February, 1937. 

Edward H. Watson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology 

"Igneous Rocks of the San Carlos Mountains, 1 ' Part II., approx. 
100 pp., Geology and Biology of the San Carlos Mountains, 
Tamaulipas, Mexico, 306 pp., University of Michigan Press, 
Ann Arbor, Michigan, 1937. ($5.00.) 

Paul Weiss, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy 

"Nature and Status of Time, 11 Philosophical Essays for A. 7\[. 
Whitehead, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1936. 

Roger Hewes Wells, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science 

Book Reviews, American Political Science Review, pp. 1193- 
1194, December, 1936. 

Harold E. Wethey, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History of Art 
"Anequin de Egas Cueman, a Fleming in Spain," Art Bulletin, 
Vol. XIX., pp. 381-400, September, 1937. 

"Gil de Siloe and Diego de Siloe," Thieme-Bec\er s Kilnstler- 
Lexi\on, Vol. XXXI, 1937. 

Anna Pell Wheeler, Ph.D., Sc.D., Professor of Mathematics 
"Spectral Theory for a Certain Class of Non-symmetric Com- 
pletely Continuous Matrices/'' American Journal of Mathe- 
matics, Vol. LVIL, pp. 847-853, 1936. 

Lectures and Entertainments by Other Than 
Members of the College 1936-37 

Goodhart Hall 

Commencement 

Dr. Abraham Flexner, Director of the Institute for Advanced 
Study at Princeton, New Jersey, delivered the Commencement 
address entitled "The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge" on Wednes- 
day, June 2nd. 

Endowed Lectures 

Mrs. Barbara Wootton, Director of Studies for Tutorial Classes 
at the University of London, since 1927, gave a series of six lectures 
under the Anna Howard Shaw Memorial Foundation on the subject 



Report by the Director in Residence 51 

"Social Trends in Contemporary England" on Monday evenings in 
April and May. In addition to the lectures Mrs. Wootton taught 
an advanced undergraduate course in Economic Thought and a 
graduate seminary in Labour Organisation. 

Dr. George Lyman Kittredge, Professor Emeritus of English 
Literature at Harvard University, gave the Ann Elizabeth Sheble 
Memorial Lecture in English Literature on the subject "Shakespeare's 
Villains," on April 29th. 

Department Lecture 

Monsieur Paul Hazard, Professeur au College de France, 
Flexner Lecturer at Bryn Mawr College, 1930, Visiting Professor of 
French Literature at Columbia University, 1936-37, gave a lecture on 
"UtvPre'Romantique de 1730, L'Abbe Prevost" on November 18th, 
under the auspices of the French Department. 

Undergraduate Association Lectures 

Dr. Sylvanus G. Morley, Director of the Chichen Itza Project 
and in charge of the Carnegie Institute's Archaeological Expedition 
to Central America, specialist in Maya Hieroglyphic Writing and 
Middle American Archaeology, gave a lecture illustrated by colored 
lantern slides on "New Mayan Excavations" on December 2nd. 

Mr. John Mason Brown, Dramatic Critic of the 7<[ew Tor\ 
Evening Post, gave a talk on "Broadway in Review" on May 6th for 
the benefit of the Mrs. Otis Skinner Theatre Workshop. 

Informal Department Lectures 

Dr. Alice Salomon, Chairman of the International Committee 
on Schools of Social Work, spoke on "Social Workers I Have 
Known" on November 19th under the auspices of the Social Economy 
Department. 

Dr. Thomas Reed Powell, Langdell Professor of Law at Harvard 
Law School, spoke on "The Constitutional Problems of Roosevelt's 
Second Term" on December 16th under the auspices of the Eco' 
nomics and Politics Department. 

Miss Martha Root, Journalist and member of the Bahai religion, 
spoke on "The Religious movement started by Baha'-u'llah in Persia 
about 1868" on December 16th under the auspices of the Social 
Economy Department. 



52 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Dr. Olaf Helmer, formerly of Berlin and Cambridge, England, 
spoke on "Logical Foundations of Mathematics" on January 6th 
under the auspices of the Departments of Mathematics and Philosophy. 

Dr. Erwin R. Goodenough, Professor of the History of Religion 
and Fellow of Jonathan Edwards College, Yale University, gave an 
illustrated lecture on "Jewish Art in Roman and Byzantine Times" 
on January 7th under the auspices of the Departments of Greek 
and Latin. 

Dr. Robert M. Ogden, Dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences at Cornell University, gave an illustrated lecture on "Naive 
Geometry in Art" on January 18th under the auspices of the Depart- 
ments of Psychology and Archaeology. 

Miss Cora Du Bois, of Hunter College, New York, with three 
Bryn Mawr professors, gave a series of eight lectures on "The Nature 
of Man" on Mondays and Wednesdays during February and March, 
under the auspices of the Departments of Psychology and Philosophy. 

Miss Dorothy Garrod, of Newnham College, Cambridge Uni- 
versity, England, gave an illustrated lecture on "Excavations of Three 
Caves on Mount Carmel in Palestine" on March 22nd under the 
auspices of the Archaeology Department. 

Dr. V. Gordon Childe, Professor of Prehistoric Archaeology at 
the University of Edinburgh, gave an illustrated lecture on "The 
Indus Valley Civilisation" on March 22nd under the auspices of the 
Archaeology Department. 

Dr. Paola Zancani-Montuoro, who has directed an expedition 
which has found a series of Greek sculptured metopes in Lucania, 
gave an illustrated lecture on "Recent Excavations at the Heraeum 
in Lucania" on April 7th under the auspices of the Archaeology 
Department and the Philadelphia Society of the Archaeological 
Institute of America. 

Mr. Samuel Fleisher, Vice-President of the Philadelphia Play- 
ground and Recreation Association, Founder and President of the 
Graphic Sketch Club, gave a lecture illustrated by motion pictures on 
"Social Adventures in Philadelphia," including playgrounds for 
young children, "Tot-lots," on April 14th, under the auspices of the 
Social Economy Department. 



Report by the Director in Residence 53 

Professors Albrecht Gotze and Edgar Howard Sturtevant, 
both of Yale University, spoke on "Hittite Culture as revealed in 
Clay Tablets of the Royal Archives found at Bagha^keuri" on April 
19th under the auspices of the Archaeology Department. 

Dr. Saul Rosenzweig, Psychologist at Worcester State Hospital, 
spoke on "The Psychopathology of Hitlerism" on April 20th, under 
the auspices of the Psychology Department. 

Dr. Anna Louise Strong, author of Chinas Millions, I Change 
Worlds, etc., spoke on "Loyalist Spain 1 '' on May 6th under the 
auspices of the Social Economy Department. 

Informal Undergraduate Association Lectures 

Miss Gretchen Green, associated with "The Seeing Eye," gave 
an illustrated talk on "The Seeing Eye" on November 2nd. 

A Political Forum was held on October 27th with speakers from 
the college for the Democrats, Republicans, Socialists and Com' 
munists, under the auspices of the International Relations Club, the 
Industrial Group and the American Students Union. 

An All College Peace Meeting was held on April 22nd. The 
outside speakers were: Mrs. Barbara Wootton, Anna Howard 
Shaw Memorial Foundation Lecturer 1937, and Mr. Francis Deak, 
Professor of International Law at Columbia University. 

International Relations Club 

Mrs. Mildred E. Chapman, Peace Scholar of the Federation of 
American Women's Clubs Overseas, a graduate of Boston University, 
spoke on "Political Religions in Europe" on January 7th. 

Mr. Philip Jacob spoke on "The Emergency Peace Campaign" on 
February 11th under the auspices of the A. S. U, as well as that of 
the International Relations Club. 

American Student Union 

Mr. Carlos March spoke on behalf of the Cuban Student Move- 
ment, of which he is a leader, on November 12th. 

Mr. John W. Smith, a striker of the International Seaman's 
Union, spoke on December 7th. 



54 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Mr. William Hossiter, field worker of the national A. S. U., 
spoke on the "New American Youth Act'" which was up before 
Congress, on February 10th. 

Industrial Group 

Mr. Conrad Rheiner, Director of Workers' Education, Phila- 
delphia, W. P. A., spoke on "The Spirit in the A. F. of L. 11 on 
November 11th. 

Mr. Warner Clark, President of the German Cooperative 
Society, and Miss Hazel Taylor, member of the Educational Com- 
mittee of the Great Consumers Cooperatives, spoke on "Consumers 1 
Cooperatives 11 on December 9th. 

Mr. William Jeanes, Director of the Carl Mackley Houses, 
spoke on "Workers 1 Housing 11 on January 13th. 

Mrs. Roberta Cramer, member of the Women's International 
League for Peace and Freedom, spoke on "Labor's Relation to Peace 11 
on April 7th. 

The Undergraduate Committee for the Summer School 

Mr. Tom Tippett, author of Horseshoe Bottoms, Mill Shadows, 
etc., spoke on "Workers 1 Education 11 on April 15th. 

Philosophy Club 

Mr. F. S. C. Northrop, Professor of Philosophy at Yale, spoke 
on "Metaphysics in Relation to Science 11 on October 15th. 

Dr. Charles Bakewell, Retired Professor of Philosophy at Yale, 
Associate Professor of Philosophy at Bryn Mawr College 1898-1900, 
spoke on "Aristotle 11 on December 3rd. 

Dr. Kurt Goldstein spoke on "Cortical Function 11 on January 
9th. 

Mr. Dean Stevenson, President of the Robert W. Blake Society 
of Lehigh University, whose members were guests of the Philosophy 
Club, read a paper on April 30th. 

Athletic Association 

Mr. Henry Woolman, who founded the Horseshoe Trail, which 
extends from Valley Forge to Manada Gap in connection with the 



Report by the Director in Residence 5 5 

American Youth Hostel, spoke and showed colored motion pictures 
on December 7th. 

Count Walter Neudegg, a skiing instructor of Salsburg, gave 
ten lessons and talks on skiing technique during January and 
February. 

Vocational Teas 

Miss Agnes Mongan, Research Assistant at the Fogg Art 
Museum at Cambridge, spoke on "Museum Work" on January 1 1th. 

Miss Grace Hayward, of the Katharine Gibbs School in New 
York, spoke on "Secretarial Work" in April. 

Music 

Alexander Kelberine, Russian pianist, gave a Pianoforte Recital 
on March 10th, under the auspices of the Music Department. 

Myra Hess, English pianist, gave a Pianoforte Recital on March 
18th, under the auspices of the Agnes Irwin School Virginia T. 
Stoddard Memorial. 

Entertainment 

The Latin Players presented Plautus 1 "Mostellaria," translated 
by Margaret Lacy, 1937, on October 24th. 

The Varsity Players of Bryn Mawr College and the Cap 
and Bells of Haverford College presented "Holiday," by Philip 
Barry, on December 4th and 5th. 

The Dancers Club presented a Dance Recital on December 12th. 

The German Club presented a German Christmas play, "Krip- 
penspiel," by Joseph Lenke, on December 15th. 

Uday Shan-Kar and his Hindu Ballet with Musical Ensemble 
gave a programme of dancing and music on February 4th under the 
auspices of the Undergraduate Committee on Entertainments. 

Andres Segovia, guitarist, gave a recital on March 2nd under 
the auspices of the Undergraduate Committee on Entertainments. 

The German Club presented a German motion picture of "Emil 
und die Detektive" on March 17th. 



56 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

The French Club presented "L'Ecole des Maris," by Jean 
Baptiste Poquelin, on March 20th. 

Cornelia Otis Skinner gave a programme of Modern Mono- 
logues and the "Loves of Charles II." on March 24th for the benefit 
of the Mrs. Otis Skinner Theatre Workshop. 

The Glee Club presented 'The Mikado," by Gilbert and Sulli- 
van, on April 23rd and 24th. 

The Spanish Classes presented "La Cueva de Salamanca," by 
Cervantes, on April 30th. 

The Junior League of Philadelphia presented "The Indian 
Captive" on May 1st. 

The Bryn Mawr League presented the College Maids and 
Porters in "The Cat and the Canary," by John Willard, on May 8th. 

The German Clubs of Bryn Mawr College and Haverford 
College presented the official motion pictures of the "1936 Olympic 
Games" on May 11th. 

Exhibitions 

The exhibitions held in the Common Room opened November 5th 
with paintings by the noted Chicago artist, Ivan Le Lorraine 
Albright, and included a collection of wooden figures, Primitive 
African Sculpture; a collection of sculpture of Thomayom 
Katchamakoff, who had been exhibiting his sculpture in the Boyer 
Galleries in Philadelphia, and came to Bryn Mawr to discuss them 
on March 23rd; and photographs taken by students and Faculty and 
exhibited by the Camera Club May 7th, 8th and 9th. 

Deanery 

Mr. James G. McDonald, Associate Editor of the K[ew Tor\ 
Times, Honorary Chairman of the Board of the Foreign Policy Asso- 
ciation, formerly High Commissioner for German Refugees under 
the League of Nations Association, Vice-president of the National 
Council for the Prevention of War and Trustee of the American 
Council of the Institute of Pacific Relations, talked on "European 
Realignments" on November 15th. 



Report by the Director in Residence 57 

Dr. Alfred Salmony, Visiting Lecturer in Oriental Art at Mills 
College, California, and Executive Secretary of the Friends of Far 
Eastern Art, formerly Director of the Museum of Far Eastern Art 
in Cologne, talked on "The Ancient Art of Siberia and Its Influence 
on Chinese and European Art" on December 13th. The talk was 
illustrated by lantern slides, some of them taken from Dr. Salmony 's 
original photographs which have never been published. 

Florence Fraser (Mrs. William L. Mudge) gave a dramatic 
recital of Wagner's "Die Meistersinger" on January 10th. Mrs. 
Mudge studied under Philipp and under Yvette Guilbert in Paris, 
under Consolo in Florence, and is a graduate of the Curtis Institute 
of Music and of the American Conservatory at Fontainebleau. 

Tokaniya and Paal Batab, two American men who have taken 
Indian names and lived among the Indians, gave interpretations of 
American Indian Ceremonials and Dances in costume on Febru' 
ary 7th. 

The Montgomery County Citizens' Committee on Public 
Assistance studied the Goodrich Plan for State Relief on Feb- 
ruary 13 th. 

Mr. George Edward Slocombe, who had come recently to this 
country from Spain, talked on the "Spanish Situation and Its Reper- 
cussions" on February 21st. Mr. Slocombe is an author and jour- 
nalist, Chief Foreign Correspondent for the London Daily Herald, 
Foreign Editor of the London Evening Standard, author of Crisis in 
Europe, Dictator, Henry of ~Hjavarre, Paris in Profile, Don John of 
Austria, etc. 

Leonie Adams (Mrs. William Troy) read from her verse on 
March 7th. She is the author of High Falcon and other Poems. 

Dr. Walter Livingston Wright, Jr., President of the Istanbul 
American Colleges in Turkey, showed colored motion pictures of the 
American campuses in the Near East and talked about these educa- 
tional institutions founded by Americans, on March 8th. 

Mr. Haniel Long, who was on a visit to the east from Santa Fe, 
read from his verse and talked about creative writing on March 11th. 
He is the author of Pittsburgh Memoranda. 



58 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Dr. Christian Brinton, critic and author and a resident of West 
Chester, gave an illustrated talk on "Art in the Soviet Union 1 ' on 
March 21st. 

Mr. C. Emerson Brown, formerly .Director of the Philadelphia 
Zoological Gardens and a corresponding member of the Zoological 
Society of London, talked on "My Animal Friends" and showed 
motion pictures on April 11th. The lecture was very much enjoyed 
by the Faculty children and the alumnae and their children who 
attended. 

Miss Dorothy F. Leet, Director of Reid Hall, Paris, spoke 
informally about Reid Hall and the opportunities for study in Paris 
at tea on April 12th. 

The Hampton Quartet gave a recital on April 18th. Instead 
of four men, six appeared and sang. Mr. John Wainwright, who 
has been associated with Hampton Institute for fifty years, gave a 
farewell solo. 

The Yale Puppeteers returned to present "Mister Punch at 
Home" to a full house on May 2nd. 

Mr. Ellis Ames Ballard talked about Kipling and illustrated his 
talk from his world-famous collection of manuscripts and editions 
on May 9th. 

Master Harry Cykman, fourteen-year-old protege of Efrem 
Zimbalist, who has been soloist with the San Francisco and Portland 
Orchestras, gave a violin recital on May 23rd. 

Dr. Frederica De Laguna, leader of the Archaeological and 
Geological Expedition to the Yukon, sponsored by the American 
Philosophical Society, gave a talk illustrated by informal motion 
pictures on "Eighty Days on the Yukon" on May 28th. 

Concours Oratoire 

Miss Mary Hinckley Hutchings was winner of the Concours 
Oratoire, a competition for a French Medal offered by the Comite 
France-Amerique, held on May 13 th, at which the judges were M. 
Maurice Faivre dArcier, French Vice- Consul in Philadelphia, Mrs. 
J. Stogdell Stokes, and Professor Edwin C. Byam, of the University 
of Delaware. 



Report by the Director in Residence 59 

The Graduate School 

Miss Anne Wiggin, Secretary of the International Student Com' 
mittee, spoke at a dinner in Radnor Hall on November 4th on the 
purpose of the committee. 

Mrs. Dorothea Ways, President of the Philadelphia League of 
Women Shoppers, spoke at a tea in Radnor Hall on December 6th 
on the League's programme and the recent department store strike 
in Philadelphia. 

Miss Inez Munoz, Spanish Social Worker in Philadelphia, spoke 
and led discussion on Spain in Radnor Hall after dinner on April 
21st. 

Sunday Evening Services 

The Reverend Ernest C. Earp, Rector of the Church of the 
Redeemer, Bryn Mawr, opened the series of Sunday evening services, 
sponsored by the Bryn Mawr League, with a service for the 
Freshmen on September 27th. 

The Reverend Alexander C. Zabriskie, of the Theological 
Seminary, Alexandria, Virginia, conducted a series of three services 
in October and November. 

The Reverend Henry P. Van Dusen, Dean of the Union 
Theological Seminary, New York, conducted a service on November 
22nd and returned to conduct a second on April 25th. 

The Reverend Andrew Mutch, Minister Emeritus of the Bryn 
Mawr Presbyterian Church, conducted the Christmas Carol 
Service on December 13th. 

The Reverend John W. Suter, Jr., Rector of the Church of 
the Epiphany, New York City, conducted a service on February 7th 
and returned to conduct the Out of Door Service on May 16th. 

The Reverend Elmer T. Thompson, Director of the Interna- 
tional Student House, Philadelphia, conducted a service on Feb- 
ruary 2nd. 

The Reverend Thomas Guthrie Speers, Minister of Brown 
Memorial Church, Baltimore, conducted a service on March 7th. 



60 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Mrs. Harper Sibley, member of the Appraisal Commission for 
Foreign Missions in the Orient, 1931 '32, spoke at the service on 
March 21st. 

The Reverend C. Leslie Glenn, Rector of Christ Church, 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, conducted a series of two services in April 
and returned to conduct a third on May 2nd. 

Dr. John Edgar Park, President of Wheaton College, Norton, 
Massachusetts, gave the Baccalaureate Sermon on May 30th. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CAROLINE CHADWICK-COLLINS 



REPORT BY THE LIBRARIAN 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College: 

I have the honour to present the annual report of the work of the 
college library for the year ending June 30, 1937: 

Size and Growth of the Library 

The following table shows the additions made from various sources 
and the total present extent of the library. The corresponding table 
for the year 1935-36 is given for purposes of comparison: 

Number of volumes June 30, 1936 154,110 

Number of volumes added 1935-36 1936-37 

By purchase 2,653 2,436 

By binding 713 760 

By gifts and exchange 776 750 

By replacement 70 106 

Total additions 4,212 4,052 

Volumes withdrawn 346 459 

Net increase 3,866 3,593 

3,593 

Total volumes June 30, 1937 157,703 

Pamphlets added 361 566 

Pamphlets withdrawn 272 134 

Net gain , 89 432 

Total accessioned pamphlets June 30, 1937 9,411 

These figures represent catalogued pamphlets which are unbound. 
When pamphlets are bound they are withdrawn and again acces- 
sioned as books. There is also in the library a growing collection of 
several thousand pamphlets, for the most part uncatalogued disserta- 
tions from foreign universities, which are arranged alphabetically by 
author. So many of these dissertations deal with some minor and 
obscure point in German history, philosophy, finance or medicine that 
they are not of enough importance to us to catalogue but are avail- 
able if needed. 

[61] 



62 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

The volumes added were distributed by classes as follows showing 

that the relative rate of increase by subject matter remains about 
the same. 

1935-36 1936-37 

Class General works 204 239 

Class 1 Philosophy and Psychology 197 310 

Class 2 Religion 73 99 

Class 3 Economics, Sociology, Education 710 778 

Class 4 Philology 170 201 

Class 5 Science 478 502 

Class 6 Applied Arts 210 100 

Class 7 Fine Arts 312 310 

Class 8 Literature 1,178 1,000 

Class 9 History, Biography, etc 680 513 

Total 4,212 4,052 

The library has received by gift and exchange from societies, 
institutions and government bureaus, over two thousand pamphlets 
and books. From individual donors about 350 volumes have been 
received but no large collection of books was given to the library 
this year. All of these gifts are appreciated and have been acknowl- 
edged by the Librarian on behalf of the college. A few are of such 
significance as to deserve brief mention here. 

Miss Mary Winsor added to her gift of the limited edition of the 
Boswell Papers . . . from Malahide Castle in the collection of 
Lt. Col. Ralph H. Isham, the first edition of Boswell's Journal of a 
tour to the Hebrides published from the original manuscript in 1936. 

Dr. Simon Flexner presented a set of ten volumes of fiction of the 
early 19th century, containing 46 different titles. It is an unusual 
collection and will be of value to any one studying the novelists of 
the period. 

From Miss Dorothy Wood, through Mrs. Myra Elliot Vauclain, 
'08, we received 25 volumes on art and a number of pictures, also 
scrap books containing clippings on the World War. 

Mr. Frederick S. Bigelow continued to show his interest in the 
library by the gift of 40 volumes of drama, art and biography. 

From Mr. Thomas S. Cole we received 5? volumes of German 
literature, including a set of Schiller's Works. In his letter announc- 
ing the gift he says: "There is surely no place where good books 
will get into better hands than at Bryn Mawr." 

Through the courtesy of Mr. Grover A. Whalen the library has 
been placed on the mailing list to receive the publications about the 



Report by the Librarian 63 

New York World's Fair of 1939. A copy of the elaborate pros- 
pectus, issued in very limited edition and for the most part sent to 
foreign governments, was presented to us at his special request. 

Miss Allegra Woodworth, '25, gave 18 volumes of recently pub' 
lished works on history and politics of the day. 

Before her death in January, Miss Ella Riegel, '89, made two 
gifts, the first of $125.00 to purchase books on archaeology, the 
second of $100.00 to pay for part of the cost of Gerhard. Etruskische 
Spiegel, 5 vols. 

Two anonymous gifts of $250.00 each were made for art which 
enabled the department to make some important purchases in the 
field of Gothic art' and have a number of lantern slides made for 
class work. 

It is difficult to select a few titles from among our purchases of the 
year as being the most important. Current publications, suited or 
necessary to the requirements of undergraduate study, use up a large 
part of the appropriation but a few desirable works of more perma- 
nent value are added each year. 

A special grant for French literature enabled Dean Schenck, 
while she was in Paris in the spring, to purchase a number of 
Eighteenth Century French books to fill in the gaps in our collec- 
tion. For the most part, the books represent work of dramatists, 
almost forgotten, but who had considerable influence in the develop' 
ment of French drama. Among the important sets are Destouches, 
Oeuvres dramatiques, Paris 1774, 10 vols.; Boissy, Oeuvres de 
Theatre, Paris 1758, 9 vols.; Palissot de Montenoy, Oeuvres, Paris 
1778, 6 vols.; also of interest is Shakespeare traduit de Tanglois, 
dedie au Roi par M. LeTourneur, Paris, 1776-83, 20 vols. An 
attempt was made to complete the works of George Sand and 
61 vols, were added to our set. 

A fortunate purchase in the secondhand market was Bullen's 
Collection of old English plays, 1st Series, London 1882-85, 4 vols., 
which is out of print and rare. We have borrowed this work from 
the Johns Hopkins University Library repeatedly and it is a great 
satisfaction to have our own copy. 

Two important collections were purchased for Spanish: Jose 
T. Medina. Bibliotheca hispano americana (1493'1810). Santiago 
de Chile, 1898-1907, 7 vols.; Leo Rouanet. Coleccion de autos, 
farsas y coloquios del siglo XVI. Barcelona, 1901, 4 vols. Among 
the significant works bought for the German department are the 
following: Brockhaus' konversations — lexikon: Der Grosse Brock' 
haus, neubearbeiten, Lpz. 1928-35, 21 vols.; Deutsches rechts' 
worterbuch, hrsg. von der Preussischen Akademie der Wissen' 
schaften. Wiemar, 1914-37. vol. 1-3; Lessings Werke, hrsg. von 
Julius Petersen und Waldemar v. Olshausen. Berlin, 1925-3 5, 
30 vols. 

In science three notable sets were secured. Landolt-Bornstein 
Physikalischchemische tabellen. 5 auflage, und erganzjungs band. 
Berlin, 1923-36, 8 vols.; Serge von Bubnoff. Geologie von Europa. 
Berlin, 1926-36, 2 vols.; Stereochemie . . . hrsg. von Karl J. 
Freudenberg. Lpz;. 1933. 



64 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Two important sets of periodicals have been added to our already 
valuable collection of art books: Capitolium, rassegna di attirita 
municipale, Roma, 1926 to 1933, completes our set. This periodical 
is not to be found in any library in the vicinity and is useful for its 
descriptions of the recent excavations in Rome. The second set is 
likewise not in any Philadelphia library: Munchner jahrbuch der 
bildenden kunst. Miinchen, 1906 to 193 5, 24 vols. A valuable 
purchase for the specialist in the study of Etruscan art was F. W. E. 
Gerhard. Etruskische spiegel, Berlin, 1843-97, 5 vols, with plates. 

Extensive purchases were made in the field of social economy, 
both in public welfare and in labor and industrial problems. The 
amount of material issued on these subjects is abundant and much 
of it is important to have because of the rapid developments which 
are taking place at the present time. Over 300 books and many 
pamphlets were added during the year. Subscriptions to 92 periodi' 
cals, which are bound when the volume is complete, further increase 
our resources for study in these subjects. 

Catalogue Department 

It is with great satisfaction we can report the completion of the 
work of recataloguing which has been under way for years. The 
original catalogue was in two parts, an alphabetical arrangement of 
authors and a so-called "classed 1 ' catalogue arranged by subjects as 
the books stood on the shelves. In the early days this type of catalogue 
was used extensively until the dictionary form came into prominence 
and was adopted by most libraries. In 1904 it was decided to change 
to this newer and more convenient form of catalogue. Two years 
later a special cataloguer was appointed to carry on the work which 
progressed quite rapidly at first. Printed cards were purchased 
whenever possible and in 1910 a typewriter was added to the 
equipment of the library. The books classified as literature, history, 
biography, travel, archaeology and sociology were finished within a 
short time. When new accessions increased with enlarged appropria- 
tions there was less time for the arrears of work so the recataloguing 
has dragged on through the years. 

The situation, however, has not been as serious as it sounds for 
when the new catalogue was started the old subject cards were given 
tentative subject headings and filed with the new cards and all new 
purchases have been done according to the new method. It has 
meant that some books were not as fully catalogued as others but it 
was possible to find them. 

There still remains much to be done to improve the appearance of 
the catalogue. Many of the old manuscript cards have become dirty 
with use and it is our intention to replace them by printed or typed 
cards. New guide cards are needed and are being added as time 



Report by the Librarian 65 

permits. A new angle-tab visibility guide card is being used in the 
lower trays which can be read as one looks down on it and in the 
upper trays a new "wearever" guide is replacing the old broken ones. 

A number of sets of serial publications, such as studies, mono- 
graphs or collected works, which were not analyzed at the time of 
purchase, would have a greater usefulness if more fully catalogued. 
In the past the policy was not to analyze these sets but to depend 
upon printed lists for their contents. We can now secure printed 
cards for such publications and we are starting to analyze a few as 
time permits. During the year several collections of English plays 
by different authors were done, cards being made for each author 
and title: Inchbald's Collection of farces in 7 vols.; The British 
theatre in 25 vols.; The Modern theatre in 10 vols.; and Dodsley's 
Old English plays in 15 vols. 

In December the Physics Department proposed that its N. Y. A. 
student make subject cards for the books in the physics library as the 
present catalogue listed the authors only. Since it is impossible to 
expect any one without the fundamentals of library technique to 
assign subject headings and to type cards to conform with our estab- 
lished rules, very close supervision had to be given by one of the 
members of the cataloguing staff. The N. Y. A. student typed 1,024 
subject cards for the author entries from "A" through "R" under 
our instruction and it is expected the work will be finished next 
year. While the idea of having subject cards for a department library 
is an excellent one, the work cannot be done by an untrained student. 
Time must be taken from the regular duties of a member of the staff 
to teach the student and revise the work. Also the catalogue depart- 
ment must continue to supply subject cards for all new books hence- 
forth added to the department library. 

In accordance with our agreement with the Union Library Cata- 
logue of the Philadelphia Area to furnish it with a card for each of 
our new accessions that our holdings be kept up to date, we sent in 
3,132 cards covering our new entries from April 1936 to April 1937. 
The statistical summary of the work of the department for the 
year is as follows: 

1935-36 1936-37 

Titles catalogued 2,844 2,959 

Volumes, copies and editions added 3,223 2,828 

Cards added 18,748 18,481 

Cards added to department catalogues... 431 1,559 

Recataloguing 1,542 886 



66 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Binding and Periodicals 

On July 1st, 1936, there were 557 volumes at the binders. 2,051 
volumes were sent during the year, 2,451 were returned bound, 
leaving 157 at the binder's July 30th, 1937. Of the volumes which 
were bound, 546 were new books supplied unbound, 1,008 were 
volumes of periodicals and 897 were old books needing rebinding. 

Circulation and Reference 

Record of volumes circulated: 1935-36 1936-37 

July 581 636 

August 465 492 

September 3,148 3,745 

October 6,487 5,413 

November 3,175 3,575 

December 3,489 3,029 

January 5,03 1 4,308 

February 4,927 4,285 

March 4,653 4,09 1 

April 4,473 3,956 

May 3,222 3,254 

June 1,537 1,130 

41,188 37,914 

Of the total circulation, 8,367 volumes were placed on reserve in 
the Seminaries and in the Reserve Room. Statistics show that the 
Faculty and Staff borrowed 20% of the total, the Students 58%, 
and the Reserves account for the remaining 22%. Of the June 
circulation 260 volumes were taken for the Summer School library. 

The figures for the general circulation of books again show a 
decrease in withdrawals by the students. This is due to the fact that 
the two-week time limit on stack withdrawals is gradually being 
abandoned. In every case where there is need for books for a long 
period, the student is allowed to keep them, provided no one else 
wants them. This exception now applies not only to the Faculty and 
Staff but to the graduate students, the honor students, those work- 
ing on semester reports, and, finally, to all students studying for the 
comprehensive examinations. There is less charging and recharging 
of the books. There are more cases of a group sharing the same book 
under one name. 

The following table indicates the circulation of books by classes, 
excluding the books sent to the reserves: 



Report by the Librarian 67 

Bibliography and General Periodicals (Bound) 318 Volumes 

Philosophy and Psychology 2,066 

Religion and Church History 893 

Economics, Sociology, Education _ 3,305 

Philology 633 

Natural Sciences* 532 

Applied Arts 228 

Fine Arts 2,055 

Literature 14,660 

History and Biography 4,857 



29,547 



No figures are available of the use of the libraries in Dalton Hall, 
the Halls of Residence, or the Reserve Book Room, after the books 
have once been sent there. 

At the beginning of the year the incoming undergraduate and 
graduate students were given preliminary instruction in the use of 
the library in general and of the reference books in particular. The 
function of the library staff is to show the students how to find the 
material needed, not to supply them with it. Few students know how 
to use a card catalogue and find a book, or how to find facts from 
reference books other than the common encyclopaedias. We try, in 
the brief time allowed us, to show the important parts of the library 
and to impress upon the students that the Reference Department is 
always ready to help them with their problems. 

Inter-Library Loan 

We are deeply indebted to the various libraries which have sent 
as inter'library loan the many volumes which we cannot purchase 
and especially are we indebted to the libraries in the vicinity for their 
many courtesies. The number of books indicated here as borrowed 
only partially shows the amount of our indebtedness. Many of our 
students go to the libraries to work and some bring back books of 
which we have no record. These figures indicate the books sent and 
returned by mail and represent a considerable expenditure of time 
in correspondence. 

During the year 307 volumes have been borrowed from other 
libraries and institutions and 42 volumes have been loaned to other 
colleges and universities by the Bryn Mawr College Library. 

* Dalton Hall science books are not included. 



68 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Inventory 

During the year the search for missing volumes was continued but 
few were found. It is therefore safe to assume that those not located 
since the last inventory are permanently lost. Because of the crowded 
condition of the stacks, it is quite impossible to take a complete 
inventory at this time. The stacks were read during the summer and 
misplaced books reshelved whenever found but no record of our losses 
has been made in five years. When the new stacks are built and we 
are able to rearrange the books, our first duty will be to take a 
thorough inventory. 

Financial Statement 

The yearly appropriation made for books, periodicals and binding 
by the Trustees of the College, was increased by $250.00 and a like 
amount is promised for next year. Despite this small but most 
welcome addition to our funds, they are still far below those of 
other institutions which offer graduate work. Our funds barely allow 
us to purchase the books which are necessary to keep abreast of 
recent scholarly activity. The systematic development of our library 
by the purchase of older works of more permanent value cannot be 
carried on to any extent without an enlarged income. 

Regular Library Fund 

Library appropriation for 1936-37 $14,750.00 

Receipts from examination fees, late registra- 
tion, course book fines and academic records... 178.20 



$14,928.20 
Less amount over-appropriated last year 120.41 

Total income $14,807.79 

Appropriations were made as follows: 

Regular appropriations to departments $13,225.00 

Special appropriations to departments 1,855.00 

Total appropriated $15,080.00 



Over-appropriated $272.21 



Report by the Librarian 69 

Special Library Funds 

Receipts for the year 193 6' 3 7 from special library funds were as 
follows : 

Invested Funds* $2,002. 1 1 

Gifts* 859.20 

Other Special Funds 353.42 



-$ 3,214.73 



Summary of Expenditures 



1935-36 1936-37 

For books $9,940.42 $8,195.44 

For periodicals and continuations 7,373.92f 5,608.28 

For binding 2,478.62 2,516.41 

For supplies 709.43 667.41 

For postage, express, freight 76.94 38.17 



$20,579.33 $17,025.71 

Administration 

Lack of funds has postponed the construction of the new wing on 
the library. The necessity for additional space for books has grown 
year by year. Since the present building was opened in 1906 the 
book collection has grown from 47,600 volumes to 157,110 volumes. 
This growth has resulted in increased pressure on book shelving and 
in crowded working conditions for students and Faculty. We have 
exhausted the possibilities for expansion and until more shelving is 
provided, books will have to be piled on the floor during the summer 
months when those which have been in circulation are returned to 
the stacks. 

The students suddenly became conscious of the disgraceful condi- 
tion of the books which have been on reserve for years and started a 
campaign through the College l^lews to have them cleaned. We were 
delighted to have the students take such an interest. It is only through 
their cooperation that we can hope to keep the books from being 
marked although notices have been posted and warnings given to 
suspected offenders. The students agreed to assess themselves 50 
cents per person, the money to be used to pay for having as many 

* Listed in Treasurer's report. 

f Includes payment of bills for two years for German periodicals and 
continuations as the bills for 1934-3? were not paid until after July 1st, 193?. 



70 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

books cleaned as possible, the library to oversee the work and supply 
the tools. Ten high school girls were hired at 30 cents per hour to 
come after school. In the course of six weeks they worked 122 hours 
and examined approximately 2,000 volumes. Each book in the reserve 
room was gone through page by page, the checks and comments in 
the margins erased when in pencil or noted if in ink for more drastic 
measures later. As a result the most used books were cleaned or 
replaced by new copies but there was neither time nor funds to really 
finish the work. There are many books in the stacks which need 
attention. The agitation and assessment have made the students aware 
of the damaging effects of marking books and will, we hope, be of 
lasting benefit. 

The number of students who ask for work in the library has 
increased and since the Reserve Book Room is now open on Sunday 
we can give employment to a greater number. Twenty- four students 
were employed for the Reserve Book Room, the Hall libraries and 
Loan Desk on Sundays. Six N. Y. A. students were used for other 
work, either at the Loan Desk, shelving books or helping in the 
Catalogue Department. One student spent most of her time putting 
a preservative on the leather bindings of our old books which are 
drying out in the heat of the building. The average number of hours 
given by any one student did not exceed four or five per week but 
the work accomplished was extremely useful. 

In the fall Mrs. Anna Foster Allen, assistant at the Loan Desk, 
resigned to accept a similar position at Temple University. It has 
been my desire to rearrange the hours at the desk so Miss Terrien 
would be there during the day when there is the greatest activity and 
this gave the opportunity. Miss Anne Coogan, who is a resident of 
Bryn Mawr, was appointed to work afternoons and evenings, and 
Miss Terrien's hours changed to mornings and afternoons, except 
on Wednesday. Miss Coogan is an A.B. of the Women's College 
of the University of North Carolina and has had some experience in 
library work. At the end of the year Miss Edith Crowther, who 
has been in charge of the Reserve Book Room since February 1935, 
resigned because of ill health. 

The Librarian attended the meeting of Eastern College Librarians 
which was held at Columbia University in November. The annual 
meeting of the American Library Association was held in New York 
City in June and was attended by the Librarian and Miss Helen C. 
Geddes, head-cataloguer. 



Report by the Librarian 71 

In ending this, the 25th report which it has been my privilege to 
make, I wish to express my appreciation to the members of the Staff 
for their support and devotion to the interests of the library. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOIS A. REED 



REPORT BY THE COLLEGE PHYSICIAN 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic 
year 1936-1937: 

Infirmary 

In order to prepare this report before the close of college, the 
dispensary visits were totalled through the 15 th of May and the 
infirmary admissions through the 18th of May. For this period, there 
were eighteen less infirmary admissions of students than last year. 
The admissions for the first semester, however, were forty-seven 
more than last year. The admission rate for February was about at 
the level of previous years, while the rate for March, April, and 
May was less. The high admission rate of the first semester was 
caused principally by the large number of admissions for respiratory 
infections. During January, and continuing into February, what 
appeared to be a mild form of influenza was epidemic in the com- 
munity and on the campus. There were eleven cases of this in 
January, four in February, two in March. They are listed as grippe 
in the report. There were ten cases of appendicitis in the first 
semester, as against five in the second. Most of these cases went to 
the Bryn Mawr Hospital for operation. The hospital was most 
cooperative about caring for them, and the patients were unanimous 
in reporting that their stay there was pleasant. Another factor in the 
high admission rate of the first semester was the number of cases of 
exhaustion. There were fifteen of these, as against four in the 
second semester. The class of 1940 had almost twice as many 
admissions as any other class in the first semester, and exactly twice 
as many in the second, and a disproportionate number of cases of ( 
exhaustion were drawn from this class. The drop in number of cases 
of exhaustion in the second semester suggests that the students of 
the class of 1940 learned during the year to arrange academic work 
on the college level so that they could handle it efficiently. 

The mild gastro-intestinal disturbances prevalent last year were 
also frequent this year. The usual duration of a case was three days. 
Miss Charlotte Howe, Director of Halls, is making a study of the 
occurrence of these cases in relation to the type of food offered in 
the dormitories at the time of the outbreaks. This relationship will 

[72] 



Report by the College Physician 73 

be checked even more carefully next year if intestinal upsets are 
frequent again. However, it should be noted that in a number of 
instances the students made ill had not eaten in the dormitories for 
several days preceding the attacks. The water supply was checked 
for the college by the Bryn Mawr Hospital in the autumn and was 
found to be uncontaminated. 

Contagious Diseases 

Six college students have had measles during the current year. 
Non-immune contacts were given convalescent serum obtained from 
the Philadelphia Serum Exchange. Later, the serum exchange was 
unable to supply convalescent serum, but furnished pooled adult 
serum instead. The injections of serum seemed to be valuable in 
preventing spread of the disease. A summary of the six cases which 
occurred is appended to this report. 

There have been no other cases of contagious diseases to date. 

Dispensary 

The number of cases and the number of visits were both less than 
last year, but the dispensary was busy' throughout the year. 

Employees 

The health of the employees was in general good throughout the 
year, though an unusual number of them suffered from upper 
respiratory infections at the time when grippe was epidemic in 
December and January. Those who were ill were sent home if 
possible, as the Infirmary was very full at the time. 

Tuberculosis Survey 

The most important piece of work done by the Health Department 
was undoubtedly the tuberculosis survey, which was carried out for 
the second year. Students, graduate and undergraduate, Wardens, 
Hall Managers, and employees were included this year, thus covering 
all persons in residence in the dormitories. All persons not previously 
tested, and all those whose previous reaction to tuberculin was 
negative, were tuberculin tested with Purified Protein Derivative 
tuberculin, using a two-dose test (0.000,02 mgm. and 0.005 mgm.). 
This tuberculin testing was completed during the first week of college. 
All positive reactors from these tests and all positive reactors from 



74 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

the previous year were X-rayed with paper X-ray plates by the 
Powers X-ray Company. The paper X-ray plates were examined 
for the college by Dr. Marion Loew, of New York. Any plates 
which showed shadows of a suspicious nature were re-checked by 
stereoscopic celluloid X-ray films made at the Germantown Hospital 
and read by Dr. Maurice McPhedran. The results of the study may 
be tabulated as follows: 

Childhood Type Tuberculosis 

Undergraduate — 1. Follow-up films show healing. Under super- 
vision. 

Adult Type Tuberculosis 

Undergraduates — 3 . 

1. Lesion found before college entry. Student under supervision 
elsewhere. Follow-up X-rays show healing. 

2. Lesion found in survey of 1935. Student under supervision of 
family physician. Follow-up X-rays show no progression. 

3. Lesion found in survey of 1936. Student withdrew on advice 
of Dr. McPhedran and of the Health Department. 

Graduates — 3. All lesions found in survey of 1936. 

1. Check films show no progression. Lesion regarded as stable. 

2. Check films show no progression. Lesion regarded as stable. 

3. Student withdrew from college on advice of Dr. McPhedran 
and of the Health Department. This student was from a foreign 
country, and was advised to withdraw in part because of the diffi- 
culties which would have been created for her had her lesion pro- 
gressed while in residence here. 

Pulmonary Shadows of Doubtful Significance 

It is not possible to make a definite diagnosis in these cases, and 
follow-up X-rays, without other treatment, are advised. 

Undergraduates — 3 . 
Employee — 1. 

The students were most interested in the methods and purpose of 
this survey, and in general expressed themselves as approving of it 
thoroughly. It can definitely be said that the survey has considerable 
importance as a piece of public health teaching, regardless of the 



Report by the College Physician 75 

number of cases of tuberculosis which may be discovered. The fact 
that an undergraduate was found by these methods who had suffi' 
ciently serious tuberculosis so that her continued stay at college 
seemed inadvisable, also demonstrates clearly the value of the survey. 

Employees with positive tuberculin tests, but over age 35, are to 
be X-rayed only every two or three years after this. The drop in 
tuberculosis morbidity after age 3 5 makes us believe that less frequent 
check-ups are safe. New employees with positive tuberculin tests 
will of course be X-rayed during their first year. 

A complete summary of the tuberculosis survey of undergraduate 
and graduate students for the current year is appended to this report. 

Hygiene Course 

The hygiene course was given during the first semester only. 
Dr. Bond presented four lectures in mental hygiene, which were 
well received. Eighty-seven students took the final examination, and 
ten failed it. 

Next year the course is to be given in the second semester. This 
will be far simpler for the College Physician, as the routine physical 
examinations will be over. 

New Equipment 

A plaster cast of a hemisected head was purchased in the autumn. 
The cast was used in the hygiene course and was then hung in the 
dispensary, so that the internal anatomy of the nose can be demon- 
strated to students needing treatment for colds. 

A model of a torso showing a full term pregnant uterus and 
removable foetus has been ordered for delivery in the fall. This 
model is to be used for demonstration in the hygiene course. The 
cost was met from the fees of students who failed to have vaccinations 
made before the opening of college. 

A Benedict-Roth basal metabolism machine has just been pur- 
chased. It has been tried out and is very satisfactory. It is expected 
that frequent use will be made of it in the coming year. 

The Infirmary now has two new "overbed" tables, with legs which 
go down on each side of the bed. These tables are very well liked 
by the patients, and are much more stable than the old variety of 
bedside table. Three more of the new type are to be ordered in 
the fall. 



76 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Summary of Cases of Measles, 1936-37 

The following summary is included by request of the President as 
an illustration of the method of studying infectious cases. 

Case No. 1 was known to be exposed to measles during the Easter 
holiday. She was at college during part of her incubation period and 
was sent home from the Dispensary on the appearance of a sore 
throat. Her only contact who had not had measles was given a 
prophylactic injection of measles convalescent serum, and did not 
contract the disease. 

Case No. 2 had no known exposure. All known contacts who had 
not had measles were given convalescent serum, and none contracted 
measles. 

Case No. 3 was the roommate of Case No. 2 and was said to have 
had measles. She was not given serum and she came down with 
measles while at home for the week-end. Fortunately, she was away 
from college during most of her infectious period. Two contacts, one 
of whom had had measles, and one of whom had not, were given 
serum, and neither contracted the disease. 

Case No. 4 was in the Infirmary for twenty-four hours while Case 
No. 2 was there and before the diagnosis of measles had been made. 
The students did not see each other, but they used the same bath 
room, and had the same nurse. Case No. 4 had not had measles 
previously and was not given serum. Her symptoms began exactly 
two weeks after discharge from the Infirmary. Twenty-two contacts 
of Case No. 4 were given serum. Eighteen of these students had had 
measles before but were anxious to avoid any possibility of contract- 
ing it again. One contact who had not had measles before con- 
tracted it. All other contacts escaped. 

Case No. 5 was a contact of Case No. 4. She had not had measles, 
' and she was given' 20 cc. of pooled adult serum prophylactically. 
However, she came down with an attenuated case of measles. The 
dose of serum was somewhat small, and in a like situation arising 
again 30 cc. would be given. Five contacts of Case No. 5, three of 
whom had not had measles, were given serum. Their incubation 
period is not yet over. 

Case No. 6 had no history of exposure, and was definitely not 
exposed to any other case from the college. Two contacts, one of 
whom had not had measles, were given serum. Their incubation 
period is not over yet. 



Report by the College Physician 77 

Infirmary Report, 1936-37 

Number of Infirmary 

Admissions Days Hours 

Students 240 790 1 1 

Employees 4 3 2 5 J/2 

Guest 1 17 



Total : 245 795 5</ 2 

Dispensary Report, 1936-37 

Total number of Dispensary Cases 1,306 

Total number of Dispensary Visits 2,492 

Infirmary Report, 1936-37 

Semester I. Semester II. Total 
Diseases of the body as a whole: 

Exhaustion 15 4 19 

Measles 2 2 

Mononucleosis, Acute Infectious 2 2 

Mental Disorders: 

Anxiety State 1 

Depression 1 

Neurasthenia 1 

Diseases of the skin and mucous membranes : 

Abrasion — Foot — Infected 1 

Carbuncle 1 

Dermatitis Venenata 2 

Erythema Nodosum 1 

Erythema Nodosum, Recurrent 1 

Furuncle 3 

Infection — Finger 1 

Diseases of the musculoskeletal system: 

Contusion — Head 1 

Contusion — Knee 1 

Contusion — Spine 1 

Dislocation, External Semilunar Cartilage 1 

Fracture, 1st and 2nd Lumbar Vertebrae... 1 

Fracture, 1st and 2nd Lumbar Vertebrae 

(Readmitted) 1 1 

Sprain — Ankle 2 1 

Sprain Fracture — Ankle 1 

Sprain — Knee 1 

Strain — Back 2 

Strain — Lumbo- Sacral 1 

Strain — Sacroiliac 1 



78 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Diseases of the respiratory system: 

Bronchopneumonia 1 1 

Common Cold 57 37 94 

Grippe 11 6 17 

Laryngitis 1 1 

Pleurisy '. 1 1 

Tonsillitis 3 3 

Diseases of the haemic and lymphatic system : 

Lymphadenitis 2 2 

Diseases of the digestive system : 

Appendicitis — Acute 6 2 8 

Appendicitis — Subacute 4 2 6 

Diseases of the digestive system: 

Appendicitis — Chronic 1 1 

Enteritis 2 2 

Gastritis 10 2 12 

Gastric Neurosis 1 1 

Gastro-Enteritis 5 13 18 

Impacted Molar 1 1 

Indigestion — Acute 1 1 

Jaundice — Acute Catarrhal 1 1 

Diseases of the genital system: 

Dysmenorrhea 2 13 

Hemorrhage of Ovary From Ruptured 

Graafian Follicle 1 1 

Menorrhagia 1 1 

Diseases of the ear: 

Otitis Media 1 1 

Diseases of the eye: 

Iritis 1 1 

Iritis (Readmitted) 1 1 

Undiagnosed diseases classified by symptoms: 

Constipation 2 13 

Headache 3 14 

Insomnia 2 2 

Pyrexia 1 1 

Syncope 1 1 

Non-diagnostic terms for record: 

Convalescent Care — Appendectomy 3 3 

Convalescent Care — Tooth Extraction 1 1 

Convalescent Care — Employee Returned 

from Bryn Mawr Hospital 1 1 

Report of Tuberculosis Survey, 1936 

Undergraduates 
Tuberculin Tests 

Total number of undergraduates under care of the Health 

Department, October, 1936 398 



Report by the College Physician 79 

Students still in college who showed a positive 
reaction to the tuberculin test in 1935 122 

Students not tuberculin tested because of pre- 
vious positive reaction elsewhere 1 

Students who showed a positive reaction to first dose 
of tuberculin, 1936 26 

Students who showed a positive reaction to second 
dose of tuberculin, 1936 15 

Total number of positive reactors, tests of 1936 41 

Total number of positive reactors, including those from 

1935 still in college 164 

Students who showed a negative reaction to both doses of 

tuberculin, 1936 227 

Students not tuberculin tested 7 

398 

Students with negative reaction to tuberculin 

in 1935, and a positive reaction in 1936 4 

Percentage of positive reactors, including those 

from 1935 still in college 41.9% 

X'rays 

Positive reactors to the tuberculin test 164 

X-rayed during survey 156 

Not X-rayed because of recent X-ray elsewhere 6 

Not X-rayed because of illness, later X-rayed at Bryn 

Mawr Hospital 1 

X-rayed at Bryn Mawr Hospital because of unsatisfac- 
tory X-ray during survey 1 

164 



Others 

Students with negative tuberculin test X-rayed during 

survey 1 

Students not tuberculin tested, X-rayed during survey 4 



Total number of X-rays of students made by Powers 

Company 161 

Other X-rays reported to the college 8 



Total number of X-rays reported to the college 169 

X-r<ay Reports 

Childhood type tuberculosis 1 

Adult type tuberculosis (all stages) 3 

Healing, under supervision elsewhere 1 

Not progressing, under supervision 1 

Active, withdrew from college 1 



80 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Pulmonary shadows of doubtful significance to be re- 
checked by X-ray in six months 3 

Apparently healed primary lesions 1 1 

Healed cervical lymph nodes, lung fields negative 1 

Old pleurisy, left base 1 

No apparent pulmonary lesions 149 

169 

Graduates 
Tuberculin Tests 

Total number of resident graduates, 1936-37 68 

Students still in college who showed a positive reac- 
tion to tuberculin in 1935 5 

Students not tuberculin tested because of previous 

positive reaction elsewhere 5 

Students who showed a positive reaction to tuberculin 
in 1936 27 

Total number of positive reaction 37 

Students who showed a negative reaction to both doses 

of tuberculin 2 5 

Students not tuberculin tested 6 

— 68 
Percentage of positive reactors, including those 

from 1935 and those tested elsewhere 54.4% 

%'rays 

Positive reactors to the tuberculin test 37 

X-rayed during survey 3 3 

Not X-rayed because of recent X-ray elsewhere 4 

— 37 
Students not tuberculin tested, X-rayed during survey 2 

Total number of X-rays 39 

Students neither tuberculin tested nor X-rayed 4 

X-ray Reports 

Adult tuberculosis (all stages) 3 

Active 1 

Probably healed, requiring recheck 2 

Apparently healed primary lesion 4 

Healed cervical lymph nodes 1 

I am most grateful to the staff of the Infirmary, and to the college 
administration for their help and cooperation in the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

OLGA CUSHING LEARY, M.D. 



REPORT BY THE DIRECTOR OF 
THE EDUCATIONAL CLINIC 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College : 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic 
year 1936-1937: 

The outline which follows summarizes the work for the year: 
Work with the Bryn Mawr Elementary School children: * 

Numberf Number 
children tests given 

Children examined individually 182 544 

For purposes of demonstration $ .... _ 7 7 

For practice 68 80 

Blain 21 children 29 tests 

Henrich 29 children 32 tests 

Levi 14 children 19 tests 

In connection with Miss Levi's study of 

intelligence and social maturity § 97 194 

Levi _ 36 children 72 tests 

In connection with Miss Blain's study of 

mechanical ability - 34 238 

Blain 24 children 168 tests 

Henrich 9 children 63 tests 

At the request of teachers ** 4 5 

Children examined in groups f f 343 72 

Levi 6 groups 

Martin 4 groups 

Remedial lessons in reading given by Mrs. 
Michels (and occasionally observed by 
students) 10 43 lessons 

* The number of children studied and the tests given by individual 
students are indicated in subheadings. The other tests were given by the 
Director. 

f Since some children enter into more than one of the subgroups, the 
total number of children examined individually is less than the sum of the 
numbers in the various subgroups. 

J To students other than those learning to give the tests; advanced students 
learning to give the tests observed them more frequently and informally. 

§ This group is about double the size of that on which Miss Levi wrote 
her Honors Report. The problem seemed interesting enough to pursue 
further, and Miss Levi stayed on with me after Commencement to complete 
the group. 

** This number includes only those children examined at the request of 
teachers and not included under other headings. 

ft Eight students observed the giving of one or more of these group tests. 

[81] 



82 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

No. No. 

cases visits Fees 

Wor\ with private cases 11 122 $424 

Psychological studies 5 12 80 

Psychological studies with remedial 

work 6 112 344 

The work of the Educational Clinic in 1936-37 was more extensive 
than in 1935-36. The number of cases examined individually for 
demonstration purposes, practice testing, research studies, or as a 
basis for therapeutic work was 183; the number of children examined 
by group tests was 343. Since 171 cases of the first group fell also 
into the second, the total number of cases with which the Clinic 
came in contact was 355. 

For the most part the unusually heavy work was the result of 
research studies carried on by two students, one in the Department 
of Education and one in the Department of Psychology, and of a 
survey of intelligence and educational achievement of all children in 
the Bryn Mawr Elementary School from grades II. through VII. 
This sQrvey added to the information the principal and teachers of 
the school had for these children and also furnished the Clinic with 
information necessary for a fair consideration of the children present- 
ing particular problems and with additional data on those children 
chosen for the special research groups. A survey fortunately need 
not be repeated yearly but it should be repeated at intervals of two or 
three years. 

The private work of the Clinic, which was discouragingly small 
last year, increased in amount and also in interest. The four cases 
receiving the most extensive study and remedial work were cases of 
speech difficulty, three of them children in whom speech failed to 
develop normally and one an adult aphasic patient. 

Respectfully submitted, 

KATHARINE E. McBRIDE 



REPORT BY THE DIRECTOR OF THE 
BUREAU OF RECOMMENDATIONS 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic 
year 1936-1937: 

Total Calls to the Bureau 317 



Teaching Positions 140 



Non-Teaching Positions 119 



Small Positions 58 



of which 2 1 were from col' 
leges and 119 from schools. 
14 of the school positions 
were apprentice ones and 
12 others were part-time, 
of which 1 1 were part-time 
and 21 were temporary, in- 
cluding 17 summer posi- 
tions, 
tutoring, typing, etc. 



317 



Placements made by the Bureau 78 

Positions offered but refused by the candidate 4 

Total 



82 



Teaching Positions: 

Full-time 

Apprenticeship ... 
Part-time .._ 



all in schools. 

with living expenses. 

all in schools. 



Total 

Positions offered 



17 
2 



Total Teaching Positions 19 

Non-Teaching Positions: 

Full-time 7 

Temporary 8 included 7 summer positions. 

Part-time 3 of which 1 became full-time. 



Total _ 18 

Positions offered 2 full time. 

Total Non-Teaching Positions 20 

Small Positions 43 



Total 



82 



[83] 



84 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

Last year there were 21 calls from colleges, as against 27 of the 
year before. No placements were made. In 8 cases there was no one 
to recommend. In the other 13 the departments felt that they had 
good candidates. The colleges were Florida State College for Women; 
Hollins, in Virginia; Judson, in Alabama; Kalamazoo College; 
Milwaukee-Downer; Mount Holyoke; Purdue; Skidmore; Sophie 
Newcomb; Texas State College for Women and Wilson College. 
The calls were very varied — Politics, French, French and Spanish, 
German, English, Chemistry, History of Art, History, Classics, and 
three Administrative positions. It seems increasingly evident that 
college placements will never be made by the Bureau but must be 
done through the departments. Probably when a call does come, it is 
made to all other colleges at the same time and unless the candidates 
are especially recommended or immediately available for interviews, 
there is little chance of filling the position. The Bureau, of course, 
reports all college requests to the departments and in most cases the 
professor writes special recommendations. 

The comparison of the records of the Bureau in 1935-36 and 
1936-37 is as follows: 

1936-37 1935-36 

Teaching calls 140 144 

Colleges 21 27 

Placed 1 

Schools 119 117 

Placed 17 11 

Non-Teaching calls: 

Full-time or Regular 119 84 

Placed 18 16 

Small Positions 58 52 

Placed 43 40 

Total calls 317 280 

Placements 78 68 

The number of calls to the Bureau was approximately the same 
this year as last and the percentage of placements was also about the 
same. Including the part-time teaching, placements in schools were 
somewhat better than last. The number for full-time was as bad as 
ever. Probably more small positions were filled last year than the 
records indicate. 

Of the 87 full-time positions which came in, 31 were entirely 
secretarial and many others required knowledge of typing. One or 



Report by Director of Bureau of Recommendations 85 

two were filled but the Bureau has not nearly enough secretaries to 
supply the demand. 

Eight laboratory positions and 7 non-scientific research positions 
came in this year as against none the year before. 

An account of what the 1937 seniors are doing, as far as the 
Director of the Bureau knows, is added. 

Members of Class of 1937 who Corresponding 

have positions 1937-38 : figures for 1936 

Teaching 9 15 

Four of the seniors have regular paid 
positions. Five are apprentices; only two 
are unpaid, the other three have $400 
or $500 salaries. 

Miscellaneous 4 13 

Members of Class of 1937 doing Graduate 

Work 1937-38 8 19 

Members of Class of 1937 at Medical School 

1937-38 5 1 

Members of Class of 1937 taking Laboratory 

Technicians 1 Course 1937-38 3 

Members of Class of 1937 taking Business 

Courses 1937-38 2 2 

Members of Class of 1937 studying Art 
1937-38 2 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUISE F. H. CRENSHAW 



REPORT ON THE 

MADGE MILLER RESEARCH FUND 

MADE BY THE CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College : 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic 
year 1936-37: 

The committee appointed by you to administer the Madge Miller 
Research Fund for the year 1936-37 informed each member of the 
Faculty by letter that applications were in order for grants in support 
of research. 

In response to this letter the committee received both applications 
for grants and suggestions for the use of the fund. 

After consideration it was decided, as a matter of policy for the 
first year, to make no grants for the purpose of payment of the cost 
of publication or for the purchase of apparatus for general use until 
a plan solving the question of responsibility for the care of such 
apparatus had been worked out. 

The committee made six grants, exhausting the funds at its dis- 
posal. In most cases it was found impossible to appropriate the full 
amount desired but in every case the amount granted seemed to be 
of material help in the promotion of the research. 

In the administration of the grants all charges and requisitions 
against each grant were made through the offices of the college in 
the usual way. 

The following grants were made: 

Grant Number 1. 

T. Robert S. Broughton 

For skilled secretarial work $100.00 

Grant Number 2. 
Arthur Clay Cope 

Purchase of ozoniser 21 5.00 

Grant Number 3. 
Walter C. Michels 

Purchase of potentiometer 250.00 

Grant Number 4. 
Fritz Merger 

For skilled secretarial assistance .". 185.00 

[86] 



Report on the Madge Miller Research Fund 87 

Grant Number 5. 
Berthe Marie Marti 

Photostats of manuscripts in different European 
libraries 100.00 

Grant Number 6. 
Hertha Kraus 

Travel 50.00 

Clerical and research assistance 100.00 



Total $ 1,000.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

DAVID HILT TENNENT 



REPORT ON THE EXCAVATION AT TARSUS 
MADE BY THE REPRESENTATIVE FOR BRYN 
MAWR COLLEGE ON THE JOINT COMMITTEE 

To the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College: 

I have the honour to present the following report: 

The Excavation at Tarsus directed by Dr. Hetty Goldman for 
which Bryn Mawr College, the Archaeological Institute of America 
and Harvard University share the responsibility was carried on sue' 
cessfully during this winter. A report from the Director with many 
fine photographs covering the work done in 1936 is published in the 
American Journal of Archaeology spring 1937 and reprinted in part 
in the Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin June 1937. Apparently the 
excavation as it proceeds is increasingly promising. 

One of the main objectives of the expedition, namely the finding 
of proof of the presence of Mycenaean Greeks at Tarsus, was realized 
during the 1936 season. Mycenaean pottery was discovered dating 
from t'he period when Agamemnon went to the Trojan War. Most 
interesting were the tablets and seals which were found with this 
pottery and which date it definitely from the first half of the 
thirteenth century B. C. on. 

The excavation proved that the ancient Kizzwadna mentioned in 
Hittite texts, is Cilicia. The discovery of iron knives, awls and other 
objects emphasizes the fact that this region was one of the great early 
centers of iron, as inscriptional evidence had suggested. 

The material found in the excavation has now been set out in the 
museum at Adana. It includes pottery from the Bronze and Iron 
Ages down to Hellenistic times. The collection of Hellenistic terra' 
cottas is especially fine. 

Our Department of Archaeology has profited by it directly in that 
two or more Bryn Mawr graduate students have each year had an 
opportunity for exciting field work. 

In the autumn of 1936 Dr. Goldman was appointed full professor 
at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, the only woman 
on that distinguished staff. She will continue to direct the excavation 
in the late winter and spring and the fall, the only seasons when 
work is possible in the field. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARION EDWARDS PARK 
[88] 



REPORT ON THE SUMMER SCHOOL FOR 

WOMEN WORKERS IN INDUSTRY 

MADE BY THE CHAIRMAN OF 

THE SUMMER SCHOOL BOARD 

To the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the session 
of 1937: 

The Summer School of 1937 was interesting and to me satisfactory 
from start to end. The session of the year before had necessarily 
suffered somewhat from the shortness of the preparatory period 
which preceded it. Miss Carter was appointed Director only in 
April, and although she attacked her problems of communicating 
with local Finance and Admissions Committees and choosing Faculty 
without losing a moment of time and with remarkable success, this 
year the result of the longer season at her disposal was evident. The 
teachers chosen by her and approved by the Summer School Board 
were also able to give more time to their summer work and to the 
integration of their particular subject matter with the whole pro' 
gramme of the summer. Dr. Amy Hewes of Mount Holyoke is of 
course a veteran in the Bryn Mawr Summer School teaching, and Mr. 
Loud of Sarah Lawrence has had two years of previous experience 
and Dr. Cummins of Union College one. Others, Dr. Emily Brown of 
Vassar, Dr. Fagin of Johns Hopkins, Miss Loomis of the Park School, 
Buffalo, Mrs. Cerney of the North Shore Country Day School and 
Dr. Madelaine Grant of Sarah Lawrence came to the school at Bryn 
Mawr for the first time. Of the staff, Mrs. Peterson (dramatics), 
Miss McDonald (recreation), Miss Ferguson (hall manager), Dr. 
Leary (physician), Sylvia Bowditch (administrator assistant), had 
had in many cases long experience of the school. The three assistants 
were from Skidmore, Union and San Jose Colleges, respectively, 
the six undergraduates from Bryn Mawr (two), Mount Holyoke, 
Goucher, Vassar and Connecticut. 

The actual session was preceded by a two'day conference of all 
members of the teaching and executive staff at the college in May. 
At that time the teaching programme of the summer was put together 
by the faculty proper and discussed, and smaller groups, those, for 
instance, concerned with household management, health and recrea^ 
tion programmes and special projects, had a chance to bring their 

[89] 



90 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

plans through the preliminary stages. A definite effect of the more 
leisurely preparatory months was the high level of the student body. 
I don't know whether Miss Carter's visits to the Admissions Commit- 
tees throughout the country made clearer than before the need of 
alertness, persistence and public spirit in the candidates they recom- 
mended, or whether the stir and change in the younger groups of the 
labor movement itself has brought more of these questions to the 
surface. At any rate, no stranger, much less a constant visitor, could 
have come and gone on the campus without an impression of vigor 
and seriousness from the students of the summer. The two halls, 
Denbigh for the students and Merion for the Faculty, were opened 
early on Saturday, June 11th, and as fast as possible the students 
had their physical examinations, their individual conferences with 
the Director, and their assignment to one of the three units into 
which the school was divided. At the opening exercises in the Music 
Room Miss Helen Lockwood, Professor of English at Vassar College, 
spoke and a W. P. A. Orchestra from Philadelphia played, and, with 
a promptness which reminded me of the winter college, all classes 
were in full swing on Monday, June 14th. The session closed after 
seven weeks of work, on July 31st. 

The school had been planned for about seventy students and out 
of the unusually large number of good applicants proposed by the 
local committee, ninety-nine were accepted by the central committee. 
There were, however, more than the thirty withdrawals which the 
committee from its previous experience had allowed for, some of 
them unfortunately too late to allow their places to be filled from 
the waiting list. These withdrawals were largely due to hesitations 
in risking loss of a settled job. Of the sixty-one who arrived, fifty- 
four were regular students, and seven second-year students who 
returned to earn part of their expenses by doing the lighter work in 
the halls, the waiting on the table and washing dishes, for instance, 
under the direction of Miss Ferguson, the house manager, and of one 
of their own number. They took at least one course and shared in 
all the activity of the school. Four foreign students, two from 
England, one from Sweden, and one from Czechoslovakia, added 
far more than their numerical share to the color and variety of the 
small community. They were more mature, more formally ' 'edu- 
cated," and with more labor experience than most of the Americans, 
full of interest and zest, and eager to compare and contribute to the 
surprising life they found. 



Report on Summer School for Women Workers 91 

The conduct of the school was made pleasanter by a cool July. 
At the suggestion of the girls themselves, classes were held in Taylor 
rather than out of doors, as being less distracting, but the informal 
conferences, the still more informal discussions and talk, the folk 
dancing and singing often starting up spontaneously in the leisure of 
the early evenings and the more carefully prepared festas all used 
as a background Denbigh and Merion Green or the cloisters. The 
tennis courts and the swimming pool were constantly used and 
enjoyed. No general trips off the campus for the whole school were 
arranged, and very few students left the campus. Everywhere the 
careful preparation of the Faculty, the integration of the programme 
and the seriousness of the girls showed in greater concentration on 
the academic work. The special projects in English literature, 
creative writing, English usage, the discussion groups on Marxism 
and the discussion on the problem of household employees were 
carried on faithfully and with great interest; but the main business 
of the school was quite clearly its hard and brain^stretching daily 
work. The theme agreed on at the May conference for the work 
of the summer was Labor in its Relation to Industry and Government 
and each unit attacked the subject in the way which interested it 
most under the guidance of two instructors, one in Economics and 
one in English. 

The work in Science was given in part by the regular instructor, 
Mr. Loud, but during two weeks it was taken over by Miss Grant, 
who presented in brief the work in Human Biology which she has 
taught at length at Sarah Lawrence and at Vassar. It seemed to me 
the most interesting single contribution to the teaching of the summer, 
moving very directly through its many complications to a solid and 
useful end. 

Before the students left each one of them brought her Bryn Mawr 
experience to a formal end by a conference with Miss Carter. In 
many cases this concerned the next step in the student's road to 
better equipment for her work in the world; further classes at her 
own home if they were available, responsible work in her trade 
union, her Y. W. C. A. group or among her friends; good reading; 
personal advice as to health. 

And to the Admissions Committee which had recommended her, 
sufficient report was made to enable the committee to assist its 
returned student wherever possible to use any new knowledge and 
experience she had gained. 



92 Report to Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College 

I have spoken of the seriousness of the work of Faculty and 
students. Miss Carter's personal contribution to that concentration 
of effort was direct and effective. But she provided also the back- 
ground against which only such concentration is possible; sympathy, 
lightness of touch in personal matters, gaiety which relaxed tension, 
wisdom. It is with the greatest regret that all those interested in the 
Summer School will learn of her resignation as Director to take a 
position in the Association for Adult Education. 

An anxiety which underlay the summer and which confronts the 
Summer School Board immediately is the lack of funds. All expenses 
of the Summer School session can be met and the winter office 
maintained to the close of the fiscal year (November 1st), and a 
little longer. There are, however, no funds in hand for the important 
work of the winter at a central office or in the field. The experience 
of the summer shows how necessary these funds are, and the choice 
of a new Director is involved with these financial questions. 

It is necessary in accordance with the terms of the agreement of 
November 1935 between the Board of Directors, the College and 
the Summer School to take up again this autumn the relation of the 
school to the college. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARION EDWARDS PARK 



A report made by the Director of the Summer School covering details 
of faculty, students, curriculum and budget is available at the college. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 

to 
THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

of 
BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

for the year 

1938-39 



Published by Bryn Mawr College 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

December, 1939 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Report of the President of the College 5 

Supplement I, Changes in the Academic Staff 12 

Supplement II, Faculty Publications 14 

Report of the Dean of the College 18 

Supplement, Statistics of Undergraduate Students 21 

Report of the Dean of the Graduate School 23 

Report of the Director in Residence and Editor of Pub- 
lications 31 

Report of the Librarian 38 

Report of the College Physician 47 

Report of the Director of the Educational Service 55 

Report of the Director of the Bureau of Recommenda- 
tions 57 

Report of the Chairman of the Committee on the 

Madge Miller Research Fund 59 

Report of the Director of the Archaeological Excava- 
tions at gozlu kule, tarsus „ 60 

Report of the Chairman of the Summer School Board 62 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 

To the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1938-39. 

The year has been to everyone at the College singularly interesting, begin- 
ning, one might decide, a new period in Bryn Mawr's history. No one can 
question its headlines! On the first day of the year the faculty and students 
were taking possession of a new building for Chemistry and Geology and of a 
Dalton Hall wholly remade in which Biology and Physics each occupied greatly 
increased space and Mathematics a floor of its own, leaving behind when it 
moved from Taylor Hall and the Library its classrooms and offices for other 
college uses. Fifty-seven students chosen from all four college classes were 
unpacking their belongings in the just completed rooms of the south wing of 
James E. Rhoads Hall. Around the buildings the grading and clearing up had 
not been finished, but new roads ending in parking spaces led past Rhoads 
Hall to the Deanery and from the Gulph Road to the Chemistry-Geology 
Building. The opening chapel and the corridors and class-rooms showed at a 
glance our added numbers. The end of a long journey was in sight, a journey 
which began with the report of the Joint Committee on the Future of the 
College presented in 1930 and which has led through the alumnae gift in 
celebration of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the College to this day. 

The exercises formally opening the Chemistry-Geology Building and 
incidentally displaying Dalton and Rhoads South were held on October 22nd. 
The date was set to coincide with the open weekend arranged by the Alumnae 
Association, but in addition to the alumnae guests many members of science 
faculties in eastern colleges and universities were invited and came. The main 
address was given by Dr. Norman L. Bowen, the Charles L. Hutchinson 
Distinguished Service Professor of Petrography at the University of Chicago, 
who spoke with authority and with wit and keenness as well on the common 
ground of the Sciences, especially of the two represented in the building. 
Dr. Louis F. Fieser, Professor of Chemistry at Harvard, followed with a brief 
history of the Department of Chemistry at Bryn Mawr, and Dr. Florence 
Bascom, Professor Emeritus of Geology, spoke on eminent Bryn Mawr geologists. 
The building, as well as Dalton, was shown to many visitors; a reception was 
held in Pembroke for the visiting scientists and the Bryn Mawr faculty, and 
in Rhoads for the alumnae. On the following day four conferences were 
arranged for the alumnae visitors on the work of the Departments of 
Psychology, Mathematics, Biology and Physics in relation to the whole cur- 
riculum. Not only the exercises of the two days pleased everyone, but the 
jump in our facilities for teaching and learning made a deep impression on 
our own college community as well as on the visitors who know us less well. 

This impression has persisted through the first year of the use of the 
buildings. They have proved themselves wonderfully convenient and increas- 
ingly pleasant. Those of us who protested the slow formulation of their plans 
and the meticulous attention paid to detail are complete converts to the 

m 



6 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

method. The plans for the Quita Woodward Wing of the Library I believe 
have gained notably from the many hours of discussion and careful revision 
carried on by the architect, the Chairman of the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee, and the Library Committee of the Faculty. Work on the wing 
was actually begun on the day following Commencement, and the College is 
promised its completion by February 1st, although it is not likely that the 
move into the stacks, the classrooms and the offices from the present Library 
and Taylor Hall will be possible before the summer of 1940. 

During the course of the year the College and the Baldwin School came 
to an agreement to give as a joint memorial to their much-loved friend, Mrs. 
Otis Skinner, a Dramatic Workshop to be used by both the College and the 
School. The Baldwin School generously offered the fine old barn standing 
on its grounds as a starting point for the actual building. A joint committee 
was appointed by the School and the College to establish the proper basis for 
this joint undertaking, to consider plans, and to raise the necessary funds. 
The members from the College were the President, Miss Charlotte Howe and 
Mrs. Chadwick'Collins, the last of whom shouldered the main responsibility 
for all three of the committee's activities. During the course of the summer 
a trust agreement was drawn up by the lawyers representing the College and 
the School which has been approved by the Board of Directors of both institu- 
tions. This trust agreement provides that the building with 1.08 acres shall be 
held in trust for the Dramatic Workshop, the acreage providing for an inde- 
pendent driveway to the workshop should the rest of the property be sold at 
any time. The term of the agreement is thirtyfive years, renewable thereafter 
for five-year periods, and can be terminated only by written notice one year 
prior to the expiration of any term. The title to the land and building remain 
with the School. As the idea of the workshop grew in discussion it was 
decided to add to the small theatre proper quarters for the Art Club, which 
has lived precariously in various buildings during its history. The double 
plans were discussed and re-discussed with the architect, cut down from our 
first aspirations and finally approved by the joint committee. The final cost is 
$25,000, to which School and College each contribute half. The $12,500 
raised by the College came in part from the family and friends of Mrs. Skinner, 
from alumnae of the College, from the undergraduates, and from the products 
of various entertainments, notably a recital given by Cornelia Otis Skinner in 
Goodhart Hall and . a special production of The Philadelphia Story, a play 
given by the Theatre Guild in Philadelphia, made possible by the generosity 
of Miss Theresa Helburn, 1908, Director of the Theatre Guild, and Miss 
Katharine Hepburn, 1928, who took the leading part. The work on the 
theatre was begun at the end of the summer, and it is hoped that it may be 
ready for use in December. As part of the agreement a Board of Managers 
having full jurisdiction in regard to the use and maintenance of the workshop 
will be set up in three units, each unit with one vote. College and School 
name their own representatives, and these representatives together select the 
outside members who will constitute the third unit. 

The first duty of the College toward the theatre will be to raise a suffi- 
cient fund to buy the equipment for our workshop and studio. This done, 
we can be off to a start in its use. No one who has had anything to do in 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 7 

late years either with the serious interests of the students or with the history 
of the Playwriting course can fail to have seen the great need for dramatic 
opportunities both less formal than those provided by Goodhart Hall and 
less restricted by other college uses than that stage and audience hall neces- 
sarily must be. I shall expect this venture of the College to produce a great 
deal of combined pleasure and profit. 

The Board of Directors 

The Board of Directors has held its four stated meetings. Its officers and 
committee chairmen have not changed. At the October meeting the resignation 
of Mr. Owen D. Young as Director-at-Large was presented and accepted with 
regret. In the place of Josephine Young Case, 1928, who completed in October 
her term as Alumnae Director, the Trustees elected Eleanor Marquand Forsyth, 
1920, nominated to them by the Alumnae Association, and Mrs. Case was then 
elected by the Trustees as Director-at-Large to fill the vacancy caused by her 
father's resignation. Professor Edward H. Watson succeeded Professor Max 
Diez whose term as one of the three faculty representatives was completed. 

By a vote of the Directors at the close of last year the meetings of the 
Board were transferred from half past two and the Provident Board Room to 
the campus and the late afternoon. They have been followed by an informal 
dinner, and discussion of Board business has often continued afterward. 
Three of the four meetings were held at the Deanery, the March meeting 
and dinner at Rhoads Hall. 

The Director-in'Residence followed her five weeks' journey to the Pacific 
Coast during the summer of 1938 by a series of visits to the Middle West in 
the spring of 1939. The letters to the Chairman of the Board and the Presi' 
dent which followed her visits from the Alumnae Chairmen of Districts and 
of Clubs and from school heads showed the usefulness to the College of such 
an ambassador. 

Faculty 

Three great Bryn Mawr teachers, no longer members of its faculty, have 
died during the year: Edmund Beecher Wilson, who set up the Department 
of Biology in 188? at the beginning of the College and has been since 1891 
Professor of Biology at Columbia University; Tenney Frank, who taught Latin 
at Bryn Mawr from 1904 to 1919 and resigned to become Professor of Latin 
at Johns Hopkins; and Georgiana Goddard King, Professor Emeritus of the 
History of Art, whose retirement in 1937 closed thirty-one years of teaching 
at the College. All of them left a deep impression on the individuality of the 
College as well as on their own students. They remained, all three, our warm 
friends, eagerly coming to our assistance whenever we asked or hinted a need. 

The appendix to this report gives concise information on the composition 
of the faculty group of the year. Two of its members were released tempo- 
rarily for public service. Professor Fenwick, at the request of the Department 
of State, served as a Delegate to the Inter- American Conference for the 
Maintenance of Peace at Buenos Aires and was absent from the College on 
this duty for a few weeks; and during the second semester Professor Kraus 
was released from about a third of her work in order to act as consultant 
for the Friends Relief on refugee problems. 



8 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

One great advantage which the new buildings have given is an increased 
number of private laboratories for advanced students and faculty. Dr. Bascom, 
Professor Emeritus of Geology, has returned to live in Bryn Mawr and is 
carrying on her own work in one of them. Dr. Tennent's retirement from the 
active faculty and his establishment in a laboratory of his own in Dalton as 
the first Research Professor at the College were mentioned in my report of last 
year. Dr. Tennent has taught Biology at Bryn Mawr since 1904 and has been 
a full professor since 1912. It is important in the history of the College that 
for all those years he not only has conducted the advanced undergraduate and 
graduate work in his own field, but like Professor Wilson and Professor 
Morgan before him has taught part of the General Biology, and that consc 
quently a very high percentage of the graduates of Bryn Mawr have come in 
contact with his keen and accurate mind and have caught something I hope of 
his quiet and determined pursuit of scientific truth. Among those who have 
worked longer with him he has sent out several excellent scholars and teachers, 
including Professor Gardiner, who succeeds him in charge of the Department. 
The College has greatly missed him this year in the active work of the faculty, 
for he has served on all important committees and often carried a heavy load 
of the general business. It is, however, with great pleasure that we have 
watched him working industriously and seriously in his Dalton laboratory and 
in two ways he continues to serve the College actively. He has taken charge 
of the Plan for the Coordination of the Teaching of the Sciences, and has 
headed the committee which makes awards from the Madge Miller Research 
Fund; his report forms part of this report. 

The individual work which is being carried on by the faculty is indicated 
in part by the report of the committee just mentioned and in part by the list 
of faculty publications; in part again it is implied by the list of the graduate 
degrees and of honour students granted the A.B. I call attention also in this 
connection to the report of the rotating research project given by the Dean 
of the Graduate School. 

A brilliant instance of the faculty interests and power was given to the 
College in the series of eight lectures on "The Aesthetic Experience" by Pre 
fessors Bernheimer, Carpenter and Nahm of Bryn Mawr and Kurt Koffka of 
Smith College. The lectures and the conferences following them were crowded 
with faculty and students. To quote the Alumnae Bulletin, "For a month 
Art was a most popular topic in residence halls, seminar rooms and at Faculty 
functions. Nonexperts agreed that each paper was clearly understood, experts 
that each was a contribution to scholarship." These lectures are to be pub' 
lished in the Bryn Mawr Series of Monographs. 

An important action taken by the faculty and the Academic Council 
following the proposal of a special committee, did away with the Council as 
the court of graduate business and substituted a Graduate Committee enlarged 
to seven, chosen to represent groups of departments and acting as a standing 
committee of the faculty. This change in the Plan of Government was 
approved by the Directors and goes into effect in 1939'40. Its effect will 
be a broader basis for graduate policy and experiment, and on the other 
hand a quicker and more intelligent acquaintance with the technique and 
the demands of graduate work by the faculty as a whole. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 9 

Academic Matters 

With no melodramatic changes in the long range of problems from 
entrance requirements to Ph.D. hoods with which the College has to deal, there 
are several facts which should be called to the attention of the Board. 

The faculty has voted to enlarge the choice of studies which can be 
presented for entrance by schools by adding History of Art and the Bible. This 
is important only because Bryn Mawr has been conservative in a situation in 
which other colleges are more liberal. In each case the school course must be 
approved by the College. 

Dean Manning in her report speaks of the success of the new major in 
Sociology and something of the courses offered in it and of the additional 
instruction provided for the increased undergraduate numbers. 

A chance to practice under supervision spoken French and German was 
possible at Bryn Mawr last year for the first time, and it impressed both the 
language departments and the students so much that a more permanent 
arrangement was made for this year by changes in Wyndham and the south 
wing of Denbigh which allowed for a separate dining room and living room. 
The second year has outshone the first, and residents of the two houses (seven- 
teen in Wyndham and eleven in the Denbigh wing) have not only increased 
their language facility to a surprising degree, but the two houses have become 
centres for the interest in French and German on the campus. The normal 
opportunities for a Junior Year Abroad were withdrawn during the summer 
of 1939, and I am glad that the College is able to offer the disappointed 
students a form of substitute at home. 

The graduate courses offered under the Plan for the Coordination of the 
Teaching of the Sciences were carried out with success, and during the year 
an extension of the programme was planned for 1939'40, including to my great 
satisfaction a second'year course in Anatomy and Paleontology to be open to 
undergraduate students in which the Departments of Geology and Biology 
propose to unite, with the addition of a Lecturer on Vertebrate Paleontology 
from the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. The students will do 
their laboratory work in part at the Academy. 

Of our two ventures into work connecting us with our own community, 
the Educational Service presents through Professor McBride its own interesting 
report. In its seminary in Social Welfare Planning, the Department of Social 
Economy carried on throughout the year a Training and Research Project in 
Community Organization for Child Welfare, under the direction of Professor 
Kraus, with the assistance of Dr. Tugendreich, Research Associate in Social 
Economy. The seminary was attended by twelve students, including four 
special scholars selected from the young women in the social field in Mont- 
gomery and Philadelphia Counties. The project divided itself into two sec- 
tions, one working on a study of agencies and institutions in Montgomery 
County, the other on a child welfare exhibit, undertaken at the request of 
the Pennsylvania State Department of Welfare. The expenses of the exhibit 
were met by a special grant from the State Department of Welfare. It will 
be used throughout the State for purposes of instruction and publicity at 
county fairs, conferences and other large community meetings. 



10 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

The College Community 

The reports of Dean Manning and Dean Schenck will give you a formal 
picture of the two groups of students and the problems which present them- 
selves to the two administrative officers. I should like to add an informal 
note to their reports. An increase of interest in public affairs on the part of 
the students was to be expected in a year of international and national strain. 
To this interest, however, was clearly added a growing sense of personal 
responsibility, directed toward the College as members of the college community 
and as citizens to public interests. This impression of mine can be illustrated 
in various ways. There was incessant activity in such organizations as the 
Peace Council which unites all students on the campus, the committees of the 
Bryn Mawr League which are concerned with social services (Americanization 
Committee, Haverford Community Centre Committee, Bryn Mawr Summer 
Camp Committee, Summer School Committee, Industrial Group Committee), 
the American Student Union and the International Club; fairly large funds 
for the purposes of these organizations were raised, and in addition a student 
committee, uniting with faculty, raised over night $2200 to ensure scholar' 
ships for two refugees who could continue their education at Bryn Mawr. 
Tuition scholarships for these students were given by the Directors. The many 
lectures and conferences on subjects of national and international interest 
included in this year's list: the request of the students for eight assemblies 
lasting an hour and scheduled during the morning when public problems and 
problems of interest to the College could be discussed, and the discussions 
and decisions of the College Council on college affairs: all these indicate a 
point of view which is general enough to be noted. 

A second note should be made on the happy increase of opportunities to 
enjoy music at Bryn Mawr. The gift early in the year of the Carnegie Founda- 
tion and the College of a collection of 2500 records, 150 books on music, an 
excellent victrola, and so on, was put in the charge of the Undergraduate Asso- 
ciation whose officers had engineered the original request to the Foundation. 
The collection has been used as a lending library and has given immense 
pleasure. 

Miss Helen Rice, 1923, Warden of Rhoads South this year, and herself 
an excellent violinist, has organized a small string orchestra, which could 
break up into smaller groups and which has given unending pleasure to its 
own members and to the College. Miss Rice and groups of students have 
played at the college plays, at Sunday evening chapel, and given several 
separate recitals. Miss Rice was given a definite appointment this spring as 
Leader of Chamber Music Groups under the Music Department. 

Budget 

The budget for 1938-39 showed no excess of probable income over 
probable outgo, and the utmost economy was obviously necessary in carrying 
on the College through the year. In particular no provision could be made for 
the closing of the account of the Dalton renovation which over and above 
the sum of the Boucher bequest and the personal gifts of the Directors was 
regarded by the Board as chargeable to current maintenance. The income 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 11 

on investments was in the end slightly higher than had been estimated and 
by the omission from the summer work of what had seemed necessities, like 
the renewal of plumbing in the older halls, the excess could be applied to 
the Dalton account ($6500) and the account closed. 

A similar budget for 1939'40 was made last spring, and I must call to 
the attention of the Board the demands on us for increased individual salaries 
for the faculty, for new courses, not many but important, and remind them 
that at the same time plumbing, painting and general renovation of old 
buildings and old equipment could absorb all that we can save. The increase 
in income arising from the increase of student numbers is by terms of an old 
understanding sacred to the general raising of the level of faculty salaries. 
We have also a particular responsibility to provide adequate infirmary care 
and opportunities for exercise to our increased student body. The reports 
of the Dean make a clear statement as to this. 

End of the Year 

The year closed with a Commencement as dramatic as the opening day 
had been. It was attended by sixteen of the twenty-two members now living 
of the first class of the College, who met for their Fiftieth Anniversary, and 
its European Fellow, Dr. Emily G. Balch, was called to the platform and 
sat with the European Fellows of 1939. The students receiving Ph.D., M.A. 
and A.B. degrees had completed work of an unusually high standard, and 
for the first time the College conferred a degree (M.A.) on a man, a 
candidate in the Department of Geology. 

During the year the bequest of Ella Riegel to be used for general endow 
ment and for a scholarship in Archaeology was turned over to the College. 
Other gifts to the College included the bequest of $20,000 made by Mrs. 
Amalia F. Morse and the sum of $5000 to establish the Jeanne Crawford 
Hislop Scholarship, a memorial made by the family of a member of the Junior 
Class who died suddenly during the college year. 

Two new prizes were announced, the Tenney Frank Prize in Classics, 
and the Charlotte Angas Scott Prize in Mathematics. The Hannah E. 
Longshore Memorial Medical Scholarship to be used by a graduate of the 
College for the study of medicine was awarded for the first time. 

I am grateful to the various groups with which I deal, the Board of 
Directors, the faculty, the students and the alumnae, for a year of generous 
help. I have felt definitely that each group realized the quick and direct 
connection between its own activities and interests and the common good of 
the College, and at the same time the parallel connection for each of the other 
groups. This realization makes an increasing possibility for understanding of 
purpose and cooperation in action between, for instance, faculty and alumnae, 
alumnae and students, and faculty and Board of Directors. It is in such years 
as this, when we are not slowed up by friction, that the College moves ahead 
most quickly and most surely. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARION EDWARDS PARK, 

President of the College. 



SUPPLEMENT TO THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT 



Changes in the Academic Staff of Bryn Mawr College 
October 1, 1938 - October 1, 1939 

Faculty Returned From Leave of Absence 

The following members of the faculty, absent in 1937-38, returned to 
the College in 1938-39: 

Helen Taft Manning, Ph.D., Dean of the College 

Grace Mead Andrus de Laguna, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy 

Joseph Eugene Gillet, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish (absent semester 

II., 1937-38) 
Angeline Helen Lograsso, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Italian 

(absent semester II., 1937-38) 
Paul Weiss, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy 

Leave of Absence 
Seven members of the faculty were on leave of absence in 1938-39: 

Horace Alwyne, F.R.M.C.M., Professor of Music (absent January to 

June 1939) 
Charles Wendell David, Ph.D., Professor of European History 

(absent semester II., 1938-39) 
Grace Frank, A.B., Non-Resident Professor of Old French Philology 
Marion Parris Smith, Ph.D., Professor of Economics (resignation to 

take effect in June 1939) 
Mary Hamilton Swindler, Ph.D., Professor of Classical Archaeology 
Gustav A. Hedlund, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics 
Cornelia Lynde Meigs, A.B., Associate Professor of English Composition 

Promotions 
The following promotions took effect in 1938-39: 

Karl Anderson, Ph.D., promoted from Assistant Professor to Associate 
Professor of Economics 

Arthur Clay Cope, Ph.D., promoted from Assistant Professor to 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Katharine Elizabeth McBride, Ph.D., promoted from Assistant Pro- 
fessor to Associate Professor of Education and Psychology 

Caroline Robbins, Ph.D., promoted from Assistant Professor to Asso- 
ciate Professor of History 

Richard Bernheimer, Ph.D., promoted from Lecturer to Assistant Pro- 
fessor of History of Art 

Kathrine Koller, Ph.D., promoted from Instructor to Assistant Pro- 
fessor of English 

Agnes Kirsopp Lake, Ph.D., promoted from Instructor to Assistant 
Professor of Latin 

K. Laurence Stapleton, A.B., promoted from Instructor to Assistant 
Professor of English 

Josephine McCulloch Fisher, Ph.D., promoted from Instructor to 
Lecturer in History 

[12] 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 13 

T^ew Appointments 

The following were added to the faculty and teaching staff in 1938'39: 

Joseph C. Sloane, Jr., M.F.A., Associate Professor of History of Art 

Raymond Elliott Zirkle, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology 

Frederica de Laguna, Ph.D., Lecturer in Anthropology 

Cora Hardy Jarrett, A.B., Lecturer in English 

Ruth Stauffer McKee, Ph.D., Lecturer in Mathematics 

Florence Fraser Mudge, Lecturer in Music (January to June 1939) 

Mildred Benedict Northrop, Ph.D., Lecturer in Economics 

Cletus O. Oakley, Ph.D., Lecturer in Statistics, Semester II. 

Mary Zelia Pease, A.B., Lecturer in Classical Archaeology 

Leo Spitzer, Ph.D., Lecturer in Old French Philology 

Katharine Wolff, A.B., Lecturer in Music, Semester II. 

Mary Margaret Zender, M.A., M.S.S., Lecturer in Social Economy 

Gustav Tugendreich, M.D., Research Associate in Social Economy 

Russell W. Bornemeier, M.A., Instructor in Psychology 

Melcher P. Fobes, M.A., Instructor in Mathematics 

Isabelle Lawrence Gonon, M.A., Instructor in French 

Marion Monaco, M.A., Instructor in French 

Jane Marion Oppenheimer, Ph.D., Instructor in Biology 

Theodore M. Steele, M.A., Instructor in English 

Jane Isabel Marion Tait, M.A., Instructor in Latin 

Elizabeth Booth, A.B., Reader in Music 

Elizabeth Moore Cameron, B.S., Reader in History, Semester I. 

Marianna D. Jenkins, M.A., Reader in History of Art 

Melanie Freda Staerk, Ph.D., Reader in Politics 

Dorothy King Benedict, A.B., Demonstrator in Geology 

Martha Isabel Fields, A.B., Demonstrator in Physics 

Resignations and Expirations, June 1939 

Marion Parris Smith, Ph.D., Professor of Economics 

Ernst Diez, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History of Art 

Gustav A. Hedlund, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Cora Hardy Jarrett, A.B., Lecturer in English 

Ruth Stauffer McKee, Ph.D., Lecturer in Mathematics 

Florence Fraser Mudge, Lecturer in Music (January to June 1939) 

Cletus O. Oakley, Ph.D., Lecturer in Statistics, Semester II. 

Richard Salomon, Ph.D., Lecturer in History 

Leo Spitzer, Ph.D., Lecturer in Old French Philology 

Katharine Wolff, A.B., Lecturer in Music, Semester II. 

Elizabeth Cook, M.A., Instructor in Italian 

Melcher P. Fobes, M.A., Instructor in Mathematics 

Mary Henderson, A.B., Instructor in English 

Edith G. H. Lenel, Ph.D., Instructor in German 

Marion Monaco, M.A., Instructor in French 

Grace Chin Lee, M.A., Reader in Philosophy 

Marianna D. Jenkins, M.A., Reader in History of Art 

Melanie Freda Staerk, Ph.D., Reader in Politics 

Selma Blazer Brody, M.A., Demonstrator in Physics 

Martha Isabel Fields, A.B., Demonstrator in Physics 

Mary Therese Henle, M.A., Demonstrator in Psychology 

Corris Mabelle Hofmann, B.S., Demonstrator in Chemistry 

Pauline Rolf, M.A., Demonstrator in Physics 



Georgiana Goddard King, Professor Emeritus of History of Art, died 
on May 4, 1939. 



SUPPLEMENT TO THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

II. 

Faculty Publications for the Year 
October 1, 1938 - October 1, 1939 

This report is based on questionnaires sent out in November 1939. 

Karl L. Anderson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics 

Protection and the Historical Situation: Australia. Quarterly journal of 
Economics 53 1 : 86-104, 1938. 

Richard Bernheimer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History of Art 

A literary description of the most primitive kind of vault. Journal of 

the American Oriental Society 59: 109-110, 1939. 

A Sasanian Monument in Merovingian France. Ars Islamica 5: 221-232, 

1939. 

Russell W. Bornemeier, M.A., Part-time Instructor in Psychology 

Further evidence of color discrimination in rodents. Journal of Genetical 
Psychology 52: 165-181, 1938. 

Annie Leigh Broughton, M.A., Part-time Instructor in Latin 

Notes on Lucretius. American Journal of Philology 60: 238-242, 1939. 

T. Robert S. Broughton, Ph.D., Professor of Latin 

Ancient History Bibliography. American Historical Review 44: 177-179; 
427-429; 685-687; 952-953, 1938-39. 

Arthur Clay Cope, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Dichloroacetic Acid. Organic Syntheses 19: 38-39. New York, Wiley 

1939. (In collaboration with J. R. Clark and Ralph Conner.) 

The Introduction of Substituted Vinyl Groups. II. (1-Methylpropenyl)- 

alkylmalonic Esters. Journal of the American Chemical Society 60: 2901- 

2902, 1938. (In collaboration with Evelyn M. Hancock.) 

The Introduction of Substituted Vinyl Groups. III. (Dialkylvinyl)- 

alkylcyanoacetic Esters. Journal of the American Chemical Society 60: 

2903-2906, 1938. (In collaboration with Evelyn M. Hancock.) 

Substituted Vinyl Barbituric Acids. I. Isopropenyl Derivatives. Journal 

of the American Chemical Society 61: 96-98, 1939. (In collaboration 

with Evelyn M. Hancock.) 

Substituted Vinyl Barbituric Acids. II. (1-Methylpropenyl) Derivatives. 

Journal of the American Chemical Society 61: 353-354, 1939. (In 

collaboration with Evelyn M. Hancock.) 

Substituted Vinyl Barbituric Acids. III. Derivatives Containing a 

Dialkylvinyl Group Having Five or More Carbon Atoms. Journal of 

the American Chemical Society 61: 776-779, 1939. (In collaboration 

with Evelyn M. Hancock.) 

(Review.) Mann and Saunders. Practical Organic Chemistry. Journal 

of the American Chemical Society 61: 1939. 

Lincoln Dryden, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology 

(Review.) Edelman. '"''Ergehnisse der sedimentpetrologischen Forschung 
in den J^iederlanden und den angrenzenden Gehieten 1932-1937." 
Journal of Sedimentary Petrology 9, 1939. 

Geological map of Charles County Maryland. Baltimore, Maryland 
Geological Survey, 1939. 

[14] 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE -15 

Grace Frank, A.B., Non-resident Professor of Old French Philology 
Faire ravoir les gages. Modern Language Tslotes 53: 603-604, 1938. 
Historical Elements in the chanson de geste- Speculum 14: 209-214, 1939. 
Le Roman de la Rose ... 11. 1330 ff. Romanic Review 29: 209-211, 
1938. 

(Reviews.) Modern Language 7s[otes 67, 476, 1938; Romanic Review 
30: 71; Speculum 13: 105. 

Joseph Eugene Gillet, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish 

Lexicographical Notes: "Lagniappe," "Bozo," "Bull." American Speech 
93-98, April 1939. 

(Review.) Keniston, H. The Syntax of Castilian Prose. The Sixteenth 
Century. Hispanic Review 7: 253-260, 1939. 

Margaret Gilman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French 
Baudelaire and Stendhal. PMLA 54: 288-296, 1939. 
Les Limbes. Modern Language J^_otes 54: 195-196, 1939. 
Le Voyage and L'Albatros: The First Text. Romanic Review 29: 262- 
277, 1938. (In collaboration with E. M. Schenck.) 

Gustav Arnold Hedlund, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Symbolic Dynamics. American Journal of Mathematics 60: 815-866, 
1938. (In collaboration with M. Morse.) 

The Dynamics of Geodesic Flows. Bulletin of the American Mathemati- 
cal Society 45: 241-260, 1939. 

Fuchsian Groups and Mixtures. Annals of Mathematics 40: 370-383, 
1939. 

The Measure of Geodesic Types on Surfaces of Negative Curvature. 
Du\e Mathematical journal 5: 230-248, 1939. 

Harry Helson, Ph.D., Professor of Experimental Psychology 

Color tolerances as affected by changes in composition and intensity of 
illumination and reflectance of background. American Journal of 
Psychology 52: 406-412, 1939. 

(Abstract.) Journal of the Optical Society of America 

29: 262-263, 1939. 

Effects of certain variables on hue, lightness and saturation of samples 
having identical trilinear coordinates. Journal of the Optical Society of 
America 29: 260, 1939 

Stephen Joseph Herben, B.Litt, Ph.D., Professor of English Philology 
Knight's Tale, A 1881 ff. Modern Language T^otes 53: 595, 1938. 
The Ruin. Modern Language K[otes 54: 37-39, 1939. 

Hertha Kraus, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Social Economy 

Experiences with Refugee Services. American Public Welfare Associa- 
tion 8-17, June 1939. 

Starting Life Anew in a Strange Country. Annals of the American 
Academy of Political and Social Science 99-105, May 1939. 

Richmond Lattimore, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Greek 

Herodotus and the Names of Egyptian Gods. Classical Philology 24: 
357-365, 1939. 

The Second Storm at Artemisium. Classical Review 53: 57-58, 1939. 
The Wise Adviser in Herodotus. Classical Philology 24: 24-35, 1939. 

Donald Wallace MacKinnon, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology 
Motivation. (In Boring, E. G., Langfeld, H. S., and Weld, H. P. Intro- 
duction to Psychology. Ch. 5, pp. 146-182.) New York, Wiley 1939. 
Problems of motivation in relation to attitude. Journal of Social Psychol- 
ogy 10: 443, 1939. 



16 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Cornelia Lynde Meigs, A.B., Margaret Kingsland Haskell Associate Profes- 
sor of English Composition 

The Scarlet Oak. New York, Macmillan 1938. 

Stories in children's magazines. 
Fritz Mezger, Ph.D., Professor of Germanic Philology 

Ae. gendtstan 'streiten : ae. hatst 'Heftig\eit, Streit'. Archiv fur das 

Studium der J^eueren Sprachen 17?: 97'98, 1939. 

OE. gehygd, hyht, hlyst, gethyld. Ar^iu for K[ordis\ Filologi 54: 229- 

234, 1939. 

Hittite hasa hanzasa. Language 15: 188'189, 1939. 
Walter C. Michels, E.E., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics 

The Apparent Bore-Diameter of Transparent Tubes. American Physics 

Teacher 7: 258-259, 1939. 

Valentin MiiLLER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Archaeology 

A Chronology of Greek Sculpture 400 to 40 B. C. The Art Bulletin 

20: 359-418, 1938. 

A Greek Bronze Statuette. Journal of the Walters Art Gallery 1 : 

33-43, 1938. 

The Origin of Mosaic. Journal of the American Oriental Society 59: 

247-250, 1939. 

(Reviews.) American Journal of Archaeology 42, 1938; 43, 1939. 
Milton Charles Nahm, B.Litt., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy 

John Wilson and His "Some Few Plays." The Review of English 

Studies 14 54 : 143-154, 1938. 

Ths Philosophical Implication of Some Theories of Emotion. The 

Philosophy of Science 6: 458-486, 1939. 

Mildred B. Northrop, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics 

Control Policies of the Reichsbank, 1924-1933. New York, Columbia 
University Press, September 1938. 

Cletus O. Oakley, Ph.D., Lecturer in Statistics, Semester II. 

On the representation of line segments in the plane by equalities. Bul- 
Zetin of the American Mathematical Society 45: 80, 1939 (abstract). 
Problem E 366. American Mathematical Monthly 46: 106, 1939. 
Testimony given before the Federal Trade Commission: Application of 
Mathematical Probabilities to Problems of Economics. Transcript of 
Record in Docket No. 3167 — Cement Institute, et al. 18584-18630, 
April 1939. 

Jane Marion Oppenheimer, Ph.D., Instructor in Biology 

The capacity for differentiation of fish embryonic tissues implanted into 
amphibian embryos. Journal of Experimental Zoology 80: 391-421, 1939. 
Potencies for differentiation in the teleostean germ ring. Journal of 
Experimental Zoology 79: 185-212, 1938. 

Arthur Lindo Patterson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics 
Homometric. Nature 143: 939-940, 1939. 

The Use of an MKS System of Units in a First Course in Electricity. 
American Physics Teacher 7: 335-336, 1939. 

Richard Salomon, Ph.D., Part-time Lecturer in History, Semester II. 

Civilization in Western and Eastern Europe. Social Education, Decem- 
ber 1938. 

Eunice Morgan Schenck, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School and Pro- 
fessor of French 
Le Voyage and LAlbatros: The First Text. Romanic Review 29: 
262-277, 1938. (In collaboration with Margaret Gilman.) 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 17 

Joseph Curtis Sloane, Jr., M.F.A., Associate Professor of History of Art 
(Review.) Webster, James Carson. The Labors cf the Months in 
Antique and Mediaeval Art. American Journal of Archaeology 43 : 
550-551, 1939. 

K. Laurence Stapleton, A.B., Assistant Professor of English 

An Experience Curriculum in English. English Journal 28: 1939. Reply 
to Mr. Hatfield. English Journal 28: 1939. 

Lily Ross Taylor, Ph.D., Professor of Latin 

Cicero's Aedileship. American Journal of Philology 40: 194-202, 1939. 
(Reviews.) American Journal of Philology 40: 393-394, 1939; American 
Journal of Archaeology 43: 173, 545-546, 1939. 

David Hilt Tennent, Ph.D., Research Professor of Biology 

Report of the Executive Officer of the Tortugas Laboratory. Tear Boo\ 
of the Carnegie Institution of Washington 37: 84-103, 1938. 

Paul Weiss, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy 

The Locus of Responsibility. Ethics 49: 349-3 55, 1939. 

Towards a Cosmalogical Ethics. Journal of Philosophy 35: 645-651, 1938. 

(Reviews.) Ethics 1938-39; New Republic 1938-39. 

Roger Hewes Wells, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science 

(Review.) American Political Science Review 33: 320-321, 1939. 

Ernest Willoughby, A.R.C.M., Assistant Professor of Music 

Arrangements for Bryn Mawr College Choral Series. 545 "O come every 
one that thirsteth" (from Elijah) Mendelssohn; 546 "Lord hear the 
voice of my complaint" (a cappella) Bach; 547 "O Thou that tellest" 
(from "The Messiah") Handel. New York, Carl Fischer, 1939. 

563 Carol for Christmas "Joseph came seeking a resting place." (For 
women's voices.) New York, Carl Fischer, 1939. 

564 Carol for Christmas "Joseph came seeking a resting place." (For 
mixed voices.) New York, Carl Fischer, 1939. 

The Mary Flexner Lectureship 

Erwin Panofsky, Lecturer under the Mary Flexner Lectureship, 1937-38 
Studies in Iconology. New York, Oxford University Press, September 
1939. 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam : 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1938-1939. 

The increase in the number of students, which was provided for in 
residence space by the opening of the south wing of Rhoads Hall, took care 
of itself readily in classroom space through the use of the ChemistryGeology 
Building and the removal of the Mathematics classes to the fourth floor of 
Dalton. On the other hand, the congestion both in the Gymnasium and in 
the Infirmary was serious. Due to the prevalence of colds and influenza in 
a mild form, the Infirmary was full from the first of November to the first 
of May, and several times we were threatened with the necessity for opening 
an extra ward in one of the Halls of Residence. Although the Infirmary 
staff have succeeded by heroic efforts in increasing the number of beds in the 
present Infirmary to seventeen for the year 1939' 1940, more rooms are 
urgently needed for the care of patients as well as an increase in the space 
allotted to the dispensary and the laboratory work. 

In the registration of the students it was necessary to arrange for one 
additional 'section in the Freshman English and for one additional section 
in the Elementary German. In other respects the large class was absorbed 
in the various first'year classes. It may be necessary in the course of time to 
have two divisions in First Year Economics and two divisions in First Year 
Politics. It will also be necessary to have a supplementary French course to 
provide for freshmen whose school work in French has been rather deficient 
since the minimum entrance requirement has been cut down, but except for 
this readjustment no reorganisation of the first'year work for the benefit of 
the larger freshman class seems to be required at present. 

Admissions 

In the absence of Miss Julia Ward, the Director of Admissions and 
Assistant to the Dean, I assumed the general direction of the admissions 
work. I was ably assisted by Miss Anne Hawks, the Warden of Denbigh, 
who had helped Miss Ward in the interviewing of candidates in 1937'1938 
and who assumed most of the responsibility for such interviews during the 
year. She also visited many high schools in the neighborhood of Philadelphia 
when they were holding "college nights" to which representatives of the 
colleges were invited. I visited a number of the private schools near New 
York to which we had not recently sent a representative, and also a dozen 
or more schools in Ohio when I attended the meeting of the National 
Association of Deans of Women at Cleveland in February. While in 
Cleveland I also attended a meeting at which the admissions secretaries of 
the women's colleges conferred with a committee of the National Association 
of Principals of Girls 1 Schools. In the course of the discussion it was evident 
that Bryn Mawr is still regarded by the private schools as more inflexible in 

[18] 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE 19 

its entrance requirements than any other college. Although we have made 
many exceptions of late years for able students and have reduced the 
requirement in Latin from four to three years, the other colleges are moving 
very rapidly in the direction of a freer system of elections for admission. 
Our requirement of Science is unpopular with many of the private schools, 
which also object to the absolute requirement of the third year of Latin. 
Almost all the schools give the third year of Latin but they find that an 
increasing number of students wish to drop Latin after two years. The 
registration for admission showed a satisfactory increase during the year 
1938-1939 over the previous one, but there is some falling off in the regis- 
tration from certain of the large private schools which have sent a steady 
stream of students to Bryn Mawr in the past, and this probably should be 
met by a clearer statement of what we have to offer. 

Final Examination in the Major Subject 

The Curriculum Committee appointed a sub-committee to consider 
whether changes in the plan for the final examination were immediately 
necessary. A questionnaire was sent to all members of the faculty, and con- 
ferences were held with the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. It was 
found that only a minority of the faculty or of the students had serious objec- 
tions to the working of the original plan, although many interesting suggestions 
for changes were offered and discussed. In the end it was decided to make the 
rule with regard to the omission of examinations for seniors at midyears more 
flexible but to make no other changes for the present. It will probably be 
best to make a survey after the plan has been in operation for five years. 

Undergraduate Study Abroad 

For the first time last year one of the juniors spent the year in Geneva 
with a group which was studying International Affairs, History, and Politics, 
under the supervision of the University of Delaware. The student in ques- 
tion, Miss Louise Morley, has always been outstanding in her college work 
and won new honours for herself in this group. In her case, certainly, this 
new development proved to be of great value. There were five students in 
France and one student in Germany, all of whom profited greatly by the 
work. One of the students in France had been admitted to Bryn Mawr as a 
member of the Class of 1942. She was granted a scholarship for a year in 
France when she graduated from school, and the reports of her work in 
Paris were so excellent that the French Department has recommended that 
she be given a year of credit for the work. 

Curriculum Changes 

The Class of 1939 contained students who were offering the new major 
in Sociology. The advanced course on The City, which had never been offered 
by the Department, was based on a survey of the city of Norristown, involv- 
ing a very considerable amount of field work in which the city authorities 
were most cooperative. The major is proving popular. There are six seniors 
offering it this year, and there will probably be a larger group in the present 
junior and sophomore classes. The other new course in the Department of 



20 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Sociology, Anthropology, offered by Dr. Frederica de Laguna, has also filled 
a long-felt want and is being elected by a considerable number of students 
majoring in other departments. 

In closing this report I wish to call special attention to the great assist' 
ance rendered to the Dean's office by Dr. Katharine McBride in the course 
of the year. Dr. McBride for several years has devoted part of her time to 
testing the freshmen and to carrying on corrective work with students who 
are especially slow in their reading or who seem to need special help in the 
organization of their college work. During the year she assumed responsi' 
bility for advising a much larger group of the freshmen on all their academic 
problems and was outstandingly successful in the work. It will be exceedingly 
difficult to replace her as an educational adviser in the Dean's office, and it 
is with great regret that we see her leave Bryn Mawr for Radcliffe. 

A report on statistics of undergraduate students, submitted by the 
Secretary of the College, is appended. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HELEN TAFT MANNING, 

Dean of the College. 



SUPPLEMENT TO THE DEAN'S REPORT 

Statistics of Undergraduate Students 1938-39 

Summary of Registration by Classes: 

Class of 1 9 3 9 9 5 

Class of 1940 87* 

Class of 1 941 1 29 

Class of 1942..- 146 

457 

Geographical Distribution : 

New York City and its suburbs on the north, Washington on 

the south, Paoli on the west 44% 

The rest of Pennsylvania 10% 

The rest of New York 6% 

New England 1 7 % 

Middle West 1 5 % 

Southern States 3% 

Foreign 3% 

Pacific Coast _ 1% 

Far West other than Pacific Coast 1% 

Occupations of Fathers: 

Business men 44% 

Professional men 44% 

Miscellaneous 12% 

Denominational Affiliations of Student Body: 

Episcopalian . 37% 

Presbyterian 16% 

Other denominations 3 5 % 

No affiliation _ 1 2 % 

Students enrolled October 1937 who did not return October 1938: 

Poor academic work 1 1 

Finances 5 

Health 7 

Death '.:.'. 1 

Miscellaneous (marriage, travel, study elsewhere, etc.) 10 

34f 

Temporary withdrawal 6 

40 
Statistics of the Entering Class 

Total admitted: 146 — including 11 transfer students 

Plans of Entrance: 

a ; 1% 

B 36% 

B Modified 1 7 % 

C 25% 

D • 3% 

New York Regents.. 1% 

Progressive Education Experiment - 12% 

Oxford and Cambridge Examinations 1% 

On Certificate 4% 

* Including 6 studying abroad, 
f 7.4% of total number. 

[21] 



22 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Institutions from which students transferred: 

Connecticut College for Women, George Washington University, 
Goucher, Smith, Swarthmore, Wells and Wheaton Colleges, the 
Universities of Nebraska, Pennsylvania, Rochester and Texas. 

Preparation: 

Private Schools - 66 % 

Private and Public Schools 6% 

72% 

Public Schools 28% 

Average age: 17 years, 10 months (transfer students not included) 

Geographical Distribution: 

New York City and its suburbs on the north, Washington on 

the south, Paoli on the west 46% 

The rest of Pennsylvania _ 7% 

The rest of New York 5% 

New England 1 9 % 

Middle West 1 4 % 

Southern States 4% 

Foreign 3% 

Far West 1% 

Pacific Coast 1% 

Occupations of Fathers: 

Business men 47% 

Professional men 3 9 % 

Miscellaneous 14% 

College Training of Parents: 

Both parents with degree or some college training 35%- 

One parent with a degree or some college training 47% 

Neither parent with a degree or college training 18% 

Denominational Affiliations of Entering Class: 

Episcopalian 32% 

Presbyterian 13% 

Other denominations 40% 

No affiliation 1 5 % 

15 Bryn Mawr alumnae daughters in the entering class. 

Respectfully submitted, 

BARBARA GAVILLER, 

Secretary of the College. 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 

Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1938-1939: 

Registration 

The Graduate School of 1938-39 numbered 139 students: 

Resident in Radnor Hall and Low Buildings 65 

Non-Resident 74 

The Non-Resident group included the following students studying abroad: 
European Fellows studying abroad on our European Fellowships: 
Delight Tolles — Mary Elizabeth Garrett European Fellow 

A.B. Vassar College 193 5; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1936. 
Mary Margaret Taylor — Fanny Bullock Workman Fellow 

A.B. Mount Holyoke College 1934; M.A. Mount Holyoke 

College 193 6. 
Sara Anderson — Ella Riegel Fellow in Classical Archaeology 

A.B. Mount Holyoke College 193 5; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 

1937. 

Exchange Scholars studying abroad on exchanges arranged through the 

Institute of International Education:* 
Louise Atherton Dickey — Exchange Scholar in Germany 

A.B. Bryn Mawr College 1937 and M.A. 1938. 
Henrietta Rechlin — Exchange Scholar in Italy 

A. B. Barnard College 1937; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1938. 

Foreign Students studying at Bryn Mawr on Scholarships awarded by Bryn 
Mawr: 
Mary Paul Collins Scholar in Geology: 

Anna Martta Hietanen, Ph.D., University of Helsinki 1938. 
Exchange Scholars: 

Solange Jacquemond, Licenciee'h'lettres, 1936. Exchange Scholar 

from France. 
Gertrud Achenbach, Student, Wells College 193 5-36, University 
of Munich, 1936-37; Universities of Rome and Perugia 1937- 
38. Exchange Scholar from Germany. 
Carla Faa, Laurea in Filosofia, State University of Milan 1936; 
M.A. Bryn Mawr College, 1939. Exchange scholar from Italy. 

Chinese Graduate Scholar: 

Ch'en Fang-Chih, A.B. Yenching University 193 5. 
Special Scholar in Chemistry: 

Arsenia Arroyo, Licenciada en Ciencias Sluimicas, University of 
Madrid 1936; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1939. 

* Marjorie Houghton, the Exchange Scholar to France, was prevented 
from going at the last moment for family reasons. She continued her work 
at Columbia University. 

[23] 



24 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Josephine Go\dmar\ Scholars (Scholarship for a German exile given by 
President Park in honour of Josephine Goldmark, class of 1898): 
Edith Braun Treuer, Student, University of Vienna 1930-31 and 

1933-38.* 
Berta Fischer, Artzlich Vorpriifung. Friedrich Wilhelms Uni- 
versity 1937 (appointed Semester II.). 

Students holding awards from outside institutions: 

Blanche Virden Anderson, A.B. Earlham College 1938; M.A. 
Bryn Mawr College 1939. Earlham College Scholar in English. 

Katherine Lever, A.B. Swarthmore College 1936; M.A. Bryn 
Mawr College 1937. Scholarship of the Society of Pennsyl- 
vania Women in New York. 

Belle Biberman Parmet, A.B. University of Pennsylvania 1938. 
Y. W. C. A. Tuition Scholar in Social Economy. 

Academic Activity 

Doctors of Philosophy 
At Commencement in June 1939 the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
was awarded to the following ten candidates: 
Elizabeth Jeanne Armstrong 

A.B. Barnard College 193 3; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1934. 
Subjects: Geology and Chemistry. 

Dissertation: Mylonization of Hybrid Roc\s J^ear Philadelphia. 
Occupation for academic year 1939-40: Lecturer in Geology, 
Barnard College. 

NlTA SCUDDER BAUGH 

A.B. Miami University 1920. 

Subjects: English Philology, English Literature and English History. 

Dissertation: A Worcestershire "Miscellany, Compiled by John 

T^orthwode, c. 1400. 
Occupation for academic year 1939-40: Research in Saints' Lives 

and Mediaeval Drama. 
Dorothy Anne Buchanan 

A.B. Smith College 1930; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1931. 
Subjects: English Literature and Germanic Philology. 
Dissertation: The Love Complaint, A Study of a Lyric Type. 
Occupation for academic year 1939-40: Instructor in English, 

Vassar College. 
Mary Lane Charles 

A.B. Earlham College 1927; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1928. 

Subjects: French and Italian. 

Dissertation: The Growth of Diderot's Fame in France From 

1784 to 1875. 
Occupation for academic year 1939-40: Instructor in French, 

Earlham College. 
Margaret Hastings 

A.B. Mount Holyoke College 1931 and M.A. 1932. 
Subjects: European History and American History. 
Dissertation: A Guide to the Court of Common Pleas in the 

Fifteenth Century. 
Occupation for academic year 1939-40: Teacher of History, The 

Winsor School. 

* Mrs. Treuer resigned from the Scholarship in order to accept a Family 
Society grant which enabled her throughout the year to continue her work 
at Bryn Mawr College. 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 25 

Mary Henle 

A.B. Smith College 1934 and M.A. 193 5. 

Subject: Psychology. 

Dissertation: An Experimental Investigation of Dynamic and Struc' 

tural Determinants of Substitution. 
Occupation for academic year 1939'40: Research Associate in 

Psychology, Swarthmore College. 

Marion Monaco 

A.B. New Jersey College for Women 193?; M.A. Bryn Mawr 

College 1936. 
Subjects: French and Italian. 
Dissertation: Sha\espeare on the French Stage in the Eighteenth 

Century. 
Occupation for academic year 1939'40: Instructor in French, 

Swarthmore College. 

Florence Hemley Schneider 

A.B. Brooklyn College 1934; M.A. Columbia University 193?. 

Subjects: Social Economy and Economics. 

Dissertation: The Bryn Mawr Summer School for Women Workers 

in Industry, A Resident School in the V\Zor\ers' Education 

Movement. 
No occupation reported for the academic year 1939'40. 

Jane Isabella Marion Tait 

BA. Victoria College, University of Toronto 1934 and M.A. 193?. 
Subjects: Latin and Greek. 

Dissertation: Philodemus and Contemporary Latin Poets. 
Occupation for academic year 1939-40: Instructor in Latin, Bryn 
Mawr College. 

Allegra Woodworth 

A.B. Bryn Mawr College 192? and M.A. 1931. 

Subjects: European History and American History. 

Dissertation: Purveyance for the Royal Household in the Reign 

of Sjueen Elizabeth. 
Occupation for academic year 1939-40: Teacher of History, the 

Shipley School. 

Masters of Arts 

The Degree of Master of Arts was awarded to twenty-five candidates 
distributed as follows among the departments: 

Biology 1, Chemistry 2, Economics and Politics 1, English 2, French 2, 
Geology 4, Greek; 1, History 1, Latin 2, Mathematics 1, Social Economy 8. 

The steadily maintained success of our newly-made Doctors of Philosophy 
in securing teaching, administrative or research positions to their liking has 
been highly gratifying. The achievements of the M.A. candidates in this 
respect seems also well worth recording this year. 

Occupations for 1939-40 of Students Who Received the 
M.A. Degree in 1939 

Those Holding Positions 

B. Anderson — Apprentice Teacher, The George School. 
A. Arroyo — Instructor in Spanish, Barnard College. 
P. Auerbach — Part-time work for Bryn Mawr Geology Department in 
its Museum. 



26 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

C. Bill Osborn — Teacher, The Brown School, Rochester. 
J. Billings — Teacher of Latin and French, Moravian Seminary. 
B. Davis — Social work, United Charities, Wilkes-Barre. 
L. Ellsworth — Case worker, Family Society, Philadelphia. 

B. Goldstein — Working in adult education with the International 

Ladies' Garment Workers. 
E. Hardy — Research Assistant in Organic Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College. 

C. Hildebrand — Case worker, Main Line Federation of Churches. 
N. Krauss — Teacher of Mathematics, New York City Schools. 
M. Kunz — Case worker, Urbana, Illinois. 

E. Meirs — Working in the Y. W. C. A. in Erie, Pennsylvania. 

E. Norwick — Social work, Department of Public Welfare, Indianapolis, 

Indiana. 
N. Woo — Social work, Department of Public Welfare, Westchester 

County, New York. 

Those Holding Positions and Studying at the Same Time 

J. Armstrong — Demonstrator in Geology and graduate student at Bryn 

Mawr College. 
K. Dedman — Assistant to Editor of Publications of the Illinois Geologi' 

cal Survey and graduate student at University of Illinois. 
C. Faa — Social work, Neighborhood Guild, Philadelphia, and studying 

at Bryn Mawr. 
A. Meier — Assistant to the Dean of Men at Swarthmore College and 

studying at Bryn Mawr. 

Those Studying 

N. Angell — University Scholar, Yale University. 

C. Brice — Fellow in Latin, Bryn Mawr College. 

E. Buchen Blanc-Roos — Studying at Bryn Mawr College. 

H. Corsa — Scholar in English, Bryn Mawr College. 

N. Samson — Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr College. 

M. Van Brunt — Studying at Columbia University. 

Special Research Project 

Upon the recommendation to the Directors by the President, the Depart- 
ment of Geology was chosen as the fifth department to receive the award of 
the Mary Paul Collins Scholarship for Foreign Women and of two special 
scholarships in the furtherance of a research project.* 

Eight applications were received for the Mary Paul Collins Scholarship 
from candidates in France, Hungary, Russia, Australia, England, Germany, 
Finland. The award was made to Anna Martta Hietanen, of Finland, Doctor 
of Philosophy of the University of Helsinki. 

The research project of the Department of Geology was announced in 
the following terms on the poster offering the Mary Paul Collins Scholarship: 

"The successful candidate will be expected to assist in research on the 
igneous and metamorphic rocks of the Piedmont Province of southeastern 
Pennsylvania and to participate in the Journal Clubs and discussion groups 
led by members of the department. Bryn Mawr College is located within 

* In 1934-3? the Department of Mathematics was named under this 
rotating plan, in 1935-36 the Department of Biology, in 1936-37 the Depart- 
ment of Classical Archaeology and in 1937-38 the Departments of Latin and 
Greek. 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 27 

the Piedmont Province and for a long time has been investigating the geology 
of that complicated area. Within recent years there has been a marked 
renewal of interest in the many problems of the Piedmont that still remain 
unsolved and it is hoped that some solution of these may be attained by 
focusing upon them the courses and research of both members of the staff and 
graduate students during the year 1938-39. Dr. Watson will lecture on the 
petrology of the igneous rocks and the formation of the composite gneisses 
common in the Piedmont Province. Dr. Dryden will give a seminary on 
stratigraphy and sedimentation with particular emphasis on the origin of 
the sedimentary rocks of the area. Dr. Wyckoff will discuss the general and 
specific problems of metamorphism related to the region. In addition, Dr. 
Crenshaw, of the Department of Chemistry, will lecture on the principles of 
physical chemistry as applied to metamorphic processes. It is also planned 
to invite as lecturers during the year several of the outstanding workers in 
the metamorphic geology of the eastern United States." 

Of the actual year's work, Professor Watson reports: 

"For some years the Department of Geology has been engaged in 
research on the problems of petrologic and metamorphic geology as they 
concern the so'called Piedmont Province of southeastern Pennsylvania and 
adjacent states. A focusing of attention on this work both by the students 
at Bryn Mawr and neighboring institutions in the Middle Atlantic States 
region was undertaken last year in connection with the above plan. To 
this end the Mary Paul Collins Scholarship was awarded to Dr. Anna 
Hietanen, of Finland, who was especially trained in geology of similar prob' 
lems in Finland. Under the general direction of Professors Watson and 
Wyckoff a symposium was held on the Problems of the Crystalline Rocks of 
the Piedmont Province in Eastern North America. Professor Watson lec- 
tured and conducted field trips on the relations of the igneous rocks of the 
region and Professor Wyckoff did the same for metamorphic problems of the 
area. A series of seven lectures by outstanding workers in eastern North 
America contributed greatly to the success of the program. Other courses 
given last year in the Department, Petrology by Professor Watson and 
Metamorphism by Professor Wyckoff, were coordinated to aid in the general 
research plan. Four students received their M.A. degrees all of whom wrote 
papers which resulted from field and laboratory research done by them on 
problems on local geology. In addition, two other students who did not 
receive the M.A. degree were similarly engaged. One of the M.A. papers 
has just been published : A. E. Meier's 'Association of harmotome and 
barium feldspar at Glen Riddle, Pennsylvania 1 - — American Mineralogist, Sep- 
tember 1939. In addition, Dr. Hietanen is writing a paper on the relation 
of some very controversial formations by the use of petrofabric analysis. The 
general results of the Symposium and research project were highly satisfactory. 
New relationships and ideas were gained by both the staff and the students 
in relation to their work and the work on these problems has been vitalized 
to an extent which will be felt for many years, both at Bryn Mawr and in 
the neighboring institutions with whom we cooperate." 

Academic Cooperation With Neighboring Institutions 

Under our Cooperative Plan, four students from the University of 
Pennsylvania (one in Biology, one in Geology, two in Philosophy), two 
from Haverford in French (candidates for the M.A. degree at Haverford), 
and one member of the staff of Swarthmore (in Geology) were studying in 
the Bryn Mawr Graduate School. Four Bryn Mawr graduate students (one 
in Chemistry, one in Economics, one in History and one in Latin) were 
taking courses at the University of Pennsylvania. 



28 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Ph.D. Dissertations Published 1938-39 

Department of Biology 

Sylvia B. Rouse and E. W. Blanch ard (Degree awarded at Com- 
mencement 1937) 

The Influence of Calcium and Potassium Salts on the Uterine Con- 
tractions in Normal and Adrenalectomized Rabbits, pp. 752-757. 
Reprint from The American Journal of Physiology, Vol. 123, No. 3, 
Sept. 1938. 
E. Frances Stilwell (Degree awarded at Commencement 1938) 

Cytological Study of Chick Heart Muscle in Tissue Cultures, pp. 
447-476; Plates 11-15. Gustav Fischer in Jena. Reprint from 
Archiv fur experimentelle Zellforschung besonders Gewebeziichtung 
(Explanation). 1938. bd. XXI, heft 4. 

Department of English 

Helen Muchnic (Degree awarded at Commencement 1937) 

Dostoevsky's English Reputation (1881-1936). 219 pp. George 
Banta Publishing Company, 1939. Reprint from Smith College 
Studies in Modern Languages, Vol. XX, Nos. 3 and 4, April and 

July. 

Department of German 

Irmgard Wirth Taylor (Degree awarded at Commencement 193 5) 

Kultur, Auf\ldrung, Bildung, Humanitdt und verwandte Begriffe 
, bei Herder. 50 pp. von Miinchowsche Universitats-Druckerei Otto 
Kindt GmbH in Giessen. 1938. Reprint from Giessener Beitrage 
zur deutschen Philologie, No. 62. 

Department of History 

Pauline Relyea Anderson (Degree awarded at Commencement 1937) 
The Background of Anti-English Feeling in Germany, 1890-1902. 
The American University Press, Washington. 1939. 

Department of Social Economy 

Jennette Rowe Gruener (Degree awarded at Commencement 193 5) 
Employment and Productivity in a Sheet Steel Mill. A Study of 
Labor Displacement in Prosperity and Depression. 87 pp. H. M. 
Downs Printing Co., Fitchburg, Massachusetts, 1938. 

Significance of the Increase in Registration 

The marked increase in registration (139) over our all-time high (121) 
of 1936-37 and over our average of the past ten years (108) seems worth 
commenting upon in view of the fact that at the time of writing this report 
(December 1939) the registration for 1939-40 (140) has maintained the 
increase. 

An examination of the spread of these 139 students through the depart- 
ments in comparison with the departmental numbers of the preceding years 
shows widespread but slight variations. It looks like a healthy growth. No 
single department exceeds by more than four its high of the three preceding 
years. 

It is not due as might, perhaps, have been expected to a suddenly large 
increase in the number of foreign students. Our normal pattern in recent 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 29 

years has had six or seven foreign students: one each from France, Germany, 
Italy and Spain; the holder of the Mary Paul Collins Scholarship; and one or 
two others who were brought to the campus by specially interested groups or 
on foundations. In 1936-37 and 1937-38, for instance, Madeleine Sylvain, 
of Haiti, Fellow of the American Association of University Women, and 
since 1937, Agnes Chen, as "Chinese Scholar,''' have been members of the 
Graduate School. In 1938-39 we have had eight foreign students of whom 
two were German exiles. 

Five departments have reached their top registration in 1938-39 (Biology, 
Chemistry, Education, Geology, History) and another, Social Economy, 
equalled its top registration of a former year, 1937-38. It may be significant 
that five of these six had recently announced new plans of work: Biology, 
Chemistry and Geology with the Plan for the Coordination of the Teaching of 
the Sciences and the new equipment of the Chemistry and Geology Building 
and Dalton; Education and Social Economy with the special courses and 
projects referred to in my last report. It would seem desirable for other 
departments to consider bringing out more explicitly either in the Calendar 
or in special announcements the new methods and content which I am sure 
they are continually offering to their students. 

People Employed by Bryn Mawr College and Receiving Free 
Tuition from the Graduate School 

The cost of operation of the Graduate School will remain a source of 
concern until a proper special endowment is secured. In the relation between 
graduate and undergraduate budgets a small amount of satisfaction may be 
derived, on the graduate side, from the contribution that the Graduate School 
is able to make in the remission of graduate tuition to instructors, demon- 
strators, wardens, etc., concerned with the undergraduate work of the College. 
Increases in salary, amounting to about $3,000, would have to be provided 
for twenty-one individuals on the staff if the Graduate School were not here 
and much might be said about the quality of the candidates available for 
these positions just because of the opportunity they offer of working towards 
a Bryn Mawr Ph.D. 

The Graduate School and the Alumnae Association 

The Alumnae Association has a committee at work to further the par- 
ticipation in the Association of those holders of higher degrees who are not 
Bachelors of Arts of Bryn Mawr College. At the suggestion of this commit- 
tee, the Board decided to invite four "graduate alumnae" to take part in 
the panel discussions of the Alumnae Weekend to be held in the autumn 
of 1939. Immediate and cordial acceptances were received from the fol- 
lowing : 

Philosophy: 

Dorothy Walsh 

A.B. University of British Columbia 1923; Ph.D. Bryn Mawr 
College 193 5. Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Psychology, 
Wells College. 



30 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

German: 

Esther Metzenthin 

A.B. Duke University 1929; Ph.D. Bryn Mawr College 193 5. 
Assistant Professor of German, Beaver College. 
French: 

Helen E. Patch 

A.B. Mount Holyoke College 1914; Ph.D. Bryn Mawr College 1921. 
Head of the Department of Romance Languages, Mount Holyoke 
College. 

Government: 

Melanie Staerk 

MA. Bryn Mawr College. Professor of Political Science, Rosemont 
College. 

Miss Vesta Sonne, who has been the very efficient Senior Resident of 
Radnor Hall since 1936, during which time she has carried on her own work 
towards the doctorate in Social Economy, has accepted the position of Assistant 
to the Director of the Goodrich Settlement in Cleveland. Miss Elizabeth Ash, 
Fellow in 1938-39, has been appointed to succeed her. I wish to express here 
my appreciation of Miss Sonne's contribution to the life of Radnor Hall. 

I have concluded this year a five-year term on the Committee for the 
Admission of Colleges and the Maintenance of Standards of the American 
Association of University Women and have been elected to the Council 
of the 'American Association of University Professors and to the Board of 
Directors of the Baldwin School. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EUNICE MORGAN SCHENCK, 

Dean of the Graduate School. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR IN RESIDENCE 
AND EDITOR OF PUBLICATIONS 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 

Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1938-39. 

Official Publications 

Annual Publications 
The Bryn Mawr College Calendar, Vols. XXXI. and XXXII. 

Finding List, Vol. XXXI., No. 3, November 1938. 

Halls of Residence, Vol. XXXI., No. 4, December 1938 (published in 

March). 

Undergraduate Courses, Vol. XXXII., No. 1, April 1939. 

Graduate Courses, Vol. XXXII., No. 2, June 1939. 
Bryn Mawr College Commencement Programme, June 1939. 

Special Publications 
Supplement to the Bryn Mawr College Calendar (revised picture 

pamphlet), April 1939. 
Needs of Bryn Mawr College (lithographed pamphlet), July 1939. 
Carola Woerishoffer Graduate Department of Social Economy and 

Social Research (pamphlet, printed in place of Department calendar), 

January 1939. 

LECTURES AND ENTERTAINMENTS 

Goodhart Hall 

Opening of the Chemistry and Geology Building 
Dr. Norman L. Bowen, Professor of Petrography at the University of 
Chicago; Dr. Louis F. Fieser, Professor of Chemistry at Harvard University, 
and Dr. Florence Bascom, Professor Emeritus of Geology, spoke at the 
ceremonies held on October 22nd in connection with the opening of the 
Chemistry and Geology Building. 

Commencement 

Charles Phelps Taft, LL.D., delivered the Commencement address 
on June 7th. 

Endowed Lectures 

The Anna Howard Shaw Memorial Foundation: Judge Florence 
Ellinwood Allen, of the United States Circuit Court of Appeals, gave a 
series of six lectures on "The Historical Development of the Constitutional 
Powers" on Monday evenings in October, November, February and March. 
Judge Allen was in residence for one week during which she held conferences 
with the students. 

The Ann Elizabeth Sheble Memorial Lecture in English Literature: 
Mr. Paul Eliot Green, author . of the Pulitzer Prize winning play, In 

C 31 3 



32 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Abraham's Bosom, gave a lecture on "The Imaginative Theatre in America" 
on November 16th. 

The Mallory Whiting Webster Memorial Lecture in History: Miss 
Elizabeth Wiskemann, Tutor in Modern History at Cambridge University 
(author of Czechs and Germans; associated with the Royal Institute of 
International Affairs), spoke on "National Socialism in Central Europe" on 
December 1st. 

College Lectures 

Mrs. Carl Akeley gave a lecture, illustrated by motion pictures and 
slides, on "Carl Akeley's Africa" on April 4th. 

Sir William Bragg, O.M., P.R.S., Nobel Laureate, 191?; Director of 
the Davy-Faraday Laboratory of the Royal Institution, London, gave an 
illustrated lecture on "The Structure of Organic Crystals" on May 4th. 

Dr. Samuel C. Chew, Professor of English Literature, gave an illus- 
trated lecture on "Time and Fortune in the Elizabethan Imagination" on 
May 1st. 

Dr. Charles G. Fenwick, Professor of Political Science, spoke on 
January 12th on "The Lima Conference," to which he was a delegate. 

Edna St. Vincent Millay gave readings from her works on October 
17th. 

Carl Sandburg gave his programme, "American Folk Songs and Tall 
Tales," on April 20th. 

Sir Ronald Storrs, formerly Military and Civil Governor of Jerusalem, 
gave a lecture on "The Problem of Palestine" on January 16th. 

Mr. Raymond Gram Swing gave a lecture on "The Intrigue for World 
Power" on October 26th. 

Departmental Lectures 

The Biology Department sponsored a series of three lectures: the first 
on February 14th by Dr. George W. Corner, of the University of Roches- 
ter, on "The Reproductive Cycle of Macacus rhesus"; the second on March 
15th by Dr. Baldwin Lucre, of the University of Pennsylvania, on "Tumor 
Growth," with a moving picture of tumor cells growing in tissue culture; 
the third on April 12th by Dr. F. Brink, of the Johnson Foundation, on 
"Chemical Excitation of Nerve Impulses." 

The Carola Woerishoffer Graduate Department of Social Economy and 
Social Research sponsored lectures on November 10th by The Honorable 
Frances Perkins, Secretary of Labor of the United States, and The 
Right Honorable Margaret Bondfield, Minister of Labor of Great 
Britain, 1929-31, on "The Relation of Government to Organized Labor"; 
on December 8th by Dr. William Duncan Strong, Associate Professor of 
Anthropology at Columbia University, and leader of many archaeological 
expeditions in Labrador, the Far West and Central America for the United 
States Bureau of Ethnology, on "Early Man in the New World"; on February 
9th by Dr. Ruth Murray Underhill, ethnologist attached to the United 
States Indian Office, on "American Indian Poetry." Dr. Strong's and Dr. 
Underbill's lectures were given in the Deanery. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR IN RESIDENCE 33 

The Classical Archaeology Department sponsored lectures on January 
8th by Dr. Axel Boethius, Professor of Classical Archaeology and Ancient 
History at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, on "Architecture of 
Imperial Rome and Its Importance for Mediaeval Times" 1 ; on January 24th 
by Professor A. J. B. Wace, of Cambridge University (formerly Director 
of the British School at Athens), on "Sparta"; on March 12th by Dr. Doro 
Levi, former Superintendent of Antiquities for Sardinia, on "Native Elements 
in Etruscan Art." Dr. Levi's talk was given in the Deanery. Dr. Hetty 
Goldman, Director of the Joint Excavation of Bryn Mawr College and the 
Institute for Advanced Study of Princeton, at Tarsus, gave a series of three 
lectures in April and May on "Aspects of Early Anatolian Civilization," 
sponsored by the Classical Archaeology Department. 

The French Department held a lecture on December 5th by Monsieur 
Paul Hazard, Professeur au College de France, Flexner Lecturer at Bryn 
Mawr College, 1930, Visiting Professor of French Literature at Columbia 
University, 1938-39, on "jean de la Fontaine et Jean Giraudoux." 

The Departments of German, Philosophy and Psychology joined in spon' 
soring a lecture on January 26th by Dr. Karl Buhler, Professor of Psy 
chology at the University of Vienna, on "The Theory of Language." 

The Department of History of Art sponsored a lecture on January 9th 
on "Yoga and Surrealism" by Dr. Friedrich Spiegelberg, Visiting Professor 
of Philosophy at Columbia University (formerly Professor of Sanskrit and Pali 
at Dresden University). A Symposium on Art was held two evenings a week 
through April; the speakers were: Dr. Richard Bernheimer, Professor of 
History of Art, who spoke on "Representation in Art"; Dr. Rhys Carpenter, 
Professor of Classical Archaeology, who spoke on "Archaeological Approach 
to Art"; Dr. Kurt Koffka, Professor of Psychology at Smith College, who 
spoke on "Problems in the Psychology of Art," and Dr. Milton Nahm, 
Associate Professor of Philosophy, who spoke on "Form and Function in Art." 

The Psychology Department sponsored a lecture, illustrated by moving 
pictures and ethnological materials, on "Mental Testing in the African Bush" 
on January 10th by PROFESSOR Sherman Oberly, of the University of 
Pennsylvania, and a lecture, illustrated by moving pictures, on "Experimentally 
Produced Neurotic Behavior in the Rat" on February 14th by Dr. N. R. 
Maier, of the University of Michigan. 

The Physical Education Department sponsored a "skiing evening" with 
a talk, illustrated by moving pictures, by Mr. William E. Chambers on 
January 9th; a lecture-demonstration on January 15th by Ronny Johansson, 
Swedish dancer; a dance-recital on January 18th by the Humphrey-Weidman 
Dance Group, and on February 16th an evening of folk dancing with a 
talk and songs by Dr. Douglas Kennedy, Head of the English Folk Dancing 
and Song Society. These events were held in the gymnasium. 

Undergraduate Club Lectures 

The American Student's Union brought three speakers: Dr. Richard 
Chodoff spoke on February 8th on the "Critical Military and Political Situation 
in Spain"; Mr. M. H. Goldstein, Philadelphia labor lawyer, spoke on May 



34 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

12th on the "National Labor Relations Act," under the auspices of the Ameri' 
can Student's Union and the Industrial Group, and Najib P. Eadeh spoke 
on December 15th on the "Historical Background of the Arab-Jew Conflict." 

Under the auspices of the Industrial Group, representatives of the Girls' 
Division of Branch No. 1 of the Hosiery Workers' Union, affiliated with the 
C. I. O., and representatives of the Industrial Group of the Germantown 
Y. W. C. A., held a supper and discussion meeting on January 6th when 
Miss Anna Geisinger, of the Girls' Division, spoke. 

Under the auspices of the Peace Council Miss Gertrude Ely spoke on 
Czechoslovakia on October 11th; an Armistice Day meeting was held on 
November 1 1th with a talk on "Constructive Action for Peace" by Miss 
Rose Terlin, former Secretary of the World's Student Christian Association; 
Mr. Pennington Haile, National Assistant Director of the League of 
Nations Association, spoke at the Peace Assembly on April 20th. 

Under the auspices of the Philosophy Club, Dr. Rufus M. Jones, Pre 
fessor Emeritus of Philosophy at Haverford College and Trustee and Director 
of Bryn Mawr College, gave a talk on May 3rd on "The Nature of the 
Mystic Experience," and Dr. Mortimer Adler, Professor of Law at the 
University of Chicago, gave a talk on April 23rd on "Plurity of Logics." 

The Science Club sponsored a lecture on November 3rd on "Chemistry 
in the Detection of Crime" by Dr. Alexander O. Gettler, Professor of 
Chemistry at Washington Square College, New York University. 

The Undergraduate Committee for the Summer School brought Miss 
Hilda Worthington Smith, former Dean of Bryn Mawr College and 
former Director of the Summer School, Director of Workers' Education for 
the W. P. A., to speak on February 10th on the "Bryn Mawr Summer School 
and Current Trends in Workers' Education." 

Vocational Teas 

Mr. Frank A. Arnold, Vice-President in Charge of Radio of the Edwin 
Bird Wilson Advertising Corporation, spoke on February 27th on "Oppor- 
tunities for Women in Radio." 

Miss Molly Drysdale, Instructor in Plant Materials and Assistant in 
Landscape Architecture, spoke on February 7th. 

Dr. Helen A. Field, Associate Professor of Education at the University 
of Pennsylvania, gave a talk on April 10th on "Teaching As a Profession." 

Miss Helen Hartman, second prize winner of the Vogue contest, 
spoke on November 8th. 

Miss Wendy Iglehart, of the editorial staff of Harper's Bazaar, spoke 
on May 18th. 

Miss Edna Lee, Assistant Registrar of the Katharine Gibbs School, 
spoke on February 9th. 

Mrs. Helen Hill Miller, senior agricultural writer in the United States 
Department of Agriculture, spoke on "Government Service" on February 13th. 

Miss Eileen O'Daniel, Secretary to the Chairman of the Republican 
National Committee, spoke on May 1st on "The Great Game of Politics." 

Miss Virginia Pope, Fashion Editor of the K[ew Tor\ Times, spoke on 
March 20th on "Opportunities for Women in Newspaper Work." 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR IN RESIDENCE 35 

Services 

Dr. Willard Learoyd Sperry, Professor of Homiletics and Dean of 
the Divinity School, Harvard University, delivered the Baccalaureate Sermon 
on June 4th. 

The Sunday evening services, arranged by the Bryn Mawr League, were 
conducted by the following: 

The Reverend Donald B. Aldrich, D.D., L.H.D., Rector of the 
Church of the Ascension, New York City. 

The Reverend George A. Buttrick, Minister of the Madison Avenue 
Presbyterian Church, New York City. 

The Reverend Rex Clements, Minister of the Presbyterian Church, 
Bryn Mawr. 

The Reverend John Crocker, Episcopal Student Chaplain, Princeton, 
New Jersey. 

Dr. H. Flanders Dunbar, Graduate of Bryn Mawr College, Columbia 
University, Union Theological Seminary, Yale School of Medicine. 

The Reverend Ernest C. Earp, Rector of the Church of the Re- 
deemer, Bryn Mawr. 

The Reverend C. Leslie Glenn, Rector of Christ Church, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts. 

Dr. Hornell Hart, Professor of Sociology and Psychology at Duke 
University, Durham, North Carolina. 

The Reverend John Robbins Hart, Lecturer and Consulting Psychol- 
ogist and Minister of the Valley Forge Chapel, Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. 

The Reverend Frederic B. Kellogg, of Christ Church, Cambridge, 

Massachusetts. 

Entertainments 

MUSIC 

The combined choirs of Bryn Mawr College and the Church of 
the Redeemer, Bryn Mawr, gave a Christmas carol service on December 11th. 

The Curtis String Quartet gave a concert, for the fund for refugee 
students at Bryn Mawr College, on May 8th. 

Josef Hofmann gave an all-Chopin piano recital on April 11th, under 
the auspices of the College Entertainment Committee. 

Fritz Kreisler gave a violin recital on December 1st, under the auspices 
of the College Entertainment Committee. 

The Salzburg Trapp Choir gave a concert on November 28th. 

Myra Hess gave a piano recital on February 7th for the benefit of the 
Mrs. Otis Skinner Dramatic Workshop. 

Marjorie Edwards gave a violin recital on March 13th. 

Mrs. Susan Metcalfe Casals gave a song recital on April 30th, under 
the auspices of the Music Department. 

PLAYS 

"Les Perles de la Couronne," a French movie, was shown on March 18th, 
under the auspices of The French Club. 

"Rudens," paraphrased as "Flotsam and Jetsam," the fourth Latin play 
to be given at Bryn Mawr, was presented by The Latin Club on Novem- 
ber 5th. 



36 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

The German Club presented a German play, consisting chiefly of well- 
known German carols, on December 13th. 

The Glee Club presented "The Gondoliers," by Gilbert and Sullivan, 
on April 28th and 29th. 

The Varsity Players presented two one-act plays, "The Great Dar\," 
by Don Totheroh, and "The Devil on Stilts" by Ryerson and Clements, on 
October 28th. 

The Varsity Players and the Haverford Cap and Bells presented 
"Arms and the Man," by G. B. Shaw, on December 10th. 

The Players Club presented "The K[ew School of Wives," by John 
Kirkpatrick, and "Riders to the Sea," by John Synge, on March 11th, for 
the benefit of the Mrs. Otis Skinner Dramatic Workshop. 

The Players Club presented "Pullman Car Hiawatha," by Thornton 
Wilder, on May 6th. 

An undergraduate group gave "Premature Lilies," written and directed 
by Mary Alston, 1941, on February 18th, for the benefit of the Mrs. Otis 
Skinner Dramatic Workshop. 

The maids and porters presented "Murder in Rehearsal" on April 14th. 

DANCING 

The Hampton Institute Creative Dance Group gave a perform- 
ance on March 21st. 

Martha Graham and Her Dance Group gave a performance on 
February 23rd for the benefit of the Mrs. Otis Skinner Dramatic Workshop. 

miscellaneous 

The Eastern Pennsylvania Alumnae Regional Scholarship Committee 
presented The Yale Puppeters in "It's a Small World," on January 13th, 
for the benefit of the Eastern Pennsylvania Alumnae Regional Scholarships. 

Ruth Draper gave her monologues on December 12th for the benefit 
of the Mrs. Otis Skinner Dramatic Workshop. 

Exhibitions 

Photographs by Mrs. Alice Benedict Jackson of Bryn Mawr were on 
exhibition from November 12th to December 2nd. The art of young children, 
pictures loaned by the Spanish Child Feeding Commission, were exhibited 
on December 8th. Reproductions of the works of Pieter Bruegel, loaned 
by Raymond and Raymond of New York, were displayed on December 11th. 
Colored reproductions of Florentine and Venetian paintings loaned by Ray- 
mond and Raymond were exhibited from February 12th to 24th. The works 
of Cezanne were on exhibition on April 16th. Pictures from faculty collec- 
tions were displayed on May 21st. The Camera Club held exhibitions of its 
work on October 20th and November 30th; and its third annual exhibition 
from April 29th to May 6th. 



Goodhart Hall was loaned to the Baldwin School for its fiftieth anni- 
versary celebration on October 14th and 15th; and to the Shipley School for 
a benefit performance on January 21st, and for Class Night on June 8th. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR IN RESIDENCE 37 

Commencement exercises of the following schools were held in Good' 
hart Hall: 

The Baldwin School on June 13th. 

The Agnes Irwin School on June 9th. 

The Ursula Murray School of Dancing on May 26th. 

The Shipley School on June 9th. 



Conferences 

The Joint Physics Colloquium of Philadelphia held their last 
meeting of the year in Dalton Hall on May 18th. Dr. Katharine Way, 
Helen Schaeffer Huff Memorial Research Fellow in Physics, spoke on "Nuclear 
Fission." 

The Eastern Psychological Association held its tenth annual spring 
meeting on March 31st and April 1st. Headquarters were in the Deanery 
with Professor Helson and Professor MacKinnon in charge. There were 655 
psychologists present, the largest number that ever attended one of the con' 
ferences, and Rhoads, Pembroke, Merion and Denbigh Halls were used to 
accommodate them. The program committee prepared for meetings in special' 
ized fields; eighteen sessions were held for the presentation of one hundred 
thirteen papers. Mr. George H. Gallup, of the American Institute of 
Public Opinion, spoke on "Some Problems in the Measurement of Public 
Opinion." 

The president, dean and a faculty representative from Mount Holyoke, 
Smith, Vassar, Wellesley and Bryn Mawr met for a weekend in April to 
discuss academic problems that they have in common. 

The University of Pennsylvania Chapter of Sigma Xi met on May 17th 
in Dalton Hall. 

The Deanery 

Dr. Alfred Salmony, Professor of Fine Arts at New York University 
(formerly Curator of the Museum of Far Eastern Art, Cologne, Germany), 
gave two illustrated lectures: one, on "Chinese Bronzes," on November 2nd; 
the second, on "Chinese Jades," on November 30th, under the auspices of the 
Executive Committee of the Chinese Scholarship Committee. 

Two recitals were given: a recital by a string quartet (Florence 
Duvall and Helen Rice, violins; Mary Fairchild, viola; Ruth Mc- 
Gregor, cello) on February 19th; and a piano recital by Fritz Kurzweil 
on March 5th. 

Mrs. Eleanor Mercein Kelly spoke on "The Basque Country" on 
January 8th to the senior class. 

Mr. Jonathan Griffin, B.A., Oxon., Editor of Essential ls[ews; author; 
spoke on "The Ukraine and Hitler" on April 23rd. 

Mr. W. H. Auden, British poet, dramatist and lecturer, spoke on May 
2nd on "The Poet's Position in Modern Society and the Use of Contemporary 
Material in Poetry." 

Respectfully submitted, 

CAROLINE CHADWICK-COLLINS, 

Director in Residence and Editor of Publications. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the annual report of the work of the 
College Library for the year ending June 30, 1939. 

Size and Growth of the Library 

The following table shows the additions made from various sources and 
the total present extent of the Library. The corresponding table for the 
year 1937'38 is given for purposes of comparison. 

Number of volumes June 30, 1938 161,601 

Number of volumes added 1937-38 1938-39 

By purchase 2,559 2,756 

By binding 674 723 

By gifts and exchange 858 1,509 

By replacement 104 78 

Total additions 4,195 5,066 

Volumes withdrawn 297 681 



Net increase 3,898 4,385 



4,385 



Total volumes June 30, 1939 165,986 

Pamphlets added 323 444 

Pamphlets withdrawn 74 228 

Net gain 249 216 

Total accessioned pamphlets June 30, 1939 9,876* 

The following table shows how the volumes were distributed by classes. 
It will be noted that the largest gain was in the literature group. This is due 
to extensive purchases in South American literature and the gift of French 
books for the French House. 1017,10 1918-^0 

Class General works 273 288 

Philosophy and Psychology 159 186 

Religion 80 109 

Economics, Sociology, Education 686 703 

Philology 228 215 

Science 554 667 

Applied Arts 107 68 

Fine Arts 302 365 

Literature 1,253 1,744 

History, Biography, etc 553 721 

Total 4,195 5,066 

* These figures represent catalogued pamphlets which are unbound. 
When pamphlets are bound they are withdrawn and again accessioned as 
books. There is also in the Library a growing collection of several thousand 
pamphlets, for the most part uncatalogued dissertations from foreign universi- 
ties, which are arranged alphabetically by author. So many of these disserta- 
tions deal with some minor and obscure point in German history, philosophy, 
finance or medicine that they are not of enough importance to us to catalogue 
but are available if needed. 

[38] 



Class 


1 


Class 


2 


Class 


3 


Class 


4 


Class 


5 


Class 


6 


Class 


7 


Class 


8 


Class 


9 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 39 

The Library has received by gift and exchange from institutions, societies 
and government bureaus over two thousand books and pamphlets. Alumnae 
and friends of the College have contributed 1,700 volumes. All of these gifts 
are appreciated and have been acknowledged by the Librarian on behalf 
of the College. A list of donors is appended but a few of the gifts are of 
such significance as to deserve special mention. 

One of the most valuable gifts that has ever come to the Library was 
that of the late Professor Georgiana Goddard King's collection of books. 
After Miss King's death her sister, Miss Margaret G. King, offered us her 
library consisting of several thousand volumes gathered over a period of 
years. As Miss King's first teaching years were in English, her library con- 
tained the usual books of literature found in any such collection, later when 
her interest turned to art and particularly to Spanish art, she bought exten- 
sively in that field. To a certain extent Miss King's books duplicate those 
already in our Library and it was not expedient to transport all across the 
country so while I was in California this summer a selection of about one 
thousand volumes was made. 

We also received, as a gift, the library of Miss Helen Strong Hoyt, 1897. 
Miss Hoyt taught English at Bryn Mawr from 1898 to 1907 and her collection 
of books amounting to 736 volumes of literature, literary history and misceh 
laneous works of interest thirty years ago, was turned over to us in the winter. 

From the estate of Mrs. Anna Rose Giles we received a unique collection 
of over one hundred books on Sardinia and the Sard language. Mrs. Giles 
had lived in Sardinia for many years and had made a study of the folklore 
and religious drama of that country. The books form the nucleus of a collec- 
tion for any one who wishes to continue the study. 

Mrs. Albert E. Goodhart presented a set of The Critical and Historical 
Corpus of Florentine Painting by Richard Offner, Section III. The Four- 
teenth Century, published under the auspices of the College of Fine Arts, 
New York University, 1931. It is a valuable work and important to the study 
of the history of the art of the period. 

From former Professor Prentice Duell, who is now the Field Director of 
the Sakkarah expedition in Egypt, we received his volumes descriptive of the 
work. Published by the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, The 
Mastaba of lsAereru\a contains a great treasury of the art and history which 
has survived in the tomb of Mereruka in the ancient Memphite cemetery. 

Through the influence of Dr. Frederica de Laguna we were given a 
part of the library of Dr. Diamond Jenness, chief of the Division of 
Anthropology, National Museum, Ottawa. This gift of over two hundred 
volumes has enabled us to fill in gaps in our sets of the Journal of American 
Folk'lore, American Anthropologist, University of California Publications on 
American Ethnology and other series, as well as considerable new material 
about the Indians and Eskimos of North America. 

The alumnae have remembered us with, or secured for us, a number of 
gifts which, although general in character, contain much that is useful. Miss 
Viola Margaret Blaisdell, 1906, sent two sets: The ~Wor\s of Charles Lamh, 
edited by William MacDonald, the limited edition in twelve volumes; and 
The ~Wor\s of the Poets of Great Britain, compiled by Robert Anderson, 



40 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

London, 1795, in fourteen volumes. Mrs. Mary Grimm Anderson Crocker, 

1924, gave twenty volumes of miscellaneous works. Miss Susan Fowler, 1895, 
presented a copy of the facsimile reproduction of Petrarch's own early 
fourteenth century manuscript of the Vergilianus codex, which was issued by 
the Ambrosian Library, Milan, in 1930 in honour of the two thousandth 
anniversary of Vergil's birth, a valuable addition to our classical collection. 
Miss Marianna Duncan Jenkins, 1931, gave several books on French art. 
Mrs. Aimee Leffingwell McKenzie, 1897, brought us a number of French 
texts and pamphlets on the Romance languages. The family of Miss Rebecca 
Grace Rhoads, 1918, sent us several books from her library. Mrs. Helen E. 
Williams Woodall, 1898, added fifteen more volumes to the many she has 
already given. Miss Allegra Woodworth, 1925, presented fifteen new books 
on topics of the day. Through Miss Emily Redmond Cross, 1901, we received 
twentyfive volumes of the Museum of Modern Art Publications from Miss 
Margaret L. Draper. Through Miss Catherine Barton, 1921, the early volumes 
of the Revue de Paris were given by Miss Susan D. Bliss. Mrs. Eleanor 
Marquand Forsyth, 1920, secured a number of books on etching and engrav- 
ing for the Library, the gift of Mrs. Loomis B. Johnson. 

The usual number of items have been received as gifts or exchanges from 
learned societies, universities and government agencies. We are particularly 
indebted to the Stockholm National Museum for a set of its Arsbok, 1930 
to 1938, dealing with the Archaeology and Ethnology of the country. Through 
the Smithsonian Institution we received 367 dissertations from foreign univer- 
sities. The French Ministry of Education sent thirtythree volumes in addition 
to its generous gift of last year. 

Gifts of money for the purchase of books and periodicals are welcome. 
The names of the donors are inscribed on the book plate which is put in each 
volume purchased from such a gift. Grateful acknowledgment is made to 
the Class of 1897 for its gifts; $200.00 in memory of Rebekah Munroe 
Chickering for the Department of English, $200.00 in memory of Caroline 
Gait for the Department of Archaeology, and $200.00 in memory of Emily 
Eastman Brown for the Department of Latin. Miss Anne Cutting Jones, Ph.D. 

1925, gave $100.00 for French books in memory of her aunt, Lilla D. Vaughan. 
As in previous years, the greater part of books purchased have been 

inexpensive, current publications but also an unusual number of valuable 
purchases were made. The most noteworthy for the Art Department is the 
monumental work on Oriental art, A Survey of Persian Art From Prehistoric 
Times to the Present, edited by Arthur U. Pope, London 1938, six volumes 
of text and plates. Another of interest is the new edition of Leonardo da 
Vinci's Literary ~Wor\s, compiled from original manuscripts by Jean Paul 
Richter, London 1939. Through a special gift Professor Alexander Soper 
was able to secure a number of Japanese art books and pictures for a new 
course which is to be given in Oriental Art. 

By the terms of the Ella Riegel endowment of a scholarship for the 
Archaeology Department, part of the fund can be used for the purchase of 
books. The Department availed itself of this generous provision and made 
many valuable purchases of long desired works of both foreign and domestic 
publication. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 41 

The English Department added to its resources the facsimile edition of 
Defoe's Review, reproduced from the original editions with notes by A. W. 
Secord, New York, Columbia University Press, 1938, nine volumes; and the 
new limited and first complete edition of The Greville Memoirs, 1814-60, 
edited by Lytton Strachey and Roger Fulford, London 1938, eight volumes. 

We were fortunate in securing a complete set, now almost impossible to 
find, of J^osotros, revista mensiud de literatura, historia, arte, fdosofia, 
Buenos Aires, 1907-1934, eighty-one volumes. Also of value to our South 
American collection is Repertorio Americano, semarario de cultura hispanica, 
1919-38, thirty-five volumes. 

From a duplicate collection of two thousand history books at the Law 
Library of the University of Michigan, we were given the privilege of selecting 
at a nominal price, the ones we could use. We secured among other items 
a number of the publications of the Societe de THistoire de France which have 
long been desired and which if bought from the Society are expensive. 

The addition of the subject of Anthropology to the curriculum necessi- 
tated the purchase of a number of books. Although it was found, when the 
holdings of the Library were compared with a bibliography of the subject, 
that we already had a good working collection, we lacked many important 
series and special studies. By exchange we secured publications from the 
University of Pennsylvania Museum and the Southwest Museum at Los 
Angeles; by purchase, the publications of the American Museum of Natural 
History, the Field Museum, Yale and Columbia Universities. The gift from 
Dr. Jenness, previously mentioned, materially helps to strengthen the collection 
and other fundamental works have been purchased. 

The Catalogue 

At the close of the year the work of this Department was well in hand 
although the pressure of work at the beginning was unusual. During the 
summer, part of the time of the catalogue staff, who are not on vacation, is 
consumed in substituting for other members of the staff who are away. 
Vacations are planned so that there are always three members of the staff 
at work daily throughout the summer but the regular routine is broken. 
Consequently when a large number of books arrive in June, as happened last 
year, September finds the cataloguers with an accumulation of work. The 
gift of 618 volumes of French books received late in the previous year were 
bound during the summer and waiting to have cards made, the books marked 
and sent to the French House library or to the stacks. The books purchased 
by Professor Gillett in South America were also waiting to be catalogued 
together with an accumulation of new books received during the summer. 
It was several months before the Department caught up with its work. 

In September the Mathematics Department was moved to its new 
quarters in Dalton Hall. This involved the remarking of some of the books, 
making book cards for several hundred volumes and the typing of a special 
shelf list of over fifteen hundred cards. A special assistant was employed for 
a month to do this work. 

When the Geology Library was moved to the new Science Building the 
Department desired a number of changes made in the classification of the 



42 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

books. In consultation with the Head Cataloguer, the new assistant in charge 
of the libraries of the Science Department, made these changes. The books 
had to be remarked and the numbers on all the catalogue cards changed. The 
subject catalogue for the Geology Library which was begun last year was 
finished in February by an N. Y. A. student. It was also decided to remove 
from the main library catalogue certain so'called "analytic cards," e. g. cards 
made for parts of a long set of volumes, and to file them in the department 
catalogue where they will be more useful. 

The typing of subject cards for the Biology Library was started and 1,078 
were finished. A catalogue for the Mathematics Library was also begun and 
2,394 cards made. Both of these projects are being carried on by N. Y. A. 
students and as the time they give us is limited the work goes slowly. As the 
students were unfamiliar with the work considerable time was spent by a 
trained cataloguer in teaching them and revising their work until they attained 
such proficiency that the revision could be turned over to the Science Librarian. 

In my last report the plan of including the catalogue cards of Haverford 
College Library was described. Over nineteen thousand cards were filed last 
year and over fourteen thousand this year. We have also copied over a thousand 
of the Haverford cards of new accessions. Thus we have added to the resources 
of our Library nearly thirty-five thousand titles which we do not possess. There 
is still a gap of over two years from February 1936 to March 1938 for which 
we do not have the Haverford cards but we hope to secure these soon. 

We have continued to cooperate with the Union Library Catalogue of 
the Philadelphia area by sending to it the cards for our new accessions. The 
number of cards sent during the year was 3,541. 

A much needed and wholesome overhauling of the libraries of the halls 
has been undertaken which has burdened the Department with the thankless 
task of undoing its work and reversing the process by which books are added 
to the Library. A survey of the libraries of five halls led to the elimination of 
three hundred duplicate volumes which were out of date and were only an 
encumbrance. The opening of Rhoads Hall South entailed the establishment 
of another library; 170 volumes were purchased and a catalogue made. 

The statistical summary of the work of this department for the year is 

as follows: 1937-38 1938-39 

Titles catalogued 3,166 3,222 

Volumes, copies and editions added 3,816 3,117 

Volumes recatalogued 508 61 

Cards added to main catalogue 18,070 17,758 

Cards added to department catalogues 4,207 9,172 

Cards sent to Union Catalogue 3,816 3,541 

Haverford cards for new accessions, copied... 1,342 

Haverford cards for old accessions, filed 19,220 14,245 

Binding and Periodicals 

On July 1, 1938, there were 973 volumes at the binders. Thirty-seven 
hundred and sixty-three volumes were sent during the year, 3,560 were 
returned bound, leaving 203 at the binders June 30, 1939. Of the volumes 
which were bound, 1,313 were new books supplied unbound, 1,130 were 
volumes of periodicals and 1,117 were old books needing rebinding. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 43 

The Library regularly receives 788 periodicals and ten newspapers. Of 
this number, 707 periodicals and seven newspapers are purchased; eightyone 
periodicals and three newspapers come as gift. This is a net gain of 148 
titles since the last count in 1934. During the period a number of periodicals 
were discontinued or ceased publication but others have taken their place. 
The increase in numbers shows our ever widening interests. 

Circulation and Reference 

The circulation of books shows an increase in the number of volumes 
registered at the Loan Desk and in the Department Libraries. This is due to 
the enlargement of the student body and to the inclusion of the circulation 
statistics of the libraries of the Science Departments which have never been 
included in our record. No figures are kept for the use of books in the libraries 
of the halls or those sent to the Reserve Book Room after they have once been 
deposited there. If these figures were included in our circulation, as in many 
libraries, our statistics would be considerably increased. 

Record of volumes, circulated: 1937-38 1938-39 

July 653 875 

August 441 473 

September 4,118 1,968 

October .: 4,644 5,846 

November 3,494 3,985 

December 2,687 3,465 

January 4,932 5,3 53 

February 4,277 4,985 

March 3,994 4,394 

April 3,762 4,794 

May 3,093 4,088 

June : 1,184 1,187 

37,279 41,413 
Of the total circulation, 7,680 volumes were placed on reserve in the 

Seminaries and in the Reserve Room. Statistics show that the faculty and 

staff borrowed 19% of the total, the students 62%, and the reserves account 

for the remaining 19%. 

The following table indicates the circulation of books by classes, exclud' 

ing the books sent to the reserves. 

Bibliography and General Periodicals (bound) 471 volumes 

Philosophy and Psychology .._ _ 2,201 

Religion and Church History 1,012 

Economics, Sociology, Education 3,583 

Philology 83 3 

Natural Sciences 2,574 

Applied Arts 302 

Fine Arts 2,272 

Literature 16,096 

History and Biography 4,389 

33,73 3 volumes 

Throughout the year, the Reference Librarian has helped the students and 

faculty increasingly with their special problems. There is no phase of the 

activity of the Library which is of greater importance and none on which the 

Library is more frequently complimented than our reference work. 



44 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Inter-Library Loan 

The Union Catalogue of Philadelphia continually demonstrates its useful' 
ness as an aid to the location of books. As the requests for inter-library loans 
are increasing, we turn to it more often for information and the promptness 
with which our inquiries are answered is most gratifying. 

We have borrowed 246 volumes from thirtythree institutions during the 
year. This figure, however, only partially indicates the number of books belong' 
ing to other libraries actually used, for many of our students go to the libraries 
in the vicinity and bring back books of which we have no record. Seventy 
letters were sent asking for the loan of books at the request of members of the 
faculty, sixty for graduate students and fiftyone for undergraduates. Letters 
of introduction to other libraries were given to 136 students and faculty. 

To twenty 'three libraries we have sent 108 volumes on inteflibrary loan. 

Science Libraries 

The appointment of a new assistant to take charge of the five libraries of 
the Science Departments has provided a much needed service both to the 
faculty and students as well as to the libraries. Formerly one of the Loan Desk 
assistants visited Dalton Hall once a week to check up the books but there 
was no systematic supervision nor any assistance given to those using the 
libraries. Miss Van Sickle, the new appointee, spends her entire time between 
the new Science Building and Dalton Hall, and the efficient service she is 
giving has the unqualified endorsement of all the Science Departments. 

Miss Van Sickle has made the following report of the work for the year: 

The circulation of books in the libraries of all the Science Departments 
was 2,242 volumes. Eight hundred and twentythree were taken out by 
faculty and staff, 1,091 by students and 328 were placed on the reserve book 
shelves but no statistics kept of their use. 

Bibliographies were compiled for graduate students and faculty upon 
request; twelve for Geology, ten for Biology, seven for Chemistry, two for 
Physics and one for the Latin Department on the Geology of Rome. 

Three collections of books were assembled, the largest being on the 
Geology of Southeastern Pennsylvania for the use of the graduate students in 
Geology. At the occasion of the dedication of the new Science Building, books 
by members of the faculty, former students and Bryn Mawr doctor's disserta- 
tions on Chemistry and Geology were collected and displayed in the Library. 

Information about new books is supplied and orders are filled out and 
turned over to the Head Librarian. Attending to requests for inter'library 
loans, verifying references and delivering the books after they are received 
at the main library are other services which save time for the faculty. 

Miss Van Sickle has revised the cards typed by N. Y. A. students for 
the department catalogues and filed the cards. She has assisted in collecting 
and preparing the unbound periodicals for binding. 

In the fall with the help of an N. Y. A. student an inventory was taken 
of the libraries of the Science Departments. It has been impossible to do this 
for several years due to the very crowded condition of the libraries before 
they were moved into new quarters. The following table gives the number of 
missing volumes. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 45 

1933 Inventory Physics Biology Chemistry Geology Maps 

4 5 (bound) 5 11 (bound) 22 
16 (unbound) 9 (unbound) 

1938 Inventory 17 9 (bound) 8 23 (bound) 109 
25 (unbound) 48 (unbound) 



Total 21 14 (bound) 13 34 (bound) 131 

41 (unbound) 57 (unbound) 

Financial Statement 

Library appropriation for 1938-39 $15,000.00 

Receipts from course book fines, academic records, late 

registration and library fines 281.80 

Unappropriated balance from 1937-38 316.00 

Total income $ 1 5,597.80 

Appropriations were made as follows: 

Regular, to departments $13,075.00 

Special, to departments 2,340.00 

Total appropriated .'. $ 1 5,4 1 5 .00 



Unappropriated balance $ 182.80 

Special Library Funds 

Receipts were as follows: 

Invested funds (listed in Treasurer's report) $2,423.77 

Gifts (listed in Treasurer's report) 755.00 

Duplicate Book Fund 300.00 

Sale of books 1 44. 54 



$3,623.31 



Summary of Expenditures 



1937-38 1938-39 

For books $8,304.71 $9,494.21 

For periodicals and continuations 5,489.39 4,416.63 

For binding 2,566.62 3,647.10 

For supplies 720.10 766.16 

For postage, express 57.72 57.88 



$17,138.54 $18,381.98 

Administration 

The outstanding event of the year was the completion of the plans for 
the new addition to the Library Building and the beginning of its construction 
in June. The new part is to be known as the Quita Woodward Memorial Wing 
and will contain a memorial room, added stack space, new offices, seminary 
rooms and a large class room for the Art and Archaeology Departments. Since 
but one third of the stacks are to be finished, only the 700s can be moved 
which will not relieve the congestion in the old stacks to any great extent. 

There were no changes in the personnel of the staff during the period 
of this report. In June Mrs. Maud Haskell Slagle, Assistant Cataloguer, asked 
for a year's leave of absence. Miss Grace E. Elliott, A.B. Westhampton 



46 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

College and graduate of the Drexel Institute Library School, Class of 1939, 
was appointed in her place to carry on the work for the coming year. 

Twentytwo students were employed for the Reserve Book Room and 
the libraries of the halls. Seven N. Y. A. students were given work at the 
Loan Desk or in the cataloguing room. 

The Library was represented by the Librarian at the Pennsylvania State 
meeting in October, at the meeting of Eastern College Librarians in November 
and at the A. L. A. in June at San Francisco. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation to the members of the 
staff for their support and devotion to the interests of the Library. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOIS A. REED, 

Librarian. 



REPORT OF THE COLLEGE PHYSICIAN 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic 
year 1938-39. 

There was considerably more illness among the students in the year just 
past than in any previous year during the service of the present Infirmary 
staff. A form of grippe, or mild influenza, was prevalent in Philadelphia and 
the surrounding country in the winter and spring. Many such cases occurred 
on the campus, the largest number in February, when thirty-seven required 
admission to the Infirmary. The increase in the number of students was also 
responsible in part for the greater amount of work done by the department. 
The following table shows the increase in work graphically: 









Aver. 


Aver. Daily 


Total 






Total 


Total 


Stay per 


Number of 


Dis- 


Total 




Infirmary 


Infirmary 


Patient 


Patients in 


pensary 


Dispensary 


Year 


Admissions 


Days 


in Days 


Infirmary 


Cases 


Visits 


1934-35 


226 


55234 


2.4 


2.2 


No record 


2,557 


1935-36 


258 


739l/ 2 


2.9 


2.9 


1,539 


3,248 


1936-37 


245 


79514 


3.2 


3.1 


1,306 


2,492 


1937-38 


301 


811 


2.7 


3.2 


1,736 


2,915 


1938-39 


398 


1,230|4 


3.1 


4.8 


1,871 


3,167 



Staff 

The staff of the Infirmary for the year 1938-39 was as follows: 
Frederick C. Sharpless, M.D., General Consultant 
Earl D. Bond, M.D., Consultant in Psychiatry and Mental Hygiene 
Olga Cushing Leary, M.D., College Physician 
Genevieve M. Stewart, M.D., Attending Psychiatrist 
Mary F. Slavin, B.S., B.N., Head Nurse 
Elizabeth S. Cook, R.N., General Duty Nurse 
Mary L. Hamilton, R.N., General Duty Nurse 
Lavina S. Towey, R.N., General Duty Nurse 
Dorothy Holt Hadley, A.B., Technician and Secretary 

All the members of the staff will continue to hold their positions in the 
coming year. 

Miss Hadley, who has been with the Infirmary on half time for some years 
past, is to start on full time in the autumn of 1939. The larger number of stu- 
dents has caused a marked increase in the necessary record keeping and clerical 
work, and Miss Hadley can no longer complete this on a half-time schedule. 

The Infirmary is very fortunate in its nursing staff. There have been 
repeated comments throughout the year from patients and parents, not only 
as to the efficiency of the nurses but also as to how pleasant they are in 
dealing with patients. 

[47] 



48 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Infirmary 

The list of diagnoses made in the 398 cases admitted to the Infirmary is 
appended to this report. The increase in Infirmary admissions for this year, as 
has been stated, is attributable primarily to the large number of cases of grippe, 
or mild influenza. There were also twenty more admissions for gastroenteritis 
this year than last. A number of these cases probably represented gastro- 
intestinal influenza rather than the type of gastroenteritis seen in other years. 

The most serious cases seen during the past year were three of "atypical 
pneumonia" of the type described by Dr. Hobart Reimann (J. A. M. A. 
111:2377-2384, December 24, 1938). Dr. Reimann was called as consultant 
for one of these cases and stated that it was similar to those on which his 
paper was based, and further cases seen by him at the Jefferson Hospital 
during the winter of 1938-39. It is interesting to note that Dr. D. F. Smiley 
and other members of the Cornell University Health Service have reported 
eighty-six similar cases seen at the Cornell University Infirmary from October 
1937 to January 1939 (J. A. M. A. 112:1901-1904, May 13, 1939). They 
have applied the term "acute interstitial pneumonitis" to this disease, which 
they believe to be probably identical with that described by Dr. Reimann. 
The three patients seen at Bryn Mawr were severely ill. All, however, made 
uneventful recoveries, although the period required for recuperation was long. 

It will be noted from the table given at the beginning of this report that 
the average daily infirmary census increased to practically five patients a day. 
On two occasions the daily census reached thirteen patients, which meant that 
not only was every infirmary bed occupied, but also the office of the Attending 
Psychiatrist had to be taken over as a patient's room. Since the number of 
undergraduates will increase again next year, it is clear that additional beds 
must be provided. As this report is being prepared (June 1939), plans for 
remodeling the Infirmary are being considered. The suggested bed capacity is 
seventeen, an allowance of three beds per hundred students, as advised by the 
American Student Health Association. This figure includes two beds for gradu- 
ate students. Because of the difficulty of planning the best and most economical 
revision of the present building it will probably seem wiser to postpone major 
alterations until the summer of 1940, which will allow adequate time for 
consideration. If so, a temporary increase in bed capacity can be effected by 

(a) asking the nurse on duty at night to sleep in the treatment room 
when the Infirmary is crowded, 

(b) putting two beds in the present ground floor kitchen, now unused 
as the nurses no longer eat on the ground floor, and 

(c) housing the maids elsewhere and putting two beds in their room. 
The bed capacity would thus be increased to seventeen beds without taking 
over the Psychiatrist's office. Such provision should be adequate for the 
coming winter. This plan does not offer a permanent solution, however, as 
the arrangement of beds under it makes the nursing much more difficult and 
strenuous than it should be. 

Owing to the great amount of illness, it would have been impossible for the 
Infirmary to function without the third general duty nurse who was added to 
the staff this year. Even so, it was necessary to supplement our nursing staff by 



REPORT OF THE COLLEGE PHYSICIAN 49 

calling in an outside general duty nurse for several fairly long periods. When 
the number of patients in the Infirmary reaches eight or nine, it is clear that the 
Infirmary nurse, on twentyfour hours duty, may be called several times in the 
night; so much loss of rest will prevent her working to full capacity the next 
day. Under such circumstances a night nurse is put on. Also, extra nursing is 
frequently required because in the present building patients must be housed on 
two floors when the Infirmary is full. However, the cost of extra nursing, even 
in the past year, remained less than the salary of an additional full-time general 
duty nurse. Therefore, it is proposed to continue with the present system 
which works very satisfactorily, until such time as it becomes clear that it will 
be more economical to add another general duty nurse to the permanent staff. 

Dispensary 

As in previous years, the Dispensary was under the very able charge of 
Miss Mary Slavin, the Head Nurse. The table given at the beginning of this 
report shows the increase in the number of Dispensary cases and visits during 
the past year. The figures do not represent the total increase, however, as most 
patients are admitted to the Infirmary from the Dispensary, and these admis- 
sions are not recorded as Dispensary cases. The list of Dispensary diagnoses is 
not appended to this report, as the Infirmary diagnoses show for what types of 
illness students are treated. The most important part of the work done in the 
Dispensary is of course preventive, both the giving of advice designed to keep 
patients well, and the use of various prophylactic measures to ward off illness. 

One of Miss Hadley's new duties will be to see that patients, both 
students and employees, return when they should for periodic examinations, 
supervision and treatment. This will give Miss Slavin and the College 
Physician more time to devote to Dispensary and Infirmary patients. 

Mental Hygiene 

Dr. Genevieve M. Stewart has just completed her second year as Attend- 
ing Psychiatrist. This year has served to confirm abundantly the great value 
to the College of her addition to the medical staff. Dr. Stewart has held 
regular office hours at the Infirmary one afternoon a week. However, the 
requests to consult her have been so frequent that she has often had to spend 
part of another day at the College, and there is little question but that it will 
become necessary to ask her to increase her regular time at the College in the 
course of the next year or so. Her presence at the Infirmary has made it 
easily possible for the wardens and other officers of administration to consult 
her as to the best methods of procedure in handling students, and they have 
availed themselves of this opportunity as freely as her time would permit. 

Dr. Stewart's report of the year's work follows: 

In the second year in which an Attending Psychiatrist has given 
regular service at the Infirmary the volume of work increased over the 
first year to a total of 146 interviews. Of the forty-six students seen 
(nineteen in 1937-38) fifteen were referred by Dr. Leary, six by the 
Dean's office, eight by wardens, two were carried over from the previous 
year. Two were requested by the Psychiatrist following freshman inter- 
views and thirteen students voluntarily sought advice. We have con- 
tinued to encourage voluntary requests for interviews. Twenty of the 



50 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

students were one-interview cases, most of the others required two-four 
appointments, but two students came on twelve occasions and one girl 
totaled twenty interviews. Of these three, there were two who benefitted 
and were able to do adequate work with the psychiatric help obtained, 
the third girl also claimed improvement, but campus behaviour continued 
to be undesirable and she was requested by the Dean's office not to return 
this year. In addition to these persons who remained in College there 
were two students, one undergraduate and one postgraduate, in whom 
definite mental illness, depression of the manic depressive type, was 
present. Both these immediately left college to be placed under psychiatric 
care. It is a pleasant followup note that both girls are recovered suffi' 
ciently to resume academic work this fall. One has returned to Bryn 
Mawr. In addition, the two students most deeply engrossed in family 
difficulties voluntarily left college in mid-semester, and two others (fresh- 
men) culled themselves by inability to make satisfactory grades. Only 
seven students therefore interviewing the Psychiatrist in 1938-39 had a 
break in the continuity of their academic work. It is doubtful if two 
others could have continued their work without psychiatric aid. The 
minor personality disturbances do not greatly incapacitate the persons 
affected. Yet they do lessen efficiency, lower morale, and render those 
who suffer from them less capable of living satisfactory lives. 

Five lectures in Mental Hygiene were given to sophomores as part 
of the Hygiene course. Dr. Earl D. Bond, Psychiatric Consultant to the 
College, gave the concluding one of the series. At Miss Park's request 
some remarks were made by the Attending Psychiatrist to the wardens 
at a luncheon meeting to indicate obvious symptoms most commonly seen 
in personality deviations. 

A new departure this year was the short interview asking a few 
general questions of each freshman as she went the rounds of admission 
examinations. A base-line impression was obtained, and two students 
in addition to those referred by Dr. Leary or wardens were recalled for 
further interview. Some of the later troubles were anticipated, and 
especial note was made of the ease with which later appointments could 
be made for a student to see the College Psychiatrist. 

It should be mentioned that in a large measure the success of this 
venture is due to the enthusiastic cooperation not only of the Infirmary 
and Dr. Leary in particular, but also of the Dean's office and the 
wardens in the halls. 

Tuberculosis Survey 

The routine tuberculosis survey was carried out for the fourth successive 
year, and a summary of it is appended to this report. One freshman was 
found to have early tuberculosis, and was advised to withdraw. She left 
college at the start of the Christmas holiday, going home for bed rest under 
medical supervision. One upperclassman, who was found to have tubercu- 
losis in the survey of 1936, and who withdrew from college that year for 
bed rest at home, returning in 1937, showed progression of her lesion, which 
was followed by serial films made under Dr. McPhedran's supervision during 
1938-39. She withdrew from college in March 1939 and went to a sana- 
torium for pneumothorax and other care. 

Employees 

In general, the health of the employees remained good throughout the 
year. The group receiving treatment for syphilis at the Bryn Mawr Hospital 
reported quite regularly, owing to an improved system of follow-up put 
under Miss Hadley's supervision. 



REPORT OF THE COLLEGE PHYSICIAN 51 

Physical Examinations 

In carrying out the entrance examinations of freshmen, a new method 
was tried in the fall of 1938. Dr. Stewart was asked to see each student 
and go over her medical history; the student was then sent on to the College 
Physician for physical examination. This reduced the time required by each 
examiner and made it possible to arrange the examinations conveniently with 
those of the Physical Education Department. The examinations were done in 
the Gymnasium and went very smoothly. The students seemed to like the 
arrangement as it permitted them to dispose of their interviews with the 
Physical Education and Medical Departments in one session and required 
that they undress only once. The greatest advantages were, however, that 
the students met Dr. Stewart as an integral part of the Medical Department, 
and that she had an opportunity to make an estimate of each student's per' 
sonality and probable need for future attention. The arrangement will be 
continued in coming years. 

Hygiene Course 

In the spring of 1938 several students suggested to the Chairman of 
the Alumnae Committee on Health and Physical Education that more mate' 
rial on sex and marriage, and on first aid, be included in the Hygiene course. 
In response to this request, the lectures on sex, reproduction and marriage 
were increased to seven, one-quarter of the entire course. In her lectures 
on Mental Hygiene, Dr. Stewart also gave considerable time to the question 
of marriage. In general the students seemed to feel that these lectures had 
met their request, if not in full, at least in good measure. Furthermore, a 
continued effort is being made to find and place on the reserve shelf books 
which may help young people to understand the problems of preparation for, 
and adjustment in, marriage. Such purchases are paid for from a fund 
known as "Vaccination Fees and Fines." 

Through the Red Cross, a demonstration on home nursing and another 
on first aid were arranged. These demonstrations were received with 
enthusiasm by the students, and it is planned to repeat them annually. 



Infirmary Report 1938-39 

Number of Infirmary Infirmary 

Semester I. Admissions Days Hours 

September and October 49 82 12 

November _ 43 131 15 

December 31 115 6 

January 60 143 7]/ 2 

183 472 161/i 

Employees 3 8 23|/ 2 

Staff 3 8 21 

189 490 13 



52 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Semester II. 

February 60 23 3 20j/ 2 

March 47 187 5 

April 50 157 7|/ 2 

May and June 45 129 20|/ 2 

202 708 5|/ 2 

Employees _ 5 20 4 

Staff 2 _U 7j/ 2 

209 739 17 

Total Students 385 1180 22 

Total Employees 8 29 3 1/2 

Total Staff 5 20 4/ 2 

Grand Total Admissions 398 1230 6 

Sem. I. Grad. Staff '39 '40 '41 '42 Emp. 

Adms 16 3 28 33 58 48 3 

Sem. II. 

Adms 23 2 36 23 62 58 5 



39 5 64 56 120 106 8 398 

Total No. Dispensary Cases 1871 

Total No. Dispensary Visits 3167 

Diseases of the Psychobiological Unit: 

Mental Disorders: Semester I. Semester II. Total 

Anxiety State 2 2 

Examination Hysteria 2 2 

Simple Adult Maladjustment 1 1 

Diseases of the Body Generally: 

Contusions — Multiple 1 1 

Exhaustion 13 18 31 

Exhaustion — Readmitted 1 1 

Rubella 1 1 

Diseases of the Skin and Mucous Membranes: 

Abscess — Breast 1 1 

Carbuncle — Buttock 1 1 

Carbuncle — Chin 1 1 

Dermatitis Venenata 12 3 

Furunculosis — Cheek 1 l 

Infection — Cheek 1 1 

Infection — Foot 1 1 

Infection — Streptococcic — Leg 2 2 

Infection — Streptococcic — Leg — 

readmitted 1 1 

Infection — Sebaceous Cyst of Back 1 1 

Infection — Toe 1 1 

Diseases of the Musculo-Skeletal System: 

Contusion — Back 112 

Dislocation — Lateral of Left Patella 1 1 

Myositis — Quadriceps 1 1 

Myositis — Trapezoid Muscles 1 1 

Myositis — Right Thigh 1 1 

Tear — Semilunar Cartilage — Knee 2 2 4 



REPORT OF THE COLLEGE PHYSICIAN 



53 



Diseases of the Respiratory System: 

Atypical Pneumonia 1 

Bronchitis — Acute 4 

Bronchitis — Chronic 

Bronchopneumonia 2 

Common Cold 68 

Common Cold — readmitted 4 

Grippe (Influenza) 10 

Grippe — readmitted 

Laryngitis 3 

Laryngitis — readmitted - 

Sinusitis — Chronic ..- 

Diseases of the Digestive System: 

Appendicitis — Acute 

Appendicitis — Acute — readmitted 

Appendicitis — Subacute _ 

Appendicitis — Chronic Recurrent > 

Constipation with Appendiceal Irritation 

Gastritis 

Gastroenteritis 20 

Gastroenteritis — readmitted 

Gingivitis „ 

Haemorrhoids — External 

Parotitis — Epidemic 

Pharyngitis — Acute 

Streptococcus Sore Throat 

Tonsillitis — Acute 

Tonsillitis — Streptococcic 

Vincent's Angina of Tonsil 

Diseases of the Urinary System: 

Pyelitis 

Diseases of the Genital System: 

Gonococcal Salpingitis (Employee) 

Diseases of the Eye: 

Blepharitis 

Conjunctivitis _ _ 

Conjunctivitis due to Thianyl Chloride... 
Hordeolum 



Diseases of the Ear: 

Otitis Media, acute, nonsuppurative 

Undiagnosed Diseases Classified by Symptoms: 

Dysmenorrhea _ 

Eye Strain 

Headache 

Menorrhagia 2 

Non-Diagnostic Terms for Record: 

Basal Metabolic Rate Determinations.. 10 

Observation _ 4 

Post'Operative Care — 

Appendectomy 1 

Extraction — Third Molar 1 

Removal of Sebaceous Cyst 1 

Grand Total 





4 


1 


1 




2 


49 


117 


1 


5 


50 


60 


1 


1 


3 


6 




1 


1 


1 


4 


5 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 




1 




7 


27 


47 


1 


1 


1 


2 




1 


3 


3 




1 


2 


2 


I 


1 


1 


2 




1 



19 



.398 



54 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Report of the Tuberculosis Survey for the Academic Year Ending June, 1939 

Summary 
Number of students eligible for Health Service, 1938-39 514 

Tuberculin Testing: 

Number of students tuberculin tested, 1938-39 387 

Number of students not tuberculin tested, but X-ray re- 
quired 21 

Number of students who were previously positive reactors 

to tuberculin test and not retested 102 

Number of students who were not tuberculin tested because 

they were not in college at time of tests 4 

514 

Results of Tuberculin Testing: 

Total number of students tested, 1938-39 387 

Number found to be positive to test, 1938-39 97 

Number found to be negative to test, 1938-39 „ 290 

387 

Number of known positive reactors to tuberculin test 

still in college, 1938-39 102 

Number of new positive reactors found, 1938-39 97 

Total number of known positive reactors in college, 

1938-39 199 

Percentage of all students under tuberculosis program who 

were known positive reactors, 1938-39 40.49% 

X>Rays: 

Number of students X-rayed at college during survey 208 

Number of students X-rayed elsewhere, and reports filed at 

college - 12 

Total number of students receiving X-ray of chest in 1938-39 220 

%'Ray Results: 

Number considered to show no pulmonary lesions by X-ray 

methods - 194 

Number showing apparently healed primary infections 22 

Number showing X-ray findings suggestive of re-infection 

( "adult") type tuberculosis 2 

Number showing clinically active, progressive tuberculosis 2 

220 

Number of students who withdrew from college because of 

tuberculosis, 1938-39 2 

I am most grateful to the officers of administration and to the other 
members of the Infirmary staff for their cooperation and assistance during the 
past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

OLGA CUSHING LEARY, M.D., 

College Physician. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE 
EDUCATIONAL SERVICE 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic 
year 1938-39. 

The work of the Educational Service increased in both amount and 
interest during the year. The number of children studied individually rose 
from 85 to 104, with the largest increase in the group of public school 
children referred by the superintendent and principals for examination and 
suggested programs. 

The children referred by both public and private school authorities pre 
sented a variety of difficulties and needs. A rough classification of the fifty- 
four public and nine private school children referred because of some psycho- 
educational problem shows: about 25% with emotional difficulties which 
were apparently preventing satisfactory school adjustment; about 25% 
mentally retarded; about 25% with difficulty in reading; about 10% with 
defects in speech, vision, or hearing; and about 15% with problems of school 
adjustment because of extraordinarily good ability. In the cases of the first 
group with evident emotional complications the children were referred else- 
where for psychiatric study and aid. In the cases of the other groups rec- 
ommendations for the child's program were made and if necessary remedial 
work was undertaken or outlined with the child's teachers. 

For the year 1938-39 an assistant was appointed on a part-time basis, 
to be paid from the Educational Service Fund built up through fees from 
private cases. In January, however, she was released to take a full-time 
position, and a new appointment was deferred until the new academic year. 

The following tabulation shows how the work of the year was divided : 

Work With Public School Children 

Assistant 
and 
Students Volunteer Director Total 

Group tests to school grades 3 15 9 

Children examined individually: 
At request of superintendent and 

principals _ _ 5 24 29 

At request of teacher or parent... 7 2 16 25 

For research projects _ 27 27 

To demonstrate methods to class* 4 4 

For practice _ 9 1 10 

Remedial lessons in reading to 8 

children! 28 25 53 

* Individual students frequently observed other studies informally, 
t Mrs. Walter Michels again gave her services for special teaching. 



56 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Work With Private School Children 

Number of Number of 

Cases Conferences Fees 
School survey by group tests with consulta' 

tion on individual children $300.00 

Psychological studies ~ 4 12 65.00 

Psychological studies with remedial work 5 105 287.50 

For the public school group nine group tests were given; ninety 'five 
children were examined individually, fiftyfour of them at the special request 
of school authorities or parents; and fiftythree remedial lessons in reading 
were given. For the private school group one school survey was made, with 
consultation on individual children; nine cases were examined, with 117 
conferences for these cases; and $652.50 was collected in fees. 

Respectfully submitted, 

KATHARINE E. McBRIDE, 
Director of the Educational Service. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE 
BUREAU OF RECOMMENDATIONS 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1938-39. 

Total Calls to the Bureau „ 309 

Teaching Positions 149 3 3 college, 101 school, 15 

tutors. 20 of the school posi- 
tions were apprentice ones and 
3 were part-time. 

Non-Teaching Positions 116 27 part-time, 22 summer, 2 

temporary. 

Small Positions 44 typing, selling, etc. 

Placements made by the Bureau _ _ 90 

Positions offered but refused by the candidate _ 10 

Total 100 

Teaching Positions: 

Full-time 8 (2 college, 6 school) 

Apprenticeship 2 

Part-time 2 (1 college, 1 school) 

Temporary 1 

Tutors „ 8 



Total 21 

Positions offered 5 

Total _ 26 

Non-Teaching Positions: 

Full-time 12 

Temporary 14 (6 summer) 

Part-time _ 9 



Total 3 5 

Positions offered 4 

Total _._ 39 

Small Positions _ 34 

Positions offered 1 

Total 3 5 

Placements in colleges were made at: 
Monticello College 
Mount Holyoke College 
The University of Rochester 



and in schools at: 



The Brearley School 
The Bryn Mawr School 
Columbus School for Girls 
Hathaway-Brown School 
Holton-Arms School 
Milton Academy 

[57] 



58 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

The comparison of the records of the Bureau in 1937-38 and 1938-39 
is as follows: 

1938-39 1937-38 

Total calls 309 302 

Placements 90 67 

Teaching calls 149 178 

Colleges 3 3 47 

Placed 3 4 

Schools 101 121 

Placed 10 26 

Tutors 15 10 

Placed 8 

Non-Teaching calls: 

Full-time or Regular part-time 116 89 

Placed 29 1 1 

Small Positions 44 3 5 

Placed 34 26 

The number of calls to the Bureau was approximately the same this 
year as last. The total number of placements was considerably larger, but 
the number of full-time placements was less, especially so in the case of 
teachers. The Bureau is suffering from the lack of teachers which every col- 
lege has been reporting for several years. We are very low, particularly in 
Mathematics, Latin and English, the three subjects most often asked for last 
year. In many more than half the number of calls the Bureau was obliged to 
say that it had no one to suggest. As opposed to last year there were more 
placements in non-teaching positions than in teaching. 

Members of the Class of 1939 who Corresponding 

have positions 1939-40: figures for 1938 

Teaching 12 12 

Miscellaneous 13 8 

Members of the Class of 1939 who are doing 

graduate work 1939-40 18 9 

Members of the Class of 1939 who are studying 

at medical school 2 

Members of the Class of 1939 who are taking 

business courses, nursing, etc 8 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUISE F. H. CRENSHAW, 

Director of the Bureau of Recommendations. 



REPORT OF THE CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
THE MADGE MILLER RESEARCH FUND 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic 
year 1938-39. 

The committee appointed by you to administer the Madge Miller 
Research Fund for the year 1938'39 informed each member of the faculty 
in October by letter that applications were in order for grants in support of 
research. 

In response to this letter the committee received applications for grants 
exceeding in amount the funds at its disposal. 

The following grants were made: 

Grant Number 17— William L. Doyle 

Microphotographic camera, film and chemicals $3 5.00 

Grant Number 18 — Angeline H. Lograsso 

Secretarial assistance 1 00.00 

Grant Number 19 — Fritz Mezger 

Secretarial assistance 20.00 

Grant Number 20 — Arthur C. Sprague 

Collection of references from source material 100.00 

Grant Number 21 — Roger H. Wells 

National, state and local official government documents 25.00 

Secretarial assistance - _ - _ 25.00 

Grant Number 22 — Mary Katharine Woodworth 

Photostatic reproductions of letters in the Adam 

Collection . 25.00 

Grant Number 23 — Raymond E. Zirkle 

Equipment for the quantitative measurement and 

transfer of small volumes of bacterial suspensions 200.00 
Grant Number 24 — Charles G. Fenwick 

Secretarial assistance 1 50.00 

Grant Number 25 — Arthur C. Cope 

Potentiometric temperature controller and recorder 85.00 

Grant Number 26 — Edward H. Watson 

Chemical analyses of a series of rocks 200.00 

Grant Number 27 — 

Lily Ross Taylor and T. Robert S. Broughton 

Secretarial assistance 3 5.00 

Total $1,000.00 

These eleven grants exhausted the funds at the disposal of the 
committee. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DAVID HILT TENNENT, 

Chairman of the Committee. 

[59] 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL 
EXCAVATIONS AT G6ZLO KULE, TARSUS 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

The last report on the excavations was submitted while the second, or 
autumn, campaign of 1938 was in progress. Field work was discontinued in 
January 1939, but photography and completion of records continued for 
several weeks after. The purpose of substituting a fall campaign for one in 
the following spring (1939) was to leave 1939 free for uninterrupted study 
of the material. In view of present European conditions the change was wise 
as it permitted a few extra weeks of work at Tarsus which would have been 
denied us later in the year. 

By the end of the season, three major building complexes were exposed 
in the trenches. The earliest, belonging to the first part of the 3rd millenium 
B.C., consisted of a fortification wall, entered by an L-shaped gateway, with 
houses and streets inside the circuit. The mud-brick walls were preserved 
for over 2 m. in height. The same architectural plan was in use for many 
generations, with only the slight alterations of gradual rebuilding and repair. 
Pottery is a sensitive indicator of historical events and the basis for much 
of our knowledge of early history; the sherds and pots from this unit indi' 
cated close relationship with Troy and the western Anatolian region and 
prove an early penetration of that culture south of the Taurus mountains 
and possibly even the racial unity of Anatolia in the 3rd millenium. The 
prevalent use of bone for household objects and tools showed that the copper 
industry was in its infancy. 

A still earlier phase of this unit, which ended in a great conflagration, 
is already visible and awaits excavation. Samples of pottery were obtained 
from the lower level; some ot the pots were archaic versions of the types 
from the strata above, but others were entirely different — thick, hand-made 
incised wares showing Cypriote connections. Further work in the unit should 
reveal an interesting and important commentary on the foreign influences 
in Cilicia. 

The two Hittite units were mentioned in the last report when they were 
still being uncovered. The large temple building, closely paralleled at Bogazkoy, 
the capitol city of the Hittite kingdom, is the only one of its kind yet found 
outside of central Anatolia. The second complex had been expanded during 
successive seasons, exposing a broad street with buildings on either side, all 
well preserved, paradoxically, by the severe conflagration that once swept the 
area and buried it under a layer of brick burned to cement-like hardness. 
One of the structures, containing a room with cribs for feeding animals, was 
analogous in plan to the American bank-barn in which the lower level is 
entered by a side door and the hay loft reached by an artificial embankment. 

New shapes were added to the repertory of Hittite pottery. The most 
important of the several bullas found was stamped with a bilingual cylinder 
seal in both cuneiform and hieroglyphs. An outstanding find was a perfectly 

[60} 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL EXCAVATIONS 61 

preserved lance head, about a foot long, of the socketed type used by the 
Hittites. 

Before leaving Tarsus, arrangements were made for the care of the 
excavation in the event of a European war. All plans, photographs and 
records were brought to America, as well as the drawings of bulks and seals 
which give a complete record of linguistic documents found at Tarsus. The 
complete or restored pots, all the seals and bullas, the important small finds 
(lamps, terracottas, glass, etc.) were transferred to the Adana Museum, where 
they are under official protection. Other objects and the boxes of sherds were 
stored and sealed in rooms, to be opened only by the Director of the Museum. 
Mr. W. S. Woolworth, Director of the Tarsus American College, has kindly 
taken charge of many matters during the absence of the excavation staff. 
Respectfully submitted, 

HETTY GOLDMAN, 
Director of the Archaeological Excavations at Tarsus. 



REPORT OF THE CHAIRMAN OF THE 
SUMMER SCHOOL BOARD 

To the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the year 1938-39 : 

The college representatives of the Board of the Bryn Mawr Summer 
School remained the same as in the previous year: Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, 
Mary Coolidge, Eleanor Dulles, Josephine Goldmark, Agnes Brown Leach 
and Hilda Smith; the representatives of Women in Industry: Rose Schneider- 
man, Mabel Leslie, Matilda Lindsay and Edith Christenson; the faculty repre- 
sentative, Amy Hewes; the student representative, Sally Russian. The President 
of the College continued to act as Chairman both of the Board and the 
Executive Committee, and Miss Dulles as Treasurer. 

The Board held two important all-day meetings in the first half of the 
year. The annual meeting on November 19th was prefaced by reports from 
the Associate Directors of the School, Miss Carter and Miss Gilmore, on the 
summer session of 1938, and then given over to an earnest discussion of 
the future plans of the School. The lengthy survey prepared by Professor 
Fairchild and Miss Florence Hemley at the request of the Board was presented. 
It fell into two parts, the first a study of the most commonly used forms of 
workers' education in this country, with special emphasis on what workers' 
organizations were themselves developing in general and local groups; the 
second, the history of the Bryn Mawr Summer School from 1929, when a 
study of the early school, to 1938, was published by Hilda Smith and Helen 
Hill. An estimate was also attempted of its value to individuals, to organized 
labor, especially since 1933 when many more industrial women were organized, 
to the whole problem of adult education and to Bryn Mawr College. The 
survey was accepted by the Board as of lasting interest and value, and its 
material provided facts for the discussion of plans. 

A second meeting of the Board was held on Sunday, December 17th, 
and again gave itself over to discussion preparatory to a final decision on 
the future of the School. This decision is stated in the following resolution: 

"In view of the fact that with coming changes in administration at 
Bryn Mawr College, it seems impossible to proceed with definite plans 
for the Summer School, and that the need for an immediate, long range 
plan is imperative, the Board of Directors of the Summer School proposes 
to carry on its program elsewhere than on the college campus, beginning 
this summer. 

"Therefore at this time the Board of Directors of the Summer School 
wishes to express to the Directors of Bryn Mawr College its appreciation 
of the notable contribution made by President Thomas and Bryn Mawr 
College, in initiating the School in 1921, thereby laying the foundation 
for a rapidly growing movement in workers 1 education, and also for the 
support given by the college during the past eighteen years. This sup- 
port has included not only the use of the college campus and equipment, 
the active help of members of the college faculty and staff, but also the 
wise and generous assistance of President Thomas and President Park, 
whose leadership has guaranteed freedom of thought and expression as 
the condition of the enterprise. The Summer School Board of Directors 
is appreciative of President Park's long and actively expressed interest 

[62] 



REPORT OF THE CHAIRMAN OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL BOARD 63 

in the School, and especially of her contribution as Chairman of the 
Summer School Board during the past three years. In the light of her 
thorough knowledge and understanding of the School, she has inter' 
preted its policies and given wise direction to the development of admin' 
istration and teaching. Everyone in the School group of students, faculty 
and Directors values the contribution she has made to the workers' 
education movement. 

"The Summer School Board hopes that the accomplishments of these 
years are a source of as deep gratification to the college as they are 
to the Board. The report of Miss Florence Hemley, under the direction 
of Dr. Mildred Fairchild of the Carola Woerishoffer Graduate Depart- 
ment, makes clear the widespread influence of the school. Not only has 
the education of some 1500 women workers been made possible, but 
many of them have played effective roles in industrial relations, in pro' 
gressive legislation and in workers 1 education throughout the United 
States. 

"The Summer School Board is convinced that these activities must 
be further promoted, even though the School no longer occupies the 
Bryn Mawr campus, and it hopes that a relationship of good will and 
understanding in the furthering of similar aims will be maintained between 
the new School and Bryn Mawr College.'" 

A committee of the Board, Miss Smith, Mrs. Leach, Miss Leslie, Miss Carter 
and the Chairman, was asked to meet with the Executive Committee of the 
Bryn Mawr Board of Directors, which had been empowered to act for the 
College Board, and to present the resolution. This joint meeting was held 
in Philadelphia on January 6, 1939, and the resolution presented by Miss 
Leslie. The Executive Committee of the College, in accepting the decision 
of the Summer School Board, expressed its appreciation of the work of the 
Summer School in its sessions at Bryn Mawr and in the help it had given 
to the cause of workers' education in the country at large. The Committee 
believed that Bryn Mawr had gained much in the many years of association 
with the School. It acquiesced in the feeling of the Summer School Board 
that the time had come when the growth of the School demanded wider scope 
than a college campus could give, and wished the School the greatest success 
in its new venture. 

The further proceedings of the Summer School Board during the winter 
and spring, which included the legal processes of obtaining a charter for the 
Hudson Shore Labor School, the organization of the board for the new School, 
and the many arrangements for the first summer session of the School at 
West Park, New York, are not properly part of the report of the Chairman 
of the Bryn Mawr Summer School to the Board of the College. 

The Board of the Hudson Shore Labor School was notified in March 
that the Directors of the College, on the recommendation of the Executive 
Committee, had voted that the Dorothy Whitney Straight Fund, a gift of 
$10,000 made to the College in 1922 by Dorothy Whitney Straight (now 
Mrs. Leonard Elmhirst), should be paid over to the Hudson Shore School 
provided Mrs. Elmhirst or her agents agreed to this arrangement. As the 
income of this fund had been designated originally for the use of the Bryn 
Mawr Summer School and as the Hudson Shore School will continue to 
function for the same purpose of giving education to women workers in 
industry, it was believed that the original purpose of the gift could best be 



64 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

served by transferring the fund to the newly organized School. The permis' 
sion of Mrs. Elmhirst was later received through her attorney, Miss Anna 
Bogue, and the action of the Bryn Mawr Board was carried out by the 
Treasurer of the College in June 1939. 

The College T^ews of January 11, 1939, and the Alumnae Bulletin of Feb- 
ruary and of March 1939 contain fuller statements of the important change 
described briefly in this report. It may interest the Board to know that three 
of the representatives of the College on the Bryn Mawr Summer School Board, 
Mrs. Leach, Miss Smith and the President, have been elected to the Board 
of the new School, and that Mrs. Leach and Miss Park are on the Executive 
Committee. A report of the extremely successful first session of the new School 
will be forthcoming in the T^ews and the Bulletin. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARION EDWARDS PARK, 
Chairman of the Summer School Board. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 

to 
THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

of 
BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

for the year 
1939-40 



Published by Bryn Mawr College 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

December, 1940 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Report of the President of the College 5 

Supplement I, Changes in the Academic Staff 1? 

Supplement II, Faculty Publications 17 

Report of the Dean of the College 21 

Supplement, Statistics of Undergraduate Students 24 

Report of the Dean of the Graduate School 26 

Report of the Director-in-Residence and Editor of Publications 33 

Report of the Librarian :. 41 

Report of the College Physician 48 

Report of the Director of the Educational Service 52 

Report of the Director of the Bureau of Recommendations 55 

Report of the Chairman of the Committee on the 

Madge Miller Research Fund 57 

Report of the Director of the Archaeological Excavations 

at GozLii Kule, Tarsus - 58 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 

To the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1939-40. 

I begin with two explanations. First, the fiscal year runs from July first 
to June thirtieth; the chronicled history makes more sense if the summer 
following the academic winter is associated with it. This report therefore runs 
from the opening of college in 1939 to the beginning of the present college 
year. Second, my own report and those of the other members of the staff are 
deliberately written as though the College were unaffected by the apprehen- 
sions and disturbance of the year. The campus was on the contrary deeply 
affected and all thought and work sobered by the increasing pressure of the 
international situation. In presenting to the Board the reports of the various 
members of the staff which it employs, however, it has seemed to us proper to 
give you our brief record and ask you to take the complicating background 
for granted. 

From this restricted point of view any college president might pray for 
such a year as this has been at Bryn Mawr, neither spectacular on the one 
side nor dull on the other. In the steady unrolling of the plan made in 1931 
it has been important. That part of the plan which was based on an increase 
in undergraduate numbers advanced ahead of schedule; that part which was 
devised to heighten the quality of the academic work as well as to increase its 
quantity and therefore called for the construction or reconstruction of build- 
ings was forwarded by the coming into use during the year of the Mrs. Otis 
Skinner Theatre Workshop, by the completion of the Quita Woodward Wing 
of the Library, and by the enlargement and beautifying of the 1905 Infirmary, 
whose complicated blue prints began to come alive the day after Commence- 
ment and which was ready for use for the medical examinations preceding 
the opening of the College in September. 

Our careful timetable, in accordance with which we filled Rhoads South 
with students last year, had set one half the capacity of Rhoads North as 
our limit in 1939-40. The members of the Admission Committee when they 
met in July 1939, however, had found so many good applicants on their lists 
and had seen so many vacant rooms open before them that they wisely 
enlarged their ideas, recognizing the principle of the bird in the hand and 
knowing that the numbers in future classes could be adjusted to our capacity. 
They had admitted 165 new students at the opening of the College, 152 
freshmen and 13 transfer students from other colleges to be added eventually 
to the numbers of the sophomore or junior classes. Thus, while the graduate 
numbers remained about the same as last year (145), the undergraduate 
body, increased by 42, reached 495 and raised the College to the highest 
registration of its history — 640. Four hundred fifty-two undergraduates were 
in residence, leaving only 16 rooms vacant in the college halls. The number 

m 



6 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

of nonTesident students seems to be almost a constant, and the filling of all 
vacancies on the campus next year will give the College just over the five 
hundred undergraduates it set out to find. 

A look at the college statistics in the Supplement to the Dean's Report 
will show that the type of student has not changed. She is born of the same 
parents, in the same parts of the country, has gone to the same schools, gets 
herself admitted to Bryn Mawr in the same ways, and, if we look at the 
records, does the same kind of college work, or a little better. I think indeed 
it is possible to show that applications from good candidates have increased, 
encouraged perhaps by what seems to families and schools a better chance of 
admission. In other words, the College seems to have grown without sacri' 
ficing its standard of admission at any point. For the moment, however, the 
increased numbers were indisputably inconvenient. The classrooms of the new 
library wing were not yet available and the rooms at the rear of the library 
proper were either shut off or noisy, as the masons and carpenters worked 
close by; the demands on the Infirmary also have been constant and heavy, 
and as you can see between the lines of Dr. Leary's report, we have been in 
continual alarm lest a slight epidemic or some other special cause might create 
a crisis hard or even impossible to meet. Next year with the increase of beds 
in the Infirmary up to the ratio advised by the College Medical Association — 
three to every hundred students — the Dean and the Doctor will sleep more 
soundly at night. No satisfactory plan has been made for increased numbers 
using the gymnasium space or specifically for badminton or squash courts to 
be used in the winter. 

In the early spring the Mrs. Otis Skinner Dramatic Workshop came into 
use, though its formal opening was not held until the fifth and sixth of May. 
At that time the College and the Baldwin School united in pleasant exercises 
to which the alumnae and students of both, the outside subscribers to the fund 
and many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Skinner were invited. The President of 
the College presided as Chairman of the Joint Committee of the College and 
the School and spoke of the history of this joint memorial; Miss Elizabeth 
Johnson, Head of the Baldwin School, of the long and fruitful connection of 
Mrs. Skinner with both School and College; and Mr. Otis Skinner, informally 
and delightfully, of the "Art of Acting." The next evening the Players Club 
of the College took the workshop over and exhibited to its audience some of 
the many possibilities of its use. The President of the Club herself and the 
President of the Art Club said something^ of their expectations, Cornelia Otis 
Skinner gave two monologues delightful in the intimacy of the small room, 
and an original play by one of the members of Miss Latham's course in 
Playwriting was put on by the members of the class in the same fashion in 
which it would be treated in one of their own sessions. In accordance with 
the arrangements between College and School confirmed by the two Boards, 
a permanent Managing Committee has been appointed with three members 
each from College and School and three from outside chosen by the college 
and school representatives jointly. I hope very much that this Committee 
may be active not only in readjusting the small problems of the uses of the 
building, but in making it serve where it can the needs of the Bryn Mawr 
community of which we are both parts. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 7 

During the winter the building of the Quita Woodward Wing of the 
Library, begun in the previous May, went tranquilly on and it was actually 
completed in the spring. The architect and Chairman of the Buildings and 
Grounds Committee, and the Faculty Committee whose earlier work in con' 
nection with the building was so outstanding, continued to give us advice and 
suggestion through the year, and much of the final convenience of the building 
is due to their consultations, discussions and often miraculous agreements. 
It seemed wise to everyone concerned, however, even those who, like the 
librarians and the members of the faculty, suffered most from the winter's 
crowding, that the actual use of the building, entailing as it did a complicated 
plan of moving books and equipment from the library proper and the installa' 
tion of new equipment, should be postponed to the summer and an empty and 
leisurely campus. It was possible, however, just before Commencement to hold 
in the wing an exhibition of the pictures and jades belonging to Professor 
Howard L. Gray and thus allow the college community as well as many 
alumnae and outside visitors at the same time to see the many excellencies of 
the building. The moving was accomplished very expertly under the direction 
of Miss Reed and at the close of the summer the wing was ready for use. 
New paths and roads connected it with Rockefeller, Goodhart and Rhoads and 
were pleasantly smooth under the feet of the returning faculty and students. 
The Librarian in her report describes the building. It increases book capacity 
by one third, adds new faculty offices and gives new class-rooms, seminaries, 
exhibition spaces and library to the Departments of the History of Art and 
Archaeology. In the M. Carey Thomas Library it was also possible to make 
astonishing changes — a new reference room twice as large as the old has been 
created, the old reference room emerges as the Carola Woerishoffer Seminary 
of the Social Economy Department, the New Book Room becomes a Treasure 
Room to be equipped and presented to the College by the Class of 1912. 
Half way up the stairs to the Reading Room the Carola Woerishoffer Room 
changes into a second reserved book room, and opening directly out of the 
main reading room the old Art Seminary is waiting for the decision of the 
College Council to be used by some selected seekers of quiet. 

Plans for the new infirmary building were authorized by the vote of the 
Board at the December meeting and worked out with endless patience and 
care on the part of the architect, the Chairman of the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee and the various members of the college staff most concerned. I am 
very grateful that when it was obvious that the initial cost authorized by the 
Board must be increased and the Chairman of the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee presented the reasons for the changes, the new plans and the 
greater cost were accepted by the Board in the March meeting. A few gifts 
were made toward the cost, but the greater part must be thought of as an 
informal charge against the increased income from the increased number of 
students. An unbelievable improvement in the building, described in the 
report of the Dean, has come about over night. 

The Board of Directors 

It is a continued advantage to the President, the Director-in'Residence 
and the three faculty representatives on the Board that the Board of Directors 



8 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

has held its four stated meetings and many of its committee meetings at the 
Deanery. We cannot but believe that here on the campus the problems we 
meet become more vivid to the Board and the close connections between our 
interests constantly clearer. In my absence on holiday Dean Manning repre- 
sented me at the March meeting of the Board. 

The Faculty 

You will find following my report full information on the faculty and 
teaching staff who served during the current year. I should, I believe, call 
attention to the fact that for the first time in the history of the College no 
promotions in the faculty were recommended by the President, although a 
few minor increases in salary were made. This caution was due to the small 
margin in the budget for the year accepted by the Board in the spring of 
1939. In the appointments for 1940-41 this unusual situation was taken into 
account and the delayed promotions were in a number of cases made. It is, 
however, a source of discomfort to me that the College has not been able to 
make a general increase in its salaries and that individual increases of salary 
and promotions have been slowed up. 

Professor McBride presented her resignation early in the year to accept 
the deanship at Radcliffe College in September 1940. The excellent work she 
has done at Bryn Mawr in teaching, in her own research and in her direction 
of the Educational Service, a report of which is included in this President's 
Report, makes her loss to the College a very considerable one. I know by 
personal experience, however, the interest and importance of the position to 
which she goes, and I am proud that Bryn Mawr can furnish to Radcliffe 
such an excellent college officer. Again this year Professor Fenwick was 
borrowed by the State Department, first for five weeks in the winter as a 
member of the delegation to the Lima Conference, and later from early March 
to the end of the year as a member of the permanent American Neutrality 
Committee at Rio de Janeiro. Professor Kraus again gave one third of her 
time as consultant on problems of refugees to the Friends Service Committee, 
and Professor Guiton asked and obtained a leave for the entire year for war 
service in France. In addition to the regular members of the faculty an actual 
part in the year's teaching was taken by the Flexner Lecturer, Professor 
Arturo Torres-Rioseco of the University of California, who spent the first 
six weeks of the second semester at the College and in addition to his six 
public lectures on the "Literature of Spanish America," took part in the 
joint seminary held by the Department of Spanish in connection with the 
Rotating Research Project. Dean Schenck in her report gives a lively account 
of the work of our own faculty and students and of Professor Torres-Rioseco 
in this project. Through a special gift in honour of Josephine Goldmark, 
1898, Professor Erich Frank, Associate Professor at the University of Heidel- 
berg, gave four lectures at Bryn Mawr in the second semester to an audience 
primarily composed of faculty and students of Philosophy, but including also 
many faculty members and students of other departments. Professor Frank 
also conducted a graduate seminary at Bryn Mawr during the same period. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 9 

The research work done by the faculty during the year comes to the 
surface as always in three different sections of this report, but I must remind 
you that in any one year much of it remains under ground. I call attention 
to the list of faculty publications which follows this report. All of us who 
are connected with Bryn Mawr can congratulate ourselves on the picture of 
faculty zeal and hard work, and I should add to it that at the end of the 
year Professor Cope, who had been carrying on his research under subsidies 
from the American Philosophical Society and from the Philadelphia firm of 
Sharp 6? Dohme, received a Guggenheim Fellowship which he will use in 
1940-41. Professor Tennent, who presents again the report of the Committee 
in charge of the Madge Miller Research Fund, continued his own research in 
his Dalton Hall laboratory. I should like to call to the attention of the 
Directors the smallness of the general research fund and its great usefulness 
in forwarding the work we are constantly pressing members of our faculty 
to do. Professor Bascom worked throughout the year in the laboratory placed 
at her disposal in the Geology Department. Twelve candidates who had 
worked under the direction of the members of the faculty received the 
Doctor's degree in June, and others in almost every department of the 
College are in various stages of the long process. 

I reported last year an important action of the faculty in its own 
reconstruction. Dean Schenck gives some account in her report of the new 
Graduate Committee which by that action replaced the Graduate Council. 
I feel somewhat the same satisfaction in the parallel changes made this year 
in the constitution of the College Senate, which until now was made up 
arbitrarily of full professors, so that occasionally departments were left 
without representation. A representative chosen by each department now 
sits on the Senate. The responsibility for its important work is thus given 
to those who must carry out its rulings, and I believe that its business will 
be more fully understood and more wisely done in consequence. Two 
anachronisms were formally corrected: the "Committee on Entrance Exam- 
inations, " a relic of the long abandoned Bryn Mawr examinations, becomes 
the "Admissions Committee," and the Dean becomes a member of the 
Curriculum Committee and, with the Director of Admissions, a member of 
the Admissions Committee, where they have previously sat only on invita- 
tion though they have been responsible for the direction of the committees 
and done much of the work. The changes of these two years have been both 
sensible and, to use again a hard-worked word, democratic: an increased 
number of informed persons share the major faculty responsibilities, and the 
faculty itself gives to its control of academic matters a broader basis. 

Following the procedure adopted in 1921 in regard to the appointment 
of the president and deans of the College, the faculty held a special meeting 
in November to elect a committee to consult with the Directors 1 Committee 
to receive and consider suggestions of names for the next president of 
Bryn Mawr. After a full discussion it was decided that this committee should 
consist of five members, — one full professor, one associate professor, one 
assistant professor and two members chosen from the faculty at large. Profes- 
sors Crenshaw, Gardiner, Stapleton, Broughton and Swindler were elected. 



10 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Academic Matters 

Admission and degree requirements have not been under discussion. An 
experiment of importance is however beginning to shape itself. To my satis- 
faction, the College has been cautiously experimenting in the joint teaching 
of courses, in increased cooperation between members of the faculty or 
between departments. For instance, two sets of eight lectures each have been 
given by groups of departments on an extra-curricular basis and the publica- 
tion this year of the second set on the "Approach to Art" in the Bryn Mawr 
series indicates their importance. The courses given on the graduate level 
under the Plan for the Joint Teaching of the Sciences have been continued 
and two courses offered for qualified undergraduate students, one in Crys- 
tallography by Professor Patterson (Physics) and Professor Wyckoff (Geology) 
and a second in Comparative Zoology and Paleontology taught by Professor 
Dryden (Geology), Professor Gardiner and Dr. Oppenheimer (Biology) and 
Dr. Colbert, Assistant Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology in the American 
Museum of Natural History in New York. This course will be repeated in 
1940-41. On the proposal of a group of seniors and juniors, Professors de 
Laguna, Robbins, Stapleton and Northrop of the Departments of Philosophy, 
History, English and Economics respectively, conducted jointly through the 
year a course on "Aspects of Life and Thoughts in the 18th Century.'" The 
four instructors were all present at the classroom sessions, and other members 
of the faculty were asked to give special lectures where they were needed. 
The class itself worked with a certain independence in presenting its reports 
and its discussions, and obviously felt less distinction than in the ordinary 
classroom between those who taught and those who learned. They found the 
course extremely interesting and profitable, and the members of the faculty 
were interested in its technique. This course will be repeated, I hope, and 
others tried out. Our limited but successful experience in cooperative 
teaching on the Bryn Mawr campus on one hand and on the other hand 
the difficulty in increasing the variety of our courses because our income 
has allowed us little more than enough to keep in operation courses and 
sequences of courses already planned, have led me to think of the possi- 
bility of academic cooperation with Haverford College, and to a less 
degree for obvious reasons with Swarthmore. Such a plan seems pure 
common sense. A communication to the Board of Directors at the March 
meeting saying this at somewhat greater length was, astonishingly enough, 
supported by a letter addressed to the Boards of Bryn Mawr, Haverford and 
Swarthmore by Dr. Joseph Willits of the Rockefeller Foundation. I was 
empowered at once by the Board to study with the faculty the possibilities 
of some form of cooperation, and my first interchanges of letters with Mr 
Morley, President-elect of Haverford, and Mr. Nason, President-elect of 
Swarthmore, proved that they were as interested in the possibility as I was. 
I believe that during the coming year it may be possible for the three colleges 
to make a useful if not spectacular beginning in this direction. It seems to 
me more fruitful in its possibilities than any proposal made within my 
recollection at Bryn Mawr. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 11 

The College Community 

In the Report of the Director-of-Residence .will be found a list of the 
lectures and concerts which have been given before many audiences large and 
small at the College this year. Many of them were attended by the schools 
in Bryn Mawr and by our neighbors, but our own faculty and students should 
and usually do form the core of the audiences. The short Bryn Mawr week 
however makes the scheduling of these events extremely difficult; some of us 
are unable to be present on occasions which we should enjoy and some are 
actually overcome by the richness of the feast and end by complete loss of 
appetite. A small committee, is attempting to make a programme of greater 
moderation for the coming year which will prevent overcrowded evening 
engagements, the inevitable clash of interests and an occasional lamentably 
empty audience room. The undergraduates themselves provided the usual 
number of plays and entertainments, among which I should perhaps mention 
particularly the evening of Bach Cantatas given jointly in December by the 
Princeton and Bryn Mawr Choirs in the Chapel at Princeton and in 
Goodhart Hall at Bryn Mawr. 

Two conferences held at the College were of special interest. In Noveni' 
ber, following a suggestion of Mrs. Mcintosh of the Board of Directors, 
twenty Bryn Mawr graduates who are headmistresses of schools came for a 
day of conferences with the President and Dean and the Director of Admis' 
sions. No group of critics could have been more useful to us in their under' 
standing of and sympathy with the college problems and their day by day 
experience of the impressions made by the College on schools. It was possible 
also for us who work sometimes blindly here to make ourselves better under- 
stood and in particular to clear up small misunderstandings which have proved 
annoying and hampering to parents or schools or to the pupils themselves. 
In the spring the Alumnae Council met at the Deanery for three days and 
carried on its programme of report and discussions. Here again we profited 
by the criticism and proposals of the visitors wherever these touched campus 
matters. No college can, I believe, show a more intelligent and vigorous 
Alumnae Council. It is of assistance to have its advice and comment on the 
business we are trying to do and I hope that it will continue to hold meetings 
at Bryn Mawr at regular intervals for our sake as well as its own. The 
Council dinner at the Philadelphia Museum in which the Board of Directors 
joined in inviting guests to meet the President was a high point in her career. 

Three undergraduate projects deserve full recognition by all those who 
are interested in Bryn Mawr: 

1. Last year's plan for general college assemblies held once a month has 
come into full action. Two assemblies continue the established ritual of the 
College- — in October a gathering of all students in the first class hour of the 
first day of the College and in May the announcement of the undergraduate 
scholarships following the ceremony of "Little May Day." 1 A third familiar 
day of excitement, the announcement of Graduate Travelling Fellowships in 
March is also retained, and the Graduate School has asked to make that its 
own and to invite a speaker on some subject of interest not only to itself but 



12 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

to the whole college body. This year Mr. Frederick Keppel of the Carnegie 
Corporation spoke on "American Philanthropy and the Advancement of 
Learning."' The other four assemblies were entirely in the charge of the 
students themselves. In late October they arranged a series of short speeches 
on "Education and Democracy"; in November a discussion by a student forum 
of methods of teaching; in February a discussion of college entertainments by 
a student panel; and in April Professor Philip Jessup of Columbia University 
spoke on possibilities of peace. The students themselves have been responsible 
for every part of the arrangements as well as for the active conduct of the 
meetings, and Goodhart Hall has been nearly filled by the audience which has 
gathered to hear them. It is clear in many ways that these assemblies have 
formed a framework for campus discussion. 

2. Since the College began, as far as I know, the budgets for the various 
campus organisations have been raised individually and often inconveniently 
by the officers or by interested committees of students. For the first time this 
year the officers of the large undergraduate organizations made a careful, 
sensible and effective plan for a so-called "activities drive" to be held in the 
first month of the college year, which would do away with the excited attempts 
to raise money which often rocked the campus during the winter. Within 
one week in October the sum of $4500 was raised. Funds were provided for 
the ordinary activities of the Bryn Mawr League, the camp for children which 
the League manages during the summer, the Hudson Shore Labor School, and 
for the Players Club. A lump sum, $900, was assigned to a general committee 
which in turn assigned small amounts from it as student contributions to, for 
instance, the Friends Service Committee, the Red Cross and the International 
Students Service Fund. The quiet efficiency of the campaign and the subse- 
quent peace for all college pocket-books has I believe established the system 
for good and all on the Bryn Mawr campus. 

3. During the spring and again in the fall of 1939 there was continuous 
discussion among various groups on the campus of the decision on the May 
Day Pageant which, if tradition were observed, would have been presented in 
the spring of 1940. Not only among the Directors of the College and the 
alumnae and the faculty but among the students there was considerable differ- 
ence of opinion and to the usual arguments pro and con, the financial risk, 
and the demands made on student time and interest in the second half of the 
year, were added new questioning of the now conventional May Day pro- 
gramme and of the good sense and good taste in a year of so much anxiety 
and tension of setting the energies of the College toward the perfection of an 
elaborate entertainment. There were two strong arguments for the continu- 
ance of the May Day tradition, — its success and beauty as a pageant and the 
prestige it had earned everywhere for the College and, from the student point 
of view, the valuable and unique experience of working unitedly in a large 
organization in which many different talents were pooled for a common end. 
The final decision has always been made by the undergraduates themselves 
voting in the spring of the year preceding May Day and again in the fall of 
May Day year. In the College Council in the fall it was decided that unless 
a definitely large majority voted yes, May Day should not be given. In the 
general vote this majority was not attained and the pageant was omitted 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 13 

for the year. It is possible in any succeeding year for a group of under' 
graduates to take up the question again. 

Budget 

As I have said earlier in this report, the budget accepted in the spring of 
1939 showed no margin for emergency expenses during the year, and anyone 
who has had anything to do with spending at the College, from the grounds- 
men to the President, has weighed carefully every item of expenditure which 
came up for decision. This caution undoubtedly made some saving in our 
funds, the income from investments was also slightly higher than had been 
estimated by the Finance Committee, but the surplus of $15,000 at the close 
of the fiscal year was due in great part to the increase in the fees of under- 
graduate students in this year of a full College. After prolonged consideration 
and with due regard to the other useful ways in which this surplus could be 
disposed of, the Board agreed to the request of the Chairman of the Buildings 
and Grounds Committee and the President that it should go to the replacing 
of the entire plumbing system in Merion Hall and the addition of water units 
in Pembroke East. Both of these expensive pieces of work had been taken up 
and then postponed many times and in Merion Hall at least the condition had 
become alarming. In Pembroke such plumbing as there was was in good con- 
dition, but the ratio of separate water units to students was one to fifteen. 
The work was done efficiently by our own college men under Mr. Foley 
and certainly in Merion Hall an emergency is avoided. Mr. Stokes and I 
believe that with this work done and with the purchase of a new generator 
in the power house, thus insuring sufficient light and heat in the new 
buildings, there is no other major flaw in the machinery of the College 
on which our comfort and health so completely depend. Our hatches are 
battened down for bad weather. 



The year ended with a Commencement at which the Reverend George 
Buttrick preached the Baccalaureate sermon and His Excellency, Hu Shih, the 
Chinese Ambassador, made the Commencement address. It was the last public 
occasion at which Professor Howard Gray of the Department of History and 
Dr. Herbert Miller of the Department of Sociology appeared as active mem- 
bers of the faculty. Professor Gray came to Bryn Mawr from Harvard in 1915. 
In his large Department of History he has taught many Bryn Mawr under- 
graduates and graduates something of his meticulous method of working, 
something of his persistent, lively curiosity about his material, something of 
the importance of historical study in human affairs — academic and practical. 
The College is well aware in what respect he is held by students of his field 
of history everywhere and is proud of his connection with it. It is grateful 
also for his interest in all its business and the way he has shouldered his part 
of every responsibility. To all of the students and to all of us, the faculty, he 
has been a friend on whose kindness and generosity we could rely. Dr. Miller 
came to Bryn Mawr after a notable career as a sociologist at Oberlin College 
and at Ohio State University, and as President of the Sociological Association 
and a friend and counsellor of the early Czech Republic. Dr. Miller has 



14 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

put his wide knowledge, illuminated by acquaintance all over the world, at 
the disposal of graduate and undergraduate students and has helped establish 
the new major in Sociology. It is pleasant news that he will be at Temple 
University next year in the place of Professor Burgess and that we keep him 
as a neighbor. 

It has been a year in which we have not concerned ourselves with the 
past which has too often dominated our thinking at Bryn Mawr. Along with 
a sufficiently careful attention to the present we have been busy with the best 
plans we can devise for an unpredictable future. 
Respectfully submitted, 

MARION EDWARDS PARK, 

President of the College. 



SUPPLEMENT TO THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

I. 

Changes in the Academic Staff of Bryn Mawr College 
October 1, 1939 - September 30, 1940 

Faculty Who Returned From Leave of Absence in October 1939 

Grace Frank, A.B., Non-Resident Professor of Old French Philology 
Mary Hamilton Swindler, Ph.D., Professor of Classical Archaeology 
Cornelia Lynde Meigs, A.B., Associate Professor of English Composition 
Julia Ward, A.B., Director of Admissions and Assistant to the Dean 
Horace Alwyne, F.R.M.C.M., Professor of Music (absent semester II., 

1938-39) 
Charles Wendell David, Ph.D., Professor of European History (absent 

semester II., 1938-39) 

Faculty on Leave of Absence 1939-40 

Rhys Carpenter, Ph.D., Professor of Classical Archaeology 

Jean William Guiton, Licencie-es-lettres, Assistant Professor of French 

(absent on military service) 
Samuel Claggett Chew, Ph.D., Professor of English Literature (absent 

semester I.) 
James Llewellyn Crenshaw, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry (absent 

semester II.) • 
Lily Ross Taylor, Ph.D., Professor of Latin (absent semester II.) 
Mildred Fairchild, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Social Economy and 

Social Research (absent semester II.) 
Charles Ghequiere Fenwick, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science 

(absent March-June 1940) 

>iew Appointments for the Tear 1 939-40 

Alexander Coblrn Soper, III., M.F.A., Associate Professor of History of 

Art 
John Chester Miller, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History 
John Corning Oxtoby, M.A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Susan Burlingham, M.S.S., Lecturer in Social Economy 
Hilda Geiringer, Ph.D., Visiting Lecturer in Mathematics 
Grazia Avitabile, M.A., Instructor in Italian 
Martha Cox, M.A., Instructor in Physics 
Francoise Laurent, Licencice-eS'lettres, Instructor in French 
Elizabeth Porter Wyckoff, A.B., Instructor in Greek 
Josephine Margaret Mitchell, B.Sc, Reader in Mathematics 
Frances Hardee Murphy, M.A., Reader in Philosophy 
Mary Elizabeth Puckett, A.B., Reader in History of Art 
Jane Crozier Armstrong. M.A., Demonstrator in Geology 

[15] 



16 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Patricia Ann Cain, A.B., Demonstrator in Psychology 

Norma L. Curtis, B.S., Demonstrator in Physics 

Elizabeth Mary Osman, M.S., Demonstrator in Chemistry 

Madeleine T. Thomas, M.A., Demonstrator in Physics 

Helen Rice, A.B., Leader of Chamber Music Groups 

Edwin Harris Colbert, Ph.D., Lecturer in Vertebrate Palaeontology, 

semester I. 
Wolfgang Michael, Ph.D., Instructor in German, semester I. 
Thomas S. Chambers, M.A., Lecturer in Chemistry, semester II. 
Elizabeth Stafford Edrop, M.A., Instructor in German, semester II. 
Dorothea R. Heyl, A.B., Demonstrator in Chemistry, semester II. 
Helen Dwight Reid, Ph.D., Lecturer in Political Science, beginning 

March 1940 

Retirements, June 1940 

Howard L. Gray, Ph.D., Marjorie Walter Goodhart Professor of History 
Herbert Adolphus Miller, Ph.D., Lecturer in Social Economy 

Resignations and Expirations, June 1940 

Katharine E. McBride, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education and 

Psychology 
Raymond Elliott Zirkle, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology 
Mary Zelia Pease, A.B., Lecturer in Classical Archaeology 
Grazia Avitabile, M.A., Instructor in Italian 
Franqoise Laurent, Licenciee'es'lettres, Instructor in French 
Theodore M. Steele, M.A., Instructor in English 
Jane Isabelle Marion Tait, MA., Instructor in Latin 
Margaret Palfrey Woodrow, A.B., Instructor in English 
Josephine Fisher, Ph.D., Reader in Politics 
Josephine Margaret Mitchell, B.Sc, Reader in Mathematics 
Frances Hardee Murphy, M.A., Reader in Philosophy 
Jane Crozier Armstrong, M.A., Demonstrator in Geology 
Patricia Ann Cain, A.B., Demonstrator in Psychology 
Lois M. Schoonover, M.A., Demonstrator in Geology 
Wolfgang Michael, Ph.D., Instructor in German, semester I. 
Thomas S. Chambers, M.A., Lecturer in Chemistry, semester II. 
Elizabeth Stafford Edrop, M.A., Instructor in German, semester II. 
Dorothea R. Heyl, A.B., Demonstrator in Chemistry, semester II. 



SUPPLEMENT TO THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

II. 

Faculty Publications for the Year 
October 1, 1939 - September 30, 1940 

This report is based on questionnaires sent out in November 1940. 

Richard Bernheimer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History of Art 

The Art'Historian. Art: A Bryn Mawr Symposium. Lancaster, Penn- 
sylvania, Lancaster Press, Inc.: 2'74, 1940. 

An Ancient Oriental Source of Christian Sacred Architecture. Ameri- 
can Journal of Archeology 43 4 : 647-668, 1939. 

Russell W. Bornemeier, M.A., Part-time Instructor in Psychology 

Color Discrimination in Rats. Journal of Comparative Psychology 28: 
417-436, 1939. 

T. Robert S. Broughton, Ph.D., Professor of Latin 

General Index. Economic Survey of Ancient Rome. Volumes I.-V. 
Baltimore, Maryland, The Johns Hopkins University Press, April 1940. 
(In collaboration with L. R. Taylor and others.) 

J. Alister Cameron, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Greek 

(Review.) Zeller, E.-Mondolfo, R. La Filosofia dei Greci. Volume 2. 
lonici e Pitagorici. Firenze, "La T^uova Italia," 1938. American Journal 
of Philology 61 3 : 369-372, July 1940. 

Rhys Carpenter, Ph.D., Professor of Classical Archaeology 

The Archaeologist. Art: A Bryn Mawr Symposium. Lancaster, Penn- 
sylvania, Lancaster Press, Inc.: 76-177, 1940. 

American Academy in Rome. Memoirs. 18: (folio pp. 120+pls. 35) 
1940-41. 

Samuel Claggett Chew, Ph.D., Professor of English Literature 

Time and Fortune. Journal of English Literary History 6: 83-113, 1939. 
(Reviews.) A[eu; Tor^ Herald-Tribune 1939-1940. 

Arthur Clay Cope, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

The Introduction of Substituted Vinyl Groups. IV. (Primary I-Alkenyl) 

Alkyl Malonic Esters. Journal of the American Chemical Society 62: 

314-316, 1940. (In collaboration with Evelyn M. Hancock.) 

The Introduction of Substituted Vinyl Groups. V. A Re-arrangement 

Involving the Migration of an Allyl Group in a Three Carbon System. 

Journal of the American Chemical Society 62: 441-444, February 1940. 

(In collaboration with Elizabeth MacGregor Hardy.) 

Substituted Vinyl Barbituric Acids. IV. Derivatives Containing a Primary 

I-Alkenyl Group. Journal of the American Chemical Society 62: 1199- 

1201. 1940. (In collaboration with Evelyn M. Hancock.) 

William Lewis Doyle, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology 
Amylase in Amphioxus. J^ature 144: 867, November 1939. 
Structure and Composition of Valonia ventricosa. Papers from Tor- 
tugas Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution of "Washington 517: 145- 
152, September 1940. 

Structure of Zooxanthellae. Papers from Tortugas Laboratory of the 
Carnegie Institution of Washington 517: 127-142, May 1940. 

[17] 



18 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Lincoln Dryden, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology 

A Key to Common Non-Opaque Heavy Minerals of the Eastern Penn- 
sylvania Region. Proceedings of the Pennsylvania Academy of Science 
14: 49-54, August 1940. (In collaboration with Clarissa Dryden.) 

Charles G. Fenwick, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Political Science 

American Neutrality, Trial and Failure. New York, New York Univer- 
sity Press; London, Oxford University Press, 1940. 

Declaration of Panama. American Journal of International Law 34: 
116-119, January 1940. 

International Law and Lawless Nations. American Journal of Interna- 
tional Law 33: 743-746, October 1939. 

Revision of Neutrality Legislation in Time of Foreign War. American 
Journal of International Law 33: 728-730, October 1939. 

Erich Frank, Ph.D., Special Lecturer in Philosophy 

The Fundamental Opposition of Plato and Aristotle. American Journal 
of Philology 61 1 : 34-53, January 1940; 61 2 : 166-185, April 1940. 

Grace Frank, A.B., Non-resident Professor of Old French Philology 

As by the Whelp Chastised Is the Leon. Modern Language J^otes 55: 

481, 1940. 

Introduction to a Study of the Mediaeval French Drama. (In Essays and 

Studies in Honor of Carleton Brown.) pp. 62-78, New York, New York 

University Press, 1940. 

Proverhes en Rimes (B). Romanic Review 31: 209-238, 1940. 

Mary Summerfield Gardiner, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology 

Effect of Beta-Indole Acetic Acid upon Isolated Plant Embryos. Bulletin 
of the Mt. Desert Biological Laboratory. 2pp. 1940. 

Joseph Eugene Gillet, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish 

Lexicographical Notes: Oislo. Modern Language Review 35: 66-69, 1940. 
The "Memorias" of Felipe Fernandez Vallejo and the History of the 
Early Spanish Drama. (In Essays and Studies in Honor of Carleton 
Brown.) pp. 264-280, New York, New York University Press, 1940. 
Note on the Lazarillo de Tormes A. Modern Language J^otes 55: 
130-134, 1940. 
(Reviews.) Hispanic Review 1939-40. 

Evelyn Margaret Hancock, Ph.D., Research Assistant in Organic Chemistry 
The Introduction of Substituted Vinyl Groups. IV. (Primary 1-Alkenyl) 
Alkyl Malonic Esters. Journal of the American Chemical Society 62: 
314-316, 1940. (In collaboration with Arthur C. Cope.) 
Substituted Vinyl Barbituric Acids. IV. Derivatives Containing a 
Primary 1-Alkeny] Group. Journal of the American Chemical Societx 
62: 1199-1201, 1940. (In collaboration with Arthur C. Cope.) 

Elizabeth MacGregor Hardy, M.A., Research Assistant in Organic 
Chemistry 
The Introduction of Substituted Vinyl Groups. V. A Re-arrangement 
Involving the Migration of an Allyl Group in a Three Carbon System. 
Journal of the American Chemical Society 62: 441-444, February 1940. 
(In collaboration with Arthur C. Cope.) 

Harry Helson, Ph.D., Professor of Experimental Psychology 

The Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association. 
American Journal of Psychology 53: 462-464, 1940. 
Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Eastern Psycho- 
logical Association. Psychological Bulletin 37: 558-566, 1940. 
Fundamental Problems in Color Vision. II. Hue, Lightness and Satura- 
tion of Selective Samples in Chromatic Illumination. Journal of Experv 
mental Psychology 26: 1-27, 1940. (In collaboration with Virginia B. 
Jeffers.) 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 19 

Myra Richards Jessen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of German 

Spannungsgefiige und Stilisierung in den Goetheschen J^ovellen. Modern 

Language Association. Proceedings. 55, 445'471, 1940. 

Goethe Bibliography for 1939. Monatshefte fiir deutschen unterricht 32: 

83-88, 1940. (In collaboration with the MLA Committee on Goethe 

Bibliography.) 

(Review.) Hermann Pongs. Das Bild in der Dichtung. II. Band. 

Modern Language Quarterly 1: 405-407, 1940. 

Kathrine Roller, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English 

Abraham Fraunce and Edmund Spenser. English Literary History 7 2 : 

108-120, June 1940. 
Hertha Kraus, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Social Economy and Social 
Research 

The Plight of Refugees in a Pre-occupied World. Rational Conference 

of Social Wor\. Proceedings. 1940 

. Woman's Press. July-August 1940. 

Trends in Old Age Security Planning for a Richer Old Age. Social 

Security 1, 1940. 

Richmond Lattimore, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Greek 

(Review.) Powell, J. E. The History of Herodotus. Classical Philology 
35 3 : 331-333, July 1940. 

Marguerite Lehr, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

The Right to Think. Journal of American Association of University 
Women 33: 152-155, April 1940. 

Donald Wallace MacKinnon, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology 
(Review.) Muenzinger, Karl F. Psychology: The Science of Behavior. 
Character and Personality 8: 250-253, 1940. 

Cornelia Lynde Meigs, A.B., Professor of English Composition 
Mother Makes Christmas. New York, Grosset, 1940. 

Fritz Mezger, Ph.D., Professor of Germanic Philology 

O. Icel. seg(g)ja, OHG. sag^n, OE. secg(e)an, a verb of the first and 
third weak class and the — eio/e: e-formation of the third weak class. 
Ar\iv for Js[ordis\ Filologi. 1939. 

Walter C. Michels, E.E., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics 

Undergraduate Experiments for Determining the Boltzmann Constant 
and the Loschmidt Number. American Physics Teacher 7: 401-403, 
December 1939. (In collaboration with Selma Blazer Brody.) 
The Remodeled Physics Laboratory at Bryn Mawr College. American 
journal of Physics 8: 117-119, April 1940. (In collaboration with 
Arthur L. Patterson.) 

Valentine Muller, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Archaeology 

Types of Mesopotamian Houses. Journal of the American Oriental 

Society 60: 151-180, 1940. 

(Reviews.) American Journal of Archaeology 44, 1940. 

Milton Charles Nahm, B.Litt., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy 
The Philosopher. Art: A Bryn Mawr Symposium. Lancaster, Penn- 
sylvania, Lancaster Press, Inc.: 276-348, 1940. 

Jane Marion Oppenheimer, Ph.D., Instructor in Biology 

The non-specificity of the germ-layers. Quarterly Review of Biology 
15: 1-27, 1940. 

Arthur Lindo Patterson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics 

The Remodeled Physics Laboratory at Bryn Mawr College. American 
Journal of Physics 8: 117-119, April 1940. (In collaboration with 
Walter C. Michels.) 



20 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Joseph Curtis Sloane, Jr., M.F.A., Associate Professor of History of Art 
(Review.) L'Art Pre-Roman by Jean Hubert. American Journal of 
Archceology 43: 728-730,' 1939. 

Alexander Coburn Soper, III., M.F.A., Associate Professor of History of 
Art 
A Bibliography for the Study of Japanese Temple Architecture. Monu- 
ments Serica 4 1 : 345-354, 1939. 

Japanese Evidence for the History of the Architecture and Iconography 
of Chinese Buddhism. 'Monumenta Serica 4 2 : 1940. 

Lily Ross Taylor, Ph.D., Professor of Latin 

General Index, Economic Survey of Ancient Rome. Volumes I.-V. 
Baltimore, Maryland, The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1940. (In 
collaboration with T. Robert S. Broughton and others.) 
(Review.) Tanzer, Helen H. The Common People of Pompeii. Ameri- 
can Historical Review 46: 194, 1940. 

David Hilt Tennent, Ph.D., Research Professor of Biology 

The Photodynamic Action of Dyes on the Egg of the Sea Urchin, 
Lytechinus variegatus. Carnegie Institution of Washington, 1940. 

Paul Weiss, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy 

God and the World. Conference on Science, Philosophy and Religion 
in Relation to Democracy. (Mimeographed.) 72 pp. September 1940. 
The Year in Philosophy. Hew Republic 101: 204-208, December 1939. 
The Place of Man in Nature. Archeon, Athens, 88-108, April 1940. 
The Essence of Peirce's System. Journal of Philosophy 37: 253-264, 
May 1940. 

(Reviews.) Philosophical Review, Ethics, Philosophical Abstracts, 
1939-40. 

Roger Hewes Wells, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science 

American Local Government. New York, McGraw-Hill 1939. 
(Reviews.) American Political Science Review 33: 888-889, 1110-1111, 
1939; 34: 385-386, 1940. 

Dorothy Wyckoff, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geology 

Appendix I. On the petrographic description of potsherds. (In Ehrich, 
Ann M. H. Early Pottery of the Jebeleh District.) Philadelphia, The 
American Philosophical Society, 89-99, 1939. 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1939-40. 

The history of the Dean's office in 1939'40 was uneventful. I was 
more occupied than I had been with teaching and depended upon Miss Julia 
Ward and Miss Anne Hawks, who was acting as an assistant in the office, to 
care for much of the routine business. Miss Ward has always been able to 
handle the question of adjustment of the freshmen with unequalled skill. 
Because of the knowledge which she has of them before they enter college 
she can put her finger on their difficulties in the first month of college and 
keep in touch with members of the faculty as to their progress. She and 
Miss Hawks have handled the routine work with regard to the admission of 
students to the Infirmary, arrangements for quizzes in the Infirmary when 
students are ill, makeup work, etc., very successfully and have relieved me 
from a considerable amount of pressure at the busy seasons. 

In considering the whole question of advising students I should like to 
make certain definite recommendations for the future as the result of my 
own experience in the Dean's office: 

1. It is important that the Director of Admissions should act as the 
adviser of freshmen and should supervise the work of the wardens in this 
connection. She has more light than anyone else on the experience and record 
of the freshmen when they enter college and she can give to the wardens, 
who are the first people on the campus to come into intimate contact with the 
freshmen, the kind of help which no one else can provide. She should avoid 
pushing the freshmen toward the choice of the major subject. There is a 
tendency on the part of the members of the faculty who are teaching the 
abler members of the freshman class to draw them rapidly into specialized 
work. In arranging their courses for the sophomore year, their adviser should 
urge that they keep an open mind as to the choice of a major subject until 
they have experienced a wider range of courses. In the case of the scientific 
students it is essential from the beginning to plan their schedules with some 
care, since a major in Biology should, if possible, include work in Physics and 
Mathematics, as well as Chemistry. But even in these cases the time can be 
divided between the different departments and a student can be urged to delay 
her final decision until she has done some elementary work in several 
different departments. 

2. The most important task of the Dean of the College in advising the 
undergraduates is that of helping the sophomore class in the choice of the 
major subject. I have come to believe that more time should be devoted early 
in the year to long interviews, especially with the abler students in the 
sophomore class, helping them to plan their college work for three years so 
as to include all of the fields which are necessary in understanding the work 
of their major subject and also such elective work as makes a special appeal 

[21] 



22 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

to their imaginations. I believe that if the Dean can devote enough time to 
such interviews in the first semester the arrangement of the details of the 
courses for the junior year can be left to the members of the major depart' 
ment, who have interviews with all of the sophomores in the spring, and to 
an assistant in the Dean's office who would check up on the requirements for 
the degree. 

If this policy is successful it will be unnecessary to add to the staff of 
the Dean's office or to have a group of faculty advisers for the students as is 
done in many other colleges. Five hundred undergraduates is a large group to 
be handled by two advisers. On the other hand, if the right kind of guidance 
is given early and the students are put in touch with members of the faculty 
who can shed light on their special problems, the work of advising the junior 
and senior classes from a central office is comparatively light. 

Another question in guidance which has become more pressing in recent 
years is the question of vocational guidance. Our placement bureau, under 
the direction of Mrs. James Crenshaw, is most efficient in answering promptly 
requests from the schools for well qualified teachers, and requests from Bryn 
Mawr alumnae for recommendations. On the other hand, the Bureau has 
always been on a part-time basis and is not equipped to provide vocational 
advice without outside assistance. This year Mrs. Crenshaw and I are asking 
Winifred McCully, Bryn Mawr '32, who has had several years experience in 
the United States Employment Service, to come down three or four times 
during the year and discuss the question of getting their first jobs with 
groups of seniors. Miss McCully is undertaking to do the same kind of work 
which was done by Mrs. Lillian Gilbreth for a number of years but her angle 
of approach is somewhat different, and she will connect her work more directly 
with the question of securing a job and adjusting to new conditions at the 
end of the college course. I have been uncertain in the past whether it was 
better to have someone with other duties on the campus give vocational advice 
or whether it was better to bring in someone with wider contacts. On the 
whole, if we can find someone who has had the right experience and is 
successful at the work, I think it would be better to have her come to the 
campus from New York or Philadelphia and retain her outside connections 
which will be valuable in securing information about openings. 

As the Directors know, the College Infirmary was rebuilt in the course 
of the summer and is proving to be in every way satisfactory for its purpose. 
The plans, which were very cleverly drawn by Mr. Martin, have provided 
ten single rooms, not available before, and more attractive in their outlook, 
their arrangement, and their lighting than any of the rooms previously in use. 
The new Dispensary and waiting room, which are located in a part of the 
building which had previously been almost waste space, have also proved very 
pleasant and well arranged. The chief problem at the moment is the appor- 
tionment of the time of the College Physician, Dr. Leary, who is finding it 
difficult to accomplish all of the routine medical examinations and also take 
care of the necessary office visits. Next year my suggestion would be that the 
routine medical examinations be cut down in number omitting, perhaps, the 
examinations for members of the sophomore class where the health record for 
the previous year has been good. The alternative would probably be to have 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE 23 

another physician assist with the medical examinations in October. Such an 
addition to the medical staff would not be very expensive if it proves necessary. 
I should like to say a word in praise of the work done by Dr. Genevieve 
Stewart, our Consulting Psychiatrist. The number of visits to Dr. Stewart 
made by students on their own initiative has increased from year to year. 
They have come to rely on her wisdom and her sympathy; her sense ol 
detachment from the college scene has made them feel freer to go to her with 
their problems. The cooperation of Dr. Leary, Dr. Stewart, the nurses at the 
Infirmary, and the seven wardens with the Dean's office has been excellent on 
all matters of health, and adjustment to the student body has been very 
remarkable. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HELEN TAFT MANNING, 

Dean of the College. 



SUPPLEMENT TO THE DEAN'S REPORT 

Statistics of Undergraduate Students 1939-40 

Students enrolled October 1938 who did not return October 1939: 

Death _ 1 

Exclusions (poor academic work or other reasons) 10 

Health 8 

Finances 3 

Marriage 5 

Junior year elsewhere 3 

Miscellaneous (study elsewhere, specialized training, etc.) 12 

42 

Summary of Registration by Classes: 

Class of 1 940 86 

Class of 1941 1 1 5 

Class of 1942 1 40 

Class of 1943 1 54 

Hearer 1 

496 

Geographical Distribution: 

Atlantic seaboard from New York City to Washington 50% 

The rest of Pennsylvania 6% 

The rest of New York 4% 

New England 1 6 % 

Middle West 1 4 % 

Southern States 4% 

Far West 4% 

Foreign Countries 2% 

Religious Affiliation: 

Students with church connection 88% 

Students with no church connection 12% 

Occupation of Fathers: 

Business men 50% 

Professional men 46% 

Miscellaneous 4% 

Average age of class graduating June 1940 22 years, 4 months 

Bryn Mawr alumnae daughters in the Undergraduate School 57 

Statistics of the Entering Class 

Total admitted: 166, including 13 transfer students 

Plans of Entrance: 

Plan A (examinations on all 15 required units) 

Plan B (4 examinations at close of high school course) 35% 

Plan C (4 examinations divided between third and fourth year 

of high school) 34% 

[24] 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE 25 

Plan D (highest seventh plan) 3% 

New York State Regents „ 5 % 

Progressive Education Experiment 13% 

Foreign Examinations _ - 3% 

Transfer from other colleges 7% 

Colleges and universities from which students transferred: 

Bennett Junior College, Elmira, Goucher, Hollins, Radcliffe, 
Sweet Briar and Vassar Colleges, Johns Hopkins and Leland 
Stanford Universities, London School of Economics, Universi' 
ties of London and of North Carolina. 

Preparation: 

Private schools 70% 

Private and public schools 5% 

75% 

Public schools 2 5 % 

Average age: (transfer students not included) 17 years, 11.8 months 

Geographical Distribution: 

Atlantic seaboard from New York City to Washington 42% 

The rest of Pennsylvania _ 7% 

The rest of New York 7% 

New England 15% 

Middle West 1 5 % 

Southern States 5% 

Far West 5% 

Foreign Countries 4% 

Religious Affiliation: 

Students with church connection 90% 

Students with no church connection 10% 

Occupation of Fathers: 

Business men 54% 

Professional men 32% 

Miscellaneous 14% 

Bryn Mawr alumnae daughters in the entering class 16 

Respectfully submitted, 

BARBARA GAVILLER, 

Secretary of the College. 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1939-40: 

Registration 

The Graduate School of 1939-40 numbered 145 students.* Of these 62 
were resident in Radnor Hall and Low Buildings and 83 were non- 
resident. 

Students who had been awarded travelling fellowships and were prevented 
from studying abroad because of the European war: 

Jean Holzworth, Mary Elisabeth Garrett European Fellow, who 

would have studied at the American Academy in Rome, spent 

the year studying at Yale University. 
Katherine Lever, Fanny Bullock Workman European Fellow. f 
Grace Dolowitz, Bryn Mawr European Fellow 1939-40. § 
Elizabeth Duncan Lyle, Bryn Mawr European Fellow 1937-38, 

spent the year studying in Mexico. 
Louise Atherton Dickey, Ella Riegel Scholar, who would have 

studied at the American School in Athens, spent the year 

studying at Bryn Mawr. 

Foreign Graduate Students studying at Bryn Mawr on scholarships awarded 
by Bryn Mawr: 

Mary Paul Collins Scholar in Spanish: 

Frida Weber, Profesora de Castellano y Literatura, 1937. 

Teaching Fellow in French: 

Francoise Cusin, A.B. Randolph-Macon Woman's College 1938; 
M.A. University of Wisconsin 1939. 

Chinese Graduate Scholar: 

Lucy Tou, A.B. Yenching University 1937. 

Graduate Scholar in Economics and Politics (Semester I.): 

Agnes Chen, A.B. Yenching University 193 5: Ph. D.J Bryn Mawr 
1940. 

Graduate Scholar in Economics and Politics: 

Josceline Newcombe, B.A. Oxford University 1939. 

Graduate Scholar in French: 

Sonja Petra Karsen, A.B. Carleton College 1939. 

* In 1938-39 the Graduate School numbered 139, the largest registration 
up to that time. 

f Miss Lever postponed the use of her fellowship and accepted a position 
as Instructor in English at the University of Rochester. 

§ Miss Dolowitz postponed the use of her fellowship and accepted a 
graduate scholarship in the Department of French at Bryn Mawr. 

$ Degree not to be used until dissertation is published. 

[26] 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 27 

Carola VJoerishoffer Scholar in Social Economy: 

Afife Sayin, B.A. American School for Girls, Istanbul, 1936; M.A. 
Brown University 1939. 

Special Scholar in History of Art: 

Gertrud Achenbach, M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1940. 

Other Foreign Graduate Students:* 

Carla Faa, Laurea in filosofia, State University of Milan, 1936; M.A. 

Bryn Mawr College 1939. 
F. Margret Paschkis, M.D. University of Vienna 1919; M.A. Bryn 

Mawr College 1940. 
Otto I. Pollak, LL.D. University of Vienna 1930: M.A. Bryn Mawr 

College 1940. 
Edith Braun Treuer, Student, University of Vienna, 1930'31 and 

193 3-38; Josephine Goldmark Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 1938-39. 

Degrees 

Doctors of Philosophy 
At Commencement in June 1940 the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
was awarded to the following twelve candidates: 

Ch'en Fang-Chih 

A.B. Yenching University 193 5. 
Subjects: Politics and History. 

Dissertation: Certain Problems of International Law with Reference 
to China. 

Grace Chin Lee 

A.B. Barnard College 193 5; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1937. 
Subject: Philosophy. 

Dissertation: Social Individualism, A Systematic Treatment of the 
Metaphysics of George Herbert Mead. 

Jean Holzworth 

A.B. Bryn Mawr College 1936 and M.A. 1937. 
Subjects: Latin and Mediaeval Latin. 

Dissertation: An Unpublished Commentary on Ovid's "Fasti" by 
Arnulfus of Orleans. 

Dorothy Maharam 

B.S. Carnegie Institute of Technology 1937. 

Subject:. Mathematics. 

Dissertation: On MeasurcPreserving Transformations. 

Mother Mary Norbert 

A.B. Bryn Mawr College 1919: M.A. University of Pennsylvania 

1923. 
Subjects: English and Old French. 

Dissertation: The Reflection of Religion in English Mediaeval Verse 
Romances. 

Elizabeth Knight Patterson 
A.B. Wellesley College 1930. 
Subjects: Biology and Chemistry. 

Dissertation: The Photodynamic Action of K[eutral Red on Root 
Tips of Barley Seedlings. 



* See report of last year, pp. 28-29, for numbers of foreign students in 
recent vears. 



28 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Susan May Savage 

A.B. Bryn Mawr College 1933 and M.A. 1934. 

Subjects: Latin and Ancient History. 

Dissertation: The Cults of Trastevere. 
Lois Margaret Schoonover 

A.B. Oberlin College 1934; M.A. Cornell University 1936. 

Subject: Geology. 

Dissertation: A Stratigraphic Study of the Mollus\s of the Calvert 
and Choptan\ Formations of Southern Maryland. 
Mary Margaret Taylor 

A.B. Mount Holyoke College 1934 and M.A. 1935. 

Subject: History. 

Dissertation: Some Sessions of the Peace in Cambridgeshire in the 
Fourteenth Century. 
T*)pt tct-tt 1 Tot t p^ 

A.B. Vassar College 193 5; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1936. 

Subjects: Greek and Latin. 

Dissertation: The Banquet'Libations of the Gree\s. 
Elizabeth Hazard Ufford 

A.B. Bryn Mawr College 1929 and MA. 1934. 

Subjects: Biology and Biochemistry. 

Dissertation: A Study of Crystals in the Lungs of Swiss Mice. 
Julia Ward 

A.B. Bryn Mawr College 1923. 

Subjects: History and Politics. 

Dissertation: English Government Finance During the Reign of 
Richard III., 1482-1485. 

Masters of Arts 

The Degree of Master of Arts was awarded to twenty-four candidates 
distributed as follows among the departments: 

Biology 3, Chemistry 4, Education 1, French 2, Geology 2, Greek 1, 
History 2, History of Art 1, Latin 1, Social Economy 7. 

Ph.D. Dissertations Published 1939-40 

Department of Classical Archczology 

Ann M. H. Ehrich (Degree to be awarded) 

Early Pottery of the Jebeleh Region. The American Philosophical 
Society, Independence Square, Philadelphia, 1939; Lancaster Press, 
Inc., Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 

Katharine Shepard (Degree awarded at Commencement 1936) 

The Fish'Tailed Monster in Gree\ and Etruscan Art. ix+116 pp.+ 
XVI plates+7 pp. Index, 8vo. George Banta Publishing Company, 
Menasha, Wisconsin, 1940. 

Department of History 

Joan M. V. Foster (Degree awarded at Commencement 1937) 

Reciprocity and the Joint High Commission of 1898-9. pp. 87-98, 
8vo. Reprint from The Canadian Historical Association, 1939. 

Beatrice N. Siedschlag (Degree awarded at Commencement 1937) 
English Participation in the Crusades, 1150-1220. vii+106 pp.+ 
66 pp. Appendix and Index, 8vo. The Collegiate Press, George 
Banta Publishing Company, Menasha, Wisconsin, 1939. 

Department of Latin 

Rosamund E. Deutsch (Degree awarded at Commencement 1937) 
The Pattern of Sound in Lucretius. 188 pp., 8vo. The George 
Banta Publishing Company, Menasha, Wisconsin, 1939. 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 29 

Department of Mathematics 

Anna Grant (Degree awarded at Commencement 1937) 

Surfaces of Negative Curvature and Permanent Regional Transi- 
tivity, pp. 207-229, 8vo. 1939. Reprint from Du\e Mathematical 
Journal, vol. 5, no. 2, June, 1939. 

Department of Physics 

Barbara Raines (Degree awarded at Commencement 1937) 

The Accommodation Coefficient of Helium on ?^ic\el. Reprint 
from Physical Review, vol. 56, October 1, 1939. 

Department of Psychology 

Marian B. Hubbell (Degree awarded at Commencement 1938) 

Configurational Properties Considered "Good" by T^a'ive Subjects. 
pp. 46-69, 8vo., with plates. Offprint from The American Journal 
of Psychology, Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y., vol. 53, Janu- 
ary 1940. 

Department of Social Economy 

Ruth Enalda Shallcross (Degree awarded at Commencement 1938) 
Industrial Homewor\. xi+212+44 pp. Appendix and Index, 8vo. 
Industrial Affairs Publishing Company, New York. 1939. 

Special Research Project 

Upon the recommendation to the Directors by the President, the Depart- 
ment of Spanish was chosen as the sixth department to receive the award of 
the Mary Paul Collins Scholarship for Foreign Women, of the value of 
$1000, and of two special scholarships in the furtherance of a research 
project.* 

The Mary Paul Collins Scholarship was awarded to Miss Frida Weber 
of Argentina, Profesora de Castellano y Literatura, and a special scholarship 
to Miss Dorothy Nepper, A.B. Smith College 193 5 and M.A. 1937. Miss 
Mary Elizabeth Fox, A.B. James Millikan College 1925, B.S. Colorado State 
College 1926, was departmental Fellow and Miss Eloise Lejeune, A.B. 
Wellesley College 1938 and M.A. 1939, held a resident scholarship. 

The research project of the Department of Spanish was announced in 
the following terms on the poster offering the Mary Paul Collins Scholarship: 

"The successful candidate will be expected to devote the year to a- 
research problem preferably on the materials, technique or expression of the 
Peninsular or Spanish-American Drama during the sixteenth and seventeenth 
centuries. Dr. Gillet will divide the first semester between the works of 
Bartolome de Torres Naharro and the Autos sacramentales of Fernan Gonzalez, 
de Eslava, with special emphasis on problems of sixteenth century bibliog- 
raphy, textual criticism and interpretation; in the second semester Dr. Whyte 
will discuss the supernatural in a group of comedias of the Golden Age, with 
special reference to the sources and authorship of "El Nino Diablo" (attrib- 
uted to Velez de Guevara) and to certain plays of Juan Ruiz de Alarcon. 
During the six weeks of his stay at Bryn Mawr College as Flexner Lecturer, 
Professor Arturo Torres-Rioseco, of the University of California, will conduct 
a series of meetings on the Spanish Drama in Latin-America during the 
Colonial Period." 



* In 1934-3 5 the Department of Mathematics was named under this rotat- 
ing plan, in 193 5-36 the Department of Biology, in 1936-37 the Department 
of Classical Archaeology, in 1937-38 the Departments of Latin and Greek 
and in 1938-39 the Department of Geology. 



30 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Of the actual year's work, Professor Gillet reports: 

"For a number of years the Department of Spanish has been engaged in 
research on the Spanish Drama of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. 
This year an enlarged Spanish group, including representatives of Argentina, 
Colombia, Puerto Rico and the Spanish-speaking American Southwest, was 
enabled by the Rotating Plan to focus attention on the still largely unexplored 
field of the Spanish-American Drama, and in particular on the work of 
Mexico's earliest dramatist, Gonzalez de Eslava, and her greatest one, Juan 
Ruiz de Alarcon. 

"To this end the seminaries of the Flexner Lecturer, Dr. Torres-Rioseco, 
leading up from the first dramatic dances of aboriginals in Central America 
and Mexico, were arranged to bring out the native elements in the work of 
Eslava. The regular lectures by Dr. Gillet on Torres Naharro and the 
Spanish peninsular drama of the sixteenth century, given during the first half 
of the year, were planned to reveal the Spanish roots of Eslava's tradition. 
On the other hand, the special work undertaken by the Mary Paul Collins 
Scholar, Miss Frida Weber, of the Instituto de Filologia of Buenos Aires, 
threw light on the linguistic traits of Eslava's plays, and may eventually 
become the basis of a new edition of Eslava's works. In the second semester 
the lectures of Miss Florence Whyte on the Spanish comedia of the Golden 
Age led up to a study of the plays of Ruiz da Alarcon, especially in their 
relations with the supernatural. The whole atmosphere of the department 
became sensitized to the subtle changes in Hispanic culture transplanted to a 
new and different environment. Reports and discussions bore witness to this, 
as did also the dissertation in course of preparation by Miss Mary Elizabeth 
Fox, on Survivals of the Older Spanish Drama in the American Southwest. 

"Undoubtedly, Spanish studies at Bryn Mawr, having been directed into 
such relatively new fields as Spanish' American drama and Spanish'American 
philology, have been refreshed and stimulated. The Spanish collection in the 
Library now offers a sufficient basis for serious further study. Miss Dorothy 
Nepper, who has been named Fellow in Spanish for 1 940-4 1, has begun to 
prepare for a dissertation on the Argentine writer and statesman, Domingo 
Faustino Sarmiento, and the eventual return to Bryn Mawr of Miss Weber 
as a candidate for a Ph.D. is not unlikely. Altogether we feel that the year's 
work under the Rotating Plan has been effective and fruitful." 

Academic Cooperation With Neighboring Institutions 

Under our Cooperative Plan, four students from the University of 
Pennsylvania (one in Archaeology, two in Geology, one in Psychology), one 
member of the staff of the University of Pennsylvania (in Philosophy), one 
student from Haverford (in English), and one member of the staff of 
Swarthmore College (in Geology) were studying in the Bryn Mawr Graduate 
School. Four Bryn Mawr graduate students (one in History of Art, one in 
Mathematics, and two in Social Economy) were taking courses at the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. 

The Newly Constituted Graduate Committee 

The Board of Directors having accepted the recommendation of the 
faculty to abolish the Academic Council, the faculty, at a meeting held 
October 11, 1939, voted the following rules for the constitution of a Graduate 
Committee, to function as a faculty committee: 

"The Graduate Committee shall consist of the President as chairman, the 
Dean of the Graduate School as vice-chairman, and six other members of the 
faculty who have had experience in graduate teaching at Bryn Mawr College 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 31 

and who represent as far as practicable groups of related departments. The 
elective members shall be chosen by ballot for .terms . of three years, two 
retiring annually and not subject to. immediate reelection. 

"The Graduate Committee shall, under the supervision and control of 
the faculty, exercise the powers formerly vested in the committees of the 
Academic Council.'' , 

In order to ensure the desired representation, a grouping of departments 
was established, as follows: 

"Group 1. Art, Literature, Philosophy: English, Classical Archeology, 
History of Art, Philosophy. 1 member. 
Group 2. Sciences: Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, 

Psychology, 2 members. 
Group 3. Classical and Modern Languages: Greek, Latin, Italian, 

German, Spanish, French. 1 member. 
Group 4. Social Sciences: Economics and Politics, Education, His' 

tory, Social Economy. 1 member. 
The sixth member of the Committee shall be chosen from any of the 
groups." 

The first Graduate Committee, chosen under the new arrangement, was 
elected at the same meeting and has served throughout the year: 
Professor Cope — Department of Chemistry. 
Professor Gillet — Department of Spanish. 
Professor Gray — Department of History. 
Professor Michels — Department of Physics. 
Professor Nahm — Department of Philosophy. 
Professor Swindler — Department of Classical Archaeology. 

The Committee has established three stated meetings for its regular 
agenda, one at the end of November, one during the third week in April 
and one at the end of May. These deal, on principle, respectively, with 
problems of registration and candidacy for degrees, with the general super' 
vision of students and with the final award of degrees. The Committee has 
held, in addition, this year, two special meetings for emergency business. 

Since the Committee is now a committee of the faculty, the Dean of the 
Graduate School, who acts as its secretary, can bring its recommendations for 
action to the regular meetings of the faculty throughout the year. This 
facilitates enormously the work of the Graduate Office, and consequently 
proper service to graduate students, by comparison with the previous arrange- 
ment, which held up much Graduate Committee business until the one stated 
meeting of the year of the Academic Council, in May. Action at this meeting 
tended to become perfunctory because of the overcrowded agenda and many 
questions that the Committee would have liked to hear discussed fully were 
hurried over. Another advantage of the new arrangement is that the increase 
in the membership of the Graduate Committee, from five to eight, keeps a 
greater number of the faculty constantly in touch with the administrative 
problems of the Graduate School. And the regular reporting of graduate 
matters in faculty meetings brings them to the attention of the entire faculty 



32 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

instead of relegating them, as in the past, to a Council meeting made up 
exclusively of the senior members of the faculty. 

These changes rank, I believe, in importance with the recent changes 
effected in the requirements for the higher degrees. In considering the whole 
matter of new requirements, the Academic Council recognized the values that 
would be brought to the discussions by younger members of the faculty, 
excluded from Council membership. It therefore invited the younger members 
to participate in committee work and final deliberations. The new constitution 
of our Graduate Committee and its consolidation with the faculty thus make 
permanent the conditions which proved so satisfactory in the highly important 
undertaking of reexamining the basis of the higher degrees. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EUNICE MORGAN SCHENCK, 

Dean of tfie Graduate School. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR-IN-RESIDENCE 
AND EDITOR OF PUBLICATIONS 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1939-40. 

Official Publications 

Annual Publications 

The Bryn Mawr College Calendar, Vols. XXXII. and XXXIII. 

Finding List, Vol. XXXII., No. 3, November 1939. 

Halls of Residence, Vol. XXXII., No. 4, December 1939 (published in 

March 1938). 

Undergraduate Courses, Vol. XXXIII., No. 1, April 1940. 

Graduate Courses, Vol. XXXIII., No. 2, June 1940. 
Bryn Mawr College Commencement Programme, June 1940. 

Special Publications 

Regulations of Bryn Mawr College concerning the degree of Master 
of Arts, July 1940. 

Lectures and Entertainments 

Dinner in Honour of President Par\ 

The Directors of Bryn Mawr College and the Executive Board of the 
Alumnae Association sponsored a dinner in honour of President Park on 
Friday evening, April 12th, at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. President 
Ada L. Comstock of Radcliffe College, Professor Rufus M. Jones of 
Haverford College, and Professor Howard L. Gray of Bryn Mawr College 
spoke. Mr. Charles J. Rhoads presided. 

Opening of the Mrs. Otis S\inner Dramatic ~Wor\shop 

A special opening of the Mrs. Otis Skinner Dramatic Workshop for 
outside subscribers and friends was held May 5th. President Park, Miss 
Elizabeth Johnson of the Baldwin School, and Mr. Otis Skinner spoke. 
On May 6th the Dramatic Workshop was opened for the College with 
speeches by Mr. Otis Skinner, Fifi Garbat, 1941, and Marian Gill, 
1940. Cornelia Otis Skinner presented two monologues and Caroline 
Garnett, 1940, directed her original play, "East River." 

Commencement 

His Excellency, Dr. Hu Shih, the Ambassador of China, delivered the 
Commencement address on June ?th. 

[33] 



34 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Services 

The Reverend George A. Buttrick, Minister of the Madison Avenue 
Presbyterian Church of New York City, delivered the Baccalaureate Sermon 
on June 2nd. 

The Sunday Evening Services, arranged by the Bryn Mawr League, 
were conducted by the following: 

The Reverend Donald B. Aldrich, D.D., L.H.D., Rector of the 
Church of the Ascension, New York City. 

The Reverend C, Leslie Glenn, Rector of Christ Church, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts. 

The Reverend Erdman Harris, Student Chaplain of Lawrenceville 
School, Lawrenceville, New Jersey. 

Dr. Hornell Hart, Professor of Sociology and Psychology at Duke 
University, Durham, North Carolina. 

Dr. Rufus Jones, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Haverford Col- 
lege and Trustee and Director of Bryn Mawr College. 

The Reverend Leicester Lewis, D.D., Rector of St. Martin-in-the- 
Fields, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 

The Reverend A. Grant Noble, Rector of St. John's Church, Wil- 
liamstown, Massachusetts. 

The Reverend Vivian T. Pomeroy of the First Parish, Milton, Mas- 
sachusetts. 

The Reverend T. Guthrie Speers, Minister of Brown Memorial 
Church, Baltimore, Maryland. 

The Reverend Donald Stuart, Rector of the First Presbyterian 
Church, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. 

The Reverend' John W. Suter, Jr., D.D., Rector of the Church of 
the Epiphany, New. York City. 

Dr. Howard Thurman, Dean of the Chapel, Howard University, 
Washington, District of Columbia. 

The Reverend Alexander C. Zabriskie of the Theological Seminary, 
Alexandria, Virginia. 

Assemblies 

Six college assemblies were held during the year: at the opening of 
college on October 3rd when President Park spoke; on October 27th, when 
President Park, Professor McBride, and Miss Jean Carter, Director of 
the Hudson Shore Labor School, spoke at a discussion on "'Education and 
Democracy"; on March 13th when the college programme of entertainments 
was discussed; on March 28th when Dr. Frederick P. Keppel, President 
of the Carnegie Corporation, spoke on "The Relationship between Endowed 
Foundations and the Advancement of Learning"; on April 18th when the 
Peace Council sponsored a Peace Day Assembly at which Dr. Philip C. 
Jessup, Professor of International Law at Columbia University, spoke on 
"America's Contribution to World Peace"; and on May 1st when President 
Park announced the undergraduate scholarships and prizes. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR IN RESIDENCE 35 

Endowed Lectures 

The Mary Flexner Lectureship of Bryn Mawr College: Dr. Arturu 
Torres-Rioseco, Professor of Spanish'American Literature at the University of 
California and Visiting Lecturer at Columbia University, Semester I., 1939-40. 
gave a series of six lectures on "The Literature of Spanish America" on 
Monday evenings in February and March. Two lectures, illustrated by lantern 
slides, were given in connection with this series: "The Economic Geography 
of South America," by Dr. Joseph T. Singewald, Jr., Professor of Economic 
Geology at Johns Hopkins University, on January 12th, and "South American 
Archaeology," by Dr. Wendell C. Bennett, Professor of Anthropology at 
the University of Wisconsin, on February 16th. 

The Ann Elizabeth Sheble Memorial Lecture in English Literature: 
Dr. Roger Sherman Loomis of Columbia University, distinguished medie- 
valist and archaeologist, gave an illustrated lecture on "Arthurian Romance 
in Medieval Art," on April 17th. 

The Mallory Whiting Webster Memorial Lecture in History: Dr. 
Herbert Heaton, Professor of History at the University of Minnesota and 
Visiting Professor of Economic History at Princeton University, spoke on 
"Clio in Overalls, the Muse as Seen by an Economic Historian," on May 7th. 

Departmental Lectures 

The Biology Department sponsored a lecture on "Rickets" on April 
23rd by Dr. Edwards A. Park, Pediatrician in General at the Johns 
Hopkins Hospital. 

The Carola Woerishoffer Department of Social Economy and Social 
Research sponsored two lectures: the first on December 8th by Mr. Junius 
Bird, Assistant Curator of Anthropology of the American Museum of Natural 
History, on "Early Man in South America," the account of results of 
archaeological research in Patagonia; the second on April 19th by Dr. George 
C. Vaillant, Associate Curator of Mexican Archeology of the American 
Museum of Natural History, on "The Conquest of Mexico by the Spaniards 
as Seen Through Indian Eyes." The lectures were illustrated by lantern slides. 

The French Department held a lecture on April 16th by Monsieur 
Jacques Maritain, Professor of Philosophy in the Institut Catholique of 
Paris; author of Degrees of Knowledge, Art and Scholasticism and Freedom 
in the Modern World, who spoke (in English) on "Action and Con- 
templation." 

The Philosophy Department sponsored a series of four lectures during 
February and March by Dr. Erich Frank, Special Lecturer in Philosophy, 
Semester II. His topics were: "Greek Music and Pythagorean Philosophy," 
"Plato's Conception of Philosophy," "Augustine and Greek Thought," and 
"Aristotle and Aquinas." 

Horace Alwyne, F.R.M.C.M., Professor of Music, gave an illustrated 
talk on "The Music and Dancing of the Island of Bali," on October 31st. 



36 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Undergraduate Club Lectures 

The American Student Union brought two speakers: Mr. Rajui Petel 
of Bombay Province, who spoke on "India and the War" on November 17th 
and Mr. Herbert Witt, new National Secretary of the American Student 
Union, on February 27th. 

The Art Club together with the History of Art Department presented 
Mr. Henry Clifford, Assistant Curator of the University Museum, who 
traced the different styles of Picasso's work chronologically, on December 18th. 

The Bryn Mawr League presented the Reverend Frederic R. Griffin 
of the First Unitarian Church of Philadelphia, who spoke at a non-denomina- 
tional meeting on December 6th, and Mr. E. W. Barnes of the Ardmore 
Y. M. C. A., who spoke at two meetings on "Group Leadership" on December 
7th and 14th. 

The Industrial Group, in cooperation with the Science Club and workers 
from the Y. W. C. A., held a panel discussion on health at which Miss 
Eloise Spenser of the Kensington Y. W. C. A. reported on the recommen- 
dations of the Technical Committee on Medical Care, on December 13th. 

The International Relations Club sponsored a lecture by Dr. Charles 
G. Fenwick, Professor of Political Science, on "Pan-American Problems in 
the European War," on February 20th. 

Under the auspices of the Philosophy Club, Dr. Mortimer J. Adler, 
Associate Professor of Law at the University of Chicago, gave a talk on 
"Faith and Reason" on November 5th. On April 18th, Dr. Brand Blan- 
SHARD, Professor of Philosophy at Swarthmore College, addressed the Club on 
"The Coherence Theory of Truth." 

The two political clubs each sponsored meetings. Miss Gertrude Ely 
spoke to the Young Democrats Club on February 27th, and Miss Eileen 
O'Daniel talked about "The Republican Record" to the Republican Club 
on February 29th. 

The Undergraduate Committee for the Summer School brought Miss 
Jean Carter, Director of the Hudson Shore Labor School, on December 
4th, to outline the School's programme, and the place of the college student 
there. 

Vocational Teas 

Dr. Theodora M. Abel, Director of Research of Trade Extension 
Classes, spoke on "Opportunities in the Field of Clinical Psychology," on 
March 1 1th. 

Miss Alice Burrows, Associate Editor of the Vogue Merchandising 
Service, spoke on "Opportunities for Women in Fashion and Fashion Design," 
on January 9th. 

Miss Alice Rice Cook, Director of the Business Internship Plan, 
spoke on the Plan on December 4th, and on the following day gave interviews 
to individual students. 

Mrs. Rogers Dunn explained the Vogue Prix de Paris contest to 
seniors on October 23rd. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR IN RESIDENCE 37 

Miss Elizabeth Farnsworth, 1939 winner of the Vogue Prix de 
Paris Contest, spoke on April 16th to juniors interested in the 1940 contest. 

Miss Dorothy Hankins of the Child Guidance Clinic spoke on "Social 
Work" on February 10th. 

Miss Amy Hostler of the Bank Street Schools in New York City spoke 
on February 20th. 

Miss Edna Lee of the Katharine Gibbs Secretarial School spoke on 
February 13th. 

Miss Charlotte Lockhead of the Packard Business School in New 
York spoke on May 3rd. 

Miss Winifred McCully of the Bureau of Occupations, New York 
City, spoke on "Opportunities for Jobs" on March 25th. 

Miss Elizabeth Neal of the Interboro Institute in New York inter- 
viewed students interested in foreign language secretarial training on April 9th. 

Mr. Perry Dunlap Smith of the North Shore Country Day School 
spoke on "The Winnetka Teachers College" on February 14th. 

Entertainments 
MUSIC 

Horace Alwyne, F.R.M.C.M., Director of the Department of Music, 
gave a pianoforte recital on April 22nd. 

The combined choirs of Bryn Mawr College and Princeton Uni- 
versity, assisted by Margaret Whitcroft, soprano; Fritz Krueger, tenor, 
and Leonard Treash, bass, and members of the Philadelphia Orches- 
tra, gave a concert of cantatas by John Sebastian Bach and Sir Hubert 
Parry, conducted by Ernest Willoughby, A.R.C.M., Assistant Professor 
of Music, on December 11th. The concert was given on December 10th at 
Princeton University. 

The combined choirs of Bryn Mawr College and Haverford Col- 
lege, together with the choir of the Church of the Redeemer, Bryn 
Mawr, directed by Mr. Willoughby, gave a Christmas musical service on 
December 17th. The concert was given the following evening at Haverford 
College. 

Carroll Glenn gave a violin recital on March 5th, under the auspices 
of the College Entertainment Committee. 

Jose Iturbi gave a pianoforte recital on February 8th, under the 
auspices of the College Entertainment Committee. 

Yehudi Menuhin gave a violin recital on December 20th under the 
auspices of the College Entertainment Committee. 

plays and movies 

The French Club on December 15th gave "La Mystere de la 
T^ativite." 

The Freshman Class presented its show, "Third Termite in Taylor," 
on February 24th. 

The Glee Club presented "Iolanthe," by Gilbert and Sullivan, on 
May 3rd and 4th. 



38 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Schuyler Ladd gave a programme of dramatic sketches on January 
1 Oth under the auspices of the College Entertainment Committee. 

A Latin play, concerned with the peregrinations of the Menaechmi 
twins, better known as the hoys from Syracuse, was given by The Latin 
Club on November 4th. 

The Players Club gave Ben Jonson's "Bartholomew Fair" on Merion 
Green on April 30th. 

The Varsity Players and the Haverford College Cap and Bells 
presented '"Time and the Conways," by J. B. Priestley, on December 1st 
and 2nd. 

"The Living Newspaper," sponsored by The American Student 
Union, The Industrial Group and The Players Club, was presented 
on October 27th. 

The Maids' and Porters' Glee Club presented "Porg;y and Bess" 
on March 16th. 

A French movie, "Crime and Punishment," was shown on March 21st, 
under the auspices of The American Student Union. 

"Emil und die Dete\tive," a German movie, was presented by The 
German Club on March 8th. 

The Peace Council presented a movie on May 13th, called "Trie 
Four Hundred Million," which showed the effects of the war on the Chinese 
people^ 

DANCING 

Estelle Dennis and her Dance Group gave a programme on May 
14th under the auspices of the College Entertainment Committee. 

Angna Enters presented a programme on October 26th under the 
auspices of the College Entertainment Committee. 

Doris Humphrey-Charles Weidman and Company appeared on 
November 21st under the auspices of the College Entertainment Committee. 

miscellaneous 

Robert Frost gave a reading of his poems on March 25th under the 
auspices of the College Entertainment Committee. 

Owen Lattimore, F.R.G.S., Director of the Walter Hines Page School 
of International Relations at Johns Hopkins University; Editor-in-Chief of 
Pacific Affairs; author of High Tartar y and Manchuria, Cradle of Conflict, 
spoke on "America's Stake in a Free China," under the auspices of the Bryn 
Mawr Chinese Scholarship Committee. The lecture was preceded by a dinner 
at the Deanery for members of the Supporting Committee and their guests. 

Mr. Earl Schenck on April 11th gave a lecture on "Polynesia — A 
Tale of Tahiti," illustrated with a full-length color movie with sound equip- 
ment and native Polynesian music, under the auspices of the College Enter- 
tainment Committee. 

Exhibitions 

The first of the Art Club exhibitions was held the week of December 
17th with a collection of modern French paintings; this was followed by an 
exhibition of paintings of campus views, and such events as May Day proces- 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR IN RESIDENCE 39 

sions and Parade Night, by Mr. Francis B. Hall, on March 17th; an exhibi' 
tion of Rembrandt reproductions on April 14th; an exhibition of the work 
of the Art and the Camera Clubs on May 5th and original etchings and 
lithographs loaned by Mr. Albert E. McVitty of Princeton on May 12th. 



Goodhart Hall was loaned to the Shipley School for the Northfield 
Conference on February 25th; and to the Shipley School and Episcopal 
Academy for a recital on March 6th. 

Commencement exercises of the following schools were held in Goodhart 
Hall: 

The Baldwin School on June 11th. 

The Agnes Irwin School on June 7th. 

The Shipley School on June 7th. 

The Ursula Murray School of Dancing on May 24th. 



Conferences 



The Bryn Mawr League sponsored a religious conference on March 9th 
and 10th. The Reverend Donald Stewart, Chaplain of the University 
of North Carolina and Rector of the First Presbyterian Church of Chapel 
Hill, addressed the conference. 

A student government conference was held on April 19th and 20th at 
which were present undergraduate representatives from Bryn Mawr, Mount 
Holyoke, Radcliffe, Smith, Vassar, Wellesley and Barnard. 

The Deanery 

Dr. Spiridion N. Marinatos, Director of Antiquities and Historic 
Monuments in the Greek Ministry of Culture and Education, and Professor 
of Archaeology at the University of Athens, spoke on November 5th on 
"'Recent Excavation at Thermopylae. " 

Mlle. Marcelle Denya of the Opera Comique and the Grand Opera, 
Paris, gave a lecture recital on November 12th, on French vocal music chosen 
from the best song writers of each important epoch from Luly to the present 
day. 

Mme. Henriette Bagger Plum, Danish mezzo-soprano, gave a recital, 
accompanied by Mrs. Mildred Kolb Schulze, on December 3rd. 

Mr. Chung Loh Wei played traditional Chinese music on ancient 
stringed instruments on December 10th, under the sponsorship of the Bryn 
Mawr Chinese Scholarship Committee. 

Mr. Louis MacNeice, British poet and playwright, spoke on "The 
Younger English Poets" on February 11th. 

The Hampton Quartette sang on March 3rd. 

Miss Fannie Ratchford, Librarian of the Wrenn Library of the 
University of Texas, author of "Legends of Angria and Two Poems by 
Emily Bronte," spoke on "The Web of Childhood" on March 14th. The 



40 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

talk was illustrated by manuscripts from the famous collection of Bronteana 
owned and kindly loaned by Mrs. Henry H. Bonnell of Chestnut Hill, 
Philadelphia. 

Mr. Theodore Spencer gave a series of three talks on April 9th, 16th 
and 23rd on "The Present State of Poetry." 

Mr. Felix Winternitz gave a violin recital on May 26th. 
Respectfully submitted, 

CAROLINE CHADWICK-COLLINS, 

Director'iri'Residence and Editor of Publications. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: • 

I have the honour to present the annual report of the work of the 
College Library for the year ending June 30, 1940. 

Size and Growth of the Library 

Number of volumes June 30, 1939 165,986 

Number of volumes added 1938-39 1939-40 

By purchase 2,756 2,942 

By binding 723 866 

By gifts and exchange 1,509 1,489 

By replacement 78 82 



Total additions 5,066 5,379 

Volumes withdrawn 681 173 



Net increase 4,385 5,206 



5,206 



Total volumes June 30, 1940 171,192 

Pamphlets added 444 321 

Pamphlets withdrawn 228 43 



Net gain 216 278 

Total accessioned pamphlets June 30, 1940 10,154 

The volumes were distributed by classes as follows showing that the 

relative rate of increase by subject matter remains about the same. 

1938-39 1939-40 

Class General Works 288 406 

Class 1 Philosophy and Psychology 186 213 

Class 2 Religion 109 140 

Class 3 Economics, Sociology, Education 703 791 

Class 4 Philology 215 180 

Class 5 Science 667 705 

Class 6 Applied Arts 68 141 

Class 7 Fine Arts 365 736 

Class 8 Literature 1,744 1,222 

Class 9 History, Biography, etc 721 845 



Total .... 5,066 5,379 

The Library has received by gift and exchange from institutions, societies 
and government bureaus some 1,500 books and pamphlets. Alumnae and 
friends of the College have contributed about 1,700 volumes. A few of the 
gifts are so outstanding as to deserve special mention. 

From the library of the late Professor Paul Shorey of the University 
of Chicago we received 325 of the early volumes of the Revue des Deux 
Mondes, the gift of Mrs. Shorey. The volumes fill in our set from 1835 to 
1890. 

[41] 



42 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Mrs. Allan Marquand presented a copy of the reproduction of the 
Tic\hill Psalter and Related Manuscripts, edited by D. D. Egbert and pub' 
lished under the auspices of the New York Public Library and the Depart- 
ment of Art and Archaeology of Princeton University, 1939. It is one of 
the richest Gothic manuscripts and of unusual interest to students of 
iconography and Biblical history. 

Miss Annie D. Ferree sent two art books: C. R. Morey's Gli Oggetti 
di Avorio e di Osso del Museo Sacra Vaticano, Biblioteca Apostolica Vati' 
cana, 1936, part of which was written by Professor Joseph C. Sloane; and 
the publications of the Committee for the Excavation of Antioch and its 
vicinity, Antioch on the Orontes Excavations of 1932, 1933-36, two volumes. 

Mr. Leonard Bacon, the father of Helen H. Bacon, 1940, presented a 
valuable second edition of the Matthaei Raderi Ad M. ~Valerii Martialis 
Epigrammaton, Libros Omnes, plenis commentariis, published at Ingolstadt 
by Sartorius in 1611. 

Susan Fowler, 1895, sent several books on Aristotle and a copy of 
Jowett's translation of Plato's Republic. Jeanne Kerr Fleischmann, 1910, 
presented a set of Thackeray's Works, in the Kensington edition, thirty-two 
volumes. Bertha Haven Putnam, 1893, sent several of her own publications 
issued by the Yorkshire Archaeological Society and the Ames Foundation. 
Miss Mary Winsor gave the money to purchase Hans Schrader's Die 
ArcKaischen Marmorbildwer\e der Acropolis, 1939, two volumes, a new, 
important work on Greek sculpture. 

In the spring the Deanery Committee of the Alumnae Association gave 
the Librarian permission to look over the Deanery Library and to select any 
volumes desired for the College Library. Some 270 volumes were chosen, 
mostly books of travel, of which Miss Thomas had a large collection, 
biography, English architecture and English literature. As time permits 
during the coming winter a further selection will be made. 

The buying activities of the Library have been confined largely to 
current publications and to those issued in the past ten years which are most 
useful. Only a few are important enough to warrant enumeration but they 
are the most significant of our acquisitions. As in the past, the largest 
expenditure has been made by the Departments of Art and Archaeology. 
Both had special funds, the Art Department the Jane and Harriet Brownell 
Fund; the Archaeology Department, the use of part of the Ella Riegel Scholar- 
ship Fund. The art purchases covered a wide range as is seen by the follow- 
ing selection of a few titles: W. R. W. Kohler, Die Karolingischen 
Minaturen, Berlin, 1933, volume one; Comte A. de. Laborde, Les Manuscrits 
a Peintures de la Cite de Dieu de St. Augustin, Paris, 1909, three volumes: 
T. H. Fokker, Roman Baroque Art, London, 1938, two volumes; Medieval 
studies in memory of A. Kingsley Porter, Harvard University Press, 1939, 
two volumes; Werner Hegemann, City Planning and Housing, New York, 

1938, three volumes; Samuel Newson, Japanese Garden Construction, Tokyo, 

1939. A number of books were bought on French and English painting. 
The Archaeology Department could not secure many of the foreign 

publications ordered because of the war in Europe and curtailed transportation 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 43 

facilities. A few of the orders placed early in the year were filled but many 
important works have not been supplied. Whenever possible, purchases were 
made in this country and a number of the publications of the Oriental 
Institute of the University of Chicago were acquired to fill in our set. 

In literature our acquisitions were for the most part limited to recently 
published books and useful, but not rare, older works. We have continued 
our purchases in South American literature adding 250 volumes to what is 
beginning to be a notable collection. A few of the noteworthy purchases 
for English were: Chaucer, The Text of the Canterbury Tales, edited by 
J. M. Manly and Edith Rickert, Chicago, 1940, eight volumes; Emerson's 
Letters, edited by R. L. Ruck, New York, 1939, six volumes; and the Yale 
edition of Horace Walpole's Correspondence, edited by W. S. Lewis and 
W. H. Smith, New Haven, 1939, eight volumes. Special emphasis has been 
placed on seventeenth and eighteenth century literature and history, a period 
which has hitherto been neglected. 

An effort has been made to build up our collection about the stage in 
England and America; a number of biographies of famous actors and actresses 
as well as histories of the stage, have been secured. In drama, the best of 
the modern plays in both England and America have been added and we 
have a fairly representative collection. 

The most valuable purchase by the Latin Department was a copy of 
Lucretius, Codex Vossianus oblongus phototypice editus, praefatus est 
Aemih'us Chatelain, Leyden, 1908. 

Other important additions of general interest were: 

Sir Aurel Stein. Innermost Asia, detailed report of explorations in 
Central Asia, Kan-su and Eastern Iran. Oxford Press, 1928. Three volumes 
with plates. 

A. B. Cook. Zeus, a study in ancient religion. London, 1939. Volume 
three to complete the set. 

Leonardo da Vinci. Literary wor\s, edited from original manuscripts 
by ]. P. and I. A. Kichter, new edition. London. 1939. Two volumes. 

Each year we endeavor to build up the resources of the Library by the 
acquisition of some important sets of periodicals or to fill in missing parts 
of an incomplete set. The additions this year were: 

American Association of Petroleum Geologists. Bulletin. 1918- 1926. 
volumes two to ten. 

American Journal of Cancer. 19 16' 1939, volumes one to thirtyfive. 

Annals of Mathematical Statistics. 1930T939, volumes one to ten. 

American Anthropologist. 1929-1939, volumes thirty-one to thirty-seven. 

Journal of American Folklore. 1918-1937, volumes thirty-one to fifty. 

The Catalogue 

The cataloguing of books purchased during the year was kept up to date 
and in addition many volumes which came as gifts were catalogued as far as 
time permitted. The art library of the late Professor G. G. King, consisting 



44 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

of over one thousand volumes, came to us in the summer of 1939. About 
one half of the collection was finished. The anthropological books given by 
Dr. Diamond Jenness were all catalogued and also many of the books from 
the Deanery. 

More analytic entries were made for the Geology Library, also several 
hundred analytic cards for sets of volumes, such as the United States 
Geological Survey which were filed in the main catalogue, were transferred 
to the Geology Library catalogue. The same procedure was followed in 
Mathematics. Author and general subject cards for all science books are, 
of course, kept in the main catalogue with duplicate cards for the department 
libraries except in the case of analytics. 

The copying of subject cards for the Biology and Mathematics Libraries 
was finished in the spring by the N. Y. A. students. This released them for 
other work and an author catalogue was started for the art books which 
were to be moved to the new stacks in the Quita Woodward Wing. Only 
1,486 cards were typed when the work was interrupted by the end of the 
college year. An arrangement was made whereby these same students were 
to continue this typing during the summer but other more pressing work 
intervened and the plan for a new catalogue had to be postponed. 

The transfer into the new stacks, the rearrangement of various semi' 
naries and the Carola Woerishoffer Memorial Room, necessitated remarking 
many books, withdrawing the cards from the catalogue, changing the numbers 
and refiling, all of which came under the supervision of the cataloguers. 
The students were of great help in this work for the young assistants in the 
Department were engaged in shelving the books as the men moved them. 
It was also decided to shelve the large sized art books according to a different 
arrangement which required the remarking of many of the folios, work 
which the students could do. 

The new edition of the Union List of Serials which is being prepared 
for printing, has been checked during the year as the preliminary sections 
have come to us. Each title entry must be looked up in our catalogue and 
our holdings listed. 

We have continued to cooperate with the Union Catalogue of the Phila' 
delphia Area by sending to it the cards for our new accessions. We have 
also continued the plan of adding to our catalogue the Haverford College 
Library author cards for new books which we do not possess, thus adding 
to our resources. Figures for these two projects are shown in the table of 
statistics for the year. 

A summary of the work of this department for two years is given for 
comparison: 

1938-39 1939-40 

Titles catalogued 3,222 3,44? 

Volumes, copies and editions added 3,117 3,534 

Volumes recatalogued 61 51 

Cards added to main catalogue 17,758 19,272 

Cards added to department catalogues 9,172 5,206 

Cards sent to Union Catalogue 3,541 3,508 

Haverford cards for new accessions, copied 1,342 1,022 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 45 

Binding 

On July 1, 1939, there were 203 volumes at the binder's. Twentyfive 
hundred and one volumes were sent during the year, 2,585 were returned 
bound, leaving 119 at the binder's June 30, 1940. Of the volumes which 
were bound, 411 were new books supplied unbound, 1,059 were volumes of 
periodicals and 1,115 were old books needing rebinding. 

Circulation and Reference 

The circulation of books, 44,616 volumes in 1939-40 as compared with 
41,413 in 1938-39, again shows an increase in the number of volumes regis- 
tered at the Loan Desk and in the Department Libraries. No figures are 
kept for the use of books in the libraries of the Halls of Residence nor of 
those sent to the Reserve Book Room after they have been deposited there. 
If these figures were included, as is the usage in many libraries, our statistics 
would be considerably increased. Of the total circulation, 7,946 volumes 
were placed on reserve in the Seminaries and in the Reserve Room. The 
faculty and staff borrowed 20% of the total, the students 60%, alumnae and 
inter-library loan account for 2% and the reserves for the remaining 18%. 

The following table indicates the circulation of books by classes, exclud- 
ing the books sent to the reserves: 

Bibliography and General Periodicals (bound) 373 volumes 

Philosophy and Psychology „ 2,544 

Religion and Church History 1,009 " 

Economics, Sociology, Education 4,389 

Philology 630 " 

Natural Sciences _ 2,105 

Applied Arts 433 

Fine Arts 3,336 

Literature 16,729 

History and Biography _ 5,122 

36,670 volumes 
Inter-Library Loan 

We have borrowed 382 volumes from thirty-seven institutions during 
the year. This figure, however, only partially indicates the number of books 
belonging to other libraries actually used, for many of our students go to 
the libraries in the vicinity and bring back books of which we have no record. 
Letters of introduction to other libraries were given to 167 students and 
faculty. 

To twenty-three libraries we have sent 73 volumes on inter-library loan. 

It is increasingly difficult to give any adequate summary of work which 
is growing so continuously. While statistics give figures which are larger 
each year, these figures give little intimation of the numerous and diversified 
ways in which the library is being used. They show, however, that it is 
being used more intensively. 



46 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Financial Statement 

Library appropriation for 1939-40 $15,000.00 

Receipts from course book fines, academic records, late 

registration and library fines 135.80 

Unappropriated balance from 1938-39 182.80 



Total income $15,3 18.60 

Appropriations were made as follows: 

Regular, to departments $13,775.00 

Special, to departments 1,130.00 



Total appropriated $ 14,905.00 



Unappropriated balance $413.60 

Special Library Funds 

Receipts were as follows: 

Invested funds (listed in Treasurer's report) $1,787.92 

Gifts (listed in Treasurer's report) 188.75 

Duplicate Book Fund 300.00 

Sale of Books 201.32 



Summary of Expenditures 



$2,477.99 



1938-39 1939-40 

For books $9,494.21 $8,412.94 

For periodicals and continuations 4,416.63 4,897.62 

For binding 3,647.10 3,276.76 

For supplies 766.16 886.52 

For postage, express 57.88 50.44 



$18,381.98 $17,524.28 

Administration 

It has been an unusually active year in the administration of the Library. 
In addition to the regular routine duties of the Librarian there were many 
conferences over the equipment for the new part of the building and discus- 
sion of plans for moving in the summer. It is a pleasure to report the 
completion of the Quita Woodward Wing of the Library. Although promised 
for early in the spring, it was not until nearly the first of June that the last 
workman left. 

It was expected that money would be available at this time for only three 
sets of stacks for the new wing; however a most welcome gift of $1,000.00 
from Mary Taylor Mason, of the Class of 1892, and an additional $100.00 
from Mrs. Pierre S. duPont of the same Class, made it possible partly to 
equip the second floor of the new stacks. The additional space thus gained 
was greatly needed for it permitted the removal of a larger number of books 
from the old stacks and so relieves the congestion there. The original plan 
had been to transfer only the art and archaeology books to the new stacks. 
With additional shelves twice as many volumes could be moved. After 
consultation with the faculty, it was decided to move the Greek and Latin 
group, both philology and literature, and the large collection of Biblical 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 47 

literature and history. On June 6th the first truck load of books was trans- 
ferred and from then on for six weeks, trucks of books rolled out of the old 
stacks and into the new. At the same time the contents of the offices of the 
professors, who were to occupy the new offices, were moved, as well as all 
the equipment belonging to the Art and Archaeology Departments. 

The enlargement of the Library made necessary the appointment of 
another assistant to take charge of that part of the building. Miss Marion 
Van Geem, a graduate of Mount Holyoke College and of the School of 
Library Science, Simmons College, was appointed for the year 1940-41. 
There were a number of changes on the staff. Miss Ruth Van Sickle, assist- 
ant in charge of the science libraries, resigned and in her place A. Geraldine 
Whiting, Ph.D. University of Chicago, was appointed. Miss Whiting spent 
one year at the Columbia University School of Library Service. Mrs. Mae 
E. Craig, first assistant in the Cataloguing Department, asked for a year's 
leave of absence and Priscilla Lee Reid, B.L.S. University of Montreal 
Library School, has been appointed in her place. The increase in the size 
of the student body has made greater demands on the Loan Desk and Reserve 
Book Room. To meet this, another untrained assistant, Caroline Ransom, 
A.B. Bryn Mawr 1939, was appointed. 

Twenty students were employed for the Reserve Book Room to cover 
the afternoon and evening hours and seven students were in charge of the 
Hall Libraries. Six N. Y. A. students were given work at the Loan Desk 
or in the Catalogue Department. 

The Library was represented by the Librarian at the Pennsylvania State 
meeting in October and at the meeting of Eastern College Librarians at 
Columbia University in November. 

In conclusion, I wish to acknowledge my appreciation of the loyalty 
with which the members of the staff have served the best interests of the 
Library. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOIS A. REED, 

Librarian. 



REPORT OF THE COLLEGE PHYSICIAN 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic 
year 1939-40. 

With the increase in size of the student body, the volume of medical 
work increased considerably during the past year. This is reflected most 
noticeably in the fact that there were 258 more dispensary cases, and 635 more 
dispensary visits than in the preceding year. While the infirmary admissions 
increased by only 10 for the year, the average daily census rose from 4.8 to 
5.8 patients. This was caused largely by the fact that 5 students were 
seriously injured in automobile accidents, and one by a fall while skating, and 
these students remained in the Infirmary for long periods while convalescing. 

As will be seen from the classification, infirmary admissions fall under 
the same diagnoses as in previous years, and occur in practically the same 
proportions, with the exception of the accident cases mentioned above. 

There was one case of scarlet fever during the year, which occasioned 
great concern as the student had been in the Infirmary twentyfour hours 
before characteristic symptoms appeared. The patient had apparently picked 
up her infection during the Christmas holiday. She had a moderately severe 
case of the disease and made an uneventful recovery. Routine Dick tests 
and throat cultures were done on all contacts, but by great and unexpected 
good fortune no secondary cases developed. One of the general duty nurses, 
who had been caring for the patient, had a throat culture positive for the 
same type of streptococcus found in the patient, presumably from contact 
with her. The nurse was taken off duty for several days until her throat 
culture became negative. 

Measles, in a mild form, was epidemic in Lower Merion Township 
during the spring, and there were four cases at the College. These four 
students had had no contact with each other and all of them presumably 
contracted the infection off the campus. As a prophylactic measure, injec 
tions of immune globulin were offered to contacts of these cases, and were 
accepted in some instances. There were no secondary cases. 

An increase in number of beds for the past year was accomplished as 
suggested in the previous annual report, by asking the nurse on duty at 
night to sleep in the treatment room when the Infirmary was full, by putting 
beds in the unused ground-floor kitchen, and by putting beds temporarily 
into the sunroom when necessary. As a result of these manoeuvres, actual 
shortage of beds was felt rather less than in the preceding year, but caring 
for patients in the kitchen was difficult owing to its distance from the nurses" 
station and supplies, and there was always an urgent wish to get bed 
patients out of the sunroom so that it could be used for convalescents. The 
most hopeful and encouraging statement to be made in this report is that a 
satisfactory plan of addition to and revision of the Infirmary was drawn up 
and approved during the winter and was carried out in the summer of 1940. 

[48] 



REPORT OF THE COLLEGE PHYSICIAN 49 

This plan provided fifteen single bedrooms, one of which can be used for 
two patients if necessary, one room for ill employees, and a room for the 
nurse on duty at night, on the second floor of the Infirmary. It also provided 
an excellent isolation unit, with two double bedrooms and a nurse's room, 
on the ground floor of the Infirmary. This should prove adequate for all 
usual medical care of bed patients for some time. 

Dr. Elizabeth Humeston, the Physician at Ellis College, acted as College 
Physician at Bryn Mawr for the first ten days of the fall term, as I had a 
leave of absence owing to illness. Dr. Humeston made the annual medical 
examinations of the employees and of the entering class. She did a thoroughly 
competent and satisfactory piece of work, and I am very grateful to her. 

There will be no change in the infirmary staff for the coming year. Full 
time duty for the technician and secretary has been very helpful and will be 
continued. It would be difficult, if not impossible, to get through the present 
volume of routine work without this. 

The health of the employees was good throughout the year. The system 
of follow-up under the supervision of the infirmary secretary for those 
employees undergoing treatment for syphilis at the Bryn Mawr Hospital is 
working out well and these employees are returning for treatment more 
regularly than in the past. 

The annual tuberculosis survey was carried out satisfactorily. No new 
cases of tuberculosis were found this year. Statistics as to the number of 
students tuberculin tested and X-rayed are on file at the Infirmary. 

The Hygiene course was given without substantial change this year. 
Each student is now allowed cuts from any lectures which cover material 
which she has already had elsewhere. This reduces overlapping with courses 
in other departments and makes the student more ready to accept the Hygiene 
requirement. To the majority of the students, however, the entire content 
of the course is new. 

The work of Dr. Stewart, the Attending Psychiatrist, again proved most 
valuable. Although the College had arranged for only one half day of her 
time per week, we were delighted to find that during most of the year she 
could give us two half days a week at the College. For the coming year it 
has been possible to plan to have her at the College regularly two mornings 
a week. Dr. Stewart interviewed 36 students. A number of these required 
appointments at frequent intervals, so that compared with the previous year 
there was more intensive work with somewhat fewer students. The total 
number of student interviews was 174. 

Infirmary Report 

Five'Tear Summary 

Total Total Aver. Stay Aver. Total Total Dis- 

Infirmary Infirmary per Patient Daily Dispensary pensary 

Year Admissions Days in Days Census Cases Visits 

193 5-36 258 739'/ 2 2.9 2.9 1,539 3,248 

1936-37 245 495J4 3.2 3.1 1,306 2,492 

1937-38 301 811 3.7 3.2 1,736 2,915 

1938-39 398 1, 23014 3-1 4.8 1,871 3,167 

1939-40 408 1,474 3.6 5.8 2,129 3,802 



50 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



Infirmary Admission Report for 1 939-40 



Number of 
Semester I. Admissions 

September'October 52 

November 52 

December 46 

January 56 

Semester II. 

February 66 

March 43 

April 4 5 

Mayjune 42 

Total Student Admissions 402 

Employees 3 

Staff 2 

Guest 1 



Infirmary 
Days 
162 
76 
168 
187 



Infirmary- 
Hours 
20l/ 2 

7 
20 



lOj/2 

22 
21 
12 



17 



10 



Grand Total Admissions 408 

1940 1941 1942 1943 Grads 

Semester 1 3 5 45 48 62 16 

Semester II 36 45 47 46 22 



1,474 3 

Employees Staff Guest 

2 

1 2 1 



71 



90 



95 108 



38 



1 



Reasons for Infirmary Admissions 

Semester I. 
Diseases of the Body as a Whole 

Exhaustion 1 7 

Readmission 

Food Allergy 1 

Measles 

Mononucleosis, Acute Infectious 

Scarlet Fever 

Diseases of the Skin 

Carbuncle — Cheek 

Carbuncle — Chest 

Dermatitis Venenata 

Infection— Finger 

Infection — Foot 

Laceration — Hand 

Paronychia 

Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System 

Contusion — Forehead 

Contusion — Forehead and Knee 

Fracture — Clavicle - 

Readmissions 

Fracture — Seventh Rib, Left 

Fracture — Body of Fifth Cervical Vertebra... 
Readmission 

Fracture — Body of First Lumbar Vertebra 

Fracture — Tranverse Processes of Lumbar 
Vertebrae 

Sprain — Right Ankle 

Sprain — Foot . 

Tear — Medial Meniscus — Right Knee 



Semester II. Total 



24 
1 



REPORT OF THE COLLEGE PHYSICIAN 51 

Diseases of the Respiratory System 

Bronchitis 1 

Common Cold 99 78 17 

Readmissions 3 6 

Grippe - 15 10 2 

Laryngitis 1 

Diseases of the Lymphatic System 

Lymphadenitis 1 

Diseases of the Digestive System 

Appendicitis — Acute 1 

Appendicitis — Subacute - 2 

Readmissions 2 

Appendicitis — Chronic Recurrent 1 

Gastritis - 1 

Gastroenteritis 30 27 5 

Readmission - 1 

Gastroenteritis with Appendiceal Irritation... 2 1 

Streptococcus Sore Throat 1 

Tonsillitis — Acute 1 

Vincent's Infection of Tonsils _ 2 

Diseases of the Urinary System 

Pyelonephritis 1 

Readmission 1 

Diseases of the Nervous System 

Idiopathic Grand Mai _ 1 

Diseases of the Eye 

Traumatic Conjunctivitis 1 

Diseases of the Ear 

Otitis Media — Purulent 1 

Undiagnosed Diseases Classified by Symptoms 

Abdominal Pain 112 

Dysmenorrhea 6 4 10 

Eye Strain _ 1 

Myalgia 1 

Pain in Toe _ 1 

Vertigo 1 

Non'Diagnostic Terms for Record 

Basal Metabolic Rate Determinations* 8 9 

Boarder 1 

Convalescent Care 

Contusion — Mid-Brain 1 

Extraction — Third Molars 2 1 

Nasal Haemorrhage _ 1 

Streptococcus Sore Throat 1 

Observation 112 

I am very grateful to the officers of administration and to the other 
members of the infirmary staff for their cooperation during a very strenuous 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

OLGA CUSHING LEARY, M.D., 

College Physician. 



* An additional basal metabolic rate determination was done on a 
student admitted ' under another diagnosis. Thus a total of eighteen such 
determinations was made during the year. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE 
EDUCATIONAL SERVICE 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 

Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1939-40: 

The Educational Service has had an active year, with larger numbers of 
children studied, broader contacts and greater success in introducing students 
to its work. 

The number of children examined individually rose from 104 to 154. 
This rise reflects for the most part an increase in the number examined for 
research projects, chiefly for a study of Abstract Thinking which the Assistant 
in the Educational Service was beginning. There were also small increases in 
other groups, however. The numbers in the clinical service increased from 
63 in 1938-39 to 72 in 1939-40. Of these 72, 60 were public and 9 private 
school children; 2 were referred by the Bryn Mawr Hospital; and one was 
an adult referred by a physician as a private case. The 60 public school 
children referred by the superintendent, the principals, or teachers in the 
Lower Merion School District compare with 54 studied last year; but repre- 
sent less than two thirds of those for whom examination was requested by the 
school authorities. Because of lack of time a total of 36 children so referred 
to the Service unfortunately could not be seen this year. 

Of the 72 individuals referred whose studies were made, about 30 per 
cent, were mentally retarded; 20 per cent, were children whose grade place- 
ment or educational progress was uncertain; 20 per cent, had difficulties in 
reading or speech; 15 per cent, showed behavior problems or emotional dis- 
turbances and 15 per cent, had various other bases for the examinations. 

The public school children studied this year came from five elementary 
schools in the district. In addition to the individual examinations, certain 
group tests were given as requested in three of these schools. Two other 
elementary schools referred the 36 children noted above, for whom no time 
could be found. Two children were referred for the first time by the Bryn 
Mawr Hospital. The private school children this year came from five schools. 
In one of these, as in the last two years, a complete school survey was made 
by group tests. 

A particular effort was made this year to have students see or take part 
in more of the work of the Service. As before they had no contact with the 
fee-paying cases, but observed, or in special cases participated in, the work 
done for the public schools without fee. Eight children were examined 
especially to demonstrate methods to students, but the general plan was to 
have students sit in on the regular service or research studies. In addition to 
the formal demonstrations 17 students observed a total of 57 examinations, 
29 of them given in the Pagoda and 28 in schools in the district. The work 
in the Pagoda can of course be seen more conveniently but that in the schools, 

[52] 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATIONAL SERVICE 53 

against the child's usual background, is often particularly illuminating, and is 
worth extra time and effort. This year as before difficulties in scheduling- — 
both from the point of view of the students and from the point of view of 
the children — prevented the degree of continuity that would be desirable, 
that is, arrangements which would enable the student to see a few cases 
through from beginning to end. 

The following tabulation shows how the work of the year was divided: 

Section I Students Assistant Director 

Wor^ with children from public schools* 

Group tests given to school grades 6 2 

Children examined individually: 

At request of superintendent and 

principals _ 6 17 22 

At request of teacher 5 10 

For research projects 45 21 

To demonstrate methods 3 5 

For practicef - 9 1 

VJor\ with children referred by the Bryn ~Mawr 
Hospital 
Children examined individually 2 

Totals 15 77 62 

Section II Number of Number of 

Wor\ with fee-paying cases, individuals conferences Fees 

done by the Director 

School survey by group tests, with con- 
sultation on individual children... $250.00 

Individual examinations 5 12 95.00 

Individual examinations followed by 

remedial work 5 68 240.00 

Totals 10 80 $585.00 



With more work than can be covered it is of course difficult to decide 
where the cuts shall be made. The 36 children whose examinations had to 
be omitted because of lack of time could have been seen, for example, if less 
time had been devoted to demonstration tests for students and to research. 
The division this year, however, struck a fairly satisfactory balance and the 
effort must clearly be to keep the clinical service, the training and the research 
functions of the Educational Service in satisfactory balance. 

* Mrs. K. Mayer, a volunteer teacher, gave 13 reading lessons to four of 
the children listed in this group. 

f Our graduate student, a private school teacher, made 45 additional 
examinations in her school for practice. 



54 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

The fees of $585.00 in 1939-40 failed to meet the expenses of the year. 
These were: 

Salary of Assistant $500.00 

Additional salary of Secretary _ 100.00 

Supplies and Telephone 11.69 



Total $6 1 1 .69 

To meet the additional expenses of $26.69 the Educational Service Fund, 
accumulated from fees of earlier years, was drawn on. The sum of $1677.82 
remains in the Fund. 

Respectfully submitted, 

KATHARINE E. McBRIDE, 

Director of the Educational Service. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE 
BUREAU OF RECOMMENDATIONS 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1939-40. 

Total Calls to the Bureau - ! 294 

Teaching Positions _ 123 23 college, 93 school, 7 

tutors; 17 of the school posi' 
tions were apprentice ones and 
2 were temporary. 

Non-Teaching Positions 126 16 part-time, 21 summer, 10 

temporary. 

Small Positions 45 typing, selling, etc. 

Placements made by the Bureau 56 

Positions offered but refused by the candidate 2 

Total 58 

Teaching Positions: 

Full-time 6 (2 college, 4 school) 

Apprenticeships 3 

Tutor 1 

Total 10 

Positions offered 1 

Total 11 

Non-Teaching Positions: 

Full-time 7 

Temporary 5 (3 summer) 

Part-time 6 

Total 18 

Position offered 1 

Total 19 

Small Positions 28 

Placements in colleges were made at: 
Beaver College 
Sweet Briar College 
and in schools at: 

The Baldwin School 
Booth School 
The Brearley School 
Holton-Arms School 
Potomac School 
Westover School 

[55] 



56 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

The comparison of the records of the Bureau in 1938-39 and 1939-40 
is as follows : 

1939-40 1938-39 

Total calls 294 309 

Placements 56 90 

Teaching calls _ 123 149 

Colleges _ 23 33 

Placed 2 3 

Schools 93 101 

Placed 7 1 

Tutors 7 1 5 

Placed 1 8 

Non-Teaching calls: 

Full-time or regular part-time - 126 116 

Placed 18 29 

Small positions _ 45 44 

Placed 28 34 

The number of calls to the Bureau was about the same as last year. 
Again very few placements were made in teaching positions, partly on 
account of our small supply of teachers and partly because, in many cases, 
too ^little salary was offered to interest any qualified alumna. Many of the 
non-teaching positions also offered such small salaries that no one was 
interested. 

Members of the Class of 1940 who Corresponding 

have positions 1940-41: figures for 1939 

Teaching 12 12 

Miscellaneous 24 13 

Members of the Class of 1940 who are doing 

graduate work 1940-41 10 18 

Members of the Class of 1940 who are studying 

at medical school 2 2 

Members of the Class of 1940 who are studying 

at law school 1 

Members of the Class of 1940 who are studying 

art and music 3 2 

Members of the Class of 1940 who are taking 

business courses 2 7 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUISE F. H. CRENSHAW, 
Director of the Bureau of Recommendations. 



REPORT OF THE CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
THE MADGE MILLER RESEARCH FUND 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1939-40. 

The committee appointed by you to administer the Madge Miller 
Research Fund for the year 1939'40 informed each member of the faculty 
by letter that applications were in order for grants in support of research. 

In response to this letter the Committee received applications for grants 
that exceeded the amount of money available. The Committee made five 
grants. In all cases it was found impossible to appropriate the full amount 
desired, which was regretted, but in every case the amount granted seemed 
to be of material help in the promotion of research. 

In the administration of the grants all charges and requisitions against 
each grant were made through the offices of the College in the usual way. 

The following grants were made: 

Grant Number 28 — Arthur C. Cope 

Part salary research assistant $100.00 

Grant Number 29 — Mary S. Gardiner 

Research assistant 75.00 

Grant Number 30 — Jane M. Oppenheimer 

Research assistant .._ 100.00 

Grant Number 31 — Lily Ross Taylor and T. Robert S. Broughton 

Toward preparation of index of Tenney Frank's 

Economic Survey of the Roman Empire 100.00 

Grant Number 32 — Arthur Colby Sprague 

Collection of references from source material 50.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

DAVID HILT TENNENT, 

Chairman of the Committee. 



[57] 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL 
EXCAVATIONS AT G6ZLO KULE, TARSUS 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

As I stated in my last report, it seemed wise, in view of the present 
conditions in Europe, to have all excavated material removed from our house 
at Tarsus and to have it placed in the Adana Museum which built a new 
wing especially for our material. The excavation house in Tarsus has been 
closed and handed over to the owners. Sherds and study material are now 
stored in a warehouse where we believe they will be reasonably safe. 

Preparations for publication of objects found in the excavations are now 
going on. The section on the Islamic, Roman and Hellenistic periods is 
receiving our immediate attention. Miss Florence E. Day, at present on a 
grant from the Institute for Advanced Study, is completing the Islamic part. 
I am working on terracottas and lamps. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HETTY GOLDMAN, 

Director of the Archaeological Excavations at Tarsus. 



[58] 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 

to 
THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

of 
BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

for the year 
1940-41 



Published by Bryn Mawr College 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

December, 1941 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Report of the President of the College 3 

Supplement I, Changes in the Academic Staff 10 

Supplement II, Faculty Publications 12 

Report of the Dean of the College 16 

Supplement, Statistics of Undergraduate Students 17 

Repqrt of the Acting Dean of the Graduate School 19 

Report of the Director-in-Residence and Editor of Publications 24 

Report of the Librarian 32 

Report of the College Physician 39 

Supplement, Infirmary Report 42 

Report of the Director of the Educational Service 44 

Report of the Director of the Bureau of Recommendations 46 

Report of the Chairman of the Committee on the 

Madge Miller Research Fund 48 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 

To the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1940-41. 

This includes the eight months which make up the academic year 
of Bryn Mawr College, from October 1, 1940 to June 4, 1941, and of the 
summer months following. In the midst of the increasing confusion of the 
world our routine has seemed to go on not with a careless but a deliberate 
smoothness. It is I think remarkable that while the under surface tension 
showed itself in occasional restlessness and disintegration of interests, on the 
whole it was plainly transmuted into a determined sticking to business and an 
increasingly steady drive in the serious work — academic and non-academic — 
of the College. 

For the first time since 193? the academic work had a complete framework 
of buildings. The enlarged Infirmary slipped into use without any official 
notice, but the Quita Woodward Wing of the Library was formally opened on 
October 18th and 19th, a Saturday and Sunday when both the members of 
the Board and the alumnae returning for the annual week-end might attend it. 
By the generosity of Mrs. John D. Mcllhenny and Mr. Henry Mcllhenny of 
Philadelphia, a distinguished group of modern French pictures was shown 
through the week-end in the galleries of the third floor. To introduce the 
building and its uses at once to less frequent visitors the Alumnae Executive 
Committee had asked members of the Art and Archaeology faculty to speak 
about their work and to show the building, and at the formal exercises in 
Goodhart Hall the College invited Mr. Francis Henry Taylor, the recently 
appointed Director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and Professor Rhys 
Carpenter to speak. Late on Sunday afternoon the family of Quita Woodward 
and her college friends met in the beautiful memorial room where special 
collections of the new books are housed and where her portrait by Violet 
Oakley, the gift of the Class of 1932, hangs over the fireplace. 

The report of the Librarian will have something to say about the connec- 
tions between the older library and the new wing, the use of the new stack 
spaces and the general atmosphere of space and order which the Library as a 
whole now offers. Certainly the day-by-day use of the building through the 
year has proved again and again the value of the careful planning on the part 
of the Faculty Committee and the Librarian within the pattern of the 
architect's blueprints. 

During the winter and spring considerable gilding of the lily took place. 
In April Mr. Alec Miller who had carved the gargoyles in the Library Cloister 
in 1909 and the inscription across the front of the Library in 1937, reappeared 
miraculously and finished the formal doorway of the wing in beautiful simple 
designs. And beside the Quita Woodward Memorial Room, three others were 
completed, — the small, perfect museum named in honour of Ella Riegel, of 
the Class of 1889, who at the time of the Fiftieth Anniversary had made a 
gift of $50,000 toward the erection of the library wing; the undergraduate 

[3] 



4 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

reading room, spacious and pleasant, given by the parents of Elizabeth Bigelow, 
of the Class of 1930; and the archaeological seminary in the old building 
adjoining the new wing rebuilt and redecorated as a gift of the family of 
Ruth Emerson Fletcher, of the Class of 1893. 

Before Commencement Day the Class of 1912 carried through the 
arrangements for the Rare Book Room which was selected as its reunion gift 
to the College. The former New Book Room in the M. Carey Thomas Library 
is now a miracle of compactness, and loses none of its distinction by reason 
of its practical convenience. In its glass cases and shelves the fine or rare 
books owned by the College or loaned for particular occasions can be shown. 
And during the summer the Class of 1907 has by its generous reunion gift 
turned the former Art Seminary opening out of the Reading Room into a 
quiet and convenient writing-room for students who wish seriously to learn to 
write. This has meant various problems, especially of lighting and quiet, all 
skilfully solved, and a beautiful room has resulted. 

I should like to point out how increased provision for quiet, uninterrupted 
study has gone along with the increased importance laid on advanced under- 
graduate work. The great reading room in the Library with its 140 con- 
venient desks was once large enough. Since 1935 there has been added new 
library and study space in Dalton Hall for Biology, Physics and Mathematics 
students, for Geology and Chemistry students in the New Science Building, 
and for the students of The History of Art and Archaeology in the Quita 
Woodward Wing. On two out of the three floors of the new stacks carrels 
have been built in for the special use of students who must work with more 
books than can be conveniently carried to the general reading rooms, and 
another sixteen can be added on the third floor when we can pay for them. 
And, finally, in each residence hall a quiet study room has been contrived, 
with work tables and comfortable chairs. With the addition of the new 
writing room I think we have provided places where the independent, con- 
centrated work the College asks for can be done. 

Two building projects not laid down in the original program were 
carried out. "Ty-Bach," literally "Small House, 1 ' designed by Mr. Martin, 
was built for the Director of Halls on the Wyndham property, and an 
extensive rebuilding of the basement floor of Dalton Hall was made necessary 
by a fire of unknown origin which occurred on January 23rd. The fire itself 
was kept to one floor by the good work of the Bryn Mawr Fire Company, but 
the smoke and fumes were sucked up into the four other stories of the building 
through the stair well, blistering paint and plaster, and, much more important, 
harming some of the delicate apparatus on the upper floors. The insurance 
carried by the College covered the fire damage, but we were required by the 
Building Division of the State Department of Labor to put fire doors on each 
floor opening from the stairs. At the expense of a thousand dollars we have 
gained a feeling of greater security and considerably more quiet in the Dalton 
classrooms and laboratories. 

The new paths which could only be laid down when the building program 
ended deserve a special paragraph. Their direct lines have kept even walkers 
in a hurry off the grass, and the pleasant patterns they make have pleased 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 5 

everyone who has used them. I hope the Chairman of the Buildings and 
Grounds Committee, to whom much of their design is due, may be soon 
empowered to reconsider the present ugly and roundabout connections between 
the various central campus buildings. 

The Board of Directors 

The four stated meetings of the Board were held at the Deanery, and 
with a few exceptions the standing committees met here as well. The Alumnae 
Representatives on the Board have agreed to spend time on the campus before 
and after the Board meetings to familiarize themselves gradually with the 
college activity which does not raise its head in the Board meetings — the 
housekeeping arrangements, for instance, the servants 1 quarters and food, the 
medical care of ill and convalescent students, and the facilities for student 
interests in acting, art and painting. This firsthand knowledge and the sug' 
gestions based on it will bring fresh air into our plans. 

A second obvious assistance to the administration was the appointment 
of a Board Committee on Public Relations which among other things will 
endeavor to coordinate the work done in the present administrative offices 
with that of the alumnae groups everywhere. The number of students at Bryn 
Mawr is by our best judgment limited. We have consequently a particular 
duty not only to find successors to our alumnae, as able as they have been, 
but to get as much variety as we can onto our campus. 

The Faculty and Staff 

The supplement to my report presents the changes in faculty and staff 
with which the year started off. 

At one time a complete change for the coming year in the three important 
administrative offices of the College seemed probable. The automatic retire' 
ment of the President was due in June, Miss Schenck presented her resignation 
from the deanship of the Graduate School in order to return to full time work 
in the French Department, and in March Mrs. Manning resigned as Dean of 
the College to accept a professorship in the Department of History. At the 
March meeting, the Chairman of the Board reported that the Committee on 
the Choice of a New President had asked for more time to continue its work 
and that he had asked the President to remain during 1941-42. Dean Schenck 
agreed in view of the coming change in the presidency to remain for another 
year with the understanding that she increase her work in the French Depart' 
ment at once and decrease correspondingly the amount of time given to the 
Graduate Dean's office. With the same regard to a new president, an acting 
dean, Julia Ward, 1923, was appointed for the coming year. I do not need 
to point out that a new president and two new deans means a lively time in 
the college offices, though the continuance of Mrs. Manning and Miss Schenck 
on the faculty does much to cushion the shock. The choice of the new deans 
should clearly be made in relation to the new president and in consultation 
with her. I believe it should follow the announcement of her choice as soon 
as possible. 



6 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Dean Schenck's contribution to the Graduate School can be estimated 
when she leaves the office. Mrs. Manning has rendered great services to the 
College during her years as Dean and Acting President, and I am sorry that 
President Thomas under whom she began her deanship cannot contribute 
her thanks and praise again now. She has made many contributions to the 
improvement of the curriculum and it was largely due to her efforts that the 
present regulations with regard to advanced work, honours work and the 
final examination in the major subject were adopted. Her administration of 
the routine of the office has been just and generous; individual students have 
found her a careful adviser and groups and classes have looked to her to 
define and protect their interests. She has always brought to the Dean's office 
a breath of the world outside and helped the College to keep its connections 
without feeling itself isolated on the one hand or confused on the other. 
The faculty and the new President will be fortunate in having Mrs. Manning 
present for advice and counsel and as a full time member of the teaching staff. 

On January 14, 1941, Professor David Hilt Tennent died, for thirty-four 
years associate professor and professor in the Department of Biology, and 
since 1938 special research professor. Dr. Tennent was a scholar of wide 
recognition, a careful and at the same time a stirring teacher, a singularly 
honest and upright man. His death brought sorrow to everyone who knew 
him and the flood of praise for his work and grief for his loss showed how 
many were counted in that number. A memorial service for him was held on 
the 16th of February in Goodhart Hall by the Board of Directors and the 
Faculty of the College. 

The Sabbatical leave for the year of Miss Schenck from her work in the 
French Department, the continuing appointment of Mr. Fenwick on the 
Neutrality Court sitting in Rio de Janeiro, which allowed him only brief and 
irregular residence at the College, and the arrangement by the University of 
Pennsylvania and Bryn Mawr College for the joint use of Mr. David's time, 
half as Director of Libraries of the University of Pennsylvania, and half in 
the continuance of his work as professor in the Department of History here, 
should be specially noted. Dr. Arthur Clay Cope, on leave during the year, 
whose research work has often been noted, resigned his position as Associate 
Professor of Chemistry to accept a professorship at Columbia. No appoint' 
ment was made in the Department of Education to replace Dr. Use Forest. 

The list of faculty publications printed later in this report, the important 
positions in professional associations held by members of the faculty and the 
standard of work for the Bryn Mawr degrees accounts for much faculty time. 
The Board should also recognize that the arrangements of the Plan of Gov- 
ernment (1919) require faculty service on committees which because they are 
important are also time consuming. This is especially true of the Committees 
on Appointments, Curriculum and Admissions, and during this particular year 
of the special committee elected by the faculty to consult with the Directors' 
Committee on the choice of a President. In estimating the contribution of the 
faculty to Bryn Mawr College, its heavy committee work should not be 
forgotten: I believe that in time it can be properly reduced and that Board 
and faculty should consider ways to this end. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 

A particular service was done during the year by members of the science 
faculty who at the students 1 request gave a series of eight lectures open to the 
College on the "History of Science." These were attended by from one hundred 
to one hundred and fifty students and faculty, and made so much impression 
on both groups that a longer series on the same subject is to be offered as a 
regular elective course. A second interesting series of three lectures on 
"Economic Legal and Institutional Foundations of the Next Peace" was given 
by members of the three Social Science faculties at Haverford for Haverford 
and Bryn Mawr students and faculty and repeated at Swarthmore. 

The instruction offered by the College was further amplified by the 
Anna Howard Shaw lectures given by Dr. Ruth Fulton Benedict, Associate 
Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University, in Goodhart Hall to a 
large audience during the first six weeks of the second semester; Mrs. Benedict 
conducted the graduate seminary in Anthropology during her visit and met 
the undergraduate class. 

The presidents of Haverford, Swarthmore and Bryn Mawr met frequently 
through the winter in an attempt to increase for 1941-42 the cooperation 
between the three colleges in which they are all deeply interested. The most 
ambitious plan, that for a series of joint projects in the field of Economics 
and Politics had to be arbitrarily reduced because of changes in the Swarth- 
more faculty and the inability to leave Europe of two of the three visiting 
lecturers and professors originally assigned to the three colleges by the Emer- 
gency Committee in Aid of Displaced Foreign Scholars. A modified plan was 
arranged, however, and ground laid for increased exchange of faculty and 
classes. It has always been clear that a cooperation which adds variety to the 
courses now offered by each college is relatively easy to arrange; no one is 
charged with poaching, and irritating and inconvenient details are absent. 
On the other hand, a cooperation which eliminates some of the present repeti- 
tion of courses tends to come slowly. A perfectly worked out system would 
require a considered plan of faculty appointment between the three colleges; 
this ir it is ever decided on ior obvious reasons can come into effect only very 
slowly. It will always depend on a willingness to cooperate with the possible 
implications of inconvenience and adaptation, and of relinquishment of 
important or favorite courses in one of the two cooperators. I must point out, 
however, that we may soon find the bayonet behind us and be forced to do 
in haste what we should prefer to do at leisure. I hope the three faculties 
as well as the executive officers may anticipate necessity by voluntary and 
extensive experiment now. 

The Student Body 

The numbers of both graduate and undergraduate students were high 
this year. The Acting Dean of the Graduate School reports the details of the 
graduate enrollment, which included besides our own appointments several 
students holding at Bryn Mawr fellowships from other sources. Our own 
travelling fellows all worked in American institutions. The number of nation- 
alities represented among the resident students carries on an old tradition of 
the College which we feared would go by the board in a year of difficult and 



8 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

even impossible travel. Variety of another kind was added by the exchange 
of students between the College and the University of Pennsylvania and by 
the enrollment of 13 men for courses at the College. Miss Taylor reports also 
the large numbers of graduate degrees awarded at Commencement. Her own 
work in the Graduate Office ensured confidence and satisfaction in all general 
matters coming before the Graduate Committee of the Faculty and the graduate 
student body. 

I should include even in this brief report the death during the summer 
of an able young chemist on the faculty of Connecticut College, Edith Ford 
Sollers, Ph.D. 1937 at Bryn Mawr, which followed an accidental explosion in 
the laboratory of the University of Maryland where Miss Sollers was working 
as a volunteer in defense research. Other Bryn Mawr graduates are working 
in laboratories and offices in actual defense projects and in the increased 
government work connected with the present national situation. 

The number of undergraduate students rose to 500. In July the Admis' 
sions Committee found an unusual number of well prepared and recommended 
candidates for its entering class and believed that in accepting them it had 
filled all the rooms in the halls with a set of students perhaps more promising 
than ever before. During the late summer, however, an unexpected number 
of upper class students withdrew, among them eleven who decided to spend 
the Junior year at other institutions, and there were in consequence a few 
vacant rooms in the halls. Of the eleven, eight have registered at the College 
again for the Senior year, and in turn another group of students in the 
Sophomore Class this year have arranged to be away from Bryn Mawr for 
1941'42. Dean Manning's report comments on this new situation. 

There might, I think, be added to Dean Manning's general report a few 
instances of the increasingly good organization of the undergraduate com' 
munity by the undergraduates themselves. 

1. In 1941-42 the Self'Government Association will celebrate its control 
of the conduct of the students for fifty years. 

2. Last year the budgets for all student organizations were drawn up 
early and met by a single drive in October. The plan was repeated this year 
and $5000 raised and assigned to the groups under the Bryn Mawr League 
in charge of various kinds of social and community work, to the Peace Council 
and the Refugee Scholarships of the Undergraduate Association, to the 
Players Club, and to various outside groups to which the College is asked 
to contribute: Red Cross, Philadelphia Community Chest, International and 
Far Eastern Student Service, Hudson Shore Labor School, etc. Such a careful 
and successful plan for supporting general interests seems to me excellent 
practice for future members of any community. 

3. The Undergraduate Association through the Curriculum Committee 
presented student opinion to the faculty on various academic matters. It again 
arranged five of the eight monthly assemblies of the year, providing for two 
of them student speakers and in the other three holding conferences on the 
subjects presented by the outside speakers they had chosen. In May the first 
meeting of the general college forum was held, to be continued at regular 
intervals. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 9 

4. The League organized a daylong Haverford'SwarthmorcBryn Mawr 
conference in March on Community Work which could be seriously attacked 
in college, with expert speakers and an attendance of 150. 

5. The two plays of the year given by Haverford and Bryn Mawr jointly, 
"Our Town" and "Midsummer Right's Dream," were good enough almost 
to pass beyond the amateur stage. The question of holding the May Day 
Pageant, which had been decided in the negative for 1940 and 1941, 
was again under discussion in the spring. A final vote will be taken in 
November. Opinion among alumnae as well as on the campus has been much 
divided and the complications, financial, aesthetic, and, so to speak, political, 
increase with discussion. 

All in all, I feel the energy and intelligence of the students can be 
increasingly trusted to control and direct the life on the campus; it is a serious 
and intelligent rehearsal for many of the activities in which they will take 
part later. 

The national and international situation made itself felt everywhere in 
the college work and life. Much of this was naturally intangible; a few facts, 
like the Directors' vote in regard to military service of the faculty, can be 
noted. Contributions of money were made to the Red Cross, the British 
Relief (an ambulance), and Bundles for Britain, and a Red Cross Workshop 
was run in Goodhart Hall for the year; distinguished speakers brought to the 
campus by various organizations discussed many subjects of immediate interest; 
a Defense Council was organized among the faculty and conducted a highly 
developed and varied program. The Directors were asked to allow the use of 
the campus during the summer for some educational work which might be 
useful to the government and welhdeveloped plans for courses at graduate 
level in the applications of science and in the modern languages were presented 
fully to the bureaus in Washington. When none of them seemed acceptable, 
the College welcomed a proposal from the Red Cross to conduct on the 
campus a Red Cross nursing course for college graduates. This was held 
from June 26th to September 12th, and its Executive Committee believed that 
it had proved invaluable as a pattern of what might be done all over the 
country and hoped it might be repeated next year. 

The Board voted to allow the 150-200 members of the Institute of 
International Relations of the American Friends Service Committee to hold 
a conference on the campus from June 27th to July 6th. They used the 
Pembrokes, Denbigh and Goodhart Hall. 

Budget 

The budget for the year as accepted in May 1940 showed a surplus of 
about $5000 and even as the Board accepted it, the members were asked to 
remember that in a turnover of almost a million dollars this small amount was 
in no sense a proper margin. By October it had in fact disappeared and a 
paper deficit of $5000 replaced it. This shift was in part due to the few 
vacant rooms in the halls not allowed for in the item of rents, to the necessary 
purchase of a new generator for which the first of four annual payments was 
to be made, to the additional cost of altering offices in the old library and the 



10 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

making of new walks which cost somewhat more than Mr. Strawbridge's 
generous gift for them. It was offset in part by an increase in fees from the 
graduate students and by a few savings in operating expenses and in part by 
a slight increase in income from investments. The year closed with a surplus 
of about $3000 which would have been $1000 more if the changes in Dalton 
Hall required by the Building Division of the State Department of Labor 
had not been necessary. 

The various enterprises managed by the College were outstandingly 
successful. The College Book Shop had an operating surplus of $1,117.28. 
After providing student help to the amount of $740, $600 of this has been 
appropriated for scholarships for 1941'42. For the Low Buildings Association, 
the excess of receipts over expenditures for the year was $1,839.31, of which 
$1000 will be applied to reduction of the debt of the association. The net 
earnings for the College Inn, after providing $2500 for renewing the equipment, 
was $5,277.27; this will be applied toward the reduction of the Inn's debt. 

Commencement 

The year closed with a pleasant Commencement to which two old friends 
of the President contributed, Rufus M. Jones the Baccalaureate sermon, and 
William Allan Neilson the Commencement address. 
Respectfully submitted, 

MARION EDWARDS PARK, 

President of the College. 



SUPPLEMENT TO THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

I. 

Changes in the Academic Staff of Bryn Mawr College 
October 1, 1940 - September 30, 1941 

Faculty Who Returned From Leave of Absence in the Autumn of 1940 

Rhys Carpenter, Ph.D., Professor of Classical Archaeology 

James Llewellyn Crenshaw, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry (absent 

semester II., 1939-40) 
Lily Ross Taylor, Ph.D., Professor of Latin (absent semester II., 1939-40) 
Mildred Fairchild, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Social Economy and Social 

Research (absent semester II., 1939-40) 



Jean William Guiton, Licencie es Lettres, Assistant Professor of French 
(absent for military service September 1939 to December 1940) 

Faculty on Leave of Absence 1 940*41 

Eunice Morgan Schenck, Ph.D., Professor of French and Dean of the 

Graduate School 
Charles Ghequiere Fenwick, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Political Science 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 11 

Karl L. Anderson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics 

Arthur Clay Cope, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Richard Bernheimer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History of Art (absent 

semester II.) 
K. Laurence Stapleton, A.B., Assistant Professor of English (absent 

semester II.) 
Ilse Forest, Ph.D., Lecturer in Education (absent semester II.) 

Promotions, 1940'41 

Edward H. Watson, Ph.D., promoted from Associate Professor to Professor 

of Geology 
Paul Weiss, Ph.D., promoted from Associate Professor to Professor of 

Philosophy 
Arthur Lindo Patterson, Ph.D., promoted from Assistant Professor to 

Associate Professor of Physics 

T^ew Appointments for the Year 1940'41 

Robert E. L. Faris, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology 

L. Joe Berry, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology 

Elizabeth Vanderbilt Fehrer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education 

and Psychology 
Michael A. Heilperin, D.Sc, Lecturer in Economics 
Fritz Karsen, Ph.D., Lecturer in Education 
Germaine Lafeuille, Agregee des lettres, Lecturer in French 
Mary Henderson, A.B., Instructor in English 
Evan C. Horning, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry 
Ludwig W. Kahn, Ph.D., Instructor in German 
Mary Roberts Meigs, A.B., Instructor in English 
Susanna Louise Wright, A.B., Instructor in Italian 
Anita Evelyn Dunlevy, A.B., Reader in Philosophy 
Annette Baker Fox, A.B., Reader in Politics 
Dorothy Dudley Scovil, A.B., Reader in Mathematics 
Helen G. Weaver, M.A., Demonstrator in Psychology 
Helen Jo Whetstone, B.S., Demonstrator in Geology 
Troyer Steele Anderson, D.Phil., Lecturer in History, semester II. 
Marianna D. Jenkins, M.A., Lecturer in History of Art, semester II. 
Margaret Coss Flower, A.B., Instructor in English, semester II. 

Resignations and Expirations, June 1941 

Arthur Clay Cope, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Ilse Forest, Ph.D., Lecturer in Education 

William Cabell Greet, Ph.D., Lecturer in English 

Michael A. Heilperin, D.Sc, Lecturer in Economics 

Fritz Karsen, Ph.D., Lecturer in Education 

Germaine Lafeuille, Agregee des lettres, Lecturer in French 

Florence Whyte, Ph.D., Lecturer in Spanish 



12 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Gustav Tugendreich, M.D., Research Associate in Social Economy 

Madeleine Hunt Appel, MA., Instructor in Education 

Isabelle Lawrence Gonon, MA., Instructor in French 

Evan C. Horning, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry 

Susanna Louise Wright, A.B., Instructor in Italian 

Elizabeth Porter Wyckoff, A.B., Instructor in English 

Annette Baker Fox, A.B., Reader in Politics 

Dorothy King Benedict, M.A., Demonstrator in Geology 

Norma L. Curtis, B.S., Demonstrator in Physics 

Elizabeth Mary Osman, M.S., Demonstrator in Chemistry 

Madeleine Tritch Thomas, M.A., Demonstrator in Physics 

Edwin Harris Colbert, Ph.D., Lecturer in Vertebrate Paleontology, 

semester I. 
Troyer Steele Anderson, D.Phil., Lecturer in History, semester II. 
Marianna D. Jenkins, M.A., Lecturer in History of Art, semester II. 



SUPPLEMENT TO THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

II. 

Faculty Publications for the Year 
October 1, 1940 - September 30, 1941 

This report is based on questionnaires sent out in October 1941. 

Richard Bernheimer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History of Art 

(Review.) Mongan, Agnes'Sachs, Paul. The Drawings in the Fogg 
Museum of Art. Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 1940. 
Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 21 1 : 14'16, January 1941. 

Germaine Bree, Agregee, Assistant Professor of French 

(Translation.) Romains, Jules. Seven Mysteries of Europe. London, 
Melbourne, Hutchinson and Co., Ltd., 1940. New York, Knopf, 1940. 
(In collaboration with Marguerite Lehr.) Source et emploi d'un episode 
dans A la recherche du temps perdu. Romanic Review 31: 372'379, 1940. 

T. Robert S. Broughton, Ph.D., Professor of Latin 
(Reviews.) 

Rhys Carpenter, Ph.D., Professor of Classical Archaeology 

(Addresses.) The Vision of Ancient Life. University of Pennsylvania 
Bicentennial Conference. University of Pennsylvania Press, Studies in 
the Arts and Architecture, 15'24, 1941. (Review.) Bliimel. Griechische 
Bildhauer. Classical Wee\ly 35 2 : 18-19, 1941. 

Samuel Claggett Chew, Ph.D., Professor of English Literature 

(Reviews.) T^lew Tor\ Herald'Trihune Boo\s. The Christian Science 
Monitor. The Tale Review. The Art Bulletin. The Moslem World. 

Hilde D. Cohn, Ph.D., Part'time Instructor in German 

Symbole in Adalbert Stifter's "Studien" und "Bunten Steinen." Monat- 
shejte fiir Deutschen Unterricht 33: 241'264, 1941. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 13 

Edwin Harris Colbert, Ph.D., Part-time Lecturer in Vertebrate Paleon- 
tology, semester I. 
The Tar Pit Tiger. Natural History 46: 284-287, 1940. Where the 
Cats Came From. Natural History 46: 288-289, 1940. Pleistocene Mam- 
mals from the Ma Kai Valley of Northern Yunnan, China. American 
Museum Kiovitates 1099: 1-10, 1940. Nomenclature and Correlation of 
the North American Continental Tertiary. Bulletin of the Geological 
Society 52: 1-48, 1941. (In collaboration with H. E. Wood and others.) 
The Ancestral Ursid, Hemicyon, in Nebraska. Bulletin of the University 
of J^ebraska State Museum 2: 49-57, 1941. The Osteology and Rela- 
tionships of Archaeomeryx, an Ancestral Ruminant. American Museum 
Tiovitates 1135: 1-24, 1941. A Study of Orycteropus gaudryi from the 
Island of Samos. Bulletin of the American Museum of J^atural History 
78: 305-351, 1941. The Type of Clepsysaurus pennsylvanicus and its 
bearing on the Genus Rutiodon. ~Njotulae J^aturae 90: 1-19, 1941. (In 
collaboration with R. G. Chaffee.) Three Animals That Went to Sea. 
Natural History 48: 96-99, 112, 1941. Our Vanished Herds. Frontiers 
6: 8-10, 1941. 

Arthur Clay Cope, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

The Introduction of Substituted Vinyl Groups. VI. The Regeneration 
of Substituted Vinyl Malonic Esters from their Sodium Enolates. Journal 
of the American Chemical Society 62: 3319, 1940. (In collaboration 
with Elizabeth M. Hardy.) 1, 3 -Dimethyl- 5-alkyl Barbituric Acids. 
Journal of the American Chemical Society 63: 3 56, 1941. (In collabora- 
tion with Dorothea Heyl, Dorothea Peck, Catherine Eide and Arsenia 
Arroyo.) The Introduction of Substituted Vinyl Groups. VII. Alkylidene 
and Substituted Vinyl Alkylmalononitriles. Journal of the American 
Chemical Society 63: 733, 1941. (In collaboration with Kathryn E. Hoyle). 
The Rearrangement of Allyl Groups in Three-Carbon Systems. I. 
Journal of the American Chemical Society 63: 1843, 1941. (In collabora- 
tion with Kathryn E. Hoyle and Dorothea Heyl.) The Rearrangement 
of Allyl Groups in Three-Carbon Systems. II. Journal of the American 
Chemical Society 63: 1852, 1941. (In collaboration with Corris M. 
Hofmann and Elizabeth M. Hardy.) 

Norma L. Curtis, B.S., Part-time Demonstrator in Physics 

A Pentode Lock-in Amplifier of High Frequency Selectivity. Review of 
Scientific Instruments 12: 444-447, 1941. (In collaboration with Walter 
C. Michels.) 

Frederica de Laguna, Ph.D., Lecturer in Anthropology 

(Review.) Ritchie, William A. Two Prehistoric Sites at Brewerton, 
New York. ?iew Yor\ History 217-219, April 1941. 

Grace Mead Andrus de Laguna, Ph.D., Professor of Geology 

Professor Urban on Language. Philosophical Review 50: 422-431, 1941. 

Lincoln Dryden, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology 

Heavy Minerals and the History of the Coastal Plain. (Abstract.) 
Bulletin of the Geological Society of America 51: 1993-1994, December 
1940. (In collaboration with Clarissa Dryden.) A Note on Hyacinth 
Zircon in the Honeybrook Upland. Proceedings of the Pennsylvania 
Academy of Science 15: 2pp., 1 fig., 1941. (In' collaboration with 
Clarissa Dryden.) 

Anita Evelyn Dunlevy, A.B., Assistant in Philosophy 

(Review.) Gotshalk. Metaphysics in Modern Times. Philosophic 
Abstracts l 4 : 7, 1940-41. 

Pv.obert E. L. Faris, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology 

Sociological Causes of Genius. American Sociological Review 5- 689- 
699, 1940. 



14 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Charles G. Fenwick, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Political Science 

Neutrality on the Defensive. American Journal of International Law 
34: 697'699, 1940. Inter' American Neutrality Committee. American 
Journal of International Law 35: 12' 35, 1941. Role of Organization 
in International Law. American Journal of International Law 35: 524- 
527, 1941. (Reviews.) American Journal of International Law. Annals 
of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. Etc. 

Annette Baker Fox, A.B., Reader in Politics 

The Local Housing Authority and the Municipal Government. Journal 
of Land and Public Utility Economics 17: 280-290, 1941. 

Grace Frank, A.B., Non-resident Professor of Old French Philology 

Pathelin. Modern Language K[otes 56: 42-47, 1941. (Reviews.) Mod' 
em Language T^otes. Romanic Review. 

Hilda Geiringer, Ph.D., Visiting Lecturer in Mathematics 

The Probability Theory of Compatible Events. Reports of the Sixth 
Annual Research Conference (Cowles Commission for Research in Eco- 
nomics) 6: 1940. A Generalization of the Law of Large Numbers. 
Annals of Mathematical Statistics 11: 333-401, 1940. 

Joseph Eugene Gillet, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish 

Hernandez-Santillana. Ohra nuevamente compuesta sohre el nacimiento 
del Principe Don Felipe (1527-?). Hispanic Review 9: 48-64, 1941. 
M. Romera-Navarro. Gracian's EI Criticon. Hispanic Review 9: 314- 
3-24, 1941. 

Harry Helson, Ph.D., Professor of Experimental Psychology 

Some Implications of Recent Psychology. Phi Kappa Phi 20 4 : 139- 
144, 1940. The Twelfth Annual Meeting of the Eastern Psychological 
Association. American Journal of Psychology 54: 441-443, 1941. 
Sections on "Color Perception," "Acuity and Space Perception" in 
"Military Psychology." Psychological Bulletin 38: 433-440, 1941. 
The Effects of Quality and Intensity of Illumination and Reflectance of 
Background on Lightness and Saturation as Shown by Analysis of 
Variance Technique. (Abstract.) Psychological Bulletin 38: 610, 1941. 

Myra Richards Jessen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of German 

Kurzform und Langform hei Adalbert Stifter. Modern Language T<[otes 
56: 439-444, 1941. 

Ludwig W. Kahn, Ph.D., Instructor in German 

Fortschrittsglaube und Kultur\riti\ im burgerlichen Roman: Gustav 
Freytag und Wilhelm Raabe. (In Corona. Studies in honour of S. 
Singer.) Durham, N. C. 252-267, 1941. Some Sociological Aspects of 
Literature. Modern Language Journal 25: 460-466, 1941. 

Berthe Marie Marti, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Latin and French 

Arnulfus and the Faits des Romains. Modern Language Quarterly 2: 
3-23, 1941. Three New Glosses from Vacca's Commentary on Lucan. 
Classical Philology 36: 64-65, 1941. 

Cornelia Lynde Meigs, A.B., Professor of English Composition 

Vanished Island. New York, Macmillan, 1941. Various short stories in 
children's magazines. 

Fritz Mezger, Ph.D., Professor of Germanic Philology 

O.E. tan: Idg. *duou; *duoi-? The Journal of English and Germanic 
Philology 40: 348, July 1941. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 15 

Agnes Kirsopp Lake Michels, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Latin 

A Note on the Pediment of the "Tuscan Temple." American Journal 
of Archaeology 45: 71-72, 1941. A Note on the Location of the Cena 
Trimalchionis. American Journal of Philology 62: 495-496, 1941. 

Walter C. Michels, E.E., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics 

Advanced Electrical Measurements. (Second edition.) New York, Van 
Nostrand, 1941. A Pentode Lock-in Amplifier of High Frequency 
Selectivity. Review of Scientific Instruments 12: 444-447, 1941. (In 
collaboration with Norma L. Curtis.) 

Valentine Muller, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Classical Archaeology 

The Date of the Augustus from Prima Porta. American Journal of Philol- 
ogy 62: 496-499, 1941. (Reviews.) American Journal of Archaeology 
45: 138, 481, 482 f., 1941. Classical Weekly 34: 269, 1941. 

Milton Charles Nahm, B.Litt., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy 
Selections from Early Greek Philosophy. (Second edition.) New York, 
F. S. Crofts and Co., 1941. 

Jane Marion Oppenheimer, Ph.D., Instructor in Biology 

The Anatomical Relationships of Abnormally Located Mauthner's Cells 
in Fundulus. Journal of Comparative Neurology 74: 131-167, 1941. 
(Review.) Sherrington, Sir Charles. Man on His Nature. American 
Journal of Science 239: 534-53 5, 1941. 

Arthur Lindo Patterson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics 

Crystal Lattice Models Based on the Close Packing of Spheres. Review 
of Scientific Instruments 12: 206-211, 1941. 

Joseph Curtis Sloane, Jr., M.F.A., Associate Professor of History of Art 
Religious Influences on the Art of J-L. Forain. Art Bulletin 23 3 : 199- 
206, 1941. 

Alexander Coburn Soper, III., M.F.A., Associate Professor of History 
of Art 
Early Chinese Landscape Painting. Art Bulletin 23: 141-164, 1941. 

K. Laurence Stapleton, A.B., Assistant Professor of English 

Halifax and Raleigh. Journal of the History of Ideas 2: 211-224, 1941. 

Lily Ross Taylor, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the Graduate School and Pro- 
fessor of Latin 
Caesar's Early Career. Classical Philology 36: 113-132, 1941. (Reviews.) 
Shaw, Chandler. Etruscan Perugia. Classical Philology 36: 206, 1941. 
Degrassi. Inscriptiones Italiae, XIII., III. American Journal of Philology 
62: 379-380, 1941. Papers of the British School in Rome. American 
Journal of Philology 62: 380-381, 1941. Strasburger. Caesars Eintritt 
in die Geschichte. Classical Philology 36: 413-414, 1941. Evans. 
Cults of the Sabine Territory. Classical Philology 36: 414-415, 1941. 

Paul Weiss, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy 

Science, Philosophy and Religion. (In God and the World.) New York, 
Conference, 379-436, 1941. The Meaning of Existence. Philosophy 
and Phenomenological Research 1: 191-198, December 1940. Adven- 
turous Humility. Ethics 51: 337-348, April 1941. Midway between 
Traditionalism and Progressivism. School and Society 53: 761-763, 
June 1941. The Golden Rule. Journal of Philosophy 38: 421-430, July 
1941. An Introduction to the Study of Instruments. Philosophy of 
Science 8: 287-296, July 1941. (Reviews.) Ethics. Philosophic 
Abstracts. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research. Philosophical 
Review. 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following brief report for the academic 
year 1940-1941: 

During the past academic year the College was operating with almost the 
maximum number of students permitted by the building of Rhoads Hall and 
a large registration of nonresident students. The increase in numbers resulted 
in a busy year for the Dean's office due to the increase in the work of advising 
the freshmen and sophomores, both in the general arrangement of their courses 
and in the choice of a major subject. I should like to refer you to my report 
of last year for the arrangements made in advising the undergraduates, and to 
say that those arrangements worked out successfully and gave me sufficient 
time, in most cases, to follow up my first interview with the sophomores, if 
they were in any uncertainty about their major, and to make adjustments 
where it was necessary. 

The general movement, which seems to exist in other colleges as well as 
at Bryn Mawr, towards spending one year of the undergraduate course at 
another institution, continued to manifest itself last year. It should be said 
that al'most all members of the present Senior Class who had been away for the 
Junior year returned to Bryn Mawr for the Senior year and seemed to have 
been able to adjust their courses satisfactorily. In some cases there was real 
profit from having made the change; in others, there was a loss of time 
involved. If we could be sure that the undergraduates would choose another 
college with real discrimination based on the work which they wished to do 
and the subject matter which can be ^ad there and cannot be had at Bryn 
Mawr, there seems to me to be the possibility of real gain from this arrange- 
ment. Unfortunately, the impulse to go to other colleges is often due to a 
general restlessness and is accompanied by an uncertainty about the choice of 
a major subject and the lack of a good plan for academic work generally. 

The Freshman Class admitted in 1940 was outstanding for the excellence 
of its record at entrance and, as is not always the case, it more than fulfilled 
the happy expectations of the Entrance Committee. Last spring it showed the 
shortest list of academic delinquencies of any freshman class in my memory, 
and is still maintaining its uniformly good record. The class admitted for 
1941-42 is also very promising, and all the records indicate that we are con- 
tinuing to receive a very highly selected group of applicants. In view of the 
necessary increase in the number of the undergraduate body, this fact is so 
encouraging as to deserve special mention. 

The number of admissions to the Infirmary in 1940-1941 increased 
considerably over those for 1939-1940. The arrangements in the remodelled 
Infirmary worked out very well and it was not found necessary to increase the 
permanent staff of nurses. It is hoped that the rooms in the new wing, being 
at some distance from the sun parlor and the entrance, can be kept quiet and 
comfortable for students who are really ill and that the other wings of the 
building can be used in general for the convalescents. I think that everyone 

[16] 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE 17 

is agreed that the enlargements and the improvements in the Infirmary have 
given us a very attractive and well arranged building, which should accom' 
modate all our needs for an indefinite period. 

Since my report for 19394940 embodied most of my suggestions and 
recommendations for the Dean's office in the immediate future, I think that 
I have nothing to add to them at the present time. 
Respectfully submitted, 

HELEN TAFT MANNING, 

Dean of the College. 



SUPPLEMENT TO THE DEAN'S REPORT 

Statistics of Undergraduate Students 1940-41 

Students enrolled October 1939 who did not return October 1940: 

Studying elsewhere . . 20 

(Of these, 8 withdrew for one year only.) 

Poor academic work ... _ _ _ 10 

Marriage _ . 6 

Health _ - 5 

(One of these returned semester II.) 

Miscellaneous (lack of interest, family situation, etc.).. 8 

Withdrawal reason unknown _ _ 1 2 

Summary of Registration by Classes: 

Class of 1941 118 

Class of 1942 - _ 114 

Class of 1943 - 140 

Class of 1 944 _ 1 3 

50 2 

Geographical Distribution : 

Atlantic seaboard from New York City to Washington... 48% 

The rest of Pennsylvania _ _ 5 % 

The rest of New York _ 5% 

New England . . 1 6 % 

Middle West 1 5 % 

Southern States _ 6% 

Far West _ „ _ 4% 

Foreign Countries 1% 

Religious Affiliation: 

Students with church connection 88% 

Students with no church connection _ 12% 

Occupation of Fathers: 

Business men „ 50% 

Professional men _ 47% 

Miscellaneous _ 3% 

Average age in senior class (October 1940) 22 years, 1 month 

Bryn Mawr alumnae daughters in the Undergraduate School — 46 



18 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Statistics of the Entering Class 

Total admitted: 141, including 8 transfer students 

Plans of Entrance: 

Plan B (4 examinations at close of high school course) 28% 

Plan C (4 examinations divided between third and fourth year 

of high school ) 46 % 

Plan D (highest seventh plan) .._ 6% 

New York State Regents „ 7% 

Progressive Education Experiment 2% 

Foreign Examinations 5% 

Transfer from other colleges 6% 

Colleges and universities from which students transferred: 

Universities of Chicago and of Colorado, Our Lady of the 
Lake College, Smith, Vassar, Wellesley, Wheaton and Wilson 
Colleges. 

Preparation: 

Private schools 67% 

Public schools _ 22% 

Private and public schools 1 1 % 

Average age: (transfer students not included) 18 years, 1 month 

Geographical Distribution: 

Atlantic seaboard from New York City to Washington 49% 

The rest of Pennsylvania 9% 

The rest of New York 4% 

New England 1 2 % 

Middle West 1 3 % 

Southern States 6% 

Far West '. „ 3% 

Foreign Countries 4% 

Religious Affiliation: 

Students with church connection 92% 

Students with no church connection 8% 

Occupation of Fathers: 

Business men 52% 

Professional men 45% 

Miscellaneous 3% 

Bryn Mawr alumnae daughters in the entering class 13 

Respectfully submitted, 

BARBARA GAVILLER, 

Secretary of the College. 



REPORT OF THE ACTING DEAN 
OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1940-41: 

Registration 

The Graduate School of 1940-41 numbered 158 students.* Of these 65 were 
resident in Radnor Hall and Low Buildings and 93 were non-resident. 
Ninety-eight students devoted full time to graduate work. 

Students who had been awarded travelling fellowships: 

Grace Madeleine Hennigan, Mary Elizabeth Garrett Fellow, who 
postponed the use of her fellowship. 

Grazia Avitabile, Fanny Bullock Workman Fellow, who used her 
fellowship at Radcliffe College. 

Marie Anna Wurster, Bryn Mawr European Fellow and Shippen 
Foreign Scholar, who postponed the use of her fellowship and 
accepted an appointment at The Baldwin School as apprentice 
teacher. 

Dorothy Maharam, Emmy Noether Fellow, who used her fel- 
lowship at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton 
University. 

Louise Atherton Dickey, Ella Riegel Scholar in Classical Archae- 
ology, who used her scholarship at Bryn Mawr College. 

Foreign Graduate Students studying at Bryn Mawr on scholarships awarded 
by Bryn Mawr: 

Mary Paul Collins Scholar in Anthropology: 

Karin Judith Stephen, B.A. Newnham College, Cambridge 
University, 1940. 
Teaching Fellow in French: 

Franqoise Laurent, Baccalaureat, Latin, Greek, Philosophy, Dijon 
1932, Paris 1933; Certificat d'aptitudes a Venseignement sec 
ondaire des jeunes filles, Paris, 1935-36; Diplome d'etudes 
superieures, 1937. 
Teaching Fellow in Italian: 

Elfrieda Frankl, Ph.D. Royal University of Milan 1938; M.A. 
Bryn Mawr College 1941. 
Teaching Fellow in Spanish: 

Josefina Aguirre, Profesora de Castellano, University of Chile, 
1929. 
Chinese Graduate Scholar: 

Lucy Tou, A.B. Yenching University 1937. 
Josephine Goldmar\ Scholar: 

Irene Fontheim Tugendreich, State Diploma for Kindergarten 
Teacher, Berlin, 1914; State Diploma as Head Worker and 
as Registered Social Worker. 

* In 1939-40 the Graduate School numbered 145, the largest registration 
up to that time. 

[19] 



20 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Graduate Scholar in Economics and Politics: 

Josceline Frances Newcombe, B.A. Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford 
University, 1939. 
Graduate Scholar in French: 

Sonja Petra Karsen, A.B. Carleton College 1939; M.A. Bryn 
Mawr College 1941. 
Special Scholar in Anthropology: 

Madeleine Sylvain, Licence-en-droit, University of Haiti, 1934; 
M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1938 and Ph.D. 1941.f 
Special Scholar in Social Economy: 

Afife Sayin, B.A. American College for Girls, Istanbul, 1936; 
M.A. Brown University 1939. 

Other Foreign Graduate Students: 

Odette Levesque, Diplome de Professeurs de Frangais, University of 

Paris, 1935. 
Annette Minier, A.B. Miami University 1940. 
Hedwig Nyhoff, Ph.D. Vienna University 1933; M.A. Bryn Mawr 

College 1941. 
F. Margret M. Paschkis, M.D. University of Vienna 1919; M.A. Bryn 

Mawr College 1940. 
Otto I. Pollak, LL.D. University of Vienna 1930; M.A. Bryn Mawr 

College 1940. 
Erna Reich, Ph.D. University of Vienna 1928; M.A. Bryn Mawr 

College 1941. 
Marjorie Walters, B.A. and M.A. University of London 1938; 

Ph.D. Oxford University 1940. 

Degrees 

Doctors of Philosophy 
At Commencement in June 1941 the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
was awarded to the following nine candidates: 

J. Winifred Alston 

B.A. University of British Columbia 1934 and M.A. 1935. 

Subjects: Greek and Archaeology. 

Dissertation: The Hera\lids. 
Hazel Dorothy Burwash 

B.A. Somerville College, Oxford University, 1931; M.A. Mount 
Holyoke College 1933. 

Subjects: European History and American History. 

Dissertation: English Merchant Shipping 1460-1520. 
Mary Thorne Campbell 

A.B. Vassar College 1934; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1936. 

Subjects: Greek and Roman Archaeology. 

Dissertation: Later Corinthian Pottery. 
Anna Laura Dorsey 

A.B. University of Missouri 1937. 

Subjects: Paleontology and Stratigraphy. 

Dissertation: A Faunal Study of the Foraminifera From the Chesa- 
pea\e Group (Miocene) of Southern Maryland. 
Corris Mabelle Hofmann 

B.S. University of Illinois 1937. 

Subjects: Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry. 

Dissertation: A Study of ThrecCarbon Tautomerism and Certain 
Condensation Reactions. 

f Degree not to be used until dissertation is published. 



REPORT OF THE ACTING DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 21 

Margaret La Foy 

A.B. New Jersey College for Women 1936; M.A. Bryn Mawr 

College 1938. 
Subject: Political Science. 

Dissertation: The Chaco Dispute and the League of 'Hations. 
Marcia Lewis Patterson 

A.B. Sweet Briar College 1932; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1934. 
Subjects: Latin and Ancient History. 

Dissertation: Roman Magistrates during the Second Punic "War. 
Madeleine Sylvain 

Licence-en-droit, University of Haiti, 1934; M.A. Bryn Mawr 

College 1938. 
Subjects: Social Economy and Education. 

Dissertation : Haiti et Ses Femmes: Une Etude d' Evolution Culturelle. 
Elizabeth Porter Wyckoff 

A.B. Bryn Mawr College 1936; M.A. Newnham College, Cambridge 

University, 1938. 
Subjects: Greek and Philosophy. 
Dissertation: Pindar s Handling of Ethical Problems Raised by 

Traditional Mythology. 

Masters of Arts 

The Degree of Master of Arts was awarded to twentyeight candidates 
distributed as follows among the departments: 

Biology 2, Chemistry 1, Classical Archaeology 1, Economics 1, English 2, 
French 4, Geology 2, German 1, Greek 2, History 1, History of Art 1, 
Latin 1, Mathematics 1, Philosophy 1, Physics 2, Social Economy 4, Spanish 1. 

Ph.D. Dissertations Published 1940-41 

Department of Geology 

Elizabeth Armstrong (Degree awarded at Commencement 1939) 

Mylonization of Hybrid Roc\s near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Bulletin of the Geological Society of America 52: 667-694, 8 pis., 
5 figs., 1941. 
Lois Margaret Schoonover (Degree awarded at Commencement 1940) 
A Stratigraphic Study of the Mollus\s of the Calvert and Choptan\ 
Formations of Southern Maryland. 298 pp., 12 plates, 5 pp. index, 
8vo. Bulletins of American Paleontology 25: no. 94 B. Paleontc 
logical Research Institution, Ithaca, N. Y., 1941. 
Department of German 

Esther Metzenthin (Degree awarded at Commencement 1935) 

Die Lander — und Vol\ernamen im Altisldndischen Schrifttum. 
138 pp. Edwards Brothers, Lithoprinters, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 
1941. 
Department of History 

Helen Georgia Stafford (Degree awarded at Commencement 1935) 
James VI of Scotland and the Throne of England. 3 36 pp., 8 vo. 
D. Appleton-Century Company, New York City, 1940. 
Department of Latin 

Susan M. Savage (Degree awarded at Commencement 1940) 

The Cults of Ancient Trastevere. Extract from Memoirs of the 
American Academy in Rome xvii: 26'56, pi. 1'4, 1940. 
Jane Isabella Marion Taitt (Degree awarded at Commencement 1939) 
Philodemus Influence on the Latin Poets. 118 pp. Edwards Brothers, 
Lithoprinters, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 1941. 
Department of Social Economy 

Florence Hemley Schneider (Degree awarded at Commencement 1939) 
Pattern of Workers' Education: The Story of the Bryn Mawr Sum' 
mer School. The American Council on Public Affairs, Washington. 
D. C. 1941. 



22 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Special Research Project 

Upon the recommendation to the Directors by the President, the Depart' 
ment of Social Economy and Social Research was chosen as the seventh 
department to receive the award of the Mary Paul Collins Scholarship for 
Foreign Women, of the value of $1000, and of two special scholarships in 
the furtherance of a research project in Anthropology.* 

The Mary Paul Collins Scholarship was awarded to Miss Karin Judith 
Stephen, B.A. Newnham College, Cambridge University, and special scholar' 
ships in Anthropology were awarded to Miss Marjorie Lismer, BA. University 
of Toronto 193 5, to Miss Madeleine Sylvain, Licence- en-droit, University of 
Haiti 1934 and MA. Bryn Mawr College 1938, and to Miss Frances Wenrich, 
A.B. University of Pennsylvania 1938. 

The research project was announced in the following terms on the poster 
offering the Mary Paul Collins Scholarship: 

"The successful candidate will be expected to devote the year to a research 
problem chosen within the general field covered by the seminary on The 
Individual and Society, to be given jointly by Dr. Frederica A. de Laguna and 
Dr. Donald W. MacKinnon. During the six weeks of her stay at Bryn Mawr 
College, Professor Ruth Benedict of Columbia University will conduct the 
seminary. The field covered may include such topics as religious systems seen 
as psychological projections of security or insecurity produced by the social 
order, culturally determined continuity and discontinuity in the life of the 
individual, reaction to frustration in various societies, abnormal behavior and 
the cultural norm, etc." 

Of the actual year's work Professor Frederica de Laguna reports: 

"In connection with the seminary each student did original research on 
some topic falling within the general problem of the interrelationships between 
individual behavior and personality structure and the structure and integration 
of the culture. Thus, cultural conditioning of frustration was studied in two 
primitive societies, and reactions to frustration in two further societies. Other 
studies were concerned with leadership and the personality of the leader in 
primitive cultures, the roles and personalities of women in certain primitive 
cultures, especially with respect to a possible relationship between personal 
insecurity, and cultural insecurity, and the interplay between factors making 
possible high individual achievement and factors affecting high or low synergy." 

Academic Cooperation with Neighboring Institutions 

Under our Cooperative Plan, eight students from the University of 
Pennsylvania (one in Geology, one in Greek, two in Philosophy, one in 
Spanish and three in Crystallography) and one member of the staff of 
Swarthmore College (in Geology) were studying in the Bryn Mawr Graduate 
School. Seven Bryn Mawr students (four in Social Economy, one in Mathe- 
matics, one in Chemistry and one in History) were taking courses at the 
University of Pennsylvania. 

* In 1934-3 5 the Department of Mathematics was named under this rotat' 
ing plan, in 1935-36 the Department of Biology, in 1936-37 the Department 
of Classical Archaeology, in 1937-38 the Departments of Latin and Greek, 
in 1938-39 the Department of Geology and in 1939-40 the Department of 
Spanish. 



REPORT OF THE ACTING DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 23 

There has been a steady growth in the Graduate School during the past 
three years. The registration of 1938-39 (139), the largest known in the 
history of the College, was exceeded by that of 1939'40 (145), which was 
again surpassed by the enrollment of 158 in 1940-41. This year the greatest 
increase was in the Department of Social Economy and Social Research, 
which numbered 46 students. Radnor and the full quota of rooms available 
for graduate students in Low Buildings were full. Miss Elizabeth Ash con- 
tinued as Senior Resident in Radnor, and Miss Mary Elizabeth Dumm took 
the responsibility for the members of the Graduate School who lived in Low 
Buildings. 

In spite of war conditions there was a strong representation of foreign 
students in the Graduate School. But our own European Fellows had to be 
transformed into Travelling Fellows who studied at other American institu- 
tions. Only one student so far has carried on her work in Spanish-America — 
Elizabeth Lyle Huberman of the Class of 1937, who has sent in an interesting 
report of her study of labour conditions in Mexico. The two students awarded 
travelling fellowships for next year will both study in the United States. Miss 
Mary Elizabeth Dumm, Mary Elizabeth Garrett Fellow, will pursue her research 
in microchemistry at the laboratory of A. Baird Hastings in the Department of 
Biological Chemistry of the Harvard Medical School. Miss Barbara Bradfield, 
Fanny Bullock Workman Fellow, will work on her dissertation, supplementing 
the Bryn Mawr Library by the libraries of the Union Theological Seminary 
and Yale University, institutions which have special material on her subject, 
"Republicanism under the Later Stuarts." 

Among the outside awards which came to members of the Graduate 
School special mention should be made of two fellowships granted by the 
American Association of University Women: the Gamma Phi Beta Lindsey 
Barbee Fellowship to Miss Florence Hollis and the Sarah Berliner Memorial 
Fellowship to Miss Helen Jupnik. We are proud to report that both of them 
will use their awards at Bryn Mawr next year. 

I should like to express my deep gratitude for assistance to Dean Schenck 
and to Mrs. Doris Carland, the Secretary to the Dean of the Graduate School. 
With an office so admirably organized I have found the work of the year 
both interesting and profitable, and I return to full teaching in the Latin 
Department grateful for the contact I have had with graduate students and 
with the methods of graduate instruction in other fields. 
Respectfully submitted, 

LILY ROSS TAYLOR, 
Acting Dean of the Graduate School. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR-IN-RESIDENCE 
AND EDITOR OF PUBLICATIONS 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 

1940-41. , w. ... . 

Annual Publications 
The Bryn Mawr College Calendar, Vols. XXXIII. and XXXIV. 

Carola Woerishoffer Graduate Department of Social Economy and Social 
Research issue, Vol. XXXIIL, No. 3, November 1940. 

Halls of Residence issue, Vol. XXXIIL, No. 4, December 1940 and 

Halls of Residence issue, Vol. XXXIV., No. 4, December 1941. 

Undergraduate Courses issue, Vol. XXXIV., No. 1, April 1941. 

Graduate Courses issue, Vol. XXXIV., No. 2, June 1941. 
Bryn Mawr College Finding List, November 1940. 
Bryn Mawr College Commencement Programme, June 1941. 

Opening of the Quita Woodward Wing of the Library 

The opening of the Quita Woodward Wing of the Library took place 
during the Alumnae Week-end, Friday, October 18th, to Monday, October 
21st. On October 19th, Mr. Francis Henry Taylor, Director of the Metro- 
politan Museum of Art, made an address on "Art History and the Museum 
as a Career for Women." On Sunday afternoon, October 20th, Professor 
Rhys Carpenter of Bryn Mawr College spoke on "several discoveries" 
connected with his year's study in the sculpture galleries of Rome. The lecture 
was illustrated by lantern slides. Dean Eunice Morgan Schenck of the 
Graduate School and Charlotte Tyler Siepmann of the Class of 1932 
spoke at the opening of the Quita Woodward Memorial Room on Sunday 
afternoon, October 20th. The Ella Riegel Memorial Museum was open to 
visitors during the week-end and a loan exhibition of nineteenth century French 
painting from the collection of Mr. Henry P. McIlhenny was on view. 

Memorial Service 

A meeting in memory of David Hilt Tennent, who died January 14, 
1941, was held in Goodhart Hall on Sunday afternoon, February 16th. Brief 
addresses in appreciation of the work of Professor Tennent as a scholar, teacher 
and member of the community were made by President Park; Professor 
Robert Ervin Coker, President of the American Society of Zoologists and 
Kenan Professor of Zoology at the University of North Carolina; Professor 
Mary Summerfield Gardiner of Bryn Mawr College; Abbie Ingalls of 
the Class of 1938, student at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Columbia University; and Mr. William G. Hower, former owner and 
publisher of the Bryn Mawr Home T^ews. 

Commencement 

Dr. William Allan Neilson, President Emeritus of Smith College, 
delivered the Commencement address on June 4th. 

£24} 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR'IN -RESIDENCE 25 

Institute of International Relations 

The Twelfth Annual Institute of International Relations, under the 
auspices of the American Friends Service Committee, was held from June 27th 
to July 6th. The theme of the conference was "Democracy, Religion and 
World Change." 

Red Cross Nurses' Training Camp 

The American Red Cross, Bryn Mawr College and The Woman's Medical 
College of Pennsylvania sponsored the Red Cross Nurses' Training Camp 
which was held from June 26th to September 12th. President Park presided 
at the opening ceremonies on Thursday evening, June 26th; the invocation 
was made by the Reverend Andrew Mutch, D.D., Minister Emeritus of the 
Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church. The speakers were Mrs. August Belmont, 
member of the Central Committee of the American Red Cross; Dr. Margaret 
Craighill, Dean of The Woman's Medical College; and Dean Margaret E. 
Conrad of the Red Cross Nurses' Training Camp and Professor of Nursing, 
Faculty of Medicine, Columbia University. Dr. Thomas Parran, Surgeon 
General of the United States Public Health Service, was scheduled to speak 
but was prevented from being present. His speech was given by his assistant. 

The closing exercises were held on Friday, September 12th, when Dean 
Conrad awarded the certificates, Miss Alta Dines, Chairman of the National 
Committee on Red Cross Nursing, made the address, and Dr. Rufus M. 
Jones made the invocation. 

Services 

Dr. Rufus M. Jones, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Haverford 
College and Trustee and Director of Bryn Mawr College, delivered the 
Baccalaureate Sermon on June 1st, 

The Sunday Evening Services, arranged by the Bryn Mawr League, were 
conducted by the following: 

The Reverend Donald B. Aldrich, D.D., L.H.D., Rector of the 
Church of the Ascension, New York City. 

The Reverend Eugene C. Blake, Minister of the First Presbyterian 
Church, Pasadena, California. 

The Reverend James T. Cleland, Professor of Religion at Amherst 
College, Amherst, Massachusetts. 

The Reverend Ernest C. Earp, Rector of the Church of the Redeemer, 
Bryn Mawr. 

The Reverend C. Leslie Glenn, Rector of St. John's Church, Wash' 
ington, District of Columbia. 

The Reverend Erdman Harris, Chaplain of Lawrenceville School, 
Lawrenceville, New Jersey. 

Dr. Rufus M. Jones, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Haverford 
College and Trustee and Director of Bryn Mawr College. 

The Reverend Arthur Lee Kinsolving, D.D., L.H.D., Rector of 
Trinity Church, Princeton, New Jersey, and Episcopal Student Chaplain at 
Princeton University. 



26 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

The Reverend Robert G. Metters, Curate of St. Paul's Church, 
Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 

The Reverend Lewis Seymour Mudge, D.D., LL.D., Emeritus Stated 
Clerk of the Presbyterian Church of the United States. 

The Reverend Andrew Mutch, D.D., Minister Emeritus of the Bryn 
Mawr Presbyterian Church. 

The Reverend A. Grant Noble, Rector of St. John's Church, Wil- 
liamstown, Massachusetts. 

The Reverend John S. Stephenson, Curate of the Church of St. 
Martin's-in-the-Fields, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 

Dr. Howard Thurman, Dean of the Chapel, Howard University, 
Washington, District of Columbia. 

The Reverend Alexander C. Zabriskie of the Theological Seminary, 
Alexandria, Virginia. 

Assemblies 

Eight college assemblies were held during the year: at the opening of 
college on October 1st, when President Park spoke; on November 4th, 
when the Undergraduate Association conducted an assembly on "Responsibility 
in Freedom"; on November 15th, when Dr. Hans Kohn, Professor of 
History at Smith College, spoke on "Understanding Our Time"; on February 
11th, _a Self-Government Assembly on "The Case of Miss Bee"; on March 
27th, when President Park announced the award of graduate travelling 
fellowships and Acting Dean Taylor spoke on "Research in War Time"; 
on April l?th, when President Park and President Nason of Swarthmore 
College spoke on "Two Aspects of College Education"; on May 1st, when 
President Park announced the award of undergraduate scholarships and 
prizes; and on May 7th, when Mr. Max Lerner, Professor of Political 
Science at Williams College, spoke on "America and the War." Also an open 
discussion of curriculum by faculty and students was held on March 13th. 

Endowed Lectures 

The Anna Howard Shaw Memorial Lectureship: Dr. Ruth Fulton 
Benedict, Associate Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University and 
Editor of The Journal of American Fol\'Lore, gave a series of six lectures on 
"Human Nature and Social Institutions," on Monday evenings in February 
and March. 

Departmental Lectures 

Bryn Mawr College and the Carola Woerishoffer Department of Social 
Economy and Social Research sponsored a lecture on "England Organized 
for War," by Dr. Winifred Cullis, Professor of Physiology at the Univer- 
sity of London, on March 23rd. 

The Department of Economics and Politics held a lecture on December 
13th by Mr. Charles O. Hardy of the Brookings Institute, who spoke on 
"War-Time Control of Prices." 

The Department of French sponsored a lecture by Monsieur Henri 
Peyre, Sterling Professor of French at Yale University, on "La Litterature 
Franchise et l'Antiquite," on May 1st. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR-IN -RESIDENCE 27 

Undergraduate Club Lectures 

The French Club brought Miss Margaret Frawley of the American 
Friends Service Committee on November 12th and joined with the French 
Club of Shipley School in presenting Monsieur Pierre de Lanux, who 
spoke on "Les Frangais" on December 5th. 

The Philosophy Club sponsored four lectures: on March 9th, Dr. Edgar 
A. Singer of the University of Pennsylvania read a paper on "The Function 
of Art"; on April 20th, Dr. Veltman of Bryn Mawr College and Dr. T. M. 
Greene of Princeton University spoke on "The Metaphysics of Religion"; 
on May 1st, Professor Cameron of Bryn Mawr College spoke on "Tragedy 
in Greek Thought"; on May 8th, Dr. Martin Foss of the Haverford Cooper' 
ative Workshop spoke on "Reason and Intuition." 

The Science Club sponsored a series of eight lectures by members of the 
faculty of Bryn Mawr College in October, November and December: on 
October 21st, Professor Wyckoff spoke on "The Beginnings of Modern 
Geology"; on October 28th, Professor Dryden spoke on "The Development 
of Historical Geology"; on November 7th, Professor Gardiner spoke on 
"Genetics"; on November 11th, Professor Crenshaw spoke on "The 
Development of the Concepts of Elements and Atoms"; on November 18th, 
Professor Doyle spoke on "The Development of Bio'chemistry and Its 
Origins"; on November 25th, Professor Lehr described the "Interaction 
Between Natural Science and Mathematics"; on December 2nd, Professor 
Michels spoke on "The Development in Physics Since the Beginning of the 
Present Century"; on December 9th, Professor Weiss spoke on "The 
Nature of the History of Science." The Science Club brought Dr. Albert 
H. Wilson of Haverford College to speak on "How Far Are the Stars?" 
on April 23rd. 

The Spanish Club gave a tea on April 23rd at which Professor Gillet 
of Bryn Mawr College gave an explanation of Richard Strauss' "Don Quixote," 
translated into Spanish by advanced Spanish students under his direction. 

The American Student Union brought three speakers: Mr. Liu Liang-Mo, 
Secretary of the Chinese Y. M. C. A., who spoke on the organization of the 
Mass Singing Movement, on November 12th; Mr. David Neifield of the 
Philadelphia Retail and Wholesale Employers' Union, who spoke on "The 
CIO Position on Labor and National Defense as It Was Keynoted at the 
Atlantic City Convention," on December 17th; and Mr. Orestes Stephano, 
member of the Philadelphia Committee for Peoples' Rights, on April 15th. 

The Catholic Club sponsored a lecture by the Reverend James M. 
Gillis, C.S.P., who spoke on "Religion in Relation to Culture," on 
November 14th. 

The France Forever Group presented Madame Eugene Houdry, who 
spoke on the "French Quand Meme Relief Committee," on November 21st. 

The Industrial Group brought two speakers: Miss Alice Hansen, 
editor of a publication of the United Textile Workers of Philadelphia and 
former instructor at the Bryn Mawr Summer School, who spoke on "Civil 
Liberties," on March 12th; and Mrs. Marie Elliott Algor, Director of 
the Hudson Shore Labor School, who spoke on May 7th. 



28 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

The International Relations Club had an evening of informal discussion 
on November 19th, when the speakers were members of the Inter' American 
Commission of Women; and presented Professor Enrique S. de Lozada of 
Bolivia and Professor of Political Science at Williams College, on March 16th. 

The Peace Council presented speakers at three meetings: Louise Morley, 
1940, spoke on "The International Student Service," on October 14th; Miss 
Helen Arbuthnot of the British Library of Information, New York City, 
spoke on "How Women in England Help National Defense," on February 
14th; and Mr. Brantz Mayor of the Washington staff of Time Magazine 
spoke on "What You Want to Know About National Defense," on 
February 28th. 

The political groups sponsored meetings in the autumn: on October 7th 
Professor Northrop of Bryn Mawr College spoke on "The New Deal 
and Business"; on October 14th, the Willkie Group held a rally at which the 
speakers were: Mr. Oren Root, Jr., Chairman of the Associated Willkie 
Clubs, Inc., and founder of the Willkie'for'President movement; Mr. Samuel 
Ewing, Vice-Chairman of the Young Republicans of Pennsylvania; Virginia 
Sherwood, 1941, and Professor Herbert Fraser of Swarthmore College; 
on October 21st, a lecture was given by the Honorable Norman M. Littell, 
Assistant Attorney General in charge of the Division of Lands, on "Foreign 
Policy and Defense," under the auspices of the Roosevelt Club. 

Vocational Talks 

Mr. David Corkran, Assistant Headmaster of the North Shore Country 
Day School, Chicago, spoke at a tea on February 18th. 

Miss Ruby Mae Jordan, representative from the Katharine Gibbs Secrc 
tarial School, spoke on "Qualifications for Success in Business," on March 17th. 

Mary Moon, 1940, winner of the Vogue contest, spoke to the seniors 
on October 4th. 

Mrs. Charles J. Little, former Personnel Director of Saks-Fifth 
Avenue, spoke on "Opportunities for Women in Personnel Work," on 
May 5th. 

Miss Stella McCann of the United States Rubber Company at 
Naugatuck, Connecticut, interviewed students on April 11th. 

Alison Raymond, 1938, founder of Proxy Parents, Inc., spoke on "Jobs 
After College," on May l?th. 

MlSS Katharine Taylor, Headmistress of Shady Hill School, Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts, and Mrs. Ellis Waring, head of the school's appren- 
tice system, had interviews with students on February 19th. 

Miss Isabella Van Meter, Head of the Time Magazine Letters Bureau, 
and Advertising Editor of Time Inc. Magazines, spoke on magazine work, 
on February 12th. 

Miss Mary Abell Watson of the Cooperative Bureau for Teachers 
interviewed students on January 21st. 

Miss Mabel Williams, Superintendent of School Work of the New 
York Public Library, spoke on "Opportunities for Women in Library Work," 
on March 20th. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR'IN-RESIDENCE 29 

The Vocational Guidance Committee of the Undergraduate Association 
sponsored an evening lecture by Mrs. Gladys P. Berenguer, member of 
the Examining Division of the United States Civil Service Commission, on 
"Opportunities for Women in the Federal Civil Service," on January 9th. 

Entertainments 

Music 

A Bryn Mawr College Ambulance for Great Britain Benefit was held on 
October 30th. The artists were: Mrs. Henrietta Bagger Plum, Danish 
mezzo-soprano, with Mrs. Mildred Kolb Schultze, accompanist; Professor 
Alwyne of Bryn Mawr College, pianist; Madame Lea Luboshutz, violinist. 
Mr. Vladimir Sokoloff of the Curtis Institute accompanied Madame 
Luboshutz in the absence of Mrs. Edith Braun. A group from the Academy 
of Vocal Arts, conducted by Mr. Vernon Hammond, presented Hindemith's 
"There and Back." 

Helen Traubel, prima donna soprano of the Metropolitan Opera 
Association, was presented by the College Entertainment Committee on 
November 26th. 

Alec Templeton, blind pianist and composer, was presented by the 
College Entertainment Committee on January 13th. 

The combined choirs and instrumentalists of Bryn Mawr College and 
Haverford College, directed by Professor Willoughby of Bryn Mawr 
College, gave a Christmas musical service on December l?th. The concert 
was given the following evening at Haverford College. 

Plays and Movies 

The Dance Club presented "Sleeping Beauty" on May l?th and 16th. 

The French Club presented a French nativity play on December 13th. 

The Freshman Class presented its show, '''Fantasia Forty-jour," on 
February 22nd. 

The German Club presented a mediaeval Christmas play, "Bearbeitet," 
by Max Mell, on December 18th. 

The Glee Club presented "The Pirates of Penzance," by Gilbert and 
Sullivan, on April 2?th and 26th, for the benefit of the Myra Hess Music 
Fund for Great Britain. The operetta was given at Haverford College on 
May 3rd. 

The Latin students, under Professor Agnes Kirsopp Lake's direction, 
gave a translation of Plautus' "Mostellaria" (All This and Plautus, Too), on 
November 2nd. 

"The Living Newspaper," on the growth of civil liberties, presented on 
November 15th, was written and directed by members of The Players 
Club, The Industrial Group, and The American Students' Union 
and done in cooperation with the maids and porters of Bryn Mawr College 
and members of a colored choir from the Germantown Y. W. C. A. 

The Maids and Porters presented "Midsummer's Madness," a musical 
comedy adapted from Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Right's Dream," on 
May 17th. 



30 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

The Players Club presented two one-act plays: "The Rising of the 
Moon," by Lady Gregory, and "Aria da Capo," by Edna St. Vincent Millay, 
on March 8th. 

The Varsity Players and The Cap and Bells Club of Haverford 
College presented "Our Town," by Thornton Wilder, on December 7th. 
The play was given at Haverford College on December 6th and at Swarthmore 
College on December 19th. "A Midsummer Right's Dream," by William 
Shakespeare, for the benefit of the Mrs. Otis Skinner Dramatic Workshop, 
was presented on May 10th. 

Movies and a lecture by Captain Dirk van Ingen on "Horsemanship 
and Tactics" followed an Athletic Association supper on May 14th. 

Miscellaneous 

American Defense ' Bryn Mawr College Group sponsored the following 
lectures: on April 8th, when Professor Heilperin of Bryn Mawr College 
spoke on "The Economic Consequences to Us of a German Victory"; on 
April 16th, when Professor Fenwick of Bryn Mawr College and United 
States Representative on the Inter- American Neutrality Committee, spoke on 
"Inter-American Relations"; on April 22nd, when Professor Fairchild 
of Bryn Mawr College spoke on "Strikes in Defense Industries"; on April 
27th, when Miss Mary Craig McGeachy, in charge of Public Relations 
in the War Trade Department of the British Embassy, Washington, spoke 
on "Women in Defense in England," and Mrs. John F. Lewis, Jr., Chair- 
man of Women's Home Defense Association of Philadelphia, spoke on 
"Women in Defense in the United States"; on May 4th, when Professor 
Carpenter of Bryn Mawr College spoke on the Greek campaign and its 
possible results, and Professor Broughton of Bryn Mawr College spoke 
on the geography of Turkey and obstacles Turkey offers an invading army; 
on May 11th, when Dr. Frederick J. Manning, Professor of History at 
Swarthmore College, spoke on "The Present Situation in the Light of 
Military History." 

Mr. Paul Robeson, sponsor of the National China Aid Council, 
assisted by the Simfonietta String Quartet, sang on April 18th under the 
auspices of the Bryn Mawr Chinese Scholarship Committee for the benefit of 
the Bryn Mawr Chinese Scholarships Fund. 

Mr. Milton Brown of the Belgian Relief Fund, Inc., spoke on "Food 
for the Small Democracies," on March 6th. 

Professor Guiton of Bryn Mawr College spoke on February 11th on 
his experiences with the French Army and as a liaison officer with a British 
division at the front, in Belgium and at Dunkirk. 

Monsieur Jules Romains, poet, dramatist and novelist, gave a lecture, 
"A Propos des Hommes de Bonne Volonte," under the auspices of the College 
Entertainment Committee, on February ?th. The lecture was given in French. 

Mr. Vincent Sheean, news correspondent and author of Personal 
History, who had just returned from London, was presented by the College 
Entertainment Committee on November 6th. 

Miss Cornelia Otis Skinner gave a programme of modern character 
sketches under the auspices of the College Entertainment Committee on 
March 7th. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR-IN 'RESIDENCE 31 

Exhibitions 

The first of the Art Club exhibitions was held on November 17th when 
reproductions of contemporary American paintings were shown; this was 
followed by contemporary American cartoons on March 16th. On January 
19th and on May 8th open meetings were held when Professor Herben 
of Bryn Mawr College gave illustrations of the Canterbury Tales and Chaucer's 
England with an exhibition of illustrations from rare Chaucerian manuscripts. 
On May 11th two exhibitions were shown: representative work of The Art 
Club and an exhibit of small wood carvings from many lands, loaned by the 
International Arts Exhibit of Connecticut. 



Commencement exercises of the following schools were held in Goodhart 
Hall: 

The Baldwin School on June 10th. 

The Agnes Irwin School on June 6th. 

The Shipley School on June 6th. 

The Ursula Murray School of Dancing on May 28th. 



Conferences 

A conference on Community Work was held on February 15th, under 
the auspices of the Bryn Mawr League, the Haverford Service Project and 
the Swarthmore Project Committee. The main speaker was Congressman 
Jerry Voorhis of California, member of the American Federation of Teachers. 
Discussion was led by Professor Fairchild of Bryn Mawr College. Miss 
Ambler, head of social workers of the Main Line Federation of Churches; 
Miss Jones, secretary of the Eastern County Public Charities Association: 
and Professor Kraus of Bryn Mawr College, spoke. 

A meeting of the Geological Section (E) of the conference of the 
American Association for the Advancement of Science was held on December 
28th when Professor Kirk Bryan, Professor of Physiology at Harvard 
University, spoke on "The Geologic Evidence of the Antiquity of Man in 
North America." 

The Main Line Forum held a conference on October 24th on "Historic 
Elections of the Past" at which Mr. John G. Herndon spoke. 

The Deanery 

Christina H. Garrett, 1903, gave a lecture on "French Gardens of the 
Fifteenth Century" on February 11th. The lecture, based on special research 
on the influence of the mediaeval pleasure garden, was illustrated by lantern 
slides from rare and beautiful French and Flemish illuminated manuscripts. 
The lecture was given in aid of British War Relief. 
The Hampton Quartet sang on March 2nd. 

Constance Sullivan, 1930, gave a song recital, accompanied by Mr. 
Paul Meyer, on May 4th. 

Mr. Felix Winternitz played the six Bach Sonatas for solo violin in 
a series of recitals on November 7th, November 10th and November 13th. 
Respectfully submitted, 
CAROLINE CHADWICK'COLLINS, 
Directornn-Residence and Editor of Publications. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the annual report of the work of the 
College Library for the year ending June 30, 1941. 

Size and Growth of the Library 

The following table shows the additions made from various sources and 
the total present extent of the Library. The corresponding table for the year 
1939-40 is given for purposes of comparison. 

Number of volumes June 30, 1940 171,192 

Number of volumes added 1939-40 1940-41 

By purchase 2,942 2,481 

By binding 866 639 

By gifts and exchange 1,489 1,263 

By replacement 82 67 



Total additions 5,379 4,450 

Volumes withdrawn 173 297 



Net increase 5,206 4,153 



4,153 



Total volumes June 30, 1941 - 175,345 

Pamphlets added 321 308 

Pamphlets withdrawn 43 111 



Net gain 278 197 

Total accessioned pamphlets June 30, 1941..- 10,351 

The volumes were distributed by classes as follows showing that the 

relative rate of increase by subject matter remains about the same. 

1939-40 1940-41 

Class General Works 406 189 

Class 1 Philosophy and Psychology 213 203 

Class 2 Religion 140 117 

Class 3 Economics, Sociology, Education 791 897 

Class 4 Philology 180 125 

Class 5 Science 705 514 

Class 6 Applied Arts 141 94 

Class 7 Fine Arts 736 487 

Class 8 Literature 1,222 1,038 

Class 9 History, Biography, etc 845 786 



Total 5,379 4,450 

The Library has received by gift and exchange from institutions, societies 
and government bureaus some 1,700 books and pamphlets. Gifts from alumnae 
and friends of the College have been numerous and amount to over 2,500 
volumes. Due acknowledgment and an expression of appreciation have been 
made to all donors by the Librarian on behalf of the College. 

£ 32} 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 33 

Mrs. Paul Shorey added to her generous gift of last year the balance of 
the French books, amounting to over 1,500 volumes, from Professor Shorey' s 
library. The gifts covered a wide field, embracing French literature, the 
theatre, philosophy, biography and history of the French Revolutionary period. 
A unique item was an edition of Plato — Omnia divini Platonis Opera tralatione 
Marsilii Ficini, emandatione, et ad Graecum Codicem collatione Simonis 
Graynaei. Lugduni, apud Beringos fratres, 1548. This was found many years 
ago in Porto Rico by Alice Bache Gould, 1889, in the possession of a 
Spanish Castilian family who were willing to sell it. Miss Gould gave it to 
Professor Shorey and Mrs. Shorey has kindly passed it on to us. 

Professor Joseph C. Sloane, Jr., presented a number of books on garden' 
ing which came to him through the death of an aunt, Mrs. William Wirt 
Phillips, who was a distinguished landscape architect of Pasadena, California. 

Through the courtesy of Dorothy Hale Litchfield, 1924, Dr. Mary A. 
Bennett of New York City presented a facsimile of the fourth folio edition 
of William Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories and Tragedies, faithfully reprc 
duced from the edition of 1685, London, 1904. 

By the bequest of Mr. Thomas Whitney Surette of Concord the Music 
Department received the valuable set of Johann Sebastian Bach, VJer\e 
heransgegeben von der Bach Geselhchaft, Leipzig, 1878, in 57 volumes. 
These volumes formerly belonged to Arthur J. Balfour. 

Mrs. Albert E. Goodhart has shown her continued interest in the 
Department of Art by contributing a number of valuable books on the 
Italian schools of painting. 

From the library of the late Professor David H. Tennent we received 
160 volumes on biology, embryology and zoology. Professor Howard L. Gray 
presented 50 volumes from his library of history books; and Dr. Diamond 
Jenness added 40 volumes to his generous gift, made two years ago, of books 
on American archaeology and anthropology. 

The alumnae always have been generous in remembering the Library 
and this year an unusual number of gifts have been made. Susan Follansbee 
Hibbard, 1897, presented several 18th century works. Elizabeth Caldwell 
Fountain, 1897, gave a set of the large paper, limited edition of Thackeray's 
Works, London, published by Smith, Elder and Company, 1897, in 26 volumes. 
Shirley Putnam O'Hara, 1909, sent a list of books from which were chosen 
a number of desired titles. From the library of Mary L. Fay, 1897, 36 volumes 
were received. Mary Crawford Dudley, 1896, expressed the wish that after 
her death the College Library should have some of her books. Some 200 
volumes of literature, biography and travel were selected. Darthela Clark, 
1920, sent 37 volumes on early French literature, philology and history; 
Caroline Newton, 1914, 200 volumes of general character; and Anna L. Cole, 
former graduate student, 60 volumes of language texts. From Mary Safford 
Hoogewerff, 1919, was received a set of James Branch Cabell's Works in the 
Storisende edition, 18 volumes. 

We are indebted to Miss Mary Winsor for a choice selection of 250 
volumes from the library of her family. Among the most important items are 
17 volumes of the Variorum edition of Shakespeare, several of which were 



34 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

presentation copies signed by the editor, Horace Howard Furness, Jr. The 
gift also included sets of the works of Corneille, Thiers, Chaucer, Walpole's 
Letters, all in unusually fine leather bindings, and modern works of biography 
and travel. 

Although the amount available for books this year was practically the 
same as last, purchases were curtailed and limited largely to current publica- 
tions and those obtainable in this country. This was due to the war in Europe 
which has closed the continental markets to us and slowed up communications 
with Great Britain. The policy for acquisitions has followed that of last year. 
We have bought some source material in the seventeenth and eighteenth 
centuries, including books of travel of those centuries, have added to our 
Spanish and South American collection a number of titles and have endeavored 
to bring up to date our reference collection by the purchase of a number of 
important works. Several periodical sets have been completed and odd 
numbers of sets have been added. 

The Catalogue 

The amount of work accomplished by this Department, as shown in 
statistics, appears to be less for this year than for last. This is due to several 
factors. A great deal of time was spent in finishing work which was begun 
in the summer of 1940 and an experienced assistant resigned, leaving two 
new assistants not familiar with our methods. The new purchases were 
catalogued and sent into circulation promptly but many of the older books 
which came as gifts are still waiting attention. 

As stated in my last report, the transfer of books from the old building 
to the new and the rearrangement of various rooms necessitated the remarking 
of many books and their cards. The Carola Woerishoffer Memorial Room 
was abandoned and its collection of over 1,000 volumes was put into the 
stacks, the New Book Room books were transferred to the Quita Woodward 
Memorial Room and a number of changes made in the arrangement of the 
art and archaeology books. 

An author catalogue was started last year for the books which were to 
be moved to the new stacks but pressure of other work prevented much 
progress on it. In the fall it was decided to have the author cards copied by 
a dexigraph machine as this method would be more economical than copying 
by typewriter, and quicker. The author cards, in number 12,451, for all the 
books classed as Religion, Philology, Art and Archaeology, were withdrawn 
from the main catalogue and sent to New York City to be copied. The work 
was done within two weeks and the result has been highly satisfactory. 

When the cards for the Haverford College Library were copied in 1936 
for addition to our catalogue, a period of two years had elapsed since the 
original work was done for the Union Catalogue and the date when we began 
to receive the Haverford cards for current accessions. It had always been our 
desire to have these missing titles listed and this spring we were able to do so. 
A special assistant was employed who checked the Haverford accessions for 
the period with our holdings and cards were typed for the titles not shown in 
our catalogue. Over eight hundred author cards for books not in the library 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 35 

were added. We have also continued to add to our catalogue the Haverford 
cards for new books which we do not possess and to send to the Union 
Catalogue of the Philadelphia Area the cards for our new acquisitions. 

Another activity in which the assistants of the Department took part was 
the inventory. Each one gave a couple of hours a day during the spring to 
this work which naturally reduced the time spent in the cataloguing of books. 
A statistical summary of the work for two years is given for comparison: 

1939-40 1940-41 

Titles catalogued _ 3,445 3,041 

Volumes, copies and editions added 3,534 2,807 

Volumes recatalogued 51 74 

Cards added to main catalogue 19,272 17,440 

Cards added to department catalogues 5,206 2,673 

Cards sent to Union Catalogue 3,508 3,112 

Haverford cards for new accessions, copied 1,022 2,015 

Binding and Periodicals 

On July 1, 1940, there were 119 volumes at the binder's. Twenty-six 
hundred and eighty -three volumes were sent during the year, 2,169 were 
returned bound, leaving 633 at the binder's June 30, 1941. Of the volumes 
which were bound 321 were new books supplied unbound, 880 were volumes 
of periodicals and 968 were old books needing rebinding. 

The Library receives currently 772 periodicals and 7 newspapers. Of 
this number 711 periodicals and 4 newspapers are purchased; 61 periodicals 
and 3 newspapers come as gifts. This is approximately the number of periodi- 
cals we have been receiving for the past ten years. 

Circulation and Reference 

The circulation of books at the main desk and at the desk in the Quita 
Woodward Wing, plus that of the Science Libraries, totalled 47,041. It is 
gratifying to note that there was an increase of about 2% over the preceding 
year in the individual withdrawals from the main desk. The new policy of 
giving honours students the unlimited privileges accorded to graduates may 
account for this increase. 

The following table indicates the total circulation of books by groups: 

Main 

Stack 

Students 21,115 

Faculty 6,308 

Reserves 7,374 

Outsiders 971 



West 


Science 




Stack 


Libraries 


Total 


5,093 


1,530 


27,738 


1,685 


558 


8,551 


1,928 


389 


9,691 


57 


33 


1,061 



Total 3 5,768 8,763 2,510 47,041 

The transfer of the music records and books from Rhoads Hall to the 
Library, where they are under the supervision of the Librarian of the West 
Stack, has proved to be an excellent move. Stricter supervision has lessened 
breakage as well as unexplained disappearance. The records are circulated 
in the same way as books and may be taken out for a limited period. The 
total number of record withdrawals for the year was 5,239 while the number 
of borrowers was 539. 



36 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

The commodious new Reference Room made from the elimination of the 
Students' Cloak Room and an adjoining office has proved a boon to the 
whole College. It is spacious, well ventilated and adequately lighted. Reference 
books are being used more than ever before and we have never had a more 
up'to-date, a more representative, or a finer collection. A small, duplicate 
reference reserve has been placed in the West Stack also. 

Inter-Library Loan 

Requests by students and faculty for books to be secured from other 
libraries have been numerous. We have borrowed 352 volumes from thirty 
five institutions during the year. This figure, however, only partially indicates 
our indebtedness for many of our students go to the libraries in the vicinity 
and bring back books of which we have no record. Letters of introduction to 
other libraries were written for 190 students and for 10 members of the faculty. 

An unusual number of requests for our books was received and books 
were sent to various parts of the country as far afield as Texas and Michigan. 
To twentynine libraries 197 volumes were loaned. In the course of the year 
our Library handled over 500 packages for inter-library loan and at least an 
hour and a half was spent each day on the work. 

Inventory 

'Nine years have elapsed since a complete inventory of the Library has 
been taken as it was impossible to do the work while the stacks were so 
congested. This year, with the expansion of the Library, an inventory of all 
collections in the main building and in the Halls of Science was completed. 
The result of this inventory shows 511 volumes unaccounted for in the main 
library building and 304 volumes missing from the libraries in the Halls of 
Residence. 

Science Libraries 

The Librarian in charge of the Science Libraries reports a busy year. 
During the academic year from October to June, a detailed analysis of the 
circulation was made, and was given to the departments involved. Figures 
from this report show a total circulation of 2,103 for unreserved books, of 
which 469, or 22%, were taken by the faculty, and the remainder, 78%, by 
the students. Three hundred and seventytwo books were placed on reserve 
for the various Science Departments. There was a total circulation of 3,338 
for these books. 

The fire in Dalton Hall caused a temporary upheaval in the physical 
organization of the Science Libraries. Actual damage by the fire to the books 
was not serious. Naturally, all the books show the results of smoke stain, 
most only slightly, others more seriously. Of the latter about two hundred 
volumes needed attention. Most of these were rebound, but the relatively 
out'of'date volumes were discarded. In the process of rebuilding and cleaning 
Dalton, 225 shelves of books had to be removed temporarily from position, 
and ultimately, 600 shelves of books were cleaned, book by book. 

A most advantageous reorganization took place in the Biology Library. 
Here new catalogue cases allowed the four different catalogues, which had 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 37 

been scattered in various cases, to be housed uniformly in the one large 
catalogue stand. 

In connection with the Bibliographical Center of Philadelphia two 
projects were carried out. The first consisted of a survey of the Science 
Libraries for special resources in the various specialized subjects, a general 
list of which was to be made for the Philadelphia area. This survey emphasized 
again that the Bryn Mawr Science Libraries are particularly well equipped in 
the number and completeness of their periodical sets. 

The second project was a list of the technical periodicals found in the 
Bryn Mawr Library, this list to become part of a union list at the Bibliographi' 
cal Center and including all the technical libraries of the Philadelphia area. 
In connection with this the Science Librarian attended two meetings at the 
Bibliographical Center and later, as Bryn Mawr's contribution, sent two 
hundred specially prepared cards to this catalogue. 

In addition to these special projects, the usual reference work was carried 
on. This included the making of eight bibliographies for faculty members, 
with entries ranging from five to thirty-three in number, and with two rather 
longer ones in process. 

Financial Statement 

Library appropriation for 1940-41 $15,000.00 

Receipts from course book fines, academic records, 

late registration and library fines 155.60 

Unappropriated balance from 1939-40 _ 413.60 

Total income $ 1 5,569.20 

Appropriations were made as follows: 

Regular, to departments $14,175.00 

Special, to departments 1,100.00 



Total appropriated $15,275.00 



Unappropriated balance $294.20 

Special Library Funds 
Receipts were as follows: 

Invested funds (listed in Treasurer's report) $1,740.70 

Gifts — Elizabeth Higginson Jackson, 1897: 

In memory of Rebekah Munro Chickering, 1897 100.00 

For the Class of 1897 , 100.00 

History Class, 1st year, Division I. 25.00 

Duplicate Book Fund 300.00 



Summary of Expenditures 



$2,265.70 



1939-40 1940-41 

For books _ $8,412.94 $7,430.96 

For periodicals and continuations 4,897.62 4,064.05 

For binding 3,276.76 2,261.69 

For supplies .„ 886.52 1,319.15 

For postage, express _ 50.44 53.20 

$17,524.28 $15,129.05 



38 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Administration 

The first year's use of the enlarged Library leaves us with a bewildering 
feeling of wonder that such a collection of books could have been shelved in 
its former inadequate quarters. The new arrangements are highly satisfactory. 
The excellent lighting of the new stacks and the improved conditions for 
study have resulted in a greater use of the building. The installation of a 
victaphone for the necessary communication between the new and old stack 
rooms, has effected a great saving of time and energy. Although the necessary 
expansion has resulted in difficult adjustments and added responsibilities for 
the whole staff the year has been a pleasantly active one from the standpoint 
of library management. 

My last report ended at the time when the moving from the old to the 
new building was in progress. The summer of 1940 was one of general 
upheaval in the Library for, after moving the books into the new stacks and 
transferring the equipment of the Art and Archaeology Departments into 
their new quarters, several alterations were made in the old part of the 
building. 

During the winter the room formerly used as a New Book Room was 
furnished by the Class of 1912 as a Rare Book Room. It is hoped that the 
addition of this new interest will help to awake in the students a love of 
books, and that the accustomed sight of the rare and beautiful examples of 
the best typographers will make the presentation of literature more vivid. 

In the spring, orders were placed for two microfilm reading machines, 
one a small Argus, the other a Recordak which is large enough to read 
newspaper film. The use of microfilm for reproducing books and periodical 
articles is growing in importance and it has become necessary to supply the 
faculty and students with this service. 

There were thirteen fulhtime members of the staff this year, of whom 
nine are trained librarians and four untrained assistants. At the end of the 
year Mrs. Priscilla Lee Reid resigned and in her place Miss Elizabeth A. 
Muenscher was appointed as assistant cataloguer. Miss Muenscher is a gradu' 
ate of Cornell University and of Simmons College School of Library Science. 
Among the young assistants there were several changes during the year. 

In addition to the regular staff, thirtyfive students were employed for 
the Reserve Book Room or for the evening hours at the desk in the West 
Stack and seven students were in charge of the Hall Libraries. Six N. Y. A. 
students were given work at the Loan Desk or in the Catalogue Department. 

The Library was represented by the Librarian and several members of 
the staff at the meeting of Eastern College Librarians at Columbia University 
in November and at the American Library Association Conference at Boston 
in June. 

In conclusion, I wish to pay tribute to the fine spirit of loyalty and of 
team work shown by the staff in one of the busiest and most complicated 
years of my administration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOIS A. REED, 

Librarian. 



REPORT OF THE COLLEGE PHYSICIAN 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1940-41: 

The remodeled Infirmary went into use in the autumn of 1940, and the 
year demonstrated beyond question that the plans had been well thought out 
and that the reconstruction was successful. The summer rains delayed the 
workmen, and when College opened the painters and plumbers were still in 
possession, so that for much of the first month patients were housed in the 
new isolation unit. The fact that the Dispensary was unfinished also necessi' 
tated omitting a large number of the routine physical examinations of 
employees which are ordinarily completed before the students return to the 
campus. After the first month, the whole building was in working order and 
the additional space proved a most welcome relief after years of crowding. 
The working units both in the Dispensary and in the Infirmary proper are 
far better and more efficiently arranged than previously. Fresh paint in grey 
and apricot throughout the building combined with the rearrangement of 
rooms has increased the light so much that it is difficult to believe that this 
is the result of remodeling alone. The new waiting room and the sun room 
with their gay upholsteries have occasioned many admiring comments from 
students and visitors. 

The number of admissions for the year 1940'41 rose to a new high of 
509, an increase of 101, or 25%, over the totals of the preceding two years. 
Of this increase of 100 admissions, 86 can be accounted for as follows: 

Contagious Diseases 17 Observation 11 

Respiratory Infections 22 Basal Metabolic 

Gastroenteritis - _.. 12 Rate Determinations 24 

In all, there were 14 cases of German Measles, six of Chicken Pox, one 
of Measles, and one of Mumps during the past year. German Measles in 
college students may honestly be said to be more important for its nuisance 
value to the patient than as an illness. The patients never feel sick for more 
than three days, but the official quarantine is ten days from the date of onset, 
which the students find very irksome. The Advisory Health Board of the 
Commonwealth during the summer of 1941 shortened this quarantine period 
to seven days, which should decrease the hardship for future patients consid- 
erably. German Measles is transmissible very easily, especially just before the 
appearance of the characteristic rash, so that when one case appears on the 
campus more may be expected with a good deal of certainty. This is the first 
time there has been German Measles on the campus since 1934-35. We did 
not have the experience of having two different contagious diseases isolated 
at the same time, which may prove a little difficult during the convalescent 
period, as there is only one bathroom in the new isolation unit. Except for 

[39] 



40 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

this test, the unit was thoroughly tried out and stood the trial admirably. 
It is possible with the new arrangement to maintain rigid isolation easily and 
to make the patient thoroughly comfortable. 

A mild form of influenza was epidemic in this vicinity in January and 
February of 1941. Since the diagnosis of influenza can only properly be made 
after laboratory studies which are not generally available, it has seemed 
desirable to class those cases of respiratory disease which clinically resembled 
influenza under the heading Grippe. There were no cases of serious illness 
among this group, but the disease plainly manifested its most unpleasant char' 
acteristic, an ability to reduce the strength and energy of the patients so much 
that prolonged convalescence was usually necessary. Despite the sixtyseven 
cases of grippe during January and February, the total number of cases of 
respiratory disease was only twentytwo greater than the preceding year. 

It should be explained that the heading Observation covers a variety of 
cases in which an accurate final filing diagnosis could not be reached. In some 
instances the Physician thought the student might be "coming down with 
something," and in most of these the student had presented herself with the 
same idea, but a brief rest caused the disappearance of the rather nebulous 
symptoms. Others of these cases were under Dr. Stewart's care and required 
prolonged study after leaving the Infirmary before a diagnosis could be made. 

The increase in the number of basal metabolic rate determinations is 
evidence both of the value of the test and of the desirability of the enlarge 
ment of the Infirmary. In the preceding two years a number of these deter' 
minations were omitted because the Infirmary was full and no room available 
in which to perform the test. 

There were complaints from students and wardens about the noise in the 
Infirmary during the past year. When the patients are convalescent they 
frequently find the temptation to call to their friends in other rooms irresistible, 
and repeated reprimands from the nurses seemed to have little effect. Miss 
Slavin and I had a number of conferences during the summer, and concluded 
that, with the increasing number of patients, it was necessary to revise all the 
Infirmary regulations thoroughly and make them much more stringent. In 
the future, the number of visitors will be much curtailed, and radios will be 
forbidden except for an Infirmary radio in the sunroom, which should decrease 
the noise considerably. 

At the same time we considered various measures to make the work of 
the Infirmary go more smoothly. A quicker method of doing the annual 
physical examinations which will permit their completion by November 1st, 
will be tried in the coming year. If successful this will permit an earlier start 
of follow'up visits. The office hours of the Physician have been rearranged 
to permit her to complete morning rounds on bed patients before she starts 
seeing Dispensary cases. 

Dr. Genevieve Stewart completed her fourth year as Attending Psychia' 
trist. As before, her help proved of especial value to students with problems 
of adjustment, as her training and skill enable her to see the student in 
relation to all factors in the situation. 

Dr. Stewart's report of the year's work follows: 



REPORT OF THE COLLEGE PHYSICIAN 41 

During the year 1940-41 the Attending Psychiatrist had 163 
student interviews. Thirty-four students were seen. There were 
several students requiring a larger number of interviews than is the 
usual average. 

Four lectures were given in the Mental Hygiene section of the 
hygiene course on personality needs in various developmental phases. 
We congratulated ourselves upon being able to present Dr. Earl D. 
Bond to the students in a discussion of some trends made evident 
by exhaustive study of well students being made at Harvard College. 

Realizing that the Mental Hygiene point of view is best inter- 
preted in discussion of actual situations it was suggested at the 
Wardens' Lunch that wardens with problems feel free to come for 
consultation in particular cases. It was felt that in this quiet way a 
better understanding by a larger number of people of the scope of 
our work on campus might be established in an effective manner. 
The response to this suggestion was gratifying, the students found 
in the warden a friend on campus whose help was not contrary to 
ideas developed during their interviews with the Attending Psychia- 
trist. Constructive help given at a period which the students consider 
crucial in their lives is so gratefully received that the task is an 
unusually satisfying one. The early recognition of psychoneurotic 
trends and personality derangement is a small but no less important 
part of the work of the Attending Psychiatrist. 

The consultation room made available for the Attending 
Psychiatrist by the new Infirmary was a welcome addition to the 
comfort and efficiency of the service. The sunny exposure and 
attractive decoration created a pleasant atmosphere in which ease 
and conversation came naturally. 

I wish again to express my appreciation of the cordial coopera- 
tion of Dr. Leary and the Dean's office without which the service 
could not be satisfactory. 

The remaining work of the medical department was carried on as usual. 
No cases of tuberculosis were found in the annual survey. The hygiene 
course was given without substantial change. 

Several new pieces of equipment for the Infirmary were purchased from 
the fund made up of vaccination fees and fines, to which Mrs. Manning 
permitted us last year to add the fees for basal metabolic rate determinations. 
A much needed four-tube electrical centrifuge was bought to replace the 
badly worn water-driven centrifuge. A special work table for the laboratory 
and an extra sink for the Dispensary were also paid for in this manner. 

It is our hope that the coming year will go especially well, as we are now 
well settled into the remodeled building, and we have endeavored to provide 
for smoother functioning by careful revision of administrative detail. 

I am most grateful to the officers of administration and to the other 
members of the Infirmary staff for their cooperation during the past year. 
Respectfully submitted, 

OLGA GUSHING LEARY, M.D., 

College Physician. 



42 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



SUPPLEMENT TO THE PHYSICIAN'S REPORT 
Infirmary Report 



Five-Tear Summary 

Aver. Daily- 
Aver. Total Total No. of Dis- 
Daily Dispensary Dispensary pensary 

Patients 



Total Total 

Infirmary Infirmary 

Year Admissions Days Census Cases Visits 

1936-37 245 795J4 3.3 1,306 2,492 

1937-38 301 811 3.4 1,736 2,915 

1938-39 398 1,2301/4 5.1 1,871 3,167 

1939-40 408 1,474 6.1 2,129 3,802 

1940-41 509 1,726 7.2 2,341 3,605 

Infirmary Admission Report 1940-41 

Semester I. Admissions Days 

Students 244 782 

Employees 3 5 

Staff 1 7 

Semester II. 

Students 248 ' 860 

Employees 5 56 

Staff 8 14 

TotaUAdmissions .' 509 1,725 

Infirmary Diagnoses 1940-41 

Diseases of the Psychobiological Unit Semester I. 

Anxiety State 2 

Readmission 1 

Diseases of the Body as a Whole 

Chicken Pox 5 

Contusions, Multiple 1 

Exhaustion 1 6 

Readmissions 

German Measles 

Heat Prostration 

Hypothyroidism with Menorrhagia 1 

Measles 

Reaction to Injection of Antuitrin S 

Vaccination Reaction, Typhoid Vaccine 

Diseases of the Skin and Mucous Membranes 

Burns, 1st Degree 

Carbuncles 1 

Cellulitis of Face 

Readmission 

Dermatitis Actinica 

Dermatitis Venenata 3 

Furuncles 

Infection, Finger 1 

Ulcer, Buccal Mucosa 

Diseases of the Musculo-Skeletal System 

Sprain, Left Knee 1 

Dislocation of Patella 

Myositis, Left Trapezius 

Strain, Right Sacro-iliac Joint 



10.4 
12.1 
13.2 
15.9 
15.0 



Hours 

19'/ 2 

4 


12 



15 

221/ 2 



Semester II. 


Total 


1 


3 




1 


1 


6 




1 


28 


44 


2 


2 


14 


14 


2 


2 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


8 


11 


5 


5 




1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 



REPORT OF THE COLLEGE PHYSICIAN 43 

Semester I. Semester II. Total 
Diseases of the Respiratory System 

Common Cold 71 81 152 

Readmissions 3 3 

Laryngitis 1 2 

Grippe ..- 51 21 72 

Readmissions 3 3 

Infection, Congenital Cysts of Lung 1 

Readmission 1 

Asthma 1 

Diseases of the Cardiovascular System 

Hypotension 1 

Diseases of the Haemic and Lymphatic Systems 

Secondary Anemia 1 

Diseases of the Digestive System 

Adenitis, Salivary Glands 1 

Amoebic Dysentery 1 

Appendicitis 

Acute 1 

Subacute 1 5 

Readmission 1 

Chronic Recurrent 1 

Epidemic Parotitis 1 

Gastroenteritis, Acute 39 30 69 

Readmission 1 

Streptococcus Sore Throat 1 4 

Diseases of the Genital System 

Acute Gonococcal Salpingitis 1 

Haemorrhage from Ruptured Graafian 

Follicle 1 

Diseases of the Nervous System 

Cerebral Haemorrhage (Arteriosclerosis) 1 

Concussion 1 

Intercostal Neuralgia 1 

Diseases of the Ear 

Furuncle, External Auditory Canal 1 

Readmissions 3 

Undiagnosed Diseases, Classified by Symptoms 

Abdominal Pain 1 

Dysmenorrhea 4 3 

Eye Strain 2 

Metrorrhagia 1 

Non-Diagnostic Terms for Record 

Basal Metabolic Rate Determinations 27 14 

Boarders _ 2 

Convalescent Care Following Streptococcus 

Sore Throat 1 

Observation 1 3 

Post Operative Care 

Appendectomy 1 

Removal of Fibroma of Breast 1 

Tooth Extraction 1 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE 
EDUCATIONAL SERVICE 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1940-1941: 

During the present academic year, the work of the Educational Service 
has been directed primarily to the problems that have been presented to us by 
the Lower Merion Township school system. The services rendered to private 
schools have been fewer in number than in previous years. As the work for 
the private schools is not used for purposes of demonstration and teaching, 
this decrease has not reduced the opportunities for student observation. 
Instead, the relatively greater time devoted to public school problems has 
perhaps resulted in wider opportunities for student observation and training 
in educational and clinical procedures. 

This year the Educational Service was asked by the Superintendent of 
the Lower Merion schools to give two new kinds of assistance. One request 
has resulted in the institution of regular lessons in remedial reading for public 
school children. Three children with serious reading disabilities have come 
to the clinic regularly after school for a total of 68 lessons. The second 
request was for assistance in evaluating a group testing program which was 
instituted in the public school system this year. The research involved has 
resulted in two statistical studies carried out by a student, the Assistant and 
the Director. I feel that participation in such service studies is extremely 
valuable experience for students, not only because it gives insight into 
practical school problems, but also because it offers training in educational 
research techniques. 

The clinical work of the Educational Service is summarized in the 
following tables: 

Summary of Individual Tests Administered 1940'1941 

Total 
Number 

Children referred by public schools 71 

Children referred by Bryn Mawr Hospital... 3 
Fecpaying cases 7 



Director 


Assistant 


Student 


34 


27 


10 


3 






7 







Total 81 44 27 10 

Summary of Group Tests Administered 1 940-1 94 2 

No. of No. of 

Classes Children Director Assistant Student 

Public schools 18 42? 10 7 1 

Private schools 23 23 

Total 41 425 33 7 1 

[44] 



No. of 








Lessons 


Director 


Assistant 


Student 


68 


16 


4? 


7 


32 


32 







REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE EDUCATIONAL SERVICE 45 

Summary of Remedial Instruction 1940-1941 

Type of No. of 

Instruction Children 

Reading 3 

Speech 1 

Total 4 100 48 45 7 

The children tested individually have come from ten different public 
schools and from five private schools. With one exception, the individual 
tests given in the public schools were made at the request of school superin' 
tendents, principals and visiting nurses. The most frequent cause of referral 
was poor work in school. Other individual tests requested were for the 
purpose of locating the very superior and very inferior children for whom 
special curricula are being planned for next year. Ten other children were 
given individual tests in connection with the research study of the school-wide 
group testing program. Requests for individual tests were greater in number 
than we could handle. Children whom we did not have time to test this year 
will be examined during the coming year. 

Of the eighteen group tests administered to public school classes, sixteen 
were tests of intelligence and two were reading tests. Eight of these tests 
were given as part of the school-wide testing program, six others at the specific 
request of school principals, and four in connection with the statistical study 
of the testing program. One of these tests was administered by a student, 
seven by the Assistant, and ten by the Director. 

A financial statement for the year 19404941 follows. The fees of 
$252.50 failed to meet the expenses. It was therefore necessary to meet the 
additional expenses of $3 52.24 from the accumulated Educational Service 
Fund. The sum of $1,296.38 remains in the Fund. 

Financial Statement for 1940-1941 
Balance as of October 1940 $1,648.62 

Fees, 1940-1941: 

School survey $1 15.00 

Individual examinations 5 5.00 

Remedial teaching 82.50 

252.50 



Total _ $1,901.12 

Expenses, 1940-1941: 

Salary of Assistant $500.00 

Part salary of Secretary 100.00 

Supplies 4.74 

604.74 



Total $1,296.38 

Balance as of June 1941 $1,296.38 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH FEHRER, 
Director of the Educational Service. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE 
BUREAU OF RECOMMENDATIONS 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1940-41. 

Total Calls to the Bureau 487 

Teaching Positions 181 20 college, 148 school, 13 

tutors; 24 of the school posi' 
tions were apprenticeships, 10 
were part-time and 8 were 
temporary. 

Non-Teaching Positions 134 10 part-time, 27 summer, 8 

temporary. 

Small Positions 127 typing, selling, staying with 

children, etc. 

Placements made by the Bureau 149 

Positions offered but refused by the candidate 7 

Total 156 

Teaching Positions: 

Full-time 13 (1 college, 12 school) 

Apprenticeships 4 

Part-time 3 (2 college, 1 school) 

Tutor 10 

Substitute 2 

Total 32 

Positions offered 2 

Total 34 

Non-Teaching Positions: 

Full-time 1 5 

Temporary 9 (3 summer) 

Part-time 3 

Total 27 

Positions offered 5 

Total 32 

Small Positions 89 

Placements in colleges were made at: 

Bryn Mawr College (part-time) University of Rochester 
Rosemont College (part-time) 

[46] 



REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF RECOMMENDATIONS 47 

and in schools at: 

The Baldwin School The Nissequogue School 

The Birmingham College The Ogontz, School 

Preparatory School St. Margaret's School 

The Brearley School The g arah Dix Hamlin SchooJ 

The Cincinnati College The ghady Hm School 

Preparatory School „ . , c , , 

1 » i bpnngside bcnooi 

Concord Academy 

-n/r- -c- ' c u i The Walnut Hill School 

Miss hne s bcnooi 

The Garrison Forest School M"* Wharton's School 

The Holton-Arms School The Winnetka Graduate 

The Kent School for Girls Teachers College 

Comparison of the records of the Bureau in 1939-40 and 1940-41: 

1940-41 1939-40 

Total calls 487 294 

Placements 149 56 

Teaching calls 181 123 

Colleges 20 23 

Placed 3 2 

Schools ._ 148 93 

Placed 1 9 7 

Tutors _ 13 7 

Placed 1 1 

Non-Teaching calls: 

Full-time or regular part-time 134 126 

Placed 27 18 

Small positions 127 4? 

Placed 89 28 

The number of calls increased very greatly this year, about 66 per cent. 
Exclusive of the small calls, teaching and non-teaching ran somewhat farther 
apart than they have for some years, with teaching well in the lead. In pro- 
portion, more of the non-teaching than teaching positions were filled. 

As might be expected, more varied and more interesting positions than 
usual came in this year. 

Members of the Class of 1941 who, as far as Corresponding 

known to the Bureau, have positions 1941-42: figures for 1940-41 

Teaching 12 12 

Miscellaneous 26 24 

Members of the Class of 1941 who are doing 

graduate work _ 15 10 

Members of the Class of 1941 who are studying 

at medical school 2 or 3 2 

Members of the Class of 1941 who are studying 

nursing _ 4 

Members of the Class of 1941 who are studying art 2 

Members of the Class of 1941 who are taking 

business courses 5 2 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUISE F. H. CRENSHAW, 
Director of the Bureau of Recommendations. 



REPORT OF THE CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
THE MADGE MILLER RESEARCH FUND 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1940-41. 

The Committee appointed by you to administer the Madge Miller Research 
Fund received applications for grants that were considerably in excess of the 
money available. The Committee made six grants, as follows: 

Grant Number 33 — Dr. Bernheimer 

Photographs, etc., for project, old 

masters 1 drawings $150.00 

Grant Number 34 — Dr. Berry 

Apparatus 100.00 

Grant Number 3 5 — Dr. Dryden 

Drawings 50.00 

pi-ant Number 36 — Dr. Fairchild 

Research assistance 100.00 

Grant Number 37 — Dr. Merger 

Purchase of material for Old English 

dictionary 80.00 

Grant Number 38 — Dr. Sprague 

Work on newspapers 25.00 



$505.00 



Probably because of war conditions, several projects for which grants 
were made in the years 1937-39 have not been completed and the sums have 
not been entirely expended. The Committee has decided that grants assigned 
to members of the faculty shall be available to them until June 30th of the 
year subsequent to the academic year in which they are assigned. After that 
time money not expended will revert to the Research Fund and may be 
assigned to others. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LILY ROSS TAYLOR, 

Chairman of the Committee. 



[48] 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 

to 
THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

of 
BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

for the year 
1941-42 



Published by Bryn Mawr College 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

December, 1942 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Report of the President of the College 3 

Supplement I., Changes in the Academic Staff 10 

Supplement II., Faculty and Staff Publications 11 

Report of the Acting Dean of the College 16 

Supplement, Statistics of Undergraduate Students 18 

Report of the Dean of the Graduate School 20 

Report of the DirectoR'IN'Residence and Editor of Publications 26 

Report of the Librarian 35 

Report of the College Physician 41 

Supplement, Infirmary Report - 42 

Report of the Director of the Educational Service 44 

Report of the Director of the Bureau of Recommendations 46 

Report of the Chairman of the Committee on the 

Madge Miller Research Fund : 48 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 

October - June 

To the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1941-42. 

The President's Report to the Board of Directors falls this year into two 
parts: the first nine months are covered herewith, the report of the summer is 
presented by President McBride who took office on July 1st. 

1941'42 broke away sharply from the usual pattern. Emotional tension 
in the country and far-reaching organization of citizens and resources to meet 
first a prewar and then a war situation were instantly reflected in colleges and 
schools, in the colleges for women only less dramatically than in the colleges for 
men. By the end of the first semester Bryn Mawr had lost important members 
of the faculty and the Graduate School; it had agreed to a revolutionary shift 
in its method (though not in its requirements) for admission; as a section of 
Lower Merion Township it had made itself ready by the joint work of faculty, 
staff and students for possible air raids or for a prolonged disturbance of its 
routine; and its faculty, staff and students had also taken on a heavy load of 
defense work both in academic and extra-curricular fields, some of it difficult 
and very demanding, all of it time consuming. The efficiency of the re-arrange- 
ments or of the entirely new plans which produced these changes seemed to 
play a part in doing away with the earlier tension and on the whole the new 
whirl of activity did not disturb too much the sober academic work. We gave 
our June degrees with a good academic conscience. 

The year began quietly and at the stated time in spite of an infantile- 
paralysis epidemic in several counties of eastern Pennsylvania which threatened 
postponement. To their surprise, the President and the Dean of the Graduate 
School found themselves back for a year of administrative work and Miss 
Ward, the Director of Admissions, began her appointment as Acting Dean. 
The list of faculty appointments appended to this report shows that at first no 
one was on leave of absence but Professor Fen wick (Political Science) whose 
services had again been asked for by the State Department as a member of the 
Inter-American Juridical Committee meeting in Rio de Janeiro during the heart 
of the winter. Before the end of the year, however, Professors Michels 
(Physics), Soper (History of Art), Anderson (Economics), and Mr. Borne- 
meier (Psychology) had left to do military service or defense work; Professor 
Fenwick had found himself unable to return for the late spring months and 
Professor Helson of the Department of Psychology was absent a day or two 
each week on a research project. At the May meeting of the Board leave of 
absence for defense work in 1942-43 was voted to Professors Doyle (Biology) 
and Dryden (Geology). The minute passed by the Board at its March 1941 
meeting was acted on in the case of Mr. Bornemeier and a payment made 
him to cover the difference between his army pay and his Bryn Mawr salary. 
In the other cases no action was needed. Differing arrangements were made 
for the work of the absent instructors. Professors Michels and Anderson were 
able to return from Washington for brief visits but in the main the work of 

[3] 



4 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

the absent faculty members was carried by instructors or graduate students with 
some earlier experience of the college courses. There was, naturally, increased 
pressure in the departments involved and in all departments everywhere 
members of the faculty were giving many hours of extra time to defense work 
of various kinds on and off the campus. 

It is striking, therefore, that the number of applications by members of the 
faculty for research grants enumerated in the report of the Madge Miller 
Research Fund Committee was unusually large and that in an important field 
of faculty activity, general responsibility for academic matters, its discussions 
and decisions were many and important, necessitating many special meetings. 
The faculty discussed and voted its approval of an accelerated program 
for serious students, enabling them to complete work for the A.B. degree in 
less than four years. It approved the substitution of a series of entrance 
examinations of the intelligence test form, given on one day in April, for the 
established series of essay form examinations given on six days in June. The 
spade work in these two important decisions was done respectively by the 
Curriculum Committee and the Admissions Committee of the Faculty, and the 
Acting Dean of the College not only contributed considerably to the form in 
which the actions were presented but to the complicated working out of the 
registration of the older students for the following year and to the acceptance 
of the applications of would'be freshmen. I recommend her lively report on 
both problems. 

Three special faculty committees presented important reports during the 
year, the Committee of the Faculty on the Choice of a President, the Committee 
of the Faculty on the Choice of Administrative Officers, and the Committee on 
the Teaching Load. The first two committees worked jointly with parallel 
committees appointed by the Board and the result was not only the excellent 
choices for new administrative officers announced in November and in April 
but further the discovery by each group in the other of lively interest in the 
good of the College and appreciation of its purposes and above all an illumin' 
ating experience of the advantage of differing opinions and points of view when 
they are pooled to a common end. The report on the Teaching Load made by a 
Committee composed of the four administrative officers of 1940'41 made 
definite recommendations to meet the problem brought about as time went on 
by sharply shifting interests among students of both graduate and under' 
graduate schools. After a long investigation it recommended a decrease in the 
number of hours offered in Teutonic Philology and Archaeology and a possible 
omission of Italian as a major subject. Corresponding adjustments in the work 
of the instructors in the courses were recommended for 1943-44. The recom- 
mendation of the Committee was accepted by the Board of Directors. 

Three series of lectures were given in 1941-42; two of the lecturers took 
an active part in the teaching of seminaries. Dr. Gisela M. A. Richter, Curator 
of the Department of Greek and Roman Art at the Metropolitan Museum of 
Art, New York, lectured under the Mary Flexner Fund on "The Art of Archaic 
Greece Against Its Historical Background," from October 13th to November 
17th, and during this time met with the Archaeology and Classical Journal 
Clubs for very profitable sessions. Professor Manley O. Hudson, Judge of the 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 5 

Permanent Court of International Justice, Member of the Permanent Court of 
Arbitration and Bemis Professor of International Law at the Harvard Law 
School, was the Anna Howard Shaw Lecturer of the year and in addition to his 
series of addresses on "Twenty Years' Development of International Law, 
1919-1939," he conducted for the six weeks of his stay (February 6th through 
March 13th) the seminary on "The Next Peace" directed during the year for 
Haverford and Bryn Mawr graduate students in Politics by Professor Gerig 
of Haverford and Professor Wells and Dr. Helen Reid of Bryn Mawr. A third 
series of lectures was arranged by the Committee on the Coordination of the 
Sciences in memory of David H. Tennent, the first Chairman of the committee, 
and were given by five distinguished scholars. The subjects were chosen in 
marginal fields between the Sciences and Mathematics. The interest of the 
surprisingly large audiences made the profit to the College of a permanently 
established series of Science lectures very plain. Other single lectures and 
concerts of the year appear in the report of the Director-in-Residence. 

I should like to report something of the cooperative plan of the three 
nearby colleges which is beyond the springboard stage! I can at least say that 
the three Presidents believe foundations are being prepared for joint work 
which will be useful and important. Two definite steps were taken during the 
year: the three Presidents agreed to discuss all new appointments jointly, with 
a view to cooperation in providing all three colleges with more varied instruc 
tion and in avoiding local overlapping in advanced work. And, second, certain 
departments in the three colleges likely to be called on often for government 
work consulted early in the second semester and in most cases drew up sug- 
gestions for cooperation in maintaining scheduled work if instructors in one 
or more of the colleges were absent. One joint appointment was made by 
Haverford and Bryn Mawr. Dr. Richard Bernheimer was appointed Associate 
Professor of History of Art in both colleges, and Haverford agreed that both 
individual courses in History of Art and the series of courses leading to a 
major should be offered to Haverford students at Bryn Mawr. A plan for a 
joint administration of the three libraries with a view to diminishing the 
maintenance costs was carefully prepared and discussed and I hope will 
certainly emerge again. I do not need to say that the general disturbance of 
faculty, student body and curriculum this year made combination at once 
more difficult and more advantageous. 

In November a chapter of the scientific honour society, Sigma Xi, was 
established at Bryn Mawr; the society is open only to faculty and to graduate 
students who are especially recommended by faculty. 

The number of students registered for the year reached 660, 156 in the 
Graduate School and 504 undergraduates, and this figure may well remain the 
high water mark. Resident students in both schools have practically filled 
available college rooms in late years and the local (non-resident) group has not 
increased but kept about the same ratio to the whole. For obvious reasons a 
high registration in the Graduate School next year is not probable and further- 
more undergraduates with two or three years of training will undoubtedly 
withdraw to fill places in industry or in defense work for which they are already 
fitted. On the other hand it seems likely that in a time of chaos steady training 



6 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

for young women may seem useful to an unusual degree and applicants for 
entrance may be many. The faculty Admissions Committee, therefore, as it 
met during the winter and spring, tried to make an elastic plan which allowed 
for a drop in the registration of the graduate students and the older groups 
and an increase of freshman numbers. The list of applicants did actually prove 
very long and fortunately very good. The Committee had a sensitive con- 
science and it was relieved to find its standards could be kept and a very large 
number of students admitted. The summer began with an overflowing regis- 
tration of the College for next winter. 

The number and variety of foreign students, both graduate and undergrad- 
uate, either on scholarships or paying their own fees, were amazing; thirty-nine 
states and Hawaii, and twelve foreign countries were represented. Their contribu- 
tion to the college year was underlined by a student assembly at which students 
of seven different nationalities spoke on education in their own countries. 

And not only numbers and variety but excellent work marked the year. 
At Commencement nineteen Ph.D. degrees, twenty-three M.A. and one hun- 
dred and twenty-six A.B. degrees were given, forty per cent of the seniors 
taking the degree with honours. It was a great satisfaction that the daily 
routine work of both schools was done steadily in spite of occasional sudden 
shifts of instructors and against the mounting tide of extra courses which the 
government or local defense organizations asked for and in which a high 
percentage of faculty, staff and students took part. The usual campus activities 
were somehow maintained too. Student assemblies were held, one of special 
interest celebrating the fiftith anniversary of the Bryn Mawr Self-Government 
Association; the student Model Assembly of the League of Nations, with 
representatives from colleges in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania, held 
its annual session at Bryn Mawr during the spring vacation; and the Bryn 
Mawr League in particular undertook a very heavy programme, both on the 
campus and in social centres in Bryn Mawr, Haverford and Ardmore. 

There was fortunately an unusually good health record. Dr. Leary reports 
no serious illness or epidemic. 

All in all it was a year with which the College can be satisfied. Its only 
misfortune was the serious fire in the Pembroke dining room and kitchen on 
January 3rd. The repairing was done as quickly as possible and was covered by 
insurance, but there was naturally much inconvenience to the Pembroke staff 
which proved itself both patient and resourceful. 

Perhaps one reason for the spirit and liveliness of the whole college 
community was the choice of the new President in November followed by that 
of the other new administrative officers in March. The naming of Miss McBride 
preeminently, but also of Mrs. Grant, Miss Taylor and Miss Ward brought to 
us all a wave of confidence and even excitement. In the uneasy course which 
every college is likely to steer in the next years they seem certain to be alert 
and skillful pilots; their pooled experience and equipment are almost formidably 
satisfactory! This confidence came out clearly in the meetings of the faculty 
and of the college community at which the new appointments were announced 
and in the editorials and reports of the College T^ews, the Alumnae Bulletin 
and in the Philadelphia papers. The year has been pointed up by anticipation. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 7 

There will be an extraordinary shift as a matter of fact in the whole 
administrative side of the College next year. Mr. Sandy Lee Hurst, Comptroller 
of the College since 1913, retires from that office, though fortunately he 
remains as Assistant to the Treasurer. His service has been so unremitting, so 
useful, so loyal that it has called out an unusual expression of gratitude from 
faculty, Directors and students. Many of us have profited personally from his 
knowledge and experience and everyone knows of his contribution to the good 
of the College day by day, year by year. His place as Comptroller is taken by 
Mr. Raymond Buckley who has been working in the office for one year already. 

In January Mr. John J. Foley, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, 
died suddenly. He had been in the service of the College since 1904 and 
Superintendent since 1920. The heads of the various Buildings and Grounds 
Departments and the workmen had all been trained by him and he had created 
an efficient and interested group which took pride as he did in the good 
condition and good looks of the college buildings and campus. He himself 
had technical experience especially in the fields of heating and lighting and he 
knew how to get good work done and was a loyal and responsible officer. In 
May Mr. Horace N. Smedley was appointed in his place. 

The lists of gifts to Bryn Mawr during the year is set down in the report 
of the Treasurer. It is long and will repay your reading and your gratitude. 
I ask your special notice, however, as you look them through, of the large 
addition to the college endowment made by the bequest of Alice Day Jackson, 
Bryn Mawr 1902. I hope it will be used in a way that is in keeping with 
Mrs. Jackson's singular wisdom and gift for living and that, through its 
application, more women may repeat her contribution to public affairs. The 
alumnae in general have enriched the life at Bryn Mawr not only by the 
scholars sent by the Regional Committees, but by many carefully applied 
special gifts, such as the moving picture projector, the room for student enter- 
taining in Goodhart and the library writing room. Three new scholarships 
have been used for the first time this year, given by women outside the 
immediate college circle. 

Dean Schenck presents for this year her final report of the Graduate 
School. To her interesting account of the winter I must add my appreciation 
of her administrative work since 1929. For her clear picture of what the 
Graduate School of Bryn Mawr should be and for her patience, tact and 
persistence in working it out year by year the College owes her a great debt. 
She has made herself familiar with all the problems of the graduate teacher and 
the graduate student, and used her ingenuity to solve them. It has been of 
great value to the School that she lived in Radnor Hall and brought to it her 
wide official and personal experience. Her return to full time teaching is of 
advantage to her Department and to the College, and fortunately she can 
continue to give as a member of the graduate faculty her ideas on graduate 
work and its province at Bryn Mawr. 

The Directors held their four stated meetings at the Deanery and a fifth 
special meeting in Philadelphia for the election of the new President. There 
have been important changes in the Board this year. Alice Lee Hardenbergh 
Clark replaced Adelaide Neall as Alumnae Director. Frances Fincke Hand 



8 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

resigned as Director'at'large, an alumna who has made a contribution to Bryn 
Mawr of intelligence, liberal thinking and unceasing interest which few can 
match. She has been — beyond her solid virtues — a delightful member of the 
Board. Mr. Edgar Rhoads was elected to fill last year's vacancy in the Trustees. 
The death of Mr. Parker Williams, one of the Directors'at'large, lost to the 
Board not only Mr. Williams' expert financial advice but the kindliness and 
common sense of his point of view on general matters. His place was filled in 
May by the election of Mr. W. Logan MacCoy. President-elect McBride 
attended the March meeting of the Board and could, I feel sure, foresee the 
deep interest of the Directors in the College and their generous help to the 
executive officers. 

The year closed on June 2nd. The Baccalaureate sermon was preached 
by the Reverend Vivian T. Pomeroy of Milton, Massachusetts, and the retiring 
President spoke briefly at the Commencement. She was greatly honoured by 
being given the M. Carey Thomas Award by the Committee named by the 
Alumnae Association of the College. 

During the year various plans for the summer use of the campus were 
approved by the Board. The Institute of International Affairs of the American 
Friends Service Committee asked for the use of Rockefeller Hall and various 
conference rooms and the auditorium in Gcodhart Hall for a ten day confer' 
ence in July. A group of three nursing schools (Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, 
Columbia' Presbyterian, New York and Lincoln Hospital, New York) obtained 
a subsidy from the Federal Government to establish the Bryn Mawr College 
Summer School of Nursing for college graduates on the campus for a thirteen 
week period: this implied the use of Pembroke Hall, parts of the biology and 
chemistry laboratories and the Deanery. The Departments of Geology and 
Chemistry were asked by the U. S. Office of Education, Engineering, Science, 
Management Defense Training to hold courses of seven weeks length in 
Surveying, Mapping and Photogrammetry and in Analytical Chemistry respec 
tively. And as Miss Ward notes in her report a few of our own students 
remained for intensive study in Physics and Mathematics. I should like to 
call special attention in this connection to the report by the head of the 
Bureau of Recommendations. It is perhaps the most startling information 
provided in this report. I leave for President McBride's report the account 
of the working out of these projects. 

I cannot close this report without setting down my thanks to the Board 
for the kindness its members have shown to the retiring President during her 
long term and the confidence they have given her. Officially and unofficially, 
as a Board and as individuals, they have been unceasingly generous of their 
time and interest when I asked for counsel or for support. I cannot believe 
many such boards exist in American colleges. Bryn Mawr's character owes to 
its Board much of its integrity and its idealism. I count myself very fortunate 
to have known it at first hand. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARION EDWARDS PARK, 

President of the College. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 9 

July -October 1942 

I have the honour to submit to the Directors of the College the following 
report for July, August, and September 1942. This report is a record of the 
active summer on the Bryn Mawr campus and of the opening of a new year. 

During the summer second'year courses in the crucial fields of Physics and 
Mathematics were carried on by Dr. Patterson and Mr. Oxtoby for a few 
regular students. The Engineering, Science, Management Defense Training 
under the direction of Dr. Watson enrolled 59 students in Chemistry and 
Photogrammetry; while the Bryn Mawr College Summer School of Nursing 
enrolled 80 college graduates for their preclinical training in nursing. Miss 
Margaret Conrad was Dean of the Nursing School, Mrs. Chadwick'Collins 
its Administrator. 

One large conference was held at the College during the summer, the 
Institute on International Relations of the American Friends Service Committee. 

With the fall, the College faced the problem of further changes in the 
faculty as Dr. Helson and Dr. Frederica de Laguna asked for full leave and 
Dr. Northrop for partial leave. Dr. Mary Butler Lewis was appointed for the 
year to teach the course in Anthropology in Dr. de Laguna's place; but substi' 
tute arrangements in the absence of Dr. Helson and Dr. Northrop, like those 
for Dr. Dryden and Dr. Doyle, were made through the cooperation of Haver' 
ford and Swarthmore. We are indebted to Swarthmore for three of our courses 
this year, and to Haverford for one. Seven of our undergraduates are regularly 
enrolled at Haverford, taking there a course which in the emergency had to be 
cancelled at Bryn Mawr; 19 Haverford and two Swarthmore students are 
enrolled at Bryn Mawr. 

The year began with the decreased enrollment in the Graduate School 
foreseen by Miss Park in the spring, and the unusually large enrollment of 
undergraduates. In fact, the resident undergraduates exceeded the capacity of 
their halls and filled the eight vacant places in Radnor. The freshman class is 
the largest in the history of the College, and from its entrance records one of 
the ablest. 

As a result of the war two new courses were introduced. Dr. Watson 
substituted an elective course in Mapping and Photogrammetry for the earlier 
course in Field and Structural Geology and opened the new course to promis' 
ing juniors and seniors outside the Department of Geology. A course in 
Russian is being given by Mr. Rene Jean Daudon, Instructor in Romance 
Languages at the University of Pennsylvania, for 14 Bryn Mawr and three 
Haverford students. 

The budget in July 1942 presented an excess of receipts beyond expendi' 
tures of $38,000 and an excess of operating against budgeted items of $16,000. 
This extremely favorable outcome for the year set before the new President a 
high standard. The academic year 1942'43 began favorably from the point of 
view of tuition fees received, but unfavorable factors were also evident. 
Necessary increases made over the summer in the wages of maids, porters, 
mechanics, and laborers raised operating costs by something over $7,000. 
When other known changes were included, the estimated net surplus according 



10 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

to the figures of September was about $6,000; the estimated surplus in May 
had been $11,000. 

The College suffered a sad loss in August in the death of Arthur H. 
Thomas, for thirty years a member of the Board of Trustees of the College. 
I greatly regret having missed the privilege of working with Mr. Thomas. 

Three former members of the faculty of the College died during the year: 
Dr. George A. Barton, one of the best known figures of Bryn Mawr, who 
resigned as Professor of Biblical Literature and Semitic Languages in 1922 
after thirtyone years of service to the College; Dr. Matilde Castro, Professor 
of Education and Director of the Phebe Anna Thorne School from 1913 to 
1923; and Dr. Clarence Errol Ferree, who came to the Department of Psychol' 
ogy in 1907 and resigned in 1928 to take charge of the Wilmer Ophthalmo- 
logical Laboratory at Johns Hopkins. 

Respectfully submitted, 
KATHARINE ELIZABETH McBRIDE, 

President of the College. 

SUPPLEMENT TO THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT 
I. 

Changes in the Academic Staff of Bryn Mawr College 
October 1, 1941 - September 30, 1942 

Faculty Who Returned From Leave of Absence in the Autumn of 1941 

Eunice Morgan Schenck, Ph.D., Professor of French and Dean of the 

Graduate School 
Karl L. Anderson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics 
Richard Bernheimer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History of Art (absent 

semester II., 1940-41) 
K. Laurence Stapleton, A.B., Assistant Professor of English (absent semes' 

ter II., 1940-41) 

Faculty on Leave of Absence 1941 '42 

Charles Ghequiere Fenwick, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Political Science 
Karl L. Anderson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics (on partial leave 

of absence from March 1942-) 
Walter C. Michels, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics (on partial leave 

of absence from December 1941') 
Alexander Coburn Soper, III., M.F.A., Associate Professor of History of 

Art (absent from January 1942-) 

Promotions, 1941 '42 

Germaine Bree, Agregee, promoted from Assistant Professor to Associate 

Professor of French 
Alister Cameron, Ph.D., promoted from Assistant Professor to Associate 

Professor of Greek 
Jean William Guiton, Licencie es lettres, promoted from Assistant Professor 

to Associate Professor of French 
Richmond Lattimore, Ph.D., promoted from Assistant Professor to Associate 

Professor of Greek 
Mildred Northrop, Ph.D., promoted from Assistant Professor to Associate 

Professor of Economics 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 1 1 

Frederica DE Laguna, Ph.D., promoted from Lecturer to Assistant Professor 

of Anthropology 
Doris Holtoner Paul, M.A., promoted from Demonstrator to Instructor in 

Physics, December 1941 

K[ew Appointments, 1941-42 

Marshall DeMotte Gates, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

John W. Gassner, M.A., Lecturer in English 

Robert Waelder, Ph.D., Lecturer in Social Economy and Social Research 

Edwin Wolf, 2nd, Lecturer in Bibliography 

Manuel J. Asensio, A.B., Instructor in Spanish 

Jean Holzworth, Ph.D., Instructor in Latin 

Rosalie Hoyt, M.A., Instructor in Physics (from December 1941) 

Marianna D. Jenkins, M.A., Instructor in History of Art (from January 1942) 

Dorothy Nicole Nepper, M.A., Instructor in Spanish 

Josephine McCulloch Fisher, Ph.D., Reader in Political Science, semester I. 

Otto I. Pollak, M.A., J.D., Reader in Political Science, semester II. 

Eleanor Jayne Bradley, B.S., Demonstrator in Chemistry 

Jeanne Griffiths DeBow, M.A., Demonstrator in Psychology 

Dorothy M. Duroux, M.A., Demonstrator in Physics 

Mary Louise Oswald, B.S., Demonstrator in Geology 

Resignations and Expirations, June 1942 

Kathrine Roller, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English 

Susan Burlingham, A.B., M.S.S., Lecturer in Social Economy and Social 

Research 
Maud Rey, Lecturer in French Diction 

Robert Waelder, Ph.D., Lecturer in Social Economy and Social Research 
Edwin Wolf, 2nd, Lecturer in Bibliography 
Russell W. Bornemeier, M.A., Instructor in Psychology (called for military 

service, April 1942) 
Ludwig W. Kahn, Ph.D., Instructor in German 
Jane M. Oppenheimer, Ph.D., Instructor in Biology 
Stella Dueringer Wells, M.A., Instructor in German 
Josephine McCulloch Fisher, Ph.D., Reader in Political Science, semester I. 
Mary Elisabeth Puckett, M.A., Reader in History of Art 
Dorothy Dudley Scovil, A.B., Reader in Mathematics 
Eleanor Jayne Bradley, B.S., Demonstrator in Chemistry 
Jeanne Griffiths DeBow, M.A., Demonstrator in Psychology 
Dorothy M. Duroux, M.A., Demonstrator in Physics 
Mary Louise Oswald, B.S., Demonstrator in Geology 
Helen G. Weaver, M.A., Demonstrator in Geology, semester I. 

SUPPLEMENT TO THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

II. 

Faculty and Staff Publications for the Year 
October 1, 1941 - September 30, 1942 

This report is based on questionnaires sent out in October 1942. 

Richard Bernheimer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History of Art 

(Abstract.) Wild Men: a remnant of prehistory in mediaeval art. College 

Art Journal 1: 70-71, 1942. 
Germaine Bree, Agregee, Associate Professor of French 

Etude du Style de Marcel Proust dans "Les plaisirs et les jours." French 

Review 15: 401-409, 1942. 



12 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

T. Robert S. Broughton, Ph.D., Professor of Latin 

Cleopatra and "The Treasure of the Ptolemies."' American Journal of 
Philology 63: 328-332, 1942. (Editor.) Transaction and Proceedings of 
the American Philological Association. American Philological Association 
72, 1942. (Editor.) Pearson, Lionel. The Local Historians of Attica. 
Philological Monographs of the American Philological Association 11, 
1942. 

Alister Cameron, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Greek 

(Review.) Linforth, Ivan M. The Arts of Orpheus. American Journal 
of Archaeology 46 3 : 450-455, 1942. 

Elizabeth Moore Cameron, Ph.D., Instructor in History 

Prologue to Appeasement. Washington, D. C, American Council on 
Public Affairs, 1942. 

Rhys Carpenter, Ph.D., Litt.D., Professor of Classical Archaeology 

(Addresses.) The Basis of Artistic Creation in the Fine Arts. Rutgers 
17 5th Anniversary Celebration. Rutgers University Press, The Bases of 
Artistic Creation, 30-59, 1942. Classic Greece. University of Pennsyl- 
vania Bicentennial Conference. University of Pennsylvania Press, Studies 
in the Arts and Architecture, 1941. (Reviews.) American Journal of 
Archaeology. Classical Weekly. 

Samuel Claggett Chew, Ph.D., Professor of English Literature 

JTennyson: Representative Poems, ed. with Introduction and Notes. New 
York, Odyssey Press, 1941. Islam and England during the Renaissance: 
Notes Supplementary to "The Crescent and the Rose.'' , The Moslem 
World 31: 371-399, 1941. The Web of English Culture: Introduction to 
"The British Tradition." (On exhibition.) The Pierpont Morgan Library, 
1941, pp. i-xiv. (Reviews.) T^ew Yor\ Herald'Tribune Boo\s. 

Charles Wendell David, Ph.D., Marjorie Walter Goodhart Professor of 
History 
(Pamphlet.) Library Planning in Philadelphia. Philadelphia Bibliographi- 
cal Center and Union Library Catalogue, 1942. 

Frederica de Laguna, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Anthropology 
(Reviews.) 

Grace Mead Andrus de Laguna, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy 

(Address.) Cultural Relativism and Science. Presidential Address, East- 
ern Division of the American Philosophical Association. Philosophical 
Review 51 2 : 141-166, 1942. 

William Lewis Doyle, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology 

Origin of Peptidase in a Protozoan. Science 95: 206, 1942. (In collab- 
oration with E. K. Patterson.) 

Lincoln Dryden, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology 

(Abstract.) Weathering of Garnet and other Heavy Minerals in Crystal- 
line Source Rocks. Bulletin of the Geological Society of America 52 12 > 2 : 
1898, 1941. (In collaboration with Clarissa Dryden.) 

Mildred Fairchild, Ph.D., Grace H. Dodge Associate Professor and Director 
of the Carola Woerishoffer Graduate Department of Social Economy 
and Social Research 
Social Welfare in a Ukrainian Village. Social Wor\ Today 9 s : 5-7, 1942. 
(Review.) Burns, Eveline M. British Unemployment Programs 1920- 
1938. Report for Committee on Social Security — Social Science Research 
Council, Washington, 1941. Journal of American Statistical Association 
37 2i9. 395,396, 1942. 

Grace Frank, A.B., Non-resident Professor of Old French Philology 

Voltaire to Mazzuchelli. Modern Language K[otes 57: 355-356, 1942. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 13 

John W. Gassner, M.A., Lecturer in English 

Our Heritage of World Literature. New York, Dryden Press, 1942. (In 
collaboration with Professor Stith Thompson.) "Candle in the Wind" 
and Other Plays. Current History l 4 : 376-380, 1941. Robert Emmet 
Sherwood: An Atlantic Portrait. Atlantic Monthly 169 1 : 26-3 3, 1942. 
Plays of a Month. Current History l 5 : 472-477, 1942. "Clash by 
Night" and Other New Plays. Current History l 6 : 566-569, 1942. 
Stalemate in the Theatre. Current History V : 66-68, 1942. "The Moon 
Is Down" as a Play. Current History 2 9 : 228-232, 1942. This Year's 
Plays. Tomorrow l 10 : 40-42, 1942. The Theatre's Need. Current 
History 2": 380-385, 1942. 

Marshall DeMotte Gates, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

The Condensation of B-Cyclogeraniol with Leucoisonaphthaz,arin. Journal 
of the American Chemical Society 64: 1979-1980, 1942. (In collabora- 
tion with Fernanda Misani.) 

Hilda Geiringer, Ph.D., Lecturer in Mathematics 

Geometrical Foundations of Mechanics. Providence, R. I., Brown Univer- 
sity, 1942. (Mimeographed, 154+viii pp.) A New Explanation of Non- 
Normal Dispersion in the Lexis Theory. Econometrica 10: 8pp., 1942. 
On the Probability of Arbitrary Events. Annals of Mathematical StatiS' 
tics 13: 8pp., 1942. Observations on Analysis of Variance Theory. 
Annals of Mathematical Statistics 13: 19pp., 1942. 

Joseph Eugene Gilliet, Ph.D., Professor of Spanish 

Coplas de unos tres pastores, attributed to Rodrigo de Reynosa. Philologi- 
cal Quarterly 21: 23-46, 1942. Dofia Bisodia and Santo Ficeto. Hispanic 
Review 10: 68-70, 1942. (Reviews.) 

Margaret Gilman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French 

Two Critics and an Author: "Madame Bovary" judged by Sainte-Beuve 
and by Baudelaire. French Review 15: 138-146, 1941. (Review.) 
Feuillerat, Albert. Baudelaire et la Belle aux cheveux d'or and L' Archi- 
tecture des Fleurs du Mai. Modern Language Quarterly 3, 345-349, 1942. 

Harry Helson, Ph.D., Professor of Experimental Psychology 

Multiple-variable analysis of factors affecting lightness and saturation. 
American Journal of Psychology 55: 46-57, 1942. 

Myra Richards Jessen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of German 

Goethe Bibliography for 1940. Monatshefte fiir Deutschen Unterricht 
33: 356-367, 1941. (In collaboration with the members of the MLA 
Committee on Goethe Bibliography.) 

Richmond Lattimore, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Greek 

Themes in Greek and Latin Epitaphs. University of Illinois Press, 1942. 
Some Odes of Pindar. Norfolk, Conn., New Directions, 1942. 
(Translation.) 

Marguerite Lehr, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

(Review.) Elementary Mathematical Concepts. American Mathematical 
Monthly 48: 548-549, 1941. Contribution of Mathematics in a Long- 
Range Curriculum. Proceedings — National Association of Principals of 
Schools for Girls, 23rd year, 81-89, 1942. 

Bettina Linn, M.A., Part-time Instructor in English Composition 
The Fortunate Generation. Tale Review 31: 555-568, 1942. 

Cornelia Lynde Meigs, A.B., Margaret Kingsland Haskell Associate Profes- 
sor of English Composition 
Magazine stories. 

Fritz Mezger, Ph.D., Professor of Germanic Philology 

The formation of Old High German diorna, Old Saxon thiorna, Gothic 
widuwairna, and Old English niwerne. Modern Language ?N[otes, 432- 
433, 1942. The verbal type faran in Germanic. Language 18: 223-225, 
1942. A Semantic study of scritan in the Hildebrandslied. The Germanic 
Review 17: 94-98. 1942. 



14 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Walter C. Michels, E.E., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics 

Elements of Modern Physics: Parts I. and II. Bryn Mawr College, 
1941 '42. (In collaboration with A. L. Patterson.) Special Relativity in 
Refractive Media. Physical Review 60: 589-592, 1941. (In collaboration 
with A. L. Patterson.) 

Valentin Muller, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Classical Archaeology 

(Reviews.) Zonengliederungen der vorchristlichen Eisenzeit in Nord 
europa. American Journal of Archaeology 46: 148, 1942. 28. Bericht. 
Roemisch-Germanische Kommission. American Journal of Archaeology 
46: 148-149, 1942. Gordon. The Living Past. American Journal of 
Archaeology 46: 248, 1942. Riis, Thyrrhenica. An Archaeological Study 
on the Etruscan Sculpture in the Archaic and Classical Periods. American 
Journal of Archaeology 46: 305-306, 1942. 

Milton Charles Nahm, Litt.B., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy 
Philosophical Essays in Honor of Edgar Arthur Singer, Jr. University of 
Pennsylvania Press, 1942. (Editor, with F. P. Clarke.) Some Aspects 
of the Play-Theory of Art. Journal of Philosophy 39: 149-160, 1942. 
Ateleological Theories of Aesthetic. (In Philosophical Essays in Honor 
of Edgar Arthur Singer, Jr.) University of Pennsylvania Press, 1942, 
pp. 258-278. (Review.) Flaccus, L. W. The Spirit and Substance of 
Art. The General Magazine and Historical Chronicle (University of 
Pennsylvania), 235-237, 1942. 

Jane M. Oppenheimer, Ph.D., Instructor in Biology 

(Abstract.) Postulated factors controlling decussation of Mauthner's 
fibers in Fundulus embryos. 1942 meetings of American Association of 
Anatomists. Anatomical Record 82: 43, 1942. Regulation and recon- 
struction in Fundulus. Journal of Experimental Zoology 90: 127-157, 
1942. (In collaboration with J. S. Nicholas.) 

John Corning Oxtoby, M.A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Measure-preserving homeomorphisms and metrical transitivity. Annals of 
Mathematics 42: 874-920, 1941. (In collaboration with S. M. Ulam.) 

Arthur L. Patterson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics 

Elements of Modern Physics, Parts I. and II. Bryn Mawr College, 
1941-42. (In collaboration with Walter C. Michels.) Special Relativity 
in Refractive Media. Physical Review 60: 589-592, 1941. (In collabora- 
tion with Walter C. Michels.) 

Otto I. Pollak, M.A., J.D., Reader in Politics, semester II. 

The criminality of old age. Journal of Criminal Psychopathology 3 : 
213-235, 1941. 

Norman Powell, Instrument-maker 

Shotgun Choke Tubes. The American Rifleman 90 6 : 18-20, 1942. 

Joseph C. Sloane, Jr., M.F.A., Associate Professor of History of Art 

Carpenter, Rys. The Basis of Artistic Creation in the Fine Arts. (In 
The Bases of Artistic Creation. Rutgers University Press, 1942. (Com- 
mentary.) 

Alexander Coburn Soper, III., M.F.A., Associate Professor of History of 
Art 
Evolution of Buddhist Architecture in Japan. Princeton Monographs in 
Art and Archaeology. Princeton University Press, 1942. 

Lily Ross Taylor, Ph.D., Professor of Latin 

Caesar's Colleagues in the pontifical college. American Journal of 
Philology 58, 385-412, 1942. The Election of the Pontifex Maximus in 
the late republic. Classical Philology 37: 421-424, 1942. (Reviews.) 
Pisciculi. American Journal of Archaeology 46: 157, 1942. The Feriale 
Duranum. American Journal of Archaeology 46: 310-311, 1942. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 15 

Robert Waelder, Ph.D., Lecturer in Social Economy and Social Research 
The Living Thoughts of Sigmund Freud. New York, Longmans, Green 
and Co., 1941. The Scientific Approach to Case Work with Special 
Emphasis on Psychoanalysis. The Family 22: 179-185, 1941. 

Paul Weiss, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy 

Dictionary of Philosophy, Art, Cosmology. New York, Alliance, 1942. 
Democracy and the Rights of Man, with an appendix dealing with the 
criticisms of various philosophies. Science, Philosophy and Religion, 2nd 
conference. New York, 1942. pp. 273'296. Beauty, Individuality and 
Personality. Personalist 23: 34-43, 1942. Freedom of Choice. Ethics 
52: 186499, 1942. Charles Sanders Pierce. Sewanee Review 50: 184- 
192, 1942. The Logic of Semantics. Journal of Philosophy 39: 169-177, 
1942. Sources of the Idea of God. Journal of Religion 22: 1 56' 172, 
1942. The Purpose of Purpose. Philosophy of Science 9: 162-165, 1942. 
Cosmic Behaviorism. Philosophic Review 51: 345-356, 1942. Morality 
and Ethics. Journal of Philosophy 39: 381-385, 1942. Habits, Instincts 
and Reflexes. Philosophy of Science 9: 268-274, 1942. The Ethics of 
Pacifism. Philosophical Review 51: 476-496, 1942. (Reviews.) Philoso- 
phy and Phenomenological Research. Ethics. 

Roger Hewes Wells, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science 

The Next Government of Germany. Bryn ~M.awr Alumnae Bulletin 21: 
2-4, 1941. (Reviews.) Annals of the American Academy of Politics and 
Social Science 219: 188, 1942. American Political Science Review 36: 
587-588, 1942. Social Studies 33: 136-137, 1942. 

Edwin Wolf, II., Lecturer in Bibliography 

Press Corrections in Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Quartos. 
Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America 36: 187-198, 1942. 

Mary Katharine Woodworth, PhD., Assistant Professor of English 

(Co-author.) Report of the Literature Committee. Wallingford, Conn., 
School and College Conference on English, 1942. (Pamphlet.) 



REPORT OF THE ACTING DEAN OF THE COLLEGE 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following brief report for the academic 
year 1941-42: 

The year 1941-42 may be regarded as a year of transition in which no 
major changes in the curriculum were to be undertaken. Our entry into the 
war, however, necessitated a number of adjustments in the college course, 
the entrance requirements, and the undergraduate activities. 

Early in the autumn the student Curriculum Committee embarked on a 
study of the desirability of introducing a reading period into the college year. 
The students made a study of various plans for reading periods as they existed 
in other colleges, tested the reaction of our own undergraduates to such plans, 
and then brought in a preliminary report to the Faculty Committee on Cur- 
riculum. The undergraduates were interested in a reading period of approxi- 
mately two weeks which would be devoted not to preparation for examinations 
but to reading widely and under faculty supervision in the field of the student's 
own choice. Since classes were to be suspended during this period the intro- 
duction of such a plan pointed to the elimination of at least some of the mid- 
year examinations, the lengthening of the college year, or to both. Although 
the faculty members of the Curriculum Committee were interested in the 
students' suggestions, we were not able to develop a workable plan before 
December when we had to turn to more pressing questions. However, there 
had already been sufficient discussion to make it evident that a considerable 
number of undergraduates wanted a reading period and favored lengthening 
the college year in order to obtain it. I hope that we shall be able to resume 
the discussions before long. 

Our entrance into the war brought up immediately the question of whether 
any form of an accelerated college program should be introduced at Bryn 
Mawr. The question was raised first by a group of younger students, freshmen 
and sophomores, who had become so interested in their work in Physics and in 
the opportunities for war-time service that they drew up, with the help of 
members of the Physics and Mathematics Departments, a plan whereby they 
might go on with their work in those two subjects during the summer in order 
to qualify for more advanced courses the next year. Similar requests for an 
accelerated program came from pre-medical and pre-law students. Before 
making any decisions, it seemed advisable to discuss the subject with the 
students as a whole and this was done at three separate meetings that I held 
with the junior, sophomore, and freshman classes. At these meetings the 
emphasis was on the fact that the usual four-year course was undoubtedly 
better suited to the needs of the majority of students and that any exceptions 
would have to be treated as individual cases. Many students, who at first 
wished an accelerated course, decided after further discussion to use their 
summers for practical training and experience rather than for academic work. 
The plans of those students who were still interested in an accelerated program 
were again discussed with the faculty Committee on Curriculum. This Com- 
mittee recommended to the faculty that students for whom it was important 

r i6] 



REPORT OF THE ACTING DEAN OF THE COLLEGE 17 

should be allowed to complete their work for the degree in less than four years 
provided that their plans were approved in advance by the Curriculum Com' 
mittee, the students' major department, and the department in which the 
summer work was to be done. In most cases the summer work was to be carried 
on away from Bryn Mawr at universities having special summer sessions longer 
than the usual ones. The faculty approved the recommendation of the 
Curriculum Committee and at present about four per cent of the students in 
the two upper classes are following an accelerated program. 

The introduction of the accelerated program at the men's colleges brought 
with it the necessity of changing the system of entrance examinations. College 
Board examinations, which were held in the third week of June, were of no 
value to the colleges which were starting their freshman classes in that month. 
Fortunately another series of College Board tests — those given in April — was 
available. These April tests had been in use since 1937. They covered the 
same subject matter, in many cases were constructed by the same examiners, 
and were marked on the same scale as the June examinations. Furthermore 
there was a high correlation between the results of the April tests and those of 
the June examinations. The colleges changed to the April tests with interest 
and confidence. 

Early in December the undergraduates were still discussing the possibility 
of having a big May Day in 1942. They changed quickly from these discus- 
sions to organizing defense courses on the campus. Although all of the usual 
undergraduate activities continued through the rest of the year the defense 
courses absorbed an increasing amount of time. Organized under the Alliance 
in collaboration with members of the faculty and staff from the Bryn Mawr 
Defense Group those courses offered opportunities for training in office tech- 
niques, auto mechanics, community survey techniques, child center work, 
and citizenship, as well as in the regular fields sponsored by the Red Cross, 
such as first aid, home nursing, nurses' aides and nutrition. The registration 
for the courses was overwhelmingly large and many courses had to be repeated. 
A system for air-raid precautions and blackout for the Shipley School and the 
campus (an area designated by the Lower Merion Township officials as Post 
K 12) was established promptly under the direction of the senior air-raid 
warden, Professor Alister Cameron. Faculty, college officials, and students 
took courses in air-raid precaution and in first aid and became duly accredited 
air-raid wardens. Another group, working under the supervision of Miss 
Howe, learned new techniques of fire prevention and fire fighting. 

The increased demands from employers for trained undergraduates and 
the increased interest on the part of the students in future employment should 
also be mentioned. All members of the college administration devoted a con- 
siderable part of each week to giving information about alumnae and students 
to government officials and others who were seeking data about their future 
employees. The undergraduates showed a keen interest in jobs of various 
kinds: summer jobs, either volunteer or paid, for those still in College, perma- 
nent jobs and war jobs for those who were graduating. 

Although I have mentioned only a few of the things that absorbed our 
time in 1941-42 I can say with emphasis that the year was an extremely busy 



18 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

one. The changes brought about by the war increased very greatly the work in 
the Dean's Office, the Office of Admissions, and the Bureau of Recommenda' 
tions. A half'time secretary was added to the staff of the Dean's Office in the 
second semester, and a similar addition was made in the Bureau of Recom' 
mendations. Throughout the year I had the very able assistance of three col' 
leagues. Mrs. T. R. S. Broughton advised the sophomore and junior classes 
with skill and understanding, and handled the routine work with regard to the 
admission of students to the Infirmary. Miss Barbara Colbron and Miss Nancy 
Wood (Wardens of Rhoads Hall) were of invaluable help in the Office of 
Admissions. Miss Wood made all the arrangements for students and their 
parents who were visiting the campus; Miss Colbron visited a number of schools 
and attended meetings at schools which had invited colleges to send represen- 
tatives to a "College Night." Both helped with the correspondence and with 
interviewing of candidates in a year when the volume of this work was 
increased by the recent changes in the examination system and by the fact that 
the number of candidates was the largest in the history of the College. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JULIA WARD, 
Acting Dean of the College. 

SUPPLEMENT TO THE DEAN'S REPORT 

Statistics of Undergraduate Students 1941-42 

Students enrolled October 1940 who did not return October 1941: 

Studying elsewhere 2 2 

(Of these, ten expected to return to 
Bryn Mawr College after one year) 

Health 11 

Marriage 6 

Poor academic work 3 

Miscellaneous (conduct, lack of interest, family situation, etc.) 8 

Reason for withdrawal unknown 4 

54 

Summary of Registration by Classes: 

Class of 1942 125 

Class of 1943 115 

Class of 1944 125 

Class of 1945 140 

505 

Geographical Distribution: No. Percent 

Atlantic Seaboard from New York City to Washington 224 44.3 

The rest of Pennsylvania and New York 58 11.4 

New England 73 14.4 

Middle West 66 1 3 .6 

South - -.. 30 5.8 

West 19 3.6 

Canada - 4 .8 

Honolulu, T. H 2 .4 

Brazil 1 .2 

Canal Zone 1 • 2 

Foreign Countries 27 5.3 

505 100.0 



REPORT OF THE ACTING DEAN OF THE COLLEGE 19 

Religious Affiliation: 

Students with church connection .._ - 442 88.0 

Students with no church connection 63 12.0 

505 100.0 

Average Age in Senior Class (October 1941) 20 years 9 months 

Daughters of Bryn Mawr Alumnae in the Undergraduate School 55 

Statistics of the Class Entering Autumn 1941 

Total Admitted: 146, including 13 transfer students 
Plans of Entrance: 

College Entrance Examination Board: 'Ho. Percent 

Plan B and Plan B Modified (four examinations 

at close of high school course) 39 

Plan C and Plan C Modified (four examinations 
divided between the third and fourth years 

of high school) 50 

Plan D (for students ranking in the highest 

seventh of their class) 17 

— 106 72.4 

New York State Regents Examinations 6 4.3 

Progressive Education Experiment 16 10.9 

Canadian Junior Matriculation Examinations 3 2.1 

Oxford University School Certificate 1 .7 

Swiss Diplome de Pedagogie _ 1 .7 

Transfer students 13 8.9 

(Students were admitted from the following colleges: 
Agnes Scott, Colby, Goucher, Pennsylvania State, 
Smith, Sweet Briar, Tufts, and Western, the London 
School of Medicine for Women, Holton-Arms Junior 

College, and the University of Wichita.) 

146 100.0 
Preparation: 

Prepared by private schools only 89 60.9 

Prepared by public schools only „ 42 28.8 

Prepared by both public and private schools 15 10.3 

146 100.0 
Geographical Distribution : 

Atlantic Seaboard from New York City to Washington 62 42.4 

Middle West „ 29 19.9 

New England 19 13.0 

Middle States 19 1 3.0 

South _ 6 4.1 

West 4 2.8 

Foreign Countries 7 4.8 

146 100.0 
Religious Affiliation: 

Students with church connection 130 89.0 

Students with no church connection 16 11.0 

146 100.0 
Average Age October 1941 (transfer students not included) 17 years 10 months 

Daughters of Bryn Mawr Alumnae in the entering class 22 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARIAN C. ANDERSON, 

Recorder of the College. 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1941-42: 

Registration 

The Graduate School of 1941-42 numbered 167 students.* Of these 57 were 
resident in Radnor Hall and Low Buildings and 110 were non-resident. 
Seventy-six students devoted full time to graduate work. 

Students who had been awarded travelling fellowships: 

Mary Elizabeth Dumm, Mary Elizabeth Garrett Fellow, who used 
her fellowship at the Harvard University Medical School. 

Barbara Hoult Bradfield, Fanny Bullock Workman Fellow, who 
used her fellowship at libraries in New Haven, New York, 
Chicago and Bryn Mawr. 

Rachel Susannah Ingalls, Bryn Mawr European Fellow and 
Shippen Foreign Scholar, who used her fellowships at the 
University of Missouri School of Journalism. 

Cleta Olmstead Robbins, Ella Riegel Fellow in Classical Archae- 
ology, who used her fellowship at Bryn Mawr College. 

Foreign Graduate Students studying at Bryn Mawr on scholarships awarded by 
Bryn Mawr: 

Teaching Fellow in French: 

Genevieve Tissot, M.A. Smith College 1941. 

Teaching Fellow in German: 

Anneliese Pulvermann, A.B. Mount Holyoke College 1940 and 
M.A. 1941. 
Teaching Fellow in Italian: 

Fernanda Misani, A.B. Mount Holyoke College 1941; M.A. Bryn 
Mawr College 1942. 
Josephine Goldmar\ Scholar: 

Gabriele Schoepflich, Ph.D. "University of Florence 193 5; M.A. 
Bryn Mawr College 1942. 
Graduate Scholar in Social Economy and Social Research: 

Afife Sayin, B.A. American College for Girls, Istanbul, 1936; 
M.A. Brown University 1939. 

Other Foreign Graduate Students: 

FRANgoiSE Dony, D.Sc University of Brussels 1930; Ph.D. Univer- 
sity of Berlin 1934. 

Elfrieda Frankl, Ph.D. Royal University of Milan 1938; M.A. 
Bryn Mawr College 1941. 

Elfriede Friese, Certificate, Women's Academy of the Lower 
Rhine, Germany, 1929. 

Tatjana Kahn, A.B. University of Rochester 1941. 



* In 1940-41 the Graduate School numbered 158, the largest registration 
up to that time. 

[20] 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 21 

Odette Levesque, Diplome de Professeurs de Franrais, University 

of Paris 193 5. 
Erna Reich, Ph.D. University of Vienna 1928; M.A. Bryn Mawr 

College 1941. 
Konrad Reisner, LL.B. University of Breslau 1930. 
Karoline Solmitz, Social Certificate, School of Social Work, 

Berlin, 1914. 
Edith Braun Treuer, M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1942. 
Remedios Garcia Villa, B.Litt. University of Santo Tomas 1940. 

Degrees 

Doctors of Philosophy 

At Commencement in June 1942 the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
was awarded to the following 19 candidates: 

Madeleine Hunt Appel 

A.B. Vassar College 1917; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1934. 
Subjects: Education and Psychology. 

Dissertation: Aggressive Behavior of T^ursery School Children and 
Adult Procedures in Dealing with Such Behavior. 

GRAZIA AVITABILE 

A.B. Smith College 1937 and M.A. 1938. 

Subjects: Italian and Modern European History. 

Dissertation: Vincenzo Monti in the Light of Italian Romanticism. 
Betty Bock 

A.B. Bryn Mawr College 1936 and M.A. 1937. 

Subject: Economics. 

Dissertation: Broadcast Songs — A Paradox in Monopoly Control. 
Barbara Hoult Bradfield 

A.B. University of Michigan 1938 and M.A. 1939. 

Subjects: European History and American History. 

Dissertation: The Fate of the Republican Party in Seventeenth 
Century England. 
Selma Blazer Brody 

A.B. Washington Square College, New York University, 1934; 
M.A. University of Virginia 193 5. 

Subjects: Physics and Mathematics. 

Dissertation: An X'ray Investigation of the Crystal Structure of 
Lead Chromate. 
Helen Storm Corsa 

A.B. Mount Holyoke College 1938; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1939. 

Subjects: English Literature and Mediaeval French. 

Dissertation: Some Philosophical and Admonitory Poems in the 
Exeter Boo\. 
Martha Cox 

A.B. Cornell University 1929; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1936. 

Subjects: Physics and Mathematics. 

Dissertation: The Thermal and Electrical Conductivities of Pure 
Tungsten. 

Alva Doris Elford 

B.A. Victoria College, University of Toronto, 1932, and M.A. 

University of Toronto 1938. 
Subjects: Classical Archaeology and Greek. 
Dissertation: Architectural Terracottas in the Gree\ Archaic Period. 



22 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Catherine Fehrer 

A.B. Vassar College 1934; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1935. 

Subjects: French and Spanish. 

Dissertation: The Madrigal in France to the End of the Seventeenth 
Century. 
Harriet Labe Goldberg 

LL.B. University of Minnesota 1930 and A.B. 1932. 

Subjects: Social Economy and Politics. 

Dissertation: Family Support in Public Assistance. 
Hester Jane Gruber 

A.B. Indiana University 1937 and M.A. 1939. 

Subjects: Latin and Greek. 

Dissertation: Civitates Liherae under the Roman Republic. 
Elizabeth MacGregor Hardy 

B.Sc. McGill University 1938; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1939. 

Subjects: Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry and Physical Chemistry. 

Dissertation: Molecular Rearrangements in Three Carhon Systems. 
Dorothea Reinwald Heyl 

A.B. Bryn Mawr College 1939 and M.A. 1940. 

Subjects: Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry and Physical Chemistry. 

Dissertation: A Study of Certain Compounds Related to Malonic 
Ester. 
Josephine Margaret Mitchell 

B.Sc. University of Alberta 1934; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1941. 

Subject: Mathematics. 

Dissertation: On Double Sturm-Liouville Series. 
Mother Mary Alphonsus 

A.B. Villanova College 1930; M.A. University of Pennsylvania 1932. 

Subjects: French and Italian. 

Dissertation: The Influence of Joseph de Maistre on Baudelaire. 
Elizabeth Mary Osman 

B.S. University of Illinois 1937 and M.S. 1938. 

Subjects: Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry and Physical Chemistry. 

Dissertation: A Study of Three Carbon Tautomerism — the Prepara- 
tion and Properties of Conjugated, Unsaturated T^itriles. 
Pauline Rolf 

A.B. University of Cincinnati 1934; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1936. 

Subjects: Physics and Mathematics. 

Dissertation: The Accommodation Coefficie\nt of Helium on 
Platinum. 
Cleta Olmstead Robbins 

A.B. University of Chicago 193 5 and M.A. 1936. 

Subjects: Classical Archaeology and History of Art. 

Dissertation: Ionic Chiton Clad Maidens of the Fifth Century. 
Vivian Ryan Sutton 

A.B. Oberlin College 1934; M.A. Bryn Mawr College 1937. 

Subjects: English Literature and History of Art. 

Dissertation: Inns and Taverns and English Literature, 1558'1642. 

Masters of Arts 

The Degree of Master of Arts was awarded to 23 candidates distributed 
as follows among the departments: 

Biology 1, Chemistry 1, Classical Archaeology 1, Economics and Politics 
2, Geology 2, German 1, Greek 1, History 3, Latin 3, Mathematics 1, Physics 
2, Psychology 1, Social Economy 4. 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 23 

Ph.D. Dissertations Published 1941-42 

Department of Biology 

Elizabeth Ufford Green (Degree awarded at Commencement 1940) 
On the Occurrence of Crystalline Material in the Lungs of formal 
and Cancerous Swiss Mice. pp. 210-217. Reprint from Cancer 
Research 2, no. 3, March 1942. 

Elizabeth Knight Patterson (Degree awarded at Commencement 1940) 
The Photodynamic Action of T^eutral Red on Root Tips of Barley 
Seedlings, Part I. The Effect on Frequency of Cell Division, pp. 
628-638. Reprint from American Journal of Botany 28, no. 8, 
October 1941. 

Part II. Abnormalities of Cells and Tissue, pp. 109-121. Reprint 
from American Journal of Botany 29, no. 2, February 1942. 
Department of Chemistry 

Corris Hofmann (Degree awarded at Commencement 1941) 

Condensation Reactions. II. Al\ylidene Cyanoacetic and Malonic 
Esters, by Arthur C. Cope, Corris M. Hofmann, Cornelia Wyckoff 
and Esther Hardenbergh. pp. 3452-3456. 

The Introduction of Substituted Vinyl Groups. VIII. Acetoacetic 
Ester Series, by Arthur C. Cope and Corris M. Hofmann. pp. 3456- 
3459. Reprints from Journal of American Chemical Society 63, 
3452, 3456 (1941). 
Department of Classical Archaeology 

Mary Zelia Pease (Degree awarded at Commencement 193 3) 

The Gallatin Collection, 1924-39. pp. 79-116. pi. 33-64. Reprint 
from Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum, U. S. A. Fascicule 8, 1942. 
Department of English 

Honor McCusker (Degree awarded at Commencement 1937) 

John Bale, Dramatist and Antiquary. 142 pp. J. H. Furst Com- 
pany, Baltimore, Maryland. Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, 1942. 

Mother Mary Norbert (Degree awarded at Commencement 1940) 

The Reflection of Religion in English Medieval Verse Romances. 
173 pp. Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. 1941 

Department of German 

Esther M. Metzenthin (Degree awarded at Commencement 1935) 

Die Lander — umd Vol\ernamen im Altislandischen Schifttum. 
138 pp. Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. 1941. (Lithoprinted.) 

Department of Latin 

Jane Isabella Marion Tait (Degree awarded at Commencement 1939) 
Philodemus' Influence on the Latin Poets. 118 pp. Edwards 
Brothers, Inc., Lithoprinters, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Bryn Mawr, 
Pennsylvania. 1941. 
Department of Mathematics 

Dorothy Maharam (Degree awarded at Commencement 1940) 

Ova Measure in Abstract Sets. 20 pp. Reprint from Transactions of 
the American Mathematical Society 51, no. 2, 413-43 3, March 1942. 
Department of Philosophy 

Isabel Stearns (Degree awarded at Commencement 1938) 

The Grounds of Knowledge, pp. 359-375. Reprint from Philosophy 
and Phenomenological Research. March 1942. 

Department of Psychology 

Mary Henle (Degree awarded at Commencement 1939) 

An Experimental Investigation of Dynamic and Structural Determi- 
nants of Substitution. 112 pp. Duke University Press, Durham, 
North Carolina. 1942. Reprint from Contributions to Psychological 
Theory 2, no. 3. serial no. 7. 



24 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Special Research Project 

Upon the recommendation to the Directors by the President, the Depart' 
ment of Economics and Politics was chosen as the eighth department to carry 
on a special research project for the year. The departmental fellowship was 
awarded to Miss Margaret Rush, A.B. Earlham College 1939, M.A. Fletcher 
School of Diplomacy 1940; a resident scholarship to Miss Blanche Veron, A.B. 
Brooklyn College 1941; a nonresident scholarship to Mrs. Fritzie Nisenson 
Newmeyer, A.B. University of Pennsylvania 1941; and special resident scholar' 
ships to Miss Ruth Louise Kroneman, A.B. Wilson College 1941 and to Miss 
Margaret Frances Weaver, A.B. Georgia State College for Women 1940. 

The project was announced in cooperation with the Department of Gov 
ernment of Haverford College as centering on the political, legal and economic 
problems of peace after the present war and a joint seminary was offered by 
representatives of the two colleges. 

Of the actual year's work Professor Helen Dwight Reid reports: 

"The seminary attempted to envisage the foundations of a more stable 
world order in terms of an analysis of relatively permanent factors such as 
geography, and the distribution of raw material resources, and then of those 
economic, political, psychological, and juridical forces affecting stability. Exist- 
ing institutions of world organization were subjected to intensive analysis and 
critical appraisal, and a cooperative effort was made at the end to draw up a 
general outline of the elements of a more stable and orderly world. Each 
member of the seminary undertook three types of independent research in the 
course of the year: (1) special study of the policies and problems of an 
assigned country or countries, so that the group could bring to bear on each 
topic the special interests of a variety of nations, large and small; (2) intensive 
study of the background and implications of one of the Eight Points of the 
Atlantic Charter; (3) a thesis on some special phase of world organization, 
such as regional federation, the role of the small state in world affairs, the 
problem of colonial administration, public opinion as a factor in international 
relations, etc. Emphasis was laid on training in the critical use of official 
documents and source materials. " 

The Graduate School and the War 

The entry of our country into the war, setting this year apart from others, 
was felt almost immediately in the fundamental structure of the Graduate 
School. 

Professor Michels, of the Department of Physics, receiving leave of 
absence to carry on work in Washington, recommended the appointment of 
Miss Rosalie Hoyt, Fellow, and Mrs. Doris Holtoner Paul, Demonstrator and 
Graduate Student, to teaching positions in the Department of Physics. They 
were therefore released by the President from the fellowship and demonstrator' 
ship respectively. 

Professor Soper, of the Department of History of Art, was granted leave 
of absence for marine duty and Miss Marianna Jenkins, candidate for the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy, was appointed Instructor. 

Six graduate students were allowed to withdraw: 

Miss Virginia Addison, of the Department of Social Economy 
to take a position with the Social Security Board; 

Miss Deborah Anderson, of the Department of Biology, to go 
into nursing; 



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 25 

Miss Norma Curtis, of the Department of Physics, to devote full 

time to her position in a defense project; 
Miss Alberta Hoskins, of the Department of Biology, to do war 

work in the International Health Division of the Rockefeller 

Foundation, 
Miss Margaret Rush, of the Department of Economics and 

Politics, to replace a member of the Sweet Briar faculty who 

was called to government service; 
Miss Mary Elizabeth Wright, of the Department of Chemistry 

to free Professor Cope at Columbia University for further 

defense work. 

To advance and accelerate research projects, both those organised at 
government request and individual investigations, an unusually large number 
of graduate students planned to spend the summer on the campus. This 
resulted in the authorization by the faculty of a new form of registration for 
work carried on outside the limits of the academic year, but under the super' 
vision of faculty members. These units of supervised work, registered at the 
outset, are, when reported as satisfactorily completed, to be inserted in the 
student's regular record 

The increasing number of faculty members called into government service 
has brought home the difficulty of the proper organization of graduate work 
in war time which we share with the other graduate schools of the country. 
It is a difficulty that must be met and overcome if research workers are to be 
trained and there is to be no break in the preparation of college teachers. 
In awarding fellowships and scholarships for next year, and accepting applicants 
for admission to the School, the most careful scrutiny has been given to the 
needs of the candidates for special courses and supervision in relation to the 
teaching staff which we may expect to have available. The moment has come 
for the fullest possible pooling of teaching faculties among the institutions of 
the neighborhood. 

In leaving the deanship of the Graduate School I wish to record, Madam 
President, the privilege I have felt it to be to hold the office in your adminis' 
tration. I wish also to express my appreciation of the incomparable assistance 
I have had in the Graduate Offices and in Radnor Hall from Miss Catherine 
P. Robinson, now Dean of Residence at Mount Holyoke Cpllege, who was 
Senior Resident of Radnor Hall and Secretary to the Dean of the Graduate 
School from 1929 to 193?; Mrs. Doris Sill Carland, who 'since 1935 has been 
Secretary and will continue to work with Miss Taylor; successive Senior Resi' 
dents of Radnor Hall and Miss Dorothy Nepper, Assistant to the Dean of the 
Graduate School this year, who will be Miss Taylor's assistant next year. 
A survey of the years would be entirely incomplete without reference to Miss 
Taylor's two able services as Acting Dean in 1937 and in 1940-41. It is a 
source of the deepest satisfaction to me that she should now assume the 
direction of the Graduate School as Dean. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EUNICE MORGAN SCHENCK, 

Dean of the Graduate School. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR-IN-RESIDENCE 
AND EDITOR OF PUBLICATIONS 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1941-42: 

Annual Publications 

The Bryn Mawr College Calendar, Vols. XXXIV. and XXXV. 

Carola Woerishoffer Graduate Department of Social Economy and Social 

Research issue, Vol. XXXIV., No. 3, November 1941. 
Undergraduate Courses issue, Vol. XXXV., No. 1, April 1942. 
Graduate Courses issue, Vol. XXXV., No. 2, June 1942. 
Bryn Mawr College Finding List, November 1941. 
Report of the President to the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr 

College, December 1941. 
Bryn Mawr College Commencement Programme, June 1942. 

Services 

"The Reverend Vivian T. Pomeroy of the First Parish, Milton, Massa- 
chusetts, delivered the Baccalaureate Sermon on May 3 1st. 

The Sunday Evening Services, arranged by the Bryn Mawr League, were 
conducted by the following: 

The Reverend William J. Alberts, Rector of Christ Church, Media, 
Pennsylvania. 

The Reverend Donald B. Aldrich, Rector of the Church of the 
Ascension, New York City. 

The Reverend J. Gillespie Armstrong, Rector of St. Mary's Church, 
Ardmore, Pennsylvania. 

Thf Reverend James T. Cleland, Professor of Religion at Amherst 
College, Amherst, Massachusetts. 

The Reverend Rex Stowers Clements, Minister of the Bryn Mawr 
Presbyterian Church. 

Canon Ernest C. Earp, Rector of the Church of the Redeemer, Bryn 
Mawr. 

The Reverend C. Leslie Glenn, Rector of St. John's Church, Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia. 

The Reverend Erdman Harris, Chaplain at Lawrenceville School, 
Lawrenceville, New Jersey. 

The Reverend John Robbins Hart, Minister of Valley Forge Chapel, 
Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. 

Dr. Thomas H. Johnson, Master of English at Lawrenceville School, 
Lawrenceville, New Jersey. 

Dr. Rufus M. Jones, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Haverford 
College and Trustee and Director of Bryn Mawr College. 

[26] 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR-IN -RESIDENCE 27 

The Reverend Arthur Lee Kinsolving, Rector of Trinity Church, 
Princeton, New Jersey. 

The Reverend Harry C. Meserve, Rector of the First Parish Church, 
Cohasset, Massachusetts. 

The Reverend Andrew Mutch, Minister Emeritus of the Bryn 
Mawr Presbyterian Church. 

The Reverend A. Grant Noble, Rector of St. John's Church, Wil- 
liamstown, Massachusetts. 

The Reverend Robert Wood Nicholson, Church of the Messiah, 
Woods Hole, Massachusetts. 

The Reverend William Sherman Skinner, Minister of the First 
Presbyterian Church, Germantown, Pennsylvania. 

Dr. Howard Thurman, Dean of the Chapel, Howard University, 
Washington, District of Columbia. 

The Reverend George A. Trowbridge, Rector of St. Paul's Church, 
Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania. 

Assemblies 

Ten college assemblies were held during the year: at the opening of 
College on September 30th, when President Park spoke; on November 
11th, when the Undergraduate Association conducted an assembly on Educa- 
tion, from the point of view of the foreign student; on November 28th, when 
the announcement was made that Miss Katharine Elizabeth McBride had been 
chosen as the fourth President of the College; on December 10th, when the 
Celebration of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Self-Government Association 
was held, when President Park, Mrs. Richard Fitzgerald, Mrs. Edward 
W. Evans, Mrs. Russell Wilson, Miss Rosamond Cross, Miss Barbara 
Colbron, and Miss Catharine McClellan, '42, spoke on the problems 
of Self-Government; on March 9th, when Dr. Henry A. Murray, Associate 
Professor of Psychology at Harvard University, discussed "Psychological 
Aspects of the World Conflict"; on January 19th, when a special assembly 
was held about plans for courses and defense activities open to students and 
members of the college community for the second semester; on March 26th, 
when President Park announced the Graduate Travelling Fellowships; on 
April 13th, when the Reverend Michael Coleman, Acting Vicar of 
All-Hallows by the Tower, London, spoke on "Experiences in England"; on 
April 20th, when Miss Ward announced the courses for the year 1942-43; 
on May 1st, when President Park announced the award of undergraduate 
scholarships and prizes. 

Endowed Lectures 

The Mary Flexner Lectureship: Dr. Gisela M. A. Richter, Curator 
of the Department of Greek and Roman Art, the Metropolitan Museum of 
Art, New York, gave a series of six lectures on "The Art of Archaic Greece 
Against Its Historical Background," on Monday evenings in October and 
November. 



28 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

The Anna Howard Shaw Memorial Lectureship: Mr. Manley O. 
Hudson, Judge of the Permanent Court of International Justice, Member of 
the Permanent Court of Arbitration, Bemis Professor of International Law at 
the Harvard Law School, gave a series of six lectures on "Twenty Years' 
Development of International Law 1919-1939" on Friday evenings in Febru' 
ary and March. 

Dr. Marjorie Nicolson, Professor of English Literature at Columbia 
University, gave the Mallory Whiting Webster Memorial Lecture in History, 
on January 16th. The subject of Dr. Nicolson's speech was "Mountains and 
Men." 

Conference 

Dr. Karl S. Lashley, Professor of Neuro-Psychology at Harvard Uni- 
versity, spoke on November 29th to the graduate students and members of 
the faculty doing work in scientific fields. His talk, "The Psychology of 
Memory," was given in connection with the establishing of the Sigma Xi 
Society Chapter at Bryn Mawr College. 

Opening of the Treasure Room in the Library 

Dr. John D. Gordan, the curator of the Berg Collection in the New 
York Public Library, gave a talk on October 18th, about "A Rare Boo\ 
Room and Scholarship"; his talk marked the opening of the Treasure Room 
in the Library. 

Departmental Lectures 

The Committee on the Coordination of the Teaching of the Natural 
Sciences of Bryn Mawr College sponsored the following series of five lectures 
in memory of David Hilt Tennent, Professor of Biology 1904-41: 

Dr. Louis F. Fieser, Professor of Organic Chemistry at Harvard Univer- 
sity, spoke on "Cancer Producing Hydrocarbons," on November 15th. 
Dr. Kenneth S. Cole, Associate Professor of Physiology, Columbia 

University, spoke on "The Nerve Impulse," on December 6th. 
Dr. Leslie A. Chambers, Associate in Biophysics, Johnson Foundation, 
University of Pennsylvania, spoke on "Influenza as a Problem in 
Physics," on January 10th. 
Dr. Ernst Cloos, Professor of Structural Geology, Johns Hopkins 
University, spoke on "Mechanics of Crustal Deformation as Illus- 
trated by the Appalachians," on April 11th. 
Dr. Hermann Weyl, Professor in the School of Mathematics, Institute 
for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey, spoke on "Symmetry," 
on May 6th. 
The History and the Politics Departments held a conference on October 
18th. Miss Robbins spoke on "The Irish Problem"; Mrs. Manning spoke 
on "The Future of the British Empire"; Mr. Wells spoke on "The Next 
Government of Germany"; and Mr. Fenwick spoke on "Continental 
Solidarity in the Presence of War." 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR-IN -RESIDENCE 29 

The English Department and the Committee on the Rare Book Room 
presented Mr. Arundell Esdaile, distinguished librarian and scholar and 
President of the British Library Association, on December 11th. He spoke on 
"The History of the British Museum.' 1 

The Philosophy Department presented Dr. Glenn Morrow of the 
University of Pennsylvania on January 6th. His subject was "Plato and 
Democracy." 

Madame Noulet De Carner was presented by the French Department 
on January 6th. Her topic was "Paul Valery." 

The Greek and Latin Departments presented Dr. George Calhoun 
on January 8th. Dr. Calhoun, Professor of Greek at the University of Cali- 
fornia, discussed "Homer Through the Looking Glass." 

Professor Karl Anderson gave the first of three lectures on "Inflation" 
on February 9th; his topic was "Can We Check Inflation by Control of 
Money?" Dr. Clair Wilcox of Swarthmore gave the second lecture, "Can 
We Check Inflation by Controlling Prices?" on February 11th. (This lecture 
was given at Haverford College.) Dr. Frank W. Fetter of Haverford 
College gave the third in the series on February 18th, when he discussed 
"Can We Control Inflation by Taxation?" This series was sponsored by the 
Departments of Economics of Bryn Mawr, Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges. 

Undergraduate Club Lectures 

Professor Jean Guiton spoke to the French Club on October 8th about 
sending Christmas packages to the French soldiers. 

The International Relations Club presented Professor Charles 
Fenwick on October 23rd. He discussed life in South America. 

Mr. Walter von Neudegg spoke on "Skiing, and the Laurel Mountain 
Trail," to the Athletic Association, on October 23rd. 

Professor Mildred Northrop spoke to the Industrial Group on 
November 5th about the absorption of surplus incomes. 

The first meeting of the Forum was held on November 6th: pressure 
groups were analysed. The second meeting was held on November 27th: 
the unrestricted press of the United States, England, and France was dis- 
cussed. Education was the topic discussed at the third Forum on March 9th. 

The first meeting of the Alliance was held on November 25th, at which 
time the three principles of the organization were established. They are: to 
defeat Hitler, to win the war, and to broaden the social benefits. The Alliance 
presented Dr. Max Lerner, Professor of Political Science at Williams College 
on February 10th. He spoke on "Ideas for War and Peace." 

Miss Alice Hansen spoke on the labor problems of defense industries, 
at the Industrial Group meeting on December 3rd. 

Mr. Duncan Hall of Haverford College spoke to the International 
Relations Club about "The British Commonwealth in the Present Crisis," on 
December 4th. 



30 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Dr. Martin Foss, of the Haverford Workshop, gave a lecture to the 
Spanish Club about Spanish Art, on January 8th. 

Professor Pedro Salinas, of Johns Hopkins University, spoke to the 
Spanish Club on February 12th. His topic was "Protagonist of Some Essays 
of Az.orin.'" 

Mr. Donald Watt, the director of the Experiment in International 
Living, spoke about his organization to the Spanish Club on February 26th. 

Mrs. Fritzie Newmeyer spoke at a meeting of the Industrial Group on 
March' 4th, about Labor in Wartime. 

Dr. Ernst Cassirer, Professor of Philosophy at Yale University, spoke 
to the Philosophy Club on March 23rd about "Language and Art.'" 

Martha Kent, Bryn Mawr '41, spoke about "Philosophy and Science" 
at a joint meeting of the Philosophy and Science Clubs on April 16th. 

The Model Assembly of the League of Nations held its sixteenth annual 
session at Bryn Mawr College from March 29th to March 31st. Delegates 
from 24 colleges discussed "The Period of the Transition Following the War." 

Vocational Talks 

Mary Moon, Bryn Mawr '40, Vogue Prix de Paris, spoke to the seniors 
about the Vogue Contest on October 27th. 

Miss Jessie M. Stuart, Assistant Professor of Store Service Education, 
Prince School of Store Service Education, Simmons College, spoke to seniors 
interested in personnel work and stores on November 28th. 

Mrs. Percy C. Madeira, Jr., of the American Red Cross, spoke about 
Civilian Defense on December 1st. 

Mr. Albert H. Aronson, the Chief of the State Technical Advisory 
Service of the Social Security Board, spoke about "Opportunities in Federal 
Civil Service," on January 8th. 

Miss Henrietta B. Padgett, of the Information and Recruiting Divi' 
sion of the United States Civil Service Commission, spoke about this branch 
of the government on January 9th. Miss Padgett returned on January 24th 
to interview juniors. 

Mr. Herbert Smith, of the Frances W. Parker School, discussed teach- 
ing on February 11th. 

Miss Julia Coburn, of the Tobe-Coburn School for Fashion, spoke on 
"Fashion Careers and Fashions" on February 19th. 

Mr. Frank A. Arnold spoke on "Radio in Wartime," on March 10th. 

Dr. Ruth S. Tolman, of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, spoke 
on "Women in Psychology" on April 9th. 

Miss Elizabeth Neal, of the Interboro Institute, spoke on April 13th 
about jobs following a secretarial course. 

Miss Margaret E. Conrad, of the Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, discussed nursing on May 25th. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR'IN'RESIDENCE 31 

Entertainment 

Music 

The combined choirs and instrumentalists of Bryn Mawr and Haverford 
Colleges, under the direction of Professor Willoughby of Bryn Mawr 
College, gave a Christmas musical service on December 14th. The concert 
was given the following evening at Haverford College. 

The National Association for Advancement of Colored People, Churches 
and Clubs of the Main Line presented Wilbur Marshall, Tenor, and 
William Smith, Bass-Baritone, on January 14th, for the benefit of Bryn 
Mawr Hospital. 

The National Youth Administration Orchestra, under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Louis Vyner, gave a concert on February 4th. 

Dorothy Maynor, soprano, was presented by the College Entertainment 
Committee on February 16th. 

Horace Alwyne, F. R. M. C. M., Director of the Department of Music, 
gave a pianoforte recital on March 16th. 

The combined choirs of Bryn Mawr College and Haverford College, and 
instrumentalists from the two colleges, Lower Merion High School, and profes- 
sional players, gave excerpts from Mendelssohn's Oratorio "Elijah" on March 
22nd. The production was under the direction of Professor Ernest 
Willoughby, A. R. C. M. 

The Schola Cantorum, conducted by Mr. Hugh Ross, gave a concert 
on April 7th. 

The Bryn Mawr Chamber Music Ensemble gave a concert on 
May 1st. 

Marian Anderson, contralto, gave a concert on May 4th for the benefit 
of the Bryn Mawr Scholarship Fund. 

Plays and Movies 

The Varsity Players presented "The Twelve Pound Loo\," and "Rosa- 
lind, " two one-act plays by Philip Barry, on October 18th. 

The Varsity Players sponsored six one-act plays, on November 21st and 
28th, given by the freshmen in each hall, in competition. The plays were: 
"The Man in the Bowler Hat," by A. A. Milne; "The Inca of Perusalem," 
by G. B. Shaw; "The Happy Journey," by T. Wilder; "The ?S[tght at the 
Inn," by Lord Dunsany; "Than^ You Doctor," by Gilbert Emery; and "The 
Wonder Hat," by Hecht. 

The Varsity Players and The Cap and Bells Club of Haverford College 
presented "Stage Door" by Edna Ferber and George S. Kaufman, on 
December 5th and 6th and "Hay Fever," by Noel Coward, on April 24th 
and 25th. 

The Cap and Bells Club of Haverford College presented "Margin for 
Error," by Clare Booth, on December 12th and 13th. The feminine leads 
were taken by Bryn Mawr students. 



32 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

The French Club presented "Les jours Heureux," by C. Puget, on 
November 22nd, to raise money for Christmas packages for the French soldiers. 

The French Club and German Club presented their annual Christmas 
plays on December 12th. The French play was "Le Mystere de la T^ativite" ; 
the German play was the traditional nativity play. 

The Playwriting Class presented a group of one-act plays written and 
directed by the students, on May 16th. They included "Thim Divils," by 
Edgar Emory; "Child of the Wind," by Isabel Martin; "Tea for Ten,'" by 
Dorcas Dunklee; "Psychology Did It," by Sylvia Maynard; and ''''Death at 
Frederic\sburg," by Edgar Emory. 

The Bryn Mawr and Haverford College Glee Clubs presented "Patience" 
by Gilbert and Sullivan, on May 8th and 9th. 

The College Entertainment Committee presented Arthur Menken on 
November 24th. Mr. Menken, a photographer for Paramount "h^ews and 
The March of Time, spoke on "The Battle for the Pacific" and he showed 
the movies of his 3 5,000 mile trip on the Pacific Ocean. 

A movie demonstrating fire fighting and different types of incendiary 
bombs was shown on February 24th. 

The College Entertainment Committee presented the movie "The Lady 
Vanishes,'" on March 20th. 

The Swimming Classes presented an Aquacade on March 21st. 

Captain Littauer, former President of the Boots and Saddles Club, 
gave a lecture followed by movies showing schooling for field riding and 
demonstration of dressage, on April 10th. 

The German movie, "Der Haujptmann von Koepnich," was shown on 
April 14th. 

The American Defense Group of Bryn Mawr College sponsored a benefit 
movie for British, Russian and Chinese Relief, the week of April 22nd. 

The Spanish Club presented the movie "'Americans All," on May 1 1th. 

The Dance Club gave "Cinderella," on May 15th. 

"Miscellaneous 

The following series was sponsored by the House Committee of the 
Bryn Mawr Hospital for the benefit of their Maternity Fund: 

Mr. Walter Duranty, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Foreign Corre- 
spondents, former Moscow correspondent for the J^ew Yor\ Times 
and special correspondent, North American Newspaper Alliance, 
spoke on "What Will Russia Do?" on November 4th. 

Miss Virginia Cowles, author of "Loo\ing for Trouble"; roving Euro- 
pean correspondent, spoke on "Behind the Scenes in Europe" on 
November 18th. 

Mr. Vincent Sheean, war correspondent and author of "Personal 
History" and "l^[ot Peace but a Sword," spoke on "Pearl Harbor," 
on December 8th. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR'IN-RESIDENCE 33 

Professor Fenwick spoke at Current Events on October 7th. His topic 

was: "What Will the United States Do About Repealing the Neutrality Act?" 

• Miss Reid and Professor Fenwick discussed at Current Events on 

October 14th the question, "Will the United States Go Into War Against 

Japan If Japan Attacks Russia in Siberia?" 

The Frontier Nursing Service presented Mrs. Mary Breckenridge 
who illustrated her talk with slides, on January 15th. 

Madame Nadia Boulanger gave a lecture on "Some Aspects of Twen' 
tieth Century French Music," on February 22nd. 

The Modern Dance Club of Bryn Mawr College gave a dance programme 
with Cheyney State Teachers' College and the University of Pennsylvania on 
February 26th. 

The Chinese Scholarship Committee presented a series of two lectures. 
Mr. W. H. Auden, British poet, spoke about "The Poet in the War" on 
March 1st; Mr. George A. Rowley, Curator of Art of the Far East and 
Associate Professor of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University, gave a 
lecture illustrated by slides, on "The Pacific Background Seen Through 
Painting," on March 15th. 

Dr. Frederick L. Schuman, Woodrow Wilson Professor of Govern- 
ment at Williams College, spoke about Federal Union on March 8th. Dr. 
Schuman was sponsored by the Main Line Committee for Federal Union. 

The Maids and Porters of Bryn Mawr College gave an appreciation 
programme for President Park, on April 16th. 

Madame Ludmilla Pitoeff gave dramatic readings of Jeanne D'Arc, 
on April 20th. 

Commencement 

President Marion Edwards Park delivered the Commencement address 
on June 2nd. 

Retirement of President Marion Edwards Park 

The Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College and the Executive Board 
of the Alumnae Association sponsored a concert by the Budapest String 
Quartet on June 1st in honour of President Marion Edwards Park on 
her retirement. 

Summer Activities 

Bryn Mawr College Summer School of T^ursing 

The Bryn Mawr College Summer School of Nursing in cooperation with 
the United States Public Health Service and sponsored by the American Red 
Cross was held from June 15th to September 13th. President Park presided 
at the opening ceremonies on June 15th; the invocation was made by Dr. 
Rufus M. Jones, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Haverford College and 
Trustee and Director of Bryn Mawr College. The speakers were: Mrs. 
Thomas Raeburn White, Chairman of the Executive Committee; Dean 
Margaret E. Conrad of the Bryn Mawr College Summer School of Nursing 



34 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

and Professor of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Columbia University; and 
Miss Pearl McIver of the United States Public Health Service. 

The closing exercises were held on September 9th when Dean Margaret 
E. Conrad awarded the certificates. Mrs. Thomas Raeburn White was 
the presiding officer. Dean Margaret E. Conrad and Miss Annie W. 
Goodrich, founder and Dean Emeritus of the Yale School of Nursing and 
one of the outstanding figures in the nursing profession, addressed the faculty 
and student body. The Reverend Andrew Mutch, D.D., Minister Emeritus 
of the Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church, made the invocation. 

Institute of International Relations 

The Thirteenth Annual Institute of International Relations, under the 
auspices of the American Friends Service Committee, was held from June 26th 
to July 5th. The theme of the conference was "Emergent Democracy Struggles 
for World Order." 

Exhibitions 

The Art Club exhibition was held on October 19th, when a group of 
lithographs of Ella Fillmore Lillie, were shown. 



Commencement exercises of the following schools were held in Goodhart 
Hall: 

The Baldwin School on June 9th. 

The Agnes Irwin School on June 5th. 

The Shipley School on June 5th. 

The Ursula Murray School of Dancing on May 20th. 



The Deanery 



Mr. Andrew J. Kauffmann, Harvard '42, gave a talk about "The 
Harvard Mountaineering Club's 1941 Expedition in Peru," on January 11th. 

Mr. H. S. Ede, Curator of National Gallery of British Art, discussed 
"The National Gallery of Art, Washington, D. O," on March 22nd. 

Mr. Francis Madeira, of the Juilliard School of Music, gave a piano 
recital on April 12th. 

Mr. James Cushman discussed "The Present Day Claims of the Earl 
of Oxford to the Authorship of Shakespeare's Plays," on May 3rd. 

The Right Honorable Margaret Bondfield spoke on "The British 
Labor Party in the War," on May 10th. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CAROLINE CHADWICK-COLLINS, 

Director-in-Residence and Editor of Publications. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the annual report of the work of the 
College Library for the year ending June 30, 1942. 

Size and Growth of the Library 

The number of accessioned volumes in the Library June 30, 1942, was 
180,622. The number added July 1, 1941 to June 30, 1942 was 5,533. 
The number of volumes withdrawn during the year was 256. 

Of the 5,533 volumes added, 2,861 were purchased, 1,808 were received 
through gifts and exchanges, 763 were added by binding serials. One hundred 
and one volumes were replaced either by purchase or gift. 

The Library has received by gift and exchange from institutions, societies 
and government bureaus some 1,250 books and pamphlets. Alumnae and 
friends of the College have remembered the Library by presenting 1,550 
volumes. While gifts have not been as numerous as in other years a few are 
of sufficient interest to deserve brief mention. 

Miss Alice Bache Gould, Class of 1889, gave 158 volumes from the 
library of her father, Benjamin A. Gould, who was professor of Astronomy 
at Harvard. These books are largely early scientific works, some dating back 
to the 16th Century, which are valuable historically. 

Miss Hannah T. Carpenter, Class of 1898, presented the limited subscrip' 
tion edition of Science and Health, designed by William Dana Orcult, of 
the Plimpton Press. 

The library of the late Fannie E. Teller, Class of 1918, was given to the 
College by her sister, Miss Ida Teller. There were 725 volumes in the collec 
tion which was composed largely of the literature of this century with some 
modern editions of earlier authors. 

At the death of Albert J. Edmunds in the spring, his library, numbering 
about 3 50 volumes, came into possession of the College. Mr. Edmunds was 
a scholar in Biblical History, Buddhism, and Sanskrit, and his books are highly 
specialized in these fields. 

A number of special gifts in the form of early printed works were 
received for the Rare Book Room. Mrs. Sylvia C. Bowditch, Class of 1901, 
gave a copy of Cicero's Rhetorica, published in Venice in 1511, which had 
belonged to her father, Mr. Horace E. Scudder. Through the courtesy of 
Mr. Donald G. Wing, the Yale University Library sent three 15th century 
pamphlets. Miss Hetty Goldman, Class of 1903, and Mrs. Agnes Goldman 
Sanborn, Class of 1908, presented an autographed copy of Charles Dickens 1 
Posthumous papers of the Pic\wic\ Club, London, 1866, 2 volumes. 

Mr. Howard L. Goodhart presented a handsome folio manuscript of the 
early 16th century entitled Le Saint Voyage de Jerusalem, a narrative by 
Pierre Mesenge, Canon of Rouen, of the pilgrimage made in the year 1507. 
This is our first original manuscript and is a prized possession. 

£35] 



36 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

The opportunity to purchase a small collection of early and rare economic 
works at low cost was presented to Dr. Karl Anderson while he was on leave 
of absence at Harvard. Funds were granted him for the purpose and he 
secured 31 items, many of which were published before 1700. 

In general the policy in the purchase of books has followed that of last 
year. The growth of the Library has been normal in spite of war conditions 
which have closed the continental European book markets and resulted in a 
decrease in accessions in some subjects, but by no means in all. Much of our 
book buying was, naturally, influenced by current events, as well as by the 
demands of teaching. It has been a period of general development with no 
particular emphasis on any subject matter. 

Financial Statement 

Library appropriation for 1941-42 $15,000.00 

Receipts from course book fines, academic records, late 

registration and library fines 116.19 

Unappropriated balance from 1940-41 294.20 

Total income $ 1 5,410.39 

Appropriations were made as follows: 

Regular, to departments $12,434.39 

bpecial, to departments 1,987.3 5 

Total appropriated $14,421.74 

Unappropriated balance $988.65 

Special Library Funds 

Receipts: 

Invested funds (listed in Treasurer's report) $1,894.13 

Duplicate Book Fund 300.00 

Gifts: 

Miss Anne Blake 50.00 

Mrs. Sylvia C. Bowditch 25.00 

Miss Dorothy D. Walsh 10.00 

Class of 1930 in memory of Betty Bigelow 268.00 

$2,547.13 
Summary of Expenditures 

1940-41 1941-42 

For books $7,430.96 $8,466.56 

For periodicals and continuations 4,064.05 3,139.60 

For binding 2,261.69 3,027.81 

For supplies 1,319.15 1,781.21 

For postage, express 53.20 71.97 

$15,129.05 $16,487.15 

Cataloguing 

New books and in addition an accumulation of old books which came as 
gifts were catalogued. The number of titles catalogued during the year was 
3,760. The number of new cards added to the catalogue was 21,341. 

We have continued to send cards for our new accessions to the Union 
Catalogue of the Philadelphia Area and to add to our catalogue the Haverford 
College Library author cards for books. 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 37 

Last year an author catalogue was started for the books which are shelved 
in the West Stack and cards were made for all except the Classics. This year 
the cards, numbering 12,798, for the Greek and Latin authors, and the editors 
of the texts, were copied. The work was done by a dexigraph machine which 
is found to be entirely satisfactory. 

New problems were presented in the cataloguing of microfilms. Some of 
these were copies of old manuscripts for the Spanish Department, others were 
from early printed books for the Latin Department and a few for the Science 
Departments. 

Binding and Periodicals 

The number of volumes bound during the year was 2,83 3. Of this number 
713 were new books supplied unbound, 823 were volumes of periodicals and 
1,297 were old books needing rebinding. 

The number of periodicals which are being received is gradually falling 
off as a result of war interference in the shipment of foreign publications. 
Subscriptions to foreign periodicals in 1941 were paid through our agents, 
but payment for the 1942 subscriptions presented new problems. The Com' 
mittee on Importations of the American Library Association undertook to 
negotiate for the payment of a limited number of foreign scientific periodicals 
and a list of our most important ones was sent in and accepted. We hope to 
receive these volumes eventually. 

Circulation and Reference 

Circulation statistics show that 51,433 volumes were recorded as being 
in use. This is an increase of 4,392 volumes over that of last year, and an 
increase of 6,817 volumes over that of two years ago. No figures are kept 
for the use of books in the Hall Libraries nor of those sent to the Reserve 
Book Room after they have been put on reserve. If these figures were included 
in the circulation, as is done in many libraries, our statistics would be con' 
siderably increased. 

The demands made on the Reference Department by the student body, 
particularly by those of the Graduate School, and by the faculty, have increased, 
and no phase of the work is of more importance, although it is impossible 
to show results by figures. 

The following table indicates the total circulation of books by groups: 

Science 

Main Stack West Stack Libraries Total 

Students 23,498 6,065 1,632 31,19? 

Faculty 6,03 5 1,93 5 523 8,493 

Reserves 7,418 2,661 451 10,530 

Outsiders 1,074 134 7 1,215 

Total 38,025 10,795 2,613 51,433 

The circulation of music records and music scores, which is controlled at 
the loan desk in the West Stack, was 6,448 records and 99 scores taken out 
by 958 borrowers. 



38 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Inter-Library Loan 

Requests by students and faculty for books to be secured from other 
libraries have been numerous. We have borrowed 318 volumes from 33 
institutions during the year. This figure, however, only partially indicates our 
indebtedness, for many of our students go to the libraries in the vicinity and 
bring back books of which we have no record. Letters of introduction to 
other libraries were written for 168 students and eight for members of the 
faculty. 

To 3 5 libraries we sent 142 volumes on inter'library loan. 

Science Libraries 

The Librarian in charge of Science Libraries reports that during the 
academic year, October to June, a total of 2,280 books circulated, of which 
417 were taken by the faculty, giving a ratio of 18% taken by the faculty, 
and the rest, or 82%, by the students. Four hundred and fifty-one books were 
placed on reserve, for which there was a total circulation of 2,380. 

In addition to the regular course reserves, a special reserve "Science for 
the Layman," was set up in the Quita Woodward Memorial Room for the 
purpose of interesting the non-science student. Another special reserve was 
the ^'Nutrition Reserve"' in connection with the defense course given at the 
College by the Biology Department. During June reserves were organized for 
the acceleration courses in Physics and Mathematics, the nurses' course in 
Biology, and the Analytical Chemistry and Photogrammetry courses in Chem- 
istry and Geology. 

A considerable amount of work was done this year with microfilm. A new 
Argus microfilm reader was bought jointly by Chemistry and Biology, so that 
now there are two Argus readers in the Science Libraries, one housed in 
Park Hall and the other in Dalton in the Physics Department. Over 200 
individual microfilms were ordered, primarily for faculty research in Biology 
and Chemistry. 

The usual reference work was carried on along with three special projects. 
In Biology, the Tennent pamphlet file was reorganized, and in Physics a 
number of subdivisions in the classification were brought up to date; in Geology 
a check was made of the Library's holdings of governmental publications and 
letters were sent to various countries requesting their publications pertaining 
to Geology. Six bibliographies of varying lengths were compiled during the 
course of the year for faculty members. 

An important acquisition in the Physics Library is the complete set of 
the Journal of Mathematics and Physics. A total of 252 new titles were added 
in the Science Libraries through book purchases. This number is a sharp 
increase over books purchased in previous years by the Science Departments, 
reflecting the importance and the impetus given scientific publications during 
war years. 

Administration 

The work of the Library has been carried on throughout the year without 
special incident. The enlargement of the building entailed certain adjustments, 
but both faculty and students soon became accustomed to the changes and the 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 39 

new arrangements have proved satisfactory. The report shows the largest 
circulation of books which has ever been recorded and represents an increase 
in the use of the Library by the students, both for study and recreational 
reading. 

It has long been our desire to replace the old loan desk which was built 
by the college carpenter in 1906 and which was hopelessly inadequate for the 
work now done by the loan desk assistants. By saving up the book fines for 
several years and by adding some money from the sale of old books, we at 
last accumulated enough to purchase a new, up to date loan desk made to 
our specifications by the Library Bureau. The larger desk has solved many 
difficulties and the work of the Loan Department has been brought to a new 
level of achievement. 

The space in the stack around the loan desk, surrounded by catalogue 
cases, had become more and more congested as the number of cases grew 
and the activity at the desk increased. Several years ago four of the catalogue 
cases were moved into the corridor and this year, when it became necessary to 
add another case, it was decided to move them all out of the stack. They were 
placed along the wall facing the Reference Room and new lights were installed. 
The new arrangement of the cases is much more convenient and the entrance 
to the stack and loan desk is greatly improved also by the change. 

After moving the Art Department to the new wing of the building, several 
suggestions regarding the use of the old Art Seminary were considered before 
it was decided to equip it as a study and writing room, to be used by under' 
graduate students. The Class of 1907 undertook the furnishing of it and 
supplied new lights and chairs. 

In October the Rare Book Room, furnished last year by the Class of 1912, 
was formally opened. The guests assembled at the Deanery to listen to an 
address by Mr. John D. Gordan, Curator of the Berg Collection in the New 
York Public Library, and afterwards adjourned to the Library to see the room 
and inspect an exhibit of incunabula which had been arranged by Miss Terrien. 
Until now there has been no suitable place to house and to exhibit such special 
material and the new room has met with general approval. During the year 
six exhibitions were held, partly planned to supplement the new course in 
Bibliography. 

In the fall at the suggestion of the three Presidents, of Haverford, 
Swarthmore, and Bryn Mawr, the librarians of these colleges held a series of 
conferences at which the possibility of library cooperation in the purchase of 
supplies, books and periodicals was discussed. The plan proposed was that, 
except for a few periodicals necessary to the work of each institution, only 
one subscription be placed for the remainder and that the current numbers 
be passed around between the libraries. This suggestion met with opposition 
from the faculty and action on it was postponed. The librarians agreed to 
avoid duplication in the purchase of expensive books and rare sets of journals 
wherever possible and to make more liberal inter-library loan exchanges. The 
saving in the joint purchase of supplies was found to be so small as to be 
almost negligible. 

In January the Presidents asked Mr. Shaw, of Swarthmore College, to 
draw up a plan of "unified library control for the three colleges.'" This was 



40 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

done but no definite action on the plan was taken. It is to be hoped that 
such drastic reorganization of the work of the Library will not be undertaken 
until all the librarians concerned have the opportunity to study the problems 
involved and jointly make a careful investigation of the advantages and dis- 
advantages of such a plan. Only in this way could a reliable estimate of the 
desirability of "unified control" be determined. 

Changes in the personnel of the staff this year were few. In August 
Miss Geraldine Whiting, assistant in charge of the Science Libraries, resigned 
to accept a position with the government in Washington; Miss Joan McKee, 
a graduate of Wellesley College and of Simmons College School of Library 
Science, was appointed to take Miss Whiting's place. Mrs. Mae E. Craig, 
who has been on leave of absence, returned for part time work as assistant 
cataloguer. 

In addition to the regular staff, 30 students were employed for the 
Reserve Book Room and for the desk in the West Stack, to cover the time 
when a member of the staff is not on duty. Seven students were in charge 
of the Hall Libraries and six N. Y. A. students were given work at the loan 
desk or in the Catalogue Department. 

The Librarian served as a member of the Philadelphia Metropolitan 
Library Council Executive Committee during the year and also attended the 
meeting of Eastern College Librarians held at Columbia in November. 

In conclusion I wish to make grateful acknowledgement to the staff for 
their support and their loyalty to the work which has made the year a success. 



Respectfully submitted, 



LOIS A. REED, 

Librarian. 



REPORT OF THE COLLEGE PHYSICIAN 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1941-42: 

This year was a busy but uneventful one from the medical point of view. 
The number of admissions to the Infirmary was 451, half-way between the 
total admissions of the preceding two years. The total dispensary visits rose 
slightly. The distribution of illness, both as to variety and season, showed no 
significant change from the past. 

The changes in routine carried out for the first time this year worked very 
well. The campaign against noise and the strict curtailment of visitors make 
it possible for us to report with pride that the Infirmary is now admirably 
quiet, in fact much quieter than many general hospitals. By having the head 
nurse, Miss Slavin, take the history on each student as she comes for her 
annual medical examination, we were able to complete the medical examinations 
of all students by November 1st. This made possible an earlier start on follow 
up interviews, and also made it easier for the Medical Department to carry the 
usual load of medical work which is always heavy from November to spring. 

The work of Dr. Stewart, the Attending Psychiatrist, is always one of the 
most valuable contributions which the Department makes to the health of the 
students. Dr. Stewart's report on her year's work follows: 

"The year 1941'42 was an especially interesting one to the 
Attending Psychiatrist in that there were several students carried 
over from the previous year, and several of the new referrals required 
a series of interviews which covered a period of rapid growth in 
personality. It seems to me that there was demonstrated in this year 
a wiser use of psychiatric time on the part of the students. This 
included, of course, those who by experience in interviews had 
learned the limits of our field, and also those who came for the first 
time already aware of difficulties which they were prepared to discuss, 
some of which were by no means superficial or trivial. One student 
indicated that since hearing the mental hygiene lectures in which she 
first became aware of psychiatric facilities as part of the hygiene 
program she 'saved' it in her mind till she should get 'in a hole, and 
here I am.' This growing objectivity and skill in the use of special 
facilities I appreciate as indicative of an acceptance on campus of the 
psychiatrist's role in periods of growth and crisis 

"There was a total number of 154 therapeutic interviews. 
Thirty-nine students were treated, including a few graduate students. 
Conferences with Dr. Leary were of weekly occurrence. The Dean, 
Assistant Dean and Wardens were seen as often as situations arose 
in which need for mutual understanding in a particular case pre- 
sented itself. There were occasional interviews with faculty members 
and parents. The cooperation of Dr. Leary, the Dean's office and the 
Infirmary staff was responsible for making the year a successful one." 

A new ultra-violet lamp was purchased in December 1941, to replace one 
which had worn out. It permits much more rapid giving of treatments, and has 
proved a great time saver to students and operator. The new lamp was paid 
for in part by an undesignated gift to Miss Park who generously allowed the 

[41] 



42 REPORT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

Infirmary to use it for this purpose, and in part from vaccination fees and 
infirmary fees. 

The College Physician and the Head Nurse gave an intensive ten-hour 
course in First Aid for air raid wardens in February 1942. A Red Cross 
course in Advanced First Aid was given to a small class of students in March 
and April. 

Two of our general duty nurses resigned at the end of the year. One of 
them, Miss Elizabeth Cook, is now in the Army. 

I am most grateful to the officers of administration and to the other 
members of the Infirmary staff for their cooperation during the past year. 
Respectfully submitted, 

OLGA CUSHING LEARY, M.D., 

College Physician. 

SUPPLEMENT TO THE PHYSICIAN'S REPORT 



Infirmary Report 



Total 
Infirmary 
Year Admissions 

1937-38 301 

1938-39 398 

1939-40 408 

1940-41 509 

1941-42 451 



Total 
Infirmary 
Days 
811 
1230|4 
1474 
1726 



Five'Year Summary 

Aver. Daily 
Total Total No. of 

Dispensary Dispensary Dispensary 



Average 
Daily 
Census 

3.4 

5.1 

6.1 

7.2 



1326% 5.5 



Case 

1736 

1871 

2129 

2341 

2456 



Visits 
2915 
3167 
3802 
3605 
3738 



Patients 
12.1 
13.2 
15.9 
15.0 
15.6 



Infirmary Diagnoses 1941-42 

Diseases of the Psychobiological Unit: Semester I. 
Anxiety State 1 

Readmission 1 

Conversion Hysteria , 1 

Diseases of the Body as a Whole: 

Exhaustion 2 1 

German Measles 1 

Multiple Contusions and Abrasions 

Diseases of the Skin: 

Dermatitis Venenata 

Furuncles: 

Axilla 

Cheek 

Finger 

Lip _ 

Nose 

Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System: 

Contusion, Erector Spine 

Multiple Sprains 

Myositis : 

Sprain, Right Ankle 2 

Diseases of the Respiratory System: 

Bronchitis 

Common Colds 

Readmissions 



Semester II. 
1 



36 

4 



Total 

2 
1 

2 

57 
5 



1 




1 




1 


1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


2 




2 




1 


1 




1 


1 


1 




1 


2 




2 




2 


2 


'2 


123 


215 


4 




4 



REPORT OF THE COLLEGE PHYSICIAN 43 

Grippe 14 5 

Laryngitis 2 2 

Pertussis 1 1 

Sinusitis: 

Acute Maxillary 1 1 

Chronic 1 1 

Diseases of the Digestive System: 

Alveolar Abscess 1 1 

Appendicitis : 

Acute 1 1 

Subacute 112 

Chronic Recurrent 1 1 

Gastroenteritis, Acute 29 19 48 

Readmissions 2 2 

Gastrospasm 1 1 

Gingivitis : 

Partially Erupted Third Molar 1 1 

Pharyngitis, Acute 1 1 

Streptococcus Sore Throat 1 1 

Tonsillitis : 

Acute Follicular 1 1 

Subacute 1 1 

Ulcer, Lingual Tonsil 1 1 

Diseases of the Urinary System: 

Cystitis 1 1 

Diseases of the Genital System: 

Dysmenorrhea 7 3 10 

Metrorrhagia 1 1 

Diseases of the Nervous System: 

Cerebral Thrombosis 1 1 

Migraine 2 3 5 

Readmission 1 1 

Sciatic Neuralgia 1 1 

Diseases of the Eye: 

Conjunctivitis 3 3 

Undiagnosed Diseases, Classified by Symptoms: 

Abdominal Pain 1 1 

Back Pain 1 1 

Constipation 2 13 

Headache 1 1 

Non-Diagnostic Terms for Record: 

Basal Metabolic Rate Determinations* 16 11 27 

Boarder 1 1 

Convalescent Care following Grippe 1 1 

Observation 8 4 12 

Post'Operative Care: 

Extraction, Third Molar 112 

Readmission 1 1 

Repair, Muscle Sheath 1 1 

Resection, Pilonidal Sinus 1 1 

Tonsillectomy 1 1 

Quarantine 1 1 

Special Laboratory Work 1 1 

Total 213 238 451 



* Three basal metabolic rate determinations were done on students 
admitted under other diagnoses. The total number of such determinations 
for the year was 30. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE 
EDUCATIONAL SERVICE 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1941-1942: 

During the present academic year the work of the Educational Service 
has again been primarily with the Lower Merion Township School system 
although we have also examined children referred by private schools and by 
a number of the surrounding social service agencies. The year's work is 
summarized in the following tables: 

Summary of Individual Tests Administered 1941*1942 

Total No. Director Assistant Students 

Children referred by the public schools 118 38 59 21 

Children referred by social service agencies 6 5 1 
Fee-paying cases 3 3 , 

Total 127 46 60 21 

Summary of Group Tests Administered 1941-1942 

No. of No. of 

Children Classes Director Assistant Student 

Public schools 548 23 8 11 4 

Private schools 26 26 



Total 548 49 34 11 4 

Summary of Remedial Instruction in Reading 1941-1942 

No. of Children No. of Lessons Director Assistant Student 

4 59 14 33 12 

In addition to the testing and remedial instruction we have completed a 
number of service studies in connection with the school-wide testing program 
of the Lower Merion Schools. These studies, which were largely carried out by 
the students in the undergraduate course in Mental Tests and Measurements 
with the help of the Assistant and the Director, are listed below: 

1. A study of the relative validities of the California Test of Mental 
Maturity and the Kuhlmann-Anderson Intelligence Test. 

2. A study of the value of the Minnesota Paper Form Board Test and 
the Stenquist Mechanical Aptitude Test for predicting success in 
vocational courses in the Lower Merion Senior High School. 

3. A study of the scatter of scores of ninth grade senior high school 
students on the Otis, California, and Pintner intelligence tests. 

4. Comparison of scores on the California Test of Mental Maturity 
and the Revised Binet for those children whose I. Q. scores on the 
California test are above 130. 

5. A study of the scattering of scores on the Otis Self-Administering 
Tests of Mental Ability administered under standard-time and 
double standard-time limits. 

[44] 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE EDUCATIONAL SERVICE 45 

A financial statement for the year 1941-1942 follows: (This year the 
Lower Merion Township Schools have paid a fee for each child examined for 
special class placement.) 

Balance as of October 1941 $1,395.73 

Fees, 1941-1942: 

School survey $150.00 

Individual examinations 258.00 

Remedial teaching 28.00 

• 436.00 

Total $1,831.73 

Expenses, 1941-1942: 

Salary of Assistant $500.00 

Transportation 7.56 

507.56 

Total $1,324.17 

Balance as of June 1942 $1,324.17 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH FEHRER, 

Director of the Educational Service. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU 
OF RECOMMENDATIONS 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1941-42: 

The figures which follow give only a slight indication of the great flood 
of positions which engulfed us last year. Government and industry were 
literally combing the colleges for women to fill every kind of position from the 
more or less routine ones in offices and laboratories to those for research 
workers and administrators. In many cases, the calls were not for one or two 
women but for as many as we could find; in others, they were for fifteen, 
twenty, and fifty at a time. 

The greatest demand was for women with training in science and mathe- 
matics. Ninetytwo different organizations asked the Bureau for former 
students with this training. They included airplane factories, oil companies, 
dairies, paint companies, textile manufacturers, drug manufacturers, foundries, 
hospitals, and, above all, the Federal Government for arsenals, navy yards, 
agricultural research laboratories, signal corps laboratories, and so on almost 
without limit. 

Next in demand were the Social Science majors, particularly the econo- 
mists. They went to such agencies as the W. P. B., the O. P. A., the O. W. I., 
the O. E. M., the War Department, the British Purchasing Commission, the 
Department of Labor, the Department of the Interior, the Office of Strategic 
Services: and private industry called for them no less loudly. 

The most significant change of the year was the demand for college 
trained women without regard to major. The emphasis was on intelligence 
and not on experience or previous training. For example, English and History 
of Art students became after a seven-weeks'' course excellent map makers for 
the Geological Survey; and Latin and Philosophy Ph.D.'s found themselves in 
the Army and the Navy. 

However, not everyone went to war work. Welfare organizations, schools, 
colleges, libraries, community services, stores, museums, airlines and so forth 
claimed their share of Bryn Mawr alumnae. Out of last year's senior class of 
126, ten are doing graduate work, three are in medical school, two at nursing 
school and one in law school. 

Total Calls to the Bureau (not including Civil Service positions) 660 

Teaching Positions 219 47 college, 159 school, 13 tutor- 
ing. 8 of the college positions 
were part-time; 20 of the school 
positions were apprenticeships, 
6 were part-time and 4 were 
temporary. 

Non-Teaching Positions 317 24 part-time, 41 summer, 9 

temporary. 
Small Positions 124 typing, selling, staying with 



children, etc. 



[46] 



REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF RECOMMENDATIONS 47 

Placements known to be made by the Bureau _ 206 

No estimate of positions offered can be made. 
Teaching Positions: 

Full-time 13 (6 college, 7 school) 

Apprenticeships 2 

Part'time - - 6 (2 college, 4 school) 

Tutoring 5 

Substituting 2 

Total 28 

Non-Teaching Positions: 

Full-time 55 (Not including positions filled 

through regular Civil Service 
channels) 

Temporary 13 (10 summer) 

Part-time _ 8 

Total 76 

Small Positions 102 

The comparison of the records of the Bureau in 1940-41 and 1941-42 
is as follows: 

1941-42 1940-41 

Total calls 660 487 

Placements 206 149 

Teaching calls 219 181 

Colleges _ 47 20 

Placed 8 3 

Schools 159 148 

Placed _ 15 19 

Tutoring 13 13 

Placed 5 10 

Non-Teaching calls: 

Full-time or regular part-time 317 134 

Placed 76 27 

Small positions 124 127 

Placed 102 89 

We know that our records are very incomplete. We were not able to 
keep track of positions which came in or alumnae who filled them. Records of 
summer positions are particularly incomplete as most of this work was done 
outside of our office. 

To keep up with increasing demands, the Bureau staff has been enlarged 
from its old force of one quarter-time director and one half-time secretary. 
We began this year with one half-time director, one full-time psychologist and 
vocational adviser, and two secretaries, one full-time, the other half-time. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUISE F. H. CRENSHAW, 

Director of the Bureau of Recommendations. 



REPORT OF THE CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
THE MADGE MILLER RESEARCH FUND 

To the President of Bryn Mawr College 
Madam: 

I have the honour to present the following report for the academic year 
1941-42. 

The Committee appointed to administer the Madge Miller Research Fund 
made thirteen grants last year as follows: 

Grant 39 — Dr. Broughton 

Expert secretarial assistance $100.00 

Grant 40 — Dr. Doyle 

Apparatus 52.20 

Grant 41 — Dr. Dryden 

Expenses for field trip 100.00 

Grant 42 — Dr. F. de Laguna 

Photographs and checking references 80.00 

Grant 43 — Dr. Fenwick 

Secretarial assistance 40.00 

Grant 44 — Dr. Gates 

Preparation of compounds 55.00 

Grant 45 — Dr. Marti 

Expert secretarial assistance 60.00 

Grant 46 — Dr. Mezger 

Research material 60.00 

Grant 47 — Dr. Miiller 

Secretarial assistance 50.00 

Grant 48 — Dr. Oppenheimer 

Research assistance 100.00 

Grant 49— Dr. Reid 

Cataloguing material 40.00 

Grant 50 — Mr. Soper 

Assistance of Chinese scholar 40.00 

Grant 51 — Dr. Sprague 

Photostats 40.00 

$817.20 

The number of requests was unusually large. Some of them were refused 
and most of the awards were necessarily smaller than the sum asked for. The 
aid provided by the Fund has been much appreciated by members of the faculty. 

Again in 1941 '42 several projects for which grants had been made earlier 
have not been completed. The explanation is to be found in war conditions. 
Either the member of the faculty to whom the grant was made or the research 
assistant that he had expected to employ was prevented by war work from 
continuing the research project. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LILY ROSS TAYLOR, 

Chairman of the Committee. 

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