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Full text of "Annual reports, Town of Acton, Massachusetts"

^ernor/'a/ 




^. 



LIBRARY NO 

ACCESSION WO....i^..3_^.,..^.t>.... 

DATE 

PURCHASED 




ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 



2211 




171 



REFERENCE BOOK 

ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
ACTON, MASSACHUSETTS 01720 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportstow18791894acto 



I?. E :f o I?. T s 

OF THE 

-IflNDAOTHERiOFFICERS^ 

OF THE 

TOWN OF ACTON, 

FEOM 

FEB. 26, 1879, to FEB. 26, 1880, 



INCLUDING THE 



MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS IN i8]9. 



ALSO THE 



HREPORTlOFlTHElSCHOOLtCOMMITTEE.K 






ACTON: 

PRINTED AT THE OFPIOE OF THE ACTON PATRIOT, SOUTH ACTON. 

1880. 



TOWN OFFICERS FOR 1880. 



DauielJ. Wetlieibes. 



William D. Tuttl( 



JohiiE, Gutter, 



TOWN CLERK. 
William D. Tattle. 

SELECTMEN. 
John Vfhite, 

ASSESSORS. 
Aaron C. Hanclley, 

OYERSEERS OF THE POOR. 
Jolin White. 



Phineas Wetherbae. 



Phineas Wetherbee. 



Frank Hosmer, 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Mrs. Lucy M. Mead, Charles D. G-riggs, for 3 year,-; ; Luther Conant, George F 

Flagg, for 2 year,^ . George H. Harris. Isaac Y\\ Fiagg, for 1 year. 

HIGHWAY SURVEYORS. 

Charles Wheeler, Abram H. Jones. Daniel Wetherbee 

Oliver W. Mead, Geoige Ft. Keyes. 

FENCE YIEWERS. 
John E. Houghton. 

SURVEYORS OF LUxMBER. 
George H. Harris, 
Fvancis D wight, 
E. J. Bobbins. 

SURVEYORS OF WOOD. 

Henry D. Parlin. 
George H. Harris, 
L. S. Hosmer. 
Isaac W. Flagg. 

CEMETERY COMMITTEE. 
John Fletcher, 2d, Wm. W. Davis, Joseph F. Cole. 



John Fletcher, 

Y\alliam B. Davis 
Charles B. Stone 



E, J. Kobbins, 
WiUiam B. Davis, 
Charles B. Stone 



Nahum C. Keed. 

E. F. Eichardson, 
L. W. Stevens, 



G. H. Warren, 
Jona. W. Loker, 
Solomon L. Button. 



REFERENCE BOOK 

ACTON MEMORIAL LtBRARY 
ACTON, MASSACHUSETTS Ctt720 



IS 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT, 



Appropriations and 


Receipts. 






Unexpended balance of last year, 


83,184 


39 




Regular Town Grant, 


7,000 


00 




'• " '' for Schools, 


2,500 


00 




" '^ " '' Higmvays, 


1,200 


00 




State Tax, 


360 


00 




County " 
Overlay in gs 5 

Eight Polls, 


520 

371 

13 


10 

68 
44 




Liquor Licenses, 


251 


00 




Corporation Tax, 
National Bank Tax, 


593 
419 


50 

61 




Received of Charles Yfheeler for sluice at 






N. Acton, 


5 


00 




State Aid, 


96 


00 




Lidigent Soldiers' Aid, 


- 285 


12 




Cash of A. IT. Jones, for old plank, 


6 


50 




'• John Fletcher, Woodlawn Cemetery, 24 

'^ State Treasurer, School Fund, 177 


00 
63 




''- Town Hall, 


79 


00 




Cash from E. H. Cutler, receipts from 


Es- 






tate of Lucy Hosmer, 


20 


17 




" " Mount Hope Cemetery, 
'• Dog Fund, 


12 

203 


00 
49 




" '^ Benj. F. Hapgood, reward, 


10 


00 

117,332 


63 



4 

EXPENDITUEE8. 
Support of Schools, 



Paid Chas. B. Stone, West District, 


,1)681 21 




Geo. F. Flagg, South 


681 21 




Luther Conant, Centre, '• 


676 37 




I. W. Flagg, East '' 


308 11 




Geo. H. Harris, North •' 


308 11 




W. S. Jones, So. East ^' 


150 00 


,^2,805 01 



Kepairs on To^rn Biiildmg'S« 
Paid Geo. F. Flagg, repairs on South Ac- 
ton school house and fence, S63 34 

Ai Robbins, for stone gutters for 

Town House, 12 00 

I. W. Flagg, for lead and oil for North 

Acton school house, 23 49 

C. B. Davis, for 13 3-4 d^ys work on 

North Acton school house, 27 30 

Henry VV. Richardson, for repairing 

ToAvn House chimneys, 17 85 

Henry W. Richardson, for repairing 

East school house, 27 94 

Luther Conant, for painting Centre 

school house, 77 84 

John White, material for North Acton 

school house, 2 10 

Chas. B. Stone, repairs on West Ac- 
ton school house, 13 60 



Repairs on Higliways. 
Paid F.H.Whitcomb, breaking roads, 1879, $14 80 
Geo. Chandler, posts for railings, 11 80 

T. C. Graham, gravel bank in West 

Acton. 15 00 



$265 46 



Paid C. A. Harrington, plank for Powder 

Mill bridge, 69 07 

D. J. Wetherbee, iron and bolts for 

Powder Mill bridge, 37 34 

D. J. W^therbee, plank for Pow^der 

Mill bridge, 31 19 

A. H. Jones, repairs on Powder Mill 

bridge, 114 36 

J. E. Reed, lumber for Powder Mill 

bridge, 26 34 

A. H. Jones, breaking and repairing 
roads in Jan., Feb. & Mar., 1879, 
Chas. Wheeler, breaking roads, ^' 
American Powder Co., labor on Pow- 
der Mill bridge, 

E. B. Forbush, breaking|roads. 1879, 
Luther Conant, '' " " 1878-79, 
Geo. H. Harris, " " " 
J. E. Billings, " '^ 1879, 
Silas Conant, labor railing roads, 
A. H. Jones, gravel for highways, 



53 


38 


40 


14 


10 


41 


6 


45 


7 


05 


2 


63 


7 


27 


7 


63 


37 


00 



Eegiilar Iligliway Work. 

A. H. JONES, SURVEYOR. 

For 66 1-2 days work, at |2.00, $113 00 



50 


i '. 


a 


oxen, 1.75, 


87 51 


94 1-4 


a 


a 


horses, 1.00, 


94 25 


49 3-4 


. i 


u 


Lowell Jones, 1.50, 


74 64 


47 1-4 


a 


a 


Elmer Holman, 


70 88 


50 1-2 


u 


a 


A. Cole, 


75 75 


20 1-4 


u 


u 


Fred Mann, 


30 38 


6 


a 


u 


Chas. Brooks, 


9 00 


Repairs 








4 00 



$491 86 



,1 
1559 41 1 



CHARLES WHEELER. SURVEYOR. 



For 54 1-2 days work, at |2.00, 


S109 00 


58 


^ " oxen, 1.75, 


101 50 


95 4-5 ' 


' " horses, 1.00, 


95 80 


66 


^ 4 1-2h., C.H. Wheeler, 1. 


50, 99 67 


16 


^ work, Allen Smith, 


24 00 


57 3-4 ' 


' " James Waldren, 


86 63 


67 3-4 ' 


-' Ed. O'Neal, 


101 63 


7 1-2 ' 


' " Silas Conant, 


11 25 


1-2 ' 
5 3-4 ' 


' '' Spofford Robbins, 
' '' Fred Mann, 


75 
8 62 


4 1-2 ' 


' '-' James Wheeler, 


6 75 


1-2 ' 
1 ^ 
1 ' 
1-2 ' 


' '' Henry Wheeler, 
'' Daniel Redding, 
' " Alfred Moorhouse, 
' '' x\i Robbins, 


75 

25 

1 25 

75 


6-10 ' 


" John McCarty, 


90 


Repairing 
Powder, 


I Scraper, 


4 90 
15 61 


Black smi 
Rake Ha 

Castings, 
2 Hoes, 


th bills, 
ndle, 


7 76 
25 
66 

1 50 







18 



By Order of County Coiumissiouers. 



Paid A. H. Jones, South Acton Road, -115300 06 

Chas. Wheeler, ''- " - 369 74 

" '^ North ^- '^ 40 00 

'-'• ^' for stone bounds and 

labor setting, 80 70 



8790 50 



Support of Poor, 
Paid E. H. Cutler, for support of — 



Clara Wheeler, 


1336 93 


Lucy Hosmer, 

Coffin and Robe for Lucy Hosmer, 


71 75 
21 00 


Burial expenses, 
Sarah B. Childs, 


14 30 
13 50 


Lucy Oliver, 
Flora Butler, 


48 23 
3 00 


Car fare of Esther Oliver, 


75 


Henry Jones, 
Ellen McClern, 


49 10 
10 88 


John Dakin, 


78 00 


Betsey Chaffin, 

Family of Patrick Redding, 


164 00 

14 75 


Dr. Sanders, Redding Family, 

'' Tray nor, 
Dr. Hutchins, services 1877-78, 


5 00 
94 54 

9 80 


Journey to Boston respiting E. McClern, 2 50 
" " '' "- Bergendhall, 2 50 


Stationery, 


1 00 


Stamps, 
E. H. Cutler, balance due Town Farm 


1 00 


April 1, 1879, 
E. H. Cutler, for use on farm 1879, 


162 05 

80 00 






Town Debt. 

Paid Mrs. Harriet Davis, 
Mrs. Philip Peters, 
David M. Handley, 
Joseph Barker, 


$529 37 

1,623 67 

500 00 

546 17 






State Aid. 

Paid Mrs. R. C. Wright, 

Mrs. Hattie W. Wilder, 


12 00 
12 00 



$1,184 58 



13,199 21 



$24 00 



Indigent Soldiers' Aid. 

Paid Mrs. Hattie W. Wilder, $32 00 

Mrs. R. C. Wright, 
George Dole, 
John Carroll, 
Win. F. Wood, 
Wm. Reed, 
Allen G. Smith, 

Benj. Skinner, paid E. H. Cutler, 
Wm. F. B. Whitney, 



32 


00 


32 


00 


76 


00 


62 


00 


8 


00 


56 


00 


48 


00 


60 


00 



Cemetery Expenses. 

Paid John Fletcher, Woodlawn Cemetery, |58 75 
Jos. F. Cole, Mount Hope " 39 75 



Town Offic'erSe 
Paid B. S. Woodward, sealer of Weights 

and Measures, " |18 00 

F. P. Wood, Supt. of Schools, 1878-79, 45 00 

u u u u u 45 00 

Phineas Wetherbee, services as Assessor, 25 00 

A. C. Handley, '^ " " 23 50 

Wm. D. Tuttle, " ^- '' 30 00 

" Town Clerk, 25 00 

D. J. Wetherbee, services as Selectman, 70 00 

John White, " " " 45 00 

Chas. B. Stone, '' '^ '' 45 00 

Francis Dwight, services as Collector 

and Treasurer, 70 00 



$406 00 



198 50 



M41 50 



Interest od 


Notes. 




id J. K. Putney, 




$39 00 


Mrs. Philip Peters, 




93 00 


Fredrick Rouillard, 




150 00 


Mary P. Hosmer, 




60 00 


Daniel Harris, 




48 00 


James E. Billings, 




201 96 


Calvin Harris, 




12 00 


Jonathan A. Piper, 




36 00 


David M. Handlej, 




180 00 


D. J. Wetherbee, 




34 52 


Luther Billings, 




24 00 


Joseph Barker, 




30 00 


Sarah C. Noves, 




48 00 


Thos. P, Noyes, 




24 00 


Geo. H. Harris, 


- 


6 00 







Miscellaneous. 
Paid Reuben L. Reed, for sealers stamp 
and weights, 
Edward Tuttle, use of Pump, 1877-78, 
C. W. Leach, for Warrants, 

" " Selectmen's Reports, 
'• '' Order Blanks, 
" Town Reports, 
'' " Reward Notices, 
" " Blanks, 
" " Voting Lists, 
" '' Posters, 
H. M. Smith, repairing Town Clock, 
Freeman Williams, for sign boards for 
Magog Pond and No. Acton road, 
Josiah Dow, land and building sluice 
and roadway to his place. 



12 00 


5 


00 


6 


00 


15 


00 


1 


50 


51 


00 


1 


75 




42 


14 


00 


1 


50 


9 


25 


f) 
o 


75 



25 00 



10 



r*aid D. J. Wetherbee, coal for Town House, 


18 54 


C. B. Stone, tile for sluice in So. Acton, 


IT 67 


A. H. Jones, labor on '• '• '^ '' 


6 8 


Luke Tuttle, Journey to Winchester 




to procure fish> 


5 00 


Luke Tuttle, Journey from - Depot to 




Magog Pond, 


2 00 


Francis Dwight, discount on Taxes, 




1879, 


640 86 


A. C. Handley, 2 Assessors' Books, 


85 


James Fisk, opening Town Hall, 26 




times, 


19 00 


James Fisk, cleaning Hall, 


4 50 


" pail. 


12 


" '' broom, 


38 


" " oil. 


24 


'' '• care of cellar, 


3 00 


^- " " clock, 


6 67 


Julian Tuttle, opening Hall 8 times. 


5 75 


" " washing Hall, 


2 00 


" oil. 


1 88 


" wicks, 


10 


" ^- chimneys, ^ 


1 50 


" " shavings, 


70 


Luther Conant, Dictionary for Centre 




school, 


8 50 


Luther Conant, recording deed, 


1 00 


John Eletcher, repairing Town Clock, 


2 00 


'' '' " Ladders on 




Monument, 


1 40 


Wm. D. Tuttle, express on documents. 


2 45 


" " locating bounds. 


1 50 


" " 2 journeys to Concord, 


3 00 


" " postage, 


67 


" " recording deed, 


85 



11 



Paid Wm. D. Tiutle recording Births, $16 00 

'' - " ' Deaths, 4 90 

" •• " Marriages, 

Francis Dwiglit. a])iitement of Taxes 

1877, 
Francis Dwlght. sriiiimonihg persons 

to take oaili oi" Dllice, 
Francis Dwi,:zlit, pi-intingDog notices, 
Tax book, 

(tationery and postage, 1 25 
ijiaking returns 26 deaths, 6 50 
•ewurd, 25 00 

'M burials, 90 00 

iees for travel to en- 

3 25 









'1 


I C 






]J 


a 






r 


i: 








u 






•'( 


force 


doo; 


1; 


.p.f . 



3 


75 


10 


74 


9 


50 


1 


50 


1 


25 



$1,054 77 



Heceipts from l»»ruaiy 26, 1879, to February 26, 1880. 
Unexpended balance ;»> per report of Feb. 

26, 1879, $3,184 39 

Appropriations and Receipts, 14,148 24 

$17,332 63 









Support of Schools, 
Repairs on Town l>u]l< 


l^lxpenditures. 

lings, 


$2,805 01 
265 46 


" ^' Highways, 




491 86 


Regular Highway AVoi 
By Order of County ( 


•k. 
'oinraissioners, 


1,239 59 
790 50 


Support of Poor, 




1,184 58 


Town Debt, 




3,199 21 


State Aid, 




24 00 


Indigent Soldiers Ai<* 




406 00 


Cemetery Expenses. 
Town Officers, 




98 50 
441 50 


Interest on Notes, 




986 48 



12 



Miscellaneous, 


1,054 77 


State Tax, 


360 00 


County Tax, 


520 10 


State Treasurer, Liquor Licenses, 


62 75 




S&1Q QQO ^1 




upLOjijoy/ oj. 


Balance in Treasury, Feb. 2'6, 


1880, 13,402 32 


Town BeM. 


Notes. 


Daniel Harris, 


1819 33 


D. J. Wetherbee, 


595 41 


J. E. Billings, 


3,440 96 


L T. Flagg, 


105 41 


Calvin Harris, 


202 63 


Luther Billings, 


405 49 


Mrs. J. K. Putney, 


686 94 


Joseph Barker, 


501 08 


J. A. Piper, 


609 82 


David M. Handley, 


2,543 75 


Fredrick Rouillard, 


2,606 69 


Sarah C, Noyes, 


800 00 


Thomas P. Noyes, 


400 00 


Mrs. M. P. Hosmer, 


1,039 33 


George H. Harris, 


100 00 




114,856 84 



Amount due from State Aid, $ 24 00 

'' " " Indigent Soldiers' Aid to 

Feb. 1, 1880, 203 00 

'' " Town Treasurer, 3,402 32 



Balance ao-ainst the Town. 



D. J. WETHERBEE, 
JOHiNT WE[ITE, 
CHAS. B. STONE, 



- $3,629 32 

111,227 52 

Selectmen 

of 

Acton. 



Acton, Feb. 26, 1880. 



13 



TOWN CLERK^S REPORT 

FOR 1879. 



Birtlis ill Actoii iii 1879. 

No. Date of birth. Name of child. Names of parents. 

1. Jan. 4c, Harry LesKe Mason, son of Irad and Catherine 

Mason. 

2. Jan. 6, Grace Evelyn Taylor, daughter of Lyman C. and 

Addie Taylor. 

3. Feb. 16, Marion Hesselton, daughter of Lucius A. and 

Martha F. Hesselton. 

4. Mar. 3, Harvey Fletcher Tuttle, son of Joseph F. and 

Jennie E. Tuttle. 

5. Mar. 4, Elbrit Mayu Goding, son of Theodore P. and Ella 

F. Goding. 

6. Mar. 8, Wallace Edwin Stone, son of Edwin and Frances 

A. Stone. 

7. Mar. 10, Alice Emma Miller, daughter of Charles I. and 

L. Lizzie Miller. 

8. Mar. 28, Blanche May Smith, daughter of Frank and 

Anna Smith. 

9. April 29, Simon Davis Taylor, son of Moses E. and Clara 

Taylor. 

10. May 2, Jennie Mabel Redding, daughter of Patrick and 

Hannah Redding. 

11. May 31, Hattie Isabel LaAvrence, daughter of James R. 

and Abbie F. Lawrence. 

12. June 6, Ralph Blanchard Knowlton, son of Amasa M. and 

Elizabeth F. Knowlton. 

13. June 7 Edith May Griggs, daughter of Charles D. and 

Sarah Jane Griggs. 

14. June 9, Nettie Sophia Richardson, daughter of Henry 

W. and Mary H. Richardson. 



14 

15. June 12, in Greenville, N. H., I'm -ssk- Amanda Ritter, 

daughter of Albion ~L. ;iii<l Mary L. Eitter. 

16. June 15, Grrace Elsie Reed, daudirn- (^f Isaac G-. and 

Garafelia M. Reed. 

17. July 9, Mabel Frances Wetlierlrc. . I;i n-liter of D. James 

and Augusta A. Wetlici-I •<■(■. 

18. Aug. 10, Nellie May, daughter of .ImIh, .nid Julia May. 

19. Aug. 29, Arthur Edwin Wheelei'. >«.!, ..l Edwin M. and 

Ellen G. Wheeler. 

20. Sept. 1, Clifton Wentworth Clag--ri. s-.n of Charles W. 

and Mary Claggett. 

21. Sept. 1, Frank Percy Richardson. >" I ; oT James E. and 

Sara R. Richardson. 

22. Sept. 4, Lizzie Lucinda Wlierrej i . ( i;i 1 1 -■! 1 1 or of Ji^sepli W. 

and Augusta H. When-rn. 

23. Sept. 4, Albert Davis, son of JoJm :iii.| !']lizabeth Davis. 

24. Sept. 28, Hannah Calanan, daiiglir.i- .if Daiiiel and Ellen 

Calanan. 

25. Oct. 12, Mary Agnes O'ComiolL .l;.ii-!ir.T of ^L C. and 

Lizzie O'Connell. 

26. Oct. 19, Alberta Mav Chadwick.M;iii-l,hT of Cyrus W. 

. and Helen B. Chadwirk. 

27. Nov. 5, a daughter to Michael am! .-;ir;,li McCarthy. 

28. Nov. 9, Franklin Ernest Jo]uis.)ii. .-mm of Nathan and 

Sally Johnson. 

29. Nov. 17, George Albert Dockeii«l<Tli'. s.mi of Jacob and 

Martha A. DockendorlT. 

30. Dec. 16, Rutli Amv Mills, dau^^ho-r ..t Jaiiies I. and 

Mary M. ]\mis. 
Births not php:viously b'Ki'<ti;TK]). 
Mav 7, 1875, Ira Alberto Mills, son ot .bunrs [ and Marv M. 

Mills. 
Jan. 5, 1878, Ada Luella Griggs, dau-iit.r ..f CMiarles D. and 

Sarah Jane GriQ-ti'S. 



Marriages Recorded in Actou \\\ 1879. 
No_. Date of Marriage. Names and ivsi( I. -nee of parties. 
1.' Jan. 6, Mr. Uri A. Stone of Actiii. :iimI Miss Martha Jen- 

■ nette ^Tay of Boston., 
2. Feb. 17, Mr. Edmund B. Hoope:' -nul InIis. Ella L. Drew, 
Ijoth of Acton. 



15 

3. Mar. 11, Mr. Franl^ W. Brigham of Acton, and Miss 

Mary L. Morey of Boylston. 

4. April 8, Mr. Levi W. Stevens of Acton, and Miss Mary 

. Croston of Bradford. 

5. April 14, Mr. Greorge A. Horslin of Fitchburg, and Miss 

Delia Moiilton of Acton. 

6. April 15, Mr. John Quinlan and Mrs. Julia Lynch, both 

of Acton. 

7. April 16, Mr. Benjamin C. Mansfield and Miss Clara M. 

Fowler, both of Acton. 
.8. May 1, Mr. Charles W. Leach of Acton, and Miss Maria 

A. Forbush of StoAV. 
9. May 12, Mr. Henry M. Warden of Manchester, N. H., 
and Miss Lizzie Perkins of Acton. 
.10. May 12, Mr. Edwin A. Phalen and Miss Hattie D. Eeed, 
both of Acton. 

11. May 15, Mr. Frank R. Ivnowlton and Miss Emma S. 

Hosmer, both of Acton. 

12. May 21, Mr. Sidney D. Haynes of Sudbury, and Miss 

GeorQ,-ie E. Gates of Acton. 

13. June 3, Mr. AYalter E. Hayward and Miss Nettie F. 

Bobbins, both of Acton. 

14. June 22, Mr.' George M. Parker of Bedford, and Miss 

Lulu >w Mouiton of Acton. 

15. June 26, M]-. Lorenzo E, Reed of Acton, and Miss A.- 

Florence House of Lowell. 

16. July 21, Mr. Silas Taylor Fletcher and Miss Sarah F. 

Robbins, ijotli of Acton. 

17. Aug. 8, Mr. James Arkerman and Mrs. Martlia Ethel 

iMarcliant, both of Acton. 

18. Auo-. 31. Mr. J. Herbert Blodgett and Miss Minnie A. 

Munroe, both of Acton. 

19.. Oct. 5, Mr. Ginery T. Davis of Brookline, and Miss 
Hattie D. Mouiton of Acton. 

20. Oct. 16, Mr. Jacob T. Rideout of Brunswick, Me., and 
Miss Jennette McKenzie of Dartmouth, N. S. 

21 Oct. 22, Mr. Charles LI. Taylor of Acton, and Miss Fan- 
nie A. Hussey of Littleton. 

22. June 7, Mr. George A. AYhitney and j^Iiss Emeline 

Sharp, both of Maynard. 

23. April 2, Mr. Fred E. Nason and Miss Fannie E. Wheeler, 

both of Concord. 



16 

24. Axjril 9, Mr. Charles A. Moore of Littleton, and Miss 

Clara E. Smith of Waltham. 
25 Sept. 3, Mr. Adelbert A. Martin and Miss Sarah J. 

McAustin, both of Maynard. 



Deaths Registered in Acton in 1879. 

No. Date of Death. Names and Ages of Deceased. 

1. Jan. 7, Mrs. Ruth Dole, aged 96 years, 5 months, 19 days. 
2* Feb. 4, Mrs. Myra T. Miles, aged 74 years, 11 months, 
9 days. 

3. Mar. 2, Mrs. Mary A. Manion, aged 30 years, 5 months, 

19 days. 

4. Mar. 14, Mrs. Dolly M., wife of Joseph Noyes, aged 57 

,years, 7 months, 9 days. 

5. April 15, Widow Sarah B. Stearns^ aged 85 years, 2 

months, 11 days. 

6. April 18, Mrs. Angenette W., wife of G-eorge H. Harris, 

aged^35 years, 5 months, 18 days. 

7. April 26, ^Marion, daughter of Lucius A. and Martha F. 

Hesselton, aged 2 months, 10 days. 

8. May 26, at Fergus Falls, Minnesota, Mr. Simon D. Tay- 

lor, aged 23 years, 6 months, 24 days. 

9. May 28, Mr. Jonas K. Putney, aged 76 years, 9 months, 

28 days. 

10. June 15, Mr. Leyi Chamberlain, aged 72 years, 4 months. 

11. June 16, at Westford, Mr. Daniel Jones, aged QQ years, 

2 months, 24 days. 

12. June 28, Miss Delia A. Barker, aged 27 years, 6 months, 

17 days. 

13. July 16, Dea. John Fletcher, aged 88 years, 11 months, 

25 days. 

14. June 7, Mrs. Loisa Mohr, aged 28 years, 5 months, 11 

days. 

15. July 23, Herbert, son of John and Elizabeth Davis, aged 

1 year, 7 months, 24 days. 

16. July 28, Mr, William Moynehan, aged 58 years. 

17. Aug. 8, Mrs. Emily Churchill, aged 75 years, 4 months 

18. Aug. 16, Mr. Jeremiah Hosmer, aged 8*5 years, 4 months, 

16 days. 

19. Aug. 25, Harry Ernest, son of George W. and Angle H. 

Knowlton, aged 7 years, 9 months,- 14 days. 



17 

20. Sept. 4, 'Rev. J). M. Cranes aged 67 years, 6 monthR, 4 

days. 

21. Sept. 16, Albert, son of John and Elizabeth Davis, aged 

.12 days. 

22. Oct. 2, Mrs. Nancy B., wife of Cyrus Law, aged 64 years, 

5 months, 24 days. 

23. Oct. 13, Widow Harriet Davis, aged 82 years, 9 months 

13 days. 

24. Oct. 18, Mr. John C. Moore, aged 20 years, 10 months, 

14 days. 

25. Nov. 9, Edith M., daughter of William H. and Ida Hob- 

son, aged 1 year, 2 months, 28 days. 

26. Nov. 5, a daughter of M. and Sarah McCarthy, aged 1 day. 

27. Nov. 18, Mrs. Nancy W., wife of Francis Bobbins, aged 

63 years, 10 nionths, 14 days. 

28. Dec. 8, Mr. Josiah D. Wheeler, aged 67 years, 11 months, 

4 days. 

29. Dec. 27, Mr. Martin Pike, aged 73 years, 11 months, 23 

days. 



18 



NAMES OF PERSONS IN ACTON HAYING DOGS LICENSED 

1879. 



M. Augusta Hosmer, 
Mrs. H. M. Beck, 
Daniel Harris, 
Baldwn & Hesselton, 
Dame F. I-Iay\vard, 2, 
Chas. H. Fairbanks, fern. 
Frank Barker, 
Nixon Ball, 
T. P. Goding, fern., 
Francis D wight, 3, 

E. B. Hooper, 
Theron F. Newton, 
Elnathan Jones, 
H. Waldo Tuttle, 
L. S. Hosmer, 

Tuttles. Jones & Wether- 
bee. 2, 
C. H.Suow, 
A. S. Fletcher. 
Chas. A. Harrington, 
Jos. W. Wlierren, 
Edwin TarbeU, 
Levi Houghton, 
Moses Tavlor, 
A. C. Handley, 
A. J. Wilhs, 
John Temple, 
George Flagg, 

F. J. Wood, 
Augustus Fletcher, 
Windsor Pratt, 
Geo. V. Mead, 
Lester Fletcher, 
John Fletcher, Jr., 



John Fletcher & Sons, 

John W. Charter. 

E. B. Forlni^h. lem. 

John White, fern. 

Francis Coniuit. 

Jas. Hannoii, 

S. F. Eeed. 

Chas. Wheeler, fern. 

Robert N. GoAvell, 

Luther Conarit. 

H. A. Littlexi^>,ld. 

C. H. Handley. 

Anson C- Pi])er. 

Jos. Wheeler. 

Jos. Heed. 

Taylor, BroUins & Co., 

Frank Prcitt. 

Frank Wetherbee, 

E. J. Robbins, 
Henry Haynes, 
Solon Bobbins, 
G. H. Waugh.' 
Neil Currie, 
Danl Gallaghar. 
Daniel Tutfle. 

I. S. Leach. 
George Pratt, 1. m. 
George Pratt, 1 lem. 
deo. R. Keves. 
Geo. C. Wri,<ht. 
X. B. Brown. 

F. W. Houghton, 
M. F. Going, 
Geo, Jackson, 

95 Males at .v;2.()0, ;*<190.00 
9 Females a I ^5. 00. 45. 00 



0. E. Preston. 
H. E. Preston, 
Geo. H. Shapley, 
Geo. C. Conant, 
Cyrus Hayward. 
Geo. Y/. Knowltcn, 
WiUie O^Neil, 
H. W. Richardson, 
Charles Morris, 
James Waldron, 
W. A. Gihnore. 
Geo. Conant, 
H. Hanson, 
John Welch. 
John Dubois. 
A. L. Tuttle,' 
Geo. W. Livermore. 
Jerry H. McCarthy, 
Nathan Johnson, 
Chas. D. Griggs. 
Waldo Littletield, 
Albert IMoulton. 
H. C. Wheeler, fem. 
John Kellv, 
Hugh GiU, 

has. H. Conant. 
Francis Bobbins, fem, 
Chas. E. Worcester, 
John D. Moulton. 
George Worster, fem. 
Isaac Barker, 
James D. Cobiu'n. 
C. J. WiUiams. 



Total, 104 



$235.00 



WM. D. TUTTLE, Town Clerk. 



Acton, -March 1, 1880. 



19 



REPORT OF THE 

Receipts & Expenditures 

AT THE 

ALMSHOUSE IN ACTON, 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING APRIL 1st, 1880. 



ARTICLES ON HAND APRIL 1, 


1880. 


13 cows, 




$520 


00 


Boiled cider, 


75 


1 horse, 




80 


00 


Cider, 


3 00 


12 1-2 tons of 


hay. 


195 


00 


Salt pickles, 


1 50 


Cotton seed meal, 


2 


80 


Beets, 


50 


Meal, 




6 


90 


Soap, 


50 


Shorts, 




24 


00 


Apples, 


50 


Corn, 




1 


30 


Onions, 


25 


Plaster, 






40 


Ketchup, 


50 


Bags, 




3 


00 


80 lbs. ham, 


9 60 


Barrels, 




17 


00 


Sausages, 


3 00 


Glass, 






24 


Flour, 


6 50 


1 2 cords wood cut for use, 54 


00 


Tea, 


1 00 


31 hens, 




15 


50 


Sugar, 


50 


Boxes, 






60 


Spices, 


25 


Tub, 






75 


Dried apples. 


1 00 


Lumber, 




18 


00 


Eggs, 


45 


Potatoes, 




43 


50 


Candles, 


50 


325 lbs. pork, 




29 


25 


Beans, 


20 


115 lbs. lard, 




11 


50 


Oil, 


12 


Butter, 






60 






Corned beef, 






64 




11,056 35 


Apple sauce, 






75 







20 





EXPENSES. 




Paid for butter, 


154 74 


Paid for rye meal, 


20 


cheese, 


9 


18 


boots & shoes, 


12 98 


crackers, 


25 


44 


lanterns. 


2 02 


Sugar, 


19 


89 


oat meal. 


52 


molasses, 


6 


87 


oil, 


5 62 


coffee, 


2 


7S 


wicks, 


10 


tea, 


10 


30 


whet stones, 


43 


tobacco, 


13 


11 


snath, 


83 


fish, 


16 


98 


fare to Lowell, 


80 


beans, 


4 57 


raisins, 


1 51 


spices, 


1 


95 


lemons, 


1 15 


matches, 


2 


30 


curtains, 


38 


clothing, 


19 


52 


peas, 


35 


chimneys, 




69 


hoes, 


1 00 


chambers, 


1 


40 


horse radish, 


08 


saleratus, 


1 


02 


grain, 


254 74 


sad iron, 




45 


starch. 


38 


seeds, 


1 


01 


stationery, 


16 


candles. 


1 


37 


pins, 


08 


medicine, 


5 


58 


Paris green, 


90 


shovel. 




17 


Bristol brick. 


10 


snuff, V 




80 


corn cutter, 


60 


scythes, 


2 


55 


alum, 


22 


rakes. 


1 


36 


glass. 


79 


flour, 


54 


00 


salt petre, 


16 


pipes, 




10 


cards. 


16 


mustard, 


1 


54. 


axes, 


1 70 


salts, 




12 


gimblet, 


10 


pails, 




97 


tumblers, 


30 


brooms, 




95 


printers' ink, 


1 05 


RECEIPTS FROM TC 


)WN FARM- 1879-80. 




[leceived for calfskin, 


$ 


70 


Received for bull. 


2-8 00 


milk, 


571 


71 


use of bull, 


3 00 


calves, 


18 


25 


berries. 


5 00 


apples, 


322 


05 


eggs, 


4 76 


cows, 


137 


28 


potatoes. 


7 62 


grapes. 


1 


68 


soap grease 


50 


poultry, 


10 


93 


care & support 


boarding B 


. 




F.J.Aiken 


34 71 


Skinner 


72 


00 








pork, 


17 


47 


$1,235 66 



21 



Paid for soap, 


12 


88 


Paid for prunes, 35 


yeast, 




99 


tin ware, 88 


onions, 


9 


07 


grass seed, 5 36 


cream tartar, 


2 


28 


lock, 50 


fork, » 




37 


phosphate, 7 85 


cans, 




82 


castings, 4 47 


shells, 




19 


meat, 62 75 


clothes line, 




90 


bags, 25 


nails, 




90 


wash tubs, 1 50 


salt, 


2 


^^b 


basket, 42 


barrels, 


24 


95 


bug poison, 50 


rice. 




36 


sink, 3 00 


lamp, 




37 


blacksmith bill, 13 77 


horse blanket, 


1 


25 


eggs to set, 75 


cabbages, 




36 


smoking hams, 1 20 


teaming lumber 


9 


00 


repairing pump, 4 50 


labor, 


183 


00 


coffin and robe for 


bull. 


20 


00 


L.ChamberIain,13 00 


saw bill, 


2 


94 


wheelwright bill, 2 25 


repairing shoes 




85 


repairing harness, 10 


filing saws. 




73 


keeping cows, 6 00 


cows. 


254 


00 


use of bull 77, 78 


use of team, 


22 


75 


and 79, 14 00 


butchering, 




75 


board & nursing 


truss B. Skinner, 2 


50 


F. J. Aiken, 17 71 


cider, 


8 


96 


Dr. Sanders, do., 17 00 


cash B, Skinner 


, 9 


00 


K S. Brooks, 12 00 


vinegar, 


2 


80 


services of 


plow beam, 


2 


60 


J.Dubois &wife,247 50 


use of harrow. 




50 


E. H. Cutler, 50 00 


Dr. Sanders' bill,15 


65 


John White, 10 00 


peach trees. 


12 00 
iclitures, 


Frank Hosmer, 10 00 


Total amount of Exper 


$1,663 05 


'' " Eeceipts, 




1,235 66 



Deficiency, 

Balance due as per report of the Overseers of 
Poor, April 1, 1879, 



$427 39 
162 05 



1589 44 



22 



Drawn from the Treasury April 1,1879, $162 05 

" " " '^ for use on 

farm 1879-1880, 80 00 



242 05 



Balance dne April 1, 1880, $347 39 

Deficiency, $427 39 

Interest on Farm, 240 00 

$667 39 



Victualing 504 Tramps at 40 cents, 201 60 



Cost of supporting poor on farm, $465 79 

Whole number of persons, exclusive of tramps supported 
in Almshouse, 7 ; average number, 4 3-4 ; present number, 5. 

ELISHA H. CUTLEE, ) Overseers 
JOHN WHITE, y OF 

FRANK HOSMER, j Poor. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SchoolGoinniitfeelTownofSctoii 

FOR THE 

SCHOOL YEAR, 1879-80. 



To The Citizens of Acton : — 

Your School Committee, through theii agent the Su- 
perintendent of Schools respectfully submit for your care- 
ful consideration the following report : 

When we take into consideration the number of our 
school months, the number of different teachers who have 
been in our employ and all the obstacles which are in the 
way of the perfect success of anything in this world, which 
has an elevating tendency, we feel that we have good rea- 
son for congratulation. Our appropriations for school 
purposes are necessarily so small in comparison with those 
of the larger towns and cities that we are unable to retain 
our best teachers or to attract superior ones from neigh- 
boring towns. Our appropriation for schools is only 
about nine dollars per scholar while that of the town of 
Quincy which has a deserved reputation for excellent 
schools is over twenty-one dollars per scholar. When the 
results of our educational work are compared with those oi 
larger towns and cities this fact should be borne in mind. 
How long would the town of Quincy have a reputation lor 
superior public schools, were she to reduce her school ap- 
propriation by more than one-half ? 

We are able to state, how^ever, without any exaggera- 



lion that no teacher has been in our employ during the 
year who was not well qualified to instruct her pupils in 
all the studies they wished to pursue. In two or three 
instances the usefulness of the teachers was somewhat im- 
paired by a lack of enthusiasm, but in all these cases the 
deficiency was more noticeable, because the teachers who 
preceded them possessed this qualit}' to a marked degree. 

No epidemic has prevailed in the town during the 3^ear 
to impair the attendance to any considerable extent, though 
some parents have not been careful to keep their chil- 
dren in the schools every day, and on this account pupils 
have met with an irreparable loss. Facts have been 
reported to us, since the last term closed, which impress 
us with the importance of a more careful- enforcement of 
our truant laws. 

We think it also important that better provisions should 
be made for the safe ventilation of our scliool rooms that 
so many pupils may not be detained from school by colds 
contracted there. We trust our teachers will be more par- 
ticular in the future in this regard. Such care ought to 
be taken oi the health of our pupils that they will be safer, 
when in charge of the teacher, than when they are at 
home. 

We have been pleased with the evidently growing in- 
terest in our public schools, on the part of the parents, and 
have been assisted very much by their co-operation. 

The new and more natural methods of teaching which 
we have endeavored to introduce during the last 3^ear have 
been most heartily welcomed by the pupils and have met 
with little opposition from the parents, and that simply 
through a failure to fuih^ understand the processes which 
we have endeavored to apply. Every thing that has been 
done in this direction has been at the suggestion and by 
the advice of the School Committee and we feel that the 
result in all the schools, where the methods have been 
enthusiastically and skillfully applied has justified the 
course which we have pursued, and we trust no adverse 
judgment will be passed until a sufficient time has elapsed 
to test the system. 

Our schools are so far apart that it is not possible for us 
to have teachers' meetings without much inconvenience, 



so that progress in methods of instruction depends quite 
largely upon the private suggestions of the Superintendent 
and is necessarily slow. We have not attempted to apply 
our ideas fully to the managemxCnt of any of the schools 
and in some of the schools there has been but little change 
from the old methods, as we have feared teachers might be 
embarrassed and the pupils confused and the orderly ap- 
pearance of the schools disturbed, but we have entered 
upon a course which, if persistently pursued, will result in 
more practical, more pleasant and in every way more 
efficient schools than we have had in the past. 

That the teachers and general public may have a bet- 
ter understanding of our views, we think it expedient to 
state them quite fully in this report, though it be at the ex- 
pense of some of the space which is usually devoted to a 
review of the different schools. 

We wish to find and apply such a method of instruc- 
tion that the pupils will seek, and find the knowledge, that 
the schools are intended to impart, with the same zest and 
growing interest that, in the first years of their lives, they 
sought and acquired the knowledge of language and of 
the external world which they possessed when they began 
to go to school. From the time of birth to the age when 
the school life begins the mental powers are onl}/^ slightly 
developed, but the organs of the body are free from unnat- 
ural restraint, the attention is constantly excited by a 
change of scene or by the presentation of new objects, the 
senses are constantly on the alert and there is hardl}^ a mo- 
ment of the conscious life of the child but contributes some- 
thing to his stores of knowledge, simply because he is so 
circumstanced that he is taught in a natural way. The 
necessity of the child is to have a knowledge of the things 
which surround him and he acquires it by a perception of 
the things themselves. He needs to understand language 
and to be able to use it and he gains the desired knov/1- 
edge by seeing what he hears illustrated by actual objects 
and by illustrating it himself. These are the natural 
methods which we ought to strive to imitate in our 
schools. 

When the pupils leave the free out of door life to be con- 
fined several hours each day to receive knowledge which 



most of them can not otherwise acquire, they ought to be 
placed in such pleasantly furnished rooms that the transi- 
tion from home life will not be so abrupt and unpleasant as 
to prejudice them against the school and its pursuits. 

Several of our school rooms are adorned with pretty 
mottoes and pictures and we see a growing tendency to 
cultivate flowering plants and to have vases of cut flowers 
in these rooms ; which things indicate a drift in the right 
direction. 

To every one who makes any marked progress in 
study there comes a time of mental inspiration, when he 
begins to feel that knowledge is a pearl of great price. It 
is the fact of this inspiration, or the lack of it that usually 
marks the diflerence between the bright and the dull 
scholar. We wish to conduct our schools in such a way 
that, if possible, we may secure this inspiration ^o all 
the pupils at an early age, so that the school duties may 
not be irksome to them for so many years. 

The natural methods of instruction have been most suc- 
cessfully applied, in this countrv, thus far, to the primary 
schools and it is in them that they are most needed, for, if 
the pupils acquire a love for study before they leave the 
lov/er grades, they will be sure to learn in the higher de- 
partments, though the methods of teaching are not so per- 
fect. If a man is really hungry he does not refuse to eat, 
though the food is coarse and poorly served, but if the ap- 
petite is poor, everything must be scrupulously nice or 
there is no relish. In our endeavors to benefit the schools, 
we have not only aimed at better methods of teaching but 
have encouraged our teachers to appear more enthusi- 
astic in their work and thus to kindle enthusiasm in 
the pupils. The teacher and the pupils are engaged in 
the same w^ork ; if the manner of the former seems to indi- 
cate that she thinks it is drudgery, the latter will think it so 
in sober earnest. It is well and very necessary for the 
pupils to acquire habits of industr}^ in school, but it is bet- 
ter for them to be made to feel that there is something so 
ennobling in work that they will pursue it out of love for 
it. 

But without further reference to the general principles 
which we wish to see applied to the management of our 



schools, we desire to slate, as clearly as we are able to in a 
few words, our ideas of the proper treatment of the princi- 
pal common school branches. 

Reading, Under this head, we consider the following 
points important. When the child begins to learn, famil- 
iar objects should be presented and their names placed up- 
on the board in script (writing). It has been ascertained 
that a child can learn a whole word as the sign of an ob- 
ject or idea just as easily as he can learn the name of a 
single letter, composing the word. When the child has 
become somewhat familiar with one word, another should 
be placed upon the board with it and so on, as his list of 
familiar words is enlarged. The words should be placed 
in various combinations and the child should be required 
to point them out, that it may be certain that he knows the 
form of the word without reference to its location. The 
transition from script words to the printed forms is so easy 
that we do not advise teachers to print words upon the 
boards. The pupils will learn the letters and their sounds 
later, when they have made some progress in acquiring a 
knowledge of words. By this method, we avoid the drawl- 
ing and labored reading which is so common in public 
schools. When the pupils have passed through one grade 
of readers it has been found very useful for them to pursue 
other reading matter of the same grade before they are ad- 
vanced to the next book in the regular series. 

It ought to be borne in mind constantly that the ability 
to pronounce the words correctly is only a part of the art 
of reading. If a person is to read well he must be able, 
in the first place, to understand the ideas of the author 
and to promote a facility in this we think it well to require 
pupils to read selections silently and then state the sub- 
stance of what they read either orally or in writing. 

Of course much attention should be paid to expression 
in reading and the teachers ought never to tire of question- 
ing the pupils as to the meaning of words which they 
read. 

Writing. As we have stated above, the child's 
first reading lessons should be written upon the board. 
The pupil's first lessons in writing should be found in his 
efiforts to copy these words. At first the word "cat" and 



other simple words should be set before him and he should 
be taught to trace them many times that he may become 
familiar with the forms and the use of the cra3^ons and in a 
few weeks he will be found copying the words upon his 
slate. 

Spelling should furnish a constant drill in writing. 
The words ought to be carefully written upon the board 
and copied by the pupils ^nd thus learned. Experience 
has shown that, if the pupils copy a list of words five or six 
times, it so impresses them that they may be reproduced 
at any time and that they are more permanently retained 
than when learned from the printed page to be recited oral- 
ly. The principal use of knowing how to spell is the 
ability to write words correctly, and by this method the pu- 
pil is sure of a drill upon the very act which he will need 
to perform. 

Of course it is ver}' important that the teacher be a 
good writer and keep before her pupils excellent penman- 
ship, as she will have more influence than their copy books 
in determining the hand they will write. 

Ai'itJnnetic. In teaching the first principles, it is of 
the utmost importance that every step be illustrated by ob- 
jects. The neglect of this practice has been the occasion 
"of more poor instruction in this branch than in almost any 
other. It is very essential that the pupil thoroughly un- 
derstand one combination before another is made. It has 
been said thai during the first term no combination beyond 
four should be made. We have used the Franklin Primary 
Arithmetic in one of our schools, as an experiment, and 
have found it admirably adapted to the object method, when 
supplemented, as it was here, b}' a stand abundantly fur- 
nished with blocks and other articles which were distribu- 
ted to the pupils to illustrate the principles of the book. 

Practical problems out of the book involving the prin- 
ciples of the science should be frequently presented to the 
pupils through their whole course. 

Geography should be -first taught in its application to 
the vicinity of the school-room and of the town. This 
course will furnish the pupils a knowledge from which 
they may form an intelligent idea of that which lies beyond. 

Geography is usually studied too much by rote and in 



its dry details. Several of our schools have pursued the 
study during the past year by a scheme which has neces- 
sitated a more definite and practical knowledge of our 
globe than is usually acquired. 

The plan has been about as follows : 

1st. The study of the earth as a physical body, with 
reference to its vertical forms, the configuration of its land, 
water, etc. 

2d. The study of it, as it has been affected by climate, 
the various causes which determine the climate and its ef- 
fect upon vegetable and animal life, and upon the condition 
of the different races of men. 

3d. The study of the face of the earth, as man has 
arranged it, with reference to political divisions, cities, 
et-c* 

Grammar. This branch of knowledge has been de- 
fined, by a standard authority, as " The art of speaking or 
writing with propriety; the right use of language." V/hile 
we have a high appreciation of the value of a nice knowl- 
edge of analysis and parsing, we feel that there is a most 
urgent need of better instruction in English grammar as 
defined above. 

The pupils should be encouraged to describe objects 
and pictures which are presented to them and the language 
of their descriptions should be corrected if it is faulty in 
any respect. The teachers ought to make a note of all 
the incorrect expressions, which they may overhear and 
teach the pupils in w^hat particulars and why they are 
wrong. The scholars should be required to write letters 
and compositions upon familiar subjects and these should 
be carefully corrected. 

Our limited space permits us only to glance at our 
ideas of the right methods of instruction in these branches, 
but we trust what we have said will suffice to illustrate the 
general principles which we wish to see applied. 

We have referred to the branches of study which are 
usually taught in our schools and we have laid especial 
emphasis upon good instruction in them, but we think the 
cultivation of our pupils in morals and good manners is a 
matter which ought to occupy a very prominent place in 
the work of all our teachers. 



We wish to say that one of the most pleasing results 
of the methods of teaching which we have briefly described 
is to be found in the fact that it almost completely obviates 
the necessity of corporal punishment. There are several 
of our schools in which there has not been a case of the 
kind during the year, and in all the schools the cases have 
been very rare, which fact makes our schools appear in 
pleasing contrast with some of those of our metropolis, as 
it appears from their superintendenf s report. 

Right methods of teaching seem to us of such vital 
importance that we wish all our teachers could have the 
benefit of the instruction of our normal schools, or, as this 
cannot be, we wish they might have some one or more of 
the excellent educational journals which are published at 
the present time. If the teachers do not feel able to pro- 
cure such helps, we think it well worthy of the careful 
consideration of the committee, whether it would not be a 
profitable investment of money to place such periodicals 
in their teachers' hands. 

We now invite your attention to a brief notice of the 
different schools. 

CENTER GRAMMAR. 

The Spring and Fall terms were taught by Miss A. C. 
Davis whose excellent work has been noticed in several of 
our previous reports. The Winter term was somewhat 
disturbed by a change of teachers when it was about halt 
through. But the examination at the close showed that 
the scholars had made good progress in their studies. The 
teachers during the Winter term were Mr. Alfred N. 
Fuller and Miss Mary Fifield. 

CENTER PRIMARY. 

Miss Bessie M. Ball taught throughout the year, and 
by her enthusiastic application of the new methods of teach- 
ing and school management merits and has the apprecia- 
tion of all in this vicinity who desire the most efficient 
work in our schools. This was Miss B's first experience 
in teaching, but her complete success seemed to be assured 
from the very commencement of her work. 



SOUTH GRAMMAR. 

The Spring term was taught by Miss H. S. Symonds, 
a teacher of excellent mental accomplishments and of an 
extended experience. She devoted herself very earnestly 
to her work, and would have been highly successful had 
she been able to secure a more perfect co-operation. 

The Fall and Winter terms were taught by Miss R. 
E. Stacy and under her care the school is making as rapid 
progress as we can reasonably expect. 

SOUTH PRIMARY. 

Miss Jennie M. McAlister, who was favorably men- 
tioned in our last report, taught throughout the year. This 
teacher has begun to appl}^ the new methods ol instruction 
with gratifying results. 

WEST GRAMMAR- 

Mrs. M. W. Going, an enthusiastic teacher, who was 
mentioned in our last report continued in charge of this 
school during the Spring and Fall terms with excellent 
success, and was succeeded in the Winter term by Miss 
Elvira C Gordon. Miss G. is a teacher of good intellec- 
tual qualifications and has had much successful experience 
in her vocation, but, in comparison with her predecessor, 
seemed lacking in enthusiasm. The examination at the 
close of school proved that the pupils had not failed to 
make progress in their studies. Some of the classes ap- 
peared exceedingly well. 

WEST PRIMARY. 

Miss Clara L. Sweatt, who has been very favorably 
mentioned in two of our previous reports, taught during 
the Spring and Winter terms. Because of illness she was 
not able to teach during the Fall term and Miss Hattie H. 
Freeman, who was teaching in a neighboring town, took 
charge of the school. Miss F.»practiced the most approvd 
methods of teaching and in the management of her pupils 
showed a natural faculty for government. We consider 
her instruction in reading especially good. 



10 

l^ORTH SCHOOL. 

The Spring and Fall terms were taught by Miss Susie 
M. Welherbee. This was Miss W.'s first experience in 
teaching, but the examination at the close of the Fall term 
was very satisfactory to the parents and Committee and 
showed that she had done her work well. 

The Winter term was taught by a teacher of tried ex- 
perience, Mrs.A.H.Loker, whose excellent work has been 
noticed in several of our reports, and who never succeeded 
better than during this term. 

EAST SCHOOL. 

Miss Florence Hartwell continued in charge of this 
school, during the Spring and Fall termS; and the school 
made a steady progress while under her care. The Win- 
ter term was taught by Miss Emma Esterbrook, a teacher 
of experience and excellent natural qualities for her voca- 
tion. We have never seen the order of the school more 
perfect or the school spirit of the pupils better than 
during this tern^. 

SOUTH EAST. 

There was butone term of school in this part Of the town 
durmg the year and that was during the Winter months 
in charge of Miss A. W. Packard. We have commended 
this teacher's work in previus reports, but we considered 
the last term one of the most profitable schools in this part 
of the town for several years. 

Appended are the usual statistical reports. 

LUTHER CONANT, Chairman,] 

C. B. STONE, Clerk, School 

I. W. FLAGG, 

W. S. JONES, y Committee 

G. H. HARRIS, 

G. F. FLAGG, of Acton. 

F. P. WOOD, Supt. of Schools, 



11 



ROLL OF HOISOK, 



NAMES OF THOSE WHO HAVE NOT BEEN ABSENT OR TARDY. 

West Primary. For three terms. 



For one Term. 

Bertie Gardner, 
Ida Litdefield, 
Ida Richardson, 
.Bertie Going, 
Guy Mead, 
Herman Parker, 
Brooks Parker, 

For two terms. 

Bertie Preston^ 
Vio Preston, 
Bertie Hall, 
Genie Hall, 
Hohart Mead, 
Alfred Richardson. 

Center Grammar 

For one term. 

Ella E. Daniels, 
Grace E. Taylor, 
Mary T. Waldron, 
John F. Kingsley,* 
Arthur B. Robbins, 
Arthur W. Taylor, 
Horace F. Tuttle, 

For two terms. 
Sara E. Hammond, 
yiilia M. Lane, 
Annie B. Lee, 
Elbridge R. Conant, 



Susie E. Conant, 
Annie M. Hammond, 
Carrie A. Lund, 
George S. Lee. 

Center Primary. 

For one term. 

Jennie L. Ayers, 
Almira Ayers, 
Abbie F. Coughlin, 
M. Ida Davis, 
Bertha I. Fisk. 

South Grammar. 

For one term, 
Susie Billings, 
Susie Pond, 
Myrdlla Richardson, 
George Kelley. 

For two terms. 
Eda Shafley, 
Eva Shafley, 
Carrie S hap ley , 
Etta Temple. 

South Primary. 

For one term. 
Florence F. Fletcher, 
Carrie F. Hanson, 
Clara F. Leach, 
Sadie E. Sawyer, 
Tillie W. Burns, 
George C. Warren.* 



12 



For two terms. 
Ada M. Jones, 
Arthur Miller, 

For three terms. 
Martha C. Pratt, 
Lillian F. Richardson. 

West Grammar. 

For one term. 
Mary A. Blanchard, 
Florence T. Noyes, 
Lottie S. Richardson,* 
Bertha T. Wright, 
Emery W. Clark,* 
Walter C. Gardner. 

For two terms. 
Hattie A, Davis, 
Mary L. Tuttle, 
Herbert A Ha f good, 
Willie B. Hart,"" 
Freddie S. Whit comb. 
For three terms. 
J. IdaTuttle, 

Center Primary. 

For one term. 

Nellie E. Lane, 
Lizzie M. Schofield, 
Hattie L. Tuttle, 
Arthur C. Allen, 
Frank E. Fisk. 

For two terms. 
Lucy M. Davis, 
Clara S. Hammond, 
Hattie M. Robbins, 
Clara B, Robbins, 
Grace E, Tuttle, 

* Were tardy once. 



For three terms. 

Albert J. Reed, 
Oliver D. Wood,* 

North School. 

For one term. 
NeUie Ryan, 
Everett Rouillard, 
James Ryan, 
Edward Ryan, 
Bertie H. Smith, 
Edvvin Smith, 
Robert Wilson. 

For two terms 
Mat tie Randolph, 
Annie Ryan, 
Lizzie Ryan, 
yoh7i Rya7i, 

For three terms. 
Mattie F. Smith. 

East School. 

For one term. 
Fred W. Billings, 
Roy G. Brooks, 
Arthur B. Davis,* 
Willie O. Smith, 
Ernest E. Wetherbee. 

For two terms. 

Frank H. Billings, 
Herbert H. Robbins,* 
Harry G. Robbins. 

South East. 

For one term 
George Hooper, 
Ella Johnson, 
Harry Hooper. 



13 



FINANCIAL REPORT, 



WEST SCHOOL. 

Drawn from the treasury, $681 
Balance from last year, 4 


21 
71 


Paid to teachers, 
'' for fuel and preparing it, 
" '' care of house and furnace 
" '* incidentals. 

Balance on hand. 


$540 
55 
45 
15 
29 


50 
44 
00 
41 
57 


C. B. STONE, 

SOUTH SCHOOL. 

Drawn from the treasury, ^686 
Balance from last year, 35 
Due to the Committee, 


Co 

21 

80 
39 



$685 92 



$685 92 



$722 40 



Paid to teachers, $650 00 

" for fuel and preparing it," 49 00 

'* '' cleaning and caring for room, 5 39 
" *' repairs, 4 54 

" " brooms, erasers, crayons, books, 

etc., 13 47 

$722 40 

GEO. F. FLAGG, Committee. 

CENTRE SCHOOL. 

Drawn from the treasury, $676 37 

Balance from last year, 18 69 

For fuel and care of room for writing 

school, 2 00 

— $697 06 



14 



Paid to teachers, 


$568 00 


" for care of house, 


31 50 


" " fuel and preparing it, 


56 56 


^' " incidentals, 


14 80 


** " maps,' 


9 00 


" " use of instrument two terms. 


8 50 


Balance on hand, 


8 70 



$697 06 
LUTHER CONANT, Committee. 



EAST SCHOOL. 

Drav.-n from the treasury, §308 11 



Deficiency on last year's account. 
Paid to teachers, 

" for fuel, 

^« '* incidentals, 

" '* care of house. 
Balance on hand. 



4 


67 


225 


00 


26 


00 


.6 


57 


12 


00 


33 


87 



11 



$308 11 
I. W. FLAGG, Committee. 



NORTH SCHOOL. 



Drawn from the treasury 
Balance from last year, 



$308 


11 


13 


70 


$237 


25 


29 


90 


14 00 


4 


58 


36 


08 



21 81 



Paid teachers, 
" for fuel, 
" " care of house, 
*' '' incidentals. 
Balance on hand, 

$321 81 
GEO. H. HARRIS, Committee. 

SOUTM EAST SCHOOL. 

Drawn from the treasury, §150 00 

Balance from Jast year, 18 55 

$168 55 



15 



Paid teacher, 


$105 00 


" for fuel, 


8 00 


" " cleaning school-house, 


2 00 


*' '' ink, crayons and erasers. 


3 3,8 


" '' care of school house. 


5 00 


'* " sending scholars to So. Acton 




instead of having a school, 


20 00 


Balance on hand. 


25 17 



$168 55 
W. S. JONES, Committee. 

Amount appropriated by the town for 

schools, $2500 00 

Income from the State school fund, 177 (?3 

Income from the dog fund 203 49 

Total, $2881 12 

Number of children in town between the ages of five 
and fifteen, 303. Sum appropriated by the town for each 
scholar, $8.20. 



16 



TABULAR VIEW. 







tr 




< 


ft- 


> 
< 

CD 


^ 


^ 


tz 










'^ 

Eo 


o 


S0 


p 


p 
o 


p 
a- 


!z! 






o 


m 




a> 








o 
i 


S' 






W 


^ 




\^ 




I-! 


I_i 


2 


a> 


SCHOOLS. 


TEACHEES. 


g- 


cr 


p 


% 


VI 


OX 


§ 


o 






§ 


•-1 

3 
o 




t 
o' 




o 


a 


oc 


-< 






i 


B- 


o 

i 


5' 


i 






&. 
f^ 


f 




SPRING TERM, 




















PftTifrft i Grammar 


Miss A C Davis 


2f 


#34 00 


29 


27i 


25+ 





8 


21 


27 


" BMBall 


2f 


30 00 


35 


30 


26 








24 


72 


a^ ., i Grammar 

S«"<^li i Primary 


" H S Symonds 


2i 


36 00 


37 


34f 


29+ 





3 


21 


8 


" J M McAUster 


2| 


36 00 


50 


47i 


43 








34 


12 


w..«f i Grammar 
^^«* 1 Primary 


Mrs M W Goiug 


2- 


34 00 


33 


33" 


30 





; 1 


30 


11 


Miss C L Sweatt 


2 


32 00 


43 


42^- 


39 


3 





19 


25 


North 


'• SAWetherbee 


2- 


28 00 


21 


171 


1^ 








10 


39 


East 


" FMHartwell 
Totals, 


2i 
19f 


30 00 
260 00 


23 


211 


19 



3 


1 

13 


16 
175 


11 




271 


2541-6 


225^ 


205 




FALT. TERM. 




















CenU-e | ^^aT 


Miss A C Davis 


2f 


i!34 00 


29 


261 


25+ 





8 


21 


29 


" B MBall 


2r30 00 


27 


27" 


24 








18 


93 


«"""• 1 graT 


" RE Stacy 


3 40 00 


36 


35- 


33+ 





12 


23 


12 


•' J M McAUster 


S 


36 00 52 


50 


45 2-3 








36 


19 


West i Grammar 
^®®* 1 Primary 


Mrs M W Goiug 


2i 
2t 


34 00 


39 


371 


30+ 








25 


45 


Pliss H H Freeman 


32 00 


42 


42" 


38- 


1 





21 


43 


North 


'• 8 A Wetherbee 


2^ 


28 00 


23 


19 


17 








10 


20 


East 


" F M Hartwell 
Totals, 


n 


30 00 


26 


22i 


18 




1 



20 


16 
170 


9 






21 


264 00 


274 


259i 


230 


270 




WINTER TERM. 




















( Grammar 
Centre ■/ 


Mr A N Fuller ) 
Miss Mary Fitield [ 


3 


$40 00 


37 


34f 


32* 





19 


15 


28 


I Primary 


" BMBall 


3 


32 00 


34 


30 


26 





1 


21 


70 


Q,^«+^n J Crramm'ar 
South jpj.ijj,aiy 


" RE Stacy 


3 


40 00 


4.^ 


42 


36 


Qi 


18 


27 


6 


'• J M McAlister 


3 


36 00 


45 


441 


37 








38 


11 


Woof J Grammar 
W^^^ 1 Primary 


" ECGordou 


3i 


34 00 


42 


34" 


30+ 





3 


37 


37 


•' C L Sweatt 


Si 


32 00 


43 


42^ 


371 





o! 


21 


29 


North 


Mrs A H Loker 


3 


34 00 


23 


22^ 


20- 





3i 


12 


15 


East 


Miss E F Estabrook 


3 


80 00 


24 


22| 


19 





oj 


18 


12 


South East 


•• AW Packard 

Totals, 

Aggregate for year, 


3* 
28* 


30 00 


14 


13 


12 





2! 


10 
194 


10 




308 00 


307 


2951 


2995-6 





218 




69i 


832 00 


852 


S09 


7551-6 


_4 


79^ 


539 


683 



The average attendance during the year 93^ of the average No. belonging to the 
schools. 



REPORTS 



-«@^ SELECTMEN s^>">" 



AND OTHER OFFICERS 



W^ 




■II 



m 



FE(B. 26. 1880, to FE(B. 26, 1881, . 

INCLUDING THE 

MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS IN 1880, 

ALSO, THE 

Report of the School Committee. 




ACT N : 

PRINTED AT THE OFFICE OF THE ACTON PATRIOT, SOUTH ACTON. 

1881. 



TOWN OFFICERS FOR 1881. 



Town Clerk. 
William D. Tuttle. 

Selectmen. 

D. J. Wetherbee, John White, Phineas Wetherbee. 

Assessors. 

Wm. D. Tuttle, Phineas Wetherbee, Lucius S. Hosmer. 

Overseers of the ^Poor. 
John E. Cutter, Otis H, Forbush, Lyman C. Taylor. 

School Committee. 

Job W. Dupee, 3 years ; Lucy M. Mead, Chas. D. Griggs, 

2 years ; Luther Conant, George F. Flagg, 

I. W, Flagg, 1 year. 

Highway Svtrveyors. 

Daniel Wetherbee, Chas. Wheeler, Abram H. Jones. 

Fence Viewers. 

John Fletcher, John R. Houghton, Nahum C. Reed. 

Surveyors of Lumber . 

^QSTrcL. B. Davis, Edward F. Richardson, L. W. Stevens, 

Geo. H. Harris, Chas. B. Stone, E. J. Robbins, 

James B. Tuttle. 

Surveyors of Wood. 

E. J. Robbins, H. D. Parlin, Wm. B. Davis, I. W. Flagg, 

J. W. Loker, George H. Harris, Chas. B. Stone, 

Lucius S. Hosmer, Solomon L. Dutton, A. S. Fletcher, 

James B. Tuttle, Charles H. Taylor. 

Cemetery Committee. 

John Fletcher, Wm. W. Davis, Joseph F. Cole. 



TREASURERS REPORT. 



DR. 

Paid State Treas. lor liquor licenses. 187 75 

" '' '' State tax, ,. 1,080 00 

County Treas., County tax, 542 70 

Selectmen's orders, 9,299 62 

Outstanding orders, 999 81 

Balance due the Town Feb. 26, 1881. 1,470 42 



*13,48(l 30 



CR. • \ 

1 

W. S. Jones, unexpended school money, #25 17 j 

Liquor licenses. 351 00 \ 

City of Boston, for care F. J. Aiken, 35 36 j 

State Treas., corporation tax, 727 07 • \ 

" '' National Bank tax, 545 71 ] 

Mass. School Fund, 179 56 i 

'' " State Aid, 96 00 ! 

Reliel of indigent soldiers, 178 00 | 

Chas. Wheeler, digging stone near Button's 1 50 | 

T. Hammond, laying sluice, 10 00 I 

Jos. Cole, lots sold in Mt. Hope Cemetery, 40 00 .; 

John Fletcher, lots sold in Woodlawn '' 33 00 \ 

wood '• - .^ 1 10 j 

E. H. Cutler, on account of Town Farm, r),'y \ 

Geo. F. Flagg, rent of school rooms, 114 00 ■ | 

Julian Tuttle, use of Town Hall, 88 75 j 

County Treasurer, dog fund, 178 67 ] 

Interest on Money in Bank. 42 86 j 

John E. Cutter, Collector, 10,832 00 ' 

$13,480 30 



J. K. W. WETHE(R(BEE, Treasurer. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



Appropriations and Receipts. 

Unexpended balance of last year, $3,402 32 



Regular Town Grant 


7,000 


00 




State Tax, 


1,080 


00 




County ^' 


542 


70 




Roads, 


1,400 


00 




Schools, 


2,500 


00 




Overlayings, 


518 


90 




Geo. F. Flagg, use of schoolroom, 1879 








& 1880, 


114 


00 




W. S. Jones, unexpended school money, 


25 


17 




Licenses, 


351 


00 




City of Boston, for F. J. Aiken, 


35 


36 




Cash State Treas. Corporation Tax, 


727 


07 




National Bank Tax, 


545 


71 




State Aid, 


96 


00 




Soldiers' Aid, 


178 


00 




Chas. Wheeler, digging stone near Duttoi 


% 1 


50 




Thomas Hammond, laymg sluice, 


10 


00 




Jos. Cole, West Cemetery, 


40 


00 




John Fletcher, Center " 


34 


10 




State Treas. Mass. School Fund 


179 


5Q 




E. H. Cutler, on account Town Farm, 




55 




J. K. W. Wetherbee, interest on Town 








Money, 


42 


86 




J. Tuttle, use of Town Hall & Cellar, 


88 


75 




Dog Fund, 


178 


67 








$19,092 


22 



EXPENDITURES. 



Support of Schools. 

Paid Luther Conant, Center District, $682 16 

I. W. Flagg, East District, 308 64 

Geo. H. Harris, North District, -308 64 

Mrs. Lucy M. Mead, West '' 682 16* 

Geo. F. Flagg, South " 682 16 

Chas. D. Greggs, " East '' 200 00 



Repairs on Town Buildings. 

Paid I. W. Flagg, repairs on East School 

House, $5 82 

D. J. Wetherbee, paint and oil for 

Town House, 80 85 

C. S. Davis, painting Town House, . 85 00 
" '' " " clock faces, 2 00 
'' '^ '' '' flag staff, 1 50 
" " '' building stage, 6 00 
'^ ^^ '•' teaming lumber, 1 50 
John Fletcher, repairs on vane and 

clock, 46 ^Q 

. L. U. Holt, stove South Acton School 

House, 33 00 

L. U. Holt, 751bs. pipe, 11 25 

'' '' 2 elbows, '30 

9 lbs. zinc, 81 

coal hod, 1 00 

'^ 7 hooks, 50 

D. J. Wetherbee, gilt for Town Clock, 2 00 
'^ ^' paint for Town House, 6 50 

Mrs. Lucy M. Mead, slating black- 
board, West Acton School House, 12 00 
Mrs. Lucy M. Mead, tinting school-room, 7 90 



$2,863 76 



6 



Paid Mrs. Lucy M. Mead, sundry repairs, 
'^ •* Holt's bill, 



11 24 
6 05 

chairs, school-room, 1 25 



basement chairs, 
seven new desks, 
putting down ^' 
curtains for school 



room 



Mrs. Lucy M. Mead, desk book, 
Chas. Davis, labor on Town House 

staging, 
Robert Wayne, '^ '^ vane at Town 

House, 



1 00 

22 40 
1 30 

11 44 
1 25 

4 40 

4 40 



Regular Highway Work. 

CHARLES WHEELER, SURVEYOR. 

For 75 days Avork,' 2.00, $150 00 

44 1-4 days work, oxen, 1.75, 77 44 



141 1-4 


iC 


a 


horses, 1.00, 


141 25 


74 3-4 


'• 


a 


C.H.Wheeler, 1.50, 


112 12 


3 3-4 


u 


u 


J. Priest, 


5 63 


13 


a 


8 1-2 


hours, H. Blodgett, 


20 77 


1 


a 


work 


, Allen Smith, 


1 50 


47 3-4 


u 


u 


James Waldron, 


71 63 


34 1-4 


a 


ii 


Levi Hobbs, 


51 37 


1 1-2 


a 


il 


John Charter, 


2 25 


36 


a 


ii 


Gardner McLaughlin, 53 99 








Silas Conant, 


3 90 


17 1-4 


a 


il 


W^. Hussey, 


25 88 


3 1-2 


a 


ii 


H. Taylor, 


5 25 


13 1-4 


u 


u 


H. Lewis, 


19 87 


13 3-4 


ii 


ii 


J. Bell, 


20 63 


2 1-2 


ii 


ii 


A. Cole, 2.00, 


5 00 


Blacksmith 


's bills, powder, nails and 




gravel. 






21 75 



$369 52 



$790 23 





A. COLE, SURVEYOR. 




For 70 3-4 daj^s work 


, 2.00, 141 50 


12 3-4 ^' '■ 


Thos. Cote. 7.00, 


89 25 


19 1-2 ' 


E.N.Robbins, 1.50 


29 25 


13 3-4 '• 


S. R. Collis, 


20 62 


3 '• " 


W. Page, 


4 50 


28 1-4 '^ 


J. Priest. 


42 37 


9 1-4 '' 


A. H. Jones, 


13 87 


3 '' " 


T.,J. & W., 


4 50 


4 1-2 '' 


" '• oxen, 1.75 


, 7 87 


9 1-4 " 


Amos Tuttle, 1.50, 


13 87 


6 1-4 '^ 


E. O'Neal, 


6 37 


2 


H. Conant, 


3 00 





'^ '' horse, l.OC 


) 2 00 


3 


Charles Beck, 1.50, 


4 50 


4 


'' " horse, 


4 00 


12 3-4 " 


H. Turner, 1.50, 


19 12 


11 1-2 '• 


A. Turner, 


17 25 


3 


L. McLaughlin, 


4 '50 


51 1-2 - 


A. Jones' horse, 1.00 


51 50 


L. Billings and horse, for work, 


3 87 


Charles Wheeler 


, for labor. 


8 50 


J. P. Brown's bill. 


3 48 


1 Plow 3 days .50, 


1 50 


1 Pick axe. 




1 12 


1 Scraper plate, 




7 44 


1 Pick handle, 




25 


1 Rake. 




67 


1 Sledge, 




3 00 


Gravel for Stow 


road, 


3 00 








Support of Poor. 




Paid E. H. Cutler, deficiency on Town 




Farm to April 1880, $347 89 


E. H. Cutler, board and doctor's bill 




of F. J. Aiker 


I, 


37 36 



$512 67 



Paid J. E. Cutter, oxen lor Town Farm, 125 00 

" /' support Clara Wheeler, 272 82 

u Henry Jones, Q6 01 



Sarah S. Childs. 


13 


06 


Elizabeth Bur- 






gendahl, 


293 


25 


" John Dakin, 


12 


42 


" Traynor Family, 


115 


38 


Redding " 


39 


13 


Mrs. M. Pike, 


34 


00 


robe and burial of Lucy 






Oliver, 


18 


06 


burial of Geo. BuUard, 


10 


00 


" "W. F.B.Whit- 






ney's child. 


15 


00 


medical attendance F. 






E. Chaffin, 


20 


00 


aid furnished Ola Nel- 






son, 


3 


75 


aid furnished Mrs. John 






Whitney. 


20 


50 


board & medical atten- 






dance Mrs. B. Chaffin, 


53 


20 


Dr. Hutchins' medical 






attendance M. Pike, 






1879, 


8 


25 


journey to Taunton, 


5 


60 


" '' Tewksbury, 


3 


25. 


express on bundle for H. 






Jones, 




30 


tax book, 


2 


00 


printing dog notices, 


1 


25 


advice on Follard and 






Bryan case, 


2 


00 

$1,519 48 



Town Debt. 

Paid Fredrick Rouillard, $500 00 

David M. Haiidley, 500 00 
James E. Billings, note and interest, 1,517 70 

Mary P. Hosmer, '• "^ '• 1.029 82 

Geo. H. Harris, 106 23 

I. T. Flagg. 105 30 

Calvin Harris, 202 53 

J. A. Piper, 404 46 

Luther Billings, 202 53 



Soldiers' Aid, 

John Carroll, 120 00 

Geo. Dole. 48 00 

Wm. F. Wood. 96 00 

Allen G. Smith, 96 00 

Benj. Skinner. 96 00 

George Knights, 8 00 

Wm. F. B. Whitney, 144 00 

Miss R. G. Wright, 48 00 

Mrs. Mattie W. Wilder, 48 00 



Interest on Town Debt. 

Paid Mrs. J. K. Putney, 39 00 

Mary P. Hosmer, 60 00 

Fredrick Rouillard, 150 00 

D, J. Wetherbee, 34 52 

T. T. Flagg, 12 00 

Daniel Harris. 48 00 

J. A. Piper. 36 00 

James E. Billings, . 117 00 

Calvin Harris, 12 00 

Sarah C. Noyes, 48 00 

Thomas P. Noyes, 24 00 

Luther Billings, 24 00 

Joseph Barker, 30 00 



$4,568 57 



$704 00 



$634 52 



10 



Town Officers. 

Paid F. P. Wood, Supt. Schools 1879-80, 45 00 

U U .. .i 45 QQ 

1880-81, 45 00 
L. U. Holt, sealer of weights and 

measures, to Apr '80. 10 00 



Phineas Wetherbee, Assessor, 


25 00 


A. C. Handley, 


21 50 


Wm. D. Tuttle, 


30 00 


" '' Town Clerk, 


25 00 


J. K. W. Wetherbee, Town Treas., 


25 00 


Phineas Wetherbee, Selectman, 


40 00 


John White, " 


45 00 


D. J. Wetherbee, 


70 00 






Printing. 




id C. W. Leach, Selectmen's reports, 


12 50 


'' " Town warrants, 


1 50 


" 525 Town reports. 


56 00 


'' 12 Warrants. 


1 50 


•' '■' 500 Orders, 


1 50 


^' " 200 Cemetery deeds. 


5 50 


" '' Posters, 


1 50 


'' •' Stationery & printing, 


3 50 



Cemetery Expenses. 

Paid John Fletcher, trees for Woodlawn, 
J. F. Cole, posts for Woodlawn, 

- lock '' 
J. Fletcher, work in Woodlawn and 
Mt. Hope Cemeteries, 
" '' labor in .VVoodlawn, 
J. F. Cole. '' " Mt. Hope, 
• " " 150 posts, 
Luke Smith, mowing brush in North 

Cemetery, 8 00 

^' '' setting post, Woodlawn, 2 00 



6 


00 


6 


00 




25 


7 


85 


36 


25 


40 50 


6 


00 



$426 50 



$83 50 



$112 85 



11 

Miscellaneous. 

Paid for rope for monument, $ 83 

John Fletcher, work on monument, 75 

Town Seal, 5 00 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, admr. estate F. 

D wight, attending burials, 36 30 

J. K. VV. Wetherbee, admr. estate F. 

D wight, coffin & robe B. Chaffin, 13 00 

J. K. W. Wetherbee admr. estate F. 

Dwight, collecting taxes, 45 00 

Fhineas Wetherbee, book for valua- 
tion use oi State, 5 00 

Wm. D. Tuttle, copying tax-book, 5 00 

John Fletcher, block to flag-staff on 

monument, 1 00 

Chas. Wheeler, railing bridge at H. 

Smith's mill, 15 60 

Chas. Wheeler, repairs on bridge at 
I. W. Flagg's 

Waldo Littlefield, painting hearse, 

A. C. Mandley, 3 tax books, 

Henry Haynes, breaking roads, 1879, 

A. H. Jones, breaking roads and re- 
pairs, 1879, 

D. J. Wetherbee, license blanks, 
•' '' engraving powder horn, 1 00 

J. K. W, Wetherbee. abatement of 

taxes in 1878 & 1879, 69 58 

Julian Tuttle, opening Town Hall 20 

times, 19 50 

^' •' opening selectmen's 

room 11 times, 2 75 

" '■ care clock 15 months, 12 50 

" •' cleaning clock, 2 00 

" " cellar, 75 



16 


78 


20 


00 


1 


50 


11 


55 


• 




12 


65 




50 



12 



Paid Julian Tuttle, sawing wood, 50 

'' oil, 8 49 

'' " wicks, 15 

" '' lamp, _ 90 

'' '' matches, 25 

'•' '' repairs on cellar door 

and settees, 4 00 

" '' cleaning small clock, X() 

'' " 2 springs Town clock, *2 00 

Wm. D. Tuttle, printing notices, 1 00 

" " express public docu- 

ments, books &c., 2 20 

'' " laying out lots in 

Cemeteries, 3 50 

'^ ^' blanks for dog licenses 1 40 

" '* journey to Concord to 

make returns, 1 50 

^' '* journey to Boston, 

respt. State tax, 2 00 

" '' recording 18 marriages, 2 70 

28 deaths, 4 <S0 
'' '• collecting & recording 

28 births, 
" '' postage & stationery, 

L. E. Reed, attending 14 burials, 

" ^' making 11 death returns, 
J. E. Cutter, discount on taxes, 18^0, 
E. Hall & Son, plank for sluice, 
'' ' labor and nails. 



14 


00 






1 


.'){') 






42 


00 






2 


75 






717 


13 






3 


40 

50 










$1,116 


07 



Receipts from February 26, 1880, to February 20, 1881. 

Unexpended balance as per report of 

Feb. 26, 1880, $3,402 32 

Appropriations and receipts, 15,689 90 

119.092 22 



13 



Expenditures. 




Support of Schools, 


12,863 76 


Repairs of Town buildings, 


369 52 


Regular Highway work, 


1.302 90 


Support of Poor, 


1,519 48 


Town Debts. 


4,568 57 


Soldiers' Aid, 


704 00 


Interest on Notes, 


634 52 


Town Officers. 


426 50 


Printing, 


83 50 


Cemetery Expenses, 


112 85 


Miscellaneous, 


1,116 07 


State Tax, 


1,080 00 


County Tax, 


542 70 


State Treas., liquor licenses, 


87 75 



Bal. HI Col & Treas. hands, Feb. 26, '81. 



Town Debt. Notes, 

Daniel Harris, 

D J. Wetlierbee. 

David M. Handley. 

Iredrick Rouillard, 

James E. Hillings, 

Luther Billings 

Mrs. J. K. Putney. 

Joseph Barker, 

J. A. Piper, 

Sarah C. Noyes, 

Thomas P. Noyes, * 

Amount due from Soldiers' Aid, 

" " '• Treas. & Collector, 



$15,412 12 
.t3.6S0 10 



S819 


33 


595 


41 


2.042 


50 


2,101 


16 


1,994 


75 


203 


00 


686 


94 


501 


08 


205 


00 


800 


00 


400 


00 



$10,349 17 



1352 00 
3.680 10 



i4,032 10 



Balance against the Town, #6.317 07 

D. J. WETHERBEE, ) Selectmen 

JOHN WHIIE, V of 

P. WETHERBEE, j Acton. 

Acton, Feb. 26, 1881. 



14 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

FOR 1880. 



Births in Acton in 1880. 

No. r»}ite of birth. Name of child. Names of parents. 

1. Jan. I, Hannah Louise Beck, daughter of Chas. L. and 

Lulu A. Beck. 

2. Jan. 15, Dora Etta Owens, daughter of Tliomas P. and 

Eliza J. Owens. 
8. Jan. 18, Alice Mabel Teele, daughter of Charles H. and 
EstelleL Teele. 

4. Jan. 22, Mary 0. Conners, daughter of Maurice and 

Honora Conners. 

5. Jan. 17, George All)ert Dockendorff. son of Jacob and 

Martha A. Dockendorff. 
♦ ). Jan. 7. Frank Harrison, son of Henry and Eliza Harrison. 

7. Feb. 28, Minnie Mabel Haynes, daughter (^f Sylvester 

and Eliza W. Havnes. 

8. Mar. 1. Albert Edward Willis, son (^f WiUiam W. and 

Elizabeth Willis. 

9. Mar. IG, Edward Dion, son of Agistes and Emma Dion. 

10. Aprd 17, James Qninlan, son of John and Julia Quinlan. 

11. April 21, Alice Crane Haskins, daughter, of John R. 

and Helen A. Haskins. 

12. May 22, Roscoe Hosmer Knowlton. son of Frank R. and 

Emma S. Knowlton. 
18. May 2G, Francis Victor D. Nelson, son of Oscar P. and 

Mary Ann Nelson. 
14. May 27, Fanny Louise Rich, daugliter of Edward S. and 

Mary Alice Rich. 



15 

15. June 7, Eva Sawyer, daughter of Thomas J. and Kate 

Sawyer. 

16. June 8, Guy Ernest Tuttle, son of Amos S. and Amy M, 

tuttle. 

17. June 27, G-eorge Morton Guilford, son of Samuel A. and 

Nellie M. Guilford. 

18. July 17, Millicent Mamie Edwards, daughter of Alfred J. 

and Ehoda Edward«. 

19. Aug. 3, Grace Alice Hayward, daughter of Walter E. 

and Nettie F. Hayward. 

20. Aug. 22, How^ard Knowlton Tuttle, son of H. Waldo 

and Lizzie S Tuttle. 

21. Aug. 24, Ernest Hooper, son of Edmund B. and Ella L. 

Hooper. 

22. Sept. 5, Walter S. Jones, son of Wm. S. and Laura A. 

Jones. 

23. Sept. 17. John Edward Cain, son of Edward and Ann 

Cain. 

24. Oct. 4, Albert Ashley Palmer, son of Nathan R. and 

Abbie M. Palmer. 

25. Oct. 12, Clarence Everett Blodgett, son of J. Herbert 

and Minnie A. Blodgett. 

26. Oct. 17, Nellie Maria Scanlan, daughter of Thomas and 

Maria C. Scanlan. 

27. Nov. 2, Luther Warren Piper, son of Anson C. and Ellen 

L. Piper. 
Births not Previously Reported. 

28. Mar. 15, 1879, Eva Lina Nelson, daughter of Oscar P. 

and Mary Ann Nelson. 



Marriages Recorded in Acton in 1880. 

No. Date of Marriage. Names and residences of parties. 

1. Jan. 20, Mr. Joseph Barker and Miss Harriet Redmile, 

both of Acton. 

2. Jan. 28, Mr. Anson C. Piper and Miss Ellen L. Jones, 

both of Acton. 
8. April 14, Mr. Francis Conant and Mrs. Ellen J. Marshall, 

both of Acton. 
4. April 17, Mr. Benjamin Skinner and Mrs. Oeorgie Anna 

Du Bois, both of Acton* 



^e 



5. May 16, Mr. William Wheeler and Mrs. Louisa M. Smith, 

both of ActoD. 
T). June 1, Mr. William C. Closeman and Miss Catherine 

Dawson, both of Maynard. 

7. June 26, Mr. John F. Nickless ot Acton, and Miss Anna 

C. Currier of Lowell. 

8. July 7, Mr. Chas. Griffin of Greenwicli, N. Y., and Miss 

Kate C. Houghton of Acton 

9. July 17, Mr. Kobert P. Burroughs and Miss Ella S. 

Teele, both of Acton. 

10. Sept. 7, Mr. Joseph Noyes of Acton, and Mrs Maria T. 

Jones of Hyde Park. 

11. Sept. 22, Mr. Octavus A. Knowlton and Miss Etta L. 

Houghton, botli of Acton. 

12. Sept. 22, Mr. Moses A. Reed of Acton, and Miss Ellen 

A. McDaniels of East Dorset, Vt. 

13. Oct. 3, Mr. George H. Harris of Actou, and Miss Sarah 

Addie Heald of Carlisle. 
14 Sept. 23, Mr. Edwin W. Taylor of Acton, and Miss 
Flora A. Hussey of Littleton. 

15. Oct. 14, Mr. Cyrus L. Angier of Acton, and Miss Maggie 

A. Rickerbey of St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

16. Nov. 4, Mr. George VV. Worster of Acton, and Miss 

Mary E. Sherman of Mavnai-d. 

17. Nov. U, Mr. Eri S.Brooks and Miss Susie A. Batchelder, 

both of Acton. 

18. Nov. 25, Mr Arthur A. Jones and Miss Mary F. Clark, 

both of Acton. 



Deaths Registered in Acton in 1880. 

No. Date of Death. Names and Ages of Deceased. 

1. Jan. 6, Mr. William Davis, aged 89 years, 3 months, 27 

days. 

2. Jan. 18, a daughter of Loren C. and Ella S. Baldwin, 

aged 1 day. 

3. Feb. 6, Mr Eben Macauley, aged 28 years, 4 days. 

4. Feb. 7, Mr. John DuBois, aged 51 years, 11 months. 7 

days. 

5. Feb. 14, Mr. Ebenezer Wood, aged 87 years, 8 months^ 

14 days. 



17 

6. Feb. 17, Mr. James F. Greenwood, aged 28 years, 2 

months. 14 days. 

7. Feb. 23, Ella A., daughter of Jacob and Adaline A. 

Priest, aged 5 years, ^ month, 9 days. 
H. Feb. 27, Mr. Geo. W. Knights, aged 46 years, 6 months. 
9. iSIar. 19^ Mr. Peter Tenney, aged 81 years, 2 months, 

15 days. 

10. Mar. 25, Col. Winthrop E. Faulkner, aged 74 years, 11 

months, 9 days. 

11. Mar. 31, Mrs. Louisa, wife of Benjamin C. Baldwin, aged 

59 years. 9 months. 

12. April 3, Mr. Jonathan Wheeler, aged 89 years, 4 months, 

5 days. 

13. April 7, Mr. Willard C. Lane, aged 81 years. 

14. April 13, Mrs. Betsey Chaflfin, aged 87 years, 9 months, 

17 days. 

15. April 24, Mrs. Marietta C, wife of Charles B. Stone, 

aged 30 years, 3 months. 24 days. 

16. May 9, Mrs. Ruth Hager, aged 91 years, 5 months, 1 day. 

17. May 27, Mr. Francis Dwight, aged 64 years, 10 month's, 

7 days. 

18. June 10, Bernard A., son of Herbert E. and Sophia E. 

Preston, aged 5 years. 8 months. 3 days. 

19. June 18. Mr. John Erwin Fletcher, aged 38 years, 1 

month, 25 days. 

20. July 6. Miss Florence K. Jones, aged 23 years, 9 months, 

20 days. 

21. Aug. 10, Mrs. Lucy Noyes, aged 66 years. 

22. Aug. 14, Mrs. Sarah Girard, aged 50 years, 26 days. 

23. Aug. 18, Mr. Richard Kinsley, aged 56 years, 7 months, 

19 days. 

24. Sept. 12, Ernest, son of Robert and Maria Hart, aged 

10 months, 21 days. 

25. Oct. 2. Frank H., son of James E. and Tamson Billings, 

aged 13 years. 

26. Nov. 14, Mr. John H. Quirk, aged 25 years, 11 months, 

21 days. 

27. Nov. 29, Mrs. Eliza Poultney, aged 34 years, 6 months, 

6 days. 

28. Dec. 1, Mr. Henry W. Richardson, aged 30 years, 2 

months, 1 day. 



18 



Names of Persons in Acton havinsj Do2:s Licensed in 1880, 



Clias. H. Coiiant, 
Otis H. Forbusli, 
Jeveiny Austin, 
Joseph Wheeler, 
Elbridge J. Kobhins, 
M. Augusta Hosmer, 
Luther Conant, 
Daniel Harris, 
Alonzo L. Tuttle, 
Elnathan Jones 
'J'uttles, Jones & Wether- 

hee, 3, 
H. Waldo Tuttle, 
Theron F. Newton, 
Lucius 8. Hosiuer, 
Daniel Tuttle, 
Francis CoTiant, 
Louis E. Allen, 
Chas. Morris, 
Moses Taylor, 
A. B. Brown, 
Taylor Bros. & Co., 2, 
(ieorge C. Wright, 
John R. Houghton, 
Chas. J. Williams, 
Cyrus Hay ward, 
Frank VV^etherbee, 
Henry W. Richardson, 
George W. Livermore, 
Chas.' L. Beck, 



Charles H. Snow, 

Joseph W. Wherren, 

Francis Dwight, 

Sylvester Haynes, 
I Jerry H. McCarty, 
I Moses A Heed, 
I Solon A. Robbins, 
j Chas. D. (Jriggs. 

Winsor Piatt. 

Chas. IL Ilandley, 
! E. F. Fuller, 
I George C. Conant, 
; John Kelly, 
I Chas. A. Harrington, 

Levi Houghton, 
j Eri S. lirooks, 
i A. Lucian Noyes, 
j James D. Cobni-n, 
I Moses E. Taylor, 

Walter A. (iilmore, 

Gnstavus H. Waugli, 

George Conant, 
j Hanson A. Littlelield. 
j Henry Haynes, 

James Haiinon. 
i Nathan K. Jolnison; 

A. J. Willis, 
1 Chas. Holton, 
j Frank Pratt, 
I J. A. Houston, 
S<) INIales at $2.00, S17i 
.5 Females, at $.5.00, 2i 



Anson C. Piper, 
(ieorge V. Mead, 
Danie F. Havward. 
John W. Charter, 
Henry Bohannon, 
John Fletcher, 
Isaiah S. Leach, 
Edwin Tarbell, 
John Tenii)le, 
Lester Fletcher, 
J. C. Wheeler, 
Willis L. Mead, 
Albert Moulton, 
Augustus Fletcher, 
John Welch, 
Isaac P.aiker, 
Warren Maustield, 
Chas. Wheeler, 
(jleorge W. Kiu)wlton, 2, 
M^•roll F. Going, 
George Pratt. 2, 
Henry Hanson. 
(ieor?e l{. Keves, 
N. R. I'almer," 
Forbush A: Hartwell, 
John D. Moulton, 
Edward Q-Neil, 
J. E. Reed, 
Geo. H. shapley, 
Patrick (iallagher. 



?.00 
).00 



Total, 94 



.$20.3.00 



WM. ^D. TUTTLE, Towiz Clerk. 



xVCTON, March 1, 1S8L 



19 



REPORT OF THE 



Receipts & Expenditures 







OF 


THE 




ALMSHOUSE IN ACTON, 


For the Year Ending Ipril 1, 1881. 




Articles 


ON Hand 


April 1st, 1881. 




12 cows, $480 


00 


37 hens. 


$18 50 


1 horse. 


60 


00 


12cds. wood cut for use, 54 00 


7 1-2 tons hay, 


145 


00 


1 2 market boxes. 


1 20 


1 1-2 '' oat fodder, 


22 


50 


40 barrels, 


4 00 


800 lbs. meal, 


10 


00 


Lumber, 


3 00 


1100 '^ cotton seed, 


14 


30 


Flour, 


75 


2 tons shorts. 


40 


00 


Crack(5rs, 


20 


Bags, 


3 


50 


2 lbs sugar. 


20 


10 lights of glass. 




40 


Spices, 


50 


2 cider barrels, 


2 


00 


Tea, 


87 


Potatoes, 


5 


00 


Coffee, 


35 


325 lbs. pork, 


35 


00 


Molasses, 


80 


50 ^' lard, 


5 


50 


Rye meal. 


1 00 


100 '' ham, 


12 


00 


2 dozen eggs. 


40 


12 '' butter. 


3 


72 


Dried apple. 


70 


Mackerel, 




50 


1-2 bushel beans. 


1 CO 


8-4 bbl. of soap. 


2 


50 


Salt, 


20 


Pickled pigs head & feet, 2 


00 


1-4 gross matches. 


58 


Beets, 


1 


00 


Oil, 


14 


2 gallons boiled cidei 
2 bbls. of apples, 




75 






1 
3 

EROM 


1 c 

00 




i937 06 


Receipts 


To 


w^N Farm 1880-81. 




Received for potatoes, $14 31 


Received for milk. 


814 30 


calves, 


17 95 


eggs. 


5 44 


cows. 


177 


00 


berries, 3 77 


oxen, 


130 00 


apples 


, 349 25 


nseofnxpn 7 00 






'' wagon, I 75 




11,524 61 


bed. 


3 84 







20 





Expenses. 




Paid for crackers, 


$16 67 


Paid for grass seed. 


$4 43 


cheese, 


9 69 


filing saw. 


40 


butter, 


55 24 


rep. rigging and 


oil. 


4 80 


cultivator, 


2 05 


sugar. 


17 56 


plaster. 


1 40 


molasses, 


19 92 


garden seeds, 


78 


coffee, 


3 35 


liniment. 


90 


rye meal. 


2 41 


vinegar, 


1 10 


tea, 


6 90 


snuff, 


20 


flour, 


61 50 


sulphur, 


51 


beans, 


10 18 


saltpetre, 


32 


tobacco. 


2 00 


beeswax, 


17 


cream tartar, 


2 28 


tomatoes, 


25 


meat, 


80 13 


cattle cards. 


32 


fish. 


7 59 


shovel. 


90 


saleratus, 


2 24 


pork barrels, 


1 87 


salt, 


5 50 


horse blanket. 


1 25 


starch. 


49 


harness. 


30 00 


yeast cakes. 


58 


horse rake. 


25 00 


hops and malt 


. Tl 


apple header, 


1 00 


soap, 


13 22 


grindstone and 


baskets^ 


1 06 


gearing. 


4 13 


brooms. 


2 50 


scythe snath, 


75 


thread 


50 


scythes, 


155 


pails. 


1 72 


forks. 


2 60 


tin ware. 


1 18 


bog hoe. 


117 


rep. tin ware. 


e^i 


ladders. 


6 02 


'• shoes. 


28 


hammer, 


1 00 


" roof, chim- 


saw, 


75 


ney, &c. 


3 70 


clothes pins, 


12 


^' pumps. 


3 00 


fly paper, 


25 


oyster shells. 


12 


wash board. 


37 


paris green, 


30 


cloths and 




bristol brick. 


10 


clothing, 


10 98 


spittoon. 


35 


mittens, 


1 22 


wheel grease. 


20 


socks, 


144 


phosphate, 


10 6Q 


yarn, 


1 29 


grain, 


891 83 


wicks, 


05 


cows, 


218 00 


crockery, 


2 28 


pi. 2:, 


15 00 


spices. 


2 30 



21 



Paid for oxen, $ 125 00 

pasturing cows, 10 00 



use of bull, 


6 00 


butchering, 
lanterns, 


2 50 
1 34 


axe helve, 


25 


stove polish, 
labor. 


08 
141 10 


blacksmith bil] 


,29 68 


barrels, 


55 51 


glass. 


75 


tacks, 


15 


shoes, 


3 15 


ropes, 
sick chair, 


73 

1 75 


wash tub. 


1 25 


Total amount of Expenditures 
<' /' ^- Receipts, 



Paid for matches, 


$1 16 


rice, 


45 


raisins, 


47 


herbs. 


85 


onions, 


45 


Dr. Sanders bil 


[, 7 45 


lumber, nails, 




zinc, & labor 




rep. barn, 


74 66 


services of J. 




Austin* wife, 200 00 


services of 




J. E. Cutter, 


40 00 


John White, 


10 00 


Frank Hosmer 


10 00 



Drawn from Treasury to balance accounts 
" ^' '-'■ *' pay for Oxen, 



Income less than Expenditures, 
Interest on Farm, 
Drawn from Treasury, 

Victualing 54 Tramps at 40 cents, 

Cost of supporting Poor on Farm, 



$ 240 00 
409 85 



$ 1,809 46 
1,524 61 

$284 85 
125 00 

1409 85 



$ 649 85 
21 60 



$ 628 25 



Whole number of persons, exclusive of tramps, supported 
in Almshouse, 7 ; average number^ 6 ; present number, 7. 



JOHN E. CUTTER, 
JOHN WHITE, 
FRANK HOSMER, 



Overseers 

OF 

Poor. 



SCHOOL REPORT 



To THE Citizens of Acton : — 

The School Committee respectfully submit the following 
report : 

In compliance with your instructions we elected at the 
beginning of the official year, a Superintendent of Schools 
and herewith present his detailed report of the condition of 
the schools and of everything pertaining to the educational 
work of the town. 

The following statement indicates the disposal which we 
have made of the funds, committed to our care. On account 
of the interruption of schools by sickness there is quite an 
unexpended balance in two of the accounts which the Com- 
mittee will apply to increase school privileges next year. 

WEST SCHOOL. . 

Mrs. Lucy M. Mead, Agent. 

Drawn from the treasury, $682 16 

Balance from last year. 29 57 

1711 73 



Paid to teachers, 


$512 00 


for fuel and preparing it. 


92 28 


care of house and furnace. 


45 00 


incidentals. 


2 88 


organ. 


2 00 


Balance on hand, 


57 57 



$711 73 



NORTH SCHOOL. 

Geo. H. Harris, Agent. 

Drawn from the treasury, $ 308 64 

Balance from last year, • 36 08 

Paid to teachers, 
for fuel, 

care of house, 
incidentals, 
Balance on hand, 

EAST SCHOOL. 

I. W. Flagg, Agent. 

Drawn from the treasury, i 308 6-1: 

Balance from last year, 33 87 



$246 


00 


35 


40 


14 


00 


4 


91 


44 


41 



Paid to teacher. 






f 270 00 


for fuel. 






37 62 


care of house, 






16 00 


incidentals, 






6 84 


Balance on hand, 


SCHOOL 


12 05 


SOUTH 




George F. 


Plagg, 


Agent. 


Drawn from the treasury, 






$682 16 


Received from town of Stow, 






■ 8 00 


Paid to teachers, 


$570 00 


for fuel and preparing it, 






30 50 


care of house, 






55 00 


incidentals, 






23 20 


Deficiency on last year's account. 




39 


Cash in the treasury, 






11 07 



#344 72 



$344 72 



$ 842 51 



1342 51 



$690 16 



$690 16 



CENTER SCHOOL. 

Luther Conant, Agent. 



Drawn from the treasury, 


S682 


16 




Balance from last year, 


8 


70 


$ 690 86 








Paid to teachers, 


1567 


00 




for care of house. 


31 


50 




books and other incidentals, 


7 


48. 




fuel and preparing it, 


67 


63 




To be paid to music teacher. 


15 


00 




Cash on hand, 


2 


25 


1690 86 








SOUTH EAST SCHOOL. 






C. D. Griggs, Ag( 


3nt. 






Drawn from the treasury. 


$200 00 




Deficiency, 


12 


18 


$212 18 


Paid to teachers, 


$188 00 


for fuel, 


19 


00 




care of house, 


2 


00 




incidentals, 


3 


18 


$212 18 


Amount raised by the towm for schools, 


1 2,500 


00 


Income from the State school fund, 


179 


56 




'^ ^' dog fund. 


178 


67 





Total, 12,858 23 

Number of children between the ages of five and fifteen, 
297. Sum raised by the town for each, $ 8. 41-. 
Respectfully submitted, 

LUTHER CONANT. 
I. W. FLAGG, 



G. H. HARRIS, 
G. P. FLAGG, 
LUCY M. MEAD, 
C. D. GRIGGS, 



School 

Committee 

of Acton. 



Superintendent's Report. 



It is one of the requirements of the statutes of the State, 
that the School Committee, or a Superintendent of Schools, 
acting for them, shall present annually, for the consideration 
of the citizens of each town, a report, not only of the disposal 
of the educational funds, but also an account of the condition 
of the several schools, and of the general work of school 
management with which the committee is charged, and it is, 
in accordance with this wise provision, that the following 
pages are now laid before the public. 

In what we here present, we strive not so much to set 
forth the details of our school work during the past year, as 
to give to the people an idea of the aims which we have had 
before us and the aspirations, by which we are inspired, in 
what we propose to ourselves in the future, and we wish we 
might so express ourselves that all our citizens may be led to 
share in our enthusiasm respecting the importance of this 
work ; for this in relation to all our citizens is by far the most 
important work with which the town, in its corporate capacity, 
is charged. 

What is this work? We answer : It is nothing short of 
this, — to make what all thoughtful men confess to be man's 
greatest boon, viz.: knowledge, the common bounty of all — 
it is to make it possible for every man's child, however poor 
and ignorant the man may be himself, to receive the rudiments 
of learning with which he may unlock for himself treasuries 
of unknown wealth and which may be to him a passport to 
the same avenues of respectability and honor which, in less 
favored countries, are the exclusive possession of the rich and 
of the noble by birth. 

In this department of municipal work, it is not only our 
aim to make the acquisition of knowledge a possibility to all. 



if they are inclined to strive for it, but to impart knowledge 
in the most effective way; to awaken a desire for it in the minds 
of young persons who lack stimulating influences at home and 
to make these schools in every respect, to every family of our 
town, what expensive institutes of learning have been in the 
past to the few who could afford to avail themselves^of their 
advantages. 

This is the grand aim which we keep constantly before 
us in our exertions for the advancement of the interests of 
this work and it is an aim which brings to us at least very 
much of the highest and purest inspiration. This is a com- 
munism of the most philanthropic and practical sort, for it is 
making common to all what, adroitness, and greed on the one 
hand and the opposite qualities on the other, can not soon 
make to revert to the favored few. But. how to realize to the 
fullest extent the high aim, just set forth, is the question, 
which we are ever striving to solve, and, as we trust, not with- 
out some encouraging indications, if not of a complete, yet of 
a quite satisfying result. 

Modern science, in these last years, has done very much 
to simplify processes, in the management of material forces, 
and in the construction of the implements of art and of in- 
dustry from the raw materials, but, until quite recently, the 
methods of mental development in the young and the general 
work of school management have undergone but little modi- 
fication. The prevailing idea has seemed to be that there is 
no ro3^al road to learning, that the old ways are the best and 
the only ones. But, within the last ten years, a great change 
has come over everything pertaining to educational affairs, 
and there is as much difference between the general appear- 
ance and efficiency of our schools today and what they were 
only ten years ago, as there is between a plow of the most ap- 
proved style now and what the plow was in general use even 
fifty years ago. 

By the old methods of instruction, the reliance for sue- 



cess was upon the impression Avhich the printed page could 
make upon the pupil's memories, by a bare strain. Anything 
like the cultivation of originality of thought or expression, in 
the pupils, was a thing unthought of in our common schools ; 
and, in the discipline of schools, the principal element of in- 
fluence was that of fear, and what scenes of violence did the 
walls of many of the school-rooms, of not a very remote pe- 
riod, witness ! What ingenious methods of torture and hu- 
miliation were practiced upon children and youth who were 
capable of responding to high and noble motives had they 
been properly treated, but whose dispositions received per- 
manent injury from injudicious treatment, in the way of dis- 
cipline, both at their homes and at school ! But to-day there 
is not a faculty of the child's nature that is not the object 
of the educator's study ; there is not a sense in the child's 
possession but the ingenious teacher finds it and makes it an 
ally m his work, so that, under the present regime, it may be 
said of wisdom (even Avith a limited application), "Her ways 
are ways of pleasantness and all her paths are peace." The 
force of the last part of this quotation appears from the fact 
that, now, such a thing as corporal punishment is almost un- 
known in our schools. In our last report we described so 
fully the methods of instruction which we were endeavoring 
to have practiced by our teachers that we will not refer to 
that topic here 

A general survey of the year's work gives us much sat- 
isfaction, not simply from the impression which it makes upon 
us of work done, bat also from the encouragement which it af- 
fords us, as to the future. It has been with us, in the past, a 
serious question, whether, with our necessarily limited funds, 
we would be able to make our schools compare at all, in effi- 
ciency, with the schools of the more densely populated and 
more wealthy portions of the State ; whether with an appro- 
priation of a little more than eight dollars per scholar and with 
a scattered population so that anything like a systematic grad- 



ing is impossible we could produce anything like the results 
which appear in towns able to appropriate nearly three times 
eight dollars per scholar, and with a population so situated 
that the most methodical grading is feasible. But the suc- 
cess, already attained, encourages as to believe that, with a 
careful supervision, with competent resident teachers, and 
with the moderate additions to our school funds that the town 
soon will be in a condition to make, we may hope to extend 
to all our pupils, as good a preparation for the ordinary prac- 
tical DUTIES of life as can be secured to them anywhere in 
the commonwealth. 

A judicious supervision can greatly assist some teachers 
who, without it, would be quite • inefficient ; in every com- 
munity there is good teaching talent, which, with a pros- 
pect of preference in patronage, will be developed and which 
can be secured to the schools with a permanence and at an 
expense which will be of great advantage to the town, and 
even the inability to grade our schools perfectly is not an un- 
mitigated disadvantage. In an ungraded school, if the en- 
thusiasm is what it ought to be, the younger pupils will learn 
much from the older ones, when they tire of their own pur- 
suits, and thus, unconsciously to themselves they will be pre- 
pared to pass from the lower classes into the higher, with less 
abruptness, than is possible in perfectly graded schools, so 
that, with all our disadvantages, we are not sure but we may 
bring forward our pupils so that when they attain the age of 
fourteen years, they may be on a fair average with the pupils 
of the same age of our cities and large towns. 

This is our hope and it is for this that we are encouraged 
to strive. But when citizens attempt to criticize us and feel 
it their duty to set forth the faults of our schools, all of which 
they may be justified in doing, we ask them, in simple justice 
to us, to take into consideration the difficulties with which we 
are obliged to contend, and to mete out praise, so far as it is 



merited in the same measure that they set forth our defects, 
and be ready not simply to find fault, but to assist in removing 
the causes of failure by voting for increased appropriations 
for school purposes and by earnest co-operation in every effort 
which promises to add to the efficiency of the schools. 

During the last term, we have made changes in the text 
books of Arithmetic and of spelling; substituting the Franklin 
Series in the former and the Swinton Word Book in the lattei-; 
we have also introduced the Dinsmore Spelling Blanks, and 
these changes promise to be a substantial benefit to the 
schools. The most perfect efficiency of some of our schools 
has been somewhat impaired by defective heating arrange- 
ments, a difficulty, which we trust, will be obviated before anoth- 
er winter. We hope, too, that better provisions will be made 
for ventilating the school- rooms. Teachers too often open 
windows and expose the children to drafts of air. Boards 
should be so arranged against the lower window sashes that 
this danger will be avoided. 

We consider it very important that the out-buildings of 
our school- houses shall be properly cleansed every spring 
and that they be so thoroughly white-washed that every mark 
which might make an injurious impression upon the minds of 
the young shall be obliterated. Too much care can not be 
exercised in this respect. Unless constant vigilance is used, 
in this direction, some of the objections which have been 
made to our system of common schools, on moral grounds, 
will prove to be well founded. 

Every educator ought to bear it constantly in mind that he 
is charged with the care of certain young persons, not only as 
regards their mental training, but in eveiy respect, and any 
system of school management which leaves out the physical 
and moral elements is, in our opinion, fatally defective. 

Certain of our schools have suffered from the lack of ad- 
equate supplies, in some cases wanting such necessary articles 



as erasers. A teacher^ like any artisan, in order to the most 
perfect success, must have tools, — good ones, and the best 
that the market affords. 

We will suggest that, in addition to our regular grant, 
the town appropriate, for the incidental uses of our schools 
one hundred and fifty dollars, to be divided in the same pro- 
portions as the other school funds. 

But, without further general remarks, we proceed to a 
brief review of each school. 

West Grammar. 

The Spring term was taught by Miss Olive A. Prescott, 
an experienced teacher, and a graduate of the Bridgewater 
Normal School. Miss P. manifested natural and acquired 
qualifications for the teacher's vocation which ver}^ few of 
our instructors are so fortunate as to possess. She was genial 
in her manners, winning every heart by her gentle ways. 
She was methodical and forcible in her methods of teaching 
and unsparing in her exertions for the good of her school. 
Indeed, she exerted herself far beyond her strength and be- 
yond what we had any reason to expect of her or any teacher. 
She produced results fully equal to her endeavors, and we 
would have considered it a bright prospect for the school, if 
she could have continued as its head, but, after the service of 
one term, being offered a more advantageous position, she re- 
signed. 

The Fall and Winter terms were taught by Miss Ida J. 
Barker, who was also a graduate of the Bridgewater Normal 
School and of considerable experience in the management of 
public schools. Miss B.'s methods of teaching were excellent 
and she showed satisfactory results from her work, though 
she found the discipline of the school somewhat difficult. 
Considering everything we think this teacher did well and is 
worthy of high commendation. 



10 



West Primary. 
This school was taught throughout the year by Miss 
Mabel Lewis, a teacher who has been very successful in an- 
other town. She spared no pains to make her school a suc- 
cess, — she was, if possible, too anxious to reach the best 
results, and we consider her one of the very best instructors 
that this school has had during the last ten years. We think 
she was well liked by all the pupils and by the parents, and 
that all concerned were well satisfied with her work. 

South Grammar. 

This school has continued under the care of Miss R. E. 
Stacy who received a favorable mention in our last report. 
The number of pupils here is not so large as it has been in 
the past, and this fact, during the last term, conduced some- 
what to the scholars' success, as it has lost some of its most 
troublesome element. During the last year, this has been one 
of the pleasantest schools in town and has been so Avell con- 
ducted that it has shown excellent results, fully equal, taking 
everything into account, to any scliool in town. The good 
influence of the teacher is developing a class of young people 
which gives promise ol a high degree of excellence in every 
respect. The school is creditable to the village and to the 
town. 

South Primary. 

Miss J. M. McAlister has continued in charge of this 
school during the year, and the pupils have shown a good de- 
gree of improvement in almost every particular The teacher 
has introduced some pleasing motion songs and has mingled 
the boys and girls in the seats over the room, has interested 
the pupils in writing and has adopted other expedients which 
have been of great advantage to the school. The scholars 
still seem somewhat backward in reading and we recommend 
that special attention be given to this most important branch 
during the coming year. 



11 



Centek Grammar. 

Miss A. C. Davis, who has been commended in more of 
our reports than any other person, [now upon our corps of 
teachers, has continued to do excellent work in this school, 
throughout the year. This is now the most advanced school 
in town and presents a good illustration of the extent to 
which the educational force of even a Grammar school can be 
developed by a well qualified teacher. We would not hesi- 
tate to have the pupils of this school compared with a similar 
number of the same ages from any public school in the State. 
We are sorry to lose Miss D.'s services from this school, but 
are glad to K:now that she is to continue in the service of the 
towm. We doubt not she will have a similar success in her 
new field to that which has attended her efforts in the one she 
has left. 

Center Primary. 

This has continued to be, in our opinion, the model pri- 
mary school in the town, under the charge of the same teach- 
er, Miss B. M. Ball. We think this school is managed in such 
a way that little is lacking that can be desired in a primary 
school. The general principles of school work which we 
have set forth in the early part of this report are well carried 
out here, and, if any citizen wishes to know .'< what ' our ideas 
of good teaching are, let him spend a half day in this school. 
Here is something, not in theory, on paper, or in a large town 
or city where the conditions are altogether different from our 
own, but here is the right sort of a school, in actual opera- 
tion, in our midst. Perhaps it is more than we have the 
right to expect that all teachers will be able to manage their 
schools in a similar way to this, or that they will secure the 
same results, tor very few have Miss B.'s natural fitness for 
the work : but the existence of such a school in the town, 
taught term after term by one of our own residents, is of 
very great advantage to all our educational work. 



12 

East School. 

This school has been taught the whole year by Miss S. 
A. Wetherbee and has been a complete success. We consid- 
er Miss W.'s moral influence over her pupils worthy of the 
highest commendation. She has the full confidence of both 
parents and scholars and has not been excelled in real effi- 
ciency by any teacher that has had charge of the school dur- 
ing the last ten years. 

North School. 

The Spring term was taught by Mrs. A. H. Loker who 
has been mentioned most favorably in many of our previous 
reports. Mrs L., during a part of the term, labored under 
some disadvantage from impaired health, but in spite of that, 
at the end of the term, manifested the usu d good results of 
her earnest and Avell-planned work. 

The Fall and Winter terms were taught by Miss E. F. 
Estabrook who was mentioned in a commendatory way in our 
last report, in connection with another school. Miss E., like 
several of our other teachers, has the happy faculty of man- 
aging her schools without a resort to physical force. The 
school has suffered in its numbers by removals from town, and 
by sickness of scholars, but is well sustained by the citizens 
of the community and for the few children who are now pu- 
pils, is doing a good work. 

South East School. 
This school has been kept in operation during the whole 
year. The Spring and Fall terms were taught by Miss N. G. 
Richardson and the Winter term by Miss E. E. Tuttle. Both 
of these teachers found here their first experience in the 
management of schools ; but both did a good work, and the 
school, considering the number of its pupils and other condi- 
tions, showed as good results from the year's work, as almost 
any school ni the town. 

Appended are the usual statistical reports. 
For the Committee, 

FRANKLIN P. WOOD, Superintendent. 



13 



ROLL OF HONOR 



NAMES OF THOSE WHO HAVE NOT BEEN ABSENT OR TARDY. 



On account of the severe storms of the last winter, and 
of the epidemics which have prevailed in some parts of the 
town, the number in the list is smaller than it otherwise would 
have been. It has been suggested that it would be a good 
idea to make some arrangement that our schools will not be 
in session on very stormy days or when, because of a drifted 
condition of the roads, it is difficult for the pupils to reach the 
schools. 



One Term. 

Susie Billings, 
Emily Hannon, 
Carrie Hay ward, 
Susie Pond, 
Mabel Richardson, 
Harry Fletcher, 
Hiram Gates. 



One Term. 

Nellie Callanane, 
Jessie Currie, 
Bertie M. Jones, 
Evie Page, I 
Lottie Page, 
Carrie Page, 
Freddie Fletcher, 
Charlie tiapgood, 
Lutie E. Hosmer, 
Frank Wherren, 
Charlie F. Wherren. 



South Grammar. 

Two Terms. 

Josie Hannon, 
Eva Shapley, 
Carrie Shapley. 



South Primary. 

Two Terms. 

Mamie May, 
Lillian Richardson. 



Three Terms. 

Sadie Sawyer, 
Etta Temple. 



Three Terms. 

Ada M. Jones, 
Clara F. Leach. 



14 



West Grammar. 



One Term. 

Walter Gilmore, 
Eugene L. Hall, 
Willie Hart, 
Clesson Parker. 



One Term. 

Mabel Decoster, 
Alice J. Hoar, 
Lulu M. Lawrence, 
Florence Richardson 
Mabel Robinson, 
Bertram Hall, 
Ray Littlefield, 
Albertis Preston, 
Brooks Parker, 
Sumner Teele. 



West Primary. 

Two Terms. 

Alice J. Stone, 
Guy Mead, 
Alfred Richardson. 



Three Terms. 
Ida Richardson. 



Center Grammar. 



One Term. 

Nellie Lane, 
Hattie Tuttle, 
Lizzie Scofield, 
Elbridge R. Conant, 
George S. Lee, 
L. Harry Tuttle. 



One Term. 

Lottie G. Conant, 
Carrie M. Dunn, 
Clara L. Hammond, 
Hattie M. Robbins, 
Clara B. Robbins, 
Warren 0. Robbins X 
011ie'D.,Wood,J: 



* Not absent or tardy for two j^ears, 
t Tardy once. 



Center Primary. 

Two Terms. 

May Caulder, 
S. MaudPurcell. 
Grace E. Tuttle, :|: 
Arthur C. Allen, 
Luther Conant, jr. 



Three Terms. 

Susie E. Conant,"^ 
Carrie A. Lund, f 
Hattie Lund. 



Three Terms. 
Charlie Caulder. 



t Not absent or tardy for three years. 



15 



One Term. 

Fred W. Billmgs, 
Kay G. Brooks, 
Carlton Conant, 
Herbert Robbins, 
Ernest E.Wetherbee 



One Term. 

Edith Flagg, 
Annie By an, 
Mattie F. Smith, 
James Ryan, 
Edward M. Ryan, 
John Ryan. 



East School. 

Two Terms. 

Bertha M. Hosmer 



North School. 

Two Terms. 

Hattie Smith, 
Augusta Smith. 



South East School. 



One Term. 

Josie Keith, 
George Hooper. 

'J'he proportion ot the average attendance to the number 
of persons between the ages of 5 and 15 for the State is 70 
per cent. Our average is 79 per cent., which is very good. 
But will not the parents help the children to enlarge the Roll 
of Honor and raise our average even higher next year ? 



16 



TABULAR VIEW. 









tH 




^ 


> 


> 






Z 










^ 


Cr- 


CD 


< 


o 


z 




^ 
g 






aQ 




o 

Co 


i-S 


^ 






g 


B 






3^ 


05 




OQ 


OQ 


^ 


o 




C' 






!E 




O 


CD 


^ 


< 


^ 


CD 


SCHOOLS. 


TEACHERS. 


o o 


TJ 
? 


f 


? 


% 


Pu 
B. 




2 


1=? 
O 








5 

o 


o 


o 






i 


GO 


Ms 






5' 


r" 


1 




9 


X 


DC 




? 




SPKING TEEM. 














C-tre ]«—■?- 


Miss A. C. Davis 


W^ 
2K 


$34 00 


32 


26 


22.5 





6 


26 


56 


" B. M.Ball 


32 00 


32 


27 


25t 


2 





17 


75 


so^ti" ]£=r 


" R. E. Stacy 


2K 


40 00 


24 


22.7 


22.3 





8 


12 


8 


" J. M. McAllister 


iy> 


36 00 


46 


44.75 


42 








46 


12 


^^'^ (Primary 


'' 0. A.Prescott 


23^ 


32 00 


38 


30t 


23 





4 


31 


30 


" B.D.Lewis 


2 


30 00 


42 


40.37 


37 


1 





14 


36 


North 


Mrs. A. H. Loker 


2K 


30 00 


*21.5 


20 


19 


1 





12 


24 


East 


Miss S.A.Wetherbee 


21/? 


30 00 


24 


23 


19.8 








19 


28 


Southeast 


" N. G Richardson 
Totals. 


2>? 


20 00 


14 


12.5 


12 


1 

5 



18 


14 
191 


9 




223€ 


284 00 


273.5 


246.32 


222 6 


278 




FALL TERM. 




















Ppn+rp jG-rammar 
centre j p^i^^^rv 


Miss A. C, Davis 
" B. M. Ball 


2K 


^34 00 
32 00 


26 

27 


23 
24 


19 
23 



2 


9 



15 
11 


19 
108 


South i grammar 
I Primary 


" R. E. stacv 

" J. M. McAUister 


2K 


40 00 
36 00 


25 
51 


24.3 
50 


22.3 
43.3 






8 



14 
51 


13 
19 


West i <^^rammar 
^^'^^ 1 Primary 


" I, J. Barker 
•• B.D.Lewis 


2K 
23^ 


34 00 
30 00 


35 

39 


30t 
38 


26 
36 



1 


4 



31 
11 


24 
28 


North 


" E. F. Estabrook 


2i.< 


.30 00 


21 


18 


16.5 


1 





9 


21 


East 


" S.A.Wetherbee 


2i<; 


30 00 


23 


22 


19.2 








17 


13 


Southeast 


" N.G.Richardson 
Totals. 


2£ 


24 00 


15 


11.5 


11 




4 



21 


15 
174 


22 




23% 


290 00 


262 


240.8 


216.3 


267 




WINTER TERM. 




















Centre j G^^'ammar 
centre -j pri^^^rv 


Miss A. C. DaviR 


3 


i36 00 


35 


33t 


28 





15 


20 


18 


" B. M. Ball 


3 


32 00 


29 


25^ 


21.5 


{, 





20 


85 


South J grammar 
1 Prmiary 


" R. E Stacv 


2K 


40 00 


34 


32.6 


30.6 





21 


15 


17 


•' J. M. McAllister 


2>? 


36 00 


42 


40 


35 








42 


19 


West i Grammar 
^""^^ 1 Primary 


" I J. Barker 


3 


36 00 


47 


44 


40 





9 


25 


22 


" B. D. Lewis 


3 


32 00 


38 


36.3 


32 








17 


26 


North 


" E. F.Estabrook 


3 


32 00 


16 


15 


13.8 





2 


12 


22 


East 


" S.A.Wetherbee 


3% 


32 00 


22 


18 


15 








15 


15 


Southeast 


" E. E. Tuttle 
Totals, 
Aggregate for year. 


_2K 


24 00 


11 


10.5 


10 






86 


11 

177 
542 


36 




26>i 


300 00 


274 


254.4 


225.9 


260 




72)^ 


874 00 


809.5 


741.52 


664.8 


_9 


805 



The average attendance during the year 89 5-7 of the average number belong- 
ing to the schools. 

*One-half day pupil. 

Of the above"^ number of visits 99 were by the Superintendent. The Superin- 
tendent has held also eighteen half day examinations, at which large numbers 
have been present. 



k^(3) 



REPORTS! 



5)0,^ 



SELECTMEN 



AND OTHER OFFICERS 




H 



FEB. 26, 1881, TO FEB. 26, 1882, 



INCLUDING THE 



Marriages, Births and Deaths in li 



ALSO, THE 



Report of the School Committee. 




ACTON: 

PRINTED AT THE OFFICE OF THE PATRIOT, SOUTH ACTON. 

18 82. 



TOWN OFFICERS FOR 1882. 

Town Clerk, 

William D. Tuttle. 

Selectmen, 

D. J. Wethekbee, John White, Phineas Wethekf.ee. 

Assessors, 

Wm. D. Tuttle, Phineas Wetherbee, Lucius S. Hosmer. 

Overseers of the Poor, 

Elisha H. Cutler, Otis II. Forbush, Luke Blanchard. 

School Committee, 

Geo. Chandler, Job W. Dupee, 2 years ; Lucy M. Mead, Chas. 

D. Griggs, 1 year ; two to be chosen at April meeting. 

HigJiiucty Survey o rs , 

Daniel Wetherbee, Charles Wheeler, Abram H. Jones. 

Fence Viewers, 

Wm. W. Davis, John R. Houghton, Nahum C. Reed. 

Surveyors of Lumher, 

Wm. B. Davis, Edward F. Richardson, L. W. Stevens, 

Geo. H. Harris, Chas. B. Stone, E. J. Robbins, 

James B. Tuttle. 

Surveyors of Wood, 

E. J. Robbins, H. D. Parlin, Wm. B. Davis, I. W. Flagg, 

J. W. LoKER, Geo. H. Harris, Chas. B. Stone, 

Lucius S. Hosmer, Solomon L. Dutton, A. S. Fletcher, 

James B. Tuttle, Charles H. Taylor. 

Cemetery Committee, 

John Fletcher, William W. Davis, Joseph F. Cole. 

Surveyors of Hoops and Staves, 

David M. Handley, Augustus Fletcher. 

Field Drivers, 

Chas. B. Stone, Frank W. Houghton, Austin E. Lawrence, 

Jairus C. Wheeler, H. B. White, Eri S. Brooks, 

OsE[A Knowlton, George Smith. 



Treasurer's Report. 



DR. 

Paid State Treasurer, State Tax, $ 1,080 00 

County " County Tax, 542 70 

Selectmen's orders, 12,738 38 

Outstanding orders, 3,079 07 

Balance due the Town Feb. 26, 1882, 39 08 



CR. 

Balance in Treasury Feb. 26, 1881, f 1.470 42 

Received of J. E. Cutter, taxes, 1880, 2,209 68 

'^ State Treas., Corporation tax, 857 60 

" " -' State Aid. 304 00 

'' '^ ^' Indigent Soldiers, 96 00 

" School Fund, 180 21 
'' " " National Bank 

tax, 653 90 

" John Fletcher, stone step, 1 00 

" ^' '' lots sold in 

Woodlawn Cemetery, 33 00 

" J. E. Cutter, oxen sold at 

^OAvn Farm, 173 b5 

'' A, C. ' Handley, -rebate on 

council fees, 25 00 

" Chas. Wheeler, stone sold, 1. 00 

" County Treas., dog fund, 173 95 

'^ Julian Tuttle, use Town Hall, 68 78 

" J. E Cutter, error Jiscount 

on taxes, 1880, 15 00 

J. E. Cutter, Collector, 11,144 41 

Interest on Money in bank, 71 73 



17,479 23 



J. IC W. WETHERBEE. Trea^i^ 



117,479 23 



Selectmen's Report, 



Appropriations and Receipts. \ 



Unexpended balance of last year. 


$3,680 


10 


Corporation Tax, 


857 


60 


National Bank Tax, 


653 


90 


Aaron C. Handley, rebate on council fees, 25 


00 


John Fletcher, for Stone Step, 


1 


00 


John E. Cutter, for oxen, 


173 


55 


State Tax, 


1,080 


00 


County Tax, 


542 


70 


Regular Town Grant, 


7,000 


00 


Schools, 


3,000 


00 


Eoads, 


1,500 


00 


Overlayings, 


277 


98 


Soldiers' Aid, 


304 00 


Relief of Indigent Soldiers, 


96 


00 


State Treas. Mass. School Fund, 


'180 


21 


'' '' Dog Fund, 


173 


95 


Interest on money in bank. 


71 


73 


Charles Wheeler, stone sold, 


1 


00 


John Fletcher, lots in Woodlawn Cemetery, 33 


00 


J. E. Cutter, errors in discount, 1880, 


15 


00 


J. Tuttle, use of Town Hall, 


68 


78 

$19,735 50 



5 

EXPENDITURES. 



Support of Schools. 

Paid Geo. F. Flagg, South District, $790 00 

Chas. D. Greggs, South East District, 250 00 

Luther Conant, Centre '' 790 00 

J. W. Dupee, North " 350 00 

Lucy M. Mead, West '' 790 00 

Geo. Chandler, East '' 370 00 



$3,340 00 



Repairs on Town Buildings. 

Paid I. W. Flagg, repairs on East School 

House, $ 4 02 

Luther Conjant, " Centre '^ 

House, , 28 78 

Geo. H. Harris, " North " 

House, (1880) 3 25 

Geo. F. Flagg, ^' South '' 

House, 25 82 

Chas. D. Greggs,'' ^' East '' 

House, 5 50 

J. W. Dupee, stove and funnel North 

School House, 39 80 

J. W. DupbO, repairing chimney, 3 40 

Geo. Chandler, "' East School 

House, ' 21 43 

Lucy M. Mead, " West '' 

House, 18 75 



Regular Highway Work. 

Paid Charles Wheeler, $662 20 

'* ^' by order County 

Commissioners, 169 44 

A. H. Jones, ' 681 52 

'' • " by order County 

Commissioners, 122 67 



50 75 



,585 83 



Support of Poor. 

Paid J. E. Cutter^ for oxen on Town farm, $ ^ 73 55 
'' '^ deficiency on Town Farm 

to April 1, 1881, 159 85 

'' " use on Town Farm, 40 00 

" " support Clara Wheeler, 217 41 

'' '' '' Eliza Burgendahl, 178 74 

'' " '- Kate Bryan, 37 72 

'^ '' '' Michael FoUand, 54 00 

^' " " Mrs. John Whitney, 22 00 

" '' Sarah B. Childs, 13 76 

" " " Traynor Family, 114 49 

^' ^' " Redding " 41 00 

'^ " " Desmond " 14 10 

" " Mrs. Small, 55 15 

" ^' ■^' Mrs. U. B. Adams, 30 00 







Printing. 




Paid C. W. Leach, 12 Warrants, 


$ 1 25 


" '^ 500 Selectmen's repor 


ts, 12 50 


'' '' 525 Town reports, 
" ^' Voting lists, 


56 00 
13 00 


" '' Posters, 


1 50 






Soldiers' Aid. 

Paid John Carroll, 


1102 00 


W. I. B. Whitney, 
Geo. Dole, 


48 00 
44 00 


Benj. Skinner, 
W. F. Wood, 


70 00 
32 00 


Allen S. Smith, 


82 00 


Mrs. R. G. Wright, 
Mrs.H. W. Wilder, 


48 00 
12 00 



$1,153 77 j 



$84 25 



1438 00 



Town Debt Paid. 

Paid I. W. Flagg, note Jos. Barker and 

interest, ' $ 524 58 

Sarah C. Noyes, note and interest, 837 46 

Thomas F. '' " '^ 418 73 

D. M. Handley, '' '' 2,121 66 

Daniel Harris, "' " 808 00 

James E. Billings, '' '^ 1,289 00 







Interest on Town Debt 
Paid David M. Handley, 
Frederick Rouillard, 


$152 25 
135 83 


James E. Billings, 


45 00 


J, A. Piper, 
Daniel Harris, 


12 00 

48 00 


D. J. Wetherbee, 


34 52 


Mrs. J. K. Putney, 
Luther Billings, 


39 00 
12 00 






Town Officers. 




Paid L. U. Holt, Sealer Weights and 




Measures, 


$ 8 00 


J. E. Cutter, services as Collector, '80, 


80 00 


W. D. Tuttle, '' '' Assessor, 


35 00 


Phineas Wetherbee, " 


25 00 


Lucius Hosmer, '• 


20 00 


'' " lor book, 


1 00 


F. P. Wood, Supt. Schools, 


45 00 


Phineas Wetherbee, Selectman, 


45 00 


John White, 


45 00 


D. J. Wetherbee, " 


70 00 


J. K. W. Wetherbee, Treas, 


35 00 


Wm. D. Tuttle, Town Clerk, 


25 00 



,999 43 



$478 GO 



34 00 



Cemetery Expenses. 




,id John Fletcher, trees VVoodlawn, 


121 50 


'' *^ hook and staples, 


25 


'' '^ labor, 


18 21 


" '' '^ Woodlawn, 


44 38 


J. F. Cole, labor Mt. Hope cemetery, 


32 25 





Miscellaneous. 

Paid Andrew J. Willis, breaking roads/81, I 12 30 

Edward Tuttle, use of pump for 

Centre School, 5 00 

Daniel Wetherbee, breaking roads, 

1880, 30 76 

Abel Cole, breaking roads, 1881, 134 75 

James Kinsley, for use of highway 

for James Hurley, 8 00 

Chas. D. Greggs, by order of the 

town for schools, 25 00 

Treasurer of Littleton, for schooling 
children of Mr. ]3ulette and Mr. 
Littlefield, 

Chas. Wheeler, breaking roads, 1881, 

E. B. Forbush, " 

A. H. Kimball, road scraper, 

Seth Clapp, for town pump, 

Chas. W. Parker, for Decoration, 

A. C. Handley, council fees on boun- 
ty question, 100 00 

A. C. Handley, witness fees on boun- 
ty question, 63 40 

I. W. Flagg, for tile for West Acton 

sluice, 30 78 

J. E. Cutter, abatement of taxes, 1880, 88 56 

A. L. Tuttle, in part, for building road, 50 00 





34 10 


1881, 


143 87 


u 


19 21 




170 00 




10 00 


in, 


50 00 



$116 59 



Paid Luke Tuttle, jourDey to Winchester 
to procure fish, 
A. H. Jones, labor, lumber and spikes 

Powder Mill bridge, 
A. H. Jones, railing roads, lumber 

and iron, 
E. F. Conant, land in South Acton, 
Jerome Sawyer, reward, 
A. H. Jones, laying wall in S. Acton, 
Reuben L. Reed, decorating Town 

Hall. 
J. E Cutter, tax book, 
^- " advice, 
'■^ '* posting warrants, 1880, 
^' '' notifying town officers 

take the oath, 
'^ " discount on taxes, 
Julian Tuttle, care Town House and 
cellar, 
*^ " care clock, 

'^ " repairs on clock, 

Phineas VVetherbee, committing An- 
drew Brella to asylum, - 10 00 
Wm. D. Tuttle, recording births, mar- 
riages and deaths, 22 95 
^ ^' postage and returns, 3 12 
^' " express on documents, 1 40 
^' " journey to Boston, 1 50 
" '-' surveying A. L Tut- 

tle's road, 4 75 

'^ '• hiying out lots in 

Woodlawn Cemetery, 3 50 
'' '' journey to Boston re- 

specting record of 
soldiers, 1 20 



5 


00 


95 


70 


52 


92 


15 


00 


ICO 


00 


7 


25 


11 


17 


2 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


658 


40 


43 


31 


10 


00 


2 


33 



2,030 23 



10 j 

•1 

i 
Eec^eipts from February 26, 1881, to February 26, 1882. | 

Unexpended balance as per report of . ' 

Feb. 26. 1881, ^ 13,680 10 ■ 

Appropriations and receipts, 16 055 40 i 

119,735 50 : 



Expenditures. 






Support of Schools, 


13.340 00 




Eepairs on Town buildings, 


150 75 




Regular Highway work, 


1.58.") H3 




Support of Poor, 


1.153 77 




Town Debt, 


5,91)9 43 




Soldiers' Aid. 


438 00 




Interest on Notes, 


47S 60 




Town Officers, 


434 00 




Printing, 


84 25 




Cemetery Expenses, 


116 59 




Miscellaneous, 


2,036 23 




State lax, 


1.080 00 




County Tax, 


542 70 


1)17.440 15 




^82. 
5. 


Bal. in Col. & Treas. hands, Feb. 26, 1^ 


$2,295 35 


Towu Debt, Note? 




J. A. Piper, estate of 


1205 00 




Mrs. J. K. Putney, 


686 94 




Luther P>illings, 


203 00 




Luther Conant, 


773 62 


' 


Frederick Houillard, 


2,101 16 




D. J. Wetherbee, 


595 41 


$4,565 13 






Amount due from Soldiers' Aid. 


219 00 




'\ '' Collector & Treas. 


2.295 35 


$2,514 35 






Balance against the town, 


$2,050 78 


D. J. WETHERBEE. 


) Selectmen 


JOHN WHITE, 


y 


of 


PFIINEAS WETHERBEE ) 


Acton. 



Acton, Feb. 26, 1882. 



M 



Town Clerk's Report 

MiFOR 1881. ^H& 



Births in Acton in 1881. 

No. Date of birtli. Name of child. Names of parents. 

1. Jan. 6, Walter B., son of Edwin C. and Hannah H. 

Parker. 

2. Jan. 19, Jennie Pnrner, daughter of Aaron J. and Mary 

Eliza Fletcher. 

3. Feb. 25, Ethel Louise, daughter of Chas. H. and Fannie 

A. Taylor. 

4. Mar. 4, Daniel, son of Michael and Sarah McCarthy. 

5. Mar. 6, Annie Louise, daughter of Jeremiah and Louise 

Lucius. 

6. Mar. 23, (Jhas. Horace, son of Horace P. and Charlotte 

A. Potter. 

7. April 2, Carrie Adelia, daughter of tianson A. and 

Florence M. Littlefield. 

8. April 7, Minnie Ethel, daughter of Willis L. and 

Julia A. Mead.: 

9. April 29. Ellen, daughter of Michael and Katie Des- 

mond. 



12 

10. May 1, Mary Haskell, daughter of Frank B. and Anna 

E. Lothrop. 

11. May 5, Sarah Ingham, daughter of Frank D. and Eliza- 

beth I. Rand. 

12. May 19, Howard Lewis, son of Samuel, Jr.. and Emma 

E. Jones. 

13. Jnne 1, William Wilbur, son of George S. and Emma F. 

Jacobs. 

14. June IB, Ghas. Walton, son of George VV. and Ane-ie 

H Knowlton. 

15. June 20, Nellie, daughter of John and Julia May. 

16. July 2, Frederic Wiiliam. son of George William and 

Alice R. Hunt. 
1 7. July 9 Hannah, daughter ot Hennis and Hannah Bradley. 

18. Jnly 18, Harry Earle, son of Lorenzo U. and Clara E. 

Holt. 

19. July 21, Walter, son of Michael and Frances R. Dono- 

van. 

10. July 30, Massillon Warren, son of Cyrus L. and Mag- 
gie A. Angier. 

21. Aug. 23, Harriet Bai-ker, daughter ol John and Elizabeth 

B. Davis. 

22- Aug. 2G, Mary Eh'zabeth daughter of Orenzo W. and 
Olive L. Penniman. 

23. Sept. 8, Dennis Joseph, son of Dennis and Mary O'Con- 

nell. 

24. Sept. 10, Hermon Lenzor, son of George and Abbie J. 

LI oar. 

25. Sept. 28, Otis, son of Otis S. and Edith F. Small. 

26. Oct. 21, Elaine (dinjena, daughter of James A. and Flora 

C. Symonds. 

27. Oct. 22, Nettie Louise, daughter of George M. and 

Lucy N. Parker. 

28. Nov. 5, George Henry, son of George and Mary A. 

Sears. 

29. Nov. 9, William, son of John and Julia Quinlan. 

30. Nov. 25, Samuel Elmore, son of Charles I. and Lucy E. 

Miller. 

31. 'Nov. 26, Jennie Etta, daughter of Moses A and Ellen 

A. Reed. 
S2. Dec. 23, Clarence Bernard, son of Thomas P. and Eliza 
J. Owens. 



13 

Marriages Recorded in acton in 1881 

No, Date of Marriage. Names and resicleiices of parties, 

1. Jan. 1, Mr. David Mason and Miss Alice M. Robbins, 

both of Concord. 

2. Feb. 23, Mr, Chas. Barker of Acton, and Miss Clara A. 

Goward of Lowell. 

3. Feb. 24, Mr. James M. Hendley and Mrs. Mary A. 

Wheeler, both of Acton. 

4. Feb. 24, Mr. Stephen Waters of Harvard, and Miss Mary 

Berry of Acton. 

5. April 17, Mr. Frank C. Bobbins and Miss Hattie Young, 

both of Acton. 

6. April 18, Mr. Otis S. Small and Miss Edith F. Reynolds, 

both of Acton. 

7. May 18, Mr. Chas. B, Stone of Acton, and Miss Isabel 

D. Lewis of Stow. 

8. June 7, Mr. Chas. W. Bradley and Miss Josephine E. 

Walker, both of Marlboro. 

9. July 24, Mr. Eri S. Brooks and Miss Ada L. Barnard, 

both of Acton. 

10. Aug. 3, Mr. William W. Davis of Acton, and Miss Abbie 

R. Worthley of Andover. 

11. Sept, 4, Mr. William H. McGee and Miss Emma E. 

Moodey, both of Boston. 

12. Sept. 6, Mr. Chas. P. Willis of Acton, and Miss Cora E. 

Willard of Nashua. N. H. 

13. Sept. 24, Mr. Howard B. White of Acton, and Miss 

Bertha Sawtelle of West Townsend. 

14. Oct. 4, Mr. John L. Wetherbee of Astoria, Oregon, and 

Miss Ida F. Wilder of Acton. 

15. Nov. 16, Mr. George D. Conant of Acton, and Miss 

Margaret L. O'Neil of Concord. 

16. Nov. 20, Mr. Jairus C. Wheeler of Acton, and Miss 

Alice M. Tibbetts of Concord. 

17. Nov. 23, Mr. Osha Knowlton and Miss Nellie M. Han- 

dley, both of Acton. * 

18. Dec. 24, Mr. George Sumner Wright and Miss Emma 

A, Mead, both of Acton. 

19. Dec. 25, Mr. George H. Smith and Miss Cora E. Doav, 

both of Acton. 



14 

Deaths Registered in Acton in 1881. 

No. Date of Deatli. Names and A.i?es of Deceased. 

1. Jan. 3. Mrs. Susie A., wife of Eri S. Brooks, aged 20 
vears, 10 months. 29 days. 
^ 2. Jan. 6, Mrs. Ruth C, wife of Joseph P. Reed, aged 73, 
years, 6 months, 17 days. 

3. Jan. 20, Mrs. Betsey H Adams, aged 86 years, 9 months 

11 days. 

4. Feb. 10, Mrs. Eh'zabeth W. Blood, aged 78 years, 9 

months, 22 days. 

5. Feb. 18, Mrs. Sarah J., wife of Chas. D. Griggs, aged 

30 years. 

6. March 1 , Mrs. Alice H. Munroe, aged 21 years, 7 months. 

7. March 27, Miss Effie W. Alien, aged 16 years, 3 months, 

16 days. 

8. April 1, Mrs. Louisa R. Putnam, aged 77 years 3 months 

20 days. 

9. April 6, Mr. John Dakin. aged 76 years. 

10 April 13, Mr. Hugh Gill, aged 47 years, 6 months. 

11. April 23, Mr. Edwin Tuttle, aged 40 years, 6 months, 

13 days. 

12. May 8, Jacob H-, son of Jacob and Martha DockendorfF, 

aged 2 years, 7 months, 14 days. 

13. May 11, Mr. Nathan Brooks, aged 81 years, 5 months, 

14 days. 

14. June 12, Mr. Ashyille Sears, aged 82 years. 

15. July 24, Walter, son of Michael and Frances R. Dono- 

van, aged 3 days. 

16. Aug. 4, Mr. Abel Forbush. aged 84 years, 8 months, 

17. Aug. 12, Mr. Aaron Fletcher, aged 80 years, 7 months. 

18. Aug. 15, Mrs. Susan, wife of Thomas P. Sawyer, aged 

57 years.. 11 months, 5 days. 

19. Aug. 31, Mr. Benjamin F. Shattuck, aged 54 years. 

20. Sept. 6, Mr. Luther H. Jones, aged 49 years. 

21. Oct. 21, Mr. Michael J. Hannon, aged 21 years, 1 day. 

22. Nov. 3, Mrs. Lydia Hyde, aged 79 yra., 6 mos., 9 dys. 

23. Nov. 15, Mrs. Mar}^ Ann Sears, aged 19 yrs., 11 mos., 3 d. 
24'. Nov. 25, Mr. Jonathan A. Piper, aged 73 years, 6 months 

27 days. 

25. Dec. 2, Mrs. Bridget, wife of David Rynn, aged 62 years 

3 months. 

26. Dec. 81, Mr. James W. Wheeler, aged 69 yrs., 9 mos. 



15 



Names of Persons in Acton having Dogs Licensed in 1881. 



O. Ellsworth Hon glitoB, 
Otis II. Fovbiish, " 
M. Augusta Hosnier, 
Willie F. Richardson, 
Joseph Wheeler, 
Joua. K. W. Wetherhee, 
Theron F. Newton, 
Elnathan Jones, 2, 
Tuttles, Jones & Wether - 

bee, 2, 
Lutlier Conant, 
Daniel T. Moore, 
Danie F. Haywarfl, 
Fraiicis Conant, 
Chas. H. Handley, 
Lxike Tuttle, 
Jeremy Austin, 
Joseph W. Wherren, 
Daniel Harris, 
T-,ncius S. Hosnier, 
E. F. Fuller, 
J. E. Harris, 
Whitcorab & Knowllon, 
Jolm Hanaforci, 
Willis L. Mead, 
John W. Charter, 
James W. Cob urn, 
John Fletcher, 
George C. Conant, 



Frank E, Hai-ris, 
George Conant, 
M. E. Taylor, 
Eri S. Brooks, 
Job W. Dupee, 
Chas. A. Harrington, 
Solon A. Robbins, 
G. H. S. Houghton, 
E. J. Robbins, 
Daniel Tuttle, 
George R. Keyes, 
Herman Chaplin, 
Jolm Kelley, 
Isaac Barker, 
Lester N. Fletcher, 
Jairus C. Wheeler, 
Jerry H. McCarthy, 
Louis E. Allen, 
Augustus Fletcher, 
Isaiah S. Leach, 
Chas. Holton, 
H. A, Littlefield, 
Moses A. Reed, 
Chas. H. Wheeler, 
George C. Wright, 
Taylor Bros. & Co., 
John R. Houghton, 
A. Lucien Noyes, 
Moses Taylor, 



82 Males, at $2.00, 
7 Females, at $5.00 



Total, 89 



$164.00 
35.00 

$199.00 



Gustavus H. Waugh, 
Joseph F. Cole, 
George Pratt, 2, 
Mis. Chas. H. Conant, 
Edward Wood, 
John Welch, 
James Tuttle, , 
Anson C. Piper, 
Henry Hanson, 
Henry Playnes, 
George H. Shapley, 
Forbush & Hart well, 
T. P. Owens, 
Constance O'Neal, 
Daniel Gallagher, 
Jona. H. Barker, 
Chas. L. Beck, 2, 
Chas. D. Griggs, 
Cyrus Hay ward, 
Windsor Pratt, 
J. W. Randall, 
J. E. Reed, 
Stephen White, 
J. W. Aldrich, 
James Baker, 
Frank Pratt, 
Daniel McCarthy, 
Francis Robbins. 



WM. I). TUTTLE, Town Clerk. 



Acton, March 15, 1882. 



REPORT OF THE 

Receipts and Expenditures 



OF THE 



Almshouse in Acton, 

For the Year Ending April 1, 1882. 



Articles on Han 


D April 1, 1882. 




13 cows, 


1585 00 


7 lbs butter. 


$ 2 80 


1 horse, 


200 


00 


35 lbs. lard, 


3 90 


Oat fodder, 


22 


50 


Boiled cider, 


75 


8 tons hay. 


160 


00 


4 barrels Apples, 


4 00 


2 " shorts. 


40 


00 


5 gallons soap, 


62 


2 bags grain, 


2 


80 


2 cider barrels. 


2 00 


Cotton seed, 




75 


1-2 barrel flour, 


4 12 


Corn and oats, 


1 


50 


Eggs, 


20 


2 shotes, 


25 


00 


Rye meal. 


38 


Lot bags. 


4 


00 


4 lbs. tea. 


1 80 


14 cords wood cut for use, 63 


00 


1 peck beans. 


1 00 


40 fowls. 


20 


00 


Salt, 


17 


75 barrels, 


11 


25 


Spices, *^ 


62 


10 market boxes, 


1 


00 


Yeast cakes, 


H 


1 market wagon. 


112 


00 


Crackers, 


50 


33 bushels potatoes. 


33 


00 


Soap, 


35 


12 '' small do. 


3 


00 


Matches, 


30 


160 lbs. salt pork. 


20 


00 


Kerosene oil. 


20 


75 " ham, 
40 gallons cider. 


10 
5 

FROM ". 


50 
00 






$l-,345 13 


Receipts 


rowN Farm 1881-1882. 




Received for calves. 


% 20 


75 


Received for use of oxen. 


S75 


cows. 


118 


00 


old iron. 


1 13 


oxen. 


155 


00 


board of Miss 


old horse. 


48 


00 


Carter, 


26 80 


old wagon 


, 20 


00 


birch poles. 


20 00 


milk, 


902 


02 


pork. 


33 21 


poultry, 


4 


50 


apples. 


612 60 


grapes. 




90 







1,963 Q>(j 



17 



EXPENSES 



*aid for sugar, 


$26 10 


Paid for baskets. 


56 


molasses, 


22 24 


flour. 


84 81 


cheese, 


11 18 


tobacco, 


1 50 


butter, 


58 15 


onions, 


1 10 


beans, 


7 20 


starch, 


71 


neat's foot oil. 


62 


clothes pins, 


19 


yeast cakes. 


49 


pails, 


44 


salt, 


2 54 


room paper, 


3 88 


malt and hops. 


70 


1 keg. 


1 25 


soap. 


8 85 


rakes. 


90 


tea. 


9 85 


hoes. 


96 


crackers. 


22 51 


bean pot, 


28 


nutmegs, 


'88 


rice. 


90 


clove. 


26 


vinegar, 


57 


whip and lash. 


1 00 


ginger. 


28 


cookmg soda, 


1 70 


liniment. 


45 


cream tartar. 


2 37 


paregoric, 


20 


fish. 


9 37 


oat meal, 


18 


meat, 


63 88 


rye meal, 


33 


brooms, 


1 82 


pepper. 


16 


shoes. 


2 15 


lamp wicks, 


05 


' castings, 


57 


raisins, 


34 


coffee. 


52 


saltpetre 


08 


snuff. 


40 


stove polish, 


07 


axle oil. 


37 


lantern globes, 


50 


spirits turpentine, 10 


filing saws. 


85 


. sponge. 


42 


repairing shoes 


and 


oil tank, 


1 50 


harnesses. 


1 15 


axe. 


1 25 


collar & sweat pad, 7 00 


cattle cards, 


24 


shavings, 


40 


zinc and nails, 


3 71 


white washing, 


4 50 


candles. 


15 


labor. 


148 00 


kerosene oil, 


4 74 


pasturing cows, 


32 25 


chimneys. 


69 


cows. 


178 00 


matches. 


55 


oxen, 


153 55 


brush, 


42 


shotes, 


43 00 


fly paper. 


10 


horse. 


175 00 


garden seeds. 


1 14 


coffin, robe, &c. 


, for 


cloth and clothir 


g, 14 52 


Henry Jones, 


16 00 


scythes 


1 80 


barrels, 


49 50 


whetstones, 


59 


use of cart, 


2 00 


Paris green. 


30 


use of market 


and 


sulpher, 


30 


express wagon, 10 50 



18 



Paid for market wagon, Si 12 00 
use of bull, 3 50 

smoking hams, 1 60 

Dr. Sanders' bill, 10 25 



board and nursing 




Mrs. Small, 


47 


15 


Dr. Sanders, do.- 


■ 8 


00 


express. 




50 


making cider. 


1 


84 


killing hogs. 


2 


75 


repairmgpump, 


1 


48 


rep. riggmg. 


10 


00 



Paid for blacksmith's bill, $18 65 



expense marketing 12 SG 
stove, 30 00 



Receipts, 

Income less than Expenditures, 
Drawn from Treasury for Small, 
- " " '^ " use on Farm, 



Due from Treasury to balance account, 
Interest on Farm, 
Drawn from Treasury, 

Victualing 47 Tramps at 40 cents. 

Cost of supporting poor on Farm, $ 543 77 

Whole number of persons, exclusive of tramps, supported in 
Almshouse. 9 ; average number, 6 ; present number, 5. 

JOHN E. CUTTER, ) Overseers 
OTIS H. FORBUSH, [ of 

LYMAN C. TAYLOR, J Poor. 



grain, 


450 61 


phosphate, 


16 84 


plaster. 


2 25 


seed potatoes, 


4 00 


grass seed, 


4 65 


lumber. 


18 64 


rep. sled & slei 


gh, 3 00 


services of J. 


Aus- 


tin and wife 


, 250 00 


J. E. Cutter, 


40 00 


0. H. Forbusl- 


I, 15 00 


L. C. Taylor, 


10 00 


$2,286 23 




1,963 66 




$322 57 


$55 15 




40 00 






$95 15 






$227 42 


$240 00 




322 57 






$562 57 






18 80 



^REPORT 



(?y>. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




H 



SCHOOL YEAR 1881-82 




A C T O N 



PRIISTED AT THE OFFICE OF THE PATRIOT, SOUTH ACTON, 

■188-2. 



" A boy is better unborn than imtanght." — Gascoigne. 

"Education alone can conduct us to that enjoyment wliich is at once best in 
quahty and infinite in quantity."— Jfanw. 

" Education is the only interest worthy the deep, controlling anxiety of the- 
thoughtful man." — Phillips. 

''Do not then train boys to learning by force and harshness ; but direct them 
to it by what amuses their minds, so that you may be the better able to discover with 
accuracy the peculiar bent of the genius of each." — Plai'o, 300 B. 0. 



Superintendent's Report, 



That the interest of our citizens in the schools may be broiio^ht 
into a condition of more complete sympathy with the best educational 
thought of the present, we will consider, at some length, in this 
report, the following topics : The true Aim of the Public School, 
The most effective methods of education. The importance of the 
most efficient school management and the need of the people's co- 
operation and support. 

The True Aim of the Public School. 

According to Webster "a school is an educational establish- 
ment." The office of the piihlic school is to educate the children of 
all, without any expense to the parents, or guardians, as individuals. 
The true aim of these institutions is to educate the young. This 
being so the next question which we ought to consider is. What is 
education ? The word is from the Latin language and is from a verb 
which means, to draAV or lead' out. It indicates the process of calling 
out, or unfolding the powers of those who are under its influence. 
Says the authority, quoted above, "Education implies not so much 
the communication of knowledge as the discipline of the intellect, 
the establishment of the principles and" the regulation of the heart." 
Another good author says "The true purpose of education is to 
cherish and unfold the seed of immortality, already sown within us ; 
to develop to their fullest extent the capacities of every kind, with 
which the God who made us has endowed us." 

According to these authorities, it is the true aim of the schools, 
as educational institutions, to call out the faculties of the young and 
properly stimulate and to direct them in their development so that there 
may be in them not only a vigorous physical growth, but, at the 
same time, a liealthy growth of mental and moral power, which, 



at the expiration of a certain time, will make them men and women, 
in the highest sense, well fVirnished with all the resom-ces which they 
will need to enable them to act well their part in life, both for them- 
selves, and for the public good. 

This being tlie evident object of the schools, the next question 
which we ought to consider is. How may these ends be accomplished ? 
What must these institutions attempt practically to do for those 
committed to their care ? 

To answer this question, we may suppose a child at the age of 
five years, brought to the door of a school room and given into the 
care of a teacher to be educated by him, until he shall be of a suit- 
able age to take up the serious Avork of life. Now how shall the 
teacher determine what the measure of his responsibility is, in rela- 
tion to that child? What must he attempt to do for his ward, so 
that, if he fails in his life work, or, if his career is not a happy one, 
he may feel that the fault is not in his education ? 

It seems to us that the only way by ^vliich the teacher can reach 
a satisfactory solution of this problem is to consi'der, what the child 
will need, as he shall stand upon the verge of manhood, in order to 
be reasonably sur<5 of a successful life, and, then to decide what of 
these qualifications must come to him from without, that is, aside 
from a merely natural development, and this will determine the extent 
of his own responsibility, as an educator, and in the same way may be 
ascertained the proper scope and method of any school. 

A person's qualifications for success in life may be embraced 
under four heads : (a) a good physical organism {h) a mind 
well furnished with the most practical and suggestive elements of 
knowledge, (c) a set of well disciplined mental powers whicli will 
make independent thought and investigation possible and easy, and. 
{d) coi-rect habits and moral principles. 

The space of this report will not permit us to in<licatc, in detail, 
the processes by which a true system of education will tend to secure 
to the pupils all these desirable ends. In this paper, we wish to im- 
ply more than the space permits us to express. Of course, the little 
child, as he stands at the door of the schoolroom, lacks every quality 
which would secure to him power and success in life, and, strange as 
it may seem, almost every desirable acquisition must come to him 
from his education. It may be said that nature will give him a 
physical development, if he is properly provided with food and shelter. 
This may be true to a degree, but still it is the fact that, in this re- 
gard, education may have a most important office to perform. The 
nation which has a population of the best physique and of the great- 
est endurance is Germany, in whose schools, physical culture and 
instruction in the laws of hygiene occupy a prominent place. In the 
best school, much attention must be paid to the right development of 



the pupils' bodily powers so that he will be erect and graceful in his 
movements and have a good presence in every respect. As to the 
second qualification for success in life, viz. : the possession of the 
practical and suggestive essentials of knowledge, great care should 
be l^aken not only to secure these to the pupils but to do so in the best 
possible way that the knowledge may be not only practical, but 
really suggestive and stimulating. The American schools, of the 
past, have not underrated the importance of instilling the largest 
possible amount of knowledge, but by the methods which they have 
practiced to secure this essential to success, they have sacrificed the 
third requisite named above ; they have dwarfed the reasoning 
powers and made of the children's minds mere pockets for certain 
scraps of knoAvledge and, in their eflfbrts to compel them to apply 
themselves to their mental tasks, they have resorted to such expe- 
dients, in the way of incentives, that they have done little for the 
pupils' morals, so that only a small part of the true end of education 
has been accomplished in many schools. 

All this being true, every one having at heart the highest inter- 
ests of the rising generation and of the state, ought to be ready to 
inquire. 

What are the Most Effective Methods of Education ? 

Space does not permit us, in attempting to answer this question, 
to enter into details. Briftly stated, we would say that the best 
methods are those which promote in a systematic and symmetrical 
Avay all the ends of education. There are in the minds of children 
natural and easy avenues of access, by which, stores of most useful 
information may be conveyed so that they will rest where they are 
placed. Knowledge, thus imparted, will be retained, not simply by a 
sheer strain of the memory, until the examination is over and then 
be gone, leaving in the minds only some shreds of information and a 
feeling of disgust for everything that pertains to the scliool, but it 
will be a permanent acquisition. The natural agents, for the com- 
munication of ideas to the minds of children, are the five senses. 
It is the province of these, from the very commencement of human 
life, to tes.t the qualities of objects and to carry the impressions of 
them to the seat of reason, where they are duly considered and pass- 
ed upon, by the mind's highest power, and these decisions, are the 
facts which are the first possessions of the human soul. The natural 
method of infancy and cliildhood, in the acquisition of knowledge, 
furnishes us the clue to the best methods of education. A school 
conducted upon these principles may not be so brilliant in its seeming, 
immediate results, but, in the end, it will prove to be the best school 
even as regards the communication of facts and, in relation to the 
grand scope of education, it will be the only truly successful school. 



c> 

In the statements wliieli we have just made and explained is to 
be found the underlying principle of the most approved methods of 
school management, at the present time. The system ¥/hich the 
best educationists, not only of America but of any country, which 
lays claim to a progressive spirit, wish to see adopted is foimded upon 
an intelligent view of the powers of the mind and therefore is rea- 
sonable and must, in the end, be generally received and practiced. 

In our report for 1879-80, we indicated quite fully our ideas of 
the best methods of teaching all the branches, required to be taught 
in our common schools, and we will not take the space to repeat 
anything that we said in that report. In most of our schools, these 
principles have been quite fully carried out and the result has been 
so pleasing, both to parents and to pupils, that anything like the old 
methods will fail to satisfy the popular demand. We are Avilling 
that the merits of the system shall be determined by its results, as 
pronounced upon by those who are in a position to know the facts in 
the case. Here and there is a person who objects to the advanced 
methods, on the score that they are new. But this objection is 
founded upon a very grave mistake ; they are not new. They are as 
old as the human race and in these modern times they have been 
practiced upon the continent of Europe, for a period of more than 
a hundred years and with the most completely satisfactory results. 

We have in our possession extracts from a report by M. Cuvier, 
on the schools of Holland, made to the French government in 1812, 
which contains descriptions of schools whose processes were almost 
identical with what are termed " the advanced methods" in America, 
to-day. M. Cuvier in speaking of this system as he saw it in operation, 
throughout the Netherlands, says" " It is admirable and above all 
praise. " This is and lias been, for jeavs, the system of Germany, 
which is confessedly the best educated nation in the Avorld : and, in 
our own land, its most essential ideas have been practiced for such a 
period of time that they are no longer experimental to any degree. 
But without occupying more space upon this topic I proceed to con- 
sider 

The Importance of our School Interests, and of their Efficient 
Management, and the Necessity that exists for the Cor- 
dial Co-operation and Hearty Support of the People, 
THAT the Wisest Measures may be Adopted and 
Uninterruptedly Continued. 

Tbe public schools are the people's most valuable possession, 
for, while they are continued and rightly conducted^ they have it 
within their power to secure to their children a good education, 
which may be to them the key to wealth, to position and to every- 
thino% which man considers desirable in this life. For this reason, 



the mass of the people ought to take a keen interest in these institutions 
and to see to it that they are not only sustained for a certain num- 
ber of months, during the year, but that, they are so managed, as 
to be abreast of the most intelligent thought of the times and fully equal 
to the best private institutes, which are accessible only to the 
children of the rich. In America every man is as good as his neigh- 
bor, so long as he shows himself a law-abiding and useful citizen 
and the best schools are none to good for the children of the poorest 
and most unfortunate men and women in the State. 

But this matter of efficient schools touches not simply the 
homes that have children, but it affects the good name and even the 
property interests of the town. Who will venture to select, as liis 
place of residence, a com'munity whose schools have the reputation 
of being far behind the times? We are sure it is apparent to almost 
every one that good and efficient schools are a public necessity, but 
it ought also to be understood they cannot be secured and continued 
without the co-operation and support of the people. 

If we are to be up with the times, educationally, changes in 
school methods, must be made, and, however good they may be, they 
will excite criticism and opposition on the part of some, which may 
greatly hinder their work and neutralize their good results. 

Says Ex-Gov. Rice, in a recent speech, '•' I have- heard sensi- 
ble men point to the old red school house and say they and other 
men as good and successful got their education there and is not that 
sufficient? In all our communities, there are some who talk as 
above. We quote again, from the same speech, " It is substantially 
true that the simple sclrools of those days were sufficient, but does it 
follow that, because they were sufficient for those days, therefore we 
shall stick to them, while the whole world has been rushing forward, 
in every department of knowledge, and while society and the whole 
sphere of human activity have been advancing at a rapid rate ? It 
is an absurdity to say, that our school system shall be stationary, 
while every other instrumentality in the world is rushing forward 
with a velocity that is absolutely incomprehensible. Now, I venture 
nothing in saying that the school system of Massachusetts to-day' is 
no farther advanced .than were the schools, to which I have alluded, 
com^pared with the state of society that then existed." 

Without dwelling further upon these general topics, which we 
have considered it to be expedient to discuss at some length, we wish 
in presenting this report to congratulate the town upon the success 
which, on the whole, has attended our schools during the past year. 
We^diave , been enabled, by the town's generous increase of appropri- 
ation, to extend the average length of the schools so that we can 
report to the State a school year of nine months, which will be great- 
ly to^our credit.; i^We trust^the ])ublic spirit of our citizens will be 



8 

equal to anotlier similiar appropriation this year. It is with a perfect 
confidence in your generosity and wisdom that Ave again com- 
mend to your consideration this interest which occupies a large place 
in our hearts and in our thoughts. 

We now call your attention to a brief review of each' school. 

West Gram:\iar. 
This school has been taught by Miss A. C. Davis, whose name 
has been most favorably mentioned in our annual reports for several 
years, as in charge of other schools. To give our estimate of her 
work here, would be simply to repeat what we have said respecting 
her before. Her service has been as satisfactory here as elsewdiere 
and is highly appreciated by all having the highest interests of the 
school at heart. 

West Primary. 
This school has had but one teacher during the year, Miss I. B. 
Campbell, a graduate of the Framinghara ^^ormal School. She 
found the discipline somewhat difficult, during the first two terms, but 
was more successful the last term, in this respect. Her methods of 
teaching are excellent, her temper is so even and her ways are so pleas- 
ing that she must have a beneficial influence over her pupils. We 
feel that the school is doing well under her care. 

South Grammar. 
This school has continued under the efficient charge of Miss 
R. E. Stacy, and we look upon the favorable exhibit of the scholars 
at the examination which closed the winter term, as a conclusive 
proof of the wisdom of retaining a good teacher several consecuti\'e 
years. Tlie condition of the school is highly creditable to all con- 
nected with its management. 

South Primary. 

Miss Jennie McAlister continued to have charge of this school 
until nearly the close of the spring term, when she resigned to accept 
a position abroad and Mrs. M. A. Leach, a former successful teacher, 
finished the school. The Fall term was commenced by Miss J. 
Brown who, at the end of three weeks, having an opportunity to 
continue her studies, at Harvard College, and finding the discipline 
of the school quite too difficult for her strength, resigned. In this 
emergency. Miss M. B. Alien took charge of the school. As might 
be expected from so many changes in teachers. Miss A. found the 
school in a very disorganized state. But by the exercise of considerable 
force of will, and by the introduction of systematic and natural 
methods of manao-ement and instruction, she has made this to be 



9 • 

one of the most orderly and efficient schools in town. The examina- 
tion, at the close of the last term, showed that the pupils had made 
a most commendable progress in all their studies. We trust the 
present desirable state of affairs will continue. 

Centre Grammar. 
This school was taught by Miss C. H. Allen, who, as a teacher, 
found her first experience here, but who discharged her duties so 
well that she won, to a marked degree, the love and respect of both 
pupils and parents. This school is so well classified that, it is possi- 
ble to accommodate quite a large number of older scholars by permitting 
them to pursue some of the more advanced studies. We think these 
pupils, by their presence in the school, have done much to keep up 
its morale and to excite the ambition of the younger scholars, and 
that the policy has been a good one in every respect. The present 
teacher has done much for pupils, in the way of developing their pow- 
ers of expression, and the examination, at the close of the winter 
term, showed a breadth of culture such as is seldom equalled in a 
common school. 

Centre Primary. 

This school has continued in the charge of Miss B. M. Ball and 
retains the same distinguished position which it has held in the past. 
Each term of school, under the care of this teacher, is an improve- 
ment upon the previous one. Here is another proof of the wisdom 
of retaining the same teacher in a school for a series of years. We 
trust this policy will be continued. It is only by this means that we 
can have schools that are worthy of the name. Miss Ball, 
by an undisturbed service, in this school, for a period of three years, 
has secured to it an efficiency which we had not supposed was possi- 
ble. If we have good teachers let us keep and sustain them. 

East School. 
Miss S. A. Wetherbee has continued to be the teacher, through- 
out the year, and with a seemingly constant increase of efficiency. 
We have never witnessed an examination here that gave us more 
pleasure than the one which closed the winter term. The present 
excellent condition of the school is greatly to the credit of the teacher 
and of all concerned. 

North School. 
Miss Emma Esterbrook, who was mentioned in favorable terms 
in our last report, continued in this school during the first two terms 
of the year. The examination at the close of the Fall term was very 
pleasing to all who are interested in the school. We wish to com- 
mend the taste whicli was displayed in the decoration of the room. 



10 

Tlie Winter term was taught by Mr. O. W. Duttou, a resident 
of the district. Mr. D. had a good reputation, as a teacher in a 
neighboring town, and his Avork here was perfectly satisfactory. 
The examination showed that the pupils had made a good degree 
of progress in all their studies, and that they had a practical 
knowledge of what they had attempted to learn. The register of this 
school for the year is not defaced by a single tardy mark. 

South East School. 

The Spring and Fall terms were taught by Miss Ella E. Tuttle 
and with a general acceptance and success which we never have seen 
excelled in this school. The examination, at the close of the Fall 
term, was very satisfactory and the committee would have retained 
her the next term, had she not preferred to seek further school ad- 
vantages for herself. 

The Winter term was taught by Miss Estelle D. Heath, a resi- 
dent of the district. Miss H. devoted herself with much earnestness 
to the work and, under more favorable circumstances, might have 
had a high degree of success. As it was, the few pupils who were 
present at the examination appeared quite well. 

Appended, are the usual statistical tables. 
For the Committee, 

FRANKLIN P. WOOD, Superwtendent. 



11 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Names of those who have not been Absent or Tardy. 



One Term. 

Susie Billings, 
Carrie Hanson, 
Mary Knights, 
Clara Leach, 
Mabel Richardson, 
Carrie Shapley, 
Isadore Willis, 
George Warren, 
Liitie Hosmer. f 



May Bo wen. 
Bertha Jones, 
Ada Jones, 
Maude Sawyer, 
Charles Moulton, 
Charles Fletcher. 

Ida Tuttle, 
Bertie Hall, * 
Emery Clark, * 
Edward Holton, * 



Florence Richardson ^ 
Grace Richardson, * 
John Hannaford, 
John Mahoney, 
Alice Stone. 



Susie Conant, 
Sara Hammond, 
Carrie'Lund, 
Warren Robbins. 



South Grammar. 

Two Terms. 

Emily Hannon, 
Sadie Sawyer, 
Eva Shapley, 
Eda Shapley. 



Three Terms. 



South Primary, 

Dora Barker, * 
Olive Barker. 



West Grammar. 



West Primary. 

Ida Richardson, 
Alfred Richardson. 



Centre Grammar. 

Annie Hammond, 

Annie Noyes, 
Elbrid^e Conant. 



Emma Hart. 



Hattie Robbins. 



12 



One Term, 

May Calder, * 
Lottie Conant, * 
Millie E. Handley, 
Clara L. Hammond, 
Maude Purcell, 
Clara B. Robbins, 
Grace E. Tuttle, 
Arthur C. Allen, 
Albert J. Reed, 
Olive D. Wood. * 



Bertha F. Hosmer, 
Kittie O'Connell, 
John O'Neal, 
Herbert H. Robbins. 



Bertha Dupee, 
George Smith, 
Irving Smith, 
Elwyn Harris, 
Everett Wayne. 



Josie Keith, 
Gertrude Griggs, 
Joseph Pother, 
Shirley Jones, 
Moses Young. 



Centre Priimary. 

Tivo- Terms. 

Charles Calder, * 
Luther Conant, Jr. 
Henry L. Livermore, 
Harry Niekerson, * 
Parley Richardson, * 



Three Terms. 



East School. 



North School. 

Elorence Dupee, 
Mattie Randolph, 
Mattie Smith, 
Hattie Smith, 
Augusta Smith, 
Wallie Smith,. 
J. Sidney White. 

South East School. 

George Hooper, 
Fred. Pother, 
Willie Jones. 



Willie Hooper. 



Tardy once. f Absent one half day. 



13 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE'S FINANCIAL REPORT. 



To THE Citizens of Acton : — 

Your School Committee respectfully submit the following report 
of receipts and expenditures. For information respecting the condition 
and management of the schools, we refer you to the foregoing report 
of the vSuperintendent and to the annexed tabular view. We con- 
gratulate the town upon the present apparently prosperous condition of 
our educational work and ask for it your continued generous support. 

WEST SCHOOL, 
Mrs. Lucy M. Mead, Agent. 



$847 57 



Drawn from the treasury, 


. $790 00 


Balance from last year, 


57 57 


Paid to teachers. 


S623 00 


for fuel. 


90 27 


care of house and furnace, 


60 00 


incidentals, 


10 83 


Balance on hand. 


63 47 



$847 57 



CENTRE SCHOOL. 

Luther Conant, Agent. 

Drawn from the treasury, 
Balance from last year. 

Paid to teachers, 

for care of house, 
incidentals, 
fuel and preparing it. 



$790 


00 


2 


25 


$673 


00 


43 


00 


6 


92 


69 


33 



792 25 



$792 25 



14 





SOUTH SCHOOL. 






George 


F. 


Flagg, 


Agent 






Drawn from treasury, 










$790 


00 


Balance from last year. 










11 


07. 


Paid to teachers, 


1681 


00 


for books, 










. 4 


11 


fuel, 










40 


00 


care of house, 










55 


00 


incidentals. 










10 


40 


Balance on hand. 










10 


56 



801 07 



NORTH SCHOOL. 

Job Dupee, Agent. 

Drawn from the treasury, $ 350 00 

Balance from last year, 44 41 

Paid to teachers, $ 305 50 

for fuel, 35 94 

care of house, ^ 13 00 

maps and pointers, 9 75 

organ, 5 00 

erasers, desk books and incidentals, 8 16 

Balance on hand, 17 06 

SOUTH EAST SCHOOL. 
CD. Griggs, Agent. 

Drawn from the treasury, on last year's acct. $ 25 00 

'' " ' this '' '' 250 00 



Deficiency on last year's 


account, 


$12 18 


Paid to teachers, 




204 00 


for fuel, 




34 50 


incidentals, 




1 76 


care of house, 




3 00 


Balance on hand. 




19 56 



394 41 



194 41 



275 00 



lo 



EAST SCHOOL. 
George Chandler, Agent. 



Drawn from the treasury, 
Balance from last year, 
Deficiency, 



270 00 

12 05 

1 13 



Paid to teachers. 


$288 00 


for fuel. 


46 27 


organ (in part for last year).. 


16 00 


care of house, 


30 50 


incidentals, 


2 41 


Amount raised by the town for schools. 


13,000 00 


Income from State school fund, 


180 21 


'' " dog fund, 


173 95 



I 383 18 



$383 18 



$3,354 16 



Number of children between the ages of five and fifteen, 29 2. 
Sum raised by the town for each, $10.75. 

Respectfully submitted. 



LUTHER CONANT, Chairman, 
JOB DUPEE, Clerk, 
GEORGE F. FLAGG, 
LUCY M. MEAD, 
CHARLES D. GRIGGS, 
GEORGE CHANDLER, 



School 



Ccmmittee 



of Acton. 



1(1 



TABULAR VIEW. 





- 




-^ 


SCHOOLS. 


TEACHEES. 


'M'^j r^- \ ui 


1 ^ i 

J 1 1 io 








^ ;r 


K 1^ 


"^ 


t 1^ 


111 1 






■^ ^ 


T' I aj 


P, 


if- j ^ 








1"^ 


^, 


'^ 


cc 


"3 i _• 


' j-^ i 






r^ 


S 


1 


> 

< 

■ 


^ |« 


c c 1 ;£ 




SPRING TEEM. 










1 








Centre i ^'^'animar 


3Iiss C. H. Alien 
'•' B. M. Ball 




i<36.00 

mm 


30* 
33 


27 
31.7 


24.85! 

27.3 !2 


13 




23 
14 


56 
71 


( Grainniar 


" E. E. Stacv 


3 


40.00 


26 


24 


23.3 





7 


14 


6 


S"""' ] Primary 


jMissJ.M.ivPAlistei 
iMrs. M. A. Leach 


3 


36.00 


41 


37 


34.6 








21 


34 


w^«+ J <^Trammar 


Miss A. C. Davis 


3 


36.00 


35 


32.3 


28.05 





7i 251 32 


" LB. CampbeU 


3 


30.00 


45 


39.7 


32.7 


1 


Oi 16| 41 


East 


" S. A.Wetherbee 


m 


32.00 


27 


23.7 


24.0911 


16 


14 


North 


" E. F. Estahrook 


2%\ 30.00 


21 


20 


18.39 '0 


ll 10 


27 


South East 


" S. E. Tut tie 
Totals, 


2^41 24.00 


18 


16 


14 il 


JL! 


27 




253ii 


300.00 


276 


254.4 


227.28 


5 


28147 


308 




FAI^L TEEM. 














1 

! 




ce..t-i?szr 


Miss C. H. Allen 


2% ■^40. 00 


21 


18.3 


16 io 


13 


12 


88 


" B. M. Ball 


2^4 


36.00 


30 


29.4 


27.2 1 





12 


84 


Grammar 


" E. E. Stacy 


3 


40.00 


28 


24 


23.3 


10 


14 


8 


South ^p,.i^,^,y 


j Miss J. Br; )wn 
] '' M. B.Allen 


3 


36.00 


46 


42 


37 





25 


60 


Wpg+ * Grammar 
^^ ^^^ ] Primary 


Miss A. C. Davis 


3 


36.00 


38 


36.1 


31.4 io 


7 


25 


23 


'• LB. CampbeU 


3 


32.00 


43 


41.17 


37.05 





16 


26 


East 


'' S. A.Wetherbte 


^H 


3-2.00 


33 


27.7 


25.6 '0 





22 


20 


North 


" E. F. Esta brook 


•2h 


32.00 


18 


16.17 


14.27 io 





9 


34 


South East 


'' E. E. Tuttle 
Totals, 


2y> 


24.00 


19 


18.5 


16 jl 





8 


21 




2oy, 


308.00 


276 


253.34 


227.82 1 2 


30 


143 


364 




WINTER TERM. 




















Gpti trp i C^rammar 
Centie ^ p^.^-.^j^^.^ 


MissC.H. Allen 


sy 


^40.00 


32 


30.7 


28.2 





14 


15 


110 


" B. M. BaU 


3y 


36,00 


32 


29.2 


25.4 








16 


94 


Q^.n+i, Gramm.ar 
South ]p,.i,,,ary 


'• E. E. Stacv 


3 ■ 


40.00 


28 


26 


24 





12 


12 


10 


" M. B. AJieia 


3 


36.00 


47 


39 


34.7 


1 





31 


44 


Wo«+ J Grammar 
^^^'* -j Primary 


'• A. G. Davis 


334 


36.00 


47t 


41.34 


36.04; 


13 


23 


13. 


" LB. CampbeU 


3>1 


32.00 


41 


39.25 


35.14! 





17 


25 


East 


'' S. A.Wetherbee 


sy 


32.00 


32 


29.2 


24.44 lO 


2 


19 


30 


North 


Mr. 0. W. Dutton 


m 


36.00 


15 


14.2 


13.5 io 


2 


8 


22 


South East 


Miss E. D Heath 
Totals, 
Aggi-egate for year, 


4i 


24.00 


17 


15.75 


13 io 


2 


10 


27 




30 


312.00 

1 


291 


264.64 


234.42 1 1 


45 


151 


375 




811^ 


920.001843 


772.38 


689.52 '8 


103'44lll047 



* One of these a half day scholar and another recited in special studies. 

f Two of these half day scholars. 

The average attendance, during the year, was 89 1-5 per cent, of the average 
num-ber belonging to the schools, and 79 per cent, of the nural:)er in town between 
five and iifteen years of age. 



I^EI^OK^TS 



SelegienandOtherOfficers s 



OF THE- 



¥ow:K 0^ ^c^oK, 



FEB. 26, 1882, TO FEB. 26, 1883, 



-INCLUDING THE- 



P^^^I^eEg, Bll^ipg ma DE^TP^ ipj iss^, 



-ALSO, THE- 



Report of the School Committee, 







ACTON: 

PRINTED AT OFFICE OF THE ACTON PATRIOT, SO. ACTON. 

18 8 3. 



TOWN OFFICERS for 1883. 



Town Clerk. 
William D. Tuttle. 
Selectmen. 

D. James Wetherbee, John White, Phineas Wetherbee. 

Assessors. 
Wm. D. Tuttle, Phineas Wetherbee, Hiram J. Hapgood. 

Overseers of the Poor. 
Elisha H. Cutler, Otis H. Forbush, Luke Blanchard. 

School Committee. 

Job W. Dupee and Geo. Chandler, 1 y; Lucius S. Hos- 

mer and John E. Cutter, 2 yrs. ; 2 to be chosen 

at April meeting. 

Highvjay Sjii'veyors. 

Daniel Wetherbee, Charles Wheeler, Abram H. Jones, 

Joseph F. Cole, John Fletcher, 2d, Geo. R. Keyes. 

Fence Viczucrs. 

Wm. W. Davis, Nahum C. Reed, John R. Houghton. 

Surveyors of Ltunher. 
Wm. B. Davis, Geo. H. Plarris, Ed. F. Richardson, 
Chas. B. Stone, L. W. Stevens, E. J. Robbins. 
Surveyors of Wood. 

E. J. Robbins, Geo. H. Harris, S. L. Dutton, Wm. B. 

Davis, Chas. B. Stone, Isaac W. Flagg, J. W. 

Loker, L. S. Hosmer, Aaron S. Fletcher, Charles H. 

Taylor, Moses E. Taylor. 

Surveyors ofHoofsanct Staves. 

David M. Handley, Augustus Fletcher. 

Cein ctery Co m m ittee . 

John Fletcher, Wm. W. Davis, Joseph F. Cole. 

Field Drivers, 

A. W. Gardner, M?crtm Tuttle, Wm. U. Murphy, James 

B. Tuttle, Geo. W. Cole, Clarence W. Brown, 

James P. Brown. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Dr.— 

Paid State Treasurer, State Tax, $ 1,440 00 

County Treasurer, County Tax, 542 70 

On Selectmen's Orders, 12,479 22 

To Outstanding Orders, 1,513 84 

Balance due the Town Feb. 2G, 1883, 1,149 51 

$;i f ,i25 2T 

— Ur. 

By Balance in Treasury Feb. 26, 1882, $ 39 08 

Received of J. E. Cutter, taxes, 1881, 2,256 27 

" State Treas., Corporation tax, 907 96 

'' ^- " National Bank tax, 728 48 

'^ Indigent Soldiers, 201 00 

" ^' •' State Aid, 

''■ " '■' State Paupers, 

'' '' " Scliooi Fund, 

" Joseph Cole, for lots sold in 

Mt. Hope Cemetery 1881, 

^' Geo. P. Flagg, rent S. Rooms, 

'^ Chas. Wheeler, for labor, 

" J. E. Cutter, for poll tax of 

Scott Adams, 2 00 

Julian Tuttle, rent Town Hall, 117 20 
D. J. Wetherbee, for oil, 8 40 

'' John Fletcher, for lots sold in 



64 00 


14 10 


179 13 


23 00 


45 00 


50 



Woodlawn Cemetery, 




37 00 


Joseph Cole for lots in 






Mt. Hope Cemetery, 




3 00 


County Treas., dog fund, 




145 08 


J. W. Dupee, Collector, 


12 


,284 34 


laterest on money in Bank, 




69 73 

$ 17,125 27 



SELECTMEN'S REPOET. 



Receipts and Expenditures. 

{Jnexpeiicled balance of last year, $2,295 35 

Joseph F. Cole, Mt. Hope Cemetery '81, 23 00 
Geo. F. Flagg, rent of So. A, School House, 45 00 



Charles Wheeler, labor, 


50 


John E. Cutter, poll tax, 


2 00 


State Treas., Corporation Tax, 


907 96 


''- '' National Bank Tax, 


728 48 


State Aid, 


64 00 


•• '• Relief of Indigent Soldiers 


, 201 00 


'^ " Support of State Paupers, 


14 10 


'' " School Fund, 


179 13 


Interest on money in bank. 


69 73 


D. J. Wetherbee, oil, 


8 40 


Julian Tuttle, use of Town Hail and cellar, 117 20 


Town Grant, 


7,000 00 


'' for Schools, 


3,000 00 


" " for Highways, 


1,500 00 


State Tax, 


1,440 00 


County Tax, 


542 70 


Bounty Tax, 


4,000 00 


Overlayings, 


■ 82 77 


Joseph P. Colo, Mt. Hope Cemetery 188 


2, 3 00 


John Fletcher, Woodlawn " 


37 00 


County Treas., Dog Tax, 


145 08 



$22,406 40^ 



Support of Schools. 

iPaid Lucius S. Hosmer, South District, $ 790 00 
John E. Cutter, Centre 
LncyM. Mead, West '' 

George Chandler, East '' 

Job W. Dupee, North 
Charles D. Griggs, S. East " 



790 00 




790 00 




350 00 




350 00 




275 00 






$ 3,345 00 



Repairs on Town Buildings. 

Paid L. S. Hosmer, repairs on South Acton 

School House, $ 25 38 

Geo. Chandler, '^ " East 

House, 15 10 

Luther Conant, " ^' Centre 

House, 21 46 

Lucy M. Mead, '' -' West 

House, 13 19 

L. U. Holt, register for Town Hall, 8 00 







Kegular 








Higfeway 


Work. 


Paid A. 


H. 


Jones, 




$ 300 00 


Chas. 


Wheeler, 




681 15 


A. 


H. 


Jones, 




385 37 



f 83 13 



$ 1366 52 ' 

Printing. i 

Paid C. W. Leach, 24 Warrants, $ 3 00 ; 

'^ 500 Selectmen's reports, 10 00 ' \ 

<• '' 600 Town reports, 56 00 ] 

E. J. Hammer, Warrants and Posters, 8 00 I 

D. J. Wetherbee, Warrants, 6 50 

$ 83 50 J 



Support of Poor. 

Paid John E. Cutter, deficiency on Town Farm, 

to April 1st., 1882, $227 42 

E. H. Cutler, support Clara Wheeler, 275 42 

" '' '' Eliza Bergendahl, 179 91 

'- " '' Traynor Family, 29 71 



t< 



a i. 

a i. 



" Mrs. Pike, 


47 00 


'' Reddin Family, 


13 00 


'• R. B. Adams, 


79 00 


Coffin and Robe for 




Mrs. Adams, 


14 00 


support Ola Nelson, 


37 80 


" Hannah Stanton, 


42 10 


^' Mrs. John Whitney, 16 00 
'^ Jeremiah Shine, 17 00 


'^ W. Moffitt, 


31 88 


for Dr. Hutchins, medical 




attendance on J. Shine, 


64 25 


for Dr. Hutchins, medical 




attendance Traynor family, 7 50 
for Dr, Sanders, medical 


attendance 0. Penniman, 


7 00 


lor journey to Lowell, 1 50 

" '• Boston, 2 00 

'^ ^' Westford, 1 50 

Stationery and Stamps, 1 50 

Samuel Hoar, counsel fees 

in Adams' case, 9 00 







Cemetery Expenses. 




Paid John Fletcher, labor and trees for 




Woodlawn Cemetery, 


$ 79 77 


J. F. Cole, labor in Mt. Hope 




Cemetery, 


39 75 


John Flether, labor in Woodlawn 




Cemetery, 


57 82 



81,104 4^ 



$176 84 



state Aid. 






Paid John CorroUj 


^96 00 




George Dole, 


48 00 




Allen G. Smith, 


96 00 




Benjamin Skinner, 


72 00 




Mrs. R. C. Wright, 


48 00 




Ola Nelson, 


4 00 


$364 00 






Town Debt. 




Paid Luther Billings, note and interest. 


1211 26 




Mrs. H. A. Piper, " " 


2016a 




Luther Conant, ^' '' 


763 87 




Fred. Rouillard, ^' " 


2,049 67 




Mrs. J. K. Putney, " 


676 00 




D. J. Wetherbee, " " 


587 35 


$ 4,489 78 







Interest on Town Debt. 

Paid F. Rouillard, $120 00 

Luther Conant, 45 00 

D. J. Wetherbee, 34 52 

H. A. Piper, ' 12 00 

Mrs. J. K. Putney, ' 39 00 



$25062 



\ 



Town Officers, ] 

Paid lu U. Holt, Sealer of Weights and ] 

Measures, $ 9 00 1 

Rev. F. P. Wood, Sup't. Schools, 55 00 i 
John E. Cutter, Collecting Taxes, '81, 80 00 

Wm. D. Tuttle, services as Assessor, 40 00 j 
L. S. Hosmer, " " '' 20 00 " ] 

Phineas Wetherbee, " " 30 00 j 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, services as Treas, 40 00 j 
John White, Selectman, 45 00 . I 
D, J. Wetherbee, " 85 00 

P. Wetherbee, '' 45 00 \ 

Wm. D. Tuttle, Town Clerk, 25 00 ^ 

$474 00 : 



Miscellaneous. 

Paid A. J. Willis, breaking roads, $ 17 84 

L. E. Reed, attending 25 burials, 75 00 

" " making 25 death returns, 6 25 
" " work at Cemetery, 2 00 

" " repairs on Hearse, 7 00 

James Kinsley, for the Hurley road, 8 00 

Dr. Sanders, medical attendance 
on J. W. Mansfield, 50 00 

E. Robbins, for land for E. Cemetery, 8 00 

C. W. H. Moulton & Co., for ladders, 125 00. 
Job W. Dupee, breaking roads, 25 15 
John E. Cutter, abatement of taxes, 42 42 
E. F. Richardson, stakes for 

Woodlawn Cemetery^ 8 79 

A. L. Tuttle, building road, 100 00 

P. Wetherbee, lumber and labor for 

storage of ladders, 15 07 

D. J. Wetherbee, sign boards, • 2 19 
^* ^' tile for So. Acton sluice, 8 45 
" " coal for Town House, 14 50 

James W. Hayward, freight on tile, 2 00 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, over draft on 

Treas. at time of settlement, 11 16 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, 

for settees for Town House, 
John E. Cutter, discount on taxes. 
Treasurer of Littleton, for schooling 

A. Bulette's children, 
Samuel Hosmer, breaking roads, 
L. S. Hosmer, tax book, 

*' " printing tax notices, 

" *^ collector's book, 

" post for So. A. School H. 
€has. Wheeler, repairs on W. A cton 

bridge, 117 88 



68 71 


39 50 


43 00 


1 50 


1 00 


2 50 


100 


7 00 



Paid C, Wheeler railing on W. A. bridge, 

$32 61 

'< " breaking roads, 28 03 
*' *^ building new bridge at 

Smith's Mill, 25 86 

Luke Tuttle, breaking roads, 15 82 

J. E. Cutter, " '' 13 65 

Moses Taylor, " ^^ 6 45 

Luther Conant, " '• 4 50 

A.H.Jones, " '' . 77 45 

Francis Pratt, '' '' 26 45 

F. H. Whitcomb, " 44 00 

N. Littlefield, '^ ' '' 2170 

J. P. Tenney, " '' " 7 68 

C. L. Davis, '' " 60 

D. Wetherbee, '' '' 1882, 29 56 
I. W. Flagg, 10 doz. paper pails, 43 25 
A. H. Jones, repairs on Powder Mill 

bridge, 30 82 

L. E. Reed, attending 30 buriels, 90 00 

'> '^ making 29 returns 7 25 

'' '^ repairs on Hearse, 155 
Edward Tuttle, use of pump, C. School, 5 00 

Julian Tuttle, opening Hall, 26 times, 35 00 

'* " '^ Selectmen's room, 3 75 





'' 


care of cellar, 


3 00 


a 


u 


clock. 


10 00 


a 


a 


cleaning '' 


2 00 


u 


'' 


Hall, 


2 00 


u 


u 


wood, chimneys, brooms. 




u 


(C 


hooks. 


18 00 


Wm. 


D. Tuttle, express on documents. 


2 58 


u 




" laying out lots in 








Woodlawn Cemetery, 


150 


u 




'* Assessors' notices. 


125 


i( 




book. 


25 



10 



Paid W. D. Tuttle message to W. Acton, $ 10 
'' "• journey to Concord, 2 39 

" " collecting returns, 75 

^•' '^ collecting and recording 

36 births, 18 00 

" " collecting and recording 

25 marriages, 
'- '• recording 32 deaths, 

Job W. Dupeo, discount on taxes, 
D. J. Wetherbee, counsel fees, 
Henry Brooks, repairs on highway, 
J. W. Dupee, abatement off taxes. 



3 75 


5 20 


769 31 


12 00 


10 00 


27 14 



$2,255 28^ 



11 

Receipts from February 26th, 1882, to February 26th, 1883. 

Unexpended balance, as per report of 

Feb. 26tli., 1882, $2,295 85 

Appropriations and receipts, 20,111 05 





83,345 00 


<i[)^^,~Z:\JKJ TtV ,^ 


Expenditures. 
Support of Schools, 


# 


Repairs on Town buildings, 


83 13 




Regular highway work. 


1,366 52 




Support of Poor, 


1,104 49 




Town Debt, 


4,489 78 




Soldiers' Aid, 


364 00 


',i 


Interest on Notes, 


250 52 




Town OflScers, 


474 00 


■i 


Printing, 


' 83 50 




Cemetery Expenses, 


176 84 


\ 


Miscellaneous, 


2,255 28 




State Tax, 


1,440 00 




County Tax, 


542 70 


$15,975 76^ ^ 




1883, 


Bal. in Col. and Treas. hands, Feb. 26, 


$6,430 64 I 


Deduct Bounty Tax, 




4,000 00 


Balance in favor of the Town, 


$2,430 64 i 

4 


D. J. WETHERBEE ] Selectmen \ 
JOHN WHITE, y of i 
PHINEAS WETHERBEE, J Acton. ; 


Acton, Feb. 26th., 1883. 







12 



TOWN clerk;s report 

worn issSo 



List of Births in Acton in 1882. 

No. Date of Birth. Xame of Child. Name of Parents. 

1. Jan. 4, Ralph Bradley Stone, son of Edwin and 

Frances A. Stone. 

2. Jan. 24, Eugene Warren Knowiton, son of Ancil W. 

and Lizzie M. Knowiton. 

3. Feb. 15, Clara Lewis Stone, daughter of Charles B. 

and Isabel D. Stone. 

4. Feb. 21, Charles Austin Lawrence, son of Austin E. 

and Mary J. Lawrence. 

5. Mar. 9, Daniel Connors, son of Morris and Honora 

Connors. 
C). Mar. 20, Charles Eliot Coding, son of Theodore P. 
and Ella F. Coding. 

7. Mar. 22, Margaret Anna McCarthy, daughter of 

Michael and Sarah McCarthy. 

8. Mar. 23, Cenie Evelyn Fletcher, daughter of Jon a P. 

and Lizzie Fletcher. 

9. Apr. 20, Crace May Hayward, daughter oi Amos 

H. and Etta C.*^ Hayward. 

10. Apr. 26, Frank O'Neil, son oY Patrick and Hannah 

O'Neil. 

11. June 4, Sadie Emma Lindley, daughter of Ceorge 

and Alice Lindle}^. 

12. June 7, Charles L. Bradford, Jr., son of Charles L. 

and Eliza D. Bradford. 

13. June 29, Florence Pearl Smith, daughter of George 

H. and Cora E. Smith. 

14. June 30, Jessie Louise Knowiton, daughter of Frank 

R. and Emma S. Knowiton. 



13 

15. July 1, Winfield iVlmon Lawrence, son of James R. 

and Abbie F. Lawrence. 

16. July 14, A daughter to Jeremiah Jr. and Louise Lu- 

cius. 

17. July 23, Marion Wood, daughter of Eben F. and 

Mary A. Wood. 

18. July 24, Daniel Callahan, son of Daniel and Ellen 

Callahan, 

19. July 2(), Walter Gaston Tuttle, son of Amos S. and 

Amy M. Tutde. 

20. Aug. 1, Anne Sawtelle White, daughter of Howard 

B. and Bertha White. 

21. Aug. 3, Jennie Blanche Sawyer, daughter of Thom- 

as J. and Kate Sawyer. 

22. Aug. 22, Vera May Knowlton, daughter of Octavus 

A. and Etta L. Knowlton. 

23. Aug. 25, Alia Blanche Hesselton, daughter of Lu- 

cius A. and Martha F. Hesselton. 

24. Aug. 25, Clarence Bernard Smith, son of Allen G. 

and Georgianna Smith. 

25. Sept. 5, Charles Julian Tuttle, son of Julian and 

Hannah E. Tutde. 

26. Sept. 11, Mary Eleanor Louise Palmer, daughter of 

Nathan R. and Abbie M. Palmer 

27. Sept. 14, Sarah Viola Knowlton, daughter of Osha 

P. and Nellie F. Know^lton. 

28. Oct. 21, Ethel Mildred Qiiimby, daughter of George 

L. and Emma L. Quimby. 

29. Oct. 22, Arthur Herman Gould, son of Herman A. 

and Sarah E. Gould. 

30. Oct. 31, Everett Marshall Mains, son of John and 

Maria Mains. 

31. Nov. 14, John Edward Bixby, son of John W. and 

Veronica M. Bixby. 

32. Nov. 16, Eula Sophia, daughter of Lyman C. and 

Addie Taylor 

33. Nov. 20, Michael Murphy, son of Michael and Jo- 

hanna Murphy. 

34. Dec. 3, Ralph T. Jones, son of William S.and Lau- 

ra A. Jones. 



14 

35. Dec. 11, Leonard Averv Phalen, son of Edwin A. 

and Hattie D. Phalen. 

36. Dec. 28, Albert P. Willis, son of Charles P. and 

Cora E.Willis. 



Marriages Recorded in Acton in 1882. 

No. Date of Marriage. * Names and Residences of Parties. 

1. Jan. 2, Frank W. Houghton of Arlington and 

Miss Lizzie L Walker of Acton. 

2. Jan 13, George L Quimby, and Miss Emma L Bil- 

lings, both of Acton. 

3. ■ Feb. 12, John W Bixby and Miss Veronica Cain, 

both of Acton. 

4. Feb. 15, Howard Marchant and Miss Annie Jack- 

man both of Acton. 

5. April 12, Joel H Whitcomb and Mrs. Lidian E Sco- 

field, both of Acton. 
C), Apr. 18, Seymour S Colby and Miss Clara M 
Whitney, both of Stow. 

7. Apr. 30, George N Gove of Ma3mard and Miss Ros- 

ella Hale of Concord. 

8. Apr. 30, Oliver E Houghton and Miss Mary Estella 

Barrett both of Acton. 
^L May 3, Sidne}^ L Richardson and Miss M Kate 
Moulton, both, of Acton. 

10. May 14, George Sears and Miss Katie M Hoff- 

man, both of Acton. 

11. June 28, Charles Hammond Avery, Esq., of Cincin- 

nati, O., and Miss Nettie Norton Barker 
.of Acton. 

12. Aug. 2, Alfred W Gardner of Acton and Miss Hat- 

tie H Freeman of Ayer. 

13. Aup;. 13, Orzando Davis of Somerville and Mrs. 

Mary H. Richardson of Acton. 

14. Sept. 6, James B Tuttle of Acton and Miss Florence 

M. Hartwell of Boxboro. 

15. Sept. 7, William S Warren of Acton and Miss Rosa 

E Stacy of Waterville, Me. 

16. Oct. 3, Richard E Frye of Nashua, N. H.,and Miss 

Helen M Webber of Acton. 



15 

17. Oct. 26, George Wm. Cole and Miss Anna Z Hew- 

ins, both of Acton. 

18. Nov. 7, Joseph Truette of Acton and Miss Emma 

Lawson of St. Albans, Vt. 

19. Dec. 9, George E. Priest and Miss Alice G Scarbro, 

both of Acton. 

20. Dec. 18, William H Murphy of Acton and Miss Mary 

Jane Porter of Boxboro. 
. 21. Dec. 21, Albert J Day and Miss Ella E Tnttle, 
both of Acton. , 

22. Dec. 24, Martin Tuttle and Miss Mary Emma Co- 

nant, both of Acton. 

23. Dec. 25, James T Goodsell of Maynard and Miss 

Addie C Jones of Ac(on. 

21. Dec. 25, James P Brown and Miss Laura A Jones, 

both of Acton. 
25. Dec. 2Q, Clarence W Brown of Acton and Miss 
Minnie A Caswell of Barton, Vt. 



» 



Deaths in Acton in 1882. 

No. Date of Death. Names and Ag-es of Deceased. 

1. Jan. 11, Mr. Frederick W. Brj^ant, 31 years 6 

months. 

2. Jan. 12, Mrs. Lucinda Gilmore, 75 years, 10 months. 

3. Jan. 30, Varnufti P. Tuttle, son of Varnum and 

M. Medora Tuttle, 8 years, 1 month, 17 
days. 

4. Feb. 2, Mr. Joseph Dole, G8 years. 

5. Feb. 4, Mrs. Hattie A. WoodVard, wife of BixbyS. 

Woodward, 41 years, 2 months, 14 days. 
(). Feb. 22, Mrs. Eliza A. Lawrence, 57 years, 3 months, 
29 days. 

7. Mar. 10, Walter B. Parker, son of Edwin C. and Han- 

nah H. Parker, 1 year, 2 months, 4 days. 

8. Mar. 15, Mr Jonas Blodgett, 71 years, 4 months, 17 

d'ys. 

9. Mar. 20, Clarence E. Blodgett, son of J Herbert and 

Minnie A Blodgett, 1 year, 5 mo's, 8 days. 
10. April 3, Mrs Sarah Fuller, widow of Alden Fuller, 
78 years, 7 months, 19 days. 



16 ' 

11. April 5, Mr Alanson B Gibbs of Charlestown^ hj 

accident on railroad, 27 years. 

12. April 14, Mr Joseph Wheeler, 85 years, 5 months. 

13. May 2, Mr Daniel T Angier, ^& yVs, 8 mo's, 6 days.. 

14. May 6, M Florence Penniman, daughter of Orenzo 

W, and Olive L. Penniman, 4yr's, 8 mo's. 

15. May 16, Mrs Sally Davis, widow of Jonathan B 

Davis, 84 years, 11 months, 29 days. 

16. May 31, Mr Edwin M Wheeler, 26 years, 5 months, 

10 days. 

17. June 2, Miss Hepsey R Robbins, 63 years, 1 month, 

16 days. 

18. June 11, Mr James H Freeman, 22 years, 13 days. 

19. July 13, Mrs Elkn Carney, 70 years. 

20. July 16, Arthur Edwin Wheeler, son of Edwin M 

and Ellen G. Wheeler, 2 3'ears, 10 months, 
17 days. 

21. July 25, Mrs Susan J He wins, 54 years,, 7 months, 

5 days. 

22. Aug 16, Mr Samuel Chaffin, 70 ^^ears. 

23. Aug 19, Mrs Martha Fletcher, wife of John Fletcher, 

53 years, 5 months, 12 days. 

24. Aug 24, Mrs. Betse}^ C. Parker, 79 years, 6 months, 

12 days. 

25. Aug 26, Mrs Rosalinda B Adams, 94 3'ears, 9 mo's, 

2 da3^s. 

26. Aug 30, Mr Jeremiah Shien, o5 years, 8 m.onths. 

27. Sept 6, Miss Alice J. Phalen, 29 years, 10 days. 

28. Sept 6, Mrs Jerusha P Noyes, widow of Thomas J 

Noyes, 72 years, 2 months, 23 days. 

29. Sept 9, George Henry Sears, son of George and Ma- 

ry A Sears, 10 months, 4 days. 

30. Oct 8, Margaret A, daughter of Michael and Sarah 

McCarthy, 6 months, 16 days. 

31. Oct 22^ John Manion, son of Thomas and Mar}' Ann 

Manion, 6 years, 9 months, 6 days. 

32. Dec 27, Mr Henry Adalbert Mead, 30 years, 4 

months. 



17 



Names of Persons Having Dogs Licensed in 1882, 



Jairus C. Wheeler, 1 fern., 


Y. J. Brennan, 


Jona H. Barker, ; 


M. Augusta Hosmer, 


Francis Conant, 


Moses A. Beed, , 


Walter C. Gardner, 


John Welch, 


Alman H. Gilmore, 


Chas. J. Sioring, 


0. Ellsworth Houghton, 


Forbush & Hart weU,l fern, 


Tattles, Jones & Wether- 


D. J. Wetherbee, 


John Kelly, 


bee, 2, 


John W, Charter, 


Geo. S. Jacobs, 


Elnathan Jones, 3, 


John Hanaford, 


James D. Coburn, 


Dana F. Havward' 


Hiram Walker, 


Geo. Pratt, 2, 1 a fern., 


J: K: W. Wetherbee, 


Lester'N. Fletcher. 


Chas. H. Wheeler, 1 fern., : 


Theron F. Newton, 


Daniel McCarthy, 


Cyrus Hayward, 


James Tuttle, 


Oscar E. Preston, 


Geo. C. Wright, 


Lncms S. Hosmer, 


John R. Houghton, 


Mrs. H. M. Beck, 


Jeremy Austin, 


Frank E. Harris. 


Eri S. Brooks, ' , 


Otis H. Forbush, 


E. F, Fuller, 2, 


JerrvH. McCarthy, 


Daniel Harris, 


Luke Tuttle, 


M. E. Taylor, 


Chas. D. Griggs. 


Chas. A. Harrington, 


A. W. Gardner, 


Geo. W. Livermore, 


Chas, A. Taylor, 


Joha W. Randall, 


Chas. Handley, 


Solon A. Bobbins, 


Herman Chaplin, 


J. E. Harris, 


James Kingsley, 


Geo. Conant, : 


A. L. Noyes, 


Willis L, Mead, 


Constance O'Neil, * 


Frank Wetherbee, 


Gustavus H. Waugb, 


L. E. Allen, 


Isaiah S. Leach, 


Geo. B. Keyes, 


Mrs. Jarvis Williams, 


John Temple, 


Wm. D. Tuttle, 


Augustus Fletcher, 


Isaac Barker, 


John Fletcher, 


Albert MoUlton, 


Geo, C. Conant, 


Chas. Holton, 




Sylvester Haynes, 

1 
I 


G. H. S. Houghton, 
yiales, 76, at $2.00, $152.C 
'emales, 4, at $5.00, 20.( 


] 

, ^ 
)0 



Total, 80 



$172.00 



LICENSED SINCE JAN. 1st, 1883. 
Eliza Wheeler, Edward Wood, 1 fern. 



WM. n, TXITTLB, 

Toivn Clerk of Acton, 



REPORT OF THE 

OF THE 

ALMSHOUSE IN ACTON, 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 1, 1883. 



Articles on Hand March 1st, 1883. 




<) cows, S405 


00 


80 lbs. ham, 




$12 00 


1 horse, 200 


00 


12 lbs butter, 




3 72 


1 1-2 tons oat fodder, 22 


50 


17 lbs. lard, 




3 00 


9 1-2 tons hay, 171 


00 


1 1-2 bbls. apples. 


4 00 


7 ba^i;3 cotton seed meal, 10 


00 


Soap, 




1 22 


1 ton shorts, 22 


50 


Cider, 




4 00 


G bags meal, 8 


20 


Flour, 




G 00 


oats, 1 


00 


Tea. 




4 00 


225 barrels, 45 


00 


Crackers, 




50 


lot bags, 5 


00 


Spices, 




50 


salt, 1 


00 


Molasses, 




1 50 


14 cords wood cut for use, G3 


00 


Rye meal, 




50 


market boxes, 1 


00 


Kerosene oil. 




83 


wat^on, ^ 107 


00 


2 cider bbls.. 




2 00 


26 hens, ' 13 


00 


1-2 bushel bcaus, 


2 00 


15 bushels potatoes, 12 


00 


Matches, 




50 


10 bushels do. small. 2 


50 









200 lbs. salt pork, 28 


00 






$1163 97 


Receipts from Town Farm 


FR03 


r April 1st, 1882 to March 1st, 




18 


83. 






Received for cows, $172 


12 


Received for 


eggs, 


%\ 94 


milk, 742 


01 




pork. 


39 59 


potatoes, 11 


00 




calves, 


11 00 


birch poles, 44 


40 




poultry, 


1 00 


apples, 184 


87 









berries, 1 


67 






$1209 60 



19 



Paid for 







Expenses. 




sugar, 


$19 


93 


Paid for wagon jack, 


$3 00 


cheese, 


16 


69 


phosphate. 


8 95 


butter, 


39 


40 


chimney & glob 


es.l 30 


spices. 


1 


18 


tea, 


10 00 


room papci', 


3 


86 


scythes, 


•2 20 


brick. 




08 


cards and curry 


saleratus, 


1 


20 


comb, 


1 41 


cr. tartar. 


*1 


57 


fly paper. 


04 


grass seed, 


4 


90 


onions. 


1 58 


castings, 


1 


41 


flour. 


64 37 


kerosene oil. 


3 


45 


barrels. 


64 20 


oil can. 




22 


candles, 


31 


cloth & clothin 


gU 


05 


resin. 


24 


hoe, 




07 


tobacco, 


25 


soap, 


10 


44 


horse radish, 


08 


yarn. 


1 


00 


vinegar. 


44 


shoes. 


1 


50 


snuff. 


96 


seeds. 




35 


screening, 


64 


tomato plants, 




35 


tacks, 


14 


fork handle, 




26 


rakes, 


50 


nails, 




89 


malt. 


55 


basket, 




62 


starch. 


19 


brooms, 


1 


17 


raisins, 


54 


lemons, 




33 


mop handle, 


20 


fly trap. 




37 


mustard , 


2d 


meat. 


7G 


25 


coffee. 


30 


pails. 


1 


00 


knife, 


42 


beans. 


9 


60 


wicks, 


04 


bean pot. 




28 


fish. 


12 21 


crockery, 


1 


26 


labor. 


46 00 


spade 


1 


15 


cows, 


105 00 


tin ware, 




20 


keeping cows, 


18 00 


yeast. 




43 


grain. 


453 66 


sweet potatoes, 




83 


wheelwright bill, 4 90 


crackers. 


23 


40 


pump & repairs 


, 16 85 


ladder. 


1 


44 


blacksmith's bill, 19 35 


putty, 




10 


rep. shoes, 


1 27 


axe. 


1 


17 


doct. cow. 


1 00 


glass, 




75 


shavings, 


60 


saw. 




90 


uses of bull, 


2 50 


salt. 


3 


23 


killing hogs. 


2 75 


matches. 


1 


13 


smoking ham. 


60 


lock. 




30 


cash for M. Pol- 


stove polish, 




07 


lard, 


3 00 


molasses, 


27 


40 


use of oxen. 


3 00 



20 



Paid for filing saws, $1 05 

Services of J. Austin, wife 

and SOD, 275 00 
E. H. Cutler, 45 00 
Expenditures, 
Receipfs, 



Services of O.H.Forbush, 15 00 
Luke B 1 a n- 
chard, 10 00 





$1476 62 
1209 60 


$267 02 
240 00 


$267 02 


507 02 
36 40 





Income less than Expenditure, 

Due from treasury^ to balance account, 

Interest ol farj*i, 



Victualing 91 tramps at 40c. each, 

Cost of supporting poor on farm, $470 62 

Whole number of persons exclusive of tramps supported in 
almsli@Tise, 4 ; Average number, 4 ; Present number, 4. 

ELISHA H. CUTLER, 
OTIS H. FORBUSH, 
LUKE BLANCHARD, 

Overseers of Poor. 



K.EI=OK.T 



School Committee 



TOWN ei 7ICTOPe<- 



SCHOOL YEAR, 1882-83. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT, 



The brief space usually taken for this report requires 
that it be confined to the consideration of a few practical 
questions, viz., 1. What branches shall be taught in our 
schools? 2. How shall they be taught? 3. How can we 
make our schools more eflicient? 4. The need of a High 
School. 5. Remarks concerning each school. 

I. What Branches Shall be Taught in Our Schools. 

The studies that may be pursued by man with interest 
and profit are legion. Some of these are absolutely essen- 
tial. The common sense of the Commonwealth, embodied 
ia the Public Statutes Page 209, Sec. 1, says : 

"In every town there shall be kept lor at least six 
months in each year at the expense of said town by a 
teacher or teachers of competent ability and good morals, 
a sufficient number of schools for the instruction of all the 
children who may legally attend public school therein, in 
orthography, reading, writing, English grammar, geogra- 
phy, arithmetic, drawing, the history of the United States, 
and good behavior. Algebra, vocal music, agriculture, 
sewing, physiology and hygiene shall be taught by lec- 
tures or otherwise, in all the public schools in which the 
school committee deem it expedient." 

Your superintendent, in accordance with a vote of the 
committee, has required all scholars to pursue the studies 
prescribed in the first period of said section, unless ex- 
cused on satisfactory examination or for other good cause, 
and has permitted all who desired, to take algebra and 
physiology if sufficiently advanced in other studies. In 
no school where these -branches are faithfully studied and 
taught is there time for scholars or teachers to attend to 



French and Latin or other studies properly taught in a 

High School. 

II. How Shall These Studies be Taught? 

So far as circumstances will permit the same as they 
are taught in our Normal Schools and in the best common 
schools in the state ; for it is Irom these sources that our 
best teachers come and they must teach mainly as they 
have been taught. Therefore if we had a system of our 
own more conservative or more advanced than the meth- 
ods in said schools, we should be powerless to introduce 
it. But we have no desire to do so. The schools of 
Massachusetts were never doing better work than now. 

It is not the use but the abuse of the so called "new 
methods" that is to be deprecated and avoided. 

What are the "new methods?" They are very simi- 
lar in all our best schools, although, because so success- 
fully carried out in the Quincy schools, they are some- 
times called the "Qiiincy methods." In these schools 
they strive to teach as the mind naturally acquires knowl- 
edge ; reading by beginning with the word, and that a 
most familiar one, rather than the letter ; spelling mainly 
b}^ writing, sinte it is in writing that we most practice 
this art; arithmetic to the beginner, by the use of objects 
instead of abstract numbers, and to the more advanced 
scholar by requiring him to perform, without book to aid 
him those practical problems which he will be called up- 
on to perform in after life in business ; geography by giv- 
ing in his own language descriptions of countries and imag- 
inary or real journeys, illustrated by maps drawn from 
memor}^ ; history in like manner ; grammar by requiring 
constantly the use of correct language in writing and 
speaking, with simple rules for the same ; penmanship by 
requiring the written exercises and examinations, numer- 
ous as they are, to be executed in the best style. 

These methods have been in use in an increasing de- 
gree in our schools for half a century or more. They 
were in part inaugurated by Pestalozzi in Switzerland a 
century ago, and are practiced in the best schools of Eu- 
rope. They teach not merely words but ideas ; they train 
not only the memory but the powers of observation and 
reasoning ; they accustom the pupil to solve such prob- 



lems and perform such tasks as the duties of life will re- 
quire him to solve and perform. 

It is when books and study are discarded and these 
methods are pursued without system that they cease to be 
effective. A teacher of the best possible attainments, with 
one, or at the most only two classes, might teach without 
books, but in our schools, as in most common schools, the 
book must be constantly used by all except possibly the 
youngest primary scholars, as a guide and manual, sup- 
plemented by entertaining illustration and lucid explana- 
tion from the teacher, who must know more of the subject 
than any one book can teach. It is in primary teaching 
that books are too often neglected and pupils not soon 
enough accustomed to their use. 

I am glad to say that our teachers have most readily 
followed the suggestions of your superintendent and that 
in the primary schools an increased use of books has re- 
sulted in better order and more rapid and thorough pro- 
gress. This is especially the case in the West Acton Pri- 
mary. 

At the beginning of the year there w^as not such uni- 
formity in books used as is desirable, an attempt having 
been made to change old books gradually. So your com- 
mittee made an arrangement with the Messrs. Harper 
whereby their geographies and Swinton's grammars have 
at slight expense been introduced in all the schools and 
are to be furnished at such a fixed price, for at least five 
years, as to save the parents several hundred dollars dur- 
ing that period. 
III. How Can we Make our Schools more Efficient? 

All of us, superintendent, committee, teachers and 
parents, must in every possible way try to arouse the en- 
thusiasm and ambition of the scholars. While, in general 
the order of the schools has been excellent, there is room 
for improvement and it is the special business of the super- 
intendent to see that it is made. 

The greatest hindrance to the best progress is the 
constant evil of absence and tardiness. For the latter, 
there is seldom a good excuse. The former is sometimes 
caused by sickness, but in the weekly reports which the 
teachers have so faithfully made to me, the reason mos 



frequently given is "kept at home to work." This some- 
times seems necessary but can rarely be justifiable. There 
should be as long a vacation as possible in the busy sea- 
son and parents should make any reasonable sacrifice for 
the sake of keeping their children regularly at school ; for 
to be absent from a single recitation hinders the scholar's 
progress and that of his class, and to be al;!>sent, as many 
are, for days and weeks each term, is a mbst serious obsta- 
cle to the progress of the absentee's class, and renders it 
impossible for him to acquire any thorough knowledge or 
discipline. 

Such a scholar will leave school so poorly equipped for 
life that any after acquisition of knowledge will be so diffi- 
cultthat what little he has learned will slip from him. Clas- 
ses must not be kept back for absentees. Such must drop 
into lower classes. In school, they must be behind, as 
they will be in after life. It is no more what is learned at 
school that benefits, than it it is the patient, persevering ap- 
plication which the scholar who is regular in attendance 
cannot easily escape. 

Parents, we can do little for your scholars unless you 
send them constantl}^ and promptly to school. 

But though we bring our schools to the highest de- 
gree of excellence they form but an imperfect system. 

A town like Acton can afi:brd her children a better edu- 
cation than her present schools can give and cannot afford 
to give them less than the best town schools in the state 
furnish ; hence 
IV. The Need of a High School. 

Our citizens are largely men of moderate means, not 
rich enough to board their children away from home for a 
long course of study, but able to give them their time if they 
can be educated in their own town. 

Situated near the large towns and cities, our sons and 
daughters must, in the battle of life, compete with those 
who are educated in the best schools. Are we giving 
them such an education as they need for the highest suc- 
cess in life ? 

Of the nine teachers employed the past term in Acton, 
not one was educated wholly in our schools. Four of 
them are residents of Acton, but they, as well as the other 



6 

five, completed their education in the high schools of other 
towns. 

Among us are many young ladies, not attending- 
school, earning little or nothing, who, if we give them a 
good high school education, will be able to take the places 
of these teachers when needed. 

How many young men are we titting for book-keep- 
ers, land surveyors, master mechanics, architects, civil en- 
gineers, teachers, master mariners, practical chemisis, 
and scientific agriculturists? Yet a m.ajority of the most 
successful men in these callings, and even many of our 
best clersj-ymen, lawvers, and statesmen received no bet- 
ter education than a good high school can give. 

Thirty- seven scholars from this town have attended 
various High Schools and Academies in other tovvus dur- 
ing the present school 3-ear, as reported to me b}' our com- 
mittee. 

This shows that a large number of our best citizens 
consider a common school education insufiicient. Is 
there a parent in our town who does not desire for his 
child as crood an education as anv one of these thirtv-sev- 

O _ - w 

en are getting? 

Yet even these thirt3'-seven could get a better educa- 
tion in a High School in our own town than they will get 
abroad. With ample time a longer and more thorough 
course of study would be taken. Let no , parent think 
that he need look out for the higher education of only his 
own children. If your children, after their school days 
are over, live in Ac ton, as we hope they will, their daily 
and most intimate associates will not be the boj^s and girls 
they meet in those schools abroad, but their own town 
folk, and if you help educate 3'our neighbor's children you 
indirectly educate your own, throw around all an atmos- 
phere of culture and refinement, and make the social and 
intellectual life of our town richer, nobler and more 
stimulating. 

Many of our scholars seem to lose their ambition on 
}5assing from the Primary to the Grammar School. The 
diploma at the end of the High School course, and the 
rigid examination lor admission to said school would keep 
their ambition alive through both courses of study, and 



awaken an enthusiasm in all the schools of our town such 
as I have seen aroused in other towns by such a school. 

V. Remarks on the Various Schools. 
North School. 

The three terms w^ere taught by Miss Viola S. Tuttle of 
Acton — her first attempt and a most successful one both 
as to discipline and instruction. The scholars obeyed 
readily and studied faithfull}^ The home influence mus 
be good. 

East School. 

Miss Susie A. Wetherbee of Acton taught the three 
terms with increasing success. QLiick, energetic, thorough 
and systematic, she governed and instructed this school 
as few could. At the end of the fall term her pupils show- 
ed their appreciation of their teacher by presenting her a 
gold ring. ««- 

South East School. 

The Spring and Fall terms were taught by Miss Ella 
E. Tuttle of Acton, and the winter term by Miss Minnie 
L. Fletcher of Littleton ; both labored faithfully, and those 
scholars who attended regularly made good progress. At 
the end of one month the spring term was discontinued on 
account of scarlet fever. 

Centre Primary. 

This school has for several years been taught by Miss 
Bessie M. Ball of Acton. The visitor can hardly decide 
which he would rather be, the pupil of such a teacher or 
the teacher of such pupils ; she has slinstilled into them 
such a spirit of obedience and love of learning, has taught 
them not merely to repeat words, but to observe, think 
and reason, and cares for their health b}^ giving them fre- 
quent gymnastic exercises. 

Early in the Spring term Miss Ball, on account of ill 
health, was obliged to take a vacation and did not resume 
her position until the next term. Miss Angle Hutchins 
of Acton completed the term very successfully. 



Centre Grammar. 

The Spring term was taught by Miss C. H. Allen of 
Acton and the Fall and Winter terms by Miss Jennie A. 
Hemenway of Framingham. The examination at the 
close of the year indicated faithful study and thorough in- 
struction. The most of the scholars obeyed cheerfully, 
but a few of those boys who attended only the winter term 
became quite unruly near its close, and one ©f them, War- 
ren Robbins, was expelled, after which, the order of the 
school was good. The excellent examination of a class of 
3^oung ladies in histor}^ and physiology is worthy spec- 
ial mention. 

Although these schools are smaller in number than 
the other graded schools in town, we earnestly advise that 
the two schools be continued. The Primary must be kept 
as a model, and those ambitious and faithful scholars in 
the Grammar School ought to be deprived of no opportu- 
nitv that we can o-ive them. 

South Grammar. 

The Spring and Fail terms were taught by Miss El- 
len O. Clark of Sudbury, who labored faithfull3', and the 
Winter term by Miss Emma C. B. Gra}' of Framingham. 
This school needs a teacher of firmness, energy and en- 
thusiasm. Miss Gray possessed these qualities with fine 
scholarship, being a graduate of Framingham High 
School and Smith College. She had been assistant in an 
Academy, but had never had the management of a school 
and vet she succeeded in maintainino; ofood order and in- 
spired the school to study sufficiently to steadily ga inin 
scholarship and pass quite a satisfactory examination. She 
has taken the position of teacher of Latin and Greek in an 
Academy in Pulaski, N. Y. 

South Primary. ' 

Miss Emma F. Esterbrook of Acton taught the three 
terms with excellent success, and at the close of the yecLV 
valuable presents w^ere given her by her scholars, real 
tributes of merited affection. The examination was re- 
markable for prompt, correct and distinct answers. The 



large number from this school on the ''Roll of Honor"^ 
speaks well for teacher, school, and parents. • 

West Acton Grammar. 

For several years this school has been under the in- 
struction of Miss Ada C. Davis of Acton. She w^as edu- 
cated at Framingham Normal School, and teaches as 
thoroughly as she v^as taught. To hold every scholar to 
hard study and thorough v^ork, and also maintain good 
order, as she does, severely tasks the endurance of the 
strongest, and w^ithin a few^ weeks of the completion of the 
year her health became such that she was obliged to re- 
sign her position^ Miss Lillie R. Daniels of Framingham 
attempted to complete the term, but at the end of two 
weeks was obliged to discontinue her labors on account of 
sickness. 

West Acton Primary. 

Miss Ida B. Campbell of Marlboro, a graduate of one 
of our Normal Schools, commenced the Spring term, hav- 
ing taught the school the year before, but after a few days 
was obliged to take a vacation on account of sickness, 
and Miss M. B. Allen of Acton successfully completed 
the term. Miss Campbell resumed her position at the 
beginning of the Fall term and taught and governed the 
school most admirably, but soon after beginning the win- 
ter term resigned. on account of ill health, and the term 
was most successfully completed by Miss S. J. Wyman of 
Westminister, who is a good instructor and an excel- 
lent disciplinarian. 

Appended are the usual statistics and the "Roll of 
Honor." 

For the Committee, 

FREDERICK C. NASH, 

Superintendent. 



10 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE'S FINANCIAL REPORT. 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

Your School Committee respectfully submit the fol- 
lowing report of receipts and expenditures, and for infor- 
mation respecting the condition of the schools refer you 
to the foregoing report of the Superintendent, and the tab- 
ular statement annexed. 

CENTRE SCHOOL. 

John E. Cutter, Agent. 

Drawn from treasury, $790 00 



$790 00 



Paid teachers, $606 60 

fuel and preparing it, 118 00 

care of house, M 00 

incidentals, 9 82 

Balance on hand. It 58 

SOUTH SCHOOL. 
L. S. HosMER, Agent. 

Received from town, 
Balance from last year. 



$790 00 



To expenses around the building, 
Paid Miss E. O. Clark, 

Emma Gray, 
* Emma Estabrook, 

F. J. Wood, janitor, 

A. S. Fletcher, coal, 

Washing school house curtains, 

H. Gould, 1 cord wood, 

T. J. W, bill sundries, 11 28 $727 28 



$790 00 


10 


56 


$5 


00 


198 


00 


120 


00 


284 


00 


71 


00 


35 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


11 


28 



S800 56 



Amount due the district, $68 28 



11 

WEST SCHOOL. 
Lucy M. Mead, Agent. 



•awn irom the treasury, 


$790 00 


lance from last year, 


63 47 


id to teachers, 


$634 00 


for fuel. 


94 64 


care of house and furnace. 


60 00 


incidentals, 


3 16 


fiance on hand. 


61 67 



W. Acton, March 20th, 1883. 



NORTH SCHOOL. 
J. W. DupEE, Agent. 



Drawn from the treasury, 
Balance from last year. 

Paid to teachers, 
for fuel, 

care of house, 
Rep. boards, 
incidentals, 

Balance ou hand. 



EAST SCHOOL. 

George Chandler, Agent 

Drawn from ihe treasury, 

By paid Susan Wetherbee, 3 terms, 

coal for heating, 

wood, 

care of school house firey, 

rent for organ, 
' key for door, 

J. W. Flagg, sundries, 
deficiency, 1882, 
Balance, 



$350 


00 


17 


06 


$257 


00 


31 


95 


16 


00 


6 


30 


5 


18 


50 


63 



350 


00 


265 


00 


30 


45 


7 


50 


24 


25 


13 


50 




30 


6 


75 


1 


12 


1 


12 



$853 4' 



$853 47 



S367 06 



$367 06 



$350 00 



12 

SOUTH EAST SCHOOL. 

Chas. D. Griggs, Agent. 

Received from town, $294 56 

Clenning and repairing buildings, 2 50 

Wood, 16 50 

Preparing wood, 6 50 

Paid Miss E. E. Tuttle, 126 00 

M. Fletcher, 98 00 

Care of school house, 5 00 

Incidentals, 2 34 

Balance on hand, 37 72 

$294 56 

Number of children between the ages of five and fif- 
teen, ^290 
Sum raised by the town for each, $10.84 

Respectfully submitted, - 

JOHN E. CUTTER, Chairman, * 
J. W. DUPEE, Clerk, 
LUCY M. MEAD, 
# LUCIUS S. HOSMER, 

CHARLES D. GRIGGS, 
GEORGE CHANDLER, 

School Committee of Acton. 



13 



ROLL OF HONOR 



Kames of thoss wlio have been neither Absent or Tai d j. 

Centre Grammar. 
One Term. Two Teruis. Three Terms. 



Arthur Allen, 
Carleton Taylor, 
Henry Livermore,f 
Arthur Laue,f 
Lutie Couaot, 
Ida Austin,* 
Lizzie Scofield,*| 
Grace E. Tut tie, f 
Auuie J. Noyesf 

Oue Term. 



Hattie £. Tuttie, 



Centre Primary. 
Two Terms. 



Susie E. Conant,* 
Hattie Robbius.* 



Three Terms. 



Ollie D. Wood,t 
Jessie P. Wood.| 
8. Maud Purcell,t 
Robert Purcell.t 
Millie E. Haudley, 
Harrv B. JNiekerson, 
Charlie I. Calder,t 
Jennie E. McCarthy, f 
Emma L. Noyes. 

Oae Term. 

I^a Tuttie, 
I la Liitlefield, 
Aibeita Preston, 
Viola Preston, 
Gertie Cutler^f 
Alice Hoar, 
Bertha Wright, f 
Eddie Parker,* 
Clessoij ParKer,* 
Daniel Joues, 
Willie Hart, 
Guy Mead,* 
Eugene L. Hall.f 
Bertie U. Hall.f 



May L, Calder,*t 
Nannie 8. Nickerson, 
C. P^ugene Johnson, 
Wilinot E. Taylor* 
Carrie E. Taylor,* 
Clara B. RobDins,* 
Willie 8. Johnson,! 



West Grammar. 
Two Terms. 

Hattie Davis,! 



Clara L. Hamniond, 
Lottie G. Conant 



u 



One term. 



West Primary. 
• Two Terms. 



Three terism. 



Mary Frank Rich, 
IjhUi LavvFoncef 
Kay LittleHeW,t* 
Wmie Ho!t,* 
bumuer Tecle. 



CaiTie Gil more, 
Sasie Poultuey, 
Mabel Mead,* 
Katie Parker, f 
Gertrude Stone,* 
E-ima Stone, t* 
Fred Davis, *t 
Charlie I>ecostar,^ 
John Hanaford, 
Alfred Richardson. 
Eddie liobiuson.f 



Richard Davis,* 
Willie Davis,* 
Ida HichardsoUy 
Alice Stone. 



One Term. 



South Grammar. 
Two Terms. 



Three Terms. 



Edith Bean, 
Delia Barker,! 
Martha Pratt, 
Mary Mav,*t 
Mary McLauojhlin, 
C.>ra M. Champion, 
Lilian Richardson, 
Francis Carroll, *f 
Levi L. Pratt, 
George Warreo, 



Ada M. Jones,* 
Carrie Shapley,t 
Willie Fletcher,! 
Nellie CuUiaue,! 



Sadie Sawver, 



One Term. 



East School. 
Two Terms. 



Three Terms, 



Blanche M. Basett, 
Eva M. Hibbard.t* 
Mary L. Nichols,! 
Arthur B. Davis,! 
Harry G. Robbins, 
Herbert H. Robbins, ! 
Willie O. Smith,* 
Ernest E. Wetherbee, 
Roy G. Brooks,!* 
Carleton C. Conant!* 
Harry C. Estabrook. 



Florence H. Flagg, 
La Roy Hacscom.! 



Mattie F. Smith, 
Edwin F. Smith,! 
Charlie E. Smith. 



15 



Ooe Term. 



South Primary. 
Two Terms. 



Three Terms. 



Nellie Ciilliane,! 
Mary May, 
Maud JSawyer, 
jNiary McLaughlin, 
Alice [lausoD, 
Evie Fletcher, 
Nellie Bradford, 
8usie Hayes, 
Ella Jacobs, 
Nora Connors, 
Ida Tapley, 
Julia Tapley,t 
Oiis Ackerman, 
James Cul!iaue,f 
Frank Farrar, 
Cormie Connors* 
Willie Bradley, I 
Herman Farrar, f 
Harvey Tuttle,f 
Dennis Bradley, 
Herman Tapley, 



One Term. 



Delia McLaughlin. 
Dora Barker, 
Ulive Barker, 
Richard Murphy, f 



Jerry Bradley, 
.John May, 
Harry Sawyer, 
Michael May, 
Frank Randall. f* 



North School. 
Two Terms» 



i 



Mettle Randolph, 
Ella Miller, 
Georgie Harris, 
Irving Smith, 
Bertha Dupee. 



One Term, 

Lucy Haynes, 
Ada L. Griggs, f 
Willie E. Jones. 



Augusta Smith, f 
Grace Rouillard, 
Everett Wayuef 



South East. 
Two Terms. 

George B. Hooper, 
Willie D. Hooper. 



Marked * Tardy only once. Marked f Absent not more than one day* 



16 



TABULAR J^IEW, 









1 


o^ 




> 

2 


^ 


^ 


f 


3 


SCHOOLS. 


TEACHEES. 


3& 

2a 




9 


1 


1 


a 
^ 


1 


% 

B 

Ot 


1 

o 






1 


o 

s 


1 

o 




^ 

t 
p 


'1 








^ 




cr 


1 


DO 


i 




_X 


0^ 


.^ 




SPRIKG TERM. 














Gramriiar 


Miss C H Allen 


2% 




24 


20.16 


17 5-6 










C'ntre j primary 


•' jBMBall 

" / Angle Hutchii B 


2^ 


f32 00 


21 


18.6 


17.6 


1 


( 


< 


27 


Grammar 


• ' " Ada C Davis 


3 


36 


3( 


3J.3 


30.24 





4 


26 


39 




" ( Ida B CampbeL 
" j MB Allen 




















West -j pj-imary 


2^ 


32 OC 


37 


36K 


34.76 








13 


32 


„ ,■, G'-ammar 
So^^l^ ] Primary 
East 


" El en Clark 


2^ 




2J 


26. 3S 


24.8 


(1 


^ 


27 


26 


" EFE4abr<.ok 


2?1 


32 OC 


4;- 


40.4: 


365-6 





( 


16 


17 


" SAWetherbee 


2^1 


32 0{ 


3 


29.3 


25.71 





t 


17 


20 


Southeast 


'^ Ella E Tuttle 


1 


28 0! 


IS 


13 


11.7/ 








IL 


North 


" Viola S Tuitle 
Totals, 


2% 
23>4 


28 UC 


1'/ 

24, 


11.6 


10.56 




1 


8 


lU 


24 






^29.0fc 


-09.77 


96 




FALL TERM. 




















^, , Grammar 
Cntrej pj-imary 
„, , Grammar 
West -j Primary 


Miss J A Hemenway 


m 


f 32 0' 


17 


15.5 


13.9 





^ 


H 


29 


•' Bessie M Bull 


2% 


32 0( 


2; 


19.8 


18.91 


(! 





.0 


64 


" Ada C Davis 


3 


36 (i( 


3f 


305-6 


27.23 


(, 


4 


n 


24 


M Ida B Campbell 


3 


32 OC 


3 


33. IC 


34.4 





{ 


l^ 


14 


^ ., G ammai 
South ] pri^,,.^ 

East 


'• Ellen Clark 


m 


36 01 


2! 


16.08 


16+ 


(■ 





34 


22 


" • E F Estabrook 


2%. 


32 OC 


4 


43 


40.6 








17 


10 


" S A Wetberbee 


3 


32 OC 


3J 


:-2.21 


28.73 


) 





18 


18 


Southeast 


" ElaETutrle 


sy, 


28 00 


i; 


14.7 


14.14 







t 


49 


North 


" Viola S Tuttle 


3 " 


28 Oi 


15 


14.75 


14.2 


1 


1 


K 


J6 




Totals, 


263^ 




250 


222.98 


208.56 


3 


7 


5( 


246 




WINTER TERM. 




















C ntie j Primary 


Miss J A Hemenway 


3K 


$36 00 


25 


23.5 


22.27 





10 


15 


34 


" BMBall 


3K 




20 


20 


19.3 








13 


29 


I Gramraai 


'• ( Ada C Davis 
'" ) Lillie R Daniels 




















3 


36 00 


38 


35.8 


31.4 


C 


5 


22 


6 


West - 


" jida B Campbell 
'' jSJWyman 




















Primary 


3% 


34 00 


42 


40.5 


36.99 


( 





24 


38 


„ ,. Gramma? 
South j Primary 

Fif)-st 


♦' E C B Gray 


3 


40 00 


37 


34.7 


32.2. 


( 


i 


34 


39 


" E F Estabrook 


3 


36 00 


40 


3X.6 


36.4 


( 





19 


36 


" S A Wetherbee 


23^' 


86 00 


33 


28% 


26.77 


f 





3? 


6 


Southeast 


" ML Fletcher 


sy. 


28 00 


15 


13.03 


11.71 


2 


2 


13 


4 


North 


" VS Tuttle 

Totals, 
Aggregate for year. 


3 

283^ 


32 00 


16 


15.08 


13.79 


1 


2 


53 


10 

60 

425 


10 






266 


249.96 


230.85 


202 




783^ 




763 


702 


«49.18 


644 



I2;E:pok.ts 




OF THE- 



TOWN OF ACTON, 

FROM FEB. 26, 1883, TO FEB. 26, 1884, mCLUDINa 
THE MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS 

IE" 1883, ALSO THE REPORT OF 

THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 




ACTOI^ : 

PRINTED AT OPFICP] OF THE ACTON PATRIOT. 

1884. 



TOWN OFFICERS FOR 1884. 



TOWN CLEBK. 

WilUam D. Tuttle. 



SELECTMEN. 

D. James Wetlierbee, J. K. W. Wetherbee, Job W. Dupee. 



Wm. D. Tuttle, Phineas "Wetlierbee, Hiram J. Hapgood. 

OVEESEEPvS OF THE POOE. 

Elislia H. Cutler, Luke Blancliard, Julian Tuttle. 

SCHOOL C03HMITTEE. 

John E. Cutter, ly : Tlieron F. NeA\i;on, ly ; George Gardner, 2y ; Theo. P. 
Goding, 2y : Oliver W. Button ; 3y ; Luke J. Robbing, 3y. 

HIGHWAY SUHYEYOES. 

Charles Wheeler, Abram H. Jones, Isaac Heed, Elbridge J. Robbins, George 
E. Keyes, John Fletcher. 

FENCE TIEWEES. 

John E. Houghton, Nahum C. Eeed, James B. Tuttle. 

SUEVEYOES OF LUMBEE. 

William B. Davis, Edward F. Eichardson, L. W. Stevens, George H. Harris, 
Charles B. Stone, Elbridge J. Bobbins. 

SUEVEYOES OF WOOD. 

Elbridge J. Bobbins, Wm. B. Da^is, Jona W, Loker, Geo. H. Harris, Chas. 

B. Stone, S. L. Button, Isaac W. Flagg, A. S. Fletcher, Chas. H. 

Taylor, M. E. Taylor, John F. Davis, E. F. FuUer. 

CEMETEEY COIOnTTEE. 

John Fletcher, William W. Davis. Levi W. Stevens. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Dr 



To Cash paid State Treasurer, State 

Tax, $ 1,110 00 I 

" " County Treasurer, Co. 1 

Tax, 678 38 | 

'« " onSelectmens'Orders, 13,353 35 ; 

To Outstanding Orders, 1,120 94 

To Balance due the Town Feb, 26, \ 

1884, 724 24 

$16,986 91 

Acton, Feb. 26, 1884. j 



Cr. 

By Balance in the Treasury, Feb. 2Qt, 

1883, $1,149 51 

Received of J. W. Dupee, Taxes 

1882, 2,349 64 

Received of State Treasurer Corpora- 
tion Tax, - 855 17 

Received of State Treasurer National 

Bank Tax, 725 59 

Received of State Treasurer Relief of 

Indigent Soldiers, 158 00 

Received of State Treasurer for State 

Aid, 48 00 

Received of State Treasurer for sup- 
port of State Paupers, 32 ^Q 

Received of State Treasurer for In- 
come of School Fund, 178 36 

Received of T. W. Hammond to Re- 
pair Road, 50 00 

Received of Daniel Harris, Borrowed 

Money 700 00 

Received of Concord Bank, Borrowed 

Money, 1,500 00 

Received of G. H. Warren for Rent 

of School Room, 33 00 

Received of Josep h Cole for Lots sold 

in Mount Hope Cemetery, 31 00 



Received of John Fletcher for Lots 
3T.B in Woodlawn, 32 00 

Received for Rent of Town Hall, 65 00 

Received of Phineas Wetherbee for 

Force Pumps, 57 50 

Received of D. J. Wetherbee for do, 35 00 

Received of Charles Wheeler for Old 

Lumber, 4 50 

Received of John Fletcher for Lum- 
ber, 2 2(^ 
Received of Moses A. Reed for do, 13 45 
Received of A. L. Noyes for Stone 

Step, 1 70 

Received of John E. Cutter, Collector 

of Taxes, 8,895 60 

Received for Interest on Money in 

Bank, 68 77 



$16,986 91 



J. K. W. WETHERBEE, 

Treasurer. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 



Paid George Gardner, West Dis 
John E. Cutter, Centre 
Lucius S, Hosmer, South 
Job W. Dupee, North 
George Chandler, East 
Theadore P. Goding, S. E. 

High School, 
George Gardner, 
John E. Cutter, 
Lucius S. Hosmer, 



rict, $ 


790 


00 




790 


00 




790 


00 




350 


00 




350 


00 




275 


00 




255 


00 




240 


00 




240 


00 



$3,345 00 



$4,080 00 



REPAIRS ON TOWN BUILDINGS. 

Paid Levi Boles & Co. for Doors -for 

Town Hall, 32 50 

I. W. Flagg, for Hardware for 

Town Hall, 19 65 

L. S. Hosmer, Mason work on 

South Acton School House, and 

Material, 33 55 

Wm. W, Handley, Labor and 

Material Renovating Town Hall, 164 60 
T. P. Coding, repairs on South 

East School House, 6 81 

Mrs. E. F. Blood for labor and 

Material washing Town House, 25 00 
Mrs. Lucy Mead for repairs on 

West Acton School House, 28 24 

Charles L. Davis for Painting 



Town House, 87 08 

J. E. Cutter repairs on Centre 

School House, 47 13 

R. L. Reed repairing Settees and 

Cleaning Hall, 20 86 

I. W. Flagg for Paint and Varnish 

for Town Hall, 36 44 

SpofFord Robbins, Labor on 
Town House '82 
and '83, 31 65 

L. U. Holt, Stoves for South 

Acton School House, 59 32 
<i «< " *« Centre 

School House, 51 79 

ii a it a "West 

School House, 116 98 

** " Repairs Town House 

furnace and stove, 17 30 
H. J. Hapgood for Chairs for 

Town House, 12 00 

L. U. Holt repairs on North 

School Furnace, 5 75 

E. H. Cutler Paint for Town 

Farm Buildings, 41 29 

^' '' Labor Painting same, 45 99 
George Chandler repairs on East 

School House, G 75 

M. E. Taylor for Paints, Nails etc., 2 02 
John E. Cutter, Mason work, 
and Settees, Centre 
District, 8 92 



REGULAR HIGHWAY WORK. 



$900 ^2 



Paid Joseph F. Cole, 


569 26 


Abraham H. Jones, 


565 98 


Charles Wheeler, 


597 16 




$1,732 40 



PRINTING. 



Paid H. M. Smith, fish Permits, $ 


3 65 


W. N. Sharp, Printing Town 




Warrants, 


2 00 


'' " Printing 500 Re- 




ports, 


10 00 


*« '' Printing Town 




Warrants, 


4 00 


*< " Print'g 600 Town 




Reports, 


56 00 


" " Fisli Permits, 


2 75 


*« '' Treas. Orders, 


1 50 


a a Warrants, 


3 00 


P. Wetherbee, Printing War- 




rants, 


3 00 

$ 


SUPPORT OF POOR. 




Paid E. H. Cutler deficiency on Town 




Farm for year ending March 1 , 




1883, $ 


267 02 


Support of Clara Wheeler, 


330 26 


'' '' Eliza Bergendahi, 


180 m 


" " Ola Nelson, 


49 90 


" '' Oilman Newton, 


m 25 


,i Mrs. Pike, 


48 00 


Dr. Hutchins, attendance on 




Mrs. Pike, 


4 50 


Dr. Sanders, medical attendance. 




on Andrew Connell, 


16 00 


*' " medical attendance 




on Mrs. Traner, 


75 


Support of Joseph Martin, 


9 71 


Dr. Hutchins, attendance on 




Joseph Martin, 


7 00 


Support of John Quinlan, 


12 72 


Dr. Whitney, attendance on John 




Quinlan, 


12 15 


Support ot Mrs. Raddin, 


20 00 


'' " Whitney 


10 00 


" Mrs. Wm. H. 




Murphy, 


5 00 



^b 90 



Journey to Tewksbury, 

*' " Lowell respecting Mrs. 
Raddin, 


7 50 
3 00 


*' '' Littleton respecting 
Oilman Newton, 


1 50 


'' " Boston respecting Mar- 
tin, 


2 00 


'* '* Boston respecting Con- 
nell. 


2 00 


Stationery and Stamps, 


1 50 
$ 1,077 64 



CEMETERY EXPENSES. 

Paidjohn Fletcher for Trees, Labor and 
Posts, Woodlawn 
cemetery, ^66 34 

'*■ " Labor, cemetery, 63 50 

J. F. Cole for Trees, labor and 
making Deeds, 

Mt.Hope cemetery, 66 00 







STATE 


AID. 


John Carroll, 


96 00 


Allen G. Smith, 


104 00 


Benjamin Skinner, 


86 00 


George Dole, 


48 00 


Mrs. R. C. Wright, 


48 00 


Ola Nelson, 


44 00 



TOWN OFFICERS. 

Paid L. U. Holt, Sealing, Weights and 

Measures, 9 00 

F. C. Nash, Supt., of Schools, 

year 1882, 90 00 

Phineas Wetherbee services as 

Assessor, 25 00 

H. J. Hapgood services as assessor, 20 00 
, W. D. Tutde, '' *' 30 00 

F. C. Nash in part payment for 

Supt,, of Schools, 62 50 



$195 84 



$426 00 



J. W. Dupee, posting Warrants 
1882 and 1883, 

W. D. Tuttle services as Town 
Clerk, 

D. J. Wetherbee services as 
Selectman, 

John White services as Select- 
man, 

Phineas Wetherbee services as 
Selectman, 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, Treasurer, 



10 


00 


25 


00 


85 


00 


45 


00 


45 


00 


40 


00 



$486 5 



MISCELLANEOUS. j 

Paid James Kinsley, use of road for 

Hurley, $8 00 

L. M. Ham & Co. for Fire Escape, 140 00 \ 

National Manf. Co. for 27 Force \ 

Pumps, 131 22 ] 

I. B. Perkins for Land Widening I 

Road, 31 72 \ 

J. E. Reed, Lumber tor Railing I 

and Town House, 75 30 | 

Julian Tuttle, repairs on Town j 

Clock, 6 25 \ 

Josiah Shaw for building Powder , ; 

Mill Bridge, 1,167 00 

NationalManf.Co. forlOPumps, 48 60 
Concord Nat. Bank Int. on Tern- : 

porary Loan, 
A. L. Tuttle for building Road, 
H. J. Hapgood, assessors' books, 

" " " Notices, 

Wm. D. Tuttle, copying Inven- 
tory, 
Silas Conant for moving and 

building wall near house of I. 

B. Perkins, 
A. L. Tuttle for building road, 

'• " Stone bounds and 

setting, 
Daniel Harris for Note and Int., 



23 


25 


100 


00 


2 


75 


2 


75 


7 


50 


60 


00 


300 


00 


5 


00 


711 


00 



10 

Concord National Bank, Tempo- 
rary Loan, 1500 00 
J. F. Cole for building sluice in 

West Acton, 63 75 

Charles Wheeler, Repairing 

Scraper, 4 00 

" "• for gravel, 7 05 

" '' scraper plate, 8 00 

** •* widening road 

near C. Har- 
ris, 42 00 
*' ** StoneBounds 

and setting, 2 62 

*' ** nails and lum- 

ber for rail- 
ings, 8 95 
do Labor railing road near the 
house of I. W. Flagg and at 
Cemetery, 70 73 
E. Jones for Lumber, 3 45 
J. P. Brown, blacksmith bill, 3 90 
Francis Jones, guide boards, 7 50 
Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee for 

tile for sluice, 34 30 

Fletcher & Jones for lumber, 2 72 

A. H. Jones, Widening road 

near x\nson Piper, 34 25 

do for railing roads, 12 23 

do for labor on Powder Mill 

Bridge, 38 04 

S. B. Harris, breaking roads ^S2, 1 76 

Julian Tuttle, care Town Hall 

and Clock, 21 46 

Reuben L. Reed, 27 99 

L. E. Reed, attending 29 burials, 87 00 
'« •• making 33 death re- 
turns, " 8 25 
Wm. D. Tuttle, survepng and 
making plan of West Acton 
Cemetery, and survepng roads 
and making deeds. 27 75 
Journey to Concord, 1 50 



11 



Wm. D. Tuttk 


, meeting tax Com- 






missioners, 


2 00 


a a 


Assessor's book, 


2 00 


a a 


Postage, 


1 08 


u u 


Expense charges, 


1 92 


i.i a 


Collecting Births, 


14 50 


a a 


T^ppn-prlino' IVTfl.r- 





riages, 3 00 

" " Recording thirty- 

five Deaths, 5 50 

Anson C. Piper for Land, 10 00 

Luther Davis tor wood for Town 



House, 


5 00 


John E. Cutter discount on taxes, 


531 60 


" " Abatement of " 


36 00 


do notifying officers to take oath 




of office. 


2 50 


L "W. Flagg, bolts and iron for 




railing, 
D. J. Wetherbee, advertising. 


21 41 




paints, oil and express, 


8 84 


John Fletcher, repairing |)ump, 


2 00 

% 




w 


Unexpended balance of last year including 


Bounty tax, 


$6,430 64 


Town charges, 


3,500 00 


For Roads, 


1,600 00 


" Schools, 


3,000 00 


" High Schools, 


800 00 


State tax, 


1,110 00 


County tax, 


678 38 


Overlay, 


71 62 


Corporation tax, 


850 99 


National bank tax, ^ 


725 59 


State aid, 


48 00 


Relief of indigent soldiers. 


158 00 


Support of State paupers, 


32 86 


Rent of South Acton School House, 


33 00 


J. F. Cole, lots sold in Mt. Hope cemetery, 


31 00 


T. W. Hammond, to be expended on ledge. 


50 00 


Interest on money in bank. 


68 77 


Charles Wheeler, old lumber. 


4 50 


Daniel Harris, borrowed money. 


700 00 


Concord bank, *' "• ' 


1,500 00 



5,489 89 



1 


70 




65 


00 




92 


50 




178 


36 




32 


00 




4 


18 






«t91 7fi7 HQ 




^^ 1. } 1 u < 




2 


26 




13 


45 







-$21,782 


80 



12 



Amos L. Noyes, stone step. 

Use of TowuHall, 

For Force Pump, 

vState School fund, 

John Fletcher, lots sold in Woodlawn cemetery. 

Corporation tax. 



Received of John Fletcher, lumber, 
'' " Moses A. Reed, " 



RECEIPTS FROM FEBRUARY 26, 1883 TO FEBRUARY 26, 1884. 

Unexpended balance as per report of February. 
26, '83, including Bounty Tax, 

S 6,430 64 
Appropriations and receipts, 15,352 16 

821,782 80 

EXPENDITURES. 

Support of Schools, 4,080 00 

" " Poor 1,077 64 

Repairs on Town Buildings, 900 62 

Regular Highway Work, 1,732 40 

State Aid, 426 00 

Town Officers. 486 50 

Printing, 85 90 

Cemetery Expenses. 195 84 

Miscellaneous " ' 5,489 39 

State Tax, 1,110 00 

County " 678 38 

$16,262 67 

Amount due the Town from Collectors and 

Treasurer, 5,520 13 

Deduct Bounty tax, 4,000 00 

Balance in favor of the Town, 1,520 13 

D. J. WETHERBEE, ) Selectmen 

JOHN WHITE, [ of 

PHINEAS WETHERBEE, ) Acton. 

Acton, February 26, 1884. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

FOR 1883. 
Registry of births in acton for 1883. 
No. Date of Birth. Name of Child. Name of Parents. 

1. Jan. 28, John Edward Reilly, son of Patrick and Katie Reilly. 

2. Jan. 29, Pierre Raymond Nelson, son of Oscar P. and Mary 

Ann Nelson. 

3. Feb. 21, Howard Wood, son of Isaac and Mary F. Wood. 

4. Feb. 22, Ruth Louise Piper, daughter of Anson C. and Ellen 

L. Piper. 

5. March 16, VVinitred Loveriug, son of Lowell C. and Julia 

Lovering. 

6. April 16, Henrietta Frances Wood, daughter of Edward and 

Henrietta F. Wood. 

7. April 21, Estellf Louise Priest, daughter of George E. and 

Alice G. Priest. 

8. April 26, Harvey Wtieeler, sou of JaJrus C. and Alice M. 

Wheeler. 

9. May 7, Lulu Knowlton, daughter of AraasaM. and Elizabeth 

F. Knowlton. 

10. July 1, Helen Margaret Warren, daughter of William S. and 

Rosa E. Warren. 

11. July 4. Franklin S. T. Brown, son of Samuel T. and Henri- 

etta C. Brown. 

12. July 14, Fannie Edna Teele, daughter of Wm. H. and Mar v 

E. Teele. 

13. July 20. Bertie Leon Johnson, son of Nathan and S. Maria 

Johnson. 

14. August 7, Charles William Kane, son of Edward ai.d Ann 

Kane. 

15. Sept. 13, Ethel Gowen, daughter of John C. and Laura B. 

Gowen. 

16. Sept. 15, Ralph Waldo Lawrence, sou of Austin E. and Mary 

J. Lawrence. 

17. Sept. 15, Olive May Knowlton, daughter of Ancil W. and 

Lizzie M. Kuolton. 

18. Sept. 21, Florence Piper Tuttle, daughter ofH. Waldo and 

Lizzie S. Tuttle. 



14 

19 & 20. Sept. 27, Julia O'Neil and Jennie O'Neil, twin daughters 
of Patrick and Hannah O'Neil. 

21. Oct. 8, George Howard Cole, son of George Wm. and Anna 

Z. Cole. 

22. Oct. 16. John Boylen, son of James and Sarah Boylen. 

23. Oct. 26, Clifton Harlaud Chadwick, son of Cyrus W. and 

Helen B. Chadwick. 

24. Oct. 29, Nellie Gertrude Hanaford, daughter of John H.^and 

Mary J. Hanaford. 

25. Nov. 21, Albert M. Horslin, son of George A- and Delia H. 

Horslin. 

26. Nov. 22, Mary Elizabeth Davis, daughter of John and Eliz 

beth B. Davis. 

27. Nov. 26, Gracie Evelyn Nash, daughter of Winslow and 

Josephine Nash. 

28. Dec. 4, Ralph Barton Sanders son of Dr. Charles B. and S. 

Lizzie Sanders. 

29. Dec. 13, Zelma Juliet Goding, daughter of Theodore P. and 

Ella F. Goding. 

Marriages registered in acton in 1883. 

No. Date of Marriage. Names and Keaideuce of Parties. 

1. Feb. 10, Mr. Edward Wood and Miss Henrietta F. Sawyer, 

both of Acton. 

2. Mar. 29, Mr. Manoel DeSonza of Acton, and Miss Isabel E. 

Silver of Newton. 

3. Apr. 5, Mr. Roswell L. Tattle and Miss AnnaB. Simpson 

both of Acton. 

4. Apr. 10, Mr. Samuel B. Harris of Acton and Miss Harriet L. 

Lane of Taunton. 

5. Apr. 10, Mr. Francis Bobbins and Mrs. M. Lizzie Hutchins, 

both of Acton. 

6. Apr. 25, Mr. James A. Devarne and Miss Margaret Maillian, 

both of Acton. 

7. June 16, Mr. Charles H. Mead of Acton, and Miss Jennie F. 

Bruce of Groton. 

8. July 15, Mr. Charles H. Moore of Boxborough, and Miss 

Alice M. Shackford of Concord, N. H. 

9. Aug. 11, Mr. Franklin P. Young of Acton, and Miss Mary 

O. Grady of Boston. 

10. Sept. 3, Mr. Oswald L. Dart of Acton and Miss Cora A. 

Cooper of Methuen. 

11. Sept. 12, Mr. Edgar H. Hall and Miss Angle Hutchins both 

of Acton. 

12. Oct. 5, Mr. Hiram B. Butters and Mrs. Nettie R. Berry both 

of Maynard. 



15 

13. Oct. 6, Mr. Charles B. Cilley and Mrs. Addie A. McMon- 

agle both of Lowell. 

14. Oct. 27, Mr. Oria L. Blanchard and Miss Mary J. Green 

Loth Acton. 

15. Nov. 7, Mr. Lewis C. Hastings of Acton, and Miss Emma 

Frances Brown of Stow. 

16. Nov. 17, Mr. Greorge V. Mead and Miss Effie R. Wright 

both of Acton. 

17. Nov. 28, Mr. Jeremiah Mc Carthy and Miss Hannah Moore 

both of Acton. 

18. Nov. 29, Mr. Frank S. Everett of Nashua, and Miss Flor- 

ence B. Perkins of Acton. 

19. Dec. 25, Mr. Isaiah W. McLaughlin and Miss Maggie A. 

Young both of Acton. 

20. Dec. 29, Mr Freeman Williams and Mrs. Etta E. Pelton 

both of Acton. 
Deaths recorded in acton in 1883. 
No. Date of Death. Name and Age of Deceased. 

1. Jan. 19, Miss Ida J. Tuttle, daughter ot Joseph F. and Jen- 

nie E. Tuttle, aged 14 years 5 months 24 days. 

2. Jan. 24, Mr. George F. Flagg, 35 y. 4 m. 20 d. 

3. Jan. 24, Mr Simon Robbins, 51 y. 10 m. 14 d. 

4. Jan. 24, Mrs Harriet H. Mason, 59 y. 11 m. 12 d. 

5. Jan. 31, Mr Levi Barnard, 82 y. 3 m. 

6. Feb. 8, Mrs Lydia Lucinda Fletcher, 78 y. 3 m. 

7. Feb. 23, Mrs Mary Lane, wife of Morris Lane, 47 y. 

8. March 7, Leonard A. Phalen, son of Edwin H. and Hattie D. 

Phalen, 3 m. 

9. March 8, Mrs. Mary Grimes, wife of John Grimes, 02 y. 2 m. 

11 d. 

10. Mar. 30, Mrs Matilda Comslock, 78 y. 6 m. 

11. April 4, Mrs Celia E. Whitnev, wife of Dr. F. W. Whitney, 

34y. ^ ^ 

12. April 7, Mrs Harriet E. Hosmer, wife of Simon Hosmer, 77 

years. 

13. April 22, Mrs Henrietta F. Wood, wife of Edward Wood, 

21 y. 1 m. 28 d. 

14. April 27, Mr Thomas P. Sawyer, 64 y. 10 m. 21 d. 

15. April 27, Mrs Mary Ann Piper, wife of Josiah Piper, 76 y. 

7 m. 

16. April 29, Harvey Wheeler, son of Jairus C. and Alice M. 

Wheeler, 3d. 

17. May 29, Mrs Agnes Burnham, 28 y., at Antrim, N. H. 

18. May 30, Mr George Watson, 73 y. 10 m. 

19. June 19, Mrs Lydia B. Piper, widow of Luther W. Piper, 48 

y. 6 m. 26 d. 



16 

20. June 23, Grace M, daughter of Amos H, and Etta C. Hay- 

ward, 1 y. 2 m. 3 d. 

21. July 6, Daniel Wetherbee, Esq., 68y. 10 m. 19 d. 

22. July 18, Mrs Harriet E. Jones, wife of Abram H. Jones, 

57 y. 2 m. 

23. July 25, Mrs. Lucy F. Dole, widow ot Joseph Dole, 63 y. 5 

m. 16 d. 

24. July 29, Mrs Mary M. Mills, wife of Jas. I. Mills, 28 y. 3 m. 

25. August 11, MifeS Nellie Grace Fletcher, daughter of Lewis E. 

and Lucv E. Fletcher, 15 y. 11 m. 

26. August 26, Mr. Sumner F. Reed, 29 y. 10 m. 

27. Aug. 29, Mrs Myra Dwioells, 79 y. 

28. Aug. 30, Mr Tilly Robbins, 81 y. 1 m. 15 d. 

29. Oct. 17, Miss Catherine M. Wefliogton, 50 y. 3 d. 

30. Oct. 18, Mrs. Mary Ann Nelson, wife of Oscar P. Nelson, 

34 V. 1 m. 1 d. 

31. Oct. 31, Mr. Andrew Connell, at Tewksbury, 21 y. 

32. Nov. 25, JViiiinie Murphy, daughter of William H. and Mary 

Jane Murphy, 2 m. 18 d. 

33. Dec. 3, Mrs Margaret Eager, 62 y. 5 m. 6 d. 

34. Dec. 19, Mr. Jeremiah H. McCarthy, son of Daniel and 

Mary McCarthy, 21 y. 2 m. 12 d. 



AMOUNT RECEIVED FROM LICENSES OF 
DOGS SINCE LAST REPORT. 





On Tax of 1882 : 






Mi-H. Eliza Wheeler, 


- 


- 


■$2 00 




Edward Wood, 


- 


- 


5 00 




Moses Taylor. 


- 


- 


2 00 






Total, - 


m 00 






On Tax 


OF 1883 : 






M, Augusta Hosmer, 


$2 00 


Jairus C. Wheeler. 




5 00 


■^ Moses A. Keed, 


2 00 


Edward Wood. 




5 00 


Antoine Bxilette. 


2 00 


T. P. Goding, 




2 00 


Wm. D. Tuttle,, 


2 00 


George Pratt. 




7 00 


Jeremy Austiu. 


2 00 


James Baker. 




2 00 


Chas. J. Williaibs, 


2 00 


Willis L. Mead, 




2 00 


Alonzo L. Tuttle, 


2 00 


Isaac Wood. 




7 00 


John Temple, 


2 00 


Webster C. Bobbins, 




2 00 


Mrs. Geo. T. Flagg, 


2 00 


Joseph Bassett, 




2 00 


George G. Conant. 


2 00 


James Tuttle, 




2 00 


E. F. Fuller. 


2 00 


Francis Conant, 




2 00 


Chas. H. Mead, 


2 00 


Michael Hannon, 




2 00 


Frederic Eouillard, 


5 00 


J. E. W. Wetherbee, 




2 00 


Frank E. Harris, 


2 00 


Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee. 


4 00 


John Hanaford; 


2 00 


Elnathan Jones, 




6 00 


James E, Harris, 


2 00 


Chas. A„ Taylor, 




2 00 


Hanson Littlefield, 


2 00 


Otis H. Forbush, 




2 00 


A, W. Gardner, 


2 00 


George E. Keyes, 




2 00 


John Fletcher, 


2 00 


Daniel McCarthy, 




2 00 


A. Lucien Noyes, 


2 00 


G. H. S. Houghton, 




2 00 


G. H. Waugh, 


2 00 


Solon A. Bobhins, 




2 00 


Dr. Chas. B. Saunders, 


2 00 


George VV. Livermore. 




2 00 


Frank Wetherbee, 


2 00 


John Kelly. 




2 00 


D. J. Wetherbee, 


2 00^ Cyrus Hay ward. 




2 00 


Andrew F. Priest, 


2 00 


Lucius S. Hosmer. 




2 00 


Theron F. Newton, 


2 00 


Chas. H. Wheeler, 




5 00 


A. H. Gilmore, 


2 00 


Edwin Tarbell, 




2 00 


Chas, J. Holton. 


5 00 


E. A. Eandali, 




2 00 


L. E. Allen, 


2 00 


Jas. D. Coburn, 




2 00 


Luke Tuttle. 


2 00 


M. E. Taylor, 




2 00 


Walter C.Gardner. 


2 00 


Forbush & Hartwell. 




5 00 


J. W. Dupee. 


2 OO^J. E. Eeed. 




2 00 


J. H. McCarth}^ 


2 00 


Isaac Barker. 




2 00 


C. A. Harrington, 


2 00 


E. J. Bobbins. 




2 00 


Henry Hanson, 


2 00 


Hiram Walker. 




2 00 


Lester N. Fletcher, 


2 00 


John C. Gates.' 




2 00 


Geo. C. Wright, 


2 00 


Mrs. Eliza Wheeler. 




2 00 


Mrs. H. M. Beck, 


2 00 


Herman Chaplin. 




-2 00 


Fred S. Whitcomb. 


2 00 


Thos Calder, 




2 00 


Ed. O'Neil, 


2 00 


James Tobin, 




4 00 


•J. W. Aldrich, jr. 


2 00 


A. Eisso, 




2 00 


Chas. D. Griggs, 


2 00 


Const O'Neil, 




2 00 


JLuther Conant, 


2 00 


F. E. Knowlton, 




2 00 


Chauncey B. Bobbins, 


2 00 


Taylor Bros. & Co.. 




2 00 


George Conant. 


2 00 


Sylvester Haynes. 




2 00 


Moses Taylor, 


2 (0 


Jos. F. Cole," 




2 00 


Anson C. Piper, 


2 00 


James Kinsley, 




2 00 


Mrs. Jarvis Willianis, 


2 00 


Nahum Littlefield, 




2 00 


John Welch, 


2 00 


Geo. A. Smith. 




2 00 


Total Number of Males, 
Femah 


98 at !ip2.00, 


.*196 00 




5s, 9 at 5.00, 


45 00 




Whole 


amount, 




8241 00 








WILLIAM D. TUTTLE, 










ToAyn Cler 


k. 



Acton, March 10, 1884. 



REPORT OF THE RECEIPTS AND EXPENDI- 
TURES OF THE ALMSHOUSE IN ACTON, 

FOR THE YEAR ENDINa MARCH 1, 1884. 



8 cows, 


$400 00 


1 horse, 


200 00 


13 tons hay. 


234 00 


5 cwt straw. 


3 00 


lot bags, 


5 00 


3 bags meal. 


3 75 


12 cwt. shorts, 


15 00 


22 hens, 


11 00 


2 pigs, 


25 00 


wagon. 


100 00 


75 barrels. 


11 25 


4 market boxes, 


50 


100 bushels potatoes, 


40 00 


7 bushels small potatoes. 


2 75 


cider. 


4 00 


2 cider barrels, 


2 00 


15 gallons soap, 


2 25 


2 lbs. butter, 


66 



AKTICLES ON HAND MAECH 1, 1884. 



salt, 



ajiples. 

100 lbs. salt pork, 

eggs. 

kerosene, 

10 lbs. corned beef. 

crackers, 

beans, 

spices, 

molasses, 

rye meal, 

matches, 

tea, 

hard soap, 

15 oords wood cut for stove. 70 00 



$1,159 85 



4 00 


14 00 


88 


48 


80 


3 00 


1 75 


1 00 


75 


1 50 


25 


60 


40 


70 00 



19 

EXPENSES. 



Paid for flour, ^ 


5 46 23 


grain, 


306 93 


meat. 


65 46 


sugar, 


16 11 


clothes & clothing, 


43 64 


crackers, 


29 70 


cheese. 


7 78 


candles, 


15 


butter, 


46 20 


cream tartar. 


59 


snuff, 


46 


starch, 


18 


giaSs seed, 


1 00 


oat meal. 


2 39 


phosphate. 


10 28 


fish. 


13 86 


wash tubs. 


4 75 


coffee, 


7 30 


brooms. 


1 27 


mustard. 


65 


d. apple, 


1 59 


scythes. 


3 60 


whetstones, 


55 


scythe snaths. 


1 40 


paris green, 


28 


yeast, 


63 


molasses, 


8 26 


lard. 


7 23 


essences. 


75 


shoes. 


5 65 


vinegar. 


75 


soap. 


10 74 


stove polish. 


23 


nails, 


1 86 


spices, 


1 31 


oil. 


1 08 


tea, 


15 55 


pails, 


2 15 


matches, 


50 


shells. 


32 


sulphur. 


28 


rake. 


25 


crockery, 


3 52 


horse radish, 


10 


bean pot, 


20 



beans. 


6 65 


salt. 


81 


pepper, 


14 


ginger, 


7 


medicine. 


1 60 


rye meal. 


1 56 


garden seeds, 


63 


twine, 


6 


tomato plants, 


25 


glass. 


40 


saleratus. 


40 


barrels, 


4 32 


raisins. 


1 66 


chimneys, 


41 


lamps. 


40 


comb. 


12 


tin ware, 


7 75 


bluing, 


10 


rolling pin, 


17 


tacks. 


43 


clothes pins, 


25 


brushes. 


1 63 


clothes Hues, 


60 


curtains, 


1 56 


shovel. 


75 


saw, 


83 


cattle cards, 


, 45 


knife. 


22 


chains. 


95 


currants. 


44 


hoes. 


66 


sad iron, 


37 


chalk. 


6 


lounge, 


8 00 


pork. 


50 


lime. 


10 


baskets. 


28 


bag, 


25 


scraps. 


64 


jug, 


30 


horse blanket. 


2 25 


clothes dryer, 


1 00 


table, 


2 76 


whiting, 


15 


brick. 


8 



20 



harrow, 

seed potatoes, 

pigs, 

repairing harnesses, 

use of oxen, 

onions, 

use of bull, 

advertisements, 

straw, 

whitewashing, 

wheehmght bill; 

pump and repairs, 

castings, 

stove and repairs, 

copper tank, 

killing hog. 



2 50 
7 75 

22 00 

7 50 
5 00 

1 00 

8 00 

3 75 

4 80 

2 40 
2 45 

12 80 
8 95 

7 55 

8 25 
1 25 



cider, 


4 90 


cider barrel, 


1 00 


lumber, 


1 08 


filing saws, 


45 


blacksmith's bill, 


14 05 


cows. 


155 00 


Dr. Sanders' bHl, 


3 50 


labor. 


145 44 


Services of J. Austin, wife 




and son, 


25 00 


W. Bemis & wife, 


206 25 


E. H. Cutler, 


45 00 


Luke Blanchard, 


10 00 


Julian Tuttle, 


12 00 


$1,436 23 



RECEIPTS FROM TOWN FAl^M FROM MARCH 1, 1883, TO MARCH 

FIRST, 1884. 



Received for milk. 


622 26 


apples. 


594 59 


peaches. 


13 28 


cows, 


187 84 


calves. 


6 50 


benies. 


5.91 


potatoes, 


3 70 


bu-ch poles. 


8 00 


Expenditures, 




Income more than expenditures. 


Interest on farm. 




Cash due treasury. 





Received for old iron, 65 


Voard of 


Joseph 


Martin, 


9 71 


tiour. 


5 93 


eggs, 


15 45 


tomatoes. 


25 


Receipts, 


$1,474 07 




1,436 23 



Victualing 170 tramps @ 40c.. 



•f 240 00 
87 84 


$202 
()8 


16 
00 



$37 84 



Cost of supporting poor on farm, 



#134 16 



Whole number of persons exclusive of tramps, supported iu almshouse, 
■8 ; average number, 5 : present number, ~>. 

E. H. CUTLER, 
LUKE BLANCHARD, 
JULIAN TUTTLE, 

Overseers of Poor. 



COIIONWEALTHOFIASSACHUSETTS. 

MIDDLESEX SB. 
To John E. Cutter, Constable of the Town of Acton, in said County. Gkeetixg : 

You are hereby required, hi name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to 
notify the legal voters of said Town of Acton to meet at the Town Hall on Monday 
the seventh day of April next, at one o'clock in the Afternoon, by posting copies 
of this Warrant, by your attested, at the Post Office in the centre of the Town, 
and also at the stores of Tuttlc, Jones & Wetherbee, Taylor Bros. & Co., and Isaac 
W. Flagg, in said town, seven days at least before the time appointed for said 
meeting, then and there to act upon the following articles as they may think 
I)roper, viz. 

Art. 1st. To choose a Modcratoi-. 

Art. 2nd. To choose all necessary town ofticers. 

Art. 3rd. To see if the town will appropriate the sum of Seventy-Uve dollars 
for decoration day, and pay the same to Isaac Davis Post. 

Art. 4th. To see if the town will purchase a new hearse, and purchase run- 
ners for the old one. 

Art. 5th. To see what amount of money the Town will raise to defray town 
charges the present year. 

Art. 6th. To see what amount of money the town will raise for the support 
of schools the present year and how it shall be divided. 

Art. 7th. To see if the town will raise the sum of Eight Hundred dollars for 
support of High School, 

Art. 8th. To see what amount of money the town will raise to repair its 
roads the present year. 

Art. 9th. To see if the towii will choose a Superintendent of Burials. 

Art. 10th. To see if the town will instruct their School Committee to choose 
a Superintendent of schools, 

Ai-t. 11th. To see if the town will authorize their Treasurer to borrow money 
for the town if neccesary. 

Art. 12th, To consider and act upon the acceptance of the Jury List as re- 
vised by the Selectmen. 

Art. 13th. To see if the town will widen the road near house of Mrs. War- 
ner, or pass any votes thereon. 

Art. 14th. To see if the town will vote to accept of the reports of the Select- 
men, Overseers of the Poor, School Committee, and other Town Officers. 

' Art. 15th. Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in 
this town the present year? vote by ballot yes and no. 

Art. 16th. To see if the town will abate the amount of forty-two dollars and 
sixty-two cents submitted to Job W. Dupee for collection. 

Art, 17th. To see if the town will purchase a new road machine. 

Art. 18th. To hear and act upon report of the selectmen in relation to grave 
gtones for its soldiers. 

Art. 19th. To see if the Town will widen the street leading from the Turn- 
pike near the house of Luke Blanchard, and extend the same to the South Acton 
road near the Cemetery, or take any action thereon. 

Hereof fail not, and make due return of this warrant to us with your doings 
thereon at or before the time appointed for said meeting. 

Given under our hands this the twenty-second day of March, in the year 
eighteen hundred and eighty-four, 

D. J. WETHEEBEE, ) Selectmen 

J. K. W. WETHEPvBEE, J- of 

J. W. DUPEE, ) Acton. 

A true copy. Attest : , 

Constable of Acton. 



beJob ^i/ i^LaBsad EzAas \^s^:^ las&am^^ m^mm 



Bchool Committee 



TOWN OF ACTON 



SCHOOL YEAR, 1883-84, 



SUPERmTEMlE^^T^S REPOET. 

The purpose of edueatiou is not only to iiupart knowl- 
edge but so to train tlie pliysieal, intelleetiial and moral 
facnities of onr children tliat tliey may become healthy, 
capable, honest men and women and good citizens. 

While health of ])ody and strengtli of morals must 
mainly depend upon inherited tendencies and home train- 
ing, yet a good school may do much to supplement home 
work. Our commodious school houses are weM warmed 
and ventilated, and our intelligent teachers vriry the 
monotony of recitations and the unhealthfulness of sitting, 
by frequent gymnastic and musical exercises, which allay 
nervousness and promote cheerfulness and good health. 

The teacher may do much to train the conscience and 
inculcate kindness and all the manh^ and womanly virtues, 
not only by ilie constant power of example, but by respond- 
ing to the love of children for stories, and in many other 
w^ays. I believe the moral influence in our schools is good. 

There is however, one subject in this connection that de- 
mands special remark. The high position Acton has taken 
as a temperance town recpiires that she be not behind in 
temperance work. Ko man Avishes his son to become in- 
temperate. The best safeguard against it is to see to it 
that every boy and girl in our schools be taught the bane- 
ful effects of alcohol on body and mind. A few lessons in 
connection with, the study of physiology will accomplish this. 

But the main purpose of scliools is to train the intellect 
and impart knoAviedge. Pa-rents haA^e not time for this 
work. It must be done in the schools. It has been given 
up almost AAdiolly to them. They must theii do the Avork 
thoroughly or it Avill not be done. In my last year's re- 
port AA^ere remarks on the studies to be pursued in our com- 
mon schools and the methods of teaching tliem. Our 
teachers Ivayq faithfully and efficiently practiced those 
methods Avith excellent results. The frequent reviews and 



26 

written examinations wherein each scholar is re(.|nirecl to 
write the whole lesson in his own i^^orcls withont hook to 
aid, has induced hard study and accurate knowledge, with 
facility of expression. Such an exercise is a lesson not only 
in the subject taught, hut also the best possible drill in 
spelling, grammar, composition and penmanship. 

The increased use of books in the primary classes has 
made the instruction more thorough and good discipline 
easier. The best way to keep a young scholar still, is to 
keep him while in the school room busy in recitation, or 
with book or slate. But the book is the mere skeleton 
which the teacher must clothe with life and beauty. In 
each grade the teacher must know all in the book and 
more, and must be able to conduct the recitation with book 
closed and with rapidity. Let each member of the class 
feel that he is liable at any moment to be called upon to 
iinisli his classmate's answer. Thus attention is secured. 

During the last two years the text l)ooks in grammar, 
geography and reading have been exchanged at slight ex- 
penses to the town [less than iift}' dollars] and made uni- 
form, and parents obliged to bu}' books, have, by a con- 
tract made by us Avitli the publishers, been able to get 
them at one-third less expense than foi*meraly. T have no 
further changes to recommend. 

IJISCIPLIXE. 

What has l)een the standard of order or l)ehavior in 
our schools during the past year, is a (piestion of prime 
im.portance. 

lam glad to say that witli a few exceptions it lias 
been excellent. 

A daily record of the deportment of each scholar has 
been kept by the teachers and reported to me every 
three weeks. The result of these reports is embodied in 
the annexed table, the number hve indicating a perfect de- 
portment for the whole year. Xo doubt some teachers 
have been more exacting than others, l)ut on tlie Avhole, 
the marking is a very fair indication of the behavior of 
each scholar. 

Should this system be persevered m and the result 
inserted in each annual report, disobedience will become 
rare, for it keeps before teachers, superintendent, and 
committtee the names of oifenders, and enables them to 



27 

apply discipline j list where and when it is needed. Be- 
sides the system is a powerful incentive to the scholar to 
beware of his behavior so as to have a good record. In 
each of the two schools which have been at all disorderly 
the trouble has been caused almost wholly by the half 
dozen scholars whose deportment is lowest, and they must 
be thoroughly reformed the very first week of next term. 
Let their parents assist and the work will be quickly and 
easily done. 

Tardiness and Absence. 

While there has been on the whole much less of these 
evils than last year, there is much room for improvement 
and we must all aim to secure the highest possible stan- 
dard. Scholars are often tardy, absent, or dismissed, when 
one or both parents know not of it. 

A system of frequent reports sent to parents will tend 
to suppress this evil if they will co-operate. Let ns now 
glance at the different schools. 

Center Primary. 

This school has been so much praised that it is difficult 
to say anything new about it. Teacher and pupils deserve 
all the encomiums that have been bestowed on them. 

Although our other primary schools are most admira- 
bly taught, this school holds the high place it has so many 
years occupied and it is to be hoped that Miss Ball may 
long be retained as its teacher. 

The parents showed their appreciation of her worth 
by presenting her at the annual examination with a costly 
and .appropriate present. 

Center Grammar., 

Miss Jennie A. Ilemmenway of Framingham, taught 
the Spring and Fall terms very successfully and received 
beautiful presents from lier pupils, but declined to take 
the "Winter term, so Miss Bessie R. Brackett of Winches- 
ter was employed to complete the year. 

She is a thorough scholar, having had an excellent 
training in the schools of her own town and graduated 
from a four years course at one of our I^ormal Schools. 
It was hoped that although of limited experience she would 
manage the school successfully. The general order of the 
school was not bad, and the persistent disobedience of a 



28 



few prevented its being good. Wc gave her prouipt 
aid when called upon, ])ut it is useless to expect a lirst- 
class school when made up largely of scholars wlio are sent 
to school only one term in a year and irregnlarly at that. 
Yet some of these one term scholars study well and made 
as good progress as could be expected. All interested 
must resolve that this school sliall be mada to take liigli 
rank, and if parents Avill keep their scholars at school regu- 
larly it can be done. 

North School. 

Miss Viohi S. T little of Acton has completed her 
second 3^ear as teacher of tliis school. The examination 
at the close of the jear was a most successful one. This i.^ 
.one of the few scliocls in wliich we have never been called 
upon to reprimand a. scholar. [*arents, teacher and schol- 
ars ha^'c done their duty well. 

East School. 

Miss Susie A. Wetherboe deserves all the praise given 
her last year. The school was a very successful one. The 
expenses incurred in care of room, and running the 
furnance, shortened the last term, but notwithstanding the 
limited time for review% the examination showed good 
progress and thorough training. 

More money should be appropriated to this school. 
South East. 

Miss Elsie Willoughby of New Hampshire, taugh^ 
the Spring term. She is a fine scholar but her youth and 
inexperience were not ecpial to the task. The Fall and 
Winter terms Avere taught by JMiss Bertha Manley of 
Brockton, Mass. Having had a thorough Normal training 
and several terms of experience she succeeded in keeping a 
good school and the examination was very successful 
considering the frefpu^nt absence and tardiness of many 
scholars. 

S 1^ T n (111 A M M A Tx . 

}iliss .Minnie Mains of Framingham taught the three 
terms. She is a good teacher and disciplinarian. The 
general order of the school was very good. The bad de- 
])ortment of a few scholars, near the end of the last term 
[and the table shows who they are] hurt the good name 
of the school and interfered with its success. At the end of 
the fall term her pupils ga^T her some fine presents. 



29 

South Primary. 
Miss Emma F. Estabrook of Acton has completed her 
second year with this school, with excellent success, which 
is the result of her firmness, kindness and ability to teacli. 
The School gave her some line presents. 

West Gtrammar. 

Miss S. J. Wyman of Westminster has taught the 
whole year most successfully. 

The excellent maps drawn on the boards examination 
day, without atlas to guide, were the result of much prac- 
tice. In no school in town is more hard study done than 
in this one, and the discipline has been excellent. 

West Primary. 
Miss Lettie F. ITewton of Hudson taught the three 
terms with unusual success, the school being a very large 
one. One exercise deserves marked attention — the compo- 
sitions written by the two higher classes, not disquisitions 
on subjects beyond their years, but interesting and instruc- 
tive stories told or read to them by their teacher, and af- 
terwards written by them in blank boolfs in their own 
words and read to j^he audience examinajbion day. 

The High School. 

This school may now be considered a permanent part of 
our system of education and how to make it the greatest 
benefit to the whole town deserves careful consideration. 

Established so unexpectedly, and not until several 
scholars had made arrangements to attend elsewhere, it did 
not immediately and wholly arrest that exodus to the 
schools of other towns which has done so much to weaken 
our schools, and it became necessary to admit scholars who 
had not fully completed the regular grammar school course. 
But at the next term older scholars came in and during 
the year the school has numbered about 48 different 
scholars, of whom one-third would probably have gone else- 
where but for this school, one-third have remained in the 
grammar schools, and one-third would not have attended 
school at all. 

It seems to me that those common English branches 
usually taught in our Grammar and mixed schools ought 
to be nearly completed in them, in order that scholars may 
receive as much as possible of their education near home. 



30 

the grade of tlie Higli 8cliool be kept well up to the stan- 
dard oftlie bestHigli Scliools, and the necessity of having 
a.n assistant be avoided. 

It will be necessary for the committee and superinten- 
dent to fix the standard for admission, have a public writ- 
ten examination of candidates, and adhere firmly to sucli 
standard. 

The course of study foi* this school deserves much 
thought. 

I recommend that it be one of three years, that it com- 
prise a thorough drill in Book-keeping, Algebra, Geome- 
try, Ancient and Modern History, English Literature, I*^at- 
ural Philosophy, Chemistry, the Constitution and Govern- 
ment of the United States, and such other branches as are 
usually taught in High Schools, including French and Lat- 
in, but that no one be required to study the languages in 
order to graduate, a special clause however, to be inserted 
in the diplomas of those who take the languages. In short 
let the English course be required, and that in other lan- 
guages be optional. 

The High School is the College of the common peo- 
ple. The standard for admission to our colleges has been 
put so high, opportunity to earn monej^ by teaching de- 
vded, and the expense so much enhanced, that few young 
men can afford the requisite time and money to take the 
regular college course, especially where three years more 
must be taken in special instruction for some business or 
profession. I concede the value of a college course, but 
not one per cent of the people of Acton ever have or ever 
will go througli college. The High School then must be 
the common resort for a liberal education. It will raise 
up between a rich and highly cultured aristocracy^ and the 
uncultured masses, a middle class of ambitious young men 
and women who will be the saving of the nation. 

Liberal education of the people is one of the strongest 
safeguards against the concentration of wealth and power 
in the hands of the few. Let then no j)oor man, no rich 
man who loves his country, vote against the High SchooL 

But let us make our High School even more popular. 
Let us avoid discussion about location which at present is 
needless, and if need be appropriate a small sum to pay the 
expense of conveyance of scholars, as they do in Concord. It 
Avould be cheaper than to erect a needless building. With 



31 

a, spare sclioolroom in eacli village, and elieap transporta- 
tion by rail between tlie West and Sontli, tlie question of 
location need not trouble us for years to come. 

The High School scholars deserve special praise for 
excellent deportment and close application. 

We were fortunate in securing Mr. H. H. Williams as 
teacher, and he is engaged for another year. 

The examination showed hard study and faithful in- 
struction. The school presented their teacher a costly six 
volume edition of Shakespeare in token of their apprecia- 
tion of his worth. 

In conclusion let me say that the committee have not 
sought to favor relatives or friends but have tried to em- 
ploy the very best teachers to be obtained. We enter up- 
on the new school year under the most favorable auspices. 

Appended is the usual tabular statement, and the re- 
port of attendance and deportment. 

For the Committee, 

FREDERICK C. :N"ASH, Superintendent. 



FINANCIAL REPORT. 

To the Citizens of Actou : 

The undersigned School Committee of Acton respectfully submit 
the following report of receipts and expenditures for the year and for 
a statement of the condition of the schools refer you to the superia- 
tendent's report and annexed tables. 

JOHN E. CUTTER, Chairman. 

J. W. DUPEE, Clerk. 

GEO. CHANDLER. 

GEO. GARDNER. 

LUCIUS S. HOSMER. 

T. P. CODING. 
Acton Mar. 26, 1884. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Received from Town, $800 00 

Paid H. H. Williams, Teacher, $720 00 

A. S. Fletcher for Coal, 9 90 

For 2 Settees and Teaming Seats, 9 06 

Mr. Wood. Janitor 12 00 

T. J. & W. For Sundries, 4 51 

For Care of Room at WestActon, 5 00 

For Coal at West Acton, 10 00 

Cash For Rent of Organ, 12 00 

For Fuel at Acton Centre, 8 00 

For Care of Room at Acton Centre, 6 00 

For Cleaning, &c., at Acton Centre, 2 10 



Balance, 



CENTRE SCHOOL 1883-4— JOHN E. 

Drawn From Treasury, 
Balance From Last Year, 



$798 57 
1 43 


$800 00 

CUTTER, COMMITTEE. 

$790 00 
11 58 



$801 58 



33 

Paid Teachers, $653 00 

Fuel and Preparing it, 95 15 

Care ot House, 42 00 

Incidentals, 11 26 











$801 41 


Balance on Hand, 








17 




$801 58 


WEST SCHOOL. 






By Balance From last Year, 




$61 67 


Received From 


Town Treasurer, 




790 00 










851 67 


Paid Teachers' Salaries, 






S684 00 




Coal, 






92 64 




Care of House, 






52 35 




Sundries, 






3 90 




Balance on Hand, 






18 78 






851 67 








GEO. GARDNER, Committee. 


NORTH 


SCHOOL. 






Drawn from tlie treasury. 






$350 00 




Balance from last year, 






50 63 


$400 63 


Paid to teacher. 






$312 00 


Fuel, 






36 59 




Care of house, 






16 00 




Crayons, 






77 




Cleaning house. 






75 




Balance on hand. 






34 52 


<tAhn iio^ 



J. W. DUPEE, Committee. 

SOUTH EAST SCHOOL. 

April 1, Cleanino^ School House, $ 2 00 

2, Chairs, - 1 34 

Sundries, 1 74 

6 1-2 Cords Wood, ^ 30 50 

Sawing Wood, 8 25 

Care of School House, 8 00 

June 14, Paid Miss Willoughby tor teaching, 70 00 

Feb. 20, Miss Manley for teaching, spring 

term, 10 weeks, fall term, 9 vv^eeks, 
winter term, 12 weeks, total 31 
weeks, 168 00 

$289 83 



34 



Received from Town Treasurer, 
Amount left over from last year, 
Total, 



Credit, 
Debit. 



Bal., $22 89 

THEODORE P. GODING, Committee. 



$275 


00 


37 


72 


8312 


I 7 




2 


$312 


72 


289 


83 



EAST SCHOOL. 








Received from Treasurer, 


$350 00 




Amount to Balance 1883, 


1 


13 




By Paid Teacher, 






$284 00 


Coal, 






29 00 


9 It OaK Wood, 






6 18 


4 ft Pine Wood, 






2 00 


Care for School House, 






22 00 


Rent of Organ, 






12 50 


I. W. Flagg, Sundries, 






1 25 


To Balance, 


5 


80 





$356 93 $356 93 
GEO. CHANDLER, Committee. 

SOUTH SCHOOL. 

To cash, paid Minnie J. Maines, 36 weeks, 
Emma Estabrook, 36 weeks, 
Janitor and work, 
A. S. Fletcher, coal, 
Anson Piper, 

E. F. Richardson, for wood and cuttins:, 
Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee, 
Frank Jones, 



Received from Town, 
Balance from last year, 





$360 00 




336 00 




68 00 




32 50 




2 75 


uttins:. 


4 00 




18 01 




2 24 




$823 50 


790 00 




68 28 





858 28 
823 50 



Balance due the town, $34 78 

LUCIUS S. HOSMER, 

Committee. 



SCHOLARSHIP STANDING. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

N. B. — In the High School table the scale of deportment is 100. 
In that of the other schools it is 5. 

m,„^„ Days ab- Days 
Names of Scholars. Age. Deportment, rf^fly^ sent for f^^^^Xr 

Delia J. Barker, 
Jennie Bean, 
Ella Cole, 
Susie Conant, 
Gertie Cutler, 
Hattie Davis, 
Florence Fletcher, 
Alice Guilford, 
Minnie Harris, 
Addie Houghton, 
Martha Pratt, 
Alberta Preston, 
Mabel Richardson, 
Sadie Sawyer, 
Lizzie Scofield, 
Carrie Shapley, 
Etta Tuttle, 
Hattie Tuttle, 
Mattie Smith, 
Annie Lee, 
Florence Dupee, 
Sarah Hammond, 
Susie Billings, 
Joseph Bird, 
Emery Clark, 



14 


95 


16 


95 


16 


99 


13 


95 


14 


97 


17 


98 


14 


98 


19 


96 


18 


99 


16 


95 


15 


95 


13 


98 


18 


99 


14 


99 


15 


95 


15 


97 


15 


96 


13 


92 


16 


98 


19 


100 


16 


99 


16 


98 


IT 


99 


17 


85 


13 


94 





sicKness. 


causes. 


5 





3 1-2 





2 


6 1-2 


1 


1 


3 


9 





1 1-2 


9 


2 


1-2 





6 1-2 





8 





6 


2 





23 


1 





41 


1 





10 


2 





3 


1 


1 


1 1-2 








5 


9 








2 


2 


9 


3 





3 1-2 


1 


21 


5 


1 


1 


8 








2 








I 








10 1-2 














3 


2 


26 





13 


7 





3 



36 



Ora Clough, 


15 


100 











Elbridge Con ant. 


18 


99 


22 





5 


Harry Fletcher, 


16 


99 


8 


1 1-2 





Walter Gardner, 


14 


88 


5 





14 


Eugene Hall, 


15 


95 


8 





4 


Millie Handley, 


17 


94 


1 





19 


Willie Hart, 


15 


93 


2 





8 1.2 


Lucius Hosiner, 


13 


92 


1 





14 


William Kelley, 


20 


100 


15 





6 1-2 


David Kinsley, 


17 


100 


1 





1 


George Lee, 


18 


98 


16 





10 1-2 


Hobart Mead, 


13 


84 


10 





3 1-2 


Clesson Parker, 


15 


93 


4 








Herbert Bobbins, 


18 


100 











Frank Teele, 


17 


94 


4 


14 


1-2 


Frank Whitcomb, 


16 


85 


2 





3 1-2 


Fred Whitcomb, 


16 


97 


3 





3 1-2 


Eugene White, 


16 


95 


6 





4 1-2 


Arthur Davis, 


If) 


98 


1 





7 


Willie Davis, 


17 


95 


2 





1-2 


Bertie Reed, 


14 


85 


10 





6 


Fred W. Reed, 


16 


95 


1 





9 


Lutie Conant, 


11 


97 








12 



centp:r grammar. 



Ida J. Austin, 


15 


1 17-30 








1 


Snsie E. Conaot, 


12 


4 1-2 











Stella Damon,* 


10 


4 61-65 


3 


3 


1 


Clara L. Hammond, 


10 


4 3-4 


1 





I 1-2 


Jennie McCarthy, 


13 


4 4-5 





3 1-2 


11 


Annie J. Noyes, 


14 


4 3-5 


{) 


13 1-2 


1 1-2 


Emmi L. Noyes, 


10 


4 6-11 








1 


S. Maud Purcell, 


11 


4 8-11 





6 1-2 


2 


Hattie M. Robbins, 


14 


4 4-11 


1 








Clara B. Robbins, 


11 


4 8-11 


1 








Hattie E. Tuttle, 


12 


4 9-11 





2 





Gracie E. Tuttle, 


11 


4 8-11 


1 


9 


1 


Gracie A. Hutchings, 




•4 1-2 








11 



:-57 



Clarance A. Austin, * 


17 


4 1-G 


f) 





4 1-2 


Arthur Allen, f 


13 


4 3-4 


1 


5 


2 


Lutie Conaut, * 


10 


4 





2 





James Hill, * 




4 3-10 








5 


Willie S. Johnson, 


11 


3 9-11 


23 








Joseph F. Kingsley, 


14 


4 


2 


22 


13 


Arthur Lane, * 


IG 


3 3-4 


1 


5 


3 


Henry L. Livermore, 


12 


4 7-11 





1 


7 1-2 


Daniel McCarth}), * 


IG 


4 


1 





5 


Harry B. Nickerson, 


9 


4 5-11 


1 


5 





George L. Noyes, 


17 


4 1-2 


1 





3 1-2 


Eugene Peckham, I 


12 


4 3-7 





11 





Lymau Kobbins * 


17 


4 1-4 


1 





2 


Fred Reed, * 


IG 


5 








5 


Bertie J. lieed, 


11 


4 7-11 





Gl-2 


9 1-2 


Carleton C Taylor, 


15 


3 9-11 


6 


9 


1 


Eddie Thompson, * 




4 1-2 








8 


Elbridge L Wheeler, * 


13 


4 


4 





10 1-2 


Ollie D. Wood, 


11 


4 3-11 


4 


5 1-2 


2 


* A member only 


one term. 










t A member only 


two terms. 










CENTER PRIMARY. 








May L. Calder, 


8 


4.95 











Lottie G. Conant, 


7 


4.93 











Millie E. Handley, 


10 


4.92 








1-2 


Mansie F. Lane, 


7 


4.72 


2 


1 


1-2 


Lizzie A. Manion, 


8 


4.97 





11 


45 


Nannie S. Nickerson, 


6 


4.95 











Lizzie M. Nickerson, 


4 


4.78 





12 


15 


Carrie E. Taylor, 


8 


4.7G 











Jessie P. Wood, 


7 


4.8G 


^ 5 


5 





Sadie A. Wood, 


4 


4.96 


G 


18 1-2 25 


Charlie T. Calder, 


10 


4.60 





6 





F. Ethel Wayne, 


4 


4.84 


5 


19 


14 


Walter A. Tattle, 


6 


4.62 


4 





1-2 


Tommy Manion, 


5 


4.91 


1 


7 1-2 17 1-2 


Sarah A. Edwards, 


10 


4.82 


3 


1 






38 



^Lizzie Edwards, 


7 


4.99 


3 


5 





*Gussie B. Conant, 


4 


4.93 


1 


7 


18 


Charlie Bemis, 


6 


4.86 


2 


8 


3 


Eddie Sheridan, 


7 


4.80 


1 








Clarence S. Peckham, 


10 


4.88 


1 


1-2 


1-2 


C. Eusjene Johnson, 


8 


4.94 








1-2 


Johnny Sheridan, 


5 


4.86 





1 





fjohn Chase, 


8 


4.99 


1 


9 





*Walter I. Taylor, 


5 


4.95 





3 


22 


Wilmot E. Taylor, 


6 


4.75 











Jessie W. Richardson, 


G 


4.96 





5 





Perley W. Richardson 


.'^ 


4.97 





6 





* 1-2 day pupils. 












t Highest rank in 


Deportment. 












WEST GRAMMAR. 








Aldrich, J. W., 


16 


4-9 








4 


€lark, C. B., 


10 


4-5 





2 





Decoster, M. H., 


9 


4-9 











Gardner, B. L., 


12 


4-7 











Guilford, G. M., 


9 


5 





2 


2 


Gilmore, F. W., 


15 


4.4 


10 





37 


Guilford, A. L. 


8 


5 





I 1- 


3 4 


Hall, B. D., 


11 


4-4 


4 





2 


Harris, H. B., 


14 


4'6 


8 





28 1-2 


Hart, E. J., 


8 


5 











Hoar, A. J., 


11 


4-8 











Holden, E. B., 


11 


4-9 








5 


Holt, W. B., 


10 


4-8 


4 








Houghton, G. N., 


10 


5 





1 


2 


Jones, D. E., 


12 


4-3 


8 


5 


5 


Littlefield, I. M. 


13 


4-8 





5 





Mead, L. G., 


1) 


4-9 


6 


4 


1-2 


Nash, F. H., 


9 


4-8 





13 


3 1-2 


Parker, E. M. 


12 


4 


19 








Parker, H. W. 


12 


4-1 


5 





2 


Poultney, S. M., 


9 


4-8 





5 





Preston, V. A., 


11 


4-8 





1 


1 



39 



Richardson, F. A., 


12 


4-8 


10 


11 


14 1-2 


Richardson, G. A., 


10 


4-9 


5 





2 


Robinson, M. L., 


10 


4-9 











Robinson, E. H. 


8 


4-7 


9 


9 1-2 





Teele, F. W., 


11 


4 


4 





13 


Town,C. N., 


13 


4-23 








8 1-2 


Trainor, Patrick, 


12 


3-4 


22 





13 1-2 




WEST PRIMARY. 








Brown, Nellie, 


13 


4 9-10 


26 





35 


Brown, Ruth, 


9 


4 7-10 


28 





20 


Brown, Lucy, 


7 


5 


27 





21 


Brown, Etta, 


5 


5 


5 





21 


Clark, Etta, 


8 


4 7-10 


10 





1-2 


Cutler, Emma, 


6 


5 


5 





10 


Carey, Ruth, 


9 


4 9-10 











Carey, Wilson, 


,7 


5 


1 





5 


Decoster, Charles, 


9 


4 1-5 


1 





1 1-2 


Davis, Willie, 


10 


4 1-2 


1 








Davis, Richard, 


9 


4 1-2 


1 








Davis, Fred, 


7 


4 9-20 


2 








Gilmore, Carrie, 


9 


4 7-10 








2 


Gilmore, Willie, 


6 


5 











Hall, Etta, 


8 


4 8-10 








1-2 


Handley, Ethel, 


7 


4 9-10 








29 


Holt, Bertie, 


7 


4 9-10 


2 





1-2 


Hanaford, John, 


7 


4 4-10 


1 








Kuowlton, Forrest, 


7 


4 3-10 


13 


,0 


4 1-2 


Leonard, Willie, 


9 


4 3-10 


12 





10 1-2 


Lawrence, Lulu, 


9 


4 7-10 








2 1-2 


Littlefield, Ray, 


10 


4 7-10 


4 





3 1-2 


Littletield, Guy, 


7 


4 8-10 


2 





2 


Mahoney, John, 


11 


4 


6 








Mead, Mabelle, 


7 


4 8-10 


1 





1 


Parker, Brooks, 


9 


4 


1 


, 





Parder, Mary C, 


7 


4 1-2 








1-2 


Palmer, AViliie, 


7 


4 1-5 


12 





2 


Palmer, Hiram, 


5 


5 


4 





1 


Preston, Roy, 


7 


4 1-3 


3 





1 



40 



Puffer, Elia, 


11 


5 








4 


Puffer, Willie, 


7 


5 








4 


Richardson, Ida, 


11 


4 


2 








Richardson, Alfred, 


13 


4 1-2 


2 








Richardson, Linwood, 




4 9-10 


4 





5 


Rich, Mary F., 


8 


4 8-9 








5 1-2 


Rich, Nelfie, 


5 


5 








13 1-2 


Rhodes, Julia, 


7 


4 l-i 


1 








Stone, Alice, 


9 


4 8-9 


1 








Stone, Elma, 


<) 


48-9 


. 


1 1-2 





Stone, Gertrude, 


7 


4 7-9 





4 


13 


Stone, Wallace, 


5 


4 8-9 








1 


Teele, Sumner, 


1) 


4 2-9 


2 





5 


Teele, Ernest, 


T) 


4 8-9 


5 





15 


Trainer, Dannie, 


1) 


4 1-9 


25 





18 



SOUTH GRAMMAR. 



Eva Grows, 


15 


4-9 








1 


C. Chanapion, 


14 


4-9 








5 1-2 


Carrie Hanson, 


13 


4-8 








5 1-2 


Edith Bean 


13 


5 











L. Richardson, 


12 


4-9 





11-2 





Bertha Jones, 


12 


4-8 


1 





3 1-2 


Ada Jones, 


11 


4-8 


21 


1 





Mary Bowen, 


11 


44 








1 


Nellie CuUiane, 


11 


4-9 


1 


5 


8 


Minnie Hud, 


11 


3-8 


17 





1 1-2 


Minnie Tapley, 


10 


3-9 


6 





7 


Jessie Currie, 


12 


4-6 








2 1-2 


Carrie Wheeler, 


10 


4-9 





15 1-2 


3 1-2 


Dora Barker, 


10 


4-8 








1 


Mary May, 


10 


4.9 


2 





4 


Alice Hanson, 


9 


4-8 








5 1-2 


Maud Swger, 


9 


4-8 


1 





35 


Olive Barker, 


8 


4-9 





3 


1 


G. Marshall, 


9 


"4-8 


1 


2 1-2 


14 


Ida Tapley, 


8 


4-6 


3 


■ 1 1-2 


2 1-2 


E. Fletcher, 


8 


4'6 


1 


G 


25 1-2 



41 



Ida Hapgood, 


7 


5 





9 1-2 


2 


Henry Randall, 


14 


3-9 


18 





58 1-2 


Geo. Warren, 


14 


4-5 


7 





16 1-2 


Morrie Couners, 


13 










53 


Willie Fletcher, 


12 


3-7 








15 1-2 


Chas. Moulton, 


12 


4-2 


19 


1 


1-2 


F. Carroll, 


12 


3-7 


33 





18 1-2 


Chas. Fletcher, 


11 


3-4 


20 


1-2 


i 


Levi Pratt, 


11 


3-8 


12 


1 


I 


Albert Randall, 


10 


3-5 


20 





18 1-2 


Connie Conners, 


10 










53 


Frank P'arrar, 


10 


3-1 


31 





3 


Jerrie Bradley, 


9 


4-G 


2 


3 1-2 8 


Guy Currie, 


10 


4-9 


5 


13 1-2 





Ray Cuirie, 


8 


4-1 


C) 


3 





Harvey Tuttle, 


8 


4-8 


1 


-2 4 1-2 


• 


John May, 


8 


4-9 


9 


1 1-2 





Nancy Austin, 


11 


4-4 





37 1-2 





Chas. Hapgood, 


13 


3-8 


1 


1-2 


4 


Eddie Thompson, 


9 


4-4 


5 


26 


4 




SOOTH PRIMARY. 








Emma Bradford, 


11 


5 





28 





Olive Wheeler, 


8 


5 





4 





Julia Tapley, 


13 


5 





11 


1 


Fannie Booker, 


8 


4.7 





13 





Rebecca Bradley, 


5 


5 





13 





Annie Tucker, 


7 


5 





8 





Ella Spinney, 


6 


5 





31 





Nellie Bradford, 


(5 


5 


0- 


2 





Frank Marshall, 


7 


5 





5 


2 


Willie Holland, 


8 


5 





22 





Frank Hapgood, 


9 


5 





f) 





Willie Bradley, 


10 


5 


1 


15 


1 


John Buttles, 


7 


5 





1 





Alvin Nelson, 


9 


5 





20 





Bertie Mills, 


9 


4.5 





5 


1 


Willie Tucker, 


9 


5 





9 






42 



Fred Baldwin, 


7 


5 





2 





Denuis Bradley, 


7 





1 


10 





Frauk Randall, 


10 


5 


3 


3 





Chrissie Cane, 


7 


4.7 


1 


2 





George Hird, 


8 


4.7 


6 


3 





John Hannon, 


6 


5 





3 





Sherman Farrar, 


8 


5 


1 


1 





Richard Murphy, 


5 


4.7 


3 








Herman Tapley, 


5 


5 











Dexter Spinney, 





5 





13 





James Culliane, 


G 


5 





1 





Geo. Austin, 


10 


5 





36 





Frank Austin, 


9 


5 


a 


36 





Robert Booker, 


5 


4.8 


1 


2 





Clifford Robbins, 


6 


."> 





13 





Percy Tuttle, 


6 


5 





7 





Lawrence Cain, 


5 


4.2 





7 





Fred Robbins, 


9 


5 . 





1 






EAST SCHOOL. 



Chester B. Robbins,! 


5 


5 


1 


14 





Mattie F. Smith,* 


15 


4.74 


1 








Bertha E. Hosmer, 


13 


4.63 





10 1-2 


1-2 


M. Gertrude Bassett, 


14 


4-3 


1 


25 


5 


Plarry G. Robbins, 


14 


4.04 


3 


3 1-2 


6 1-2 


Edwin F. Smith, 


10 


4.3 





2 


2 


Ernest E. Wetherbee, 


12 


4.2 


2 


2 


o 
O 


Katie C. 0'Connell,t 


11 


4.8 


2 


U 1-2 





Blanche M. Bassett, 


10 


4.4 * 


' 1 


17 


1 


Roy G. Brooks, 


10 


4 


3 





rr 

i 


Fred H. Ball,* 


13 


3.8 


8 





32 


Carlton C. Conant,* 


14 


3-6 


1 


1 


21 


Davie L. Ball, 


14 


4-45 


3 





16 


Ida F. Davis,* 


15 


4-8 


3 


13 1-2 


10 


Reno W. Ball, 


11 


4.25 


10 


2 


12 


Florence H. Flagg 


8 


4.48 





6 


1 


Annie H. Keefe,* 


13 


4.8 





8 


2 



43 



Rose A. Keefe,* 

Emma M. Sawyer, 

Charlie E. Smith, 

Lucie M. Davis, 

Harry C. Estabrook,* 

Fred L. Robbios, 

John E. O'Neill, 

La Roy C. Hanscom, 

Marcia E. Ball,* 

Lizzie M. Taylor, 

Thomas J. Keefe, 

Wendell P. Davis 

Mabel F. Hanscom, 

Francis Davis, 

Mary E. O'Neill, 

Cornelius X. 0'Connell,t 

John A. Williams, 

Willie O Smith,t 

Henry OC'onnell, 

* A member less than one term, 
t Not a member the whole year. 



14 


4.2 


2 


41-2 


17 


7 


4.5 





2 


6 


7 


4.48 











9 


4.4 


3 


9 1-2 


5 


8 


4.65 





1 





8 


4.4 


1 


5 





8 


4.2 


1 





47 


7 


4.3 





2 


2 


7 


4.7 


5 


1 


16 1-2 


6 


4.9 





2 


9 


9 


4.4 


2 


4 


7 


6 


4.4 


6 


17 1-2 


12 1-2 





4.8 





16 1-2 


7 


5 


4.7 


3 


7 


9 1-2 


7 


4.97 


3 





19 1-2 


8 


4.7 





4 1-2 





12 


3.6 





12 





14 


3.6 


1 





1-2 


6 


5 


2 


10 






SOUTH EAST SCHOOL. 



Chase, Louise I., 


7 


4 











Clough, Cora, 


8 


4.7 





2 





Griggs, Ada, 


5 


4.8 


14 





19 1-2 


Griggs, Edith, 


4 


4.7 


10 





10 


Griggs, Gertrude, 


13 


4.1 


13 





17 


Haynes, Lucy, 


8 


4.6 


18 





20 


Penniman, Eva, 


10 


4.8 


1 


1 


32 


Penniman, Hattie, 


12 


4.2 


3 


3 


38 


Mulholland, Rebecca, 


8 


4.7 





11 


i) 


Ward, Lucy, 


8 


4 











Bradley, John, 


16 


4.9 











Charlin,Fred, 


15 


4.2 


8 








Clement, John, 


5 


4.1 


2 





7 


Clough, George, 


9 


4.3 


1 


2-12 





Dole, Arthur, 


8 


4.5 


3 


5 


23 



44 



Drew, Arthur, 


6 


4.5 


y 


4 


12 


Glines, Willie, 


8 


4.8 


2 





9 


Glines, Fred, 


5 


4.3 


2 


3 


7 


Hooper, George, 


14 


4.1 


28 


2 


11-r 


Hooper, Willie, 


16 


4.2 


18 


4 


1 1-2 


Jones, Willie, 


10 


4.4 


9 





10 1-2 


Jones, Shirley, 


7 


3.9 


7 


1 


8 1-2 


Jones, Fred, 


17 


4.8 





2 


7 


Mnlholland, Willie, 


13 


4.2 


3 





10 


Pierce, George, 


7 


4.3 


1 





1 


Patterson, Bertie, 


8 


3.7 


13 





10 1-2 


Cloiigh. Harry, 


5 


4.8 





6 


9 



NORTH SCHOOL. 



Mattie Haudolph, 


14 


4 1-2 





5 


4 


Bertha Dupee, 


13 


4 5 r, 


1 


3 


3 1-2 


Hattie Smith, 


14 


4 11-12 











Augusta Smith, 


11 


4 3-4 


1 








Edith Flagg, 


8 


4 o-C 





8 1-2 


11-2 


Hattie Reed, 


11 


4 3-4 





9 


4 1-2 


Grace Rouillard, 


11 


4 7-9 





2 


9 


Ella Miller, 


6 


4 59-60 





4 


2 


Alice Miller, 


4 


5 








2 


Geo. Smith, 


17 


4 3-8 


2 





9 1-2 


Elwyn Harris, 


14 


4 3-4 


7 





6 1-2 


Everett Wayne, 


14 


4 11-30 











Georgie Harris, 


9 


4 63-80 





2 


1-2 


Irving Smith, 


9 


4 5-8 


1 


1 


1 


Walter Smith, 


7 


4 3-40 


1 








Lyman Hutchins, 


7 


4 2-3 


4 





15 


Robert Maines, 


5 


4 7-12 


9 


4 1-2 


7 1-2 



47 



TABULAR STATEMENT. 







a 




QQ 


<o I 


& 






tW 








•IH 


r* 


^ O 




» 




T-( 




SCHOOLS. 


TEACHERS. 


8 


1 


1 




13 

£ 

s 




I 
o 


CO 


1 






e 


1 


'o 




fcC 


% 


g 


M 


o 
c 








^ 


^ 


< 


5 


i 


i 


i 


^ 




8PKIKG TEEM. 




















<^''*^M Primary 


Mi8s J A Hemenway 


2M 


$36 


21 


20 


20 








21 


46 


" Bessie M Ball 


m 


36 


20 


19 


19 





3 


7 


37 


South i grammar 
Primary 


" Minnie J Mains 


3 


40 


34 


31 


32 








24 


46 


" EFEstabrook 


3 


36 


34 


27 


29 








5 


49 


Wpsf ^ Grammar 
^^^* ] Primary 


*' SJWyman 


3 


40 


31 


27K 


29 








31 


31 


" LFNe-wton 


3 


36 


34 


32 


33 








15 


23 


North 


" Viola S Tuttle 


3 


32 


14 


13K 


13 2-3 








9 


9 


East 


" SAWetherbee 


3 


36 


35 


26 


29 








9 


15 


Southeast 


'^ E Willoughby 


2K 


28 


20 


12 


14 1-3 





1 


6 


5 


High 


Mr H Williams 


2K 


80 


28 


25-7 


27 


17 





5 


18 




FALL TEKM. 






1 












C'ntre -^ gi^mmar 
untie ipj-iniary 


Miss J A Hemenway 


3 


36 


20 


19 


27 


2 





18 


26 


'• Bessie M Bair 


3 


36 


24 


22 


23 








10 


50 


r, ,-, ( Grammar 
^«^^*^ i Primary 


" Minnie J Mains 


3 


40 


34 


30 


33 








29 


44 


'• E F Estabrook 


3 


40 


37 


32 1-5 


35 








9 


51 


itr^c+ Grammar 
^^^«* ) Primary 


•' SJWyman 


3 


40 


29 


27K 


29 


2 





26 


25 


" C L Ne^vton 


3 


36 


41 


39 5-6 


40 2-3 





1 


19 


17 


North 


•' Viola S Tuttle 


3 


36 


15 


14X 


14 2-3 





1 


7 


16 


East 


" S A Wetherbee 


3 


36 


29 


22-3 


23 2-3 








7 


24 


Southeast 


'• Bertha Manley 


23^ 


32 


21 


18-7 


20 


1 


1 


6 


8 


High 


Mr H H Wilhams 

WINTEK TERM. 


3 


80 


39 


35K 


37 2-3 


28 





7 


25 


^^*^^1 Primary 


Miss B R Brackett 


3)^ 


36 


31 


21 


28 1-3 


8 





13 


14 


" Bessie M Ball 


3 


36 


19 


14-8 


18 





1 


6 


29 


<a^„+i. Grammar 
^^^^^ i Primary 


'' Minnie J Mains 


3 


40 


34 


30-1 


33-2 








29 


26 


" E F Estabrook 


3 


36 


35 


28 


32 








11 


38 


Wpcf i Grammar 
^^'* /Primary 


'• S J Wyman 


3 


40 


32 


28-75 


30-8 


5 





25 


35 


" C L Newton 


3 


36 


44 


42 


43-4 








22 


28 


North 


" Viola S Tuttle 


3 


36 


15 


14 


15 


1 





6 


25 


East 


'* S A Wetherbee 


2 


33K 


26 


20 3-4 


25-6 


1 





8 


11 


Southeast 


" Bertha Manley 


3 


32 


23 


17 


20 


3 


1 


5 


10 


High 


Mr H H Williams 


3K 


80 


38 


34 


35 


27 





5 


28 



Number of children between the ages of five and fifteen years, 295. 
8um raised by town for each (besides $800 for High School,) $10.66. 



I^EIPOIRTS 



OF THE 



1^ 



V 



U^ M 



m 






AND 



OTHER OFFICERS, 



OF thf: 



TOWN OF 4CT0N 

From Feb. 26, 1884, to Feb. 26, 1885, 

INCLUDING THE MARRIAGES, BIRTHS and DEATHS 
IN 1884, ALSO THE REPORT OF TPIE 




ACTON: 
TiiK EN'i'Fiii'insi.; STKA.\r Jok ritix' 

issr,. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



Dr. 

To Cash paid fur State Tax, $1,4.SU OO 

County Tax, (SHO SO 

On Selectmcns' Order. l4,2<Sl-l>i 

To Outstanding Orders, 1 7o 

To Balance due the Town, Feb. 2(). ISST), 1,871 17 



■$i<s.;]i:) 18 



Cr. 

By Balance in the Treasury, Feb. 2G, 1<SS.'). $724 24 

By Cash received of County Treasiu-er. 

Dog Fund for 1883, 21;] 01 

By Cash received of John White f(.)r LuuiIkm-. h '.)') 

By Cash received of G. II. Warren, for 

Rent of School Room, '"5-') 0() 

By Cash received of Elisha FI. Cutlei , In- 
come from Town Farm o7 'S4 

13y Cash received from Town of Methuen 

for Aid furnished Wm. Austin, ■")■'» <;s 

Ijy Cash received of State Treasurer for su im- 
port of State Paupers, 10 00 

By Cash received of Theron F. Newton, on 

account of School supplies. 4 77 

l^y Cash received for rent of Town Hall celhu\ 1<S r>0 

B}'^ Cash received of City of Boston for sup- 
port of Mason Jones, '')7 '");) 

By Cash received of Willis ^V. White, bor- 
rowed money, 100 oo 

]jv Cash received of Daniel Harris, 1)()n-()wed 

money, 400 00 

By Cash received of Franlv 11. Jones, bor- 
rowed money, 400 00 

By Cash received of J. K. W. Wetherbcc. 

borrowed money, C)-")-') (H) 

l>y Casli received of Estate of Simon llosmer. 

borrowed monev, b>** Oil 

By Cash received of vState Trea.'-urer, Cor- 
poration Tax, l.oy-j ')\ 

Bv Cash received of State Treasurer, Nation- 
al Bank Tax, 891) (;o 

Ani07i>/t carried forzvarcL $-').720 O."] 



Amount brought up. $5,720 03 
Bv Cash rccci\cd of State Treasurer. vState 

Aid. 
By Cash received of State Treasurer. ReHef 

of Indig-ent vSoldiers, 
By Cash received of State Treasurer, Income 

of School Fund, 
By Cash received from Town of Billerica tor 

support of Thomas Russell, 
By Cash received for rent of Town Hall, 
By Cash received from Theron F. Newton 

for South school District, 
By Cash received from John E. Cutter for 

North school District, 
By Cash received from John Fletcher for lots 

sold in Woodlawn Cemetery, 
By Casli received from John E. Cutter. Col- J 

lector of Taxes. 11.1)47 .")! \ 

By Cash recei\ed for interest on monew (JO 1(» ! 

$1^,315 lb ; 

J. K. \V. WETIIERBEE, ' 

Acton, Feb. 2(5, l<S<sr). l^rcasurcr of Acton. \ 



48 


00 


188 


00 


IGO 


18 


24 


00 


53 


00 


34 


78 


34 


h'l 


30 


00 



Kcpoit ol tlie ;>electiiiefl of tlic Town ot Acton, 

From February 26, 1884, to February 26, 1885. 



Centre District School. 

Paid Miss Ik\ssie M. Ball, teachinc^ school, $!)0 (M) 
Miss Carrie L. Haynes, teaching school, 00 00 
Miss Carrie L. Haynes, teaching school, 120 00 
Miss Bessie M. Ball, teaching school, 
John E. Cutter, 

John E. Cutter, cleaning house, 
[uhn E. Cutter, repairs, 
li!(l\varcl Tuttle. for use of pump, 
John E. Cuttei , 

South Actov Districi^ School 



108 


00 


1)8 


28 


(; 


(k; 


27 


7.') 


5 


00 


288 


00 



$o6 


00 


o8 


00 


o6 


00 


o8 


00 


10 


07 


'dh 


00 


o8 


00 


32 


75 


1 


12 



:>2 


78 


1 


oO 


, ^s 


20 


1 


80 


3 


.30 



•$8oo GU 



Paid JMiss Enima Estabrook, teaching school 

in vSo. Acton, 
Miss Jennie A. Hemniinvvay, teaching 

school in So. Acton. 
Miss Emma Estabrook, teaching school 

in So. Acton, 
Miss Jennie A. Hemminway, teacliing 

school in So. Acton, 
Theron F. Newton, repairs on south 

school house. 
Miss Emma Estabiook, teaching school 

in So. Acton, 
jMiss Jennie A. Hemminway, teaching 

school in vjo. Acton, 
Theron Y. Newton, coal, 
Theron F. Newton, blind, 
Theron F. Newton, cleaning and wasli- 

ing,* o 1)8 

Theron F. Newton, labor, U 00 

Theron F. Newton, paint for house and 

fence, 
Francis Hey ward, labor, 
Francis Jones painting house and fence. 
Francis Jones, labor, 
L. W. Holt, labor, 

Ai-uoiint carried forvtjard^ $4GG 70 



Amount brought zip., 
Paid vSamuel Jones, labor, 

Theron F. Newton, care of bouse, 
Tberon F. Newton, soutb district, > 
Tberon F. Newton, sundries, 
Theron F. Newton, ventihitors for 
Soutb Acton Higb scbool, 

Theron F. Newton, 



West Acton District Sciioot. 



%\m 70 




1) ?)V 




5 00 




247 00 




1 7:j 




12 00 






$741 74 






289 52 



$1,031 2G 



I^iid Miss S. J. Wyman, teaching scbool in 

West Acton, 
Miss Lettie Newton, teaching scbool in 

West Acton, 
Miss S. J. Wyman, teaching scbool in 

West Acton, 
Miss C. Lettie Newton, teaching school 

in West Acton, 
Geo. Gardner, chairs for West School, 
Geo. Gardner, Dictionary " 

Geo. Gardner, Miscellanies '• 
Geo. Gardner, care bouse. 
Miss S. J. Wyman, teaching school, 
Miss C. Lettie Newton, teaching scbool, 
Geo. Gardner, care house, 
Geo. Gardner, use of organ, 
Geo. Gardner, repairs on West School 
, house. 

Mead & Stone, paint for West Acton 

school house, 
E. F. Wood, painting West Acton 

scbool bouse, 
E. C. Parker, coal, 
Geo. Gardner, repairs, 
Tvliss S. J. Wyman, teaching scbool, 
Miss C. Lettie Newton, teaching school, 
Miss C. Lettie Newton, teaching school, 
Miss S. J. Wyman, teaching scbool. 
Miss S. J. Wyman, teaching scbool. 
Miss C. Lettie Newton, teaching school. 
Miss C. Lettie Newton, teaching school, 
Miss S. J. Wyman, teaching scbool, 
Miss S. J. Wyman, teaching school. 
Miss C. Lettie Newton, teaching scbool, 



$40 00 
3G 00 
40 00 



8G 


00 


5 


00 


8 


25 


G 


25 


13 


00 


40 


00 


oi:> 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 



10 00 

48 74 

78 25 
88 93 
13 18 
90 00 
81 00 
27 ^00 
30 00 
40 00 
3G 00 
36 00 
40 00 
40 00 
36 00 



$970 6( 



1 



North Acton District School. 



Paid Miss Alice Mansfield, teaching- school, $80 00 
Miss Alice Mansfield, teaching school, 108 00 

T. E. Cutter, repairs 
J. E. Cutter, 



Paid L. J. Robbins, repairs of house, 
L. J. Robbins, crayons, 
L. J. Robbins, care of house, 
Mr. S. A. Wetherbee, teaching, 
L. U. Holt, for stove and fixtures, 
L. J. Robbins, for teacher, 
L. J. Robbins, repairs, 

LuVe J. Bobbins, 



South East School District. 

Paid G. Booker, whitewashing school 

house, $ 3 50 

Francis Jones, painting black boards, 3 00 

Miss Bertha Manley, teaching school, 93 00 

Samual Jones, labor, 3 25 

Theron F. Newton, for wood, 17 50 

Theron F. Newton, South East, 111 00 







$188 00 






4 26 






163 85 




$356 11 


[lOOL. 






$ 1 


GO 
60 




3 


00 




108 


00 




53 


57 




129 


75 




o 


00 


$299 52 










131 60 



Theron F. Newton, repairs, 1 25 

Theron F. Newton, sundries, 8 00 



High S 



CIIOOL 



19 


72 


24 

•5 


60 


t 

164 


45 


18 


00 



$431 12 



$231 2i 



$240 50 

Theron F. Newton, 129 00 



Paid L. S. Plosmer, balance due High School, $ 65 00 
L. S. Ilosmer, moving settees and 

other repairs for High School, 
Geo. Gardner, for repairs and sundries 

for West Acton High School, 
Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, desks, seats 

and freight for High School in West 

Acton, 
Geo. Gardner, labor putting down same, 

Anioitnt carried fo7"Wa7'd, $291 



so 


00 


so 


00 


so 


00 


12 


00 


IT) 


00 


12 


OS 


10 


00 



Amo7int broupht up^ $2!) I 77 

Paid II. K. Williams, teaching Hig-h School, 

West Acton, 
H. H. Williams, teaching High School, 

West Acton, 
II. H. Williams, teaching High School, 

West Acton, 
Geo. Gardner, care of roonn, 
Geo. Gardner, for clock, 
Geo. Gardner, coal, 
Geo. Gardner, use of piano, 
Theron F. Xewton, for coal for High 

school ' 10 :> 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, desks, seats, 

table and freight, 
H. H. Williams, teaching Centre, 
H. H. Williams, teaching Centre, 
H* H. Williams, teaching Centre, 
J. E. Cutter, Centre High School, 
H. H. Williams, teaching South Acton. 
II. H. Williams, teaching South Acton 

Theron F. Newton, for High vScliool. 

.fl.lSS ;■).-, 
vSciIOOL vSl'PlMJES. 

Paid Theron F. Newton, book printing and 
express, 
Theron F. Newton, 

F. C. Nash, difference in exchange of 
books for schools in \ears If^S;) and 
1884, 
Theron F. Newton, school supplies, 
Theron F, Newton, 

J. E. Cutter, school supplies. 

-,i;s:) ;,,") 



SI 7s 






so 00 






so 00 






so 00 






i:) 00 






so 00 






so 00 






— $1. 


0111 


!).S 




:m; 


•")7 



$:57-l 


47 

OS 






;)<; 
;>() 








201 


i .") 










$i;7 


I 1 7 














; OS 



Towx Officers. 

Paid L. V . Holt, sealing weights and meas- 
ures, ' $ :> 00 
F. C. Nash, balance of salar\- for vSupt. 

of schools 188-5, " 02 r,o 

H. J. Ilapgood, services of Assessor, 21 00 

Phineas VVetherbee, 2.") 00 

Wm. D. Tuttle, o2 00 

AvioiLiit carried for~va)-d^ ■ $11'.) "jO 



$149 


5cr 


75 


00* 


50 


00 


25 


00 



9 

Amojint brought up^ 
Paid L. E. Reed, for Supt. of burials, 

F. C. Nash for Supt. ot schools 1884-85 
Wm. D. Tuttle, services as Town Clerk, 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, services as Select- 
man, 45 00 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, services as Trctis- 

urer, 40 00 

J. W. Dupee, services as Selectman, 45 00 

*D. J. Wetherbee, services as Selectman, 85 00 



Cemetery Expenses. 

Paid John Fletcher, labor in Woodlawn 

cemetery, $ 45 40 

John Eletcher, trees in Woodlawn cem- 
etery, 20 50 

B. H. & O. K. Patch, changing bound 

on lot in iMt. Hope cemetery, 2;) 00 

John Fletcher, labor in Woodlawn cem- 
etery, 43 55 

L. U. Holt, repairing pmnp in Mt. 

Hope cemetery. 3 36 



Printing. 

Paid O. H. Duren, printing town orders, 
O. H. Duren, warrants and reports, 
Pratt Bros, warrants, 
Paid Pratt Bros, advertising, 
W. N. Sharp, voting lists, 
Tolman & White, printing warrants. 



$ 2 


00 


71 


45 


7 


00 


7 


00 


17 


50 


3 


00 



State Aid. 

John Carroll $96 00 

Benj. Skinner 96 00 

Allen G. Smith 96 00 

Geo. Dole 32 00 

Ola Nelson 48 00 

Mrs. R. C. Wright 48 00 

Richard G. Dane 30 00 



$514 m 



$144 81 



$107 95v 



$446 m 



10 
Support of Poor. 



E. H. Ciitle 


r. support Clara Wheeler, 


$88 2a 


k ( 


ic 


E. Burgendahl, 


44 25 


(( 


i i 


Mrs. P. Redding, 


14 00 


u' 


i ( 


Mason Jones, 


37 53 


CC 


(( - 


Wm. Austin, 


55.68 


u 


c; 


Clara Wheeler, 


64 25 


C ( 


u 


E. Burgendahl, 


45 15 


(, c 


; ; 


Mrs. Redding, 


49 00 


(( 


u 


John Carney, 


21|00 


u 


('. 


Mrs. Stanton, 


4 60 


(( 


I c 


Mrs. Pike, 


14 00 


ii 


( i 


Mrs. J. Whitney, 


20 00 


ii 


i(. 


Michael Follard, 


23 15 


ii 


i c 


Clara Wheeler, 


69 81 


HI, 


i i 


E. Burgendahl, 


42 75 


ii 


ii 


E. Burgendahl, 


42 71 


ii 


'' 


Clara Wheeler, 


61 91 


a 


b (, 


Mrs. Town, 


22 69 


(.i 


a 


Ed. Johnson, 


4 50 


Dr. Sanders, 


medical attendance, 


7 50 


For support 


Catherine O'Brien, 


22 50 


Dr. Hutchins, med 


ical attendance. 


25 82 


ik 




D. Bradley, 


20 42 


For support 


of Ohi 


Nelson, 


10 00 


E. H. Cutlei 


•, expe 


use to Tewksbur}', 


6 00 




Joui 


•ney to Worcester, 


3 85 




Stat 


ionary and stamps, 


1 50 




Support of Mrs. Pike, 


34 00 






*' Mrs. Whitney, 


10 00 






" Mrs. Redding, 


4 00 






Thos. Russell, 


24 00 



$895 00 



Repairing Highways. I 

Paid Chas. Wheeler, regular highway work, $200 00 1 

A. H. Jones, '^ ' " 300 00 

Chas. Wheeler, repairs on Thos. Ham- 
mond road, 200 00 
J. C. Wheeler, breaking roads, '83-84, 8 37 
A. H. Jones, highway work, 250 00 
Geo. E. Fi field, repairing road to T. 

Moore place, 2 06 

J. F. Cole, breaking roads in 1884, 8 25 

Amount carried forvjard^ ■■ — $968 0)8 



U i 

Amount brought up^ $968 68 \ 
.A. H. Jones, widening road near Mrs. \ 
Warner's, 268 34 \ 
Abel Cole, for moving wall and laying \ 
same near house of Mrs. Warner's, 55 50 I 
Chas. Wheeler, railing road near Con- 
cord Hne, 13 09 \ 
■Chas. Wheeler, regular highway work, 494 83 i 
'Chas. Wheeler, labor performed for ] 
Jos. Cole, scraping road from C. .1 
Wheeler's to W. Handley's, 1883, 15 00 \ 
A. H. Jones, regular highway work, 161 74 \ 
A. H. Jones, repairs on Powder Mill \ 
Bridge, 11 05 j 
A. H. Jones, repairs on dry bridge near 

house of Mr. Gates, 34 43 ^ 

Geo. Keyes, breaking roads, 1884, 1 73 



$2,024 39 



Miscellaneous. 



IPaid R. M. Yale, for flag, $25 00 

James Kinsley, for use of road for hur- 
ley, " 8 00 
Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, for road 

machine, plate and freight, 210 02 

J. W. Loker, Decoration day, 75 00 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, seal, weights and 

measures for Town, 
L. U. Holt, for weights, 

" labor and team, 

" sand chamber for pump, 

" labor on pump, 

Tuttles, Jones &Wetherbee, invoice books, 

" ''' collector "• 

Geo. L. Brov/nell, for new hearse, 
Wm. D. Tuttle, laying out road in W. 

Acton, 
D. H. Hall, for stakes, 
Spofford Robbins, labor on town clock, 
R. L. Reed, labor and material on clock, 
R. L. Reed, labor and material on 

chandeliers, 
Geo. M. Stevens, for town clock, 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, for chandelers, 80 07 \ 

L. U. Holt, repairs on town house fur- ; 

nace, 14 16 ■; 

Auiount carried forxvard, $1,200 80 i 



14 


75 


8 


28 


2 


"Ih 


7 


00 


1 


75 


1 


05 


1 


25 


635 


00 


8 


00 


1 


00 


8 


18 


9 


86 


7 


60 


82 


64 



$1,200 


S&' 


4 


50 




25' 




65 


6 


48 


n 

15 


03 


CI 

20 


85 


11 


28 


2 


95 


3 


05 


20 


55- 



12 

Amount brought up^ 
Geo. L. Brovvnell. cover for hearse, 
D. J. Wetherbee, express on flag, 
" " recording deed. 

*' " freight on hearse, 

*' ^' 4175 coal for town 

house, 
Spofford Robbins, labor on stage and 

furnace, 
M. E. Taylor, oil, chimneys and sun 

dries for town hall, 
Win. D. Tuttle^ express on packages, 
"• "' books for registers, 

"' '-^ copying record book, 

'^ collecting and record- 

ing births, 18. 50 

Win. D. Tuttle, collecting and record - 

in<:^ marriajj^es, 2 70 

Wni. D. Tuttle, collecting and record- 
ing deaths. 
R. L. Reed, taking care of hall, 

repairs on town hall, 
care of clock, 
Francis Conant, repairs on town hall, 
J. E. Cutter, discount on taxes, 1884, 



Temporary Loan Paid. 

Paid Willis A. White, note and interest, 
Daniel Harris "* " 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, •' 
Frank H. Jones, '' '' 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, - 



Unexpended balance as per report, Feb. 26th, 1884, I 

including bounty tax v$5,520 Vd- | 

Received of VV. A. White, borrowed monev 400?' 00' ] 

Daniel Harris, ^' ^ 400 00'; 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, ^' 635 00 i 

F. H. Jones, " 400 00^ 

Estate Simon Hosmer, '' 450 00 I 

Dog fund, 1883 213 01 I 

J. White, lumber 5 35^ 1 

G. H. Warren, rent school room 33 OO 

Amo7iiit carried forward^ $8,056 4^^ 



4 50 




32 25 




17 14 




15 00 




3 38 


* J 


591 82 






$1,971 7*- j 


$406 55 


\ 


405 83 




642 41 


,1 


404 28: 




453 37 






$2,312 44 i 



13 

Amount brought up^ $8,056 49 

Received of E. H. Cutler, income from Town fi\rm. . 37 84 

Town of Methuen, support of Wm. Austin. . . />5 68 

State Treasurer, supjoort State pauper 10 00 

T. F. Newton, on account school supplies. ... 4 77 

Use of cellar in town hall 18 50 

City of Boston, support of M. J. Jones .37 53 

State Treasurer, corporation tax 1,395 51 

National Bank 899 60 

vState Aid 48 00 

" Relief of Indigent soldiers. . 188 00 

" Income of school fund 169 18 

Town of Blllerica, for support T. Russell. ... 24 00 

John Fletcher, Woodlawn Cemetery 30 00 

Interest on money 66 16 

For use of town hall 53 00 

Town charges 3,000 00 

for schools 4,000 00 

$18,094 26 



Town charo-cs for roads 1,400 00 

State tax . .' 1 ,480 00 

County tax 680 80 

Overlay 7 71 

T.F.Newton,ba]anceof last years' school money 34 78 

J. E. Cutter " ^' ^' .\ 34 52 

$21,732 07 



RECEIPTS 
From February 26th, 1884, to February 26th, 1886, 



Unexpended balance as per report of Feb. 

26th, 1884, including bounty tax $5,520 13 

Appropriations and receipts 16,211 94 



$21,732 07 



14 
EXPENDITURES. 



Support of the Centre District School $ 833 69 i 

*' So. Acton '' 1,03126 ! 

" W.Acton " 970 60; 

N. Acton " 356 11 i 

'' E. Acton ^' 431 12 i 

^' So.-E. Acton " 369 50 j 

"'• High School and expenditures 1,188 55 . 

School supplies 685 55 \ 

Town officers 514 50 ■ 

Cemetery expenses 144 81 ! 

Printing' 107 95 ; 

State Aid 446 00 \ 

Support of Poor 895 00 - 

Repairs on Highways 2,024 39 j 

Miscellaneous expenses 1,971 74 ] 

Temporary Loan paid 2,312 44 ] 

State Tax 1,480 00 ; 

County Tax 680 80 

I 

$16,444 01 ] 

Amount due the Town from Collectors and 'i 

Treasurer 5,288 06 ' 

Deduct Bounty Tax* 4,000 00 -i 

$1,288 06 ] 

D. J. WETHERBEE, ~) Selectmen I 

y. K. W. WETHERBEE, \ of \ 

J. W. DUPEE, j Acton. ' 

Acton, Feb. 26, 1885. 



16 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



Registry of Births in Acton for 1884. 

No. Date of Birth. Name of Child. Name of Parents. 

1. Jan. 5, Euth Mildred, daughter of Sidney L. and M. Kate Richardson. 

2. "7, Alice Beatrice, daughter of Nathan R. and Abbie M. Palmer. 

3. " 12, Chester Arthur, son of Thomas J. and Kate Sawyer. 

4. " 26, Howard Arthur, son of Howard B. and Bertha White. 

5. Feb. 10, Henry Franklin, son of William H. and Ida C. Lawrence. 

6. " 14, Mable Gertrude, daughter of Edwin E. and Abbie F. Foster. 

7. Mar. 1, James Ernest, son of Chas. H. and Fannie A. Taylor. 

8. " 12, John Hubbard, son of Hanson and Florence M. Littlefield. 

9. " 18, Annie May, daughter of James T. and Addie C. Goodsell. 

10. *' 28, Willie James, son of Thomas and Maria C. Scanlan. 

11. Junel2, Walter son of Edwin L. and Hattie C. Hay ward. 

12. " 18, Ross Melvin, son of Fred C. and Sarah A. Reed. 

13. July 5, ISTorman Asaph, son of Isaac B. and Ellen Spinney. 
14&15." 16, Ada May and Annie Maud, twin daughters of Oslia P. and 

' Nellie F. Knowlton. 

16. " 25, Flora Blanche, daughter of Moses A. and Ellen A. Reed. 

17. *' 27, Mary Ellen, daughter of Michael and Sarah McCarthy. 

18. Aug. 1, Rilla Lester, daughter of Samuel B. and Harriet L. Harris. 

19. " 7, Thomas Edward, son of Joseph A. and Margaret J. Devane- 

20. " 16, Maud Beatrice, daughter of Andrew F. and Emma M. Priest. 
' 21. " 16, Ines Maud, daughter of Joseph E. and Ida C. Dole. 

■ 22. " 29, Estean D. son of James A. and Flora C. Symonds. 

23. Sept. 7, William Munroe, son of William H. and Lora M. Hartwell. 
' 24. " 17, Henry Wilder, son of Edwin W. and Flora A. Taylor. 

25. '* 24, A son to Charles W. and Lena A. Melone. 
'> 20. " 27, James, son of Isaac and Mary Frances Wood. 

: 27. Oct. 17, James Leonard, son of Jairus C. and Alice M. Wheeler. 
' 28. " 23, Albert William, son of William H. and Ella E. Kinsley. 

29. " 27, Alice Marion, daughter of Edgar H. and Angle Hall. 

I 30. Nov. 6, Loraine Esther, daughter of Charles I. and L. Lizzie Miller. 
131. " 8, Levern Lincoln, son of Roswell L. and Anna B. Tuttle. 

32. '' 22, Cora Edith, daughter of Edmund B. and Ella L. Hooper. 

33. '' 26, Flora Elizabeth, daughter of John H. and Anna L. Clark. 
34:. " 29, Charlotte Sophia, daughter of Rev, Franklin P. and Abbie O. 

Wood. 
35, Dec, 20, Eldora Mary, daughter of Freeman and Etta E, Williams. 



16 

i 
Marriages Registered ix Actox ix 1884. j 

Xo. Date of Marriage. Xanie.s and Kesideiiecs; of Parties. 

1. Jan. .31, Mr. William, il. Hartwell and Miss Loia M. Bickford, both ! 

of Acton. i 

•1. Feb. 2."), Mr. .John McCarthy of Acton, and Misis Mary Ann McElligott I 

of Westford. i 

?u Mar. 12, Mr. Willis A. White of Acton, and Miss Clara B. Gay of | 

Belfast, Me. \ 

4. May 4, 2klr. Chas. E. Worcester of Acton, and Miss Eliza G. Feeney 

of Hudson. \ 

'). ^Nlay S, 31 r. Franklin I). Barker of Acton, and Miss Eucietta Derby j 

of Concord. ; 

<). May 11, Mr, George Gallant of Concord, and Mrs. Mary Conuell of \ 

Acton. I 

7. May 22, ^Ir. ilobert Il.irt of Boston, and Miss Eleanor Blackburn of \ 

Franklin. ! 

5. May :]l. Mi-. .John T. Bcrgrew of Cambridge, and Miss Agnes J. I 

Wood of Acton. 
1>. .)une .■], ]\Ir. Timothy Bissell and Mrs. Khoda ("arleton. both of Acton. 

10. June 24. Mr. Henry I). Daley and Mrs. :Mary L. Blanehard, both of \ 

Marlboio. j 

11. .Tuly 1, Mr. Edward Wood of Acton, and Miss Mary B. McLearn of : 

Canibi-idge. 

12. iSept. 1), Dr. Fred W. Whitney of .Sherburne. X. '\'.. and Miss Emma 

F. Esta brook of Acton. i 

13. Sept. IS, Mr. Fred S. Mead and Mi.ss Lizzie M. Gates. l)oth of Acton, i 

14. Oct. 1.'), Mr. (ieorge Y. ITutchins and Miss Ilattie A. Parker, both of 

Acton, i 

lo, Oct. \\:^, Mr. Frank Brooks of Acton, and Miss .Jessie E. Purdy of I 

^lansfield. 
](). Nov. 2o, Mr. James Kinsley and Miss Annie ^IcCarthy, both of Acton. ; 
IT. Dec. 11, ^Iv. Charles H. Fairbanks of Cambridge, and Miss Nellie L. I 

Tuttle of Acton. 
18. Dec. 2-j, Mr. Ira Elliot Barber and Miss Mary Ann Bradlev, both of ^1 

Acton. 



Deaths Recorded ix Actox ix 1881 

Xo. Date of Death. Xaine and Age of Deceased 

1. Feb. 10, Mr. John Chatfin, 75 years months 18 days, 

2. Feb. 24, ]N[rs. Ellen Coughlin, 96 y. 

3. Mar. 20, Mr. James H. Burnham, 64 y. 7 m. 8d. 

4. Mar. 27, Mr. Levi Frost, 78 y. 5 d. 

5. Mar. 27, Miss Edith Y. Bean, 14 y. 7 d. 

6. Apr, I. ^Irs, Louisa M, E<5i'hi^sb, 52 y. 



17 

No. Date of Death. Xame and age of Deceased. 

7. Apr. 2, Pierre 11. Nelson, son of Oscar P. and Mary Ann Xelson, 1 y. 

2 m. 4 d. 

8. Apr. G, Mr. Thomas Smith, 90 y. 3 m. 15d. 

9. Apr. 'l^,, Mrs. EUa S. Baldwin, 34 y. 6 m. 12 d. 

10. May 14, Mrs. Mary Fairbanks Tenney, 80 y. 7 d. 

11. June 17, Walter Hayward, son of Edwin L.and 11 ittie (J. Ilayward, 5 d 

12. July 7, Mr. Simon Hosmer, 84 y. 9m. 

13. Auo-. 12, Mrs. EHza Beatty Downer, (51 y. 

14. Aug. 14, Mrs. Martha M. Stevens, wife of (r^or.;o A. Stevens, 07 y. 

2 m. 10 d. 

15. Aug-. 18, Mr. Thomas Kinsley, 70 y. 1") d. 

16. Aug. 20, Mrs. Lizzie E. Beck, 20 y. 13 d. 

17. Sept. 7, (In Concord) Mabel F. Worden, daughter of Henry and 

Lizzie Worden, 3 y. 
A son of Charles W. and Lena A. Melone, 1 d. 
Mr, Charles H. Teele, 27 y. 10 m. o d. 
Mrs. Lois H. Freeman, 70 y. 10 m. 13 d. 
Mrs. Maggie A. McLaughlin, 27 y. 
25, Mr. Charles E. Worcester, 29 y. 1 m. 
Mr. James Hurley, 78 y. 

WILLIAM D. TUTTLE, Tvw.u Clerk. 



IS. 


Sept. 


-^4, 


19. 


Oct. 


4, 


20. 


Oct. 


')■> 


21. 


Oct. 


23, 


22. 


Dec. 


25, 


23. 


Dec. 


29, 



18 



Amt. Rec'd from Licenses of Dogs since last Report. 



Henry Brooks, 


$2 00 


Isaac W. Flagg, 


$2 00 


M. Augusta Hosmer, 


2 00 


D. J. Wetherbee. 


2 00 


Wra. D. Tuttle, 


2 00 


Frank E. Wetherbee, 


2 00 


Luther Conant, 


2 00 


J. W. Dupee, 


2 00 


Elbridge J. Robbiiis, 


2 00 


George R. Keyes, 


2 00 


Antoine Bulette, 


2 00 


George Conant, 


2 GO 


Alonzo L. Tuttle, 


2 00 


G. H. S. Houghton, 


2 GO 


George W. Livermore, 


2 00 


Joseph Reed, 


2 00 


(leorge Gardner, 


2 00 


Moses A. Reed, 


2 00 


Dana F. Maynard, 


2 00 


Gustavus H. Waugh, 


2 00 


Elnathan Jones, 


6 00 


James D, Coburii, 


2 00 


Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee, 


4 00 


Sylvester Haynes, 


2 00 


Theron F. Newton, 


2 00 


Frederic Rouillard, 


2 00 


Francis Conant, 


2 00 


M. E. Taylor, 


2 00 


J. K. W. Wetherbee, 


2 00 


Augustus Fletcher, 


2 00 


Charles A. Harrington, 


2 00 


Solon A. Robbins, 


2 00 


Willie S. Fletcher, 


2 00 


James Tuttle, 


7 00 


John Fletcher, 


2 00 


J. W. Randall, 


2 00 


Emerson F. Fuller, 


2 00 


H. M. Beck, 


2 00 


Daniel McCarthy, 


2 00 


Cyrus Hay ward. 


2 00 


A. Lucien Noyes, 


2 00 


Charles H. Wheeler, 


5 00 


Luke Tuttle, 


2 00 


Charles Wheeler, 


2 00 


George C. Conant, 


2 00 


Isaiah S. Leach, 


2 00 


John Hamaford, 


.2 00 


Nahum Littlefield, 


2 00 


Mead & Stone, 


2 00 


James E. Harris, 


2 00 


Emmons Hansconi, 


2 00 


Lucius S. Hosmer, 


2 00 


William B. Davis, 


2 00 


George C. Wright, 


2 00 


Mrs. George F. Flagg, 


2 00 


James Kinsley, 


2 00 


James Tobin, 


2 00 


Joseph Cole, 


2 00 


John Temple, 


2 00 


John Kelley, 


2 00 


L. E. Allen, 


2 00 


Edward O'Xeil, 


2 00 


Anson C. Piper, 


2 00 


Otis H. Forbush, 


2 00 


Lester N. Fletcher, 


2 00 


Charles J. Williams, 


2 00 


Willis L. Mead, 


2 00 


Frank E. Harris, 


2 00 


Fred Whitcomb, 


2 00 


Isaac Baker, 


2 00 


A. H. Gilmore, 


2 00 


Charles Varney, 


2 00 


Charles J. Holton 


2 00 


John L. Marshall, 


2 00 


James P. Taylor, 


2 00 


J. E. Durkee, 


2 00 


A. W. Gardner, 


2 00 


Henry M. Smith, 


2 00 


Charles B. Sanders, 


4 00 


J. Everett Reed, 


2 00 


Herman Chaplin, 


2 00 


Frank R. Knowltou, 


2 00 


John W. Aldrich, 


2 00 


Edwin Taylor, 


2 00 


Moses Taylor, 


2 00 


Constance O'lS'eil, 


2 00 


Edward Wood, 


5 00 


Frank W. Houghton, 


2 00 


For bush & Hart well, 


5 00 


Everett Wayne, 


2 00 


Isaac Wood, 


5 00 


John C. Gates, 


2 00 


Freeman Williams, 


5 00 


A. L. Lawrence, 


.5 00 


Henry Haynes, 


5 00 


George Pratt, 


5 00 


Jairus C. Wheeler, 


5 00 


Hanson Littlefield, 


5 00 


Charles H. Teel, 


2 00 


Joseph R. Bassett, 


2 00 


Webster C. Bobbins, 


2 00 


Chauncey B. Robbins 


2 00 


Mrs. Jarvis Williams, 


2 00 


Charles W. Grant, 


2 00 


Charles D. Griggs, 


2 00 


Reuben L. Reed, 


2 00 


Andrew J. Willis, 


2 00 


Henry Haynes, 


2 00 


Henry Hanson, 


2 00 


Daniel McCarthy, 


2 00 


Total number of Males 


105, at 


S2, . . $210 00 


Females 10, at 


$5, 


50 00 


Whole amount 


received, — 


$260 00 



Acton, March 10, ISSo, 



WILLIAM D, TUTTLE. Town Clerk, 



19 



Report of Receipts and Expenditures at the 
Almshouse in Acton, 

For the Year Ending February 28, 1885. 



Articles on Hand February 28, 1885. 




8 Cows, 


$420 00 


8 Barrel Apples, 


$12 00 


1 Horse, 


200 00 


15 Gallons Soap, 


2 00 


13 Tons Hay, 


234 00 


40 Pounds Lard. 


5 20 


Meal and Shorts, 


10 10 


20 Pounds Butter, 


6 00 


Straw, 


1 50 


125 Barrels, 


15 00 


Lot of Bags, 


5 00 


2 Gallons Oil, 


25 


Salt, 


1 00 


Flour, 


2 00 


27 Hens, 


13 50 


Crackers, 


50 


15 Cords wood cut for sto 


ve,70 00 


5 Pounds Coffee, 


50 


Wagon, 


95 00 


Hard Soap, 


40 


4 Market Boxes, 


40 


2 Pounds Tea, 


1 00 


125 Bushels Potatoes, 


62 50 


Molasses, 


40 


30 Bushels Small Potatoes, 6 00 


Eggs, 


60 


250 Pounds Salt Pork, 


25 00 


Spices, 


50 


75 Pounds Ham, 
1 Cider Barrel, 


9 00 
1 00 






$1,200 35 


E-ECEiiPTS ipjeicd:m: 


To^wnsr ip^^E-iivc, 




From March 1, 1884, to 


February 28, 1885. 




Apples, 


$305 30 


Calves, 


$10 25 


Potatoes, 


34 45 


Poultry, 


1 00 


Eggs, 


14 39 


Berries, 


3 80 


Bag, 


25 


Board and clothing, M. E. 




Paper, 


90 


Grimes, 


35 00 


Meat, 


4 08 


Board, Edward Johnson, 


4 50 


Butter, 
Milk, 


4 62 
745 12 






$1 


,308 66 


Cows, 


145 00 








E^^ieEiisrsE s . 




Paid for 




Paid for 




Cows, 


$173 75 


Thread, 


$ 96 


Labor, 


157 77 


Extracts, 


20 


Meat, 


93 93 


Curtain Fixtures, 


90 


Grain, 


374 76 


Crockery, 


1 05 


Potatoes, 


8 80 


Curtain cords. 


49 


Vinegar, 


75 


Rice, 


54 


Barrels. 


39 24 


Mustard, 


47 


Repairing harness. 


1 01 


Pepper, 


12 


Butchering, 


5 00 


Saleratus, 


18 


Onions, 


50 


Raisins, 


2 06 


Pigs, 


8 00 


Tacks, 


10 


Pump and repairing. 


, 10 50 


Stove polish, 


21 


Tinware, 


2 46 


Note paper, 


10 


Stove and repairs. 


4 00 


Oat meal. 


70 


Repairing lounge, 


1 50 


Tapioca, 


40 


Soap, 


11 05 


Molasses, 


7 84 


Use of oxen. 


10 00 


Ginger, 


55 


Blacksmith bill, 


18 50 


Tomatoe plants. 


30 


Use of bull, 


4 00 


Wash board, 


25 


Lumber, 


1 53 


Starch, 


32 


Filing saws, 


1 35 


Burners, 


30 



20 



Paiu F01{ 




Paid for 






Cheese, 


.-) 21 


Wicks, 




12 


Dried apple, 


1 36 


Jars, 




1 38 


Phosphate, 


l:^, 58 


Needles, 




6 


Fish, 


10 74 


Cocoa, 




9 


Flour, 


41 84 


Oil, 




1 04 


Butter, 


()4 68 


Jug, 




25 


Tea, 


28 60 


Globes, 




24 


J.ard, 


10 58 


Yarn, 




1 10 


Oyster shells. 


88 


Kettles, 




92 


Bhieino^, 


22 


Dressing, 




25 


Coffee, 


10 26 


Trap, 




12 


Brooms. 


05 


Lime, 




50 


('ream tartai'. 


56 


Spoons, 




34 


Cultivator, 


5 00 


Mattresses, 




18 50 


Salt, 


2 70 


Table, 




1 15 


Yeast, 


56 


Mirror, 




67 


Paris |2jreeii, 


50 


Drag, 




4 80 


Scythes, 


8 80 


Spade, 




87 


Beans, 


8 88 


Grass seed, 




5 64 


Lemons, 


18 


Castings, 




90 


Turpentine, 


15 


Pails, 




2 28 


Seeds, 


40 


Hoes, 




88 


Cloth and cloth in<>-. 


:}5 09 


Oil cloth. 




70 


Comb, 


5 


Whet-stone, 




83 


Shoes, 


8 (}5 


Castor, 




12 


Sulphei-, 


1 86 


Peas, 




20 


Sugar, 


15 50 


Tubs, 




60 


Putv, 


6 


Baskets, 




1 00 


ISTaiis, 


I 90 


Barrel header 




1 12 


Crackers, 


28 15 


Hatchet, 




62 


Spices, 


1 02 


Halters, 




1 16 


Currants, 


58 


Cabbages. 




28 


Matches, 


20 


Bed-spreads. 




4 80 


Medicines, 


2 85 


Blankets, 




7 15 


Saltpeter, 


2 


AY all paper. 




6 01 


Snuff", 
Oil Meal, 


88 
08 












>;l,284 92 


Services of Warren Bern is 


and wife. 


S247 


98 




E. fl. Cutler, 




45 


00 




Luke Blancha 


•d. 


10 00 




Julian Tuttlo, 




12 


00 


$314 93 








Expenditures. 


.S;l,609 85 


Ifeceipts, 








1,308 66^ 



Income less than expenditures. 

Due from Treasur3^ to balance account. 
Interest on farm. 



.^801 19 
240 00 



$541 19 
Yictualing and lodging 102 tramps at 40 cents each, 76 80 

Cost of supporting poor on farm, §^464 89 

Whole number of persons exclusive of tramps supported in alms- 
house, 7; average number, 4 1-2; i)resent number, 4. 

E. 11. CUTLER, } 

LUKE BLANCHAKD, [ Oi-erseers of Poor. 

JULIAN TUTTLE, ) 



21 



COMMONAVEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. MIDDLESEX, S8. 

To John E. Cutter, Co)istable of the Tormi of Arton, hi -"iaid Comity, 

Greeting : 

You are lierel)y requested in the uame of the Commonwealth of Mas- 
sachusetts, to notify the legal voters of said Town of Acton, to meet at 
the Town Hall, on MONDAY, the sixth day of April next, at half-past 
ten o'clock a. m. By posting copies of this Warrant by you attested, at 
the Post Office, in the centre of the town, also at the stores of Tuttles, 
Jones & Wetherbee, Mead & Stone, and Isaac W. Flagg, in said town, 
seven days before the time appointed for said meeting, then and thei^e 
to act upon the following articles as they may think proper, viz : 

Art. 1. To choose a Moderator. 

Art. 2. T^o fill all existing vacancies in the list of town officers. 

Art. 3. To see what amount of money the town will raise to de- 
fray town charges the present year. 

Art. 4. To see what amount of money the town will raise for sup- 
port of schools the present year, and how it shall be expended. 

Art. 5. To see what amount of money the town will raise to repair 
the roads the present year, and how it shall be expended. 

Art. 6. To see if the town will instruct the School Committee to 
annually appoint a Superintendent of Schools. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will choose a Superintendent of Burials. 

Art. 8. To consider and act upon the acceptance of the Jury list as 
revised by the Selectmen. 

Art. 9. To see if the town will vote to accept the reports of the 
Selectmen, Overseers of the Poor, School Committee, and other town of- 
ficers. 

Art. 10. To see if the town will instruct their Treasurer to borrow 
money for the town if necessary. 

Art. 11. To hear and act upon reports of any committee chosen to 
report at this meeting. 

Art. 12. Shall the Selectmen grant licenses for the sale of intoxicat- 
ing liquors in this town the present year, vote by ballot. 

Art. 13. To see if the town will paint the school houses in North, 
East and South-east district, or pass any vote thereon. 

Art. 14. To ste if the town will build a fence at Mount Hope Cem- 
etery, or pass any vote thereon. 

Art. 15. To see if the town will order the removal of the stones or 
rocks lying in the highway between Simon Blanchard's and Nahum Lit- 
tlefield's farms, or take any action thereon. 

Art. 16. To see if the town will pay Hannah Trainor for manure 
bought by the Overseers of the Poor, and not paid for, or take any action 
thereon. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant to us with your 
doings thereon, at or before the time appointed for said meeting. 

Given under our hands this eighteenth day of March, in the year 
eighteen hundred and eighty-five. 

D. J. WETPIERBEE, ) Selectmen 

J. K. W. WETHERBEE, > of 
J. W. DUPEE, ) Acton, 



Town Officers for 1886, 



Town Clerk. ' 

Wm. D. Tuttle. 

Splectmen. \ 

D, James Wetherbee, J, K. W. Wethekbee, Job W. Dfpee. 

I 
Assesffors. 

Wm. D. Tuttee, Pjiineas Wetherbee, Hiram J. Hapgood. \ 

Overseers of the Poor. \ 

Emsha H. Cutler, Luke Blaxchard, ■ 

One vacancy to be filled at April meeting. [ 

School ('oinmlttee. < 

CiiART>Eft [. MiLEER, for 2 yeavs, FrantvLIN D. Barker, for 1 year, ' 

Theron F. Nkwton, for 3 years, Luke J. Robbixs, for 2 years, ] 

George Gardner, for 1 year. \ 



One member to be chosen at next meeting. 4 

Highway Surveyors. } 

Charles Wiieelek, Abram H. Jones, Isaac Reed, i 

Elbridge J. Robbins, George R. Keyes, Francis Pratt. 1 

Fence Viewers. '.: 

James B. Tuttlk, Nahum C. Reed, Oliver W. Mead. ' 

Surveyors of Luiuber. 
WiM. B. Davis, Edward F. Richardson, Levi W. Stevens, 

George H. Harris, Herbert T. Clark, Elbridge J. Robbins, 

Charles A. Brooks. 

Surveyors of Wood. 
W^r. B. Davis, Jona W. Loker, Geo. H. Harris, 

S. li. Dutton, Isaac W. Flagg, Charles H. Taylor, 

J<HiN F. Davis, Emerson F. Fuller, H. T. Clark, | 

Henry D. Parlin, Charles H. Mead. ^ 

Surveyors of Hoops and Staves. - 

DaVid M. Handle y, Augustus Fletcher. 

Cemetery Committee. 
John Fletcher, Wm. W. Davis, Levi W. Stevens. 

Field Drivers. 
James Kinsley, Charles H. Handle y, F. D. Barker, 

Fred S. Mead. Chas. D. Griggs, Wm. H. Kinsley^ 

John McCarthy\ 



i?,ei:poi?.t 



OF THE 



gCHOOI^ COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 



FOR THE 



Bclxool ITeax^ 18S4-5 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 



The town, which has provided so munificently for the educa- 
tion of its children ought of riglit to be well informed as to the 
use made of its expenditures, and the measure of success resulting 
therefrom. 

Such is one of the purposes of this report. Another purpose is 
to explain the methods of descipline and instruction employed, and 
recommended, so that committee, superintendent, teachers and 
parents, may the better understand and co-operate \v ith each other 
to accomplish the desired results. 

To have good schools w^e must have earnest, capable, ener- 
getic teachers, who have been well trained, in excellent schools 
from primary to high or normal school, proper supervision, and 
the zealous co-operation of parents. 

Given these requisits, the results will be regidar and prompt 
attendance, excellent deportment, and satisfactory progress. Your 
superintendent has, in the limited time at his command, done what 
he could to make the descipline as steady and uniform as possible 
in all the schools and to encourage thorough and practical instruc- 
tion. 

The system of monthly reviews and examinations commenced 
two years ago has been faithfully continued by the teachers, and 
the results, together vvith the deportment and attendance, report- 
ed to parents. The benefit of this was manifest in the prompt- 
ness and accuracy of recitation at our recent annual examinations, 
and is also apparent in the increased average membership and 
attendance as shown in the tabular statement herewith printed. 
Such improvement in attendance shows a commendable increase 
ot interest on the part of parents which is further evinced by the 
generally excellent deportment of the scholars. 



26 

We enter upon the new school year with a corps of compe- 
tent teachers, but we must remember that they are but human 
and liable to err, and so long as they are animated with zeal for 
their work and are striving to perfect themselves in their high 
calling, we should retain, uphold and encourage them, and not dis- 
charge them, especially after several terms successful w^ork, until 
after the most careful investigation the committee become satisfied 
that they have manifested a disposition or incapacity incompatible 
with the proper performance of their duties. 

Methods of Discipline. 

Usually the better the discipline the less the corporal punish- 
ment. Indeed in a school properly governed such punishment 
need seldom or never be resorted to. Let parents and scholars 
distinctly understand that implicit obedience is the condition of 
continuance in school, and disobedience will be rare. 

The successful teacher will keep her pupils so busy with 
book, slate, crayon, gymnastics, music, or recitation, will so ap- 
peal to that love of praise and fear of blame to which children are 
most succeptible, will so bring to bear on the oflender the moral ^ 
sentiment of the school, and impress upon him the certainty of 1 
suspension or expulsion for persistent disobedience, that resort to ■ 
physical force will very rarely be necessary. ^ 

IMetiiods of Teaching. 

While we aim to get the best teachers and let them pur&ue 
their own methods, it is proper for us to make a few suggestions. 

In Reading scholars are too often allowed to pass to the high- 
er book before they have mastered the lower one. The scholar 
who merely pronounces all the words in a book correctly and readi- 
ly, is just fitted to be drilled in that book in emphasis, inflection, ex- 
pression — to be taught to read as a good speaker talks. Parents | 
should not be over anxious for their children to take the higher i 
book. ■ 

Spelling receives its due share of attention in all the grades, \ 
but we advise the more constant use of the spelling book, and ■ 
the taking it in course from beginning to end, that no common I 
word in our kinguage may be omitted. Both the oral and 
written methods should be practiced, but mainly the latter. 

In Arithmetic, the giving of practical examples drawn from 
ordinciry business transactions shoidd be practiced in all th? 



2T 

grades. One such example performed by the shortest and sim- 
plest method, in the neatest manner, and clearly explained, the 
teacher and each member of the class giving the closest attention 
and sharpest criticism, will be so impressed on the mind as not 
to be forgotten, while the explanation of a dozen examples at one 
recitation will fade from the memory. 

In Geography the method of map drawing from memory has 
been pursued in most of bur schools, with excellent results. 
While we require the scholar to master the whole of Harper's 
Introductory Geography we have required only such portions of the 
larger book as we deem essential. An excellent exercise is to let 
the class make imaginary journeys along the coasts, up the rivers, 
and by the principal lines of railroad, drawing the map and des- 
cribing the natural divisions of land and water, and naming the 
cities, boundaries, climate, productions and occupations. 

It is a stubborn fact that many who know Grammar " by 
heart" still speak very incorrectly. Why is this? It is because 
they have been learning rules, but not practicing the use of correct 
forms of speech. 

The two should go together, the practice, however, predom- 
inating. We think that only the simplest parsing and the more 
common rules and definitions should be taught in the Grammar 
schools, and abstruse rules and exceptions, and difficult analysis, 
be postponed to the latter part of the High school course. 

But in all grades of school the study of grammar can avail 
little if the use of incorrect expressions is allowed to pass un- 
noticed. Such an expression aflbrds a golden opportunity for a 
practical lesson in language. Be not satisfied with merely cor- 
recting the error, but insist that the scholar and even the whole 
class or school, repeat the correct form, and drill them to criticise 
an error in expression as readily as one in substance. 

We have sought to introduce the simplest and most concise 
text books and discourag^ed the verbal memorizing: of all but the 
tables and more essential rules and definitions, in order that more 
time may be given to such work as is herein indicated. 

In correcting the monthly examination papers and other 
written exercises, the teachers should merely indicate errors by 
certain marks, and insist that the scholar make the correction 
himself and re-write the work in whole or part. 

Let us now pass to a review of the different schools. 



2R _ . 'j 

Center Grammar. \ 

The Committee were fortunate in securing the services of \ 
Miss Carrie L. Haynes of Framingham, whose long and success- ^ 
ful experience as a teacher in that town enabled her to enter upon ] 
her duties with all the advantage that an educated trained teacher ; 
has over one who is new in the work. 

The discipline was good, the methods of instruction excellent, '■ 
and the examination at the end of the year a most successful one. i 
One exercise deserves special commendation — the recitation of \ 
brief gems of thought from the works of our best authors. If ; 
each of our schools v^ere required to memorize weekly a few ' 
choice lines from some standard author, our scholars on going 
from school would carry with them rich treasures of noble ; 
thought, ready to spring to the lips in apt quotation. ; 

Center Primary. i 

Of our old teachers we must speak briefly, having spoken so ' 
fully of them in our previous reports. Miss Ball so combines j 
thorough instruction with varied and interesting exercises that her ij 
scholars go not " unwillingly to school," but deem it a great loss ] 
to be absent a day, and make excellent progress. -A 

North School. j 

Miss Alice Mansfield of Chelmsford, taught the Spring and ' 
Fall terms with good success, but was obliged to employ a sub- I 
stitute for a few weeks on account of the sickness of a member of j 
her family, and for a similar reason resigned at the end of the 1 
Fall term. Miss Eugenia Shea of Lynn, a normal graduate of i 
two years successful experience as a teacher, succeeded Miss M., j 
but in a few weeks went home ill, and soon passed from this life. J 

Miss Mar}^ E. Davis of Chelmsford, completed the term, i 
Notwithstanding these drav^^backs the older scholars appeared ! 
well examination day, and deserve special praise for excellence of ^ 
deportment. 

East School. ,^ 

Miss Susie A. Wetherbee continues to teach and govern this 
school, with that abilitj' of which we have spoken in former re- ;, 
ports. The large number of daily recitations — about twenty-five ; 
— comprising all grades, from the lowest primary to studies more ^ 
properly pursued in the High School, render the task of teaching ; 



20 

veiy arduous ; much more so than Is the teach uig of thrice as 
many scholars well classed. We remedied this evil all we 
could, by putting classes together when only a few pages separat- 
ed them. The parents of scholars fitted for the High School 
should, if possible, send them there, instead of letting them do as 
best they can with only such brief instruciton as the busy teacher 
can give them. If not too inconvenient on account of distance, it 
would be better for all concerned if scholars from this school were 
to spend their last year before admission to the High School in 
the Center Grammar School, where they would be stimulated by 
the enthusiasm of a large class, and could receive that careful in- 
struction which is possible only in a graded school, or a very small 
ungraded one. 

vSouTii East School. 

Miss Bertha Manley has now taught this school more than 
two years, and it has steadily improved in deportment and schol- 
arship. Absenteeism is the great drawback here. Much of it is 
caused by sickness, and in case of very young scholars, by incle- 
mency of the weather, but if parents would resolve that their 
children should l)e absent only for good cause, the school would 
make a better showing examination day, and in the tabular state- 
ment. 

South Primary. 

Miss Emma F. Estabrook, after having taught this school 
very successfully more than two years, resigned at the end of the 
Spring term, to enter into that more private position in life which 
the New England school mistress usually fills so admirably. She 
was succeeded in the school by Miss Viola S. Tuttle, under 
whose able discipline and instruction there was no diminution of 
success. 

South Grammar. 

Miss Jennie A. Hemenway taught the Spring and Fall 
terms with excellent success, and then resigned, to follow the ex- 
ample of Miss Estabrook. Miss Susan B. Holmes, a Normal 
School graduate, and for three years a successful teacher in a 
Cambridgeport grammar school, taught the Winter term, and no 
school in town is now under better instruction and discipline than 
this. Systematic exercises in drawing were a prominent feature 
examination day, and should be practiced in all our primary and 
grammar schools. 



so 

West Grammar. 

Miss S. J. Wyman continues to give thorough instruction, 
but the annual examination was not quite up to the high standard 
previously maintained, due no doubt largely to the fact that her 
largest and best class at the beginning of the Winter term left 
her for the High School. 

West Primary. 

Miss C. Lettie Newton has now taught this school two years 
with increasing success, until it is now second to no school in 
town in excellence of discipline and character, and amount of 
work done. Nowhere have we seen more accurate memory 
maps than those that adorned the boards examination day. 

High School. 

It has been a matter of some difficulty to decide on the re- 
quirements for admission. It was necessary to fix the standard 
according to the material we were likely to have to choose from. 
At present the requirements are — the ability to read well at sight 
any selection from the Grammar School Reader, good spelling 
and penmanship, the Franklin Arithmetic or its equivalent to 
'^ Roots," the whole of the prescribed course in Geography as stat- 
ed elsewhere in this report, and in grammar, Swinton's Language 
Primer, and Language Lessons. The sickness of Mr. Williams, 
the teacher, detracted somewhat from the success of the Winter 
term, but the excellence of the work done in the five preceeding 
terms, and even in the last term, as well as the general good be- 
havior and enthusiasm of the scholars, lead us to believe the 
teacher, with renewed health, will in the future be even more 
successful than in the past, and that this school will become a 
permanent part of our school system. 

Appended is the usual tabular statement. 

For the Committee, 
FREDERICK C. NASH, Superintendent. 



31 

FINANCIAL REPORT. 



To the Citizens of Acton: 

The undersigned, School Committee of Acton, respectfully 
submit the following report of receipts and expenditures for the 
year, and for a statement of the condition of the schools refer }'Ou 
to the Superintendent's report, and annexed tables. 

JOHN E. CUTTER, Chairman. 
THERON F. NEWTON, Clerk. 
GEORGE GARDNER. 
LUKE J. ROBBINS. 
Acton, March 25th, 1885. 



South School. 



To cash paid Jennie A Hemenway, 24 weeks $228 00 

Susan Holmes, 12 '' 120 00 

Emma Esterbrooks, 12 '^ 108 00 

Viola S. Tuttle 216 00 

F. J. Wood, care of house 90 00 

^' cleaning ^' 3 98 

E. Jones & Co., coal 32 75 

Mrs. Edward Harris, cleaning. . 75 

E. Jones, wood 2 25 

David Rynn, sawing same 1 00 

$802 73 

CR. 

By cash received from town $802 73 

THERON F. NEWTON, Committee. 



South East School. 

To cash paid Bertha Manley, 36 weeks $324 00 

'' '' care of house 9 00 

Frank D. Barker, wood 17 50 

Sylvester Haynes, work 8 00 

$358 50 

CR. 

By cash received from town $358 00 

THERON F. NEWTON, Committee. 



32 

Acton High School. 

To cash paid H. H. Williams $240 CO 

F. J. Wood, care of room 15 00 

E. Jones & Co., coal 10 35 

Geo. Gardner, piano 1 58 

$266 93 

CR. 

By cash received from town $266 93 

THERON F. NEWTON. Committee. 

Centre School. 

To cash paid teachers $674 00 

Fuel and repairs 77 28 

Cleaning house 6 66 

Care of house 43 00 

$801 94 

CR. 

By cash received from town $801 94 

JOHN E. CUTTER, Committee. 

North Acton School. 

To cash paid teachers $308 00 

Fuel and repairs 1 2 85 

Care of house 21 00 

Miller 10 00 

$351 85 

CR. 

By cash received from town $351 85 

JOHN E. CUTTER, Committee. 

East School. 

To cash paid S. A. Wetherbee, 36 weeks $324 00 

Care of house 21 00 

Coal 21 75 

Wood 4 00 

Cutting wood 1 60 

Crayons 60 



$372 95 

CR. 

By cash received from town $372 95 

LUKE J. ROBBINS, Committee. 



33 



Scholars leitlier Alisent nor Tardy duriog the Year 



West Grammar School. 

Emma J. Hart, Ida L. Richardson. 

Bertram D. Hall, 1 term High School. 

West Primary School. 
Ray Littlefield. 

Centre Grammar School. : 

May Calder, Cla^'a Hammond, 



Scholars not Tardy during the Year. 



Centre Grammar School. 

Arthur Allen, Lizzie Manion, 

Lottie Conant, Maude Purcell, 

May Calder, Albert Reed, 

Clara Hammond, Clara Robbins, 

Sarah Edwards, Hattie Robbins, 

Eugene Johnson, Jessie Wood, 

Jennie McCarty, Grace Tuttle, i term. 

Centre Primary vSchool. 

Charles W. Bemis, Mary E. Edwards, 

Carrie E. Taylor, Simon D. Taylor. 

Acton High School. 

Lutie Conant, Minnie S. Harris, 

Arthur B. Davis, 1 term, Clara A. Nye, 1 term, 

Edwin Smith, 2 terms, Lottie Richardson, 1 term. 

Carrie F. Hanson, Sadie E. Sawyer, 

Carrie L. Shapley, 



34 

East School. 

Blanche M. Bassett, Emma M. Sawyer, 

Bertha E. Hosmer, 1 term High, Mabel F. Wetherbee, 
Mabel F. Hanscom, John E. O'Neil, 

Mary E. O'Neil, James O'Neil, 

Fred L. Robbins. 



North School. 

Hattie E. Smith, Everett S. Wayne, 

Irving E. Smith, Augusta W. Smith, 

Walter E. Smith, Rena N. Keyes, 2 terms, 

Bertha H. Dupee. 

South East School. 

George Clough, part of 1 term, Frank Austin, 1 term, 
Eva Penniman, 2 terms, George Austin, 1 term, 

Rebecca Mulholland, Robert McCarty, 1 term, 

Emma Charlow, 1 term, Maria McCarty, 1 term, 

Nancy M. Austin, 1 term, Nellie McCarty, 2 terms. 

West Grammar School. 



Mabel H. Decoster, 

Bertha L. Gardner, 1 term High, 

Gertie M. Guilfoid, 

Addie L. Guilford, 

Carrie M. Gilmore, 

Etta R. Hall, 

Hattie B. Harris, 1 term High, 

Alice J. Hoar, 1 term High, 

Edith B. Holden, 1 term High, 

Fred. H. Nash, 1 term High, 

Grace N. Houghton, 



Lulu M. Lawrence, 
Susie M. Poultney, 
Viola A. Preston, 
Mabel L.Robinson,! term High, 
Eddie H. Robinson, 
Alice L. Stone, 

Grace E. Tuttle, 1 term Gram- 
mar and 1 term High, 
Emma J. Hart, 
Ida L. Richardson, 
Bertram D. Hall, 1 term High. 



West Primary School. 



Lulu Whitcomb, 2 terms, 
Willie Brazalle, 
Ruth Carey, 1 term, 
Wilson Carey, 1 term, 
Charlie Decoster, 
Richard Davis, 
Fred Davis, 
Willie Gilmore, 
Sidney Edvs^ards, 1 term, 
Ethel Handley, 
John Hanaford, 
Bertie Holt, 



Hattie Lav^rence, 
Mabelle Mead, 
Ella Puffer, l^term, 
Willie Puffer, 1 term, 
Alfred Richardson, 
Mary Frank Rich, 
Willie Rich, 
Julia|Rhoades, 
Carl Rhoades, 
Elma Stone, 
Harry Tuttle, 
Ray Littlefield. 



35 



South Grammar School. 



Olive G. Barker^ 
Jessie E. Currie, 
Evie B. Fletcher, 
Ida A. Hapgood, 
Alice M. Hanson, 
Ada M. Jones, 
Lilian F. Richardson, 
Bessie Tucker, 1 term, 
Carrie L. Wheeler, 

George 



Isa I. Willis, 1 term, 
A. Maud Sawyer, 
Guy E. Currie, 
A. Raymond Currie, 
Willie S. Fletcher, 
Charlie Hapgood, moved, 
Charlie S. Moulton, 2 terms, 
George Warren, 1 term, 
Jerry Bradley, 2 weeks, 
Clough, 2 terms. 



South Primary School. 



Emma Bradford^ 
Helen Bradford, 
Jessie Jones, 
Bertha Newton, 
Clara Sawyer, 
Annie Tucker, 
Ella Spinney, 
Almira Page, 1 term, 
Mabel Hastings, 
Frank Hapgood, 
Harry Sawyer, 



Fred Baldwin, 
Willie Tucker, 
Johnny Hannon, 
Frank E. Hapgood, 
James Culliane, 
Richard Murphy, 1 term, 
Percy Tuttle, 
Clifford Robbins, 
Raymond Tuttle, 1 term, 
Fred Tuttle, 1 term, 
Georgie Clapp, 
Cora Clough. 



TABULAR STATEMENT. 









fl 




f< 


a 









"S 






o 
o 

o 2 


A. 
1 

2 


<A 
O 


1 


i 




05 




SCHOOLS. 


TEACHERS. 


OS 


1 

Vi 


6 




t 


% 




'2 


1 






s 

^ 




% 


V 

< 


> 
< 


6 


6 







SPIJIXG TERM. 












ppntvp S Grammar, 


^riss Carrie L. Havnes, 


2 1-2 


.f.36 00 


25 


25 


24 


1 





24 


" Bessie M. Ball, 


2 1-2 


36 00 


18 


17 


16 





1 


4 


South, 1 Grammar, 
' ( Primary, 


" J. A. Hemmenway. 


3 


38 00 


34 


30 2-3 


30 


2 





32 


" Emma F. Estahroblc, 


3 


36 00 


39 


36 


34 





1 


15 


Wpat \ Gramm^ar, 
West, jpj.j.jjarv. 


" Sarah J. Wyman, 


3 


40 00 


37 


36 


35 


3 





34 


•' C. Lettie Newton, 


3. 


36 00 


42 


41 


39 1-3 








15 


North, 


" Alice M. Mansfield, 


2 1-2 


32 00 


17 


16 2-3 


15 1-2 


1 





6 


East, 


" Susie A. Wetherbee, 


3 


36 00 


25 


20 1-8 


18a-4 





1 


7 


South East. 


" Bertha AFanlev, 


3 


36 00 


19 


16 2-3 


14 1-3 


1 


•2 


13 


High, 


Mr. H. H. Williams, 

1 AT.r, TKHM. 




80 00 


32 


31 3-4 


301-12 


22 





3 


PpntPr S Orammar, 


Miss Carrie L. Haynes. 
" Bessie M. Ball, 


3 
3 


$40 00 
36 00 


25 
25 


20 3-4 
23 1-3 


18 5-6 
21 1-3 


1 







24 
9 


(^nntii i <^'iainmar, 
South, j Primary, 


" J. A. Henmienway, 


3 


.38 00 


30 


27 1-3 


25 2-3 








30 


" Viola S. Tuttle, 


3 


.36 00 


34 


30 


26 1-0 





1 


l^ 


AVP«f S Grammar, 
West, j Primary, 


" S. J. Wyman, 


3 


40 00 


34 


32 1-2 


31 2-3 


1 





33 


" C. L. Newton, 


3 


36 00 


39 


35 1-3 


34 1-6 








16 


North, 


" Alice Mansfield, 


3 


36 00 


17 


16 5-6 


16 1-20 


3 





6 


East, 


•' S. A. Wetherbee. 


2 3-4 


36 00 


23 


22 1-8 


21 1-3 








7 


South East, 


" Bertha Manlev, 


3 


36 00 


20 


16 


14 1-6 





1 


12 


High, 


:Mr. H. H. Williams, 


3 


80 00 


23 


21 


19 1-6 


17 





3 


pp«tpr f Grammar, 
*^^"^^''irrimarv, 


:Miss C. L. Havnes, 


3 1-2 


$40 00 


29 


28 


25 


5 





24 


" B. M. Ball, 


3 1-2 


36 00 


22 


191-16 


14 3-4 








4 


sinnth S Grammar, 
South, j Primary, 


" Susan B. Holmes. 


3 


40 00 


26 


04 0.3 


23 








26 


" Viola S. Tuttle, 


3 


.36 00 


31 


28 1-2 


25 








16 


xvpst J Grammar, 
west, 1 Primary, 


" S. .J. Wyman, 


3 


40 00 


29 


27 1-2 


26 1-3 


1 





24 


" C. L. Newton, 


3 


36 00 


37 


34 


.30 1-3 








24 


North, 


" Eugenia Shea. ^ 
" Marv E. Davis, j 


3 1-4 


36 00 


17 


17 


15 1-8 


3 





6 


East, 


" S. a". Wetherbee. 


3 1-4 


36 00 


28 


26 1-2 


20 2-3 


3 





11 


South Fast, 


" Bertha Manley, 


3 


36 00 


19 


15 


12 5-6 





2 


n 


High, 


Mr. H. H. Williams, 


3 


80 00 


42 


37 1-3 


33 2-3 26 





8 





Number of children in town between five and fifteen, as i-eported by the Assessors, 
May 14, 1884, .263. 

Sum raised by town for each, (besides ,f 800.00 for High School,) $12.16. 



OF THE 

SELECTMEN 

AND OTHER OFFICERS 

OF THE 

TOWN OF 4CT0N 

From Feb. 26, 1885, to Feb. 26, 1886. 
INCLUDING THE MARRIAGES, BIRTHS and DEATHS IN 1885 



ALSO THE 



IIepout of the School Committee. 




ITUDSOJs": 
TiiK Enteupjuse Steam Job Pi;i]S[t, 

1880, 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Town, of Acton in Account with J. K. W. Wetherbee, Treas. i 

Dr. 

1886. "= 

Feb 2G. To cash paid for State Tax, 1,110 00 

" " County tax, 8G0 1'2 { 

" paid on Selectmen's or- '\ 

ders, 15,009 53 ' '\ 

Outstanding orders, . 1,379 04 

Balance due the town, 375 55 

$18,734 34 \ 

Cr. \ 
By Balance in the Treasury, Feb. 26th, 

1885, ' $1,871 17 ; 
Amount received of County Treasurer 

on account of dog licenses, 229 89 | 

Received of L. W. Stevens for lots sold \ 

in Mount Hope cemetery in 1884, 36 00 \ 

Received of tov^^n of Methuen, for aid i 

furnished William Austin, 22 87 '\ 

Received of Town of Methuen, iox aid \ 

fm-mshed E. S. New, 99 92 j 

Received of State Treasurer, for sup- ■ 

port of State paupers, 27 15 

Received of G. H. Warren, for rent of '> 

school room, 33 00 j 

Received of Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee \ 



borrowed money. 


3,000 


00 


Received of George Chandler borrowed 






money, 


500 


00 


Received of J. K. W. Wetherbee, bor- 






rowed money, 


1,200 


00 


Received of C. H. Stuart for old lum- 






ber. 


3 


75 


Received of Town of Natick, for aid 






furnished James Hoye, 


10 


51 


Received for rent of Town Hall cellar. 


25 


50 


Received of R. L. Reed, for rent of 






Town Hall and cellar. 


64 


00 


Amou7zt carried forward^ 




— $7123 



7G 



Amount hi'ottght fo7'%vard^ $7123 76 

Received of State Treasurer for Cor- 
poration tax, 

Received of State Treasurer for Na- 
tional Bank Tax, 

Received of State Treasurer for State 
Aid, 

Received of vState Treasurer, relief of 
indigent soldiers, 

Received of State Treasurer for income 
of school fund, 

Received of N. Johnson for stone, 

Received of J. W. Dupee for taxes for 

A. D. 1882, 392 08 

Received of John E. Cutter, Collector 

of Taxes, 0,318 75 

Received for interest on money, 52 91 

$18,734 34 

J. K. W. WETHERBEE, 

Treasitrer of Acton. 
Acton, Feb. 26, 18^0. 



713 


04 


708 


71 


73 


00 


184 


00 


164 


99 


2 


50^ 



Report of the Selectmen of the Town of Acton, 

From Feb. 26, 1885, to Feb. 26, 1886. 



CENTRE DISTRICT SCHOOL. 


Paid John E. Cutter, 


$260 00 


ii, i(, 11 


250 00 


4C ii ii 


294 25 




'^ROi ^^1 






WEST DISTRICT SCHOOI.. 


Paid Miss S. J.Wyman, services as teacher, 


$60 00 


Miss G. Lettie Newton, '' '' 


54 00 


W. C. Gardiner, care of house, 


25 00 


Miss S. J. Wyman, sevicesas teacher. 


60 00 


Miss G. Lettie Newton, '' " 


54 00 


;; L^ it. ;> u 


40 00 


Li (.i a a u 


40 00 


Miss S. J. Wyman, '• " 


80 00 


Miss G. Lettie Newton, " " 


70 00 


Miss S. J. Wyman, " " 


70 00 


E. G. Parker, for coal, 


38 37 


W. G, Gardner, care of house. 


25 00 


Miss S. J. Wyman, teaching school. 


40 00 


Miss G. Lettie Newton, "^ '' 


40 00 


a i.i a u iL 


50 00 


Miss S. J. Wyman, '• " 


50 00 




$796 37 


SOUTH DISTRICT SCHOOL. 


Paid Theron F. Newton, 


$270 00 


"' " coal and wood. 


33 43 


" " Soutli District, 


10 00 


a a Li c c 


237 50 


Susan B. Holmes, teaching. 


44 00 


c; ii a 


44 00 


T. F. Newton, care of house. 


10 00 


'' " South District, 


204 50 



$853 43 



EAST DISTRICT SCHOOJL. 



Paid Luke J. Robbins. East District, 
" '' coal, " 

" ^' coal, " 



$121 62 

7 00 

104 50 

20 02 

135 50 



SOUTH-EAST 


DISTRICT 


SCHOOL. 




Barker, 




$113 


00 


u 




109 


15 


(; 


' 


131 


00 



$388 64 



$353 15 



IS^ORTII DISTRICT SCHOOL. 

Paid Ella D. Daniels, services as teacher, $54 00 

C.|I. Miller, north school 

coal for north school, 
North District, 



59 00 




28 88 




36 00 




68 00 




54 00 




74 00 






$373 f^^ 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Paid E. C. Parker, coal for West High 

School, 
W. C. Gardner, care of house, West 

High School, 
H. PI. Williams, services as teacher 

in high school, W. Acton, 
H. H. Williams, services as teacher 

in high school, Acton Centre, 
T. F. Newton, coal for high school, 
H. H. Williams, teaching school, 



J. E. Cutter, for coal and care of 

house, 
T. F. Newton, for high school, 



$12 00 

12 00 

240 00 



80 


00 


12 


80 


80 


00 


60 


00 


80 


00 


80 


00 


18 


75 


121 


25 



$796 80 



SCHOOJL SUPPJLIES 

Paid T. F. Newton, school supplies, 



$39 


89 


6 


44 


148 


38 


126 


74 


38 


54 


282 


69 


140 


43 


74 


09 


184 


67 


23 


22 



TOW]Sr OFIICEIIS. 

Paid F. C. Nash, balance of salary for Supt. 

of schools, ^ $50 00 

L. U. Holt,sealer weights and measures, 8 00 

Rev. C. L. Rhoades, Supt. of schools, 41 67 

H. J. Hapgood, services as Assessor, 21 00 

A. L. Noyes, services as Registrar, 15 00 

John White, " '' 15 00 

Chas. B. Stone, " ^' 15 00 

Wm. D. Tuttle, " " 15 00 

Phineas VVetherbee, services as Assessor, 2ij 00 

Wm. D. Tuttle, '' '' 32 00 

C. L. Rhoades, vSupt. of schools, 41 6G 
J. W. Dupee, collecting taxes, 1882, 70 00 
Wm. D. Tuttle, services Town Clerk, '2i) 00 
J. W. Dupee, services Selectman, 45 00 

D. J. Wetherbee, '' 85 00 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, '^ 45 00 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, Treasurer, 40 00 



PRINTING. 

Paid John F. Wood, Selectmen's report and 
warrants, 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, printing warrants 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, order blanks, 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, advertising, 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, fishing and hunt- 
ing notices, 
S. F. Pratt, printing. 



$68 


00 


', 6 


75 


2 


25 


1 


50 


3 


50 


2 


60 



$1,060 09 



$589 



$84 60 



8 

CEMETERY EXPENSES. 

Paid L. W. Stevens, labor in Mt. Hope 

cemetery, $71 7i) 

John Fletcher, labor and material in 

Woodlawn cemetery, 16 38 

L. W. Stevens, labor and lumber in Mt. 

Hope cemetery, 113 37 

John Fletcher, labor on monument, 1 00 

John Fletcher, labor in Woodlawn cem- 
etery, 40 60 

John Fletcher, labor in North Acton 

cemeter}', 8 00 



Paid John Carroll, 

Allen G. Smith, 
Benj. Skinner, 
Ola Nelson, 
Geo. Dole, 
Richard G. Dane, 
Mrs. R. C. Wright, 









STATE 


AIB. 


$132 00 

82 00 






96 00 
48 00 
40 00 
GO 00 
48 00 



UPPOlll' OF POOR. 



$301 


19 


45 


21 


43 


97 


44 


21 


10 


51 


10 


00 


14 


00 


22 


87 


15 


8o 


20 


00 


4 


82 


2 


00 


27 


83 


2Cy 


00 


1 


60 


52 


40 


43 


38 


42 


35 



$251 10 



$506 00 



Paid E. li. Cutler, deficiency on town farm, 

'' support Clara Wheeler, 

" "' E. Burgendahl, 

'' •"' Emily Tovvne, 

" '' James Hoye, 

" " James Stowe, 

Dr. Sanders, med. attendance, J. Stott, 
E. H. Cutler, support Wm. Austin, 
Luke Blanchard,expense respecting poor. 
E. FT. Cutler, support Mrs. Pike, 
•' Abbie Fish, 

" '' Michael Folard, 

" " Mrs. Whitney, 

'' " Pat Sullivan, 

'' " Mrs. Stanton, 

" " Clara Wheeler, 

" "■ E. Burgendahl, 

" " Emily Tovvne, 

Amount car 7"i0d forward^ ■^- -" '- $728 19 



Amount brought fovcvard^ $728 19 

Paid E. H. Cutler, support Clara Wheeler, 56 36 

E. Burgendahl, 42 71 

E. F. Tovvne, 48 61 

'' '' Annie Shaw, 134 50 

Dr. Hutchins, attendance to Annie Shaw, 97 05 

E. H. Cutler, support Mrs. Pike, 25 00 

James E. Harris, 40 69 

^' '' Mrs. Whitney, 15 00 

'\ '^ E. S. New, 99 92 

" '' Redding family, 19 50 

'' '' Mrs. Whitney, 15 00 

'' '' Clara Wheeler, 48 59 

'' " E. Burgendahl, 47 01 

^' '' E. F. Towne, 45 95 



Mrs. Whitney, 23 03 i 

aid furnished Penniman \ 

family, 5 00 J 

aid furnished Baker family, 3 01 

support T. Russell, 39 76 \ 

J. E. Harris, 28 39 \ 

Ola Nelson, 10 00 ' 

Redding family, 19 50 | 

'' Mrs. Whitney, 10 00 \ 

Mrs. Pike, 9 75 \ 

journey to Tewksbury, 3 50 ■, 

'* Amesbury, 12 50 \ 

'' Concord, 1 50 1 

'' Worcester, 8 00 

telegraph dispatch, 35 

aiding tramps, 35 \ 

stationery and stamps, 1 50 \ 

$1,640 22 I 



REGULAR HIGHWAY TTORK. 

Paid Charles Wheeler, $ 325 00 

A. H. Jones, 400 00 

A. M. Knowlton, 3 55 

Charles Wheeler, 427 1^ 

Charles Wlieeler, on Flail road by order 

Selectmen, 29 74 

A. H. Jones, regular highway work, 338 15 

A- H. Jones, repairs on road at Mrs. 

Law, by order Selectmen, 59 69 



$1,588 39 



10 

BRIDGES. 

Paid E. Jones & Co., plank and spikes for ' 

Powder mill bridge, $131 22 

Michael Hannon, on account of bridge, 100 00 
Michael Hannon, on account of bridge, 100 00 
Geo. McQueston & Co., lumber for 

bridge, near J. W. Flagg's house, dQ 58 

Charles Wheeler, labor building bridge 

and grading near J. W. Flagg's 

house, 5'0 75 

A. II. Jones, repairs on Powder mill 

bridge, 23 95 

J. W..Flagg, for nails, zinc and bolts, 

for bridge, 14 68 

D. ]. Wetherbee, teaming lumber for 

bridge, 5 00 

D. J. Wetherbee, freight on lumber for 

bridge, . 8 40 



REPAIRS 0]S" TO^VX BUILDINGS. 



$530 58 



Paid Tuttle, J<jnes ^ Wetherbee, furniture 

town hall, $6 74 

F. E. Harris, repairs on West Acton 

school house, 15 39 

C. I. Miller, repairs on North Acton 

school house, 13 60 

L. U. Holt, repairs on North Acton 

school house, 9 95 

L. U. Holt stove for West Acton school 

house, 44 23 

T. F. Newton, repairs on So. Acton 

school house, 5 20 

H. T. Clark, closets West district, 10 00 

F. D. Barker, repairs on Southeast 
school house, 10 67 

C. L. Davis, labor and material paint- 
ing East school house, 69 56 

C. L. Davis, labor and material paint- 
Southeast school house, 66 8Q 

C. L. Davis, labor and material paint- 
ing North school house, 73 76 

^. Jones & Co., lumber for town hall, 24 84 

^ffio-ppnt cciri'led forwctrd^ ^.w .i^.--- ^350 80 



11 

Amount brought forward^ $350 80 
Paid L. U. Holt, repairs on furnace No. Ac- 
ton district, ?)S 10 
L. U. Holt, stove and pipe Centre dis- 
trict, 47 78 
C. I. Miller, lumber and labor North 

Acton school house, 81 26 

Luke J. Robbins, repairs on East school 

house, 12 39 

F. W. Greene, cleaning house and vault 

West Acton district, 6 50 

Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee, material 

decorating town hall, 5 12 

F. D. Barker, repairs on southeast school 

house, 17 78 

Warren Houghton, repairs on West 

school house, 5 05 

J. E. Cutter, lining for stove and grate. 

Centre district, 7 23 

J. E. Cutter, repairing settees, do, 3 75 

Wayne and Hosmer, labor, 5 13 
Window cord, 2 25 

Dressing blackboards, 8 35 

Tinting walls, 96 96 



$63^ 4i 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid John E. Cutter, for tuition of Mr. Bul- 

lette and Mr. Littlefield's children, $28 50 
T. F. Newton, wood and repairs South 

district 9 07 

B. C. Nickerson, entertaining sixth Regt, 166 40 

Dr. Sanders, memorial expenses, 100 00 

P. A. Collins, counsel in bounty case, 250 00 

Daniel Tuttle, yoke for town farm, 3 00 
Sullivan, Harris & Prescott, stone for 

town house, 11 50 
Samuel Hoar, expenses in bounty case 

by order of Supreme Court, 387 02 

Daniel Tuttle, expenses for band Apr.l9, 10 00 

John Fletcher, platform for town pump, 2 50 
Francis Jones, painting and lettering 

guide boards, 51 48 

Amount cetrried forward^ $1018 47 



2 


50 


13 


83 


2 


00 


8 


00 


40 


00 


61 


00 


10 


50 



12 

Amount bro2ight fo7"ward, $1018 47 

Paid A. L. Tuttle, breaking roads in J 883, 14 40 

L. E. Reed, making 25 death returns 1884, 6 25 
L. E. Reed, summoning two witnesses 

before registrars 1884, 3 32 

L. E. Reed, express on cover for hearse 50 

L. E. Reed, attending 19 burials, 57 00 

E. A. Phelan, labor on hitching posts, 
town hall, 12 79 

S. Robbins, labor on hitching posts, 
town hall, 

S. Robbins, labor on tables. 

W. N. Sharp, vaccinating five children, 

J. Kinsley, for use of road for Hurley, 

Luther Conant and D. J. Wetheibee, 
expenses on bounty case, 

Henry Brooks, land widening road, 

Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee, pails, 

Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee, three doz. 

grenades, 26 25 

Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee, 12 hold- 
ers, 2 75 
R. L. Reed, labor on fire escape and 

hitching posts, 19 05 

C. B. Sanders, vaccinating 45 school 
children, 18 00 

F. D. Barker, clock southeast district, 4 00 
H. J. Hapgood, collectors and overseers 

books, 2 00 

A. H. Jones, railing road at Bowens 
mills, ,^ 

D. J. Wetherbee, breaking roads 1885. 
C. L. Davis, painting guide boards, 

E. Jones & Co., lumber for town house, 
E. Jones & Co., lumber for railings, 
E. Jones & Co., brackets for fire ladders, 
M. E. Taylor, oil, wicks and supplies 

town hall, 
J. W. Dnpee, abatement of taxes 1882, 
Wm. D. Tuttle, express charges, 
Wm. D. Tuttle, postage and stationary, 
Wm. D. Tuttle, laying out road, 
Wm. D. Tuttle, index book, 
Wm. D. Tuttle, journey to Concord, 
Wm. D. Tuttle, journey to Boston, 
Wm. D. Tuttle, recording births. 

Amount carried forward^ — — $1465 52 



45 


81 


5 


79 


3 


87 


, 10 


53 


3 


22 


2 


65 


13 


13 


31 


60 


1 


83 




95 


2 


75 


2 


28 


1 


50 


1 


00 


16 


00 



13 

Amount hr ought forward^ $1465 52 

Paid Wm. D. Tuttle, recording deaths, 4 80 

Wm. D. Tuttle, recording marriages, 3 60 

E. J. Robbins for chestnut posts, 4 00 

R. L. Reed, care of hall, 58 15 

^' care of clock, 15 00 

*' for wood, 2 50 

'' for glass, 1 10 

'' for oil for clock, 1 00 

" repairs on town punnp, 1 00 

Isaac Reed, breaking roads, 1884, 12 60 

'' work on sluice, 1 50 

D. J. Wetherbee, for care town house, 13 50 

J. E. Cutter, collecting taxes, 1883, 47 50 

" posting warrants, 10 00 

'^ collecting taxes, 1884, 150 00 

" discount on taxes, 1885, 488 28 

" notifying pcsons to take 

oath, 1883, 1 75 
'^ notifying persons to take 

oath, 1884, 2 50 
Town of Littleton, schooling children of 

Littlefield and Bullette, 1883-84, 100 00 
Town of Littleton, schooling children 

Mr. Bullette, 1885, 
L. E. Reed, attending 16 burials, 
*' making death returns, 

" straps for hearse, 



6 


00 


48 


00 


6 


50 




50 



$2446 30 i 

I 



TEMPOARY LOAN PAID. 

Paid Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee, note and interest, $1540 83 



BOUNTY TAX. 

Bounty Tax refunded, $1156 16 



14 

RECAPITULATION. 



$1,288 


06 


1,461 


19 


8,000 


00 


4,100 


00 


1,400 


00 


162 


93 


1,110 


00 


860 


22 


229 


89 


;]6 


00 



Unexpended balance as per report, Feb. 

26^ 1885, not including bounty tax, 
Bounty tax collected in 1882 and '83, 
Town charges, 

for schools, 
for roads, 
for overlay ings, 
for wState tax, 
for County tax, 
Received of State Treasurer for dog fund, 
for lots sold Mt. Hope cemetery, 
from Town Metliuen, aid of W. 

Austin. 22 8 

from State Treasury for support of 

State paupers, 
for rent school-room. South Acton, 
for old lumber, 
from Town Xatick. support of Jos. 

Hoye, 
for rent town hall cellar, 
from corporation tax, 

National bank tax, 
State aid. 
Soldiers aid, ■ 
Town of Medway, aid furnish- 
ed E. S. New, 99 02 
Tuttle, Jones &. Wetherbee, 

money borrowed, 3,000 00 

Geo. Chandler, borrowed mone}', 500 00 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, bor- 
rowed mone}^ 1,200 00 
Income from school fund, 
Interest on money in bank, 
Nathan Johnson, for stone 
R. L. Reed, use of Town Ha 
"' '-' cellar. 



21 


15 


33 


00 


3 


75 


10 


51 


25 


50 


713 


04 


708 


71 


73 


00 


184 


00 





164 


99 








52 


91 








2^50 






lall. 


50* 
13 


50 
50 











—$20, 


534 


14 



15 

RECEIPTS 

Fr®m February 26, 1885 to Feb. 26, 1886. 

Unexpended balance as per report Feb. 26, 

1885, not including bounty tax, $1,288 06 

Bounty tax collected, 1,461 19 

Appropriation and receipts 17,784 89 



$20,534 14 



EXPENDITURES, 



Support of Centre Distri 


ct School, 


$804 25 


" West 


- 


796 37 


'' South 


u 


853 43 


"' North 


a 


373 88 


'' East 


a 


388 64 


" South-east 


a 


353 15 


" High School, 




796 80 


School supplies, 




1,060 09 


Town officers. 




589 33 


Cemetery expenses, 




251 10 


Printing, 




84 60 


^tate aid. 




506 00 


Poor, 




1,640 22 


Regular highway work, 




1,583 39 


Bridges, 




530^58 


Repairs on town buildings, 




633^45 


Miscellaneous expenses. 




2,446 30 


Temporary loan paid. 




1,540 83 


State tax. 




1,110 00 


County tax, 




860 22 


Bounty tax refunded. 




1,156 16 
$18,358 79 



Balance in Collecter's hands, 1,799 80 

Balance in Treasurer's hands, 375 do 

, $2,175 35 

$20,534 U 



16 

Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee note, $1,500 00 

George Chandler note, 500 00 

J. K. W. Wetherbee note, 1,200 00 

$3200 00 

Bahmce against the town, 1,024 65 

D. J. WETHERBEE, ■) Selectmen 

J. K. W. WETHERBEE, \ of 
J. W. DUPEE, 3 Acton. 

Acton, Feb. 26, 1886. 



17 



REPORT OF TOWN CLERK, 



BIRTHS. 



/IrJ 



1885. 

Jan. 17, 

Feb. 14, 

Mar. 2, 

" 12, 

" M, 

" 30, 

Apr. 3, 

" 19, 

May 6, 

" 6, 

" 31, 

June 24, 

July 7, 

" 15, 

Aug. 2, 

" 15, 

'' 2.3, 

Sept. 1, 

" ^ 

" 18, 

Oct. 1, 

- 6, 

" 9, 

" 27, 

*' 27, 

" 31, 

Nov. 5, 

Dec. 14, 

" 19, 

'' 26, 



NAME OF CHILD. 



A daughter, 
Maggie Calinane, 
Benjamin F. Hay ward, 
Lizze Jones Brown, 
Blanche Silvia Piper, 
Albert Porter Durkee, 
Roy Luke Buttles, 
Ralph Leroy Barnes, 
Randall Augustus Whittier, 
Wayland Franklin Whittier, 
Mary Quinland, 
Alice Lovenia Wood, 
Ralph Edwin Houghton, 
Irving Gordon Dart, 
Alva Spencer Rhoades, 
Abbie Gertrude Palmer, 
Julia McCarthy, 
Martha Taylor, 
Eyerett Derby Barker, 
Bernard H. Knowlton, 
Frederick S. Mead, Jr., 
Oliye May Harrington, 
Frank H. Finch, 
Eva May Lawrence, 
Harold La Roy Crosby, 
Charles Barnard Cole, 
Ethel Brown Hastings, 
Rebecca Nye Warren, 
A daughter, 
Charles T. Owens, 
Roland Ellis Hutchins, 



NAME OF PARENTS. 



Frank and Honora (Baker) 
Daniel and Maggie (Callahan) 
Amos H. and Etta 0. (Hatch) 
James P. and Laura A. (Jones) 
Anson C. and Ellen L. (Jones) 
J. Edward and Susie E. (Tuttle) 
Hiram S. and Sybil G. (Selleck) 
Wm. and Charlotte E. (Hatch) 
twin children of 
Geo. E. and N. Edna (Walker) 
John and Julia (Carey) 
Edward and Mary B. (McLearn) 
Frank W. and Lizzie L. (Walker) 
Oswald L. and Cora A. (Cooper) 
Rev. Chas. L. and Mary E. (Fitch) 
Nathan R. and Abbie M. (Martin) 
John Jr. and Mary A. (McEUigott) 
S. H. and Mary B. (Thompson) 
Franklin D. and Lucietta (Derby) 
Oslia and Nellie F. (Handley) 
Frederick S. and Lizzie M.( Gates) 
Chas. E. and Marion E. (Brodie) 
Chas. and Phebe M. (Smith) 
Austin E. and Mary J. (Stebbins) 
Frank L. and Josie M. (Keith) 
Geo. W. and Anna Z. (Hewins) 
Lewis C. and Emma F. (Brown) 
Wm. S. and Rose E. (Stacy) 
Wm. G. and Sarah R. (Warren) 
Thomas and Eliza J. (Edwards) 
Geo. Y, and Hattie A. (Parker) 



18 
MAERIAGES. 



nu 





DATE. 


NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


1 


1885 
Feb. 7, 


Charles D. Grii^^gs. 
Abbie E. Roberts. 






Acton. 
Acton. 


2 


Feb. 8, 


Charles H. Handley. 
Katie B. Jewett. 






Acton. 
Acton. 


3 


Feb. 22, 


Aaron Wheeler. 
Mary L. Hosmer. . 






Natick. 
Acton. 


4 


Mar. 7, 


William Banks. 
Elizabeth Jane Tucker. 






Acton. 
Acton. 


5 


Mar. 9, 


James B. Wheeler. 
Mary Amanda Wheeler. 






Acton. 
Acton. 


6 


Mar. 17, 


George H. Brigham. 
Katie Lavelle. 






Marlborough. 
Marlborough. 


7 


Apr. 25, 


Frank L. Crosby. . 
Josephine M. Keith. 






Acton. 
Acton. 


8 


May 25, 


George A. Conant. 
Mabel E. Dow. 






Acton. 
Acton. 


9 


May 27, 


Webster C. Bobbins. 
Amelia H. Nichols. 






Acton. 
Concord. 


10 


June 10, 


Maurice Hefferman. 
Nellie A. Hannon. 






Boston. 
Acton. 


11 


June 18, 


William G. Brown. 
Sarah R. Warren, . 






Acton. 
Stow. 


12 


June 27, 


Walter N. Sharp. . 
Nettie C. Fuller. . 






Acton. 
Acton. 


13 


July 12, 


William F. Richardson. 
Flora A. Foote. 






Acton. 
Acton. 


14 


July 12, 


Walter A. Wright, 
Emma J. Willis, . 






Concord. 
Concord. 


15 


Sept. 11, 


Benjamin F. Keith. 
Tinsa Wagner. 






Acton. 
Maynard. 


16 


Sept. 12, 


John McCarthy. 

Ellen Louise Tuohey. . 






Acton. 
Acton. 


17 


Sept. 23, 


Frank Zehetli Taylor. . 
Caroline Augusta White. 






Acton. 
Ringe, N. H. 


18 


Nov. 3, 


John S. Hoar. 
Minnie R. Hart. 






Acton. 
Acton. 



19 



!25 

o 


DATE. 


NAME. 


RESIDENCE. 


19 


1885. 
Nov. 13, 


William T. Mason. 
Etta T. Hoyt. 






Acton. 
Acton. 


20 


Nov. 15, 


James W. Hunt. 
Mary E. Grimes. 






Maynard. 
Acton. 


21 


Nov. 23, 


Rev. Howard M. Jones. 
Clara K. Tuttle. 






Albert Lea, Minn. 
Acton. 


22 


Dec. 3, 


H. Everett Burnham. 
Rachel E. Scott. . 






Maynard. 
Maynal-d. 


23 


May 23, 


Hendrick Miller. . 
Abbie A. Puffer. 






Maynard. 
Concord. 


24 


July 15, 


Philip Allen. . 

Ellen Gates 






Stow. 
Stow. 



20 



DEATHS. 



n^j 



1885 
Date of 


NAME OF DECEASED. 


AGE. 








H« 


^ 


b 


KESIDENCE. 


PLACE OF BIRTH. 


Death. 
Feb. 10, 




GO 
1 


CO 


05 






George Frazier, 


Acton, 


Lowell. 


Mar. 1, 


Blanche L. Hayward, 


6 


11 








Milford. 


" 2, 


Eldora M. Williams, 




2 


9 






Acton. 


" 11, 


Mary F. Wellington, 


59 










Wilton, Me. 


'' 19, 


Ellen Kearney, 


8 


5 


15 






Hudson. 


" 22, 


Frances Booker, 


9 


11 








Ludlow, Eng. 


Apr. 22, 

- 25, 


Lucretia A. Frost. 
Michael McCarthy, 


65 
32 


4 


13 


i 










Boston. 


" 23, 


Daniel Fletcher, 


74 


8 








xlcton. 


May 5, 


Alvin A. Hayward, 


37 


9 








(( 


'' 15, 


Albert M. Horslin, 


1 


6 








(( 


June 3, 


Isaiah B. Perkins, 


85 


3 


19 






Brookfield. 


" 6, 


Ann Kinsley, 


70 










Ireland. 


'' 24, 


Sarah J. Reed, 


56 


8 


20 






Billerica. 


'' 29, 


W. J. McLaughlin, 


1 


1 


22 






Acton. 


July 9, 


Ancil W. Knowlton, 


33 


1 








Swanville, Me. 


" 13, 


Daniel T. Moore, 


23 


3 


14 






Acton. 


Auo:. 24, 


Frances A. Knight, 


48 


9 


9 






Concord. 


Sept. 15, 


Zabine C. Burroughs, 


84 


9 








Alstead, N. H. 


" 27, 


Ada M. Knowlton, 


1 


2 


11 






Acton. 


Oct. 20, 


Silas W. Wetherbee, 


79 


8 


4 






Boxborough. 


J^OY. 5, 


Lydia R. Keyes, 


73 


4 








Acton. 


" 17, 


Frank H. Finch, 




1 


15 






" 


- 25; 


George H. Warren, 


61 


7 








Littleton. 


Dec. 1, 


Jennie McAllister, 


33 


7 


22 






Shrewsbury. 


" 10, 


Mary A. Mehegan, 


18 


10 


7 






East Boston. 


" 21, 


Olive May Harrington, 




3 








Acton. 


" 23, 


Horatio Law, 


85 


8 


21 






a 



Whole No., 28; Average age, 37 6-10 years. 



21 



AMOUNT RECEIVED FROM LICENSES OF DOGS, 
SINCE LAST REPORT, $836.00. 



ISTAMES OF OWNEES. 



Dana F. Hayward, 

Aug^ustus Fletcher, 

Antoine Bulette, 

Ai Kobbins, 

Wm. D. Tuttle. 

Luther Conant, 

John Fletcher. 

Lester N. Fletcher, 

James Tobin, 

Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee, 

Elnathan Jones, 

James Tuttl^, 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, 

Charles Varney, 

Moses A. Keed, 

Gustavus H. Waugh, 

George W. Livermore, 

Isaiah S. Leach, 

Fred S. Whitcorab, 

Daniel McCarthy, 2d., 

A. Lucien Noyes, 

James D. Coburn, 

John Temple, 

E. F. Fuller, 

George '^. Conant, 

Isaac Barker, 

Charles A. Taylor, 

Charles A. Harrington, 

Mrs. George F. Flagg, 

John H. Hannaford, 

Job. W. Dupee, 

Mead & Stone, 

Luke Tuttle, 

Wm. B. Davis, 

J. E. Harris, 

George E. Keyes, 

William Barnes, 

Henry M. Smith, 

John W. Randall, 

Sylvester Haynes, 

Willis S. Mead, 

Elbridge J. Bobbins, 

Frederick Rouillard, 

John Welch, 

Isaac W. Flagg, 

Charles J. Williams, 

Daniel J. Wetherbee, 

Mrs. Daniel Wetherbee, 

Cyrus Hayv^ard, 

G. H. S. Houghton, 

Chas. J. Holton, 

Henry Hanson, 



p 




~l 


$2 
2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




8 




6 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 




2 



NAMES OF OWNERS. 



Joseph R. Bassett, 
William Barnes, 
M. E. Taylor, 
George C. Wright, 
Otis H. Forbush, 
Reuben L. Reed, 
George Gardner, 
William H. Teele, 
Frank R. Knowlton, 
Frank E. Harris, 
John C. Gates, 
Herman Chaplin, 
George Conant, 
Moses A. Reed, 
John Kelley, 
Edvi^in W. Taylor, 

A. H. Gilmore, 
Moses Taylor, 
Chauncey B. Bobbins, 
Webster C. Robbins, 
Chas. W. Grant, 
Frank W. Houghton, 
John W. Aldrich, 
Patrick Kearney, 
Joseph F. Cole, 

Dr. Chas. B. Sanders, 
Nelson J. Cole, 
Everett Wayne, 
Chas. D. Griggs, 
Michael Hannon, 
Andrew J. Willis, 
Edward O'Neil, 

B. C. Nickerson, 
Daniel Tuttle, 
Alonzo L. Tuttle, 
A. F. Blanchard, 
John Grimes, 
Nathan R. Palmer, 
J. E. Scofield, 
Geo. E. Whittier, 
Geo. W. Worester, 
Henry Brooks, 
Charles L. Beck, 
L. E. Reed, 
Francis Pratt, 
Chas. H. Handley, 
Henry Haynes, 
Chas. H. Wheeler, 
Forbush & Hartwell, 
George Pratt, 
Jairus C. Wheeler, 



Males, 103; Females, 6. Total, 109. 



22 



Report of Receipts and Expenditures at the 
Almshouse in Acton, 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY 28th, 1880. 



Articles 


ON Hand, 


February 28th, 1886. 




7 Cows, 


$350 00 


100 lbs. ham. 


12 00 


1 horse, 


200 00 


Lard, 


7 20 


15 tons hay, 


3 00 


30 bushels potatoes, 


22 50 


Meal and shorts, • 


12 15 


Bushels small potatoes. 


3 50 


900 C. S. meal, 


11 25 


Eggs, 


1 60 


Corn, 


2 00 


3 bbls. apples. 


3 GO 


500 straw, 


2 50 


Butter, 


1 80 


Lot of bap^s, 


5 00 


Oil, 


60 


17 cords wood cut for stove, 80 00 


Fh.ur, 


5 00 


31 hens, 


15 50 


Soap, 


5 30 


1 wagon, 


90 00 


1 cider barrel, 


1 00 


1 bugory^ 


25 00 


50 lbs. corn beef. 


3 00 


57 barrels. 


5 70 


Beans, 


1 00 


2 tons coal, 


12 00 


2 lbs. tea. 


1 GO 


4 market boxes. 


40 


Spices, 


50 


350 lbs. salt pork, 


35 00 














$1,215 50 



Receipts from Town Farm, 

From March 1, 1885 to February 28, 1886. 



Rec'd for 




Rec'd for 




Apples, 


215 48 


Labor, 


$1 25 


Milk, 


575 50 


Meat, 


2 92 


Potatoes, 


89 65 


Calves, 


9 25 


Eggs, 


15 39 


Beef cow, 


40 00 



$949 44 



23 





Expenses. 




Paid for 




Paid for 




Coffee, 


10 17 


Hoes, 


2 25 


Yeast, 


71 


Dried apples, 


98 


Fish, 


10 92 


Castings, 


1 85 


Flour, 


45 24 


Meat, 


123 53 


Tea, 


23 10 


Soap, 


15 10 


Sugar, 


16 94 


Ginger, 


25 


Beans, 


4 25 


Oatmeal, 


1 40 


Shoes, 


8 52 


Medicine, 


2 45 


Butter, 


51 98 


Jug, 


75 


Cheese, 


6 03 


Molasses, 


9 25 


Vinegar, 


70 


Pace, 


1 08 


Cloth and clothing, 


54 64 


Pepper, 


47 


Nails, 


97 


Potatoes, 


5 00 


Tubs, 


88 


Raisins, 


2 02 


Phosphate, 


19 95 


Curtains, 


43 


Wash-board, 


30 


Barrels, 


13 91 


Seeds, 


1 10 


Brooms, 


1 30 


Stove polish, 


29 


Lard, 


6 00 


Starch, 


16 


Paris green. 


25 


Saleratus, 


36 


Plaster, 


30 


Spices, 


1 30 


Use of oxen, 


8 00 


Kope, 


05 


Onions, 


1 00 


Matches, 


45 


Pigs, 


8 00 


Crockery, 


1 68 


Gargetine, 


87 


Salt, 


1 46 


Shovel, 


38 


Cream tartar, 


97 


Carpeting, 


2 00 


Tobacco, 


1 35 


Chairs, 


3 25 


Oil, 


3 09 


Ammonia, 


18 


Snuff, 


18 


Axe, 


83 


■ Lemons, 


66 


Clothes line, 


35 


Alum, 


02 


Candles, 


15 


Crackers, 


23 42 


Repairing harnesses, 


1 63 


Tinware, 


3 29 


Use of bull. 


4 50 


Twine, 


05 


Butch erins:. 


2 50 


Mustard, 


66 


Blacksmith bill. 


11 38 


Currants, 


63 


Smokins: Ham, 


60 


Oyster shells, 


18 


Filing saws. 


80 


R. tacks, 


61 


Harness, 


6 00 


Blueing, 


24 


Bu^^y, 


25 00 


B. bricks, 


08 


Labor, 


182 28 


Glass, 


31 


Grain, 


321 71 


Handles, 


76 


Stoves and furniture, 


62 65 


* Pails, 


50 


Coal, 


17 64 


Lime, 


38 


Burial of H. Law and 




Cattle cards, 


32 


Mrs. E. Southard, 


32 00 


Turpentine, 


30 


Dr. Sanders' bill, 


21 25 


Brushes, 


63 


Repairs on house. 


14 00 


Paint, 


1 70 


Services of Warren 




Basket, 


45 


Bemis and wife. 


250 00 


Paper, 


31 


Services of E. H. Cut- 




Plow, 


6 25 


ler, 


50 00 


Lampblack, 


07 


Services of Luke 




Lock, 


52 


Blanchard, 


25 00 


Scythes, 


2 64 


Services of Reuben L. 




Bake, 


25 


Reed, 


10 00 


Whetstone, 


25 






# 


1565 74 



24 



Expenditures, 
Receipts, 

Income less than expenses. 
Due from Treasury to balance account. 
Interest on farm, 



Victualing and lodging 128 tramps at 40 cents each, 

Cost of supporting poor on farm, $805 10 

Whole number of persons exclusive of tramps supported in alms- 
house 7; average number 5^; present number 4. 





$1565 74 
949 44 


$616 30 
240 00 


$616 30 


S856 30 
51 20 





E. II. cutl?:k, ) 

LUKE BLANC^HARD, [ Overseers of Poor. 
REUBEN REED, ) 



25 



COMMONAVEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. MIDDLESEX, SS^ 

To John E. Cutter, Constable of the Town of Acton in said County, 

Greeting : 
You are hereby requested in the name of the Commonwealth of Mas- 
sachusetts, to notify the legal voters of said Town of Acton, to meet at 
the Town Hall, on MONDAY, tne fifth day of April next, at twelve 
o'clock M. By posting copies of this Warrant by you attested, at the 
Post Office in the centre of the town, also at the stores of Tuttles, Jones 
& Wetherbee, Mead & Stone and Isaac W. Flagg in said town, seven 
days before the time appointed for said meeting, then and there to act 
upon the following articles as they may think proper, viz: 

Art. 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said meeting. 

Art. 2. To fill all existing vacancies in the list of Town Officers. 

Art. 3. To see what amount of money the Town will raise to de- 
fray Town charges the present year. 

Art. 4. To see what amount of money the Town will raise for the 
support of schools the present year, and how it shall be expended. 

Art. 5. To see what amount of money, the Town will raise to repair 
the roads the present year and how it shall be expended. 

Art. 6. To see if the Town will instruct the School Committee to ap- 
point a Superintendent of Schools. 

Art. 7. To see if the Town will choose a Superintendent of Burials. 

Art. 8. To consider and act upon the acceptance of the Jury list as 
revised by the Selectmen. 

Art. 9. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of Select- 
men, Overseers of Poor, School Committee and other Town Officers. 

Art. 10. To see if the Town will authorize the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money for the Town, if necessary, 
in anticipation of the taxes of the current year. 

Art. 11. To vote by ballot. Yes or No, in answer to the question. 
Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this town 
the present year? 

Art. 12. To see if the Town will widen and straighten the road lead- 
ing from the house of Orlando Leland through the village of West Acton, 
to the house of Geo. A. Stevens. 

Art. 13. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of one hundred 
dollars for Memorial Day. 

Art. 14. To see if the Town will build a sluice near the house of 
Eeuben L. Reed. 

Art. 15. To see if the Town will paint the School House in the centre 
district. 

Art. 16. To see if the Town will furnish Intermediate Schools in the 
South and AVest districts. 

Art. 17. To see if the Town will furnish an assistant teacher for the 
High School. 

Art. 18. To see if the Town will furnish transportation for scholars 
attending the High School. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant to us, with your 
doings thereon, at or before the time appointed for said meeting. 

Given under our hands this twentieth day of March in the year eighteen 
hundred and eighty-six. 

J. K. W. WETHERBEE, } Selectmen 
J. W. DUPEE, > of 

T. F. NO YES, ) Acton, 



26 



Town Officers for 1886, 



Town Clerk, 
Wm. D. Tuttle. 

Selectmen, 
Job W. Dupee, 

Assessors. 
Phineas Wethekbee, 

Overseers of the Poor. 
John E. Cuttek, 

Constables. 

Lewis V. Clough, at South Acton. 

[Three to be chosen.] 

School Committee. 
Chakles H. Mead, for 3 years, Theron F. ISTewtox, for 2 years, 



JoNA K. W. Wethekbee 
Wm. D. Tuttle, 
Luke Blanchard, 



Thos. F. Noyes. 



Hiram J. Hapgood. 



JONA W. LOKEK 



William S. Jones, for 3 years, 
Charles I. Miller, for 1 year. 



John E. Cutter, for 2 years, 
Luke J. Bobbins, for 1 year. 



Charles Wheeler, 
Francis Pratt, 



WM. B. Davis, 
L W. Flagg, 
E. F. Fuller, 



Highway Surveyors. 

Isaac Keed, Abel Cole, 

Elbridge J. Bobbins, Job. W. Dupee. 



Surveyors of Wood. 

J. W. LOKER, 

s. l. dutton, 
John F. Davis, 



Geo. H. Harris, 
Chas. H. Taylor, 
Herbert T. Clark, 



Henry D. Parlin, 



Chas. H. Mead. 



Ww. B. Davis, 
Geo. H. Harris, 



Nahum C. Reed, 



John Fletcher, 



Surveyors of Lumber. 
E. F. Richardson, 

E. J. ROBBINS, 

Chas. A. Brooks. 

Fence Viewers. 
O. W. Mead, 

Cemetery Committee. 
M. W. Davis, 



Levi W. Stevens, 
Herbert T. Clark, 



Francis Hosmp:r. 



Levi W, Stevens. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



gCHOOI< COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON, 



For the School Year 1885-6. 



To the Town of Acton : 

REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 

BY ITS SUPERINTENDFNT. 



The School Committee, having been allowed by you to act 
in the schools during the year past through a Superintendent, 
now makes its report to you through the same officer. 



REPORT. 



Perfect unanimity has existed between members of the Com- 
mittee, and between the Committee and its Superintendent, dur- 
ing the year. 

No step of importance, in the way of discipline, introduction 
of books, or further progress in establishing courses of study and 
grades in the schools has been taken without the action of the 
whole Committee. 

The first matter of special importance that required attention, 
was the course of study in the High School. Recommendations 
had been made, but no regular course adopted. It was not pos- 
sible, therefore,forthe teacher to the hold the scholars to any sys- 
tem of study, or keep the school in proper grade. 

After painstaking correspondence with, and examination of 
courses of study in other schools, a course of study was recom- 
mended, and after full discussion, adopted. The following is a 
copy of the same : 



30 



ACTON HIGH SCHOOL. 



Course of Study. 



< 

H 
CO 

« 

I— I 



"-A 
O 



1st Term; 
2d Teem: 
3d Term: 

1st Term : 
2d Term: 
3d Term: 

1st Term: 
2d Term : 
3d Term: 

1st Term : 



W -{ 2d Term: 
3d Term: 



Arithmetic. 
Bookeeping. 
Arithmetic. 



English Grammar 
and Composition. 

English Grammar 
and Composition. 

Khetoric. 



General Histor.y. 
General History. 
General History. 



Algebra. Rhetoric. Physiology. 

Algebra. English Literature. Physiology. 

Algebra. English Literature. Physics. 



Geometry. Latin or French. 

Geometry. Latin or French. 

Botany. Latin or French. 



Astronomy. Latin or French. 
Astronomy. Latin or French. 
Politics. Latin or French. 



Physics. 

Chemistry. 

Chemistry. 

Geology. 
Geology. 
General Review, 



Those taking only a three years' or English course will substitute 
for Latin or French the following studies for the third year: 



1st Term : 
2d Term: 
3d Term: 



Astronomy. 

Geology. 

Politics. 



Note. — Exercises in Reading and Spelling will be had during the 
entire course. Exercises in Declamation or Composition will be re- 
quired weekly throughout the course. 



31 

Immediate steps were taken to classify the school as closely 
as possibly under the circumstances, and teacher and scholars 
have become settled into systematic work. The good effects have 
been apparent in many ways. Each scholar knows beforehand 
his place in the term and terms to come. Each study prepares 
the way for the one following, and steady and satisfactory progress 
is thus assured. 

This step also led to other important results. It made it 
simple and easy to fix the grade of scholarship for entering the 
High School, and consequently prepares the way for classifying, 
or grading more perfectly the lower schools and classes. 

Another step of importance has been the changing the school 
year. Heretofore the school year has been from the beginning of 
the spring term to the close of the winter term. This gives but 
the short vacation between the winter and spring terms to make 
any changes that may be thought wise. It places teachers and 
committee in straightened relations with each other. This custom 
has also made our schools to be out of the uniform plan of the 
schools around us. 

The school year now begins with the fall term, and ends with 
the spring term, making our school year uniform with those of 
the commonwealth, and giving the committee and teachers abun- 
dant time to consider the advisability of another year's engage- 
ment. 

BOOKS. 

With one exception there has been no change in text books, 
and that has been of minor importance, so far as expense is con- 
cerned. 

We must either have purchased a new supply of Higginson's 
United States Histories, or make a change. 

Taking advantage of this need, Scuddei's United States His- 
tory vvas purchased to replace the other. This change has been 
proven to be a wise one. 

Higginson's History was not planned for a text book in 
schools, and lacked many essential elements for that purpose. 
The new^one by Scudder is specially adapted for a text book, and 
the study of it has aroused new interest among the scholars. 

The new Temperance Education Law made the teaching of 



32 

Hygiene and the evils of narcotics, (alchohol, tobacco and opium) 
compulsory in the common schools. 

After close examination and comparison of different text 
books issued by various publishers, one was selected, recom- 
mended and adopted. 

The supplying of all the schools w^ith this text book was quite 
a large expense, but your committee had no choice in the matter, 
except in the selection of a book ; and though a committee v^^ould 
hesitate to take this responsibility without the law, the benefits 
resulting from compliance with this law can hardly be estimated. 

We have had reason to congratulate the committee on the 
choice of books made. The interest of teachers and scholars has 
not flagged, but at times has had to be restrained, so desirous were 
they to follow up this study so pleasantly placed before them. 

The advancement of the High School into higher studies 
made the purchase of text books necessary, and much care has 
been taken in the selection of them, to secure those that embraced 
the most advanced scholarship, expressed in such manner as to 
meet the wants of our scholars. 

These text books, though more expensive than those of the 
lower grades, are not subject to as frequent change or renewal. 
The line of text books for the full course is now nearly complete. 

One other step of great importance has been taken. And we 
may say that no other received more careful consideration. This 
was the selection and purchase of suitable reference books for the 
schools. 

The use of only text books finally becomes a slavish follow" 
ing ot them, and results in a narrow and unsatisfactory progress. 
Geographical, historical and biographical notices in common 
school text books are necessarily short, while many important and 
interesting truths in geographical discovery and progress, in histori- 
cal epochs, and the lives and thoughts of great men are not men- 
tioned at all. A gradually increasing library of well selected ref- 
erence books in our Grammar and High Schools, will furnish an 
element of power that cannot be overestimated. Your committee, 
after mature deliberation, authorized the purchase ot a copy of 
each of Lippincott's "Biographical Dictionary," and Lippincott's 
" Gazetteer of the World," for each school district and the High 
School. In addition to these they authorized the purchase of 



33 

Lippincotfs edition of" Chambers' Encyclopedia," for each one 
of the village districts and the High School, the same to be used 
by all the scholars and teachers in the town. 

The gratitude of the teachers was almost unbounded. At 
first the scholars hardly knew the use of these new tools of educa- 
tion ; but as, under the lead of their teachers, they gradually became 
acquainted with the treasuries within their grasp, their enthus- 
iasm was as great as that of the teachers. 

Now almost any hour of school, in some schools, from one to 
three or more of the scholars may be found digging into these 
new mines of mental wealth, searching these volumes in con- 
nection with places, persons and thoughts suggested in their les- 
sons. These reference books have thus become perinaitent 
teachers in our schools without salary or further expense, and for 
years their steady influence will he felt. 

SCHOOLS. 

The only schools in which changes of teachers have been 
made have been, the Centre Grammar and Primary, and the 
South East Schools. Miss C. L. Haynes, of the Centre Gram- 
mar, resigned at the close of the fall term, and Miss Davis was 
employed to take her place. Miss Davis' health failed, so that 
she was compelled at the holidays to resign, and Mr. O. W. 
Dutton was secured. Notwithstanding these changes, the school 
lias kept steadily on with its work. Miss B. Ball of the Centre 
Primary, on account of ill health, gave place to Miss Edith Gar- 
field for the fall term, and in the winter term resumed her place 
a^ain. Miss Bertha Manley, of the South East District, resigned 
at the close of spring term, and Miss C. A. Granger was em- 
ployed in her place, and has kept the school since. The other 
schools have kept the same teachers, and all have worked hard. 
Uniformity ot teaching cannot be attained, even if it were desira- 
ble, but general uniformity of advancement has been attained 
throughout the town. We do not consider it necessary to partic- 
ularize in regard to each school. Similar methods as to disci- 
pline, teaching and examinations have prevailed throughout the 
town. Each district has had thirty-six weeks of schooling. The 
pleasantest relations have existed between the teachers and the 
Committee and Superintendent. In discipline, punishment has 



34 

been discouraged, and scholars made to feel that the schools were 
for their benefit, and they were welcome to get all the good pos- 
sible from them ; but, if ignoring this, they persisted in disturb- 
ing the work of the school, and maintained a spirit of insubordi- 
nation, they would be expelled. These methods have proven ef- 
fectual. 

The general system of monthly reviews and examinations 
has been maintained. In methods of teaching, the old and safe 
method of memorizing important facts and rules has been supple- 
mented by conversational exercises, so that the student might not 
only know, but know how to use his knowledge. To this same 
end, the highest classes in the Grammar schools, and all the 
scholars in the High school, have been required to prepare and 
read an essay, a selection for public reading, and a declamation 
once in three weeks, thus giving each of them one of these im- 
portant exercises each week. Thel'e have been no examinations 
during the year for the purpose of passing from class to class or 
school to school. 

In accordance with the vote of the Committee, the school year 
will begin in the fall, though the examination for advancement 
will be at the close of the spring term. These examinations will 
be mostly in writing, and so framed as to, so far as possible, be a 
test of scholarship, a certain percentage of accuracy being re- 
quired before a scholar can pass into a higher class or school. 
SUGGESTIOISS WITH REASONS. 
The increase of scholars in the West and vSouth districts re- 
quires consideration. The average attendance of the Centre 
Grammar school this last year has been twenty ; this is tlie largest 
school outside of the two above. In the schools at the West the 
average attendance has been 66, while those at the South has been 
62, making an average three times as large as that of the Centre 
Grammar. Three school rooms are crowded ; more room is 
needed ; the classes are too large and difficult to teach, the few 
minutes the teacher has for each, when all the classes must be 
heard. An intermediate school is recommen^ded for each of these 
districts, and in the opinion of committee and superintendent, 
needed for the best interests of these schools. More scholars will 
come into these schools this spring and fall than will go out by 
examinations — and thus increase the present need. 



35 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

This year for the first time the High school is working its 
three years' course — those who come in the first year, and have 
continued, have been followed by two other classes and now three 
regularly formed classes are doing steady work. This has of 
course necessitated the steady introduction of new text books, as 
the first class advanced from first to second, and then into the 
third years' work, and their places were steadily filled by those 
coming after ; thus eighteen difl^erent text books come into use, 
besides reading, spelling and writing, with declamations and essays 
required by the course. 

The average membership for the year has been thirty-four, 
and the average attendance thirty-one. Then each succeeding 
class is larger than its predecessor, so that while at the close of 
the spring term, only eight or ten will pass out of the school, at 
•the beginning of the fall term nearly or quite twenty will step in 
as the new class. A few moments consideration will convince 
any candid mind that one teacher cannot with justice to himself 
or the scholars, carry such a number through such a course of 
study. The school is proving its worth more and more all the 
time. Its growth is far beyond the expectation of its most san* 
guine friends, and shows the value placed by both parents and 
children on such educational advantages. The town owes it to 
itself and these scholars, to make this school all it should be, and 
to that end it should furnish an assistant teacher. This, in the 
opinion of your committee and superintendent, is needed, and 
therefore recommended. 

Again, our town is so situated that it has been found best to 
have the High school hold its sessions one term in each central 
district of the town, viz : the Centre, the South and the West. 
Undoubtedly this is more convenient when all things are con- 
sidered. This has placed quite a burden on many of the scholars, 
and, it is remarkable how faithful they have been in their attendance 
through wind and storm. It is believed by your committee and 
superintendent to be wise and just that the town provide trans- 
portation from these centres to the sessions of the High school. 
This will equalize the advantages of the High school to all. At 
the present quite a number who are unable to bear the expenbe of 



36 

transportation are cut off from the education offered in the High 
school. This ought not to be. The town should authorize the 
committee to provide transportation for the scholars upon the 
wisest and best terms possible. This is the opinion of your com- 
mittee, and it is therefore recommended. 

The usual financial and attendance tables are appended. This 
report with its statements of the condition of the schools the last 
year, and the important action taken by superintendent and com- 
mittee, also its statements of present needs and suggestions having 
been read to, and discussed by the committee, was unanimously 
adopted as their report of work done, and recommendations for 
the schools. 

C. L. lX.YiOAT)^S^ Super httendent of Schools^ 

For the School Committee of the Town of Acton. 



•Financial Report. 



To the Town of Acton : 

Your School Committee hereby submit their report of the ex- 
penses of the schools ot the town by districts ; said expenses 
covering salaries of teachers, the cost of fuel and care of school 
buildings. 

JOHN E. CUTTER, Chair ma7t. 
THERON F. NEWTON, Clerk. 
Acton, March 22d, 1886. 



Acton High School. 



Salary of teacher $700 00 ■ 

Fuel 35 05 i 

Care of room 50 00 I 

$785 05 \ 

'I 

Acton Centre Schools. ■ 

Salary of teachers $684 00 '}■ 

Fuel 73 00 i 

Care of rooms 47 25 i 

$804 25 I 



South Acton Schools. 

Salary of teachers $720 00 

Fuel 39 20 

Care of house 100 22 

$859 42 



West Acton Schools. 

Salary of teachers $663 00 

Fuel 38 37 

Care of rooms 25 00 

$726 37 



38 

East Acton School. 

Salary of teachers $324 00 

Fuel 1 40 14 

Care of room 24 50 

$388 64 

North Acton School. 

Salary of teachers $324 00 

Fuel 34 88 

Care of room , 25 00 

$383 88 

South East Acton School. 

Salary of teacher $324 00 

Fuel 15 00 

Care of room 15 00 

$354 00 

Total $4,301 61 



39 



TABULAR STATEMENT. 



♦ \ 







c 


CO 


d> 


• 






^ 


SCHOOLS. 


TEACHERS. 


1 
II 


'o 
o 


j 



a 

1 


i 


10 








O o 

— s 




1 


a 

t, 

S^ 







^ 
« 

P 








xi 


>■ 


V 


d 


c 


d 






h5 


^ 


< 


< 


_^ 


'/?^ 


^ 


f 


Miss C. L. Haynes, 












1 Grammar, 


" Evilina Davis, 


3 


28 


25 


22 





4 


16 


Centre, \ 


Mr. 0. W. Dutton, 
















1 Primary. 


Miss Bessie Ball, 


3 


31 


25 j 22 


1 





9 


I 


" Edith Garfield, 
















^-th, : {?,T---' 


" S. B. Holmes, 


3 


33 


29 


28 





1 


32 


'•' Viola S. Tuttle, 


3 


52 


38 


34 








28 


w-t, {gjs-' 


•' S.J. Wyman. 


3 


37 


34 


33 





2 


31 


'< C. L. Newton, 


3 


40 


35 


33 








14 


East. 


•' S. A. Wetherbee, 


3 


28 


23 


20 





2 


15 


North, 


" Miss Ella D. Daniels, 


3 


26 


19 


18 





4 


14 


South East, 


( Miss Bertha Manley, 
{ " C. A. Granger, 
H. H. Williams, 


3 


21 


16 


12 





1 


12 


Acton High, 


3 


47 


34 


31 





37 


4 


Totals. 






343" 


278 


253 

1 


1 


51 


176 



Number of children in town between the ages of live and fifteen years, as reported 
by the Assessors, May 1st, 1885, 264. 



OF THE 

SELECTMEN 

AND OTHER OFFICERS 

OF THE 

TOWN OF ACTON 

From Feb. 26, 1886, to Feb. 26, 1887, 



1^'CI.UDING THE 



MARRIAGES, BIRTHS AND DEATHS IN l.s«G. 



AT^SO, THE 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 




ACTON: 
Thk Entekpkise Steam Job Piunt 

18S7. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



Town of Actor in Account with J. K. W. Wetherbee, Treasurer. 

1887. Br. 

Feb. 26. To cash paid for State tax, $1,110 00 
^' " County tax, 667 35 
" " on Selectmen's or- 
ders, 14,353 97 
"• Outstanding orders, 967 33 
'' Balance due the town. 897 36 

$17,996 01 



Cr. 

By balance in the treasury, Feb. 26th, 

1886, $375 55 

Cash received of Dennis Shehan, for 

old lumber, 9 00 

Received of John Fletcher, for lots sold in 

Woodlawn ceinetery, 12 00 

County Treasurer, for dog 

fund for 1885, 207 77 

T. F. Newton, on account of 

High School, 21 26 

L. W. Stevens, for lots sold in 

Mount Hope cemetery, 30 00 

Town of Billerica, support of 

Thomas Russell, 39 76 

Town of Harvard, aid furnish- 
ed Arthur Whitney, 11 67 
Chapel Societv, rent of school 

rooni to April 1, 1886, 33 00 

State Treasurer, corporation 

tax, 845 29 

State Treasurer, National bank 

tax, 715 40 

State Treasurer, State aid, 

chap. 252, acts of 1879, 200 50 

State Treasurer, State aid. 

chap. 301, acts of 1879. 108 00 



Received of State Treasurer, support of 

State paupers, 135 72 

State Treasurer, income of 

school fund, H37 73 

Charles H.Wheeler, borrowed 

money, 400 00 

George Chandler, borrowed 

money, 200 00 

Varnum Tuttle, borrowed 

money, ] ,oOO 00 

Charles H.Wheeler, boirowed 

money, 150 00 

Varnimi Tuttle. borrowed 

mone}-, '115 06 

County Treasurer, dog fund 

for 1H8(), ^ 195 4(S 

John Fletchei", lots sold in 

Woodlawn Cemetry, 13 00 

L. W. Stevens, lots sold in 

Alount Hope Cemetery, 5S 00 

T. F. Newton, school books 

sold. IC) 4(] 

Reuben L. Reed, rent of tow n 

hall, 17 00 

John E. Cutter, collector of 

taxes, for taxes of 1885, 1,7!)1< 80 

John E. Cutter, bS.SC, 10,201 (J3 

Interest on mone\' in l)aid<. 37 84 

^\. L. Noyes, rent of town 

hall in 1885, 1<S 00 

Julian Tuttle, rent of town 

hall and cellar, 57 50 

$17, DOG 01 

J. K. W. WETHERBEE, 7rcaszcrcr of Ac^o?^. 

Acton, Feb. 2{ith, 1887. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT, 



SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 

Centre District. 

Paid John E. Cutter, $71)7 95 



Mest l>i!«trict. 




Paid F. W. GrccMi, for care of school house, 


$28 00 


L. U. Holt, for 4 brooQTs for '' 


1 20 


C. H. Mead, 


770 72 


C. H. Mead, for coal, 


59 85 


C. H. Mead, care of school house, 


33 00 


South l>i!«trict. 




Paid T. F. Newton, 


$733 50 


'' for coal. 


44 09 


" ''• for wood, 


5 12 


" '' care of house, 


61 00 


\V. Law, for sawing wood. 


1 50 


North Oistrict. 




Paid Ella F. Daniels, services as teacher, 


$36 00 


C. L Miller, 


291 08 


'' coal. 


27 93 


" " wood, 


5 00 


'' '' cutting wood. 


1 75 


" " care of house, 


12 00 



daiiit District. 



Paid Luke J. Robbins, 377 50 

^' " for care of house, 6 00 



Soiith-JEast District. 

Paid W. S. Jones, $369 61 



$797 95 



$892 77 



$845 21 



$373 76 

$383 50 
$369 61 



High School. 

Paid H. H. Williams, services as teacher, 
A. W. Armstrong, " 
C. H. Mead, for rent of organ, 
C. H. Mead, for rent of piano for grad- 
uating exercises, 
C. H. Mead, for care of room. 
C. H. Mead, for fuel, 
J. E. Cutter, care of room, 
J. E. Cutter, for fuel. 
T. F. Newton, care of ro(jm. 
for fuel, 
'' teacher, 



WC'IIOOI^ NUPPL.1ES, 



Paid T. F. Xewton, 

Rev. C. L. Rhoades. 
John E. Cutter, 



TOWIV OFFIC'KR?*. 



$240 


00 


400 


00 


15 


00 


/ 


00 


12 


00 


6 


00 


8 


00 


7 


00 


15 


00 


10 


00 


80 


00 



$5 


65 


46 




5 


50 




/ 


10 



Paid Rev. C. L. Rhoades, Supt. of schools, $124 

Rev. C. L. Rhoades, expense of proem 
ing teachers for High School. 

L. U. Flolt, sealer of weights and meas- 
ures, 

\Vm. D. Tuttle, scr\ ices as Assessoi-. 

\Vm. D. Tuttle, making duplicate tax 
book, 

Wm. D. Tuttle, services as Town Clerk. 

\V. D. Tuttle, services as Registrar of 
voters to May ist, 18<Sr.. 

Phineas VVetherbee, serxices as Assesso 

H. J. Hapgood, ser\ices as Assessor. 

J. E. Cutter, collecting taxes in 1885, 

A. L. Noves, services as Registrar of 
voters to Feb. 12th, 18S7. 

J. \V. Dupee, ser\ices as Selectman 

T. F. Noves, 

J. K. W. Wetherbee. 

J. K. W. Wetherbee. services as Treas. 



$124 


\)H 


15 


00 


10 


00 


;]2 


00 


10 


00 


<. 25 


00 


\:) 


00 


r, 2r, 


00 


22 


00 


DO 

L' 


00 


1 

24 


00 


45 


00 


45 


00 


85 


00 


40 


00 



$800 00 



$578 06 



$607 98 



PRfNTI]V«, 



Paid John F. Wood, 500 sheet reports. 
" GOO book reports, 
" '^ printing town warrant.' 

Pratt Brothers, printing notices, 



$10 


00 


58 


50 


;, 7 


00 


1 


25 



CEiriETKRi: EXPENSES. 

Paid Nathan Johnson, labor in Woodlawn 
Cemetery, 

Nathan Johnson, labor in North Acton 
Cemetery, 

L. W. Stevens, lumber for fence in Mt. 
Hope Cemetery, 

L. W. Stevens, labor in Mount Hope 
Cemetery, 1885, 

L. W, Stevens, labor in Mount Hope 
Cemetery, 188G, 

John Fletcher, labor on well in Wood- 
lawn Cemetery, 



$52 


03 


13 


53 


17 


75 


11 


37 


78 


50 


4 


/ i) 



STATE AII>. 



Paid John Carroll, 

Benjamin Skinner, 
Ola Nelson, 
Allen G. Smith, 
Richard G. Dane, 
Rebecca C. Wright, 
Susan F. Dearborn, 



$144 


00 


96 


00 


48 


00 


60 


00 


60 


00 


48 


00 


6 


00 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 

Paid E- H. Cutler, deficiency on Town Farm, $616 30 
Luke Blanchard, for support of Clara 

Wheeler, 195 Q6 

Luke Blanchard, support of Elizabeth 

Burgendohl, 82 09 

Luke Blanchard, support of Emily F. 

Town, ' 162 28 

Luke Blanchard, aid furnished Edward 

O'Neil, 6 78 



$76 75 



$172 93 



$462 00 



8 



PaiM Luke Blanchard, for Edward O'Neil at 

Massachusetts General Hospital, 
Luke Blanchard, aid furnished Thomas 

Russell, 
Luke Blanchard. aid furnished Arthur 

Whitney, 
Luke Blanchard, aid furnished Thomas 

Russell, 
Luke Blanchard, aid furnished Ruth 

Pike, 
Luke Blanchard, aid furnislied Gihiian 

Newton, 
Luke Blanchard, aid furnished James E. 

Harris, 
Luke Blanchard. aid furnislied Hannah 

Trainor, 
Luke BUuichard. aid furnished Hannah 

Stanton, 
Luke Blanchard, aid furnished Mrs. 

John Qiiinland, 
Luke Blanchard, expenses to Worcester 

and return, 
Luke Blanchard, Journey to Fitchburt^, 
J. W. Loker. aid furnished Redding- 

family, 
Luke Blanchard. aid furnished ^^'alter 

H. Whitney, 
Dr. W. N. Sharp, attending family of 

Amos Hayvyard. 
Dr. C. B. vSanders, medical attendance 

at the Almshouse, 
Dr. C. B. J^anders, attend i no- Thomas 

Russell, 
Dr. C. B. Sanders, attending," Henr\ 

Farwell, 
J, E. Cutter, aid furnished Thomas 

Russell, 
J. E. Cutter, journey to Worcester, 
J. E. Cutter, aid furnished Thomas 

Lowden, 



92 


00 




.') 


13 




n 


07 




54 


00 




."iZ 


00 




40 


00 




104 


/ 1 




24 


25 




47 


79 




104 


02 




9 


10 




• ) 


00 




58 


57 




15 


00 




k; 


25 




18 


25 




12 


75 




i 


00 




40 
il 


73 
70 




5 


38 


$1,794 47 



ROAI>i!$ AND BRI1>0£fii. 



Paid Chas. Wheeler, regular highway work, $600 00 
Abel Cole, '^ '- 600 00 

Isaac Reed, '^ " 604 09 



Paid A. H. Jones, labor on highway in Jan. 

and Feb., per order of selectmen, 80 IG 
Abel Cole, repairing culvert on Maple 

street, South Acton, 8 00 

E. F. Conant, gravel. 2 50 
Charles Wheeler, repairs on road near 

house of Geo. Brooks, 59 33 

Charles Wheeler, labor on Hall road, 21 62 

American Powder Co., lumber for bridge G 40 

" "' guarding bridge. 2 80 

Charles Wheeler, labor on highways in 

Jan., Feb. and March, " 8 55 

Charles Wheeler, labor on Lowell road, 17 92 

" '■' '' in centre of town 11 40 



$2,022 77 



Paid T. F. Newton, repairs on school-house 

in South district, 
C. H. Mead, repairing blackboards in 

West district, 
C. H. Mead, repairs on school-house in 

West district. 
L. J. Robbins, repairs on school-house 

in East district, 
L. U. Holt, repairing stove in East 

school-house, 
L. U. Holt, repairing furnace in towm 

hall, 
Reuben L.Reed, painting hearse-house, 
C. L. Davis, painting school-house in 

Centre district, 
J. E. Cutter, material for painting school- 
house in Centre district, 
J. E. Cutter, repairs on school-house in 

Centre district, 
L. U. Holt, repairing stove and funnel. 

West school-house, 
Robert Wayne, repairs on town hall, 



40 


29 


23 


10 


3 


01 


G 


32 


4 


50 


11 


85 


13 


95 


111 


81 


74 


79 


54 


21 


3 


50 


4 


24 



1T1IS€EI.I.ANE0UP1. 



Paid G. W. Livermore, w^ood for town hall, $ 2 50 
" carrying in wood, 50 

" teaming stone posts, 1 50 



$351 57 



]0 



Paid J. Kinsley, use of road for Hurley, 8 00 

Dr. I. Ilutchins, vaccinating 38 school 

children, 15 20 

Dr. I. Hutchins, reporting 14 births, 3 50 

A. H. Kimball, plate for road scraper, 8 00 

R. M. Yale, repairing flag, 2 55 

Dr. I. Hutchins, for Memorial day, 100 00 

Rev. 1. C. Knovvlton, land taken to vs id- 
en street, 50 00 
Reuben L. Reed, taking care of town 

hall and clock, 16 95 

John E. Cutter, abatement of taxes for 

1883, 1884 and 1885, 119 81 

E. A, Phalen, repairing tov^n pump, 1 10 

Nathan Johnson, rope for flag stafl\ 1 50 

^' '' labor on •' 1 00 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, pitcher 

and goblets for town hall, 57 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, town or- 
der book, 1 62 
Tuttles, Jones <fe Wetherbee, town rec- 
ord book, 2 25 
Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, coal hod, 
dust-[)an and feather duster for town 
hall, Hr> 
C. I. Miller, lumber and repairs on fence 

in North school district, 6 84 

T. F. Newton, clock for East school dis- 
trict, 5 00 
E. A. Phalen, door for Davis monu- 
ment, 5 75 
Abel Cole, repairs on plow and scraper, 2 50 
James P. Brown, blacksmith bill, 3 30 
L. W. Stevens, repairing door where 

fire ladders are kept, 40 

C. B. Stone, making deeds of lots sold 

in Mount Hope Cemetery. 
L. U. Holt, repairing town pump, 
Isaac Reed, breaking roads, 
Abel Cole, 

Charles Wheeler, blacksmith bill, 
E. Jones & Co., coal for town hall, 
Wm. D. Tuttle, postage and stationery, 
' ' express on public docu- 

ments, 2 58 

Wm. D. Tuttle, printing registration 

blanks, 2 40 



4 


00 


1 


00 


9 


50 


17 


14 


8 


25 


8 


16 


1 


40 



11 



Paid Wm. D. Tattle, meeting tax commis- 
sioners, 

Wm. D. Tuttle, laying out road near 
Baptist church in West Acton, 

Wm. D. Tuttle, duplicate key to town 
hall, 

Wm. D. Tuttle, collecting and record- 
ing 34 births, 

Wm. D. Tuttle, recording 31 deaths, 

" "20 marriages, 

L. E. Reed, attending 31 burials, 
*•' returning 29 deaths, 

G. W. Livermore, teaming coal for town 
hall, 

J. E. Cutter, discount on taxes 188G, 

Fish Committee, cash paid C. H. Wal- 
cott for services in case of prosecution 

Fish Committee, 3 fares to Lowell and 
return, 

J. E. Cutter, notifying 16 persons to 
take oath of office, 

H. J. Hapgood, assessors" and collect- 
or's books, 

M, E. Taylor, oil, wicks and supplies 
for town hall, 

Julian Tuttle, care town hall and clock 

Charles Wheeler, breaking roads, 



1 


50 




2 


00 
35 




17 


00 




5 


10 




3 


00 




93 


00 




^ 


25 




1 


70 




599 


10 




10 


00 




1 


68 




2 


00 




2 


00 




7 


45 




46 


00 




27 


65 


$1,242 AO 



TEI^IPOKABY I.OAN» PAIl*. 

Paid Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, note and 

interest, $1,598 34 

Varnum Tuttle, note and interest, 622 59 

George Chandler, interest on note, 25 00 

• J. K.W. Wetherbee, note and interest, 1,281 00 

$3,526 93 



BOUNTi: TAX. 

Bounty tax refunded, $22 64 



$22 64 



12 



RECEIPTS AND APPROPRIATIONS. 



Balance in the treasury Fel:). 26, 1886, $375 55 

" due from collector of taxes Feb. 20, 

1886, 1,799 80 

^Appropriation for Town charo^es, 4,000 00 

Schools, 4.100 00 

Roads, 1,800 00 

Overhivin<^rs, '2'd2 12 

State tax, 1,110 00 

County tax, 667 ;35 

Rec'd of Deiniis Shehan old lumber, 9 00 

John Fletcher, lots sold in Wood- 
lawn Cemetery, 12 00 
County Treasurer, dog fund, 1885, 207 77 
T. F. Newton, acct. of High school, 21 '2') 
L. W. vStevens, lots sold in Mount 

Hope Cemetery, 'M) 00 

Town of Billerica, support of Thos. 

Russell, ol) 76 

Town of Harvard, aid furnished Ar- 
thur Whitney. 11 67 
Chapel Society, rent of school room 

to April 1, 1886, 33 00 

State Treasurer, corporation tax, 845 29 

•' National bank tax. 715 40 

'• State aid chap. 252. 

acts of 1879, 200 50 

State Treasurer, State aid chap. 301 

acts of 1879, 108 00 

State Treasurer, support of State 

paupers, 135 72 

State Treasurer, school fund. 167 73 

Chas. H. Wheeler, borrowed mone}- 400 00 
George Chandler. "• "200 00 

Varnum Tuttle, '' 1,300 00 

Charles H. Wheeler, " 150 00 

Varnum Tuttle, '' 615 m 

County Treasurer, dog fund, 1886, 195 48 
John Fletcher, lots sold in Wood- 
lawn Cemeterv, 13 00 



13 



Rec'd of L. W. Stevens, lots sold in Mount 

Hope Cemetery, .')8 00 

T. F. Newton, school books sold, 16 40 

Reuben L. Reed, rent of town hall, 17 00 

Interest on money in bank, 87 'S4 
A. L. Noyes, rent of town hall in 

1885, 18 00 
Julian Tuttle, rent of town hall and 

cellar, 57 50 



EXPENDITURES. 



■$19,700 8;-) 



^or support of Centre District school, 


$797 


95 


" West ^' '' 


892 


77 


South 


845 


21 


" North " " 


373 


76 


" East '^ 


383 


50 


" So. East " " 


369 


61 


High School, 


800 


00 


School supplies. 


■ 578 


06 


Town officers, 


607 


98 


Cemetery expenses. 


172 


93 


Printing, 


76 


75 


State aid. 


462 


00 


Support of poor, 


1,794 


47 


Roads and bridges, 


2,022 


77 


Repairs on town buildings, 


351 


57 


Miscellaneous expenses. 


1,242 


40 


Temporary loan paid, 


3,526 


93 


State tax. 


1,110 


00 


County tax, 


667 


35 


Bounty tax refunded, 


22 


64 
$17,098 65 



Balance in collector's hands, 
" treasurer's " 



$1,704 84 
897 36 



- 2,602 20 
$19,700 85 



14 

Balance in collector's and treasurer's hands, $2,602 20 

NOTES PAYABLE. 

Charles H. Wheeler, $400 00 

George Chandler, 500 00 

Varnum Tuttle, 1,800 00 

Charles H. Wheeler, 150 00 

Georcre Chandler, 200 00 

$2,550 00 



Balance due the town, $52 20 

J. K. W. WETHERBEE,) Selechnen 
J. W. DUPEE, V of 

T. F. NOYES, ) Acton. 



Acton. Feb. 2r)th, 1.S87, 



15 



TOWN WARRANT. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Middlesex, ss. 
/c* either Constable of the Town of Acton^ in said County^ 

Greeting : 

You are hereby requested in the name of the Coinmonwealth 
of Massachusetts, to notify the legal voters of said town of Acton 
to meet at the Town Hall on Monday, the fourth day of April 
next, at twelve o'clock M,, by posting- copies of this warrant, by 
you attested, at the Post Office in the centre of the town, 
also at the stores of Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, Mead & 
Stone and Isaac W. Flagg, in said town, seven days at least 
before the time appointed for said meeting, then and there to act 
upon the following articles as they mav think proper, viz : 

Art. 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said meeting. 

Art. 2. To see what amount of money the town will raise 
to defray town charges the present year. 

Art. 3. To see what amount of money the town will raise 
for the support of schools the present year, and how it shall be 
expended. 

Art. 4. To see what amount of money the town will raise 
to repair the roads the present year, and how it shall be expended. 

Art. 5. To see if the town will instruct the School Com- 
mittee to appoint a Superintendent of Schools. 

Art. G. To see if the town will choose a Superintendent 
of Burials. 

Art. 7. To consider and act upon the acceptance of the 
Jury list as revised by the Selectmen. 

Art. 8. To see if the town will vote to accept the repoils 
of the Selectmen, Overseers of the Poor, School Committee and 
other town officers. 



16 

Art. 1). To see if the town will authorize the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money for the 
town, if necessary, in anticipation of the taxes for the current 
year. 

Art. 10. To vote by ballot. Yes or No, in answer to the 
question : Shall Licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this town the present year? 

Art. 11. To see if town will appropriate the sum of one 
hundred dollars for Memorial day. 

Art. 12. To see if the town will build a highw^ay from 
near the house of John Davis, to the Fufler place, so called, or 
pass any vote or votes thereon. 

Art. 13. To see if the town will instruct the constable to 
post town warrants at North Acton. 

Art. 14. To see if the tow^n will build a receiving tomb in 
Mount Hope cemetery, or pass any vote thereon. 

Art. 15. To hear and act upon the reports of any com- 
mittees chosen to report at this meeting. 

AR'r. 10. To see if the town will purchase a piece of land to 
enlarge Mount Hope cemetery or pass an}- vote or votes thereon. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this wan^ant to 
us, with your doings thereon, at or before the time appoint- 
ed for said meeting. 

Given under our hands this nnieteenth day of March in the 
year eighteen hundred and eighty-seven. 

J. K. W. WETHERBEE, ") Sclcctiiicn 
J. W. DUPEE. \ of 

T. F. NOYES, ) Acton. 



17 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT, 

TO JANUARY 1, 1887. 



JBIRTHH TiV 1886. 



1886 
Jan 



NAME OF CHILI). 



25 James Arthur Wayne, 
" 25 Herman T. Wheeler, 

Feb. 4 Arthur Chandler Baldwin, 
" 6 J ulia Katherine Richardson. 
" 11 Isabella Louisa Green, 

18| Benjamin Gilbert Reed, 
'• 2olCharles William Edwards, 

Mar, o Margaret Dustan Quimby, 
22 Charles Edmund Davis, 
" 24 Gallon M. Spinney, 

April 8 Eva Marion Hairis, 
'' 22 Alva Stanley Hall, 

May 20 Mary Eliza Kinsley, 

June 24 Blanche Knowlton. 

" 26 Richard Stearns Sanders, 
" 28 Florence Ena Hartwell, 
" 29 Eva Mary Jane Hunt, 

July 5 Alice Tuttle Fairbanks, 
" 5 Annie Moan, 
" 7 Hoi lis Freeman Williams, 
" 29 Harold Roscoe Littlefield, 

Aug. 12jMarjorie Pitman, 
" 21 j Thomas McCarte. 

Sept. 9|Crosby Arthur Hoar, 
'• 29 Ida May Tribble, 

Oct. 5 Lillian Florence Ha,y ward, 
" 11 Emily Augusta Mains, 
" 17 Milton Cleveland Bean, 
" 22 Charles Herbert Griggs, 
" 25 Wilfred Emerson Sharp, 
" 26 Helen Ardell Knowlton, 
" 30 Margaiet McDonald, 

Xov. 18 Clara Frances Richardson, 
" 80 Orma Francis Davis, 



jS^AMES of PAUElSfTS. 



Robert and Elizabeth Wayne. 
James B. and Mary A. Wheeler. 
Loren C. and Ra<-hel Baldwin. 
James E. and Sara R. Richardson. 
Frederic W.ancl Catherine M.Green. 
Benjamin W, and Helen R. Reed. 
Charles and Elizabeth Edwards. 
Geoige L. and Emma L. Quimby. 
Charles L. and Lucy C. Davis. 
Isaac B. and Ellen Spinney. 
David C. and Jennie B. Harris. 
Delette H. and Susie A. Hall. 
James and Anna Kinsley. 
AmasaM.and Elizib'h F.Knowlton. 
Charles B. and Lizzie S. Sanders. 
William H. and Lora B. Hartwell. 
James W. and Mary E. Hunt. 
Charles H. and Nellie L. Fairbanks. 
Frank and Margaret E. Moan. 
Freeman and Etta C. Williams. 
Hanson and Florence M. Littlefield 
Charles W. and Edith Pitman. 
Thomas and Maria McCarte. 
John S. and Minnie R. Hoar. 

Clara Tribble. 

Amos H. and Etta C. Hayward, 
John and Anna Maiia Mains. 
Alcander P. and Mary M. Bean. 
Charles D. and AbbieE. Griggs. 
Walter N. and Nettie C. Sharp. 
Fiank R. and Emma S. Knowlton. 
John and Mary Ann McDonald. 
Austin A. and Mary 1, Richardson. 
Charles T. and Carrie E. Davis. 



18 







TWARBIA^ 


;;es 


IN 1886. 




DATE. 


I 
NAMES. PvESIDEXCE. 


1880 
Jan. 


*13 


George B. Go wen. 
Carrie B. Hayward. 






South Acton. 
South Acton. 




April 


2 


Archibald W. Stronach. 
Mary Isabella Hunter. 






Stow. 
Stow. 




April 


7 


Warren A. Stevens. . 
Emily Augusta Ireland. 






West Acton. 
Littleton. 




April 10 


Charles H. Snow. 
Mary E. Robinson. 






Acton. 
Groton. 




June 


1.-) 


Nelson H Tenney. . 
Eliza Jane Putnam. . 






Acton. 
Waltham. 




June 


16 


George H. Parker. 
Emily Lackey. . 






Littleton. 
Pepperell. 




June 


28 


Isiael M. Charlton. . 
Carrie A. Granger. 








Boxborough. 
West Acton. 




June 


30 


Fred W. Heed. . 
Lina Fales. 








Acton. 
Acton. 




July 


o 


Lawrence M. Pitcher. 
Emma L. Munroe. 








Acton. 
Somcrville. 




July 


•^ 


Joseph F. Griffin. 
Blanche M. Pitcher . 








Acton. 
Charlestown. 




July 


4 


Charles Forest. 
Fannie Delory. . 








South Acton. 
South Acton. 




July 


28 


Alphonso A. Wyman. 
Laura A Id rich. . 








West Act(m. 
West Acton. 




A u<j;'. 


24 


Patrick Carroll. • 
Mary Mur[>hy. . 








South Acton. 
South Acton. 




Sept. 


23 


Arthur Tuttle. . 
Florence ('. Dupee. . 








('helseti. 
North Acton. 


• 


Oct. 


24 


Daniel O'Leary. 
Olive Landry. 








Cambridge. 
South Acton. 




Oct. 


28 


Edgar F. Clark. 
Amy M. Godfrey. 








Concord. 
Acton. 




Nov. 


19 


Byjon W. Austin. 
Hattie Bella Penniman. 








Acton. 
Acton. 




Nov. 


24 


Fred G. Jones. . 
Mary A. Brindley. 








Acton. 
Maynard. 




Nov. 


25 


Olin L. Wright. 
Maiy J. Ross. 








South Acton. 
Concord. 




Nov. 


25 


Arthur E. Reed. 
Carrie E. White. 








(.Hielmsford. 
Acton. 





19 



DEATHN IN 1886. 






I^AME OF DECEASED. 


AGE. 






DATE. 


1.°^ 


=c 


00 


PLACE OF DEATH. 






N 


^ 


Cl 




i8sr>. 










Jan. 6 


Esther (Oliver) Souther, 


74 






Acton. 


7 


Jane E. Jesson, 


19 


10 


12 






11 


Joseph Jones, 


78 


3 


5 






17 


Levi Houu^hton, 


88 


7 


6 






27 


James Tobin, 


33 










27 


Joseph F. Tuttle, 


51 


2 


16 






Feb. 11 


Mrs. Delina Farrar, 


44 


5 


5 






11 


John Quinlan, 


52 










Mar. 17 


Mrs. A bio-ail D. Cowdry, 


79 


5 








20 


Franklin Wheeler, 


84 




16 






April 9 


John W. Crocker, 


18 


3 


12 






18 


Charles A. Hanscom, 


62 


4 


25 






14 


Annie O'Neil. 




5 


3 






16 


Mrs. Ursula C. Leland. 


74 


5 


18 






27 


Edwin Stone, 


51 


4 








29 


Mrs. Sarah F. Walcott, 


57 


10 


25 






May 12 


Oliver C. Wyman, 


65 










July 13 


William E. Stearns, 


58 


5 


5 






17 


Mrs. Harriet Harris, 


76 


6 


3 






Aug. 11 


Mrs. Susan T. Chandler, 


74 


4 


3 






19 


Mrs. Maria Stockwell, 


77 


3 








Sept. 10 


Lena F. Sarg^ent, 


2 


9 


2 






Oct. 11 


Charles Tuttle, 


91 


6 








in 


Mrs. Helen E. Little, 


46 






Woburn. 


30 


Charles Herbert Grigjfs, 






8 


Acton. 


Nov. 12 


Blanche S. Piper, 


1 


7 


29 






23 


Mrs. Ella E. Kingsley, 


28 


8 


25 






Dec. 3 


Mrs. Mahala Williams, 


67 










21 


Mrs. Clarissa Wetherbee, 


69 


1 


25 






29 


Isaiah McLaughlin, 


26 


7 


9 






1887. 












Feb. 10 


Elmer Rouillard, 


21 




14 


Ma 


plewood. 



20 



AltiOUNT RECEIVE© FROITX T^ICENSES OF 1>0<;:^. 
SINCE I>AST REPORT, $246.00. 



OWNER. 

James I). Coburii, 

Daniel Tuttle, 

Charles W. Grant, 

Dana F. Hay ward, 

Antoine Bulette, 

Wm. D. Tuttle, 

Otis H. Forbush, 

Daniel Harris, 

M. A. Tobin, 

M. H. Warden, 

Anson C. Piper, 

Elbridge J. Bobbins, 

Everett Wayne, 

Mrs. G. F. Flagg, 

A. L. ISToyes, 

E. Eddie Fletcher, 

Lester N. Fletcher. 

Charles Varney, 

John Fletcher, 

Charles H. Hodges, 

Daniel McCarthy, 2nd, 

Mrs. M. D. M. Ball, 

Amos P. Wood, 

William Barnes, 

Mead & Stone, 

Augustus Fletcher, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbeo, 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, 

Elnathan Jones, 

E. H. Jones, 

David Shapley, 

E, F. Fuller, 

Mrs. Daniel Wetherbee, 

Charles J. Williams, 

Fred Penniman, 

Sylvester Haynes, 

Reuben L. Reed, 

Wm. B. Davis, 

Ai Bobbins, 

Luke Tuttle, 

Aaron J. Fletcher, 

Joel H. Conant, 

Moses A. Reed, 

Edwin W. Taylor, 



]SrO. OWXEE. 

Willis L. Mead, 

Daniel J. Wetherbee, 

Isaac W. Flagg, 

Henry Hanson, 

Andrew J. Willis, 

George Gardner, 

Chauncy B. Bobbins, 

Henry Haynes, 

Jos. R. Bassett, 

M. E. Taylor, 

H. M. Smith, 

Moses Taylor, 

John Kelley, 

Webster C. Bobbins, 

Frank W. Houghton, 

Joseph F. Cole. 

Herman Chaplin, 

John C. Gates, 

L. U. Holt, 

Xahum Littlefield. 

Alonzo L. Tuttle, 

Mrs. Eliza Haynes, 

John Temple, transfered from 

Marlboro, 
Edward Willis, 
A. W. Gardner, 
A. H. Gilmore, 
Isaac Barker, 
John E. Hannon, 
L. E. Beed, 
Balph Crooker, 
John H. Hanaford, 
Mrs. Thomas Moore, 
Charles D. Griggs, 
Delette H. Hall, 
John Grimes, 
Frank L. Crosby, 
Geo. E. Whittier, 
Isaiah S. Leach, 
James B. Wheeler, fern., 
Chas. B. Sanders, 
Henry Brooks, 
Thomas Calder, 
George Pratt, fem., 



21 



OWNEIJ. XO. 

Ollie D.Wood, ' 1 

Greorge R. Keyes, 1 

Frank E. Harris, 1 

Frederick Rouillard, 1 

Cyrus Hay ward, 1 

Francis Bobbins, 1 

J. W. Dupee, 1 

Forbusb & Hartwell, fcni., 1 

Charles H. Morris, 1 

Charles J. Holton, 1 

Wm. n. Teele, 1 

Fred L. Whitcomb, 1 



OWNER. NO, 

J. E. Scofield. 1 

Thomas Owens, 1 

Francis Pratt, 1 

Frank R. Knowlton, 1 

Mrs. H. M. Beck, 1 

Edward O'^^Teil, 1 

Edward Wood, 1 

Solon A. Robbins, 1 

F. A. Houston, 1 

Luther Conant. 1 

Warren Bemis, ] 

Chai-les H. Wheeler, fern., 1 



Whole number licensed, 117. Number transferred, 1. 
113 males at $2.00. A22r).00; 4 females at $5.00, $20.00; Total, $24(100. 



WILLlAiSr D TUTTLE, Tovm Clerk: 



22 



Report of Receipts and Expenditures at the 
Almshouse in Acton, 

FOR THE TEAR ENDIXG FEBRUARY t>S, 1887. 



Articles ou J 


hand, 


February 2^j, 1SS6. 






7 cows, 


$350 


00 


1 wagon, 


$95 


00 


1 horse. 


200 


00 


1 Concord bnggv. 


25 


00 


16 tons ha}-. 


320 


00 


30 lbs. hams. 


4 


20 


1-2 ton mowed rv'e, 


5 


00 


7 lbs. hu-d, 




75 


Shorts and meal. 


22 


00 


4 doz. eg^s. 




80 


185 flonr barrels. 


33 


30 


1-2 bushel beans, 


1 


00 


Lot of bags, 


7 


00 


Spices, 




50 


4 market boxes, 




40 


1 barrel flour. 


5 


50 


Salt, 




30 


Crackers, 




25 


?)3 hens, 


IG 


50 


3 lbs. coflee. 




75 


70 bushels potatoes. 


49 


00 


2 lbs. tea, 


1 


00 


20 " small potri 


itoes, 3 


50 


Hard soap, 




50 


6 barrels apples. 


9 


00 


1 cider barrel, 


1 


00 


on, 




30 


17 cords wood, 


<S5 


00 


1 barrel soap, 


4 


00 


Coal, 


3 


00 


300 lbs. salt pork. 


30 


00 










$1274 


55 



Receipts from Town Farm, 

Frons ITIarch 1, 18S6, to iWaich 1, 18S7. 

Rec'd for Apples, $173 32 Rec'd 



Milk, 


631 32 


Calves, 


22 50 


Potatoes, 


12 46 



Cabb^ 


iges, 


$ 


50 


Pork, 




25 


02 


Eggs, 




16 


08 


Cow, 




35 


00 



$916 20 



23 



E:x::F>EisrsEs. 



ID FOr. 








Paid for 




Cows, 




$95 


00 


Lantern, 


$ 90 


Pigs, 




10 


00 


Tea, 


18 10 


Barrels, 




38 


■57 


Lantern burner, 


12 


Phosphates, 




81 


06 


Tobacco, 


88 


Hanging pa 


per and 






Butter, 


44 60 


whitening 


rooms, 


G 


40 


Yeast, 


1 45 


Labor, 




171 


08 


Cloth and clothing. 


44 88 


Curing hams 


'•) 




GO 


Brushes, 


1 34 


Use of bull, 






75 


Whetstone. 


30 


Filing saw. 






GO 


Crackers, 


19 85 


Use of oxen, 




5 


00 


Molasses, 


8 81 


Lumber, 






53 


Cheese, 


8 70 


Fish, 




12 


96 


Hops, 


45 


Blacksmith bill, 


19 


08 


Paris green, 


50 


Soap, 




11 


80 


Cocoa, 


17 


Meat, 




98 


19 


Hatchet, 


75 


Grain, 




313 


82 


Salt, 


2 00 


Trees, 




18 


00 


Wash boiler. 


2 00 


Repairing cl 


iimney. 


2 


00 


Rye meal, 


28 


L. U. Holt's 


bill, 


8 


10 


Extracts, 


GO 


Pearline, 




1 


13 


Wood saw. 


92 


Crockery, 




4 


28 


Sugar, 


17 92 


Axle, 




1 


25 


Raisins, 


2 90 


Spice, 




1 


46 


Currants, 


1 12 


Medicine, 




G 


55 


Rake teeth, 


2 50 


Oil, 




2 


17 


Nails, 


95 


Pepper, 






8 


Sponge, 


37 


Rice, 




1 


35 


Flour, 


28 05 


Beans, 




2 


85 


Scythes, 


80 


Brooms, 




1 


72 


Rakes, 


54 


Tin ware. 




2 


43 


Onions, 


1 00 


Coflee, 




8 


32 


Cream tartar. 


47 


Hoe, 






50 


Tacks, 


23 


Lemons, 






73 


Vinegar, 


50 


Oyster shells 


, 




^0 


Dried apple, 


72 


Pails, 




1 


87 


Rolling pin. 


20 



24 



J'AIV FOR 








Paid fuk 






Graham ineal. 


$ 


1 


15 


Glass. 




$ 14 


Lard, 




;3 


'J 2 


Alum. 




<s 


Wall paper. 




:3 


31 


Oat meal. 




62 


Seeds. 






47 


Hams, 




1 56 


Saltpetre. 






SO 


White lead. 




16 


Shelt paper. 






3 


Curtains and cord. 


85 


Vinegar, 




:3 


75 


Saleratus. 




32 


Ammonia. 






33 


^Matches. 




17 


Turpentine, 






33 


Hominy, 




70 


Grass seed. 


10 


SS 


Shells.' 




50 


Bolts and screws. 






27 


Postage and stationery, 88 


Starch. 






84 


Butchering. 




2 50 


Stove polish. 






2U 


Services of Warren 


Be- 


Mustard. 






44 


mis and wife. 




250 00 


Baskets, 






51) 


Services of Luke Blan- 


vSpit cup, 






12 


chard, 




50 00 


Lamp wicks. 






6 


Services of John 


E.Cut- 


Borax. 






15 


ter. 




40 00 


Wheat. 






()4 


Services of Jona. 


W. 


Ketchup. 






40 


Loker, 




8 00 




$1480 80 


Expenditures 






. . . . 


$1,480 


8<^ 




Receipts 








016 


20 






>es. 










Licome less than expen 






. $564 66 


Due from treasury to hi 


dance 


account $5G4 


66 




Interest on farm .... , . , 








240 


00 
















$804 66 








A^ictualing and lodgin<^ 


112 

■ on 


ti 


amp 
irm. 


s at 40 cents each 




... 44 80 


Cost of suDOortino- 1300 


. $759 86 



Whole numl)er of persons, exclusive of tramps, supported 
in almshouse, 7 ; aveiage number, 4 1-2 ; present number, 6. 

LUKE BLANCHARD. ) Overseers 

JOHN E. CUTTER, [ of 

JONATHAN W. LOKER. ) Poor. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



School Committee 



FOR THE 



SCHOOL -YEAR 1886-7. 



To the Tozvn of Acto7i : 

REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 

BY ITS STJPEKINTENDENT. 



The same Committee, with one exception, makes its report 
t-his year, as last, throu^-h its Superintendent. 



The same policy has been pursued this last year as in the 
year preceding. All matters pertaining to the interests of our 
schools have come before the full Committee for action, and, with 
one exception, entire unanimity has existed between members of 
the Committee, and between the Committee and its Superinten- 
dent, and this exception would probably have not been had not 
there been outside interference. 

The establishing of the course of study of the High School 
during the year preceding, whereby its grade of scholarship was 
not only established but largely raised from what it was before, 
opened the way for grading the lessons of the lower schools. 
This has been done, so that now every study is marked out and 
the scholars and teachers move in an even course of study from 
the time of entering the Primary grade till they have passed 
through the Grammar and High School. 

The first graduating class from our High School had their 
commencement or graduation exercises at the Town hall at the 
close of the spring term of 1886. The following program wil' 
indicate the character of the exercises : 
Greeting Song. ....... School 

Prayer. ........ 

Salutatory and Essay — "Character." . . Minnie G, I^assett 



28 



History. .... 

Song — "Home Eetuniing." 

Oration — ''Education/' 

Essay — " Over the Alps lies Italy." 

Duet—" Witches' Flioht. 

Oration — " Have a Purpose." 

Essay — ''Conversation as a Fine Art." 

Song — "Anniversary." 

Essay — "Ever Onward, ever I^pward." 

Prophecy. .... 

Song — (Selected.) 

Valedictorv. .... 



Martha C. Pratt 

Quartette 

Eugene L. Hall 

M. Florence Fletcher 

Minnie O. and Blanche M. Bassett 

Emery W. Clark 

Carrie L. Shapley 

Martha C. Pratt 
Eugene L. Hall 



PIJESEXTATIOX OF DIPLO^FAS. 



Address. 
Parting Song. 



Emery W. Clark 

Oeorge A. Walton 
School 



The Town hall was crowded and we believe every one was 
not alone pleased but deeply gratified at the merit shown as the 
exercises pro^jfressed to tlieir finish, and more than c\'er determined 
to support that system of education in our town tliat shoidd main- 
tain the High School as the fitting complement to the Primarv 
and Grammar grades. 

Sickness lias interfered with the schools during the year to a 
hirge extent. The average membership and attendance table 
shows the eflect of the same. 

Still in the South and West Primary and the West Grammar 
schools, with the High Scliool, every seat has been filled, and 
there is a need of more seats and no opportunity in the school- 
rooms to place them. And it is now, as it was last year, urged 
upon the town, b\- its School Committee, that it take speedy action 
to provide for this necessity now befoi-e us. Tlie South Primarv 
school with a total membership of tiftv-two. and the West vvitii 
its membership of forty-six, would have presented difficulties that 
your Committee could not have answered for had not sickness 
taken many from their desks and thus given room for others. As 
it was, your Committee had to vote to refuse entrance to scholars 
until the beginning of the fall term, when some seats would be 
vacated by the classes going into the next room. This will not 
relieve the embarrassment, as those desiring to enter are more than 
those who will be fitted to go into the next grade. 

With the High School your Committee had to make arrange- 
ments with the teachers of the Grammar grades at the North and 
Centre to take some High School scholars, because there was not 



'20 

room cMiough for all in the school-room at South Acton. This 
school is in still a worse condition, as one-half of the highest class 
have concluded to take the four years' course, so that but four or 
five will graduate this spring, wdiile thirty are reported from the 
different schools as fitting themselves for and intending to enter 
the High School in the fall. This will increase the membership 
of our High School from fifty, which has been its membership 
since the entering of the last class last fall, to seventy-six ^or next 
year. There is no school-room to accommodate such a school in 
the town, even if one teacher could, with any justice to himself 
or the scholars, be the tutor of so many scholars covering a four 
years' course of study embracing seventeen different text books, 
besides exercises in reading, writing, spelling and rhetorical. 

These problems can only be solved, in the opinion of your 
Committee, by giving assistants to these schools, and specially 
the High School. 

Your Committee again recommend that the town make suit- 
able arrangements through the School Committee for the trans- 
portation of scholars to and from the villages whei'e the High 
School is held in its successive terms. It has pained us to know 
that children of parents who were unable to provide transporta- 
tion, or pay for the same, have been denied that which they so 
much desire, and are fitted for, in that they could not go to the 
High School. 

But little has been done in the direction of books during the 
year. The necessity of buying many more new arithmetics was 
taken advantage of in making a change, which we are confident 
was for the best. 

The same necessity existed as to reading books, and instead 
of buying the same, or any one series of reading books, for the 
whole town, the plan of the Superintendent was unanimously 
adopted of purchasing enough of each of three series for three 
schools, and at the end of the year change readers, thus giving 
new readers to each school for three years, this being about the 
length of time that reading books can be used advantageously. 

Your Committee has also voted to put single entry book-keep- 
ing into the Grammar schools for the highest class, to be studied 
in connection with, and place of, writing, so that every Grammai' 



30 

school scholar will receive training in the elementar}' principles 
of book-keeping, even if they do not attend the High School, and 
fit them for higher attainment in that branch of stndy if they do 
enter the Higli School. 

SCHOOI>S. 

It has been the custom man\' vears for each Committeeman in 
our town to hire the teacher for his district. During a visit from 
the agent of the State Board of Education, in making inquiries as 
to the general school work of the town, tliis fact was inquired 
about, and, when known, the Committee was notified that such 
practice was against the law of th.e Commonwealth, and that 
every teacher of the town must be elected by the action of the 
whole Committee before thev could enter upon their work ; oth- 
erwise the town would run the risk of losing its proportion (jf the 
State educational fimds. Therefore the Committee as a whole has 
voted upon the hiring of everv teacher in the town during the 
past }'ear. 

There have been a niunber of changes among the teachers in 
our schools. 

In the vSouth East, by the marriage of the teacher, the school 
was left vacant at the close of the spring term, and Miss Laura 
Brown of Littleton, an experienced teaclier, was secured for the 
place. 

At North Acton it was deemed best bv the Committee to 
make a change, and during the summer vacation Mr. Joseph 
Godfrey of Acton, was employed to take the school at its opening 
in the fall. 

In the Centre Grammar Miss Louise Crooker began the \ ear, 
but gave place to Mr. O. ^V.Duttonfor the winter term, at her own 
request, she not desiring to keep the school longer. Miss Bessie 
Ball continues as teacher in the Primary grade, where slie has 
been for so manv years. 

At East Acton Miss S. A. Wetherbee, who has taught this - 
school for years, found it needful to take a prolonged rest for her 
health in the winter, and Miss Evilina Davis and Miss Louise 
Crooker, successivelv, were employed as substitutes. 

At the South Miss Viola S. Tuttle has continued to be the 
teacher of the Primary school. 

Miss Holmes, who had proven herself to be one of the best 
of teachers, had some trouble in matters of discipline, and, though 



31 

it was the expressed wish ot most of the parents of the scholars 
to retain her, it was deemed best by the committee to make a 
change. This was acquiesced in by parents and Committeman, 
and Miss Fannie Houghton was secured and has held the school 
since the beginning of the school year. 

There has been a cliange also in the teacher of our High 
Scliool, and we are convinced it has proven to be for the best in- 
terests of the school. A. W. Armstrong is nov/ the teacher. 

At West Acton Miss C. Lettie Newton continues as the 
teaclier of the Primary school. 

As to the Grammar school at West Acton, where Miss S. J. 
Wyman was teacher, the Committee became aware that she was 
using methods of punishment that were cruel and could not be 
allowed by the Committee ; other matters, also, that were not in 
accord with the policv of the Committee, were continually carried 
out, and at the close of the spring term the Committee requested 
the Committeeman from the West district to confer with her, that 
either these matters should be remedied or a new teacher be se- 
cured. No conference was held and nothing was done in the 
case, and matters were the more aggravated, till, during the fall 
term, the Committee refused to hire her for another term, and re- 
quested the Committeeman to select and bring another teacher 
before them for their approval. Outside parties, not parents of 
any children in the school, interfered, delaying action, until, as a 
matter of compromise, the Committee gave its consent to the 
hiriuCT of said teacher for another term with the express under- 
standing that it was to be the last. 

' With this one exception entire unanimity has existed in all 
the workings of the Committee. 

Another teacher has been selected for the West Acton Gram- 
mar school and enters upon her work at the beginning (jf the 
spring term. 

The usual financial and attendance tables are appended. 

The foregoing report in full, with the statistical table, its 
statements as to schools and its recommendations havmg been 
read to the Committee is accepted and adopted by them as its 
report, through its Superintendent, without an objection. 

C, L. RHOADEvS, Super iiitendent of Schools. 
For the School Committee of Acton. 



FINANCIAL REPORT. 



71? the Towit of Acton : 

Your School Committee hcrcb\' submit their report of the 
expenses of the schools of the town l)y districts ; said expenses 
covering salaries of teachers, the cost of fuel and care of school 
buildings. 

JOHN E. CUTTER, Chairman. 
CHARLES H. MEAD, Clerk. 
Acton, March 16, 18«7. 



Acton High vSciiools. 



Salary of teacher $720 00 

Rent of instrument 22 00 

Care of room o5 00 

Fuel 23 00 

$800 00 



West Actox Schools. 

Salary of teachers $700 00 

Fuel... 57 40 

Care of rooms 85 62 

$843 02 



Acton Centre Schools. 

Salary of teachers $676 00 

Fuel 76 95 

C^re of building 44 50 

-— $797 45 



33 



South Acton Schools. 



Salary of teachers $712 00 

Fuel 40 71 

Care of buiklinn" 92 50 

$845 21 



'to 



NoiiTH Acton School. 

Salary of teacher $315 00 

Fnel 34 68 

Care of building 24 13 

$373 81 



East Acton School. 

Teacher's salary $326 00 

Fuel 34 45 

Care of building 23 00 

$383 45 



South East Acton School. 

Salary of teacher $315 00 

Fuel 2'J 62 

Care of building 17 11 

$361 73 

Total $4,404 67 



34 



TABULAR STATEMENT. 



SCHOOLS. 



Acton Hijih 



Ccntio 



Soutli 



West 
North, 



Eh St. 



South East, 



Totals. 



Primary, 

(iranimar. 

i Primary, 

j (xrammar, 

I Primary, 
j (Jrammar, 



TIOACHKRS. 



I H. H. Williams, 
( A. W. Armstromi-. 

Miss Bessie Kali; 
I " J^ouise Crookor, 
( O. W. Duttoii, 

Miss A'iol:i Tiittle, 
) " S. H. Holmes. 
i " Fannie Houghton 
" ('. Lettie Newtou. 
" S. J. AVvman. 
I " Ella I). Daniels, 
i Joseph W. ("owdry. 
\ Miss S. A. Wetherbee, 
I " Evilina Davis, 
( " Louise Crocker. 
I " C. A. Granjier, 
\ " Laura llrown. 



l9 



3 


m j 








« 






















J J. 




'■■ii, 






O 


■^ ^ 


;< 




o 


























" 




3G 


(54 1 


.3.") 


34 


;}.") 


30 


.•io 


52 


35 


3!) 



35 ' 4t) 
35 \ 35 

35 28 21 



% i ^ 



20 i 17 



14 12 11 ! 



369 269 1242 | 



1!) 



1 200 



Number of children, between the atfes of live and fifteen years, 
turned bv the Assessors in 1886, 25!). 



the town a.- 



35 



Town Officers for 1887. 



Toion Clerk. 
Wm. T). 'J'uttlk, 



Selectmen, 
J. K. W. Wetheubee, Job W. Dcpee, 



Thos, F. Notes. 



Assessors. 
Phinp:as Wetpierbee, J. W. Dupee, Ohaijncp:y B. Robbins. 



Eeisha H. Cutler, 



Overseers of the Poor 
Luke Blanchakd, 



M. E, Tayuok. 



School Committee. 
(Jhakles H, Mead, Charees J. Williams, 

George R. Keyes, William S. Jones, 



Hiyhivay Surveyors. 
Charles Wheeler, Francis Pratt, Nahum Eittlefield. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



Town of Acton, 



February 26, 1887, to February 26, 1888, 




"^SJ" «^.^cJ.a«-ll-„'.r'«l? 



ACTON: 

The Enterprise Steam Job Print. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Town of Acton in Account with J. K. W. Wetherbee, Treasurer. 
1888 Dr. 

Feb. 27. To cash paid, State lax, $1665 00 

*' '' County tax, 778 56 
'' *' on Selectmen's 

orders, 17,962 77 

" Outstanding orders, 580 88 

'' Balance due the town, 799 56 



$21,786 77 



1887 Cr, 

Feb. 26. By balance in the treasury, $897 36 

Cash received of T. F. Newton 
on account of South School 
District, 
Cash received of T. F. Newton 
for school books sold, 
Received ofC. H. Burroughs for tuition at 
High School, 
Chapel Society for rent of 
school room to April 1, 
1887, 
American Powder Co., for 253 

feet hard pine lumber, 
Town of Billerica, for support 

of Thomas Russell, 
Varnum Tuttle, borrowed 

money, 
George Chandler, borrowed 

money, 
Angle B. Hill, borrowed mon- 

Daniel Harris, borrowed mon- 
ey, 

State Treasurer, corporation 
tax, 



23 


50 


1 


59 


16 


67 


33 


00 


7 08 


268 


90 


1723 


00 


500 00 


430 


00 


500 


00 


1,073 


69 



4 



Received of State Treasurer, National bank 

tax, 578 21 

State Treasurer, State aid, 

chap. 252, acts 1879, 176 50 

State Treasurer, State aid, 

chap. 301, acts 1879, 107 00 

State Treasurer, support of 

State pauper, 9 25 

State Treasurer, burial of 

state pauper, 10 00 

State Treasurer, income of 

Mass, school fund, 167 54 

County Treasurer, dog fund for 

1887, 240 54 

J. E. Cutter, for taxes of 1886, 1704 84 
J. E. Cutter, for taxes of 1887, 13,098 40 
Interest on money in bank, 80 69 

L. W. Stevens for lots sold in 

Mount Hope Cemetery, 38 00 

City of Boston for aid fur- 
nished Mrs. Abbie Sibley, 53 01 
Julian Tuttle,for rent of Town 

Hall and cellar, 48 00 



$21,786 77 



J. K. W. WETHERBEE, Treasurer of Acton. 
Acton, Feb. 27th, 1888. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



SUPPORT OF ACHOOIiS. 

Centre I>i8trict. 

Paid Rev. James Fletcher for teachers, $700 00 

'' " care of house, 66 45 

" <■' fuel, 80 06 

"• " incidentals, 3 20 

" cleaning school, 

rooms, 2 78 



;( 







IVest ]>i!<trict. 




id C. H. 


Mea 


d for teachers, 


$700 00 


i4 


u 


care of house. 


78 17 


ii 


(k 


fuel, 


28 42 


U 


ii 


incidentals, 


4 21 


;i 


a 


cleaning school-rooms. 


6 40 



South I>istrict. 

Paid Anson C. Piper for teachers, $700 00 

" '^ care of house, 90 25 

'" fuel, 45 35 

" " cleaning school-rooms, 2 25 

'' "• incidentals, 3 78 



IVorth District. 




Paid George R.Keyes for teachers, 
" '' fuel, 
" " care of house, 
" '' cleaning school- 
'* '^ incidentals. 


$338 00 

67 97 

23 50 

rooms, 3 00 

73 


East District. 




Paid C. J. Williams for teachers 

*' " care of house, 

'' '* fuel, 

" '* incidental, 


f 338 00 

31 70 

48 12 

1 60 



$854 49 



$817 20 



$841 63 



$433 20 



$419 42 



Paid W. S. Jones 


for teachers, 
fuel, 
care of house, 


Paid C. H. Mead, 

a (.1. 


High School. 

care of house, 
use of organ, 
fuel, 



Southeast District. ; 

1 



$370 53 



George Gardner for rent of piano and mu- 
sic for graduating exercises. 
Paid George Gardner for rent of organ, 
A. W. Armstrong for teaching. 
Rev. James Fletcher, care of house, 

^' '• fuel, 

Anson C. Piper care of house, 
'' - fuel, 
^' " rent of organ. 



School Supplies. 

Paid T. F. Newton, 
C. H. Mead, 
Rev. James Fletcher, 



$315 


00 


38 


53 


17 


00 


$240 


00 


12 


00 


5 


00 


4 


00 


nu- 




ll 


04 


6 


00 


480 


00 


8 


00 


4 


00 


15 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


$14 


62 


321 


19 


11 


90 



$800 04 



TOAVIV OFFICERS. 

Paid Rev. C. L. Rhoades for service as su- 
perintendent of schools, $41 66 

Rev. James Fletcher, for services as su- 
perintendent of schools, 124 98 

John E. Cutter, collecting taxes for 1886, 100 00 

L. U. Holt, sealer of weights and meas- 
ures, 10 00 

C. B. Stone, services as registrar of 
voters to May 1st, 1887, 30 00 

John White, services as registrar of vo- 
ters to Jan. 1st, 1887, 5 00 

C. J. Williams, services as registrar of 
voters, 2 50 

Phineas Wetherbee, services as assessor, 35 00 

C. B. Robbins, services as assessor, 22 00 

Wm, D. Tuttle, services as town clerk 
to March 5th, 1888, 25 00 

Wm. D. Tuttle, services as registrar of 
voters to May lst,1887, 15 00 



$347 71 



Paid Julian Tuttle, services as registrar of vo- 
ters to May 1st, 1888, 

J. W. Dupee, services as assessor, 
" ''• '' selectman, 

T. F. Noyes, '' '' 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, services as select- 
man, 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, services as treasu- 
rer. 



12 


00 


24 


00 


45 


00 


45 


00 


85 


00 


45 


00 



PRINTING. 

Paid John F. Wood, printing 500 sheet re- 
ports, $10 00 

John F. Wood, printing 600 book re- 
ports, 55 00 

JohnF. Wood, printing town warrants, 10 00 
" '*' " notices, 4 50 

Clarence Hosmer, printing bridge no- 
tices, 75 

John Fletcher, printing notices to fisher- 
men, 2 50 

John Fletcher, printing fish permits, 5 00 



€s:]M.£te:rv expenses. 

Paid Nathan Johnson, for labor in Wood- 
lawn cemetery, $55 90 

Moses A. Reed, relaying wall at Wood- 
lawn cemetery, 21 90 

L. W. Stevens, labor in Mount Hope 
cemetery, 69 05 

North Acton Granite Co., for building 
receiving tomb, 452 00 

L, W. Stevens, labor on tomb, 26 52 

Nathan Johnson, labor in North Acton 
cemetery, 5 25 

L. W. StevenSjdoor for receiving tomb, 25 00 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 

Paid Luke Blanchard, deficiency at Town 

Farm, in 1886, $564 66 

Luke Blanchard, for support of Clara 

Wheeler, 18 49 

Luke Blanchard, for support of Emily 
F. Town, 39 00 



$667 14 



$ 87 75 



$655 62 



8 

Paid Luke Blanchard, aid furnished Thomas 

Russell, 24 00 

Luke Blanchard, aid furnished Ola Nel- 
son, 3 00 
E. H. Cutler, for support of Clara 

Wheeler, 167 91 

E. H. Cutler, for support of Emily F. 

Town, 90 00 

E. H, Cutler, for aid furnished Ruth 

Pike, 61 00 

E. H. Cutler, for aid furnished J. E. 

Harris, 126 82 

E. H. Cutler, for aid furnished Oilman 

Newton, 54 68 

E. H. Cutler, burial expenses of Oilman 

Newton, 15 00 

E. H. Cutler, for aid furnished Trainor 

family, 16 00 

E. H. Cutler, for aid furnished Barzilai 

Lawrence, 17 00 

E. H. Cutler, for aid furnished Annie 

Stone, State pauper, 10 00 

E. H. Cutler, for medical attendance, 6 00 

E. H. Cutler, burial of an unknown 

tramp, 10 00 

E. H. Cutler, for medical attendance, 1 25 

E. H. Cutler, for aid furnished Mrs. 

Abbie Sibley, 53 01 

E. H. Cutler, for aid furnished Mrs. 

John Quinland, 102 77 

E. H. Cutler, for aid furnished Hannah 

Stanton, 98 72 

E. H. Cutler,journey to Boston, respect- 
ing Mrs. Abbie Sibley, 2 00 
E. H. Cutler, aid furnished T. Rus-ell, 151 66 

$1,632 97 











STATE AID. 




Paid John Carroll, 




$60 00 


Benjamin Skinner, 




96 00 


Richard O. Dane, 




60 00 


Allen O. Smith, 




60 00 


Ola Nelson, 




48 00 


Mrs. Rebecca C. Wright, 


48 00 


Luke Smith, 




20 00 


Mrs. Mary Smith, 




20 00 



$412 00 



ROADS AND BRI]>€}C:S. 

Paid Charles Wheeler, regular highway work, $600 00 
Francis Pratt, regular highway work, 592 20 
N. Littlefield, regular highway work, 607 07 
N. Littlefield, labor on road near the 
house of Isaac Reed per order Coun- 
ty Commissioners, 23 75 
Thomas McCarthy, widening bridge 

near the mill of H. M. Smith, 
Dennis Farmer, labor on Gould road, 
Charles Wheeler, labor on Gould road, 
Joseph Noyes, for land taken for road, 
Joseph Barker, for land taken for road, 
Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, drain pipe 
for sluice near house of Moses Gar- 
field, 
J. W. Dupee, freight on drain pipe, 
L. W. Stevens, for widening and railing 

road near Receiving tomb, 38 47 

L. W. Stevens, lumber and repairing 
railing near Littlefield^s Carriage Man- 
ufactory, 14 37 
Charles Wheeler, repairing and railing 
road near the houses of H. R. Hos- 
mer and Geo. Brooks, 30 27 
Charles Wheeler, repairing sluice near 

house of Moses Garfield, 4 79 

F. R. Knowlton, for gravel, 6 35 

John Kelley, for gravel, 50 

Francis Pratt, lumber for railing road, 7 91 



300 


00 


405 


00 


150 


00 


20 


00 


25 


00 


22 


62 


1 


28 



REPAIRS ON TOWN BUIIiOINOS. 

Paid Rev. James Fletcher, repairs on school- 
house in Centre district, $46 30 

J. E. Cutter, repairs on school-house in 

Centre district, 4 55 

Nathan Johnson, labor at school-house, 

in Centre district, 7 51 

Anson C. Piper, repairs on school- 
house in South district, 27 57 

C. J. Williams, repairs on school-house 

in East district, 29 18 



$2,849 58 



10 ; 

Paid George R. Keyes, repairs on school- 
house in North district, 2 73 j 
George Booker, whitening chapel room 1 

in South district, 3 50 ! 

C. H. Mead, repairs on school-house '\ 

in West District, 61 12 i 

W. S. Jones, repairs on school-house, t 

South-east district, 8 33 \ 

L. U. Holt, repairs at town hall, 8 28 
Robert Wayne, repairs on school-house 

in Centre district, 16 00 j 

L. U. Holt, Repairing stove in Centre I 

district, 5 87 ] 

L. U. Holt, grate for stove in East Dis- i 

trict in 1886, 1 50 I 

^222 44 ! 



TE.^IPORARV liOAN PAID. 

Pi^id Varnum Tuttle, note and interest, $1,756 74 



Daniel Harris, '- " 


511 87 


George Chandler, interest on notes. 


35 00 


Varnum Tuttle, " " 


65 00 


C. H. Wheeler, 


20 00 


" "■ note and interest, 


577 90 


George Chandler, notes and interest. 


1,234 47 


Varnum Tuttle, " " 


1,349 83 







$5,550 81 



MISCEI.I.AJ\EOlJS EXPEIVSES. 



S. A. Guilford, for Memorial Day, f 100 00 ' 

Andrew S. Jackson, for 5 fire hooks, 68 44 "^ 

Freight on fire hooks, 25 

Town of Littleton for schooling of Frank j 

Bulette and Edward Jewett, 6 90 ] 

North Acton Granite Co., for 12 stone ' 

bound posts, 3 60 j 

L. E. Reed, attending 36 burials, 108 00 *^ 

L. E. Reed, making return, 36 deaths, 9 00 
L. E. Reed, services at Magog pond, 

per order fish commissioners, 25 00 

James Kinsley for use of road for Hur- i 

ley, 8 00 \ 



11 



Paid Waldo Littlefield, painting and repair- 
ing hearse, 31 00 

H. C Sherwin, for services in relation 
to hall road per order County commis- 
sioners, 13 85 

C. J. Williams, lumber and advertising 

for Fish commissioners, 2 25 

Dr. I. Hutchins, for Military record, 75 00 

J. E. Cutter,abatement of taxes for 1885 

and 1886, 63 59 

J. E. Cutter, abatement of taxes for 

1887, 40 40 

J. E. Cutter, notifying 21 persons to 

take oath of office, 2 63 

J. E. Cutter, discount on taxes for 1887, 759 48 

E. Jones & Co., repairing fire hook, 

E. Jones & Co., coal for town hall, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, 1 and 1-2 
doz. fire pails, 

N. Johnson, sign boards for Davis mon- 
ument, 

N.Johnson, cutting grass around monument, 

Francis Pratt, blacksmith's bill, 

Charles Wheeler, blacksmith's bill, 

Phineas Wetherbee, meeting tax com- 
missioners, 2 00 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, three in- 
voice books, 1 05 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, Collec- 
tor's book, 1 20 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, lamp 

bracket for town hall, 37 

Wm. D. Tuttle, laying out Gould road 

and writing bond, 9 00 

Wm. D. Tuttle, taking water level near 
H. M. Smith's mill, 2 00 

Wm. D. Tuttle, meeting selectmen on 

Hall road, 1 50 

Wm. D. Tuttle,surveying at town farm, 1 25 

Wm. D. Tuttle, surveying and making 
lease of gravel pit of Moses Taylor & 
G. E. Whittier, 1 75 

Wm. D. Tuttle, postage and express 

charges, 3 42 

Wm. D. Tuttle, collecting and record- 
ing 30 births, 15 00 



51 


44 
36 


4 


87 


4 75 

1 00 

2 54 

7 75 



12 

Paid Wm. D. Tuttle, stationery, 

Wm. D. Tuttle, recording 19 marriages, 
Wm. D. Tuttle, recording 42 deaths, 
Charles Wheeler, teaming and setting 

12 stone bounds, 
Charles Wheeler, stone guide post, 
Moses Taylor, for gravel pit, 
James C. Graham, for gravel pit, 
J. P. Tenney, breaking roads, 
C. J. Williams, grading and labor at the ' 

East school-house, 9 00 

M. E. Taylor, oil, wicks and supplies ' 

for town hall in 1886, 3 34 I 

M. E. Taylor, oil, wicks and supplies ] 

for town hall in 1887 and 1888, 10 29 i 

Julian Tuttle, for care of town hall and j 

clock, 58 35 j 

G. H. Parlin, repairing flag, 40 i 

G. H. Parkin, for tolling bell 6 times, 1 20 



1 


25 


2 


85 


6 


20 


4 


62 


1 


50 


n 


63 


30 


00 


1 


25 



f 1,540 52 



BOUNTY TAX REFUNDSD. 



Paid Herbert T. Clark, 
J. M. Harlow, 
John Grimes, 
James W. Hayward, 
James W. Fisk, 



$1 


12 


15 


48 


10 


49 


13 


32 




19 



$40 60 



13 



RECEIPTS AND APPROPRIATIONS. 



Balance in the treasury Feb. 26, 1887, $ 897 36 

" due from collector of taxes Feb. 26, 1887, 1,704 84 

Appropriation for Town charges, 6,000 00 

for supports of schools, 4,100 00 

for roads, 1,800 00 

Overlayings, 202 97 

State Tax, 1,665 00 

County Tax, 778 56 

Rec'dof T. F. Newton, on account of South school 

district, 23 50 

T. F. Newton, for school books sold, 1 59 

C. H. Burrough,for tuition at High school, 16 67 
Chapel society, for rent of school-roona to 

April 1st, 1887, 33 00 

American Powder Co., for lumber sold, 7 08 
Town of Billerica, for aid furnished Thomas 

Russell, 268 90 

Varnum Tuttle, borrowed money, 1,723 00 

Geo. Chandler, " u ' 500 00 

Angle B. Hill, '' " 430 00 

Daniel Harris, '' '' 500 00 

State Treasurer, corporation tax, 1,073 69 

" National bank tax, 578 21 

" State Aid chap. 252, acts 79, 176 50 

" " '' 301, " '79, 107 00 

" Support of State pauper, 9 25 

'* Burial of State paupers, 10 00 

*^ Income Mass. school fund, 167 54 

County Treasurer, dog fund, 240 54 

Interest on money in bank, 80 69 

L. W. Stevens, for lots sold in Mount Hope 

cemetery, 38 00 
Julian Tuttle, for rent of town hall and cel- 
lar, 48 00 
City of Boston, for aid furnished Mrs. Abbie 

Sibley, 53 01 

$23,234 90 



14 



EXPENDITURES. 



For Centre District School, 


$854 


49 


West '' " 


817 


20 


South 


841 


63 


North " " 


433 


20 


East " 


419 


42 


So. East " '' 


370 


53 


High School, 


800 


04 


School supplies, 


347 


71 


Town officers. 


667 


14 


Cemetery expenses, 


655 


62 


Printing, 


87 


75 


State aid, 


412 


00 


Support of poor, 


1,632 


97 


Road and bridges, 


2,849 


58 


Repairs on town buildings, 


222 


44 


Miscellaneous expenses, 


1,540 


52 


Temporary loan paid, 


5,550 


81 


State tax. 


1,665 


00 


County tax, 


778 


56 


Bounty tax refunded, 


40 


60 
q;90 Q87 21 






sP^v7, i/O 1 £i 1. 


Balance due from collector. 


^1,448 


13 


" " treasurer. 


799 


56 

9 '24-7 69 










^23,234 90 


Balance due from collector and treasurer, 


$2,247 


69 


NOTES PAYABLE. 






Mrs. Angie B. Hill, note and interest, 


441 


46 



Balance due the town, 



^1,806 23 



J. K. W. WETHERBEE,) Selectmen 
J. W. DUPEE, \ of 

T. F. NO YES Acton, 



Acton, Feb. 27, 1888. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

TO JANUARY 1, 1888. 



BIRTHS IN ACTON IN 1887. 



No. Date of Birth. Name of Child. Names of Parents. 

1. Jan. 17. Mabel Eudora Tuttle, daughter of Roswell and Annie B. 

Tuttle. 

2. Feb. 1. Hattie L. Dane, daughter of Ida L. Dane. 

3. Feb. 5. Frank Mahoney, son of Sevier and May Grace Mahoney. 

4. Feb. 20. Arthur Noble Snow, son of Charles H. and Mary E. Snow. 

5. Mar. 31. Carrie Eliza Fletcher, daughter of Jonathan P. and Lizzie 

Fletcher. 

6. Apr. 9. Oliver Aldrich Wyman, son of Alphonzo A. and Laura 

Wyman. 

7. Apr. 9. Herbert Harry Penniman, son of Orenzo W. and Olive L. 

Penniman. 

8. Apr. 16. Charlotte Mary Reed, daughter of Fred W. and Lina Reed. 

9. May 18. Lizzie May Burroughs, daughter of Samuel R. and Ella 

A. Burroughs. 

10. May 31. Bertha Mabel Austin, daughter of Byron W. and Hattie 

Belle Austin. 

11. May 31. Henry Irving Worden, son of Martin H. and Lizzie M . 

Worden. 

12. June 6. Mary Elizabeth Jones, daughter of Edward H. and Sarah 

J. Jones. 

13. June 6. Mary Lizzie Forest, daughter of Mary E. Forest. 

14. June 11. Alice Stacy Warren, daughter of William S. and Rose 

Evelyn Warren. 

15. June 27. William Francis Brown, son of Clarence W. and Minnie 

A. Brown. 

16. July 8. J. Carlton Wood, son of William H. and Minnie B. Wood. 

17. July 13. Wm. Harold Hatfield, son of William H. and Mildred A. 

Hatfield. 

18. July 30. Wallace Howard Owens, son of Thomas P. and Eliza J. 

Owens. 

19. Aug. 4. Marion Fernette Dart, daughter of Oswald L. and Cora A. 

Dart. 

20. Aug. 14. A son of Timothy and Ellen Sullivan. 

21. Sept. 21. Nellie May Sargent, daughter of Albert F. and Sarah F. 

Sargent. 



16 

22. Oct. 8. Charles Edward Sidney Eichardson, son of Sidney L. and 

M. Katherine Eichardson. 

23. Oct. 13. Joseph Haggerty, son of William and Eliza Haggerty. 

24. Oct. 23. Alexander Lewis Mckerson, son of Bowman C. and Eliza 

K. Nickerson. 

25. Nov. 8. Kichard Earl Florist, son of Truman F. and Fannie M. 

Florist. 

26. Nov. 30. Michael James McCarthy, son of James L. and Margaret 

A. McCarthy. 
Lizzie S. Piper, daughter of Anson C. and Ellen L. Piper. 
Arthur Fitch Harris,, son of David C. and Jennie B. Harris. 
George McCarty, son of Thomas and Hannah McCarty. 
Christine Ann O'Leary, daughter of Daniel and Olive E. 
O'Leary. 
Males, 17; females, 13. Total, 30. 



27. 


Dec. 


1. 


28. 


Dec. 


2. 


29. 


Dec. 


22. 


30. 


Dec. 


25. 



No. 
1. 
2. 
3. 


Date. 
Jan. 9. 
Mar. 8. 
April 24. 


4. 
5. 

6. 


April 27. 
May 8. 
May 15. 



I^ARRIAODS RX:CORI>£]> IN ACTON IN 18^7. 
Names of Parties. 
Clark G. Durkee and Ida L. Reed, both of Acton. 
Abel Farrar and Martha P. Dufresne both of Acton. 
James L. McCarthy of Acton and Maggie A. Trainer of 

Stow. 
Newton E. Bean and Harriet A. Kenty, both of Acton. 
George A. Smith and Alma W. Forbush, both of Acton. 
Norman A. Davidson and Mary Alice Hodge, both of 

Acton. 
7. June 7. Alfred M. Chaffee of Oxford and Mary E. T. Brown of 

Littleton. 
William H. Hill and Angle B. Worthen, both of Acton. 
Martin Baker of Acton and Margaret Hart of Littleton. 
Charles E. Cloud of Norwich, Yt., and Nellie M. Conant 

of Acton. 
Daniel J. Gallagher of Acton and Katie Bulger of Lowell. 
William Ross and Frances E. Tower, both of Maynard. 
Fredson P. Brooks and Martha M. Durgin, both of Con- 
cord. 
Frederick W. Gray and Clara F. Leach, both of Acton. 
Eugene C. Stevens of Stow and Alice S. Guilford of Acton. 
Rev. George W. Stearns of Acton and Sarah Elizabeth 

Dow of Island Falls, Me. 
Joseph L. Brown of Littleton and Lizzie M. Scofield of 

Acton. 
John Fitzgerald, Jr., of Concord, and Margaret Coughlin 

of Acton. 
Edward F. Pratt and Etta Cora Temple, both of Acton. 
Total, 19. 



8. 

9. 

10. 


July 
Aug. 
Sept. 


17. 
23. 

7. 


IL 
12. 
13. 


Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 


18. 
2. 
4. 


14. 
15. 
16. 


Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 


5. 

7. 
21. 


17. 


Nov. 


9. 


18. 


Nov. 


17. 


19. 


Dec. 


5. 



17 



I>£]ATHS RECOB1>EI> IN ACTON IN 1887. 
Names of Persons. Age. 

Joseph F. Cole, 70 years, 10 months, 5 days. 
Abbie Charlton, 7 months, 20 days. 
Norman A. Spinney, 2 years, 6 months, 7 days. 
Charles W. Melone, 38 years, 4 months, 5 days. 
Abbie Gertrude Palmer, 1 year, 5 months, 11 days. 
Olivia L. B. Drew, 71 years, 10 months, 17 days. 
Arthur F. Duren, 1 year, 6 months, 2 days. 
Lizzie Booker, 19 years, 2 months. 
Clarissa P. Wetherbee, 69 years, 6 months, 2 days. 
An unknown man at Almshouse, about 45 years. 
Jane Kelleran, 79 years, 11 months, 4 days. 
Daniel Callahan, 48 years. 
Nancy M. Burnham, 65 years, 10 months. 
Lydia Dane, 62 years, 10 months, 15 days. 
Charles T. Owens, 1 year, 5 months. 
Andrew J. Willis, 70 years, 7 months, 6 days. 
Emily W. Parker, 39 years, 11 months, 5 days. 
Sarah F. Parlin, 78 years. 
Mary M. Bo wen, 65 years, 4 months, 4 days. 
Hattie L. Dane, 6 months, 21 days. 
Joseph Estabrook, 76 years, 2 months, 21 days. 
Joseph Piper (died in Springfield), 85 years, 5 months. 
Infant son of Timothy and Ellen Sullivan, 2 days. 
Henry Loker, 79 years, 7 months, 26 days. 
Martha C. Harris, 49 years, 11 months, 20 days. 
Lena Fitch, 34 years, 6 months, 22 days. 
Ellen Moore, 67 years. 

Thomas Russell, 78 years, 5 months, 26 days. 
Mary E. Forest, 3 months, 17 days. 
Ephraim Oliver, 77 years, 1 month, 23 days. 
Eliza W. Hay ward, 69 years, 10 months, 7 days. 
James Callahan, 10 years, 8 months, 13 days. 
Myrtle W. Tucker, 1 year, 2 months. 
Elizabeth N. Brooks, 83 years, 11 months, 11 days. 
(In Maynard.) Mary E. Currie, 40 years, 2 months, 20 days. 
Aaron M. Jones, 64 years, 7 months, 23 days. 
Hiram Walker, 55 years, 10 months, 16 days. 
Mary Farrar, 87 years, 10 months, 11 days. 
Robert Chaffin, 90 years, 9 months, 25 days. 
Orlando Leland, 81 years. 

Arthur B. Robbins, 23 years, 1 month, 18 days. 
Total, 41. 



Date of Death. 


Jan'y 


10. 


Jan'y 


11. 


Jan'y 


12. 


Jan'y 


19. 


Jan'y 


26. 


Feu'y 


27. 


March 


10. 


March 


25. 


March 


29. 


March 30. 


April 


17. 


April 


21. 


May 


8. 


May 


16. 


May 


19. 


May 


29. 


June 


23. 


June 


27. 


July 


18. 


July 


22. 


July 


25. 


Aug. 


10. 


Aug. 


16. 


Aug. 


26. 


Sept. 


1. 


Sept. 


7. 


Sept. 


8. 


Sept. 


22. 


Sept. 


23. 


Sept. 


23. 


Oct. 


3. 


Oct. 


8. 


Oct. 


18. 


Oct. 


18. 


Oct. 


20. 


Dec. 


7. 


Dec. 


11. 


Dec. 


11. 


Dec. 


16. 


Dec. 


30. 


Dec. 


31. 



18 



AMOUNT RECEIVE!? FKOM I.ICENSE8 OE DOOS SINCE 
liAST REPORT, AS EOIiliOWS FROM 



Owner. Amount 


Warren Bemis, 


$2 


James D. Coburn, 


2 


Chas. H. Hodges, 


2 


E. J. Robbins, 


2 


Allen Waterman, 


2 


Charles Yarney, 


2 


Charles J. Williams, 


2 


Antoine Bulette, 


2 


Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, 


6 


J. K. W. Wetherbee, 


2 


Elnathan Jones, 


4 


F. A. Houston, 


2 


E. Eddie Fletcher, 


2 


Augustus Fletcher, 


2 


Danie F. Hay ward, 


2 


Albert F. Sargent, 


2 


A. W. Gardner, 


2 


Stephen E. Martin, 


2 


Mrs. Geo. F. Flagg, 


2 


John Fletcher, 


2 


D. J. Wetherbee, 


2 


J. W. Dupee, 


2 


Adelbert Mead, 


2 


William Barnes, 


2 


Albert Moulton, 


2 


Reuben L. Reed, 


2 


Daniel Tuttle, 


2 


A. L. Lawrence, 


5 


Daniel Harris, 


2 


MoFes A. Reed, 


2 


Fred S. Whitcomb, 


2 


Wm. D. Tuttle, 


2 


Charles B. Sanders, 


4 


Willie S. Fletcher, 


2 


Isaac Barker, 


2 


Otis H. Forbush, 


2 


A. L. Noyes, 


2 


Solon A. Robbins, 


2 


Henry Hanson, 


2 


Daniel McCarthy, 2d, 


2 


Ai Robbins, 


2 


Wm. B. Davis, 


2 


Olie D. Wood, 


2 



Owner. 
Willis L. Mead, 
John H. Hanniford, 
Geo. R. Keyes, 
Joseph R. Bassett, 
H. M. Smith, 
Webster C. Robbins, 
Frederick Rouillard, 
John Temple, 
John Kelly, 
William Hurd, 
Chauncy B. Robbins, 
Edwin H. Jones, 
Lewis V. Clough, 
Anson C. Pipei', 
Ralph Crooker, 
Sylvester Haynes, 
Frank E. Harris, 
Henry L. Willard, 
Charles J. Holton, 
Isaiah S. Leach, 
Arthur G. Knowlton, 
Thomas P. Owens, 
Francis Pratt, 
David Shapley, 
Frank W. Houghton, 
Willie F. Stevens, 
Charles H. Morris, 
A. B. Brown, 
Moses E. Taylor, 
Moses Taylor, 
Nahum Littlefield, 
Joshua Sawyer, 
Isaac S. Ford, 
Waldo Littlefield, 
Forbush & Hartwell, 
John C. Gates, 
Eben Davis, 
Fred Penniman, 
Geo. B. Gowen, 
Edward O'Neil, 
Henry Haynes, 
John W. Aldrich, 
Henry Brooks, 



Amount. 
$2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
7 



19 



Owner. 


Amount. 


Owner. 


Amount. 


Geo. H. S. Houghton, 


$2 


Herman Chaplin, 


$2 


John W. Randall, 


2 


Georsre Gardner, 


2 


Luther Conant, 


4 


Delette H. Hall, 


2 


Wm. H. Hatfield, 


2 


George Conant, 


2 


Henry C. Scarlett, 


2 


Josie G. Wood, 


2 


Nathan R. Palmer, 


2 


]Sr. A. Davidson, 


2 


Allen G. Smith, 


2 


Edward Willis, 


2 


Jeremiah McCarthy, 


2 


Mrs. Joseph Cole, 


2 


Chas. K. Harrington, 


2 


Thomas J. Sawyer, 


5 


A. H. Gilmore, 


2 


Howard Merchant, 


2 


A. L. Tuttle, 


2 


Geo. E. Whittier, 


2 


Thomas Calder, 


2 


Frank R. Knowlton, 


2 


George Pratt, 


5 


Geo. A. Conant, 


2 


J. E. Schofield, 


2 


Jairus C. Wheeler, 


5 


Wm. H. Teele, 


2 


L. E. Reed, 


2 


Chas. H. Taylor, 


2 


L. U. Holt, 


2 


Geo. C. Wright, 


2 


Geo. W. Worster, 


2 


Isaac W. Flagg, 


2 


A. Risso, 


2 


122 Males at $2, 


$244; 7 Females at $5, $35. Total, $279. 





WM. D. TUTTLE, Toion Clerk. 



Acton, March 15th, 1888. 



20 



Report of Receipts and Expenditures at the 
Almshouse in Acton, 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY 39, 1888. 



Articles on hand, February ^9, 18S8. 

8 cows, 1325 00 

1 horse, 175 00 

1 wagon, 85 00 

13 tons hay, 234 00 

2 tons straw, 20 00 

1 horse mower, 40 00 

40 hens, 20 00 

15 cords wood, 75 00 

200 pounds pork, 20 00 

Lumber, 20 00 

Cotton seed, 1 20 

Shorts and meal, 5 00 

Bags, 7 00 

Salt, 50 

Market boxes, 40 

Barrel, 1 00 

10 pounds ham, 1 40 

Beef, 1 00 

Potatoes, 1 00 

Soft soap, 1 00 

Concord buggy, 25 00 

Lard, 1 40 

Pickles, 1 20 

Sugar, 60 

Beans, 2 25 

Butter 50 

Eggs, 1 00 

Plour, 1 50 

Spices, 85 

Cream tartar, 37 

Soap, 1 85 

Matches, 18 

Apple jam, ,..,., , 50 



21 



Molasses, 

EicG; 

Coffee, . . . 
Coal, .... 
Barrel,. . . 
Crackers,, 



70 






15 






17 






1 00 






1 00 






12 








$1,073 


84 



Appraisal of Towu Farm Property, Klarch 1, 1888. 

ContefUs of Boom TVb. 1. Southeast. 
2 chairs, 2 bedsteads, 2 feather beds, 2 mattresses, 3 
pillows, 2 bolsters, 4 sheets, 3 pillow cases, 2 pair 
blankets, 2^quilts, 2 bed spreads, 2 mats, 2 bureaus, 
5 pictures, 3 window curtains, 2 chambers, $26 80 

Room No. 2. East Room. 
1 chair, 1 table, 1 lounge, 1 bedstead, 2 curtains, 1 

feather bed, 1 mattress, 1 quilt, 1 spread, $9 25 

Room No. 3. — Northeast Room. 
1 bedstead, 2 chairs, 1 table, 1 mattress, 1 feather bed, 
2 sheets, 2 bed quilts, 1 bed spread, 1 blanket, 1 
trunk, 2 pillows, 1 chamber, 1 bolster. $13 35 

Room No. 4. Northwest. 

1 bedstead, 2 pair blankets, 1 mattress, 1 feather bed, 

2 sheets, 3 quilts, 1 pillow, 1 bolster, 2 curtains, 

1 chair, 1 bureau, 1 chamber, 1 trunk, $13 95 

No'.b. Hall 2. 

2 comforters, 8 new sheets, 6 new pillow cases, 5 sheets, 

8 pillow cases, blankets, 1 curtain, $14 25 

No. 6. West Attic. 
Mop and brush, 4 feather beds, 8 pillows, 1 table, 3 
bedsteads, rubber sheet, 4 quilts, 1 spread, 1 
traveling bag, 1 sick chair, clothes line, $18 85 

No. 7. East Attic. 
14 trunks, 1 cot bed, 1 pair andirons, 1 stove, 2 clocks, 

1 spittoon, $6 40 



22 

No. 8. Entry. 
1 table, 1 chair, curtains, $1 25 

Contents of Southeast Koom. 
5 chairs, 4 rockers, 1 table, 1 table cloth, 1 looking 
glass, 3 curtains and lixtures, 1 stove and coal 
hod, 1 lamp, 2 nappies, 2 dish pans, set knives 
and forks, 1 dozen table spoons, 5 plates, 10 cups 
and saucers, 1 mug, 1 bowl, 1 pitcher. $28 01 

Cooh Room or Kitchen. 
1 salt cellar, 1 tin dish, 1 pepper box, 1 dust., can, 
cook stove, 1 table, 1 wash dish, tin horn, apple 
parer, 1 can, 1 lantern, 1 dipper, 1 strainer pail, 
3 sad irons, 3 plates, 1 nappy, 1 saucer, 1 bowl, 1 
coffee pot, milk pail, wood box, $39 15 

Contents of Dining Room. 

1 rocker, 3 chairs, 2 lamps, 1 table (small one), 1 cur- , 
tain, oil cloth, 2 table cloths, oil can, lantern, tin 
dippers, wash bowl, pail, 1 stove, 3 brooms, wash 
pan, $13 75 

Contents of Pantry. 

4 baking tins, sugar box, 2 baking pans, 11 Mason jars, 
1 tunnel cullender, 1 steamer, tin dish, 2 flour 
scoops, 7 pans, 5 bowls, 2 pitchers, spoon holder, 
sugar bowl, 5 goblets, 11 cups and saucers, set 
knives and forks, 1 butcher knife, 15 baking 
plates, 3 meat dishes, 1 mixing bowl, 4 tins, 1 
platter, 1 pitcher, 6 tin pans, 1 cooking dish, bread 
toaster, 5 bread pans, 1 rolling pin, stew pan, 2 
bread mixing pans, 1 platter, steam kettle, roast 
pan, tray, 4 pans, 4 jugs, 1 gallon jug, 1 strainer, 
5 dish towels, 5 roller towels, $17 45 

Contents of Store Room. 
3 wash tubs, snow shovel, 2 screen doors, 3 chairs, 1 
clothes basket, 1 clothes rack, 1 wash boiler, 1 
wringer, 2 wash boards, 4 baskets, clothes line, 1 
peck measure, clothes pins, $13 02 



23 

Contents of Entry and Shed. 

1 stove, 2 milk pails, tin, 2 wood saws, 1 ladder, 1 lan- 
tern, 1 bushel basket, ^7 35 

Contents of Tramp Room. 

Wash dish, 1 dipper, 1 stove, 2 chairs, 12 mattresses, 

13 blankets, $20 80 

Contents of Cari'iage and Tool House. 

1 watering trough, 1 cart, 1 sled, 1 pung, 1 ladder, 1 
bar, 2 steel bars, 3 forks, 1 water pot, bog hoe, 2 
six-tine forks, 1 manure puller, 1 wagon jack, 1 
spade, 1 long handle spade, 2 chains, 3 stake 
chains, hay rake, 2 apple headers, 3 hoes, 2 potato 
forks, 2 bush scythes, 2 corn knives, 2 saws, 2 
oil cans, 3 shovels, 1 plane, 1 wrench, 1 compass, 
1 rasp, 1 lantern, grindstone, 1 shovel, 1 street 
blanket, sledge hammer, 1 pick, $64 90 

Contents of Barn. 

1 harrow, 3 harnesses, 2 girths, 1 surcingle, 9 pails, 1 
broom, 1 fork, 4 ladders, 2 plows, 2 cultivators, 1 
hay cutter, drag rake, 1 hay wagon, 1 log chain, 1 
stone drag, horse rake, 2 whiffle trees, 1 mowing 
machine, 4 cart wheels, brush, cattle cards, 1 ham- 
mer, feed trough, 2 axes, wheelbarrow, 1 chair, $120 70 



Amount of appraisal, $429 23 

Receipts from Town Farm, 

From miarch 1, 1887, to March 1, 1S8S. 

Eeceived for Apples, $431 48 

Milk, 754 93 

Potatoes, 20 95 

Peaches, 13 00 

Pork, 16 66 

Calves, 11 00 

Hoop poles, 5 25 

Beef cow, 36 91 

Tomatoes, 40 

Eggs, 20 86 

Berries, 75 

$1,312 19 



24 

Expenditures at the Town Farm 

For the Year Ending February 29, 1888. 

Axe and helve, $ 1 00 

Acid phosphate, 45 

Apple jam, 75 

Anguintum, 20 

Advertising for warden, 2 00 

Barrels, 20 33 

Book, 8 

Berries, 1 09 

Blacksmith bill, 21 15 

Boiler, 83 

Brushes, 1 23 

Butter, 42 09 

Brooms, 1 40 

Beans, 6 49 

Baking powder, 90 

Bristol brick, 8 

Burner, 10 

Camphor, 12 

Comb, 12 

Cows, 83 00 

Coal, 9 95 

Cabbage, 30 

Clothes line, 37 

Composition, 10 

Cloth and Clothing, 23 79 

Crackers, 21 6o 

Crockery, 4 80 

Cheese, 4 54 

Coffee, 4 28 

Cream tartar, 1 48 

Cocoa, 28 

China eggs, 15 

Chimney, 28 

Door spring, . . . . ; 30 

Disinfectant, 20 

Evaporated apple, 47 

Extracts, S6 

Ely powder, 32 

Ely paper, 5 

Eork, 42 

Eish, 13 51 

Elour, 32 45 

Glasses, 62 



25 

Glass, 58 

Grain, 326 80 

Grass seed, 7 51 

Glue, 20 

Hoes, TO 

Harrow tooth, . 75 

Hen meat, . . 14 

Hames, 1 25 

Ham, T 14 

Iron for rake, 1 65 

Iron bars, 2 95 

Jars, 1 10 

Knives and Forks, 2 00 

Kettle, 50 

Lettuce, 5 

Labor, 5 65 

Lemons, 77 

Lard, 6 25 

Lantern globe, 12 

Labor on chimney, 70 

Meat, 72 17 

Mustard, 20 

Mowing machine, 42 00 

Molasses, 12 40 

Mending boots, 1 46 

Matches, 33 

Netting, 50 

Needles, 7 

Nails, 1 45 

Nutmegs, 22 

Oyster shells, 45 

Onions, 30 

Oil, 2 26 

Oat meal, 45 

Paris green, , 23 

Pigs, 6 50 

Phosphate, 13 30 

Potatoes, 15 21 

Pork, 4 64 

Postage, 66 

Peas, 95 

Pickles, 35 

Pins, 8 

Pails, 50 

Rifle, 10 

Eubbers, 50 

Rice, 21 



26 



Raisins, 1 80 

Repairing chimney, 3 75 

Rope, 64 

Repairing pump, 2 85 

Services of W. Bemis,... 21 00 

H. C. Scarlet, 366 67 

" E. H. Cutler, 40 00 

" Luke Blanchard, 40 00 

" M. E. Taylor, 12 00 

Saleratus, 32 

Spoons, 28 

Sulphur, 20 

Spirit nitre, 16 

Scraps, 2 76 

Steel Trap, 33 

Sperm oil, 38 

Sawing lumber, 5 88 

Seed potatoes, 5 00 

Seed oats, 2 00 

Squash, 10 

Stove blacking, 30 

Sugar, 25 06 

Sweet potatoes, 1 50 

Shoes, 4 00 

Seeds, 1 75 

Salt, 1 78 

Soap, 5 50 

Spices, 63 

Starch, 65 

Sage, 08 

Soapine, 1 00 

Salt-petre, 8 

Sledge hammer, . 2 00 

Thread, 43 

Tobacco, . , 10 

Turkey, 1 05 

Tea, 6 10 

Table cloth, 1 60 

Turnip, 07 

Tacks, 13 

Use of oxen, 5 00 

Useof bull, 1 50 

Vinegar, 1 85 

Wick, 01 

Watering pot, 1 05 

Wheelwright bill, 3 00 



27 

Wash board, 30 

Yeast, 57 

Yarn, 42 

^1^22 61 

Expenditures, $1,422 61 

Receipts, 1,312 19 

Income less than expense, $ 110 42 

Due from treasury to balance account, $110 42 

Interest on farm, 240 00 

$ 350 42 

Victualing and lodging 75 tramps at 40 cents, 30 00 

Cost of supporting poor on farm, $ 320 42 

Whole number of persons, exclusive of tramps, supported in 
almshouse, 5 ; average number, 3 1-2 ; present number, 4. 



E. H. CUTLER, ") Overseers 

LUKE BLANCHARD, f of 

MOSES E. TAYLOR, \ Foor. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



School Committee 



FOR THE 



SCHOOL -YEAR 1887-8 



To the Town of Acton : 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT, 

IN BEHALF OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



The Superintendent, in entering upon his duties during the 
closing weeks of the school year, felt the embarrassments of the 
situation. 

Through the courtesy of the Committee, and the hearty co- 
operation of the public, the difficulties were in a measure over- 
come, and the schools, upon the whole, have had a year of peace- 
ful, steady and substantial progress. 

All has not been accomplished that could be desired. Many 
plans, thoughtfully matured in various lines of improvement, yet 
lack completion. Accidents and failures feared have not been 
realized, thanks to the discretion of teachers and the second 
thought of parents. 

The pestilence has flaunted its dark wings over our homes, 
but through a merciful interposition the death angel has de- 
parted, leaving the hearthstones unmolested. 

SCHOOL BUILDINGS, 

The several local committees have endeavored to secure 
proper attention to the grounds, outbuildings and main struct- 
ures, deeming it no economy for the town to let these depreciate 
for the want of timely and judicious expenditures. Ko large 
outlay has been required in any district. The present accommo- 
dations for the schools are thought to be sufficient for present 
needs, and are a credit to the generosity of the town. 

ATTENDANCE OF SCHOLARS. 

The epidemic colds, which have been unusually severe and 
prevalent, scarlet fever, mumps and measles, which have all been 



32 

camping on our grounds^ have done their work, making many 
vacant seats in the busiest hours of study, to the discouragement 
of the whole educational interest. 

With proper allowance for these hindrances, emphasis must 
still be given to the importance of not losing a single hour from 
the school routine. Children's whims, parents' conveniences, 
parties, entertainments, transient discomforts of travel and 
weather, all have their part to play, but must not imperil the 
culture of the child who is so soon to enter upon life's mature 
responsibilities. 

The school " days go swifter than a weaver's shuttle," and 
are gone in the morning, and they are gone not to return. 

The agent of the Mass. School Board, in his recent visit, 
recommendedjthat in estimating the amount of attendance of a 
scholar, he should be credited only with the time actually pres- 
ent in the school session. If he is dismissed a quarter of an 
hour after the opening of the school, he should be credited for 
that half-day 15-180, discredited 165-180, and so through the 
term and year. 

Attention is called to the law of the State which forbids 
children between the ages of eight and fourteen from working in 
any of the mills and factories without a certificate from the 
teacher, that they have attended school at least one hundred days 
in three terms of ten weeks each. 

There is a tacit understanding between the tax payers and 
the pupil, none the less binding because tacit, that these free and 
ample accommodations of school room, instruction and text 
books, shall be acknowledged by a regular a id studious improve- 
ment of the privileges offered. Any failure here is an injustice 
to the donors, and they have a right to file their grievance and 
insist upon more appreciative returns. 

The State is discussing the question of compulsory educa- 
tion, and the legislation is more and more towards that conclu- 
sion. 

The visit of Mr. John T. Prince, State Agent, in February, 
was a pleasant and healthful episode to the teachers and scholars. 
After visiting, in company with the Superintendent, all the 
schools, he spent a half day in an address to the teachers, full of 



33 

suggestive hints and profitable criticisms. Cordial thanks were 
given him for his interview. 

TEXT BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

No change of text books is reported for the year, and there 
has been a marked falling off in the supply account, — $347.71 
against $568.06 the preceding year. The amount for the coming 
year can hardly be estimated beforehand. 

VENTILATION: ATMOSPHERIC AND MENTAL. 

The janitor is an important factor in the school arrange- 
ments. He should have all his fine senses in full cultivation, so 
that he can scent an impurity in the air ; see a very small pile of 
dust on desk or floor ; feel the temperature of the room without 
a thermometer ; but have one all the same for his reference book, 
and consult it often. He must have a special fondness for the 
black diamonds during the zero mornings and nights, and handle 
them with discretion. He must remember that vigilance is the 
price of victory every time. 

But a janitor's faithful services must be supplemented by the 
teacher. In the absence of the janitor the teacher is ex-officio 
master of the situation, and his comfort and success, and that of 
the school, hangs largely upon the temperature and quality of the 
air in which the work is done. 

No amount of zeal or tact in conducting recitations will over- 
balance a vitiated atmosphere. One good current of air from the 
outside world will often settle problems in discipline and in arith- 
metic all at the same time. 

By mental ventilation is meant a clarifying the minds of 
teachers and pupils by frequent and timely inspirations of good 
humor and noble sentiment. 

Kow and then let the mental windows be lifted wide open, 
and one good gust clear the room of that vile brood of evil sur- 
roundings, jealousies, irritations and low ambitions, which so be- 
little and becloud the mind. These occasional drafts must not, 
however, be the main dependence of the teacher. He should 
have about him an air which shall itself be a perpetual ventila- 
tion of all the genial elements within his range. 

The expression " taking on airs " is not slang. It is not an 



34 

Americanism. It has the sanction of classic G-reece, two thou- 
sand years ago, and it is just as apt for the school-room and the 
teacher of to-day. 

The tone of the teacher among the susceptible minds of the 
young is pervasive, contagious, influential, and it is the all-im- 
portant key to the best results. 

THE MODEL TEACHER AND HIS REWARDS. 

He should be born under the right star and bring his creden- 
tials from the skies. 

He should have a mind of large volume, stored with the ■ 
earliest and latest decisions of science. 

He should have an eye far-sighted and near-sighted 5 quick 
to catch the first signal of disorder, and an ear sensitive to the 
faintest undertone of rebellion. 

He should have a judgment which finds at once the equipoise 
of justice amid conflicting claims. . 

He should have an arm ready to fling out the banner of 
" Excelsior " on the heights, and in the valley the same. 

He should have a mother's love and a father's care for the 
lowliest of his flock. 

He should be alert from the first stroke of the bell to itsjast 
reverberations. 

■ He should be a martyr in spirit all the time, and a martyr in 
fact at any time, rather than betray the precious trust committed 
to his charge. 

You ask : Where is he ? What is his name ? . Find him if 
you can, and hold him fast when found. If you find even one 
who approaches the standard, be thankful and think twice before 
parting company. He has a value above 7nthies. 

Let not the teacher be discouraged.- He has enough to de- 
press the most sanguine temperament. Granted. But he also 
has enough to inspire the most desponding moment. • 

He may be arousing an ambition for good which is to make 
the difference between a citizen whose name the people will never 
let drop from their loving remembrance, and one whose memorial 
will only be, that he lived and that he died. 

He may be really quarrying from the rough marble the block 



35 

destined to stand in the high places of power, when his own dust 
has gone back to its native dust and his name is forgotten. 

The teacher cannot gauge at the time the subtle magic of his 
looks, and words, and example, but if he stops to think he /uzioi^^, 
and if he is a man of common sensibility he feels that he is doing 
a work of untold value to the great future. 

His words of cheer, his patience, his noble bearing in mo- 
ments of trial, his fidelity, will not be forgotten, but will have 
new exhibition in the lives of those whom he loved and taught. 

If he knows he is doing the best thing for his pupils, his 
prohibitions, his reprimands, his earnest pleas, his probing in- 
quiries, his wearisome drills, will have an equivalent in the end. 

The time will come when they will thank him, if living, or 
bless his memory, if dead, because he stood firm, when to yield 
would have been the easiest course for him^ but the fatal one for 
them. 

Teachers : 

You are irritated to-day ; you can hardly refrain from utter- 
ing the bitter word of impatience at the constant annoyance 
which that vicious and heedless youth is giving you as you seek to 
turn him towards the right. He is the more bent on folly as you 
ply him again with the higher motives. He taunts you, when he 
should thank you. You judge your labors more than lost ; but 
distrust -that hasty judgment. Eepress that impatient thought. 
Ten years hence that way ward lad may accost you on the streets 
of some distant city, or greet you in the cars, or call at your door, 
and with a warm grasp of the hand and a tearful eye, ask your 
forgiveness for his stupid and unfeeling conduct. He may tell 
you but for your kind, earnest efforts in his behalf, he would 
have gone down in ignorance and vice to an unhonored grave. 
You can afford to wait for these incidental testimonies. They 
are sure to cross, your path and sweeten many a cup which, at 
the time, you thought to be only bitter. 

Fellow Citizens : 

ji jSTo true lover of his country can contemplate the elements 
which are striving for ascendency in this land, without at times 
feeling a deep solicitude for the result. 

The (question which comes back upon us is the old question 



36 

which troubled our fathers, and which they have handed down to 
us as their legacy. Who in this contest between ignorance and 
culture, between anarchy and order, between organized fraud and 
organized integrity, is to win ? 

Shall the dear old flag of the past remain the symbol of con- 
stitutional, stable, enlightened freedom, or shall it be trailed in 
the dust as the synonjan of shattered hopes and basest crimes ? 

Potent among the agencies which have saved the nation thus 
far, potent among the agencies which are to save the nation in 
the coming conflicts, is the teacher's humble work. 

In great crises the men and women who have been taught 
and disciplined in our schools have been the ones to stand in the 
surging waters, and tide the ship of state over and through the 
breakers. 

Let us idealize in our minds the future of America, as the 
best desires and hopes of patriotism and intelligence would give 
it, and then let us be content to have a part, however humble, in 
assuring to unborn millions this grand and happy fruition. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

The school has remained in charge of Mr. A. W. Armstrong 
during the year. He has performed his duties as Principal with 
a growing interest in his work, and with marked improvement in 
methods of discipline and instruction. Monthly written tests, 
applied to the whole school, have been a stimulus to better schol- 
arship and more studious habits. 

The written test given to the candidates for admission to 
the school in June, was not only a great advantage to the grade 
of the High School, but also to the grade of all the other schools 
in town. 

Nearly fifty per cent, of the 29 applicants failed to reach 
the required standard. Those not admitted have continued their 
studies in the Grammar school, and the prospect now is that the 
candidates next June will be older, more numerous, and better 
qualified than those of the preceding year. 

The average age of those admitted in June was 13 1-2, mak- 
ing them on an average nearly J7 at the completion- of a three 
years' cou^rse. 



37 

The first thought of the Committee, after the decision of 
the town in the spring, was that no admissions could be granted. 
Upon further consideration, a unanimous conclusion of the Board 
was reached that it would be an injustice to these applicants to 
give them no chance for a trial when they had reached the age 
and qualifications required, for the sake of those who proposed 
to continue on a four years' course with separate lines of study 
in Latin and Erench. 

If an assistant had been provided these special privileges 
could be granted, but without one it did not seem practicable to 
.the Committee, or just to the masses. This conclusion was 
reached without knowing who the three pupils concerned were. 

Some say reduce the school to twenty-five and the difiiculty 
is solved, and these advanced courses can be taken. That de- 
pends upon the classification of the school. Twelve scholars, if 
not properly graded, will involve difficulties which no teacher 
can match, and give proper time in the brief school day to each 
recitation, while forty scholars can be easily handled and have 
ample time for each class, when the proper grade is secured. 
Here is the advantage and^justice of the graded system. 

Again, some say : ^'Abolish the High School, and let these 
higher branches revert back to the Grammar department." This 
proposition only complicates and multiplies the diJ0B.culties. 

Granted that the demand for these higher branches must be 
met, how can these High school scholars be dispersed among the 
districts, and take their three years' course with them, and leave 
anything but fragments for the Grammar and Intermediate schol- 
ars? 

Who have the first claim upon the generosity of the citizens 
if not those who are studying the fundamental branches in our 
Primary, Intermediate and Grammar departments ? 

One of the main arguments for the High School, in the way 
of economy and fairness, is that it protects the other departments 
from this intrusion of the higher branches, and gives the teacher 
time and nerve to deal fitly with his younger scholars. 

The graduating exercises in June, in the Town Hall,' showed 
the iiitense interest of the public in the school, and were a happy 



38 

omen of good things to come. The programme is printed as a 
memento of the occasion. 

class motto, 1887: '' aim at the highest:' 

Music, - - ■ - ,:. ... 

Prayer, - - - - Kev. Mr. Knowlto:n^. 

Salutatory and Essay, - Bertha H. Dupee. 

'^ Des2nse not Small Beginning s.'^^ 
History, - - - Ernest E. Wetherbee. 

Music, - . - - - - 

Essay, - - - - Bertha E. Hosmer. 

" By-ways and Nooks of ActonJ^ 
Essay, - - - Sadie E. Sawyer. 

" Abilities without Exercise ca.nnot Ensure Success J^ 
Music, 
Essay, - - . - Albertine M. Preston. 

'•' Suffer no Part of Life to Remain Unimproved.^^ 
Essay, - - - - Susie E. Conant. 

" What Girls can Do.'' 
Music, - - - - - 

Essay, - * - - Ernest E. Wetherbee. 

^^ Science and Art."" 

Essay, _ - . _ Hattie L. Tuttle. 

''Lift the Latch:! 

MUSIC; _._--. 

Valedictory, - - - Albertine M. Preston. 

Music, - ■ - . - • - ■ - . - 

Presentation of Diplomas, - By Superintendent. 

The three years' course is also appended, as now adopted, 
subject to changes which may hereafter be made, according to the 
judgment of the Committee and the light of experience.'. 

THBEE YEARS' COURSE OF HIGH SCHOOL. 

FIRST. YEJVR.V; 

First Term. — Arithmetic and Book-keeping alternating. 
Eng. Grammar and Composition. General History. 

Second Term. — Arithmetic and Book-keeping alternating. 
Eng. Grammar and Composition. General History. 



39 

Third. Term. — Arithmetic and Book-keeping alternating. 
Rhetoric begun. Botany. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — Algebra begun. Rhetoric continued. Physi- 
ology; ;• 

Second Term.— Algebra continued. Eng. Literature begun. 
Physics begun. 

Third Term. — ^Geometry begun. Eng. Literature continued. 
Physics continued. 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term.^-^Geometry continued. Latin begun. Chemis- 
try begun.- ■ 

Second Term. — Civil Government. Latin continued. Chem- 
istry continued. 

ThirdfTerm. — Physical Geography. Latin continued. Geol- 
ogy. 

Four "recitations in each branch per week. 

Wednesday an off day, with a different programme, includ- 
ing Compositions, Declamations, Reading, Spelling, Drawing, 
and other miscellaneous recitations as shall be deemed most im- 
portant at the time. 

THE CENTRE SCHOOL, 

Grammar Department. 

Miss Fannie L. Perry, - - Teacher. 

■ The school has counted more in results than in numbers. 
Owing to change in residence and transient causes the member- 
ship of the school has been less than in some years. Yet the 
rare experience, tact and quiet efiB-ciency of the instruction has 
compensated. The scholars have made rapid and thorough ad- 
vancement in all branches of knowledge and done it happily to 
their own credit and that of the Teacher. 

Primary Department. 

Miss Bessie M. Ball, - - - Teacher. 

The same felicity and fervor in the management of the 
school which have been noted in former years still remain. The 



40 

hum of busy and cheery work goes on the same in storm and 
in sunshine. The day's routine is a pastime, but it is more. 
Good thorough scholarship is obtained in the essential rudiments 
which are the basis of progress in the higher studies. 

THE NORTH SCHOOL, 

Mr. Joseph W. Godfrey has remained in charge through the 
year. SprightlinesSj cleanliness and a rapid succession of classes 
is the usual programme. More time is needed for thorough drill 
in the elementary branches. The teacher labors diligently and 
fervently and has at heart the best interests of the school, and 
it is always a pleasure to look in upon the happy company. 

THE EAST SCHOOL. 

Spring Term. 

Miss Minnia E. Tenney, - - Teacher. 

She spared no efforts to make the school a success. She was 
a good, faithful scholar herself, and had enjoj-ed the advantages 
of Normal training and some experience in teaching. She met 
with discouragements in the classification and tone of the school. 
At the end of the term the public examination showed her labors 
had not been in vain. A very gratifying programme was pre- 
sented to the visitors, and complimentary remarks were made by 
gentlemen from Littleton and the Committee. 

Fall and Winter Term. 

Miss Susie A. Wetherbee, - - Teacher. 

There seemed to be a mutual congratulation between teacher, 
pupils, committee, and parents upon the return of Miss Wether- 
bee tocher "old stand. She has taken up the reins of government 
with a firm hand, and the scholars have yielded to her guidance 
apparently saying, '-only steer to some sure station and we will 
gladly bow to your nod." Real progress has been made. The 
tests given show it. What is needed in this, and all our schools, 
is the same, — Drill, drill, drill ; crosswise, up and down, around 
about, here a little, there a good deal, and some more afterwards. 
The multiplication table, and all the other tables, must be so in_ 



41 

corporated in the mind that they cannot drop out, or be shaken 
from their moorings, though fire, music and the blizzard all com- 
bine to disturb their equilibrium. 

THE SOUTHEAST SCHOOL. 

Miss Laura A. Brown, - - - Teacher. 

The school was fortunate in being able to retain the services 
of one so well equipped by experience, natural and acquired re- 
sources, and a disposition to spend and be spent, for the good of 
her pupils. The membership of the school, though variable, has 
made some advance. Let the full co-operation of parents, pupils 
and committee continue, and the months to come, like the months 
that are gone, will be full of blessing to all concerned. 

THE SOUTH SCHOOL. 

Grammar Department. 

Miss Fannie Houghton, - - Teacher. 

Order combined with agreeable ease and natural freedom, 
here meet in harmony. The teacher is an enthusiast in her pro- 
fession, and the scholars are not slow to meet her half way, and 
join hands for good work. iTo drones in the hive ? Yes, one or 
two, and notice is hereby posted ; let them take warning. The 
truant officer has been appointed, with full powers to clear the 
premises, if necessary. The desks are too good for any but 
studious and obedient occupants. It is but a few miles to the 
Reform School, and railroad conveyance at that. The break of 
two weeks in mid-winter, from sickness, was well covered, and 
the different classes are in good position for the next campaign. 

Primary Department. 

Miss Viola S. Tuttle, - - - Teacher. 

A year of earnest primary work by one who knows how to 
do it, and does it, is reported, and this would not be if the schol- 
ars had not said yes. The latest methods which experience has 
tested and sanctioned, have been tried and the verdict is, "Better 
try it again." The discouragements of the winter were bravely 
met by the little sufferers, and the singing of birds is at hand. 



42 j 

WEST ACTON. 
Grammar Department. 

Miss Sarah Hopkinson, - - Teacher. i 

i 

This is the largest Grammar School in town, requiring all i 
kinds of ability and graces in its successful management. Miss I 
Hopkinson has encountered difficulties peculiar to the situation, 
and has met them in a brave, heroic spirit, and if she has not ac- 
complished all that her ambition has sought, she has accom- j 
plished what has laid the committee and the district under last- i 
ing obligation. The methods of instruction have been thorough, ] 
the order good, and the progress in the different branches satis- \ 
factory. The scholars stand the tests, however put, orally or by | 
written examination in a creditable manner. Let there be mu- ; 
tual understanding and charitable judgments between scholars, ^ 
teacher, parents and committee and a hearty co-operation of all, \ 
for the happiest issue. 

Primary Department. | 

Miss C. Lettie Newton, - - Teacher. ] 

The past commendations of this school and teacher, bear re- | 

peating and that is perhaps enough to be said. Let the good | 

work go on. ; 

Respectfully submitted, \ 

JAMES PLETCHER, Superintendent, j 



43 



FINANCIAL REPORT. 



To the Town of Acton : 

Your School Committee hereby submit their report of the 
expenses of the schools in town, by districts ; said expenses cov- 
ering salaries of teachers, the cost of fuel, and care of school 
buildings. 

JAMES FLETCHEE, 
CHAELES J. WILLIAMS, 
GEOEGE E. KEYES, 
WILLIAM S. JONES, 
ANSON C. PIPEE, 
CHAELES H, MEAD. 



Centre District. 



Paid Rev. James Fletcher for teachers, $700 00 

'' care of house, 68 45 

" fuel, 80 06 

" incidentals, 3 20 

cleaning school, 

rooms, 2 78 



a 



$854 49 



West District. 



Paid C. H. Mead for teachers, $700 00 

'' '' care of house, 78 17 

" '^ fuel, 28 42 

incidentals, 4 21 

cleaning school-rooms, 6 40 



4( (.(. 



$817 20 



South District. 



Paid Anson C. Piper for teachers, $700 00 

" "- care of house, 90 25 

'" fuel, 45 35 

" " cleaning school-rooms, 2 25 

*^ ^^ incidentals, 3 78 



$841 63 



44 



North District. 

Paid George R.Keyes for teachers, $338 00 

'^ '' fuel, 67 97 

" " care of house, 23 50 

cleaning school-rooms, 3 00 

incidentals, 73 



u u 









vp-iUc* 


£j\J 


^as?^ District. 




Paid C. J. Williams for teachers 


$338 00 






'' " care of house, 


31 


70 






'' '' fuel. 


48 


12 






*' '^ incidental, 


1 


60 


$419 


42 








Southeast District. 




Paid W. S. Jones for teachers. 


$315 


00 






'* '' fuel, 


38 


53 






'' " care of house, 


17 


00 


$370 


53 








High School. 




Paid C. H. Mead, 


$240 


00 






" '^ care of house, 


12 


00 






'' '' use of organ, 


5 


00 






>■' '' fuel. 


4 


00 






George Gardner for rent of piano and 


mu- 








sic for graduating exercises, 


ll 


04 






George Gardner for rent of organ. 


6 


00 






A. W. Armstrong for teaching. 


480 


00 






Rev. James Fletcher, care of house. 


8 


00 






'' '• fuel, 


4 


00 






Anson C. Piper care of house, 


15 


00 






'' '' fuel, 


10 


00 






" " rent of organ. 


5 


00 












$800 


04 


School Supplies. 




Paid T. F. Newton, 


$14 


62 






C. H. Mead, 


321 


19 






Rev. James Fletcher, 


11 


90 


<^^A7 


71 



45 



TABULAR STATEMENT FOR 1887-88. 







a 


tW 


.& 

3 


6 









i 










m 


a 








>j 








^ 


u 


c« 
















© 




rjj 














xj . 


r^ m 


^ 




s 


e3 


c^ 


1— 1 






r>^^ 


as 




« 


>> 


%. 


^ 


een 8 and 


SCHOOLS. 


TEACHERS. 


J" 
1 








u 

p 


10 


10 








^ 


I 


< 








t 


Acton High, 


A. W. Armstrong, 
Miss Fannie L. Perry, 


36 


47 


40.3 


36 





47 


38 


9 


Centre Grammar, 


35 


18 


15 


13.3 





18 


1 


18 


Centre Primary, 


' Bessie M. Ball, 


35 


24 


19 


16 


1 


18 





15 


South Grammar, 


" Fannie M. Houghton, 


35 


32 


28 


24.7 





32 


1 


31 


South Primary, 


" Viola S. Tuttle, 


35 


43 


32.1 


27.7 





43 





22 


West Grammar, 


" Sarah Hopkinson, 


35 


42 


35.87 


33.98 





42 


4 


38 


West Primary, 


" C. Lettie Newton, 


35 


45 


42.5 


38.5 


1 


44 





17 


North, 


Joseph W. Godfrey, 


35 


31 


23 


2.22 





35 


2 


20 


East, 


Miss Susie A. Wetherbee, 


35 


32 


26.5 


22.5 





32 


1 


20 


South East, 


" Laura A. Brown, 


35 


23 


17 


13.2 


1 


22 





23 





Number between 5 and 15 years, as reported by the Assessors for the year 1887, 269. 



TOWN WARRANT. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Middlesex, ss. 

To either constable of the Town of Acton, in said country y 

GREETING: 
You are hereby required, in the name of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, to notify the legal voters of said Town of 
Acton, to meet at the Town Hall, on Monday, the second day 
of April, A. D. 1888, at 1 o'clock P. M., by posting copies of 
this warrant, by you attested, at the Post Office, at the centre 
of the town, also, at the stores of Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, 
Mead & Stone, and Isaac W. Flagg, at the Magog House and in 
all the railroad stations in said town seven days at least before 
the time appinted for said meeting, then and there to act upon 
the following articles as they may think proper, viz.: 

Akticle 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said meet- 
ing. 

Art. 2. To fill all vacancies in the list of town officers. 

Art. 3. To see what amount of money the town will raise 
for the Support of Schools the present year, and how it shall be 
expended. 

Art. 4. To see what amount of money the town will raise to 
repair the Poads the present year, and how it shall be expended. 

Art. 5. To see what amount of money the town will raise 
to defray Town Charges for the present year. 

Art. 6. To see if the town will instruct the School Com- 
mittee to appoint a Superintendent of Schools. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will choose a Superintendent of 
Burials. 

Art. 8. To consider and act upon the acceptance of the 
Jury List as revised by the Selectmen. 

Art. 9. To see if the towu will vote to accept the reports 



of the Selectmen, Overseers of the Poor, School Committee and 
other town officers. 

Art. 10. To see if the town will authorize the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money for the 
town, if necessary, in anticipation of the taxes for the current 
year. 

Art. 11. To vote by ballot Yes or No, in answer to the 
question, Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this town the present year ? 

Art. 12. To see if the town will instruct the Selectmen to 
finish off a room in the lower story of the town house and build 
a fire proof vault or safe in connection therewith. 

Art. 13. To see if the town will prohibit the use of fire 
crackers. 

Art. 14. To hear and act upon the reports of any commit- 
tees chosen to report at this meeting. 

Art. 15. To see if the town will instruct the Selectmen to 
prohibit coasting and ball playing on the public highways. 

Art. 16. To see if the town will appropriate and pay Geo. 
M. Pike $125.00 for his re-enlistment on Acton quota as a vete- 
ran in the late war, or take any action thereon. 

Art. 17. To see if the town will ^appropriate the sum of 
one hundred and fifty dollars for Memorial Day, or take any action 
thereon. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant to us 
with your doings thereon at or before the time appointed for said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this sixteenth day of March in the 
year eighteen hundred and eighty-eight. 

J. W. DUPEE, ) Selectmen 
T. F. NOYES, V of 
H.B.WHITE, ) Acton. 



TOWN OFFICERS FOR 1888, 



J. W. DUPEE, 



Selectmen. 
Thomas F. Noyes, 

Town Clerk. 
William D. Tuttle. 



HowAKD B. White. 



Phineas Wetherbee, 



Elisha H. Cutler, 



Chauncy B. Bobbins. 



(One Vacancy.) 



Assessors. 
J. W. Dupee, 

Overseers of the Poor. 
Lyman C. Taylor, 

School Comrtdttee. 
Rev. James Fletcher and Anson C. Piper for 3 years. 
Charles J. Williams and George R. Keyes for 2 years. 
William S. Jones and one vacancy for 1 year. 

Highway Surveyors. 
Charles Wheeler and Nahum Littlefield. 



John Fletcher, 



Nahum C. Reed, 



W^M. B. Davis, 
Geo. H. Harris, 



Cemetery Committee. 
Wm. W. Davis, 

Fence Viewers. 
O. W. Mead 

Surveyors of Lumber. 
E. F. Richardson, 

E. J. ROBBINS, 



Levi W. Stevens. 



Francis Hosmer. 



L. W. Stevens, 
Herbert T. Clark, 



Jon A. P. Fletcher, Chas. A. Brooks. 

Surveyors of Wood. 
Wm. B. Davis, Geo. H. Harris, Solomon L. Dutton, 

Isaac W. Flaog, Chas. H. Taylor, John F. Davis, 

Herbert T. Clark, Henry D. Parlin, Chas. H. Mead, 

Chas. J. Williams, Jona. P. Fletcher. 

Surveyors of Hoops and Staves. 
David M. Handley, Augustus Fletcher. 

Collector for 1887. 
John E. Cutter. 

Treasurer for 18^. 
J. K. W. Wetherbee. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 



Town of Acton, 



FROM 



February 26, 1888, to February 26, 1889. 



ACTON : 

The Enterprise Steam Job Print. 

1889. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Town of Aclon in Account with J. K. W. Wetherbee, Treasurer. 

1889. Dr 

Feb. 26. To cash paid, State tax, f 1,665 00 

" '' County tax, 934 27 

'• '" on Selectmen's or-. 

ders, 14,442 13 

" Outstanding orders, 1,226 36 

" Balance due the town, 1,865 83 

-$20,133 59 



1888. Cr. 


'S 


Feb. 26. By Balance in the treasury, 


$799 56 


Eeceived of Town of Harvard for aid fur- 




nished Barzillai Lawrence, 


17 00 


City of Lowell, for aid fur- 




nished William R. Davis, 


51 28 


Chapel Society, rent of school 




room to April 1, 1888, 


33 00 


John Fletcher, for lots sold in 




Woodlawn Cemetery, 


45 00 


L. W. Stevens, for lots sold in 




Mt. Hope Cemetery, 


38 00 


State Treasurer, corporation 




tax. 


808 96 


State Treasurer, National bank 




tax, 


560 29 


State Treasurer, State aid. 




chap. 252, acts of 1879, 


138 00 


vState Treasurer, State aid, 




chap. 301, acts of 1879, 


142 00 


State Treasurer, income Mass. 




school fund. 


158 54 


State Treasurer, revenue Mass. 




school fund, 


142 6J 



County Treasurer, on account 

of Dog licenses for the 

year 1888, 
Varnum Tuttle, borrowed 

money, 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, bor- 

rowed money, 
Julian Tuttle, rent of Towm 

hall and cellar, 
Julian Tuttle, for old iron sold 
J. E. Cutter, for taxes of 1887, 1,448 13 i 

A. F. Blanchard, for taxes of ' 

1888, 13,047 22 ] 

Interest on money in Bank. 80 09 \ 

^20,133 59 I 

J. K. W. WETHERBEE, Treasurer of Acton. 



$218 


83 


1894 


80 


421 


45 


80 


72 


8 


15 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT, 



SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 

Center District. 

Paid Rev. James Fletcher, for teachers, $720 00 

'^ ^ " care of house, 67 62 

fuel, 48 33 

•' " cleaning rooms, 3 87 

" incidentals, 9 45 



$849 27 



West District. 

Paid A. A. Wyman, Esq., for teachers, $720 00 

" ' '' care of house, 78 00 

fuel, 63 94 

^' " cleaning rooms, 5 00 



$866 94 



South District. 



North District. 

Paid G. R. Keyes, for teachers, $360 00 

" " care of house, 24 50 

fuel, 38 12 

" " incidentals, 43 



East District, 

Paid C. J. Williams, for teachers, $360 00 

" " care of house 36 00 

fuel, 52 82 



$423 05 



.f 448 82 



Paid A. C. Piper, for teachers, $720 00 

'^ " care of house, 90 00 ] 

" fbel, 53 72 j 

" " cleaning rooms, 4 05 1 

*' " incidentals, 3 75 i 

$871 52 ] 



South-East District. 



Paid W. S. Jones, for teachers, 

" " care of house, 

fuel, 
" " cleaning rooms, 

" " incidentals. 



High School. 

Paid A. W. Armstrong, for teaching, 

fuel, 
A. A. Wyman, Esq., cleaning school 

rooms, 
A. C. Piper, moving schoolroom fur- 
niture, 
Geo. Gardner, rent of piano, 
" " rent ot organ, 

. "^ " moving organ, 

" " care of rooms. 



$324 


00 


15 


00 


26 


38 


2 


00 


I 


42 


$720 00 


25 


00 


3 


00 


1 


50 


10 


00 


15 


00 


1 


00 


34 


00 



SCHOOL SUPPLIES. 



Paid C. H. Mead, 

Rev. James Fletcher, 
Geo. Gardner, for music. 



PRINTING. 
Paid J. F. Wood, for 500 sheet reports, 
600 book reports, 
" " town warrants, 

" " reward notices, 

" " voting lists, 

H. S. Turner, for poll tax lists 
iVgustine Hosmer, for notices, 

" " treasurer's orders, 

W. D. Tuttle, getting posters printed. 



STATE AID. 
Paid Benjamin Skinner, chap. 252, acts 1879, 
Ola Nelson, " 

Allen G. Smith, 

Richard G. Dane, chap. 301, acts 1879, 
J.uke Smith, 



$27 


08 


350 


88 


1 


36 


$10 


00 


69 


50 


9 


50 


1 


50 


8 


25 


9 


00 




60 


1 


65 


1 


33 


, $96 00 


48 00 


60 


00 


, 60 


00 


48 


00 



$368 80 



$809 50 



$379 32 



$111 33 



Mrs. Mary Smith, chap. 301, acts 1879, $48 00 

Rebecca C. Wright, " " 48 00 

W. F. B. Whitney, " " 15 00 

Mary J. Brown, " . " 18 00 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 

Paid Luke Blanchard, deficiency on Town 

Farm, 1887, $110 42 

E. H. Cutler, for cows bought for Town 

Farm in 1888, 206 00 

E. H. Cutler, support of Clara Wheeler, 169 92 

A. L. Brooks, 131 85 

Frank Brooks, 28 32 

" " balance on support of E. 

Bergendahl, 46 

E. H. Cutler, aid furnished W.R.Davis, 51 28 

E. F. Town, 137 00 
Redding 
familv, 
E. H. Cutler, aid furnished Mrs. Mar- 
shal Jones, 
E. H. Cutler, aid furnished Mrs. Ruth 

Pike, 
E. H. Cutler, aid furnished T- E. Harris, 

Elijah Bryan, 
Mrs. John 
Quinlan, 
E. H. Cutler, aid furnished Mrs. Abbie 

Sibley, 
E. H. Cutler, aid furnished Mrs. 

Russell, 
E. H. Cutler, aid furnished Nancy A. 

Whitcomb, 
E. H. Cutler, looking up case of J. H. 

Whitney, 
E. H. Cutler, expenses to Lowell re- 
specting E. Bryan, 
E. H. Cutler, expenses to Westford re- 
specting Wm. Piper, 
E. H. Cutler, expenses to Marlboro re- 
specting Mrs. Marshal Jones, 
E. H. Cutler, expenses to Rockbottom 

respecting Mrs. Marshal Jones, 
E. H. Cutler, expenses to Mansfield, re- 



$441 00 



25 


00 


121 


42 


52 

126 

28 


00 
36 
71 


93 


77 . 


59 75 


22 


67 


,8 


00 


4 


68 


1 


50 


2 


00 


1 


50 


1 


00 



8 

specting Frank Brooks, ' 4 00 

E. H. Cutler, postage, 1 39 

aid furnished Mrs. Trainor 76 26 

$1,465 26 



CEMETERY EXPENSES. 

Paid North Acton Granite Co., cutting date 

on tomb in Mount Hope cemetery, $8 00 
^L. W. Stevens, labor in Mount Hope 

Cemetery, 58 85 

Nathan Johnson, labor in North Acton 

Cemetery, 5 00 

Nathan Johnson, labor in Woodlawn 

Cemetery, 50 20 

John Fletcher, repairs on pump in 

Woodlawn Cemetery, 40 

John Fletcher, trimming trees in Wood- 
lawn Cemetery, 1 50 

Wm. D. Tuttie, laying out lots, 1 75 



$125 70 



EXPENSES OF ROADS AS LAID OUT BY COUNTY 
COMMISSIONERS. 

Paid M. A. Reed and Julian Tuttie, for lay- 
ing wall on Littleton road, 

M. A. Reed and Julian Tuttie, drilling 
and blasting on Littleton road, 

Nahum Littlefield, labor on Littleton 
road, 

Chas. Wheeler, labor on Littleton road, 131 47 

H. T. Clark, award of damages, 

A. W. Gardner, " 

E. Hall, 

Amasa Knowlton, " " 

W. T. Mason, 

W. S. Mead, 

A. W. Gardner, moving wall to new 
lines ot road, 

E. Hall, moving fence to new lines of 
road, 

Amasa Knowlton, moving fence to new 
lines of road, 

Dep. sheriff H. C. Sherwin, services on 
Hall road, 

$881 98 



$28 


00 


10 


00 


211 


60 


131 


47 


50 00 


15 


00 


125 


00 


5 


00 


100 00 


100 


00 


70 


81 


15 


00 


10 00 


10 


10 



EXPENSES ON ROADS AND BRIDGES. 
Paid Chas. Wheeler, regular highway work 

Center division, $601 70 

Nahum Littlefield, regular highway 

work, West division. 616 15 

Chas. Wheeler, regular highway work, 

South division, 250 91 

Nahum LittlefTeld, regular highway 

work South division, 361 70 

Tuttles, Jones and Wetherbee, breaking- 
out roads, 

J. W. Dupee, breaking out roads 
J. F. Jones 



A. C. Piper, 

Abel Cole, 

Francis Pratt, " 

Nahum Littlefield, " 

A. L. Tuttle, 

J. P. Tenny, 

Chas. Wheelev, 

J. E. Cutter, 

E. Jones, " 

F. H. Whitcomb, " 
A. H. Jones, breaking out roads and 

repairing washouts, 

Chas. Wheeler, repairing washouts. 
South division, 

Chas. Wheeler, repairing washouts Cen- 
ter division, 

Nahum Littlefield, repairing washouts, 

Abel Cole, repairing culvert, 

American Powder Mills, repairing 
washouts, 

A. H. Jones, repairing road and bridge, 

F. R. Knowiton, for gravel used in 
1887. 

F. E.. Knowiton, gravel, 

E. F. Conant, 

F. D. K. Hoar, 
Chas. Wheeler, 

Thomas McCarthy, for stone and labor 

on powder mill bridge, 
Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, for drain 

pipe for sluice near Hall's mill, 
Nahum Littlefield, building cesspool and 

sluice, 



23 08 

24 56 
2 00 
4 35 
7 68 

20 30 
23 35 
16 35 

4 00 
72 26 
32 00 

2 48 
26 25 

26 77 

48 12 



60 


50 


23 


25 




50 


2 


50 


6 60 


1 


70 


6 


35 


4 


50 


4 


05 



20 81 



13 00 



27 12 



9 00 



10 



Paid Nahum Littlefield, freight on drain pipe, 


^1 56 


E. Jones & Co., for hard pine plank 




for bridge at East Acton, 


64 35 


Chas. Wheeler, labor on bridge at East 




Acton, 


7 28 


J. P. Brown, iron work for sluice, 


96 


S. Jones, Jr., labor on sluice. 


1 37 


E. Jones & Co., lumber and nails, 


2 10 


Nahum Littlefield, covering stone, 


1 00 


" " powder and fuse, 


6 85 


blacksmith's bill, 


11 61 


Chas. Wheeler, repairing scraper. 


75 


" " powder and fuse, 


5 10 


stone. 


3 00 


" " blacksmith's bill, 


9 13 


" " scraper pole, 


3 50 


" " 2 stone picks. 


1 75 


" " 3 rakes, 


135 


" " 2 handles. 


50 


lumber. 


24 


" " repairing plow, 


50 


" " plow handle. 


1 75 




®0>ICO KA 


V*"*V^U W± 



REPAIRS ON TOWN BUILDINGS. 
Paid C. J. Williams, repairs East schoolhouse, $35 04 
C. J. Williams, outside window for 

East schoolhouse, 14 70 

Horace E,. Hosmer, repairs on the East 

schoolhouse, 5 10 

L. U. Holt, pump and tubing for East 

schoolhouse, 9 10 

L. U. Holt, labor on pump at East 

schoolhouse, 3 50 

L. U. Holt, labor and repairs on stove. 

East school-house, 5 15 

A. C. Piper, putting partition in base- 
ment South school-house, 14 60 
Francis Jones, painting in South school- 
house, 5 88 
A. C. Piper, repairs and grading at 

South school-house, 14 47 

L. U. Holt, repairs on stove at South 

school-house, 3 75 

W. S. Jones, outhouse and vault for 

Southeast school-house, 15 00 



11 



Paid W. S. Jones, for repairs on Southeast 

school-house, $2 57 

Francis Jones, for painting in Southeast 

school-house, 2 58 

G. E,. Keyes, repairs on North school- 
house, 5 73 

A. A. Wyman, for new seats and setting 

up the same in West school-house, 27 00 

A. A. Wyman, for repairs on West 

school-house, 32 37 

Rev. James Fletcher, repairs and grad- 
ing at Center school-house, 30 11 



TOWN OFFICERS. 
Paid Phineas Wetherbee, services as Assessor, $ 40 00 
J. W. Dupee, " ^' 25 00 

C. B. Robbins, " '' 25 00 

L. U. Holt, sealing weights and meas- 
ures, 10 00 
C. B. Stone, services as Registrar of 

voters to Oct. 1, 1888, 12 00 

Spofford Robbins, services as Registrar 

of voters pro tem, 2 00 

J. C. Cutter, collecting taxes for 1887, 90 00 
Rev. James Fletcher, services as Supt. 

of schools, 125 00 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, services as Treas., 45 00 
Wm. D. Tuttle, services as Registrar of 

voters to May 1, 1888, 15 00 

Wm. D. Tuttle, services as Town Clerk, 25 00 
J. W. Dupee, services as Selectman, Sb 00 

T. F. Noyes, '' ^' 45 00 

Howard B. White, services as vSelectman, 45 00 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 

Paid Nathan Johnson, repairing pump, % 1 25 

F. R. Knowlton, for Memorial day, 125 00 

E. Jones & Co., coal for Town Hall, 28 31 
Garfield & Co., painting and lettering 

guide boards, 4 50 

Francis Jones, painting guide board, 75 

Thomas McCarthy, stone guide post, 2 55 

" ^' ' 18 bound stones, 7 65 



$226 65 



$589 00 



12 



Paid Chas. Wheeler, for teaming and setting 

bound stones at West Acton and 

Powder mills, $11 85 

Nathan Johnson, labor on monument 

ground^, 
Nathan Johnson, labor on monument. 
"• '' repairing Hag, 

'' "' flag rope and putting 

. up same, 
L. E. Reed, attending 24 burials. 

*' "' services at Magog pond, per 

order of Fish Commissioners, 
Mrs. L. A. Melone, reward lor securing 

conviction of illegal sale of liquors. 
J. E. Cutter, summoning 16 persons to 

take tile oath ot office. 
James Kinsley, use of road for Hurley. 
Phineas Wetherbee, expenses to get poll 

tax lists printed, 
Tutdes, Jones & Wetherbee. 3 Assessors' 

books, 
Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee. Tax Col- 
lector's book, 
Dr. C. B. Saunders, services in Board of 

Health case of Mis. Bancroft, 
Dr. A. C. Liver more, services in Board 

of Health case of Mrs. Bancroft, 
Dr. C. B. Saunders, leporting 45 births 

to town clerk, 
Heirs of Jonathan Wheeler, lease of 

gravel bank for 25 vears, 
J. E. Cutter, abatement on C. L. Hey- 

wood est., tax for 1880. 
J. E. Cutter, abatement on C. L. Hey- 

wood est., tax for 1887, 
J. E. Cutter, abatements on taxes of 1887, 

as certified by the Assessors. 
A. F. Blanchard. abatement on C. L. 

Hey wood est., tax for 1888. 
A. F. Blanchard, abatement on Henry 

Haynes tax, 
A. F. Blanchard, abatements for 1888 as 

certified by the Assessors. 
A. F. Blanchard, discount on taxes for 

1838, 736 80 



2 


50 


1 


50 




60 


3 


50 


72 


00 


3000 


50 


00 


2 


00 


8 


50 


1 


25 


1 


12 


1 


25 


2 


25 


2 


50 


11 


25 


46 


26 


10 


92 


13 


26 


106 


10 


12 


48 


:i 


00 


34 


00 



13 



Paid M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies for town 

hall, $12 32 

Julian Tuttle, 1 cord wood for town hall, 5 00 
" '' care of town hall and clock, 58 00 

Wm. D. Tuttle, tor record book, 30 

'' " expense of getting voting 

lists printed, 1 00 

Wm. D. Tuttle, surveying and making 
deed of Wheeler heirs' gravel pit. 

Wm. D. Tuttle, for express, 

" " postage and stationery, 

" '' recording 24 deaths, 

" '' '' 13 marriages, 

" '' collecting and recording 

40 births, 

L E. Reed, making 22 returns of deaths, 

A. F. Blanchard, abatements as ceitified 
by the Assessors, 



3 50 


1 85 


2 


03 


4 


40 


1 


95 


20 


00 


5 


50 


29 


06 



TEMPORARY LOANS PAID. 
Paid Mrs. Angie D. Hill, note and interest, $445 77 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, " '' 424 61 

Varnum Tuttle, " -' 1981 64 



BOUNTY TAX REFUNDED. 

Paid Mrs. Sybil Miller, $4 SS 

A. C. Handley, 6 16 

Handlev & Hosmer, 1 44 



RECEIPTS AND APPROPRIATIONS. 

Balance in treasury Feb. 26, 1888, $799 56 
due from collector of taxes, Feb. 

26, 1888, • 1448 10 

Appropriation for t wn charges, 5000 30 

support of schools, 4100 00 

for roads. 1800 00 

overlay ings, 279 72 

State tax, 1665 00 

County tax, 934 27 



$1477 31 



$2852 02 



$12 48 



14 



Rec'd of Varnum Tuttle, borrowed money, 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, ^' 
State Treasurer, corporation tax, 
" " National bank tax, 

'• '' State Aid, acts '79, 

chap. 252, 
'' ' State Aid, acts '79, 

chap. 301, 
" " income Mass. school 

fund, 
" '* revenue Irom Mass. 

school fund, 
County treasurer, dog- fund. 
Chapel society, rent of school-room 

to April 1, 1888, 
L. W. Stevens, lots sold in Mount 

Hope cemetery, 
John Fletcher, lots sold in Wood- 
lawn cemetery. 
Interest on money in bank, 
Julian Tuttle, rent of Town Hall 

and cellar, 
Town of Harvard, for aid furnished 

Barzdlia Lawrence, 
City of Lowell, for aid furnished to 

William R. Davis, 
Julian Tuttle. old iron sold, 



$1894 80 
421 45 
808 96 
560 2a 


138 


00 


142 


00 


158 


54 


142 
218 


57 

83 


33 


00 


38 


00 


45 

80 


60 
00 


80 


72 


17 


00 


51 

8 


28 
15 




$20,-865 36 



EXPENDITURES. 

For Center school, $849 27 

West School, 866 94 

South school, 871 52 

North school, 423 05 

East school, 448 S2 

Southeast school, 368 80 

High school, 809 50 

School supplies. 379 32 

Printing, ' 111 33 

State Aid, 441 00 

Support of poor, 1465 26 

Cemetery expenses, 125 70 
Roads ordered by Co. Commissioners, 881 98 

Jloads and oridges, ^468 54 



15 



Repairs on town buildings, 
Town officers, 


1226 65 
589 00 


Miscellaneous, 


1477 31 


Temporary loan paid, 
Bounty tax refunded, 
State tax, 


2852 02 
12 48 
1665 00 ' 


County tax, 


r934 27 




$18,267 76 


nee due from collector, 


731 77 


due from treasurer. 


1865 83 


mce in favor of the town, 


2597 60 




$20,865 36 



JOB W. DUPEE, ) Selectmen 

THOMAS F. NOYES, >- of 

HOWARD B. WHITE, ) Acton. 
Acton, Feb. 27, 1889. 



4. 


Jan. 


12 


5. 


Feb. 


8. 


6. 


Feb. 


24. 


7. 


Mar. 


9 


8. 


Mar. 


13 


9. 


May 


10 


10. 


May 


16 


11. 


May 


24 


12. 


June 


21. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

FOR i888- 

BIRTHiJI RSCil^^TfBED IN ACTON IN:5I888. 

No. Date of Birth. Name of Child. Names of parents. 

1. Jan. 1. James William, son of Frank and Margaret Moan. 

2. Jan. 2. In Passadena, Cal., Raymond Franklin, son of J. 

Edward and Susie E. Durkee. 

3. Jan. 7. Grace Florence, daughter of Wm. and Charlotte E. 

Barnes. 
Harry Olin, son of Wm. H. and liOra M. Hartwell. 
Helen Winifred, daughter of Edgar H. and Angie Hall. 
Guy Edward, son of Norman A. and M. Alice Davidson. 
Arthur Frederic, son of Olin L. and Mary J. Wright. 
Earle Frank, son of Walter E. and Nettie F. Hayward. 
Sarah Etta, daughter of Amos H. and Etta C. Hayward. 
Richard Francis, son of James and Annie Kinsley. 
Carroll A. M., son of George B. and Carrie B. Gowen. 
Ethel Florence, daughter of Frank H. and Ellen M. 

Thompson. 
13. July 7. Harold Stanley, son of Frank R. and Emma S. Knowl- 

ton. 
Joseph, son of Sevior and May Grace Mahony. 
Ruth Frances, daughter of Nathan F. and Adelle E. 

Derby. 
Roswel, son of George W. and Sarah E. Stearns. 
Benjamin Harrison, son of Thomas J. and Kate Sawyer. 
Wilbert Melvin, son of William and Catherine A. 

Tucker. 
Alonzo, son of Allen and Bessie Leonard. 
Carl Edward, son of Edward and Ora Anna Willis. 
Percy Leroy, son of John W. and Eliza Jane Hudson. 
Carl Roland, son of Samuel, Jr. and Emma E. Jones. 
May Belle, daughter of John and Anna M. Maynes. 
Arthur Roland, son of Roswell L. and Anna B. Tuttle. 
Benjamin F. B., son of Fredson P. and Mattie M. Brooks* 
Gertie Alma, daughter of James A. and Nettie Fowler. 
Charles Herbert, son of Byron W. and Hattie Belle 

Austin. 

a daughter to Charles H. and Hannah R. Clark. 

Sarah Lizzie, daughter of Thomas and Maria C. hcan- 

lan. 



14. 


July 


9. 


15. 


July 


17. 


16. 


Aug. 


2. 


17. 


Aug. 


18. 


18. 


Aug. 


27. 


19. 


Aug. 


27. 


20. 


Sept. 


19 


21. 


Sept. 


20. 


22. 


Sept. 


20. 


23. 


Oct. 


5. 


24. 


Oct. 


10. 


25. 


Oct. 


17. 


26. 


Oct. 


20. 


27. 


Oct. 


24 


28. 


Oct. 


30 


29. 


Nov. 


2. 



17 



30. 
31. 
32. 
33 

34. 

25. 
36. 

37. 

38. 

39. 
40. 



No. 
1. 
2. 
3. 



Nov. 8. 



a daughter to Charles B. and Lizzie S. Sandeis. 



Nov. 13 riareiice Warren, son of Wm G. and Sarah R. Brown. 
Nov. 20. Ruth Jane, daughter of .James B. and Mary A. Wheeler. 
Nov. 24. Ada Elizabeth, daughter of Wm. O, and Elizabeth J. 

Banks. 
Nov. 25. Marion Celeste, daughter of S. Hammond and Ma)y B. 

Taylor. 
Nov. 28. John, son of Michael and Mary Welch. 
Dec. 5. Bess Josephine, daughter of VVedster C. and Amelia H; 

Bobbins. 
Dec. 5. A son to Hattie Mabel Hall. 
Dec. 10. Bertha F'rances, daughter of Frederic W. and Catherine 

M. Greene. 
Dec. 12. Antoinette Ammidown, daughter of Franklin D. and 

Lucietta Barker. 
Dec. 25. Lawrence William, son of Frederic G. and Mary Ann 

Jones. 



No. 



lUARRIAOEit RXICOKUED IN ACTON MN lS!!i8. 

, Date. Names and Residence of Parties. 

Feb. 22. Charles J. Holton and .Jennie A. Bean, both of Acton. 

Mar. 21. Joseph F. Edwards and Ada C. Baily, both of Maynard. 

April 25. Michael O. Kerrigan of Concord and Annie Gallagher of 
Acton. 

June 25. Fremont 8. Vining of ' hillips, Me., and Ada F. Willard 
of Acton. 

June 27. Frank Arthur Teele of Somerville and Mabel Richard- 
son of Acton. 

Sept. 5. Charles M. Kimball of Haverhill and Carrie E. Jones of 
Acton. 

Sept. 5. David H. Bezanson and Ida M. Foote, both of Acton. 

Oct. 2. William A. Flint of Concord and Estella D. Heath of 
Acton 

Oct. 24. Frederick L. Burke and Addie H. Barker, both of Acton. 

Nov. 14. Horace M. Howard of Lexington and Lucy A. Jones of 
Acton. 

Nov. 25. Thomas Anegues of Acton and Mary Haley of Marlboro. 

Nov. 27. Samuel A. Dorrison of Clinton and Mary W. Wheeler of 
Acton. 

Dec. 13. Thomas Miller and Livina E. Demmons, both of May- 
nard. 



I 



]>C:ATI1$!( RKCORnED IN ACTON IN 18S8. 
Date. Names of Deceased. 

Jan. 1. Franklin White, aged 39 years, 27 days. 
Jan. 29. Mr. Gains W. Allen, aged 83 years. 
Feb. 1. Mary D. Farrar, aged 20 years, 4 months, 15 days. 



18 

4. Feb. 3. Lizzie S., daughter of Anson C. and Ellen Piper, aged 

2 months, 2 days. 

5. Feb. 11. Mrs. Eliza A. G. Barker, wife of Isaac Barker, aged 77 

years, 1 month, 5 days. 

6. Feb. 22. Mary F. Davis, aged 54 years, 9 months, 16 days. 

7. Mar. 9. Sarah E. Eobbins, aged 64 years, 3 months, 23 days. 

8. Mar. 15. Sarah J. Houghton, wife of Geo. H. 8. Houghton, aged 

53 years, 8 months, 16 days. 

9. Mar. 9. Mrs. Rachel C. Conant, wife of Joel H. Conant, aged 75 

years, 10 months, 12 days. 
Mrs. Abigail P. Durkee, aged 65 years. 
Mr. John Hairis, aged 86 years, 5 month, 13 days. 
Mr. James F. Jones, aged 58 years, 6 months. 
William S. Sanford, aged 23 years, 5 months, 10 days. 
Lewis M. Finney. 
Edward O. Neil, aged 50 years. 
Mrs. Hepsabeth A. Piper, wife of Jona A. Piper, aged 

80 years, 3 months, 20 days. 
Edward J. O'Neil, aged 27 years. 

Mrs. Melvina M. Bancroft, aged 72 yrs, 4 mos., 14 days. 
Sarah A. Barton, aged 68 years, 5 months, 4 days. 
William Martin, aged 33 years. 

Mr. David M. Handley, aged 86 years, 5 months, 7 days. 
Mr. Cyrus Barker, aged 85 years, 11 months. 
Mrs. Sarah A. Conant, wife of Chas. A. Conant, aged 65 

years, 1 month, 24 days. 
24. Dee. 16. Mary E. Puffer, aged 34 years. 



10. 


April 


30. 


11. 


May 


20. 


12. 


July 


25. 


13. 


Aug. 


10. 


14. 


Aug. 


10. 


15. 


Aug. 


15. 


16. 


Aug. 


21. 


17. 


Aug. 


30. 


18. 


Sept. 


19. 


19. 


Sept. 


22. 


20. 


Nov. 


10. 


21. 


Nov. 


15. 


22. 


Nov. 


22. 


23. 


Dec. 


2. 



19 



IVA.TIES OF PER^OrViHI H^VIMQ OOGS L.ICEIVS^ED IIV ACTOIV IN 
18SS, WITH THE AfWEOUIVT RECEIVED FRO.n EACH. 



David Shapley, 


$2 


John Temple, 


$2 


Fred E. Wetlierbee, 


2 


Geo. R. Keyes, 


2 


Samuel E. Miller, 


2 


Francis Pratt, 


■'.2 


Moses A. Reed, 


2 


Sylvester Haynes, 


2 


Michael Kerrisran, 


2 


Eliza Haynes, 


2 


Chas. B. Stone, 


2 


Forbush & Hartwell, 


5 


Mead and Stone, 


2 


Dan McCarthy, 2d, 


2 


Frances Stone, 


2 


Geo. W. Tuttle, 


,2 


E, Eddie Fletcher, 


2 


W. F. Stevens, 


2 


Chas. J. Williams, 


2 


T. J. Sawyer, 


5 


F. W. Green, 


2 


L. V. Clough, 


2 


Albert Moulton, 


2 


W. F. Kelley, 


2 


E. J. Robbins, 


2 


F. Rouillard, 


2 


Charles Varney, 


2 


Chas. B. Sanders, 


4 


A. W. Gardner, 


2 


F. S. Whitcomb, 


2 


Joshua Sawyer, 


4 


M. J. Worthley, 


2 


A. F. Sargent, i 


2 


Chauncy B. Robbins, 


4 


A. L. Lawrence, 


9 


J. R. Bassett, 


2 


Mrs. Geo. F. Flagg, 


2 


H. M. Smith, 


2 


George H. Books, 


2 


Moses Taylor, 


2 


Antoine Bulette, 


2 


L. U. Holt, 


2 


Daniel Tuttle, 


2 


Thomas Calder, 


2 


Thomas Mannion, 


2 


Ed. H. Jones, 


2 


Geo. B. Gowen, 


2 


Chas. Wheeler, 


5 


Cyrus Hayward, 


2 


Geo. Conant, 


2 


Walter E. Hayward, 


2 


Stephen E. Martin, 


2 


John Fletcher, 


2 


Geo. T. Knowlton, 


2 


F. W. Houghton, 


2 


Henry Hanson, 


2 


Otis H. Forbush, 


2 


R. B. Knowlton, 


2 


J. K. W. Wetherbee, 


2 


Isaac S. Ford, 


2 


Elnathan Jones, 


2 


L. E. Reed, 


2 


Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee, 


4 


Eil. O'Neil, 


2 


Daniel F. Farrar, 


2 


W. H. Teele, 


2 


Willie S. Fletcher, 


2 


J. C. Gates, 


2 


Augustus Fletcher, 


2 


Willis L. Mead, 


2 


Dana F. Hayward, 


2 


H. A. I.ittlefield, 


2 


D. J. Wetherbee, 


2 


F. W. Gray, 


2 


Solon A. Robbins, 


2 


Isaac Barker, 


2 


Ollie D. Wood, 


2 


Geo C. Wright, 


2 


Oscar H. Thompson, 


2 


Geo. A. Conant, 


2 


David M. Handley, 


2 


A. L. Tuttle, 


2 


Amasa Knowlton, 


2 


C. J. Holton, 


7 


Jeremiah McCarthy, 


2 


C. H. Holton, 


2 


0. A. Knowlton, 


2 


Fred Gilmore, 


2 



20 



James D. roburn, 


2 


Hezman Chaplin, 


2 


A. L. Noyes, 


•1 


C. A. Harrington, 


4 


(r. H. S Houghton, 


2 


Webster < '. Robbins, 


4 


M. H. Wordeii, 


2 


Chas. H. Taylor, 


2 


Anson C. Piper, 


2 


(Jeo. C. Conant, 


2 


Chas. Morris. 


2 


A. P Wood, 


2 


.1. H. Hanaforcl, 


2 


Ra'ph Crooker, 


2 


J. W. Dupee, 


2 


X. Littlefield, 


2 


R. L. Reed, 


') 


(has. H. Wheeler, 


2 


Daniel Harris, 


2 


A. Risso, 


9 


J. tl. Standish, 


2 


F. R. Knowlton, 


4 


Henry Haynes, 


2 


Geo. Gai'dner, 


2 


Wm. B. Davis, 


2 


Moses E. Taylor, 


2 


Geo. T. KnowltrMi, 


2 


Henry Hanson, 


2 


Lutuer C'oiiant. 


2 


Eliza B, Cole, 


2 


Nathnn R. Pnlmer, 


2 


Henry L. Willard, 


2 



Allen G. Smith. 

VVhole number of Dogs licensed 

females, 6. Total amount received, 



since last report, 183; males, 127; 
$284. 
WM. D. TUTTLE, Town Clerk. 



21 



Report of Receipts and Expenditures at the 
Almshouse in Acton, 

FOR THK YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY »8, 1889. 



Articles on hand February id8< 18N9* 

11 COWS, f 468 00 

1 horse, 175 00 

1 ton rye fodder, 12 00 

12 tons hay, 216 00 

Oat fodder, 4 00 

Grain, 8 00 

1 plough, 12 00 

Horse rake 23 00 

Mowing machine, 30 00 

55 hens, 27 50 

15 cords wood, 75 00 

1 wagon, 70 00 

Concord buggy, 15 00 

15 bushels potatoes, 10 50 

150 pounds salt pork, 18 00 

Molasses, ... 3 00 

Apples, 4 00 

Barrels, 4 32 

Soap, 2 00 

Vinegar, 1 00 

Canned fruit, 2 00 

Crackers, 2 70 

Flour, 2 50 

Beans, 80 

Lard, 2 40 

Butter, 75 

(3at meal, 50 

Spices, 75 

Coffee, 35 

Tea 30 

Eggs, 25 

Salt, 50 

Cream tartar, 35 

Lumber. ....,,. *,,,-, , 15 00 



$1207 47 



22 

RECEIPTS FROM TOWN FARM 

From IVlarch I. INN8. to Ularch 1. I»i89. 

Received for Apples, $334 74 

Milk, 820 44 

Calves, 16 75 

Beef cow, 1 8 65 

Labor, 11 00 

Potatoes 14 85 ^ 

Cabbages, 91 

Peaches, 1 10 

Lumber, 2 00 

Old ral<e, ,. . 2 00 

Beans, 38 

Peas 2 12 

Pickles, 79 

Eggs, -2 23 

$1247 96 

EXPENDITURES AT TOWN FARM 

For the year eudine February i£8, 1N89. 

Axes $ 2 40 

Axe handles 40 

Apple header, 1 00 

Axle grease, 25 

Alum, 10 

Beans , 9 22 

Butter,.... 47 09 

Brooms 1 75 

Boots and shoes, 7 95 

Berries, 1 00 

Brushes, 57 

Barrels 43 86 

Blacksmith bill, 18 44 

Castings, , 7 71 

Coal 24 72 

Cream tartar, 1 84 

Combs, 52 

Covv^s, 206 00 

Cocoa, 33 

Crackers, . 34 77 

Coffee, 6 98 

Crockery, 4 28 

Castor, 1 00 

Celery, ,. 15 



23 



Curtains $ 1 65 

Chimneys, 39 

Cloth and clothing, 46 04 

Campor 40 

Clothes pins, 15 

Cattle cards, 2.8 

Cheese, 1 34 

Disinfectant 20 

Eggs 36 

Evaporated apple, 1 55 

Extracts, 1 15 

Fruit jars 1 93 

Fish,....' 10 27 

Flower pots, 30 

Flour, 33 54 

Files, 30 

Fly paper and powder 97 

Fertilizer, 21 20 

Glass, 2 40 

Grain 442 15 

Grafting trees, 7 25 

Harrow teeth 1 00 

Hinges and hooks, 34 

Ham, 8 70 

Horse rake, 23 50 

Knives, 60 

Lumber, 2 96 

Lantern, 60 

Locks, 30 

Lime, 68 

Labor 14 25 

Lemons, 1 83 

Measure, . 15 

Meat, 105 55 

Molasses, 14 30 

Matches, 15 

Nails, 4 10 

Oat meal, 2 01 

Ointment, 40 

Oil, 4 65 

Onions, 35 

Poultry food, 6 40 

Pails, 62 

Paris green, 25 

Pick handle, 33 

Plough, 12 00 



24 

Paints, 1 88 

Plaster, 35 

Peppers, 35 

Pigs, 12 00 

Putty, 14 

Potatoes, 18 16 

Rosin, 15 

Rings and staples, 14 

Repairing harness, 7 05 

Raisins, 1 44 

Seeds, 8 00 

Spices, ^ 2 69 

Soda, 64 

Stove polish, 48 

Starch, 86 

Saltpetre, 20 

Spinage, 25 

Soap, 5 50 

Sulphur, 30 

Salt 2 80 

Spoons, 116 

Sugar, 41 38 

Scythes, 1 60 

Saws, 85 

Services of H. C. vScarlet and wife, 445 83 

E. H. Cutler, 50 00 

L. C. Taylor, 15 00 

A. C. Handley, 6 00 

Turpentine, " 1 13 

Tomato plants, . 50 

Tin ware, 70 

Tea, 6 10 

Tobacco, 50 

Use of bull, 3 75 

Vinegar, 2 40 

Wire, 6 60 

Wheelwright bill, 4 90 

Whetstone, 50 

Yeast, 1 10 



$1,855 82 



Expenditures, $1,855 82 

Receipts, 1,247 96 



Income less th^n expense, %■ 607 86 



25 



Drawn from the treasury, 

Due from treasury to balance account, 

Income less than expense, 
Interest on farm, 



Victualing and lodging 170 tramps at 40 cents, 

Cost of supporting poor at farm, $779 86 

Whole number of persons, exclusive ot tramps, supported at 
almshouse, 7 ; average number, 5 1«2 ; present numbei% 6. 

E. H. CUTLEH, ) Overseer$ 

L. C. TAYLOR. j of 
A. C. HANDLEY, i Poor. 



$206 00 
401 86 








$ 607 86 
240 00 


ts, 


$ 847 86 
68 00 



ANNUAL REPORT 



School Committee 



SCHOOL-YEAR, 1888-9. 



To the town of Acton : 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 

IN BEHALF OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



The town is to be congratulated upon the harmonious and 
healthful condition of the schools through the year. The 
Winter session has been free from the usual snow blockades. 
The interruptions from disease, epidemics and cold have been 
exceptional. The death angel must have found his victims 
elsewhere, as no name in our happy list of scholars has been 
starred. 

In examining carefully the various registers, two impres- 
sions are left upon the mind. In conferring with the teach- 
ers, these impressions still linger, as if on purpose to be re- 
corded in the printed annual report. One is, most of the 
parents show a care in providing food, clothes, conveyances, 
and other encouragements which prove a hearty co-operation 
injsecuring to their children the full benefit of school days. 
They have intelligence enough to see how essential to real 
progress, is the presence of the child in the school room on 
time and^in })roper condition of mind and body, for the real 
work in hand. They are willing to make sacrifices of person- 
al comfort and home accommodations for the. sake of that 
presence. Private gratifications easily yield when balanced 
against the culture and -welfare of the child.. 

These heroic self-denials of the home-life, unheralded ex- 
cept to the heart's inner consciousness, will havetheir reward. 
Nay they now have their reward in that very consciousness 



30 

which makas life to mean something nobler than simply to 
eat, drink and wear clothes and then die. 

The second impression to be recorded and published, is 
just the opposite of the one named. It is the following: 
there is here and there scattered through the town a parent, 
who fails to enforce a wholesome moral sentiment at the 
hearthstone. 

The petty jealousies of the school room are patronized 
to the exclusion of the higher grades of thought. Children 
are allowed to leave their homes in ill-humor over some mis- 
judged treatment of teacher or schoolmate. Trivial excuses 
are indulged and the tardy or absence mark is registered and 
when once the list is begun it is likely to continue, at inter- 
vals discouraging to rank and scholarship. The roll of honor 
is lost at the beginning of the contest. 

These things ought not so to be. They would not so be 

if the child^a f/ood and the pare nf a coynfort as a sentiment waS 

flung to the breeze, nailed to the mast and kept flying in al 

weathers. 

THE TEACHER'S STIMULUS. 

It is peculiar to himself. Let him make the most of it. 
There is in the wqyj presence of a company of young persons 
gathered in a school room with their minds all aglow with 
the work that has been done or is to be done within the short 
interval allotted with their thousand and one questions to be 
answered upon the spot either by themselves or their teacher 
with their varying moods of impatience, of high expectation — 
of disappointed hopes — of commingled stupidity and vivacity, 
there is in this presence an appeal to all the vital forces of 
mind and heart. 

If one has a mind and heart he will feel the impetus urg- 
ing him on to do something worthy of the day. He may be 
of a heavy heart in starting from home. An indifference like 
that of the sands beneath his feet may mark his movements 
as he passes through the routine of his home-life, but let him 
once stand before his school and he cannot retreat. He 



31 

would not if he could. Before he has time to plan he is him- 
self in the arena, doing valiant service for his youthful de- 
pendents. 

The teacher is tempted to ask what inspiration is there 
in a stupid scholar? What encouragements to work with or 
for one whose confirmed lethargy rebounds upon you ? The 
inquiry itself proves the point. It shows there is a demand 
made by such stupidity upon the susceptible forces of a 
teachei''s mind. His inventive powers are put to the tension 
if by any means he may startle this dormancy. The magic 
touch of a skillful hand may arouse the sleeper. The prob- 
lem is what to do and how to do it ? The earnest teacher 
will not be satisfied till the problem is solved. 

With one scholar the secret springs of ambition are to 
be reached. How shall they be reached ? 

With one scholar the love of approbation is to be appeal- 
ed to, but it must be done with the artist's delicacy and the 
wisdom of Socrates. 

With one scholar the untoward circumstances of his 
home-life are to be studied and that adjustment be made 
which shall meet the peculiar condition. 

With one scholar there are bad propensities, vicious in- 
clinations leading downward and ever threatening a lower 
level. The question is how can this downward grade be re- 
versed ? How can the animal part be repressed ? How can 
the mental and higher part be lifted ? 

Who has the charm that can inspirit this latent angel, if 
angel there be ? and who shall say no angel is there ? 

With one scholar it is a stubborn, chronic repugance to 
everything savoring of books and schools. Who can break 
this spell ? How can the flinty rock be struck and the fire 
of genuis evoked? He who does it is a master workman- 
He who attempts to do it, even though he may not succeed, 
shall find the very attempt helpful to the development of his 
own power. 

No education is fairly under way, none surely completed 



82 

which has not had this practical drill in this gymnasium of 
the passions. 

THE KINSHIP OF STUDIES AND SCHOOLS. 

The considerate father as he gathers the scattered group of 
his children and grand-children about him — looks in their 
faces, and talks with them one by one or in company says to 
himself: "These are all of one kin. They are every one of 
them bone of my bone, and flesh of my flesh." 

So in the family gathering of schools the careful educa- 
tor wuU find it hard to sever one of the grades from his recog- 
nition and sympathy. They each look up to him for the 
genial, helping word. 

They are sensitive if they see the coat of many colors 
given to any favorite member. This is as it should be. It 
is not for the Primary to say to the Grammar, or the High 
school to say to the Intermediate, "I have no need of you." 
They are all interlocked in one loving fellowship. If one 
suffers they all suffer. 

It is not for Geography to say to Arithmetic or Gram- 
mar to History, or Science to Language or Language back to 
either of its mates, "I have no need of you." They match each 
other. If one limps they all begin to falter in the race. If 
one starts afresh they all feel the glow and speed together for 
the prize. You think the natural Sciences are dry. They 
seem to you not to belong to the companionship of Litera- 
ture, History and Language. 

But here comes a lad with his satchel filled with flowers 
of various hue. He has traversed the mountain ranges and 
the water courses of the valley. He has gone hungry and 
tired, yet the eager countenance and the glowing words of 
the enthusiast show he feels rewarded for his toil. He has 
at last found the variety which his Botany has described. 
The glen has become sacred where his choice plant is locat- 
ed. It is like a mine of gold just found by the place-hunter, 
which he must not disclose to his nearest friends. You feel 



33 

at once the rebuke of your ignorance and lack of apprecia- 
tion. 

It is one of the facts in our Colonial History, that Har- 
vard College, instead of being, as is sometimes supposed, the 
outgrowth of the common schools, gave to these schools 
their birth and inspiration. The Grand Motor was at Cam. 
bridge and not in the rural suburbs. So it has been ever 
since. So it must ever continue to be. The consanguinity of 
letters was eternally fixed in the fiat of creation. 

THE FLAG AND THE SCHOOL. 

The vote of the citizens at the annual meeting to have 

the flag float from the monument on inauguration day, Avith- 

out regard to party politics, was a fitting accompaniment of 

the school discussion. But for the schools this flag would 

never have been unfurled in America. In the great civil 

conflict, but for the schools, this flag would have been rent 

more than once and never have been restored to position in 

more than its original lustre — not a star erased. Loj^alty to 

the flag implies loyalty to the cause of education in all its 

departments. The Memorial Library Building, which our 

generous benefactor, William A. Wilde, is rearing, is to be a 

permanent symbol of the union between Letters and Liberty. 

It accords with the sentiment of George Peabody, the great 

American patron of letters : ''Education a debt due from 

present to future generations." Let this debt be recognized 

in the full measure of its obligations. It has come down to 

us as a legacy from the- past. The fathers and mothers of a 

former generation have bequeathed it to us. 

"Along the cool sequestered vale of life 
They kept the noiseless tenor of their way," 

But the whole region is reminiscent of their toil and reform. 
THE HIGH SCHOOL. 
The present membership of this school is 36 ; the aver- 
age membership for the year 38. The attendance, interest in 
the studies, deportment of the scholars, the appreciation of 



34 

the advantages granted to the young people by the towii, 
their purpose to make the most of themselves for their ovrn 
sake and the sake of the town, were seldom more apparent. 
Never has real solid progress in all the branches of knowl- 
edge pursued been more satisfactory. 

Mr. Armstrong, the Principal, has proved himself to be 
the man for the place. His ambition to excel, his effort to dis- 
cover the best methods and to test them by a faithful trial, his 
complete luastery of the school in the way of discipline, his 
thoroughness in searching for the whys and wherefores, his 
manliness in doing honest work, his habit of trying to beat 
himself every time, and rarely failing in the efforts, make it 
worth the while to retain his services if by any proper means 
it can be done. He should have more pay. He can have it 
elsewhere. More than once during the year we feared we 
should lose him, but he is with us still, fresh as ever, and 
more competent to do noble service in our behalf from the 
experience of the past. The town should not hesitate a mo- 
ment in saying ''let the good work go on." In any light the 
matter can be viewed, the town can ill afford to vote a nega- 
tive on the High school. Its good name is involved. The 
reports of a stoppage by action of its citizens would lower 
its prestige in the neighborhood of towns ten degrees. A 
year ago a vote was taken upon this question. That prompt 
decisive action in favor of its continuance, gave the whole 
town a conscious self-respect which has lasted ever since, and 
which more than cancelled all the High school's bills. 

It is an unfortunate time to take any backward step in 
the line of education. We are just receiving a generous gift 
of a Public Library building. It is an educational epoch in 
the history of the town. It is a time when the best aspira- 
tions of our youth have been raised to the high water mark. 
It would be especially ungracious to spot the hour by an 
unlucky negative on the High school. What are you going 
to do with these High school scholars? They are on your 
hands. Few, if any, can afford the extra expenses of books^ 



35 

clothes, fare and tuitions out of town. There is a wear and 
tear of nerves by scholars and parents in sending out of 
town, which is too much for many to endure any length of 
time. This is something which is not to be estimated in 
dollars and cents. 

There is a moral risk in sending away from home which 
some may wish to forecast. We do not want these High 
school studies and scholars in our Grammar school. These 
Grammar school teachers have more on their hands than 
they know how to meet. They leave their rooms with tired 
nerves. Their time tables are- crowded and their patience 
exhausted by the present regime. With most of the High 
school scholars the decision of the town settles the question 
whether they are to have any more schooling. It is with 
them practically this or nothing. 

A negative would drop the countenances of the entire 
company. More than that, it would fall as a damp chilly 
frost upon all the lower grades of school. The experiment 
is too costly in its results to be tried without sober consider- 
ations of all its possible bearings and complications. 

The town is not so rich that it can afford to have poor 
roads. What you expend upon these roads is not to be view- 
ed as a tax. It is more properly a wise and profitable invest- 
ment which you make and for which you get sure returns. 
The same with your educational expenditures. The town is 
not so rich that it can afford to give up its school arrange- 
ments. It will not pay if that is what you are thinking 
about. Leave out all other considerations but dollars and 
cents and then it will be true, that your dollars will lessen 
as your school privileges diminish. Your lands will depre- 
ciate at a rate more than enough to off-set the extra cost of 
your High school even if double its present figures. Your 
real estate sales will soon demonstrate the short sighted policy. 

There were 37 applicants for admission to the school in 
June. 22 received certificates. The average of those ad- 
mitted was nearly 14 years, making them on an average 



36 



nearly 17, at the completion of the three years' course. 

The graduating exercises in June, in the town hall, 
showed how much the public were interested in the school. 
The hall was ci-owded. The programme for the occasion is 
printed as a proper memento : 

3? x7og x'a m X2IL e , 

CLASS MOTTO: '' LET THE END CROWN THE WORK.'' 



PRAYER 

SALUTATORY 

ESSAY 



ESSAY 
ESSAY 

ESSAY 
ESSAY 

ESSAY 
ESSAY - 

ESSAY 
PROPHESY 



MUSIC. 



" A Nations Dishonor.''^ 
MUSIC. 

" Genius is Attention.'''' 

" Wayside Thoughts."' 
MUSIC. 

''Now.'' 

" Who is a Hero?" 

" Education a Prize.'' 

" Work and Win." 
MUSIC, 

''All the World a Staye." 
MUSIC. 



By Rev. Mr. Stearns 

Alice J. Hoar 

Edith B. Holden 



Bertram D. Hall 
Grace E. Tuttle 

Bertha L. Gardner 

Ida M. Littlefield 

Blanche M. Bassett 

Mabel Ij. Robinson 

Alice J. Hoar 
Edith B. Holden 

Bertram D. Hall 
By Superintendent 



VALEDICTORY - - 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS 

MUSIC. 

A diploma was awarded subsequently to Frederic Hap- 
good Nash, who had attended a part of the year, but was 
unable to continue by reason of sickness. He had, however, 
completed the course, and by equivalents was deemed worthy 
of the diploma, which was granted b}^ the unanimous vote 
of the Committee. 



37 

The three years' course is also appended, and now adopt- 
ed, subject to changes which may hereafter be made, accord- 
ing to the judgment of the Committee and the light of ex- 
perience. 

THREE YEARS' COURSE OF HIGH SCHOOL, 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Arithmetic and Book-keeping alternating. 
English G-rammar and Composition. General History. 

Second Term.— Arithmetic and Book-keeping, alternating 
English Grammar and Composition. General History. 

Third Term. — Arithmetic and Book-keeping, alternating. 
Rhetoric begun. Botany. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Terra. — Algebra begun. Rhetoric continued. Physi- 
ology. 

Second Term. — Algebra continued. Eng. Literature begun. 
Physics continued. 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Geometry continued. Latin begun. Chemis- 
try begun. 

Second Term. — Physical Geography. Latin continued. 
Chemistry continued. 

Third Term. — Civil Government. Latin continued. Geol- 

Four recitations in each branch per week. 

Wednesday an olf day, with a different programme includ- 
ing Compositions, Declamations, Reading, wSpelling, Drawing, and 
other miscellaneous recitations as shall be deemed most import- 
ant at the time. 

THE PUBLIC HALF-DAY. 

The monthly written test in the schools is considered the 
faifesl and surest proof of the real progress made. If properly 
considered it cannot fail to reveal the weak or strong points of 
scholarship. 

These are considered in silence, and each pupil must depend 
upon his own in.dependent resources, unembarassed by the inter- 
ference of school-mates, connnittee or the puplic. 

Each pnpil having the same questions the result determines 
the .abspjujbe and relative standing. 



38 

For the sake of variety, it was thought best, at the close of 
winter term, this year, to open the doors wide at least for one- 
half day for public inspection. 

The invitation was cordially accepted. A good attendance 
of the parents greeted the teacher and scholars in very part of 
the town. The pupils of every grade came with good clothes, 
good looks, good behavior, happy to greet their friends, and re- 
solved to repay them for coming. 

The janitors did good service in helping on the day. The 
teachers did their parts well in furnishing and executing the 
programmes. They seemed to find their reward in the smile and 
word of approval from a gratified public. 

This mutual contact of scholars, teachers and parents, must 
have an inspiring effect, as it shall be recalled in the coming 
days. 

It has revealed a reserved corps of sympathing friends, ready 
to rally at any moment in the interest of education. 

THE CENTRE SCHOOL. 

Grammar Department. 
Miss Fannie L. Perry, - - Teacher. 
The district has been fortunate in retaining the services 
for another year of Miss Perry. Her rare experience, apti- 
tude to teach and govern, unflagging interest, have again 
made their impress upon the school. The several branches 
of study have had fair treatment, and each pupil has been 
taught and disciplined with judicious care. A good work 
has been done, and all hope more work of the same sort may 
be done in the future, on the same premises and by the same 
trusty hand. 

Priviary Department. 

Miss Blanche E. Henshaw, - Teacher, 
This yeai- opened with a sad disappointment to the 
membership of this school. Miss Bessie Ball, their cherished 
teacher for years, was sick. How could they go on without 
her. They missed her smiling face, her cheery word, her 
tripping step, and. for days refused to be comforted. But 



89 

like little heroes, they at last submitted to the situation, and 
yielded gracefully to the guidance of another hand. Miss 
Blanche E. Henshaw, of Lowell. She is a graduate of the 
Normal school, has had experience and success in teaching, 
and has put forth her best endeavors to win the confidence 
of her charge. The scholars have made good progress and 
been happy in their work. 

THE NORTH SCHOOL. 

Spring Term. 

Joseph W. Godfrey, - - Teacher. 

The characteristics of this school noticed in previous re- 
ports remained during the closing term of Mr. Godfrey's 
teaching. He was alert, fervent in style, ready to help, and 
untiring in his efforts to make each day of improvement to 
himself and his pupils. Many pleasing reminiscences and 
good wishes will gather about his name, as it shall be men- 
tioned in the coming years. 

Fall and Winter Term. 
Miss Jessie F. Jones, - - Teacher. 

Miss Jones is from Watertown, a graduate of the Water- 
town High School. She has testimonials which warrant ex- 
pectations of success in any line of effort which she may 
adopt. She began with the usual disadvantages of inexperi- 
ence. These have been bravely met. There has been de- 
votion to duty, thoroughness in teaching, and a steady move- 
ment in the lines of order, system and progress. It is ex- 
pected that the " fortiter in re,'" combined with the '' suaviter 
in modo.^'^ will ultimately win the day. 

Let the parents join with the teacher in that mutual co- 
operation and charity, which suffereth long and is kind. In 
due season the waving harvest will appear, and there shall be 
glad reapers in the field. 

EAST SCHOOL. 

Miss Susie E. Wetherbee, - Teacher. 
Miss Wetherbee is credited with another year of good 



40 

solid school work. Five out of six of her candidates for the 
High School received certificates of admission in June. The 
departure of this class ftom the school has made a sensible 
change in its membership. The younger members have ral- 
lied from the shock and are already marching forward rapidly 
to the given standard. The exercises on the public day, 
showed at a glance a prompt and intelligent performance of 
the tasks assigned. The panorama unrolled on time, and 
there was no lack of interest till the last picture in the scene 
was reached. That photograph group of the six boys with 
bare heads and white linen collars, peering through the mists 
and rain drops, with a good cheer for the Committee man, as 
he walked through the mud up the hill, has been put in a 
frame and will scatter the clouds in many a rainy day — in the 
future. Some time we hope to get the Committee man's 
speech on this occasion. 

SOUTH EAST SCHOOL. 
Miss Laura A. Brown, - - Teacher 

Nothing especially note worthy is reported distinguish- 
ing this year from the last. In no direction has there been 
a lessening of merit, either in the modes of instruction or in 
the results. Discipline has been maintained. Enthusiasm 
amid adverse conditions of labor, have marked the teacher's 
efforts. If the laurel wreath is not worn through the modesty 
of the teacher, it deserves to be just the same. Let the older 
members of this school vie with each other in making the 
teacher's position one of real comfort to her, as well as of 
benefit to themselves. 

SOUTH SCHOOL. 
Grammar Department. 
Miss Fannie M. Houghton, - Teacher. 

The school has prospered under the continuous charge of 
its present teacher. Miss Houghton has beenfaithful, earnest 
and persevering, seeking to find the best methods of instruc- 
tion, and putting them sharply to the test. She has found 



41 

in most of her pupils a readiness to take her ideas. Order, 
odedience, promptness, cheerfulness, intelligent progress, 
mark the school. The understanding and the upperstanding 
are both included in the care of the teacher, and the result is 
a happy development of the individual scholar. The public 
half day for this school was heralded by the dispesion of 
rain-clouds, the shining of the sun, the roll of the drum, the 
display of the national colors, and the eager gathering of the 
public. During the singing of some of the martial songs, 
and when the boys marched up to Gen. Gage, and reported 
their grievances in the words of Seventy -six, the War of In- 
dependence seemed just opening upon us. It took time to 
adjust the thoughts and bring them round to the real dates 
and scenes of the present hour. The gymnastics of the 
school were finely given. It was not strange that Mr. Piper, 
the worthy Committee man, had the headache and the heart- 
ache, and was speechless at the thought of giving up his 
trust. 

Primary School. 

Miss Viola S. Tuttle, . Teacher. 

The sun responded to the telephone message to be on 
hand at the public exercises of the South Primary. It was 
a hard push through the clouds, but the break was made ac- 
cording to order. If there had been no sunshine outside, 
there would have been piles of it indoors, with such a teacher, 
school and programme. 

How did they read ? As they would talk. 

How did they spell ? All the words but squash. 

How did they write ? Better than you and I. 

How did they act ? As if they liked it. 

How did they look ? Like flowers in a vase. 

How did they sing ? Like the spring blue birds. 

How did they march ? As if they would take the city. 

That charge of slates from the front seats on the rows of 



42 

visitors was a great success. Never have the teacher and 
scholars done more or better work than during the past year. 

WEST ACTON SCHOOL. 

Grammar Department. — Spring Term. 

Miss Sarah Hopkinson, - Teacher. 

No results of note occurred during the closing term of 
Miss Hopkinson's teaching. Though laboring under some 
pecular disadvantages, she met them gracefully, did her part 
as best she knew, and in some lines of work showed results 
more satisfactory than in preceding terms. Her methods of 
instruction were normal and designed to lead the scholar to 
self-reliant effort. 

Fall and Winter Term^s. 

Miss Nellie A. Hanson, - Teacher. 

Miss Hanson came from Woburn with good testimonials, 
showing a creditable record as teacher. Though a stranger, 
she entered eagerly upon her work, soon affiliated with the 
scholars, became conversant with their grades and sought to 
lead pleasantly along the paths of knowledge. There ap- 
peared to be harmony between scholars and teacher, an im- 
portant element of success. 

The work which needs to be done in this school requires 
uncommon tact in discipline, an ability to accomplish good 
and rapid results, untiring patience, wisdom, good cheer and 
pluck. The public half day found the teacher disabled with 
a severe cold, and the scholars many of them suffering the 
same way. A large audience was present and the programme 
was carried through to the apparent gratification of the 
visitors. Let this co-operating spirit continue, and in the end 
there will be satisfaction all around. 

Primary Departmemt. 
Miss C. Lettie Newton, - - Teacher. 
Perennial means year after year. A perennial teacher is 
one who can teach year after year, and maintain buoyancy, 



43 

and come on the home heat without panting. She has done 
it and can do it again. The scholars catch the same spirit 
and hold it to the end. Could you have seen those forty 
Primaries step with their wands and flying ribbons on the 
eighth of March, you would have said with the Committee 
man, '' the country is safe." At any rate West Acton is safe 
whatever may betide other parts of the town. Each one 
stuck to his colors, and they were all good. Let them keep 
to their colors as they mature in person and knowledge, and 
they will soon make their mark in the wide, wide world. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES FLETCHER, 

Superintendent, 



44 



T.A.BXJI-..A.:R ST^^TEnyCEZSTT FOR 1888- 



SCHOOLS. 



TEACHERS. 



a 


•3 




1^ 








o 

o 


1 




-a 


CO 


« 


i 

in 






Id 


03 


o 




o ?2 


B 


^ 


S 


^ 


h3 


< 


< 




o 


o 



Acton High. 
Center fTraiumar. 
Center Primary. 
South Grammar. 
South Primary. 

West Gramm;ir. 

West Primary. 

North. 

East. 
South East. 



A. W. Armstrong. 
Miss Fannie L Perry 
Miss Blanche E. Hensliaw. 
Miss Fannie M Houghton. 
Miss Viola S. Tuttle. 
Miss Sarah Hopkinson. 
Miss Nellie A. Hanson. 
Miss C. Lettie Newton. 
Joseph W. Godfrey. 
Miss Jessie F. Hanson. 
Miss Susie A. Wetherbee 
Miss Laura A. Brown. 



36 


41 


38.4 


35.0 




41 


26 


36 


23 


20.6 


18.8 




23 


1 


36 


•J5 


21.8 


19 5 




25 




36 


33 


30.2 


28.3 




33 


7 


36 


49 


37.5 


33.2 


49 




36 


37 


36.9 


31.9 


37 


3 


36 


45 


40.0 


36.0 2 


43 




36 


27 


237 


21.3 1 


26 




36 


20 


18.1 


15 9 


20 




36 


16 


15.0 


14.3 




16 


1 



Number between 5 and 15 years, as repn'tea by tlie Assessors, for 
the year 1888, 280. 



M 



45 



TOWN WARRANT. 



COMMON^WEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. MIDDLESEX SS. 

To either constable of the Town of Acton in said County , 

GREETING : 

You are hereby required, in the name of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, to notify the legal voters of said town of Acton, 
to meet at the town hall on Monday, the first day of April, A.D- 
1889, at one o'clock p. m., by posting copies of this warrant, by 
you attested, at the post office in the centre of the town, at the 
stores of Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee and C. B. Stone, at the 
Magog house and in all of the railroad stations in said town 
seven days at least before the time appointed for holding said 
meeting, then and there to act upon the following articles as they 
may think proper, viz : 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said meet- 
ing. 

Art. 2. To fill all vacancies in uhe list of town officers. 

Art. 3. To see what amount of money the town will raise 
for the support of schools the present year, and how it shall be 
expended. -^ S <^" ^ 

Art. 4. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise to repair the roads the present year, and how it shall ba 
expended. ^ ^.^3^^ 

Art. 5. To see what amount of money the town will raise 
to defray town charges for the present year^^ - / ^ '^ ^ 

Art. 6. To see if the town will instruct the School Com- 
mittee to appoint a Superintendent of Schools. -o^ ^ ^ -f^-P T ^ ^^ ^1^ 

Art. 7. To see if the town will choose a Superintendent 
oi Burisils. ^^'r^ ^^^„^ ^ ^.r\r.--^' 

Art, 8. To consider and act upon the acceptance of the 
Jury List j^§ revised by the Selectmen. 



46 

Art. 9. To see if fche town will accept the reports of the 
Selectmen, Overseers of the Poor, School Committee and other 
Town Officers. 

Art. to. To see if the town will authorize the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money for the 
town if necessary, in anticipation of the taxes for the current 
year. 

Art. 11. To vote by ballot Yes or No, in answer to the 
question. "Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this town the present year." J' i^ ^ c- C 5 ^y;^ J 

Art. 12. To see if the town will appropriate $150.00 for 
the due observance of Memorial Day. 

Art. 13. To see if the town will chinge the grade of the 
road leading from the turnpike in West Acton by the house of 
Wm. H. Teele, so as to take the surface water, or take any ac- 
tion theron. 

Art. 14. To see if the town will purchase a new road ma- 
chine or take any action thereon. r-^a^c--^ ^^^y^, - , - 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant to u^' 
with your doings thereon at or before the time appointed for said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this the twentieth day of March in 
the year eighteenth hundred and eighty-nine. 

JOB W. DUPEE, ) Selectmen 

THOMAS F. NOTES, )• of 
HOWARD B. WHITE, ) Acton, 



47 



TOWN OFFICERS FOR 1889. 



Job W. Dupee, 



Phineas Wethebbee 



E1.ISHA H. Cutler, 



Hiram J. Hapgood, 



Town Clerk. 

William D. Tuttlk 

Selectmen. 

Thomas F. Notes, 

Assessors. 

, Job W. Dupee, 

Overseers of Poor. 

Lyman C. Taylor, 

Town Treasurer. 

JoNA. K. W. Wetherbee. 

Auditors. 



Howard B. White. 



Chauncy B. Bobbins. 



Aaron C. Handley. 



Daniel J. Wetherbee. 



School Committee. 



Alphonso a. Wyman, 3 years, 

Chas. L. Bradford, 2 years. 
Chas. J, Williams, 1 year. 

Highway Surveyors, 



William S. Jones, 3 years. 
James Fletcher, 2 years. 

Geo. R. Keyes, 1 year. 



Charles Wheeler, 
John Fletcher, 



Nahum Littlefield. 
Levi W. Stevens. 



Cemetery Committee. 
Wm. W. Davis, 
Vence Viewers. 

O. W. Mead, Frank Hosmer. 

Surveyors of Wood. 
Geo. H. Harris, S. L. Dutton, 
Chas. H. Taylor, John F. Davis, 

Henry D. Parlin, Chas. J. Williams, 

JoNA. P. Fletcher; 

Surveyors of Lumber. 

E. F. Richardson, L. W. Stevens, 

E. J. RoBBiNS, Herbert E. Clark. 

Chas. A. Brooks, Jona. P. Fletcher. 

V Surveyors of Hoops and Staves. 

Augustus Fletcher. 
Fish Committee. 
Luther Conant, E. Jones, Frank H. Whitcomb, 

John Fletcher, Chas. J. Williams. 



Naham C. Reed, 

Wm. B. Davis, 
Isaac W. Flaqg 
H. T. Clark, 



Wm. B. Davis, 

Geo. H. Harris, 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 




^. OF ^^ 




FROM 



February 26, 1889, to February 26, 1890. 



HUDSON: 
The Entebpeise Steam Printing Company. 

1890. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Town [of Acton in Account with J. K. \¥, Wetlierbee, j 

Treasurer. 

1890. Br. I 

Feb. 26. To cash paid State tax, $1,340 00 \ 

" " county tax, 1,038 89 i 
" " on Selectmen's or- . . ; 

ders, 15,069 54 | 

" Outstanding orders, 94] 96 \ 

" Balance due the Town, 830 85 



19,221 24 



1889. Cr. 

Feb. 26. By cash in the treasury, $1,865 83 

Received of Horace R. Hosmer for old 

stovepipe sold, 50 

C. J. Williams, for fines 
Collected for fishing 
without permission, 2 50 

City of Boston, for aid 

furnished Mrs, Sibley, 90 21 

ToAvn of Billerica, for aid 

furnished Mrs. Russell, 48 13 

E. F. Richardson, for rent 
of chapel room to April 

1, 1889, 33 00 

H. W. Tuttle, for 72 loads 

gravel, 3 60 

Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee, 

borrowed money, 1,500 00 

Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee, 

borrowed money, 1,000 00 

State Treasurer, corpora- 
tion tax, 655 36 
State Treasurer, National 

Bank tax, 625 56 

State Treasurer, State aid. 

Chap. 252, Acts of 1879, 102 00 



ANNUAL REPOKT 



State Treasurer, State aid, 






Chapter 301, Aets of 






1879, 


$232 00 


State Treasurer, iucome of 






school fund, 


IGl 


30 


County Treasurer, on ac- 






count of dog licenses 






for the year 1889, 


290 


70 


Dr. I. Hutchins. for drug- 






gist's license, 


1 


00 


L. W. Stevens, for lots 






sold in Mount Hope 






Cemetery, 


70 


00 


John Metcher, for lots 






sold in Woodlawn Cem- 






etery, 


18 


00 


Julian Tuttle, for rent of 






Town hall and cellar, 


55 


50 


Arthur F. Blanchard, taxes 






of 1888, 


731 


77 


E. A. Phalen, for taxes 






of 1889, 


11,G57 


c^^ 


Rev. James Fletcher, for 






school supplies sold, 


5 25 


Interest on money in bank, 


71 


48 

1^1 Q 991 94. 






Cpl^,^^! C'± 


J. K. W. WETHERBEE, 




Treasurer of Acton. 



AcTON, Feb. 26th, 1890. 
We have examined the above account and find the same 
correct. 

HIEAM J. HAPGOOD, 
DANIEL J. WETHERBEE, 

Auditors of the Toivn of Acton. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



Treasurers Report on Account of Money received for care of Lots 

in Cemetery : 
Received for the estate of Hepsibetli Piper, $50 00 
Interest, 2 00 

lieceived from estate of Frederick Rouillard, 100 00 

$152 00 

J. K. W. WETHERBEE, 

Treasurer of Acton. 



Acton, Feb. 26th, 1890. 

We have examined the above account and find the same 
correct. 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD, 
DANIEL J. WETHERBEE, 

Auditors of the Town of Acton. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT 



SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS, 

Center School. 

Paid Rev. James Fletcher, for teachers, §709 00 

" " care of house, Qb 00 

fuel, 75 07 

" " cleaning rooms, 8 35 

" '' incidentals, 2 62 





West School. 




Paid A. A. Wyman, 


Esq., for teachers, 


$720 00 


'.i \i 


care of house, 


78 00 


i( a 


fuel. 


65 48 


U ii. 


cleaning rooms. 


7 00 


a u 


incidentals, 


4 76 




South School. 




Paid C. L. Bradford, 


for teachers. 


$720 00 


a a 


care of house, 


90 00 


a a 


cleaning rooms. 


3 25 


li ii 


fuel. 


26 86 


a ii 


incidentals, 


6 13 



$860 04 



$875 24 



$846 24 I 

North School. . ] 

Paid G. R. Keyes, for teachers, $360 00 j 

" •■ " care of house, 25 50 

" . fuel, 38 36 

" " cleaning rooms, 4 00 j 

" " incidentals, 83 > j 

$428 69 j 

Fast School. ^ 

Paid C. J. Williams, for teachers, $360 00 ] 

" " care of house, 35 00 ' 

fuel, 27 13 ■ ! 

" " cleaning, 1 00 1 

'' ^^ incidentals, 3 02 '\ 

^ ^ '$426 15 \ 



ANNUAL REPORT 







South-East School. 




Paid W. S 


. Jones, 


for teachers, 


$324 00 


ii 


.i 


care|of house, 


15 00 


a 


i( 


fuel, 


25 00 


a 


ii 


cleaning rooms. 


2 50 


ii 


" 


incidentals. 


1 75 



$368 25 



High School. 

Paid A. W. Armstrong, for teaching, 
For care of rooms, 
C. L. ]^)radt'ord, incidentals, 

'' " cleaning room, 

F. W. Green, moving furniture i 
K. Johnson, ^' 



" cleaning rooms. 

Geo. Gardner, rent of i)iano, 

'' " organ, 

for fuel. 



$920 


00 




34 


00 






02 






50 


Center, 




50 


So.Actoi 


1, 1 


75 


Ceiiter, 


2 


00 


W.Actoi 


, 2 


50 
75 




10 


00 




15 


00 




33 


62 



$1,024 24 



SCHOOL SUPPLIES. 

Paul Geo. Gardner, music for High school, 
A. A. Wyman, for supplies. 
Rev. James Fletcher, for supplies, 



$ 1 00 
2 39 
436 92 
$440 31 



STATE AID. 



Paid Allen G. Smith, Chap. 279, Acts 1' 89 
Benj. Skinner, " 

Ola Nelson, 



E. G. Dane, 
Luke Smith, 
Mary Smith. 
Rebecca C. Wright 
Mary J. Brown, 
Almira H. Loker, 
W. F. B. AVhitney, 



chap. 301, acts 



s 1-89, 


160 00 


i i 


32 00 


i i 


4 00 


S1889, 


60 00 


i. 


48 00 


'^ 


48 00 


a- 


48 00 


ii 


24 00 


a 


16 GO 


f. b 


9 00 



$349 00 



TOWN OF ACTON. 





SUPPORT OF POOR. 




Paid E. H. Cutler 


, deficiency on farm, 1888. 


^401 86 


u a 


aid of Clara Wheeler, 


169 46 


t; u 


a 


A. S. Brooks, 


169 46 


a u 


a 


Frank Brooks, 


95 61 


u a 


!.<■ 


Elizabeth H. Bobbins, 61 28 


u a 


i(. 


family of Frank Brooks 56 00 


. ^' '' 


ii. 


Mrs. Buth Pike, 


53 25 


u u 


a 


E. Bryan, 


30 


a u 


u 


Emily F. Town, 


129 00 


a a 


iC 


Julia A. Collins, 


13 76 


i. i( 


a 


J. E. Harris, 


124 45 


u a 


u 


Miss Abbie Sibley, 


30 46 


a a 


a 


Wm. B. Bead, 


19 00 


a u 


a 


Mrs. Marshal Jones, 


99 00 


a a 


a 


Mrs. Bussell, 


25 46 


u u 


a 


Mrs. J. Quinlan, 


103 45 


u a 


a 


Bichard Temple, 


52 46 


u u 


Expenses to Marlboro', 


4 00 


11 11 




" Dan vers, 


4 00 







CEMETER Y EXPENSES. 

Paid L. W. Stevensjabor in Mt. Hope cemetery$63 85 
N. Johnson, labor in No. Acton " 5 00 

" '' on monument grounds 

and cleaning tablets, 4 05 

IST. Johnson, labor in Woodlawn cemetery 59 ^6 
Julian Tuttle and M. A. Beed, labor in 

Woodlawn cemetery, 13 75 

L. U. Holt, pump and driving well in 

Woodlawn cemetery, 17 36 

Wm. D. Tuttle, for labor, 1 40 



$165 26 



EXPENSES OF ROADS AS LAID OUT BY COUNTY 
COMMISSIONERS. 

Paid Moses H. Beed, moving wall, $19 90 

Julian Tuttle. '' 13 38 

H. T. Clark, '' . 35 00 

Myron Chaflfin, ^' 15 00 

W. S. Mead, moving fence, 5 00 
jS". Littlefield, labor on Leland-Stevens 

road, 738 90 



10 ANNUAL KEPOKT 



N. Littlefield, labor on Hall road, 


114 95 




" " covering stone, 


2 50 




A.fA. Haynes, for gravel, 


30 00 




A. M. Knowlton, for gravel, 


8 25 




F. H. Whitcomb, '' 


37 50 




Francis Pratt, building Hall road, 


300 00 




M. A. Eeed and Julian Tuttle, splitting 






stone for bridge, 


5 00 




Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, 80 ft. drain 






pipe, 


19 80 




P. AVetherbee, moving fence. 


12 00 




J. Devane, settlement of claim for fencing 


17 00 




L. Elan chard, '^ " '^ 


106 00 




C. H.Nash, 


22 00 




^' award for damages, 


20 00 




Frances Stone " " 


10 00 




Wm. D. Tuttle, for grade stakes. 


75 




" " for surveying, specifica- 






tions and profile, 


15 00 




Warren Houghton, for removing fence, 


7 50 




J. T. Joslin, advice, and making contract 






and bond, 


5 00 




— 


$L 


360 43 


FEINTING. 




Paid J. F. Wood, for 600 Town reports. 


59 80 




^' " 500 sheet reports, 


10 00 




'^ " reward notices. 


1 50 




^' " notices. 


5 50 




'- " warrants, 


13 50 





^' " lish permits, 3 25 

'^ advertising for fish committee, 2 00 

John Fletcher, " " 1 75 

Augustine Hosmer, lists for soldiers names, 3 50 

^' notices, 60 

Phineas Wetherbee, list of poll tax payers, 6 00 



107 40 



TOWN OFFICERS. 



Paid Julian Tuttle, services as registrar of 

voters, to May 1, 1889, 12 00 

C. W. Chadwick, services as registrar 

of voters, to May 1, 1889, 12 00 

W. D. Tuttle, services as registrar of 

voters, to May 1, 1889, 15 00 



TOWN OF ACTON. 11 



S. A. Guilford; services as registrar of 

voters, to May 1, 1889, 
Phineas Wetherbee, services as Assessor, 
J. W. Dupee, " " 

C. B. Bobbins, 

L. U. Holt, sealing weights and meas- 
ures, 1888, 
Wm. D. Tuttle, services as Town Clerk, 
Eev. James Fletcher, services as Supt. 

of School, 
A. F. Blanchard, collecting 1888 taxes, 
J. W. Dupee, services as Selectman, 
Thomas F. Noyes, " " 

Howard B. White, '' '^ 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, services as Treas- 
urer, 



EXPENSES OF ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

Paid Charles Wheeler, regular highway work, 
N. Littlefield, " " 

Francis Pratt, " " 

Francis Pratt, special highway work, 

A. S. Fletcher, rebuilding abuttments 
to bridge, 

Francis Pratt, for railing at Bowen's pond, 

Francis Pratt, blacksmith's bill, 

Francis Pratt, labor on railings, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, scraper plate 
and bolts, 

Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee, drain pipe, 

J. P. Brown, labor, 

M. A. Eeed and Jnlian Tuttle, labor on 
sluice, E. Acton, 

E. Jones & Co., lumber for railings, 

Francis Conant, for repairing sluice, 

Fitchburg P. P. Co.,freight on drain pipe, 

J. C. Keyes, repairing washout, 

A. H. Jones, repairing washout and rail- 
ing bridge, 

Thomas McCarthy, covering stone, 

N. Littlefield, building two sluices, 
\ '' rebuilding sluice, 

" 1-2 cask cement, • 

" powder and fuse, 



12 


00 


50 


00 


18 


00 


23 


00 


10 


00 


25 


00 


125 


00 


85 


00 


18 


00 


60 


00 


Sb 


00 


50 


00 


UD 

617 


GE^ 

89 


620 


m 


600 


09 


516 


78 


2^ 


00 


55 


00 


20 


72 


1 


95 


8 


00 


5 


94 


1 


47 


6 2^ 


45 


09 


4 


00 


1 


38 




50 


6 


10 


7 


50 


12 


60 


33 


00 




88 


10 80 



600 00 



12 ANNUAL REPORT 



Paid K LittlefieW, covering stones, 


8 


30 




" two scraper sections, 


8 


00 




" grate for catch basin, 


3 


25 




" blacksmith's bill. 


18 


22 




'' 97 loads gravel. 


3 


88 




Charles Wheeler, building sluice near 








house of 0. Furbush, 


44 00 




Charles Wheeler, repairing washouts. 


27 


12 




•' blacksmith's bill, 


2 


69 




" pov/der. 


3 


20 




'• plow. 


7 


00 




" two rakes, 




80 




" one hoe. 




30 




" gravel, 


2 


15 




E. F. Conant, gravel, 


1 


80 




H. A. Gould, 


U 88 




F. E. Knowlton, " 


10 


70 




I. A. Samson, " 


4. 


60 




Est. of Cyrus Barker, gravel, 


7 


84 






ING 


— $2,770 
S. 


32 


REPAIRS ON TOWN BUILD 




Paid A. C. Piper, for ventilators for South 








school house, 


$2 


65 




Rev. James Fletcher, inside blinds 








for Center school house, 


15 


20 




Rev. James Fletcher, repairs at Cen- 








ter school house. 


12 


69 




N. Johnson, for repairs at Center 








ter school house, 


4 


25 




L. U. Holt, for repairs at Center 








school house, 


19 


20 




Francis Conant, repairs at Center 








school house. 


2 


62 




L. U. Holt, repairs at West school 








house. 


2o 


50 




A. A. Wyman, repairs at West school 








house. 


19 


00 




E. F. Wood, painting in South school 








house, 


6 


82 




C. L. Bradford, grading at South 








school house. 


20 


87 




C. L. Bradford, repairs at South school 








house. 


5 


04 




S. Jones, Jr., repalirs at South school 








house, 


30 


32 





TOWN OF ACTON. 13 



Francis Jones, painting at South 

school house, 
Francis C'onant, repairs at South 

school house, 
L. U. Holt, repairs at South school 

house, 
L. U. Holt, gutters for East school 

house, 
L. U. Holt, repairs at East school 

house, 
H. E;. Hosmer, repairs at East school 

house, 
C.J. Williams, repairs at East school 

house, 
George R. Keyes, repairs at North 

school house, 
W. S. Jones, repairs at Southeast 

school house, 
Eobert Wayne, repairs at Town hall, 
W. H. Smith, repairing slating on 

Town hall, 50 21 

F. W. Gray, painting and gilding 

clock dial and hands and labor at 

Town hall, 
F. W. Gray, painting Town hall, 
F. W. Gray, paint stock, 
Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, paint 

stock for Town hall, 
Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, for gold 

leaf, 
Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, for re- 
pairing doorspring, 
L. U. Holt, repairs at Town hall, 



i 


38 


6 


67 


3 


16 


13 


16 


2 


12 


2 


30 


6 


11 


3 


40 


2 


00 


3 


25 



34 


20 


118 


00 




80 


61 


04 


6 


15 


3 


00 


23 


09 



$510 24 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES, 

Paid A. Hosmer, for stationery, $2 53 

E,. M. Yale & Co., repairing flag, 2 75 

F. R. Knowlton, Memorial Day, 150 00 

Nathan Johnson, repairing flag, 
A. F. Blanchaad, abatements on taxes, 

as certified by the Assessors, 
A. F. Blanchard, abatement of Francis 

Bobbins' tax, 
James Devane, painting guide boards, 
S. Jones, Jr., guide boards, 



1 


73 


27 


97 


7 


00 


16 


00 


17 


20 



14 



ANNUAL REP OK T 





25 


s 


00 


21 


32 


7 


25 


1 


52 


10 


53 



M. B. Garfield, painting guide boards, 4 00 

Conant heirs, l^ase of gravel bank for 

thirty years, 35 63 

John F. Blood, rebuilding sluice, 10 00 

Phineas Wetherbee, copying valuation 

list, 8 75 

Phineas Wetherbee, express and post- 
age, 

J. Kinsley, use of road for Hurley, 

E. Jones & Co., coal for Town hall. 
'' '' stock foe voting shelves, 

Daniel Tuttle, staining " " 

Spofford Bobbins, stock and labor on 
voting shelves, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, collect- 
or's book, 1 58 

Tuttles, Jones &AVetherbee, assessor's 

book, 1 35 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, re(u)rd 

bo5k for Town Clerk, 4 25 

Julian Tuttle, grading about Town 
hall, 

William D. Tuttle, grading about 
Town hall, 

Simpson Bros., concreting about Town 
hall, 

E. H. Cutler, counsel on account of 
suit of City of Waltham, 

Thomas McCarthy, bound stone at Con- 
cord line, 

Charles Wheeler, stone guide posts, 
" " teaming and set- 

ting guide posts, 

Charles Wheeler, stone and teaming 
and setting road bounds, 

Charles Wheeler, teaming and setting 
bound stone at Concord line, 

Charles Wheeler, teaming stone for 
J. F. Blood's sluice, 

E. A. Phalen, abatement on Francis 
Bobbins' tax, 

E. A. Phalen, abatements on taxes as 
certified by the Assessors, 

E. A. Phalen, discount on taxes, 
" posting notices, 



72 


85 


r,3 


90 


40 


10 


25 


00 


2 

5 


00 
25 


4 


85 


4 


55 


2 


80 


2 


00 


G 


85 


30 

691 

4 


00 
59 
00 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



15 



William I). Tuttle, dog license blanks, • 1 00 
'' •' *" surveying and mak- 
ing out papers for roads and gravel 
banks, 8 65 
William D. Tuttle, tally sheets, 1 20 
" '' express, 2 15 
'' " postage, . 95 
Paid Wm. D. Tuttle, for telephone, 55 
•' '• recording 18 marriages, 2 70 
" '' 32 deaths, 5 20 
" " collecting and record- 
ing 34 births, 17 00 
M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies for Town 

hall, 10 17 
Julian Tuttle, care of Town hall and 

clock, 59 60 

State Treasurer, druggists license, 25 
Kev. James Fletcher, expenses to hire 

teachers 7 88 
L. E. Reed, expenses of enforcing the 

order of the Selectmen against dogs, 4 00 
L. E. Reed, services at Nagog pond as 

per order of fish committee, 8 00 
L. E. Reed, making return of 30 deaths, 7 50 
L;E. Reed, attending 32 burials, 96 00 
H. B. White, cash paid lawyer, 3 00 
•' expenses of Board of Health, 50 
" stationery, postage and ex- 
press, 4 53 



$1,536 18 



TEMPORARY LOAN RAID. 

Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee, note and interest, $1,531 25 



RECEIPTS AND APPROPRIATIONS. 

Balance in Treasury Feb. 26, 1889, $1,865 83 
due^from^collector'^of^taxes, Feb. 26, 

1889, .qja 731 77 

Appropriation for Town charges, 4,000^00 

schools, 4,300 00 

highways, 2,300^00 

overlayings, 270 76 

State tax, 1,340 00 

County tax, 1,038 89 



16 AXXUAL REPORT 



Eec'd of State Treasurer, corporation tax, 
" " Nat. Bank tax, 

" " Military aid, 

" " State aid, 

" " income of INIass. 

School Fund, 
H. R. Hognier, old iron sold, 
C. J. Williams, fines for violation of 

fishing laws, 
Town of Billerica, aid furnislied Mrs. 

Enssell, 
Town of Billerica, aid furnished Mrs. 

Russel, 
City of Boston, aid furnislied Mrs. 

Abbie Sebley, 
Chapel Society, : ent of school room to 

April 1, 1889, 
H. W. Tuttle, gravel, 
Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee, borrowed 

money, 1,500 00 

Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee, borrowed 

money, ' 1,000 00 

Dr. 1. Hutchins, druggist license, 1 OO 

County Treasurer, dog fund, 290 70 

L. W. Stevens, lots sold in Mt. Hope 

cemetery, 70 00 

John Fletcher, lots sold in Woodlawn 

cemetery, 18 OO 

Rev. James Fletcher, *schools supplies 1 

sold, b 20 I 

Julian Tuttle, rent of Town hall and j 

cellar, 55 50 | 

Interest on monev in bank, 71 48 I 



6oo 


36 


625 


5(5 


102 


00 


252 


00 


161 


30 




50 


r> 


50 


22 


67 


2o 


46 


90 


21 


:33 


00 


3 


(>0 



$20,813 34 



e:xpendit ures. 

For Center School. $860 04 

AVest School, 875 24 

South School. 846 24 

North School, 428 69 

East School, 426 15 

Southeast School. 368 25 

High School, 1,024 24 

School supplies. 440 31 

State aid, 349 00 

Support of Poor, 1,612 26 



TOWN OF ACTON. 1 7 



Cemetery expenses, 


165 26 . 


Roads ordered by County Commis- 




sioners, 


1,560 43 


Printing, 


107 40 


Town officers, 


600 00 


Eoads and bridges, 


2,770 32 


Repairs on Town buildings, 


510 24 


Miscellaneous, 


1,536 18 


Temporary loan. 


1,531 25 


State tax, 


1,340 00 


County tax, 


1,038 89 




± OjO o\J OtJ 


Balance due from Collector, 


1,592 10 


Amount due from Treasurer, 


830 85 




2,422 95 




^20,813 34 


Amounts due from Collector and Treas- 




urer, 


$2,422 95 


Less amount of 




Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee's note and 




interest, 


1,023 61 


Balance due the Town Feb. 26, 1890, 


1,399 34 



THOMAS F. NOYES, ) Selectmen 
HOWARD B. WHITE, j of Acton. 

Acton, February 26, 1890. 

We have examined the accounts of the Selectmen and find 
them correct. 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD, | Auditors of the 

DANIEL J. WETHERBEE, j Town of Acton. 



i8 



ANNUAL REPOKT 



Town Clerk's Report for the Year 1889. 



BIRTHS REGISTERED IN ACTON IN 1889. 

No. Date of Birth. 
1889. 

1. Jan. 6. Julia Elizabeth McCarthy, daughter of James L. 

and Margaret A. McCa^th3^ 

2. Jan. 26. Ernest H. Gray, son of Fred W. and Clara Gray. 

3. Jan. 27. Hazel Shackford Davis, daughter of Charles T. 

and Carrie Estella Davis. 

4. Jan. 31. Edward Milton Holton, son of Charles J. and 

Jennie A. Holton. 

5. Feb. 7. Carl Sherman Hoar, son of John S. and Minnie 

E;. Hoar. 

6. Feb. 17. Margaret Trainor, daughter of Peter and Mar- 

garet Trainor. 

7. Feb. 19. Elmer W. Lawrence, son of Austin E. and Mary 

J. Lawrence. 

8. Feb. 20. Henry Martin Jansen, son of Neils and Anna 

Jansen. 

9. Feb. 21. Georgie Belle Conant, daughter of George A. and 

•Mabel E. Conant. 

10. Feb. 22. Albert Clarence Wright, son of Olin L. and Mary 

J. Wright. 

11. Feb. 28. Harold Vernon Symonds, son of James A. and 

Flora C. Symonds. 

12. ^pr. 15. Mabel Lillian Teele, daughter of Frank A. and 

Mabel Teele. 

13. Apr. 21. Harold E-omaine Phalen, son of Edwin A. and 

Hattie D. Phalen. 



TOWN OF ACTON. I9 



14. Apr. 30. Helen Atherton Wood, daughter of Franklin P. 

and Abby 0. Wood. 

15. Apr. 30. Ealph Waldo Piper, son of Anson C. and Ellen 

L. Piper. 

16. May 20. Loraine Davidson, daughter of Norman A. and M. 

Alice Davidson. 

17. June 1. Mabel Newman Conant, daughter of George C. 

and Clara Belle Conant. 

18. June 4. Rex Harrison Taylor, son of Charles H. and 

Fannie Taylor. 

19. June 10. Flora Ida Lawrence, daughter of William H. and 

Ida L. Lawrence. 

20. June 12. Carrie May Bezanson, daughter of Daniel H. and 

Ida M. Bezanson. 

21. June 26. Maud Belle Palmer, daughter of Nathan R. and 

Abbie M. Palmer. 

22. July 28. 011a May Hartwell, daughter of William H. and 

Lora M. Hartwell. 

23. Aug. 2. William Henry Warren, son of William S. and 

Rose E. Warren. 

24. Aug 2. Agnes Bertha Wilson, daughter of John D. and 

Agnes M. Wilson. 

25. Aug. 12. Richard Eleroy Dart, son of Oswald L. and Cora 

A. Dart. 

26. Aug. 15. In Marlboro, George Andrews Wilson, son of 

George and Mary E. Wilson. 

27. Aug. 17. Helen Josephine Tuttle, daughter of JamesB. and 

Florence M. Tuttle. 

28. Oct. 25. Una Luella Smith, daughter of George A. and 

Alma W. Smith. 

29. Nov. 3. Sherburne Hutchins Heath, son of Frank and 

May Heath. 

30. Nov. 8. Mary Helena Moore, daughter of William J. and 

Mary A. Moore. 

31. Nov. 20. Chesleigh Errol Hutson, son of John W. and 

Eliza J. Hutson. 



20 ANNUAL REPORT 



32. Nov. 22. Gertrude Abbie Austin, daughter of Byron W. 

and Hattie Belle Austin. 

33. Dec. 19. Dennis Sullivan, son of Dennis D. and Annie M. 

Sullivan. 

1888. 
1. Apr. 7- Rachel Helen Martin, Stephen E. and Susan A. 
Martin. 



MARRIAGES RECORDED IN ACTON IN 1889. 

No. Date of 

Marriage. 

1889. 

1. Jan. 30. At Marlboro — George C. Conant and Clara B. 

Vidito, both of Acton. 

2. Feb. 21, At Acton — George Otis Penniman of Acton and 

Edith Pv. Peynolds of Maynard. 

3. Apr. 3. At Acton — George A. L. Gilchrist of Lunenburg 

and Mary L. Tuttle of Acton. 

4. Apr. 20. At Lowell — Albert Russell of Acton and Ida F. 

Esty of Londonderry, K. H. 

5. Apr. 30. At Concord — George McDougle and Bridget Mary 

Jackman, both of Acton. 

6. May 5. At Acton — John Stanley Rice and Ida Jose- 

phine Austin, both of Sudbury. 

7. May 12. At Acton— Joseph W. Godfrey and Mattie F. 

Randolph, both of Acton. 

8. May 25. At Concord, K H. — George A. Brown of Acton 

and Nettie L. Carr of Concord. 

9. July 8. At West Acton — Martin Elmer Clark and Hattie 

Ann Parks, both of Maynard. 

10. Sept. 8. At Acton — Seth McAlpin and Olivea Drury, both 

of Lowell. 

11. Sept. 18. At Concord — John F. Fitzgerald of Boston and 

Mary J. Hannon of Acton. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 21 



12. Oct. 19. At Acton — Clarence A. Austin and Angle Hayes, ' 

both of Sudbury. 

13. Nov. 16. At Acton — Adelbert F. Mead and Theodosia 

Bertha Wright, both of Acton. . 

14. Nov. 20. At Concord — William C. Mehegan and Mary E. j 

O'JSTeil, both of Acton. ^ i 

15. Nov. 21. At Acton — Eddie F. Conant and Mary Etta j 

Pickens, both of Acton. | 

16. Nov. 26. At Concord — Michael Foley and Joanna Reddy, • 

both of Acton. I 

17. Nov. 27. At Concord— John F. Coughlin, and Mary T. j 

Waldron, both of Acton. i 

18. Dec. 24. At Concord — James Williams of Acton and Sarah i 

L. Turner of Concord. \ 

'\ 
# j 





DEATHS RECORDED IN ACTON 


IN 


1889. 




No. 


Date of Death. Name of Deceased. 


Yrs. 


MOS. 


Dys. 




1889. 










1. 


Jan. 11. 


Daniel Harris, 


76 


8 


11 


2. 


Jan. 22. 


Charles H. Yarney, 


5^ 


9 


1 


3. 


Jan. 29. 


Olive W. Knowlton, wife of 












Amasa Knowlton, 


12 


— 


— 


4. 


Feb. 2. 


Mary A. Blan chard, 


21 


—r- 


— 


5. 


Feb. 5. 


Daniel McCarthy, 


63 





— 


6. 


Feb. 21. 


George E. Forbush, 


37 


10 


4 


7, 


Mar. 2. 


Joel Hobart Conant, 


75 


9 





8. 


Apr. 3. 


Thomas P. Owens, 


39 


— 





9. 


Apr. 9. 


Ernes t;;H. Gray, 


— 


2 


14 


10. 


Apr. 20. 


James H. Hannon, 


26 


5 


25 


11. 


Apr. 28. 


Ula Sibley, 


26 


8 


24 


12. 


May 2. 


Joseph W, Tuttle, 


84 





24 


13. 


May 8. 


Mary Hadley, 


77 


— 


— 


14. 


May 22. 


John W. Charter. 


71 


. 10 


15 


15. 


May 23. 


Franklin A. French, 


80 


9 


21 


16. 


May 29. 


Jonathan W. Loker, • 


49 


8 


8 



22 



ANNUAL REPORT 



17. 


May 30. 


Frederick Eouillarcl, 


18. 


June 9 . 


Mabel Armstrong, 


19. 


June 27. 


Arthur L. Cloud, 


20. 


June 28. 


Alfred W. Gardner, 


21. 


July 19. 


Olive Charlotte Duttou, 


22. 


July 27. 


Elmer W. Lawrence, 


23. 


Aug. 20. 


Joseph E-eed, 


24. 


Aug. 30. 


Cyrus Hay ward, 


25. 


Sept. 15. 


Minnie A. Brown, 


26. 


Sept. 30. 


Charles W. Parker, 


27. 


Oct. 8. 


Thomas Hutch ins. 


28. 


Oct. 26. 


Ithamar Eobbins, 


29. 


Nov. 1. 


Sarah A. White, 


30. 


Nov. 13. 


Charlotte Barnard, 


31. 


Dec. 2. 


Una Luella Smith, 


t 


Dec. 27. 


J^mes M. Hendley, 


NAMES OF PERSONS HAVING 






IN 1889. 



76 


10 


26 


41 

1 
52 


— 


— 


10 





77 


9 


, 8 


— 


5 


8 


06 


11 


— 


08 




5 


26 


11 


8 


50 




16 


92 




18 


73 




— 


50 


— 


— 


89 




— 


— 




7 


71 




17 



DOGS LICENSED 



l^ertie Hay ward, 

David Shapley. 

E. H. Phalen, 

Reuben Reed, 

A. Mead, 

E. Jones, 

Augustus Fletcher, 

George Gardner, 

William Davidson, 2, 

Mrs. George F. Flagg, 

Mrs. E. J. Blethen, 

Antoine Bulette, 

John C. Gates, 

R. B. Knowlton, 

George G. Keith, 

Mrs. Daniel Harris, 

A. L. Lawrence, 2, 1 female, Joshua Sawyer, 2, 



M. E. Taylor, 

Charles J. W^illiams, 

John Kelley, 

J. K. W. Wetherbee-, 

John Y. Tucker, 

F. E. Wetherbee, 

Tuttle, Jones & Weth, 2, 

Dana F. Haywood, 

A. Knowlton, 

John Fletcher, 

A. W. Gardner, 

F. P. Brooks, 

0. H. Forbush, 

Daniel H. Farrar, 

Sylvester Haynes, 

E. E. Fletcher, 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



23 



A. C. Handley, 
William H. Philbrick, 

E. J. Eobbins, 
Albert Moullon, 

C. S. Simonds, female, 
Joseph E. Bassett, 
G. H. S. Houghton, 
Isaiah S. Leach, 
George C. Conaiit, female, 

F. E. Peniiiman, 
John Temple, 
C. J. Fletcher, 
William B. Davis, 
Charles H. Holton, 
M. Kerrigan, 
Fred Eouillard, 
Daniel Tuttle, 
Mrs. Eliza Cole, 
Thomas J. Sawyer, female, 
Luther Conant, 

C. J. Holton, 

Charles Morris, 

George T. Knowlton, 

George Conant, 

M. H. Worden, 

C. B. Stone, 

Isaac Barker, 

A. Eisso, 2, 1 female, 

W. F. Stevans, 

L. V. Olough, 

John McCarthy, 

E. G. Kraetzer, 

Charles Wheeler, female, 

Charles H. Wheeler, 

A. L. Noyes, 

AV. C. Eobbins, 2, 

W. H. Teele, 

S. A. Eobbins, 



Fred W. Gray, 
Thomas Mannion, 

E. H. Davis, 
Henry Hanson, 
Anson C. Piper, 
Willie S. Fletcher, 
A. F. Sargent, 

J. H. Standish, 
Daniel J. Wetherbee, 

C. B. Sanders, 2, 
Samuel Jones, Jr., 
Willis L. Mead, 

T. Sullivan, 
I. S. Ford, 
George W. Tuttle, 
Herman Chaplin, 
L. W. Pratt, 
A. L. Tuttle, 
J. D. Coburn, 
T. McCarty, 
George E. K'eyes, 
J. E. Houghton, 
W. A. Gilmore, 
H. Littlefield, 
Herbert Pratt, 2, 
A. A. Wyman, 
Mrs. E. Stone, 
A. G. Smith, 

D. C. Harris, 

O. A. Knowlton, 
C. B. Eobbins, 2, 
Isaac W. Flagg, 

F. E. Knowlton, 
Edward Willis, 
Moses Taylor, 
F. W. Green, 

F. G. Jones, 
W. O'Neil, 



24 


ANNUAL REPORT 




C. H. Taylor, 




G. T. Barstow, 




E. S. Whitcomb, 




0. H. ThomspoD, 




J. L. McCarth}^, 




J. C. Wheeler, female. 




W. H. Jones, ' 




Henry Brooks, 




E. B, Forbiish, 




Jerry McCarthy, 




Ralph Crooker, 




N. R. Palmer, 




N. Littlefield, 




G. A. Conant, 




A. P. Wood, 




William Moore, 




E. Pratt, 




Henry Willard, 


\ 


George H. Smith, 




E. H. Jones, 




W. S. Jones, 




John W. Clark, 




M. A. Reed, 




L. E. Reed, 




Thomas Calder, 




Henry Haynes, 






N. A. 


Davidson. 




Males, 138, at ^2.00 each, 




$276 00 -i 


Females, 8, at $5.00 each, 




40 00 j 



Total amount received, $316 00 

WILLIAM D. TUTTLE, Town Clerk, 



TOWN OF ACTON. 25 



Report of Receipts and Expenditures at the 
Almshouse in Acton, 

For the Year Ending February 28, 1890. 



ARTICLES ON HAND FEBRUARY 28, 1890. 

7 tons of hay, 

2 1-2 tons of oat fodder, 

Gluten meal, 

Indian meal, 

Salt, 

Wagon, 

Horse rake, 

Mowing machine, 

Empty barrels, 

Plow, 

Horse hoe, 

12 cows, 

1 horse, 

50 hens, 

20 cords wood, 

15 bushels potatoes, 

200 pounds of salt pork, 

1 barrel apples. 

Canned fruit, 

Pickles, 

Crakers, 

Flour, 

Tea, 

Coffee, 

Eggs, 

Spices, 



$119 00 


25 


00 


13 


12 


2 


00 


1 


00 


70 


00 


20 


00 


20 


00 


27 


20 


8 


00 


5 


00 


504 00 


150 


00 


25 


00 


80 00 


10 


50 


20 00 


3 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 




70 


3 


00 


1 


S^ 




32 




60 




50 



26 ANNUAL REPOKT 



Lard, ^11 00 

Butter, 1 00 

Molasses, 50 

Beef, oO 

Lumber, 4 00 

Coal, 10 00 

$1,139 79 



RECEIPTS FROM' TOWN FARM FROM MARCH i, 1889, 
TO MARCH I, 1890. 

Received for apples, $190 74 

Milk, 997 56 

Calves, 15 25 

Cow, 3 00 

Poultry, 12 97 

Labor, 1 50 

Potatoes, 35 00 

Eggs, 28 41 







$1,284 43 


EXPENDITURES AT 


TOWN 


FARM FOR THE YEAR 


ENDING 


FEBRUARY 28, 1890. 


Axe, 




$1 00 


Ammonia, 




15 


Brushes, 




2 15 


Book, 




25 


Brooms, 




55 


Beans, 




8 39 


Blacksmith bill. 




4 07 


Butter, 




38 09 


Barrels, 




37 81 


Boots and shoes. 




9 75 


Beef, pork and sausages. 




. 101 83 


Curry comb. 




18 


Coffee, 




4 18 



TOWN OF ACTON. 






^"j 


Clothes pins, 


$ 


09 




Chimneys, 




94 




Coal and himber, 


30 


54 




Chalk, 




08 




Car fare for Mr. Johnson, 




32 




Crackers, 


38 


45 




Cream tartar, 




76 




Crockery, 




56 




Cloth and clothing, 


37 55 




Cocoa, 




25 




Curtains, 




70 




Cows, 


76 


50 




Cheese, 


2 


22 




Egg food, 




25 




Extract, 




70 




Farming tools, 


7 


30 




Eertilizer, 


16 


10 




Flour,'! 


34 


96 




Fly paper and trap, 




32 




Fish, 


8 


83 




Garden and grass seeds, 


12 


15 




Glass, 


1 


30 




Grain, 


486 88 




Glue, 




52 




Hay knife. 


1 


00 




House paper and border, 


7 


20 




Hardware, 


17 


07 




Insect powder, 




42 




Jars, tops and rubbers, 




33 




Jar, 




30 




Kerosene oil, 


2 


20 




Lard, 


2 


52 




Lemons, 




57 




Lime and cement, 


1 


55 




L. U. Holt's bill, 


12 


88 




Mustard, 




20 




Matches, 




18 




Molasses, 


11 


50 





28 ANNUAL REPOKT 



Mirror, 


$ 1 


25 




Medicine. 


2 


51 




Mowing machine extras, 


4 


75 




Nitre, 




25 




Paint and oil, 


8 


32 




Potatoes, 


12 


54 




Powder and fuse, 




27 




Poison, 




20 




Paris green. 


1 


50 




Pigs, 


17 


00 




Pasturing cows, 


21 


00 




Kice, 




40 




Paisins, 


1 


51 




Pope, 




53 




Repairing harness, 


5 


95 




Pepairing shoes. 




80 




Salt, 


/) 


00 




Soap, 


4 


37 




Starch, 




60 




Spices, 




66 




Stove polish, 




42 




Scraps, 


3 


00 




Scythe stone, 




40 


1 


Scythe snathe, 




50 




Saleratus, 




56 




Sawing lumber, 




32 


l 


Sugar, 


33 


54 




Services of H. C. Scarlet and wife, 


450 


00 


■ 


E. H. Cutler, 




50 


i 


L. C. Taylor, 




20 


• 


A. C. Handley, 


2 


50 




Tea, 


7 


49 




Tobacco, 




53 




Tinware, 




95 


■■ 


Use of bull, 


4 00 





TOWN OF ACTON. 29 



Vinegar, 
Yeast, 

Expenditures, 
Eeceipts, 

Income less than expense, 

Due from treasury to balance account, 

Interest on farm. 



Vitualing and lodging 179 tramps, 

Cost of supporting poor at farm, $574 76 

Whole number of persons, exclusive of tramps, supported at 
almshouse, 6 ; average number, 5 1-2 ; present number, 5. 

E, H. CUTLEB, ) Overseers 
L. C. TAYLOE, >■ of 
A. C. HAKDLEY, ) Poor. 

We have examined the above accounts of the Overseers of 
Poor, and find them correct. 

D. JAMES WETHEEBEE. ) , ... 
HIEAM A. HAPGOOD, ^ ^uf^^^ors. 



$1 


16 






1 


42 










fl,690 


70 








$1,690 


79 






1,284 


43 


$406 








36 






406 


36 






240 


00 




$646 


36 






71 


60 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

For the School Year 1889-90. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 



IN BEHALF OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the Town of Acton : 

Items of regret and congratulation press upon our notice 
at the passage of another year. 

Reghet No. 1. 

The loss of experienced and successful teachers in six of 
the ten schools in town during one year is a matter of serious 
disappointment. 

Their promotion to other and more responsible trusts im- 
plies for our comfort that we have been having for years good 
teacliers, worthy of our contidence and able to command 
wages and appreciation beyond oui' range. 

We thank them cordially for what tliey have done for us. 
We wish them success in striving to do for other communi- 
ties a like service, possibly one broader and more influential 
for good. 

By prompt action of local committees and the Board, these 
vacancies have been fllled. All the schools at present date 
are in charge of competent teachers, whose culture and 
promise of success warrant high hopes for the luture. 

Let these teachers continue to have the full co-operation 
of parents and the public, and the best results may be cred- 
ited before hand on the right side of the account. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 33 



Regret No. 2. 

The unanimous voice of the teachers and scholars was 
promptly expressed in season to forestall the intrusion of 
" La Grippe " on the school grounds. 

The doors wei"e locked, the bars were up and " '}io admit- 
tance'^ posted on all the avenues, but she stole a march in 
the night and had full possession in the morning without 
even a "please sir." 

She was treated gracefully. What else could be done ■ 
Her departure to other climes was however hastened. She 
took the hint and was soon oft* for a better chance elsewhere. 
The marks for absence spoiled the looks of the registers for 
a few days, but they soon resumed their wonted aspect. 

None of the scholars in town have been starred ; contagious 
and fatal diseases have kept away. 

Let this exemption be counted on the congratulation 
column, and thank God for the item. 
Regret No. 3. 

Here and there through the town is found a parent who 
seems to depreciate the privileges so gratuitously offered to 
his children, and permits trivial causes to hinder the full 
benefit. 

The rooms are warmed and swept. The teachers are there 
on time, and in full rig for a day's work: The books and 
equipments for the best methods are furnished, but where is 
the pupil who most needs the hints of the faithful teacher 
and the inspiration of the school drill ? Absent. He prom- 
ises to be present the next day, but when the roll is called, 
absent again is the response. 

Wednesday he comes. Has he Ids lesson ? Put a few 
leading questions on the days lessons and his blushing face 
and stammering tongue tell the story of Monday and Tues- 
day. He has been off duty. The jury so verdict him. The 
court pronounces the verdict just, and the sentence goes 
upon the record for its execution in after years. 



34 ANNUAL REPORT 



Mark this I The officer will be at his post in that appointed 
future and see that the sentence does not miss its victim. 

That there should be one such case in town to the discredit 
of parent or pupil is a cause for painful regret. 

Regret is an easy word to use in the circumstances. The 
fiery word seems more befitting the case, but that word shall 
be waved for one more trial. 

On the opposite column put these items : 

Most scholars do not do so. 

Most parents do not do so. 

Most of the register's mai'ks are ^^ preaenf.''^ 

Most of the hours liy richly laden with studious habits and 
golden freight. 

The idlers are the exception, thanks to loving parents and 
faithful children. 

Regret No. 4. 

In taking a rapid general retrospect of the year's impression 
in the school room, this lingers in the mind. 

They do not read as well as they oiujht to. What is the mat- 
ter ? Do they not pronounce the words cori'ectly ? Yes, as 
a rule,|remarkably well. They voice their words so as to be 
heard? Yes, that is not the line of grievance. They stand 
erect, hold their books so you can see their faces and start off 
on time ? Yes, tliey do that fairly well. But here is the 
trouble : 

There is a lack of proper personal conception and expres- 
sion of what is read. 

The inflections do not vary with the shifting sentiments. 

There is a halt where there should be a quickened step. 

There is a low tone where the tone should be intensified. 

There are more commas than those printed in the book, 
and the author probably knew best how many to put in. 

Naturalness. This grace in reading is more often found in 
the Primary department than in the higher grades. 

What is the reason ? Let not our older scholars lose their 
freedom as they advance up the grades of scholarship. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 35 



One good sentence properly studied, and properly expressed 
is worth pages of unappreciated and unexpressed repetition. 

Items in the opposite column on the credit side. 

There are a goodly number of lively, expressive, natural 
readers scattered through the town, and they will be heard 
from in the coming days, unless they lose their first love, and 
falling back join the ordinaries. 

Bashfulness. Don't mention it. Be brave and act out 
yourselves, if the ordinaries do laugh at you. 

The laugh will change sides if you can wait long enough. 

Regret No. 5. 

Outward influences often lead an earnest teacher to raise 
the question whether he shall not relinquish his trust. Other 
occupations allure his ambitious eye, and the tempter asks 
why not indulge ? He pictures to his view the quietness and 
leisure of the home, tlie farm or the shop, and asks why may 
I not enjoy this luxury of repose ? 

Why subject myself to this constant fret and criticism of 
methods and results ? Let the jaded mind wait for the 
calmer hour before decision. 

The fate of culture hangs on the delay. The teacher if he 
will hold his place may catch an inspiration from pupils here 
and there crossing his path which shall take him above the 
drudgery of his profession to the celestial heights. 

The accumulation of knowledge is largely dependent upon 
incidental circumstances. These are furnished by the de- 
mands of the school room 

Questions are suddenly pressed upon the teacher's notice, 
which lead to investigations in new and rich fields of scienti- 
fic inquiry, literary culture or historic lore. 

All that is required in many minds is that some eager 
pupil propound a question involving difficulty, and an effort 
is made to meet that difficulty. 

Time is taken for researches which otherwise would not be 
thought of, or if thought of attempted. 



36 ANNUAL REPORT 



A scholar asks yoa to bound British America. This is 
one of the familiar questions of your early school days, but 
when proposed to you iu later life by a scholar doubting your 
ability to give a correct answer, British America means some- 
thing new to you. You resolve to know more about it ; you 
will be able to define not merely its political boundaries but 
its peculiar physical organization, its capacities of mineral or 
agricultural wealth, its commercial relations now existing 
and in prospect, its extent in comparison with your own 
country, its importance as a friendly allied power in time of 
peace, its resources of military annoyance and aggression in 
war, and the next opportunity given to you by the ambitious 
scholar will be improved in pouring this acquired knowledge 
upon his astonished and gratified ear. 

Vou do not like the study of language but a scholar differ- 
ently constituted from yourself, whose culture in this direc- 
tion has far out run your own, comes to you with the spark- 
ling eye of a new interest, and tells you what he has learned 
about a given word, how it has come to be adopted into your 
own mother tongue, what it means in the original language 
from which it is derived, how it came to have that meaning 
in some distant period of a by-gone-age, how it has fought its 
way to position in plulological contests of the best scholars, 
liow it has soothed the aching heart in moments of sorrow; 
how it has fired the patriot when lifting the arm for his 
country's defence ; how it has affiiliations binding together 
different tongues in the past, and ranging out in still wider 
circles in the near and distant future. You silently condemn 
yourself for your ignorance and indifference. 

You ask why may not I have a share in this strange charm 
of linquestic inquiry, and you begin to know something 
which you did not know before ; to love something which 
you did not suppose worthy of that love, and this love im- 



TOWN OF ACTON. 37 



pels you to efforts which bring you large returns of knowl- 
edge. 

If one wishes to have a fact of science, or liistory, or lan- 
guage established in his memory, let him be compelled by his 
position to memorize, explain, and illustrate the fact to a 
class of intelligent pupils; facts which but for this collision 
would escape notice and become imbedded in the mind. 

If you have travelled with scholars in geography among 
the mountains of Asia, these mountains become a fixture in 
your mental vision. The map of Asia is suggestive of old 
familiar scenes which you have visited in loved companion- 
ship. The boundaries of states and nations are remembered 
because you have established their limits with scholars whose 
faces you cannot forget. You have heard them give those 
boundaries with tones that still linger in your ears. Mistakes 
which were at the time laughable which set the whole room 
in an uproar and gave you not a little irritation, may be the 
very circumstances which sliall make sure your knowledge of 
the facts in debate. 

What is especially desirable in a teacher is a glow for 
knowledge for its own sake. This will have a contagious 
effect upon himself and his surroundings. 

If he is born this may so much the better, but if he is not 
so born, he may have a neiv birth, which shall seem almost 
like nature's first start. 

Prof. Stuart of Andover, the great enthusiast, in the study 
of language, had a habit of projecting his tongue when he 
had suddenly struck upon some new meaning of an old 
Hebrew root, dry as the dry rot to most minds. It was an 
unclassical position for the tongue. That could not be helped 
The discovery was a nugget of gold to him. His face was 
an inspiration to all in his presence. 

They might go to the ends of the globe in after years, but 
the professor's tongue would travel with them to the banks 
of the Ganges, and give them nerve to search for tlie mysteries 
of a new language to be learned. 



38 ANNUAL REPOET 



One loved teacher m mathematics was so absorbed with 
the beanty of a demonstration in geometry that he would rub 
his hands together with an unction which thrilled the entire 
class with a love for the study. 

The highest conceivable satisfaction after all, which any 
one can have in any sphere of life, in time oi- beyond time, is 
the consciousness that he is dohui his duty, and that the In- 
finite One is looking complacently upon his work, and is 
reall}^ saying with each earnest blow for the right, '' Well 
done good and faithful servant." 

No afHuence of fortune, no heights of position, no compli- 
ments of friends, no gratitications of taste can be a substitute 
for tliis. This the teacher may have as the perennial solace 
of his life, and as the one light that shall cheer the dark pas- 
sage to another and better world. 



THE TEACHERS' INSTITrTE. 

The record of the school year would be defective without 
a reference to the Teachers' institute, at South Acton, 
Friday, December 13. 

Tlie towns represented by Committees and Teachers were 
Concord, Acton, Maynard, Carlisle, Sudbur}-, Stowe, Box- 
boro, Littleton. These numbered 75. They were furnished 
with a bountiful collation at noon, arranged b}' the ladies, in 
the Universalist vestry, which was duly appreciated by the 
guests. The exercises w^ere held in the High School room, 
which was filled with an audience intensely interested in the 
programme, provided by the State Board of Education. It 
consisted of an address by Secretarj^ Dickinson upon the 
principles of teaching. Superintendent Aldrich of Putney, 
Mass., on teaching arithmetic; Arthur C. Bo^'den of the 
Bridgewater Normal School, on Physiology; Superintendent 



TOWN OF ACTON. 39 



E. H. Davis of Chelsea, a native of Acton, on Primary read- 
ing ; Henry T. Bailey, State Agent, npon drawing. 

Agent Walton spoke of the absorbing interest with which 
the exercises of the Institute had been received, and thanked 
the people for their generous hospitality. He referred to the 
Institute as being in all particulars one of the most satisfac- 
tory ever held in the State. His warm words of gratification 
were fully responded to by the audience and the authorities 
of the town. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

The graduating exercises, Friday, June 28, in the Town 
Hall, showed an unabated interest in the school. The hall 
was crowded. The exercises were well received, and the 
occasion one to be remembered. 

r BO GRAMME. 

Class Motto:—'' HOPE LIGHTENS LABOBf' 



MUSIC. 

Prayer, ._..__. Rev. Mr. Heath 

Salutatory, - _ _ . . Lillian F. Richardson 

Essay, -__-... Albert J. Reed 

"A Glimpse of the Capital." 

MUSIC. 

Essay, -.._._ Effie V. Littlefield 

" Have We Found It .-^ " 

Essay, ------- Carlos B. Clark 

" Sources of Light." 

MUSIC. 

Essay, - - - - - - - Viola A. Preston 

'* Sculptors of Life are We." 

Essay, - - - - - - Henry L. Livermore 

" Our Navy." 

music. 

Essay, - - . . _ Alberta V. Littlefield 

" The Legend of Magog." 



40 ANNUAL KEPOKT 



Essay, - - - - - _ Lillian F. Richardson 

" Weaving." 

MUSIC. 

Essay, ---__. Hattie E. Tuttle 

" Spring and Summer Voices " 

Prophecy, - - - - . _ - Albert J. Reed 

MUSIC. 

Valedictory, - - - - • - - Carlos B. Clark 

Presentation of Diplomas. 

MUSIC. 

Three years' couise of the High School, subject to changes 
which may hereafter be made, according to tlie judgment of 
the Committee and the light of experience. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Arithmetic and Bo6k-keei)ing, alternating. 

English Grammar and Composition. General 

History. 
Second Term. — Arithmetic and Hook-keeping, alternating. 

Englisl] Grammar and Com})osition. General 

History. 
Third Ternj. — Arithmetic and Book-keeping, alternating. 

Rhetoric begun. Botany. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — Algebra begun. Rhetoric continued. Phy- 
siology. 

Second Term. — Algebra continued. English Literatine be- 
p'un. Physics beoun. 

Third Term. — Geometry begun. Physics continued. Eng- 
lish Literatuie continued. 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Geometry continued. Latin begun, Chemistiy 

begun. 
Second Term. — Physical Geography. Latin continued. 

Chemistry continued. 
Third Term. — Civil Government. Latin. Geology. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



Four recitations in each branch per week, Wednesday, 
with a different programme, including compositions, reading, 
spelling, drawing, and other miscellaneous recitations as shall 
be deemed the most important at the time. 

The monthly written test in this school, and in all the 
schools, is considered the fairest and surest proof of the real 
progress made. If properly considered, it reveals the weak 
or strong points of scholarship. These are considered in 
silence, and each pupil must depend upon his own independ- 
ent resources, unembai'assed by the interference of school- 
mates, committee, or the public. 

Each pupil having the same questions, the result deter- 
mines the absolute and relative standing. 

For the sake of public inspection the doors are open to vis- 
itors at any time which ihay suit their convenience. More 
frequent visits by parents and friends are welcome. 

New impressions may thus be I'eceived and wrong impres- 
sions corrected, and a better understanding be established 
between all the parties concerned in the education of the 
schools. 

The whole number of pupils in the High School for the 
year was 34. 

Number of pupils over 15 years of age, . . . 21 
Number of pupils under 15 years of age, ... 13 
Total average membership, ..... 30.83 

Total average attendance, . . . . . 28.16 

Per cent, of attendance, ...... 91.34 

Number of applicants in the written examination in June, 20 
Number admitted entitled to certificates, ... 10 

Mr. Armstrong, the Principal, has been doing valiant ser- 
vice, and the apparent interest in the school on the part of 
those attending has never been surpassed. 

Order, discipline and studious habits have been steadily 
rising. 

A severe domestic blow fell upon himself and family in the 
sickness of his loved companion early in the year. 



42 ANNUAL REPOKT 



He has encouDtered this heavy draft upon his powers with 
an equanimity which has ensured the equipoise of the school 
and the grand results of the year. 



THE CENTRE SCHOOL. 

Gramviar Department — Summer and Fall Terms. 
Miss Fannie L- Perry, - - - Teacher. 

The school was fortunate in again retaining the services of 
Miss Perry during two terms of the year. 

At the close of the Fall term she tendered her resignation, 
to accept of a position nearer home. Slie was the recipient 
of a pleasing token of appreciation from her scholars at the 
close of her work, and left the scene of her labors with the 
assured benedictions of pupils, parents, committee, and the 
public. Her impress is upon all who have had the benefit of 
her instructions, nor will it be effaced as the years roll hy. 

Winter Term. 

The first part of the Winter session was in charge of Miss 
Viola S. Tuttle, who has had the steerage of that lively com- 
pany of South Primaries for so long a time. They were sony 
to have her go, and we were sorry to have her leave, but the 
circumstances beyond control pointed that way. She evi- 
dently felt the embarassment of the change, but entered upon 
her work in an earnest, faithful style. She was beginning to 
feel quite at home in the higher grade. The scholars came 
to understand her methods, and were working toward a 
harmonious result, when her own health and that of her 
mother, required a dismissal of the care. 

Another break became necessary for a week and two days, 
when Miss Ida J. Bishop of North Acton, went into the 
school as a substitute for Miss Tuttle. 

Teache.r and pupils soon affiliated and lost time has been 
made up, so that the term of thirteen weeks has been suc- 
cessfully completed with less damage than could be antici- 
pated. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 43 



Center Primary Department — Spring Term. 

Miss Blanche E. Henshaw continued in charge of this 

school with increasing satisfaction during the term, but late 

in the summer vacation receiving a call to go elsewhere to a 

^ position more remunerative and responsible, tendered her 

resignation much to the regret of her scholars and committee 



CENTER PRIMARY. 

Fall Term. 
Miss Alice M. Mackintosh, - - Teacher. 

Miss Mackintosh was from Needham, a graduate of Need- 
ham High School and the Framingham Normal School. This 
was her first trial in teaching, and she entered upon her 
duties, little appreciating the difficulties of the position. She 
was zealous and faithful. Her methods were good, and with 
more experience and in other circumstances, she may win 
unqualified testimonials. She left with the best wishes of all 
for her future success. 



CENTER PRIMARY, 

Winter Term, 
Miss Sarah E. Hammond, - - Teacher. 

Miss Hammond is a graduate of Harvard Academy. She 
has had successful experience as teacher in Harvard and 
Pepperell. The Primaries have fallen into her line of 
methods, have had a good winters term, and are in the way 
to go on pleasantly and steadily in the future. 

There have been changes, quite sufficient for one year. 
Let teacher and pupils combine for the best and happiest 
work. 



THE NORTH SCHOOL, 
Miss Jessie F. Jones, - - Teacher. 

There has been no change of teacher in this school, except 
for a few days, when Miss Jones being sick with '' La-Grippe" 
Miss Ida J. Bishop acted as substitute. 



44 ANNUAL REPORT 



Miss Jones returned to her care in season to close the 
thirteenth week's term for the winter. There has been stead}^ 
improvement in all directions during the year. 

The teacher has shown great fidelity to her trust, and has 
been unsparing of time and strength in working up the school 
to its present satisfactory condition. 

There has been thoroughness in the mode of instruction in 
all branches, which it is always a pleasure to witness. 

The recitations in language and grammar have been es- 
pecially marked with thought. If all questions have not 
been answered correctly, the answers have been given in a 
way to prove study and sure advancement. The order has 
been excellent and reached with mutual good understanding 
between teacher and ]ni[)ils. 



THE EAST SCHOOL. 
Miss Susie E. Wetherbee, - - Teacher. 

This school has had a full j^ear of continuous peace and 
progress, in charge of the same experienced teacher, as re- 
ported in former years. Promptness, studiousness, showing 
gratifying interest in the studies, accommodation to the 
teacher's plan, order, vivacity, naturalness, are the features 
of the school which strike the eye whenever visited. 

The public half day at the close of the winter term, was 
furnished with a programme, which was executed with won- 
derful celerity and satisfaction. The local committee man 
had been especially unfortunate in his arrangements for the 
weather, a stubborn cold northeast snow storm, the worst of 
the season, in full blast during the session. There was com- 
fort, good cheer and pluck in doors all the same. 

There was an encouraging attendance of ladies present, 
notwithstanding the storm. Nor were tliey silent witnesses 
of the scene, but added words of commendation, which fell 
graciously on the ears of the boys. They are mostly boys in 
this school. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 45 



SOUTH EAST SCHOOL. 

Spring Term, 
Miss Laura A. Browk, - - - Teacher. 

The characteristics of this school noticed in previous re- 
ports remained during the closing term of Miss Brown's 
teaching. She was devoted to the personal welfare of her 
charge, and ready to lend a helping hand when and where 
most needed. Good wishes of pupils, parents and committee 
will follow her in her future life. Not soon can her long 
continued and faithful exertions be forgotten. 
Fall and Winter Terms. 
Miss Hattie E. Tuttle, - - Teacher. 

Miss Tuttle was a graduate of the Acton High School, and 
without experience as a teacher took the school with a'deter- 
mination to succeed, and the success which slie resolved upon 
has happily come. She has shown aptitude to teach, force in 
discipline, and thc«/roughness in methods, and the school has 
gone on prosperously under her charge. 

" La-Grippe " came as an unwelcome intruder in the last 
part of the winter ternj, and Miss Tuttle was seriously ill 
for a few days, but will complete the thirteenth week of the 
winter term at the close of this week. 



SOUTH SCHOOL. 

Grammar Department. 

Miss Clara A. Johnson, - - Teacher. 

Miss Johnson is a graduate of the Farmington Normal 

School, Maine, has large and successful experience as a teacher, 

and came to her work wfth flattering testimonials. 

The expectations which preceded the beginning of her 
work in Acton have been fully met. The school has been 
especially favored by her dignified, thorough, earnest devo- 
tion the duties of the school room. She has sought to 
modestly, yet zealously, and impartially, to reach substan- 



ANNUAL REPORT 



tial culture and lasting results. The scholars and the public ] 
have come to understand her methods and motives, and have ; 
joined with her in reaching the consumatiou of the year. ' 

The large and gratified company present on the last public ; 
day were of one mind in the expression of approval. 



PRIMARY SCHOOL. 

Spring and Fall Terms. 
Miss Viola S. Tuttle, - - - Teacher. 

The school was again favored with the efforts of Miss 
Tuttle during these two terms. They were marked with tlie 
same earnest, judicions, and experienced qualities which have 
been recorded heretofoie. Though at times her strength has 
faltered, yet no physical faltering lias lessened the ardor of 
lier ideal for the future of the school. 

But for circumstauces beyojid her control she would have 
I'emained at her post, lepeating and improving upon lierself. 
WINTER TERM, 
Miss Hadessa L. Sharp, - - Teacher. 

Miss Sharp had had large experience in teaching, and good 
Noriual and Higli School training in preparation for her 
work. She came among us a stranger, and encountered 
many embarassments and discouragements at the beginning of 
her work. 

These she met with good perseverance, and finally 
worked up to a grade of order and interest among the scholars 
and to a better understauding among the parents, which pre- 
pared the way for the pleasant surprise of all at the closing 
exercises. 

These were especially meritorious and deserved the praise 
which was so cordially expressed. There was a wide-awake 
and intelligent command of bod}^ and mind on the part of the 
youthful competitoi's, which made us older ones to wish for 
a moment that we were young once more and could have, just 
for a day, the gush of the April morning. 



TOW^ OF ACTON. 47 



THE WEST SCHOOL. 

Gramma7' Department. 

Miss Nellie A. Hanson, - - Teacher. 

Spring and Fall Terms. 

This scliool enjoyed the contiiiiied iiistriictioiis during the 

Spring and Fall Terms, and the lirst week of the Winter 

Term of their former teacher, Miss Hanson. 

Never were her methods or results more satisfactory, and 
great regret was expressed that the attractions beyond our 
control should lead her to part company with her Acton 
charge for that of any other locality ; but so it came to pass. 
Vale ! Vale ! But God speed just the same if better services 
and destinies betide her elsewhere. We will not be too selfish 
in these matters of vicissitude and disappointment. 
WINTER TERM. 
Miss Alice J. Hoar, - - - Teacher. 

Miss Hoar was a graduate of the Acton High School, and 
this was he first experience in teaching. 

She has made a good beginning, in circumstances especially 
embarassing. She has scholarship traits of mind and heart, 
wliich with the co-operation of pupils and })arents ought to com- 
mand satisfaction and success in the future. Let her have the 
full benefit of the chance, and time to work out results, to the 
gratification of all concerned. 



PRIMARY SCHOOL. 

Sprmg and Fall Terms. 
Mess C. Lettie, Newton, - - Teacher. 

She kept on doing just as she had been doing for so many 
years, in charge of these primaries, pleasing all, improving 
steadily as the years wore on, when suddenly the scene 
changed and she was among the absent worthies of the past 
in the Acton roll of teachers. 

The good work she has done cannot be undone, even 
though she has taken her departure. The primaries have sub- 



48 ANNUAL KEPOKT 



mittecl to the change with good grace, and are trying to go 
on in the line of progress. They wish for her success in her 
new efforts elsewhere, not forgetting the good start which 
her labors have given to themselves here. 
WINTER TERM. 
Mrs. Harriet H. Gardner, . - Teacher. 

Mrs. Gardner began her care of this school in the latter 
])art of the Fall Term, and continued through the Winter 
Term, 

She had taught school in town with success in previous 
yeais, and a return to the teacher's position, under tlie cir- 
cumstances, was quite congenial to her tastes. 

She has ordei-, kindness, originality and enthusiasm in tlie 
school room, which promise the best results among the 
youthful company. The West Primaries catch the first 
dawn of light in the morning, and guage the weather bulletiu 
at a glance, and they ore fortunate, .vo they think if they can- 
not have Miss Newton they can have Mrs. Gardner, and so 
go on their way with trippiiig step. 

Respectfully submitted after adoption by Committee, 

JAMES F].ETCHER, Svpemitendent. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



48 



TABULAR STATEMENT FOR 1889-90. 







7-1 


CO 


P. 






















^ 


^ 


CD 



S 


Ul 






^ 


X SCHOOLS. 


TEACHEKS. 


c 
m 

C 

4J 

bJD 


c 

CD 


> 


Av. attendan 


53 


a; 


Cb 
CD 




OS 
a; 
>^ 


34 


CD 

a; 
> 


21 


GC 

a; 

(X) 

CD 


Acton High 


A. W. Armstrong, 


36 


34 


30.83 


28.16 


91.24 


13 


Center 
Grammar, 


Fannie L. Perrv, 




















Viola S.Tuttle, 


86 


20 


18.0 


16.93 


91.57 





20 


1 


19 


Ida I. Bishop, 




















Center 
Primary, 


Blanche E. Henshaw 




















Alice Mackintosh, 


86 


23 


16.45 


13.98 


m 





23 





7 


Sarah E. Hammond, 




















S. Gram mar 


Clara A. Johnson, 


36 


34 


26.25 


23.8 


90.88 





34 


1 


21 


S. Primary, 


Viola S. Tuttle, 
Hadessa L. Sharp, 


36 


43 


38.75 


33.07 


85.30 





43 





18 


West 
Grammar, 


Nellie A. Hanson, 
Alice J. Hoar, 


36 


34 


31.96 


30.78 


96.30 





34 


2 


33 


West 

Primary, 


Lettie C. Newton, 
Harriet H. Gardner, 


36 


46 


43.44 


39. 


90. 


1 


45 





24 


North, 


Jessie F. Jones, 


36 


27 


22.22 


20.18 


90.82 





27 





20 


East, 


Susan E. Wetherbee, 


36 


25 


23 


20.21 


88. 





25 


1 


15 


Southeast, 


Laura A. Brown, 
Hattie L. Tuttle, 


36 


15 


15 


13.8 


29. 





15 


1 


13 



Number between 5 and 15 years, as reported by the Assessors 
for the year 1889, 267. 



50 ANNUAL REPORT 



TOWN WARRANT. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Middlesex ss. 

To either of the Conntahles of the Town of Acton hi the County 

of Middlesex^ Greeting :■■ — 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you 
are directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town 
of Acton qualified to vote in elections and Town affairs, to 
assemble in the Town Hall, in said Town, on Monday, the 
seventh day of April, A. D. 1890, at one o'clock in the after- 
noon, then and there to act upon the following articles as they 
may think proper, viz. : 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside in said 
meeting. 

Akt. 2. To fill all vacancies in the list of Town officers 
and committees. 

Art. 3. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for the support of schools, and for school supplies for 
the present year, and do or act anything thereon. 

Art. 4. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise to repair the roads the present year, and do or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Art. 5. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate six 
hundred dollars, to be divided equally between the Centre, 
South and West villages, to be expended under the direction 



TOWN OF ACTON. £^I 



of the Selectmen in building cement sidewalks in said vil- 
lages daring the months of June or July next, or do or act 
anything thereon. 

Art. 6. To see if the Town will re-shingle the school 
house at South Acton. 

Art. 7. To see if the Town will purchase camp-chairs for 
the Town hall. 

Art. 8. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a 
sum of money for the purpose of defraying the expenses of 
the dedication of the Memorial hall and Library building, or 
do or act anything thereon. 

Art. 9. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a 
sum of money for the maintenance of the Memorial hall and 
Library, or do or act anything thereon. 

Art. 10. To see if the Town will appropriate one hun- 
dred and fifty dollars for the due observance of Memorial day, 
or do or act anything thereon. 

Art. 11. To see if the Town will vote to have the As- 
sessors' valuation for the current year printed, or do or act 
anything thereon. 

Art. 12. To see what amount the Town will raise to de- 
fray Town charges for the present year, or do or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Art. 13. To see if the Town will choose a Superintend- 
ent of Burials. 

Art. 14. To vote by ballot, " Yes or No," in answer to 
the question : " Shall license be granted for the sale of in- 
toxicating liquors in this Town the present year?'' 



^l ANNUAL REPORT 



Art. 15. To consider aud act upon the acceptance of the 
Jury List, as revised by the Selectmen. 

Art. 16. To see if the Town will accept the reports of 
the Selectmen, Overseers of the Poor, School Committee and 
other Town officers. 

Art. 17. To see if the Town will authorize the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money for the 
Town, if necessary, in anticipation of the taxes for the cur- 
rent year. 

Art. 18. To liear the reports of any committees chosen 
to report at this meeting, and do or act anything thereon. 

Art. 19. To see if the Town will instruct the School 
Committee to appoint a Superintendent of Schools. 

Art. 20. To see if the Town will vote to remove the 
obstructions from the sidewalk adjoining the store belonging 
to Luke Blanchard in West Acton. 

Art. 21. To see if the Town will vote to widen the roadbed 
eight feet on the turnpike leading from West Acton to Con- 
cord, from a point on said road near the cigar factory of F. 
R. Knowlton to a bend in said road near the gravel bank of 
said Know! ton's, and widen the bridge and sluices six feet, 
the total distance being 1,934 feet, or take any action thereon. 

Art. 22. To see if the Town will pay George M. Pike 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars. 

Art. 23. To see if the Town will appropriate a suitable 
amount of money to provide and place a tablet commem- 
o ating the services of the Isaac Davis Guards during the 
late war, on the monument at Acton Centre, or in any pub- 
lic building within the Town. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 52 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting up 
copies, attested by yon, in the following places : One at the 
Post Office in the centre of the Town, one at the store of 
Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee, one at the store of C. H. 
Mead & Co., one at the Nagog house, and one in each of 
the railroad stations in the Town, seven daj^s at least before 
the time appointed for holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant, with 
your doing thereon, to the Selectmen or Town Clerk, on or 
before the time of holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands, in Acton, this the twenty-fifth day cf 
March in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety. 



HOWARD B. WHITE, ) Selectmen 

WILLIAM F. STEVENS, [ of 
GEORGE R. KEYES, ) Acton. 



54 ANNUAL REPORT 

TOWN OFFICERS For 1890. 



Town Clerk ^ 

William D. Tuttle. 

Selectmen^ 

Howard B. White, Wm. F. Stevens, George E. Keyes. 

Assessors^ 

Phineas Witherbee, Chauncy B. Robbins, John White, 

Aaron C. Handley, Thomas F. No yes. 

Overseers of Poor, 

Eltsha H. CtTTLER, Lyman C. Taylor, Aaron C. Handle y. 

Town Treasurer^ 

JoNA. K. W. Wetherbee. 

Auditors^ 

Hiram J. Hapoood, D. James Wetherbee. 

School Committee, 
Charles J. Williams, David C. Harris, . . 3 years 
Alphonso a. Wyman, William S. Jones, . . 2 years 
Charles L. 1>radford, Rev. James Fletcher, . 1 year 

Cemetery Committee^ 
John Fletcher, AVm. W. Davis, Levi W. Stevens. 

Fence Viewers^ 
Nahum C. E-eed, Oliver W. Mead, Frank Hosmer. 

Surveyors of Lumber^ 

Wm. B. Davis, Wm. S. Warren, Levi W. Stevens, Ed. F. 

Richardson, George H. Harris, Chas. A. Brooks, 

Herbert T. Clark. 

Surveyors of Wood, 

Wm. B. Davis, Geo. H. Harris, Henry D. Parlin, 

Solomon L. Dutton, Charles H. Taylor, 

John F. Davis, Herbert T. Clark. 

Surveyor of Hoops and Staves, 

Augustus Fletcher. 

Fish Committee for 1889, 

Luther Conant, Elnathan Jones, John Fletcher, 

Frank H. Whitcomb, Charles J. Williams. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



-OF THE- 



TOWN OFFICERS 



-OF THE- 



TOWN OF ACTON, 



-FROM- 



February 26, 1890 to February 26, 

1891. 



HUDSON: 

The Enterprise Printing Company, 

1891. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Town of Acton in Account with J. 


jK. W. Wetherhee, 


Treasurer. 




1890. Dr. 




Feb. 26. To cash paid State tax, 


11,172 50 


*^ " County tax, 


1,078 85 


" " on Selectmens or- 


ders, 


16,903 37 


Outstanding orders, 


1,117 24 


balance due the Town, 


1,296 46 




%^^ ^9x9, ^^ 


, 




1890. Cr. 




Feb. 26. By cash in the Treasury, 


$830 85 


Received for rent of Chapel rooms to 




April 1, 1890. 


33 00 


of John Eedfearn, druggist's 


\ 


license, 


1 00 


" H. T. Clark, for loam. 


4 20 


" C. B. Eobbins, for old 




plank, 


4 00 


*• Eev. J. Fletcher, balance 




due the Town on account 


\ 


of school supplies, 


54 37 


^' Dr. I. Hutchins for drug- 




gist's license. 


1 00 


" John Redfearn for drug- 




gist's license. 


1 00 


" Town of Concord, one-half 




expenses of erecting 




)ound near Dudley 




place. 


3 15 



M. A. Eeed, for two tons 
of hay sold from Wood- 
lawn Cemetery, 14 00 



ANNUAL REPORT 



" L. W. Steven, for lots sold 

in Mt. Hope Cemetery, 
" Town of Methuen, for aid 

furnished Byron Austin, 
" Amasa Kuowlton, for old 

posts. 
" Town of Shutesbury for aid 

furnished Wm. F. Reed, 
^' Bay State League, rent of 

schoolroom, 
" State Treasurer, Corporation 

tax, 
" State Treasurer, iS'ational 

Bank tax, 
" State Treasurer, Military 

aid. Chapter 279, Acts 

1889, 
" State Treasurer, State aid, 

Chapter 301 Acts 1889, 
^' Nathan Johnson, for old 

flag rope, 
'' District Court, of Central * 

Middlesex, for fines, 
** State Treasurer, income of 

Mass. School Fund, 
'' State Treasurer, for dog tax, 
^' E-ev. J. Fletcher, school 

supplies sold, 
" Julian Tuttle, rent of Town 

Hall and cellar, 
" E. A. Phalen, for taxes for 

1889, 
" E. F. Conant, for taxes for 

1890, 
^' Tuttles, Jones &Wetherbee, 

borrowed money, 
-' Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, 

for borrowed money, 
" Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, 

borrowed money, 
^' Wm. D. Tuttle, borrowed 

money, 
" John Fletcher, for lots sold 

in Woodlawn Cemetery, 
" Interest on money in bank, 



25 


00 


5 00 




80 


33 


17 


2 


00 


716 


51 


665 


20 


54 00 


252 


00 




50 


130 


65 


164 
241 


87 
67 


10 


92 


42 


00 


1,431 


56 


.2,886 


00 


1,500 


00 


1,500 


00 


600 00 


300 


00 


12 

48 


00 
00 
- $21,568 42 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



Treasurers Report of Money held for care of Lots in Cemeteries. 
Dr. 



To Hepsibeth Piper Fund, 

Interest on Hepsibeth Piper Fund, 

Frederick Eouillard Fund, 

Cash received from Town on account 

of interest on Frederick Rouillard 

Fund, 



$50 00 

2 00 

100 00 



3 00 



Cr, 




cash paid N. Johnson for labor on 




lot of Hepsibeth Piper, 


$2 00 


Cash paid K Johnson, for 




labor on lot of Freder- 




ick Rouillard, 


3 00 


Cash in Treasury, 


150 00 



$155 00 



$155 00 
J. K. WETHERBEE, 
Treasurer of the Town of Acton. 



Acton, Feb. 1891. 
We have audited the accounts of the Treasurer of the Town* 
of Acton, and find them correct. 

Auditors 

of the 

Town of Acton. 



HIRAM J. HAPGOOD, 
DANIEL J. WETHERBEE, 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 



Center School. 

Paid Eev. James Fletcher, for teachers, $720 00 

" '' care of house, 65 00 

" '' fuel, ' 74 92 

*^ ^^ cleaning rooms, 6 00 

" " incidentals, 2 41 



$868 33 



West School. I 

Paid A. A. Wyman, for teachers, $720 00 I 

" " care of house, 78 00 * 

cleaning rooms, 2 63 i 

fuel, m 88 I 

'' " incidentals, 3 76 

$870 27 






South School, 

Paid C. L. Bradford, for teachers, $720 00 

" '* care of house, 90 00 

cleaning rooms, 6 50 

fuel, 42 62 

incidentals, 7 63 






$866 75 



North School. 

Paid D. C. Harris, teachers, $360 00 

'' " care of house, 25 50 

fuel, 39 75 

"~ " incidentals. 2 50 



$427 75 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



East School. 

Paid C. J. Williams, teachers, $360 00 

'' '' . care of house, 27 00 

'' '^ cleaning rooms, 3 50 

'' " fuel, 46 m 

" " incidentals, 3 00 

South-east School. 

Paid W. S. Jones, teachers, $324 00 

'* " care of house. 15 00 

" '^ cleaning rooms, 5 00 

'' " fuel, 21 00 

" " incidentals, 4 65 



High School. 

Paid A. W. Armstrong, for teaching, $920 00 

Janitors, care of rooms, 34 00 

N. Johnson, moving furniture, 5 00 

Geo. Gardner, rent of organ, 15 00 

" " " piano, 10 00 

C. L. Bradford, cleaning room, 2 00 

" ^' incidentals, Q6 

" '' fuel, 19 32 

School Supplies. 

Paid A. W. Armstrong, $8 11 

Eev. James Fletcher, 410 ^Q 



$440 36 



$369 65 



$1,005 97 



$418 67 



STATE AID. 



Paid Allen G. Smith, Chap. 279 ; Acts 1889, 
Wm. F. Wood, " " 

Warren B. Ball, '' " 

Eichard G. Dane, Chap. 301 ; Acts 1889, 
Luke Smith, " " 

Mary Smith, " '' 

Eebecca C.Wright, " ^' 

Almira H. Loker, " " 

Mary J. Brown, " '^ 

Eliza J. Shattuck, " " 



$60 00 
36 00 
40 00 
60 00 
48 00 
48 00 
48 00 
48 00 
24 00 
40 00 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Mary 


A. 


Eand, 


u a 


18 00 


Susan B, 


. Winn, 


cc a 


16 00 


Achsa Hanscom, 


i( u 


4 00 








SUl 




(t/jQA Af> 








^PORT OF POOR. 




>aid E. H. 


Cutler, 


deficiency on farm to March 




h 


1890 


J 


^406 36 


E. H. 


Cutler, 


aid of Mrs. Trainor, 


36 00 






a 




Emily F. Towne, 


30 50 






a 


u 


Clara Wheeler, 


169 93 




. 


a 




Albert L. Brooks, 


8 36 






a 




Bichard Temple, 


169 56 






a 




W. F. B.Whitney, 


31 75 






a 




Kinsley children. 


193 50 






a 




Mrs. Marshal Jones 157 00 






u 




Ruth Pike, 


54 00 






(( 




Wm. F. Beed, 


33 17 






a 




Byron Austin, 


5 00 






u 


,{, 


i\mos Brooks, 


29 12 






a 




Julia A. Collins, 


9 25 






a 




Hannah Stanton, 


15 50 






a 




J. E. Harris, 


104 01 






<( 




W. B. Ball, 


123 50 






u 




Martha E. Bobbins, 


22 14 






a 




Mrs. J. Quinlan, 


91 34 






u 


Expenses to Portland, 


9 30 






(( 


Two 


journeys to Waltham 


, 4 00 






u 


Three journeys to Lowell, 


4 50 












©1 TAT TQ 







CEMETERY EXPENSES. 
Paid N. Johnson, labor in Woodlawn and 

on monument grounds, $52 48 

John Fletcher, memorial signs, 
" trees, 

" freight on trees, 

'* iron for signs, 

" posts, 

E. Jones & Co., stock for seats in 

Woodlawn, 
B. L. Beed, painting letters on tombstone, 
Moses A. Beed, mowing Woodlawn, 
L. W. Stevens, labor at Mt. Hope, 

$175 44 



3 50 


7 75 


1 76 


25 


50 


9 15 


ne, 1 50 


40 95 


57 60 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



F BIN TING., 

Paid A. Hosnierj 500 town orders, 
" 300 envelopes, 

" notices, 

Enterprise Printing Co., warrants, 
" " notices, 

" " 600 town reports 

" ^^ 500 sheet reports 

A. C. Handley, Assessors' notices, 
H. F. Glidden, poll tax lists, 

" 800 copies of valuation, 



1 


65 


1 


05 


1 


20 


10 


25 


3 


00 


ts, 53 


00 


ts, 10 


00 


1 


^5 


6 


50 


38 40 



$126 90 



TOWN OFFICERS. 



Paid A. A. Wyman, services as ballot clerk 

to Nov. 1, 1890, $3 00 

D. J. Wetherbee, services as ballot 

clerk, to Nov. 1, 1890, 3 00 

Julian Tuttle, services as registrar of 

voters to May 1, 1890, 12 00 

S. A. Guilford, services as registrar of 

voters to May 1, 1890, 12 00 

C. W. Chadwick, services as registrar 

of voters to May 1, 1890, 12 00 

William D. Tuttle, services as regis- 
trar of voters to May 1, 1890, 

E-ev. James Fletcher,Supt. of Schools, 

Phineas Wetherbee, Assessor, 

C. B. Eobbins, 

A. C. Handley, " 

John White, " 

T. F. Noyes, " 100 00^ ] 

L. U. Holt, sealer of weights and meas- 
ures, 1890, 

William D. Tuttle, Town Clerk, 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, Town Treasurer, 

William F. Stevens, Supt. of Roads, 

George R. Keyes. Selectman, 

Wm. F. Stevens,' " 

Howard B. White, " 

$1,001 00 ■ 

.( 



15 00 


125 


00 


150 


00 


129 


00 


45 


00 


105 00 


100 


00 


10 


00 


30 


00 


50 


00 


25 


00 


45 


00 


45 


00 


85 


00 



10 



ANNUAL REPORT 



DEDICATION OF LIBRARY. 

Paid John Fletcher, envelopes, stamps and 
express, 

F. A. Searle, posters, 
Thomas Todd, printing, 
H. W. March, committee badges, 
N. Littlefield, for team, 
A. Bulette, " 
A. L. Tuttle, " 
Luke Tuttle, . 

N. Davidson, ^'• 

J. E. Cutter, " 

James B. Tuttle, " 

George Livermore, " 

H. E. Bean, 

George N. Noyes, " 

Horace Tuttle, " 

George Worster, " 

R. M. Yale & Co., tent, 
A. H. Jones, teaming tent, 
George L. Noyes, "■ 
Freight on tent, 

G. L. Noyes, expenses of foreman for 

tent, 

R. M. Yale & Co., flags for decorations. 

Rev. James Fletcher, expenses of dec- 
orations, 

Adelphi quartette, 

Drum corps, 

Hon. John D. Long, 

Dr. C. B. Saunders, expenses of en- 
tertainment. 



$21 95 


3 00 


36 50 


7 60 


9 00 


4 00 


4 00 


5 00 


3 00 


10 00 


3 00 


5 00 


3 00 


2 60 


12 00 


1 00 


45 26 


1 75 


1 50 


1 40 


I 75 


1 00 


23 24 


18 00 


15 00 


20 00 


18 81 



$278 36 



LIBRARY EXPENSES. 
Paid D. J. Wetherbee, for insurance by vote of town, 

Bills Approved hy Trustees. 

Paid Ida A. Hale, services at library to June 

14th, 1890, $44 88 

Hattie E. Tuttle, services at library to 

June 14th, 1890, 30 25 



$180 00 



TOWN OF ACTON. 11 



Susie E. Conant, services at library to 
June 14th, 1890, 

For chimneys, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee,record book, 
" " " lawn mower, 

Rev. J. Fletcher, ink, 

100 postal cards. 

Window screens, 

Fitting screens, 

Rev. James Fletcher, repairing door, 

Francis Conant, mason work, 

J. E. Cutter, 25,695 lbs. coal, 

D. A. Cutler, carrying books, 

Ida A. Hale, services as librarian to Mar. 
1st, 1891, 

Julian Tuttle, services as janitor, 

L. Barta & Co., 10,000 library slips, 9 25 

A. Hosmer, printing 100 notices on pos- 
tal cards, 1 60 

A. Hosmer, printing 250 acknowledg- 
ments, 

A. Hosmer, printing 100 letter heads, 

A. Hosmer, printing 100 envelopes, 

L. U. Holt, repairs. 



9 


79 




60 


3 


75 


13 


75 




35 


1 


00 


16 


85 


1 


50 


1 


75 


1 


50 


80 


30 


20 


00 


75 


00 


66 


70 



1 


50 




40 




30 


9 


12 



^390 14 



EXPENSES ON ROADS ORDERED BY COUNTY COM- 
MISSIONERS. 

Paid J. W. Hayward, award of damages, $ 10 00 

W. Kinsley, moving wall of J. W. 
Hayward, 

E. C. Parker, moving wall^ 

Estate of Chas. Parker, removing 
fence, 

Wm. H. Kingsley. building bridge, 

N. Littlefield, labor on Leland Stevens 
road, 

"N". Littleiield, irons for bridge on Le- 
land Stevens road, 

Wm. H. Kingsley, labor on Leland 
Stevens road, 

H. T. Clark, labor on railings on Le- 
land Stevens road. 



10 50 
58 50 


10 
400 


00 
00 


367 


16 


7 


85 


7 


25 


4 00 



12 ANNUAL REPORT 



T. McCarthy, 50 bound stones for 

turnpike, 17 50 

Chas. Wheeler, 50 bound stones for 

turnpike, 17 50 

Chas. Wheeler, labor setting bounds 

on turnpike, 8 50 

N. Littlefield, labor setting bounds on 

turnpike, 23 17 

Wm. D. Tuttle, surveying, 8 00 

W. F. Stevens, 4 casks cement, 6 40 



$956 33 



EXPENDED ON ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

Paid Chas. Wheeler, highway work, $698 45 

Nahum Littlefield, " " 763 19 

Francis Pratt, " " 724 69 

Henry Warden, '' " 2 50 

J. Kinsley, use of road for Hurley, 8 00 

H. W. Clapp & Co., grating for sluice, 2 34 

Chas. Wheeler, 3 covering stone, 1 bQ 

Chas. Wheeler, covering stone, 5 30 

E. Jones, covering stone, 1 60 
Francis Conant, labor on sluice, South 

Acton, 3 80 
Wm. H. Kingsley, labor on sluice, 

West Acton, 36 80 
Francis Pratt, labor on sluice at 

Fletcher corner, 2 00 
. N. Littlefield, labor on sluice, Box- 

boro line, 35 80 
Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, drain 

pipe, 34 46 

F. R. E,. Co., freight on drain pipe, 1 58 
E. Jones & Co., lumber for railings, 14 61 
E. Hall & Sons, posts for railings, 5 40 
N. E. Bean, nails and irons for rail- 
ings, 33 

S. Jones, Jr., labor at powder mill 

bridge, 7 11 

Francis Pratt, teaming plank at pow- 
der mill bridge, 9 00 

E. Jones & Co., 5170 feet plank for 

powder mill bridge, 160 27 



TOWN OF ACTON. 13 



E. Jones & Co., keg spikes for powder 

mill bridge, 2 62 

American Powder Mills, repairs upon 

bridge, 
J. P. Brown, blacksmith bill, 
N. Littletield, blacksmith bill, 
D. H. Farrar, blacksmith bill, 
Francis Pratt, powder and fuse, 
Chas. Brooks, repairs upon scraper. 
A. H. Jones, repairing washout, 
E". Littlefield, breaking out roads, 

" plow beam, 

^' powder and fuse, 

" rakes and hooks, 

F. E. Knowlton, 367 loads gravel, 
Silas Conant, Jr., 318 " 
L. Eouilliard, 181 '' 
N. A. Davidson, &^ " 
F. H. Whitcomb, 246 '' 
Isaac Eeed, 134 " 
Abram Tuttle, 36 '' 
Ai Bobbins, 113 " 
W. D. Tuttle, surveying on great road, 
H. B. White, freight on sluice grating, 
J. Mains and J. McCarthy, cutting tree, 



1 


50 


6 


10 


12 


07 


3 


01 


1 


25 


2 


75 




50 


1 


90 


2 


25 


6 


80 


2 


85 


18 


35 


15 


90 


9 


05 


3 25 


12 30 


6 


70 


1 


80 


5 


Qb 




75 




50 


2 


00 



,638 64 



EXPENDED ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 

Paid Julian Tuttle, grading at town hall, $20 45 

L. U. Holt, labor at town hall, 7 00 

E. Jones & Co., lumber and nails for 

hearse house, 23 95 

S. Jones, Jr., labor and stock for re- 
pairs on hearse house, 15 57 

E. L. Eeed, painting hearse house, 8 15 

E. Jones & Co., shingles for South 

school house, 108 76 

E. Jones & Co., nails for South school 

house, 3 25 

E. Jones & Co., zinc and lead for 

South school house, 4 08 

S. Jones, Jr., labor shingling South 

school house, 51 20 



14 ANNUAL REPORT 



W. S, Jones, stove for South East 

school house, 15 00 

Rev. J. Eletcher, repairs at Center 

school house, 35 51 

Charles Wheeler, grading at Center 

school house, 4 75 

N. Johnson, labor on Center school 

grounds, 23 64 

C. W. Pitman, repairs at Center 

school house, 7 50 

]N. Johnson, repairs at Center school 

house, 7 53 

Francis Conant. repairs at Center 

school house, 4 25 

L. U. Holt, repairs at Center school 

house, 5 25* 

F. W. Green, repairs and grading at 

West school house, 10 ^7 

A. A. Wyman, repairs and grading at 

West school house, 8 80 

A. A. Wyman, 21 seats for West 

school house, 54 25 

W. L. Mead, painting at West school 

house, 9 15 

F. E. Harris, repairs at West school 

house, 10 16 

L. U. Holt, repairs on West school 

house, 11 60 

H. T. Clark, repairs on West school 

house, 11 05 

C. L. Bradford, repairs and grading 

at South school house, 15 37 

Francis Conant, repairs at South 

school house, 7 25 

E. Jones & Co., nails and lumber for 

South school house, 19 00 

L. U. Holt, repairs at South school 

house, 6 92 

Francis Jones, painting at South 

school house, 21 64 

S. Jones, Jr., repairs at South school 

house, 18 47 

Francis Conant, repairs at East school 

house, 6 19 

C. J. Williams, repairs at East school 

house, 5 30 



TOWN OF ACTON. 15 



D. C. Harris, repairs at North school 

house, 
T>. C. Harris, repairs on fence at 

North school house, 
L. U. Holt, repairs at North school 

house, 
L. U. Holt, pump and tubing at North 

school house, 
D. C. Harris, covering stone for 

North school well, 
D. C. Harris, cleaning North School 

well, 



60 11 


7 05 


7 80 


7 00 


5 00 



$689 39 i 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 

Paid for record book for Selectmen, 75 j 

for ledger for Selectmen, 

N. Johnson, repairs on hearse, 

for special police badges, 

H. B. White, license blanks, 

H. B, White, expenses of Board of 
health, 

H. B. White, express on town reports, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, pad-lock 
for hearse house, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, as- 
sessors' books, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, collect- 
or's book, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, 4 iron 
hitching posts, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, 9 doz. 
folding chairs, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, freight 
and teaming chairs, 

Isaac Davis Post G. A. R., for Memo- 
rial day, 

T. McCarthy, stone guide post, 

Dodge, Haley & Co., 225 ft. chain for 
railing. 

Express on chain, 

State Treasurer, 1-4 license fees, 

N. E. Bean, rail irons, at hall and 

library, 5 00 





75 


1 


75 


1 


05 


6 


20 




50 


1 


55 




50 


1 


25 


2 


94 


1 


50 


16 


00 


90 


00 


2 


62 


.00 


00 


2 


50 


6 


75 




30 




75 



16 ANNUAL REPORT 



Julian Tuttle, setting posts and put- 
ting up railings, 1 80 
K. L. Reed, stock and labor painting 

railings, 2 15 

H. R. Hosmer, painting guide boards, 1 50 

N. Johnson, lixing town pump, 50 

N. Johnson, repairing flag^ 25 

L. E. Reed, superintending three 

burials, 9 00 

Dr. A. H. Rose, services for Board of 

Health, 3 00 

Silas Conant, digging well North 

school house, 75 00 

Silas Conant, cementing well North 

school house, 2 50 

Spofford Robbins, guide boards, 80 

E. Jones & Co., coal for hall, 19 97 

Phineas Wetherbee, copying poll tax 

and valuation lists^ 12 50 

Phineas Wetherbee, stationery, post- 
age and express, 1 50 
C. H. Dodge & Co., putting shelves 

in town safe, 21 56 

S. Jones, Jr., labor on guide boards, 25 

E. F. Conant, discount on taxes, 724 69 

M. F. Whiton & Co., flag rope, 1 20 

E. F. Conant, services as constable 

five Sundays, 5 00 

Jas. Devane, painting and lettering 

signs, 
Jas. Devane, painting hearse, 
Jas. Devane, painting hearse runners, 
G-eo. Hey wood, bounty tax refunded, 
L. V. Clough, reward for conviction 

of illegal sale of liquors, 
M. B. Garfield, painting guide boards, 
E. A. Phalen, summoning town officers 

to take oath, 
Wm. D. Tuttle, for postage, 
" for express, 

'^ stationery and dog 

license blanks, 
" collecting and re- 

cording 33 births, 
" recording 39 deaths, 

" recording 24 marriages, 



2 25 


25 


00 


5 


00 


17 


42 


50 


00 


2 


25 


3 


00 


3 32 


2 


70 


2 


90 


16 


50 


5 


90 


3 


60 



TOWN OF ACTON. 




17 


J. K. W. Wetherbee, stationery and 






postage, 


2 25 




H. B. White, stationery, express and 






postage, 


4 42 




Julian Tuttle, care of town hall and 






clock. 


60 25 




Chas. Clements, expenses in Harri- 






man case, 


2 00 




M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies for town 






hall. 


7 84 




I. F. Duren, attending 27 burials. 


81 00 




I. F. Duren, making return of 21 






deaths. 


5 25 


$1,427 93 







ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 



C. L. Angier, 


for 1890, 


$2 00 


a. Regan, 


a 


2 00 


John Campbell, 


a 


2 00 


William G. Dunn, 


a 


2 00 


George Donald, 


u 


2 00 


Robert W. Dowling, 


i( 


2 00 


Smith Finney, 


i( 


2 00 


Harry Fletcher, 


.i 


2 00 


Luther Conant, guardian of Lottie Goodnow, 




1890, 




85 00 


Anthony J. Goding, 


for 1890, 


2 00 


H. G. Gates, 




42 


George Harris, 




2 00 


William Hill, 




2 00 


Michael J . Hayes, 




2 00 


Richard Larkin, 


i( 


2 00 


Clayton McGlusking, 




2 00 


Thomas Morey, 




2 00 


Samuel Mann, 




2 00 


George W. Mason, 




2 00 


Malcom Melaine, 




2 00 


Peter Morrison, 




2 00 


David Maguinis, 




2 00 


Anton Mulduth, 




2 00 


E. W. Quimby, 




2 00 


James Roady, 




2 00 



18 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Charles S. Bobbins, '' 2 00 i 

James Sawyer, " 2 00 | 

Eolla Starks, " 2 00 i 

Peter Trainer, " 2 00 ^ 

W. G. Tilton, 

Ivory Waterhouse, " 

Michael Walsh, " 

Clarence Whitcomb, " 

Errors, '^ 

Mary E. Cutler, " 

Michael Baker, " 

Fred Mann, 1889 tax, 



George Kinsley, 
Joseph Noyes, 
N. E. Palmer, 



2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


55 


4 25 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 00 


5 22 



$165 44 



LOANS AND INTEREST 

Paid Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, one years 

interest on $1000 note, 50 00 

W. D. Tuttle, note and interest, 304 50 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, on account of in- 
terest on bequest of F. Kouillard for 
care of lot, 3 00 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, note, 1,500 00 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, interest on 

note 5 per cent., 56 25 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, note, 600 00 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, interest on 

note 5 per cent., 11 75 



$2,525 50 
$18,020 61 



RECEIPTS AND AFPEOFEIATIONS. 

Balance in the Treasury, Feb. 26, 1890. $830 S5 

due from Collector of taxes, Feb. 26, 

1890, 1,592 10 



TOWN OF ACTON. 19 



Appropriations for Town charges, 4,000 00 

schools, 4400 00 

highways, 2300 00 

overlayings, 185 21 

State tax, 1172 50 

County tax, 1078 85 

library, 400 00 

Rec'd from State Treasurer, Corporation tax, 716 51 

'' " Nat. Bank tax, 665 20 

" " Military aid, 54 00 

'' " State aid, 252 00 

" " income of Mass. 

School Fund, 164 87 

Chapel society, rent to April 1, 

1890, 33 00 

John E-edfearn, druggist's li- 
cense, to May 1, 1890, 1 00 
John Redfearn, druggist's li- 
cense, to May 1, 1891, 1 00 
I. Hutchins, druggist's license 

to May 1, 1891, 1 00 

H. T. Clark, for loam, 4 20 

C. B. Bobbins for old plank, 4 00 

Bev. Jas. Fletcher, overdrawn 

on school supplies, 54 37 

Town of Concord, one-half ex- 
/ pense of erecting bound, 3 15 

Moses A. Beed, hay from Wood- 
lawn Cemetery, ' 14 00 
L. W. Stevens, lots sold in Mt. 

Hope Cemetery, 25 00 

Town of Methuen, aid furnished 

Byron Austin, 
A. Knowlton, old posts, 
Town of Shutesbury, aid fur- 
nished W. F. Beed, 
rent of So. school room, 
N. Johnson, old flag rope. 
District Court, for fines, 
County Treasurer, dog tax, 
Interest on money in bank, 
Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee, 

borrowed money, 
W. D. Tuttle, borrowed money, 
Julian Tuttle, rent of Town 

Hall and cellar, 42 00 



5 


00 




80 


33 17 


2 00 




50 


130 


65 


241 


67 


48 


00 


3,600 


00 


300 


00 



20 ANNUAL REPORT 



Rev. James Fletcher, school sup- 
plies sold, 10 92 

John Fletcher, lots sold in 

Woodlawn Cemeterj^, 12 00 



22,379 52 



EXPENDITURES. 



For Centre School, 


$868 33 


West School, . 


870 27 


South School, 


866 75 


North School, 


427 75 


East School, 


440 36 


Southeast School, 


369 Qb 


High School, 


1,005 97 


School supplies, 


418 67 


State and military aid, 


490 00 


Support of poor, 


1,707 79 


Cemetery expenses. 


175 44 


Roads ordered by County Commis- 




sioners, 


956 33 


Printing, 


126 90 


Town officers, 


1,001 00 


Roads aud bridges, 


2,638 64 


Town buildings and grounds, 


689 39 


Miscellaneous expenses, 


1,427 93 


Loans and interest paid, 


2,525 50 


State tax. 


1,172 50 


County tax. 


1,078 85 


Abatement of taxes. 


165 44 


Dedication of library, 


278 36 


Library, 


570 14 




$20,271 96 



Balance due from E. A. Phalan, taxes 1889, $160 54 
" " E. F. Conant, taxes 1890, 650 m 

" " Treasurer. 1,296 46 



■ $2,107 5^ 
$22,379 52 



TOWN OF ACTON. 21 



TOWN DEBTS. 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, note and in- 
terest, 1,023 61 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, note and in- 
terest, 1,551 25 

— $2,574 86 

Less amounts due from Collectors and Treas- 
urer, $2,107 56 



Balance against the Town, Feb. 26, 1891, $467 30 

HOWARD B. WHITE, ) Selectmen 
WM. F. STEVENS, V- of 
GEORGE E. KEYES, ) Acton. 
Acton, Feb. 2Q, 1891. 



We have examined the accounts of the Selectmen and find 
them correct. 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD, ) Auditors of the 

DANIEL J. WETHERBEE, ]" Town of Acton. 



22 ANNUAL REPORT 



Report of Receipts and Expenditures at the 
Almshouse in Acton 



For the Year ending Feb, 28 


, 1891. 


Articles on Hand February 


28, 1891. 


1 horse, 


$140 00 


12 cows, 


480 00 


Grain, 


4 00 


Salt, 


50 


9 1-2 tons hay, 


152 00 


1 wagon, 


70 00 


Mowing machine, 


20 00 


Horse rake, 


20 00 


Horse hoe, 


5 00 


1 plow, 


8 00 


126 empty barrels. 


22 68 


Lumber, 


2 00 


8 market boxes, 


80 


20 cords wood. 


70 00 


Coal, 


6 00 


50 hens. 


25 00 


13 bushels potatoes. 


13 00 


Apples, 


1 00 


300 lbs. pork. 


24 00 


2 dozen cans preserves, 


5 00 


2 gallons pickles. 


60 


Soap, 


50 


riour. 


7 75 


Crackers, 


30 


Tea, 


1 44 


Starch, 


40 


Coffee, 


50 


Lard, 


9 00 


Mustard, 


20 


Butter, 


50 


Fruit jars, 


2 50 



TOWN OF ACTON. 


23 


4 dozen eggs, 
40 lbs. ham, 


80 
4 80 











BECEIFTS FROM THE TOWN FARM FROM MARCH 
1, 1890, TO MARCH I, 1891. 

Received for apples, 
Milk, 

2 beef cows, 
Lard, 
Calves, 
Wood, 
Sweet corn, 
Potatoes, 
Cabbages, 
Poultry, 
Eggs, 

$1,269 ^Q 



93 95 


,062 21 


32 00 


1 10 


15 75 


5 00 


75 


25 63 


4 61 


75 


27 81 



EXFENDITURES AT TOWN FARM FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING FEB, 28, 1891. 

Axe handles. 

Butter, 

Brooms, 

Beans, 

Boots and shoes, 

Boxes, 

Basket, 

Brush cutter, S^ ^ \ 

Blacksmith bill, 

Cheese^ 

Coffee, 

Castings, 

Cloth and clothing, 

Curtains, 

Crockery, 

Canned fruit. 

Cattle cards. 

Clothes-pins, 

Cream tartar, 



52 


31 60 


2 08 


10 80 


11 35 


40 


70 


S6 


8 78 


1 46 


4 43 


3 95 


6Q 99 


1 75 


1 68 


40 


16 


15 


1 14 



24 ANNUAL REPORT 






Crackers, 


31 


09 


Cliocolate, 




19 


Coal, 


13 36 


Clock, 


1 


50 


Cows, 


90 


00 


Disinfectants, 


1 


67 


Eggs, 




71 


Evaporated apple, 




48 


Extract lemon. 




22 


Erait trees. 


5 


25 


Furniture, 


4 


60 


Flower pots. 




40 


Fruit jars. 


1 


50 


Fertilizer, 


7 00 


Fish, 


3 82 


Flour, 


34 40 


Glass, 


$1 


40 


Grass and garden seeds, 


8 


10 


Gelatine, 




16 


Grafting wax. 




45 


Grain, 


473 


29 


Hardware, 


8 


09 


Jugs, 




50 


Keeping cows, 


14 


00 


Kerosene oil. 


1 


65 


Lamp wicks, 




08 


Labor, 


16 


55 


Lemons, 




31 


Lime and cement, 




70 


Lumber, 


8 


46 


Meat, 


126 


67 


Molasses, 


14 


75 


Medicine, 


2 57 


Matches, 




33 


Mustard, 




40 


Mop, 




45 


Onions, 




25 


Oyster shells, 




55 


Paint and Oil, 


8 


18 


Puttv, 




21 


Pork bbls. 


1 


50 


Paper and bordering, 


1 


14 


Pipe and labor on pump. 


6 


14 


Potatoes for seed, 


4 


00 


Pigs, 


13 


00 


Poultry, 




75 



TOWN or ACTON. 


25 


Paris green, 


67 


Powder, 


40 


Kope, 


2 13 


Kosin. 


08 


Repairs on mowing machine, 


2 75 


Raisins, 


3 02 


Stove, 


6 00 


Scythes, 


2 00 


Salt, 


2 18 


Soda, 


46 


Seed sower. 


4 25 


Stove polish. 


46 


Soap, 


4 35 


Scraps, 


1 35 


Starch, 


49 


Spices, 


95 


Sugar, 


32 78 


Services of H. C. Scarlet and wife, 


450 00 


Services of E. H. Cutler, 


50 00 


Services of L. C. Taylor, 


15 00 


Services of A. C. Handley, 


5 00 


Tin ware, 


1 25 


Tea, 


1 00 


Tomato plants. 


38 


Use of bull, 


9 25 


Varnish, 


3 12 


Vinegar, 


1 76 


Wheelwright's bill, 


6 00 


Wire netting, 


5 35 


Whitening and papering. 


4 54 , 


Wheat, 


17 


Water pail, 


17 


Yeast, 


1 04 




1fii fifift ^fi 






Expenditures, 


$1,668 36 


Receipts, 


1,269 56 



Income less than expense, 

Due from the treasury to balance account, 

Interest on farm, 



Victualling and lodging 163 tramps. 

Cost of supporting poor on farm, $573 60 



$398 80 

$398 80 

240 00 


$638 80 
65 20 



26 ANNUAL REPORT 



Whole number of persons exclnsive of tramps 

supported at almshouse, 4 

Average number, 4 

Present number, 4 



E. H. CUTLEE, ) Overseers 

LYMAN C. TAYLOK, [ of 
AAEOK C. HANDLY, \ Poor. 



We have examined the above accounts of the Overseers oi 
the Poor and find them correct. j 



HIEAM J. HAPGOOD, ) . ^., 
DANIEL J. WETHEEBEE, | ^^^*^^^^- 



TOWN OF ACTON. 27 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT FOR 1890. 



BIRTHS RECORDED BY THE TOWN CLERK OF 
ACTON IN 1890. 

Jan. 3. Eva Idelle, daughter of Willis L. and Julia A. Mead. 
3. Mary Catharine, daughter of Michael and Mary Welch. 

11. Lois, daughter of Charles W. and Edith Pitman. 

20. Erank and Cornelius, twin children of Frank and 
Margaret E. Moan. 
Feb. 11. Luke, son of James L. and Margaret A. McCarthy. 

12. Wallace Melvin, son of George 0. and Edith Penniman. 
18. Julia Helena, daughter of Thomas and Hannah Mc- 

Carty. 
Mar. 1. , a daughter to Joseph G. and Mary Y. Begin. 

14. Perley A., son of James A. and Nettie Fowler. 
April 24. Ena May, daughter of Geo. H. and Cora E. Smith. 

30. , a daughter to Timothy and Ellen Sullivan. 

May 30. John Francis, son of John Jr. and Mary A. McCarthy. 
June 1. William F., son of William and Mary Hayes. 

10. Pauline, daughter of Rev. Geo. W. and Sarah E. 

Stearns. 
28. Eugene William, son of Wm. 0. and Emma I. Hub- 
bard. 
July 2. Lydia H., daughter of Geo. H. and Ida L. Brooks. 

10. Gladys W, daughter of Newton E. and Hattie A. 
Bean. 

12. Grace Emily, daughter of Martin H. and Lizzie M. 

Worden. 
26. Edith Frances, daughter of Joseph William and Mary 
Alice Evans. 
Aug. 11. Arthur Joseph, son of Michael 0. and Annie Kerrigan. 

15. Mary Ellen, daughter of Michael and Johanna Foley. 
26. Florence Irene, daughter of Irving V. and Nellie F. 

Whitcomb. 
Sept. 6. Florence Mabel, daughter of William and Mary Wilson. 

13, In Bucksport, Me., Sumner Cole, son of Poswell L. 

and Annie B. Tuttle. 
X9. Mary Ellen, daughter of William C. and Mary E. 
Mehegan. 



28' 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Oct. 



Nov. 



Dec. 



21. 

25. 
1. 

17. 



19. 
5. 
8. 
Males, 



Robert, SOD of Geo. R. and Lizzie M. Livermore. 
James William, son of John F. and Mary T. Coughlin. 
Helen Laura, daughter of Alphonso A. and Laura A. 

Wyman. 
Ella Louise, daughter of Loren C. and Rachel 

Baldwin. 

, a son to David C. and Betsey J. Harris. 

Eva, daughter of Simon and Sarah Kabalchnick. 
Russell Billings, son of Geo. L. and Emma L. Quimby. 
14 : females, 19 ; total, 33. 



MARRIAGES RECORDED IN ACTON IN 1890. 



DATE. NAME AND RESIDENCE OF PARTIES. WHERE MARRIED. 

Jan. 1. William D. Hooper of Acton, 

Adah Ingham of Concord. Bedford. 

8. Elmer E. Handley of Acton, 

Lizzie B. Ireland of Littleton. Boston. 
Feb. 11. William J. Hayes of Acton, 

Mary E. Forest of Acton. Concord. 

24. George H. Brooks of Acton, 

Ida L. Dane of Acton. Acton. 

Mar. 12. Plinny M. George of Eastford, Conn., 

Edith Anna Wheeler of Acton. Acton. 
22. Will Murray Charlton of Acton, 

Minnie Mildred Tapley of Acton. West Acton. 
April 26. Thaddeus Clem of Concord, 

Frances M. Brigham of Concord. 
24. William H. Kingsley of Acton, 

Carrie M. Frye of Dracut. 
May 14. Samuel Mann of Acton, 

Bridget Hoffman of Acton. 
June 5. William C. Boyd of Hudson, 

Ar villa G. Yidito of Acton. 
12. Edwin P. Woodward of Acton, 

Velma Augusta Hosmer of Acton. 
July 23. R. Byron Moore of Arlington, 

Carrie F. Hanson of Acton. 
Aug. 17. Clarence D. Cram of Town send, 

Ada M. Jones of Acton. 
Sept. 1. Giles A. Barber of Acton, 

Maggie A. McCaig of Boxboro. 
15. William A. Noyes of Acton, 

Laura S. Atwood of No. Cambridge. Newport, R. I. 



Acton. 



Lowell. 
Concord. 



Hudson. 



Acton. 



Acton. 



Acton. 



So. Framingham. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 29 



Oct. 8. Jona Davis Richardson of Acton, 

Ellen S. Fairbanks of Hudson. Walt ham. 
8. Myron L. Chaffin of Acton, 

Nancy S.Quinton of Walpole, N. H. Bellows Falls, Vt. 
16. Fred H. Dickerman of W. Swansea, 
K H., 
Lottie S. Richardson of Acton. W. Acton. 

18. David Millett of Acton, 

Ida L. Richardson of Acton. W. Acton. 

22. William R. Burr of Acton, 

Emily Randall of Maynard. Acton. 

Nov. 5. Peter Dean of Acton, 

Mary J. Landry of Acton. Concord. 

19. Hiram E. Gates of Acton, 

Etta A. Tuttle of Acton. Acton. 

,0^ 27. Lorenzo E. Reed of Acton, 

Emma A. Pratt of Acton. Littleton. 

Dec. 18. William Daniels of Whitman, 

Annie Bishop of Acton. North Acton. 

Total number, 24. 



DEATHS RECORDED IN ACTON IN 1890. j 

Jan. 15. Clarence W. Brown, 31 years, 8 months, 27 days. j 

16. Edward Tuttle, 72 years, 8 months, 20 days. I 
29. >Levi L. Pratt, 18 years, 6 months, 8 days. 

29. Thomas F. Lawrence, 78 years, 4 months, 27 days. 

Feb. 3. Loretta Lawrence, 45 years, 27 days. j 

24. Elbert W. Kingsley, son of William H. and Ellen E. j 

Kingsley, 5 years, 4 months, 1 day. j 

Mar. 15. Isaac F. B. Temple, 76 years, 2 months, 17 days. j 

18. Charles H. Taylor, 38 years. " ] 

16. Elizabeth M. McCarty, daughter of Thomas and \ 

Hannah McCarty, 5 years, 21 days. j 

Apr. 13. Mary Ann (Hosmer) Hapgood, widow of John Hap- | 

good, 83 years, 10 months, 13 days. I 

18. Elsie Annie Arnold, 22 years. ' ; 

30. Infant daughter of Timothy and Ellen Sullivan, 1 day. \ 
May 6. Francis Joseph Jackman, 21 years, 12 days. \ 

9. Wallace M. Penniman, son of Geo. 0. and Edith j 

Penniman, 3 months. j 

21. Lavinia Redfearn, wife of John Redfearn, 42 years, \ 

9 months, 21 days. ; 



30 ANNX^AL REPORT 



June 2. William F., son of William J. and Mary Hayes, 1 day. 
10. George W. Peltier, 29 years. 
26. William Warren Davis, 66 years, 2 months, 29 days. 

29. Freeman Williams, 43 years, 6 months, 21 days. 
July 12. Rebecca (Nye) Blanchard, widow of Nathan Blanchard, 

90 years. 
20. Ebenezer Davis, 78 years, 11 months, 5 days. 
Aug. 3. Nathaniel S. Faulkner, 83 years, 6 months, 24 days. 
15. William G. Dunn, 76 years, 11 months. 
15. Medora A. Mott, wife of Alonzo Mott, 54 years, 11 

months, 7 days. 

18. Elma G. Stone, 15 years, 11 months, 20 days. 

20. Sarah Sophia Tuttle, wife of Luke Tuttle, 47 years, 7 

months, 5 days. 
22. Cornelius Moan, son of Frank and Margaret Moan, 7 

months, 2 days. 

22. William Hanson, 87 years, 6 months, 10 days. 

Sept. 5. Sarah L. (Go ward) Morehouse, wife of Wm. More- 
house, 81 years, 8 months, 21 days. 
6. David Rynn, 74 years. 
25. Lois, daughter of Chas. W. and Edith Pitman, 8 
months, 14 days. 

30. Lydia H., daughter of Geo. H. and Ida L. Brooks, 

2 months, 28 days. 
Oct. 19. Elbridge Robbins, 79 years, 6 months. 26 days. 

19. Martha M. Wayne, widow of John Wayne, 78 years, 

5 months, 14 days. 

23. Robert, son of Geo. R. and Lizzie M. Livermore, 2 days. 

24. Ruth (Dole) Fletcher, widow of Daniel Fletcher, 78 

3^ears, 9 months. 
28. Bella (Batchelor) McGreen, 53 years, 3 months, 9 days. 
Nov. 23. Frederick Mann, 34 years, 5 months. 
Dec. 5. John Francis, son of John Jr., and Mary Ann Mc- 
Carthy, 6 months, 5 days. 
Total number, 39. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



31 



NAMES OF PERSONS HAVING DOGS LICENSED IN 

1 890. 



Isaac W. Magg (for 1889), 

James P. Brown, 

Charles H. Holton, 

Geo. H. Smith, 

C. A. Harrington, 

Chas. J. Williams, 

Luke Tuttle, 

Reuben L. Reed, 

Geo. W. Ball, 

E. J. Blethen, 

Charles Morris, 

J. C. Hunt, 

E. Eddie Eletcher, 

A. J. Eletcher, 

Augustus Fletcher, 

Danie F. Hayward, 

Chas. B. Stone, 

Mrs. Frances A. Stone, 

Chas. S. Moulton, 

Geo. A. Smith, 

John Temple, 

Thomas Mannion, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, 2, 

E. F. Shapley, 

C. S. Symonds, (female), 

W. W. Philbrick, 

Frank D. Barker, 

Mrs. Geo. F. Flagg, 

L. W. Stevens, 

Daniel H. Farrar, 

Antoine Bulette, 

Thomas McCarty, 

Geo. B. Gowen, 

Moses A. Reed, 

Geo. W. Peltier, 

Ralph Crooker, 

Wm. Mehegan, 

Lawrin W. Pratt, 

Solon A. Robbins, 

T. J. Sawyer, (1 female), 

Samuel Jones, Jr., 

John W. Randall, 

Wm. F. Stevens, 



Chauncy B. Robbins, 2, 

Arthur Hughes, 2, 

Blanche Bassett, 

John Kelly, 

Alexander Allen, 

Isaac Barker, 

James Hussey, 

Mrs. C. H. Taylor, 

F. S. Whitcomb, 

Geo. T. Knowlton, 

Adelbert Mead, 

A. A. Wyman, 

Geo. W. Tuttle, 

Mrs. Joseph Cole, 

Henry M. Smith, 

L. E. Reed, 

C. H. Mead(S;Co., 

Alonzo Mott, 

C. J. Holton, 

A. A. Knowlton, 

Moses Taylor, 

Webster C. Robbins, 2, 

E. J. Robbins, 

Neils Jansen, 

M. E. Taylor, 

A. L. Lawrence, 2 (females), 

A. L. Lawrence, 1 (male), 

Wm. B. Davis, 

Fred G. Jones, 

Francis Pratt, 

Hiram Woodruff, 

Daniel Tuttle, 

J. H. Standish, 

Herbert A. Pratt, 2, 

H.|A. Littlefield, 

William J. Moore, 

Warren H. Jones, 

0. A. Knowlton, 

Fred Penniman, 

Walter A. Gilmore, 2, 

Geo. Conant, 

Ephraim B. Forbush, 

Michael Kerrigan, 



32 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Fred W. Green, 
Otis H. Forbush, 

F. P. Brooks, 
Luther Conant, 
A. L. iNoyes, 
John W. Clark, . 
Isaac S. Ford, 
Henry Hanson, 2, 
Sylvester Haynes, 
Fred W. Eeed, 
Geo. R. Livermore, 

G. H. S. Houghton, 
Wm. S. Jones, 
Abel Cole, 

Ed H. Jones, 
Mrs. Daniel Harris^ 
Geo. T. Barstow, 
Carrie A. Simonds, 
Chas. B. Sanders. 
Willie S. Fletcher, 
A. C. Handley, 
D. J. Wetherbee, 

Whole number of dogs, 
132 at $2, ^264; females, 6 
from licenses, $294. 



Acton, March 6, 1891. 



William Wilson, 
Bishop & Son, 
W^m. Davidson, 

D. C. Harris, 

E. G. Kratzer, 
A. L. Tuttle, 

F. R. Knowlton, 
Jerry McCarth}^, 
Nahiim Littlefield, 
James Devane, 
Henry Willard, 
Isaac W. Flagg, 

J. L. McCarthy, 

Fred Sprague, 

Charles Wheeler, (female), 

Chas. H. Wheeler, 

Geo. H. Brooks, 

A. Risso, (1 male), 

A. Risso, (1 female), 

S. Hammond Taylor, 

Martin H. Worden, 

R. G. Brooks. 
138 ; males, 132 ; females, 6 ; males, 
at $5, $30 ; whole amount received 

WM. D. TUTTLE, 

Town Clerk. 



AN^L [[EPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



Acton Memorial L(ibrar|]. 



LUTHEE CONANT, 
ADELBERT MEAD, 
MOSES TAYLOK, 
DELETTE H. HALL, 
HIRAM J. HAPGOOD, 
DANIEL J. WETHERBEE, 
HOWARD B. WHITE, 
WM. D. TUTTLE, 
Rev. JAMES FLETCHER, 

Trustees. 



34 AN^NUAL REPORT 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

of the Acton Memorial Lihirary^ 1890-91, 



The Trustees of the Acton Memorial Library, in presen 
to the Town their first annual report, would congratulate 
Town on its great good fortune in having such an institi 
established within its borders. A solid, substantial structu] 
brick and freestone, roomy, convenient and elegantly fini 
and' furnished with every convenience for its use, situated 
most favorable location on the main street in the centre oJ 
town, with ample, well kept grounds around it, we may t 
say that it is the ideal Public Library for a country town like 
We would also congratulate the public spirited donor of 
library, that his large hearted and wisely planned beneficence 
taken the form it has. 

While it is a worthy monument commemorating the d 
of brave men in the past, it is and will continue to be, a1 
same time, a living fountain of knowledge and inspiration tc 
inhabitants of the Town in the unbounded future. The lib 
was opened to the public June 14th, 1890, consequently has i 
in running order about nine months, and we may safely sa 
has proved a source of unalloyed satisfaction to all who 1 
enjoyed its privileges. Our citizens generally, old and yc 
alike, have eagerly sought its advantages, and have found i 
increasing source of instruction and entertainment. Especi 
to the young people of the town is this institution likely to t 
the very greatest importance and value, supplementing as it ( 
the instruction in our schools. 

More and more as the years roll on is the public lib 
coming to be the college of the people, so that given the mea; 
of education our common and High Schools afford, there is 
limit to the attainments in science and literature which our ( 
dren and youth may attain. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 35 



READING ROOM. 

rhrough the abounding generosity of Mr. Wilde, the reading 
has been well supplied with the standard Magazines of the 
md other reading matter. 

Che privileges of this department of the library appear to be 
appreciated, and few library days and evenings pass when the 
is not surrounded with interested visitors, 
rhe reading room, well warmed and lighted as it is, by its 
111 janitor, with its capacious and easy chairs, forms a most 
ant and attractive place of resort. 

Che Trustees have held meetings once a month or oftener, 
lich a majority has usually been present, and it has been 
constant endeavor to make such arrangements for the dis- 
bion and care of the books, and everything pertaining to the 
:y as would give satisfaction to the public. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Che Town appropriated at its annual meeting in April last, 
,00 for the current expenses of the library. This sum would 
been fully sufficient for the year had it not been for ex- 
is incurred in cataloging the books, and other expenses in- 
t to the starting of a new enterprise like this, and which 
ises are not likely again to be incurred for some years to 
. Por a detailed account of the expenditures see Selectmen's 
t. 

[n view of the rare generosity of the worthy donor, and the 
and permanent value of this institution to the Town, we 
sak for it your favorable consideration. 

Che Librarian, Miss Ida Hale, has proved capable and effi- 
, has taken good care of the books in the library, has kept 
:oom with neatness and in order, and is commended for 
ptness and courtesy in the performance of her duties, 
[n this connection we would say a word in reference to the 
ul handling of the books (the Librarian does not like to 
). This is an important matter and every safeguard should 
.opted to protect them from abuse. All patrons of the library 
:equested to see that books are properly cared for while 
leir possession, and that they are safely returned to the 
7- 



36 



ANNUAL REPORT 



The janitor of the library, Mr. Julian Tuttle, has taken ex- 
cellent care of the buildings and grounds, and deserves praise for 
the efficient manner in which the heating and lighting of the 
building has been performed. 



STATISTICS. 

Number of volumes now in the library, . . . 4167 

Number of volumes at the time of opening, . . . 3973 
Of these 3458 volumes were the gift of W. A. Wilde ; 97 
volumes, Mrs. C. D. Wilde ; 350 volumes, Ginn & Co., Boston ; 
36 volumes, American Unitarian Association ; 20 volumes, Ameri- 
can Swedenborgan Society ; 11 volumes, Lee & Shepherd, Bos- 
ton ; 1 volume, S. K. Abbott, Maiden. 

Books and other articles donated to the Library since the 
opening : 

From Smithsonian Institute, Washington, D. C, . . 22 vols. 
Estes & Lauriat, Boston, . . ... .18 

City of Boston, 22 

Luther Conant, Esq. ...... 27 

Massachusetts State Library, . . . .10 

Acton Centre Grammar School Library, . . 38 
Acton Centre Social Library, . . . .22 

Willis B. Allen, Boston, 5 

Aaron T. Hay ward, Boston, . . . .3 

F. T. Greenhalge, Lowell, 9 

William Barrett, Esq., Concord " Social Circle," . 2 

C. J. Williams, Esq., Hist, of Middlesex County, 3 

D. C. Corey, Maiden — Fiske's Civil Governme^nt, 1 
Rev. James Fletcher, " Acton in History," . . 1 

" '' Hist, of N.Brookfield, . 1 

Dr. E. T. Eastman, Boston, 1 

Dr. B. M. Lawrence, ^' The Lawrence Family," . 1 

Hon. John S. Keyes, " Concord Celebration of ^^5,'^ 1 

U. S. Government, ...... 1 

Silas Hosmer, Concord, Centennial Celebration at 

Concord, in 1875, 1 



TOWN OF AOTON. 



37 



Mrs. 0. H. Folger, Lawrence 
tToseph Dalton, Boston, 
E. A. Goodnow, Worcester, 
Mrs. R. F. Dyer, Ottawa, 111. 
George T. Angell, Boston, 





a 




iC 




i( 




a 




a 



194 



Total, . . . ■ . 
Other articles of value donated to the library : 
From A. M. Lothrop, Washington, D. C, clock for the library. 

Friends of W. A. Wilde, Esq., of Maiden, crayon portrait 

of Mr. Wilde. 
Mary D. Bichardson and children, crayon portrait of the 

widow of Capt. Isaac Davis. 
Moses Taylor, Esq., two swords, one carried by Mr. Taylor's 

grandfather, at the battle of Bennington, and the other 

by Capt. Silas Jones, at South Boston. 
Edwin J. Piper and brother, of Springfield, the drum and 

sword belonging to Major Josiah Piper, of Acton. 
W. A. Wilde, Esq., engraving of Gen. Grant. 
L. C. Baldwin, South Acton, plate for clock. 
Silas Hosmer, Concord, '^paper cutter," made from one of 

the timbers of the Old North Bridge. 
Eugene L. Hall, photographs of Library, etc. 



CIRCULATION OF BOOKS. 



From October 11, 1890, to March 11, 1891, a period of five 
months, a total of 5770 books were issued from the library. Pre- 
vious to October 11, no record was kept, but it is safe to say that 
about 9000 volumes have been taken from the library since the 
opening. No diminution of public interest is apparent. 

The greatest number issued in one day, was 228, on March 
7, 1891. 

Number of library cards issued to present time 586. 
Fines collected, |12.67. 

For the Trustees, 

WILLIAM D. TUTTLE, 

Secretary, 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 

For the School Year 1890-61. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 39 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the Town of Acton : 

But for the annual March meeting, the jottings of the 
calendar, the singing of the blue-birds, and the courteous 
reminders of the fathers of the town that the School Report 
is due, we should be inclined to question the statement. 

The wheels of Time glide swiftly and quietly over the 
track, and we fail to note their passage till some of the way- 
stations are reached. 

What about the Report? Much the same as in former 
years. Regrets repeated and emphasized. Changes among 
the teachers, a fair average. Parental co-operations, the 
usual percentage. Epidemics, not fatal, but in some schools 
at times serious and detrimental to the surest and happiest 
progress. The attendance of the scholars, with some 
painful exceptions, encouraging to Teachers and Committee. 
Progress in studies, decidedly hopeful. Fidelity, earnest 
work, tact, patience and success among the teachers, variable, 
but quite up to the level of former reports. 
The Ideal School. 

Have you seen the ideal school anywhere within the 
Acton lines? 

What do you mean by the ideal school ? Is it the school 
where the teacher is a model of serene temper, repressing 
every passionate word and feeling, patiently enduring all the 
irritations of the varying moods of the scholars, weather and 
personal conditions, quick to detect the idle, mischievous or 
studious habit in any part of the room, brave to sound the 
alarm when the crisis of disorder is reached, wise to do the 
right act at the right moment — when to make a mistake is 



40 ANNUAL REPORT 



to imperil the tone of the school for months — loving and 
caring for the good of every scholar on the roll as if stand- 
ing in the mother's or father's place, with no hobby for any | 
particular study of the curriculum, but with an intense zest ; 
for every line of knowledge, with a motive power reaching ' 
far into the heavens, which poor pay and un appreciating ; 
returns cannot drag from the heights ? i 

Those teachers are rare. Perhaps not that ideal has i 
been seen on Acton soil within the year. Some actual 
specimens have at least suggested that ideal. We are thank- j 
fui for the approximate. i 

Again the question returns : " What do you mean by ' 
the ideal school ? " j 

Is it the school where order reigns supreme mistress of -1 
the whole department, through the aisles, through the desks, ; 
from the platform to the rear, crosswise and lengtliwise, from \ 
the crown of the head to the tip of the foot, the teacher a ] 
mirror for the scholars and the scholars each separate mir- , 
rors for the teacher, papers, pencils, books, slates, all obedient | 
to the same silent power, the voice of the teacher one of love i 
and authority sweetly blended, the voice of the scholar a | 
re-echo of the teacher's ; where all ambitions are helpful to j 
the general good, where the little jealousies and bickerings 
of the outside world find no entrance, where the sparkling | 
eye tells the story of some new hidden treasure reached in j 
the search for knowledge, where the gleesome word leaps 
from the mouth unconsciously : " I have caught one I " : 
Caught what? "One of those golden moments, flying by I 
with yellow wings, swifter than light." ' 

Yes, something like that has been seen ; not, to be sure, ; 
just like that, but more like that than anything else. Where ? | 
In what part of the town? Visit the schools and make your j 
own independent judgements. Do not take the statements , 
of Committeeman or of your next door neighbor, who may 
have some freak of personal favoriteism or prejudice, un- 
founded, but go for yourselves. Not with a scowl, not with 



TOWN OF ACTON. 41 



an alien tone, not with glasses that magnify the smallest 
foibles into huge monsters of frightful mien, not when the 
nerves are tired with the jangle of poor results in the 
kitchen or at the dinner hour ; but go when the good angels 
are with you, and if you do not see the vision charge the 
fault where you please, but be sure you do not make any 
mistake in that charge. 

Different Points of View. 

The merits or demerits of a school or teacher depend 
upon where you take in the perspective. 

View it from the tax-payer's stand, and what should be 
his judgment ? We will wait for a moment and let him have 
the floor : 

" When the tax bills come in this is my first thought : 
It is a large sum for a poor man like me to pay every year ; 
but upon taking breath I say 'all right.' I would not live 
in a town where I could not have this chance of paying a 
reasonable amount for schools. I am not rich enough to 
afford this economy of letting the children grow up in the 
range of my estates without school training. When I go 
out upon my lands and put in those sturdy strokes which 
tire the muscles, I remember that some of those strokes are 
to pay the teachers for educating the children of our town, 
and half the fatigue leaves me at the thought. I have no 
children of my own, but all the children of the hamlet 
become mine when I pay and work for their good. I at once 
feel the nobility of a pater familias on a large scale, and the 
days and nights go by with a glow. Yes, gentlemen, keep 
up your schools and see that the children for whom we toil 
are making the most of their school days. See that they are 
all there and doing their very best." 

The Parents' Standpoint. 

Let them speak for themselves : 

" We wish we could see those teachers and tell them 
face to face how much we owe them for what they have done 



42 ANNUAL REPORT 



for our boys and girls. Every month shows gains of knowl- 
edge and improved manners, and the credit, we know, must 
be largely due to a cultured mind in the teacher. The days 
are shortened and the pleasure doubled by this friendly share 
in our responsible trusts. ^ 

" Thanks to the tax-payers for lifting in part the bur- 
dens from our shoulders. What could we do if we had to 
pay from our own pockets the extra expenses of tuition and 
books for our children at school ? As it is, with all our 
economy and toil, we can scarcely make the ends of the year 
meet. Yes, tell every one of them that they have done a 
generous act in tiding us across the chasm that parted the 
two ends." 

The Teacher's Standpoint. 

Mark her words : 

" I feel every morning when those boys and girls march 
into the room from their several homes, well fed, tidily clad 
and eager for the new day's work that they come fresh from the 
parental care. I thank every one of these parents for giving 
good cheer at the start, for those parting salutes of encour- 
agement and caution. I will match them, if in my power, 
by an equal faithfulness in this part of the line, and may 
God help us both on all the line, in the outgoing and incom- 
ing trains. The school without this home inspiration is a 
weakling." 

Attention is called to some of the statutes of the State, 
bearing upon the schools. 

At the last session of the Legislature, the law in regard 
to school attendance was changed, so that children between 
the ages of eight and fourteen years must now attend thirty 
weeks during the year. 

The Acts of 1889, 464, Section 1, have been amended 
so as to read as follows : 

Section 1. Every person having under his control a 
child between the ages of eight and fourteen years, shall 



TOWN OF ACTON. 43 



annually cause said child to attend some public day school 
in the city or town in which he resides, and such attendance 
shall continue for at least thirty weeks of the school year, if 
the schools are kept open that length of time, with an allow- 
ance of two weeks' time for absences not excused by the 
Superintendent of Schools or the School Committee ; and 
for every neglect of such duty, the person offending shall, 
upon complaint of the School Committee or any truant 
officer, forfeit for the use of the public schools of such city 
or town a sum not exceeding twenty dollars ; but if such 
child has attended for a like period of time a private day 
school approved by the School Committee of such city or 
town, or if such child has been otherwise instructed for a 
like period of time in the branches of learning required by 
law to be taught iri the public schools, or has already acquired 
the branches of learning required by law to be taught in the 
public schools, or if his physical or mental condition is such 
as to render such attendance inexpedient or impracticable, 
such penalties shall not be incurred. 

Memorial Day. 

Statute law : "In all the public schools of the Com- 
monwealth, the last regular session prior to Memorial day, or 
a portion thereof, shall be devoted to exercises of a patriotic 
nature." 

Contagious Diseases. 
Chapter 47, Section 9, of the Revised Statutes : " The 
School Committee shall not allow a child who has not been 
duly vaccinated to be admitted to or connected with the 
public schools." 

The following act was passed in 1885 : 

" The School Committee shall not allow any pupil to 
attend the public schools while any member of the household 
to which such pupil belongs is sick of small pox, diphtheria 
or scarlet fever, or during the period of two weeks after the 
death, recovery or removal of such sick person, and any 



44 ANNUAL REPORT 



pupil coming from such household shall be required to 
present to the teacher of the school the pupil desires to 
attend, a certificate from the attending physician or Board 
of Health, of the facts necessary to entitle him to admission 
in accordance with the above regulation." 

High School. 
The graduating exercises Friday evening, June 20, in 
the Town hall, showed an interest in the school on the part 
of the public never excelled, if equalled. The hall was 
crowded by an intelligent audience, fully appreciative of 
every part of the programme. The floral decorations, per- 
sonal and general, were on a lavish scale of beauty. 



Class Motto: — '' VIRTUE IS OUR ANCHOR.'' 



MUSIC. 

Prayer, Rev. F. P. Wood 

Salutatory and Essay — " Sunlight and Shade,". ..Edith A. Flagg 
Essay—" The End Not Yet," Jennie E. McCarthy 

MUSIC. 

Essay — " Acton Memorial Library," Lottie L. Conant 

Essay — " William H. Grady," George I. Harris 

MUSIC. 

Essay — '^ Labor and Eest," Addie L. Guilford 

Essay and History — "The National Flower,". .Clara B. Bobbins 

MUSIC 

Essay — " How shall Graduates Improve?" L. Emma Noyes 

Essay — " Acton's Industries," Harvey P. Tuttle 

MUSIC 

Essay and Prophecy — " The Gentlemen in History," 

Clara L. Hammond 

Essay and Valedictory — " Looking Backward," Susie M. Poultney 

MUSIC 

Presentation of Diplomas 

MUSIC 



TOWN OF ACTON. 45 



Three years' course of the High School, subject to 
changes which may hereafter be made, according to the 
judgment of the Committee, and the light of experience. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term — Arithmetic and Bookkeeping, alternating. 
English Grammar and Composition. General 
History. 
Second Term — Arithmetic and Bookkeeping, alternating. 
English Grammar and Composition. Gen- 
eral History. 
Third Term — Arithmetic and Bookkeeping, alternating. 
Rhetoric begun. Botany. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term — Algebra begun. Rhetoric continued. Physi- 
ology. 

Second Term — Algebra continued. English Literature be- 
gun. Physics begun. 

Third Term — Geometry begun. Physics continued. English 
Literature continued. 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term — ^Geometry continued. Latin begun. Chemistry 

begun. 
Second Term — Physical Geography. Latin continued. Chem- 
istry continued. 
Third Term — Civil Government. Latin. Geology. 

Four recitations in each branch per week. Wednesday, 
a modified programme, including compositions, reading, 
spelling, drawing, and other miscellaneous recitations as shall 
be deemed the most important at the time. . 

The monthly written test in this, and in all the schools, 
to be continued as the fairest and surest proof of the real 
progress made. This reveals the weak and strong points of 
scholarship. 

The questions are considered in silence and indepen- 



46 ANNUAL REPORT 



dently without interference from teacher, committee, school- 
mates, or the public. 

For the sake of public inspection, the doors of all the 
schools are open to visitors at any time which may suit their 
convenience. More frequent visits by parents and friends 
are welcome. 

The whole number of different pupils in the High school 
during the year, was 53. 

Number of pupils over 15 years, . . . . 21 

Number of pupils under 15 years, .... 32 
Total average membership, ..... 34.42 

Total average attendance, ..... 31.25 

Average percentage of attendance, .... 90.79 
Number applicants in written examination in June, . 37 
Number admitted entitled to certificates, ... 23 

Mr. Armstrong has added another year of faithful ser- 
vice as Principal of this school. Order, discipline and studi- 
ous habits have remained as the marked features of the 
school when visited. 

The unusual number of applicants for admission to the 
school in June, and the success of so many, has added an im- 
portant working force. The new class has entered upon the 
course with apparent purpose to make the most of it, to their 
own advantage and to the future credit of the school. 

It is the unanimous judgment of the School Committee, 
that the question of the transportation of the scholars to 
the High School should soon be determined by the town. 

If the school is to rotate as heretofore, or is to locate 
permanently in one place, it seems desirable that the pupils 
should, so far as is practicable, be relieved of too great in- 
equality in the expense of attending. 

As the town is situated, and is likely to be in the future, 
the question is one which should be be considered in all its 
bearing. 

No hasty decisions should be reached to be annulled in 
a passion. It is hoped some feasible plan may be presented 
at the April meeting which the sober and generous sentiment 
of the citizens can approve. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 47 



THE CENTRE SCHOOL. 
Grammar Department — Spring Term. 

Miss Ida J. Bishop, - - - - Teacher. 
Miss Bishop continued in charge of this school during 
the spring term, devoting her energies faithfully to the work. 
Her acquirements in knowledge, her methods of instruction, 
and her personal interest in her pupils, are especially to be 
commended. She has fine perceptions of what should be the 
loyalty of scholars to the control of the teacher, and failing 
to reach her own ideal, and encountering obstacles which she 
cared not to meet on a second trial, she gracefully retired. 

Fall and Winter Terms. 
Miss Clara B. Holden, . - - - Teacher. 
She is a graduate of the High School at Concord, has 
fine literary tastes and successful experience as a disciplinarian 
and teacher in other schools. She is thorough in her in- 
structions, accomplishing rapidly in the drill work of the 
school-room, is unsparing of her strength, and with the 
friendly co-operation of scholars and parents, cannot fail to 
be a great blessing to the district. The exercises of the pub- 
lic half-day in this school were well attended, and could not 
be witnessed without impressing the visitors with the ability 
and devotion of the teacher. 

CENTRE PRIMARY. 
Miss Sarah E. Hammond, - - - Teacher. 
This school has been fortunate in retaining the services 
of the same teacher during the whole year. Miss Hammond 
has maintained order, and has led the pupils along the right 
paths in a quiet, firm and happy way. Good progress has 
been made in laying the foundations for promotion to the 
higher grades. We trust there will be, in the coming term, 
additions to the membership of this school, which will im- 
part to it new interest and importance. 



48 ANNUAL REPORT 



NOBTH SCHOOL. 
Spring Term. 
Miss Jessie F. Jones, - . - - Teacher. 
Miss Jones continued in charge of this school during 
the spring term. The same alacrity, faithfulness and order 
in the management of the school were noticed as in prev- 
ious terms. The two from this school who appeared as can- 
didates for admission to the High School, passed with credit 
the written test in June, and a third would have doubtless 
also passed if his courage had been equal to the trial. Miss 
Jones, during the summer vacation, receiving the offer of a 
graded school with increased pay in her native place, Water- 
town, accepted the situation. 

Fall and Winter Terms. 
Miss Susan E. Conant, - . - - Teacher. 
Miss Conant is a graduate of the Acton High School, 
and of the Framingham Normal. She had enjoyed the op- 
portunity of testing her powers as a teacher in a neighbor- 
ing town, and entered upon her duties with a confidence be- 
gotten of success. Her vivacity and pleasant manners, her 
thorough drill in the Normal methods, her resolute purpose 
to succeed in what she undertakes, joined with the co-opera- 
tion of scholars and parents, are the omens of her ultimate 
victory. 

The public half day occurring in the midst of a snow 
storm, still found every member of the school present, a 
large number of visitors and a programme of exercises, which 
were duly appreciated by all. 

EAST SCHOOL. 

Spring and Fall Terms. 

Miss Susan A. Wetherbee, - - - Teacher. 

Miss Wetherbee has persisted in her good work in this 

district as if possessed of a passion for its cares. In season 

and out of season, in sunshine and in storm, with strength 

and without strength, with voice and without voice, her 



TOWN OF ACTON. 49 



dauntless spirit carried her through two terms of the year, 
when, to the regret of all, she was obliged to say positively, 
" Thus far but not one more step ; my work is done ; I wish 
it were better done." We are all thankful she was able to 
complete it so bravely and well. Her reward is not in her 
portemonnaie, but in the testimony of a good conscience, and 
in the lasting memories of the groups whom she has loved 
and taught. 

Winter Term. 
Miss Rena M. Cark, _ . . . Teacher. 

Even an experienced teacher with the prestige of suc- 
cess in other schools might well pause before assuming 
responsibilities which had been borne so long and so accept- 
ably by her predecessor. 

Miss Carr has done well under the circumstances. She 
has steadily gained in the confidence of her pupils. She took 
the craft when the flag was flying at half-mast, but she steered 
among the breakers and gallantly reached the peaceful waters. 
Let her have the full sympathy and aid of parents and 
scholars, and more assured results are certain to come in the 
future. She has patience, firmness, love for her pupils, and a 
full equipment of mind for the work. The exercises of the 
public half day were well attended and could not be wit- 
nessed without a hearty approval. 

SOUTH EAST SCHOOL. 
Miss Hattie L. Tuttle, - - - - Teacher. 
This school has been favored with Miss Tuttle as teacher 
through the entire year. She has retained the increasing 
confidence of scholars and parents. She has order, thorough 
methods of instruction, personal interest in her scholars, and 
a devotion to her work. Some of the older pupils of the dis- 
trict have come in during the winter to take advantage of 
her service, and showed their appreciation of her help by a 
handsome token at the close of the term. 

Upon the united request of local committee, parents and 



50 ANKtJAL REPORT 



scholars, the school was continued through the spring vaca- 
tion, with the understanding that the respite was to come 
later in the season. This was to compensate some of the 
older masters, who are obliged to lose a portion of the spring 
term by work outside. 

The public half day was well attended and the exercises 
were completed with commendable interest on the part of all. 

SOUTH SCHOOL. 

Grammar Department. 

Miss Clara A. Johnson, - - - Teacher. 

This train has been on time right through the year. The 
Conductress is always careful to have all the machinery, 
wheels, brakes, engine, steam, ventilators, lights, seats, pas- 
sengers, in trim rig for the trip. When the train starts all 
are aboard and in position, sure of a pleasant passage and safe 
arrival. The course is steady up and down the grades, 
around the curves, through the drifts, over the bridges. 
When the train stops there is no rude, loud shouting at the 
door, no jostling of passengers to see who shall first make his 
outing, but John, Peter and Moses, Susan, Grace and Sarah, 
jauntily abide their time. In June the train stopped at the 
High School station, and twelve, the entire company, apply- 
ing, received their tickets and stepped on board with a quiet, 
but gleesome satisfaction at the outlook. At last heard from 
they were making fine progress up the heights of the table 
lands beyond. 

At the public half day there were many at the station 
to greet the incoming train, to see how the passengers had 
fared, and what kind of reports they could make. Warm 
congratulations were given as the different tales were told. 
The epidemics had been on board during the latter part of 
the route and had given some of the passengers a worn, weary 
look, but the old fire burned within and sparkled in the eye, 
and kindled in the voice. Many thanks are due the Con- 
ductress for the successful issue of the trip. 



TOWN OF ACTON-. 51 



Primary Department — Spring Term. 
Miss Hedessa L. Sharp, - - - Teacher. 
Miss Sharp continued in charge of the school during the 
spring term. Much the same features marked the instruc- 
tion, discipline and management of the school as had been 
previously noticed and commended. 

It was feared that any change of teacher, when the bal- 
ance was struck, might not be to the credit of such change. 
The circumstances, as considered at the time of decision, 
seemed to point towards the risk, with the hope that it might 
be in the end to the advantage of all concerned, teacher as 
well as scholars. 

Fall and Winter Terms. 

Miss S. Anna L. Tirrell, - - - Teacher. 

Miss Tirrell is from Braintree, has had fine success in 
other schools, has methods of her own, and those most 
approved in the normal training. She works with a steady, 
earnest, quiet energy, and before the day is finished the 
scholars find a good work has been accomplished, that valu- 
able knowledge has been stored up for future use, the mind 
has been trained and the will controlled. The public half 
day was gladly improved by the parents and friends of the 
school, and this silent but sure testimony was in commenda- 
tion of teacher and scholars. 

Some of the exercises in reading in this school would 

have done credit to any of the grades of school. Inflections 

and expressions of sentiment were freely given. This is 

what is most sought and most rarely found. 

WEST SCHOOL. 

Grammar Department — Spring Term. 

Miss Alice J. Hoar, ----- Teacher. 

Miss Hoar stood at the helm for this craft during the 
spring term. The waters were sometimes rough and the 
winds boisterous, but she remained calmly at her post, steer- 
ing towards the desired haven. Had she at times taken a 



52 ANNUAL REPORT 



sudden tack, some of the breakers might have been shunned. 
Her serene face betokened no sense of danger; she has some 
of the very choicest traits for a teacher : scholarship, love 
for her scholars, love for her work with all its irritations, 
ambition to excel in all lines of improvement. If there 
could be added the indescribable tact for controlling the dis- 
turbing elements of the school room, her equipment would 
seem to be complete. At the close of the term she was 
approved to continue in charge of the school, but gave up 
the position to resume her course of study in the Normal 
school. 

Fall and Winter Terms. 

Miss Albeetie A. Peeston, - - - Teacher. 
Miss Preston is a graduate of the Acton High School, a 
native of the district in which she teaches, without experi- 
ence as a teacher, and without the drill of the normal course. 
She had experimented a few days as a substitute for Miss 
Wetherbee in the East School. The data thus obtained en- 
couraged the Committee to let her make a venture in the 
West Grammar, hoping for the best, yet tremulous of the 
result. The school under her charge has been quite a suc- 
cess. She has order without apparent waste of nerve power, 
sprightliness in carrying through the programme on time, an 
impartial bearing among the different grades, and reaches 
results which show thoroughness in the preparatory step. 

The public half day brought out a large attendance of 
the ladies of the district. The ladies are said to have keener 
perceptions than the men, and for this reason, possibly, they 
ir»ay have been assigned to the duty of inspection. They 
did it thoroughly, and gave their silent but unanimous 
approval of what they saw and heard. Let the men accept 
the judgment and act accordingly in the future. 
Primary Department. 

Mrs. Harriet H. Gardner, - - Teacher. 

The school has again been favored through the whole 



TOWN OF ACTON. 53 



year with the faithful, earnest and unique care of Mrs. 
Gardner. Young scholars need especial maternal oversight ; 
they have it here in rare degree. They need a wakeful and 
varied routine ; they have it here most certainly. They 
need a rod in the background and an olive branch in front ; 
that seems to be the case here. They need clear explana- 
tions, appeals to the nobler motives, conscious and steady 
movements forward, month after month ; they have them 
here. If you doubt it, go into the court room and watch 
the case for yourself. Enter as judge, attorney, witness, 
juror or prisoner, and the verdict will be the same. 

Respectfully submitted in behalf of the Committee, 

JAMES FLETCHER, Ohairman. 



54 



ANNUAL REPORT 



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O 


O pq 


Acton High, 


A. W. Armstrong, 


36 


55 


34.42 


31.25 


90.79 





55 


24 


32 


Center Grammar, 


Ida I. Bishop, 
Clara B. Holden, 


36 


24 


19. 


15.85 


83. 





24 


1 


23 


Center Primary, 


Sarah E. Hammond, 


36 


17 


13.76 


11.65 


85. 





17 





6 


South Grammar, 


Clara A. Johnson, 


36 


29 


24.85 


23.19 


93. 





29 





27 


South Primary, 


Hadessa L. Sharp, 
S. Anna L. Tirrell, 


36 


56 


37.88 


34.40 


90. 





56 





27 


West Grammar, 


Alice J. Hoar, 
Albertie A. Preston, 


36 


36 


33. 


31. 


94. 





36 





36 


West Primary, 


Mrs. Harriet H. Gardner, 


36 


55 


36.44 


32.45 


89. 


1 


54 





24 


North, 


Jessie F. Jones, 
Susan E. Conant, 


36 


28 


23.22 


20.42 


88. 





28 





20 


East, 


Susan A. Wetherbee, 
Rena M. Carr, 


36 


33 


27.65 


25.57 


92. 





33 





18 


South-east, 


Hattie L. Tuttle, 


36 


16 


12. 

262. 


11. 
256. 


92. 
91. 





16 


3 


8 



Number between 5 and 15, as reported by the Assessors for the year 1890, 270. 



TOWN" OF ACTON. 



55 



LIST OF JURORS. 



The following is a list of persons to serve as jurors for 
the ensuing year, as revised by the Selectmen of Acton, to 
be submitted to said Town at their April meeting : 



Francis Hosmer, 
James R. Lawrence, 
Frank H. Whitcomb, 
Samuel R. Burroughs, 
John C. Keyes, 
Norman A. Davidson, 
William F. Kelley, 
Herman A. Gould, 
Joseph A. Whitcomb, 
Hanson A. Littlefield, 
George W. Worster, 
Waldo Littlefield, 
Luther Conant, 



S. Hammond Taylor, 
Daniel H. Farrar, 
Lyman Tuttle, 
Lorenzo A. Pratt, 
James P. Brown, 
Chas. S. Twitchell, 
Edward J. Blethen, 
Samuel Jones, Jr., 
George A. Conant, 
Thomas F. Noyes, 
Cyrus Hale, 
Elbridge J. Robbins, 
Luke J. Robbins, 



WM. F. STEVENS, ) Selectmen 

GEORGE R. KEYES, \ of 
HOWARD B. WHITE, ) Acton, 



56 ANNUAL REPORT 



TOWN WARRANT. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
middlesex, ss. 
To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in the Counts/ 
of Middlesex, Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants 
of the Town of Acton, qualified to vote in the elections and 
Town affairs, to assemble in the Town Hall, in said Town, 
on MONDAY, THE SIXTH DAY OF APRIL, A. D. 
1891, at one o'clock in the afternoon, then and there to act 
upon the following articles as they may think proper, viz. : 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside in said 
meeting. 

Art. 2. To fill all vacancies in the list of Town Offi- 
cers and Committees. 

Art. 3. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for the support of schools, and for school supplies for 
the present year, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 4. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise to repair the roads the present year, or act anything 
thereon. 

Art. 5. To see if the Town will make any alterations 
in the road leading from the house of Herman A. Gould to 
South Acton, near the " Puffer Place," so-called, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Art. 6. To see if the Town will lay a new floor in the 
Town Hall, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 7. To see what action the Town will take in re- 
lation to the petition of James D. Coburn and others to the 



TOWN OF ACTON. :67 



County Commissioners, for the re-location of the Littleton 
road, leading from the Union Turnpike, so-called, to the 
house of Samuel R. Burroughs. 

Akt. 8. To see what action the Town will take in re- 
lation to the pay of road men for the present year. 

Art. 9. To see if the Town will vote to locate the 
High School at South Acton for the ensuing year, or a,ct any- 
thing thereon. 

Art. 10. To see if the Town will furnish transporta^ 
tion for the pupils of the High School. 

Art. 11. To see if the Town will vote to put a system 
of ventilation into some one of its school-houses, or act any^ 
thing thereon. 

Art. 12. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
one hundred and twenty-five dollars for the due observance 
of Memorial day, or act anything thereon. ; 

Art. 13. To see what amount the Town will raise to 
defray Town charges for the present year, or act anything 
thereon. 

Art. 14. To vote by ballot, "Yes, or No," in answer 
to the question : ''Shall licenses be granted for the sale of 
intoxicating liquors in this Town for the present year ? " 

Art. 15. To consider and act upon the acceptance of 
the Jury List, as revised by the Selectmen. 

Art. 16. To see if the Town will accept the reports of 
the Selectmen, Overseers of the Poor, School Committee, 
and other Town officers. 

Art. 17. To see if the Town will authorize the Treas- 
urer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money 
for the Town, if necessary, in anticipation of the taxes for 
the current year. 

Art. 18. To hear the reports of any Committees 
chosen to report at this meeting, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 19. To see if the Town will instruct the School 
Committee to appoint a Superintendent of Schools. 

Art. 20. To see if the Town will appropriate one 



5S ANNUAL REPORT 



thousand dollars for special highway work in South Acton, 
and at the Powder Mills, or act anything thereon. 

Aet. 21. To see if the Town will vote to make special 
repairs on the road leading from the " Charles Tuttle Place," 
to the Littleton line, and make a special appropriation for 
the same, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 22. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
six hundred dollars, for the care and maintenance of Street 
lamps for the ensuing year, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 23, To see if the Town will make special repairs 
on the " Great Road " so-called, from near the residence of 
Otis H. Forbush, to near the residence of D. J. Wetherbee, 
and appropriate two hundred dollars therefor. 

Art. 24. To see if the Town will accept of the Act of 
the Legislature, relating to the employment of a Union 
School Superintendent. 

Art. 25. To see if the Town will raise a sum of money 
for the maintenance of the Memorial Library. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
up copies, attested by you, in the following places : one at 
the Post Office, in the centre of the Town ; one at the store 
of Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee ; one at the store of C. H. 
Mead & Co.; one at the Nagog House, and one in each of 
the railroad stations in the Town, seven days at least before 
the time appointed for holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due return of this Warrant, 
with your doings thereon, to the Selectmen or Town Clerk, 
on or before the time of holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands, in Acton, this the twenty-sixth 
day of March, in the year one thousand eight hundred and 
ninety-one. 

WM. F. STEVENS, ) Selectmen 

GEORGE R. KEYES, [ of 
HOWARD B. WHITE, ) Acton, 



TOWN OF ACTON. 59 



TOWN OFFICERS FOR 1891 



Town Clerk^ 
William D. Tuttle. 



Selectmen^ 
Howard B. White, Wm. F. Stevens, George R. Keyes. 

Assessors, 
Phineas Wetherbee, Chauncy B. Bobbins, John White. 

Overseers of the Poor, 
Elisha H. Cutler, Lyman C. Taylor, Aaron C. Handley. 

Toiufi Treasurer, 
Jona, K. W. Wetherbee, 

Auditors, 
Hiram J. Hapgood, D. James Wetherbee. 

School Committee^ 

Eev. James Fletcher, Chas. L. Bradford 3 years 

Charles J. Williams, Davis C. Harris 2 " 

A. A. Wyman, William S. Jones 1 " 

Cemetery Cominittee, 
John Fletcher, Levi W. Stevens, Horace F. Tuttle. 

Fence Viewers. 
Nahum C. Reed, 0. W. Mead, Frank Hosmer. 



60 TOWN OF ACTON. 

Surveyors of Lumber^ 

William B. Davis, George H. Harris, William S. Warren, 

Levi W. Stevens, E. F. Eichardson, Charles A. Brooks, 

Jona. P. Fletcher, Herbert T. Clark. 

Surveyors of Wood, 
William B. Davis, George H. Harris, Henry D. Parlin, 

John F. Davis, S. L. Dutton, Herbert T. Clark, 

Jona. P. Fletcher. 

Surveyor of Hoops and Staves. 
Augustus Fletcher. 

Constables. 

E. M. Deeth, South Acton ; James Kinsley, West Acton ; 

Edwin A. Phalen, Acton Centre. 

Fish Committee. 
Luther Conant, Eliiathan Jones, John Fletchei", 

Frank H. Whitcomb, Charles J. Williams, John White. 

Trustees of the Acton Memorial Library. ' 

(Corporate Members.) 

Luther Conant, Delette H. Hall, Adelbert Mead, 

Hiram J. Hapgood, Moses Taylor, D. James Wetherbee. 

(Chosen by the Tovai.) 

Howard B. White 3 years 

William D. Tuttle 2 " 

Eev. James Fletcher 1 " 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TewN OF AeT0N 



FROM 



FFBRDARY 26, 1891, TO FEBRUARY 26, 1892, 



HUDSON : 
The Enterprise Printing Company, j 

1892. I 



I 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



TREASURERS' REPORT. 



TOWN OF ACTON in account with J. K. W. WETHER- 
BEE, Treasurer. 

1892. Dk. 

Feb. 26. To cash paid, State tax, $1,005 00 

Cash paid, County tax, 1,078 85 

Cash paid on Selectmen's or- 
ders, 19,499 06 
Outstanding orders, 1,313 79 
Balance due the town, 1,965 67 

{^24,862 37 

1891. Cr. 

Feb. 26. By cash in the treasury, $1,296 46 

Rec*d for rent of chapel room to Apr. 1, 1891, 33 00 
from Town of Methuen for aid furn- 
ished Wm. Austin, 11 00 
M. E. Reed for hay in Woodlawn 

cemetery, 16 04 

Julian Tuttle, for rent of Town 

hall, 12 99 

for old lumber sold, 18 00 

from Globe Furniture Co. rebate on 

freight of furniture, 7 56 

State Treasurer, corporation tax, 617 28 
State Treasurer, National Bank 

tax, 619 24 

State Treasurer, Military Aid, 

Chap. 279, Acts 1889, 62 00 

State Treasurer, State Aid, Chap. 

301, Acts 1889, 340 00 

State Treasurer, for temporary 

aid furnished State Paupers, 16 00 
M. H. Garfield, for hard pine 

plank, " 6 84 



ANNUAL REPORT 



County Treasurer, on account of 

Leland and Stevens' road, 900 00 

County Treasurer, dog tax, 180 80 

State Treasurer, income of Mass. 

School Fund, 184 56 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, borrowed 

money, 526 55 

Mrs. P. V. Hapgood, borrowed 

money, 500 00 

H. J. Hapgood, borrowed money, 400 00 
Geo. A. Stevens, " " 800 00 

Estate of Wm. Davis, borrowed 

money, 350 00 

Frank H. Jones, borrowed money 600 00 
Varnum Tuttle, " " 1,240 00 

J. A. Bowen, " " 1,000 00 

E. C. Damon, for old bridge plank 6 77 
L. W. Stevens, for lots sold in 

Mount Hope cemetery, 40 00 

John Fletcher, for lots sold in 

Woodlawn cemetery, 22 00 

Estate of Amos Brooks, for aid 

furnished by the town, 64 19 

James Fletcher, for school sup- 
plies sold, 3 41 
D. C. Harris for material left 
from repairing fence in 
North District, 3 95 
C. W. Pitman, for rent of Town 



Hall, 
E. A. Phalen, taxes for 1889, 
E. F. Conant, taxes for 1890, 
J. E. Cutter, taxes for 1891, 
Interest on money in Bank, 


9 50 
160 54 

564 69 

14,188 00 

61 00 


Treasurer's Report of Money Held for Care 

Dr. 

To Hepsabeth Piper Fund, 
Interest received, 
Frederick Eouillard Fund. 
Interest received. 


of Lots in Cemeteries. 

$50 00 

2 00 

100 00 

2 00 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



Cr. 

By Cash paid K. Johnson, for labor on lot of 

Hepsabeth Piper, $2 00 

Cash paid N. Johnson, for labor on lot of 

F. Rouillard, 2 00 

Cash in Treasury, 150 00 

$154 00 

J. K. W. WETHERBEE, 

Treasurer of Acton. 

Acton, Feb. 1892. 
This is to certify that we have examined the accounts of the 
Treasurer of the Town of Acton, and find them correct. 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD, " 
DANIEL J. WETHERBEE, 

Auditors of the Town of Acton. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



SELECTMENS' REPORT. 



SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 



Centre School. 



Paid Rev. James Fletcher, 

U U (< 

ii ii ii 



for teachers, $720 00 

care of house, 65 50 

fuel, 69 82 

cleaning rooms, 11 62 

incidentals, 4 53 



Paid A. A. Wyman, foi 

a a 
ti i( 


West School. 

r teachers, 
care of house, 
cleaning rooms, 
fuel, 
incidentals. 

South School. 

I, for teachers, 

care of house, 
cleaning room, 
fuel, 
incidentals. 

North School. 

for teachers, 

care of house, 
cleaning room, 
fuel, 
incidentals, 


$720 00 

78 00 

11 67 

41 53 

5 70 


Paid Chas. L. Bradford 

ii ii 

a ii 
ii a 
a li 


$720 00 
90 00 

6 00 
30 13 

5 83 


Paid David C. Harris, 

a a 
a a 
(( a 
ii a 


$360 00 

25 00 

4 00 

39 67 

3 73 



$871 47 



$856 90 



$851 96 



$482 40 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



East School. 

Paid Chas J. Williams, for teachers, $360 00 

*^ " care of room, 27 00 

" '' fuel, 42 20 

" " cleaning room, 3 10 

" " incidentals, 4 05 



South East School. 

Paid W. S. Jones, for teachers, $324 00 

" •' care of room, 15 00 

*^ " cleaning room, 4 75 

'' " fuel, 25 75 

" " incidentals, 2 26 



High School. 

Paid A. W. Armstrong, for teaching, $920 00 

Janitors, care of rooms, 34 00 

Geo. Gardner, rent of organ, 15 00 

Geo. Gardner, rent of piano, 10 00 

C. L. Bradford, for moving furniture, 2 00 
F. W. Green, for moving furniture and 

organ, 3 00 

James Fletcher, for fuel, 10 68 

C. L. Bradford, for fuel, 6 00 

E. C. Parker & Co., for fuel, 7 00 

James Fletcher, for incidentals, 2 40 



School Supplies. 

Paid Eev. James Fletcher, $444 11 

A. W. Armstrong, 5 89 



STATE AID. 



Paid Warren B. Ball, Chap. 279, acts 1889, $96 00 
Allen G. Smith, " " 60 00 

Wm. F. Wood, ' " 40 00 



$436 35 



$371 76 



$1,010 08 



$450 00 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Chas. A. Brooks, " 
Addison B. Wheeler, " 
Kichard G. Dane, Chap. 301, 

Luke Smith, " 

Mary Smith, " 

Kebecca C. Wright, '• 

Almira H. Laker " 

Eliza J. Shattuck, " 

Susan B. Winn, " 

Achsa Hanscom, " 

Mary A. Rand, " 

Herbert E. Preston, " 

Mary J. Brown, " 

Thos. J. Sawyer, " 

Emma F. Blood, "■ 



(. 


72 00 


u 


30 00 


l( 


60 00 


ii 


48 00 


iC 


48 00 


ii 


48 00 


a 


48 00 


a 


48 00 


ii 


36 00 


ti 


48 00 


a 


24 00 


a 


20 00 


a 


24 00 


ii 


12 00 


a 


32 00 



$794 00 



SUPPORT OF POOR, 

Paid E. H. Cutler, deficiency on farm to 





March 1, 1891, 


398 80 


a 


aid of Mrs. Trainor, 


69 10 


ii 


ii 


Geo. Kingsley 








children, 


231 00 


a 


a 


Emily F. Town, 


146 71 


ii 


ii 


Clara Wheeler, 


169 46 


ii 


a 


Richard Temple, 


223 32 


a 


a 


W. B. Ball, 


S5 50 


ii 


i- 


Mrs. M. Jones, 


168 00 


ti 


a 


Mrs. Ruth Pike, 


55 00 


a 


a 


Peter Simon&on, 


40 00 


ii 


a 


Geo. 0. Austin, 


11 00 


ii 


a 


Rebecca A. Ran- 








dall, 


15 00 


ii 


a 


J. E. Harris, 


99 14 


ii 


ii 


W.F.B.Whitney, 


28 50 


a 


ii 


Murphy family 








(So. Acton), 


70 85 


a . 


a 


Amos Brooks, 


18 57 


ii . 


a 


Mrs. John Quin- 








land. 


93 01 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



Paid E. H. Cutler, aid of Two journeys to 

Lowell, 2 00 

'^ " Journey to Wal- 

tham, 1 50 

Chas. S. Twitchell, for care of C. A. 

Brooks, 16 50 

$1,942 96 



CEMETERY EXPENSES. 

Paid N.Johnson, for labor in Woodlawn cem- 
etery, 
L. W. Stevens, for labor in Mount Hope 

cemetery, 
Moses A. Reed, for labor in Woodlawn 

cemetery, 
John Fletcher, for labor in Woodlawn 

cemetery, 
John Fletcher, for trees for Woodlawn 

cemetery, 
John Fletcher, for dipper in Woodlawn 

cemetery, 
J. W. Hay ward, for additional land for 

Mount Hope cemetery, 
N. Johnson, for care of Woodbury lot, 
" labor on hearse house 

grounds, 
'^ mowing monum't gr'nds 

" care of Fred'k. Eouillard 

lot, 
" Jona. Piper lot, 

" David M. Handley lot, 

Julian Tuttle, for building wall, Wood- 
lawn cemetery, 
L. W. Stevens, for labor at Mount Hope 

cemetery, 
L. U. Holt, for repairs at Woodlawn 
cemetery. 



20 76 


64 


25 


47 


50 


2 


00 


2 


00 




10 


900 
1 


00 
00 


o 

w 


50 
00 


2 00 
2 00 
4 00 


15 27 


7 40 


2 


75 



$1,073 53 



lO ANNUAL KEPORT 



PRINTING. 

Paid H. S. Turner, for printing March war- 
rants, $3 00 

Enterprise Co., printing 600 sheet re- 
ports, 600 town reports, and town 
warrants, 

A. Hosmer, for 500 town orders and en- 
velopes, 

A. Hosmer, library certificates and no- 
tices, 

Campbell & Hanscom, printing poll tax 
lists, 

H. S. Turner, printing town warrants, 

Enterprise Co., printing voting lists, 

Enterprise Co., printing fire reward no- 
tices, 1 75 

Campbell & Hanscom, printing citation 
for adoption, Laura Maud Kings- 
ley, 6 00 



71 


50 


5 


15 


1 


90 


7 


00 


3 


00 


11 


25 



TOWN OFFICERS. 

Paid Rev. James Fletcher^ supt. of schools, ^125 00 
Hiram J. Hapgood, services as auditor, 

1889-90, 10 00 

C. B. Bobbins, assessor, 1891, 35 00 
Phineas Wetherbee, " '' 50 00 
John White, u u 13 go 
A. A. Wyman, services as ballot clerk, 

1890, 3 00 
• A. A. Wyman, services as ballot clerk 

and teller, 1891, 5 00 

D. James Wetherbee, services as ballot 

clerk and teller, 1891, 5 00 

Phineas Wetherbee, service, teller, 1891, 2 00 

Chas. H. Mead, " " " 2 00 

Hanson A. Littlefield, " " " 2 00 

W. F. Kelley, ' '' u u 2 00 

C. B. Sanders, " " " 2 00 

John Fletcher, '' " " 2 00 

E. A. Phalan, " " *' 2 00 
ILyman C. Taylor, " '^ <^ 2 00 



^110 55 



TOWN OF ACTON. II 



James R. Lawrence, inspector of elec- 
tion, 1890, 3 00 
E. A. Phalan, collecting taxes, 1889, 75 00 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, treasurer, 75 00 
Geo. E. Kej^es, selectman, 45 00 
Gustavus y. Bowen, selectman, 45 00 
Wm. F. Stevens, selectman, 85 00 
" " supt. roads, 75 00 



— ^670 00 



LIBRAE Y EXPENSES. 

Bills Approved by the Trustees. 

Paid M. E. Taylor, for supplies, f 21 24 

D. A. Cutler, transporting books, 50 00 

Ida A. Hale, services as librarian to 

March 1, 1892, 101 00 

James Fletcher, for town history of the 

towns of Woburn, Westford, Sud ■ 

bury and Medford, 5 00 

Julian Tuttle, for services as janitor to 

April 30, 1891, ' 13 40 

James Fletcher, for services as janitor 

to Jan. 1, 1892, 
James Fletcher, for supplies, 
J. E. Cutler, 20,300 lbs. coal, 
Jame Fletcher, for repairs. 



75 00 


32 90 


63 44 


5 26 



$367 23 



EXPENSES ON ROADS ORDERED BY COUNTY COM- 
MISSIONERS. 

Paid Varnum B. Mead, for damages awarded 
by the County Commissioners on 
the Leland-Stevens road, $1,000 00 

L. U. Holt, for drain pipe, 146 53 

J. E. Reed, labor on Hall shop, 8 75 

E. Jones & Co., for lumber, 50 

E. Hall & Sons, '' 3 63 

C. H. Mead & Co., nails, 38 



12 ANNUAL REPORT 



Paid Thos. McCarthy, covering stone, 40 75 

David C.Harris, covering and edge stone, 35 40 

A. C. Piper, labor on turnpike, 335 46 

K Littlefield, " '' 762 96 

" '' " Leland-Stevens road, 229 58 

'' " " Littleton road, 21 57 

Wui. H. Kingsley, labor on bridges, 117 77 

S. A. Guilford, 706 lbs. railing posts, 35 30 

*^ " making over railing posts, 2 80 

" " catch basin grates, 

Samuel Jones, Jr., labor on railings, 

E. Jones & Co., lumber for '-'■ 



7 


00 


25 


26 


28 


00 



$2,801 64 



EXPENDED ON ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

Paid Nahum Littlefield, highway work, f 696 46 

Anson C. Piper, '• '' 1,439 52 

Wm. H. Kingsley, " " 1,237 54 

Anson C. Piper, breaking out roads, 6 20 

Francis Pratt, " " " 12 00 

Forbush & Hartwell " " " 5 50 
Nahum Littlefield, " " " 

and repairing washouts, 32 07 
Henry Warden, breaking out roads, 16 63 
Thomas McCarthy, " -' '' 5 28 
A.S.Fletcher, labor on bridges, So. Acton, 30 94 
Samuel Jones, Jr., labor on bridge rail- 
ings, 10 26 
J. E. Cutter, breaking out roads, 18 ^b 
Chas. Wheeler, " '• ♦' 16 85 
A. C. Piper, dynamite, 2 00 
A. H. Jones, repairing washouts, 5 S5 
J. P. Brown, " tools, 2 75 
S. A. Guilford, " scraper, 75 
Samuel Jones, Jr., labor on railings, 54 00 
H. T. Clark, repairing scraper, 4 50 
" cover to catch basin, 30 
N. Littlefield, powder and fuse, 4 50 
'' '' repairs & blacksmith bill, 21 53 
" " covering stone, 2 00 



TOWN OF ACTON. I3 



Paid N. Littlefield, use of gigger, 
" '' 14 posts, 

" " gravel, 

Geo. F. Tyler & Co., repairs, 
J. Kinsley, use of road for Hurley, 
A. A Haynes, 72 loads gravel, 

F. C. Nash, 600 " " 

L. Rouillard, 121 " '' 

F. H. Whitcomb, 209 " '' 

A. Farrar, 225 " " 

E.Jones & Co., railing lumber and hard- 
ware, 
Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, drain pipe, 
A. C. Piper, repairs on scraper, 

I. F. Duren, removing 5 apple trees in 
making changes on hill near Abel 
Farrar's, 
Aaron Foster, cutting brush, 
I. A. Sampson, 26 loads gravel. 



1 


00 


1 


20 


4 


25 


8 


50 


8 


00 


3 60 


30 


00 


6 


05 


10 45 


11 


25 


80 


83 


42 


31 


2 


60 


40 


00 


2 


10 


1 


30 




— f 3,879 52 



REPAIRS ON TOWN BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS, 

Paid Francis Jones, for painting at South 

school house, 
Chas. J. Williams, for repairs at East 

school house, 
Chas. L. Bradford, for repairs at South 

school house, 
C. J. Williams, for repairs at East school 

house, 
N. Johnson, for repairs at Centre school 

house, 
F. W. Gray, for painting monument flag 

staff, 
Chas J. Williams lumber and^ labor on 

East school fence, 
Francis Jones, for painting at South 

school house, 
F. Z. Taylor, for labor on town hall floor, 
Francis Conant, for repairs at South 

school house, 36 16 



9 10 


1 50 


3 00 


6 6^ 


1 35 


3 00 


74 52 


23 41 
31 50 



14 AN-XUAL REPORT 



Paid C. L. Bradford, for repairs at South 

school house, 
F. D. K. Hoar, for repairs at West school 

house, 
A. A. Wyman, for repairs at West school 

house, 
Sam'l. Jones, Jr., for repairs at South 

school house, 
W. L. Mead, for repairs at West school 

house, 
W. S. Jones, for repairs at South East 

school house, 
Francis Jones, for painting at South 

school house, 
Francis Jones, for labor and stock on 

town hall floor, 
Spofford Robbins, for labor on town hall 

floor, 
Spofford Robbins, for repairs on town 

hall, 
James Fletcher, for 18 desks for school 

houses, 
C. J. Williams, for repairs at East 

school house, 
F. E. Harris, for repairs at West school 

house, 
N. Johnson, for repairs at Centre school 

house, 
Spoft'ord Robbins, for repairs on town 

vault, 
H. T. Clark, for repairs at West school 

house, 
James Fletcher, for repairs at Centre 

school house, 
Sam'l Jones, Jr., for repairs at South 

school house, 
E. Jones & Co., for lumber and hardware 

for town hall floor, 
L. U. Holt, pump for town well, 
L. U. Holt, for repairs at West school 

house, 
Chas. J. Williams, for repairs at East 

school house, 



28 


90 


49 88 


5 


00 


67 


11 


94 32 


10 


00 


6 


75 


11 


50 


42 50 


10 


88 


79 


56 


1 


20 


5 


62 


12 


67 


4 


25 


2 


80 


7 


00 


4 


76 


139 


84 


10 


90 


14 


51 


6 00 



TOWN OF ACTON. 15 



Paid Chas. J. Williams, for work on well at 
East school house, 

Chas. J. Williams, for repairing wash- 
out in East school house yard, 

C. H. Mead & Co., stock for repairs at 
West school house, 

Kev. James Fletcher, for repairs at 
South school house, 

Rev. James Fletcher, for repairs at Cen- 
tre school house, 

L. U. Holt, for repairs at South school 
house. 



4 00 


4 00 


2 32 


9 62 


14 16 


4 00 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 

Paid Chas. J. Williams, for carting fire 

ladders, 25 

Chas. J. Williams, for boat hire, for 

Fish Committee, 25 

Nathan Johnson, for repairs on monu- 
ment flag, 2 02 
James T. Joslyn, Esq., costs of court in 

V. B. Mead case, 43 94 

Chas. H. Walcott, for legal services in 

V. B. Mead case, 50 00 

E. F. Conant, for summoning town 

officers, 2 50 

Luke Blan chard, award of damage on 

hall road, 150 00 

Isaac Davis Post 138, for Memorial day, 100 00 
N. E. Bean, for repairing fire hook, 2 50 

Wm. Chisholm, for ladder, 1 50 

John Fletcher, for fish permits, 3 00 

" " " pass books for Fish 

Committee, 30 

Chas. J. Williams, advertising for High 

school, 75 

Chas. J. Williams, for cleaning East 

school well. 2 00 

Julian Tuttle, for services as registrar 

of voters, to May 1, 1891, 12 00 



^850 14 



1 6 ANNUAL REPORT 



Paid Phineas Wetherbee, for damages on Hall 

road, 144 18 

Fred'k. C. Nash; for legal services in 

Blanohard case, 37 50 

Fred'k. C. I^ash, for legal services in 

Wetherbee case, 37 50 

John S. Keyes, Justice of Central Midd. 
Court, for fee and expenses in 
criminal cases, 23 60 

J. H. Whitney, for expenses in Barker 
case, 

E. Jones & Co., coal for town hall, 

Tattles, Jones and Wetherbee, for asses- 
sor's books, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, Collector's 
books, 

H. T. Clark, for ladder rungs, 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, for one weight for 
town scales, 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, for recording deeds, 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, for postage and 
stationery, 

W. F. Stevens, for postage, express and 
stationery, 

L. U. Holt, sealing weights and meas- 
ures, 1890-1891, 

Geo. E. Fifield, for damage to rye field 
by town cattle, 

I. F. Duren, for making returns 41 
deaths,- 

I. F. Duren, for attending 47 burials, 

I. F. Duren, for removing 4 bodies from 
Elbridge Eobbins tomb and burying 
same, 5 00 

Wm. D. Tuttle, for postage, express and 

stationery, 6 80 

Wm. D. Tuttle, for ballot box repairs, 47 

" " Telephone charges, 26 

" " surveying ^[at ceme- 

tary, 1 00 

Wm. D. Tuttle, surveying and making 

plans of road near P. Wetherbee's, 7 00 



57 
29 


00 
24 


1 


00 


1 
1 


50 
50 


1 


65 
90 


1 


50 


6 


78 


10 


00 


1 


50 


10 
141 


25 
00 



TOWN OF ACTON. 1 7 



Paid Wm. D. Tuttle, for collecting and re- 
cording 37 births, 
Wm. D. Tiittle, for recording 45 deaths, 
" " '' 23 mar- 

riages, 
Wm. D. Tuttle, for services Town Clerk, 
" " " as registrar 

of voters, 
C. ]Sr. Pitman, care of town hall and 

clock, 
Geo. R. Keyes, 4 trips to Lowell acc't. 

Geo. Kingsley children, 
Geo. E,. Keyes, 1 trip to Cambridge acc't. 

Blanchard case, 
Geo. R. Keyes, 1 trip to Boston acc't. 

State aid case, 
J. E. Cutter, discount on taxes, 

" for services in dog license 
cases, 
E. A. Phalan, for services at Magog, 
pond, order Fish Committee, 



118 50 
6 50 


3 45 
30 00 


15 00 


22 55 


4 00 


2 00 


2 00 
848 16 


5 00 


5 00 
Sl,860 30 



ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

Susan F. Durkee, for 1890, $4 25 
John A. Puffer, " " 2 00 
Abatement of taxes as certified by the Asses- 
sors for 1891, 78 00 



$84 25 



LOANS AND INTEREST 

Paid J. K. W. Wetherbee, temporary loan, $526 55 
" " interest on same, 

5 months, 5 per cent., 10 97 

Hiram J. Hapgood, note, 400 00 

'^ " interest on note, 8 

months, 6 days, 5 per cent. 13 67 



1 8 ANNUAL REPORT 



Paid Tnttles, Jones & Wetherbee, interest \ 

on f 1,000 note, 1 year, 5 per cent., |50 00 ] 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, interest on | 

$1,500 note, 1 year, 5 per cent., 75 00 i 

Interest on J. W. Hayward's note, 5 \ 

months, 23 days, 5 per cent., 21 62 I 

f 1,097 81 \ 



$20,812 85 



RECEIPTS AND APPROPRIATIONS. 

Balance in the Treasury, Feb. 26, 1891, $1,296 46 
Due from Collector of Taxes, Feb. 26, 1891, 811 10 
Appropriations for Town charges, 6,500 00 
Schools, 4,400 00 
School supplies, 450 00 
Highways, 2,300 00 
Overlayings, 289 23 
State tax, 1,005 00 
County tax, 1,078 85 
Rec'd from State Treasurer, Corporation tax, 617 28 
" " Nat. Bank tax, 619 24 
" " Military Aid, 62 00 
'' '' State Aid, 340 00 
" " Income of Mass. 
School Fund, 184 m 
County Treasurer, dog tax, 180 80 
Chapel Society, rent to Apr. 1, '91, 33 00 
Town of Methnen, for aid fur- 
nished Wm. Austin, 11 00 
Moses G. Eeed, for hay in Wood- 
lawn Cemetery, 16 04 
Julian Tuttle, on acc't Town Hall, 12 99 
Cash for old lumber sold, 18 00 
Globe Furniture Co., refund of 

freight on school furniture, 7 56 

Temporary aid of State Paupers, 16 00 
M. H. Garfield^ for hard pine 

plank, 6 84 



TOWN OF ACTON. 




19 


Eec'd from County Treasurer, on Leland — 






Stevens road, 


1900 00 


J. K. W. Wetherbee, borrowed 






money, 


526 


55 


P. V. Hapgood, borrowed money, 


500 


00 


H. J. Hapgood, 


400 


00 


Geo. A. Stevens, " '' 


800 


00 


Est.W. W.Davis, '' '' 


350 


00 


F. H. Jones, " " 


600 


00 


Varnum Tuttle, " " 


1,240 


00 


John A. Bowen, " " 


1,000 


00 


E. C. Damon, for old bridge plank, 


6 


77 


Levi W. Stevens, for sale of ceme- 






tery lots. 


40 


00 


John Fletcher, for sale of ceme- 






tery lots, 


22 


00 


Interest on money in Bank, 


61 


00 


Estate of Amos Brooks, for aid 






furnished Chas. A. Brooks, 


16 


50 


C. H. Pitman, for rent of Town 






Hall, 


9 50 


Estate of Amos Brooks, 


47 


69 


D. C. Harris, for lumber sold. 


3 


95 


Kev. James Fletcher, for school 






supplies sold. 


3 41 






«ffi9A 7QQ QO 






— 'fl'^iu, 1 00 O^i 



EXPENDITURES. 

For Centre School, $871 47 

West School, SbQ 90 

South School, 851 96 

North School, 432 40 

East School, 436 35 

South East School, 371 76 

High School, 1,010 08 

School supplies, 450 00 

State and Military Aid, 794 00 

Support of Poor, ' 1,942 96 

Cemetery expenses, • 1,073 53 



20 ANNUAL REPORT 






Eoads ordered by County Comi 


mission- 




ers, 




2,801 64 




Printing, 




110 55 




Town Officers, 




670 00 




Eoads and bridges, 




3,879 52 




Town Buildings and grounds, 




850 14 




Miscellaneous expenses, 




1,860 30 




Loans and interest paid. 




1,097 81 




State tax. 




1,005 00 




County tax. 




1,078 85 




Abatement of taxes, 




84 25 




Library, 




367 23 








<a;oo QCift TA 




^r 


Y ^^yKJ %J\J 1 \J 


Balance due from E. F. Conant, taxes 


,1891 


85 87 




J. E. Cutter, taxes, 


1891, 


1,835 08 




Treasurer, 




1,965 67 


3,886 62 




^ 




P26,783 32 


TOWN DEBTS. 




Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, note, 




$1,000 00 




u u ii a 




1,500 00 




P. V. Hapgood, " 




500 00 




Geo. A. Stevens, '^ 




800 00 




Estate Wm. Davis, *' 




350 00 




E. H. Jones, '' 




600 00 




Varnum Tuttle, '' 




1,240 00 




John A. Bowen, " 




1.000 00 


$6,990 00 






Less amounts due from Collectors anc 


I Treasurer, 
26th, 1892, 


3,886 Q>2 


Balance against the Town, Eeb. 


$3,103 38 



WM. F. STEVENS, 
GEORGE R. KEYES, 
GUSTAVUS V. BOWEN, 

Selectmen of Acton. 
Acton, Eeb. 26th, 1892. 

We have examined the accounts of the Selectmen,and find 
them correct. 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD, 
DANIEL J. WETHERBEE, 

Auditors of the Town of Acton, 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



21 



List of Jurors. 



The following is a list of persons to serve as Jurors for the 
ensuing year, as revised by the Selectmen of Acton, to be sub- 
mitted to said town at their April meeting : 



Luther Conant. 
Francis Hosmer. 
James E. Lawrence. 
Frank H. Whitcomb. 
Geo. B. Parker. 
James Kinsley. 
John C. Keyes. 
Norman A. Davidson. 
William F. Kelley. 
Joseph A. Whitcomb. 
Hanson A. Littlefield. 
George W. Worster. 
Waldo Littlefield. 



Acton, March 22, 1892. 



S. Hammond Taylor. 
Daniel H. Farrar. 
Lyman Tuttle. 
Lorenzo A. Pratt. 
James P. Brown. 
Charles S. Twitchell. 
George A. Conant. 
Thomas T. Noyes. 
Cyrus Hale. 
Elbridge J.- Bobbins. 
Luke J. Bobbins. 
John S. White. 
Theron F. Kewton. 

WM. F. STEVENS, 
GEOBGE B. KEYES, 
GUSTAVUS v. BOWEN, 

Selectmen of Acton. 



22 ANNUAL REPORT 



Report of Receipts and Expenditures at the 
Almshouse in Acton. 

For the Year Ending February 29th, 1892, 



ARTICLES ON HAND FEBRUARY 29, 1892. 

11 cows, 

1 bull, 

1 horse, 

9 tons of hay, 

1 ton oat fodder, 
Horse rake. 
Grain, 

2 plows, 
Horse hoe, 
Flour barrels, 
1 wagon, 

1 mowing machine, 
24 market boxes, 
60 hens, 
Apples, 
Canned fruit, 
200 lbs. pork, 
Molasses, 
Kerosene oil, 
40 bushels potatoes. 
Onions, 
20 cords of wood. 



$440 00 


12 00 


130 00 


180 00 


12 00 


18 00 


6 75 


13 00 


2 50 


3 60 


70 00 


12 00 


2 40 


30 00 


4 00 


4 50 


20 00 


2 70 


36 


20 00 


30 


70 00 





TOWN OF ACTON. 


23 


50 lbs. ham, 




$6 25 


Crackers, 




90 


riour, 




6 00 


Tea, 




1 00 


Coffee, 




36 


Sugar, 




30 


Oatmeal, 




15 


Spices, 




50 


60 lbs. lard. 




7 20 


Truit jars. 




4 00 


Eggs, 




40 

*ffi1 0^1 1 7 


» 







RECEIPTS FROM THE TOWN FARM FROM MARCH 
I, 1891, TO MARCH I, i: 



ived for apples, 


$369 96 


Cows, 


146 95 


Calves, 


7 75 


Eggs, 


38 87 


Milk, 


982 16 


Onions, 


21 05 


Potatoes, 


18 55 


Strawberries, 


3 36 







$1,588 m 



EXPENDITURES AT THE TOWN FARM FOR THE 
YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY 29, 1892. 

Axe, f 1 00 

Asparagus, 39 

Brushes and brooms, 2 52 

Barrel linings, 35 



24 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Butter, 

Bread, 

Beans, 

Boots and shoes, 

Bean pots, 

Boxes, 

Blacksmith's bill. 

Bed bug poison. 

Bull, 

Burial expenses of Elijah Brine, 

Cheese, 

Cloth and clothing, 

Cattle cards, 

Cream tartar,' 

Crackers, 

Corks, 

Cucumbers, 

Coffee, 

Carbolic acid. 

Crockery, 

Chocolate, 

Cows, 

Castings, 

Drain pipe, 

Dr. C. B. Sanders' bill, 

Eggs, 

Extract lemon. 

Evaporated apple, 

Farming tools. 

Flour, 

Flour barrels. 

Fertilizer, 

Fish, 

Fruit jars, 

Garden and Field seed, 



$33 49 



1 


27 


9 


63 


6 


30 




55 




35 


3 


04 




75 


12 00 


17 


00 


3 47 


34 


26 




16 




94 


37 


49 




18 




07 


4 


26 




25 


1 


80 




45 


189 


00 


2 


67 


2 


00 


7 


00 




65 




83 


1 


39 


8 


06 


18 


12 


6 


30 


22 


10 


13 


61 


2 38 


22 12 



TOWN OF ACTON. 


25 


Glass, 


$2 62 


Greens, 


84 


Grain, 


617 51 


Hops, 


25 


Hardware, 


6 12 


Holt's, L. U., bill. 


9 62 


Insect powder, 


60 


Kerosene oil. 


2 40 


Lemons, 


1 23 


Labor, 


22 25 


Lamp chimneys, 


57 


Lumber, 


9 60 


Ladder, 


3 00 


Meat bill. 


83 27 


Medicine, 


4 24 


Molasses, 


8 19 


Matches, 


18 


Nest eggs. 


35 


Oyster shells 


90 


Onions^ 


46 


Paris green. 


84 


Paint and oil. 


4 07 


Pins and needles. 


40 


Pails, 


55 


Putty, 


20 


Pigs, 


13 08 


Potatoes, 


12 00 


Rolled oats. 


48 


Rope, 


28 


Rice, 


32 


Rosin, 


15 


Raisins, 


2 38 


Repairs on harness. 


4 65 


Repairs on mowing machine, 


6 35 


Salt, 


2|38 



26 ANNUAL REPORT 






Sweet potatoes, 


75 




Spices, 


2 26 




Soda, 


35 




Soap, 


4 35 




Sugar, 


27 42 




Scraps, 


2 97 




Squashes, 


90 




Stove polish. 


16 




Syrup, 


2 05 




Syrup cup. 


45 




Starch, 


25 




Services of H. C. Scarlet and wife, 


495 ^Q 




" E. H. Cutler, 


50 00 




" L. C. Taylor, 


15 00 




'' A. C. Handley, 


6 00 




Tea, 


3 50 




Tomato plants, 


30 




Tub, 


38 




Tinware, 


2 41 




Thread, 


1 28 




Twine, 


12 




Use of bull, 


1 00 




Vinegar, 


20 




Wheelwright's bill. 


4 00 




Washing powder, 


25 




Wood saw. 


83 




Yeast, 


80 




Expenditures, 




f 1,914 37 


Receipts, 




1,588 Q^ 


Income less than expense. 


^325 72 


Due from treasury to balance account, 




325 72 


Interest on farm. 




240 00 




$565 72 


Victualling and lodging 176 tramps. 




70 40 



Cost of supporting poor on farm, 



$495 32 



TOWN OF ACTON. 27 



Whole number of persons exclusive of tramps 

supported at almshouse, 4 

Average number, 3 3-4 

Present number, 3 

E. H. CUTLEK, ) Overseers 

LYMAN C. TAYLOR, V of 
AARON C. HANDLEY, ) Poor. 

We have examined the above accounts of the Overseers of 
Poor and find them correct. 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD. ) . .-, 

Auditors. 



DANIEL J. WETHERBEE 



,} 



28, ANNUAL REPORT 



Town Clerk's Report for 1891 



BIRTHS RECORDED IN 1891. 

No. Date of Birth. Name of Child. Names of Parents. 

1861. 

1. Jan. 3. Edith May Holton. Charles J. and Jennie A. 

Holton. 

2. Jan. 5. Gilbert Raymond Jones. Fred. G. and Mary A. 

Jones. 

3. Jan. 9. Harry Esmond Goodwin. Edgar and Ida F. Good- 

win. 

4. Jan. 17. Leonard Dupee White. John Sidney and Bertha 

H. White. 

5. Feb. 10. Vera May Charlton. Will Murray and Minnie 

M. Charlton. 

6. Feb. 18. Evelyn Knowlton. Frank R. and Emma S. 

Knowlton. 

7. Mar. 23. Estelle Knowlton. Amasa M. and Elizabeth F. 

Knowlton. 

8. Mar. 9. Glenna Alene Crosby. Frank and Josephine 

Crosby. 

9. Apr. 13. Lela Antonia Simmensen. Peter and Paulina 

Simmensen. 

10. Apr. 22. Walter Ball Kenyon. Noble H. and Eva K. 

Kenyon. 

11. May 4. Walter E. Burr. William R. and Emily Burr. 

12. May 27. Ralph Lewis Hastings. Lewis C. and Emma F. 

Hastings. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 29 



No. Date of Birth. Name of Child. Names of Parents. 

1891. 

13. May 29. Mary Margaret Murphy. Michael and Joanna 

Murphy. 

14. May 31. Andrew Clark Jenkins. Andrew C. and Eachel 

A. Jenkins. 

15. July 10. Virgie E. Wilson. John D. and Agnes A. Wilson. 

16. July 25. A Son. Samuel B. and Harriet Harris. 

17. July 29. Ethel Amy Ball. George W. and Addie B. Ball. 

18. Aug. 9. Jacob S. Harrington. Jas. B. and Effie V. Har- 

rington. 

19. Aug. 30. Thomas Joseph Jackman. James and Margaret 

J. Jackman. 

20. Aug. 15. Levi Clarence Wheeler. Jairus C. and Alice M. 

Wheeler. 

21. Aug.. 25. Everett Eugene Sargent. Albert F. and Sarah F. 

Sargent. 

22. Aug. 29. Ray Nichols bobbins. Webster C. and Amelia 

H. Bobbins. 

23. Sept. 27. A Son. Albert Long and Sophia E. Wetherbee. 

24. Sept. 17. Fred Earle Clark. Charles H. and Hannah K. 

Clark. 

25. Sept. 20. Harry Charles Johnson. Charles J. and Sarah 

M. Johnson. 

26. Oct. 15. Ralph Franklin Lord. Charles E. and Annie N. 

Lord. 

27. Oct. 11. Carl Norman Davidson. Norman A. and M.Alice 

Davidson. 

28. Oct. 16. Gertrude Moore. William J. and Mary A. F. 

Moore. 

29. Nov. 5. Emma Frances Poore. George W. and S. Estelle 

Poore. 

30. Nov. 4. A Son. Charles F. and Annie F. Haley. 



30 ANNUAL REPORT 



No. Date of Birth. Name of Child. Names of Parents. 

1891. 

31. Nov. 10. Agnes Viola Barber. Giles A. and Maggie M. 

Barber. 

32. Nov. 14. John Macone. Alexander and May Grace Ma- 

cone. 

33. Nov. 22. Charles Edward Rodway. Charles B. and Char- 

lotte E. Rodway. 
34-. Nov. 27. Glen Carlton Gould. Herman A. and Sarah E, 
Gould. 

35. Nov. 29. A Daughter. James A. and Minnie F. Annice. 

36. Nov. 29. Willie Russell Gill. James and Jennie Gill. 

37. Dec. 27. Eva May Gilmore. Almon H. and Mabel Gil- 

more. 

1890. 

Feb. 12. Annie Frances Kinsley. James and Annie Kins- 
ley. 



MARRIAGES RECORDED BY TOWN CLERK IN 1892. 

No. Date— 1891. Names and Residence of Parties. Where Married, 

1. Jan. 1. Gilman H. Parlin of Acton, and Annie 

U. Simmensen of Acton. Carlisle. 

2. Jan. 24. Herbert R. Moore of Acton, and Han- 

nah Holm-en of Waltham. Waltham. 

3. Jan. 28. Arthur F. Blanchard of Acton, and 

Charlotte T. Sanderson of Littleton. Littleton* 

4. Feb. 2. Franklin 0. Watson of Minneapolis, 

Minn., and Sarah A. Tuttle of Ac- 
ton. Acton. 

5. Apr. 1. Fred A. Brown of Marlboro, and Mary 

A. Hallowell of Stow. Acton. 

6. May 20. Lewis Grant Freeman of Acton, and 

Annie McCall of Cambridge. Cambridge. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



31 



Lowell. 



Acton. 



Concord. 



Acton. 



Acton. 



Acton. 



No. Date— 1891. Names and Residence of Parties. Where Married. 

7. June 11. Hugh McNamara of Acton, and Bridg- 

et Kelly of Lowell. 

8. June 17. Almon H. Gilmore of Acton, and Ma- 

bel Dufresne of Acton. 

9. July 9. William Sullivan of Acton, and Kate 

Welch of Acton. 

10. Aug. 9. Walter A. Brown of Shelburne Falls, 

and A.Blanche Mead of Boxborough. Acton. 

11. Sept. 2. Edward T. Quimby of Boscawen,]Sr.H., 

and Annie J. Noyes of Acton. 

12. Sept. 2. Elbridge L. Wheeler of Acton, and 

Florence I. Noyes of Acton. 

13. Sept. 9. John E. McGregor of Acton, and Ida 

M. Littlefield of Acton. 

14. Sept. 19. Owen L. Newcomb of Acton, and Ho- 

nora Coleman of Port Greville,]Sr.S. Boston. 

15. Oct. 1. Arthur C. Meehan of Charlestown, 

and Annie E. Bojdan of Acton. Concord. 

16. Oct. 15. George B. Hooper of Acton, and Ida 

E. Priest of Maynard. Bedford. 

17. Oct. 27. Charles A. Hoppin Jr. of Worcester, 

and May Frances Bowen of Acton. Boston. 

18. Nov. 7. Ernest S. Morse of Acton, and Estella 

M. Beach of Acton. Acton. 

19. Nov. 8. John Eedfearn of Acton, and Esther 

Logan of Acton. East Boston. 

20. Dec. 2. Frank A. Merriam of Acton, and Ber- 

tha M. Jones of Acton. Acton. 

21. Dec. 2. Anthony I. Coding of Acton^ and Flo- 

ra E. Clark of Acton. Boxborough. 

22. Dec. 17. Arthur W. Armstrong of Acton, and 

Emily C. Hall of Acton. Acton. 



32 ANNUAL REPORT 



No. Date— 1891. Names and Residence of Parties. Where Married. 

^3. Dec. 24. Samuel R. Simpson of Ac<"on, and Bes- 
sie Vaughn of Acton. Acton. 



ro. 


Date- 


-1891. 


1. 


Jan. 


6. 


2. 


Jan. 


13. 


3. 


Jan. 


24. 


4. 


Feb. 


12. 


5. 


Feb. 


14. 


6. 


Feb. 


17. 



DEATHS RECORDED BY THE TOWN CLERK IN iSgi. 

Names of Persons Deceased. Yrs. Mos. Dys. 

Nancy K. Handley, widow of 

David M. Handley, 49 10 28 

John Mann, 75 6 — 

J. Augustine Houston, . 56 1 24 

Frances A. Stone, widow of Ed- 
win Stone, 37 2 19 

John Whipple Aldrich, 57 3 _ 

Catherine Lecaine Howlett, wid- 
ow of John Howlett, 94 11 — 

7. Feb. 25. Benjamin F. B. Brooks, son of 

Fredson P. and Martha M. 

Brooks, 2 4 8 

8. Feb. 26. Ena May Smith, daughter of 

Geo. H. and Cora E. Smith, _ 10 4 

9. Mar. 6. Charlotte Tarbell Blood, widow 

of Sumner Blood, 
Frank Henry Bulette, 
John F. Blood, 
Patrick Gallagher, 
Susan E. Handley, widow of 

Abraham B. Handley, 
George Chandler, 
Martha Lawrence, 
Clarina A. Warner, widow of 

Elias Warner, 
Henry Brooks, 
Hattie M. Bobbins, 



10. 


Mar. 


18. 


11. 


Mar. 


19. 


12. 


Mar. 


19. 


13. 


Apr. 


2. 


14. 


Apr. 


6. 


15. 


Apr. 


8. 


16. 


Apr. 


16. 


17. 


Apr. 


24. 


18. 


Apr. 


27. 



<5 

32 


5 


28 


56 


1 


21 


75 


— 


— 


86 


10 


12 


80 


10 


25 


84 


1 


2 


82 


11 


29 


61 


3 


24 


21 


11 


2 



TOWN OF ACTON. 33 



No. 


Date-1891. 


19. 


May 5. 


20. 


May 13. 


21. 


May 13. 


22. 


May 17. 


23. 


May 21. 


24. 


May 21. 


25. 


May 22. 


26. 


June 11. 


27. 


June 25. 


28. 


July 7. 



30. 
31. 


July 26. 
July 31. 


32. 


Aug. 6. 


33. 


Aug. 13. 


34. 
35. 


Aug. 22. 
Sept. 2. 



11 


— 


11 


21 


8 


26 


11 


11 


11 


23 


8 


19 



Names of Persons Deceased. Yrs. Mos. Dys. 

Mary Ann McDonald, wife of 

John McDonald, 33 10 — 

Martha B.Sawin^ widow of Sam- 
uel Sawin, 81 — — 
Julia A. Hayward, wife of Ar- 
nold Hayward, 77 10 13 
Alice A. Brooks, wife of Amos 

Brooks, 75 

Gilman H. Parlin, 27 

Amos Brooks, 84 

Caroline K. Bobbins, wife of Al- 

vin M. Bobbins, 69 

Henry P. Chandler, 69 

George Irving Harris, 16 

Edith May Holton, daughter of 
Charles J. and Jennie A. Hol- 
ton, — 6 — 
29. July 25. Infant son of Samuel B. and 

Harriet L. Harris, — — — 

John Swift Fletcher, 42 3 17 

Frances M. Beed, wife of J. Ev- 
erett Beed, 60 — 7 
Mary Ann McCabe, daughter of 

Cornelius and Mary McCabe, 2 1 13 

E. Lester Hall, son of E. Lester 

and Lucy F. Hall, _ 7 3 

Francis Bobbins, 84 4 28 

Walter E. Burr, son of Wm. B. ^ 

and Emily Burr, _ 3 29 

36. Sept. 28. Lucy Jane Tuttle, widow of Hor- 

ace Tuttle, 84 — 11 

37. Sept. 29. James Wood Hayward, 81 3 29 

38. Nov. 2. Thomas Calder, 45 4 ^ 

39. Kov. 8. John J. Beatty, 75 — — 



34 



ANNUAL REPORT 



No. Date— 1891. Names of Persons Deceased. Yrs. 

40. Nov. 9. Bessie Currie, wife of Douglas 

Currie, 31 

41. Nov. 12. Infant son of Cliarles F. and An- 

nie Haley, — 

42. Nov. 24. Mary Skinner, widow of Heury 

Skinner, 95 

43. Nov. 26. Reuel Williams, 43 

44. Dec. 1. Elijah Bryan, 69 

45. Dec. 23. George A. Stevens, 79 



Mos. 


Dys. 


8 


2 


— 


. 9 


3 


10 


11 


— 



NAMES OF PERSONS HAVING DOGS LICENSED 

IN 1892. 



E. F. Shapley. 
C. S. Simonds, 1 female. 
Charles H. Holton. 
George Desseault. 
Mildred E. Handley. 
Willie S. Fletcher. 
Abel Cole. 
C. B. Sanders. 
Wm. Clark. 
Fredson P. Brooks. 
Otis H. Forbush. 
Geo. T. Barstow. 
Lawrin W, Pratt, 



Blanche Bassett. 

Corydon 0. Stone. 

H. A. Littlefield. 

Luther Conant. 

A. L. Lawrence, 1 female. 

A. L. Lawrence, 1 male. 

Chas. J. Williams. . 

Clarence B. Smith. 

Augustus Fletcher. 

John W. Randall. 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, 

George W. Ball. 

Clara L. Stone. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



35 



Samuel Jones, Jr. 
Sylvester Haynes. 
Frank Pratt. 
Daniel H. Farrar. 
Mrs. Daniel Harris. 
Aaron C. Handley. 

D. James Wetherbee. 
Amasa M. Knowlton. 
David C. Harris. 

J. W. Clark. 
Fred Keed. 
Chas. L. Davis. 
Chauncy B. Eobbins, 2. 

E. B. Forbush. 
William Wilson. 
M. E. Taylor. 
Ealph Crooker. 
Thomas Calder. 
Henry Hanson. 

Charles Wheeler, 1 female. 
Charles H. Wheeler. 
Alonzo L. Tuttle. 
John Kelley. 
Geo. H. Brooks. 
Geo- H. Smith. 
Wm. H. Hill. 
Lyman Tuttle. 
Willie H. Gilmore. 
Mrs. Chas. Varney. 
Wm. S. Jones. 
Fred G. Jones. 
Henry M. Smith. 
Webster C. Eobbins, 2. 
Adelbert Mead. 
Octavus A. Knowlton. 



Thomas Manion. 
William Jennings. 
A. J. Fletcher. 
Noble H. Kenyon. 
George McDougal. 
Abel Farrar. 
Charles Morris. 
George A. Hayward. 
Thos. J. Sawyer. 
L. M. Stewart. 
J. C. Hunt. 
John Temple. 
Solon A. Eobbins. 
E. Eddie Fletcher. 
Antoine Bulette. 
W. W. Philbrick. 
Charles S. Moulton. 
Geo. H. S. Houghton. 
Luke Tuttle. 
Chas. A. Harrington. 
Mrs. Geo. F. Flagg. 
Wm. J. Moore. 
Mrs. Jennie A. Pratt. 
Jas. P. Brown. 
Chas. J. Holton. 
J. H. Standish. 
Harvey J. Bishop. 
Eph. L. Hall. 
Moses Taylor. 
Daniel Tuttle. 
A. A. Wyman. 
E. G. Brooks. 
C. H. Mead & Co. 
Chas. Barker. 
Martin H. Worden. 



36 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Warren H. Jones. Fred Lewis. 

William Hayes, 1 female. Lucius S. Hosmer. 

Wm. B. Davis. Alexander Allen. 

Geo. Conant. 

Whole no. of Dogs Licensed, 105. Males, 99. Females, 6. 

Whole amount received from licenses, $228.00. 

WM. D. TUTTLE, Town Clerk, 
Acton, March 2. 1892. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



^TRUSTEBSi 



OF THE 



ON iEIORlAL LIBRARY, 



LUTHER CO:^ANT, 

ADELBERT MEAD, 
MOSES TAYLOR, 

DELETTE H. HALL, 

HIRAM J. HAPOOOD, 

DANIEL J. WETHERBEE, 
LUCIUS A. HESSELTON, 
WM. D. TUTTLE, 

Rev. JAMES FLETCHER. 



38 ANNUAL REPORT 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

Of the Acton Memorial Library, 1891-92^ 



The Trustees of the Acton Memorial Library, in accord- 
ance with custom, hereby present their second annual report. 
In submitting this report we feel that the assured success of 
this very valuable institution will be readily acknowledged by 
everyone. Though there has been a slight diminution in the 
number of books issued, this may be accounted for as arising 
from causes that do not affect the general condition of inter- 
est in the library. 

The number of library cards given out has increased 
during the year from 586 to 703. 

The proportion of books called for from the different de- 
partments of history, fiction, etc., remains about the same as 
last year. 

The whole number of volumes issued during the year 
has been 9937. 

The number of accessions during the year has been 253. 

Number of visitors registered from June 17, 1891, to 
March, 1892, 298. 

Whole number of books now in the library, 4420. 

Number of books lost since the opening of the library, 0. 

Number of books re-bound, 18. 
. Number of magazines bound, 18. 

Fines collected during the year, 1)20.00. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



39 



The means to pay for the books purchased during the 
year were provided as follows : Early in the year, as evi- 
dence of his continued and permanent interest in the library, 
Mr. Wilde sent to the Trustees a check for the sum of |100, 
all of which has been expended in books. The town, at its 
annual meeting in April, appropriated a similar sum, of which 
882.98 has been paid for the same purpose. For the maga- 
zines placed upon the table in the reading room for 1892, the 
sum of $22.95 has been paid. The list of these publications 
is as follows : Atlantic Monthly, Cassell's Magazine, Har- 
per's Monthly, Century Magazine, Scribner's Magazine, St. 
Nicholas, Wide Awake, Harper's Young People, New Eng- 
land Magazine. Mr. Wilde also furnishes the Child's Hour, 
Our Sunday Afternoon and the Cottage Hearth. Mr. Chas. 
J. Williams has also contributed the Congressional Record 
for the same purpose. 

Books donated to the 
William A. Wilde, (proceeds of check fo 
Social Library, 
Rev. G. W. Stearns, 
Department of State, 
Ada C. Davis, 
Hon. M. T. Stevens, 
Luther Conant, 
Augustine B. Conant, 
Hon. F. T. Green haldge, 
Deloraine P. Corey, Maiden 
Frederic A. Tupper, 
Col. Gardner Tufts, 
Smithsonian Institution, 
Jonas S. Hunt, Sudbury, 
Walter Baker, 
Paid for by the Town, 



ibrary during the past year : 

ilOO,) " 112 vols. 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
5 
1 
1 

21 
1 
1 
1- 
1 
1 
100 



Total, 



, 258 



40 ANNUAL REPORT 



Other articles of value donated to the library : 
Picture of Libby Prison, where Union soldiers were confined 

in Richmond, as it appeared in 1863, by Moses Taylor, 

Esq. 
Portrait of Gen. McClellan, by Hon. William A. Wilde. 
"The Last Cartridge," a French engraving, Hon.W.A.Wilde. 

Also, upon the evening of the 20th of April, Mr. Wilde, 
in the Town hall, presented to Post 138, G. A. R., the mem- 
bers of which were present in large numbers, an artist's proof 
engraving of Bachelder's picture of the Battle of Gettysburg 
at the time of the repulse of Longstreet's assault, July 3, 
1863, to be placed in Memorial hall, accompanying the pre- 
sentation with an interesting and eloquent address. 

Afterward, during the same evening. Dr. I. Hutching, 
representing Capt. Aaron C. Handley, who commanded Co. 
E, old Sixth Regt., Mass. Vols., during its second term of 
service in the war of the Rebellion, presented to the Post the 
sword and scabbard carried by Capt. Handley while he was 
in service. The Post in turn, through Commander Delette 
H. Hall, committed the sword to the custody of the trustees 
of the Acton Memorial Library, to be permanently kept in 
Memorial hall, as a memento of that ever memorable contest. 
The sword is a very elegant specimen of workmanship, and 
was presented to Capt. Handley by the company under his 
command, every member of the company contributing to the 
purchase. We give Capt. Handley's letter in full : 

Commander of Isaac Davis Post^ No. 138, Dept. of Mass., 
a. A. R. : 

My Dear Sir — I have treasured and held very highly 
for a long time the sword presented to me by Co. E of the 
6th Mass. Vols., while in the service of our country. I 
think every member participated in the present. 

I now desire to place it in your hands, and through you 
into the custody of the trustees of Memorial Library, to be 



TOWN OF ACTON. 4 1 



kept and preserved by the town of Acton in Memorial hall 
forever. 

I desire that it shall be for the use of Isaac Davis Post, 
No. 138, G. A. R., also for the Benj. Lovell Camp of the 
Sons of Veterans, on all public occasions and celebrations in 
which either of the above organizations or any military or- 
ganization in Acton shall take a part. 

Commander, please accept it for the purposes and uses 
above named. 

Respectfully vours, 

AARON C. HANDLEY. 
South Acton, Mass., April 20th, 1891. 

Even now an inspection of Memorial hall will show that 
it is fast becoming a repository of rare and valuable memen- 
tos of the past, and also an art gallery, to which all visitors 
are welcome. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 
By Wm. D. Tuttle. 
receipts. 
Town appropriation for current expenses, 

" " for new books, 

Gift of Hon. W. A. AVilde for same purpose, 
Fines collected to March 1, 1891, 
to March 1, 1892, 

Total, 

EXPENDITURES. 

Estes & Lauriat, for new books, 

Henry D. Noyes & Co., for magazines for reading 

room, 
Ida A. Hale, services as librarian, 
Julian Tuttle, services as janitor to April 1, 1891, 
Rev. James Fletcher, services as janitor 11 mos. 

to March 1, 1892, 91 67 



1400 00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


12 


67 


20 


00 


1632 67 


1182 98 


22 


95 


102 


00 


13 


40 



42 ANNUAL REPORT 



D. A. Cutler, for transportation of books, 

J. G. Roberts & Co., for re-binding books, etc., 

L. Barta, for printing supplementary catalogues, 

L. Barta, for printing 10,000 library slips, 

J. E. Cutter, for 20,300 lbs. coal, 

M. E. Taylor & Co., for oil and supplies for 1890, 

" u u u u ][g91^ 

For visitor's registry book and ink pot. 
For town histories of Sudbury, Medford, West- 
ford and Woburn, by way of exchange, 
L. U. Holt, for repairs, 
L. Conant, for express charges. 
Janitor, for incidental supplies, 



50 


00 


16 


98 


28 00 


9 


27 


63 


44 


21 


24 


16 


37 


7 50 


5 


00 


2 


00 


2 


70 


36 


16 


$671 66 


632 


67 



Total, 



Deficiency, 138 99 

As will be seen, a portion of the deficiency of $38.99 
arises from the fact that a bill for oil and supplies for 1890, 
amounting to $21.24, was not sent in season to be included 
in the report of that year. The actual excess of expenditure 
being so small, the trustees have voted to ask for an appro- 
priation of $400.00, the same as last year. 

Our library is doing a silent but effective work ; its in- 
fluences are felt in every house in this community. A public 
library is at once a common school and a university, and 
while it presents to us the realities of the past, it indicates 
the lines of progress of the future. And in that future we 
confidently look forward to an ever widening and broadening 
service, for that is the common destiny of institutions of this 

character. 

For the Trustees, 

LUTHER CONANT. 



7 jr^^ 



\^a^==^ 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR 1891-92. 



44 ANNUAL REPORT 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 



To the Town of Acton : 

In the retrospect of the year we have first to remind 
the citizens that God has been having what seems to have 
been a special oversight of the youth for the few months 
past. No contageous diseases have been prevalent. The 
grippe, so disastrous in its attacks upon the adults and the 
aged, has turned to the right and left when meeting the boys 
and girls on their cheery path to and from the school work. 
The average percentage of attendance for all the schools for 
the year is 91, which is better than was feared, and better 
than the general average for the State. There has been no 
approach to a failure on the part of any of the schools or 
teachers. There has been but little change in the personnel 
of instruction, and no desire for a change by the committee, 
except where stern necessity demands. The same is true of 
text books, the policy being to hold fast that which is known 
to be good rather than imperil appropriations upon doubtful 
experiments at the solicitation of every new-comer. Some 
extra expenses have been incurred in the way of repairs of 
school buildings, but they have been in the line of practical 
economy and not of wasteful extravagance. 

What is regarded by private individuals as only decent 
and prudential foresight in the case of their houses, barns 
and premises has the same claim for approval where the con- 
dition of the school house is in question. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 45 



If a school house worth preserving for future use needs 
shingling, it is not economy or sense to let it remain long 
without protection. Damages from neglect are more expen- 
sive than repairs judiciously planned. 

Public buildings, from the necessity of the case, are 
more exposed to wear and tear than private structures, and 
the school house is no exception to this statement. 

A delapidate condition here proclaims at once a muni- 
cipal stigma, demoralizing within and beyond the school en- 
closure. 

A contemplated heavy expense upon a change in our 
school structures for a more satisfactory ventilation, ordered 
by the State Inspector of Public Buildings, has been de- 
ferred for the present. 

There was a hearing before the Selectmen, who are ex- 
officio the Board of Plealth for the Town with power to 
modify or annul the State order. 

The State Inspector appeared in person, presenting the 
claims of the order. 

A. A. Wyman, Esq., appeared for the School Committee 
on an appeal to annul the order. 

After due deliberation upon the immediate necessities 
of the case, the Board of Health finally decided to an- 
nul the order, leaving the whole subject for future deliber- 
ation and action. 

The ventilation episode, it is hoped, will not be without 
its advantage to all concerned, and may ultimately lead to 
tangible results. We have a magnificent system of ventila- 
lation, provided by the higher powers, going on all around 
in these parts, without any extra charge, especially in the 
month of March, and it is a great pity if we have not brains 
nough in some way to secure our full share of the gratuity. 



46 ANNUAL REPORT 



Grading the Schools. 

The experience of years, and the careful investigations 
and decisions of the wisest experts appointed by the highest 
authorities in matters of education, pronounce in favor of 
the grade. Have your grade, b}^ all means, is their verdict. 
Make it as complete as your local conditions will permit. 
Give it a generous and loyal support. If it has its defects 
any other plan has defects more numerous. 

But what for the Town of Acton? 

We are not situated in the central, northern and east- 
ern sections of the Town for making the grade so cheaply 
and easily as at the south and west villages. 

Nor are the West and South villages so favorably con- 
ditioned as they would be ii united in one. What is wanted 
for all the scholars in town is an approximate equality in the 
advantages of a graded system. 

The most feasible plan for securing this in the present 
and prospective conditions of the Town seems, after mature 
and impartial thought, something like the following, leaving 
the High School as now : 

Take the average membership of the past year in the 
west, and have three grades — the Grammar, Intermediate 
and Primary: 

Average membership of the Grammar, 35.1 

« " " Primary, 40. 



3)75.1 



25.3 

The average membership for each school at the West. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 47 



South village, average membership of Grammar, 29.5 

" '' '' '' Primary, 35.7 

South-east, " '' . 8.2 



3)73.4 



24.5 
Average membership of Primary, Intermediate and 
Grammar at the South, providing transportation for each 
scholar at the South-east from his home. 

Combine the North and East schools at the Centre, furn- 
ishing transportation for each scholar from his home to the 
Centre : 
Average membership of the North, 19.9 



East, 


24. 


Centre, Grammar, 


16.8 


" Primary, 


13.5 



3)74.2 

24.7 
Average membership of Grammar, Intermediate and 
Primary at the Centre. 

This arrangement would give the same number of 
schools and teachers as at present, the advantages of a 
graded system for all the town, the stimulus of numbers, for 
scholars and teachers, in every school, without the confusion 
of an excess. 

This proposition will, doubtless, at first strike some in 
the rural districts with prejudice, reminiscences of the past, old 
associations, local attachments, the fea'r of diminishing values 
because of removal from the school house, will lead to oppo- 
sition at the outset. But it really brings a better school 
nearer to the door if transportation is furnished, and, if so, 



48 ANNUAL REPORT 



how can the farm lose value ? The experiment has been 
faithfully tried in other towns and the results do not prove 
the depreciation of estates. If the experiment, after proper 
deliberation, could be harmoniously adopted b}^ the town, 
the results would in the end, bej^ond doubt, vindicate the 
wisdom of the plan. If, however, the time has not yet come 
for definite action, without too much irritation and com- 
plaint, let it abide for the calm moments of a future date. 
The signs point quite significantly towards the contemplated 
project. The watchword is forward ! not a cowardly retreat 
to the rear. 

The idea of consolidation is forced upon us by the 
changed condition within fifty years. Fifty years ago there 
must have been at least a hundred scholars in the eastern and 
northern portions of the town. Large family groups were 
scattered in all that section, some of them counting by the 
dozen. Now only about half that number can be found in 
the two schools at the North and East combined. The same 
is true of the Centre. Within the memory of some now liv- 
ing, a hundred scholars were in one school, with one teacher. 
The discipline of the crowd was ordinarill}^ enough for any 
master to manage, without wasting his strength on the minor 
matters of instruction. The little ones on the lower seats 
were pleased if they had one chance recognition in the course 
of the long day from the master in the desk. If only these 
large family groups on the hills and by the brooks could be 
duplicated, we might drop the question of transportation, and 
have the grade on the old spot. 

In 1826, 412 pupils (227 males and 185 females,) attend- 
ed schools in town — 139 under 7 years, 160 from 7 to 14, and 
113 from 14 upwards. The number now reported is 254, 
with a population nearly double what it was in 1826, and 
with a valuation more than double what it was then. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



49 



The logic of these facts argues for a liberal policy in 
providing for the education of the youth, now entrusted to 
the town. They are treasures rare in comparison with the 
past. In their physical, mental and moral equipment — in 
their ambitions to match the great destinies that are just up- 
on them, they are not a whit behind their honored progeni- 
tors. The town will do itself a discredit, and its youth an 
injustice, if it does not keep step to the music of the times, 
and say "forward, march." 

Sentiment in Schools. 

Ex-President Cleveland, in his recent Washington's birth- 
day address at Detroit, emphasized the importance of senti- 
ment in politics. We may not all agree with him in our po- 
litical views. We may not all vote for him if again a candi- 
date for the presidency, but we must all sanction with a hear- 
ty amen, the main thought of that address. Politics is dead 
and buried without sentiment. So when we pass into the do- 
main of schools, they are .dead and worse than buried without 
sentiment. 

The dollars will come forth from the pockets of the tax- 
payers with but half their power to bless the giver and re- 
ceiver, unless the glow of an enthusiast starts them on their 
mission. 

The well furnished desk of the pupil will be but trash 
in his presence, unless the sentiment of a bounding heart 
swathes each book at the touch. 

The columns of figures as they are added will be but 
stupid nothings, tiring the nerves, unless there can be a sen- 
timent within to feel the beauty of those combinations, to re- 
peat the charm of ascending and descending the scale, to say 
at the end how true to themselves and to each other those 
figures stand — for all times, places and persons, what con- 
stancy ! 



50 ANNUAL REPORT 



We hear about the hum-drum of the school room, but 
never from the lips of a teacher whose heart beats quicker at 
the sight of a pupil whom she is to instruct, care for and 
bless — whose inspiration starts anew at the stroke of each 
morning bell that calls her again to her choicest work. 

Sentiment has built all our institutions of learning, from 
the Kindergarten to the Universitj,and when sentiment dies 
the grandest structures fall, and the vision is no more. 

High School. 

The Acton High School has enjo3'ed for another year the 
faithful and earnest instructions of Mr. Armstrong. He has 
labored in season and out of season for the best culture of 
his pupils. If in any instance he has missed his high ideal, 
it has not been for the lack of an ideal. If obstructions have 
crossed his path, they have only stirred within a higher pur- 
pose to stand in his lot and place, and await the issues of an- 
other trial. 

This school has already entrenched itself in the confi- 
dence of the town, as is shown by the continued support of 
its citizens. It has become so adjusted to the other grades 
that any misfortune to this must affect disastrously all the 
others. So, also, any improvement in this will have a tonic, 
uplifting force, ranging through all the ranks. 

The principal needs the efficient co-operation of a com- 
petent assistant. If this could be had, a larger and more 
satisfactory course of study could be furnished. If the ques- 
tion is assistant or transportation, let the vote go for the as- 
sistant. 
The whole number of different pupils in the High 

School during the year, . . . . . 56 
The number of pupils over 15 years, . . . . 40 
The number of pupils under 15 years, , , , 16 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



51 



examination in 



examination m 



39.2 
35.5 
90.6 



Total average membership, 
Average attendance, . 
Percentage of attendance, . 
Number of applicants in the written 

June, .... 
Number entitled to certificates, . 
Number of applicants at the written 

August, . . . . 
Number admitted. 

The climax of educational interest in town was reached 
Friday evening, June 12, when the Town hall was crowded 
with an intensely appreciative audience, to witness the sixth 
graduating exercises. The past graduates, in a body, accom- 
panied the school, and took seats near the platform, attesting 
their hearty good wishes for their alma nater. 



42 

27 

5 
1 



Rev. Dr. Knowlton 



PROGRAMME: 
1 — March. . . . . . 

2 — Prayer, . 

3 — Music. Chorus. . ..... 

4 — Salutatory and Essay. '' The Phonograph." 

Charles E. Smith 
5 — Essay and History. " Character." Mabel H. Decoster 

6— Music. Vocal Duet 

7 — Essay. ''The Education of Women." Lizzie A. Manion 
8— Essay. " At the Threshold." . . Grace N. Houghton 
9— Music. Vocal Solo. . . . . . 

10 — Essay. "The Middle Ages vs. Modern Times," 

Raymond 0. Littletield 
11— Essay. '• Books Well Chosen." . Lulu M. Lawrence 
12— Music Vocal Solo. ........ 

13 — Declamation. " The Battle of Lexington." Bancroft. 

Sumner M. Teele 
14 — Essay and Proprecy. " Our Grandmothers and We." 

Jessie P. Wood 



52 ANNUAL REPORT 



15 — Music. Vocal Duet 

16 — Essay and Valedictory. " Work that Ennobles.' 

Etta E. Hall 
17 — Presentation of Diplomas. ...... 

]8 — Music. Chorus 

The Horal decorations and tributes were rare and rich. 
The exercises were everj way meritorious, and a great grati- 
fication and credit to the town. 



Three year's course of the High School, subject to 
changes which may hereafter be made, according to the 
judgment of the Committee, and the light of experience. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Arithmetic and Book-keeping, alternating. 
English Grammar and Composition. 
General History. 
Second Term. — Arithmetic and Book-keeping, alternating. 
English Grammar and Composition. 
General History. 
Third Term. — Arithmetic and Book-keeping, alternating. 
Rhetoric and Botany. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — Algebra begun. 
Latin begun. 
Physiology. 
Second Term. — Algebra continued. 
Latin continued. 
Ph3^sics begun. 
Third Term. — Geometry begun. 
Physics continued. 
Latin continued. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 53 



THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Geometry continued. 
Latin continued. 
Chemistry begun. 

Second Term. — Physical Geograhapy. 
Latin continued. 
Chemistry continued. 
Third Term. — Civil Government. 
Latin continued. 
Geology. 
Four recitations in each branch per week. 
Wednesday, a modified programme, including Compo- 
sitions, Reading, Spelling, Drawing and other miscellaneous 
recitations as shall be deemed the most important at the 
time. 

Rhetoric and Literature the second and third years once 
a week as Wednesday work. 

The monthly written test to be continued as the fairest 
and surest proof of the real progress made. 



THE CENTRE SCHOOL. 

Grammar Departm^ent. 

Miss Clara B. Holden, .... Teacher. 

Ten pupils from this school presented themselves as 
candidates for the High School at the June examination. 
Eight of them received certificates, an unusual percentage, 
reflecting great credit upon them and their teacher. 

Notwithstanding the loss of so many from the school by 
promotion, the average membership, also the average attend- 
ance, has been larger than the numbers reported five years 
since. 



54 ANNUAL REPORT 



Order, discipline, thorough instruction, studious habits, 
have remained as the marked features of the school when 
visited. Miss Holden has a tact for reaching at once the 
foundation principles of knowledge. She seeks to plant her 
pupils upon a solid resting place to begin with, that the 
superstructure as it rises may fear no disturbance from the 
collisions of time. The public half day at the close attested 
to all present the certainty of the good work which had been 
going on so quietly all the year. 



CENTRE PRIMAR Y. 

Miss Sarah E. Hammond, .... Teacher. 

This little craft has been sailing on peaceful waters 
throughout the year under the same pilot. The decks, have 
not been crowded with passengers, but those on board have 
had a jaunty time. They have been well cared for, and have 
made some fine discoveries among the various inlets of 
knowledge. They have been allowed to throw out the hook 
and line into the sparkling waters and some of them have 
been in luck and caught a string which lias more than pleased 
their youthful ambitions. Father and mother have been de- 
lighted as the tale of their adventures has been told. Other 
excursions are planned under the same pilot. It is under- 
stood that twenty-one are available for the trip, and if they 
will all secure a passage in season they are sure of a safe and 
happy return. Those present when the craft came to her 
moorings wished they could have been on board, but those 
days are gone. The best that can be done with gray hairs is 
to let the tint remain, and be glad that the primaries are 
having their day. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 55 



NORTH SCHOOL. 
Miss Susan E. Conant, - - - Teacher. 

The school has been fortunate in retaining the services 
of Miss Conant for tlie entire year. She has been unsparing 
in her efforts to make the school a success, and such it has 
been in all particulars iu a marked degree. There has been 
excellent deportment, a vivacious method in conducting rec- 
itations, attention to the details in all parts of the daily pro- 
gramme, and prompt loyalty to the ticking of the clock. The 
apparent secret of success has been the quick perception of 
the needs of individual scholars, and the ability and disposi- 
tion to meet that need. The register shows a high percent- 
age in the average attendance. Scholars, parents and com- 
mittee united with the teacher in regrets that the pub- 
lic day had to be postponed on account of her temporary ill- 
ness, and these regrets are intensified by the necessity of her 
relinquishing the charge for the coming term. 

EAST SCHOOL. 

Miss Rena M. Carr, - - - - - Teacher. 

Miss Carr has remained faithfully at her post for the 
year, and the result is unmistakable progress in all lines. 
She has an energetic, practical, common sense wa}^ of finding 
out what needs to be done by herself and pupils, and then 
seeing that it is done by all the parties concerned before 
nightfall. When she adds up the columns at the close, though 
there are some ciphers here and there, the grand total leaves 
a good balance for another day's start. When all the bal- 
ances of the year are closed, there is found a surprising 
amount for the net income. The business has paid, and had 
better be continued at the old stand and by the same part- 
ners, 



56 ANNUAL REPORT 



Three of her* pupils passed the written test for the High 
School. There have been other losses of scholars by remov- 
al, but there are goodly number of faithful ones left, mostly 
boys. There have been two public days, one in the fall and 
one in winter, and the exercises in all the branches have been 
satisfactory, and a pleasure to the visitors. 

SOUTH EAST SCHOOL. 

Spring Term. 

Miss Hattie L. Tuttle, - - - Teacher. 

The school maintained its creditable condition during 
the term, and two of its members received certificates to the 
High School at the June examination. 

Fall Term. 
Mrs. a. H. Loker, _ . . . Teacher. 

Mrs. Loker entered upon her charge with an interest 
and ambition worthy of her former reputation as a teacher. 
She spared no pains to do full justice to the trust. She won 
the confidence of the pupils, and sure progress was made in 
all the studies. The minutest items belonging to a success- 
ful school were attended to, but the conditions of her health 
constrained the relinquishment of her care at the close of the 
term, much to the regret of the committee and district. 

Winter Term. 
Mrs. Ella E. Day, . . . _ Teacher. 

The school, disappointed in the departure of other teach- 
ers, was again favored in being able to secure, at short no- 
tice, one who had formerly taught the school with special ac- 
ceptance. 

Mrs. Day met expectations, maintained excellent order, 
and inspired an interest in the studies. The public day at 



TOWN OF ACTON. <,*] 



the close of the winter term brought together an appreciating 
company of visitors, who united in praise of the general man- 
agement and success of the school. 

SOUTH SCHOOL. 

Grammar Department — Spring Term. 

Miss Clara A. Johnson, .... Teacher. 

She retained charge of this school through the spring 
with her wonted vigor and thoroughness. It is a royal satis- 
faction to the visitor, when witnessing such a school, to note 
the quiet, dignified and graceful art with which the elements 
are kept in control. 

The superficial, hesitating answer of the idler, as his 
turn comes in the class, is at ojice detected. His head 
droops with the confession of wasted moments. The united 
sentiment of the school falls upon the guilty one and he re- 
solves to do better. 

An uncontrollable negative from the home conditions of 
her friends obliged us to let her go with a God bless you for 
the work done in Acton. 

Fall and Winter Terms. 
Miss Hattie L. Tuttle, . . . . Teacher. 

Miss Tuttle stepped from her successful experience in 
the South-east school into the graver responsibilities of the 
South Grammar Department. 

She has gone through her probationary period with 
scholars and parents, and now it is confidently hoped bright, 
peaceful futures await her efforts. 

The exercises of the public day gave sure testimony to 
the visitors of a teacher worthy of their earnest and united 
co-operation. 



^S ANNUAL REPORT 



Primary Department. 
Miss S. Anna L. Tirrell, .... Teacher. 

There has been no change of teachers in this school, 
and no occasion for a change. In the general care and in- 
struction of this large company of Primaries the same 
qualities have re-appeard as reported a year ago — origin^^ 
tact, gentle, patient manners, and a general unpretending 
habitude of mind. 

The large company of visitors present on the public 
day made a scene too impressive at the outset. The shattered 
nerves at last rallied. The palid faces began to glow. The 
tongues were loosed. They were still living and among 
friends. Quick answers came back to the questioner on the 
platform, and they did know something after all. Our re- 
grets multiply and linger at the decision of Miss Tirrell to 
leave her charge for one possibly more to her tastes, but not 
certainly more important or precious in its memories. 

WEST SCHOOL. 
Grammar Departm,ent. 
Miss Albertie A. Preston, . . . Teacher. 

This school has had a year of unbroken prosperity under 
the leadership of Miss Preston. She has excelled herself, 
which seems t(; be her ambition at every sally into the un- 
certainties. The pupils hav3 caught the idea and they have done 
what they have seen their leader do — excelled themselves. 
"In order and general deportment, do you say it?" Yes, 
that is just what is said. " In loyalty to the different studies 
pursued?" Emphatically, yes. There is no dry study on 
the list. " In obedience to the wishes of the teacher, ex- 
pressed or unspoken ? " There cannot be a doubt. You can 
see it in the very style of the movements as they trip to their 
positions at the blackboards, desk or seats. There seems to 



TOWN OF ACTON. 59 



be a rivalry through all the ranks to push the standard of 
merit for the school to the prize point among competitors. 

In the percentage of average attendance ninety-four has 
been reached, which is the highest point touched in town. 
Miss Preston has not had the advantages of the Normal 
education, but she has sought to be a Normal Institution in 
herself, and find, from actual trial, the methods which fit 
different moods, persons and conditions. 

There was a large gathering of interested visitors to 
watch the proceedings on the public day. There would have 
been twice as many if the gentlemen had been there. They 
all chanted the amen chorus at the close. 

Prwiary Department. 
Miss Harriet H. Gardner, . . . Teacher. 

" Is this the West Acton Kindergarten ? " That is the 
name of it. "Let us go in and take a look. The matron 
seems to know what she is about. All these plants and 
flowers to be cared for all the day, and day after day?" 
Yes^ but she knows how to do it, and not whisper a word of 
complaint. " Isn't that plant off to the right, wilting ; it 
looks like it ? " Yes, but you wait, and the good matron will 
see the droop of the leaf and be there soon and give the 
whole plant a sprinkling and stir the soil around the roots, 
and what a change ! No more droop. " Does she know all 
the different kinds of plants, their names, habits, and how to 
treat each one?" That is the very problem she studies. 
"Does she not get tired beyond endurance before the day is 
gone ? " She does not speak it. She does not act it. She 
can sing, and if she does not hum the tune, there is heart 
music within, and that is the reason the tired does not come. 

There was a public visiting day, and many who came 
through the gates to see were tempted to pluck some of the 
beautiful flowers and carry them off to their homes. 

Respectfully submitted in behalf of the School Committee, 
JAMES FLETCHER, Chairman, 



6o 



ANNUAL REPORT 



TABULAR STATEMENT FOR 1891-92, 





























1 


o 

,4 


Pi 




(A 








i 






A 


m 


^ 


s 


1 

O 








>-, 






3 


'S 




1 








S 


SCHOOLS. 


TEACHERS. 


CO 

■3 


M 
B 

C 
® 


a 
1 


>5 

u 


i 


i 


CO 






to 


o 


u 




o 




Sh 


;-i 


i$ 






a 


A 
^ 










0) 


11 


1.S 






0) 


> 




<u 




> 


> 


V 






Hi 


< 


< 


^ 


hJ 


0,0 


M 


Acton High. 


A. W. Armstrong. 


36 


56 


39.2 


35.5 


90.6 





56 


40 


16 


Center Grammar. 


Clara B. Holden. 


36 


26 


16.8 


14.9 


89. 





26 


3;23 


Center Primary. 


Sarah E. Hammond. 


36 


24 


13.5 


n.5 


85. 





24 


010 


South Grammar. 


( Clara A. Johnson. ) 
1 Hattie L. Tuttle. j 


36 


39 


29.5 


27.3 


92.5 





39 


432 


South Primary. 


S. Anna L. Tirrell. 


36 


51 


35.7 


31.9 


89.4 


2 


49 


0'22 


West Grammar. 


Albertie A. Preston. 


36 


51 


35.1 


33.2 


94.6 





51 


1'50 


West Primary. 


Mrs. Harriet L. Gardner. 


36 


58 


40. 


37.2 


93. 





58 


30 


North. 


Susan E. Conant. 


36 


32 


19.9 


18.5 


93. 


1 


31 


2 18 


East. 


Rena M. Carr. 


36 


31 


24. 


21.8 


91. 





31 


20 




( Hattie L. Tuttle. 




















South East. 


{ Mrs. A. H. Loker. 
Mrs. E E. Day. 


36 


13 


8.2 
251.9 


7.5 
238.8 


91.4 
91. 





13 


1 


7 



Number between 5 and 15, as reported by the Assessors for 
the year 1891—254. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



TOWN WARRANT. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Middlesex, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in the County of 

Middlesex, Greeting : 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you 
are directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town of 
Acton, qualified to vote in elections and Town affairs, to assem- 
ble in the Town Hall, in said Town, On Monday, the Fourth 
Day of April, A. D., 1892, then and there to act upon the fol- 
lowing articles as they may think proper, viz.: 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside in said meet- 
ing. 

Art. 2. To fill all vacancies in the list of Town Officers 
and Committees. 

Art. 3. To see what amount of money the Town will raise 
for the support of schools and for school supplies for the present 
year, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 4. To see what amount of money the Town will raise 
for the repairing of roads and bridges the present year, or act 
anything thereon. 

Art. 5. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of one 
hundred and twenty-live dollars for the due observance of Memo- 
rial Day, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 6. To see if the Town will accept of the provisions of 
Sec. 72, Chap. 423, Election Act of 1890, to divide the Town into 
convenient voting precints for the holding of meetings for the 
choice of officers elective by the people, except Town officers, or 
take any action thereon. 

Art. 7. To see if the Town will elect that hereafter all of 
the Town officers shall be voted for upon one ballot, or act any- 
thing thereon. 



63 ANNUAL REPORT 



Art. 8. To see if the Town will accept Sections 64 to 68, 
both inclusive, of Chap. 27 of thePublic Statutes, and any amend- 
ments thereto, providing for the election of members of the Board 
of Selectmen and Assessors for the term of three years, or act 
anything thereon. 

Art. 9. To see if the Town will accept the Jury List, as 
revised by the Selectmen. 

Art. 10. To vote by ballot, ''Yes" or ""Xo," in answer to 
the question : " Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxi- 
liquors in this Town for the present year ?" 

Art. 11. To see if the Town will accept the reports of the 
Selectmen, Overseers of the Poor, School Committee, and other 
Town officers. 

Art. 12. To see if the Town will authorize the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money for the 
Town, if necessary, in anticipation of the taxes for the current 
year. 

Art. 13. To see what action the Town will take in relation 
to lighting its streets the ensuing year. 

Art. 14. To hear the report of any Committees chosen to 
report at this meeting, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 15. To see what sum of money the Town will raise 
for the support of Memorial Library for the ensuing year, or act 
anything thereon. 

Art. 16. To see what amount the Town will raise to de- 
fray Town charges the present year, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 17. To see if the Town will authorize the Overseers 
of the Poor to dig a new well, erect wind-mill, and make special 
repairs on Town farm buildings the present year, appropriate 
money therefor, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 18. To see if the Town will shingle the West school 
house, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 19. To see if the Town will make certain repairs upon 
the Great Koad, so called, between the residence of Daniel H. 
Farrar and the Concord line, or do or act anything thereon. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 63 



Art. 20. To see if the Town will instruct the School Com- 
mittee to appoint a Superintendent of Schools. 

Art. 21. To see what action the Town will take in relation 
to the preservation and protection of shade and ornamental trees, 
or act anything thereon. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting up cop- 
ies, attested by you, in the following places : One at the store 
of Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee; one at the store of C. H. Mead 
& Co.; one at the Nagog House ; and one at each of the railroad 
stations in the Town, seven days at least before the time appoint- 
ed for holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due return of this warrant, with 
your doings thereon, to the Selectmen or Town Clerk, on or be- 
fore the time of holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands, in Acton, this twenty-third day of 
March, in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety -two. 

WM. F. STEVENS, 4 

GEORGE R. KEYES, 
GUSTAVUS V. BOWEN, 



Selectmen of Acton. 



TOWN OFFICERS FOR 1892 



Town Clerk. 
William D. Tuttle. 

Selectmen. 
Wm. E. Stevens, George R. Keyes, Gustavus V. Bowen. 

Assessors. 

Phineas Wetherbee, Chauncy B. Robbins, John White. 

Overseers of the Poor. 

Lyman C. Taylor, James B. Tuttle. 



64 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Town Treasurer. 
Jona. K. W. Wetherbee. 

Auditors. 
Hiram J. Hapgood, D. James Wetherbee. 

School Committee. 
Rev. James Fletchbr, Chas. L. Bradford, . . 3 years 

Charles J. Williams, Davis C. Harris, . . . 2 " 

Isaiah Hutchins, William S. Jones, . . ) '' 

Cemetery Committee. 
John Fletcher, Levi W. Stevens, Horace F. Tattle. 

Fence Viewers. 
Nahum C. Reed, H. F. Tuttle, Frank Hosmer. 

Surveyors of Lumber. 

William B. Davis, George H. Harris, William S. Warren, 

Levi W. Stevens, E. F. Richardson, Charles A. Brooks, 

Jona. P. Fletcher, Herbert T. Clark. 

Surveyors of Wood. 

William B. Davis, Georo^e H. Harris, Henry D. Parlin, 

John F. Davis, S. L Dutton, Herbert T. Clark, 

E. F. Richardson, Jona. P. Fletcher. 

Surveyor of Hoops and Staves. 
Angustus Fletcher. 

Constables. 

L. E. Reed, South Acton ; James Kinsley, West Acton ; 

Edwin A. Phalen, Acton Centre. 

Fish Committee. 
Luther Conant, Elnathan Jones, John Fletcher, 

Frank H. Whitcomb, Charles J. Williams, John White. 

Trustees of the Acton Memorial Library. 
(Corporate Members.) 

Luther Conant, Delette H. Hall, Adelbert Mead, 

Hiram J. Hapgood, Moses Taylor, D. James Wetherbee. 

(Chosen by the Town.) 

Lucius A. Hesselton, 3 years 

William D. Tuttle, 2 " 

Rev. James Fletcher, 3 " 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TewN ofJIqt0n 



(IVIASS.,) 



FROM 



FEBRUARY 26, 1892, TO FEBRUARY 26, 1893. 




hudson, mass. : 
The Entekpeise Printing Company. 

1893. 



II 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



TOWN OF ACTON, in account with J. K 

Treasurer. 


. W, WETHEBBEE, 


1893. 


Dk. 




Feb. 26. 


To cash paid. State tax, 
Cash paid, County tax. 
Cash paid on Selectmen's 


11,137 50 
1,270 05 




orders. 
Outstanding orders. 
Balance due the Town, 

Cr. 
By cash in the treasury, 
m\ I. Hutchins, for loam. 


20,973 08 

1,274 50 

2,827 59 

%'>7 ^8^ 7«> 


1892. 
Feb. 26. 
Kec'd fr( 


$1,965 67 
8 00 




W. F. Stevens, for loam, 


6 00 




W. F. Stevens, for lumber, 


7 88 



W. F. Stevens, for support of W. 

B. Ball, 8 00 

Nathan Johnson, for hay in 
Woodlawn Cemetery, 

Phineas Wetherbee, for asparagus, 
for rent of Chapel room, 
from State Treasurer, for support of 
State Paupers, 

State Treasurer, corporation tax, 

State Treasurer, National Bank tax, 493 11 

State Treasurer, State Aid, chapter 

301, acts 1889, 480 00 

State Treasurer, Military Aid, chap- 
ter 279, acts 1889, 145 50 

State Treasurer, income Massachu- 
setts School Fund, 268 31 



10 50 


3 00 


48 75 


49 75 


631 18 



ANNUAL REPORT 



County Treasurer, dog tax, $224 11 

Acton Memorial Library, for fines, 6 00 

First National Bank of Ayer, bor- 
rowed money, 3,000 00 

Estate of Wm. Davis, borrowed 

money, 1,000 00 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, money ad- 
vanced to pay orders, 805 33 

John Fletcher, on account of 

A¥oodlawn Cemetery 24 00 

L. W. Stevens, lots sold in Mount 

Hope Cemetery, 108 00 

L.W. Stevens, wood sold in Mount 

Hope Cemetery, 10 50 

C. W. Pitman, for rent of Town 

Hall, 94 00 

E. F. Conant, taxes for 1890, 85 87 

J. E. Cutter, taxes for 1891-2, 17,914 81 

Interest on money in bank, 84 45 

$27,482 72 



Treasurer's Report of Money held for care of Lots in Cemeteries. 

Dr. 



To Hepsabeth Piper fund, 


$50 00 




Interest received. 


2 00 




Frederick Rouillard fund. 


100 00 




Interest received, 


2 00 


i, 


William W. Davis fund, 


100 00 


i 


Jedediah Tuttle fund, 


50 00 


$304 00 \ 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



Cr. 

By cash paid N. Johnson, for labor on lot of 

Hepsabeth Piper, $2 00 

Cash paid N. Johnson, for labor on lot 

of F. Rouillard, 2 00 

Cash in treasury, 300 00 

$304 00 

J. K. W. WETHEEBEE, . 

Treasurer of Acton. 



Acton, Feb. 27, 1893. 

We have examined the accounts of the Treasurer and find 
them correct. 

HIEAM J. HAPGOOD. 
D. J. WETHEEBEE. 

Auditors of the Town of Acton. 



ANNUiL REPORT 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 
Centre School. 

Paid Rev. James Fletcher for teachers, |720 00 

" '' '' '' care of house, 74 18 

" '' '' " fuel, 47 35 

'' ^' ^' " cleaning rooms, 6 40 

" " '' incidentals, 12 15 



i( 



South School. 

Paid C. L. Bradford for teachers, ^720 00 

janitor, 90 00 

fuel, ' 43 09 

cleaning rooms, 6 50 

«' " " incidentals, 10 10 



i( U (( 

« (I u 

a u a 



West School. 

Paid Isaiah Hutchins for teachers, $720 00 

'' care of house, 78 00 

'' fuel, 30 00 

" cleaning house, 8 05 

" incidentals, 40 



a a 

(( a 

li a 



South East School. 

Paid William S. Jones for teachers, $324 00 

" '' " care of house, 15 00 

" ^' " fuel, 31 38 

'* u u cleaning room, 2 50 



$860 08 



$869 69 



$836 45 



$372 88 



TOWN OF ACTON. 




7 


•■■ ■ - ■ ■■ ■— J- 

North School. 






Paid D. C. Harris for teachers, 


$360 00 




" *' care of house, 


'2^ 00 




'' " fuel, 


35 60 




*' " cleaning house, 
" " incidentals, 


4 00 


$426 28 


East School. 




Paid Charles J. Williams for teachers, 


$360 00 




^' " " care of house. 


39 50 




" '■' " fuel, 


8 00 




'^ " "incidentals, 


2 20 


$409 70 


High School. 




Paid A. W. Armstrong for teaching. 
Janitors for care of rooms. 


$817 76 
34 00 




George Gardner for rent of piano, 
C. L. Bradford for fuel, 


10 00 
7 00 




E. C. Parker & Co. '^ 


10 83 




J. E. Cutter " 


10 00 




C. L. Bradford for incidentals, 


1 15 


$890 74 


School Supplies. 




Paid Rev. James Fletcher, 


$445 86 




A. W. Armstrong, 

E. B. Goodrich & Co., charts. 


5 14 

75 00 




Charles J. Williams, 


5 24 


$531 24 
40 93 


Balance in hands of committee, 





MEMORIAL LIBRARY.^ 

Bills Approved hy the Trustees. 

Paid Rev. James Fletcher, janitor to March 1, 

1892, (1891) $17 02 

L. U. Holt for repairs, " 2 00 

M. E. Taylor & Co., for supplies, " 16 37 

Luther Conant for express, " 2 70 

D. A. Cutler for transporting books, " 13 00 
Rev. James Fletcher for History of 

Bedford, 2 50 



8 


ANNUAL REPORT 


J. G. Roberts & Co., 


for binding 


books, 




(1891) $16 98 


L. Barta & Co., for 600 


supplements, 28 00 


Estes & Lauriat for books, " 82 98 


Ida A. Hale for services as librarian, 26 00 


Hiram J. 


Hapgood, treas., for services of 






librarian, 78 57 


a 


a 


" for services of 

janitor, 100 00 


.i 


u 


^' for repairs, 3 10 


a 


a 


'^ for books and 

magazines, 156 99 


6i 


u 


" for printing, 8 50 


u 


a 


" for labor on 

grounds, 9 40 


1 


u 


" for labor on 

books, 1 95 


a 


a 


" for transport- 
ing books, 25 00 


a 


a 


^' for binding, 4 42 


a 


(( 


" for supplies and 

repairs, 24 70 


a 


u 


" for coal, 67 72 







SUPPORT OF POOR. 

Paid E. H. Cutler, deficiency on farm to 

March 1, 1892, $325 72 
E. H. Cutler, for care of Hannah. Con- 
way, 14 25 
L. C. Taylor, for Supt. services, 41 QQ 
for aid of Mrs. M. Jones, 125 14 
Richard Temple, 170 07 
Clara Wheeler, 169 92 
Emily F. Towne, 169 92 
George Kinsley's 

children, 154 26 

Mrs. H. Trainer, 36 00 

Murphy family, 111 51 
Elizabeth Kenedy, 39 75 

Mrs. Ruth Pike, 53 75 

J. E. Harris^ 74 94 



TOWN OF ACTON, 



Paid L. C. Taylor, for aid of Nelson family, ^44 50 
" '' Mrs. S. M. Johnson, 16 00 

''- '' Hannah Stanton, 2 27 

^' " Chas. Johnson, 7 00 

^' Coal for town farm, 11 13 

" Expenses to Athol and 

Princeton, 6 97 

$1,574 76 



REPAIRS ON TOWN BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 
Paid L. U. Holt, for repairs at Centre School 

house, I? 25 01 

_ Harris & Duren, repairs on Centre School 

house, 73 83 

E. Jones & Co., for lumber and shingles. 

Centre School house, 120 74 

E. Jones & Co., for lumber and shingles, 

West School house, 152 69 

Harris & Duren, for labor on West 

School house, 72 64 

H. A. Gould, for grading West School 

grounds, 154 74 

F. W. Gray, for painting West School 

house, 70 00 

F. D. K. Hoar, for repairs on West School 

house, 2 00 

F. W. Green, for repairs on West School 

house, 3 35 

I. Hutchins, for drawing shingle. West 

School house, 4 50 

L. U. Holt, for repairs on West School 

house, 23 67 

C. L. Bradford, for grading South School 

grounds, 2 00 

C. L. Bradford, for repairs on South 

School house, 1 65 

F. Jones, for painting South School 

house, 115 06 

C. L. Bradford, for repairs on South 

school house, 5 74 

S. Jones, Jr., for repairs on South School 

house, 7 60 



lO ANNUAL REPORTS 



Paid F. Conant, for repairs on South School 

house, . $19 49 

E. Jones & Co., for nails and cord for 

South School house, 90 

L. U. Holt, for repairs on South School 

house, 2 25 

C. J. Williams, for repairs on East 

School house, 32 71 

N. Johnson, for labor on Centre School 

grounds, 10 13 

J. E. Reed, for labor on Town Farm 

buildings, 108 12 

E. Jones & Co., for lumber for Town 

Farm buildings, 161 92 

L, C. Taylor, for painting and papering 

Town Farm buildings, 17 70 

L. U. Holt, for windmill for Town Farm, 200 00 
L. U. Holt, for repairs on pump at Town 

Farm, 65 

Harris & Duren, for repairs on North 

School house, 9 33 

D. C. Harris, for cement for North 
School house, 29 88 

W. H. Kingsly, for labor cementing 

North School house basement, 14 50 

C. J. Williams, for lumber East School 

house, 2 81 

E. Jones & Co., for lumber at Town 

Farm, 16 50 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

Paid Herman A. Gould, for labor on high- 
ways, $2346 37 

Hermon A. Gould, for labor on railing, 6 25 

N. C. Davidson, for gravel, 1891, 15 00 

F. E. Knowlton, '^ " 27 50 

Louis Rouillard, <-' 1 20 

Frank H. Whitcomb, " 20 00 

Isaac Reed, " 13 00 

^ A. H. Perkins, '' 3 00 

Calvin Harris, ^^ 16 00 



TOWN OF ^ ACTON. 



II 



Paid F. E. Knowlton, for gravel, f 5 50 

K. L. Tiittle, for breaking roads, 4 80 

A. L. Tuttle, " " ^ 13 85 

Chas. Cassell, for bridge and basin irons, 10 25 

F. J. Hastings & Co., for drain pipe, 9 00 

Thos. McCarty, for flagging stones, 15 40 

0. L. Newcomb, for repairs on scraper, 4 25 

S. Jones, Jr., for repairs on bridge, 3 62 

W. H. Lawrence, for blacksmitli bill, 10 95 

Waldo Bros., for drain pipe, 4 6S 

W. H. Kingsley, for blacksmith bill, 3 82 

W. H. Kingsley, for dynamite, 80 

W. H. Kingsley, for labor, 80 

S. A. Guilford, for 45 iron railing posts, 22 75 

E. Jones & Co., lumber for railing, 22 79 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, drain pipe, 10 23 

L. W. Stevens, for labor on railing, 2 20 



$2,594 01 



EXPENSES ON ROADS ORDERED BY COUNTY COM- 
MISSIONERS. 

Paid Hermon A. Gould, for labor on turnpike, $705 00 
F. W. Green, for setting bound-stones 
on Leland- Stevens road, order com- 
missioners, 2 00 

$707 00 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES, 



Paid L. U. Holt for eight Johnson pumps, $16 00 
" " sealing weights and meas- 

ures, 
" " printing tags, 

Julian Tuttle for services as registrar, 

Rev. James Fletcher for expenses of school 
committee attending Union District con- 
vention, 

Edward Fearns for services and expenses 
in arrest of James Hunt, as approved by 
trial justice, 

State of Massachusettts balance of corpo- 
ration tax, 37 33 



10 00 

75 

12 00 



17 25 



5 00 



12 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Paid S. A. Guilford for services as registrar, ^ 
R. M. Yale for repairing monument flag, 
H. T. Clark for repairing wagon, 
J. R. Lawrence for services as registrar, 
James Devane for painting and varnishing 

hearse, 
H. M. Smith for removing tree, 
State of Massachusetts for one register, 
J. E. Marsh, M. D., for returning 5 births, 
Phineas Wetherbee for copying valuation, 
" " arranging poll tax 

list, 
" " postage, stationery 

and express, 
" " invoice book, 

Isaac Davis Post, appropriation for Memo- 
rial Day, 
A. A. Wyman, Esq., for legal advice in 

pauper cases, 
Warren Houghton for staining voting 

stalls, 
Spofford Bobbins for labor on voting stalls, 
James Devan for numbering bounds, 
C. L. Bradford for moving school furniture, 
" labor in Precinct 2 room, 

E. Jones & Co., for lumber for voting 

stalls, 
E. Jones & Co., for coal for town hall, 
Tuttle, Jones & Wetherbee for one order 

book, 
Wm. D. Tuttle for express charges, 

" " postage and stationery, 

" " collecting and record- 

ing 26 births, 
^* ^' recording 19 marriages, 

" " " 38 deaths, 

" " indexing births and 

deaths, 
J. E. Cutter for wood for town hall, 
J. E. Cutter for notifying 14 persons to 

take oath of oflice, 
J. E. Cutter for services in dog license 
cases, 



5 


35 


10 


90 


12 


00 


20 


00 


8 


00 


2 


75 


1 


25 


12 


50 


5 


00 


1 


25 


1 


35 



50 00 



25 00 



1 


15 


15 


45 


1 


50 


2 


00 


3 


00 


4 69 


16 


90 


2 


75 


3 


63 


3 


81 


13 


00 


2 


85 


5 80 


7 


00 


4 


75 



1 75 



5 00 



TOWN OF ACTON. 1 3 



Paid J. E. Cutter for abatement of taxes, $^56 83 

" " discount on taxes, 926 50 

I. F. Duren for burial of 34 bodies, 102 00 

" making 28 returns, 7 00 

C. W. Pitman for services as janitor town 

hall and care of clock, 73 75 

Rev. James Fletcher for telephone and 

po'^stage, 3 66 

Rev. James Fletcher for services of E. A. 
Phalan as constable at graduation exer- 
cises, 1 00 
Rev. James Fletcher for traveling expense 

on account of schools, 8 80 

Estate L. U. Holt, pump for East school, 9 75 

" " •'' North school, 6 00 

vW. F. Stevens for postage, express and 

freight, 10 34 



PRINTING. 



Paid Enterprise Printing Co., for warrants, f 5 75 

" " " town reports, 64 00 

A. Hosmer for letter heads, 1 80 

" " 500 town orders, 

Campbell & Hanscom for poll tax lists, 

" " check lists, 

A. Hosmer for envelopes. 
Enterprise Printing Co., for warrants, 



1 


65 


8 


50 


14 


00 


3 


60 


6 


00 



CEMETER Y EXPENSES, 

Paid Nathan Johnson for labor in Woodlawn 

cemetery, $83 50 

John Fletcher for trees for Woodlawn 

cemetery, 7 50 

" " labor in Woodlawn 

cemetery, 2 50 

. " " labor in Woodlawn 

cemetery, 28 60 

W. H. Kingsley for labor in Woodlawn 
cemetery, 2 25 



,578 34 



$105 30 



14 AHNUAti REPOUT 



Paid D. C. Harris for five fender posts Wood- 
lawn cemetery, $8 50 
N. Johnson for care David M. Handley lot, 3 00 
" Skinner lot, 6 50 
" '' Jona. Piper lot, 2 00 
" " Frank Kouillard lot, 2 00 
L. W. Stevens for labor in Monnt Hope 

cemetery, 96 57 

" " labor in Mount Hope 

cemetery, 40 85 

" ^' lumber for Mount Hope 

cemetery, 3 64 

L. U. Holt for repairing pump in Mount 

Hope cemetery, 50 

H. A. Gould, labor on street, Mount Hope 

cemetery, 105 00 

William D. Tuttle, surveying lots. Mount 
Hope cemetery, 7 00 









. 




STATU AID. 




Allen a Smith, 


Chap. 279, 


acts 1889, 


$60 00 


Warren B. Ball, 


a 


u 


175 00 


Addison B. Wheeler, " 


(( 


60 00 


Chas. A. Brooks, 


(( 


(( 


54 00 


Eliza J. Shattuck, 


Chap. 301, 


acts 1889, 


48 00 


Almira H. Loker, 


i( 


u 


48 00 


Luke Smith, 


a 


u 


48 00 


Mary Smith, 


(( 


a 


48 00 


Richard G. Dame, 


(C 


(( 


60 00 


Rebecca C. Wright, 


it. 


a 


48 00 


Achsa Hanscom, 


Cl 


a 


48 00 


Mary J. Brown, 


(( 


i( 


24 00 


Emma P. Blood, 


(( 


a 


40 00 


Herbert E. Preston, 


u 


(( 


32 00 


Susan B. Winn, 


u 


n 


48 00 


Aaron C. Handley, 


li 


(( 


30 00 


Phoebe F. Wood, 


a 


a 


36 00 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



15 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF. 

Paid H. D. Parlin, for fuel for Gould boys, | 3 13 
E. H. Cutler, for relief of Whitney 

family, 34 00 

E. C. Parker & Co., for coal for Gould 

boys, 9 15 

H. D. Parlin, for fuel and supplies for 

Gould boys, 5 60 



f 51 88 



15 10 



15 85 



TOWN OFFICERS. 
Paid Eev. James Eletcber, supt. schools, $41 67 

Edward Dixon, '^ " 292 50 

C. L. Bradford, for services as school 

committee, 
C. J. Williams, for services as school 

committee, 
Rev. James Fletcher, for services as school 

committee, 
C. B. Robbins, for services as assessor, 
Phineas Wetherbee, ^' " 

John White, '' u 

E. F. Conant, collector, 
Daniel J. Wetherbee, auditor three years, 

'^ " election officer, 

C. B. Sanders, election officer, 
L. C. Taylor, 



H. F. Tuttle, '^ ^' 

E. A. Phalan, '' " 
A. A. Wvman, " " 
H. A. Littlefield, " '' 
C. B. Stone, 

C. H. Mead, '^ " 

J.Kinsley, " " 

H. J. Hapgood, " 

H. J. Hapgood, auditor, 

T. F.JNewton, election officer, 

L. A. Hesselton, " " 

C. H. Fairbank.s, " ^' 

Phineas Wetherbee, election officer, 

F. S. Whitcomb, " '* 



51 


25 


38 


00 


50 


00 


20 


00 


70 


00 


15 00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


3 00 


3 


00 



3 00 
3 00 
3 00 
3 00 

3 00 

4 00 
3 00 

5 00 
3 00 
3 00 



00 
00 
00 



1 6 ANNUAL REPORT 



Paid M. A. Reed, special police, 


$ 1 50 


\ 


Lyman Tuttle, " ' " 


1 50 




William D. Tuttle, registrar, 


15 00 




" '' town clerk, 


30 GO 




J. K. W. Wetherbee, treasurer. 


75 00 




J. McGreen, election officer, 


3 00 




W. F. Stevens, selectman, 


85 00 




George R. Keyes, " 


50 00 




G. V. Bowen, *^ 


50 00 


$970 37 







LOANS AND IN TUB U ST. 

Paid Estate George A. Stevens, note, |800 00 

" '' '' interest, 24 97 

Persis V. Hapgood, interest on note of 

f 500 dated June 1, 1891, 25 00 

Estate William Davis, interest on 

note of $350 dated May 12, 1891, 17 50 

Frank H. Jones, interest on note of 

$600 dated April 27, 1891, 30 00 

John A. Bowen, interest on note of 

$1,000 dated June 6, 1891, 50 00 

Varnum Tuttle, interest on note of $700 

dated April 7, 1891, 35 00 

Varnum Tuttle, interest on note of $540 

dated July 11, 1891, 27 00 

Tuttles, Joues & Wetherbee, note, 1,000 00 

Interest on Wetherbee note, 50 00 

Interest on note of $1500 dated Jan. 

20, 1890, 75 00 

Interest on note of $1000, Sept. 6 to 

Oct. 8, 
First National Bank, Ayer, note, 

" " " interest, 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, temporary loan, 

" ** interest on same, 



5 


83 


3,000 00 


56 


25 


805 


33 


10 


06 



$6,011 94 



TOWN OF ACTON. 1 7 



il 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a 



RECEIPTS AND APPROPRIATIONS. 

Balance due from treasurer, Feb. 26, 1892, $1,965 67 
^' " collector, Feb. 26, 1892, 1,920 95 

Appropriations for town charges, 
" schools, 

" school supplies, 

" highways, 

" State tax, 

^' county tax, 

" overlayings, 

" Memorial library, 

Eeceived from State treasurer corporation tax, 
" " " National Bank 

tax, 
State aid, 
Military aid, 
Income Mass. 
School fund. 
County Treas., dog tax, 
Rent of Chapel room, 
Loam sold. 
Lumber sold. 
Library fines. 
State Treas., for support State 

paupers, 
Hay sold in Woodlawn Ceme- 
tery, 
Asparagus sold in Mt. Hope 

Cemetery, 3 00 

First National Bank, Ayer, 

loan, 3,000 00 

Est. Wm. Davis, loan, 1,000 00 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, tempor- 
ary loan, 805 33 
John Fletcher, account Wood- 
lawn Cemetery, 24 00 
L. W. Stevens, for lots sold in 

Mt. Hope Cemetery, 108 00 

L. W. Stevens, wood sold from 

Mt. Hope Cemetery, 10 50 

0. W. Pitman, for rent of 

'fown Hall and baseffipiitj 94 00 



6,500 00 


4,400 


00 


450 00 


2,300 00 


1,137 


50 


1,270 05 


481 


68 


550 


00 


631 


18 


493 


11 


480 


00 


145 


50 


268 31 


224 


11 


48 


75 


14 


00 


7 88 


6 00 


49 75 


10 50 



l8 ANNUAL REPORT 



Received from Interest on money in bank, $84 45 

'' W. E. Stevens, for W. B. 

BalPs board, 



EXPENDITURES. 

For support of Centre Scbool, 

South School, 

West School, 

South East School, 

North School, 

East School, 

High School, 

School supplies. 

State and Military Aid, 

Poor, 

Cemetery expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses. 

Memorial Library, 

Roads and Bridges, 

Roads ordered by County Commissioners, 707 00 ; 

Printing, 105 30 ] 

Loans and interest, 6,011 94 ' 

Repairs on town buildings and grounds, 1,462 11 \ 

Town Officers, 970 37 ' 

Soldiers' Relief, 51 88 1 

State Tax, 1,137 50 i 

County Tax, 1,270 05 \ 

$24,655 13 ; 

Balance due from J. E. Cutter, collector ! 

taxes 1891, $189 16 ] 

Balance due from J. E. Cutter, collector 

taxes 1892, 820 34 \ 

Balance due from Treasurer, 2,827 59 



8 


00 




%9,R 4.Q9 99 






$860 


08 


869 


69 


836 45 


372 88 


426 28 


409 


70 


890 


74 


531 


24 


907 


00 


1,574 


76 


399 


91 


1,578 


34 


687 


90 


2,594 


01 



$3,837 09 
$28,492 22 



TOWN DEBT. 

Note of Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, $1,500 00 

Persis Y. Hapgood, pOO OQ 



TOtV^K OF ACTON. Ip 



Note Estate Wm. Davis, $350 00 

" " 1,000 00 

Erank H. Jones, 600 00 

yarnum Tuttle, 1,240 00 

John A. Bowen, 1,000 00 



$6,190 00 



Less amounts due from Collector and Treas- 
urer, $3,837 09 
Balance against the Town Feb. 26th, 1893, $2,352 91 

WM. E. STEVENS, 
GEOEGE R. KEYES, 
GUSTAVUS V. BOWEN. 

Selectmen of Acton. 



Acton, Feb. 27, 1893. 

We have examined the accounts of the Selectmen and find 
them correct. 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD, 
D. J. WETHERBEE, 
Auditors of the Town />/ Acton. 



20 



ANNUAL REPORT 



LIST OF JURORS. 



The following is a list of persons to serve as Jurors for 
the ensuing year, as revised by the Selectmen of Acton to be 
submitted to said town at their April meeting : 



Luther Conant, 
Francis Hosmer, 
James R. Lawrence, 
Frank H. Whitcomb, 
Geo. B. Parker, 
James Rinsley, 
John C. Keyes, 
Norman A. Davidson, 
Geo. A. Conant, 
Joseph A. Whitcomb, 
Geo. R. Keyes, 
Hanson A. Littlefield, 
Job W. Dupee, 



Geo. W. Worster, 
Waldo Littlefield, 
S. Hammond Taylor, 
Daniel H. Farrar, 
Lorenzo A. Pratt, 
James P. Brown, 
Chas. S. Twitchell, 
Chas. J. Holton, 
Thomas F. Noyes, 
Cyrus Hale, 
Elbridge J. Robbins, 
Luke J. Robbins, 
John S. White. 



GUSTAVUS V. BOWEN, ) Selectmen 
H. A. LITTLEFIELD, ) of 
E. F. CONANT, ) Acton, 

Acton, Mass., March 20, 1893. 



TOWN OV ACTOm 21 



Report of Receipts and Expenditures at the 
Town Farm, Acton, 

For the Tear ending Feb, 28, 1893, 



ARTICLES ON HAND FEB. 28, 1893, 

11 cows, 
1 bull, 
1 horse, 
10 tons hay, 
Oat fodder, 
1 horse rake, 
Grain, 
1 wagon, 
1 wagon, 

1 pung, 
6 ladders, 

2 plows, 
2 horse hoes, 
40 flour bbls., 

12 market boxes, 
Lumber, 
Stone drag. 
Hay wagon, 
Horse cart, 
Express harness, 
Harrow, 
Horse sled, 



$440 00 


14 00 


100 00 


200 00 


3 00 


15 00 


10 15 


70 00 


^ 26 00 


8 00 


9 00 


12 00 


4 00 


?00 


1 20 


2 00 


5 00 


18 00 


18 00 


35 00 


2 00 


a 00 



22 ANNUAL REPORT 




15 cords wood, 


$45 00 


Mowing machine^ 


5 00 


Hens, 


26 40 


Farming tools, shovels, hoes, forks, etc.. 


22 00 


Apples, 


5 00 


125 lbs. salt pork. 


17 10 


Canned fruit, 


2 60 


24 bushels potatoes. 


24 00 


Kerosene oil. 


45 


Oil tank, 


1 00 


Fruit jars, 


2 50 


Crackers, 


1 25 


Flour, 


2 50 


Coffee and tea, 


1 50 


Sugar, 


1 37 


Spices, 


50 


Butter, 


4 00 




1,164 52 


RECEIPTS FROM TOWN FARM 


FROM MARCH 1, 


1892 TO MARCH i, 189S. 


Received for apples. 


1126 43 


1 bull. 


15 00 


Calves, 


9 75 


Cows, 


89 00 


Dinner, 


50 


Hay and straw, 


3 75 


Labor, 


13 80 


Milk, 


816 00 


Poultry, 


2 85 


Potatoes, 


8 75 


Eggs, 


23 80 


Use of bull, 


4 00 




1,113 63 



TOWN OF ACTON. 23 



EXPENDITURES AT THE TOWN FARM FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING FEB. 28, 1893. 
Bluing, 



Bread, 

Borax, 

Boots, 

Beans, 

Brooms and brushes, 

Bristol brick, 

Blacksmith's bill. 

Bull, 

Butter, 

Crockery, 

Cloth and clothing. 

Coffee, 

Cheese, 

Chocolate, 

Curtains, 

Crackers, 

Cream tartar. 

Chalk, 

Canned goods. 

Corn starch. 

Cows, 

Curing hams, 

Dalmation powder. 

Drain pipe. 

Extract lemon. 

Eggs, 

Evaporated apple. 

Express harness. 

Flour barrels, 

Flour, 



1 


27 




50 




17 


1 


25 


11 


75 


3 


34 




08 


11 


63 


14 


00 


42 


30 


4 


26 


15 99 


10 


27 


3 


23 




78 


2 


25 


12 49 


1 


85 




20 




73 




18 


202 


00 


1 


50 




20 


4 62 


1 


08 




20 




44 


35 00 


18 


00 


28 15 



24 ANNUAL REPORT 






Fish, 


$ 4 10 


4 


Farming tools, 


6 09 




Fly paper, 


45 




Grain, 


359 99 


-\ 


Grass and garden seed. 


12 41 




Glass, 


1 13 


y 


Hardware and castings, 


16 06 




Horse radish. 


25 




Hops, 


25 


H 


Iron sink, 


3 62 




Kerosene oil. 


1 80 




Labor, 


95 40 


J 


Lemons, 


68 


i 


Lime, 


78 




Lard, 


6 30 




Lamp chimneys. 


66 




Market boxes. 


1 65 


\ 


Molasses, 


7 12 




Meat, 


91 37 


^ 


Matches, 


18 


/, 


Netting, 


50 


\ 


Oyster shells. 


40 




Onions, 


34 




Pasturing cattle. 


23 00 




Potatoes, 


1 75 




Paint and oil. 


19 35 




Paper and border. 


5 04 




Putty, 


22 




Phosphate, 


8 75 


i 


Raisins, 


1 49 




Rice, 


14 




Repairs on clock, 


1 00 


i 


Soap, 


5 43 





TOWN 


OF ACTON. 


25 


Sugar, 




$19 33 


Syrup, 




90 


Sulphur, 




30 


Salt, 




1 90 


Soda, 




56 


Starch, 




06 


Salt petre. 




33 


Spices, 




68 


Stove polish. 




06 


Sheathing paper. 




53 


Services of A. S. Bradley an 


id wife. 


320 83 


Services of H. C. Scarlet and wife, 


41 66 


Services of L. C. Taylor, 




50 00 


Services of J. B. Tuttle, 




20 00 


Services of E. C. Parker, 




6 00 


Stone drag, 




5 00 


Tin ware. 




2 08 


Twine, 




15 


Tomato and cabbage plants. 




55 


Tea, 




4 38 


Teeth for horse rake. 




1 60 


Tapicoa, 




14 


Use of bull. 




1 00 


Veterinary, 




1 50 


Vinegar, 




1 04 


Wooden ware, 




1 17 


Whitewashing, 




50 


Wheelwright's bill. 




5 60 


Wagon, 




26 00 


Yeast, 




56 


Expenditures, 


$1,621 02 


Receipts, 




1,113 63 



26 



ANI^^UAL REPORT 



Income less than expense, 

Drawn from treasury, 

Due from treasury to balance account. 

Interest on farm, 



Victualling and lodging 50 tramps, 

Cost of supporting poor on farm, 

Whole number of persons, exclusive of tramps 
supported at almshouse. 

Average number. 

Present number, 

LYMAN C. TAYLOR, 
JAMES B. TUTTLE, 
EDWIN C. PARKER, 



1507 39 i 


41 66^ 


465 73 . 


240 00 , 


$747 39 ' 


20 00' 


$727 39 


3 \ 


3 


3 


Overseers 


of { 
Poor. 



We have examined the above accounts of the Overseers 
of the Poor and find them correct. 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD, ) . ,., 
D. J. WETHERBEE, ^ ^y^aitors. 



I'OWN OF ACTON-. 



27 



Town Clerk's Report for 1892. 



F'red W. and 

Elbridge L. and 

Daniel J. and 



BIRTHS RECORDED IN 1892. • 

No. Date of Birth. Name of Child. Names of Parents. 

1892. 

1. Feb. 7. Everett Windsor Reed. Lorenzo E. and 

Emma A. Reed. 

2. Feb. 8. Waldo Percival Gray. 

Clara F. Gray. 

3. Feb. 19. Ralph Noyes Wheeler. 

Florence I. Wheeler. 

4. Feb. 19. Daniel Joseph Gallagher. 

Catherine Gallagher. 

5. Mar. 4. Emma Josephine Smiley. William J. and 

Annie Smiley. 

6. May 6. Mildred Blanche Brown. Wallace A. and 

Ada Blanche Brown. 

7. June 16. Nettie Louise Smith. George A. and 

Alma W. Smith. 

8. June 20. Leslie Parker Richardson. Sidney L. and 

M. Katherine Richardson. 

9. July 6. Helen Pitman. Charles W. and 

Edith Pitman. 

10. July 12. Joseph Raymond Goodwin. Edgar and Ida 

F. Goodwin. 

11. July 20. Wendell Phillips Tuttle. Roswell L. and 

Annie B. Tuttle. 
12- July 28. Varnum Hartwell Tuttle. James B. and 
Florence M. Tuttle. 



28 



ANNUAL REPORT 



13. July 28. 

14. Aug. 8. 

15. Aug. 13. 

16. Aug. 30. 

17. Sept. 4. 

18. Sept. 16. 

19. Oct. 7. 

20. Oct. 22. 

21. Nov. 27. 

22. Dec. 20. 

23. Dec. 20. 

24. Dec. 29. 

25. Dec. 29. 

26. Dec. 30. 



Irma Christine Richardson, 

Flora A. Richardson. 
Jennie Lillian Durkee. 

L. Durkee. 
Harland Wetherbee Flagg 

Emma Flagg. 
Leonard Wm. Penniman. 

Edith R. Penniman. 
Margaret Elena Coughlin. 

Annie Coughlin. 
Florence Estella White. 

Bertha H. White. 
Bertha Mary Harris. 

Betsey J. Harris. 
Sarah Abigail Wood. 

Mary A. Wood. 
Florence Agnes McNiff. 

Delia McNiff. 
Rachel Tyler Sanders. 

Lizzie S. Sanders. 
Wm. Stearns Taylor. 

and Mary B. Taylor. 
Lester George Spinney. 
Leslie Dodge Spinney. 
Ruth Alma Evans. 

Mary Alice Evans. 



Wm. F. and 

Clark G. and Ida 

Isaac W. and 

George O. and 

William C. and 

John Sidney and 

David C. and 

Edward C. and 

John T. and 

Charles B. and 

S. Hammond 

Isaac B. and 

Ellen Spinney. 

Joseph Wm. and 



MARRIAGES RECORDED IN 1892. 

No. Date of Marriage. Names and Residence of Parties. Where Married. 

1892. 

1. Mar. 30. Aubrey T. Miner of Acton, and 

Etta E. Williams of Acton. Acton. 

2. April 14. J. Alfred Coding, W. Acton, • 

and Clara L. Tuttle, of Fitch- 
burg. Acton. 



TOWK OF ACTOIJ. ^9 



3. April 24. Joseph Gallant of W. Acton, 

and Minnie Jones of Har- 
vard. Lancaster. 

4. April 27. John H. Hartnett of So. Boston, 

and Agnes M. Hallowell of 

Stow. Acton. 

5. May 14. J. Edward Durkee of Acton, and 

Mabelle C. Small, of St. Al- 
bans, Vt. Acton. 

6. June 1. Rev.William N.Bessey of Acton, 

and Gertrude S. Harrington, 

of So. Acton. So. Acton. 

7. June 29. Frederick W. McDonald, of Con- 

cord, and Addie E. Hough- 
ton of W. Acton. W. Acton. 

8. July 9. Frederick L. Amisson, of N.Ac- 

ton, and Lois Ann Hartley 

of Acton, Billerica. 

9. July 19. William R. Tilden of Brockton, 

and Clara E. Drake of Wind- 
sor, Me. W. Acton. 

10. Aug. 7. Fred W. Gilmore of W. Acton, 

and Delia McLaughlin of 
Maynard. Acton. 

11. Sept. 6. Frank E. Fiske of Acton, and 

Bertha May Roberts of 
Chelmsford. Acton. 

12. Sept. 8. R. Gardner Brooks of Acton, 

and Libbie L. Clark of W. 

Acton. Acton. 

13. Sept. 21. Charles J. Robbins of Shelton, 

Neb., and Blanche M. Bassett 

of Acton. E. Acton. 



30 



ANNUAL REPORT 



14. Oct. 6. Fred W. Billings of E. Acton, 

and Mary A. Griffin of Ac- 
ton. Boston. 

15. Oct. 25. Frank C. Hooper of Lynn, and 

Mabel G. Pratt, of So. Acton. Acton. 

16. Dec. 1. Luther Davis of Acton, and Min- 

nie Davis of xicton. Worcester. 

17. Dec. 7. George E. Greenongh of Acton, , 

and Sarah A. Edwards of 

Acton. Acton. 

18. Dec. 16. Harvey Mader of W. Acton, and 

Edith Charlton of W. Acton. W. Acton. 

19. Dec. 25. Fred J. Whitcomb of So. Acton, 

and Mary E. Gates of Bol- 
ton. Bolton. 







DEATHS REGISTERED IN 


1S92. 






No. 


Date of Death. 


Names of Persons Deceased. 




^Age.-^ 
Mos. 






1892 






Yrs. 


Dys. 


1. 


Jan. 


1. 


Mrs. Miriam B. Jones, 














widow, 


74 


7 


9 


2. 


Jan. 


2. 


Miss Betsey L. Lawrence, 


81 


9 


29 


3. 


Jan. 


5. 


Joseph Porter Reed, 


88 


2 


3 


4. 


Jan. 


7. 


Jacob S. Harrington, 


— 


4 


29 


5. 


Jan. 


16. 


Mrs. Ruble S. Wilson, 


31 


11 


14 


6. 


Jan. 


17. 


Mrs. Cynthia Burr, 


74 


— 


28 


7. 


Jan. 


26. 


Simon Blanchard, 


83 


11 


29 


8. 


Jan. 


29. 


Arnold Hayward, 


83 


7 


13 


9. 


Mar. 


2. 


Mrs. Clarissa Stone, 


87 


11 


20 


10. 


Mar. 


17. 


Daniel Sullivan, 


— 


— 


1 


11. 


Mar. 


23. 


Miss Etta R. Hall, 


16 


9 


27 


12. 


May 


5. 


Mrs. Sarah A. Bachelder, 


62 


7 


25 


13. 


May 


11. 


Mrs. Sophia E. Faulkner, 


86 


2 


26 







TOWN OF ACTON. 






31 


No. 


Date of Death. 


Names of Persons Deceased. - 




-Age.-^ 






1892. 




Yrs. ' 


Mos. 


Dys. 


14. 


May 18. 


Loraine Davidson, 


2 


11 


29 


15. 


May 27. 


Mrs. Joanna H. Robbins, 


84 


8 


8 


16. 


May 29. 


Solomon B. Leach, 


58 


: 


— 


17. 


June 2. 


Walter A. Richardson, 


29 


2 


36 


18. 


June 13. 


Mrs. Susan Emily Willis, 


65 


,2 


7 


19. 


June 21. 


Bradley Stone, 


90 


9 


17 


20. 


June 22. 


Mrs. Clara E. Davis, 


83 


10 


21 


21. 


July 9. 


Mrs. Hannah E. Hay ward. 


74 


1 


24 


22. 


July 20. 


Mrs. Mary A. Tuttle, 


72 


4 


— 


23. 


July 23. 


Benjamin Ingham, 


38 


3 


— 


24. 


July 31. 


Mrs. Clara W. Bassett, 


52 


10 


15 


25. 


Aug. 8. 


Samuel Hosmer, 


89 


2 


13 


26. 


Aug. 23. 


James E. Harris, 


62 


1 


23 


27. 


Sept. 4. 


Thomas Mannion, 


42 


— - 


— 


28. 


Sept. 16. 


Miss Lizzie A. Mannion, 


18 


— 


8 


29. 


Sept. 30. 


Reuben Handley, 


72 


6 


12 


30. 


Oct. 5. 


Orma F. Davis, 


5 


10 


15 


31. 


Oct. 13. 


Hazel S. Davis, 


3 


8 


16 


32. 


Nov. 3. 


Mrs. Addie S. Woodruff, 


53 


1 


18 


33. 


Nov. 22. 


Lorenzo U. Holt, 


44 


6 


10 


34. 


Dec. 6. 


Mrs. Melintha L. Abbott, 


48 


5 


8 


35. 


Dec. 6. 


Abram Handley, 


49 


2 


4 


36. 


Dec. 11. 


Jonathan S. Morse, 


20 


— 


-^ 


37. 


Dec. 8. 


Winthrop E. Jones, 


71 


— 


13 


38. 


Dec. 16. 
MES OF P 


Mrs. Sarah M. Johnson, 


39 8 
JS LICEN 


5 


JSTA 


'ERSONS HAVma D0( 


8ED 






IN 1892. 








Charles A. Hodges. E. F. Shapley. 








E. Eddie Fletcher. Otis H. Forbush. 






James P. Brown 


, Solon A. Robbins. 






Luke Tuttle, 


W. W. Philbrick/ 







32 



ANNUAL REPORT 



George A. Hayward. 

William H. Hill. 

Mildred E. Handley. 

Charles H. Holton. 

George W. Poore. 

Henry L. Liverraore. 

Calvin S. Simonds, female. 

Frank L. Stiles, female. 

Antoine Bulette. 

Frank W. Bulette. 

William V. Clark. 

Elnatban Jones. 

John Temple. 

William Davis. 

Charles Morris. 

George Luddington. 

Corydon O. Stone. 

A. J. Fletcher. 

Mrs. George F. Flagg. 

Thomas Mann ion. 

Norman A. Davidson, female. 

C. H. Mead & Co. 

Howard. E. Faulkner. 

George A. Smith. 

Willie H. Gilmore. 

Fred S. Whitcomb. 

John Davis. 

Frank R. Knowlton. 

Forbush & Hartwell. 

William S. Jones. 

Fred W. Reed. 

Ralph Crooker. 

Mrs. Charles Varney, 



Willie S. Fletcher. 

William Jennings. 

L. W. Pratt. 

A. M. Knowlton. 

M. E. Taylor. 

Joseph L. Brown, female. 

A. L. Lawrence. 

A. L. Lawrence, female. 

William F. Stevens. 

Charles F. Shirland. 

Charles J. Williams. 

Abel Cole. 

David C. Harris. 

John Kelley. 

Daniel H. Farrar. 

Fred H. Lewis. 

Chauncy B. Robbins, 2 males. 

Henry M. Smith. 

Frank W. Houghton. 

Aaron C. Handley. 

Charles B. Sanders. 

John F. Coughlin. 

D. J. Wetherbee. 
George Conant. 
William B. Manning. 

E. L. Hall. 
John W. Randall. 
Moses Taylor. 
Henry Hanson. 
Fred G. Jones. 
Lucius S. Hosmer. 

A. F. Sargent, female. 
A. H. Perkins. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



33 



Charles L. Davis. 

Samuel Jones, Jr. 

Luther Conant. 

Charles S. Moulton. 

H. A. Littlefield. 

C. C. Leighton. 

Adelbert Mead. 

C. B. Stone. 

A. L. Tuttle. 

Fredson P. Brooks, 2 males. 

W. C. Robbins, 2 males. 

James Hussey. 

John Grimes. 

George W. Tuttle. 

S. H. Taylor. 

A. A. Wyman. 

C. H. Wheeler. 

Charles Wheeler. 

Warren H. Jones. 

Frank E. Allard. 

Abel Farrar, female. 

Fred Penniman. 

A. Risso. 



Ida M. Conant. 
Daniel Tuttle. 
J. R. Bassett. 
James Tuttle. 
S. L. Richardson. 
Charles Barker. 
J. H. Standish. 
Frank E. Harris. 
Francis Pratt. 
Alton White. 
May L. Calder. 
J. E. Durkee. 
Geo. A. Dasseault. 
George N. Hoit. 
Thomas McCarty. 
A. C. Jenkins. 
William J. Moore. 
R. G. Brooks. 
Hiram Woodruff. 
Mrs. S. A. Allard. 
William Hayes, female. 
H. M. Worden. 
Luther R. Forbush. 



Whole number of dogs licensed, *■ 123 

Males, 115 

Females, 8 

Whole amount received from licenses in 1892, $270 

WILLIAM D. TUTTLE, 

Town Clerk. 



34 



ANNUAL REPORT 



TOWN OFFICERS FOR 1893. 



Town Clerk^ 
William D. Tuttle. 



Selectmen^ 



Hanson A. Littlefield, 
Edward F. Conant, 
Gustavus V. Bowen, 



for 3 years 
for 2 years 
for 1 year 



Phineas Wetherbee, . . . for 3 years 

James B. Tuttle, . . . . for 2 j^ears 

Anson C. Piper, . . . . for 1 year 

, Overseers of the Poor^ 
Lyman C. Taylor, James B. Tuttle, 

Edwin C. Parker. 

Town Treasurer^ 
Jonathan K. W. Wetherbee. 



Auditors^ 



Hiram J. Hapgood, 



D. James Wetherbee. 



Collector of Taxes^ 
William F. Stevens. 



School Oommittee^ 
Charles J. Williams, and William H. Hartwell, for 3 yrs. 
Isaiah Hutchins, " William S. Jones, for 2 yrs. 

Rev. James Fletcher, " Charles L. Bradford, for 1 yr. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



3^ 



Levi W. Stevens, 



Nahum C. Reed, 



Cemetery Committee^ 

Horace F. Tuttle. 

Fence Viewers^ 



John Fletcher, 



Francis Conant, 



John R. Houghton. 

Constables and Field Drivers^ 
James Kinsley, Edwin A. Phalen, 

William F. Stevens, Fred W. Reed. 

Surveyors of Wood^ Lumber^ Hoops and Staves^ 
Augustus Fletcher, Edward F. Richardson, 

Jona P. Fletcher, Herbert T. Clark, 

Edgar H. Hall, John F. Davis, 

George H. Harris, James E. Billings. 

Fish Committee^ 

Frank H. Whitcomb, 
Charles I. Miller, 
Luther Conant. 

Trustees of the Acton Memorial Library — Corporate Members^ 6. 
Luther Conant, Adelbert Mead, 

Delette H. Hall, Hiram J. Hapgood, 

Moses Taylor, D. James Wetherbee. 

Chosen by the Town^ 
Charles J. Williams, . . . 3 years to serve 

Rev. James Fletcher, . .. .2 years to serve 

Lucius A. Hesselton, ... 1 year to serve 



Elnathan Jones, 
John Fletcher, 
Charles J. Williams, 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



YflllS'fE^^ * 



OF THE 



ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 



TRUSTEES: 

lijther con ant, 
adelbert mead, 
moses taylor, 
delette h. hall, 
hiram j. hapgood, 

daniel j. wetherbee, 
lucius a. hesselton, 
charles j. williams, 

Rev. JAMES FLETCHER. 



38 astnual kepoet 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

Of the Acton Memorial Library, 1892-93. 



'The Trustees of the Acton Memorial Library respect- 
fully submit their third annual report, showing the operations 
of the Library for the year ending March 1, 1893. We feel 
justified in stating that neither the general public, the gener- 
ous donor of the Library, or the officers of the institution 
show any diminution of interest in its workings, or in the 
appreciation of the advantages for culture and instruction 
that are offered to all. 

Number of volumes in the Library a year ago, 4,420 

Added by purchase, 157 

Donated during the year, 242 

Present number of volumes in the Library, 4,819 

Magazines same as last year, with addition of " Review 
of Reviews." The Acton Centre Improvement Society con- 
tribute the Scientific American. 

The number of Library cards has increased during the 
year from 703 to 795. 

Names registered during the year, 335. 

The books and property of the Library are in a condi- 
tion every way creditable to the librarian and janitor and 
satisfactory to us. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



39 



Donation of books to Library 1892 : 
Mrs. Robert Chaffin, 
Hon. Sherman Hoar, 
State House, 
Smithsonian Institution, 
J. H. Standish, 
Morgan & Beck, 
Wm. M. Olin, 
Washington, 

Women's Suffrage Association, 
Rev. James Fletcher, 
Wm. A. Wilde, 
Deloraine P. Corey, Maiden, 
Isaiah Hutchins, 
Topographical map of Mass. from Topographical 

Survey Commission, 
Luther Conant, 
John Fletcher, 
E. A. Good now, Worcester, 

Total, 

Mr. Wilde has marked the year with new and costly 
proofs of his continued interest in the town and library. 

August 3, 1892, he gave the beautiful and rare Italian 
oil painting of Columbus pleading his cause in the convent 
of La Rabida. 

September 17, 1892, he gave the marble bust, "Medita- 
tion." It was bought by him on his recent visit to Italy, at 
Pisa, the headquarters of the finest Carrara marble. It is by 
one of the most prominent Italian sculptors, E. Marini of 
Rome. It was placed in position in Memorial hall by Mr. 
Wilde in person, and is a thing of beauty worthy of many 
visits. 

February 25, 1893, there was deposited in the Memorial 



. 1 Vol 


4 




. 12 




1 




1 




. 194 




4 




1 




1 




1 




. 14 




1 




2 




1 




2 




1 




1 




. 242 





40 ANNUAL REPORT 



Library vault, the noted Hayward powder horn, silver mount- 
ed, by Hon. Edward Everett, having on it this inscription : 
"James Hayward of Acton was killed at Lexington on the 
19th of April, 1775, by a ball which passed through this 
powder horn into his body." Presented to the town of 
Acton by the late Hon. Stevens Hayward. 

A good sized lock of hair, taken from the head of James 
Hayward when his body was removed from the old cemetery 
in 1851, and placed under the Davis monument, after having 
been in the grave seventy-six years, was deposited in the 
vault with the other Woodbury relics, in June, 1892. Pre- 
sented by Mrs. Augusta P. Parker and Porter Woodbury, 
children of the late Rev. James T. Woodbury. 

The other Woodbur}^ relics, which came together, from 
Mrs. Augusta P. Parker, widow of George G. Parker, Esq., 
of Milford, to be kept in Memorial Library as the property of 
the town, were the shoe buckles which were on the feet of 
Capt. Isaac Davis when he fell at the North Bridge, April 19, 
1775. 

A large ancient volume, printed in England at least one 
hundred and fifty years ago, called " A Body of Divinity." It 
was the property of Rev. John Swift, the father of Rev. John 
Swift, who was the first minister of Acton, and was after- 
wards owned by Moses Adams, and was the property of Rev. 
James T. Woodbury at the time of his death. 

The original manuscript of the sermon preached at the 
laying of the corner stone of the present Congregational 
church. Also of the dedication sermon. 

The speech of Rev. James T. Woodbury in the Legisla- 
ture, pleading for the monument, and other papers. 

The following were deposited in Memorial Library vault 
by Wm. D. Tuttle, Esq., Town Clerk, Feb. 25, 1893. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 4I 



The first communion service of the original church in 
Acton, whose meeting house was built in 1736-7-8. 

. Three brittania goblets, one brittania platter, two tank- 
ards. 

A baptismal font, the gift of John and Mary Hunt, in 
1738. 

Also a later service, consisting of two tall brittania tank- 
ards and one large brittania platter. 

Also, the gift of Col. John Gumming to the church of 
Christ in Acton, Oct. 1774, consisting of three silver goblets, 
with two handles each. 

A large hanging cabinet has been ordered by the Board 
of Trustees and is nearly completed, designed to be placed 
in the Trustees' room, as a receptacle for objects of interest 
so that these mementoes may be seen by every visitor to the 
Library. 

An examination of the financial report for the year will 
show that the salaries of librarian and janitor, with the ex- 
pense of transportation of books to and from the South and 
West villages, together with the cost of coal for heating, and 
oil for lighting, absorb nearly seven-eighths of the 1400 appro- 
priated by the town for the running expenses of the Library. 

Several items in the financial report belong to the pre- 
ceeding year. Deducting these, our expenses show a small 
excess over the annual appropriation. The contingent contri- 
bution of 1150 by Mr. Wilde for new books is now being ex- 
pended. 

In view of these facts the Board of Trustees would 
recommend that the town make the same appropriation, 
i400 for current expenses and fl50 for new books, as last 
year. 

Thus, briefly, have we reviewed the work of and the 
accessions to the Library for the year. We think that we 



42 ANNUAL REPORT 



} 
I 

are warranted in the belief that it has lightened the burdens ^ 

and lessened the temptations of some lives; that it has i, 

amused, encouraged, instructed and improved numbers of i 

those that help to make up our community, and influence its j 

well-being and standing. It has certainly afforded the means 1 

of information to all, and in some measure, at least, fulfilled ] 

the obligation to keep the door of the store house of knowl- \ 

edge ever open. i 

For the Board of Trustees, \ 

LUTHER CONANT. i 



4l -14 



ANNUAL REPORT 



— OF THE — 



^dl^ool ^ Coir\ir\ittee 



FOR THE — 



SCHOOL YEAR J 



1892-93. 






44 ANNUAL KEPORT 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



In May last the town decided to adopt the Union Dis- 
trict S3^stem of superintendence of its schools and thereupon 
entered into a union with the towns of Sturbridge and West 
Brookfield. At a meeting of the School Committees of the 
three towns, held in Worcester a few days later in the month, 
Mr. Edward Dixon of West Brookfield was chosen Superin- 
tendent of the schools of the Union. For a detailed state- 
ment of his work here, and for his views regarding the de- 
fects and needs of our present school system you are respect- 
fully referred to the Superintendent's annual report, here- 
with submitted. 

Believing that the best interests of the schools demand 
the continuance, for the present, at least, of the Union sys- 
tem of superintendence, and that those interests will be 
best served by retaining the services of the present Superin- 
tendent, we recommend that the Union with Sturbridge and 
West Brookfield be continued, if possible, during the coming 
year. Certain important changes in our system of schools 
have recently been decided upon by your committee, some of 
which require the co-operation of the town. 

In presenting to you our recommendations we desire to 
express our hope and belief that they will be acted upon 
without prejudice and with an eye single to the public wel- 
fare. 

By vote of the Committee, the Grammar and Primary 
schools at the Centre are to be united at the close of the 



TOWN^ OF ACTON. 45 



present school year, and thereafter a single mixed school 
will be maintained there. An annual saving in cost of 
maintenance of about |430, and for the next fiscal year of 
about 1286 will thereby be effected. 

Your Committee has also voted to discontinue the South 
East school at the close of the school year, provided that 
the town shall appropriate a sum sufficient to defray the 
cost of transportation of the pupils to the schools at South 
Acton, We earnestly recommend that the required amount, 
estimated at |120 for the coming year, be granted. By this 
change a net sum of $190 annually and $130 for the next 
fiscal year will be saved. 

By the changes above noted $620 annually and $416 for 
the next fiscal year will become available for other purposes. 
After careful consideration of the subject we are convinced 
that the time has come to give to the High school a local 
habitation and a home. We recommend that the school be 
permanently located at South Acton. We also recommend 
that an allowance for transportation be made to each pupil 
of the High school living more than two miles from the 
school, according to the following schedule: Pupils living 
at Acton Centre, or at a like distance from the school, $6 
per term. Pupils at East Acton $7 per term, and pupils at 
North Acton $9 per terra. These sums are about equivalent 
to the cost of railway transportation from those points acces- 
ible by rail, and by clubbing together pupils can probably 
make tham cover the cost of transportation over the high- 
way. We ask that $200 be granted for this purpose. 

We heartily endorse the recommendation of the Super- 
intendent that an assistant teacher be provided for the High 
school, and request that $340 be appropriated for this pur- 
pose. As this change cannot take effect until the beginning 
of the Fall term, the sum asked for is believed to be suffi- 



4^ ANNUAL REPORT 



cient for this purpose during the two remaining terms of the 1 
fiscal year. i 

We recommend that the following appropriations be ■> 
made for school purposes for the ensuing year : ' 

For Common Schools, f3,060 00 j 

For High School, 1,340 00 ! 

For School Supplies, " 450 00 j 

For Transportation, South East School, 120 00 \ 

For Transportation, High School, 200 00 i 

For Salary of Superintendent, 400 00 I 

It is to be remembered that in order to secure the pay- 
ment by the State of the sum of $1000 to the towns of the | 
Union District the appropriations for schools must not be less ' 
than that of last year, to which must be added a further sum \ 
for the support of a Superintendent. j 

Some inquiry having been made as to the expense at- | 
tending the present system of superintendence, a statement I 
presenting the actual cost, as well as the cost in comparison , 
with that of the system formerly employed, is appended. { 

A detailed report b}^ the purchasing agent of the Board : 
is submitted, together with the statement that owing to some- i 
what extensive but much needed changes in text books and • 
purchases of charts and maps the expenses of this department | 
have exceeded the appropriations by the sum of 140.31. i 

For the Committee, ' 

CHAS. J. WILLIAMS, Secretary/, ] 



Summary of Receipts and Expenditures on account 
for the year 1892-98. 

RECEIPTS. 

Appropriation for schools, $3,400 00 
"- High School, 1,000 00 

" '' School supplies, 450 00 
Received from School fund, 268 31 

" " dog tax, 224 11 


of Schools \ 

\ 

$5,342 42 ' 





TOWN OF ACTON. 


47 




EXPENDITURES. 




Cejitre schools, 




$860 08 


South schools, 




869 69 


West schools, 




836 45 


South East school, 




372 88 


North school, 




426 88 


East school, 




409 70 


High school. 




992 97 


School Supplies, 




490 31 







Unexpended balance, 184 46 

Statement of cost to Acton of Union District system of 
Superintendence for current year : 

EXPENDITURES. 

Acton's proportion of salary 30 per cent., $390 00 

Services and expenses of Committee. 

Expense at Worcester, $17 55 

Services James Fletcher, 51 25 

" Charles J. Williams, 15 85 

" Chas. L. Bradford, 15 10 

$99 65 



RECEIPTS. 

From State, 30 per cent, of $500, (appli- 
cable to salary of Supt.,) $150 00 

From State, based on average attendance 

at schools, 166 00 



$489 65 



$316 00 



Net cost of District system, $173 63 

Deduct amount formerly paid Supt. per annum, 125 00 



Increased cost of present over former system, $48 % 



48 ANNUAL REPORT 



GRADUATING EXERCISES. 



The seventh graduating exercises of the Acton High 
School, class of 1892, were held at the Town Hall, on Friday 
evening, June 10, at eight o'clock. The music was furnished 
by the Alumnae. 

Programme. 

1. March . 

2. Prayer 

3. Salutatory and Essay, " Sunlight and shadow in the 

life of Columbus." . . . Eva N. Kraetzer 

4. Essay, " Wonders of the Ocean," James E. Clements 

5. Music 

6. Essay, " Applications of Electricity." Clara Sawyer 

7. Essay, " The battle of Bunker Hill." Chas. L. Decoster 

8. Music 

9. Essay, " What nature said to me." Helen L. Bradford 

10. Essay, " General Sheridan." . John W. Haniford 

11. Music , . . . . 

12. Essay and Prophecy, " The new Womanhood." 

Marion H. Hapgood. 

13. Essay and Valedictory, " Self Development." 

Henrietta Clark. 

14. Music 

15. Presentation of Diplomas. 

CLASS OF 1892. MOTTO, ''DOE YE NEXTE THYNGE." 

Helen L. Bradford, Henrietta Clark, 

Marion H. Hapgood, Eva F. Kraetzer, 

Clara Sawyer, James E. Clements, 

Charles L. Decoster, John W. Haniford. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 49 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



TOWN OF ACTON, to JAMES FLETCHER 


on Supply 




Account. 








Dr. C. GiNN & Co. : 








Mar. 22. 


To 5 Wentworth's Geometries, 




1 3 13 


Aug. 20. 


" 15 General Histories, 


122 50 




- 20. 


*' 20 School Algebras, 


22 


40 




- 20. 


'' 20 Physiologies, 


16 


00 




" 20. 


'^ 20 Whitney & Lockwood 










Grammars, 


14 


00 




" 20. 


" 100 Wentworth's Primary 










Arithmetics, 


30 


00 




" 20. 


'' 100 Gram. School Arith- 










metics, 


Qb 


00 




'^ 20. 


'' 7 First steps in teaching. 


6 


30 




" 20. 


'' 7 Baldwin's Arithmetics, 


3 


15 




^^ 20. 


''100 Tarbell's Language 










No. 1, 


40 


00 




" 20. 


'' 75 Tarbell's Language, 










No. 2, 


45 


00 





1264 35 
1-6 off, 44 06 



Sept. 



3. 


To 96 Spelling Blanks, 


$ 2 80 


3. 


'' 4 Csesars, 


4 17 


3. 


" 276 Copy books, 


16 bQ 


2. 


" 4 Caesars, 


4 17 



$220 29 



so 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Sept. 2. To 36 Copybooks, 

" 7. " 40 Tarbell's Language, 

No. 2, 

" 13. " 12 Gram. School Arith., 

" 16. " 12 " '•' " 

'^ 23. " 48 Copy books, 

Oct. 12. To 54 Tracing books, 

Nov. 4. "12 Tarbell's Language, 

" 4. " 24 Spelling blanks. 



f 2 16 

20 00 
6 50 
6 50 

2 88 



I 6 00 
70 



Sept. 23. Credit, by books, in exchange 

old, 1101 70 

" 23. By cash, 75 00 



$47 74 ; 

I 5 07 ' 



* 6 70 



$297 80 



Nov. 


1. 


By cash, 


75 


00 




1893. 










Jan. 


30. 


Cash to balance. 


46 


10 


$297 80 








To Boston School Supply: 








1892. 










Mar. 


2. 


To 12 qts. of ink. 






$ 3 60 


(( 


3. 


" 16 dozen tablets. 






7 68 


a 


24. 


" 6 reams of practice paper. 






2 52 


u 


24. 


" 48 spelling blanks, 






1 20 


u 


24. 


" 24 Prang's drawing books. 






1 80 


a 


24. 


" 12 slates. 






90 


a 


24. 


" 24 slate bands. 






1 72 


a 


24. 


" 216 lead pencils, 






3 75 


(( 


24. 


" 4 Warren's C. A., 






3 60 


a 


24. 


" 6 Helps in Comp., 






4 50 


May 


6. 


" 2 lbs. of rubber, 






1 70 



i 






TOWN OF ACTON. 


51 


April 18. 


To 


24 spelling blanks, 


$ 60 


u 


24. 


u 


24 slate bands, 


1 72 


Sept. 


6. 


a 


1 box of slate pencils, 


90 


i( 


6. 


a 


1 gross of lead pencils, 


2 50 


«, 


6. 


u 


1 lb. of school sponges, 


1 20 


li 


20. 


u 


18 Ward's Business Forms, 


1 80 


iC 


20. 


(i 


12 sets of Messervey's blanks, 


5 70 


ib 


27. 


(i 


12 mucilage bottles, 


50 


a 


27. 


(( 


1 Foundation of Death, 


1 20 


Oct. 


12. 


(i 


144 lead pencils, 


2 50 


ki 


12. 


(.i 


2 lbs. of rubber, 


1 70 


Sept. 


9. 


(.i 


12 Scudder's U. S. History, 


11 40 


u 


9. 


ii 


36 slate bands. 


2 16 


n 


9. 


i. 


2 boxes of slate pencils, 


24 


fcl 


9. 


u 


48 slates. 


4 80 


(( 


9. 


u 


6 Harkness' Latin Grammar, 


6 05 


a 


9. 


i( 


6 boxes of Thompson's Busy Work, 
No. 1, 


90 


ii. 


9. 


(i 


6 boxes of Thompson's Busy Work, 

No. 2, 


1 50 


Oct. 


28. 


4t 


12 quarts of ink, 


3 60 


a 


28. 


(( 


2 boxes of slate pencils. 


60 


a 


28. 


(( 


2 lbs. of rubber. 


1 70 


Nov. 


1. 


n 


13 gross of pens. 


6 50 


(( 


4. 


ii 


12 Modern Series, 


72 


(( 


4. 


a 


24 Prang's Drawing, No. 1, 


1 80 


i( 


4. 


(; 


24 » " " 3, 


1 80 


(i 


4. 


(( 


72 lead pencils. 


1 25 


(( 


4. 


i( 


12 Ward's Business Forms, 


1 20 


fc( 


4. 


a 


4 Scudder's U. S. History, 


3 80 


Dec. 


9. 


it 


144 slate pencils. 


90 


(( 


9. 


a 


288 lead pencils. No. 2, 


5 00 


(( 


9. 


i( 


144 " " " 3, 


2 50 


(( 


9. 


(( 


24 table cards, No. 6, 


96 



52- ANNUAL REPORT 



To American Book Company : 

March 24, 1892. To 12 Harper's Fourth Readers, 
April 11, " " 24 Primary Copy Books, 

" 11, " '' 12 Swinton Language Lessons, 

" 18, " " 72 Harper's Copy Book, 

May 23, "■ " 12 Harper's First Readers, 

Sept. 13, '' " 2 Barnes' Third Reader, 
" 13, '' " 12 Tracing Books, 

" 16, " '' 12 Harper's School Geography, 

Nov. 4, " '* 12 Barnes' Third Reader, 

" 4, '' '' 12 Harper's School Geography, 

To J. L. Hammett : 

April 23, 1892. To 144 Lead Pencils, 

" 23, '' '' 10 Reams of Drawing Paper, 

'' 23, " '' 50 Cornhill Pads, 

" 23, " " 15 lbs Job Blocks, 

" 23, '' " 25 boxes Crayon, 

June 15, " " 5 Maps of Massachusetts, 

Oct. 3, " " W. Jennings for expressage, 

June 1, " " 

" 27, "- '' different persons, 



u 27 " ^' " " 

Jan. 6, " '^ E. Houghton, 



June 10, 1892. Campbell & Hanscom, to printing 
blanks for Superintendent, 

July 1, 1892. To Thomas Todd, foi^ programmes 
and tickets for H. school grad. 

Aug. 3, 1892. Ink Stamp, 

Sept. 27, " Educational Publishing Co., to sup- 
plementary reading, 1 53 



14 86 


1 10 


3 06 


4 38 


1 95 


3 89 


49 


8 75 


4 80 


8 75 


$42 03 


$2 25 


3 00 


3 00 


1 27 


2 00 


17 50 


4 40 


3 85 


2 40 


1 20 


1 30 


142 17 


$8 00 


6 75 


1 15 



TOWN OF ACTON. 53 



117 43 



Town of Acton, credit by cash drawn, |445 86 

'' " debit to bills paid, 413 53 



Cr. by amount overdrawn, 832 33 

Cr. by abatement of the f 75 paid by the 

town for charts, $3 00 

Cr. by sale of supplies, 3 25 

Cr. by ink for Library, 35 

140 93 



Appropriation for supplies by town, 450 00 

Amount charged to supply account by 

Selectmen, 1531 24 

By credit as above, 40 93 

490 31 



Net cost of supplies above appropriation, 40 31 

Estimated value of supplies now in stock, 130 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES FLETCHER, 

Purchasing Agent. 



54 ANNUAL REPORT 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Committee of Acton : 

The following report is herewith presented for consider- 
ation. In my visits to the different schools, I have observed 
the sanitary condition of the school buildings, the kind and 
condition of the text-books, the methods of teaching, the 
kind of school management, the proficiency of the pupils ; 
have noted the course of study, and have endeavored to be- 
come well acquainted with the school system. In my work 
I have received the ready co-operation of teachers and school 
committee, by which my acquaintance with the school system 
has been facilitated. 

DISTRICT SUPERVISION OF SCHOOLS. 
Chapter 431 of the Acts of the Legislature of 1888 pro- 
vides as follows : 

1. Any two or more more towns, the valuation of each 
of which does not exceed two million five hundred thousand 
dollars, and the aggregate number of schools in all of which 
is not more than fifty nor less than thirty, may, by vote of 
the several towns, unite for the purpose of the employment 
of a superintendent of schools under the provisions of this act. 

2. When such a union has been effected, the school 
committees of the towns comprising the union shall form a 
joint committee. Said committee shall meet annually in joint 
convention in the month of April. They shall choose, by 
ballot, a superintendent of schools, and determine the relative 



TOWN OF ACTON. 55 



amount of service to be performed by him in each town, fix 
his salary, and apportion the amount thereof to be paid by 
the several towns. 

Financial Conditions. 

The towns forming the union, in addition to an amount 
equal to the average of the total sum paid by the several 
towns for schools during the three years next preceding, must 
unitedly raise by taxation and appropriate a sum not less 
than seven hundred and fifty dollars for the support of a 
superintendent of schools. 

State Aid. 

Upon compliance with the provisions of the law by the 
towns uniting, the state will grant them one thousand dollars, 
one-half of which amount is to be paid for the salary of the 
superintendent of schools, making it at least twelve hundred 
and fifty dollars, and the remaining one-half, five hundred 
dollars, is to be paid for the salaries of teachers employed in 
the public schools within the district. 

District Statistics. 
The joint committee of the district met at Worcester, 
May 21, organized by choosing Rev. James Fletcher of Acton, 
chairman and C. H. Clark of West Brookfield, secretary and 
unanimously elected a superintendent of schools in accordance 
with the foregoing provisions. The relative amount of his 
service was determined b}^ the committee as follows: Stur 
bridge, four tenths or eight days; Acton, three tenths or six 
days ; West Brookfield, three tenths or six days, of each 
school month of twenty days. The salary was apportioned 
in the same ratio. The year for which the superintendent is 
engaged will end May 21, 1893, practically another term. 
The net cost to the town for his services up to that date will 
be about eighty dollars, 



^6 ANNUAL REPORT 



The School System. 
Perhaps the most important question to be discussed in 
this report is : What changes, if any, shall be made in the pub-- 
lie school system ? The town is familiar with the recommend- 
ations made by the committee last spring, that certain changes 
in the system were necessary, the estimated annual cost of 
which was il726. Subtracting from this sum the cost for 
transportation of high school pupils (1300.) the estimated 
cost of the other changes proposed is '11426. The part of 
the committee's report represented by the last sum I am wil- 
ling to touch upon, but the advisability of free transportation 
must be left with those who know well the local conditions 
that demand it. How to secure all that is desirable in public 
school education and yet keep the expenditure within reason- 
able limits is a problem not easily solved. But the fact 
that the town appointed a committee ''to consider and report 
upon the proposed changes in the public school -system'' 
shows that the present system, or its application is unsatis- 
factory. The plan submitted by the committee, if adopted, 
would do much to improve the grammar and the primary 
schools of the South, West and Center. The following plan 
would, in my opinion, accomplish still more in the right di- 
rection because it would improve all the schools, nor would 
it add anything to the present cost. 

1. Let the North and East schools remain as they are. 

2. Unite the schools at the Center. 

3. Permanently locate the High School. 

4. Give to the High School an assistant teacher. 

5. Make the High school course four years. 

6. Make the proposed additional year's work of the 
grammar grade the first year's work of the High School. 

In order that a school may do the most profitable work 
there must be a sufficient number of pupils and intelligent clas- 



TOWN OF ACTON, 57 



sification. There is in the District a school of five pupils in 
two grades. The classification is ideal but profitable work can- 
not be done in such a school because there is lacking one very 
important element, viz., enthusiastic class work. This defici- 
ciency of the small district schools, together with the ever 
increasing difficulty of retaining good teachers for them, gives 
the promoters of consolidation, in which under reasonable 
conditions I firmly believe, their strongest argument. I have 
this essential of a good school in mind when I advise that all 
pupils at the North and the East attend school where they be- 
long, and that the Center schools be united. By the union of 
these schools one of the teachers becomes available for the 
position of High School assistant, while the remaining teacher 
will not find too many pupils for one good school. 

That the High School should be permanently located 
needs no discussion. The one sentiment I have met with is, 
that this should be done, right away. It is simply a question 
of wliere^ and the town is not likely to choose a wrong loca- 
tion. 

The change in the application of the system that would 
increase the efficiency of the schools most is the one advising 
the employment of a High School assistant. With this addi- 
tion to the teaching force of the High School a large class 
can be admitted, the additional year's work recommended by 
the School Committee can be done, the need of Intermediate 
schools removed, and the village schools better graded. Two 
teachers in the High school with sixty pupils would be an in- 
finitely better arrangement for the school system than two 
teacheis at tiie Center schools with thirty pupils. Upon the 
adoption of this or the committee's report, in the main, de- 
pends largely the future improvement of the schools. The 
sentiment of a community regulates in a measure the work of 
the schools, but the logical outcome of good sentiment is right 



58 ANNUAL REPORT 



action — in this case, at town meeting. A community that 
insists upon having good schools will get them. If it will 
tolerate poor schools it will have them. If the town deems 
it advisable to adopt the plan presented in this report, in 
whole or in part, and wishes to increase the efficiency of the 
schools still more I would suggest that a Grammar School be 
opened for the accommodation of the pupils of the two highest 
grammar grades of the South and West — the school to be 
located at the West if the High School goes to the South ; 
otherwise at the South — and that the present Grammar 
Schools at the South and the West be made Intermediate 
Schools. 

School Buildings. 

The school-houses are roomy, well-lighted, fairly-well 
ventilated — from the standpoint of natural ventilation — 
pleasantly located, have a good supply of blackboard surface 
and comfortable seats, and, with the exception of the South 
East, have been kept in good condition. The seats in some of 
the rooms have been moved nearer the desks, an arrangement 
more in accordance with hygienic principles. The same re- 
arrangement in the other rooms would tend to secure in the 
pupils a more healthful position of the body. The out-houses 
at the South and the West should be provided with better 
means of ventilation, and those in the other districts be re- 
paired. 

High School. 

For several years this school has been conducted by Mr. 
Armstrong, a man of broad and accurate scholarship, a strong 
disciplinarian, and a skillful instructor. He possessed the 
esteem of his pupils, the confidence of the School Committee, 
and the respect of the community. That he decided to ac- 
cept a position elsewhere has occasioned general regret. 

This school enrolls forty-seven pupils, about one sixth of 



TOWN OF ACTON. 59 



the number in town. It may be safe to assume that thirty- 
four of these will be found in the school next fall. Under 
the present system how many more can one teacher instruct 
profitably ? But there are, now, forty-seven pupils who ex- 
pect to be candidates for admission next fall, some for the 
second time. What is to be done with these pupils? Are 
from twenty to thirty of them, wounded in self-respect, to be 
sent back to the schools from whence they came, to retrace, 
in an indifferent manner, their last year's course ? The pro- 
cess of rushing pupils through the different grades should, 
undoubtedly, be stopped ; but should it be done by the doors 
of the High School? A retarding process, begun in the pri- 
mary schools and continued throughout the course so that a 
pupil would not become a candidate for High School honors 
unless he was very likely to pass, would seem more appropri- 
ate. The method of work that permits a large class to come 
through the different grades to the doors of this school and 
then refuses admission to more than one half of them should 
have a substitute. 

Course of Study. 
The present official course of study needed revising as 
soon as the new text-books in Language and Arithmetic were 
adopted, as it calls for certain pages to be taken in the text- 
book rather than for definite topics of study. I have from 
time to time outlined the work expected in each grade, but 
there should be a revised course, printed. The new "Course 
of Study for Elementary Schools," prepared under direction 
of the State Board of Education might be adopted, wholly or 
in part. When the changes to be made in the school system 
are fully decided upon, a new course of study, including one 
for the High School — for that needs revising also — adapted 
as well as it can be to the system, should be prepared for the 
schools. It should be revised from time to time to meet the 



6o ANNUAL REPORT 



needs of the pupils, and printed when it shall appear advisable 
to the School Committee. 

Examinations and Phomotions. 
What kind of examinations shall be given in the schools ? 
For what purpose shall they be given ? Shall promotions be 
made on these examinations ? Shall the tests be for knowl- 
edge, or for power, or both ? How often shall they be given ? 
By whom shall they be given ? These questions have re- 
ceived a great deal of thought from educators in the past few 
years. Every recitation tests the quality of the teaching as 
well as the knowledge or the power gained by the pupils. It 
will be well therefore for teachers to bear in mind that when 
recitations are uniformly poor, the fault lies largely in the 
teaching. I have given examinations to the schools frequently, 
both oral and written. The written examinations were con- 
ducted by the teachers. I have a record of the per cents, 
gained by the different pupils; and while they may be used 
in making promotions, the examinations were not primarily 
for that purpose. There should be this difference, in examin- 
ations — that while the teachers' tests should be given for the 
purpose of discovering the amount of knowledge and inform- 
ation retained by their pupils, their growth in power, or their 
skill acquired, the superintendent in his examination should 
test the value of the teaching, discoverable through the at- 
tainments of the pupils, and, by his questions, direct largely 
the work of the teacher with her classes. In the oral tests 
both these objects have been gained in a satisfactory degree. 
The written examinations have served well in directing the 
work of the teachers, but they have failed, in a measure, to 
accomplish the second object because generally, the aim of the 
teacher being primarily to secure a high mark for theii* pupils, 
there has been in some schools too much cramming for the 
tests. The method of examination for admission to the High 



TOWN OF ACTON. 6l 



School, together with the preliminary work for it is largely 
responsible for this interpretation of the object of examina- 
tions. And such is its influence upon teaching that without 
doubt, in the spring term one-half the time of the first class 
of the grammar grades has been taken to cram pupils for the 
annual test. While this remains the basis of promotion the 
teachers well know their success will be judged largely by 
the number of pupils they promote to the High School. This 
is not a criticism on the teachers, for it is the kind of work 
they feel compelled to do whether it accords with their judg- 
ment or not. Perhaps the most unfair feature of this work is 
that the pupils of the teacher who makes the shrewdest guess 
as to what the examination questions will be stand the best 
chance of being admitted to the High School, without regard 
to scholarship. If the end of school work is the answering 
of a few questions without regard to the method by which 
they are obtained, this cramming is the proper means ; but if 
the eyid of education is the training of the physical, intellect- 
ual and moral powers, the fitting of boys and girls to become 
good and useful members of society a different method will 
more likely accomplish the desired end. 

In speaking of the influence of prorriotion examinations, 
Dr. E. E. White says, "They set up a low and alluring end for 
study and they dissipate that natural desire for knowledge 
which is a source and inspiration of all true learning and of 
all true joy in study. The more the interest of the pupils is 
focussed on the examination as an end, the more they fall 
into the use of memoriter and mechanical methods of study. 
They work for per cents., they cram for per cents., and too 
often, as it is feared, they cheat for per cents." The teachers 
are best able to judge of the attainments of their own pupils 
and also their capacity for mental work ; and their opinions 
should have great weight in determining promotions. The 



62 ANNUAL KEPOIlT 



dam between the highest grammar grade and the High School 

should be removed. True teaching should develop power- ] 

character. | 

The Work of the Schools. ] 

The remodelling of a school system should proceed with • 

due deliberation. No changes should be made except for • 

good reasons. At the best, the upbuilding of a school S3's- ; 

tem is necessarily a slow operation. It is not a mechanical j 

process. It is a growth, therefore requires time for its de- j 

velopment. But although so much remains to be done, the \ 

work of the past year has not been without its encourage- I 

ments. Changes have taken place in methods of instruction, - 
and in the time given some of the studies. Every teacher 

aims to systematize her work, and the time given to each i 

recitation is governed by a daily programme. i 

The change of text-books in language was very accept- \ 

able to the teachers, and more and better work is now being ■ 

done in this important study. Special attention is given to ^ 

the pupils' language in all recitations. The change of text- ^ 

books in arithmetic, too, was a decided improvement. The ! 

primary school teachers especially appreciate the change. In ] 

this branch of study, objective teaching is becoming more and ; 

more the basis of work. Accuracy and speed in fundamental , 

operations are receiving special attention, and constant ap- ' 

plication to the practical business of life is required. ] 

In geography, study and recitation are more largely by j 

topic. Thus the pupils, besides storing their minds with ] 

knowledge and information in a more orderly way than is i 
possible under the question-and-answer method used alone, 

get a good training in the expression of thought, because ] 

they are required to reproduce the thought of the author in \ 
their own language. 

The primary grades have been supplied with combina- 



TOWN OF ACTON. 63 



tion charts and maps of Massachusetts, and the High School 
has had several new text-books. The teachers have found 
them very helpful. 

Perhaps the most marked improvement has been in 
primary reading. For this we are much indebted to those 
teachers who have carefully observed the same work in the 
Chelsea schools. 

Teachers' meetings for the discussion of the course of 
study, methods of instruction, and school management, have 
been held regularly, and have been very helpful in unifying 
the work of the schools. We were fortunate in having Mr. 
Geo. A. Walton, agent of the State Board of Education, to 
address the teachers at one of these meetings. The teachers 
had the privilege also-of attending a Teachers' Institute at 
Maynard. The time talvcn from regular school hours to at- 
tend these meetings and to visit the schools of other towns 
is, I believe, in every way profitable to the teachers and to the 
town. 

Duties of the Supekintendent. 

Superintendence requires wide experience in school 
work and a knowledge of the principles of teaching on which 
methods of instruction are based. The superintendent should 
be able to treat subjects of school work philosophically, and 
explain their relation to underlying principles. To prepare 
himself for his work and to keep in touch with educational 
movements, he must study the science and art of education, 
read educational journals, visit the best schools to be found, 
attend teachers' institutes, superintendents' meetings, con- 
ventions, summer schools, etc. Much of the work must 
necessarily be done on Saturdays and in vacations. He must 
direct the methods of teaching, therefore he should ever be 
alert to obtain the best thought of the day on every subject 
of school work. It would be difficult to state precisely all 



64 ANNUAL REPORT 



the duties of the superintendent, but they have been briefly 
summarized as follows : 

1. He is the executive officer of the School Boayxl. He 
keeps the Committee informed of the condition and needs of 
the schools. From time to time he makes a detailed report 
to the Committee, offering suggestions, answering questions, 
etc. He appears before the Board whenever requested, and 
makes known his plans and purposes, so that the Committee 
have through him, a knowledge of the work of the different 
schools, and of his aims for future work. He has no author- 
ity to employ or dismiss teachers, buy books and supplies, 
make repairs, change courses of study, etc., except as it is 
delegated to him by the Committee. In fact, he has no 
authority but what is derived from the School Committee. 

2. He unifies the work as much as possible throughout the 
town. He aims to systematize the whole of school instruction 
from the lowest primary through the high school course. In 
his visits he finds need of strengthening weak places. He 
sees that every study receives proper attention. He arranges 
for teachers' meetings, in which suggestions and directions, 
papers, discussions of school work, etc., are made prondnent. 

3. He directs teachers iu theirmethods of instruction. The 
superintendent should not unduly interfere with the teacher's 
management. They are most truly aided who are put in the 
way of aiding themselves. He indicates to each teacher the 
work to be attempted, calls attention to mistakes, suggests 
good methods, and gives teaching and test exercises. It is 
not necessary, nor is it desirable, that methods be the exact 
copies of one another. Teachers should be allowed all pos- 
sible freedom in developing their plans and methods, and 
then be held responsible for results. 

4. He trains young and iyiexperienced teachers. Owing 
to the small salaries paid in many of the schools, it becomes 



TOWN OF ACTON. 6$ 



necessary to employ young men, or women, who have had no 
experience in teaching. To these teachers, and in fact to all 
others, he gives the advantage of his experience, not only in 
the same town, but in other towns. 

5. ITe arranges a course of study. An outline of what 
is to be accomplished in each grade is indispensible to sys- 
4;ematic work. With this before her, the teacher becomes' 
acquainted with the work to be accomplished in the different 
grades, and knows just what she is expected to do. It en- 
ables her to confine her teaching, in the main, to subjects 
which the pupils have yet to learn, and to avoid giving much 
time to those already known. 

6. He classifies pupils according to their attainments. The 
superintendent holds frequent consultations with the teachers 
in regard to the needs of the different pupils, and sees that 
children are properly classified. Perplexing problems are 
continually arising which he assists the teachers in solving. 

7. He encouragss in pupils promptness and regularity of 
attendance. He becomes acquainted with the pupils, knows 
those who are inclined to be irregular in attendance, and in 
various ways endeavors to make them see the necessity of 
promptness and regularity. 

8. He makes school supervision a business. He gives his 
whole time to the work of superintending, visits the schools 
regularly and systematically, is acquainted with the condi- 
tion of the buildings, the kind of work done by teachers and 
pupils, the quality and quantity of books and apparatus, and 
the needs of the schools generally. 

In my work with the teachers, I have found them ready 
to receive any suggestion or directions that appeared needful, 
and earnestly desirous of advancing the school interests of 
the town. 



(^ ANNUAL REPORT 



To the School Committee, especially the chairman and 
the secretary, I am greatly indebted for valuable assistance. 
In conclusion, I desire to express my sincere thanks for the 
kindness and courtesy shown me in the discharge of my 
duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD DIXON, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



TOWN OF ACTONi 



6? 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 

1892-93. 





















i 


i 


i 


SCHOOLS. 


TERMS. 


TEACHERS. 


5 


a 
1 


1 
O 

u 


ft 


1 




>> 


1 

u 


1 

•d 






■ 




"S 


B 


a 


Is 


o 






00 








P. 


u 


c 


<a 


«> 


4^ 


^ 


a 


g 










B 


a 


^ 


^ 




£ 


cc 


» 








^ 

^ 




1 




1 


u 




ft 


1 




Spring. 


A. W. Armstrong. 


$ 


12 38 


31.6 


28.7 


&1 


0,19 


19 


High. 


Fall. 


A. W. Armstrong. 


120.20 


12,44 


43.8 


41.8 


95 





21 


23 


Winter. 


f A. W. Armstrong. 
(C. A. Crooks. 




12 46 


42.3 


37.9 


90 





22 


6 




Spring. 




12 17 


14. 


13. 


93 








16 


Centre Grammar. 


Fall. 


Clara B.Holden. 


40.00 


12 20il6. 


13.6 


85 








20 




Winter. 






12 19 1 16.58 


14.17 


91 








19 




Spring. 






1217 15.7 


15.4 


98 








1 


Centre Primary. 


Fall. 


Sarah E. Hammond. 


40.00 


12 17;14.3 


13.7 


96 













Winter. 






12 14 11.01 


10.14 


92 








7 




Spring. 






12 33 31.2 


29.9 


96 





2 


31 


South Grammar. 


Fall. 


Hattie L. Tuttle. 


40.00 


12 36 35.2 


33.9 


96 





2 


34 




Winter. 






12 35 31.6 


29.8 


94 





2 


33 




Spring. 






12 34 31.7 


28.8 


91 


1 





17 


South Primary. . 


Fall. 


Bertha L. Gardner. 


40.00 


12 42 37.5 


35.7 


96 








13 




Winter. 






12 35 30.6 


27.7 


91 








12 




Spring. 






12 32 31. 


28.4 


91 





3 


28 


West Grammar. 


Fall. 


Albertie L. Preston. 


40.00 


12,43:38.7 


36.6 


94 





1 


41 




Winter. 






12 


44 41.3 


37.7 


91 





1 


40 




Spring. 






12 


49 


45. 


38. 


85 


2 





23 


West Primary. 


Fall. 


Harriet H. Gardner. 


40.00 


12 


40 


36. 


34.9 


97 


1 





16 




Winter. 






12 


40 


35.4 


33.4 


94 








18 




Spring. 


Mattie F. Smith. 




12 


17 


16.3 


15.5 


95 








13 


North. 


Fall. 


Susie E. Conant. 


40.00 


12 


18 


17.7 


17.1 


97 


1 





10 




Winter. 


Susie E, Conant. 




12 


19 


16.2 


15.4 


94 


1 





11 




Spring. 


Rena M. Carr. 




12 


29 


27.2 


25.3 


93 


1 





20 


East. 


Fall. 


Rena M. Carr. 


40.00 


12 


29 


28.7 


27.5 


96 


1 


1 


19 




Winter. 


M. Florence Fletcher. 




11 


29 


23.7 


21.5 


90 








20 




Spring. 


Ella E. Day. 




12 


8 


8. 


7.5 


94 








6 


South East. 


Fall. 


Bertha E. Hosmer. 


36.00 


12 13 


9.5 


8.7 


92 








8 




Winter. 


Lena Hayward. 




12 11 


10.3 


9.9 


97 





1 


7 



ISTu ruber between 5 and 15, as reported by the Assesors for 
the year 1892 ; 264. 



68 ANNUAL REPORT 



TOWN WARRANT. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Middlesex ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in the County of 
Middlesex, Greeting : 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are 
directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town of Acton, 
qualified to vote in the elections and town affairs, to assemble in 
the Town Hall, in said Town, On Monday, the Third Day of 
April, A. D., 1893, at One o'clock, p. m., then and there to act 
upon the following Articles as they may think proper, viz : 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside in said meet- 
ing. 

Art. 2. To fill all vacancies in the list of town officers and 
committees. 

Art. 3. To see what amount of money the town will raise 
for the support of schools and for school supplies for the present 
year, or act thereon. 

Art. 4. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money 
for the due observance of Memorial day. 

Art. 5. To see if the Town will accept of the jury list as 
revised by the Selectmen. 

Art. 6. To vote by ballot, Yes or ISTo, in answer to the 
question : " Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this Town the present year ? '' 



TOWN OF ACTON. 69 



Art. 7. To see if the Town will accept of the reports of the 
Selectmen, Overseers of the Poor, School Committee, and other 
Town officers, or act anything thepon. 

Art. 8. To see if the Town will authorize the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money for the 
Town, if necessary, in anticipation of the taxes for the current 
year. 

Art. 9. To see if the Town will erect and maintain street 
lamps, or take any action thereon. 

Art. 10. To hear the reports of any committees, chosen to 
report at this meeting, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 11. To see what sum of money the Town will raise 
for the support of Memorial Library for the ensuing year, or act 
anything thereon. 

Art. 12. To see what sum of money the Town will raise 
for the repairing of roads and bridges the present year, or act 
anything thereon. 

Art. 13. To see if the Town will raise the sum of two hun- 
dred dollars for repairing the road leading from Acton Centre to 
East Acton, beginning at the hearse house in Woodlawn Ceme- 
tery, to the Old Colony railroad crossing, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 14. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise to defray Town charges the present year, or act anything 
thereon. 

Art. 15. To see if the Town will locate the bounds and 
straighten and widen the road leading from the house of W. F. 
Stevens, past the house of E. H. Cutler to the intersection with 
the road leading from Acton Centre to South Acton, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Art. 16. To see if the Town will accept of the provisions 
of Sec. 74, 75, 76 and 77 of Chap. 27 of the Public Statutes, in 
relation to the election of three Eoad Commissioners, or act any- 
thing thereon. 



yo AKl^ITAii HEPORO^ 



Art. 17. To see if the Town will instruct the Selectmen to 
change the precinct lines, so as to place John Kelley and S. Rich- 
ardson in precinct 3, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 18. To see if the Town will change the location of the 
roads on the south side of the Town Hall, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 19. To see if the Town will vote to hold one meeting 
in March or April in each year, instead of one in March and one 
in April, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 20. To see what sum of money the Town will raise to 
be expended on the turnpike, under the order of the County Com- 
missioners. 

Art. 21.. To see if the Town will raise the sum of one 
thousand dollars to defray the expense of breaking roads. 

Art. 22. To see what action the town will take in reference 
to better protection against fires. 

Art. 23. To see if the Town will celebrate the nineteenth 
of April, 1893, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 24. To see if the Town will lay out and grade a road 
from the house of J, C. Gates to the Leland Stevens road, or act 
anything thereon. 

Art. 25. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen 
to buy the whole or a part of the land now owned by Geo. W. 
Woodman in Acton Centre, to be a common or a highway as they 
may direct, or act anything thereon. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting up 
copies attested by you in the following places: One at the Post 
Office in the Centre of the Town ; one at the store of Tuttles, 
Jones & Wetherbee ; one at the store of H. A. Littlefield ; one 
at the store of C. H. Mead & Co. ; one at the Nagog House ; one 
at each of the Railroad stations, and one at the Post Office at 



TOWN OF ACTON. 7 1 



East Acton, seven days at least before the time appointed for 
holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due returns of this Warrant, with 
your doings thereon, to the Selectmen or Town Clerk, on or 
before the time of holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands, in Acton, this eighteenth day of 
March, in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three. 

GUSTAYUS V. BOWEN, 
HANSON A. LITTLEFIELD, 
ED. F. CONANT, 

Selectmen of Acton. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 



Town of Agton 



(MASS.,) 



FROM 



FEBRUARY 26, 1893, TO MARCH 12, 1894. 




HUDSON, MASS.: 
THE ENTERPRISE PRINTING CO. 

1894. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



TOWN OF ACTON in account with J. K. W. WETHEBBEE, 

Treasurer, 

1894. Dr. 

March 12. To cash paid, State tax, ^1,625 00 

" " '' County tax, 1,326 91 * 

" " " " on Selectmen's 

orders, 24,445 13 

" '' Balance due the town, 2,844 94 

130,241 98 

1893. Ck. 

Feb. 26. By cash in the treasury, f 2,827 59 

Received for money overdrawn for light- 
ing street lamps, 
Received from Acton Memorial library for 
fines, 
Nathan Johnson, old hearse 

wheels, 
Nathan Johnson, hay in 

Woodlawn cemetery, 
I. S.Ford, old road scraper, 
L. W. Stevens, lots sold in 

Mt. Hope cemetery, 
John Fletcher, lots sold in 

Woodlawn cemetery, 
William D. Tuttle, borrow- 
ed money, 550 00 
F.H.Jones,borrowed money, 700 00 
B. H. & 0. K. Patch, bor- 
rowed money, 500 00 



4 


00 


14 38 


10 


00 


10 


00 


20 


00 


22 


00 


22 


00 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



South Acton Young Peo- 
ple's Christian Union, 
borrowed money, 100 00 

John A. Bowen, borrowed 

money, 3,000 00 

Estate of William Davis, 

borrowed money, 28 00 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, bor- 
rowed money, 324 74 

State Treasurer, support of 

State pauper, 10 75 

State Treasurer, burial of 

State pauper, 15 00 

State Treasurer, corpora- 
tion tax, 519 69 

State Treasurer, National 

Bank tax, 314 72 

State Treasurer, military 

aid, chap. 279, acts 1889, 133 25 

State Treasurer, State aid, 

chap. 301, acts 1889, 558 00 

State Treasurer, increase 

of Mass. school fund, 233 54 

County Treasurer, dog tax, 243 08 

C. H. Clark, on account of 

supervision of schools, 315 28 

C. J. Williams, school sup- 
plies sold, 20 

C. J. Williams, damage to 
school furniture in East 
district, 1 00 

Town of Boxboro. tuition 

of Alice P. Willard, 16 00 

Estate of Kev. Jas. Fletch- 
er, cash overdrawn for 
school supplies, 40 93 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



Estate of J. E.Catter,taxes 

for 1891 and 1892, 1,009 50 

C. W.Pitman,rent of Town 

hall and cellar, 102 25 

W. F. Ste^rens, taxes for 

1893, 18,506 79 

Interest on money in bank, 89 29 

$30,241 98 

Treasurer's Report of Money held for care of Lots in the 

Cefneteries. 

Hepsabeth Piper fund, f 50 00 

Frederick Rouillard fund, 100 00 

William W. Davis fund, 100 00 

Jedediah Tuttle fund, 50 00 

Nancy K. Handley fund, 500 00 

Mary Skinner fund, 200 00 



11,000 00 
J. K. W. WETHERBEE, 

Treasurer of Acton. 

Acton, March 12, 1894. 
We have examined the accounts of the Treasurer and find 
them correct. 

HIEAM J. HAPGOOD, 
DANIEL J. WETHERBEE, 

Auditors of the Town of Acton. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

In presenting our report to you for the past year, we 
shall vary somewhat from previous reports. You having 
voted at your last April meeting to hold but one meeting in 
the Spring, it was thought advisable to change the ending of 
the town year, so as to have the school and town year end 
at the same time, and in order to do this we have extended 
it from February 26 to March 12. 

This will necessarily increase the expenses for the past 
year, but It will also enable us to report the Town farm 
account in our past year, and not carry the deficiency over 
into the following year, as has been customary in the past. 

We have also itemized some accounts more than has 
usually been done, and if we were going to make a report 
that would be satisfactory to us, and which we think would 
be acceptable to a good many, we would itemize all accounts 
in full. 

It also seems essential that there should be, not only a 
report of our past year, but also some statement or estimate 
of the coming year's expenses, that you may vote under- 
standingly, and, after carefully examining all the accounts, 
we would make the following recommendations to you .• 
For Roads and bridges, 12,000 00 

Special road work, 800 00 

Memorial Library, 550 00 

State tax, 1,500 00 



TOWN OF ACTON. 






7 


County tax, 






1,300 


00 


Overlayings, 




' 


500 


00 


Town charges the following : 










Support of Poor, 


11,300 00 






Cenietery expenses, 




100 00 






Town officers, 




700 00 






Interest on debt, 




400 00 






Printing, 




125 00 






Street lamps, 




250 00 






Discount on taxes, 




1,000,00 






Reshingling North and 


[ East 








school-houses. 




150 00 






Painting Centre school-house, 


120 00 






Supply of water for < 


Centre 








school. 




100 00 






Supply of water for 


South 








school. 




75 00 






Grading West Acton 


school 








grounds, 




100 00 






Heater for Town hall, 




400 00 






Miscellaneous expenses, 




580 00 







5,500 00 

Schools, as recommended by school committee, 4,400 00 
School supplies, as recommended by school 

committee, 550 00 
Superintendent of schools, as recommended 

by school committee, 475 00 
Transportation of scholars, as recommended 

by school committee, 630 00 

Scientific apparatus, 100 00 



$18,305 00 

Should you be governed by these recommendations at the 

coming April meeting, your rate of taxation will not exceed 



T^NNUAL KEPORTS 



•$11.40 on a thousand for the present year, that is, presuming 
that our amount of taxable property will be the same as last 
year, $1,468,910.00, and we think this is a low estimate, as 
it has increased nearly every year for the past ten years. 
Should it be larger, then our rate would be less. The poll 
tax, which is about |1300, is figured in this estimate. Then 
the town has receipts yearly of $1000 or more from various 
sources, which could be applied to the payment of part of 
the town debt. The town will also probably receive about 
$1000 from the county for work done on the Turnpike road. 
Following is the financial report: 

UNPAID BILLS FEBRUARY 26, 1893. 
Paid Lyman C. Taylor, deficiency on Tow^i'farm, 

1892, "^ $465 73 

Nathan Johnson, labor in Woodlawn ceme- 
tery, 

C. A. Crooks, teacher High school 3 2-5 weeks, 
A. W. Armstrong, teacher high school 3-5 

weeks. 
Aid for Mrs. John Qninlan, 

D. A. Cutler, transporting books, 
Mrs. C. A. Vose, aid for Mrs. Train or. 



Boston School Supply Co., 

A. W. Armstrong, 

C. H. Mead & Co., supplies and repairs. 

Enterprise Printing Co., 400 blank deeds, 

James Kingsley, use of road. 

Dr. Rich, medical attendance on W. B. Ball, 

Moses Reed, labor in Woodlawn cemeter}^ 

Dr. I. Hutchins, medical attendance on Henry 

Parlin, " 22 22 

Dr. I. Hutchins, medical attendance on Sophie 



20 


55 


86 


89 


15 


33 


104 00 


20 


00 


36 


00 


18 25 


8 


64 


2 


43 


10 


92 


6 


50 


8 


00 


13 


00 


6 


30 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



Wetherbee, 

Dr. I. Hutchins, medical attendance on M. 
Murphy, 

Dr. I. 'Hutchins, medical attendance on F. 
Smith, 

Dr. I. Hutchins, reporting births in 1891 and 
1892, 

Dr. I. Hutchins, school committee 1892, 

C. H. Mead, nails and spikes. 

Estate of L. U. Holt, repairs on West school- 
house, 

Estate of L. U. Holt, repairs on Centre school- 
house, 

C. H. Mead & Co., repairs on West school- 
house, 

H. T. Clark, repaii's on West school-house, 

Estate of J. E. Cutter, salary of collector, 
1891, 

M. E. Taylor & Co., sundries for Town hall, 
1891, 

M. E. Taylor & Co., sundries for Town hall, 
1892, 

Estate of L. U. Holt, 2 coal hods for Town 
hall. 

Estate of L. U. Holt, 15 lbs. pipe for Town 
hall, 

J. G. Roberts, binding books for library, 

Estes & Lauriat, books for library, 

Luther Con ant, magazine for library, 

Luther Conant, express and teaming for li- 
brary, 

Estate of L. U. Holt, repairs on library, 

Henry Barker, maintaining 2 street lamps. 



2 


25 


5 50 


7 


50 


6 


50 


15 


00 




95 


8 


90 


3 


25 


9 


15 


6 


70 


97 


50 


5 


96 


6 28 


1 


50 


1 


80 


7 


73 


5 


75 


5 


55 


5 


10 


7 


59 


4 


00 



lO 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



L, C. Baldwin, maintaining 1 street lamp, 



G. V. Bowen, 


a 




0. L. Dart, 


a 




G. N. Hoit, 


a 




L. A. Hesselton 


u 




H. J. Hapgood, 


(.i 




F. A. Houston, 


1.1, 




L. S. Hosmer, 


a 




F.J. Hastings & Co., 


&c 




A. H. Jones, 


a 




Elnathan Jones, 


u 




W. H. Jones, 


bC 




T. F. Newton, 


u 




Waldo Tuttle, 


;( 




F. Z. Taylor, 


;( 




J. K. W. Wetherbee 


u 




G. W. Worster, 


fc> 





Tattles, Jones & Wetherbee, maintaining 2 
street lamps, 

Acton Centre Improvement Society, main- 
taining, 23 street lamps, 

West Acton Street Lighting Association, 
maintaining 35 street lamps. 



2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


4 


00 


46 


00 


70 


00 



11,213 22 



SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 

Centre School. 
Paid Susie E. Conant, teacher 24 weeks, 
Clara B. Holden, teacher 12 weeks, 
Sarah Hammond, teacher 12 weeks, 
Nathan Johnson, janitor. 

" " cutting and getting 

in wood, 



1240 00 

120 00 

120 00 

55 50 

4 91 



TOWlSr OF ACTON. 



II 



Nathan Johnson, cleaning room, 

Luther Conant, 6 3-4 cords wood, 
F. J. Hastings & Co., 6,455 lbs. coal, 
M. E. Taylor & Co., one mop, 
" " " screw eyes, 

" " " curtain cord, 

" " " one brush, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, 1 broom, 



South School. 

Paid Hattie Tattle, teacher 36 weeks, 
Bertha Gardner, '• " '' 
C. L. Bradford, janitor, 

'' '" cleaning rooms, 

" " vault, 

" " wood and sawing, 

F. J. Hastings, 5,113 lbs. coal, 
E. Jones & Co., 4,213 lbs. coal, 
Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, mucilage, 

3 brushes. 



7 25 




30 75 




20 98 




20 




3 




25 
30 


1600 17 
92 





1 basin, 
5 dippers, 
box powder, 
3 pails, 
blacking, 
3 bottles ink 
1 bottle glue 
coal hod, 
sand paper, 
polish, 



$360 00 

360 00 

90 00 

6 75 

1 00 
3 00 

15 98 

13 07 

17 

2 60 
10 



45 
20 
66 
18 
15 
10 
62 
9 
15 



West School. 

Paid Harriet H. Gardner, teacher 36 weeks, f 360 00 
Albertie M. Preston, " " " 360 00 



1601 09 



f 855 27 



12 ANNUAL REPORTS 



F. W. Green, janitor, 


78 00 


•' •' cleaning vault, 


1 00 


'^ " " rooms, 


6 00 


'' '' cutting wood, 


2 50 


E. C. Parker & Co., 4,950 lbs. coal, 


17 52 


14,800 lbs. coal, 


47 36 


E. Hall & Sons, 2 cords wood. 


5 00 


Estate of L. U. Holt, 1 basin. 


40 


C. H. Mead & Co., 1 brush. 


33 


<' '• 1 tliermoraeter, 


25 


" '' bottle mucilage, 


10 


" " 3 dozen pencils, 


30 


'' ^' sand paper, 


6 


" -' paper. 


91 


Southeast School. 




Lena Hay ward, teacher one term, 


^106 50 


W. S. Jones, janitor. 


5 00 


" '" cleaning room, 


2 00 


North School. 





Paid Susie E. Conant, teacher 12 weeks, ^120 00 

Lillian Richardson, '^ 24 weeks, 21G 00 

Samuel Miller, janitor 1 term, 
John Maynes, janitor 2 terms, 
C. J. Miller, 10,190 lbs. coal, 
W. H. Hartwell, teaming coal, 

'' " 1-2 cord wood, 

" " cutting wood, 

" '' wood, 

" " 1 broom, 

" " cleaning rooms, 



6 


00 


18 


00 


27 


74 


2 


50 


8 


50 


2 


50 


1 


00 


4 


00 




30 


7 


00 



$879 73 



113 50 



i413 54 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



;i2o 


00 


240 


00 


30 


00 


24 


05 


10 


00 




10 




20 




10 




20 




40 




10 




5S 




37 



^ast School. 

Paid Florence Fletcher, teacher 12 weeksy 
Lucy M. Booth, '' 24 weeks, 

C. J. Williams, janitor, 

D. J. Wetherbee, coal, 
W. C. Eobbins, 2 cords wood, 
M. E. Taylor & Co., 1 dish, 

'' " 2 chimneys, 

'' *' 11 burner, 

" " 2 gallons oil, 

" " 1 shovel, 

'' " 1 dust pan, 

'' " 1 coal hod, 

'^ " 1 brush, 

High School. 

Paid C. A. Crooks, teacher 12 weeks, |306 m 

W. A. Charles, " 24 weeks, 613 34 

Florence Fletcher, asst. teacher 24 weeks, 240 00 
F. W. Green, janitor, 
C. L. Bradford, janitor, 
C. L. Bradford, cleaning room, 
F. F. Hastings & Co., 5,112 lbs. coal, 

E. Jones & Co., 4,212 lbs. coal, 
J. L. Hammett, for diplomas, 

School Supplies. 

Paid Boston School Supply Co., 
Ginn & Co., 
J. L. Hammett, 
American Book Co., 
University Publishing Co., 
Estate of James Fletcher, 

F. J. Barnard & Co., 
Houghton Mifflin & Co., 



12 


00 


60 


00 




75 


15 


97 


13 06 


22 


25 


42 


65 


157 


88 


131 


26 


26 


25 


35 


69 


2 


62 


7 


50 


10 20 



13 



$426 10 



,284 03 



ANNUAL KEPOKTS 



Lee & Sliepard, 

Public School Printing Co., 

Maynard, Merrill & Co., 

C. J. Williams, 

Dr. I. Hutchins, 

C. L. Bradford, express, 

C. J. Williams, printing, 

A. Hosmer, printing, 

C. J. Williams, express, 



MEMORIAL LIBRARY. 

Paid estate of James Fletcher, janitor, $ 

Chas. D. Clark, janitor, 
Ida A. Hale, librarian, 
D. A. Cutler, trans[)oi'ting books, 
J. Breck & Sons, repairing lawn mower, 
Ida A. Hale, curtain, 
" " postage, 

J«. F. Scott, Mass. Reformatory, printing, 
J. G. Koberts & Co., binding books, 
F. J, Barnard & Co., " " 

F. J. Hastings & Co., 12,725 lbs. coal, 
M. E. Taylor & Co., 161 1-2 gal. oil, 
" '• '' basket, 

" " '■' 2^ chimneys, 

" " " 2 brushes, 

'• '' '• 'pencils and paper, 

" " '• pail, 

" '' " sundries, 

Estes & Lauriat, books, 
DeWolf, Fiske & Co., books, 
H. D. Noyes, books, 
Luther Conant, magazine and express. 



36 


08 


8 


50 


30 


12 




60 


1 


25 




50 




50 




65 


10 


20 



8 


00 


94 


b^ 


107 


00 


55 


00 


1 


75 


1 


05 




40 


11 


00 


5 


74 


15 


30 


41 


36 


12 


92 




50 


2 


21 


1 


32 




80 




35 




54 


58 


09 


67 


12 


24 


70 


4 


69 



S502 45 



$517 30 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 

Paid Lyman C. Taylor, deficiency on town 

farm in 1893, ^416 03 

Mrs. C. A. Vose, aid for Mrs. Trainor 
in 1893, 

L. C. Taylor, aid for Mrs. Pike, 

Dr. C. B. Sanders, medical attend- 
ance on Wm. Hill, 

Dr. Steadman, medical attendance on 
Daniel Griffin, 

Solon Bobbins, aid for Mrs. A.M.Jones, 120 00 

DanversJTiunatic Hospital, for Rich- 
ard Temple, 

City of Lowell, for Kingsley children, 

Worcester Lunatic Hospital, for Em- 
ily G. Towne, 

Worcester Insane Asylum, for Clara 
Wheeler, 

L. C. Taylor, expenses to Ivoxbury 
(Welch children), 

L. C. Taylor, burial expenses of Isaac 
Bryant, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, aid for 
Mrs. J. Quinlan, 



46 


00 


2 


50 


9 


00 


120 


00 


169 


87 


155 


m 


169 46 


169 46 


2 


50 


10 


00 


108 


00 




— S1.407 38 



REPAIRS ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

Paid Samuel Jones, Jr., repairs on South 

school-house, ^159 61 

Samuel Jones, Jr., repairs on South 

East school-house, 3 09 

Samuel Jones, Jr., repairs on North 

school-house, 1 75^ 

Frank E. Harris, repairs on West 

school-house, 85 16 



1 6 ANNUAL REPORTS 



WiiQ.Kirjgsley,repairs on West school- 
house, 23 15 

Estate of L. U. Holt, repairs on West 

school -house, 63 89 

E. Jones & Co., lumber for West 

school house, 179 46 

Moses A. Reed, making vault for 

South school-house, 45 07 

W. ?I. Jones, stone for South school- 
house, 50 

Francis Jones,repairs on South school- 
house, 52 30 

A. C. Piper, grading round South 

school-house, 6 00 

A. AUard, teaming sand for mortar 

South school -house, 2 50 

John Temple, whitewashing South 

school -house, 4 00 

Estate of L. U. Holt, repairs on South 

school-house, 53 57 

Estate of L. U. Holfc,rep;urs on Centre 

school-house, 6 60 

Estate of L. U. Holt, repairs on North 

school-house, 7 00 

Estate of L. U. Holt, repairs on grate 

East school-house, 2 00 

C. J. Williams,repairs on East school 

house, 22 07 

W. B. Davis, repairs on East school- 
house, 21 17 

Spofford Bobbins, repairs on Centre 

school-house, ■ * 29 24 

Francis Jones, repairs on Centre 

scl#)ol-house, 2 00 

Francis Jones, repairs on North 

school-house, 5 26 



TOWN OF ACTON. 1 7 



Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, repairs 
on South school-house, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, 1-2 gal. 
B. B. paint for East school-house, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, light of 
glass for Memorial Library, 

Dr. I. Hutchins, teaming lumbt3r for 
West school-house, 

E. Jones & Co., lumber for repairs on 
on Town farm, 

H. F. Tuttle, repairs on Centre school- 
house, 

Thomas Hall, one bell for school- 
house, 

W. L. Mead, repairs on West school- 
house, 

J. L. Hammett, ink wells, 

Flagg & Eussel], 997 lbs. ashes for 
Library grounds, 

W. C. Bobbins, teaming ashes for Li- 
brary grounds, 
W. F. Hale, repairing pump at Town 
farm, 

W. H. Hartwell, repairing pump at 
North school -house, 

W. B. Holt, repairing pump at West 
school-house, 

W. S. Jones, repairs on Southeast 
school-house, 

W. B. Davis,repairs on Centre school- 
house, 

F. W. Green, labor on West school- 
house grounds, 
F. W. Green, bolts, 



15 56 


1 75 


1 33 


4 50 


5 82 


2 60 


2 20 


34 50 


1 20 


5 97 


1 00 


25 


30 


1 60 


2 75 


1 65 


1 00 


20 



1 8 ANNUAL PvEPOKTS 



selectmen's report no three 
Wm, Kingsley, gravel for Centre 

school grounds, 2 25 

C. H. Clark, repairs on Library, 6 15 

Estate of L. U. Holt, repairs on pump 

at Library, 1 81 

Estate of James Fletcher, repairs on 

Library, 3 10 

W. H. Hartwell, one lock, 42 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

Paid ISTahum Littlefield, for regular high- 
way work, 

H. A, Gould for regular highway 
work, 

Wm. Kiiigsley, for regular highway 
work, 

Nahum Littlefield, work on East Ac- 
ton road, 

Wm. Kingsley, work on East Acton 
road, 

^ahum Littlefield, work on 'Acton 
Centre road, 'v 

Wm. Kingsley, work on Acton Cen- 
tre road, 

C. F. Shirland, teaming stone on Stow 
road, 

Nahum Littlefield, material for fence 
on Stow road, 

Nahum Littlefield, one plow point, 

Geo. Houghton, 61 loads gravel, 

Calvin Harris, 144 loads gravel, 

N. A. Davidson, 200 loads gravel, 

S. A. Guilford, blacksmith bill. 



$605 


56 


892 


69 


186 


77 


232 


68 


140 


30 


62 


25 


i^^ 


55 


4 


00 


8 40 




54 


3 


05 


i 


20 


10 


00 


5 


85 



$873 30 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



Wm. Kingsley, blacksmith bill, 3 85 

E. Jones & Co., lumber and spikes for 

Powder Mill bridge, 159 02 

Am. Powder Mills, lumber and work 

on Powder Mill bridge, 13 85 

J. E. E-eed, work on Powder Mill 

bridge, 10 00 

James Tuttle, 150 feet timber for 

Powder Mill bridge, 2 70 

A. C. Handley, 600 feet timber for 

Powder mill bridge, 10 80 

E. F. Conant, 750 feet timber for Pow- 
der Mill bridge, 13 50 
J. D. Moulton, sawing timber for 

Powder Mill bridge, 
Thos. McCarthy, for covering stones, 

C. A. Harrington, 30 feet drain pipe, 
E. Jones & Co., lumber and nails, 

D. C. Harris, stone. 



3 


00 


40 


70 


7 


92 


15 


23 


2 


00 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSES. 

Paid W. F. Stevens, express, 1000 50 

u u u 35 

L. E. Reed, court fees, 6 79 

D. J. Wetherbee, insurance on library, 75 00 
Geo. W. Woodman, land in Centre, 250 00 
Geo. Tyler & Co., sections and bolts 

for scraper, 8 50 

J. C. Symonds, road scraper, 225 00 

James Kingsley, use of road, 8 00 

H. A. Littlefield, express, 25 

" " freight on scraper, 4 50 

Wm.Craig,court fees in Whitney case, 3 75 

" " '' " Randall case, 2 ^5 



!,510 41 



20 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



H.C.Sherwiii, court fees in Foley case, 


3 60 


E. A. Phaleii " Robbins case, 


3 60 


F. W. Reed, '' Whitney case. 


7 15 


" " Tuttle case. 


5 20 


" '' y Randall case. 


5 45 


" " " Harris case, 


5 90 


" Harris & Doyle 




case. 


10 60 


O.L. Newcomb,repairing town pump. 


1 25 


" " clock. 


1 25 


Isaac Davis Post, Memorial day. 


75 00 


S. S. Reilley, three dies. 


6 00 


Cotton & Gould, repairing and bind- 




ing record books, 


7 75 


W. H. Lawrence, fixing scraper, 


8 65 


Wm. Kingsley, w^atching fires. 


16 50 


Eugene Jolnison, watching fire. 


1 25 


William Moore, '' " 


1 25 


0. L. Newcomb, '' 


1 25 


Carlton, Taylor, "• '' 


1 25 


Joe Flint, 


1 25 


Ovflwnv " " 


1 25 
1 25 


Marvin Kelley, '' " 


E. A. Phalen, summoning person to 




take oath of office. 


1 75 


E. A. Phalen, service as constable at 




North Acton, 


2 00 


Manning & Leighton, one table for 




North school, 


4 75 


Milford Mutual Insurance Co., assess- 




ment on policy No. 9,183 on Li- 




brary, 


16 50 


Waldo Bros., one plow, 


20 00 



TOWN OF ACTON. 31 



F. D. Weld, 114 feet ladders, 18 24 

E. F. Richardson, service as cattle 
commissioner in Wheeler case, 

Wm. D. Tuttle, express charges, 
" '' postage, 

" '' stationery, 

Wm. D. Tuttle, collecting and record- 
ing 42 births, 

Wm. D. Tattle, recording and index- 
ing 43 deaths, 

Wm. D. Tuttle, recording and index- 
ing 27 marriages, 

Wm. D. Tuttle, dog license blanks, 

Wm. D. Tuttle, meeting selectmen 
about Gates road, 

Wm. D. Tuttle, surveying and laying 
out road in Centre, 

Wm. D. Tuttle,boxing ballot box and 
express, 

O. E. Houghton, painting ladders at 
Centre, 

N. E. Bean, repairing ladders at Cen- 
tre, 

D. H. Farrar, repairing ladders at 
East, 

D. H. Farrar,painting ladders at East, 

H. T. Clark,painting ladders at West, 
'' " repairing " " 

" " rope and labor on same, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, 1 table 
for Town hall, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, 2 gal- 
lons paint for ladders at Centre, 



5 


00 


4 


96 


2 


92 


1 


00 


^1 


00 


6 


30 


4 


05 




65 


1 


50 


5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


75 


2 50 


4 


50 


6 


00 


4 


60 


6 


75 


4 


00 


2 


50 


2 


50 



22 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, 6 lad- 
der hooks, 3 00 
Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, 6 wrenches, 2 04 
" '^ " 3 oilers, 1 42 
" '' " emery paper, 14 
E. Jones & Co., 10,660 lbs. coal for 

Town hall, 34 09 
E. Jones & Co., lumber for shelves 

for school supplies, 8 18 
C. L. Bradford, moving school furni- 
ture, 6 25 
C. L. Bradford, labor on same, 6 15 
C. L. Bradford, express, 30 
C. L. Bradford, fumigating N. Jacob- 
son's house (scarlet fever), 2 00 
C. L. Bradford, attending registrars' 

meeting, 75 
Anson Piper,moving school property, 1 00 
Samuel Jones, Jr., moving school fur- 
niture, 3 50 
C. J. Williams, postage, 4 46 
C. J. Williams, telephone, 60 
Phineas Wetherbee, arranging poll 

tax list, 5 00 
Phineas Wetherbee, invoice and col- 
lector's book, 1 35 
Phineas Wetherbee, stationery, post- 
age and express, 1 50 
Groom & Co., binding record book, 4 75 
R. S. Robson, repairing ballot box, 4 00 
M. E. Taylor & Co., 7 dozen pails, 22 55 
" " " 8 pails, 1 20 
'^ " " 16 pails, 1 60 



TOWN OF ACTON". 33 



FitchburgR.R.Co.,freight on truck, 3 50 

'' " ladders, 25 

" " " hose, 8 25 

" " " engine, 10 85 

W. F. Stevens, abatement on taxes, 

1893, 1,019 03 

0. A. Hosmer, repairs on fire engine, 15 04 
Joe Evans, "■ "■ " 
W. F. Hale, 
Estate of J. E. Cntter, abatement on 

taxes, 1891 and 1892, 
C. W. Pitman, care of Town hall, 

clock, 

" " repairing flag, 

W. S. Warren, express, 
G. V. Bowen, express and postage, 
Waldo Littlefield, repairing scraper, 
L. V. Clough, temporary aid for N. 

Jacobson, 3 00 

Tattles, Jones & Wetherbee, 1 ket- 
tle, sulphur and acid, 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, postage, 

" "*' 2 check books, 

" " stationery. 

Dr. J. E. Marsh, 9 returns of births, 
C. H. Clark, straps for trucks, 

" " pair straps for hearse, 

1. F. Duran, superintendent of burials 
34 interments, 

I. F. Duran, making 28 returns, 
Nathan Johnson, 1 lamp and fixture 

for Town farm, 
Nathan Johnson, repairing flag. 



1 


00 




80 


21 


76 


67 


10 


16 


25 


8 


30 




55 


3 


05 


1 


00 





83 


1 


71 


2 


00 




45 


2 


25 


3 


10 


1 


50 


102 


00 


7 


00 


4 


25 




30 



H 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Spofford Robbins, puttin 


Lg up 


voting 




stalls, 






2 39 


Dr. I. Hutcbins, reporting 8 


births. 




1893, 






2 00 


E. F. Conant, postage and express, 


2 64 


Moses A. Reed, spiking 


trees. 




15 25 


M. E. Taylor & Co.,— 








63 gal. oil for Town 


I hall, 




5 57 


1 shovel " 


u 




37 


zinc " 


u 




85 


glass 


it. 




80 


chimneys " 


ii 




1 50 


2 brackets " 


(C 




50 


dust pan " 


u 




10 


broom " 


u 




35 


4 lamp fount. " 


(( 




40 


4 burners " 


a 




50 


pitcher " 


u 




37 


wicks " 


il. 




16 


doz. pencils " 


ii 




20 


putty 


(( 




12 


copperas " 


(( 




12 


bolt 


i<. 




10 







PRINTING. 

Paid Enterprise Printing Co., warrants and 

reports, * |77 75 

Enterprise Printing Co., advertising, 2 00 

Enterprise Printing Co., warrants for 

June and November, 4 50 

Enterprise Printing Co., registrars' no- 
tices, 3 50 



Augustus Hosmer, orders and notices, 



3 15 



TOWN OF ACrON. 



2^; 



Thomas Todd, notices for Nagog, 
Campbell & Hanscom, poll tax list, 



1 75 
8 50 



CEMETERY EXPENSES. 

Paid iSTathan Johnson, labor in Woodlawn, $103 48 
iSTathan Johnson, labor in North, 5 00 

Estate of L. U. Holt, repairing pump 

in Woodlawn, 3 50 

L. W. Stevens, labor in Mt. Hope, 121 55 

E. Hall & Son, 480 feet chestnut for 

posts in Mt. Hope, 13 00 

C. H. Mead & Co., wire and staples 

for fence in Mt. Hope, 12 49 

C. B. Stone, making deeds for lots in 

Mt. Hope, 10 00 

Horace F. Tuttle, making plan of Mt. 

Hope, ' 13 95 

Horace E. Tuttle, surveying lots in 

Mt. Hope, 3 00 

John Fletcher, labor in Woodlawn, 5 50 



$101 15 



$291 47 



Allen G.Smith, " " 13 months, 

Addison B.Wheeler, chap. 279, acts 1889, 13 months, 
Mary J. Brown, chap. 801. acts 1889, 13 months, 



STATE AID. 

Paid W. B. Ball, chap. 279, acts 1889, 55 3-4 weeks' board, $196 50 

65 00 
65 00 
26 00 
13 " 52 00 

13 '' 65 00 

13 " 52 00 

13 " 78 00 

2 " 8 00 

3 '' 12 00 



Emma F. Blood, 
Richard G. Dane, 
Achsa Hanscom, 
Aaron C. Handley, 
Louisa Hobart, 
Almira H. Loker, 



26 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Eliza J. Shattuck, chap 


301, 


acts 1889, 


13 


nionths, 


52 00 


Luke Smith, 


u 




13 


u 


52 00 


Mary Smith, 


u 




13 


a 


52 00 


Rebecca C. Wright, 


'■i 




13 


a 


52 00 


Susan B. Winu, 


u 




13 


.c 


52 00 


Phoebe F. Wood, 


u 




13 


a 


52 00 




$931 50 



STREET LAMPS. 



id Henry Barker (2), 


.f 5 20 


G. V. Bowen, 


2 60 


L. C. Baldwin, 


2 60 


E. I. Banks, 


2 60 


L. V. Clough (2), 


5 20 


0. L. Dart, 


2 60 


I. F. Durren, 


2 60 


A. J. Fletcher, 


2 60 


J. P. Fletcher, 


2 60 


L. A. Hesselton, 


2 60 


L. S. Hosmer, 


2 60 


H. J. Hapgood, 


2 60 


F. J. Hastings & Co., 


2 60 


F. A. Houston, 


2 60 


A. H. Jones, 


2 60 


Elnathan Jones, 


2 60 


W. H. Jones, 


2 60 


Mrs. M. E. Lothrope, 


2 60 


Frank Merriam, 


2 60 


A. Merriam, 


5 20 


A. C. Piper, 


2 60 


Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee (2), 


5 20 


Edwin Tarbell, 


2 60 


F. Z. Taylor, 


2 60 


G. W. Worster, 


2 60 



TOWN OF ACTON. 27 



Acton Centre Improvement Society (51), 132 60 
West Acton Street Lighting Associa- 
tion (36), 93 60 



BREAKING OUT ROADS. 



Paid Aaron Allard, 
C. L. Bradford, 
Abel Cole, 

E. H. Cutler, 
J. E. Durkee, 
C. L. Davis, 
N. Davidson, 
H. A. Gould, 
M. Harmon, 

W. H. Hartwell, 
W. H. Jones, 
A. H. Jones, 
W. S. Jones, 
O. A. Knowlton, 
Wm. Kingsley, 
N. Littlefield, 
Thos. McCarthy, 
Jerry McCarthy, 
C. O. Neil, 
A. C. Piper, 
W. C. Robbins, 
John Rouillard, 
H. F. Robbins, 
C. Shirland, 
A. L. Tuttle, 
\ Luke Tuttle, 

F. H. Whitcomb, 



)S. 

Ill 


10 


1 


25 


25 


40 


4 


20 


11 


95 


14 


20 


. 4 


40 


129 


97 


1 


20 


27 


70 


2 


00 


5 


23 


8 


50 


10 00 


10 


63 


22 


13 


13 


05 


bid 


50 


6 


80 


96 


75 


180 


85 


3 


75 


1 


20 


3 


95 


14 55 


39 


90 


7 


00 



^301 60 



1714 16 



28 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



EXPENSES ON TURNPIKE ROAD AS ORDERED BY 
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS. 

Paid H. A. Gould, work, -$308 80 

Wm. Kingsley, work, 
Nahuin Littlefield, 
S. A. Guilford, blacksmith bill, 
W. F. Hale, 

Isaac Reed, 97 loads gravel, 
V. F. Gardner, 256 loads of gravel, 
H. T. Clark, plow beam, 
C. H. Mead & Co., 3 plow points, 



211 


82 


474 


12 


4 


76 


7 


00 


4 85 


12 


80 


2 


50 


1 


62 



11,028 



TRANSPORTATION OF SCHOLARS. 

Paid W. S. Jones, scholars from southeast, 

Thomas Scanlon for 1 scholar to High school, 
J. R. Bassett, 1 

Mrs. Kate Varney, 1 " " 

John Maynes, 1 '' " 

C. I. Miller, 3 

Luther Conant, 1 " " 

E. F. Conant, 1 " ' 
Emery Taylor, 2 

Charles Edwards, 1 ^' " 

Robert Wayne, 1 

L. C. Taylor, 1 

F. P. Wood, 1 
A. M. Knowlton, 1 

S. H. Taylor, 1 " 

D. J. Wetherbee, 1 

J. W. Parsons, 1 " "1 term, 



1120 00 


12 


00 


14 


00 


18 00 


18 


00 


54 00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


24 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


14 


00 


14 


00 


9 


00 



$381 00 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



FIRE APPARATUS AND BUILDINGS. 

Paid Ayer Fire Deportment, truck and 

ladders, 1100 00 

Samuel Jones, Jr., building 3 truck 

houses, 312 00 

Samuel Jones, Jr., lumber and la- 
bor (extra), 4 79 

Samuel Jones, Jr., building 1 house, 112 00 

S. F. Hayward & Co., 3 engines, 450 00 

S. F. Hayward & Co., 20 feet 4-inch 

suction hose for South Acton, 39 00 

S. F. Hayward & Co., 200 feet 2 1-2 

inch cotton rubber-lined hose, 60 00 

S. F. Hayward & Co., 20 feet suc- 
tion hose, 20 80 

S. F. Hayward & Co., 1 strainer, 1 50 

S. F. Hayward & Co., 100 feet un- 

lined linen hose, 16 00 

S. F. Hayward & Co., 20 feet suc- 
tion hose, 

S. F. Hayward & Co., 1 nozzle, 

I). H. Farrar, 3 ladder trucks, 

Francis Jones, painting four truck 
houses. 



20 


80. 






7 


20 






197 


00 






21 


88 










11,362 


97 



TOWN OFFICERS. 

Paid Edward Dixon, supt. of schools, |390 00 

C. J. Williams, school committee, 64 68 

H. F. Tuttle, - ^' 15 00 

C. L. Bradford, " '' 22 50 

Dr. I. Hutchins, " '' 10 00 



30 



i^NNUAL KEPOKTS 



Estate of James Fletcher, school 



committee, 




9 00 


William D. Tattle, registrar, 


15 00 


Samuel Guilford, 


i-i 


12 00 


Julian Tuttle, 


(,i 


12 00 


J. R. Lawrence, 


a 


12 00 


Smith Finney,special po] 


ice July 


4, 2 50 


Roswell Tuttle, 




2 50 


Fred Reed, . '' 




2 50 


Moses Reed, '' 




2 50 


Ed. A. Phalen, 




2 50 


Chas. Pitman, 




2 50 


Phineas Wetheibee, assessor. 


50 00 


James B. Tuttle, 


Cb 


26 25 


Anson C. Piper, 


- 


26 00 


T. F. Newton, election o 


fficer, 


3 00 


H. J. Hapgood, '' 


'^ 


3 00 


Jas. McGreen, '' 


u 


3 00 


Abram Tuttle, '' 


Cb 


3 00 


L. C. Tayloi-, 


1,1, 


3 00 


H. F. Tuttle, 


(% 


3 00 


D. J. Wetherbee, '' 


^; 


3 00 


E. A. Phalen, 


^i> 


3 00 


H. A. Littlefield, - 


u 


3 00 


C. H. Mead, 


^( 


3 00 


C. B. Stone, 


I.I. 


3 00 


Wm. Kelley, '' 


- 


3 00 


G. E. Holton, 


- 


1 00 


Phineas Wetherbee,elect 


ion office 


I', 1 00 


Fred S. Whitcomb, 


u 


1 00 


D. J. Wetherbee, auditoi 


1 


5 00 


H. J. Hapgood, '' 




5 00 


Wm. D. Tuttle, clerk. 




30 00 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



J. K. W. Wetherbee, treasurer, 75 00 

G. V. Bowen, selectman, 85 00 

E. F. Conant, ^' 85 00 

H. A. Littlefield, '' 4 months, 16 67 
Estate of J. E. Cutter, for salny 

of collector in 1892, 80 00 



11,100 10 



LOANS PAID. 



Paid Percis V. Hapgood, interest on 

1500 note 1 year, $25 00 

Frank H. Jones, interest on |600 

note 1 year, ^ 30 00 

John A. Bowen, interest on flOOO 

note 1 year, 50 00 

Estate of Wm. Davis, interest on 

$350 note 1 year, 17 50 

Estate of Wm. Davis, interest on 

11000 note 1 year, 50 00 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, in- 
terest on $1500 note 1 year, 75 00 
Varnum Tuttle, interest on $700 

note 1 year, 35 00 

Varnum Tuttle, interest on $540 

note 1 year, 27 00 

Mrs. W. W. Davis, interest on 

$100 cemetery fund, 5 00 

John A. Bowen; $3,000 note and 
interest from July 17 to Nov. 
17, 3,060 00 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, $324.74 note 
and interest from July 17 to 
Oct. 30, 330 85 



32 ANNUAL KEPOUTS 



Patch Bros., f500 note and inter- 

terest from June 22 to Nov. 7, 509 38 



$4,214 73 



RECEIPTS AND APPROPRIATIONS. 

Balance due from treasurer Feb. 26, 

1893, 12,827 59 

Balance due from collector Feb. 26, 

1893, 
Appropriation for town charges, 

'' t schools, 

" school supplies, 

" supt. of schools, 

'^ Memorial library, 

" highways, 

" transportation school 

children, 

'' breaking out roads, 

" State tax, 

"^ county tax, 

" overlayings. 

Received from State treasurer, — 

Burial of State pauper. 

Support of State pauper, 

Corporation tax. 

National Bank tax, 

Military aid, 

State aid. 

Income Mass. school fund. 
Received from County treasurer, dog 

tax, 243 08 

'•' C. H. Clark, on acct. of 

supervision of schools, 315 28 



1,009 


50 


6,500 


00 


4,400 


00 


450 


00 


400 


00 


550 


00 


2,700 


00 


200 


00 


1,000 


00 


1,625 


00 


1,326 


91 


552 


75 


15 


00 


10 


75 


519 


69 


314 


72 


133 


25 


558 


00 


233 


54 



TOWN OF ACTON. 33 



Received from Money overdrawn on 

street lamps 1892, 4 00 

" Library fines, 14 38 

'' Nathan Johnson, old 

hearse wheels, 10 00 

'' Nathan Johnson, hay in 

Woodlawn cemetry, 10 00 

" Isaac Ford, old road 

scraper, 20 00 

"- L. W. Stevens, lots sold 

in Mt. Hope ceme- 
tery, 22 00 

*' John Fletcher,lots sold 

in Woodlawn ceme- 
tery, 22 00 

" C. J. Williams, school 

supplies, 20 

•' Estate of James Fletch- 

er, cash overdrawn on 
school supplies 1982, 40 98 

'' C. J. Williams, cash for 

damage to furniture 
in East school, 1 00 

'' Town of Boxboro, tui- 

tion of Alice P. Wil- 
lard, 16 00 

C. W. Pitman, for rent 
of Town hall and 
basement, 102 25 

Received from borrowed money, — 

Wm. D. Tuttle, 550 00 

Frank H. Jones, TOO 00 

B. H. & O. K. Patch, 500 00 



34 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Young People's Christian Un- 
ion (South Acton), 100 00 
John A. Bowen, 3,000 00 
Estate of Wm. Davis, 28 00 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, tempora- 
ry loan, 324 74 
Received fi-oni interest on money in 

bank, ' 89 29 



$31,439 85 



EXPENDIT UK ES. 



^ov support 


of 


Centre schoc 






South '' 






East 






West 






North 






Southeast '' 






High 



School supplies. 

Bills unpaid Feb. 26, 1893, 

Miscellaneous, 

State and military aid. 

Poor, 

Cemetery expenses, 

Memorial library, 

Roads ordered by county 

misbi oners. 
Roads and bridges, 
Repairs on town buildings and 

grounds. 
Town ofificers. 
Loans and interest. 
Printing, 



com- 



1601 


09 


855 


27 


426 


10 


879 


73 


413 


54 


113 


50 


1,284 


03 


502 


45 


1,213 


22 


2,420 


86 


931 


50 


1,407 


38 


291 


47 


517 


30 


1,028 


27 


2,510 


41 


873 


30 


1,100 


10 


4,214 


73 


101 


15 



TOWN OF ACTON. 35 I 

1 



Fire apparatus and buildings, 1,362 97 

Breaking out roads, 714 16 

Transportation of scholars, 381 00 

Street lamps, 301 60 

State tax, . 1,625 00 

Connty tax, 1,326 91 



$27,397 04' 

Balance due from W. F. Stevens, taxes in 1893, 1,197 87 
Balance due from J. K. W. Wetlierbee, treasurer, 2,844 94 



TOWN DEBT, 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, note, |1,500 00 
Interest on same from June 20, 1893, 

to March 12, 1894, 
Estate of Wm. Davis, note. 
Interest on same from October 18, 

1893, to March 12, 1894, 
John A. Bo wen, note. 
Interest on same from June 6, 1893, 

to March 12, 1894, 
Frank H. Jones, note. 
Interest on same from April 27, 1893, 

to March 12, 1894, 
Frank H. Jones, note, 
Interest on same from June 15, 1893, 

to March 12, 1894, 
Varnum Tuttle, note. 
Interest on same from April 17, 1893, 

to March 12, 1894, 
Varnum Tuttle, note. 
Interest on same from July 14, 1893, 

to March 12, 1894, 17 85 



54 58 


1,028 


00 


20 


56 


1,000 


00 


38 


33 


600 


00 


26 


25 


700 


00 


25 


96 


700 


00 


31 


59 


540 


00 



131,439 85 



36 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Percis V. Hapgood, note, 500 00 

Interest on same from June 1, 1893, 

to March 12, 1894, 
Estate of mW. Davis, note, 
Interest on same from May 12, 1893, 

to March 12, 1894, 
Wm. D. Tattle, note. 
Interest on same from June 8, 1893, 

to March 12, 1894, 
Young People's Christian Union (So. 

Acton) note, 
Interest on same from June 30, 1893, 

to March 12, 1894, 

Less amount due from collector and treasurer. 

Balance against the town March 12, 1894, 13,798 82 

GUSTAVUS V. BOWEN, 

E. F. CONANT, 

Selectmen of Acton. 

AcTON, Maich 15, 1894. 
We have examined the accounts of the selectmen and 
find them correct. 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD, 
DANIEL J. WETHERBEE, 
Auditor ii of the Town of Acto'n. 



19 50 




350 00 




14 58 




550 00 




20 93 




100 00 




3 50 






17,841 63 




;urer. 


4,042 81 



^OWN OF ACTOJ^. 



37 



List of Jurors. 



The following is a list of persons to serve as Jurors for 
the ensuing year, as revised by the selectmen of Acton, to 
be submitted to said town at the April meeting : 



Luther Conant, 
Francis Hosmer, 
Frank H. Whitcomb, 
Geo. B. Parker, 
James Kingsley, 
John C. Keyes, 
Norman A. Davidson, 
Joseph A. Whitcomb, 
Geo. R. Keyes, 
Hanson A. Littlefield, 
Job W. Dupee, 
Geo. W. Worster, 
S. Hammond Taylor, 



Daniel H. Farrar, 
James P. Brown, 
Chas. S. Twitchell, 
Chas. J. Holton, 
Thomas F. Noyes, 
Luke J. Robbins, 
Lyman C. Taylor, 
D. J. Wetherbee, 
Samuel Jones, Jr., 
John Temple, 
David C. Harris, 
W. F. Stevens, 



Acton, 



F. J. Hastings. 

GUSTAVUS V. BOWEN, 

E. F. CONANT, 

Selectmen of Acton. 
March 16, 189L 



38 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Report of Receipts and Expenditures at the 
Almshouse in Acton, 

For the Year Ending February 29. 1894, 



ARTICLES 


OJSr HAND FEB, 28, m 


12 cows, 




1480 00 


175 flour barrels, 


at 18 


cents, 31 50 


Grain, 




15 00 


6 ladders. 




9 00 


4 plows, 




20 00 


2 cultivators. 




3 00 


Hay cutter, 




2 00 


12 tons hay. 




240 00 


Oat fodder, 




2 00 


Bone meal, 




35 


Salt, 




30 


Express wagon, 




65 00 


Horse rake, 




15 00 


Hay wagon. 




18 00 


Horse cart, 




18 00 


Stone drag, 




4 00 


Harrow, 




2 00 


Other farming tools. 


22 00 


1 horse, 




75 00 


Lumber, 




10 00 


Pung, 




8 00 


Express harness. 




32 00 


Light harness, 




10 00 



TOWN OF ACTO: 


N^. 


39 


Mowing machine, 


2 


00 


15 bushels potatoes, 


8 


00 


2 one-horse sleds, 


15 


00 


Tubs and pails. 




45 


Horse blanket. 


1 


50 


Light wagon, 


25 


00 


31 market boxes. 


3 


10 


Wheelbarrow, 


2 


00 


Canvas cover. 


2 


50 


Barbed wire. 


2 


00 


14 cords wood. 


56 


00 


3 wood saws. 


2 


00 


Oil tank, 


1 


00 


Tin pails. 


1 


00 


64 hens, 


32 


00 


Flour, 


4 50 


Sugar, 




15 


Eggs, 




44 


Spices, 




40 


Extract, 




30 


25 pounds dried apples, 


2 


00 


Cooking range. 


35 


00 


Beef, 


1 


68 


Beans, 




24 


Tea and coffee, 




67 


Soap, 


3 


25 


Canned fruit. 


5 


00 


Fruit jars. 


2 50 






m 0Q1 QQ 









RECEIPTS FR OM THE TO WNFARM FR OM MAR CH 

i, 1893, TO MARCH i, 1894-. 
Received for apples, 1204 13 



40 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



jceived 


for bull, 


i.i 


birch poles 


a 


cows, 


u 


calves. 


ii 


eggs. 


a 


labor, 


a 


milk. 


a 


old junk, 


a 


potatoes, 


ii 


soap, 


a 


wood, 



16 


00 


34 02 


52 


00 


17 


75 


49 


84 


4 


90 


836 52 




32 


5 


08 




27 


58 


05 



$1,278 88 



EXPENDITURES AT THE TOWN FARM FOR THE 
YEAR E JIBING FEB. 28, 189 Jf, 

Axes and handles. 

Boxes, 

Butter, 

Beans, 

Blacksmith's bill. 

Beef, 

Brooms and brushes. 

Coal, 

Canvas cover. 

Cabbage, 

Cheese, 

Cooking range, 

Castings, 

Cloth and clothing. 

Crackers, 

Coffee, 

Curtains, 

Cows, 



s 2 45 


1 


97 


31 


93 


5 


06 


26 


98 


64 


17 


2 14 


6 


43 


2 


50 




18 


2 


37 


35 


00 


1 


33 


9 


86 


36 


10 


5 


65 




60 


299 


00 



TOWN OF ACTON. 




41 


Canned goods, 




30 


Collar pad, 




50 


Cream tartar, 




81 


Dr. Sanders' bill. 


2 50 


Extracts, 




90 


Farming tools. 


15 


84 


Fly paper, 




42 


Flour, 


29 


10 


Fish, 


3 


57 


Globes and chimneys. 


1 


42 


Glass, 




33 


Grass seed. 


3 


41 


Grain, 


420 


94 


Harness, 


12 


50 


Horse blanket. 


1 


85 


Hardware, 


3 


74 


Kerosene oil, 


4 


70 


Lumber, 




24 


Lard and cottolene. 


14 


77 


Lemons, 




41 


Labor, 


82 


75 


Molasses, 




90 


Medicine, 


1 


37 


Matches, 




61 


Mop handle. 




15 


Nails, 


1 


94 


Netting, 




74 


Onions, 




15 


Potatoes, 


2 03 


Paint and oil. 


10 


36 


Printers' ink, 


1 


44 


Phosphate, 


14 


38 


Paper, 




13 



42 ANNUAL KEPORTS 



Paris green, 




36 


Pasturing cattle. 


12 


88 


Repairs on harness, 


2 


55 


Rolled oats, 


6 


06 


Rope, 




28 


Raisins, 


1 


34 


Sawing lumber, 




50 


Services of A. S. Bradley and wife for 






March, 


29 


17 


Services of E. J. Ordwa}^ and wife 11 






months. 


320 


84 


Services of L. C. Taylor, 


50 


00 


J. B. Tuttle, 


15 


00 


E. C. Parker, 


6 


00 


Spices, 


1 


80 


Soda, 




74 


Sugar, 


33 


40 


Starch, 




6 


Slippers, 




25 


Soap, 


11 


77 


Salt, 




60 


Scraps, 


2 


00 


Tea, 


14 18 


Tar paper. 


1 


37 


Tubs and pails. 


1 


48 


Tomato plants, 




25 


Till ware. 


1 


55 


Use of bull. 


2 


00 


Use of pump. 


1 


00 • 


Vinegar, 




60 


Wicks, 




7 


Wheelwright's bill. 


2 


50 


W. B. Holt, for repairs, 


4 


45 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



43 



Yeast, 



94 



Expenditures, 
Receipts, 

Income less than ex})ense, 
Due from treasury to balance account, '1416 03 
Interest on town farm, 13500, at 5 pr. cent., 175 00 



11,694 91 
1,278 88 

1416 03 



1591 03 
218 00 

1373 03 



Victualing and lodging 872 tramps, at 25 cents eacli 

Cost of supporting poor on farm, 
Whole number of persons, exclusive of tramps, sup- 
ported at almshouse. 
Average number. 
Present number, 

LYMAN C. TAYLOR, 
JAMES B. TUTTLE, 
UDWIN C. PARKER, 

Overseey^s of Poor. 



We have examined the above accounts of the Overseers 
of the Poor and find them correct. 

H. J. HAPGOOD, 
D. J. WETHERBEE, 

Auditors. 



44 AN:&fUAL REPOliTS 



Town Clerk's Report for 1893. 

BIRTHS REGISTERED IN ACTON IN 1893. 

No. Date of Birth. Name of Child. Names of Parents. 

1893. 

1. Jan. 7. Frederick Dana Jones. Fred G. and 

Mary A. Jones. 

2. Jan. 24. Edward Moen. Frank and Margaret 

E. Moen. 

3. Feb. 3. Merrill Elbridge Wheeler. Elbridge L. and 

Florence I. Wheeler. 

4. Feb. 15. Ruth Gertrude Knowlton. Frank R. and 

Emma S. Kno.wlton. 

5. Feb. 22. Robert Stuart Christie. Samuel A. and 

■ Ida E. Christie. 
G. Mar. 29. Walter Fred Gihiiore. Fred W. and Delia 
Gil more. 

7. April 6. Isaiah McLaughlin. James W. and Delila 

McLaughlin. 

8. April 19. Martha Lizzie McDonald. John and Mary 

J^IcDonald. 

9. April 20. Harold Asaph Merriam. Frank A. and 

Bertha M. Merriam. 

10. April 21. Mary Jacobson. Simon and Rosa Jacobson. 

11. April 23. Arthur Tuttle Coding. James A. and Clara 

L. Coding. 

12. April 28. David Russell Kinsley. James and Annie 

Kinsley. 

13. April 28. Burton Hart Hoar. John S. and Minnie 

Hoar. 



TOWX OF ACTOX. 45 



14. May 1. Ernest Edward Allsop. Arthur E, and Eva 

Allsop. 

15. May 13. Kenith F'ay Reed. Lorenzo E. and Emma 

A. Reed. 

16. May 17. Chester Cleveland Brooks. ^^>edson P. and 

Mattie M. Brooks. 

17. May 21. Bertram Stanley Barber. Giles A. and 

Maggie Barber. 

18. May 31. Genevieve Frances Davis. Wilber Grove 

and Annie E. Davis. 

19. June 13. Mary Frances McGreevey John and Mary 

McGreevey. 

20. June 14. Elsie Bryant. Delmer F. and Carrie M. 

Bryant. 

21. June 15. Lucilla Moore. William J. and Mary 

A. Moore. 

22. June 15. Ralph Edwaid Gates. Hiram E. and Etta 

A. Gates. 

23. June 17. Mary Whitman. John W. and Bessie 

Whitman. 

24. June 18. Elizabeth Harrington Bessey. William N. 

and Gertrude Sylvester Bessey. 

25. June 26. Howard Lyman Whitcomb. Fred J. and 

Mary E. Whitcomb. 

26. June 30. Rosa Jackman. Jane Jackman. 

27. July 1. Harry Leslie Woodward. Edwin P. and 

Velma A. Woodward. 

28. July 14 A son to Daniel E. and Susie Feeney. 

29. Aug. 7. Milton Everett Austin. Byron W. and 

Hattie Belle Austin. 

OA 0-1 A -lo Everline Kju^wlton } ^^ - ^^ ^ ^_ ^„ ^^ 
30-31. Aug. 12. -., ^ ^, ^ I Frank B. and Nellie F. 
° Everlvn Knowlton S 



Iverlyn Knowlton ^ 
Knowlton. 



46 ANNUAL KEPOKTS 



32. Aug. 20. Helen Eliza Fairbanks. Charles H. and 

Nellie L. Fairbanks. 

33. Sept. 11. Emma Genneva Gill. James and Geneva 

Gill. 

34. Sept. 18. Mabel Florence Worden. Martin M. and 

Lizzie M. Worden. 

35. Sept. 21. Ernest Linscott Hall. Ephraim L. and 

Lncy F. Hall. 

36. Oct. 8. Lena Elizabeth Glazier. Thomas Henry 

and ICmma (jlazier. 

37. Oct. 27. Annie Rosa Stroevonevecz. Frank and 

Agnes Stroevonevecz. 

38. Nov. 1. Florence Goiigh. John E. and Margaret 

Gongh. 

39. Nov. 25. A son to James and Catherine Devane. 

40. Nov. 29. Earl Gardner Brooks. Roy Gardner and 

Libby Lorraine Brooks. 
4L Dec. 5. Lena May Oidway. Joel E. and Emma J. 

Ordway. 
42. Dec. 14. William George Ryan. Michael J. and 

Rose F. Rvan. 



MARETAGKS EECOBDED IN 1893. 

Date and Place of 

Marriage. Names and Residence of Parlies. 

1893. 

1. Jan. 80. Arthnr E. i\llsop of Acton. 
At Acton. Eva May Penniman of Acton. 

2. Mar. 8. Elwin C. Wheeler of Hubbardston. 
At Acton. Carrie N. Grimes of Hubbardston. 

3. Mar. 9. Lyman R. Tuttle of North Heath. 
At Acton. Isador Willis of West Acton. 

4. Mar. 30. Warren H. Carter of Franklin, N. H. 
At Acton. Maggie F. McLeod of West Acton. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



47 



5. Mar. 27. 
At Acton. 

6. April 23. 
At ActoD. 

7. June 1. 
At Acton. 

8. June 1. 
At Acton. 

June 3. 
At Acton. 
June 7. 



9. 



10. 



At Asliland. 

11. June 24. 
At 

12. June 25. 
At Concord. 

13. June 29. 
At So. Acton. 

14. July 25. 
At Cambridge. 

15. Aug. 4. 
At Acton. 

16. Aug. 6. 
At Ayer. 

17. Aug. 12. 
At Acton. 

18. Aug. 28. 
At Maynard. 

19. Sept. 6. 
At Acton. 

20. Sept. 18. 
At Boxboro. 

21. Oct. 3. 



James A. Grimes of Acton. 
Aiinie F. Haley of Acton. 
Joseph A. Flint of Acton. 
Sarah Elizabeth Stone of Acton. 
George G. Russell of Concord. 
Susan A. Wetherbee of Acton. 
George Herman Tuttle of Cambridge. 
Idella Josephine Barker of South Acton 
Leonard F. Leavitt of Cliarlestown. ■ 
Alice M. Sawj^er of South Acton. 
Herbert F. Bobbins of Acton. 
Bessie E. Foote of Acton. 
Albert Bicker by of South Acton. 
Jennie Parker of Nova Scotia. 
Jeremiah R. Ingham of Concord.. 
M. Ella Sibley of 'South Acton. 
Ora L. Clough of South Acton. 
Myrtilla Richardson of South Acton. 
Josepli M. Ryan of Concord. 
Rose F. Rodway of East Acton. 
Manoel Miller of Cambridge. 
Mary Pauline King of South Acton. 
Waldo H Miner of South Acton. 
Caliste E. Farmer of Shirley. 
Walter Welcli of South Acton. 
Laura M. Horton of South Acton. 
Amherst F. Durkee of West Acton. 
Minnie B. Haire of Maynard. 
Luther H. Bateuian of Harvard. J 
Mary Ann Hammond of Acton, 
iilbert H. Perkins of West Acton. 
Ella B. Patterson of West Acton. 
Milledge Osborn Baker of Atlanta, Ga. 



48 



ANNUAL liP:POKTS 



At 


W. Acton. 


22. 


Oct. 


4. 


At 


W. Acton. 


23. 


Oct. 


19. 


At 


W. Acton. 


24. 


Oct. 


23. 


At Concord. 


25. 


Oct. 


24. 


At E. Acton. 


26. 


Nov. 


30. 


At 


W. Acton. 


27. 


Dec. 


25. 


At So. Acton. 




DEATHS 


No. 

1. 


Date of Death. 
1892. 

Jan. 9. 


2. 


Jan. 


19. 


3. 


Jan. 


25. 


4. 


Feb. 


19. 


5. 


Mar. 


4. 


6. 


Mar. 


9. 


7. 


I\Iar. 


25. 


8. 


Mar. 


28. 


9. 


Mar. 


29. 


10. 


Mar. 


29. 


11. 


April 


10. 


12. 


April 


27. 


13. 


June 


25. 


14. 


July 


14. 


15. 


Aug. 


2. 


16. 


Aug. 


29. 



Fannie Marceila Houghton of West Acton. 

David L. Ball of Concord. 

Vernie G. Whitcomb oi West Acton. 

Eugene L. Hall of West Acton. 

Isabelle H. Bent of West Acton. 

Lewis Leveronia of West Acton. 

Ellen C. Coughlin of West Acton. 

Fred F. Robbins of East Acton. 

Lucy M. Davis of East Acton. 

Harry P. Barteaux of West Acton. 

Minnie M. Littlefield of West Acton. 

Herbert E. Willis of South Acton. 

Evelyn Blanche Fletcher of South Acton. 



REGISTERED IN ACTON IN 1893. 



Names of Persons Deceased. 

Whitney E. Stowell, 
Enoch Hall, 
William A. Thompson, 
Joseph Truette, 
Leslie D. Spinney, 
Geoi'ge Hagar, 
Andrew Lawrence, 
Rev. James Fletcher, 
Samuel A. Dorrison, 
Jason W. Livermore, 
Leslie P. Richardson, 
James Hill, 
James B. Smith, 
Son of Daniel E. Feeney, 
Asaph Pai'lin, 
Lucy A. Flagg, 



Yrs. 

72 



4 

58 

77 
81 
69 
75 

87 



71 

81 
59 



-Age- 
Mos. 

4 

11 



2 
11 
11 

6 
4 

9 
6 
5 

9 

7 



Ds. 

4 
19 

27 
7 
5 
9 

23 

8 

15 

11 

27 
28 

4 
15 

6 









TOWN OF ACTON. 






49 


17. 


Sept. 


1. 


Eugene G. Kraetzer, 


44 


3 


9 


18. 


Oct. 


5. 


Sally M. Johnson, 


46 


11 


— 


19. 


Oct. 


12. 


Jane Jackraan, 


50 


— 


— 


20. 


Oct. 


19. 


Arthur Jackraan, 


55 


— 


— 


21. 


Oct. 


21. 


John McCarthy, 


81 


— 


— 


22. 


Nov. 


28. 


A ^on of James Devane, 


— 


— 


3 


23. 


Dec. 


30. 


James C. Graham, 


84 


8 


15 


24. 


Dec. 


17. 


Lena May Ordway, 


— 


— 


12 


25. 


Dec. 


23. 


John E. Cutter, 


68 


8 


8 


26. 


June 


19. 


Arthur E. Mead, 


24 







FEE SONS BROUGHT RUBE FOE BURIAL. 

Names of Deceased. , Age \ 

Yrs. Mos. Ds. 

Eliza A. Whitcomb of Boston, 76 10 4 

Abner Hosmer of Lawrence, 80 7 — 

Susan Simmons of Boston, 72 4 — 

Abbie L. Chapman of Everett, 37 5 13 

Gran vile Rouillard of Maiden, 39 2 18 

Moses A Noyes of Newton, 72 2 2 

Charlotte F.Heustis of HydePark,64 8 8 

Frank P. Whitcomb of Ayer, 35 8 23 

H. B. Sherman of Providence,R.I., 2 3 7 

W. Ashley Coster of Quincy, — 6 18 

James Libby of Stow, 85 — — 

William Wheeler of Maynard, 84 5 12 

Ruth Pike of Hudson, 84 10 15 

Lewis Rouillard of Littleton, 79 — 21 

Otis H. Penniman of Concord, 74 3 13 

Susan White of Lewiston, Me., 82 8 — 

Rev. Wm. K. Davy of Amesbury, — — — 



No. 
1. 


Date of Death. 
1893. 

Feb. 28. 


2. 


Feb. 


7. 


3. 
4. 


April 
May 


25. 

29. 


5. 


Aug. 


24. 


6. 

7. 


Aug. 
Oct. 


27. 
10. 


8. 


Oct. 


13. 


9. 


Mar. 


1. 


10. 
11. 


July 
Oct. 


31. 

25. 


12. 


Oct. 


27. 


13. 


Nov. 


15. 


14. 


Nov. 


16. 


15. 


Nov. 


4. 


16. 


Nov. 


30. 


17. 


April 





50 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



NAMES OF PERSONS HAVING DOGS LICENSED IN 

1893. 

Charles A. Hodges 



Luther R. P'orbush, 2 

Frank L. Stiles, female 

Mildred E. Handley 

Henry L. Livermore 

Joseph L. Brown, female 

Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee 

Elnathan Jones 

John Davis 

E. Eddie Fletcher 

J. F. Moore 

Aaron J. Fletcher 

K. W. Sawyer 

John W. Randall 

John H. Haniford 

C. H. Mead & Co 

Fred. W. Green 

E. F. Shapley 
A. L. Lawrence 
A. H. Perkins 
Aaron C. Handley 
Howard E. Faulkner 
Moses Taylor 

John Grimes 
Daniel H. Farrar 
Wm. S. Jones 
Wm. B. Manning, 2 
Frank J. Taylor 
S. A. Allard 
L. W. Pratt 
Geo. W. Tuttle 

F. P. Brooks, 



Charles Morris 

Calvin S. Simonds, female 

John F. Coughlin 

James P. Brown 

John Temple 

Wm. B. Holt 

Norman A. Davidson, female 

Otis H. Forbush 

Lyman Tuttle 

Frank W. Bulette 

Charles Barker 

Fred H. Lewis 

Sidney E. Gray 

Chas. F. Shirland 

Geo. A. Hay ward 

A. L. Lawrence, female 

Luke Tuttle, 2 

W. W. Philbrick 

Wni. F. Stevens 

Lucius S. Hosmer 

D. H. Brown 

Solon A. Bobbins 

J. H. Standish 

Chas. S. Moulton 

Chauncy B. Bobbins, 2 

Francis Pratt, 2 

M. E. Taylor 

Samuel Jones, Jr 

Geo. H. Brooks 

Daniel Tuttle 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



C. B. Sanders 
Abel Cole 

Charles H. Wheeler 
William Jennings 
Warren H. Jones 
Abel Farrar, female 
Martin Baker 
Hattie S. White 
Henry Hanson 
A. L. Tuttle 
R. A. Desseaux 
H. M. Smith 
Forbush & Hartwell 
John Kelley 
J. E. Durkee 
A. A. Wyman 
Frank R. Honghton 
J. R. Bassett 
Frank Stroevonevecz 
John McGreevey 
Freeman Robbins 
John Fahey 
A. Risso 
C. B. Stone 
A. C. Jenkins 
Wm. J. Moore 
A. Merriam 
Thomas Robinson 
Alex. Allen 
E. L. Hall 
G. N. Hoit 
E. G. Kraetzer 



Geo. W. Worster 
Ralph Crooker 
Charles Wheeler 
Lyman C. Taylor 
R. G. Brooks 
Wilber G. Davis 
Almon H. Gilmore 
Faulkner estate 
Geo. A. Conant 
George Conant 
Luther Conant 
W. C. Robbins, 2 
Mrs. C. Varney 
David C. Harris 
May L. Calder 
Geo. A. Smith 
F. R. Houghton, female 
S. H. Taylor 
Dan J. Gallagher 
Fred G. Jones 
H. A. Littlefield 
Adelbert Mead 
Sidney L. Richardson 
F. S. Whitcomb 
Maurice Lane 
B. M. Kimball & Son 
F. E. Penniman 
Henry Austin 
Willie S. Fletcher 
James Hussey 
Frank E. Harris 
O. A. Knowlton 



Total number of dogs licensed, 



132 



52 i^NNUAL KEPORTS 



Males 125 at $2.00 $250 00 

Females 7 at 5.00 35 00 



Total amount received from licenses in 1893, |285 00 

WILLIAM D. TUTTLE, Toum Clerk. 




ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



^ "f f^ If ^ ¥ :e^ S ^ -$- 



OF THE 



ACTON 



JVieiqorial ^ liibthfj. 




54 ANNUAL REPORTS 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE ; TRUSTEES 

Acton Mejnorial Library 1893-94. 



The trustees of the Acton Memorial Library in accord- 
ance to custom hereby submit their fourth annual report. 
We are glad to be able to say that the interest in the institu- 
tion shows no diminution, and feel assured that a permanent 
service of usefulness may be looked for. 

The following summary will show the work and gains 
for the year ending March 12, 1894. 

Total number of volumes in library, 5176 

Increase during the year, 357 

Increase by purchase, 330 

Increase by gift, 27 

Total number of persons who have taken out cards, 900 

Money received fi-om fines, fl2.83 

Books taken out during the year, 8,102 

Largest daily use, Feb. 17, 1894, 179 vols. 

Smallest daily use, June 21, 1893, 22 vols. 

Visitors registered during the year, 245 

Of the new volumes, nearly 200 were purchased by the 
1150 given by Mr. Wilde. 

List of periodicals regularl}^ received at the Library : 
Atlantic Monthly, Cassell's Magazine, 

Century Magazine, Cosmopolitan Magazine, 

Cottage Hearth, Child's Hour, 

Harper's Magazine, Harper's Young People, 

New England Magazine, Our Sunday Afternoon, 

Scribner's Magazine, St. Nicholas Magazine, 

Review of Reviews. 



TOWX OF ACTON. 55 



PERIODICALS DONATED. 

Child's Hour, Cottage Hearth, and Our Sunday After- 
noon, Wm. A. Wilde. 

Our Paper, Massachusetts Reformatory. 

Congressional Record, Chas. J. Williams. 

Our Dumb Animals, Anon. 

Royal Arcanum Guide, Anon. 

Fifty-two numbers of The Churchman, Mrs. M. E. A. 
Williams. 

INCREASE BY GIET- — BOOKS. 

Secretary of State, - - - - - 1 

Bridgewater Normal School, - - - 1 

Ida A. Hale, Acton, - - - - - 1 

Dr, I. Hutchins, West Acton, - - - 7 

John Fletcher, Acton, - - - - 1 

W. A. Wilde, Maiden, Mass., \ - _ - - 5 

D, C. Harris, North Acton, - - - - 2 

Edwin P. Seaver, Boston, - - - 1 

Smithsonian Institute, Washington, D. C, - - 1 



Total, 27 

Early in the year the president of the board of trustees 
placed in the trustees' room a hanging cabinet, for the safe 
keeping and exhibition of the many articles of interest be- 
longing to the library. 

The chief addition for ihe year to the beautiful works 
of art presented by the donor of tlie library, came in the 
form of a copy, by a noted artist, of Andrea del Sortos' 
&mous painting of ''The Holy Family." The figures are of 
nearly life-size and very expressive. The painting, done in 
oil colors, is enclosed in a massive oak frame, richly carved 
and gilded, and would adorn any public building or gallery 
of paintings in the country. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



During the past year the pleasant circle of the board of 
trustees has been first broken by death. The Rev. James 
Fletcher, who has been a member of the board since its or- 
ganization, passed away suddenly, March 28,1893. Resolu- 
tions suitably acknowledging the interest and fidelity of the 
deceased, and our appreciation of his worth, were prepared 
by the secretary, Mr. Wm. D. Tuttle, and adopted by the 
unanimous vote of the board of trustees, and placed upon 
the recoi'ds. Op[)ortunity is here taken, in a more public 
manner, to renew our concurrence with tlie resolutions 
adopted. 

We find by leferring to past reports that about twelve 
hundred volumes have been added to the number in the 
library since its openiiig, either by gift or purchase, — an 
avei'age of thi'ee hundred books a year. Most of these were 
new books of the class aptly described as current literature ; 
the placing of this class of books in a library is like infusing 
new blood in our l^odies ; the whole system is toned up and 
invigorated. And in no other way can we expect to keep 
alive the interest of the patrons and beneficiaries of the in- 
stitution. Your trustees would recommend the usual appro- 
priation of four hundred dollars for current expenses, and 
one hundred and fifty dolhirs for the purchase of new books. 

LUTHER CONANT, for the Trustees. 



TOWX OF ACTON. 57 



TOWN WARRANT. 



COMMONWEALTtl OF MASSACHUSETTS. MIDDLESEX SS. 

To either of the Constahles of the Toivn of Acton, in the Countif: 
of Middlesex, Greetim/ : 

You are hereby required, in the mime of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, to notify and warn the inhabitants 
of the town of Acton, qualified to vote in elections and 
town affairs, to assemble in the Town hall, in said town, on 
Monday, the Second Day of April, A. D. 1894, at nine 
o'clock A. M., then and there to act upon tlie following arti- 
cles as they may think proper, viz : 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting*. 

Art. 2. To choose all necessary town officers and com- 
mittees. 

Art. 3. To see if the town will accept of the jury list 
as revised by the selectmen. 

Art. 4. To see if the town will authorize the treasurer^ 
with the approval of the selectnien, to borrow money for the 
town, if necessary, in anticipation of the taxes for the cur- 
rent year. 

Art. 5. To see if the town will direct the board of 
assessors to make for the school committee an accurate enu- 
meration of the children in the town, between the ages of five 
and fifteen years. 

Art. 6. To see if the town will vote to heat the Town 
hall by steam, or act anything thereon. 



^S ANNUAL KEPGRTS 



Art. 7. To see if the town will allow a discount on 
taxes paid on or before November 1. 

Art. 8. To see if the town will vote to charge interest 
on all taxes not paid on or before November 1, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Art. 9. To see if the town will reconsider the vote 
taken at their June meeting, whereby they voted not to 
accept of the road, from near the residence of J. C. Gates to 
the Leland Stevens road, as laid out by the selectmen, and 
vote to accept and build it. 

Art. 10. To see if the town will accept the reports of 
the selectmen, overseers of the poor, school committee, and 
otlier town officers. 

Art. 11. To see what sum of money the town will 
raise for the support of Memorial library for the ensuing 
year. 

Art. 12. To see if the town will raise the sum of two 
hundred dollars to repair the road from the residence of 
Moses Taylor to the Turnpike road. 

Art. 13. To see if the town will raise the sum of two 
hundred and fifty dollars to repair the road leading from the 
residence of John Kelley to South Acton. 

Art. 14. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for the support of schools the present year, and how it 
.shall be divided. 

Abt. 15. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for school supplies the present year. ^ 

Art. 16. To see if the town will vote to diminish the 
number of its school committee, beginning in 1895. 

Art. 17. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to selling the school-house iii the southeast part of the 
town. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 59 



Art. 18. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to repair^the Great road from Concord line 
to Littleton line. 

Art. 19. To see if the town will erect and maintain 
street lamps the present year, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 20. To vote ''Yes" or "No" in answer to the 
question, ''Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxi- 
cating liquors in the town the present year?" 

Art. 21. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money for the enforcement of the liquor law. 

Art. 22. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for the repairing of roads and bridges the present year, 
and how it shall be divided. 

Art. 23. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money for the due observance of Memorial day. 

Art. 24. , To see if the town will vote to widen the 
road from the house of Chas. L. Davis to the Estabrook road, 
or act anything thereon. 

Art. 25. To see if the town will vote to build a cistern 
near the Town hall the present year, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 26. To see if the town will offer a reward for the 
arrest and conviction of the person or persons who poisoned 
Mr. Charles Wheeler's cattle. 

Art. 27. To see if the town will rescind the vote 
whereby they voted to accept of sections 64 to 68, both in- 
clusive, of chapter 27 of the Public Statutes, and any amend- 
ments thereto, providing for the election of members of the 
board of selectmen and assessors for the term of three years, 
or act anything thereon. 

Art. 28. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of erecting headstones or other mon- 
uments, to the memory of persons who, accredited to their 



6o ANNUAL REPORTS 



respective quotas, served in the military or naval ^service of 
the United States in the Revolutionary war, the war of 1812, 
the Seminole war, and the Mexican war, and for keeping in 
repair and decorating such monuments and the graves of 
such persons. 

Art. 29. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise to defray town charges the present year. 

And you are hereby directed to serve this warrant by 
posting up copies attested by you in the folh)wing places: 
One at the Post Office in the centre of the town, one eacli at 
the stores of Tuttles, Jones & Wetherbee, M. E. Taylor & 
Co., JI. A. Littlefield & Co., C. H. Mead & Co., one at the 
Nagog House, one at each of tlie Railroad Stations, and one 
at the Post Office in East Acton, seven days at least before 
the time appointed for holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant 
with your doings thereon, to the Selectmen or Town Clerk, 
on or before the time of holding said meeting. 

Given under our liands in Acton this nineteenth day of 
March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred 
and ninety-four. 

GUSTAVUS V. BOWEN, 
ED. F. CON ANT, 

Selectmen of Acton. 




ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



^(il\ool * doinir\ittee 



FOR THE 



SCHOOL YEAR 



1803-©-4. 




ANNUAL REPORTS 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

The town at its annual meeting in April having, in ac- 
cordance with the recommendations of this committee, de- 
cided to continue the district system of superintendence of 
its schools and having again united with the towns of Stur- 
bridge and West Brookfield, the joint committee of the dis- 
trict met in Worcester on the 25th day of April and, having 
complied with the requirements of the statute, again selected 
Mr. Edward Dixon of West Brookfield as District Superin- 
tendent for the ensuing year. The superintendent's salary 
was fixed at $1550, viz : $800 and the amount appropriated 
by the State therefor, apportioned among the several towns 
as follows : Sturbridge, 4-10, West Brookfield, 3-10, and 
Acton, 3-10 ; the amount of the salary, so far as the towns 
are concerned, and its apportionment being the same as for 
the previous year. It was voted, also, to allow the superin- 
tendent a sum equal to the cost of the postage and stationery 
expended in his official correspondence, estimated at about 
forty dollars, the same to be equally apportioned among the 
towns of the district. 

The benefits conferred upon the schools, the impetus 
given to school work and the increased interest in school life, 
as a result of the adoption of the present system of super- 
vision and the employment of a skilled professional superin- 
tendent, are easily apparent to all who are familiar with the 
schools. Not within the memory of any member of your 
committee have our schools been in so healthful a condition 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



as they are in to-day. The continuance of this system of 
superintendence is most earnestly recommended, together 
with an appropriation therefor of $475. 

It is desirable here to direct your attention to certain 
changes in the law relating to union district superintendence. 
Under the old law, that of 1888, the State refunded to the 
towns composing a district the sum of $1,000, to be distrib- 
uted among them, $500 on the basis of the amounts ex- 
pended for a superintendent by the several towns the next 
preceding year, and $500 on the basis of the average attend- 
ance upon the schools of the several towns in the said year. 
The union might also be terminated at the expiration of any 
year by the withdrawal from it of any one of its members. 
Chap. 200 of the acts of 1893 provides : " Sec. 2. When 
such a union has been effected it shall not be dissolved .... 
for any reason for the period of three years from the date of 
the formation of such union except by a vote of a majority 
of the towns constituting the union." " Sec. 3. ... A war- 
rant shall be drawn upon the treasurer of the commonwealth 
for the payment of one thousand two hundred and fifty dol- 
lars, seven hundred and fifty dollars of which amount shall 
be paid for the salary of such superintendent, and the re- 
maining five hundred dollars shall be apportioned and dis- 
tributed on the basis of the amount appropriated and ex- 
pended for a superintendent in the towns forming such 
district for the year next preceding." This act, to take 
effect upon its passage, was approved April 15, 1893. 

Under the present law, therefore, the towns of the dis- 
trict receive from the State the sum of $1250, of which $750 
is applicable to the salary of the superintendent, and the 
whole of which is distributed among them on the basis of the 
amounts they shall have severally expended for a superinten- 
dent during the next preceding year, and, furthermore, a 



ikNNUAL REPORTS 



union district, once formed, cannot now be dissolved within 
three years of its formation, save by the consent of a ma- 
jority of the towns in interest. 

In accordance with your action at the last annual meet- 
ing the High school is now permanently located at South 
Acton, where it occupies the two rooms upon the second 
floor of the school building. The task of selecting compe- 
tent teachers for this school was a somewhat difficult one, 
and to it much time and thought were given hy the superin- 
tendent and your committee. During the summer Mr. Wm. 
A. Charles was appointed principal, and Miss M. F. Fletcher 
assistant teacher, both of whom have proved faithful and 
competent instructors. The school, with a membership of 
sixty-seven against forty-four a year ago, is in a highly satis- 
factory condition. The employment of an assistant teacher 
in the High school being a new depai'ture, and in a sense an 
experiment, the present incumbe/it was induced to accept the 
position at a salary of ten dollars a week for the first two terms 
of the year, with the understanding that a different arrange- 
ment should then be made. It is not to be expected that a 
thoroughly competent teacher can be retained in so import- 
ant a position at so small a salary. 

In view of the duties and responsibilities devolving upon 
the instructors in this school, we recommend an appropria- 
tion which shall permit the payment to the principal of a 
salary of $1,000, and to the assistant of |450 per annum. 

It need not be pointed out that at the present time the 
sciences hold a very large and a very important place in all 
schemes of education. It is impossible to teach them with 
effect in the absence of apparatus, and of scientific appara- 
tus we have, in a High school of sixty-seven members, little 
or nothing worthy of the name. A High school can be such 
in little raore than title unless, among other things, it is pro^ 



TOWN OF ACTOJSr. 



vided with, at least, the more elemeDtary apparatus for illus- 
trating the problems of chemistry and physics. 

That something may be done towards supplying this 
deficiency, you are earnestly recommended to appropriate 
the sum of f 100 for the purchase of such apparatus. 

The allowance of a certain sum for transportation to 
the pupils of the High school from the centre, north and east 
parts of the town, has proved satisfactory to them and a par- 
tial compensation for the location of the school at a point 
remote from the geographical centre of the town. From the 
nature of the case the sum required for this purpose could 
be only approximately estimated, and the appropriation of last 
year has proved to be somewhat too small. We recommend 
the continuance of this allowance and the appropriation of 
1450 therefor, and that the amount of the allowance to the 
several pupils be determined by the committee. 

The Southeast school was discontinued at the close of 
the spring term and the premises transferred to the custody 
of the selectmen in August. A contract was made with Mr. 
Wm. S. Jones for the transportation of the pupils of this 
school to South Acton for sixty dollars per term, the sum 
appropriated for the purpose, and the work has been satisfac- 
torily performed. 

The closing of this school and the transfer of its pupils 
to the schools at South Acton have^ we believe, proved en- 
tirely satisfactory and profitable to those personally inter- 
ested, as well as to the town. We recommend the appropri- 
ation of $180 for the transportation of these pupils during 
the coming year. 

It is the hope and belief of your committee that the 
consolidation of the Southeast school with the village 
schools at South Aclf&n, is but the first step towards a system 
of consolidation which shall presently unite the North and East 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



schools with that at the centre of the town, to form at the 
latter place, where accommodations are already provided, a 
primary and a grammar school in which advantages of grading 
and instruction can be afforded to the children, which cannot 
be offered under the present arrangement, while these advan- 
tages will be accompanied by but a slightly increased expen- 
diture. We respectfully urge upon the parents in these dis- 
tricts the careful consideration of this subject and of the 
benefits which will accrue to their children under such a sys- 
tem of consolidation. " An Account of the Movement in 
Massachusetts to close the Mural Schools^^^ by Mr. Wm. L. 
Eaton, Superintendent of Schools in Concord, is appended 
to this report. The statements therein contained are of 
great interest and are entirely applicable to the conditions 
existing here. They are commended to your serious atten- 
tion. We recommend that this consolidation be effected 
during the ensuing summer, and that the town appropriate 
the sum of -$480 for the transportation of pupils from the 
north and east sections during the two remaining terms of 
the year. 

For detailed information regarding the work in the 
schools, for courses of study and statements of what has 
been accomplished during the past year, and of what it is 
hoped may be accomplished during the year to come, you 
are respectfully referred to the report of the superintendent 
of schools, submitted herewith. All of the recommendations 
therein contained merit careful consideration and should be 
adopted as rapidly as, and to the extent that, our resources 
will permit. The teachers' meetings, at which the superin- 
tendent meets all the teachers on one afternoon of each 
month for instruction and consultation regarding the con- 
duct of the schools, are of especial values^^and are held with 
the approval and by the authority of this board. 



TOWN OB' ACTON. 



The report of the purchasing agent of the board is also 
submitted herewith. The limited means at our command, 
and the almost unlimited demands of schools conducted up- 
on modern methods, necessitated great care in expenditure, 
and painstaking selection of its objects. With comparative- 
ly but few dollars to spend, and with many things consid- 
ered essential to modern schools pressing upon our attention, 
it becomes a somewhat difficult task to select the one, or 
possibly two, which, in addition to the every day require- 
ments of school work, is the most needed and at the same 
time within the means at our disposal. 

Last year we were able to purchase a few maps and 
charts of great value to the primary and grammar schools. 
This year a few more maps and a very fair selection of sup- 
plementary reading matter for the grammar and two higher 
grades of the primary schools have been procured. 

The greatly increased numbers in the High school, and 
the change there made from a three years' to a four years' 
course of study, has necessitated the expenditure for new 
text books for that school alone of $112.61, and the demand 
from this source will probably not be less during the coming 
year. 

Many of the text books in the other schools are worn 
out and unfit for further service. The text books in history 
and geography must be wholly replaced early in the coming 
year. With 297 pupils in our schools, the appropriation of 
$450 last year for supplies is an average of $1.51 per pupil. 
The average expenditure throughout the State for this pur- 
pose in the year 1891-92, the latest report received, was $1.70 
per pupil. At the latter rate our appropriation last year 
would have been $504.90. 

In view of these facts, and especially of the heavy de- 
mands of the High. school, we ask for an appropriation for 
this year of $550 for supplies. 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



Your committee has procured the insertion in the war- 
rant of an article looking to the making, by the board of 
assessors, for the school committee, of a more accurate enu- 
meration of the children in the town between the ages of five 
and fifteen years. The statute of 1874 directs the school 
committee to make this enumeration, but this town, in com- 
mon with many others, has heretofore neglected to comply 
with its provisions. An enumeration of the children be- 
tween the ages of five and fifteen years, which has been 
simply a statement of the number of such children, has been 
annually made by the assessors, but this is not such an enu- 
meration as the law requires, as will appear upon examina- 
tion of the statute. 

Chap. 46, sec. 3. The school committee shall annually 
in the month of May ascertain or cause to be ascertained the 
names and ages of all persons between the ages of five and 
fifteen years belonging to their respective cities and towns 
on the first day of May, and shall make a record thereof. 

Sec. 4. Whoever having under his control a child be- 
tween the ages of eight and fourteen years withholds infor- 
mation in his possession, sought by a school committee or its 
agents for the purpose of the preceding section, or falsifies 
in regard to the same, shall be punished by fine not exceed- 
ing twenty dollars, or imprisonment not exceeding thirty 
days. 

It will be observed that the names and ages of the chil- 
dren must be obtained ; without them, indeed, the enumera- 
tion is of no value. In making returns to the State Board 
of Education of the number of children in town between 
the ages of eight and fourteen years (the compulsory school 
age), as we are obliged to do each year, we are compelled to 
rely upon mere guess work, and the board is hinting more 
and more broadly that there must be greater accuracy in this 



TOWN" OF ACTON. 



regard, or, in default thereof, a possible forfeiture of the 
apportionment from the state fund. It is, moreover, impossible 
to enforce the laws relating to attendance at school in the 
absence of the necessary data. 

The grounds about the school building at West Acton 
should be graded and otherwise put in condition suitable for 
the grounds of a public building situated in a compact and 
thriving village. Several of the school buildings should be 
repainted, those in the north and east districts should be re- 
shingled, and a supply of pure water should be provided for 
the south and centre schools. For several of these under- 
takings the selectmen have been requested to provide in 
their estimate for the contingent fund for this year. 

The trustees of the Memorial Library have very kindly 
granted to the teachers in the public schools extended priv- 
ileges in the use of the educational works contained in the 
library, and to them the thanks of the teachers and this 
committee are due. 

For the information of parents and the public the laws 
relating to attendance at school and the standing rules of the 
committee are here published. 

Chap. 47, sec. 1. (As amended by chap. 464, acts of 
1889, and chap. 384 of 1890.) Every person having under 
his control a child between the ages of eight and fourteen 
years shall annually cause such child to attend some public 
day school in the city or town in which he resides, and such 
attendance shall continue for at least thirty weeks of the 
school year, if the schools are kept open that length of time, 
with an allowance of two weeks' time for absences not ex- 
cused by the superintendent of schools or school committee, 
and for every neglect of such duty the person offending 
shall upon complaint of a school committee or truant officer 
forfeit to the use of the public schools of such city or town 



lO ANNUAL REPORTS 



a sum not exceeding twenty dollars ; but if such child has 
attended for a like period of time a private day school ap- 
proved by the school committee* of such city or town, or if 
such child has been otherwise instructed for a like period of 
time in the branches of learning required by law to be taught 
in the public schools, or if his physical or mental condition 
is such as to render such attendance inexpedient or imprac- 
ticable, such penalty shall not be incurred. 

Chap. 348, acts of 1888, sec. 1. No child under thirteen 
years of age shall be employed at any time in any factory, 
workshop or mercantile establishment. No such child shall 
be employed in any indoor work x^erformed for wages or 
other compensation, to whomsoever payable, during the hours 
when the public schools of the city or town in which he re- 
sides are in session, or shall be employed in any manner 
during such hours, unless during the year next preceding 
such employment he has attended school for at least thirty 
weeks as required by law. 

Sec. 2. No child under fourteen years of age shall be 
employed in any manner before the hour of six o'clock in 
the morning, or after the hour of seven o'clock in the even- 
ing. No such child shall be employed in any factory, work- 
shop or mercantile establishment except during the vacation 
of the public schools in tlie city or town where he resides, 
unless the person or corporation employing him procures and 
keeps on file a certificate and employment ticket for such 
child as prescribed by section four of this act, and no such 
child shall be employed in any indoor work, performed for 
wages or other compensation, to whomsoever payable, during 
the hours when the public schools of such city or town are 
in session, unless as aforesaid, or shall be employed in any 
manner during such hours, unless during the year next pre- 
ceding such- employment he has attended school for at least 
thirty weeks as required by law. 



TOWN OF ACTON. II 



Sec. 9. Every parent or guardian of a child under four- 
teen years of age, who permits any employment of such child 
contrary to the provisions of this act, and every owner, 
superintendent or overseer of any factory, workshop or mer- 
cantile establishment who employs or permits to be employed 
therein any child contrary to the provisions of this act, and 
any other person who employs any child contrary to the 
provisions of this act, shall for every such offence forfeit not 
less than twenty nor more than fifty dollars for the use of 
the public schools of the city or town 

Chap. 47, sec. 9. The school committee shall not allow 
a child who has not been duly vaccinated to be admitted to 
or connected w^ith the public schools. 

Rules of the Committee. 

Rule 1. Children under five years of age shall not be 
admitted to the public schools. 

Rule 2. Pupils in all the schools of this town shall be 
promoted from grade to grade and from school to school 
according to merit. Thorough and satisfactory work will 
be required of pupils in a lower grade or school before enter- 
ing a higher grade or school. 

Rule 3. Children who have not previously attended 
school shall be admitted to the public schools only at the 
beginning of the spring or fall terms. 



Summary of Receipts and Eependitures on Account of ScJiools 
for the Tear 1893-94, 

RECEIPTS. 

Appropriation for common schools, $3,060 00 

" High school, 1,340 00 

" " school supplies, 450 00 

" " transportation S. E. 



12 ANNUAL REPORTS 



school, 


120 00 




" " traDSportation High 






school, 


200 00 




" " salary of superinten- 






dent, 


400 00 




Received from Mass. school fund. 


233 54 




" " dog tax. 


243 08 




" " tuition in High school. 


16 00 


.16,072 62 






EXPENDITUKES. 






For common schools. 


13,289 23 




High school. 


1,284 03 




School supplies, 


502 25 




Transportation S. E. school, 


120 00 




" High school. 


261 00 




Salary of superintendent. 


390 00 


.1,5846 51 







Unexpended balance, f226 11 

The sum of $315.28 has been received from the State 

on account of the district superintendency, which is to be 

credited against the appropriation of $400 for superintend. 

ent's salary for 1892-93. 

The stock remaining on hand in the supply room is 

valued at about $140. 

Summary of Appropriations Recommended for the Year 

1894-95. 

(East, Centre and North schools consolidated.) 

.For common schools, $2,540 00 

High school, 1,600 00 

School supplies, 550 00 

Transportation S. E. school, 180 00 

High school, 450 00 



TOWN OF ACTON. 




13 


Transportation North and East 






schools, 


480 00 




Scientific apparatus, 


100 00 




Salary of superintendent. 


475 00 


16,375 00 



Summary of Appropriations Kecom mended for the Year 

I894.-95. 
(Schools remaining as at present.) 



-•"or common schools, 


12,800 00 


High school, 


1,600 00 


School supplies, 


550 00 


Transportation S. E. school, 


180 00 


" High school. 


450 00 


Scientific apparatus, 


100 00 


Salary of superintendent. 


475 00 



$6,155 00 
For the committee, 

CHAS. J. WH.LIAMS, Chairman. 



14 ANNUAL REPORTS 



AN ACCOUNT 

— OF THE — 

Movement in Massachusetts to Close the Rural 

Schools, 

And to TransBort their PniiilSjat PuWic Emense^to tlie Village Schools. 

— BY — 

William L. Eaton, Superintendent of Schools, Concord, Mass. 



Since the year 1869, the cities and towns of Massachu- 
setts have been authorized by law to appropriate and expend 
money for the conveyance of pupils to and from the public 
schools. At first this authorit}^ was used, in accordance with its 
apparent purpose, mainly to convey pupils to the high school,' 
as generally there was but one such school in town. Within 
a few years, however, many communities have used this 
authority to increase the educational advantages of the chil- 
dren — constantly decreasing in numbers — who live in the 
districts at a distance from the centres of population. This 
was accomplished by closing many district schools, and trans- 
porting, at public expense, their pupils to the neighboring 
district school or to the village. When, in 1889, it became 
apparent that the towns were spending considerable sums of 
money in this way, the State Board of Education began to 
report the amounts expended. The following table is com- 
piled from the State Reports : 



TOWN 


OF ACTON. 




15 






1888-89. 


1889-90. 


1890-91. 


1891-92. 


Aggregate amount expended for con- 
veyance of pupils 

Annual increment 

Nnmber of cities and towns thus ex- 
pending money 


$22,118.38 
104 


§24,145.12 
2,026.74 

117 


$30,648.68 
6,503.56 

145 


$38,726.07 
8,077.39 

160 



In order to secure fuller information regarding this im- 
portant movement, a circular letter of inquiry was sent to 
165 cities and towns. Replies have been received from 135, 
and the answers tabulated. The following summaries are of 
interest : 

I. The cities and towns that reported an expenditure 
for 1891-92 of .$33,500 will expend for current year, $48,300. 

II. Fifteen towns and cities report conveyance to high 
school only, at a cost of 18,650.20 for 462 pupils. 

III. It appears that in the remaining 120 towns and 
cities, there were, prior to the beginning of this movement to 
consolidate, 632 outljdng schools. OE this number, 250 have 
been closed within the past twelve years, and to-day nearly 
2,000 pupils are being conveyed to adjacent district schools 
or to the village schools. 

IV. To the question, " Is it the policy of your town 
ultimately to close all the schools outside the centres of pop- 
ulation?" twenty-five answer ''Yes," without qualification ; 
forty answer "No;" and nearly all the others reply that 
their towns are working for that end, or are considering the 
question, or hope to accomplish such a result. 

V. To the request for a brief statement of the reasons 
that determined the towns to close district schools, and trans- 
port the pupils to other schools, the replies indicate two dis- 
tinct purposes — one financial and the other educational. In 
many of the towns of the State, the depopulation of the dis- 
tricts outside the villages has made it cheaper to transport 
to other schools the few pupils living in the districts than to 



1 6 ANNUAL REPORTS 



teach them m situ. In other towns, the desire to roake 
strong central schools, and the purpose to give all the chil- 
dren of the town the benefit of better teachers, better appli- 
ances, and better supervision, have been the dominant 
motives to determine consolidation. 

VT. To the question whether the results have been 
satisfactory, there is a substantial agreement in the affirma- 
tive. The most emphatic expressions of satisfaction come 
from those towns in which the educational motives have been 
the dominant ones. Repeatedly comes the assertion from 
this latter class of towns that the parents would not return 
to the old system of isolated schools if it were possible. 

The following extract from a recent report of the school 
committee of Conway — a town in western Massachusetts, 
with a population of 1,500, and a school membership of 237 
(1891-92) — is pertinent: "• The same method of uniting and 
bringing the pupils of the smaller districts to the village has 
been pursued as formerly. . . . In some instances, the parents 
are quite strongl}' opposed to the movement ; but, upon trial, 
many times the opposition disappears, and the parents have 
no desire to return to the old system. In districts where 
there are few scholars, it is practically impossible to maintain 
a school of interest and profit to the pupils, and economy to 
the town. Notwithstanding all the inconveniences and dffi- 
culties, we believe the only practical way to elevate schools 
to a higher standard is by consolidating and transferring the 
pupils of the rural districts to the centre." 

The town of Concord is regarded generally and properly 
as the pioneer in this movement to close all her district 
schools, primarily from educational motives, and to convey 
their pupils to the graded central schools. The results in 
Concord were observed carefully by the educators in Massa- 
chusetts, and found to be good, and the example of Cowcord 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



was made known throughout the State by the agents of the 
State Board of Education, and by the official reports of the 
Board year after year. Moreover, her near neighbors, Bed- 
ford, Lexington, Lincoln, Wayhand, Weston, Sudbury, May- 
nard, and Acton, have either already followed her example, 
or are, to all appearances, preparing to do so. 

The following extracts from m}^ account of the inception 
and growth of this system in Concord (printed in 1892) will 
reveal to the inquirer how were met the obstacles that stood 
in the way of the abandonment of the time-honored district 
school that gathered in the little red school-house of the 
poet's fancy, and of the '' old school-boy's " reveries. 

Concord is a town^of about four thousand inhabitants^ 
situated twenty miles northwest of Boston. It was original- 
ly laid out, in 1636, six and one-tenth miles square; but, 
having lost territory from time to time, it now contains about 
twenty-five square miles. For school administrative purposes, 
it was divided early in the century into two village districts, 
and five rural districts. 

'' P^or many years prior to 1879, the common schools of 
Concord were twelve in number, occupying eleven houses. 
Five of these schools were placed in the central village ; two 
under one roof were at West Concord ; and the remaining 
five were country district schools for the accommodation of 
the out-lying farming population. The district school-houses 
were at distances from the Centre, varying from one and one- 
half to three miles. At the Centi'e was the high school, to 
which children came from all parts of the town. An attempt 
had been made, with partial success, to grade the Centre 
schools. The school boards of that day, therefore, had to 
deal with a system of schools, some ungraded ones, and the 
rest mixed schools imperfectly graded. These schools were 
taught by experienced teachers, most of whom — if not 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 



all — bad received a special training for the work. The in- 
fluence of Colonel Parker's great work at Qiiincy was re- 
flected in many of the schools. Yet the general results were 
far from satisfactory ; and the school committee, under the 
leadership of their energetic superintendent, Mr. John B. 
Tileston, appreciating the defects of the existing system, and, 
seeing clearly a remedy, met the emergency resoluteh^ A 
vigorous and wisely directed agitation procured from the 
town an appropriation of money sufficient to build aiid equip 
an eight-room school-house at the Centre. In December, 
1880, this house (named the ^Emerson School') was ready 
for occupancy, and received the children fiom the village 
schools. An immediate and inevitable improvement in every 
quality that distinguishes a good from a poor school resulted. 
The school committee then turned their attention to the dis- 
trict schools. These schools had been for a long time a cause 
of great anxiety. They were growing feebler, and they were 
expensive to maintain in proportion to the number of pupils 
they served. The Emerson School would accommodate all 
the children, and the laws of the State (Chap. 132, Acts of 
1869) enabled the town to raise and appropriate money '"to 
be expended by the school committee in their discretion in 
providing for the conveyance of pupils to and from the pub- 
lic schools.' The school committee ado[)ted the suggestion, 
that it was advisable to close the district schools, and to con- 
vey the children to the Centre. To cany the suggestion into 
effect was a difficult matter. The difficulty can be realized 
readily when it is understood tliat a period of nearly ten years 
elapsed between the closing of the first and the closing of the 
last of the five district schools, and that, during these years, 
the successive school boards never lost sight of the end in 
view, nor relaxed their efi'orts to reach that end. Nor is it 
strange that obstacles were encountered. A strong and 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



rational conservatism existed in the districts. Tlie idea of 
consolidation was novel, and raised doubts and objections 
that could not be met by past experience here or elsewhere. 
On the other hand, it was possible for the plan to prevail in 
the end because the communities directly affected were highly 
intelligent, and formed their judgments thoughtfully and 
correctly. It is an interesting fact, also, that, during the 
whole ten years of change, a majority of the committee were 
farmers; and that, for the most of the time, a majority were 
the local representatives of the districts involved. From the 
successive annual reports of the school committee, the facts 
bearing upon the history of the movement can be gleaned. 
A few of the facts of record will be given here, in order to 
indicate the method of procedure on the part of the school 
committee. 

''In 1879, the school in District 7 was closed, and the 
children conveyed to the Centre, because the committee ' did 
not feel justified in keeping the school open for the small 
number of pupils attending it.' About the same time, the 
grammar school pupils in District 2 were directed to attend 
the Centre school, and ' to make their own way thither.' In 
1881, Superintendent Tileston reports that the children of 
District 7 ' have beeji carried to the schools of the village 
for more than a year. The parents were at first mostly op- 
posed to this course. They seem now entirely satisfied, and 
would not have their old school if they could.' In 1881, the 
parents in District 2 petitioned the committee to close their 
school and convey their children to the Centre. A counter- 
petition was sent in, however, before action had been taken. 
The committee, preferring to wait for a more permanent sen- 
timent, did not close the school. In the same year, the school 
in District 5 was closed without opposition. An attempt to 
close, at the same time, the school in District 6 met with so 



20 ANNUAL KEPORTS 



strenuous opposition, that the committee did not persist in 
closing it. In their next report (1882) the committee refer 
to their action as foUovvs : ' It has not been the policy here 
to bring the children of the outside districts to the central 
schools, unless the voters of the district desire it. When tlie 
number of pupils is less tlian ten, the committee feel that 
they are not warranted in incurring the expense of keeping 
a separate school.' They also urge that 'it is a question 
which the parents in the outer districts of the town should 
consider carefully, whether the instruction at the centre of 
the town is not better, as well as cheaper, than it can be 
made in their own schools, and what is their duty in such a 
case.' In 1886, the school in District 3 was closed at the 
request of the local member of the school committee. In 
1887, the parents in District 2 petitioned the committee to 
convey their children to the Centre. The committee acted 
promptly, and began to convey the children. A counter- 
petition then was sent in, but an investigation was made, and 
the committee, consulting what the}^ ' believed to be the best 
interests of the children,' denied the second petition. In the 
same year, the school in District 6 was closed by vote of the 
committee, and the scheme of consolidation was effected. 

"• The apprehensions of the owners of real estate, that a 
depreciation of values would result if the local schools were 
closed, have proven to be groundless. The natural reluctance 
of parents to send their young children so far from home, 
and for all day, to attend the Centre school, has vanished. 
The children are conveyed in comfortable vehicles fitted up 
for their accommodation. They are in charge of trusty 
drivers e7i route^ and at noon they are under the especial care 
of one of the teachers, who has an extra compensation for 
the service. When it is practicable, a farmer living near the 
extreme end of the district is employed to convey the qhild^ 



tOWK OF ACTOK. 21 



ren. Often the farmer's wife drives the conveyance — an 
arrangement that meets the entire approval of the school 
committee, and is, perhaps, the most satisfactory one possi- 
ble. As a rule, the committee do not approve of entrusting 
the duty to the hired man. Three two-horse barges, and two 
one-horse wagons are in use at present. All these vehicles 
are fitted with seats running lengthwise, and are closed or 
open at sides and ends as the weather requires, and in cold 
weather are provided with blankets and straw. The driver 
starts from or near the remote end of his district, and drives 
down the principal thoroughfare, taking up the children at 
their own doors or at cross-street corners. 

" The attendance of the children conveyed is several per 
cent, better than that of the village children, and it is far 
higher than it was in the old district schools. This is not 
strange when one reflects that the children are taken at or 
near their own doors, and conveyed to school without ex- 
posure in stormy weather, and with entire comfort in cold or 
snowy weather. Discipline in the carriages is maintained 
readily, as the driver has authority to put out any unruly 
child. The children are conveyed from one and one-half to 
three and one-half miles. The cost of transportation is 
about fifty dollars per week. It is estimated that it would 
cost seventy dollars a week to maintain schools in all the 
districts. The number of teachers in the Centre schools is 
not increased by the consolidation, as the eighty to one hun- 
dred children from the districts are distributed quite uni- 
formly among the various rooms, 

"Whatever advantages a system of carefully graded 
schools, occupying a well-ventilated and well-cared-for school- 
house, taught by a body of intelligent and earnest teachers 
co-operating to secure the best discipline within and without 
the school-room, has over a mixed country school, such ad- 



22 ANNUAL REPORTS 



vantages are shared alike by all the inhabitants of this town. 
All alike are interested in all real progress in methods of dis- 
cipline and instruction, and in improved appliances to aid 
instruction. Superintendence becomes more efficient. The 
introduction of new subjects of study and of drawing, music, 
gymnastics, manual training, is made easy, since all the pupils 
of the town are found in three school-houses. Appliances of 
all kinds and books of reference can be provided more ex- 
tensively and at less cost. In short, every scheme to make 
the teaching more efficient, or broader, can be carried into 
effect far more readily. The history of this movement in 
Concord conclusively shows that the success of the plan here 
was due to its intrinsic merit, acting upon the minds of an 
enlightened people desirous of furthering the true educa- 
tional interests of their children. 

'' Many incidental advantages subordinate to the prime 
one have resulted. All the children of the town meet on 
the same arena, test the quality each of the other, and ex- 
change from the beginning those influences which will mould 
them to act together harmoniously and intelligently in the 
future. All the parents of the town have an equal interest 
in the welfare of the two central systems of schools,, and for 
many years dissensions about the maintenance of schools 
have been unknown in our town meetings. Many families 
have come to live in the town because of its educational ad- 
vantages. The farms that come upon the market find readier 
sale than ever before. The children from the farming dis- 
tricts are no longer distinguishable from the village children 
by a certain awkwardness of manner or address. The moral 
tone of the school and of the school-yards has been elevated 
wonderfully. The parents feel and appreciate these many 
incidental, but vastly important, advantages, and are con- 
vinced that the system is superior to the one it has displaced." 



TOWN OF ACTON. 23 



REPORT OF EXPENDITURES 1893-94, DEPARTMENT 
OF SCHOOL SUPPLIES. 



To the School Cornmittee : 


Feb. 28. 


GiNN & Co. 
3 Scudder's History, #2 75 


April 29. 


3 Hudson Julius Caesar, 1 35 
5 Wentworth Plane Ge- 
ometry, 3 75 
8 Wentworth Gram. Sch. 

Arithmetic, 5 20 



Less 1-6, 

May 1. 5 Julius Csesar, 

5 Dana Geology. Story, 



Less 1-6, 

May 1. 5 Martin's Civil Gov't, 

May 23. 12 Health Primers, 
6 Hygiene, 

Less 55 per cent, 

May 23. 10 doz. Spelling Blanks, 
Less 1-6, 



Aug. 25. 5 Our World Eeaders, 

No. 1, 2 50 

5 Little Flower People, 2 00 

5 Water Babies, 1 72 

9 Golden River, 1 00 

40 Two Great Retreats, 16 00 



10 

1 


30 

72 


2 
5 


25 

75 


8 
1 


00 
33 


2 


05 


3 
3 


60 
00 


6 60 
3 63 


4 20 

70 



|2 75 



58 



6 67 

2 05 



2 9' 



3 50 



24 ANNUAL REPORTS 



40 Autobiography of Frank- 
lin, 16 00 

50 Cyr's 1st Readers, 14 00 
8 Harkness Easy Latin 

Lessons, 9 60 

10 Whitney & Lockwood 

, Eng Gram., 8 40 

12 Wentworth & Hill H. 

S. Arith., 12 00 

24 Gate to Csesar, 9 60 

92 85 

Less 1-6, 15 47 



Sept. 7. 5 Whitney & Lockwood 

Eng. Gram., 3 50 

2 Allen&Greenough Ceesar, 2 50 

7 Montieth Phys. Geog., 7 00 



13 00 
Less 1-6, "^ 2 17 

Sept. 7. 5 Harkness.. Easy Latin 

Lessons, 6 00 

9 Martin's Civil Gov't, 8 10 





8. 
8. 


Less 55 per cent., 

19 Montgomery Eng.Hist., 
Less 1-6, 

6 Greenough Virgils, 
Less 1-6, 


14 10 

7 75 


Sept. 


21 28 
3 55 


Sept. 


9 60 
1 60 



Sept. 12. 10 doz. Spelling Blanks, 4 20 
5 doz. Writing Books, 

No. 3, 4 80 



77 38 



10 83 



6 35 



17 73 



8 00 



TOWN OF ACTON. 2t; 





5 doz.Tracing Books,No. 


3, 3 60 
12 60 








Less 1-6, 

7 Lincoln Physiology, 
Less 1-6, 

Cr. by 8 B. & E. /Vrith., 


2 10 


10 50 
4 67 




Dec. 8. 


5 60 
93 






1 60 ' 




April 29. 


^161 98 




Sept. 26. 


Cr. by 50 old Readers, 


2 50 


4 10 








«ir»7 s« 



5 


70 


1 


20 


2 


40 




90 


3 


60 


1 


20 


4 


05 


3 


11 


, 5 


70 


1 


80 



99 



Boston School Supply Co. 

Mar. 3. 9 Book-keeping Blanks, f 84 
Express prepaid, 15 

Mar. 24. 6 Scudder's U.S.History 
10 boxes Crayons. 

2 dozen Slates. 

3 doz. Spelling Blanks, 
1 doz. Ink, 

13 80 
Mar. 28. 1 doz. Slates, 

5 Martin's Civil Gov't, 

3 Dana Geology Story, 

6 Scudder's L . S. History, 5 70 
18 Slates, 

1 15 S6 

April 20. 4 Beams Practice Paper, 2 00 

4 Reams Letter Sheet, 4 00 

4 doz. Spelling Blanks, 1 20 

5 doz. Slate Bands, 3 60 
1 lb. Sponges, 1 20 

12 00 



42 Q5 



26 ANNUAL REPORTS' 



American Book Co. 

Mar. 24. 24 Harper's 4th Readers, f 14 40 
24 Harper's 3cl Readers, 11 52 
16 Harper's School Geog- 
raphy, 12 96 



38 88 
Less 1-4 and 1-10, 12 63 



J. L. Hammett. 

April 28. 48 lbs. Packet Blocks, .^4 40 
20 lbs. Note Blocks, 2 00 
4 doz Manilla Blocks, 2 60 
2% Reams Manilla Letter, 1 88 
3 " Gem " Pencil Sharpen- 
ers, 9 00 
2 lbs. Sponges, 2 20 



April 29. 600 Blotters, 


3 60 


May 23. 5 doz. D. Slates, 


2 00 


5 Reams Manilla Draw- 




ing Paper, 


1 50 


6 Boxes Pens, 


2 28 


12 Sets Meservey's Book- 




keeping, 


8 64 


5 doz. Manilla Pads, 


2 60 


5 doz. Boxes Crayons, 


3 90 



16 Packages Col'd Splints, 3 20 
9 Boxes Splints for lay- 
ing, 1 80 
16 Boxes Large Pegs, [1 92 
16. Boxes Toy. Money, 3 20 
5 Boxes Colored Cubes, 2 40 



$26 25 26 25 



.$22 08 
3 60 



20 92 



TOWN OF ACTON. 27 



IG Boxes Thompson's Busy 

Work, 1 92 

5 Boxes Pin Cards, 2 00 

5 Boxes Little Artist, 1 00 

7 Boxes Halhnan's Beads, 2 88 



Aug. 25. 19 eJohnson's Wall Maps, 19 00 
2 Maps Mass. 1 00 

5 Sets Wood's Business 



Forms, 




2 00 


5 Gross Pencils, 




11 25 


50 Cornhill Pads, 




2 75 


5 doz. Slates, 




5 50 


3 doz. Pointers, 


wood 


2 40 


Oct. 10. 3 Gross Slate in 




Pencils, 




2 25 


5 lbs. Erasers, rubber. 


3 75 


5 doz. Slate Bands, 




3 60 


4 Eeams Letter Sheet, 


4 00 


5 doz.Ginn's Trac'g 


Course 


> 


No. 1, 




3 24 



Feb. 3. 2 Eeams No. 23 Letter 

Sheet, 2 00 

2 Peams Manilla Letter 

Sheet, 1 60 



20 32 



43 90 



16 84 



^3 60 131 26 



University Publishing Co. 

April 28. 54 Davis' 1st Readers, $14 04 
54 Davis' 2d Readers, 26 60 

f 35 64 

Aug. 25. 50 Holmes 1st Readers, 4 50 

4 50 

Sept. 9. 7 Sharpies Astronomy, 5 84 



28 ANit^^UAL REPORTS 



7 Greene's Zoology, 3 75 

9 59 



49 73 
April 28. Cr. by 108 old Readers, 14 04 14 04 



Lee & Shepard. 



30 42 
Sept. 9. Credit by express charge paid, 30 



35 69 



Aug. 25. 40 King's Geog. Readers, 

iSo. 2, $24 00 

40 Boston Tea Party, 10 00 

5 King's Geog. Readers, 

No. 1, 2 08 

f3G 08 36 08 

PaBLTc School Prtxtixg Co. 

Aug. 15. 500 Baldwin's Report Book, §8 50 8 50 

J. G. Roberts. 

Sept. 3. Rebinding Books, f 7 50 7 50 

Augustine Hosmer. 

Sept. 1. Printing, $ 50 

Sept. 2. Printing, 65 

$1 15 1 15 

Maynard, Merrill & Co. 

Sept. 9. 8 Keettels French Gram., $6 00 
15 " " Reader, 15 00 

^21 00 

Sept. 18. 4 " " Gram., 3 00 

4 " •' Reader, 4 00 

3 French Plays, 75 

7 75 

Sept. 22. 1 French Dictionaiy, 1 G7 1 67 



30 12 



TOWN OF ACTON. 29 



Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
Aug. 25. 40 Riverside Primers, ^10 20 10 20 

Sundry Expenditures. 



Paid James Fletcher estate, su[)plies, $2 G2 
C. H. Mead, supplies. 
C. J. Williams, supplies, 
N. C. Read, express, 
Wm. Jenniugs, " 
Luke Tuttle, 
C. L. Bradford, '•' 

Cr. bv sale of Word Book, 



1 25 




G5 




2 20 




7 50 




50 




50 




!ffi1 fi 17 






/ 


20 






14 97 





$502:25 
CHAS. J. WILLIAMS, Furchashfj Agent. 



30 



ANNUAL KEPORTS 



Superintendent's Report. 



School Committee of Acton : 

Gentlemen, — Tlie following report, presenting in a 
brief way the condition and progress of the schools, and 
stating suggestions for promoting their interests, is herewith 
presented. 

This report is nominally to the school committee who 
are already familiar with its probable contents through writ- 
ten communications from, and by personal consultation with, 
the superintendent, from time to time during the year ; so I 
shall be pardoned if I assume I am not only reporting to the 
committee, but, through them, to parents, teachers, and all 
others interested in the school affairs of the town. 

The statement made annually in many school reports 
that ''Our schools have advanced rapidly the past year," 
may excite the thought that those particular schools must be 
in an almost perfect condition. But it should be borne in 
mind that the best schools in our land are far from perfect, 
and that only by intelligent and earnest efforts can scliools 
be improved, or even prevented from becoming less efficient. 

The phenomenal work mentioned in many school re- 
ports comes to my mind whenever I have to touch upon the 
progress of schools, so that I approach the subject with feel- 
ings of embarrassment; and 3^et not only has much been 
done to increase the efficiency of our schools this year, but 
the work of the teachers and the progress made by the 
schools have been eminently satisfactory. However, although 



TOWN OF ACTON. 3I 



this year's work has been exceedingly gratifying, I deem it 
my duty and privilege to recommend other desirable chani^cs, 
and state those needs which, in my opinion, will still further 
promote the interests of the schools. 

The Year's Wokk. 

The most important changes made this year are as 
follows : 

The permanent location of the High school. 

The employment of an assistant for the High school. 

The substitution of a four years' course of study in the 
High school for a three years' course. 

Tlie transpoi'tatioii of High school pupils. 

The consolidation of the Centre schools. 

The consolidation of the South East and South schools. 

The first four changes directly affect the welfare of the 
High school, and indirectly they advance materially the ed- 
ucational interests of the whole town, and that, too, without 
increasing the total cost for schools, except for transporta- 
tion of High school pupils. 

By these changes we have a High school that stands for 
firmness of character, as against fickleness in its nomadic 
age; a High school course of study more befitting the size of 
the town and the intelligence of the community; a school to 
which pupils of mature age, who need more attention than 
can possibly be given them in the lower schools, may be 
sent ; a teaching force adequate for present requirements, 
and means which have brought the Fligh school nearer than 
ever before to the doors of all the people. That all the 
changes enumerated above have been made in one year, 
speaks well for the public spirit of the community. 

The consolidation of the schools at the Centre, and of 
the Southeast and South schools, has proved judicious aiid 
economicaL 



32 ANNUAL KEPOliTS 



In the Centre school the classes exhibit greater energy, 
and the pupils make more rapid progress than they did be- 
fore the schools were united. This is due to the more en- 
thusiastic class work and to the efficiency and the skillful 
management of the present teacher. 

For similar reasons the South East pupils certainly have 
better educational advantages at the South than they had in 
their own districts. 

Examinations and Promotions. 

An important cliange has been made in the use of exam- 
inations and in methods of promotion. Heretofore, pupils 
have been admitted to the High school provided they passed 
a final written examination in the common school branches. 
Happily for aspirants for High school honors and their teach- 
3rs, the school committee have abolished the written exami- 
nation as the basis of promotion, and, instead of a final ex- 
amination, have made the years work of the pupils the basis 
of promotion. Candidates from other towns, however, might 
have to take an examination before being admitted. The 
same method has been ado})ted for promotions from grade to 
grade in the lower schools. Examinations are now given 
from time to time by the teachers and by the superintendent, 
but they are used, by the teachers, to give reviews, and to 
emphasize important facts ; by the superintendent, to test 
the power rather than the memory of the pupils, to direct 
the work of the teacher, and to discover defects and omis- 
sions in the teaching. 

While none of the subjects taught in our schools have 
been neglected, special prominence has been givento read- 
ing, writing, arithmetic and language. 

Supplementary reading in these lines, viz : geography, 
history, and literature, has been furnished the pupils, and, 
by this means, the teachers have made quite an effort to cul- . 



TOWN OF ACTON. 33 



tivate ill the pupils a taste for good reading. A list of books 
contained in the public library suitable for, and desirable to 
be read by, the pupils, has been furnished each teacher, and 
the trustees of the library have very kindly voted to allow 
the teachers to take out eight books at a time under special 
conditions. Some of these books are read by the teachers to 
the school, and others are read by the pupils. The principle 
that the use of good reading in schools will tend to prevent 
a desire for worthless productions, is acted upon in providing 
this reading. 

Teachers' meetings have been held monthly, except 
when within the month the teachers have attended an Insti- 
tute. At one of these meetings it was our privilege to be 
addressed by Messrs. Geo. A. Walton and J. W. MacDonald, 
agents of the State Board of Education. These meetings 
enable the superintendent to direct the work of the teachers 
more effectively than can be done by any other means, so 
that the time taken by the teachers from regular school 
hours is considered to be profitably spent. 

The HiGFi School. 

The new condition of things affecting this school, in- 
volved not only the election of an assistant, but a change of 
principals, and we fully realized that upon the judicious se- 
lection of these teachers depended the success of the new 
system. 

Principal W. A. Charles has proved to be the right man 
for the place, and he has been ably seconded in his eff'orts to 
raise the standard of the school by his efficient assistant, 
Miss M. Florence Fletcher. This school is in excellent con- 
dition. It has been so managed that the pupils are orderly, 
industrious, and enthusiastic, and the relations existing be- 
tween teachers and pupils are the most cordial. Among the 



34 ANNUAL REPOKTS 



many excellent features of the school is a plan of self- 
government introduced by Mr. Charles, to allow pupils, 
whose previous deportment was satisfactory, the privilege of 
governing their own actions in school so long as they con- 
tinued to conduct themselves in a manner acceptable to the 
teacher. To train pupils to govern themselves is the highest 
order of discipline, so I note with pleasure the fact that, 
owing to the character of the teachers and the laudable 
inclinations of the pupils, the experiment has proved success- 
ful. He has also introduced military drill, giving the boys 
a good knowledge of military tactics, and an excellent train- 
ing in discipline. 

Aside from the regular school work the pupils began in 
November the publication of a monthly journal called the 
ACTONIAN, the contributors to wdiich are all members of the 
school. The publication reflects great credit on the school, 
and well deserves support from the alumni of the school and 
the citizens of the town. 

The membership of the school is much larger than it 
was last year. The size of the school and the four years' 
course of studies necessitated the purchase of an extra sup- 
ply of text books. This has necessarily swelled the total of 
the "textbook and supplies " account, but as pupils must 
be furnished all necessary text books and supplies, this addi- 
tional cost was unavoidable. Many more books will be 
needed in the near future to properly supply the school. 

In addition to the regular text books every pupil should 
be supplied with a small dictionary. There is not a more 
important book in school than this, and every pupil should 
learn to use one intelligently before he finishes our school 
course. 

There are probably few High schools in the state, as 
large as ours, that have so Ittlle apparatus for science work 



TOWN OF ACTON. 35 



as is found in our school. Modern methods of teaching 
make necessary the use of apparatus ; and until the pieces 
needed are furnished, the teachers will certainly lack im- 
portant means of good teaching, and the pupils will fail to 
get the full value of the training aimed at in the study of 
the natural sciences. When teachers have many subjects to 
teach they should be provided with all necessary helps in the 
way of apparatus. 

The school, with commendable zeal, has begun to raise 
money with which to purchase a piano. By an entertain- 
ment given in the town hall, fifty dollars has already been 
netted for this object. 

In Gei^eral. 

If our teachers are expected to work in accordance with 
the best methods, and to keep up with the times, we must 
make the conditions favorable for good teaching. Under the 
present system of schools we require too much when we ex- 
pect the same quality of work and the same amount of indi- 
vidual attention per scholar from our teachers that is ex- 
pected in well graded schools. It is not the number of 
pupils, necessarily, but the number of classes that determine 
largely the character of the teacher's work. Our teachers 
have not too many pupils, but, owing to the present grada- 
tion, they do have altogether too many classes for the best 
kind of work. Where schools are well graded there are not 
more than two grades in each room. In our school we have 
not less than four grades in each room. It is not reasonable 
to expect a teacher to accomplish as much per scholar with 
twenty-four classes, as is expected of a teacher with only 
twelve classes. We need better graded schools, and the 
practical way to accomplish this result is by consolidation. 
Apparatus, Text Books and Supplies. 

Teachers of the lower schools, too, need apparatus with 
which to do, in a proper and profitable way, the required 



36 ANNUAL REPORTS 



work of their schools. The following list of articles (some 
of which, however, are in the schools), recommended by the 
State Board of Education, is quoted as necessary for each 
school. 

Blackboards. — As much ,^(9oc^ blackboard surface as the 
size of the room will allow ; blackboard cloth f(»r extra sur- 
face for charts, maps, etc. ; a sufficient supply of good crayons, 
erasers, and pointers. There should be a ledge or trough 
below the blackboard to hold the dust. This should be 
cleaned whenever the room is swept. 

Closet. — A closet with lock and key for all text books, 
supplies and apparatus. The condition of this property 
should be inspected at each visit of the committee. 

For Reading. — Besides the regular series of readers, a 
chart for the beginners, and one or more different readers of 
each grade, at least three copies of each ; supplementary 
books for information ; a large dictionary, a dictionary of 
biography, and a gazetteer. 

For Writing. — Slates ruled on one side for the youngest 
pupils ; spaced practice paper for the older pupils ; good 
writing paper, pens and ink ; means of sharpening slate and 
lead pencils. 

For Arithmetic. — A low table for A^oungest pupils ; blocks 
or other counters, splints, etc. : numeral frame, foot-rules, 
yard-sticks, measures of capacity, liquid and dry, toy money. 

For Geography. — A globe, outline map of the hemis- 
pheres and of the continents; a map of the United States, 
and one of Massachusetts ; paper for map-drawing. 

For Physiology. — Anatomical and physiological charts. 

For Draiving. — Clay for modelling, geometrical forms, 
pencils, rulers, manilla and white paper, compasses. 

Small dictionaries, too, should be provided fo;^ all pupils 
above grade IV. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 37 



Additions to the supplementary reading list in the line 
of history, geography, literature, and science are desirable. 

I would also recommend a change in the text books on 
geography, history, and spelling. Many of the geographies 
now in use are practically worthless, being much worn and 
considerably out of date. 

There are many more desirable text books on history 
and spelling than those in our schools. 

If the teachers are expected to conform to the law in 
regard to teaching drawing, they should be provided with 
books and drawing material. 

I would suggest that the schools have a daily in-door 
recess instead of the customary out-door recefs, from Novem- 
ber 1 to the end of the winter term. By this plan there 
would be a few minutes in the forenoon and a few minutes 
in the afternoon that would be given to physical exercise of 
some kind ; and during this time the room could be venti- 
lated, and any pupils be permitted to leave the room. 

Attendance. 

Good attendance is one indication of a successful school. 
I would, therefore, call your attention to the attendance in 
our High school in the fall and winter terms, recorded in the 
tabular statement. It will be noticed, also, that at the Cen- 
tre, since the schools were united, the membership has been 
larger and the attendance better. The per cent, of attend- 
ance of all the schools for the year is .93. Many pupils de- 
serve great praise for punctuality and constant attendance. 
The '* Roll of Honor" is quite large; and I trust, another 
year, the names of pupils neither absent nor tardy for one or 
more terms will be published in the town report. The teach- 
ers, too, deserve much commendation for their efforts to 
secure regularity of attendance in their pupils. 



38 ANNUAL REPORTS 



A course of study to be practical must meet the needs 
of the schools for which it is made. The course prepared 
by the State Board of Education, an excellent one and very 
suggestive, has been used by the teachers as a guide in their 
work. This course was not expected to exactly meet the 
needs of all schools in the state, and while it will be used 
wholly for the course in drawing and nature study, it was 
deemed advisable to prepare one especially for our own 
schools, in other branches of study. This and the High 
school course is appended. 

Conclusion. 

In conclusion I wish to thank the committee for their 
cordial support, for the courtesy they have shown me, and 
for the assistance they*have given me in my work during 
the year. 

I wish, also, to thank the teachers for their hearty co- 
operation, for the good work they have done, and for the 
kindly manner in which they have taken my criticisms and 
suggestions. 

Respectfull}^ submitted, 

EDWARD DIXON, 

Superintendent of Schools, 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



39 



TABULAR STATEMENT. 







































6 




6 
o 

i 


^ 
















bD 


q3 


? 


fl 
















c« 


Sd 




o 














?. 


^ 




s 












a 


(H 


o 


2 


o 


^ 


<V 


TEACHERS. 


TERMS. 


SCHOOLS. 




2 


o 

1 


13 

a 

c5 






GO 


W 

1 










a 




o 


OJ 

S 


^ 
^ 




«H 










1 






X 


o 

en 




O 








o 


<D 




o 


a 


'S( 


ft 


^ 








a 


> 


> 


m 


s 


!=l 


C3 


^ 








S 


< 


< 


Ph 


fn 


^ 


Ph 


0. A. Crooks. 


Spring 




43 


37.5 


30.4 


80 








$102 22 


W. A. Charles. ) 
M. Florence Fletcher. | 




















102 22 


Fall 


High. 


67 


64.9 


63.2 


97 




36 


24 


40 00 


W. A. Charles. ) 
M. Florence Fletcher, j 




















102 22 


Winter 




64 


63.5 


59.1 


93 








40 00 




Spring 




31 


30. 


28.5 


95 










Hattie L. Tuttle. 


Fall 

Winter 

Spring 


South Grammar. 


33 
34 
42 


30.7 
31.5 
37.9 


29.8 
29.4 
35.8 


97 
93 
94 






31 


40 00 


Bertha L. Gardner. 


Fall 

Winter 

Spring 


South Primary. 


48 
43 
37 


44. 

34.5 

33.6 


41.9 
32.1 

30.7 


95 
93 
91 






15 


40 00 


Albertie M. Preston. 


Fall 

Winter 

Spring 


West Grammar. 


33 


30.9 
32.8 
39. 


29.9 
30.4 
36.1 


97 
93 
93 




2 


29 


40 00 


Harriet H. Gardner. 


Fall 
Winter 


West Primary. 


g 


28.4 
24.8 


27.4 
22.2 


96 
89 






22 


40 00 


Clara B. Holden. 


Spring 


) Centre Gram'ar. 
) Centre Primary. 


17 


12.4 


11.7 


94 








40 00 


Sarah E. Hammond. 


14 


9.5 


8.6 


90 








40 00 


Susie E. Conant. 


Fall 


Centre. 


37 


33.7 


32.5 


96 




3 


27 


40 00 


Susie E. Conant. 


Winter 




37 


27.9 


26.5 


95 










M. Florence Fletcher. 


Spring 




28 


26.4 


23.5 


89 








40 00 


Lucy M. Booth. 


Fall 


East. 


26 


25.9 


24.7 


95 




1 


26 


40 00 


Lucy M. Booth. 


Winter 




28 


26.7 


24.9 


93 








40 00 


Susie E. Conant, 


Spring 




23 


20.4 


19.3 


95 










Lillian F. Richardson. 


Fall 


North. 


20 


19.3 


18.3 


94 


1 


2 


10 


36 00 


Lillian F. Richardson. 


Winter 




16 


12.1 


9.5 


78 










Lena Hayward. 


Spring 


Southeast. 


11 


6.6 


5.9 


89 





1 


9 


36 00 



40 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Summary of Statistics. 



Number of schools, ' 8 

Whole number of children enrolled, - - - 356 

Number under 5 years of age, . - - _ 1 

Number over 15 years of age, . . - . 43 

Number between 8 and 14 j^ears of age, - - 184 

Average membership of all the schools, - - 261.6 

Average attendance of all the schools, - - 244.1 

Per cent, of attendance of all the schools, - - 93 



TOWN OF ACTON. 4I 



Report of Principal of High School. 



Having been requested by Mr. Dixon to say a few words 
concerning the High school, I submit the following : 

September 5, Tuesday morning, on reaching the High 
school building, I found an assembly of about sixty-five 
boys and girls, varying from fourteen to eighteen years of 
age. In entering into a new school, with new teachers, and 
a new course of study, it took some little time to arrange 
matters satisfactorily, but matters finally adjusted themselves 
to circumstances, and the school machinery seemed to be 
running smoothly. 

The course of study, as you know, was enlarged and 
increased to one of four years. I would still further advo- 
cate raising the standard, until algebra be pursued the first 
year, and all studies, which belong to the Grammar grade, 
be dropped from the High school curriculum. 

In the way of physical and chemical apparatus, the 
school is totally devoid of appliances, and it is as impossible, 
to build the traditional "bricks without straw," as to teach 
those branches without performing a certain amount of ex- 
periments. The one thing which I think would tend to better 
work,in all directions, would be one session in the High school. 
In order for this to be a success the closest co-operating of 
parents would be necessary, that the time which should be 
put into school work is not squandered in other ways, and 
right here I must utter my one word of dissatisfaction, and 
that is, the seeming lack of interest shown by parents, in the 
High school. Up to the present time just two persons, who 



42 ANKUAL REPORTS 



had children in school, have visited us. Now this shows one 
of two things : 1st, that you take no interest in your chil- 
dren's welfare, or 2d, that you have implicit confidence in 
your teachers. 

I could not write an article of this kind without paj^ing 
tribute to Miss Fletcher, and if the school has advanced at 
all during the past year, I would attribute a very large 
degree of it to her zeal, application, and hearty co-operation 
in everything concerning school work, and best of all, to the 
interest which, in a large degree, she awakens in all the 
pupils with whom she comes in contact. She is eminently 
the right person for the place. My relations with Mr. Wil- 
liams and Mr. Dixon, too^ have been most helpful to me, and 
1 can see nothing in the future for the Acton High school 
but success, if the people will only arouse themselves and 
open their eyes. It is the height of folly to support a High 
school in your midst, and then send your children to Concord 
or elsewhere. Give us the money which you are paying 
other schools. Give us the appliances which go to make a 
modern school-house, and we will give your children the 
education which by right they ought to have. 

In closing, I wish to say that our labors have not been 
directed wholly toward book learning, but we have also 
endeavored to instill some of the first principles of what 
goes to make up a young lady and a young gentleman. A 
man is estimated by good society to-day no more for what 
he knows than for his good breeding, and we think we should 
not be fulfilling our duty did we stop with simply the daily 
lessons. The Acton High school can be a credit to the town 
of Acton. Will you let it be ? 

WM. A. CHARLES, Principal. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



43 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 
FmsT Year. 

Term. 

Fall. Latin. Arithmetic. Civil Govenmient. 
Winter. Latin. Arithmetic. Physiology. 
Spring. Latin (Gate to Csesar). Arithmetic. Physical Ge- 
ography. 

Second Year. 

Fall. Csesar. Algebra. Phj^sics. 
Winter. Csesar. Algebra. Physics. 
Spring. Csesar. Algebra. Physics. 
Third Year. 

Fall. Virgil or French. Plane Geometry. English History. 

Winter. Virgil or French. Plane Geometry. Greek History. 

Spring. Virgil or French. Plane Geometry. Roman History. 

Fourth Year. 

Fall. Cicero or French. Zoology. General History. 
Winter. Cicero or French. Astronomy. General History. 
Spring. Cicero or French. Chemistry. Political Economy. 



English Literature. 
English Literature. 
English Literature. 



ENaLISH COURSE. 

First Year. 

English Grammar. Civil Government. Arithmetic. 

Winter. English Grammar. Physiology. Arithmetic. 

Spring. English Grammar. Physical Geography. Arith- 
metic. 



Term. 

Fall. 







Second Year. 




Fall. 


Rhetoric 


and English Literature. Algebra. 


Physics. 


Winter. 


Rhetoric and English Literature. Algebra. 


Physics. 


Spring. 


Rhetoric and English Literature. Algebra. 


Physics. 






Third Year. 




Fall. 


Erench. 


Plane Geometry. Geology. 




Winter. 


French. 


Plane Geometry. Elocution. 




Spring. 


French. 


Plane Geometry. Botany. 
Fourth Year. 




Fall. 


French. 


Zoology. Solid Geometry or 


General 




History. 




Winter. 


French. 


Astronomy. Solid Geometry or General 




History. 




Spring. 


French. 


Chemistry. Solid Geometry or 


Political 




Economy. 





Readings, declamations and compositions throughout 
eacli course. Book-keeping once a week. 

COIJRSK OK STUDY. 



LANGUAGE. 



Object. To train pupils early to use good English, and 
to make this use a matter of habit by long, consistent, and 
pro2:ressive training, and to lay the foundation for the gram- 
matical study of the language at a later period. The correct 
forms only should be emphasized. 

Copying. Pupils should be trained to grasp thoughts, 
not words only, at a glance, and to notice punctuation marks, 
capitals, etc. 

Dictation. Dictate distinctly and but once. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 45 



Reproduction. Train pupils to reproduce stories as 
truthfully as possible, in their own language. 

Memory Gems. Throughout the course liave pieces of 
appropriate prose and poetry committed to memory and 
recited. 

Punctuation. Particular attention should be paid by 
each teacher to the different punctuation and other marks, 
required to be taught in the grades of which she has charge. 

Grade I. 

Oral Lessons. Aim — to teach the children to express 
their thoughts in simple and correct forms. 

Teach to use a and an ; is and are; ivas and tvere ; Jias 
(Xudi have ; verbs, with singular and with plural subjects; 
m, on., under., heloiv., etc. Have picture lessons and reproduc- 
tions of stories. 

Written Work. New words in reading lesson ; sentences 
from board or charts ; sentences containing given words ; 
sentences expressing observed facts ; days of the week and 
months of the year; simple sentences from dictation. 

Teach the use of the period and of the interrogation 
point at the end of a sentence ; the capital letter at the be- 
ginning of a sentence and in the names of persons ; I and O 
when written alone. 

Grade II. 

Oral and written work throughout the year. Exercises 
in Avriting names of persons with residences; copying froui 
blackboard and from reading books; short stories from 
pictures; reproduction of short stories told by the teachei- 
or from reading lesson; abbreviations; dates; observation 
lessons ; short stories dictated ; letters of one paragraph. 

Teach to use tJiis and that; these and those^etc; the 
common irregular verbs ; the period in abbreviations ; the 
possessive singular with apostrophe; the hyphen in. coip- 



46 ANNUAL KEPORTS 



pound words ; the comma to separate the words of a series ; 
pronoims as subjects ; pronouns as objects of transitive 
verbs ; adverbs. 

Grade III. 

Oral and written work throughout the year. Daily work 
in short dictation exercises ; reproduction of stories, orally 
and in writing ; stories from pictures ; writing of short 
letters. 

Teach to use such words as to^ too^ two ; either^ neither ; 
pronouns with was and were, and after is and ivas ; the ex- 
clamation point ; the comma to separate the name of the 
person addressed from the rest of the sentence ; the hyphen 
in dividing words at the end of a line ; common contractions 
with the use of the apostrophe. 

Grade IV. 

Oral and written work throughout the year. Teach 
forms and use of all the common irregular verbs ; to use 
them in different tenses and in the active and the passive 
voice ; correct use of who and whom in questions ; of ivho^ 
which ernd that ; quotations (direct and indirect) ; all com- 
mon abbreviations and contractions ; formation of the pos- 
sessive cases, singular and plural ; the plural forms of nouns ; 
the use of the comma in direct quotations and to separate 
the parts of a compound sentence ; the different uses of the 
period. Have reproduction of stories from memory ; letter 
writing, full form^ and teach pupils to fold letters and ad- 
dress envelopes. 

Grade V. 

Have stories from outlines ; paraphrasing ; reproduction, 
upon paper, of (a) facts from Nature studies; (b) geogra- 
phy lessons ; (c) picture lessons ; (d) stories read or told by 
the teacher, or which the children have read silently. Prag- 



TOWN OF ACTON. 47 



tice in changing from one of the four forms of the sentence 
to each of the others, with capitals and punctuation appro- 
priate to each. Copy short lessoDS from books. Dictate, 
frequently, exercises which include the use of the apostro- 
phe, quotation marks in divided quotations, abbreviations, 
and the more difQcult forms of the plural nouns. Drill, 
frequently, on forms of irregular verbs, and the correct use 
of relative and interrogative pronouns. Continue letter 
wi'iting. 

Develop the idea of a sentence and give the definition. 
Teach classification of sentences with respect to their mean- 
ing^ and define declarative, interrogative, imperative, and 
exclamatory sentences. Give frequent practice in naming 
the subject and the predicate of sentences. 

Grade VI. 

Continue work of preceding grade. Give thorough drill 
in writing business papers of all kinds. Require pupils to 
punctuate all written work. 

Show that words have particular uses in sentences, that 
they are classified according to their uses^ and that they are 
called parts of speech. Give frequent practice in naming 
the parts of speech in a sentence. Teach classification of 
sentences with respect to form and define simple, compound, 
and complex sentences. 

Grade VII. 

Language. Continue work of preceding grade. 

Grammar. Teach the different kinds of phrases ; the 
participle; the infinitive; modified subject and modified 
predicate ; drill on transitive (active and passive) verbs ; 
intransitive (complete and incomplete) verbs ; attributive 
and objective complements ; analysis of simple sentences ; 
use of diagrams; syntax of words* 



48 ANNUAL REPORTvS. 



Grade VIIL 

Continue and extend work of preceding grade. Teach 
punctuation of complex and compound sentences; jjroperties 
of the parts of speech ; analysis of easy complex and com- 
pound sentences, with substantive, adjective, and adverbial 
clauses. General review. 



READING. 

In primary reading, teach 1, the sentence ; 2, words ; 3, 
phonics. When pupils know all the words of a reading 
lesson they are ready to exercise themselves in the two pro- 
cesses Jiecessary for good reading, viz., grasp of thought and 
feeling and vocal expression of thought and feeling. Criti- 
cism should be directed in these two directions. Wrong 
emphasis shows the thought is not mastered. Help pupils 
to understand the thought by questioniny them on the pieces 
to be read. 

Grade I. 

First Term. Reading from the blackboard. 

Second Term. Reading from the bhickboard and the 
authorized First Reader. 

Third Term. Reading from the hrst part of the author- 
ized First Readers and from the first part of the supplement- 
ary First Readers. 

Phonetics begun this year and continued throughout 
the course. 

Grade II . 

First Term. Authorized First Reader finished. 
Second Term. Supplementary First Readers finished. 
Third Term. First part of authorized Second Re<ider, 

Grade III. 
First Term. Authorised Second Reader finished, 



TOWN OF ACTON. 



49 



Second Term, Supplementary Second Readers finished. 
Third Term. First part of authorized Third Readers. 

Gbade IV. 

Authorized Third Reader and supplementary Third 

Readers. 

Grade V. 

Authorized Fourth Reader and supplementary reading. 

Grade VI-VIII. 

Fifth Readers and supplementary reading. 



SPELLINa. 
Grade I. 



Words copied from readers, charts, or blackboard ; oral 

spelling when the names of the letters are known ; spelling 

by sound. 

Grade II. 

Words selected from daily reading; oral and written 

spelling. 

Grades III-IV. 

Words selected from reading lessons ; common words 
frequently mis-spelled ; words from any of the school exer- 
cises ; work, oral and written. 

Grades V-VIIL 

Oral and written spelling ; written work chiefly in spell- 
ing blanks ; special lessons on geographical and historical 
names ; in oral spelling, have syllables indicated by a pause 
or by pronounciation. 



50 ANNUAL REPORTS 



WRITING. 

Pay particular attention to the position of the body and 
the holding of the pen. The special work of the primary 
grades should be (1) the making of the single letters, (2) 
combining them into simple words; that of the other grades, 
arm movements. 

Grades I-II. 

Small letters, capital letters, and easy words. 
Grades III-IV. 

Drill in making letters ; short words and easy sentences ; 
easy arm movements; begin use of the pen. 

Grades V-VIII. 

Arm movements; sentences from dictation; copybook 
exercises. 



ARITRMETIC. 
Grade I. 



Number 1 to 10 inclusive ; counting, notation, numera- 
tion, addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division ; frac- 
tions, 1-2, 1-3, 1-4; Roman numerals to X; cent, two-cent 
piece, nickel, dime ; day, week, month ; pint, quart, gallon, 
peck ; inch, foot (as a whole), yard. 

Grade II. 

Numbers 1 to 20 ; notation 1 to 50 ; fractions 1-5, 1-6, 
1-7, 1-8, 1-9, 1-10 ; Roman numerals to XX ; foot, square 
foot (as a whole), square yard ; ounce, pound ; dozen, score ; 
year. 



TOWN OF ACTON. ^i 



Grade III. 

Numbers 1 to 100 ; multiplication with two figures in 
the multiplicand and one in the multiplier ; division with two 
figures in the dividend and one in the divisor ; fractions 1-11, 
1-12 ; decimals to tenths, four processes ; U. S. money ; 
Roman numerals to C; tables of length, liquid measure, dry 
measure, time, weight. 

Grade IV. 

Numbers to 1000 ; multiplication and division with not 
more than two places in the multiplier and the divisor ; Ro- 
man numerals to M ; addition, subtraction, multiplication, 
and division of common fractions to twentieths, of decimals 
to hundredths ; much practice in measuring lengths ; in buy- 
ing and selling, making change, etc. Begin percentage. In 
compound numbers extend work of preceding grade. Oral 
exercises to accompany written arithmetic. 

Grade V. 

Arabic and Roman notation ; review of the fundament- 
al rules ; U. S. money continued ; factors and multiples of 
easy numbers; reduction, addition, subtraction, multiplica- 
tion, and division of fractions, decimal and common ; oral 
exercises throughout the year; percentage continued; easy 
examples in interest (years) ; simple work in finding areas 
of surfaces and contents of solids. 

Grade VI. 

Complete notation ; greatest common divisor ; least 
common multiple ; factors ; reduction' of common fractions 
to decimals, and of decimals to common fractions ; continue 



52 ANNUAL REPORTS 



work of preceding grade in common fractions and decimals ; 
compound numbers, except longitude and time, finished ; 
percentage ; interest (years and months). 

Grade VII. 

Percentage and its applications including simple inter- 
est; factors, multiples, common fractions, decimals, and com- 
pound numbers reviewed ; oral exercies throughout the year. 

Grade VIII. 

Problems in interest ; partial payments ; compound in- 
terest ; commercial discount ; bank discount; ratio and pro- 
portion ; longitude and time ; powers and roots ; mensura- 
tion. 



aEOGRAPHY. 
Grade I. 



Teach points of compass (eight), Have oral lessons on 
the seasons, the air, wind, rain, snow, hail, thunder, light- 
ning ; hills, valleys ; springs, brooks, rivers, ponds, lakes (of 
the neighborhood). 

Grade II. 

Oral lessons on the sky, clouds ; dew, frost ; the hori- 
zon ; sunrise, sunset, the sun at noon ; kinds of soil, (sandy, 
etc.). 

Home Geography. The hills, direction of slopes, etc. ; 
the streams, source, banks, branches, mouth, direction of 
flow, etc. 

Teach idea of map by a plan of school-room and yard 
on the blackboard. 



tOWi^ OF ACTOi^. 5;^ 



Grade III. 

Home geography, following outline given in the State 
course of study; county; oral lessons on town government. 

Grade IV. 

First Term^M?iss3 chusetts. SWond Tei^m^^ew^ugl'dud. 
Third Term, United States. Oral lessons on county govern- 
ment. 

Grade V. 

First and Second Terms. The earth as a whole, and the 
continents, following the outline given in the State course. 
Third Term, North America. 

Grade VI. 

First Term, South America. Second Term, Africa. Third 
Term, Europe. 

Grade VII. 

First Term, Oceanica. Second Term, Asia. Third Term, 
North America. 

Grade VIII. 

First Term, Massachusetts and New England. Second 
Term, United States. Third Term, General review. 



HIST on Y, 

Grades I-IV. 

Selected stories to be read to the pupils by the teacher. 

Grade V. 

Have pupils read stories of American history. Oral 
lessons on state government. 



I 



54 ANNUAL REPORTS 



Geade VI. 

Work of preceding grade continued. History of Massa- 
chusetts. 

Grade VII. 

Formal study of United States history. The authorized 
text book from tVe beginning of the book through the Revo- 
lutionary War. Oral lessons on national government. 

Grade VIII. 

From the close of the Revolution to the present time. 
Oral lessons on national government. 



I 



PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE. 
Grade I. 

Body as a Whole : Correct position ; blood ; breathing ; 

the senses. 

Grade II. 

Parts of the Body : Their names, uses, and care, espec- 
ially of the eyes, ears, nose, and teeth. 

Grade III. 

Elementary ideas of digestion ; necessity of thoroughly 
masticating the food ; wholesome and unwholesome food. 

Grade IV. 

Elementary ideas of the circulation of the blood ; of 
respiration ; lessons on the skin, muscles, tendons, fat, bones, 
joints, ligaments, cartilage, nerves, blood-vessels. 

Grade V. 

The Digestive System. Lessons on the internal organs 
and needs of the body. 



TOWN OF ACTON. 55 



Grade VI. 

The Circulatory System. The Respiratory System. 

Grade VII. 

The Muscular System. The Skin. The Nerv^ous Sys- 
tem. 

Grade VIII. 



The Bony System. General review. 



Lessons on stimulants and narcotics throughout the 
course. 



Drawing and Nature study is in the State course of 
study. 



REFERENCE BOOK \A/Sam'S 

ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY ' APRIL iW 

Ar-TON, MASSAnHllSETrS 0172Q