(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the State Department of Health of New York. 1896 suppl"

Google 



This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 

to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 

to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 

are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other maiginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 

publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing tliis resource, we liave taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 
We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain fivm automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attributionTht GoogXt "watermark" you see on each file is essential for in forming people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liabili^ can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 

at |http: //books .google .com/I 



► 



|tf^S^@ 



!!xch^nt;e 
Y orlc k c ■. domy of *i cdicin--- 



( 



I 



THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THB 



State Department of Health 



OF 



NEW YORK 



For THB Ybar Ending Dbcbmbbr 31, 1910 



ALBANY 
J. B. LYON OOKPANY. 8TATB PR1NTBRS 

1911 






I 



is 1 



k . .. A State of New York 






\ 



s 



No. 40. 



IN SENATE 



March 2, 1911. 



THIRTT-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THB 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 



V STATE OF NEW YORK, 

Executive Cuambeb, 

.^ * Albany, March 2, 1911. 

> 

^ To ihe. Legislature: 

I have the honor to transmit herewith the thirty-first annual 
report of the State Department of Health. 

(Signed) JOHN A. DIX 



f 

I 

[ 






• • • 



• • • 



• • • 



NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 



Commissioner 
EUGENE H. PORTER, MJL. M J). 

Division of Administration 

Deputy Commissioner William A. Howe, M.D. 

Secretary Alec H. Seymour 

Division of Sanitary Engineering 

Chief Engineer Theodore Horton, C.E. 

Principal Assistant Engineer H. B. Cleveland, C.E. 

Special Assistant Engineer Prof. H. N. Ogden, C.E. 

Ansietant Sanitary Engineer C. A. Hblmquist, C.E. 

Assistant Engineer A. O. True, C.E. 

Division of Laboratory Work 

Director of State Laboratories William S. Magill, M.D. 

Chief Sanitary Chemist L. M. Wachter 

Water Analyst L. R. Milford 

Assistant Water Analyst W. S. Davis 

Bacteriologist William A. Bing, M.D. 

Director Cancer Laboratory H. R. Gaylord, M.D. 

Director of Bender Laboratory Thomas Ordway, M.D. 

Division of Vital Statistics 
Director F. D. Beagle 

Division of Commnnicable Diseases 
Director William B. May, M.D. 

Division of Publicity and Education 

Director Hills Cole, M.D. 

Director of Tuberculosis Exhibition Edward G. Whipple, M.D. 

Consulting Staff 

Dermatologist Frederic C. Curtis, M.D. 

Ophthalmologist Herbert D. Schenck, M.D. 

Orthopedist Harlan P. Cole, M.D. 

Laryngologist John B. Garrison, M.D. 

SUtistician Prof. Walter F. Willcox, Ph.D. 

Tuberculosis Advisory Board 

Edward R. Baldwin, M.D Saranac Lake 

Thomas Darlington, M.D New York City 

Livingston Farrand, M.D New York city 

Hon. Homer Folks, Esq New York city 

Alfred Meyer, M.D New York city 

Prof. Veranus A. Moore, M.D Utica 

John H. Pryor, M.D Buffalo 

William H. Watson, M.D Utica 

John I*. Heffron, M.D Syracuse 



[V] 

89290 



vi REroRT OF THE Statb Depabtment of Health 

Medical Officers of the SUte Department of Health 

F. W. Adbiancb, M.D., 306 Lake St., Elmira, N. Y. 

W. D. Albeveb, M.D., 528 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

F. D. Ain>BEW, M.D., Sodus, N. Y. 

Chables E. Bibch, M.D., White Plains, N. Y. 

M. Cavana, M.D., Sylvan Beach, N. Y. 
•Edwabd CiABK, M.D., 571 Ellicott Sq.,* Buffalo, N. Y. 

W. H. CoNNEiXT, M.D., 98 Fair St, Kingston, N. Y. 
tH. H. Cbum, M.D., 116 E. State St., Ithaca, N. Y. 
♦F. C. CxJBTis, M.D., Washington Av., Albany, N. Y. 
$Z. F. Dunning, M.D., Philmont, N. Y. 
*Fbanklin D. Eabl, M.D., 41 Hamilton St., Ogdensburff, N. Y. 

H. A. Eajstman, M.D., 208 Lafayette St., Jamestown, N. Y. 
*GKOBas M. FiSHEB, M.D., 230 Genesee St, Utica, N. Y. 

W. S. Gabnset, M.D., 93 N. Main St., Gloversville, N. Y. 

John B. Gabbison, M.D., 616 Madison Av., New York Gi^. 
*:tWiLLiAH B. Gibson, M.D., Masonic Texnple, Huntington, N. Y. 
JChablbs H. Glidden, M.D., 31 N. Ann St., Little Falls, N. Y. 
iO, J. Hallenbeck, M.D., Canandaigua, N. Y. 

Db Vebb M. Hibbabd, M.D., 128 S. Union St., Clean, N. Y. 

John B. Hubes, M.D., 441 Park Ave., New York City. 

Edwabd H. Hutton, M.D., 154 Pine St., Corning, N. Y. 
tA. D. LiAKE. M.D., Gowanda, N. Y. 

J. W. Le Seub, M.D., 207 K Main St., Batavia, N. Y. 

Fbedebiok J. Mann, M.D., 262 Main St., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
JPeblbt H. Mason, M.D., 734 South St., Peekskill, N. Y. 

BuBT J. Mayoock, M.D., 560 Delaware Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

H. E. Mebbiam, M.D., 224 E. State St., Ithaca, N. Y. 

Geobge W. Miles, M.D., 11 Washington Ave., Oneida, N. Y. 

Douglas C. Mobiabta, M.D., 511 Broadway, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

C. F. Cbmes, M.D., 318 Main St., Jamestown, N. Y. 

F. A. Palmeb, M.D., Mechanio.viUe, N. Y. 
•O. W. Peck, M.D., 34 Watkins Ave., Oneonta, N. Y. 

Joseph Roby, M.D., 52 S. Fitzhugh St., Rochester, N. Y. 

B. W. Shebwood, M.D., 1117 S. Salina St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Geobgs E. Swift, M.D., 314 Warren St., Hudson, N. Y. 

W. C. Thompson, M.D., 2 Brinkerhoff St., Plattsburgh, N. Y. 
♦JD. M. ToTMAN, M.D., City Hall, Syracuse, N. Y. 
♦Ja. G. Wilding, M.D., Malone, N. Y. 

•tE. S. WiLLABD, M.D., 17 Paddock Arcade, Watertown, N. Y. 
ijOHN S. Wilson, M.D., 22 S. Hamilton St., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

E. H. Woloott, M.D., 57 S. Union St., Rochester, N. Y. 
tH. L. Wheeleb, D.D.S., 12 W. 46th St., New York City. 
tW. A, White, D.D.S., Phelps, N. Y. 



*Smallpox experts. 

tLecturers and consultants on oral hygiene. 

iAiso health officers. 



:ii: 



:TY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF THE STATE 
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, 1910 



To Hon. John A. Dix, Oovemor of the State of New York, 
Albany, N. Y,: 

Sib: — I have the honor to present herewith the thirty-first 
arnual report of the State Department of Health, for the year 
1910: 

PUBLIC HEALTH WORK AND THE WELFARE OF 

THE STATE 

It cannot be doubted that the citizens of this State have at last 
aroused themselves to the vital importance of public health work 
and to a full realization of its possibilities. The educational 
efforts of the Department, supplemented by local health oflBcers 
and public-spirited citizens, have awakened a keen interest in 
sanitary matters and aroused a public sentiment heartily in favor 
of health reforms. It is realized that public health work is prac- 
tical and that the State must play its part in its conduct and sup- 
port. Where a few years ago hospital facilities were denied 
those afflicted with tuberculosis, today seventeen counties have 
built, or will soon construct, county hospitals. The demand now 
is that epidemics of contagious disease shall be prevented, not 
stamped out after they have assumed alarming proportions. The 
social welfare of the State requires that the functions that should 
properly be exercised by the State government in the prevention 
of disease and the education of the masses in sanitary matters 
shall be fully carried out. 

This change of the attitude of the public is of recent develop- 
ment and signifies the abandonment of old ideas and a new con- 
ception of things. Now that contagious diseases may be pre- 
vented, it is asked, why should not this be done? If it is possi- 
ble, as Pasteur asserted, for the " world to rid itself of all con- 
tagious diseases " a stricken community rises up to know what 
progress we are making. Smallpox can be effectually checked by 
vaccination. Then why not enforce it ? Typhoid can be largely 
eradicated by proper hygienic measures. Why not establish 

[11 



2 State Depabtmkjst of Health 

them? Tuberculosis is preventable. An aroused State is 
determined to see this deadly menace to health properly con- 
trolled. Diphtheria, formerly the scourge of childhood, can be 
effectually checked by the use of antitoxin. Should the State 
exercise as much care and spend as much money to save the lives 
of children as it does to prevent diseases in cattle i These and 
many other questions of similar import we are soon to be called 
upon to answer. We must wage war against these enemies of 
our State. A new civilization demands it. Xew York should 
not be behind in so significant a movement as this. 

The increasing demands upon the Department show that the 
people believe in its efforts and that they are in thorough sym- 
pathy with the fight for better sanitary conditions, more freedom 
from disease and a stronger administration by the State in health 
affairs. Proper education of the people in health matters, effi- 
cient work by health authorities, and the co-operation of public 
officials generally in the efforts for better housing and laboring 
conditions, proper water supplies, parks and playing grounds, 
and the other improvements that we know every municipality 
should have, will eventually produce a condition which will fully 
justify our pride in our citizenship. 

The Conservation of Life in New York State 
From an economic standpoint alone, it is entirely possible to 
save millions of dollars and thousands of lives to the State. Gov- 
ernmental agencies for the protection of the public health have 
only begun the work in the vast field which they are destined to 
eventually occupy. The average value of a life lost by preventable 
disease has been estimated at $1,700. It is possible to reduce our 
death rate by proper preventive measures and at this valuation 
it would be necessary to save loss than one hundred lives annually 
to equal the entire appropriation of $150,000 to the Department 
of Health. From a business standpoint, how can a better invest- 
ment be made ? — our mortality reduced, diseases prevented, un- 
told suffering and sickness eliminated, and a better and happier 
State in which to live. Are not these things worthy of our atten- 
tion, appealing alike to humanitarian, economist, citizen and the 
stranger within our gates ? 



Our greatest uatural resource is tiie cliilcl. In tlie Hold of the 
prevention of infant mortality alone, the JState could well afford 
to spend more money than it now gives for our work and thereby 
build a larger, healthier and better commonwealth for the future. 
All the potential possibilities of the future of our State are in the 
children of to-day. Would anyone argue that in providing so far 
as lies in our power for a healthier race, the State is exceeding 
its functions? 

The PvJblic Health Laws 

Our health law is in many respects inadequate. Much of it 
wa5 enacted thirty years ago and is far behind the demands of 
to-day, and has not kept abreast of our progress. While not ad- 
vocating a large increase in the powers of the State Department 
of Health, it cannot be* doubted that there should be sufficient 
authority vested to improve many improper conditions, especially 
where local authorities neglect or refuse to perform their duty. 
The Department now has very little direct power. It can investi- 
gate but it lacks authority to enforce necessary changes. Our 
efforts to secure proper legislation in the past have met with but 
little success. I desire to point out that unless we can make the 
proper changes in our statutes strengthening the authority of he 
Health Department where needed, the State of ?^ew York will 
not occupy the position in health work which it should. It should 
be clearly pointed out that rapid progress is being made in other 
States and that our situation will soon be a reproach to us unless 
we move more rapidly. T, therefore, earnestly request that the 
JvCgislature seriously consider ray previous recommendations 
covering this matter. 

A pproprtations 

For a number of years the very limited appropriations for the 
work of this Department have been pointed out. The amount 
of money expended by the State for public health work is insignifi- 
cant when compared with many other lines of activity. Those 
who are most interested in this subject cannot but feel that it has 
not received the attention that it should. 

It is realized that the demands on the State government far 
exceed the income, and for this reason the Department is asking 



4 State DhrAUTMEAX of Ukaetii 

for verj' few new iteiiib, and only t^ucli as are al>?olu(e]^' iieee^ary 
to make its work efficient. 

Our fund for the investigation and euntnd ut communicable dis- 
eases is $7,500. There should be a sufficient amount appropriated 
to enable the Department to exercise a wider control and make 
more thorough and careful investigations of epidemics. 

The demands on the Department for other investigations and 
for assistance from municipalities require an increase in our 
fund for general investigations. 

The facilities of our antitoxin laboratory are too limited, the 
buildings are overcrowded, residents of the city of Albany com- 
plain of its location, and the manufacture of antitoxin which re- 
quires the keeping of a considerable number of horses, should not 
be conducted where the laboratory is now situated but should be 
moved outside of the city. The State owns the property and it 
has increased in value. A farm should be purchased outside of 
the city, where the antitoxin work should be moved at once, and 
where eventually the State should build and equip a State Lab- 
oratory adequate for its needs. 

Tuberculous 
The success attained in our educational efforts with this dis- 
ease has been very marked. The Department's large traveling 
tuberculosis exhibition which has been shown in most of the cities 
of the State, has Ix^en continued and for the season 1010-11 its 
itinerary is as follows: 



Saratoga 


Little Falls 


Hat a via 


Platt.sbnrgh 


(ihfversville 


irornell 


Malono 


Johns (own 


Oneonta 


Ogdensburg 
Water town 


Ithaca 


IFudson 



The attendance has l>een large. The interest which has been 
aroused is very apparent and no single educational effort on the 
part of the Department has met with as much enthusiasm. In 
addition to this joint campaign and pursuing the plan of co-opera- 
tion with the State Charities Aid Association which has l>een 
conducted in the past, the Department has also sent out six smaller 



Commissionek's Kei'okt 5 



i> 



<'xlnl>iU for the conduct of county campjiignti. The increased 
ilcniaiids for hospital facilities for iLiberculosis patients is owing 
largely to the educational work which has been done and the es- 
tablishment of county hospitals, laboratories, dispensaries and 
other efforts to combat this disease are all in large part owing to 
tlio work that has l)een jnir^ued. 

Heavimjs on Tuberculosis Hospitals 

I'nder the amendment to the Public Health Law of 10O9, re- 
fjuiring tlie approval of the State Department of Health and tlio 
hx»al health officer for the establishment of a hospital for tuber- 
culosis, ten applications were filed upon which hearings were held, 
and during the past 'year nine applications were submitted. 
These were as follows : 

The Independent Order of Brith Abraham, of Liberty, filed 
an application for permission to establish a tuberculosis hospital 
in the town of Liberty, Sullivan county, and hearing was held on 
^farch 11th. The desired permission was denied April 7th, 
1010. 

The Independent Order of Foresters filed an application for 
]>ormissinn to establish a tuberculosis hospital in the town of 
I>righton, Franklin county. The hearing was held at Albany, 
May 5th, and the application granted the same day. 

Application was filed by the Utica Tuberculosis Camp Commit- 
tf^ of the State Charities Aid Association for permission to es- 
tablish a tuberculosis haspital in the town of New Hartford, 
Oneida countv, but was withdrawn. 

Application was also filed by the Metropolitan Life Insurance 
Company for permission to establish a tuberculosis hospital in the 
town of Somers, Westchester county, and hearing was held in 
White Plains May Hth and adjourned to May 20th, and the ap- 
plication was withdrawn. A new application was filed by this 
company for permission to establish a tuberculosis hospital in 
the town of Moreau, Saratoga county. The hearing was held at 
Albany, December 2nd, and application granted December 21st, 
lf>10. 

Tlie county of Schenectady filed an application for permission 
to establish a tul>erculosis hospital in the town of Olenville, Sche- 



G State i)Ei»AUTME:<T of IIeajltu 

iKH'tady county, and hearinj^' was held in Albany, August 18tli. 
The application was granted September IGth, 1010. 

Jefferson county filed an application for permission to estal>- 
lisli a tu'berculosis hospital in the town of Wilna, Jefferson county. 
Hearing was held at Watertown, September 12th, and the applica- 
tion granted September 23rd, 1910. 

The Ked Cross Committee of Newburgh filed an application for 
permission to establish a camp for the treatment of tuberculosis 
in the town of Kew Windsor, Orange county, but the application 
was withdrawn. 

The Tupper Lake Sanatorium' Company filed an application 
for permission to establish a tuberculosis hospital in the town of 
Altamont, Franklin county, and hearing was held at Tupper 
Lake, November 28th. The application was granted December 
6th, 1910. 

The application of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 
is noteworthy as showing a determination on the part of a large 
corporation to care for its employees afilicted with this disease. 

The increased hospital provision not only provides the means 
of cure, but removes the danger of infection from the home and 
workshop and is one of the first great steps in the solution of this 
problem. I wish to call attention to my recommendation of last 
year in regard to needed amendment to the statute requiring my 
approval of sites for these hospitals. 

For the Future 
Every effort cjliouM 1x3 exerted to see that our municipalities 
provide h(>sj)ital facilities and that these institutions are properly 
conducted. The law requires the State Department of Health to 
approve plans for county tuberculosis hospitals and these will be 
required to \)0 constructed on modern lines. Special attention 
should be paid to the tuberculosis law, complete registration of 
cases should be insisted upon, and localities that have not as yet 
seen fit to appropriate funds for its enforcement should be shown 
its importance. We can proceed in tins work with the absolute 
confidence that in a comparutively sliort space of time the results 
will l)e so apparent that they will fully justify our expectations. 



Commissiojnek's ItKroiiT 7 

Cancer Laboratory 

Tliu iucrea^o each year iu the deaths from cancer, despite tu'i 
fact that the death rate from many other diseases is decrea^iing, 
furnishes the saddest chapter in medicine to-day. The establish- 
ment of a cancer laboratory by the State some years ago marked a 
point in our civilization and its research work has been devoted 
to determining the causes and methods of control of this great 
afBiction. 

It is greatly to the credit of the State that this laboratory has 
been maintained, but the point has now been reached where pro- 
vision should be made for a hospital in connection with the labora- 
tory. The proposed plan for such an institution provides for con- 
veying to the State the valuable land and laboratory building at 
present used by the State, and furnished for such use through the 
generosity of Mrs. William H. Gratwick of Buffalo, N. Y., and 
constructing necessary buildings for such a hospital, which shall 
be under the control of a board of trustees. 

It is to be hoped that the State will not fail to avail itself of 
this opportunity and that this next great step may be taken with- 
out delay. 

Oral Hygiene 

Proper hygiene care of the teeth is being rapidly recognized as 
•»iie of the most important adjuncts to good health. A good dental 
equipment, which means good teeth and a clean mouth, is one of 
the best physical assets which a person can possess, and materially 
contributes to his health and happiness. 

As in most matters pertaining to the conservation of the health 
of the people, this special line of preventive medicine finds its 
greatest possibilities for effective work among the millions of 
school children of the State. It is proposed as far as time and 
funds at our disposal will permit, to conduct a campaign of educa- 
tion throughout the State, by means of illustrated lectures, largely 
among the children of our schools. These lectures will be pre- 
pared by two of the most eminent dentists in the State, who have 
recently been appointed lecturers and consultants to the State 
Department of Health. Arrangements will then be made to illus- 
trate these lectures and to utilize them for educational purposes 
throughout the State. 



8 State Depaktment of HEAi/ru 

DEPARTAIENT DIVISIONS 

Division ok Sanitary Engineeking 

The nature and scope of the duties which a ])r()perly equipped 
division of engineering should be ready to perform was briefly 
outlined in my annual report for 1905. At that time it could 
hardly have been considered as organized, although the nature of 
the work which would devolve upon it had in a measure been 
correctly foreseen. It remained, therefore, largely a matter of 
time and experience as to the rapidity with which this newly- 
created division would have to be developed in order to meet the 
demands upon it. 

The history of this division has from its beginning been one of 
rapid and progressive development. An awakening public inter- 
est in matters relating to public and personal hygiene, a realiza- 
tion of the importance and necessity for changes in the sanitary 
conditions and customs of public and private living, have resulted 
in demands for advice and assistance which have constantly taxed 
our resources to the limit 

A high standard of efficiency of an engineering organization of 
this nature in what may still be considered a comparatively new 
field of practical science, and with a public eager to take advantage 
of all of the resources which may be legitimately demanded of it, 
can only 'be accomplished by a constant adjustment of its engineer- 
ing force and facilities to these increasing demands. The work 
and duties of an engineering division cannot stop with or be re- 
stricted to merely the duties prescribed by the Public Health 
Law. If the Department stopped here the health work of the 
State would surely retrograde. There is now an aroused interest 
in health work among the citizens of this State, brought about 
largely through a stimulus resulting from an educational cam- 
paign and an accession or response to voluntary appeals for advice 
or assistance. 

If, then, the work of this important division is to be con- 
tinued efficiently, progressively and with combined facilities and 
resources to satisfy a justly aroused public sentiment toward bet- 
ter sanitary living, it must be accomplished on the one hand by a 
continued careful study and continued readjustment of the forces 
iuu] resources of the enc^ineering staff to the work to be performed. 



Coaimissionek's Kepout 

The work of the engineering division for li>10 holds the record 
for what has been accomplished by it since its organization some 
tive yeara ago. Thid will be briefly described under general head- 
ings adopted in my previous annual reports, as follows: 

Protection of PuhlU Water Supplies 

The protection of public water supplies will probably always 
bead the list of important duties devolving upon the Sanitary En- 
gineering Division since a pure supply of water has always been 
accepted among sanitarians as one of the greatest conservers of 
public health. Indeed, the record of past epidemics of disease 
traceable to infected water supplies has lost none of its force in 
the present day in causing the public to realize that whatever 
else is lacking in the way of municipal cleanliness, a clean and 
un{>olluted water supply should be procured and maintained at 
almost any cost. 

Unfortunately the lay mind does not dwell as often or as con- 
scientiously as it should upon these grave questions and for this 
reason it becomes incumbent upon the State Department of 
Health, in addition to the regular duties required of it under the 
Public Health Law, to perform also a large amount of voluntary 
work in this field. 

These activities may, in general, be classified under the head- 
ings of 

(a) Protection of public water supplies subject to rules and 
regulations enacted ^by the State Commissioner of Health. 

(b) Protection of public water supplies not subject to any such 
rules and regulations. 

The work for 1910 under these two headings will now be briefly 
<1 escribed. 

fa) Protection of water supplier protected by rules and regula- 
tions. 

Perhaps the most important provision of the Public Health Law 
relating to water supplies is the enactment by the State Commis- 
sioner of Health of rules and regulations for the protection from 
oontaraination of public water supplies when application has been 
duly made by the proper authorities having control of these sup- 
plies, and during 1910 applications wore received and rules and 



10 State Department of Health 

regulations prepared for enactment in tlie cases of the following 
municipalities: 

East Syracuse Deansboro C'ooperstown 

DvXhi Cortland West Haverstraw 

West Carthage 

These applications were received in the latter part of the year, 
and since it is necessary in each case to carefully inspect the water- 
sheds, and customary to submit drafts of these rules for considera- 
tion and comment of local authorities, these rules and regulations 
were at the close of the year enacted only in the cases oi East 
Syracuse and West Haverstraw, the remaining ones being at this 
time in the hands of the local authorities for consideration. 

Attention was called in my last report to the lack of clear under- 
standing on the part of many water boards and companies as to 
the methods of procedure to follow in removing violations under 
these rules and regulations, and to the responsibility both legally 
and financially in causing these rules to be rigidly complied with. 
It was also pointed out that, owing to these responsibilities and es- 
pecially the burden of expense entailed by the enforcement of 
rules, there appeared to be some hesitation on the part of many 
municipalities and wat-er companies in enforcing the rules and 
regulations, and, further, a reluctance on the part of many mu- 
nicipalities where their supplies were not protected by rules but 
the sanitary quality of which was unquestionably subject to sus- 
picion to apply for enactment of these rules. 

Realizing this hesitancy on the part of local authorities to meet 
their full responsibility in this matter, and with a purpose of 
counteracting to some degree at least this undesirable, and at 
times dangerous, consequence, a special investigation was made of 
the watersheds of a considerable number of public supplies which 
were protected by rules and regulations. These inspections proved 
clearly that the fears entertained regarding the enforcement of 
rules and regulations were in a measure well founded; for in a 
number of cases violations were found to exist on the watershed 
and in a few cases the conditions revealed a shocking disregard of 
the moral and legal responsibility which undoubtedly rests upon 
water boards and water companies. 



Commissioner's Report 



11 



The municipalities, the watersheds of which were inspected dur- 
ing this investigation, are as follows : 

Avon and Qeneseo Elmira 



Canastota 

Chester 

Cobleskill 

Cold Spring 

Corinih 

Cornwall-on-the- 

Iludson 
Coxsackie 
Dolgeville 



Fredonia 

lUion 

Little Falls 

Livonia 

Mechanicville 

Monticello 

Middletown 

Middleville 

Newburgh 



Elmira (State Re- Norwich 
formatory) 



Oneonta 

OssiniDg 

Penn Yan 

Pleasantville 

Port Jervis 

Rome 

Sherburne 

Tarrytown 

Troy 

West Point 

Walton 

Waverly 



Nyack 

It is not to be inferred that any considerable number of water 
boards and companies are delinquent in maintaining a proper sani- 
tary patrol over the watersheds of their supplies. On the contrary, 
the water supplies of this State which are protected by rules are 
mostly very carefully and conscientiously patrolled and the boards 
and companies are very prompt in reporting any violations of these 
roles and regulations to the State Department of Health, as re- 
quired of them by law. These cases are always promptly inspected 
for verification following which the customary notices are issued 
and action by the State or local authorities in accordance with the 
procedure required by these rules is taken. 

During the year 1910, violations of water rules were voluntarily 
reported to this Department, examined into, and necessary orders 
to local boards of health issued in connection with the water sup- 
plies of the following municipalities : 



Auburn 


New Rochelle 


Utica 


Kingston 


New York Citv 

V 


Yonkers 


Mt. Vernon 


Saugertics 


» 



(b) Protection of ^Vater Supplies not Protected hy Rules and 

Regulations 

By far the larger proportion of public water supplies in the 
State are not protected by rules and regulations enacted by the 
State Department of Health, ^fany of those are, however, verj^ 



12 State Dkpautmknt ok Hkalth 

eflSciently patrolled, but at the same time it has been found that a 
considerable number of them receive practically no regular or 
even occasional inspection for the purpose of ascertaining and 
removing sources of pollution. 

There may be a number of reasons to account for the relatively 
few public water supplies in the State that are protected by water 
rules and undoubtedly the question of expense of abatement is, 
as pointed out above, a very important, if not the principal one. 
At any rate it has been found that the number of such supplies 
improperly patrolled is a serious question, one which might well 
deserve the consideration of some change in the laws relating to 
the control of waters of the State used for water supply. In order, 
however, that the dangerous conditions which do exist in connec- 
tion with many of them may be brought more forcibly to the at- 
tention of the local authorities responsible, as well as to the peo- 
ple themselves, the special investigation of these unprotected sup- 
plies, begun in 1908 and extended during 1909, was continued 
during the present year. 

It is noteworthy to find that many more applications were made 
by municipalities in the State for these examinations and reports 
during 1910 than in either of the two preceding y^ars, which can 
only be accounted for by a more general knowledge throughout 
the State of the activities and successful results accomplished by 
the Department through these investigations in improving the 
condition of many supplies not protected by rules. A list of the 
municipalities where such investigations were made during 1910, 
and where reports setting forth the findings and recommendations 
were duly transmitted to the local authorities, is as follows : 

East Worcester North Tarrytown Houses Point 

Fonda Oxford (Woman's Seneoa Falls 
Glens Falls Eclief Corps Sonyoa 

Kingston Home) Whitehall 

Lyons IRound Lake 

In addition to the special investigations outlined above, con- 
siderable work of the Engineering Division has been devoted to 
examinations into, and reports upon, special features or prob- 
lems which have arisen in connection with water supplies not 
protected by rules and regulations. These have usually been in 



response to jjarticular requests and in these cases field examina- 
tions have usually been made and advice freely given. 

Municipalities where examinations into special problems or 
features have been asked for during 1910 and where advice has 
been furnished, are as follows: 

lU-lmont Delhi Niagara Falls 

Hlauvelt (State Rifle Dobbs Ferry Ogdensburg 

Range) Letchworth Village Skaneateles 

Cold Spring Monticello Waterloo 

Coming 

Typhoid Fever Investigations 

Although typhoid fever through the State during 1910 was on 
the average less prevalent than for the past decade or semi-decade, 
it appears that the number of outbreaks or cases of undue preva- 
lence of this disease in cities and villages were nevertheless more 
numerous. In most, but not all, of these cases the Department 
was appealed to for aid in searching out the sources of infection 
and in giving recommendations for remedial measures. 

Since the sources of infection responsible for such outbreaks 
are in general most frequently found in conditions associated 
with infected water supplies, infected foods and insanitary con- 
ditions of living or premises, and involve frequently many ques- 
tions of a strictly engineering nature associated with water sup- 
plies and sewage disposal, this epidemiological work devolved 
largely upon the Sanitary Engineering Division. In every in- 
stance a careful study was made of the infected territory and a 
searching investigation made to determine the source of infection. 
This investigation work was not always simple but was neverthe- 
less ultimately successful, for the sources of infection were dis- 
covered and measures promptly recommended to suppress them. 

The list of places where the prevalence or epidemics of typhoid 
fever were thus investigated and reported upon by the Engineei^ 
ing Division during 1910, is as follows: 

Hobart Syracuse Willard State IIos- 

Long Lake and Webb Syracuse (State In- pita! 
(towns) stitution for Yonkers 

Moravia Feeble -Minded 

Quarryville Children) 

Rouses Point 



14 State Department of Health 

Sewerage and Sewage Disposal 

If the streams of this State used as sources of water supplies 
are to be protected against the dangers of sewage contamination, 
and if the remaining ones are to be maintained in a satisfactory 
degree of cleanliness, it is essential that some adequate control 
over the discharge of sewage into these waters be vested in the 
central authority of the State, having jurisdiction broader than 
those possessed by local authorities which if left to decide these 
questions might be swayed by local interest or prejudice. Such 
control is in part granted the State Commissioner of Health under 
certain sections of the Public Health Law, which provides that 
all plans for systems of sewerage and sewage disposal of munici- 
palities must first be submitted to and approved by him, before 
they may be constructed or put in operation ; and that in all such 
cases the Commissioner shall stipulate the conditions under which 
sewage and wastes from these factories or sewer systems may be 
discharged. 

Under these sections of the Public Health Law, which have 
been in effect since 1903, the date of the passage of the act, there 
is required of the Engineering Division the larger part of its rou- 
tine work, comprising the examination of plans for original sys- 
tems of sewerage and sewage disposal and of extensions or 
modifications thereof, and the preparation of permits containing 
the conditions as to degree and extent of purification required and 
to the location and manner of discharge of the effluent from the 
sewage disposal works. 

During 1910 plans for sewerage or sewage disposal works were 
examined, reported upon and approved in the cases of the follow- 
ing municipalities: 

Auburn Bronxville and Tuck- Clarence (T.) (Buf- 

Auburn (State ahoe falo Auto Club) 

Prison) Chappaqna (Conva- Clifton Springs 

Bingham ton lescents' Home of (Clifton Springs 

Blauvelt (New York New York City Sanitarium) 

State Rifle Range) Children's Aid So- Comstock (Great 

Bronxville ciety) Meadow Prison) 



Commissioner's Report 



15 



Dahnemora (Clinton 
Prison) 

Depew 

Elka Park (T. Hun- 
ter) 

Fulton 

FultonviUe 

Hastings-on-Hudson 

Hempstead 

Dion 

Johnstown 

Lestershire 

Letchworth Village 

Long Beach - 

Medina 



Monroe County 
Tuberculosis Hos- 
pital. 

Monticello 

New Eochelle 

North Tonawanda 

Ogdensburg 

Oneonta 

Oswego 

Pelham 

Pelham (T.) 

Poughkeepsie 

Rochester 

Rockaway Beach 

Rome 



Sonyea (Craig Col- 
ony for Epilep- 
tics) 

Spring Valley (Sal- 
vation Army Or- 
phanage) 

Stamford 

Ticonderoga 

Tuckahoe 

Utica 

Watertown 

Westfield 

Yorkville 



The following is a list of places where permits were issued 
during 1910 for the discharge of wastes from factories and indi- 
vidual properties into streams of the State under suitable restric- 
tions: 



Brasher Falls Earlville 

Chautauqua Lake Gilbertsville 

(11 permits is- Harford Mills 

sued) Hermon 

Clarkstown (T.) Java (T.) 

Downsville Pittsford (T.) 



Poughkeepsie 
Rensselaer 
Scriba Center 
Shaverton 
Sherburne (T.) 
Wolcott 



In addition to the routine of examining au<l reporting upon 
plans for sewerage systems and extensions, time-consuming as this 
work must necessarily be, there is still much work of an educa- 
tional and advisory nature to be done in connection with it. This 
educational work is considerable in amount and varied in its 
nature, and includes numerous conferences with local boards or 
committees, lectures and talks in connection with sewerage sys- 
tems and sewage disposal plants, and advice and reports concern- 
ing specific local problems. The municipalities where work of 



IG 



State Depabtment of Health 



this nature has been performed by the Engineering Division dur- 
ing 1910, are as follows: 



Akron 

(Vntral Islip (State 

Hospital) 
Cheektowaga 
Cornwall-on-Huds<.»n 
East Syracuse 
Geneva 
Glen Cove 
Hamburg 
Hastings-on-Hudson 



Lancaster 

Long Beach 

Martvillo 

Morristown 

Newark 

New Paltz 

Nyack 

Phelps 

Port Jefferson 

Ravena 



Ray Brook 

Riverhead 

Rome 

Theresa 

Victor 

Warwick 

Yonkers 

Torktown Heights 



Investigations of Stream Pollution 

If there is any one subject or topic, excepting perhaps that of 
tuberculosis, over which the people of this State have become 
thoroughly aroused during the past few years, it is the pollution 
and defilement of our streams. It is a subject which cannot be 
discussed too frequently, nor can its importance be too often 
impressed. Much has been done within recent years, it is true, 
not only in curtailing but actually eliminating some of the wan- 
ton defilement which has up to this time been permitted with 
many of the streams of our State. A vast amount of work still 
remains to be done, however, before these streams have been re- 
claimed to a degree of cleanliness which public decency demands. 

It is indeed fortunate that the people of this State have through 
the educational campaign which has been waged during the past 
five years, been awakened to a sense of appreciation on the one 
hand of the healthfulness and comforts derived from preserving 
our streams in a state of natural purity, and on the other hand 
of the dangers and annoyance in allowing tHem to become defiled 
with sewage pollution. 

DiflScult as a crusade must be against these practices of sewage 
pollution, and made more difficult by the lack of adequate laws to 
enforce its removal, it must be continued energetically until these 
streams, once pure, have been reclaimed to a reasonable degree of 
purity. The work of the Department in this field devolves neces- 
garily upon this Division, which is called upon almost daily to in- 



Commissioj^ek'b Eeport 



17 



vestigate and report upon complaints of nuisances arising from 
fetream pollution in different sections of the State. 

These nuisances are usually of a public nature, frequently far- 
reaching in their effect and not infrequently require considerable 
time to thoroughly investigate and report. 

The municipalities where the more important of these nui- 
sances have arisen and received the attention of the Department 
are the following: 



Allegheny River 

Amenia 

Andes (T.) 

Andover 

Augur Lake 

Babylon 

Banksville 

Bath 

Bethel 

Big Moose 

Binghamton 

Brant Lake 

Bronx River 

Camillus 

Chateaugay 

Chautauqua Lake 

Cortland 

Esperance 

Fairport 

Findley Lake 

Fishkill-on-lIu(lMMi 

Franklin 

Gowanda 



Greenfield Center 

Greenwood Lake 

Harriman 

Hunter 

Huron 

Islip 

Jamestown 

Lake Placid 

Lakewood 

LaSalle 

Malone 

Margaretville 

Mt. Pleasant 

North Pelham 

Oneida 

Oneonta 

Oxford 

Patchogue 

Perinton 

Phelps 

Philjnont 

Phoenicia 

Piermont 



Plattekill 

Plattsburg 

Prattsville 

Plymouth 

Rensselaer 

Scarsdale 

Scriba Center 

Sharon Springs 

Skaneateles 

Smithtown 

Spring Valley 

Stony Point 

Tonawanda 

Victor 

Warren 

Warwick 

Waterloo 

Wilton 

Windham 

Wolcott 

Yonkers 



Public Nuisances Not Arising from Stream Pollution 

Although the pollution of streams is, generally speaking, re- 
sponsible for the larger number of what may be considered serious 
nuisances, there are on the other hand a great many nuisances 
arising from other sources which must be investigated. Many 
of them are of minor importance, many are of a more private 



18 



State Department of Health 



than public nature, and most of them are directly or indirectly 
cases of appeal from the action, or more often inaction, of the 
local board of health. 

Frequently these cases can be satisfactorily dealt with through 
correspondence and the assistance of the local board of health or 
its representative, the local health officer. These local boards have 
full jurisdiction to deal with nearly all nuisances in this class 
and it seems to be generally overlooked or ignored that nearly all 
of these cases should be dealt with by the local boards and not 
referred to this Department. When referred to the Department, 
however, these complaints are always investigated and if sustained 
are either referred to the local board of health for action if the 
case falls within its jurisdiction or authority, or they are taken 
up indirectly by the Department with the party complained of 
through the local board of health if the case falls partly outside 
its jurisdiction. 

The municipalities of the State where the more important of 
these nuisances have arisen and have been referred to this De- 
partment for investigation and action during 1910, are as follows: 



Akin 


Coxsackie 


Hudson Falls 


Albion 


E. Syracuse 


Huntington 


Athens 


Euclid 


Hyde Park 


Aurelius 


Fair Haven 


Islip 


Aurora 


Fa vet to 


Jordan 


Baldwinsville 


Fayetteville 


Lewiston 


Ballston 


Fishkill Landing 


Lyndonville 


Batavia 


Franklinville 


Malone 


r» roc ton 


Freeport 


Mamaroneck 


Brooklyn 


Friendship 


!Marcellu8 


Callicoon 


Fulton 


Matteawan 


Canaseraga 


Geneva 


Milford 


Cato 


Greece 


^Montour Falls 


Catskill 


Greenport 


Mt. View 


Cheektowaga 


Harrison 


Newburgh 


Clarks Mills 


Hensonville 


New City 


Clarksville 


Hermon 


Newfane 


Clifton 


Highland Falls 


New Rochelle 


Cohoes 


Homell 


Niskaynna 



Commissionek's Report 



10 



North Salem 

Oneonta 

Oriskanj 

Ossining 

Peekskill 

Penn Yan 

Port Chester 
Port Henry 
Port Jervis 
Red Hook 
Rensselaer 
Rhinebeck 
Ripley 



Rockland Lake 
Rome 
Rosendale 
Schenectady 
Schuylerville 
Seneca Falls 
Sharon Springs 
Sheridan 
Silver Springs 
South Nyack 
Somers Center 
Stillwater 
Stony Ridge 



Syracuse 

Tarrytown 

Troy 

Tuckahoe 

Tupper Lake 

Variek 

Vestal 

Walton 

Watervliet 

Wheatfield 

Whitehall 

Yonkers 



Investigations hy Order of the Governor 

Section 6 of article I of the Public Health Law provides that 

whenever required by the Governor of the State the Commissioner 

shall have the power and shall make an examination into nuisances 

or questions affecting the security of life and health in any locality 

of the State. Although, strictly, no executive orders were issued 

under this provision of the law, two investigations and reports 

were made at the request of the Chief Executive, one in relation 

to the prevalence of typhoid fever in the State and one in rofrr- 

once to the reconstruction of the Bird Island pier outfall sewor in 

citv of Buffalo. 

The first of those investigations and reports was roquesto<l by 
Cfovemor Wliite during the month of October, aufl since at this 
season of the year typhoid fever is normally most prevalent this 
investigation afforded an opportunity of emphasizing the fact well 
understood by sanitarians hut not hy the public at large, that 
there is normally a very marked seasonal variation in the preva- 
lence of typhoid fever during the year. That this fact is not 
generally understood or appreciated was evident from the ay>- 
parent feeling of anxiety entertained by the public and freely 
circulated through the press that typhoid fever was unduly preva- 
lent throughout the State, and in certain localities or munieipali- 
ties this feeling reached a state of real alarm. The results of thi« 
investigation showed very clearly, however, that through the State 



20 State Depaktmkkt of llEAi/ni 

as II whole, tjj>hoid fever during i\)Uf was .^oiue 10 per ceut. Ieii8 
pix^vali'iit than the average for the ten-year periixl imniediatelv 
preceding, notwithstanding that in some di&triets of the State its 
prevak»nee was in excess of the normal. Incidentally the results 
alx) illustrate the false anxiety or alarm frequently evidenced by 
the puhlic concerning a strictly scientific niattervvhen important 
facts and a knowledge of the subject are lacking. 

Special Investigations 

If real and continued progress is to be made in public health 
work through the officers of a State Department of Health, it is 
essential that the work be not limited to merely the requirements 
and duties imposed by the Public Health Laws. Important as 
these duties mav be under the law% and etticient as the work of 
the Department may be in carrying them out, there is a consider- 
able amount of work of an educational character that must be 
performed in order to make the public understand and appreciate 
the rationality or the necessity of the enforcement of these laws. 
Furthermore, there is a considerable amount of information con- 
cerning statistics of health and sanitary conditions in different 
localities of the State which must be considered a prerequisite to 
suitable and appropriate action by the Department in many 
matters pertaining more especially to water supply and sewage 
disposal. This information can only be secured through special 
work and investigations outside of the routine or regular duties 
imposed by the Public Health Law. 

It is hardly ])racticablo in this brief report to describe fully the 
many investigations of a special nature, or to give detailed account 
<yf the different educational activities, devolving upon the Krigi- 
neering Division nnder this heading. The inore inij)ortanl of 
these, however, may be considered the special inv(»stigations of the 
sanitary conditions of summer resr>rtv<?, sanitary conditions of cities 
and villages, sanitary conditions of State institutions reporting to 
the Fiscal Supervisor of State Charities, illegal construction of 
sewers and violations of permits issued for the discharge of sew- 
age, and the work of preparation of the engineering exhibit for 
the State fair. 

The work in all these branches is a continuation and develop- 



Commissioner's JiEroirr .'2{ 

ment of the work instituted and carried on during previous years 
and, except in the case of the State Fair Exhibit, has in a large 
measure been fully described in my previous annual reports. A 
brief outline, however, will be given of the work during 1910 
under the headings and in the order above referred to. 

(1) Sanitary Conditions of Summer Resorts 

The work of inspecting the sanitary condition of summer re- 
sorts, first commenced by this Department in 1906, has been ex- 
tended each year since that time. During the season of 1910 
three inspectors were engaged almost continuously on this work 
for a period of three months. 

The work accomplished in 1910 includes the reinspection of 
2yj reports previously inspected, to the proprietors of which re- 
sorts letters had been addressed requesting that improvements in 
sanitary arrangements at their resorts be made, together with 
original inspections of some 170 additional resorts not previously 
inspected, a total of 429 resorts, many of them accommodating 
several hundred guests, having been visited and inspected by 
representatives of the Department. 

As noted in my report of last year, the State has been divided 
into thirteen districts in order to systematize the investigation 
and to facilitate the work of inspection. These districts are as 
follows : 

1. Thousand Islands — St. Lawrence district. 

2. Fulton Chain — Big Moose district. 

3. Raquette, Tupper and Long Lake district. 

4. Saranac — St. Regis district. 

5. Lake Champlain district, 

6. Lake George district. 

7. Lake Pleasant — Saratoga Springs district. 

8. Western district. 

9. Central — Finger lakes district. 

10. Otsego Lake — Richfield Springs district. 

11. Catskill — Albany district. 

12. Southern district. 

13. Long Island district. 

The work of reinspection in 1910 of the 259 resorts referred to 



22 State Dj£pabtmekt of Health 

above was carried on in districts 2, 3, 4, 9, 11 and 12. Original 
inspections were made of resorts in districts 1, 3, 4, 5, 11 and 12. 
With the completion of these inspections the Department now has 
full information concerning the sanitary condition of practically 
all of the summer resorts in these districts having guest capacities 
of twenty-five or more persons. 

As has been my custom in the past, it is my intention to give 
publicity in the Department's Monthly Bulletin or the press to 
those resorts where the proprietors, after repeated notices from 
this Department, have failed to make the improvements recom- 
mended to safeguard the health of their guests. 

In this connection it may be stated that many requests are re- 
ceived during the summer season from prospective summer 
visitors, for information relative to the sanitary condition at 
hotels and summer resorts which they are planning to visit. From 
the records of recent inspection of summer resorts on file in the 
Department, it has been possible to answer many of these in- 
quiries and it is expected that eventually complete records will be 
available at this Department of the sanitary condition of all 
summer resorts in the State. 

(2) Investigation of Sanitary Conditions of Cities and Villages 

These investigations and studies of the sanitary conditions of 
certain cities and villages in the State were begun some three 
years ago with the object, primarily, of determining what munici- 
palities were apparently experiencing or suffering an unduly high 
rate of mortality from communicable diseases and, secondarily, of 
determining the causes and influences responsible for these high 
rates in order that they may be removed and thq mortality rates 
lowered. These investigations have covered a considerable num- 
ber of the cities and villages of the State, have proved of in- 
estimable value to the respective localities, and have in most cases 
•resulted in the undertaking of extensive improvements which will 
unquestionably lead to a lessening of death rates from infectious 
diseases in these places. 

Since these investigations have in previous years covered the 
more important places where improvement seemed potential, 
leaving thus a smaller number of places for consideration, and 



Commissioner's Report 23 

owing to the necessity for important lines of investigation in 
other directions, there were investigated during 1910 the sanitary 
conditions of only three municipalities, namely Lockport, Kings- 
ton and Oneonta. These investigations were started late in the 
year and although only the field inspections and studies have been 
made at the close of the year it is expected that the reports will 
be completed at an early date. 

(3) Illegal Sewer Construction and Violations of Sewer Permits 

The handicap placed upon an eflfective campaign against illegal 
practices in sewer construction and the discharge of sewage into 
the waters of the State resulting from a lack of adequate powers 
granted the Commissioner of Health for the enforcement of cer- 
tain sections of the Public Health Law, and of the failure of the 
passage of bills amending this law, has however not lessened the 
efforts of the Department in this direction. This campaign, if 
such it may be called, has been carried on along two general lines ; 
first a special investigation to determine as to what municipalities 
were constructing sewers without the approval of the Department 
or were violating any of the conditions of any permit issued for 
discharge of sewage into streams; and secondly, the holding of 
conferences with local authorities when violations of the law 
occurred to enlist their co-operation and compliance with the pro- 
visions of these statutes. 

Unfortunately there are many cities and villages still openly 
violating the Public Health Law in regard to both the construction 
of sewers and the discharge of sewage from them into the waters 
of the State. The large number of these cases and the serious 
conditions of pollution of some of our streams incident to them, 
makes the matter an important one, so much so that it was referred 
to the Attorney-General a year ago for his opinion as to the scope 
and powers of the Health Commissioner under Article V of the 
Public Health Law with reference to sewerage and sewage dis- 
charge, and to his authority in dealing with municipalities which 
persisted in violating the law. 

This decision had not been rendered at the time my last report 
was transmitted but was received earlv in 1910. The decision is a 
very important one and disappointing in so far as it defines clearly 



2\: State Uepaktaiknt of Health 

the narrow limitation of authority and powers of the Health 
Commissioner in enforcement of the provisions of Article V and 
the relatively greater authority and power of local boards of health 
in correcting and removing violations of these provisions. Inci- 
dentally, it emphasized the pressing need for a complete revision 
of these sections of the Public Health Law. 

As stated above, however, the eiforts of the Department havo 
not been relaxed in this direction, nor will they be, notwithstand- 
ing the present number of continued violations of the law and 
the greater difficulties resulting from the recent decision of the 
Attorney-General. It should be stated, however, and with no 
little credit to the people and local authorities in the State, that 
throughout our work in this direction there has been generally 
sho\vTi a spirit of co-operation in this movement to correct abuses 
of stream pollution and to comply with the provisions of the 
Public Health Law. 

(4) Engineering Exhibit at Slate Fair 

Perhaps nothing can better or more graphically illustrate the 
character and diversity of the work of the Engineering Division 
than the display of maps, records and models exhibited as part 
of the Department's general exhibit at the State Fair at Syra- 
cuse; and for this reason and because a considerable amount of 
work was devoted to the preparation and arrangement of these 
engineering records and models, mention should be made of it. 

This exhibit was essentially an educational one and comprised 
largely a wall display of plans, charts, profiles, photographs and 
other graphical illustrations representing the work of the division 
in connection with public water supplies, sewerage and stream 
pollution; and a series of working models, in operation, repre- 
senting various methods and types of sewage purification works. 
Interest centered largely around these working models, and in 
connection with the operation of them a member of the engineer- 
ing staif was detailed to give brief descriptive talks upon their 
constructive and operating features. 

It may be well to mention in connection with these models that 
they were made from actual detailed plans, requiring consider- 



C'ouMissrosKn'a HKi'ttitT :ij 

able time in their construction, and that so far as known thny 
represent the first working models of sewage purification works 
that have ever been e.ihibited, at least in this country. 

(5) Investigation of State hislilutions Beportlng to Fiscal Su- 
pervisor of Stale Charities 

At the last session of the Legislature, section 14 of the Public 
Health Law was amended by chapter 03 of the Laws of 1910, to 
provide for examinations and reports on the sanitary condition 
of such institutions as report to the Fiscal Supervisor of State 
Charities whenever requested by him, and for regular analyses 
of water supplies of these institutions. A request was accordingly 
received from the Fiscal Supervisor on May 18, 1910, for exami- 
nations and reports of all of these institutions, and since that date 
the work of inspection has been in progress jointly by the Divis- 
ions of Engineering and Laboratory Work. Tliere are seventeen 
of these State institutions, -is follows: 

Western House of Refuge for Women, Albion. 

Jfew York State School for the Blind, Batavia. 

Xew York State Soldiers and Sailors' Home, Bath. 

New York State Reformatory for Women, Bedford. 

New York State Reformatory, Elmira. 

Xew York State Training School for Girls, Hudson. 

Agricultural and Industrial School, Industry. 

Thomas Indian School, Iroquois. 



2(5 Statk Depaktment of Health 

Although no provisions for increased funds were made to cover 
the work thus added to the reguFar duties of these two divisions, 
this work has l)een actively prosecuted and at the close of tlie 
year the examinations and inspections of all of the institutions 
listed above have been made and the reports when completed are 
transmitted to the State Fiscal Supervisor and to the Board of 
Managers of these institutions. 

Labobatoby Division 

For reporting the work of this division last year, it was found 
advantageous to group its services under five headings : 

A. Educational. 

B. Routine investigations for purposes of sanitary control of 
potable waters and foods. 

C. Diagnostic examinations for the detection of infectious dis- 
ease and control of quarantine. 

D. Special investigations of complaints of epidemics or unsatis- 
factory sanitary matters in various communities and institutions 
of this State. 

E. Preparation and distribution of bacterial products, sera and 
therapeutic material. 

Oroup A 

A further expansion of the educational work of the Laboratory 
Division was made during the year. After the completion of 
fifteen short courses described in the preceding yearns report, it 
was found practicable to offer every week in the year a course, for 
the first four days of each week, in bacteriology ; a course for the 
last four days of each week in chemical and bacteriological exami- 
nations of water and milk, and quarterly, a course of four days' 
duration on the purification of water and sewage, with demon- 
strations made by members of the staff and of the Engineering 
Division of this Department of large plants of water filtration 
and sewage purification in the vicinity of Albany. 

The auxiliary laboratory at Ithaca for water analyses and in- 
struction of health officers and students of sanitary science in that 
vicinity, has been continued with increasing activity throughout 
the year. Members of the laborntorv staff have also ffiven in- 



CUMMISSIONKU'S llKrOKT 27 

struction in this auxiliary laboratory at Ithaca in methods of 
sanitary water analysis for ten day periods last year and will re- 
peat this course this year. 

About fifty students taking courses at Cornell Univei*sity have 
also utilized the courses of this Department in sanitary water 
analyses oflFered at its laboratory there. 

Twice during the year courses have been offered at the labora- 
tory in Albany for the medical officers of the Department during 
their meetings there and such courses have been greatly appre- 
ciated and seemed to be of great advantage in the training of 
these men for the particular activity for which they are designed. 

In addition to the educational services aforementioned, one or 
more members of the laboratory staff have lectured at Cornell 
University in the course of lectures in sanitary science maintained 
there throughout the year. One of the staff has delivered a public 
lecture on rabies at a special meeting and invitation of the County 
Medical Society at Amsterdam, and members of the staff have 
appeared in conjunction with county medical societies to aid such 
societies in a special effort to secure a county laboratory for their 
district, and the Department in assisting such effort, through a 
member of the Laboratory Division, has appeared before the 
boards of supervisors of the counties of Allegany, Warren and 
Westchester to make the public plea that such supervisors should 
provide a County Laboratory and a well equipped and organized 
service for their respective counties. 

Members of the laboratory staff have also taken active educa- 
tional part at the Annual Sanitary Conference of Health Officers 
at Buffalo last November and have contributed very largely to the 
matter of the special number of the Bulletin distributed to every 
physician in the State (August number of 1910), and a consider- 
able portion of each number of the Bulletin throughout the year. 

A special effort of the Laboratory Division to instruct the 
physicians using the State antitoxins, in the necessity of making 
prompt and complete reports, has been made this year by corre- 
spondence with those delinquent in furnishing a satisfactory re- 
port and as a result of this education of the physician to a realiza- 
tion of his duty in the matter of reporting his use of antitoxin, a 
far greater percentage of reported cases is available for the anti- 



2S State Depaktmknt of Hkaltu 

tx)xin statistical service this year. Continued and more rigorous 
efforts in this direction, however, must manifestly be made. 

Group B 

Extending and systematizing the function of the Laboratory 
Division hero chissitied, which comprises the examination of the 
potable waters of the State; the control of filtration plants and 
protection from sewage pollution: 2,6G2 sanitary water analyses 
were made during the year 1010, an increase of 32 per cent over 
the work of the preceding year. Of this total number of analy- 
ses 1,564 were bacteriological examinations (an increase of 25 
per cent, over that of the preceding year) and 1,097 were chemi- 
cal analyses (an increase of 44 per cent, over that of the preceding 
year). 

During the year 1010, 31 G public water supplies were exam- 
ined, and of these various supplies 98 were examined once; 75, 
twice; 55, three times; 28, four times; 24, five times; 19, six 
times; 10, seven times; 3, eight times; 3, nine times; and 1, ten 
times. 

The bacteriological examination of spring waters described in 
the report of the preceding year was repeated this year as a mat- 
ter of control and these results w^re supplied to the State Com- 
mission in charge of such springs. 

It will be noted that in my report of the preceding year it was 
pointed out that the capacity of the present laboratory facilities 
was already close to its maximum. It will be noted that a very 
decided increase in every line of laboratory activity has been ac- 
complished this year, but particular attention is draw^n to the 
fact that this increase has been accomplished only by the most ex- 
acting personal effort of members of the staff, working at great 
disadvantage in unsuitable surroundings and inconvenient fa- 
cilities. 

It is gratifying to find an increased and better systematic 
laboratory control of our public water supplies, but it is by no 
means to be concluded tliat the activity of this closing year real- 
izes in any proper proportion the amount of such work necessarily 
to be undertaken for any adequate control of the waters of this 
State. 



('(IMMlSSlUNKll's IiliftJliT li'.i 

Group C 

The reorganization of tLis group, undertaken at the beginning 
o£ ]aat jear, has proved most advantageous. The bringing to- 
gether of all of the laboratory services under one personal direc- 
tion has practically abolished any foundation of complaint as to 
the promptitude and exactitude of the diagnostic service under- 
taken by the Laboratory Division during the past year. Possibly 
because of this improvement and also because of the educational 
policy- of the Department in pointing out the utility of laboratory 
services to the health officers and practicing physicians of the 
State, it is found that this work is increasing very rapidly, 
whereas the total number of specimens examined in this aervice 
in 1»08 was 2,938; in 190i», 3,Gi)5; that in IfllO, 8,895 such 
specimens were examined, showing an increase over the work of 
the preceding year of 141 per cent. 

Additional duty imposed upon this Department by the legisla- 
tion of last year involves the sanitary control of all of the institu- 
tions of the State now grouped under the authority of the Fiscal 
Supervisor, seventeen in number. 

The utilization by this Department of laboratory service in 
connection with this sanitary control, involves a still greater de- 
mand upon the bacteriological diagnostic service than heretofore. 
It is anticipated that the gradual development of county labora- 
tories will relieve the State Laboratory of a portion of the diag- 



30 SxATJi: Depaktmk.nt of Health 

breadth and depth at Cape Viuceiit, Clayton and an intermediary 
point. 

Special investigations of filtration plants at Yonkers, Pocanticc 
Lake, Peekskill, Albany and Rensselaer have been made and spe- 
cial investigations of water supplies at l\ew Paltz and Watervliet 
have been made bv members of the Lalx)ratorv staff, and the 
medical inspections of the seventeen State institutions referred to 
have been made by members of this staff. 

The laboratory examinations involved in determining the 
quality of a number of waters proposed for future public supply- 
have been undertaken bv the Laboratory IMvision at the request 
of the State Water Supply Commission and the results of all such 
examinations have ])een communicated to that commission. 

The special investigation undertaken by the Division of Lab- 
oratories, at the request of the Saratoga Reservation Commission, 
has been continued, completed and reported to that commission, 
and in addition to the technical work inv^olved, the expert service 
of various members of the staff has been utilized by the latter 
commission in determining their action upon the technical prob- 
lems involved. 

Group E 

The activity of the Antitoxin Laboratory shows a most remark- 
able development. Throughout the year 1910, 36,916 packages 
of diphtheria antitoxin of 1,500 units each were prepared and dis- 
tributed, an increase of 51 per cent, over the output of the pre- 
ceding year. 

The Department has made considerable effort during the year 
to secure a better use of its antitoxins by physicians and particu- 
larly it pointed out in its annual report of the preceding year, and 
'in various issues of the Monthly Bulletin of this year that suffi- 
ciently large doses of antitoxin were not being used by attending 
physicians in the State. The very gratifying increase in the 
number of complete reports of the use of State antitoxins fur- 
nished by the physicians is supplying sufficient data tg indicate 
that the physicians of the State are utilizing antitoxin to a some- 
what better degree and the reports thus far received would indi- 
cate a very decided decrease in the mortality from diphtheria in 
all cases where State antitoxin has been used, and a complete 



CoMMlSSlO.NKu'b liEl'OlCT 31 

Study of the development and directly consequent immediate 
results in mortality statistics will be made and included in the 
body of the annual report of this year. 

The insufficient resources of the Antitoxin Laboratory have 
been repeatedly reported and the strain involved to meet the ex- 
actions of this service with those resources has become so great as 
to require a special communication on this matter, which has 
been made elsewhere. 

The educational efforts of the Department to increase the use 
of its antitoxins and to make known more widely among the 
medical professioji, not only the curative but the prophylactic 
advantage of antitoxin use, are quite manifest in the increased de- 
Hiand for tetanus antitoxin. 

In my report of the preceding year the stationary demand for 
tetanus antitoxin, which was noted as 4,313 packages of tetanus 
antitoxin of 1,500 units each, representing the total distribution of 
1909, did not differ markedly from the distribution of preceding 
years. It is gratifying, however, to find that the distribution of 
this year, 1910, shows 9,655 packages of 1,500 units each of tet- 
anus antitoxin, an increase over the distribution of the preceding 
year of 102 per cent, and it is hoped, as a result of the educational 
efforts of the Department and the increased distribution of this 
antitoxin, that the number of deaths from tetanus, which 
amounted to over 100 in 1909, may be very decidedly decreased 
in our future annual statistics. 

Throughout the year the Antitoxin Laboratory has distributed 
solely the concentrated and purified antitoxin and the reports of 
its use confirm very decidedly the advantage of antitoxin of this 
form, as well as the advantage of the syringe package, in which 
package all the diphtheria antitoxin for therapeutic use is now 
supplied. 

The year 1910 was the first full year of the distribution of tlie 
special outfits provided by the Department for the prophylactic 
treatment of ophthalmia neonatorum. A larger number was dis- 
tributed throughout the year than was made for the initial distri- 
bution reported for the year previous. 

It is manifest that extensive educational efforts must be made 
by the Department to secure the utilization of these outfits to their 
best advantage. 



o'2 Statk Dkpautmknt of JIkaltii 

The limited resources of the laboratory and the increased de- 
mand for antitoxin have made it impossible to begin the distribu- 
tion of the material for the treatment of rabies. The laboratory is 
prepared to undertake this as soon as the resources are provided, 
as pointed out last year. The expense would be comparatively 
slight and the benefit obvious. 

Division of Communicable Diseases 

During the past year an unusual amount of effective work has 
been done by this division in conducting an energetic campaign 
against the prevalence of communicable diseases and in personal 
investigation at numerous places in which such assistance has 
been needed. 

In contagious and epidemic diseases this portion of the Depart- 
ment comes into more direct contact with the people and more 
effectually meets their needs than perhaps any other part of the 
Department. 

The thousands of report cards which are received each month 
by this division are carefully analyzed and studied by the director 
of this division, and put to such practical advantage as is found 
possible. This division is now daily utilizing reports received 
from the 1,400 health ofiicers of the State, and is constantly in 
touch with such officers and rendering to them every possible 
assistance in both the prevention of communicable disease and the 
suppression of any outbreak of the same. 

Special investigations are now in progress concerning epidemic 
poliomyelitis and ophtlialmia of the new-born, while much investi- 
gative work is contemplated concerning the prevalence of other 
diseases. 

Tuberculosis 

Of the 35,000 cases reported of pulmonary tuberculosis,. 31,731 
came from New York city. As less than one-tenth were from the 
rest of the State it is clear that far from full record of the cases 
is being made. In this third year of reporting, the law requiring 
it having passed in 1908, about two thousand more cases have been 
returned than in 1909 ; compared to reported deaths there were 
2.5 casos to one death, against 2.4 as in 1909. The number of 
reported casos to deaths in 1910 in Now York oity was 3.5. At 



Commissioner's Report 33 

this rate the number of eases in the State outside the citv would 
have lx?en three times the number reported and there would have 
been about 50,000 cases in the State. Whether the average 
longevity of pulmonary tuberculosis is more than three and one- 
half years we have no means of knowing, but as not a few cases 
recover it is probably well within the bounds. It is at any rate 
quite unlikely that the duration of the disease in the country is 
less than in the city. 

As tuberculosis is a communicable disease and one in which 
death is more certain to those deprived of fresh air, it would be 
anticipated that in the crowded parts of a city it would abound 
most, and this is true. In New York city there were, in the 
twelve months, 165 deaths from tuberculosis of the lungs and air 
passages to each 100,000 population ; in the rest of the cities taken 
together the rate was just the same ; in the rural part of the State 
there were 130 deaths to 100,000 population. 

In Xew York city there were 300 more deaths than in 1909, 
«nd the consequent death rate, 165 then against 190 this year, is 
less as the increase is less than that of population. In the other 
cities there have been on the other hand 300 fewer deaths from 
tulterculosis in this year than in 1909 and in the rural part of the 
State there were a few less deaths than in 1909. There is about 
the same mortality this j^ear as in 1909 for the entire State, but 
the rate to population, which was. 160 last year, is this year 157, 
which represents a saving of about 300 lives. 

The strenuous fight against the White Plague, in which volun- 
tary, civic and national organizations are engaged along with the 
established health workers, has gone on with unabated effort 
during the year and it is quite certain is already bringing forth 
fmit. 

Smallpox 

There has been a material decrease in the number of cases 
of smallpox reported during the past year. Since 1898 it 
has been widespread throughout the country, in a mild form 
which made its control difficult. The number of cases in 
1908 was nearly 1,000; in 1909 it was reduced to 461; 
thi? year only 355 cases have been reported. This number 
of cases is, however, largely to be credited to two areas of 
2 



34 State Depabtment of Health 

prevalence; one in and about Tonawanda and adjoining towns 
in Niagara and Erie counties; the other in the northern part 
of the State, over three-fourths of the cases occurring in these 
two areas. In the fall of 1909 one sick with smallpox came to 
North Tonawanda from Canada and the end of this outbreak 
which ensued was not reached till July, sixty cases occurring 
there, and as many more in Tonawanda and Niagara Falls, with a 
few in BuflFalo. This outbreak should have been controlled ear- 
lier, but there was considerable opposition to vaccination which 
this Department and the local health officers did all that was possi* 
ble to counteract. In the northern part of Herkimer county small* 
pox started in lumber camps in January, remote from observation 
and oversight, and it was very difficult to control it, for being 
mostly mild the men ignored it and scattered it to many adjoining 
towns where it became a source of cost and trouble. It was carried 
to twenty diflFerent towns, not remote, in Jefferson, Lewis and St, 
Lawrence counties, and in some of them continued \mtil July — 
137 cases having been accounted for. In this indifferent and un- 
controlled population of sparsely settled communities the difficul- 
ties of the case are magnified. These two outbreaks illustrate the 
obstacles to the control of a disease which, of minor importance 
now, has become so only through the operation of vaccination. One 
of them was prolonged by misguided opposition to this and the 
other by ignorant indifference to it. When everyone is vaccinated 
there will be no smallpox, and vaccination is the only means by 
which an outbreak can be promptly suppressed. 

There were 355 cases of smallpox, seldom more than one case 
being reported save in the places above noted, in twenty-eight 
counties during the year, including Greater New York, where 
there were sixteen cases. There were seven deaths in the State 
from this cause, one in Buffalo, one in Walden and five in New 
York. 

Typhoid Fever 

With the exception of a few short, spontaneous outbreaks of this 
disease . throughout the State, typhoid fever has prevailed much 
the same as during the past few years. Much detailed work is 
contemplated for the coming year, with a view of more effectually 
preventing the prevalence of this communicable disease. With 






Commissioner's Report 35 

this aim in view, it is proposed to daily locate the prevalence of 
every case of typhoid fever reported to this Department, in its 
relation to the watersheds of the water supplies of the several 
municipalities of this State. Having done so, we propose to com- 
municate this information to the health authorities of such 
municipality that proper prophylactic measures may be taken to 
prevent the pollution of the water supply of such municipality. 

The typhoid bacillus is not disseminated through the air. It 
may be transmitted by contact with the sick, by attendants, 
through infected milk or other food, through the agency of the 
house fly or by carriers for an indefinite period, but drinking 
water is undoubtedly one of the chief media for its dissemination. 
The protection of the water supplies of our State is therefore one 
of the most important parts of our work in the suppression of 
typhoid fever. 

While the department has laid special emphasis on investigation 
into the sources of all cases of this preventable disease, it proposes 
to institute even a more active campaign against its suppression. 
The causes are sometimes obscure, but they should be traced and 
removed. There have been no prolonged epidemics during the 
year 1910. There have been 8,536 cases of typhoid fever reported, 
of which 3,735 were for Greater New York, while 4,801 were 
scattered throughout the State. There was an increase in both the 
number of cases reported and in the mortality during 1910, as 
compared with 1909. There were 1,374 deaths charged to this 
disease, which is a slight increase over the mortality of 1909. 
Death occurred in one of the seven reported cases. The bulk of the 
cases occurred in the months of August, September and October 
f 3,953), almost one-half of the entire number reported during the 
year. Whether the diagnosis is more frequently made in the 
cities or not, it is a noticeable fact that the disease appears to be 
more prevalent in large centers of population, and the deaths of 
the year have been more largely urban than rural. 

Scarlet Fever 

There are periods of two or three years of higher prevalence, 
succeeded bv one of lower with scarlet fever. This year is the 
third of a high period, with a mortality for this State of 1,600. 



36 State Depabtme:^t of Health 

The anticipation in the report for 1909 that it was on a decline 
has not been realized, for the deaths are more for this year. It is 
a cold weather disease; two-thirds of the deaths in 1909 occurred 
in the first six months of the vear, and this vear three-fourths, 
with 450 more deaths than of the vear before. Scarlet fever is 
much less fatal than it was two decades ago, which is true of all 
the eruptive fevers. The mortality of this year has not been ex- 
ceeded in fifteen years ; prior to^ that the deaths sometimes ex- 
ceeded 2,000 in the year. This is because of the milder type of 
later times, for many cases occur ; it is seldom that the disease oc- 
curs in the severe and fatal form once not infrequent. There have 
been reported more than 30,000 cases this year from all parts of 
the State, and without doubt not a few have failed of report. The 
mortality has been less than five per cent. 

Measles 

In 1909 there were more deaths from measles than from scarlet 
fever. This is not infrequent. The disease is regarded lightly 
by the people, but on the average it causes yearly in this State 
1,100 deaths, while the number from scarlet fever is 1,300. Both 
have series of years of greater prevalence and mortality, succeeded 
by years of less. Now for five years measles has had a mortality 
of from 1,000 to 1,300, and this year as well as last approaches 
this high range. There were some 50,000 cases reported in 1909 ; 
this year the number is near to 70,000. It is, like scarlet fever, a 
cold weather disease; 1,000 of the deaths this year come in the 
first six months, or four times as many as in the last half of the 
year. It has had a lethality of 2 per cent., half that of scarlet 
fever. More ill conditions follow in its train, however, and it is 
far from being a disease to hold in light regard. Much has been 
done this year to instruct the people as to its prevention. As 
with all the communicable diseases, leaflets of instruction to the 
I)eople are issued in large numbers in affected localities. Measles 
is especially a disease to be controlled in good degree by intelli- 
gence about it on the part of the people. 



Commissioner's Report 37 

Whooping Cough 

There were half as many deaths from this minor disease as 
from measles. But it is not to be held in light esteem, for some 
years have a mortality in excess of measles and the average 
yearly for the past twenty-five years has approached 1,000. A 
measure of control is being imposed, and a leaflet of instruction 
for this disease has been prepared this year and is placed in the 
Manual, and used for general distribution where this disease 
prevails. 

Diphtheria 

This is a disease of the cities. In 1909 of the 2,300 deaths 
nearly 2,100 were urban, of w^hich 1,700 were in Xew York city. 
This year there were 2,431 deaths, of which 2,190 were urban and 
241 rural, the rural population being about one-third the urban 
two-thirds. Xew York city reported 17,22G cases, and the rest 
of the State 5,404. In Xew York city there were 9 deaths per 
100 reported, but as the number of deaths in the rest of the State 
to reported cases was double this lethality, the inference is that 
the reports of cases are generally imperfect. Tl^e urban mortality 
is three times that of the rural part of the State, there having 
been 33 deaths per 100,000 population during the year in the 
cities, while there were 11 to the same population in the rest of 
the State. There was no notable epidemic of diphtheria preva- 
lent during the year and the mortality is not materially different 
from that of recent vears. Xow for thirteen vears, since 1897, 
the disease has been causing less than one-half the number of 
deaths that were occurring prior to that time. Indeed the num- 
l)er of actual deaths now, with a greatly increased population, is 
hardly one-third the number that were occurring twenty-five 
years ago. Xo doubt this in part is due to the lessened severity 
in all the epidemic diseases, in w^hich this disease participates, 
but since nothing like this decrease is observed in others, such as 
scarlet fever and measles, it is certainly mainly because of the 
present day use of diphtheria antitoxin, which is freely made and 
supplied by this Department. The abrupt diminution in its 
death rate since this came into use is one of the notable facts in 
medicire. There has been a decrease from nearlv 100 deaths 
per 100,000 population to one of 25, and a saving of between 



38 State Department of Health 

3,000 and 4,000 lives a year, mostly through this beneficent 
agency, certainly a notable triumph for modern sanitary medi- 
cine, and one of the assets of the work of this department is the 
contribution made in the saving of life thus effected. 

Epideynic Poliomyelitis 

This is not a new disease, but it has of late taken on qualities 
which make it in effect a new disease, to the sanitarian at least, 
for it has become, as an evidently infectious and epidemic disease, 
and almost within the current year, so extensively prevalent as to 
be pandemic. Prior to 1907 it was in this State of rare occur- 
rence and sporadic. In 1908 a considerable epidemic occurred 
in and near New York citv, while at the same time there was 
another in Boston, which appears to have been brought by immi- 
grants from Scandinavia where it had become prevalent. From 
the same source it soon after appeared in Minnesota and other 
western states. In 1909 there was a single epidemic in this State, 
in St. Lawrence county. In 1910 it became more general and 
there have been 227 cases reported from 4G counties. It is a dis- 
ease of warm weather, and these epidemics began at midsummer 
and ended at mid-autumn. It occurred in 46 counties, in all parts 
of the State. Children have been its chief subjects. The num- 
ber of deaths credited to it for the year is 52, but many, most in- 
deed, of those in whom it has not been fatal have been left with 
some degree of paralysis. The resources of investigation are be- 
ing called upon to determine its conditions and prevention. 
Epidemiological studies are being made by many State Boards of 
Health. In this State it has been placed among the communi- 
cable diseases and a report of the surroundings of each case is 
called for. Such studies thus far made are to a degree convincing 
that it is spread by direct contact with the sick and that it may 
be carried by those who have been attendant on the sick, young 
children being its chief subjects. It is required, therefore, to be 
quarantined. Laboratory investigation shows it to be a germ 
disease, an infectious fever with inflammation of the nervous 
centres. It has clinical characteristics which define it. Its mor- 
tality IS not preat, its principal effect being a permanent disa- 
bility which often results in a lifetime of dependence. There is 



Commissioneb'i^ Kepobt 39 

evidently a low degree of susceptibility to it even among the 
young who are its chief subjects. It aflFects a limited epidemic 
area and is not apparently a disease which becomes implanted in 
a locality so as to occur in succeeding seasons where it has once 
been epidemic. It is not conveyed by food or water, but directly 
by the sick, nor is it a disease of institutions or tenement house 
districts nor of unhygienic conditions. It appears likely to be- 
come a permanent feature of medical work. 

Cerebrospinal Meningitis 

This is a disease of the cities, as the mortality to population in 
the cities is double that of the country, or as 6 to 3 per 100,000 
population for this year. For recent years it has been a minor 
disease, causing less than 400 deaths in the twelve months. It 
is a disease of the colder months, whereas poliomyelitis is one of 
the warm months. 

Pellagra 

While in recent years pellagra has arrested attention from its 
prevalence in some of the southern states and in Illinois in an 
asylum for the incurably insane, it has not been known to exist 
in this State during the year save the discovery of one or two 
sporadic cases among sailors or others coming from abroad. It is 
a chronic disease marked by nervous disorders and skin lesions 
and dependent to some degree on impoverishment of surround- 
ings and food. It is most likely to find its way to the hospitals 
for the insane on account of its effect on the nervous system. The 
disease has this year been placed among those that are report- 
able, although thei:e is doubt as to the exact manner of its com- 
munication. 

Ophthalmia Neonatorum 

This disease of the eyes of the new-bom whereby they generally 
become blind, is more important than the number of reported 
cai«es indicates. Its report is required as of scarlet fever and 
other infectious diseases. The Department has joined the cur- 
rent work by voluntary organization of a crusade for its control. 
Its prevention can be assured by the use of a prophylactic fluid 
dropped into the eyes and such simple procedures as are not only 
familiar to physicians but are easily employed by midwives or a 



40 State Department of Health 

helping neighbor. Such a prophylactic fluid is sent out for free 
distribution everywhere in the State, along with instructions for 
use, and leaflets are being extensively distributed to inform all 
as to the nature, dangers and means for preventing this unhappy- 
ailment. All birth certificates contain a reminder as to the pro- 
phylactic. The work of the Department this year has the uni- 
versal commendation of the medical profession. There have been 
but 40 cases reported during 1910. 

Infant Mortality 

While the death rate under five years of age is somewhat ap- 
palling when we look at the figures, 38,278 deaths in the year 
1910, we can congratulate ourselves and the medical profession 
in general throughout the State of New York when we compare 
this mortality rate with that of the year 1900, which was 39,204, 
a saving of 1,000 this year from the deaths on every life of ten 
years ago. At the same time the mortality at all ages was in- 
creased by over 11,000 in 1910 as compared with 1900, and the 
percentage of deaths under five years to the total death rate in 
1900, was 30.50 while that of the ye«ar 1910 was 27.35, a marked 
decrease in the percentage of deaths under five years. 

The causes of infant mortality are complex and present some 
of the most important features of the conservation of the health 
of the children. Milk being the staple food of the babies, it be- 
hooves us to exercise great care wuth this product. In municipali- 
ties where the greatest care is taken in the purity of the milk sup- 
ply, we find the lowest infant mortality. There is an essential 

feature in the milk industry which properly falls within the 

* 

province of the health officers throughout the Sts^te, viz. : the pre- 
vention of the spread of contagious diseases such as typhoid fever, 
scarlet fever, diphtheria, etc., through the milk supply. 

The diarrheal mortality of midsummer and early autumn is 
largely of young children. Conditions of the weather, crowded 
habitations and sociological conditions contribute to the sickness 
and death among these susceptible subjects. While these are not 
all within the controllable authority of boards of health, there 
are many things that can be remedied by their efforts and they 
have already accomplished a decreasing mortality rate of infancy 
and early childhood. 



Commissionee's Eeport 41 

Health Officers 

The health officers of the different towns, villages and cities 
for the most part are careful and conscientious men, and are do- 
ing excellent work in the suppression of communicable diseases,, 
but they are often hampered not only by lack of funds but also 
by the fact that in many cases they antagonize their friends and 
neighbors, who resent their interference, while frequently out- 
side advice and counsel is hailed with delight and meets with 
hearty approval. The most cordial relations are enjoyed between 
the 1,400 health officers of the State and the Department of 
Health. Mutual assistance is daily extended and an increasing 
efficiency is apparent to those who watch the results being ob- 
tained. 

During September, Medical Officers of Health made an inves- 
tigation as to the prompt reporting of communicable diseases, 
also regarding quarantine and other efforts put forth by the health 
boards to prevent the needless spread of preventable diseases. In 
the majority of cases the Medical Officers met with hearty co- 
operation from the health officers and health boards throughout 
the State. 

Some of the rural districts do not observe the provisions of the 
tul»erculosis law as fully as could be desired. This will probably 
be remedied in the near future, as the tuberculosis exhibit now 
on the road is rousing not only the physicians, but the laity as 
well, to a sense of their duty to co-operate fully in the effort to 
suppress the " White Plague." 

Division of Publicity and Education 

Monthly Bulletin 

The Monthly Bulletin continues to prove a useful medium be- 
tween the Department and the health officers, and to exercise an 
educative influence upon the wide circle of general readers which 
it reaches. 

During the year we have issued two special numbers, one deal- 
ing with the " Pollution of Streams," and the other addressed 
particularly to the medical profession of the State. A copy of 
this issue was mailed to every physician outside of Greater New 



42 State Department of Health 

York. Among the special articles it contained was one outlining 
the work of the several divisions of the Department, and there 
were others pointing out various ways in which physicians can 
co-operate with the Department and the Department with phy- 
sicians, for the protection of the health of individuals and of the 
community. 

Circulars 

The demand for the various circulars on Communicable Dis- 
eases, etc., issued by this division, has been steadily maintained 
during the past year. A number of them have been recently re- 
vised preparatory to the printing of further supplies. 

Puhlic Tlealth Manual 

Considerable effort has been put into the preparation of a com- 
plete Public Health Manual which can constitute a working guide 
for our health officers. In this volume we have incorporated the 
Public Health Law, and such parts of other statutes which lay 
duties upon local boards of health or the health officers. A model 
set of sanitary regulations is given for the guidance of local boards 
of health. The procedure governing the protection of public 
water supplies and the installation or extension of sewerage sys- 
tems and sewage disposal plants is set forth. The requirements 
of the Department in the control of cases of communicable dis- 
eases are gone into at some length. The use of the State Hy- 
gienic Laboratory and of the antitoxins and sera made by the 
Department is discussed. 

A chapter is devoted to a general survey of the work devolving 
upon the health officer. A special section is devoted to vital sta- 
tistics, and other phases of work and matters of interest to the 
health officers are discussed. 

Annual Sanitary Conference 

The Tenth Annual Conference of the Sanitary Officers of the 
State of New York was held in the auditorium of the Y. M. C. A. 
in Buffalo on November 16, 17 and 18, 1910. 

The attendance was good, but the Department looks forward 
to the (lay when every health officer, instead of one out of two or 
three, shall be present at this " school of instruction." In order 



Commissioner's Eeport 43 

to bring this about it will l>e necessary for an '* enlightened '* >^elf- 
interest in each community U not onlv defray th(» expenses of the 
health officer, but to grant him a reasonable per diem allowance 
as partial compensation for the loss of income o<*ca-ioned by his 
being awav from the practice from which, as a phy-jician, he de- 
rives his means of existence. 

The program presented at the Buffalo Conference was a*^ fol- 
lows: 

First Session — Wednesday, November i6, ii:oo A. M. to i:oo P. M. 

Address of Welcome. Hon. T>oiii9 P. Fubrniann, Mayor of Buffalo; Francis 
K. Fionezrtk, M.U., Health Commissioner, Buffalo. 
T. PrBi.ir Health a:vd the School 

(a) As an Aid to Public Health Work. John S. Wilson, M.D., Med- 
ical Officer, State Department of Health. Pour'hkeeps'e. 
(6) Follow-up Work. Franklin W. Barrows, M.D.. Medical Inspertor 

of Schools, Buffalo, 
(r) School Hygiene and School Disease. Edward Clark, M.D., Medical 

Officer. State Department of Health. BuH'alo. 
id) From Standpoint of Educationalist, Tlios. E. Finegan. Assi-tunt 

Commissioner of Education. 
DiscUhsion by John L. Hazen, M.D., Brockport: .John L. }\\i}x\ oa, 
M.D., Mt. Vernon. 
II. Pi^Bi.ic Health and the Dextal Profession. 

William O. Ebersole. M.D.. D.D.S.. Cleveland. (H io. 
Discussion by W. A. White, D.D.S.. Phelps; W. W. Belcher, D.D.S., 
Rochester. 

III, PrBLir Health and the Mfdical Profkssiov. 

(a) The Difficulties of Health Officers as Seen by the Physician. A. 
I). L«ake, M.D., Medical Officer. State Depanment of Health, 
Oowan da 

(6) The Spirit of Mutual Helpfuljie^s. Wm. I). Alsever, M.D., Medi- 
cal Officer. State Department of Health. Syrin-use. 

Di&cu^8ion bv Charles S. Clowe, M.D., Schenectady: (). W. Burhyto, 
M.D..'Brookfleld. 

Second Session — Wednesday, November i6, 3:00 P. M. to 5' 00 P. M. 

IV. PrBLir Health and the Press. 

iO) From tlie Health Officer's Standpoint. Join B. Huber. M.D., 

Medical Officer. State Department of Health. New Vo'-k. 
(6) From the Newspaper Man's St.indpoint. Mr. F. P. Hall. Jjuncs- 

town. 
Dii^cussion by Hon. Charles F. Milliken. Canarduiirna : William If. 

Snyder, M.D.. Xewbur^^h. 
V. Public Health and Municipal Authorities. 

(a) What a Health Department Expects From Mnnicipal Authoriti^M. 

Eugene H. Porter. M.D.. State Commis«ii<«iier of Health. 
(6) From the Standpoint of the ^Innicipal Offircr. Mayor Charb^a 

C. Durvee, .Schenectady. 

Third Session —Wednesday, November 16, 8:00 P. M. Public Meeting. 

I. Public Health and the Conskkvation Movemknt. 

C. A. Hodgetts. M.D., Medical Adviser, Commis-ion of Conservation, 
Ottawa. 
11. Public Health and the Publk Pi rsk. 

Col. Francis G. Ward. Commissioner of Public Worki. BiifTalo. 



44 State Department of Health 

Fourth Session — Thursday, November 17, 10:00 A. M. to 12:00 noon. Sec- 
tional Meetings. 

(a) For City Health Officers, phairman Francis E. Fronczak, M.D., 
Health Commissioner, Buffalo. 

1. Garbage Disposal. P. M. Hall, M.D.. Health Officer, Minneapolis. 
Discussion by William D. Peckham, M.D., Utica; John J. Mahoney, 

M.D., Jamestown. 

2. City Sanitation. Prof. Charles Baskerville, College of the City 

of Xew York. 
Discussion bv William S. Coons, M.D., Yonkers; George E. Ellis, 
M.D., Dunkirk. 

3. Milk and Foods, F. E. Fronczak. M.D., Health Commissioner, 

liuflfalo. 

Discus.sion by D. M. Totman, ^I.D., Syracuse: F. B. Parke, M.D., 
Elmira. 

(6) For Rural Health Oflieers. Chairman Wm. A. Howe, M.D., Dep- 
uty, State Commissioner of Health. 

1. Rural Hygiene. Allen W. Freeman. M.D., Assistant State Com- 

missioner of Health. Richmond. Va. 
Discussion by Charles S. Butler, M.D., Harpursville ; B. F. Chase. 
M.D.. East Syracuse; G. Scott Towne, M.D., Saratoga Springs, 

2. Brief Talks l)y Heads of Divisions. 
(c) For Medical Officers of Health. 

Afternoon 

Xo formal J-et-^ion held this afternoon. Health Officers had the choice of 
attending a Demonstration at the Cancer Laboratory; a Tuberculosis Clinic: 
of making a Trip through the Buffalo Stockyards, through the courtesy of 
Dr. Wm. H. Heath. C'hief Inspector of Foods and Drugs, Buffalo Department 
of Health; or a Trip to Niagara Falls. 

Social Evening 
Smoker at Hotel Iroquois, 9 P. M. 

Fifth Session — Friday, November 18, 10:00 A. M. to 12:00 noon. 

I. TiiK Laboratory as an Aid xo Diagnosis. 

Dr. John A. Amyot, Director Laboratories. Provincial Board of 

Health, Toronto. 
Discussion by 0. J. Hallenbeck. ^[.D.. Canandaigua : W. W. Waite, 
M.D., Syracuse. 
11. Rfportino CoMMUNicAm.E Diseases. 

Dr. E. C. I^vy. Health Officer. Richmond, Va. 

Discui-sion by John Diigan, M.D., Albion; E. S. Willard, M.D., Water- 
town. 
III. Quarantine, Isolation and Disinfection. 

William A. Howe, M.D., Deputy State Commissioner of Health. . 
Discussion by Harry S. Tuthill, iM.D., Penn Yan; Frank S. Overton, 
M.D., Patchouue. 
IV. The Control of Typhoid Fever. 

H. W. Hill. IM.D., Director Epidemiological Division, Minnesota State 

Board of Health, ^linneapolis. Minn. 
Discussion bv Joseph Roby, M.D.. Rochester; F. X. C. Jerauld, M.D., 
Niagara Falls. 

Sixth Session — Friday, November 18, 2:00 P. M. to 4:00 P. M. 

I. rXATTACKEI) COMMX' NIC ABLE DISEASES. 

Gardner T. ^warts, M.D., Secretary State Board of Health, Provi- 
dence. R. T. 
Discission bv J. W. Le Seur, M.D.. Batavia: 0. W, Goler, M.D., 

IvOchoster. 



Commissionek's Report 45 

II. Epidemic Antebior Poliomyelitis. 

Surgeon W. H. Frost, U. S. Public Health and Marine Hospital Serv- 
ice, Washington, D. C. 

IMscussion by Irving M. Snow, M.D., Buffalo. 
HI. The Tuberculosis Campaign as Conducted by the State Department. 

Mr. Charles W. Fetlierolf, Director Tuberculosis. Exhibits. 

School of Sanitary Science at Cornell University 

The Department has again cooperated with the authorities of 
Cornell University by providing for one-half of the lectures given 
in that university in Sanitary Science and Public Health. This 
course continues to be popular with the students and there can be 
no question of the value of the interest it is arousing among our 
educated citizens in public health work and the prevention of 
disease. A work so meritorious desei-ves to be put upon a perma- 
nent basis ; at present it is largely a voluntary effort, no remuner- 
ation being available for the lecturers who give of their valuable 
time and to whom the cause of sanitation is greatly indebted. 

The success of this course has amply justified my assertion last 
year that our colleges should have instruction in sanitary science, 
and that this work at Cornell should be on a firm basis. It is mv 
earnest desire that the Legislature will recognize the value of this 
school, and place it on a stable foundation. 

The list of lecturers and lectures for 1910-1911 is as follows: 

First Term 

October 4. Introductory lecture, outlining field and subject-matter of the 
coarse. President J. G. Schurman, Cornell University. 

October 6. Tlje History of Therapeutics, Dr. G. W. Goler, Health Officer, 
Rochester, N. Y. 

October 11. Public Health Administration, E. H. Porter, M. D., State Com- 
missioner of Health, Albany, N. Y. 

October 13. State Control of Certain Insanitary Conditions, E. H. Porter, 
H.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N. Y. 

October 18. The Application of the Laws of Heredity to Public Health, S. 
H. Gage, B.H., Professor Emeritus of Hi&tology and Embryology, Cornell Uni- 
▼errity. 

October 20. Infant Mortality, Albert Sudekum, M.D., Member of Reichstag, 
Xoremberg, Germany. 

October 25. Prolongation of Human Life, W. F. Willcox, LL. D., Professor 
of Political Economy and Statistics, Cornell University. 

October 27. Marriage and Divorce, W. F. Willcox, LL. D., Professor of Po- 
litical Economy and Statistics, Cornell University. 

November 1. The Birth Rate, \V. F. Willcox, LL. D., Professor of Political 
Economy and Statistics, Cornell University. 

November 3. The Conservation of Hiunan Life, L. L. Seaman, M.D., Sur- 
geon, Xew York city. 

November 8. European Problems of Public Health, F. A. Fetter, Ph. D., 
ProfeMor of Political Economy and Finance, Cornell University. 



46 State Department of Health- 

November 10. American Philanthropy and the Public Health, F. A. Fetter, 
Ph. D., Professor of Political Economy and Finance, Cornell University. 

November 15. Ibe Nature of Disease, \'. A. Moore, M.D., Director* of the 
New Vork State Veterinary CcJl)ej*o, Cornell I nivcrt^ity. 

November 17. Micro-Organisms and Iheir Kelation to Disease, V. A. Moore, 
M.D.. Director of the New Vork State Veti*rinary t'ollege, Cornell University. 

November 22. Di»'ea>es of Animals Transmissible to Man, V. A. Moore, M.JJ., 
Director of the New ^ ork State Veterinary Colle;je, Cornell I'niversity. 

November 21). 1 he Development of Public Health l^w. A. H. Seymour, E»q., 
Secretary' State Department of Health, Albany, N. V. 

December 1. A])plieation8 of Public Health I>aw to Specific Rejjulations. A. 
11. Seymour, Kscj.. Secietary State Department of Health. Albany, N. V. 

December ti. Inlir.ence of A^Lrrifulturul Pr< <lncts on Public Health, Hon. R. 
A. Pearson, State Coniniihsioiur of Ajiriculture. Albany, N. V. 

December 8. Sc''ool Hygiene, (i. M. Whipple. Ph. D., Assistant Professor of 
the Science and Art of Education. C orr.ell U^iver^itv. 

December 13. Probh-nis of Life and Health in 'Industry. Frederick L. IIolT' 
man, Statistician, Prudential Life Insurance Co., Newark, N. .1. 

December 15. insanity and Public Health, \V. L. Hussell, M.D., formerly 
Inspector New York State Commission in Ltmacy, Albany, N. V. 

December 20. Health in Agricultural Communities, L. H. Bailey, LL.D., 
Director of New York State College of Agriculture, C'ornell University. 

January 6. Voluntary Organizations in Public Health Work. Hon. Homer 
Folks, Secretary State Charities Aid Association, New York citv. 

January 10. Transmi^sion and Prevention of Some Infectious Diseases, Dr. 
V. E. Sorapure, Professor of Pathology. Fordham College, New York city. 

January- 12. Immunity. Dr. V. E. Sorapure, Professor of Pathohjgy, Ford- 
liam College, New ^ork city. 

January 17. Preparr.tion of Antitoxins, W. S. Magill, M.D., Director of 
State Hygienic LaljMoratory, Albany, N. Y. 

January 19. The Value of Antitoxins in Certain Infectious Diseases, W. S. 
Magill, M.D., Director of State Hygienic Laboratory, Albany. N. Y. 

January 24. The Campaign Against the Hookworm, \V. H. Glasson, Acting 
Professor of Economics and Politics. Cornell University. 

Januar}^ 26. Health Ciinditions Among the American Negroes, W. H. Glasson, 
Acting Professor of Economics and Politics, Cornell University. 

t^ccond Term 

February 14. Cancer and Its Relation to Public Health, James Ewing, M.D., 
Professor of Pathology-, Cornell University Medical College, New York city. 

February 16. The Occupatidiial Diseases of Modern Life, W. G. Thompson, 
M.D., Professor of Medicine, Cornell University Medical College. New York 
city. 

February 21. Insects and the Transmission of Disease, A. D. MacGillivray, 
Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Entomology' and Invertebrate Zoology, Cornell 
University. 

February 23. Inj^ects and the Transmission of Disease, A. D. MacGillivray, 
Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Entomology and Invertebrate Zoology, Cornell 
University. 

February 28. The Correspondence of Mental and Physical Conditions, W. A. 
White, M.D., Superintendent of the Hospital for the Insane, Washington, D. C. 

March 2. Health Conditirms in the Philippines, E. W. Kemmerer, Ph. D., 
Assistant Professor of Political Economy, Cornell University. 

March 7, Tuberculosis. Its Nature and Causes, John B. Huber. M.D., Lec- 
turer, Fordham College. New York city. 

March 9. Tuberculosi.s, Its Prevention and Cure, John B. Huber, M.D.. Lec- 
turer, Fordham College. New York city. 

March 14. Some Facts and Fallacies Concerning Tuberculosis. J. H. Pryor, 
M.D., Member of Tuberculosis Advisorj' Board, New York Sta^te Department 
of Health, Buffalo. N. Y. 

March 16. Early Diagnosis of Tuberculosis, Lawrason Brown, M.D., Trudeau 
Sanitarium, Saranac Lake. N. Y. 



im I 



Commissioner's Report 47 

March 21. Local Quarantine Measures, L. E. Cofer, M.D., U. S. Public 
Health Service, Washington, D. C. 

March 23. Ihe Supervision of Infectious Diseases, H. H. Crum, M.D., Health 
Officer, Ithaca, N. Y. 

March 28. Food Adulteration and Its Effects, H. W. Wiley, Department ot 
Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

March 30. The Detection of Food Adulteration, E. M. Chamot, Ph. D., Pro- 
fessor of Sanitary Chemistry and Toxicology, Cornell University. 

April 4. Ihe Detection of Food Adulteration, E. M. Chamot, Ph. D., Profes- 
ror of Sanitary Chemistry and Toxicologj% Cornell University. 

April 11. The Dangers of Impure Milk, W. A. Stocking, M. S., Assistant 
I^ofesaor Dairy Bacteriology, Cornell University. 

April 13. Dairy Hygiene, W. A. Stocking, M. S., Assistant Professor of 
Dairy Bacteriology, Cornell University. 

April 18. Animal Wastes and ITieir Dis{K>8aI, G. W. Cavanaugli, B. S., As- 
sistant Professor of Chemistry, Cornell University. 

April 20. The Law of Nuisances, Alfred Hayes, Jr., LL. B., Professor of 
Law, Cornell University. 

April 25. The Purification of Drinking Water, J. L. Leal, M.D., Sanitary 
Adviser of the -East Jersey Water Co., Paterson, N. J. 

April 27. Principles of Water Purification, G. C. Whipple, Consulting 
Enjfineer. New York city. 

May 2. Water Purification Plants, Theodore Horton, Chief Engineer, State 
Department of Health, Albany, K. Y. 

May 4. The Problem of Sewerage, H. X. Ogden, C. E., Professor of Sanitary 
Engineering, Cornell University. 

May 9. Sewage Disposal Plants, H. B. Cleveland, Principal Assistant Engi- 
neer, State Department of Health, Albany, N. Y. 

May 11. Ihe Sewage Disposal of a Large City, E. B. Whitman, C. E., 
Engineer in charge of Sewage Disposal, Baltimore, Md. 

May 16. Street Cleaning, William H. Edwards, Esq., Commissioner of Street 
Cleaning, Xew York city. 

May 18. House Planning with Reference to Public Health, Professor C. A. 
Martin, Director of the College of Architecture, Cornell University. 

Maj' 23. The Healthful House, Professor C. A. Martin, Director of the 
College of Architecture, Cornell University. 

May 26. The Principles of Ventilation, R. C. Carpenter, M. S., C. E., Pro- 
fessor of Experimental Engineering, Cornell University. 

May 30. The Applications and Results of Ventilation, R. C. Carpenter, 
M. S., C. E., Professor of Experimental Engineering, Cornell University. 

June 1. Health in Rural Communities, G. N. Lauman, B. S. A., Assistant 
Professor of Rural Economy, Cornell University. 

The Service of the Press 

The press of the State has shown an increasing interest in 
health matters and has been of immense assistance in the publica- 
tion of material pertaining to the subject. 

The educational effect has been marked and the assistance thus 
rendered is appreciated. 

Instruction for Health Officers 

In addition to the laboratory courses open to health officers and 
other meetings designed for their benefit, the Department has been 
jrt)le, through the courtesy of Dr. Alvah H. Doty, health officer 



48 State Depabtment of Health 

of the Port of New York, to offer an opportunity for study there, 
of the methods of inspection, diagnosis, disinfection smi quaran- 
tine used in guarding our great seaport 

Many of the health oflScers in the State availed themselves of 
this, and all have been enthusiastic over the instruction gained. 

The health service of the State owes Dr. Doty much for his in- 
terest and willingness to co-operate in this way and the knowl- 
edge gained cannot fail to be of value to the people. 

Publicity at the State Fair 

For the second time the Department was represented at the 
State Fair at Syracuse. In the space allotted to the Department 
were shown maps denoting the prevalence of various communicable 
diseases ; diagrams and tables to demonstrate in a popular way the 
value of vital statistics ; plans and pictures of filtration and sew- 
age disposal plants, etc. One feature that proved very attractive 
was a working model of a sewage disposal plant. Another model 
graphically called attention to the small sum appropriated by the 
State to its Public Health Department, as compared with the 
money devoted to the protection of the health of plants and ani- 
mals. A large amount of literature was distributed during the 
week the fair was open, one piece being a special four-page cir- 
cular giving a brief but comprehensive account of the work done 
by the Department for the citizens of the State. 

Public Leclures 

For some time past there has been in course of preparation a ' 
series of illustrated public lectures on various phrases of public 
health work. The lectures above mentioned have been prepared 
with a view to their being put in such form that they can be sent 
with a set of slides to a health officer in any part of the State 
who may be called upon or have the opportunity to use the lecture 
platform to reach the people of his community and interest them 
in hygienic living and the preservation of health, which can easily 
be demonstrated to be the most valuable phase of the increasingly 
popular conservation movement. 



Commission£b's Bepobt 49 

Division of Vital Statistics 

It is gratifying to note that the earnest effort of the Depart- 
ment to bring about a more complete and satisfactory registration 
of births and deaths occurring in the State* during the past year 
has resulted in obtaining the active co-operation of the local boards 
of health in enforcing compliance with the provisions of section 
22 of the Public Health Law. 

With but few exceptions the local board3 are awake to the im- 
portance of all births and deaths being promptly reported, and 
the returns now being received at the Department are more com- 
plete and satisfactory than at any time since the enactment of the 
State registration laws in 1880. 

The living births reported .to the Department for the past year 
numbered 213,235, which is 10,579 ijiore than were reported in 
1909, and showing a birth rate of 23.3. The number of still- 
births reported in 1910 was 9,952. 

Of the living births 210,315 were white and 2,920 colored. 
The latter were classified as follows: Xegro, 2,874; Indian, 28; 
Mongolian, 18. Of these 213,235 living births, 109,214 were 
male, 103,992 female, and sex of 29 not reported. 

The average city birth rate was 25.3, and the rural 16.1. The 
cities having the highest birth rate were : Dunkirk, 32,7 ; Rome 
27.7 ; Xorth Tonawanda, 27.6 ; Little Falls, 27.2 ; Greater New 
York, 26.9; Lackawanna, 26.7; Niagara Falls, 26.5, and New 
Kochelle, 25.8. 

The lowest birth rate is shown in the following cities, due to 
incomplete registration: Troy, 12.4; Albany, 13.6; Watervliet, 
13.9 ; and Eensselaer, 15.6. Troy reports 641 more deaths than 
births; Albany, 576; Watervliet, 51, and Rensselaer, 9. Other 
cities reporting less births than deaths were Cohoes, Cortland, 
Ithaca, Kingston, Lackawanna, Middletown and Port Jervis. 

The total number of deaths reported for 1910 was 147,629, 
and the death rate for the year was 16.1. The urban death rate 
was 16.1 ; the rural 16.3. The relative mortality in early child- 
hood is low. For fifteen years prior to 1900 there were 32.2 per 
cent, occurring under five years of age; for the next ten years, 
27,5, and last year 27.0 per cent. ; 18.5 per cent, of the deaths 
were under oAe year and 31.0 per cent, at sixty years and over. 



50 State Department op Health 

The deaths past sixty years of age were more than for any prior 
year, increasing somewhat in proportion to increase in deaths from 
acute respiratory diseases. 

The cities having the highest death rates were: Lackawanna, 
27.3; Troy, 20.8; Hudson, 20.6; Cohoes, 20.6, and Rome, 19.9, 

Xew Rochelle has the lowest death rate, 11.7; and the follow- 
ing cities show a reported death rate of 14.0 and under: 
liochester and Geneva, 14.0; Mt. Vernon, 13.9; Johnstown, 13.7; 
North Tonawanda, 13.3; Olean, 12.7; Jamestown, Hornell and 
Tonawanda, 12.8; Xew Rochelle, 11.7. 

Of the largest cities in the State, Rochester shows the lowest 
death rate, 14.0. Of the smaller cities Genevia has a like rate. 

The total reported mortality from pulmonary tuberculosis was 
14,059, or 9.5 per cent, of all deaths. There were 153 deaths per 
100,000 population. Ten years ago, with a census population less 
by 2,000,000, there were 13,600 deaths, or but 275 less than now, 
and 187 deaths per 100,000 population. In 1890, with a popula- 
tion of 6,000,000, there were 12,400 deaths, a rate of 205 deaths 
per 100,000 population. The urban rate is 165 deaths per 100,- 
000 population; the rural, 135. There were lOO more deaths than 
in 1909, but it is less than in the five years preceding. For the 
entire period of twenty-five years 11.0 per cent, of the deaths have 
been from consumption; last year 10.0 per cent., this year 9.5 per 
cent. From tuberculosis other than pulmonary there were 2,278 
deaths, the lai'gest number, one-half being from tubercular menin- 
gitis, and the next numerically abdominal tuberculosis, 385. 

Pneumonia caused 9,867 deaths, 444 more than in 1909, 1,200 
more than in 1908, but fewer than in the years preceding; 109 
deaths per 100,000 population in the cities, and 10^ in the rural 
population alike. From broneho-pneumonia there were 7,248 
• deaths, and from acute bronchitis 1,598. These were chiefly fatal 
in March, and during the annually recurring epidemic of in- 
fluenza, which is given as the direct cause of 1,452 deaths. 

Cancer, showing in each succeeding year an increase, has this 
year caused 7,522 deaths; in 1900 there were 4,871; in 1890, 
2,868. In the cities there were 80 deaths per 100,000 popula- 
tion; the rural rate was 99. Compared with tuberculosis, its 



• • • • • 

• • • < • • » » 



Commissionee's Eepobt 51 

urban mortality was less than half, its niraj considerably more 
than half- the number from that cau^e. 

Typhoid fever has caused during the year 1,374 deaths. This 
is about the mortality for the last two years, while the average 
yearly for twenty years prior was 1,600 deaths, and most of the 
years were close to the average. The rate of mortality, 15 per 
100,000 population, is the same as that of 1909, and the lowest 
ever recorded for the State. The urban mortality from typhoid 
fever was 14.9 per 100,000 population; the rural was 15.2; in the 
cities .93 per cent, of the deaths were from typhoid fever, in the 
country .94 per cent. 

Diphtheria caused 2,433 deaths, 120 more than in 1909, 40 
less than in 1908, 350 less than the yearly average of the past 
twelve years of low mortality, and 3,000 less than the average of 
the twelve years prior to that. In the urban population there 
were 32 deaths per 100,000 during the year; in the rural 10 from 
diphtheria. Sixty-four per cent, of the deaths occurred in the 
winter and spring months. 

Scarlet fever was more prevalent than last year, and the deaths 
were 1,617 to 1,205 in 1909. There were 21 deaths per 100,000 
population in the cities, and 8 in the rural population. New 
York city shared in the increase of mortality over last year to a 
less extent than the rest of the State. 

Measles which last year had a mortality in excess of that from 
scarlet fever, has now 1,285 deaths, or 332 less. In eleven years 
of the last twenty-five, the deaths from measles have exceeded 
those from scarlet fever and their average mortality has been an- 
nually 1,100 to 1,350. Taking account of its remote effects, 
measles is probably fully as large a contributor to mortality as 
scarlet fever. The urban mortality has decreased but the rural 
is nearly double that of 1909. Six-sevenths of the cases and four- 
fifths of the deaths occurred during the first six months of the 
year. 

Whooping cough, which has had an average yearly mortality 
for twenty-five years of 900, has now 727 deaths. In August the 
largest number, as heretofore noted, occurred, with July nearly 
as many, the smallest mortality having been in the winter months. 
The relative urban and rural mortality was the same. 



62 State Department of Health 

Cerebrospinal meningitis caused 452 deaths, an increase over 
the two years preceding, but one-half that of the three prior years. 
Cases were reported from thirty-five counties, two-thirds of the 
deaths occurring in New York city. 

There were fifty-eight deaths from epidemic poliomyelitis. 

Smallpox caused 7 deaths ; — 1 at Buffalo, 1 at Walden, and 5 
in New York city. 

Violence was the cause of 9,846 deaths — 614 more than in 
1909. There were 1,479 by suicide, 420 homicides and 7,695 
accidental. 

Complete returns of marriages occurring in the State during 
1910 are still lacking at the Department, but reports received 
from the county clerks indicate that there were about 85,500. The 
total number reported in 1909 was 80,090. 

• _ 

Respectfully submitted, 

EUGENE H. PORTER, M.D., 

State Commissioner of Health 
February 6, 1911 



APPENDIX 



THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 



[53] 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Disbursements for the Fiscal Year Endrag September 30, 1910 

Salaries 

Division of Administration 

Eugene II. Porter, M.D., Commissioner $5,000 00 

Alec H. Seymour, secretarj- 3,125 00 

Feninioro D. Beagle, chief clerk and registrar. . . . 2,475 00 

Edward C. Kenny, stenographer 1,800 00 

Marion L. Peters, stenographer 1,080 00 

Harry Crotty, page 480 00 

Total $13,900 00 

Temporary Services 

Helen L. MacQuide, telephone operator $440 00 

Eleanor M. Roosa, stenographer 300 00 

Grace McCollom, stenographer 18 26 

Minnie S. Warner, clerk 05 60 

Katherine C. Judd, laborer 347 0^ 

Total $1,200 95 

Division of Engineering 

The^ dore Horton, chief engineer $4,500 00 

H. B. Cleveland, principal assistant engineer 2,400 00 

Henry X. Ogden, special assistant engineer 860 00 

C. A. Holraquist assistant engineer 1,500 00 

Charles F. Breitzke, assistant engineer 125 00 

O. A. True, assistant engineer 592 66 

Homer L. Higley, stenographer 558 00 

A. Dudley Mills, stenographer 286 00 



Total $10,821 66 

[55] 



56 



State Department of Health 



Division of Vital Statistics 

Charles E. Thompson, clerk $375 00 

A. K. Cole, clerk 1,575 00 

William A. Wallace, clerk 1,500 00 

Jeremiah Grogan, Jr., clerk 1,500 00 

Ella H. Porter, clerk '. 1,125 00 

Kae Samuels, clerk 720 00 

Meta E. Mills, clerk 855 OO 

Anna B. Byrne, clerk 900 00 

Eleanore C. Gibb, junior clerk 690 00 

*Estelle Jarvis, junior clerk 50 00 

Emma H. Kelly, junior clerk 3C8 38 

Euth Van Noy, stenographer 288 00 

Total $9,946 38 

Division of Communicable Diseases 

Wm. A. Howe, director $1,187 50 

Cora Partridge, clerk 600 00 

Alice M. Fuller, stenographer 90O' 00 

Eleanor M. Roosa, stenographer 250 00 

Total ; $2,937 50 

Antitoxin Laboratory 

William S. Magill, M.D., director $2,833 32 

I. H. Lindsay, clerk 1,500 00 

Mary C. Cuthbert, stenographer 455 00 

"^Grace McCollum, stenographer 50 00 

Mrs. J. Cruickshank, cleaner 630 00 

Mrs. Fannie Mainster, cleaner 480 00 

Mrs. Charles Schadler, cleaner 82 50 

Margaret Hill, cleaner 480 00 

Elizabeth R. Lampman, cleaner 212 00 

Margaret Bott, cleaner 80 00 

•Transferred to Labor Department, 

^ Granted leave of absence November 1, 1909. 



FixANciAL Stateme^^t 57 

Bessie ^cComb, cleaner $60 00 

Charles Schadler, stableman 720 00 

Walter Reynolds, assistant stableman 525 00 

Total ' $8,107 84 

Hygienic Laboratory 

Lef^nard M. Wachter, chemist $2,100 00 

W. G. Fellows, assistant bacteriologist 630 00 

Herbert Ant, water analyst 465 16 

W. S. Davis, water analyst 143 22 

Leslie R. Milford, water analyst 150 00 

Wm. A. Bing, M.D., assistant bacteriologist 009 07 

Blanche C. Vose, cleaner 600 00 

T. G. Conklin, laborer 600 00 

Jno. C. Reynolds, laborer 100 00 

F. B. Pedrick, laborer '. . . 150 00 



$5,638 35 



Cancer Laboratory 

H. R. Gaylord, M.D., director $3,583 26 

G. H. A. Clowes, chemist 1,749 99 

Burton G. Simpson, M.D., clinical pathologist... 624 99 

F. W. Baeslack, assistant biologist 800 00 

C. A. Maclay, secretary 975 00 

D. Averill, assistant in photo-chemistry 975 00 

F. A. Payne, janitor 360 00 

Jesse McCarney, laborer 435 00 

Guv Owen, laborer 675 00 

Fred West, laborer 246 00 

Ed. Sears, laborer 46 00 

John Coburg, laborer GOO 00 

Chas. Stephan, laborer 32 00 

Chas. Gerlach, laborer 40 00 

* Arthur Johnson, laborer 5 40 

• Temporary. 



68 State Department of Health 

Anna Grerlach, laborer $35 00 

* Thomas Woodcock, laborer 12 00 



$11,194 64 



Tvherculosis Exhibition 

Chas. W. Fetherolf, director $1,875 00 

Paul Bernhardt, laborer 540 00 

* Dr. George W. Beach, lecturer 60 00 

* Dr. John H. Prjor, lecturer 20 00 

* Dr. H. B. Doust, lecturer 20 OO 

^ Dr. M. E. Leary, lecturer • 20 00 



$2,535 00 



* Temporary Employees 

Services investigating outbreaks of communicable diseases, 
registration of vital statistics, sewage disposal, stream pollution, 
public nuisances and general local sanitary conditions. 

Dr. F. C. Curtis, medical expert $1,485 00 

Dr. Wm. A. Howe, medical expert 310 00 

Dr. Hills Cole, medical expert 930 00 

Dr. Edward Clark, medical expert 215 00 

Dr. John B. Huber, medical expert 940 00 

Dr. D. C. Moriarta, medical expert. • 90 00 

Dr. E. E. Larkin, medical expert 30 00 

Dr. Geo. E. Swift, medical expert 60 00 

Dr. W. S. Gamsey, medical expert 70 00 

Dr. G. W. Miles, medical expert 70 00 

Dr. S. A. Russell, medical expert . 20 OO 

Dr. E. S. Willard, medical expert 225 00 

Dr. F. J. Mann, medical expert 30 00 

Dr. D. M. Hibbard, medical expert 60 00 

Dr. O. W. Peck, medical expert 120 00 

Dr. O. J. Hallenbeck, medical expert 80 00 



* Paid out of appropriation for suppression of communicable diseases, and 
investigations. 



Financial Statement 



59 



Dr. C. H. Gildden, medical expert 

Dr. Jos. Roby, medical expert 

Dr. F. W. Adriance, medical expert 

Dr. B. J. Maycock, medical expert 

Dr. C. E. Birch, medical expert 

Dr. G. M. Fisher, medical expert 

Dr. n. H. Crimi, medical expert 

Dr. F. D. Andrew, medical expert 

Dr. D. M. Totman, medical expert 

Dr. E. H. Wolcott, medical expert 

Dr. R. A. DeKay, medical expert 

Dr. A. D. Lake, medical expert 

Dr. J. W. LeSeur, medical expert 

Dr. W. H. Connelly, medical expert 

Dr. W. O. Alsever, medical expert 

Dr. E. H. Hutton, medical expert 

Dr. F. D. Earl, medical expert 

Dr John S. Wilson, medical expert 

Dr. John B. Garrison medical expert 

Dr. W. B. Gibson, medical expert 

Dr. H. S. Shenvood, medical expert 

Dr. A. G. Wilding, medical expert 

Dr. (\ F. OrmeSy medical expert 

Dr. W. W. Thompson, medical expert 

Dr. Z. F. Dunning, medical expert 

Dr. Wm. T. Sedgwick, lecturer 

E. Hoffman, lecturer 

Jas. C. Marriott, stenographic services, tuberculosis 
hospital hearings 

X. H. Goodnough, civil engineer, examination of 
sewage disposal plans and reported same 

T. Herbert Snow, civil engineer, examination of 

eewage disposal plans and report on same 

Hazel & Whipple, civil engineers, examination of 

sewage disposal plans, and report on same 

Dr. Thos. S. Carrington, examination of and report 

on plans for county tuberculosis hospitals 

Albert F. Forthmiller, stenographic services in in- 
vestigation of mineral springs at Saratoga 



$20 00 
80 00 
20 00 
10 00 
60 00 
80 00 
80 €0 
80 00 
50 00 
20 00 
40' 00 
90 00 

130 00 
60 00 
20 00 
80 00 

180 00 
90 00 
70 00 
70 00 
20 00 
30 00 
20 00 
80 00 
30 00 
75 00 

330 00 

910 40 
20O 00 
20O 00 
200 00 
loO 00 
62 00 



60 



State Department op Health 



Prof. W. F. WiUcox, consulting statistician 

Charles F. Breitzke, inspecting engineer 

Prof. H. N. Ogden, special sanitary engineer. . . 

Hiram G. Conger, sanitary inspector 

Carl Crandall, sanitary inspector 

E. M. Chamot, sanitary inspector 

Fritz M. Arnolt, sanitary inspector 

M. W. Brower, sanitary inspector 

Geo. T. Palmer, sanitary inspector 

T. G. George, sanitary inspector 

John M. Sill, sanitary inspector 

W. B. Clift, sanitary inspector 

Robt. L. Tate, sanitary inspector 

W. J. McKee, sanitary inspector 

Theo. B. Whittemore, sanitary inspector 

Harmon B. Smith, draftsman 



$350 


00 


880 


00 


100 


00 


20 


00 


to 


00 


10 


00 


276 


00 


85 


00 


80 


oo 


45 


oo 


90 


00 


243 


00 


216 


00 


12 


50 


204 


00 


98 


00 


$11,175 


00 



The following were employed in the preparation, packing and 
shipment of prophylactic solution for the prevention of ophthalmia 
neonatorum, and paid out of appropriation for that purpose: 

John C. Reynolds $500 00 

Margaret Bott 217 OO 

Ellen Slingerland 180 00 

Bessie McComb 101 00 

Grace McCoUum 125 00 



$1,123 00 



Detailed Statement of Expenditures from Funds Appro- 
priated FOR THE Following: 



Investigations 

Expenses in connection Avith Annual Conference 
1909, and printing proceedings of same 

Investigations of watersheds and public water sup- 
plies 



$1,S60 '27 



2,607 22 



Financial Statement 61 

Investigating registration of vital statistics, com- 
municable diseases, etc $2,382 68 

Investigating public nuisances, etc 1,982 45 

Expenses in connection with public hearings, steno- 
graphic services, etc., relating to establishment of 
profK>sed hospitals for tuberculosis patients. . . . 1,411 04 

Investigating sanitary conditions of summer re- 
sorts 756 31 

Investigations in connection with sewage disposal, 

etc 610 00 

Investigations in connection with eyesight and 

hearing of school children 559 96 

Investigating efficiency of municipal water purifi- 
cation plants 42 60 

$12,221 53 

Office Expenses 

Printing: 

Publication of Monthly Bulletin $3,693 00 

Envelopes for same 251 73 

Blank forms for registration of births 

and deaths 308 05 

General office printing 1,988 85 

$6,241 63 

Office supplies 859 35 

Furniture and office furnishings 650 45 

Telephone service 689 99 

Telegraph and messenger service 324 47 

Books and subscriptions 384 92 

$9,150 81 



^ 



Office Expenses and Equipment Division of Engineering 

Oak rack $15 00 

Book cases 25 75 

Costumer 315 



62 State Department of Health 

Curtains 

Microscope and micrometer 

Typewriters 

Steel tape measures 

Map tubes 

Sewage disposal model 

Lithoprints and blueprints 

Atlas 

Other books and subscriptions 

Office supplies 



$5 


45 


37 


54 


156 


00 


14 


00 


5 


00 


352 


15 


20 


4 t 


32 


50 


77 


60 


113 


22 


$858 13 



Antitoxin Laboratory 

Microscope, glassware, etc $1,446 65 

Centrifuge 454 20 

Refrigerating plant 1,145 00 

Antitoxin syringes 297 50 

Needles 221 57 

Boxes 54 40 

Camera, slides, etc 224 90 

Mailing cases 374 78 

General laboratory supplies 353 23 

Envelopes 109 68 

Printing 523 38 

Postage - 100 00 

Books and subscriptions 57 55 

Telephone service 67 08 

Office supplies 29 60 

Gas 46 20 

Lumber 125 44 

Painting and varnishing 607 25 

Plumbing 136 63 

Excavating and concrete work 84 55 

Work on drain 15 40 

Whitewashing 88 93 

Oilcloth 10 00 

Window shades 6 00 



Financial Statement 63 

Repairs to wagon $24 15 

Kepairs to sterilizer 7 50 

Labor in stable 96 00 

Cleaning laboratory 38 00 

Brooms and brushes 9 23 

Laundry work 18 94 

Hay, straw and oats 2,394 33 

Horses 125 00 

Horse blankets 30 00 

Guinea pigs 18 00 

Meats and vegetables 352 48 

Coal 240 50 

Ice and water 54 45 



$9,888 50 
Salaries 8,107 84 



$17,996 34 



Hygienic Laboratory 

Services of Bender Laboratory $1,650 00 

Constructing addition to laboratory 485 00 

Extra lumber 8 18 

Painting 52 00 

Plumbing 77 99 

Water bath 46 50 

Labor and material fixing up branch laboratory 

at Ithaca 25 65 

Ventilator, etc 28 00 

Platinum and petri disLes, water bottles, test tubes, 

etc 707 95 

Boxes for water bottles 234 00 

General laboratory supplies , 287 25 

Expenses collecting samples of water 89 07 

Water rent 49 25 

Ice and water 90 30 

Meat and vegetables 45 09 

Gas 121 70 



64 State Depabtmzxt of Health 

TelejAone service $21 67 

^Isiiiiiig crises 15 15 

Tag envelopes 16 28 

Printing 150 64 

VloUjs 11 74 

Laandrv 4 88 

Kxpre^?, freight and cartage 33 40 

(Jthoe expenses 5 10 

Insurance on lal»ratory buildings 102 00 



$4-358 ,79 
Salaries 5,638 35 



$9,997 14 



Cancer Lahoratory 

Lalx;ratory supplies $1,823 67 

Postage, express, freight, cartage, etc, (Sundry ac- 
counts rendered bv Secretary) 548 07 

General repairs — material and labor 594 35 

Lumber 29 70 

Painting 214 50 

Kefrigerating plant 1,650 00 

Addition to ice machine 136 13 

Tank for gas 30 00 

Desk 75 00 

Carpet 75 00 

Matting 31 25 

Mirror 2 00 

Window screens 25 50 

Shades 5 53 

Safe 65 00 

Kent of animal house 480 00 

Guinea pigs and rabbits 21 87 

Mice and rats 681 57 

Water rent 68 50 

Electric light 482 17 

Gas 66 90 



Financial Statement 



66 



Coal $856 42 

Ice 10 56 

Laundry 193 00 

Telephone service 131 44 

Telegraph service 11 63 

Books and subscriptions 401 63 

Prinring 301 11 

Traveling expenses 198 70 

$9,191 34 

Salaries 11,194 64 



$20,385 98 

Ophthalmia Neonatorum 

Equipment — glass vials, droppers, nipples and 
other materials used in preparation of ophthalmia 

neonatorum outfits $1,729 04 

Services of employees engaged in making the 
prophylactic solution, bottling and packing same 

for shipment 1,123 00 

Postage 950 00 

Printing 272 74 

Coal 136 50 

Gas ; Ill 60 

Water rental 58 63 

Telephone and telegraph 30 76 



$4,412 27 



Postage 

Transportation 



Postage and Transportation 



$2,900 00 
2,083 48 



$4,983 48 



8 



66 State Depabtment of Health 

Suppression of Communicable Diseases 

Services of medical experts investigating outbreaks 

of communicable diseases, etc $5,130 00 

Traveling expenses and printing — report cards, 
red cross shields, circulars of instructions to 
health officers, and for general household distri- 
bution 1,710 85 



$6,840 85 



Marriage Licenses 

Printing blank affidavits, marriage licenses, certifi- 
cates of marriages, registers, index books, etc. . . $3,000 00 



Traveling Expenses 

Monthly expenses of the Department investigating public water 
supplies, sewage disposal, public nuisances, registration of vital 
statistics, sanitary condition of summer resorts, etc., as follows: 

October, 1909 $512 31 

November, 1909 244 55 

December, 1909 578 65 

January, 1910 ; 341 36 

February, 1910 438 57 

March, 1910 644 06 

April, 1910 567 60 

May, 1910 437 66 

June, 1910 458 91 

July, 1910 416 46 

August, 1910 738 12 

September, 1910 1,284 52 

$6,662 77 
Commissioner 1,246 05 

$7,908 82 



Financial Statement 67 

Tuberculosis Exhibition 

Salaries of director, lecturers and laborers con- 
nected with the exhibition $2,535 00 

Traveling expenses of 2,059 38 

Banners, mottoes, lumber and othei necessary 

material for equipment 1,254 23 

Express, freight and cartage 251 51 

Kent of rooms for exhibition 156 50 

Printing and advertising 140 70 



$6,397 32 

Recapitulation 

Total Expenditures During the Year oui of Appropriations made 

for the Department 

Division of administration, salaries $13,960 00 

Division of engineering: 

Salaries $10,821 66 

Office expenses 858 13 

11,679 79 

Division of vital statistics, salaries 9,946 38 

Division of communicable diseases, 

salaries 2,9-37 50 

Antitoxin laboratory: 

Salaries $8,107 84 

Sundries 9,888 50 

17,996 34 

Hygienic laboratory : 

Salaries $5,638 35 

Sundries 4,358 79 

9,997 14 

Cancer laboratory : 

Salaries $11,194 64 

Sundries 9,191 34 

20,385 98 



68 Stats Depa&tm£nt of Health 

Investdgatioiis : 

Salaries $6,045 90 

Miscellaneous 6,175 63 

$12,221 53 

Marriage license blanks 3,000 00 

Office expenses 9,150 81 

Postage and transportation 4,983 48 

Prevention of ophthalmia neonatorum : 

Salaries $1,123 00 

MisceUaneous 3,289 27 



Suppression of smaUpox and other com- 
municable diseases: 

' Salaries $5,130 00 

Miscellaneous 1,710 85 

Traveling expenses : 

General $6,662 77 

Commissioner 1,246 05 



4,412 27 



6,840 85 



7,908 82 



Tuberculosis exhibition: 

Salaries $2,535 00 

Miscellaneous 3,862 32 

6,397 32 

Unexpended balances for temporary employees. . . 1,200 95 



$143,019 16 



DIVISION 



or 



VITAL STATISTICS 



[69] 



DIVISION OF VITAL STATISTICS 



Albany, N. Y., April 15, 1911. 
Dr. Eugene H. Pobteb, State Commissioner of Health, Albany, 
N. Y.: 

Sib: — I have the honor to transmit herewith the Annual Re- 
port of the Division of Vital Statistics for the year 1910. 

During the year the Department has kept the local registrars 
well supplied with registration blanks, and rendered all possible 
adsi&tance in aiding the local boards in the enforcement of the 
registration laws. 

Copies of sanitary regulations approved by the Department re- 
quiring compliance with the provisions of sections 22 and 23 of 
the Public Health Law were mailed to each of the local boards 
of health, together with an urgent request that the boards adopt 
and enforce the same. 

Returns received from the local registrars have been checked up 
each month, and wherever it has come to the notice of the De- 
partment that defects existed in the local registration steps have 
been taken to correct such defects. 

While this Department was obliged to serve formal notice upon 
fifty-two local boards of health to amend known defects in the 
local registration, as required by section 5 of the Public Health 
Law, but in three instances only was the Department compelled 
to take charge of the registration town of Bombay, Franklin 
county; village of Marlboro, Dutchess county and village of 
Avoca, Steuben county. 

The living births reported to the Department for 1910 wf^re 
213,235 — 10,579 more than reported in 1909. There wore 
147,629 deaths reported, which is 7,308 more than reported in 
1909. 

The United States Census Bureau gives the population of the 
State, for July 1, 1910, 9,158,328, and the birth rate per 1,000 
population is shown to be 23.3. while the death rate was 16.1. 
The urban death rate was lfi.1 : the rural 10 3. The urban birth 
rate was 25.3; the rural 17.4. 

During 1910 there were 85,490 marriages reported in the State 
— about 5,400 more than occurred in 1909. 

1711 



72 



State Department of Health 



TABLE I 

Total Registraiinn in State Since 18&5 

The following table shows the total registration of births, deaths 
and marriages occurring in the State since 1885. 



YEAR 



18^5 
ISSft 
18^7 
1S88 
1889 
1800 
1801 
1892 
1893 
189t 
189i 
1N90 
1897 
1^98 
1<99 
1000 

roi 
19; »2 

1003 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
19;)0 
1910 



Population 



5.609.910 
6.719.866 
5.831.947 
5,946.246 
6.062.764 
6.182.600 
6.316.333 
6.438.283 
6,537,716 
6.638.696 
6.741.246 
6,845.375 
6.951,111 
7.058.459 
7.167.491 
7.281.533 
7.434,896 
7.. 591, 491 
7.751.375 
7.914.636 
8.081.333 
8.251.538 
8.425.333 
8.646.356 
8.699.643 
9.158,328 



•Birthn 


Deaths 


Marriages 


Birth 
rate 


Death 
rate 


63.536 


80.407 


24.409 


11.3 


14.3 


89.828 


86.801 


36,764 


15.7 


15.2 


102.038 


108,269 


44.438 


17.6 


18.6 


103.089 


114,584 


43,683 


17 3 


19.3 


114.804 


113.156 


60.960 


18.8 


18.6 


112.672 


128.648 


41.195 


18.2 


20.8 


125.909 


129.850 


61.458 


19.9 


20.6 


130,143 


131.388 


52.725 


20.2 


20.3 


136,297 


129.659 


62.805 


20.8 


19.7 


141.827 


123.423 


52.539 


21.4 


18.6 


142.311 


128.834 


50.059 


21.1 


19.1 


147.327 


126.253 


68.990 


21.5 


18.4 


144.631 


118.526 


57,630 


20.8 


17.1 


138.702 


122,584 


57.392 


19.7 


17.4 


136.778 


121.831 


61 , 167 


19.1 


17.0 


143.156 


132.089 


63.225 


19.7 


18.1 


140.639 


131.335 


65.216 


18.9 


17.7 


146.740 


124.830 


68.903 


19.3 


16.4 


158.343 


127.498 


73,011 


20.4 


16.4 


166.014 


142.217 


74,677 


20.8 


18.0 


172.259 


137.435 


78,261 


21.3 


17.0 


183.012 


141.099 


87.870 


22.2 


17.1 


196.020 


147.130 


92.421 


23 3 


17.6 


203.159 


138.912 


73.644 


23.8 


16.3 


202.656 


140.261 


80.090 


23.3 


16.1 


213.235 


147.629 


85,490 


23.3 


16.1 



Marriage 
rate 



4.4 

6.4 
7.6 
7.8 
8.4 
6.7 
8 1 
8.1 
8.1 
7.9 
8.7 
8.6 
8.3 
8.1 
8.5 
8.7 
8.S 
9.1 
9.4 
9.4 
9.7 
10.7 
11.0 
8.6 
9.2 
9.3 



* Still births excluded. 



Registration of Deaths 

WTiile the registration of deaths has been more satisfactory 
during the past year than at any time previous in the history of 
the Department, we are still in receipt of delayed returns each 
month, and compelled to return a large number of certificates for 
the purpose of ascertaining a more satisfactory statement as to 
cause of death. During the year 2,021 defective death certificates 
were returned for correction. 

The Department has recently mailed to each of the physicians 
practicing in the State outside of Greater New York a pamphlet 
pointing out defects in the registration of vital statistics, which, 
together with the '^ Pocket reference to the International List of 
Causes of Death " issued by the United States Census Bureau, 
and mailed to all of the physicians in the State would result in 
correcting existing defects if the physicians would familiarize 



DIAGRAM SHOWING 

FLUCTUATIONS 

OF THE DEATH RATE 

PER THOUSAND^ 

IN THE STATE \ 

OF NEW YORK \ 

SINCE 1890 






21 
20 
19 
18 
17 
16 
15 
lA 



1890 "92 '9+ '96 'SS 1900 '02 '04 "06 "08 '10 



Division op Vital Statistics 73 

themselves with the nature and purpoaes of the International list, 
and co-operate with the registration officials in giving the neces- 
sarv information so that returns can be properly be classified. 

The delayed certificates of death filed with the Department are 
from the rural districts, and in most instances the delay in making 
prompt reports is due to the local board of health failing to en- 
force the provisions of section 23 of the Public Health Law re- 
quiring undertakers to obtain burial permits before remo^^ing a 
corpse for burial. Occasionally it comes to the notice of the De- 
partment that such delays are due to the undertakers insisting 
upon the physicians filling out the complete record of death, in- 
stead of obtaining the family history of deceased themselves, 
which necessitates the physician driving several miles to obtain 
the information, and they abide their time in making such visits. 

I believe that existing defects in the registration may be rem- 
edied by having section 2^2 of the Public Health Law amended 
requiring the attending physician to promptly fill out the medical 
certificate of death and deliver same to the undertaker or other 
person having charge of a corpse, and that they be required to ob- 
tain the family history and file the completed record of death with 
the local registrar of vital statistics within 24 hours after receiving 
same from the physician. 

Undertakers could then be held to strict accountability for the 
filing of prompt returns of deaths, and can be more effectively 
dealt with than the many physicians practicing in the State. 

Registration of Births 

Daring the past year there has been a noticeable improvement 
m the registration of births, due to the short interval of registra- 
tion and general attention given to the registration of births. 

The amendment to section 22 of the Public Health Law requit- 
ing births to be reported within thirty-six hours after they rc- 
cnr at first met with considerable opposition on the part of the 
practicing physicians, not so much that it was impossible to report 
the cases within the time prescribed, but that it was a hardship 
*tid unreasonable to demand such exacting services of a physician. 
Of course in some of the rural districts it is difficult to strictlv 

• 

comply with the law, but most of the rural physicians are making 



74 State Depaktmeno? op Hbai^th 

returns as quickly as possible. In the cities the law can be com- 
plied with, but there is some difficulty in getting the local boards 
of health to enforce the law, the belief being that a physician 
should be allowed a more reasonable time in which to file a com- 
plete record of the birth. 

However upon looking over the certificates filed with the De- 
partment I find a great majority of the birth certificates are filled 
out on the day the birth occurred or the day following. Ap- 
parently it is not a question of time so much as it is lack of will- 
ingness on the part of certain physicians to file certificates within 
any reasonable time after a birth occurs, as I notice that most of 
the physicians who fail to promptly report births attended by 
them delay tiling the records until weeks after the births occurred, 
when undoubtedly the local registrar has brought the matter to 
their attention. 

* 

I believe that should the law be amended allowing the phy- 
sicians five days within which to file the complete record of 
birth, local boards of health failing to enforce strict compliance 
with the law as it now stands, would heartily co-operate with the 
State Department of Health in correcting existing defects in the 
registration. 

A postal notification card could be prescribed by the Depart- 
ment to be furnished by the local boards of health in supplying 
physicians for use in making prompt reports of births as now re- 
quired by law, thus retaining the thirty-six hour clause, and mak- 
ing it possible for the local boards of health to see that proper 
measures had been taken to prevent ophthalmia neonatorum by 
the use of a prophylactic solution, and allow the physician five 
days in which to file the complete record of the birth on the form 
prescribed by the State Department of Health. Such an amend- 
ment would at least leave the local boards of health without a 
reasonable excuse for failure to enforce the law. 

The following shows the number of births occurring in I&IO re- 
ported to the Department, classified by months in which the 
births occurred : 



Division of Vital Statistics 



75 



TABLE II 



MONTH 



18.589 

16.108 

18,711 

kpni ; 17.343 



JnauMiy. 
FcbroMy 
M*rrh. 



Total 
living 
births 



May. 

Joae 

July 

Attfost.. . 
Seplaiiber. 
October. . . 

NoTODMr . 

December. 
Total. 



17.590 
17.596 
18.893 
18.123 
17.910 
17.679 
17,363 
•17.340 



213.235 



White 


Colored 




Total 




Male 


Female 


Not 
stated 


18.355 
15.889 
18.402 
17.104 
17,343 
17.384 
18.664 
17.906 
17,675 
17.458 
17.101 
17,034 


234 
219 
309 
239 
247 
212 
229 
217 
235 
221 
252 
306 


9.620 
8.200 
9.592 
8.845 
9.046 
9.055 
9.699 
9.143 
9.243 
8,998 
8.869 
8.904 


8.969 
7.906 
9.116 
8.495 
8.541 
8.538 
9.194 
8.975 
8.665 
8.677 
8.483 
8.433 


2 

3 
3 
3 
3 

5 

2 
4 
1 
3 


210.315 


2.920 


109.214 


103.992 


29 



StiU 
iMrihi 



856 
806 
925 
828 
847 
840 
816 
818 
794 
786 
803 
834 



9.952 



The 2,920 colored births were classified as follows: Negro, 
2,874; Indian, 28; Mongolian, 18. Of the 213,235 living births 
1,W5 were premature. 

Registration of Marriages 

While the local registration of marriages under the marriage 
license law is satisfactory, the law should be amended so as to 
provide for the original records to be filed with the State De- 
partment of Health, instead of copies of the records filed with 
the county clerks. 

Previous to the enactment of this law the Department received 
the original returns from all of the registration districts in the 
State, excepting the cities of Albany, Buffalo, Greater New York 
and Yonkers. The filing of returns from these cities with the 
Department has more than doubled the work formerly required in 
indexing the marriage certificates filed with the Department under 
the old law, and put the Department to the expense of providing 
additional steel filing eases to provide for copies of the original 
records. 

The Department is not only required to furnish the town and 
city clerks with the necessary printed blanks to carry out the pro- 
visions of the .marriage license law, but also required to furnish 
toe comity clerks with the necessary blanks for transcripts of 
••ine to be filed with the Department. 

If the law could be amended so as to provide that the original 



76 



State Depabtmsnt of Hsai^th 



records outside of Greater New York should be filed with the 
State Department of Health, the State would save more than one- 
half of the expenses now incurred, and the counties the expense 
of providing the clerical help now necessary to make copies of the 
original records for filing with the Department, as well as the 
expense incurred in providing filing cases for the original records. 

If the Department is to continue receiving the returns from 
the whole State it will be necessary for the Legislature to pro- 
vide for the employment of two additional clerks in the division 
of vital statistics. 

The following table shows the number of marriages reported in 
the State since 1907 — the year previous to the enactment of the 
marriage license law : 

TABLE III 

Marriages in New York State 



COUNTY 



Albany 

AUegany. . . . 

Broome 

Cattaraugus. 

Cayuga 

Chautauqua. 
Chemung . . . 
Chenango.. . 

Clinton 

Columbia . . . 
Cortland.... 
Delaware. . . 
Dutchess. . . . 

Erie 

Essex 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Genesee .... 

Greene 

Hamilton . . . 
Herkimer. . . 
Jefferson... . 

Kin^ 

Lewis 

Livin^ton. . 
Madison. . . . 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Nassau 

New York.. 

Nisf^ra 

Oneida 



1910 


1909 


1.386 


1.301 


325 


333 


859 


726 


618 


580 


511 


524 


1.181 


1.156 


538 


555 


290 


255 


408 


419 


315 


288 


230 


215 


378 


371 


575 


640 


4,728 


4.330 


281 


255 


358 


371 


387 


386 


254 


272 


210 


231 


28 


34 


514 


515 


620 


629 


12.451 


12,714 


175 


195 


235 


258 


282 


319 


2.647 


2.393 


596 


563 


628 


559 


•34.647 


31,596 


941 


848 


1.416 


1,293 



1908 


1907 


1.209 


1.331 


317 


469 


691 


1.461 


594 


1.021 


485 


632 


980 


2.147 


472 


910 


226 


296 


350 


499 



254 
195 
355 
538 

3.917 
216 
299 
341 
272 
220 
34 
391 
571 
11.664 
152 
225 
274 

2.058 

532 

472 

29.550 

750 

1.186 



371 
231 
395 
782 

5,375 
300 
436 
411 
271 
250 
34 
399 
891 
12.916 
178 
302 
315 

2.529 

606 

474 

36.097 

1,100 
996 



COUNTY 



Onondaga 

Ontario 

Orange 

Orieans 

Oswego 

Otsego 

Putnam 

Queens 

Rensselaer . . . 
Richmond. . . . 

Rockland 

St. Lawrence. 

Saratoga 

Schenectady. . 

Schoharie 

Schuyler 

Seneca 

Steuben 

Suffolk 

Sullivan 

Tioga 

Tompkins 

Ulster 

Warren 

Washington . . 

Wayne 

Westchester. . 
Wyoming. . . . 
Yates 

ToUl 



1910 


1909 


1.586 


1.419 


391 


352 


889 


783 


223 


240 


532 


551 


349 


338 


110 


97 


2.077 


1.647 


985 


904 


526 


450 


211 


265 


682 


685 


412 


399 


705 


677 


152 


147 


83 


113 


180 


162 


632 


686 


604 


544 


274 


218 


249 


239 


274 


240 


616 


581 


276 


275 


400 


360 


387 


375 


2.369 


2.055 


230 


228 


125 


136 


85.490 


80.090 

• 



1908 



1907 



1.296 
329 
727 
192 
471 
324 
114 

1.292 
916 
425 
281 
584 
369 
674 
155 
95 
158! 
608 
553 
242 
238 
233 
555 
264 
387 
336 

1.848 
226 
122 



1.423 
419 

1.008 
327 
571 
438 
145 

1.490 
998 
504 
308 
884 
553 
775 
106 
178 
1«7 
963 
628 
270 
502 
310 
716 
358 
445 
458 

2.650 
298 
124 



73.644 



92.421 



* Licenses issued. 



Division of Vital Statistics 



77 



RegiHration of Births, DecUhs and Marriages 

The following table shows the number of births, deaths and 
marriages reported in the State during 1910, by counties: 

TABLE IV 



COUNTY 


Population 


Births 


Deaths 


Marriacea 


Albany ... 


173.797 
41.341 
79.043 
66.919 
07.138 

106.492 
64.761 
36.623 
48.221 
43.092 

29.244 
46.632 
87.816 
631.338 
33.601 

46.668 
44.636 
37.690 
30.181 
4.350 

66.472 
80.392 
1.646.286 
24.777 
38.068 

39.281 

286.079 

67.902 

84.664 

2,779,103 

92.362 
164.741 
201.243 

62.280 
116.303 

32.026 
71.746 
47.182 
14.689 
287.725 

122.296 
86.626 
46.967 
88.903 
61.900 

88.966 
23,797 
13.961 
26.952 
83.382 


2.439 
769 
1.389 
1.208 
1.121 

2.242 
862 
611 

1.129 
729 

668 

782 

1.640 

12.177 

690 

1.061 

800 

686 

642 

70 

1.209 

1.486 

42.708 

446 

664 

725 

6.136 

1.107 

1.780 

77.263 

2.092 
3.426 
3.782 
942 
2.074 

662 

1.336 

779 

214 

7.119 

1.616 
1.991 
797 
1.716 
1.131 

2.103 
329 
216 
412 

1.367 


3.228 
622 

1.331 
901 
999 

1.644 
866 
698 
676 
768 

628 

726 

1.480 

8.546 

643 

822 
673 
690 
627 
66 

867 

1.362 

26.676 

374 

641 

619 
3.963 

991 

1.133 

46.636 

1.402 
2.662 
3.067 
781 
2.023 

500 

1,123 

847 

267 

3.971 

2.283 
1.467 
668 
1.351 
1.081 

1.249 
395 
215 
412 

1.221 


1.386 


ADcf^y i 


325 




869 


CittantigiM 


618 


CanMB 


511 


(Tiawtanqty^ , , , t , 


1.181 


ChfnDUBtf 


638 


^""•"■'^^ i*-i.*.... > 

Chmftncn 


290 


OmUm 


406 


Cohtmbift 


316 


CortluMl 


230 


TMftvan 


378 


D«tche« 


676 


Em 


4,728 


F«M1 . 


281 




368 


FoHoQ 


387 




264 


^JTvVOO ^ 114,4 4a&«>*>>a*«*««'**">**'**** 


210 


Haoiilton 


28 


ttCflllflttiCf , «•• • •#• 


614 


*-^ -- 


620 


ITniM , , 


12,461 


uSS:::::::::'::::::::::::::: 


175 


TJ^rfufiioii . . 


236 




283 


MoQItM . . 


2.647 




696 


iVMMa 


628 




♦34,647 




941 


oSdi....;: ■ ";; 


1.416 




1,586 


OnUno' . . 


391 


Orutt . 


889 


OrttwM. 


223 


'-'■•Nro X , , ■ 


632 


S5o .. : 


349 


rtitinm 


110 


Qoett..::: 


2,077 




985 


RKhmoBd,. 


626 




211 


8l. Ltwreme 


682 


8M»toe»....'.' 


412 




705 


gcbobwie.^: ::::::::::::::::::::;::: 


163 


jdwykr..... :::.::.. 


88 


Swept 


180 


8*wb«,.. 


632 




78 



State Department of Health 



TABLE IV — (Concluded) 



county 



Suffolk... 
Sullivan. . 

Tioga 

Tompkins , 
Ulster..., 



Warren .... 
Washington. 

Wayne 

Westchester 
Wyoming . . 
Yates 



State Institutions. 
Totols 



Population 



96.489 
33,773 
25.576 
33,633 
91.989 

32.241 
47,802 
50.233 
285.350 
31.907 
18.614 



9.158.328 



Births 



1,676 
615 
387 
554 

1.516 

538 
853 
884 
6.559 
514 
268 



213.290 



Deaths ^ Marriages 



1,403 
671 i 
404 
548 

1.459 

456 
796 
766 
4.335 
468 
280 

1.992 



147.629 



604 
224 
249 
274 
616 

275 
400 
387 
2.369 
230 
125 



85.490 



Deaths in State Institviions 



NAME OF INSTITUTION AND 
LOCATION 



Auburn State Prison, Auburn 

Binghamton State Hospital, Binghamton. 

Bloomingdale Asylum, White Plains 

Craig C^ony Sonyea* 

Dannemora State Hospital, Dannemora. . 

Elmira State Reformatory, Elmira 

Gowanda State Hospital, Gowanda 

Hudson River State Hospital, Pough- 

Iceepsie 

Long Island State Hospital, Kings Park. . 
Manhattan State Hospital, Central Islip. . 
Matteawan State Hospital, Matteawan . . 
Middletown State Hospital, Middletown . 
State Soldiers and Sailors' Home, Bath. . 

Rochester State Hospital, Rochester 

Rome Custodial Asylum. Rome 

St. Lawrence State Hospital, Ogdcnsburg. 

Sing Sing Prison, Ossining 

Utica State Hospital, Utica 

Willard State Hospital: 

Romulus 

Ovid 

Total 



3 



3 
9 
2 

10 
1 
1 
4 

26 
26 
25 



12 

12 

17 

3 

12 

2 

8 

24 

13 

11 



197 



Xi 

U4 



1 

15 

i4 
1 



20 

21 

26 

2 

7 

21 

14 

5 

12 

3 

7 

16 

6 

10 



09 



11 

4 

11 

1 



9 

30 
25 
30 

i7 
28 
16 

4 
16 

1 
15 
21 

mm 

4 

14 



188 239 



< 



1 

9 

28 

18 

38 

1 

9 

24 

8 

11 

11 

is 

10 
7 
3 



200 



(0 



8 

22 

23 

37 

3 

9 

21 

10 

3 

14 

1 

13 

9 

8 

1 



a 

3 



21 

4 
1 



197 



21 

27 

41 

6 

1 

12 

6 

3 

9 

■ • • 

3 
19 

11 

8 



177 






2 
12 
2 
4 
3 



< 



18 

32 

48 

1 

8 

29 

12 

1 

10 

2 

8 

12 

9 

3 



210 



1 
13 
3 
9 
1 
1 
6 

13 

21 

41 

1 

6 

21 

13 

2 

8 

2 

8 

19 

12 

7 



I 



189 



21 

22 

29 

1 

8 

14 

14 

1 

3 



152 



O 



10 
2 
3 
2 
1 
3 

26 

25 

36 

1 

4 

17 

8 

8 

11 



o 



1 

10 

3 

7 
3 



13 
3 

12 
2 



6 8 



10 

17 

9 

8 



184 



23 

27 

46 

2 

10 

18 

13 

6 

9 



6 
16 

7 
9 



206 



34 

39 

45 

1 

7 

Oi 

lOl 

2< 

121 



12 
21 
11 
10 






10 

139 

25 

97 
21 

4 
60 

282 
306 
442 

18 

98 
226 
141 

49 
127 

11 
111 
193 
102 

91 



230it2,369 



* Town oC Groveland. 

t This total is greater than that given in th? classification of causes of death, p. . for the 

reason that previous to March these deaths were classified for the Bulletin under the county id 
which institution is located. 

City Registration 

The following table shows the total registration of births and 
deaths in cities of the State; births and death rates for 1910, and 
the average rates for the previous five years based upon the United 
States Census Bureau estimated populations: 



Division of Vital Statistics 



79 



TABLE V 



CITY 



Population 

1910 

Census 



City of New York 

BoroQch Manhattan. 

Borough Bronx 

Bocoush Brooklyn . . 
Borouch Queens. . . . 
Borough Richmond. 

Buffalo 

Rochester 



Srracoae. . . . 
Albany. .. . 
Yoaken. . . . 

Troy 

Utica 

Hcbmectady. 



Biochamton. . 

Elmira 

Auburn 

Amsterdam. . 
iamestown.. . 
Mt. Vernon. . 
Niagara Falla . 
N*w Kochelle 
Pottghkeapsie . 
Nefn>urgh . . . , 
Watertown. . . 
Kingston .... 

Cohoea 

(ISNego 

Glorenville. . 
Rome 



Lockport 

Hunkirk 

Oifdensburg 

Middletown 

Olena Falls 

Wftterrliet 

Ithaca 

Otean 

Lackawanna 

Gomiog 

HoroeU. 

Geneva 

UttJe Falls 

North Tonawanda . 

Cortland 

Hudson 

patlaburgh 

nennelaer 

Folton 

Johnstown 

Oneonta 

Port Jervis 

Oneida 

Tottawanda 



Total urban. 
Rural 



4.799.639 

2.341.312 
437.791 

1.646.285 

287.725 

86.526 

425.715 
219.693 

138.087 
100,358 
80.589 
76.836 
74.879 
73.450 

48.671 
37.238 
34.760 
31.586 
31.523 
31.175 
30.617 
29,229 
28.055 
27.868 
26.792 
25.929 
24.737 
23.410 
20.730 
20.632 

17.993 
17.308 
15.981 
15.297 
15.268 
15,099 
14.815 
14.814 
14.549 
13.742 
13,637 
12.438 
12,326 
12.033 
11.517 
11.462 
1 1 . 182 
10,712 
10.550 
10.476 
9.552 
9.304 
8.316 
8.308 



6.768.877 



2.389,451 



Births 



129.081 

66.358 

10.905 

42.708 

7.119 

1.991 

10.008 
4,999 

2,797 
1.369 
2,064 
956 
1,902 
1,817 

908 
594 
645 
695 
659 
706 
811 
753 
570 
536 
620 
431 
438 
488 
401 
571 

342 
566 
348 
266 
290 
210 
237 
328 
389 
268 
233 
235 
335 
332 
264 
254 
284 
167 
242 
177 
190 
166 
157 
168 



171.267 



41.968 



Deaths 



76.750 

38.668 
6.968 

26.676 
3.971 
1.467 

6,877 
3,084 

2.124 
1.943 
1.226 
1.597 
1.297 
1.070 

765 
554 
522 
540 
404 
433 
551 
342 
466 
510 
468 
475 
509 
385 
321 
411 

299 
279 
268 
275 
241 
261 
244 
188 
397 
200 
174 
175 
194 
160 
219 
236 
195 
158 
155 
143 
181 
170 
118 
106 



108.660 



38.969 



Rate per 1. 000 
Population 



Births 



26.9 

28.3 
24.9 
25.1 
24.8 
23.0 

23.5 

22.8 

20.3 
13.6 
25.6 
12 4 
25.4 
24.7 

18.7 
16.0 
18.0 
22.0 
20.9 
22.6 
26.5 
25.8 
20.3 
19.2 
23.1 
16.6 
17.7 
20.8 
19.3 
27.7 

19.0 
32.7 
21.8 
17.3 
19.0 
13.9 
16.0 
22.1 
26.7 
19.5 
17.1 
18.9 
27 2 
27.6 
22.9 
22.2 
25.4 
15.6 
22 9 
16.9 

19 9 
17.8 
18.9 

20 2 



25 3 



17.6 



Deaths 



16.0 

16.1 
15.9 
15.6 
13.8 
17.0 

16.2 
14.0 

15.4 
19.4 

15 2 
20.8 
17 3 
14.6 

15.7 
14.9 
15.0 
17.1 
12.8 
13.9 
18.0 
11.7 
16.6 
18.3 
17.5 
18.3 
20.6 
16.4 
15.5 
19.9 

16.6 
16.6 
16.8 
18.0 
15.7 

17 3 

16 5 
12.7 
27.3 
14.6 
12.8 
14.0 
15.7 
13.3 
19.0 
20.6 
17.4 
14.7 
14.7 
13.7 

18 9 
18 3 
14 2 
12 8 

16 1 

16.3 



AvERAOR Rate 
Past 5 Yrarr 



Births 



27.5 

28.7 
27.4 
26.0 
25.6 
25.5 

22.4 
21.4 

18.9 
11.5 
24.9 
12.1 
23.6 
25.6 

18.5 
16.0 
19.6 
22.8 
20.5 
24.3 
20.3 
28.6 
21.1 
18.3 
18.5 
21.6 
18.9 
19.3 

18 
23.3 

18.5 
33.9 
22.8 
15.2 
15.7 
14.0 

15 6 
20 8 

i7.9 
19.2 
19.4 
20 1 
27.0 
16.3 
17.2 
20.9 
14.0 

19 9 

16 6 

17 I 
17 5 
17 5 
19 4 

25 5 



Deaths 



15 9 



17.7 

17.7 
20.4 
17.1 
16.5 
19.9 

15.7 
15.0 

15.8 
18.1 
16.1 
20.4 
18.2 
13.0 

16.0 
15.5 
15 8 
16.5 
11.4 
14 5 
15.6 

13 

18 4 
18.3 
16.3 
18.5 
19.9 
16.4 
n 6 

19 9 

14.6 
n.2 
18.4 
10.4 
It. 9 
17.4 

14 8 
12.9 

is 9 

14 I 
13 6 
13 7 

13 9 
12.8 
17.8 
14.5 
14.4 
14.9 

14 3 
17 5 
17 9 
14 7 
12.8 

17.3 

15.4 



The above table includes deaths of nonresidents occurring in 
the cities, except in the following cities, where deaths occurring 
^ State institutions are excluded : Auburn, State Prison, Bing- 



80 



State Depajeltmbnt of Hsai^th 



hamton, State Hospital, Elmira, Reformatory, Middletown, State 
Hospital, Ogdeiisburg, St Lawrence State Hospital, Borne, Stato 
Custodial Asylum, Utica, State Hospital. 

Average city death rate, 1910 15.3 

Average city birth rate 20. 3 

The average city birth rate was 25.3, and the rural 16.1, The 
cities having the highest birth rate were: Dunkirk, 32.7; Rome, 
27.7; North Tonawanda, 27.6; Little Falls, 27.2; Greater New 
York, 26.9; Lackawanna, 26.7; Niagara Falls, 26.5 and New 
Rochelle, 25.8. 

The lowest birth rate is shown in the following cities, due to 
incomplete registration: Troy, 12.4; Albany, 13.6; Watervliet, 
13.9 and Rensselaer, 15.6. Troy reports 641 more deaths than 
births; Albany, 576; Watervliet, 51 and Rensselaer, 9. Other 
cities reporting less births than deaths were Cohoes, 71 ; Cortland, 
45; Ithaca, 7; Kingston, 44; Lackawanna, 8; Middletown, 9 and 
Port Jervis 4. 

The cities having the highest death rate were Lackawanna, 
27.3; Troy, 20.8; Hudson, 20.6; Cohoes, 20.6 and Rome, 19.9. 

New Rochelle has the lowest death rate, 11.7; and the follow- 
ing cities show a reported death rate of 14.0 and under; Rochester 
and Geneva, 14.0; Mt. Vernon, 13.9; Johnstown, 13.7; North 
Tonawanda, 13.3; Olean, 12.7; Jamestown, Homell and Tona- 
wanda, 12.8; New Rochelle, 11.7. 

Of the largest cities in the State, Rochester shows the lowest 
d<*ath rate, 14.0. Of the smaller cities, Geneva has a like rate. 

The following tables shows the total registration in each of the 
registration districts in the State: 

Albany County 



Albany, city 

AUamont. village. . . . 

Berne, town 

Bethlehem, town. . . . 

Coeyman^. town 

Cohoes, rity 

Polonie. town 

Green Island, town*. 
Green Island, village. 
Guilderland, town . . . 



Birth? 


Deaths. 


Mar- 

• 


1910 


1910 


riages, 
1910 


1.369 


1.943 


824 


11 


14 




24 


34 


is 


47 


64 


13 


89 


65 


21 


413 


508 


231 


82 


118 


49 
33 


76 


72 




20 


34 


16 



Knox, town 


1 10 


New Scotland, town. . 


40 


Hensaelaerville. town. 


25 


Voorheesville. village. 


5 


Watervliet. city 


209 


Westerlo, town 


1 19 


Delayed returns 


1 9 


Total 


2.448 



Births. 


Deaths, 


1910 


1910 


10 


13 


40 


43 


25 


23 


5 


10 


209 


260 


19 


28 


9 


2 


2.448 


3.221 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



17 
17 
11 



131 
8 
6 



1.392 



*^Bm 



* Town and village have same boundaries. 



Division of Vital Statistics 



81 



Allegany County 



Alfred, town 

Alfred, village 

AOen, town 

Alma, town 

Almond, town 

Amity, town 

Andovrr. town .... 
Aodover, village . . . 
Angelica, town .... 
Angelica, village . . . 

Belfast, town 

Belfast, village .... 
Befanoot, village . . . 

BinbaU. town 

Bolivar, town 

Bolivar, village .... 

Bam. town 

Caaaseraga, village 
Gaoeadea. town . . . 
Onterville. town. . 
Clarksville. town . . 
Cuba, town 



Births. 
1910 



18 
13 
10 
20 
22 
26 
21 
18 
15 
14 
29 



18 
9 
27 
14 
9 
10 
22 
21 
23 
17 



Deaths, 
1910 



11 
20 
11 
10 
27 
10 
15 
14 
15 
23 
27 



24 

7 

11 

11 

12 

18 

21 

9 

8 

16 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



12 



3 

5 

10 

19 

18 



9 



15 



3 
22 



6 

6 

5 

20 





Births, 
1910 


Deaths, 
1910 


Mar- 
riages, 
1910 


Cuba, village 


43 
18 
11 

9 
13 
16 
36 
23 
17 

5 
30 
21 

6 
24 
76 

6 
13 
26 

3 


33 
23 
27 

9 
13 

3 
19 
14 
13 

1 
17 
20 

3 
12 
65 

7 
11 

8 

1 




Friendship, town 

Friendship, village 

Genesee, town 

Granger, town 

Grove, town 


17 

U 
2 
1 


Hume, town 


10 


Independence, town. . . 
New Hudson, town . . . 

Richburg, village 

Rushfora, town 

Scto. town 


11 
7 

i 


Wand, town 


2 


Wellsville, town 

WellsviUe. village 

West Almond, town. . . 

Willing, town 

Wirt, town 


63 

7 

8 
8 


Delayed returns 

Total 


3 


772 


619 


.')28 







Broome County 





Births, 
1910 


Deaths, 
1910 


Mar- 
riages, 
1910 


Barker, town 


20 
12 
905 
13 
26 
20 


12 
12 
765 
15 
38 
19 


13 

3 

536 

9 

15 
3 

9 

'■■j 
7 

"is 


Binghamton. city 

Okenangn. town 

CoWwrifie. town 

Conklin. town 


Deporil, village 

Dickinson, town 

EndJcott. village 

ronton, town 


25 43 

7 44 

53 27 

19 19 


Kirkifood. town 

Lestmhire. village 

liiie, town 


9 , 
49 
19 

4 


12 

62 

17 

9 


Lidei village 






Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



Maine, town 

Nanticoke, town 

Port Dickinson, village 

Sanford, town 

Triangle, town 

Union, town 

Union, village 

Vestal, town 

Whitney's Point, vil. 

Windsor, town 

Windsor, village 

Delayed returns 



Total 



23 
14 

4 
34 
14 
28 
33 
18 

9 
26 

5 
10 



1.399 



20 


17 


7 


6 


8 




27 


24 


12 


9 


23 


92 


39 




30 


13 


13 




24 


29 


7 




1.304 


807 



Cattaraugus Cownty 



ADegany. town 

Afljpnv. Tillage 

Asoford. town 

Csrrolltoa, town 

O^ranguft. village . . 
CoW Spring, town . . 

gwe»»ngo. town 

^r^on, town 

B«st Otto, town 

|S« Rsadolph, viUage 

^».town 

^wttviDe, town .... 



Births, 
1910 



52 

20 

38 

4 

16 

11 

11 

2\ 

25 

6 

8 

16 



Deaths.! 
1910 



28 
20 
22 

8 
20 

9 
14 
18 

9 
22 

6 
11 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



31 



15 
43 



5 

6 

15 

7 



4 

16 



Ellicottville. village. 
Farmersville. town. . 
Franklinville, town. 
Franklinville, village 

Freedom, town 

Gowanda, viUage. . . 
Great Valley, town . 

Hinsdale, town 

Humphrey, town . . . 

Ischua, town 

Leon, town 

limestone, villacQ . 



Births. 


Deaths, 


1910 


1910 


10 


16 


14 


11 


33 


14 


32 


28 


21 


13 


27 


21 


25 


29 


19 


20 


15 


9 


13 


11 


12 


10 


19 


7 



Mar- 
riage?, 
1910 



5 
28 



11 
3 
7 

4 
5 



82 



State Depabtmknt of Health 



Cattaraugus County — C!ontiniied 



Births, 
1910 



Litt4e Valley, town. . 
UtUe Valley, villace 

Lyndon, (own 

Machias. (own 

Maiufield, town .... 

Napoli, town 

New Albion, (own . . 

Olean, town 

Olean, city 

Otto, town 

Penysburg. town. . . 
Persia, town 



4 
16 

5 
25 
10 
15 
14 

7 

328 

15 

18 

6 



Deaths. 


Mar- 


1910 


riages. 
1910 


4 


29 


18 




5 


3 


35 


7 


10 


4 


11 


2 


11 


17 


11 


5 


188 


174 


13 


6 


12 


8 


4 


16 



1 

1 
1 


Births. 
1910 


I>eatha. 
1910 


Mar- 

riaciea, 
1010 


, Portville, town 

1 Portville, villase 

1 Randolph, town 

1 Randolph, villace 

Red House, town 

Salamanca, town 

Salamanca, villaxe. . . . 

South Valley, town. . . 

West Salamanca, vil . . 

Yorkshire, town 

Delayed returns 

Total 


35 
7 

12 

23 

9 

3 

142 

10 
6 

25 
3 


19 

8 

16 

14 

4 

9 

85 

8 

18 

32 

2 


26 
19 

io 

62 

8 

17 


1.211 


913 


618 



Cayuga County 



Auburn, city 

Aurelius, town. . . . 
Aurora, village .... 

Brutus, town 

Cato, town 

Cato, village 

Cayuga, village. . . . 
Conquest, town. . . 
Fair Haven, village 

Fleming, town 

Genoa, town 

Ira, town 

Ledvard, town. . . . 

Locke, town 

Ments, town 

Meridian, village . . 
Montesuma. town . 
Moravia, town .... 



Births. 


Deaths, 


Mar- 


1910 


1910 


riages, 
1910 


646 


521 


302 


11 


10 


10 


3 


2 




24 


17 


14 


18 


10 


11 


2 


5 


• . • • • 


5 


7 




16 


26 


9 


9 


7 




17 


10 


4 


19 


25 





' 9 


13 


9 


26 


19 


15 


10 


18 


8 


19 


11 


13 


4 


6 




18 


11 


8 


22 


8 


14 



• 


Births. 
1910 


Deaths. 
1910 


Mar- 

riagea, 
1910 


Moravia, village 

Niles. town 


19 
21 
17 
16 
23 
10 
24 

9 
25 
13 
11 

5 
11 
21 
18 

9 


19 
14 

9 
16 
20 
14 
31 

6 
40 

5 

6 
20 
19 
21 
29 


6 


Owasoo, town 

Port^ Byron, village . . . 
Scipio. town 


10 

4 


Sempronius. town 

Sennett, town 

Springport. town 

Sterling, town 

Summer Hill, town . . . 

Throop, town 

Union Springs, village . 
Venice, town 


10 
9 
3 

20 
2 
3 

6 


Victory, town 

1 Weedsport, village. . . . 

1 Delayed returns 

1 


13 

• 


Total 


1.130 


995 1 504 


1 





ChaiUauqua County 



Arkwright. town 

Brocton, village 

Busti, town 

Carroll, town 

Celoron, village 

Charlotte, town 

Chautauqua, town 

Chautauqua Lake Asso- 
ciation, village* 

Cherry creek, town .... 
Cherry creek, village. . . 

djrmer , town 

Dunkirk, town 

Dunkirk, city 

£31ery, town 




Deaths, 
1910 



i 
12 
24 
29 
12 

9 
59 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



7 


12 




13 


4 


15 


9 


10 




19 


26 


i6 


11 


7 




553 


272 


i86 


33 


19 


10 



6 



8 
10 



8 

78 



EUicott, town 

Ellington, town ... 

• Falconer, village . . . 

Forestville, village. 

Fredonia, village . . . 

French creek, town , 

Gerry, town 

Hanover, town .... 
Harmony, town. . . 
Jamestown, city. . . 
Kiantone. town. . . 
Lakewood, village . . 
MayviUe, village.. . 

Mina, town 

Panama, village . . . 




Deaths. 
1910 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



25 


48 


19 


7 


19 




15 




78 




10 


7 


16 




45 


51 


35 


4 


404 


492 


4 




15 




11 




8 


6 


8 





* P<q;>iiIation included in ihat of the town of Chautauqua. 



Division of Vital Statistics 



83 



Chaviauqua County — Continued 



PoImmI. town. 

Pomf ret, town. 

PortUnd, town 

Riplev. town 

Sheridmn* town 

Sherman, town 

SbenoAn. villa^ 

SUrar Creek, viUage. . 



Births, 


Deaths, 


Mar- 

• 


1910 


1910 


nates, 
1910 


29 


15 


7 


38 


22 


47 


42 


25 


13 


43 


28 


58 


24 


27 


9 


25 


16 


10 


n 


6 




52 


34 





Sinclainrille, village 
Stockton, town. . . . 
Villenova, town. . . 
Westfield, town . . . 
Weatfield, villace . . 
Delayed returns. . . 

Total 



Births. 


Deaths. 


1910 


1910 


8 


11 


29 


35 


28 


14 


15 


22 


44 


64 


55 


3 


2.297 


1.536 



Mar- 

1910 



6 

8 

71 



2 



1.183 



Chemung County 



town 

BeJdmn. town 

Bi( Flats, town. 

Catiin. town 

Cbemunt, town 

Ehnira. town 

Elmira, city 

Elmira Heichts. village* 
Erin, town 



Births. 


I>eaths. 


Mar- 

• 


1910 


1910 


nages, 
1910 


3 


1 


8 


5 


10 


5 


20 


19 


18 


17 


10 


5 


24 


27 


16 


12 


39 


6 


593 


554 


388 


49 


41 




15 


18 


\2 



Horseheads, town. . 
Horsehoads, village 
Southport, town. . . 
Van Etten, town . . 
VanEtten. village. 

Veteran, town 

Wellsburg. village. . 

ToUl 



Births, 


Deaths. 


1910 


1910 


21 


44 


24 


25 


24 


27 


18 


7 


8 


6 


18 


30 


11 


8 


862 


866 



Mar- 
riages. 
1910 



39 



17 
9 



15 



538 



* Part of village in town of Horseheads. 



Chenango County 



Afton, town 

Af ton, village 

Baiobridge. town 

Bainbridge. village 

Cohunbus, town 

Coventry, town 

Oetman, town 

Grerne, town 

Greene, village 

Otntford. town 

Uneklarn, town 

McDonou^, town 

^f*w Berlin, town. ... 
New Berlin, village . . 
North Norwich, town 
Norwich, town 



Births. 


Deaths, 


Mar- 


1910 


1910 


riages, 
1910 


26 


18 


11 


1 11 


12 




12 


7 


2i 


24 


24 




17 


14 


6 


7 


16 


4 


10 


2 


2 


33 


28 


30 


20 


18 


h 


31 


37 


18 


13 


4 


3 


16 


17 


4 


9 


18 


19 


' 16 


22 




12 


14 


2 


10 


11 


68 

1 



Norwich, village. . 

Otselic, town 

Oxford, town 

Oxford, village . . . 
Pharsalia, town. . 
Pitcher, town. . . . 
Plymouth, town. . 
Preston, town. . . . 
Sherburne, town. . 
Sherburne, village 
Smithville, town . . 

Smyrna, town 

Smyrna, village . . 
Delayed returns . . 

ToUl 



Births, 
1910 



153 
12 
30 
35 

9 
18 

7 
10 
19 
15 
17 
15 

4 

I 

612 



Deaths. 
1910 



122 
17 
43 
32 

9 
12 

9 
17 
25 
16 
11 
11 

7 



593 



Mar- 
riages. 
1910 



10 
20 



4 
4 
6 
6 
23 



6 
9 



280 



84 



State Department of Health 



Clinton County 



Altona, town 

Ausable, town 

Beekmantown, town 
Black Brook, town. . 
Champlain, town . . . 
Champlain. village. . 

Chasy, town 

Clinton, town 

Dannemora. town . . 
Dannemora, village . 
EUenburgh. town. . . 



Births. 


Deaths, 


Mar- 

• 


1910 


1910 


nages, 
1910 


46 


21 


10 


18 


12 


22 


25 


39 


11 


30 


23 


15 


76 


37 


55 


27 


19 




109 


37 


is 


49 


24 


7 


63 


20 


18 


25 


9 




72 


14 


19 



Mooers, town 

Mooera, village 

Peru, town 

Plattsburgh, town. . . 
Plattsburgh, citjr .... 
Rouse's Point, village 

Saranac, town 

Schuyler Falls, town. 
Delayed returns 

ToUl 



Births, 


Deaths, 


1910 


1910 


67 


64 


9 


7 


48 


27 


51 


50 


284 


192 


5 


7 


91 


46 


45 


22 


11 


3 


1.140 


663 



Mar- 
riages. 
1910 



30 

16 

18 

134 

28 

7 



408 



Columbia County 



Ancram, town 

Austerlits, town. . . . 

Canaan, town 

Chatham, town .... 
Chatham, village . . . 
Clavcrack. town. . . . 
Clermont, town .... 

Copake. town 

Gallatin, town 

Germantown, town . 

Ghent, town 

Greenport. town 

Hillsdale, town 



Births. 


Deaths. 


Mar- 

• 


1910 


1910 


nages. 
1910 


31 


17 


9 


10 


10 


8 


11 


14 


12 


23 


38 


31 


44 


37 




30 


38 


32 


14 


20 


6 


20 


25 


6 


6 


8 


5 


21 


22 


7 


15 


47 


17 


30 


15 


5 


11 


22 


7 



Hudson, city 

Kinderhook, town. . 
Kinderhook, village. 
Livingston, town . . . 
New Lebanon, town. 
Philmont. village . . . 
Stockport, town. . . . 
Stuyvcsant, town. . . 
Taghkanic. town. . . 

Valatie. village 

Delayed returns. . . . 

ToUl 



Births. 
1910 



254 
8 
19 
22 
17 
32 
42 
33 
12 
24 
3 



732 



Deaths. 
1910 



236 
21 
17 
20 
19 
32 
47 
25 
11 
27 
2 



770 



Mar- 

nages, 
1910 



66 
23 

io 

8 

ih 

18 
6 



290 



Cortlwnd County 



Cincinnatus. town. . 

Cortland, city , 

Cortlandville. town . , 

Cuyler, town 

Freetown, town 

Harford, town 

Homer, town 

Homer, village 

Lapeer, town. 

McGrawville. village. 
Marathon, town 



Births. 


Deaths. 


Mar- 


1910 


1910 


riages. 
1910 


1 18 


14 


5 


1 264 


218 


95 


26 


40 


26 


15 


16 


6 


' 7 


7 


4 


1 8 


11 


3 


1 22 


25 


25 


42 


47 




11 


8 





10 


20 




10 


4 


11 




Marathon, village 

Preble, town 

Scott, town 

Solon, town 

Taylor, town 

Tnixton, town . . . 

Virgil, town 

Willet, town 

Delayed returns . . 

ToUl 



Births. 


Deaths. 


1910 


1910 


22 


19 


14 


11 


17 


15 


10 


11 


17 


10 


22 


18 


18 


22 


6 


12 


1 




559 


528 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



1 
4 
3 
6 
10 
8 
6 
1 



214 



Division of Vital Statistics 



Delaware County 





"SS 


IBIO 


■si- 




Binhi 
1910 


^5fS^ 


'* 




i 


S2 

21 


26 

1 

15 


13 
"19 




19 

56 
4J 

60 


12 
27 








Bsn£^^::':::: 


S 




wsZn.T;™"".*.;::; 

WBlton, villme 

DtlBy.d relurai 

Toll! 




Fnnkliai viOue'. '.'.'.'.'-'. 
Btararlc. vmtB.'.V.'.'.'. 


'ss 


793 


720 


3*7 



Dvichess County 





Birtts, 


Deiths. 


M.r- 




Birthg 
1910 


Deatlii. 
1910 


S 




IS 
1 

es 

43 

1 

20 
21 


1 

i 

122 

20 

e 

3 
B 
24 


s 

105 

is 

■ 8 


Pleuant Valley, town. 
Ple^nl V,ll,y. viUw 
Poughkeepaie, town... 

Bed Hook, town 

Rod Hook. vilUce 

Rliinebeck, town 

Stanlord. town...!!:! 

Tivoli. vUlace 

Union VaC^wn 

wgSTril-Xvii: 


1 

34 

i 

2S 


20 

1 

29 

is 

48 




gl*»»«^™ 


*"'24 






^arrSi.-".::: 




Fiilikill, viUuB 


11 

■2? 


NjJ^jBuJ^wn 


Delaj^retufo. 


14 


^^"Jj^jJUj*^ 




1.553 


1.429 











Erie County 







.Mar. 1 






"l^l^' 


30 








































































21 


18 


7 



86 



Statb Depabtmewt of Heai^th 



Erie County — Continued 



Kenmore, villa^ . . . . 
Lackawanna, city. . . . 

Lancaster, town 

Lancaster, village 

MariUa, town 

Newstead, town 

North Collins, town. . 
Sardinia, town ...... 

Sloan, village 



Births, 


Deaths, 


Mar- 

• 


1910 


1910 


nages, 
1910 


18 


6 




389 


395 


134 


46 


34 


95 


100 


62 




28 


23 


8 


41 


30 


27 


47 


28 


15 


38 


21 


12 


21 


7 





SpringviUe. village. . 
Tonawanda, town. . 
Tonawanda, city . . . 

Wales, town 

West Seneca, town. . 
Williams viUe, village 
Delasred returns .... 



Total 



Births. 


Deaths, 


1910 


1910 


32 


32 


8 


21 


164 


106 


14 


14 


97 


65 


16 


18 


13 




12,190 


8,534 



Mar- 
riages. 
1910 



37 
09 

7 
34 



152 



4.745 



Essex CowrUy 



Bloomingdale, village. . . 

Chesterfield, town 

Crown Point, town. . . . 
Eliaabethtown, town. . . 
Eliaabethtown, village.. 

Essex, town 

Jay, town 

Keene, town 

Keeseville, village 

Lake Placid, village 

Lewis, town 

Minerva, town 

Moriah, town 

Newcomb, town 



Births, 


Deaths. 


Mar- 

• 


1910 


1910 


nages, 
1910 


2 


1 




25 


18 


is 


19 


35 


9 


13 


11 


16 


10 


8 




11 


25 


4 


46 


31 


15 


12 


13 


13 


25 


34 




32 


21 




14 


17 


9 


13 


11 


3 


151 


108 


78 


6 


2 


2 



North Elba. town. . . 
North Hudson, town 
Port Henry, village . 
St. Armand, town . . 

Schroon, town 

Ticonderoga, town.. 
Ticonderoga, village. 

Westport, town 

WiUsboro, town .... 
Wilmington, town. . 
Delayed returns .... 



ToUl 



Births. I Deaths, 
1910 1910 



14 

6 

74 

2 

19 

75 

37 

43 

28 

13 

6 



17 

8 

35 

9 

15 

46 

17 

32 

24 

18 

2 



Mar- 
riages. 
1910 



34 
1 

6 

9 

46 



11 
6 



696 



558 



277 



Franklin County 



Altamont, town 

Bangor, town 

Belmont, town 

Bombay, town 

Brandon, town 

Brighton, town 

Burke, town 

Chateaugay, town 

Chateaugay, village. . . . 

Constable, town 

Dickinson, town 

Diiane, town 

Fort Covington, town. . 
Fort Covington, village 



Births, 


Deaths. 


Mar- 

• 


1910 


1910 


nages, 
1910 


42 


20 


39 


40 


31 


11 


65 


26 


15 


28 


35 


12 


27 


9 


9 


22 


16 


6 


44 


23 


5 


56 


25 


23 


10 


24 




30 


32 


is 


39 


24 


8 


11 


3 




38 


18 


25 


13 


14 





Franklin, town 

Harrietstown. town. . 

Malone, town 

Malone, village 

Moira, town 

Santa Clara, town . . . 
Saranac Lake, village. 
Tupper Lake, village. 

Waverly. town 

Westville. town 

Delayed returns 



Total 



Births, 
1910 

25 
10 
64 
141 
45 
10 
tll2 
85 
64 
30 
42 


Deaths. 
1910 


Mar- 
riages. 
1910 


22 
13 
74 

108 

44 

2 

141 

50 

39 

18 

1 


8 
56 
90 

"is 



i5 

5 


1,093 

1 


812 


358 



t Part of village in E^ssez county. 



Division of Vital Statistics 



87 



Fulton County 



Bleetker. town . . 
Bro«daU)in, town 
C«roca. town. . . 
EphimtAh. town . 
Gl o r erevi Ue, city , 
Johnstown, town. 
Johnstown, city. 
Hayfieid. town.. 
Msyfiekl. village . 



Births. 


Deaths. 


Mar- 


1910 


1910 


riages, 
1910 


12 


6 





25 


29 


12 


13 


11 


1 


15 


29 


8 


401 


321 


217 


38 


39 


16 


188 


153 


110 


1 28 


23 


13 


1 6 


11 





Northampton, town 
Northville, village 
Oppenheim. town. 

Perth, town 

Stratford, town. . . 
Delayed returns . . 



Total 



Births, 
1910 



21 
21 
6 
14 
12 
12 



812 



Deaths, 
1910 



15 
9 

14 
8 

13 



681 



Mar- 
riages. 
1910 



7 
2 
1 
4 



391 



Genesee Cownty 



Alabnma. town. . . 
Alexander, town. . 
Alexander, village 

Ratavia, town 

B«t»Tia, village. . 

Bergen, town 

Bonpen. village. . . 
Bethany, town . . . 

Byron, town 

Corfu, village. . . . 
Darien. town.. . . . 
Elba. town. 



Births, 


Deaths, 


Mar- 


1910 


1910 


riages, 
1910 


41 


31 


14 


16 


22 


7 


3 


6 




18 


30 


iu 


232 


206 




17 


13 


7 


12 


21 




18 


30 


14 


24 


22 


11 


10 


7 




30 


19 


ii 


16 


6 


4 



Elba, village ... 
Le Roy, town . . 
Le Roy, village. 
Oakfield, town. . 
Oakfield, village 
Pavilion, town. . 
Pembroke, town 
Stafford, town. . 
Delayed returns 

Total 



Births, 
1910 



9 
34 
77 
25 
42 
31 
25 

6 
13 



699 



*«*" 1910 



5 
24 
45 
8 
9 
26 
35 
22 



587 



36 
U 



10 

10 

2 

1 



255 



Greene Coimty 



Births, 
1910 



Ashhind. town. . . 

Athem. town 

Athens, village . . . 

Cairo, town 

Catalan, town... . 
Cataidll. village. . . 
Coxaaclue, town . . 
Coxaarkie. village 
Durbam, town. . . 
Grvraville, town. . 
HaSoott, town 



8 
11 
31 
31 
61 
93 
33 
63 
16 
30 

7 



Deaths. M*' 
1910 nages. 
***" 1910 



32 

24 

4 



8 





15 


15 


26 




39 


8 


68 


76 


96 




17 


27 


56 





9 
13 

4 



Himter, town 

Himter, village 

Jewett, town 

Lexington, town 

New Baltimore, town 
Prattsville, town. . . . 
Tannersville, village. . 

Windham, town 

Delayed returns 

ToUl 



Births, 


Deaths, 


1910 


1910 


35 


28 


8 


8 


12 


7 


8 


11 


31 


33 


21 


14 


15 


10 


28 


29 


3 




545 


525 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



18 



6 
7 
9 
6 



12 



210 



Hamilton Cotmty 



Arietta, town 

Braaon. town 

Hoof. town 

Iikdian Lake. town. . 

Inlet, town 

Lake Pleasant, town 



Births.! Deaths,' ^^ 
1910 1910 I ™^ 



4 

4 

4 

24 

5 

4 



4 

3 
1 
8 
5 
11 



1 

5 
8 





Long Lake, town 
Morehouse, town 
Wells, town 

Total 



Births. 
1910 



Deaths, 
1910 



70 



57 



13 


10 








12 


15 



Mar- 
riages. 
1910 



7 



7 



28 



88 



State Department of Health 



Herkimer County 



Cold Brook, village . . 

Columbia, town 

Danube, town 

Dolgeville, village 

Fairfield, town 

Frankfort, town 

Frankfort, village 

German Flata, town.. 

Herkimer, town 

Herkimer, village. . . . 

liion, village 

Litchfield, town 

Little Falls, town 

Little Falls, city 

Manheim, town 

Middlevilie, village . . 

Mohawk, village 

Newport, town 



Births, 
1010 



4 

20 

16 

63 

10 

30 

119 

18 

18 

195 

131 

9 

4 

336 

5 

5 

30 

9 



Deaths, 
1910 



5 
26 

8 
19 

6 
25 
57 
18 
34 
121 
87 
11 

9 
188 

4 
11 
36 

6 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



4 
6 



6 
41 



67 
81 



1 

3 

200 

25 



15 



Newport, village 

Norway, town 

Ohio, town 

Old Forge, village. . . 

Poland, village 

Russia, town 

Salisbury, town 

Schuyler, town 

Stark, town 

Warren, town 

Webb, town 

West Winfield, village 

Wilmurt, town 

Winfield, town 

Delayed returns 

Total 



Births, 


Deaths. 


1910 


1910 


10 


10 


7 


9 


3 


4 


16 


10 




11 


18 


27 


38 


25 


14 


10 


13 


19 


6 


17 


19 


8 


16 


14 


7 


7 


14 


13 


9 


2 


1,218 


857 



Mar- 
riages. 
1910 



10 
18 
11 

4 
4 
8 

6 
5 
5 



519 



Jefferson County 



Adams, town 

Adams, village 

Alexandria, town 

Alexandria, Bay, village 

Antwerp, town 

Antwerp, village 

Belleville, village 

Black River, village 

Brownville, town 

Brownville, village 

Cape Vincent, town .... 
Cape Vincent, village . 

Carthage, village 

Champion, town 

Chaumont, village 

Clayton, town 

Clayton, village 

Dexter, village 

EUisburg, town 

Ellisburg. village 

Glen Park, village 

Henderson, town 

Henderson, village 



Births, 
1910 



22 
16 
46 
44 
44 
15 

6 
18 
19 
18 
19 
22 
90 
15 

4 
35 
39 
19 
65 

5 

8 
22 

5 



Deaths, 
1910 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



39 


25 


30 




39 


30 


29 




27 


i9 


13 




8 





11 




18 


30 


10 




22 


22 


15 




57 




11 


16 


9 




30 


33 


27 




11 




52 


18 


5 




12 




16 


io 


6 





Hounsfield, town 

Le Ray, town 

Lorraine, town 

Lyme, town 

Mannsville, village 

Orleans, town 

Pamelia, town 

Philadelphia, town 

Philadelphia, village. . . 

Rodman, town 

Rutland, town 

Sacketts Harbor, vil . . 

Theresa, town 

Theresa, village 

Watertown, town 

Watertown, city 

West Carthage, village 

Wilna, town 

Worth, town 

Delayed returns 

Total 



Births, 


I>eatha. 


1910 


1910 


23 


21 


23 


44 


19 


18 


10 


20 


1 


9 


48 


34 


7 


25 


15 


12 


9 


23 


28 


18 


13 


21 


11 


17 


29 


15 


9 


24 


14 


11 


583 


467 


15 


25 


20 


46 


12 


5 


25 


1 


1,510 


1.353 



Mar- 

riages, 
1910 



31 

10 

8 

8 

ie 

8 
6 

■ 6 
16 

"i? 

"7 

231 

49 

4 
1 

621 



Lewis County 



Constableville, village. 
Copenhagen, village . . . 

Croghan, town 

Croghan, village 

Denmark, town 

Diana, town 

Greig. town 

Harrisburg, town 




4 

4 

47 
16 
21 
24 
12 
6 



Deaths. 
1910 



5 
22 
23 
13 

18 

25 

8 

9 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



26 



15 

13 

7 

3 



Harrisville, village 
Highmarket, town 

Lewis, town 

Leyden, town . . 
Lowville, town . 
Ixjwville, village 
Lyonsdale, town. 
Lyons Falls, village 



Births, 


Deaths. 


1910 


1910 


10 


14 


7 


4 


17 


12 


28 


14 


18 


21 


37 


47 


22 


13 


15 


6 



Mar-r 

riages, 
1910 



1 

6 

13 

34 

a 



Division of Vital Statistics 



89 



Lewis Gowrdy — Continued 



MartinsburK, town. . 

Montague, town 

Xew Bremen* town . 

Oaeeola. town 

Pinokney, town .... 
Port Leyden. villace 
Ttfrin, town 



Births. 
1910 


Deaths, 
1910 


Mar- 
riages, 
1910 


28 
8 
30 
11 
11 
22 
14 


26 
5 

15 
3 

8 

18 

7 


14 
1 
6 

'■5 

■'9 



Turin, village . . . . 
Watson, town. . . . 
West Turin, town 
Delayed returns. . 

Total 



Births. 
1910 


Deaths, 
1910 


2 
17 
15 
11 


3 
22 
12 


457 


373 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



10 
9 



175 



Livingston County 



Avon, town 

Avtm, Tillage 

Caledonia, town. . 
Caledonia, village 
Concsus. town . . . 
DaofTille. village. 
Oensaeo. town . . . 
Geneseo. village . . 
Grovdand, town. 
l«ioester, town. . . 

Lima, town 

Uma. village 

Uvoma. town. . . . 
Uvonia, village... 
Moaoow. village . . 



Birtha, 
1910 



22 
41 
20 
18 
22 
59 
17 
41 
27 
42 
25 
11 
41 
13 
8 



Deaths, 
1910 



19 
32 
18 
21 
13 
76 
20 
22 
12 
15 
13 
19 
15 
16 
2 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



19 
id 

ii 

23 



15 

2 

12 



16 





Births. 
1910 


Deaths, 
1910 


Mar- 
riages, 
1910 


Mount Morris, town. . 
Mount Morris, village. 
North Dansville, town. 
Nunda, town 


23 
62 

5 
21 
12 
12 
23 

5 
26 
20 
48 

7 


13 

65 

6 

22 

20 

6 

9 

7 

16 

9 

40 

3 


18 

■ "38 
12 


Nunda, village 

Ossian, town 


3 


Portage, town 

Snarta. town 


8 
9 


Springwater, town .... 
West Sparta, town. . . . 
York, town 


17 

3 

13 


Delayed returns 

Total 


16 


671 


528 


251 







Madison Cotmty 



Brookfieki. town 

Brookfiekl, viDage . . 
Canastota, viOage . . 
Caienovia, town. . . . 
Casenovia. village. . 
Chittenango, village 
De Ruyter. town . . . 
De Ruyter, village. . 
EariviUe. village.... 

Eaton, town 

Fenner. town 

Oeorgetown. town. . 
Hamilton, town . . . . 
Hamilton, village. . . 
W»non, town 



Births. 


Deaths, 


Mar- 


1910 


1910 


riages, 
1910 


39 


30 


14 


8 


5 




81 


62 




36 


35 


21 


23 


30 




11 


14 




15 


14 


9 


1 


10 




15 


10 




23 


46 


21 


13 


8 


10 


20 


18 


7 > 


32 


28 


1 ^ 


34 


23 




20 


15 


6 



Lenox, town 

Lincoln, town 

Madison, town 

Madison, village 

Morrisville, village. . 

Nelson, town 

Oneida, city 

Smithfield, town 

•Stockbridge, town. . 

Sullivan, town 

Wampsville. village. 
Delayed returns . . . . 

Total 



Births, 
1910 



23 
17 
26 

' • ■ • 

8 

20 

157 

15 

26 

60 

2 

1 



726 



Deaths, 
1910 



18 

10 

20 

4 

8 

16 

118 

11 

20 

44 

4 



621 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



39 

6 

14 



13 

78 

4 

13 

26 



283 



90 



Statb Depa&tment of "EizAurK 



Monroe County 



Brighton, town 

Brockport, village .... 

Chariotte, village 

Chili, town 

Churchville, village . . . 

Clarkaon, town 

East Rochester, village 

Fairport, village 

Gates, town 

Greece, town 

Hamlin, town 

Henrietta, town 

Hilton, villue 

Honeoye Falls, village. 
Irondequoit, town .... 

Mendon, town 

Ogden, town 



BiHhs. 


Deaths, 


Mar- 

• 


1910 


1910 


nages, 
1910 


62 


43 


20 


66 


49 




15 


31 




26 


16 


13 


9 


9 




28 


23 


9 


69 


32 




48 


49 




68 


49 


21 


23 


94 


45 


38 


16 


18 


18 


28 


15 


11 


9 




16 


20 




76 


40 


16 


31 


21 


18 


33 


33 


30 



Parma, town 

Penfield, town 

Perinton. town. . . . 
Pittsford, town. . . . 
Pittsford, village . . 

Riga, town 

Rochester, city. . . . 

Rush, town 

Spencerix>rt. village 

Sweden, town 

Webster, town .... 
Webster, village . . . 
Wheatland, town. . 
Delayed returns. . . 

Total 



Births, 
1910 



49 
59 
41 
25 
30 
22 
5,092 
30 
17 
28 
51 
13 
52 
35 



6,171 



Deaths, 
1910 



25 
27 
32 
20 
16 
18 

3.072 
20 
15 
21 
36 

. 16 

33 

2 



3,915 



Mar- 
riages. 
1910 



Id 
37 
20 



18 
2,265 

7 



38 
25 



16 



2,647 



Montgomery County 



Akin, village 

Amsterdam, town. . . 
Amsterdam, city .... 
Canajoharie, town. . . 
Canajoharie, village. . 
Charlestown, town. . . 

Florida, town 

Fonda, village 

Fort Plain, village . . . 
Fultonville, village. . . 

Glen, town 

Hagaman, village. . . . 



Births, 
1910 



12 
18 
695 
27 
32 
11 
23 
15 
47 
14 
10 
18 



Deaths, 
1910 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



9 




35 


16 


541 


394 


18 


37 


41 




10 


9 


17 


10 


24 





60 




18 




23 


14 


9 





Minden, town 

Mohawk, town 

Nelliston, village 

Palatine, town 

Palatine Bridge, village 

Root, town 

St. Johnsville, town. . . 
St. Johnsville. village. 
Delayed returns 

ToUl 



Births, 
1910 



Deaths, 
1910 







31 


29 


20 


22 


11 


13 


32 


33 


13 


6 


16 


28 


1 


6 


61 


45 


10 


1 


1.117 


988 



Mar- 

riagoa, 

1910 



38 
23 



19 



5 

28 



596 



Nassau County 



East Rockaway, village 
Farmixigdale, village 
Floral Park, village . 

Freeport, village 

Hempstead, town. . . 
Hempstead, village. 
Lawrence, village. . . 
Mineola, village .... 



Births, 


Deaths, 


Mar- 

• 


1910 


1910 


nages, 
1910 


9 


16 




31 


20 




24 


12 




88 


46 




637 


338 


320 


76 


89 


• ■ ■ ■ • 


7 


3 




70 


105 





North Hempstead, 
town 

Oyster Bay, town 

Rockville Center, vil- 
lage 

Sea Cliff, village 

Delayed returns 

Total 



Births, 


Deaths, 


1910 


1910 


414 


173 


337 


258 


65 


41 


22 


33 


20 


2 


1,800 


1.136 



Mar- 
riage*. 
1910 



132 

175 



628 



DiviBiow OF Vital Statistics 







New York 


(tJrea^er) 










Birthi, 


D«tlui. 






Birthi, 
IS 10 


Dnths, 
1910 


Mar- 


QtrriNgw York: 


M,36S 


as.Btts 

B.ses 


•M.647 


ls;s;S"'5™srcb: 


7,119 
1.991 


8.971 
1,407 


a.on 




Toua 




129,081 


78,760 




Bontich of Brook- 























Niagara County 





»» 


"silr 




1 


■» 


"tsr 


S 




i 

«9 
340 


,1 

2S 

H 

S3 

1 

■'649 


"17 

■'"is 

140 
436 


SS.£-,S^:::: 


337 
24 

VI 

1 


13 

1 


n. 


!i3S;,-SS..:;::: 
tegSSS-,..;::: 




!S 




SSnS^' 




Niacum.lowIi 

NiMnFaU^eHy 


■ji 


3.130 


1.403 









Oneida County 





BMh*. 


°!j.r 


AUr- 




'St' 


D»tlu. 
1910 


Mh- 

US? 




33 
39 

i 

33 

1 

i 

99 

17 


i 
1 

16 

'; 

37 
13 

34 
3 


1| 
" i 

s 




1 

i 

3i 

1. 800 
30 

IS 
M 

38 
3.431 


31 

J 

i 

1.390 

i 




JarSir".-.:-.::::: 


RSST-^tV"^ 




i^Sa:::::: 




SUuben. town 

avlrtaB-K*. TJllM*. 

TnotoS; !XU' ■. : :: ! 


6 
■"■■« 




llll 

il 


17 






W.(,rvUl..Till.p..-.. 
Whitsiboro, TilUn... 
D.l.y«l ™tulir 


J 






sISSi; 




Ori.kuTFUk.TiUw>. 







92 



State Dbpabtmsnt ov Health 



Onondaga County 



Baldwinffville, villace. . 
Cumilhm, town. ...... 

CamilluB, yilUge 

Cicero, town 

Clay, town 

De Witt, town 

East Sjmtctue, village. 

Eastwood, Tiliice 

Eibridge, town 

Elbridge. villace 

Fabius, town 

Fabitia, village 

Fayetteville, village. . . 

Geddes, town 

Jordan, village 

La Fayette, town 

Liverpool, village 

Lyaander, town 

ManUuB, town 



Birtba. 


Deaths. 


Mar- 


1910 


1910 


nages, 
1910 


45 


51 




85 


25 


9 


13 


11 




51 


28 


12 


43 


29 


19 


40 


43 


47 


94 


47 




7 


5 




13 


26 


24 


8 


7 




35 


20 


i5 


2 


5 




18 


23 




8 


10 


53 


3 


16 




25 


14 


9 


22 


20 




28 


44 


30 


54 


50 


40 



Manliua, village . . . 
Maroellua. town . . . 
Marcellua. village. . 
Onondaga, town. . . 

Otiaoo. town 

Pompey. town. . . . 

Salina. town 

Skaneatelee, town. 
Skaneatelfa, village 
Solvay. village .... 
Spafford, town .... 

Svracuae, city 

TuUy, town 

TuUy, village 

Van Buren. town . . 
Delayed returns. . . 

Total 



Births. 


Deaths, 


1910 


1910 


29 


12 


25 


20 


7 


9 


62 


132 


19 


17 


39 


33 


26 


25 


46 


25 


20 


28 


100 


77 


17 


11 


2,796 


2,124 


23 


10 


6 


14 


23 


33 


51 


2 


3,833 


3,046 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



23 



35 
3 
10 
23 
31 



7 

1.144 

9 



16 
14 



1,572 



Ontario County 



Bristol, town 

Canadioe, town 

Canandaigua, town . . . . 
Canandaigua. village. . . 
Clifton Springs, village . 
East Bloomfield, town. . 

Farmington, town 

Geneva, town 

Geneva, city 

Oorham, town 

Hopewell, town 

Manchester, town 

Manchester, village 

Naples, town 



Births, 


Deaths. 


Mar- 


1910 


1910 


nages, 
1910 


22 


15 


7 


18 


11 


6 


35 


16 


81 


182 


157 




23 


64 




14 


26 


14 


30 


24 


10 


14 


7 


3 


241 


175 


122 


27 


14 


6 


23 


31 


6 


29 


21 


26 


23 


17 




21 


8 


22 



Naples, village 

Phelps, town 

Phelps, village 

Richmond, town 

Seneca, town 

Shortsville, village. . . . 
South Bristol, town. . . 

Victor, town 

Victor, village 

West Bloomfield, town 
Delayed returns 

Total 



Births. 


Deaths, 


1910 


1910 


4 


8 


50 


37 


17 


17 


21 


17 


52 


32 


27 


12 


10 


10 


30 


10 


15 


19 


8 


20 


9 


2 


951 


779 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



15 



9 

18 



10 



360 



Orange County 



Blooming Grove, town. 

Chester, town 

Chester, village 

Cornwall, town 

Cornwall, village 

Crawford, town 

Deerpark, town 

Goshen, town 

Goshen^ village 

Greenville, town 

Hamptonburah, town . . 
Highland FaUs, village . 

Hijihlands, town 

Middletown, city 

Minisink, town 

Monroe, town 

Monroe, village 

Montgomery, town .... 



Births, 
1910 



18 
39 
15 
49 
46 
17 
16 
30 
38 
10 
22 
93 
36 
268 
7 
18 
29 
36 



Deaths, 
1910 



22 
18 
15 
52 
37 
27 
34 
49 
76 
10 
22 
49 
13 
274 
16 
22 
27 
34 



Mar- 
riages. 
1910 




Births, 
1910 


Deaths. 
1910 


Mar- 
riages, 
1910 


13 
16 


Montgomery, village. . 
Mount Hope 


17 
24 
81 

541 
76 

167 
54 
5 
70 
36 
90 
47 
10 
32 
37 
31 


13 
37 
76 

509 
62 

180 

60 

9 

49 

41 

79 

41 

8 

25 

39 

3 


ii 


''4i 

19 
33 

6 

56 

147 

4 

12 


Newburgh, town 

Newburph. city 

New Winosor. town . . 

Port Jervis, city 

Tuxedo, town 

Unionville, village .... 

Walden, village 

I Wallkill, town 

1 Warwick, town 

Warwick, village 

i Washington, village. . . 
' Wawayanda. town. . . . 

Woodbury, town 

Delayed returns 

Total 


25 
238 
15 
83 
13 

...... 

50 

"12 
13 


60 


2,105 


2,017 


889 









J 



Division of Vital Statistics 



93 



Orleans Cownty 



Albion, town 

Albion. Tillage 

Barre, town 

Cazltoo, town 

Claraodon, town. . . 

Gsines, town 

HoUey. village .... 

KmHall. town 

Lyndoorille, village 



Births. 


Deaths, 


Mar- 


1910 


1910 


riages, 
1910 


15 


36 


46 


67 


85 




30 


26 


11 


42 


37 


15 


26 


25 


6 


29 


27 


12 


38 


36 




31 


19 


11 


15 


8 





Medina, village. 
Murray, town.. 
Ridseway, town 
Shelby, town... 

Yates, town 

Delayed returns 

Total 



Births. 


Deaths, 


1910 


1910 


91 


101 


74 


26 


39 


23 


31 


28 


34 


20 


16 




578 


497 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



29 
53 
24 
16 



223 



Oswego County 



Albion, town 

Altmar, village 

Amboy, town 

Bo^ston. town 

Oentral Square, village 

Clevelaoa. village 

Cooatentia, town 

Fulton, city 

Granbv. town 

Hannihal, town 

Hannibal, village 

Haattngs, town 

I^awwia. village 

Mexico, town 

Mexico, village 

New Haven, town .... 

OrwcD, town 

Oswego, town 



Births. 


Deaths, 


Mar- 


1910 


1910 


riages, 
1910 


19 


17 


18 


6 


4 




4 


11 


7 


19 


10 


5 


6 


12 






8 

25 

245 

31 

36 

7 
32 

7 
31 
15 
22 
19 
45 



11 
16 
155 
21 
23 

7 
29 

7 
46 
27 
19 

7 
47 




96 
18 
19 

i7 

ie 

8 

7 

14 



Oswego, city 

Palermo, town 

Parish, town 

Parish; village 

Phoenix, vilUge .... 

Pulaski, village 

Redfield, town 

Richland, town 

Sandy Creek, town . 
Sandy Creek, village 
Schroeppel, town . . . 

Scriba, town 

Volney, town 

West Monroe, town. 
Williamstown, town. 
Delayed returns 

Total 



Births, 


Deaths, 


1910 


1910 


488 


385 


24 


18 


10 


13 


5 


12 


23 


26 


14 


25 


8 


9 


35 


35 


20 


15 


5 


17 


25 


17 


34 


23 


41 


36 


16 


12 


11 


10 


2 




1.338 


1,122 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



184 

8 

14 




28 
12 

23 

13 

13 

7 

5 

1 

533 



Otsego County 



Boriington. town 

Bntmnuta. town 

Cbafry VaUeyi town.. . 
Cherry Valley, village. 
Coofmtown, village.. 

Deeatur, town 

Edmeaton, town 

Eaetar. town 

Oilbertaville, village. . . 

Haitwick, town 

Laurena, town 

Laurent, village 

Maryland, town 

Middletown, town 

Milford. town 

Mitford« village 

Morria, town 

Morris, village 

New lirfMm. town. . . . 
Oneonta. town 



Births. 


Deaths. 


Mar- 

• 


1910 


1910 


nagea. 
1910 


7 


15 


2 


22 


17 


8 


15 


14 


5 


9 


14 




50 


58 


■ • • • • 


11 


6 


3 


25 


23 


16 


14 


18 


9 


6 


15 




30 


24 


i6 


16 


17 


8 


3 


2 




22 


25 


ii 


28 


50 


8 


22 


16 


10 


13 


15 




17 


10 


14 


5 


12 




19 


12 


9 


16 


12 


1 



Oneonta, dty 

Otego. town 

Otego, village 

Otsego, town 

Pittafield. town 

Plainfield, town 

Richfield, town 

Richfield brings, vil- 
lage 

Roseboom, town 

Sohenevus, village .... 

Sprin|:field, town 

Unadilla, town 

UnadlUa, village 

Westford, town 

Worcester, town 

Delayed returns 

Total 



1 




Births, 


Deaths. 


1910 


1910 


190 


182 


20 


17 


11 


15 


27 


27 


11 


9 


9 


13 


9 


17 


20 


27 


6 


20 


6 


6 


16 


28 


24 


24 


12 


24 


17 


9 


51 


49 


13 


5 


792 


847 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



100 
4 

30 

8 

10 

25 



1 
22 

3 
19 



349 



94 



State Dbpabtmbnt of "ELzautk 



Ptdnam GourUy 



Brewster, yillace. . . 

Carxnel. town 

Cold Sprints, yilUge 

Kent, town 

NelsonviUe, villsc^. . 
Patterson, town .... 



Births, 
1910 



18 
29 
74 
7 
5 
18 



Deaths, 
1910 



29 
47 
47 
18 
18 
16 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 




Births, 
1910 


Deaths, 
1910 


Mar- 

ria«ea, 
1910 


" "8 


niillipstown, town 

Putnam Valley, town.. 

South East, town 

Delayed returns 

Total 


23 
13 
27 
21 


48 

16 

30 

2 


35 

6 

32 

1 


j 


235 


271 


105 









Rensselaer Coxmty 




Beriin, town 

Brunswick, town 

Castleton, yillace 

East Qreenbush, town. . 

Grafton, town 

Hooeiok, town 

Hoosick Falls, yillace. . . 

Nassau, town 

Nassau, village 

North Greenbush, town. 

Petersburgt town 

Pittstown, town 



37 
37 
28 
17 
11 
25 
129 
21 
3 
10 
25 
31 



Deaths. 


Mar- 

• 


1910 


naces, 
1910 


23 


6 


32 


10 


24 




27 


4 


12 


13 


35 


83 


86 




26 


12 


10 




15 


6 1 


13 


6 ' 


34 


H 



Poestenkill, town 

Rensselaer, city 

Sand Lake, town 

Schaghticoke, town . . . 
Schaghticoke, village. . 

Schodack, town 

Stephentown, town. . . 

Troy, city 

Valley FaUs. village. . . 
Delajred returns 

Total 



Births, 


Deaths, 


1910 


1910 


20 


18 


168 


160 


22 


27 


18 


42 


12 


18 


43 


52 


26 


24 


924 


1.597- 


9 


7 


52 


1 


1.667 


2,283 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



8 
97 
15 

9 



28 

16 

658 



989 



Rockland County 



Clarkstown, town 

Grand View-on-Hudson. 

village 

Haverstraw, town 

Haverstraw. village 

Hillbum. village 

Nyack, village 

Orangetown^ town 

Piermont, village 

Ramapo, town 



Births. 


Deaths. 


Mar- 

• 


1910 


1910 


nages. 
1910 


109 


93 


32 


4 


10 




9 


3 


5 


104 


67 




19 


13 




10) 


96 


1 



'I 


55 
35 


80 

• • • ■ • 


99 


107 


72 



South Nvaok. village. . 
Spring Valley, village. . 
Stony Point, town .... 

Suffem, village 

Upper N3rack, village. . 
West Haverstraw, vil- 
lage 

Delayed returns 

Total 



Births, 


Deaths, 


1910 


1910 


27 


34 


65 


26 


89 


54 


46 


47 


7 


7 


34 


26 


32 


3 


829 


676 



Mar- 
riages. 
1910 



^ 



212 



8t. Lawrence County 



Brasher, town. 
Canton, town. 
Canton, village 
dare, town. . . 
Clifton, town. . 
Cdton, town. . 
DeKalb, town 



Births, 
1910 


Deaths, 
1910 


Mar- 
riages, 
1910 


37 


29 


17 


69 


54 


38 


38 


52 




9 


6 


6 


53 


23 


4 


32 


25 


9 


88 


23 


11 



De Peyster, town 

Edwaras, town 

Edwards, village 

Fine, town 

Fowler, town 

Gouvemeur, town .... 
Gomremeur, vfllage. . . 



Births, 


Deaths. 


1910 


1910 


18 


14 


26 


19 


8 


6 


48 


26 


24 


IS 


84 


16 


77 


79 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



3 
11 



17 
14 
64 



Division of Vital Statistics 



95 



St. Lawrence County — Continued 



Hammond, town. . 
Hatnmnnd, viUagc. 
Hennoa. town .... 
Hermon, Tillage . . . 
Hopkinkon, town . . 
LawnBAce, town . . . 

LiBboii. town 

LouiaviUe. town . . . 

Macomb, town 

Mafdrid, town 

Mwawina. town 

Mifpini. village... 
Morratown, town. 
Morriatown, Tillage 

Nocfolk, town 

Norwood, Tillage. . 
city. . 



Births, 


Deaths, 


I 
Mar- 1 

• 


1910 


1910 


nagee, 
1910 


23 


15 


13 


10 


9 




26 


13 


16 


12 


12 




23 


23 


io 


22 


23 


17 


27 


30 


18 


28 


22 


9 


22 


14 


10 


25 


24 


6 


37 


15 


51 


72 


50 




21 


28 


12 


10 


12 




80 


36 


22 


45 


31 




343 


264 


ios 





Births, 
1910 


Deaths, 
1910 


Mar- 
riages, 
1910 


Oswegatchie, town. . . . 

PariahTille, town 

Piercefield, town 

! Pierrepont, town 

• Pitoairn, town 

Potadam, town 

Potsdam, village 

Richyille, village 

Rossie. town 


15 

39 

23 

27 

20 

48 

72 

5 

16 

30 

54 

16 

5 

6 


41 
24 
17 
21 

7 
30 
76 

3 
14 
22 
36 
11 
12 

3 


49 

18 

8 

9 

5 

66 

9 


Russell, town 

Stockholm, town 

Waddington, town. . . . 
Waddington, village. . . 
Delayea returns 

Total 


13 
18 
11 

3 


1,722 


1.325 


685 







Swratoga CownJty 



BaDatoo, town 

BaBatonSp*. village. . 

CbaiHoit, town 

CUftoB Park, town 

Coffiath, town 

Coriath, Tillage 

THj, town 

Edu^barg. town 

Oalwajr, town 

Gahray. Tillage 

Gfeenfidd. town 

Hadtor, town 

Half Moon, town 

Maha. town 

MecfaanieTille, village. 

Miitoo. town. 

Mocean, town 

NorthumbertaiMl. town 



Births. 


Deaths. 


Mar- 

• 


1910 


1910 


nagee, 
1910 


19 


32 


12 


85 


75 




18 


11 


4 


37 


40 


10 


32 


11 


18 


63 


35 




10 


9 


5 


10 


12 


7 


18 


18 


9 





4 




23 


32 


9 


18 


6 


7 


9 


31 


35 


10 


25 


7 


218 


117 




36 


40 


48 


21 


13 


33 


17 


18 


8 




Providence, town 

Saratoga, town 

Saratoga Springs, town 

Saratoga Springs, vil- 
lage 

Schuylerville, village. . 

South Glens Falls, vil- 
lage 

Stillwater, town 

Stillwater, village 

Victory, village 

Wateriord, town 

Waterford, village .... 

Wilton, town 

Delayed returns 

Total 



10 
26 
12 

218 
42 

32 
26 
14 

8 
46 
37 
16 

9 



1,140 



1,083 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



9 


2 


22 


25 


17 


78 


253 




26 




27 




45 


37 


22 




5 




57 


54 


52 




18 


4 


1 


3 



415 







Schenectady Covnty 










Births, 
1910 


Deaths. 
1910 


Mar- 
riage*. 
1910 




Buths, 
1910 


Deaths, 
1910 


Mar- 

riages, 
1910 


Oleoville. town 

Niskayuna, town 

I^saeMown, town 

RoCterdain. town .... r - 


83 
15 
39 

7 
86 


26 
24 
30 
6 
60 


18 
15 
12 
1 
33 


Schenectady, dty 

Scotia, village 

Delayed returns 

Total 


1.865 
58 
71 


1.070 
25 


626 

i 


2.174 1 2JVI i 7nA 










• v»# 



96 



State Defa&tment of TTkat.th 



Schoharie County 



Blenheim, town 

Broome, town 

Carlisle, town 

Cobleskili, town 

Cobleskill, village 

Conesville, town 

Esperance. town 

Elsperance, village . . . . 

Fulton, town 

Gilboa, town 

Jefferson, town 

Middleburgh, town . . . 
Middleburgh, village. . 



Births. 


Deaths. 


Mar- ' 


1910 


1910 


nages, 
1910 

1 


16 


13 


5 1 


12 


17 


3 : 


6 


13 


7 


25 


23 


26 


22 


33 




8 


8 


7 


6 


13 


7 





4 




30 


29 


9 


22 


25 


8 


24 


18 


7 


21 


29 


17 


9 


14 





Richmondville, town. . 
Richmondville, village, 

Schoharie, town 

Schoharie, village 

Seward, town 

Sharon, town 

Sharon Springs, village. 

Summit, town 

Wright, town 

Delayed returns 

Total 



Births, 


Deaths, 


1910 


1910 


11 


11 


6 


16 


18 


27 


11 


21 


26 


17 


21 


21 


3 


9 


15 


14 


17 


19 


7 




336 


394 



Mar- 
riages. 
1910 



10 

is 



7 
5 

8 
8 



152 



Schuyler Cormty 



Burdette, village 

Catherine, town 

Cayuta, town 

Dix, town 

Hector, town 

Montour, town 

Montour Falls, village. 
Odessa, village 



Births, 


Deaths, 


Mar- 

• 


1910 


1910 


nages, 
1910 


3 


7 




18 


13 


8 


7 


8 


3 


15 


14 


34 


49 


52 


17 


3 


3 


2 


10 


14 


• * • « • 


8 


7 






Oran^, town . . . 
Readmg, town. . 
Tyrone, town . . . 
WatkinB, village. 
Delayed returns . 

Total 



Births, 


Deaths, 


1910 


1910 


24 


13 


14 


14 


19 


16 


46 


52 


3 


2 


219 


215 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



10 

4 
5 



84 



Seneca County 



Covert, town 

Fayette, town 

Interlaken, village . 

Junius, town 

Lodi, town 

Ovid, town 

Ovid, village 

Romulus, town 

Seneca Falls, town 



Births, 


Deaths, 


Mar- 

• 


1910 


1910 


nages. 
1910 


19 


20 


29 


34 


26 


14 


4 


8 




19 


17 


9 


30 


22 


19 


9 


20 


13 


5 


9 




24 


29 


9 


10 


12 


38 



Seneca Falls, village. . 

Tyre, town 

Variok, town 

Waterloo, town 

Waterloo, village .... 
Delayed returns 

Total 



Births, 


Deaths, 


1910 


1910 


128 


112 


32 


5 


21 


20 


15 


20 


62 


52 


2 




414 


872 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



4 

8 

37 



181 



Steuben Cormty 



Addison, town . 
Addison, village 
Avoca, town . . . 
Avoca, village. . 
Bath, town .... 
Bath, village. . . 
Bradford, town. 
Cameron, town. 



Births, 
1910 


Deaths, 
1910 


Mar- 
riages, 
1910 


15 
22 
19 
13 
39 
58 
8 
14 


6 
52 
24 
15 
48 
67 
15 
15 


29 
***i4 
'"67 

* '6 

13 



Campbell, town . 
Camsteo, town . . 
Canisteo, village. 
Caton, town . . . . . 
Cohocton, town. 
Cohocton, village 
Coming, town. . . 
Coming, city 



Births. 


Deaths, 


1910 


1910 


13 


21 


16 


14 


27 


30 


23 


13 


38 


20 


10 


12 


34 


41 


209 


200 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



4 
37 

■ • 

11 
16 



14 
120 



Division of Vital Statistics 



97 



Steuben County — Continued 



Duasville. town 

Erwin. town 

Fremont, town 

Greeuwuod, town 

RAnuDoadqport. village. 

HartwiUe, town 

Horabv, town 

HoraeO. ^ty 

Horoelkriue. town 

Howard, town 

Juper. town 

Lisidley. town 

Painted Post, village. . . 

Pnttsbtirg, town 

Prmttsburg. villacc 

Pulteoey. town 



Deaths. 


Mar- 


1910 


riages, 
1910 


10 


9 


13 


19 


12 


6 


15 


11 


17 




9 


5 


8 


3 


173 


113 


31 


i 


27 


14 


18 


9 


25 


7 


17 




9 


ii 


10 




10 


8 



Rathbone, town. . 
Savona, village. . . 
Thurston, town . . 
Troopebing, town 
Tuscarora, town. . 
Urbana, town .... 
Wayland, town. . , 
Wayland, village . 
Wayne, town. . . . 
West Union, town 

Wheeler, town 

Woodhull, town . . 
Woodhnll, village. 
Delayed returns . . 

Total 



Births, 


Deaths, 


1910 


1910 


13 


12 


9 


17 


5 


15 


28 


25 


11 


9 


14 


18 


22 


22 


37 


20 


9 


12 


27 


16 


12 


13 


23 


12 


2 


6 


4 


5 


1.371 


1.199 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



6 
14 

5 
20 
18 

i 

6 

8 

10 



628 



Suffolk County 





Births. 
1910 


Deaths. 
1910 


Mar- 
riages, 
1910 




Births, 
1910 


Deaths, 
1710 


Mar- 
riages. 
1910 


AaiityviUe. village 

BabTloa. town 

Babylon, village 

BeOport. village 

Brookhaven, town 

Eut Hampton, town. . . 

Greenport, village 

Huntixigton. town 

Iriio. town 


39 

95 

48 

3 

184 

86 

106 

205 

318 

31 

72 


66 
72 
39 

'i94 
56 
51 
147 
190 
20 
50 


""7i 

"5 
97 
38 

"n 

79 


Riverhead. town 

Sag Harbor, village . . . 
Shelter Island, town. . . 

Smithtown. town 

Southampton, town . . . 
Southampton, village. . 

Southold, town 

Delayed returns 

Total . . . . : 


52 
49 
25 
77 

123 
39 

124 
50 


74 
53 

9 

56 

106 

33 

74 

9 


54 

6 

27 
70 

' "9i 
3 


". V» •V^l*. 

Northport. village 


1,726 


1.304 


607 


PMcfaogue. village 







Sullivan County 



B»-hrl, town 

C'aliiroon. town. . . 
Cocherton. town . . 
Driawtre. town . . 
Fsliiburgh. town 
Forwtbur]^, town 
rremoot. town . . . 
™«WaiKl. town . . 
Libmr, town. . . . 
I4beny. village... 
Lumberbnd, town 



Births, 


Deaths, 


1910 


1910 


35 


32 


37 


30 


17 


15 


35 


22 


101 


65 


9 


4 


34 


27 


16 


26 


68 


97 


40 


101 


16 


11 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



10 
12 

5 
14 
29 

1 



12 
35 



Mamakating, town . 
Montioello. village. . 
Neveraink, town .... 
Rockland, town .... 
Thompson, town... 

Tusten, town 

Wurtsboro, village . . 
Delayed returns .... 

Total 



Births, 
1910 



26 
58 
19 
60 
26 
14 
4 
7 

622 



Deaths, 
1910 



670 



Mar- 
riages. 
1910 



35 


13 


58 




32 


9 


49 


39 


41 


34 


17 


7 


7 




1 






224 



98 



State Dsfabtment of Health 







Tioga 


County 










Births, 
1010 


Deaths, 
1010 


Mar- 

riaces, 
1010 


1 

1 

1 


Births. De h s. 
1010 1010 


Mar- 

naiies. 
1010 


Barton, town 


22 
8 

38 
8 

10 

23 
4 
2 

55 


26 
12 
23 
14 
17 
11 
12 
8 
68 


80 

5 

21 

*i2 

■*'i2 

"86 


1 Oweco. village 

Richiord, town 

1 Spencer, town 

Spencer, villace 

Tioaa. town 


62 


54 




Berkshire, town 

Oandor. to«ni . - - r , - . - , 


14 < l\ 
18 1 15 


5 
16 


Candor, villace 

Newark Valley, town. . . 
Newark Valley, villace.. 
Nichols, town 


10 
27 

77 

1 



31 
83 


" ii 


Waverlv, villace 

' Delayea returns 

' Total 




Nichols, village 

Oweso. town 




388 


300 


249 




1 





Tompkins County 



Caroline, town . . 

Danby, town 

Dryden, town. . . 
Dryden, village. 
Enfield, town. . . 
Freeville. village 
Groton, town, . , 
Groton, village . . 
Ithaca, town. . . , 



Births. 
1010 



37 
24 
35 
10 
24 
1 
43 
22 
18 



Deaths. 
1010 



27 
10 
33 
14 
13 
7 
38 
23 
17 



Mar- 
riages, 
1010 

1 




Births. 
1010 


Deaths. 
1010 


Mar- 
riages. 
1010 


13 


Ithaca, city 


234 
50 
15 

6 
13 
22 

1 


238 
32 
10 

8 
23 
30 

2 


146 


7 1 
23 ; 
..... 

""28 I 


Lansing, town 

Newfield, town 

1 Newfie d. village 

Truman^urg, village. . 

Ulysses, town 

Delayed returns 


20 
4 

• 23 


• • • • . 1 

3 

1 


1 Total 


555 


543 


374 







Ulster County 



Denning, town 

EUenvilTe, village 

Esopus. town 

Gardiner, town 

Hardenburgh, town. . . 

Hurley, town 

Kingston, town 

Kingston, city 

Lloyd, town 

Marbletown, town. . . . 
Marlborough, town . ., . 
Marlborough, village.. 

New Palts, town 

New Palts, village 

Olive^town 

Pine Hill, village 



Births, 


Deaths, 


Mar- 

• 


1010 


1010 


nages, 
1010 


11 


6 


4 


38 


47 


■ • • • • 


82 


54 


21 


41 


47 


12 


7 


4 


3 


22 


30 


8 





6 


4 


433 


475 


233 


58 


38 


10 


75 


57 


28 


50 


45 


24 


18 


11 




22 


30 


34 


17 


23 




56 


56 


27 


1 


7 





Plattekillj town. . . . 

Rifton. village 

Rochester, town. . . 
Rosendale, town . . . 
Rosendale, village . 
Saugertira. town . . . 
Saugerties. village. 
Shandaken, town . . 
Shawangunk, town 

Ulster, town 

Wawarsing. town. . 
Woodstock, town. . 
Delayed returns. . . 

Total 



1,623 



Births, 


Deaths. 


1010 


1010 


23 


22 


10 


3 


41 


34 


47 


41 


15 


15 


123 


02 


61 


64 


44 


41 


53 


33 


37 


30 


02 


80 


30 


40 


107 





Mar- 
riages. 
1010 



1.440 



13 



2 
17 



56 



16 
18 
18 
53 
7 
1 



617 



L 



Division of Vital Statistics 



99 



Warren Cownty 



Boltoa. town 

CaJdwsU, town 

Chester, town 

GknuFUls, city 

Hacoe. town 

HonooQ. town 

Johnaburg. town. . . . 
I^Ake Qeorce, viUace 



Births. 


Deaths, 


Mar- 


1910 


1010 


nages. 
1910 


26 


18 


8 


13 


14 


14 


25 


28 


• 
« • • • • 


200 


238 


154 


13 


10 


16 


11 


18 





27 


28 


16 





10 


..... 



Luieme, town 

Queensbury. town. . 
Stony Creek, town. . 
Thurman, town. . . . 
Warrensburgh, town 
Delayed returns .... 

Total 



Births, 


Deaths, 


1010 


1010 


15 


13 


41 


36 


17 


13 


16 


3 


35 


36 


2 


• • ^ • • 


540 


464 



Mar- 
riages. 
1010 



11 

11 
27 
32 

307 



Washington County 



Argyle, town 

Argyle. village 

Cambridge, town . . . . 
Cambridge, village . . . 

Dresden, town 

Easton, town 

Fort Ann. town 

Fort Ann. village . . . . 
Fort Edward, town . . 
Fort Edward, village. 

Oraaville, town 

Gnnville, village . . . . 
Greenwich, town. . . . 
Greenwich, village. . . 
Hampton, town 



Births. 
1010 



25 
1 
9 
11 
11 
26 
40 
7 
31 
78 
51 
82 
43 
34 
17 



Deaths. 
1910 



30 
7 
20 
31 
7 
25 
27 

31 
00 
49 
36 
43 
44 
14 



Mar- 
riages. 
1910 



10 
i2 



17 
16 



40 

78 

33 

3 



Hartford, town 

Hebron, town 

Jackson, town 

Kingsbury, town . . . . 

Putnam, town 

Salem, town ....;... 

Salem, village 

Hudson Falls, village. 
White Creek, town. . . 

Whitehall, town 

Whitehall, village.... 
Delayed rotums 



Total 



Births, 


Deaths. 


1910 


1910 


25 


30 


13 


16 


16 


9 


28 


24 


9 


9 


17 


28 


22 


16 


100 


74 


19 


26 


9 


8 


129 


96 


5 


1 


858 


788 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



12 
7 
3 

56 
2 

21 



21 
63 



1 



395 



Wayne County 



Arcadia, town. . . 

Bntkr, town 

Clyde, viUago... 
Galen, town .... 
Huron, town. . . . 

Lyooa. town 

[fOML village. . . 
Maoedon. town.. 
Maeedon, village . 
Marion, town. . . 
Newark, village . . 

Ontario, town 

Pftlmyrm, town . . 



Births, 
1910 



47 
28 
55 
29 
28 
22 
72 
38 
11 
56 
82 
53 
38 



Deaths, 
1910 



31 
30 
37 
24 
17 
30 
75 
25 
10 
32 
85 
36 
27 



Mar- 
riages, 
1010 



75 
10 



34 
13 
46 



14 



14 



IS 
33 





Births, 
1910 


Deaths'. 
1010 


Mar- 
riages, 
1010 


Palmyra, village 

Red Creek, village. . . . 
Rose, town 


37 

8 

35 

10 

5 

73 

38 

74 

28 

8 

3 


30 



35 

16 

6 

64 

32 

44 

25 

20 




"io 


Savannah, town 

Savannah, village 

Sodus, town 


10 
35 


Walworth, town 

Williamson, town 

Wolcott. town 

Wolcott, village 

Delayed returns 


10 
32 
33 

i 


Total 


. 887 


758 1 


^AH, 






• ^" 1 



100 



State Depabtment of Health 



Westchester Cotmty 



Ardsley, villace. . 
Bedfonl, town... 
Briarcliff Manor, 
Bronrville, village. 
Cortlandt, town . . . 
CrotonH>n-Hudflon, vil- 

lase 

DobM Ferry, villace 
Eastcheeter, town. . . 
ESmaford, village . . . 
Greenburgh. town . . 

Harrison, town 

Hastinge-on-H u d ■ o n, 

village 

Hillside, village 

Irvington. village 

Larchmont, village 

Lewiaboro. town 

Mamaroneck,- town .... 
Mamaroneck, village. . . 

Mt. Kiaeo. village 

Mounts Pleasant, town.. 
Mount Vernon, city. . . . 

New Castle, town 

New Rochelle, city 

North Castle, town . . . . 



Births, 


Deaths. 


Mar- 

• 


1910 


1910 


nagee, 
1910 


15 


8 




95 


54 


47 


20 


11 




23 


42 




118 


87 


ieo 


35 


23 




79 


71 




33 


12 


32 


14 


3 


• • • « • 


50 


69 


136 


77 


56 


20 


96 


57 




8 


55 




41 


23 




16 


8 




13 


20 


4 


6 


10 


66 


141 


71 




59 


42 




56 


174 


113 


700 


434 


245 


43 


33 


18 


782 


342 


230 


23 


26 


6 




North Pelham. village 
North Salem, town . . . 
North Tarrytown, vil- 
lage 

Oasining, town 

Oaaining. village 

Peekakul, village 

Pelham, town 

Pelham, village 

Pelham Manor, village 
Pleaaantville, village . . 
Port Cheater, village . . 

Poundridge, town 

Rye, town 

Rye, village 

Scaradale, town 

Somera, town 

Tarrytown, village 

Tuckahoe, village 

White Plaina, town . . . 
White Plaina, village. . 

Yonkera, city 

Yorktown, town 

Delasred retuma 

Total 



31 
14 

151 

> • ■ • 

186 

330 

2 

7 

15 
43 
445 
11 
4 
54 



Deatha, 
1910 



13 
19 

80 

6 

166 

280 

1 

4 

8 

28 

207 

15 

4 

45 



22 


10 


27 


17 


89 


85 


125 


38 




5 


362 


279 


2.064 


1,226 


34 


51 


108 


1 


6,667 


4,317 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



9 

si 
is 



9 
246 



14 



118 



797 

14 

1 



2.370 



Wyoming County 



Arcade, town 

Arcade, village 

Attica, town 

Attica, village 

Bennington, town. . 

Caatile, town 

Gaotile, village 

Corington, town. . . . 

Esfle. town 

OamesvUle. town . . . 
Oaineaville. village. 
Geneaee Falls, town 

Java, town 

Middlebury. town. . 



Birtha. 


Deatha. 


Mar- 

• 


1910 


1910 


nagea, 
1910 


13 


15 


22 


40 


23 




18 


10 


• • • • • 


32 


22 


• • • • • 


20 


22 


14 


11 


15 


15 


15 


27 




19 


12 


3 


21 


12 


12 


23 


15 


15 


5 


7 




18 


9 


4 


21 


23 


13 


19 


28 


6 



Orangeville, town 

Perry, town 

Perry, village 

Pike, town 

Pike, village 

Sheldon, town 

Silver Springs, village 

Warsaw, town 

Warsaw, village 

Wethersfield, town. . . 
Delayed returns 

Total 



Birtha, 


Deatha. 


1910 


1910 


13 


28 


18 


22 


61 


58 


12 


11 


3 


7 


33 


27 


19 


10 


20 


12 


34 


39 


26 


13 


1 


2 


515 


469 



Mar- 

riages. 
1910 



5 
52 



11 
9 



39 



3 
1 



224 



Yates County 



Barringtbn, town 
Benton, town . . . 
Dresden, village. 
Dundee, village . 

Italy, town 

Jerusalem, town. 
Middlesex, town. 
Milo, town 



Births. 


Deaths. 


Mar- 


1910 


1910 


riages, 
1910 


19 


18 


3 


22 


25 


6 


6 


2 




7 


26 




14 


11 


4 


43 


40 


21 


21 


19 


8 


24 


21 


37 



Penn Yan, village . 

Potter, town 

Rushville, village. 

Starkey, town 

Torrey, town 

Delayed returns. . 

Total 



Births. 


Deaths, 


1910 


1910 


67 


70 


16 


14 


5 


10 


14 


15 


10 


8 


268 


279 



Mar- 
riages, 
1910 



10 



24 


1 



114 



Division of Vital Statistios 101 

Summary of Mortality for the Year- 1^10 

Pulmonary tuberculosis caused 14,059 or 9.5 per cent, of the 
147,629 deaths occurring in the State during the year 1910. 
There were 153 deaths per 100,000 population. 

From tuberculosis other than pulmonary there were 2,278 
deaths, the largest number, one-half being from tubercular menin- 
gitia, and the next numerically abdominal tuberculosis, 385. 

Pneumonia caused 9,867 deaths, 444 more than in 1909, 1,200 
more than in 1908, but fewer than in the years preceding; 109 
deaths per 100,000 population in the cities, and 103 in the rural 
population. From broncho-pneumonia there were 7,248 deaths, 
and from acute bronchitis 1,598. These were chiefly fatal in 
March, and during the annually recurring epidemic of influenza, 
which is given as the direct cause of 1,452 deaths. 

Cancer showing in each succeeding year an increase, has this 
year caused 7,522 deaths; in 1900 there were 4,871; in 1890, 
2,868. In the cities there were 80 deaths per 100,000 popula- 
tion; the rural rate was 99. Compared with tuberculosis its 
urban mortality was less than half, its rural considerably more 
than half the number from that cause. 

Typhoid fever has caused during the year 1,374 deaths. This 
is about the mortality for the last two years, while the average 
yearly for twenty years prior was 1,600 deaths and most of the 
years were close to the average. The rate of mortality, 15 per 
100,000 population, is the same as that of 1909, and the lowest 
ever recorded for the State. The urban mortality from typhoid 
fever was 14.9 per 100,000 population; the rural was 15.2; in 
the cities .93 per cent of the deaths were from typhoid fever, in 
the country .94 per cent. 

Diphtheria caused 2,438 deaths, 120 more than in 1909, 40 less 
than in 1908, 350 less than the yearly average of the past twelve 
years of low mortality, and 3,000 less than the average of the 
twelve years prior to that. In the urban population there were 
32 deaths per 100,000 during the year; in the rural 10 from 
diphtheria. Sixty-four per cent of the deaths occurred in the 
winter and spring months. 



102 State Depabtment of Health 

Scarlet fever was more prevalent than last year, and the deaths 
were 1,617 to 1,205 in 190^. There were 21 deaths per 100,000 
population in the cities, and 8 in the rural population. New 
York City shared in the increase of mortality over last year to a 
less extent than the rest of the State. 

Measles which last year had a mortality in excess of that from 
scarlet fever, has now 1,285 deaths or 332 less. In 11 years of 
the last 25 the deaths from measles have exceeded those from 
scarlet fever and their average mortality has been annually 1,100 
to 1,350. Taking account of its remote effects, measles is prob- 
ably fully as large a contributor to mortality as scarlet fever. 
The urban mortality has decreased but the rural is nearly double 
that of 1909. • Six-sevenths of the cases and four-fifths of the 
deaths occurred during the first six months of the year. 

Whooping cough, which has had an average yearly mortality 
for twenty-five years of 900, has now 727 deaths. In August the 
largest nimiber, as heretofore noted, occurred, with July nearly as 
many, the smallest mortality having been in the winter months. 
The relative urban and rural mortality. was the same. 

Cerebrospinal meningitis caused 452 deaths, an increase over 
the two years preceding but one-half that of the three prior years. 
Cases were reported from thirty-five counties, two-thirds of the 
deaths occurring in New York City. 

There were 58 deaths from epidemic poliomyelitis. 

Smallpox caused 7 deaths — one at Buffalo, one at Walden, and 
five in New York City. 

Violence was the cause of 9,846 deaths — 614 more than in 
1909. There were 1,479 by suicide, 420 homicides and 7,695 ac- 
cidental. 

The following shows the urban and rural death rates per 
100,000 population : 



J 



Division of Vital Statistics 103 

Urban and rural death rates per 100,000 population from dif- 
ferent causes: 

Dia eases Cities Rural 

All causes 1,606.9 1,627.1 

Typhoid fever 14.9 15.2 

Malaria 0.5 1.1 

Measles 15.2 0,82 

Scarlet fever 20.7 8.3 

Whooping cough 7.8 8.2 

Diphtheria and croup 32 . 1 10 . 

Influenza 9.4 34.9 

Erysipelas 6.1 4.7 

Cerebrospinal meningitis 5.5 3.3 

Pulmonary tuberculosis 164.0 122 . 3 

Other forms of tuberculosis 27.1 18.4 

Cancer and other malignant tumors 79.5 89.8 

Diabetes 16.0 17.5 

Other general diseases 55.2 55.0 

Diseases of nervous system 91.0 223 . 9 

Diseases of circulatory system 212.3 214.5 

Pneumonia 109.2 103.3 

Other disease of respiratory system 138 . 7 93 . 5 

Diarrhea and enteritis 127 .0 85 . 8 

Under 2 years 111.9 59.3 

Over 2 vears 15.2 26.5 

9 

Other diseases of digestive system 82 .6 88.0 

Bright's disease and nephritis; 103.0 115.2 

Other diseases of genito-urinary system ... 32.9 36.6 

The puerperal state 16.9 12.6 

Congenital debility (under 3 mos.) 59.0 24.2 

Accidents 81.3 91.9 

Suicides 15.6 17.6 

Homicides 5.1 2.8 

Til-defined diseases 29.0 51.8 

All other causes 47.9 67.3 



104 



State Depabtment of Health 



The total urban population (cities and viUagee of 8,000 popu- 
lation and over) is 6,849,203, or 74.7 per cent, of the entire popu- 
lation of the State. 

The following table shows the mortality in the State by age 
periods, sex, color, nationality, etc., outside of the cities of Buffalo 
and Greater New York. 



AGE 


Total 


Whitb 


Negro 


Other Colored 


Native 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


IVUle 


Femfile 


Male 


Female 


Under 1.... 

1-4 

5- 9 

10-14 

15-19 

20-29 

30-39 

40-49 

50-59 

60-69 

70-79 

80 and over. 
Unknown . . 


5.545 

1,785 

539 

400 

660 

2,218 

2,543 

2,939 

3,712 

4,903 

5,340 

3,455 

115 


4.228 

1.689 

552 

379 

•601 

1,761 

1.871 

2.226 

2,872 

4,389 

5.246 

3.987 

47 


5,426 

1,739 

527 

386 

644 

2,167 

2,464 

2.868 

3,647 

4,852 

5,290 

3.435 

108 


4,153 

1,647 

538 

364 

578 

1,709 

1,827 

2,183 

2,818 

4,352 

5,210 

3,958 

43 


116 
43 

8 
13 
16 
48 
75 
67 
59 
45 
45 
18 

6 


74 
40 
12 
13 
23 
47 
44 
41 
53 
37 
35 
29 
4 


3 
3 

4 
1 

" "3 
4 
4 
6 
6 
5 
2 
1 


I 

2 

2 

' ■ 5 

■ "2 

1 

j 


5.521 

1.739 

524 

361 

548 

1.580 

1,827 

1.983 

2.640 

3.309 

3.625 

2.326 

27 


4,213 

1.635 

523 

355 

531 

1.411 

1.480 

1.622 

2,120 

2.895 

3.509 

2.787 

34 


Total 


34.154 


29,848 


33.553 


29,380 


559 


452 


42 


16 


26.010 


23. 124 



• 

AGE 


Foreign Born 


Natiyitt 
Unknown 


Single 


Married 


Widowed and 
Divorced 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


1 ■ 1 

Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


Under 1.... 

1- 4 

5- 9 

10-14 

15-19 

20-29 

30-39 

40-49 

50-59 

60-69 

70-79 

80 and over. 
Unknown . . 


23 

43 

14 

35 

103 

586 

627 

857 

984 

1.520 

1.662 

1,094 

24 


15 

49 

27 

24 

67 

343 

368 

582 

730 

1.446 

1,676 

1.159 

13 


1 

3 

1 

4 

9 

52 

89 

99 

88 

74 

53 

35 

64 


5 
2 

""3 
7 
14 
22 
22 
48 
61 
41 


5,545 

1,786 

539 

400 

652 

1.610 

985 

728 

593 

538 

360 

156 

28 


4,228 
1,689 
552 
378 
520 
692 
420 
388 
349 
440 
448 
283 
8 


"■5 
521 
1.377 
1,892 
2.534 
3.223 
2,944 
1.321 
18 


j 

81 
1.032 
1.323 
1,539 
1.793 
1.922 
1.348 
390 
18 


■ 35 

96 

204 

477 

1.043 

1.933 

1,911 

11 


• ■...■ 

27 

118 

279 

699 

1.978 

3.385 

3.272 

16 




ToUl.... 


7,572 


6,499 


572 


225 


13,919 


10,395 


13.835 


9.447 


5.710 


9.774 



MariUl condition unknown, 922; Males, 690; Females, 232 



Division of Vital Statistics 



105 



The mortality statistics of Buffalo and Greater Ifew York as 
classified by the city departments of health, are as follows: 



The City op New York 
Total Nxxniber of Deaths, hy the Principal Causes, in 1910 



BOROUGH 


Tvphoid 
farer 


Malarial 
fever 


SmaU- 

POK 


Meaelea 

* 


Scarlet 
fever 


Whoop- 
cough 


Diph- 
theria 
and 
croup 


In- 
fluenia 


Tb* Bronx 

Brooldjm 


269 
41 

198 
39 
II 


7 

4 

13 

3 


4 

i 


271 
56 

422 

30 

6 


448 
76 

385 
33 
12 


154 

23 

92 

21 

4 


898 
136 
658 
104 
19 


162 

26 

144 


QUMM 


24 


^iehjBond 


10 






City 


568 


27 


5 


785 


953 


294 


1,715 


366 







The City of Xew York — (Continued) 



BOROUGH 



The Bronx 
BrDokl>-n. . 
Qo woa 
Eirhmood. 

Oty 



Other 
epidemic 
oueaiea 


Tubcr- 

cukwis 

of the 

lungs 


Tuber- 
culous 

menin- 
gitb 


Other 
forms of 
tuber- 
culosis 


Cancer 

and 

other 

malig- 
nant 

tumors 


Simple 

menm- 

gitis 


Of which 
cerebro- 
spinal 
memn- 
gitis 


292 
24 

132 

13 

6 


3.975 

1.781 

2,430 

358 

148 


485 
84 

198 
24 
10 


329 
31 

186 
24 
11 


1.915 
323 

1,212 

185 

75 


380 
53 

136 

31 

8 


177 
29 
72 
12 

4 


467 


8,692 


801 


581 


3.710 


608 


294 



Conges- 
tion, 
henoor- 
rhage 
and 
soften- 
ing of 
the Drain 



389 

254 

245 

55 

36 

979 



The City of Xew York — (Continued) 



m 


Organic 

diseases 

of the 

heart 


Acute 
bron- 
chitis 


Chronic 
bron- 
chitis 


Pneu^ 
monia 
(not in- 
cluding 
bron- 
cho- 
pneu- 
monia) 


Bron- 

cho- 

pneu- 

moma 


Other 
respira- 
tory 
diseases 


Diseases 

of the 

stomach 


Diar- 
rhea 
and 
en- 
teritis 
(under 

five 

years of 

age) 


Manhattan 

The Bronx 

Brooktrn 

Qum&s 

Richmond . ..... 


3.071 
706 , 

2.540 ^ 
405 
148 


406 
51 

405 

59 

7 


103 

10 

278 

? 


2.666 
462 

2.001 
305 
106 


2,725 
312 

1.644 

221 

77 


501 
57 

220 
27 
15 


251 
38 

Ittrt 
25 
21 


3.021 
342 

2.092 
359 
1C4 


CUy 


6.870 


928 


' 407 

1 


5.540 


4.979 


820 


501 


5.918 



106 



State Depabtmbnt of Health 



The City of New Yoek — (Contimied) 



BOROUGH 



Manhattan 
The Bronx . 
Brookl3rn. . , 
Queens. . . , 
Richmond. 

aty.. 



Api)en- 

dicitis 

and 

typhili- 

tis 


Hernia 

and 

intee- 

tinal 

obstruc- 
tion 


Cir- 
rhosis 
of the 

Uver 


Ne- 
phritis 

and 

Bright's 

disease 


Non-can- 
cerous 
tumors 
and 

othir 
diseases 

of the 
female 
genital 
organs 


Puer- 
peral 
septi- 
cemia 


Other 
puer- 
peral 
disease 


340 
43 

223 
20 
13 


308 
45 

198 

27 

9 


545 
75 

445 
47 
28 


2.627 
411 

2.160 
317 
123 


200 
21 

120 
6 
2 


138 
31 
74 
11 

1 


249 
28 

194 
20 
15 


639 


687 


1.140 


5.638 


349 


255 


506 



Congen- 
ital de- 
biUtv 
and 
malfor- 
mations 



2.396 
262 

1.311 

254 

90 

4.313 



The City of New York — (Continued) 



BOROUGH 



Manhattan 
The Bronx. 
Brooklyn. . 
Queens. . . . 
Richmond . 

aty.. 



Senile 
debility 


Violent 
deaths 


Acci- 
dents 


Homi- 
cides 


Suicides 


Other 
diseases 


235 
68 

274 
73 
33 


2,101 
280 

1,101 

245 

86 


1.919 
270 

1,023 
231 

84 


182 

10 

78 

14 

2 


459 
64 

246 
40 
16 


5.818 

664 

• 3.610 

605 

174 


683 


3.813 


3.527 


286 


825 


10.771 



Ill-de- 
fined 
causes 



522 
87 
22 
52 
36 



719 



The City of New York — ( Continued) 
Deaths According to Age and Color 



BOROUGH 



Manhattan 
The Bronx . 
Brooklyn . . 
Queens. . . , 
Richmond. 

aty.., 



Under 
1 year 


1 


2 


3 


4 


Total 
under 5 


5 


10 


15 


8,953 


2.283 


935 


563 


323 


13.047 


831 


467 


775 


1.051 


271 


149 


90 


65 


.1.626 


159 


91 


209 


5.059 


1.535 


710 


387 


256 


7,947 


707 


373 


544 


869 


201 


92 


69 


41 


1.282 


110 


56 


78 


282 


61 


19 


11 


12 


385 


27 


23 


30 


16,214 


4.351 


1.905 


1.100 


697 


24.267 


1.834 


1.010 


1,636 



20 



1.303 

342 

845 

152 

50 

2.692 



Division of Vital Statistics 



107 



The City of New York — ( Continued) 



BOROUGH 



Minhattan 
Tbe Bronx. 
Brooklyn. . 
Queena. . . . 
Richmond. 

City. . 



25 


30 


35 


40 


45 


50 


55 


60 


1.630 
398 

1.032 

137 

55 


1.916 
445 

1.135 

169 

47 


2.110 
463 

1.372 

207 

93 


2.267 
589 

1,349 

191 

62 


2,305 
459 

1.355 

204 

67 


2.316 
421 

1.481 

248 

85 


2.0S6 
239 

1.377 

194 

90 


2,080 
378 

1.526 
237 

87 


3.262 


3.712 


4.245 


4.458 


4.390 


4.551 


3.9S6 


4,308 



65 



1.863 
345 

1,432 
230 
105 

3.975 



The City of New York — (Continued) 



borough 



Maahattan 
The Bronx. 
Brooklyn . . 
Qoeeiu. . . . 
Richmond. 

City. . 



70 


75 


80 


85 


Total 


Colored 


• 

Chinese 


Death 
rate 


1,500 


1.046 


650 


468 


38.660 


1.401 


83 


16.51 


337 


231 


134 


102 


6.968 


203 


3 


15 85 


1.259 


919 


598 


425 


25,676 


582 


12 


15.59 


185 


173 


72 


66 


3.971 


84 


1 


13 77 


114 


M 


59 


34 


1.467 


33 




16.94 


3.395 


2.423 


1.513 


1,095 


76.742 


2,303 


99 


15.98 



Cor- 
rected 
inter- 
bor- 
ough 
death- 
rate* 



16.72 
13.95 
15.75 
14.30 
16.18 



^ Corrected interborough death rate means that the death rate of each borough is corrected by 
the exdusion of the d»&tha of residenta of the other boroughs occurring within its limits and the 
indoaion of the deaths of residents of that borough occurring in other boroughs. 



The City of New York — (Concluded) 
Births, Marriages and Still Births Reported 



BOROUGH 



Manhattan 
The Bronx. 
Brooklyn.. 
Queeoa. . . . 

KiehmoDd. 
City.. 



Estimated 
population 



2.341.383 
439.567 

1.647.294 

288.440 

86.580 



4.803.264 



Births 



66,357 

10.905 

42.708 

7.119 

1.991 



129.080 



Marriages 



28.883 
2.308 

12.881 

1.839 

506 



46.417 



Still 
births 



3.541 
553 

2.221 

347 

93 



6.755 



108 



State Department of Health 



City of Buffalo 
Summaries of Deaths for 1910 



totals 1910 



I. General diseases 

II. Diseases of nervous system. . . 

III. Diseases of circulatory system 

IV. Diseases of respiratory sjrstem, 
V. Diseases of dicestive system . . 

VI. Diseases of genito-urinary 

system 

VII. ChUdbirtli 

VIII. Diseases of the skin 

IX. Diseases of locomotor system . 

X. Malformations 

XI. Early infancy 

XII. Old age 

XIII. Violence 

XIV. Ill-defined diseases 

Total 



Total 






Age bt 


Yeara 


















Under 1 


lto2 


2to3 


3to4 


4to5 


1.081 


191 


135 


88 


79 


49 


626 


36 


11 


7 


4 


4 


912 


14 






2 




955 


335 


95 


30 


22 


11 


915 


487 


87 


8 


6 


3 


417 


27 


4 


1 


2 


2 


132 


80 










12 

2 

69 


3 












"*57 


..... 










3S9 


334 


3 


I 








53 




* 










468 


\A 


8 


6 


2 


6 


69 


63 


4 


1 






6.940 


1.641 


348 


142 


117 


75 



Total 
under 
Syrs. 



542 

62 

16 

493 

501 

36 

80 

3 

""58 
338 

"36 
68 

2,323 



City of Buffalo — {Continued) 





totals, 1910 

1 






Age bt Years 








5 to 10 


10 to 15 


15 to 20 


20 to 30 


30 to 40 


40 to 50 


50 to 60 


I. 


General diseases 


120 

7 

5 

9 

16 

5 


39 
9 

13 
6 

13 

5 
j 

..... 


79 
8 

17 
9 

12 

4 
1 

■"27 


247 
20 
31 
34 
26 

21 

22 

2 

"83 

■ • • • ■ 


244 
35 
59 
49 
43 

37 

23 

3 

"83 


217 
76 
91 
62 
61 

57 
6 

..... 

• • • • • 

• • • • • 

"80 

1 


219 


II. 
III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 


Diseases of nervous system . . . 
Diseases of circulatory system. 
Diseases of respirator^' system . 
Diseases of digestive system . . . 
Diseases of genito-urinary 
system 


102 

173 

61 

60 

67 


VII. 


Childbirth 




VIII. 


Diseases of the skin 


1 

..... 

1 


1 


IX. 
X. 


Diseases of locomotor system . . 
Malformations 




XI. 


Early infancy 




XII. 


Old age 




XIII. 


Violence 


27 


55 


XIV. 


Ill..defined diseases 






Total 








192 


97 


157 


486 


576 


652 


738 









Division of Vitai. Statistics 



109 



City of Buffalo — (Continued) 






TOTALS. 1910 




AOB BT 


Years 




Color 


60 to 70 


70 to 80 


80 to 90 


Over 90 


White 


Colored 


I. General diocMBo 


163 

126 

196 

72 

47 

86 


88 
115 
191 
96 
29 
66 

2 

" "ie 

23 


20 
62 
108 
55 
14 
30 

■ "27 
4 


3 
4 
12 

3 
3 

9 

3 


1,950 
623 
003 
045 

Oil 

413 

132 

13 

2 
59 

338 
53 

463 
69 


22 


II. DiMase of nervous system 

m. Diaeaaee of circulatoiy system. . 
rv. DIaeaaee of respiratory system . . 

V. Dieeaoes of digestive system 

▼1. Diseaees of genito-urinaiy system 
VII. Childfairtb 


3 

9 

10 

4 
4 


VIII. Diseaeea of the nkin 






IX. Diseases of locomotor system . . . 
X. Malformation 











] 


XII. OMace ' 


1 
36 




Xin. Violence 


5 


XIV. Ill-defined diseases 










Total 


727 


626 


320 


46 


6.882 


58 







City of Buffalo — (Concluded) 





8bx 




Social Rblationb 




TOTAL. 1010 


Male 


Female 


Single 


Married 


Widowed 


Divorced 


I. General dineaees 


1,007 
327 
490 
512 
479 
221 

48 

6 

2 

31 

195 

20 

389 

40 


074 
299 
422 
443 
436 
196 

84 
6 

""*28 

144 

33 

79 

29 


1,111 
167 
161 
587 
670 
121 

82 

6 

1 

59 

339 

4 

221 

68 


666 
252 
415 

aio 

163 

184 

50 

5 
1 

6 

198 


104 
202 
333 
157 
71 
110 

i 

43 

48 
1 


10 


II. Diseases of nervous tystem 

m. Discltees of circttlatory system. . 
IV. Diseases of respiratory system.. 

V. Diseases of digestive system . . . 
VI. Diseases of genito-urinary sys- 
tem. . . . , 


5 
3 

1 
2 
2 


VII. Childbirth 




VnL Diseases of the skin 




IX. Diseases of locomotor system. . 




XI. Karlv infancv 




XII. Old age 




XIII. Violeaoe 


1 


XIV. Ill-defined diseases 








Total 


3.767 


3.173 


3,606 


2.15Q 


1,160 


24 







The following shows the total number of deaths occurring in the 
State during the year, and the sex, color, social relations and 
nationality : 




Males 79,643 

Females 67.986 

Unknown 

Total 147.629 



White 144.102 

Negro 3,370 

Mongolian ... 99 

Indian 58 



Total 



147.620 



Social relations 



Married. . . . 


. 49,668 


Widowed. . . 


. 29,204 


Single 


. 67,261 


Divorced* . . 


103 


Unknown . . . 


. 1.393 



Total 147,629 



Nativities 



United States 101.341 

Foreign 46.117 

Unknown 1,171 



Total 147,629 



* Of New York City only — Buffalo's and rest of State being included under title " widowed." 



110 



State Depabtment of Health 



The death rate and per cent, of deaths at different age periods 
were as follows: 



•AGE period 



Under one year 

One year to four years 

Five to nine years , 

Ten to nineteen years 

Twenty to thirty-nine years. 

Forty to fifty-nine years 

Sixty to seventy-nine years. 

Over eighty years 

Unknown 

Total deaths at all ages 



Number 
of deaths 



27,457 

12.233 

3.127 

4.942 

23.340 

30,567 

34.745 

11.054 

174 



147.620 



Death rate 
per 1.000 
living at 
aU 



2.0 
1.3 
0.3 
0.5 
2.5 
3.3 
3.8 
1.2 
0.2 



16.1 



Per oent. 

of total 

mortality 



18.7 
8.3 
2.1 
3.4 

15.8 

ao.7 

23.5 
7.5 
0.2 



100.0 



The following shows the death rate and per cent, of deaths from 
different causes: 

Death Rate and Per Cent, of Deaths from Different Causes 



1 . General diseases 

2. Diseases of nervous system 

3. Diseases of circulatory system . . . . 

4. Diseases of respiratory system . . . . 

5. Diseases of digestive system 

6. Diseases of genito-urinary system . 

7. The puerperal state 

8. Diseases of skin and cellular tissue 
0. Diseases of organs of locomotion . . 

10. Malformations 

11. Early infancy 

12. Old age 

13. External causes 

14. Ill-defined causes 

Total deaths {rom all causes . 



Nimiber 
of deaths 



30,000 

11.856 

10,407 

21.520 

18.374 

12.811 

1.452 

654 

272 

1,310 

6,037 

1,051 

0,846 

1.231 



147.6^ 



Death rate 

per 1.000 

living 



4.35 
1.20 
2.12 
2.35 
2.00 
1.30 
0.15 
0.71 
0.03 
0.14 
0.75 
0.21 
1.07 
0.13 



16.1 



Per oent. 

of total 

noortality 



27.1 
8.0 
13.2 
14.5 
12.4 
8.6 
0.98 
0.44 
0.18 
0.00 
4.7 
1.3 
6.6 
0.83 



100.0 



DEATH RATE & 
PER CENT OF DEATHS 

DIFFERENT AGE PERIODS 

1910 



A6E PERIOD 



Ns OF DEATHS 



DEATH RATE 

PER WOO UVMG 

AT ALL AGES 



PER CENT 
OF TOTAL 
MORTAUTY 



UNDER I YEAR 
lYEARTO 4YEAR8 



10 



»» 



n 



SO *• 
40 " 



60 



19 
39 
69 
79 



OVER 80 
UNKNOWN 



27.467 
12.233 

3.127 

4.942 
23.340 
30.5 67 
34.745 
I 1.064 
.174 I 



TITAL DEATHS AT AIL AGES 147.629 



2.9 
1.3 
0.3 
0.6 
2.6 
3.3 
3.8 
1.2 
0.2 



18.7 

8.3 

2.1 

3.4 

15.8 

20.7 

23.5 

T.5 

0.2 



16.1 



100.- 



DEATH RATE & 
PER CENT OF DEATHS 





FICH 


DIFFERENT CAUSES 


NEW YORK STATE ISrO 




f.« FaCEMTIFniAlMnAUIT 




DEATHS 


1 imui mum 


39.900 


II DISEASES OE lEIiyDUS STSTEI 


1 IIBSe 


III - CIIICaLITDIIT " 


19.497 


n RESPIUTDIY " 


21.629 


V DISESTIVE •• 


18.374 


«i " eEiiTD-gmitiii - 


I2SII 


HI TIE PUEIPERAL STATE 


I.4S2 


m nSUSESOFSKINlIELLUlAITISSIE 


.684 


IX " imUIISOFLOEOWTIOII 


.272 


X atLFOIIIIATIIIIII 


1.319 


XI EIRLT INFtllCy 


6.937 


n 0L> taE 


1.961 


XII EXTEIIIAL CAUSES 


9M6 


Xlt ILL lEFIIED CAUSES 


1.231 



TOTAL lEATIS FROM ALL CAUSES 147.629 



J 






CHART SHOWING TOTAL 

DEATHS BY MONTHS 

DURING 1910 IN NEW YORK STATE 

FIIM TIE 

CHIEF CAUSES OF DEATH 



rca MAR. APIt MAY JUNE JULY AUQ. SEPT OCT. NOV. P£a DEATHS 




TYFHODFEVEIU- 



-J 



Division of Vital Statistics 



111 



The following table shows the seasonal fatality from the chief 
causes of death : 

Seasonal Fatality, Etc. 





January 


February 


March 


April 


May 


June 


Tuberculoflia of the lungs. 
Pnwunonia 


1.204 
1.249 
809 
891 
627 
276 
226 
92 
170 


1,156 
1.058 
619 
796 
584 
248 
221 
90 
173 


1.427 
1.429 
710 
947 
652 
271 
253 
96 
219 


1.311 
1.149 
750 
874 
622 
275 
223 
72 
195 


1,242 
867 
795 
834 
623 
238 
177 
63 
134 


1.068 
524 


VioleDoe 


887 


Bright'v ditrafff 


766 


C^nwr 


595 


Diphtheri* 


198 


S^irlet fever 


138 


Typhoid ferer 


71 


Meaalee 


138 






Total mortality in 
the SUte from all 
causes 


13.158 


12.109 


14.397 


13.085 


12.099 


11.066 







Seasonal Fatality, Etc, — (Concluded) 



Tuberculosis of the lungs .... 

Pneumonia 

Viotenc« 

Bright's disease 

Cancer 

Diphtheria 

Scarlet fever 

Tjrphmd fever 

Measles 

Total mortalitv in the 
State from all causes. . 



July 


August 


Se^m-. 


October 


Novem- 
ber 


Decem- 
ber 


1.180 


1.085 


1.078 


1.055 


1.060 


1.193 


321 


286 


333 


553 


761 


1.347 


1.253 


917 


812 


824 


765 


705 


740 


718 


696 


718 


830 


901 


601 


642 


670 


639 


637 


630 


159 


131 


108 


131 


209 


189 


73 


36 


41 


53 


83 


93 


97 


135 


191 


172 


163 


132 


83 


47 


36 


12 


31 


47 


13.098 


12.238 


11,441 


11.108 


10.938 


12.892 



Total 



14.059 
9,867 
9.846 
9.711 
7.522 
2.433 
1,617 
1.374 
1.285 



147.629 



112 



State Depabtmext op Health 



The following table shows the deaths and death rate from the 
principal causes of death in the counties of the State: 



COUNTY 



An>any 

Allegany 

Broome 

CattaraugUB 

Cayuga 

Chautauqua. . . . 

Chemung 

Chenango 

Clinton 

Columbia 

Cortland 

Delaware 

Dutchess 

Erie 

Essex 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Genesee 

Greene 

Hamilton 

Herkimer 

Jefferson 

Lewis 

Livingston 

Madison 

Monroe 

Montgomery. . . 

Nassau 

New York city.. 

Niagara 

Oneida 

Onondaga 

Ontario 

Orange 

Orleans 

Oswego 

Otsego 

Putnam 

Rensselaer 

Rockland 

St. Lawrence . . . 

Su^toga 

Schenectady. . . . 

Schoharie 

Schuyler 

Seneca 

Steuben 

Suffolk 

Sullivan 

Tioga 

Tompkins 

Ulster 

Warren 

Washington .... 

Wajme 

Westchester 

Wyt)ming 

Yates 

State institutions 

Total 



PULMONAKT 
TCBBBCUXXMn 



Number 
deaths 



344 
17 
93 
40 
67 
66 
64 
25 
61 
62 
13 
28 

126 

612 
57 

177 
40 
26 
64 
6 
56 
67 
28 
28 
26 

322 

60 

70 

8.690 

85 

192 

187 
36 

167 
35 
65 
32 
18 

229 
65 
69 
74 
83 
22 
9 
29 
45 

102 

189 
16 
29 

130 

. 35 

52 

33 

403 
15 
16 

272 



Rate per 

100.000 

population 






14,059 



197.8 

41.1 

117.6 

60.7 

99.7 

62.6 

98.6 

70.3 

126.3 

141.9 

44.4 

61.5 

143.5 

115.1 

170.0 

388.0 

89.6 

69.0 

202.0 

137.9 

99.2 

83.3 

113.0 

73.5 

66.2 

112.9 

103.6 

82.7 

180.8 

92.0 

124.1 

92.9 

68.9 

143.6 

109.3 

90.6 

67.8 

122.5 

187.2 

138.4 

77.6 

119.5 

93.2 

92.4 

64.5 

107.6 

54.0 

105.7 

559.6 

62.6 

86.2 

141.3 

108.6 

108.8 

65.7 

141.2 

47.0 

8.6 



Ttpboio FavEM 



Number 



44 

7 

U 

7 

19 

15 

14 

3 

7 

12 

12 

17 

13 

86 

6 

10 

4 

8 

11 

3 

2 

39 

2 

5 

5 

39 

11 

6 

558 

42 

16 

54 

9 

27 

3 

17 

4 



26 

5 

20 

13 

5 

2 

1 

1 

18 

13 

9 

2 

7 

17 

6 

6 

8 

39 

10 

5 

13 



153 5 



1.374 



Rate 



5 
5 
1 
1 

,7 



25.3 
16.9 
13.9 
10.7 
28.2 
14.2 
25.6 
8.4 
14.5 
27.5 
41.0 
37.3 
14.8 
16.4 
17.9 

21 9 
9.0 

21.2 
36.4 
69.0 

3 
48 

8 
13 
12 
13.7 
19.0 

7 1 
11.6 
45.5 
10.3 
26 8 
17 
23 

9 
23 

8.5 



21.3 

11.1 

22 5 
21.0 

5 6 

8.4 

7.2 

3.7 

21.6 

13.5 

26.6 

7.8 

20.8 

18 5 

18.6 

12.6 

15 9 

13.7 

31.3 

26.9 



2 
2 
4 

7 



DlPBTHBBlA 



Number 



34 
1 

13 
9 
8 

22 
9 
4 
6 
3 
3 
4 

13 
183 

12 

11 
3 
3 
1 

5 
5 
1 
1 
1 

43 

15 

14 
1,715 

22 

30 

36 
2 

23 
2 
5 
2 
1 

18 
4 
9 
7 

18 
2 

1 
1 

11 
2 



25 
1 
1 
1 

65 
2 





Rate 



19.6 
2 4 
16 4 
13.7 
11 9 
20 9 



16 
11 
12 



4 
2 

4 



6.9 

10 2 
8.8 

14.8 

34 4 

35 8 
24.1 

6*7 
8.0 
3.3 

8.9 
6.2 
4.0 
2.6 

2 5 
15.1 
25.9 
16.5 
35 7 
23.8 
19.4 
17 9 

3.8 

19.8 

6 3 

7.0 

4.2 

6.8 

14.7 

8 9 

10.1 

11 3 
20 2 

8.4 


3 7 
12 

1U4 

5.9 





27 2 

3.1 

2.1 

2.0 

22.8 

6.3 







15.0 



2.433 



26.5 



Division of Vital Statistics 



113 



COUNTY 



CMttermucus. 

Qiyuf« 

Cluiotauqua. 



CSBtOO^ 

Cohnnbia 
Gortland. 



Erie 



FHnkUn 
FtaHoo.. 



OrsBoe.. . 

Hamilton 



Lirinsstoo. . . . 

lUdiMa 

Monroe 

MootcDBiery. . 

Nmmu 

Wew York city. 



ODondaga. 
Ontario. . . 



Otaeco. 
Putnam. 



Roddand. . 
St. LawTen<« 
Saratoca .... 
Scbeneetady. 
SdMharie . . 
Schuyler 



Steuben.. . 

SoffoUc... 

SoOiTan... 

Tioga 

Tompldtta. 
Ubter . . . 



Waobington 



Weatcheeter 
Wjroming. . 



State inatitutions . 
Total 



DfABmncA (Umdxb 
2 Yeabs) 



Number 



142 
12 
49 
31 
47 
68 
21 
16 
35 
32 
7 
15 
60 
435 
25 
40 
26 
25 
13 
3 
34 
43 
11 
24 
20 
276 
100 
92 
5.655 
86 
162 
200 
22 
84 
10 
42 
23 
11 
82 
38 
63 
49 
130 
3 
4 
8 
27 
64 
28 
13 
9 
39 
7 
31 
26 
383 
18 
7 
1 



Rate 



7 




4 
3 




81 
29 
62 
47 
70 
64 
38 
45 
72.5 
73.2 
23.9 
32.9 
68.3 
81.8 
74.6 
87.7 
58.2 
66.3 
43.1 
69.0 
60.2 
53.5 
44.4 
63.0 
50.9 
96.8 
172.7 
108.7 
1.175.3 
153.1 
104.7 
99.4 
42.1 
72.2 
59.3 
" 68.5 
48.7 
74.9 
67.0 
84.8 
70.9 
79.1 
146.1 
12.6 
28.7 
29.7 
32.4 
66.3 
82.9 
50.8 
26.8 
42.4 
21.7 
64.8 
51.8 
184.2 
56.4 
37.6 



IlfrLUBNSA 



Number 



46 
17 
16 
18 
15 
36 
21 
24 
18 
17 

9 
21 
13 
42 
18 
19 
14 
12 

5 

1 
15 
24 
14 

9 
19 
29 

8 

9 
366 
14 
35 
31 
16 
31 
11 
17 
29 

6 
42 

7 
38 
26 

6 
10 

9 
10 
22 
29 
17 

9 
18 
36 

9 
25 
21 
29 

8 

9 

7 



9.036 



98 6 



1.452 



Rate 



26.6 
41.1 
20.2 
27.3 
22.3 
34 1 
38.3 
67.6 
37.3 
38.9 
30 8 
46.1 
14.8 

7 9 
53.7 
41.7 
31.4 
31.8 
16 6 
23.0 
26.6 
30.0 
56.5 
23.6 
48.4 
10.2 
13.8 
10 6 

7.6 
15.2 
22.6 
15.4 
30.6 
26.7 
34.3 
23.7 
61.5 
40.8 
34.3 
15.5 
42.7 
42.0 

6.7 
42.0 
64.5 
37.1 
26.4 
30.1 
50.3 
11.7 
53.5 
39 1 
27 9 
52.3 
41.8 
10.2 
25.1 
48.3 



Cancbb 



Number 



191 
34 
77 
69 
69 
91 
54 
34 
26 
41 
32 
48 
80 

380 
24 
33 
42 
39 
31 
2 
40 
76 
26 
29 
40 

266 

38 

62 

3.709 

58 

148 

176 
65 
99 
35 
63 
52 
18 

125 
34 
66 
66 
52 
25 
13 
26 
73 
69 
13 
20 
47 
70 
35 
36 
37 

243 
24 
13 
38 



Rate 



109 8 
82.2 
97 4 
104.7 
102.7 
86.2 
98.6 
95 
53. 



7 
.8 



93 8 



4 
4 


4 



15.8 



7.522 



109 
105 

91 

71 

71.6 

72 3 
94.1 

103.5 

102.7 

46.0 

70.8 

94.5 

104.9 

76 1 
101.8 

93 3 
45.6 

73 3 

77 1 
62.8 
95.6 
87 5 

124.3 
85 1 

109.3 
87.8 

110 

122 
92 
75 
74 

106.6 

. 58.4 

105 
93 1 
96 5 
87.5 
71 5 
38 5 
78.2 

139.7 
76 1 

108 6 
75 3 
73 7 
85.1 
7.S 2 
69 8 



82 1 



2 
5 
2 
5 
2 



lU 



State Depabtment op Health 



Mortality from Principal 



CITY 



LMkftwanna 

Troy 

CoboM 

Hudson 

Rome 

Albany 

Cortland 

OneonU 

Newburg 

Kingston 

Port Jervk 

NiannFaUs 

MkMletown 

Watertown 

Plattaburg 

Utica 

Watervliet 

Amaterdam 

Ogdensburg 

Poughkeepsie 

LockpoH 

Ithaca 

Oswego 

Buffalo 

Dunkirk 

New York (Gr.).. 

Manhattan 

Bronx 

Brooklyn 

Queens 

Richmond 

Binghamton 

Glens Falls 

Uttle Falls 

Gloverwille 

Syracuse 

Yonken 

Auburn 

Elmira 

Rensselaer 

Fulton 

Schenectady 

Corning 

Oneida 

Rochester 

Genera 

Mt Vernon 

Johnstown 

North Tonawanda 
Olean 

Jamestown 

Homell 

Tonawanda 

New Rochelle 



Population 



14.540 
70.830 
24.737 
11.402 
20.032 

100.358 

11.517 

0.552 

27.808 

25.020 

0.304 
30.017 
15.207 
20.702 
11.182 

74.870 
15.000 
31.580 
15.081 
28.055 

17.003 
14.815 
23,410 
425.715 
17.308 

4.700.030 
2.341.312 

437.701 
1.640.285 

287,725 
80.520 

48,071 
15.208 
12.320 
20,730 

138.087 

.80.580 

34.760 

37.238 

10,712 

10.550 

73,450 

13.742 

8,310 

210.003 

12.458 
31.175 
10.476 
12.033 
14,814 

31,523 

13,637 

8,308 

29.229 



Total DiAin 



AD 



307 
1,507 
500 
230 
411 

1.043 
210 
181 
510 
475 

170 
551 
275 
408 
105 

1,207 
201 
540 
208 
406 

200 
244 
385 
6.877 
270 

70.750 

38.008 

0.008 

25.070 

3.071 

1.407 

705 
241 
104 
321 

2.124 

1,220 

522 

554 

158 

155 

1,070 

200 

118 

3.084 

175 
433 
143 
100 

188 

404 
174 
106 
342 



Rate 

per 

1.000 

er,; 



27.3 
20.8 
20.0 
20.0 
10.0 

104 
10.0 
18.0 
18.3 
18.3 

18.3 
18.0 
18.0 
17.5 
17.4 

17.3 
17.3 
17.1 
10 8 
10.0 



10 
10 
10 



10.2 
10.1 

10.0 
10.1 
15.0 
15.0 
13.8 
17.0 

15.7 
15.7 
15.7 
15.5 

15.4 
15.2 
15.0 
14.0 
14.7 

14 7 
14.0 
14.0 
14.2 
14.0 

14.0 
13.0 
13.7 
13.3 
12.7 

12 8 
12.8 
12.8 
11 7 



Ttfboid 



Deaths 



1 

15 

10 



4 

15 

2 

12 
5 


80 

4 
24 

3 

5 
7 
7 

5 

2 

5 

12 

78 

4 

558 

200 

41 

108 

30 

11 


2 
1 
2 

38 
15 

3 
10 

3 

1 
5 
8 
4 
30 

3 
3 
1 
5 



5 
3 
1 



Rate 
100,000 



7.0 
10.5 
70.8 
52.3 
10.3 

14.0 
78.1 
20.0 
43.1 
10.2 

04.5 
07.0 
20.1 
80.0 
20.8 

0.7 
40.4 
22.1 
37 5 
17.8 

11.1 
33.7 
51.2 
18.3 
23.1 

11.0 
11.0 
0.4 
12.0 
13.5 
12.7 

12.4 

13.1 

8.1 

0.0 

27 5 
18.0 
8.0 
20.0 
28.0 

5 

0.8 

58.2 

48 1 

13.7 



24.1 
0.0 
0. 

41 




.5 
.0 



28 5 

36 6 

36 1 

3 4 



PULMONART 
TUBncUX<0BI8 



Deathf 



18 
175 
40 
20 
20 

230 
3 


50 
40 

11 
32 
27 
21 
23 

04 
21 
32 
17 
35 

25 
15 
17 
510 
11 

8,000 
3.070 
1.770 
2.420 
358 
148 

58 
18 
10 
10 

123 

120 

41 

10 

15 

13 

72 

7 

3 

277 

13 

34 

11 

8 

7 

23 
5 
7 

21 



Rate 
100.000 



123 7 
227,8 
108.0 
220.8 
120.0 

238.1 

20.0 

02.8 

170.4 

177.4 



118 
104 
170 
78. 
207 



125.5 
130.1 
101.3 
100 4 
124.8 

138.0 
101.2 

72.0 
110.8 

03.4 

181.1 
171.0 
400.4 
147.4 
124.2 
170.2 

110.2 

117.0 

81.1 

77.2 

80 1 
148 
118.0 

51 
140.0 

123 2 
08.0 
50.0 
36 1 

126.1 

104.4 

100 1 

106.0 

66.5 

47 2 

73 
36 7 

84 3 
83 1 



Cancbb 



Deaths 



3 

83 

14 



23 

135 
14 
13 
25 
21 

le 

14 

16 

23 



65 
8 
15 
14 
27 

12 
16 
20 
305 
13 

8.700 
1,015 

323 
1.212 

185 
74 

41 

12 

5 

15 

125 
50 
30 
38 
14 

7 

41 

6 



213 

11 
20 
13 
6 
17 

21 

5 

23 



Rate 
100,000 

ktlOD 



20.6 

107.0 

50.6 

78.5 

111.8 

134.5 

121.5 

130.5 

80.5 

80.9 

107.4 

45.0 

104.5 

85.8 
80.5 

87.1 
53.0 
47.4 
87.5 
00.1 

00.0 
108.0 
80.0 
71.7 
75.1 

77.3 
82.4 
73.8 
73.6 
04 2 
85.1 

84 1 
70.2 
40 5 
72.3 

00.5 

73.2 

112.3 

101.8 

130.0 



60 4 

55. 

43 

108.2 
00.0 



I 



88.2 
04 2 

124.0 
40.0 

114.8 

00 
06 
6) 2 

73.7 



a 



Division of Vital Statistics 



115 



Causes in Cities of State 



Dvmum ow m 

CntcajLTomr 

Simof 


PmTIMOlIU 


Onss RwpiBA- 

TOBT DUBAUS 


CHBomc BaioBT's 
Dbbabi 


DURBHSA 

Emtuutib 
(Under 3 yeam) 


ViOLSNca 
(Aocidenti, sui- 
cides, ete.) 




Rate 




Rate 




Rate 




Rate 




Rate 




Rate 


De»tbs 


100^ 


DefttlM 


ioJ!ooo 


DeatiM 


loS^ 


Deaths 


lOOAK) 


Deaths 


100.000 


Deaths 


100.000 




ponibb- 




popula- 




popuhp 




popula- 




popuhp 




popula- 




tioa 




tion 




txm 




tion 




tion 




tion 


16 


109.9 


30 


206.1 


19 


130.5 


3 


20.6 


98 


673.3 


41 


281.7 


2» 


288.6 


115 


149.5 


109 


141.7 


113 


146.9 


67 


87.1 


79 


102.7 


35 


141.4 


34 


137.4 


45 


181.8 


23 


92.9 


54 


318.2 


21 


84.8 


S 


244.2 


10 


87.2 


17 


148.3 


21 


183.1 


17 


148.2 


23 


200.6 


» 


280.7 


19 


92.0' 


18 


87.1 


35 


169.4 


27 


130.7 


26 


125.8 


379 


277.9 


126 


125.5 


97 


96.6 


139 


138.4 


56 


55.8 


96 


95.6 


SS 


217.0 


21 


182.3 


10 


86.8 


24 


206.3 


4 


34.7 


17 


147.6 


31 


220.5 


17 


178.5 


5 


52.5 


10 


105.0 


9 


94.5 


30 


315.0 


51 


182.6 


60 


179.0 


36 


93.1 


48 


171.8 


25 


89 5 


36 


128.9 


71 


273.4 


26 


100.1 


17 


65.5 


24 


92.4 


12 


46.2 


33 


127.1 


12 


128.9 


10 


107.4 


4 


43.0 


7 


75.2 


5 


53.7 


19 


161.1 


40 


130.4 


37 


120.6 


29- 


94.5 


24 


78.2 


45 


146 7 


70 


228.2 


34 


222.0 


18 


117.5 


16 


104.5 


23 


150.2 


1 


6.5 


31 


202.4 


54 


201.4 


29 


108.3 


24 


89.5 


24 


89.5 


20 


74.6 


37 


138.0 


19 


169.9 


11 


98.3 


11 


98.3 


2 


17.9 


7 


62.6 


7 


62.6 


142 


190.3 


101 


135.3 


79 


105.9 


77 


103.2 


100 


131 


75 


100.5 


26 


172.1 


23 


162.3 


23 


145.6 


17 


112.6 


11 


72.8 


11 


• 72.8 


39 


123.2 


54 


170.6 


32 


101.1 


34 


107.4 


89 


281.2 


36 


113.8 


34 


212.5 


8 


50.0 


25 


156.3 


19 


118.8 


16 


100.0 


12 


75.0 


67 


238.5 


31 


110.4 


23 


81.9 


39 


138.8 


21 


74.8 


34 


121.0 


49 


272.0 


20 


111.1 


20 


111.1 


15 


83.8 


11 


61.1 


24 


133.2 


29 


193.8 


11 


74.3 


10 


67.5 


26 


175.5 


6 


405 


19 


126.3 


43 


184.9 


19 


81.7 


11 


47.3 


36 


154.8 


18 


87.4 


31 


133.3 


899 


211 3 


110 


25.9 


761 


178.8 


277 


66.3 


264 


62.0 


345 


81.1 


18 


104.0 


25 


144.5 


9 


52.2 


21 


131.4 


23 


132.9 


29 


167.6 


lO^SlS 


218.7 


6;546 


115.4 


7.182 


148.3 


4.893 


101.8 


5.655 


117 6 


4.863 


101.2 


4,8&5 


206.8 


2,686 


115.5 


3,719 


159.9 


2.353 


101.3 


2.904 


124 9 


2,727 


117.3 


896 


204.6 


462 


105.5 


431 


98.4 


356 


81.3 


316 


72 2 


346 


79.0 


3.966 


240.7 


2.002. 


131.5 


2.546 


154.5 


1.793 


108.8 


l/«96 


121.2 


1.393 


84.6 


S83 


202.3 


296 


102.7 


325 


112.8. 


279 


96.8 


335 


116 2 


298 


103.4 


215 


247.3 


100 


115 


111 


127.7 


112 


128.8 


101 


119.2 


99 


113.9 


81 


166.1 


62 


127.1 


39 


80.0 


65 


133.3 


39 


80.0 


54 


110.7 


41 


270.6 


16 


105.0 


14 


02.4 


12 


79.3 


7 


46 2 


10 


66.0 


31 


251.1 


19 


153.9 


10 


81.0 


13 


105.3 


11 


89.1 


16 


129.6 


30 


144.6 


16 


77.1 


10 


91.6 


30 


144.6 


14 


67.5 


17 


81.9 


383 


212.1 


144 


104.3 


121 


87.6 


160 


115.8 


166 


120.2 


162 


117.3 


175 


217.0 


75 


93.0 


85 


106.4 


65 


80.0 


180 


233.2 


56 


69.4 


63 


181.4 


40 


115.2 


39 


83.5 


34 


97.9 


36 


103.6 


28 


80.6 


63 


168.8 


33 


88.4 


30 


80.4 


89 


338.5 


14 


37.5 


45 


120.6 


30 


186.6 


9 


84.0 


11 


102.6 


6 


56.0 


2 


18.6 


15 


140.0 


14 


132.7 


9 


85.3 


6 


56.9 


7 


66.4 


7 


66.4 


14 


132.7 


84 


114.2 


108 


146.9 


74 


100.6 


63 


85.7 


115 


156.4 


74 


100.6 


20 


145.4 


18 


130.9 


9 


65.4 


10 


72 7 


4 


29.1 


17 


123.6 


U 


168.3 


7 


84.1 


7 


84.1 


4 


48 1 


5 


60.1 


10 


130.3 


415 


188.8 


153 


69.6 


254 


115.6 


351 


114.3 


303 


92.4 


180 


81.9 


37 


216.5 


12 


96.2 


11 


88.3 


13 


104.3 


4 


33.1 


14 


113.3 


61 


195.8 


31 


99.6 


34 


109.1 


42 


134 8 


36 


115.6 


22 


70.6 


12 


114.5 


18 


171.7 


6 


57.3 


10 


95.4 


7 


66 8 


5 


47.7 


7 


58.2 


8 


66.5 


18 


140.6 


4 


33 2 


21 


174 5 


13 


108.0 


22 


148.5 


16 


106.0 


6 


40.5 


8 


54.0 


9 


60.8 


18 


121.5 


47 


149.0 


30 


96.1 


33 


73.9 


43 


•136 3 


8 


35.4 


22 


69.7 


36 


190.6 


14 


103.6 


3 


22 


9 


66 


4 


29.3 


15 


110 


11 


133.4 


7 


• 84.3 


6 


72.3 


3 


36.1 


5 


60 2 


14 


168 6 


35 


86.5 


22 


75.3 


35 


85.5 


33 


112 9 


23 


78.7 


34 


116.3 



116 



State Department of Health 



Toted Mortality by Motiihs 



Azmual 

death 

rate per 

1.000 

lation 



January. . , 

Februarj'- 
March . . . . 

April 

\iay 

June 

July 

August. . . 
September 
October. . . 
November 
December. 

Total. 



14.4 
13.2 
15 7 
14.3 
13.2 
12.1 
14.3 
13.4 
12.5 
12.1 
11.0 
14.0 



16.1 



Total 
deaths 



13.158 
12.109 
14,397 
13.085 
12.009 
11.066 
13.098 
12.238 
11.441 
11.108 
10.038 
12.892 



147.629 



Deaths 

under 
1 year 



2.055 
1.851 
2.192 
2,051 
1.960 
2.027 
3.512 
3,414 
2.781 
2.312 
1.537 
1.765 



27,457 



Aocs 



Deaths 
1 to4 
srears 



1.155 

1.144 

1,296 

1.172 

1.111 

953 

1,206 

1.090 

900 

713 

700 

794 



12.233 



Deaths 

5 to 19 

years 



Deaths 

20 to 30 

years 



604 
681 
760 
783 
730 
683 
702 
652 
5ol 
566 
557 
611 



8.060 



Deaths 

40 to 50 

yean 



2.053 
1,876 
2.250 
2.131 
2.048 
1.876 
1.065 
1.710 
1,760 
1.832 
1.826 
2.004 



23.340 



2.835 
2.590 
2.903 
2.734 
2.519 
2.240 
2.360 
2.252 
2.207 
2.325 
2,487 
2.007 



30.557 



Deaths 
at 60 
years 

and over 



4.352 
3.935 
4.899 
4.205 
3.704 
3,274 
3.243 
3.100 
3,214 
3.347 
3.820 
4.706 

45,790 



Total Mortality by Months — (Continued) 



Epidemic Diseasbs 



Ty- 
phoid 
fever 



January. . . 
February . . , 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August .... 
September. . 

October 

November . . 
December . . . 

Total.. 



02 

90 

96 

72 

63 

71 

97 

135 

191 

172 

163 

132 

1.374 



Ma- 
laria 



7 
4 
3 
5 
6 
5 
6 
8 
5 
10 
2 
4 

65 



Small- 
pox 


Measles 


Scar- 
let 
fever 


Whoop- 
ing 
cough 


Diph- 
theria 
and 
croup 


• 
■ • • • 


170 


226 


46 


276 


1 


173 


221 


40 


248 


• • • * 


219 


253 


56 


271 


2 


195 


223 


60 


276 


1 


134 


177 


68 


238 


2 


138 


138 


54 


198 


1 


83 


73 


97 


159 






47 


36 


103 


131 






36 


41 


57 


108 






12 


53 


48 


131 






31 


83 


45 


209 






47 


93 


53 


189 




7 


1.285 


1,617 


727 


2.433 



Influ- 
ensa 



153- 

204 

418 

260 

109 

43 

15 

8 

12 

30 

44 

156 

1,452 



Ery- 
sipelas 



51 
71 
87 
52 
50 
46 
33 
19 
11 
23 
31 
43 

526 



Cercbro- 
sinnal 
menin- 
gitis 



35 
37 
45 
49 
49 
41 
37 
37 
38 
39 
22 
33 

452 



Division of Vital Statistics 



117 



Total Mortality by Months ^ — (Continued) 






Pul- 
tobcr- 



Total 



1.204 
1.156 
1,427 
1.311 
1.242 
1.068 
1.180 
1.085 
1.078 
1.065 
1.060 
1.193 



14.059 



Other 
forms 

of 
tuber- 
coloois 


Cancer 

and 

other 

iwmltg- 

nant 
tumoiB 


Dia- 
betes 


Other 
dkeaaes 


Diseases 

of the 

nervous 

system 


Diseases 
of the 

circula- 
tory 

qrstem 


1S4 
181 
214 
216 
216 
217 
226 
167 
166 
171 
163 
157 


627 
584 
652 
622 
623 
595 
601 
642 
670 
639 
637 
630 


145 
127 
143 
130 
110 
129 
100 
118 
117 
117 
116 
146 


386 
367 
462 
'434 
423 
366 
448 
528 
460 
416 
370 
897 


1.002 
926 

1.099 
969 
987 

8n 

938 
810 
879 
913 
944 
1.060 


1.867 
1,736 
1.854 
1,720 
1,670 
1,454 
1.405 
1.284 
1.357 
1.473 
1.656 
2,021 


2.278 


7.522 


1.498 


5.057 


11.404 


19.497 



Pneu- 



1.249 

1.058 

1.429 

1.149 

857 

524 

321 

286 

333 

553 

761 

1.347 



9,867 



Other 


Diar- 


diseases 


rhea 


of the 


and en- 


tmfxnr 


teritis 


tory 


(under 


system 


2 yean) 


1,373 


223 


1.199 


200 


1,406 


224. 


1,277 


260 


990 


337 


743 


620 


641 


2,237 


524 


2.071 


623 


1,430 


731 


885 


873 


320 


1,282 


211 


11.662 


9.036 



Diar- 
rhea 
anden^ 
teritis 
(over 
2 years) 



59 

80 

69 

98 

75 

112 

283 

331 

241 

125 

91 

83 

1,647 



Total Mortality by Months — (Concluded) 





Other 




Other 
db- 




Con- 












BtRTHB 




db- 


Bright's 


The 

PUCT- 

peral 

state 


genital 








ni-<ie- 

fined 
dis- 
eases 


All 
otha 
causes 






di^estr- 

ive 
system 


and 
ne- 
phritis 


ofthe 
genito- 
urin- 
ary 
system 


de- 

bUity 
(under 

3 
months) 


Acci- 
dents 


Sui- 
cides 


Homi- 
cides 


ToUl 
births 


StiU 
births 


J.,^ 


627 


891 


276 


132 


416 


647 


112 


42 


261 


379 


18.589 


856 


FArsary 


618 


796 


266 


141 


342 


487 


101 


26 


248 


381 


16,108 


805 


Msnk. 


661 


947 


306 


166 


468 


530 


132 


31 


291 


438 


18,711 


925 


iC?-:;;. : 


616 


874 


312 


132 


397 


574 


128 


30 


230 


404 


17,343 


828 


609 


834 


256 


131 


302 


591 


140 


34 


247 


521 


17.590 


847 




629 


766 


246 


142 


362 


686 


148 


34 


236 


376 


17.596 


840 


«y 


662 


740 


279 


116 


370 


1.025 


153 


42 


315 


415 


18,893 


816 




794 


718 


229 


99 


420 


750 


108 


42 


329 


379 


18,123 


818 


S^l^^iv 


659 


696 


218 


93 


422 


624 


131 


36 


301 


409 


17.910 


794 


Oilobe 


629 


718 


211 


99 


428 


641 


113 


31 


269 


373 


17,679 


786 


%mm»bK 


538 


.830 


226 


93 


316 


593 


111 


46 


232 


332 


17,353 


803 


l>^ngakm 


649 


901 


275 


108 


356 


547 


102 


26 


223 


428 


17.340 


834 


Total 


7.691 


9.711 


3.100 


1.452 


4.599 


7.695 


1.479 


420 


3,182 


4.835 


213,235 


9.952 



118 



State Department of Health 



Detailed Statement as to Causes of Deaths 



9 




Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


1. 


All cftuses 


13,158 

3,567 

1.028 
92 


12.109 

3,467 

1.060 
90 


14.397 

4.301 

1.415 
96 


13.085 

3.857 

1,155 
72 


12,099 

3.469 

865 
63 


11,066 

3.070 

707 
71 


13.098 


?. 


T. Oftfiftml diw!!*iiw^ 


3.119 


3. 


(A) Koidennio diseases 


617 


4. 


Tvnhoid fever 


97 


R 


Tvnhiifl fftver 




6. 


RelaDsins fever 


1 










1 

6 

2 

138 

138 

54 

190 

8 

43 




7, 


Malaria 


7 


4 
1 

173 

221 
40 

239 
9 

204 


3 

' 2i9 

263 

56 

264 

7 
418 


5 
2 

195 

223 
60 

271 
4 

260 


6 
1 

134 

177 
68 

236 
2 

109 


6 


8 


BniallDOX 


1 


9. 


IVfeasles 


170 
226 

46 
262 

14 
153 


83 


10. 


Roarlet fever 


73 


11. 


Whoooine couiEh 


07 


12. 


(a^ Diohtheria 


168 


13.. 


(h) CrouD 


1 


14. 


Tnfliiensa . t 


15 


15 


\f iliftrv fever 




16 


Afliiitir cholera 
















17. 


Dvsenterv 


6 


7 


10 


9 


• 8 


7 


53 


IH 


PlAfMie 




10 


Yellow fever 
















20 


T ^enron V 
















?1. 


Krvsioelas 


51 
1 

2.539 
25 


71 

1 

2.407 
25 


87 
2 

2.886 
46 

1 


52 
2 

2.702 

34 

1 


59 
2 

2.604 
36 


46 

4 

2.363 
16 


33 


72. 


Otner eDidemic diseases 




23. 


(B) Other iceneral diseases 


2.602 


24. 
25 


Purulent infection and septicemia . . 
Glanders 


30 


26 


AntHrax 


3 










27. 


Ttabiea 




1 
6 


1 
9 


2 
9 


ii 


1 


28. 


Tetanus 


8 


9 


17 


20 


T^AllairrA 




30. 


Tuberculosis of lunss 


i;264 

7 

109 

27 

12 

6 
17 

6 

2 
50 

5 

19 

253 

91 
16 
56 
92 
102 

9 
48 
54 

5 

1 

145 

13 

2 
14 
37 
82 

3 


1.156 

15 

91 

33 

10 

5 

13 

14 

14 

36 

1 

35 

219 

78 

15 

68 

84 

85 

11 

68 

47 

6 

1 

127 

11 

2 

10 

■ 33 

68 


i.'427 
27 
93 
35 
16 

3 
18 
22 

4 
61 

1 

25 

247 

95 
16 
76 
84 
109 
11 
84 
42 
11 

2 

143 

14 

1 
17 
40 
97 

5 


1.311 
30 
91 
32 
14 

6 
32 
11 

6 
48 

3 

20 

246 

102 
15 
58 
98 
83 

6 
81 
20 
37 

1 

130 

U 

4 
18 
47 
80 

2 


i.242 

16 

117 

28 

13 

5 

25 

12 

6 

69 

1 

18 

253 

97 
19 
55 
83 
98 
5 
63 
13 
33 

"iio 

10 

2 

14 

48 
87 

1 


1.068 

14 

108 

4« 

15 

2 

24 

8 

8 

65 

214 

101 

13 

62 

109 

85 

8 
69 
14 
20 

1 

129 

10 

4 

8 
44 
61 

10 
3 

11 


1,180 


31 


Acute miliarv tuberculosis 


24 


32. 


Tuberculous meniniritis 


119 


33. 


Abdominal tuberculosis 


33 


34. 


Pott's disease 


10 


35. 


white swelling 


4 


36. 
37. 


Tuberculosis of other organff 

Disseminated tuberculoma 


27 
9 


38. 


Rickets 


12 


39. 


Svohilis 


65 


40. 


GonococcuB infections 




41. 


Cancer of mouth 


25 


42. 
43. 


Cancer of stomach and liver 

Cancer of peritoneum, intestines and 
rectum 


238 
84 


44. 


Cancer of skin 


15 


45. 


Cancer of breast 


51 


46. 
47. 
48. 


Cancer of female genital organs 

Cancer of other or unspecified organs 
Tumor (noncancerous) 


87 

101 

20 


49. 
60. 
51. 
52. 


Acute articular rheumatism 

Chronic articular rheumatism 

Chronic rheumatism and gout 

Scurvy 


17 
26 
18 


63, 


Diabetes 


100 


54. 


ExoDhthalmic goiter 


10 


56. 


Addison's disease 


3 


56. 


Leukemia 


8 


67. 


Anemia, chlorosis* 


37 


68. 


Alcoholism 


92 


69. 


Chronic lead Doisoninic 


4 


60. 


Other chronic occupational poison- 
infffl 


10 


61. 


Other chronic noisoninirs 


3 
15 


"is 


4 
13 


"\l 


1 
24 


5 


62. 


Other general diseases 


20 



• Not separately 



Comparative Mortality 

TWELVE PROMINENT CAUSES 

OF DEATH 

NEW YORK STATE lOlO 

MM tooo iooo 4000 6000 0000 Tooo 8000 0000 10000 iiooo itooo laooo woo o 
TUBERCULOSIS] 

PNEUMONIA 

VIOLENCE 

BRIGHrS DfSEAt 

CANCER 

DIPHTHERIA 

OLD AGE 

SCARLET FEVi 

TYPHOID FEVER 

MEASLES 

WHOOPING 

CCffeUfO'SMMAL 
M£NIM9m$ 




Division of Vital Statistics 



119 



Occurring in the State During 1910 



K All causes. 



3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
IL 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
10. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 

23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
38. 
30. 
40. 
41. 
42. 
43. 

44. 

45. 
46, 

47. 

48. 

40. 

80. 

51. 

52. 

33. 

54.' 

55. 

55. 

57. 

58. 

». 

ao. 

51. 
82. 



2. I. Generml diseases. 



(A) Epidemic diseases. 

Typooid fever 

Typhus fever 

Befapmng fever 

Malaria 

Snudlpox 

Measles 

Scarlet fever 

Whoopmg cough 

(a) Diphtheria. . . 

(b) Croup 

Ii&fluensa 

Miliary fever 

Asiatic cholera 

Dysentery 



Aug. 



12.238 

3,027 

611 
135 



8 



Sept. 



11.441 

2.052 

561 
191 



Oct. 



11.108 

2,877 

524 
172 



Nov. 



Yellow fever, 

Lepro«y 

Enrsipelas 

Other epidemic diseases . 



(B) Other general diseases 

Purulent infection and septicemia 

Glanders 

Anthrax 

Rabies 

Tetanus 

Pellagra 

Tuberculosis of lungs 

Acute miliary tuberculosis 

Tuberculous meningitis 

Abdominal tuberculosis 

Pott's disease 

White swelling 

Tuberculosis of other origans 

Disseminated tuberculosis 

Rickets 

Syphilis 

Gronoooccus infections 

Cancer of mouth 

Cancer of stomach and liver 

Cancer of peritoneum, intestines and 
rectum 

Cancer of skin 

Cancer of breast 

Cancer of female genital organs 

Cancer of other or unspecified or- 
gans* 

Tumor (noncancerous)* 

Acute articular rheumatism 

Chronic articular rheumatism 

Chronic rheumatism and gout 

Scurvy , 

Diabetes 

Exophthalmic goiter 

Addison's disease 

Leukemia 

Anemia, chlorosis* 

Aloobolum 

Choronio lead poisoning 

Other chronic occupational poison 
ings 

Other chronic poisonings 

Other general ois 



47 

36 

103 

129 

2 

8 



123 



19 



2.416 
13 



2 
16 



useases. 



1.085 
18 
78 
33 

6 

1 
22 

9 
17 
64 

1 

26 

272 

03 
14 
59 

00 
08 
12 
40 
16 
20f 

2 
118 

7 

3 
11 
20 
72 

1 



36 
41 
57 
103 
5 
12 



09 



11 
1 

2,391 

16 
1 



10 



12 
53 
38 
123 
8 
30 



45 



23 



2.353 
22 



11 



16 
39 



1,078 

22 

76 

32 

7 

2 

22 

5 

8 

48 

7 

24 

265 

108 
17 
74 

85 
97 
10 
41 
25 
17 



5 

1 

1,055 

16 

86 

33 

4 



10,938 

2.954 

627 
163 



31 
83 
45 
195 
14 
44 



18 



31 

- 1 

2.327 

13 
1 



Dec. 



12,892 

3.240 

729 
132 



47 
93 
53 

180 
9 

156 



10 



43 
2 

2.511 

21 



117 

8 

5 

15 

36 

77 

2 



11 
22 



26 
6 
6 

50 
3 

25 
243 

99 
16 
60 

98 
98 
14 
23 
17 
38 

3 
117 

6 

1 
11 
42 
87 

4 



1.060 

19 

82 

23 

6 



2 
36 



22 
11 

4 
40 

2 

19 

241 

97 
20 
58 

100 

102 

9 

35 

19 

25 



7 
I 
1.193 
20 
75 
30 
12 



ToUl 

147.629 

39.900 

9.899 
1.374 



1 

65 

7 

1,285 

1.617 

727 

2.350 

83 

1.452 



395 



116 

13 

4 

8 

33 

95 

3 



16 
4 
7 

59 
5 

28 
242 

86 
17 
66 

86 
105 
6 
52 
21 
27 



146 
14 

1 
13 
34 
92 

1 



1 
42 



13 
10 



526 
17 

30.001 

301 

4 

4 

7 

111 

2 

14.059 

228 

1.125 

385 

125 

' 34 

264 

117 

93 

625 

31 

285 

2.933 

1.121 
192 
732 

1.096 

1.163 

121 

630 

314 

265 

11 

1.498 

127 

32 

147 

460 

990 

26 

20 

61 

262 



tiUJuly. 



120 



State Department of Health 



Detailed Statement as to Causes of Deaths Occurring 



63. 
64. 
05. 
66. 
67. 
68. 
69. 
70. 
71. 
72. 
73. 
74. 
76. 
76. 
77. 
78. 
79. 
KO. 
«1. 
82. 

83. 
84. 
85. 
86. 
87. 
oo. 
89. 
90. 
91. 
92. 
93. 

94. 

95. 

96. 

97. 

98. 

99. 
100. 
101. 
102. 
103. 
104. 
105. 
106. 
107. 



108. 
109. 
110. 
111. 
112. 
113. 

114. 
115. 

116. 
117. 
118. 
119. 
120. 
121. 
122. 
123. 
124. 
125. 



IT. Dticaaes of nervoua system 

Ebu»phalitia* 

Simple meningitis 

Cerebrospinal fever 

Locomotor ataxia 

Other diseases of spinal cord 

Apoplexy, cerebral hemorrhage . . . 

Softening of brain 

Paralsrsis without specified cause . . 

General paralysis oi inaane 

Other forms of mental alienation. . 

Other diseases of brain 

Epilepsy 

Conrulsions fnonouemeral)* 

Convulsions of infants* 

Chorea 

Other diseases of nervous system . . 
Diseases of the eye and its adnexa. 

Diseases of the ear 

Anterior poliomyelitis 



III. Diseases of circulatory system. . . , 

Pericarditis 

Acute endocahditis 

Organic disease of the heart 

Angina pectoris 

Diseases of the arteries 

Embolism and thrombosis 

Diseases of the veins 

Diseases of the Ijrmphatic system . . . 
Hemorrhages (except of lungs)*. . . . . 
Other diseases of circulatory system . 



IV. Diseases of respiratory ssratem 

Diseases of nasal fossae* 

Diseases of the larynx 

Diseases of the thjrroid body 

Acute bronchitis 

Chronic bronchitis 

Broncho-pneumonia 

Pneumoma 

Pleurisy 

Pulmonary congestion 

Gangrene of lungs 

Asthma 

Pulmonary emphysema 

Other diseases of the respiratory sys- 
tem 

V. Disease of digestive system 

Diseases of the mouth and its adnexa. 

Diseases of pharj'nx 

Diseases of the esophagus 

Ulcer of stomach 

Other disease? of the stomach (cancer 

excepted) 

Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 years) 
Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years and 

over) 

Intestinal parasites 

Hernia . .' 

Obstruction of intestines 

Appendicitis and t>'pbiliti8 

Other diseases of intestines 

Acute yellow atrophy of liver 

Hydatid tumor of liver 

Cirrhosis of liver 

Biliary calculi , 

Other di<«ease.«) of liver 



Jan. 



1.037 
4 
64 
35 
20 
39 

511 
13 

104 
39 
12 



31 
2 

89 
1 

48 



25 



1.867 

12 

262 

M03 

61 

326 

63 

6 

5 

15 

14 

2,622 



13 

3 

204 

107 

879 

1.249 

58 

34 

6 

22 

11 

36 

909 



13 

3 

25 

104 
223 

59 



69 
23 

81 

30 

7 

3 

182 
IR 
29 



Feb. 



963 
1 
78 
37 
17 
32 

488 
14 
76 
34 
11 



31 

4 
70 

1 
60 



14 



1.736 

6 

249 

1.041 

64 

300 

42 

8 

5 

12 

9 

2.257 



8 

3 

176 

106 

787 

1.058 

45 

23 

"22 
2 

27 

898 

5 

12 

2 

39 

92 

200 

80 



71 
34 
76 
18 

4 
3 
1.51' 

ISi 
3<V 



Mar. 



1.144 

5 
99 
45 
20 
39 
632 
16 
119 
48 
17 

5 
27 

1 
97 

4 
48 



22 



1.854 

13 

320 

1.037 

49 

329 

41 

8 

2 

16 

39 

2.835 



14 

1 

203 

99 

897 

1.429 

69 

39 

7 

29 

9 

39 

054 
4 

19 
6 

29 

123 
224 

69 



76 
59 
72 

18 

4 



April 



1,018 

4 
87 
49 
10 
47 
450 
16 
105 
42 
16 

1 
34 

2 
74 

1 
66 

1 
24 



1,720 

12 

258 

982 

71 

306 

48 

8 

2 

18 

20 

2,426 



8 

6 

178 

106 

796 

1,149 

60 

32 

2 

28 

13 

48 

983 
8 

20 
3 

34 

88 
269 

98 



58 
32 

85 

2 



147 
IS' 
41i 



149 
2'? 
25 



May 



1.036 

4 
83 
49 
13 
34 
490 
28 
101 
42 
18 

2 
82 

3 
83 

3 
39 



17 



1,670 

10 

227 

1.009 

72 

266 

41 

4 

6 

9 

26 

1.847 



13 

2 

118 

90 

598 

857 

65 

18 

3 

13 

8 

62 

1.021 
5 

20 
2 

34 

103 
337 

75 

1 

47 

40 

68 

14 

8 

1 

146 

17 

331 



June 



918 

2 

60 

41 

17 

34 

443 

14 

84 

61 

7 

6 

18 

3 

61 

3 

41 

1 

22 



1.454 

12 

185 

912 

5S 

217 

88 

8 

3 

6 

20 

1.267 



14 

1 

100 

40 

461 

524 

65 

16 

3 

17 

7 

19 

1.361 
7 

11 
2 

25 

89 
620 

112 

1 

66 

49 

88 

21 

2 

1 

138 

12 

36* 



July 



975 
9 
86 
37 
14 
51 

400 
13 

106 
80 
17 
II 



1 
89 

4 
66 

8 
6 
1* 

1.405 
13 

186 

823 

48 



84 

7 
2 
6 
8 

962 



6 

2 

68 

48 

387 

321 

84 

31 



16 
9 

40 

3,182 

2 

11 

2 

36 

87 
2.237 



4 

78 

34 

125 

30 

3 

4 

123 

16 

29 



* Not separately 



Division of Vital Statistics 



121 



m the State During 1910 — (Continued) 



Aug. 



63. II. 
64. 

65. 
66. 
67. 
68. 
69. 
70. 
71. 
72. 
78. 
74. 
76. 
76. 
77. 
78. 
79. 
80. 
81. 
82. 

83. III. 

84. 

86. 

88. 

87. 

88. 

80. 

90. 

91. 

93. 

93. 



Diaeaaes of nervous Bystem 

Encenhaliiis* 

Simple meningitis 

Cerebrospinal fever 

Looomotor ataxia 

Other diseases of n>tnal cord 

Apoplexy, oerebral hemorrhage . . . 

Softening of brain 

Paralysis without specified cause*. . 

G«neral paralysis of insane 

Other forms of mental alienation. . . 

Other diseases of brain 

Epilqjsy 

Convulsions (nonpuerperal)* 

Convulsions of Wants* 

Chorea 

Other diaeasea of nervous system . . 
Diseases of the eye and its adneza . 

Diseases of the ear 

Anterior poliomyelitis. 



Diseases of drculatoiy system 

Pericarditis 

Acute endocarditis 

Organic diseases of the heart 

Angina pectoris 

DtBeaees of the arteries 

Embolism and thrombosiB 

DtBeaees of the veins. : 

Diseases of the Isrmphatic system. . . 

Hemonhages (except of lungs)* 

Other diseases of circulatory system . 



M. IV. Diseases of respiratory system 



95. 

96. 

97. 

98. 

99. 
100. 
101. 
102. 
103. 
104. 
106. 
106. 
107, 



108. V. 

109. 

110. 

111. 

112. 

iia. 

114. 

115. 

U6. 
117. 
118. 
119. 
120. 
UL 
122. 
123. 
,24. 
;25. 



Diseases of nasal fossae 

Diseases of the larynx 

Diseases of the thyroid body 

Acute bronchitis 

Chronic bronchitis 

Broncho pneumonia 

Paeumoma 

Pleurisy 

Pulmonary congestion 

Gangrene of lungs 

Asthma 

Pulmonary emphysema 

Other diseases of the respiratory 
QTstem 



Diseases of digestive system 

Diseases of the moilth and its adnexa 

Diseases of pharsmx 

Dtseases of the esophagtu 

Ulcer of stomach 

Other dieeasea of the stomach (can- 

oer excepted) 

Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 

years). . 

Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years and 

over) 

Intestinal parasites 

Hernia 

Obstruction of intestines 

Appendicitis and typhilitis 

Other diseases of intestines 

Acute valknr atrophy of liver 

Hydatid tumor of liver 

Curhoois of Uver 

Biliary calculi. .* 

Other diaessee of liver 



847 
8 
83 
37 
17 
56 

380 

77 
32 
13 
5 
80 



62 

1 

37 



1.284 

5 

136 

801 

43 

263 

25 

4 

3 

3 

11 

810 



7 

2 

75 

35 

319 

286 

34 

18 

2 

7 

7 

18 

3.196 

7 

9 

2 

38 

116 

2.071 

331 
24 
66 
59 

102 
35 
24 



178 
11 
28 



Sept. 



907 

2 
64 
28 
22 
34 
402 
24 
98 
40 
17 

7 
24 

3 
58 

5 
43 

1 
14 
21 

1,357 

7 

109 

867 

53 

264 

31 

3 

3 

6 

14 

956 

1 

7 

1 

92 

38 

376 

333 

30 

21 

2 

21 

10 

24 

2.339 

5 

7 

6 

19 

. 113 

1,439 

241 
40 
23 
46 
74 
25 
4 
1 

146 
19 
38 



Oct. 



952 

4 
61 
39 
26 
52 
464 

7 
77 
44 
13 

3 
32 

4 
52 



45 

2 

16 

21 

1.473 

9 

108 

1.020 

40 

238 

33 

7 

1 

6 

11 

1.284 



7 

1 

101 

64 

442 

553 

42 

28 

2 

10 

6 

28 

1.630 

5 

14 



46 

103 

885 

125 

1 

39 

45 

83 

27 

2 

1 

126 

11 

40 



Nov. 



966 
8 
43 
22 
10 
39 

485 
21 
88 
56 f 
14 

O 

37 
2 

49 
1 

50 
1 

16 

11 

1.656 

11 

104 

1,107 

55 

319 

31 

2 

1 

5 

21 

1,634 



11 

2 

113 

71 

509 

761 

41 

35 

2 

23 

9 

57 

949 
4 

12 



35 

73 

320 

91 



10 

70 

66 

15 

2 

2 

143 

20 

31 



Dec. 



Total 



1.093 


11.856 


7 


58 


82 


889 


33 


452 


16 


211 


50 


507 


526 


5.556 


20 


191 


109 


1.144 


50 


538 


18 


173 


14 


59 


44 


368 


2 


27 


65 


839 


1 


25 


38 


561 




9 


14 


191 


4 


58 


2.021 


19.497 


10 


120 


121 


2.265 


1.413 


12.115 


64 


673 


317 


3.363 


51 


523 


10 


75 


3 


36 


2 


104 


30 


223 


2.629 


21.529 




1 


13 


121 


2 


26 


170 


1,598 


114 


918 


797 


7.248 


1.347 


9.867 


44 


587 


38 


333 


4 


33 


29 


237 


18 


109 


53 


451 


943 


18.374 


1 


53 


15 


163 


2 


30 


36 


396 


99 


1.190 


211 


9.036 


83 


1,647 


2 


51 


84 


687 


46 


537 


68 


988 


13 


270 


2 


42 




16 


172 


1.801 


23 


203 


29 


395 



clsasified till July. 



122 



State Depabtment of Health 



Detailed Statement as to Canises of Deaths Occurring 



V. Diaeaaes of diseotive aystem — {Con,) 

126. DiseaseB of tBe spleen 

127. Simple peritonitis (nonpuerperal) 

128. Other diseases of digestive ssrstem 

(cancer and tuberculosis excepted).. 



Jan. 



129. 
130. 
131. 
132. 
133. 
134. 
136. 

136. 
137. 

138. 
139. 
140. 
141. 
142. 
143. 

144. 



146. 
146. 
147. 
148. 
149. 
150. 

151. 



152. 

153. 
154. 
155. 
156. 
157. 



VI. Diseases of genito-urinary system, 
mtui 



Acute nephri 

Bright's disease 

Other dia^ises of kidneys and adnexa. 

Calculi of urinarv passage 

Diaeaaes of bladder 

Other diaeaaea of urethra, urinary 

abscess, etc 

Diseases of prostate 

Nonvenereal diseases of the male 

genital organs 

Metritis 

Uterine hemorrhage (nonpuerperal).. . 

Uterine tumor (noncanceroua) 

Other diaeaaes of uterus 

Cyata and other tumors of the ovary. . 
Salpingitia and other diaeaaea of feinale 

gepital organs 

Nonpuerperal diaeaaes of the breast 

(cancer excepted) 



VII. ChUdbirth *. . . . 

Accidents of pregnancy 

Puerperal hemorrhage 

Other accidents of labor. 

Puerperal septicemia 

Puerperal albuminuria and convul- 
sions 

Puerperal phlegmasia alba dolens, 
emDolus following childbirth (not 
otherwise defined) 

Puerperal diseaaea of the breaat 



VIII. Diaeaaea of the akin. . 

Gangrene 

Furuncle 

Acute abaceaa 

Other diseaaea of the skin . 



158. IX. Diaeaaes of locomotor aystem 

159. Diaeaaes of bones (tuberculosis ex- 

cepted) 

160. Diseases of joints (tuberculosis and 

rheumatism excepted) 

161. Amputation 

162. Other diseases of organs of locomotion 



163. X. Congenital malformations (still births 

not included) 

164. XI. Diseaaea of early infancy 

165. Premature birth 

166. Congenital debility, ic tenia and 

sclerema 

167. Other diseases of early infancy 

168. Lack of care 



169. Xn. Old age senility. 



170. XIII. Violence 

171. Suicide by poison 

172. Suicide by asphyxia 

173. Suicide by hanging or strangulation . 

174. Suicide by drowning 

175. Suicide by firearms 

176. Suicide by cutting instruments 



80 

10 

1,167 

139 

891 

23 

3 

40 



26 

2 
2 



10 
6 
3 

22 



132 

29 

6 

14 

53 

26 



3 
1 

60 
33 
'1 
21 
5 

29 

27 

1 



1 



115 

583 
148 

416 
19 



195 

809 
29 
20 
14 

5 
33 

6 



Feb. 



2 
33 

22 

1,062 

148 

796 

11 

7 

41 

2 
18 

1 
3 
2 
9 
3 
4 

17 



141 
30 
11 
12 
55 

24 



9 



56 
32 

5 
13 

6 

17 
16 



126 

519 
147 

342 

29 

1 

178 

619 
28 
22 
11 
1 
28 
5 



Mar. 



3 
29 

13 

1,253 

161 

947 

26 

10 

41 

6 
19 

3 
2 



12 
4 
4 

18 



166 

35 

9 

13 

68 

24 



17 



75 
37 

5 
27 

6 

43 
40 



124 

647 
136 

468 

40 

3 

201 

710 
29 
20 
22 
11 
37 
10 



AprU 



38 

28 

1,186 
152 

874 
18 

4 
46 



3 

1 

18 

5 

8 

22 



132 

36 



11 

56 

18 



55 
28 

8 
13 

6 

42 
41 



96 

590 

168 

397 

24 

1 

156 

750 
20 
19 
23 
10 
39 
12 



May 



2 
32 

36 

1.090 

116 

834 

23 

13 

21 

7 
14 

1 
1 
2 

17 
9 

15 

16 

1 

131 
32 
11 
16 
43 

22 



53 
29 

3 
16 

5 

14 

10 

1 

3 



114 

612 
274 

302 
36 



165 

795 
27 
22 
27 

8 
35 

13 



June 



1 
51 

20 

1,012 

113 

766 

17 

9 

28 

4 
19 

2 

1 



16 
9 
6 

22 



142 

28 

18 

6 

49 

28 



13 



55 

35 

3 

6 

11 

19 

17 

1 

i 



107 

538 
135 

362 

40 

1 

149 

887 
18 
30 
28 

7 
42 

9 



July 



10 
25 

43 

1.019 

121 

740 

22 

5 

42 

1 
22 

1 
1 



18 

11 



29 



116 
22 
18 
10 
24 

26 



16 



57 

82 

6 

10 

no 

21 
21 



98 

576 
153 

370 
46 

7 

148 

1.253 
31 
21 
29 
11 
40 
7 



* Not separately classified 



Division of Vital Statistics 



123 



in ihe State During 1910 — (Continued) 












Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Total 


* 

V Diaruea of digestive system — [Con.) 
|M r>Mr>*flnn nf thfi imleen , 








1 
35 

19 

1,056 

100 

830 

16 

3 

36 

6 

18 

1 


30 

27 

1,176 

155 

•901 

22 

3 

30 

2 
20 

2 
2 


21 


127. Simple peritonitis (nonpuerperal) . . 

128. Other dueases of diaestive system 

(csneer and tuberculosis excepted) 

139. VI. Diseases of ^ni to-urinary system. . 
130. Amte nenhnti* t 


38 

101 

947 
112 
718 

15 
6 

31 

3 

17 

1 


23 
70 

914 
89 

696 

16 

8 

34 

2 
24 


39 

47 

929 
100 
718 

17 
2 

23 

2 
23 


403 

445 

12.811 
1.506 


\%\. Bricht's disease 


9.711 


132. Other diseases of kidnesrs and adnexa 
131. CslcuU of urinary rinnnsfl.r 


226 
73 


IS4. Dimases of bladder 


413 


lis. Other diseases of urethra, urinary 
sbsoess, etc r 


39 


110. Disease of orostate 


250 


117. Nonvenereal diseases of the male 


14 


138. Metritis 


1 
3 
12 
6 
9 

13 

1 

93 
14 
10 
10 
26 

27 
6 


1 

1 

14 

11 

4 

13 


17 


IK T^terine hemorrhage (nonDuemeral) . 


2 
13 
10 

5 

14 


11 


110. Uterine tumor (noncancerous) 

^^1 . Other diseases of uterus 


12 

7 
8 

20 


20 
3 
6 

10 


171 

84 


142. Cysu and other tumors of the ovary 
141 Salpingitis and other diseases of fe- 
male genital organs 


78 
216 


144 Nonpuerperal dis^wes of the breast 


2 


145. 111. Childbirth 


99 
15 
10 
6 
37 

25 
6 


99 
29 
16 
7 
24 

18 
6 


93 
26 

8 

4 

32 

17 
6 


108 
13 
10 
11 
31 

29 

9 
5 

49 

28 

7 

8 

6 

18 

16 

1 
1 


1,452 


144. Accidents of Dreimancy 


309 


147. Puerperal hemorrhage 


136 


148. Other accidents of labor 


120 


Itf. PtMSperal septicemia 


498 


UO- Puerperal albuminuria and convul- 
tions, ... 


284 


IM. Punpcral phlegmasia alba dolens, 
embolus following childbuth (not 
otherwise defined) 


99 


^^ Puerperal diseases of the breast ... 


6 


Ua. Tin. Diseases of the skin 


46 
22 

7 
12 

6 

22 
21 

1 


43 
20 

5 
11 

7 

19 

18 


41 

20 

5 

6 

10 

9 

8 

1 


64 
32 

3 
24 

5 

19 

16 

3 


654 


1^ Gangrene 


348 


lis. FWuncle 


57 


'^ Acute abscews 


167 


^' Other disrasffl of the nkin 


- 82 


j% IX Diseases of locomotor system 

Ul. Diseases of bones (tuberculosis ex- 
cepted) 


272 
251 


^ Diseases of joints (tuberculosis and 
liieumatism excepted) 


13 


•*!• Antmitation ... 


1 


*^ OtMr diseases of organs of locomotion 


92 

622 
150 

420 
51 

1 

147 

917 
21 
17 
20 

6 

33 

5 


1 

122 

626 
162 

422 

39 

3 

142 

812 
33 
25 
12 

8 
30 
11 






7 


1^ X Omgeaital malformations (still 
births not included) 


105 

607 
126 

428 

50 

3 

138 

824 
20 
24 
22 

6 
30 

7 


89 

461 
107 

316 

37 

1 

163 

765 
19 
23 
17 

9 
29 

8 


131 

556 
145 

356 

53 

2 

169 

705 
15 
24 
13 
35 
11 
4 


1,319 


^ XI. Dieeases of early infancy 


6.937 


'**• P^mature birln 


1.851 


W Congenital debility, icterus and 


4,599 


J2 Other diseases of eariy infancy 

iw. Ladt of care 


464 
23 


*. XII. Old age— senility 


1,951 


l^ Xm. Violence 


9.846 


171. Suicide by poison 


290 


*!?• Suicide by asphyxia 


267 


\t*' ftiieide by hanging or strangulation. 
\i!t' duieide by drowning 


238 
117 


!l*- 8aieide by firearms 


387 


i««. Suicide by cutting instruments 


97 



^^. tMyeosis. 



124 



State Department of Health 



Detailed Statement aa to Cavses of Deaths Occurring 







Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


* 

June 


July 


177. 
178 


XIII. Violence — (C<m<»ntt«<0 
Suicide by jumping from high places. . 
8ui<?ide by mwninff 


3 


3 


3 


4 
1 


5 

2 

1 

3 

9 

16 

49 

34 

38 

103 


• 

11 

2 

1 

5 

10 

6 

38 

18 

65 

129 

3 

30 


13 
1 


179 


Other suicides . 


2 


3 
1 

16 
10 
52 
50 
48 
13 
3 






180 


Poisonimi bv food 


4 
13 

5 
53 
31 
61 
40 

1 


8 
16 

6 
58 
42 
62 
65 


3 


181 


Other acute Doisoninirs 


23 
5 
90 
65 
55 
14 
2 


13 


182 


ConflaffTfitioD 


6 


183. 
184. 
185 


Bums (conflagration excepted) 

Inhalation of poisonous gases 

Fractures 


57 
13 
60 


186 


Accidental drownimr 


272 


187 


Dislocations 


3 


188. 


Heat and sunstroke 






136 


189 


Cold and freesing 


19 


13 


4 


1 






190 


Lishtnins 


I 
9 


1 
13 


5 


191. 
192 


Electricity (lif^htning excepted) 

Starvation, privation, etc 


6 

1 

5 

11 

3 

76 

35 

177 

6 

54 

35 

6 
1 
8 

66 

1 


2 

6 

3 

2 

60 

8 

134 

21 

46 

22 

4 

5 

70 
3 


3 

2 

3 

18 

2 

91 

26 

121 

6 

46 

15 

3 
13 
17 

1 


8 


14 
2 


193 


Accidental gunshot wounds 


6 

9 

1 

86 

39 

117 

7 

43 

18 

8 

4 
18 

74 
3 


2 
11 


5 
16 


16 


194. 


Injuries by machinery 


16 


195 


Injuries in mines and quarries 

Railroad accidents and injuries 

Injuries by horses and vehicles 

Other accidential traumatisms 

Suffocation 




196. 
197. 
198. 
199 


147 
23 
99 
6 
41 
16 

4 
14 
30 

82 
3 
3 
9 
2 


106 
47 

141 

5 

46 

16 

5 
13 
19 

87 
3 

2 

1 


157 

54 

158 

4 


200 


Injuries at birth 


37 


201 


Homicide by firearms 


24 


202. 


Homicide by cutting and piercing 
instruments 


5 


203 


Homicide by other means 


13 


204. 


Other external violence .* 


33 


205 


XIV. Ill-defined diseases 


167 


206 


Dropsy 


2 


207. 


Sudden death 


10 


208. 


Heart failure 


5 

8 


6 
2 


12 

4 


7 
6 

1 
50 


12 


209. 


InapiMon 


2 


210. 


Debility (over 3 months) 




211, 


Marasmus 


41 


11 


67 
1 

i 


58 


80 


97 


212. 


Fever 


1 


213. 


Other ill-defined diseases 


9 
2 


47 
1 


4 

3 


6 
1 


i 


39 


214. 


Unknown 


4 




« 





• Not separately 



Division of Vital Statistics 



125 



in the State During 1910 — (Continued) 



XIII. Violence — {Contin%itd) 

177. Suicide by jumping from high places 

178. Suicide by cnuoing 

179. Other auicides 

180. Poisoning by food 

181. Other acute poisoningB 

1S2. Conflagration 

183. . Bums (conflagration excepted) . . . 

184. Inhalation of posionous gaaes 

185. Fractures 

184. Accidental drowning 

1H7. Dislocationa 

188. Heat and sunstroke 

VA. Cold and freeiing 

190 Li^tning 

191. Electricity (U|Jitning excepted) . . . 

192. Starvation, privation, etc 

193. Accidental gunshot wounds 

194. Injuries by machinery 

195. Injuries in mines and quarries 

196. Railroad accidents and injuries. . . . 

197. Injuries b^ horses and vehicles .... 
19S. Other accidental traumatisnls 

199. SufFooation 

200. Injuries at birth 

201. Homicide by firearms 

20*2. Homicide by cutting and piercing 

instruments 

203. Homicide by other means 

204. Other external violence 



Aug. 



205. XIV. Ill-defined diseases 



206. Dropsy* 

207. Sadden death 

208. Heart failure 

209. Inanition 

210. Debility (o\'er 3 months) 

211. Marasmus 

212. Fever 

213. Other ill-defined diseases. 

214. Unknown 



2 
15 
13 

2 

39 

18 

76 

142 



17 



7 
14 



6 



4 

167 

34 

131 

6 

60 

23 

7 
12 
17 

182 

1 

2 

12 



Sept. 



155 
2 

4 
6 



• 7 

1 

4 

7 

10 

4 

22 

22 

61 

97 

2 





7 

11 

4 

173 

36 

106 

1 

43 

17 

6 
13 
21 

159 
3 



II 
6 



127 



U 
1 



Oct. 



8 
17 
12 
73 
32 
67 
84 

3 



7 

1 
15 
11 

4 

133 

29 

98 

4 
42 
16 

7 

8 

39 

131 
3 



Nov. 



100 
2 
9 
2 



2 
3 
16 
14 
65 
50 
71 
31 



7 

13 

5 

146 

15 

110 

5 

30 

26 

8 
12 
15 



Dec. 



8 
3 



49 

"6 
2 



3 
16 
13 
69 
50 
52 
27 



9 



4 
12 

i26 

6 

107 

9 

40 

16 

4 

6 

30 

54 
1 
1 
9 
2 



31 

io 



Total 



61 
7 

15 

60 
172 

99 

666 

425 

716 

1,017 

16 
192 

47 

16 

90 
6 

81 
140 

25 

1,470 

352 

1.499 

80 
527 
244 

63 
113 
252 

1.231 

30 

16 

102 

42 

1 

866 

6 

144 

. 24 



elsssified tiU July. 



State Depahtment op Health 



Total Mortality for the Vrar 



SANITARY DfSTRfCTS 



MARITIME DISTRICT: 
CilyofNrwlok: 
Bat noH □ MnauiTi 



BoR noH < 
Totel 



ToUlitiirllMiliitrHt. .. 



H0D80N VALLEY DiaTRICT: 

AlbmyfAlUiiyCo,) 

Cobw (Albmy Co.) -. -. 

Onm Uud, vUli«« (Albuqr Co.) 
W«toT»lirt (AJUny Co.) 



FUikiU. lowD (Duicboi Co.) 

F ifiiVili f^p4j*r TiUifv fDulehflii C< 
MiitU*wu,Tilb«« (DuUluB Co.) . . 



CaUdil, villiga lOrtsnt Co.) 
Cowsku. Man (Onne Co.) 

RgrtatmiDlr 

G«ha. Uon (Oiufc Co.) . . 
MiddltUum (Orufi Co.) . 



17.S88 
II, UT 
S.710 
i.SM 
2.810 

j!io7 



Divisios OF Vital Statistics 137 

1910 in the Sanilart/ Districts — (Continued) 



State Depabtmest of Health 

Total Mortality for the Year 1910 In 



I)lVISU»N 0\ VlJ'AL S'JAriSlKs 



120 



//le Sanitary DiMricls — (Continueil) 



SANITARY DISTRICT? 



MARITIME DISTRICT: 
Citjr of New York: 
BoiuMJOB or Manbattam 
BoKOUQB ow TBI Bronx. 
BoM»iTeH or BaooiaTN . . 

BoROfTOB or OcnN* 

BosoroH or Ricbmi.nd. . 



Toteb 

Frwport. rUli^e (Nmbm Co.) 

HempstciMl, town (Nunu Co.).. . . 
North Hflmpiteftd, town (Nmmu Co.) 
Offtm Bay. town (Nmmu Co.).. . . 
Roekrille Center. Tilkn (Nunu Co.) 

AmHyrille, Tillage (Suffolk Co.) 

Babrloa, rillaxe (Suffolk Co.) 

BrookhaTOL. town (Suffolk CTo.) 

Greeoron. riOace (Suffolk Co.) 

Rontincloo. town (Suffolk Co.) 

PklchoKUtt. Tillaee (Suffolk Co.) 

Sac Harbor. rUlaoe (Suffolk Co.) ... . 

HoothoM. town (Suffolk Co.) 

Reat of county 

Dobfaa Fmy. riUage (West. Co.). . . . 
Oreeobur^ town (Weitehester Co ) . 
Haatmca-OQ-Hudaon, Til. (West. Co.). 
Irrioffton. riOafe (Wfetctwster C^.). . 
Mamnronedc. town (Weatehester Co.) 
Mount VaiaoD (Wertebester Co.). . . . 

New RoehtUe (Weatckeeter Co.) 

North Tanrtown. Tillafte CWeat Co ). 
Oaiininc, Tillage (Westchester Co.).. . 
PUkrtim. TtUage (Westrhesfr Co.) . 
Port Cheater, villace (^est. Co.). . . . 

Rye. town (Westchctter Co.) 

Tarrytown. Tillace (Weetcbeiter Co.) 
White Plaim, Tifla^ (Weat Co.). . 

Yooken. (Weatehester Co.) 

Rest of oounty 



ToUh for the District. 



HUDSON VALLEY DISTRICT: 

Albany (Albany Co.) 

Cohoea (Albany Co.) 

Qretn Uuand. village (Albaoy Co.). . 

Wfttenrliet (Albany Co.) 

Rest of county «, 

Hwbon (Cohunbia Co.) 

Restof eounty 

Fahkin, town (Duteheas Ck>.) 

FahkJl iMod'um, Tillan (Dutch. Co.) 
Matteawan. riUbge (Dutchess Co.).. 

Pbughkeepair (Dutchess Co.) 

Wappivtert Falla. Tilk«e (Dutch. Co. 

Htri of oounty 

Catakill rihace (Greeoe Co.) 

CovsacLie, town (Greene Ca) 

Rest of oounty 

Gosbco, town (Orange Co.) 

Middletown. (Orange Co.) 

Montgomery, town (Orange Co.) . . . 

Newburgh (Orange Co.) 

Port Jenris (Oranxe Co.) 



H 
4 

5 
6 

69 
7 
3 
2 

• • • 

33I 

6, 
18 
21 
U 

ri 

28' 
65' 
62 



1 



13 
3 
1 
1 
1 
2 
7 
8 
1 
4 
7 
7 
4 
1 
6 
41 
11 



4291,578 



139 
23 

3 
17 
38 
21 
57 

1 

6! 

9 
39 

3 
43 

7 

4! 
30; 

3, 
23, 

3 
48 

7 



3 
5 
1 
2 
5 
4 
1 
1 
4 
16 
7 



839 



72! 

8' 

2 

7' 

8 

2 
11 

11 

"7 
10, 

2, 
17| 
1 
2,. 

'• 



CO 

"S 



e 

o 
U 



5 

a 

:2 

< 



2.148 2,147 

175 272 

902 1.091 

223 242 

69 81 



1.517 3.833 
2 



15 
6 




37 

38 

21 

2 



7 
7 

3; 
2 

8 
5 

1 
6 

I 

12' 



3 
13 
2 
9 
2 
3 
8 

33, 

I2I 

4; 

3 

t 

19 

26 

3 

6 

13 

10 

5 

11 

34 

46 

5% 



1.614 1.271 



15 

4; 
2. 

i' 

2i 

1 

1 



70 
10 
3 
2 
9 
1 
12 



2' 
2 



2 
6 



10 
1 



10 

4! 



7 
1 
4 



5 
5 



79 

14 

4 

11 

33 

21 

46 

7 

5 

9 

31 

1 

43 

5 

4 

15 

5 

24 

4 

27 
16 







QQ 



1 
11 

2 



6 

S 

o 



180 

10 

76 

16 

2 



284 



761 
156 
296 
125 
68 



1.416 
1 
8 
5 
7 
• 1 
2 
1 
8 
1 
1 
1 

• 2 

10 

2 

1 

2 



I 



750 

14S 

604 

4- 

33 



1' 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

5 



818 


30S 


14 


3 


' 






1 


9 


1 




2 


4 


4 


3 




4 


2 


1 




1 





3 
6 


• 1 


1 




6 


3 


3 





2 
1 
3 
1 

2 
10 



2 

3 

12 

18 



30S' 1.513 1.9r)0 



1.58.T 

1 

35 

15 

12 

2 

2 

4 

6 

7 

18 

1 

3 

1 

34 

5 

2 
2 
3 

23 

23 

5 

14 

11 

7 

1 

3 

18 

76 

33 



38 
7 
2 
5 

12 
3 

21 

i 

2 
6 
1 
10 
6 
1 
3 
6 
3 
1 
3 
6 



43 
24 

16 

15 

II 

23 

3 

4 

5 

2S 

3 

36 
4 
6 
17 
3 
5 
4 

22 




Births 



o 



66.358 

10.905 

42.708 

7.119 

1.991 



CO 



3.526 

549 

2.206 

XiA 

OV3 

93 



i29.O8r5.722 

76, 6 

717, 31 

473 « 

378' 15 

61 2 

39; 2 

60 

174; 1 

97, 2 

234 16 

64 1 

49i 3 

103; 



80 

63 

97 

36 

145 

706 

75 i 

14^ 

171 

33) 

440 

61 

90 

351 

2.064 



2 
5 
6 
2 
6 

28 

35 

6 

6 

13 

26 

4 

8 

26 

100 



1.369. 

43rt. 

75 

210 



76 

26 

4 

8 



254 10 



84 

94 

105 

570 

46 



2 
2 
3 
25 




91 

95 



3 
4 



6^ 

266! 
53 1 

536 
166. 



5 
9 
3 

20 
7 



130 



Statk Dkpartmk.nt ok Hkai.th 



Total MoHality for (he Year 11)10 /// 



SANITARY DISTRICTS 



HUDSON VALLEY DISTRICT-iCcm/rf) 

Waklen. village (Onnge Co.) 

Warwick, town (Orange Co.) | 

Rot of county i 

Cold Spring. viTage (Putnam Co.) 

Rest of county • ;, : 

Hoosick Falb. village (Rcnwdaw Co.) 

Rennelaer (Renaselaer Co.) 

Troy (Renaelaer Co.) 

Rert of county 

Haventraw. town (Rockland Co.) 
N/ack. village (Rockland Co.) 
Ramapo, town (Rockland Co.) 
Spring Valley, village (Rockland Co.) 

Suffcrn, village (Rockland Co.) 

Rest of county 

Ellenville,villaKe (Ulster Co.) 

E^pua. town (Ubter Co.) 

Kingston agister Co.) 
Marbletown. town (Ulster Co.) 

Roaendale, town (Ulster Co.) 

Saugertiea. village (Ulster Co.) 

Rest of county 




Totals for the District. 



ADIRONDACK AND NORTHERN DIS- 
TRICT: 
Plattsburg* (Clinton Co.) 

Rest of county 

Essex county 

Mak>ne. village (Franklin Co.) 
Haranac Lake, village (Franklin Co.) 
Tupper Lake, village (Franklin C^).) 

Rest of county 

Hamilton county 

Carthage, village (Jefferson Co.) 

Clayton, town (Jefferson Co.) 

EUbburg, town (Jefferson Co.) 

Watcrtown (Jefferson Co.) 

Rest dr county 

liowville, town (Lewis Co.) 

Rest of county 

Canton, town (St. Lawrence Co.) 

Gouvemeur. town (St. Lawrence Co.) — 

Maasena. village (St. Lawrence Co.) 

Ogdensburg (St. Lawrence Co.) 

PotKlam, village (St. Lawrence Co.) 

Rest <rf county 

GkiiM Falb (Warren Co.) 

Rest of county 

Fort Edward, town (Washington Co.) 

Granville, town (Washington Co.) 

Greenwich, town (Washington Co.) 

Sandy Hill, village (Washington Co.) 

WhitehaU. vUlage (Washington Co.) 

Rest of county - 

Totals for the District 

MOHAWK VALLEY DISTRICT: 

JohiMtown (Fulton Co.) 

Oloversville (Fulton Co.) 

Rest of county 



4.015 
7.161 

44,048 
2.557 

12.132 
5.544 

10.712 

76.83A 

29.203 
9.288 
4.626 
6.588 
2.344 
2.663 

21.448 
3.124 
4.731 

25.929 
4.787 
3.678 
3,933 

45.807 



727.719 



11.182 

37.03P 

33.501! 

6.4671 

5.032. 

3.079' 

31.090| 

4.350 

3.569 

4.026 

3,631 

26.792 

42.374 

3.872 

20.905 

6.123 

5.998 

2.968 

15.981 

4.031 

53.802 

15,268 

16.973 

5.759 

6,433 

4.224 

5.184 

4,949 

21.253 



406,855 



I 



S 

o 



49 

121 

727 
50 

217 
87 

158 
1.597 

441 
97 
97 

122 
21 
47 

284 
47 
58 

475 
57 
56 
63 

703 



12,703 



195 

481 

543 

108 

150 

50 

514 

56 

57 

59 

73 

468 

695 

08 

306 

104 

95 

50 

268 

78 

756 

241 

215 

100 

87 

89 

74 

96 

350 



6,426 



10,476 
20.730, 
13.430| 



143 
321 
209 



t 

a 

9 

I 
I 



8 

23 

140 

9 

22 

12 

32 

224 

43 

18 

16 

23 

4 

7 

58 
5 
5 
71 
7 
2 
9 
87 



1.867 



53 
93 
88 
22 
13 
21 
102 

9 
12 

4 
11 
87 
86 

7 
36 

9 
21 
11 
55 

8 
107 
32 
16 
13 
18 
10 
10 
21 
36 



l.OU 



20 
60 

28 



I 



i 





14 

53 

3 

7 

5 

5 

103 

17 

5 

3 

8 

1 

16 

3 

5 

25 

3 

2 

7 

35 



705 



14 

48 

34 
6 
8 
7 

56 
4 
5 

2 

27 

34 
2 

11 
2 
4 
7 

15 
9 

42 
8 
2 
3 
5 
4 
1 
1 

10 



371 



4 

14 
4 



AOBS 



§ § 






a 
i 



2 
8 

35 
2 

12 
8 

10 

82 

17 
7 
4 
5 
2 
3 

14 
2 
1 

26' 
6 
6 
2' 

41i 



30 
39 1 

a: 

3' 
38 
4 
? 
1 
? 

26 
33 

2, 
14. 
4 
7 
2' 
12 
2 

46 
12 
9 
5 
6 
3 
4 
7 
10 



348 



3 



5 

P 

95 

6 
20 

14 

22 

2621 

47l 
17 
19i 
13 

3' 
10) 
41 

6| 
lOl 
66! 
Ill 

io' 

7 
98 



6771 1.774 



261 

84) 

201 

67 

10 

75 

16: 

9 

7 

7 

85 

52 

10 

36 

10 

14 

4 



S'i 

'•3 



5- 
i 



131 
23, 

19; 

30 ! 
374 « 

72| 
21 ( 
18 
2.'»i 
5 

J' 

5 

12, 
93 > 

.11 

1341 



21 
44 

289 
20 
98 
29 
59 

550 

244 
27 
87 
50 
5 
19 

102 
26 
25 

194 
22 
29 
24 

314 



2.551' 6.087 



28 
52 
89 

i 

69' 

8( 

.1, 

12' 

80 

104 

8. 

42 

17 

16 

7 



4 

12 

8 



33 


54 


9 


6 


83 


97 


35 


48 


24 


44 


16 


22 


2 


11 


4 


18 


10 


14 


14 


15 


36 


46 


849 


989 


12 


32 


31 


71 


21 


33 



60 

207 

208 

40 

14 

4 

174 

15 

22 

33 

39 

163 

385 

39 

166 

62 

33 

18 

98 

43 

375 

106 

120 

40 

45 

50 

35 

38 

210 



2.842 



71 
132 
115 



Division ov Vitat, Statisths 



ini 



the Sanitary Disfricls — (Coiitiimed) 



SANITARY DISTRICTS 



HUDSON VALLEY DlffT .—iContd) 

WaMea. villBiie (Onnge Co.) 

Wanrksk, town (Onoge Co.) 

Rest of eoanty 

Cold Saiiag, vUlace (Putnam Co.) . . 

Reai ot county 

Hoooiek FaUb. villMce (Rcuselaer Co.) 

RcoflKber (Rconeber Co.) 

Troy (Rcn«eber Co.) 

Rot of county 

HaTcntnw, town (Rockland Co.) . . . 
Nyaek. TUlage (Rockland Co.) .... 
Ramapo. town (Rockland Co.) .... 
Spring Vallv. villace (Rockland Co.) 

Saffcrn« TiOaKe (Rockland Co.) 

Rest of county 

EOenTiOe, ▼Ulan agister Co.) 

Enpua, town (Ulster Co.) 

KittotcMi (Ulster Co.) 

Marbletown. town (Vbter Co.) 

Roseodale. town agister Co.) 

SauieertieB. village (Ulster Co.) 

Rest of county 

Totals for the District 



Epidemic DukAvSrs 



ADIRONDACK AND NORTHERN 
DISTRICT 

Flattrtnirg. (Clinton Co.) 

Rett of eounty 

FmrT county 

Makme. Tillage (Franklin Co.) 

Saranae Lake, village (Franklin Co.) 
Tupper Lake, vUlage rFranklin Co.). 

Rest of county 

Hamilton county 

Carthage, village (Jeffefvon Co.) 

ClaytMi. town (Jeffenon Co.) 

EOi^iirg. town fJeffeiaon Co.) 

Watcrtown (Jefferson Co.) 

Rest of county 

LowviOe, town (Lewis Co.) 

Rest of MMinty 

Canton, town (St. I^wrence Co.)... 
Gouvcmeur. town (St. Lawrence Co.) 
Masseoa, village (St. Lawrence Co.).. 

Ogdensburg (St. Lawrence Co.) 

Potsdam, village (St. Lawrence Co.).. 

Rest of ooun^ 

Glois FaUs (Warren Co.) 

Rest of county 

Fort Edward, town (Washington Co.^ 
Granville, town (Washington Co.) . . 
Gremwich. town (Washington Co.) . 
Sandy Hill, vilbiae (Washington Co.) 
Whitehall, viUage (Washington Co.). 
Rest of eounty 

Totab for the Dktriet 



MOHAWK VALLEY DISTRICT: 

Johnstown (Fulton Co.) 

GbvenviOe (Fulton Co.) 

Rest of eounty 




S'I'ATf: DkI'AIiTMKNT ^•V HeAI.T 



Total MvriaUlii for (he Ymr 1910 i 



SANITARY DISTMCTS 



ill 



Wuwicic, IDWB (Orute Co.) !.'.'.!!. . 
Cold Sprint, riitet (Piilaim Co.). . . 

"■tofoOUDQ 



Hoovck F*U>, •^]^^n (Rm 
RnwlMt (RmMbcr Co. 



F*U>,ii1ku«(RaiLCo.)... 



Htimnw, loan (RocUuid Co.). 
Nyuk. Tilligi (Roeklud Co.) . . . . 
Rtmspa. tom {RocUud C«.) . . . . 
S[*iD| Villcr. TUlikti (RodLbul Co 
- n{R«llii>dCo.).... 



nlL;(Ukla 



KinntoD, (UlttaCo.) ,. 

MirUetovn, ton (irbts Co.) . . . 

R«Dd>b.lo<ni(l1MaCo.} 

Swcrtis. villigt (Uklir Co.). . . 
Rul ol comity 



Plittabiiig (Cliotoo Co,).. 



MalDiK.TilUcc(FrukliiiCci.l,... . 
Stnuc UIu, Tilbfe (Fnnklio Co.) . 
'I\ippa' Lake, TilUge (FnnkliD Co.). 



FoUdim, vilitgn (St. Un 



Ijwidy Hill, vilUic <W>duii(iuD To.] 
Whitahill, Tilkge (Wubintloii Co.). 
RMt dI county 

TDl«l>lottli«D«i™i.. 

MOHAWK VALLEY DISTRICT: 

JriuMon (Fulton Co.) 

alOTonlla {PnhoB Co.) 

Rotoloauiit; 



Ill ISI « 



Division of Vitai, Statistics 



133 



tlie State During 1910 — (Continued) 



BlRTHB 



SANITARY DISTRICTS 



HUDSON VALLEY DI8T.— (Confrf) 
WaUcD. Tilhge (Onnge Co.) 
WanricK, town (Onnge Co.) 

Rest of county 

CoM Sbrinft. ▼iDage (Patoun Co.). . . 

Regtofooonty 

Hooaidc Falb, villaM (ReuKber Co.) 

Reoaebcr (RcDadtetf Co.) 

Troj (RcDMber Co.) 

Rett of county 

HaTcntnw. town (Rockkiid Co.). . . 
Nyaek, Tilhce (Rockland Co.) 

Ramapo, town 

Spring Valkgr. vUIage (Rockland Co.) 
Suffcrn, Tfllago (Rockland Co.) 



Rest of county. . 

EDoiTUie, TiUaKe (Ubtcr Co.) 

bopoa, town (Ubtcr Co.). . . . 

Kinoton (Ubtcr Co.) 

Bla^btown, town (Ubtcr Co.) 
Roandale, town (Ulster Ck>.) 
SaogerticB, village (Ubter Co.) 
Rot of county 



Totab for the Dirtriot 

ADIRONDACK AND NORTHERN 
DISTRICT: 

Flattaburg (Clinton Co.) 

Rot of county 

Ebbx county 

Malone. Tiflage (Franklin Co.) 
Sannae Lake, Tflbgo (Franklin Co.) 
Tuiiper Lake, TiOage (Franklin Co.). 

Rcit of county 

Hamilton county 

Certhage, Tillage fJeffemn Co.) 

Cbyton, town (Jeffcraon Co.) 

El^uzg, town (Jeffcraon Co.) 

Watertown (Jeffenon Co.) 

Rest of county 

Lowrille, town (Lewb Co.) 

Rest cf county 

CanUm, town (St Lawrence Co.) — 
CkMtTcraenr. town (Si. Lawrence Co.) 
MiBBTOB, village (St. Lawrence Co.).. 

OgdeDebun; (St. Lawrence Co.) 

Potfldam, TiQage (St. Lawrence Co.) . 

Rot of county 

GloiB Falb (Warren Co.) 

Rcat of county 

Fact Edward, town (Waahington Co.). 
QranvilleL town (Waahington (To.) . . . 
Gfeeawiai, town (Waahington Co.) . . 
Sandy Hill. Tillage (Waafamgton Co.). 
Whitehall. TiUage (Waahington Co.). 
Reatofeouaty 

Totab for the Diatrict 



■M 



70 


3 


136 


7 


64 


■■■"2 


m 


"h 


167 


3 


956 


61 

■ • > ■ • 



MOHAWK VALLEY DISTRU^ 

JohiHtown (Fulton Co.) 

r.bverevilte (Fulton Co.) 

R«t of county 




lU 



State Dkpaktmknt of IIkalth 



7^otal Morfalitj/ for the Year 1010 in 



SANITARY DISTHICTS 



MOHAWK VALLEY DISTRICT— (Con/rf) 
Frankfort, villafte (Herkimer Co.). . . 

Herkimer, villase fHerkimcr ('o.> 

I lion, viU««c rHerkimer Vo.) . . 

Little Falls (Herkimer Co.; 

Reit of countv 

AmRterdam (Mont^tomerv Co.) 

Fort Plainfl, village (Montgomery Co.) . . 

Rest of county 

Boonville. town (Oneida Co.) 

Camden, town (Oneida Co.) 

Rome (Oneida Co.) 

rtica fOneida Co.) 

Whitefltown. town (Oneida Co.) 

Rest of county 

Ballaton Spa, villaRe (SaratoRa Co.) 

Mechanicville, villaire (Saratoga Co.) 

Saratoga Springs, village (Saratoga Co.) . 

Waterford, town (Saratoga Co.) 

Rest of county 

Schenectady (Schenectady Co.) 

Rest of county 

Coblcakill, town (Schoharie Co.) 

Rest of county 

ToUls for the District .... 



SOUTHERN TIER DISTRICT: 
Welisville, village (Allegany Co.). . . 

Rest of county 

Binghamton (Broome Co.) 
I^estenhire, village (Broome Co.) . . 

Rest of county 

Olean (Cattaraugus Co.) . . 
Salamanca, village (Cattaraugus Co.) 

Rest of county 

Dunkirk (Chautauqua Co.) 

Frcdonia, village (Chautauqua Vq.) . 

Jamestown ((Miautauqua Co.) 

Westfield, village (Chautauqua Co.). 

Rest of county 

Elmira (Chemung Co.) . 
Horscheads, town (Chemung Co.). . 

Rest of county 

Bath, village 'Steuben Co. ». . . 

Coming (Steuben Co.) 

Hornell (Steuben Co.) 

Rest of county 

Candor, town (Tioga Co.) 

Owego, village (Tioga Co.) 

Waverly, villuge (Tioga Co.) . 
Rest of county 



Totals for the District . . . 

EAST CENTRAL DISTRICT: 
Norwich, village (Chenango Co.) 

Rest of county 

Cortland ((\)rtland Co.) . 
Homer, village ((^ortland Co.) . 

Rest of county 

Sidney, town (Delaware Co.> 
Walton, town ( Delaware Co.) 



3 
S 



**© 








cca 




. "^ 




e 


1 


.2 

It 


1 


i 


3 


o 


O 




H 



' il 

9 






3,321 

7.559 

6.616 

12.326 

26,650 

31.586 

2.769 

23,547 

3.193 

3.413 

20,632 

74.879 

7.8.3S 

44,786 

4.138 

6.666 

12.680 

6.134 

32,282 

73.450 

15,516 

3.574 

20.223 



488.414 



56 


If 


121 


22 


90 


12 


194 


29 


406 


45 


540 


160 


61 


10 


390 


44 


57 


7 


52 


4 


411 


71 


1.297 


314 


107 


28 


638 


69 


74 


15 


117 


24 


255 


35 


109 


23 


526 


57 


1.070 


289 


179 


31 


57 


4 


338 


32 


7,818 


1,452 



4.383 
36.958 
48.671 

3,764 
26.608 
14,814 

5.806 
45.299 
17.308 

5.290 
31.523 

2,991 
48.380 
37.238 

5.398 
12.115 

3.891 
13,742 
13.637 
52.112 

2.9f)2 

4,617 

4,853 
13,204 



65 


10 


657 


52 


765 


13^ 


63 


6 


503 


461 


188 


28 


85 


18 


628 


67 


279 


76 


79 


15 


4C4 


66 


64 


9 


718 


89 


554 


74 


76 


3 


236 


36 


67 


6 


200 


30 


174 


20 


780 


76 


43 


1 


54 


4 


83 


7 


224 


19 



2 
16' 

37; 

41 
19' 

Hi 

lOj 
36 
37 
4 
21 
4 

22 

20 

2 

10 
1 
8 
7 
21 


3 
8 



7.434 
28.089 
11.517; 

2,701 
15.026, 

4.142 

5.094; 



122 


»", 


476 


38 


219 


36 


49 


2i 


26(1 


21 


72 


41 


88 


s. 



10 

19 

11 

1 

12 

1 

3 



AOES 



1 


s 


s 


s 


>k 


«>* 


• ** 1 




oa 


« 


iO 1 




3 


5 


5 

o 


^H 


lO 


•* 


2 


1 


i 


J 


1 


8 


t 


t • 


Q 


O 


Q 


5 


3 


4 


1 
12* 


m 
1 


12 


16 


27, 


1 


5 


16 


11 


11 


18 


23 


41 


18 


12 


47 


87 


61 


30 


71 


95- 


V 


1 


11 


10 


V2 


14 


46 


77 


2 


4 


5 


8 


? 


2 


8 


7 


21 


14 


49 


79 


102 


64 


166 


221 


12 


1 


18 


12 


21 


25 


65 


94 


1 


1 3 


6 


16 


15 


5 


14 


28 


16 


9 


42 


59 


12 


4 


15 


17 


18 


22 


61 


74 


111 


52 


177 


1981 


12 


9 


31 


30 


2 


4 


7 


12 


16 

1 


12 


27 


47i 



500> 350i 989 



2 
20 
41 

4 
16 
19 

3 

32 
28 

2 
23 

3 

271 
30| 

i' 

2! 
12 
14 
30' 
2; 
0> 
8' 
6 



455.504' 6. 889 896 1 3031 331 



4 

12 
5 
1 
9 
3 
5 



4 

55 
128 
14 
49 
32 

9 
51 
38 

8 
71 

5 

57 
78 

8 
31 

m 

I 
34 

21 
59 
3 
3 
11 
13 



789 



19 
25 
20 
5 
11 
10 
11 



«o > 

t 



13 
36 
45 

71 

217 

122 

29 

192 

SI 

29 

177 

42« 

36 

364 

33 

31 

94 

38 

292 

243 

65 

28 

201 



1.378 3.131 



11 

75 

158 

»l 
90! 

41i 

20, 

88* 

39 1 

9 

80 

12 

103 

114 

13 

41 

9 

41 

40 

122 

8 

16 

10 

41 



1,190 



28 
78 
39 
9 
37 
17 
17 



36 

336 

263 
26 

282 
57 
25 

353 
61 
41 

143 
31 

419 

236 
49 

HO 
42 
75 
72 

466 
29 
31 
44 

136 



3,363 



51 
304 
108 

31 
169 

37 

44 



Diviftiox OF Vital Statistics 



ir; 



ihr Sfafp Duruu/ 11)10— ((^ontimiea) 



• 


E 


PIDBMIC DUBA8B8 




.s 


SANITARY DIbTRKrrS 


1 
1 




s. 

1 

a 

OQ 


1 


Scarlet fever 
Whooping cough 


Diphtheria and 

eroup 




9 
S3 

a 


I 


Cerebrospinal 
^ Meniotitis 


1 Pulmonary tuberculuii 


MOHAWK VAIJ.KY DI8T.-(C«iUrf) 
Frankfort, village (Herkimer Co.) . . . 
Herkimer, village (Herkimer Co.) 
Tlkfn riHiure (Herkimer Co.) . . 


1 

1 


1 

2 


1 1 
3 2 


1 

1 


1 


3 
5 

4 


Utile Falls (Herkimer Co.) 








••• J, 
12 

"3 

10 
14 

6 

i 

2 
3 
1 

15 
3 




3 

Hi. . 

2i 1 

1... 

61 5 

1.. . 

1' .. 
7i 1 
18. 2 
3 . 
6 2 

3 ... 
1. 1 
5i . 

1 
161 2 

4 2 
2 . 


10 


Reat of oountv 








3 

8 


34 


Am«ierdam (Montgomery Co.) . 
Fort Plain. Tillage (Montgomery Co.) 


7 
2 






1 


4 


] 32 
3 


Reat of eountv 

BoonviLe. town (Oneida Co.) 


2 

'"4 
5 
2 
5 
2 
2 
2 
2 
5 
5 

1 






1 


1 3 

.... 


25 
3 


Camden, town (Oneida Co.) 

Rome(0nei'1aCo.) 

rtiea (Oneida Co.) 

Whitestown. town (Oneida Co.). . 

Reat of county 

Balbton Spa. vUlage (Saratoga Co.). . 
Meehanicville. village (Saratoga Co.). 
Saratoga Spring, "nl (Saratoga Co.) 
Watcrford. town (Saratoga Co.) 

Reat of eountv 

Schenectady (Schenectady Co.) 

Reat of county 

Coblnkill. town (Schoharie Co.) . . 


1 

.... 
.... 




...... 

1 

..." 

. . . 

4 

. ... 
1 

11 
3 




2 

::.: 't 

1 3 
2 

2 1 

4 ... 
8 1 

3 10 
1 

1 1 
1 5 


5 
1 
3 

1 
3 

1 


8 
26 
04 

9 
52 

5 

6 
22 
13 
28 
72 
11 

4 


Reat of county 


1 
53 


2 


.... 


6 


2 


10|.... 


18 

1 
1 

i 


18 


Totab for the District 


■- ■ 
56 


30 60 


80 


114 


17 


J>27 


SOUTHERN TIER DISTRICT: 
WeHarUle. village (.Mlegany Co.) . 

R<«t of eountv 

Binghamton (Broome Co.) 

Ijeaterahire. village (Braome Co.) . . 
Rert of oountv 


6 
5 


4 

< 



3 5 

1 ... 

7 1 

2 ".'.'.'. 

3 1 
25 . 

1 

4 1 
I' 

3 6 
1 5 

■.' 1 


.... 

11 

.... ^ 

5 
1 

3 
9 

5 

3 
5 

8 

1 


\7 

t 

10 


2 

4 


2 
15 

^4 
31 


Olemn (Cattaraugus Co.) 


.. 




2 

6 

4 
2 
1 

3 
2 


1 


7 


Salamanca, village (Cattaraugus Co.) 


•■ "i'.. 


2 
16 




3 


Rest of county 


6 
4 
1 
9 

I 
10 


1 
2 


4 


2 

1 
3 


.TO 


Dunkirk (Chautauqua Co.) 

Frerionia, village (Chautauqua Co.) . 
Jamestown (Chautauqua C« ) . . . 
Weatfield, village (Chautauqua Co.). 
Rort of county 


2..... 
2 . . 
4 .... 

28 6 


11 
7 

23 
2 

23 


Elnura (Chemung Co.) 


n .1 19 


Horaeheads, town (Chemung Co.). . 
Rest of eoonty 


'""4 
1 
8 
5 








1 . ! 10 

9. li 1 25 


Bath, village (Steuhen Co.) 

Coramg (Steuben Co.) 

Homdl (Steuben Co.) 










6 






3 


1 
1 
4 


1 




i .. 
5 

16!. . 




.. ' 7 
1 5 


Reat of eoonty 


4. ... 


5 


1 


2 27 


Caodor. town (Tioga Co.) 




J . 


Oweao. village (Tioga Co.) 


y- 






. . * • ■ 




41";' 

5;... 


... . 4 


WavCTly. village (Tioga Co.) 




...! 5 


Reat of county 


21 ... 






1 




7 






1 












Totals for the Dtttrict 


74 


3 

1 


31 


60 26 


55 


139 


16 
1 


16 


331 


EAST CENTRAL DISTRICT: 
Norwich, village (Chenan^ Co.) . . 

Rest of county 

Cortknd (Cortland Co.) 
Homer, villav- (CortUmd Co.) . 


3 

9 
1 


3 

1 

1 


2 


' 1 


3 

1 
2 
1 

i 


4 

20 
2 
2 
5 
1 


2 

2 
1 

1 


6 

19 

3 

1 


Rest of county 

Sidanr. town (Ddaware Co.) . . . 


2 
3 

1 


1 




9 
5 


Walton, town (Delaware Co.) 


1 ... 


... 


. • . . 


i 


• 


5'... : ... 3 



136 



State Depaktment of Heai^tk 



Total Mortality for the Year !010 in 



SANITARY districts 



MOHAWK VALLEY DIST—(Co»U<r I 
Fnnkfort. villajre (Htrkmn Co.).. . 
Herkimer, villftce ("Herkimer Co.) . . . 

Ilion. vilUice (Herkimer Co.) 

Little Falb (Herkimer Co.) 

Rest of eoontv 

Amirterdam fMonteomery Co.) . . . 
Fort PUuw, village (.Montgomery Co. 

Rest of county 

Bconville, town fOneichi Co.).. . . 

Camden, town (Oneida Co.) 

Rome ' Onei'Ja Co.) 

I'tica fOneida Co.) 

WTiitestown, town (Oneida Co.) 

Rest of county 

BalUton Spa, villaie (Saratoga Co.). 
Mechanicville. villace (Saratoica Co.) 
Raratoffa Sf rings, vil. (Saratoca Co.) 

Waterf< rd, town (Saratoga Co.) 

Rest of county 

Schenectady i Schenectady Co.) 

Rest of county 

CobleskiU. town (Schoharie Co.) 
Rest of county 

Totals for the District 



SOrTHFRN TIER DISTRICT; 
WellrvjUc, rUlage (AUegany Co.) 

Rest of county 

Binehamton (Broome Co.) . . . . 
LestCTshire, village (Broome Co.) 

Rest of county 

Olean (CattarauRua O).) 

ailamanca, village (Cattaraugus Co.) 

Rest of county 

Dunkirk (Chautauqua Co.) 

Fredonia. village (Chautauqua Co.). 
Jamestown ^Chautauqua Co.) 
Westfield, village (Chautauqua Co.). 

Rest of county 

Elm ra (^Chemung Co.) 

Horsehcarlfl, town (Chemung Co.) 

Rest of county 

Bath. viHwre (Steuben Co.) 
Comine <Ste«jl)en Co.) .... 

Homcll ( StoLben Co.) 

Rest of county 

Candor, town (Tioga Co.) 
Owego. village (Tioea Co.). 
Waverly, village i Tioga Co.) 
Rest of county 

ToUb for the District 

EAST CENTRAL DISTRICT: 
Norwich, village ((^hcnanso Co.) 

Rp<!t of county 

Cortland (Cortland Co.) .... 
Homer, villajre ((\)rtlund C%».^ 
Ke«»t of county. 
Sidney , town ( Dt-laware Co ) 
\Valt4,n. town Dihiwan- <\t > 




Division' of N ital SrA'n.-«ri( s 



.*'>: 



the Sanitary Distrirt^ — (Continued) 



SANITARY DISTRICTS 



MOHAWK VALLEY DIST.— (C«iK'rf 
nukfort. yilbksv rHerkimer Co.) . . 
Heriomer. villMe (Herkiiner Co ) . . . 

IKoQ. TiDiae (Harkimer Co.) 

UtOe Falls (Hericimer Co.) 

Rett of eounty 

Amiterdain (Montgomery Co.) 

Fort Pkia. Tiliace (MoDtgomery Co.) 

RcRt of county 

BooDTille. town (OnakU Co.) 

C^ndeo, town (Onoda Co.) 

Rome (Oneida Ca) 

Ulka (Oneida Co.) 

WUteeftown, town (Oneida Ck>.) 

Rest of eoonty 

BaBiton Spa. TilOfle (Saratov Co.). 
Mechaoieyille, ▼iOiNBe (Santoc» Co.) 
Saratoga Sprince, vil (Saratofia C^.) 
Waterford. town (Saratoca 0>.) ... 

Rest of ooonty 

Sebeneetady (Schenectady Co.) 

Rest of county 

CobleskOl, town (Schoharie Co ) 

Rert of coonty 

Totak for the DiBtrict 

SOUTHERN TIER DISTRICT: 
WdbWDe. TiUage (AUegany Co.) ... . 

Rest of ooonty 

Bini^iamtoo (Broome Co.) 

Lestoshire, village (Broome Co.) — 

Rest of county 

Olean (Cattaraagus C^.) 

^^"TTira. village (Cattaraugus Co.) 

Rest of county 

Dmikirk (Chautauqua (^.) 

Fredonia, riUage ((jhautauqua Co.) . 

Jamestown (C^fiuitauqua 0>.) 

WertaeU, Tillage (ChauUuqua Co.).. 

Rest of eounty 

Elmira (Chemung Co.) 

Homheada, town (Chemung Co.) . . . 

Rest of eounty 

Bath, Tilhce (Steuben Co.) 

Coming (^keoben Co.) 

Honeil (Steuben Co.) 

Rest of county 

CSmdor. town (Tioga Co.) 

Ovego. ▼iUage (Tioga Co.) 

Wanrjy.^lkge (Tioga O.) 

Rert of county 

Totals for the District 

EAST CENTRAL DISTRICT: 
Norwieh, Tillage (Chenango Co.) . 

nert of county 

Cortland (Cortland O.) 

Homer, villaite (Cortland 0>.) 

ReHof county^ 

Ridwy, town (Delaware Co.) 

Wilton, town (Delaware Co.) 



3 

i 

o. 

s 
s 



f 



1 
11 

7 
13 
44 

34 
5 

2« 
I 

5 

35 

77 

7 

51 

6 

3 

9 

3 

42 
63 
14 
5 
34 

577 



8 

49 
65 

6 
36 

8 

3 
37 

4 

2 
43 

3 
51 
8fi 

7 
17 

6 
10 

9 
68 

4 



18 



639 



8 

43 
24 

3 
32 

8 
10 



i 



1 



1 
1 
1 

f: 

11 
3 
5 

1 

c, 

36 

I 

10 

2 

4 

2 

11 

25 

a 

3 

m 

I 

• » 



1 

10 

12 

4 

16 

6 

1 

14 

7 

1 

9 

4 

13 

17 

1 

9 

2 

p 

10 
15 
3 
2 
5 
8 

178 



II 

u! 

6 

3| 
13 

2' 



10 



12 
2 
1 



63 



1 
9 
12 
3 
3 
3 



CO 

hi 
o 

a 



3 

I 

O 



2 
74 



3 



If 



It 

27 
I 



i 
1 

!»' 

If 

2 

1 

2 

141 



2 
9 



2 
1 
3 
5 
10 



11' 



1 

5 
5 

3 

3 



a 

S 

< 



1 

II 

8 
15 
19 
31 

4 
36 

2 

3 

19 
61 

3 
34 

4 
14 
10 

7 

29 
C2 
20 

I 
17 



442 



3 

29 
39 

2 
28 
1? 
13 
24 
26 

n 

20 

2 
42 
36 

3 
14 

1 

16 
14 
.2 

1 



8 

:a 



5 
2 

4 
1 

6 

11 

1 

7 



2 

7 

11 

3 

6 

83 



2 
7 
13 
2 
6 
5 
3 
5 
2 



5 

8 



I 
1 

12 
1 



9 
13 

392 



14! 

2 

12 
4 

5i 



1 

14 



85 10 



1 


"2 


2 


1 


4 




2 





4 

>■ 
1( 



2? 



3 

27 
1 

15 
1 
I 

5 
10 
20 
16 
3 
1 
12 



197 



(J 

JB 



5 

7 

5i 

12 

15 

25 

3 

8 

4 

1! 
131 
781 

6i 
311 

II 

^ 

8 

6 

22 

8O: 
6 

II 

393' 



2 

28 

17 
2 

16 
4 
3 

19 
2' 
2 
61 
5 1 

.30' 
4' 

3 

7 

3. 

35 1 

6 
4 

3 1 

7' 



41 
25; 
35 

6 

22, 
11 

7; 
24 
1 91 

3 
28 

1 
25 



217 



2 
16 
8 
4 
5 
2 
6 



3 
22 
19 



10 
2 
5 



Births 



i 


J3 


3 


«j> 


^ 


.!a 


,^ 


M 


1 


^ 


H 


ra 


119 


5 


17? 


5 


115 


1 


335 


10 


095 


14 


38 





5'2 


1 


46 


1 


571 


16 


1.902 


79 


152 


11 



8.11 


1 


2is| 


5 


2211 


10 


79. 






1,8171 70 



44 



1 















100 


2 


908 


44 


49 





328 


12 


139 


10 


666 


20 


129 


6 


659 


18 


47 


1 



30 


694 


39 


3 


54 


4 


16 






5 


57 


1 


11 


268 


9 


6 


233 


11 


27 








46 


2 


2 


62 


1 


1 


74 





6 












316 













150 


5 


264 
39 


6 

1 



681 
104 1 



1 




138 



Statk Department of Healtii 



Tofal Mortallti/ for the Year 1910 



in 



SANITARY DISTRICTS 



EAST CENTRAL DISTRICT— (Cimhmiaif) 

Rest of oountv 

Canastota, village fMaiison Co.) 

Caienovia. town CMaHlisoii Co.) 

Hamilton, town (Madimn Co. ) 

Oneida (Madimn Co.) 

Rest of oountv 

Baldwinsville, vilUure ^Onondaga Co.) 

DeWitt. town (Onondaga Co.) 

East Sjrraruw, villase (Onondaga Co.) ... 

Solvay, village (OnonHaa Co.) 

Syracuse (Onondaga Co.) 

Rest of eounty 

Coopentown, village (Otsego Co.) 

Oneonto (Otsego Co.) 

Worcester, town (Otsego Co.) 

Rest of county 

Liberty, town f Sullivan Co.) 

R«t of county •. 

Totals for the District 



WEST CENTRAL DISTRICT: 

Auburn (Cayuga Co.) 

Rest of county 

Batavia. village (Genesee (^o.). 

]je Roy, village (Genesee Co.) 

Rest of oountv . « . 

Daosvillc, village (Livingston Co.) . 

Mt. Morris, village (Livingston Co.) 

Rest of county 

Cananiaigua. village (Ontario Co.). . 

Geneva (Ontario Co.) 

Manchester, town (Ontario Co.) 

Phelps, town (Ontario Co.) 

Rest of oountv . . 

Hector, town (Schuyler Co.) 

Rest of county 

Seneca Falls, village (Seneca Co.) 
Waterloo, village (Seneca Co.). 

Rest of county 

Ithaca (Tompkins Co.) 

Rest of county 

Perry, village (Wyoming Co.) 
Warsaw, town (Wyoming Co.) . . . 

Rest of oountv 

Penn Yan, village (Yates Co.) 

Rest of county 

Totols for the District 



I -• 



LAKE ONTARIO AND WESTERN 
DISTRICT: 

Amherst, town (Erie Co.) 

Buffalo (Erie Co.) 

Depew. village (Erie Co.) 

East Aurora, village rErie Co.) 

lAckawaona (Erie Co.) 

Lancaster, village (Erie Co.) 

Tonawanda (Erie Co.) 

West Seneca, town (Erie Co.) 

Rest of countv 

Brockport, village (Monroe Co.) 



9 

s 

V 



x: I 



s 
o 

a. 



I -- 



.3A.2% 
3.247 
3.003 
3.83.') 
8.316' 

20.190 
3.1041 
4.181 
3.283 
5.17Q 
138.087 

47.407' 
2.485 
9,552 
2.180 

32,965 
5.399 

28.374! 



431.778 



34.760 

32.378 

11.673 
3.787 

22.230 
3.939 
2.789 

31.340 
7.212 

12.45S 
4.893 
4.733 

22.984 
3.500 

10.461 
6.582 
3.923 

16.447 

14,815 

18.818 
4.415 
4.302 

23.190 
4.600 

14.014 



320.243 



4.635 
425.715 

3.9.37 

2.795 
•14.549 

4.385 

o,,JUO 

19.335 

47.679 

3.. 577 









AOBS 








1 


>. 


g 


1 


S 


S 






>k 


Si"^ 


»>» 


>» 


i 


1 

3 


•<• 

s 


3 


S 






1 


1 


i 


i 


J 


J 


1 


1 


n 

Q 


1 


1 


1 


,566 


.56 


23 


38 


71 


89 


2«7 


62 


It 


4 


4 


5 


11 


27 


65 


7 


1 


3 


8 


10 


36 


61 


8 





3 


3 


4 


43 


118 


20 


6 


3 


8 


24 


57 


313 


29 


5 


15 


25 


47 


191 


52 


4 


1 


1 


7 


11 


2« 


4« 


1 


2 


1 


3 


13 


22 


47 


7 


5 


6 


10 


6 


13 


4 t 


28 


11 


10 


9 


9 


10 


2.124 


448 


114 


128 


291 


450 


693 


700 


72 


13 


29 


72 


121 


401 


58 


3 








7 


11 


87 


181 


27 


4 


/ 


35 


28 


77 


49 


4 


3 


2 


• 4 


5 


31 


5.59 


48 


8 


17 


39 


76 


368 


200 


10 


4 


7 


81 


SO 


47 


471 


51 


23 


42 


83 


76 


194 


7.046 


959 


284 


355 


862 


1.266 


3.306 


522 


101 


22 


22 


73 


97 


207 


477 


45 


11 


22 


48 


81 


270 


206 


32 


6 


9 


33 


39 


87 


47 


5 


3 


2 


7 


11 


19 


337 


35 


5 


9 


28 


63 


197 


74 


8 


5 





8 


13 


40 


58 


12 


14 


2 


9 


9 


12 


409 


47 


17 


25 


45 


49 


225 


157 


20 


3 


6 


19 


25 


84 


175 


18 


6 


12 


19 


35 


83 


116 


12 


2 


2 


9 


20 


70 


54 


5 





2 


4 


4 


99 


279 


32 


5 


9 


19 


33 


181 


.59 


6 


3 





4 


7 


39 


1,56 


11 


5 


5 


9 


29 


96 


114 


13 


2 


4 


14 


18 


62 


52 





1 


1 


5 


9 


36 


246 


19 


6 


7 


23 


37 


153 


244 


24 


8 


16 


34 


49 


113 


304 


25 


6 


3 


17 


45 


207 


58 


11 


2 


1 


4 


6 


34 


51 


3 


1 


2 


5 


7 


33 


350 


40 


11 


16 


27 


49 


216 


70 


1 


3 


3 


7 


8 


41 


210 


28 


2 


4 


16 


29 


130 


4.8;J4 


,559 


149 


184 


486 


772 


2.674 


65 


9 


3 


1 


9 


8 


35 


6.877 


1.482 


683 


452 


1.067 


1,433 


1,760 


8,5 


41 


18 


10 


8 


5 


3 


41 


6 


2 


1 


2 


4 


26 


,197 


243 


69 


8 


43 


13 


19 


67 


15 


9 


5 


8 


15 


15 


106 


20 


1 


4 


17 


20 


44 


63 


12 


4 


5 


6 


12 


24 


845 


141 


50 


46 


99 


122 


386 


50 


6 





1 


5 


5 


33 



* Excise censuf. 



Divisiox OF Vital Statistics 



MO 



fhe Sanitary Districts — (Continued) 



Epidemic Disk asks 



S\NITARV DISTRIPTS 



EAST CENTRAL DIST.— (ConTd) 

Rot of eountv 

CanMtoto. ▼illaxe (Madison Co.) — 

CanooYta, town (Madison Co.) 

Hamilton, town (Madison Co.) 

Oneida (Madison Co.) 

Rest of county 

BaMwinsrille. villave (Onondaga Co.) 

DeWiit, town (Onondaca Co.) 

East Synpme, villatte (Onondaga Co.) 

SolTay. vi11*i<e (Onondava Co.) 

Svracase (OiM>ndaga Co.) 

Rest of county 

Coppentown, viUave (Otsego Co.) . . . 

OneooU (OtMRo Co.) 

Woreestar. town (Otsego Co.) 

Rett ofnranty 

libertv, town (Sullivan Co.) 

Rest of county 

Totals for the district 



> 
S 

Xi 

a. 



13 



1 

2 

1 

38 

12 



I 



M 

8. 

18 
S 






12 

2 





j: 




bt 




3 


83 


O 


t 


M 


«S 


.S 


** 


& 


9i 


r; 


a 


O 


S 


^ 


2 


11 



a 
Q 






22 
5 



1 



104; 1 



WEST CENTRAL DISTRICT: 

Attbuni (Cayuga Co.) 

Rest of county 

Batavia Tillage (Genesee Co.) 

Le Roy, rillace (Genesee Co.) 

Rest of county 

DansriUe. village (Liyintcston Co.) . 
Mt. Morris, village (Livingston Co.) . i 

Rert of county 

CanaiMlai«ua. village (Ontarb (3o.) . . < 

Geneva (Ontario Co.) 

MandMstcr, town (Ontario Co.) — 

Phelps, town Ontario Co.) 

Rest of county 

Hector, town (Schuyler Co.) , 

Rest of county — I 

Seneca Falls, village (Seneca Co.). . . . 1 

Waterloo, village (Seneca Co.) 

Rest of county { 

Ithaca (Tompkins Co.) j 

Rert of county ' 

Perry, village (Wyoming Co.) 

Wamw. town (Wyoming Co.) 1 

Rest of county 

Penn Yan. village (Yates Co.) 

Rest of county 

Totab for the district 



3 
lA 
4 
1 
3 
1 
1 

3! 
2t 

3 
1 



H 
2. 





32 1 




1 

3, 




I 

3 
1 

1 



7 
41 



4 

1 



3| 
1 

1 



UKE ONTARIO AND W^ESTERN 
DISTRICT: 

Amherst, town (Erie Co.) 

Buffalo (Erie Co. ^ 

Depew, village (Erie Co.) 

East Aurora, village (Eric Co.) 

Lackawanna (Erie Co.) 

Lancaster, village (Eric Co.) 

Tnoawanda (Erie Co.) 

West Seneca, town (Erie C^.) . . .. 

Reit of eountv 

Broekport, village (Monroe .Co.) 



1 
5 
2 
1 
3 
6 
2 
3 

65 1 



1 



1 








4 1 

... . 1 


• . . . 






5 . . . 


19 21 



7s 



1 
3 

4 

II 



97 
3i 

23' 

•>' 
-I 



223 

8 

14 
1 



1 

10 



II 
1 



27 



2< 

I 

ll 



2 
1 



10 



SOI 
2' 

1 

1 

3 



25 
3 



52 



d 



15 
2 
1 
2 
4 

lOi 



s 
1 
1 

Ed 



1 



15 

15 

4 



3 
22 

5 
12 



-I- 



150' 15 



2 
13 
3 
2' 
7, 



1 

8 
1; 
2. 

4 
1 

5 
3 

«l 

3 

4 

» 

12 
9 



& 

■& 

a 

is 

I 

o 
« 



15 



6. 
4" 
5 



17 



•?! 



106 14 



163! 



16 
■> 



1 

1 

11 



1 
1 
3 

19 
1 



26 

3 

1 

2 



14 

3 



1 



"3 

I 

3 
b 
3 

o 

J 

0U 



20 

3 

2 

1 

3 

17 

2 

2 

2 

8 

123 

50 

3 

6 

1 

22 

111 

78 

500 



41 

26 
7 
4 

15 
4 
3 

21 
4 

13 
5 
1 

13 
2 
7 

10 
4 

15 

15 

14 
3 



12 

5 

11 

255 



4 

510 
3 



18 
5 
t 
4 

61 
2 



i:34 



State Dkpaktment of Health 



Total Mortality far the Year 1910 in 



JJANITAUY DISTRICTS 



MOHAWK VALLEY DI8TRICT-< Con/'rf) 

Frankfort. vUlftfie < Herkimer Co.) 

Herkimer, villaee (Herkimer Co.) 

Ilion. village (Herkimer Co.) 

Little Falls (Herkimer Co.) 

Rest of county 

Amsterdam (Montgomery Co.) . 

Fort Plains, village (Montgomery Co.) . 

Rest of county 

Boonville. town (Oneida Co.) 

Camden, town (Oneida Co.) 

Rome (Oneida C^.) 

Utica (Oneida Co.) 

Whiteatown. town (Oneida Co.) 

Rest of county 

Ballston Spa, village (Saratoga Co.) 

Mechanicville, village (Saratoga Co.) 

Saratoga Springs, village (Saratoga Co.). . 

Waterford, town (Saratoga Co.) 

Rest of county 

Schenectady (Schenectady Co.) 

Rest of county 

Cobleskill, town (Schohwic Co.) 

Rest of county 

Totals for the District ... 



SOUTHERN TIER DISTRICT: 
Wellsville, village (Allegany Co.) . 

Rest of county 

Binghamton (Broome Co.) 

liestershire, village (Broome Co.) ... 

Rest of county 

Olean (Cattaraugus Co.) 

Salamanca, village (Cattaraugus Co.) 

Rest of county 

Dunkirk (Chautauqua Co.) 

Fredonia, village (Chautauqua Co.) . 

Jamestown (Chautauqua Co.) 

Westfield. village (Chautauqua Co.).. 

Rest of county 

Elmira (Chemung Co.) 

Horseheads, town (Chemung Co.). . 

Rest of county 

Bath, village (Steuben Co.) 

Coming (Steuben Co.) 

Hornell (Steuben Co.) 

Rest of county 

Candor, town (Tioga Co.) 

Owego, village (Tioga Co.) 

Waverly, village (Tioga Co.) 

Rest of county 



Totals for the District 

EAST (^ENTRAL DISTRICT: 
Norwich, village (Chenango Co.) 

Rest of county 

Cortland (CortUnd Co.) 

Homer, village (Cortland Co.) . 

Rest of county 

Sidney, town (Delaware Co.) . . 
Walton, town (Delaware Co.) 



"3 
S 



e 
.2 



££ 



3.321 

7.559 

fi,616 

12.326 

26.650 

31.586 

2,769 

23,547 

3,193 

5,413 

20,6;i2 

74.879 

7.8.38 

44,786 

4,138 

6,666 

12,680; 

6,134 

32.282 

73.450 

15.516 

3.574 

20.223 



488,414 



4,383 
36,958 
48,671 

3,764 
26,608 
14.814 

5.806 
45.299 
17.308 

5.290 
31.523 

2,991 
48,380 
37,238 

5.398 
12.115 

3,891 
13.742 
13,637 
52.112 

2.902 

4,617 

4.853 
13.204 




65 
557 
765 

631 
503 
188 

85' 
628' 
279 1 

79, 
4C4, 

64' 
7181 
554' 

76' 
236 

67 
2001 
1741 
780, 

43| 

54| 

83 
224 



10 



2, 



11 



36 



455,504! 6.889 



7,434 
28,089; 
11,517 

2,701 
15,026 

4,142' 

5.0941 



122 

4761 

219 

49 

260 i 

72 

88. 



52 


16 


20 


55 


75 


336 


13^ 


37 


41 


128 


158 


263 


6 


4 


4 


14 


9 


26 


46 


19 


16 


49 


90 


282 


28 


11 


19 


32 


41 


67 


18 


10 


3 


9 


20 


25 


67 


36 


32 


51 


88 


353 


76 


37 


28 


38 


39 


61 


15 


4 


2 


8 


9 


41 


66 


21 


23 


71 


80 


143 


9 


4 


3 


5 


12 


31 


88 


22 


27 


57 


103 


419 


74 


20 


30 


78 


114 


236 


3 


2 


1 


8 


13 


49 


36 


10 


6 


31 


41 


110 


6 


1 


2 


7 


9 


42 


30 


8 


12 


34 


41 


75 


20 


7 


14 


21 


40 


72 


76 


21 


30 


59 


122 


466 


1 





2 


3 


8 


29 


4 








3 


16 


31 


7 


3 


8 


11 


10 


44 


19 


8 


6 


13 


41 


136 


896 


303 




331 


789 


1.190 


3.363 


10 




10 


4 


19 


26 


51 


38 


19 


12 


25 


78 


304 


36 


11 


5 


20 


39 


108 


2 


1 


1 


5 


9 


31 


21 


12 


9 


11 


37 


169 


4 


1 


3 


10 


17 


37 


8 


3 


5 


11 


17 


44 



Division of Vital Statistics 



i:]r; 



ilic Sfnfr Durbui 1010— ((^ontinued) 



sanitary districts 



MOHAWK VALLEY DIST.-lCoiU'rf) 
Frankfort, rilUge (Herkimer Co.) . . 
Herkimer, village (Herkimer Co.) . . 

Ilion. viQace (Herkimer Co.) 

Little Falb (Herkimer Co.) 

Rcft of counts' 

AmHerdam (Montcomery Co.) 
Fort Plain, village (Montgomery Co 

Rett of county 

BoooviLe, town (Oneida Co.) . . 
Camden, town (Oneida Co.) ... 
Rome (Oneida Co.) . . . 

rtira (Oneida Co.) 
Wbitertown, town (Oneida Co.) . 

Rent of county 

Balbton 8f>a, village (Saratoga Co.). 
Meehanieville. village (Saratoga Co.). 
Saratoga SpringB. vil. (Saratoga Co.) 
Watcrford. town (Saratoga Co.) 

R*wt of countv 

Schenectady (Schenectady Co.) . 

Rart of eounty 

Coblericill. town (Schoharie Co.) 
Rart of county 



Totals for the DMtrict. 



SOUTHERN TIER DISTRICT: 
WeUaville, village (ADegany Co.) . 

R«at of countv 

Bingfaamton (Broome Co.) 

Lestenhire. village (Braome Co.) . 

Rcvt of eounty 

Olcu (Cattaraugus Co.) 

Salamanca. viUage (Cattaraugus Co. 

Rest of eounty 

Dunkirk (Chautauqua Co.) . . 
Fredonia, viUage (Chautauqua Co.) . 
Jameittown (Chautauqua Co ) . 
Westfield. ^-illage (Chautauqua Co.). 

Rett of county 

Elnura (Chemung Co.) 

Horaebeads, town (Chemung Vo.).. . 

Rent of county 

Bath, village (Steuben Co.) 
Oornmg ^teuben Co ) 

Homcll (Bteuben Co.) 

Rot of county 

Candor, town (Tioga Co.) 
OwegD. viUate (Tmga Co.) 
Wavcrly. village (Tioga Co.) 
Rest of county 

TotakfortheDwtrict. 

EAST CENTRAL DISTRICn-: 
Norwich. viHage (Chenango Co.) . . 

Rest of county 

Cortknd <Cortknd Co.) 
Homer, village (Cortland Co.) 

Rest of coun^ 

Kidney, town (Delaware Co.) 
Wahoo. town (DeUware Co.) 



)' 



Kpidsmic Diskasks 



3 



4 

5 

2 
5 
2 

21 
2 
2 
5 

5| 



1 1 






QQ 



53 



7 
6 



1 
6| 

41 

1 

9 

r 

10 



8 

4 



I: 
11 



7 
4, 

I 

11 
3 



6| 
56 



4 
4< 



6 
4, 

2 
1 
3 
2 



741 3 



3 
9 

1! 

2 

3! 

1 



31| 



3 
4 

i 



2 
4 

8 
3 

1 
1 



30 



2 
3 
1 
7 

2 
3 
25 
1 
4 
1 
3 
1 



1 
1 
4 



I 

60 



9 

8 



8 






ja 






1 
1 
2 
3 
8 



Q. 



121 



3 
11 
2, 



2 

i; 

3 
2 

1 

1 

10 
I 
1 
5 



60 

— 



li 



I 



i; 



10 
14 



1 

2 
3 

l! 
151 

2| 



1| 
111 
! 
2 
5 
1 
3 
9 

5 

3 
5 
8 
1 



1 
7 
18 
3 
6; 
3 
1* 

t! 

16 
4 

2i 
• I 
101 



17 
5 
1 

10 



2; 
16 
21 
2 
4 

28 

11, 

1 

9 

1 
5 

16' 



4 

5 



.a 

e 

"e 



.3 

J 

3 

1 



e 
o 

s 

3 

eu 



5 
1 



I 



80< 114i 17 



3 
1 



1 
2 
1 



3 

5 

4 

10 

34 

32 

3 

25 

3 

8 

26 

94 

9 

52 

5 

6 

22 

13 

28 

72 

11 

4 

18 



18 527 



2 
15 
58 

4 
31 

7 

3 
.30 
II 

7 
23 

2 

23 

19 

10 

25 

6 

7 

5 

27 



4 

5 
7 



26i 55; 139 16| 16 331 



31 


4i .. 


2 


6 


1 


20 1 


2 


19 


2: 


2 


1 


3 


1, 


2 


1 


1 


1 


5 


... 1 


9 


i 


1 


. . 


5 


i 


5'. . 




3 



136 



Statk IJepaktment of Health 



Total Mortality for the Vcar 1910 in 



SANITARY DISTRICTS 



MOHAWK VALLEY DI8T.— (Con/'rf) 
Frankfort, vUlace (Herkimer Co.).. . 
Herkimer, villaee (Herkimer Co.) . . . 

Ilion, nllase (Herkimer Co.) 

Little Falla (Herkimer Co.) 

Rest of county 

Amsterdam (Montffomer>' Co.) 

Fort Plains, village (Montgomery Co.' 

Rest of county 

Boonville, town (Oneidh Co.) 

Camden, town (Oneida Co.) 

Rome (()neiHa Co.) 

Utica (Oneida Co.) 

WTiitertown, town (Oneida Co.) .... 

Rest of county 

Ballston Spa, village (Saratoga Co.). 
Mechanicville, village (Saratoga Co.) 
Saratoga Si rings, vil. (Saratoga Co.). 

Waterford, town (Saratoga Co.) 

Rest of county 

Schenectady (Schenectady Co.) 

Rest of county 

Cobleskill, town (Schoharie Co.) 

Rest of county 

Totals for the Datrict 



SOUTHFRN TIER DISTRICT: 
WellsviUe, village (Allegany Co.) . . , . 

Rest of county 

Binghamton ^roome Co.) 

Lestershirc, village (Broome Co.) — 

Rest of county 

Olean (Cattaraugus Co.). 

Salamanca, village (Cattaraugus Co.). 

Rest of county 

Dunkirk (Chautauqua Co.) 

Fredonb, village (Chautauqua Co.). 

Jamestown (Chautauqua Co.) 

Westfield, village (Chautauqua Co.). 

Rest of county 

Elmira (Chemung Co.) 

Horseheads, town (Chemung Co.) . . . . 

Rest of county 

Bath, village (Steuben Co.) 

Coming (Steuben Co.) 

Homell (Steuben Co.) 

Rest of county 

Candor, town (Tioga Co.) 

Owego, village (Tb^ Co.) 

Waverly, village (Tioga Co.) 

Rest of county 



3f 



6 
14 
4 
1 
1 



108 



1 
4 

1 
5 
? 
1 
6 
6 
2 
10 

i? 

7 



Totals for the District ! 74 



EAST CENTRAL DISTRICT: 
Norwich, village (Chenango C^o.) , 

Rest of county 

Cortland (Cortland Co.) 

Homer, village (Cortland Co.). . 

Rest of county 

Sidney, town (Delaware Co.) 
Waltcn, town fDelawar«' Co.^ 



f 
45 

4 

4 
22 

3 

3? 
41 
11 

5 
20 



411 



4 

30 

41 
4 

3? 

17 
6 

46 

1? 
2 

21 
7 

48 

38 
5 

11 
5 
6 
P 

53 
2 
3 
4 

11 



418 



9| 
25 1 
14i 

2' 

16' 

4 

5 



2 
4 

2 
6 
6 
7 
2 
P 
1 
1 
2 
11 



1? 



3 
1 
5 
10 
1 



95 



13 
6 



83 



1 

1 

4 

13 

12 

2 

17 

3 

1 

17 
52 
2 
19 
2 
1 
8 
3 

22 

60 

6 

6 

9 



277 



3 

25 

35 

1 

20 

8 

4 

21 

6 

4 

14 



19 

18 
4 

10 
5 
5 
8 

31 
3 
2 
2 
9 



23 
^' 
2\ 
7 
2 
3 



9 

o 
> 




4 

8 
14 
14 
60 
44 

4 
53 
10 

7 

55 
126 
14 
74 
12 

8 
21 
13 
75 
90 
20 

6 
66 



887 



5 
75 
77 

4 
84 
19 
10 
95 
29 
18 
43 

9 

85 
62 
13 
26 

7 

29 

26 

128 

7 

7 
15 
37 



267' 910 



I 

9 



i 



I 



10 
15 

5 
31 
60 
39 

8 
41 
11 

7 

58 

142 

10 

86 

8 
13 
25 

9 
64 
84 
17 

8 
44 



859 



7 

89 
81 

4 
71 
22 

5 
89 
18 

5 

47 

13 

124 

63 

5 
31 
12 
20 
26 
134 

1 

9 
10 
32 



•s 

o 






5 
12 

9 
19 
1^ 
54 

1 
36 

6 

1 

le 

101 

11 

52 
3 
4 

19 
8 

40 
108 

13 
5 

23 



618 



4 

27 
6? 

4 

27 
16 

5 
48 
25 

4 
30 

3 

42 
33 

9 
13 

.«» 

ly 

14 

41 

2 

3 

4 

11 



9181 450 



14 


10 


12 


65 


72 


21 


26 


25 


21 


5 


G 


7 


38 


33 


2(> 


111 


5 


4 


7 


5 


14 



7 

16 

5 

10 

16 

32 

4 

21 

3 

2 

18 

79 

7 

35 

5 

15 

19 

7 

30 

74 

6 

3 

17 



463 



6 
31 
39 

4 

23 
B 
2 

37 
9 
6 

23 



37 

30 
3 

10 
1 
9 
3 

31 
4 
3 
A 

10 



333 



14 
24 
10 

3 
16 

2 

3 . 



DUIWHCA 

anh 



i 



7 
3 
1 

11 
12 
89 
2 
9 
1 
3 

27 

100 

15 

16 

8 

7 

10 

5 

19 

115 

15 

3 



504 



3 

9 

39 

2 

8 

9 

6 

16 

33 

7 

8 

3 

27 

14 

1 

6 

1 

4 

4 

18 

1 

2 

3 

7 



221 



6 

10 

4 



V 

4 
K 



1 

4 
10 



r 
d 

3 

12 

2 



75 



2 

10 

17 

2 

7 

1 
13 

2 

e 
1 

7 
4 
3 
1 



3 

1 

19 



107 



2 
14 
1 
1 
2 



I 

7 

9 

11 

23 

30 

6 

20 

1 

2 

28 

88 

5 

47 

3 

5 

19 

4 

23 

59 

4 

3 

17 



477 



4 

35 
55 

6 
35 
19 

4 
41 
21 

3 
31 

2 
40 
29 

2 
10 

4 
24 
10 
48 

4 

5 

5 
16 



453 



7 
43 
11 

3 
15 
U 

5 



tttf ^ 



^ Ui 



-* 



*ii.::ir.* 



<i* -^ 



^>r"=J" BPTKl 






* 






-i ■ * 



i. < 






I 



i 

3 



J 



IIFT— ' 




80CTHESK TIER DISTRICT: 

Eflitorcoa^. 

Biiw^aatoa (BrooBM Co.) 

Tilnihiii villi«e (Broome Co.) . 

Rcmtofeoiaity 

OlttB (Csttaransoi Co.) 

B«u».^.>>« TiBAie (CtettanugoB Co.) 

Ralof eoontx 

(CliMitaBDgaft Co.) 

TiDace (OhaotanqtiA Co.) 

(ChMtauqnft Co.) 

WciCfield, vOkce (ChMtaoquft Co.). 

Rflrtof ooooty 

Efanira (Chantiiig Co.) 

HonehflMfa, town (Cbomunc Co.) . . 

Rot of OOOBty 



B«Ui. TiOase (Steaben Co.) 

{^tmbenC 
HarmlKSlfliibeQCo.). 



Cornuut 



Co.). 



Ratof eoonty. 
Ctador, town (Tiota Co.). . . 
O«c(0.Ti]lMB(TwaCo.) . 
WsVcfhr. Tftiee (Tioift Co.) 
Rotoccovoty 



TolablbrtkeDiftnet ... 

EAST CENTRAL DITTRTCT: 
NorwidL inOm (CtwMcn Co 
RMkoTcmtr 

v«^'CortlM4 0> 
R^oTcpMlr 

Cl»u, 



1 



5* 



14 
U 



I' 



4 



4 
t 
1 






49 

6 
35 

3 

37 
4 

2 
43 

3 
51 
89 

7 
17 


10 

g 

58 
4 

4 

n 

53" 



43 

24 
1 



1' 

1? 

4 
16' 

5 

1 
14 

I 

I 



4 
13 
17 

1 



2 

Id 

15i 

3i 
2 
ft' 
M 



1 

>» 
12 

3 
3 

3i 

« 
I 
I 

h 

4 
4 

4 

I 
I 

3 




9 
IS 



'i 
I 
3 

"l 



I 

2 
I 



17s 74. Ir 



J''« 



II 

r 
13 

2 



7 
4 

2 

1 

2 



t 
« 






\: 



5771 I : ** >41 44; 



N 
3^ 

•» 

'{i 

10 
M 
2' 
I, 

n 

Vi/ 



7 
17 



.'1 


M 




? 


4 


1/ 




4 


i 








I 
13 

3 



ft 



I 
I 

131 

1' 

I 
A 



I 
2 

4 

2 









2 



1 

r 



r 

I 

4 

IU 
J 

n 

\u 
4 

ft 
4 

3 
7 
\ 

n 
4 

I 

/ 



4 



V 

*■ 

V 



u 



4 
'\ 

^^ 
n 

}) 

n 

* 

lu 

I 

,1 
in 

ft 
M 

ft 
'J/ 



J 
I 

n 



I') ii; at, 



A 

n 
to 






1 



\ 



4U 

M»» 
nnn 

4.' 

ftUlt 

ft*l 
or 

Mil 

I n 

I 






* \1 *' 

4« ^ 



\» 

lU 

•Xl 
M 

I* 
I 

i 

I 

u 

II 
I 





I 




j)Kl'.\iiiMKNT <1K WkAI-TU 



Toial Morlaidij for (he I'car I'JIO m 



SANITARY DlRTRlfTV* 



I i 



EAST CENTRAL DI3T.— (CrmCifl 

CiiwitaU. vutg* (MadiKin Co.) . . . 
CucDoriL town (Mudwui Co.) . - - 
nundloB, iDirD (MBdnn Co.) .... 

Onads (MuJaon Co.) 

RatolKmity. 

BiUiriimilla. villigc (OnoDiliciI Co.) 

DtWiU.Unni(Ou>iiiUaCit.) 

Emi Bstuuk. viUm* (Onoodiii Co.) 
Eolny, liltace (OnmidM* Co.) 



CoapgnitDirt.Tiibce(OUegaCo.). . 

OMonta (OMfo Co.) 

WonHliT, lovn (OlaegoCo.) 

Kalofooimty 

LilwtT. Ion (SuIUnn Co.) 



TDUlifurtbEDklriot... 



ii.imics(i 



TDUkloiUieDiitiict... 



■" "llM«(trii'Co.) 

■. Tfll^ (EiH Co.). 



Bnekport, •iui(t (Mimroe V'n 



i i 




i i 


3 


!■! 


-a 



Divisio.N OF Vital Statimtics 



(he Sanitary Districts 


— 


Continued 


















1 

1 

1 


1 

f 


1 

1 


P 
1 


J 


ill 


1 


1 
a 

1 


Burm 


flNlTARY DISTRICTS 


11 


E*8T CENTRAL DiaT.-(Ci>iifJ) 


17 


s 


8 


3 






i 


j 

1^: 

■ 
i 






1 i ■ 


























.; ! 


-3 






J 










sSssKr:"-'' 




!,...';...■ 

i. V 




i 










S^S*" 






■■■j 


Bfl 




e 

""s 

3 


t: 'Si '^i ' 






^1 - 

2\ i 

M 11 




C<»[«»towii. TiilUe (OW Co.) . . . 


..,. ; : 




ItOi ■ 










»\ 18 i|'.::: 


104 6 








HI7 lit 


K 


« «,| »i „ 


18t 


307 








WEST CBNTRAL DBTRICT; 


»i 1 

lo' < 

12 i 

2fl i: 

''■■•■« 


S 

■ 1 


. 1.' >! I 


3! 

1 

V 


■ 

.... 
1 


64E' n 




'1 "i 
4 1 






^sS&."^?CL%' 


Ii:;::: 


W 3 
01 1 


























..... 






SS^.I^SSIWiwc^j::;;::;" 


■i\ Ji j: 


Vi 3 


»-rt»i«7iffliir®«. Co.) 


; 

i 


Li' 

....J -if:::: 


« ! 










fta.-fc'Sa'Ki;:;;: 


67 3 


Si T^CJ^ (t«iii ci.')'.'.' : ■ : 


3 






1 








2 


















38 


7 


W' <.< 7 


X 


IS 


1 














■» 


1 








» 


70 
lO.ON 

1 

M 

'g 






771 iU 




Ml 


IB 


12 


» 












. 














1 




48 si 





























142 



Statk Dkpaktmknt of IIkaltii 



Total Mortalitii for the Year 1910 in 



S.VNITARY DISTRICTS 



LAKE ONTARIO AND WESTERN DIS- 
TRICT— (Conltntt«f) 

Kairport, village (Monroe Co.) 

Rochester (Monroe Co.) 

Rest of county 

T^ockport (Niagara Co.) 

Niagara Falls (Niagara Co.) 

North Tonawanda (Niagara Co.) 

Rest of county , 

Albion, village (Orleans Co.) 

Medina, village (Orleans Co.) 

Rest of county 

l-\ilton (Oswego Co.) 

Oswego (Oswego CJo.) 

Richland, town (Oswego Co.) 

Re^t of county 

Clyde, village (Wayne Co.) 

Lyons, village (Wavne Co.) 

Newark, village (Wayne Co.) 

Palmyra, town (Wayne Co.) 

Rest of county 

Totals for the District 



Totals for the State 

Deaths in State institutions. 



a 

■s 

o 



3,133 

219.693 

58,676 

17.993 

30,617 

12,033 

31.719 

5.010 

5.707 

21.309 

10.550 

23.410 

3.799 

33.986 

2.701 

4.446 

6.274 

4.175 

32.637 



1,062,781 



9,i68,St8 



6 



S 



48 

3.084 

781 

209 

551 

160 

392 

85 

101 

314 

155 

385 

60 

523 

38 

75 

85 

71 

497 



16.300 



147.629 



•1.992 



I -a 



1(1 

445, 

141 

36i 

1431 

57! 

52, 

12 

18i 

30i 

31 

76' 

5 
48 

2 
11 

7 

8 
67 



i7,4S7 



Agbs 









>i 


8 




a» 


e«9 


3 


a 


2 




*n 


^ 


i 


i 


i 


1 


1 


i 


2 


2 


4 


206 


168 


479 


41 


35 


93 


9 


20 


42 


59 


33 


120 


28 


9 


20 


13 


15 


36 


2 


I 


9 


7 


4 


5 


IP 


8 


28 


7 


13 


25 


17 


24 


52 


2 


2 


5 


23 


IP 


36 





1 


2 


7 


2 


8 


1 


3 


21 


1 


2 


6 


11 


18 


37 


1.294 


91? 


2.29? 


tt.tss 


8.069 


is.sio 


3 


43 


404 



s 



3 

a 

I 



5 

716 

104 

54 

107 

13 

6<* 

13 

19 

52 

18 

65 

6 
81 

6 
13 
14 

9 
81 



3,083 



30,567 



i 






I 



055 



25 
1.070 

366 

131 
»8 
32 

205 
48 
4S 

177 
61 

151 
40 

312 
27 
34 
30 
45 

212 



5.5>6 

4SJ^ 



882 



* Previous to March these deaths wore classified in " Rest of county" in which each institution is located. 



Divisiox OF Vital Statistics 



143 



ihe Sanitary Districts — ( C'oiitiiiueil) 



SANITARY DISTRICTS 



UKE ONTARIO AND WESTERN 
DISTRICT— (ContfniMrf) 
Faimrl. riOace (Monroe Co.) . . 

RoeMrter (Monroe Co.) 

Reit of eoonty 

Loekport (NiMVft C^.) 

NiMvsFftns(Nift«MmCo.) 

North Toiuwsndft (NtsgarA CTo.) . 

R*rt of county 

Attnon, rilbse (Orleans Co.) 

Medioft, Tillage (Orleans Co.) 

Rert of coantv 

Fohon (Oswego Co.) 

Oewe^ (Oswego Co.) 

Ricfakad, town (Oswego Co.) 

Rest of county 

Hyde. Tillage (Wayne Co.) 

Lrotm, Tilbge (Wayne Co.) 

Newark, rillaw (W»yne Co.) 

Palmyra, town (Wajmc Co.) 

Rest of eounty 

Totals (pr the District. 



Totals for the State 

Deaths in State institution 



1 



30 
8 
2 

30 
5 
5 
2 



1 

1 

12 



1 
6 

195 



1.574 



13 



Epidbmic Dibbabbs 



I 



II 1 



e5\ 



8 
i 



15 



3 

14 

2 



1 

I 



47 
7 
3 
5 
3 
5 



1 



169 



1 



s 



Q. 


I 


1 




% 


{l 


-5 


g 


•S 


9 


s 


d 



1 

10' 

7, 

..I 
9 

■3! 
II 

I 
I 
5 
1 

5: 



34 
9 
4 

10 
7 



2) 
2, 



331 136! 256 



I 



17 
11 
1 
6 
1 
6 



11 
6 



1 

14 
2 
I 



111 

.1 

51 

2I 

131 



134 57 



1,$86\ t,et7\ 7i7\ t,m\ tA6t\ 5t 

. . • n 7i~i"i 



11 



6 . 

I 



0' 

11 
2 



2 

277 

41 

25 

32 

S 

20 

9 

1 

25 

13 

17 

2 

33 

1 

3 

6 

4 

19 



37 1.152 



~~2\~~'.72 



144 



State Depaktmknt of Heal= r 



Total Mortality for iht ' r 1910 in 



SANITARY DISTRICTS 



•LAKE ONTARIO AND WtlSTERN 
DISTRICT— (r<m«nu«/) 
Fairport, village (Monroe Co.) . 

RocnestCT (Monroe Co.) 

Rest of county 

Ix)ckport (Niagara Co.) 
Niagara Falla (Nia<atra Co.) 
North Tonawanda (Niagara C»».) . . 
Rest of county ... 
Albion, village (OrUsiiis Co.) 
Medina, village (Orleans <\>.) 

Rwt of county 

Fulton (Oswego Co.) 

()8wogo (Oawcfo Co.) 

Richland, town (Oswego Co.) 

Rest of county 

Clyde, village (Wayne Co.) 

Lyons, village (Wayne Co.) 

Ncwaric, village (Wayne Co.) 

Pahnyta, town (Wayne Co.) 

Rest of countv 



57 

i:: 

4 

IS 

4 

4 

3 

•> 

5 
2 
4 



1 

3 



Totals for the District 

Totals for the State 

Deaths in State institutions. 



2 

43 
47 
12 
14 

6' 
261 

^! 

21 

t 

20 
3 

32 
5 
6 
3 
3 

20 



221 83v 



i,27f^ 



22 



7,62k 



38 



29 
4 
5 
4 




2 

105 

21 

10 

2^ 

7 
21 

2 

6 
13 

6 
12 

5 
26 



1 

7 

6 

13 



731 



5.057 



27 



E 



4> 



■2| 



12 
270 
93 
33 
41 
13 
57 
16 
16 
30 
15 
59 
II 
7i 



13 

6 
11 
95 



1,69: 



n,^oj, 



485 



I 



3 
415 
111 

49 

401 

8 
49 
14 
43 

9 
84 
14 

14 

12 

70 



3 
153 

28 

20 

37 
8 

23 
5 
4 

24 
9 

19 
2 

33 
3 
8 
4 
4 

23 



2,083 646 



19,J,9', 9,867 



30. 



123 



1 
254 
48 
20 
29 
18 
20 

6 

S 
22 

6 
11 

2 
22 



DURMIEA I |g 

AND sr 

Ektcbitu 



5 
5 
4 

27 



1,373 



U,6€t 



236 



t 



2 

ao3 

70 

11 

45 
21 
9 
5 
5 
9 
7 
18 



r. 



4 

1 

2 

19 



884 



9,0S6 



1 



c« 



I 



35 
10 
4 
8 
1 
5 
2 
1 
3 
3 
7 
1 
5 



2 

203 

37 

20 

26 

10 

21 

1 

K 

13 

17 

32 

7 

32 
1 
3 
6 
4 
39 



lU 1.231 



t.947 



9i 



7,691 



63 



^. 



M 



Division of Vital Statistics 



145 



fhe Sanitanj Districts — (Concluded) 



BlRTHH 



SANITARY DISTRICTS 



LAKE ONTARIO AND WESTERN 
DISTRICT— (C<m«mii«d) 

Fairport, vilbge (Monroe Co.) 

RoehtBttT (Monroe 0>.) 

Rest ct ooonty 

Loekport (Niasva Co.) 

Nacva Faik (NiBRMra C«.) 

North Tonswanda (Nagvm Co.) . . . . 

Rest of county 

Albion, villaee (Orlnnt Co.) 

Medina. vilk«e (OricMU Co.) 

Rest of county 

FultoD (OBwego Co.) 

Oswe«o (Onr^ Co.) 

Rirhhtpd. town (Oswego Co.) 

Restofeoun^ 

CIyd«, vilkife (Wayne Co.) 

Ljrona, TiUan (Wume Co.) 

Newark. ▼ilfii«c (Wayne O).) 

I^Jmyr*, town (Wayne Co.) 

Reat of county 

Totals for the District 

Totals for the State 

Deaths in State institutions 




150 Statk Dki'artmkxt hf IIkaltii 

Total Mortality in Cities for the Year 1910 — f <'onc]u<led ) 





1 1 


i 
i. 

F 

] 






A.. 








k 


1 
1 


> 

i 

4 


1 

2 

i 


o ■ 3 

« : s 

III 


i 

s 

1 




Tklri-r>auiMa, hk-Iit 10.000 

OonoU 

Touwudi 


sf.m 

».M2 

8.30S 


181 


in 


27 
M 
2(1 


I, MS 




w 


•5 

57 


ToTtLUui^MoBTlUTT.. 

Tor»i.RDiuLMoiiTAl,rrT.. 




ST.SJI 


".'. 


*,r» 


i.m K,iffi 


e.m 


n.tu 



Divisiox OF ViTAT^ Statistics 



14' 



Total Mortality in Cities for ike Year 1010 — (Contiuueil) 



Epidemic Diseasks 



Fint<Uu eitiea, over llSfiOO 
CUt •/ S9W Ymk 



BoBocoH or 
BoKoroB or 
BosocoH or 
BotovoB or 
BoftouoH or 

Buffalo 

Roehca^er 



Manhattan 
THE Beonx 
Beookutn . 
QrEEm 
RicHuo?rD 



Skcomd^Uu nHn, SOflOO tom.OCfO_ 



Svneoae . 
ARmov... 
Yonkcn 

Trov 

Utk* 

Scbowctady 



ThinMau citie$, iOjOOO to SOjOOO 



Buwhamton . 
Efanin. . 

Auburn 

AmsterdaiD. . 
jEmestown 
Mt. Vernon 
NiEcnn Falls 
Sew Roehdle 
Poughkeepsie . 
Newbur^ . . 
Watertown . . 
KinKston. . 

Cohoa 

OSWCKO 

(tUivcrarine.. . 
Runw 



Tkird-dau eUU$, lOflOO to iOfiOO. 



Lockpwt 

Dunkirk 

White PbuM. village. . . . 

OKdensbunt 

Peebriull. Tillage 

Middletown 

GlenaFalb 

Watcnrliei 

Itliaca 

Clean 

Lackawanna 

Cominic 

Homdl 

Portcheater. village 
Saratoga Springs, village. 

Geneva 

UtUe Falls 

North Tonawanda 

Batavia, village 

Oaining, villi«c 

Cortland 

Hudaon 

Plattaburgh 



> 



o 



.9 



666 \ i7, 



FoHon 

johnatowa. 



5 
6 
4 
4 

5 



1 

8 

5 

2', 

2 

3 

1'. 

5 

4 

2 

<» 

3 
3 
1 
1 



S6 

■T, 
I 

3 

13i 
3 



55S 

260 
41 

198 

30 

I 

78 

30 

9S\ 

38 
15 
15 
15 
5 

*i 

15i 

6 
10 
3 
7 
9 
3 

30 

1 

5 

12 

24 

5 

19 

12 

2 

4 



n, 8\ 



I 

S 

6 
6 
4 
I 



J 



886 

77J, 

271 
45 1 

422 
301 

6' 

97| 
15' 

70' 

I 

24 



2 



9 



6 

*2 
231 

I 

3 
4 
4 



2 
3 
6 



4 
1 
li 



15i 
63 



3 
1 
1 
1 

14 
6 
1 
5 

15 
2 
3 

4 

3 

75 

3 
4 



^ I 



96g 

44« 

75 
384' 

331 

t? 
223 1 

47 

691 

I 

22 1 
9 

181 
17' 



62 

3 
1 
5 
4 
4 
2 
5 



2, 
32 

1 



69 

3 

25 
1 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
2 

14 
1 
1 



M 
M 

S3 

8 

be 

a 



^ I 

ja I 



JS.il l,9tf 



154 

2'< 

02 

21 

4 

80 
10 

4P 

4 

9 

8 

4 

14 

10 

6.- 



5 

5! 

li 

8 

1 

4 

9 

8 

7 

4 

5 
1 
5 



SS 



1 

s 



89^ 
136 
55« 
104 

IP 
163 

34 

lie 

25 
17 
28 
13 
14 
15 

tit 

II 

6l 
12' 

61 
101 

8' 

ti 

3l 
7 

13 
I 
3 

10 

64 

4 

9 
3 
4 



7 
2 
3, 
2 

2 

I 

1, 

31 



e 

4) 

3 



162 
26 

144 
24 
10 
16 
17 

».5 

15 

2P 

5 

24 

18 

4 

77 

5 
11 
2 
2 
4 
4 
6 
1 
2 
5 
4 
14 
4 



7 



61 

1 

2 

1 

1 
«> 

1 

4 

3 
6 

■ 1 
1 
5 
2 
5 
2 
3 
1 
3 
1 
2 

2 
3 
6 
3 



I 
1 




3 



o 
E 

a. 



399, 369. 5/7 



23", 

161 

79 1 

5 
3' 

26; 

14l 
/5| 

5, 

4' 

2 

2i 

4 



4 
1 



1 
o 



3 

4' 
1' 



1 

// 

1 



1' 

J! 



947 



366 \ Sift 29 4 \ 8,6 fO 



29! 

7? 

12 

4 
14 

9 



1 

9, 
5 
3; 



1 



3,976 
1,779 
2.429 
358 
148 
510 
277 



gj «f.T 



123 
239 
120 
175 
94 
72 



f/ 6iS 



2 
4 

I 

3, 



1; 
1 



1' 

II 



58 
19 
41 
32 
23 
34 
32 
24 
35 
50 
21 
46 
49 
17 
16 
26 

38S 

25 

11 

16 

17 

23 

27 

18 

21 

15 

7 

18 

7 

5 

9 

22 

13 

10 

8 

7 

15 

3 

26 
23 
15 
19 
U 



].':J SiATK Dki'aujmk.nt 111-- Health 

VVtii Uorlaiity in VUies fur the I'ear I'JIO — ■ (Concluded) 



DiviaioN OF Vital Statistics I'l-'t 

T'fftit Mortality hi, Cilu-s for lite JV«r ]!) 10 — (Concluded) 





1 

1 

1 

1 


i 

II 

1 


1 








1 






Biinu 




1 


i 


1 

1 


8 

1 

9 


1 




i 
1 




li 


no 


r. 


* 




H 


M 


(81 

ISO 
IH 

is; 


\i.i 


" 






JEM 


ass 


/.W( 


17S.0W 
W.tt! 






TorU. RUK«L MOBTIUTT 


t.tm 


.» 


•'• 


■■■" 


.,< 


l,M) 



150 StaTK Pkl-ART-MK-NT OF HkALTU 

Total Morlalitij in f.'ities for the Year 1910 — «"oiiclii(led ) 





k 










T-lirtf^ou «Ha. Hufrr 10/000 


is.m 




fl.SM 
R.30S 






To»«»il.,. 


ToTiL U.iu» MonTiLnr . 


...|.,«» 


TUTIL RrUL MOKTIUTT . 


..«../.. 



Division (ii- Vitm. SrAiisTirs 1." 

Total MorlaUlyii, rilinforlhe Year 19!0— (ronchijcj) 



e !i 



ToML t'uix Mm 
Torn. RnAL Mm 



,,j „,| 



i I 



^:r2 



Statk Depaktmkxt of Hkalth 



Tlvc Morialiiy in Cities for the I'car 11)10 — (Concluded) 



Tkird-dau eitu$, tinder WfiOO. 



Oneonta 

Port Jcrris. 

Ondda 

Tonawaoda. 



Total Urban Mobtautt 
Total Rural Mortalitt 



I 



3 



3 



1,853 
4S6 



t 

I, 



»s 
11 

1 



57 

13 

10 

9 

5 



6,U7 
9,076 



1,093 
406 



1 



S4 

9 

12 

9 

4 



S,786 
t,t7» 



i 



•a 



ee 

17 
24 

11 

14 



6,tSS 
6,171 



•3 



SB 

21 
12 
14 
11 



H,64» 
4,966 



41 

17 
10 

7 
7 



7,4S1 
i,586 



$t 

5 
4 

7 
6 



9,60» 

i,ieo 



DURRHKA 
AND 

Entiritis 



I 



94 

9 
5 
5 
5 



7,666 
1,S71 



S 



10 

2 
2 
5 
1 



1,056 



.» 



S4 

10 

11 

6 

7 



5.95« 



Wfl f.OM 



Bivisiox in' ViTAi, Statistii's I'i;! 

Tofal Mortalilij in VUies for Ihr Yair 1!U0 — (Concluded) 





1 
1 

1 
1 


i 

II 

i 


1 

1 

s 








1 






B»rai 




, 


i 




J 
J 




1 
1 


nM^lu eMit. m-Jt lO/XtO. 


■■ 


i 


::; 


: 


11 


3 

1 


.... 




a 

\ 


IH 


!»:( 




ToTtL Besu. Mdhtiutt 


Jl 


na 


m 


t.lN 


«W 


us 


i.m 


]Z 


tn.ow 


«.! 


;:: 



15G 



SlATii DkPAKTMKNT OF HeALTII 



liecord of ench reporting local board of health, slvowhuj total 
deaths from all causes and from the principal zynwlw diseases 
for 1910, by counties 

[Cities are printed in small caps, villages in ikdia and towns in Roman type.} 



• 

COUNTY AND 

REGIBTRATION 

DBTRICl'S 


1 

3 


Cerebrospinal 

1 meningitis 
ca- *. • 


1 

o 

44 
15 
19 


73 

i 


1 

51 

9 

32 

1 


S7 

24 

3 


1 

1 

1 

11 

9 

1 


•a 

S4 
17 
13 


1 

A 

140 
56 
54 
1 
1 
3 
8 


Tuberculosis 

of lungs 


1 

46 
29 

4 

""4 
1 
2 
1 

..... 


1 

189 
135 
14 
2 
3 
2 
9 
2 
1 
3 
3 
2 
8 
5 

55 
2 


rt 

1 



3 


ALBANY COUNTY. . . 
Albany 


3Jg8 
1,943 

509 
34 
67 
55 

119 
50 
14 
53 
24 
28 

261 
71 

ets 

32 
11 

9 

27 
35 
29 
38 
27 

7 
21 
30 
20 

9 

8 
51 
51 

9 
13 

5 
19 
14 
13 
18 
20 

3 
12 
65 

7 
11 

P 

1,S06 
765 


49 
1 
7 
5 
4 
3 
1 
4 
2 




COBOBS 




Berne 




Bethlehem 








3 




1 




Coeymans 













Colonie 








1 






1 




(tuilderland 




■ 1 






Knox 












1 
2 




New Scotland 




2 






1 








Rensselaerville 












Westerk) 
















1 

11 
2 

12 




Watbhvlibt 


i 

1 


7 




2 
6 

S 


6 




2 


21 

8 

17 


3 

1 

17 
2 




Grtenldand 




ALLEGANY COUNTY. 
Alfred 


6 


• • • • • 


4 




/ 


630 
28 


Alien 
















! 


11 


Alma 








1 








2 

1 








6 


Almond 


















1 
1 


25 


Amity 




1 












1 
3 
1 
1 


2 
2 




30 


Andover 














24 


Angdica 




1 










1 


..... 


30 


Betfast 




1 






24 


Biidsall ,. 


















7 


Bolivar 
















1 


1 


• 


5 


14 


Bums 










1 






29 


Caneadea 




1 














1 


2 

1 

"3 
2 


16 


Centerville 






1 






1 




6 


ClarkiviUe 
















1 
2 
3 


7 


Cuba 




1 
1 















45 


Friendship 






1 








44 


Qenesee 















Granger 










1 












1 


11 


Grove 
















* 




5 


Hume 
















1 


1 


i 


1 


16 


Independence 
















13 


New'Hudson 


1 



















1 
2 

1 


11 


Rushford 














1 


1 
1 


""4 


14 


Scio 
















14 


Ward 


















3 


Wellsville 


















2 
2 

1 


1 


"4 


9 


WeUtviUe 
















' 


56 


West Ahnond 
















6 


Willing 




1 


















10 


Wirt 










.... 
1 






1 

76 

41 

1 

i 

2 
2 

1 

1 


7 


BROOME COUNTY... 

BlKOHAMTON 


1 


10 
6 




9 
3 


4 
4 


6. 13 

5! 11 


49 
39 


88 
58 


17 

5 

1 

1 

..... 

1 
. ... 

1 

1 

.... 


l,OSi 
592 


Barker 


12 
12 








10 


Binghamton 


















11 


Chenango 


15 
37 
18 






1 




1 


"I 

1 
5 

4 

1 




12 


Colesvifle 




1 








1 


26 


Conklin 




1 






14 


Dickinson 


53 
19 
12 

r»3 

2(1 


1 


f 




1 


1 

2 


45 


Fenton 


1 


. . _ . 


1 


.... 1 ' 1 

r 1 


IS 


Kirkwood 




11 


Lntmkirt 

Lisle 




1 


. . . . ' , . .'.... 


51 
2 


Muiiic j 

Nanticokr 


' 1 _ . . 


1 


Saiiford 




ll 




ll 





9 


4 


*■■■.' 


8. 


4 



ISutinnartf of Mortaliiij m the Sauitiiry Diiflriclm for the Yrar 
1(H0^ (Continued) 













.. 


: 




PASITARY 


1 


- 


^ 


DIJrRICTSi ' 


■5 


■^ 




i? 


1 


i 






















s 


o 






1.483 


*w 



























































































Irisn ntorUlit]' II.KIJ, I.SUr 1 
Ron] morUElr . ?.8U' 4U : 



Stniiiiini:!/ of MorUifHi/ in the Sanilary Districts- for the Year 
lltlO— (Concluded) 



15G 



State Department of Health 



Uncord of eadv reporluuj local hoard of health, slvowifu/ total 
deaths from all causes and frovi the priiwipal zynuHic diseases 
for 1910, by counties 

[Cities are printed in small caps, viilai^os in UaUct and towns in Roman tiype.] 



COUNTY AND 

REGISTRATION 

DISTRICTS 



ALBANY COUNTY. 



Albany. 

COHOBS 

Berne 

Bethldiem 

Coeymans 

Colonic 

Guilderland — 

Knox 

New Scotland. 
Rensselaerville. 

Westerlo 

Watbrvlht... 
Grtenldand. .. 



ALLEGANY COUNTY. 

Alfred 

AUen 

Alma 

Almond 

Amity 

Andover 



fast. 

BitdsaU 

Bolivar 

Boms 

Caneadea 

Craterville. . . 
Clarksville.... 

Cuba 

Friendship — 

Genesee 

Granger 

Grove 

Hume 

Independence. 
New Hudson. 

Rushford 

Scb 

Ward 

WellsviUe 

WeOinUe 

West Almond. 

Willing 

Wirt 



BROOME COUNTY... 

BraOHAHTON 

Barker 

Binghamton 

Chooann) 

CoIesviUB 

Conklin 

Dickinson 

YeaUm 

Kiricwood 

LuUnkire 

Lisle 

Maine 

Nanticoke 

Sanford 



1 


•3 

a" 
3 


> 

15 
19 


IS 


1 

1 

51 

9 

32 

1 


S7 

24 

3 


n 

9 

1 


•a 

S4 
17 
13 


1 

ll 

b 
140 

56 
54 

1 
1 
3 
8 


Tuberculosis 

of lungs 


3 
i 

e 

4e 

29 
4 

"4 
1 
2 

1 

• • . . . 

1 


o 

189 
135 
14 
2 
3 
2 
9 
2 
1 
3 
3 
2 
8 
5 

55 
2 


e4 

1 



3 


3,ti8 

1.943 

509 

34 


49 
1 
7 
5 
4 
3 
1 
4 
2 




A7 








3 




1 




55 












119 








1 




1 


1 




50 




1 






14 












1 
2 




53 




2 






1 








24 












28 
















1 

11 
2 

12 




261 
71 


i 


7 




2 
6 

i 


6 




2 


21 

8 

17 



3 

1 

17 
2 




ets 

32 


6 




4 




; 


6S0 

28 


11 
















..... 


11 


9 
















1 








6 


27 


















1 
1 

5 


25 


35 




1 












1 
3 
1 
1 


2 
2 


30 


29 














24 


38 




1 










"•'il:::;: 


30 


27 












1 


24 


7 
















7 


21 
















1 


1 


» 


5 


14 


30 
















29 


20 




1 












1 

1 
2 
3 


2 

1 

'3 
2 


16 


9 













1 




6 


8 














7 


51 




1 
1 
















45 


51 












( 


44 


9 












9 


13 










1 






, 




' 


11 


5 














i 




5 


19 
















1 


1 


..... 


1 




16 


14 
















13 


13 


1 












, , 




1 


11 


18 














1 


1 
1 


""4 

• • • • • 


14 


20 
















14 


3 


















3 


1? 


















2 
2 


1 


"*"4 


9 


65 












, 


3 


56 


7 














6 


11 




1 

















10 


9 












1 

49 
39 






1 

76 
41 

1 

" \ 

2 
2 

1 

'-i 

•• 

1 


7 


t,S06 

765 

12 


1 


10 
6 




9 
3 


4 
4 


6 

5 


IS 

11 


88 
58 


17 

5 

1 

1 

..... 

1 
..... 

1 

1 

... 


l.OSt 

592 

10 


12 












! 




11 


15 






1 




1 




2 
2 
1 
5 

4 

I 


12 


37 




1 










1 


26 


18 






1 




14 


53 


. .. 1 .... 






1 




1 


45 


19' 

12j 

fi3' 

26 
20 


1 






1 


::;:■ ;:;;■ ""■i 
t 


2 


15 
11 

51 

2 

1 


•» 
1 










54 


1 


ll 




ll 







4 


, , , . , 


SI 


4 



Divisiox OF Vital Statistics 



1 "^^ 



Record of each reporting local hoard of health, showing total 

deaths/ etc. — (Continued) 

(Cities are printed in small C4ps, villages in itdiet and towns in Roman type.] 



COUNTY AND 

REGISTRATION 

DISTRICTS 


1 

3 


1 

1 


1 

9 




1 

1 


1 


Whooping oottgh 


1 


1 
1 

■""4 


Tabercak»s 

of hugs 


1 

* 2 

19 

* 3 
1 


1 
3 
2 
3 

68 

17 

3 

3 


1 

S3 
< 


BROOBIE COUNTY- 
(Cmtinued). 


25 
04 
30 
34 

904 
188 




1 
5 
2 
3 

S9 

7 

6 

• 


21 


Vnicm 


1 


1 

1 


- • • ■ • 


2 

1 




78 


Vestal 








24 


Windsor 










26 


CATTARAUGUS CO... 

OUIAF 


5 
1 


7 


/ 


6 


7 
2 


/ 


9 St 


7/5 
147 


Alkgsny 


47 

23 










35 


Atijerd. 




1 










1 




17 


CanoQton 


15 2 












1 

1 
1 


1 
1 


12 


Cold Spring 



26 
18 
9 
5 
27 
11 
















1 
3 


..... 

2 

1 


7 


Conevango 
















20 


Dayton 










1 






13 


EMtOtto 














8 


Elko 


.... 


1 












1 






3 


EDioottTiUe 












2 






24 


Farmcrarille 




1 














10 


FianklinTille 


41 
13 
29 














2 




1 


3 
2 
1 

1 


35 


Freedom 
















11 


Great VaOey 








2 


1 




1 








24 


HiiMdale .. 


20 
9 

11 
10 
22 
5 
35 
10 

n 










1 
2 






18 


















1 




6 


Isehitt 
















1 




1 
1 
4 

1 

1 

1 
3 

1 
1 


9 


Lmn 












.... 








9 


Little Valley 


1 . . 






. • . . . 






1 




1 


16 


Lyndon 
















4 


Madiias 
















1 


3 
2 


"2 


30 


Maufield 


. . . 














6 


Napolt 


















10 


New Albion 


31 
11 
13 
12 
22 
27 
41 

3 

26 
85 

7 
32 

522 
17 
46 
16 
26 
10 
26 
18 
21 
18 
26 
11 
27 
14 
9 
20 
14 
82 
26 
47 










1 








2 
1 


1 
1 
1 


24 


Okui 
















8 


Otto 


J 






2 








9 


Perrysbnrg 


1 












1 
3 


11 


Pema 






■ 


1 . . 






1 
2 

1 






18 


Portville 




1 


1 








2 

1 


23 




...... 


•■■? 












1 




36 


Red House 










' 




3 


Salamanca .... . . . 






.... 


1 










3 
3 


■ 2 


3 
6 


19 


Sottmonn 


' 1 


2 






1 A 


64 


Sooth Valley 




'l 


•■•■I 

, 1 . . . 


1 


6 


Yorkshire 


: il i 


\ 


1 




2 

68 
41 

1 
1 


2 

IS 
2 

"2 


7 

69 

39 

2 

I 
1 
1 
1 
3 


18 


CAYUGA COUNTY ... 

AlTBUBN 


/ 


18 
3 


/ 


6 3 
5 3 


/ 

1 


rl n 

6 -^A 


760 
386 


Aiirelin 






^ 






14 


Bratus 




2 









J 


1 


> • • • ■ 

3 


39 


Cato 


1 








i 




12 


Cooqaest 




2 










. . . 


•• 




23 


Flemmg , . 












2 


1 

i 

i 

6 
1 
2 


.... 


7 


Genoa 


1 













19 


Ira 


1 
1 


.... 


16 


Ledyard 




1 








- 


1 
1 


1 


17 


Loeke 


15 


Menu 














20 


Mcmtesoma 


















2 


■"■4 

1 
1 


8 


Moram 




1 














20 


Niks 








> • • ■ . 








13 


Owaseo 




.... 1 . . - . 












1 
2 


• • ■ • • 


6 






\ 










18 


IfQIBPfOQIIIf , 




















14 


r Scnaett 
















6 

1 
2 


..... 
4 


4 
2 
4 


22 


L BDrtSCDOfY 




6 
2 








..... 






16 


liSSSt. 








. . . • . 




■ 3 


32 



158 



Statk Dki»ai{t\ikxt of Health 



Record of each reporting local hoard of health, showing total 

deaths, etc. — (Continued) 

[Cities aro printed in small caps, villages in Ualici and towns in Roman type.) 







.s 














Diarrhea (under 2 
years) 


M 








COUNTY AND 


1 ."S 

; 1 


1 


b 




Whooping cough 










i 


REGISTRATION 
DISTRICTS 


1 

< 


Cerebroepin 
m 


1 


1 


J 

1 


i 


J 

Q 


3 


i 

c 


s 


8 

a 

o 

< 


CAYUGA COUNTY— 








1 ■-' ■■■ 
1 






(Cond'ntMd) 














1 










Summer Hill 


5 




1 • • • 




. . ■ . 










5 


Throop 


6 





[ 1 










1 


..... 


5 


Venice 


18 
21 




* . . . 












4 


14 


Victory 




1 






I 




19 


CHAUTAUQUA CO . 


1,639 


4 15 j S4 


11 


7 


2l\ 63 


. '^^I 


S6 


88 


1.194 


Dunkirk 


279 


4 


25 


4 




9 23 


ll' 


2 


13 


188 


Jaukbtown 


404 


1 9; 


4 


1 


1 


5 


8 


23, 


4 


21 


327 


Arkwright 


» 7 


! « 








2 






I 


5 


Busti 


38 
29 
16 
83 








1 


1 
1 


3 

1 


2 
1 
1 
1 




3 
1 


31 


Carroll 


1 1 . . . . 

1 


* ' ' ■ . . - 




23 


Charlotte 


1 


• 




14 


Chautauqua 


1! .. V. 








1 






5 


75 


Cherry Credc 


14 


1 1 












2 


2 


10 


Clymer 


26 


1 ..... 1 .... 1 .... 


1 










? 


5 


18 


Dunkirk 




I 




















Ellery 


21 


1 

. . . . 1 .... 


1 










. 


1 


20 


EUicott 


56 


::... 1 


__ 




4 


2 


3 


1 


4 


41 


EU'mKton 


19 
79 












1 




2 

7 


* 2 


2 
2 


15 


Frtdonia 




1 




.... 
1 


2 




7 


57 


French Creek 


10 
19 












' 








1 
1 


9 


Gerry 


2 




. . 


1 


i 






2 


13 


Hanover 


98 

43 

4 

8 

14 








2| .... 
(..... 


■.'...' 


9 
2 


4 

1 
... 


'2 

2 

1 


9 
5 



3 


73 


Harmony 








32 


Kiantone 












4 


Mina 










6 


Poland 












1 







10 


Pomf ret 


23 
38 
28 
24 
22 
37 
14 
22 
64 










.. ..1 


2 


I 
1 

1 


■ 2 

1 
1 
2 
4 

i 


1 
. 

3 

• • • t • 

1 


20 


Portland 
















34 


Ripley 

Sheridan 
















25 






1 










18 


Sherman 














20 


Stockton 






. . . 












1 




32 


Villenova 


1 










11 


WestfieW 


■ ■ ■ ■ 1 ■ ■ ■ 
1 




' 


1 




18 


Wettfidd 


1 




1 


3 


3 


3 


2 


45 


CHEMUNG COUNTi' 


865 


s' 14 


1 
2' 1 




B 9 


to 


62 


22 


53 


684 


Eluira 


554 


1, 10 


21 1 




5, 8 


14 


19 


11 


38 


445 


Ashland 


8 
10 


1 I 


1 




1 


1 








6 


Baldwin 










• • • 


10 


Big Flats 


19 


. 1 1 












2 


1 




15 


Catlin 


10, 1 .... 










.1 




1 






10 


Chemung 


27. i.... 





. . . 










4 


2 


20 


Elmira 


73 1 1 


1 




1 







i7 


2 


1 


49 


Erin ' 


18; 




1 












1 


2 


15 


Hora^eads 


76 

27 

12 


1 


1 ... 






1 

.... 




10 

1 

. . . . 1 


1 
2 


5 
1 
1 
3 

5.5 


58 


Sou^port 

VanEtten 






22 




1 

1 


11 


Veteran 


31 

698 




■ ■ 1 
1 


2 
15 


3' 

23 


Si 


23 


CHENANGO COUNTY 


5 S 


1 

/! 


5 


l\ 4 


488 


Afton 


30 


1 


1 


1 




1 


I 


1 


2 


23 


Bainbridge 


31 




i 


1, 


1 


1' 


3 


1 


1 


23 


Columbus 


14 






1 




1 


1 


1 


. 


H 


Coventry 


171 ., 




. 




1 . 











15 


German 


2i . . 







1 








1 


1 


Greene 


48 


- ■ . . 




. 




1 


4 


3 


40 


Guilford 


391 


, 




1 


1 






2 


35 


lincklaen 


4 . 


1 
... . .... 




. . . . 1 






. 


1 


3 


MoDonough 


17 








■ ■ ' ' i .... 




1 


1 




15 


New Berlin 


41 


1 




i 




1 




1 


3 


34 


North Norwich 


13 


. . 




• • • 








3 




10 



Division of \*itak Statistics 



159 



Tircord of each reporting local hoard of health, shomn<j total 

deaths, etc. — (Continued) 

(Cities are printed in small caps. Tillages in Ualiet and towns in Rfjman type.] 



COUNTY AND 

REGISTRATION 

DISTRICTS 


t 

< 


Cercbro-«pinal 

meningitis 


1 






1 


1 


Whooping cough 

1 


Diphtheria 


1 Diarrhea (under 2 
i years) 


Tuberculosis 

of lungs 


9 
1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

2 
1 


1 
1 

\ 

3 

" '1 

2 

1 

1 1 

i 27 
..... 

1 

1 


All other causes 


CHENANGO COUNTY 

Norvieh 

NerwitA 


11 

122 

17 

75 

9 
12 

9 
17 
41 




2 
6 

2 


7 


2 


1 

1 


1 








3 


6 
1 


01 


OtreBc 

Oxfocd 






14 
67 


Fliarmlia 












8 


Pitdia' 

Plymooth 
















2 

1 


1 
2 

i 


9 














. . - . . 


7 
12 


Sberbome 


















37 


SmithTiUe 


11 

18 


..... 
















9 


^QIYfBft ■ . ' 














1 


17 


CUNTON COUNTY 
AUoDa 


676 
21 


S 


r. 




// 8 


16 


6 


S5 
2 

1 
1 


69 
3 
2 

4 


18 
3 

1 
1 


486 
[ 13 


Aosable 

Bfif4in>nto«^ 


27 
40 
23 


. . . . 






'.'.'.'. 2 
1 I 


3 




21 
28 


BhdcBiook 








3 
3 4 


18 


Champliii 

Chasy 

CUntoa 


61 
36 
27 


1 


2 


1 




3 

5 

1 
4 
3 
7 

23 
3 
1 

62 

26 

1 


2 
4 
2 


! 5 
2 
1 


40 


1 






1 




1 
5 

. . . 


27 
19 


Daanemora 

EOenburgh 


27 




1 








22 


14' 1 

61 












5 


:':;'i 


12 








7 






2 


1 
..... 

17 

•j 

2 
I 
3 
1 
.. . 

■■■ 2 

1 

1 

"2 
.... 

8 


1 

1 
9 
3 
2 

^i 

1 

5 
4 

. . . . 1 
2 
2 

3 
1 
1; 

7' 

1 

1 

2' 

1' 
1 

32\ 
. .1 


41 


Peni 


28 






i 

8 
3 

S 
1 
1 


... ....^ 

....! 7 
2 
2 

S SS 
2 17 


23 


Hattabnrg 


51 

195 

47 

18 

768 
236 
18 
10 
14 
67 
70 
20 
26 
8 


1 

i 
1 


3 

1 







39 


PLktrnvma 

Saraoae 

Sehnjlo' Falls 


2 


4 
1 


136 
35 
12 


COLUMBU COUNTY 


12 

6 


/ 




696 


HrMON 




174 


Ancmn. ... 




13 


Ausierlita 








8 


Canaan 


i 

1 


1 










1 
- • - • • 

41 
4i 

ll 

1 

2 

2 

2 

6 

1 

2; 

6 

2 

13 
1 

4 

'• 

1 

1 
2 

1 


13 


Chatham 








54 


CkTcraek 

Clcnnoot 

Copake 






3 

..' ;.■ 2 

1 


56 
19 
21 


Gabatia 


1 
1 




4 




22 , 
54 
15 
22 

6-^' 

20 . . 

20 

47 








1 
1 

2 

1 
2 

1 


21 


Ghent 


. 






45 


Grccnpoft 

HJlUale 
Kinderbook 


2 








* 
.... 


11 
18 
46 


Lirinaion 

Nev Lebanon 


• 1 
. 1 










1 


16 
15 


Stockport 


... 1 








] 


35 


StuyreMnt 

Taghkanir 

CORTLAND COUNTY 


25 
11 

628 
15 

219 
16 

•* 

11 
22 
49 

8 
23 

111 
15 


t 


1 

i2\ 
1 




1 

2 2 


1 


2 
1 

3 8 



. ' 2' 
•• 2, 4 

1 


20 
6 

U6 
14 


Cortlaodville 

COBTlAlffO 


1 

1 9 




. ... 


1 
2 

1 
■ 2 


8' 
14 

i 

2 

1 

2! 

■■ '21 
1' 
. 1 


45 
184 


Cttyler 

Freetown 


.... 




1 




15 
6 


Harford 
HooMr 


1 1 


.... 


1 
1 


9 

18 


Htmer 

Lapefr 


2 


1 




1 


40 
5 


Marathon 

Pktble 

Scott 


-.'■■■ 

1 






20 
10 
10 



100 



Statk 1)ki»aimmi:nt of TIeai.th 



liecord of each reporting local hoard of health, showing total 

deaihs, etc, — (Continued) 

(Cities are printed in small caps, villagci in ifolict ani towni in Ram in t/no.) 



COUNIT AND 

REGISTRATION 

DISTRICTS 


AU deaths 


Cerebrospinal 

moiingitis 


1 


Malarial diseases 


Scarlet fever 


J 


Whooping cough 


Diphtheria 


Diarrhea (under 2 
yean) 


Tuberculosn 

of lungs 


t3 

Ni4 


Cancer 


CORTLAND COUNTY 
—{CmHnwi) 
Solon 


11 
9 
18 
22 
12 

7U 
41 
11 
45 
26 
45 
9 

46 
20 
70 
17 






Taylor 

















TruxUm 












1 


1 








Virgil 












1 








Wifiett 












1 










DELAWARE COUNTY. 
Andes 


t 

i 


/7 
2 




5 


.... 

It 
3 


11 
2 


4 


16 


V 
3 


SI 
1 


4fi 
1 


Bovina 








2 


Colchester 


3 

1 






1 




1 




1 


2 
? 
3 


Davenport 


1 




Ddhi 






1 






4 


3 


Deposit 














Fn^nklin 




1 






1 
1 






1 


? 

1 






4 












Hancock 









1 




2 


4 


? 


fi 


Harpersfield 











1 


1' 1 


Kortaight 


20 
















i 

1 


3 

1 


1 
..... 

4 

? 
, 4 
5 
2 
5 

79 
27 

1 


Maaonville 


13 
19 
















1 


Meredith 
















Middletown 


76 
35 
72 


1 


1 






1 
4 


4 
2 




? 


2 
2 
5 
I 

\ 

ISO 
35 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
3 
6 
2 


1 

] 

IS 
2 




Roxbury 






Sidney 




3 

4 
1 
1 

IS 
5 








2 


Stamford 


46 










Tompkinii , 


26 

88 

466 
30 
15 
20 
37 
24 
58 
67 
41 


4 

2 




... 1 


2 




1 


Walton 


t 


1 

6 




DUTCHESS COUNTY. 

PoUOHKKEPSn 


5 
1 
1 


9 
7 


IS 

4 


69 
21 

1 


Amenia 






Bedcman 






Clinton 
















1 
2 

1 
8 

1 


1 
..... 


1 
1 


Dover 








4 








EastFishkill 














1 


Fishkill 














2 


2. 


Fishkill Landing 




1 








1| 3! 


HydePftrk 






1 




2! li 


T^^Gr^ngf , , 


15 
122 






1 
I 






1 
5 




1 
6 
1 
4 
5 
1 
1 
4 
4 
2 
1 
1 
2 
5 
4 

S74 
305 
3 
3 
7 
1 
4 

3 


MaUmwan 














10 


4 


Mili^n 


13 
44 
41 

24 




"i 











North East 






1 






2 

3 
1 
1 

2 

1 

■•■2 


i 
2 

1 
4 

16 
4 

I 

3 
1 

7 
5 

eo8 

510 
7 
3 
4 


• • * . 

■ 1 
..... 

. • • • • 

• • ■ • - 

16 
3 

• • • • • 


Ptwling 






■ 






Pine Pfiiins 




1 


i F 


Pleasant Valley 


34 
68 




... . J 
1 


1 




PcNighkeeneie 




1 


1 


Red^Hook' 


52, 

651 

35 1 


2 
2 


.'.'... 1 








Rhinebeck 






2 


Stanford 


1 1 




Union vale 


11 
30 
51 
69 


- 




1 






WapiHnger 







1 









1 
4 


3 
2 

1 

264 
5 
4 
6 


Wappinger Falls 

Wasnington 


1 


1 




i 




1 




ERIE COUNTY 

BUPPALO 


8,658 

6.877 

106 

49 

65 

26 

16 

S3 

111 


19 

14 




86 

78 

3 




tS7 
223 


tst 

97 


86 

80 

1 


18S 

163 

1 


ToifAWANDA 


Akleo 








Anihcfflt 
















Aurora 














1 
1 
1 
8 
1 


Boston 














I 
1 

11 
3 


1 

1 
9 

1 


""2 


Brant 








1 

5 

. . • • • 






Cheektowaga 


...... 


1 






i 


Clarence 


37 


.,,,,, 



10 
9 
17 
22 
12 

667 
29 

8 
36 
21 
34 

9 
36 
18 
53 
14 
15 
10 
18 
69 
25 
56 
34 
19 
73 

i,its 

362 
26 
13 
15 
29 
20 
42 
55 
35 
13 
97 
U 
36 
31 
20 
27 
45 
39 
55 
22 
7 

22 
32 
58 

6,318 
5,127 
83 
39 
49 
24 
9 
27 
79 
99 



Division of Vital Statistics 



161 



Record of each reporting local hoard of health, showing total 

deaihs, etc. — (CSantinued) 



[Cities are piinted in small OAn, rillaffes in UdUa and towns in Roman type.] 






COUNTY AND 

BB0I8TRATI0N 

DlirrHICTS 


1 

3 


Cerebrospinal 

meningitis 


8 
J 

1 




b 

I 


s, 


1 


1 


1 

>% 

A 


Tuberculosis 

of lungs 


1 


1 


b 

o 

3 


ERIE COUNTY— 
(CofKiaiMf) 
CoWen 


14 
35 
53 
85 
41 
28 
37 
25 
54 
16 
85 
16 
397 
3? 
67 
23 
56 
28 
22 
27 
14 
63 

6^3 




1 
6 
2 
8 


13 


CoDiM 










1 








1 

1 

16 
2 


2 
5 
2 


5 
..... 

6 
3 


20 


Concord 


1 
3 






..... 






44 






. • • • . 


6 


• 8 


2 




47 


Eatt Awitra 






33 


Ea«t Hamburg 








1 








1 
3 
3 
5 




23 


Eden 




1 




2 






2 


29 


KYma 










"i 


1 
7 


21 


K*siw 










1 






2 


35 


Grand Island 








..A. 






16 


Hunburg 


1 


1 
1 

1 






1 




3 


2 


7 
1 

18 
2 
6 


1 

1 

1 

..... 


1 
2 
8 
1 

4 
1 
3 
3 

2 

1 

t8 
3 
3 
1 
2 
2 


69 


Holland 






U 


hadnwfum/n 




14 

2 

1 


23 

1 
2 


1 


7 


98 

1 
6 


230 


lAncairtfr 


25 


Lonevttr 








48 


Marina 












22 


Newstcad 
















2 
..... 


8 
2 

i 


4 
..... 


39 


North Collins 














1 


22 


Sardinia 










1 




19 
















24 


Wales 
















1 
5 

1 


11 


West Seneca 








1 






1 


4 

57 
3 
6 

1 
1 
2 
3 
3 
1 

'■' io 
1 

9 


IB 

" z 
3 

1 


51 


ESSEX COUNTY 


5 


6 




5 


6 


991 


Cbepterfiekl 


36 
19 








30 


Crown Point 

















27 


Eliaabethtown 




1 












1 


12 


Easez 


25 
36 
13 
13 
17 
11 
138 

2 
27 

8 
10 














19 


Jsy 


1 


1 






2 

1 








27 


Keene 










1 
3 


8 


hakgPlaeid 








^ 










7 


Lewis 
















1 
1 
3 


1 

"l 
1 


14 


Minerva 














1 
9 


■'15 


9 


Moriah 




3 








2 


95 












North Elba 


I 










2 




1 


14 


North Hudson 














% 




















3 
1 
9 
2 
2 






7 


Scbroon 


15 
63 
30 


















"2 

....^ 


1 
2 
1 
3 
2 

St 
2 

..... 

1 


13 


Tioonderoga 




1 








1 


..... 


2 

..... 


46 


Weatport 


26 


Willsboro 


25 

18 

8»S 
21 
30 


• • • . 












15 


Wilmington 


1 
/ 












1 

11 
1 
2 


14 


PRANKLIN COUNTY.. 


10 






i7 


t8 


58 
3 
2 


in 

2 
2 


»0 
"l 


sot 








13 


Bmucot 




2 






1 




20 


Pefanont 


27 








24 


Boabay 


36 

16 
23 
48 
32 
25 
3 

32 
22 
13 
108 
75 
4S 












2 


• • • • ■ 


4 

1 

1 


6 


1 


22 


Braodoo 




1 




1 


6 


Brighton 










5 
3 
1 
5 

1 






10 


Burke 




2 








1 




• • « . • 

1 
3 

1 


3 

2 

..... 


14 


Chateaugay 










4 


40 


Constable.' 












1 
2 


■ • • • ' 


S3 


Didcinson 












2 


• • • • • 


18 


Duant 












3 


Fort Corington 


1 










2 


.... 

1 
.... 


1 
1 
1 
5 
6 
2 


3 
6 
4 

16 
7 
1 




1 
1 


24 


FrtokUn 










13 


Harriettatown 














7 


MoUmt 




2 
3 







2 
5 

4 


1 
3 
2 


6 

4 
1 


4 
6 

1 


72 


Malooe 


41 


Moira 






31 


Santo Clara 


2 


^ 


2 



6 



162 



State Department of Health 



Record of each reporting local hoard of health, showing total 

dealhs, etc. — (Continued) 

[Cities are printed in small caps, villages in iialiet and towns in Roman type.] 



COUNTY AND 

REGISTRATION 

DISTRICTS 



FRANKLIN COUNTY- 

{Contin\t/td) 

Saranac Lakt 

TvpperLake 

Waverlv 

Westville 

FULTON COUNTY... 

Glovbrsvillk 

Bleecker 

Broadalbin 

Caroga 

Ephimtah 

Johnstown 

Johnstown 

MayfieW 

Northampton 

Oppenheim 

Perth 

Stratford 

GENESEE COUNTY.. 

Alabama 

Alenmder 

Baiavia 

Batavia 

Bergen 

Bethany 

Bsrron 

Darien 

Elba 

Le Roy 

LeRoy 

Oakfield 

Pftvilion 

Pembroke 

Stafford 

GREENE COUNTY... 

Ashland 

Athens 

Cairo 

Catakill 

CaUkiU 

Coxsackie 

Durham 

Greenville 

Haloott 

Hunter 

Jewett 

Lexington 

New Baltimore 

Prattsville 

Windham 

HAMILTON COUNTY 

Arietta 

Benson 

Hope 

Indian Lake 

Inlet 

Lake Pleasant 

Long Lake 

Morehouse 

Wells 



1 


B 
'1 


1 


^ 


1 

1 


1 

2 
2 


c 
'1 

3 
1 


i 

•a 

Q 

1 
2 


u 

b 

2 
4 

1 


1 


9 

' 1 
*1 

14 
6 


J 

4 

1 
2 

4e 

15 


150 
50 
39 
19 

ere 

321 

6 

29 

11 

29 
143 
39 
34 
25 
15 
7 
13 

689 
31 
28 

206 
30 
35 
30 
20 
19 
11 
47 
24 
17 
25 
44 
22 

628 
^ 8 
41 
41 
68 
96 
72 
32 
26 

4 
46 

7 
11 
33 
14 
29 

66 
4 
1 
3 
8 
5 

11 

10 


14 




99 

10 

2 

1 

40 
16 


































4 
2 


•f • ■ ' 


1 


4 
4 


/ 


5 
3 


14 
















2 


3 
2 
1 

11 
5 
1 
1 


• • • • > 

2 


..... 

4 








ft. . . . 












.... 












"■3 

..... 


2 

13 
2 
2 
1 
2 




1 












7 
2 
1 




























1 


















1 














. • . • « 




























2 

IS 
2 

"■3 

1 


1 

S6 
2 
1 

17 
2 
3 


/ 


8 


t 




6 




5 


t4 
2 

1 
9 

1 


ee 

3 
2 
7 
2 
1 
2 
















1 


4 


2 




3 




2 

1 
















1 
































1 












1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 




1 


..... 

3 

1 














1 






1 






4 


2 










































3 

1 
1 

61 

1 

4 

5 

10 

15 

. 6 

3 

2 


..... 
2 
6 

« • • • • 

. .. 

■ 3 


1 
1 
3 

St 

1 
1 
4 
3 
5 
4 
3 
2 










1 








1 

to 

1 















5 


t 




15 


> . • . . 














1 
1 
5 
1 
4 





















2 
3 
















• • • ■ " 



















2 
2 


..... 














1 
1 


























1 




1 


7 


























1 






1 
2 
2 
3 

6 

1 




I 


1 

1 
2 

4 

f 














1 
... . 

5 
1 










1 
















5 








































































1 


"l 
2 




1 
































. . , 






3 












I 












....: 




..... 










2 


1 


1 



s 



39 
29 
34 
17 

6Sr 

260 

6 

18 

9 

26 
108 
30 
29 
22 
12 
7 
10 

22 
24 
158 
23 
31 
27 
20 
16 
8 
34 
21 
16 
20 
37 
15 

400 
5 

35 
31 
48 
72 
57 
24 
16 
3 

37 

7 

8 

29 

9 

19 

41 
2 
1 
3 

6 
4 
9 
6 



Division of Vital Statistics 



163 



Record of each reporting local hoard of health, showing total 

deaihs, eic. — (Continued) 

(Citiea are printed in small caps, villages in italiea and towns in Roman type.] 



COTT^TY AND 

REGISTRATION 

DISTRICTS 


1 

3 


'3 

la 
1 

s 


1 

1 Typhoid fever 


•a 


1 

1 

4 


8 

1 

5 


1 

7 
1 


Diphtheria 

• Ot 


1 
|1 

Q 
55 


TuberottkNns 

of lungs 


\ 

z 

d 
^•* 

15 
2 


1 

40 

3 

1 


1 

< 


HERKIMER COUNTY 
Cohimbia 


869 
26 
8 
13 
25 
56 
55 

121 
35 
90 

u 

194 

8 

21 

21 

10 

4 

42 
27 
10 
19 
17 
18 
6 
29 

1,S6S 
468 
73 
67 
40 
51 
36 
57 
36 
59 
73 
22 
36 
44 
18 
30 
32 
25 
35 
18 
32 
39 
11 
46 
5 

S74 

32 

43 

38 

8 

9 

5 

12 

32 

68 

13 

26 

6 


1 


64 

1 


rot 

18 


Dmnibf^ 










7 


Fairfield 






















13 


Frmnkf ort 


















2 
3 
2 
5 
6 
4 


1 
1 

..... 


1 
1 

e 

7 

•••j, 

2 

5 


20 


Frankfort 










1 




1 


42 


German Flats 










46 


Btrkiwur 










2 


1 


1 


102 


ff crKfmcr 










28 


JliOH 


1 






1 




1 






78 


Litchfield 


9 


Ltttlb Taus 




1 




3 




2 


..... 


11 


10 


3 


159 


Little F^ 


7 


Manbeim 
















3 

1 

i 

2 
4 

1 






17 
















1 


1 
1 




17 


Norway 














8 


Ohio 
















3 


Russia 


















2 
2 


3 

1 


33 


Salisbury 
















19 


Schuyler 












1 

1 


• • . • • 


. 7 


Stark 












1 


1 
2 

1 


16 


Warren 














1 


2 
6 

1 


12 


Webb 
















u 


Wihnurt 


















5 


WinfifM 














1 

5 
3 






3 

73 

23 

6 

6 

1 

■ 1 
1 
3 
4 
2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
3 


25 


JEFFERSON COUNTY. 


t 

1 


SP 
24 

1 
1 
1 


1 


/ 


55 

15 

1 

•7 




45 

20 

2 

2 

I 


69 
21 
4 
5 
3 
2 
4 
3 
1 
5 
2 
4 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 


ts 

4 

1 

1 

1 

..... 

2 
3 

4 

"3 
..... 


1.064 
357 


Adams 






59 


Alexandria 






47 


Antwerp 










33 


BrownviDe 












47 


Cape Vincent 






3 








28 


Cartiiao* 




2 










4 
2 


46 


Champion 






1 






27 


Clayton 




2 












44 


EHkburg 










65 


Henderson 














. 2 


15 


Houi^eld 














28 


LeRoy 


• -*•••• 


1 






8 

1 






1 
1 
1 
3 

1 


37 


Lorraine 










14 


Lyme 






25 


Orleans 




2 






1| 




22 


Pamelia 






22 


Philadelphia 


















34 




. 









1 


1 
1 


1 
1 
1 




3 
3 
8 

"3 


13 


Rntland 




1 
1 






1 

■ ■ ■ ' * 

1 


2 

1 


..... 
1 


23 


Thftesa 






26 


Watcrtown 


10 


Witaa 

Worth 


i 


3 










. . . 




2 


38 
4 


LEWIS COUNTY 


t 










; 


10 

1 


rr 

1 

6 

7 

1 


14 
2 

1 
3 


te 

1 

2 

1 
1 


t9i 


Croglnn. 










27 


Pmmark 
















34 


Diana 


















27 


Qm^ 


















6 


HarrinMinr, .......... 
















1 


8 


High Maitet 




















1 
2 
3 
5 

1 
5 


4 


Lews 
















1 

3 
2 






9 


Lerden 














1 


1 
5 

i 


2 


26 


LowviDt "..'..! 




1 










54 


L^oosdale. 

MartinrtrarR 












10 




1 












19 


Montague 














6 



164 



State Department of Health 



Record of each reporting local hoard of health, showing total 

deaths, etc. — (Continued) 

[Cities are printed in bmall caps. TiUaffni in UaHet and towns in Roman type.] 



county and 

registration 

districts 



LEWIS COUNTY— 

(CvnHnuei) 

New Bremen 

Oic«ola 

Pindmey 

Turin 

Wataon 

West Turin 

LIVINGSTON COUNTY 

Avon 

Caledonia 

Conesus 

GeneMO 

GroveUmd 

Leicester 

Lima 

Livonia 

Mt. Morris 

m.Mam» 

North Dansville 

DamvilU 

Nuoda 

Ossian 

Portage 

Sparta 

Sprinffwater « . . 

West Sparta 

Yorlc 

MADISON COUNTY .. 

Brookfiftki 

CanatU^a 

Caienovia 

DeRnyter 

Eaton 

Fenner 

Geovptown 

Hamuton 

Lebanon 

Lenox 

Lincoln 

Onvida 

Madison 

Nslson 

Smithfield 

Stockbridge 

Sullivan 

MONROE COUNTY. . . 

ROCHBSTBH 

Brighton 

chm; 

Clarkson 

Pttirport 

Gates 

Greeoe 

Hamlin- 

Henrietta 

Irondequoit 

Mendon 

Ogdso 

Panaa 

PenfieJd 

PerintoB 



I 



16 
3 
8 
10 
22 
23 

690 

51 

39 

13 

42 

12 

17 

32 

30 

13 

58 

U 

74 

42 

7 

8 

7 

16 



30 

619 
35 
62 
65 
25 
54 
8 
17 
61 
15 
22 
10 

118 
32 
16 
10 
20 
49 

8,9St 
3.084 
42 
15 
23 
48 
52 
127 
18 
28 
40 
. 44 
49 
35 
27 
52 



SB 
30 



J 



S4 

47 

1 



8 
1 



t 



15 



IS 
10 



1 



I 



4i 

34 

1 



.•« 



1 
1 

«5 
1 
2 



1 



1 
1 
8 



fO 
1 
3 



1 



976 

203 

5 



2 
3 

42 
1 
2 
2 
1 
3 



10 



H 
1 
8 
2 
1 
2 



8 

919 
277 

8 



2 
3 
5 



77 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 



99 
17 



2i 



2 



99 
2 
1 
8 
2 



8 
5 
4 
3 
2 
1 
8 
5 



965 
213 
3 
1 
3 
2 
8 
5 
3 
3 



13 

3 

6 

8 

19 

17 

45 

31 

9 

33 

12 

14 

28 

25 

10 

41 

11 

59 

38 

5 

6 

6 

15 

6 

27 

SOS 
20 
47 
58 
19 
49 

7 
12 
49 
13 
16 
10 
88 
26 
12 

7 
19 
42 

9,865 
2.228 
24 
18 
18 
41 
41 
73 
12 
23 
26 
31 
44 
31 
22 
39 



Division of Vital Statistics 



165 



Record of each reporting local board of health, showing total 

deaihsj etc. — (Continued) 



(CitiH are priatei in small cam, villaffee in iiaUa and towna 


m Roman type.] 






COUNTY AND 

REOTSTRATION 

DISTRICTS 


1 

3 


•3 

e 


1 


1 


1 

1 


1 


{ 


1 


C9 

• 

2 

1 


•8^ 


1 

..... 


I 

3 

3 

1 
1 
4 
3 
3 

57 
15 
3 
3 
2 
1 
3 
2 
3 
3 
..... 

1 

6f 
27 
10 
17 
2 
6 

5, TOP 
1,915 

323 
1,212 

185 
74 

68 
12 
14 

1 
1 
3 
3 
2 


1 

t 
1 


MONROE COUNTY— 

(CoatffiiMd) 
Pittrfoid 


48 
26 
20 
21 
50 
51 
32 

994 
540 
54 
59 
10 
17 
45 
34 
61 
46 
. 52 
27 
49 

t.iss 

457 

278 

311 

41 

46 

78,760 

38.668 

6.968 

25,676 

3,971 

1,467 

i.m 

299 
551 
15 
28 
41 
62 
42 
16 
15 
30 
70 
34 
15 
160 
26 

i,6se 

1.297 

411 

17 

24 

57 
16 
52 
15 






1 


2 


1 

1 


2 
1 


38 


Rin 




1 








19 


TiaOi 










18 


Sweden 














1 






20 


BaOOKFOBT 




1 
1 












■ 1 
3 

1 

101 

89 

4 

2 


2 
2 
1 

60 

32 

5 

3 


1 
2 

7 
2 

"2 


41 


W^jetv 




1 






1 
1 

a 

1 


38 


Wbealiand 




1 

10 
8 


25 


MONTGOMERY CO... 
AMsmoAii - - 


1 


10 

7 

1 




6 

4 
1 


• • . • . 

i 

1 


747 
369 


Amitardam 


39 




1 


1 


47 


Charleetown. 










8 


Floricb 

















1 
1 
1 
2 






15 


Glen 
















1 
1 
3 
4 
5 
2 
4 

70 

32 

7 

23 
2 
6 

8,690 
3.976 
1.779 
2,429 
368 
148 

85 

25 

32 

2 


..... 

1 
..... 

P 
3 

1 
4 
1 

see 

162 
26 

144 
24 
10 

14 

1 

6 

..... 


40 


Minden 
















30 


fori Phin 




2 












51 


Mohawk 










1 


37 


Palntm 




• 








1 


45 


Root 
















24 


StJohnsriUe 














1 


1 

9t 
34 
29 
20 
3 
6 

6,656 

2.904 

316 

1.996 

335 

104 

85 
11 
45 


42 


NASSAU COUNTY 

HempBtead 

North Hempatead 

Oyster Bay 


t 

1 

i 


6 
2 
3 


t 

1 

1 


9 
7 
2 


f 

* 2 


6 
2 
2 
2 


^ 14 
5 

4 
4 

1 


859 
343 
219 
238 


BodniB* denkr 








32 


mT^^V^^m 


994 

177 

29 

72 

12 

4 

6 

1 
2 


1 

658 

26» 

41 

19g 

3» 

11 

*i 

3& 










27 


NEW YORK, CITY OF 

Bor. of Madliattan 

Bor. of Bronx 


te 

71 

3 

13 

3 


95t 

448 

75 

384 

33 

12 

16 
3 
5 


774 

271 

45< 

422 

3(V 

& 

19- 

3 

14 


M94^ 

154 

23 

92 

21 

4 

It 

"9 


1,715 
898 
136 
558 
104 
19 

t2 

4 
10 


55,777 

27.487 

4.172 


Bor. of Brooklyn 

Bor. of Queens 

Bar. of Riehaiond 

NUCTARA COUNTY... 

LOOKPOST 


18.156 
2.827 
1.075 

1.047 
237 


NiAOAKA Falls 


384 
12 


Hsrtbmi 








1 










25 


Lewiiton 


2 








1 




1 
1 
1 

1 


'"■3 
3 
3 

1 


31 


Loekfort 






1 




54 


New^ 














36 


Ntagm 




■ 1 








1 




12 


Pendleton .......... 


- 








4 

3 
3 
3 

1 
6 
2 

'^ 

23 

1 
1 
1 
6 
1 
3 
1 


11 


Forter 




1 
1 




2 










i 
2 
3 

1 

8 

1 

187 
91 
26 


""5 
..... 

35 
18 

7 


23 


RoyahoB 


> • • • • 


I 


1 


2 

1 

1 

21 


55 






1 




26 


Wheatfield 




1 
& 










11 


N. TOHAWAMDA 

Wibm 




3 


2 




7 


107 
23 


ONEIDA COUNTY. . . . 

Utica 1 


6 
5 


5 


/ 


i 


IS 

11 

3 


19 

14 

2 

1 


5a 

14 
10 


les 
100 

27 


i.m 

971 


R(k|ft . . 






309 


AnnffTiDe 






15 


Aiimla 














1 


3 


1 


18 


Ava 








1 

. . , , , 1 






7 


















1 


3 




47 


BndgBwatv 












3 


12 


OBuim...../. ...... 










L 

..... 1 




3 


8 
2 


1 


36 


DMrMd 







::::: .::;:i 







12 



166 



State Depabtment of Health 



Record of each reporting local board of health, showing total 

deaihs, etc. — (Continued) 

[Cities are printed in small caps, villaises in italiet and towng in Roman tjrpe.t * 



COUNTY AND 

REGISTRATION 

DISTRICTS 


1 

3 


.5 

•| 

c 

'1 
1 


J 

.•2 
1 




1 

1 


i 


Whooping cough 

1 


1 


1 

1 


,•8 
5 


..... 


1 
1 
3 
3 
2 
1 
1 
6 
1 
1 


1 


ONEIDA COUNTY— 

(Continued) 
Florence 


• 

15 
10 
19 
56 
10 
13 
25 
01 
, 37 
28 




1 
1 
2 
4 


11 


Floyd 












7 


Forestport 


1 1 






1 










12 


Kirkland 










2 


1 


46 


Lee 














17 


Marcy 






















12 


Marshal] 


















2 
7 
3 
5 


..... 


22 


New Hartford 














1 


6 
2 


71 


Paris 






1 








29 


HftniffTi , ....... 










1 




21 


Rome 


















Sangerfield 


16 
13 
25 
38 
44 
28 
22 
33 
107 

S,0S8 
2,124 
36 
29 
29 
48 
47 
49 
26 
10 
13 
46 
52 
87 
27 
141 
18 
33 
45 
53 
77 
11 
24 
33 

781 
16 
11 
16 

157 

25 

23 

7 

175 
17 
30 

116 
17 
54 
17 
33 




















2 


2 
1 
2 
3 
2 
5 


12 


Steuoen 
















3 

1 


1 
2 
8 
4 
1 
2 
4 


189 

123 

' 2 


8 


Trenton 
















10 


Vernon 




1 
1 












SI 


Verona 












1 


36 














23 


Western 


















20 


Westmoreland 


6 
5 


1 
2 

6S 
38 








• 






■■"3 

51 
15 

..... 

..... 

3 


2 
2 

17S 

125 

1 

'■"4 
4 
2 

1 
2 


26 


Whitestown 








1 

7 
4 


S6 
25 


15 

198 

166 

3 


76 


ONONDAGA COUNTY. 
Stra cubx 




te 

22 


If 

9 


9,Si7 
1.692 


CamilhiB 


30 


Cicero 


i 


1 
1 












24 


Clav 














1 
2 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
5 
1 
25 


22 


De Witt 








1 

1 






40 


Bast Svraeuu 




2 








..... 


3 


87 


Elbridge 




1 




42 


Fabius 












20 


Geddes 
















1 


8 


La Fayette 
















""2 

2 
2 

1 


1 
3 
2 
7 
2 
6 
2 
1 
3 
1 
3 


11 


Lysaiuler 




3 




2 










83 


BaUwinnUU 


1 
1 






46 


Man lias 




1 




1 






68 


MarceUus 








« 21 


Onondaga 




1 










1 


108 


Otisco 










16 


Pompey 




2 














1 
2 
8 
8 




28 


Salina 






1 






88 


Skaneateles 




2 
1 
1 










47 


Solfay 








1 


8 




45 


Spaff ord 








9 


TuDy 










1 




• • • 


2 

1 

66 
1 
1 
1 

22 


20 


Van Burcn 














4 

36 
1 
1 
1 
4 
1 


16 

1 
2 
1 


27 


ONTARIO COUNTY.. 
Bristol 


/ 


9 

1 




5 


1 


5 


ff 


6tS 
13 


Canadice 














7 


Canandaigua 




1 
2 










1 


9 


Canandaiava 





1 






123 


East Bloomfield 








23 


Farmington 










1 








' 2 


10 


Geneva 














2 
13 
2 
1 
5 




5 


GentM 


1 


3 
1 




2 










2 


11 


ISO 


Oorham 








13 


Honewell 












1 
7 


1 

11 
1 
5 


27 


Manchester 




1 








2 




2 


88 


Naples 








16 


Phelps 














» 


3 


1 

1 
1 


1 


44 


Richmond 
















16 


Seneca 





















l" 3 


20 



Division of VitxVl Statistics 



167 



Record of each reporting local board of health, showing total 

deaths, etc.— (Continued) 

(Cities are printed in small caps, riUa^es in ttitici nnd towns in Roman type.] 



COUNTY AND 

REGISTRATION 

DISTRICTS 



ONTARIO COUNTY 
(Continued) 

Sooth Bristol 

Vtetor 

West Bloomfield 

ORANGE COUNTY.. 

NlWBUKOH 

BflDDLSTOWlf 

Blooming Grove 

Chester 

Com Will 

Crawford 

Deerpsrk 

Port Jenris 

Goshco 

GreeDTiUe 

Hamptoobur^ 

Hi^hlaods 

Mmisink 

Monroe 

MoDtg(»nery 

Mount Hope 

Newborgh 

New Windsor 

Tuxedo 

WallWl 

Warwick 

Wawayaada 

Woodbury 

WaUUn 

ORLEANS COUNTY. 

Albion 

Albion 

Barre 

Carlton 

Clarendon 

Gaines 

HoDcy 

KendaU 

Murray 

Ridgeway 

iMna 

Shelby 

Yates 

OeWBOO COUNTY.. 

OawMO 

AlbioQ 

Amboy 

Boylston 

Coostaatia 

Granbv 

Hannioal 

HMtinp 

M«doo 

N««HaT«D 

OrweU 

Oivego 

Pklorno ^. 

VviA 

BedMd...'. 

RieUand 

Sandy Creek 



I 



9 

38 
20 

t,OOS 

610 

275 

26 

32 

93 

27 

35 

170 

124 

8 

22 

62 

25 

50 

47 

37 

76 

51 

60 

40 

121 

26 

39 

49 

496 
85 
35 
25 
37 
25 
27 
11 
19 
52 
23 

101 
28 
28 

t,lt7 
385 
24 
11 
10 
27 
22 
30 
41 
73 
19 

7 
46 
18 
25 

9 
60 
39 



f7 

12 

4 



18 
12 



16 
3 
3 






IS 
6 



i 



14 
4 



2 



II 
6 



it 

5 
2 
1 



1 
2 
1 

86 

25 

1 



3 
1 
3 
2 
2 
6 
4 
5 
1 
6 
1 
5 
3 

17 
6 



4i 

18 

3 



167 
60 
27 



4 

7 

1 

4 

11 

11 



2 
1 
2 
4 

1 

10 
5 
2 
6 
3 
9 



3 
6 

66 
9 
6 
1 
2 
4 
3 
2 
1 
3 



tt 

5 
1 



// 



19 



98 

26 

16 

3 



1 



10 
9 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
6 



64 
6 
2 
4 
1 
2 
4 



. • • > • 


1 


4 


3 


1 


1 




8 




1 


1 


1 



66 

20 

1 



I 

I 

3 



5 
83 
14 

1,660 
372 
220 
22 
23 
72 
22 
29 
136 
96 
6 
19 
49 
19 
36 
39 
24 
69 
42 
46 
82 
88 
17 
29 
34 

669 
61 
26 
18 
80 
17 
18 
9 
16 
40 
20 
85 
24 
26 

90S 

812 

17 

10 

8 

24 

16 

26 

84 

64 

14 

7 

40 
14 
20 
6 
64 
31 



168 



State Depaetment of Health 



Record of each reporting local hoard of health, showing total 

deaths, etc. — (Oontinued) 

(Citie* are orinteH in an ux cam, Tillaffei in UaMct and towns in Roman type.) 



COUNTY AND 

RBOISTRATTON 

DISTRICTS 


J 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


s 


1 

il 


& 

c 


1 

e 

..... 
6 


1 


i 

8 


OSWBOO COUNTY- 
Sohro^pd 


43 
23 
37 
155 
12 
11 

84B 
11 
8fl 
2S 

22 
18 
24 
23 
31 
51 
82 
2? 
12 
12 
181 
32 
27 
68 
10 
12 
45 
20 
20 
47 
8 
40 

46 
18 
16 
W 
15 
M 
50 

tjst 

1.5fl7 
23 
32 
27 
13 

m 

35 
87 
36 
15 
13 
38 
16 
27 
72 
69 
24 




1 
1 

3 
13 


s« 


Seriba 
















3 


18 


Volney 


1 


1 
1 












30 


PrTLTOIf 






1 


1 


3 


7 


116 


Went Monroe 






11 


Williamstown 
















1 

81 

1 


1 

tr 
..... 

2 
2 
2 
2 
1 


61 
1 


8 


OTSEGO COUNTY.... 
Burlincton 




4 




/ 


/ 


/ 


t 


fff 


70S 
9 


Butternuts 


















34 


Chemr Valley 




















24 


Decatar 








1 










■ 


4 


EHmeston 


















1 


17 


Exeter 


















15 


Hartwiek 














2 


1 


2 

1 
3 
5 
2 
1 


17 


lianrens 




1 










21 


Maryland 












2 


■'2 


I 


25 


Mi^dlefield 
















40 


MUfoid 


















SO 


Morris 




















3 
3 
2 
13 
1 
2 
4 


18 


New Lbbon 
















2 


7 


Oneonta 




1 
2 
















9 


OlfBOMTA 












9 

1 
1 


6 

1 

3 


..... 

2 
4 


150 


Oteito 








28 


Otseco 














22 


x^Of^WT^^O^W^ ••••>#•••.. 
















47 


Pittsfirid 


















10 


PWnfield 


















1 

1 
1 
1 


1 
1 


"2 


10 


Richfield 
















1 


40 


Roaehoom 


















19 
21 


8i!)nn<'fi(wl 










1 


1 






2 

1 


3 


UnadiBa 












2 


3 


41 


Weetford 
















R 


Worcester 
















3 

// 
2 


1 

18 
2 
4 
3 
3 


3 

6 
2 


2 
18 


40 


PUTNAM COUNTY.... 






f 


/ 


f 




/ 


i08 


Cannd 






5 35 


Kent 
















1 


13 


Patterson 










1 






2 
2 


10 


Philipetown 






1 








2 


1 


57 

' 13 

41 


Putnam Valler 






1 


1 






South East 










1 


2 
3 

8t 
67 


2 
4 

t$8 

176 
3 
2 


2 

1 
..... 


8 


Cold Spring 






1 
/ 








3 39 


RENSSELAER CO 

Trot 


// 



15 


it 

17 


16 
15 


tt 
4 


18 
13 


114 1,700 
83 1,176 


Berlin .• 


3. 16 


Brunswick 














1 


1 
1 


J 
14 


27 


East Qreenbush 














21 


Grafton. . '. 
















12 


RlFSeBLAIR . , 




3 


1 


1 


1 


7 


1 
1 
1 


2 


15 


3 

3 

..... 


no 


Hooeick 


80 


Boontk FalU 


1 






1 






3 

1 


11 
4 
2 


06 


Naasau 










26 


North Oreenbosh 


1 














11 


Petersburg 
















13 


Pittsiown 




1 
2 
1 
1 
3 












1 
2 
1 
2 
1 


8 
1 

4 

7 
1 


..... 

3 
2 
3 




32 


Pbesteakill 




1 








9 


Band Tjike 








24 


Sshashtfeoke 










1 


8i 56 


Behodaok 




2 






1 54 


Btfephflntown 




1 


• • • • • 


11 18 



Division of Vital Statistics 



169 



Record of each reporting local hoard of health, showing total 

deaths, etc. — (Continued) 

[Cittea are pfrinted in small ooe, villaReB in itaUet and towns in Roman type.) 



COUNTY AND 

REniRTRATION 

DISTRICTS 


3 


•B 


1 

i 


4 


1 

1 


1 

4 


1 

i 


1 

4 
2 


1 


1 
5 


1 

7 
2 

■*"8 
2 


S4 
5 
8 
8 
9 
6 


1 


ROCKLAND COUNTY. 
Clarkitown 


668 
99 
97 

133 
97 

122 
21 
52 
47 

i,ssi 

268 

29 

104 

7 

24 
26 
26 
14 
25 
24 
15 
95 
23 
25 
23 
23 
29 
22 
14 
24 
15 
50 
40 
3P 
43 
23 
16 
20 
12 
61 
78 
15 
21 
• 36 
23 

l\076 
74 
31 
11 
40 
46 
8 
12 
22 

'I 

31 
24 
IIT 
41 
39 
1» 
9 


s 


37 
5 
6 
7 
2 
9 
1 
4 
3 

61 
16 
1 
3 
2 
2 
1 


03 
9 

13 
9 
5 

16 
2 
4 
5 

66 
17 

4 


30/ 
73 


HavsUaw 


71 


Onuwetowa 






....*. 


f 

..... 






103 


tiyoA 








2 


2 
1 


..... 


75 


RAinapo 


1 

2 


1 




86 


Svrina VaOm 






16 


StonT Point 


2 










1 


37 
1 
1 
4 


1 
2 

35 
14 

1 
1 

1 
3 

? 


40 


8^€m 










37 


ST. LAWRENCE CO... 

OODKHBBCBO .......... 


9 
t 


ti 

• 




f 

1 


17 


f 


9 

4 


'•SS? 


Praflh* 






27 






1 








1 




87 


Clar« 








4 


CliftoB 


> • • • • • 


1 






1 










19 


CottMi 










i 

1 


4 
5 


20 


DeKaS) 




1 












16 


De Pevster 














10 


Fidwanfa 


1 






1 


2 

1 


■**'j 


1 


2 
2 
1 
6 
1 
2 
1 


17 


Tine 


1 




1 

1 
6 
4 

1 

i 




17 


Fowkr 










IS 


GouTwnear 


t 


1 






f 




1 


4 

2 
2 
1 


6 
4 

1 
..... 

6 


67 








12 


Hermon 














1 


18 


Hopkintm 














21 


litWf^lMM, ^ . . , 
















21 


LasboB 


















23 


LotiigTille 


1 


















2 
1 

1 


19 


Maconb. 


1 
1 












2 

1 


.... . 
1 


9 


Madrid 












20 






■ 




1 




14 


Af OAMIM , 










5 


1 


1 








43 


Morriaioini 


... 

i 








1 
1 

2 
1 


1 


8 
1 
1 
2 


34 


Norfolk 


1 






I 






4 

3 

1 
4 


31 


Oswecatehie 








1 


u 


ParMhTille 








2 
1 




17 


Pkrecfield 










1 




10 


Ptenepont 










8 

1 
6 
6 
2 

8 

1 

74 
5 

1 




1 
2 
4 
4 


16 


PHeaira 




1 

2 
1 














8 


Potsdam 








1 






43 


Pcfnrfani.. . . . 






I 




3 


62 


Ti^jnif 










13 


Rnmfl 


1 














2 


ts 


■'2 

• • • ■ 

66 
4 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
I 
8 
2 

• • 

2 
1 
4 
2 
2 


18 


Stoekhohn 














30 


WaddiagtoD 


















it 


SARATOGA COUNTY.. 
BaUtttnS^ 


4 


2 




H 


li 


i 


7 


4S 
8 


B09 
50 


BallftoB 








26 


CHarHon 


















10 


l/DtSDD HBB 










1 








8 
3 




38 


Corbth 




8 










1 
1 


86 


Day 












5 


Ivdnibttfgh 




















11 


OalvavT. 


















1 
8 


..... 

1 
..... 


17 


















6 


21 


Ha^ty , . u 
















5 






1 




1 
1 










2 
1 
6 

1 
2 


24 


MaHa , 








1 

7 
2 
2 


20 


MtAaniagU 


3 


2 




7 




1 


86 


Maion 






85 


MoffftQ 














1 


82 


NflVvatBikn^fl^|in 














17 


neridaooe 






• • • • • 










1 




8 



170 



State Depabtment of Health 



Record of each reporting local board of health, showing total 

deaihs, etc. — (Oontinuod) 



(Cities are printed in small caps, nllagea in ^ioUu and towns i 


n Roman tjrpe.] 






COUNTY AND 

REGISTRATION 

DISTRICTS 


1 

S3 


.9 

1 

c 

r 


.•2 


X 


£ 

1 


1 


"1 

•1 

1 


1 


04 

A 

1 




3 
1 
5 
1 
1 


o 

6 
1 
22 
4 
3 


s 

1 

=3 
< 


SARATOGA COUNTY- 
(CanHniMd) 
SaratogA 


54 

13 
256 

66 
109 

18 

l,f49 
1,070 
25 
49 
80 
6 
69 

m 

12 
17 
13 
57 
8 
17 
29 
25 
18 
43 
26 
47 
19 
30 
14 
19 

BIS 
19 
8 
63 
59 
20 
14 
16 
16 

S7i 
27 
26 
19 
22 
29 
29 
10 

114 

5 

19 

20 

62 

1,198 

200 

174 

56 

40 




3 
2 

22 
6 

13 


40 


Saratoga Springs 








• 




9 


Saratoga Springa 

Stillwater 


i 

i 


2 




2 
6 
4 


4 


1 


2 


10 
2 
6 
1 

m 

115 


185 
46 


Waterford 


2 
1 

6 
5 








3 


78 


Wilton 






16 


SCHENECTADY CO... 




5 
3 


U 
11 

1 
1 


10 
10 




18 
16 


84 
72 

1 
2 
6 


€ 
4 

..... 


St 
41 
3 
2 
2 
1 
3 

MS 
2 
1 


9tM 
791 


Duanesburg 


20 


Gloiville 














2 
2 


41 


Niskayuna 












1 


19 


Prinoetown 














5 


Rotterdam 


1 








1 

6 


6 


2 
f 


12 
S 


3 

Ml 
2 
2 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 

2 

2 

1 
1 


1 
9 

• • • • ■ 


46 


SCHOHARIE COUNTY. 
Bloiheim 


f 


1 


f 


81S 
8 


Broome 


















14 


Carlisle 


















12 


Cobleskill 




""l 




1 


"i 


1 

1 






..... 

1 

1 
..... 

1 

1 
1 

. • • • • 

2 

9 

1 

* 2 

3 

..... 


■"6 
..... 

2 
2 

""8 
2 
1 
2 
2 

'■'2 

IS 
1 
1 

4 
2 
3 


45 


Concsville 




1 


1 


Esperance 










14 


Fulton 











1 


2 




1 


21 


Gilboa 










22 


Jefferson 




1 












1 

. . . . • 
1 
1 


15 


Middleburs 








1 


1 


35 


Richmondville 










2 


20 


Schoharie 














42 


Seward 












1 




15 


Sharon 






1 










26 


Summit . . , , 
















12 


Wright 








1 






1 


4 


2 
9 


13 


SCHUYLER COUNTY. 




/ 






ff 


177 


Catherine 








17 


Cayuta 


















1 
4 
2 
2 


6 


Dix 












2 




1 
2 

1 


SO 


Hector 




. 








50 


Montour 
















14 


Orange 
















13 


Readmg 




















16 


Tyrone 




1 

1 
















2 

9 
2 


2 

MS 
2 
* 1 
2 
5 
2 


11 


SENECA COUNTY.... 
Covert 


/ 


t 


1 


/ 


1 
1 


« 

8 


1 


SOM 
21 


Fayette 




1 










24 


Junitis 












1 
1 
1 

1 






16 


Lodi 
















1 
2 
2 


..... 


15 


Ovid 
















24 


Romulus 
















25 


Seneca Falls 
















10 


StMca FaUt 






1 


2 




1 




3 


10 


3 


6 


88 


Tyre 






5 


Varick."'.!." 










1 






• 1 








17 


Waterloo 














1 
4 

1 

5 
2 
5 






19 


WaUrUo 


















3 

it 

1 
5 

• 2 


7 

71 
6 
9 
2 

4 


S3 


STEUBEN COUNTY... 

COBNIKO 


5 

i 


18 

8 
6 

1 

■ • • • ■ 


• • • • t 


6 

1 
1 


8 
*'3 


6 

1 




MS 

4 
4 


1,008 
172 


HOSNELL 


141 


Addison 


1 




50 


Avoca 












2 


27 



Division of Vital Statistics 



171 



Record of each reporting local board of health, showing total 

deaths, etc. — (Continued) 

[Citiea M« printed in bmill caps, vUIhoi in UaUn and towu in Roonan type.) 



COUNTY AND 

REGISTRATION 

DISTRICTS 



STEUBEN COUNTY- 
[Cmtinutd) 

B*th 

BaA 

Bradford 

Cnmcron 

Campbell 

Cnnieteo 

Cntoo 

Cohoeton 

« Corainv 

Dnnw iBe 

nemont 

Greenwood 

HwtiviDe 

Hornby 

HomeOiTille 

HowBid 

Jaaper 

IJndley 

Pmttibarg 

PuHeney 

Rathbone 

Thunton 

Troopaburg 

Tuaearora 

Urbaaa 

Wayhnd 

Wayne 

Wert Union 

Wheeler 

Woodhnll 

SUFFOLK COUNTY. 

Babylon 

BMnn 

Brookhaven 

Eaat Hampton 

t%mwyun 

Huntmgton 

bUp 

Patchotut 

Rivcrhead 

SheltiT bland 

Snuthtown 

Southampton 

Sag Harbor 

SouthoU 

SULLIVAN COUNTY 

Bathel 

Callieooo 

Cocheeton 

Delaware 

FalUmrgh 

Forertbvqih 

Fremont 

Hii^iiand 

Liberty 

Lumberlaad 

Mamakating 

Netenink 



g 


J § 


1 

3 


1 


J 

1 


i 


^ 


1 


1 

Jl 


s 

5 ' 


3 

• 


7 
5 


97 


1 


2 
6 
2 


67 
15 


1 




• 






... . 


1 


15 








1 














21 














1 
2 

1 








43 












1 




1 
1 
1 
3 


1 


4 


13 












33 












- 




41 


1 


1 
















3 
1 
8 


9 














30 
















2 


1 




12 
















10 






\ . . . . 
















4 
1 
1 
5 
2 
1 
1 
2 


9 
















3 






8 





















31 
















1 


1 
1 


"3 
2 


27 
















18 


















24 




1 








1 








19 












2 

1 




10 


















12 












1 








1 


15 




















25 
















1 




4 


3 


9 












85 


















1 
..... 

1 


1 
3 
2 


43 










1 ■" 




1 


1 


12 








■ > • ■ ■ 






16 








3 












13 


















20 
















2 

60 
1 
1 


1 

88 
4 
7 
3 

22 


1 

M9 

..... 

5 

8 

2 

1 

• 


78 
7 
1 
3 

12 

4 

. 1 

7 

10 

11 
4 


1,S0S 
67 


/ 


li 


/ 


10 


ti 


IS 


10 
2 


72 






1 


41 


1 










2 
2 
2 




202 


1 
1 

4 

1 
3 






4 


1 
1 


7 


56 






48 


.,... 


1 

"3 

4 


2 
2 


1 
8 
6 
1 
6 
1 
7 
13 
2 
6 

t8 
2 

4 
1 
1 
2 


3 
8 

12 
2 
2 
1 
2 

10 
3 
9 

18t 
1 
2 
1 
1 

17 
1 
2 
3 

111 
1 
8 
2 


166 
191 


1 


1 


50 


1 






77 








1 


2 


9 












58 














3 
f 


1 
1 
4 

1 

18 

1 
1 
1 
1 


..... 

1 
6 

It 

• • • • 

1 
■ 2 


136 










2 
1 


3 
1 
1 

t 


53 










77 

$78 
32 




1 

B 
1 




2 
7 


31 












15 








1 








23 














63 




1 


• • • • > 


4 








5 








27 
















2 






26 
















1 
5 

1 
1 

1 


..... 
"2 


200 


■••••• 


4 








1 


1 


4 

1 


11 


* 






42 





1 












31 




1 






1 


2 



67 
54 

13 
14 
20 
84 
11 
32 
33 

8 
24 
12 
12 

5 

7 
24 
21 
15 
21 
IS 

9 
10 
15 
16 

9 
33 
38 


12 
13 
16 

989 
52 
63 
31 

148 
40 
36 

132 

155 
80 
62 
7 
46 
96 
41 
51 

41S 
27 
23 
11 
20 
37 

4 
23 
22 
72 

8 
32 
21 



172 



State Depaetment of Health 



Record of each reporting local hoard of health, showing total 

deaths, etc. — (Continued) 



(Cities are printed in amall caps, villages in ittdiet and towni in Roman type.) 






COUNTY AND 

REGISTRATION 

DISTRICTS 


1 

S3 


Cerebrospinal 

menin^tis 


1 

"2 
'o 

1 


"3 

a 


1 

1 




8 

1 




§ 

>% 

l| 

6 
3 
1 

// 
3 


,5 


9 

1 

c 

4 
1 


1 
3 


1 

3 


SULLIVAN COUNTY- 
{ConHn\ui) 
Rockland 


60 

101 

16 

S9S 
83 
25 
12 
43 
27 
10 
66 
54 
12 
23 
31 

548 
244 
28 
19 
56 
12 
60 
17 
32 
, 27 
63 

l,46fi 
476 

6 

6^ 
47 

4 
30 

7 

38 
671 
62 
62 
66 
23 
33 
56 
H 
63 
48 
33 
39 
81 
47 
40 

456 
18 
23 
28 
10 
8 
28 
13 
36 

241 




6 

24 
3 

H 
6 
1 


34 


Thompson 




2 




* 1 




67 


Tusten 








12 


TIOGA COUNTY 


1 


f 




/ 






1 


9 
4 
1 


IP 
4 

1 
1 
2 
3 

i 

3 
1 
3 


557 


Waverly.... 






67 


Barton 
















22 


Berkshire 


















11 


Candor 


1 














1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 






89 


Newark Valley 














• ••>•• 

i 

4 

1 
2 


1 
1 
1 

'* 1 


22 


Nichols 
















15 


Owei(o 




2 




1 








60 


Otrego 


• 






45 


Richford 
















n 


Spencer. 














1 


16 


Tioga 














31 


TOMPKINS COUNTY. 
Ithaca 





6 
5 


t 
1 


S 

I 




t 




9 
6 


t9 
16 


17 
6 


il 

5 

4 
7 
1 
6 
1 
5 

"2 

S9 
21 


4S5 
103 


Carcdtne 








23 


Danby 












1 






2 

2 

1 
3 


1 
1 

■ "6 


11 


Drvden 
















46 


EnfieU 


















10 


Groton 
















1 
1 


44 


Ithaca 






1 








14 


I Ansinff 














1 

1 

• 4 

46 


..... 

2 

57 
14 


26 


Newfiekl 


















25 


XJlyHMs *. .. 


3 


1 

t7 
5 












1 

57 
12 


43 


ULSTER COUNTY 

Kingston ; . . . . 


5 


5 

2 


6 
2 


7 
2 


7 
1 
8 
1 


t,lt7 
361 


Denning 


6 


Eeopiu 


1 












• • • • • 

3 


7 
1 




2 
2 


45 


Gardiner 




1 








39 


Hardenburg 












4 


Hurley 


















4 


2 


2 

1 
1 
3 
7 
2 
6 
1 
3 
1 
6 
3 
3 
1 

"2 
1 
2 

U 
..... 

1 
..... 

2 
2 

J 
12 


22 


Kingston 


















6 


Llovd 


1 














1 

3 

■•'2 

1 

3 
1 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

7 


i 

8 

6 

2 

8 

2 

6 

16 

10 

1 

2 

2 

10 

4 

55 


1 

1 
....^ 

..... 

"2 
1 

1 
1 
6 
2 

1 

9 

. 1 


34 


Marblefown 








1 






48 


Marlborough 


2 


2 
3 








1 

1 
2 


44 


NewPalti 


1 








44 


Olive 




1 




41 


Plattekill 








18 


Rochester .....' 


1 
1 
2 












2 

..... 


22 


Roeendale 


1 
1 
2 








1 


45 


Saugerties 








68 


Sniiferiien 










43 


Shaadaken 






1 


1 
1 

1 
1 


2 


40 


Shawanzunk 










27 


Ulster 






1 


1 




31 


Wawarting 




1 
2 


59 


EUentiUe 








37 


Woodstock 










2 

1 


34 


WARREN COUNTY. . . 
Bol^n 


/ 


5 


t 


t 




1 


570 
17 


Caldwell 




1 














3 
2 

1 
1 
2 
2 

1 
1£ 


..... 
""4 


18 


Chester 










1 




23 


Haifflte , 










8 


Horicon 


















6 


Johasbura 


















22 


Luseme 


1 


1 

• • • • 

2 














8 


Queensbury 


•j 


1 
1 










32 


Glen»FaU9 




1 




7 


193 



Division of Vital Statistics 



17a 



Record of each reporting local board of health, showing total 

deaths, etc. — (Continued) 

(Citief art prmted in small cips, TiUaset in Udkt and tow is in Roman tjrpe.l 



COUNTY AND 
RB0I8TRATI0N 
DISTRICTS . 


1 

3 


1 

.9 




1 


1 

1 

1 


s 


1 


i 


1 


a 

a 

9 

5 


c 
1 




• • • • 

1 
4 

2 
2 


1 

3 


WARREN COUNTY- 
(ConHnmd) 
StonT Creek 


13 

3 

36 

796 

47 

47 

7 

27 

100 
74 
87 
89 
14 
30 
17 

25 

9 
44 

30 

8 

96 

757 
85 
31 
30 
24 
38 
17 
30 
35 
33 
36 
71 




1 


11 


Thurman 


















'\ 


Waireuburg 


















2 

6t 
6 

1 
1 


3 


30 


WASHINGTON CO... 

Antrle 




6 




i 


1 


6 


/ 


SO 
1 


6^8 
35 


Cambridge 




1 












43 


Dreeden 














6 


Easton 




1 




2 








1 




2 
1 
2 
A 

5 


21 


Fori Ann 




2 

1 




4 

2 
4 

9 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
3 


2 
3 
4 
4 

5 


27 


Fort Edward 














2 
5 
6 

1 


89 


BudaonFaUt 


1 








57 


GranfiDe 


1 




' ' 








62 


Greenwich 








1 


73 


Hampton 


1 








12 


Hartford 
















1 
1 

1 


1 


27 


Hefaton 










1 






1 


1 


12 


Jackaon 










7 


Kinobury 
















1 

... 

1 

11 
5 
1 

"l 


■ 1 

2 
2 
2 
3 

• 

se 

1 
1 
1 
5 
1 

2 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
3 
2 


21 


Putnam 


















7 


Salcni 












1 






39 


White Creek 




1 








1 


2 


21 


Whitehall 










5 


WkiUhaU 


f 


1 
7 












9 

fe 

1 

2 

1 
1 


8 

9t 
6 

2 

1 


74 


WAYNE COUNTY 

Nt*»k 




t 
.... 


f 
1 


J, 
2 


/ 


ese 

67 


Arcadia 


( 


27 


Sutler 




2 












24 


Galen 










21 


Clydi 


1 












1 


31 


Huron 


15 


















1 

1 
1 
3 
4 

3 

1 
3 

1 
1 
1 
3 

m 

120 
34 

18 
8 
4 

23 

6 
5 
8 
2 


2 

■ 1 
2 

1 

""4 


27 


Maeedon 














2 
3 
2 
2 


30 



















27 


Ontario 






1 

. . . ' 






29 


Palsiyra 




1 












59 


Krpn' . 


35 














30 


Savannah 


22 
65 
32 
46 
63 
75 

4.S7S 

1.266 

433 

69 

110 

72 

280 

91 

79 
















1 
3 

1 
2 
1 
4 

S8S 

180 

36 

3 

14 
14 


18 


Sodui 


■ ■ ■ ■ I 


1 








51 


Walworth 




■ r ■ ■ ■ 










28 


WiffiuDaoa 








1 






42 


Wofcott 


i 


3 










3 

1 

t9 
5 
4 
1 
3 
1 
2 
2 

1 

.... 


■ 2 

6 

tu 

59 
20 
5 
2 
3 
13 
2 
6 
2 
1 
1 


52 


LyOM 


; 1 








2 

\ 

1 
4 


GB 

28 

6 

1 



58 


WF^rrCHESTERCO... 
Yoncm 


5 
1 


S8 
15 


i 

1 


S8 

18 

2 

I 


1 
..... 


S,W5 
831 


Momrr VnKoir 

Bedford 


a: 

1 . .. 


323 
39 


Cortlandt 




i 1 


84 


MAtFmrv 


■" 1 


60 


P$tk4kia.' 




t! ' 


■••2'-- 9 


"s 




" 1 

1 

" 2 


209 


EMtChciter 


3i ....'... . 
11 .... 
1 


72 




■••••• - 1 

1 


58 


Harriion 


59 
57 
24 




1 


47 


Hutin^^^in-Hudmt.... 
Irrinfton 


! !•■■ 


5, .. 

... . |. . . . 



. L . . . 


1 


26 
21 


Lewitboro 


20 


■■■■■| .: ■' 








20 


Mamarooeek 

Mount Pleaaant 

Naw CMtle 


89 1 .... 

264 , 2 

6S 1 1 


• ■ ■ 



1 


1 


9 

5 

23 

2 


9 
59 

4 
24 

2 


1 




2 

1 


65 

148 

46 


NtwRedutU 


342; 

331 


1 






6 


8 


8 
2 


248 


North Caetk 


.... 




26 



174 



State Department of Health 



Record of each reporting local board of health, showing total 

deaths, etc, — (Concluded) 

(Cities are printed in small caps, villages in UaHa and towns in Roman tjrpe.) 



COUNTY AND 

REGISTRATION 

DISTRICTS 


1 
3 


Cerebrospinal 

meningitis 


1 


"3 
'5 

e 

2 


1 
1 


s 


•a 
i 

a 
1 


Diphtheria 


Diarrhea 

(under 2 years) 


Tuberculosis 

of lungs 


9 
C 

..... 

1 


1 

1 
3 
1 
7 
4 


3 


WESTCHESTER CO — 
{Continued) 
North Salem 


22 
79 
17 

167 
26 
15 

209 
49 
10 
17 
84 
5 

281 
51 

468 
38 
32 
22 
42 
12 
14 
31 
9 
23 
• 29 
28 
58 
22 
17 
27 
51 
13 

£80 
18 
25 
11 
41 
19 
24 




1 
9 

3 
15 


20 


North Tarrytovm 


1 






2 






1 


6 


57 


Ossining 










13 


0$sinina .., 




2 






6 


"'2 


8 
1 


6 


127 


Pelham 






18 


Poundridge 












1 

27 

3 




14 


Port CheiUr 


1 


2 






4 


5 





9 
2 


2 

1 


8 
..... 

1 
8 


145 


Rye 






43 


Scarsdale 
















9 


Somen 








1 
1 








1 
3 


4 
6 


..... 


10 


TarrytoitH 




1 




1 


1 


1 


61 


White Plains 


5 


WhU$ PUdM 




5 


1 


J 
1 




1 


3 


18 
2 

18 
2 


16 
6 

IS 
2 


1 
2 

8 


15 

gs 

4 

3 
2 
2 


220 


Yorktown 


40 


WYOMING COUNTY.. 
Arcade 




to 

1 

1 




4 




f 


S91 
29 


Attica 










1 


27 


Bennington 






2 










18 


Castile 




2 
1 










4 

1 


2 


3 


29 


Covington 










1 


9 


EagleT 












1 


1 
2 


12 


Gainesville 








X ■• 








1 


1 


26 


Genesee Falls 














9 


Java 


















2 






21 


Middlebury 










1 






1 
1 
2 




1 
1 
2 


26 


Orangeville 














1 
3 
1 


1 
2 


24 


Perry 




1 












48 


Perry 












21 


Pihe 
















1 




2 

""2 

1 

15 

"2 
1 
1 
1 
3 
3 
.. ... 

1 

2 
33 
11 


14 


Sheldon 




1 

3 














1 


25 


Warsaw 












1 
2 

7 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 




45 


Wethersfield 






1 






..... 

16 
2 


8 

1 


8 


YATES COUNTY 


1 


5 





/ 






£80 


Barrington 








14 


Benton 
















21 


Italy 




















9 


Jerusalem 




1 












2 




36 


Middlesex 












17 


Milo 




1 
2 













1 
5 

1 
3 
1 

14 

245 

68 


1 

4 
1 
1 

■■* 6 
1 


18 


Penn Yon 


70 - . 




1 








1 


54 


Potter 


21 
41 











19 


Stwkey 


1 
















35 


Torrey 


IC . 


1 














7 


State cdsons 

State Hospitals for Insane 


60 
1.934 


















i 


i4 ... 


6 


1 










Other public institutions. . 


378 


2 


2 ... 








1 

















Division of Vital Statistics 



175 



Deaths by Causes 1885 to Date 



YBAR 



1885. 

1886. 

1887. 

1888. 

1889 

1890, 

1891. 

1892 

1893. 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 



AU 
deaths 



80.407 
86.801 
108.269 
114,584 
113,155 
128.648 
129,850 
131.388 
129.659 
123.423 
128.834 
126.253 
118,525 
122.584 
121.831 
132.352 
131,461 
124.657 
127,602 
142.014 
137,222 
140.773 
147.890 
138,912 
140,261 
147,629 



Death 
rate 



14.3 
15.2 
18.6 
19.3 
18.6 
20.8 
20.5 
20.3 
19.7 
18.6 
19.1 
18.4 
17.1 
17.4 
17.0 
18.2 
17.7 
16.4 
16.4 
17.8 
17.0 
17.1 
17.6 
16.3 
16.1 
16.1 



Deaths 

under 

five years 

of age 



30.027 
32,928 
35,114 
38,345 
40.243 
37.392 
42.740 
42.434 
41,643 
41,472 
42,002 
40.136 
35.771 
37,113 
35,386 
39,204 
35,775 
31,215 
32,768 
39,086 
38.045 
39.292 
40.168 
37,941 
38,278 
39,690 



Epidemic Diseases 



Cerebro-* 
spinal 
menin- 
gitis 



446 
572 
540 
490 
402 
474 
589 
649 
875 
489 
546 
610 
538 
695 
702 
531 
492 
456 
454 
1.708 
2,566 
1.178 
230 
539 
485 
452 



Typhoid 
fever 



1,067 
1,169 
1,327 
1.483 
1,550 
1,612 
1.926 
1,664 
1,685 
1.640 
1.716 
1,542 
1.351 
1.810 
1,604 
1,948 
1,741 
1,318 
1,665 
1,652 
1,554 
1,568 
1,673 
1.375 
1.315 
1,374 



Malarial 
diseases 



944 

899 

935 

813 

746 

738 

619 

613 

493 

.422 

409 

449 

380 

404 

248 

309 

283 

189 

137 

149 

106 

139 

136 

84' 

78 

65 



Deaths hy Causes 1885 to Date — (Continued) 



YEAR 



1885. 

1886. 

1887. 

1888. 

1889. 

1890. 

1801. 

1892. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

1896. 

1897. 

1898. 

1809 . 

1900. 

1901. 

1902. 

1903. 

1904. 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 





Epidemic Diseases — 


■ {Continited) 




Small- 
pox 


Scarlet 
fever 


Measles 


Erysip- 
elas 


Whoop- 
ing 
cough 


Croup 
and 
diph- 
theria 


Diar- 
rhea 
(under 
2 years) 


33 


1.184 


1,170 


354 


834 


4,508 


7.301 


39 


1.011 


895 


357 


1.244 


5,597 


7,028 


175 


1.267 


1.205 


327 


447 


6,490 


9.258 


212 


2.452 


944 


342 


994 


6,448 


8.774 


30 


2,205 


899 


293 


1,303 


5,855 


8,294 


4 


913 


1.161 


312 


1,156 


4.915 


8.468 


4 


2.262 


1,200 


367 


825 


5.072 


9.179 


143 


2.177 


1,350 


477 


921 


5.918 


9.185 


252 


1.626 


789 


366 


1,203 


5.947 


9.056 


308 


1.227 


900 


331 


1,020 


6.592 


8.956 


11 


850 


1.266 


370 


1.169 


4.989 


9,055 


3 


759 


1.495 


340 


996 


4.597 


8.776 


27 


841 


873 


303 


825 


4,115 


7.267 


1 


837 


838 


237 


1,155 


2,612 


8.499 


21 


730 


756 


353 


886 


2.786 


6. 480 


14 


689 


1,333 


466 


1,020 


3.306 


7,959 


445 


1.430 


859 


363 


721 


3.026 


9.337 


442 


1,215 


929 


314 


923 


2.859 


' 8.315 


41 


1.057 


721 


354 


811 


3.035 


7,480 


13 


1.194 


1,170 


430 


426 


3.041 


8.329 


9 


726 


988 


415 


847 


2,296 


8.955 


7 


690 


1.369 


452 


821 


2.691 


8,578 


10 


1.032 


997 


483 


789 


2.603 


9.213 


3 


1.688 


1,175 


419 


. 503 


2.473 


9.111 


4 


1.205 


1,272 


472 


783 


2.313 


7.873 


7 


1.617 


1.285 


526 


727 


2.433 


9.036 



176 



State Depaetment of Health 



Deaths by Causes 1885 to Date — (Continued) 



year 



1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1880 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908. 

1909. 

1910. 



Other Causes op Death 



Con- 
sumption 



11,238 

11.947 

11.609 

12.383 

12,300 

13.831 

13.445 

13.471 

13.123 

12.824 

13,267 

13,265 

12,641 

12,079 

13.412 

13,500 

13.766 

12.582 

13.104 

14.159 

14.061 

14,027 

14,431 

14,347 

13.096 

14,059 



Acute 

respiratory 

diseases 



10,864 

11,380 

11,557 

13,756 

13,833 

18.053 

20.647 

20.432 

19.807 

15.885, 

17.725 

16.820 

16.277 

16.350 

17.938 

19.232 

17.580 

16,986 

17.330 

21.132 

17.832 

20,178 

22,663 

18.477 

20.820 

21,520 



Puerperal 



074 

884 

885 

1.060 

070 

028 

1,063 

1,131 

1,054 

Oil 

030 

072 

1.013 

020 

877 

1.136 

1.068 

1.034 

1,110 

1.272 

1.377 

1.326 

1,413 

1,335 

1,333 

1,452 



Digestive 



4.343 
5.066 
5.500 
6.146 
6.501 
7.606 
8.486 
8.020 
8.834 
8.745 
8.802 
8.055 
8.963 
10.101 
10.163 
10.644 
7.478 
7.235 
7,282 
7,866 
8.158 
8.741 
9.035 
8.398 
8,791 
9,338 



Urinary 



4,069 

4,305 

4,582 

4,926 

5,732 

5,688 

6.473 

6,602 

6.055 

6,046 

7.440 

7,770 

7.866 

8.641 

0.064 

0.501 

0.55S 

0.604 

O.OOS 

10.815 

10.607 

11.344 

12,163 

11,320 

12,106 

12.811 



Deaths by Causes 1885 to Date — (Concluded) 



YEAR 



1885..,. 
1886.... 
1887.... 
1888..., 
1880.... 
1800.... 
1891.... 
1892.... 
1893.... 
1894.... 
1896.... 
1896.... 
1897.... 
1898.... 
1899.... 
1900.... 
1901 .... 
1902.... 
1903.... 
1904.... 
1905.... 
1906.... 
1907.... 
1908. . . . 
1900.... 
1910.... 



Other Causes op Death — (jCond%^ded) 



Circtila- 
tory 



4 

5 

5 

6 

6 

7 

8 





8 



10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

11 

12 
13 
14 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
10 



.060 
.238 
,737 
,304 
.886 
.306 
.480 
.013 
.042 
.451 
.066 
.486 
.005 
.511 
,606 
.676 
.949 
.889 
.561 
.309 
.547 
.395 
.952 
,233 
,784 
,497 



Nervous 



8,651 
8,799 
9.967 
11.174 
11.266 
11.603 
13.166 
14.009 
13.826 
12.948 
11.724 
11.925 
12.124 
13.312 
13.177 
12.903 
13.366 
12.064 
12.066 
14.142 
13.660 
13.621 
14.680 
11.080 
11.101 
11.404 



Cancer 



1.887 
2.050 
2,363 
2,407 
2.638 
2.868 
3.028 
3,162 
3,232 
3.305 
3.554 
3.780 
4.131 
4.385 
4.533 
4.871 
6.033 
4,990 
5.456 
5.607 
6.056 
6.168 
6.420 
6.554 
7,060 
7.522 



Violence 



2.004 
3.206 
3.780 
3,842 
3,834 
4,542 
5.028 
5.543 
6.295 
5.487 
5.889 
7.022 
6,172 
6.520 
6.093 
6.714 
7.926 
7.058 
7,646 
8.822 
8.352 
8.874 
9.668 
9,183 
9,232 
9,846 



Old age 



4.889 
5,990 
8.676 
7,994 
5.980 
5.484 
6.530 
6.385 
5.826 
6.497 
6.669 
5.377 
5.516 
5.524 
6.068 
5.402 
5.439 
4.949 
4.765 
5.120 
4.923 
4.332 
2.723 
2.516 
2,189 
1,961 



Unclas- 
sified 



7.72a 
8.981 
9,736 
11.310 
12.615 
18.728 
15.371 
14.647 
14.622 
15.310 
16,380 
14.836 
14,960 
14.641 
15.324 
16.134 
17.388 
15.833 
17.466 
19.858 
19,026 
18,944 
20,717 
20,181 
18.860 
20,698 



Division of Vital Statistics 



177 



Infant Mortality 

The following table shows the mortality among children imder 
five and infants under one year of age, and also relation to total 
deaths at all ages and in their relation to the total births. 



1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1888 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895..., 

189« 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1906 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 



Total 
mor- 
taUty 



80.407 
86.801 
108.269 
114.584 
113.155 
128.648 
129.850 
131.388 
129.659 
123.433 
128.834 
126.253 
118.525 
122,584 
121.831 
132,089 
131,335 
124.830 
127.498 
142.217 
137,485 
141.099 
147.130 
138.912 
140.261 
147.629 



Mor- 
tality 
under 
five 
yean 



30.027 
32.928 
35.114 
38,345 
40.243 
37.392 
42.740 
42.434 
41,643 
41.472 
42.002 
40.136 
35,771 
37.113 
35.386 
39.204 
35.775 
31.215 
32,768 
tl4,177 
12,218 
12.176 
12.157 
11.380 
12.201 
12,233 



Under 

one 

year* 



24.909 
25.827 
27.114 
28,011 
26,561 
26.077 
27,457 



Total 
birtha 



63.536 
89.828 
102,038 
103,089 
114,804 
112,572 
125,909 
130.143 
136.297 
141.827 
142,311 
147,327 
144,631 
138,702 
136,778 
143,156 
140.530 
146.740 
158.343 
165.014 
172.259 
183.012 
196.020 
203.159 
202.656 
222.074 



Annual 

number 

of deaths 

under 

one year 

to 1.000 

living 

births 



151.0 
150.0 
148.1 
142.9 
130.7 
128.6 
128.7 



Per- 
centage 

under 

one year 

to total 

deaths 



17.5 
18.8 
19.2 
19.0 
19.1 
18.6 
18.6 



Per- 
centage 
of deaths 
under 
five 
years 
to toUl 
deaths 



37.3 
37.9 
32.4 
33.5 
35.5 
29.1 
32.9 
32.3 
32.1 
33.6 
32.6 
31.7 
30.1 
30.2 
29.0 
29.6 
27.2 
25.0 
25.7 
27.5 
27.7 
27.9 
27.3 
27.3 
27.3 
27.0 



* Until 1904, deaths under one year were not olaanfied separately, 
t Mortality one to five years. 



1910. 



MortalUy undtr one'vear 

Rural 4.736 1909.. 

Urban 22,721 



Rural 4,692 

Urban 21,485 



178 



State Depaetment of Health 




Population of the Sanitary Districts 



DISTRICTS 



Maritime 

Hudaon Valley 

Adirondack and Northern . 

Mohawk Valley 

Southern Tier 

East Central 

West Central 

Lake Ontario and Weston 

Entire SUte 



1890 


1900 


1905 


1907 


1908 


1909 


2,743,959 
679.647 
378.577 
368,503 
401.864 
382,954 
314.876 
727,473 


3.753.614 
690,000 
394,772 
408,974 
438.543 
401.082 
316.945 
876.206 


4,393.861 
703.893 
408.116 
444,741 
438.936 
414,209 
315.677 
947,875 


4,686.262 
710,679 
413,178 
460.528 
442,574 
419.076 
314.433 
978,703 


4,776,624 
711,302 
415.502 
466.496 
446.042 
421.941 
317,252 
991,198 


4.881.466 
729,736 
419.664 
466.973 
449,936 
426,973 
320.101 

1.005.895 


6,997,853 


7,269.136 


8.067.308 


8.425.333 


8.546.356 


8.699.643 



1910 



5,266,032 
727,719 
405,856 
488.414 
455.504 
431.778 
320.243 

1.062,783 

9.168.328 



Relative Area, Density of Population and Death Rates in the 

Sanitary Districts for 1910 





Area in 

square 

miles 

(land) 


Popu- 
lation 

per 
square 

mile 






Pkrcev 


TAOB OF 


Deaths 


• 




DISTRICTS 


Urban 

death 

rate 


Rural 

death 

rate 

14.6 
16.0 

15 6 
15.4 
15.5 

16 6 
14 9 
14.3 


Total 

death 

rate 


Under 
1 year 


Be- 
tween 1 
and 6 
years 


At 60 

years 

and 

over 


From 
epi- 
demic 
diseases 


Maritime 


1,946 
5.679 
13,358 
5,179 
6,419 
6.252 
4,588 
4.199 


2,706 
128 
30 
94 
71 
69 
69 
253 


15.9 
19.0 
17.0 
16.4 
14 5 
15.7 
15.5 
15.7 


15.8 
17.5 
15.8 
16.0 
15.1 
16.3 
15.0 
15.3 


20.9 
14.6 
16.7 
18.5 
13.0 
136 
11.6 
19.4 


10.3 
5.5 
5 7 
6.4 
4.4 
4.0 
3.1 
7.9 


22 7 
40 
44 2 
400 
48.8 
46.9 
653 
33.9 


6.8 


Hudson Valley 


6.4 


Adirondack and Northern 

Mohawk Valley 


7.6 
6.6 


Southern Tier 


6.1 


East Central 


6.2 


West Central 


6.4 


Lake Ontario and Western 


8.0 


Entire State 


47.620 


192 


16.1 


16.3 


16.1 


18.6 


8.3 


31.0 


6 7 







t 



MORTALITY 

FROM 

PI lARY 

TUE LOSIS. 

DEATHS PER 
100,000 POPULATION. 
SINCE 1885. A 



^IVyOfW STATt IXfiVfnUENr OF HEA17H 



Division of Vital Statistics 



179 



Mortality from Pulmonary Tvberculosis 

The following table shows the total deaths in the State, annual 
death rate per 1,000 population; reported mortality from tuber- 
culosis, and deaths, per 100,000 population, due to tuberculosis 
since 1885 ; also percentage of deaths due to tuberculosis. 



YEAR 



1885.. 
1886.. 
1887.. 
1888.. 
1889.. 
1890.. 
1891.. 
1892.. 
1893.. 
1894.. 
1895.. 
1896.. 
1897. . 
1898. . 
1899.. 
1900.. 

1901. . 

1902. . 
1903.. 

1904. . 

1905. . 
1906. . 
1907.. 
1908. . 
1909. . 
1910. . 



Population 



5.609.910 
5.719.855 
5,831,947 
5.946.246 
6.062,764 
6,182.600 
6,316,333 
6,438.283 
6,537,716 
6,638.606 
6.741.246 
6,845,375 
6.951,111 
7,058.459 
7,167,491 
7.281,533 
7.434,896 
7,891,491 
7,751.375 
7.914,636 
8,081,333 
8.251,538 
8,425,333 
8.546.356 
8.699.643 
9.158,328 



ToUl 


Death 


deathfl 


rate 


80.407 


14.3 


86,801 


15.2 


108,269 


18.6 


114.584 


19.3 


113,155 


18.6 


128,648 


20.8 


129.850 


20.5 


131.388 


20.3 


129,659 


19.7 


123.423 


18.6 


128.834 


19.1 


126.253 


18.4 


118.525 


17.1 


122.584 


17.4 


121.831 


17.0 


132,352 


18.2 


131,461 


17.7 


124,657 


16.4 


127,602 


16.4 


142,014 


17.8 


137,222 


17.0 


140,773 


17.1 


147,890 


17.5 


138,912 


16.3 


140,261 


16.1 


147,629 


16.1 



Deaths 

from tu« 

berculosif 



11.238 
11,947 
11,609 
12,383 
12,390 
13,417 
13.445 
13.441 
13,123 
12,824 
13,267 
13.265 
12.641 
12,979 
13,412 
13.591 
13.766 
12,582 
13.194 
14.158 
14.059 
14.027 
14.406 
14.316 
13,996 
14,059 



Deaths 

per 
100.000 
popula- 
tion 



200.3 
208.8 
199.0 
208 2 
204.3 
217.0 
212.8 
209.2 
200.7 
193.1 
196.7 
193.7 
181.8 
183.8 
187.1 
186.6 
185.1 
165.7 
170.2 
178.8 
174.0 
170.0 
171.0 
167.5 
161.0 
153.5 



Percentage 

of aU 
deaths due 
to tubercu- 
losis 



14.0 
13.7 
10.7 
10.8 
10.9 
10.8 
10.4 
10.3 
10.2 
10.5 
10.5 
10.7 
10.8 
10.7 
11.0 
10.6 
10.6 
10.2 
10.4 
10.0 
10.3 
10.0 

9.8 
10.3 
10.0 

9.5 



Reported Mortality from Pulmonary Tuberculosis in the Sanitary 

Districts for past 10 years 



DISTRICTS 



Msntime 

Hudsoo Valley 

Adiroodack and Northern . 

Mohawk Valley 

Southern Tier 

EsBt Central 

Wcit Central 

Lake Ontario and Western 

Entire Bute 



1901 


1002 


1003 

• 


1904 


1905 

9 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


8.730 


8.080 


8.582 


9.124 


9.096 


9.540 


9.590 


9.517 


9.252 


1.342 


1.180 


1.259 


1.346 


1,286 


1,126 


1.235 


1.226 


1.181 


564 


521 


493' 


552 


583 


550 


549 


571 


556 


608 


517 


570 


579 


588 


523 


604 


612 


585 


441 


431 


378 


459 


431 


395 


400 


419 


362 


563 


482 


479 


567 


576 


491 


526 


525 


512 


363 


341 


355 


357 


352 


315 


357 


340 


335 


1.155 

13.766 


1.030 


1.078 


1,175 


1.152 


1.086 


1.145 


1,137 


1.213 


12.582 

• 


13.194 


14.159 


14.064 


14.026 


•14.431 


14,347 


13.996 



1910 



9.265 
1.205 
552 
527 
331 
500 
255 
1.152 

114,059 



* Inchidfi twenty-fire delayed returns not classified by district in which they occurred, 
t InchideB 272 deaths in State InstitutJooa. 



180 



State Depaetment of Health 



The following table gives the number of deaths per 100,000 popu- 
lation from Pulmonary Tuberculosis in the Sanitary Districts 
in the State during the past 10 years 



DISTRICTS 



Maritime 

Hudaon Valley 

Adirondack and NOTthem . 

Mohawk VaUey 

Southern Tier 

East Central 

Weit Central 

Lake Ontario and Western. 

Entire State 



1001 


1902 


1903 


1904 


1905 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


224.9 


201.5 


207.4 


213.8 


207.0 


210.8 


204.6 


204.6 


189.6 


193.7 


169.9 


180 2 


189.1 


182.6 


159.7 


173.8 


172.1 


161.8 


141.9 


130.2 


122.4 


136.1 


142.8 


134.0 


132 9 


136.7 


132.5 


146.1 


122.1 


132.4 


182.3 


132.2 


115.7 


131.1 


132.7 


125.8 


102.4 


99.6 


86.9 


105.0 


96.1 


89.0 


90.3 


93.7 


80.4 


139.4 


118.6 


117.1 


137.7 


139.0 


118.1 


125.5 


•124.7 


120.2 


114.9 


107.9 


121.4 


113.1 


111.6 


99.1 


113.6 


105.7 


104.6 


129.6 


113.8 


117.2 


125.8 


121.5 


113.8 


117.1 


116.8 
167.5 


120.5 


186.1 


165.7 


170.2 


178.8 


174.0 


170.0 


171.0 


161.0 



1910 



175.9 
165.5 
136.0 
107.0 

72.7 
115.8 

79.6 
108.4 

153.5 



In ea^h 1,000 Deaths there were from Tuberculosis in the — 



DISTRICTS 



Maritime 

Hudson Valley 

Adirondack and N<niheni. 

Mohawk Valley 

Southern Tier 

East Central 

West Central 

Lake Ontario and Western. 

Entire State 



1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


1905 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


115 


110 


117 


110 


113 


115 


111 


119 


114 


113 


107 


100 


108 


104 


93 


95 


100 


96 


110 


105 


92 


96 


97 


89 


87 


95 


89 


93 


85 


90 


85 


87 


73 


79 


81 


82 


76 


75 


65 


60 


67 


61 


57 


60 


52 


96 


90 


80 


87 


90 


77 


78 


76 


77 


80 


77 


75 


71 


70 


. 64 


68 


70 


69 


90 


85 


80 


85 


82 


74 


73 


77 


80 


106 


102 


104 


100 


103 


100 


98 


108 


100 



1910 



111 
95 
86 
67 
48 
71 
53 
71 

95 



Division of Vital Statistics 



181 



The following table shows the mortality from Pulmonary Tuber- 
culosis in the cities of the State grouped in order of population 



CITIES 



First-da— ciiif, over 176,000: 

Cityof New Yoric 

Buffalo 

Rocbeoter 



SeeondrdoMt dliet, 60,000 to 176,000: 

Ssmouae 

Albany . . . 

YonkeTB 

Troy 

Utica 

Sohenectady 



Third-dau ciHtt, iOjOOO to 60,000: 

Bitt(|h»fnton 

Elmira 

AuburB 

Amsterdam , 

Jameatewn 

Mount Venion 

Niagara F^ls 

New Roehelle 

Poughkeepcie , 

Newburgh , 

Watertown 

Kingston , 

Cohoet , 

Oswego , 

GlovenviUe , 

Rome 



TkirdrdoM cUiea, 10,000 to 90,000: 

Lockport 

Dunkirk 

Ocdensburg 

Middletown 

Glens Falls 

Watervliet 

Ithaca 

Olean 

Lackawanna 

Corning 

Homell 

Geneva 

Little Falls 

North Tonawanda 

Cortlsnd 

Hudson 

Plattsburg 

Rensselaer 

Fulton 

Johnstown 



Third dau cUies, under 10,000: 

Oneonta 

Port Jenris 

Oneida 

Tonawanda 



1901>1005 



Deaths 
per 

100.000 
popular 
tion from 
tubercu- 
losis 



1006 



215.8 
132.0 
138.2 



135.2 
228.0 
188.2 
276.5 
174.7 
141.7 



130.0 
134.0 
143.3 
149.5 

03.0 
115.1 

99.8 

94.9 
174.2 
261.4 

95 6 
209.0 
220.8 
150.0 
107.9 
171.7 



135.8 

81.4 
331.7 
202.5 
149.5 
177.6 
129.7 

54.9 



119.7 

116.3 

83.7 

105.3 

92.6 

73.6 

184.3 

171.0 

148.6 

121.3 

104.9 



91 

173.4 
126.2 
117.1 



Percent- 
age of 
total 
deaths 
from 
tubercu- 
losis 



11.6 
8.7 
9.5 



9.4 

12.6 

11.6 

13.6 

9.6 

9.3 



8 
8 
9 
9 
9 



1 
7 
1 
5 




8.1 
6.2 
7.0 
8.8 

11.9 
6. 

11 

11 
9 
7. 



,4 
.0 
.3 
.4 
,8 
10.0 



8.7 

5.1 

12.5 

10.0 

9.5 

10.6 

8.4 

4.8 

'8!2 
8.0 
5.9 
9.2 
7.6 
6.0 
9.7 

11.3 
8.6 
8.3 
7.9 



5.9 

10.0 
8.9 
8.7 



Deaths 

per 
100,000 
popula- 
tion from 
tubercu- 
losis 



218.2 
129.9 
135.2 



116.2 
206.1 
160.9 
270.6 
130.8 
116.3 



121.3 

131.7 
158.1 
129.2 

82.7 
101.6 

71.9 
116.3 
136.0 
192.5 

88.8 
T84.3 
233 
177 



3 
.3 



107.5 
73.4 



91.4 
100.6 
141.9 
106.9 
147.3 
172.4 
68.0 
70.0 

123.1 

104.0 

127.3 

60.0 

87.0 

133.3 

60.0 

93.4 

11.4 

135.4 



97.1 

92.8 

71.4 

113.9 



Percent^ 
age of 

total 
'deaths 

from 
tubercn- 

losis 



11.8 
7.7 
8.8 



7.6 
11.5 

9.4 
13.4 

6.9 

7.9 



8.1 
9.1 
9.5 
7.4 




5 
6 
3 

.7 



8. 

6. 

4. 

7. 

7. 

9.7 

5.0 

9.9 
11.9 
10.3 

7.2 

4.3 



6.6 
6.3 
7.8 
7.1 



8 
10 
4 
6. 



4 

1 
7 




5.0 

8.5 
6.4 
9.2 
4.3 
6.6 
6.9 
4.6 
6.2 
0.73 
10.9 



6.1 

5.1 

4.6 

10.8 



1007 



Deaths 

per 
100.000 
popular 
tion from 
tubercu- 
losis 



212.0 
128.5 
126.5 



122.3 
177.0 
126.0 
275.8 
186.3 
117.4 



100.5 
128.9 
124.6 
104 

70 
113.2 

89.7 

66. 
112 
240. 
126. 
185.3 
254.2 
118.9 

63.8 
186.4 



.0 
4 



1 
.0 
.7 
.4 



122.9 
119.8 
135.1 
157.2 
117.4 
176.9 
126.7 
90.0 

'7i!4 
100.0 
124.0 
154. 

76. 

91 
200. 
120 
100. 

77.8 
122.5 



5 
2 
.7 
.0 
.4 
.0 



59.4 

ni.i 

126.4 
87.5 



Percent- 
age of 
total 
deaths 
from 
tubercu- 
losis 



11.4 
8.1 
8.1 



7.7 
0.8 
8.0 
13.2 
0.7 
7.9 



8.2 
7.7 
6.2 
6.1 



7 
4 

.4 
5 

12 
6 

10 

12 



5 


4 
5 
3 
7 





7.6 
3.9 
0.7 



8 

7 

7 
10 

7 
10 

7 




5 
6 

4 
9 
2 
7 



6.5 



3.7 
7.1 
8.9 
0.4 
5.8 
7.1 
10.6 
9.4 
7.0 
6.0 
8.1 



3.0 
6.3 
8.6 
6.4 



182 



State Depabtment of Health 



Mortality from Pulrnonary Tuherculosis — (Concluded) 





1908 


1909 


1910 




CITIES 


Deaths 

ioSTooo 

popula- 
tion from 
tubercu- 
losis 


Percent^ 

age of 

total 

deaths 
from 

tubercu- 
losis 


Deaths 

per 
100.000 
popula- 
tion from 
tubercu- 
losis 


Percent- 
age of 
total 
deaths 
from 
tubercu- 
k>sia 


Deaths 

per 
100.000 
popula- 
tion from 
tubercu- 
losis 


Percent- 
age of 
total 

deaths 
from 

tubercu- 
losis 


Firat'class cities, over 176,000: 

Citv of New York 


204.4 
134.3 
133.6 

124.6 
210.0 
166.9 
237.7 
177.9 
92.3 

110.7 

92.3 
141.9 
124.5 

82.5 
129.0 

84.9 
100.9 
158.8 
132.6 

80.2 
142.7 
202.9 
102.3 
128.2 
178.2 

150.5 

80.7 

94.0 

152.6 

101.8 

178.4 

104.5 

86.1 


12.1 
8.7 
9.5 

7.6 

11.4 

10.9 

11.9 

9.4 

7.0 

6.7 
6.1 

10.0 
7.5 
7.4 
9.0 
5.8 
7.3 
8.5 
8.2 
5.4 
8.4 

11.4 
6.1 
7.0 
9.2 

10.8 

5.8 

5.6 

9.4 

• 7.7 

10.3 
6.4 
6.5. 


194.2 
131.8 
143.3 

115.6 
168.7 
148.2 
239.5 
159.8 
117.7 

78.6 

97.3 

99.2 

150.3 

63.2 

104.0 

106.2 

92.2 

130.5 

156.8 

106.6 

237.4 

244.0 

97.6 

117.2 

111.0 

127.3 

55.3 

114.0 

120.4 

147.4 

198.5 

83.4 

50.0 


11.7 
8.6 
9.7 

7.6 
9.6 
9.5 

12.5 
9.7 

10.2 

5.1 
6.2 
6.8 
9.0 
5.3 
7.4 
7.3 
7.1 
6.8 
9.1 
7.0 
11.9 
12.1 
6.5 
7.3 
5.5 

8.3 
5.0 
7.0 
7.8 
10.6 
12.6 
6.1 
4.3 


181.1 
119.8 
126.1 

89.1 
238.1 
148.9 
227.8 
125.5 

98.0 

• 119.2 

51.0 

118.0 

101.3 

73.0 

109.1 

104.5 

82.1 

124.8 

179.4 

78.3 

177.4 

198.0 

72.6 

77.2 

126.0 

138.9 

63.4 

106.4 

176.5 

117.9 

139.1 

101.2 

47.2 

123.7 

50.9 

36.7 

104.4 

81.1 

66.5 

26.0 

226.8 

207.7 

140.0 

123.2 

105.0 

62.8 

118.2 

36.1 

84.3 


11.3 
7.4 
9.0 

5.8 
12.3 

9.8 
11.0 

7.2 

6.7 

7.6 
3.4 
7.9 
5.9 
5.7 
7.9 
5.8 
7.0 
7.1 
9.8 
4.5 
9.7 
9.6 
4.4 
5.0 
6.3 

8.4 
3.9 
6.3 
9.8 
7.6 
8.0 
6.1 
3.7 
4.5 
3.5 
2.9 
7.4 
5.2 
6.0 
1.4 
11.0 
11.8 
9.5 
8.4 
7.7 

3.3 
6.5 
2.5 
6.6 

-■ s 


Buffalo 


Rochester t 

Seeond'clas9 cities, 60,000 to 176,000: 
SvT&cufle 


Albanv 


Yonkera 


Trov 


Utica 


Sohenectadv 


Third^ase cities, BOfiOO to 60,000: 
Dinffhamton 


Elimra *... 


Auburn .' 


•Amrterdam , 


Jamestown 


Mount Vernon 


Niacara Falls. 




New Rocbelle 


« 


PouicbkeeDsie 




NewDuncn 




Watertown 




Kimrston 




£!!ohoefl 




Osweso 




Gloversville 




Rome 




Third-class cities, 10,000 to S0,000: 
Lockoort 




Dunkirk 




OffdensburiE 


Middletown 




Glens Falls 




Watervliet 




Ithaca 




Olean 




Lackawanna 




Coming. . . .' 


107.6 
72.0 
83.4 

140.0 

102.1 
73.8 

165.7 
90.0 

108.2 
97.9 
73.3 

58.1 
141.7 
114.0 

62.5 


6.9 
4.8 
7.3 
11.8 
7.2 
5.1 
. 10.8 
7.8 
8.7 
6.0 
6.7 

3.2 
8.3 
7.5 
4.9 


78.0 

95.0 

110.7 

155.6 

72.9 

47.8 

126.9 

139.7 

90.0 

68.0 

105.5 

125.0 
80.4 
49.5 

123.0 


5.5 
6.5 
8.9 
9.9 
4.9 
8.7 
8.1 
8.1 
7.0 
4.8 
6.4 

7.2 
4.4 
3.6 
8.6 




Homell 




Geneva 




Little Falls 








Cortland 








Plattsburs 




Rensselaer 




Fulton 




Johnstown 




Third-class cities, under 10,000: 
Oneonta 




Port Jervis 




Oneida 




Tonawanda 









A study of the above table shows that there is a pretty uniform 
lessening of the number of deaths in cities from pulmonary tu- 



Division of Vital Statistics 183 

berculosis, and also of the percentage of the total deaths repre- 
sented by the mortality from consumption. In some cities, nota- 
bly Syracuse^ Utica, Schenectady, Cohoes, Watertown, Dunkirk, 
Watervliet, Little Falls, HomeU and Cortland, the reduction is 
marked. 

The table following shows the deaths from pulmonary tubercu- 
losis in, Greater New York and in the rest of the State. The 
mortality is shown month by month for the series of years from 
1890 to 1910 inclusive. 

It will be seen that the lowest annual mortality from pulmonary 
tuberculosis occurred in 1902, when the total for the State was 
12,582. In 1903 it increased to 13,194, and to 14,158 in 1904, 
It remained in the 14,000 mark until 1908, the highest fig- 
ure, 14,406, being reached in 1907. In considering these figures 
it must be borne in mind that they are the records of years during 
which increasing attention has been called to the ravages of tu- 
berculosis, and it is fair to assume that the returns have been in- 
creasingly accurate and complete from year to year. In 1909 the 
mortality, for the whole State dropped to 13,996, and the figures 
just compiled for 1910 show an increase to 14,059, or only 63 
more deaths from this cause in 1910 than in 1909. 

In 1910 there were 154 deaths from consumption per 100,000 
population as against 205 deaths per 100,000 population in 1890. 
For a period of 25 years 11 per cent of the deaths have been from 
consumption; in 1909, 10 per cent.; in 1910, 9.5 per cent. 

And while this reduction in mortality has been taking place, 
there has been an increase in the population, and an increase in 
the total number of deaths from all causes. The total deaths 
throughout the whole State, from, all causes, were, in 1909, 
140,261 ; in 1910 they were 147,629. 

From these figures it seems fair to assume that the tuberculosis 
situation in the State as a whole is improving. 

Taking the records for these two fields, the lowest mortality 
from pulmonary tuberculosis in Greater New York wae 7,589 in 
1902 ; and in the same year the rest of the State had its minimum 
mortality of 4,993. The maximum annual mortality for Greater 
New York was 8,996, recorded in 1907; the maximum mortality 
in the rest of the State occurred in 1892, the figures then being 



184 State Depaktment of Hjjaxth 

6,180. The anti-tuberculosis campaign began in New York city 
several years before it was started throughout the rest of the State 
in 1907. The annual mortality in Greater New York since then 
has been aa follows : 1907, 8,996 ; 1908, 8,867 ; 1909, 8,645 ; 
1910, 8,690. The corresponding figures for the rest of the State 
are: 1907, 5,410; 1908, 5,449; 1909, 5,351; 1910, 5,369. 

The total deaths from all causes were in 1909 : Greater New 
York, 74,105 ; rest of State, 66,156; in 1910 : Greater New York, 
76,750; rest of State, 70,879. Thus while the total mortality 
from all causes in Greater New York in 1910 shows an increase 
of 3.5 per cent over the returns for 1909, the mortality from pul- 
monary tuberculosis in the metropolis increased only 5 per cent, 
during the year. In the rest of the State the total mortality from 
all causes in 1910 shows an increase of 5.3 per cent, over the fig- 
ures for 1909, while the mortality per 100,000 population from 
pulmonary tuberculosis in 1910 dropped 3.7 below the figures for 
1909. 



Division of Vital Statistics 



185 



Mortality from Pulmonary Tuberculosis by Mor^ths 1890-1909 — 

Greater New York and Rest of State 



1890. Greater New York*. 
Rest of State 



Total. 



1891. New York aty*. 
Rest of State 



Total 



1892. New York Gty*. 
Rest of State 



Total. 



1803. New York City*. 
Rest of State.... 



Total. 



1894. New York City*. 
Rest of State 



Total. 



1895. New York City*. 
Rest of State.... 



Total, 



1896. New York aty*. 
Rest of State 



"^otal. 



1897. New York City*. 
Rest of State.... 



Total, 



1898. Greater New York. 
Rest of State 



Total 



1899. Greater New York. 
Rest of State 



Total 



1900. GrMter New York. 
Rest of State 



Total. 



1901. Greater New York. 
Rest of State 



Total. 



1902. OfMter New York. 
Rest of State...... 



Total 



1903. Greater New York. 
Rest of State 



Total. 



Jan. 


1 

Feb. 


Nfar. 


April 


1,008 
757 


706 
549 


657 
538 


575 
527 


1.765 


1.255 


1,195 


1.102 


661 
549 


520 
465 


733 
585 


707 
670 


1.210 


985 


1,318 


1,377 


665 
621 


598 
598 


728 
544 


691 
561 


1.286 


1,196 


1,272 


1.252 


595 
504 


525 
429 


750 
536 


741 
588 


1.099 


954 


1.286 


1.329 


628 
512 


563 
500 


609 
581 


551 
540 


1,140 


1,063 


1,190 


1,091 


728 
516 


670 
491 


706 
568 


653 
567 


1.244 


1.161 


1,274 


1.220 


650 
602 


582 
602 


969 
521 


677 
512 


1.152 


1.084 


1.490 


1.189 


578 
473 


637 
480 


620 
670 


581 
577 


1,051 


1,117 


1.190 


1.158 


615 
436 


592 
430 


705 
461 


629 
471 


1.051 


1,031 


1.166 


1.100 


769 
535 


726 
479 


786 
498 


708 
479 


1,304 


1.204 


1.284 


1,187 


676 
464 


686 
445 


816 
547 


802 
500 


1,140 


1.131 


1.363 


1.302 


817 
509 


702 

428 


778 
515 


761 
535 


1,326 


1.130 


1.293 


1.296 


613 
425 


666 
434 


736 
499 


669 
485 


1.038 


1,100 


1,235 


1,154 


761 
444 


732 

428 


734 
526 


726 
498 


1.205 


1.160 


1.260 


1.224 



May 



588 
460 



1.048 



679 
555 



1«234 



654 
540 



1.194 



673 
566 



1,239 



567 
526 



1.093 



627 
522 



1,149 



665 
528 



1,193 



562 
492 



1.054 



669 
458 



1,127 



671 
498 



1,169 



765 
620 



1,285 



659 
665 



1,224 



658 

477 



1,135 



688 
451 



1,139 



June 



527 
422 






504 

474 



978 



508 
497 



1,005 



570 
495 



1,065 



557 
425 



982 



526 

448 



974 



612 
485 



1,097 



542 
460 



1.002 



604 
403 



1.007 



577 
451 



1,028 



616 
454 



1.070 



651 
460 



1.111 



615 
365 



980 



576 
402 



978 



* From 1890-97 the statbtics are for New York City and Brooklyn. 



186 



State Depaetment of Health 



Mortality from Pulmonary Tvhercidosis — (Continued) 





July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Total 


1890. Greater New York* . . . 
Rest of State 


585 
432 


578 
429 


598 
407. 


590 
455 


558 
426 


618 
427 


7.588 
5.829 






Total 


1,017 


1.007 


1.005 


1.045 


984 


1.045 


13.417 






1891. New York aty* 

Rest of State 


569 
463 


546 
495 


574 
465 


603 
521 


574 
443 


609 
481 


7.279 
6.166 






Total 


1.032 


1.041 


1.039 


1,124 


1,017 


1.090 


13.445 






1892. New York City* 

Rest of State 


558 
535 


519 
537 


561 
445 


535 
461 


615 
325 


629 
516 


7,261 
6.180 






Total 


1.093 


1.056 


1.006 

496 
416 


996 


940 


1.145 


13,441 






1893. New York City* 

Rest of State 


589 
484 


586 
454 


570 
500 


547 
410 


608 
491 


7,250 
5.873 






Total 


1.073 

600 
494 


1,040 


912 


1,070 


957 


1,099 


13.123 






1894. New York City*. . . , . . 
Rest of State 


569 
462 


538 
450 


542 

471 


568 
454 


637 
480 


6.929 
5,896 






Total 


1.094 


1,031 


988 


1.013 


1,022 


1,117 

* 


12.824 






1895. New York aty* 

Rest of State 


571 
469 


613 
438 


579 
430 


651 
461 


671 
408 


614 
440 


7,609 
5,758 






Total.'. 


1,040 

543 
507 


1.051 


1.009 


1,112 


979 


1,054 


13,267 


1896. New York aty* 

Restof SUte 


604 
455 


571 
452 


576 

414 


486 
390 


604 
458 


7.539 
5.726 


Total 


1.050 

549 
392 


1,059 


1,023 


990 


876 


1.062 


13,265 


1897. New York aty* 

Rest of State 


593 
434 


556 
442 


631 
439 


550 
427 


612 
444 


7 Oil 
5.630 






Total 


941 

664 
452 


1.027 


998 


1.070 


977 


1,056 


12,641 


1898. Greater New York 

Rest of State 


598 
421 


647 
429 


630 
422 


645 
404 


732 
453 


7.730 
5.249 






Total 


1.116 

"659" 
417 

1.076 

673 
429 

1.102 

^639~ 
423 


1.019 

639~ 
395 

1,034 

619 
428 


1.076 

568 
379 

947 

562* 
418 


1.052 


1,049 

628 
399 


1.185 


12.979 


1899. Greater New York .... 
Rest of State 


537 
527 


652 
436 


7.919 
5.493 






Total 


1.064 

663 
415 

1,078 

^639 
473 


1.027 

623 

388 


1,088 

661 
421 


13,412 


1900. Greater New York 

Rest of State 


8.162 
5.429 






Total 


1.047 


980 

404 
1.021 


1,011 

^640" 
423 

1.063 


1,082 


13.591 


1901. Greater New York 

Rest of State 


632 
446 


606 
444 


8.141 
6.626 






Total 


1.082 

632 
406 


1.078 

585~ 
399 


1.112 

638 
389 


1.060 


13.766 


1902. Greater New York 

Rest of State 


550 
367 


613 
338 


614 
409 


7.589 
4.99? 






Total 


1.03S 

695 
396 

991 


984 

626 
399 


917 

^564~ 
382 


1,027 

640 
398 

1.038 


951 


1,023 

712 
440 


12.582 


1903. Greater New York 

Rest of State 


649 
427 


8,003 
5.191 






Total 


1.025 


946 


1.076 


1,152 


13.194 



♦ From 1893-97 the statistics are far Naw York City aad Brooklyn. 



Division of Vital Statistics 



187 



Mortality from Pulmonary Tuberculosis — (Continued) 



1904. Greater New York 
Rest of State 

Total 

1905. Greater New York 
Rest of State 

Total 

1906. Greater New York 
feM Rest of State 

Total 

1907. Greater New York 
Rest of State 

Total 

1906. Greater New York 
Restof SUte 

Total 

1909. Greater New York 
Rest of State 

ToUl 

1910. Greater New York 
Restof State 

Total 



Jan. 



702 

485 



1.187 



731 
438 



1.169 



731 
452 



1.183 



816 
419 



1,235 



804 
427 



1.231 



749 
420 



1.169 



767 
437 



1,204 



Feb. 



728 
451 



1,179 



686 
454 



1.140 



732 
466 



1.198 



822 
470 



1.292 



862 
457 



1.319 



707 
446 



1.153 



706 
450 



1.156 



Mar. 


869 
563 


1,432 


830 
552 


1.382 


872 
515 


1,387 


907 
548 


1,465 


830 
644 


1.374 


840 
522 


1.362 


859 
668 


1.427 



April 



871 
528 



1.399 



814 
526 



1.340 



774 
575 



1.349 



903 
491 



1.394 



816 
678 



1.393 



861 
638 



1.399 



809 
502 



1.311 



May 



1.242 



June 



783 
514 


643 
493 


1.297 


1.136 


767 
619 


648 
467 


1.286 


1.105 


793 
435 


758 
383 


1.228 


1.141 


. 801 
501 


692 
447 


1.302 


1.139 


765 

484 


693 
434 


1.249 


1,127 


775 
483 


717 
425 


1,258 


1.142 


755 

487 


656 
412 



1.068 



188 



State Depaetment of TTeat.th 



Mortality from Pulmonary Tuberculosis — (Concluded) 





July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec 


Total 


1904. Greater New York 

Rest of State 


674 
472 


652 
423 


590 
400 


654 
415 


670 
434 


680 

464 


8.516 
5.642 






Total 


1.146 


1.075 


990 


1.069 


1.104 


1.144 


14,158 






1905. Greater New York 

Rest of State 


657 
433 


655 
435 


619 
437 


679 
436 


714 
417 


732 
423 


8.532 
6.527 






Total 


1,090 


1,090 


1,056 


1.115 


1,131 


1.155 


14.059 






1906. Greater New York 

Rest of State 


725 
382 


708 
366 


670 
327 


733 
357 


714 
380 


766 
413 


8.976 
5.051 






Total 


1.107 


1.074 


997 


1.090 


1,094 


1.179 


14.027 






1907. Greater New York 

Rest of State 


676 
444 


665 
461 


596 
377 


661 
419 


664 
408 


793 
425 


8.996 
5.410 






Total 


1,120 


1.126 


973 


1.080 


1,072 


1,218 


14,406 






1908. Greater New York 

Rest of State 


728 
423 


639 
430 


674 
415 


650 
434 


689 
412 


718 
411 


8.867 
5.449 






Total 


1.151 


1.089 


1.089 


1,084 


1.101 


1,129 


14.316 






1909. Greater New York 

Rest of State 


683 
445 


635 
404 


585 
373 


649 
440 


695 
395 


740 
460 


8.646 
5.351 






Total 


1.128 


1.039 


958 


1.089 


1.000 


1.209 


13.996 






1910. Greater New York 

Rest of State 


728 
452 


665 
420 


674 
404 


666 
389 


662 
398 


743 
450 


8.690 
5.360 






Total 


1.180 


1.085 


1.078 


1.055 


1.060 


1.193 


14.059 







TOTAL DEATHS BY YEARS PREVIOUS TO 1890 



1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

% 



Greater 
New York 



7.189 
7.722 
6.841 
7.312 
6.629 



Rest of 
State 



4,049 
4.225 
4.768 
6.071 
5.761 



Total 



11.238 
11,947 
11.609 
12.383 
12.390 






MORTALITY 

FROM 

CANCER. 

DEATHS PER 

>'I00.000 POPULATION>. 

/ SINCE 1885. \ 



N£V/yOP/( STATE 0£fWiTMafr OF HCALTH 



Division of Vital Statistics 



189 



Mortality from Cancer 

The reported mortality from cancer, and deaths per 100,000 
population due to cancer in the State since 1885 is shown by the 
following: 



YEAR 



1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1800 
1891 
1802 
1803 
1804 
1805 
1896 
1807 



Deatha 

from 

cancer 



.887 
.050 
.363 
.497 
.638 
.868 
.028 
.162 
.232 
,805 
,554 
.789 
,131 



Deaths 
per 100.000 
popu^- < 
tion 



33.6 
35.8 
40.5 
41.9 
43.5 
46.3 
47.9 
48.9 
49.4 
49.7 
52.7 
55.3 
59.4 



YEAR 



1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 



Deaths 

from 

cancer 



.375 
.535 
.871 
.033 

.456 
,697 
.055 
.169 
,420 
,554 
.060 
.522 



Deaths 
per 100,000 
popula- 
tion 



62.0 
63.2 
66.0 
67.6 
65.7 
70.3 
71.9 
74.9 
74.8 
75.9 
77.0 
81.1 
82.1 



Reported mortality from Cancer in the sanitary districts for past 

10 years — 



DISTRICTS 



Mantone 

Hudaoo YtXky 

Adirondack and Northern . 

Mohawk VaUejr 

SoathemTier 

EMtCeotral 

West Central 

Lake Ontario and Western. 

Eotire State 



1901 


1902 


1003 


1904 


1905 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


2,651 


2.557 


2,828 


2.967 


3.151 


3.288 


3.514 


3.564 


3.841 


459 


497 


536 


535 


549 


580 


571 


609 


657 


208 


220 


239 


255 


288 


278 


272 


265 


341 


267 


282 


276 


314 


331 


310 


352 


336 


397 


261 


259 


309 


338 


342 


831 


349 


388 


412 


295 


304 


314 


325 


335 


343 


337 


351 


383 


227 


246 


276 


250 


,291 


276 


288 


295 


296 


665 


624 


678 


713 


768 


763 


717 


746 


783. 


5.033 


4.969 


5.456 


5.697 


6.055 


6.169 


6.420 


6.554 


7,060 



1910 



4.093 
689 
314 
411 
418 
395 
325 
839 

•7,522 



* ladodes 38 deaths in State Institutions. 



Deaths from Cancer per 100,000 population in the — 



DISTRICTS 



Maritime 

Hodwn Vsllasr 

Adirondack and Northern. 

MobawkVaOeir 

SoothemTier 

EsfltCeotna 

West Central 

laka Ontario and Western. 

Entire State 



1901 


1902 
65 


1903 


1904 


1905 


1906 


1907 


1906 


1909 


66 


61 


71 


72 


72 


75 


75 


79 


67 


72 


n 


78 


78 


82 


80 


86 


80 


53 


58 


60 


64 


75 


68 


66 


64 


81 


65 


67 


66 


73 


76 


69 


76 


72 


85 


63 


60 


72 


78 


78 


75 


80 


87 


91 


74 


76 


79 


80 


80 


82 


80 


83 


90 


71 


78 


86 


80 


90 


87 


91 


93 


92 


75 


71 


75 


78 


81 


80 
75 


73 


75 


73 


68 


60 


70 


72 


75 


76 


77 


81 



1910 



78 
95 
76 
84 
92 
91 
101 
79 

82 



190 



State Depabtment of Health 



In each 1,000 Deaths there were from Cancer m the — 



DISTRICTS 



Maritime 

Hii<te)n Valley 

Adirondack and Northern. 

Mohawk Valley 

Southern Tier 

East Central 

West Central 

Lake Ontario and Western 

Entire State 



Decade 
1885-1804 

21.6 


Decade 
1805-1004 


1005 


1006 


1007 


1008 


1000 


31.8 


30.4 


MO 


40.7 


44.6 


47.4 


25.8 


37.6 


44.2 


48.1 


44.1 


40.5 


53.3 


32.0 


42.0 


48.0 


45.1 


43.1 


43.8 


54.5 


34.2 


42.5 


48.8 


42.8 


46.1 


44.6 


55.8 


35.5 


46.5 


53.5 


51.3 


50.5 


55.7 


50.1 


36.4 


51.8 


52.0 


53.8 


50.8 


51.2 


57.8 


37.5 


40.5 


57.2 


56.1 


55.2 


60.8 


60.5 


30.2 


. 46.5 


54.0 
44.2 


52.1 


45.8 


50.0 


48.4 


25.0 


37.0 


43.0 


43.4 


47.3 


50.3 



1010 



48.0 
54.2 
48.8 
52 6 
60.7 
56.1 
67.2 
51 5 

51.0. 



During the past four years there were reported 26,516 deaths 
from cancer in this State, 10,567 (or 39.8 per cent.) being due 
to cancer of the stomach and liver, as will' be seen from the 
following : 



SEAT OF disease 



Cancer of mouth 

Cancer of stomach and liver 

Cancer of intestines and peritoneum . 

Cancer of skin 

Cancer of breast 

Cancer of female genital oraans 

Cancer of other or unspecined organs 

Total 



1907 


1908 


1909 


206 


169 


267 


2.396 


2,561 


2.677 


812 


849 


926 


201 


200 


202 


617 


599 


665 


946 


1,043 


1,146 


1.222 


1,113 


1.177 


5,400 


6,534 


7,060 



1910 



285 
2.933 
1.121 
192 
732 
1.096 
1.163 



7,522 



Mortality from Typhoid Fever 

The following table shows the reported mortality from typhoid 
fever and deaths per 100,000 population due to typhoid since 
1885: 



YEAR 



1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 





Deaths 


ktlia 


per 100,000 


iins 


popula- 




tion 


.067 


19.0 


,169 


20.4 


,327 


22.7 


,483 


24.9 


,550 


25.6 


,612 


26.1 


,926 


30.5 


,664 


25.8 


,685 


25.7 


.640 


24.7 


,716 


25.4 


,542 


22.6 


.351 


19.4 



YEAR 



1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 



Deaths 


1.810 


1.604 


1.948 


1,741 


1.318 


1.665 


1.652 


1,554 


1,568 


1.673 


1.375 


1.315 


1.374 



Deaths 

per 100.000 

popuU- 

tion 



25.6 

22.4 

26.7 

23.4 

17.4 

21.5" 

20.9 

19.2 

19.0 

19.8 

16.0 

15.1 

15.0 



MORTALITY 

FROM 

TYPHOID FEVER. 

DEATHS PER 

inn nnn nnniiiATinki 



NlWymX SrAT£ IXPA/fTMCNr OF HEALTH 



Division of Vitai- Statistics 



191 



Deaths from Typhoid Fever per 100,000 population in the — 



DISTBICTS 



Hodm VaOcy 

AdJroodMtk and Northern. 

Mohawk VftOey 

SootberaTier 

EMt Central 

Wert'Ccatfsl 

Lake Ontaiio and VttaAan. 

Entire SUte 



1901 



20.0 
34.3 
24 4 
26.4 

24.8 
25.7 
190 
28.0 



234 



1902 



20 
36 
24 

19.8 
233 
17 7 
15.8 

27.8 



1903 



16.8 
25.4 
27.8 
23 4 
25.5 
17.1 
36 7 
30.4 



17.4 21.5 



1904 


1905 


170 


16.2 


35 1 


28.4 


31.5 


26 7 


19 4 


18 4 


21.2 


17 5 


194 


169 


20.5 


18.0 


245 


25.2 


20.9 


19.2 



1906 1 1907 



15 2 
26.1 
27.9 
19.4 
27.9 
14.1 
19.4 
25.8 



17.2 
27.3 
26.1 
17.2 
20.3 
18.8 
14.3 
27.1 



19.0 19.8 



1908 



13 
21 
18 
17 
20 
17 
19 



22.8 



16.0 



1909 



12 
20 
19 
13 
22 
16 
13 
20 



15.1 



1910 



11 

21 

24 

10. 

16 

34 

20 

18 



tf.O 



In each 1,000 deaths there were from Typhoid Fever in the — 



DISTRICTS 


1 
1901 


1902. 


1903 


1904 

9 
20 
22 
13 
11 
12 
13 
17 


1 

1 
1906 , 

1 


1906 


1907 


1906 


1909 


1910 


Maritime 

Hodaon Valley 

Adiraodark and Northern. 
Mohawk VaUer 


10 ; 

20 
17 
17 
18 

18 
13 
20 

13 J 


11 
23 
20 
14 
17 
13 
11 
20 


10 
14 
21 
16 
20 
14 
24 
21 


9 1 

" i 

18 
12 
12 

11 
11 . 

17, 


.1 

19 
12 
19 
9 
13 
16 


9 
15 
17 
10 
13 
11 

9 
17 


8 
13 
13 
11 
13 
10 
13 
15 


8 
12 
13 

9 
15 
11 

9 
13 


7 
12 
15 

7 


Soathem Tier 


11 


Evt Central 


15 


Wert Central 


11 


Lake Ontario an^ Wertcm. 


12 


Entire State 


14 


" 


12 


12 


11 


11 

1 


10 


9 


9 







City Mortality from^ Typhoid Fever 

The following shows the annual mortality by months from 
typhoid fever in the cities of the State since 1900; also total 
deaths from all causes, and typhoid death rate. 

The death rate for years other than those in which official 
census wad taken is based upon estimated population as shown 
by the average yearly increase between census periods. 



State Department op Health 



Mortality fbom Typhoid Feveb 
Greater New York 



Buffalo 



Syracuse 




Divisiox OF ViTAT, Statistics 



Mortality FROsr Typhoid Feveb — (Continued) 
Albany 



\UR 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


J 


i 


1 


f 




1 


1 


Totel 


P"^'^ 


ToU 

1 


1 


IMO 
IMl 






! 




i 


1 






1 


: 


"e 


i 


11 


.":■•■ 




;;; 

Ml 
Mi 


Ml 


itot 

ItM. 
not 




■ 1 


ii ; 


looidia 


ill 




If! 




i* 


JOO 


;i^ 






H.t 


TaUl 


"1 "1 - 


U' 1! 


J2 


,.|. 


J! 


_J! 


J! 


J! 


«* 


i..i» 


„ 



« i }[ 2 l' to 9 



Troy 



State Depabtmknt of Health 



MoKTALiTT FRou Typhoid Fevek — {C(mtinued) 
Schenectady 



YEAR 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 

1 


1 


i 


1 


ToUl 


^^!r 


TdW 


1 


is 




3 


3 

2 
1 


3 
2 




■J 






j 


! 


IS 


*^ 








1 


iS 'I 










-TiMO 






^ 




,.j 1 




MS 
1.070 


'» 




Total .. 


^j. 




J 


J 


_1 


_!; 


J? 


. "1 _• 


-i! 


'" 





B.tSO 








Binghamton 



Division of Vital Statistics 



MoBTALiTY FBou Typiioid Fevee — {Continued) 
Jamestown 



■no. 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


J 


1 


1 


■ 


1 


1 


1 


ToW 


PopuU- 
tun 


3 


1 




-1 








■, 








1 


\ 




«.m 


2B0 
291 


3B3 








2£ 
» 
23 
( 
11 




















tos 

S:;;: 


1 






i 




:■ 




\\ 3 


\ 






■ ie.iw 


I 


•07 .... 


... j ' 


'J 




.,,,,,., 


3i: 




























~i 
























Total.. 


10 


_! 


_! 


1 


J 


! 


„• 


1! 


< 


10 


Jl 


»^l 1 ^-'^ 


_ 





















2 










1 


■■■■23'MS 


3W 
BBS 

*2C 
MO 








1 












2 
3 














"i 


































1 


1 
















1 




























•ss 


















■■■■J^JM 


I?" 




' 




1 






1 


1 


22.1 


TeW... 


^ 


_J 


_! 


_L 


t 




_! 


_! 


_J 


I 


_* 


_? 


5? 


==^ 








SSf 
















...| ..j..^ 


t; 




...":"'' 


2W «8 












-,l 

.1 ■■; ■ 

1 • 


































■ 2S;«M 






... 


... 


.... 


«3 lot 


IK 


i 




«! 


37. 




l"*'j 




























Total - 




ai 3 










I 


1 fi 


«] 


3.S4S 



































Niagara Falls 





3 

1 


3' 1 3 1 

!| ! ■ J !; 1 

I;"' ii....' 1 


24 
9 


1S.»S7 


301 

1 


m.3 












1!!? 


! 


».Ha 










j 


■■■3o:«i7| 


nv 


7 


'* 


" "i i " " 


JSP 




t.m 






State Department of Health 



MoETALiTY FKOM Typhoid Feveb — (Conitnued) 
New Bochelie 



'ye*r 


1 


1 


J 


1 


i 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 


j 


1 


ToUl 


P°£^ 




1 


IMO . .. 

tm.' ... 

1«B 




, 






' 


■ 


1 


::■ 


i 


} 




i 




14.720 
M.»80 


ICf 
33! 


3S.a 






1 




S:: 


-i 




Si 


1»10. ... 


jP 


i 1 ' 




■sflim 


34; 


■J:i 


ToUJ.,, 




> 1 , 


= 


= 


i 


7 


17 















Poughkeepsie 



Kingston 



4M 












MS 
























.. 









DiTisiow OF Vital Statistics 



Mortality fbom Typhoid Fevee- 
Newburgh 



-{Continued) 



JKAB 


1 


1 


1 


1 


s 


1 


J 


1 


1 


1 


J 


i 


ToUl 


"r- 


i 

(MM) 


1 
























i 

1 


! 

■"■; 


1 


24,«43 


HI 


































1 








■■ Hi.m 




IS 


"2 
2 




' 


:• 






«■? 








! 
1 


















■■■ islBM 


















J S 












Totol, ,. 


s 


_2 


_i 


2 


= 


_! 


_! 


^1^^ 


j._i,i_™ 


t S.«8 








! 


».... 


i 








& i 


M,»10 


i 








= 






,. 1 


' 










: 




2 




' 




"si !( 








"■"' 




IS 


13 


^i 


_i 


: • I 


a' 2ii 




1.K7 













Oswego 



^ 


3 

1 


■:::ii 


2 
3 


!: 
'; 


71 m 


g 

3K 
(0. 

1 


«■! 








i 


'"^'M 


WO 


I 


■ --l -l-* 


2J.«0 


2sa 


13 


Ifi 


7 IS 13 


122 




*,0S3 


. 



198 



State Department of Health 



Mortality from Typhoid Fever — (Continued) 

Rome 



YEAR 



1900. 

1901. 

1902. 

1903. 

1904. 

1905 

1906. 

1907. 

1908. 

1909 

1910. 



Total. 



S 



6 



< 



& 



9 



I 



I 



C 
55 



10 



Total 



Po|>uIa- 
tioii 




1 

2 


15.343 


239 
277 


4 




261 


2 




248 


3 




270 


7 
5 


10.552 


366 
299 


3 




340 


5 




360 


3 




382 


4 


20.632 


410 


39 




8.362 










ill 



65 
12.2 
25.2 
18.6 
24.6 
43.3 



28 
17 
26 
16 
19 



1900 
















Lockp 

2 1 

4! 1 


ort 






3 
12 

6 
13 

6 

9 
12 

9 
11 

9 

2 


16.581 


266 18 


1901 






2 


2 


3 

1 

1 

1 

.... 

2 
5 


1 
.... 

1 
2 


2 

1 
2 








284 
237 
283 
287 
261 
241 
274 
250 
276 
299 


71 5 


1902 






i 

1 

1 

3 


• • ■ • 

• • • ■ 

2 


1 
1 
1 

1 




35.4 


1903 


1 






2 
.... 

2 




75.7 


1904 




1 




1 




34 6 


1905 






1 

"3 
3 






17.552 


51.8 


1906 




2 






2 


# 


67.6 


1907 


1 






2 


1 
1 
2 

1 




60.1 


1908 


2 






* 1 
3 


4 




60 7 


1909 


1 






4 


1 




49 7 


1910 






1 

8 








17,993 


11 I 




3 


2 


10 


14 


7 


5 


12 


10 




Total... 


14 


92 




2.958 











Dunkirk 



1900 




3 


1 


1 
2 
1 
1 
1 










1 








6 
4 

10 
4 

6 
6 
5 
13 
2 
2 
4 


11.616 


184 
165 
233 
r»7 
274 
228 
255 
265 
241 
202 
279 


51.6 


1901 




1 








1 






33.4 


1902 


1 
1 


1 
1 


4 


1 




.... 


1 


1 


.... 




76.5 


1903 




29.0 


1904 


1 


1 


1 






2 

1 
1 
1 






41.3 


1905 


1 
2 
2 




1 




1 


* • • • 

2 


2 
1 

1 


15.250 


39.3 


1906 










1 
3 

1 


31.4 


1907 


1 
1 


1 


.... 






1 




71.8 


1908 








11.1 


1909 




( 










1 


1 


.... 
6 




11.1 


1910 








1 
3 


2 


1 
3 


1 

6 






17,308 


23.1 




7 


7 


7 


7 


3 




4 




Total... 


7 


62 




2.563 





1900 

1901 

1902 


1 
2 


.... 


1 


1 
1 


1903 

1904 


2 




2 


1 
2 


1905 

1906 


1 






1 


1907 

1908 


1 


"l 
"2 


'"2 


1 


1909 

1910 


.... 




Total... 


7 


3! : 
— 1 — 


7 



Ogdensburg 



1>.... 










2 




5 
4 

8 
8 
6 
7 
10 
7 
4 
4 
6 


12.633 


205 
252 
204 
233 
23^ 
251 
269 
265 
252 
245 
266 


39.5 


11 








31.4 


2 1 





.... 


1 










62.3 


1 ... 


1 


1 


• • • ■ 




61.7 


4 1 


"2 


1 

• • • ■ 

2 






68.9 


■r- 


1 
3 

1 

1 

• • • • 

2 

9 


2 
1 

i 

1 


"3 
1 
1 


13.179 


53.1 
67.3 


1 


1 




47 1 


■■'ic; 


""i5.98i 


26 8 




1 




36.8 


|. . . . 


1 
f 


4 


37.5 


"•"i 








11, 2 


6 3 


6 


72 




2.680 





Division of Vital Statistics 



MoBTALiTT FROM Ttphoid Fevee — (^Ccmttnued) 
Middletown 



YEAR 


1 


1 


1 


! 


1 


i 


f 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 


ToW 


-fi^ 


ToUl 
sun) 


1 




























• 


„,» 


231 
221 

241 

S 
1 












' 




















1 














3 
































































M.5W 










1 


:::. 


















■■ 




















.... 
































U.IBT 






7~ 


"1 


~2 
















_! 


_! 


t 


_• 


_! 


! 


^ 


-? 


^ 




=.» 
























WatervUet 


14.131 






... 




i 
4 
















1 






22i 
2(0 






































s: 


: 




-1 


[ 




1 




....":" 




















1 


1 


J 




• 






























T 


' 






' 






. '*■'*' 






TWil,.. 


_I 


8 


l> 


_1 


10 


1 


2 


J 


_• 


=! 


_2 


_J 


_y 







lU... 










-, 




! 


i 


I 


1 
1 


u.m 
















'i ' 


" 


* ' 










2 


















.-.^. 


.'. 


».«ii 
























.... 




~4 


'": 














■Uisii 






















rMd... 


4 10 


J? 


4 S 


_1 


_1 


i 


7 


_« 


_J 







200 



State Depabtment of Health 



MoBTALiTY FROM Typhoid Fever — {Coiitinued) 

Olean 



YEAR 



1900. 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1004. 

1905 

1006 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910. 



Total 



I 



1 



1 1 






-& 



1 



J 



I 






J6 



ToUl 



I 

2 

3i 

3| 
2. 



201 



Popula- 
tion 



Total 
mor- 
tality 
(an 
causes) 



Q 



9.462 


130 
110 
117 
104 
138 
12^ 
139 
138 
139 
211 
188 


105 
20.8 
30.7 




30 3 




ao.o 


10.163 


0.0 

ao.o 




19.1 




22.1 




111 


14,814 







1.536 










LacJcawanna^ 



1910 








( 










Total... 









































1 



14,549 


397 




547 


1 





6.0 



1900 






1 








Cormng 

1 2t 11 I 1 


2 


6 

5 

3 

6 

6 

4 

6 

10 

12 

19 

8 


11,061 


1901 


1 










1 




2 






1 




1902 


1 
.... 














1903 


2 

1 
1 


1 


1 




.... 
1 
1 


.. 


1 

"z 

1 

1 
2 

1 

10 


1 






1904 


i 


1 




1 


1 

1 

4 




1905 








11.... 


2: 2 
4i 1 


13.515 


1906 










1 




1907 


2 


1 


1 


.... 


1 

1 
6 










1908 


1 
1 

3 


2 


3 
2 

• • • • 




1909 

1910 


2 


1 


3 

1 

7 


3 
3 


1 
2 

13 


2 

1 

10 


13^74? 







3 




Total.. 


6 11 


85 





202 


512 


178 


43.2 


149 


24 9 


167 


48 


200 


46 1 


217 


30 


188 


43 I 


268 


69 


232 


78.2 


217 


12 3 


200 


58 2 



2,218 



Homell 



1900 


1 














1 


1 


i.::::::: 


3 

1 '" 

5, 


11.918J 

1 


165 
174 
154 
191 

204 
202 
189 
IH 
209 
1P5 
174 


25 1 


19C1 




1 










32.8 


1902 


.... 










1 
1 


1 
1 


••j 




32 1 


1903 




1 


2 










■ 13.259 


55.0 


1904 










' I 


■ "2 
1 


7 7 


1905 
















1 




1! 


30 2 


1906 


















ll 


7.5 


1907 


















) 


13.637 


7 5 


1908 


















2 

1 
3 

9 




14.1 


1909 












1 


.... 
5 


:;::::.:::: 1 


21.2 


1910 




1 










4 


36.6 




1 


........ 




.... 


3 




Total.. 


2 3 




3', 5 


35 




2.031 




I 











rt-=:=r 



♦ iDcorporated in 1909; formed from part of the town of West Seneca. 



Divisiox OF Vital Statistics 



Mortality from Typhoid Fevee — (Contititted) 
Geneva 



VEAR 


|!| 


1 


} 


1 


1 


S 


j 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Toui 


Ifi- 




.»> 






::: 




:■ 








:■ 










,..« 


m 


00 


IS i i 






1 




ij ia.MB 


Ml 


1(09 


:;J ■ i 


-j " 










"2 
a 


.. 














' 






IK. :. 






■■■ 


::::|. 


;■■ 


1 




S ■■»..» 


!!I 


Total . 


_1 


_;i_!l_:;_i[_!| I 


_i 


_! 


" 


1.810 






North ToTtawanda 



I0.3S1 


IS 
18C 

183 

182 


IIS 














11.122 


» 














iz.Sia 


S 



B.ON 


'l3» 








10,157 






■■i2;033 


180 



State Department of Health 



MoBTALiTT FBOM Typhoid Fever — (CmtHnued) 
Hudson 



YEAR 


1 


1 


1 

a 


I 


1 


g 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


To«d 


■s- 


Total 

.1, 


i. 






2 




! 


1 














'i 


■.5» 


1 
1 

19 


M.4 






^ 
















I 


... ,^ 




■"■i6;»o 






t 


:;:: , 


1 






was , 


















,.'■ 




~ 


~ro 


'u 




,..' 














"iiiiM 






























Total.. 


10 


! 


a 


1 


3 


s 


2 


^ 


_1 


" 




I.IM 









Platt^urgh 












ii 1 






















































■ i 












■■ 


















n 

[■ ' 




















































































I 






















Otal... 


= 


1 


=^ 


= 


=4 


=i 


1 




=L 


3 3 4 


= 



EE: 


2 




..." 


■f'l: 




Be 


laaelaer 




* 1 






2 






■j 






























..' 


s 


S 






































Total.. 


_!• 


_J. 


•! ' 


^ 


_^ 


_J 


-J 3 


S 


_ 



io^iiz| 



Division of Vital Statistics 



203 



MoBTALiTY FROM Typhoid Fevee — {Continucd) 

Johnstown 



TEAR 



1900. 

1001. 

1902. 

1903. 

1904. 

1906. 

1906 

1907. 

1906. 

1999. 

1910. 



Totol 



I 



I 



1 



J6 






6 



I 



Total 



Populft- 
toon 



2 
1 

18 



10.130 



9,845 



10,476 



ToUl 

mor- 

UUty 

(aU 

causei^ 



Ik 
1§l 



lOP 

117' 

134 

156 

124 

145 

IIP 

UP 

123 

155 

143 



1.474 



6)1 
30.1 



10.2 
20.4 



21.1 



9.5 



1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1003. 

19:h. 

1905. 

1906 

1907. 

1906. 

1909. 

1910. 



Totel. 



2 



Oneonta 



V. 



6 



2 
1 


7,147 


5 




2 
4 




2 
4 


8.064 


2 




6 




7 
2 


9^552 

1 


37 


1 







89 

112 

09 

no 

139 
135 
131 
164 
156 
152 
181 



1.468 



27.9 
13.6 
56.5 
26.0 
60.8 
24.8 
48.6 
23.8 
68.2 
79 6 
20.9 



Port Jervis 



190O 

1901 


• • • 




1 


1 

1 




• • « ■ 


1 
1 

1 
1 


_ 


1 

1 

"2 
1 


1 


3 
3 
5 
7 
7 
7 
3 
5 


9. 385 


163 
164 
176 


1902 


1 






2 


• • • • 

3 
2 




1 


i 

- • • • 


1903 




1 


.... 


9.695 


165, 


1904 


3 




:::::: 1 


19S 


1905 




1 




2 




2 


2 




17* 


1906 








1 




"1 


176 


1907 




1 










2 ... 




176 


1908 


















16^ 

IW 
170 


1909 












1 


.... 


1 


' 1 

6 


'.'.'.'.'\ "^ 


""'3 
5 


2 

6 




1910 












9.304 




4 


1 


3 


2 


4 


6 


5 


3 




4 




Totol... 


— ■ 

6 


48 




1.9131 






( 



31.0 
31.8 
52.5 
73.1 
72.6 
72.2 
31.0 
51.0 



20 
64 



1900. 

1901. 

190S. 

1901. 

1904. 

1906. 

1906. 

1907. 

1906. 

009 

1910. 



Total. 



Oneida 



2 
4 

16 



7,538 



8,420 



8.316. 



86 
111 
108 
111 
112 
1311 
1311 
12H 
134 
13i! 
1171 



13.3 
25.9 
38.0 



36.3 

ir.8 

i9!8 
48!i 



1.308 



^ 






204 



State Department of Health 



MoHTALiTY FROM Typhoid Fever — (Coticluded) 

Tonawanda 



YEAR 


1 


u* 


1 


1 

< 


^ 

s 


»n 


^ 

^ 


-< 

1 
1 
1 

1 


i 




i 

55 


i 


Total 


Popula- 
tKm 


Total 
mor- 

•a 

causes) 


Death rate per 
100,000 pop- 
ulation 


190U 






' 1 " 

1 






1 
1 


7.421 




86 

106 

114 

98 

89 

98 

83 

109 

103 

1C6 

106 


13.4 


1901 
























18.3 


1902 
















.... 
1 


2 
1 


1 


.... 


5 

2 


67.3 


1903 


1 














26.0 


1904 




1 


1 








3 

2 




38.4 


1905 




1 
1 
1 








1 




7.904 


25.3 


1906 


1 








1 


.... 


1 








4 

2 
7 
2 
3 




50.6 


1907 














25 


1908 




1 




1 
I 


1 




1 


1 


1 




95.6 


1909 




1 
1 

5 








27.3 


1910 




2 

4 


















8.308 


36.1 


*> ' ' 


2 


1 


2 


2 


1 








2 


1 




^Total... 


5 


3 


4 


32 




1.097 











Mortality from Diphtheria 

The reported mortality from Diphtheria since 1885 and deaths 
per 100,000 population is shown by the following: 



YEAR 



Deaths 

from 

diphtheria 



1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 



.508 
.597 
,490 
,448 
.885 
.915 
,072 
.918 
,947 
.592 
.989 
.597 
.115 



Deaths 

per 100.000 

population 

aue to 
diphtheria 

80.3 
97.8 
111.3 
10S.4 
96.9 
79.5 
80.3 
91.9 
91.0 
99.3 
74.0 
67.1 
59.2 



YEAR 



1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 



Deaths 

from 

diphtheria 



2 
2 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



,612 
.786 
,306 
,026 
,859 
,035 
,041 
.296 
.691 
,603 
,473 
.313 
.433 



Deaths 

per 100.000 

population 

due to 
diphtheria 



37.0 
38.9 
45.4 
40.7 
37.7 
39.2 
38.4 
28.4 
32.6 
30.9 
28.9 
26.6 
26.5 



Deaths from Diphtheria per 100,000 potpulation in the — 



DISTRICTS 



Maritime 

Hudion Valley 

Adirondack and Northern 

Mohawk Valley 

Soutliern Tier 

East Central 

WeitCc&txal 

Lake Ontario and Western 

Entire State 



1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


1905 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


55.3 


52.6 


54.6 


51 3 


37 5 


43 5 


39.7 


38.8 


37.0 


33 7 


25.1 


19.4 


23.2 


21 1 


22.9 


31.6 


21.6 


14.4 


23.3 


11 4 


14.1 


16 


10 2 


16.3 


16 2 


12.7 


7.6 


34.1 


28.5 


22 5 


24.6 


15.6 


25.4 


17.4 


15 6 


11.8 


18.5 


27.9 


17 2 


23.5 


16.1 


13.7 


20.0 


14.1 


15.8 


15.8 


10.8 


12.2 


14.3 


8.6 


10.5 


15.2 


19.1 


10.0 


8.8 


10.4 


12 6 


15 2 


11.7 


8.4 


15.0 


10.9 


7.8 


26 7 


22.9 


34.5 


32.7 


25.5 


26.4 


19.1 


11.0 


17.6 


40.7 


37.7 


3)2 


38.4 


28.4 


326 


30.9 


28.9 


a«6 



1910 



34.2 
16.7 
11.3 
16.4 
13.1 

la.o 

5.3 

24.a 

26 6 



MORTALITY 

FROM 

DIPHTHERIA. 
DEATHS PER 

inn nnn nnniii ATinM. 



/MfM' mW STAm S£PAmM£ffrQFH£ALm 



/\ 



\'\ 






\ 



\../ 




MORTALITY 

FROM 

SCARLET FEVER 
AND MEASLES. 

DEATHS PER 

100,000 POPULATION^ 

SINCE 1885. ^ 

40 



30 



20 



10 







/Vl 






















































\ 




















































/ 




■ 


r 


V 














































/ 






_l 


\ 














































/ 






/ 




) 














































/ 






/ 






II 










































f 






/ 






\ 








































k 


> 


1 






/ 




ft 


i 




k 




































^ 


^ 


V 






fi 


\ 






i 


r" 








i 


V 










~~1 


i 












\ 


r 


\ 








\ 






f 


V 






J 


^ 


> 


V 






A 


k 


/ 


V 


/ 






















\ 








J 






/ 


X 




\ 


•i^ 


N 


/ 


) 


^ 


>< 


^ 






















\ 


^ 




^ 


•^ 


^ 


L 




V 


/ 


X 


1^ 




























^" 












^ 






^ 


'' 


A 


~ 


r 






















































































































































































18 


86 


•8 


8 


•9 





•9 


2 


•9 


4 


•fl 


« 


•9 


8 


i» 


00 





2 


'0 


4 


•0 


6 


'0 


8 


•1 










30 



20 



10 



Ibciti 



SCARLET FEVER. 
MEASLES. 



/V£Wyom STATE D£PAP7Af£Nr or HIAITH 



r\ 



Division of Vital Statistics 



206 



In each 1,000 deaths there were from Diphtheria in the — 



DISTRICTS 


1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


1905 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


1910 


Muitime 


28 
20 
17 
22 
13 
11 
8 
18 


28 

16 

9 

20 

21 

8 

8 

17 


31 
12 
10 
16 
14 
9 
8 
22 


26 
13 
11 
15 
19 
9 
10 
22 

21 


21 

12 

7 

11 

11 

6 

7 

17 


24 

13 

11 

15 

9 

7 

5 

17 


21 
17 
11 
10 
13 
10 
9 
12 


23 

13 
9 

10 
9 
7 
7 

12 


22 
9 
5 
7 

10 
6 
5 

12 


22 


Hudaon Valley 


10 


AdirondAck ftod NorthcrD . 
Mohftwk Valley 


7 
10 


Soathern Tier 


8 


EastCeotnl 


7 


Weit Central 


4 


Lake Ontario and Western . 


16 


Entire State 


23 


23 


24 


17 


19 


18 


18 


16 


17 







Scarlet Fever and Measles 

The reported mortality from scarlet fever and measles, and 
deaths per 100,000 population is shown by the following: 



YEAR 



18S5. 

1886. 

1887. 

1888 

1889. 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894. 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1900 

1907 

1908 

1900 

1910 



Deaths 
from 

scarlet 
fever 



1.184 

1.011 

1,267 

2.452 

2.205 

913 

2.252 

2.177 

1.626 

1,227 

850 

759 

841 

837 

730 

689 

1.430 

1.215 

1,057 

1.194 

726 

690 

1,032 

1.688 

1,205 

1.617 



Deaths 

per 100.000 

popuIaiioD 

frona 

scariet 

fevOT 



21.1 
17.7 
21.7 
41.2 
36.4 
14.8 
35.6 
33 8 
24.8 
18.8 
12.6 
11.1 
12.1 
11.8 
10.2 
9.4 
19.2 
16.0 
13.6 
15.1 
9.0 
8.4 
12.2 
19.8 
14.0 
17.6 



YEAR 



Deaths 

from 
measles 



1886. 

1886. 

1887. 

1888. 

1889. 

1890. 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1906 

1909 

1910 



Deaths 

per 100,000 

population 

from 

measles 



1.170 


20.8 


895 


15.6 


1.205 


20.7 


944 


15.9 


899 


14.8 


1,161 


18.8 


1,200 


19.0 


1.350 


20.9 


789 


12.1 


900 


13.6 


1,266 


18.8 


1.495 


21.8 


873 


12.6 


838 


11.8 


756 


10.6 


1.333 


18.3 


859 


11.6 


929 


12.2 


721 


9.3 


1.170 


14.8 


988 


12.2 


1.369 


16.6 


997 


11.8 


1.175 


13.7 


1.272 


16.0 


1,285 


14.0 



^ 



206 



State Department of Health 



In each 1,000 deaths ihere were from Scarlet Fever in the — 



DISTRICTS 



KUntime 

Hudson Vdley 

Adirondack and Northern 

Mohawk VaUey 

Southern Tier 

East Central 

Wert Central.. 

Lake Ontario and Western 

Entire SUte 



igoi 


1902 


15 


13 


7 


5 


6 


6 


4 


13 


3 


5 


5 


2 


2 


1 


4 


4 


11 


11 



1903 1904 



10 ' 

7 , 
4 I 

11 I 
5 

2 
1 
6 



8 



11 
3 
5 

11 
9 
6 
1 
2 



8 



1905 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


6 


6 


9 


17 


10 


4 


1 


3 


5 


3 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1 


6 


7 


3 


7 


7 


3 


1 


3 


2 


3 


9 


4 


3 


2 


5 


2 


2 


3 


2 


3 


5 


4 


4 


9 


15 


5 


5 


7 


12 


9 



1910 



12 

8 
3 

4 
7 
6 
4 
2 

11 



In each 1,000 deaths there were from Measles in the — 



DISTRICTS 



Muitime 

Hudson Valley 

Adirondack and Northern 

Mohawk Valley 

Southern Titf 

East Central 

West Central 

Lake Ontario and Westo-n 

Entire State 



1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


1905 


1908 


1907 


1908 


1909 


6 


10 


7 


11 


7 


14 


8 


13 


13 


5 


2 


3 


8 


9 


5 


4 


3 


4 


15 


5 


3 


1 


11 


. 3 


2 


1 


4 


8 


3 


3 


2 


5 


1 


4 


2 


2 


5 


5 


2 


9 


2 


1 


4 


2 


2 


13 


2 


5 


4 


4 


3 


1 


4 


6 


6 


3 


3 


3 


4 


3 


2 


2 


1 


6 


7 


6 


3 


11 


4 


7 


4 


8 


6 


8 


9 


10 


8 


10 


7 


8 


9 



1910 



10 
7 

12 
7 
5 
5 
4 

10 



Deaths from Violence 

The reported mortality from Violence and deaths per 100,000 
population due to accidents is shown by the following: 



YEAR 



1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895, 

189rt 

1897 



Deaths 

from 
violence 



2.994 
3.296 
3,780 
3,842 
3.834 
4.542 
5.028 
5,543 
5.295 
5.487 
5.889 
7,022 
6.172 



Deaths 
per 100.000 
popula- 
tion 




YEAR 



1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1006 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 





Deaths 


Deaths 


per 100.000 


from 


popula- 


violence 


tion 


6,520 


02.4 


6.003 


85.0 


6.714 


02.2 


7.926 


106.6 


7.058 


93 


7.646 


98.6 


8.822 


111.5 


8.352 


103.3 


8,874 


107.5 


9.668 


114.2 


9.183 


107.4 


9.232 


106.1 


9,846 


107.6 



r 

ilo 



no 

100 
90 
80 
70 
60 
90 



MORTALITY 

FROM 

VIOLENCE. 
DEATHS PER 
100,000 PGPULATIONy 

SINCE 1886. ^ 



NEW Y(mK STATE i 



Ml 



h 



E, 



Division of Vital Statistics 



207 



In eac\ 1,000 deaths there were from Violence in the — 



districts 



Ifantune 

HudsoDVaDey 

Adirondack koA Northern. 

Mohawk VftUey 

Soathem Tier 

Eaat Central 

Wert Central 

Lake Ontario and Western 

Entire SUte 



Decade. 
1886-1894 


Decade. 
1895-1904 


1905 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


3«.0 


57.7 


53 5 


63.1 


66.4 


69.0 


65.4 


40.7 


49.3 


64.6 


58.3 


60.3 


61.9 


70.0 


36.7 


46.2 


52.3 


56.1 


54.0 


60.4 


58.7 


43.5 


53.1 


58.8 


60.9 


61.5 


60.4 


68.4 


51 


55 5 


67.0 


59.4 


63.3 


62.7 


66.9 


44.0 


50.0 


54 5 


60.9 


63.7 


62.1 


61.5 


44.5 


51.7 


58.0 


63.6 


63.3 


64.1 


65.8 


48.5 


57.0 


66.2 


74.2 


71.2 


63 1 


73.4 


40.3 


55.8 


61.0 


63.3 


65.3 


66.1 


65.8 



1910 



64. 

74. 

58. 

67. 

70. 

67.8 

65.7 

62.8 



.6 
1 

.3 
.6 
.6 



65.0 



In each 1,000 deaths there were from Diarrhea {under 2 years 

of age) in the — 



DISTRICTS 



Maritime 

Hudsoii Valley 

Adirondack and Ncrthem 

Mohawk Valley 

PcuthemTwr 

East Central 

Wect Central 

Lake Ontario k Western . 

Entire State 



1900 


1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


1905 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


56 


93 


£5 


75 


76 


83 


74 


79 


81 


69 


68 


40 


42 


35 


36 


43 


36 


20 


43 


35 


72 


41 


33 


38 


23 


43 


34 


86 


46 


39 


65 


41 


44 


35 


40 


41 


44 


47 


63 


50 


55 


30 


34 


35 


23 


29 


37 


25 


34 


22 


68 


31 


33 


28 


20 


32 


36 


37 


41 


36 


67 


28 


35 


26 


26 


36 


36 


22 


30 


26 


86 


60 


66 


50 


53 


50 


57 


46 


62 


48 


62 


72 


67 


60 


60 


66 


61 


63 


66 


56 



1910 



74 
39 
40 
64 
33 
44 
33 
54 

61 



In each 1,000 deaths there were from Pneumonia in the — 



DISTRICTS 



Maritime 

HudKn Valley 

Adirondack vod Northern. 

Mohawk VaOey 

Soathem Tio 

East Central 

WestCentral 

Lake Ontario and Western 

Entire State 



1903 


1904 


1905 


1906 


89 


110 


125 


137 


70 


78 


76 


79 


57 


60 


66 


74 


64 


73 


77 


76 


55 


70 


70 


60 


64 


83 


75 


61 


60 


72 


70 


65 


' 51 


65 


65 


60 


fM) 


95 


104 


109 




1910 



72 
67 
64 
79 
65 
69 
57 
40 



67 



As one of the representatives of the Department designated to 
attend the annual meeting of the American Public Health Asso- 
ciation, held in Milwaukee, Wis., September 5-9, 1910, I respect- 



208 State Depabtment of Health 

fully report that I attended the sessions of the Section on Vital 
Statistics and took part in the prc^ram, which was as follows : 

September 6 

Business meeting of the Section, followed by an address by the 
chairman. 

Presentation of papers as follows: 

1. " Kegistration of Births/' by F. D. Beagle, Director Division 
Vital Statistics, Xew York State Department of Health, Albany, 
N. Y. 

2. " Premature Still Births," by Dr. Jno. S. Fulton, Secretary 
General International Congress on Hygiene and Demography. 
Washington, D. C. 

3. " The Importance of Birth Eegistration to Determine In- 
fant Mortality," by Dr. J. H. Mason Knox, Jr., Physician in 
charge of the Thos. Wilson Sanitarium for Children, Balti- 
more, M. D. 

4. *^ The Work of the Association for the Study and Prevention 
of Infant Mortality," by Dr. Marshall L. Price, Secretary State 
Board of Health, Baltimore, Md. 

September 7 

5. " The Practical Side of Eegistration and the Obstacles En- 
countered in the Application of the Registration Laws in Ne- 
braska," by Dr. E. Arthur Carr, Secretary State Board of Health, 
Lincoln, Neb. 

6. " The Prevalence of Tuberculosis in European Immigrants 
to Canada," by Dr. P. H. Bryce, Chief Medical Director, Depart- 
ment of Interior, Ottawa, Canada. 

7. " The Importance of the R^istration of Marriage Certifi- 
cates," by Dr. F. W. Shumway, Se^cretary State Board of Health, 
Lansing, Mich. 

8. " Occupational Statistics for Tuberculosis in Wisconsin," by 
Mr. L. M. Hutchcroft, Statistician, Stat^ Bureau of Vital Statis- 
tics, Madison, Wis. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. D. BEAGLE, 
Chief Clerk and Director Division of Vital Statistics 



SPECIAL REPORT ON VITAL STATISTICS 



1900-1909 



BY 



Prof. Walter F. Willcox, Consulting Statistician 



I209I 




212 



Statk Department of Health 



The table shows that the number of deaths in the last years was 
between 4i and 6 per cent greater than the number in 1900. As 
the population of the State has been increasing more rapidly than 
this and in 1910 exceeded that in 1900 by more than one-fourth 
(25.4 per cent), it is clear that the ratio of deaths to living 
population has been falling. 

The simplest and so the first mode of classifying these deaths 
is by sex. During the ten years the deaths of males were 730,134 
and those of females 631,658, an excess of nearly 100,000, or 
7.2 per cent, in male deaths. This is probably not due to any 
excess of males in the population of the State, for in 1900 and 
earlier females were more than half of the State's population. 
To determine whether the ratio of deaths of either sex to the total 
has undergone any change during the period, the deaths by sex for 
each year as well as for the two quinquennial periods are given 
below. 

Table 2. — Deaths in New York State Classified by Sex, 
FOR Each Year, 1900-1909, inclusive 





Total 


Dbathh 


Per C«nt 


Excses OP Maim 
Deaths 


year 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


Number 


Per cent 


1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1900-04 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1905-09 


132,352 
131.461 
124,657 
127,602 
142,014 
658.086 
137.222 
140,626 
146.882 
138,883 
140.073 
703.686 


69.687 
70.070 
66,841 
68.030 
75.985 

350.613 
73.432 
75.990 
79.922 
74.691 
75.466 

379,501 


62.665 
61,391 
57,816 
59.572 
66.029 

307.473 
63.790 
64.636 
66.960 
64.192 
64.607 

324.185 


S2.7 
53.3 
53.6 
53.3 
63.5 
53.3 
53.5 
54.0 
54.4 
53.8 
53.9 
53.9 


47.3 
46.7 
46.4 
46.7 
46.5 
46.7 
46.5 
46.0 
45.6 
46.2 
46.1 
46.1 


7.022 

8.679 

9,025 

8.458 

9.956 

43.140 

9.642 

11.364 

12.962 

10.499 

10.869 

66.316 


5.4 
0.6 
7.2 
6.6 
7.0 
0.6 
7.0 
8.0 
8.8 
7.6 
7.8 
7.8 



In each of the ten years deaths of males outnumbered those of 
females by from seven to thirteen thousand and by 5 to 9 per 
cent. The excess of male deaths was greater absolutely and 
relatively toward the close of the decade. This may be due to an 
increasing proportion of males in the population (about that we 
are not yet informed) or to a fall in the death rate of females 
greater than the fall for male^ or to some combination of the two. 



Special Report ox Vit.vl Statistics 



213 



A classification almost as obvious as that by sex And exercising a 
greater influence upon death is the classification by age. The 
tabulations by age are for single years under five and by five year 
age periods above five. The deaths during this ten year period 
were distributed to the several ages as shown in Table 3. 



Table 3. — Deaths in Xew Yokk State Distributed by Age 
Fon THE QnxQUENNiAL PERIODS 1900-1904 and 1905-1909 
AND FOR THE Decexnial Period 1900-1909 



AGE 



Under 1 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5-9 

10-14 

16-19 

20-34 

25-29 

3Q-34 

35-39 

40-44 

46-49 

50-64 

55-fiO 

GO-^ 

66-69 

70-74 

76-79 

SO-S4 

86-89 

90-94 

95 and over. . 
Age unlcDowo 

Total ... 



1900-1909 


1900-1904 




Ratio 


• 


Ratio 


Number 


per 
10,000 


Number 


per 






10.000 


257.010 


1.887 


122,783 


1.866 


63.981 


470 


32.010 


486 


27,488 


202 


14.036 


213 


17,122 


126 


8,764 


133 


12.261 


90 


6.637 


99 


33.496 


246 


17.599 


267 


19.069 


140 


9.529 


145 


30.644 


225 


15.012 


228 


47,716 


350 


23.569 


358 


57.286 


421 


29.103 


442 


61.221 


450 


30,592 


465 


67,016 


492 


32.289 


491 


65,096 


478 


31,210 


474 


64,120 


471 


29.291 


445 


68.129 


500 


32.288 


491 


69.330 


509 


33.082 


503 


78,648 


578 


37.076 


563 


80.583 


592 


37,705 


573 


78.750 


578 


37,719 


573 


70.078 


516 


33,327 


607 


51,580 


379 


24.957 


379 


27.636 


202 


12.535 


191 


9,277 


68 


4.414 


67 


2.638 


19 


1.239 


19 


1.698 


12 


1.420 


22 


1.361.772 


10.000 


658.086 


10.000 



1905-1909 


Qttinqueimial 
change 


Number 


Ratio 

per 

10.000 


De- 
crease 


In- 
crease 


134.227 

31.971 

13.452 

8.358 

5.724 

15,897 

9,540 

15,632 

24.146 

28.183 

30.629 

34.727 

33.886 

34.829 

35.841 

36.248 

41,572 

42.878 

41,031 

36.751 

26.623 

15.001 

4.863 

1.399 

278 


1,907 
454 
191 
119 
81 
226 
136 
222 
343 
401 
435 
494 
482 
495 
509 
515 
591 
609 
583 
522 
379 
213 
69 
20 
4 


"32 
22 
14 
18 
41 
9 
6 
15 
41 
30 

"is 


41 

3 

8 
50 
18 
12 
28 
36 
10 
15 

22 

2 
1 


703.686 


10,000 







This shows that much the largest number of deaths, between one- 
fifth and one-sixth of the total, occur in the first vear of life and 
that more deaths occur in each of the three following years than 
at any later year of age. After four is reached the annual num- 
ber of deaths fall below that in and beyond middle life, 35 to 79 
\-ears of age, and continue to sink to a minimum at the age of 
puberty, when only about one three hundred and fiftieth of the 
total number of deaths oc^-cur in any one year of age. The 
largest number of deaths after the years of infancy are passed 



214 



State Depabtment of Heai^th 



occur at the ages 65 to 69, when about one eighty-fifth of the 
total deaths occur in any one year of age. A rough distribution 
of the total deaths to age periods has been made and shows that 
each five deaths in the State on the average occur within the fol- 
lowing limits of age: 

One between birth and the age of 1 year, 3 months — interval 15 months. 
One between 1 year, 3 months and 27 years, 2 months — interval 311 months. 
One between 27 years. 2 months and 48 years. 6 months — interval 256 months. 
One between 48 years, 6 months and 65 years. 1 month — interval 199 months. 
One between 65 jrears, 1 month and limit of life. 

The interval requisite to result in one-fifth of all the deaths 
is least in infancy and, as the oldest person to die among the 
1,861,772 was probably more than. 100, it is greatest in old age. 
A second maximum is found in youth and early adult life, after 
which the interval diminishes because the increasing danger of 
death more than counterbalances the diminishing number ex- 
posed to it. 

Table 3 in showing the distribution of deaths by age for each 
quinquennial period reveals the fact that deaths under 1 and 
deaths over 35 years of age were a larger proportion and deaths 
between 1 and 34, inclusive, were a smaller proportion in the 
second five years. Failures to report ages have decreased and 
their number is now insignificant. These changes in distribution 
are summarized below: 





Propobtion or Dsaths in 


Increase (+) 
or decrease ( — ) 


AGE PERIOD 


1900-04 


1905-09 


Under 1 


1.86« 

2.830 

5.276 

22 


1.907 

2.608 

5.481 

4 


-HI 


1-34 

36 and over 


—228 
+205 


Unknown 


— 18 






Total 


10.000 


10,000 









The decrease in the proportion of deaths at ages of 1 to 34 and Ht 
unknown ages and the increase in the proportion at ages of 35 and 
over are just what would be expected. But it is surprising to 
find an increase in the proportion of infantile deaths. In previous 



Special Repoet on Vital Statistics 



215 



reports reasons have been given for believing that in the State 
outside of New York City the unrecorded deaths are still numer- 
ous, but less so now than in 1900. Omission of infantile deaths 
is more oommon than omission of deaths at other ages. This 
seeming increase of infantile mortality may then be due, at least 
in part, to an improvement of the records. To test this con- 
jecture, the total has been broken into two parts, one for New 
York City, where the omissions in 1900 and since were probably 
very few, and the other for the rest of the State, where omissions 
were more common. 



age period 



Under 1 

1 to34 

85 and oyer . . 
Unknown age 

Total 



Pbopobtion or Dkatrb in 



OTDw TosK cmr 



190(M)4 


1905-09 


2,198 

3.309 

4.490 

3 


2.208 
3.047 
4.744 

1 


10,000 


10,000 



Increase (+) 
or decrease ( — ) 



+10 

—262 

+254 

—2 



IUB8T or BTATa 



1900-04 



1,475 

2.284 

6,197 

44 



10.000 



1905-09 



1.662 

2,105 

6.325 

8 



10,000 



Increase (+) 
or decrease ( — ) 



+87 
^179 
+128 

—36 



The table shows that ages have been reported much more uni- 
formly in New York City where the age return is lacking on only 
one certificate in 10,000. The proportion in the rest of the State 
is now eight times that and in the first five year period the dif- 
ference was even wider. In the city the proportion of infantile 
deaths to the total has changed very little, but in the rest of the 
State it has noticeably increased. This supports but is far from 
proving the conjecture that much of the apparent increase in the 
proportion of infantile deaths is due to more accurate returns. 

The table gives no ground for concluding that infant mortality 
in New York City is greater than in the rest of the State. To 
determine that, the living population under one year of age, or 
better yet, if possible, the annual number of living births is 
needed. This point must be passed by for the present with a 
caution against such a misinterpretation of the figures. 



216 



State Department of Health 



The mass of deaths may next be analyzed by sex and age oom- 
bined, as in Table 4. 



Table 4. — Deaths in New York State Classified by Sex and 

Age, 1900-1909, inclusive 



age 



Under 1 . . 

1.. 

2.. 

3. 

4.. 
5-9.. 
10-14.. 
15-19.. 
20-24.. 
25-29.. 
30-34.., 
35-39.. 
40-44.. 
45-19 .. 
oO-54.. 
55-59.. 
60-«4.. 
65-69.. 
70-74... 
76-79... 
80-84... 
85-89... 
90-94.. 
95+ .. 
Inknowu. 

Total 



Total 



257,010 
63.981 
27,488 
17,122 
12,201 
33.496 
19,069 
30.644 
47.716 
57,286 
61.221 
67.016 
66.096 
64.120 
68.129 
69.330 
78.048 
80,583 
78,760 
70.078 
51,580 
27.536 
9,277 
2,638 
1,698 



Male 



142.223 

33.933 

14.643 

8.901 

6,308 

17,367 

9,776 

16.864 

24.969 

30.628 

34.609 

39,078 

37,665 
38.481 
37,916 
41.169 
41.408 
39.414 
34,343 
24,575 
12,664 

3,729 
960 

1.158 



1.3G 1.772 ; 730.114 



Female 



114,787 
30.048 
12.946 
8,221 
5,968 
16.129 
9.294 
14,780 
22,766 
26.668 
26,622 
27.938 
26.606 
26.465 
29.648 
31.415 

of ,4ov 

39.175 

39.336 

35.735 

27.005 

14.972 

5.548 

1.688 

540 



631,658 



E^xcEss OF Dkatbs 
Auoxo — 



Males 



27,436 

3.885 

1,598 

680 

346 

1.238 

481 

1.064 

2.203 

3.970 

7.977 

11.140 

12.084 

11,190 

8,833 

6.500 

3.670 

2.233 

78 



618 



98.456 



Females 



1.392 
2.430 
2,408 
1.819 
738 



Male 

deaths 

to 1.000 

female 



1,239 
1,129 
1.124 
1,083 
1.068 
1,077 
1.073 
1,052 
1,097 
1,149 
1,300 
1,399 
1,466 
1,423 
1,298 
1,207 
1.006 
1.057 
1.002 
961 
910 
839 
672 
563 
2.145 



1,166 



An excess of male deaths is found at every age under 75 and 
of female deaths at every age over 75. This is probably not due 
t4> an excess of males in the living population, for in 1900 such 
exces?} of males was reported by the census only at ages below 15 
(except 8 and 13) and between 29 and 56, inclusive (except 50, 
54 and 55).^ At 63 of the 105 diflFerent age periods included in 
the census table the female population of the State was more 
numerous than the male. The excess of male deaths between 30 
and 54 and of female deaths at ages above 75 must be due at 
least in part to the larger num'ber exposed to die. But the excess 
of male deaths between 15 >ind 30 and between 55 and 75 cannot 
1)0 >^o accounted for and must be due to a greater male death rate. 



« Tm-elfth cenaus. volume 2, pages 72. 73. 



Special Report on Vital Statistics 



217 



Much the largest part, nearly 28 per cent, of the net excess of 
uiale deaths is found in infancy, the deaths of males under one 
year of age exceeding those of females by 24 per cent. As the 
births of males exceed those of females by only 5 or 6 per cent and 
the male children under 1 living in the Stat© in 1900 exceeded the 
female by only 2 per cent, the difference between these ratios is 
an evidence of the much greater mortality of male infants. 

A table similar to Table 3 but including also the sex classifica- 
tion has been prepared, but it adds so little that it does not deserve 
ins^ion. It does show that the increase in the proportion of 
female infant deaths between the two periods, 1900-04 and 1905- 
09, was 2i times the increase in the proportion of male infant 
deaths. If this be due in part to improvement of the records, 
as has been conjectured, it would seem to follow that during the 
five years, 1900-1904, the deaths of female infants were more 
likely to escape registration than the deaths of male infants. 

The State contains so small proportions of races other than 
white that little need be said regarding deaths by race. The fol- 
lowing summary shows the general results. 



Deaths in New York State Classified by Race, 1900-1909, 

inclusive 



race 



White 

N«|po. . . . 
laman. . .. 
Mongoliui 

ToUl. 



1900-04 


1905-09 


642,794 

14.477 

251 

564 


686,701 

16.245 

238 

502 


658.086 


703,686 



1900-0<» 



1.329,495 

30,722 

4S<» 

l.OrW) 

1.361.772 



Reported deaths of Indians and Mongolians have decreased in 
actual numbers and still more in proportions. That the reported 
dealiis of Negroes have increased more rapidly than tot^l de^th^ is 
shown by the fact that of each 10,000 deaths Negro deaths con- 
stituted 220 in 1900-04 and 231 in 1905-09. Whether these 
changes are due to a decrease in the number of Indians and 
Mongolians in the State and an increase in the proportion of 
Negroes to total population only the unpublished figures of the 
census of 1910 can determine. 



218 



State Depabtment of Health 



Because of the much greater numbers involved, the classification 
of deaths among the white, population bj nativity is far more im- 
portant than the classification of total deaths by race. 

From this point of view the deaths are classified as follows : 

Number and per cent of all Deaths of Whites in New York 

State 



NATIVITY 



NfttiTe white 

Of native pArentB 

One or ootfa parents foreignbam 
pBrents' country of birth unknown. 

Foreign-bom white 

Country of birth unknown 

Total white 



Number 
1900-1904 


Percent 


Number 
1905-1909 


436.087 
193.639 
191.602 
50.846 
197,098 
9,609 


67.8 
30.1 .... 
29.8 .... 
7.9 .... 
30.7 
1.5 


463.512 
203.413 
218.087 
42.012 
216.591 
6.598 


642.794 


100.0 


686.701 

1 



Per cent. 



29.6 

31.8 

6.1 



67.5 



31.5 
1.0 



100.0 



About two-thirds of the decedents in the State are of native 
birth and less than one-third are of foreign birth. Here, too, evi- 
dence of improvement in the records is apparent. The propor^ 
tion of decedents whose country of birth was unknown fell from 
1.6 per cent in 1900-1904 to 1.0 per cent in 1905-09 and the pro- 
portion of decedents the birthplace of whose parents was unknown 
fell from Y.9 per cent in 1900--04 to 6.1 per cent in 1906-09. As 
these changes tend to obscure the changes in the other classes a 
second computation has been made after subtracting all decedents 
whose birthplace or parents' birthplace was unknown. The result 
is as follows : 



Number and pee cent op White Decedents with Birthplace 

AND Pabents' Bihthplace Stated 



NATIVITY 



Native: 

Of naiiye parents 

Of foreign-born paronta 

Foreign-bom 

Total with birthplace and parents' 
birthplace stated 



Number 
1900-1904 


Percent 


Number 
1905-1909 


Percent 


385.241 
193,639 
191.802 
197.098 


66.2 
33.3 .... 
32.9 ... 

33.8 


421.500 
203.413 
218.087 
216.591 


66.1 
31.9 .... 
34.2 .... 

33.9 


682.339 


100.0 


638,091 


100.0 



or de> 
(-) 



—1.4 
+1.S 



— .1 



+ .1 



Special Report on Vital Statistics 



219 



The marked decrease in native decedents bom of native parents 
is almost counterbalanced by the increase in native decedents bom 
of foreign-bom parents, the increase in the proportion of deatha 
among the foreign-bom population being very slight. 

The deaths are also classified by reported cause. The numerous 
causes are tabulated under 189 heads and these are combined into 
14 main groups. These groups may be divided into two classes, 
those in which the proportion of deaths to the total tended to de- 
crease between 1900 and 1909 and those in which the proportion 
tended to increase. Eight groups, as given below, showed an in- 
crease and six a decrease. This does not imply any increase in 
the mortality from these eight groups compared with the popula- 
tion, but merely that they are causing a larger proportion of such 
deaths as occur. 



Table 5. — Ratio of Deaths in New York State from Speci- 
fied Groups of Causes to 10,000 Deaths from all Causes 
FOR Each Year, 1900-1909, inclush'^e 

Groups causing an increasing proportion of deaths 



of ciroahtory 

lystttm 

DiMMi of digastiTe 

lystttm 

Tmemm of genito- 

urinaiy aystam... 

Child-birth 

DisMMi of looomotor 

■mam 

Mftlfannatioia 

Early inCaney 

ViolflDoa 

Total 



1000 


1001 


1002 


1003 


1004 


1905 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


858 


903 


1,015 


1,05S 


1.090 


1.U3 


1.130 


1.219 


1.264 


1.331 


1.328 


1,230 


1,188 


1.122 


1.170 


1,246 


1,262 


1,233 


1,278 


1.179 


744 
77 


783 
85 


835 

83 


87? 
85 


849 

89 


869 
99 


877 
94 


898 
99 


878 
98 


920 
05 


14 
67 

381 
522 


18 

68 

345 

636 


10 

73 

371 

697 


22 

78 
390 
657 


18 

78 

367 

633 


20 

85 

403 

674 


20 

93 

420 

693 


18 

96 

416 

091 


22 

94 

440 

696 


23 

97 
423 
687 


3.091 


4,068 


4.181 


4.285 


4.344 


4.509 


4.598 


4.670 


4,770 


4,755 



1900- 1905- 
1904 1009 



085 1.213 
1.208 1.230 



817 
84 



18 

73 

371 

620 



4,176 



97 

21 

93 

421 

688 



4.600 



Groups causing a decreasing proportion of deaths 



GaoaraldiaaneB. 
DiaeaMB of nervoiu 

lyatan. 
DiMoea of reapiratory 

ayatem 

Diaeianw of ricin. 

Old ace 

lU-dSned 

Total. 



1900 


1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


1905 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


1900- 
1904 


2.656 

1,093 

1,635* 

44 

260 

311 


2.790 

1.064 

1.541 

46 

257 

234 


2,661 

1.086 

1,564 

42 
250 
216 


2,676 

1.044 

1,513 

46 

22S 

208 


2,570 

1.079 

1,57S 

43 

196 

190 


2.542 

1.144 

1,389 

42 

192 

182 


2,570 

1,007 

1,418 

41 

201 

165 


2.609 

962 

1,476 

37 

147 

99 


2.696 

935 

1.307 
35 

149 
108 


2.632 

913 

1.449 

36 

128 

87 


2.608 

1.073 

1.568 
44 

239 
232 


6.00W 


5.932 


5.81?4 


5.715 


5.656 


5.491 


5.402 


5.330 


5,230 


5.245 

1 


5,824 



1905- 
1000 



2.010 

001 

1,400 

30 

103 

128 

5,340 



220 



State Department of Health 



The noteworthy fact revealed by Table 5 is the marked increase 
in the proportion of deaths from diseases of the circulatory sys- 
tem. Each year showed a larger proportion than any preceding. 
The total incre^e in these eight groups of causes between 1900 
and 1909 was 764 per 10,000. The increase from diseases of the 
circulatory system alone was 473 per 100,000, or more than three- 
fifths (61.9 per cent) of the increase from all eight groups of 
causes. At the same time there has been a marked decrease in 
the proportion of deaths from *' ill-defined causes " pointing to an 
improved detail and accuracy of diagnosis. As *' heart failure" 
is one of the group of ill-defined causes, it may well be tbat part 
of the increase in deaths from diseases of the circulatory system 
is due to an improved diagnosis. But even if all the decrease in 
the proportion of deaths from ill-defined causes were ascribed to 
a transfer from that group to the group of diseases of the circu- 
latory system, this would not account for one-half of the apparent 
increase in the latter. The conclusion that a rapidly increasing 
proportion of the deaths in New York State are due to diseases of 
the circulatory system seems well established by the evidence. 

The figures have been analyzed for New York City and the rest 
of the State with the following result. 



Pbr Cestt of De.vths From All Cavses Due to — 



YEAR 


DIABASES OF CIRCULATORY 
SYSTEM 


ILL-DEFINED CAC«E« 




New York 
city. 


Rest of 
State 


New York 
city 


Ke^i of 


1900 


7.2 

7.5 

8.4 

8.8 

8.9 

9.4 

9.7 

10.1 

10.5 

11.1 


10.2 
10.9 
12,3 
12.6 
13.4 
13.1 
13.5 
14.7 
15.0 
15.8 


2.2 
2.3 
1.8 
1.9 
1.5 
1.6 
1.4 
0.9 
1.0 
0.8 


4 2 


1901 


2.7 


1902. 


2.fi 


1903 

1904 


2 3 
2.3 


1905 


2.1 


1906 


2 


1907 


1.1 


1908 ■ . 


1.2 


1909. ... 


10 






Chanire 


+3.9 


+5.6 


—1.4 


—3.2 







Special Repout os Vital Statistics 



331 



Tile proportion of deaths from diseaeeis of the circulatory sys- 
tem in New York City is much smaller than the proportion in the 
reet of the Stiite. The main reason no doubt is that these are 
diseases characteristic of old age and the proportion of aged per- 
sons in New York City is much less than in the rest of the State. 
The increase in tlie proportion of deaths from these diseases in 
Now York City has been not much more than two-thirds of the 
increase in the rest of the fitate. Probably this is connected with 
the fact that the decrease in the proportion of deaths from ill- 
defined causes has been less than half as great in New York City 
as in the rest of the State. 

The fact that the average age at death is steadily and rapidly 
rising is closely connected with the increasing prevalence of 
death from diseases characteristic of old age, like those of the cir- 
culatory system. The common saying that a man is as old as his 
arteries illustrates this connection. No doubt the increasing ag© 
at death is an important element in explaining the increasing pre- 
valence of these diseases. If it were the sole cause we should expect 
to find that when deatlis are classified by the age of the decedent 
the pri^wrtion of deaths, for example, between 50 and 59 years 
of age which were due to diseases of the circulatory system was 
not greater or not materially greater in 1009 than in 1900. The 
following table shows the facts on this point. As these diseases 
are not common in early life, the table begins with the age of 30. 



Table 6. — Numbee of Deaths fbom Diseases of Circulatoey 
System Classified by Age and Propoetion to Deaths from 
all Cadses, 1900 AND 1909 





Dbatbs Fboh All 


Dbatu Fhoii Dueaoes or 
CincoLAToaT STmu 


Per CtKT Th*t Deathe 
Fbdu DiBBAaBE or Ciur 

or Dbitbs Fkim Au. 




■«„ 


1909 


IfOO 


IMS 


■«- 1 - 


Hi::;;;:; 

70-70 

ST:- 


ii 

";S 


13:823 

'Is 


ill 

'b75 


iItm 

4; 442 

2.aso 





222 



State Depaktment of Health 



Of all persons dying in New York State at ages above 60 more 
than one-fourth die of diseases of the circulatory system. The 
proportion of deaths ascribed to this group of causes at each age 
period was considerably greater in 1909 than in 1900. Hence 
the increase is not adequately explained by the increasing length 
of life alone or by the increasing accuracy of diagnosis alone or 
by these two cooperating causes. 

Is there any difference between New York City and the rest 
of the State in the proportion of deaths at a given age period due 
to diseases of the circulatory system? As these are diseases of 
old age the following table designed to answer the question begins 
with the age of 50. 

Peb Cent That Deaths from Diseases of the Cieculatoby 
System Constitute of Deaths fkom all Causes, 1900 and 
1909 



age 


In New York Citt 


In Rest or State 


1900 


1909 


1900 


1909 


50-50 


13.6 
16 
15.5 
10.0 


17.7 
22 7 
26.0 
27.7 


15.6 
17 8 
17 
11.8 


19 


60-69 


25.9 


70-79 


28.8 


80 + 


26.1 











The real increase in the mortality from these diseases during 
the decade has been much exaggerated by the transfer of deaths 
from old age and from ill-defined causes to this group. The 
figures indicate that deaths from diseases of the circulatory sys- 
tem are a smaller proportion of all deaths in New York City than 
in other parts of the State. 

Table 5 on page 219 shows that the general diseases as distin- 
guished from localized diseases, or diseases attacking some partic- 
ular system of the body, cause more than one-fourth of all the 
deaths in New York State and almost twice the number ascribed 
to any other group. The group of general diseases, therefore, 
deserves special attention and a more detailed analysis. The 
eight general diseases each causing more than one thousands deaths 
annually have been selected and analyzed in Table 7 in the effort 
to determine hwtli tb(^ir comparative importance and their in- 
ereaso or decrease within tlie decade. 



Special Report on Vital Statistics 



223 



Table 7. — Eatio of Deaths fbom Main Kinds of Qbneeal 
Diseases to 10,000 Deaths peom all Causes in New Yobk 
State foe Each Year^ 1900 to 1909, inclusive 



Tuberoolom. 

Cftaoer 

Diphtberia and 

croup 

TjrpboidfeTcr.. 

Dbbetei 

Seariei fever... 
MeMlee.^.^^ 
Ohmt geoeiM 
dawMoi. . 

Total.. 



1000 


1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


1905 


1.177 


1.193 


1,163 


1.192 


1.140 


1.164 


306 


394 


418 


434 


411 


448 


249 


228 


230 


231 


212 


164 


151 


141 


141 


135 


119 


117 


108 201 


67 


105 


123 


93 


02 


72 


74 


82 


86 


91 


M 


112 


100 


88 


88 


67 


89 


66 


6U 


62 


80 


65 


399 


394 


408 


357 


311 


343 


2.655 


2.791 


2.660 


2,676 


2.570 


2.542 



1906 


1907 


1908 


1009 


1900- 
1904 


1905- 
1909 


1.174 


1.134 


1.108 


1.159 


1.173 


1.166 


446 


450 


490 


519 


405 


471 


191 


174 


174 


165 


230 


174 


113 


116 


101 


05 


137 


1C8 


53 


150 


107 


67 


119 


04 


94 


97 


102 


108 


75 


18 


54 


74 


126 


88 


88 


80 


89 


66 


83 


03 


69 


70 


356 


348 


314 


330 


374 


340 


2,570 


2.609 


2.695 


2.633 


2,670 


2.610 



1000- 
1909 



1.160 
438 

202 

123 

106 

87 

84 

74 

357 

2.640 



Table 7 shows that typhoid fever is the only general disease the 
relative importance of which has steadily and rapidly decreased 
through the decade. In 1900 it caused 1.5 per cent of the deaths 
in the State and in 1909 less than 1.0 per cent. Diphtheria and 
croup were at the maximum in 1900 and very close to the mini- 
mum in 1909, but the course during the intervening period was 
one of less steady decrease. Still the decrease in the prevalence 
of diphtheria and croup as shown by comparing the two five-year 
averages has been a little more rapid than the decrease of typhoid 
fever. Influenza has undergone even wider fluctuations but in 
the second five years, like typhoid fever and diphtheria and croup, 
it was responsible for only about three-fourths of the proportion of 
jdeaths which it caused in the first five years. 

Tuberculosis, the most deadly general disease, unlike the fore- 
going, has shown no regular and important change but rather a 
zigzag movement well illustrated by the fact that the smallest and 
the largest proportion of deaths occurred in successive years, 1907 
and 1908, and that the five-year averages show very little change. 
This does not mean that tuberculosis carries off as large a propor- 
tion of the population as formerly. It does mean that deaths 
from tuberculosis and deaths from all causes, if they have changed 
at all in rate or ratio to the population, have changed in the same 
direction and to much the same degree. 



224 State Department op Health 

This unchanging proportion of deaths due to tuberculosis may 
l>e due in part to a more discriminating and conscientious 
diagnosis. Various pieces of evidence, some of which have been 
mentioned, concur to support the conclusion that the medical pro- 
fession is certifying the cause of death more carefully and more 
accurately. Changes of this sort would probably reduce the pro- 
portion of undetected oases of tuberculosis. When the deaths are 
divided into those in New York City and those in the rest of the 
State no noteworthy difference appears in the trend of deaths from 
tuberculosis. The proportion of deaths from tuberculosis to 
deaths from all causes is greater in New York City than in the 
rest of the State, but this may be due to the larger proportion of 
young adults in the city and the large proportion of deaths from 
tuberculosis at that age. Neither in the city nor in the rest of the 
State has the proportion of deaths due to this cause undergone any 
steady and material reduction during the decade 1900 to 1909. 
We may hope that the next decade will show different results. 

Monthly Di^tribuH&ti of Deaths 

A study has been made of the distribution of deaths through the 
months of each year in the ten-year period. This, like the fore- 
going analysis, can be made without constant reference to the 
population. The number of deaths in each month has been di- 
vided by the number of days in that month to obtain the daily 
average. In a similar way the daily average for the entire year 
is computed and on dividing the daily average for each month by 
the daily average for the year a series of twelve quotients is 
reached, each of which is not very far from 100 and indicates the 
proportion between the mortality of that month and that of the 
7X3ar. 

The average results for the ten years are as follows: 



Special Kepobt on Vital Statistics 225 

Table 8. — Monthly Distbibution of Deaths in New York 

State, 1900-1909 

Ratio of daily 

mortality in 

montha to 

daily mortality 

of year 

January 105 

February >. .■ . 112 

March 112 

April 109 

May 98 

June 90 

July 103 

August 101 

September 95 

October 89 

November 89 

December 97 

Total • 1200 



The table shows six healthy and six unhealthy months. If the 
results are grouped by seasons they are: 

Winter 105 

Spring % 106 

Sxunmer 98 

Fall... 91 



Total 400 



This shows that in New York State on the average of the last 
ten years spring is the most unhealthy season of the year and 
fall the most healthy. Winter is almost as unhealthy as spring 
and summer is a healthy rather than an unhealthy season. 

Returning now to the preceding table, it may be noticed that 
there are two healthy periods, one of four months, the other of 
two, and that the unhealthy periods are similarly divided. Stated 
l>riefly, the first four months of the year are unhealthy with the 
maximum mortality in February and March ; the last four months 

8 



220 State Depaktment of Health 

are healthy with the minimum in October and November; of the 
middle four months the first two are healthy, the second two un- 
healthy. An earlier study of this subject for the years 1894- 
1898 has been brought into connection with the present by comput- 
ing the distribution for the separating year 1899, thus yielding 
a total period of siyteen consecutive years for which the preceding 
statements hold true. One important difference appears. In the 
six-year period 1894-99, July (116) was the unhealthiest month 
and August (107) was almost as unhealthy as February (108). 
This suggests either that the years 1894-99 were characterized 
by abnormally high summer mortality or that since 1894 there 
has been an increased control of summer deaths. The following 
figures showing the relative mortality of July in each of the six- 
teen years test the accuracy of the conjecture. 

Ratio of daily mortality 
in July to daily 
Year mortality of year 

1894 125 

1895 113 

1896 124 

1897 '113 

1898 Ill 

1899 109 

1900 107 

1901 '. Ill 

1902 104 

1903 103 

1904 101 

1905 Ill 

1906 100 

1907 97 

1908 101 

1909 98 



The first three years include the two with the highest July 
mortality; the last three years include the two with the lowest 
July mortality and throughout the period the tendency to a re- 
duced July mortality is clear and unmistakable. The change in 
the August mortality has been in the same direction. The average 
for 1894^99 was 107; that for 1900-09 was 101. Apparently the 



Special Report on Vital Statistics 257 

reduction in summer mortalitj has progressed so rapidlj- eince 
1894 that the midsummer months are no longer the utihealthiest 
of the year. This subject deserve© further study in order to de- 
termine whether similar changes have occurred in other states or 
countries. In Europe as a rule the winter months from Decem- 
ber to March, inclusive, have the highest mortality and in coun- 
tries, like Italy and Spain, in which the summer mortality is high 
it has apparently decreased of recent years jusit as it has in New 
York. 

The detailed figures for each of the sixteen years 1894-1909 
with the averages for 1894-99 and 1900-09 are given below: 

Table 9. — Moxtiily Distbibdtio:^ op Deaths ix New York 
State, 1894-1909, inclusive 



MONTH IBM I^M I!tH|I8fi7'l8»l 





inn 


IfKI 


.« 


















«r,f 






'S 


















































Dicembcr 


UJ 


"' 


KU 



Similar tables have been prepared for New York City and 
for the rest of the State for each of the ten years 1900-Od and for 
the entire period. The general results are as follows : 





-c,; 


oiV 


Re.l ..( 






98 


^ 






»' 


Iffi 


















S-";::;;;::;:;;;::;;;;;:;;:: :■:;::;;;;:;;;:;;::; 


'm 











228 



State Department of Health 



The preceding figures show that on the average June and 
especially July in New York City are much more unhealthy than 
the same months are in the rest of the State, but that August, 
October and especially September in New York City are much 
more healthy than the same months are in the rest of the State. 
In the other seven months the differences between, city and country 
are very slight. Apparently in the country the heat of summer 
takes a longer time to cause death than it does in the great city. 

When the figures for July are analyzed by successive years 

for New York City and the rest of the State, it appears that 

in both areas the July maximum diminished between 1^00 and 

1909, but the decrease in New York City was much greater than 

in the rest of the State. 

• 

Analysis of Mortality Rates 

From the United States census population figures for 1900, 
those of the State census for 1905 and those for 1910 published 
thus far by the Census Bureau it has been possible to estimate 
the population of the State on July 1st of those years and of 
each intervening year. This has been done by the arithmetical 
method used in previous reports. Similar figures have been 
computed also for all incorporated places having at least 10,000 
inhabitants in 1910 and included in the Federal Mortality Re- 
ports for the entire period, 1900-1909. The word urban as 
used throughout this analysis is to be nnderstood in this sense. 
Similar computations have been made for each county and 
sanitary district. 

The population estimates for the entire State and for the urban 
and rural districts are given below. 

Table 10. — Estimated Population of New York State and 
ITS TJeban and Rural Districts, July 1, 1900~July 1, 
1910 



year 



1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 



New York State 



Urban 



7.282,217 


4.899.408 


7.441.886 


5,049.689 


7.601.574 


5.199.981 


7,761.257 


5.360,281 


7,920,940 


5,500,576 


8,085.190 


5,654.972 


8.299,732 


6.854.523 


8.614.289 


6,054,074 


8,728,843 


6,253.634 


8.943.403 


6.453.196 


9,167.963 


6.652,772 



Rural 



2.382,.<»11 
2.392.197 
2.401.593 
2,410,976 
2.420.364 
2.430,218 
2,445,209 
2.460.215 
2.475.209 
2.490,207 
2.505,191 



Special Report on Vital Statistics 



229 



By the use of these more accurate estimates it is possible to 
obtain more trustworthy birth, death and marriage rates for the 
decade than was possible before the census figures for 1910 were 
available. Table 11 shows the main statistical results of regis- 
tration in the State since 1885. • 



Table 11. — Popclatiox, Births, Deaths, Stillbirths, Mar- 
riages AND Divorces in New York State, 1885-1910 



YEAH 



1885. 

1886 

1887. 

1888. 

1889. 

1890. 

1891. 

1892. 

Is93 

1894 

1895. 

1897. 

1898 

1899. 

1900. 

1901. 

1902. 

1903 

1904. 

1905. 

1906. 

1907. 

1908. 

1909. 

1910. 



Estimated 
population 



I ^ 



5.fi09 
5.719 
5,831 
5.946 
6,062 
6,182 
6.316 
6.438 
6.537 
6.638 
6.741 
6.845 
6.951 
7,085 
7,167 
7.282 
7.441 
7.601 
7.761 
7,920 
8.085 
8.299 
8.5U 
8.7^8 
8.943 
9,157 



.910 
,855 
,947 
,246 
,764 
.600 
,333 
,283 
.716 
,696 
,246 
,375 

.111 
. 459 
.491 
.217 
. HSC) 
.574 
.2.57 
.940 
.190 
.732 
,289 
.843 
,403 
,963 



Births, 
excluding 
still- 
birth«i, 
according 
to state 
Depart- 
ment of 
Health 



63..'>36 
89.828 
102,038 
103.089 
114,804 
112,.'>72 
125.909 
1.30.143 
136.297 
141.827 
U2.311 
147.327 
144.631 
13S.702 
136.778 
143,156 
140.539 
146,740 
1.58.343 
165.014 
172.259 
183,012 
196.020 
203.159 
202.6.56 
213,290 



Deaths, Exclvdino 
.*^TiLL-BiRTHs, Ac- 
cording TO — 



State 
Depart- 
ment of 
Health 



80. 

86. 
108. 
114. 
113. 
128. 
12(». 
131, 
129. 
123. 
IJH. 
126. 
118. 
122. 
121. 
132. 
131. 
124, 
127, 
142. 
137, 
441, 
147, 
138. 
140. 
147, 



407 

801 
269 
.584 
1.55 
648 
.S.'O 
388 
6.59 
423 
S.34 
253 
525 
5S4 
831 
089 
335 
830 
498 
217 
433 
099 
130 
912 
2il 
629 



Census 
Bun»au 



132.3.52 
131.461 
124.651 
127.602 
142,014 
137.222 
140.626 
146.H8_> 
1.38, 8S3 
140,073 



.«ftill- 
birthn, 
according 
to Stat« 
Depart- 
ment of 
Health 



MARRIAQKn, 
ArCOKDI>0 TO — 



9,401 
10.261 
10.291 

lo.O'-g 

9,9.52 



State 




Depart- 


Census 


ment of 


Bureau 


Health 




24,409 




30.764 




44,438 


44,542 


43/83 


44,645 


50,96) 


49,997 


41,195 


49,201 


51,468 


51,277 


52,725 


.52,798 



52,805 
52,.5o9 
.59,059 
58,990 
57.530 
57,392 
61,167 
63,225 
65,216 
68,903 
73,011 
74.677 
78,2«U 
87,870 

95,:in 

72.28'3 
78,363 
84.543 



.52.999 
,52,621 
.58,889 
.59,189 
57.025 
57,165 
59.907 
63,743 
65,158 
69.439 
73.338 
74,581 
ST, 162 
88,979 



230 



State Department of Health 



Table 11. — Continued 

Population, Births, Deaths, Stillbirths, Marriages and 
Divorces in New York State, 1885-1910 



year 


Divorces, 

accordint; 

to Census 

Bureau 


Births 
per 1 .000 
popu- 
lation 


Deaths 

per l.OOD 

popu- 

ration 


Persons 

married 

per 1.000 

lation 


Persons 
divorced 
per 100.000 
popu- 
lation 


1S85 


936 
1.006 
1.042 
1,034 
1.095 

901 
1,052 
1.155 
1.175 
1,386 
1.434 
1,270 
1.324 
1,493 
1,600 
1.800 
1,832 
1,533 
1,774 
1.952 
2.144 
2,069 


11.3 
15.7 
17.5 
17.3 
18.8 
18.2 
19.9 
.20.2 
20 8 
21.4 
21.1 
21.5 
20.8 
19.7 
19.1 
19.7 
18.9 
19.3 
20.4 
20.8 
21.3 
22.1 
23.0 
23 3 
23.7 
23.3 


14.3 
15.2 
18.6 
19.3 
18.6 
20.8 
20.5 
20.3 
19.7 
18.6 
19.1 
18.4 
17.1 
17.4 
17.0 
18.1 
17.7 
16.4 
16.4 
18.0 
17.0 
17 
17.3 
15.9 
15.7 
16.1 


8.8 
12.8 
15.2 
14.6 
16.8 
13.4 
16.2 
16.2 
16.2 
15.8 
17.4 
17.2 
16.6 
16.2 
17.0 
17.4 
17.5 
18.1 
18.8 
18.8 
19 4 
21.2 
22.4 
16.6 
17.5 
18.5 


33 


1886 


35 


1887 

1888 


36 
36 


1889 


36 


1890 


29 


1891 


33 


1892 


36 


1893 


36 


1894 .• . 


42 


1895 


42 


1896 


37 


1897 


38 


1898 


42 


1899 


47 


1900 


49 


1901 


49 


1902 


40 


1903 


46 


1904 .• 


49 


1905 


53 


1906 


50 


1907 




1908. . . ' 




1909 




1910 





It is interesting to note that, although the population estimates 
for the years 1905—1909, inclusive, are somewhat altered through 
the use of the 1910 figures, the rates do not show any material 
(lilferences from those given in my report for last year.^ The re- 
vised figures confirm and emphasize the statement then made that 
** 1909 stands at the high water mark of public health in the his- 
tory of New York State.^ 

In Table 12 are given the death rates from all causes for the 
State and sanitary districts during the last decade. 



1 State Department of Health, 30th Annual Report, Vol. 1. p. 239. 
* Ibid. p. 241. 



Special Report ox Vital Statistics 



231 



Table 12. — Death Eates of New Yobk State and of the 
Sanitary Districts, 1900-1909, I^X'LUSIVE 



year 



1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
19CM 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1906 
1909 





Adiron- 


State 


dark A 
North- 




ern 


18.2 


15.7 ' 


17.7 


15.0 1 


16.4 


13.1 


•IfiA 


13.5 


17.9 


14.3 


17.0 


14.8 


16 9 


14.9 


.17.2 


15.0 


15.9 


14.8 1 


15.7 


15.1 ' 

1 



Lake 
Ontario 

Western 



14 9 

14 9 
13 9 
15.0 

15 2 
15.2 
15.3 
15.9 
14.6 
14.7 



Mo- 
hawk 
Valley 



16.1 
15.9 
14.5 
15.5 
15.6 
15.1 
15 8 
16.4 
15.9 
14.7 



West 


East 


Central 


Central 


15.4 


15.6 


15 3 


15 3 


14.5 


13.8 


15.5 


14.3 


15 7 


15 6 


16.0 


15.7 


15.5 


15.2 


16.1 


15.8 


15.2 


16.1 


15.1 


15.3 



South- 
ern Tier 



15.0 
14.3 
13 7 

13 9 
15.6 
14.6 

14 4 
15.4 

15 5 
15.3 



Hudson 
Valley 



18 6 
17 8 
16 1 
16.9 
17.8 
17.6 
16.9 
17.9 
17.1 
16.9 



Mari- 
time 



20.2 
19.5 
18.2 
17.6 
19.7 
18.1 
18.1 
18.1 
16.2 
15.9 



The table indicates that the mortality from all causes has de- 
creased during the decade, but not uninterruptedly. At no time 
since. 1900 has the rate risen as high as in that year (18.2). A 
study of the rates according to sanitary districts indicates that the 
same is true of the Hudson Vallev and Maritime districts, that 
the high rate in the State in 1900 was due to excessive rates in 
those two districts and that the general decline in the State is 
largely due to the improvement in the same districts. 

Although for the State as a whole 1909 was the healthiest year, 
yet for every sanitary district, except the Maritime, 1902 shows 
the minimum rate, the decrease from 1901 ranging from .6 to 1.9 
per thousand and in five of the seven sanitary districts being 1.0 
or above. These minima seemed so notable as to make a brief 
studv of the deaths by cause for 1902 worth while. Below are 
given the deaths in 1901 and 1902 from all causes and from each 
cause showing a difference between the two years of at least 200 
deaths. 



232 



Stat? Departmext of Health 



Table 13. — Deaths in New Yoek State in 1901 and 1902 

FROii Principal Causes 



CAUSE 



All causes 

Scarlet fever 

Whooping cough 

Influenza 

Tuberculosis of lungs 

Meningitis 

Other diseases of the nervous system . . . 

Diseases of circulatory system 

Pneumonia 

Other diseases of the respiratory system 
Diarrhea and enteritis under 2 years . . . 

Violence other than suicide 

Ul-detined causes 



Deaths 


Deaths 


1901 


1902 


131,461 


124,657 


1.469 


1,249 


633 


900 


2,643 


713 


13.877 


12,657 


2.328 


2,092 


11.6o4 


11,438 


11,871 


12.649 


11.400 


10,303 


8,850 


9,194 


8.053 


7,016 


7.557 


G.546 


3,030 


2,622 



Excess ( + 

or de- 
crease ( — ) 
in 1902 



—6.804 

—220 

4-267 

—1,930 

—1.220 

—236 

—2m 

+778 
—1.097 

-f344 

—1,037 

—1,011 

—408 



It will be seen that the decrease of 6,804 deaths in 1902- was 
largely due to fewer deaths from the following causes: Influ- 
enza, tuberculosis of the lungs, pneumonia, diarrhea and enteritis 
under two years and violence other than suicide. An investigation 
of this last class reveals the fact that the decrease is due to a de- 
cline in deaths from heat and sunstroke (from 1,465 in 1901 to 46 
in 1902), a decrease so great as to more than account for that in 
the whole class and so offset the increase in other forms of violeuco 
to be expected with the growth in population. The character of 
the five causes noted above, which account for 6,295 of the 6,804 
fewer deaths, points to climatic conditions peculiarly favorable to 
health in 1902. 

The year 1907 shows a high death rate, the highest in the de- 
cade for three districts (Lake Ontario and Western, Mohawk Val- 
ley and West Central) and an increase over several preceding 
years for the State as a whole and for every other district, except 
the Maritime where it was the same as for the two preceding years. 
To throw light on the reasons for this high rate, the deaths from 
the principal causes in 1907 were compared with the average in 
1906 and 1908. Table 14 indicates the results for causes showing 
significant differences. 



Special Report ox Vital Statistics 



233 



Table 14. — Deaths in New York State from the Principal 
Causes, 1907 and Average op 1906 and 1908 



cause 


Average 

number 

deaths 1906 

and 1908. 


Number 
deaths 1907 


Excess ( +) 

or de- 
crease ( — ) 
in 1907. 


All causes 


139.755 

1.118 

11,683 


146.882 

2.204 

12.107 

17,902 

11.136 

10.539 

0.827 

11.675 

8,872 

1 ,455 


+7.127 


I tnflucnaa 


+1,086 


Nervous diseases other than meningitis 


+424 


Diseases of the circulatory system 


16,781 


+1,121 


Pneumonia 


9,4 
9.552 
9,453 
10,821 
8,296 
1,882 


+1,646 


CHber diseases of the respiratory system 


+987 


Diarrhea and enteritis under 2 years 


+374 


Bright's disease and nephritis 


+854 


Violence other than suicide 


+576 


Ill-defined causes 


— 127 









Some increase in the number of deaths was to be expected with 
the growth of population and the improvement in registration, but 
these factors seemed insufficient to account entirely for an increase 
of more than 7,000. The causes which suggest further study are : 
Pneumonia, diseases of the circulatory system, influenza, other 
diseases of the respiratory system, Bright's disease and nephritis, 
violence other than suicide. In some cases it is necessary to study 
the figures for the entire decade to appreciate the significance of 
those for 1907. 

The increase of deaths from diseases of the circulatory system 
and its connection with the decline in deaths from ill-defined 
causes have been discussed. The increase in the former in 1907 is 
slight in comparison with that for many of the other years of the 
decade, not at all accounting for the increase in the general death 
rate. The mortality from diseases of the nervous system other 
than meningitis, from Bright's disease and nephritis, from di- 
arrhea imder 2 years and from accidents reached its maximum in 
1907. On investigation, the increase in accidents is found to be 
connected not at all with mortality from heat and sunstroke as 
was the decrease in 1902, but rather with increases in several sorts 
of casualties. A study of the death? from influenza during the do- 
cade indicates that the great increase in 1907 over 1906 is due 
to an exceedingly favorable condition in the earlier year, although 
the fact that the deaths from this cause in 1907 were considerably 



w 

234 State Department of Health 

more than in any other year with one exception (1901) partially 
explains the increase in the general death rate. The mortality 
fron^ pneumonia and other diseases of the respiratory system, 
while not at its maximum in 1907, was nevertheless heavy. Deaths 
from causes more or less influenced by climatic conditions (in- 
fluenza, diseases of the respiratory system, diarrhea and enteritis 
under two years) account for about four-sevenths of the difference 
between the deaths in 1907 and the average for 1906 and 1908. 
The rest of the heavy mortality in 1907 was due in varying de- 
grees to disekses of the circulatory system, nervous diseases other 
than meningitis, accidents, Bright's disease and nephritis. 

A study of the rates in the various sanitary districts reveals in 
the Adirondack and Northern, Lake Ontario and Westeni, Mo- 
hawk Valley, West Central and East Central distlricts an increase 
from the minima in 1902 to or past the high rates in 1907,' a tend- 
ency not uninterrupted in some districts. Doubtless much of this 
increase is due to improvement in the completeness of registration. 
This hypothesis is strengthened by the fact that in the Maritime 
district where the influence of New York City's more perfect 
registration is predominant, a decrease throughout the decade is 
obvious. While the organized public health movement of the 
metropolis is to be credited with this decrease, it is not to be sup- 
posed that similar work in other portions of the State has been 
without results. In my report for 1907 this point was discussed 
in the light of figures then at hand.^ 

Improvement in registration may also account for the fact that, 
while no general tendency of any sort may be traced in the South- 
em Tier, yet the last three years of the decade had the highest 
rates with the exception of 1904. 

The Maritime district shows the greatest decrease of any dis- 
trict from 1900 to 1909 (20.2 to 15.9) and also the greatest by 
individual years. In the Hudson Valley a decrease is apparent 
but it has not been at all steady. 

»8tate Department of Health. 28th Annual Report, Vol. I, pp. 215-210. 



Special Report on Vital Statistics 



23 







Table 15 shows the urban mortality for the State and the sani- 
tary districts. 

Table 15. — Urban Death Rates of New York State and 
OF THE Sanitary Districts, 1900-1909, inclusive. 



year 


State 


Adiron- 
dack & 
North- 
em 


Lake 
Ontario 

A 
Western 


Mo- 
hawk 
Valley 


West 
Central 


East 
Central 


South- 
ern Tier 


Hudson 
VaUcy 


5 

Alari- 
time 


1900 

1901 

1902 .. 

1903 . 

1904 

1905 . . 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 


19 5 
18.8 
17.6 
17.4 
19.1 
17.7 
17.8 
17.9 
1G.2 
15.9 


18.2 
19.3 
16.4 
17.0 
18.8 
18.0 
21.4 
20.8 
18.2 
18.4 


14.6 
15.2 
14.3 
15.6 
16.7 
15.5 
15.9 
16.4 
14.8 
15.0 


17.4 
16.5 
16.2 
17.0 
17.0 
16.0 
17.3 
17.9 
16.8 
15.2 


17.0 
13.9 
14.7 
17.0 
15.6 
15.3 
16.3 
15.9 
14.7 
14.7 


15.0 
14.1 
12.9 
14.3 
15.0 
15.0 
15.1 
15.1 
15.7 
14 5 


16.2 
14.8 
14.1 
14.3 
16.3 
15.6 
14.6 
15.5 
15.2 
15.0 


21.2 
19.9 
18.1 
18.8 
19.9 
19.5 
18.9 
19.7 
18.6 
18.5 


20.5 
19.8 
18.4 
17.8 
19.9 
18.2 
18.2 
18.1 
16.2 
15.9 



The urban death rate of the State as a whole has fallen from 
19.5 to 15.9, a decrease interrupted materially only in 1904. 
The higher rate in that instance is seen to coincide with a 
higher rate for that year in every district except the West Cen- 
tral, but most clearly marked in the Southern Tier, Hudson Val- 
ley and Maritime. 

Downward trends are noticeable in the Hudson Valley and 
the West Central urban rates and a less marked one in those of 
the Southern Tier. At no time during the decade has the urban 
rate in the Hudson Valley been as high as in 1900, but its de- 
cline has not been without interruptions. At all times its rate 
has considerably exceeded the urban rstte of the whole State, rang- 
ing in most instances between 1.1 and 2.6 per thousand higher. 
It has exceeded the rate in the Maritime district in every year ex- 
cept 1902 and the difference between the two has been rapidly 
widening. 

The Mohawk Valley has a comparatively high urban rate and 
it is difficult to see any decided trend in it. The rates of the 
East Central and Lake Ontario and Western districts have been 
increasing, due partly no doul)t to improved registration. 

Perhaps to the same cause in part is due the increase in the 
urban rate of the Adirondack and Northern district. Its rate. 
however, deserves special attention, as it is high in comparison 



236 



State Department of Health 



with the urban fate of other districts. In six of the ten years its 
urban death rate was higher than the corresponding rate for the 
entire State, in four of the years being between 2.0 and 3.6 per 
thousand higher. This is the more striking because the district 
contains no large cities. A study of the rates of its three cities 
having over 10,000 population in 1910 (Watertown, Glens Falls 
and Ogdensburg) shows that its high- urban rate is due to that of 
Ogdensburg. Since 1901 tiie rate for that place has not been 
below 24.4 and has risen as high as 30.1 and 31.1 (1907 and 
1906). This excessive mortality is due in part to the fact that 
the St. Lawrence Hospital for the insane is situated there. The 
figures for deaths ip that institution, available in the State De- 
partment of Health Reports since 1905, show that it has fur- 
nished from 24 to 30 per cent of the city's total mortality. If 
these deaths be substracted, however, the city rate is still high ; in 
fact, for every year, higher than the urban rates of any other dis- 
trict except the Hudson Valley. 

The most significant feature of the decrease in the urban 
mortality of the State appears in the noteworthy decline in the 
Maritime district, from 20.5 in 1900 to 15.9 in 1909, a down- 
ward trend broken only by the year 1904. The excess of its rate 
over the urban rate of the entire State has only twice been as 
much as 1 per thousand. 

Table 16 gives the rural deuth rates for the State and the 
sanitarv districts. 



Table 16. — Rural Death Rates of N'ew York State and 
OF THE Sanitary Districts 1900-1909, inclusive 



year 



1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
190r> 
1906 
1907 
190R 
1909 



State 



15.5 
1 5 3 
13.9 
14.4 
15.3 
15.2 
14.9 
15.7 
15 3 
15.1 



Adiron- 

North- 
ern 



15 3 
14.4 

12 G 

13 O 
13.7 
14.4 
1.1 9 
14.1 

14 3 
14.6 



1 Take 

Ontario 
i & 
; Western 



15 4 
14.5 
13.1 
14 1 
14.3 
14 7 
14 2 
15.0 
14.1 
14.2 



Mo- 
Hfiwk 
Valley 


We-^t 


Fast 


Central 


Central 


15 2 


15.0 


15.8 


15.5 


15 6 


15 S 


13 3 


14.4 


14.1 


14.3 


15.2 


14.2 


14 5 


15.S 


16.0 


14 4 


16.1 


16 1 


14.4 


15.3 


15.2 


15.1 


16.2 


16.1 


15 1 


15.3 


16.3 


14.3 


15.2 


15.7 



South- 


Hudson 


ern Tier 


Valley 


14 5 


16.7 


14 1 


16 2 


13.6 


U.6 


13 8 


15 3 


15 2 


16.1 


14 2 


16.1 


14.4 


15.3 


15 3 


16.5 


15.6 


15.8 


15 4 


15.7 



Mari- 
time 



15 6 
16.3 
15.5 
15.5 
17.0 
16.2 
16.5 
17.4 
16.1 
15.7 



Special Report on Vital Statistics 



237 



In comparing the rates of the various districts it should be 
home in mind that differences in accuracy of registration may 
accoimt somewhat for differences in rates. The Adirondack and 
Northern has had, on the whole, the lowest rural rates. Those in 
the West Central, East Central, Hudson Valley and Maritime 
districts have in almost every year exceeded that of the State, the 
last district showing the highest rate for nearly every year. 

Xo decrease in rates can be traced in the rural portion of the 
State as a whole. This is probably to be accounted for by im- 
provement in the registration masking a real decrease. In my 
last report^ the difference between the urban and rural rates was 
discussed. As the revised estimates of population give rates 
differing a little from those there presented, the urban and rural 
mortality with excess in the former is given below. The urban 
rates here are for cities of 10,000 and over; those given last year 
were for cities of 8,000 and over. 



Death Rates in Urban and Rural New York 



year 



1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1903 

1906 

1907 

190e 

1909 

Decrease 1900-09 



In iirbfln 


In rural 


districte 


dUtricts 


19.5 


15.5 


18. H 


15.3 


17.6 


13.9 


17.4 


14.4 


19.1 


15.3 


17.7 


15.2 


17.8 


14.9 


17.9 


15.7 


16.2 


15.3 


15.9 


15.1 


3.6 


.4 



Excess 
in urban 
districts 



4.0 
3.5 
3.7 
3.0 
3.8 
2.5 
2.9 
2.2 
.9 
.8 



These figures emphasize the statement made last year that the 
difference between urban and rural rates has been rapidly grow- 
ing less. As there suggested, this is probably due to two causes, 
greater advances in sanitation in the cities and improved 
registration in the rural districts so great as to hide a probable 
decrease in mortality. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER F. WILLCOX, 

Consulting Statistician 

* State Department of Health, 30th Annual Report, p. 243. 



DIVISION OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 



(2391 



J 



DIVISION OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 



Hon. Eugene H. Porter^ A. M., M. D., Commissioner of Healthy 
Albany, N. Y.: 

Sir: — I have the honor to submit the following report of the 
work of the Division of Communicable Diseases for the year 1910. 

This division of the State Health Department has developed 
greatly since 1907, at which time it was placed under the direc- 
tion of Dr. John T. Wheeler, whose efforts in the preservation of 
the public health were beginning to bear fruit when the grim 
reaper saw fit to call him to his long home. Through his untiring 
efforts and those of his successors in the division, a friendly feel- 
ing has been created between the health oflficers of the various mu- 
nicipalities throughout the State and this portion of the machinery 
of the State Health Department, and it is a pleasure to be able ta 
report that there are but few of the health officers delinquent with 
their monthly reports. Some, however, are rather dilatory, espe- 
cially in making reports of the first cases of infectious diseases 
which appear in their districts, and I would remind the health 
officers that it is only by the cordial support of those interested in 
the conservation of the health of the State that this division is 
enabled to keep in touch with the morbidity of the different local- 
ities and render such aid as may be required either by advice or 
assistance through the medical officers of the State Health De- 
partment, whenever needed either to control or when possible to 
prevent an epidemic. 

The State institut^'ons and State hospitals are now reporting 
all cases of communicable diseases occurring among their inmates 
to the State Department of Health, either directly or through the 
health officer of the municipality in which they are located. This, 
with the increase of the number of reportable diseases, has some- 
what increased the clerical work of this division. The following 
table will show the distribution of the morbidity of the State by 
counties : 

[241] 



242 



State Department of Health 



Albany 

AQeeany — 

Broome — 

CatUmuKus. 

Cayuica 

Chautauqua 

Chonung. . . 

Chenanfo... 

Clinton 

Cohirobia . . . 
Cortland... 
Ddaware. . . 

DutcbcM 

Erie 

Ebmx 

Franklin — 

Fulton 

Genesee 

Greene 

Hamilton ... 
Herkimer . . . 

Jefferson 

Lewis 

Livingston. ., 

Madison 

Monroe 

Montgomery. 

Nassau 

Niagara 

Onada 

Onondaga — 

Ontario 

Orange 

Orleans 

Oswego 

Otsego 

Putnam 

Renssdaer. . . 
Rockland.... 
StLawrenee. 

Saratoga 

Seheneetady.. 

Rchoharie 

Sfthuyler 

Seneca 

Steuben 

Suffolk 

Sullivan 

Tioga 

Tompkins 

Ulster 

Warren 

Washington.. 

Wayne 

Westchester . 

Wyoming 

Yates 



518 

23 

208 

66 

88 

60 

190 

16 

39 

61 

12 

11 

223 

1.238 

438 

652 

14 

14 

14 

4 

33 
55 
10 
13 
27 
263 
92 
47 
94 
145 
248 
29 
121 
15 
30 
33 
2 
222 
30 
30 
58 
218 
17 
13 
32 
41 
114 
631 
8 
19 
22 
30 
16 
17 
394 
11 
4 
Greater New York 32.006 




263 

32 

54 

48 

38 

113 

111 

33 

48 

28 

8 

25 

91 

1.437 

74 

53 

41 

26 

13 

""■44 

51 

6 

5 

20 

245 

103 

101 

152 

215 

477 

40 

182 

17 

46 

22 

6 

168 

95 

83 

54 

131 

8 

9 

15 

66 

12 

7 

9 

121 

24 

22 

25 

472 

13 

8 

17.226 



411 

149 

101 

226 

184 

341 

152 

72 

51 

64 

21 

78 

203 

2.549 

34 

39 

32 

119 

19 

3i 
81 
5 
161 
125 
1.818 
228 
189 
298 
128 
1.103 
78 
353 
63 
75 
97 
11 
212 
121 
67 
64 
142 
19 
17 
123 
53 
162 
71 
16 
71 
140 
24 
68 
51 
1.282 
32 
8 
19.284 



Measles 



1.161 
281 
385 
851 
181 

1.121 
60 
47 
364 
191 
286 
341 
456 

7.042 
240 
158 
425 
603 
265 
6 
302 

2.708 
338 
290 
226 
678 
235 
378 

1.092 
707 

2.311 
47 

1.259 
34 
189 
461 
62 
877 
167 

1.318 

1.044 

1.437 

407 

22 

128 

386 

<855 

74 

13 

144 

502 

72 

59 

254 

1.369 

406 

194 

35.816 



Tvphoid 
fever 



259 
50 
77 
46 
111 
188 
74 
26 
96 
56 
68 
72 
80 
483 
38 
40 
10 
18 
67 
10 
20 
216 
18 
9 
11 
258 
45 
46 
321 
90 
312 
64 
152 
20 
106 
66 
12 
130 
18 
98 
74 
140 
17 
7 
51 
147 
56 
28 
14 
52 
64 
23 
35 
63 
278 
45 
19 
3.735 



spinal 

Qenm* 

gitis 



2 

8 



3 
1 
3 



31 



1 

4 



2 
3 
1 




1 
1 
2 
1 



2 
4 



2 
230 



SmaU- 
pox 



3 
1 
1 



54 



21 
30 
22 



1 

72 

1 



5 
1 
1 
1 



1 
95 



8 



1 
1 
4 



1 
2 



16 



Oph^ 

ntona- 
tcvum 



1 
8 

3 



2 
1 



Polio- 
myelitis 



1 
5 



2 
1 
4 
1 



5 
4 
8 

3 



1 
6 



2 
6 
3 



1 


1 


1 




1 


2 


1 


8 




1 


i 


1 


3 


3 



1 

8 



4 

1 

1 

1 

14 



3 

10 

3 

'4' 
4 



8 
3 



Two counties were not visited by the diphtheria germ and only 
one escaped scarlet fever. 

A mortality table of the different infectious and contagious dis- 
eases has not been prepared, as this is dealt with by the Division 
of Vital Statistics in an able and exhaustive manner. 

The medical oflScers have frequently been called upon to render 
valuable assistance to the health officers throughout the State, not 



a 



Division of Communicable Diseases 



243 



onlj in cases of doubtful diagnosis but in establishing and main- 
taining an efficient isolation and quarantine of infectious and con- 
tagious diseases. Their counsel is often of great benefit both to 
the health officer and the community in the prevention and con- 
trol of epidemics. 

There have been reported to the Department during 1910, as 
shown by the following table, which likewise shows the distribu- 
tion of them through the year, 171,345 cases of those communic- 
able diseases, of which a report is required and which are here 
designated : 



Cases of conimunicahle diseases reported during 1910 



TabcreukMns. . 
Diphtheria. . . 
8ciirletfe\'er.. 
McMict 

Typhoid fever. 
Cerdnxapinal 

Citii 

SniAUpox 

Ophthalmia 

torum 

PoUomyditis . 



menin- 



neooa- 



Jan. 



2.416 
2.018 
3.636 
»,728 
456 

27 
51 



Feb. 



3.203 

2.025 

4.565 

10.047 

566 

32 
50 



Mar. April 



4,497 

2.489 

5.346 

13.770 

457 

34 
69 



3.969 
2.447 
4.412 
9.931 
322 

32 
61 



May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


3,418 


2.692 


2,621 


3.375 


2,856 


2.684 


3,240 


2.996 


2.654 


1.835 


1.468 


1,303 


1.010 


1.509 


2.144 


1.668 


4.061!2.486 


987 


688 


579 


924 


1,673 


2.128 


10.490(6.837 


2,474 


883 


452 


722 


1,593 


2.953 


374 356 


486 


i,2ai 


1.457 


1.293 


989 


577 


36 20 


21 


36 


28 


22 


17 


26 


55; 41 


10 


10 


1 


1 


2 


2 


4 4 


6 


1 


7 


5 


5 


2 










57 


35 


18 


2 











Total 



37.963 
22,630 
31.504 
09.878 
8.530 

331 
353 

38 
112 



Diphtheria 

There were 22,630 cases of diphtheria reported. This is 2,000 
more than in either of the two years preceding. The number of 
deaths is 2,431, an increase of 125 from last year. The average 
number of deaths yearly for the past ten years has been 2,675 ; of 
the five years preceding this year, 2,470. There have been only 
two vears in which the number was less than in 1910. 

New York city reports more than half the increase in reported 
cases, but the number of deaths is identical with last year. The 
rural mortality is likewise identical. The increase in cases and 
deaths is in Buffalo, where the disease became more prevalent dur- 
ing the last quarter; in Rochester, Ut ica, Troy and some of the 
cities of the third class. 

The urban mortality from diphtheria was 2.0 per cent, of the 
total mortality; the rural 0.6 per cent. These were the proper- 



244 State Depaktmeat of Health 

tions of last year j in 1009, of 2,300 deaths from diphtheria 2,100 
were urban; this year, of 2,431 deaths, 2,100 were urban, this 
population being two-thirds of the State, In 100,000 urban pop- 
ulation there were 33 deaths during the year; in 100,000 rural 
population there were 11 deaths. 

In the State l.G per cent, of the mortality was from diphtheria 
and there were 27 deaths per 100,000 population. For the ten. 
years prior to 1895, 5.3 ix?r cent, of the deaths were from diph- 
theria, the average yearly mortality being 5,734, and there were 
nearly 100 deaths a year per 100,000 population. Since 1895 
there have been about 3,000 deaths yearly from diphtheria, the 
population having increased from six to nine million. 

There have been no noteworthy epidemics from diphtheria dur- 
ing the year; the State institutions have been mostly free from 
it. The experience of the year has given further evidence of the 
value of the prophylactic use of antitoxin. The early use of anti- 
toxin has been urged for clinical cases, and when question has 
arisen as to the ability of subjects to pay for it, it has been urged 
on health oflScers that the first thought should be the safety of 
the people and the conservation of their lives. 

Of questions ask^d, one has been as to quarantining subjects 
who have been exposed during the period of incubation, and it 
has been found safe to release such imder observation with im- 
munizing doses of antitoxin. Emphasis has been laid on the 
laboratory test for diagnosis and as a guide for release from quar- 
antine. The question of management of cases of persisting germs 
long after clinical symptoms hav^e disappeared, in one case as long 
as six months, has come up. The infectivity of such subjects is 
recognized and the virility of the bacilli is established, but it has 
been advised to modify the strict quarantine, excluding the child 
from school and from contact with other children. Indefinite iso- 
lation is hard to enforce and no harm is known to have come in 
this instance. In one locality not a few of the school children, not 
ill, had persistent positive cultures, and the school was closed for 
a length of time. 

The relation of bad sanitation to diphtheria has been asked 
about. Emphasis should be laid on the fact that the disease can 
only arise from specific infection. Insanitary surroundings can 



Divisiox OF Communicable Diseases 245 

Lave only a general bearing on its vinilence and dissemination; 
doubtless it may influence tbe septic nature of the disease. 

The relation of the dairy to diphtlieria has been the subject of 
inqniry. ^Hiking or washing of milk pails by members of a fam- 
ily in which diphtheria exists, where the dairy product is to be 
sold, has been interdicted. 

^lild cases have* frequently 1 .cen the source of spread, the na- 
ture of the disease having Ik^cu overlooked. If there is reasonable 
doubt the public should have the l)enefit of it, pending a laboratory 
test. The experience of the year has emphasized the value of iso- 
lation and of antitoxin w^oi] earlv in a clinical case and for im- 
inimizing those, especially chihlren, exposed to diphtheria. There 
has been no recognized ca-e rep(»rted of spread of the disease by 
a germ case, though this has been discovered heretofore. The dis- 
ease has not l>een as viruhiit as formerly and few septic cases have 
l)een reix)rted. In this diphtheria has been in common with the 
other infectious diseases and it is }><^ssibly due to the better sani- 
tary surroundings wliich are U'ing made more and more general. 
In Xew York city there was one deatli to ten reported cases, which 
is a considerably lower lethality than last year: in the rest of the 
State 1 death to 7.7 reported eases. Tn the city it chiefly pre- 
vailed in the s])ring months; outsi<le the city it increased abruptly 
in October and chief prevalence wa> from then till December. 
The most deaths were from January to April. 

Scarlrt Fever 

From 1895 to 1000, a period of six years, there were less than 
SCO deaths a year from scarlet f(»ver ; then for four years the num- 
Ler was 1,200 ; two years followed of 700 deaths ; and now for four 
years there have been l.GOO deaths yearly. Periods of prevalence, 
four to six years in duration, follow period of abatement. The 
disease is of milder type and virulent eases are infrequent. From 
1888 to 1802 there were, with the break midway of one year of 
abatement, from 2,000 to 2,500 deaths a year from it, a mortality 
never since reached. This year there were 1,600 deaths, a larger 
number than has oe*urre<l, save one year, since 1802. 

There were 31,000 eases rej>orted. a number exceeded only by 
measles and tulx^rculosis, and exc(H^dinc: by 8,000 the number in 



240 State D^paktment of Health 

1909. Jn 1908 the number both of cases autl deaths was somewhat 
greater. Greater Xew York reported nearly 20,000 cases, against 
13,000 last year; with one death to 20 cases. The rest of the 
State had a rate of 1 death to 18 cases, which, however, probably 
shows that 1,000 cases failed of report. And many cases must 
have failed of detection, for our investigations have disclosed 
the overlooking of the disease repeatedly by' physicians, and 
the existence of cases which never came under the care of a 
physician. 

One of the embarrassments of the year has been the diflSculty of 
diagnosis in the case of mild forms of scarlet fever. Some out- 
breaks have been overlooked by the medical men. In some the 
sore throat has Ix^en the conspicuous symptom and erythema if 
present has been regarded as t^econdarv; ** epidemic tonsilitis "^ 
has been entertained as the diagnosis of a number of outbreaks 
until not a few cases have developed and the fact of scarlet fever 
was established. The eruption has often been evanescent or irreg- 
ular in its appearance. Physicians err often in attaching weight 
to the absence of certain sjTuptoms, unmindful that in scarlet fever 
no symptom is pathognomonic and no one symptom necessarily 
present. It has heen found that emphasis can be laid on the 
abrupt onset, early sore throat and the orderly occurrence of a 
rash after twelve hours and usually first on the upper chest, 
though it may occur elsewhere, and in rare cases ha« not been de- 
tected even evanescently ; the red tongue with enlarged papillae 
has been very commonly present; streptococci in the throat have 
been regarded as of positive value; glandular tumefaction has 
much of the time been lacking. Desc[uamation is often so slight 
or to be detected only by such careful scrutiny as to be overlooked 
or declared absent. 

As an instance of the tracing of an outbreak: A young man 
came home from abroad ill with fever and a sore throat, for which 
he received office treatment once by a physician; nine days later 
his sister has a similar illness, which after two weeks abates and 
she returns to school ; the teacher is taken ill nine days after her 
return and is variously diagnosed as having tonsilitis and scarlet 
fever; pupils follow with illness and eruptions called "teething 
rash " and " humor of the blood,'' but in some instances recognized 



Division of Communicable Diseases 247 

as scarlet fever ; the disease even appears, though without further 
result, in the family of a man employed in a milk depot; scarlet 
fever becomes widespread in the community before its nature is 
recognized. 

Frequent inquiry is made for a rule as to duration of quaran- 
tine. This has been left indeterminate, as no certain period can 
be given to cover every case, ^ild cases may recover fully in a 
shorter neriod than severe cases; in anv case discharge from the 
ear set up in the course of scarlet fever may prolong infectivity 
indefinitely. All clinical symptoms may abate in three weeks, 
and in others may continue for twice that length of time. It has 
been advised during the year to keep children from school for not 
less than five weeks and to release from quarantine after six weeks 
provided the mucous surfaces are clear. 

Closing schools and churches and other congregations has been 
regarded an extreme measure and not to be resorted to without 
good cause. Personal inspection by teachers under instructions 
from the health oflScer has been an eflFective means for detection of 
mild cases, for which the maintenance of schools has had com- 
pensatory advantage. Clandestine cases, and mild ones recognized 
by no one, restiveness under their efficient quarantine, the quaran- 
tine of apartments, the possibility of isolation that shall allow lib- 
erty to the male adult breadwinner, the use of placards, are ques- 
tions and difficulties that have called for investigation by the De- 
partment and have swollen the corres|X)ndence of the year. There 
has been no well established instance coming to attention of a 
milk-borne epidemic. 

Scarlet fever was most prevalent during the first half of the 
year; it has become again prevalent in December, with a proba- 
bility of being somewhat less so during the coming year. 

Measles 

There were 70,000 cases of measles reported in 1910 and no 
doubt a great many more not reported. In New \^ork city there 
were 34,000 cases, not far from half the total for the State, while 
60 per cent, of the deaths occurred there. There was one death to 
44 cases in the city and one to 70 in the rest of the State. The 



i 



248 State Department of Health 

reported cases in the city were not much in excess of last year; of 
the rest of the State the number is very much larger. 

The urban mortality which was 18.2 per 100,000 population in 
1909 is 16.2 in 1910. The rural is 8.5 against 4.7 in 1909. The 
total State mortality is the same as that of last year. 

For the first decade of the records of mortality of this Depart- 
ment, beginning with 1885, there were 10,500 deaths from 
measles and 16,300 from scarlet fever ; during this decade occurred 
almost as manv deaths from scarlet fever as in the sixteen subse- 
quent years. In these sixteen subsequent years there have been 
17,300 deaths from measles and 16,500 from scarlet fever. In 
nine of these years the measles mortality has been greater than 
tlie scarlatinal. Taken by five year periods the deaths from 
measles have been, 5,113; 5,400 ;"5,228 ; 5,012; 5,800. For the 
same five year periods the deaths from scarlet fever have been, 
8,119; 8,195; 4,017; 5,585; 5,340. This shows that while scar- 
let fever i-s decreasing, measles shows no change in actual mor- 
tality. Scarlet fever has become mostly a mild disease, while 
measles continues pretty much the same as formerly. 

The number of reported cases of measles for the year far ex- 
ceeds any other reported communicable disease and is more than 
double the numl>er for scarlet fever. It is, to be sure, much less 
fatal, 1 death in 50 cases against 1 in 20. Probably if the remote 
effects of measles were ascertainable by records it would be found 
that its credited fatalitv would be increased. As it is much more 
contagious, few escape it when it gets a good start in a community; 
moreover, the people do not shun it m they do other diseases. 

The largest number of cases were reported in March and the 
most deaths of any month occurred then and in April; the case- 
fatality was also greater then. In the last half of the year there 
have been few deaths. 

Typhoid Fever 

There were 8,536 cases in the State, against 7,894 in 1909 ; of 
these 3,735 came from Xew York city, 100 more than last year. 
The deaths were 1,374, of which 558 were in the city. This is 
rate of deaths to cases of 1 to 6 outside the city and 1 to 6.7 in 
the city. 



Division of Communicable Diseases 240 

For the last three years there have been 1,350 deaths a year; 
for the five years preceding, 1,600; and during twenty-five years 
the mortality has been between 1,300 and 1,600, in only a few 
exceptional years exceeding that number because of some unusual 
epidemics. The rate per 100,000 population has decreased from 
about 25.0 for five year period averages to 15.0 in the recent years. 

There were no large epidemics during the year. Attention was 
attracted to unusual prevalence at Syracuse, Union Springs, 
Moravia, Ithaca, where there were 35 cases traced to a milk source; 
Clayton, where it became prevalent the year before ; Lyons, Pal- 
myra, Pine Plains, Jamestown. Besides these, investigations of 
some smaller communities were instituted because of an increase 
in reporteil cases. At AVillard State Hospital and the Syracuse 
Institution for Feeble-Blinded Cliildron there was au exeossive 
number of cases of typhoid fever. 

With a death rate of 15.0 j^r 100,000 population for the State, 
New York city rate was 11.7; Buffalo, 18.4; Rochester, 13.7; the 
cities of the second class as a group, 17.3; the larger cities of the 
third class, 32.3 ; of twenty-three cities having from 10,000 to 
20,000 population, 28.0; and of four cities under 10,000 popula- 
tion, 42.0. The rural rate was 15.5. The excess of prevalence is 
in the smaller cities, which are generally above the State average. 
The cities which have had less than a 15 death rate are, Xew York, 
Rochester, Albany, Utica, Schenectady, Binghamton, Auburn, 
MU Vernon, New Rochelle, Gloversville, Lockport, Glens Falls, 
Olean, Lackawanna, Little Falls, Fulton and Johnstown. Their 
combined mortality is 11.5. That of the rest of the incorjX)rated 
cities is 30.0, double the entire State rate. Those which have had 
this year conspicuously high prevalence have been Niagara Falls, 
Watertown, Cohoes, Port Jervis, Cortland, Corning, Oswego, Hud- 
son, all having a rate of more than 50, while IN^ewburgh, Ogdens- 
burg, Watervliet, Ithaca, Xorth Tonawanda, Hornell, Batavia and 
Oneida have had a rate above 30 deaths per 100,000 population, 
and Syracuse, Elmira, Jamestown, Dunkirk, Middletown, Peeks- 
kill, Geneva, Plattsburgh, Rensselaer and Tonawanda have been 
but little below this average. 

In some of these cities typhoid fever has been long prevalent 
from infected water supply. In Xiagara Falls, the most note- 



250 State Department of Health 

worthy instance, measures to rectify this are under way. In some 
the increase has been recent and not due to long prevalent condi- 
tions. Syracuse has had a very complete investigation by the 
Sanitary Engineering Division for a prevalence perhaps due to a 
not permanent disturbance of the water supply system. A de- 
tailed report of the investigation of the Syracuse situation will 
be found under the Division of the Sanitary Engineers. Ithaca 
had a considerable milk-borne outbreak. Numerous smaller places 
have been under investigation for excess of the disease. 

Water has been the chief carrier of infection; 136 cases were 
traced to direct infection. The ease with which typhoid fever 
may be so taken is overlooked, that*is, by so-called contact infec- 
tion, in which may be included fly-infection, which likewise is the 
result of imperfect care of the sick. Several milk epidemics have 
been verified during the year, and of other food infections there 
are few established instances; in one instance 10 cases were at- 
tributed to ice cream cones a« a possible source of infection. 

There is a shifting of the seasonal prevalence of typhoid, taking 
the safe guide of its mortality as a basis; it is less a winter dis- 
ease than formerly. The average yearly mortality for the decade 
1891-1900 was: 

For the winter months 406 

For the spring months 276 

For the summer months 331 

For the fall months 666 

For the corresponding seasons of 1910 the number of deaths 
was, respectively, 305; 223; 298; 518. 

This gives a seasonal distribution of the deaths of the year as 
follows : 



In the winter months. 
In the spring months. 
In the summer months 
In the fall months . . . 



r tlie decade 
1891-1910 
Per cent. 


For 1910 
Per cent. 


24 . 20 


22.69 


16.45 


16.60 


19.70 


22.17 


39.65 


38.54 



Division of Communicable Diseases 251 

A smaller proportion of the deaths occur now in the winter, 
and a larger proportion in the summer. It has been found here- 
tofore that the winter mortality is high in cities supplied with 
water from large sewage-ln^aring streams and low in rural com- 
munities. This is illustrated in Niagara Falls, where in the last 
two years there have l)een 54 deaths from typhoid fever, of which 
19 were in the winter, 10 in the spring, 15 in the summer and 10 
in the autumn months. 

Unscreened vaults and the convalescent typhoid germ carrier 
have been the medium of spreading this disease through the 
iigency of flies and" by other means. T^xi-s has been found on our 
investigations. Every case of this disease calls for investigation^ 
iind the local health officer has been urged to personally inquire 
into the source. A large part of the work of investigating out- 
breaks or of localities where typhoid fever has become established 
for a long time ha-s very properly fallen on the Engineering Divi- 
sion of the DopartuK nt, as most causes are of secondary impor- 
tance to the chief one of an infected water supply. 

Cerebrospinal Meningitis 

The nmuber of re])orted cases of this disease, 353, is less than 
the number of last year. But the reports are incomplete, since 
the reported deaths are 45;]. New York city reported 230 cases 
and 294 deaths. The rest of the State had 160 deaths, equally 
divided between the other cities and the rural population. The 
disease is of the cities and the mortality to population is double 
that of the country under the conditions of mild prevalence of 
recent time. 

Smallpox 

This disease has much decreased in prevalence; 355 cases oc- 
curred and there were 7 deaths. There has been much vaccinat- 
ing during recent years and the result has been felt. Thirty-seven 
counties had cases, but in twenty-seven there were only the one 
imported case or the spread was limited to two or three secondary 
cases. Most of the ca-^es of the year came into two areas of prev- 
alence. In the fall of 1900 a case came from Canada to Xorth 
Tonawanda, Xiagara county, and the outbreak that followed not 



252 Statjc Department of Health 

only lasted there until July but spread to Niagara Falls and Lock- 
port; to Buffalo, Toiiawanda and Wlieatfield, Erie county, and 
probably to other towns. About one-third of the cases of the State 
and one death came here. Another third or more occurred in an- 
other outbreak which started in a lumber camp in the northern part 
of Herkimer county and was carried by indifferent and irresponsi- 
ble people in the country al>out in Jefferson, Lewis and St. Law- 
rence counties. In one of these areas the outbreak was prolonged by 
opposition to vaccination and in the other by ignorant indifference 
to it. In Steuben comity there were 10 cases in five towns; in 
Walden 5 with 1 death; in New York city 16 with 5 deaths* 
In no other municipality exee[>t those noted were there as many 
as five cases during the year. In every instance, w^here needed^ 
an expert of the Department has visited the location of smallpox 
cases and rendered material assistance to the health officer. 

Epidcm ic Pol lorn ijelitis 

This juade its a]>pearance iu September. An epidemic occurred 
in 1909 about Gouverueur, iu St. Lawrence county; there had 
been a large epidemic in 1908 in Xew York and Westchester 
county. It had l>een [)reva]eijt iu Massachusetts in 1909 and 
l)ecame more so in 1910, as likewise in numerous other States 
specially in the middle West, in this State it became extensively 
])revaleut in August ami C(»utiuiied until December. In forty-seven 
of the sixty-one counties there were cases reported to the total 
number of 327. The numl>er of deaths reported was fifty-six* 
There were no special centers from which cases spread from one 
community to another; a few cases, often but one or two, occurred 
in most of the localities. In the cities of Buffalo, Rochester, Svra- 
cuse, Schenectady, Elmira there were cases, the greatest num- 
ber, twenty-five, occurring in Buffalo. There were at the ^arae 
time cases in larger villages and in the rural towTis remote from 
railroads. Affected l(K*alitii\s were along the Mohawk Valley 
rather numerously, in the SuntlK^'u Tier counties along the Erie 
railnad, but also in the s}>arsely settled communities between, in 
the northern part of the State, and all the way between Long 
Island and Xiagara Falls. Tliere was a recurrence in the towns of 
St. Lawrence county in which the epidemic of 1909 appeared. 



Division of Communicable Diseases 253 

Early in January, 1911, Dr. W. H. Frost, Passed Assistant 
Surgeon, U. S. Public Health and Marine Hospital Service, made 
a detailed study of the 227 cases of epidemic poliomyelitis which 
Tvere reported to the State Department of Health during the year 
1910. Dr. Frost has submitted a detailed report of his investiga- 
tion which will subsequently 1h» published and circulated by the 
State Department of Health. 

Whooping Coiujh 

Considerable attention has been drawn to this disease owing to 
the fact that the average yearly mortality has been almost 1,000. 
A measure of control has been advocated which it is believed will 
in some d^ree lessen the spread of this very annoying and dis- 
tressing malady. A leaflet of instruction has been printed for 
distril)ution by the health officers, wherever this disease is 
prevalent. 

Xo reports of the numln^r of cases Jiave been received, but 
iereafter they are to l)e called for from health officers. The 
average mortality from it in this State has been 900, that of 
measles having been 1,100 and of scarlet fever 1,300 for the last 
twentv-five years. This year there were 720 deaths and that has 
been its average for the last ten years. Xot infrequently it has 
caused more deaths in the vear than has measles or even scarlet 
fever. Its midsummer mortality is highest; this year there were 
<iouble the number of deaths both in July and August of any other 
montJi, which is not unusual. 

Ophthalniia Xeonatoi'iim 
The campaign which was In^gun in 1909 for the suppression of 
ophthalmia neonatorum has betm successfully carried on during 
the year 1910. With this disease, as with some others, much 
difficulty has been experienced by this Department in getting the 
physicians to report its prevalence. For instance, only forty-two 
eases of ophthalmia neonatorum were reported to this Department 
from January 1 to Decemk»r 31, 1910. Knowing that this small 
iiuml>er by no means represented the actual prevalence of the 
disease throughout the State, a circular letter was addressed to 
about 6,000 physicians outside of Greater New York asking them 
to report at once such cases as had occurred in their practice during 
the past year. This request was responded to by over 2,000 phy- 



254 State Depabtmekt of IlKAi/ni 

sicians, from whom reports were received of 277 cases of ophthal- 
mia neonatorum. 

Cases were reported from 52 counties, while 7 counties failed to 
report a single case. Onondaga county reported the greatest num- 
ber of cases, 35; Erie, 29; Monroe, 19; Nassau, 16; Oneida, 11 j 
Westchester, 10; Chemung and Schenectady, each 9; Steuben and 
Wyoming, each 8; Broome, 7; Franklin, Eensselaer and. St. Law- 
rence, each 6, and many others from 5 to 1 case. The numerous 
replies received from the physicians throughout the State clearly 
indicate the educational influence which this campaign has ex- 
erted, in that practically all physicians are to-day employing either 
the silver solution supplied by the State or some other prophylactic 
measure in every case of confinement. It is also very gratifying^ 
to find in analyzing these 277 cases that only one child was blind 
in both eyes, 6 blind in one eye, while 270 cases had a favorable 
outcome. 

Influenza 

The annual epidemic of influenza reached its height in March. 
It began in December preceding, and lasted into May. The num- 
ber of deaths directly credited to it is 1,439; in 1909, 1,117. 
How many cases of it occurred and how many deaths it was the 
dominant contributing cause of is a matter only of conjecture. 
Since during the epidemic there is increase in the number of 
deaths from pneumonia and other acute diseases of the respiratory 
system, from consumption, from diseases of the circulatory, nerv- 
ous and digestive systems to some degree ; and since this increase 
as a matter of record set in abruptly with the first outbreak in 
1889 and has continued from that time, it is safe to attribute a 
certain proportion of this increase to influenza. This has been 
estimated year by year heretofore and the table of estimates is 
carried down here. In the twenty years past there has been an 
average yearly estimate of 7,000 deaths from influenza, which is 
no doubt conservative ; varying with the severity of the epidemic 
from 2,500 to 11,500 and in duration three to six months. The 
intensity of the epidemic increases to its acme, which may take 
two or three months even in mild epidemics, and hence it dimin- 
ishes, generally covering a period of five or six months. March 
is more often, as this year, the high point of the epidemic, but not 



Division of Communicable Diseases 



255 



infrequently it has been January. In March there were 14,134 
deaths from all causes, the largest number in the year ; 400 were 
ascribed directly to influenza. One-third of the deaths occurred 
past the age of 60 years ; deaths from consumption, acute respira- 
tory, circulatory and nervous diseases wei'e all excessive. 

Grippe pneumonia is a recognized form of pneumonia by the 
medical profession. The United States census report shows the 
urban mortality as very much lower than tlio rural. In this State 
the actual reported rural mortality this year was 708, while the 
urban mortality in nearly three times the population was 641, or 
a death rate of 10 in the latter to 33 in the former. 



Estimated Mortality from Epidemic Influenza 



EPIDEMIC YEAR 



1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 



Heiffht of 
epidemic 


Duration 


Estimated 
mortality 


Acute 
respiratory 
mortality 


January. . 


3 monthly 


5,000 


18.053 


April 


6 months 


8.000 


20,697 


January. . 


5 months 


8.000 


20,432 


April 


6 months 


6,000 


19.807 


January. , 


4 months 


3.000 


15,885 


February . 


4 months 


5,000 


17,725 


March . . . 


5 months 


2.750 


16.820 


March . . . 


4 months 


3,000 


16,277 


March. . . 


6 months 


2.500 


16.350 


January . . 


5 months 


7.000 


17.938 


March. . . 


6 months 


11,500 


19.232 


January . . 


5 months 


7.000 


17 5i»9 


February. 


6 months 


5.000 


16,986 


March . . . 


6 months 


8.000 


17.339 


March . . . 


6 months 


10.000 


21.132 


February. 


5 months 


9.000 


17:832 


March. . . 


6 months 


9,000 


20,178 


January. 


6 months 


10.000 


22.663 


January. . 


5 months 


9.500 


18.477 


March. . . 


5 months 


9.000 


20.781 


March . . . 


5 months 


10.000 


21,487 



Pneumonia 

It has been decided to place pneumonia on the list of reportable 
diseases, a special card for which has been prepared and dis- 
tributed to the physicians of the State through the health officers. 
The infectiousness and contagiousness of pneumonia has become 
more and more apparent and its extensive mortality rightfully 
makes it one of the most important diseases with which the De- 
partment has to contend. During the year 1910, 9,843 people died 
of lobar pneumonia, while 7,240 -^uccumlK^d to broncho-pneumonia. 



256 State Department of Health 

The combined mortality of the pneumonias exoeeds the total mor- 
tality throughout the State from tuberculosis, and as both of these 
diseases are in a measure preventable, many valuable lives should 
be saved by the systematic management as now planned by the 
Department. 

Cancer 

Cancer, like pneumonia, has been placed on the list of report- 
able diseases and a separate card likewise prepared on which to 
report the detailed history of each case occurring throughout the 
State. The deaths from cancer are increasing far more rapidly, 
in proportion, than other diseases throughout the State. During 
the year 1910, 7,505 people died in this State from cancer. This 
is an increase of 470 over 1909, while from tuberculosis there 
was an increase of 100. This Division is carefully studying the 
details of 'every case reported and proposes to prepare a map show- 
ing the geographical distribution of cancer throughout the State, 
for the purpose of locating, if possible, what appears to be certain 
localized infected regions, in which this disease is particularly 
prevalent. A more extensive report on the prevalence of cancer 
and the work which is being done in the investigation of the same 
will be found under the report of the Cancer Laboratory, in this 
same volume. 

Infant Mortality 

Infant mortality has engaged the attention of the Department 
and special efforts to lessen the death rate under one year have 
been made. The causes are many and do not all fall within the 
control of the health oflBcer, but it is gratifying to note that the 
percentage of infant deaths is decreasing throughout the State. 
Improper feeding is the chief cause of infant mortality, and as 
milk is the most widely used article of food for babies it is neces- 
sary that the health officers not only of our cities but also of the 
rural districts should exercise care in the supervision of the milk 
supply. Xo milk should ever be shipped from a farm where a con- 
tagious disease exists, unless it is absolutely certain that every 
precaution has been taken to prevent a possible infection of the 
milk. 



Division* of Communicable Diseases 



257 



In the decade 1885 to 1895 the deaths under five years were 
35.0 per cent, of the total mortality ; in the last decade this early 
life mortality has been uniformly 27.0 per cent, of the total. 

Tvi)erculo9is 

In 1910 there were reported 38,000 cases of pulmonary tuber- 
culosis, of which 32,000 came from New •York city. New York 
and Buffalo reported 20,000 cases in 1907; 24,000 in 1908; 
27,000 in 1909 ; 33,150 in 1910. In the rest of the State 2,100 
cases were reported in 1907 ; 2,635 in 1908 ; 5,820 in 1909 ; 4,800 
in 1910. The increments are due to fuller reports, it having be- 
come only recently reportable. 

The greatest number of new cases were reported in March, in 
April and in May ; the smallest in June and July. 

Tuberculosis — Registration of Living Cases 



1907 



Re«tof 
State 



Januar>' • • • 

Total. 
February . , 

Total. 
March... 

Total. 
April . . . . 

Total. 
May 

Total. 
Junr ... . 

ToUl. 
July 

Total. 
Auicu»t. . . 

Total. 
SrT>f mber 

Total. 
October. . . 

Total. 
Xo\'rmber . 

Total . 
I>rc*'mber. 

Total. 

Toiftl . . . 



262 

1.708 
222 I 

1.466 
267 I 

2,400 
103 I 

2.298 
136 I 

1.864 
125 I 

1.633 
242 I 

1.975 
204 I 

1.701 
190 I 

1.929 
229 I 

1.567 
229 I 

1.592 
277 I 

2.065 

22.098 



Greater 

New 
York 



1,446 
1,244 
2.133 
2.105 
1,728 
1.408 
1.733 
1.497 
1,739 
1.338 
1.363 
1,788 



1908 



Rest of 
State 



Greater 
New 
York 



256 

1.865 
284 I 

1.802 
330 L 

2.775 
279 I 

2,216 
309 I 

1.982 
347 I 

2.021 
137 I 

2.297 
207 I 

1.962 
226 I 

2.657 
305 I 

2,328 
271 I 

2,097 
359 I 

2.228 

26,230 



1,609 
1.518 
2.445 
1.937 
1.673 
1,674 
2.160 
1.755 
2.431 
2.023 
1.826 
1.869 



1909 



Reetof 
State 



1,469 

3,739 
587 I 

2,352 
592 I 

3,097 
563 I 

3,015 
374 I 

2,671 
'!57 I 

2.755 
725 I 

2.638 
510 I 

2,529 
312 I 

2.664 
437 I 

2,276 
4(iO I 

2.913 
422 I 

2,208 

32.887 



Greater 

New 
York 



1910 



Rest of 
State 



2,270 
1.765 
2,505 
2.452 
2,297 
2,298 
1.913 
2.019 
2,35. 
1.839 
2,483 
1.786 



167 

2.416 
458 I 

3.203 
523 I 

4.497 

451 I 
3.969 

452 I 
3,418 

514 I 

2.092 
490 I 

2.0 1 
485 I 

3.:t75 
454 I 

2.s:,o I 

71ft ' i 
2.084 I 

oil 
3.240 ' 

742 1 
2.992 

37,9<i:} , 



Greater 

New 
York 



2.249 
2,745 
3,974 
3.518 
2,966 
2.178 
2,131 
2.890 
.402 
1.974 
2.729 
2.250 



The above table should not be accepted as proof that tubercu- 
losij* is increasing throughout the State, but rather that the State 

9 



258 State Department of Health 

law requiring the registration of all cases of tuberculosis is being 
more generally observed by the medical profession. This, together 
witli better methods of diagnosis and a clearer understanding of 
the disease by the public, has led to fuller reports of the *' White 
Plague " being received. 

Doubtless many cases of tuberculosis are not reported, but the 
tuberculosis exhibit now on the road and the mass of literature 
distributed, not only by this Department but also by the various 
social organizations, is having a salutary effect. 

A full accoimt of the tuberculosis exhibit work will be found in 
another portion of the annual report, together with the report of 
the action taken by the different counties and cities in regard to 
the establishment and maintenance of hospitals for the care of 
tuberculosis. 

The deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis for the year are 
14,059. This is 100 more than in 1909, and 100 less than the 
average of the preceding years. The deaths were 9.5 per cent, 
of the deaths from all causes. 

In the twenty-five years preceding 1910 there occurred 319,800 
deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis, and 3,036,200 deaths from 
all causes. This makes 10.5 per cent of the deaths from this 
cause. 

Is tuberculosis decreasing ? To determine this we have no sta- 
tistics of existing cases to throw light, for even after a few years 
of reporting them the reports are incomplete and imtrustworthy 
for statistical data, and we have no record of the number of exist- 
ing cases in past years. Neither do we know the average duration 
of illness from tuberculosis. We have a certain guide to the mor- 
tality, the record of which is fairly trustworthy. This we have 
record of for this State since 1885. The yearly number of deaths 
has been pretty constant, with moderate yearly increase; begin- 
ning with 12,000 it has gi'own to 14,000. During this period the 
number of deaths from all causes has increased from 90,000 to 
140,000. The population has grown from less than six million to 
more than nine million. While the population has increased fifty 
per cent and the total deaths in the same proportion, the tubercu- 
losis mortality has increased less than one-fifth. This is shown 
by five-year periods, and for 1910: 



Division op Communicable Diseases 



259 



5 YEAR PERIODS 



188&-188G 
1890-1884 
1895-1899 
1900-1904 
1905-1909 
1910 



Estimated 
population 



5,760,000 
6,300,000 
6,880.000 
7,500,000 
8,750.000 
9,158.328 



Death rate 
(all causes) 



16.43 
19.33 
18.10 
17.50 
17.00 
16.10 



Average 
yearly 
deaths 
from con- 
sumption 



11,915 
13.320 
13.115 
13.258 
14.157 
14.059 



Per cent 

tuberculosis 

mortaUty 



12.6 
11.0 
10.9 
10.4 
10.1 
9.5 



Tuberouloms 
deaths per 
1,000 pop- 
ulation 



2.07 
2.11 
1.90 
1.77 
1.62 
1. 



The second period, 1890-4, shows a larger mortality than the 
two following periods, and the largest per capita death rate of the 
series. The total mortality is high, with a death rate of 19.33, 
which is the highest on our records. This is explained by the 
pandemic of influenza which began in 1890. With this exception 
there has been a steady decrease in the death rate from tubercu- 
losis. That of the year 1910 corresponds to a saving of 50 in 
100,000 population over the rate of the decade 1885-95. 

Compared with deatlis from other causes the decrease is con- 
stant and imbroken. Twenty-five years age one-eighth of the 
deaths were from pulmonary tuberculosis, and now they are less 
than one-tenth. If the proportion of deaths from tuberculosis 
were the same this year as then, there would have been 18,000 
instead of 14,000. If the same per capita mortality prevailed 
now as then, the number of deaths would be found to be even 
greater, almost 19,000. Indeed, the lowering of the general death 
rate corresponds pretty closely to the saving in deaths from tu- 
berculosis. If the rate of mortality of to-day had prevailed 
twenty-five years ago there would have been 9,000 instead of 
12,000 deaths annually from this cause. 

In what populations of the State is saving in tuberculosis mor- 
tality being effected? The urban and rural rates of death from 
this, along with the rates in the sanitary districts, for the past 
five vears, is as follows: 

Deaihs per 1,000 population in the Sanit<iry Districts 



YEAK 



igoe 

1007 
IMS 
1M9 
1910 



Urban 


Rural 


MarU 
time 
Dis- 
trict 


Hudson 
VaUey 

> 


Adiron- 
dack . 


Mobawk 
Valley 


Soutb- 
emTier 


East 
Cent- 
ral 


West 
Cent- 
ral 


1.95 


1.30 


2.10 


1.61 


1.35 


1.17 


0.90 


1.20 


1.00 


1.95 


1.25 


2.12 


1.75 


1.34 


1 34 


0.90 


1.26 


1.12 


1.85 


1.23 


2.05 


1.72 


1 38 


1.33 


96 


1.25 


1.13 


1.76 


1.20 


1.90 


1.61 


1.30 


1.25 


80 


1.20 


1 03 


1.65 


1.21 


1.78 


1.65 


1.28 


1.10 


0.74 


1.18 


0.80 



West- 
ern 



1 15 
1.19 
1.16 
1.20 
1.16 




260 State Department of Health 

This record shows that the chief decrease is in the city popula- 
tion. There is but little change in some of the districts, although 
most of them show some decrease, and especially in the last three 
years. The Southern Tier District has always been noted for its 
freedom from tuberculosis. That tuberculosis is a city disease is 
shown by its mortality in districts with large urban population. 

In submitting the above report I desire to tender thanks to Dr. 
F. C. Curtis, consulting dermatologist, for his assistance in com- 
piling the same. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM B. MAY, 

Director 



REPORT 

OF THE 

TUBERCULOSIS CAMPAIGN 



(2611 



REPORT OF TUBERCULOSIS CAMPAIGN 



Albany, N. Y., May 1, 1911. 

Hon. Eugene H. Porter, State Commissioner of Heulth, Albany, 
N. Y.: 

Deab Sir: — I have the honor to herewith submit a report on 
the work in connection with the tuberculosis campaign for the 
vear 4910. 

The work of the year was in charge of Mr. C. W. Fetherolf 
until November 22, 1910, when Dr. E. G. Whipple was tem- 
porarily appointed to fill the vacancy caused by Mr. Fetherolf s 
resignation. In an examination on February 18th Dr. Whipple 
qualified under the civil service, and on March 15th received the 
appointment as director of the tuberculosis exhibit. The work 
since November 22d has been in his charge. 

During this year the large exhibit of the State Department of 
Health has been shown in the following ten cities, in which a 
vigorous anti-tuberculosis campaign has been carried on conjointly 
with the State Charities Aid Association: 

1. Niagara Falls. 6. Saratoga. 

2. Lockport. 7. Plattsburg. 

3. Amsterdam. 8. Malone. 

4. Watervliet. 9. Ogdensburg. 

5. Glens Falls. 10. Watertown. 

A definite program was agreed upon before starting this series 
of campaigns, and wherever possible, it was closely followed. 

This program included meetings for church organizations, 
which were usually held on the oi>ening Sunday. Meetings for 
school children of the public and parochial schools were held dur- 
ing the school hours, both mornings and afternoons. One after- 
noon during the week was given over to the women of the city and 
the meeting conducted under their auspices. The evening meet- 
ings were held for fraternal, labor, military, business men's, 
religious and other prominent local organizations. Sometime 

[263] 



i 



264 State Department of Health 

during the week a meettag was held under the auspices of the 
city or county medical society, at which some physician, expert 
on the subject of tuberculosis, was asked to be present and speak 
on this subject, giving special attention to the diagnosis of early 
cases. The series of meetings ended with, the mass meeting 
usually held on Friday night, making a campaign of six days, dur- 
ing which time every group of citizens and all classes of people 
were reached to some extent. 

« 

It was at Niagara Falls that the first campaign of this year 
was inaugurated. Here the usual program was followed, the 
opening day including separate meetings for Polish and Italian 
residents. 

On Tuesday evening a special meeting for physicians was held 
under the auspices of the Niagara Falls Academy of Medicine at 
the Hotel Imperial. A dinner preceded this session, attended by 
41 physicians. The paper of the evening was presented by Dr. 
G. W. Beach of Binghamton, N. Y., on " Why Many Cases of 
Early Pulmonary Tuberculosis Are Not Found by Physicians." 

On Friday night the campaign closed with the mass meeting, 
at which Dr. J. H. Pryor of Buffalo, Dr. Francis E. Fronczak of 
Buffalo, Rev. E. J. Walsh and Senator James P. Mackenzie were 
among the speakers. 

Immediately following the campaign, provision was made by 
the city for examination of indigent cases, Drs. E. B. Horton and 
C G. Leo- Wolf contributing their services. A total attendance 
of 5,076 was reached during this campaign. 

On Sunday, January 30th, the second campaign of the series 
opened in Lockport at the Walton Rink. The opening day was 
made " Industrial Sunday," and the meeting held especially for 
labor organizations. During the week all of the school children of 
the city attended in a body, and special meetings were held under 
the auspices of fraternal and benevolent societies, the Board of 
Trade, church organizations and the Y. M. C. A. The campaign 
closed with the mass meeting on Friday night, which 1,684 people 
attended. 

The medical meeting in connection with this campaign was 
held under the auspices of the Lockport Academy of Medicine at 
the home of Dr. F. J. Baker. Dr. John H. Pryor of Buffalo, on 



Kepobt of Tuberculosis Campaigx 265 

behalf of the State Department of Health delivered a paper on 
** The Diagnosis of Early Pulmonary Tuberculosis." There was 
an attendance of 23 physicians at this meeting. 

Amsterdam was the third city to be visited by the large exhibit 
and there, as in the other campaigns, the opening meeting oc- 
curred on Sunday, but the number of days was extended to seven 
instead of six as in the two previous campaigns. The usual 
program was followed throughout the campaign. The mass meet- 
ing on Friday night brought out about 1,400 people to hear the 
following speakers : Rt. Rev. Monsignor J. L. Reilly of Schenec- 
tady, Prof. Chas. McClumpha of Amsterdam, the Hon. Alec H. 
Seymour of the State Department of Health and the Hon. Jas. H. 
Mitchell, M. D. of Cohoes. Hon. Seeley Conover, mayor of the 
city, presided. 

The medical meeting usually held during the campaign could 
not be arranged at that time, but was held on March 24th while 
the interest in tuberculosis was still keen. Dr. A. H. Garvin, 
Superintendent of the New York State Hospital at Ray Brook 
talked on the subject of *^ The Early Diagnosis of Tuberculosis '' 
and luncheon was served by the Montgomery County Medical 
Society, under whose auspices this meeting was held. There was 
an attendance of 54 physicians at this meeting. 

Sunday, March 6th, was the opening day of the Watervliet 
campaign, which was continued until Saturday, March 12th. It 
was necessary to engage two halls for the exhibit and meetings, 
and arrangements were finally made whereby the new city hall 
was used on March 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th and St. Bridget's Hall 
on March 11th and 12th, there being no meetings held on March 
10th. It was impossible to arrange a mass meeting, because no 
central auditorium could be secured, otherwise the usual pro-am 
was adopted. 

Dr. A. T. Laird of Albany was the speaker at the medical 
meeting which was held at the home of Dr. B. J. Ward on the 
evening of March 10th. Dr. Laird had for his subject "The 
Diagnosis of Early Pulmonary Tuberculosis." 

The fact that there were no daily newspapers in Watervliet 
made the publicity diflBcult, but in spite of this fact 32.2 per cent. 
of the population was reached. 



266 State Depaktment of Health 

The fifth place to be shown the exhibit was Glens Falls. The 
dates fixed were from April 3d to 8th, inclusive. The Glens 
Falls Committee for the Prevention of Tuberculosis collected 
$200 from the citizens to carry on the local work. The usual 
program was followed throughout, ending with the mass meeting 
at which Col. J. A. Cunningham presided. Dr. F. G. Fielding, 
Hon. Philip V. Danahy, Hon. J. A. Kellogg and Mr. C. W. 
Fetherolf spoke. 

The medical meeting on tuberculosis was held prior to the 
campaign. At this meeting Dr. A. H. Garvin, Dr. A. T. Laird 
and Dr. H. D. Pease spoke. 

From April 3d the active campaign work was not renewed until 
September 25th, when Saratoga was made the scene of activity. 
This campaign covered but five days and here again the usual 
program was followed. The mass meeting, however, was held on 
Wednesday instead of the closing night, and a large audience of 
2,000 people assembled to hear Dr. E. R. Baldwin "of Saranac 
Lake, Hon. Homer Folks of New York and the Hon. E. A. Mer- 
ritt address this meeting. Mr. John A. Kingsbury of New York 
presided. 

From Saratoga the campaign extended to Plattsburg, where a 
six day warfare was again waged. Special military meetings 
were the feature of the week. The campaign closed on Friday 
night, October 15th, with a rousing meeting, at which L. L. Shed- 
den presided. Addresses were made by the Hon. C. C. Duryee of 
Schenectady, Dr. Wm. J. Brennan, President of the Board of 
Health of Plattsburg, the Rt. Rev. Father Reilly of Schenectady 
and Mr. C. W. Fetherolf of this Department. This campaign 
was notable in being the first campaign of this sort in which 
soldiers of the regular army of the United States have partici- 
pated. The medical meeting was omitted because it was impos- 
sible to secure any physician to give the usual demonstration. 

From October 30th to November 4-th the exhibit was shown in 
Malone, and it was there that the record percentage attendance 
was secured. Seventy-seven per cent, of the population was 
registered as entering the State Armory during the campaign. 
This town, although right in the territors' influenced by Saranae 
Lake and the intelligence coming from that tuberculosis center, 



Eeport of Tuberculosis Campaigx 267 

• 

hsLs been for years very negligeut in public health matters, and 
tuberculosis was not considered at all. A slight interest had been 
aroused just previous to the campaign, so that it seemed the 
psychological moment for such a campaign to, be carried on. Its 
effect was remarkable and as a result a tuberculosis nurse was 
engaged and a free examination station established. This town 
is a striking example and a proof positive of the educational 
value of this exhibit in public health w^ork other than that per- 
taining to tuberculosis. A recent visit to this town shows better 
hygienic and sanitary conditions throughout and an increased 
activity of the board of health and health officer along all lines of 
public health. The usual program was carried out during the six 
day campaign and the mass meeting was a fitting close. Dr. E. 
R. Baldwin of Saranac Lake, Dr. Lawrason Brown of Saranac 
Lake, Dr. John B. Huber of New York, Mr. M. E. McClary, 
President of the Board of Trustees of the State Hospital at Ray 
Brook, Hon. J. P. Badger, Mr. C. W. Fetherolf of the State 
Department of Health and Mr. G. J. Xelbach of New York were 
the list of speakers. The Hon. F. G. Paddock presided. 

Owing to the fact that the Franklin County Medical Society 
usually devotes most of its scientific program to tuberculosis, the 
usual medical meeting was dispensed with. 

From Malone the exhibit went to Ogdensburg, where it ex- 
hibited in the State Armony from November 2 2d to December 2d. 
Here again the usual program was followed and the week's cam- 
paign was closed by the mass meeting, at which Major 'W. H. 
Daniels presided. Dr. E. R. Baldwin, Mr. John A. Kingsbury, 
Hon. F. J. Gray and Dr. G. C. Madill were the speakers. The 
medical meeting usually held at the time of the campaign, in this 
instance preceded the exhibit Dr. A. H. Garvin gave a clinical 
demonstration of the diagnosis of early tuberculosis. 

The year 1010 closed its campaign work with a visit to Water- 
town, the campai^ being conducted thei^ from December 11th 
to 16th. Friday night, December 16th was called "Watertown 
Night " and nearly 1,000 people turned out in spite of the severe 
weather to hear Dr. Henrv L. Eisner of Svracuse, Mr. W. H. 
Stevens of Watertown, Mr. Geo. J. Xelbaeh of Xew York and 
Mr. Philip V. Danahy of Albany. 



268 State Depaktment of IIealth 

These ten local campaigns can be considered the most successful 
yet undertaken, and the following figures seem to warrant this 
statement : 

There has been a total attendance of 55,169. The average 
per cent of the population reached has been 37.66 per cent. 
There have been held 133 meetings; 50 of these meetings were for 
school children, 10 women's meetings', 10 meetings for fraternal 
organizations, 9 meetings for labor organizations, 9 mass meet- 
ings, 7 joint public meetings, 3 meetings under the auspices of 
business organizations, 9 meetings for foreigners, 16 church meet- 
ings, 4r military meetings and 8 medical meetings. There have 
been distributed approximately 132,705 pieces of literature. 
Newspaper space used for publicity has amounted to 51,085 
column inches. There have been 232 speakers at the various 
meetings, 134 of which have been physicians and 98 others. 

The plan of the campaign has been practically the same as that 
of the year 1909, and the results should be most gratifying. The 
movement seems to have become a very popular one and because 
of this fact local co-operation and endorsement are much easier 
to secure. The clergy seem more willing to unite on wiping out 
this social evil and physicians have assisted us greatly. Labor 
organizations are very active and their help can always be de- 
pended upon. Through the meetings held under the auspices of 
the women's clubs, local health laws and ordinances are enforced 
and new ones instituted and we have come to place great depend- 
ence on them as the best means to secure these results. Practi- 
cally all fraternal and benevolent organizations have been in- 
structed by the officers of their order to lend all possible assistance 
to "the movement and they are obeying these instructions. Much 
credit for the success of this work is due to the co-operation of the 
editors of the newspapers throughout the State. 

The medical meetings which have been held in connection with 
the local campaigns have proved to be one of the most effective 
ways of giving to the physician in general practice the essentials 
of diagnosis of tuberculosis. So much has been done through 

magazine articles during the past few years that it is not 
uncommon for the physician to refuse to read the articles that are 
appearing because they are merely reviews and contain no new 



Eeport of Tubeeculosis Campaign 269 

facts. The demonstrations given by this Department are prac- 
tical and each physician has an opportunity to examine and 
familiarize himself with the essentials of diagnosis. The De- 
partment has been especially fortunate in the men who have been 
its representatives in this particular work. Much credit belongs 
to Dr. John H. Pryor of Buffalo, and Dr. A. H. Garvin, Superin- 
intendent of the New York State Hospital at Kay Brook, who 
have given their time and ability for this purpose. Their lec- 
tures and demonstrations tare very popular with the physicians 
and much good has been accomplished through their efforts. If 
I might be permitted to recommend one thing for the coming 
year which I feel is one of the most important that the Depart- 
ment might undertake in this work, I would respectfully suggest 
that this particular work with the physicians be continued more 
extensively than heretofore. It has been proved that it is the 
ideal way to instruct the physicians in a field of knowledge in 
which it must be admitted that they are woefully lacking. 

The six small exhibits built by this Department during the 
summer have been used very effrctively throughout the oovnties, 
visiting the smaller towns and villages. Six demonstrators wore 
secured and an active county hospital campaign was carried on 
jointly with the State Charities Aid Association. The yearns 
reports show that these six small exhibits have visted 131 towns 
and viUages in 17 different counties. In connection with these 
county campaigns, there have been held 361 meetings, 112 of 
which have been for the school children. There has been a total 
attendance at these meetings of 41,409; 425 speakers have ad- 
dressed the various gatherings. These exhibits have been re- 
sponsible for securing provision for county hospitals in 16 coun- 
ties and 18 other boards of supervisors are seriously considering 
this question. 

From the knowledge which we have there is no doubt that hos- 
pitals are the best solution for the tuberculosis problem, but there 
is also no doubt but that they will never prove the success that is 
expected unless they are in charge of a competent physician who 
must be a resident physician and who will devote all' his time to 
the institution, and each institution should have regular and 
systematic inspection by this Department. 



270 State Depaet:ment of Health 

The small exhibits have been used largely to secure county 
hospitals but aside from this object in which they have been very 
successful, their educational value cannot be over-estimated. The 
rural districts are the communities which our statistics show need 
most education in regard to tuberculosis and the value of these ex- 
hibits has never been in doubt. 

The work of the summer months was given over to the recon- 
struction of the large exhibit and the building of six county cam- 
paign exhibits. The itinerary for the year 1010 and 1911 was 
planned at this time and the following cities were placed on the 
list of cities to be visited by the large exhibit; Saratoga, Platts- 
burg, Malone, Ogdensburg, Watertown, Little Falls, Gloversville, 

Johnstown, Ithaca, Batavia, Ilornell, Oneonta, Hudson. 

Kindest cooperation has been met with by each and all in the 
Department and it is largely through their interest that the Cam- 
paign has proved ^the success that it has this year past. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. G. WHIPPLE, M. D., 

Director Tuberculosis Exhibit 



REPORT 



OF THE 



ANTITOXIN LABORATORY 



1271) 



REPORT OF THE ANTITOXIN LABORATORY 



Albany, X. Y., April 19, 1911. 

Hon. Eugene H. Poetee, A.M., M.D., State Commissioner of 
Health, Albany, N. Y.: 

Sib : — I have the honor to submit to you a report of the work 
of the Antitoxin Laboratory for the year 1910. 

For purposes of comparison, the general statements of the 
activity of the Antitoxin Laboratory are made in tabular form 
corresponding to those of reports of this service in preceding years. 

The total amount of diphtheria antitoxin distributed during 
1910, consists of 36,916 bottles of diphtheria antitoxin of 1,500 
units each or equivalent. The character and total number of 
places supplied during the year is shown in the following table, 
which covers the period from 1902 : 



YEAR 



cities supplied.., 
VUia«e8 supplied 
Towns supplied . 

Total 



1902 


1903 


1904 


1905 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


30 
161 
171 


42 
204 
280 


42 
}617 


42 
691 


42 
793 


42 
828 


43 
926 


47 
(169 

\273 


362 


626 


659 


733 


835 


870 


969 


489 



1910 



53 
168 
232 

453 



Of this amount of diphtheria antitoxin, a total of 66,374,000 
units, the proper form of requisition has been filled in and is duly 
filed for 46,236,000 units, showing a balance of 10,138,000 unite 
of diphtheria antitoxin distributed during that year in some 
manner other than the usual form of signed requisition. For 
33,480,000 units of this year's distribution of diphtheria anti- 
toxin, receipts in due form have been returned to this Depart- 
ment and are filed. Eeporta of the use of 18,578,943 units of 
diphtheria antitoxin more or less completely filled out and signed 
have been forwarded to this Department and are on file. In 
addition thereto, 2,751,000 units of diphtheria antitoxin are rep- 
resented by report slips received by the Laboratory perfectly 

[273] 



274 State Department of Health 

blank, generally returned with a package containing an empty 
syringe of antitoxin and without any address of sender which 
would make possible the identification or trace of the person sup- 
plied with the antitoxin used in these cases. 

Among the reports of diphtheria antitoxin utilized it is found 
that this therapeutic agent was used in thirty-five cases that were 
other than diphtheria, 

Reports of the utilization of the State antitoxin are at hand for 
1,863 cases of diphtheria, of which 1,700 recovered and 163 died; 
3,921 cases were immunized. 

The mortality, therefore, of all reported cases of diphtheria 
with the use of the State antitoxin for 1910, is 8.8 per cent. , 

The relative amount of the distribution of 1910, with that of 
previous years since 1902, is shown by the following table, which 
is a continuation of Table II of the reports of previous years: 

Bottles 

Nine months of 1902 6^552 

Full year, 1903 14,121 

Full year, 1904 16,374 

Full year, 1905 16,308 

Full year, 1906 17,794 

Full year, 1907 23,629 

Full year, 190S 25,469 

Full year, 1909 24,429 

Full vear, 1910 ! 36,916 

The relative strength of serum issued this year, compared to 
that of previous years, is shown in the following table: 

1902 300 units per cubic centimeter 

1903 325 units per cubic centimeter 

1904 375 units per cubic centimeter 

1905 350 units per cubic centimeter 

1906 350 units per cubic centimeter 

1907 450 units per cubic centimeter 

1908 350 units per cubic centimeter 

1909 370 imits per cubic centimeter 

1910 530 units per cubic centimeter 



Report of Antitoxin Laboratory 275 

Of all the cases reported, involving a total of over 18,000,000 
units of diphtheria antitoxin, approximately 5,000,000 units of 
antitoxin were used for immunizing purposes, 11,700,000 units 
for purposes of cure, and 1,800,000 units of antitoxin were used 
in lethal cases. 

Special study of the most thoroughly re}>orted series of anti- 
toxins utilized during the year, showed that for 3,921 cases im- 
munized, 5,000,000 units of antitoxin were used, showing the 
utilization of an average dose of 1,530 units. 

Of this same series of antitoxin utilization, 163 deaths were 
reported, for which 1,800,000 units of diphtheria antitoxin had 
been utilized, showing an administration of 19,000 units per case 
of the deaths reported. 

Of 1,700 cases of reported recoveries in this same series, a total 
of 11,700,000 imits are shown to have l)een utilized; an average 
amount of under 7,000 units of antitoxin per case for those in the 
series that recovered from diphtheria. 

A considerable nimiber of State institutions were supplied with 
both diphtheria and tetanus antitoxins. A total of more than 
2,600,000 units of diphtheria antitoxin is reported as supplied 
during 1910 to State institutions, of which practically 675,000 
units were supplied for purposes of immunization. Approxi- 
mately, therefore, 2,000,000 units were supplied for therai>eutie 
use in these State institutions. 

Tetanus AufifUvin 

It is very noticeable that many health officers fail to keep anti- 
toxins on hand, and tetanus antitoxin in particular ; and the mor- 
tality statistics of the State from tetanus, showing 111 deaths in 
the year, do not indicate that a sufficiently extensive distribution 
or, at least, utilization of tetanus antitoxin exists. 

A total of 14,482,500 units of tetanus antitoxin was distributed 
during the year, and requisitions to the amount of slightly over 
6,492,000 units of such antitoxin are in proper form and duly 
filed. The form of requisition is lacking for 7,990,000 units of 
State antitoxin. The receipts required from such physicians as 
have utilized the State antitoxin are at hand and file<l for 1,301,000 
units of tetanus antitoxin, and reix)rts of its use to the amount of 
2,276,400 units have been received and filed. 



276 State Depaktment of Health 

Of actual cases of developed tetanus subjected to State antitoxin 
treatment, there are reported only fourteen cases, nine deaths 
and five recoveries. 

Of 2,276,400 units for the utilization of which sufficient re- 
ports exist, it is found that 326,400 units were used for prophy- 
lactic purposes, and that 1,950,500 units of such antitoxin were 
used for treating actual cases of tetanus. 

Approximately 3,225,000 units of tetanus antitoxin were sup- 
plied to 31 cities in the State; 11,257,500 units to 83 towns and 
67 villages and 18,000 units of tetanus antitoxin were furnished 
to the State institutions. 

During the year 1910, the Laboratory Division has continued 
the work of preparing and distributing the outfits furnished by 
the State Department of Health for the purpose of prophylaxis 
of ophthalmia neonatorum. Quantities were supplied as the de- 
mand and utilization of these outfits indicated the necessity, to 
the amount of 24,454. 

Respectfully submitted 

WILLIAM S. MAGILL, 

Director of Laboratories 



REPORT 



OF THE 



HYGIENIC LABORATORY 



1277] 



:iiac8i\r'.»? 



, - . ^ 






Njs: 






•I 



— ' *■■ 



, >: 



4 V'V* 



J. > . - *.^ 



11**^ Z TT 



•-• * 



'— : 11- 1. 



1*^ ^.1 • .1 • 



-«." * * ■ * 






*>- ^ * M *V^. 



■ » \ \v 















State Dbpartmext of Health 



i 


■>■ 


3 1X11-1 


■:::■■■ :l ■ :+ : :+ 


+ 


■+ ■ : + 


"01-1 




: + 4 

+ 1 / + 

+ r~ 


.+ + .+ 


~-S0l 


+++I III .+ 1 .+ 11 




++++I 1+ . .-t- : . 1+ ; 


+ ■+ ; 


!i 






8=1 S 


=1 |8| 




»WK) 


SS^SiS^SSe %Si SSS 


■S : 


;= ;22 


^l^FmiV 


^SS£E:SSgS >$ ^ZS 


:K ■ 


-S 




$8SS333§3 :$^ :?33 


;S ; 


:s ss 


Muopio 


sKsssasss ,ss ^asa 




■s ss 


3 


-1"1>N 


ss£sssis8$ .sa -8aa 

— 0OC3O0O— o -oo =o« 






"i!^m 


ili|j8jli ;iB ^sii 


j: 


.§■ ig 


pioo 


™mq,v 


E8SSIill» ;li :jll 




.§ m 


^o™. 


nay 


151515811 ;IS iSB 


.i .ii. 


■i.p«u[.sain 




:'- : 


-s sa 


■uodmu do gnpiBH 


SSasiSSiS : -.t Ki 


:| : 


-g -£5( 


Atpwmi 


rimi^'T 


:|: 


:\r 


1 -P.0 


""■""SBB- ;-- ;S-a 






1 




ill il III 


1 


Mm ti li 4 iU 

lltlltllJ ill llslllsllli J 










Illllllllllllllllllllllll 



Eeport of Hyoiesic Laboratory 



1 1 1 11 1 ++ 1 1 n 



^1 .es 3iisessss% 5s?.s sssssss . - - . a . . " 



:i:3 an ■-nsKir^^ftsn . ssxs ss^e^sx 



S3 :S8 stsss^ss: 



»|S5 



=S£8t:i= 






; ass ss^s^ss "sasHsa" s' 



gi p §spsgiis 



|§iis§§i§ : 'i§£8 .i|ssisi 



is js jsiigiiis: "iiiriliii^i : 



SS 88 :8gg|ggS:S = 









11: 



.r 






■111! 



jidjirijjft 



Jiiittilttililjsjisijljijr 
I i i i i a I ! ililliJJs I jji 






i ill III Ijjijii 111 liiilll|ll|fiilll|l I 



State Depabtmest of Health 



m 



I +++++ I + I + 



SiisgRi§sss|| iis|§§i§8_iii§ipi§§ 



88S5SS5SSS88 S$ : 



;g ;$ SSiSSSSSSS 



■ S -^»USS?iViXSSS 



snss'ss^snsss 



Si^Si^t^nn^ 



SiSl^issa^ssssi: 



.g S ESSHgHSiSl 



ssssss^sssss 



S a »SS33S: 






isisssSiSili 



Isjsssji 



§1 : : .1 s .isiilisSs 



^S=|g§||g|Si 



ir : g ,§ :SS5=li»g| 



i3i|§iiliili : M : Mi ii :=§SiiiS|| 



■sRsaRa5s8¥sG~~6; 



"RisassslsWl" 



33$S8?SSSSS5 - SS 



: s :sssaaiisss 









Tl 



mm, 



^^5Sas^g^=s5| Sg|||SS|g£aag£|^^JJ 



U\ 



Tii 8 Isl -'Si ■ 



isiiiJililiJiiii 






i 



83 



jlUHlii 



Hill 



Report of Hygienic Laboratory 



283 



+ 1 I I I i I i I I I I I I I I I i I i i I I I I I I I 1 I I I :| i I i I 



I + + I 



4-14-IIMlll + lllH-IIII + llllllllll -H-f + Mil 



I + -f 



++-H- 1 1 1 I + I + I I I I ++ I + I -H I 1 1 1 I 1 I I I I +-I-+ I I I I 



I + + I 






IgSSSSSSS^S-'gSSl 






C«C>5»OC<3 v4 



eo 



coec^ eo© 



8 



e^ 



« « • M ci e« e« ci 



QOOOOQQQOQ -SO O O £« O O QO O O O O O O O «0 Q O 



3 ^ 

94 O 



s s 



^<-iOOOOOCC<4C« 



— oo 



000O0C«OC40O00 



o •-• 



oo o 






OOOOOOOOOkO 



oico • oooooooooo -oo 



Se^aQ«>eoccc4a>o^ 
osoooiocceoNOO 

C4 o« ^« vx w^ 



S:S2 : 



vx vH v4 •« o* vMvMvHe^ 



ss 



o o 



c* 



t>»t* ^acc4&*e4 



t-Oi'r'r»o«o«*'<"»'e^ 



00 M C4 «o e«i o C4 oo oo 00 — < 00 oc ao o to <o «D go oo 






CO^ -toSSkOBS 



Oa 0> OS 0> <Q ^ CO CO •"" ^^ 

C4 o* 1X <^ «-4 «-4 



O CO «* •'WS C 1^ CO CO QO CO C4 Ct ^ Q ^ tD«0 CI <0 

w* C4 •— I ^ "^ <^ ^* v^ i_i I— I ^4 £3} wH «•« «■« «■« «i4 



M>eSoeo**t«t« 



c«^<•5cleiiAr«C4C4c« 



c4cor««>AiocSS ■c4eoooc4C4oor«> 



• »o 



00 t^ 



esi «o 



c«eot*«»^**"*»- 



•■ViH^^V^^vMO^^tC^ 



»0©»-«0"-O0'r— «eoo ^'^eooo^^eo e* eo 



ss sssss 



mnS^SSSS^ 



oo Oieooo 



©oooo^*i-*^*o 



4' 






ci^cooco coooe* 



©* 



s 



c« 



!888^ 



8888i8l8§§ 



§ §888888 Siii 



,c»c«« 

888 



8 8 



Si&8S 









•-■000©©©0©00©©0© 



jJ00'*«O< 

o©ool 



S 3 



ie« 



i«e©o<oi 

) ^4 «^ «rt «-4< 

>©©oo< 



I CO 



, e-ii 



'©©«OdC4l 



ill 



e«oi 



cSmc^mS 



5SS8S^^!S^$ 



eoeo»-i 
^feo' 






)iA<e«OMO^t^c4 



S £q S 



**•- 



(^^$9SS 



co«<»eocoofth"t»*>»ocoo 



gOQb^t>«03ineo|<>q9eO'«>©0'«eiootQ 
•- notcieinfico e* m c« eo w w ci 



S3 

04 






•OM) 



J 



.C« 



.eo 



J 11 «|8ii 



eo 



,^*e^«e»io 



S S 8 J i c i go o S 8 8 

HOHOOOUHO Ot-Go 



il i 

O O 



•o*e 



© lO xa o >o 



m 



>*o 



HHH HHHI 



eo»- a,© 



H HHHHH 



III I 



C4 



2 



oo 



©©©©©©©©©©©C 0©OOG©©©C 0©0©00©0©0©©©©©©© © © o © © 

o<-*«-^4C4eQ^>Oko<ea»©©c4iAr«©oeor^©r^'-'^«-«>n«09>"C4««C4C4tc^eM«ot» oo oT o»" © © 




'S'eL'a'a'S.'S'a'a'S^ 
SSSSSSSSSo 

e u u o o o o c p 89 

22 S 15 2 IH 2 X 2 [^ 



i 
I 

B 

c.'o.'cii.'a a'o.'S.'S.'a a'a'E't.'o. o.'c.'d. c c q. " o.'o.'a . 

• H.Si.S.Si. — .i.Si.SJ.S.Si.Si.S.'^.— . — .2.2.SS.2.— 2. — .2.^ 
222222Ic2I5222x22l5lE22Z'-2223 S 






'S.'S.'S.'e.'ft.'n.'a.'S.'S. C'fc.'S.'S.'S.'S.'e.'S.'S.IS.'S.'S.'S't^'a.'a.'e-'o.'e.'S.'S. ■'S.'S.'S 



<S 



"6 
I 

"5. 
a 

S 



e 

§ 



c^ 



I 



^ 

s 



t-t-G. 



t$mmmmatmm it^r 
Ht-Ht-HHHHE-Ef 



acaaaaa 



a & a a a o. A a a Ok a a a o. a a a Q. a cua n 
^ as ts a * m m m a m 9i m n m m W a 9» m m m « n m o**^ 
HHE-E-HE-HE-E-E-E-E-Ht-E-HHHHHHHHHO 



c 9 

X o.fi 

3fC O 

. « o o 

H CO 



e 

1 



s 

S 

ia 

a I 

5 o _ o 




aS 3 3 3 3 3 3 

^J532x22 

re 999393. 



£ 



O 

o 



§i 



« V 



=: = -a = =: = g S 
^i » » > i if » ^-i???? 



9 3 9 9 > > > >- >- > > J J^^JIS^J^'S « 4 4 «S^ « « « 5 



•S 

fiQ 



I 



■State Depaetment of Health 



J 

id+-- 


■«OI-[ 


; 1 - It M , (l + l 1 1 :| 1 1 1 1 1 1 : 1 + 


.«, 


: 1 :++IMII+l+]+l+l+ll I. 1+ 


■"01 


. 1 . ++ ++ 1 + 1 +++ 1+++ 1 +++ 1 ; 1 + 


II 


; S : IS «ll!=S8i.S8s5'a8s s : | | 


psnmnoouMio 


a s a : , sss ees tsaaasaa :s s 


« O « : ; 0-» : =0 = -0«-0 ;- - 


firajlWHV 


i S 


s 


; 5SS ;s5s isKsasssi ;8 R ; 


IW"! •""'P^ 






• S a 


:- SS% :a!;3 SK&SSEsSS ;;: R 


«ruo[n3 


■8 a a . aas .sss gsssasss ;fi a 


I 

s 

1 


WMiN 


p! 


aaa jss saaaasss a a . 


' *="= 


:§§§ ;S8i 


000= ._ - : 


"lu»!N 


Ill , ; Hi 


S8?8i ■:§ s ; 


pioinimqiv 


i 8 i 


: : 8li 


ilii ;3giilMi J ! : 


™™-y 


S s 3 


.ill SiiiiliS :S § ; 


.. 


»-^« 


IS 


"a 

a 


SES :SSS|Si333 iS C 


«M„ 


°.!^«P»ii 


! S 


;: » = | 






ftnw"! 


"1 


inr'M r" ^ 


"PO 


"J 


njr 


i-=":-TlJ r : 


^ 


i 1 1 1: ii 


Hi 


^llllls^i II 1 1 


1 


1 


1 
1 

1 

i 


i it 


til 

Ills 


1: 

Ills 


ii 


Mill:!: 




1 


II 


1 


iill 


III 






iJiii 
fiiii 



Report of Hygienic Laboratory 



285 



i I I I + 1 I I I I 1 I I i I M I 1 I 1 I + 1 i I I I i i I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ++ 1 



llll + llll + lllllllllll+-H||-hilllll + || + |||||-l-| 1-1-++ 



+ 1 I I -f-i- 1 +++++ 1 + 1 I I I I 1 I -J-++-I-+ I -f I I 1 ++ 1 I -I- 1 I I I I -K I I +++ 



i-^§§ii^^§§§§§g§i 



1 »^ cmc »o •-• oi c« I 






mmw^ w^ CO 



ro^ototo 



tfi 



to CO ^^ 



:§ 



ss$ 



OiCQ 



c c 



O O O C4 •-^ to O O O O O CO esi o o* o o *^' ^ '^ ^ "^ "^ "^ *** ^ *''* 

g o © o o c o c o o c c o c o c o o ; o © o oo poo 

^ C4 1-4 ■■« -Hw^ Ct C4 ?l C4 C4 • "M t.m r-*w^m*f^ 



^O'^ 



ooo 



ooo 



2 



tn 

s 



»o 



OeOl^ 



oo«0 






t«OC40^COOOOO^t^OO>COO>0-vOOCI>-CM«OOiOO 

s: 









r«CTK>c<Oie4ooQ^o»t(5io96<ee7inr«>^ood»<-«'«oo< 

\C^^mr-*ma •-< «» >C lO < 



ss 



w5 



UdM»tO 



OltO*' 



■^^eo 



8 






SSoo»>-t^aoc5c^5M5S«oor>-Sfecii^icSt>ic4ff5©o 

0«eoi-<«>^»>^o-"0co^0i-*ope«i00»o>e^c4e««eoe^«-"^'rco 

!>• CO CO ^ CO CO 




$sg 



s 



«oo 






o o o o b fi <-« ««• CO (o b o o © c o o o c o o o o © o o o 



:888 



888 



© 
© 



i5§ 






Sisis©SS8SS8S8SgS§58i8 |Sg; 

H 



'«'acaooc<0'^c^M©<0©««'*Mi 
M — mMcoM'rco—'0»co»^ — cot 
©O ©©*-•©© ©©9©©000< 



' V ^ 9 Q <f <OC4< 



■ ©©< 



■©! 



CM 

© 



©58S8&Sco©sS8©5888S8©©88ooo 



t-» A O 



sss 



S §2 



30 



i>.eoci»o^«c«o«^cs»fticoct>.t>.©cc»c©0'- — •o*-<«ft«-" 
*•* rtcoeo* _^_ 






?§; 



oat^Ok 



ajocco 



— r>. CI 

0> QC A 



m 




t-H 






a; to© 

e 



•o 



s 



eo CI —« — * .-«o»-« ^ ^ ^ «^ .^ v^ .M «» T-4 ~ — I o © '-^ 



11 






.•c — 



S 8 g 8 J sS§S8 ""2 88 '*-' 



%> &l V 






■.Sec S £C cC 22 



4, ii,C>4©fOfO 4, — »0©© 

O £_ »" tJ ^^ "^ M 



e 



©©c=:c=©©©oc©oo©c©^s©©©©©c©©©©©c©©©©cc©©©o©c©oc© 

» «>» ^ ar jc X cc 3t tc — © cf © c -p c» 04 c< CI CM ^ f ci — « ^c^'ci 3C«cc:«ct'- — © o ^»c c c: ac c7^ — 
— CM -- — — — — -«'^i '?l'fii5i?icici'ri'MCMCM — — ciCM— — — ci — re— • cc ecM —d-M — — — 

iO fo C c« y, oe ac X -->r cV^ W^'"*" ^ r»r>» ^C^-.^^ o © c^ « CI CM~« c^»c CMr*»^ ^ « 04© CM CM 't'^ di CM « ffM lor^ 



a. 
E 

>, 

c 



I 



o 



— Cl 



> = = 
>■>;>>: >■> _>,> jzJc- '<^- ^• 

'c.'c. a'H. aacc.c-&;4, „ 
e.c>a.c.&ci.cc..a Sp-S ^ 

n a 










^.Ss^^-TcM-eo 




, c- c:. a. :i £1. c^ 3. ^"E. o. zJc. a. 

3333333333353 
oaixiCiicnx. oanxtevneo 

■^ *^ ""^ "^ "X "^ ^-. "^ '^ ^2 * *^ .-^ 
3 3 33 3 3 3 3 3 3 33 3 



J 



«_g_V Jt 



• o 



feOCCCCOg 

SI3 o a s c c c 
S «s «• :s s « « 



2.a^ 



b &/ ^ &> c 



lIllJJIIIII 



1 cQ c8 rt 

3 * 3_^ 2'3'3'5'5 5 « 

•^ "^ -^ - "^ "" "C "C "C "3 fc 

_ _ ^ nmi $ ^ s s's'^ 5-5-1^ II § I II I II I i 1 1 i II 3 




- ^355 



296 



State Department of Health 



^ 



s 



o 



» 

O 
m 

'A 
Ph 

< 
Xfl 

o 

H 

P 

m 
W 

w 

< 



^ I '03 noi-i I 



U B^T^ 



ESf 



u 

oil II 



n 



+1 



•DO OI-I 



TiTfi rri I I++I M 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 M II 



•0-3 I 



+ 1 1 



"II I I ++ 1 ++ M -I- 1 I N 1 II II II II ++ 



•3-3 01 



'TTu I + I + 1 I ++ 1 +++ 1 + 1 + 1 I I I I I I I I I +++ 



it ^ 

PC o. 



c« •^ * C a- 1 






CO 



poninsaoa uaSXxQ 






X»niitmnV 






piox BwnpCTH 






9TOO[qo 






s»»«J^?N 



I ! 



2SS 
odd 



H 

O 

o 



8*ifn!N 



*-« — CI 



vnioonnv 

piomoiTiqiv 



cTuommv oaij 



onptsdi i«J3ini^ 






<D ^ C4 

sis 



•c oc so 

v-i ^4 CI 



-uodcAd no anpf»^ 



CO ec c» 

CO CO CO 



X^ipiqitij. 



CO ^ Qj 

Ci -« t-( 



joioo 



oo 



00( 



eo o "^^^ ^^ 



CO 



oo»o 



oroo» 









*-<N 



»0'«<0 

o»-^d 

— O 00 



cs t~ »ft 



oc 
do 

CM •— 



2S2 
dcd 



— M — 



CO C^ 

*-o 



CI « cs 
CSCi ■^ 

coo 



Oi CM O C-4 ■ 

SooSi 



CM o •- »o CI 

CJ CM C^ c: C» 



M5 — oc •* 



3 -* "^ 



9) 

I S 

«3 «, oc O «-• 



•^OOOOO 

•-4 ci d ^ CO 



o o lO oo 
dt*' 

C4e4 



OOOB^pt* 



CSIOt>."-M 

»- d M lO •-« 
OBO^eoco 



tC >C tC •O CO 

QO t** M 00 ^* 



d fiood 



CC ^^ CO CO ai 

gggSg 



«C CM '»• ao'* 
^ O •-■ i>- "^ 
"OO'-'C* 



^ «C «C ocicO 

sggss 



^^ i^CMO CO 
CMOOi 'S'CO 



!>. o a. — OO 

«0 CO i^ b- t'- 






2 



82 



oo 



iCO 

eo« 



Ssg 
2^ 



dd 



;8 



«c o 

oo 






00 1^ 
OCCO 






a»aOQOOOQO 

o o o « "^ d d ** 



oooo t> 



CO 

at 



too«o«oo«oao 



Sg8^r*Sot«> 
C4 id >C) «o (>^ ci ^ d 



88SS$$S^ 

■ d ^ «-i e« <-i IE o 



888 §8 lis 

• • -^ • = • • 



o 00 gc oc C4 e>« «o ' 
0888800! 




o <o CO ^^ "^ to 
X 10 «o t« r« «e 



— Mj^oeooeo^ 

C»«-i^MM«-iCO^^ 



iiisi<!|j 



8 9«9 



Ai O CI aj 

Q Q Q O O 



de4 



00 
rvo 



ooo 



d»-» 



S8 

do 



:8 



02s 



83 



S2 



S 



CO 



§2 



S^ 



CO 






"o c c c c c"c ccoccocd'ct^ccodcddoct-cooooo 

--"»« »C oc ClC^-- •-< « CO CM"^C5"»'t>^ ■«»<•-•-« CM 1^ iX X) OO OC I— "oC COCO CO t-* ^ «3 «o O '^ 









o 



^ e £ £ t 

, 3 ^ 3 h 3 



•^ 






o.'E'o.'o. 
aaaa 



a 



D. ^ o. ^ a. 

ba 1^ be kI' s 



s >. >, >. >.^ _>% 

;=; 'E'B.'E'a o. a. 
u: o. a c Oi c. Q. 

■ -333322 

O; X to 9B n ID « 

h u u u_o o u 

3 3 3 3 3 3 p 

Oc90OflSc9flOflOw 



. •• . M • r* • -4 " CM CO ^ • "" '^ yj ;2 ;2 'J^ iSi iS ' T iS iSi 
3 3 3 3 ®^?».2»2 93939333325 



aaa 









a d 3 ca 
o Q q 9 




e8 «Q ce 
CSC. 

- -. c 3 c B 
a B 03 aa ea «• 

Q 9 it is ^ ^ 

) sj oj „ 



Repoht of Hygienic Labobatory 





i 1 M 1 M 1 I 1 1 1 M + ; 1 + 1 M 11 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 N ++++ 




1 +++ 1 1 1 1 1 + ) + + 1 +- .+++++ 1 1 1 1 + 1 1 +- 1++ 1 + 1 1 1 1 + 1 ++++++ 


=l§iiSSB=SS § lis :SSSSSE=!SS=SS!S6-SS-r§8liSSSi 


8 ;a =SS : SE 


. : :88Sa . SBS^M 


SS :SS8SSSS8aSS282as 


&Se SEE^SSISS 


\ . ieizi ; i ; 888 


SS ilS : :gssa=ti3ss=ss 


5 :a :5SSKSSa 


: ; ;»=^= ; ISaSi as :S=SiSi8S«!=si!S3sa 


S S SSiSSf^SS 


. ; :SaS8 : .SSSSK :SS .SKSaaSSJSlSSSSaSS 


3 I essss^s 


: atii : ssaas 


s4 aSBsBtssassasass 


= .g . — — ««* 


; : ;4|= : -i.^^ 


! :g :iiiii8i 


;::iil|. IHI§ iS:88!lii8|l§§iS8ii 






1 g iiSliil 


: : :iS5l : :SeS8s 


IS iSiisSSISSsSHliS 








5 5 iillliii 


:i:iils::|SI!l 


Si ;SiHigil!iiis§Sa 








s s :as=IS5S 


: : ;S=S= : ;M»S8 


5= MmiS-^"-"S-S 


a i ssiassa 


; ; ;l»S=i ; J55SS 


IS :i.M5SHia=iSS|5SS 


1 ^1 muu 


:::riMijr 


1 


-JfJIIJ— 


jijiinj 


::fTM"™ 


U 


l""l"IJ=-=~^"^' 


lliiiilig 1 lliiiiifiliiil 


liiiiii 






ilii 



I III : ;i : ^iMtii 

J IIIIJ:i|tijlllllJIJMai|llll 



288 



State Depaetment of Health 




•o» OOI-I I 



'9-9 Ol-I 



III :M II I I I I I M I II II M I I i l + l i I I II 



•D'O I 



++ I : I I I I II I I I I I I I ++ I I + I I I I -I-+-H I M + 



•»*o 01 



++I :-l-l I I I I I I I I-I-I-+++I I + I+++++-I-I + I + 




138 



IS$SSS8*»S3SSS! 



^ -caio 



2 SS--" 



;2iis 



c« 



pranifao3 oaSiCzo 



S8SS 

ei ^ o e« 



^SSSSS$gSS288S$§§SS9:oSSSSi3SSS 



ooooo*-* ooo^>^omoo^oo«-4oe«ooo»"«ii« 



'^ 



Aninwnv 



o p o o 

MM O 00 



OOOOOO -OOOOOUdOOOOOOOM3000000< 






vx «-M «ii« t-^ ^4 ^4^4 «>« viM «« v« C4 C4 ^^ ^4 






c 



C/3 



< 
a: 

o 






c 

H 






pnox •■aapwH 






io«eaoc«aoiooc40^o*«r«oao«oe4ce^eoc40*eM3e«o«oo 



e»l •^ •^ «^ ^^ ^m ^* ^^w^i-^ v4 .M «^ «iH ^4 «i4 ^4 C4 CI C« ^4 v4 



anuofqo 



SSi33 



CIW^O 



255558S?SJ28J288S§8{2aSS^SoSga8Sa8 



B»»w»!N 



SS8 

©do". 



8SS89 |SS88SSS8SS^^S88$SSS^SS 



»»WN 



18: 



SSS§8S8 i88 §88888888! 

' _** • _%* . • . . g^ • . 



1888 

» • • • 



vraocDoni 

piouiuinqiY 



c» c»» ao 1 



^^ c c^ «j CI 

BiSoS: 



•oooooooooooooooooooooo 



wuouiura 90JJ 



I©' 
'©: 



'©©I 



■ © ©^ jre«»i 
'oeoool 



ie«i' 



9npiB0i ]«i3Tn)^ 



not) 
•uodVAd no anptn^ 






CM "T e^ n 
t»ab09cs 



COM !>-««« (M*4c»i«©oct»eo«S«oe»--«oO'^cc-*rtMa»© 



ii 



>^^Mtcr»kO>no©©iOQCQoro^a>C4<-*oQ«<e'^'«*ie 
ic% ,« « »- ^* — »i« — ^ ,-1 ,-1 ,-1 ,-1 ,-. »• c« ec e5 M ^^ « «-> *H 



X^ipfq^nj, 



§ *^ ^ 



^ S g^ 8 ^^ 8^ g a| S^ 8_S g 



,OiC«C 



.•o»o 






J0|oo 



»CiC 4, 4, 






4,»0 4, 5^ J, 






CCS c e e e 

6-HH E-HHH 









ccoocc.ooooocooo©©oo©©©oo©©cooooo© 

<M C, <M PC — •— ' •— fC — — • ■ri C^l — — C>l — M CM c^i •— — •— 

o « »« c. © •« r* » — ciV- •« »c r>» cs c<i cm"« cm »o co — cc Vs o» ^^ «c — • cm »c o" w © 










OO 







o c o 



S8 



o o o o 



o o 




^ ^ W >d U ' ' 

o 9 JO _o _o £ _£ £ a 



O ej C C* C C 



OOOOCOOOOOOOOOUOOOwOCCU 





Kki'okt (.if HvaiENic Laborato: 



I + I +++++ I 



s3a|gag§s|s||||||=ss^sg|||gg||ps|S|2S"|S8gsgs|| 



KiiUm 


sssss:!S£»s 


.ssasaaa 


isssssssssas 


^aassas 


8£=s;;gsr ■ 


ss3=s3ss8ia 


1 ;Sg£S22 


;ss8si:K£3asa 


;SI= : ;3 


ssssassss 


SfeSSS?5gg=ffS 


S=iS55= 


;S3SSSfiBsaS| 


;SSSS=3 


asasss^sa 




.assegga 


.stsssssssss 








;«« «-0 




;---s-i! 


sssjjijss 








SSSSeS 

; = 'I ■ 


Silsiliii 


ilssilSisis 


Sliijil 


siis£i5i|ii 


lilili 






»=ltlS3 


■gggiii"iii*r 




HIiiisSS 


sHieHissj 


E-i5!M 












§g|3S§ili 


iiiliiiiili 


umM 


isiililHIsi 


iiiHi 






WfiBfT 






oSSK»$XHg 


SS|SSS|SjI2 


IsagSS 


asssssgSS 


SS§s"sl8l5 


aSSsISS 


23S558 


'TfiU 


"-'"^mr 


r-ji- 


"rr'fi 


JWIJI 


..I....^IJ 


"■""IJIJIJ 


:^J-"T 


...-.=^=.=l- 


"FJIJ 



^asg2s|=a^s|3j2^^g2|aS5g|*i;a^^g^*3^r2g5^^^^J|2|^* 



\h 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiititiitiitttii :ii i 1 i ^'lii itiii 

titsssatlttttattlaltlltltlitts !?:i;3|;|tlia 



l&IJiifllJiiljji, 
10 



i ^ieetflPSSMSlli----' •■■■■■ ■•I- ■ 

!ljjal9IIISIIIjllllJllljJjlllJIJ|]I 



State l>ErAHT 

Hi ■^.^jiiiMiT: 



i 



I++1 1 



1 1 1 



I pKOMKBOSt^ 



=5S-|S|if|§SS|§j§S|SS|gSS|j|S|gS2 
RSSSSSSS S gSSSSS^SS"8"SS^S 88888 :2 



asgsss SfilsfifiW 



^S?388SKS S 



3SSS*S88 :S 



8283^ 8883 SS; 






8 iimiuiiiii 



883 gSg 

lis iiieiii : 



38S88.; 
§£§§§ :i 



iiibSi %mmn 



sSSa^SSS 






JIfJI 



uni 






r"-lJ:J:rj-|:-|=--| 



13 






i 

illllMI: 



III 



iiiiiji 



liiii 



Uei'okt ok Hyoienic Labokatoiiy - 



I [ I I 1 I 1 I : I I I I 1 ++++ 1 1 I 1 M l++f"l 1 l++r+l + l 

i+i + i i+i \\ 1 1 ++++++ 1 1 + 1+++++++ n ++++++ 1 



ssgsagSRssssssggsg' :|§ 



;pii8ssiisg«g§i^iiriiisssi 



3S2rai^*d?"!!!f ?: '^^t 


\ :S88SS88 
: SSSSSfitS 


.^ssssiis^asssi 


sga ; isaaasssRassii ; i isa 


;==aS2J iSSSBRS 


agaagssgsssfflRSsssgs issg 


;22SftR83ftSSSSa 


8SS8SSSSSS8SSSSSS3S -8SS 
Sa-SS~Sg""K""3-"S§S .SH3 


.as.isssfissass."! 




:e!3^S3$SSSSSi«£ 


ISiisliiilliiliisil IsS 


: :i|i§8ll 


:IiS§si8gS8il'll 






iESlSliilisliiljgBS iiSI 


; iissssi 


:§llliisgSS|ig 








ggS|lill§i§liil§ilJ:|§i 


"; :ISiiSiS 


:ili§ggigliiii 






5BaE!'8|S=8ss5''»SS ;s!S 


: sgg^s^;; 


;£=j;s!a^sa3S8SS 


EgESI'SSaSliSSSSSJi Mi 


: ;:586=s3s 


;?3SSSSS3K«S8S 


ifimmMUWu m 


MJIHf" 


=-|j|jr""jr 


Tfrmmimi 


::|j-|.-= 





»s»2g^^sgsasSs2S£ss^;rs*2s^aSss;^555=2S":;as'^^^^ 



.- ^ .-.«,?,?,- ,?i >." ,?^ ;• ^ 



iiii 



M'.iiii*S 






llilllllll 





•" 001-1 

■IHtOl-I 


1 1 ; 


"i""i 


^i <'\"V 1 + 


i 1 M 1 V i i 1 1 


-«, 


+++-(-++ I 1 [ 1 + 1 + 




■o,.0I 


++++++ +1 1 1 + I + 


1 l + l 1 ; ;+l 1 




^ 
& 


ii|§ 

' aiss 


1- ! 

7s- 8 


s 1 s s a i 8|aS!:= ;J3S 






8SSS [■. 8g ; ; 


Ami»mr 




;S3 S S S S S £ : 


'==> ; i S3 ; ; 


I 
S 


""no 

■1W!JJ 
pioitnimqiv 


" SSSS 


;3 S 
-Si 

■3/8 


is is S 


3S^S : : &^ : : 
■3SSS"'r^|S f; 

ssssi i sst: 


; ; 8 ; S 1 


fill : ; IS ; : 


T: i 'a 1 


§|S= ; ; S= n 


;i 1 ; ; 1 ; g ; 


i8l| ; ; |J ; : 


gnpnutwntn 


ssss ;s s ; : 1 : g ; 


s-BS i i :3 ; ; 




RSSg S g 


; i 5 i S ; 


3338 ii ;i:i 


^S3S- 


.« s 


": ^It^": 






1 


iiii i 


lllllliiilil 


1 


f 
1 
1, 


i 
i 
a 


S J i l -i i -i 
I i ;1 ;| ;1 iS 1 


n N Nf ijJl 
■ ■ i ; ; !l i II 

m 




1 


i 


Jj 


yiiiii 


m 111 

lliiij III 



Ivtl'OJtT Uli' JIi<Jli:.\iC LAJJUlt-VTOllV J'J'ii 

i7 1 I + r i 1 1 I T I ; 1 I + M I 1 I i I I N N + 1 + 1 I + i I +1 + 11 + 111 

"I'irrF'i-rif rr+r+r+i 1 1 i + i 1 1 m~m + i + i i + i i +4 n i + i 1 1 

1 1 1 +++++++++".+++ r I'l +++ 1 + 1 1 1 1 + I++++I+ +++I++1 1 1 



k3 ss8S8^s^ssi£S^ss!;8s'ssi;s .^s^f;5;:sss f 



■KSSSR -ga 



^SS3nS83>:SS»»K 



SS ■.ffi5isse£SSSS = = = -|1 



= E0£sSSS :8£3RS.= |5S ; 






■S ■BSS^sSiS^SSESsissSti^ili -sHils^S' 



:§ ■3§Rsl0sa222SIISsS5sS§si ISSSSSl:'^ 



2 :|-«'-r"K2|-'-|||g2g||^ ^=j— S«3 












tittii 



I II : : ; : n 



2!)^ 



StATK DErAKTMfeNT OF UeALTII 



^ 

^ \ 

'«.' 






Em 
O 

vi 

< 
Pm 

o 

H 

A 

< 

^-^ 

H 







3£. 



•*•» ooi-i I 



•00 oi-l 



•1111111+ + +11 + 111 : I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 



•0*0 I 



I I I I I I I 1+ + +1 l + l I + l I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



•0-0 01 



+++ I ++ I I + + +++++++ I I + I I I I I I I I +++ 



1 ro w TO fr» w < 






• 00<Daoooiooooo< 



«•* lO t>» CO 



Mt'- 



pomnsaoo va&SxQ 



SS8^8SS^g 



•o«to>^4C<e^'<«iOr4 



x^iuirnnv 



00000000*0 



eo eo ec QO •^ "^ rt 



I»;ox woprtH 



oiiuo(qQ 



^4oestocot^«D'->>e 



"w" M ca ^ »^ ^< CO 

&S^SSS2g8 



,.,-ivai.HC4C4eO^<-4 



I 



»lw»!K 



»)!^!xV 



•^•^TOoSS^^SS 



ooooooooo 

gisiisiii 



muuiuuiv 



pioonnnqiY 



I 



OCOO^-CMCMOWOD 

I e^ to »^ <M cs o ^ ' 
oooo 



3255 



VIUUUIUIV MJ^ 



I C* 00 ■5« oc •< c< 



onpnoj {uaai)^ 



o<oo>c9^«'OQa3oo 



aor) 
-«iod«Ad aoXonpisa^ 



aOQOA<DCDCO>OOCO 



d 



o 



S^ 






C4 

8 



8 



CI 



8$8S^S;^SSSSggS :S 



O0r40oe^oooooor4>^ 



ooooooooooooo 



88S?2S22S:t8gS?SS 



ooaoeMiOicc4C4io<PC4aoM9ao 



S^S3f:sgs;:!:sS?S85S 



SSSS8;ei!28S8S!3SS 



r» a» CM ct CO to o < 

CO 



!■*« 



o o d d o d d o d d d 




!8i8888888§ 



"MOOOOOOOOOOOO 



« 



s 



^ 



o 

8 






'888080! 






•^4oo«D«-«c4tOi-HOQO^eoc>a9 
r»o>coor»c4^'^d»S>>otfSrt« 



CO 



X»!p!qjnx 



5hoo 



*•* tt ojOO 



o 






jqoo 



OOO tt a)OCC>00>0 



8 



a a a 



a 



OOOOOOOOO 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOO 



<D CC 0» O «-• 00 C4 00 00 00 >C to ^ ^ ^> CO O '^ '<•• Oa CO r-i A t«> OO lO <o iC <e o 

«e>*e>< »- c» .-1 .-I ^»*»-i ^,-i^«e4«rt«4,i^^,^ ,1 «m kh .-« im ?i 

aooe>«c<eMt»r«oe*i e>« o*C4 s>« «o oiooc4<ooe>)ie lO t« a» *-• C4 c« c« t» t*" 






;=3 

I 






=3 



S •••3 



3 

o 



3SS8 3S8J 



a o.cOiOia&o.Ci 



1 



it 



alt 



ri 



llll&lllslllllll 

;33SS3S5S83SSS8Sg 






CO 







>Z3P3tQ 




^ 






II i iiiillii'iiiiiigi 

00^ o 00 e o o^ o o^ 000000 



n tzj^nXS!!z;SSKRX!ES^PQVSXXSX 



IvKroKT OF IlV(JIK.\lO LaBOKATOUY 



205 



-M M I I t I t i I I I I + I : I I I I I i 

+ irTrri fTTi + i !++":[ iT+rr 



^ SSSSSS ^^^SS§§«r^t'-i 



m toQ ^ to uS 



C4 



I I I M I I I I + I 



I I I I I I I I I ++ 



I I I I 1+4-+ I ++ 



C4 



:2 



n 



1 1 1 n 1 1 1 ++ f 



i+i i+i I I+++ 



+++ 1 + 1 + 1 ++ f 

<5 S ^^®^2 P o C Q © 
ci »^ eo »^ •^ M ^^ ^ O 



SSieSSS^ :SSS9SSSS3S88^S8S83 $S^SS :^83S9S:!:2S:S§SS8 : S 



ss 



ssss 



ss::ssssss 



3;^39S8!e 



•«io*o 



.SSSS9S 



• ooo 



sslSisi 






oSSSoo 



0*^^*^*^MC9C«0<-i«^*^«^<-<0^0 OOr^OO 



e«oooooooioooooooo 



::$sssi$!;::;^l§SSS$99!;S 



o o o o 
00*^ ooao 



«* C4 *-••-< r^ "^ t^ ^H «-< f>4 



S8S5g2a8SJ2a8SS8{2S8 SSS8S 



oe^^^rNciM^Mr^Moo^O'-io ©«c*iMC< 



'S 



o d e o o E o o c« o o o o o d d C 
6- H 



o C d C S 



iPi 



8: 






1888: 






:888| 






' CC C^ JO 

'COO 



'siii 



Cvi wXJ <0 O <M 

o --o do 



■ ^ CM C4 «& X» <M « ' 

( ^ «-! O « S O <M I 

>o©ooooo 



lOi 



"* SP T 29 ■* *S 
'•""So C — 3 
'OOOO Ot-i 



1 ••• CM « • 

T^ Q — I 
lOOOi 



vMMMixtOnOOC^OO'^v^ 



oooo 

00 90 






0«'*^ 



So 3 Ok 00 



OOOOOOOO 
W**0000QOCO • • 



pcoooocoeot- 



i^QtoSc^iS*^'^ 



•09C4C>4C^4r»Ot«C)00»C»» 



•-«00-*OOM«»0®Q»^»^ 



8' 



85S2'g8gg8S5S§8 



00000000<-iOMOO 



iilisisSiissi 

oooo^ooooooo 



■ o ■ 



' ao «g c^ 3> «e c^ I 
>o8o8oo( 



eo 



8 



Ok 






o 
d 



S«;99SSS 



•-I CS C< »* W 1^ •« r-« C* »-< i-i«^ 



'^ so t« « ofo r« ( 



aot>»«r>.t>.cioocoeccp«o< 



I C9 CO 03 I 






SoSSo r«SoraSton>^ 



Oco»ocsi<Oe<5«o«OC5C^Mt^e< 

^" t^ ** *« 30 OO ^^ ^^ ^H 



i3 



Jll 



8 






■ •o «,«»- 



ar"""r 



.c^ 



HC^O 



I 11 



i*^ ». 



83 ||ig|S8l|8 



•o 



oo 



,MiOi0 



,il5iOO 4,WiCO 4,»-i-<W oC^ ©OCO 

! C C 



H H 



g2 » OJ V 
"^ O Q O 






4> Q O 4> ^^ V 



S 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOO oooooooooooooooooooooo 
io«>i«oa^«>>eAaooc4C4 eJ^^w aj » tcr-*^ o«eoa»iO t^d»rteco«o»oo t^c*oo»co>»oo»^c<aooo*^ •-• -^" 



I 



o 






8 ii22888S8.| 81^88 3 

J J;|-J:i;S J J;S;S| fa g;^;^ J 



• >» 

. a 

9 
' as 



c. a'S.Z.'Si'S.'S.'S.'S 
p.aao. AaSao. 

SSS883SS8 



a 

9 



X >• >> >> >»CO D. . 



3SS8S 



■MM" 



^ 



JJ-o. 




?P^fr2^^ 





S 8 S 8 8 8J-J J 

llllllll S ||||l||ll|^ig2222 a Z^^ 



doHHHHHHHHE-" 




Statk 1>epabtmekt of Health 



i 


-■;."m 


+ 11 1 I++I 1 1 II N 1 


■:f», 




3 
E 


+ 1 i 1 I + 1 + 1 1 ++ 1 +++ 1 + 1 + 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ; +++ 


tBDIMlCBlloa^tO 




^mncflV 


-=2 isEiis Iss-ss ;|s : i : ■ ; ssss a sg 


moj, ■■™p«H 


•== iaa^sa iajss- iji ; : ; igsSaSSSS :=! 


liniopio 


s^s e?;Sr:% :RSSK3 ss ; ; : ssiSBSse as 


B)U|I>] 


£53 SSSSS :SSSSS -SS : : ^ gSSSSSsS :8S 


lii liill Igsi; .11;., Sii.iili gg 




' 1 .1.:; 


tii sum mm ;« : : : iiHSiSH m 


-wod.»a do anpium 


SSa KSSSS :SES!S3 :;=::: SsSEE-l ,= :^^ 


1 

1 


"unr-'iT'i-^'mmr 




|l iiiiitliiiiitf 
it. ____nmmiUimmm 




Jijjjijffliiid^^^^ 



m II 



H 



s i oil 



: ^f! ^i^r; i^ Ksl 1= ;::;;;, lit: ^1= ^li »; H ir 5: . - 



liliiii!iiiiiiiiiiiliiiJiiiiiiiii;i 



298 



State Department of Heat^th 



IP 

«± 



•o*a OOI-I ! 



•30 oi-l 

•00 01 



: I I I 1 + I 1 -fl 1 1 I I : I I 1++ I I I 1 I I I I I + 1 I I 



I 1 I I 1 + I ++ 1 + I I I I I I I ++ I I I I I I + 1 -H- 1 I -f 



I I I I +++++ I + I I I + I I +++ 1 + I ++ 1 + 1++ 1++ 






^ r>. t» CM t^ » ■* »o I 



>iO<0< 



C4 



w8w«8io8i«S« 



iiisKs 



CM 



poimunioo voSXxq 






— oo^ 



gSSSSgggSSSSS :=S§ : :Sg88S : :S 



^ W O «-• ©■© © O O O ^ C» r^ 



o»oc«^^ 



'XS 



5S 



X^iOTi^nV 



oooo 



ooooooooooooo 



ooo 



ooooo 



040*91 



i58SgJ§S;g§?§S?S5'^*' 



•OtO'* 






s 
1 



52 
o 



O 

CO 

< 

m 
o 

H 

p 

CO 



^ 

-< 









oooua 



cie5«ci 



OiQio^Oaooooaocicsitfd'-i 
esi e* oo i«-< Q lO M o c« ■«*< t>i o» c« 



iO«0( 






^ CO CO C4 C4 

eo<o«v^>o 



528?^ 



b-i^eood 



3^Sr2i!;838SS8^S 



^^s 



«-< — o»t^»^^eot^coeocooeo 



t*«c« 



CO ^ « ©* lO 



8 



83 

< 

aa 

8 



1 9 00 00 
! M o 04* 



o o o o o o o o o d o 






«n!^!N 



CO £» — '-• 

8888 



8§§§§§§i88S§8 



;88 






eoiocoa!*^ 

8^* o o '^ 
ooSo 



eo 



vitummra 

pioinaraqiY 



5S; 



oao»-"c>i'->'i»-"Q«*-5cot^ 

•-•-OOOOOOCJOO — — 



vTuoannv auj 



cM^r o" 
o8oI 



Q0^>5«teMeMQ0C4C^- 






I Q QO 9 (0 

'282fe 



onpiiu iwoui]/^ 



iOOO' 



»"C«QOCS«0 — C^'*'»ft'*CCCO 

co^ — w5^ao«OOiao»ot>--^M 



ass 



$£2SSSSS 



s 



s 



HOI) 
-viodvAa do anprao^ 



X^ipiqjmx 



9 CO 00 1 
coeo»0' 



SsSoSS* 






£3S;c^ 



ssiss 



s 



IIJI 



:S 



.CM 



_ ^r I Jill I 



»-<t^ lO 






jojoo 



w^ 



,>00 m uCO 



t-HH 



COlO 



.lO 



I io ooooo 



CO 



■HHH 



HH 



5 



ooooo oooo ooooooooooooo ooo oooooooc 
«c eo •»»'»'-^— -^ — — < r^ t, b« M5 «c '-<o^?loo»<f^«-» -^ooocoo oo^gposo o' 
e»J<b o CM o o'oob— <"o5— ■^ «c"aoo cMt>. ooooo* o»©o©»^»'3<ot^oco coco 



3 

eg 



>>>>>. 










ggggggggg'S 



^>> 




s.aa 



a§.ES.§.R^ 



g-||| g g g g g| 



|:|«(»n;i:i-J;S| 



loD^^-a. 




.« .*.* ,* ,a» .* .* .* .« -g 



HHHHHHHHH^I 






cc 






tt 



na 






^IllSlisialllllllll i I §1 § 8 § § 



IlliSSS 
ssssSSJ 



Bepoet of Hygiesic Labohatory 



-rrr 


1 1 1 1 I 1 1 + M I 1 1 I++I + I M 1 1 1 1 1 1 


++ 1 1 1 N 1 


Ttf 


+ + + 


I 1 1 l + l 1++I 1+ +I++++I !++! 1+1 i 




l + l 


+++ 




+++++I+I i 1+1 




;- ssa "S3" " - - ; -, 






; i ;ss i : i ; : ; : ; ; ; ;8a i^ ;sa8s°s sssas 


i ;sea 


:h 




: ! iSS i : : i ; i ; i i : igS i; :|SS!S£S i^SSSS 


; ;asH 


: :S 




; i ;a= i ; M i i ; ^ ; i :=« S :6SI6I= =*= 


S3 

if 




: ;s 




; : :aS : : r - r : : : : : :SS :S .SSESSB ESS 


:^| 




. : 88 : j : : : : ; ; : ;:S8 jS :SSgSSS S gSSS 


: :£SS 


^ ;^ 




i : ;Si ; 1 ; : ; M ; M :'^ ;J :*|?^^^ "^5 


; iiiS 


; '■■^. 




: ; :SS : i ; : : : ; : : ; :5S S JiiliS 38128 


::i» 


::§ 




:; Jl :;;;;; ; ; i ; iii :? SPPi 5ip5 


n??s 


: i^ 




:: :*fe :;;::! : : ; ; :=s ;5 isE^SS* s^^ 


8S 
W 


"TTigsT 


: :S 




;;;»*;;;;;;; ! i ; jS* ;3 ;5SI8S5 g=! 


: :K 




:;:r:.MiM i|:|iiirrT''" 


Mil 


Ml 




::"-mNM m:iir:irm~ 


M"'l 


ii" 


MS2 


SHSSSSSSWa «MMggSSSSMS !M 


3 = £ 




?== 



222a522;^^f*^fa^^g !S|jip'g-«g§gn322g S§S"S-=2^E=22; 



1:1 



iRtillllllpltl 



m 
d 

'111* 
lilii 



|!.;|S.s.j..i|i.i,i.|.i.| 



: : M : : yiiilli liil^ifl 



f!i! 



iijiii ill 



Statj-: I>Ki'AKT.\rKNT OK Health 





1 




l + l 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 


M + l + l 1 1 I++I 1 1 1 1 1 1 






1 I + I++I + 1++++1 1 ( J 1 




■n.i 


I + I++I ;++++++ 


++++++ 1 I++++I 1 I++I 




i 


8||liii8lisS8 i5IS§SSiilSlii=iii» 




pmr 


«»D>3.CI0 


asa :8a :sess s 


:8 ;SSSSSS 


:SS=aB5= 








:3 :!S2'-^SS 


;s ; SsES 




:Ss5SS6i 


5 


a»H°n3 


KSS SS :^SSS .3 


.^ "S'^SHSS 


■S5;!HS 


1 


; -^,S 






:;^''»:»2 


s 


jb 


"tWK 


IIS ill :iiii ;i 


;i iiiiiis 


;i8iSili 


e 


TSUn- 


iSi :ii ipSS ;= 


;s ^^iiPg 


;!iHHi 


c 

i 

X 

c 


^i- 


™™,^ 




:l ;§i|?§l 


liiiiiii 


-«-,--« 


:5 :S3E5SI« 


l^sialSS 


^..."S .,_» 


SSS :S= :=S = S = 




:!3ISISi 


XlTt.qjni 




rmf 


E ;■ 


I""!!" 



S^R^2*;5 ^5SBa2|2j;22S=2s5aRg 



iiiii 



J JlJJJIJIJjili III 

I lilillieiji. 



iiiisiilinnicH 



1 1 



I M i I 



I ++++++ : 



I I I I I 



f I I 



f I 1 



+ I I "+ 1 I i ++ 1 I 11 I I ++ :+;■;;: ;+++ 1 I I +++++ 1 

+ I +++++++ r+++++++~i^; ~ ;T: [T: 



SS^SSSSSSSSS . 



Se8*SSSS3S3Z : S^ :l 



SSZSSS933XRZ ; ;RI! \S :SE:3 



■2S2£< 



n o eb&bci"Bd ■ so 

l||!|liiSsiS nSS 
Hii7lllil.JS5 : :IS 
SiiilHIiigi ; |i 



.sss^s sr^^ssbt: 






5S .SSa88SS88S :$ 



ill .isigigi 



S3=kS SsS .SS 



ill :iiiiiii§g§ s 

isi"-i ills I ^_n. I I 






■fii 






1" 






jjRg|g|;|||||^^gs=|^pS||||||£p||||||s|||||^||||; 



nmuuMn 



s Is ^s ii ;. 



sjist 

MIEinElllEI 



ilijliiij 



1I|1||| 



pillllfftBlliinfiiiiiiiiiflllilllllit 



302 



State Department of Health 



'TS 



5S 






O 

m 

W 

CM 

m 
o 

m 
H 
A 

P 

CO 

W 
< 

M 

H 

<1 



_ I -oa noi-l I 



fcgS 






•oa oi-l 



I i I I I l + l I I i 1 I 

i ] ++I I + I++I I I 



•30 01 



I H-+I+++++I 1 + 



.2 . 

It 



pounsuod aa8Xso 






;88S88i 



U3C1 esi 



»-«c« 



^ 



1 i I i I I I I I 1 I 1 I 1 I I I 1 + 



I I I I I I I I I i I 1 + 1 I 1 i 1 + 



I I I + I I I + I ++ I +++++ I + 



%%%\ 



JtWl^lIV 



l»|ox fflonpwH 



I 



©auopio 



»»w»!N 



»»«»!N 



vraouDuiv 

ptooTinnqiy 



vraomcav mjj 



anpisM pusoT)^ 



noT) 
•uodvAd uo anpraa^ 



^^!P!q-"M 



aoioQ 



8 :8 



o 
o 

8 



3 

d 



o 



Cn» 



8 



e^ 



S 






8 
8 

d 



8 



3 






8 

5 



to 



9 
d 



8 



© 

o 






I 



— d 



oo 

8^ 



88 
38 



88 






oo 
oo 



t^« 



oooc 



61 

OH 



82 



oo 

§3 



oo 

88 

88/ 

dCM 

So 
od 






ooo 



00 t» 



»o 



O 



leo 



o 



o 
to 



o 

8 

d 
d 



8 



>o 



s 



»c 



g 



J? 



o 






8 
8 

d 



5 

CM 



8 

d 



o 
d 






8 

d 



CM 



R 



CO 

o 



•o 



eo 



;8S8§881 



eo »^ t^ 



eo«^^ci 



o 



^ 



8 

d 



8 



esi 

o 



s 



0» ©^6i 0»(^^B 

*^' e« ^ CO 64 00 e« 



ooooooo 



OOOOtOOOO 
«i0i0>0^9 



t-<^ r« a» d ^' d ^' 



8^ §3 

ddC 



S8 

d 



'sSsis 



lO «^ «^ •*< 



OCO^OCMQCC 

83§5oiS 



!88S^S^ 



Ot>-ac^os© 



«0 ^ •-• lO MS O CO 



•OOOOCMiQiOO 
v^ r4 ,M v4 CO *^ ^4 



^8 



OO 






8*^ 



e* 



83 

88 



:S5 



•o 



QOCO 






OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

e<iMt«t«t»t^oo ooo4CM'c4*oio«-<cieO'<<i«ooo<-<eMC(itor« AOC4«4<-«<^'<««' 

•iiW ^< — -^ »■ ^ 1-N virt 



cZ 






III 






g 



c£ I > I cL'I ^ S d I |> 






fit gdinSdl^^ 



a 
,S 

:! 

3.5 

gggg^fBei'BSggg'g :^| 

l<3 




! daacbacaaaaaaacwd^, 
IHHHHHHHE-HHHHHHHKI 







Re1>OKT of HvtUENlC Laboeatory 





+ ' 


1 1 1 1 t N 


l+l I+++++I+I 1 1 


1 i 1 t M 


1 + 


11 
+ 1 


1 M 1 1 i l-t-l 






I+I++++++I+I 1 1 










I+I++++++++1 1 1 


1 1 1 ++ I 


1 + 


+ 1 


I++I++++I 







5§|S§l§8§ss|§|||iSiil-ssse|S5"; 



88 -SKRSsssssgsg^iWsgss s""s~ssas=sssss£ 



;SS? 



S3£3S8SS=£S$ 



isp5|iiigg§ 



¥l|iiii:ii| 



!gS" ;" S 8 S«3!S iSSggSR 



3 SSS»5i'S8SSSS 



t$HE;$^ 3 S SSSe333:S8$S 






SsisiSligiii 



'Si%U~ 



i i iiisissgiii 
ITTIIIiliilll 



isssss I 5 sesssggggij 



i^SlliS'sssisa 



S|S3=^ I g 3S&£&gS|||§ 



"^"IJIII 



Tiu j ^ jjiruur 



ill 



■J "j ijri" " " jjjf ""°j 



fS^gEJ^J^ 



^*^a2g^£asSas*=2=5i5||f ■ ■ ^g^^|2||iRss? 



I 



IS' 



lilt |3^tltl|ll 



:l:i:l 



lllJllJlilJillllliiiiiiii^i¥iiit 



304 



Stati: Depaktmkxt of Health 









^■t"^ 

>i-i 



< 

o 

an 

CM 
< 

o 

H 
A 
D 

< 

O 
»-i 

H 
< 



•x 9 « 
Oil 



•OJ3 00I;1 I 
•03 OM 



I I I I II I 



•0-0 \ 



1 1 1 1 1 1 I 



•33 01 



+++++ I + 



1^ 

Si o 



I *>- M O ■* »0 CO 



+ 111 : I I l + l I 



+ 1 + 1 I I + I 1 + 1 I 



+++I I I+I I+++ 






II :l I + I I I I II 

li + II +Tl I I II 



II :| i f I I + M 1 



^% -* 



psomBaoo naaXxQ 



I 



o ooo 



M ^ M t- 



x^ran^nv 



Itnoj^ -ssaaprtH 



oooo 



CO t~» 00 ra 

CI 



o^to — 



cot^ oo»Q 



I j 

■: ! 

2 






SS8S 

ci esi c» eo 

CO S Sci 
' as M 

>n C Co 

CO CM e^ CO 

8B|8 






VTnoonne 

piomomqiv 



CC X !C « 
0-. X CI T^ 

O O ^^ »^ 



vraoanue 30Jj{ 



GC O 0» 30 

cooo 



onpisai [U3ni)\ 



ei » o o 

CO 






^irFFV"! 



Oi c — ■^ 
»o •-< •— > 






40100 



oco«oo 



o poo • o 
i>. - M o r- • ■ CO I 



«o 



CI 

CO 



P9' 



COO 



CO 00 ^ 



® •*i>» 



•♦CO'<«» 



8 28^ 



CO 



o 



CM 



3 



00 



8 



CO 



SSCSM 



sss 



ooo 



888 



ooo 



8: 



'CI 

;8 






c;-«co 
oor>.oc 



««0 4, 



ac«oo 
ficici 



\ftU% :^SSS88SSSSg§SS$ 



00©i^ 

oIdoo" 



oooaot^ 



*" 2 ri 00 



j>.SS8 

csi co" c< CO 



« X ^ 
lOOO 



•^ O 



^< — .— Cs» 

l888 



JC ■^O 00 



'X CJ CI 

'OOO 






ceo at 55 



8 s 



.CO 






S-'gS 



»-C^ C0»-i»-»OOO»-CS — CI 



oooo -OOOOOOOOO 



r>.«^c« 

•♦o»-a» 



dOSS — ^SM — ■* 

«D t>> 0» 0> SO CO »" "^ »" 



«o»oc»C4ioe«o»o»-»^ci»^04 



Qoeo^^^oot-gp««sioae — « 
'^dS^r^t'.oofr-ScieOTO — "^-^ 



ici 



r^t>.o6fr»OCi 



oo«5cot-c»e5i^eit-«o»^ 

CO Q c* o csi •^(I esi CI ci o o © ^ o 

O — CI 

CI d — 

S«c<SoS*'«*<S5 So 8 8 8 



o o •-> "^ "^ ci c« eo c« CO 

^- — — -^ ^ («0 -r d »^ "- CI CO CI CI 

88888888888888 



OX'^O«0Oa0Q0<C< 



— — 00^-f»'5CI»-"K^^©iC 

-^oooooooooo© — o 



o X CI CI e« ^ ^ CI « o ^ oc I 

o©8o888o8o8o: 



coocoaa^90Q>oc«oor>oceoa 
•oifteococbpao-^cocoeociM*^ 
■*^eo»-«M*-cic« 



— oi^co — r-<p«ccoQoeooo^ 
x>Q<-->oeo>owco«o^iom^co 
e© o ■* c« c* c* CO CI 






©CM 



t>»«-i 




QO '^ coo 



OS 

Q 



oococccoooccooo©ooccocooocooooooo 
r>.iocicococoeocoxoc«o««ococo«oteo»osgBO»t»r>.t-.^»o ©os oo »o t>» »>• -^ 

— CI CICI dCICICId CId — Cld-^CI — '-• ^ 

CI c CI — V-i M — •-i^^t«t»t«t«o»a>0'-<-<i-Hcoior>-'«-«coaacic«»'"*^ac4' 



3 



8 



I 



2 

M'c.'E'S.b 

• o o w 



CO 

o 

0S 



CI 

CI CO - 

6 6' 

lis 



o o 



(a 



Jit 



w a g a ** 






iS-^jg 



3 

a 
fi. 



o o S 

• M**M CD ^> 

5;5 ..2 b k 



I 
;§fc 

J3-5 



'S. c'S.'o.'B. c Ok'SL Ok'o. Ok'Oi'H. 






:zw 






•a ft sSSSCCvvSSC 



I 








Repobt of Hygienic Laboratory 



305 



I I I I I +++ 1 I I 



1111 + 



+ 



+ 



1 I I I I I l + l I I i + l l + I I I l + l i-f-I 



+ 1 + 1 I + 1 ++ 1 I I 



+ I ++++++++ 1 I 



;S88| 

( ^« ^^ w< 






« .-g 



+ 111+ :+++ 
+++!+ :+++ 

»^ t-H f-* tti ft' '^ *n 
CO »or>» 

04 



I I + I M I ++ I 1 ++ I I + I I I +++ I + I 



I +++++ I ++ 1 +++ I +++++++++++ 



»«©QO 



C» 



S8gSSg88SSS58SSgSS85 



I'-'OMt-O-' 



i-iM»-iao 



«9 ao^<tf*r4 






oSSSSSoS 



S8SSgSs8$ 



^S2g^S^g$S8^$^SS$SSS :S$ :^$8 



eo C) ^0 cc coco ^ 



eoooo 



000«DC*N0C4 
O O OO O O 0*0 






<^^c«^^^oeoo^oor4C»loe»OftC»u3«^e« 

OOiOtO o o o o o to ol^ O O OO o ooo' 



c«eo 

o" 



ooo 



cior^aaoQcooo 

t^t^C*CC<^^CO»Q 



oeoc4eoiQtomot<««DO«-*aot«t^r«aoooinesi 



^ 



SS^ 



00 



CD'<<ilOOiO 



a>^<D«DiO'«t^<0 



«Dc>30^r^aoeOf-<ao«DQO>c«^*0'4'<«ia>«o<-< 



t>.eo 



eteooo 









afi^.p«D«owd'^e4oaoo^e«e»r^«Qe4^ot<« 



2^858852 

«4 Ok C4COCC 00 M 

oooo'o'oo 



•Q»OiQQO>CO>4 



•o 



>COQC0Q»CQQ0«O>CQiniAlQ4no«Oi0W0 

oio»o*-"Ot-*0«-'25t^»ftclc5t^e5M5cJt>-c5 



c^c^^O'^e^o*'* 



Sggg^SSSS 



CO 









8^, 

c>iesi 



SSt^ 



so ^ 



ooo 



§8^ 



•» oi e« — ^ c'* 

s^oSSSo 



OrHOOOOOO 

8§8§il88 



to 



»- COOOOO^OOO'-OOOOOOOO 

H 
<N —• — «•-• — —<eo>— <M-^co-«»^coe^«-« 0C4 c^ 

38888888888888888588 



OO 

co«^ 

88 



ooo 
oe>io 



^•> OO Ob C^ <p QC I 



122:881 

lOO^--** 



3 



— «SoS3ooSo©I 



I 00«^ ^"O o 



el 



OO 



^;t^ vg'^°(3 



C^ OCOCJ OCQ«i 

8oo8oo2' 



•-©ooo< 



;8! 



»OC<5««00©' 
I «^ to CO *** P4 a^ < 

>ooc5o©o< 



00^ 

OO 






I 



ooooe^c^rQo 



2S;$8S88§ 



8 



esaooccr»«o<«>C4CNi«MC4««'>ooaes«^Moaoc4iO 
O»nco25toe^e4coc4>oe>»t»e'lioaoooaot»oo>o 

o-i «4 >-4 CM 



81! gs 

Co 



CIO aH-i 



g"2 



© 

•oT 



M3t^aoOOM3^^COt^^Og^^-itO>OeOCOCOOa 



M »^ t-« 



CO ajjc 0, 



g gS III 8 — SS^P 



e>»eo 



ss 



CM 



CO CO 00 



•cSS 



©WSCM 



e>4 " (Q CM CM MO >0 



— 4, «©»o©«o»o 
(J 5 CO ^^ v^ 



s 



•««28 8 sS-*-" g-' gg8g5§5S?$§2 



•OO 



2g 



©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©^©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©ooooo 
00 — • jp Oj ** «o 00 OO 00 00 CO CO c* J* ^ocrao*-"«oooco**^eMeM©©o»io j-'t*^cooO'*©© «-• A^9 0»a<p cmmo «*" 
•«^iooo»**eM^^^CMC«eMCOO»«-« — eMCM^«o^^^^coeO'-"-<o**eoocMeMe««'-"*-»«-iO«-<i^«o«o»-'-< — co'oct 



8S8SSgS|g 

M * ^ * » » » 

aaaaaacw 




I 



Its 



a&^ 



^fiisfis, 



i* 









State Departmknt of Health 



i 


■^C; 


■ ■ ■+ I I ■+■■:+■+■■:■■■+■+: 

fl 1 + 1 1 1 + +++ i+"l ["i + l 1+ . . 1 :|++'l + i 

i"i 1 ." ". + ++ ~■T■|TT^~lT+1++">F-+ 


"01 


+++ . - - + ++ : 1 ■+++ ■;! 1 .++++ :::+.+ 


1 








&SSU : . S £% SSS ■■ S S ■ ■■ ■■ S ■% .38S 






SSE28 :::;;: isl SR* : ;S ;= ; : : ;S ;» i'SS 


[•to 


3gss \[ S ': -.fis Stis ; ;^ ;;;::; is :S :;:83 




"WO 


SSSS - _ S ■ -Sa S^S i :S ::S : : . ;S :S .SSS 


a 




"l"HN 


SkSS : 8 2S SJ3 : .5 ;S ! ; : :S S =S3 


"IWN 


ilii : : ! : i§ ili ::!:§;;: :i :l i^ 


pnnamqnr 


Sm :fi ^ H ill : :S :? : ; i 1 :| :l§| 


1™"- « 


1513 : : ;S : :1s ili ; :i ;S : : : :i 1 :SSI 


,np».p™„ 




™d,»."°«!} ™p-H 


am : ; :S ; i^ ;'- : :» ;» ; ; i :S :6 ;E55 


xjwqmx 


-T::;- r»ri:=:im:-nr 


"VO 




1 


ill i 

Ilii 1 






t 
7 

§ 


.[iiiiu iiiyiiii 



Rkpokt of ITyoikxic Laborah 



+++TTTr+i.i I++1 11 \\ 1 1 111 M 1 rriVT"i + 


i"i ") f i + i"i"f 


+ ;+++ 1 + 1 1 ++++ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ++ 1 1111 + 11 + 


+ 1 I + ++ M I 


+ :+-!-+ 1 +++++++ 1 1 + 1 ++ I 1 +++ I ++++ 1 ++ 


++ 1 + +++++ 


a s =- s - - " "a" 


J§ i i §l>a8 



S3S3 - :SS838SSS 


: ■ ; : ; ■ 3 SHSS S .8 :S : S S : ; ;8 


3SS5S ; :aasas3ss , 


S£^S : 'SSSiSIS^s; ; 


: ; ; ; : : ; is sass ;^ ;= > ; i 1 1 ; :i 






gggg : ;isg§§8ls: 


;;;;:;;;§ :§§ii -1 ;§ i I i i 1 ; ^S 


gSSi : ;?.riil5§i : 


; i i : : M :i ;=i§i ;§ ;l J ; M i 1 1 


§iS§ : §li§§iii : 


; ; ; : ; i hs :liii :| ;i ;i ; i 3 ; ; :i 




;;:;:;: ;S ;SS3R ,S :X S ; S 5 , : .? 


SSig : SsssssKs ; 


; ; j : : : : - :SSS2 :g :S :(; : R S ; : :S 




" Mr- :| :"-;:" 




- 'If-f " :^^:|:| 



5g$SJ^^Sg|*Ss22s5=s=a^sss -"^"=22^=; 



1 1 tetitffl ii 

Amimmuu d 



m 



'ii 



iiiiiiiiiijii.. 



iiiiia Ii I i.iill 
IIIIJII 11,1 Lllll 



308 



State Department of Health 



•^ 






(4 
< 

O 
02 

S3 

< 

m 

O 

H 

CO 

Ph 
o 

M 

H 



lis 

"If 



n 



'3 .> ooi-i I 



•o-a oi-l 



+111+11111 



•08 01 



+ 1 I l + l I I I 1 

+ 1+++++'! I + l 



I I I I I 



I 



I I I I I 



+ 1 I I f 



I I I l + I + l I I l + l I 1 + 
Ml l+l ++++1 + 11" IT 



II I I 



I I++ 



Is 

II 



I* S9oSSSr>.S«^! 






C9aor9 



I 



pamnaaoo oaaXxQ 



iSSS8Si$SS§ 



c««^*-iv-ie40*^ci«« 



^iran»wr 



ooooooooo 



!8*=5®.8 



»A*4 •oo0a -QtQO 



I 



t-Mt-»OtO»<CSQO 



l«»ox ManpitHI 522sS 



8' 



I 



«HC0O»t^ 

CO 



f 

M 

s 






3^88SS3i2S 



•^CO^^»Hfi^^i<^^CO»^ 



8^ 

oo 



3SS8 






viaouiim 

pumramqiY 



8888§88SS 



• «-iOOOOOO<-4 



VlUUUJUltl MiJ 



ooooooooo 



dnpnu i«»ai|^ 



nof) 
-uodtAO no onpwH 



§eoc38SS«SS 






iC^ipW^VL 



•OOC9»OOC^ 9 



iOlOQ 



0«C4iO 0.00*0 «)>0 



•^ M ^ d 



0*000 



<0 00*4*4 



<D <0 CO <0 



oeoo^kO 
do5«Hf^ 



e«« 



cdod 



siss 



I 04 CO 30 



8i 



oa^«o*o 



S^TOC^ 



e>io*o 



*o>-4e>i*o 



SS88$^S 



o^o-^ooo 



;S8SSSS8 

*o" t^ 

S^i»»8?8 

d »4 -^ csi c«« *4 o' 



ooooooo 



3S:3S8SS8 ;: 



ooo 



ss^ 



0«M*0»-4.«*I 



S§^>-4«SSS 



o«O'<«ic>«ao^>t0 



S«g{5J2S8 



CO ^ • o o o c* 

o 

oowo^dop 
mmO*o3*oc4 

dododd*-< 



00 O Q e« <«• CI 00 
o ^* >o -^ CS vl *4 

ooooooo 



S*^8S8S5«. 

Csi S <^ !:> r«^ CO 7 

SS Scora So 
do' Co o' Co' 



»»o« 



OOO toes* 
o8oo< 



!o8So! 



*-4 v^ w^ »"< f^ N e* W "H •-« w^ 



O^*0t»*0C0 fN. »5 *P » Oi 23 o» 

00 — rt^MNcS 002CSS2SS 

C»C) v^f-if-HvH t-i N M C« M CI C« 



OO 



00 



^^o«^ 



OOO o 



)*oeo tt*o*4 



CO 2 






"oo ooooooo oooooooooooooooo S3SSSSS 
.— »oco*oo«^e»»c«oooooo^e^oc««o«oo>-4t>.c>io>cj» •2»hc«^«o»o 



& 



1 



X >. >»±» >»i?i? >»^ ^ CO 

s s s s s s s s slri'l 



^J 



I 
I 







a 
o 



ddda 



I 



^^^ 



&_^ 



J 






Si 



OO 







Kei-ort of Hyoiknic Laboratory 



1 i + i 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 i + i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III.: 




1 1 ++ I 1 1 1 ++ 1 ++ 1 1 +++ 1 1 1 1 1 1 f ++++ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f ++ 1 + 1 + 1 1 : 


iSSiS*ii6ss|!8=*ii=a=l !8SSIi=gSs|s=!s|lis|sssa ; ; 


3a,8sisss£s$ssssssss :S3s s^asssssssssss^s -.H 




;;s8 


in^ii^s^^^s^s^zsss \ -ssi ss&sssss^si \ i||s i^ 




Msg 


SZnsi=:=^St7'SS3$S^Sg:X :5!:S S3S=S^gS=^^j||SX :3 




:;s§ 


=sasss|SBgsiss^|ssa sss Es^ssssBfiassasss :ie 




: :a8 






::|2 


igiigiililJJiliSSi :Sii illiilSllliiilii :8 


;;§i 


iSiiieiSiiiSiillgg :ilg iillilSliSlslIgs ;^ 


_ 


i:Si 


lSi3i§lg;;ili§iili ;iii illlilliieSJiisI :S 


;;8S 


siKsaaasaBaaBseajs ;a5| aSsasSa^gSSgSSII ;6 


;;ig 


5gsss5SS!!sss=s|=ss :=== S3a3SSi=sgSS||5y. J. 


i;S3 


iriiifiin"!' ill if'^Mmiuu :j 




;:1 


^^,^^„,..^,,„,^.^^.^^,...^^,^^^^„^J^^^ 




Ml 



■S22^^::^5??5 ^«n-g^.r-!-gg^~g^=r.r-222j22S 



it; 
Hill 

LUi j,ei£sa££ : 



iiiilaiillilliliiiii 



Statk Bei'artmknt 



I 



foiaiaata KOSiQ 



inoj. •■HpnH 



"I ++ I 1 I M ++++ I 



TT": .SSSS828 ■ SSSSSSSRl 



mn 



"Tssssssa" 
'5iss§§s 



iissssSsii - .s§s 



liSiisi ; jiigssiiii ; mm 



umm : :f §iii§iiii ; m 



■mmj 



.^sss^sssss 



<::S9SSS;SZ&S 



llJIIfl 



m 



llOiiiOM 



2SS2S2 



II 

If 



:|elSEEESB, 



11 






e3 



fllilllliJillt&^Ssmssllllllli 



J-ABOfiATOBY 



TT 


.+1+ 


1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 


1 +1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I M 1 1+ ; 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




;+l + 


1 1 1 +++ 


f + 1 +++ 1 I +++ 1 + 1 ++ 1 ++ . I 1 1 1 1 M 




:+++ 


++ 1 +++ 1 + 1 1 1 




' 






:i9l 


paesssajst 


1 piHS4|S-SI|8SS6B. :i|.=iSSI 


: SS 


::^s :• 


.% :s : :3 3 isssssssssss^ssssss aasesit 


; :2S 


inss :^ 


jS ;B : :a S ;Sffi8S3SSSS2aS2SC:SRR :S*"3HS 




EI 13 


m i 


is ;s ; ;3 8 iissssssasasssiassRai isissa^Js 




53 


^ :• 






=.= 




2 :r : :e g . eS SZ^SS^S^S^ k358SS SSSSBS 




ii 


;S88 ;S 


;g is ; :§ g ;li§§3§ii§iii§g§i§g Igsiii 




Si 


;!SI a 


;S S ^ :S 1 ;ll!iSS§8SSSi!iSS=l BilliS 




i* 


:iS| ;l 


:i :i : ;l i ;IISil=l8Si!i5i!BI8 :?!SIII 




ss 


:JSS ;J 


;= ;S ; :S J ;5|sgsssssssss=sa=j ;ssaaas 


: ss 


;sas ;e 


:5 ;S i :3 a ijjlssassssiEjcssjs ;»aass8 


Ml" 


r':- 


:|-::-| ;"- -— "H :|ri| 


yr 


r" 


;" :« i ;- 1 :""'E-2S2S«*«|8£S8s| i^-'-Sj" 



SStilslHllis'sSISS g g4gaK!5iSi;;«!;;e!|e686s 



in 



!|lj 1 llttlllilllllil 



iiiiWitt 



irnmrn, 



m 



State J)ei'aktmext ov Health 






n 



I I M I I I -4-+ M I I 



I +++ I I i I [ I ++ I 
"I++++I \T\T++1 



I ++++ 1 + 1 I f ++ 1 + 



§iSSS3;|§§§|§g§aai§||as8E|ss§s§g§ 



'S8SS8SS8S«S$S:S£S3S£ 



SSS'SSSSBSSsaSSiSSSR 



mu ™op"^ 



SHE;S:;=SSSSSS!:SS! 



PHSaSSt^S^ 



llsl§i 



iasiim 



piii§|§ 



S335TSSS 



.iiiiilissislissips. 



iggiiii=isi§isssi=i 






o?$SSSa3E;S»SSS:i = |§S 



'g'Sf::;sS33SSSSS0ssgi£ 



T- 



Ifl 



M 



jgaasassssssa— 



■^22»»»h-;---5g|^g22|a«2g-« 






miii 



■l-t-t-»P^PFt-t-^t-Pt-^f-t-t-l-Pt-Wt-l- 



I 



iJi|jii|j|jJjiiji|!l|JSJ|^^ 



Keport of Hygienic Labukatoby^ 



313 



TTTl I :+ 1 I +++ : 1 I I I I I I ++ I I I I I I + I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



I I + I + :++ I +++ I I + I ++++++ I I I I I I -f I I ++ I I I I +++ I I I I I I + I 



+++ I H- :++++++ I +++++++++ 1 + I I +++ I I +++ I I ++++ I + I I I +++ 



1^1 



IK81 



o — e« 



S^2S5^S ^ 



I CO tM 






:^S88S8S$8:28S^^8:S 



C4 



•O 



^8 



C4 






SSSSSS8SSSSS^88 :S^8^8S8^^SSSg§Sg$8SSS:SSg^§SS$ 



^*4^^^ow3cieo<oeot«o»«e«i 



v4ClC<eOOOX9^ClC«00000«<-«C« 00*^<-4<-<000 



oo 



0000i00000000*0 



'^SSSSSSSSS 



oooo 



5 cScboA 



oooooooo -ooo 



se^^g^g^SS:: 






oooo 



C40r««D 



0>OaDOCOO^«00«H<OeOOtO 

SoooooeoSSSoot^SSo 



OOOOO^MOOtO^O^O'^^M 



kOOtO<DO 



OOOOO 



S8 



c«e4QM^aD«ea)eoo><OQC«^>-'r« 
«oo»-«o»«>e«^eieoe«9eo»H^»H 



SSc; 






282! 






^.^. 

«*-• 



8S 



8S8i^88!SS58S:S2^iS2^S 

og g g jt ^ jg o o « ci i-i lO* ^" ^' «d 



8?288^8SS8^8SS£2S88iS8 



Q0e5OM'^»^«-»^»i^«-l»^««C«O«C«« 



:g$ssss 



s< 



^ii^S 



^■^•o 



OMcisSSSmScot-iSSMSS 



S822?;S$g2 sSS8S$S^S8 S8$22S$ 



ooooooooooo -ooo 



oo o o 



•^•^«© c«JC^ 



88 



Steoe* 
Soo 



8*^oooo 0<-4 
ooSooeo 



!8888 18888 S §888888 §88 



8! 



8S 



§1 






OOOOt 



l'^0^<*^*^000*-<*-<^^000 



c«<o^oo« 

OOOOO 



)OOoSooomoo8oon 



CM" 

8! 



I 00 O 00 ^ I 

>oooo< 



i'<««*e»»eM«oO'«'« ajcsi 

• OOOOOOOO ao< 



ss 



'«f-«3o90»<ot^^9oao6i>oo 



ooooiioeoeocoic^ctcteo 



|8 



s 



iS88gS?|Si 



Ml 



l(0QC^Q00»<^O'^CIQCQQaQ 



ie>«e4C4 






ic*o*^><d 



[^«»oclSSS»^ 






OOH 



CO ^ ->•-" 



«09« ttCOkO e>^iOOOO 



•^eo»^SS8eo 



,«oeoesi ^cocoMdooicMO 



COM^OOICMO 

CO i-^ <-< i-^ v^ Vi^ 



8 s 8 8 8 8s 

OH OOOOO 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

Qtoeoeaooocoi^OMaa >S ^ ^ oTr^ iot^'o>t^r^eooao^>ooC'^oco>oe>4<300QOt>o<;^cio ocT^ oo <x> oo eo r« i>^ 
**«M) « o — "^ * <o » o MM •-••-• eo (O'oeo MMMM>ocor»aio^Hiot»ob^«Mior«abt*QOO»i^i^eo««<>oa»'4M 



3 









64?-:^ 



I 



= =3-5 
i> « s 

^ » & 

•W« '4 •«« 

til, 



11^ 



if 



»1 ftftftSaaSft- M - SftftftSftftftaftftftftaaftftftft o.s SS ftftftftftftftft 
2| 3 S 8 S 5 S S S||| S S S S S S 3 S S 8 S S S 3 S g S 3 3 g||| S S S S S S S S 

*** H« :S SSi u9 IS •£ '*" ^ a-S V V * yr ' IS 13 ;5 JsS «fl Jfl vH us iS 1S5 U3 IS! SS ITS iS d iS iSJ c »_ •»*—^ -»^ •X'-^.g •-^•S 

ftdftftcicxaftft ftftftft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ftft ddftdft ft ddddft^ u'v dddddddd 
H6-HHt^HHHHHHHHHHHeHHHHHHHHE-'HHHHHHH«p5«HHHeHHHH 




•S t'C'E E> 



314 



State Department of Health 



■^ 



;2 



;2 



0) 

» 

O 

OS 

S3 

m 

o 

H 

:_) 
'A 



< 
H 

Hi 



""is 



•i>3 OOI-l 1 


• 


• 


• • - • 


• a 


• • 


• • • 


• ' 




« 


• 


• 


• • • . 


• - • 


• 




■ra oi-I 1 


1 


1 


I l + l 


1 1 


1 + 


+ ! 1 


1 1 


Mill 


1 


I 


1 


MM 


1 1 1 


1 


1 


•D3 1 1 


1 


1 


1 1 + l 


1 + 


: + 


+ 1 1 


1 1 


1 l + l 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 l + l 


l + l 


1 


I 






•0 J 01 



II I ++ I ++++ + I ++ I I +++ II I M ++ II +++ I 



o 



II 



SSSSSSiSS! 

•O «0 lO 



\%%\ 



»o 



£a ^ 



;g 



« 



M 



pooinsaoo odSXxo 



SS8SSSS 



o o^*»-«^ 



ooooooo 



^rairnnvi S8SS82?3 



l«>ox -MaopjWH 



«oo^o«oe<^* 






I 

3 



?: 



aauomo I 



"IWIIK I 



00 w5 acr«oor« 



csi t> M «o ic r« o 



w^ecSo eoS 



OOO 



OO 



vfoonniiv 

pioonnnqiY 



!§ 



CM ^ CM O CS "S" M 

cc M 05 r>. •"! M •<> 

'--OO 



OOO O' 



tiaoomre mjj{ 



dnpisaj (Udai)^ 



0«00«D'<«<' 
•i« In, »« (p <-« ' 

OOOOOi 



tN. r« r« .-I OO ^ P4 



-uodvAO DO anpiso){ 



OS — W t^ to !"• QC 
M »^ »-< 



iCiipiqjnx 



JOjoo 



CM 4jC>l etO oO 



I 



H H 



.•O ajO*0 a>C4 



eSS toS^^Sra 



oe«) ooo«He>««^ 



OO OUSOOiOO 



s 






04 esi ej <r -• Ma 

COtO«O00C««M 



<0 9 QO CQ CC 00 CO ^* 



S8 



«o233c4e3 



esi^'o»*o^ 



t% 



OOOOC4o' 



8888 §8 



looo^cBS* 



o 



•4 P4 •Q(DO>Ot»^ 



g^ ^3S|:s:S 



UdC^ 



jigj 

OOHO 



C«iO 



.OO 



S9S$SS98 



*-ieo«H«HC4 »-iO 



OOUdiOiOOOO 



S2a««5l25S 



eoiQ^M^oocQe^ 



!3 



^s^^^^S^s 



t»t^Sr«SSer« 



oie^eoe^teoeoeoeo 



doo ' C * 'o' 



88888888 



;8SSS28i 

I T^ *^ ^ « O •-' < 






8S;:8SS|?:§ 



H I 



«H o to t» r» i» 00 



S8SS 



O'^ •->*<) 

'oo'©«o 



P!coS*4 



OB OOO (O 



SI882 



88SS3 



COO'^O 



39S$ 



OO-^O 



8! 



>o< 



b-S«8 



3SS9 



O oCOM 



■COtOO 






OOO OOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

kOcc«oooe4coo»c»e« c»eo^^e4«D<o««»4t«aoaoooQOOOOO^^«4^ 






III! 

S S S 5-il s sg 

o o V o "S o e 
«• « «• la.S « <8 6 



CO . 



i-^J 



I 






iiisiiiiiiiiilhii' 



9 




I: a: 





nil* M^ll 



Repokt of IIycuenic Laboratory 



315 



I I 1 I I I I I I 1111 + 11 + 111:11 +++++ + I + 1 T 



ll + lll + II +II++II + II+ :+++++++ ++++ + 



I I+++++I I +I+++I I++++ :+++++++ ++++ + 






■'••C>»»^ -iQt-it^ 



:S5' 



• CO C» »^ •H ( 



CO 



SSSSoSSSSS 8SSS 



^ooooooieo oooo 

v4 V4 ^4 v4 v4 t-4 «^ 



48 <D C« Ok « M3 aO CO CO M 



•eo 

H 



SSSSSSSSiS ssss 

^ O '^' C> W ' ^ O •H >-^ ^ C4 o» 

•O 1^ ^4 ^4 



SS^SS^.^^.^ S88S 



8888888 



i-< o 



oo 



■"••oo 






8 



IS 



S8 



o 



t* 

:$ 



eo 



o 
o 



eo»-« 



oo 
oo 



8 



o 



SSS8 



oo 



3 

ci 



s 



S8 



CO 



S 



00 






«o 



o 



8 oo 
esi ■*; 



•^ eo 



o to 
eo 



8 ^ 



S 8 



ra o 



3 

o 



>OO0oS«^0O Ooo( 









»H eo 



> c« ^ c« 2 « "<• I 

!88o8oo< 



>o< 

>0( 



,1^ v4 v4 94 ^^^t» 



11 



eot>» 



o 






0«D 

«o 



i^^M3t-i8SSo 

I C4 c« e) *4 



•'-!3 



M 



lO^ 



n I 

oo oi 



,«o 



eo« 



HO 



3 



•o 



COM? 



•oesi 



8 



90 



?; 



30 

o 



Ob 

00 



S 






o 



g JS 



«o 



I 



•C aO 



iS-'SgS'^ 



•OtOd 



f) K^ aw <i-« 



i<0 



•CtO 



8 



o 



W5 



S 8 



ooooooooo oooooooo oooo oo ooooo oooo 



r«e««e*»^-^MO« •-< c^*^ e* r* •^ •-• "^ ^ '^ 



>Ok»^^t«e>i oac<o«DO- 



«-• M CO CO <D (O CO CO to QC 00 OC 00 ^ 

ooooooooo ai^ «-• i-« *-4* O) 







u=3 






|sgs 



•c 



I. 



Jl 



i«oua cua^ 



o o« 
5 S g* 8 3 3 -- 



O 



a 



• • ■ • 

oooo 

55 S5 5552; 



3 

.a 



5i5i 



no. 



S SL5.&0 5.a^ &| g-p ►* 5 g g g g 
dddalo dd^ SJ^ i^S ^^^^S 
HHHH£E-H«OuSS(2iiM(2HH&3S 



•c 



:S 



S Is 



a o 
OS 

o. 
8 






S.5 

li 

^5 a » 








^ >^^^^^^;^^jS;S;2^;^;S;Sj2; 



310 



State Uepaktmknt of Healtu 



in co-operatiou with tbo Eugiueeriiig Divisiou a hpecial in- 
vt»8tigatiou of the sauitary quality of thu water of the St. Law^- 
ivuco river at Cape Vincent aud Chiyton haa been made and else- 
where reported. 

The work of Group C — diagnostic examinations for the de- 
tection of infectious disease and cimtrol of quarantint^ — has l)eeu 
carried out by this laboratory for its first full year. 

Laboratory Diagnostic Work for 1910 

CCLTUREB rOR DlPHTHEBIA DIAGNOSIS 



MONTH 



January. . . 
February . . 
March . . . . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

AuKUst. . . . 
September. 
October . . . 
November . 
December . 

Total. 



POBITIVIO 

1 


NKQATIVE 




TOTAL 




1 

1908 

1 


1909 


1910 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1908 


1909 


1910 


50 


120 


284 


61 


150 


282 


124 


303 


566 


87 


83 


253 


82 


54 


389 


178 


153 


642 


84 


30 


231 


68 


40 


331 


158 


74 


562 


60 


59 


178 


44 


35 


439 


110 


110 


617 


58 


32 


171 


23 


52 


581 


87 


129 


252 


32 


54 


100 


35 


69 


326 


71 


143 


426 


31 


49 


61 


45 


55 


394 


79 


121 


455 


32 


26 


88 


27 


81 


472 


66 


121 


560 


61 


34 


77 


53 


68 


541 


123 


122 


618 


52 


24 


107 


45 


68 


266 


109 


100 


373 


85 


101 


124 


129 


169 


222 


227 


281 


346 


100 


143 


148 


123 


173 


337 


265 


314 


486 


741 


765 


1.822 


735 


1.024 


4,680 


1.597 


1,971 


6,402 



Laboratory Diagnostic Work for 1910 — (Continued) 



MONTH 



January . . . 
February. , 
March . . . . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . . 
September. 
October. . . 
November. 
December . 

T<)tal . 









Sputum 


EXAMINATIOKS 






] 


POSITIVE 


1 NKGATIVE 

1 


TOTAL 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1 

! 1908 


1909 ; 1910 


1908 


1909 


1910 


14 


51 


48 


1 

' 40 


92 94 


54 


143 


J42 


23 


44 


43 


40 


101 110 


63 


145 


153 


29 


58 


76 


40 


85 150 


71 


133 


226 


28 


44 


61 


47 


69 162 


75 


115 


223 


33 


45 


53 


42 


120 121 


76 


165 


174 


35 


39 


as 


45 


115 89 


80 


156 


127 


31 


33 


36 


37 


135 79 


68 


168 


115 


28 


60 


5(i 


42 


113 80 


70 


173 


136 


31 


32 


37 


61 


110 71 


93 


142 


108 


55 


39 


48 


27 


115 98 


82 


154 


146 


7 


36 


42 


1 ® 


89 99 


18 


126 


141 


15 


45 


46 


i 68 


101 124 


92 


146 


170 


33U 


526 


5S4 


49K 


1.245 1.277 


842 


1,766 

1 


1.H61 



Report of Hygienic Laboratory 



317 



Laboratory Diagnostic Work for 1910 — (Concluded) 









WiDAL Tbot 


FOR Typhoid Fever 






MONTH 


POSITIVE 


NEGATIVE 


total 




1908 


1909 


1910 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1908 


1909 


1910 


Janunry • 


4 
7 
6 


12 
25 
18 
10 

• • • • 

2 

1 
1 
3 

• a • • 

5 
15 


17 

28 

21 

6 

8 

9 

32 

23 

26 

29 

38 

17 


8 
14 
13 

6 
11 
16 
• 15 
33 
61 
41 
48 
16 


15 
24 
18 

9 
15 
12 
10 

8 
18 
18 
16 
16 


26 
21 
21 
22 
13 
15 
46 
41 
46 
38 
62 
27 


18 
24 
24 
7 
21 
25 
35 
84 
88 
63 
76 
34 


34 

77 
63 

'?? 

14 
11 
9 
22 
18 
24 
39 


43 


February 


49 


\farcli 


42 


April 


28 


May 


8 
6 
11 
29 
19 
16 
26 
16 


21 


June 


34 


July 


78 


AinrtiKt ■ 


04 


September 


72 


(^tobcr 


67 


November 

I>ecember 


100 
44 




' 




Total 


147 


92 


254 


282 

1 


179 


378 


499 


358 


632 







The special investigations of the mineral waters of Saratoga 
hare been continued by the Laboratory Division and reported to 
the Saratoga Reservation Commission. 



Albany, N. Y., September 2®, IMO. 

Hon. Eugene H. Poeteb, A.M., M.D., State Commissioner of 
Health, Albany, N, Y. 

Sib: — Complying with your instructions to report to you 
further details and conclusions of the Laboratory Division in re- 
gard to the investigation of the mineral waters of Saratoga; re- 
ferring to the preliminary report already in your hands, I sn]y 
mit the following matter with the understanding that it is in- 
tended only for assistance of various parties concerned in their 
actual efforts to determine more precisely the situation and value 
of some of these springs. 

In the preliminary report, the waters of the springs of Sara- 
toga were presented as of three kinds ; the saline alkaline waters, 
of which the principal mineral ingredients from the point of view 
of quantity, are chlorine of sodium and bicarbonates of calcium 
and magnesium. 



318 <State IJepautment of Health 

• 

In all of the waters of this group the relative quantity of 
various salts contained may vary, but in so far as the investiga- 
tions of the laboratory have gone, it is apparent that any character- 
istic mineral matter found in one of the spring waters of the 
group is also to be found in every other spring water of that 
basin. 

The amount of total mineral substances contained in the waters 
of the various springs, i. e.j the mineralization factor of each 
spring water varies very decidedly and in consequence of this 
variation of the quantity .of mineralization is the different 
therapeutic action established in all probability ; that is to say, the 
difference in the action of various of these spring waters upon the 
human organism is more rationally due to the different quantity 
of mineral matter in the respective waters considered, more than 
to a particular salt or substance existing in any specific water. 

The meaning of the previous statements is that the various 
saline alkaline waters of Saratoga differ from each other for all 
practical purposes merely in the degree of concentration of their 
mineral substances. 

The most highly mineralized waters of this class, such as the 
Carlsbad and Hathorn, show a relatively strong purgative or 
cathartic and diarrhetic action upon the human organism, 
whereas the less highly mineralized water becomes of relatively 
slight immediate therapeutic effect, but is valuable as a pleasant 
table water. 

The majority of the mineral waters of Saratoga belong to this 
saline alkaline class. 

A few of the springs are reputed to supply Chalybeate waters. 
The investigations of the lal)oratory to this point would indicate 
that tJiese waters contained relatively the same mineral &ul)stanoe8 
as those of the saline alkaline group, but a somewhat increased 
quantity of iron. 

(Such iron exists in this water as the ferrous bicarbonate; the 
access of air to a water containing this salt of iron results in the 
oxidation of this iron to au unstaple compound, the conse- 
quenl; precipitation of which causes clouding of the water. Sudh 
a water as ordinarily bottled, undergoing this change of oxida- 
tion, does not present a pleasant appearance and the exploita- 



Hepoet of Hygienic LABoitAtoKY 319 

tion of such bottled water is pradiically not undertaken on this ac- 
eoimt. Such waters have been for the most part utilized merely 
for drinking upon the premises ; as a type of these are the waters 
of the Columbian and Clarendon Springs. 

A number of waters grouped as saline alkaline also contain 
this ferrous bicarbonate in sufficient quantity as to render the 
maintenance of its clear condition when bottled very difficult, a 
slow oxidation of the iron salt generally resulting in the produc- 
tion of a yellow iron compound, causing a dirty and disagreeable 
sedimentation. The bottling of such waters containing consider- 
able iron, has been successfully accomplished by a special bottling 
machine, closing the bottle with the exclusion of all air and thus 
assuring the maintenance of a clear content. Such method ds 
followed at the Hathorn Spring. 

A second method of maintaining a clear fluid in the bottle con- 
sists in adding a small amount of tartaric or citric acid to the 
spring water, which successfully maintains a clear solution of the 
iron compound. 

The exploitation of the Congress Spring waters acknowledges 
this procedure and a statement to that effect is found on the 
labels of their bottles distributed outside of Saratoga. 

A third method used to avoid a subsequent oxidation and sedi- 
mentation of iron compounds in such water consists in aerating 
the water before bottling it, thus bringing about the oxidation of 
this nnstaple iron compound, its immediate precipitation and re- 
moval from the water by filtration. The Lincoln Spring uses this 
method to obtain a water that will remain clear when bottled. 

A third group of waters found at Saratoga is made up of the 
so-called sulphur water. The so-called sulphur spring at the 
Eureka baths is not highly mineralized, but is to some extent 
impregnated with hydrogen sulphide. This is the only water 
of this class known in Saratoga by the Department. 

In considering the value of those different mineral springs as 
commercial assets, besides the material condition and equipment 
connected with each spring, the extent and organization of its 
business, there are a number of factors demanding important 
consideration which depend upon the spring itself. 



320 State Depaktmext of Health 

Foremost among such factors is the question of the relative 
mineralization of the waters; that is to say, the quantity and 
nature of mineral substances dissolved in each water. The 
second consequence of this first factor consists in the amount of 
such water that is obtainable daily from a given spring without 
affecting the permanent mineralization value of its water; that is 
to say, the total volume of the daily flow of each spring showing a 
constant mineral content and no trace of exhaustion of the under- 
lying mineral water vein. 

A third and all important factor is the sanitary^ quality of such 
water intended for human consumption. 

In the preliminary report to you it was shown to what extent 
the bacteriological investigations of some of these waters showed 
them to contain fecal organisms, subject to further investigation 
and control. A permanent content of such fecal organisms would 
of course indicate that such waters were unsafe for consumption 
and consequently such permanent contamination would totally 
abolish any commercial value that otherwise might be assigned to 
such waters. 

The problem of determining any possible value in the presence 
of these actual investigations showing the existence of fecal organ- 
isms, involves a study of surroundings and repeated controls. 

It can be said now that the presence of these fecal organisms in 
the waters so reported to you would indicate a quite direct infiltra- 
tion of surface or close underlying surface water with that of the 
springs concerned. This connection being once so made, may 
persist and constitute a permanent condition beyond relief, or it 
may be that a cessation of pumping or other drainage of large 
volumes of Avater and stop to this extent the depletion of the 
spring water basins and that consequent changes in such basins, 
may immediately again exclude the infiltration of this undesir- 
able water of surface source and in such a case it would be per- 
fectly possible that such springs could then regain a water of 
satisfactory sanitary quality. 

The preceding paragraphs indicate more or less natural de- 
terioration of such spring waters, but further than that a de- 
terioration directly caused by human intervention is perhaps of as 
wide or even more disastrous effect. 



Repojbt of Hygienic Laboratoet 321 

It is persistently rumored that falsification of the natural water 
product of numbers of the Saratoga Springs is very prevalent m 
the exploitation of Saratoga mineral waters. The investigation 
of your Department has secured evidence that in some cases these 
rumors are well founded. It is not diflBcult to find incentive for 
such falsifications and imitations in the mineral water basins 
under the conditions at present prevailing in Saratoga. 

Three inducements for such fraudulent action are immediately 
apparent : 

First, falsification might be reported to cover up, and to this 
extent, remedy a deterioration of the degree of mineralization 
of the water of some of these springs. 

Second, the development and distribution to the public of a 
spring water of established reputation might extend beyond the 
actual water capacity of the spring, the name of which was a 
valuable asset in this business ; and to meet a distribution greater 
than the actual production, falsification by the use of other water 
might be undertaken. 

A third inducement to fraud might be found more or less in the 
partial or complete failure of a given spring to supply its water 
after a business had been developed in its name which had hereto- 
fore been supplied with a perfectly reliable product 

The investigations of your Department and minute examina- 
tion of various establishments bottling mineral water at Saratoga 
have discovered in a number of establishments an arrangement of 
pipe systems, tanks, pumping machinery, etc., which make it very 
possible to introduce water from a source other than that of the 
true mineral spring into tanks in the establishment from which 
the water for bottling is taken. 

Various chemical substances and the necessary apparatus for 
dissolving and intnxlucing solutions thereof into the above-men- 
tioned tanks, have been found practically in position that would 
indicate such use. 

It is vitally necessary in determining a commercial value of a 
given spring to determine whether or not any falsification has 
ever been practiced in connection with the exploitation of its 
waters; for in the estimate of such commercial value the eood 
will, name and trade labels which might be of great value if 

11 



322 State Department of Health 

strictly honest, would be totally valueless for any State control of 
the water, the reputation of which had been established in any 
way by fraudulent practice. 

Furthermore, if the addition of chemicals should be necessary 
to maintain the iron in solution, and this fact had heretofore 
been concealed, the necessary public acknowledgment that a State 
control would require, might reduce the volume of business to a 
considerable extent and be an important factor in determining 
the future value of such a spring water. 

It might, on the contrary, be desirable to market such an inm 
containing water without the introduction of a chemical solvei*t 
and such procedure would necessitate the introduction of a special 
method of bottling, with the exclusion of air. The change antl 
new machinery and methods thus involved might greatly increase 
the cost of placing this water on the market and to this extent 
would effect the determination of the value of such water. 

Suppose, however, the removal of a subsequently precipitated 
iron from a water were undertaken by its aeration and filtration, 
this practically should be publicly acknowledged under any State 
control and such acknowledgment might involve a considerable 
loss of business in a water that had been exploited without the ad- 
mission of these truths. 

A number of springs exploited at Saratoga would apparently 
have great difficulty in maintaining their reputation after a care- 
ful investigation of facts. For instance, there is a pavilion in 
Saratoga in which are located three healing springs ; one of which 
is declared to be a producer of an iron water, the second, of a 
magnesia water ; and the third of a lithia water. There are three 
wooden tubes in the pavilion supposedly connected with such 
springs, but at the time of the investigation made by the De- 
partment, your inspector using for five minutes a hand pitcher 
pump, had exhausted the flow of all three of the springs. There 
remained no doubt that the three tubes were undoubtedlv fed 
from one common source and that the water flowing: from each 
one of them was the same. 

The location of a vSpring, its general and widely established 
reputation and the extent to which its water is advertised are 



Repobt of Hygienic Laboratory 323 

widely important factors in determining the value of individual 
springs^ 

At the present time in Saratoga there are existent springs, the 
material conditions and mineral properties of which are far iu 
exce^ of their exploitation. In fact, there are springs in Sara- 
toga and its vicinity that in quality of mineralization and volume 
of flow are worthy of consideration as among the hest springs of 
that district, hut the waters of which are little known to the pub- 
lic and the exploitation and business developments of whicJi 
waters are of very snmll degree. 

The progress of your investigation of these mineral waters is 
sufficient to show that although it cannot be said that the mineral 
content of the waters of many of these springs exactly duplicate 
the water of another, nevertheless there are a number of these 
springs, the general character of the waters of which is so similar 
that the use of any one of these waters would fill all proper aud 
therapeutic requirements of a successful exploitation. It would 
undoubtedly be beneficial to select one or more of these springs for 
its better location, sanitary character or other greater desirability 
and utilize the waters of this spring for general exploitation an«l 
advertisement to the exclusion of manv of the other less desirable 
springs supplying the watc r of practically the same nature. 

There is appended herewith a table showing the amounts of ih»* 
more important chemical substances found in a number of these 
spring waters, (A) as reported in Bulletin Xo. 91 "Mineral 
waters of the United States," by the United States Departniei'l 
of Agriculture in 1005, and just below each of these quantirif- 
in line (Bi the results found bv analvisis of waters taken fron 
these same springs in the winter r.f ItHiD to 1010, during the In- 
vestigations of your Department and analyzed by your order .t 
the State Hygienic Lal)oratory. The quantities in this ta^l^ 
state the nunilx»r of milligrams i>er liter. 

The comparison of these two series of analyses at an inten a! 
of five vears shows verv sftrikinsrlv a verv material rethiction in 
the mineralization of the-e waters. 

The knowle<lge possessed by your technical staff on condition^ 
and operations at present existing in Saratoga renders the ob- 
served lessened mineralization of the=e waters, a confirmation of 



324 



State Department of Health 



the resultaiyts to be expected from the present condition of th'i 
mineral basin of Saratoga as we know it. 

A number of illustrations or exploitations in this resultant 
from the investigations of your inspectors at Saratoga are ap- 
pended to this report to you. 

Yours very respectfully, 

WILLIAM S. MAGILL 

LEONARD M. WACHTER 



High Rock 
Mssnetic. 
Cvlsbad.. 
Hftthorn. . 
Lincoln. . . 













Oxide, 






SiUca 


Sul- 
phates 


Chlorine 


Calcium 


Magni- 
sium 


iron, 
Alumi- 
nium 


Sodium 


Potas- 
sium 


33.4 


157 


483 3 


223.0 


60 6 


175 


348.0 


34. 3« 


5.02 


10.8 


109.30 




14 55 


Trace 


71 50 


11.34 


42.7 


2.3 


1.313.4 


326.4 


122.8 
01.82 


80.0 


840.7 


56.0 


53.03 


1.80 


811 08 


138 41 


18.8 






13.5 


2.8 


4,410.6 


628.6 


298.8 


18.8 


3.014.5 


237.8 


8.60 


Trace 


3,014.16 


601.80 


281.78 


10 83 


2.732 00 


288.18 


10.6 


5.6 


3,685 5 


650.7 


228.8 


14 


2.430.7 


197 2 


11.03 


0.3 


1.759.20 


510 87 


130 27 


33 66 


1.284 5 


124.06 


32.7 


3.5 


4.068 


675 8 


325 


10.8 


2.688.0 


243.7 


13.16 


2.18 


1.290.84- 


156 76 


70.12 


36.16 


1.320.82 


178.25 



Lithium 



8) 
Trace 
3.2 

6 3 

10.6) 

0.5 

"I'.'S 
Trace 



A 
B 
A 
B 
A 
B 
A 
B 
A 
B 



A — The numerals of lines marked "A" are the corresponding analytical data of the United States DepirtmcLt 
of Agricultural Reports. 

B — The numfrals of lines marked " B " are the corresponding analytical data of the New York State Department 
of Health Reports. 



Albany, N. Y., May 27, 1910. 

Hon. Ei'GKNE H. PoRTEE, A.M., M.T)., State Commissioner of 
Health, Albany, N. Y.: 

Sir: — Under date of May 21st, the attention of your Depart- 
ment was called to the washing of vegetables by truck gardeners 
in the water of the Erie canal, between Troy and Albany. This 
complaint was rec^eived by you on May 2t5d and transmitted U^ 

Inspector Xumter , with your instructions to investigate 

that matter on the following day. 

Your inspector called upon the gentleman making this com- 
plaint, but was unable to find him at home. He accordingly pro- 
ceeded to the direct investigation of the subject-matter. 

He found that it is a constant practice and has been for some 



Repobt of Hygienic Laboratory 325 

time for a number of truck gardeners to wash vegetables in the 
water of the Erie canal at various places, which vegetables they 
subsequently supply to the markets of Troy and Albany. 

In particular at a point in the canal near Schuyler bridge, 
spinach was seen by your inspector to be wasl^d and his investi- 
gation showed that this spinach was the property of a Mr. Beattie, 
who had built a wooden rack pen in the canal, into which pen 
vegetables to be washed were thrown from a wagon with forks j 
and after remaining in this pen, submerged with water, were 
taken out with the forks and thrown upon the bank to drain. 
They were subsequently loaded on to wagons, which wagt^ns 
as a matter of custom usually left his residence from two to three 
in the morning to arrive at the Troy market at an early hour the 
following day. 

At the time of this inspection a number of boys were in swim- 
ming at this place and samples of the water of the canal were taken 
at this time for examination at the laboratory. 

In this vicinity also another pen, in which spinach, lettuce and 
onions were washed, was found existing in the canal, stated to 
be the property of O'Leary, a truck gardener who conveyed the 
most of his produce to Troy and also to the Albany market. 

Another installation of the same sort served for the washing 
of products, the property of a man named Keys, who sold this 
produce at Troy. 

At another point a similar 'installation belonging to Mr. 
O'Brien, was found ; he washed practically all of his green produce 
in this way; at the time he was washing spinach, lettuce and 
onions and he sold all of this produce both in Troy and Albany. 

Another installation was visited belonging to a Mr. Mattimore, 
where the actual washing of thirteen barrels of spinach, three of 
lettuce and a quantity of onions were seen and the two sons of 
this proprietor were interrogated. They stated it to be the usual 
custom to wash green produce here in this way; that after the 
produce remained in the water for some half hour or more, it was 
removed therefrom with forks, allowed to drain on the banks, sub- 
sequently loaded on to wagons and driven to the barn. From this 
bam the wagons started about two or three o'clock in the morning 
to arrive at the market at an early hour and sell the produce. 



326 State Depaetmext of Health 

Another installation for washing the produce of Mr. T. Smith 
was also found, where spinach and lettuce were washed, which 
produce it was stated was carted early the following morning 
for sale at the Troy market 

Another installation opposite the farm of Mr. Clancy was said 
to be used by Mr. J. Mullen of Island Park, for washing of his 
green produce and a further installation was found of this nature, 
utilized by Mr. Bums. 

Nearer to Albany, in the rear of Altro Park, a Mr. Burns was 
found to have a similar wash stand ; and a Mr. Sheller and Mr. 
Carmend, vendors of such products, were found in this vicinity, 
but these last two were not provided with wash stands. The last 
three mentioned bring their truck for sale in Albany. 

This method of washing green produce has been known for a 
long time by the people dwelling in that vicinity and is easily 
observed by passengers in the car line running between Troy an4 
Albany and has been so observed in actual operation by members 
of the Laboratory Staff. 

A report of the actual nature of the water in this Erie canal 
at the time of the washing is appended. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM S. MAGILL 
•WILLIAM A. BING 



Appendix Number 1 

Albany, N. Y., May 27, 1910. 

Four samples of water from the Erie canal were taken and 
designated as follows: 

Alta Hotel / Sample number 3358 

Key's Fann *..... Sample number 3357 

Schuyler Bridge Sample number 3355 

O'Leary Sample number 3356 



Report of Hygienic Laboratory 327 

The designations used for these samples denote the places iu 
the canal at which the water was taken, at each of which places 
green products for market were washed. The samples were col- 
lected between three and four p. m. of May 24th and were plated 
before 6:30 of the «ame afternoon. The laboratory examination 
reports as follows: 



Sample No. 



3358 Bacteria per c. c, 3,700 

3357 Bacteria per c. c, 4,100 

385^ Bacteria per c. c, 1,500 

3356 Bacteria per c. c, 800 



B. coli iyipe present in 1/10 c. c. 
B. coli type present in 1/10 c. c. 
B. coli type present in 1/10 c. c. 
B. coli type present in 1/10 c. c. 



The -water of this canal is that of the Mohawk river, the water 
of the last level of the Champlain canal and of at least one small 
stream which enters the canal at a point north of the Arch Street 
bridge, which crosses the State basin at Green Island. 

In addition to the usual polluted condition of Mohawk river 
water, there is evident pollution occurring along the canal at the 
points covered by your inspection. For the general dangerous 
nature of such water and particularly that of the Mohawk river, 
reference is made to th^ laboratory reports of previous years of the 
water of this river ^nd of these districts. 



Albany, N. Y., October 4, 1910. 

Hon. E. n. Porter, A.M., M.D., State Commissioner of Health, 
Albany, N. Y.: 

Sir : — The undersigned has received copies of correspondence 
with the president of the State Commission in Lunacy, under 
date of June 28th and July 21st, with the replies of this Depart- 
ment of June 30th and July 27th, a letter of this Department to 
the superintendent of the Gowanda State Hospital, dated July 
27th, a reply of that superintendent dated July 29th and tho 
acknowledgment of that reply, made by this Department on Au- 
gust 2d. 

The correspondence has to do with the damage of clothing and 



328 State Depabtmbnt of Health 

similar material treated at the Gowanda State Hospital for dis- 
infection for a scarlet fever epidemic, by immersing this material 
in a bath made up of a solution of bichloride of mercury one part 
to 500 parts water, and a constant damage of this material is 
reported from that hospital. 

Complying with your order, the Division of Laboratories has 
investigated this matter and it is herewith submitted. The com- 
mon name of bichloride of mercury is that of " corrosive sub- 
limate " and this name signifies the particular corroding nature of 
this substance, which property is very marked, even in' its most 
dilute solutions. 

It is well established that a solution of the strength heretofore 
specified of this chemical compound is quite destructive to fabric 
and as illustration of this general knowledge, reference is made to 
a book on " Disinfection and Disinfectants,'* by S. Rideal, edition 
of 1895, page 138, where referring to the use of such a solution for 
disinfection of railway carriages, the following sentence occurs: 
" It is to be noted that mercuric chloride solution, especially if 
acidified, would rapidly injure the cushions or hangings." 

It is well known that such a solution should not be used for 
fabric if damage is to be avoided and for this reason the disin- 
fection of all clothing, curtains and such material for which steam 
disinfection or washing is unavailable is rc^rted to by formalin 
gas or sulphur dioxide. 

Your attention is respectfully called to paragraph No. 3 on the 
second page of the circular issued by this Department, entitled, 
" Disinfection and Disinfectants," where the use of such a solu- 
tion for disinfection of clothing is distinctly recommended. 

Apparently such recommendation should not have been made, 
or if made should have been accompanied by a special caution that 
a very decided damage to any fabric would result from such 
treatment. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM S. MAGILL, 

Director of Laboratories 



Kepobt of Hygienic Labobatory 329 

Albany, N. Y., October 11, 1910. 

Hon. Eugene H. Pobteb, A.M., M.I)., State Commissioner of 
Health, Albany^, N. Y.: 

Sib : — Complying with your order of October 5th, the under- 
signed inspector has received the Department file with the corre- 
spondence matters pertaining to health conditions at Rouses Point 
and has visited that place on October 6th and investigated the 
question of the existence of typhoid fever in that village at the 
present time; and in further compliance with your general order, 
has investigated the general health conditions and the attitude of 
the various public boards of the village, upon whom responsibility 
for health conditions should rest, and the steps that have been 
taken by any such board for improving the conditions since March 
of this year, and the reasons why steps for the betterment of 
health conditions have or have not been taken. 

The immediate determinant of the order for the present inves- 
tigation appears in two letters, both dated September 29th, written 
from Houses Point and herewith submitted as appendix "A." 
The information of these letters states that a number of cases of 
typhoid fever actually exists at Rouses Point; that a scandalous 
pollution of water used for the public supply is known to exist; 
that at least one physician is suppressing all knowledge of typhoid 
cases and endeavoring to conceal such from the local health board 
and that the village board of trustees are doing nothing to relieve 
the known polluted condition of the water supply; that they are 
not acting in any way to aid the local health board in improving 
conditions; that at least two deaths have very recently occurred 
from typhoid fever; that with the exception of cases reported by 
the health officer, no cases are reported by any other attending 
physician at the present time; flud the charge is made that an 
effort to conceal any knowledge is being made. 

Complying with your order of October 5th, Dr. W. C. Thomp- 
son, medical officer of this Department for that district, was noti- 
fied to meet the undersigned inspector at Rouses Point early on 
the morning of October 5th and this medical officer accompanied 
said inspector in the principal investigations of the health condi- 
tions of the locality during his interviews with every practicing 



330 State Depabtment of Health 

physician at Rouses Point and the official interviews of the in- 
spector with the health officer, the first meeting of the local board 
of health and the joint meeting of the local board of health, mem- 
bers of the village board of trustees, including the president, a 
member of the water board of Rouses Point and one or more in- 
fluential citizens, including the largest property holder of that 
village. 

It is recalled that health conditions at Rouses Point have been 
unsatisfactory to this Department for more than a year ; that last 
winter for a period of several months a decided infection of 
typhoid fever existed in that community. 

The records of the Department show that the laboratory report^ 
on the condition of the water supply of that village indicate that 
the water taken from Lake Champlain at that point is of such 
unsanitary quality as to be dangerous for use in its raw condition. 

Because of the imsanitary conditions of that community, an 
extended investigation of these conditions was made by your De- 
partment and a report embodying the results thereof, was made 
to you by the Chief Engineer of this Department under date of 
March 2, 1910. A copy of this report was forwarded by you to 
a suitable official of Rouses Point under date of March 18th. 

Your report included recommendations, very insistently stated, 
requiring the immediate action- of the local authorities to protect 
the health of the citizens of that community and to take further 
action to assure a safe water supply in the future for that 
commimity. 

I beg to refer you to a copy of your report here attached as 
appendix " B " and specifically to the recommendations for the 
action of the local authority on pages 12 to 15 of that report. 

The Department file shows some correspondence with the vil- 
lage president and with the health officer of Rouses Point since 
that time and shows also a report of the consulting engineer em- 
ployed by that locality for the subject of improvement in the 
water supply, and shows under date of July 14th a communica- 
tion from the president of the village to you, stating that a propo- 
sition to raise funds to build a slow sand filtration plant — ac- 
cording to the recommendations of the consulting engineer — was 
submitted to vote of town and lost 



Report of Hygienic Laboratory 331 

It is evident from the file and established by investigation of the 
undersigned inspector that since last spring not a single step has 
been taken to improve the sanitary condition of the water supply, 
to abate the sewage pollution of that water, nor to warn the citizens 
to any further degree of the danger of using such water, nor in any 
way to protect the health of the citizens from the constant menace 
of the admittedly unsafe water of the public supply. 

Your inspector has foimd that no notice has been issued to the 
citizens concerning the insanitary condition of the water since 
last May, when a notice (copy attached as appendix ** C) was 
issued and various faucets of the public supply in school buildings 
and other exposed public places, were closed by the health officer. 

It has been stated to your inspector and corroborated by more 
than one witness, that prominent members of the village board of 
trustees, or of the water board, have openly and repeatedly stated 
since that time that the water was in satisfactory sanitary con- 
dition; that tliere was no harm to be feared from the use of the 
water; and that investigations made by a private individual, stat- 
ing the results of laboratory analyses, showed the water to be quite 
harmless. 

Furthermore, it was stated and proved that in spite of the 
closing of various faucets of the public supply by the health officer, 
in particular in public schools, that these faucets had been, with- 
out authority of the health officer, reopened and that the water was 
actually in daily use in these schools and it was apparent and 
admitted at the joint meeting attended by your inspector, that the 
use of this water and that the opening of the faucets distributing 
this water without authorization of the health officer and contrary 
to his repeated insistence that they must be maintained closed, 
was well known to the principal member of the water board, to the 
President at least, of the village board of trustees of Rouses Point, 

Your inspector noted that residences of Rouses Point alonp: the 
shore of the lake, most closely adjacent to the point of intake of 
the public water supply; residences extending for a half a mile 
or more along this lake front and all within the breakwater, consti- 
tuting a sort of bay, within which public supply is taken ; that all 
of these residences practically discharge their entire sewage directly 
into the water at the edge of the lake ; that in some cases the dis- 



332 State Depaetmbxt of Health 

charge of such drain pipe was not even under water and that in 
relatively every case the drain pipe did not go further than a point 
of constant submersion. 

It was pointed out to your inspector that a number of these resi- 
dences, complying with the advice of the health officer, were con- 
structing cesspools, into which the house drain would flow directly 
and of which the overflow alone would flow into the lake and it was 
the contention of the health officer that wherever these cesspools 
were constructed (directly on the shore of the lake) he would see 
to it that they were properly and thoroughly cleaned at suitable 
times. 

It was further noted by your insi>ector that practically all of the 
houses not directly upon the lake front, but upon streets further 
back paralleling the lake shore, were unsupplied with any public 
sewer ; that there was a considerable number of such houses extend- 
ing for several blocks back from the lake front and for a distance 
of perhaps half a mile where all of the house drainage discharged 
directly into open ditches, which ran to open ditches on the side of 
the street and that these open ditches conducted all of this waste 
directly into the lake at the point of abutting of cross streets 
upon the lake shore. In a number of cases it was observed there 
were for considerable distances, stagnant pools of such house drain- 
age, containing putrefying material and giving off offensive odor. 

Practically without exception, the privies of every one of these 
houses were little outhouses a short distance back of each house, 
built from the surface of the ground, or in some cases perhaps, into 
a slight excavation about one foot in depth. 

As a general rule, however, all of the excreta lay upon the sur- 
face, in a large number of cases directly accessible to insects of 
any kind and where surface wash would carry it with slight resist- 
ance or retardation directly into the open ditches utilized for the 
house drainage. 

Such material, therefore, would also be poured very directly 
into the lake water. 

A number of houses were observed by your inspector, in which 
there was absolutely no provision of privy, where the human 
excreta must of necessity be deposited quite miscellaneously over 
the surface of the dooryards, either before or behind the house, 



Report of Hygienic Laboratory 33? 

and a number of such houses showed a considerable accumulation 
of waste, garbage and similar material in close proximity to the 
house. 

Report of this Department previously alluded to and attached 
as appendix '* B," describes very completely the actual inlet of 
the public water supply. 

It was stated to your inspector, but not verified by him, that 
the intake is actually not so far from the shore as is indicated in 
that report. 

The conditions of wind and current indicated in that report, 
which so facilitate the arrival of sewage at the intake of the 
water supply, were very manifest at the time of the visit of your 
inspector. 

It was stated to your inspector and a map was shown to him, 
of an original proposal for the establishment of sewers at Rouses 
Point and that the sewage system indicated by that map was at 
one time approved by this Department. 

Whatever the case mav be, it was evident that all of the dis- 
charge of sewage from residences on the lake shore and back of, 
but parallel to these residences, into the 'lake was illegal. It was 
also evident that there was no legal authority for the existing 
sewage system, the construction of which is very widely different 
from the map shoAvn your inspector as having been the design of 
the original sewer system, for which authority was at one time 
obtained. 

Your inspector called upon every practicing physician in 
Rousee Point, three in numher. He found, and the statements 
were apparently verified, that one physician had no cases of 
typhoid fever in his practice and had had none for a long time. 
This physician was not engaged in active practice. Another phy- 
sician, not the health officer, who has been previously found at 
fault by your Department for not notifying the Department nor 
the health officer of cases of contagious disease and who was at 
this time directly ac'cused in the correspondence referred to pre- 
viously and attached as appendix **A" as concealing cases of 
typhoid fever actually existing or having existed within the last 
few weeks, was interviewed by your inspector with the assistance 
of the medical officer designated, and this physician admitted that 



334 State Department of Health 

he had actually two cases of typhoid fever in his practice and that 
a short time previously a patient under his care had died of 
typhoid feven 

It was also stated by other parties that a second death in the 
practice of this physician had recently occurred from typhoid 
fever, but this case was not mentioned by the physician when 
interrogated. 

The physician in question admitted that he had not reported 
any of these cases to the health officer, nor to the Departments He 
stated that he would do so as soon as he received proper cards for 
such reports and he stated that his excuse for not doing so before 
was that he did not have such cards. 

In this connection it was stated to your inspector by the health 
officer and corroborated by his secretary, that he had at frequent 
intervals mailed to the physician now at fault for not reporting his 
cases, suitable report cards and that not less than ten days previ- 
ous to the visit of your inspector a quantity of cards suitable for 
the reporting of typhoid fever, had been mailed by the health offi- 
cer to the physician specifie<l, and furthermore, it was stated to 
your inspector by the secretary of the local board of health that 
he had personally called upon this physician a number of times, 
requesting him to report all of the proper cases promptly to the 
health officer and that he had personally handed to him such 
request in writing; that he had a copy of this written request in 
his files and that at the time of handing such request he had also 
handed to the physician the suitable report blanks. 

It is evident from the file of this Department, from the state- 
ments and corrolx)rated statements of members of the local board 
of health and the health officer, that the physician specified hag 
been unusually well informed of his duty to make prompt reports 
of the various matter of vital statistics and of contagious diseases 
required by this Dei)artnient ; that this physician has been unusu- 
ally well, frequently and amply supplied with the necessary report 
blanks and that he has, with scarce an exception, and then only as 
a last resort, made any suitable report of the matters required by 
him. 

It is evident by investigation of this Inspector that the dame 
ohysician has repeatedly had cases of typhoid fever in that com- 



Eepobt of Hygienic Laboeatoey 335 



munity; that there were actually eases in his care at the time of 
the visit of the inspector that were unreported and furthermore, 
in which it was evident that active effort had been made to pre- 
vent the health oflScer from having due knowledge of the existenc<» 
of this disease and that these conditions and actions of the said 
physician had existed for some time and had been maintained even 
when at least one patient had died from typhoid fever, the knowl- 
edge of which said physician admitted to your inspector and cor- 
roborated statements were made to your inspector concerning this 
specific case and of other cases in general ; that in such case, under 
the care of the physician above alluded to, not a single precaution 
had been taken for the disinfection of the excreta from such 
patients or to prevent contact infection of the neighborhood. 

Statements were made and corroborated that excreta from such 
case under the care of this physician, were known to have been 
thrown out in the yard of the house, without any effort at burial 
or disinfection being made at all and that protests made by neigh- 
bors relative to this carelessness were met bv the statements of the 
house members where this case existed that the physician declared 
it was not typhoid fever and precautions were not necessary. 

Your inspector ascertained by inquiry from a number of citi- 
zens of the community, that the physician in question never sup- 
plied circulars issued by this Department, setting forth the pre- 
cautions to take for various contagious diseases and that he practi- 
cally never notified the health officer of the existence of such 
•liseases, apparently doing all in his power to prevent knowledge of 
the existence of such disease from coming to the health officer and 
taking any active measures to control such infection. 

Your inspector feels that in this investigation it is necessary to 
state before you the results of an investigation on a broader basis 
than the mere determination of material conditions. 

Unsatisfactory as the sanitarv conditions of this community 
evidently are, as they are set forth in the report of your Depart- 
ment previously alluded to and attached as appendix " C," un- 
satisfactory as they are found to be by this present investigation 
of your inspector, it is evident that there exists at Rouses Point 
an unhealthy condition far more disastrous than anv of the 
material conditions heretofore set forth. 



336 State Department of Health 

« 

There exists an unhealthy paychological condition in that com- 
miinity, which requires severe and radical therapeutic measurea- 
to bring about a tenable condition for the development of a healthy 
community. 

Your inspector found an energetic, earnest health officer, awake 
to the danger of the water supply, perhaps not sufficiently awake- 
to some other unsatisfactory material conditions, but eager to do 
his full duty. He foijud acting in full endorsement and co-opera- 
tion with their health officer the members of the local board of 
health, with whom he came in contact. 

On the contrary, it was apparent that one or more of the leading 
property owners in that community, the President and others of 
the village board of trustees and at least one member of the water 
board, were not acting in hearty co-operation or endorsement witli 
the health board and their health officer. The inaction of the 
responsible officials of that commimity since your communication 
of last March is very largely attributable to this division in the 
community. 

Apparently the President and other members of the village 
board of trustees have not realized their responsibility for con- 
ditions detrimental to the health of their citizens. Apparently 
these gentlemen have made no effort to point out to the citizens 
of that commimity the individual responsibility of each for im- 
])roving their conditions and safeguarding the health, not only of 
their community, but of suppressing the danger of health con- 
ditions at Rouses Point to the outside world. 

It was pointed out to your inspector that during this summer 
season over two hundred cruising parties, passing through Lake 
Champlain, have stopped at Rouses Point and that with the excep- 
tion of the health officer, apparently no official in that community 
has taken the slightest precaution to warn such visitors of their 
dangerous water supply. 

It is apparent that not only have some members of the official 
family of that village failed to realize the necessity of improving 
their local condition, but that there has existed in the minds of 
some'of them a spirit of doubting the statements and recommenda- 
tions of the iSt^te Department as of any weight or value ; a dis- 
position to dispute all such authoritative communication and to 



Repobt of Hygienic Laboratoby 337 

play for time and delay by useless remark and argmnent and futile 
resort to private analyses for basis for further dispute. 

Your inspector failed to see in the minds of many of these men 
the slightest indication that they had ever concentrated any 
thought or effort to take immediate action to better their con- 
ditions. It was manifest that the spirit of strife between at 
least two sides existed in this community and that other than 
mutual reproach and useless ailment, little had been done. 

It is respectfully submitted by the subscriber that the most ener- 
getic action of this Department be initiated to immediately cure 
this condition of inactivity. It is herewith certified : 

Referring to the excuses submitted as appendix "A^^ that 
typhoid fever undeclared actually existed at Rouses Point at the 
time of your inspector's visit; the parties responsible for these 
concealed cases of typhoid fever are signakd in this report and 
this failure to declare such cases is not a first offense; that subject 
to the conditions described in this report, no proper effort for 
bettering of conditions pointed out to that community as dangerous 
hy your department last spring, has been made and that there 
exists a condition of spite and dissention among the responsible 
members of that community which it is necessary to immediately 
correct, in order that a period of immediate activity to secure safe 
conditions can be brought about. 

Very respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM S. MAGILL, 

Director of Laboratories 



Albany, N. Y., October 17, 1910. 

Hon. E. H. Porter, A.M., M.D., State Commissioner of Health, 
Albany, N. Y. 

Sib: — The undersigned respectfully submit a report of con- 
ditions and data of examinations resulting from a series of investi- 
gations of samples of water collected at different points from the 
public water supply system of Yonkers during the last year. 



338 State Department of Health 

In this connection we beg to refer you to data concerning the 
public supply of Yonkers published in the annual report of this 
Department, Volume No. 1, 1907, pages 363 to 365, and to ana- 
lytical data concerning samples of water from this public supply 
published in that same volume on page 371 and in the correspond- 
ing report of the following year, the analytical data of examina- 
tions of samples of water from the public supply of Yonkers, 
published in Volimie No. 1 of the annual report for 1908, page 
459, and to similar analytical data furnished you with this report 
on special sheet marked "Appendix A." 

In addition to the dates designated as the time of taking samples 
within the last year, this plant has been inspected by members of 
the laboratory division at several other times, at which particular 
times conditions existed which would prevent the taking of a fair 
sample at the time of that inspection. 

Your particular attention is invited to the following analytical 
data from examination of samples taken by Inspector Number 
Twelve, of your department, at the time of his last inspection 
on October 6th, 1910. 

On this date bacteriological samples were collected by this 
inspector of the raw water from the Nepperhan River, as it passed 
through the inlet chamber of the old filters and corresponding bac- 
teriological samples were collected from every filter unit of the 
Yonkers system. . 

Numbers one and two of these units represent the effiuent 
from the so-called old filter beds, numbers three and four from the 
so-called new filters. To facilitate the comparison, corresponding 
figures from previous examinations of these corresponding 
raw waters and effluents from the various units are placed in ad- 
joining colimins with the date of such examination. 

The conditions of operation at the time of collection of the last 
samples — October 6th, last — were somewhat unusual, for the 
reason that the low stage of water of the Nepperhan river did not 
permit a constant maintenance of level of the raw water on the 
filters at the usual elevation, if the normal amount of filtered 
water was constantly pumped from the filter plant. 



Report of Hygienic Laboratory 339 

Therefore, the pumps were operated only part of the time, being 
frequently stopped to allow the water level on the filters to rise 
again to a suitably high point. 

Such intermittenee of pumping would, of course, produce 
marked changes in rates of filtration and constant alteration of 
filtration rate is, of course, not conducive to filter efficiency, but 
these variations of rate could not be easily avoided under the 
actual conditions of raw water supply. 

Although the low stage of the river complicated the actual situ- 
ation, there can be no doubt whatever of the possibility of purifica- 
tion of raw water under the actual conditions in a manner that 
would render the water of the effluents from the filter units of far 
better sanitary quality than that actually found by this examina- 
tion. 

You will note that the results of the examination of samples of 
water of the effluent from every one of the four filter units in- 
volved showed fecal organisms to be present in the filtered water 
and the conclusion is manifest, therefore, that the water then 
actually delivered from every unit of this filtration plant at Yonk- 
ers, was unsafe for human consumption. 

Information concerning this water supply and filtration plant 
gathered at different times and from many sources, would indicate 
that for the two filter units, numbers three and four, the construc- 
tion of which is noted in your annual report of 1907, as carried out 
under the direction of Messrs. Hazen & Whipple, it is evident 
that the design included a building to be used as a laboratory and 
it was then the intention to maintain a chemist and consequent 
permanent chemical control of the operation of this filtration plant. 

The new filter units were constructed and the laboratory also, 
but no resident chemist has ever been provided. 

At about this time the form of city government was changed 
and Yonkers commenced operation under a uniform charter, since 
which time there has evidently resulted a change of policy for the 
operation of this water system. 

The water works of Yonkers are now under the direction of the 
Commissioner of Public Works and under the immediate charge 
of the Superintendent of Water Works. 



340 State Department of Health 

It is understood by the present reporter that by order of the 
Commissioner of Public Works of Yonkers, the Superintendent of 
the Water Works has been instructed to operate the water filters 
as directed by a specified chemist, an employee for chemical work 
in one of the sugar factories of Yonkers. 

It is understood that this chemist has at times procured samples 
— according to the observation of your inspector, by sending a 
boy to collect such samples at the filter plant — at various times 
and it is understood that according to the direction of this chemist 
a solution of hypochlorite of lime has been added to the raw 
water for purposes of purification and it is understood that the 
filtration rate for the operation of each filter unit has been directed 
by this chemist. 

Incidentally, your inspector has learned that the sum of $1,500 
per annum has been paid for these chemical services — a sum of 
money sufficient in the opinion of your inspector to secure the 
services of a competent chemist, who should be permanently estab- 
lished and maintained at the filter plant. 

It has been determined that the operation and introduction of 
the solution of hypochlorite of lime above mentioned, is carried 
out by an ordinary laborer, who takes his orders from the chemist. 
The method of preparation of this solution and of its distribution 
to the raw water is crude in the extreme. 

The solution is made by this laborer stirring in an open cask 
a quantity of commercial bleaching powder and water and allow- 
ing this to settle. By opening a spigot near the bottom of the 
cask the solution is allowed to flow into an open trough, eventually 
leading the solution into the raw water for treatment. The rate 
of flow is controlled only by the cmde attempt of the laborer to 
adjust the quantity flowing from such spigot and it is also pointed 
out that this laborer leaves his work at four or five o'clock in the 
afternoon and that there is no further adjustment of flow of such 
solution from casks throughout the night until his return at the 
usual working hour of the following day. 

At the various times when visited by one or more of your inspec- 
tors, it has been found that the raw water going upon one filter 



Report of Hygienic Laboratoby 341 

was treated by such hypochlorite of lime solution, when the raw 
water going upon a corresponding adjoining filter unit was un- 
treated and inquiries made by your inspectors to determine the 
method of such procedures have been unable to discover any 
method whatever, as replies have been given that such introduc- 
tion of solution was made to-day for one filter unit and perhaps 
on the following day for another filter unit, but no key to any sysr 
tern of procedure for the use of such solution has been found by 
your inspectors. 

It would be scarcely possible to devise a more crude method of 
utilization for such a solution, even for a very temporary expedient. 

It should be most evident on the slightest consideration that 
such solution must of necessity be applied to raw water through 
a weir or orifice which would assure a constant flow of a prede- 
termined quantity, the delivery of which could thus be maintained 
to a reasonable degree of accuracy. 

This solution of hypochlorite of lime is applied to the raw water 
as it flows upon a filter unit, usually nimibers three and four or 
one of these. It is remembered that this solution has a strong and 
imm^iate bactericidal effect upon most of the bacteria of the raw 
water and that it is used for this purpose. 

It is pointed out, however, that one of the paramount conditions 
of successful operation of filters of this nature is Jhe biological 
(largely bacteriological) activity going on at certain points in the 
filter bed — the particular utility of the so-called Schmutzdecke, 
the period of formation of which Schmutzdecke constitutes the so- 
called period of ripening of the filter bed, after which the filter 
becomes most biologically active and of consequent greatest 

The direct result of introduction of a solution of hypochlorite 
of lime to the raw water would be to sterilize this water to a more 
or less d^ree and to this extent sterilize the Schmutzdecke of the 
filter unit and to this extent suppress all of the biological processes 
of the sand filtration with a consequent retardation and diminu- 
tion, if not total loss, of efficiency of every filter imit, in which 
case the object of slow sand filtration would be very largely 
diverted. 



34'2 State Department of Health 

To be sure, the prevention of formation of Schmutzdecke would 
enable such filter to be operated for a much longer time without 
cleansing and for the saving of cleaning expense it might seem 
desirable, if no thought of obtaining a sanitary quality for the 
water is taken. It is needless to add that sand filtration is resorted 
to to render water sanitary and safe and not for puropses of saving 
money on cleaning. 

It is suggested by your reporter in this connection that if a 
solution of hypochlorite of lime is to be used at any place where 
sand filtration is resorted to, that such solution should be added in 
carefully determined dosage to the effluent water of the filter unit, 
thus functioning as a final safeguard of its quality. 

When added under these conditions, where all suspended matter 
would have been previously removed by the sand filtration, a far 
smaller amount of this hypochlorite of lime solution would be more 
effective for its germicidal action and the sand filters themselves 
would not be injured nor the biological functions be in any way 
retarded or diminished by the practice of such sterilization. 

Under the present abnormal conditions of the water supply of 
Ifonkers, largely resultant of the extreme drought, it would be con- 
sidered most desirable to add a suitable dosage of a solution of 
hypochlorite of lime to all of the effluent water of every sand filter. 

Your reporters are aware of the particular conditions involved 
in the water supply of Yonkers. They are of the opinion, how- 
ever, that there should be no difficulty if these conditions are 
properly met in supplying to that city a water that is safe for 
human consumption at all times and with the present filters. 

The unsatisfactory situation at Yonkers filter plant, which has 
been apparent throughout the past year, is quite similar to con- 
ditions of a similar filter plant at Poughkeepsie some time ago. 
The unsatisfactory conditions previously existing at Poughkeepsie 
filter plant caused the establishment of a resident chemist and 
since that time it is to be noted that the work of those filters and 
their operation have been quite satisfactory to your department. 

Apparently Yonkers has a well designed filter plant, the opera- 
tion of which at its highest efficiency is perfectly realizable at once 



Eepobt of Hygienic Laboratory 843 

and would assure at once a safe potable water throughout any con- 
ditions of water supply that are likely to be encountered at that 
point for some time. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM S. MAGILL 
LEONARD M. WACHTER 



Albany, K". Y., January 24, 1910. 

Dr. M. Wolf, 9 Dach Street, Yonkers, N. Y.: 

Dear Doctor: — I herewith enclose the report of the State 
Hygienic Laboratory on the examination of samples of water ob- 
tained at the Grassy Sprain pumping station, and at the Sawmill 
River filter plant by a member of our laboratory staff on January 
11, 1910. 

The Grassy Sprain samples did not show that fecal organisms 
were prevalent, though there were indications of considerable 
organic matter being present. 

The results of the ex-amination of the filter plant samples showed 
that the raw water was badly polluted and that the filter effluents 
examined did not show high filter efficiency. 

The samples were from the new filters and it is possible that 
they have not as yet settled down to effective work. 

Yours very respectfully, 

EUGENE H. PORTER, 

Commissioner of Health 



Albany, N. Y., Atigust 29, 1910. 

Dr. W. S. Coons^ Health Officer, Yonkers, N. Y.: 

Dear Doctor: — I transmit herewith report of the Division of 
Laboratories on the examination of samples of water taken from 
the filter plant furnishing part of your public water supply. The 
samples were taken by a member of our laboratory staff on August 
2, 1910. 



344 State Department of Health 

The results of the examinations indicated that the raw water 
was badly polluted and that at the time the samples were taken 
filter unit No. 4 was not operating with satisfactory efficiency. 

Your new filters have now been in operation for a considerable 
period and should be delivering a better effluent than that shown 
by this examination and previous ones made by the Department 
for its own information. 

Yours very respectfully, 

EUGENE H. PORTEK, 

Commissioner of Health 



• • • • 



• • • • 



Report of Hygienic Laboeatory 345 

Comparatively Tabulated Report of the Work of the New York 
State Hygienic Laboratory for the Year 1910 

Per cent 
Increase 
1910 ovor 
1000 Number of packages of 1910 1009 

23,688 Diphtheria Antitoxin distributed (1500 

units) ! 36,916 56 

4,313 Tetanus Antitoxin distributed (1500 units) 9,655 124 

22,000 Outfitsn-Prophylaxis Ophthalmia 24,454 11 

Outfits — Sputum specimens — 10 months 

only 3,289 

Outfits— Widal test— 10 months only 1,834 

Outfits — ^Diphtheria culture — 10 months 

onlv 9,152 

3,695 Specimens examined for Diagnosis — Total 

received 8,914 141 

Total 
received Positive Negative 

1,971 Diptheria cultures 6,421 1,826 4,595 225 

1,766 Sputum specimens 1,861 584 1,277 5 

358 Widal test (Blood serum) ... 632 254 378 76 

2,013 Samples of water examined— Total rec'd. . .2,662 32 

761 Chemical examinations 1,097 44 

1,252 Bacteriological examinations. 1,564 25 

No previous 

record Mail matter Total handled of Ist class Pieces 

Received— Ist class 3,963 12,471 

Sent— 1st class 8,508 12,471 

Xo increased appropriations of 1910 over 1909. 

Xo decrease in any item of the Laboratories' activities in 1910. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM S. MAGILL, 

Director of Laboratories 



CANCER LABORATORY 



(3471 



CANCER LABORATORY 



Buffalo, March 6, 1911. 

Dr. Eugene H. Poeteb, State Commiss^ioner of Health, Albany, 
N. Y.: 

Deab Sik : — I herewith transmit to you the annual report of 
the Kew York State Cancer Laboratory for the year 1910. 

Goiter and Cancer in Fish. In the early part of the oflacial 
vear 1910 our studies into the distribution and nature of the so- 
called thyroid tumor of fish, which comprehends a series of tumor- 
like growths ranging all the way from simple enlargement (goiter) 
to infiltrating and metastasising neoplasms (cancer) had reached 
a degree of advancement which made it clear that this disease is 
little short of a menace to fish culture and that it bears without 
question an important relation to the public health. With the 
approbation of the Commissioner of Health the State Cancer Lal>- 
oratory has since 1908 been engaged in a joint investigation of 
this disease with the United States Bureau of Fisheries of the 
Department of Commerce and Labor, George M. Bowers, Com- 
missioner. The work has thus far consisted of experimental work 
in Buffalo at the laboratory and of work conducted during two 
summers at a government fish hatchery in a neighboring State. 
Besides these activities, with the co-operation of the Forest, Fish 
and Game Commissioner of the State of New York, we have 
studied for two years an epidemic of this disease in a New York 
State hatcher^'. At the beginning of the present year these in- 
vestigations were sufficiently far advanced to indicate to us be- 
vond all reasonable doubt that the disease is an infectioiis disease 

9 

transmitted by the water and breaking out in epidemic form; 
that it occiirs in fish living under practically wild conditions and 
is probably introduced into hatcheries with the fish or eggs ; there 
finds favorable conditions for further development and assumes 
the astonishing epidemic character frequently observed. The dis- 
oa.^ is fundamentally that of goiter. 



350 State Department of Health 

Goiter in Man. The distribution of goiter in human beings 
in the United States has never been carefully tabulated. In 
Switzerland and in the Alpine regions of France and Austria 
the disease is so extensive as to be of the greatest economic import 
to these countries. In Switzerland alone not less than 7 per cent, 
of the young men are rejected for military service on account of 
goiter. There are regions in which more than 70 per cent, of all 
the youthful inhabitants are affected by various forms of thyroid 
disease (goiter). In regions in which human beings have goiter 
the animals are also affected and it has been recently conclusively 
shown by the experiments of Bircher that the water from certain 
wells and certain water supplies which have long been known to 
be the cause of goiter in man, when given to animals causes the 
development of goiter in these animals. It has furthermore been 
shown that the ordinary bacteria-proof filters do not hold back 
this agent but that it is destroyed by boiling the water. Careful 
attention to the water supply in Switzerland has in some cases 
controlled the disease. In the district of Aargau where in the 
eighties not less than 59 per cent, of the inhabitants had goiter, 
changing the water supply and bringing water into the district 
from a non-goiterous region has reduced the percentage of the 
disease to less than two and a half per cent. We have, therefore, 
in goiter a serious disease affecting man and animals definitely 
associated with water supply. It is, therefore, not surprising to 
find that fish are also subject to this disease. 

So important were the facts elicited from the study of goiter 
and cancer in fish imder the joint arrangement with the Bureau 
of Fisheries that when the facts ascertained were, in April, 1910, 
placed b^' Commissioner Bowers and ourselves l>efor© Seert^arv 
of Commerce and Labor Nagel and President Taft, it was at once 
seen that the Bureau of Fisheries, for the purpose of protecting 
fish cultiire against the ravages of this disease and for the purpose 
of properly studying this disease in fish under suitable condi- 
tions, should be provided with a biological station for the study 
of fish disease. The message which the President transmitted to 
Congress en April 9th is herewith submitted: 



Eetport of the Cancer Labokatory 351 



CANCER IN FISHES 

Message from the President of the United States, Transmitting 
Communications from the Secretary of Commerce and Labor, 
the Commissioner of Fisheries, and Dr. H. R. Gaylord, Di- 
rector of the New York State Cancer Laboratory, in Respect 
to the Necessity for an Active Investigation into the Subject of 
Cancer in Fishes. 

April 9, 1910. — read, referred to the Committee on Interstate 
and Foreign Commerce, and ordered to be printed. 

To the Senate and House of Representatives: 

I transmit herewith communications to me from the Secretary 
of Commerce and Labor, the Commissioner of Fisheries, and Dr. 
H. R. Gaylord, director of the New York State Cancer Labora- 
tory, in respect to the necessity for an active investigation into the 
subject of cancer in fishes, and I respectfully request an appro- 
priation of $50,000 for the purpose of erecting one or more labora- 
tories at suitable places and to provide for the proper personnel 
and maintenance of these laboratories. Were there a bureau of 
public health as I have already recommended, the matter could 
be taken up by that bureau and if in the wisdom of the Congress 
it should be provided in the near future, all such instrumentalities 
as that for which appropriation is here recommended may be 
placed in that bureau as the proper place for research in respect to 
human diseases. 

I have directed the Secretary of Commerce and Labor and the 
Secretary of the Treasury to forward an estimate for the appro- 
priation here recommended, in accordance with the procedure 
provided by law. 

The very great importance of pursuing the investigation into 
the cause of cancer can not be brought home to the Congress or 
to the public more acutely than by inviting attention to the 
memorandum of Dr. Gaylord herewith. Progress in the pre- 
vention and treatment of human diseases has been marvelouslv 

« 

aided by an investigation into the same disease in those of the 



352 State Depabtment of Health 

lower animals which are su'bject to it, and we have every reason 
to believe that a close investigation into the subject of cancer in 
fishes, which are frequently swept away by an epidemic of it, may 
give us light upon this dreadful human scourge. 

WM. H. TAFT 
The White House, April 9, 1910. 



Department of Commerce and Labor, 

Office of the Secretary, 
Washington, D. C, April 8, 1910. 
My Dear Mr. President : — I have read the letter of Com- 
missioner Bowers to you on the subject of cancer in fishes, and 
have also had an interview with Dr. Gaylord. I join in the 
recommendations of the Bureau of Fisheries, because the inquiry 
into the disease can no doubt be most advantageously pursued by 
investigation into the same disease as it is found to prevail in 
lower animals. A further reason for the investigation is that 
cancer among some of the species of fish seems to have reached 
such proportions that we are confronted with the problem whether 
we shall control the disease or abandon the hatcheries. 

The subject is one which appeals to the judgment so strongly 
that I can not believe Congress will entertain any doubt as to the 
propriety of the appropriation. 

Very sincerely yours, 

CHARLES :N^AGEL, 
The President, Secretary 

The White House. 



Department of Commerce and Laror, 

Bureau of Fisheries, 
Washington, April 7, 1910. 
To the President : — With reference to the data for a special 
message on the subject of cancer in fishes submitted to you by 
Dr. H. R. Gaylord, director of the New York Stat^ Cancer Lab- 



Report of the Cancer Laboratory 353 

oratory, I would say that the bureau regards this matter as of 
great importance and concurs in his statements. Your attention 
is respectfully called to the accompanying extract from my last 
annual report to the Secretary of Commerce and Labor, outlining 
the joint investigations already undertaken and showing the posi- 
tion of the bureau with reference to the continuation of this work. 

I feel that unless this situation is handled energetically, 
promptly, and by a highly efficient staff of specialists, the fish- 
cultural operations of the bureau and of all the States will be 
seriously handicapped and placed in such a position in the mind 
of the public as to greatly impair its usefulness. 

The bureau has been giving to the subject all the attention 
which the resources and facilities permit, but it is fully realized 
that the conditions already disclosed demand a special laboratory 
and staff for the determination of the cause and prevention of this 
most serious malady. 

If Congress will promptly authorize Uie construction of the 
necessary laboratory, at an estimated cost of $50,000, to be Iccated 
on an advantageous site to be selected later, and provide for its 
proper personnel and maintenance, there is every reason to believe 
that our fish-cultural work will s<^K>n be reliev^ed of this great im- 
pediment, and coincidentally there will l>e acquired information 
that will be invaluable in the elucidation of the cancer proiblem as 
related to human beings. 

This work can, of course, be properly conducted only in this 
bureau, and I would suggest that your message should specify that 
the proposed appropriation be made for this bureau, under which 
conditions we are assured of the continuation of the joint investi- 
gation already referred to with the IN'ew York State Cancer Lab- 
oratory, which is the only institution that possesses several years' 
experience with this particular phase of the cancer problem. 

Very respectfully, 

GEO. M. BOWERS, 

Commi^siotier 
12 



354 State Depabtment of Health 

[^Extract from the report of the Commissioner of Fisheries to the 
/Secretary of Commerce and Labor for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1^09.] 

Study of Fish Diseases 

The bureau has continued to give attention to the diseases to 
which fish, particularly when under domestication, are liable, and 
during the past year has devoted special consideration to the oc- 
currence of cancers and other tumorous growths. Tumors in fish 
have been known for many years, and the bureau has from time 
to time collected specimens of various kinds of tumors from dif- 
ferent species of fish. Owing to the activity that has characterized 
the investigation of cancer during the past ten years, cancer in 
the lower animals, and in fact in all the vertebrates, becomes a 
subject of great interest. 

Certain types of cancer appear to be more frequent than others 
in domesticated fish ; and cancer of the thyroid gland has been ob- 
served at various time in trout and salmon at government and 
other hatcheries. Of late the disease seems to be on the increase, 
and the bureau has undertaken a thorough and systematic investi- 
gation of the entire subject of cancer in fish, and to this end has 
availed itself of the services of the director of the New York 
State Cancer Laboratory, who will pursue his studies in conjunc- 
tion with the regular work of that institution. The Forest, Fish, 
and Game Commission of the State of New York also will co- 
operate in this work. 

The inquiries already made have shown that the subject is very 
important and will require thorough study covering a considerable 
period of time. Careful investigation has been made in two 
localities where the disease is so prevalent as to constitute an epi- 
demic; and the work will be extended so as to include a systematic 
examination of wild fish in open waters as well as the young and 
adult fish in government, state, and private hatcheries. At Buf- 
falo, N. Y., where it is proposed to conduct experiments on fishes, 
arrangements have been made for the installation of two aquaria 
on the closed-circulation plan, with full provision for refrigeration 
and aeration of the water. The bureau is fully alive to the far- 
reaching importance of this investigation, and will devote every 



Keport of tue Cancer Laboratory 355 

energy and facility at its disposal for the prompt and thorough 
elucidation of the problems of the cause and prevention of this 
most serious malady. 



[^Memorandum given to the President by Dr, U. R, Gaylord, 
Director of the New York State Cancer Ldbomtory.'] 

One woman out of every eight, beyond the age of 35, dies of 
cancer, and one man out of every eleven. 

This terrible disease has increased of late years in all civilized 
countries. In the United States from 9 deaths per 100,000 of 
population in 1850 it had risen in 1900 to 43 deaths per 100,000. 

In the registration area of this country in 1906 it was 70 per 
100,000. This astonishing increase has raised the deaths from 
this cause so that now approximately half as many die of cancer 
as tuberculosis. 

The cause of cancer is not yet known, but investigations of the 
most promising character are being pressed under the inspiration 
of entirely new ideas, and in tliis work American scientists are 
taking a leading part. 

The most fruitful of these new lines of investigation has to do 
with experimentation on and the distribution of cancer in lower 
animals. 

Domestic animals of various sorts are subject to the disease. 

In the United States as well as continental countries cancer in 
man is most prevalent in the well wooded, well watered, and 
mountainous regions or in poorly drained areas with alluvial soil. 

These facts have attracted the attention of scientists to the pos- 
sible prevalence of cancer in fish. 

We now know that fish are subject to various types of cancer, 
certain varieties being subject to epidemics of cancer which have 
destroyed thousands in a single summer. 

The disease has spread to such an extent that it already con- 
stitutes a menace to the propagation of this variety of fish. It is 
a further astonishing coincidence that the distribution of this 
variety of fish and the concentration of cancer in man in this 
country are almost identical. A map of one might well be taken 
as a map of the other. 



.*• 



. -*-*.». 



•• •*! 



■» • » 



' • 1 



1- V 



,.^.^l_- .- -—# - ^■'■»- • . — ^ . 



.- ■ ' : minjt rt- rile 



'-*■* ui .: • 









T"^ "IT 

*lunie -7.11:" r< >. 'A I jr < . 



M -. . - -• 






* * > 



\ . 



1 • , 



a 



r-i 



\ * 1 , ' ' • ~ J I • 



-* I 



1 . 11, • t 



I '■ t 






w- 






-Li .i - 



» » • '' 



- ' • ' .** !ai»»»nirory. 
- . v. Tie Pr^f^i'tt^nt 

-* . -. :• a 'f J. aum*^ 

• * L 

lit K 'US** -if Kep" 



Rkpokt of thk (^\Nri:u Laboratoky ^^)7 

on the calendar at the end of the session just closed, it failed to 
pass. For this reason the expected aid to fish culture by the 
establishment of a government laboratory is, for the time being, 
postponed and the State of New York will have to meet this 
serious problem in some suitable way. A conference with the 
Commissioner of Forest, Fish and Game will be held shortly for 
the purpose of determining how facilities for the continuation of 
this work may be secured at one of our State hatcheries and means 
found for the elimination of this important menace to fish culture. 
Geographical Study of Goiter and Cancer in Man. There is 

reason to believe that goiter in human beings is increasingly 
prevalent in this country. With the knowledge we now have of 
the distribution of the disease in fish and the evidence indicating 
that it is an infectious disease transmitted by the water, at least 
90 far as the fish are concerned, it becomes a matter of great im- 
portance to determine the distribution of goiter in the State of 
New York. The later phase of this disease in fish is cancer of the 
thyroid gland. The intimate relationship between goiter and can- 
cer of the thyroid in man is well known. No less an authority on 
this subject than Professor Kocher told me in October last, on the 
occasion of the International Cancer Congress in Paris, that he 
had never known a case of cancer of the thyroid which had not 
begun as goiter. There is also a geographical relationship be- 
tween the distribution of goiter in man and cancer in man. 
Gherard has shown that the geographical distribution of goiter 
and the distribution of cancer in Switzerland are almost identical. 
There is furthermore a rapidly increasing literature indicating a 
relationship between water and cancer. In this connection the 
distribution of cancer in the United States at the time of the 
census of 1900 shows that cancer is most prevalent in the moim- 
tainous, well wooded and well watered regions of the United 
States. It is very desirable that the geographical distribution of 
cancer in the State of New York at the present time should be 
definitely determined on a basis of new statistics, covering care- 
fully the question of etiologj^ and that such statistics properly 
collected should be compared with the distribution of goiter. 

International Cancer Congress. In 1908 following a proposal 
which originally emanated from this laboratory an international 



358 State Depabtment of Health 

congress for the consideration of cancer was held in Heidelberg 
and Frankfort, on the occasion of the opening of the cancer lab- 
oratory and hospital directed by Professor Czerny. The circum- 
stances leading to the orgajiization of this congress were such that 
America was not represented by any of its qualified investigators. 
At that time there was formed an international society for the in- 
vestigation of cancer. The American Association for the Investi- 
gation of Cancer was organized in the spring of 1908 and became 
a component part of this society in 1909 and has been co-operatinj? 
with the international society since that time. The second Inter- 
national Cancer Congress was held in Paris from the first to the 
fourth of October, 1910, under the patronage of the President of 
the French Eepublic. The American Association for Cancer 
Research sent oflScial delegates to this convention and the director 
of this laboratory was designated as one of these del^ates ; there- 
fore, as the official representative of the State* laboratory and as 
an accredited delegate of the American Association for Cancer 
Research, he attended the congress. The international commit- 
tee in forming the official program for the congress honored this 
institution by naming the director in company with Professor 
von Dungern of the Heidelberg Institute, to present to the con- 
gress the subject of immunity to cancer. The congress was opened 
in the Ecole de Medicine on the first of October by the minister 
of education, who, in his address, referred in a complimentary 
way to the early and important work of the American investiga- 
tors of cancer. The sessions of the congress continued on the 
third, fourth and fifth of October. The delegates were received 
officially by the mayor and heads of departments of the city of 
Paris in the Hotel de Ville on October fourth and were officially 
entertained on the fifth by the Academy of France at Chantilly. 
There were over 300 registered attendants at the congress and 
thirty-eight countries were officially represented. At least 100 of 
the registered scientists were specially engaged in cancer research 
and perhaps fifty of them exclusively engaged in the investigation 
of cancer. The United States sent five accredited delegates. The 
underlying note of the congress appeared to us to be the increased 
importance attributed by many investigators to the parasitic 
theory of cancer. The principal topics of discussion were the 
phenomera of immunity and there were reported to the congress 



Repoet of the Cancer Laboeatory 359 

several cases of cure by vaccination. This laboratory was able to 
report the apparent euro of a case of sarcoma in a boy by this 
method. Professor Bertrand of Antwerp showed a case which 
had been free from evidence of cancer for over a year following 
the disappearance of cancer of the breast after treatment by this 
method, and two cases of inoperable sarcoma were reported from 
Denmark by Rovsing and Madsen. We believe that the principle 
on which this method of vaccination is based was first scientifically 
demonstrated in animals in 1907 in this la'boratory, which ex- 
periments have been referred to in the annual reports of 1908 and 

1909. The advance which we were ourselves able to report to 
the congress related to the observation first reported in May, 

1910, before the American Association for Cancer Research in 
Washington, that vaccines prepared from transplantable cancers 
in animals produced the same reactions and apparently served 
the same purpose in the vaccination of human beings as vaccines 
prepared from human growths. It is impossible to determine 
what the possibilities of this method may be. It seems best ap- 
plicable to cases in the early stages of the disease and has only 
given results in selected and favorable cases. The method is cer- 
tainly not applicable in its present form to the later stages of the 
disease. Tip to the present time we have been obliged to work 
with vaccines made from tumor growths which are composed 
largely of the tissue of the animal or the individual from which 
the tumors are derived. It is our belief that in the future a 
method of separating the essential factor from these masses of 
tissue may be found, in which case the outlook for vaccination as 
a means of treating cancer will be greatly improved. 

Parasitic Theory of Cancer. Since 1901 this laboratory has 
constantly supported the parasitic theory of cancer. This theory 
has dominated the research of the laboratory and has been the 
principal factor in suggesting to us lines of experiment which 
have proven fruitful. It was the belief in this theory which, 
in 1904, led to the discovery of immunity in cancer, now recog- 
nized as having been first demonstrated in this institute. Efforts 
to test the parasitic theory of cancer by a crucial experiment have 
been frequently attempted. In an article on The Analogy he- 
twcen Smallpox and Cancer in which a comparison was drawn 



360 State Department of Health 

between certain features of these diseases, it was pointed out that 
in smallpox, vaccine and sheep-pox we had a filterable agent^ 
and that one point in which tiie comparison up to that time, 
failed, was in the attempts to secure a filterable agent in cancer, 
but it was pointed out that if such experiments could succeed, we 
had almost a complete case for cancer as a parasitic disease. At- 
tempts to accomplish the separation from the cancer cell of an 
agent capable of producing cancer have been made from time to 
time in many laboratories. It is now evident, in the light of 
recent developments that some of these attempts have been partly 
successful, but were not so recognized. Within the last few 
months Dr. Peyton Kous of the Rockefeller Institute, in working 
with a transplantable sarcoma (cancer) in the chicken, repeated 
these filtration experiments with success. On transferring his 
operations to a room heated to body temperature, he succeeded 
in passing the agent through a so-called germ proof filter and 
with the filtrate thus obtained, he obtained tumors in four out of 
ten inoculations. This evidence when extended to other forms of 
transplantable laboratory cancers will complete the basis of rea- 
soning on which we originally took our stand in favor of the 
parasitic theory of cancer, and again endow with significance 
the original experiments reported from this laboratory in 1901, in 
which in two cases, the peritoneal fluid from human cancer cases 
produced tumors in animals after injection into the circulation 
of these animals. It is interesting to note that at that time we 
took precautions to keep the fluid at body temperature and handled 
it by the identical method which has yielded these results which 
Dr. Rous has recently reported. It is needless to point out that 
the establishment of the parasitic theory of cancer can only endow 
us with the greatest feeling of optimism as to the future of cancer 
research. If cancer is an infectious disease then it is preventable 
and curable and it now behooves us to perfect experiments to 
determine the exact nature of the agent, and then continue the 
investigations into the nature of the immunity developed in can- 
cer and the developments of the recent suggestive results which 
indicate the possible value of the principle of vaccination. 

One characteristic of the International Congress was the pre- 
vailing feeling of optimism; it was the Mief of almost every 



Report of the Cancer Laboratory e*]61 

one tJiat caucer research has now advanced to the point where we 
shall shortly find means of applying to human iKungs the modern 
fact^ wo have determined hy pi-olongcd and careful experimenta- 
tion with animals. 

Value of Animal Experimentation. Xo better evidence of the 
value of experimentation upon animals can be found than in the 
modern cancer research. Up to 1900 when experimentation with 
cancer animals was generally begim, cancer research had not pro- 
gressed appreciably in the preceding twenty-five years and none 
of the most vital facts relating to the possibilities of cure for 
cancer as they now appear were known to medical scienca These 
experiments have been carried out without the infliction of cruel- 
ties or severe pain of any sort on the animals, and we are to-day 
able to begin the application of facts thus obtained to human 
beings, with knowledge and some certainty of the results to be 
obtained; whereas if we had continued the older methods we 
should have had to conduct prolonged and probably fruitless ex- 
perimentation upon human beings. If those who advocate the 
restriction of vivisection could only know the agony of mind 
and the suffering of those condemned to death through this terri- 
ble disease, they would better appreciate the services to humanity 
now being accomplished through the sacrifice of a few thousand 
rats and mice. For some time past in this laboratory we have 
been able to successfully treat animals afflicted with cancer, 
whereas we are only now prepared to apply these principles to 
human beings. 

Application of New Principles to Treatment of Human Beings. 

It is because these more recent methods are based upon a scien- 
tific foundation that the favorable results obtained, although very 
meager, are of so much significance. The time has come when 
all research laboratories must begin the application of these facts 
to human beings and it is for this reason that those institutes 
which are equipped with hospital facilities will shortly take the 
lead in cancer research, whereas those which are not equipped 
with such facilities under their immediate direction are now seek- 
ing a means of accomplishing this end. At a meeting held in 
Boston in April, 1910, for the purpose of raising funds for a 
hospital for incurable cases of cancer, to be under the management 



362 State Department of Health 

of the Harvard Cancer Commission, ex-President Eliot of Har- 
vard University spoke in the following words : " I suppoee we all 
know that cancer is the most horrible disease which afflicts 
humanity. 

" Now, the terrible nature of the disease being clearly in our 
minds, what is there to encourage us to hope that science is going 
to find a remedy? The basis of hope is the wonderful series 
of conquests over formidable disease which has been achieved 
during the nineteenth century and the few years of the twentieth. 
The conquest of diseases by the progress of medical science and 
research is one of the most extraordinary phenomena of the nine- 
teenth century. When we look back to .Tenner's discovery, vac- 
cination against smallpox, we see the starting point of a wonder- 
ful series of rapid and effectual discoveries in preventive and 
curative medicine, preventing the spread of formidable diseases, 
and curing formidable diseases. That is the blessed encourage- 
ment we feel to expect the successful discovery of means of pre- 
vention and of cure for cancer. Now that hope is strong, firm, 
assured. Without such hope we should hardly 'be justified in 
urging the free expenditure of money in the pursuits of defense 
against cancer. With that hope we are fully justified in urging 
a liberal expenditure in the continuous search for the means of 
preventing and curing this formidable disease." 

Cancer Hospital. The New York State Cancer Laboratory 
has now reached a point where the work of the last thirteen years 
justifies the erection of a hospital to accommodate twenty-five or 
thirty patients, for the study of cancer in human beings and the 
development of methods of treatment. This laboratory was begun 
by a State appropriation made in 1898. In 1901 the work which 
had up to that time been accommodated in two or three rooms of 
the medical school building of the University of Buffalo, through 
the munificence of Mrs. William H. Gratwick was provided with 
the present laboratory building, erected upon a site provided 
with funds subscribed by public spirited citizens of Buffalo. 
Through this generous act of Mrs. Gratwick the State for ten 
years has occupied for the purposes of this work a perfectly ap- 
pointed building. The influence upon the work and the stimulus 
which this high minded act of Mrs. Gratwick's has been to the 



Report of the Canceb Labobatoby 363 

workers of the institution cannot bo overestimated. It is there- 
fore a pleasfire to announce tnat Mts. (iratwick is now prepared, 
if cenain conditions are lultilled by tlie b-tate, to deed tnis nand- 
sonie building to tne tttate. It is lurthermore proposed, in order 
that a suitaDle hospital may be erected immediately adjacent to 
the laboratory, to purchase with funds to be subscribed by iJulfalo 
friends of tne laboratory an extensive site adjoining on the west 
whicli, with the present property will likewise be deeded to the 
State. In order to accomplisli this purpose a bill has been intro- 
duced in the JSenate and Assembly, entitled '*An act to amend 
the public health law, in relation to the establishment of a State 
institute for the study of malignant disease at Buffalo, providing 
for its management and control, and making an appropriation 
therefor." The time has come when this laboratory, if it is to 
fulhll its final purpose to the people of the State of New York, 
should be given a more definite form. Therefore, this bill pro- 
vides that the new hospital to be erected by the State and the 
Gratwick Laboratory together, shall be known as the State In- 
stitute for the Study of Malignant Disease, under the manage- 
ment of a board of trustees. The trustees named in the bill are 
Roswell Park, M. D., Buffalo; John G. Milburn, New York; 
William H. Gratwick, Buffalo; Frederick C. Stevens, Attica; 
Charles S. Fairchild, New York; Charles Gary, M. D., Buffalo. 
The commissioner of health, is ex officio a member of this board of 
trustees. It is fair to remind the Legislature that this laboratory 
is the first research institution in the world established for the 
investigation of cancer; that since the inauguration of this work 
by the State, nearly all the prominent countries have established 
like institutions modeled after it. The institute under Professor 
Czemy in Heidelberg opened in 1908 has enjoyed from the first 
hospital and laboratory facilities combined. The Imperial Can- 
cer Institute at the Charite Hospital likewise has hospital and 
laboratory facilities. The cancer commissioner of Harvard Uni- 
versity has just made provision for the erection of a hospital of 
about the size contemplated for this institute, and this laboratory 
now lags behind these institutes, although it was the first in the 
field and has contributed largely to the advance of cancer re- 
search. The property which it is now proposed to deed to the 



364 State Dep.vbtment of Health 

State represents an actual investment of not less than $85,000, 
is centrally located within a block and a half of tl^e University 
of Buffalo Medical School. Such a site in the city of New York 
would cost many times this sum. The citizens of Buffalo are there- 
fore providing the State with an institution complete in every 
respect except for a hospital building, which it is now asked that 
the State shall provide. 

International Hygiene Exposition 

In 1911 there will be held in Dresden, Germany, an Interna- 
tional Hygiene Exposition under the patronage of the King of 
Saxony. An honorary committee of great German statesmen and 
scientists has been formed and invitations have been issued to 
all the civilized countries. Under the grouping of each disease, 
special international committees have been designated and I have 
the honor to state that the director of this laboratory has been 
named by the general committee of the exposition as a member of 
the group committee for the subject of cancer and also as a mem- 
ber of the general committee of the United States. This lab- 
oratory is preparing to exhibit photographs illustrating the re- 
sults of our work. It is of special interest to note the list of sub- 
jects designated in the prospectus of the congress for exhibition 
under the subject of cancer. 

Scheme for Exhibition on Cancer Diseases 

Occurrence in men, animals and plants. 

Endemic, local prevalence — cancer houses — cancer fami- 
lies. 
Origin of cancer diseases. 

Heredity. 

Infection theory — degeneration theory. 

Cancer in relation to occupation (chimney sweeps, paraffine, 
aniline, arsenic, rontgen rays, radium). 

Connection between cancer in man and cancer in plants and 
animals. 

Influence of nutrition and metabolic diseases on the origin of 
cancer. 

Significance of syphilis for cancer. 

Relation of cancer to injuries by accident. 



Ebpobt of the Cancer Laboratory 365 

Campaign against cancer diseases. 

Protective measures against the further dissemination of 

cancer (obligatory notification? Disinfection?) 
Success of therapy. Operation statistics. Advantages of 

early operation. 
Utility of other methods of treatment. 
Disposal of incurables. 
Mortality statistics; increase of cancer. — The mortality from 
cancer and tuberculosis in the State of New York for the years 
1909 and 1910 was as follows: 

1909 1910 IncreMe 

Cancer 7,034 7,505 471 

Tuberculosis 13,948 . 14,047 99 

This is an increase in cancer over the previous year of 471 
and in tuberculosis of ninety-nine. These figures show that in 
spite of the increasing population tuberculosis is practically sta- 
tionary while cancer has notably increased. 

Bulletin eight of the mortality statistics of the United States 
census bureau which covers eighteen r^istration States and fifty- 
four cities in the nonregistration area, with an estimated popu- 
lation of 44,877,893 which is approximately 53 per cent of the 
population of the United States in 1909, is now available. The 
real population is found by the census just completed to be 
91,500,000 and from this it appears that the registration area 
represents about half the population. Therefore these figures 
already given may be safely doubled to obtain an estimate of the 
cases of tuberculosis and cancer in the United States at the time 
of the last census 1909. This gives us tuberculosis, 163,000; 
cancer, 75,000. 

The estimated population of the Stat« of New York is 9,000,000 
and the deaths in 1909 were 7,034. This indicates that the deaths 
from cancer are a little more frequent in the State of New York 
than the average indicated by the estimated statistics for the 
entire country. On the basis of 75,000 deatlis from cancer for 
the year 1909 estimated from the above bulletin, it is safe to 
assume that there are not less than 200,000 sufferers from cancer 
in the United States and on the same basis not less than 20,000 



366 State Depabtmbnt of Health 

cases in the State of New York. The relative increase of cancer 
pointed out in our last annual report therefore continues and 
cancer is steadily becoming a greater and graver problem. The 
purpose of this institute is to determine the nature of cancer and 
to find means for its prevention. It represents the modem con- 
ception of preventive medicine and it is hoped that by the State 
continuing to pursue the policy already inaugurated, the increas- 
ing demands upon the State to support the indigent sick may 
never include this disease. With the present promising outlook 
for the establishment of the parasitic theory of cancer, we may 
confidently expect that this enormous increase in cancer, when 
we are ahle to attack it with enlightened knowledge as to the 
cause, may be ultimately checked. 

Financial statement. — The statement of the expenditures of the 
laboratory for the past year is as follows : 

Sept. 30, 1909 — Balance $230 98 

1910 — Stock and material 2,241 57 

Equipment 3,316 85 

Expense 4,445 57 

Salaries 11,199 64 

Balance 5,565 39 



$27,000 00 



Sept. 30, 1909 —Appropriation $18,000 00 

July 1. 1910— Supply bill 9,000 00 



$27,000 00 



The balance shown on September 30th is due to tho reduced 
activities of the summer months. The increased activities and 
expenses in the winter months will absorb this sum during the 
current year. 

It has been possible to increase the activities of the laboratory 
during the past year and with our increasing responsibilities and 
opportunities for work, the staflF of the institution has been some- 



Eepoet of the Cancer Laboratory 367 

what enlarged. Dr. Burton T. Simpson has been added to the 
staflf as clinical pathologist. Dr. F. C. Busch is now connected 
with the laboratory as temporary assistant and there have been 
several other additions to the staff, so that the laboratory now em- 
ploys regularly seventeen people. Mr. Millard C. Marsh of the 
Bureau of Fisheries in Washington and an assistant, A. B. 
Hardie, have been stationed at the laboratory by the government 
during the past year. 

The appropriation for the coming year should be not less than 
that of the present year, $3'2,000, and if the State begins the 
erection of the much-needed hospital, an item of $10,000 should 
be placed in the supply bill to enable us to open the hospital when 
completed and maintain it until the meeting of the next Legis- 
lature when an appropriation for its maintenance should be pro- 
vided. 

The ultimate activities of this institution on a basis to enable 
it to successfully cope with the important problem of cancer will 
ultimately require from the State about three dollars per annum 
for every case of cancer in the State of New York. It may well 
appear that the expending of a sum so small in the fight against 
a disease so important and so disastrous is but a small demand 
upon the finances of the State in the interest of the public welfare. 

Very truly yours, 

HARVEY R. GAYLORD, M. D., 

Director 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 



[369] 



CONTENTS 



Report of Chief Engmeer: 

I. Sewerage and sewage disposal: page 

(a) Examination and approval of plans for sewerage and sewage disposal: 

Auburn 381 

Auburn (State Prison) 382 

Binghamton 385 

Blauvelt (State Rifle Range) 385 

Bronxville 386 

BronxviUe and Tuckahoe 388 

Chappaqua (Convalescent's Home) 389 

Clarence (Buffalo Automobile Club) 391 

Clifton Springs (Clifton Springs Sanitarium) 394 

Comstock (Great Meadow Prteon) 395 

Dannemora (Clinton Prison) 397 

Depew 398 

Elka Park (town of Hunter) 398 

Fulton 401 

Fultonville 407 

Hastings-on-Hudson 408 

Hempstead 414 

lUon 420 

Johnstown 422 

Lestershire 427 

Letchworth Village 429 

Long Beach 431 

Medina 433 

Monroe County Tuberculosis Hospital 433 

Monticello 434 

New Rochelle 435 

North Tonawanda 438 

Ogdensburg 440 

Oneonta 442 

Oswego 443 

Pelham 447 

Pelham (Town) 449 

Poughkeepsie 451 

Rochester 452 

Rockaway Beach 468 

Rome 471 

Sonyea (Craig Colony for Epileptics) 473 

Spring Valley (Salvation Army Orphanage) 474 

Stamford 476 

Ticonderoga 476 

Tuckahoe 477 

Utica : 477 

Watertown 479 

Westfield 479 

Yorkville 483 

Individual Permits 487 

(b) General investigations relating to sewerage and sewage disposal: 

Akron 488 

Central Islip (State Hospital) 490 

Cheektowaga 498 

ComwaU-on-Hudson 499 

East Syracuse 500 

Geneva 501 

[371] 



372 Contents 

I. Sewerafce and sewage disposal — Continued: 

(b) General inveetigationB relating to sewerage, etc. — Continued: paok 

Hamburg 501 

Hastings-on-Hudson 601 

Long Beach 602 

MartviUe 502 

Morristown 602 

New PaltB 503 

Nyack 604 

Phelps 506 

Port Jefferson 506 

Ravena 606 

Ray Brook 606 

Riverhead 607 

Rome 608 

Theresa 608 

Victor 610 

Warwick 610 

Yonkers 612 

Yorktown Heights 614 

List of other investigations 516 

II. Protection of public water supplies: 

(a) General examination of public water supplies: 

Blauvelt (State Rifle Range) 519 

Cold Spring 521 

Coming 623 

Delhi 626 

Dobbs Ferry 526 

Letchworth Village 527 

Monticello 627 

Niagara FaUs 628 

Ogdensburg 533 

Skeineateles (town) 533 

Waterloo 535 

(b) Preparation of rules for the protection of public water supplies: 

Haverstraw Water Supply Company 541 

Syracuse Suburban Water Company 545 

(c) Inspections of violations of rules for the protection of public water 

supplies: 

Auburn 549 

Kingston 549 

Mt. Vernon 549 

New Rochelle 549 

New York City 549 

Saugerties 549 

Utica 549 

Yonkers 549 

(d) Investigation of sanitary conditions on watersheds protected by rules 550 

(e) Special investigation of public water supplies: 

East Worcester 553 

Fonda 556 

Glens FaUs 558 

Kingston 560 

Lyons '. 566 

North Tarry town (Consolidated Water Co. of Suburban New York) 569 

Oxford (Woman's Relief Corps Home) 572 

Round Lake 574 

Rouses Point 576 

Seneca Falls 581 

Sonyea (Craig Colony for Epileptics) 584 

Whitehall 586 



OONTENTS 373 

III. Investigation of outbreaks of typhoid fever: page 

Hobart 593 

Long Lake and Webb (towns) 600 

Moravia 603 

Quarryville (town of Saugerties) 609 

Rouses Point 612 

Syracuse 612 

Syracuse (State Institution for Feeble-Minded Children) 612 

Willard State Hospital 6I3 

Yonkers 61 6 

IV. Investigation of complaints relating to stream i)ollution: 

Allegheny River 628 

Augur Lake (town of Chesterfield) 631 

Brant Lake (town of Horicon) 633 

Bronx River 635 

Cortland 638 

Esperance 640 

Harriman 640 

Oneonta 642 

Piermont 645 

List of other cases of stream pollution 646 

V. Investigation of public nuisances not arising from stream pollution: 

Greenport 649 

IsUp 650 

Nidcayuna 651 

North Salem 652 

Port Chester 654 

Vestal 655 

Watervliet 656 

list of other cases of nuisances 658 

VI« Investigations ordered by the Governor: 

Bufifalo (Bird Idand pier sewer) 671 

Syracuse (typhoid fever) 662 

VII. Inspection of rendering plants: 

Barren Island 675 

Cheektowaga 676 

Rochester Tallow Company 678 

VIII. Special investigations: 

(a) Investigation of sanitary conditions of cities and villages 681 

(b) Investigation of illegal sewer construction 682 

(c) Sanitary inspection of summer resorts 684 

(d) Investigation of sanitary conditions of State institutions: 

West Haverstraw (New York State Hospital for the Care of 
Crippled and Deformed Children) 688 

(e) Sanitary inspection of labor camps 694 

IX. Engineering Division exhibit at the State Fair 697 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER 

Eugene H. Porter, M.D., St<ite Commissioner of Health, Albany, 
N. Y.: 

Dear Sir: — I have the honor to submit herewith the report of 
the work of the Engineering Division for the year 1910. 

Experience during the past five years with methods which have 
been gradually developed from year to year to meet the exacting 
requirements of securing eflFective results with a limited organiza- 
tion indicates in the character and amount of work accomplished 
during 1910 that not only have these methods been carefully 
gauged with respect to these requirements but that no material 
changes are desirable with our present limitation as to resources. 

The routine work of the division for 1910 has shown the usual 
yearly increment in volume, and as has been pointed out on former 
occasions this increase can only be accomplished in the future with 
the present organization by a curtailment, if not a sacrifice, of 
some of our special investigation work, much of which previous 
experience has demonstrated is essential in forming a resource or 
a working capital (as it were) for many lines of regular current 
work required under the Public Health Law. Notwithstanding 
the pressure of work during the past year, however, especially in 
the field of special investigations, and the fact that it has been 
necessary to abandon certain investigations that have been carried 
on for a number of years, it has been possible to concentrate the 
eflforts of the division upon certain other special investigations 
which our experience has proved to be of considerable importance 
and productive of marked results in a practical way in the con- 
servation of the public health of the State. 

I refer more particularly to the importance and necessity of 
concentrating more attention on the conservation of water supplies 
in the future than has been done in the past. Not that we should 
in any way relax our efforts in restricting stream pollution, for 
this restriction does, and always must, bear an intimate relation, 
and in many cases be a prerequisite, to the protection of water 
supplies. That it is not the sole prerequisite, however, nor in 

[375] 



376 State Department of Health 

many cases a deciding nor even a relatively important one con- 
cerning public health we are rapidly coming to learn; and if we 
as a Department are to stand ready to accomplish practical re- 
sults we must accept promptly the teachings of experience and 
take action in accordance with them. In fact the lesson seems to 
force itself upon us with eueh year's experience under existing 
conditions in this State that public health can be more effectually 
conserved through an improvement in sanitary conditions of 
streams used for water supplies than through the indiscriminate 
restriction against pollution of streams not so used. 

So important is this principle and far reaching in its effect upon 
public health and the future work of this division, that it de- 
serves more than passing notice. We cannot point out too strongly 
that it is in the contaminated water we drink and not that which 
flows through our community, even though at times it creates a 
nuisance from odors, so long as it is not used for potable purposes 
without purification, that the danger of contracting typhoid fever 
and other communicable diseases lies; and conversely if in the 
future we focus our attention on the conservation of our smaller 
streams used largely for potable purposes without purification, 
and see to it that our other, and, as happens, more numerous and 
larger streams, which ordinarily cannot safely be used for water 
supplies without purification, are kept in such reasonable degree 
of purity as will prevent any local nuisances and insure at all 
times a sufficient degree of purity as will make it safe after purifi- 
cation, not only will there be a more general conservation of public 
health but also of public wealth. In fact the principle of economy 
can be no more disregarded in the field of sanitation than in other 
fields of engineering; and although we can never sanction the 
popular tendency ofttimes observed of judging public health im- 
provements by the standard of money value only, our obvious duty 
is to see that what money is expended for health work is so con- 
served and directed along economical lines as will result in the 
greatest saving of human life. 

From a strictly engineering standpoint the year 1910 has been 
marked by the more general introduction of two comparatively 
new principles and methods of water purification and sewage dis- 
posal. One is an application of the principle of disinfection or 



Report of the Chief Engineek 1577 

sterilization of water by the use of hypochlorite of lime ; the other 
is the clarification of sewage by the application of the combined 
principle of sedimentation and prolonged septic action, accom- 
plished in tanks of special design. 

Although the sterilization of water by application of various 
chemicals is nothing new in principle its application on a practical 
and economic scale is, however, of comparatively recent date ; and 
during 1910 the introduction of sterilizing plants in conjunction 
with other methods of purification or independently has been quite 
marked through the State. The views of the Department have 
been frequently asked in regard to it and it might be well to state 
now that whereas its success has been marked in many cases and 
it is destined to play an important part in the future in connec- 
tion with water purification, especially as a finishing process to 
sand filtration, there is yet much to learn in regard to its general 
adaptability to waters of varying qualities. With our present 
limited knowledge and experience, therefore, the Department can- 
not at this time recommend its general and unrestricted applica- 
tion as an independent process, or as a substitute to well tried, 
eflScient methods of sand filtration except in cases of emergency or 
for temporary use pending the construction of more reliable 
methods. It is expected, however, that these views may be modi- 
fied in the future as knowledge and experience is joined with this 
method of purification. 

In r^ard to the introduction of the new type of sewage tank 
referred to above for the clarification of sewage it may be said 
that although this so-called *' Imhoff Tank '^ has been used with 
marked success in the Emscher District in Germany it is prac- 
tically a new device in this country ; and that although it has not 
up to the present time been applied on a practical scale except in 
experimental plants it has, however, been included in a number of 
sewage disposal designs presented to and approved by the Depart- 
ment This tank is designed not only to remove efficiently the 
suspended matters in the sewage but to so control and store the 
sludge formed that it may be removed and disposed of in a con- 
venient and innocuous manner; and if the results soon to be 
tried out in practice in this State prove as satisfactory as they 
have Iwen in Germany whore, however, the sewage is of a some- 



378 State Depabtment of Health 

what different character, these tanks may prove of considerable 
value to many municipalities from not only a sanitary but an 
economical standpoint. 

The personnel of the permanent staff of the Engineering 
Division during 1910 has remained the same as during the pre- 
vious year with one exception — the resignation of Mr. Chas. F. 
Breitzke, Assistant Engineer, to accept a position with the board 
of water supply of New York city, and the appointment in his 
place of Mr. A. 0. True of New York city, who at the time was 
in the employ of the consulting engineering firm of Hering & 
Fuller. As has been the custom in previous years, special engi- 
neering inspectors were employed during the summer months; 
fcur during the months of June to September, in connection with 
the special investigation of the sanitary condition of summer 
resorts; and five in the month of September in connection with 
the special investigation of the sanitary conditions of certain 
watersheds of the State used for public water supplies and pro- 
tected by special rules and regulations enacted by the State 
Department of Health. 

In the subject matter of this report, as well as in the general 
execution and manner of filing of correspondence and records of 
the entire work of the Division, substantially the same classifica- 
tion of subjects has been adopted as in previous years and as 
presented in my former annual reports to you. This classifica- 
tion will not be rejx^ated here since it has been adopted in the 
arrangement of the index of this report and is presented in full 
in this index. 

EespectfuUy submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



SEWERAGE AND SEWAGE DISPOSAL 



1370] 



378 State Depabtment of Health 

what different character, these tanks may prove of considerable 
value to many municipalities from not only a sanitary but an 
economical standpoint. 

The personnel of the permanent staff of the Engineering 
Division during 1910 has remained the same as during the pre- 
vious year with one exception — the resignation of Mr. Chas. F. 
Breitzke, Assistant Engineer, to accept a position with the board 
of water supply of New York city, and the appointment in his 
place of Mr. A. 0. True of New York city, who at the time was 
in the employ of the consulting engineering firm of Hering & 
Fuller. As has been the custom in previous years, special engi- 
neering inspectors were employed during the summer months; 
four during the months of June to September, in connection with 
the special investigation of the sanitary condition of summer 
resorts; and five in the month of September in connection with 
the special investigation of the sanitary conditions of certain 
watersheds of the State used for public water supplies and pro- 
tected by special rules and regulations enacted by the State 
Department of Health. 

In the subject matter of this report, as Avell as in the general 
execution and manner of filing of correspondence and records of 
the entire work of the Division, substantially the same classifica- 
tion of subjects has been adopted as in previous years and as 
presented in my former annual reports to you. This classifica- 
tion will not be repeated here since it has been adopted in the 
arrangement of the index of this report and is presented in full 
in this index. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



SEWERAGE AND SEWAGE DISPOSAL 



[379] 



Examination and Approval of Plans for Sewerage and 

Sewage Disposal 

If the streams of this JState used as sources of water supplies 
are to be protected against the dangers of sewage contamination, 
and if the remaining ones are to be maintained in a satisfactory 
degree of cleanliness, it is essential that some adequate control 
over the discharge of sewage into these waters be vested in the 
central authority of the State, having jurisdiction broader than 
those possessed by local authorities which if left to decide these 
questions might be swayed by local interest or prejudice. Such 
conitrol is in part granted the State Commissioner of Health under 
certain sections of the Public Health Law, which provide that 
all plans for systems of sew^erage and sewage disposal of munici- 
palities must first be submitted to and approved by him, before 
they may be constructed or put in operation ; and that in all such 
cases the Commissioner shall stipulate the conditions under which 
sewage and wastes from these factories or sewer systems may l)e 
discharged. 

Under these sections of the Public Health Law, which have 
been in efFeot since 190'], the date of the passage of the act, there 
is required of the Engineering Division the larger part of its rou- 
tine work, comprising the examination of plans for original sys- 
tems of sewerage and sewage dispf)sal and of extensions or 
modifications thereof, and the preparation of permits containing 
the conditions as to degree and extent of purification required and 
to the location and manner of discharge of the effluent from the 
sewage disposal works. 

During 1910 plans for sewerage or sewage disposal works w^re 
examined, reported upon and approved in the cases of the follow- 
ing municipalities: 

AUBURN 

On April 4, 1910, application was made by the common council of the city 
of Auburn for the approval of plans for a proposed sanitary sewer extension 
in Boston avenue. These plans were approved on April 16, 1910, and a permit 
was issued, allowing the discharge of sewa^ into the Owasco lake outlet on 
condition that whenever required by the State Commissioner of Health com- 
plete plans satisfactory to this Department for the interception and treatment 
of the entire sanitary sewage of the city or any portion of such sewage, which 

[asi] 



382 State Depabtment of Health 

is not treated by sewage disposal plants now in operation or under construc- 
tion shall be prepared and submitted to this Department for approval; and 
that within the time limit stated in such requirement the construction of 
any or all works shown by said plans as may be specified shall be completed. 
On September 14, 1910, application was made by the common council for 
the approval of plans for a sanitary sewer extension in North Nelson street. 
These plans were approved on September 27, 1910, and a conditional permit, 
similar to that granted to the common council on April 16, 1910, was issued, 
allowing the discharge into the Owasco lake outlet of sewage to be collected by 
the proposed sewer. 



Albany, X. Y., April 15, 1910. 
EicjEXE II. PoBTEB, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N, Y,: 

Dear Sir: — I beg to submit the following report on the examination of 
plans for a proposed sanitary sewer extension in the city of Auburn, Cayuga 
county, submitted to this Department for approval on April 4, 1910, by the 
common council. 

The plans show that it is proposed to construct an eight-inch sewer in Bos- 
ton avenue, having a slope of 1.0 per cent. The sewer is to extend easterly 
from the intersection of Fulton street and Boston avenue for a distance of 
alwut 280 feet. 

This sewer is not within the sewer district in which the sewage disposal 
plant is beng constructed, namely, the first, sixth and tenth wards sewer dis- 
trict, but will discharge into the existing sewer in F\ilton street, which is 
tributary to the present outfall sewer discharging into the Owasco lake out- 
let near State street. Plans for the sewer in this section of Fulton street 
and that portion of the sewer connecting with the outfall sewer were approved 
by the Department on December 18, 1908. 

The plans now under consideration have been examined by the Engineering 
Division and it is found that -the proposed sewer will have sufficient slope to 
produce self-cleansing velocities if properly constructed, and since it will never 
be extended will be adequate as to capacity to meet the future requirements 
of this portion of Boston avenue. 

I, therefore, recommend that the plans be approved and a permit issued, 
allowing the discharge of sewage to be collected by the proposed sewer into 
the Owasco lake outlet near State street, on condition that whenever required 
by the State Commissioner of Health complete plans satisfactory to this De- 
partment for the interception and treatment of the entire sanitary sewage 
of the city or any portion of such sewage which is not cared for by the exist- 
ing sewage disposal plant or to be cared for by the sewage disposal in the 
first, sixth and tenth ward sewer district now under construction shall be 
prepared and submitted to this Department for approval; and that within 
the time stateil in such requirement the construction of any or all works 
shown by said plans as may be specified shall be completed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



AUBURN (State Prison) 

On October 6, 1910, plans were submitted to the Department for approval 
by the State Architect, which provided for intercepting sewers and pumping 
station to collect the sewage of the State prison at Auburn, and discharge 
into a section of the city sewer system tributary to the fourth, fifth, sixth 
and seventh wards sewajre disnosal plant. These plans were approved on 
October 19, 1910, on condition that no storm or surface water from grounds, 
roofs or other areas shall be admitted to the sanitary intercepting sewers or 
pump well. 



Sewerage and Sewage Disposal 383 



Albany, N. Y., October 14, 1910. 

Eugene II. Pokteb, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N, Y.: 

DcAB SiB: — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of 
plans for a proposed intercepting sewer and pumping station to be constructed 
for the purpose of collecting the sewage of the State prison at Auburn and 
discharging it into the city sewer system and sewage disposal plant. 

These plans were submitted to this Department for approval by the State 
Architect on October 6, 1910, together with a copy of the specifications and 
a short report stating briefly the oasis of design. 

The matter of sewage disposal for this institution has been considered by 
this Department from time to time for the past three years. In Deceniber, 
1907, Prof. H. K. Ogden, Special Assistant Engineer of the Department, made 
a report at your direction of the estimated cost of pumping the sewage of 
Auburn prison into the city sewer system and thence into one of the sewage 
disposal plants and of constructing and maintaining a separate sewage dis- 
posal plant and discharging the purified sewage into the Owasco outlet. These 
comparative estimates showed that the cost of disposing of the sewage by 
pumping into the city sewer system would be somewhat greater than the 
alternate plan of separate disposal. From a purely sanitary consideration, 
however, the former plans appear to be the more desirable and practicable 
owing to the limited space for a sewage disposal plant within the stockades 
of the prison where it would be necessary to locate such plant. 

According to the report of the State Architect, the maximum population to 
be cared for is 1,600 persons and the present average per capita rate of 
water consumption is 110 gallons per day, equivalent to a flow of 122 gallons 
per minute. It appears also that the men's prison is at present sewered on 
the combined plan and that the sewage and storm water is discharged into 
the Owasco outlet at five different, points. The women's prison is provided 
with storm water sewers. Practically all of the storm water in the men's 
prison which is collected and flows in gutters at present will be intercepted 
by a storm water sewer. It appears, therefo/e, that according to the report 
of the State Architect the only storm or surface water that would reach the 
proposed intercepting sanitary sewers in the present design would be that 
from a small grass plat at the eastern end of the grounds of the men's prison 
where a large amount of pavement and walk cutting would be necessary in 
order to collect a small amount of surface water. 

Since the sewage from the prison is to be treated in a sewage disposal 
plant that will be taxed almost to its full capacity by the additional contribu- 
tion of sanitary sewage from the prison it is essential that even this small 
amount of storm water be eliminated from the sanitary sewage to be inter- 
cepted and discharged into the pump-well. It will, therefore, be necessary 
to divert this storm water and dispose of it in some other way. 

The plans now under consideration provide also for the collection and 
interception of the sanitary sewage and industrial wastes contributed by the 
institution, the discharge by gravity of such sewage and wastes into a piunp- 
well located inside of the prison walls and the pumping of this sewage into 
the sewer system and sewage disposal plant of the fourth, fifth, sixth and 
seventh wards' sewer district. 

Upon reaching the pumping station the sewage is to be passed through a 
horizontal bar screen with bars spaced one and one-half inches apart in the 
clear. Adequate facilities are to be provided for cleaning this screen. 

Two pumps, each with a capacity of 265 gallons per minute, are to be 
installed in an adjacent dry pump-well. These pumps will, therefore, have 
a capacity equal to about four times the average fiow of sewage and will be 
operated automatically so that both pumps can be operated at the same time 
if necessary, although under normal conditions one piunp will be more than 
adequate to care for the normal flow of sewage. 

liie pumps will discharge the sewage through an 8" cast iron force main 
to a manhole at the intersection of Cross and van Anden streets from which 



386 State Depabtment of Health 

effluent at the rate of about 170,000 gallons per acre per day. A portion of 
the filter is to be temporarily used for the disposal of sludge when troops are 
not at the range for practice. 

The effluent from the sand filters is to be discharged into the Sparkill creek, 
which fiows in a southerly direction from Blauvelt and empties into the Hud- 
son river near Piermont. 

It appears that the design of these plans is in general in accordance with 
my views and suggestions expressed auring a conference held with the de- 
signing engineer from the office of the State Architect. There are, however, 
certain features in the details of the design that require modification in order 
that the sewerage system may operate satisfactorily and efficiently, viz., the 
substitution of manholes for inspection holes and the installation of manholes 
at all points of change of grade and alignment as these changes will facilitate 
the cleaning and inspection of the sewers. 

I therefore beg to recommend that the plans be approved on the condition 
that the changes above referred to be made in the plans for the sewer system. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



BRONXVILLE 

On October 18, 1910, application was made by the board of trustees of the 
village of Bronxville for the approval of plans for extensions and modifica- 
tions to the sewer system of the village. These plans were approved on Novem- 
ber 1, 1010, and a permit was issued allowing the discharge into the Bronx 
river of sewage to be collected by the proposed sewers after treatment in the 
Bronxville sewage disposal plant. 

On November 9, 1910, plans for a proposed sewer extension in Palmer 
avenue were submitted for approval by the board of trustees. These plans 
were approved on November 11, 1910, and a permit was issued allowing the 
discharge of sewage from the proposed sewer into the Hudson river on condi- 
tion that no sewage shall be admitted to or discharged from the proposed 
sewer until the Bronx Valley trunk sewer shall have been completed and con- 
nection made therewith. 



Albany, N. Y., Novemher 1, 1910. 
Eugene H. Pobteb, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N. Y,: 

Deab Sib: — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of 
plans for extensions and modifications to the sewer system of the village of 
Bronxville, Westchester county, submitted to this Department for approval by 
Rogers & Latimer, civil engineers, of New York city, on behalf of the board 
of trustees of the village on October 18, 1910. 

The plans and documents submitted comprise the following: 

1. Tracing and duplicate sets of blueprints of amended plans for pro- 
posed sewers in Avon and Governor's roads, formerly known as Sagamore 
Circle and Beverly road. 

2. Tracings and duplicate sets of blue-prints of plans and profiles of 
proposed sewers in Tanglewylde and Rockwell avenues. 

3. Tracings and one set of blue-prints of plans and profiles of a proposed 
sewer extension in Tanglewylde avenue. 

4. One blue-print showing profile of proposed sewer in Palmer avenue. 

5. Report of designing engineers and village president together with 
a certified recommendation of the board of health. 

The plans show that it is proposed to amend the plans of the sewers in the 
streets in that portion of Sagamore Park, formerly known as Sagamore Circle 



Sewerage and Sewage Disposal 387 

and Beverly road, which were approved by this Department on February 25, 
1010, but were never constructed. The location of these streets have been 
changed and they are now called Avon and Governor's roads. 

The sewage to be collected by the proposed sewers in Avon road is tributary 
to the Bronx ville sewage disposal plant, and the sewers in Grovemor's road 
are tributary to the I^ckahoe disposal plant. The amount of sewage that 
will reach the two disposal plants from the sewers shown by the amended 
plans will be practically the same as that provided for by the plans approved 
on February 25, 1010, and will be divided in about the same proportions. 

The plans for the proposed sewer extension in Tanglewylde and Rockwell 
avenues show that it is proposed to construct some 1,543 feet of 8'' 
sewers in these two avenues. The sewage to be collected by these sewers 
will be discharged into the existing sewer at the intersection of Tanglewylde 
avenue and Midland avenue and thence into the Bronxville disposal plant. 

The plans also provide for a 6" sewer extension in Tanglewylde avenue be- 
tween Pondfield road and Gardner avenue, a distance of 275 feet. This sewer 
is to be tributary to«the existing sewer in Gardner avenue and the Bronxville 
avenue disposal plant. 

Inasmuch as only one copy of the plan for the proposed sewer in Palmer 
avenue was received, action on this plan must be deferred until a duplicate 
copy is received. 

The plans for the other sewers now under consideration, however, have been 
carefully examined in regard to sizes, capacities and grades and the sewers as 
planned are found to be adequate to meet the future requirements of the dis- 
tricts to be served by them on the usual assumption as to population and 
sewage contribution providing the sewers are properly constructed. 

I therefore beg to recommend that the plane be approved and permits issued 
allowing the discharge of sewage from the proposed sewers into the Bronx- 
ville and Tuckahoe sewage disposal plants and the Bronx river. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



Albany, N. Y., tfovemher 1, 1910. 

Board of Trustees^ Village of Bronxville, N, Y.: 

Gentleacen: — In response to the application made to me by your board, 
imder date of September 12, 1910, pursuant to the provisions of section 21 
of the Public Health Law and certifying to me for my approval a recom- 
mendation to construct certain additions to the sewer system of the village 
of Bronxville made to your board by the board of Health of the vdllage of 
Bronxville, pursuant to section 21 of the Public Health Law, on the grounds 
that the sewers of such village are insufficient to properly and safely sewer 
such village, said recommendation having been duly considered and approved 
by your board, I hereby approve such recommendation that certain additions 
to said sewer system be constructed, to wit: 

An 8" sewer starting at the manhole in the Midland Valley sewer at 
its intersection with Tanglewylde avenue, running thence easterly in 
Tanglewylde avenue, 400 feet to its intersection with Rockwell avenue, 
thence southerly in Rockwell avenue 350 feet, with the necessary man- 
holes and appurtenances, as shown on the map submitted therewith. 
The above approval is duly given this 1st day of November, 1910, in accord- 
ance with the provisions of section 21 of chapter 45 of the Consolidated Laws, 
the Public Health Law. 

Very respectfully, 

ALEC H. SEYMOUR, 

Acting Commissioner of Health 



388 State Depabtmbnt of Heaxtii 

Albany, N. Y., November 10, 1910. 
Eugene H. Pobteb, MJ)., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N. Y,: 

Deab Snt. — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of plans 
for a proposed sanitary sewer extension in Palmer avenue in the village of 
Bronxville, Westchester county, submi4;ted to this Department for approval 
by Rogers & Latimer, civil engineers of New York city, on behalf of the 
board of trustees of the village on November 9, 1010. 

A blue-print showing the profile of this sewer was submitted for approval 
on October 18, 1910, in connection with other plans for sewer extensions in 
the village, but this plan could not be passed upon at that time inasmuch 
as only one copy of the plan was submitted and the plan did not show the 
location of the sewer. The designing engineers were therefore notified that 
the matter of the apf>roval of the plans for the proposed sewer in Palmer 
avenue would be considered as soon as duplicate copies of such plans, showing 
both plan and profile of the sewer, were received. 

The records of the Department show further that plans for a sewer in 
Palmer avenue, formerly known as Glen Road, were approved in connection 
with plans for a sewer system and sewage disposal plant approved on May 
14, 1902. These plans provided for a 6" sewer in Glen Road tributary to 
the then proposed Bronxville disposal plant. It appears, however, that this 
sewer was never constructed. 

The plans before the Department and now under consideration show that 
it is proposed to construct some 400 feet of 8'' sewer on a grade of 2.84 per 
cent, in Palmer avenue which will eventually be tributary to the Bronx Valley 
sewer now under construction. A flush tank is to be provided at the upper 
end and a manhole is to be located near the lower end of the proposed sewer 
and about 20' from its junction with the Bronx Valley sewer. According 
to the statements of the village president and the engineers the proposed 
sewer is not to be used and the outlet of the sewer will be sealed un-til tho 
Bronx Valley sewer is in operation. 

The plans have been carefully examined in reference to the size, grade, 
capacity and other hydraulic and sanitary features of the proposed sewer 
and it is found to be adequate to meet the future requirements for sanitary 
sewage of the district to be served by it, and I, therefore, b^ to recommend 
that the plans be approved. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



BRONXVILLE AND TUCKAHOE 

On February 25, 1910, application was made jointly by the boards of trustees 
of the villages of Bronxville and Tuckahoe for the approval of plans for 
sewer extensions in Beverly road, the Plateau and other streets in these vil- 
lages. A portion of the sewage to be collected by the sewers in Bronxville 
discharges into the Tuckahoe sewage disposal plant and the remainder of 
the sewage from the Bronxville sewers discharges into the Bronxville plant, 
and conversely some of the sewers in Tuckahoe are tributary to the Bronx- 
ville plant and some to the Tuckahoe plant. The plans were approved on 
February 25, 1910, and permits were issued allowing the discharge of sewage 
to be colleoted by the proposed sewers into the Bronx river after treatment 
in the sewage disposal plants referred to. 



Albany, N. Y., February 25, 1910. 

Eugene H. Pobteb, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N. Y.: 

Dear Sie: — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of plans 
for proposed sewer extensions in the villages of Bronxville and Tuckahoe, 
submitted jointly by the trustees of the two villages on February 21, 1910. 



Seweibage and Sewage Disposal 389 

The plans aud docuioente comprise the following: 

1. One tracing and two blue prints of a map showing plan of proposed 
sewers. 

2. Five tracings and two complete duplicate sets of blue prints showing 
profiles of streets and sewers. 

3. Report by the designing engineer. 

The plans show that it is proposed to construct sewers in Beverly road, 
the Plateau, Sagamore circle, Fairview avenue. Terrace place tributary to 
the Tuckahoe sewer system and sewage disposal plant, and that the proposed 
sewers in Prescott avenue and in a portion of Beverly road are to be tribu- 
tary to the Bronx ville sewers and sewage disposal system. 

According to the report of the designing engineer the proposed sewers will 
ultimately serve about eighty dwellings and care for about 32,000 gallons of 
sewage per day, 50 per cent, of which is to be conveyed to the Tuckahoe 
disposal plant and the remainder into the Bronxville. The sewers if prop- 
erly constructed are adequate as to sizes and capacities to meet any probable 
demand that may reasonably be made upon them for a considerable period 
in the future. 

The sewage disposal plants of the two villages, especially that of Tuckahoe, 
seem to have ample capacity if properly operated to care for the additional 
contribution of sewage to be collected by the proposed sewers. The question 
of sewage disposal for the two villages by means of separate disposal plants 
on the Bronx river watershed has come to be largely a question of temporary 
expediency since the sewage contributed by Tucl^hoe and Bronxville will be 
intercepts! by the Bronx ValW sewer now under construction. 

I beg to recommend that tne plans be approved and permits be issued 
allowing the discharge of additional effluent from the two sewage disposal 
plants into the Bronx river. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



CHAPPAQUA (Convalescents' Home) 

On March 17, 1910, plans for sewerage and sewage disposal for the Con- 
valescents' Home of the Children's Aid Society of New York city, at Chap- 
paqua, were submitted for approval. After some correspondence with the 
designing engineers in reference to the basis of design and rate of operation 
of the sewage disposal plant the plans were approved on April 20, 1910, and 
a permit was issued allowing the discharge of effluent from the disposal plant 
into a tributary of the Saw Mill river. 



Albany, N. Y., April 19, 1910. 
Eugene H. Porter, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, y, Y.: 

Dear Sir: — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of 
plans for the Convalescents* Home, at Chappaqua, Westchester county, sub- 
mitted to this Department for approval on March 17, 1910. 

TTie Convalescents* Home, owned by the Children's Aid Society of New 
York city, is located near the headwaters of the Saw Mill river. Prior to 
1909 the property was owned and used for school purposes by the Chappaqua 
Mountain Institute. The water supply is at present obtained from a spring 
and pumped into an underground reservoir having a capacity of 15,000 gallons. 

A new water supply is being developed consisting of a 6" driven well and 
a collecting gallery fed by underdrains. A pump is to be installed which 
will pump the water from either the well or the gallery to the old dife- 
tnbuting reservoir and to the new storage reservoir adjacent to it which 
has a capacity of 51,500 gallons. The capacity of this new water supply is 
estimated at 12,000 gallons per day. 



390 State Depabtment of Health 

According to the report by the designing engineers the population of the 
home for the greater portion of the year will not exdeed 100 persons, with a 
maximum of some 250 for a period from eight to ten weeks during the sum- 
mer, and 270 will be reached only on occasional days. The sewage from the 
institution is at present discharged into a leaching cesspool near the main 
buildings. 

It is now proposed to intercept the sewer leading to the cesspool by means 
of a 6" vitrified tile sewer and to convey the sewage to the new disposal site 
some 300 feet from one of the main buildings. .The plans show only the 
location, size, and alignment of this sewer, a portion of which is to be laid 
on a curve. 

It is stated in a supplementary report by the designing engineers that 
the sewer is to have a slope of 0.5 per cent., and that no manholes are con- 
sidered necessary inasmuch as the sewer is only about 450 feet long and one 
end is accessible through the proposed screen chamber. It is very probable, 
however, that, owing to the very flat grade for a sewer of this size and the 
curved alignment, it will have a tendency to clog easily. In order, then, to 
facilitate cleaning and inspection a manhole or lamphole should be installed 
at each change of grade and alignment and the sewer laid straight between 
manholes both as to vertical and horizontal alignment, and since no facilities 
for flushing are provided, the grade of the sewer should be increased to 0.65 
per cent. 

The sewage disposal plant consists of a screening chamber, settling tank, 
contact beds and sand niters. 

The sewage enters a screen chamber provided with a screen 10 feet wide, con- 
sisting of %" iron bars spaced %" apart in the clear. Owing to the short 
distance that the sewage travels in the sewer before reaching the screen cham- 
ber and, consequently, the fresh state of the sewage it may be found necessary 
to install a double screen in order to prevent clogging during the night at 
the time of maximum flow of sewage. There is a difTerenoe of elevation of 
1.4' between the inlet and the outlet pipes in the chamber. 

From the screen chamber the sewage will flow into the settling tank located 
about fifteen feet away. This tank has but one compartment of suflicienl 
capacity to give eleven hours* detention of sewage contributed by a population 
of 250 persons based on a daily water consumption of 100 gallons per capita. 
The tank is provided with baffle walls and the bottom slopes toward one end 
to a blowoflf valve and pipe which extends to adjacent sludge beds where the 
sludge is to be disposed of by ploughing into the soil. 

Adjoining the settling tank are to be placed two contact beds having a 
total area of .023 acres and an eflfi'ctive depth of 3 feet of broken stone vary- 
ing in size from ly/' to 3". Each bed is to be dosed alternately by means 
of an automatic tipple trough which diverts the flow of effluent from the set- 
tling tank to one bed or the other. 

It appears that the contact beds which are to have an effective depth of 
only 3 feet will be required to operate at a rate of about 1,000,000 gallons 
per acre per day for a considerable period during the summer. This is an 
excessively high rate for contact beds of this depth and will tend to clog the 
beds rapidly during the period of maximum sewage flow thereby increasing 
the cost of operation due to more frequent cleaning of the beds. 

The cost of cleaning should, however, be somewhat decreased by the fact 
that below the effluent underdrains of the contact beds is a space filled with 
broken stone and provided with additional underdrains. This space varies 
in depth from 1.3 to 1.8 feet below the effluent underdrains and it is in- 
tended that any suspended matter that may settle down through the contact 
material will be collected and retained in this space to be discharged at in- 
tervals to the sludge beds through a blowoff valve and pipe. 

From the contact beds the effluent is to be discharged to either of two 
sand filters having a combined area of about 0.1 acres and filled with sand 
to a depth of 3 feet. These beds will treat cowtact bed effluent at the rate 
of 250.000 gallons per acre daily on the basis of 250 persons contributing sew- 
age at the rate of 100 gallons per capita. 

The distribution of effluent over the surface of the sand filters is to be 



Sewebaqe and Sewage Disposal 391 

effected by means of a wooden trough over the center line of each bed and 
provided with 2" openings about 5 feet apart. Directly below each opening 
is to be placed a splash plate intended to break the fall of the liquid and 
allow it to spread out over the surface of the filter. 

Each sand filter is provided with four parallel lines of tile underdrains 
spaced 9 feet on centers, and according to the designing engineer's report 
the effluent collected by these underdrains can either be discharged into a 
trench and allowed to flow over the surface of the ground to the brook or the 
trench can be run continuously iback and forth over the available sloping 
ground for a distance of about 700 feet to the brook. The best results would 
undoubtedly be obtained by arranging the effluent pipe or drain according to 
the latter alternative and in such a way as to dispose of the effluent from 
the sand filters by means of subsurface irrigation on the sloping area from 
the sewage disposal plant to the stream, and would be desirable inasmuch as 
the Saw Mill river is used as a source of water supply by 'the city of Yonkers. 

I would add, in conclusion, that although the plants as shown upon the plans 
will probably produce a satisfactory effluent if properly constructed and oper- 
ated, it is not a well-balanced design, and the cost of operation could be de- 
creased and somewhat better results obtained if the contact beds were increased 
in area and depth, and if the capacity of the septic tank could be somewhat 
decreased. 

The slope of the sewer should be increased and manholes or lampholes in- 
lerted at all changes of grades and alignments in order to minimize the tend- 
ency to clog and to facilitate cleaning and inspection. 

I would, therefore, recommend that the plans be approved and a permit 
be issued allowing the discharge of effluent from the proposed sewage disposal 
plant into a tributary of the Saw Mill river, on condition that either a 
manhole or lamphole be installed on the sewer line at each change of grade 
and alignment, that the alignment be made straight between manholes, and 
that the grade of the sewer he increased to 0.65 per cent. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



CLARENCE (Buffalo Automobile Club) 

On October 20, 1910, plans for sewerage and sewage disposal for the BuffaH 
Automobile Club, at Clarence, N. Y., were submitted to the Department for 
approval. These plans were not in satisfactory shape for approval and were 
returned to the designing engineer for amendment and additional data. 

On November 7, 1910, plans revised in general accordance with reconunen- 
datiotts of this Department were resubmitted for approval. These plans were 
approved on November 11, 1910, and a permit was issued allowing the dis- 
charge of effluent from the proposed sewage disposal plant into Ransom creek, 
a tributary of Tonawanda creek, on condition that a main collecting drain 
shall be constructed to intercept the flow from the six imderdrains shown by 
the plans; that on this main collecting drain a manhole shall be constructed 
through which the entire flow from the six underdrains shall pass; and that 
the main collecting drain leading to this manhole shall be placed at least 
50 feet from the bank of the pond at all pointe. 



Albany, N. Y., November 3, 1910. 

Eugene H. Pobteb, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N, Y,: 

Deab Sir: — I beg to submit the following report on an examination 
of plans for sewerage and sewage disposal for the Buff'alo Automobile Club 
at Clarence, N. Y.. submitted to this Department for approval on October 20, 
1010. 



3&2 State Depabtmbnt of Health 

According to the statement of the designing engineer in his letter of trans- 
mittal, dated October 19, 1910, the club has at present about 2,200 members and 
the sewage disposal plant is designed on the basis of a daily contribution of 
sewage of 5,000 gallons. 

The disp<M»al plant consists of a s€?ttling tank, dosing chamber and subsurface 
irrigation field. The settling tank, which is 8'ic23'x5' deep, has a capacity of 
about 6,900 gallons. This is adequate to give a detention of sewage of six 
hours when serving a population of 276 persons on the usual assumption as 
to sewage contribution. The settling tank, if properly constructed and oper- 
ated, should furnish a satisfactory means of preliminary treatment and re- 
move a large percentage of suspended solid matter before the discharge of 
the sewage to the subsurface irrigation system when serving a population of 
up to some 300 persons. 

No means, however, are provided for cleaning the tank when required and 
caring for the sludge. A sludge pipe should he connected with the settling 
tank so that the sludge and supernatant liquid may be drawn off and dis- 
charged to a properly constructed sludge bed. 

The plans also show that it is proposed to discharge the settled sewage 
intermittently through a 3" Miller siphon to the subsurface irrigation field 
located near a pond on Ransom creek tributary 'to Tonawanda creek. The 
irrigation field has an area of about 0.1 acres and although no data are sub* 
mitted as to the chartuster of the soil this area is too small to properly care 
for 5,000 gallons of settled sewage per day even under the most favorable soil 
conditions. It is impossible, however, to properly pass upon the plans unless 
complete data are furnished in regard to the character of the soil at the dis- 
posal area. 

There are also a number of discrepancies between the plans and specifica- 
tions submitted as follows: 

( 1 ) The plans show an 8'' pipe from the settling tank to the disposal 
area while the specifications call for a 4" pipe or carrier. (It may be 
noted also in this connection that a .5 per cent, slope of a 4^^ effluent pipe 
from settling tank to disposal area, as specified, is too flat and should 
not be less than 1 per cent, for that size pipe.) 

(2) The plans show 10 lines of 3" tile laterals to be laid 12" deep 
for the irrigation field, while the specifications call for 4 lateral drains 
of 4" porous tile to be placed 12" to 18" under the surface of the ground. 

(3) The plans show four lines of 4" cross underdrains spaced 20 feet 
apart on centers and to be placed four feet deep, while the specifications 
call for three under cross drains 3' tt) 4' deep. 

No data is furnished as to the proposed method of caring for the storm 
water from roofs, walks, grounds and other areas. Such storm water should 
not be admitted to the disposal plant. 

It is al*^o noted that while the elevation of each end of the sewer is shown 
the rate of slope or gradient is not given. Manholes should also be placed at 
all changes of grade and ali^niment. 

In conclusion I would say that there were not sufficient data submitted with 
the plans to properly pass upon them and that additional data should be fur- 
nished in reference to the character of the soil at the disposal area; more 
definite data as to the area of the disposal or irrigation field which should also 
be enlarged; the number, size and length of the lateral distributors; the size 
and slope or gradient of the effluent pipe from the settling tank, and of the 
main sewer; and the proposed method of caring for the storm water. The 
plans should also provide means for cleaning the settling tank and for the 
proper disposal of sludge. 

In addition to the above, more complete information should be submitted as 
to the number of persons it is expected will be at the club house at any one 
time, the number of inside closets, lavatories and sinks installed, the dining- 
room facilities provided at the club house and other data which would lead 
to a conclusion as to the probable a«iount of sewage to be treated by the 
plant. 



Sewebaoe and Sewage Disposal 393 

I therefore beg to recommend that the plans be returned for amendment 
along the lines suggested above and that the designing engineer be asked to 
submit additional dftta as noted. 

Yours respectfully, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

City Engineer 

Albany, N. Y., November 9, 1910. 
EUOENS H. POBTEB, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N, Y.: 

DjUkU SiB: — I beg to submit the following report on a re-examination of 
amended plans for sewage disposal for the Buifalo Automobile Club at Clarer.ce, 
X. Y., resubmitted to this Department for approval on November 7, 1910. 

The plans have been revised in general accordance with the recommenda- 
tions of my report of November 3, 1910, on the examination of the first set of 
plans submitted and the additional information required to finally pass upon 
the plans has also been received. 

It appears from the plans and letter of transmittal of the engineer dated 
November 4, l^UO, that all storm water is to be eliminated from the sewage 
disposal plant. The storm water from the roofs is to be cared for by a storm 
water sewer which is to discharge directly into the pond and that from the 
grounds, walks and drives, is to be allowed to soak into the soil. 

Ihe settling tank has been provided with a sludge pipe connected with 
the low section of the tank toward which bottom of the tank slopes. When 
ever it is required to clean the tank, the sludge and supernatant liquid is to 
be discharged by gravity through a 6" vitrifi^ pipe to a sludge bed having 
an area of 400 square feet. This bed is to be locatea near the West Shore rail- 
road track and about 400 feet from the club house. 

Ihe gradient of the 4" effluent pipe from the dosing chamber of the settling 
tank to disposal area has been increased to 1.0 per cent. Ten lateral dis- 
tributing lines have been added to the disposal area and their length increased 
from 80' to 140', giving in all some 2,800 feet of tile in the distributing system. 
Two additional crogs underdrains have been added, making a total of six lines 
as against four lines provided for by the first set of plans. 

It appears, however, that the second discrepancy noted on pase two 
of my former report in reference to the size of the distributing laterals has not 
been corrected. The plans show that it is proposed to use 3" porous tile while 
the specifications call for 4" tile. It appears that a better distribution of the 
settling tank effluent would be obtained by using 4" tile for laterals as specified 
in the specifications. 

The area of the subsurface irrigation field has been increased to about 0.4 
acres so that the disposal field will be required to treat settled sewage at the 
rate of about 13,000 gallons per acre per day when the maximum contribution 
ooeurs. This will amount to 5,000 gallons daily on such days of maximum at- 
tendance at the club, according to the report of ihe designing engineer. 

The subsurface irrigation field, if properly prepared, should be able to prop- 
erly care for this amount of sewage and produce a satisfactory effluent, inas- 
much as the engineer states that the soil at the disposal area is of a sandy 
loam of good absorbing quality. 

The underdrains of the irrigation field as shown by the plans discharge 
separately into the pond, so that if from any cause such as the work of burrow- 
ing animals or the damage to the field from surface wash during storms, holes 
are formed through which the effluent from the settling tank would pass directly 
to the underdrains, no ready means of determining such defective condition 
of the surface irrigation field and of insuring a proper operation of the plant 
would be had. For this reason it is recommended that a main collecting drain 
be constructed parallel to and fifty feet from the bank of the pond to intercept 
the six underdrains and that a central manhole be constructed on this main 
collecting drain or such a manhole be constructed below the last underdrain 
from which the final outlet will lead to the pond. In this way opportunity 
will be had to obtain samples of the filtrate reaching the underdrain system 
and any breaks in the surface of the field would be readily discovered. 



394 State Depabtmbnt of Health 

In view of the above^ I would recommend that the plans be approved and 
a permit be issued allowing the discharge into Ransom creek, a tributary of 
Tonawanda creek, of eflQuent from the proposed sewage disposal plant and that 
the permit contain in addition to the usual revocation and modification clauses 
the following provisions: 

(1) That a collecting drain be constructed to intercept all cross under- 
drains and convey the effluent to a manhole from which it shall be dia- 
charged into the stream or pond through a single effluent or outlet 
sewer; and that such collecting intercepting drain shall not be nearer 
than fifty feet from the pond or stream at any point. 

(2) That the laterals of the distributing system shall not be less than 
4" in diameter. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



CLIFTON SPRINGS (Clifton Springs Sanitarium) 

On September 12, 1910, plans for sewage disposal for the Clifton Springs 
Sanitarium were submitted for approval. These plans were approved on 
October 29, 1910, and a permit issued allowing the discharge into Sulphut 
creek of effluent from the proposed sewage disposal plant. 



Albany, N. Y., October 27, 1910. 
Eugene H. Pobteb, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, y, Y.. 

Deab Sir: — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of 

Slans for sewage disposal for the Clifton Springs Sanitarium at Clifton Springs, 
•ntario county, submitted to this Department for approval by the business 
manager of the sanitarium on September 12, 1910. 

Clifton Springs is located on Sulphur creek at its confluence with Canau- 
diagua outlet and about five miles above the village of Phelps. At the village 
of Lyons, about twelve miles below Phelps, the outlet joins Ganagua creek 
and forms the Clyde river. This river empties into the Seneca river which is 
tributary to the Oswego river. 

According to the report of the designing engineer the present population of 
the institution is 500 and the metered daily water consumption about 100,000 
gallons, equivalent to 200 gallons per capita per day. It is proposed to pr(^ 
vide for an ultimate population of 600 persons and a sewage contribution of 
120,000 gallons per day. The sewage is at present discharged into Sulphur 
creek through a 9" outfall sewer. 

The proposed sewage disposal plant which will intercept the existing sewer 
is to consist of a grit or screen chamber settling tank, sprinkling filter and 
sludge bed. 

The grit chamber is divided into two compartments and has a total capacity 
of about 800 gallons which is sufficient to give about nine minutes' detention 
of sewage when kept free from detritus. The velocity of flow through the 
chambers will be about 6" per minute with a detention of about nine minutes 
when treating the sewage contributed by a population of 600 persons at the 
rate of 200 gallons per capita per day which is the basis of design of the 
plant. 

One inclined bar screen is placed at the end of each grit chamber adjacent 
to the settling tank. The screens are to be made of l%" x %" steel bars spaced 
%" apart in the clear. A platform is provided to facilitate cleaning the screens 
and handling the screenings. 

After passing through the screens the sewage flows into the settling tank 
divided into two compartments having a total capacity of some 3,100 gallons. 
Each compartment is eight feet long, four feet wide and varies in depth from 
six to seven feet. The average time of detention of the sewage in the tank wiil 



Sewerage and Sewage Disposal 395 

be about 36 minirtes and the average velocity of the sewage through the tank 
about 2^" per minute when the ultimate rate of contribution is 120,000 gal- 
lons per day. 

A sludge pipe and 12" sluice gate is connected with the low end of the tank 
by means of which any accumulated sludge may be discharged by gravity to a 
properly construoted sludge bed located near the tank. The sludge bed is 
twenty feet square and is provided with underdrains placed beneath a layer 
of sand and gravel about one foot deep. 

The sewage passes from the settling tank into a dosing chamber three feet 
deep through submerged outlets. The doses are to be discharged to the 
sprinkling niter through a 12" float valve which will tend to give intermitten 
discharges to the filter and in connection with the distributing system, an even 
distribution of sewage on the filter. 

From the dosing chamber the settled sewage is to be discharged through an 
8" cast-iron pipe to the sprinkling filter located about 260 feet away. The 
filter has an area of 0.062 acres and is to be filled to a depth of five feet witn 
broken stone VsT to 1" in size. The distributing system supported on piers 
two feet below the surface of the filter oonsierts of a 6" castiron main, 4" 
cast-iron laterals and 2" cast-iron soil pipe risers provided with nozzles of the 
''Columbus" pattern spaced 10" on centers. The head at the nozzles will be 
about five feet. 

The sprinkling filter will be required to operate at the rate of about 1,930,000 
gallons per acre per day when the average contribution of sewage amounts to 
120,000 gallons per day. The effluent from the disposal plant will be dis- 
charged through the existing outlet sewer into Sulphur creek near its con- 
fluence with Canandaigua outlet. 

The area of the watershed of the Canandaigua outlet at the point where 
the eflluent from the disposal works will reach it is some 216 square miles, so 
that, although complete purification of the sewage treated will not be obtained, 
there will be at all times a high dilution of the effluent entering the stream. 
The Canandaigua outlet is not used as a source of public water supply below 
Clifton Springs. 

The underdrain system consists of six parallel lines of 4" farm tiles which 
connect with a 9" tile drain. 

The plans have been carefully examined in reference to the design and rates 
of operation of the different parts of the plant and it is found that the pro- 
posed sewage disposal plant, if properly constructed and operated, should pro- 
duce a satisfactory effluent. 

I therefore beg to recommend that the plans be approved and a permit be 
issued allowing the discharge into Sulphur creek of effluent from the proposed 

sewage disposal plant. 

Respectfully eubmitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



COMSTOCK (Great Meadow Prison) 

On January 29, 1910, plans for sewage and sewage disposal for the Great 
Meadow Prison were submitted for approval by the State Architect. These 
plans were approved on February 8, 1910, on condition that the sewage dis- 
posal plant be enlarged whenever the number of persons contributing sewage 
to the plant is materially increased. 



Albany, N. Y., February 2, 1910. 
Eugene H. Porter, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N. Y,: 

Dear Sir: — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of 
plans for sewerage and sewage disposal for the Great Meadow Prison to be 
located at Comstock, Washington county, submitted to this Department for 
approval on January 29, 1910. 



396 State JDepabtmbnt of Health 

It is stated in the report by the State Architect that the proposed prison (s 
under construction and that this year accommodations will be provided for 
some 300 prisoners. It is also stated that the ultimate number to be pro- 
vided for in the future is about 1,300 and that the assumed rate of water 
consumption is estimated at 100 gallons per capita per day based upon the 
quantities used at existing prisons in the State. 

The water supply for this institution is to be taken from Dolph pond, located 
in a wooded and uninhabited region about two miles northwest of Gomstock. 
It is estimated that this source of supply will furnish a daily yield of 260,000 
gallons and a storage capacity of 31,210,000 gallons. Plans for this water 
supply were approved by the Department on October 25, 1909. 

The plans now under consideration provide sewerage facilities for the ulti- 
mate population and sewage disposal for a population of 1,000. The sewage 
disposal plant consists of a settling tank and four sand filters. 

The settling tank is divided into two equal compartments having a com- 
bined capacity of 27,000 gallons which is adequate to g^ve about six and one- 
half hours' detention of sewage for a daily contribution of 100,000 gallon 
Each compartment is to be built with a hopper-shaped bottom for the accumu- 
lation of sludge which can be discharged to adjacent sludge beds through two 
six-inch blow-off pipes extending to within six inches of the bottom of the 
hopper-shaped compartment. 

The last compartment of the settling tank is connected with the dosing 
chamber and is so arranged that one foot of sewage is drawn from the top 
of this compartment at each discharge of a siphon. The dosing chamber, 
located at the center of the filter bed area, is provided with four eight-inch 
alternating siphons for discharging the settling tank effluent upon the four 
intermittent sand filters in rotation. 

These filters have an average depth of about 2.7 feet. While this depth 
may be adequate, a greater efficiency would undoubtedly be obtained 
by increasing the depth of the beds to three or three and one-half feet. 
Each bed is provided with an efficient system of troughs for distribution and 
underdrainage and have a combined area of about .45 acres. At the assumed 
rato of contribution of 100 gallons of sewage per capita per day for 1,000 
persons, the beds have a sufficient area to treat settled sewage al the rate 
of 220,000 gallons per acre daily. 

The plans have been carefully examined by the Engineering Division and it 
is found that the design of the sewage disposal plant is well balanced and if 
properly constructed and operated should produce a satisfactory effluent for a 
population up to 1,000 persons contributing sewage at a daily rate of 100 
gallons per capita. The location of the plant is sucli that it can readily be 
enlarged as may be required in the future. 

The plans show that it is proposed to discharge the effluent from the dis- 
posal works into a 24-inch pipe designed to carry the flow of a small stream 
which flows through the site of the disposal works and is tributary to the 
Barge canal. The flow of this stream is also carried under the proposed sfewer 
above the disposal plant site through a 16-inch pipe. No data has been fur- 
nished by the State Arcliitect as to the area of the watershed tributary to this 
stream and no attempt has been made while examining the plans to pass upon 
the adequacy of these pipes to care for the flow of this stream, it being assumed 
that the design provides for adequate waterway. 

I would, therefore, recommend that the plans be approved on condition that 
the sewage disposal plant be enlarged as may become necessary whenever the 
number of persons contributing sewage to the plant is materially increased. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



Seweraqb and Sewage Disposal 397 

DANNEMORA (CUnton Prison) 

On January 4, 1010, plans for sewerage and sewage disposal were submitted 
to this Department for approval by the State Architect. On January 28, 1910, 
these plans were approved on the following conditions: 

(1) That the capacity of the settling tank be increased whenever the 
daily contribution of sewage shall materially exceed the amount of flow 
which the tanks as now designed will properly treat. 

(2) Ihat a complete separation of sanitary sewage and storm water 
shall be effected at such time as additional purification of sewage shall 
become necessary. 

(3) That sludge beds shall be installed if the proposed method of caring 
for the sludge is found to be inadequate or unsatisfaotory, and at no time 
shall sludge be discharged into the stream. 



Albany, N. Y., January 19, 1910. 
Eugene H. Pobteb, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N, 1., 

Deab 8ib: — I b^ to submit the following report on an examination of 
plans for proposed sewers and sewage disposal works for the Clinton Prison, 
located at Dannemora, Clinton county, suomitted to this Department for ap 
proval on January 4, 1910. 

The present sewers are on the combined plan and discharge into an open 
ditch and a small stream tributary to the Saranac river. This discharge of 
sewage is causing and has in the past created insanitary conditions in and 
near the village of Dannemora. 

The plans show that it is proposed to intercept the dry weather flow from the 
existing combined sewers which serve the State Prison, Dannemora State Hos- 
pital and part of the village of Dannemora, and to provide overflows at three 
different points in order to control the amount of flow through the new sewers 
and settling tanks in time of storms. It is stated in the report by the State 
Architect that owing to extensive outlay of work and money that would be re- 
quired to separate the storm water from the sanitary sewage of the village, 
prison and hospital, it is proposed to postpone the matter of separation imtil 
such a time as filtration of the effluent from the settling tanks shall be found 
necessary. 

It was learned that there are no records of the existing connections to the 
present sewer system and that it would be necessary to construct about 6,000 
feet of additional sanitary sewers in order to effect a complete separation for 
which construction there are no funds available at the present time. The pro- 
posed sewers are, however, so designed that they can be made a part of a 
complete sanitary sewer system whenever the separation of sanitary sewage 
and storm water shall be required. 

The report also states that the present population of the State institution 
is about 1,800 with allowance for a future population of 2,500 and that, 
while 100 village people are at present tributary to the sewer system, the 
ultimate number of persons of the village to be served by the proposed sewers 
is estimated at about 500 persons. The ultimate future population therefore 
to be served by the proposed sewers and sewage disposal plant will be about 
3,000. 

Although no definite data is submitted as to the source of the water supply 
and rate of consimiption, it is intimated that the design of the sewer system 
is based upon an average rate of 100 gallons per capita per day allowing for 
a maximum rate of twice the average rate of contribution of sewage. On this 
assumption the proposed sewers are adequate ks to sizes, capacities and grades 
if properly constructed to care for the contribution of sanitary sewage from 
the future estimated population of some 3,000 persons. 

The sewage disposal plant consists of a settling tank divided into two equal 
longitudinal compartments, each of which is divided into two parts by a 



398 State Depabtmbnt of BLealth 

division wall which extends to within four inches of the surface of the sewage 
in the tanks when full and forming a submerged weir over which the sewage 
must flow in passing through the tank. This arrangement is intended to 
facilitate the cleaning of the tank. The sewage before entering the tank is 
discharged into a small receiving chamber containing two six-inch outlets, one 
leading to each of the two longitudinal compartments of the tank and one 
ten-inch outlet so arranged that all the sewage can be by-passed whenever the 
tank is not in operation or to care for excessive contributions of sewage during 
storms. 

The settling tank has a capacity of about 66,000 gallons which is adequate 
to give an eight-hour detention of sewage for the present population of 2,000. 
The capacity of the tank can be readily increased by a slight alteration of 
the outlet and inlet chambers so as to give a proper time of detention when 
the contribution of sewage is materially increased. 

Although the plans do not show an area for the disposal of sludge, it wajs 
found upon further inquiry, that the owner of the property upon which the 
sewage disposal plant is to be located intends to use the sludge for the purpose 
of irrigation and that the land is to be properly prepared to receive and dis- 
pose of this sludge. 

In conclusion I would say that although the sewer system and sewage dis- 
posal works are satisfactory as to engineering features to adequately meet the 
present needs of the institutions, the capacity of the settling tank should be 
increased whenever the contribution of sewage is materially increased, and 
complete separation of the sanitary sewage and storm water shall be made 
at such time as additional purification shall be required or upon the unsatis- 
factory operation of the proposed sewage disposal plant. Sludge beds should 
also be installed if the proposed method of caring for the sludge is found to be 
inadequate or unsatisfactory. 

I would, therefore, beg to recommend that the plans be approved on the 
above conditions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE IIORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



DEPEW 



On September 23, 1910, application was received from the board of trustees 
of the village of Depew for the approval of plans for proposed sewer extensions 
in Elliott avenue and tributary sewers. These plans were approved on Septem- 
ber 27, 1910, and a permit issued allowing the discharge into Cayuga crcSek of 
sewage to be collected by these sewers after treatment in the village sewage 
disposal plant. 



ELKA PARK (Town of Hunter) 

On February 18, 1910, plans for sewage disposal for the Elka Park Associa- 
tion in the town of Hunter, Greene county, were submitted for approval by the 
superintendent of the association. These plans were returned to the designing 
engineer for revision and were finally resubmitted for approval on May 11, 
1910. 

The revised plans were approved on May 24, 1910, and a permit was issued 
allowing the discharge of effluent from the proposed sewage disposal plant 
into ('ook creek, a tributary of Schoharie creek, on condition that the sewage 
contributed by not more than 200 portions shall be tributary to or treated by 
the sewage disposal plant approved this day. 



Sewerage and Sewaqe Disposal 399 

Albany, N. Y., February 26, 1910. 
EUQBNK H. POBTEB, M.D., State Commiasioner of Health, Albany, N. Y.: 

Dbau Sib: — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of 

Slans for sewage disposal for the Elka Park Association in the town of Himter, 
treene county, submitted to this Department for approval on February 18, 
1910, by the superintendent of the association, application for their approval 
having been submitted later by the town board. 

The association comprises a summer colony having a present population of 
about 200 persons, and is located near Cook creek, a tributary <to Schoharie 
ereek, about three miles south of the village of Tannersville. The ultimate 
population is estimated at 350 persons. 

Ihe report of the designing engineer states that the association is provided 
with an adequate supply of pure spring water but that the present system of 
sewage disposal, by means of subsurface irrigation for each individual cottage, 
has not been entirely satisfactory. 

It appears from the report, specifications and plans submitted for approval 
that it is proposed to provide sewerage facilities for the existing twenty-two 
cottages, club house and laundry. 

Ihe plans submitted show the sewage disposal plant more or leas in detail, 
but does not show the proposed sewer system. 

In order to intelligently pass upon the plans, a general plan of the sewers 
showing sizes, alignments, grades, manholes at all changes of grade and 
alignment and profile of the main sewer should be submitted for approval. 

The sewage disposal plant consists of settling tank, dosing chamber, contact 
beds and an underground storage chamber to be used for the purpose of equal- 
izing the discharge of effluent into the stream. The settling tank has a capacity 
of about 6,500 gallons, which is sufficient to give eight hours* detention for 
sewage contributed by the present population of 200 persons at the rate of 
100 gallons per capita per day. 

From the settling tank the sewage is to pass into a dosing chamber having 
a capacity of some 6,400 gallons and provided with two alternating siphons 
arranged so as to discharge the settled sewage to either or both contact beds. 
Ihese beds are to be filled with broken stone to a depth of five feet and have 
a combined area of about 0.04 acres. 

Each contact bed is provided with a timed siphon which will discharge the 
effluent into the storage chamber, referred to above, so that the discharge into 
the small stream may be regulated and not occur in large, intermittent doses. 

It appears from the plans that the general principles upon which the design 
is based are in accordance with good practice. There are, however, several de- 
fects in details of construction and operation. 

While the plans and report of the designing engineer show that it is pro- 
posed to construct both contact beds it appears from the specifications that only 
one of the beds is to be operated for an indefinite period after the plant is 
installed since the specifications require the contractor to furnish one alter- 
nating dosing siphon and one timed discharge siphon complete. The total 
capacity of tha beds should be operated as soon as the present population is 
connected with the system inasmuch as these beds, with a combined area of 
0.04 acres, will be required to treat settled sewage at the rate of 500,OGO gallons 
per acre per day (with a daily contribution of 20,000 gallons). This is as 
high a rate as should be allowed on contact beds five feet deep. 

The sewage disposal plant as designed is, however, not well balanced in re- 
gard to the relative capacity of the dosing chamber and contact beds. In 
order to utilize the full capacity of the contact beds the dose of sewage applied 
at each filling should be sufficient to fill each bed to within a few inches of 
the top of the broken stone. This can be accomplished either by increasing 
the size of the dosing chamber or by dividing the contact bed area into three 
compartments so as to form three beds instead of two. 

The Utter arrangement would be the better since ihe capacity of the dosing 
chamber shown on the plans could not be increased materially without making 
the time of detention too long. It appears, therefore, that in order to make 
the proposed plant more efficient and satisfactory there should be installed three 



400 State Dbfabtmknt of Health 

coniact beds having a combined area of not less than 0.04 acres, and a dosing 
chamber having about the same capacity as the one shown on the plans or 
sufficient to fill the voids in each bed so that the effluent from the tank wUl 
rise to within a few inches of the top of the bed. It will be necessar>% of 
course, to add one dosing and one discharge siphon. In this connection it is 
important to so design the size of the dosing chamber that each dose will 
nearly fill the voids in one bed, basing the estimated percentage of voids on 
that obtained when the beds have been in operation for some considerable 
time. 

It appears from the plans 'that the underground chamber is not to be pro- 
vided with manholes. It would be advisable to place such manholes ovei 
both the inlet and the outlet of this chamber in order to facilitate inspection 
and cleaning. Better control of the discharge of effluent from the chamber 
would also result if a valve chamber were constructed at one end of the com- 
partment or outside and on line with the effluent pipe extended. 

The effluent pipe to the stream, which is only four inches in diameter, should 
be increased to at least five inches, and manholes or inspection holes should be 
inserted at each change of grade and alignment. 

In conclusion I would say that before the plans can be finally examined and 
passed upon, a plan of the proposed sewer system should be submitted and, in 
order to make the sewage disposal plant efficient and satisfactory, the relative 
capacity of the dosing chamber and contact beds should be readjusted and 
balanced. 

The underground chamber should be provided with manholes and valve 
chamber and the size of the effluent pipe should be increased to at least five 
inches. Inspection holes or manholes should also be inserted at all changes of 
grades and alignment. 

I therefore recommend that the plans be returned to the designing engineet 
for revision together with a copy of this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 

Albany, N. Y., May 18, 1910. 
Eugene H. Pobteb, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N, Y,: 

Deab SiB: — I beg to submit the following supplementary report on the ex- 
amination of revised plans for sewage disposal for the Elka Park Association, 
in the town of Ilunter, Greene county, resubmitted to this Department for 
approval on May 11, 1910, by the superintendent of the association. 

Original plans for sewage disposal for this association were submitted for 
approval on February 18, 1910, but owing to a lack of sufficient data as to the 
sewer system and the unsatisfactory design or arrangement of details of the 
contact bed and underground equalization chamber the plans were returned to 
the designing engineer for amendment. These plans have been revised in sub- 
stantial accordance with the recommendations embodied in my report dated 
February 26, 1910. 

The plans and documents received and now under consideration consist of: 

(1) Report in duplicate. 

(2) Specifications in duplicate. Tracing and blue print of: 

(3) Topographical map showing location of cottages, sewers and pro- 
posed disposal works. 

(4) Plan and cross-sections of disposal works. 

According to the plans and report of the designing engineer the present sewer 
system consists of four-inch house drains connected with six-inch castiron 
sewers laid on a grade of not less than 1.5 per cent. These sewers carry sani- 
tary sewage only and serve thirteen cottages, one laundry, a casino and club 
house. The remaining eight cottages are provided with subsurface irrigation 
systems which are giving satisfactory results but are located so that they can 
be connected with the present sewer system and proposed disposal works when- 
ever such an arrangement shall become necessary. 



SEWEaAQE AND SeWAQE DISPOSAL 401 

Ihe sewer system which has been constructed for a considerable period is 
not provided with manholes. Such manholes should be constructed at all 
changes of grade and alignment in order to facilitate cleaning and inspection. 

It appears from the plans that the association is at present provided with 
two Beetling tanks each having a capacity of some 5,500 gallons. One oi 
these tanks serves the clubhouse and three cottages and the other tank, which 
is located at a considerable lower elevation, serves all but eight of the present 
cottages. 

it is now proposed either to continue using the present settling tanks aud 
to construct a dosing tank in connection with the proposed contact beds 
and equalizing chamber or to abandon the use of the present tanks and con 
struct a new settling tank adjacent to the proposed dosing -chamber. Inas- 
much as the present tanks are of adequate capacity to give sufficient deten- 
tion for the sewage contributed by the present population it seems unnecessary 
to construct a new settling tank unless these tanks are found to operate 
improperly. 

ihe proposed dosing chamber is to have a capacity of 5,300 gallons and is 
to be provided with three alternating dosing siphons arranged so as to dis- 
charge the sewage to any one of the three contact beds. These beds have a 
combined area of about 0.04 acres and are to be filled with broken stone to a 
depth of five feet. 

'Ihe rate of operation of the contact beds will be about 500,000 gallons per 
acre per day, assuming that 200 persons will ultimately be served by the 
proposed sewage disposal plant and that the rate of water consumption will 
amount to 100 gallons per capita per day. 

The contact Ms are also to be provided with automatic time siphons which 
are intended to regulate the time of contact and discharge the effluent into the 
proposed equalizing chamber. 

It appears that the contact beds and equalizing chamber have been rede- 
signed in accordance with the recommendations of my former report and the 
disposal works, if properly constructed and operated, should produce a satis 
factory effluent. 

In conclusion, I would say that the present settling tanks could be used 
in connection with the proposed dosing chamber and contact beds with such 
modification as may be foimd necessary to produce a satisfactory effluent or 
until such time as a material increase in the population or in the quantity 
of sewage shall require a settling tank of greater capacity. 

I would, therefore, recommend that the plans be approved and a permit 
issued allowing the discharge of effluent from the proposed sewage disposal 
works into Ck>ok creek, a tributary of Schoharie creek. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



FULTON 



On September 16, 1900, plans for a change in the alignment of the sani- 
tary sewer along the towing path in the city of Fulton were submitted for 
approval by the city engineer on behalf of the board of public works. A 
proper application was not received until January 19, 1010. On January 28, 
1910, the plans were approved subject to the provisions of a permit issued 
on July 27, 1900, allowing the discharge into the Oswego river of sewage 
from the then proposed intercepting sewer. 

On July 18, 1910, application was made by the board of public works for 
permission to discharge sewage into the Oswego river from extensions and 
XBodificationB of the existing sewer system in the West Side sewer district 
in the city of Fulton after such sewage shall first have been passed through 
the sewage disposal plant. These plans were approved and a conditional per- 
mit was issued on September 30, 1910. 



402 State Dbpabtmbnt of BLealth 

On October 25, 1010, plans for a proposed extension to the sewage disposal 
plant were submitted for approval hj tne citv engineer on behalf of the board 
of public works of the city of Fulton, in conformity with the permit issued on 
Seotember 30, 1910. These plans were approved on November 12, 1910, on 
conditions embodied in a letter to the city engineer, dated November 12, 
1910, which is printed below. 



Albany, N. Y., January 28, 1910. 
Eugene H. Pobteb, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N. Y.: 

pEAB Sib :— 3.1 b^ to report on an examination of plans for a proposed 
change in the alignment of the sanitary sewer along the towing path in the 
city of Fulton, Oswego county, submitted to this Department for approval by 
the city engineer, September 16, 1909. 

Owing to some delay complete duplicate plans consisting of five blue prints, 
each showing the proposed location or alignment of the sewer along the 
towing, path, were not submitted until December 18th, and an application 
properly filled out by the board of public works was not received by the De- 
partment until January 19, 1910. 

Plans for this section of the intercepting sewer were approved on July 27, 
1909. The plans now under consideration cover changes in the alignment of 
this sewer near Lock No. 2 on the New York StaAe Barge canal, and in 
passing through the walls of this lock. It is stated in the letter by the city 
engineer, accompanying the plans, that the Barge Canal Board desired the 
proposed changes " to better accommodate the construction which they con- 
template." The size and grade of the proposed sewer is to remain the same 
as that shown on the plans approved in July. 

I recommend that the plans be approved subject to the provisions of a 
permit issued on July 27, 1909, allowing the discharge of sewage from the 
proposed intercepting sewer into the Oswego river. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



Albany, N. Y., September 14, 1910. 
Eugene H. Pobteb, M.D., State Commissiofier of Health, Albany, N, Y.: 

Deab Sib: — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of 
plans for extensions and modifications of the existing sewer system in the 
West Side sewer district in the city of Fulton, submitted to this Department 
for approval by the city engineer on behalf of the board of public works, on 
July 12, 1910. 

The plans show that it is proposed to construct nineteen sewer extensions 
on the west side of the river. These sewers are to be extensions or modifi«*4- 
tions to the existing sewer system in what is known as the West Side sewer 
district. They, however, modify but slightly the West Side sewer system ap- 
proved on August 25, 1904. 

The plans have been carefully examined in regard to grades, velocities, 
capacities and other hydraulic and sanitary features in connection with the 
proposed sewers, and it is found that except in the case of five of these exten- 
sions the sewers are adequate to meet the future rquirements of this district 
on the usual assumptions as to population and water consumption, and as- 
suming that in the construction the sewers will be made sufficiently water- 
tight to prevent excessive infiltrations of ground water. 

The five sewers which are not satisfactory are the proposed 6*' sections in 
(1) West Second street between Walnut and Maple, (2) Cedar street . between 
West Fourth and Wickham, (3) W^orth street between West First and West 
Sixth, (4) Wickham street between Walnut and Cedar, and (5) West First 
street between Walnut and Cedar. Some of these sections of 6" sewers have 



Sewebage and Sewage Disposal 403 

slopes of .45 per cent, which are entirely too flat for sewers of this size. In 
order to secure self-cleansing velocities i" sewers should be constructed on a 
slope of not less than 0.7 per cent. The plans show that slopes of 0.7 per 
cent, can readily be obtained for all of these sections of 6" sewers either by 
raising the invert elevation of the manholes at the upper ends of these sewers 
or by lowering the invert of the manhcrfes at the lower ends. 

The consideration of these plans brings up the question of sewage disposal 
which is an important one, inasmuch as Oswego at present derives its public 
water supply from the Oswego river below Fulton. 

I'he records of the Department show that plans for a sewer system and sew- 
age disposal plant for the West Side sewer district were approved by this 
Department on August 25, 1904. On December 23, 1908, plans for sewage 
disposal were approved and a permit issued allowing the discharge of effluent 
from the proposed settling tank to be constructed as part of the sewage dis- 
posal plant to treat the sewage to be collected by the West Side sewer system 
on the condition that whenever it is deemed necessary by the State Commis- 
sioner of Health sand filters shall be constructed in accordance with the plans 
approved and the effluent from the settling tank shall be passed through 
them. This permit also limits the amount of sewage to be passed through 
such settling tank and subsequent filter beds to that contributed by 500 per- 
sons until the capacity of such sewage disposal plant shall be increased in 
accordance with plans approved by this Department. 

The settling tank which is now in operation is divided into two compart- 
ments having a combined capacity of 12,960 gallons, and is adequate to give 
about 6 hours' detention of sewage contributed by 500 persons. 

According to the. report of the city engineer this settling tank serves about 
250 persons at present and, after the completion of the proposed sewer exten- 
sion for which plans are under consideration, will serve a population of about 
2«500. It appears, therefore, that in order to comply with the requirements 
of the permit granted on December 23, 1908, and provide for sufficient set- 
tling tank capacity to properly treat the sewage to be contributed by a pop- 
ulation of 2,500 it will be necessary for the board of public works of the city 
of Fulton to submit for approval complete, detailed plans, satisfactory to this 
Department, either for 4 sJdditional 2-compartment settling tanks of the size 
and capacity of the existing tank so as to provide for a total capacity equal 
to about 5 times that of the present tank or to construct two or more addi- 
tional settling tanks having a combined capacity equal to 4 times that of 
the existing tank. In other words, it will require settling tanks having 
a capacity of about 62,500 gallons to give a 6 hours' detention of sewage 
contributed by a population of 2,500 persons, assuming a rate of water con- 
sumption of 100 gallons per capita per day. 

It will further be necessary for the city authorities, in order to comply 
with the permit granted to them and thereby protect the water supply ot 
Oswego, to increase the capacity of the existing sewage disposal plant in 
accordance with the above suggestions and with plans to be approved by this 
Department, before any sewage is discharged into the proposed sewer extension. 

It appears that the construction of the sand filters may be deferred until 
such time as in the judgment of the State Commissioner of Health a more 
complete purification of the sewage of the city of Fulton may become necessary, 
provided the settling tank now in operation be enlarged or extended so as to 
give a proper time of detention of sewage to be contributed by 2,500 persons. 

In conclusion, I would say that the plans before the Department are sat- 
isfactory except as noted above, and they can easily be revised to meet the 
requirements of the Department. The question of sewage disposal, however, 
is an important one and has received careful consideration. 

I would, therefore, recommend that the plans be approved and a permit be 
issued allowing the discharge into the Oswego river of settling tank effluent, 
and that the permit contain in addition to the usual revocation and modifi- 
cation clauses the following provisions: 

1. That the slope of all sections of six (6) inch sewers shown by the 
plane shall be increased to at least 0.7 per cent. 



404 State Department of Health 

^. That no sewage shall be admitted to the proposed sewers until the 
sewage disposal plant is enlarged in complete conformity with compete, 
detailed plans satisfactory to this Department for the treatment of the 
entire sanitary sewage of the West Side sewer district, which plans shall 
first have been submitted to and approved by this Department. 

3. That whenever required by the State Commissioner of Health com- 
plete, detailed plans satisfactory to this Department for more complete 
treatment of the sanitary sewage of the West Side sewer district shall 
be submitted to the Department for approval, and any or all portions of 
the sewage disposal works shown by said plans shall thereafter be con- 
structed and put in operation when required by the State Commissioner 
of Health. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer, 



Albany, N. Y., November 2, 1910. 
Eugene H. Porter, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N, Y,: 

Dear Sir: — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of 
plans for a proposed extension to the sewage disposal plant of the city of 
Pulton, Oswego county, submitted to this Department for approval by the 
city engineer on behalf of the board of public works on October 25, 1910. 

The records of the Department sht>w that plans for a sewage disposal plant, 
consisting of a settling tank and sand filters, were approved on December 23, 
1908. A provisional permit was issued in connection with these plans which 
allowed the discharge into the Oswego river of effluent from the settling tank 
to be cqnstructed as part of the sewage disposal plant to treat the sewage 
collected by the West Side sewer system on the condition that whenever it 
was deemed necessary by the State Commissioner of Health sand filters should 
be constructed in accordance with the plans as approved and the effluent from 
the settling tank should be passed through them. This permit also limited 
the amount of sewage to be passed through such settling tank and subse- 
quent sand filters to that contributed by 500 persons until the capacity of 
such sewage disposal plant should be increased in accordance with plans to 
be approved by this Department. 

On September 30, 1910, plans for some 19 sewer extensions in the West 
Side sewer district tributary to the sewage disposal plant were approved. It 
was estimated by the city engineer that these sewer extensions, when com- 
pleted, would ultimately serve about 2,500 persons. 

In view of the condition of the permit issued on December 23, 1908, which 
limited the number of persons to be served by the settling tank to 500, the 
permit issued on September 30, 1910, in connection with the plans for sewer 
extensions approved on that date contains in addition to the usual revocation 
and modification clauses the condition that no sewage shall be admitted to 
the proposed sewers until the present sewage disposal plant shall be enlarged 
in full conformity with complete detailed plans satisfactory to this Depart- 
ment for the treatment of the entire sanitary sewage of the West Side sewer 
district, which plans shall first have been submitted to and approved by 
this Department. This permit also contains the provision that the gradients 
of all sections of 6-inch sewers shown by the plans should be at least .6 per 
cent. 

In connection with the plans for an extension to the sewage disposal plant 
recently submitted for approval the city engineer, on behalf of the board of 

{mblic works under date of October 24, 1910, requests that the board be re- 
eased from the two conditions of the permit referred to above inasmuch as ( 1 ) 
two of the five sections 6" sewers with flat gradients could not be changed 
owing to existing connections and location of other piping; and (2) that the 
existing settling tank is giving a detention of ten and one-half hours at present 
and will at least not be overtaxed before January 1, 1911 (when it is expected 



Sewesaoe and Sewage Disposal 405 

that the proposed extensions to the present settling tank will be completed), 
since only 5 per cent, of the houses to oe connected with the sewers are provided 
with plumbing. It was further pointed out that the people whose houses are 
provided with proper plumbing fixtures are anxious to have them connected 
with the sewers and that the work could be done more easily now than in 
the spring owing to the conditions of the ground. 

The plans before the Department and now under consideration show that it 
is proposed to construct an additional settling tank with three equal com- 
partments and one dosing tank. Each compartment is 12' x 24' x 10' deep, 
giving a total capacity of the new tank of about 64,800 gallons, which is ade- 
quate to give about six hours' detention of sewage contributed by a popula- 
tion of some 2,600 persons. The total settling tank -capacity will therefore be 
adequate to care for the sewage to be contributed by an ultimate population 
of 3,100 persons and this population formed the basis of design with respect to 
the necessary capacity of the sewage disposal plant when the original plans for 
the West Side sewer system and sewage disposal plant were submitted to the 
D^artment and approved in 1004. 

The dosing tank, which is to be provided with two six-inch alternating 
siphons, will have a capacity of about 15,000 gallons. It may be necessary to 
add additional siphons to the dosing tank when supplementary treatment works 
are constructed in order to properly distribute the effluent over the sand 
filters. 

The proposed settling tank, if properly constructed and operated, should 
produce a satisfactory effluent for this type of plant and, in connection with 
the present settling tank, should be adequate to give a satisfactory preliminary 
treatment of sewage when serving a population of 3,100 persons on the usual 
assumptions as to sewage contribution. 

In view of the above, therefore, I beg to recommend that the plans for the 
proposed settling tank to be constructed as part of the permanent sewage dis^ 
posal plant for the West Side sewer district be approved on condition that 
detailed plans for more complete treatment of the sanitary sewage of the 
West Side sewer district shall be submitted to this Department for approval 
whenever required and that any or all portions of the sewage disposal works 
shall be thereafter constructed when required by the State Commissioner of 
Health and that such additional siphons and dosing apparatus shall be in- 
stalled in the dosing tank shown by the plans when supplementary treatment 
works are installed, as may be necessary to properly deliver the effluent from 
the five settling tanks to the supplementary treatment works when such works 
are required by this Department to be constructed. 

Respecting the request made by the city engineer on behalf of the board of 
public works that the city authorities be released from the provisions con- 
tained in conditions III and IV of the permit issued on September 30, 1910, 
I beg to recommend that with reference to condition III, this request be 
granted since it appears that the gradients of three of the five sewers of which 
criticism was made have been increased as required, while in the case of the 
other two sewers of which criticism was made, existing connections are too 
low or storm sewer and water pipes were encountered which made the in- 
crease of gradient impracticable. 

With respect to the application for permission to allow connections with pro- 
posed sewers for which plans were approved on September 30. before the com- 
pletion of the additional settling tanks, it is stated by the city engineer that 
the bids for contracts for constructing the additional settling tanks for which 

Slans are now before this Department for approval are to be received on 
fovember 7, 1910, and their completion is to be asked for on or about Janu- 
ary 1, 1911. It is further stated that gaugings of the flow to the two existing 
tanks show that nearly 70 per cent, surplus capacity is available at present in 
these tanks over that for which these tanks were designed and the plans ap- 
proved, while it is estimated that only about twenty-five connections out of 
500 would probably be made. 



406 State Department of Health 

In view of the foregoing, I would recommend that permission be given until 
February I, 1911, for the discharge into Oswego river of such sewage as may 
be c(^ lee ted by the proposed sewers shown by the plans approved on September 
30, 1910, provided such sewage is passed through the existing settling tanks. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



Albany, N. Y., November 12, 1910. 
Gbobge W. Hackett, City Engineer, Fulton, N, Y,: 

Deab Sib: — I am sending you under separate cover the approved plans for 
additional settling tanks for the preliminary treatment of sewage to be col- 
lected by proposed extensions to the West Side sewer system for which plans 
were approved on September 30, 1910, the submission of such plans for ap- 
proval and the construction of the additional tanks in accordance with ap- 
proved plans havine been required by the conditions of the permit granted on 
September 30th before house connections should be mad^ with the proposed 
sewers. 

The permit issued on September 30, 1910, above referred to, allows the dis- 
charge of effluent from the additional tanks into the Oswego river so that the 
granting of an additional permit in connection with the approval of the plans 
for additional settling tanks is not necessary, the conditions of approval of such 
plans being contained in this communication. 

In accordance with the recommendations of the report of the chief engineer 
on an examination of the plans, a copy of which is herewith inclosed, I have 
this day approved the plans, in response to the application for their approval 
made by you under date of October 24, 1910, on behalf of the board of public 
works of the city of Fulton, under the following conditions extending and con- 
forming to the conditions of the permit granted on September 30, 1910: 

(1) That whenever required by the State Commissioner of Health, com- 
plete detailed plans satisfactory to this Department for more complete 
treatment of the sanitary sewage of the West Side sewer district shall be 
submitted to this Department for approval, and any or all portions of 
the sewage disposal works shown by said plans shall thereafter be con- 
structed and put into operation when required by the State Commissioner 
of Health. 

(2) That such additional siphon and dosing apparatus shall be installed 
in the dosing tank shown by the plans, when supplementary treatment 
works are installed, as may be necessary to properly deliver the effluent 
from the five settling tanks to the supplementary treatment works when 
such works are required by this Department to be constructed. 

In your communication of October 24th you asked on behalf of the board 
of public works that such board be released from conditions III and IV of the 
permit granted on September 30, 1910, requiring an increase to 0.6 per cent, 
of the gradient of all six-inch sewers shown by the plans and requiring that 
no sewage should be admitted to the proposed new sewers imtil the additional 
settling tanks should be constructed. Your communication stated the reasons 
why release from these conditions was asked for and might reasonably be 
granted and the advisability of granting such request is fully discussed in the 
accompanying report of the chief engineer. 

In accordance with the recommendations of said report, I hereby release 
the board of public works from complying with that requirement of the per- 
mit granted on September 30th which involved the increase of gradient of the 
sewers on Worth and Wickham streets. 

Furthermore, in accordance with the recommendations of the inclosed report, 
permission is hereby granted to the board of public works until February 1, 
1911, to discharge into the Oswego river, the sewage to be collected by the 



Sewebage and Sewage Disposal 407 

proposed sewer extensioiiB, provided such sewage shall be passed through the 
existing settling tanks pending the completion of the additional settling tanks 
for which plans are this day approved. 

The permit embodied in this communication to become operative must first 
be recorded in the county clerk's office of Oswego county. 

Very respectfully, 

EUGENE H. PORTER, 

Commiesumer of Health 



FULTONVILLE 

On September 17, 1910, plans for an extension of the trunk sewer to a new 
location of the settling tank near the easterly boundary line of the village 
were submitted for approval. The plans were approved on September 19, 1910, 
and a permit was issued allowing the discharge of effluent from proposed 
settling tank into the Mohawk river. 

This permit contains, in addition to the usual revocation and modification 
clauses, the following conditions: 

(1) That both the sewer system and the sewage disposal plant shall 
be constructed in full conformity with the approved plans or such as 
may hereafter be approved by this Department; and that all the sewage 
to be collected by the proposed sewers shall be passed through the sewage 
disposal plant. 

(2) That whenever in the opinion of the State Commissioner of Health 
an extension or enlargement of the proposed settling tank or supplementary 
or additional treatment may become necessary, satisfactory detailed plans 
for such enlargement or for supplementary or additional treatment shall be 
submitted to the Department for approval, and upon approval of said plans 
such aditional works shall be constructed within the time limit then 
specified. 



Albany, N. Y., September 19, 1910. 
Eugene H. Pobter, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Alhanyy N. Y.: 

DcAB SiB: — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of 
amended plans of the sewer system of the village of Fultonville, Montgomery 
oounty, submitted to this Department for approval by the president of the 
board of trustees on September 17, 1910. 

The plans were sulmiitted in duplicate and show that it is proposed to change 
the location of the sewage disposal plant to a site on the corporation line near 
the river some 1,100 feet below that shown by the original plans for a sewer 
system and sewage disposal plant approved by this Department on October 2, 
1909. 

According to the statement of the village authorities, the location of the 
settling tank near the silk mill, as provided by these plans, is not a proper 
location for a sewage disposal plant as it is presumably near the built-up sec- 
tion of the village. It appears that the new location shown by the amended 
plans is better inasmuch as it will place the disposal plant in a more isolated 
position in regard to dwellings. 

The only change in the sewer system provided by the plans now under con- 
sideration is the extension of the 15-inch outfall sewer in River street to the 
new site, a distance of 1,100 feet. This extension is to be of the same size 
and to be laid on the same slope as that portion of the outfall sewer from 
Franklin street east to the former site near the silk mill shown by the original 
plans. 

I therefore recommend that the plans be approved and a permit issued 
allowing the discharge into the Mohawk river, in the town of Glen, near the 



408 State Department of Health 

easterly corporation line, of effluent from the proposed sewage disposal plant 
and that the permit contain in addition to the usual revocation and modifica- 
tion clauses, the same conditions as to future treatment of sewage as were 
embodied in the permit issued on October 2, 1900. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



HASTINGS-ON-HUDSON 

Plans for sewerage and sewage disposal for the Hudson Heights sewer dis- 
trict in the village of Hastings-on-Hudson were submitted for approval by 
Ward Carpenter & Co., civil engineers, on behalf of the board of trustees of 
the village early in January, 1910. 

After considerable correspondence and several conferences between this De- 
partment and representatives of the owners of the Hudson Heights propertp*, 
and after & number of revisions of the plans, they were finally approved on 
September 22, 1910, and a permit was issued allowing the discharge into the 
Saw Mill river of effluent from the proposed sewage disposal plant on condi- 
tion that the amount of sewage to be passed through the sewage disposal plant 
is hereby limited to that contributed by 100 persons until the capacity of such 
sewage disposal plant shall be increased in accordance with plans approved by 
this Department. 



Albany, N. Y., January 19, 1910. 
VVabd Carpenter & Co., Tarrytown, N. Y,: 

Gentlemen: — In further reference to the plans for sewage and sewage dis- 
posal plans for the section of the village of Hastings, known as ''Hudson 
Heights," I beg to say that after carefully considering the plans we find that 
they are not only defective in certain features, but that there are other 
features concerning the Public Health Law and the requirements of this De- 
partment for the submission of plans which require further consideration. 

Under the Public Health Law there is no provision made whereby the State 
Commissioner of Health can accept and approve plans submitted by individuals 
or real estate corporations, and it has been my custom that plans for private 
development areas be accepted by the village and be presented to the Depart- 
ment by the village before any approval is given of them. In explanation of 
this, I would point out that it is not practicable for this Department to deal 
directly with such companies and that practically there is no responsibility 
attached to any approved plans or a permit when issued to a private party or 
company. In other words, as soon as a land company has sola its property to 
various individuals, the company may cease to exist and it would be a very 
difficult matter to hold the individual property owners responsible for any 
failures on the part of said company. 

If, however, the village will accept the plans of the private company and 
will make application to the Department and take the responsibility of taking 
over these sewers and maintaining the sewage disposal plant in the future, 
this Department can then have some definite guarantee as to the proper con- 
struction and operation of the proposed plant. I would, therefore, suggest 
that you take this matter up at once with the president of the village or the 
board of trustees and come to some agreement or arrangement whereby the 
village may construct and operate the necessary sewers and sewage disposal 
plant for this district of Hudson Heights. 

In regard to the plans themselves, there are two general defects; one is 
that they do not show all of the sewers which will ultimately contribute 
sewerage to this disposal plant and consequently it will not be possible for me 



SiEWEiRAQE AND SeWAGE DISPOSAL 409 

to determine the suitability of the plant for this ultimate requirement. Further 
than this no grades are shown upon the sewers as required in the rules and 
r^pilations of this Department which have been furnished your engineers. 

Further than this, the contact beds and the sand filter areas are entirely too 
small for the population which you propose to connect this sewer within the 
next few years; viz., 125 persons. This matter, as well as the former referred 
to, were taken up in detail by our Chief Engineer, Mr. Horton, during his 
recent visit to Hastings where he met one of your engineers, and looked over 
the ground and pointed out to him the difficulties and desirable changes which 
it would be necessary to make in the plans before they could be approved 
by him. 

Since I have already suggested that you take this matter up with the 
village, I would suggest that it would be well for it individually or for them 
and you jointly to consider not only one treatment by the means which are 
shown upon the plans submitted by the engineers, Ward Carpenter &, Co., but 
that other means of sewerage and disposal of this whole section lying in the 
western portion of the village be considered and a sewage system and disposal 
works, on a more comprehensive scale for this entire section, be considered 
and developed. 

I will therefore await further advice from you as to the success you have 
had in reaching an agreement with the village board concerning either the 
present plans or the more comprehensive plan as just referred to, and as soon 
as such comprehensive plans or corrected plans for the individual plant now 
under consideration are submitted, your plans will be at once considered and 
examined. 

Respectfully yours, 

EUGENE H. PORTER, 

Cotntniasioner of Health 



Albany, N. Y., July 20, 1910. 
£UGENE H. POBTEB, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N. Y.: 

Deab Sib: — I beg to submit the following report on the examination of 

elans for sewerage and sewage dispoeal at Hudson Heights, Hastings-on- 
[udson, in the county of Westchester, submitted to this Department for ap- 
proval by the board of trustees of the village of Hastings-on -Hudson. 

Hudson Heights is a large tract of land owned by the Hudson P. Rose Co. 
in the village of Hastings-on -Hudson. There are at present five houses on 
this property and it is expected that this number will be increased to fifteen 
or twenty-five within the next two years. 

Plans for sewerage and sewage disposal for this territory were submitted to 
this Department for approval early in January, 1910, by the designing engi- 
neers, but owing to the inadequate size of the sewage disposal plant and the 
lack of proper application from village authorities these plans were returned 
for amendment. As the result of an inspection of the proposed location of 
the sewage disposal plant by me, several conferences and considerable corre- 
spondence with the representatives of the H. P. Rose Co. and this Department, 
amended plans, revised in general in accordance with the recommendations of 
this Department were finally resubmitted for approval on July 8, 1910. An 
application properly filled out and signed by the board of trustees of thp 
village of Hastin&:s-on-Hudson, asking for the approval of these plans was 
also received on June 10, 1910. 

The revised plans now under consideration show that it is proposed to con- 
struct some 3,000 feet of 8" sewers in Mount Hope boulevard and Stanley 
avenue. This sewer is to have a slope of from 0.5 per cent, to 14 per cent. 
and is to extend from a point some 200 feet west of Le Furgy avenue to a pro- 
posed sewage disposal plant near Saw Mill river and about 400 feet from 
the Mount Hope station on the Putnam division of the New York Central and 
Hudson River railroad. This sewer is adequate as to size and capacity to 



410 State Department of Health 

meet the probable future demand for the conveyance of sanitary sewage that 
may be made upon it in the future, provided that in construction the sewers 
will be made sufficiently water-tight to prevent excessive infiltration of ground 
water. 

The proposed sewage disposal plant consists of a settling tank, a contact bod 
and a sand filter. The sewage enters the settling tank through a submerged 
inlet near the middle of the long side of the tank and is discharged into the 
contact bed through a submerged outlet formed by connecting a riser pipe with 
a collecting box placed across the end of the tank near the inlet pipe. 

This arrangement requires modification inasmuch as the provision for the 
sewage entering the tank so near the outlet will tend to cause the sewage to 
flow directly from the inlet to the outlet, thus leaving a large portion of the 
tank in a stagnant condition. In order to utilize the entire capacity of the 
tank and thereby make it more efficient, the inlet should be located at the 
opposite end from the outlet. 

From the settling tank the sewage is to flow continuously into the contact 
bed filled with two-inch broken stone to a depth of thirty-six inches laid upon 
a layer of field stone varying in depth from six inches to eight inches. This 
layer of large stone is intended to act as a system of underdrains. When the 
contact bed is filled with sewage to a depth of about thirty-six inches, a three- 
inch Miller siphon will discharge the contents to the distributing system of 
the sand filter. Better results would undoubtedly be obtained if the contact 
bed be divided into two units having a combined area and depth equal to 
that of the proposed contact bed inasmuch as smaller and more frequent doses 
would be delivered to the sand filters. Under the proposed arrangement only 
one and one-half fillings of the contact bed would obtain per day for the 
maximum contribution of sewage which the disposal plant is designed to treat 
and a considerable period of the time would be consumed in discharging each 
dose to the filter. Furthermore, each dose of contact bed effluent although 
some time is required for its discharge, will be sufficient to flood the sand 
filter to depth of one foot, which is undesirable inasmuch as too rapid a rate 
of filtration will result. 

It is important that a satisfactory effluent from the proposed sewage dis- 
posal plant be obtained since a portion of the public water supply of the 
city of Yonkers, although filtered, is taken from the Saw Mill river a few 
miles below the point of discharge. 

It appears therefore that while the plans have been designed in general 
accordance with the suggestions of this Department, there are certain features 
in the details of the design that require modification in order that the sewage 
disposal plant may operate more satisfactorily and efficiently, viz., (1) placing 
the inlet pipe of the sewer at the opposite end of the settling tank from the 
outlet; (2) dividing the contact bed into two units having a depth and area 
equal to that of the proposed bed. 

I therefore beg to recommend that the plans be returned to the designing 
engineers for amendment in accordance with the above suggestions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



Albany, N. Y., September 16, 1910. 
EuGEN^ H. POBTEB, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N. Y,: 

Dear Sir: — I heg to submit the following report on aji examination of 
amended plans for sewage disposal at Hudson Heights, Has tings-on -Hudson, 
in the county of Westchester, resubmitted to this Department for approval by 
Ward Carpenter & Co., civil engineers, on behalf of the Hudson P. Rose Co., 
application for permit having been submitted by the board of trustees of the 
village of Hastings-on-Hudson. 

The plans have been before the Department since January, 1910, and have 
been the subject of several conferences and considerable correspondence be- 



Sewerage and Sewage Disposal 411 

tween this Department and representatives of the owners of the Hudson 
Heights property. The plans have finally been revised in accordance with the 
recommendations embodied in my report on an examination of plans for sewage 
disposal at Hudson Heights, dated July 20, 1910. Reference is made to this 
report for a discussion of the sewer district plant and of the plans that have 
been under consideration from time to time. 

As noted in the last report, the proposed sewage disposal plant consists of a 
settling tank, contact beds and a sand filter. 

The settling tank has a capacity sufficient to give about ten hours' detention 
of sewage contributed by a population of 100 persons assuming a rate of water 
consumption of 100 gallons per capita per day. From the settling tank the 
sewage passes through a submerged outlet controlled by the Merritt air-lock 
inlet feeds into either of the two contact beds. These contact beds are filled 
with broken stone to a depth of three feet and have a combined area of about 
0.033 acres, which permits of a rate of operation of ^about 300,000 gallons per 
acre per day on the above assumption as to population and water consumption. 

The contact bed effluent is then to be discharged to the distributing system 
of the sand filter by means of Merritt air-lock discharge siphons. The sand 
filter is to be provided with two longitudinal lines of underdrains which con- 
nect with a six-inch collecting drain and outlet pipe. The underdrains are to 
be covered with a six-inch layer of one-half inch broken stone ; over the broken 
stone are placed eighteen inches of coarse sand and a top layer of medium sand 
twelve inches deep. 

The sand filter has an area of about 0.026 acres and will be required to 
treat the contact bed effluent at the rate of about 384,000 gallons per acre per 
day when serving a population of 100 persons contributing sewage at a daily 
rate of 100 gallons per capita. 

In conclusion I would say that the proposed sewage disposal plant, if 
properly constructed and operated, should produce a satisfactory effluent when 
treating sewage contributed by a population up to 100 persons on the usual 
assumptions as to water consumption. Whenever the population to be served 
by the disposal works shall exceed 100 persons it will be necessary to in- 
crease the plant in accordance with plans to be approved by this Department. 

I therefore recommend that the plans be approved and a permit be issued 
allowing the discharge into the Saw Mill river of effluent from the proposed 
sewage disposal plant, and that the permit contain in addition to the usual 
revocation and modification clauses, the provision: 

That the amount of sewage to be passed through the sewage disposal 
plant shall be limited to that contributed by 100 persons until the 
capacity of such sewage disposal plant shall be increased in accordance 
with plans approved by this Department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



On October 1, 1910, plans for a sewer extension in Broadway in the village of 
Hastings-on-Hudson were submitted for approval by the board of trustees. 
These plans were approved on October 28, 1910, and a permit was issued allow- 
ing the discharge into the Hudson river of sewage from the proposed sewer on 
condition that whenever required by the State Commissioner of Health detailed 
pians satisfactory to this Department for such intercepting sewers as may be 
necessary to convey the entire sanitary sewage of the village to a suitable site 
for sewage disposal works together with detailed plans for sewage disposal 
works to treat the entire sanitary sewage of the village, accompanied by a 
proper application from the village authorities for the approval of such plans, 
shall be submitted to this Department for approval ; and that such intercepting 
sewers and any or all portions of such sewage disposal works as may be 
designated shall be constructed and put into operation whenever required by 
the State Commissioner of Health. 



412 State Depabtmbnt of Health 

On November 2S, 19 10^ plans for proposed sewers in Warburton avenue and 
in the '' Uniontown " sewer district were submitted for approval. These plans 
were approved on December 23, 1910, and a permit was issued allowing the 
discharge into the Hudson river of sewage from the proposed sewers. This 
permit contains in addition to the usual revocation and modification clauses 
the following conditions: 

1. That on or before January 1, 1912, the village of Hastings-ou- 
Hudson shall submit for approval detailed plans satisfactory to this 
Department for intercepting sewer for collecting and conveying the entire 
sanitary sewage of the village to a suitable eite or sites for sewage dis- 
poeeU works. 

2. That ofi or before January 1, 1912, the village of Hastings-on- 
Hudson shall submit for approval detailed plans satisfactory to the De- 
partment, providing for preliminary treatment of the entire sanitary 
sewage of the village, comprising ecreening, sedimentation or septic action 
or a combination of these methods, accompanied by general plans for addi- 
tional and more complete treatment of the sewage. 

3. That any or all portions of such intercepting sewers and sewage dis- 
posal works shall be constructed and put in operation whenever required 
oy the State Commissioner of Health. 



Albany, N. Y., October 25, 1910. 
Eugene H. Porteb, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N, F.; 

Deab Sib: — I beg to submit the following report on the examination of 
plans for the proposed sewer extension in the village of Hastings-on -Hudson 
recently submitted to this Department for approval by Ward Carpenter and 
Company, Civil Engineers and Surveyors of Tarrytown, N. Y., on behalf of 
the board of trustees. 

The records of the Department show that plans for a comprehensive sewer 
system for the village were approved on September 21, 1894, and that amended 
plans were approved by the Department on January 25, 1895. 

The plans now under consideration show that it is proposed to construct 
some 1,863 feet of 10'' sewer in Broadway from the village line of Dobbs 
Ferry to Edgar's lane. The sewer is to have a slope of from 0.53 per cent, 
to 1.2i3 per cent, and is to discharge into the existing sewer at the intercep- 
tion of Broadway and Edgar's lane. The sewage to be collected by the pro- 
posed sewer is to be discharged into the Hudson river at the wharf near the 
foot of Maple street extended. 

The sewer which it is now proposed to construct is shown by the plans ap- 
proved on October 4, 1894, referred to above. 

The plans have been carefully examined in regard to grades, velocities, 
capacities and other hydraulic and sanitary features in connection with the 
proposed sewer, and it is found to be adequate to meet the future require- 
ments for sanitary sewerage for the section to be sewered by it on the usual 
assumption as to population and water consumption, and assuming that iti 
construction the sewer will be made sufficiently water tight to prevent 
excessive infiltration of ground water. 

It should be kept in mind that the time is approaching when preliminary 
treatment, at least, should be given the sewage from Hastings-on-Hudson be- 
fore its discharge into the Hudson river. However, in view of the fact that 
the proposed sewer is shown on the plans approved in 1894, and in order that 
no unnecessary delay in constructing the sewer may result it would seem that 
approval of the plans might be given, provided the permit issued includes a 
clause requiring the submission of plans for intercepting sewers and sewage 
disposal works when required by this Department. 

I would, therefore, recommend that the plans be approved and a permit 
for the discharge into the Hudson river of sewage to be collected by the pro- 
posed sewer be issued which shall contain, in addition to the usual revoca- 



Sewerage and Sewage Disposal 413 

tiou and modification clauses, the provision that whenever required by the 
State Commissioner of Health detailed plans be submitted to this Department 
for intercepting sewers and sewage disposal works to treat the entire sewage 
of the village, and that such intercepting sewers and sewage disposal works 
shall thereafter be constructed and put into operation when required by the 
State Commissioner of Health. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE NORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



Albany, N. Y., December 9, 1910. 
Eugene H. Poster, M.D., 8tate Commissioner of Health, Albany, N, Y,: 

Dear Sib: — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of 
plans for proposed sewer extensions in the village of Hastings-on-Hudson, 
Westchester county, submitted to this Department for approval by Ward Car- 
penter and Company, Civil Engineers and Surveyors of Tarrytown, on behalf 
of the board of trustees, on November 28, 1910. 

The records of the Department show that original plans for a sewer system 
for the village were approved on September 21, 1894, and amended plans were 
approved on January 26, 1895. These plans provided for the discharge of 
untreated sewage into the Hudson river at several points. 

Plans for an extension to the sewer system in Broadway were approved 
on October 28, 1910. The permit issued in connection with the approval of 
these plans contains in addition to the usual revocation and modification 
clauses the condition: 

" That whenever required by the State Commissioner of Health detailed 
plans satisfactory to this Department for such intercepting sewers as may 
De necessary to conveiy the entire sanitary sewage of the village to a 
suitable site for sewage disposal works, together with detailed plans for 
sewage disposal works to treat the entire sanitary sewage of the village, 
accompanied by a proper application from the village authorities for 
the approval of such plans, shall be submitted to this Department for 
approval; and that such intercepting sewer and any or all portions of 
such sewage disposal works as may be designated shall be constructed 
and put into operation whenever required by the State Commissioner of 
Health." 

The plans now before the Department and under consideration show that 
it is proposed to construct some 1,600 feet of 8" and 10" sewer in Warburton 
avenue in general accordance with the plans approved in 1894, except that 
the proposed outlet into the Hudson river is to be located about 1,000 feet 
south of one of the outlets provided for by the original plans. Although the 
slope of the ground is such that the flow of sewage would be in the opposite 
direction from that provided for by the plans the engineers state in their 
report that it would be practically impossible to get a right-of-way for an 
outfall sewer into the river at a point farther north and the outfall sewer 
would also be longer at any other point than that shown by the plans. The 
cut, however, does not exceed 15 feet and it is pointed out that a deep cut is 
desirable inasmuch as the property on the westerly side of Warburton avenue 
is considerably below the street level. The 8" sewer has a slope varying 
from 0.75 per cent, to 1 per cent., and the 10" sewer is to be laid on a slope 
of 0.36 per cent. About 200 feet of the proposed sewer is tributary to the 
existing sewer in Warburton avenue. The proposed sewer extension should 
be adequate as to size and capacity to satisfactorily care for the sewage of 
the district to be served by it. 

Plans are also presented which provide for sewers in the easterly section 
of the village located on the Saw Mill river watershed, including the Union- 
town and Hudson Heights sewer districts. These sewers are for sanitary 
sewage only and vary in diameter from 8" to 15". It appears that the pro- 
posed sewers are somewhat larger than would be required to care for the 
ultimate contribution of sanitary sewage for the district to be served by them 



414 State Depabtment of Health 

on the UBual assumptions as to population and sewage contribution. Tliid« 
however, is a good fault and will insure ample capacities for future needs, 
provided that in the construction the sewers be made sufficiently water- 
tight to prevent excessive infiltration of ground water. 

The sewage to be collected by the proposed sewers is -to be conveyed by 
gravity to a piunping station located near the Putnam Division of the New 
York Central and Hudson River railroad at the foot of Farragut road from 
which it will be pumped through a 6'' cast-iron force main to the existing 
8" sewer in Farragut road near Merrill street, a distance of about 3,800 feet. 

The sewage pumps, which are in duplicate, are to be operated by compressed 
air similar to the Pries tman sewage ejector. According to the engineers the 
pumping plant is designed to care for an average flow of 300 gallons per 
minute or about 430,000 gallons per day, which is nearly equal to additional 
quantity of sewage which can be cared for by the existing 8" sewer on a 1.0 
per cent, slope in Farragut road. The proposed system should be adequate 
to care for the district to be served by it for a reasonable period in the 
future, inasmuch as the preseat population of the sewer district is only about 
600, according to the engineer's report. 

In view oi the fact that the plans under consideration provide for a 
comprehensive sewer system in a new sewer district which will greatly in- 
crease the amount of raw sewage discharged into the Hudson river, and In 
view of your consistent policy of removing, as far as possible, the gp*oss pollu- 
tion of the river by requiring at least screening or settling tank treatment 
of sewage before it is discharged into the Hudson river, especially where new 
sewer districts are involved, I believe that the village should be required at 
an early date to provide for the interception and treatment of the entire 
sanitary sewage of the village. 

I, therefore, recommend that the plans be approved and a permit issued in 
connection with the approval of the plans containing, in addition to the usual 
revocation and modification clauses, the condition that detailed plans satis- 
factory to this Departpaent for such intercepting sewers as mav be necessary 
to convey the entire sanitary sewage of the village to a suitable site for dis 
posal, together with detailed plans for sewage disposal works, providing for 
at least screening or settling tank treatment, or both, of the entire sanitary 
sewage of the village, be submitted to this Department for approval on or 
before January 1, 1912. 

Very respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 

HEMPSTEAD 

On October 21, 1910, plans for a sewer system and for sewage disposal 
works for the village of Hempstead were submitted for approval by the board 
of trustees. These plans were examined and returned to the designing engineer 
for revision as respecting the capacity and gradients of certain portions of 
the sewer system and the arrangement of double compartments at the screen- 
ing chambers. 

The plans were revised and resubmitted for approval on November 22, 1910. 
They were approved on December 2, 1910, and a permit was issued in con- 
nection with the approval of the plans on condition that the amount of sew- 
age to be treated in the disposal plant shall not exceed that contributed 
by 5,000 persons unless the plant is enlarged in accordance with approved 
plans. 

Albany, N. Y., November 7, 1910. 

Eugene H. Porter, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N, Y,: 

Dear Sir: — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of 
plans for a proposed sewer system and sewage disposal works for the village of 
Hempstead, Nassau county, submitted to this Department for approval by the 
board of trustees on October 21, 1910. 



Sewebage and Sewage Disposal 415 

The plans were prepared by Cyril E. Marshall, civil and landscape engineer 
of Hempstead, and comprise blue prints of the following in duplicate: 

1. Plan of the village of Hempstead east of Franklin street. 

2. Plan of the village of Hempstead west of Franklin street. 

3. Filter beds and outfall sewer to disposal works. 

4. Profiles of sewers and streets (two sets). 

5. Manholes and flush tanks. 

6. Profile of outfall sewer to disposal works. 

7. Pumping station No. 1 at Franklin street and Mill road. 

8. Pumping station No. 2 at disposal works. 

9. Disposal works. 

Specifications and report by the designing engineer were also submitted in 
duplicate. 

The report of the engineer states that the sewer system is designed on the 
separate plan and that all storm water from roofs^ streets or other areas 
are to be excluded from the sewers. It is understood and appears from the 
plans that the system covers all portions of the built-up sections of the vil- 
Lage, although only the northerly corporation line is shown on the plans. 

The village of Hempstead is situated in the northern part of the town of 
Hempstead, in the county of Nassau, and has a population, according to the 
statement of the engineer, of about 5,000. The village is provided with a 
water supply taken from wells. The total consumption is apparently 500,000 
gallons per day, equivalent to a per capita rate of 100 gallons per day, as 
this is the basis of design according to the engineer. 

The village has had a somewhat erratic growth for the past twenty years, 
according to the census figures, which are as follows: In 1890 it had a pop- 
ulation of 4,831; in 1900, 3,582; in 1902, 3,653; in 1905, 4,145; and according 
to the report of the engineer the population at present is estimated at 5,000 
persons. Owing to its close proximity to New York city and the increasing 
facilities for transportation in Long Island the village will probably have a 
more rapid growth in the future, and it is stated by the engineer that there 
is a possibility that the village limits will be extended in the course of a few 
years, and that provisions for such extension have been made in the design 
of the sewer system. 

The area of the village to be served by the proposed sewer system shown 
on the plans ia about 670 acres of which some 90 per cent, is tributary to the 
pumping station located at Franklin street and Mill road, and the sewage 
to be collected from the remainder of the area in the southeastern portion of 
the village will reach the sewage disposal site directly by gravity flow through 
the outfall sewer into which the pumps discharge. 

Inasmuch as the corporation limits are not shown on the plans as they 
should be, except on the north, it is impossible to determine from the plans 
if the proposed sewer system covers all portions of the village. According 
to the engineer the present population of the area covered by the proposed 
system is nearly 5,000 persons and, on the usual assumption of twenty persons 
per acre for nilly developed municipalities, the ultimate population to be 
provided for is about 13,400. The populations which will in the immediate 
future contribute sewage to the pumping station in the village and the outfall 
sewer with corresponding flow in gallons per day based on 100 gallons (aver- 
age rate of flow) and 300 gallons per capita, respectively, will be as follows: 

1. Population, 4,500; flow at 100, 450,000 gallons; flow at 300, 1,350,000 
gallons. 

2. Population, 5.000; flow at 100, 500,000 gallons; flow at 300, 1,500,000 
gallons. 

The populations which will ultimately contribute sewage to the pumping 
station and outfall sewer, respectively, with corresponding flows of 100 and 
300 gallons per capita per day will be as follows: 

1. Population, 12,000; flow at 100, 1,200,000 gallons; flow at 300, 
3,600,000 gallons. 

2. Population, 13,400; flow at 100, 1,340,000 gallons; flow at 300, 
4,020,000 gallons. 



416 State Depabtment of Health 

The plans have been carefully examined with respect to the sewerage bys- 
tem and sewage disposal works. In connection with the sewerage system the 
design has been carefully studied with reference to alignments, sizes, grades, 
capacities, facilities for cleaning, inspection and flushing, and other features 
of a hydraulic or sanitary nature. In connection with means for sewage dis- 
posal it has been studied with reference to general method and efficiency of 
the sewage disposal as a whole, and of the capacities, efficiencies and practical 
operation of individual structures, appurtenances and apparatus. 

In reference to the sewer system, it appears that although the minimum 
size of sewers used is 8^ there are a niraiber of flat grades and sections of 
sewers, including the outfall sewer, which are inadequate as to capacity to 
properly care for the ultimate maximum contribution of sewage on the usual 
assumptions as to populations and sewage contribution. 

The gradients of some of the S" sewers are as flat as 0.2, and the conse- 
quent velocity of flow would be too low to induce a self-cleansing of the sewer 
and prevent stoppage from occurring. Although automatic flush tanks are to 
be placed at the upper ends of all sew^er lines that are not to be extended the 
lengths of some of the 8" and ICT lines with flat gradients, especially of the 
former, are too great to be materially affected or benefited by such means of 
flushing except for comparatively short distances below the flush tanks. 

The minima slopes of different size sewers which should not be decreased 
except in extreme cases, even where ample facilities for regular flushing are 
provided, are as follows: 

0.35 per cent, for 8" sewers. 

0.25 per cent, for 10" sewers. 

0.18 per cent, for 12" sewers. 

0.13 per cent, for 15" sewers. 

0.10 per cent, for 18" sewers, etc. 

On the usual assiunption as to population and sewage contribution, i. e., 
20 persons per acre at 300 gallons per capita per day, the ultimate maximum 
rate of contribution of sewage tributary to the 8" sewer on a 0.4 per cent, 
g^ade in Fulton %venue between Hilton avenue and Franklin street, assuming 
that the sewer district shown on the plan be not extended in a westerly direc- 
tion, will be about 1.35 cubic feet per second and the capacity of this sewer 
on 0.4 per cent, grade flowing full is only about .66 cubic feet per second. 
On the same assumption the proposed sewers in portions of Franklin, Front 
and Clinton streets and Fulton avenue are not adequate to care for the prob- 
able, ultimate, future contribution of sewage. 

Using the same basis of computation and assuming also that the territory 
covered by the proposed sewer system will not be extended the ultimate 
maximum rate contribution of sewage to be cared for by the 18" outfall 
sewer will be about 4,000,000, while the carrying capacity of this sewer on 
a grade of 0.2 per cent, is only about 3,000,000 gallons per day when flowing 
full. The size of this sewer should be increased, therefore, to at least 20** 
in order to properly care for the probable maximum rate of sewage contribu- 
tion when the territory to be served by the proposed sewer system is fully 
developed. 

It appears that the efficiency and capacity of the sewer system could be 
increased and most of the flat grades of the small sewers eliminated by run- 
ning a comparatively large sewer in the streets along the creek in the astern 
section of the village to a point at or near Jackson street, and by having 
smaller branches cross the creek at one or two points to connect with such 
trunk sewer. This would tend to concentrate the sewage at the upper end of 
the trunk sewer quickly, thus securing self-cleansing velocities by increasing 
the depth of flow of the sewer. Such trunk sewer could possibly be provided 
for in the western section of the village also. 

As an alternative means for providing increased capacities of sewers, where 
needed, and insuring a more nearly self-cleansing velocity of flow in some 
of the lateral sewers, it is possible to increase the diameters of some of the 
main trunk and more important lateral sewers, the gradients remaining the 
same, and to increase the gradients of the upper sections of some of the lateral 



Sewkrage and Sewage Disposal 417 

sewers where an increase in diameter is not warranted by the amount of 
flow to be provided for. If especial facilities for flushing are provided at the 
head of such lateral sewers the danger of stoppage in these sewers will be 
greatly lessened. Owing to the unusual conditions obtaining at Hemp»tead 
with iWpect to the flatness of the area to be sewered and the height of ground 
water near the pumping plant as compared to the invert elevation of the main 
trunk sewer leading to the pumping plant, I believe that it may be found 
necessary to construct some of the 8" lateral setwers on gradients of from 
0.25 per cent, to 0.3 per cent. 

Alao the grade of some of the sewers could be increased by better balancing 
the available fall, viz. : the S'^ sewer in St. Paul road has a grade of 0.3 per cent, 
in the upper half of the sewer and of 0.4 per cent, in the lower seotion. The 
gradient could be changed so as to give a slope of 0.35 per cent, for its entire 
length. 

As noted by the engineer the portion of Long Island on which the village 
of Hempstead is located is comparatively flat and has an average slope of 
about fifteen feet to the mile toward the south. The problem, therefore, of 
designing an efficient sewer system with adequate grades is difficult and has 
evidently required a great deal of study.- This Department has neither the 
time nor facilities to do more than offer the above suggestions for improving 
the design as respecting capacity of the system and velocity of flow. 

The alignment of all sewers are straight between manholes which are to be 
placed at street and sewer line intersections and at all points of change of 
grade and alignment. The manholes are spaced on an average of 300 feet 
apart and the spacing rarely exceeds 400 feet. 

Automatic flush tanks four feet in diameter are to be placed at all dead ends 
exoept where sewers are to be extended. These tanks are to have a maximum 
depth of 6'-0" and are provided with 5" siphons. According to the profiles 
of the sewers and the detailed plans of flush tanks a break in the grade of 
the sewer is to be made 10 feet from the center of the flush tank. 

The sewage from about 90 per cent, of the village is tributary to a central 
pumping station located near the intersection of Franklin street and Mill roao. 
The sewage upon reaching the pumping station is discharged into a square 
manhole 4'x4'xl0' deep placed adjacent to the receiving well. The sewage 
flows into the receiving well through an opening IS'^ square after passing 
through a vertical bar screen 4 feet wide placed in front of the outlet. The 
screen is to consist of ^" bars spaced y^" apart in the clear. It appears 
that the screen cannot readily be removed and no means or facilities are pro- 
vided for cleaning the screen and handling and disposing of the screening. 

Although the screens in thie case are primarily for the purpose of protect- 
ing the pumps by removing the coarse floating material from the sewage 
rather than as a means of preliminary treatment they should, nevertheless, 
be installed in duplicate in separate chamber so that they may be more acces- 
sible at times of dogging. Cleaning of the screens and the handling of the 
screenings would also be facilitated if they were to be placed in an inclined 
position wi4:h an operating platform slightly above the screens. 

The pump well is divideii into two compartments consisting of a receiving 
well and suction well having a combined capacity of about 18^000 gallons. 
Although no connection is shown between the pump and suction wells this is 
probably due to error in drafting. The pumps are placed in an adjacent dry 
well which can be drained into the suction well when empty. 

According to the plans and the report of the engineer it is proposed to 
install at present two 6" vertical top suction volute centrifugal sewage pumps 
of the Worthington type with a capacity of 750 gallons per minute each, 
equivalent to about 2,160,000 gallons per day for the two pumps. It appears, 
therefore, that the pumps have a capacity equal to about 1.6 times the es- 
timated maximum rate of contribution for the present population. The plans 
provide for the installation of two additional pumps whenever required. 
Aach pump is to be driven by a direct connected 15-horsepower Wagner verti- 
cal m<kor with a Cutler hammer float switch and self-starting control. Alter - 

14 



418 State Department of Health 

nating single phase 60 cycle current of 220 volts is to be used far motive 
power. The fetatic head under which the pumps will operate varies from 10 
to 22 feet and the starting apparatus is designed to start the pump at dif- 
ferent heads. 

The pumps are to discharge the aewage through a 12'^ force main some 
2,000 feet long to a manhole at the intersection of Greenwich and Grove streets 
from which point it flows by gravity through an 18" sewer on a grade of 
0.2 per cent, to a second pumping station at the disposal site some 7,400 feet 
south of Grove street. 

The disposal site is to be located in the sandy district to the south of the 
village and consists of 41 acres of land. The disposal works are ultimately 
to comprise four complete units each consisting of two pumping stations, u 
septic tank, dosing ciiamber and 12 sand filter beds, two of which are to be 
used as sludge beds. It is proposed to construct one pumping station and 
one unit of the disposal works at present. 

This pumping station is the same in design and capacity as the first both 
as to arrangement and equipment. The pumps are to discharge the sewage 
into the septic tank and will operate under a static head of from 16 to 22 feet. 

The septic tank which is covered has but one compartment, 125'x30' with 
6' depth of flow, giving a liquid capacity of some 168,000 gallons and is 
sufficient to provide for about 8 hours' detention of sewage when serving a 
population oi 5,000 persons on the usual assiunptions as to sewage contribu- 
tions. The tank has submerged inlets and outlets and the average velocity 
of flow through the tank will be about 3" per minute when treating sewage 
at the rate of 500,000 gallons per day. 

Two sludge pipes are located near the outlet end of the tank which are 
provided with a blow-ofl* valve so that the sludge and supernatant liquid can 
be discharged to the sludge beds by gravity when required. It appears that 
the sludge outlets could be placed near the inlets to better advantage inas- 
much as the greater portions of the sludge is usually deposited near inlet of 
the tank. 

From the septic tank the sewage passes into a small separate chamber 4' 
wide through 15 submerged outlets. From this chamber the sewage flows into 
a dosing chamber 50'x30'x4' deep, having a total capacity of about 45,000 gal- 
lons. Five plural alternating 14" siphons of the Miller type are located in 
a separate chamber 20'xl0'x4' deep which communicates with the main cham- 
ber by means of four 18" openings. According to the report of the engineer 
tbe siphon:* are designed to empty the dosing tank in about 15 minutes. 

The siphons discharge through 15" and 18" vitrified pipes to the 10 sand 
filter beds having a total area of 3.4 acres. These beds are provided with 
distributing systems but are not underdrained, it being assumed that the 
soil which consists of sand some 40 feet deep will be able to absorb the effluent. 
Wlien treating sewage at the rate of 500,000 gallons per day the beds will 
be required to operate at a rate of 145,000 gallons per acre per day. The 
sewage disposal plant, if properly constructed and operated, should provide 
for a satisfactory means of caring for the sewage for a population up to 
about 5.000 persons on the usual assumption as to sewage contribution. 

It appears, therefore, that the four units comprising the sewage dis]>0fiai 
works to be constructed ultimately will care for a future population of some 
20,000 persons. 

In view of the results of our examination of these plans and after careful 
consideration of the essential features of the design and of local and general 
requirements with respect to proper methods for the disposal of sewage from 
the proposed system of sewers it appears that the plans, with the exception 
of the screening chamber plans, are well designed in this respect and provide 
for a satisfactory means of sewage disposal. 

With respect to the proposed sewer system, however, it appears that there 
are a few features of the plans which should be revised before final approval 
of the plans is given. There are, as indicated above, a few lines of sewers 
with flat grades and the system, including the outfall sewer, is not entirely 
adequate as to capacity, as noted above, to care for the probable future con- 
tribution on the usual assumptions as to population and water consumption 



J 



Sewebage axd Sewage Disposal 419 

winch gives rise to the sewage. I would recommend, therefore, that the plans 
be returned for amendment in accordance with tlie suggestions embodied in thisf 
report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



Albany, N. Y., November 28, 1910. 
Eugene H. Pobter, M.D., State Commissioner of Healthy Albany, N. y.; 

De.\r Sib: — I beg to submit the following suplementary report on an ex- 
amination of amended plans for a proposed sewer system and sewage disposal 
plant for the village of Hempstead, Nassau county, resubmitted to this De- 
partment for approval on November 22, 1910. 

The plans have been carefully examined by the Engineering Division and 
it appears that they have been revised in general accordance with the recom- 
mendations embodied in my report of November 7, 1910, on the examination 
of the original plans. 

The tlat gradients of some of the sewers criticised in my last report have 
been increased or the sizes of the sewers increased so as to give a minimum 
slope of 0.3 per cent, for the 8" sewers, 0.2 per cent, for the 10" sewers and 
0.16 per cent, for 12" sewers. While these gradients are rather flat to insure 
self-cleansing velocities except when the sewers are flowing full or half-full, 
clogging can be prevented by proper flushing and attention. 

Ihe design of the system has been rearranged so that trunk sewers are to 
be constructed in the streets along the creek which has permitted the use of 
larger sewers on flatter grades than shown on the original plans. 

The sizes of some of the main sewer lines tributary to the central pumping 
plant at Franklin street and Mill road have been increased so as to better 
care for the probable future contribution of sewage from the sections served 
by them on the usual asbumptions as to population and water consumption 
giving rise to the sewage. 

The size of the 18" outfall sewer from the end of the force main in Green- 
wich street to the sewage disposal works has also been increased to 20" so 
that this sewer will now care for a population of some 13,000 persons con- 
tributing sewage at a maximum rate of 300 gallons per day. 

It appears, therefore, that the proposed sewer system should be adequate 
to meet the needs of the village for a considerable period in the future, assum- 
ing that in the construction the sewers be made sufficiently water-tight to 
prevent excessive infiltration of ground water. 

The receiving manholes or screen chambers in connection with the pump- 
ing stations have been enlarged so as to form two compartments. Each com- 
partment is provided with two inclined screens, 2'x4', composed of ^" rodb 
spaced 1" apart on centers, giving a total screening area of 32 square feet at 
each pumping plant. 

Although each compartment of the screen chamber is provided with valves 
at the inlet and outlet so that either one may be by-passed while cleaning, no 
platforms, however, are provided to receive the screenings and for the operator 
to stand on when raking the screens. It appears also that the screens are 
rather fine and will tend to clog quickly and require frequent cleaning, thereby 
increasing the cost of operation so that it may become necessary to replace 
them with somewhat coarser screens before the sewer system is fully developed. 

The design of tJie sewage disposal plant has not been changed from that 
shown by the original plans. 

It appears that the sewer system, pumping stations and sewage disposal 
plant if properly constructed and operated should provide satisfactory sewage 
facilities for the village of Hempstead for a reasonable period in the future 
and I would therefore beg to recommend that the plans be approved. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

• Chief Engineer 



420 State Depabtment of EDeialth 

ILION 

On October 31, 1910, plans for sewer extensions in the village of Ilion were 
submitted for approval by the sewer commissioners. These plans were ap- 
proved on December 2, 1910, and a permit was issued allowing the discharge 
of sewage from the proposed sewers into the Mohawk river. This permit con- 
tains in addition to the usual revocation and modification clauses the follow- 
ing conditions: 

1. That on or before January 1, 1912, detailed plans for settling, sedi- 
mentation or septic tanks to treat the sanitary sewage of the village of 
Ilion, which shall meet the requirements of this Department accompanied 
by general plans for additional or supplementary works for more complete 
treatment of the sewage, sftiall be submitted to this Department for 
approvaL 

2. That the said settling, sedimentation or septic tanks shall be con- 
structed and put in operation by September 1, 1912. 

3. That whenever required by the State Commissioner of Health detailed 
plana for said additional works for more complete treatment of the sewage 
of the village shall be submitted for approval and that any or all por- 
tions of said additional or supplementary works for more complete treat- 
ment of sewage shall be constructed and put in operation when required 
by the State Commissioner of Health. 



Albany, N. Y., Novemker 18, 1910. 
Eugene H. Pobteb, M.D., State CommiaHoner of Health, Alhaa^y, N. Y,: 

Deab Sib: — I beg to submit the following report of an examination of plans 
for proposed sanitary sewer extensions in the village of Ilion, Herkimer county, 
submitted to this Department for approval by the sewer commissioners on 
October 31. 1910. 

The records of the Department show that plans for a comprehensive sewer 
system, pumping station and sewage disposal plant were approved on January 
16, 1893. The plans showed that the proposed pumping station and sewage 
disposal plant consisting of a chemical precipitation plant were to be located 
near the West Shore railroad tracks and some 600 feet east of East street 
extended. It appears that the pumping station and chemical precipitation 
plant were never constructed. 

On August 25, 1893, amended plans were approved showing ohangea of align- 
ment of the outfall sewer and outlet and change of location of the sewage 
disposal plant to a point near the intersection of East street extended and 
the West Shore railroad, some 600 feet west of the location shown by the pre- 
vious plane. 

On January 16, 1894, amended plans for the sewer system for the village 
were approved by the Department. These plans pro\'ided for a change in the 
alignment, sizes and gradients of the sewers in the vicinity of River and Kail- 
road streets and Brewery lane between the West Shore railroad and the Erie 
oaoial so «« to eliminate the pumping plant at the intersection of Bailroad 
and River streets and thereby change the entire sewer system of the village 
into a gravity system. 

On February 13, 1902, plans for extensions to the sewer system were 
approved. 

The report of the public sewer system made in accordance with section 79 
of the Public Health Law, as amended by chapter 468 of the Laws of 1903, 
together with a plan showing all sewers constructed to date, were not submitted 
until April 15, 1904. This report shows that tlie total length of sewers in the 
system at that time was 12.41 miles and the estimated population served by 
the sewer system about 4,500. The population of the village in 1905, ac- 
cording to the State census, was 5,924. 

The plans now submitted were prepared by James D. Ringwood, civil engi- 
neer of Ilion, and eomprise duplicate tracings of plans of proposed sewer 
extension* and dapUcate tracings of profiles of proposed sewers and streets. 



Sewerage and Sewage Disposal 421 

These plans show that it is proposed to oonstmct eight-inch sewers on grades 
Tarying from .34 per cent to 11.7 per cent, in Hakes road, Spring, Maple, 
McCann, Elm and Gordon streets. 

Manholes are to be placed at all points of change of grade and alignment 
and flush tanks are to be located at the upper ends of Maple and Elm streets 
and Hakes road. The spacing of the manholes vary from 75 feet to 500 feet, 
but in no case are manholes to be placed at a greater distance than 500 feet 
apart. 

The plans have been carefully examined in reference to sizes, grades and 
capacities in connection with the proposed sewers and it is found that the 
sewer extensions should be adequate as to size and capacity to satisfactorily 
care for the sanitary sewage of the 4iBtrict to be served by them on the usual 
assiunptions as to population and to sewage contribution provided that in the 
construction the sewers be made sufficiently water tight to prevent excessive 
infiltration of groond water. 

The urgent need lor sewage disposal was pointed out in the report of the 
Consulting Engineer of the Depar^ent, dated October 27, 1892, on his exam- 
ination of plans for sewerage for the village and in accordance with the resolu- 
tion of the then State Board of Health revised plans including plans for the 
chemical treatment of sewage before discharging into the Mohawk were sub- 
sequently submitted for approval and reported upen under date of January 6, 
1893. These revised plans were approved on January 11, 1893, but the sewage 
disposal works were never constructed as noted above. The discharge into the 
Mohawk river of untreated sewage from the village is therefore in direct vio- 
lation of the Public Health Law and Village Laws. 

The need for sewage disposal along the Mohawk river is becoming more and 
more urgent, and in view of the policy of this Department to eventually re- 
move, as far as possi'ble, all pollution of the waters of the State caused by 
the direct discharge of raw sewage and inasmuch as no plans for sewerage are 
being approved that do not provide for some means of sewage disposal, 
especially where public water Bupplies are involved, the village of Ilion i^ould 
at this time be required to provide for the treatment of its sanitary sewage at 
an earlv date. 

I am of the opinion, however, that the village should not be required to 
construct the rather expensive and antedated chcmiical precipitation plant pro- 
vided for by the plans approved on January 11« 1893^ inasmuch as a properly 
eocistructed and operated settling, sedimentation m* septic tank will give prac- 
tically as satisfactory results as those obtained by means of chemical precipita- 
tion, and the cost of operation in the case of ch^nical precipitation is much 
greater than by either of the other means of preliminary treatment owing to 
the added cost of chemicals and the additional amount of sludge to be cared 
for. 

While it may not be necessary for the village to provide immediately lor 
complete purification of the sewage that is now being discharged into the 
Mohawk river, steps should be taken to provide for at least settling, sedimenta- 
tion or septic tank treatment at an early date. 

I would therefore recommend that the plans now before the Department be 
approved and a permit issued allowing the discharge into the Mohawk river 
of sewage to be collected by the proposed sewers and that the permit contain 
in addition to the usual modification and revocation clauses, the following 
provisions : 

1. That only sanitary or domestic sewage and no surface or storm water 
from streets, roofs or other areas shall be admitted to the proposed sewers. 

2. That on or before January 1, 1912, detailed plans for settling, sedi- 
mentation or septic tanks to treat the sanitary sewage of the village of 
Ilion, which shall meet the requirements of this Department,- accompanied 
by general plans for additional or supplementary works for more complete 
treatment of the sewage, shall be submitted to this Department lor 
approval. 

3. That the said settling, sedimentation or septic tanks shall be con- 
structed and put into operation by September I, 1912. 



4i'22 State Depajkt3I£nt of Health 

4. That whenever required by the State Commissioner of llealth de- 
tailed plans for said additional works for more complete treatment of the 
sewage of the village shall be submitted for approval and that any or all 
portions of said additional or supplementary works for more complete 
treatment of the sewage shall be constructed and put in operation when 
required by the State Commissioner of Health. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTOX, 

Chief Engineer 



JOHNSTOWN 

On May 2, 1910, plans for a proposed intercepting sewer in the city of 
Johnstown were submitted for approval by the city engineer on behalf of the 
common council. These plans were approved on June 13, 1910, and a con- 
ditional permit issued allowing the discharge, into Ca\*adutta creek, of sewaj^e 
to be collected by the proposed sewer. 

On June 29, 1910, plans for a proposed sewer extension in Grove street were 
submitted for approval. The plans were approved on July 26, 1910, and a per> 
mit was issued allowing the discharge of eewage from the proposed sewer into 
Cayadutta creek. 

Plans for a proposed sewer extension in East State street were approved on 
August 20, 1910, and a permit issued allowing the discharge of sewage from 
the proposed sewer in Cayadutta creek. 

On August 23, 1910, plans for an extension of the intercepting sewer were 
submitted for approval. These plans were not satisfactory inasmuch as the 
capacity of the proposed sewer was considerably smaller than that portion of 
the intercepting sewer above the proposed extension and the plans were there- 
fore returned to the city engineer for amendment with the request that pre- 
liminary plans be submitted showing a tentative location of the proposed 
sewage disposal site together with a profile of proposed route of a sewer from 
Montgomery street to such disposal site. These plans were amended in ac- 
cordance with the recommendations of the Department and were resubmitted 
for approval on November 21, 1910. The revised plans were approved on 
December 2, 1910, and a conditional permit was issued allowing the dis- 
charge into Cayadutta creek of sewage from the proposed sewer. 

The permits issued to the common council of the city of Johnstown during 
the past year contain the condition that on or before June 1, 1911, complete 
detailed plans, satisfactory to this Department, for the purification of the 
entire sanitary sewage of the city shall be submitted for approval; and that 
the construction of any or all portions of the sewage disposal works ©hown by 
said plans shall thereafter be undertaken when required by the State Com- 
missioner of Health and be completed within the time limit set by said 
Commissioner. 



Albany, N. Y., June 15, 1910. 
Eugene H. Porteb, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N. V.: 

Deab Sir: — I beg to submit the following report of the examination of 
plans for a proposed intercepting sanitary trunk sewer in the city of Johns- 
town, Fulton county, submitted to this Department for approval by the city 
engineer on behalf of the common council on May 2, 1910. 

The city of Johnstown has a population of about 10,000 and is located in 
the south central part of Fulton county near the Montgomery county 
boundary line. It is situated on both sides of Cayadutta creek, which 
meanders through the city in a southerly direction and empties into the Mo- 
hawk river at Fonda, a distance of about seven miles below Johnstown 
measured along the stream. The creek has a fall of about 400 feet in that 
distance. 



Sewerage and Sewage Disposal 423 

The water supply of the city is furnished by the municipality which owns 
the entire watershed. 

The records of the Department show that the construction of the sewer 
system commenced in 1876 and although extensions of this system have been 
made from time to time until at present practically the entire population is 
served by sewers, none of these extensions have been submitted for approval 
or approved by this Department. All but a small portion of the existing 
sewers are constructed on the separate plan and discharge into Cayadutta 
creek within the city limits. 

The plans and documents now under consideration were submitted in per- 
son by the city engineer and city attorney and consist of duplicate copies of 
each of the following : 

1. A eeneral plan showing the alignment of sewers constructed to date 
in the city. 

2. A general plan for a proposed intercepting sewer with discharge into 
Cayadutta creek in the lower end of the city, comprising: 

(a) A general plan of intercepting sewer. 

(b) Profile of intercepting sewer. 

3. Report and application signed by the city attorney. 

4. One copy of specifications. 

A duplicate set of blue-prints of plans for sewers recently constructed by 
the city were later submitted in order to facilitate the examination of the 
plans now before the Department. 

The proposed intercepting and trunk sewer is to extend along Cayadutta 
creek from the existing 24-inch sewer near Market street to Montgomery 
street, a distance of 4J50 feet, and is to consist of 24-inch and 30-inch vitrified 
tile and iron pipe sewers, the latter to be used where the sewers are to be laid 
in trenches in the bottom of the creek. This precaution should tend to reduce 
the infiltration of ground water or creek water to a minimum if proper care 
is taken during construction to secure tight joints. Manholes are to be 
located at intervals not exceeding 500 feet. 

The proposed trunk sewer will intercept all but one of the sewers which now 
discharge into Cayadutta creek and the outlet of this sewer as well as that of 
the proposed trunk sewer is below the series of ponds in the western pare ot 
the city which are at present polluted by sewage. 

The plans have been carefully examined in regard to sizes, grades, velocities, 
capacities and otlier hydraulic and sanitary features in connection with the 
intercepting sewer and it is found to be sufficient to meet the probable future 
requirements for sanitary sewage of the district to be served upon the usual 
basis of population and water consumption, and assuming that in the con- 
struction the sewers will be made suflBciently water tight to prevent excessive 
infiltration of ground water. It appears, however, that considerable saving 
could be eff'ected by reducing the size of the proposed sewer from 30" to 2^ 
between stations 24 -|- 04 and 29 -f- 29, a distance of 725 feet, inasmuch as 225 
feet of this section is to be of iron pipe. This reduction in size can safely be 
made since a 24" sewer on a 1.48 per cent, grade has a greater carrying 
capacity than the sewer below this section which is to be 30" in diameter and 
have a grade of 0.3 per cent. 

It will be noticed that the plans make no provision for any method of sewage 
purification, the contemplated improvements involving merely the interception 
of the sewage and conveying it to a point below the city where no nuisance 
will be created afl'ecting the citizens of Johnstown. In order to determine the 
extent of pollution of Cay;idutta creek above and through the city as a 
result of the discharge of sewage of not only Johnstown but the citj' of 
Gloversville, and to secure other information that might have a bearing' upon 
the requirements for sewage disposal in the case of Johnstown, I visited the 
city on May 16, 1910, and made an examination of the creek through the 
city. 

It appears that above the discharge of the intercepting sewers just below 
Market street Cayadutta creek is comparatively clean and apparently no 
nuisance would be created in this section of the stream during any season. 
Below the discharge point of this 24" sewer, however, the stream is seriously 



424 State Department of Health 

fouled and was not only a nuisance at the time of my visit bint unquestionably 
would be one to a worse extent during the summer season. 

Just below the Fonda, Johnstown and Gloversville railroad the oM canal 
enters Cayadutta creek. This canal is covered for a portion of its diiFfcanee 
through the city and into it is discharged the sewage of Gloversville some tmo 
miles above. Consequently below the intersection of the canal with Cayadutta 
creek the combined pollution of G-loversville and Johnstown produces a con- 
dition of sewage pollution that is hardly if at all exceeded anywhere in the 
State. It should be noted, however, in this connection that the city of Glover* 
ville has authorized the construction of a sewage disposal plant and that when 
the construction of this plant is completed the sewage pollution of this canal 
water will be removed, thus leaving in Cayadutta creek the pollution from 
Johnstown only. 

It is therefore quite important for the city of Johnstown, owing to the 
serious nuisance that exists along this stream on the greater portion of its 
course through the city, that the sewage now discharged into the stream 
should be intercepted and carried below the city. It is likewise important 
that suitable provision should be made for sewage purification, either at the 
present time or in the very near future. The city of Gloversville has already 
imdertaken to purify its sewage for the benefit of the city of Johnstown and 
riparian owners, and it appears that these plans will be executed within a 
reasonably short time. There is no legitimate reason why the city of Johns- 
town should not do the same thing for the benefit of riparian owners below 
Johnstown. There is, however, an important difference between the condi- 
tions below the city of Gloversville and those existing below the city of 
Johnstown, namely: that below the city of Glovers\ille the health and comfort 
of a very large community is immediately affected, whereas below the city of 
Johnstown a relatively few riparian owners live along this stream between 
the city and its junction with the Mohawk river. 

In consideration of the important distinction above pointed out in regard 
to the two cities, the further fact that a very necessary relief is immediately 
needed in the city of Johnstown from the present sewage pollution of this 
stream and the nuisance resulting from it; the limited funds available for 
sewerage improvements at the present time by the city, that the construction 
of disposal works for the purification of the sewage of the city might be 
temporarily deferred under certain conditions cited below; although no special 
study has been made by the city engineer or other person, to my knowledge, as 
to the feasibility, type or proper location for disposal works below the city, 
it appeared from my inspection of the land that there was sufficient fall and 
the requisite area somewhere available below the city for the construction of 
suitable methods of sewage disposal. 

Since the plans for the proposed system of intercepting sewers are suitable 
from an engineering standpoint as pointed out above, and notwithstanding the 
lack of detail study as to the exact Uiethod and location of suitable works for 
the disposal of the sewage, it is from my inspection, easily possible to design 
these works for the economical and satisfactory disposal or purification of the 
sewage from this system when necessary, I should recommend on the grounds of 
immediate relief from present insanitary conditions in the city, that these plans 
be approved and a permit be issued for the discharge of sewage at proposed 
outlet upon the conditions: that, satisfactory plans be submitted by the city 
within one year providing for the purification of the sewage of the entire 
city and that whenever in the opinion of the Commissioner it shall become 
necessary, the construction of any or all of said sewage disposal plant shall be 
undertaken and completed within the time limit set by him. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



Sbwkraqe and Sewaob Disposai. 425 

Aidant, N. Y., July 25, 1910. 
EuoBTfE M. PoBTER, M.D., State Commieaioner of Health, Albany, N, Y.: 

DiiiUK'SiB: — I beg to submit the following report on the examination of 
plans for a proposed sewer extension in the city of Johnstown, Fulton county, 
submitted to this Department for approval by the common council on June 
29. 1910. 

The plans show that it is proposed to construct an eight-inch sanitary sewer 
in Grove street from Mill street 250 feet west. The topography of Grove 
street is such that this sewer will probably never be extended and is therefore 
adequate as to size and capacity ror future requirements for the conveyanc 
of sanitary sewage provided that in construction the sewer is made sufficiently 
water tight to prevent excessive infiltration of ground water. 

Plans were recently approved by this Department for the construction uf an 
intercepting sewer in the city of Johnstown and the permit issued by this 
Department for the discharge into Cayadutta creek of sewage to be collected 
by this sewer required that on or before June 1, 1911, complete detailed planS) 
satisfactory to this Department, for the purification of the entire sanitary 
sewage of tlie city shall be submitted for approvals 

Therefore the question of the disposal oi sewage need not be considered in 
connection with the plans now before the Department for approval inasmuch 
as this matter was carefully considered in my report of June 15, 1910, on the 
examination of plans for the construction of the intercepting sewer approved 
by you on that date. 

I beg to recommend that the plans be approved and a permit issued allowing 
the discharge of sewage to be collected by the proposed sewer into Cayadutta 
creek. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



ALBAI9T, N. Y., AMguat 19, 1910. 
EvoBNE H. Poster, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Alhany, N. Y.i 

Deab Sib:— ^I beg to submit the following report on the eatamination of 
plans for a proposed reconstruction and extension of the present sewer in 
East State street in the city of Johnstown, Fulton county, submitted to this 
Department for approval by the city engineer on behalf of the common council 
on August 13, 1910. 

The plans show that it is proposed to reconstruct some 250 feet sewer la 
East State street easterly from Chase street on a slope of 0.5 and to extend 
this sewer on the same slope for a distance of about 560 feet beyond the end 
of the existing sewer. The total length of this sewer will be 810 feet and 
owing to the topography of this street the proposed sewer will probably not 
be extended in the future. 

The sewer is found to be adequate as to size and capacity to meet the prob- 
able future requirements for sanitary sewage for the district to be served by 
it» assuming toat in the construction the sewer is made sufficiently water- 
tight to prevent excessive infiltration of ground water. 

The sewer, however, should be provided with an intermediate manhole in 
order to facilitate cleaning and inspection. The distance between manholes 
should not be greater than 500 feet and the proposed sewer is to be 810 feet 
with no manholes except at the upper and lower ends of the sewer. 

The question of sewage disposal for the cit^ was carefully considered in 
my report of June 15, 1910, on the examination of plans for tlie proposed 
intercepting sewer and need, therefore, not be taken up in connection with the 
present plans. 

I would recommend that the plans be approved and a permit be issued 
allowing the discharge into Cayadutta creek of sewage to be collected by the 
proposed sewer on the condition that an intermediate manhole be inserted on 



426 State Department of Health 

the line of this sewer. I would also recommend that the permit contains the 
provision as to the future disposal of sewage of the city of Johnstown em- 
Dodied in the permit issued to the common council, June 15, 1910. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



Albany, N. Y., September 28, 1910. 
Eugene H. Pcateb, M.D., State Commissioner of Healthy Albany y N. Y.: 

Dbab Sir: — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of 
plans for a proposed extension of the intercepting sewer along Cayadutta 
creek in the city of Johnstown, Fulton county, submitted to this Department 
for approval by the city engineer on behalf of the common council on August 
23, 1910. 

Plans for a 30" intercepting sewer for the city were approved on June 15, 
1910. This sewer extended from Market street to Montgomery street along 
Cayadutta creek, a distance of some 4,600 feet. All but one of the outfall 
sewers of the city which formerW discharged into the creek at various points 
within the city limits are to be intercepted by this sewer. These plans also 
provided for a tentative extension of this sewer on a 0.30 per cent, grade. 

The plans now under consideration show that it is proposed to extend this 
30" intercepting sewer from Montgomery street southerly along Cayadutta 
creek for a distance of about 700 feet. This additional extension will inter- 
cept a 12" sewer, known as the Madirfon avenue outfall sewer, below Mont- 
gomery street. 

According to the plans it is proposed to construct this sewer from station 
46+30 to station 53-1-05 on a slope of 0.15 per cent. While this slope is ade- 
quate to give self-cleansing velocities in a sewer of this size it does not appear 
that the capacity of this sewer on a slope of 0.15 per cent, will be adequate 
to care for the sewage of the city when fully developed on the usual assump- 
tions as to population and sewage contribution and the basis of computation 
used in passing upon the plans for that portion of the intercepting sewer above 
Montgomery street, approved on June 15. 1910. 

Although the proposed extension will be required to care for considerably 
more sewage than the intercepting sewer above Montgomery street the capacity 
of the former will be only two-thirds that of the latter. 

It will be necessary, therefore, to either increase the size of the proposed 
extension or to increase the slope to at least 0.30 per cent, so that the capacity 
of this section will be at least equal to that of the intercepting sewer above 
the proposed extension, thereby better balance the design of the intercepter 
for the entire distance and make it more adequate and meet the probable 
future requirements of the city. It may be possible to utilize a portion of 
the 13.79 feet of head lost in the 51 feet of sewer between stations 45-1-79 and 
46+30 to increase the slope of the section of the proposed extension now 
under consideration as well as in the case of future extensions of this sewer. 

It appears that at this time before any plans for extensions to the intercept- 
ing sewer are approved by this Department tentative or preliminary plans 
showing a profile and proposed route to the disposal plant site should be sub- 
mitted in order to show the feasibility of further extending this sewer and 
conveying the sewage to the proposed disposal plant by gravity. 

I, therefore, beg to recommend that the plans be returned to the city engineer 
for amendment, in accordance with the above sugsrcptions, and that he also 
be requested to submit tentative or preliminary plans showing the probable 
location of the sewage disposal plant, together with a profile of the proposed 
route of the outfall sewer to such sewage disposal plant. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



Sewerage and Sewage Disposal 42T 

Albany, N. Y., November 26, 1910. 
EtJOENE H. Porter, M.D., State Commissioner of Healthy Albany, A\ Y.: 

Dear Sir: — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of 
amended plans for a proposed extension of the intercepting sewer aJong Cay- 
adutta creek in the city of Johnstown, Fulton county, resubmitted to this 
Department for approval by the city engineer on November 21, 1910. 

The plans have been revised in accordance with the recommendations em- 
bodied in my report of September 28, 1910, and show that it is proposed to 
extend the 30" intercepting sewer on a slope of 0.3 per cent, along Cayadutta 
creek southerly from Montgomery street to a temporary outlet into this creek, 
a distance of some 700 feet. 

A preliminary plan has also been submitted which shows that it is possible 
to extend the intercepting sewer on a slope of .3 per cent, along the southerly 
bank of Cayadutta creek to a proposed disposal site near the iron bridge 
some 4,000 feet from the end of the sewer extension now under consideration 
and, according to the city engineer, this site has an area of 4.6 acres, and the 
elevation of the intercepting sewer at the disposal site is 20 feet above the 
creek. It appears, therefore, that it is possible to convey by gravity How the 
entire sanitary sewage of the city of Johnstown to a suitable site for disposal 
works about three-quarters of a mile beyond the city limits. 

In view of the above I would recommend that the plans be approved and 
a permit be issued allowing the temporary discharge of sewage into Cayadutta 
creek about 700 feet below Montgomery street and that the permit contain in 
addition to the usual revocation and modification clauses the following 
provisions : 

1. That the proposed sewer extension shall be constructed in complete 
accordance with the plans approved this day. 

2. That on or before June 1, 1911, complete detailed plans satisfactory 
to this Department for the purification of the entire sanitary sewage of 
the city shall be submitted for approval; and that the construction of 
any or all portions of the sewage disposal works shown by said plans 
shall thereafter be undertaken when required by the State Commissioner 
of Health and be completed within the time limit set by said Commissioner. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



LESTERSHIRE 

On July 14, 1910, plans for sanitary sewer extensions in Lewis street and 
Jenison avenue were submitted for approval. Application made by the board 
of trustees of the village for the approval of these plans was received on 
July 18, 1910. The plans were approved on August 16, 1910, and a permit was 
issued allowing the discharge into the Susquehanna river of sewage from the 
proposed sewers. 

On September 29, 1910, application was made by the board of trustees for 
the approval of plans for a proposed sewer in Main street. These plans were 
approved on October 21, 1910, and a permit was issued allowing the discharge 
into the Susquehana river of sewage from this sewer. 



Albany, N. Y., August 12, 1910. 
EuoE?JE H. Porter, MID., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N, Y.: 

Dear Sir: — ^I beg to submit the following report on the examination of plans 
for sanitary sewer extensions in the village of Lestershire, Broome county, sub- 
mitted to this Department for approval by the board of trustees on Julv 14, 
1910. 

The records of the Department show that original plans for a comprehen- 



428 State Department of Health 

sive sewer system and sewage disposal plant were approved on February 27, 
1903, and amended plans were approved on October 4, 1904. Permits for 
extensions to the sewer system have been issued from time to time since the 
year 1904. On February 7, 1906, a permit was issued on the condition that 
the sewage disposal plant be put in operation within two years of that date. 
On April 10, 1908, this permit and the one issued on October 30, 1907, were 
extended until such time as the State Commissioner of &alth shall require 
the construction of the sewage disposal plant. 

The plans now under consideration ^ow that it is proposed to construct 
some 700 feet of 6" and 8" sanitary sewers in Jenison avenue and Lewis 
street which are to discharge into the existing sewer in Willow street at the 
intersection of this street and Lewis street. The plans also riiow that it is 
proposed to construct the sewer in Lewis street on a straight alignment from 
a manhole in Jenison avenue to a manhole on the east line of Willow street 
at which point the alignment changes so as to connect with the sewer in Wil- 
low street on a steep grade at right angles to this sewer. 

This is not a good arrangement and in order to facilitate cleaning and 
inspection the oewer in Lewis street should be continued on a straight align- 
ment from the proposed manhole at the intersection of Jenison avenue and 
Lewis street to the present sewer in Willow street where a drop manhole oould 
be constructed on the line of this sewer. Such an arrangement would eost 
b«it very little more, if any, than that shown on the plans now before the 
Department. 

Tbe proposed sewer extensions have been carefully examined as ia sices, 
grades and capacities, and it is found that they are adequate, if properly eon- 
structed, to meet any probable demand that may be made upon them in the 
future. 

I, therefore, recommend that the plans be approved and a permit issued 
blowing the discharge of sewage to be collected by the proposed sewers into 
the Susquehanna river through the existing outlet on condition that a man- 
hole be constructed at the intersection of the proposed sewer and the existing 
sewer in Willow street. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 

Albany, N. Y., October 18, 1910. 
Eugene II. Porter, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N. Y.: 

Dear Sir: — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of 
plans for a proposed amendment to plans for the sewer system of the village 
of Lestershire, Broome county, submitted to this Department for approval 
by Mr. S. Foster Jaques, consulting engineer of the city of Bingham ton, on 
behalf of the board of trustees, on September 29, 1909. 

The question of sewerage and sewage disposal of the village was dlscusfled 
in my report on an examination of plans dated August 12, 1910, to which ref- 
erence is made, and this matter will, therefore, not be considered at this time. 

The plans for sewerage and sewage disposal for Lestershire, approved by this 
Department on February 27, 1903, provided for an 8" and 10" sewer in 
Main street that would drain west from Baldwin street. 

The plans now under consideration show that it is proposed to construct 
this sewer in Main street so that it will drain east from St. Charles street 
to Baldwin street, a distance of some 800 feet, and beyond Baldwin to Arch 
street. The sewer is to have a slope of from 0.3 per cent, to .35 per cent. 

It is stated in the report of the designing engineer that the section of Main 
street west of St. Charles street is sparsely settled and will not require sew- 
erage facilities for years, but that it is desired to lay a sewer in that portion 
of Main street east' of St. Charles street before paying Main street, which is 
the business street of the village. 

The plans hare been carefully examined in reference to sizes, slopes, capaci- 
ties and other hydraulic and sanitary features, and it is found that the pro- 



Sewerage and Sewage Disposal 429 

posed sewer is adequate for fitture requirements for sanitary sewage for the 
section to be served by it, assuming that in construction the sewer will be 
made sufficiently water-tight to prevent excessive infiltration t)f ground water. 
In conclusion, I would state that the proposed change in the direction of 
flow of sewage in the section of Main street under consideration does not 
materially change the original design, and in view of this and the adequacy 
of the proposed sewer I l^g to recommend that the plans be approved arid a 
permit issued allowing the discharge of sewage to be collected by this sewer 
into the Susquehanna river. 

Very respectfully, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



LETCHWORTH VILLAGE 

On July 22, 1910, plans for water supply, sewerage and sewage disposal for 
Letchworth village were submitted to the Department for approval by the 
State Architect, in accordance with the provisions of section 14 of chapter 
49 of the Laws of 1909, the " Public Health Law," constituting chapter 45 
of the Consolidated Laws. These plans were approved on July 27, 1910. 



Albany, N. Y., July 26, 1910. 
EtroENE H. Porter, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N. Y.: 

Dear Sir: — I beg to submit the following report on the examination of 
plans for water supply, sewerage and sewage disposal for Letchworth Village, 
Thiells Station, Rockland county, submitted to the Department for approval 
by the State Architect on July 22, 1910. 

According to the State Architect the institution is to be established for the 
purpose of caring for feeble-minded and idiots and will provide for an ulti- 
mate population of 3,000 persons, consisting of about 2,500 patients and 500 
employees. The daily per capita water consumption is estimated at 125 gal- 
lons based upon water consumption of similar institutions, making a total of 
375,000 gallons per day to be provided for. 

The water supnly is to be taken from the middle branch of Minisceongo 
creek. This supply was recommended to the commission appointed to select 
a site for the institution by Mr. Emil Kuichling who, together with Mr. G. 
C. WTiipple, went over the watershed of that part of Minisceongo creek which 
lies above the proposed site. 

According to Mr. Kuiehling's report to the chairman of the Commission, 
" various samples of water were closely examined in the field, and three were- 
taken to Mr. Whipple's lalx>ratory f»>r chemical and bacteriological analysis.**^ 
Mr. Whipple, in liis report to Mr. Kuichling, dated October 30, 1907, on the 
result of their inspection and analyses, states that "the water of the middle 
branch would not need filtration, as the color is low and the watershed almost 
uninhabited. If properly stored, it would make an excellent supply. One of 
its most attractive qualities is its extreme softness." 

Mr. Kuichling also states in his report that by constructing an impounding 
reservoir of about 25,000.000 gallons storage capacity at an elevation of about 
700 feet above tide level the institution "would secure an abundant supply 
of pure and very soft water, delivered by gravity at a sufficient pressure or 
head to throw copious streams for fire service directly from the hydrants 
over any of the buildings." A storage capacity of 25,000,000 gallons is equiva- 
lent to a uniform daily supply of 250,000 gallons during 100 consecutive days 
of absolute droujrht. 

According to the report of the State Architect and plans now before the 
Department for approval it is proposed to construct a dam to intercept the 
middle branch of Minisceongo creek so as to give a total drainage of about 
three square miles and form an impounding reservoir of some 21,000,000 gal- 
lons capacity. The elevation of the crest of the spillway is 682 feet above tide- 
water level. 



430 State Department of Health 

The dam has been designed under the direction of the Deputy State Engi- 
neer and Surveyor. The bottom of the reservoir, which is composed largely 
of rock and clay, is to be cleared and grubbed together with whatever strip- 
ping of loams may be found necessary. 

A 12'' distributing pipe will be carried under the dam from the gatehouse 
to manhole below the dam where this pipe will be divided into two 8" dis- 
tributing pipes which are to be provided with blowoff valves, air valves at 
different intervals along the lines. These two 8" water pipes which will have 
a capacity of 600.000 gallons per day, each with a pressure head of about 150 
feet at the buildings, loop the central portion of the institution grounds. 

The plans show that it is proposed to construct only the trunk sewers 
at present. Tlie system of sewers also inchides two pipe siphons, 8" and 
10" in diameter across the creek, which are provided with screens and flush- 
ing connections with the water supply system. The plans have been carefully 
examined with respect to sizes, capacities, grades and other hydraulic features 
in connection with the proposed sewers and it is found that they are adequate 
to care for the sanitary sewage for the institution on the basis of population 
and water consumption used, and assuming that in the construction the sewers 
will be made sufficiently watertight to prevent excessive infiltration of ground 
water. 

The sewage will be conveyed by gravity to the proposed sewage disposal 
plant, consisting of settling tanks, sprinkling filters, settling basins, and 
sludge tank and sludge bed. 

The ultimate design provided for seven settling tanks with hopper shaped 
bottoms for the depositing and collection of sludge. The settling tanks have 
a combined capacity to give about six hours* detention of sewage for the ulti- 
mate conditions for which the plant is designed. It is proposed to install 
about one-half of this plant at present. 

Each hopper of the settling tank is provided with a force pipe and valve bv 
means of which the accumulated sludge is discharged into a sludge tank 
where the heavier materials tend to settle to the bottom and the liquid is dis- 
charged through a siphon to sludge beds. The heavy sludge in the sludge 
tank is conveyed to trenches at the sludge disposal field. 

There are two dosing tanks connected with the settling tanks, the smaller 
one is provided with a 6" discharge siphon and the larger tank, which has a 
capacity equal to two times the smaller tank, is provided with a 10" siphon. 
Although both of the dosing tanks are to be constructed with the first instal- 
lation the larger tank will not be used until whole plant is constructed. 

Under the average contribution of sewage for the ultimate population the 
large dosing tank will be filled about every twelve minutes, and it will take 
about one minutes to discharge each dose. 

The effluent from the settling tanks are to be discharged to a sprinkling 
filter filled with broken stone to a depth of 5' 6" and designed to operate at 
a rate of about 1,900,000 per acre per day. The filtrate is to be collected by 
underdrains which discharge into settling basins and then into Minisceongo 
creek through a submerged outlet. The ends of the underdrains are connected 
with riser pipes for the purpose of ventilation. 

A uniform distribution of the settling tank effluent is effected by means 
of nozzles of the square distribution type in connection with dosing tanks 
having a varying cross section. 

The sewage disposal plant, if properly constructed and operated, should pro- 
duce a satisfactory effluent. 

It appears from a careful examination of the plans, in connection with the 
data furnished by the State Architect's report and the report of the CJommis- 
sion appointed to select a site, that the plans provide for an adequate and 
satisfactory water supply, sewer system and sewage disposal works for the 
future requirements of the institution on the basis of population and water 
consumption used in the design. 

I, therefore, recommend that the plans be approved. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



Seweselage and Sewage Disposal 431 

LONG BEACH 

On January 31, 19 10, plans for a proposed sewer system and sewage disposal 
plant for Long Beach were submitted for approval. The plans were returned 
for amendment and additional information and were finally resubmitted for 
approval on February 15, 1910. The plans were approved on March 16, 1910, 
and a permit issued allowing the discharge into Broad or Long Beach chan- 
nel of eflSuent from the proposed sewage disposal plant. This permit con- 
tains, in addition to the usual revocation and modification clauses, the con- 
ditions that the effluent shall be discharged into the channel only during 
the periods of ebb tide but not within two hours of the time of low tide ; that no 
sowage sludge shall be discharged into Broad or Long Beach channel; and 
that whenever required by the State Commissioner of Health arrangements 
shall be made to effectually sterilize or disinfect the effluent or additional 
works shall be constructed for more complete treatment of the sewage than 
that provided for by the proposed plans. 



Aidant, N. Y., March 7. 1910. 
Eugene H. Porteb, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany , N. Y.: 

Dear Sir: — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of 
plans for the proposed sewer system and sewage disposal plant for Long Beach, 
Long Island, suomitted to this Department for approval by Charles W. 
Leavitt, Jr. 

These plans were first submitted for approval on January 31, 1910, but 
owing to deficiencies in certain features of design and a lack of sufficient and 
definite data as to the methods of operation, the plans were returned for 
amendment and additional information on February 5th. Revised plans^ to- 
gether with a supplementary report, were resubmitted for approval on Feb- 
ruarv L*?. 1910. 

Long Beach is an island located in the town of Hempstead, south of Long 
Beach channel, and has an area of about 2,000 acres. About 600 acres of the 
western portion of this island is being developed as a summer resort, and 
this constitutes about one-half of the entire area to be improved in the near 
future for the use of the proposed summer colony. 

The plans show that it is proposed at present to provide sewerage facilities 
for the central and eastern portion of the section undergoing development, 
and the report of the designing engineer states that the future population of 
this area is estimated at 5,000 persons. The lateral sewers are to be 8" 
in diameter in the east and west streets, draining through alternate north 
and south streets by gravity through 8 and 10" sewers. to the main sewer 
which is to have a diameter of from 20 to 30". Flush tanks are to be in- 
stalled at the ends of all lateral sewers. Owing to the level surface of the 
ground pumping stations are to be located at difi'erent points along the line 
of the main intercepting sewer for the purpose of raising the sewage to differ- 
ent levels and allow it to flow by gravity from one station to the next. 

The plans have been carefully examined by the engineering division , in 
regard to grades, sizes, velocities, capacities and other hydraulic and sanitary 
features in connection with proposed sewers, and they are found to be suffi- 
cient to meet the future requirements of this district upon the basis of popu- 
lation used, and assuming that in the construction the sewers shall be made 
sufficiently watertight to prevent excess leakage. The plans for the trunk 
and lateral sewers provide for sanitary sewage only and, it is understood, 
in the development of all branch and lateral sewers, which will discharge 
into this interceptor in the future, that additional plans for this shall be sub- 
mitted for approval by this Department. 

According to the plans the sewage disposal plant is to consist of a settling 
tank and storage tank. The settling tank is divided into three compartments 
and the 6ewage is to flow from one compartment to the other through sub- 
nierged orifices. The total capacity of the settling tank is sufficient to give 
about six hours' detention of sewage on the basis of 5,000 persons and an 
average rate of water consumption of 100 gallons per capita per day. 



43^ State Depabtment of Health 

From the last compartment of the settling tank the sewage is to pass into 
a storage tank large enough to retain the maximum contribution of sewage 
for a period of eight hours, on the assumption that three-fourths of the sewage 
will reach the disposal plant in twelve hours. 

It appears from the report of the designing engineer that it is proposed 
to discharge the effluent from the storage tank at high tide and allow a 
continuous flow to within two hours of low tide when the outlet valve will 
be closed and the effluent stored for eight hours until the next high tide. The 
effluent pipe extends into the channel some 100 feet to deep water where it 
is divided into several branches in order to better facilitate dispersion. Sludge 
from the settling tank is to be disposed of in sand pits adjacent to the dis- 
posal works. 

There has been considerable correspondence between the designing engineer 
and this Department since the plans were first received as to a possible cnange 
of location of the disposal plant to a more suitable site to the west, embrac- 
ing: a more complete purification of the sewage owing to the location of im- 
portant oyster beds in the waters wherein it is proposed to discharge the 
effluent from the disposal works. It was suggested that on account of the 
possibility of the settling tank effluent returning to the inner harbor on the 
flood tide due to improper operation of the disposal works or other causes 
the effluent should either receive supplementary purification on natural sand 
filter beds following treatment in contact or sprinkling filters, or be treated 
on sand filters without the use of preliminary filters. 

It was learned, however, from the designing engineer that the land to the 
westward is in litigation and, therefore, not available for this purpose at 
present. It was further pointed out that the proposed installation of the 
sewage disposal plant as designed is to be used for two or three years only 
or imtil such time as it will be possible to secure land and extend the sewers 
to the west end of the island, where it could be more efficiently treated, or to 
provide other satisfactory means of purification. Permission was, therefore, 
asked to allow the temporary discharge of settling tank effluent from the 
proposed sewage disposal plant at the point shown upon the plans. 

In view of the above and of the apparent urgent need for sewerage facili- 
ties, I beg to recommend that the plans be approved and a permit be issued 
allowing the temporary discharge of effluent from the proposed sewage dis- 
posal plant containing, in addition to the usual modification and revocation 
clauses, the following conditions: 

1. That whenever required by the State Commissioner of Health, and 
upon due notice from him, arrangements shall be made to effectually ster- 
ilize or disinfect the effluent to be discharged from the sewage disposal 
plant, or additional works shall be constructed for more complete treat- 
ment of the sewage than that provided by the plans; such sterilization 
or more complete treatment to be accomplished in accordance with plans 
which shall be submitted to and approved by the State Commissioner of 
Health. 

2. That the length of time after due notice of revocation, as specified 
. by section 79 of the Public Health Law, within which the discharge of 

sewage effluent shall cease shall be two months, imless otherwise stated 
in such notice. 

3. That the effluent from the proposed disposal plant shall be discharged 
into the channel only during the period of ebb tide, but no such discharge 
shall be caused during these periods within two hours of the time of low 
tide. 

4. That no sewage sludge shall be discharged either into the waters of 
Broad or Long Beach channels or where they may pollute the same or 
other waters tributary thereto or connected therewith, but shall be dis- 
posed of by burying in trenches as specified in the designing engineer's 
report accompanying the plans or by other means or methods approved 
by this Department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



Sewerage anb Sewage Disposal 433 

MEDINA 

On Jaouanr 4, 1910, application was received from the board of sewer com- 
inissioners oi the village for the approval of a proposed amendment to the 
plans for sewers in the West Side sewer district. These plans were approved 
on January 8, 1910. 



Albany, N. Y., January 8, 1910. 
To the Board of Sewer Commi88ioner8f Medina^ N, Y,: 

Gentlemen : — In response to the application, contained in a resolution 
adopted by your board on December 30, 1909, for my approval of a proposed 
amendment to the plans for proposed sewers in the West Side sewer district 
in the village of Medina, approved on November 15, 1909, I hereby approve 
such amendment and change, to wit: 

A change in the diameter and gradient of the trunk sewer in said sewer 
district from Center street to Prospect avenue from a diameter of 20 inches 
and a gradient of 0.4 per cent., as shown on the approved plans, to a 
diameter of 22 inches and a gradient of 0.275 per cent., as shown on a profile 
sheet submitted to this Department on December 31, 1909. 

The above approval is duly given this 8th day of January, 1910, in ac- 
cordance with section 260, article 11 of chapter 64 of the Consolidated Laws, 
the Village Law, subject to the provisions of a permit issued on November 15, 
1909. 

ALEC H. SEYMOUR, 

Acting Commissioner of Health 



MONROE COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL 

On January 24, 1910, plans for a sewage disposal plant for the proposed 
Monroe County Tuberculosis Hospital were submitted for approval by the 
board of supervisors of Monroe county. These plans were approved on March 
1, 1910. 



Albany, N. Y., January 26, 1910. 
Eugene H. Porter, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N. Y.: 

Dear Sir : — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of 
plans for the proposed sewage disposal plant for the Monroe County Tuber- 
culosis Hospital submitted to this Department for approval on January 24, 
1910. 

The proposed hospital is to be located just outside the city limits of 
Rochester and the report of the designing engineer states that it is designed 
to accommodate 100 persons, including patients, attendants and officers. A 
per capita rate of water consumption of 100 gallons per day is assumed in 
the design, based upon the rates used in similar institutions in the State. 

The sewage disposal works consists of a settling tank, three sand filters 
and a sludge bed. The settling tank is divided into three compartments by 
transverse division walls forming a grit and screen chamber, sedimentation 
compartment and dosing chamber. The settling tank has a sedimentation 
capacity equivalent to about ten hours' detention of sewage for an average 
daily contribution of 10,000 gallons. 

The sedimentation compartment is to be built with a double hopper bottom 
for the accumulation of sludge which can be discharged to an adjacent sludge 
filter through two 4-inch blow-off pipes extending to within three inches of the 
bottom of the hoppers. The grit and dosing chambers are also provided with 



434 State Department of Health 

similar blow-off pipes leading to the sludge bed so that the entire tank can be 
cleaned without emptying. 

The settling tank effluent passes into the dosing chamber provided with 
three 6-inch alternating dosing siphons for discharging the contents of the 
chamber upon three intermittent sand filters in rotation. These filters are 
three feet deep, properly underdrained, and have a combined average area of 
about 0.1 acres. At the assumed rate of contribution the beds have suffi- 
cient area to treat settled sewage at the rate of 100,000 gallons per acre 
daily. 

The plans have been carefully examined by the Engineering Division and the 
sewage disposal plant is found to be well balanced and shows evidence of 
careful study and design. A satisfactory and nonputrescible effluent should 
be produced by this plant if properly constructed and operated. The capacity, 
moreover, is adequate to meet the present needs of the institution and allow 
for a reasonable increase in the future. 

Respecting the design of the vitrified sewer to convey sewage from the 
hospital to the disposal plant, however, it should be noted that the final 
section, 350 feet long, is designed to act as an inverted siphon from manhole 
Xo. 4 to the screening chamber. 

This feature of the design is likely to prove unsatisfactory, owing to the 
probability of grease deposits induced by fluctuations of the elevation of 
sewage in the settling tank and in this siphon and owing to the usual ten- 
dency to deposition of solid matters in siphons and the consequent stoppage 
of the sewer. 

If this entire section of sewer were located to the southward, the gradients 
of the last two sections of sewer flattened so that the inlet to the tank should 
enter at elevation 529 or above and connect with a tee or a cross with a 
vertical pipe from this tee or cross reaching nearly to the bottom of the 
screening chamber, the result would be that the unsatisfactory section of in- 
verted siphon would be eliminated, ready access for inspection and cleaning 
of the portion of the inlet pipe below the elevation of sewage in the tank 
would be had and a comparatively small amount of embankment over the 
sewer would be required. 

I, therefore, beg to recommend that the plans be approved on condition 
that the inverted siphon be eliminated in a manner similar to that de< 
scribed above. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON 

Chief Engineer 



MONTICELLO 

On June 1, 1910, plans for an amendment to the plans for sewage disposal 
for the village of Monticello, which were approved on December 16, 1909, 
were submitted for approval by the board of sewer commissioners. These 
plans were approved on June 15, 1910, and a permit was issued allowing the 
discharge into Cold Spring brook of effluent from the proposed sewage dis- 
posal plant. 



Albany, N. Y., June 13, 1910. 
EuoEXE H. PoBTEB, M.D., State Gommiasioner of Health, Albany, 2V. F.: 

Deab Sib: — I beg to submit the following report on the examination of 
amended plans for sewage disposal for the village of Monticello, Sullivan 
county, submitted to this Department for approval on June 1, 1910. 

According to the records of the Department, plans for sewerage and sewage 
disposal for Monticello were approved on December 16, 1909. The proposed 
sewage disposal plant was to consist of settling tank, contact beds and natural 
irrigation or filter beds. 



Sewerage and Sewage Disposal 435 

The amended plans and dociunenta recently submitted comprise the 
following: 

1. Duplicate reports and specifications. 
Tracings and prints of: 

2. Topographical map showing alignment of a portion of the sewer 
system and the new location of the sewage disposal plant. 

3. Amended plan of sewage disposal works. 

4. Plan of former sewage disposal plant to be superseded. 

5. Profile of main outfall sewer. 

The plans now under consideration show that it is. proposed to change the 
location of the sewage disposal plant to a site some 1,200 feet to the south- 
west and up-stream on Cold Spring brook from the site shown upon the plans 
approved last December. It is stated in the application for the approval of 
the amended plans that the change in location of the plant is necessitated by 
the inability to secure a site at the point shown by the approved plans. 

While the general arrangement of the difTerent parts of the disposal plant 
has been changed to suit the new conditions of topography of the changed 
location, the capacity of the plant is the same as that shown by the former 
plans. 

The approved plans proposed to divide the irrigation field into three unitsi 
one having a superficial area of two acres and two units of about one acre 
each. The present plans show that it is proposed to divide the field iiito 
four units of about one acre each. The amended plans also provide for a 
somewhat different method of applying the sewage to the contact beds as 
well as a field for the disposal of sludge adjacent to the proposed irrigation 
field. 

The new location of the proposed disposal plant seems to be more suitable 
for a disposal site than the former, inasmuch as it will be necessary to divert 
the flow of only one stream around the plant, whereas two streams flow 
through the former site. 

After a careful examination of the amended plans, I beg to recommend that 
they be approved and a permit issued allowing the discharge of effluent from 
the proposed sewage disposal plant into Cold Spring brook, a tributary of 
the Neversink river. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



NEW ROCHELLE 

On March 17, 1910, application was made by the board of public works for 
the approval of plans for sewers in North avenue. Beech mont drive and 
Montgomery circle. These plans were approved on March 25, 1910, and a 
conditional permit was issued allowing the discharge, into Long Island sound, 
of sewage from the proposed sewers. 

On March 22, 1910, an application was also made by the board of public 
works of New Rochelle asking for an extension of the time for filing plans 
for a clarification of the sewage discharged through the Bailey's Rock out- 
let, as was required by the permit issued on May 4, 1909, to be done within 
one year. The time for filing such plans was extended to February 1, 1911, 
as noted in a letter to the chief engineer of the board of public works dated 
March 25, 1910. A copy of this letter is printed below. 

The permit issued on March 25, 1910, contains in addition to the usual 
revocation and modification clauses the following conditions: 

1. That on or before February 1, 1911, satisfactory detailed plans shall be 
submitted to the Department providing for a clarification by means of 
effieient screening or sedimentation, or both, of the portion of the sewage of 
the city not treated in the sewage disposal plant at the foot of Morgan street; 
and that such plans shall also show in detail suitable works for supplementary, 
complete treatment of sewage. 



436 State Department of Health 

2. That whenever required by the State Commiesioner of Health the clarifi- 
cation works shown by the approved plans shall be constructed within the 
time then specified; and that whenever deemed necessary or desirable by the 
State Commissioner of Health suitable extensions to such clarification works 
shall be made or supplementary works shall 'be constructed for more complete 
treatment of sewage within the time specified by said Commissioner. 



Albany, N. Y., March 22, 1910. 
Eugene H. Porteb, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N. Y.: 

Deab Sib: — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of 
plans for proposed sewer extensions and for proposed alterations to the sewer 
system of the city of New Rochelle, Westchester county, submitted in person 
to this Department for approval on March 4, 1910, by Mj. J. K. Wilkes, 
chief engineer of the board of public works. 

Several conferences have been held during the past year between the city 
officials and this Department in regard to extending the sewer system and 
providing sewerage facilitie^i for a large territory that is being rapidly de- 
veloped and built up north and northeast of Eastchester road. 

Tlie plans under consideration show that it is proposed to change the align- 
ment, size and grade of the sewer in North avenue between Brookside place 
and Eastchester road; to extend the sewer in North avenue from Eastchester 
road to Broadview; also to change the alignment of sewers in Beechmont 
drive and Montgomery circle. 

Plans were approved by this Department on March 22, 1904, providing for 
a 24-inch sewer running north from Brookside place in North avenue and 
through private land to Eastchester road. The portion of tlie sewer through 
private land was to follow, approximately, the course of a stream presumably 
to avpid deep rock cutting during construction. This sewer, however, has 
not been constnictod. 

It is stated in the rejwrt by the designing engineer that in order to " avoid 
certain physical difliculties of construction and also the usual delays and 
complications arising from acquiring the necessary rights of way," it is now 
proi)osiHl to abandon the route along the creek between Brookside place and 
Eastchester road and to construct a 27-inch sewer entirely in North avenue 
from Brookside place to Broadview, about 2,100 feet north of Eastchester road. 
This change will iioee.-isitate a cut of twenty feet in depth far a considerable 
distance in order that this sewer may at some future time intercept sewers to 
be constructed to serve streets in the low area to the west of the Inter-Urban 
Company's reservoir. Tlie dilTerence in the cost of the two routes is prob- 
ably not great since it will be necessarv' to lay a small sewer in North avenue 
parallel to the intercepting sewer for a distance of some 900 feet, if the 
trunk sewer is constructed along the stream. 

The plans also show that it is proposed, eventually, to extend this trunk 
sewer from Broadview in a northerly direction to Quaker Ridge road, a dis- 
tance of some 6.400 feet, but since the present plans show only the probable 
location of such sewer, detailed plans for the extension of the proposed trunk 
sewer in North avenue should be submitted to this Department for ap- 
proval before any extensions are made. 

The territory that will ultimately be tributary to the new sewer is about 
850 acres. Plans for sewers in a portion of this territory, known as Halcyon 
park, Becclimont and part of Sunsetview park, including about 200 acres of 
land, were approved on May 4, 1009. Tliese sewers were tributary to the 
main intoreej)ting sewer between Brookside place and Fifth avenue. 

It is now proposed to change the alignment of sewers in parts of Beech- 
mont drive and Montgomery circle in this section so as to discharge into the 
proposed trunk sewer at the intersection of Montgomery circle and North ave- 
nue, and not, as originally planned, into the existing trunk sewer between 
Brookside place and Fifth avenue. Both designs make these sewers tributary 
to the same outfall but at dilTerent points. 



Sewkbage and Sewage Disposai. '4r37 

• 

The plans have been carefully examined by the engineering division in 
regard to grades, sizes, velocities, capacities and other hydraulic and sanitary 
features concerning the proposed sewers and they are found to be properly 
designed to meet the future requirements of this district upon the usual basis 
of population and per capita consumption, and assuming that in the con- 
struotion the sewers be made sufficiently watertight to prevent excess infiltra- 
tion. A considerable saving could be made by reducing the size of the pro- 
posed 27" sewer between Beechmout drive and Brookside place, a distance of 
1,055 feet. In any. case of reducing the size of a main trunk sewer for a 
section having a steeper grade than the section above precaution should be 
taken to prevent any accidental stoppage which is more probable at such 
points of reduction in size than at other points in a sewer. 

The plans for the sewage under consideration provide for sanitary sewage 
only, and it is understood that in the development of all branch and lateral 
sewers which will discharge into this interceptor in the future or in the ex- 
tension of this sewer plans for such sewers shall be submitted for approval by 
this Department. 

The existing outfall sewer, with outlet into Long Island sound at a point 
some 800 feet beyond Bailey's Rock to which the proposed sewer extensions 
are tributary, has been examined aa to capacity to care for additional sewa^. 
It is found 'that it is adequate for reasonable service in the future, but that 
it will probably be necessary to relieve that portion of the outfall sewer be- 
tween Fifth avenue and the New York Central right of way before the addi- 
tional territory made tributary to this sewer by the proposed sewer extensions 
ia fully developed. 

The general questions of extensions to the sewer system for the city of 
New Bochellfi and the effect upon the waters of Long Island sound and the 
oyster beds in such waters of additional pollution from the discliarge of sew- 
age from the sewer system of the city were discussed at length in my report 
to you of April 14th on the examination of plans approved on May 4, 1900, 
and at that time it was advised that: 

"Owing to the comparative remoteness of any oyster beds from the 
existing outlet of the system of which the pxx>poBed sewers will be an 
extension, I am of the opinion that it will not be necessary to require 
at the present time a thorough purification of the sewage now discharged 
into this outlet from the existing sewers and the proposed extensions. I 
do believe, however, that with the rapid development that has taken place 
along this shore of Long Island sound, the importance of the oyster in- 
dustry which must be protected, the desirability of curtailing visual pol- 
lution and possible offense in these waters and your consistent policy 
with the municipalities along this shore, it is necessary to require clari- 
fication of this sewage in the immediate future and to require that suit- 
abje provision be made to increase the efficiency of this purification at 
such a time or times in the future as local conditions nwiy in your opinion 
demand/' 

The proposed extensions are tributary to the same outfall to which the 
extensions made the subject of the report quoted above were tributary. The 
permit granted for the discharge of sewage from sewers for which plans were 
approved on May 4, 1909, required that within one year satisfactory, detailed 
plans be submitted to the Department providing for a clarification of the sew- 
age by efficient screening or sedimentation, or a combination of both, and that 
such plans shall show in detail also suitable works for the complete purifica- 
tion of the sewage. 

From conferences which Iiave been held with the members and oflicers of 
the board of public works of tlie city of New Bochelle during the past year 
conserning the preparation of these plans for treatment of sewage, it is seen 
that for various reasons, some of which are not under the control of the 
board of public works, it has not been possible for such board to prepare 
the plans as required for submission by May 4, 1910. Further, the Depart- 
ment is this day in receipt of an application from the chairman of the board 
of public works for an extension of tne time within which plans for treatment 
of sewage were to be submitted to this Department for approval. 



438 State Department of Health 

In view of the forgoing I would, therefore, recommend that the plans 
for a change in the alignment, size and grade of the sewer in North avenue 
between Brookside and Eastchester road; for the construction of a sewer 
in jNorth avenue from Eastchester road to Broadview; and a change in the 
alignment of sewers in Beechmont drive and Montgomery circle be approved 
as submitted, and that the provisions requiring that plans for sewage treat- 
ment as embodied in the permit granted May 4, 1909, be included in the 
permit granted for discharge from the sewers proposed at this time, the 
terms of such requirement being substantially as were stated in the per- 
mit granted May 4, 1900, except that the time for filing said plans be extended 
to February 1, 1911. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTOX. 

Chief Engineer 



Albany, K. Y., March 25, 1910. 

Mr. J. K. Wilkes, Chief Engineer Board of PuhHo Works, New Rochelle, 
N, y.; 

Deab Sir: — I am sending you, under separate cover, by American Express, 
the approved plans for sewer extensions in North avenue, Beechmont drive 
and Montgomery circle, and am enclosing herewith a permit allowing the 
discharge into Long Island sound of sewage to be collected by the proposed 
sewers. 

You will note that this permit to become operative must first be recorded 
in the county clerk's oflSce of Westchester county. 

In response to the application from the board of public works of New 
Rochelle, received on March 22d, asking for an extension of the time for filing 
plans for a clarification of the sewage discharged through the Bailey's Rock 
outlet, as was required by the permit issued on May 4, 1909, to be done 
within one year, I have extended the time for filing such plans to Februarv 
1, 1911. 

I would at this time call your attention to the desirability of carefully 
considering in any proposed plans providing for treatment of sewage of the 
city of New Rochelle some provision for permanent treatment of the sewage 
now treated in the disposal plant at the foot of Morgan street. A study of 
this portion of the system and of the question of sewage disposal for this 
section may show that, on account of the comparatively obsolete type of 
this plant and the fact that the plant is overtaxed at the present time, it 
might be found advisable to arrange for treatment of sewage from this sec- 
tion in the same plant to be designed for treatment of the sewage now dis- 
charged through the Bailey's Rock outlet. 

These matters, I presume, will be carefully considered 'by your Board in 
studies you are making of plans for sewage disposal for the city. 

Very respectfully, 

ALEC H. SEYMOUR, 

Acting Commissioner of Health 



NORTH TONA WANDA 

Application was made by the board of public works, under date of March 
16, 1910, for permission to discharge sewage into the Niagara river from 
proposed sewers in Cramer, Robinson and other streets, and plans cover- 
ing these sewers were submitted for approval on April 8, 1910. These plans 
were approved on April 25, 1910, and a permit was issued allowing the dis- 
charge of sewage to be collected by the proposed sewers into Niagara river, on 
condition that whenever required by the State Commissioner of Health com- 



Sewebaoe and Sewage Disposal 439 

plet« plans satisfactory to this Department for the interception and treat- 
ment of the entire sanitary sewage of the city shall be submitted to this 
Department for approval; and that any or all portions of the works shown 
by such plans shall be constructed thereafter when required, and within the 
time limit set by the State Commissioner of Health. 



Albany, N. Y., April 25, 1910. 
Eugene H. Pobteb, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N, Y,: 

Deab Sib: — I beg to submit the following report on the examination of 
plans for proposed sanitary sewer extensions in the city of North Tonawanda, 
Niagara county, submitted to this Department for approval on April 8, 1010, 
by the city engineer. 

The plans and documents submitted connist of: 

1. One copy of report of city engineer. 

2. One copy of specifications. 

3. Application. 

Tracing and blue print of: 

4. Plan of pumphouse building. 

5. Plan of pumping plant. 

6. Two sheets of protiles of proposed sewers. 

7. Plan of sewer district to be served by the proposed sew^ers. 

The general plan of the city, recently submitted to the Department for filing, 
shows that although sewers have been constructed from time to time since 
1889, no plans for sewers or sewer extensions have been submitted to or ap- 
proved by this Department. 

The plans now under consideration show that it is proposed to construct 
sewers in Cramer, Robinson, Rombolt and Zimmerman streets and Hagen ave- 
nue. These sewers are to carry sanitary sewage only and vary from 10" to 
12," in diameter. 

The plans of the proposed sewers have been carefully examined as to grades, 
sizes, velocities, capacities and other hydraulic and sanitary features, and all 
but the proposed extension in Hagen avenue are found to be satisfactory and 
adequate to meet the future requirements of the district to be served by them 
upon the usual assumed basis of population and water consumption, and 
assuming that in the construction the sewers will be made sufficiently water- 
tight to nrevent excessive infiltration of ground water. 

The plans show that the proposed 10'' sewer in Hagon avenue is to be 
constructed on a .25 per cent, grade except for the last fifty feet near the 
manhole at Rombolt street where the grade suddenly changes to about 8 
per cent. The slope of this sewer should be made at least .3 per cent, for 
the entire length in order to hotter insure self-cleansing velocities which 
will probably not be obtained under the proposed conditions even though a 
flush tank is placed at the upper end of a sewer, since the sewer is some 
2,200 feet long. The vertical alignment should also be made straight between 
manholes so as to. facilitate cleaning and inspection. This can be done by 
installing a drop manhole at the intersection of Rombolt street and Hagen 
avenue or by installing an additional manhole at the change of grade. 

It also appears from the examination of the plans that the invert elevation 
of the sewer at the upper end of Cramer street should be 508.46 instead of 
563.46, this evidently being an error made in marking elevations on the map 
and profile. 

The sewage to be collected by the proposed sewers is to be conveyed 
by gravity to a pumping station to be located near the intersection 
of Rombolt and Division streets. Two automatic and electrically operated 4" 
centrifugal piunps are to be installed at the pumping station which will 
raise the sewage some fifteen feet and discharge it into the existing sewer 
system. 

According to the city engineer's report each pump is to have a capacity 
of 470 gallons per minute which should be adequate to care for the sanitary 
sewage contributed by tlie prr posed sewers. 



440 State Dbpabtment of Heai^th 

Respecting the advieability of allowing the temporary discharge of an in- 
creased amount of sanitary sewage from North Tonftwanda into the Niai^ara 
river it may be stated that at present no municipality derives its water sup- 
ply from the river below North Tonawanda, or from Lake Ontario near the 
mouth of the river, except Niagara Falls. The city of Niagara Falls is 
planning to improve its water supply, and while my report on an investiga- 
tion of proposed water supply for Niagara Falls, dated December 26, 1907, 
was transmitted by you to the city authorities, it is not known if the city 
intends to follow the recommendations contained in said report. 

The seriously contaminated condition of a supply taken from the Ameri- 
can channel was pointed out in the report above referred to, and in this 
report it was shown that a relatively pure water could be secured from the 
Canadian channel which would avoid the pollution from North Tonawanda. 

Even if the present sewage of North Tonawanda were excluded from 
the river the discharge of sewage from Buffalo and Tonawanda would make 
it just as imperative for Niagara Falls to extend its intake to the Canadian 
channel in order to obtain a supply relatively free from ooniamination. 

It would seem, therefore, that since the purification of the sewage of North 
Tonawanda would not materially lessen the desirability of an extension of 
the Niagara Falls intake to the Canadian channel the adoption of any re- 
quirement for the purification of such sewage may reasonably be deferred 
until some comprehensive plan has been adopted looking toward the removal 
of other and greater amounts of sewage from the river. 

Since the volume of the flow in the river is great and the currents of the 
river are swift there will be abundant opportunity for aeration and disper- 
sion, and as a result there will be no danger that the additional discharge of 
sewage proposed will have any effect in causing a nuisance in or along the 
river below the city. 

In view of the foregoing, I beg to recommend that the plans be approved 
and a permit be issued allowing the discharge into Niagara river of sewage 
to be collected by the proposed sewers, such permit to contain the usual revo- 
cation and modification clauses, together with a stipulation tiiat the gradient 
of the Hagen avenue sewer be increased to 0.3 per cent, and that the ver- 
tical alignment of the sewer be made straight betweeen manholes. 

I would further recommend that the permit reqiiire the submission of com- 
plete plans for interception and treatment of the sanitary sewage ol the 
city and tlie construction of any or all portions of the works shown by Uie 
plans when required by the State Commissioner of Health. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



OGDENSBURG 

On May 26, 1910. application was made by the board of public works for 
the approval of plans for proposed sewer extensions in Market, Brown and 
Jiickson streets. These plans were approved on June 15,. 1910, and a pennit 
was issued allowing the discharge into the Oswegatchie river of sewage to be 
colleote<i by the proposed sewers. 

On August 12, 1910, application was also made for the approval of plana 
for sewer extensions in Rensselaer avenue and Oak sti*eet. These plans were 
approved on August 20. 1910. and a permit was issued allowing the discharge 
into the Oswegatohie river of sewage from the proposed sewers. 



Albany, N. Y., June 8, 1910. 

Ei'GENE H. roRTKR. M.D., Stiitv Cotfimissit>tier of lieaith, Albany, N. T.: 

Dear Sir: — I bog to submit the following report on the examination of 
plans for proposed siinitary sower extensions in the city of Ogdensburg, St. 
Lawrent^ county, suhmittwi t«» this Department for approval by tha board of 
public works on May 2«>, HMO. 



Sewekage anb Sewage Disposal, 441 

The plans show that it is proposed to construct some 4S0 feet of 10" and 
12" sewers in Market street from the intersection of Jackson sjid Market 
streets to tke upper end of the existing stone sewer which commenees at Com- 
merce street and discharges into the raceway tributary to the Oswegatchie 
river through outlet No. 12. It is also proposed to construct two short sec- 
tions of 8" sewers in Jackson and Brown streets between Main and Market 
streets and tributary to the proposed Market street sewer. 

Owing to the necessarily flat grade of the proposed sewer in Market street 
it is proposed U> tap the existing sewer in Main street at Jackson street so 
as to obtain a greater depth of flow of sewage in this sewer at all times. 
In addition to increasing the flow by diverting some of the sewage from the 
Main street sewer a more uniform flow through the entire length of the 
proposed sewer in Market street would result if the invert elevation of the 
manhole at Brown street be lowered somewhat so as to obtain a slightly 
greater srlope of the 10" sewer and at the same time decrease the grade of the 
12" sedtion of this sewer. More satisfactory results could pro^bly be ob- 
tained by making the proposed sewer 12" in diameter for the entire distance. 
The sewer will probably require cleaning occasionally no matter which one of 
the two alternative changes is adopted. The sewer is, however, adequate as 
to size and capacity if properly constructed to meet the future requirement 
of the section to be served by it. 

I would, therefore, recommend that the plans be approved and a permit 
issued allowing the discharge of sewage from the proposed seMcr into the 
raceway tributary to the Oswegatchie river through outlet No. 12. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



Albany, N. Y., Avffust 25, 1910. 
Eugene H. Porter, M.D., State Commiasioner of Health, Albany, A^. Y,: 

Dear Sir: — I beg to submit the following report on the examination of 
plans for sanitary sewer extensions in the city of Ogdensburg, St. Lawrence 
county, submitted to this Department for approval by the city clerk on behalf 
of the board of public works, on August 12, 1910. 

These plans, as first submitted for approval, did not contain suflicient data 
to enable the engineering division to pass upon the plans and they were, 
therefore, returned to the city engineer for additional information. Amended 
plans were resubmitted for approval on August 23, 1910. 

The plans now under consideration show that it is proposed to construct 
sewer ^tensions in Rensselaer avenue and Oak street. The proposed sewer in 
Rensselaer avenue is to be laid on a slope of 3.5 per cent, for a distance of 
400 feet between Adams and Jefferson avenue and is to have a slope of 1.23 
per cent, for a distance of 200 feet westerly from Jefferson avenue. A man- 
hole is to be installed at the intersection of Jefferson avenue and Rensselaer 
avenue and a lamphole is to be located at the upper end of this sewer. Owing 
to the short length of this section of the proposed extension it appears that 
a lamphole should afford adequate facilities for cleaning and inspection. 

The proposed sewer in Oak street is to be constructed on a slope of 0.4 per 
cent, for a distance of 180 feet easterly from Ford avenue, and is to be pro^ 
vided with a lamphole at the upper end of the sewer which should be ade- 
quate for purposes of cleaning and inspection^ inasmuch as the section of 
sewer is comparatively short. 

These sewers will probably never be extended inasmuch as the proposed sewer 
in Rensselaer avenue is to extend to the limit of the watershed in that 
avenue, and in the case of Oak street extension there is at present a sewer in 
New York avenue which is the next street east of Ford avenue and will pre- 
vent any extension of the proposed sew^er in Oak street. 

The phuis for the proposed sewer extensions have been carefully examined 
and it is found that the sewers are adequate for future requirements of the 
districts to be served by them, if properly constructed. 



442 State Department of Health 

I, therefore, recommend that the plans be approved and a permit be issued 
allowing the discharge of sewage to be collected by the proposed sanitary 
sewer extension into the Oswegatchie river through the existing outlet No. 4 
which empties into the raceway crossing, Main street. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 



ONEONTA 



On June 18, 1910, plans for sewer extensions in London avenue, Henry and 
other streets were submitted for approval by the board of public works of the 
city of Oneonta. These plans were approved on July 20, 1910, and a condi- 
tional permit was issued allowing the discharge into the Susquehanna river 
of sewage to be collected by the proposed sewers. 

On August 11, 1910, plans for a proposed sewer extension in West street 
were submitted for approval. These plans were approved on August 17, 1910, 
and a permit was issued allowing the discharge of sewage from the proposed 
sewer into the Susquehanna river, on condition that on or before April 1, 
1911, plans satisfactory to this Department for complete sewage disposal 
works to treat the entire sanitary sewage of the city of Oneonta, accompanied 
by a proper application for the approval thereof, shall be submitted to this 
Department for approval, together with plans for such intercepting and out- 
fall sewers as may be necessary to convey the sanitary sewage of the city 
to the site or sites selected for such sewage disposal works, and that, when- 
ever in the opinion of the State Commissioner of Health it is deemed neces- 
sary or desirable, any designated portion, or all of, said sewage disposal 
works shall be constructed within the time limit there specified. 



Albany, N. Y., July 20, 1910. 
Eugene H. Porter, M.D., State Commissioner of Health, Albany, N. Y.: 

Dear Sir:— I beg to submit the following report on the examination of 
plans for sanitary sewer extensions in the city of Oneonta, Otsego county, 
submitted to this Department for approval by the board of public works on 
June 18, 1910. 

The plans show that it is proposed to construct 8" sewer extensions in 
London avenue between River and Henry streets, in Henry street between 
London and Burnside avenues, and in Bumside avenue between Henry and 
Luther streets, all of which will discharge into the Susquehanna river through 
the present outlet at the foot of Main street; also 8" sewers in Norton avenue 
between Third and Fourth streets, and in Fourth street between Norton ave- 
nue and Main street with outlet into the Susquehanna river at the foot of 
Hunt street; also an 8" sewer extension in Spruce street east of East street 
for some 240 feet, with an outlet into the river through the existing outlet 
at the foot of Hunt street. 

Tliese plans have been carefully examined in regard to grades, velocities, 
capacities and other hydraulic and sanitary features in connection with the 
proposed sewer extensions, and with some exceptions noted later it is found 
that they are adequate to satisfactorily meet the future requirements for 
sanitary sewage of the sections to be served by them on the usual assumptions 
as to population and water consumption, and assuming that in the construc- 
tion the sewers will be made sufficiently watertight to prevent excess infiltra- 
tion of ground water. 

However, the gradient or slope of the proposed sewer extension in Norton 
avenue is too fiat and should be increstsed to at least 0.4 per cent., so as to 



Sewerage and Sewage Disposal 435 

The amended plans and documents recently submitted comprise the 
following: 

1. Duplicate reports and specifications. 
Tracings and prints of: 

2. Topographical map showing alignment of a portion of the sewer 
system and the new location of the sewage disposal plant. 

* 3. Amended plan of sewage disposal works. 

4. Plan of former sewage disposal plant to be superseded. 

5. Profile of main outfall sewer. 

The plans now under consideration show that it is proposed to change the 
location of the sewage disposal plant to a site some 1,200 feet to the south- 
west and up-stream on Cold Spring brook from the site shown upon the plans 
approved last December. It is stated in the application for the approval of 
the amended plans that the change in location of the plant is necessitated by 
the inability to secure a site at the point shown by the approved plans. 

While the general arrangement of the different parts of the disposal plant 
has been changed to suit the new conditions of topography of the changed 
location, the capacity of the plant is the same as that shown by the former 
plans. 

The approved plans proposed to divide the irrigation field into three units, 
one having a superficial area of two acres and two units of about one acre 
each. The present plans show that it is proposed to divide the field iiito 
four units of about one acre each. The amended plans also provide for a 
somewhat different method of applying the sewage to the contact beds as 
well as a field for the disposal of sludge adjacent to the proposed irrigation 
field. 

The new location of the proposed disposal plant seems to be more suitable 
for a disposal site than the former, inasmuch as it will be necessary to divert 
the flow of only one stream around the plant, whereas two streams flow 
through the former site. 

After a careful examination of the amended plans, I beg to recommend that 
they be approved and a permit issued allowing the discharge of effluent from 
the proposed sewaa^e disposal plant into Ck)la Spring brook, a tributary of 
the Xeversink river. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THEODORE HORTON, 

Chief Engineer 

NEW ROCHELLE 

On March 17, 1910, application was made by the board of public works for 
the approval of plans for sewers in North avenue. Beechmont drive and 
Montgomery circle. These plans were approved on March 25, 1910, and a 
conditional permit was issued allowing the discharge, into Long Island sound, 
of sewage from the proposed sewers. 

On March 22, 1010, an application was also made by the board of public 
works of New Rochelle asking for an extension of the time for filing plans 
for a clarification of the sewage discharged through the Bailey's Rock out- 
let, as was required by the permit issued on May 4, 1909, to be done within 
one year. The time for filing such plans was extended to February 1, 1911, 
as noted in a letter to the chief engineer of the board of public works dated 
March 26, 1910. A copy of this letter is printed below. 

The permit issued on March 25, 1910, contains in addition to the usual 
revocation and modification clauses the following conditions: 

1. That on or before February 1, 1911, satisfactory detailed plans shall be 
submitted to the Department providing for a clarification by means of 
efficient screening or sedimentation, or both, of the portion of the sewage of 
the city not treated in the sewage disposal plant at the foot of Morgan street; 
and that such plans shall also show in detail suitable works for supplementary, 
complete treatment of sewage. 



436 State Department of Health 

2, That whenever required by the State Commissioner of Health the clarifi- 
cation works shown by the approved plans shall be constructed within the 
time then specified; and that whenever deemed necessary or desirable by the 
State Commissioner of Health suitable extensions to such clarification works 
shall be made or supplementary works shall be constructed for more complete 
treatment of sewage within the time specified by said Commissioner. 



Albany, N. Y., March 22, 1910. 
Eugene H. PoRTsa, M.D., State Commiesioner of Health, Albany, N, Y,: 

Dear Sir: — I beg to submit the following report on an examination of 
plans for proposed sewer extensions and for proposed alterations to the sewer 
system of the city of New Kochelle, Westchester county, submitted in person 
to this Department for approval on March 4, 1910, by Mr. J. K. Wilkes, 
chief engineer of the board of public works. 

Several conferences have been held during the past year between the city 
officials and this Department in regard to extending the sewer system and 
providing sewerage facilitie«i for a large territory that is being rapidly de- 
veloped and built up north and northeast of Eastchester road. 

Tlie plans under consideration show that it is proposed to change the align- 
ment, size and grade of the sewer in North avenue between Brookside place 
and Eastchester road; to extend the sewer in North avenue from Eastchester 
road to Broadview; also to change the alignment of sewers in Beechmont 
drive and Montgomery circle. 

Plans were approved by this Department on March 22, 1904, providing for 
a 24-inch sewer running north from Brookside place in North avenue and 
through private land to Eastchester road. The portion of the sewer through 
private land was to follow, approximately, the course of a stream presumably 
to avoid deep rock cutting during construction. This sewer, however, has 
not been constructed. 

It is stated in the rcjwrt by the designing engineer that in order to "avoid 
certain physical difliculties of construction and also the usual delays and 
complications arising from acquiring the necessary rights of way," it is now 
proposed to abandon the route along the creek between Brookside place and 
Eastcliestor road