(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual reports, Town of Acton, Massachusetts"

For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 



REFERENCE BOOK 

ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
ACTON, MASSACHUSETTS 01720 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportstow19061910acto 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 



Massachusetts 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 10 



1906 



Together with the School Report 




NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY, PRINTERS 

HUDSON, MASS. 

1 906 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 

Massachusetts 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 10 

1906 

Together with the School Report 




A IS? 

— 



NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY, PRINTERS 

HUDSON, MASS. 

1906 



REFERENCE BOOK s 
ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
ACTON, MASSACHUSETTS 01720 



Town Officers, 1905. 



Town Clerk— Horace F. Tattle. 

Selectmen. 

Frank W. Hoit, Arthur M. Whitcomb, Lyman O. Taylor. 

Assessors. 

E. Faulkner Conant, William F. Kelley, Daniel J. Wetherbee. 

Overseers of the Poor. 

William F. Kelley, O. A. Knowlton, J. Sterling Moore. 

Town Treasurer — Jona. K. W. Wetherbee. 

Auditor — Waldo E. Whitcomb. 

Collector of Taxes — Daniel J. Wetherbee. 

Constables. 

James Kinsley, Albert S. Bradley, 

Moses A. Reed, Daniel J. Wetherbee. 

Cemetery Commissioners. 

Herbert T. Clark, Term expires 1908. 

Horace F. Tuttle, Term expires 1907. 

Julian Tuttle, Teim expires 1906. 



Road Commissioners. 



Albert H. Perkins, 
Anson O. Piper, 
William H. Kingsley, 



Term expires 1906. 
Term expires 1907. 
Term expires 1908. 



Oharles J. Williams, 
Frank R. Knowlton, 
Horace F. Tattle, 



School Committee. 



Term expires 1908. 
Term expires 1907. 
Term expires 1906. 



Trustees of Memorial Library. 
(Chosen by the town. ) 



Charles J. Williams, 
Lucius Hessleton, 
Horace F. Tuttle, 



Term expires 1908. 
Term expires 1906. 
Term expires 1907. 



Board of Health. 



Frank J. Barker, M. D. , 
Frank E. Tasker, M. D. , 
Charles J. Williams, 



Term expires 1907. 
Term expires 1906. 
Term expires 1908. 



Fence Viewers. 
Frank W. Hoit, Edwin A. Phalen,* Arthur M. Whitcomb. 

Surveyors of Lumber, Wood, Hoops and Staves. 



Herbert T. ClaTk, 
Jona. P. Fletcher, 
Edward F. Richardson, 



Edgar H. Hall,* 
Charles E. Smith, 
Job W. Dupee.* 



5 
Field Drivers. 

Arthur P. Blanchard, I. Warren Flagg, 

Webster O. Bobbins, Delette H. Hall,* 

Charles E. Wood, David O. Harris.* 

Tree Warden — Charles J. Williams. 
♦Failed to qualify. 



Proceedings of the Annual Meeting Held March 27, 1905. 



Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said meeting. 

Lather Oonant was cho?en Moderator. 

Art. 2. To see if the Town will accept the reports of the 
Selectmen, Overseers of the Poor, School Committee, Library Trus- 
tees and other town officers. 

Voted, to accept the reports of the several town officers as 
printed. 

Art. 3. To choosa all necessary town officers and committees 
and fix salaries. 

Voted, to choose on one ballot, a Town Clerk, Town Treasurer, 
three Selectmen, three Asses ors, three Overseers of the Poor, one 
member of the School Committee, a Collector of Taxes, four Con- 
stables, one Cemetery Commissioner, six Field Drivers, six Sur- 
veyors of Lumber, Wood, Hoops and Staves, three Fence Viewers, 
one Trustee of Memorial Library, one Auditor, one Road Com- 
missioner, one member of the Board of Health and a Tree Warden. 

Voted, that the salary of the Tax Collector be one per cent of 
the amount collected and that lie perform the duties hitherto per- 
formed by said officer. 

Voted, that the salary of the Road Commissioners be the same 
as last year, namely : Two and one-half dollars per day em- 
ployed, nine hours to constitute a day. 

Voted, that the salary of the Auditor be fixer! at six dollars. 



The following persons were elected to the respective offices. 

Town Clerk— Horace F. Tnttle. 

Town Treasurer — Jona. K. W. Wetherbee. 

Self ctmen— Frank W. Hoit, Arthur M. Whitcomb, Lyman O. 
Taylor. 

Assessors — E. Faulkner Conaut, Wm. F. Kelley, Daniel J. 
Wetherbee. 

Overseers of the Poor — William F. Kelley, O. A. Knowlton, J. 
Sterling Moore. 

School Committee — Charles J. Williams. 

Collector of Taxes — Daniel J. Wetherbee. 

Constables — Tames Kinslt y, Albert S. Bradley, Moses A. Reed, 
Daniel J. Wetherbee. 

Cemetery Commissioner — Herbert T. Clark. 

Field Drivers— Arthur F. Blanchard, I. Warren Flagg, W. C. 
Robbins, Delette H. Hall', Charles E. Wood, David C. Harris. 

Surveyors of Lumber, Wood, Hoops and Staves — Herbert T. 
Clark, Edgar H. Hall, Jona, P. Fletcher, Charles E. Smith, Ed- 
ward F. Richardson, Job W. Dupee. 

Fence Viewers — Frank W. Hoit, Edwin A. Phalen, Arthur M. 
Whitcomb. 

Trustee Memorial Library — Charles J. Williams. 

Auditor — Waldo E. Whitcomb. 

Road Commissioner — William H. Kingsley. 

Tree Warden — Charles J. Williams. 

Board of Health — Charles J. Williams. 

Art. 4. To hear and act upon the reports of any committee 
chosen to report at this meeting. 

Voted, to accept the report of the Selectmen in reference to 
enlarging the town hall. 



8 



Voted, that the Selectmen be instructed to enlarge the town 
hall in accordanca with the plan reported to the town at this 
meeting. 

Voted to raise the sum of twenty- two hundred dollars for en- 
larging the town hall. 

Heard and ac *epted the report of the School Committee relative 
to sending pupils to the Concord High school. 

Art. 5. To see what amount of money the Town will raise for 
due observance of Memorial day. 

Voted, to raise the sum of fifty dollars. 

Art. 6. To see if the Town will accept the jury list as revised 
by the Selectmen. 

Voted, after taking from the list the names of George W. 
Worster, S. Hammond Taylor, and Nelson J. Cole, to accept the 
list as revised by the Selectmen. 

Art. 7. To see what amount of money the Town will appro- 
priate for repairing roads and bridges. 

Voted, to raise the sum of five thousand dollars. 

Art. 8. To see if the Town will authorize the Treasurer, with 
the approval of its Selectmen, to borrow money for the Town, if 
nec3ssary, in anticipation of taxes the current year. 

Voted, to authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, to borrow money for the Town if necessary, in antici- 
pation of taxes the current year. 

Art. 9. To vote Yes or No in answer to the 'question : Shall 
licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in Acton 
the present year? 

• Whole number of ballots cast, 192 

Yes, 68 

No, 124 

Art. 10. To see what amount of money the Town will raise 
for the support of Memorial Library the present year. 



Voted, to raise four hundred dollars for current expenses and 
two hundred dollars for books. 

Art. 11. To see what amount of money the Town will raise 
for the support of schools the present year. 

Voted, To raise for : 

Common schools, $3,800 00 

High school, 1,800 00 

School supplies, 525 00 

Transportation of pupils, 1,360 00 

Salary of superintendent, 480 00 

Art. 12. To see what amount of money the Town will raise 
for school supplies. 

Action taken under Art. J 1. 

Art. 13. To see what amount of money the Town will raise 
for town charges. 

Voted, to raisa five thousand dollars. 

Art. 14. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money 
for the enforcement of the liquor laws. 

Voted, to appropriate five hundred dollars. 

Voted, to instruct the Selectmen to enforce the liquor laws. 

Art. 15. To see if the Town will maintain street lamps the 
present year, or act anything thereon. 

Voted, to raise one thousand dollars for lighting streets. 

Voted, to authorize the Selectmsn to purchase sucli additional 
iucandesc^nt lamps as they may S3e fit. 

Voted, that the lighting of the lamps be under the direction of 
the Selectmen. 

Art. 10. To se what amount of money the Town will ap- 
propriate for the care of cimateries the current year, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Voted, to appropriate the s-um of five hundred dollars. 



IO 



Art. 17. To see if the Town will take any action in regard to 
Old Home Week. 

Voted, to observe the week marking the anniversary of tlie in- 
corporation of the town as Old Home Week. 

Voted, to appropriate three hundred dollars. 

Chose Luther Gonant, D. James Wetherbee, Rev. F. P. Wood, 
J. Sidney White, George C. Wright, Edgar H. Hall, Frank R. 
Knowlton, Arthur F. Blanohard, Frank Lothrop, E. F. Richard- 
son, Rev. F. S. Rice, Anson C. Piper, Samuel A. Guilford, E. 
F. Conant, Augustine Hosmer a committee of arrangements. 

Art. 18. To see if the Town will vote to straighten the road 
at the old school honse lot in So. Acton and raise a special 
amount for the same, or act anything thereon. 

Voted, to refer to the Road Commissioners with power to act. 

Art. 19. To see what amount of money the Town will 
to maintain the Fire Department. 

Voted, to appropriate three hundred and fifty dollars. 

Art. 20. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of one 
hundred and twenty-five dollars for six band concerts, two in each 
village, Acton, South Acton and West Acton, or act anything 
thereon. 

A motion to appropriate one hundred and twenty-five dollars 
did not prevail. 

Art. 21. To see if the Town will accept as a private way, the 
laying out by the Road Commissioners of a private way, for the 
benefit of Mary T. Coughlin, from the town road near her dwell- 
ing house, over the land of Mary O'Neil to land of said Coughlin 
northerly of said town road. 

Voted, to accept and allow the laying out by the Road Com- 
missioners of a private way from the town road, near the house of 
Mary T. Coughlin, northerly to land of said Coughlin, over the 
land of Mary O'Neil, in accordance with the return of said Com- 
missioners dated March 18, 1905. 



1 1 



Art. 22. To see if the Town will take any action in relation 
to the speed of automobiles. 

Voted, to instruct the Selectmen to enforce the State law rela- 
tive to the speed of automobiles. 

Art. 2 3. To see if the Town will take any action in regard to 
the extermination of the brown tail moth. 

Voted, to appropriate one hundred and fifty dollars to be used 
at the discretion of the Tree Warden for the extermination of the 
brown tail moth. 

Art. 24. To see what action the Town will take in regard to 
the erection of a flag pole at Acton Center. 

Voted, to instruct the Selectmen to replace the flag staff on the 
Davis monument. 

Art. 25. To see if the Town will take any action in regard to 
supplying a public watering trough for the West village. 

Voted that the Selectmen be instructed to provide a public 
watering trough in the village of West Acton. 

Art. 26. To see if the Town will vote to buy a lookup, or take 
any action thereon. 

Voted, to dismiss the article. 

Art. 27. To see if the Town will build a road across the land 
of O. W. Mead in West Acton, beginning at the turnpike at the 
south east corner of the land of Fitchburg R. R. Co. thence 
northerly on the east side of Fitchburg R. R. Co. land to the road 
that passes the house of Mrs, G. B. Parker, the road to be built 
thirty feet wide, or act anything thereon. 

Voted, to instiuct the Road Commissioners to lay out a street as 
described in the article. 

Art 28. To see if the Town will buy a piano for the town 
hall. 

Voted, that the Selpctmen be instructed to place a piano in the 
town hall at an expense not exceeding fifty dollars. 



12 



Art. 29. To see what action the Town will take in regard to 
a heater for the town hall. 

Voted, that the Selectmen be instructed to repair the present 
heater. 

Art. 30. To see what action the Town will take in relation 
to the collection of taxes the present year. 

Voted, that the Collector charge interest at the rate of five per 
cent per annum on all taxes remaining unpaid after the first day of 
November next. 

Voted, to adjourn without day. 



i3 



State Election. 



Party designations : R. , Republican; D. , Democratic; P., Pro- 
hibition; S., Socialist; S. L. , Socialist Labor. 



Whole number of ballots cast 



Charles W. Bartlett, D. 
James F. Carey, S. , 
William H. Carroll, S. 
Curtis Guild, Jr., R., 
Willard O. Wylie, P., 
Blanks, 



Thomas F. Brennan, S. L. 
Eben S. Draper, R., 
Patrick Mahoney, S. , 
John H. Smith, P., 
Henry M. Whitney, D. , 
Blanks, 



Charles C. Hitchcock, S. 
Jonathan S. Lewis, P., 
Henry B. Little, D., 
William M. Olin, R., 
Moritz E. Ruther, S. L., 
Blanks, 



Prec. 1 


Prec. 2 


Prec. 3 


Total 


t, 119 


100 


128 


347 


Governor. 








41 


21 


30 


92 


























77 


76 


93 


246 





2 


2 


4 


1 


1 


3 


5 


ut. Governor. 




















75 


72 


85 


232 





1 


1 


2 





3 


3 


6 


42 


23 


34 


99 


2 


1 


5 


8 


Secretary. 








1 


1 





2 





1 


1 


2 


32 


12 


21 


65 


80 


82 


91 


253 














6 


4 


15 


25 



H 





Treasurer. 










Prec. l 


Prec. 2 


Prec. 3 


Total 


Christopher D. Albro, P., 





1 


1 


2 


David S. Brodeur, S., 














Arthur B. Ohapin, R., 


79 


79 


93 


251 


Joad Claudino, S. L., 


1 








1 


Daniel P. Doherty, D. , 


29 


15 


21 


65 


Blanks, 


10 
Auditor. 


5 


13 


28 


Patrick J. Ashe, D. t 


32 


14 


19 


65 


Herbert B. Griffin, P., 


1 


2 


2 


5 


E. 0. Fredrik Hansson, S. 


L., 1 





1 


2 


Ambrose Miles, S , 














Henry E. Turner, R., 


75 


76 


89 


240 


Blanks, 


10 


8 


17 


35 



Attorney General. 



Allen Coffin. P., 
Henry C. Hess, S. L. , 
John P. Leahy, D. , 
Dana M alone, R., 
John Weaver Sherman, S. 
Blanks, 



Alfred E. Cox, R., 
George W. Enwright, D. 
Wilbur R. Hatch, S., 
Blanks, 









2 


2 


1 


1 





2 


32 


18 


21 


71 


76 


73 


90 


239 


1 





1 


2 


9 


8 


14 


31 


Councillor. 








77 


79 


92 


248 


34 


13 


20 


67 


1 


1 





2 


7 


7 


16 


80 



Senator. 



Chester W. Clark, R. , 
Patrick J. O'Brien, D. , 
Blauks, 



*6 


83 


90 


259 


9 


13 


20 


62 


4 


4 


18 


26 



15 



Representative in General Court. 



Delette H. Hall, R., 
Gardner W. Prouty, D. , 
Blanks, 



Prec. 1 Prec. 2 

89 82 

27 15 

3 3 



County Commissioner. 



Prec. 3 Total 

119 290 

6 48 

3 9 



Frederick Bancroft, D. , 
Levi S. Gould, R. , 
Blanks, 



36 


17 


21 


74 


79 


80 


90 


249 


4 


3 


17 


24 



Register of Probate and Insolvency. 



Alfred Belanger, D. , 
William E. Rogers, R. 
Blanks, 



31 


16 


17 


64 


80 


80 


91 


251 


8 


4 


20 


32 



Vote lor Representative, 23d Middlesex District. 

Acton Ayer Littl'n Shirley Wes'd Total 

Delette H. Hall of Acton, R., H 1 .290 207 106 ^87 199 889 

Gardner W. Prouty of Littleton, D., 48 150 78 49 87 412 

Savillian W. Longley of Shirley, 3 3 

Blanks, 9 27 7 21 28 92 



847 384 191 160 314 1396 



i6 



Town Clerk's Report, 



BIRTHS. 



Whole number recorded, 


28 


Mixed parentage, 


6 


Males, 


15 


Foreign parentage, 


5 


Females, 


13 


Born in Acton, 


28 


Native parentage, 


17 


Both parents born in Acton, 


1 






One parent born in Acton, 


6 




MARRIAGES. 





Whole number recorded, 
Residents of Acton, 
Residents of other places, 



10 

8 

12 



DEATHS. 



Whole number recorded, 86 

Residents of Acton, 81 

Residents of other places, 5 

Occurring in Acton, 29 

Occurring in other places, 7 

Average age, 52.2 

Note — The Town Clerk requests information of any omission 
or error in the lists of births, marriages and deaths. 

The Town Clerk hereby gives notice that he is prepared to 
furnish blanks for the return of births and deaths. 



i7 



p 



W 

H 

CO 

O 

UJ 

« 

C/5 

K 
P 

(5 
S3 



ill* 

^ & "& J 



PL) 



"" J a 






*< « 

5 DC H 

g i-r © 

•T- © — i 



DC ,5 

a .— ■ 
► o 

CO C, 



.3 < 

-a S 

a - 

b3 . 

© © 



^ o 



C S 

H P « 

- "1 ■- 

£ *^ 

- - ~ 

- 1 s 

O - 

I- I -= 

fl ~ © 

< cq cq 



03 •— ^ 

Com 

, — - C3 'i-t N 

8 ^ 2 £ ' 

,2 W c3 fc 

Sh < 

*1 H s 

§ 3 r * g 

a £ a a 



5R ^ 
© — < 
a oa 



I § 
© g 

< s 






Dq 



.£ g .5 

a n£ S 

2 | 8 

■.*■■ 



a 
£ c C, 

s£« 

«d a g 



a a 

S3 © 

a :C 



- 



-~v DC 

© a 



51 

O r* 



. a . H 

^ M K r ; 



© 

a 

— . a 

1 *e 

5 o 

S 3d 



© ^ < 



9 a 



-a § a ^ -d t- 



.2 5 ~ 

a r-> ^ k 



3 - -r 



« C! K 



rrt 2 ^ 

a ^ *5 

s ,2 .a 

O a H n Q < 



a^ 

fli | -s 

O co Q 



o 
- . j S 

» b I a 

o ii 
c — 



EC O 



3 ^ 

fe § 00 

« ^ 5 

fe fe hS 



.11 

•i-a « 

— — -i 
© — -** 

£.^ 
a ^ -d 

3 fl 2 

1:3 03 S3 

I |1 

o a a 



C3 

© 
© ""C 



X ^ IT"! 



f- ^ ^H - © - 



w 



< EC 



p 

03 



!l i 



© 



1A *=> 
C © 

a l> -g a -S ^ i m .5 
2 *^ i3 -c .5 - p p a ^ 

-3^ 



a ^ 



O 2 ^ 



- = f s S 



© 

3 






3 ^fe 



W «S2S 



H O O 



fl 08 

Q 'J 



£• « 2 



— 5 
c a tc 

a © © z: 



© 03 

H a 
^3 - c 



a 

H © 

fc£Q 






- 9 

o .5 



f= ^ . ^ ^ S ^ S 



^3 -K ^ 



^= ^ 



O EC 



£j 5 13 3 2 ^ 



a ^ 
.3 o 

^ K CH SL. 



S O 03 - 



^.2 



g © 






>>^ a 



-^ jj • • k! ^ >» >» "S > 

^ -! « 03 p, ^ S? © Pi.O .« 5 o a a^ 



^ >» 



«i^(««CJ — O»O9r|liO©t-00 

S5 ^ ^ ^ ^ - - 



i8 



MARRIAGES REGISTERED IN 1905. 



No. Date Place Names 

1 Juue 28 Allen, Joseph A. 

Maynard Frazier, Mary J. 



2 Sept. 6 

Acton 

3 Aug. 2 
W. Acton 

4 May 10 

Hudson 

5 Oct. 21 

Concord 

6 Dec. 1 

Acton 

7 Mar. 22 

Concord 

8 June 1 
Maynard 

9 June 10 

Acton 

10 Oct. 10 
Medford 



Blois, Edwin G. 
Wood, Etta F. 

Boot, William 
Hansen, Rosetta 

Brigham, Edwari 
Coding, Cora Elizabeth 

Brown, Joseph R. 
Ring, Lena Ashton 

Fowler, Loring N. 
Cutier, Maiy Spaulding 

Guilford, George Morton 
Robinson, Ida 

Jones, Shirley E. 
Murphy, Catherine 

Kennedy, Duucan Stewart 
Green, Isabelle Louise 

Wotton, Henry Domingus 
Brabazon, Lina May 



Residences 

Maynard 
Acton 

Arlington 
Wohurn 

Lynn 
Lynn 

Acton 
Stow 

Acton 
Concord 

Concord 
Acton 

Acton 

Concord 

Acton 
Maynard 

Littleton 
Acton 

Acton 
Medford 



19 
DEATHS REGISTERED IN 1905- 

No. Date Names 

Beach, Mabel Ella (Burroughs) 

Billings, Susan Elizabeth 

Brooks, George 

Brown, Lottie, Irene (Lehy) 

Clark, Harriet (Emery) 

Clements, Gertrude F. 

Campbell, Lemabel 0. 

Connor, Walter C. 

Cutler, Elisha H. 

Davis, William Bradford 

Davis, Martha Parsons (Griffin) 

Fletcher, John 

Gallagher, Bridget (Keenan) 

Gray, Alice Fay 

Harrington, Mary Jane (Faulkner) 

Hoit, George Nelson 

Hunt, Paul Edwin 

Leighton, Lillian Frances (Crawford) 

McFarland, Annette (Zeiner) 

McCormick, Daniel 

Mead, Adelbert 

Merriam, Harry Irving 

Monckton, George 

Morrison, Julia Ann (Lewis) 

Moult on, Huldah 

Miner, Sumner Harlaud 

Reynolds, Joseph 

Richardson, Harriet Frances (Parker) 

Simonds, Calvin S. 

Shattuck, Clareuce Chapman 

Swallow, Hedley Yickers 

Tenney, Emma A. (Field) 

Tuttle, Clara Sophia (Fletcher) 

Waldrou, Catherine (O'Neil) 

Wetherbee, Daniel Jamps 60 10 3 

Wheeler, Berintha W. (Hood) 69 5 20 



1 


May 


14 


2 


July 


• 5 


3 


Feb. 


28 


4 


Jan. 


12 


5 


May 


2 


6 


Nov. 


14 


7 


Nov. 


26 


8 


Aug. 


6 


9 


Nov. 


29 


10 


Dec. 


13 


11 


Deo. 


31 


12 


Feb. 


25 


13 


Feb. 


22 


14 


Nov. 


11 


15 


Dec. 


27 


16 


Feb. 


6 


17 


July 


10 


18 


Jan 


8 


19 


Feb. 


16 


20 


Nov. 


5 


21 


Apr. 


6 


22 


May 


15 


23 


Aug. 


6 


24 


Sept. 


17 


25 


Feb. 


22 


26 


Aug. 


17 


27 


Jan. 


6 


28 


May 


7 


29 


Dec. 


13 


30 


Oct. 


1 5 


31 


May 


28 


32 


Aug. 


15 


33 


Juno 


8 


34 


Mar. 


1 


35 


Nov. 


26 


36 


Jan. 


5 





Ages 


Yrs 1 


vios 


Dys 


80 


9 


24 


39 


10 


1 


80 


4 


25 


25 


2 


11 


87 


4 


5 




2 


14 


26 






87 






81 


1 


17 


69 


6 


24 


77 


4 


14 


88 


10 


4 


80 




2 


74 


7 


9 


40 


6 


3 


55 


3 


7 


40 


8 


19 


27 


JO 




23 


10 




83 


2 


26 


9 


10 


15 


34 






79 






73 


7 







4 


12 


64 


2 


19 


72 


10 


3 


71 


6 


7 


34 


9 


15 


43 


4 


12 


46 


10 


28 


48 


8 


11 


80 


2 





20 



Non Resident Burials 





1870 














1 


Sent. 
1905 


21 


Burbsck, Thomas 


Racine, Wisconsin 


59 






a 


Mar. 


29 


Cutter, William Albert 


Wakefield 


'56 


3 


21 


8 


Apr. 


8 


Cunnnigham, A. Iiola 


Phoenix, Arizona 


28 






4 


June 


24 


Jones, Harrie P. 


Somerville 


22 


8 


14 


5 


Mar. 


5 


Pratt, Leonard V. 


Boston 




7 




6 


Jan. 


19 


Sawyer, George W. 


Tauiton 


83 


4 


11 


7 


Feb. 


28 


Sawyer, Grace A. 


Clinton 


24 


6 


25 


8 


May 


23 


Spinney, Ellen Myria 


Boston 


49 







21 



Persons Having Dogs Licensed in 1905. 



Chas. B. Boyce, 
J. Sterling Moore 
Frank Williams, 
Roy L. Duren, (2) 
George A. Hall, 
W. J. Webster, 
Wm. P. Merrill, 
Edmund Dow, 
Willinm Rawitzer, 
John H. Watkins, (2) 
William F. Watkins, 
George T. Weaver, 
Albert H. Perkins, 
Ellis Wetherbee, 
Carl E. Moore, 
Lizzie J. Brown, 
Henry Mekkelsen, 
Henry J. Stooss, 
John F. Goughlin, 
Charles A. Taylor, 
Charles H. Morris, 
John Downey, 
Cyrus G. Dole, 
Levi W. Perkins, 
Allen Hawes, 
John M. Stevenson, 
George E. Murphy, 
Eugene L. White, 
J. E. Durkee, 
W. B. Holt, 
Warren Jones, 
Est. of E. Jones, 
Herman A. Gould, 
Clarence B. Owen, 
Carlton C. Taylor, 



|2 00 


Frank J. Barker, 


'$5 00 


2 00 


Moses Taylor, 


2 00 


5 00 


Henry M. Smith, 


2 00 


10 00 


Abel Farrar, 


2 00 


2 00 


Eva C. Shapley, 


2 00 


2 00 


Joseph Gallant, 


2 00 


2 00 


A. L. Lawrence, 


2 00 


2 00 


H. Lewis Jones, 


2 00 


2 00 


Thomas J. Mannion, 


2 00 


4 00 


Nathaniel G. Brown* 


2 00 


2 00 


Charles M. Kimball, 


2 00 


2 00 


Fred. A Hollowell, 


2 00 


2 00 


L. C. Carberg, (2) 


4 00 


2 00 


Tuttle & Newton, 


2 00 


2 00 


Frank W. Hoit, 


2 00 


2 00 


L. H. Pinkham, 


2 00 


2 00 


Timothy A. Thompson, 


2 00 


2 00 


Luke Tuttle, 


2 00 


2 00 


Fred S. Whitcomb, 


2 00 


2 00 


James A. Grimes, 


2 00 


2 00 


J. Linwood Richardson, 


5 00 


2 00 


Solon A. Robbins, 


2 00 


2 00 


Luther Conant, 


2 00 


2 00 


Catherine Green, 


2 00 


2 00 


George A. Libby 


5 00 


5 00 


John Palmer, 


2 00 


2 00 


Thomas Devane, 


2 00 


2 00 


Frank H. Willard, 


5 00 


2 00 


Roy J. Grady, 


5 00 


2 00 


William Foster, (2), 


4 00 


5 00 


John M. Kelley, 


2 00 


2 00 


John Kennedy, 


2 00 


2 00 


Charles H. Clark, 


2 00 


5 00 


Edward Willis, (2), 


4 00 


6 00 


W. W. Hern, 


2 00 



22 



Almon L. Gilinore, 
Edwin T. Swift, 
Wendell Z Sanborn, 
G. R. Smith, 
Frank Pratt, 
Arthur S. Lanoue, 
Mrs. John Davis, 
Lester N. Fletcher, (2) 
I. S. Ford, 
N. J. Cole, (2) 
George W. Worsier, 
Margaret Coughlin, 
Mary Reynolds, 
George Laflamme, 
Francis S. Davis, 
Fred'k. D. Morrison, (2 
Joseph R. Brown, 
Edson Baird, 
George F. Laurey, 
William F. Kelley, 
Rob't. G. Reed, 
W. C. Coughlin, 
C. H. Schnair, 
Geo. F. Simonds, 
F. G. Smith, 
O. W. Penniman, 
Harding Bent, (2), 
William J. Moore, 

Whole nnrnber lioensedj 
1 17 at $2 each, 
24 at $5 each, 



5 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


4 


00 


5 


00 


7 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


4 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


% 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


7 


00 


2 


00 



Wm. S. Warren, 
Wendell F. Davis, 
Daniel H. Fariar, 
Abel Cole, 
W. C. Robbins, (2) 
Edward Anderson, 
Benjamin Pope, (6) 
Frank A. Pratt, 
Alfred J. Morse, 
T. C. Lothrop, (2) 
Michael G. Hayes, 
Madeline M. Ineson, 
Michael O'Connell, 
Wm. H. Swett. 
James Bent, 
Patrick O. Neil, 
Allen T. Gross, 
F. C. Cousseus, 
Michael Ennegupss, 
Albion Johnson. 
Elizabeth Taylor, 
Fred W. Gray, 
Moses A. Thompson, 
D. C. Harris, 
F R. Knowltou, 
Joseph W. Evans, 
Arthur C. Hard}', 



#234 00 
120 00 



2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 

4 00 
2 00 

21 00 
2 00 
2 00 
7 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 

5 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 

141 



Deduct fees, 14 1 lioenses at 20 cents eaoli 
Amount paid to County Treasurer, 



13.14 00 
2 8 20 



$3 2o 80 

HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Town Clerk. 



23 



Selectmen's Report, 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Paid A. L. Faxon, principal , $357 50 

Ruby M. Atwood, assistant, 162 50 

Walter B. Pierca, principal, 6 75 00 

Mary E. Bartlett, assistant, 337 50 

So. Acton Coal and Lumber Co., tools, 13 72 

A. W. Hall Scientific Co. , 37 03 

So. Acton Coal and Lumber Co., coal, 91 96 

G. C. Turner, janitor, 100 00 

Geo. C. Turner, wood, 8 15 

Geo. C. Turner, cleaning, 12 80 

$1,796 16 

Musical intruction, 56 25 

W. B. Pierce, incidentals, 3 09 

J. L. Hammett & Co., incidentals, 5 62 



$1,861 12 



SOUTH SCHOOL. 

Paid Martha Fagerstrom, $120 00 

Charlotte Canfield. 260 00 

Inez G. Kilton, 444 00 

Katherine B. Feeley, 406 00 

Geo. C. Turner, janitor, 100 00 



24 



Paid So. Acton Coal and Lumber Co., coal, $91 97 

Geo. O. Turner, oleaning, 12 80 

Geo. C. Turuer, wood, 8 15 

Geo. C. Turner, janitor grammar school, 47 50 

Geo. C. Turner, wood, grammar school, 1 50 
Geo. 0. Turner, cleaning grammar 

school, 8 65 



Musical instruction, 

Tuttle & Newton, incidentals, 

J. L. Hammett & Co. , incidentals, 



WEST SCHOOL. 

Paid Harriett H. Gardner, 
Emma Foster, 
Elizabeth Sheehau, 
Mabel J. Spa Iter, 
Edith L. Dexter, 
Karin Eknian, 
E. C. Parker & Co., coal, 
Thos. Soaulon, janitor, 
Thos. Soanlon, cleaning, 
Thos. Scaulon, carrying water, 
C. D. Wetherbee, wood, 
Hall Bros., wood, 
Wood Piano Co. , piano, 



Musical instruction, 

C H. Mead & Co. , incidentals, 

J. L. Hammett & Co. , incidentals, 



$1 


,500 


57 




56 


25 




2 


86 




5 


62 


$1 


,565 


30 



$456 00 




862 00 




220 00 




40 00 




50 00 




121 00 




95 40 




124 98 




2 6 00 




8 00 




16 50 




1 25 




80 00 




$1,601 


13 


56 


25 


] 


31 


•"> 


62 


$1,664 


31 





25 










CENTER SCHOOL. 










id Angie P. Main, 




$110 


00 






Minnie Gamble, 




260 


00 






Ella L. Miller, 




418 


00 






Martha F. Srrith, 




456 


00 






D. J. Wetherbee, coal, 




93 


44 






Asaph Parlin, janitor, 




133 


00 






Asaph Parlin, cleaning, 




18 


40 






Lulher Davis, wood, 




16 


50 


$1,505 










34 


Musical instruction, 








56 


25 


M. E. Taylor & Co., incidentals, 






2 


94 


J. L. Hammett & Co., i 


incidentals, 






5 

$1,570 


62 
15 



SCHOOL SUPPLIES. 



Paid J. L. Hammett & Co. , 
Rand, McNally & Co., 
E. E Babb & Co , 
Esterbiook Pen Co., 

B. F. Wood Music Co. , 
Atkinson, Mentzer & Grover, 
Educational Publishing Co., 
Houghton, Mifflin Co. , 

D. C. Heath & Co., 

A. W. Hall Scientific Co., 

C. Scribner & Sons, 
Langman, Green & Co., 
Ginn & Co., 
American Book Co., 
Lothrop Lee Slieppard Co., 
Allyn & Bacon, 

Silver, Buidett Co., 



|178 66 

3 48 

58 33 

6 40 

1 35 

2 75 
2 50 

24 62 

30 05 

21 60 

7 76 
7 90 

87 85 

2 3 08 

2 55 

1 67 

6 54 



26 



Paid G. P. Putnam, 

University Pub. Co. 
D. Appleton & Co. , 
Mrs. S. A. Weaver, 



A. W. Kay nor, express, 
A. L. Noyes, express, 
W. B. Pierce, express, 



$5 65 




66 




6 25 




1 50 






$481 15 


$13 J8 




1 1 60 




55 






$25 33 



$506 48 



PRINTING 



Paid News Publishing Co. , reports, 
News Pub. Co. , warrants, 
News Pub. Co., tree w T arden noticrs. 
News Pub. Co., notices, 
E. F. Worcester Press, poll tax lists, 
E. F. Worcester Press, warrants, 
E. F. Worcester Press, voters' lists, 
Brookside Printing Co., brown tail 

moth notices, 
Brookside Printing Co. , caucus notices, 
Brookside Printing Co., town meetings, 
Brookside Printing Co. , tree warden 

notices, 
Brookside Printing Co., graduation 

printing, 
Brookside Printing Co. , stationery, 
Brookside Printing Co. , school com- 
mittee, 
Brookside Printing Co., tree warden, 
Brookside Printing Co. , gypsy moth 
notices. 



$121 


80 


2 


75 


1 


60 


2 


10 


14 


00 


2 


75 


13 


00 


1 


10 


1 


10 


2 


5 



7 5 

50 
00 

20 
7 



3 65 



27 



Paid Brookside Printing Co., selectmen, 
Brookside Printing Co., school com 

mittee, 
Brookside Printing Co. , notices, 
H. S. Turner, School Committee, 
P. B. Murphy, Assessors' notii es, 
Wright & Potter Co., Assessors' 

notices, 



$4 50 

4 25 

1 00 

1 05 

2 00 

I 07 



$193 37 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Paid West Acton Dept. , allowance, 
South Acton Dept., allowance, 
Boston Coupling Co., 400 ft. hose, West, 
Boston Coupling Co. , repairs, West, 
Boston Coupling Co., spanners, West, 
National Mfg. Co., 2 pumrs, West, 
National Mfg. Co., repairs, West, 
Fred Green, McCarthy fire, 
Fred Green, watching fires, 
Fred Green, charging chemicals, 
H. K. Barnes, hose straps, West, 
H. K. Barnes, 1 coat, West, 
S. A. Guilford, repairs, West, 
H. T. Clark, repairs, West, 

B. S. Holt, Houghton fire, 
S. Toombs, Houghton fire, 
A. J. Morse, Houghton fire, 
E. L Miner, watching fire, 

D. Bezanson, watching fire, 

E. Morse, watching fire, 

F. Hawes, watching fire, 
Hall Bros. , freight, 

C. H. Mead, supplies, 

Solon A. Robbins, painting ladders, 
South , 



1117 


00 


117 


00 


180 


00 


1 


■72 


1 


00 


12 


24 


2 


56 


1 


50 


4 


70 


3 


00 


9 


00 


3 


25 


1 


50 




40 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


1 


25 


1 


25 


1 


25 


1 


25 




32 


3 


36 



7 57 



28 



Paid E. E. Miles, watching fire, 
E. L. Wheeler, watching fire, 
N. J. Cole, aoid and bottles, 
J. P. Brown, rep. engine, 
Tuttle & Newton, 2 lanterns, 
Tattle & Newton, soda, 
Tattle & Newton, team. 
Dan Farrar, care of East engine, 
Win. Kingsley, care of Center engine, 
Wm. Kingsley, expenses DeLord fire, 
Geo. Greenough, ase of horses, 
Wm. Livermore, ase of horses, 1902 

to date* 
Ben Ineson, DeLord fire, 
S. A. Neil, soda, 





40 


1 


00 


1 


80 


4 


95 


1 


66 


1 


08 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


75 


5 


90 


6 


00 





20 


2 


00 


2 


49 





SNOW BILLS. 




Paid Lester Fletcher, 




$24 78 


Thos. McCarthy, 




21 72 


A. Chri-tensen, 


• 


49 47 


W. H. Kingsley, 




5 25 



BROWN TAIL AND GYPSY MOTHS. 



Paid J. L. Richardson, labor, 
F. S. Davis, labor, 
N. G. Brown, labor, 
Lester Worden, labor, 
Moses A. Reed, labor and expenses, 
A. H. Perk in?*, labor and expenses, 



Received for private work, 



$52 5 35 



$10 1 22 



$10 00 




3 00 




12 75 




15 00 




26 50 




60 45 






$127 70 




$13 70 



2 9 
SUPPORT OF OUTSIDE POOR. 

Paid City of Fitchbnrg, aid furnished Mrs. 

Tom Randall, $23 00 

City of No. Adams, aid furnished 

Mrs. Gough, 141 50 

City of Somervile, aid furnished Mrs. 

J. Hill and family, 39 58 

City of Marlboro, aid furnished Mrs. 

Jennie Rickerby, 7 00 

City of Boston, aid furnished Clarence 

E. Dnsseault, 17 00 

City of Boston, aid furnished Chas. 

H. Kimball, 64 00 

Massachusetts School for Feeble 

Minded, care of Chas. Bradford, 71 96 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

hoard of Frank H. Harris, 7 1 4 

M. E. Taylor & Co., aid furnished 

Dan Daily, 4 61 

M. E. Taylor & Co., aid furnished 

Geo. H. Brooks, 107 56 

M. E. Taylor & Co., aid furnished 

Mrs. D. Galliger, 234 17 



SOLDIERS' AID. 



$717 52 



Paid M. E. Taylor & Co. , aid furnished 

Mary Whalen, $46 70 



3° 

MEMORIAL LIBRARY BOOKS. 

Paid W. B. Clark Co., $341 31 

N. J. Bartlett & Co. 10 94 

W. A. Wilde Co., 9 00 

Pilgrim Press, 12 96 

Philadelphia Book Store Co., 26 95 

W. H. Guild Co. 40 80 

W. D. Tuttle, 1 45 



MEMORIAL LIBRARY EXPENSES. 



Paid Arthur F. Davis, librarian, 
Aithur F. Davis, extra, 
S. H. Taylor, janitor, 
J. R. Wales, binding, 
Chas. Twitohell, carrying books, 
M. E. Taylor & Co. , supplies, 
D. J. Wetherbee, coal, 
D. J. Wetherbee, insurance, 
Mass. Reformatoiy, printing, 
4 Brookside Printing Co., printing, 
S. H. Taylor, cleaning, 
Geo. Greenough, wood, 
Dennison Mfg. Co. , labels, 
Wm. D. Tuttle, expenses and express, 



$101 


00 


10 


00 


133 


32 


32 


30 


52 


00 


23 


16 


39 


14 


66 


50 


5 


00 


1 


50 


1 


00 


5 


50 




57 


12 


85 



$443 41 



$483 84 



3i 
CEMETERY EXPENSES. 

Paid Julian Tuttle, labor, Woodlawn, $91 86 

N. G. Brown, labor, Woodlawn, 89 7 3 

Asaph Pari in, labor, Woodlawn, 21 57 

Moses A. Reed, loam, Woodlawn, 22 50 

W. H. Kingsley, teaming, 3 00 

H. T. Clark, labor, Mt. Hope, 38 50 

H. T. Clark, lumber and frt., Mt. Hope, 3 05 

Fred Green, labor, Mt. Hope, 11 35 

A. H. Perkins, labor, Mt. Hope, 130 86 

A. Batley & Son, plants, Mt. Hope, 13 98 
Hubbard and Arnold, nursery stook, 

Mt. Hope, 6 50 

Julian Tuttle, labor, North 4 50 

N. G. Brown, labor, North, 3 50 

Asaph Parlin, labor, North, 1 35 

A. Vanderhoof, rep. pump, 5 60 



INDIVIDUAL CARE OF LOTS. 

Paid Julian Tuttle, $85 60 

Julian Tuttle, plants and flowers, 30 56 

H. T. Clark, 19 50 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Paid Moses A. Reed, labor and expenses, $57 14 

Joslin & Mendum, legal services and 

expenses, 112 80 



$447 85 



$135 66 



$169 94 



32 



ENFORCEMENT OF LIQUOR LAWS. 



Paid A. S. Brartley, 
F. W. Hoit, 



$6 76 
8 00 



OLD HOME WEEK. 



$9 76 



Paid F. A. Merriam, band, 

French, Mitchell & Woodbury, crockery 

S. H. Taylor, cleaning, 

W. H. Kingsley, moving bandstand, 

J. S. Moore, 205 lbs. beef, 

Tuttle & Newton, 2 tubs, 

Geo. Gove, bread, 

E. F. Conanf, postage, tel. , etc, 

H. S. Greenough, labor and teaming, 

Brookside Printing Co., printing, 

C. H. Mead &Co. , sugar, 

J. F. Cook, paper and envelopes, 

Hall Bros., supplies, 

W. C. Robbins, team, 

A. L. Noyes, cooking meat, 

Hall Bros , team, 

Geo. Greenough, team, 

Chas. Edwards, team, 

Anson 0. Piper, team, 

Leroy Tice, team, 

A. H. Perkins, team, 

Tuttle & Newton, team, 

Concord Fruit Co. , fruit, 

Simon Bresth, use of stoves. 

Ed. Jewett, team, 

Boston Dairy Co. , butter and cheese, 



Reo'd. for crockery sold, 



$75 00 




34 83 




4 50 




2 00 




14 35 




1 80 




28 00 




13 39 




15 00 




4 15 




6 49 




5 25 




40 35 




6 00 




10 00 




6 00 




13 50 




5 00 




5 00 




6 00 




10 00 




1 00 




32 00 




2 00 




75 




21 95 






$364 31 




$20 00 



33 

STATE AID. 

Paid Mary Smith, 12 months, 
Maiy Whalen, 3 months, 
Mary A. Wood, 12 months, 
Addison B. Wheeler, 12 months, 
Susin A. Clough, 12 months, 
John Clark, 5 mouths, 
Aaron S. Fletcher, 12 months, 
Ephraim B. Fori ush, 12 months, 
Lydia Handley, 12 months, 
Mary I. Richardson. 12 months, 
Mary A. Parlin, 12 months, 
Emma Blood, 12 months, 
Walter O. Holden, 11 months, 
Isaiah Leach, 8 months, 



To be returned by state. 

SALARIES. 

Paid C. A. Durkee, auditor, $6 00 

H. E. Richardson, supt. schools, 480 00 

H. T Clark, bnrial agt. , 5 00 

Chas. J. Williams, oh. school committee, 83 00 

Horace F Tuttle, clerk school committee, 10 00 

Horace F. Tuttlp, town clerk, 30 

Horace F. Tuttle, registrar voters, 15 00 

David T. Kingsley, registrar voters. 12 00 

James McGreen, registrar voters, 12 00 

Sani'l. A. Guilford, registrar voters, 12 00 

E. Faulkner Conaut, assessor, 8") 00 

Wm. F. Kclle.v, assessor, 5 5 00 

D. J. Wetheibee, assessor, 5 5 00 

D. J. Wetheibee, school census, 15 00 

Win. F. Kelley, overseer of poor, 50 00 



■48 


00 


12 


00 


48 


00 


48 


00 


48 


00 


25 


00 


48 


00 


48 


00 


34 


00 


48 


00 


48 


00 


48 


00 


44 


00 


40 


00 




$587 00 



34 



J. Sterling Moore, overseer of poor, 
O. A. Know I ton, overseer of poor, 
Frank W. Hoit, ch. selectmen, 
Arthur M. Whitcomb, selectman, 
Lyman C. Taylor, selectman, 
J. K. W. Weiheibee, treasurer, 
James Kinsley, election officer, 

C. B. Stone, election officer, 
W. F. Kelley, election officer, 
A. B. Parker, election officer, 
H. F. Tuttle, election officer, 
Aaron Foster, election officpr, 

D. J. Wetherbee, election officer, 
L. C. Taylor, election officer, 

T. F. Newton, election officer, 
H. J. Hapgood, election officer, 
Abram Tnttle, election officer, 

E. F. Barker, election officer, 

H. E. dough, sealer of weights and 

measures, 
Geo. O. Turner, truant officer, 
Moses Reed, truant officer, 



ENFORCEMENT OF THE AUTO LAWS. 

Paid Pettingill & Andrus Co., eleotrical 

apparatus, $19 73 

Geo. W. Daniel, apparatus, 2 10 

So. Acton Coal and Lumber Co., wire, 2 44 

Tuttle & Newton, wire, 24 

A. S. Bradley, expenses ani labor, 59 79 

Moses A. Reed, expenses and labor, 34 50 

E. E. Miles, services, 19 00 

Fred Billings, services, 12 00 

$149 80 

Rec'd in fines, $143 57 



$25 


00 


20 


00 


100 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


100 


00 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


6 


00 


2 


00 


4 


00 




$1,812 00 



35 

LOANS AND INTEREST. 

Paid Ayer Nat. Bank, note, $3,000 00 

Ayer Nat. Bnnk, interest, 40 00 

J. K. W. Wetherbee note, 2,000 00 

J. K. Wetlurbee, interest, 39 33 

E. Jones E>t., interest, 80 00 

F. C. Hay ward, int on cemetery fund, 17 50 



RENTS. 

Paid A. L. Noyrs, school supply room, $10 00 

Universal ist Scciety, So. Acton election, 3 00 

Ella Hosmer, Central Hall for school, 125 00 



176 83 



$138 00 
REPAIRS ON TOWN BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 



Paid C. L. Chase & Son, oil for school 
floors, 

Geo. B. Crowley, rep. hall roof, Mon- 
ument, 

J. L. Hammett & Co., clock for 
Center school, 

American School Furniture Co., rep. 
desks 

Tuttlo & Newton, repairs for schools, 

Fred Green, cleaning vault W. eirj,in" 
lioue, 

C. H. Mead & Co. , repairs for schools, 

C. H Mead & Co , paint for West 
school liou=>e, 

So. Acton Coal and Lumber Co., lum- 
ber and repaiis, schools, 



$14 


50 


15 


00 


4 


13 


3 


75 


8 


46 


1 


00 


5 


62 


59 


06 




91 



2 


75 


1 


50 


3 


95 


50 


25 


13 


50 


40 


00 


6 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 



36 

Paid So. Aoton Coal and Lumber Co. , lum- 
ber Center school, $62 33 
So. Acton Coal and Lumber Co., lum- 
ber, So. school, 37 89 
A. Vanderhoof, rep. Center school 

pump, 
A. Meiriam Co., 1 stool, South school, 
E. Jones Est., repairs schools, 
American School Furniture Co., desks, 
American School Furniture Co , chairs, 
Geo. W. Daniels, repairing heater, hall, 
L. H. Pinkham, relettering monument, 
H. S. Gretnough, rep. trough South 

A., 
Geo. W. Daniels, rep. mower, 
Waldo Lapham, labor and stock, 

library, 24 25 

L. T. Fullonton, painting West school 

house, 
L. T. Fullonton, stock West school, 

C. H. Persons, tuning school pianos, 

D. Pratt & Son, 1 clock for So. schools, 
H. S. Greenough, rep. Center well, 

E. A. Phalen, labor and stook, Center 

school, 
A. Vauderhoof, rep. school furnaces, 
Tuttle & Newton, wax for hall floor, 
Hatch Experiment Station, testing water, 
L. H. Pinkham, painting library screens, 
Solon A. Robbins, labor and stock, 

So. school, 
Geo. W. Daniels, rep. school bells, 
E. A. Phalen, repairs So school, 
E. A. Phalen, repairs Center school, 
E. T. Rice, repairs school houses, 
E. T. Rice, repairs library heater, 



102 


09 


2 


00 


4 


00 


13 


50 


1 


50 


23 


93 


11 


82 




20 


6 


00 


1 


75 


7 


44 


1 


85 


26 


29 




60 


3 


96 


20 


50 



3 


00 


3 


00 


3 


95 


3 


06 


4 


54 


12 


80 


1 


00 




50 


2 


00 


4 


65 



37 



Paid L. T. Fullonton, kalsomining West 

school house, $3 5 00 

Chas. Twitohell, rep. West schools, 12 20 

J. L. Hammett & Co.,reslating black- 
boards, 64 86 

Moses Reed, cleaning Center school 
vault, 

E. W. Q nimby, rep. library table, 

Sam Jones, repairs engine house, 

Frank Priest, repairs West school, 

E. Jones Est. , repairs So. school, 
J. L. Hammett & Co., school furniture, 
Geo. W. Daniels, rep. at town hall, 
W. B. Pierce, lock, So. school, 
C. H. Persons, tuning piano, 
M. E. Taylor, rep. Center school, 
J. P. Brown, making drier, S. en- 
gine house, 10 79 

Road Dept. , repairing driveway, So. 

school, 
Road Dept., rep. West school grounds, 

F. W. Hoit, exp. on So. pump, 
Geo. E. Greeuough, mowing common, 
A. C. Piper, gravel for So. well, 
M. E. Taylor & Co , rope end sup- 
plies monument grinds, 6 46 

G. C Turner, repairs So. school and 

grounds, 42 50 

A. Parlin, repairs Center school and 

% grounds, 14 55 

T. Scanlon, repairs West school and 

grounds, 17 00 

Arthur Wayne, care of hall clock and 

trough, 
S. II. Taylor, rep. clock, library, 
S. H. Taylor, oare of hall clock, etc. 



12 


00 


15 


00 


1 


25 


2 


25 


2 


00 



26 


84 


1 


50 


51 


90 



$940 88 



38 



REPAIRS TO FLAG STAFF. 



Paid Wm. King«ley, erecting pole, 
J. M. Sheehan, irons, 
O. W. H. Moultou, new pole, 
L. II. Pinkham, painting, 
E. Jones Est. , flag, 



$32 


00 


1 


87 


18 


00 


5 


15 


14 


65 



SPECIAL WELL, WEST ACTON. 



$71 67 



Paid Dan Bench, cleaning well, 
Geo. H. Holt, 1 pump, 
Geo. H Holt, piping and labor, 
D. C. Harris, stone trough, 



$8 50 
18 00 
40 00 
70 00 



FARM REPAIRS. 



$136 50 



Geo. W. D:miels piping at farm, 

E. T. Rice, labor on engine, 

So. Acton Coal and Lumber Co., lumber 

and repairs, 
E. Jones Est., paper and border, 
E. A. Phalen, labor and exp. , 
E. A. Phalen, labor and stock, 
E. T. Rice, labor and stock, 
So. Acton Coal and Lumber Co., lumber, 
Geo. W. Daniels, repairs, 
L. H. Pink liana, paper and border, 



Total repairs, 





$9 


57 




7 


27 




15 


57 




o 


45 




7 


95 




33 


95 




3 


67 




28 


42 




3 


55 




3 


35 


11, 


,265 


80 



$116 75 



39 

ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

Paid Wm. H. Kingsley, expenses, $1,337 78 

Anson C. Piper, expenses, 1.562 6 2 

A. H. Perkins, 1,810 74 

Good Roads Machine Co. repairs, 276 86 

Tuttle & Newton, gasoline and sup- 
plies, 216 70 

So. Acton Coal and Lumber Co. , lum- 
ber aud supplies, 

F. J. Hastings & Co., tools, 

T. F. Parker, tools, 

J. P. Brown, blacksmithing, 

J. M. Sheelian, blacksmithing, 

S. A. Guilford, rep. wagon, 

A. S. Bradley, 1 grate, 

H. T. Clark, repairs, 

W. F. Hale, 1 grate, 

American Powder Mills, dynamite, 

Vestal Oil Co. , oil, 

H. S. Greenough, repairs, 

J. Breok & Sons, repairs, 

N. H. Tenney, repairs, 

E. T. Rice, 

Hall Bros., pnmping, bds. , etc., 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies, 

W. H. Kingsley, frt. and exp. , 

Rec'd. for use of pump, 
Broken stone, 

Labor, West and South school ground 
Street dust, 
From Augustin Conant, for repairing 

road near John McCarthy's, 175 13 

From Mrs. M. T. Taylor, grading 

driveway, 32 00 



19 


01 


3 


90 


4 


16 


27 


03 


15 


72 


13 


65 


3 


00 


3 


75 


4 


24 


13 


30 


12 


74 


3 


00 


5 


40 


113 


05 


1 


25 


19 


16 


5 


84 


12 


28 




* ^ A K 1 1 R 




$o, too io 


$6 


00 


8 


75 


27 


00 


4 


00 



52 88 



4 o 

SUPPORT OF POOR ON FARM. 

Paid Moses Thompson, labor, $350 04 

Clarence Shaw, labor, 30 00 

John Welch, labor, 22 00 

J. Bariows, labor, 2 76 

Jas. Russell, labor, 81 70 

Thos. Derabuo, labor, 71 88 

E. O. Parker & Co., grain, 212 63 

F. J. Hastings & Co., grain, 143 40 
M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies, 431 51 
J. S. Moore, meat, 99 (5 6 
W. E. Whitcomb, meat, 32 47 
M. G. Hayts, fish, 12 83 
A. D. Shaw, fish, 11 78 
Tnttle & Newton, supplies, 42 23 
C. H. Mead & Co., supplies, 113 58 
J. M. Shefhan, blacksmi thing, 31 42 
W. H. Lawrence, blai k?mithing, 3 45 
Moses Thompson, su pplies paid for, 2 80 
Rider, Erickson Co. , hot air engine, 12 5 00 
Jas. Devane, painting wagon, 15 00 
J. P. Brown, ironing wagon, 12 83 
F. J. Hastings, harrow, 15 50 
E. Jones E t. , refrigerator, 18 50 

E. Jones Est. , pr. pants, 100 

F. S. Whitcomb, repairs for mower, 4 25 
L. H. Tnttle, 50 bbls., 14 00 
F. C. Hartwell, bds., 20 00 
E. F. Conanfe, peaches, 1 00 
A. Johnson, rdging bds., 75 
A. D. Fesstnd n, 40 bbls., 13 20 

E. C. Parker & Co., coal, 4 45 
Sam'l. Toombs, 20 bbls., 5 8a 
Hall Bros., sawing, 16 5 

F. J. Livingston, soap, 3 00 
S. A. Guilfoid, rep. wagon, 1 25 



4i 



Paid A. H. Perkin*, pasturing cattle, $19 00 

W. P. Kelley, pork, 14 85 

Finney & Hoit, 1 pr. pants, 150 

J. S. Moore, employment office fee, 1 00 



$2,004 52 



TRANSPORTATION OF SCHOLARS. 



Paid W. S. Jonrs, 
W. M. French, 
Jtns. Mikkleson, 
Geo. Greenough, 



STREET LAMPS. 

Paid Fred Green, lighting, West, $192 00 

O. H. Mead &Co., supplies, 1905, 33 03 

Tnttle & Newton, supplies, 35 75 

Fred Green, repairs, 90 

E. T. Rice, repairs, 16 26 

Earl Hay ward, lighting, South, 24 35 

Karl Jones, lighting, 68 35 

Harold Simnnds, lighting, 68 35 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies, 123 37 

Karl Jones, repairs, 75 

Harold Phalen, lighting, Center, 80 00 

Harold Phalen, repairs, 2 80 

M. E. Taylor & Cn., supplies, 44 17 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies, 42 

E. W. Quimby, repairs, 1 50 

D. H. Farrar, lighting, East, 7 00 

Clias. Davis, lighting, 13 50 

Geo. Laurie, lighting, 40 00 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies, 23 34 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies, 8 06 



$75 00 




182 50 




532 00 




544 00 






$1,333 50 



42 



Paid L. D. White, lighting, North, $1 50 

Tattle & Newton, supplies, 3 36 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies, 3 73 
Tuttle & Newton, 8 gasoline lamps 

and fixtures, 232 18 

Blanchard & Gould, 9 poles, 22 50 

W. H. Kingsley, setting poles, 18 61 

J. P. Brown, aims for lamps, 12 7 5 

S. A. Guilford, work on irons, 2 50 

Blair Light Co., repairs and supplies, 4 65 

Finney & Hoit, supplies, 12 00 

D. C. Harris, maintaining 1 lamp, 4 00 

S. L. Richardson, maintaining 1 lamp, 4 00 

W. J. Webster, maintaining one lamp, 4 00 

Abel Farrar, maintaining 1 lamp, 4 00 

Chas. Wheeler, maintaining 1 lamp, 4 00 

Lyman Taylor, maintaining 1 lamp, 4 00 

H. W. B. Proctor, maintaining 1 lamp, 4 00 

I. F. Daren, maintaining one lamp, 4 00 

Chester Harris, maintaining 1 lamp, 4 00 

Frank Lothrop, maintaining one lamp, 4 00 

M. Tobin, maintaining one lamp, 4 00 
F. B. Lothrop, maintaining one lamp, 

1905, 4 00 

John D. Moulton, maintaining one lamp, 3 00 



$1,143 68 



MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS. 

Paid C. H. Mead & Co., tree guard, $1 50 

Thos. McCarthy, 2 guide stones, 3 20 

Geo. B. Parker, G. A. R. appropriation, 50 00 

Thorp & Martin, 1 order book, 8 25 

Thorp & Martin, 1 ledger, 5 75 

H. E. Richardson, postage and stationery, 10 00 

J. McDonald, graduation addres?, 15 00 



43 

Paid F. A. Merriam, music for graduation, $28 00 

O. J. Williams, postage, tel. etc., 9 50 

H. E. Richardson, postage, tel. etc., 10 84 

E. Jones Est., assessors' book, 3 75 

Wright & Potter Co., town clerk's book, 1 25 
Middlesex Registry of Deed, recording 

papers on So. Acton grade orossing, 6 00 
C. F. Young & Co. decorating publio 

buildings for old home week, 45 00 
J. D. Hoar, plans for town hall addi- 
tion, 6 00 
C. H. Persons, 1 piano for hall, 60 00 
Carrie Shapley, music for grRduation, 2 00 

E. F. Conant, postage, tel., etc., 3 25 
Jo*liu & Mendum, legal services, 100 00 
Joslin & Mendum, legal services park 

sys-tem, 15 00 

J. L. Hammett & Co., engrossing diplomas, 88 
Luther Davi*, wood for hall, 2 25, 

A. S. Bradley, constable expenses, 7 25 

F. W. Hoit, postage on gypsy moth 

notices, 10 6 

J. K. W. Wether bee, flowers for fu- 
neral of D. J. Wetherbee, 
S. H. Taylor, July 4, 
Moses A Reed, July 4, 

B. S. Holt, July 4, 
E. E. Miles, July 4, 
A. S. Bradley, Jnly 4, 
A. S. Bradle} 7 , cons' able expenses, 
A. H. Perkins, labor on ditch, W. A., 
A. H. Perkins, trimming trees, 
Thos< Scanlon, opening school house, 
Moses A Reed, iu-pection cattle, 
So. Acton Coal and Lumber Co. , coal 

for hall, 
Cohcord court, court fees, 



5 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


8 


85 


12 


03 


8 


75 


4 


62 


61 


37 


8 


97 


10 


88 



44 



Paid Tnttle & Newton, tree trimmers, 
Geo. W. Gregerson, collector's bond, 

E. Jones Est. , stationery for treas. , 
Jas. Kinsley, use of Hurley road, 

F. E. Tasker, M. D., returning 13 births, 

F. J. Barker, M. D. , returning ? biiths, 
S. A. Christie, M. D., returning 3 births, 

G. E. Titcomb, M. D. , returning 1 birth, 
I. L. Pickard, M. D. , returning 1 birth, 
T H. Grady, M. D., returning 1 birth, 
Dan'l. Goodnow, M. D. , returning 1 

death, 
F. P. Flagg, M. D., returning 1 birth, 
Jas. Kinsley, constable exp., 
Jas. McGreen, recount votes, 
Dave Kinsley, recount votes, 
Sam'l. Guilford, recount votes, 
H. F. Tuttle, recount votes, 
Lyman C. Taylor, postage, etc., 
F. W. Hoit, frt. and exp. , 
F. W. Hoit, telephone and postage, 

F. W. Hoit, car fares, etc. 

A. M. Whitcomb, postage, etc. 

G. C. Turner, opening rooms, 
Geo. C. Turner, extra labor, 

I. F. Duren, making returns of 21 

deaths, 
M. E. Taylor & Co., 4 pr. climbers, 
M. E. Taylor & Co., clippers, 
Moses A. Reed, trimming trees, 
Moses A. Reed, constable, exp., 
W. F. Kelley, postage, etc., 
Est. D. J. Wetherbee, postage and exp. , 
H. F. Tuttle, exp. Phoebe Wood case, 
H. F. Tuttle, collecting and recording 

28 births, 
H. F. Tuttle, recording 10 marriages, 



$4 


20 


10 


00 


2 


75 


8 


00 


3 


25 


1 


75 




75 




25 




25 




25 




25 




25 


8 


65 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


2 


00 


2 


15 


11 


85 


6 


98 


2 


90 


2 


00 


1 


25 


5 


25 


11 


00 


1 


80 


31 


10 


3 


72 


2 


60 


19 


21 


10 


00 


14 


00 


2 


00 



45 



Paid H. F. Tuttle, recording 3 5 deaths, 
H. F. Tuttle, postage, blanks, etc., 
H. F. Tuttle, copying plans, deeds 

and laying out cemetery lot*, 
A. S. Bradley, constable exp. , 
Geo. Greenougb, wood for town hall, 
E. G. Parker & Co. , 2 trimmers, 
Wm. Craig, police exp., 
J. K Wetlierbfe, postage, etc., 
M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies for hall, 



$7 


00 


15 


39 


16 


50 


2 


CO 


2 


75 


2 


00 


4 


05 


12 


83 


10 


52 



$782 64 



RECEIPTS FOR YEAR ENDING MAR. 12, 1906. 



Balanre due from Collector Mar. 12,1905, 


$2,688 65 


Balance doe from Treasurer, 


4,186 36 


Appropriation for : 




Memorial day, 


50 00 


Memorial library, 


600 00 


Roads and bridges, 


5,000 00 


Common schools, 


3,800 00 


High school, 


1,800 00 


School supplies, 


525 00 


Transportation of soholars, 


1,360 00 


Supt. of schools, 


480 00 


Street lamp?, 


1,000 00 


Addition for town hall, 


2,200 00 


Town charges, 


5,000 00 


Overlayings, 


387 02 


Raised for : 




State tax, 


2,400 00 


County tax, 


1,970 65 


Highway tax, 


132 81 


Received from : 




State Treas. , corporation tax, $2,552.60, 




less $14.27 refunded, 


2,538 33 



4 6 



State Treas., Nat. Bank tax, 

State Treas^, slate aid, 

State Treas. , income from school fund, 

State Treas., St. Railway tax, 

State Treas., inspection of animals, 

Temporary loans, • 

Supervision of schools, 

County Treas. , dog tax, 

Cemetery fund, 

City of Newbnryport, 

Town of Boxboro, tuition of H. Norris, 

Augustine Conant, for repairing road near 
house of John MoCarthy, 

Mrs. M. T. Taylor, grading driveway, 

H. F. Tuttle, lots sold in Woodlawn 
cemetery, 

H. T Clark, lots sold in Mt. Hope ceme- 
tery, 

Memorial Library, fines, 

Income from cemetery fund, 

Income from Library fund, 

Care of L. B. Goodnow lot, 

Board of health, 

Phoebe Wood, pension, 

Eli Gruber, license, 

Concord Court, flues, 

House of correction, fines, 

Concord Court, auto fines, 

Rent of town hall, and cellar, 

A. F. Blanchard, slaughter license, 

C. J. Williams, old school furniture, 

C. J. Williams, school supplies, 

Road Commissioners, use of pump, 

Road Commissioners, broken stone, 

Road Commissioners, labor, West sohool 
grounds, 



$638 


25 


630 


00 


1,026 


40 


45 


31 


27 


52 


5,000 


00 


375 


00 


320 


92 


1,000 


00 


104 


00 


4U 


00 


175 


13 


32 


00 



56 00 

36 00 

17 02 

81 90 

221 20 

6 40 

3 55 
27 20 

8 00 

60 00 

10 00 

143 57 

48 50 

1 00 

4 25 
3 75 
6 00 
8 75 

15 00 



47 



Road Commissioners, crushed stone, So. 

srhool grounds, 
Road Commissioners, street dust, 
Cash for removing brown tail moths from 

private property, 
Old Home Week Committee, 
Town Farm, milk, 
Town Farm, apples, 
Town Farm, calves, 
Town Farm, cows, 
Town Farm, eggs, 
Town Farm, potatoes, 
Town Farm, windmill, 
Town Farm, boarding child, 
Town Farm, use of horse, 
International Trnst Co., int?rest, 
F. W. Hoit, collector, interest, 1904 taxes, 
F. W. Hoit, collector interest, 1905 taxes, 



EXPENDITURES FOR YEAR ENDING MAR. 12, '06 

High school, $1,861 12 

South school, 1,565 30 

West school, 1,664 31 

Center school, 1,57 15 

School supplies, 506 6 8 

Transportation of scholars, 1,333 50 

Street lamps, 1,143 68 

Fire Dept., 525 35 

Printing, 193 37 

Support of poor, 2,004 52 

Support of outside poor, 717 52 

Snow bills, 101 22 

Brown tail and gypsy moth, 127 70 

Soldiers' aid, 46 70 



$12 


00 


4 


00 


13 


70 


20 


00 


882 


05 


415 


17 


18 


00 


28 


00 


19 


13 




90 


15 


00 


17 


50 


2 


70 


125 


89 


26 


76 


25 


74 




$47,917 98 



4 8 



Roads and bridges, 


$5,485 18 




Repairs on buildings and grounds, 


1,2(55 80 




Memorial Library, books, 


443 41 




Memorial Library, expenses, 


483 84 




Cemetery expenses, 


447 85 




Cemetery expenses, individual care, 


135 66 




Board 01 Health, 


169 94 




Enforcement liquor laws, 


9 76 




Old Home week, 


364 31 




State aid, 


587 00 




Salaries, 


1,312 00 




Loans and interest, 


5,176 83 




Auto timing expenses, 


149 80 




Misc. accts., 


782 64 




Rents, 


138 00 






$30,313 


14 


Paid state tax, 


$2,400 00 




Repairs on state highway, 


132 81 




County tax, 


1,970 65 






$34,816 


60 


Due from Collector, 


$3,056 69 




Due from Treasurer, 


10,044 69 





$47,917 98 
FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDING MAR. 12, '06. 



Due from Treasurer, 
Collector, 

State, inspection of animals, 
Stale, state aid, 
State, burial of soldiers, 
Interest on collected taxes, 



$10,044 69 

3,056 69 

30 68 

587 00 

140 00 

58 63 



$13,917 69 



49 

LIABILITIES. 

Cemetery fnnd, $4,000 00 

Cemetery fund, unexpended balance, 14 8 09 

Library fond, unexpended balance, 136 05 

E. Jones Est., note, 2,000 00 

E. Jones Est., int. on note, 68 00 



Balance in favor of the town, 



Acton, Mass., March 12, '06. 



$6,352 14 

$7,565 55 

FRANK W. HOIT, 
ARTHUR M. WHITCOMB, 
LYMAN C. TAYLOR, 

Selectmen. 



SO 



List of Jurors. 



The following names will bo presented at the annnal towu meet- 
ing March 26, 1906, to be plaoud in the jury box, subject to re- 
vision aud acceptance by the town. 

Herbert T. Clark, 



Franklin P. Wood, 
James Devaue, 
Alfred W. Flint, 
Lymjn C. Taylor, 
James Kinsley, 
John S. White, 
James B. Tattle, 
Alfred Godiug, 
Abram Tattle, 
Emery Lothrop, 
Waldo E. Whitcomb, 
George 0. Turner, 
Daniel H. Farrar, 
Sidney L. Richardson, 
Harry E. Clough 
Edward C. Wood, 
Edward F. Richardson, 
Hiram J. Hupgood, 
Thomas McCarthy, 
Fritz Hawes, 
Frauk S. Rice, 
Clark G. Durkee, 
Charles Edwards, 



Signed, 



Wheelwright 

Minister 

Paiuttr 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Manufacturer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Farmer 

Butcher 

Janitor 

Wheelwright 

Farmer 

Postina-ter 

R. R. Employe 

Farmer 

Retited 

Ouutra^tor 

Mechanic 

Minister 

Ct.rpenter 

Farmer 



FRANK W. HOIT, 
ARTHUR M. WHITCOMB, 
LYMAN C. TAYLOR, 

Selectmen of Acton. 



5i 



Treasurer's Report. 



1905 

Receipts. 
March 12, cash on hand, $4,186.36 

Received : 
From State Treasurer, corporation tax, 2,552.60 

State Treasurer, National Bank tax, 638.25 

State Treasurer, state aid, 630.00 

State Treasurer, income of Mass. sohool 

fund, 1,026.40 

State Treasurer, street railway tax, 45.31 

State Treasurer, compensation for inspec- 
tion of animals, 27.53 
Temporary loans, 5,000.00 
Supervision of schools, 375.00 
County Treasurer, L on account of dog 

licenses, 320.92 

Cemetery fund, 1,000.00 

City of Newburyport, for aid furnished 

Mary Whalen, 104.00 

Town of Boxboro, tuition of H. Norris, 

4 terms, 40.00 

Augustine Conant, for repairing road near 

the lionse of John McCaitliy, 175. 13 

Mrs. M. T. Taylor, for iepairing drive- 
way, 32.00 
Horace F. Tuttle, for lots sold in Wood- 
lawn cemejbery, 56.00 



52 



Herbert T. Clark, for lots sold in Mount 

Ho re cemetery, 36.00 

Memorial library, for fine?, 17.02 

Income of Cem< tery fund, 81.90 

Income of library fund, 221.20 
Cemetery Committee, cash refunded for 

care of Lewis B. Goodnow lot, 6.40 

Cash received from the board of health, 3.55 

Phebe P. Wood, pension, 27.20 

Ely Gruber, pedler's license, 8.00 
Middlesex Central Distiict Court, for auto 

fines, 143.57 

Middlesex Central District Court, for fines, 60.00 

Hcuse of Coirection, for fines, 10.00 

Rent of town hall and cellar, 48.50 
Arthur F. Blanchard, slaughter house 

license, 1.00 
Charles J. Williams, old school furniture 

sold, 4.25 

Charles J. Williams, sohool supplies sold, 3.75 

Road Commissioners, for use of pump, 6.00 

Road Commissioners, for broken stone sold, 8.75 
Road Commissioners, broken stone for 

West school ground, J 5. 00 
Road Commissioners, for repairing drive- 
way at South school grounds, 12.00 
Road Commissioners, for street dust sold, 4.00 
Cash received for removing brown tail 

moths on private land, 13.70 
Cash received from Old Home Week Com- 
mittee, 20.00 
For milk, sold from town farm, 882.05 
Apples, sold from town farm, 415.17 
Calves, sold from town farm, 18.00 
Cow 7 s, sold from town farm, 28.00 
Eggs, sold from town farm, 19. 13 
Potatoes, sold from town farm, 90 



53 



Windmill, sold from town farm, 15.00 

Board of child at town farm, 17.50 

Use of horse, 2.70 

International Trust Co., interest on depcsits, 125.89 
D. J. Wetherbee, collector, taxes for A. 

D. 1903, 120.32 

D. J. Wetherbee, collector, taxes for A. 

D. 1904, 1,450.76 

D. J. Wetherbee, collector, taxes for A. 

D. 1905, 20,922.75 

Frank W. Hoit, collector, taxes for A. D. 

1904, 442.49 

Interest on taxes, 1904, 26.76 

Frank W. Hoit, taxes for A. D. 1905. 3,401.12 

Interest on taxes, 1905, 25.74 



$44,875.56 



Expenditures. 



Paid state tax, 

On corporation tax, refunded, 
Repairs on state highway, 
County tax, 
On selectmen's orders, 
Cash on hand and in bank, 



$2,400.00 

14.27 

132.81 

1,970.65 

30,313.14 

10,044.69 



$44,875.56 

J. K. W. WETHERBEE, 

Treasurer of Acton. 



54 



Treasurer's Report of Money Held for Care of Lots in Cemt 

teries. 

1906 Dr. 



Maroh 12, to cash in North End Savings 

bank, 
To cash in Town treasury March 12, 1905, 
To cash received in 1905-1906, 
To unexpended balance March 12, 1905, 
To income for 1905-1906, 



Cr. 



By casli paid cemetery committee for care of 

lots, $135.66 

By cash paid F. O. Hayward, 17.50 

Principal of cemetery fund March 12, 1906, 6,175.00 
Balance of income unexpended, 14 8.09 



$2 


,175.00 




3, 


000 


00 




1 


,000. 


00 






91. 


99 






209. 


26 








$6,476. 


25 



$6,476.25 

J. I*. W. WETHERBEE, 

Treasurer of Acton. 



55 



Report of the Wilde Memorial Library. 

1906 Dr. 

March 12, to cash in North End Savings bank, $1,000.00 

Cash in Home Savings bank, 1,000.00 

Cash in Middlesex Institution for Savings, 1,000.00 

Cash in Warren Institution for Savings, 1,000.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings Bank, 1,000.00 
Mortgage bond of the West Shore Railroad Co., 1,000.00 

Cash received for fines, 17.02 

Cash received for interest on money in banks, 181.20 

Cash received for interest on railroad bond, 40.00 

Town appropriation for books, 200.00 

Unexpended balance March 12, 1905, 141.24 



$6,579.46 



Cr. 



By cash in banks, 


$5,000.00 


By Susan Augusta and Lnther Conant fund, 


1,000.00 


Paid for books and magazines : 




W. B. Clarke Co., 


341.31 


Philadelphia Book Store Co., 


26.95 


The Pilgrim Press, 


12.96 


N. J. Bartlett Co. , 


10.94 


W. H. Guild & Co., 


40.80 


W. A. Wilde Co., 


9.00 


W. D. Tattle, 


1.45 


Balance unexpended, 


136.05 



$6,579.46 

J. K. W. WETHERBEE, 

Treasurer of Acton. 



56 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



I have examined the accounts of the Selectmen and Treasurer of 
the town of Acton and to the best of my knowledge I find them cor- 
rect. W. E. WHITCOMB, Auditor. 

March 16, 1906. 



57 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



Valuation May 1, 1905: 

Real estate (buildings) $975,635 00 

Real estate, (land) 470,020 00 

Value of assessed personal estate, 332,695 00 



Total valuation, $1,778,350 00 

Valuation May 1, 1904, 1,697,930 00 



Gain, $80,420 00 

Rate of taxation 1905, $14.25 on a thousand. 

Tax assessed as follows: 

On real estate, $20,600 58 

Personal property, 4,740 90 

Polls, 1,364 00 



$26,705 48 



Amount of money raised: 

For state tax, 
State highway tax, 
County tax, 
Town purposes, 
Overlayings, 



$2,400 00 




132 81 




1,970 65 




21,815 00 




387 02 






$26,705 48 



58 

Number of individuals assessed on property, 408 

All others, 72 

Number of individuals (non-resident) assessed on property, 110 

All others, 27 

Number of persons assessed for poll tax only, 373 

Number of horses assessed, 444 

Number of cows assessed, r 1045 

Number of sheep assessed, 9 

Number of neat cattle other than cows assessed, 176 

Number of swine assessed, 28 

Number of fowls assessed, 52G 

Number of houses assessed, 5145 

E. FAULKNER CONANT, 

WM. F. KELLY, 

*D. JAMES WETHERBEE, 

Assessors of Acton. 
♦Deceased. 



59 



REPORT OF THE OLD HOME WEEK COMMITTEE. 



The Committee of Fifteen, to whom the town intrusted the prepa- 
ration and management of the Old Home Week commencing July 
17th, held numerous meetings which were well attended, and as 
far as possible every effort was made to insure a successful cele- 
bration. Some seven hundred invitations were sent to natives of 
Acton and to former residents, some of which did not reach the per- 
sons to whom they were sent because the committee could not as- 
certain the street and number where the parties lived, but enough 
accepted the invitation to make the occasion a complete success. 

The invitations were as follows: 

The one hundred and seventieth anniversary of the incorporation 
of the Town of Acton, Mass., will be celebrated from the 17th to the 
23rd of July, inclusive. 

You are cordially invited to be present during this "Old Home 
Week," and on Friday be the guest of the town. 

Come and meet old friends, renew former associations, and visit 
again the old scenes. 

Please inform one of the secretaries if you can come. 

Committee — Luther Conant, Chairman; Rev. F. P. Wood, Secre- 
tary; E. F. Conant, Assistant Secretary; Ceo. C Wright, F. B. Loth- 
rop, A. C. Piper, F. S. White, Rev. F. S. Rice, S. A. Guilford, A. F. 
Blanchard, E. F. Richardson, D. F. Wetherbee, F. R. Knowlton, E. 
H. Hall, Aug. Hosmer. July 1, 1905. 

The sub-committee to whcm was left the duty of obtaining speak- 
ers and other entertainment for the afternoon of July 21st sent the 
first invitation to Governor Douglas, who courteously declined; also 



6o 

invitations were sent to Lieut.-Gov. Guild, Attorney-General Herbert 
Parker, Hon. Henry L. Parker of Worcester, Rev. F. B. Noyes of 
Scituate, District Attorney Geo. A. Sanderson, Mayor Sidney But- 
trick of Melrose and others, which were accepted. We were cer- 
tainly fortunate in securing the presence of such a galaxy of bright 
rising young men. 

The Acton Band furnished excellent music and our own soloists, 
Miss L.izzie Taylor and Miss Genie E. Fletcher, contributed their 
share to the enjoyment of the day. 

The beautiful weather favored us and the attendance was all that 
could be asked for. When the preparations were almost completed 
the question arose, how could our own people get to the centre vil- 
lage to take part in the exercises. 

An order to permit all to come, the committee with the consent 
of the selectmen, arranged to furnish free transportation to our 
own people as well as to visitors. In transporting and entertaining 
stranger and friend alike, the town maintained its well established 
reputation of proffering the old-time hospitality. 

Situated as we are, three small towns in one, not the least ad- 
vantage was in getting those who now reside in the different parts 
of the town together for one day. Gur people all responded, as 
they always do, in providing an ample supply of edibles. It was es- 
timated that over a thousand enjoyed the collation and several hun- 
dred more could have been taken care of. Mr. George C. Wright 
added to the many obligations for which the town is indebted to 
him by giving an unlimited supply of his best coffee. 

The chairman, whose duties were largely confined to presiding 
at the meetings, feels at liberty to say that he never acted with 
a committee who worked so hard and so well to make the occasion 
(as it was) a magnificent success. 

Those natives of Acton who went beyond her borders to seek 
other fields of usefulness in the days of the long ago, returned with 
a flood of delightful memories and associations to their early homes — 
homes consecrated by self-denial, by labor, love and loyalty and every 
motive and sentiment that is good and right. It is our belief that 



6i 

the same characteristics in the main control the homes of the Acton 
of today. And we would add that then and now that all these homes 
are of a character in which the fibre of manliness is created that 
forms the best basis for success in later life. 

Religious observances on the common, Sunday afternoon, July 
23rd, closed the celebration of "Old Home Week" in Acton. A large 
number were present, the choirs of all the churches in town furnish- 
ing the music and all our resident clergymen participated in the 
exercises which closed with the singing of the national anthem. 



62 



Report of Road Commissioners. 



Receipts. 



Appropriation repairing roads and bridges, $5,000.00 
Received of Augustine Conant fnr grading 

bill near house of J. McCarthy, 175 13 

Mrs. Taylor, driveway 32.00 

Broken stone, 8 75 

Use of jjuinp, 6.00 

Street dirt, 4.00 
School Dept., repairing driveway to 

So. school, 12.00 
School Dept , 1 loads crushed stone, 

West school, 15.00 

15,252.88 

Expenditures, $5,485.18 

Inventory of Tools on Hand March 12, 1906. 

Crushing plant, $1,700.00 

One truck, 100.00 

One iion roller, 280.00 

One snow roller, 100.00 

One scraper, 6.00 

Two roa<i n achines, 160.00 

One sewer pump, 50.00 

One plow 30.00 



63 

Small tools, 18.00 

Watering cart, 330.00 



12,774.00 

We wish to call your attention to the road from the Center to 
the state road at East Aoton. The large amount of heavy teaming 
on this road has worn oat the top that was pnt on some years 
ago, and it is now in need of repair, and as it does not seem prac- 
ticable to spend a few hundred djllars to make temporary 
repairs, we recommend that a sufficient sum be appropriated to 
cover it with crashed stone. 

Our citizens are alive to the advantages of good roads as shown 
by their generosity in giving stone and the use of land for crushing 
purposes. One gentleman not only offers to give a nice lot of 
stone but also fifty dollars if vse would set the ciusher on his 
land. Mr. A. Conant who so generously paid for grading the hill 
last fall, offers to furnish money to grade schoolhouse hill, which 
is near the one graded last fall, if the town will cover that part 
of the road with cru-hed stone. 

We are pleased to report the crushing plant in first class condi- 
tion and able to continue its good work. We recommend that 
$5,000.00 be raised for the repair of roads and bridges. 

WM. H. KINGSLEY. 
ANSON C. PIPER, 
A. H. PERKINS, 

Road Commissioners. 



6 4 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH, 
Town of Acton for Year 1905. 



The Board of Health submits the following as its report for the 
year ending March 1, 1906: 

The number of deaths occurring in the Town during the year end- 
ing December 31, 1905, was 29. 

The number of contagious diseases reported to this Board since 
January 1, 1905, to March 1, 1906, are as follows: 

Disease. No. of Cases. 

Small Pox, 

Diphtheria, 

Scarlet Fever, 

Typhoid Fever, 1 

Measles, 5 

Cerebro-spinal meningitis, 

Total for 14 months, 6 

The past year has been one of exceptional freedom from all forms 
of contagious diseases in the town, a fact upon which our citizens 
may be congratulated. 

The Board notes with satisfaction the interest manifested and the 
hearty cc-operation by the citizens in our efforts to improve the 
sanitary conditions in our town. 

This Board respectfully ask that the sum of $100 may be appro- 
priated for its use the ensuing year. 

F. J. BARKER, M. D., 

C. J. WILLIAMS, 

F. E. TASKER, M. D. 



6 5 



Report of Overseers of Poor. 



Inventory of Stock and Provisions on Hand March 1, 1906. 

11 cows, $550.00 

2 calves, 20.00 

3 heifers, 70 00 
13 tons hay, 221.00 
2 hoises, 300.00 
Double harness, 20.00 
Light harness, 10.00 
Express harness, 18 00 
Horse collars, 7. 00 
Express wagon, 85.00 
Hay wagon, 25.00 
Word wagon and rack, 110.00 

2 sleds, 80 00 
Farming tools, 2 5 00 
Grain, 15.00 
Cora on ear, 10. 00 
1 two-hoTse cart, 25.00 
Stone drag, 1.0 
Horsfl rake, 7 00 

3 harrows, 2 7 00 
1 iron collar, 1.25 
Cultivator, 4.00 
7 ladders, 12 00 
Wheel barrow, 3 00 
Hay cutter, 2.00 
Hay fork, 20.00 



66 



Plows, 14.00 

Koller, 4.00 

Sail oloth, 1.00 

Feed trough, 2 00 

Bq. boxes, 2.00 

Pnng, 5.00 

Democrat wagou, 35.00 

Baskets, 1.50 

Apple barrels, 5.00 

Watering trough, 5.00 

Mowing maohine, 35.00 

Grindstone, 4.00 

Spray pump, 8.00 

Wood out for stove, 75.00 

Cord wood, 35.00 

Saws, 3.00 

Carpenter tools, 6.00 

Wagon jai k, 1.50 

Saw clamp, 1.00 

Ladder hook, 60 

Set of measures, 1.00 

Salt, 50 

Lumber, 15.00 

Bbl. header, 1.00 

Snow shovel, 50 

Wrench, 75 

35 tuns, 26.25 

32 bu. potatoes, 24. OX) 

Soft soap, 3 00 

Pork and barrel, 16.00 

Apples, 5.00 

Washing machine, 5.00 

Horse blanket, 5.00 

Range and waler front, 20.00 

Lounge, 2.00 

3 rockers, 3.00 

2 lanterns, 1.00 



6 7 



2 razors, 2.00 

2 axes, 1. 50 

Lamps, 2.50 

Snap, 30 

Molasses, 25 

Laid, 1.50 

Spices, 50 

Butter, 3.50 

Flour. 4.00 

Sugar, 1.25 

Crackers, 25 

Fruit jars, 3.50 

Broctns, 50 

Crockery and tinware, 8.00 

Tea and coffee, 60 

Oil and tank, 1.25 

Pails and tubs, 3.00 

Tiee pruner, 1.00 

Plow point, 5 

4 stoves, 20.00 

2 cabinet chairs, 2.00 

3 tables, 5.50 
220 cakes ice, 25.00 
Chamber set, 12.00 
Air cu-hion, 1.00 
Bed and bedding, 71.00 
Bed-pan, 3.00 
Traps, 50 
Tmnks, 2.00 
Wheel chair, 22.00 
2 clocks, 6.00 
Cereals, 1.25 
Bread mixer, 2.00 
Clothes line, 75 
8 chairs, 4.00 
Refrigerator, 18.00 
Ice tougs, 50 



68 

Pump, 125.00 

Canned fruit, 5.00 

Inventory, Mar. 1, 1906, $2,403.25 

Reo?ii)ts from farm, $1,347.75 

Due for milk, 56.00 

Due for teaming, 2.00 

Victualiziug 135 tramps, 33.75 

$1,439.50 



$3,842.75 
Expenditures, $2,004.52 

Interest on farm , 1 05. 00 

Inventory Maroh 1905, 2,248.35 

$4,357.87 

3,842.75 

$515.12 
Deduct amt. of 1905 unpaid bills, 139.00 

Cost of supporting poor on farm, $376. 12 

Inmates at Farm During Year. 

Lncy Hapgood 12 mo., Wm. Quinlan 12 mo., Susan Fisk 10 mo. 

Support of Poor on Farm. 

Paid Moses Thompson, salary, $350.04 

John Walsh, labor, 22.00 

John Barrow, 2.7 6 

Thos. Dembin, 71.88 

Jas. Russell, 81.70 

J. S. Moore, provisions, 99.66 

W. E. Whitoomb, provisions, 32.47 

M. G. Hayes, fish, 12.83 



69 



A. D. Shaw, fish, 11.78 

M. E. Taylor, groceries, 335 34 

Tutfcle & Newton, groceries, 42.23 

C. H. Mead, groceries, 113.58 

E. C. Parker & Co., grain, 217.08 

F. J. Hastings & Co , grain, 158.90 
Elnathan Jones, refrigerator, 18.50 
Jas. Devane, painting ex wagon, 15.00 
W. H. Lawrence, iron work, 3.45 
J. M. Sheehan, iron and horseshoeing, 13.03 
J. M. Sheehan, iron and horseshoeing, 13.48 
J. M. Sheehan, iron and horseshoeing, 4.91 
Rider Ericson Engine Co. pump, 125.00 
Moses Thompson, 2 bu. turnips, 1.00 

20 cabbages. 1.00 

Sawdust, 20 

Care of cans, 60 

J. S. Moore, emp office fee. 1.00 

Elnathan Jones, 1 pr. pants, 1.00 

L. H. Tuitle, 50 empty barrels, 14 00 

Sam'l. Toombs, 20 empty barrels, 5.80 

O. B. Fessenden. empty barrels, 13 20 

Fred Whitcomb, 1 pole and yoke, 3.00 

1 bx. section and rivet, 1.25 
F. C. Hartwell, 1,000 ft. matched boards, 20.00 

E. F. Conant, peaches, 1.00 

Sam'l. Guilford, rep Democrat and chain, 1.25 

Hall Bros , sawing wood, 16.50 

A. A. John on, edgin * boards, 75 

E. J Livingstou, soap, 3 00 

A. H Peikius, pasturing 5 heifers, 15 00 

Pastutingone 2-yr. old, 4.00 

W. F. Kelley, 198 pork, 14.85 

Finney & Hoit, 1 pr. }iant, 1.50 
Clarence Shaw, labor, (not rerorted 1905), 30.00 
J. P. Brown, iron work on ex. wagon, 

nor repo ted 1905, 12 83 
M. E. Taylor, groceries, not reported 1905, 96. 17 



$2,004.52 



7° 

Aid Outside Poor. 

Paid City of No. Adams, Mass , aid furnished 

Mrs. Johu Gough and family, $141.50 

City of Boston, Mass., aid furnished Mrs. 

Rebecca Randall, 23.00 

Mass. State Hospital, board furnished 

Frank Harris, 7.14 

Mass. School for Feeble Minded, board and 

med. attendance furnished Chas. 

Bradford, 71.96 

City of Somerville, Mass., aid furnished 

Mrs. Jas. Hill and family, 11.75 

City of Boston, Mass , med. aid furnished 

Clarence E. Dusseault, 17.00 

City of Boston, Mass., med. aid furnished 

Chas. H. Kimball, 64.00 

City of Marlboro, Mass. , board and med. 

aid furnished Jennie Rickaby, 7.00 

M. E. Taylor, aid furnished Mrs. D. 

Gallagher and family, 181.60 

M. E. Taylor, aid furnished Geo. H. Brooks, 107.56 
M. E. Taylor, aid furnished Dun Daley 

and family, not reported 1905, 4.61 

M. E. Taylor, aid furnished Mrs. D. 

Gallagher, not repotted 1905, 52.57 

City of Cambridge, Mass. , aid furnished 

Mrs. Jas. Hill and family, 27.83 



$717.52. 



7< 



REPORT OF THE TREE WARDEN. 



To the Citizens of Acton: 

The work of this department during the past year has been great- 
ly extended and its expenses increased very considerably because 
of the advent of the brown-tail moth whose nests were first found 
in numbers in this town in the spring of 1905. At the annual town 
meeting in March, 1905, the sum of $150 was appropriated for the 
purpose of destroying these insects upon the public trees. 

The severe winter of 1904-05 and the following late spring de- 
tained the caterpillars in their nests until late in April thus per- 
mitting the work of destroying the nests to be carried on for a con- 
siderable time after the funds required for such destruction became 
available. In the early weeks of April the trees within the limits 
of the highways and public places and grounds were carefully ex- 
amined and all nests of these moths were cut off and burned. The 
greater number of the nests were found in rhe west, south and 
southeast parts of town. 

At the same time that this public work was being carried on 
private owners of orchards and village property were generally in- 
terested and active in destroying the moth nests and to such an 
extent that during the summer a careful and continued searching of 
the wayside, orchard and other trees failed to reveal any indications 
of the presence of the brown-tail moth caterpillar. 

When the leaves fell in the late autumn, however, the nests of 
these caterpillars were found to be present in far greater num- 
bers than in the preceding spring. In the opinion of the writer 
this fact was due to the inroads of moths from infected districts 



72 

during the moth flying season,. late July and early August, and not 
to the increase of those insects which had already found lodgement 
in the town. 

During the summer the state officials, under the direction of Mr. 
A. H. Kirkland, who had been appointed state superintendent for 
the suppression of the gypsy and brown-tail moths under the act 
of the legislature of 1905, assumed charge of the work of destroying 
the nests of both these insects and, acting under the same legisla- 
tion, the board of selectmen on August 9th, appointed the tree 
warden local superintendent of gypsy and brown-tail moth work. 

On November 1st, 19C5, the beard of selectmen issued an order 
to all property owners to destroy the moth nests upon their prem- 
ises before December 31st of that year. A very large proportion of 
such owners complied promptly with the order and several of them 
requested that the nests on their lands might be destroyed by the 
force employed by the town at, of course, the owner's expense. These 
requests have been in all cases 1 complied with and the work has 
been charged to these owners at its actual cost. 

I regret, however, to be obliged to say that a certain number of 
our citizens have neglected to' comply with this order and conse- 
quently the town will presently enter ur.cn their lands and destroy 
the nests found there and collect the cost of the work through the 
office of the assessors of taxes. 

In November, road maps of the town having been procured from 
the office of the state superintendent, the town was divided into 
two districts and two sets of men under the direction of deputy 
wardens Moses A. Reed and Albert H. Perkins, began the work of 
clearing the town trees of the brown-tail moth nests. This work 
was continued through November and December with the result 
that 4027 nests were removed from the public trees and property 
destroyed. 

During the fall months the state inspectors made a careful ex- 
amination of the town in a search for the nests of the g; p y 
moth. The nests were found in four localities, as follows: 



73 

Several nests of 1904 in the orchard of Mr. Asaph Parlin at the 

Center. 

A single nest in the orchard of Mr. Crcoke on the turnpike. 

A colony of eleven nests on an apple tree in the yard of Mr. Moul- 
ton on the turnpike. 

A single nest on property of Mr. Manley near the Stow line. 

All, nests discovered were destroyed with creosote. 

The colony planted in 1904 in the orchard of Mr. Parlin has not 
propagated and has evidently been destroyed by birds, probably by 
Baltimore orioles which nest in numbers in the vicinity. 

The other colonies mentioned will require close attention and ob- 
servation during the present spring in order to prevent further 
infection. 

The receipts and expenditures on account of destruction of brown- 
tail moth nests on the public trees during the season of 1905 have 
been as follows: 

RECEIPTS. 

From town appropriation $150 00 

EXPENDITURES. 



Tools 

Labor and teams 

Advertising 



$19 00 






128 


45 






1 


GO 






$149 


C5 




13 


70 


$135 








35 



Credit by receipts for work on private lands 



Balance unexpended $14 65 

The tools charged to this year's appropriation will, of course, be 
of service for many years. 



74 

An appropriation of $200.00 is recommended for the purpose of 
moth destruction the coming year. Under the laws of 1905 the town 
may be called upon to expend for the destruction of brown-tail and 
gypsy moths in the year 1908 the sum, of $679.17. 

The writer desires to call the attention of citizens to Bulletin No. 
1, published by the state, and treating of these moths and methods 
of destroying them. Copies may be obtained upon application to 
A. H. Kirkland, state superintendent of moth work, No. 6 Beacon 
street, Boston, or of the local superintendent. 

Below is given a list of birds known to feed upon the brown-tail 
moth in any of its stages: 

Yellow-billed cuckoo. Red-eyed vireo. 

Black-billed cuckoo. Yellow-throated vireo. 

Kingbird. Black-and-white warbler. 

Bluejay. American redstart. 

Baltimore oriole. Chickadee. 

Rose-breasted grosbeak. American robin. 

Indigo bird. Chestnut-sided warbler. 

Scarlet tanager. English sparrow. 

The most formidable enemy of the mature moths is the English 
sparrow. 

Although the laws relating to the protection of shade trees have 
been annually published in this report for several years a number 
of our citizens appear to be unaware of the fact that the old "spiked 
tree law" so-called, has been repealed and that under the law now 
in force all trees within the limits of any public way or place are 
public shade trees belonging to the town for its use and benefit 
until such use and benefit is relinquished in writing by the town 
through its agent, the tree warden. 

Any growth measuring one inch in diameter at the butt is a tree 
within tbe meaning of the statute. 

CHARLES J. WILLIAMS, 

Tree Warden. 



75 

NOTE — Upon application to the tree warden, or to a deputy 
tree warden by persons desiring to cut trees growing within the 
limits of a public way along their lands and outside of village 
limits, such trees as the Town desires to permanently retain will 
be marked, and a permit given to cut the remainder. 



Revised Laws. 



CHAPTER 53. 

Section 12. The tree warden may appoint and remove deputy tree 
wardens. He and they shall receive such compensation as the town 
determines, or, in default thereof, as the selectmen allow. He shall 
have the care and control of all public shade trees in the town, ex- 
cept those in public parks or open places under the jurisdiction of 
the park commissioners, and of those, if so requested in writing by 
the park commissioners, and shall enforce all the provisions of law 
for the preservation of such trees. He shall expend all money ap- 
propriated for the setting out and maintenance of such trees. Regu- 
lations for their care and preservation made by him, approved by 
the selectmen and posted in two or more public places, imposing 
fines and forfeitures of not more than twenty dollars in any one 
case, shall have the force and effect of town by-laws. All shade 
trees within the limits of a public way shall be public shade trees. 

Section 13. Public shade trees outside the residential part of a 
town, as determined by the selectmen, shall not be cut or removed, 
in whole or in part, except by the tree warden or his deputy or 
by a person holding a license so to do from the tree warden. Public 
shade trees within said residential part shall not be cut, except for 
trimming by the tree warden, nor shall they be removed by the tree 
warden or his deputy or other person without a public hearing at a 
suitable time and place, after notice thereof posted in two or more 
public places in the town and upon the tree and after authority 



7 6 



granted by the tree warden therefor. Whoever violates the pro- 
visions of this section shall forfeit not less than five nor more than 
one hundred dollars to the use of the town. 

CHAPTER 208. 

Section 102. Whoever wantonly injures, defaces or destroys an 
ornamental or shade tree in a public way or place, or negligently 
or wilfully suffers an animal, driven by or for him or belonging to 
him and lawfully in a public way or place, to injure, deface or de- 
stroy such tree, or whoever, by any other means, negligently or wil- 
fully injures, defaces or destroys such tree, shall forfeit not less than 
five nor more than one hundred dollars, one-half to the use of the 
complainant and one-half to the use of the city or town in which 
said act is committed; and shall in addition thereto be liable to said 
city or town or other person interested in said tree for all damages 
caused by said act. 

Section 103. Whoever negligently or wilfully suffers an animal, 
driven by or for him or belonging to him and lawfully on the high- 
way, to injure, deface or destroy a tree which is not his own, stand- 
ing for use or ornament on the highway, or whoever, by any other 
means, negligently or wilfully defaces or destroys such tree, shall 
forfeit not less than five nor more than one hundred dollars, one- 
half to the use of the complainant and one-half to the use of the 
city or town in which said act is committed; and shall in addition 
thereto be liable in damages to the owners or tenant of the land in 
front of which the tree stands. 

Section 104. Whoever affixes to a tree in a public way or place 
a playbill, picture, announcement, notice, advertisement or other 
thing, whether in writing or otherwise, or cuts, paints or marks 
such tree except for the purpose of protecting it, and under a writ- 
ten permit from the officers having the charge of such trees in a 
city or from the tree warden in a town, shall be punished by a fine 
of not more than fifty dollars for each offence. The tree warden 
shall enforce the provisions of this and the preceding two sections 
in towns. 



77 



Report of Cemetery Commissioners. 



FOR THE YEAR 1905-1906. 

We present the following schedule showing the amonnts of the 
several funds, for the perpetual care of cemetery lots, and the 
income and payments on account of eacli fund for the year. 

HERBERT T. CLARK, 
JULIAN TUTTLE, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 
Cemetery Commissioners. 



OOOlOMffilOOO 



^00©lOOJ©lO© 

C C lO t» D3 K3 £» i- 1 



OJ ^ © © 

c oj o o 



N « N C OJ C (.» 



o 

K3 
4^ 


O 


© 


© 


© 

OJ 


CO 
IO 


c 


OJ 

O 


^H 


o 


o 


SO 

© 


d 


o 


O.' 

c 


© 


CO 

o 


© 

© 


iO 

fc- 


ee 
© 


1— \ 


CO 

o 

1—1 


© 

o 


© 

1—1 


iO 


© 

© 

1—1 


© 


o 


IO 


o 

IO 


c 

IO 


to 


so 

OS 


o 


o 

IO 


c 
o 


o 

IO 


o 

o 


00 

X 


o 
o 


c 
o 


o 

c 


o 

o 


© 

© 


© 

to 


L"- 


iO 

I- 


© 
c 


© 


© 

© 


o 

IO 


o 
© 


lO 


© 
© 


oj 
oj 


© 
to 


_ 


<cv 


co 


__ 


cc 


OQ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


(0 


OJ 


*tf 


CO 


CO 


CO 


OJ 


T* 


OJ 


CO 


OS 


— 


CO 


-* 


OJ 


CO 


T 


•H 


■¥.* 










*"' 
















































O 
to 


IO 




o 

o 


c 

IO 


o 

IO 


O 

IO 


© 

IO 


© 
to 


c 
o 


o 
to 


o 
to 


o 
ia 


© 
to 


© 

IO 


© 

»o 


© 

IO 


cm 

CO 


o 
to 


© 
»o 


© 


© 

to 


© 

IO 


oj 
cc 


© 


IO 


3 

IO 


— H 
<5© 


co 


CO 


r " i 


t> 


1—1 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


L- 


SO 


CO 


50 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


OJ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


OJ 


CO 


CO 


■CO 


c 


1- 

1—1 


C 

iO 


oj 


35 
ec 


CO 


iO 


o 


o 

IO 


ia 


eo 
00 


o 
o 


LO 

o> 


OJ 
00 


o 


IO 
CM 


o 


CO 

TV 


CO 


o 


© 
ec 


CM 


o 


CO 
GO 


© 




CO 


OS 


o 

IT 


c 

T— 1 


O 
O 


© 


o 

OQ 


OS 
O 
IO 


© 


o 


o 


c 

o 


^r< 


CM 




o 


CM 

o 


s 


o 


© 


IO 

fr- 


CM 


© 


© 

© 


© 


o 


«o 


c 


o 

o 


CM 

o 



©©©©©©°,©© 



©©©©©© 



© © 



<=>©©©©®0©©© ©©c 
^©o©©^ 000 © 



o©©o©©°°© 
io©©joo©°o© 

»« H CM tO '""''-' »H 



© 5 © 



© © 



© © © 



S22 



© © © © ^ 

© © © © r^ 



© © © 

© © © © 

© ° © c' © to © 

© © c © © c- o 



© © 

© © 

© © 

© © 



CD r ™7 

?( O 0° 

* § 2 

PL . 



t: 



CD OJ 



V. 



O 00 
a; e>j 

ft 



CD 
CD " 

5 o o ^ 

p* &J 

6 M ^ . g c- 

M . . ^ J"" OJ 

Oi CO co l^ fa 

. -H co • © 

CO -h to © CO oj 



CO 



H 

o 












£ 






p. 






QQ 






■J. 












o 












u 






w 






04 






Ti 






T! 






fl 






S 






CJ 






S3 






43 






p 






o 

fa 


43 




o 




43 — 

5R =3 




CD 








s ^ 


o 

CD 


O 


CD 


c 
o 




1 a 

— CU 


fa 


© 


S5 


^ 


CO 


© ^ 


55 


CM 


CO 


CO 


OJ 


OJ I> 



DU 



?"8 

•X CD 






2£ 
d 



CO !> fl 



© © 

CO OS 
00 00 



> CD 



OJ OJ 

cs © 

00 00 



M ►, - 

S § S S 5 

m m t- ^ co 

© © © © © 

00 00 00 oo oo 



ft 

O M 

f-i <D 

.= ft 

43 --1 

^ O DL4 

<D J "■* 

M *-* . 

^ ^ 

h h (D 

5 = -z 

Ol CD rj 

ffi ffi J 



« O 

CD 



HI 



© © © © 
© © © © 
oo 00 yo © 



A § 



© © 
© © 
© © 



03 a> 

a oj 

.3 ^2 

^ S CD 

rv^ * J -*3 

P-l CD *3 

fe 5 



CD 



t: 
O .a 



is a. S 5 

K = £ - 

O 03 ^ 



z: ^ « ffl 

£ ^ *-> & 



._ CD 

a a 



CD « 

■•*•••!= a r^ 



a »e-i -^ 



•-O 1-5 



s s ^ 






hX ^ <; o a 



© © © 

© © © 



OJ CJ OJ OJ -H 

© © © © © 
© © © © © 



© o © © 
© © © © 



© 


CO 


CO 


d 


co' 


©" 


w 


to 


co' 


~r 


CO 


© 


o7 


© 


T 


w 


OJ 


ss 


-<* 


a* 


a' 


IO 


Kj' 


CO 


c- 


IO 




to* 


CO 






CO 


^ 








rt 


CM 


OJ 


CM 


^ 


CO 


OJ 


1— 1 


o< 


i—i 


CQ 




OJ 


^^ 


' ' 




o^ 


"^ 




OJ 


o 


-" 


ci 


CO 


M 


M 


k» 


a 


>3 

ea 


u 


a 




.d 


ea 

1— 1 


■i-^ 


a 


^ 


^. 


43 


43 


CO 


CM 

< 


J 


-a 


af 


:-" 


ft 


>. 


03 

Q 




pS cd a- 
< Q < 


<9j S 


a 


< 


a 
Ha 


C3 CD 
O fa 


6 


ea 
i-: 


a 
Ha 


S 


QQ 


01 
fa 


D 

i-a 


w a 
O fa fa S 


s 


- 


OJ 


CO 


Tj< 


IO 


CO 


t- 


00 


© 


o 


- 


o> 


CO 


^t* 


to 


so 


c- 


00 


© 


c 

OJ 


c^ 


o> 
CM 


CO 
CM 


o> 


IO 
OnJ 


CO 
OJ 


o> 


cc 
CM 









© 
CO 


(- 


c 
o 


o 


o 
10 


o 


o 


o 


c 
10 


o 
© 


ia 


U3 




o 











IC o ^ o> 
t- o t" © 
t-I co « d 



03 £- 

t- © 



<=> O 2 5 ° 

o o ° p © o 

d d d o d 

10 o ° 



o 



tH i-h lO ,_, 



© c 

o o 



© © 

© lO 



fl 

C3 

a 
o 
O 

-A 2 

■*= fl 

P3 £ 



o ° a 
a h E 

03 



°k3 



oS 03 

g-s 



5 C3 



c5 S ^ c3 

GQ &H S <! W W S5 

T)* •* io in © «D «o 

© © © © o © © 

OS Q CS C5 Q C5 C5 



O (M „ „ lO W oo 
CO co 



CD . ^ • 

rl O **> &£ ,Q *"« *-• 

n ffl C! S m * S 

ffi O h N M Tf lO 

O* CO CO CO CO CO CO 



0* 

w 
H 
w 

a 

w 
u 

w 

Oh 
O 

X 
H 

O 

S 



oioiocooooioiono- 



© 00 



05«iO05?CO00OO 

ocjio^rioiocco 

lO LO ' -1 t-i 1-1 r-i 



© © © © o 

lO lO m lO io 



© © © © 

io io o io 



i-t -* t- t,: ~ ,-• 



^©©o© 11 ^ 1 ^ 1 ^ 1000 

©©^ioiot^t-ojc-Oic- 



"* *° IS co 
© c- c CO 

■rti t* lO 



o in 10 

O © 03 



° 3 



© CO "3 1 

© T-l »0 

»o jo 



d CK> <5 © 
,-H lO *° © 



©-; ©©©©© 

©Q5©© ©o© 

" r* S °" d d © ©' 

W © © o »o »o *° 

rt lO ifl *-« 



U3 



© © © 

© © © § 

© © © _: 

»o © O o 



w 

H 

w 

s 

w 
u 

S 
H 

g 



5 £ 



f- 1 fe- «J 

a J a 

n o -^ 2 

EC o a o 

a> • ^ 



05©©©©©©©©©©^ 

00050J05O05 0; oososos 1 - 5 



ooco?-r?'«i<^t<cNioo©coc<*co 



5 


05 


•d 

FH 

03 


d 


«a 


- 


ad 


^3 


- 


£ 


£ 


CJJ 


(31 


w 


fl 


£ 


4= 








d 


£ 

w 


<i 


0U 

Ifl 


N 


<J 





CO 


03 


d 




GO 




M 


w 


H( 






N 


fl 


J 


B 










£ 


s s 


72 




<D 0) . O 

OOCQffi 



60 CJD > > 



^H » 



6^ 






c 




© 


et 


© 
© 



10 


© 


© 


10 


CO 
CSJ 

CO 








10 


S 



-H 1-1 CO 






lO 


lO 


lO 


CD 




* - 


C- 


c- 




« 












o? 




Tt< 


-f 


© 


CQ 


© 




© 


U3 


C3 


© 


© 




c 


3 





^ 


cc 




IT 


»o 


ia 


»o 


CO 
lO 

m 


-d 


© : 


© 


r^ 


© 


1 ° 


ctj 


O 


O 


© 


© 


1 © 


^ 


© 


© 





© 


LO 


^ 


lO 


IO 


IQ 


JO 


T— t 





ft — 

s * 



>d 

o 

c 

M 
o3 



2 H 

MS 



CO CO CO ^f 

© © z: © 
© © © © 



1— I 1— > T-l • 4J 



a fl fl £ 

03 « C3 'j 
•-3 t-3 IS < 



8o 



Acton Memorial Library 



In the Act of Incorporation of the Acton Memorial Library, 1890, 
the life members named by Mr. Wilde were: Mr. Meade, Mr. Tay- 
lor, Mr. Hargood, Mr. Hall, Mr. Wetherbee and Mr. Conant. It is 
an illustration of the uncertainty of life that both the oldest and the 
youngest member, after fifteen years of service, should have died 
the same year. 

Mr. Meade, though not born in Acton, had passed nearly all the 
active business years of his life in town, and had become thoroughly 
identified with its best interests. Never of a very robust physique, 
he so conserved his strength that he lived to a good old age, so 
that of his passing it might be said that he died of over four-score 
years, after a very busy, active, temperate life. Of a very even tem- 
perament, not unduly elated by prosperity, nor depressed by ad- 
versity to the end of life he enjoyed the respect and friendship of 
his townsmen to a very large degree. One of our most valuable 
members, when possible he attended the monthly meetings of the 
Board of Trustees, coming when failing strength made it difficult 
for him to do so. 

It has been said that the close of every human life is a tragedy, 
more or less pathetic, and in the death of Mr. Wetherbee and sub- 
sequent events, this seems to be doubly true. Without a second's 
warning, cut off in the prime of life, he met his death in the shock- 
ing disaster at Lincoln, Nov. 26, 1905. Gifted by nature with a cheer- 
ful and serene temperament, he seemed to live in an atmosphere 
of perpetual sunshine, both in social intercourse and in the per- 



8i 



formance of his many official duties. Perhaps no one in the town 
had more acquaintances, which is another form of saying that no 
one had more friends. The real life, the home life of both these 
men was ideal. Living for a higher purpose than merely the accu- 
mulation of properly, they lived to see their children's children play 
and grow up about them, and as these two lives have gone to their 
final account, thank God that as far as we know that account in 
both cases is fair and open and clean. As these men in life were 
never fully appreciated at their real worth, so perhaps there are 
others among us whose best qualities are now unknown, but who 
will pass forward through death to a generous and affectionate recog- 
nition. The death of these men was a distinct loss to the town, 
though its annals are richer for their having lived in it. 

At a meeting of the five surviving members May 3, 1905, Mr. 
Frank R. Knowlton was unanimously elected to fill the vacancy 
caused by the death of Mr. Meade, and at a similar meeting January 
27, 1900, Mr. E. Faulkner Conant received the same vote to succeed 
Mr. Wetherbee on the board. 

The ordinary service of the library goes en as usual, as can be 
seen by referring to the librarian's report. We are pleased to be 
able to report a material increase in the number of books taken 
from the library. Among the acquisitions during the year is a paint- 
ing of Mrs. Mehitible Piper, widow of Silas Piper, presented by her 
grandson, Mr. Edwin J. Fiper of Springfield, Mass. She is the only 
inhabitant of Actcn, known to be a centenarian, and died March 
25, 1872, aged one hundred and one years. Those who remember 
her say the likeness is excellent. 

Patrons of the library have heretofore been permitted to enter 
the alcoves and select their books from the shelves and it is the 
wish that all persons doing so shall remain only long enough to 
make their selection and retire to the reading room. 

The book room is not intended for a reception room and the con- 
tinual presence of such visitors annoys and delays the work of the 
librarian. 

The services rendered by the librarian, Mr. Arthur F. Davis, have 



82 

met the entire acceptance of the trustees and the same may be 
said of the work done by Mr. S. Hammond Taylor, janitor. 

The Board of Trustees recommend the same appropriation as last 
year ($400) for current expenses of the library, and the same ($200) 
for the purchase of new books. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LUTHER CONANT, for the Trustees. 



83 



16TH ANNUAL REPORT. 



Accessions — Number of volumes in the library March 12, 1905, 
correct count, 8877; increase by purchase 348, of which 28 were ob- 
tained by binding magazines; increase by gift 41. Total increase, 
389. Number of volumes in the library March 12, 1906, 926G. 

Circulation — Number of days the library was opened 101, number 
of volumes circulated 7000, daily average circulation 70, largest daily 
circulation 115, April 15, 1905; smallest daily circulation 22, June 21, 
1905. 

Amount received from fines and catalogues, $17 91 

Expended for postage, etc., 1 14 



$16 77 
Cash on hand, 25 

$17 02 

Gifts of books have been received from the following sources: 
U. S. Government 13, State of Massachusetts 19, City of Boston 1, 
Luther Conant 1, Waldo E. Conant 1, Chas. S. Hart 1, Peace Com- 
mission 1, R. M. Smythe 1, Levi S. Gould 1, Union Press 1, Union 
Pub. Co. 1. 

Periodicals subscribed for and in the reading room 22, viz.: 
American Magazine, Appleton's Book Lovers, Century, Cosmopolitan, 
County Life in America, Current Literature, Everybody's, Harper's, 
Harper's Weekly, Independent, McClure's, Munsey's, National, New 
England, Review of Reviews, Success, Scribner's, Scientific Ameri- 
can, St. Nicholas, World's Work, World Today, Youth's Companion. 

A. F. DAVIS, 
Librarian. 



69TH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



AND THE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 

Massachvisetts 
FOR THE YEAR 1905-1906 

1906 




* ACTfflt ■.«) !» 



NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY, PRINTERS 
HUDSON, MASS. 
y Oti 



8? 



SCHOOL CALENDAR. 



SPRING TERM, 1906. 

High School. 
Spring term begins March 26th, closes June 22d; 13 weeks. 

Common Schools. 
Spring term begins March 26th, closes June 15th; 12 weeks. 



YEAR 1906-1907. 

High School, 40 Weeks. 

Fall term begins Sept. 4th; closes Nov. 28th; 13 weeks. 
♦Winter term begins Dec. 3rd; closes March 15th; 14 weeks. 
Spring term begins March 25th; closes June 21st; 13 weeks. 

Common Schools, 38 Weeks. 

Fall term begins Sept. 4th; closes Nov. 23d; 12 weeks. 
♦Winter term begins Dec. 3rd; closes March 15th; 14 weeks. 
Spring term begins March 25th; closes June 14th; 12 weeks. 

♦Recess of one week — December 24th to 31st. 



88 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1905-1906. 



Horace F. Tuttle, Secretary, Term expires 1906. 

Frank R. Knowlton, Term expires 1907. 

Charles J. Williams, chairman, Term expires 190S. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 

Herbert EL Richardson, Residence, Littleton, Mass. 

TRUANT OFFICERS. 

Moses A. Reed, George C. Turner, Thomas Scanlon. 

STANDING RULES. 

♦Rule 1. Children under five years of age shall not be admitted 
to the public schools. 

Rule 2. Pupils shall be promoted from grade to grade and school 
to school, according to merit. Thorough and satisfactory work will 
be required of pupils in a lower grade or school before entering a 
higher grade or school. 

Rale 3. Children who have not previously attended any school 
shall be admitted to the public schools only at the beginning of 
the fall term. 

Rule 4. Pupils will be held responsible for books loaned to them 
until such books shall, have been returned to the teacher. 

Rule 5. No repairs shall be made upon the public property in 
the care of the school committee except by their authorized agents. 

♦When the birthday of a child falls on or before the 15th day of 
the month it is reckoned as falling upon the first day of that 
month. 



89 



Extracts from the Statute?. — Revised Laws. 



Chapter 43. 



Section 11. The several school teachers shall faithfully keep 
the registers of attendance daily, and make due return thereof to 
the school committee, or to such person as the committee may 
designate. No teacher of a public school shall receive payment 
for services for the two weeks preceding the close of any term, 
until the register, properly filled up and completed, is so returned. 
All registers shall be kept at the schools, and at all times during 
school hours shall be open to the inspection of the school commit- 
tee, the superintendent of schools, the truant officers and the sec- 
retary and agent of the board of education. In reckoning the aver- 
age membership and the percentage of attendance in the schools, 
no pupil's name shall be omitted in counting the number of such 
persons belonging to> the school and the number of absences of 
such persons until it is known that such pupil has withdrawn 
from the school without intention of returning or, in the absence 
of such knowledge, until ten consecutive days of absence have 
been recorded; but the foregoing provision for computing the 
average membership and the percentage of attendance shall not 
affect proceedings against habitual truants, absentees or school 
offenders, or other persons, under the provisions of section one 
of chapter forty-four and sections three, four and five of chapter 
forty-six. A pupil who is not present during at least half of a 
session shall be marked and counted as absent for that session. 

Chapter 44. 

Section 1. Every child between seven and fourteen years of age 
shall attend some public day school in the city or town in which 



90 

he resides during the. entire time the public day schools are in 
session, subject to such exception as to children, places of attend- 
ance and schools as are provided for in section three of chapter 
forty-two and sections three, five and six of this chapter. The 
superintendent of schools or, if there is no superintendent of 
schools, the school committee, or teachers acting under authority 
of said superintendent or committee, may excuse cases of neces- 
sary absence. The attendance of a child upon a public day school 
shall not be required if he has attended for a like period of time a 
private day school approved by the school committee of such 
city or town in accordance with the provisions of the following 
section, or if he has been otherwise instructed for a like period 
of time in the branches of learning required by law to be taught 
in the public schools, or if he has already acquired such branches 
of learning, or if his physical or mental condition is such as to 
render such attendance inexpedient or impracticable. Every per- 
son having under his control a child as described in this section 
shall cause him to attend school as herein required; and if he 
fails for five day sessions or ten half day sessions within any period 
of six months while under such control to cause such child, whose 
physical or mental condition is not such as to render his atten- 
dance at school harmful or impracticable, so to attend school, he 
shall upon complaint of a truant officer and conviction thereof, be 
punished by a fine of not more than twenty dollars. Whoever in- 
duces or attempts to induce a child to absent himself unlawfully 
from school, or employs or harbors a child who, while school is in 
session, is absent unlawfully from school shall be punished by a 
fine of not more than fifty dollars. 

Section 6. A child who has not been vaccinated shall not be 
admitted to a public school except upon presentation of a certificate 
signed by a regular practising physician that he is not a fit sub- 
ject for vaccination. A child who is a member of a household in 
which a person is ill with smallpox, diphtheria, scarlet fever or 
measles, or of a household exposed to such contagion from another 
household as aforesaid, shall not attend any public school during 
such illness or until the teacher of the school has been furnished 



9i 

with a certificate from the board of health of the city or town, or 
from the attending physician of such person, stating that, in a 
case of smallpox, diphtheria or scarlet fever at least two weeks, 
and in a case of measles, at least three days, have elapsed since 
the recovery, removal or death of such person, and that danger of 
conveying such disease by such child has passed. 

Chapter 46. 

Section 3. Any child between seven and fourteen years of age 
who wilfully and habitually absents himself from school contrary 
to the provisions of section one of chapter forty-four shall be 
deemed to be an habitual truant, and, upon complaint of a truant 
officer and conviction thereof, may, if a boy, be committed to a 
county truant school for not mere than two years, and, if a girl, to 
the state industrial school for girls, unless such child is placed on 
probation as provided in section seven of this chapter. 

Section 4. A child between seven and sixteen years of age who 
may be found wandering about in the streets or public places of any 
city or town, having no lawful occupation, habitually not attending 
school, and growing up in idleness and ignorance, shall be deemed 
an habitual absentee, and, upon complaint by a truant officer or 
any other person and conviction thereof, may, if a boy, be commit- 
ted to a county truant school for not more than two years or to 
the Lyman school for boys, and, if a girl, to the state industrial 
school for girls, unless such child is placed on probation as prov- 
ided in section seven. 

Section 5. A child under fourteen years of age who persist- 
ently violates the reasonable regulations .of the school which he at- 
tends, or otherwise persistently misbehaves therein, so as to 
render himself a fit subject for expulsion therefrom, shall be 
deemed to be an habitual school offender, and, upon complaint by 
a truant officer and conviction thereof, may, if a boy, be committed 
to a county truant school for not more than two years or to the 
Lyman school for boys, and, if a girl, to the state industrial school 
for girls, unless such child is placed on probation as provided in 
section seven. 



92 

Section 13. Truant officers shall inquire into all cases arising 
under the provisions of sections one and six of chapter forty-four 
and sections three, four and five of this chapter, and may make 
complaints and serve legal processes issued under the provisions of 
this chapter. They shall have the oversight of children placed on 
probation under the provisions of section seven. A truant officer 
may apprehend and take to school, without a warrant, any truant or 
absentee found wandering about in the streets or public places 
thereof. 

Chapter 106. 

Section 28. No child under the age of fourteen years shall be 
employed in any factory, workshop or mercantile establishment. 
No such child shall be employed at work performed for wages or 
other compensation, to whomsoever payable, during the hours when 
the public schools of the city or town in which he resides are in 
session, nor be employed at work before six o'clock in the morning 
or after seven o'clock in the evening. 

[CHAP. 267.] 

AN ACT RELATIVE TO THE EMPLOYMENT AND SCHOOL AT- 
TENDANCE OF MINORS. 

Section 1. Section twenty-eight of chapter one hundred and 
six of the Revised Laws is hereby amended by inserting after the 
word "years," in the first line, the words: — and no child who is 
over fourteen and under sixteen years of age who does not have a 
certificate as required by the following four sections certifying to 
the child's ability to read at sight and to write legibly simple 
sentences in the English language,— by striking out the word 
"such,"' in the third line,— by inserting after the word "child," in 
the third line, the words:— under the age of fourteen years, 
—and by striking out the word "nor," in the sixth line, and 
inserting in place thereof the word:— or,— so as to read as fol- 
lows:— Section 28. No child under the age of fourteen years 
and no child who is over fourteen and under sixteen years of age 



93 

who does not have a certificate as required by the following four 
sections certifying to the child's ability to read at sight and to write 
legibly simple sentences in the English language shall be em- 
ployed in any factory, workshop or mercantile establishment. No 
child under the age of fourteen years shall be employed at work 
performed for wages or other compensation, to whomsoever payable, 
during the hours when the public schools of the city or town in 
which he resides are in session, or be employed at work before 
six o'clock in the morning or after seven o'clock in the evening. 
Section 2. No certificate as provided for by sections twenty- 
nine to thirty-two inclusive of chapter one hundred and six of the 
Revised Laws shall be approved by any person for a minor under 
the age of sixteen years who intends to be employed in a factory, 
workshop or mercantile establishment, unless such person is satis- 
fied that such minor is able to read at sight and to write legibly 
simple sentences in the English language. 

Section 3. This act shall, take effect on the first day of January 
in the year nineteen hundred and six. [Approved April 6, 1905. 



[CHAP. 213.] 

AN ACT RELATIVE TO THE APPROVAL OF AGE AND SCHOOL- 
ING CERTIFICATES OF MINORS. 

Section 1. Chapter one hundred and six of the Revised Laws, 
as amended by section one of chapteer four hundred and thirty-two 
of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and four, is hereby further 
amended by striking out section thirty-one and inserting in place 
thereof the following: — Section 31. An age or schooling certifi- 
cate shall not be approved unless satisfactory evidence is furnished 
by a certificate of birth or baptism of such minor, or by the register 
of birth of such minor with a city or town clerk, that such minor 
is of the age stated in the certificate, except that other evidence, 
under oath, may be accepted in case the superintendent or person 



94 

authorized by the school committee, as provided in the preceding 
section, decides that neither the certificates of birth or baptism, nor 
the register of birth is available for the purpose. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect on the first day of July in 
the year nineteen hundred and five. [Approved March 24, 1905. 

[CHAP. 320.] 

AN ACT TO EXTEND THE AGE FOR COMPULSORY ATTEND- 
ANCE IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS IN CERTAIN CASES. 

Section 1. Section one of chapter forty-four of the Revised 
Laws is hereby amended by inserting after the word "age," in 
the second line, the words: — and every child under sixteen years 
of age who cannot read at sight and write legibly simple sentences 
in the English language, — so as to read as follows: — Section 1. 
Every child between seven and fourteen years of age, and every 
child under sixteen years of age who cannot read at sight and 
write legibly simple sentences in the English language, shall 
attend some public day school in the city or town in which he re- 
sides during the entire time the public day schools are in ses- 
sion, subject to such exceptions as to children, places of attendance 
and schools as are provided for in section three of chapter forty- 
two and sections three, five and six of this chapter. The super- 
intendent of schools or, if there is no superintendent of schools, 
the school committee, or teachers acting under authority of said 
superintendent or committee, may excuse cases of necessary ab- 
sence. The attendance of a child upon a public day school shall 
not be required if he has attended for a like period of time a 
private day school approved by the school committee of such city 
or town in accordance with the provisions of the following section, 
or if he has been otherwise instructed for a like period of time 
in the branches of learning required by law to be taught 
in the public schools, or if he has already acquired such branches 
of learning, or if his physical or mental condition is such as to 
render such attendance inexpedient or impracticable. Every per- 
son having under his control a child as described in this section 



95 

shall cause him to attend school as herein required; and if he 
fails for five day sessions or ten half day sessions within any 
period of six months while under such control to cause such child, 
whose physical or mental condition is not such as to render his 
attendance at school harmful or impracticable, so to attend school, 
he shall, upon complaint by a truant officer and conviction thereof, 
be punished by a fine of not more than twenty dollars. Whoever 
induces or attempts to induce a child to absent himself unlaw- 
fully from school, or employs or harbors a child who, while 
school is in session, is absent unlawfully from school shall be pun- 
ished by a fine of not more than fifty dollars. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect on the first day of January 
in the year nineteen hundred and six. [Approved April 21, 1905. 

[CHAP. 375.] 

AN ACT RELATIVE TO THE RIGHT OF CHILDREN OF NON- 
RESIDENT PARENTS TO ATTEND PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

Section 1. Section four of chapter forty-four of the Revised 
Laws is hereby amended by striking out all after the word "guar- 
dian," in the second line, to and including the word "to," where 
said word first occurs in the fifth line, and inserting in place thereof 
the words: — and in the opinion of the school committee of the 
said city or town such residence is for the purpose of there attend- 
ing school in preference to the place of the legal residence of his 
parent or guardian, the said city or town may recover from the 
parent or guardian for the tuition of said child, while there attend- 
ing school, subject to appeal to the probate court, — so as to read 
as follows: — Section 4. If a child resides in a city or town other 
than that of the legal residence of his parent or guardian, and in 
the opinion of the school committee of the said city or town such 
residence is for the purpose of there attending school in preference 
to the place of the legal residence of his parent or guardian, the 
said city or town may recover from the parent or guardian for the 
tuition of said child, while there attending school, subject to appeal 
to the probate court, an amount equal to the average expense of 



9 6 

such school for each pupil during the preceding year, for a period 
equal to the time during which the child so attends, unless the city 
or town in which the parent or guardian resides is required by sec-" 
tion three of chapter forty-two to pay for said tuition. For the 
tuition in the public schools in any city or town of a child between 
the ages of five and fifteen years, who shall be placed elsewhere 
than in his own home by the state board of charity, or by the trus- 
tees of the Lyman and industrial schools, or kept under the control 
of either of said boards in said city or town, the Commonwealth 
shall pay to said city or town, and for such tuition of any such 
child so placed by the trustees for children of the city of Boston, 
or so kept under the control of said trustees, the city of Boston 
from its appropriation for school purposes, shall pay to said city 
or town, fifty cents for each week of five days, or major part 
thereof, of attendance of every such child in the public schools. For 
the transportation to and from a public school of any child whose 
tuition is payable by the Commonwealth or by the city of Boston 
under the provisions of this section, the Commonwealth or 
the city of Boston, as the case may be, shall pay to the city or 
town furnishing such transportation, for each week of five days 
or major part thereof, an amount equal to the average amount for 
each child paid by said city or town per week for the transporta- 
tion of children to and from school over the route by which such 
child is conveyed. Settlements of the accounts of the several cities 
and towns with the Commonwealth and with the city of Bcstou 
shall be made annually on the first day of April, and the amounts 
found due shall be paid within three months thereafter. The money 
received by said cities and towns under the provisions of this sec- 
tion shall be applied to the support of schools. For the tuition in 
the public schools in any town of less than ten thousand inhabi- 
tants cf any child between the ages of five and fifteen years not 
theretofore resident in such town, who is an inmate of an institu- 
tion containing more than six inmates, said town may recover from 
said institution the extra school expense incurred, as may be de- 
termined jointly by the school committee of said town and the 
trustees or managers of said institution, or, in case of disagreement 
between said school committee and said trustees or managers, as 



97 

may be decreed by the probate court; but no demand shall be made 
upon said trustees or managers without a vote of the town in- 
structing the school committee to that effect. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. [Approved 
May 5, 1905. 



98 



BIRTHS REGISTERED IN 1901 



No. Date 


Name of Child 


Names of Parents 


1 Jan. 


2 


Gladys Arvilla Colby 


George W. and Ella J. (Hartt) 


2 Jan. 


9 


Hope Kimball 


Charles M. and Carrie E. (Joues) 


3 Jan. 


16 


George Albert McAllister 


Geo. O. and Mary V. (Mclntyre) 


4 Mar. 


7 


Theresa Amelia Lundberg 


Axel G. and Amauda (Lofneudalil) 


5 Mar. 


18 


Marion Morse Davis 


Fred W. and Lizzie (Mors?) 


6 Mar. 


27 


George Berg 


George O. and Margaret (Hayes) 


7 April 


2 


Ruth Esther Clark 


Harry A. and Catherine F. (Keegan) 


8 April 


10 


Edgar Hmry Hall, jr. 


Edgar H. and AugHline (Hutchins) 


9 May 


2 


Gladys Lorena Warren 


Georgp C. and Hattie K. (Smith) 


10 May 


15 


Jonathan Walter Teele 


Ernest R. and Martha R. (Shattuck) 


11 May 


30 


Sidney Charles Smith 


Henry and Annie B. (Gray) 


12 June 


4 


James Oscar Brodeur 


Chas. E. and Annie L (Woodard) 


13 June 


11 


Harold Patrick Powers 


ICdward and Mary Ellen (Powers) 


14 June 


15 


Orland Elwood Spinney 


Everett and Lilliau M. (Woli) 


15 July 


3 


Eugene Philip Lowden 


Arthur S. and Bertha M (Newton) 


16 July 


6 


Marion Hayes 


Michael G. and KatheriueA. (McNerny) 


17 July 


16 


Ruth Bell Levy 


Amos E. and Lena S. (Bairri) 


18 Aug. 


3 


George Douglas Smith 


Johu D. and Louisa A. (Frazer) 


19 Aug. 


13 


Clarence Hill 


James aud Maiy J. (McArthur) 


20 Aug. 


15 


Ruth Choate Harlow 


Ellis B. and Lillian A. (Downing) 


21 Aug. 


21 


Vira Lillis Stoue 


Peter G. and Rose M. (McGum) 


22 Aug. 


25 


Florence Amanda Wheeler 


Elbr'dge L. and Florence I (Noyes) 


23 Aug. 


31 


Clara Lillian Smith 


Robert J. and Hattie L. (Hawes) 


24 Sept. 


8 


Charles Oliver Brown 


Chas. W. and Edna A. (Kuowlton) 


25 Sept. 


13 


Margaret Hall 


Eugene L. and Isabella H (Bent) 


26 Oct. 


10 


Klara Cornelia Lee 


John and Kristiue (Kolst-th) 


27 Oct, 


16 


Stephen Roger Townsend 


Stephen F. and Jessie H. (Jones) 


28 Oct. 


18 


Harry Cliffnrd Barteaux 


Harry P. and Minnie M. (Littlefield) 


29 Oct. 


29 


Mary Ruth Brazier 


Andrew B. and Mary M. (Luoiet) 


30 Nov. 


28 


Joseph Howard Kellogg 


Geo. A. and Carrie I. (Campbell) 


31 Dec. 


9 


Dorothy Zoe Dusseault 


George A. and Mildred F. (Mills) 


32 Dec. 


27 


Ernest Cooper Grcenough 


George E. aud Sarah A. (Edwards) 


33 Dhc 


30 


Edith Sophia Tut tie 


Luko H. aud Hattie Lee (Miles) 



99 



SIXTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE. 



To the Citizens of Acton: 

That portion of this report prepared by the committee may very 
well be confined within quite restricted limits. We have great 
pleasure in again being able to report your schools to be in excellent 
condition. Not in many years has the machinery of our school sys- 
tem moved more smoothly or with less friction than during the 
year just closing, and this condition is due in very large measure 
to the efficiency of the superintendence and to the faithful service 
of competent teachers. 

The increase within the last year or two in the amount received 
from , the income of the Massachusetts School Fund has greatly 
aided us in retaining the services of tried and successful teachers, 
since it has enabled us in such cases to pay larger salaries without 
making further drafts upon your generosity at the annual town 
meeting. 

During the summer vacation Mr. A. L. Faxon, the principal of the 
high school, tendered his resignation, with the purpose of accepting 
a more attractive position in Utica, N. Y. The vacancy was filled 
by the appointment of Mr. W. B. Pierce, principal of the high school 
at Goffstown, N. H., whose work has been highly satisfactory. 

In our report of last year your attention was called to the fact 
that some of the schools were greatly in need of a piano as an 
assistance to the work in music. The West school having most 



IOO 

need of such an instrument, your committee towards the close of 
the year appropriated a small sum from the appropriation for com- 
mon schools for the purchase of a piano for the West grammar 
school. 

That portion of this report prepared by the superintendent of 
schools and treating in detail of their work and requirements i3 
especially commended to your attention. 

The sum of $300 has been received from the State on account of 
the salary of the superintendent of schools for the year ending 
September 1st, 1905. 

The reports of the truant officers and of the purchasing agent 
are appended. 



IOI 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES ON ACCOUNT OF SCHOOLS 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1905-1906. 



RECEIPTS. 




>propriation tor: 




Common schools. 


$3,800 00 


High school, 


1,800 00 


School supplies, 


525 00 


Transportation of pupils, 


1,360 00 


Salary of supt. of schools, 


480 00 


iceived from: 




Mass. school fund, 


1,026 40 


Dog licenses, 


320 00 


Tuition fees. 


10 00 



$9,321 40 



EXPENDITURES. 



For common schools, 
High school, 
School supplies, 
Transportation of pupils, 
Salary of supt. of schools. 



Unexpended balance. 



$4,799 76 




1,861 12 




502 93 




1,333 50 




480 00 




$8,977 31 




$344 09 



102 



ESTIMATE FOR THE SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS FOR THE YEAR 

1906-1907. 



For common schools, 
High school, 
School supplies, 
Transportation of pupils,. 
Salary of supt. of schools, 



$3,800 00 


1,800 00 


525 00 


1,360 00 


480 00 



$7,965 00 



The School Committee of Acton, 
By 

CHAS. J. WILLIAMS, 

Chairman. 



io3 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



Gentlemen of the School Committee: 

This, my sixth annual report, which is the fourteenth in the 
series, is hereby submitted to you and through you to the citi- 
zens of Acton for the year ending March 1, 1906. 

Below are given the school census of September, 1905, and a sum- 
mary of statistics from September, 1904^ to June, 1905. At the 
end of this report will be found tabulated statistics from Septem- 
ber, 1904, to March, 1906. 

Number of persons in town between 7 and 14 years of age, boys, 
111; girls, 130: total, 241. 

Number of persons in town between 5 and 15 years of age: Boys, 
146: girls, 183: total, 329. 

Number of illiterate minors over 14 years of age: Boys, 0; Girls, 

1; total 1. 

Number enrolled in all the schools, 362 

Number of pupils between 7 and 14 years of age, 236 

Number of pupils between 5 and 15 years of age, 314 

Number of pupils over 15 years of age, 41 

Average membership, 321 

Average attendance, 297 

Percent of attendance, 92.5 

Number of schools, 10 

Number of teachers, 12 

Number of male teachers 1 

Number of female teachers, 11 



104 

Number of college graduates, 2 

Number who have attended college, 3 

Number of normal graduates, ■ 6 

TEACHERS. 

A few changes have occurred in the teaching force and the stand- 
ard of good work has been well maintained during the year. 

During the summer Miss Angie Main resigned to accept a school 
in Waltham, her home city, and Miss Minnie Gamble of Woburn 
was elected to succeed her as teacher in the Centre Grammar 
school. Miss Charlotte Canfield, a graduate of Lowell Normal 
school, followed Miss Martha Fagerstrcni at the South Intermediate 
school. In December Miss Elizabeth Sheehan accepted a more lucra- 
tive position in the Newton schools and was followed by Miss 
Karine Ekman of Woburn as teacher in the "Yvest Grammar school. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

During the summer Mr. A. L. Faxon resigned to accept a posi- 
tion in Utica, N. Y., after five years' faithful service as principal of 
the High school. Mr. Faxon was a man of quiet, unassuming man- 
ners, rare tactfulness in the administration of school affairs and 
ever alert to the best interests of the school. His services will 
long be remembered and appreciated by those who knew him best. 

Mr. W. B. Pierce, a graduate of Bates College and a teacher of 
several years' successful experience, was chosen to succeed Mr. 
Faxon, and Miss Mary Bartlett, Bates College, '05, was appointed 
assistant teacher in place of Miss Atwood, resigned. 

The general spirit and progress of the students is commendable 
and we have no hesitancy in saying that the school under the pres- 
ent management merits the fullest confidence of parents and citizens. 
Your attention is called to a fuller report of the High school by the 
principal, Mr. Pierce, which is appended. 



io5 

PROMOTIONS. 

Most promotions occur at the cJose of the school year and in 
determining the grade in which it is advisable for the pupil to spend 
the coming year judgment is based entirely upon what is desmed 
best for each individual child. The truth that the school is for 
the child and not the child for the school should never be lost sight 
of. 

When it is evident that any pupil, through some mental defect 
has received from any given grade all that it seems possible for him 
to derive from it he should be allowed to advance with his class 
to the next grade. This is done with the thought that with a new 
environment and through the presentation of different subject mat- 
ter he may be quickened to better effort and may make better prog- 
ress than as if he had been obliged to repeat the work of the 
lower grade. 

If, on the other hand, a child because of slow development and 
immaturity of mind fails to derive from any given grade all that 
he is capable of deriving from it, with the necessary mental growth 
and strength which time alone can give him, that pupil should be 
obliged to repeat the grade work. While on the surface it may seem 
that the schools ar,e partial and do not treat aU alike the con- 
stant aim and desire of teachers and school authorities is to treat 
all according to merit with a view to the welfare of each pupil. 

REPORT CARDS. 

A report of every pupil's standing in school is sent to parents 
at the middle and close of each term. In marking these cards the 
teacher exercises her best judgment as to the character of the work 
dene by the pupils in her classes. It sometimes happens, as all 
who have had any experience in teaching well know, that a given 
grade, composed of the less ambitious or brilliant pupils, is not 
fully up to the requirements and the teacher must necessarily adapt 
the work to the capacity of the class. By so doing her pupils are 
able to make commendable progress although on a somewhat lower 



io6 

level than that of regular grade work and while a card may in- 
dicate commendable results for the year the pupil may not be ready 
for promotion to the next higher grade. 

A report card is designed primarily to give a true record of the 
pupil's daily work and effort and in the majority of cases is an ab- 
solute guide for promotion although, as I have endeavored to ex- 
plain, does not purport to be the only or infallible one. 

MORAL INSTRUCTION. 

Moral instruction in the public schools, ever a vital subject, is now 
receiving a great deal of attention and much is being said and 
written upon it. One of the best articles that has come to my 
notice appeared in a recent leading periodical and for the benefit 
of those who may not have seen it, I quote quite generally from 
it. The author states that the cry for more effective moral in- 
struction in the schools and for a better moral output from them 
is growing more and more insistent. It is pointed out that crime 
is on the increase and the public schools, as one of several educa- 
tional agencies, are in some measure responsible for it. Granting 
that the schools have a serious responsibility in the matter the ques- 
tion arises, what is to be done? 

• 

In the teaching of morality there are two general types corre- 
sponding to the two ways of teaching religion; namely, the formal 
teaching of ethics and the informal inculcation of morality. Each 
of these types has strong advocates but the weight of opinion 
seems to favor the latter and to adhere to the idea that to at- 
tempt to secure morality by instruction is not only futile but per- 
nicious and that behavior can no more be taught by rule than 
ran correct speech. The advocates of the informal inculcation of 
morality believe that the two great means of moral education are 
individuals and institutions, and that the best results are obtained 
through the personal character of the teacher, and through such a 
choice of subjects of study and such methods of teaching as will 
produce respect for the school and exert a moral influence upon the 
pupil. 



107 

For the benefit of any who may be interested an outline is ap- 
pended embodying these views and indicating the lines on which the 
problems of moral education are being worked out in the class- 
room by thousands of teachers in many of the leading elementary 
schools in the country. 

"It should be the aim of every teacher to make each part of the 
life of the school count for moral education. This aim should 
be present not cnly in formal instruction and training, but also in 
the general atmosphere and spirit of the class room and of the 
school. In working toward this aim the following suggestions 
based on the experience of practical teachers, will be found helpful: 

1. The personality of the teacher is at the root of all moral 
education in the school. The teacher's ideals, sincerity, poise, self- 
control, courtesy, voice, manner, dress and general attitude toward 
life are potent forces for character building. 

2. Reverence is vital to morality, whatever quickens in children 
the feeling of dependence on a Higher Power, whatever leads them 
devoutly to wonder at the order, beauty or mystery of the universe, 
whatever arouses in them the sentiment of worship or fills them 
with admiration of true greatness, promotes reverence. There is no 
subject studied in school which reverently taught, may not yield 
its contribution to this feeling. 

3. Self-respect, which is also fundamental to moral develop- 
ment is engendered in a child when he does his best at tasks that 
are worth while and within his power to do well. 

4. The corner-stone of a self-respecting character is principle — 
the will to be true to the right, because it is right, whatever the 
consequences, to act "with firmness in the right as God gives us to 
see the right." 

5. The spirit of the c)ass-room and of the school— the spirit 
that makes children say with pride "my class" and "oar school" — 
is one of the strongest of moral forces. When there exists a proper 
esprit du ccrps, the problem of discipline is largely solved. 

6. The child should early gain the idea of social membership. 



io8 

The truth that co-operation and unselfishness are essential to true 
social living should be made real and vital. 

The child should also learn that he is a member, not only of the 
school, but of the family, of the neighborhood, of the town and of 
the state and nation. The meaning of loyal membership of these 
social institutions should be made clear. The naturalness and the 
necessity of obedience and helpfulness should be shown. The 
moral aspect of home tasks and of working with and not against 
the departments of health, street-cleaning, police and education, 
should be enforced by concrete applications. In general, the truth 
should be impressed that without loyal and effective social mem- 
bership no individual can wholly live. 

7. No person has a fully developed moral character until there 
has been a transfer of the seat of authority from without to 
within himself: A moral man obeys himself. Each child in every 
grade should be steadily helped toward self-direction and self-gov- 
ernment. 

8. In connection with the regular studies of the school, certain 
aspects of contemporary civilization which are of value for develop- 
ing the social spirit should receive attention. Hospitals, societies 
for the prevention of cruelty to children and to animals, homes 
for orphans and for the aged and infirm, fresh air funds, and simi- 
lar agencies for social service, should be brought within the child's 
comprehension at the proper stage. Deeds of heroism and self- 
sacrifice done by firemen, policemen, soldiers, inventors and per- 
sons in the ordinary walks of life should be- presented and dwelt 
on. The truth that success in life means more than mere money- 
getting can thus be brought home again and again. 

9. In alj such moral instruction and guidance the following 
principles should be observed: 

(a) The course of moral training is a development. 

(b) The culture of the imagination is a powerful aid in moral 
instruction. 

(c) In using literature and similar material for purposes of 
moral instruction, the teacher should not violate the law of self- 



109 

activity. The child properly resents having a moral drawn for 
him which he could draw for himself, and he is the more likely to 
follow the principle which he himself discovers or formulates, be- 
cause it is his own. 

(d) The most effective method in moral education is positive 
rather than negative. A mind filled with good interests, high 
ideals, and helpful activities has no room for evil." 

MEDICAL INSPECTION. 

The state in establishing and maintaining a system of public 
schools is able to provide facilities which ordinary means cannot 
afford. At present there is a movement on foot providing for medi- 
cal inspection in the public schools and the annual examination of 
the sight and hearing of school children. Boston introduced medi- 
cal inspection in 1894 and the system has been adopted in some 
fifteen of the Massachusetts cities and towns and now the idea is 
to make it universal. 

It has been shown over and over again that frequent and 
thorough inspection for the detection of contagious disease is of 
the highest value in preserving the public health. It has been 
shown also that about 25 percent of school children are defective 
in sight and that 5 percent are defective in hearing. What is of 
special importance is that only a small minority of these defects 
of sight and hearing are discovered by the teachers, or are known 
to them, to the parents, or to the children themselves. 

The expense of inspection, which will be large, will be met by 
a special appropriation, to be expended by the State Board of Edu- 
cation. 

STATE INSPECTION. 

For the benefit of those who may be interested and have no 
knowledge of the recent legislation regarding district superintend- 
ents, the following is appended from the Revised Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, relating to public instruction. 
Chapter 215, Acts of 1904, provides as follows: 



TIO 

"In all the superintendency unions in which any part of the ex- 
pense of the superintendent is borne by the Commonwealth the 
State Board of Education shall determine, by examination or other- 
wise, the qualifications of candidates for the position of superintend- 
ent of public schools, and, after the first day of January in the year 
nineteen hundred and five, no person shall be elected to such posi- 
tion who does not hold a certificate of fitness and competency from 
said board." 

The schools are inspected annually by the state agents, men 
whose lives have been devoted to educational interests. Thus the 
state through her authorities knows the quality of the work being 
done and determines and maintains the educational standards in 
the public schools throughout the districts of the state. 

It is hoped that parents and citizens generally will visit the 
schools often and know by personal inspection what their children 
are doing. 

In conclusion I wish to say that the generous attitude of your 
chairman, his masterful manner of dealing with all matters 
pertaining to school affairs and his frequent inspection of the work 
have been of inestimable value. Whatever success may have been 
attained has been due to your co-operation and constant support 
without which all efforts of teachers and superintendents are of lit- 
tle avail. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HERBERT E, RICHARDSON, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



I II 



REPORT OF THE HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL. 



Superintendent H. E. Richardson: 

Dear Sir — I present the following report of the Acton High 
School: 

The total number of students registered is twenty-seven. Of 
these one student attended only one day. Of the remaining twenty- 
six it may be said that with a few exceptions; their work is done 
with a faithfulness and sincerity that is very gratifying to the 
teachers. 

The entering class is somewhat smaller than it has been in past 
years, but it makes up in quality what it may lack in numbers. 
The way that the students in this class have entered upon the work 
and have adapted themselves to the new conditions shows that the 
grade teachers have been faithful to their charge. 

The system of self-government is still in force. Pupils on enter- 
ing the High School should begin to appreciate the duties that 
they owe to themselves and to each other if they are to become 
good and useful citizens. In wasting his time a pupil brings upon 
himself a loss that he may never be able to make up, while by in- 
terfering with the work of another he does him a grave injustice. 
On the whole our pupils seem to have a realizing sense of their 
responsibility in this regard. 

In addition to the regular report cards heretofore issued at the 
middle and end of each term, it has seemed best to have a printed 
form to be sent to parents whenever for any reason, either through 
lack of attendance or through apparent loss of interest a pupil's 



112 

work falls below the standard. It is hoped that parents will accept 
these reports in the spirit in which they are sent. We desire to 
avoid all danger of a misunderstanding, and so wish to inform the 
parent whenever a pupil's work is not satisfactory. In such cases 
a frank discussion of the situation between parent and teacher 
is often of value. The pupil should regard his school work with 
the same seriousness that he must later feel for his daily work if 
he is to get the best that the school affords. 

Early in the Fall term the room in the basement formerly used 
as a chemical laboratory was enlarged and fitted with shelves for 
chemicals, a closet for apparatus, a sink, a laboratory to accom- 
modate ten students, and a work bench. The stock of apparatus 
and chemicals has been increased so that each of the eight students 
in the class may do the individual work now required in all 
schools where chemistry is taught. Some carpenters' tools have 
also been added to our equipment and have been of value in the 
construction of apparatus and pieces of equipment. 

Miss Mary E. Bartlett, a graduate of Bates College, has satis- 
factorily filled the position as assistant. Her enthusiasm for her 
work and her faithfulness therein are worthy of praise. 

In closing I wish to thank you for the kindness and cordiality 
with which you have met me on all, occasions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. B. PIERCE, Principal. 
South Acton, March 3, 1906. 



"3 



REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC. 



Mr. H. E. Richardson, Superintendent of Schools. 

Dear Sir — The work in the music classes has been generally very 
satisfactory — surprisingly so, considering that it was my first year 
in the district and that many of the regular teachers were new — 
everyone under these conditions being at a disadvantage, teachers 
as well as pupils. 

While the same method of teaching has been carried on as by 
my predecessor, there was necessarily some difference in present- 
ing the subject — different phraseology — not affecting the ultimate 
results, but causing at first some confusion and misapprehension. 
This, however, has gradually disappeared, until now I think I can 
safely say that there is perfect unity of purpose and effort all 
along the line. 

And speaking of method — while we have a well formulated and 
graded system we endeavor constantly not to "method" our chil- 
dren to death, as it were, but to so develop all sides of the work 
that they will be well-rounded musicians with a comprehension of 
the artistic as well as the mechanical side. 

The use of the individual slips, for sight reading we regard as 
very important, as it develops concentration and an independence 
of thought and action that no amount of class singing will ac- 
complish — for the reason that in classes there are always "leaders" 
who do the greater part of the work — the weaker ones either not 
singing at all or else following along in an aimless way that will 
be of little if any benefit. And, too, the individual work is most 



ii4 

useful in enabling the teacher to know the capacity of each child 
and their ability to "do" when thrown on their own resources. 

On the other hand, the importance of class singing from board 
and music readers can hardly be over-estimated. It induces more 
of the spirit of music, aids in the tonal sense, and in part-singing 
develops a sense of harmony. And also— a fact that should not 
be ignored — it gives the children much more time for actual par- 
ticipation in the work. 

No child has been excused from singing except in remote cases — 
principally when children in advanced classes have come from 
other schools where music was not taught. In such cases, to attain 
any results, it would be necessary for the regular teacher to give 
a great deal of individual instruction, beginning with the lower 
grade work — and this, as can be readily seen, would be quite im- 
possible. 

Rote songs are taught in the primary grades — songs from the 
best composers with words appropriate to child life. Sight reading 
is taught with black board exercises, involving principles of time 
and tune adapted to the needs and capacity of young children. 

In fourth grade and up, part singing is taught, both class-wise 
and individually, with, in many cases, astonishingly good results — 
as, for instance, in eighth and ninth grades, where we have some 
"changed" voices among the boys, the four-part work — soprano, 
alto, tenor-alto and bass — has been very gratifying. The boys read 
from bass clef as readily as from treble, and in moderately difficult 
music the parts are well sustained. 

We have had written work in all grades — copying, writing from 
number and song dictation, writing songs that have been mem- 
orized, and, in a very small way, original work, with attention 
to correct form. 

The question has sometimes been raised: "Is it advisable to teach 
sight reading in the primary grades?" If those who dojbt could 
see the eagerness and joy and alacrity with which the little tots 
receive the knowledge that makes it possible for them to "read" 



the notes just as they do words, the question would be satisfactorily 
answered. 

After the thorough preparation in the grades the pupils are sup- 
posed to have acquired such proficiency in reading music that only 
choral work with piano accompaniment is done in the High school 
— and this once a week, instead of every day as in the grades. 
The full chorus is sometimes supplemented with small choruses 
and quartettes. 

Much credit is due the regular teachers for their generous and 
effective co-operation in the work — without which a supervisor can 
do but little. 

Respectfully, 

ELIZABETH C. CHASE. 
March 3, 1906. 



n6 



COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES OF THE ACTON HIGH SCHOOL, 

AT TOWN HALL, ACTON, MASS., THURSDAY EVENING, 

JUNE 22, 1905, 8:15 O'CLOCK. 



PROGRAM. 

I. Invocation, Rev. A. B. Peebles 

II. Song, "King's Champion," "In the Harbor," School 

III. Address, "The Great Problem," 

Mr. James A. Macdonald (Agent, State Board of Education) 

IV. Song, "Come Flit Around," School 
V. Presentation of Diplomas, Mr. Macdonald 

VI. Song, "America." 



Motto: "Ever Ready." 



GRADUATES. 
Carrie Eliza Fletcher, 

Harold Roscoe Littlefield, 

Harold Francis Norris. 



Colors: Gold and White. 



ii 7 



STATISTICS FOR 1904-1905. 









o 
o 
A 




6 




< 


G 


c 




SCHOOLS 






"o 


c 

V 

a 

"o 




< 

V 


o 


V 




»< 






V 


u 


60 

>- 

V 


V 


c 

V 






> 
o 






^ 


£ 


c 


> 


> 




Ct- 


6 L~ 


o 






o 


w 


< 


< 


Ou 


2 


Z. 


2 




10-1. 


L 












High 


1-2-1! 


) 40 


34 


30 27 


90 


3 


5 33 


South Grammar 


7-8- 


9 38 


26 


21.8 18 


82 


17 


23 3 


South Intermediate 


4-5-6 


38 


42 


38 36 


94 


38 


38 


South Primary 


1-2? 


38 


51 


44 41 


93 


22 


43 


Center Grammar 


7-8-1 


I 38 


32 


29.7 27.8 


93 


22 


30 2 


Ceuter Intermediate 


4-5-6 


38 


26 


25 23.7 


94 


27 


27 


Center Primary 


1-2-S 


1 38 


37 


30 28 


93 


23 


3 7 


West Grammar 


7-8-1 


) 38 


29 


25 23 


92 


26 


26 3 


West Intermediate 


4-5-* 


i 38 


37 


36.9 33.9 


92 


37 


37 


West Primary 


1 


-2-1 


) 38 


48 


42.9 


38.6 


90 


21 


48 






Total 



362 321 297 92.5 236 314 41 



n8 



Statistics Fall and Winter Terms, 1905-1906. 



SCHOOLS 

























o 
o 

XI 
















t/t 




fl 




*J 








-a 


i/> 




<u 


■J3 


•< 


a 


rt 




in 
u 


c 


s 


< 


o 


jj^t. 




a 


O 
a 

6 


o 

J2 

<u 


g 

>- 


to 
<y 


u 
> 


6t- 


6 »o 


O 


2 


^ 


w 


< 


< 


0- 


2 


2 



High 



South Grammar 



South Intermediate 



South Primary 



Center Grammar 



Center Intermediate 



Center Primaiy 



West Grammar 



West Intermediate 



West Primary 



Total 



13 3 


















12 7 


















11 8 


















10 9 


40 


27 


26 


2 3 


92 


4 


4 


23 


9 12 


















8 9 


















7 12 


38 


33 


28 


25 


84 


25 


29 


4 


6 13 


















5 19 


















4 15 


38 


48 


45 


40.6 


93 


45 


48 





3 18 


















2 16 


















1 18 


38 


52 


44 


41 


93 


29 


52 





9 7 


















8 10 






■ 




- 








7 14 


38 


31 


27 


25 


93 


23 


23 


1 


6 7 


















5 7 


















4 12 


38 


26 


24 


22.9 


94 


26 


26 





3 10 


















2 14 


















1 10 


38 


34 


32.8 


31 


94 


22 


22 





9 11 


















8 7 


















7 10 


38 


28 


25 


23 


93 


24 


27 


1 


6 11 


















5 16 


















4 12 


38 


39 


34.8 


32.8 


94 


39 


39 





3 13 


















2 13 


















1 16 


38 


4-3 


3 9 


86 


92 


27 


42 






360 325 300 92 264 312 29 






ii9 



O 
On 

i 

8 



4 



l/J 

a 



< ,5 h © £ . 

"S « Ft * -5 

o o 00 © «o 

O O ^h GO jo 

o io « w - 



60 



>. 
<\ 

- QC CO oo 00 CD lO 
00 - io h -, 10 (M 
CO "* «+ -Tf t*i Tfi CM 



- ^ a 



0) CD 



o s ^ 

p 

O C» M r^ 

+= £ o o 



c 




o 


CO 


CO 

CD 






o 

03 q 

■£fc 



a> 



(Dpi 



§!■§ 



McqfeJ^SfciJ^E^'^ 



»C iq tI* io co io 

O o O O o ^ 

© 05 OS Ci 5j 



OS 



a <M no "* OS ^ 

OS O O O oo O 
00 OS oj OS qo OS 



*= _<D "2 



+- ~ CD 

J£ ^ «c 



CD 'if .'3 Ofl 

CD PQ CD W M « 

h r is ,k cd 

• cd ^ O .;; 

CQ £>~ u N p 

^ S 15 5 1 .2 

£ a m o 5 s 



CD 9 



rt&ry 



s£ 



g 



cd a * 
3£ 3 



a a o 5 5 s 

1Z £ O o o CD 

S3 ffl gg gq m O 



h3 5 

S a 



.s - 

3 1 



6 S 

o • 
o 

(j CO 
CD ,£2 



CD CD 



c3 

a 

a h - 

03 CD 

o 5 



£ £ 



| ^ 
P^ CO 



120 



ROLL OF HONOR. 



SEPT., 1904-JUNE, 1905. 



Moore, Carl E. 



Byron, James C. 
Bezanson, Mable 
Bezanson, Grace E. 
Bezanson, Helen M. 
Davidson, Guy 
Foley, Patrick 
Foley, David 
Foley, Thomas 
Flagg, Harland 
Fletcher, Carrie E. 
Greenough, Frank E. 



One Year. 

Wood, Helen B. 

Two Terms. 

Harris, Alfred 
Harris V. Maud 
Hoit, Hazel W. 
\ ekkelson, Ida 
Morse, Walter R. 
Peebles, Marjorie 
Phalen, Harold 
Quimby, Marjorie 
Rikeman, Roland 
Stancombe, Eva 
Tuttle, Varnum 
Willis, Clifton E. 



One Term. 



Bent, May 
Burroughs, Lizzie 
Byron, Florence M. 
Carr, Charles C. 
Cahill, Edw. 
Clark, Fred E. 
Coolidge, Hazel A. 



Daniels, Howard B. 
Deossie, Dora 
Downie, Cora 
Eastbrook, Fred 
Evans, Albert 
Foley, Michael D. 
Fletcher, Dora 



121 



Coding, Arthur 
Griswold, Ethel 
Griswold, Georgie 
Gilbert, Alfred 
Heath. Benha 
Heath, Isabel 
Hall, Ruth E. 
Hanning, Ray R. 
Hawes, Verne 
Harris, Bertha 
Kinsley, Annie 
Kinsley, Richard 
Leach, Natalie 
Lowden, Theron 
Lawrence, Harley 
Lawrence, Wayne 
Lincoln, Arnold H. 
McMulty, Frank J. 
Moult, George 
Morse, Arthur 
Mekkelson, Christine 
Murphy, May 
McNeill, Mary C. 
Moan, David 
Miner, Lillian F. 
Munroe, Alexander 
Nagle, Annie R. 
Nickerson, Pansy 
O'Connell, Margaret 
Piper, Ralph 



Peebles, Ray K. 

Pay sen A. Hardy 
Quimby, Howard 
Qui m by, Russell 
Randall, Earl 
Richardson, Harold 
Reed, Kenneth F. 
Reed, Everett 
Rice, Beatrice 
Robbins, Hazel G. 
Robbins. Ray 
Sargent, Vera 
Sargent. Gladys E. . 
Sawyer, Benj. 
Scanlon, Lizzie 
Sehnair, Harriet A. 
Stillman, George 
Sheehan, Arthur 
Smiley, Mary E. 
Stancombe, George 
Wat kins, Nellie 
Wetherbee, Howard 
Welsh, Grace 
Willard Leslie 
Willis, Mabel 
Worden, Henry I. 
Worden, Grace 
Woodward, Frank 
Woodward, Edith 
Wood, Chester 



122 



ROLL OF HONOR. 



SEPTEMBER, 1905, TO MARCH, 1906. 



Rezanson, Helen M. 
Bezanson, Grace E. 
Benere, Annie J. 
Byron, James 
Cheney, Robert B. 
Cheney, Florence R. 
Daniels, Howard B. 
Farrar, F. Raymond 
Foley, Patrick 
Greenough, Frank E. 
Holden, Una L. 
Harris, E. Elizabeth 



Two Terms. 



Worden, 



Harris. V. Maud 
Harris, Ray L. 
Harris, Bertha M. 
Hoit, Hazel W. 
McNeil, Mary 
Morse, Walter R. 
Mekkelson, Christine 
Murphy, May 
Peebles, Marjorie A. 
Robbins. Helen B. 
Teel, Alta R. 
Wood, Helen B. 
Leonard 



One Term. 



Anderson, Alfred S. 
Bezanson, Mabel 
Brooks, Chester C. 
Byron, William 
Burroughs, Lizzie M. 
Callan, Katharine 
Campbell, Lei and H. 
Carr, Charles C. 
Coolidge, Hazel A. 
Coughlin, William C. 
Durkee, Irma M. 
Evans, Albert 
Fairbanks 
Foley, Frances 



Frederickson, Esther 
Frederickson, Ebba 
Frederickson, Ella M. 
Gilbert, Alfred 
Goding. Arthur 
Griswold, Ethel M. 
Heath, Bertha 
Hoar, Burton 
Hawkins, Ruth E. 
Hawes, Ethel V. 
Hall, Wesley 
Kimball, Margie 
Lane, Johanna M. 
Lane, Michael C. 



123 



MacGregor, Phelma R. 
McCarthy, Xora 
McNeil, Aleada 
Miner, Lillian F. 
Mead, Dorothy 
Mocre, Carl E. 
Monsen, Mabel 
Morse, Arthur W. 
Mekkelson, Bertha 
Mekkelson, Loren M. 
Nagle, Annie 
O'Connell, Alice 
Phalen, Harold R. 
Robbins, Ray 
Robbins, A. Sylvia 
Sawyer, Philip D. 



Slayski, Nellie 
Schnair, Harriet 
Schnair, Florence L. 
Schnair, Cora 
Stillman, George H. 
Sheehan, Arthur 
Thompson, Ethel E. 
White, Leonard D. 
White, Florence E. 
Wetherbee, Elmer D. 
Willard, Ruth E. 
Wheeler, Merrill 
Woodward, Frank 
VTcrden, Grace 
Worden, M. Florence 
Wood, Chester E. 
Willis, Clifton E. 



124 



TRUANT OFFICERS' REPORT. 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 1. 1906. 



To the School Committee of Acton, Mass: 

The truant officers submit their fourth annual report to the 
School Committee for the year ending March 1, 1906. 

The truant officers submit the following list of pupils looked 
up for the year, the cause of their absence, and if truants, the 
number that have been returned to school: 
Whole number of pupils looked up, 16 

Cause of absence Center sch. South sch. West sch. 

Sickness, 2 2 

Kept at home by parents, 4 2 3 

Returned to school, 4 2 3 

Reported truants, $ 

Yours respectfully, 

C. G. TURNER, 
THOMAS SCANLON, 
MOSES A. REED, 

Truant Officers. 



*25 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL SUPPLIES. 



REPORT OF THE PURCHASING AGENT. 

The School Committee of Acton: 

The following statement of the expense account of this depart- 
ment for the financial year ending March 11th, 1906, is respectfully 
submitted: 

J. L. Hammett Co. 

Mar. 22. 150 pkgs. arithmetic paper, $18 00 

50 pkgs. H3 paper, white, 9 50 

10 pkgs. HI paper, white 1 90 

40 pkgs. No. 19 exam, paper, white, 12 00 
15 pkgs. antique white drawing pa- 
per, 8x10 1-2, 6 75 
10 pkgs. antique white drawing pa- 
per, 6x9, 2 50 
8 pkgs. Quaker grey drawing paper, 

Gx9, 2 00 

12 pkgs. No. 27 exam, paper, 4 80 

10 pkgs. No. 25 hectograph paper, 3 50 

480 No. 140 note books, 12 00 
200 No. 120 spelling blanks, 2 00 

15 gross No. 800 pencils, 11 25 

1 lb. No. 120 rubber erasers, 65 

2 doz. Le Page paste, 1 80 
2 doz. Treasury mucilage, 1 00 

1 doz. violet Hecktograph ink, 2 25 

2 doz. No. 144 note books. 1 44 



126 



3 gr. No. B scientific drawing pencils, 4 25 
1-4 case Enametteo crayons, 3 50 

1 doz. quarts Treasury ink, 



Apr. 5. 29 sheets paper, sample 1, 
50 sheets paper, sample 2, 
50 sheets paper, sample 3, 
2 yds, white enamelled cloth, 



Apr. 8. 1 doz. quarts Treasury ink, 



Apr. 17. 1 Webster Int. Dictionary, 
1 Gem pencil sharpener, 



Apr. 27. 1 box No. 37 Dennison hooks, 



May 17. 1 doz. violet Hecktograph ink, 



Aug. 9. 2 No. 620 inkstands, 

2 Webster Int. Dictionaries, 



Aug. 23. 1 Comstock's Study of Insects, 
Postage, 



3 00 






$104 34 


$1 45 




3 50 




4 00 




50 






$9 45 


$3 00 






$3 00 


$8 50 




3 00 






$11 50 


$ 75 






$ 75 


$2 25 






$2 25 


$1 35 




17 00 






$18 35 


$1 75 




15 





$1 90 



127 



Sept. 6. 



Sept. 13. 



Oct. 3. 



Oct. 10. 



Nov. 14. 



500 report card envelopes, 4x6, 


$2 25 




2 lbs. rubber erasers, No. 120, 


1 30 








$3 55 


10 doz. No. 30 rulers, 


$1 67 




2 gross No. 1407 penholders, 


2 00 




6 doz. No. 23 rulers, 


75 








$4 42 


1 Blair's Rhetoric, 


$1 00 




5 blocks New Century maps, 


1 60 


f 


• 




$2 60 


1 wall numeral frame, 


$1 50 




1 lb. rubber erasers, No. 120, 


60 




12 pkgs. colored paper, 4x4, 


1 80 




3 glass prisms, 


36 








$4 26 


12 boxes number builder, No. 4, 


$1 44 




12 boxes sentence builder, No. 5, 


1 68 




6 boxes No. 470 beads, 


2 40 






$5 52 




Less 25 per cent, 


1 38 





$4 14 
Dec. 2. Repairing Gem pencil sharpener, $ 65 



Jan. 29. 5 pkgs. antique white drawing, 8x10 1-2, 
4 pkgs. antique white drawing, 6x9 
1 lb. rubber erasers, No. 120, 



, $2 


25 


1 


00 




65 



66 



$3 90 



128 



Feb. 2. 1 doz. qts. Treasury ink, $3 00 

3 pkgs. blotters, 60 



Edward E. Babb & Co. 
Mar. 24. 6 Tarr & McMurray's Geog., 5, 2d, $2 00 



$9 38 


10 42 


5 42 


7 00 



Apr. 6. 6 Tarr & McMurray's Geog., 3, 2d, $3 75 



Aug. 8. 15 Tarr & McMurray's Geog., 5, 3d, 
25 Tarr & McMurray's Geog., 5, 4th, 
13 Tarr & McMurray's Geog., 5, 5th, 
6 Tarr's Elem. Phys. Geog., 



Sept. 11. 13 Tarr & McMurray's Geog., 5, 3d, $8 13 
2 Cornan & Kendall Hist, of Eng., 2 09 



Sept. 23. 13 Tarr & McMurray's Geog., 5, 5th, $5 42 



Oct. 5. 1 Shakespeare as a Dramatist, 

1 The English Pilgrims, 
1 Elizabethan Literature, 
1 Hist. 19th Cent. Literature. 



$3 60 



$178 66 



$2 00 



$3 75 



$32 22 



$10 22 





$5 42 


$1 71 




1 25 




83 




1 13 






$4 92 



$58 53 



129 
Ginn & Co. 



Mar. 24. 2 Weaver series No. 2, 
2 Weaver series No. 3, 
1 Weaver series No. 4. 



Less 1-6, 



Postage, 



Apr. 3. 35 each, Coda, Nos. 196, 259, 238, 
Less 15 per cent, 



Credit 33 Coda, No. 196, 



Apr. 22. 28 Coda, No. 73, 

Less 10 per cent, 



Postage, 



Apr. 24. 35 Coda, No. 226, 

Less 10 per cent, 



Postage, 



$1 00 

1 00 

50 


$2 50 
42 


$2 08 
11 


$3 15 
49 


$2 68 
60 


$ 56 
6 


$ 50 
6 


$1 05 
10 


$ 95 
6 



$2 19 



$2 08 



$ 56 



$1 01 



13° 



May 17. 2 Jones 1st Readers, 
2 Jones 2d Readers, 



Less ]-6, 



May 15. 8 Wentworth Plain Geom. Rev., 
Less 1-6, 



Aug. 8. 7 Montgomery Eng. Hist, 

7 Wentworth New Sen. Algebra, 



$ 60 
70 


$1 30 
20 


$6 00 
1 00 



$1 08 



$5 00 



Less 1-6, 



Aug. 31. 10 New Virgil and Vocabulary, 
Less 1-6, 



Sept. 11. 7 Montgomery Am. Hist., 
Less 1-6, 



Sept. 7. 5 Robinson Hist. Western Europe, $8 00 

5 Immensee, 1 50 

3 Auxiliary Virgil, 45 

2 New Cicero, 2 80 



$7 84 
7 84 


$15 68 
2 61 


$15 00 
2 50 


$7 00 
1 17 



$13 07 



$12 50 



$5 83 



$12 75 
Less 1-6. 2 12 



$10 63 



i3i 

Oct. 2. 8 Immensee 

2 Gayley's Classic Myths, 

2 Myers' M. & M. Hist, Rev. 



Less 1-6, 



Oct. 6. 1 Weaver No. 6, 
1 Weaver No. 4, 



$2 40 


3 00 


3 00 


$8 40 


1 40 


$ 50 


50 


$1 CO 


17 



Less 1-6, 



$ 83 
30 each Coda Nos. 39, 55, $1.20, less 

10 per cent, 1 08 



Oct. 9. 5 doz. Vert, writing books, No. 1, $3 75 

10 doz. Vert, writing books, No. 2, 7 50 

10 doz. Vert, writing books, No. 5, 7 50 



Nov. 11. 2 Weaver No. 4, 
1 Weaver No. 5, 



Less 1-6, 



Postage, 



$1 


00 




5ii 


$1 50 




25 


$1 


25 




7 



$7 00 



$1 91 



$15 63 



$1 32 



132 

Dec. 12. 60 Coda No. 147, $1 62 

1 each Weaver Nos. 5, 6, 7, 1 25 



$2 87 



Jan. 22. 36 Coda @ 3c, less 10 per cent, pos- 
tage lie, 



Jan. 27. 1 Key Wentworth Sen. Algebra, 



Feb. 12. 25 each Coda Nos. 208, 258, 299, 
Less 15 per cent, 



American Book Co. 

Mar. 23. 5 Gateways Idylls of the King, 
Less 1-5, 



Aug. 10 7 Martin's Civil Government, 
Less 1-5, 



$1 08 






$1 08 


U 75 






$1 75 


$2 75 




41 






$2 34 



$87 85 



Rand, McNalJy & Co. 
Mar. 23. 12 Lights to Literature, No. 2, $3 48 



$3 48 



$1 75 
35 


$0 30 
1 26 



$1 40 



01 



i33 

Sept. 2. 1 Carpenter's So. America, 
1 Carpenter's No. America, 



Less 1-5, 



Sept. 9. 5 Smith's Small Hist, of Rome, 
Less 1-5, 



Sept. 12. 3 Carpenter's Asia, 
Less 1-5, 



Sept. 28. 6 Carpenter's So. America, 
Less 1-5, 



Oct. 3. 6 Dryer Phys. Geog\ 
Less 1-5, 



Dec. 8. 2 Smith's Hist, of Greece, 
Less 1-5, 



$ 60 
60 


$1 20 
24 


$5 00 

1 00 


1 80 
36 


$3 60 

72 


$7 20 
1 44 


$2 00 
40 



% 



$4 00 



$1 44 



$2 88 



$5 76 



$1 60 



$23 08 



Easterbrook Steel Pen Mfg. Co. 
Mar. 24. 20 gr. pens, No. 556, $6 40 



$6 40 



Apr. 22. 



134 




B. F. Wood Music Co. 




Opus No. 29, 
Postage, 


$1 30 
5 



Educational Publishing Co. 

May 27. 10 Aesop's Fables, Vol. 1, $3 00 

Less 1-6, 50 



Chas. Scribner's Sons. 

May 17. 1 How to Know the Wild Flowers, 
Express, 



Oct. 17. 6 Physical Geog., 

Less 20 per cent, 



Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 



Aug. 8. 2 Fiske U. S. Histories 
Less 15 percent 



Sept. 27. 2 Riverside Lit. Series 
2 Riverside Lit. Series 
14 Tennyson Selected poems, Rolfe 
2 Larned Eng. Hist. 



$2 00 


30 


$ 26 


42 


6 58 


2 13 



$1 35 



$2 50 



$1 60 




16 






$1 76 


$7 50 




1 50 






$6 00 



$7 76 



$1 70 



!35 



7 Fiske Hist. U. S. 
5 Bigelow Papers 



Oct. 2 4 Simond's Hist. Eng. Literature 
Less 15 percent 



Less 1-6 



Oct. 6. 10 Mon Oncle, $4 50 less .75 



Oct. 11. 10 Petite Fadette 
Less 1-6 



5 95 
3 33 




$5 00 
75 


$18 a 




$4.25 



D. C. Heath & Co. 
Aug. 8. 2 American Indians, 45c less 1-6 $ 75 



Oct. 2. 11 Kalte Herz 

11 L'Arrabbiata 
11 Das Madchen 
11 Die Journalisten 
11 Neffe Als Onkle 
11 Columba 
10 Mare au Diable 
8 Le Tartuffe 



$24 62 





$ 75 


$4 40 




2 75 




3 30 




3 30 




3 30 




3 50 




2 50 




2 00 






$25 05 




4 17 




$20 88 


$3 75 






$3 75 


$3 00 




50 





$2 50 



136 

Feb. 2. 2 Super Readers $1 17 

2 Marchen Erzahlungen 1 00 



A. W. Hall, Scientific Co. 
Aug. 16. 1 Magnifier No. 754; 1 No. 760 $1 45 



$1 45 
Nov. 23. Chemicals and apparatus 20 15 



Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Co. 



Sept. 13. 


4 King's Geog. Readers, No. 4 
Express 

Allyn & Bacon. 

2 Bennett's Caesar 
Less 1-6 


$2 40 
15 


Sept. 7. 


$2 00 
33 



University Publishing Co. 



Sept. 16. 2 Ivanhoe, paper 
2 Rob Roy, paper 



Less 1-5 



Postage 



$ 40 
25 


$ 65 
13 


$ 52 
14 



$2 17 
$30 05 



$20 15 
$21 60 



$2 55 



$1 67 



$ 66 



*37 

Silver, Burdett & Co. 

Oct. 4. 6 Earth and It's Hist. $6 00 

Less 1-G 1 OO 



Oct. 10. 2 Normal Music Readers, No. 1 
2 Normal Music Readers, No. 2 



Less 1-6 



G. P. Putnam's Sons. 



Oct. 1. 1 Mathew's Flowers 

Express 



Nov. 17. 2 Mathew's Flowers 
Express 



$ 64 
1 20 


$1 84 
30 



** Longmans, Green & Co. 



Oct. 3 6 Longmans' School Geog. $7 50 

Express 40 



$5 00 



$1 54 



$6 54 



$1 75 




15 






$1 90 


$3 50 




25 






$3 75 



$5 C5 



$7 90 



138 

D. Appleton & Co. 
Oct. 3. 6 G. & B. Phys. Geog. $6 25 

Mrs. Sterrie A. Weaver. 
Oct. 16 10 Supervisor & Teacher's Record Books $1 50 



Atkinson, Menzer & Grover. 

Dec. 29. 2 Doz. Crayons, No. 54 $1 20 

1 Doz. Crayons, No. 55 35 

6 Lots Sunbonnet cards 90 

1 Box Antiseptic Crayons 30 



Express Charges. 



Paid A. W. Raynor 
Paid A. L. Noyes 
Paid W. B. Pierce 



Credit supplies sold 



$6 25 



$1 50 



$2 75 



|13 18 

11 60 

55 






$25 33 


| 


$506 68 
$3 75 



$502 93 



CHARLES J. WILLIAMS, 

Purchasing Agent. 



i39 






Town Warrant, 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS, MIDDLESEX, SS. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in the County 
of Middlesex, Greeting : 

You are hereby required in the name of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town of 
Acton, qualified to vote in elections and town affairs, to assemble 
in the Town Hall, iu said town, on Monday, the twenty-sixth day 
of March, A. D. , 1906, at nine o'clock in the forenoon, then and 
there to act on the following articles, as they may think proper, 
viz. 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said meeting. 

Art. 2. To see if the Town will accept the reports of the 
Selectman, Overseers of the Poor, Sr-hool Committee, Library Trus- 
tees, and other town officers. 

Art. 3. To choose all necessary town officers and committees 
and fix salaries. 

Art. 4. To hear and act upon the reports of any committees 
chosen to report at this meeting. 

Art. 5. To see what amount of money the Town will raise for 
due observance of Memorial clay. 

Art. 6. To see if the Town will accept the jury list as revised 
by the Selectmen. 

Art. 7. To see what amount of money the Town will raise for 
repairing roads and bridges. 



140 

Art. 8. To see if the Town will authorize the Treasurer, with 
the approval of its Selectmen, to borrow mom y for the Town, if 
necessary, in anticipation of taxes the cut rent year. 

Art. 9. To vote Yes or No in answer to the question "Shall 
licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in Acton 
the present year?" 

Art. 10. To see what amount of money the Town will raise for 
support of Memorial Library the present year. 

Art. 11. To see what amount of money the Town w 7 i 11 raise 
for the support of schools the present year. 

Art. 12. To see what amount of money the Town will raise 
for school supplies. 

Art. 13. To see what amount of money the lown will 
raise for town charges. 

Art. 14. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money 
for the enforcement of the liquor laws, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 15. To see if the Town will maintain street lamps the 
1 present year, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 16. To see what amount of money tho Town will appro- 
v priate for the care of cemeteries the present year, or act anything 
thereon. 

Art. 17. To see w 7 hat amount of money the Town will raise to 
maintain the fire department. 

Art. 18. To see if the Town will adopt the use of official 
ballots at their elections, and determine what officers in addition 
to those required to he so elected, shall be so chosen and determine 

the number and term of office. 

• 

Art. 19. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum of 
$500.00 to macadamize the piece of road in Acton, fiom the May- 
nard town line to the Concord town line, about 2,000 feet in 
length, or act anything thereon. 



I 4 I 

Art. 20. To see if the Town will take any action in regard to 
leaving a driveway under the proposed overhead bridge at South 
Acton, between the property of Mrs. Ella Hosmer and railroad, 
or take any action thereon. 

Art. 21. To see if the Town will take any action in relation 
to the speed of automobiles. 

Art. 22. To see if the Town will take any action in regard to 
the extermination of the brown tail moth. 

Art. 23. To see if the Town will vote to bny a lockup, or 
take any action thereon. 

Art. 24. To see if the Town will accept anrl build the road 
leading from Massachusetts avenue to School street, in West Acton, 
as laid out by Road Commissioners, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 25. To see if the Town will further instruct the Select- 
men in regard to building the addition to the town hall, or take 
any action thereon 

Art. 26. To see if the Town will officially accept the his- 
torical box and gavel which has been presented to the Chairman 
of the Selectmen by D. Hemy Scarlett, or take -any action thereon. 

Art. 27. To see if the Town will taise $1 20.00 for six band 
concerts, or take any action thereon. 

Art. 2 8. To see if the Town will discontinue the private way 
laid out by the Road Commissioner of the Town of Acton on 
petition of Mary T. Coughlin, over land of Maiy O Neil, and ac- 
cepted by the Town at its meetiug held on the 2?th day of March, 
1905. 

Art. 29. To see if the Town will rescind the vote passed at the 
April meeting in 1893, whereby they voted to choose three Road 
Commissioners, and accept the provisions of Chapter 11, Section 
336, Revised Laws, relating to the election of Highway Surveyor. 

Art. 30. To see if the Town will vote to pay the bonnty of 
$125.00 as voted on March 2, 1891, to G. M. Pike, with interest, 
or act anything thereon. 



142 

Art. 31. To see what action the Town will take in relation to 
the collection of taxes the present year. 

Art. 32. To see if the Town will appropriate the snra of 
$2,000.00 to macadamize the road from Acton Center to East 
Acton, or act anything thereon. 

And you are hereby directed to serve this warrant by posting 
copies, attested by you, in the following places, one in each of 
the Post Offices and Railroad Stations, one in each of the stores of 
C. H. Mead & Co., M. E. Taylor & Co., Tuttle & Newton, Finney 
& Hoit, J. Cushing & Co. , and one at the Nagog House, seven 
days at least before the time appointed for holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due return of this warrant, with your 
doings thereon, to the Selectmen or the Town Clerk on or before 
the time of holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands in Acton this thirteenth day of March, 
in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and six. 

FRANK W. HOIT, 
ARTHUR M. WHITCOMB, 
LYMAN C. TAYLOR, 

Selectmen of Acton. 

A true copy, Attest : 

Constable of Acton. 



Index, 



Town Officers 3 

Town Meetings 6 

State Election 13 

Town Clerk's Report 16 

Births 17 

Marriages 18 

Deaths 19 

Non-Resident Burials 20 

Dog Licenses 21 

Selectmen's Report 23 

List of Jurors 50 

Treasurer's Report 61 

Auditor's Report 56 

Assessors' Report 57 

Report of Old Home Week Committee 59 

Road Commissioners 62 

Board of Health 64 

Overseers of the Poor 65 

Tree Warden 71 

Report of Cemetery Commissioners 77 

Report of Librarian 80 

School Report 85 

School Calendar 87 

Organization 88 

Committee 99 

Financial Statement 101 

Superintendent's Report 103 

High School Principal Ill 

Supervisor of Music 113 

Commencement Exercises 116 

Statistical Tables 117 

Roll of Honor 120 

Tiuaut Officers 124 

Dt part men t of Sohool Supplies 125 

Town Wanant 139 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 

Massachusetts 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 12 

1907 

Together With the School Report 




ACTOM l, 



HUDSON, MASSACHUSETTS 

NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY;* PRINTERS 

?1907 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING MARCH 12 



1907 



Together With the School Report 




HUDSON, MASSACHUSETTS 

NKWS PUBLISHING COMPANY, PRINTERS 

1907 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1906. 



~ Selectmen. 

Frank W. Hoit, Bertram D. Hall/ Edwin A. Phalen .""" 

Town Clerk. 

Horace F. Tuttle. 

Town Treasurer. 

Jona. K. W. Wetherbee. 

Assessors. 
William F. Stevens, James B. Tuttle, Harry E. Clough. 

Overseers of the Poor. 

r 

William F. Kelley, J. S. Moore, Oetavus A. Knowlton. 7P^ 

Auditor. 

Waldo E. Whitcomb. 

Collector of Taxes. 

William F. Stevens. 



Tree Warden. 

Charles J. Williams. 

Constables. 

Albert S. Bradley, Moses A. Reed, 

James Kinsley, William P. Stevens 

Field Drivers. 

Albert S. Bradley, Moses A. Reed 

James Kinsley, \IT William F. Stevens 



r-> 






Fence Viewers. 

Frank W\ Hoit, Edwin A. Phalen* Bertram D. Hall. 

Surveyors of Lumber, Wood, Hoops and Staves. 

Herbert T. Clark, Edgar H. Hall, Jona. P. Fletcher, 
Charles E. Smith, Edward F. Richardson, Job W. Dupee. 

Road Commissioners. 

Anson C. Piper, ( Term expires 1907 

William H. KingsleyjO 1 Term expires 1908 

Albert II. Perkins, Term expires 1909 

Cemetery Commissioners. 

Horace F. Tuttle, Term expires 1907 

Herbert T. Clark. Term expires 1908 

Julian Tuttle, Term expires 1909 



School Committee. 



Charles J. Williams, £ 
Frank R. Knowlton, \jf. 



Samuel A. Christie, 



, 



Board of Health. 



Frank J. Barker, M. D.. • 
Frank E. Tasker, M. D., r \J/ t 
Charles J. Williams, d . 



Term expires 1908 
Term expires 1907 
Term expires 1909 



Term expires 1907 
Term expires 1909 
Term expires 1908 



Trustees of Memorial Library. 
(Chosen by the Town.) 



Charles J. Williams, 
Lucius A. Hesselton, 
Horace F. Tuttle, 



C« 



Term expires 1908 
Term expires 1909 
Term expires 1907 



TOWN WARRANT. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Middlesex ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in the 
County of Middlesex, 

Greeting. — You are hereby required in the name of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts to notify and warn the in- 
habitants of the Town of Acton, qualified to vote in elections 
and Town affairs, to assemble in the Town Hall, in said town, 
on Monday, the twenty-fifth day of March, A. D. 1907 at nine 
o'clock in the forenoon then and there to act on the follow- 
ing articles, as they may think proper, viz : 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Art. 2. To bring in their votes on one ballot for the 
following town officers, Town Clerk, three Selectmen, three 
Assessors, three Overseers of the Poor, Town Treasurer, one 
Collector of Taxes, one Auditor, one Tree Warden, four 
Constables, four Field Drivers, three Fence Viewers all for 
one year; one Road Commissioner, one Trustee of Memorial 
Library, one member of the School Committee, one member 
of the Board of Health, all for three years. Also on the same 
ballot with the above named town officers, to vote upon the 
following question, shall licenses be granted for the sale of 
intoxicating liquors in the Town? 



The Polls will be opened at 9.30 a. m. and may be closed 
at 4 o'clock p. m. 

Art. 3. To choose all necessaiw Town officers not named 
in Art. 2 and fix salaries. 

Art. 4. To see if the Town will accept the reports of 
the Selectmen, Overseers of the Poor, School Committee, 
Library Trustees, and other Town officers. 

Art. 5. To hear and act upon the reports of any com- 
mittees chosen to report at this meeting. 

Art. 6. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for due observance of Memorial day. 

Art. 7. To see if the Town will accept the jury list as 
revised by the Selectmen. 

Art. 8. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for the repairing and building of roads and bridges, 
or act anything thereon. 

Art. 9. To see if the Town will authorize the Treasurer 
with the approval of its Selectmen, to borrow money for the 
Town, if necessary in anticipation of taxes the current year. 

Art. 10. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for support of Memorial Library the present year. 

Art. 11. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for the support of schools the present } T ear. 

Art. 12. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for school supplies. 

Art. 13. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum 
of money for the enforcement of the Liquor Laws, or act 
anj^thing thereon. 

Art. 14. To see what amount of money the Town will 



8 

appropriate for the care of cemeteries or act anything 
thereon. 

Art. 15. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for maintenance of Fire department or act thereon. 

Art. 16. To see if the ToAvn will authorize its Selectmen 
to contract with the American Woolen Co. for the lighting 
of its streets or take any action thereon. 

Art. 17. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for Town charges. 

Art. 18. To see if the Town will vote to buy a steam 
roller or act anything thereon. 

Art. 19. To see what action the Town will take in 
regard to the extermination of the brown tail and gypsy 
moth. 

Art. 20. To see if the Town will adopt the sidewalk 
act or take any action thereon. 

Art. 21. To see if the Town will discontinue an old 
bridle road from the house of Moses Taylor to the late 
Isaac Barker or act anything thereon. 

Art. 22. To see if the Town will vote to install electric 
lights in the public buildings or act anything thereon. 

Art. 23. To see if the Town will vote to place a memo- 
rial stone in the Pilgrim Monument at Provincetown, or act 
anything thereon. 

Art. 24. To see if the Town will take any action in 
regard to the speed of automobiles. 

Art. 25. To see if the Town will purchase a suitable 
piece of land adjoining the school house lot at South Acton 
for a play ground or take any action thereon. 

Art. 26. To see what action the Town will take in re- 
lation to the collection of taxes. 



Art. 27. To see if the Town will maintain street lamps 
or act anything thereon. 

Art. 28. To see if the Town will straighten the lower 
end of Maple street, Sonth Acton, or act anything thereon. 

And you are hereby directed to serve this warrant by 
posting copies, attested by you. in the following places, one 
in each of the Post Offices and Kailroad stations, one in each 
of the stores of C. H. Mead & Co., W. E. Whitcomb, M. E. 
Taylor & Co.. Tuttle & Xewton, Finney & Hoit, J. Cushing & 
Co. and one at the Nagog House, seven days at least before 
the time appointed for holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due return of this Warrant 
with your doings thereon, to the Selectmen or the Town 
Clerk on or before the time of holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands in Acton this thirteenth day of 
March in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred 
and seven. 

FRANK W. HOIT. 
EDWIN A. PHALEN, 
BERTRAM D. HALL. \ 

Selectmen of Acton. 



A true copy attest 



Constable of Acton 



IO 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL MEETING HELD 
MARCH 26, 1906. 



Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Allen B. Parker was chosen Moderator. 

Art. 2. To see if the Town will accept the reports of the 
Selectmen, Overseers of the Poor, School Committee, Library 
Trustees and other town officers. 

Voted, to accept the reports, of the several town officers 
and the Committee on Old Home Week as printed. 

Art. 3. To choose all necessary town officers and com- 
mittees and fix salaries. 

Voted, To choose on one ballot a Town Clerk, Town 
Treasurer, three Selectmen, three Assessors, three Overseers 
of the Poor, one member of the School Committee for three 
years, one Collector of Taxes, four Constables, one Ceme- 
tery Commissioner for three years, four Field Drivers, six 
Surveyors of Lumber, Wood, Hoops, and Staves, three 
Fence Viewers, one Trustee of Memorial Library for three 
years, one Auditor, one Road Commissioner for three years, 
one member of the Board of Health for three years, and a 
Tree Warden. 

Voted, that the salary of the Tax Collector be one per- 
cent of the amount collected and that he perform all the 
duties hitherto performed by said officer. 



i r 

Voted, that the salary of the Road Commissioners be the 
same as last year namely: Two and one-half dollars per 
day employed nine hours to constitute a day. 

Voted, that the salary of the Auditor be fixed at six 
dollars. 

The following Town Officers and Committees were 
chosen : 

Town Clerk— Horace F. Tuttle. 
Treasurer — Jona. K. W. Wetherbee. 

Selectmen — Frank W. Hoit, Bertram D. Hall, Edwin 
A. Phalen. 

Assessors — William F. Stevens, James B. Tuttle, Harry 

E. Clough. 

Overseers of the Poor — Octavus A. Knowlton, J. S. 
Moore, W. F. Kelley. 

School Committee — Samuel A. Christie. 

Collector of Taxes — William F. Stevens. 

Constables — Albert S. Bradley, Moses A. Reed, James 
Kinsley, William F. Stevens. 

Cemetery Commissioner — Julian Tuttle. 

Field Drivers — Moses A. Reed, Albert S. Bradley, W. 

F. Stevens, James Kinsley. 

Surveyors of Lumber, Wood, Hoops and Staves — Her- 
bert T. Clark, Edgar H. Hall, Jona. P. Fletcher, Charles E. 
Smith, Edward F. Richardson, Job W. Dupee. 

Fence Viewers — Frank W. Hoit, Edwin A. Phalen, Bert- 
ram D. Hall. 

Trustee Memorial Library — Lucius A. Hesselton. 

Auditor — Waldo E. Whitcomb. 



12 

Road Commissioner — Albert II. Perkins. 
Board of Health— Frank E. Tasker. 
Tree Warden — Charles J. Williams. 

Art. 4. To hear and act upon the reports of any com- 
mittees chosen to report at this meeting. 

No action taken. 

Art. 5. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for due observance of Memorial Day. 

Voted, to raise the sum of one hundred dollars. 

Art. 6. To see if the Town will accept the jury list as 
revised by the Selectmen. 

Voted, to accept the jury list as revised by the Select- 
men, after taking therefrom the names of Herbert T. Clark 
and Abram Tuttle and adding the name of Octavus A. 
Knowlton. 

Art. 7. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for repairing roads and bridges. 

Voted, to raise the sum of five thousand dollars. All 
special work to be done from this appropriation. 

Art. 8. To see if the Town will authorize the Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money for 
the Town if necessary, in anticipation of taxes the current 
year. 

Voted, to authorize the Treasurer to borrow money for 
the town, as stated in the article. 

Art. 9. To vote Yes or No in answer to the question. 
" Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors 
in Acton the present year?" 



J 3 
Total number of ballots cast, 221 

Yes, 69 

No, 152 

Art. 10. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for the support of Memorial Library the present year. 

Voted, to raise four hundred dollars for running ex- 
penses and two hundred dollars for books. 

Art. 11. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for the support of schools the present year. 

Voted, to raise for: 

Common Schools, $3,800 00 

High School, 1,800 00 

School supplies, 525 00 

Transportation of pupils, 1,360 00 

Salary of Sup't. of schools, 480 00 



$7,965 00 

Art. 12. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for school supplies. 

Voted, to pass over the article. 

Art. 13. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for town charges. 

Voted, to raise $3,500. 

Art. 14. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money for the enforcement of the liquor laws, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Chose. Allen B. Parker, Moses A. Reed, Sidney L. Rich- 



14 

ardson and 0. A. Knowlton, a committee for the enforcement 
of the liquor laws. 

Voted to appropriate $500. 

Art. 15. To see if the Town will maintain street lamps 
the present year or act anything thereon. 

Voted, to raise $850 for the maintenance of street lamps 
the current year. 

Art. 16. To see what amount of money the Town will 
appropriate for the care of cemeteries the present year or 
act anything thereon. 

Voted, to appropriate $500. 

Art. 17. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise to maintain the fire department. 

Voted, to appropriate $350. 

Art. 18. To see if the Town will adopt the use of of- 
ficial ballots at their elections and determine what officers 
in addition to those required to be so elected, shall be so 
chosen and determine the number and term of office. 

Voted, to adopt the use of official ballots in town 

elections. 

Voted, that hereafter the town officers to be chosen by 
ballot, the number of said officers and their term of office 
shall be as follows: Three Selectmen, Town Clerk, Town 
Treasurer, three Assessors, three Overseers of the Poor, one 
Auditor, one Collector of Taxes, four Constables, four Field 
Drivers, three Fence Viewers and a Tree Warden, all for one 
year. Also three Road Commissioners, three members of 
the School Committee, three members of the Board of Health, 
three Cemetery Commissioners and three Trustees of Memo- 
rial Library, all for the term of three years, one to be elected 
each year. 



15 

Art. 19. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum 
of $500, to macadamize the piece of road in Acton from the 
Maynard town line, to the Concord town line, about 2,000 
feet in length, or act anything thereon. 

Voted, to instruct the Road Commissioners to construct 
the road at the Powder Mills after the now incomplete ma- 
cadam roads between Acton Center and South Acton and 
South Acton and West Acton, shall have been completed. 

Art. 20. To see if the Town will take any action in re- 
gard to leaving a driveway under the proposed over-head 
bridge at South Acton, between the property of Mrs. Ella 
Hosmer and railroad or take any action thereon. 

Voted, to pass over the article. 

Art. 21. To see if the town will take any action in re- 
lation to the speed of automobiles. 

Voted, to enforce the law relating thereto. 

Art. 22. To see if the Town will take any action in re- 
gard to the extermination of the brown tail moth. 

Voted, to appropriate $200 for exterminating brown tail 
moths. 

Art. 23. To see if the town will vote to buy a lockup 
or take any action thereon. 

Voted to leave the matter of buying a lockup to the 
Selectmen. 

Art. 24. To see if the town will accept and build the 
road leading from Massachusetts Avenue to School street, 
in West Acton as laid out by the Road Commissioners or act 
anything thereon. 

Voted, to pass over the article. 



i6 

Art. 25. To see if the Town will further instruct the 
Selectmen in regard to building the addition to the town 
hall or take any action thereon. 

Voted, to rescind the vote of last year taken under Art. 
4 of the warrant for March 27, 1905, relating to the enlarge- 
ment of the town hall and the raising of twenty-two hundred 
dollars therefor. 

Art. 26. To see if the town will officially accept the 
historical box and gavel which has been presented to the 
chairman of the Selectmen by D. Henry Scarlett, or take 
any action thereon. 

Voted, to accept the gift of Mr. D. Henry Scarlett and 
that the same be placed in the Memorial Library in care of 
the Trustees. 

Voted, to present to Mr. D. Henry Scarlett a memento in 
recognition of his gift as shall be determined by the Select- 
men. 

Art. 27. To see if the Town will raise $120 for six band 
concerts or take any action thereon. 

Voted, to pass over the article. 

Art. 28. To see if the town will discontinue the private 
way laid out by the Road Commissioners of the Town of 
Acton on petition of Mary T. Coughlin over land of Mary 
O'Neil and accepted by the Town at its meeting held on the 
27th day of March 1905. 

Voted, to dismiss the article. 

Art. 29. To see if the Town will rescind the vote passed 
at the April meeting in 1903, whereby they voted to choose 
three Road Commissioners and accept the provisions of 
Chap. 11, Section 336, Revised Laws, relating to the election 
of Highway Surveyor. 



*7 

Voted, not to rescind said vote. 

Art. 30. To see if the town will vote to pay the bounty 
of $125, as voted on March 2, 1891, to G. M. Pike with in- 
terest or act anything thereon. 

Voted, to instruct the Selectmen to pay to Mrs. Sawyer 
once the widow of George M. Pike the sum of one hundred 
and twenty-five dollars. 

Art. 31. To see what action the town will take in re- 
lation to the collection of taxes the present year. 

Voted, that the collector charge interest at the rate of 
five per cent, per annum on all taxes remaining unpaid after 
the first day of November next. 

Art. 32. To see if the Town will appropriate the sum 
of $2,000 to macadamize the road from Acton Center to East 
Acton or act anything thereon. 

Voted, to pass over the article. 

Voted, to adjourn without day. 



i8 



TOWN MEETING, AUGUST 2, 1906. 



Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Herbert T. Clark was chosen Moderator. 

Art. 2. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen 
to enter into a contract with the Commonwealth for the 
building of a section of State Highway beginning at West 
Acton and extending east on the Turnpike as laid out by the 
Shite Highway Commissioners. 

Amount appropriated by State $6,000. 

Voted, that the Selectmen be authorized to enter into a 
contract with the Commonwealth for the building of a section 
of State Highway beginning at West Acton and extending 
east on the Turnpike as laid out by the State Highway Com- 
mission. 

Art. 3. To see if the Town will take further action in 
reference to street lighting. 

Voted, that the street lamps be lighted twenty nights 
every month in the year. 

Voted, to appropriate $200 to carry out this vote. 

A T oted, to adjourn without day. 



J 9 



STATE ELECTION, NOVEMBER 6, 1906. 



Party designations: R., Republican; D., Democratic; P., 
Prohibition; I. L., Independence League; S., Socialist; S. L., 
Socialist Labor; S. G. R., State Government Reform. 



Whole number of ballots cast, 

Governor. 



Precincts 
1 2 3 Tl. 
99 106 115 320 



Gamaliel Bradford, S. 


G. R,, 








1 


1 


James F. Carey, S., 
















William H. Carroll, S. 


L, 


1 


1 





2 


Curtis Guild, Jr., R., 




78 


79 


92 


249^ 


John B. Moran, P., 




4 


2 


3 


9 


John B. Moran, I. L., 




3 


4 


2 


9 


John B. Moran, D., 




10 


15 


11 


36 


John B. Moran, 




1 


2 


2 


5 


Blanks, 


Lieut. Governor. 


2 


3 


4 


9 


E. Gerry Brown, I. L. 


,D., 


22 


26 


20 


68 


Hervey S. Cowell, P., 







2 


1 


3 


Eben S. Draper, R., 




72 


70 


82 


224^ 


Walter J. Hoar, S. L., 







3 


1 


4 


John F. Mullen. S., 
















Blanks. 




5 


5 


11 


21 



20 

Secretary 

Jonathan S. Lewis P 
Ambrose .Miles. S., 
. William M. Olin, R., 
Charles C. Paine, I. L., 
Blanks, 



Arthur B. Chapin, R., 
George B. Cushman, S.. 
s. Frederick French, P., 
George M. Harrigan, D. 
Blanks, 








1 


1 


2 




2 








2 




71 


76 


91 


238 IS 


)., 


20 


22 


16 


58. 




6 


7 


7 


20 


Treasurer. 












74 


77 


85 


236 ^ 




1 








1 




1 


1 


1 


3 




17 


22 


17 


56 




6 


6 


12 


24 



Auditor. 



Albert Barnes, S. L., 
Thomas L. Hisgen, D., 
Fred L. Johnson, S., 
James F. Pease, P., 
Henry E. Turner, R., 
Blanks. 






2 





2 


17 


22 


19 


58 


1 








1 


3 


2 


1 


6 


71 


74 


83 


228 


7 


6 


12 


25 



Attorney General. 



Allen Coffin, P.. 
Dana Malone, R., 
Arthur E. Reimer, S. L., 
John "W. SBerman, S., 
John A. Thayer. D.. 
Blanks, 






2 


1 


3 


69 


72 


84 


225 





2 





2 


1 








1 


24 


23 


21 


68 


5 


7 


9 


21 



21 



Representative in Congress. 



Timothy Richardson, S., 
v - Charles Q. Tirrell, R., 
Charles E. Wood, ' 
Blanks, 



7 6 1 14 

73 79 92 244 

11 

19 21 21 61 



Councillor. 



John C. Call, S., 
Edward Gallagher, D., 
Seward W. Jones, R., 
Blanks, 



10 1 

16 17 18 51 

73 78 83 234 

9 11 14 34 



Senator. 



John P. Farley, D., 
\ James W. Grimes. R. 
Charles W. Pratt, S., 
Blanks, 



19 


16 


16 


51 


59 


73 


86 


218 


1 


1 





2 


20 


16 


13 


49 



Representative in General Court. 



James P. Dunigan, D. 
Edwin C. Perham, R., 
Blanks, 



20 


21 


24 


65 


71 


76 


80 


227 


8 


9 


11 


28 



County Commissioner. 



Oscar J. Johnson, S., 
Patrick E. Sullivan, D. 
Samuel O. Upham. R., 
Blanks. 



1113 
20 17 15 52 
70 80 86 236 

8 8 13 29 



Clerk of Courts. 










Theodore C. Hurd, R., 


74 


77 


86 


237 


Charles E. McCarthy, D., 


18 


16 


17 


51 


Blanks. 


7 


13 


12 


32 



•\ 



22 










Register of Deeds. 










Edwin 0. Childs, R., 


75 


78 


87 


240 


Seymour J. Milliken, S., 


6 


4 


1 


11 


Blanks, 


18 


24 


27 


69 






County Treasurer. 



Joseph 0. Hayden, R., 
John 0. Brien, D., 
William Parker, S., 
Blanks, 



74 


77 


88 


239 > 


15 


15 


14 


44 


2 


1 





3 


8 


13 


13 


34 



Vote for Representative in 11th Middlesex District. 



James P. Dunigan of Chelms- 
ford, Dem 

Edwin C. Perham of Chelms- 
ford, Rep 

Blanks 

Total 









T5 








U 








© 






a> 


«H 


o 


Ph 


m 


l-H 


+3 




?H 


0> 


o 


K^ 


e8 


,£) 


< 


< 


o 


o 


65 


187 


44 


364 


227 


225 


44 


302 


28 


44 


10 


38 


320 


456 


98 


704 



49 

111 

18 
178 



134 

180 

38 

352 



o 
Eh 



843 

1089 

176 

2108 



23 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



Births. 



AVhole number recorded, 37 Native parentage, 16 

Males, 17 Foreign parentage, 12 

Females, 20 Mixed parentage 9 

Born in Acton, 35 

Marriages. 

Whole number recorded, 18 

Residents of Acton, 24 

Residents of other places, 12 



Deaths. 

Whole number recorded, 29 

Residents of Acton, 25 

Residents of other places, 4 

Occurring in Acton, 26 

Occurring in other places, 3 

Average age, 59 

Note. — The Town Clerk requests information of any 
omission or error in the lists of births, marriages and deaths. 

The Town Clerk hereby gives notice that he is prepared 
to furnish blanks for the return of births and deaths. 



24 



o 
oa 



Q 
W 
« 

at 

i— i 

H 

W 
En 



03 
?h 

- 

o 






O 



a? 
— 
- 

- 



R 
O 
x 

' •- 

O 

• — 

cO 
cO 



SO 

•3 5 



eS Sh 

?h 03 

P-i P-. 



cO 



fe w w 



-d 

-r 

TO 



TJ r^ r^ ^ 

73 eS co to 



^ QQ h3 pq' o 



03 

rH 

o 

o 



R 

o 

DC 

- 
03 
-3 



C8 .03 -J R 



M = .3 



QQ 



r^> 03 2 

-sq o • « .R 

F< -3 F S 

^ CQ ^ 03 

+J M -I 2 

2 1 * s 

^ § R~ R~ 

^ I S " £ 

3 g 2 2 

PQ pq PQ PQ 



_Q S3 

o M 

Eh C 

_ <° 

R r^ 

R r^ 

h 03 

TO *, 



03 o3 

R R 

rd ^r 

o o 

1-3 1-5 



"8 £ § 

p fj 05 

^ ^ - 

5 ^ s 

r— ^ 1—1 



R „ 



R 

o3 

. d 3 

11 



72 03 

03 rR O 



PQ- 

>— ) Cv 

R • 
to pq 

8 ^ 

r— 03 



e 



H 



TO O 

Z - 

-— ' 03 

03 CO 

-d 

« TO 

CO -j 

■A " 

03 03 



o s 

CO g 

bC w 

u 



TO ^ 



* R 

08 F 

a; ^ 



CT d 

s — ' 03 



R 

TO 
03 

d 



O 

R 
CO 

'3 
R 

TO 

> 
C 



^ ^ 3 > ~ 

hh ^ >-r P" — 



cc a 



i^i ry, ^ 



|S 



^ E 

H 03 

^ o 

8 -3 

pa o 



DO 

03 ;£ 

CO pq ^ 

•-3 , CO 

d ^3 

rj ?-i ?-( 

'g CO 03 



03 



W R 

03 y-A 
'to 



R 
O 

~ «3 



m 

03 

'S S 

S 2 

«3 « 
03 rH 



x 



rH 

03 

~ 

03 
- 

TO 



>> H 

03 O 
R «2 



R ±± f— !3 
S ^ ^ ^ 



b "G « 

n w ^ 



rR d 



- 
r— I Tj 

"d ° 

R rH 



_«3 rt 

rH CO 

TO 03 



s I 

r— I i—l 

03 CH 

r— I C7 ^ 



03 & > 

t: r to 



03 

rO 

03 03 
O -H 

bo 

CO Sh 

rH CO 

CO ^ 

r— ( f^H 

O - 

o 

a S 



a a 



CM (M 



rH CO 



-h 



R 03 o 

^ fr ^ 



be g 



H C£) L ^ <M 
CO C<1 



J3 co 3 o 

% ^> < m 



50 w go qo <* 



be 



r.^3 : 
<^ fe ^ ^ 



. • ex 

R 



3 H N W ^ I'D O I> CO C2 o h n 



00 C5 



02 

o 

be 

c _ 

^ o 

g ,3 



d ^dq 






- 

u — 



>. y 



a 

" "u 



a: d 



^ 3 
"2 * 



- e3 



ra c 



PJ ^^ o > 

$ * a ^ 
* g.2 ' 

•5 s rp *r~ 
r 

"-S-d 



a g g ^ 

« 2 ^ 'g 



bC ^ -^ 



~ w 



« w h^ <p pq 



^ s= - -s 



O fcH 
bfl 

o -cj 

* 3 



*-! - ZZ 



ZZ E 



G GO ""> 

£> F 03 

— ' — - 

o a> 2 

3 ^ c 






bD § 



fe J 



« a: 



P ^ 2 

c 



a: 

p 7^ eg 

2 CS ?- 



a: 

•lis 



d d 

wi ^ r - 



O 






& o S S g fl - 



i 

O 



d o 
'I xs 5c 



c rd 
u 



- 



cc ^ ~ 



-z 

a 

OS 





- : ^- 








c 




•r 


r 


X 


DQ 


2^ 


c 


- 


— 


p 


^ 


c 


a 


^ 


- 


O 


•- 


o 


< 


3J 

- 


— 
- 






- 


d 

a: 

- 


>i 






c: 






h 




O 


— 


s 



P^ ^H 



!zj g 2 § 



C^ Cvl O ^ ,^ 

^ & <V ~ p 

<; Q fe 'r-t -r 



^1 cc 
C<3 



a .a 3 a 

& 3 .| 5 

X OS K -/. 



^ § 



P K 

S £ 
~ .2 



H EH 



c 



cc c 



SSSSss 



<r. oc . 



be be 






>. z'l >* -e -e o 

j: ^ p c o ^ 

S < -T X X P 



C 

- 
- 



O -~ ^ ^ ")■ 1^ '^ h « C 

M *M M W N M ^ 'M N CI 






r: ^ ifl — 
^ ^ <r: ^ 



I- 



26 



MARRIAGES REGISTERED IN 1906. 



No. Date Place 



Names 



Residences 



1 June 27 Ackorn, Albert Allen 

Concord Emery, Harriet Elizabeth 

2 Sept. 19 Bosworth, James Davis 
W. Acton Decoster, Mabel Hattie 

3 Mar. 15 Brenan, Frederick 
Providence, R. I. Hartwell, Olla May 

4 Jan. 6 Calder, Charles T. 
Chelmsford George, Elizabeth 

5 Apr. 17 Carey, Wilson 0. 

Boston Monaghan, Martha 

6 Sept. 5 Davidson, Frank Alfred 
W. Acton Withington, Eva Idella 

7 May 31 Downie, Alfred C. 
W. Acton Harris, Daisy J. 

8 June 6 Gould, Arthur Herman 

Acton Wood, Charlotte Sophia 

9 Oct. 1 Harris, Edwin N. 
W. Acton Davis, Hattie A. 

10 June 6 Harrod, Edgar Walter 
W. Acton Whitcomb, Lulu Frances 

11 June 27 Jones, Ralph 
Hudson, Tobin, Mary Ellen 



Cambridge 
Acton 

Somerville 
Somerville 

Acton 
Acton 

Acton 
Chelmsford 

W. Acton 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Wayland 
Boxboro 

W. Acton 
W. Acton 

W. Acton 
Acton 

W. Acton 
W. Acton 

Concord, N. H. 
W. Acton 

S. Acton 
Hudson 



2/ 



12 May 17 Lamphere. Stewart Roy Lowell 
Providence. R. I. Chase. Elizabeth Mildred. Acton 

13 Aug. 29 Lawrence, Henry F. W. Acton 
Boxboro Nelson, Amy Frances Boxboro 

14 Oct. 25 Porter, Clarence A, W. Acton 
^ W. Acton Teele, Fannie E. W. Acton 

15 July 29 Rock, Joseph Marlboro 
Maynard Reynolds, Mary S. Acton 

16 April 28 Symonds, Samuel J. S. Acton 
S. Acton James, Liley S. Acton 

17 June 22 Watkins, Frederick W. W. Acton 
W. Acton Snedden, Margaret W. Acton 

18 June 20 Willard, Lewis Taylor Acton 
Acton Huntoon, Carolena Sophia Acton 



28 






00 -LOCO '(NfflO(NI>OCClfl(XHO(NlO 
•d • t— I N H i—l t— I t—i i— ! <N 



02 o 



CTi • rH r- 1 .|>NNI>^HCOO^(M(MHO 



<C\! CO CO O <C0 LQ <M 'OCOHO;l>LOCOCOaH 
t> CO 00 l> W lO W •Q00'*t>|>Q0(NI>00lO 



ID 
O 
C5 



Q 
W 

w 

CO 

s 

CO 

W 
Eh 
<J 
W 
P 



— 
- 

a 

03 

w 



a) be 



3 cc 



03 

a 

o3 



03 



02 02 

03 o3 
Q P 



- 
- 
o3 

u 

03 



03 

03 03 

CO * 

w 03 

,»« 02 

03 03 



X 



03 

"1 


• 

03 






Q 




Henry 
za (Mir 


a 

o> 


< 


^3 






Q 




03 

w 


^ 


1 




5 


03 


< 


sis 




q 


M 

03 




,0 

z 




+3 

03 


rH 

O 03 

o 

^3 03 


£ 


>» 
p 


03 

T3 


h3 




- 


o3 


03 


03 
Fh 




c 


-3 
03 
5 


- 
03 


— 



>> 
0) 

a 




o3 


ft 


r*a 


>s 


Ph 


2 o 


a 


C 1 


S- 


00 


- 


03 


03 


o o 


a? 



fe^feOWKKKWKW 



rH O Oi 



CO 



- 



8 >* >> S 


r-l 


>> 


03 

a 


'S 03 03 g 

S 3 g 


N 


03 


03 Pi ?-< .JS 


03 


a 


a> 


« ,fi ,£> ft 


PI 




y 


03 03 o 57 
Q fe fe 02 


£ 


5 


03 
- 



•4-3 ^ 

^ O 



rH 


-M 


0J 




rC 


P 


5 

03 

> 


o 


o 


O 


£ O 



GO 

ft « 



CO C<I 



03 03 . ^ 



/. 



H W CC H LO ^ h OO Co O H N CO ^ l: O I- X 



29 



-M oo to ic c: C CO 
j- ' CM CM rH CM 



LO UO 



rH • UO CM H O i— 



r-l CO b- 

t- CO -xH 



co cc 



O CT. tO Ol y— 
CO (N CO to -t 



CD 


,^-^ 


C 


— 


-f 


Iz 


s 


-r 






+J 


- 


03 


tf 



O t* 



^s 



5 ft ci * ^ 

^ O CD j- 

^ Ha -j ~ 






**£ 



<; a 



06 

S jf £ rt - « 

- £ *-" 5C fl 

8 .5 a 2 s 

j ^ g s ph 











>. 


^- — ■> 










CD 


a? 


































+3 


^-s 




, s 








O 




^ 






^_| 


£ 
















cd 












— 








gg 




^ 


:, 




<^ 






* — ' 


— 






C 


EH 


S3 

> 


3D 




be 


— 

— 

CD 




! 


£-1 




— 


a 


Jh 


CD 


rj 




< 


- 






-(J 




a> 


c 




S 


< 


— 

2 


cd 


• T* 


pzT 


jT 


- 


s-i 


c 


• ~ 


<x> 


CT 


^ 


— 


c 


rS 




' ~ 


-^ 


<J3 


~ 















« 




h> 


•s 


£ 



CO 

ci 




CO 
CM 


CM CO 




"* 




CO 
CM 




33 




cd 


CD ^ J 


CO 


5 CO 




>> 


1—1 

1— 1 


— 
= 

cd 
CD 


uo 
cm 

09 


s 

"S 


CD rO 


- 


>vemb 
tober 


CO 
CM 


- 


CO 

p 

8M) 


CD 

- 


^a 


CD 


CD CD 

a ISC) 


~ 


O CD 


^ 


CD 


-^ 


— 


- 


T— 


CM CO 


-+ 


.^ 


t^ 


co 


^^ 




CI 


CM 


Ol CM 


CI 


<N CM 


CI 


Ol 


oi 



30 






cc oo 

CQ CM 



t- uC CC 

r- C3 r- 



bC S 



rH .,_i ■'^O'<*t-00i.':HL'5(M 



i 

pq 






o 10 ^ 

t- rt< t- 



^ CO O O LO 
lO L^ CC CO C© 



t— ! CO UC CD CO L.C IC CI CO 



- 
- 

o 

- 



- 



03 
0) 


d 
— 


S3 

o 




s3~ 

CO 


O 


u 

CC 

C3 


- 


- 


> 
o 


0) 




+3 


a 
u 
o 


DQ 


- 
- 


— 


£ 


o 
- 


as 
O 




£ 





- 






be 



*H C 



- 

© 

r» 

c >- r3 c 

U g CU J3 CO S3 2 
<^ £ S3 ,£ > <! S 
S x > TJ V! ' BB 



<; pq o ^ x pq - 



x 



CO 



S3 






0) 






t3 






• rH 






co 






a> 






« 






S3 




CO 


O 




<1 W .3 


fc 




13 cc 

o » fl 




cc 

CD 


r-3 ^ C3 

S«3 




3 


6 s* 




co 




fc 


Allen, 
Babcoc 



Eg 

Q 

C 



w 



«.1 

c 



Ss 5^E 



3 



^ 



CD S3 CC 



r>s 

- 
S3 

W DC J rv - 

S3 r*» 

5 S3 

^ £ <5 



U ^ 



^£ §v- 



.2 © 



£" 



» a 






o © g £ 

Ph Ph X j£ 



X 



; co ►>. 

-s *a ? 



o 

>. 
co 
En 



COCO^COLC^O^^^^ - 
t-H _ r— i — — I >— i rH ~ 



5§§§§g 
^ 2 ^ oi ^ Oi o: -: 



C5 GO 



Th rH 

cxi 



ofi - O 



r lo °° 2 <*T ^ 3 



be 



£ = a CO 
HH ^) X § 





7\ 


CO 

rH 


CC 


co" 


— 




rH 


'•--. 


■4J 


CD 

S3 


CO 




s^ 




+i 




O 




- 




x 


C3 


■— 


c 


1-3 


— 


--, 


< 


X 


c 



Jt r-J d CC HH >C> CO 



X 5: c; — ci cc ^h 






3* 



PERSONS HAVING DOGS LICENSED IN 1906. 



Burroughs, Samuel R. 


$2 00 


Boyce, Charles E. 


2 00 


Brown. Lizzie J. 


2 00 


Bulette, F. W. 


2 00 


Brown. Nathaniel G 


2 00 


Bixby, Edward F. 


2 00 


Brooks, George H. 


2 00 


Baird, Edson 


2 00 


Buckley, John 


5 00 


Byron, William 


2 00 


Bent, Harding 


2 00 


Bent, James 


2 00 


Baker, Martin 


2 00 


Bresth, Simon 


2 00 


Barker, F. J. 


5 00 


Barber, Walter, H. 


2 00 


Bailey, Frank E., 2 


4 00 


Coughlin., William C. 


2 00 


Clark, Fred E. 


2 00 


Cole, Abel 


2 00 


Coussens, Frank C. 


2 00 


Conant, Luther 


2 00 


Carberg, L. C. 


2 00 


Cole, Nelson J., 2 


7 00 


Coughlin. John F. 


2 00 


Coughlin. Margaret 


2 00 



Dole, Cyrus G. 2 00 

Downey, John 2 00 

Davis, Chas. E. 2 00 

Durkee, J. E. 2 00 

Dusseault. Geo. A. 2 00 

Devane, Thomas E. 2 00 

Davis, Wendell F. 2 00 
Donnelly, Thomas A.. 2, 4 00 

DeLord, George A. 2 00 

Davis. Mary E. 2 00 

Durkee. Harold C. 2 00 

Enneguess, Michael 2 00 

Finney & Hoit 2 00 

Finney, Smith 2 00 

Fairbanks, C. H. 2 00 

Fullonton. L. T. 2 00 

Farrar, Daniel H. 2 00 

Fletcher, Lester N., 2, 4 00 

Farrar. Abel 2 00 

Green. Fred W.. 3, 12 00 

Gray. F. W. 2 00 

Gilmore. Almon H.. 2. 7 00 

Grady. Roy 5 00 

Grimes, James A. 2 00 



32 



Gallant, Joseph 2 00 

Gates, Hiram E. 2 00 

Gould, Herman A. 2 00 

Greenwood, O. II., 2, 10 00 



Harris, Hattie B. 
Houghton, O. Ellsworth 
Hollowell, William 
Holt, W. B. 
Holden, Willis L. 
Hollowell, Fred A. 
Hawes, George A. 
Hawes, Fritz B. 
Harris, David C. 

Jones, Warren 
Jones, Samuel 

Kelley, William F. 
Kelley, John M. 
Kennedy, John 
Kimball, Chas M., 3, 

Lawrence, A. L. 
Libbey, George A. 
Lothrop, T. C. 
Lawrey, George 

Mitchell, John, 2, 
McCarthy, Thomas 
Morse, A. J. 
Moore, William J. 
Morrison, F. D., 2, 
Maines, John 
Mead, C. W. 
Moore, J. Sterling 
McCarthy, Jennie E. 
Merrill, William F. 



5 00 
2 00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



2 00 



00 
00 



2 00 

2 00 

2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
9 00 

2 00 
5 00 
2 00 
2 00 

7 00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
5 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 



Mekkelsen, Henry, 


2 00 


Morris, Charles 


2 00 


Manley, Ira D. 


2 00 


Moore, Carl E. 


2 00 


Mannion, lliomas A. 


2 00 


Mekkelsen, John 


2 00 


Meacham, Minnie 


5 00 



Noyes, A. L. 



5 00 



Owen, C. B. 5 00 

O'Connell, Michael 2 00 
O'Neil, Constantine 2 00 

Perkins, Levi W. 
Payson, A. E. 
Perkins, Albert II. 
Pope, Benj., 3m, 3f, 
Pinkham, Leonard PI. 
Pratt, Francis 
Pratt, Frank A., 2, 

Robbins, W. C. 2, 
Richards, E. B. 
Reynolds, Mary E. 
Richardson. James E. 5 00 
Rikeman, A. J. 
Reed, Robert G. 
Robbins, Solon A. 
Rawitzer, William 

Stevens. William F. 
Stoss, Henry J. 
Shapley, Eva C. 
Sweet, Anthony 
Smith, Frank G., 2, 
Sanborn, Wendell Z. 
Stevenson, John M. 



2 00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


21 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


7 


00 


4 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


4 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 



33 



Scott, Thomas, 2, 


4 00 


Taylor, Moses 


2 00 


Sweet, William H. 


2 00 


Worst er, George W. 


2 00 


Smith, Henry M. 


2 00 


Wetherbee, Ellis 


2 00 






Whitcomb, Fred S. 


2 00 


Thompson, Moses 


2 00 


Wheeler, C. H., 2, 


7 00 


Tobin, Michael J. 


2 00 


Wheeler, A. M. 


2 00 


Taylor, Carlton C. , 


5 00 


White, Eugene L. 


2 00 


Thompson, Timothy A 


. 2 00 


Watkins John H., 2, 


4 00 


Toombs, Samuel 


2 00 


Watkins, W. F., 2, 


4 00 


Tuttle & Newton 


2 00 


Warren, Wm. II. 


2 00 






Weaver, George T. 


2 00 


Taylor, Elizabeth 


2 00 


Willard, Frank H. 


5 00 


Taylor, Charles H. 


2 00 


Willis, Edward, 2, 


4 00 


137 licenses at 


$2.00 each 


l, $274 00 




25 licenses at 


$5.00 each 


l, 125 00 








$399 00 


Deduct fees, 162 licenses at 20 cents. 


32 40 



Balance paid to county treasurer. 



$366 60 



Number of licenses issued since last 
return, Dec. 1, 1906, three. 



$9 00 



Total number of licenses issued, 165. 



34 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



High School. 








Paid Walter B. Pierce, principal, 


$1,000 00 




Mary E. Bartlett, assistant, 1 3 w 


eeks, 162 


50 




Ethel Leighton, assistant, 27 weeks, 337 


50 




Alice Maclntyre, assistant, 26 weeks, 260 


00 




South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 


coal, 87 


25 




Geo. C. Turner, janitor, 


100 


00 




Geo. C. Turner, cleaning, 


13 


05 




Geo. C. Turner, wood, 


15 


50 


* 


Elvin Tuttle, wood. 


8 


12 










* 1,5)83 92 


Musical instruction, 






53 75 




$2,037 67 


Appropriated, 






1,800 00 


South School. 









Paid Inez G. Kilton, primary, $456 00 

Charlotte Canfield, intermediate, 410 00 

Katherine B. Feeley, grammar, 444 00 

Julia McCarthy, assistant primary, 170 80 

Abbie McNiff, substitute, 7 50 
South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal, 87 26 

Geo. C. Turner, janitor, 100 00 



35 



Geo. C. Turner, janitor grammar 

school, m 
Geo. C. Turner, wood. 
So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co.. coal 

for grammar school, 
Geo. C. Turner, cleaning, 
Geo. C. Turner, cleaning grammar 

school, 
Elvin Tuttle, wood. 



Musical instruction. 



West School. 

Paid Harriett H. Gardner, primary. $456 00 

Karine L. Ekman, grammar, 132 00 

Emma Foster, intermediate, 132 00 ' 

Ada E. Harris, grammar, 275 00 

Rose O 'Toole, intermediate, 260 00 

Elizabeth Smith, substitute, 8 00 

E. C. Parker & Co., coal. 103 90 ; 

C. D. Wetherbee, wood, 17 25 

Thos. Scanlon, janitor. 124 98 

Thos. Scanlon. wood and labor. 3 75 

Thos. Scanlon. cleaning, 24 00 



47 50 
15 50 




3ai 

21 75 
13 05 




iar 

9 00 
8 13 






$1,790 49 

53 75 




$1,844 24 



$1,536 88 
Musical instruction. 53 75 

$1,590 63 



36 



Center School. 






Paid Martha Smith, primary, 


$456 00 


Minnie Gamble, grammar, 


406 


00 


Ella L. Miller, intermediate, 


444 


00 


A. Parlin, janitor, 


133 


00 


A. Parlin, cleaning, 


18 


70 


So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co.. coal, 


153 


90 


Luther Davis, wood, 


16 


50 






$1,628 10 


Musical instruction. 




53 75 




$1,681 85 


School Supplies. 






Paid Ginn & Co., 


$271 


74 


J. L. Hammett & Co., 


174 


01 


Atkinson, Mentzer & Grover. 


10 


43 


American Book Co., 


84 


60 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 


62 


56 


D. C. Heath & Co, 


46 


58 


E. E. Babb & Co, 


31 


39 


Educational Publishing Co, 


6 


71 


A. W. Hall Scientific Co, 


5 


05 


Munn & Co, 


4 


50 


Oliver, Ditson Co.. 


4 


99 


Allyn & Bacon, 


39 


42 


Orange Judd Co, 


13 


50 


Esterbrook Pen Co, 


5 


44 


Ellis Publishing Co, 


22 


95 


Hall Smith & Co, 


5 


30 


Frost & Adams, 


8 


10 


Typewriter Exchange, 


25 


00 


W. B. Pierce, 


1 


15 


J. Louise Long, 




90 



$824 32 



Express on Supplies. 

Paid Geo. L. Noyes, 
Thos. Scanlon, 
W. A. Raynor, 
W. B. Pierce. 


$13 50 
30 ' 
13 93 
75 








$28 48 


Appropriated, 




$852 80 
$525 00 



Transportation of Scholars. 



Paid Jens. Mikkleson, 
Geo. Greenough. 
N. M. French, 
A. Christefferson. 



Appropriated, 

School Incidentals 



$532 00 




544 00 




295 00 




49 00 






$1,420 00 




$1,360 00 



id J. L. Hammett Co., 


$15 00 


Tuttle & Newton, 


1 71 


C. H. Mead & Co., 


4 73 


M. E. Taylor & Co., 


70 



$22 14 



Printing. 

Paid A. Hosmer, caucus notices, $2 50 

A. Hosmer, school notices, 1 00 

A. Hosmer, school printing, 4 75 

A. Hosmer, notices, 2 40 

A. Hosmer, gypsy moth notices, 3 50 



38 



A. Hosmer, for collector, 

A. Hosmer, for tree warden, 

A. Hosmer, for school committee, 

A. Hosmer, for selectmen, 

A. Hosmer, for assessors, 

A. Hosmer, for collector, 

News Publishing Co., 750 Town re 

ports and 50 school reports, 
News Publishing Co., warrants. 
News Publishing Co., warrants, 
News Publishing Co., notices, 
E. F. Worcester Press, warrants 
E. F. Worcester, poll tax lists, 
Enterprise Co., notices, 
The Item Press, for assessors. 



Fire Department. 

Paid West Acton department, 

C. H. Mead & Co., supplies, 
Fred Green, express, 
Tuttle & Newton, one wagon jack, 
H. T. Clark, repairs, 
Boston Coupling Co., repairs, 
S. A. Guilford, repairs. 
South Acton department, 
John Cahill, watching fire, 
Percy Sweet, watching fire, 
J. Shannahan, watching fire, 
E. W. Gould, watching fire, 

D. H. Farrar, repairs east engine 
Geo. E. Greenough, two teams, 



Appropriated, 



4 


75 




75 


11 


70 


4 


50 


2 


68 


2 


68 


re- 

143 


85 


3 


50 


3 


00 


2 


50 


3 


40 


15 


25 


2 


10 


4 


35 



$219 16 



$117 00 




7 82 
1 25 




k, 4 00 




40 




1 50 




1 25 




117 00 




75 




75 




75 




75 




4 50 




4 00 






$261 72 




350 00 



39 



Library Expenses. 

Paid Arthur F. Davis, librarian. $102 00 

Arthur F. Davis, extra. 10 00 

S. Ii. Taylor, janitor. 100 00 

S. H. Taylor, labor, 50 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies, 39 93 

J. R. Wales, binding, 15 65 

The Durea Binding Co., binding, 26 90 

Mass. Reformatory, 300 catalogues, 58 45 
So. Aeton Coal & Lumber Co., coal 

and deld. 79 23 

A. F. Davis, express, -45 

A. Hosmer, labels, 2 00 

C. S. Twitchell, carrying books. 52 00 

S. H. Taylor, cleaning, 1 00 

Wm. D. Tuttle. express, postage, 8 08 



» 

Library 


Books. 




Paid W. B. Clark Co., 




$248 47 


C. W. Clark Co., 




27 59 


E. B. Hall & Co., 




29 00 


W. A. Wilde Co., 




7 17 


Wm. H. Guild Co., 




42 05 


Win. D. Tuttle, 




6 45 



Street Lamps. 

Paid H. V. Simonds, lighting, $94 00 

Karl Jones, lighting, 46 50 

Wayne Lawrence, lighting, 47 50 

Karl Jones, repairs, 75 



$496 19 



$360 73 



40 



H. V. Simonds, repairs, 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies, 

Finney & Hoit, repairs, 

J. P. Brown, repairs. 

F. W. Hoit, express, 

H. R. Phalen, lighting, 

Leonard White, lighting, 

H. R. Phalen, repairs, 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies, 

Fred Green, lighting, 

Fred Green, repairs, 

C. IT. Mead & Co., supplies, 
Tuttle & Newton, supplies, 
Valvoline Oil Co., gasoline. 
Hall Bros., freight, 

Pettingill & Andrews, lamp bracket, 

E. T. Rice, supplies and repairs, 

Geo. Laurey, lighting, 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies, 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies, 

N. H. Tenney, repairs, 

Globe Gas Light Co., glass, 

Blair Light Co., repairs and supplies, 

Tuttle & Newton, glass and repairs, 

Finney & Hoit, supplies, 

D. C. Harris, one lamp, 

S. L. Richardson, one lamp, 
Abel Farrar, one lamp, 
Chas. Wheeler, one lamp, 
Lyman Taylor, one lamp, 
H. W. B. Proctor, one lamp, 
I. F. Duren, one lamp, 
Frank Lothrop, one lamp, 
John Cahill, one lamp, 



Appropriated, 
Appropriated, 



2 00 


128 95 


2 50 


85 


55 


93 00 


2 00 


1 90 


55 30 


222 00 


1 50 


154 95 


15 96 


26 91 


1 84 


2 95 


15 75 


102 00 


23 50 


23 69 


75 


5 00 


22 55 


5 75 


53 40 


4 00 


4 00 


4 00 


4 00 


4 00 


4 00 


4 00 


4 00 


4 00 


$1,190 30 


$850 00 


200 00 



4* 
Roads and Bridges. 

Paid Wm. H. Kingsley, $1,143 69 

A. H. Perkins, 1,863 83 

A. C. Piper, 1,338 36 

Good Roads Machinery Co., repairs, 110 02 
Vestal Oil Co., oil and supplies, 17 23 

Tuttle & Xewton, gasoline and sup- 
plies, 305 87 
T. F. Parker, tools and hose. 47 44 
M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies, 7 33 
C. H. Mead & Co., supplies, 7 64 
W. A. Haynes Co., tools, 2 60 

A. C. Piper, 22 posts, 3 30 
So. Aeton Coal & Lumber Co., lumber, 

pipes, etc., 65 13 

W. C. Bobbins, gravel, "1900 to 1906", 90 33 

American Powder Mills, dynamite, 5 94 

Solon A. Robbins, painting fences, 17 00 

J. M. Sheehan, blacksmithing, 6 80 

H. T. Clark, repairs, 75 

J. P. Brown, blacksmithing, 27 73 

S. A. Guilford, blacksmithing, 10 85 

E. T. Rice, repairs, 2 50 

N. H. Tenney, repairs, 48 25 

N. H. Tenney, pumping water, 10 00 

Finney & IToit, batteries and tester, 4 00 

B. & M. Railroad, freight, 40 



$5,136 99 
Appropriated. 5,000 00 

Received for stone, etc.. 29 50 



42 

Snow Bills. 

Paid A. H. Perkins, $22 06 

Wm. Kingsley, 15 64 



State Aid. 




Paid Ephriam B. Forbush, 


$48 00 


Walter 0. Holden, 


48 00 


Mary A. Wood, 


48 00 


Addison B. Wheeler, 


48 00 


Mary Smith, 


48 00 


Aaron S. Fletcher, 


48 00 


Mary I. Richardson, 


48 00 


Mary A. Parlin, 


48 00 


Emma Blood, 


48 00 


Susan A. Clough, 


48 00 


Lydia Handley, 


24 00 


Isaiah S. Leach, 


60 00 


Almira Willard, 


56 00 


Bridgett Mawn, 


40 00 



Returned bv state. 



/ 



$37 70 



$660 00 



Support of Poor Farm. 

Sundry expenses per report of Over- 
seers of Poor, $2,000 97 



43 
Support of Outside Poor. 

Sundry expenses per report of Over- 
seers of Poor, $590 55 

Received from Town of Concord for care of 

James Kerrigan, $39 09 

Due from Concord, 50 00 

Farm Repairs. 

Paid E. A. Phalen, labor, $10 00 

W. P. Lapham, repairs, 20 63 

Finney & Hoit, paper and border, 7 11 

L. H. Pinkham. painting, 140 00 

L. H. Pinkham, paper and border, 6 50 
South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

lumber, 11 18 

M. E. Taylor & Co., paint stock, 90 18 



Rent Account. 

Paid Mrs. Ella Hosmer, rent of Central 

Hall for school purposes, $125 00 

Universalist church, rent of vestry, 3 00 
A. L. Xoyes, rent of room for school 

supplies, 10 00 



Interest Account. 

Paid E. Jones estate, interest on note, $120 00 
F. C. Hayward, interest on cemetery 

fund. 17 50 



$285 60 



$138 00 



$137 50 



44 
Enforcement of Liquor Laws. 

Paid A. B. Parker, services and ex- 
penses, $133 50 
0. A. Knowlton, services and ex- 
penses, 
M. A. Reed, services and expenses 
A. S. Bradley, services and expenses 
Wm. H. Walch, serving papers, 1905, 



Appropriated. 
Received fines. 

Lock Up. 

Paid E. T. Barnum, two steel cages, $219 13 

B. & M. Railroad, freight on cells, 7 87 

A. S. Bradley, bnilding and land,. 350 00 

E. A. Phalen, labor on cells, 5 00 

E. E. Miles, labor and expenses, 1 50 

Finney & Hoit, mattresses and blank- 
ets, 6 00 



38 68 




43 06 




»es, 24 50 




905, 2 30 






$242 04 




500 00 




50 00 



Board of Health. 

Paid P. C. Croy, serving notices, $3 90 

Moses A. Reed, labor and expenses, 56 73 

C. H. Goldthwaite & Co., supplies, 3 20 



$589 50 



$63 83 



45 
Cemetery Expenses. 

Paid H. T. Clark, labor Mt. Hope, $35 00 

A. H. Perkins, labor Mt. Hope, 43 10 

Fred Green, labor Mt. Hope, 14 40 

A. W. Davis, labor Mt. Hope, 52 50 
Shady Hill Nursery, plants Mt. Hope, 30 35 

Julian Tuttle, labor, Woodlawn, 95 04 

N. G. Brown, labor, Woodlawn, 61 25 

L. H. Pinkham, labor. Woodlawn, 3 50 

Asaph Parlin, labor, Woodlawn, 14 95 

E. A. Phalen, repairs, 1 75 

A. Vanderhoof, repairs, 6 70 

L. H. Pinkham, lettering sign, 2 50 

E. A. Phalen, sign boards, 1 60 

Julian Tuttle, labor north. 3 00 

N. G. Brown, labor north, 2 63 

A. Parlin, labor north, 1 75 

Julian Tuttle, plants. Woodlawn, 3 99 



Perpetual Care of Lots. 

Paid Julian Tuttle. labor and plants, $131 31 
H. T. Clark, labor. 45 50 



Town Buildings and Grounds. 

Paid Geo. W. Daniels repairing hall 

heater. $-1 25 

C. L. Chase & Co., floor dressing for 

schools. 15 00 

Jas. Cole, teaming ashes, south 

school, 2 50 



$374 01 



$176 81 



4 6 



A. S. Bradley, cleaning south school 

vault, 3 00 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., lumber, 

shingles and repairs for south 

school house, 62 08 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., lumber 

and repairs for center school 

house, 66 62 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., lumber 

and repairs for west school 

house and grounds, 101 02 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., lumber 

for town hall, 12 50 

Asaph Parlin, labor and repairs 

center school, 23 55 

Hammond Taylor, care of town hall, 78 60 
Hammond Taylor, care of town clock, 20 00 
Hammond Taylor, care of trough and 

flag, 10 00 

Hammond Taylor, labor on grounds, 29 53 
Hammond Taylor, fertilizer for library 

grounds, 2 48 

Geo. C. Turner, labor and repairs 

on south school house and 

grounds, 38 90 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies and repairs 

for school houses, 8 87 

B. F. Townsend, repairing south school 

pump, 3 00 

B. F. Townsend, repairs south school 

house, 29 09 

Fred Green repairs west engine house, 1 50 ' 
Finney & \Hoit, 12 curtains for T. 

hall, 12 00 

Finney & Hoit, one table for town hall, 11 00 
Finney & Hoit, repairs and supplies for 

all schools, 29 51 

E. A. Phalen, repairs town hall, 4 40 



47 



E. A. Phalen, lumber and repairs at 

library, 4 46 

E. A. Phalen, labor center school 

house, 25 00 

E. A. Phalen, labor west school house, 45 00 
Thos. McCarthy, stone for well, 3 00 
L. T. Fullonton, repairs south school, 2 06 
W. B. Pierce, repairs south school, 2 62 
Thos. Scanlon, labor and repairs, on 

west school house and grounds, 18 84 

C. II. Persons, tuning pianos, 10 00 
American Seating Co., desks for west 

school house, 52 00 

American Seating Co., desks for south 

school house, 16 00 

American Seating Co., chairs and 

repairs, 7 50 

Fred W. Gray, labor painting and 

finishing south school house, 256 34 
M. A. Reed, labor on west school 

house, stone steps, 7 50 

Dan Beach, digging well for west 

school house, 24 80 

F. R. Knowlton, tile, labor and pump 

for west school well, 37 95 

G. W. Daniels, repairing batteries, 50 

D. C. Harris, lettering trough, 6 00 
Wm. Kingsley, laying pipes for west 

well, ' 50 75 

J. L. Hammett Co., one school flag, 9 00 

Tuttle & Newton, paint stock for 

south school house, 93 90 

A. Vanderhoof, repairing school fur- 
naces, 11 00 
Frank Taylor, school repairs. 4 00 
Frank Taylor, engine house repairs, 50 

E. Z. Stanley, repairing library heater. 6 80 



4« 



M. A. Reed, cleaning town hall 

vault, 
F. E. Harris, west school repairs, 
Solon A. Robbins, labor and paint 

for south school house, 
N. H. Tenney, repairing town hall 

clock, 
So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., one 

window for So. Fire house, 
M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies for 

town hall, 
M. E. Taylor & Co., repairs for center 

school, 4 37 

F. W. Hoit, repairs on pump, 1 00 

E. T. Rice, thawing out pump, 2 00 



2 00 


1 


50 


14 


23 


4 


00 


1 


75 


18 


31 



Brown Tail and Gypsy Moths. 

Paid Moses A. Reed, labor and expenses, $36 14 

H. M. Martin, labor, 9 40 

Chas. E. Davis, labor, 13 86 

Lester Warden, labor, 8 00 

H. L. Frost & Co., burlap and twine, 4 23 

W. G. Hallock, creosote, 3 89 

S. H. Taylor, labor, 26 85 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies, 1 50 

Bowker Insecticide, supplies, 1 20 

Jennie Reed, typewriting services, 5 30 

E. C. Parker & Co., one pair pruners, 1 00 

Finney & Hoit, two pair glasses, 7 00 

Fred W. Billings, labor, 137 00 

John P. Murphy, labor, 141 00 

H. O. Hartwell, labor, 66 00 

Geo. Laurey, labor, 35 00 

J. O'Neil, labor, 42 00 



$1,311 08 



49 



Wm. Duggan, labor, 

B. J. Ineson, labor, 

Geo. McCarthy, labor, 

A. H. Perkins, labor and expenses 

A. H. Perkins, labor and expenses, 



Appropriated, 
Received for labor, 
Due for labor, 



Salaries of Town Officers. 



Paid E. L. Willard, sup't. schools, 
A. E. Webber, sup't. schools, 
C. J. Williams, ch. school committee, 
Aaron J. Foster, election officer, 
Lyman Taylor, election officer, 
John F. Coughlin, 
Hiram J. Hapgood, 
E. F. Barker, 
Abram Tuttle, 
Jas. Kinsley, 
A. B. Parker, 
W. F. Kelley, 
C. B. Stone, 
T. F. Newton, 
E. F. Conant, school census, 
H. E. Clough, assessor, 
Jas. B. Tuttle, assessor, 
Horace F. Tuttle, town clerk, 
Horace F. Tuttle, registrar, 
Horace F. Tuttle, cemetery com. and 

expenses, 
J. S. Moore, overseer of poor, 
0. A. Knowlton, overseer of poor, 
Wm. F. Kelley. oh. overseers of poor. 



25 00 




24 00 




30 00 




i, 46 44 




«, 181 40 






$846 21 




200 00 




25 66 




125 00 



$160 00 


320 00 


89 


00 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


15 


00 


55 


00 


55 


00 


30 


00 


15 


00 


9 


50 


25 


00 


20 


00 


50 


00 



50 



Moses A. Reed, truant officer, 3 00 

Geo. C. Turner, truant officer, 2 00 

Jas. McGreen, registrar, 12 00 

S. A. Guilford, registrar, 12 00 

D. T. Kingsley, truant officer, 12 00 

II. E. Clough, sealer of weights and 

measures, 6 00 

F. W. Hoit, one per cent for collect- 
ing $4,538.76 taxes, 45 39 
W. F. Stevens, ch. assessors, 75 00 
W. F. Stevens, iy 2 p. c. for collect- 
ing $1,388.00 taxes, 20 82 
W. F. Stevens, 1 p. c. for collecting 

$19,548.00 taxes, 
J. K. W. Wetherbee, treasurer, 
F. W. Hoit, eh. selectmen, 
Edwin A. Phalen, selectman, 
Bertram D. Hall, selectman, 



Miscellaneous Expenses. 

Paid Mrs. Oliver Sawyer, bounty for G. 
M. Pike, 
Grand Army Post, Memorial day, 

E. F. Conant, insurance on library, 
Hobbs & Warren, assessors books, 
So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal 

for hall, 
Finney & Hoit, 150 flags, 
C. J. Williams, car fare, postage, etc., 
Pro. H. H. Horn, graduation exercises, 15 00 

F. A. Merriam, graduation music, 28 00 
Gertrude Fitzgerald, graduation music, 2 00 
W. B. Pierce, graduation ribbon, 1 50 
Geo. W. Worster, horse hire, 1 50 
M. A. Reed, posting warrants, 2 00 



195 


48 


125 


00 


125 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 



;125 00 


100 00 


22 08 


7 38 


18 79 


4 13 


10 00 



$1,604 69 



SI 



M. A. Reed, officers fees, 

A. S. Bradley, officers fees, 

Thos Scanlon, carrying water, 

H. E. Richardson, expenses hiring 

teachers, 
J. L. Hammett Co., engraving diplomas, 
F. W. Hoit, postage on brown tail 

moth notices, 
E. L. Willard, expenses hiring teachers, 
Wm. Craig, officers fees, 

E. J. Lyons, officers fees, 
Luther Davis, half a cord wood for 

hall, 
A. II. Perkins, trimming trees, 
M. A. Reed, inspection of animals, 
Finney & Hoit, envelopes, 
Finney & Hoit, one pair handcuffs, 
News Publishing Co., notices, 

A. W. Raynor, express, 
Town of Concord, P. C. tubes, 
M. G. Hayes, painting ladders, 

B. D. Hall, expenses perambulating 

bounds, 2 00. 

F. W. Hoit, expenses perambulating 

bounds, 2 00 

Axel Wahlberg, medal for D. H. Scar- 
lett, 15 00 
Thos. Scanlon, opening school house, 3 00'"" 
Jas. Kinsley, use of Hurley road, 8 00 
M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies for tree 

warden, 2 88 

M. A. Reed, trimming trees, 6 50 

Geo. C. Turner, opening rooms, 1 00 

Geo. L. Noyes, teaming school supplies, 2 00 

C. W. H. Moulton, ladders for tree 

warden, 34 30 



13 


98 


25 


05 


6 


67 


4 


68 


> 


84 


12 


72 


,4 


90 


6 


60 


5 


65 


2 


75 


60 01 


62 


30 




90 


4 


75 


2 


50 


1 


55 




75 


4 


00 



52 



I. F. Duren, making returns of 23 

deaths, 5 75 
I. F. Duren, hearse and grave for Lucy 

Hapgood, 8 00 
Arthur Webber, telephone rental and 

car fare 6 51 

Horace F. Tuttle, recording 37 births, 18 50 
Horace F. Tuttle, recording 18 

marriages, 3 60 

Horace F. Tuttle, recording 29 deaths, 5 80 

Horace F. Tuttle, sundry expenses, 21 15 

Dr. F. J. Barker, returns of 9 births, 2 25 

Dr. F. E. Tasker, returns of 6 births, 1 50 

Dr. S. A. Christie, returns of 8 births, 2 00 

Dr. R. A. Daniels, returns of 2 births, 50 

Dr. F. U. Rich, returns of 4 births, 1 00 

Dr. I. L. Pickard, returns of 4 births, 1 00 

W. F. Stevens, services as constable, 1 50 

W. F. Stevens, postage and express, 16 24 

W. F. Stevens, auditing tax books, 5 00 

E. A. Phalen, postage and telephone, 1 20 
B. D. Hall, postage and telephone, 1 47 

F. W. Hoit, postage and car fares, 16 01 
W. F. Kelley, postage, etc., 3 70 
J. K. Wetherbee, postage, etc., 11 37 
W. F. Stevens, abatement of taxes, 591 75 
E. L. Wheeler, special police duty, 2 50 
Fritz Hawes, special police duty, 2 50 
Geo. DeCoster, special police duty, 2 50 
James Kinsley, special police duty, 2 50 

E. E. Miles, special police duty, 2 50 
Geo. Clark, special police duty, 2 50 
J. McNiff, special police duty, 2 50 

F. W. Hoit, express on reports, 1 60 
N; E. T. & T. Co., telephone rental at 

farm, 7 60 



$1,387 16 



53 
Receipts for Year Ending March 12, 1907. 



Balance due from treasurer, 


$10,044 69 


Balance due from collector, 


2,994 03 


Appropriations : 




For memorial library, 


600 00 


For roads and bridges. 


5,000 00 


For common schools, 


3,800 00 


For high school. 


1,800 00 


For school supplies, 


525 00 


For superintendent of schools. 


480 00 


For transportation of pupils. 


1,360 00 


For fire department. 


350 00 


For town charges, 


3,500 00 


For overlayings. 


404 34 


Raised for state tax. 


2,100 00 


For county tax 


2,088 83 


For highway tax, 


221 55 


Received from state treasurer: 




Corporation tax. 


3,232 36 


National bank tax, 


733 20 


State aid. 


595 00 


Income of school fund, 


845 62 


Burial of soldiers, 


140 00 


Inspection of animals, 


30 68 


Street railway tax. 


7 38 


Account dog licenses. 


331 77 


Dog fines. 


10 00 


Cemetery fund. 


1,125 00 


Supervision of schools. 


375 00 


I. F. Duren, for hearse. 


45 00 


Lots sold in cemeteries, 


99 00 


Loam sold in cemeteries, 


17 00 


Lvman industrial school. 


22 74 



Town of Concord, aid for James Kerrigan. 39 09 



54 



School supplies sold, 






11 91 




Rent of town hall and cellar. 




51 50 




Rent of town hall, grange. 




•47 50 




Removing brown tail 


and 


gypsy 






moths. 






25 66 




Concord court, fines. 






71 82 




Broken stone, sold. 






28 50 




Road dust. sold. 






1 00 




Library tines. 






22 31 




A. F. Blanchard, slaughter license. 


1 00 




Income of library fund 






231 in 




Income of cemetery fund. 




129 10 




Town farm. milk. 






908 99 




Town farm, apples, 






710 30 




Town farm. cows. 






75 81 




Town farm, calves, 






26 50 




Town farm, potatoes, 






7 10 




Town farm. eggs. 






6 68 




Town farm, ice, 






1 00 




Town farm, teaming, 






1 00 




Town farm, labor. 






3 00 




Interest on taxes. 






121 32 




St. Railway Tax. ('.. M. 


& H.. 




17 4:6 




St. Railway Tax. L.. A. 


& ML, 


1905. 


27 13 




St. Railway Tax. L.. A. 


& M., 


1906. 


31 20 




Interest on deposits. 






ill 58 








$45,654 


38 



Expenses for Year Ending March 12, 1907. 

High School. 12,037 67 

South School. 1.811 21 

West School. 1.590 63 

Center School. 1,681 S5 

School supplies. 852 80 

School transportations, 1.420 00 



55 



Brown tail and gypsy moth, 


846 21 


Library expenses. 


496 19 


Library books. 


360 73 


Fire Department, 


261 72- 


Printing, 


219 16 


Street Lamps, 


1,190 30 


Lockup, 


589 50 


Board of Health, 


63 83 


Cemetery expenses, 


374 01 


Perpetual care of lots. 


176 81 


Roads and bridges, 


5,136 99 


Enforcement liquor law, 


242 04 


Support of town farm, 


2,000 97 


Support of outside poor, 


590 55 


State aid. 


660 00 


Snow bills, 


37 70 


Rent account, 


138 00 


Interest account. 


137 50 


School incidentals, 


22 14 


Salaries of town officers, 


1,604 69 


Repairs of buildings and grounds, 


1,311 08 


Farm repairs. 


285 60 


Miscellaneous accounts, 


1,387 16 




$27,560 07 


Paid repairs on highway. 


$221 55 


County tax, 


2,088 83 


State tax. 


2,100 00 




$4,410 38 


Cemetery fund withdrawn, 


$2,500 00 


Cash due from Treasurer, 


8.380 56 


Due from estate D. J. Wetherbee. 


90 84 


Uncollected taxes. 


2,712 53 




$45,654 38 



56 
Statement for Year Ending March 12, 1907. 

Due fromTreasurer, $8,380 56 

Collector, 2,712 53 

Estate D. J. Wetherbee, 90 84 

State inspection of animals, 31 15 

State, state aid, 660 00 

Concord, aid for Jas. Kerrigan, 50 00 

Gypsy moth work, 125 00 



$12,050 08 



Liabilities. 

Cemetery fund, $2,625 00 

E. Jones estate, note, 2,000 00 

E. Jones estate, interest, 25 55 

Unexpended balance, cemetery fund, 198 20 

Unexpended balance, library fund, 229 03 



$5,077 78 
Balance in favor of town, $6,972 30 

PRANK W. HOIT, 
EDWIN A. PHALEN, - 
BERTRAM D. HALL, 

Selectmen of Acton. 



0/ 



LIST OF JURORS. 



The following names will be presented at the annual 
Town Meeting March 25, 1907 to be placed in the jury box, 
subject to revision and acceptance by the Town. 



Franklin P. Wood, 
Emery D. Lothrop, 
Alfred Goding, 
Lyman C. Taylor. 
Walter French, 
Waldo Whitcomb. 
John S. White, 
Geo. C. Turner, 
Sidney L. Richardson, 
James B. Tuttle, 
Harry E. Clough. 
Fritz Hawes. 
Augustine Hosmer. 
Daniel H. Farrar, 
Charles H. Mead. 
Edward C. Wood. 
Clark G. Durkee, 
Edward F. Richardson. 
Arthur M. Whitcomb, 
Thos. McCarthy. 
Frank E. Harris, 
John McCarthy, 
Hiram J. Hapgood, 
Chas. E. Smith. 



(Signed) 



Minister 

Farmer 

Clerk, 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Butcher 

Farmer 

Janitor 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Post Master 

Mechanic 

Printer 

Wheelwright 

Merchant 

R. R. Employe 

Carpenter 

Farmer 

Clerk 

Farmer 

Carpenter 

Farmer 

Retired 

Farmer 



FRANK W. HOIT, 
EDWIN A. PHALEN. 
BERTRAM D. HALL. 



Selectmen of Acton. 



58 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



1906. 

March 12. Cash on hand, $10,044 69 

Receipts. 

Received from State Treasurer, corp- 
oration tax, $3,232 36 
State Treasurer, National Bank 

tax, 733.20 

State Treasurer, state aid, 595 00 

State Treasurer, income of Mass. 

school fund, 845 62 

State Treasurer, burial of soldiers, 140 00 
State Treasurer, compensation for 

inspection of animals, 30 68 

State Treasurer, street railway tax, 7 38 

County Treasurer, on account of 

dog licenses, 331 77 

County Treasurer, for dog fines, 10 00 

Cemetery fund, 1,125 00 

Supervision of schools, 375 00 

I. F. Duren for hearse, 45 00 

Horace F. Tuttle for lots sold in Wood- 
lawn cemetery, 69 00 
H. T. Clark, for lots sold in Mount 

Hope cemetery, 30 00 

H. T. Clark, for loam sold, 17 00 

Trustees, Lyman and Industrial school, 

instruction public schools, 22 74 

Town of Concord, for medical at- 
tendance and board of James 
Carrigan, 39 09 



59 



C. J. Williams, for school supplies sold, 11 91 
Rent of town hall and cellar, 51 50 

Acton grange for rent of town hall, 47 50 
Removing brown tail and gypsy 

moths, 25 66 

District court of Central Middlesex 

for fines, 71 82 

Road commissioners for broken stone 

sold, 28 50 

Road commissioners for street dust 

sold, 
Memorial librae for fines, 
Arthur F. Blanchard, slaughter house 

license, 
Income of library fund, 
Income of cemetery fund, 
For milk, sold from town farm, 
Apples, sold from town farm, 
Cows, sold from town farm, 
Calves, sold from town farm, 
Potatoes, sold from town farm, 
Eggs, sold from town farm, 
Ice, sold from town farm, 
Teaming, town farm, 
Labor, town farm, 
Frank W. Hoit, collector, taxes for 

A. D. 1904, 
Interest on taxes, 1904, 
Frank W. Hoit, collector, taxes for 

A. D. 1905, 
Interest on taxes, 1905, 
Wm. F. Stevens, collector, taxes for 

A. D. 1903, 6 97 

Wm. F. Stevens, collector, taxes for 

A. D. 1904, 371 24 

Interest on taxes, 1904, 31 05 

Wm. F. Stevens, collector, taxes for 

A. D. 1905, $l,3ir» 33 



1 


00 


22 


31 


1 


00 


231 


40 


129 


40 


908 


99 


740 


30 


75 


84 


26 


50 


7 


10 


6 


68 


1 


00 


4 


00 


3 


00 


29 


37 


1 


64 


808 


77 


15 


62 



6o 

Interest on taxes, 1905, 51 51 

Wm. F. Stevens, collector, taxes for 

A. D. 1906, 19,888 70 

Interest on taxes 1906, 21 50 

Concord, Maynard & Hudson Street 

Railway tax, 17 46 

Lowell, Acton & Maynard Street 

Railway, tax 1905, 27 13 . 

Lowell, Acton & Maynard Street 

Railway, tax 1906, 31 20 

International Trust Co., interest 

on deposits, 144 58 



$42,851 01 



Expenditures. 

Paid state tax, $2,100 00 

Repairs on state highway, 221 55 

County tax, 2,088 83 

Cemetery fund, deposited in Charles- 
town five cent savings bank, 1,000 00 
Cemetery fund deposited in Warren 

institution for savings, 1,000 00 

Cemetery fund, deposited in Mid- 
dlesex institution for savings, 500 00 
On selectmen's orders, 27,560 07 

Cash on hand and in bank, 8,380 56 



$42,851 01 

J. K. W. WETHERBEE, 

Treasurer of Acton. 



6l 



Treasurer's Report of Money Held for Care of Lots in 

Cemeteries. 



1907 Dr. 

March 12. To cash in North End Savings 

bank, $2,175 00 

Cash in Charlestown five cent savings 

bank, 1,000 00 

Cash in Warren institution for savings, 1,000 00 

Cash in Middlesex institution for savings, 500 00 

Balance in Town treasury, 1,500 00 

Cash received in 1906-1907, 1,125 00 

Unexpended balance, March 12, 1906, 148 09 

Income for 1906-1907, 244 42 



Cr. 



By cash paid cemetery committee for 

care of lots, $176 81 

Cash paid F. C. Hayward, 17 50 

Principal of cemetery fund March 12, 

1907, 7,300 00 

Balance of income, unexpended, 198 20 



$7,692 51 



$7,692 51 

J. K. W. WETHERBEE, 

Treasurer of Acton. 



62 

Report of the Wilde Memorial Library. 



1907 Dr. 

March 12. To cash in North End Savings 

bank, $1,000 00 

Cash in Home Savings Bank, 1,000 00 

Cash in Middlesex institution for sav- 
ings, 1,000 00 
Cash in Warren institution for savings, 1,000 00 
Cash in Charlestown Five Cent Savings 

Bank, 1,000 00 

Mortgage Bond of the West Shore Rail- 
road Co., 1,000 00 
Received for fines, 22 31 
Received for interest on money in banks, 191 40 
Received for interest on railroad bond, 40 00 
Town appropriation for books, 200 00 
Unexpended balance March 12, 1906, 136 05 



Cr. 

By cash in banks, $5,000 00 

By Susan Augusta and Luther Conant 



fund, 




1.000 00 


Paid for books and 


magazines. W. 


B. 


Clarke Co., 




180 00 


C. W. Clarke Co., 




96 06 


E. B. Hall & Co, 




29 00 


W. H. Guild, 




42 05 


W. A. Wilde Co., 




7 17 


W. D. Tuttle, 




6 45 


Balance unexpended. 




229 0:$ 



$6,589 76 



$6,589 76 
J. K. W. WETHERBEE. Treasurer. 



63 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



I have examined the accounts of the Selectmen, Tax 
Collector and Treasurer of the Town of Acton and to the 
best of my knowledge I find them correct. 



W. E. WHITCOMB. Auditor. 



March 16, 1907 



6 4 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



Valuation May 1, 1906 : 

Real estate (buildings) $980,930 00 

Real estate (land) 472,100 00 

Value of assessed personal estate, 363,815 00 



Total valuation, $1,816,845 00 

Valuation May 1, 1905, 1,778,350 00 



Gain, $38,495 00 

Rate of taxation 1906, $11.50 on a thousand. 

i 

Tax assessed as follows : 



On real estate, 


$16,709 85 


Personal property, 


4,183 87 


Polls, 


1,336 00 




$22,229 72 


Amount of money raised: 




For state tax, 


$2,100 00 


State highway tax, 


221 55 


County tax, 


2,088 83 


Town grants, 


17,415 00 


Overlayings. 


404 34 • 




$22,229 72 



65 

Number of individuals assessed on property. 431 
All others, 32 
Number of individuals (non-resident) assessed on pro- 
perty, 96 
All others, 34 
Number of persons assessed for poll tax only, 345 
Number of horses assessed, 429 
Number of cows assessed, 972 
Number of sheep assessed, 9 
Number of neat cattle other than cows, 159 
Number of swine assessed, 35 
Number of fowls assessed, 5,355 
Number of houses assessed, 529 

WM. F. STEVENS, 
JAMES B. TUTTLE, 
HARRY E. CLOUGH, 

Assessors of Acton. 



Applications for exemptions under Act of April 24th, 
1906, according to ruling of the Tax Commissioners office, 
must be made on, or before June 15th, in the year in which 
exemption is asked for. 



66 



COLLECTOR'S REPORT FOR 1903-1904-1905. 



The following statement of uncollected taxes committed 
to me for collection by the selectmen is respectfully sub- 
mitted. 

1908 Dr. 

Uncollected, $22 17 

Cr. 

Cash paid Treasurer, $3 54 

Abatement, 3 43 



$6 97 



Uncollected, $15 20 

1904 Dr. 

Uncollected, $388 87 

Interest collected, 31 05 



$419 92 



Cr. 



Cash paid Treasurer, $337 01 

Abatements, 65 28 



$402 29 



Uncollected, $17 6H 



6/ 



1905 Dr. 

Uncollected, $1,645 07 

Interest collected, 51 51 



$1,696 58 

Or. 

Cash paid Treasurer, $1,177 76 

Abatements, 189 58 

$1,367 34 

Uncollected, $329 24 



68 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



For Financial Year Ending March 12, 1907. 

Amount committed for collection, $22,239 19 

Interest collected, 21 47 



$22,260 66 



Cash paid Treasurer, $19,576 74 

Abatements, 333 46 



$19,910 20 
Balance uncollected due Town, $2,350 46 

To the act passed April 1906, relative to soldiers and 
widows exemptions, is due the increase in abatements for 
the fiscal year just ending. 

WM. F. STEVENS, Collector. 



6 9 



REPORT OF ROAD COMMISSIONERS. 



Receipts. 



Appropriation. 
Broken stone, 
Street dirt, 
Gasoline, 



Expenditures. 



$5,000 00 




27 50 




1 00 




1 00 






$5,029 50 




5,136 99 



Inventory of Tools and Supplies on Hand March 12, 1907. 



Crushing plant. 

One truck, 

One iron roller. 

One snow roller, 

One scraper, 

Two road machines, 

One sewer pump, 

20 feet of hose, 

One plow, 

Small tools, 

Watering cart, 

Gasoline, 

Oil, 

2 gasoline tanks, 



We recommend that the town purchase a steam roller. 
We are pleased to report the crushing plant in good 



$1,700 00 


100 00 


275 00 


100 00 


5 00 


160 00 


40 00 


40 00 


30 00 


20 00 


325 00 


15 00 


7 00 


20 00 


$2,837 00 



7° 

condition and able to continue its good work. We recom- 
mend that $5,000.00 be raised for the repair of roads and 
bridges. 

WM. H. KINGSLEY. 
ANSON C. PIPER, 
A. H. PERKINS, 

Road Commissioners. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Town of Acton for the Year 1906. 

The Board of Health submits the following report for 
the year ending March 1, 1907. 

The number of deaths occurring in the town during the 
year ending January 1, 1907. was 26. 

Our citizens have been spared the dangers and incon- 
venience of a serious outbreak of any contagious disease du- 
ring the past year, the character and number of each as re- 
ported to the Board from March 1, 1906 to March 1, 1907 are 
as follows. 

Diseases No. of cases. 

Small Pox, 

Diphtheria, 1 

Scarlet Fever. 2 

Typhoid Fever, 1 

Measles. 12 

Cerebro-spinal Meningitis, 



Total, 16 



Keep (Jlean and Avoid Trouble. 

Several flagrant cases of utter neglect of the simplest 
laws of sanitation were brought to the attention of this 
Board during the past year and were promptly attended to 
by our Agent. 

This Board would suggest that about now is a good time 
to clean up the ash-heap and refuse-pile that has been ac- 



7 2 

cumulating' all winter. Look to the sink drains, cesspool and 
privy-vault, see that they are properly cared for and in good 
condition. Remember the town has acquired two good dump- 
ing grounds fairly accessable to all for the deposit of all 
refuse matter. Do not throw rubbish of any kind along the 
road-side ; it does not look well to begin with and it may be 
expensive if you are caught doing so. 

Appropriation. 

This Board respectfully asks that the sum of $100.00 be 
appropriated to its use for the ensuing year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. J. WILLIAMS, 

F. E. TASKER, M. D., 

P. J. BARKER, M. D., 



73 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF POOR. 



Inventory of Stock and Provisions on Hand March 1, 1907. 

12 cows, $600 00 

5 heifers, 100 00 

15 tons hay, 255 00 

2 horses, 300 00 

Double harness, 20 00 

Express harness, 15 00 

Light harness, 5 00 

Horse collars, 7 00 

Express wagon, 85 00 

Hay wagon, 25 00 

Wood wagon and rack, 110 00 

2 sleds, 80 00 
Farming tools, 25 00 
Grain, 5 00 
1 two horse cart, 25 00 
Horse rake, 7 00 

3 harrows, 25 00 
1 Iron collar, 1 25 
Cultivator, 4 00 
7 ladders, 12 00 
"Wheelbarrow, 3 00 
Hay cutter, 2 00 
Hay fork, 20 00 
Roller, 4 00 
Sail cloth, 1 00 
Plows, 14 00 
Feed trough, 2 00 
Bush, boxes, 2 00 



74 



Fung, 

Democrat wagon, 

Baskets, 

Apple barrels, 

Watering trough. 

Mowing machine. 

Grindstone. 

Spray pump, 

Wood cut for stove, 

Cord-wood, 

Saws, 

Carpenter tools, 

Wagon jack. 

Saw clamp. 

Ladder hook. 

Set measures. 

Salt. 

Lumber, 

Barrel header. 

Snow shovel. 

Wrench, 

30 hens, 

18 bush potatoes, 

Soft soap and barrel, 

Pork and barrel, 

Apples, 

Washing machine. 

Horse's blanket, 

Range and water front, 

3 rockers, 

1 lantern, 

Conch and two easy chairs, 

2 coal hods. 



o 



razors. 



Lamps, 
Soap, 
Molasses, 
2 axes. 



5 


00 


30 


00 


1 


50 


2 00 


5 


00 


33 


00 


4 


00 


8 


00 


50 


00 


25 


00 


3 00 


6 


00 


1 


50 


1 


00 




60 


1 


00 




50 


10 


00 


1 


00 




50 




75 


22 


50 


13 


50 


4 


50 


22 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


60 


00 


3 


00 




90 


20 


00 




50 


2 


00 


2 


50 




30 




60 


1 


50 



75 

Lard, 

Spice, 

Butter, 

Flour, 

Sugar, 

Crackers, 

Fruit jars, 

Brooms, 

Crockery and tinware, 

Tea and coffee, 

Oil and tank, 

Pail and tubs. 

Tree pruner, 

5 stoves, 

2 cabinet chairs, 

3 tables, 
Ice, 

Chamber sets,. 
Air cushion, 
Beds and bedding, 
Bed pan. 
Traps, 
Trunks, 
Wheel chair, 
2 clocks, 
Cereals, 
Bread mixer, 
Clothes line, 
8 chairs, 
Refrigerator, 
Ice tongs, 
Vinegar, 
Clothes wringer, 
Meat chopper, 
Pump, 
Canned fruit, 

Inventory, March 1, 1907. $2,467 45 



1 


20 




60 


1 


75 


4 


25 


1 


30 




10 


3 


25 




50 


9 


00 




30 


1 


30 


3 


00 


1 


00 


20 


00 


2 


00 


5 


50 


25 00 


12 


00 


1 


00 


71 


00 


3 


00 




50 


2 


00 


22 


00 


6 


00 




75 


2 


00 




75 


4 


00 


18 


00 




50 




25 


3 


00 


1 


25 


125 


00 


4 


00 



7 6 
Support of Poor on Farm. 

Paid Moses Thompson, salary, $372 92 

Chas. Nelson, labor, 15 00 

John Sokalouski, labor, 75 00 

Joe Lincoln, 46 00 

J. Welsh, 18 00 
W. F. Kelley, emp. office fees and 

men's hire, 10 50 

J. S. Moore, provisions, 91 80 

W. E. Whitcomb, provisions, 55 09 

A. D. Shaw, fish, 6 60 

J. T. Day, fish, 4 79 

F. Wakelin, fish, 3 79 

S. B. Inson, fish, 3 08 

Tuttle & Newton, groceries, 17 05 

M. E. Taylor & Co., groceries, 412 61 

C. II. Mead & Co., 87 86 

E. C. Parker & Co., 178 16 
J. dishing, 172 76 
So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal, 3 78 
So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., lumber, 75 
J. M. Sheehan, shoeing and ironwork, 10 50 

F. M. Hopkins, shoeing and ironwork, 8 60 
J. P. Brown, repairs on wagon, 4 00 
Houghton, & Dutton, couch, 8 98 
Houghton & Dutton, chair, 6 98 
Houghton & Dutton, porch, 2 98 
Houghton & Dutton, 2 couch covers, 2 98 
W. A. Mack & Co., Crawford range, 53 00 
W. A. Mack & Co., water front and zinc, 5 70 
Jas. Hapgood, grafting 147 heads, 7 35 
C. O'Neil, one cow and calf. 60 00 
W. F. Kelley, one cow, 57 50 
W. F. Kelley, one pair pigs, 9 00 
A. B. Parker, advice on claim of city 

of Lowell regarding Carl A. 
Austin, 2 00 



11 



M. Thompson, pasturing 2 cows, 

iy^ weeks, 
JV1. Thompson, ladder, 
M. Thompson, medicine, 
W. H. Livingston, 125 barrels, 

D. S. Kennedy, picking apples, 
H. S. Barker, 100 barrels, 

F. J. Livingston, 24 gal. soap, 

E. T. Rice, repair on pump and set- 

ting up stove and pipe, 

C. H. Clark, repairing harness 
Finney & Hoit, blankets and bed 

linen, 

D. F. Spinney, dressing two hogs, 
Perkins & Bulette, pasturing two 

calves, 
Perkins & Bulette, pasturing three 
two-year-olds, 

G. E. Greenough, cutting ice 
Dr. F .J Barker, medical attendance 

furnished ¥m. Quinlan 

Mrs. Susan Fisk, 
Frank Harris, 
Lucy Hapgood 



6 00 


2 30 


50 


37 50 


40 00 


35 00 


3 00 


8 10 


3 10 


17 86 


2 00 



6 00 



12 


00 


1 


50 


ice 

3 


00 


z, 1 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 



$2,000 97 



Aid Outside Poor. 



Paid city of Somerville, Mass., aid fur- 
nished Mrs. Mary Hill and 
family, $114 66 

City of Boston, Mass., aid fur- 
nished Mrs. Sophia Randall, 3 69 
City of North Adams, Mass., aid 
furnished Mrs. Margaret 
Gouo:h and familv, 101 50 



7« 



City of Boston, Mass, medical aid 

furnished Marion Howland, 24 29 

M. E. Taylor & Co., groceries and 
supplies, furnished George 
Brooks and family, 96 19 

M. E. Taylor & Co., groceries and 
supplies furnished Mrs. 
Daniel Gallagher and family, 1.61 13 

Dr. Sam'l Christie, medical at- 
tendance and expense to 
Boston for Jas. Kerrigan, 16 09 

Dr. E. J. Salmon, medical attend- 
ance furnished Jas. Kerrigan, 

Dr. K. T. Richards, medical attend- 
ance furnished Jas. Kerrigan, 

Jas. Bent, board and attendance 

furnished Jas. Kerrigan, 70 00 



1 50 



1 50 







$590 55 


Inventory March 1, 1907, 




$2,467 45 


Receipts from farm, 


$1,173 39 




Due on milk, 


58 00 




Victualizing 16 tramps, 


4 00 








$1,835 39 




$4,302 84 


Expenditures, 


$2,000 97 




Interest on farm, 


105 00 




Inventory March 1, 1906, 


2,403 25 




- 




$4,509 22 
4,302 84 



Cost of supporting poor on farm, 



$206 38 



79 
Inmates at Farm During Year. 

Lucy Hapgood, 8 months, Wm. Quinlan, 12 months, 

Susan Fisk, 12 months, Frank Harris, 11 months. 

WM. F. KELLEY, 
0. A. KNOWLTON, 
J. STERLING MOORE, 

Overseers of Poor. 



8o 



REPORT OF THE TREE WARDEN. 



To the citizens of Aeton : 

The duties of the tree warden during the past year have 
Lain along the usual lines of routine of that office with the 
exception, possibly, of the work of trimming the public shade 
in West Acton. This work, done in October under the im- 
mediate supervision of deputy warden Albert H. Perkins, 
should have been done years ago. Some of the trees, indeed 
a large per centage of them, had not been trimmed since 
they were planted. The shade trees in West Acton are an im- 
portant and most valuable feature in that village and should 
be most fully protected and cared for. The work done upon 
them this year, though handicapped by the neglect of many 
years, was highly satisfactory and very much to the credit 
of the deputy warden in charge. 

The tree warden in this town, being also, by appoint- 
ment of the board of selectmen, local superintendent for 
the suppression of the brown tail and gypsy moths under 
the act of the legislature of 1905 has had during the year 
a very important and serious duty imposed upon him which 
he has endeavored to discharge to the satisfaction of the 
state and of the town. 

The brown tail moth has now been with us in numbers 
since 1905 and has this year appeared in increased force 
while the distribution of the nests of this moth throughout 
the town is somewhat different from that of last year. 

The trees within the limits of highways and public places 
have been cleared of the nests of this moth as have the trees 
belonging to many owners of real estate who have requested 
that the work of removing the nests be done by the town 
force. 



8i 

At the present writing the work of removing the nests 
from trees upon lands of ow T ners who have neglected to 
comply with the order of the board of selectmen, requiring 
the removal of said nests on or before December 31st, 1906, 
is in progress. 

In the fall of 1905 the state inspectors, for the first 
time discovered the nests of the gypsy moth in this town; 
they were found in four places, two of them colonies of 
importance in a town not hitherto infested, and two of 
them containing but a single nest. These colonies were care- 
fully inspected and treated during the summer of 1906 with 
the gratifying result that in the fall of that year, no new 
nests were found in three of these colonies, including the 
largest one, while the remaining colony developed but a 
single new nest. 

By direction of the state authorities a thorough ex- 
amination of the orchards and woodlands of the town, for 
the purpose of discovering to what extent they were in- 
fested by the gypsy moth, was began October 29 and finished 
about the middle of March. 

The result of this examination, during which every 
apple tree in the town was inspected, and the eggs in the 
nests found upon them destroyed, and the woodlands ex- 
tending over an area of approximately sixteen square miles, 
were carefully scanned, is that the town is found to be very 
seriously and generally infested by the gypsy moth through- 
out its area. 

The nests of this insect have been found upon 122 dif- 
ferent estates within the residential district, the heaviest 
infestation being found in the northern and eastern portions 
of the town. 

About seventy-five acres of woodlands are found to be 
seriously, in cases heavily, infested by this moth. 

With the exception of a small district, badly infested, 
in the south eastern part of the town the infestation in the 
woodland is almost wholly confined to the district lying 
north and east of a line drawn from 1lie Littleton town line 



82 

on the poor farm road through the Centre Village to the 
Concord town line at East Acton. 

In concluding' this report 1 wish to express my sincere 
appreciation of the services which the men employed in the 
brown tail and gypsy moth work have rendered during a 
most severe winter and my respect for the qualities which 
have enabled them to continue this work day after day 
under the most trying conditions of weather. 

CHAS. J. WILLIAMS, 
Tree Warden and Local Superintendent. 

NOTE. — Upon application to the tree warden, or to a 
deputy tree warden by persons desiring to cut trees growing 
within the limits of a public way along their hinds and out- 
side of village limits, such trees as the Town desires to per- 
manently retain will be marked, and a permit given to cut 
the remainder. 

Although the laws relating to the protection of shade 
trees have been annually published in this report for sev- 
eral years a number of our citizens appear to be unaware of 
the fact that the old "spiked tree law" so-called, has been 
repealed and that under the law now in force all trees with- 
in the limits of any public way or place are public shade 
trees belonging to the town for its use and benefit until such 
use and benefit is relinquished in writing by the town 
through its agent, the tree warden. 

Any growth measuring one inch in diameter at the 
butt is a tree within the meaning of the statute. 

Deputy Tree Wardens. 

Moses A. Reed, Acton Center; Albert II. Perkins, West 
Acton. 



83 



REVISED LAWS. 



Chapter 53. 

Section 12. The tree warden may appoint and remove 
deputy tree wardens. He and they shall receive such com- 
pensations as the town determines or, in default thereof, as 
the selectmen allow. He shall have the care and control of 
all public shade trees in the town, except those in public 
parks or open places under the jurisdiction of the park com- 
missioners, and of those, if so requested in writing 
by the park commissioners, and shall enforce all the pro- 
visions of law for the preservation of such trees. He shall 
expend all money appropriated for the setting out and 
maintainance of such trees. Regulations for their care and 
preservation made by him, approved by the selectmen and 
posted in two or more public places, imposing fines and 
forfeitures of not more than twenty dollars in any one case, 
shall have the force and effect of town by-laws. All shade 
trees within the limits of a public way shall be public shade 
trees. 

Section 13. Public shade trees outside the residential 
part of a town, as determined by the selectmen, shall not 
be cut or removed, in whole or in part, except by the tree 
warden or his deputy or by a person holding a license so to 
do from the tree warden. Public shade trees within said 
residential part shall not be cut, except for trimming by the 
tree warden, nor shall they be removed by the tree warden 
or his deputy or other person without a public hearing at 
a suitable time and place, after notice thereof posted in 
two or more public places in the town and upon the tree and 
after authority granted by the tree warden therefor. Who- 
ever violates the provisions of this section shall forfeit not 
less than five nor more than one hundred dollars to the use 
of the town. 



8 4 
Chapter 208. 

Section 102. Whoever wantonly injures, defaces or des- 
troys an ornamental or shade tree in a pnblic way or place, 
or negligently or willfully suffers an animal, driven by or 
for him or belonging to him, and lawfully in a public way 
or place, to injure, deface or destroy such tree, or whoever, 
by any other means, negligently or willfully injures, defaces 
or destroys such tree, shall forfeit not less than five nor 
more than one hundred dollars, one-half to the use of the 
complinant and one-half to the use of the city or town in 
which said act is committed; and shall in addition thereto 
be liable to said city or town or other person interested in 
said tree for all damages caused by said act. 

Section 103. Whoever negligently or willfully suffers 
an animal, driven by or for him or belonging to him and 
lawfully on the highway, to injure, deface or destroy a tree 
which is not his own, standing for use or ornament on the 
highway, or whoever, by any other means, negligently or 
willfully injures, defaces or destroys such tree, shall forfeit 
not less than five nor more than one hundred dollars, one- 
half to the use of the complainant and one-half to the use 
of the city or town in which said act is committed ; and shall 
in addition thereto be liable in damages to the owners or 
tenant of the land in front of which the tree stands. 

Section 104. Whoever affixes to a tree in a public way 
or place, a playbill, picture, announcement, notice, advertise- 
ment or other thing, whether in writing or otherwise, or 
cuts, paints or marks such tree except for the purpose of 
protecting it and under a written permit from the officers 
having the charge of such trees in a city or from the tree 
warden in a town, shall be punished by a fine of not more 
than fifty dollars for each offence. The tree warden shall 
enforce the provisions of this and the preceding two sections 
in towns. 



8s 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

For the Year 1906—1907. 



We present the following schedule showing the amounts 
of the several funds for the perpetual care of cemetery lots, 
and the income and expenditures on account of each fund 
for the year. 

HERBERT T. CLARK, 
JULIAN TUTTLE, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Cemetery Commissoiners. 



xn 

O 

o 

w 

o 
o 

P 
15 

E> 
En 

H 
H 

H 

a 

w 
o 



CD 

s 

o 

I 

S3 

O 
O 



!0(il 'LI qs»«W 
pneq nQ 



paptradxg 



v)lll().)UJ 



9061 'II qw«]V: 
pneq uq 



p9|lS0d9Q 

^unoray 



IfilflOOClWOOO^OOlONO 

(NHlCintOt-OlClflinr-CfMCOlC 

OHHOMLOHlMHrtinWHr-r- 

LOOOiOOi— ioooooooog 

r- iH (NlOHHHH(NHHrHr« 



"oooo^tDirsooooooooo 

lOWiCOOWNOlCCOOCOCLO 



ioooloooooooooooo 

t^ LO O t- O LO LC LC lO W O lO LO uC IG 



cc 



omoLocooLOCo^oooinNo 

OHiO!Nt>Wl>OmOCT5iflt»^W 

OHQ O-^ WH(MHr^*COOH(M 
iCOOiOOi— lOOOO'OOOOO 

r-r-H NLOHHr-H!MHnr-rH 

ooooooooooooooo" 
ooooooooooooooo 

©©ooooooo©©©©©© 

lOOOiOOOOOOOOOOOC 

rH tH <N*OrHrHrHrHCMT-(rHrHrH 



•- 




a 


CD 


CD 


CD 




> 


— 


r 


- 


C/J 


3 


H 


_ 


Ph 


3 


Ph 



X 



£s 



r- rH © 



& 




a: 




*h 


4— 


|tS tS 8 aZ 

^ ' CD &h 03 


2 a 


K ^ P o o 


j- j£ 


r fr 


72^^ r^^S 


-02 


^ 




*— ■ cc ■ to to 


' ' cc 


rH IC CM 





Name of Fund 


Hebsabeth Piper 
Frederick Rouillarr 
William W. Davis 
Jedediah Tuttle 
Mary Skinner 
Nancy K. Handley 
Mary Severance 
Mary W. Chaffin 
Warren Robbins 
Henry Locker 
Henry Loker 
Luther W. Piper 
James Temple 
Fidelia Wheeler 
Wm. II. Chapman 


^ISOdGQ JO 
9^(T 


©©cMc^rocot^t^ao©^©©©© 
coasOioiC^cjiCiCiOi .ci cs cs © © © 

QOCOOOHCOQOCOOOOOOOODQOCiCia) 

rir-HQOHHHHHHHr-Hr-H 

©~ co" cc" ©~ ©~ ©~ ci » c co aT cc" ©~ of o" t*T 

CCr- CO t-H t-H rH r— CI CM C3 r- CC CJ 

a> a3 3 a; a P.J5 g * o_ = T £ * « 


'ON 


r- C<l CC ^ iO CC t- X C O H CI CC H iC' 



HOWO 



o o t- o 



c ^ c r: x l- l: r. i- i^ m c ?j c ifl o n o <m l~ o 

O t> O] ^ ^ tJ< ^ (M -^ C t* r-l C L': ?■! C O r- QO Ci t> 

r-ii^OOLO,— lOCOOt^OOCGOi— O CD O lO O <M O 
OOOOt-OOOLOOOi-^UCOi^t-OcOOOO 
,— ,__,_,— ^ ,_ ,_ ,_! r-| iQ ,-) r-J(M Wr- 



i~ io »fl kn 



oooooocooo 

ut O L-~ CO kO OC4Q Ifl 



<M 



CM — 



o o o o o 
o o o o lt: 



(N © i-H ©3 rH 



C 

c 



"©©©©<M©©©l^©©©^©^>©<M©'MO© 
lf3 LO LO LO O lO LQ O t> LC LO LC f O t> C LO r- CO C5 t> 



O O <N © 

O UO CD U3 



(N CO WWCOCO(NCOCOCOHCOWl>HCOT-(HNlfl 



in o 



o -* 
O <N 



£1 l.' 



O ONOW 
O O tN CI K 



co t— r- c: C^i t- CM OS l— O © 
OOlOt-N^NCOHOC 



do •— rroOi.rtoo^tOTtir-oooo 
C ©OOOfr-OOOiOOOT-HiOOifl 



O 0030 ooooooooooooooooooooo 
o oooo ooooooooooooooooooooo 



0OOOOOOOW5O0OO0 

o >~ o o o i-t o ur: c— o o lc o o 

r- i-H tH IT3 i— H CM N tH 



+3 


© 




05 c 


^ 03 




^ > 


5 — 












s r £ 


gg s 


— w 












c 1 


rv. n o __ 


fv [jh r* 




fcfc^ * 


v: X x 




















£ 


w X 


(N CI 



— r 



~ ad 



-O DD 

-o bo 

5 '£ -j jj> 
^ E l x - = 



a 



-o . 



> < o g § c§ " ~ C 

^ ^f! . d £ ^ ^- o Cl 






1£J* 

> — ^. - r- ^" W • ^ — 
&j "^ — ffi (u p-4 a: — '-P — """ 

§.2"E 3 ^ .= = ^ ^ ^ F 3 d t- & d ^ 

OS OS OS OS OS OS OS OS OS OS OS OS OS as OS OS OS 



i-i t— HHNCQ 

O o 
as a; 



* ac 



CO CO 

o o 

OS OS 



a: 2 



CO CO 

o o 

OS OS 



d 
c 

C b£ 

fe H 1-3 



CO CO t^ 

o o o 
os os as 






OS -f* O O O X ^ t- Lt C. I* C (M r- r- LC X X C r- C M C r- 

iH (N CQ <M i—i— <M ^- c^l TC TC iH (N i— • (N i-H 



be 4j p ^ h "C ^ £ a >- rf- jf E E = = rf o — d 



S d 



CO t^ X CT. O — NC0^lOC0l*00 0SOHNWr*lOC0l>W0SOH 



COinLCCOOLOinOO(MCDHt>-(MCO 

<x»(Moocoto»0(MTti'*^b-aiQOcr>oo 

iCOt*05t»^0000OO>HHHCJOJ 
hHOONlO^lCmOOOWOiO 
# HUtHO y—\ r- IHHr I 



o o o o o 
o o o to o 



CO CO CO t>- CO 



ooooooooo 

OOOtOtOtOtOOtO 



COCO(M(MiM(M(MCOCl 



!MOOOOtOtOtOtOOOOt^<C<lCO 
<X>OtO*OtOL~t^<Mt-LOlOtOCOCOCO 

NWCOt-t^HHirDHCOCOCO^fNW 



^lOlOWOOOiOlOIMOH 
OCQCOWOOOinHCD^OOi 

ccGot>ocomo5^ooooo 
o- oocqtoTjHLotoooo 

tH »0 tO t— I rH r- I tH 





8rt 


ooooooooooooo 






ooooooooooooo 






(2« 


ooooooooooooo 






OOOtOtOtOtOOOOtOOO 








rH 


n 


O 






— 


rH 


r- 1 r^ rH tH 






Ph 






















0> 






















P 






















86 






















rp 






















DQ 




















t? 


r— 




















Q> 




















« 


« 




















& 


a 




















0) 


o> 




















a> 


O 




















s 


p. 




















O 


o 




















$ 


-£ 




















Fh 
o 


§ 




















fc 


o 


















d 




s 










5 


— 






to 
u 
u 

- 

73 
o 






7^ ^ 


o3 


— 




fl 

^ 


03 


c 


r. 










o3 o3 

WW 
.2d 


dcio 


?3 
73 

FH 


03 

w 


3^ 

op 


Walcott 
il Louisa 
R. Hough 
m A. Cut 






_» a> 


N 


rX 


&D b£ . 


as 


03 


t/5 


r| 


03 cc 






^ .9 


- 




H t* r-H 

O O HH 


^ 


£ 




03 


p .sp s a 






'£4 _CJ ^ <D <X> . 

W P* 0Q fc .3 CO 


u 

HH 


. <D o3 .^ ot> 
H^> J C£ fo O H? J> 






to o 


— 


rH(M(MT±lT+lTWCOtOtOCO<X>CD 






OiOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 






COCJOjCi(J5CiC)CiQGiOiOiOiQOi 





1 50| 50 29 
1 50| 50 79 

1 50| 50 54 

2 00| 50 77 

1 


1 

194 31J7498 20 
1 


to to to to 

rH rH i-\ rH 




HH H< Ci CM 
O to <M O 

O O O r- 

to to to to 


OS 

o 

CO 
(M 

CO 
CD 


O O O O 
O O O O 

O O O O 

to to to to 


o 
o 

o 

o 

CO 




0Q 

-H> 

o 



c 

3D 
-g.J 

^ HH 

i— I «2 

8 "8 

sS 

as Jh 



U 

^ c 

Pi c 

<rj bt> 



COCOt-HHHHOOOCO(MCO(M(M(M 
(M CM CO (M(MH(M rHrHrH 

H(MCOHlO f OI>ODCiOH(MCOHlO 



CO CO CO HH 
O O O O 

&s a &s ci 



NNIMr- 



03 'S 



03 r 
ha < 



-M 



03 
03 

w 

d 



o 
o 

.S 

a 
# 



8 9 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE ACTON 
MEMORIAL LIBRARY, 1906—1907. 



LUTHER CONANT, President, 
E. FAULKNER CONANT, Secretary. 
HORACE F. TUTTLE. 
MOSES TAYLOR, DELETTE H. HALL, 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD, CHAS. J. WILLIAMS, 

L. A. HESSELTON, FRANK R. KNOWLTON. 



The Trustees of the Acton Memorial Library respectfully 
submit their 17th annual report. We refer you to the report 
of the Librarian, Mr. Arthur F. Davis, printed herewith 
showing in detail the receipts for the year ending March 
12th, 1907, together with a statement of the general affairs 
of the book and periodical departments. 

The service and work of the institution has gone on as 
usual and we think that no extended report is called for. 

The writer has in the last two months had an opportun- 
ity to visit in the far West and see many libraries more 
costly and pretentious, but has*examined none that seemed 
to be better fitted for the purpose for which they were in- 
stituted than our own. 



9° 

We are fortunate in retaining Mr. Davis as librarian, 
also Mr. Taylor as janitor. 

The Trustees recommend the same appropriation as last 
year. $400.00 for current expenses and $200.00 for new books. 

Respectfully submitted 

LUTHER CONANT, 

For the Trustees. 



9i 



SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT. 



Accessions — Number of volumes in the library March 12. 

1906, 9,266 ; increase by purchase 335 of which 41 were ob- 
tained by binding magazines; increase by gift 35. Total 
increase 370. Number of volumes in the library March 12, 

1907. 9,636. 

Circulation — Number of days the library was opened 
102. number of volumes circulated 7,050, daily average circu- 
lation 69, largest daily circulation 133, on July 7, 1906. small- 
est daily circulation 25. on November 28, 1906. 

It is my duty to report that the Library was entered 
and the contents of the money box in the private draw were 
stolen, after forcible entry had been made into the drawer by 
some person or persons unknown to the Librarian in May 
1906. 

The exact amount taken is unknown to the Librarian. 
Since that time there has been received for 

Catalogues and fines. $23 26 

Expended for postage, 95 



$22 31 



Gifts of books have been received from the following 
sources: U. S. Government 11, State of Massachusetts 18, 
City of Boston 2. J. L. Hildreth, M. D. 1, Luther Conant 1, 
Rev. J. S. David. F. D. Wood. Luther Conant and A. F. 
Davis 1. 

Periodicals subscribed for and in the reading room 22, 



9 2 

viz: Monthly: American Magazine, Appleton's, Atlantic, 
Century, Cosmopolitan, Current Literature, Delineator, 
Everybody's, Harper's, McClure's, Munsey's, National, New 
England, Review of Reviews, Scribner's, St. Nicholas, 
World's Work, World Today. Weekly: Harper's Weekly, 
Independent, Scientific American, Youth's Companion. 



A. F. DAVIS, Librarian. 



70TH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



AND THE REPORT OF THE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

OF THE 

TOWN OF ACTON 

Massachusetts 
FOR THE YEAR 1906-1907 

1907 



HUDSON, MASSACHUSETTS 

NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY, PRINTERS 

1907 



95 



SCHOOL CALENDAR. 



Spring Term, 1907. 
High School. 

Spring term begins March 25th. closes June 21st: 13 weeks. 

Common Schools. 
Spring term begins March 25th. closes June 14th; 12 weeks. 



Year 1907-1908. 

High School, 40 Weeks. 

Fall term begins Sept. 3rd ; closes Nov. 27th ; 13 weeks. 
*Winter term begins Dec. 2nd; closes March 13th; 14 weeks. 
Spring term begins March 23rd ; closes June 19th ; 13 weeks. 
^Recess of one week. December 23rd to 30th. 

Common Schools, 38 weeks. 

Fall term begins Sept. 3rd; closes Nov. 27th; 13 weeks. 
* Winter term begins Dec. 2nd ; closes March 13th ; 13 weeks. 
Spring term begins March 23rd; closes June 12th; 12 weeks. 
*Recess of two weeks, December 23rd to Januarv 6th. 



9 6 



School Committee 1906-1907. 

Frank R. Knowlton, Term expires 1907 ^ 

Chas. J. Williams, chairman, Term expires 1908 

Samuel A. Christie, M. D.. secretary. Term expires 1909 



Superintendent of Schools. 
Arthur B. Webber, Residence. Littleton. Mass. 



Truant Officers. 
Moses A. Reed, Geo. C. Turner. Thomas Scanlon. 



97 



STANDING RULES. 



::;: Rule 1. Children under five years of age shall not be 
admitted to the public schools. 

Rule 2. Pupils shall be promoted from grade to grade 
and school to school, according to merit. Thorough and 
satisfactory work will be required of pupils in a lower grade 
or school before entering a higher grade or school. 

Rule 3. Children who have not previously attended any 
school shall be admitted to the public schools only at the be- 
ginning of the fall term. 

Rule 4. Pupils will be held responsible for books loaned 
to them until such books shall have been returned to the 
teacher. 

Rule 5. No repairs shall be made upon the public prop- 
erty in the care of the school committee except by their 
authorized agents. 

*When the birthday of a child falls od or before the 
15th day of the month it is reckoned as falling upon the first 
day of that month. 



9 8 



EXTRACTS FROM THE STATUTES.— REVISED LAWS. 



Chapter 43. 



Section 11. The several sehool teachers shall faithfully 
keep the registers of attendance daily, and make due re- 
turn thereof to the school committee, or to such person as. 
the committee may designate. No teacher of a public school 
shall receive payment for services for the two weeks preced- 
ing the close of any term, until the register, properly filled up 
and completed, is so returned. All registers shall be kept 
at the schools, and at all times during school hours shall be 
open to the inspection of the school committee, the super- 
intendent of schools, the truant officers and the secretary 
and agent of the board of education. In reckoning the aver- 
age membership and the percentage of attendance in the 
schools, no pupils 's name shall be omitted in counting the 
number of such persons belonging to the school and the 
number of absences of such persons until it is known that 
such pupil has withdrawn from the school without intention 
of returning or, in the absence of such knowledge, until 
ten consecutive days of absence have been recorded; but 
the foregoing provision for computing the average cember- 
ship and the percentage of attendance shall not affect 
proceedings against habitual truants, absentees or school 
offenders, or other persons, under the provisions of section 
one of chapter forty-four and sections three, four and five 
of chapter forty-six. A pupil who is not present during 
at least half of a session shall be marked and counted as 
absent for that session. 

Chapter 44. 

Section 1. Every child between seven and fourteen 
years of age. and every child under sixteen years of age 



99 

who cannot read at sight and write legibly simple sentences 
in the English language, shall attend some public day school 
in the city or town in which he resides during the entire 
time the public clay schools are in session, subject to such 
exceptions as to children, places of attendance and schools 
as are provided for in section three of chapter forty-two 
and sections three, five and six of this chapter. The super- 
intendent of schools or, if there is no superintendent of 
schools, the school committee, or teachers acting under au- 
thority of said superintendent or committee, may excuse 
cases of necessary absence. The attendance of a child upon 
a public day school shall not be required if he has attended 
for a like period of time a private day school approved by 
the school committee of such city or town in accordance 
with the provisions of the following section, or if he has been 
otherwise instructed for a like period of time in the branches 
of learning required by law to be taught in the public schools 
of if he has already acquired such branches of learning, or 
if his physical or mental condition is such as to render such 
attendance inexpedient or impracticable. Every person 
having under his control a child as described in this section 
shall cause him to attend school as herein required; and if he 
fails for five day sessions or ten half day sessions within any 
period of six months while under such control to cause such 
child, whose physical or mental condition is not such as to 
render his attendance at school harmful or impracticable, so 
to attend school, he shall, upon complaint by a truant of- 
fici • and conviction thereof, be punished by a fine of not 
more than twenty dollars. AVhoever induces or attempts 
to induce a child to absent himself unlawfully from school, 
or employs or harbors a child who, while school is in ses- 
sion, is absent unlawfully from school shall be punished by 
a fine of not more than fifty dollars. 

Section 6. A child who has not been vaccinated shall 
not be admitted to a public school except upon presentation 
of a certificate signed by a regular practising physician that 
he is not a fit subject for vaccination. A child who is a 



lOO 

member of a household in which a person is ill with small-. 
pox, diphtheria, scarlet fever or measles, or of a household 
exposed to such contagion from another household as afore- 
said, shall nol attend any public school during such illness 
or until the teacher of the school has been furnished with a 
certificate from the board of health of the city or town, or 
from the attending physician of such person, stating that, in 
a case of smallpox, diphtheria or scarlet fever at least two 
weeks, and in a case of measles, at least three days, have 
elapsed since the recovery, removal or death of such person, 
and that danger of conveying such disease by such child 
has passed. 

Section 3. Any child between seven and fourteen years 
of age who wilfully and habitually absents himself from 
school contrary to the provisions of section one of chapter 
forty-four shall be deemed to be an habitual truant, and, 
upon complaint of a truant officer and conviction thereof, 
may, if a boy, be committed to a county truant school for 
not more than two years, and, if a girl, to the state industrial 
school for girls, unless such child is placed on probation as 
provided in section seven of this chapter. 

Section -i. A child between seven and sixteen years of 
age who may be found wandering about in the streets or 
public places of any city or town having no. lawful occu- 
pation, habitually not attending school, and growing up in 
idleness and ignorance, shall be deemed an habitual ab- 
sentee, and, upon complaint by a truant officer or any other 
person and conviction thereof, may, if a boy, be committed 
to a county truant school for not more than two years or to 
the Lyman school for boys, and, if a girl, to the state in-i 
dustrial school for girls, unless such child is placed on pro- 
bation as provided in section seven. 

Section 5. A child under fourteen years of age who 
persistently violates the reasonable regulations of the school 
which he attends, or otherwise persistently misbehaves there- 
in, so as to render himself a fit subject for expulsion there- 
from, shall be deemed to be an habitual school offender, and, 



IOI 

upon complaint by a truant officer and conviction thereof, 
may, if a boy, be committed to a county truant school for 
not more than two years or to the Lyman school for boys, 
and, if a girl, to the state industrial school for girls, unless 
such child is placed on probation as provided in section 
seven. 

Section 13. Truant officers shall inquire into all cases 
arising- under the provisions of sections one and six of 
chapter forty-four and sections three, four and five of this 
chapter, and may make complaints and serve legal processes 
issued under the provisions of this chapter. They shall 
have the oversight of children placed on probation under 
the provisions of section seven. A truant officer may ap- 
prehend and take to school, without a warrant, any truant 
or absentee found wandering about in the streets or public 
places thereof. 

Chapter 106. 

Section 28. No child under the age of fourteen years 
and no child who is over fourteen and under sixteen years 
of age who does not have a certificate as required by the 
following four sections certifying to the child's ability to 
read at sight and to write legibly simple sentences in the 
English language shall be employed in any factory, work- 
shop or mercantile establishment. No child under the age 
of fourteen years shall be employed at work performed for 
wages or other compensation, to whomsoever payable, du- 
ring the hours when the public schools of the city or town 
in which he resides are in session, or be employed at work 
before six o'clock in the morning or after seven o'clock in 
the evening. 

Section 2. No certificate as provided for by sections 
twenty-nine to thirty-two inclusive of chapter one hundred 
and six of the Revised Laws shall be approved by any person 
for a minor under the age of sixteen years who intends to be 
employed in a factory, workshop or mercantile establish- 



102 

ment, unless such person is satisfied that such minor is able 
to read at sight and to write legibly simple sentences in the 
English language. 

Section 31. An age or schooling certificate shall not be 
approved unless satisfactory evidence is furnished by a cer- 
tificate of birth or baptism of such minor, or by the register 
of birth of such minor with a city or town clerk, that such 
minor is of the age stated in the certificate, except that other 
evidence, under oath, may be accepted in case the superint- 
endent or person authorized by the school committee, as 
provided in the preceding section, decides that neither the 
certificates of birth or baptism, nor the register of birth is 
available for the purpose. 



ACTS OF 1906. 

Chapter 499. 

An Act Relative to the Illegal Employment of Minors and to 
the Duties of Truant Officers. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Whoever employs a minor under the age of 
sixteen years, and whoever procures or, having under his 
control a minor under such age. permits such minor to be 
employed in violation of the provisions of sections twenty- 
eight or twenty-nine of chapter one hundred and six of the 
Revised Laws, as amended by chapter two hundred and 
sixty-seven of the acts of the year nineteen hun- 
dred and five, shall for each offence be punished by 
a fine of not more than three hundred dollars, or by im- 
prisonment for not more than six months, or by both such 
fine and imprisonment; and whoever continues to employ a 
minor in violation of the provisions of either of said sections 



io 3 

as so amended, after being notified thereof by a truant officer 
or by an inspector of factories and public buildings, shall for 
every day thereafter while such employment continues be 
punished by a fine of not less than twenty nor more than one 
hundred dollars, or by imprisonment for not more than six 
months. 

Section 2. Inspectors of factories and public buildings 
shall visit all factories, workshops and mercantile establish- 
ments within their respective districts, and ascertain whether 
any minors are employed therein contrary to the provisions 
of chapter one hundred and six of the Revised Laws and 
amendments thereof or additions thereto, or contrary to the 
provisions of this act, and shall enter complaint against 
whomever is found to have violated any of said provisions. 
Any inspector of factories and public buildings who know- 
ingly and wilfully violates any provision of this section may 
be punished by a fine of not more than one hundred dollars. 

Section 3. A truant officer may apprehend and take to 
school, without a warrant, any minor under the age of six- 
teen years who is employed in any factory, workshop or mer- 
cantile establishment in violation of the provisions of sections 
twenty-eight or twenty-nine of chapter one hundred 
and six of the Revised Laws, and of any amendments 
thereof or additions thereto, and such truant officer shall 
forthwith report to the police, district or municipal court or 
trial justice within Avhose judicial district the illegal employ- 
ment ment occours, the evidence in his possession relating to 
the illegal employment of any child so apprehended, and shall 
make complaint against whomever the court or trialjustice 
may direct. Any truant officer who knowingly and wilfully 
violates any provision of this section may be punished by a 
fine of not more than one hundred dollars for each offence, 
against whomever the court or trial ustice may direct. Any 
truant officer who knowingly and wilfully violates any pro- 
vision of this section may be punished by a fine of not more 
than one hundred dollars for each offence. 



104 

Section 4. [nspectors of factories and public buildings, 
and truant officers may require that the age and schooling 
cerl ificates and lists of minors who are employed in factories, 
workshops or mercantile establishments shall be produced 
for their inspection. A failure to produce to an inspector of 
factories and public buildings or to a truant officer an age and 
schooling certificate or list required by law shall be prima 
facie evidence of the illegal employment of any person whose 
age and schooling certificate is not produced or whose name 
is not so listed. A corporation or other employer or any 
agent or officer thereof, who retains an age and schooling 
certificate in violation of the provisions of said certificate 
shall be punished by a fine of not less than ten nor more than 
one hundred dollars. 

Section 5. Police, district and municipal courts and trial 
justices shall have jurisdiction of offences arising under the 
provisions of this act. A summons or warrant issued by any 
such court or justice may be served, at the discretion of the 
court or magistrate, by an inspector of factories and public 
buildings, or by a truant officer, or by any officer qualified to 
serve criminal process. 

Section 6. Section thirty-three of chapter one hundred 
and six of the Revised Laws, and all other acts and parts of 
acts inconsistent herewith, are hereby repealed. (Approved 
June 20. 1906.) 



o 

03 



H 

W 
E-« 

w 
w 

PQ 



c6 



88 



o 



c8 



03 



OS Ah 

►— i o 
<— > tc 

03 



M CD 






03 
— 

- 
03 



3 ww t 



— -^ a 






- _ - 



^ 5<X 5 ^ 



0> 

bio 

o 

03 

3 



^ . M 



a feg 






03 -f^ 

2^ 



o3 



+-> p 

CO 



60 b 

03 ^ 
03 C3 



03 



^5 . CQ 

"5 p ~ 

fl 03 p 
03 . eg 

OS - 



'j bw^ 

a *<; '—i p 

03 03 — 

^2A p 

c8 — ' -3 • — 

03 CO ^ ^ 



03 - — vi> 0/ 

§ 82S^ 



"P 
- 
03 



o 



o3 r »- 



as.2 

*- - p 



§3 1,1 as 

^ £ 2 - ~ i: ~ 



o 



^ o ,p = c 03 ^ ^- .a 



H ~ M _C □ — • - "- 1 r— 4 



= S-?£ 



"0 c x j> 03 &*> 

13 -*-> oj ^12,^13 

p rp ^ 03 






> .go _p -z rg 
g >• I— j rt a: 



IH hh .S ,« Ph g 5|=l 



^o 

,-=3 C 



-£ 



w 



a 5Ki 



.^-O^H S5 03 



•— ' -^ P^H 



_>. C gjjj j. .* o s. ^ 






QJD^ 03 f-i 2 .^ A .h 'S 



w~. 



o^<o^^ 



"~! ^ r_^ ^- r> 





- 


^ 








!h 


03 


PQ 






oc 


^ 


- 


- 


<13 


— 


3 


- 


03 

w 


U 

c 


^ 


A 




- 


~- 


r/j 


W 


- 


o- 




- 

c 


— 


~ 


03 
r 


- 
— 


w 


^ 






— 


E 


r-. 


sd 


^! 




- 


^ 


.2 


_£ 


= 


J 


,y 


s 


- 




03 












J^ 


A3 O 


£ 


— 


- 


X 

C 



CM r-^'MCM r-iHNN COCO r-OdOafM 



c8 

- 



oc - 



u: i: 



c8 co A A A A 

d rt O O O Olrtfl , 



03 03 



ace 



?-i ^-f ?-i S-i P-( 



+j s^ +j s-J +J 
OD M 05 3D 05 
C 53 p p p 
". OJD it oc he £JD 



^ n i~h fh ^< j^i ^| r^» rj» r* r_» r .« r- « ' . jju m«j uu uw u) 

^oooco3o3p^^'03o3o3o3 r p r ^ r Pppppp 



^>r=H 



O 



r— Ol CO -f »0 »t»00OiC 



T— r- i— T-! r^ T— »— r— ri Ol Ol 







ec 








- 




p 
<x 

CO 

.P 


i 

o 


5 


"5 

o 
£-1 


r— « 

x> 

to 


58 ft 
O r 


QQ 


> 

x> 


— i 


< 


p 




O 
CO 




T5 

p 
W 

<X 
P 




:/: 

p 
at 

< 


< 


Q 

P 


—- 


P 
P 

- 

O 


<x 
<x 

< 


S 


— 


^j 




-T 


— 




S3 

ce 

P 

o 


p 

- 


— 

<v 

— 


T3 

P 

DC 

- 
<X 


- 


P 
M 

a 


p 
- 

p 


C 

— 
p 

p 


d 


— 


X 


P 


~ 


- 


- 
- 


n 


02 


~ 




< 


T 


- 


[x, 


— ; 





-= 






CI 


~ 




p 


a> 




O ,P 








X 


~ 


+2 


■/■ 




' 


3 


1 — 


E 


p ^ 

p » 

P a> 


08 


s 


pj 


~ 


cu 


Of 





— 
X 


< 




?H 


X 


P 


~ 


T 


SO 


o 


r 


V 


r 


c. 


r— 





3C 


X 



p 

X 

<x c v 
StJ ^ a? 

J^ <X rP 



£ o^? 



+5 h O 

•4-3 (-H 

.= &.1 

-^ P ^ 

r- ° ° 

P a: rj 

£ P +2 

P3 =6 P 



P <X 
O ^ 

<x 

a E 
uJ ha 



35 



— OC CO 


TC 


(MMW 


rH 


T ~ 






rH 


Ol cc 


ember 
ember 
ember 


<x 


jmber 
;mber 
mber 


<X 

a 


+J -M +J 


r 








<x 


ftftP 


+a 


k 


K- 


-" 


o 


<x <x x> 


w 


- 


c 


C 


Q3 


GG <72 02 O £ £ £ q 



'M M (M Cq (M C<l (M o: 



X 



T3 
o» 

f-i 

c 

(X 



IO" 



SEVENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COM- 
MITTEE.. 



To the Citizens of Acton: 

We again have the pleasure of reporting to you that the 
past year in your schools has been a successful one and that 
the schools are now. as they have been for several years, in 
excellent condition. We wish to acknowledge here, as we 
have frequently done in former reports, the competent and 
faithful services of the superintendent and teachers, who 
have in large degree made our schools what they now are. 

In the early months of the year the duties of your com- 
mittee and the anxieties connected therewith were increased 
and made somewhat onerous because of the rapid and un- 
expected changes in the superintendence*. In March, after a 
faithful and very successful service' of six years. Mr. Richard- 
son resigned to accept the Aver — West Boylston District. By 
the consent of these towns, however, our schools received 
the benefit of his supervision until May 1st. 

On April 14th, Mr. E. L. Willard was chosen district 
superintendent and took charge of the schools on May 1st. 
Mr. Willard resigned on June 28th to accept the superintend- 
ency of the schools of Newburyport. On July 5th, Mr. 
Arthur B. Webber, the present incumbent of the office, was 
chosen superintendent and entered upon his duties August 
1st. We have every reason to congratulate ourselves upon 
the selection of Mr. Webber for the position. 

To the report of the superintendent, incorporated in and 
made a part of this report, we invite your careful attention. 

We again urge upon your attention the pressing need of 
proper and sufficient accommodations for the graded schools 
at South Acton and again point out that the building in 



iocS 

which the south grammar school is at present housed is, be- 
eause of its location and for other reasons, totally onfit for 
this purpose. 

The constant din caused by the operation of the rail- 
road near this building not only makes the conduct of the 
school exceedingly difficult but is apparently working se- 
rious physical injury to the pupils. The south primary and 
intermediate schools are full to overflowing, the former to 
an extent that made imperative the employment of an as- 
sistant teacher at the beginning of the fall term. 

All the room afforded by the school building at South 
Acton is needed for the accomodation of the graded schools 
and Ave ask more earnestly, if that is possible, than Ave have 
asked before that the town adopt such measures as Avill re- 
lieve the present and increasing congestion in the primary 
and intermediate school in this village and at the same time 
provide a suitable home for the grammar school. 

At the opening of the fall term, the class entering the 
high school Avas found to be so large as to nearly double the 
number of pupils in attendance at this school in the pre- 
ceding year and to force upon your committee the im- 
mediate consideration of a subject Avhich the board of edu- 
cation had kept quite constantly before them during several 
years. Believing that the best interests of the pupils AA'hose 
training had been entrusted to this school demanded the ser- 
vices of a second assistant teacher, and that the town desired 
to afford to these pupils all the opportunities for an education 
possible, and believing also that the time had arrived when 
action in the matter could not wisely be longer deferred, 
your committee appointed a second assistant teacher in the 
high school at the beginning of the school year. This in- 
crease in the number of the teaching staff makes it necessary 
for us to ask for an appropriation for the support of the high 
school of $2,300.00. 

For some time past the employment of an instructor in 
drawing has been under consideration, it being our belief that 
the study of this art Avhich enters so importantly into the 



109 

work of so many business and professional men and women 
and so intimately into the lives of many others should no 
longer be left to the ordinary instruction of the school room 
but should have competent presentation in all your schools 
from the primary to the high. Accordingly at the beginning 
of the school year and in concert with the other towns of 
the district the services of an instructor in free-hand and 
mechanical drawing were engaged and these branches are 
now taught in your schools. Since a single instructor at 
present teaches both drawing and music the increased cost 
of instruction is but slight. 

Owing to the very large number of pupils in attendance 
at the South primary school at the opening of the fall term. 
an assistant teacher was at that time appointed in that 
school. 

An act of the legislature of 1906 requires the appoint- 
ment by the school committee of a physician or physicians 
who shall at stated times make certain examinations of the 
pupils in the public schools for the purpose of detecting de- 
fects in hearing, eye sight, etc., which might otherwise be 
unobserved and who shall act at the call of the teachers in 
cases of suspected contagious diseases in the schools and on 
other necessary occasions. For the purpose of carrying 
out tin 1 requirements of this statute we ask an appropriation 
of $100.00. 

The amount received from the ^Tass. school fund is 
$845.62 compared with $1,026.40 received last year, a 
reduction of $180.78, due to the fact the sum raised for the 
support of schools was smaller in proportion to the whole 
amount raised by the town by taxation than was the case 
in the preceding year. 

During the summer the school house at South Acton 
was repainted outside, the interior of the building repainted 
and whitened and the finish and furniture renovated. One 
new floor was laid in the west house and one also in the 
house at the center. 

It will be noted that the expenditure for books and 



no 

supplies has this year quite largely exceeded the sum ap- 
propriated for that purpose. The heavy increase in member- 
ship in the high school and in the graded schools at South 
Acton, the introduction of drawing as a study in all the 
schools, and the fact that at the beginning of the school 
year an unexpectedly large number of books were found 
to be unfit for further use, are the causes of the expend- 
iture. In the matter of books unfit, by reason of wear, for 
further use. the conditions were met as far as seemed at all 
advisable, but much remains to be done in the direction of 
replacing worn out books. A somewhat larger annual ex- 
penditure in this department is demanded by existing con- 
ditions, and Ave therefore ask that the amount appropriated 
in past years for the purchase of books and supplies be in- 
creased by the sum of $100 00. 

Three hundred and seventy-five dollars have been re- 
ceived from the state on account of salary of superintendent 
of schools for the year 1905-1906. 

The reports of the purchasing agent and of the truant 
officers are appended. 



Receipts and Expenditures on Account of Schools for the 
Fiscal Year 1906-1907. 

Receipts. 

Appropriation for common schools, 

Appropriation for high school, 

Appropriation for school supplies, 

Appropriation for transportation 
pupils, 

Appropriation for salary of superintend- 
ent of schools, 

Received from Mass. school fund. 

Received from dog licenses, 

Received from tuition fees. 

$9,185 13 



$3,800 


00 


1,800 00 


525 


00 


of 




1,360 


00 


1Q- 

480 


00 


845 


62 


341 


77 


32 


74 



I II 



Expenditures. 






For common schools. 


$5,116 72 




High school. 


2,037 67 




School supplies. 


840 89 




Transportation of pupils. 


1,420 00 




Salary of superintendent of schc 


»ols, 480 00 


$9,895 28 


Overdraft. 




710 15 



Estimates for the Support of Schools for the Fiscal Year 

1907-1908. 



For 


■ common schools. 




$4,100 00 




High school. 




2,300 00 




School supplies. 




625 00 




Transportation of 


pupils. 


1,360 00 




Salary of superintendent of schools, 480 00 




Medical inspection 


of pupils. 


100 00 



$8,965 00 
For the School Committee of Acton. 

CHAS. J. WILLIAMS. Chairman. 



112 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the School Committee, 
Gentlemen : 

Herewith I submit the 15th annual report of the Su- 
perintendent of Schools. 

This year being my first in the field must of necessity 
be largely spent in getting in touch with the work and 
learning the needs of the field. In the half year which has 
elapsed certain points of strength and certain weaknesses 
have manifested themselves. The main points attacked have 
been arithmetic and reading. There seems to be a general 
backwardness in the reading and language work which I 
attribute to the fact that the classes have been without 
basal text books in the grades. Upon this point I must 
differ radically with my predecessor. I do not believe that 
satisfactory work can be secured from children below the 
ninth grade without a uniform text to which the child 
shall be held, making use also of all the reference works 
available. The mind of the child in the grades is in need 
of discipline, and the habit of study along definite lines, 
and of definite facts, must be insisted upon. In cases where 
I have followed the method of using many texts with a 
lower grade the result has invariably been that the child 
hung upon the teacher, and failed to become an independent 
worker. This is very manifest in the seventh grade work, 
and in many of the grades above. That the work may be 
strenghtened in this line I would urge that each child be 
furnished basal texts in arithmetic, language, geography 
and histor3 T . In the majority of schools geography has al- 
ready been put upon this footing. 

The general organization of the schools I have found 
to be in excellent running order, and the spirit shown by 



i J 3 

both pupils and teachers is most commendable. The at- 
tendance is in too many cases not what it should be. There 
is a tendency among parents to feel that the absence of a 
child once a week is not of great importance. While real- 
izing that there are times when the older children are a 
virtual necessity as helpers in the work of the home, I wish 
to emphasize especially the claim of the school to regular 
and unbroken attendance. The child has little enough 
schooling at best, and certainly only the extremest neces- 
sity should be allowed to deprive him of his just dues. 

In as much as the school is a community, the training 
school for life, it behooves us to seek to inculcate in the 
pupils the principles of honesty, truthfulness, reverence, 
cleanliness, industry, a respect for the right of others, as well 
as the common school branches. Here it is that the 
child must learn the principles of punctuality, perseverance, 
honor and application to the task at hand. Unless he makes 
school work his business, and enters upon it with just that 
regularity and purposeful determination that mark the suc- 
cessful business man in his daily work just so surely will he 
fail to meet the demands of his later life. 

A system of medial writing has been introduced in the 
hope that the more thorough teaching entailed by the use 
of copy books will produce a more satisfactory result. The 
medial system was chosen as productive of a speedier and 
more easily acquired handwriting, and in response to a de- 
mand from business men that vertical writing be discarded. 

The new education, which to some seems to include 
certain "fads" is the logical outcome of changed conditions 
of society. The purpose of education is no longer the mere 
cramming of the mind with facts, and the ability in narrow 
lines of the fundamentals life today is far more complex even 
for the child than it was twenty years ago. The average boy 
leaving school today comes face to face with the need for 
greater mental alertness and a finer sense perception than 
did his equal of a generation back. The great cry today 
is for mechanical, or industrial training, not to fit the child 



ii4 

for a trade, but to so round out the character that it is a 
unity. The older methods of instruction unquestionably 
produced good results, yet as we readily see by our own ex- 
perience, they failed to make the average pupil master of 
what he was taught. Modern psychology teaches that every 
sensation creates an impulse within the brain which seeks 
an outlet through motor activity. If this tendency to pro- 
duce something be curbed, and the child be given no op- 
portunity to express the awakening of the mind through 
action there is a distinct loss. This repeated leads to a 
mental laziness which is to be deplored. 

In some of our schools there is an unorganized effort to 
furnish this training, and much of the work observed is 
commendable. It should, however, be made more systematic 
and present a more continous development, 

The teaching force has been subject to the usual changes. 
but upon the whole we have been fortunate in securing able 
and enthusiastic teachers. They are to be commended for the 
willingness and earnestness with which they have under- 
taken work suggested, which was along lines new to many 
of them. 

A most important factor in promoting the welfare of the 
schools is the continuance of a teacher in the same place. I 
quote from Hon. W. W. Stetson, State Superintendent of 
Maine: "The value of what a teacher does depends on what 
she is'; her personality teaches more than her works. Unless 
she helps to develop in the children worthy motives and en- 
nobling ideals she is a failure. The desire to be useful is 
worth more than glib recitations ; the thirst for knowledge is 
more to be coveted than high ranks ; a love for the best in 
literature and art is more fruitful than class honors, and the 
wish to do right, because it is right, is more blessed than 
fantastic diplomas. The work of the school is to give such 
instruction, furnish such stimulus, and form such habits as 
will help the child to be prompt to do justice, and alert in 
responding to the best that is within him." 

The teacher who is worthy of the name, puts herself in 



H5 

touch with her pupils and their home environment at the 
earliest possible moment. Until she knows what influences 
in the home and in the community are helpful and what are 
hindrances she cannot do her best for her school ; hence fre- 
quent changes are disastrous both to the schools and to the 
teachers. The schools suffer because of the loss of an in- 
fluence potent for good; the teachers because such an in- 
fluence is not easily gained. "Good reputations are not 
easily or quickly made. ' ' 

''Education at every stage of life consists of two pro- 
cesses ; the training of powers and the acquisition of know- 
ledge." The mere accumulation of facts should be of the 
least importance. The development of power, of self-con- 
trol and initiative should be the leading aim in all our school 
work. It is here I find the greatest lack. Certain tests now 
underway show a good knowledge of fact, but a deficiency 
in thought power. The teachers are alive to the situation 
and signs of an awakening are apparent. In all the branches 
this change is to be looked for. The relation of school to 
daily life is essential to the maintenance of interest. 

Teachers' meetings for the district have been held once 
each term. At Littleton the subject chosen for discussion 
was Medial Writing, and at Westford, Miss Mary Lang, 
the able instructor in Psychology at the Hyannis Summer 
School, and formerly of the Oswego Normal School, gave a 
most helpful and suggestive talk upon Interest. Groups of 
the teachers are meeting monthly for reading and study 
along lines of professional growth. No teacher can stand 
still, and the increase of salar3 r should be based upon a 
teacher's growth, not upon length of service. 



Drawing and Music. 

After many attempts to secure a supervisor of music it 
seemed wise in view of the fact that no systematic work had 
been done in drawing, to choose a supervisor for both music 
and drawing. As many of the teachers were apparently well 



n6 

able to look after the music with a minimum of supervision, 
the new supervisor has given a major part of her time to 
establishing the work in drawing. In consideration of the 
fact that the work was w T holly unorganized the results are 
most satisfactory. It is to be hoped that the time may come 
soon when a supervisor of each subject may be secured. To 
get over the territory within the time allows but a meagre 
period to give much instruction. For more detailed inform- 
ation upon these subjects I refer you to the report of the 
supervisor. 



To Superintendent Arthur B. Webber. 

Dear Sir: — Beethoven has said that " Music is a higher 
manifestation than all wisdom and philosophy.'' If this is 
so, music is worthy of one of the most important places in 
the school curriculum. 

There are two essential things to be considered in the 
musical education of the child — first: the cultivation of the 
musical sense, — the appreciation of the musical sense; sec- 
ond: the development of the understanding in the elements. 
— the ability to read at sight, etc. 

These two branches should go hand in hand, being 
introduced in a very simple way in the first grade and in- 
creasing in difficulty as the child advances. 

In the beginning of the first school year an interest in 
music is developed by means of the rote songs; later the 
child studies the representation of music from the board. 
When this is mastered the Weaver slips are used and the 
child is tested as to his ability to sing at sight. All through 
the grades these slips are used, also work in tone perception, 
the teacher or some pupil singing a series of tones and the 
others writing the notes on the staff or singing the melody 
with the syllables. In addition to the board work and the 
Weaver slips, the educational music course is used. The 



"7 

^ase with which the pupils overcome the difficulties in time 
and intervals in the songs, speaks very loudly in favor of the 
Weaver slips. 

In all the schools especial drill has been given on songs 
which are to be used on Longfellow's birthday. 

In this department I wish to thank teachers and pupils 
for their kind co-operation and sympathy. 

Respectfully submitted, 



J. LOUISE LONG, 

Supervisor of Music. 



Westford, January 14, 1907. 



To Superintendent Arthur B. Webber. 

Dear Sir: — Since beginning my work in your schools, 
I have been very much encouraged by the spirit of enthu- 
siasm with which the pupils have taken hold of the work in 
drawing, and also by the kind co-operation of the grade 
teachers. The aim of teaching drawing, is to develop the 
mind of the child through the eye as well as through the 
hand. He is taught to appreciate all the beautiful and 
true there is in life, and is led to a keener perception of 
details. 

There are three branches or kinds of drawing — pictorial, 
structural and decorative. Under the first topic come 
plant drawing, perspective, landscape sketching, animal and 
pose sketching, and picture study. Through these studies 
the child gains an appreciation of beauty in nature, accuracy 
of observation and skill in drawing what he sees. 

The second topic is a science of facts. This trains the 
child in accuracy and he studies geometric problems and 
becomes acquainted with the work-shop and the limitations 



n8 

of different materials in order that he may make practical 
structural designs. 

In the field of decoration, is the stud}' of color theory, 
through which the child gains an appreciation and enjoy- 
ment of color in nature, good taste in the practical things of 
life and a gradual development of a refined color perception. 
In order to make good designs the children are referred to 
the ancient schools, where purit3 r and simplicity of form may 
be found which will have an influence in cultivating good 
taste and will later develop originality and individual 
power. 

Two half-hour lessons a week are given in all schools ex- 
cepting the high, which has one forty-minute period. All the 
teachers are furnished with the supervisor's outline so that 
the work may continue without any interruption. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. LOUISE LONG, 

Supervisor of Drawing. 

Acton. January 14, 1907. 



ii9 

The bill passed by the last legislature providing for 
medical inspection for all public school pupils by regular 
physicians, and for eye and ear tests by teachers has been 
put into effect in our schools. The following is the text of 
the law : 

Act of 1906, Chapter 505. 

Section 1. The school committee of every city and 
town in the Commonwealth shall appoint one or more school 
physicians, shall assign one to each public school 
within its city or town, and shall provide them with all 
proper facilities for the performance of their duties as pre- 
scribed in this act: provided, however, that in cities wherein 
the board of health is already maintaining or shall hereafter 
maintain substantially such medical inspection as this act 
requires, the board of health shall appoint and assign the 
school physician. 

Section 2. Every school physician shall make a prompt 
examination and diagnosis of all children referred to him as 
hereinafter provided, and such further examination of teach- 
ers, janitors and school buildings as in his opinion the pro- 
tection of the health of the pupils may require. 

Section 3. The school committee shall cause to be re- 
ferred to a school physician for examination and diagnosis 
every child returning to school without a certificate from 
the board of health after absence on account of illness or 
from unknown cause : and every child in the schools under 
its jurisdiction who shows signs of being in ill health or of 
suffering from infections or contagious disease, unless he is 
at once excluded from school by the teacher: except that 
in the case of schools in remote and isolated situations, the 
school committee may make such other arrangements as may 
best carry out the purpose of this act. 

Section 4. The school committee shall cause notice of 



120 

the disease or defects, if any, from which, any child is found 
to be suffering to be sent to his parent or guardian. When- 
ever a child shows symptoms of small-pox, scarlet fever, 
measles, chicken-pox, tuberculosis, diphtheria or influenza, 
tonsilitis, whooping cough, mumps, scabies or trachoma, he 
shall be sent home immediately, or as soon as safe and proper 
conveyance can be found, and the board of health shall at 
once be notified. 

Section 5. The school committee of every city and 
town shall cause every child in the public schools to be 
separately and carefully tested and examined at least once 
in every school year to ascertain whether he is suffering 
from defective sight or hearing, or from any other disability 
or defect tending to prevent his receiving the full benefit of 
his school work, or requiring a modification of the school 
work in order to prevent injury to the child or to secure the 
best educational results. The test of sight and hearing shall 
be made by teachers. The committee shall cause notice 
of any defect or disability requiring treatment to be sent to 
the parent or guardian of the child, and shall require a 
physical record of each child to be kept in such form as the 
state board of education shall prescribe. 

Section 6. The state board of health shall prescribe the 
directions for tests of sight and hearing, and the state board 
of education shall, after consultation with the state board of 
health, prescribe and furnish to school committees suitable 
rules of instruction, test cards, blanks, record books, and 
other useful appliances for carrying out the purposes of this 
act, and shall provide for pupils in the normal schools in- 
struction and practice in the best methods of testing the 
sight and hearing of children. The state board of education 
may expend during the year 1906 a sum not greater than 
fifteen hundred dollars and annually thereafter a sum not 
greater than five hundred dollars for the purpose of supply- 
ing the material required by this act. 

Section 7. The expense which a city or town may incur 
by virtue of the authority herein vested in the school com- 



121 

mittee or board of health, as the case may he, shall not ex- 
ceed the amount appropriated for that purpose in cities by 
the city council and in towns by a town meeting. The appro- 
priation shall precede any expenditure or any indebtedness 
which may be incurred under this act. and the sum appro- 
priated shall be deemed a sufficient appropriation in the mu- 
nicipality where it is made. Such appropriation need not 
specify to what section of the act it shall apply, and may be 
voted as a total appropriation to be applied in carrying out 
the purpose of the act. 

Section 8. This act shall take effect on the first day of 
September in the year nineteen hundred and six. (Ap- 
proved June 20. 1906.) 

Under this law it will be necessary to ask for an ap- 
propriation for the services of the school physicians. Besides 
the annual inspection the school physician should be expected 
to call at least once a term. I would urge a ready response 
to the call for an appropriation, as the results of the inspec- 
tion in the other towns have been of undoubted advantage. 
By preventing the spread of disease it has contributed 
materially to improve the attendance and has protected the 
general health of the children. 

An especial benefit has been noted in the discovery of 
cases of advanced growth and enlarged tonsils. Some have 
received prompt attention after being reported and have 
shown marked improvement in consequence. Many parents 
are unaware of the serious nature of these troubles and 
unless their attention is called to the matter the children 
would continue to suffer. 

The eye tests required by the state board of education 
are for near-sightedness. Every pupil above the first grade 
and most of that grade, so far as the attendance has made 
it possible, has been examined. Most of the cases of defec- 
tive sight were suspected, but the seriousness of a large 
number, as shown by the tests, was a revelation. 



122 

Several children were found who had to be placed 
within three feet of the chart in order to distinguish letters 
that should have been recognized by them at a distance of 
fifty feet. 

In some cases the parents are unable to give the proper 
attention to the case, and it would seem wise for the town 
to provide for the expense in such cases. This surely is 
philanthropy of the practical kind. 

The following tables show the result of the eye and ear 
test : 

Number of pupils examined 348 

Number of pupils found defective in hearing. . 57 
Number of pupils found defective in sight. ... 85 
Number of parents notified 102 

The increase in attendance at the high school made it 
necessary to expend a considerable sum for new books, and 
the same increase must to a measure prevail next year as 
the present equipment is not sufficient to supply the number 
who will enter the sophomore and junior classes in the fall. 

The introduction of a broader course, including the 
commercial branches, offered a wider range of subjects and 
at the same time necessitated the employment of a third 
teacher. The work of the school at present is thorough, 
and of sufficient range to satisfy all classes. It deserves 
the hearty support of the townspeople, and I am confident 
that no pupil will gain by attending elsewhere. The classes 
are sufficiently large to give stimulus and yet small enough 
to allow largely individual attention. It should be a 
matter of local pride to support the local high school. I 
would call attention to the report of the principal herewith 
appended. 



123 



Mr. A. B. Webber, Superintendent of Schools. 

Dear Sir: — T take pleasure in presenting the following- 
report of the Acton High School from September 4, 1906. 

The entering class numbered twenty-three, giving the 
school a total enrollment of forty-one. This membership 
seemed to warrant the addition of another teacher of the 
teaching force. This made it possible to revise the course of 
study and offer more subjects to the students in the English 
course. A course in Agriculture was introduced into the 
first year work, courses in elementary physics and bookeeping 
were introduced for the second year and a course in steno- 
graphy and typewriting found a place in the work of the 
third year. The courses in bookkeeping, stenography and 
typewriting seemed to meet a popular demand and will un- 
doubtedly prove of value. 

In choosing his course from the program of studies of- 
fered, the student should bear in mind that he must have 
at least seventeen prepared recitations per week and must 
choose his work from the subjects offered for his grade if 
he is to be regarded as a regular student. If on the other 
hand he does not expect to attend the school for the whole 
four years, he may be enrolled as a special student and may 
then choose any subject in which there is a class, regardless 
of grade, provided of course that he is capable of doing- 
work of a sufficiently high grade to give him at least an 
average standing in the class. 

In order to prepare those students who may wish to 
enter college or technical school, some arrangement should 
be made for heating the room in the basement now used as 
a chemical laboratory. During the greater part of this 
term, we have been obliged to omit laboratory work in the 
advanced Physics' class owing to the extremely low tem- 
perature in the laboratory. This is unfortunate, for in 
teaching modern Physics, it is necessary for the pupil to 
handle the apparatus and work most of the experiments him- 
self, thus getting his data at first hand and gaining the ex- 



I2 4 

perience that he will surely need in beginning his science 
work in college or technical school. 

At present it seems probable that in the course of the 
next few years there will be several graduates of the Acton 
High School in college or school of technology. Our school 
is fully up to the college grade, and we expect to enter two 
students next fall on certificate. 

The Avork in drawing is progressing. The introduction 
of mechanical drawing for the young men is especially sa- 
tisfactory. 

Miss Mary E. Bartlett resigned to accept a similar posi- 
tion at an increased salary in Cohoes, N. Y. Miss Ethel L. 
Leigh ton, a graduate of Radcliffe College, 1906. is satisfac- 
tory in the position. Miss Alice N. Maclntyre, a graduate 
of Boston University, 1903, is satisfactory as second assist- 
ant. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. B. PIERCE. 
February 28. 1907. 



12 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



Classical. 



English. 



1st Year. 



Latin, 

Algebra, 

Eng. Gram. & Comp, 

G. & R. History, 



5 English Gram. & Comp, 4 

5 Algebra, 5 

4 G. & R. History, 5 

5 Agriculture, 3 
Commercial Arith., 5 





2nd Year. 




Latin. 


5 


Eng. Lit. & Comp., 


4 


German, 


4 


English History, 


4 


Plane Geometry. 


5 


Plane Geometry, 


5 


English Lit. & Comp., 


4 


Elementary Physics, 


4 


^'Elementary Physics, 


4 


Book-keeping, 


2 




3rd Year. 




Latin, 


5 


English Lit. & Comp., 


4 


German ,v 


4 


French or German, 


4 


French, 


4 


Physics, 


4 


English Lit. & Comp., 


4 


Medieval & Mod. Hist., 


3 


* Physics, 


4 


Solid Geom. & Trig., 


5 



Stenography & Typewriting. 











I 2 


:6 












4th Year. 




Latin, 








5 


English Lit. & Comp.. 


4 


German. 








4 


French or German, 


4 


French. 








4 


Chemistry. 


5 


English 


Lit. 


& 


Comp., 


4 


V. S. Cons. History, 


4 


^Chemistry. 






5 


Reviews. 




Reviews. 















* Optional. 

A pupil miisl have at least seventeen prepared recita- 
tions a week. Pupils may take Latin together with subjects 
in the English Course, sufficient to complete the required 
number of hours. 

One period a week is given to Music; one to Drawing. 



for some immediate action regarding a new building. The 
intermediate room will be overcrowded next year as nearly 
as we can judge: the high school is at present working 
under a handicap, and, if the parents give it the support 
which they should give, new quarters ought to be afforded 
at once. 

The grammar grades labor under a severe handicap in 
their physical environment and ought to be relieved. These 
conditions could be remedied by the building of a new school 
building For the high school giving the present building to 
the grades, or by a new Union school with ampler ac- 
commodations. 

The work of the grammar classes at West Acton was so 
unsatisfactory from the standpoint of power and memory 
that we found it advisable to hold to a considerable amount 
•of outside work. It is to be hoped that the improvement 
already noted will continue, and that the pressure may gra- 



127 

dually be reduced. The entrance requirements for our high 
school necessitate stronger work than has been done in the 
past. A distinct gain is noticeable already. The response 
by the pupils has been unusual and they deserve commend- 
ation for the earnest and faithful work which has been 
noticeable from the start. 

In conclusion I wish to thank the committee and citizens 
for the cordial reception and hearty support with which T 
have met. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR B. WEBBER, 
Littleton, Mass., February 28, 1907. 



128 



ROLL OF HONOR, 1905-1906. 



vBeuere, Annie J. 
Farrar, Raymond 
Greenough, Frank E. 
Harris, Ray L. 
Harris, V. Maude 



Peebles, Marjorie A. 
Robbins, Helen 

Warden, Leonard 



129 



ROLL OF HONOR, 1906-1907. 



Two Terms. 



/vBeuere. Mary G. 

''Bezanson, Helen 
Coolidge, Harold 
Harris, Elizabeth 
Hoit, Hazel 
Hoyt, Allen 
Leach, Nathalie 



Mekklesen, Ida M. 
Morse, Walter 
Robbins, Helen B. 
Shnyski, Nellie 
Stanley, Lena B. 
Swett, Fred L. 
Tuttle, Varnum H, 



One Term. 



Anderson, Alfred 
Brown, Roger 
Cheeney, Robert 
Cheeney, Florence 
Durkee, Irma 
Evans, Alice 
Farrar, Earle 
Farrar, Raymond 
Gates, Ralph 
Gilmore, Lillian 
Greer, Isabelle 
Hall, Howard 
Harris. Ray 
Harris, V. Maude 
Hayes, Raymond 
Hayes, William 
Hopps. Francis 
• Leavitt. Elma 
Lowden. Theron 
Kerrigan. George 



/^Kinsley, James 
MacGregor, Thelma 
McNeil, Mary 
Meade, Pauline 
Merriam, Herbert 
Moore, Lauretta 
Morrison, Lillian 
Nagle, Emily 
Pendergast, Edward 
Prentiss, Florence 
Robbins, Hazel 

* Schnair, Cora 

' Schnair, Florence 
X^Schnair, Richard 
Schnyski, Morris 
Sleep, Muriel 
Teele, Alta 

* Welsh, Grace 
Warden, Florence 

Willis. Clifton 



k 



1 3° 



STATISTICS FOR 1905-1906. 



SCHOOL 



Grades 



S s 

S 2 

■S g § 

£ d Mi 



5 . ! 






IS" 



High X.— XIII. 40 

South Grammar VII. — IX. 38 

South Intermediate IV. — VI. 38 

South Primary I. — III. 38 

Center Grammar VII. — IX. 38 

Center Intermediate IV. — VI. 38 

Center Primary I. — III. 38 

West Grammar VII. — IX. 38 

West Intermediate IV. — VI. 38 

West Primary I. — III. 38 



349 



25.5 

27.3 

44.8 

44. 

26.2 

24.2 

30.4 

24.3 

34.2 

38.5 



23.6 
24.6 
42.1 
40.2 
24.1 
23.1 
28.5 
21.9 
31.1 
34.7 



319.8 1293.9 



92.4 

90.2 

93.4 

90.9 

91.6 

95.06 

93.8 

89.9 

88.7 

90.1 



23 45 



91.9 



|248 315 



29 1 

2 6 
34 
26 

3 7 



41| 



STATISTICS FOR FALL AND WINTER TERMS 1906-1907 



SCHOOL 



Grades 











C | s 












H 


s 

- 


_J 




I 14 

el we 
1 15 


~ 


s 


^- 




PQ a ffl c 


u 








S * 


a 


> 


> 






:■:. 


< 


-- 


Ph 


•z \sz ' 



High X.— XIII 

South Grammar VII. — IX. 

South Intermediate IV. — VI. 

South Primary I. — III. 

Center Grammar VII. — IX. 

Center Intermediate IV. — VI. 

Center Primary I. — III. 

West Grammar VII. — IX. 

West Intermediate IV. — VI. 

West Primary I. — III. 



41 


38. 


27 


23.3 


44 


39.6 


54 


50.8 


22 


19.8 


25 


24.8 


34 


32.1 


27 


22.4 


40 


38.7 


43 


40.2 


3 5 7 


329.7 



36. 

20.6 

35.3 

44.1 

18.7 

23.1 

29.1 

19.1 

33.7 



36.7190 



I I 
21 I 
6 16| 2 

I 43 '43 
33 54 
15| 19 
25| 25 
22| 34 
19| 27 
39| 40 
25! 43 



296.4 60.8 

I 



2391326 



J3 1 



S3 
U 

< 
i 



^ ^H ^ Wh Q} " ,_ ^h ?H 

^££ S g gj 3 o 2 



O 2 



I^oj^^I £s 



- 
- 



o c c lo li m h o lo h co io lc 
o lc ^f -f -f ^ -f -t -f -f :•: -+ ^i 



#&■ 



o 

iH 

i 

CO 

o 
a 

tH 

O 

OB 

W 

W 
o 

<J 

w 

Eh 

O 
H 



t 

■fa 

C3 



■3 ~ w^ ^ ^ H •" J=h oc 

^ rG += '§ £ ^ 

K C.T- 



0> 



OOOOOOO05OOO00O 
0>OiOi050SOiOi00050i050C :r. 



Si* 

-La m <D 



ac 



w 



23 - 



^ <-• ^ g: g u .06 
• a . +* rG 



* I fc "I 






5 OS 



o> g 
'2 9 



T3 * 

ac 



o 
X 



.G oo eg S-. "G 

,G X ^ 5 +2 

bC Jtf tJD G G 

a ww o c 



?-. G 

2 S 
G X 



G fl 
C <V 



1 £ 

£ g 

G o 

CD ^ 



^-WH 






- 
G- 

-7 



132 



Graduation Exercises of the Acton High School, at Town 

Hall, Acton, Mass., Thursday Evening, June 21, 

1906, 7.45 o'clock. 



Program. 

1. March, Orchestra 

2. Selection, "The Morning Ramble" Veazie 

School. 

3. Invocation, Rev. D. W. Lovett 

4. Reverie, "Apple Blossoms" Roberts 

Orchestra. 

5. Address, "The Making of a Man" 

Prof. H. H. Home, Dartmouth College 

6. Overture, "Mosaic" Rollinson 

Orchestra. 

7. Presentation of Diplomas, Supt. E. L. Willard 

8. Selection, ' ' The Red Scarf ' ' Bonheur arr by Veazie 

School. 

9. March, "Arabia" Buck 

Orchestra. 



i33 



"Non Palma sine Pulvere" 

' ' No Reward without Effort ' ? 



Graduates. 

Classical Course. 
Lizzie May Burroughs. Richard Francis Kinsley 

English Course. 
Jennie Rebecca Wheeler. 



Colors : Pink and Green. 



Class Flower; The Rose. 



34 



TRUANT OFFICERS REPORT. 



For the Year Ending March 1, 1907. 

To the School Committee of Acton, Mass : 

The truant officers submit their fifth annual report to 
the school committee for the year ending March 1, 1907. 

The truant officers submit the following list of pupils 
looked up for the year. 

The cause of their absence, and if truants, the number 
that have been returned to school. 
Whole number of pupils looked up, 

Cause of absence, 
Sickness, 

Kept at home by parents. 
Returned to school, 
Reported truants, 

Yours respectfully, 

C. G. TURNER, 
THOMAS SCANLON,\ 
MOSES A. REED. 

Truant Officers. 







12 


c. s. 


s. s. 


W. S. 


3 








1 


3 


1 


4 


3 


2 





2 


2 



*35 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL SUPPLIES. 



Report of the Purchasing Agent. 



The following report of the expense account of this 
department for the financial year ending March 11, 1907. is 
respectfully submitted : 

Ginn & Co. 
March 13. 36 educational 3d. music 

readers. $12 60 

Less 1-6. 2 10 



March 22. 



10 Montgomery Am. 


Hist.. 


•$10 00 


50 Cyr's primers. 




12 00 


20 Cyr's 3d readers. 




10 00 


24 Cyr's 1st readers. 




6 72 


40 Jones' 1st readers. 




12 00 


40 Jones' 2d readers. 




14 00 


50 each. 3d, 4th. 5th 


. 6th 




and 7th readers. 




112 50 


50 Jones 8th readers. 




25 00 


3 Trees in prose and 


poetry. 


1 35 






$203 57 


Less 1-6. 




33 93 



$10 50 



$169 65 



April 23. 



Mav 11. 



Sept, 15. 



2 Ovr's primers, 

14 Cyr's 1st readers, 

3 Jones 1st readers. 



Less 1-6, 



Express, 



$ 48 

3 36 

90 



$4 74 
$ 79 



4 Went worth new school 

algebras, $4 48 

Less 1-6. 75 



$3 73 
25 



1 Myers M. & M. Rev.. $1 50 

1 Went worth plain Geom. Rev., 75 



Less 1-6. 



$2 25 
37 



$3 95 



$3 98 



$1 88 



Sept. 10. 2 new Cicero and Vocab., $2 so 

6 Wentworth new Seh. Algebra, 6 72 

12 academy song books. 11 28 

12 Scott Marmidu, 4 80 



Less 1-6. 



$25 60 
4 27 



$21 33 



*37 

Sept. 11. 6 Wentworth new school 

algebras, $6 72 

7 Montgomery English histories, 7 84 
5 Montgomery Amr. histories, 5 00 



$19 56 

Less 1-6, 3 26 



Sept. 19. 8 W. & H. physics Rev., $9 20 

Montgomery students' history, 2 80 



$12 00 
Less 1-6, 2 00 



$8 28 
1 38 




$1 75 



Oct. 29. 4 Wentworth new Sch. algebras, $4 48 

2 Montgomery Amr. Hist., 2 00 

5 Cvr's 1st readers, 1 80 



Less 1-6, 



Oct. 30. 1 key Wentworth algebra, 



Nov. 5. 10 Doz. Medial writing books 

No. 1, $6 00 

11 Doz. Medial writing books 

No. 3, 6 60 

8 Doz. Medial writing books 

No. 6, 4 80 

1 Doz. each, No. 2, 4, 5 and 7, 2 40 

$19 80 



$16 30 



$10 00 



$6 90 



$1 75 



138 
Less 1-6, 3 30 



$16 50 
Credit 15 10-12 Doz. 

writing books, 7 96 



$8 54 



Nov. 19. 36 new educational 1st readers, $10 80 
36 new educational 2d readers, 10 80 





Less 1-6, 


$21 60 
3 60 






Credit, 64 old readers, 


$18 00 
1 92 




Dec. 17. 


1 each Weaver 3 and 5, 
Postage, 


$ 83 
05 


$16 08 

* 








$ 88 



$271 74 

Atkinson. Mentzer & Grover. 

March 23. 10 Art Lib. primers $3 00 

13 Art Lib. readers Bk. 1, 3 90 

13 Art Lib. readers Bk 2, 5 20 



$12 10 
Less 1-6, 2 01 



Oct. 29. 1 Art. Lib. reader Bk. 2, $ 34 



$10 09 

$ 34 
$10 43 



139 
American Book Co., 

March 14. 4 Gateway Idylls of the King, $1 40 
Less 1-5, 28 



March 23. 10 Carpenter's Africa, $6 00 

10 Carpenter's Europe, 7 00 

10 Carpenter's So. America, 6 00 

6 U. S. history, 6 00 



$25 00 
Less 1-5, 5 00 



April 26. 3 Gateway Idylls of the King 

by mail, $ 96 



Sept. 11. 17 Smith Hist, of Greece, $17 00 

. 13 Smith Hist, of Rome, ' 13 00 



Less 1-5, 



Oct. 9. 1 Avery school physics. 



$1 12 



$20 00 



$ 96 



$30 00 
6 00 


$1 00 


$24 00 




$1 00 



$47 08 



140 

Rand, McNally & Co. 

March 27. 40 Lights to Literature, bk. 1, $8 00 

36 Cave Men, 12 96 

36 Tree Dwellers, 12 96 

6 King Arthur, 2 40 

6 Holton primers, 1 20 



$37 52 



Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

March 23. 10 Fiske Hist. U. S., $8 50 

10 Our Country's Hist., 5 53 

10 R. L. S. each No. 38 and 122, 2 55 
10 R. L. S. No. 6, 2 13 

12 R, L. S. each No. 132 and 133, 4 08 
6 Bigelow Papers, 4 00 

12 Schentz Cloy., 2 Vol., 20 00 



Sept. 10. 1 Symonds Eng. Literature $1 06 
Sept. 11. 7 Fiske Civil Government, 



Sept. 19. 6 Larned Hist, of England, 
2 Larned Hist, of U. S., 



Less 15 per cent, 



$37 52 



$46 79 



, ' $5 95 


$1 06 


$7 50 
2 80 


$5 95 


$10 30 
1 54 






$8 76 



$62 56 



141 

J. L. Hammet Co. 
March 9. 1 Doz. quarts treasury ink, $3 00 



March 21. 12 Pkgs. No. 3 paper, $2 28 



March 29. 1 box No. 37 Dennison hooks, $ 75 



April 10. 1 bottle stamp pad ink, $ 15 

4 Doz. table cards, 1 40 

4 boxes Little Artist, 80 



Feb. 13. 5 ruled letter pads, $ 28 

5 plain letter pads, 25 



May 3. 5 Pkgs. No. 19 paper, $1 50 

5 Pkgs antique white drawing 

8xl0y 2 , 2 50 

5 Pkgs. No. 27 paper, 2 00 

100 No. 12 spelling blanks, 1 00 



June 13. 15 Pkgs. antique white drawing 

8x10%, 6 75 

15 Pkgs. white antique drawing 

6x9, 3 75 

15 Pkgs. No. 27 paper, 6 00 

40 Pkgs. No. 19 paper, 12 00 

15 Pkgs. No. 25 paper, 5 25 

480 No. 140 note books, 10 80 



$3 00 



$2 28 



$ 75 



$2 35 



$ 53 



$7 95 



142 



150 No. 12 spelling blanks, 1 35 

15 gross No. 800 pencils, 11 25 

1 lb. No. 120 erasers, 55 

1 Doz quarts treasury ink, 2 50 

50 Pkgs. No. 3 white paper, .9 00 

10 Pkgs. No. 1 white paper, 1 80 

125 Pkgs arithmetic paper, 15 00 

1 Doz. 2-oz. treasury mucilage, 50 

2 Doz. No. 144 note books, 1 20 
1-2 Doz. No. 4965 Memo, books, 1 50 



May 17 100 No. 12 spelling blanks, $1 00 

1 gross No. 800 pencils, 75 

5 Pkgs. antique white drawing 

8x10%, 2 50 

5 Pkgs. antique white drawing 

6x9, 1 50 



Sept. 10. 1 Doz. quarts treasury ink 

5 Pkgs. blotters 6x8, 
2 gross No. 120 pen holders 
1 lb. No. 120 erasers, 

6 Doz. No. 30 rulers, 



Oct. 2. 3 Doz. Gem erasers. 

1 lb. No. 120 erasers, 

1 Doz Hammett ink wells 



:, $2 50 
90 

>rs, 2 00 

55 

1 00 


$1 13 

55 

i, 1 20 



I 

Oct. 13. 8 boxes B. 1 paints M. B. Co., $1 92 



$89 20 



$5 75 



$6 95 



$2 88 



$1 92 



i43 
Nov. 12. 1 Gem pencil sharpener. $3 00 



Nov. 29. 5 Condon pitch pipes. $1 88 

5 Pkgs. 4x4 standard colors, 75 

40 boxes Springfield crayons. 6 00 
12 Pkgs. 80 medium drawing 

6x9, 3 84 

3 pictures No. 620, 03 

3 pictures No. 820. 03 

4 Doz. No. 576 Eagle compasses. 4 00 
4 Doz round pointed scissors. 7 00 
.3 bottles Higgins ink. 57 

1 gross thumb tacks, 55 

12 No. 2 drawing lists. 4 80 
1 Pkg. mechanical drawing 

11x17. 3 00 

1-4 Doz. sheets gummed linen. 45 



Dec. 6. 24 Pkgs. standard colors 4x4, $3 60 
3 Doz. Xo. 710 blue pencils. 1 50 



Nov. 10. 5 boxes B. 1 paints. $1 20 

7 No. 6 brushes. 25 



Feb. 2. 1 Doz. quarts treasury ink. $2 50 



Feb. 2. 10 Doz. No. 12 spelling blanks. $1 20 

2 Pkgs. blotters 6x8. 60 

1 lb. No. 120 erasers, 55 
5 Pkgs. No. 1 gray drawing, 

9x12. 3 20 



$3 00 



$32 85 



$5 10 



$1 45 



$2 50 



$5 55 

$174 01 



1 44 

D. C. Heath & Co. 
Feb. 20. 6 German dictionaries, $6 00 



March 13. 6 Fraser & Squires Grammars, $6 72 
11 Wessel Haeft composition, 4 40 



Less 1-6, 



$11 12 
1 85 


$13 44 
2 70 


$16 14 
2 69 



March 24. 12 Sheldon Am. Hist., 
6 American Indians, 



Less 1-6, 



Sept. 10 1 Fraser & Squires Grammar, $ 94 

Oct. 23. 6 Minna Von Barnhelm & Voc, $3 90 

6 William Tell & Voc, 

6 Die Hastzreiza, 
4 Sans Famille, 
4 Pondre aux Yeux, 

7 German lessons, 
2 Complete trigonometry, 



Less 1-6, 3 12 



4 20 


1 50 


1 60 


1 20 


4 20 


2 16 


$18 76 



$6 00 



$9 27 



$13 45 



$15 64 



Oct. 17. 



Minna Von Barnhelm, 
1 William Tell 


$ 6.") 

70 


Less 1-6, 


$1 35 
22 


Express, 


$1 13 
15 



Edward E. Babb & Co. 

March 23. 3 How we are Clothed, 
3 How we are Fed, 
5 Tarr & Me Murray Geog., 



Oct. 15. 4 Wentworth Sch. algebra, $2 00 

14 Wentworth Gram. Sch. Arith., 4 06 

3 Fiske Hist. U. S., 1 35 



$1 


(!() 


1 


00 


3 


13 



Nov. 19. 15 Tarr & McMurray Geog. Ft. 1, $6 00 
5 Tarr & McMurray Geog. Pt. 3, 3 75 



$9 75 
Less 1-6, 1 62 



Oct. 21). 32 boxes M. B. Co. B. 1 paints, *7 68 
1 Doz U. C, brushes No. 6. 36 



*1 28 



$46 58 



$5 13 



$7 1 



$8 1.3 



$8 01 



146 

May 14. 1 McLean's English Bk. 2, $ 60 

1 Milne Eng. Grammar 75 

1 Bartlett's Essentials, 62 

1 Sebolt & Sont English Bk. 2 60 

1 Dubbs Arithmetic Problems, 1 00 



$3 57 
Less 1-4, 89 



Educational Publishing Co. 



March 27. 20 In Mythland, 

3 each No. 148 and 211). 



Less 1-6, 



Oct. 30. 4 Robinson Crusoe 
4 No. 91, 

4 No. 28, 
3 No. 83, 



Less 1-6, 



$6 


00 




30 


$6 


30 


1 


05 


$1 


20 




20 




20 




15 


$1 75 




29 



A. W. Hall Scientific Co. 

April 10. 1 X-Ray tube, $5 00 

1 iron nut, / 05 



$2 6S 



$31 39 



$5 2:. 



$1 46 



$6 71 



$5 on 



H7 
Munn & Co. 
May 1. 1 Hopkins Ex Science, 2 Vols, $ 4 50 



Oliver Ditson & Co. 
May 2. Music readers, $2 25 



May 24. 32 Cecilian, $2 56 

Postage, 18 



Sept. 10. 


Allyn & Baco] 

22 Bennett Foundations, 
2 Caesers, 

Less 1-6, 


a. 

$19 80 
2 00 




$21 80 
3 63 



Oct. 8. 1 C. & C. Elements of Physics, $1 20 

23 R. & D. High Sch. English, 23 00 

1 Galley Physics, 1 30 



$25 50 



Less 1-6; 4 25 



$4 50 



$2 25 



$2 74 



$4 99 



$18 17 



$21 25 
$39 42 



148 

Orange Judd Co. 
Sept. 10. 12 Judd Agriculture, $13 50 



Esterbrook Steel Pen Co. 
Sept. 8. 17 gross pens No. 556, $5 44 



Ellis Publishing Co. 

Sept. 14. 12 Intermediate bookkeeping, $27 00 
Less 15 per cent, 4 05 



Hill, Smith & Co. 

Sept. 17 4 gross Mimeo. Auto, stencils, $3 60 
1 tube purple ink, 90 



Oct. 26. 1 Mimeo. Stylus, $ 15 

1 ream No. 328, 40 

1-2 Doz. No. 3740 note books, 25 



Frost & Adams. 

Nov. 22. 12 Sets No. 4441 drawing in- 
struments, $10 80 
Less 25 per cent, 2 70 



$13 50 



$5 44 



$22 95 



*4 50 



80 



$5 30 



$8 10 



149 

Typewriter Exchange. 
Dec. 4. 1 Remington No. 2, 73050, $25 00 



W. B. Pierce. 

May 28. 1 5-quart bottle, $ 25 
1 quart Ethel Alcohol 90 


.Music books. 


.Miss Hunt. 

$ 90 


Paid A. W. Raynor, 

A. L. Noyes, 
W. B. Pierce, 
T. Scanlon, 


Express Charges. 

$13 93 

13 50 

75 

30 



$25 00 



$1 15 



$ 90 



$28 48 



Credit supplies sold. 



$852 80 
11 91 



$840 89 
CHAS. J. WILLIAMS. 

Purchasing Agent. 



15° 



FLAG DAYS. 



The School Committee have appointed the following list 
of flag days. On the days designated the Hags on all the 
schools in the town are to fly, and the teachers are to give 
special instruction upon the event commemorated: 

January 1. Emancipation Proclamation, 1863 

s February 12. Lincoln's Birthday, 1809 

^February 22. Washington's Birthday, 1732 

March 17. Evacuation of Boston by the British, 1776 

v April 19. Battle of Lexington, 1775 

May 1. Battle of Manila, 1898 

May 23. Foundation of Jamestown, 1607 

May 30. Memorial Day, 1866 

June 14. United States Flag adopted, 1777 

V June 17. Battle of Bunker Hill, 1775 

July 4. Declaration of Independence, 1776 

September 3. Treaty of Paris, 1782 

September 17. U. S. Constitution adopted, 1787 

October 19. Surrender of Cornwallis, 1781 

December 16. Boston Tea Party, 1773 

December 21. Landing of the Pilgrims, 1620 

Also Labor Day, Inauguration of the President of the 
United States and the Governor of Massachusetts, and on 
opening and closing days of each term and other days as 
directed. 



INDEX. 



Town Officers 3 

Town Warrant 6 

Town Meetings 10 

State Election 19 

Town Clerk's Report 23 

Births 24 

Marriages 26 

Deaths 28 

Non-Resident Burials 30 

Dog Licenses 31 

Selectmen 's Report 34 

List of Jurors 57 

Treasurer's Report 58 

Auditor 's Report 63 

Assessors ' Report 64 

Collector 's Report 66 

Road Commissioners 69 

Board of Health 71 

Overseers of the Poor 73 

Tree Warden 80 

Report of Cemetery Commissioners 85 

Acton Memorial Library. . 89 

School Report 93 

School Calendar . . . v 95 

Organization 96 

Committee 97 

Financial Statement 110 

Superintendent's Report 112 

High School Principal 123 

Supervisor of Music 116 

Supervisor of Drawing 117 

Roll of Honor 128 

Statistical Tables 130 

Graduation Exercises 132 

Truant Officers 134 

Department of School Supplies 135 



ANNUAL REPORTS 

OF THE 

TOWN OFFICERS 

OF THE 

TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 
For the Year Ending March 12 

1908 

Together With the School Report 




HUDSON, MASSACHUSETTS 

NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY. PRINTERS 

1908 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1907. 



Selectmen. 
Frank W. Hoit, Bertram D. Hall, James B. Tuttle. 

Town Clerk. 
Horace F. Tuttle. 

Town Treasurer. 
Jona. K. W. Wetherbee. 

Assessors. 
William F. Stevens, James B. Tuttle, Harry E. Clough. 

Overseers of the Poor. 
William F. Kelley, J. Sterling Moore, Octavus A. Knowlton. 

Auditor. 

Waldo E. Whitcomb. 

Collector of Taxes. 
William F. Stevens. 

Tree Warden. 

Charles J. Williams. 

Constables. 

Albert S. Bradley, James Kinsley, Moses A. Reed, 

William F. Stevens. 



Fence Viewers. 
Bertram D. Hall, Frank W. Hoit, James B. Tuttle. 

Field Drivers. 

Albert S. Bradley. James Kinsley, Moses A. Reed 

William F. Stevens. 

Road Commissioners. 

William H. Kingsley Term expires 1908. 

Albert H. Perkins Term expires 1909. 

Anson C. Piper Term expires 1910. 

Cemetery Commissioners. 

Herbert T. Clark Term expires 1908. 

Julian Tuttle Term expires 1909. 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1910. 

School Committee. 

Charles J. Williams Term expires 1908. 

Samuel A. Christie Term expires 1909. 

Arthur F. Blanchard Term expires 1910. 

Board of Health. 

Charles J. Williams Term expires 1908. 

Frank E. Tasker Term expires 1909. 

Frank J. Barker Term expires 1910. 

Trustees of Memorial Library. 

(Chosen by the Town.) 

Charles J. Williams Term expires 1908. 

Lucius A. Hesselton Term expires 1909. 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1910. 



TOWN WARRANT. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Middlesex, ss. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in the 

County of Middlesex. 

Greeting. You are hereby required in the name of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Acton, qualified to vote in 
elections and Town affairs, to assemble in the Town Hall, 
in said Town, on Monday, the thirtieth day of March, A. D., 
1908, at nine o'clock in the forenoon, then and there to act 
on the following articles, as they may think proper, viz : 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Art. 2. To bring in their votes on one ballot for the 
following Town officers : Town Clerk, three Selectmen, three 
Assessors, three Overseers of the Poor, Town Treasurer, 
Collector of Taxes, Auditor, Tree Warden, four Constables, 
four - Field Drivers, three Fence Viewers, all for one year ; 
one Road Commissioner, one Trustee of Memorial Library, 
one Member of School Committee, one Member of Board of 
Health, one Cemetery Commissioner all for three years. 
Also on the same ballot with the above named Town Officers, 
to vote upon the following question : "Shall licenses be 
granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in the Town ?" 

The Polls will be opened at 9.30 A. M. and may be 
closed at 4 o 'clock P. M. 



Art. 3. To choose all necessary Town officers not 
named in Art. 2, and fix salaries. 



Art. 4. To see if the Town will accept the reports of 
the Selectmen, Overseers of the Poor, School Committee^ 
Library Trustees, and other Town Officers. 

Art. 5. To hear and act upon the reports of any Com- 
mittees chosen to report at this meeting. 

Art. 6. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for due observance of Memorial Day. 

Art. 7. To see if the Town will accept the jury list as 
revised by the Selectmen. 

Art, 8. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for the repairing and building of roads and bridges, 
or act anything thereon. 

Art. 9. To see if the Town will authorize the Treas- 
urer, with the approval of its Selectmen, to borrow money 
for the Town, if necessary in anticipation of taxes the cur- 
rent year. 

Art. 10. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for support of Memorial Library the present year. 

Art. 11. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for the support of Schools the present year. 

Art. 12. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for School supplies. 

Art. 13. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of 
money for the enforcement of the Liquor Laws, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Art. 14. To see what amount of money the Town will 
appropriate for the care of Cemeteries, or act anything 
thereon. 



Art. 15. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for maintenance of Fire Department, or act thereon. 

Art. 16. To see if the Town will raise a sum of money 
for the purpose of widening Acton Street, South Acton, as 
laid out by the County Commissioners, or act anything 
thereon. 

Art. 17. To see what action the Town will take in 
regard to the extermination of the brown tail and gypsy 
moth. 

Art. 18. To see if the Town will vote to rebuild the 
road leading from the D. Hennessey place to the new State 
road, or act anything thereon. 

Art. 19. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for Town charges. 

Art. 20. To see what action the Town will take in 
regard to the collection of taxes. 

Art. 21. To see what action the Town will take in 
regard to street lamps the present year. 

Art. 22. To see if the Town will vote to build a suit- 
able building for the purpose of storing the steam roller and 
other road machinery. 

Art. 23. To see what action the Town will take re- 
specting the maintaining of a High School and the trans- 
portation of High School scholars. 

Art. 24. To see what action the Town will take in 
regard to building a High School building, or the building 
of an addition to either of its present buildings. 

Art. 25. To see what action the Town will take in 
regard to furnishing water for the watering trough at West 
Acton. 



8 

And you are hereby directed to serve this warrant by 
posting copies, attested by you, in the following places : One 
in each of the Post Offices and Railroad stations, one in each 
of the, stores of C. H. Mead & Co., W. E. Whitcomb, E. C. 
Parker & Co., M. E. Taylor & Co., Tuttle & Newton, Finney 
& Hoit, J. Cushing & Co., and one at the Nagog House, at 
least seven daj^s before the time appointed for holding said 
meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due return of this Warrant 
with your doings thereon, to the Selectmen or the Town 
Clerk on or before the time for holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands in Acton this eighteenth day of 
March in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred 
and eight. 

FRANK W. HOIT, 
BERTRAM D. HALL, 
JAMES B. TUTTLE, 

Selectmen of Acton. 
A true copy attest : 

Constable of Acton. 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL MEETING, MARCH 

25, 1907. 



Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Allen B. Parker was chosen Moderator. 

Art. 2. To bring in their votes on one ballot for the 
following Town Officers : 

The following Town Officers were chosen on one ballot : 

Town Clerk— Horace F. Tuttle. 

Selectmen — Frank W. Hoit, Bertram D. Hall, James B. 
Tuttle. 

Assessors — William F. Stevens, James B. Tuttle, Harry 
E. Clough. 

Overseers of the Poor — William F. Kelley, Octavus A. 
Knowlton, J. Sterling Moore. 

Treasurer — Jona. K. W. Wetherbee. 

Auditor — Waldo E. Whitcomb. 

Collector of Taxes — William F. Stevens. 

Constables — Albert S. Bradley, James Kinsley, Moses A. 
Reed, William F. Stevens. 

Field Drivers — Albert S. Bradley, James Kinsley, Moses 

A. Reed, William F. Stevens. 

Fence Viewers — Frank W. Hoit, Bertram D. Hall, James 

B. Tuttle. 



10 

Road Commissioner — Anson C. Piper. 

School Committee — Arthur F. Blanchard. 

Cemetery Commissioner — Horace F. Tuttle. 

Board of Health — Frank J. Barker. 

Trustee of Memorial Library — Horace F. Tuttle. 

Tree Warden — Charles J. Williams. 

Also on the same ballot the vote on the question : 
"Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this Town ?" was : 

Whole number of ballots cast 297 

Yes 120 

No 106 

Blanks 71 

Art. 2. To choose all necessary Town Officers not 
named in article 2, and fix salaries. 

Voted : That the Selectmen be instructed to appoint 
surveyors of lumber, wood, hoops and staves. 

Voted : That the salary of the Collector of Taxes be 
one percent of the amount collected and that he perform all 
the duties hitherto performed by said officer. 

Voted : To fix the salary of the Auditor at six dollars. 

Voted : That the salary of the Road Commissioners 
be two and one-half dollars per day, nine hours to constitute 
a day. 

Art. 4. To see if the Town will accept the reports of 
the Selectmen, Overseers of the Poor, School Committee, 
Library Trustees and other Town Officers. 

Voted : To accept the reports of the several Town 
Officers. 

Voted : That hereafter all Town Officers include in 
their reports an itemized statement of money expended. 



11 

Art. 5. To hear and act upon the reports of any com- 
mittees chosen to report at this meetinig. 

No action taken under the article. 

Art. 6. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for due observance of Memorial Day. 

Voted : To raise the sum of fifty dollars. 

Art. 7. To see if the Town will accept the jury list, 
as revised by the Selectmen. 

Voted : To accept the jury list as revised by the Se- 
lectmen. 

Art. 8. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for the repairing and building of roads and bridges, or 
act anything thereon. 

Voted : To raise five thousand dollars ($5,000). 

Voted : That the Road Commissioners be instructed to 
expend three thousand dollars ($3,000) in building maca- 
damized road and the balance of the appropriation for gen- 
eral repairs in such a manner as they shall consider most ex- 
pedient. 

Art. 9. To see if the Town will authorize the Treas- 
urer with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money 
for the Town if necessary, in anticipation of taxes the cur- 
rent year. 

Voted : To authorize the Treasurer to borrow money 
for the Town as stated in the article. 

Art. 10. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for support of Memorial Library the present year. 

Voted : To raise four hundred dollars ($400) for run- 
ning expenses and two hundred dollars ($200) for books. 

Art. 11. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for the support of schools the present year. 



12 

Voted : To raise for 

Common schools $4,100 00 

High school 2,300 00 

School supplies 625 00 

Transportation of pupils 1,360 00 

Salary of superintendent 480 00 

Medical inspection 100 00 



$8,965 00 

Art. 12. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for school supplies. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Art. 13. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of 
money for the enforcement of the liquor laws, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Voted : To appropriate five hundred dollars ($500). 

Voted : That the Selectmen enforce the liquor laws. 

Art. 14. To see what amount of money the Town will 
appropriate for the care of cemeteries, or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted : To appropriate five hundred dollars ($500). 

Art. 15. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for the maintenance of fire department, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Voted : To appropriate three hundred and fifty dollars 

($350). 

Art. 16. To see if the Town will authorize its Select- 
men to contract with the American Woolen Co., for the 
lighting of its streets, or take any action thereon. 

Voted : To authorize the Selectmen to contract with 
the American Woolen Co., for lighting streets for a term of 
five years, the contract to include one hundred lamps at a 
cost not exceeding seventeen hundred dollars per annum. 



13 

Art. 17. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for Town charges. 

Voted : To raise thirty-five hundred dollars ($3,500). 

Art. 18. To see if the Town will vote to buy a steam 
roller, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To dismiss the article. 

Art. 19. To see what action the Town will take in re- 
gard to the extermination of the brown tail and gypsy 
moths. 

Voted : To appropriate seven hundred dollars ($700). 

Art. 20. To see if the Town will adopt the sidewalk 
act, or take any action thereon. 

Voted : To refer the matter to the Selectmen, to re- 
port to the Town at its annual meeting in 1908. 

Art. 21. To see if the Town will discontinue an old 
bridle road from the house of Moses Taylor to the late 
Isaac Barker, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To discontinue as a town or public way the 
piece of road described in the article. 

Art. 22. To see if the Town will vote to install electric 
lights in the public buildings, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To authorize the Selectmen to contract for 
the lighting of the Town Hall and Memorial Library by 
electricity. 

Art. 23. To see if the Town will vote to place a me- 
morial stone in the Pilgrim Monument at Provincetown, or 
act anything thereon. 

Voted : That the Selectmen be authorized to place a 
memorial stone in the Pilgrim Monument at Provincetown, 
said stone to be of native granite, subject to the approval 
and acceptance of the Monument Association. 



14 

Art. 24. To see if the Town will take any action in 
regard to the speed of automobiles. 

Voted : That the Selectmen enforce the law relative 
thereto. 

Art. 25. To see if the Town will purchase a suitable 
piece of land adjoining the schoolhouse lot at South Acton 
for a play-ground, or take any action thereon. 

Voted : That the matter be left with the Selectmen 
and School Committee, with power to act. 

Art. 26. To see what action the Town will take in re- 
lation to the collection of taxes. 

Voted : That the Collector charge interest at the rate 
of five percent per annum on all taxes remaining unpaid 
after the first day of November next. 

Art. 27. To see if the Town will maintain street lamps, 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To maintain such street lamps as shall be ap- 
proved by the Selectmen. 

Art. 28. To see if the Town will straighten the lower 
end of Maple street, South Acton, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Voted : The following resolution presented by Reuben 
L. Reed : 

Whereas, At a patriotic meeting in the Flag Room at 
the State House on February 8, 1907, on the occasion of the 
presentation of the historical canes to Governor Curtis Guild 
and to Col. J. Payson Bradley, Dept. Commander of the 
Mass. G. A. R., Capt. Charles T. Ripley, Chief of the Police 
of the Boston Navy Yard, made a valuable contribution to 
the patriotic record of the Town of Acton by the presenta- 
tion of a poem highly eulogistic of the services of Capt. 
Isaac Davis on the 19th of April, 1775. Therefore, be it 



15 

Resolved by the citizens of Acton, in town meeting as- 
sembled, on this, the twenty-fifth day of March, 1907, that 
we put on record our appreciation of Capt. Ripley's senti- 
ments contributed on the above mentioned occasion, and 
that they are especially appreciated by us as coming from 
the pen of one who did signal service on land and sea in the 
war for the preservation of the Union, for the establishment 
of which Capt. Isaac Davis was the first officer to lay down 
his life. 

Resolved, That a copy of this resolution be sent to Capt. 
Charles T. Ripley as an expression of our appreciation and 
regard. 

Meeting adjourned. 



16 



TOWN MEETING, JUNE 4, 1907. 



Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Chose Allen B. Parker, Moderator. 

Art. 2. To see if the Town will vote to purchase or 
take by right of eminent domain a suitable piece of land 
and build a high school building thereon, or take any action 
in the matter. 

(1) A motion to strike the article from the warrant 
did not prevail. 

(2) A motion that the Town purchase or take by right 
of eminent domain, a suitable piece of land and build a high 
school building thereon, the location to be determined by 
the Town, did not prevail. 

Art. 3. To see if the Town will take any action in re- 
gard to the school or schoolhouse at South Acton. 

Voted : To refer the matter to the School Committee, 
with authority to improve the sanitary conditions of the 
schoolhouse at South Acton, satisfactory to the State Board. 

(1) Motion : To pass over the article did not prevail. 

(2) Motion : To build oh the South schoolhouse 
sufficient room to accommodate the grammar school did not 
prevail. 

(3) Motion : To remove the high school from the 
South schoolhouse and send its pupils to Concord did not 
prevail. 

(4) Motion : That the School Committee be author- 
ized to send the junior and senior classes of the high school 



17 

to Concord and place the remaining classes of the high 
school in a room at West Acton, temporarily, without pre- 
judice to any final location of a high school building. This 
motion did not prevail. 

(5) Motion : To refer the matter to a committee to 
report to the Town, some recommendations at a special 
meeting to be called two weeks from this day. This motion 
did not prevail. 

(6) Voted to refer the entire matter to the School 
Committee. 

Art. 4. To see if the Town will vote to accept a steam 
road roller, as presented to the Town by Alvin M. Lothrop, 
or take any action thereon. 

Voted : Unanimously that the Town extend to Alvin 
M. Lothrop a vote of thanks for the generous gift of a 
steam road roller and for the interest he has taken in fur- 
nishing our citizens with the means of making and keeping 
in repair roads which the Town will be proud of. Also 
that a copy of this vote be sent to Mr. Lothrop and a record 
thereof made on the Town records. 

Art. 5. To see if the Town will discontinue the pri- 
vate way laid out by the Road Commissioners, on petition 
of Mary T. Coughlin and accepted by the Town. March 27th, 
1905. 

Voted : That the Town discontinue the private way 
laid out by the Road Commissioners, on petition of Mary T. 
Coughlin over the land of Mary O'Xeil and accepted by the 
Town, March 27, 1905. 

Art. 6. To see what action the Town will take in 
reference to the suit brought against the Town by Mary 
O'Xeil. 

Voted : That the matter be referred to the Selectmen, 
with full power to act. 

Meeting adjourned. 



18 



TOWN MEETING, JUNE 27, 1907. 



Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Allen B. Parker was chosen Moderator. 

Art. 2. To see if the Town will vote to purchase or 
take by right of eminent domain, a suitable piece of land 
and build a high school building thereon, or take any action 
in the matter. 

The following motion was made by C. M. Kimball : 
That the Town build a high school building, not to exceed in 
cost $15,000 complete, and that said school building be lo- 
cated on the Ellis Wetherbee lot on Prospect street, South 
Acton. 

On motion of W. H. Kingsley, it was voted that the mo- 
tion of Mr. Kimball be divided, action to be taken first on 
the question of building, second on the question of location. 
Voted : the following amendment made by F. C. Nash, pro- 
vided the building so voted shall be located in town meeting 
and in no other way. 

On the question of the first part of Mr. Kimball's 
motion as amended by Mr. Nash, 142 voted in favor, 134 
against. ; the motion as passed reading as follows : Voted 
that the Town build a high school building not to exceed 
in cost $15,000 complete, provided the building so voted 
shall be located by the town in town meeting, and in no 
other way. 

Voted: on motion of L. E. Reed, offered as a substi- 
tute for the second part of Mr. Kimball's motion, that said 
school house be located at or near Acton Center ; 185 voted 



19 

in favor. 92 against the motion. A viva voice vote was taken 
on the question of the passage of the original motion as 
amended and it passed. The motion as passed reading: 
Voted, that the Town build a high school building not to 
exceed in cost $15,000 complete, provided the building so 
voted shall be located by the town in town meeting and in 
no other way. and that said school building shall be located 
at or near Acton Center. 

Voted: On motion of Luther Conant that the Town 
choose a building committee of six persons, two from each 
precinct, to which shall be added the chairman of the Board 
of School Committee, the chairman of the Board of Se- 
lectmen, and the Town Clerk, the last three ex-officio. 

Voted : That said committee be nominated by the 
Moderator and Town Clerk, their nominations to be ap- 
proved by the meeting. The following persons were nomi- 
nated and approved by the meeting as members of the Build- 
ing Committee : 

Edwin A. Phalen, J. Sidney White ; Precinct 1. 

C. M. Kimball, William Rawitzer ; Precinct 2. 

Edgar H. Hall, William F. Kelley ; Precinct 3. 
Mr. Kimball declined and was excused. 

Voted : On motion of Luther Conant that the build- 
ing committee be empowered to fill vacancies. 

Art. 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
and borrow if needed, a sum of money for the purpose of 
purchasing land and building a high school building, or 
take any action thereon. 

Voted : On motion of Luther Conant, that the Select- 
men be authorized to borrow a sum of money not exceeding 
ten thousand dollars ($10,000). 114 voted in favor ; 112 
voted against. 

Voted : To adjourn. 

No action taken under articles 4 and 5. 



20 



TOWN MEETING, AUGUST 8, 1907. 



Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Allen B. Parker was chosen Moderator. 

Art. 2. To see if the Town will authorize the Select- 
men to borrow money for a new high school building, not to 
exceed $15,000, or act anything thereon. 

A motion that the Selectmen be instructed to borrow a 
sum of money, not exceeding $10,000 to build a high school 
building did not prevail. 68 voted in favor ; 96 against 
the motion. 

Art. 3. To see if the Town will vote to pay the cost of 
the transportation of the high school pupils, or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted : To dismiss the article. 

Art. 4. To see if the Town will rescind its vote or 
votes passed at its last meeting, whereby it voted to build 
a high schoolhouse for the high school and locate it at, or 
near Acton Center, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To lay on the table. 

Art. 5. To see if the Town will vote to purchase or 
take by right of eminent domain, a suitable piece of land 
and build a high school building thereon, or take any action 
in the matter. 

Passed over. 

Art. 6. To determine whether or not the Town will 



21 

sustain the action of the School Committee in contracting 
with the Town of Concord for the tuition of Acton high 
school pupils during the school year 1907-1908, under the 
powers delegated to said committee by the Town acting un- 
der article 3 of the warrant for a town meeting, dated May 
22, 1907, or act anything thereon. 

A motion made by S. A. Guilford that the Town sustain 
the action of the School Committee, stated in the article, 
did not prevail. 83 voted in favor ; 95 against the motion. 

An amendment made by F. C. Nash, that the School 
Committee be sustained so far as they can reasonably and 
lawfully be sustained and sustained in sending the third and 
fourth year classes of the high school to Concord, did not 
prevail. 95 voted in favor ; 115 against. 

Voted : On motion of Luther Conant, that the Select- 
men be instructed to procure able counsel to defend the 
Town in any suit or suits that may be brought against it. 

Voted : On motion of C. B. Stone, that the School 
Committee be added to the Selectmen, they together to con- 
stitute a committee to defend the Town in any suit or suits 
brought against it. 

Art. 7. To see if the Town will vote to build an addi- 
tion to either of its schoolhouses for the use of its high, 
school, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Voted : To adjourn. 



22 



STATE ELECTION, NOVEMBER, 5, 1907. 



Party designations : R., Republican ; D., Democratic ; 
P., Prohibition ; I. L., Independence League ; S., Socialist ; 
S. L., Socialist Labor ; I. C, Independent Citizens ; D. C. 
N. P., Democratic Citizens' Norn. Paper ; A. M., Anti-Merger. 



Whole number of ballots cast. 



Precincts 
12 3 Total 

83 96 106 285 



Governor. 

Charles W. Bartlett, A. M., 2 2 4 

Thomas F. Brennan, S. L., 

John W. Brown, S., 

Hervey S. Cowell, P., 2 3 5 

Curtis Guild, Jr., R., 54 61 76 191 

Thomas L. Hisgen, I. L., 1 13 5 19 

Henry M. Whitney, D., 22 16 17 55 

Henry M. Whitney, I. C, 10 12 

Henry M. Whitney, D. C. N. M., 10 12 

Blanks, 2 2 3 7 



Lieutenant Governor. 

E. Gerry Brown, I. L., 3 14 6 23 

John T. Cahill, A. M., 2 2 

Eben S. Draper, R., 48 57 69 174 

Walter J. Hoar, S. L., 11 

Robert Lawrence, S., 

Jonathan S. Lewis, P., 2 2 4 

George A. Schofield, D., 20 16 21 57 

Blanks, 10 7 7 24 



23 



Secretary. 










Solon W. Bingham, P., 


. 





1 


2 


3 


Odilon Z. E. Charest, D. C. N 


. M, 










Dem., 




18 


14 


15 


47 


John Hall, Jr., S., 










1 


1 


William M. Olin, R., 




54 


68 


75 


197 


Arthur E. Reimer, S. L., 
















Dennis J. Ring, I. L., 




1 


5 


4 


10 


Blanks, 




10 


8 


9 


27 


Treasurer. 








*i 


Albert Barnes, S. L., 







1 





1 


Edward J. Cantwell, I. L., 




2 


7 


2 


11 


Arthur B. Chapin, R., 




51 


66 


73 


190 


William P. Connery, A. M., 




1 








1 


Daniel F. Doherty, D. C. N. 


M., 










Dem., 




16 


12 


16 


44 


Charles C. Hitchcock, S., 
















Edward Kendall, P., 







1 


3 


4 


Blanks, 




13 


9 


12 


34 


Auditor. 










Joao Claudino, S. L., 




1 








1 


Joseph A. Conry, D. C. N. M., 


D., 


19 


12 


13 


44 


Thomas E. Finnerty, I. L., 




1 


8 


3 


12 


George G. Hall, S., 







1 


1 


2: 


James F. Pease, P., 










3 


3 


Henry E. Turner, R., 




52 


67 


70 


189 


Blanks, 




10 


8 


16 


3± 


Attorney 


General. 








Allen Coffin, P., 




1 





3 


4 


Dana Malone, R., 




52 


63 


73 


188 


John McCarty, S., 
















James E. McConnell, D., 




21 


13 


15 


49 


William N. Osgood, I. L., 




1 


10 


2 


13- 



24 



Harvey H. Pratt, A. M., 





1 


1 


9 


Gilbert G. Smith, S. L., 














Blanks, 


8 


9 


12 


29 


Councillor. 










Alvin S. Bennett, D., 


21 


17 


19 


57 


Seward W. Jones, R., 


50 


64 


73 


187 


William H. Partridge, P., 





3 


2 


5 


Blanks. 


12 


12 


12 


36 


Senator. 










William F. Cnrtin, D. ? 


23 


18 


19 


60 


James Wilson Grimes, R., 


47 


63 


72 


182 


Blanks, 


13 


15 


15 


43 


Representative in General Court. 






James P. Dunigan, D., 


25 


25 


33 


83 


Edwin C. Perham, R., 


50 


63 


62 


175 


Blanks, 


8 


8 


11 


27 


County Commissioner. 








Francis Bigelow, R.. 


53 


66 


70 


189 


George A. DeLord, D., 


17 


13 


16 


46 


Austin B. Robbins, P., 


2 


3 


4 


9 


George W. C. Smith, I. L.., 


2 


6 


1 


9 


Charles E. Wood, 








2 


2 


Blanks, 


9 


8 


13 


30 


Associate Commissioners. 








James H. Christie, I. L., 


6 


11 


3 


20 


George B. Glidden, I. L., 


8 


6 


4 


18 


.Matthew II. Quick, P., 








1 


1 


David T. Strange, R., 


46 


49 


57 


152 


Edward Everett Thompson, R., 


36 


44 


37 


117 


Charles A. Ward. P., 


1 


4 


1 


6 


Ered W. Green 








14 


14 


Blanks, 


69 


78 


95 


242 



25 

District Attorney 

John J. Higgins, I. L., R., 
John J. McClure, Jr., D.. 

Blanks. 



John R. Fairbairn, R., 
Albion A. Weeks. P., 
George AY. WilkinSj D. 

Blanks. 



Sheriff. 



54 


72 


72 


198 


19 


13 


15 


47 


10 


11 


19 


40 


53 


73 


77 


203 





1 


2 


3 


20 


12 


18 


50 


10 


10 


9 


29 



Constitutional Amendment, Relating to Removal of 

Justices of the Peace and Notaries Public 

by the Governor. 

Yes. 41 46 42 129 

No, 7 8 15 

Blanks. 42 43 56 141 



Vote for Representative in 11th Middlesex District. 





< 


- 
< 












James P. Dunigan of Chelms- 
ford, Dem. 


83 

175 
27 


125 

171 
41 


34 

35 



297 

260 
26 


47 

89 
9 


101 

183 
27 


687 


Edwin C. Perham of Chelms- 
ford, Rep 


913 


Blanks 


130 






Totals 


285 


337 


69 


583 


145 


311 


1730 







26 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



Births. 



Whole number recorded 28 

Males 14 

Females 14 

Born in Aeton 28 

Native parentage ' 19 

Foreign parentage 4 

Mixed parentage 5 

Marriages. 

Whole number recorded 20 

Residents of Acton 23 

Residents of other places 17 

Deaths. 

Whole number recorded 49 

Residents of Acton 44 

Residents of other places 5 

Occurring in Acton 42 

Occurring in other places 7 

Average age 53 minus 

Note — The Town Clerk requests information of any 
omission or error in the lists of births, marriages and deaths. 

The Town Clerk hereby gives notice that he is prepared 
to furnish blanks for the return of births and deaths. 

HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Town Clerk. 



27 



© s-^ 

-+J © 



© 

- 
O 

© 



fll 



p! 

© 

- 
- 

- 



© 

^^ © 

© E£! 



c5 

-a 

c3 

P 

C 



C5 



— 

a: 

~ 

- 



o 

C5 



Q 

W 

M 
H 

CO 

3 
9 

H 

PQ 



M r- « ^ ^ jg J 



- a 'g S3 



c s^ ^ P ~ 

^ s 6 "^ s 



pa 



— 
C 

CO 

Pi 



o 

o 



< £ 



© 

S E 



§ * a R 



© 



- 

© 



3 



© 

p 

c 

o 

© 

© 

© © 

C6 -^ 

O O 



, — 33 



fo <; 



13 

P 



© 



X 

- 
P 



£ 



tC fPi r-H 



© £ cs 

° © if 

P 60 g 

-^ § 

fe E & 






© 

13 
QQ 



£ o 



— 
P w 



o 



2 s 

w 3 3 



3 « S 

d K Z 

© M S-l 

^ ft ^ 



'© 

PI 



© 

^ *© 
66 r-' 



P P 



© 

13 

© 

03 



H 



- 



P 

c 
cc 

p ""£ 

v -" © O 

r^ C 



^ •a s s 



- 



^ H-l 



^ 5 a H 






DQ fl M *° 



n3 - - 

-8 i -e 

S J < 






p 

05 OJ 



^ 

^ 



,£ PQ < O 



o 

jH © 

5 - 



H 



be 



fefeOO 



© 

p 

© 
^p 

03 



- 



S ^ 



<1 H 



^ © H 



-3 

13 
- 



^3 
rS* 



s s 

© ^2 

B 

D8 



© 'c § 

h— i i— i © 

h- i— i rs 



© 

P 



© 
ha 



CO 

© 

c8 



- 

P 

S3 



O 
© 

© 
© 
© 



TtH rH 



- 
OS 
PS 

© 



© 



GO 

© 

^2 






C\l 



- 
© 



l—J © © 



— 
© 

X 



ft 

© 



© 

© 
© 
© 

p 



-^s 






© 



13 



rjn 



a: 

PS 

E be 

Ph p 



rH CvJ CO Tj^ LO* <X> t>-* GO* C5 O 



^ ifl d ^' 



28 



o 



§ o 



T3 

C 
c3 

c 
o 



,a 

OS 

a 

d 



P 



^ w p a 



- 



< 

a: 



- 

O 
Pi 

a> 
P 

re 



s w s £ 



>. 



r <& r- < 



r^ X 



£ 






— 
- 






r< Q 



^ ^ P « 



'S X a? 

On v -' • 

— . PQ 

& « .1 

& % & 

■3 a £ 



8 1 5 

+j P3 X 

02 ?h 'c 

H H b 



03 



o 

o 
O 



be 

PI 



r© ^ 



r^ ' 



<D GG O) 

•T- c C 






o Ph 

O <-h' 

Q § 

w 



05 tf 



'- 
a? 

Ph 



o <- 

PI c 

.a s 

CO QQ 



•a a 



02 

3 



•a 

0) 



S 
o 



CQ 



£2 S 



bo >> S 

C3 P3 g 
< S ^ 



PH 

> 

c 



CM 
H=! 

p 



O) 






00S5OHCq»T|(l0C0 






29 



MARRIAGES REGISTERED IN 1907. 



No. 


Date Place 


Names 


Residences 


1. 


September 17 


Baker, Ralph G. 


Boston 




West Acton 


Knowlton, Vera M. 


West Acton 


2. 


September 16 


Bariteau, Arthur V. 


South Acton 




Maynard 


Coughlin, Catherine E. 


Maynard 


3. 


January 9 


Barteau, Ernest L. 


Boxboro 




West Acton 


Wetherbee, Carrie D. 


Boxboro 


4. 


June 19 


Bradley, Jerry W. 


South Acton 




Maynard 


Mahoney, Alice Clare 


Maynard 


5. 


January 1 


Castle, Roswell S. 


Proctor, Vt. 




West Acton 


Lovett, Mary L. 


Brandon, Yt. 


6. 


April 17 


Cramblett, Earl G. 


Lynn 




West Acton 


Hawes, Georgiana 


West Acton 


7. 


July 31 


Dacey, William Thomas 


Acton 




Maynard 


King, Elizabeth Bell 


Acton 


8. 


November 17 


Duren, Roy Leslie 


South Acton 




South Acton 


Lyon, Agnes Florence 


West Acton 


9. 


October 12 


Gage, Walter Irving 


Stoughton 




West Acton 


Stone, Clara L. 


West Acton 


10. 


June 26 


Gibson, Robert B. 


Oxford 




South Acton 


Skelton, L. Ula 


South Acton 


11. 


June 30 


Hoit, Edgar Clinton 


South Acton 




Concord 


Brown, Maybell Chase 


Concord 



30 



12. 


September 29 
West Acton 


Joy, Albert J. 
Taylor, Edith M. 


Providence, R. I. 
West Acton 


13. 


November 5 
Stow 


King, Benjamin Arthur Acton 
Thompson, Ethel Elizabeth Stow 


14. 


December 18 
Maynard 


McLaughlin, JosephEllsworthSouth Acton 
Sullivan, Catherine Maynard 


15. 


February 12 
Boston 


Nickerson, Frank H. 
Giblin, Delia G. 


West Acton 
West Acton 


16. 


June 12 
North Acton 


Patterson, Ned Foster 
Maynes, Emily Augusta 


Westford 
Acton 


17. 


November 26 
West Acton 


Phillips, Thomas F. 
Hawes, Elora E. 


Concord 
Acton 


18. 


October 19 
Maynard 


Richardson, William R. 
Otis, Grace Vesta 


South Acton 
South Acton 


19. 


October 23 
Maynard 


Tobin, Francis J. 
Mannion, Mary F. 


Maynard 

Acton 

1 


20. 


October 22 
Sudbury 


Wheeler, Elbridge L. 
Hynes, Catherine Ellen 


West Acton 
West Acton 



31 



>> HNNHNNn 



(MHHn CM ^- CM r-^ CO rH iH 



5P on c O oo lo o t- in 
<3 o rH 



WC^OO I CD CO CO ICCOO 



rA COrtHClCOCOlCCTiCMCDOi— HOL'tt-HrUHCO^lCt- 

S ^Nt-00^t>t>t*WOa CO CO GO iH lO CO CD CO GO 



o 
m 



Sjo cd 



p 

H 
H 

3 

w 

GO 

« 

Eh 
< 
W 
Q 



33 



a: 

c 



c 

S © S J- 

o ^ 7-7- 



5^ 



H H 3 .2 -P 



X 



sic S 



^ o 3 ^ c . 



>»rrt 



cu cu 






GO 

d§ 

Ȥ s 

p 

c >s 

r. - 

CD «3 



C3 

oa 

P 
U 

^■> 

QQ 5>B 

- P 
r "S 
Sjd S 
09 09 



cd 

03 U CD 
*"" rT 



O 

■fH _ 



>-. 



5 P 



cS 
cd 






CXI CO 








r- CM CM _ 

Cyj ^- ,— CO 


p 






i-i CM 








O t>. <M CD CD tJH 

^CM—^^^^t^ CMCOtJ-t- 

^ N cc a; o co K ^ >i r-i cm 
S-S-g I 1 g « £ £ § « £ 2 «"^ 


e+H 


CD 
CM 




- - 






cc 


O 

cd 


GO 

5b 

p 


CD rG ^2 


X 


o 

CQ 


T— 


c3 




cd cd 

CO CP 


CD 

p 

p 


p 


— 


ca« k S«Da>a>c8 / S?- F 9cs--cspp 



l-t •-» 



9 



HMCO^LC^OCOClOHWCO^LCCOt-OOC: © i— CMCO 
rirT-Hr-i-iHHHriWlM(M(M 



32 



tH O 



cd cd in co cd | t- co co o Tf cd i a ^ in « c I cm 



H^HCOHC(M00t>CO I lO 00 W O CO CO O I H 



O^COOOCCCOO 
t>in0DOlCnCCCD 



H O N CD ^ CD C LO lO O I CO C CO H H 
H"^lO(Mt>t>COI>t>00 | CD CD CD (M 00 






2^ °3 






•73 

.3 



PQ^ 



£S 






^.•-3 



&a 



$_i eg cc p • — 

"£ o o CO O 



Is 



PQ 



a> 



£0 



a3 

T3 
C 

fe'-i 3 § 

£ S 
b ® •■§ 



b£ 



»-» r^ J3 FT! h^ 



fc>8?"3jS 

£ ec - c 
C gCK 

"IsJtf g 

5 r ~ 






^ * a <i 

0> <D C 
03 <13 .13 C 

ce ^3 pfi ^ c 



■S s a b p 



o| 

•73 "73 



C5 rH 



CO 



<°S8S 






CO o t- 

rH CM 

CJ o ^ ^ ^ ^ 

J3 05 Ph 57 P 3 57 <D Q3 O «S Ph O g £ *= 2 ^C^ Sc3^L_ 



'—i CO >- 



i— I cc cc 



H CM 



CD 

O 

rH 
CO 



■^UOCD)t-C»C)OH(MCOTHUOCDI>OOCiOH(MCO^lOCD!t-CO 
NNNNNWCCCOWWCOCOC0COC0lCCTH^^'<f'rJi'^^^'* 



33 



£S I I I ISS3 03 

a 6 | | | » oo « © ^ 



TjH T* 



<M 






CM 



CM i— i— b- GC O 



CO0(MI> 



73 



• o I i>^oct-cc!Ncoccccr:(M!ML':t>cc:^iM 

Ph CM |i— ! r "CDt-t~CCr^CCl>-CCTt'l>- CCCt>X^O 



w 



- 



B 

Eg O 
^ fcc 



B X 
c — 



>> 06 



■s^s 






s- a a a _d 8R 






c o c 



;v — o o fcj .— : o t — u n u u <~> .;-< O 



- > 

p c 

S 



g K 






o 

B S 


OX 



't-t 

in 
B 



CO 
CD 

s 



&g ^ d ^ 



>s 



a 5 o 



x 



ar, o g 



- S-. Jh fe rZ ^2 . 

= " S 5-a • ^^ 

co a a w -©S^flToff 
-g^-c^.E s b j§ B^ 

B">h"^i»5 c ,a ,a o a c ~ 



s -a 

Ox 



Ph v a 






w 8^ 



^ ~ .^ ^ 






~ rB 73 ^ CU 



hd ^^Ci Er 



a 

£££££'£ 



a 



1* 



-a tr 



- 

— 
O 

CD 

- 

- 



©ooocooooooocaoocooooo 
05 Oi c: OS OS os c: c: c: c: OS oa cc oa oa c: c: OS OS ca OS 



^H tH CM i-^' i— . CM CM nKr-r(MNH(M(N CM 



O 

c 



— 

k. co 

>> a 



— i >-. 



> fei 



b ^ '5 ^ a ^o « 73 i ^P b « a £ g ^3 _ 

r-" c<i CO Tji ua co t-' cc ci O t-h cm' CO ^' kffl CD t> CC Cft o ^ 
r-iTHrH^HrHiHr-lTHT-JrHOQOQ 



- 



- 



34 



PERSONS HAVING DOGS LICENSED IN 1907. 



Barker, Frank J. 


$5 00 


Durkee, Charles A. 


5 00 


Bent, James 


2 00 


Davis, Wendell F. 


2 00 


Bresth, Simon 


2 00 


Durkee, J. E. 


2 00 


Byron, William 


2 00 


Davis, Charles E. 


2 00 


Brooks, George H. 


2 00 






Bixby, Edward F. 


2 00 


Emery, F. E. 


2 00 


Baker, Martin S. 


2 00 


Enneguess, Michael 


2 00 


Bailey, Fred L., 2 


4 00 






Barber, Walter H. 


2 00 


Farrar, Abel 


5 00 


Bent, Harding P. 


2 00 


Fletcher, Lester N. 


2 00 


Brooks, Mary D. 


2 00 


Farrar, Daniel H. 


2 00 


Bulette, F. W. 


2 00 


Fobes, E. S. 


5 00 


Baird, Edson 


2 00 


Fitzgerald. R. 


2 00 


Bradley, Mary 


2 00 


Fullonton, Llewellvc 


i 2 00 


Burroughs, Samuel R.2 00 


Ford, I. S. 


2 00 


Brown, Arthur 


2 00 


Ford, Charles L., 2 


7 00 


Baker, Ferd C, 2 


4 00 


Fairbanks. C. H. 


2 00 


Boyce, Charles E. 


2 00 






Brown, Lizzie J. 


2 00 


Goodwin, M. A. 


2 00 






Gookins, C. B. 


2 00 


Chase, Addie M. 


2 00 


Gray, F. A. 


2 00 


Carberg, L. C. 


2 00 


Green, Fred W., 2 


7 00 


Coughlin, John F. 


2 00 


Grimes, James A. 


2 00 


Coughlin, Wm. C. 


2 00 


Greenwood, O. H., 3 12 00 


Coughlin, Margaret 


2 00 


Gallagher, Joseph 


2 00 


Carrigan, Michael 


2 00 


Gould, H. A. 


2 00 


Coussens, Frank C. 


2 00 


Grady, Roy 


5 00 


Conant, Luther 


2 00 


Gates, Hiram E. 


2 00 


Cole, James 


2 00 


Gallant, Joseph 


2 00 






Gilmore, A. H., 2 


7 00 


Dow, Charles E. 


2 00 


Hoit, F. W. 


2 00 


DeLord, George A. 


2 00 


Hayes, Michael G. 


2 00 


Dusseault, G. A. 


2 00 


Hardy, Nellie T. 


2 00 


Donnelly, F. H., 2 


4 00 


Harris, David C. 


2 00 


Downey, John J. 


2 00 


Hartwell, F. E. 


5 00 


Dole, Cyrus G. 


2 00 


Hollowell, William 


2 00 



35 



Harris, Hattie B. 


5 


00 


O'Connell, Michael 


2 00 


Holden, Willis L. 


2 


00 


O'Neil, Constantine 


2 00 


Hawes, George A. 


2 


00 


Ourens, Clarence 


5 00 


Hawes, Fritz B. 


2 


00 






Hallo-well, Fred A. 


2 


00 






Houghton, 0. Ells- 






Pratt, Francis 


2 00 


worth 


2 


00 


Perkins, Levi W. 
Price, Wm. A. 


2 00 
2 00 


Jones, Samuel 


2 


00 


Pope, Benjamin, 7 
Phalen, Harold 


23 00 
2 00 


Jones, Warren 


2 


00 


Payson, Arthur E. 
Pratt, Frank A., 2 


2 00 
7 00 


Kelley, Wm. F. 


2 


00 


Perkins, Albert H. 


2 00 


Kinnaird, A. 


2 C 






Kimball, Charles M., 










3 


9 


00 


Richardson, Sidney L.5 00 


Kelley, John M. 


2 


00 


Reed, Robert G. 


2 00 








Robbins, Webster C. 
Robbins, Solon A. 


2 00 
2 00 


Libby, Geo. A. 


5 


00 


Richardson, Jas. E. 


5 00 


Lawrence, A. L. 


2 


00 


Richardson, Jas. L. 


2 00 


Lothrop, T. C, 3 


9 


00 


Rikeman, A. J. 


2 00 


Lawrey, George 


2 


00 


Rawitzer, Wm. 


2 00 


Morse, J. Alfred 


2 


00 






McAllister, Oscar A. 


5 


00 


Stevens, Wm. F. 


2 00 


Moore, J. Sterling 


2 


00 


Smith, C. R. 


5 00 


Morris. Charles 


2 


00 


Stevenson. John M. 


5 00 


Mekkelsen, Henrv 


2 


00 


Smith, Henry M. 


2 00 


Mitchell, John, 2 


7 


00 


Shaplev, Eva C. 


2 00 


Manley, Ira D. 


2 


00 


Smith, F. G. 


2 00 


McCarthy. Jennie 


2 


00 


Sweet, Anthony 


2 00 


Merrill, Wm. F. 


2 


00 


Stoss, Henry J. 


2 00 


Mannion, Thomas A. 


2 


00 


Symonds, E. D. 


2 00 


Murphy, Geo. E. 


2 


00 


Scott, Thomas, 2 


4 00 


Meecham, Minnie 


5 


00 


Sweet, Wm. H. 


2 00 


Miller, Chas. I. 


2 


00 






Morrison, F. D., 2 


4 00 


Taylor, C. C. 


5 00 


Moore, Wm. J. 


2 


00 


Teele, Ernest R. 


2 00 


Mason, Wm. E. 
Morrison, Alex 


2 00 
2 00 


Thompson, Timothv 
A. 


2 00 








Tavlor, Elizabeth 


2 00 


Noyes, A. L. 


5 C 


Taylor, M. E. 


2 00 








Tuttle & Newton 


2 00 


O'Neil, Patrick 


2 


00 


Taylor, Charles A.,2 


! 4 00 



36 



Weston, Philip S. 5 00 
Warren, Wm. S. 2 00 
Wilder, W. B. 5 00 

Willis, Edward, 2 4 00 
Wheeler, Chas. H., 4 14 00 
Weaver, Geo. T. 2 00 



Watkins, John H.,2 4 00 

Worster, Geo. W. 2 00 

Willard, Frank H. 5 00 

Whitcomb, Fred S. 2 00 

Wetherbee, Ellis 2 00 

White, Eugene L. 2 00 



145 licenses at $2.00 each $290 00 

34 licenses at $5.00 each 170 00 



Deduct fees, 179 licenses at 20 cents . . 
Balance paid to County Treasurer. . 



$460 00 
35 80 

$424 20 



37 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



High School, Spring Term. 

Paid W. B. Pierce, 13 weeks $325 00 

Ethel Leighton, 13 weeks '. 162 50 

Alice Maclntyre, 13 weeks 162 50 

Coal 23 33 

Janitor 32 50 

Cleaning 3 75 



$709 58 



Fall and Winter Terms. 

Paid Alice Maclntyre $375 00 

Town of Concord, tuition 1,120 00 

Transportation High School schol- 
ars, one term 264 10 

Goal 27 71 

Wood 9 25 

Janitor 33 33 

Cleaning 2 50 

Musical Instruction: 

J. Louise Long 20 32 

E. N. C. Barnes 35 00 

Drawing Instruction: 

W. L. Adams 11 25 



$1,898 46 
$2,608 04 



38 

South School. 

Paid Julia McCarthy $84 00 

Inez G. Kilton 144 00 

Katherine B. Feeley 144 00 

Charlotte Canfield 72 00 

Margaret Reed 60 00 

Julia McCarthy 275 00 

Edith Ginns 347 20 

Margaret Quimby 275 00 

Pauline Berthold 275 00 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal 264 76 

E. Tuttle, wood 31 00 

W. E. Woodward, sawing wood 3 00 

G. C. Turner, janitor 282 50 

G. C. Turner, cleaning 20 30 

G. C. Turner, janitor, Central hall 15 00 

G. C. Turner, cleaning, Central hall 5 00 

J. Louise Long, musical instruction 20 31 

E. N. C. Barnes, musical instruction 35 00 

W. L. Adams, drawing instruction 11 25 

$2,364 32 
West School. 

Paid Harriet H. Gardner $469 00 

Rose O'Toole 120 00 

Ada Harris 132 00 

Mollie Freeman 300 00 

Jennie E. Stowell 300 00 

Mollie Freeman 5 50 

Hall Bros., wood 11 25 

Thos. Scanlon, janitor 141 67 

Thos. Scanlon, cleaning 27 50 

Moses Thompson, wood 13 50 

E. C. Parker & Co., coal 83 12 

W. E. Woodward, sawing wood 7 00 

J. J. Louise Long, musical instruction ... 20 31 

E. N. C. Barnes, musical instruction 35 00 

W. L. Adams, drawing instruction 11 25 

$1,677 10 



Center School. 

Paid Martha Smith $472 40 

Minnie Gamble 444 00 

Ella Miller 482 00 

Asaph Parlin, janitor 142 00 

Asaph Parlin, cleaning 21 45 

■So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal 176 98 

Laither Davis, wood 17 25 

J. Louise Long, musical instruction 20 31 

E. N. C. Barnes, musical instruction 35 00 

W. L. Adams, drawing instruction 11 25 



$1,822 64 



Miscellaneous School Expenses. 

Paid Arthur Webber, Superintendent schools . . . $480 00 

Arthur Webber, postage and tel 10 00 

Arthur Webber, telephone rental 6 05 

Chas. J. Williams, postage, tel., etc 8 91 

E. F. Conant, school census 15 00 

A. Hosmer, printing 4 60 

Enterprise Co., notices 1 30 

News Publishing Co., notices 1 00 

C. H. Persons, tuning pianos 2 00 

J. L. Hammett & Co., brushes 19 06 

S. A. Christie, postage, tel., etc 13 14 

G. C. Turner, Truant officer 4 50 

M. A. Reed, Truant officer 4 00 

P. A. Merriam, graduation music 28 00 

Rev. H. G. Smith, speaker 10 00 

J. L. Hammett & Co., engrossing diplomas. . 1 00 

A. Hosmer, graduation printing 3 85 

American Woolen Co., electric current 3 00 

Dr. F. J. Barker, School Physician 25 00 

Dr. S. A. Christie, School Physician 25 00 

Dr. F. E. Tasker, School Physician 25 00 

Ella Hosmer, rent of Central hall 62 50 

$752 91 



40 



School Supplies. 

Paid J. L. Hammett & Co $173 77 

Ginn & Co 83 68 

D. C. Heath & Co 5 05 

E. E. Babb & Co 119 23 

Silver, Burdett & Co 101 98 

Walter Hadley 1 65 

Houghton, Miflin & Co 8 50 

W. B. Pierce 14 90 

Thos. Scribner & Sons 15 00 

Little, Brown & Co 3 20 

American Book Co 12 10 

Milton Bradley 51 99 

Esterbrook Steel Pen Co 4 80 

$595 85 

Thos. Scanlon, express $1 05 

W. A. Raynor, express 10 95 

G. C. Turner, express 35 

Geo. L. Noyes, express and freight 17 00 



$29 35 



$625 20 



Repairs on School Grounds and Houses. 

Paid Thos. Scanlon, repairs at "West" $32 65 

F. E. Harris, repairs at "West" 35 78 

L. T. Fullonton, refinishing blackboards at 

"West" 19 51 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., lumber for 

floor, "West" 53 30 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., repairs, 

"West" 13 25 

M. B. Wilder, wiring bells, "West" 11 75 

A. Vanderhoof, repairs, "West" 5 33 



41 

S. A. Guilford, tools "West" 1 20 

Finney & Hoit, 1 clock, "West" 5 00 

Finney & Hoit, repairs, "West" 2 38 

C. H. Mead & Co., repairs and paint, "West" 34 68 

A. Parlin, repairs, "Center" 22 27 

F. E. Harris, repairs, "Center" 24 10 

Geo. W. Daniels, Rep. bells, "Center" 1 00 

Waldo Lapham, labor, "Center" 9 00 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., flooring, 

"Center" 46 65 

E. A. Phalen, labor, "Center" 1 60 

M. A. Reed, cleaning vault, "Center" 5 25 

M. E. Taylor & Co., paint, etc., "Center". . . 23 58 

J. L. Hammett & Co., 1 flag 1 20 

1 silk flag 4 25 

A. Vanderhoof, setting up heater, "Center" 156 41 

L. T. Fullonton, painting, "Center" 206 41 

C. H. Persons, tuning pianos 6 00 

G. C. Turner, labor and teaming, "South". . 68 20 

Repairs, "South" 14 13 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., lumber 

"South" 11 19 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., repairs, 

"South" 335 87 

W. B. Pierce, repairs, "South" 75 

Jas. Byron, labor, "South" Ill 42 

Fuller & Warren Co., heating contract, 

"South" 2,115 20 

Jas. R. Cole, labor and team, "South" 231 00 

W. A. Suoro Iron Works, weather vane, 

"South" 15 40 

A. C. Piper, teaming, "South" 15 44 

J. J. Vandeveer Co., plumbing per contract, 

"South" 175 00 

F. S. Glines, labor, "South" 101 82 

John Gilbride, labor, "South" 58 44 

Sewell Jones, labor, "South" 11 43 



42 

Tuttle & Newton, repairs, " South" 10 3£ 

Waldo Lapham, cementing cellar, " South". 33 75 

C. W. Leach, labor, "South" 10 51 

James Simond, teaming, "South" 83 10 

M. B. Wilder, electrical wiring, "South".. 43 07 

Solon Robbins, stock and painting, ' ' South " . 23 00 

Solon Robbins, painting fence, "South"... 21 35 

Frank Priest, labor on fence, "South" 70 44 

Frank Priest, labor on building, "South".. 212 27 

Frank Priest, labor on doors, "South" 8 30' 

E. M. Dawson, moulding and wiring, 

"South" 1 30 

George Daniels, keys 50 

M. A. Reed, cleaning well 3 50 

B. F. Townsend, stock and labor 24 84 

James Cole, sand for walks 2 25 

J. P. Brown, repairs on tools 2 63 

A. Vanderhoof , hot air pipe 1 50 

American Seating Co., desks and seats 403 55 

B. & M. Railroad, freight on desks 8 99* 

American Seating Co., ink-wells 2 00 

L. C. Chase Co., floor dressing and brushes. 16 19 

J. L. Hammett Co., 1 flag 1 20' 



$4,972 41 



Transportation of Scholars. 

Common Schools. 

Paid George E. Greenough $544 00 

W. M. French 275 00 

Jens Mikkleson 532 00 

A. Christofferson 58 50 

$1,409 50 



43 

Gypsy and Brown Tail Moth Account. 

Paid Barney Rush, labor $472 50 

Fred Billings, labor 533 15 

A. H. Perkins, labor and expenses 390 60 

John H. Murphy, labor 549 05 

Harry Hartwell, labor 256 87 

James O'Neil, labor 510 00 

George McCarthy, labor 499 00 

Martin L. Brown, labor 510 30 

George Lawrey, labor 45 00 

William Duggan, labor 45 00 

William Harris, labor 79 90 

B. J. Ineson, labor 54 00 

Ed. Rush, labor 138 00 

William Charter, labor • 29 00 

John C. Keyes, labor 83 50 

Charles Dawsett, labor 67 40 

Fred Gilmore, labor 22 00 

George Wetherbee, labor 2 00 

M. Woodard, labor 2 75 

Moses A. Reed, labor and expenses 152 36 

W. H. Claflin & Co., burlap and twine 267 00 

E. C. Parker & Co., pruners 4 00 

Globe Stamp Works, badges 10 00 

Bowker Insecticide Co., supplies 29 10 

News Publishing Co., notices 1 00 

W. C. Robbins, use of team 45 00 

W. G. Hallock, supplies 3 75 

A. J. Wilkinson & Co., 12 poles 1 62 

Joseph Breck & Sons, supplies 7 49 

Enterprise Co., notices 2 10 

C. J. Williams, telephone, postage and 

express 10 68 

C. J. Williams, superintendent 70 00 

W. A. Raynor, labor and express 8 18 

Charles J. Jager & Co., supplies 3 00 

F. S. Sears, climbers 3 50 



44 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 5 10 

J. M. Keyes, supplies 9 00 

W. M. Farwell, supplies 20 75 

Boston Harness Co., supplies 7 20 

Electric Diamond Grinder Co., 1 grinder... 15 00 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 23 17 

A. Hosmer, printing 4 50 

W. H. Moulton, ladders , 7 50 

M. G. Hayes, painting ladders 1 25 

Prank W. Hoit, postage 13 00 

Frank W. Hoit, carfares, telephones, etc. . . 23 92 

C. E. Bailey, primers and poles 18 00 

C. H. Clark, 2 straps 50 

$5,057 69 

Received from State, on account of work $2,317 32 

Received from taxes 461 58 

Due from State highway work 601 63 

Due from State 1,053 96 

Due on account of unpaid taxes 516 75 

Roads and Bridges. 

Paid A. H. Perkins, labor $2,183 20 

A. C. Piper 1,317 80 

W. H. Kingsley 1,074 03 

Good Roads Machine Co., repairs 180 55 

W. H. Kingsley, repairs, etc 13 33 

Finney & Hoit, batteries, etc 10 50 

Vestal Oil Co., oil, etc 36 23 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., lumber, 

coal, etc 136 01 

Tuttle & Newton, gasoline and supplies 141 48 

T. F. Parker, tools 6 82 

J. P. Brown, repairs and blacksmithing 43 50 

Thomas McCarthy, posts 5 25 

W. W. Gordon, blacksmithing 7 20 



94 


50 


19 


40 


14 


13 


19 


66 


6 


50 


18 


30 


123 


34 


11 


55 


5 


35 


7 


15 


88 


13 


6 


24 


10 


80 



45 

L. E. Tice. teaming 

American Powder Mills, labor 

American Powder Mills, coal 

American Powder Mills, powder, etc. . . 

Moses A. Reed, teaming 

Ole Granberg, 366 loads of gravel 

M. E. Taylor & Co., gasoline and tools.. 

A. H. Perkins, 231 loads of gravel 

Isaiah Reed, 107 loads of gravel 

W. E. Whitcomb, tools 

X. H. Tenney, repairs 

Hall Brothers, belt lacings and repairs. , 
E. P. Gates, blacksmithing , 

$5,580 95 

Received from W. H. Kingsley, use of crusher. $100 00 

Road Commissioner, for stone 14 50 

Road Commissioner, street dust 3 50 

Road Commissioner, use of pump 1 00 

Road Commissioner, gasoline 33 00 

Support of Poor on Farm. 

Expenses per report of Overseers of Poor $1,583 36 

Received from farm products, per Treasurer's 
report. 

Outside Poor. 
Expenses per report of Overseers of Poor $773 75 

Received from Town of Concord $185 00 

Due from Town of Concord 20 00 

Due from State Board of Charity 43 75 



46 

Street Lamps. 

Paid Fred W. Green, care of lamps $259 20 

Valvoline Oil Co., gasoline and freight 28 36 

Fred W. Green, express 75 

Charles H. Mead & Co., supplies 80 83 

"Wayne Lawrence, care of lamps 120 00 

Everett Reed, care of lamps 60 00 

Harold Simonds, care of lamps 60 00 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 221 29 

Harold Phalen, care of lamps 109 00 

Harold Phalen, repairs 2 25 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 50 00 

George Lawrey, care of lamps 120 00 

George Lawrey, express 70 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 16 40 

Blair Light Co., repairs and supplies 27 45 

Finney & Hoit, supplies and repairs 26 03 

F. W. Hoit, express and repairs 1 71 

E. T. Rice, repairs and supplies 15 67 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 5 43 

D. C. Harris 4 00 

Simon Bresth, 1905-1906-1907 12 00 

S. L. Richardson 4 00 

Charles Wheeler 4 00 

Lyman Taylor 4 00 

H. W. B. Proctor 4 00 

I. F. Duren 4 00 

John Cahill 4 00 

L. T. Fullonton, 1906-1907 8 00 

F. B. Lothrop 2 33 



$1,255 40 



Printing. 

Paid News Publishing Co., 750 town reports and 

50 school reports $ 153 20 

News Publishing Co., warrants 3 50 



47 

News Publishing Co., ballots 10 50 

News Publishing Co., notices 

News Publishing Co., 25 warrants 

News Publishing Co., notices 

News Publishing Co., 50 voting lists 

E. F. Worcester Press, warrants 

E. F. Worcester Press, 25 poll tax lists... 
E. F. Worcester Press, warrants 

E. F. Worcester Press, warrants 

A. Hosmer, printing for Selectmen 

A. Hosmer, printing for Collector 

A. Hosmer, printing for Assessor 

A. Hosmer, printing for Treasurer 

A. Hosmer, caucus notices 

A. Hosmer, printing for Registrars 

$230 85 

Library Books. 

Paid Tabard Inn Library $41 15 

W. B. Clark Co 428 89 

F. B. Noyes 14 47 

W. H. Guild & Co 42 30 

William A. Wilde Co 5 84 

William D. Tuttle 1 71 



3 00 


3 00 


3 00 


14 00 


3 75 


13 00 


3 75 


4 50 


6 40 


3 75 


2 00 


1 35 


1 00 


1 15 



$534 36 



Library Expenses. 

Paid The Durea Binding Co $30 05 

A. Hosmer, printing 8 50 

S. Hammond Taylor, janitor 100 00 

Arthur Davis, librarian 115 00 

Dennison Mfg. Co., labels. 57 

S. H. Taylor, cleaning 3 00 

E. F. Conant, insurance 71 92 



48 



E. Z. Stanley, repairs 8 74 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co 56 79 

Charles Twitchell, carrying books 65 00 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 20 82 

S. H. Taylor, wood 4 50 

S. H. Taylor, trimming hedge 5 00 

William D. Tuttle ,express 11 20 



$501 09 
Cemetery Expenses. 

Paid Julian Tuttle, labor in Woodlawn $97 87 

N. G. Brown, labor in Woodlawn 71 75 

Asaph Parlin, labor in Woodlawn. 26 25 

Julian Tuttle, plants for Woodlawn 9 90 

Julian Tuttle, painting for Woodlawn 2 00 

Asaph Parlin, labor in North 1 75 

A. H. Perkins, labor in Mt. Hope 193 83 

Fred W. Green, labor in Mt. Hope 4 18 

H. T. Clark, labor in Mt. Hope 92 02 

Elvin Tuttle, shade trees for Mt. Hope 9 50 

H. F. Tuttle, laying out lots, etc 9 50 



$518 55 

Perpetual Care of Lots. 

Paid Julian Tuttle, care of Woodlawn $166 53 

H. T. Clark, care of Mt. Hope 60 00 



$226 53 
Fire Department. 

Paid West Acton department allowance $117 00 

South Acton department allowance 117 00 

Fred Green, cleaning West vault 1 00 

Knight & Thomas, 3 extinguishers 33 00 

E. L. Wheeler, watching fire 1 00 

$269 00 



49 



Police Department. 

Paid A. S. Bradley, court fees $94 75 

A. S. Bradley, constable 15 38 

Moses A. Reed, court fees 6 45 

Finney & Hoit, supplies for lock-up 55 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies for lock-up 72 

James Kinsley, court fees, 1906 1 59 

Moses A. Reed, constable 11 75 

Finney & Hoit, badges, club and twisters. . . 6 25 

A. D. Bradley, special duty 63 75 

M. A. Reed, special duty 3 00 

Geo. A. Libby, special duty 66 50 

A. S. Bradley, duty July 4 2 50 

John Lee, duty July 4 2 50 

Geo. Libby, duty July 4 2 50 

J. L. Richardson, duty July 4 2 50 

Will Kelley, duty July 4 2 50 

Geo. DeCoster, duty July 4 2 50 

M. A. Reed, duty July 4 2 50 

Pat Callon, duty July 4 2 50 



$290 69 



Received from F. H. Donnelly for special police 

expenses $200 00 

Board of Health. 

Paid C. H. Goldthwait & Co., supplies $15 60 

A. Hosmer, priDting 5 75 

A. Hosmer, printing 2 75 

Moses A. Reed, agent, labor and expenses ... 74 62 

Finney & Hoit, 6 comfortors 5 70 

W. J. Smiley, lost time on account of quaran- 
tine 64 63 

M. A. Reed, agent, expenses on Miner case. . 53 86 

W. E. Whitcomb, supplies for Miner family. 133 42 

Fred S. Whitcomb, milk for Miner family. . 25 60 



50 

Finney & Hoit, supplies for Miner family. . . 11 56 

F. H. Willard, medicines for Miner family. 4 20 

Hall Bros., wood for Miner family 20 81 

William Kingsley, wood for Miner family. . 6 25 

C. H. Mead & Co., supplies for Miner family. 4 40 
Florence Hall, services as nurse for Miner 

family 250 00 

Dr. F. E. Tasker, medical attendance on 

Miner family 159 40 

$838 55 

Due from Town of Concord, on account of Miner 

family $669 50 

Enforcement of the Liquor Law. 

Paid Edwin F. Knight, services in liquor cases 

1906 $44 58 

A. S. Bradley, services and expenses 11 85 

$56 4a 

Appropriated $500 00 

Town Buildings and Grounds. 

Paid S. Hammond Taylor, care of hall and 

grounds $112 45 

S. Hammond Taylor, care of flag 5 00 

S. Hammond Taylor, care of trough 5 00 

S. Hammond Taylor, care of clock 20 00 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal for 

hall 34 02 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., lumber for 

booths 1 97 

E. A. Phalen, repairs at hall 3 50 

George W. Daniels, sharpening mower 75 



51 



Fred Green, labor and moving booths, West 

Acton 1 80 

M. A. Reed, cleaning town hall vault 2 00 

A. S. Bradley, repair on pump, South Acton. 75 

Finney & Hoit, repairs on pump 2 00 

George H. Brooks, wood for town hall 3 50 

William Kingsley, wood for town hall 4 50 

Sam Jones, repairs South fire house 1 05 

Charles Edwards, mowing Common 2 00 

M. B. Wilder, wiring town hall and library 

per contract 348 00 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies for hall 15 42 

M. E. Taylor & Co., phosphate for grounds. . 3 40 

M. E. Taylor & Co., rope for monument. ... 1 20 

Ed. Rice, repair on pumps 5 35 



$573 66 



State Aid 

Paid Mary Wood 

Emma Blood 

Susan Clough 

Aaron S. Fletcher 

Ephraim B. Forbush 

Lydia W. Handley 

Mary A. Parlin 

Mary I. Richardson 

Mary Smith 

Addison B. Wheeler 

Walter O. Holden 

Bridget Mawn 

Isaiah S. Leach 

Almira L. Willard 

John T. Sibley 

Fred A. Norris 

Edward Willis 



$48 


00 


48 00 


48 


00 


48 


00 


48 00 


24 00 


48 


00 


48 


00 


44 


00 


48 


00 


48 


00 


48 


00 


60 00 


48 


00 


40 00 


8 


00 


12 


00 



$716 00 



52 

State and Military Aid. 

Paid 0. S. Fowler, burial of Warren Ball $58 50 

F. M. Bennett, nurse for Warren Ball 16 70 

Mrs. II. B. Fowler, board and care of War- 
ren Ball 55 00 

Town of Hudson, aid furnished Mrs. Lucy 

Wood 10 00 



$140 20 



Snow Bills. 

Paid W. A. Flint, February, 1907 
W. M. French, February, 1907 . . 

A. C. Piper, February, 1907 

A. Christofferson, February, 1907 
W. M. French, repairs on plow. . 



Salaries. 

Paid Aaron Foster, election officer 

J. L. Richardson, election officer 

Charles E. Smith, election officer 

Abram Tuttle, election officer 

Charles J. Williams, chairman, School 

Committee 

W. E. Whitcomb, Auditor 1905-1906 

Brooks Parker, election officer 

W. F. Kelley, election officer 

James Kinsley, election officer 

Fred S. Whitcomb, election officer 

John F. Coughlin, election officer 

E. A. Phalen, election officer 

Horace F. Tuttle, election officer 

Lyman C. Taylor, election officer 

Abram Tuttle, election officer 

H. J. Hapgood, election officer 



$3 19 


9 


03 


10 


28 


15 


78 


2 


20 



$40 48 



$2 50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


71 


50 


12 


00 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 


2 


50 



53 

James McGreen, election officer 

■S. F. Newton, election officer 

William F. Stevens, chairman, Assessors . . . 

H. E. Clough, Assessor 

James B. Tuttle, Assessor 

H. F. Tuttle, Town Clerk 

H. F. Tuttle, election officer 

O. A. Knowlton, chairman, Overseers of Poor, 

J. S. Moore, Overseer of Poor 

W. F. Kelley, Overseer of Poor 

H. F. Tuttle, Registrar of voters 

James McGreen, Registrar 

S. A. Guilford, Registrar 

Fritz Hawes, Registrar 

Frank W. Hoit, chairman, of Selectmen. . . . 

Bertram D. Hall, Selectman 

James B. Tuttle, Selectman 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, Treasurer 

D. J. Wetherbee, Est., collecting taxes 1903. 
D. J. Wetherbee, Est., collecting taxes 1904. 

D. J. Wetherbee, Est., collecting taxes 1905. 
William F. Stevens, collecting taxes 1903... 
William F. Stevens, collecting taxes 1904... 
William F. Stevens, collecting taxes, 1905. . . 
William F. Stevens, collecting taxes 1906... 
William F. Stevens, collecting taxes 1907... 

$1,339 90 

Loans and Interest. 

Paid First National Bank of Ayer, note $3,000 00 

Interest on note, 3 months at 4 percent 30 00* 

E. Jones, Est., interest at 4 percent on note 

to March 1, 1908 103 11 

F. C. Hayward, interest on cemetery fund ... 17 50 
M. Medora Tuttle, interest on cemetery fund, 8 75 

$3,159 36 



2 


50 


2 


50 


75 


00 


55 00 


55 


00 


30 00 


2 


50 


50 


00 


25 


00 


20 


00 


15 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 00 


125 


00 


50 


00 


50 00 


125 


00 


38 


05 


14 


54 


209 


22 




25 




28 


5 


12 


20 


65 


214 


79 



54 



Miscellaneous Accounts. 

Paid George B. Parker, for Memorial Day 

Finney & Hoit, flags for Memorial Day 

D. C. Harris, stone for Pilgrim monument, 
Provincetown 

D. C. Harris, freight on stone 

Hobbs & Warren, Assessors' books 

M. A. Reed, labor for Tree Warden 

Horace J. Stevens, stock list for Assessors. . 
Joslin & Mendum, legal work for South 

bridge job 

Joslin & Mendum, legal work for North 

bridge job 

Joslin & Mendum, legal advice to Board of 

Health 

Joslin & Mendum, legal advice relating to 

Assessors 

Joslin & Mendum, legal advice to Collector. 

Universalist Society, rent of vestry 

Moses A. Reed, inspection of animals 

George A. Sanderson, legal work on O'Neil- 

Coughlin case 

Francis G. Hayes, legal work and settlement 

of 'Neil and Coughlin case 

Mrs. Ella Hosmer, sand for South school- 
grounds 

E. F. Richardson, services as appraiser 

James Kinsley, use of Hurley road 

George C. Turner, opening rooms 

Dr. F. J. Barker, making returns of 7 births, 
Dr. S. A. Christie, making returns of 6 births, 
Dr. F. E. Tasker, making returns of 5 births, 
Dr. F. U. Rich, making returns of 4 births. . 
Dr. H. Hamblin, making return of 1 birth . . 
Dr. I. L. Pickard, making return of 1 birth. 
Dr. E. J. Alley, making return of 1 birth . . 
Dr. R. A. Daniels, making return of 1 birth . 



50 00 


4 50 


25 00 


1 08* 


7 75 


3 58 


3 31 



448 87 



50 


84 


10 


00 


25 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


51 


36 



100 00 

135 00 

400 00 

25 00 

8 00 

1 00 

1 75 

1 50 

1 25 

1 00 

25 

25 

25 

25 



55 

Horace F. Tuttle, collecting and recording 
28 births 

Horace F. Tuttle, recording 49 deaths 

Horace F. Tuttle, recording 20 marriages... 

Horace F. Tuttle, transmitting copy of re- 
turns of 5 deaths 

Horace F. Tuttle, surveying and bounds for 
South school-grounds 

Horace F. Tuttle, copying, carfares, tele- 
phones, express, etc 

J. K. Wetherbee, recording deed 

J. K. Wetherbee, postage and stationery. . . . 

Frank W. Hoit, postage and express 

Frank W. Hoit, carfares 

Frank W. Hoit, blanks 

Frank W. Hoit, team hire 

Frank W. Hoit, telephones, etc 

B. D. Hall, carfare and postage 

W. F. Stevens, copying valuation book 

W. F. Stevens, copying, postage, etc., for 

Assessors , 7 40 

W. F. Stevens, posting warrants for special 

meetings 4 50 

W. F. Stevens, postage, notices, election ex- 
penses 16 36 

W. F. Stevens, killing dog 1 20 



14 00 


9 80 


4 00 


1 25 


6 50 


17 45 


75 


10 93 


2 99 


10 57 


1 50 


3 0G 


8 10 


2 00 


5 00 



$1,589 09 



Receipts for Year Ending March 1, 1908. 

Balance due from Treasurer $8,380 56 

Balance due from Collector 2,803 37 

Apropriation : 

For Memorial library 600 00 

For roads and bridges 5,000 00 

For common schools 4,100 00 

For high school 2,300 00 



56 



For school supplies 625 00 

For superintendent of schools . . . 480 00 

For transportation 1,360 00 

For medical inspection 100 00 

For Memorial Day 50 00 

For extermination of moths 700 00 

For Town charges 3,500 00 

For overlayings 428 93 

Raised for State tax 2,320 00 

For State highway tax 142 68 

For County tax 2,046 77 

For crossing assessments 1,348 67 

Received from State Treasurer : 

Corporation tax 2,853 66 

National Bank tax 821 42 

State aid 644 00 

School fund 1,079 98 

Moth .work 2,317 32 

Street Railway tax 7 33 

Received from County Treasurer, dog 

licenses 402 32 

F. H. Donnelly, liquor licenses 1,300 00 

First National Bank of Ayer, loan. . . 3,000 00 

I. Reed, loan 500 00 

Supervision of schools .• 375 00 

Cemetery fund 700 00 

Lots sold in Woodlawn cemetery 35 00 

Lots sold in Mt. Hope cemetery 45 00 

Income of cemetery fund 193 98 

Income of library fund 241 60 

Memorial library fines 25 00 

Lyman and Industrial schools 77 50 

Town of Concord, board of J. Kerrigan, 185 00 

District Court, fines 27 65 

Inspection of animals 31 15 

Rent of hall 47 50 

Rent of hall and cellar 45 50 



57 



W. H. Kingsley, use of crusher 100 00 

Road Commissioners, stone, etc 52 00 

School supplies sold 7 16 

C. J. Williams, floor dressing 1 00 

C. J. Williams, old iron 4 80 

Town of Stow, 3 sets of book-keeping, 5 94 

Ely Gruber, peddlars' license 8 00 

A. F. Blanchard. slaughter license. ... 1 00 

M. A. Reed, formaldehyde 1 50 

Old junk. South school 82 

For repairs. South school 25 

Town farm, products 1,569 29 

F. H. Donnelly, for special police. . . . 200 00 

Interest on taxes 125 99 

Interest on deposits 148 47 

Gypsy moth taxes 461 58 

Street Railway tax, L. A. & M 36 28 

Street Railway tax. C. M. & H 17 34 



$53,983 31 



Expenditures. 

High school $2,608 04 

South school 2,364 32 

West School 1,677 10 

Center school 1.822 64 

Miscellaneous school expenses 752 91 

School supplies 625 20 

School repairs 4,972 41 

Transportation of scholars 1,409 50 

Gypsy and brown tail moths 5,057 69 

Roads and bridges 5,580 95 

Support of poor on farm 1,583 36 

Outside poor 773 75 

Street lamps 1,255 40 

Printing 230 85 

Library books 534 36 



58 

Library expenses 501 09 

Cemetery expenses 745 08 

Fire department 269 00 

Police department 290 69 

Enforcement of liquor laws 56 43 

Town buildings and grounds 573 66 

Board of Health 838 55 

State Aid 716 00 

Military aid 140 20 

Snow bills 40 48 

Salaries 1,339 90 

Loans and interest 3,159 36 

Miscellaneous accounts 1,589 09 

Total Selectmen's orders $41,508 01 

Paid JState tax $2,320 00 

Repairs on State highway 142 68 

Payment on abolition of crossing, 1,348 67 

County tax 2,046 77 

State, one-fourth liquor license.. 325 00 

Cash on hand 2,519 08 

Uncollected taxes 3,773 10 

$53,983 31 



59 

Financial Statement for Year Ending March 1, 1908, 

Due from Treasurer $2,519 08 

From Collector 3,773 10 

Town of Concord, account of 

Miner family 669 50 

Town of Concord. J. Kerrigan... 20 00 

State aid 716 00 

Inspection of animals 25 68 

Gypsy moth work. State highway, 601 63 

Gypsy moth work 1,053 96 

State Board of Charity 43 75 

Uncollected moth taxes 516 75 



$9,939 45 



Liabilities. 

E. Jones, Est., note $2,000 00 

I. Reed, note 500 00 

Cemetery fund 2,625 00 

Unexpended balance, cemetery fund. 216 98 
Unexpended balance, library fund. . . . 161 27 
Transportation high scholars for win- 
ter term, "estimated" 250 00 



$5,753 25 



Balance in favor of Town $4,186 20 

FRANK W. HOIT, 
BERTRAM D. HALL, 
JAMES B. TUTTLE, 

Selectmen of Acton. 
March 1, 1908. 



60 



LIST OF JURORS. 



The following names will be presented at the annual 
Town Meeting, March 30, 1908, to be placed in the jury box, 
subject to revision and acceptance by the Town. 



Franklin P. Wood, 
Emery D. Lothrop, 
Alfred Goding, 
Lyman C. Taylor, 
George C. Turner, 
Sidney L. Richardson, 
James B. Tuttle, 
Harry E. Clough, 
Fritz Hawes, 
Augustine Hosmer, 
Daniel H. Farrar, 
Charles H. Mead, 
Edward C. Wood, 
Arthur M. Whitcomb, 
Thomas McCarthy, 
Frank E. Harris, 
John McCarthy, 
Hiram J. Hapgood, 
Charles E. Smith, 
Charles I. Miller, 
Frank W. Bulette, 
Arthur Tuttle, 
William F. Stevens, 
Smith Finney, 

Signed, 



Minister 

Farmer 

Clerk 

Farmer 

Janitor 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Post Master 

Mechanic 

Printer 

Wheelwright 

Merchant 

R. R. Employe 

Clerk 

Farmer 

Carpenter 

Farmer 

Retired 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Carpenter 

Retired 

Merchant 



FRANK W. HOIT, 
BERTRAM D. HALL, 
JAMES B. TUTTLE, 

Selectmen of Acton. 



61 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



1907. 
March 12, Cash on hand , $8,380 56 

Receipts. 

State Treasurer, corporation tax 2,853 66 

State Treasurer, national bank tax . . 821 42 

State Treasurer, State Aid 644 00 

State Treasurer, income of Mass. School 

fund 1,079 98 

State ^Treasurer, for suppression of 

brown tail and gypsy moths 2,317 32 

State Treasurer, street railway tax . . 7 33 
County Treasurer, on account of dog 

licenses 402 32 

Liquor licenses 1,300 00 

First National Bank, tempory loan . . 3,000 00 

Isaiah Reed, temporary loan 500 00 

Supervision of schools . . 375 00 

Cemetery fund 700 00 

Horace F. Tuttle for lots sold in Wood- 
lawn cemetery 35 00 

H. T. Clark, for lots sold in Mt Hope 

cemetery 45 00 

Income of cemetery fund 193 98 

Income of library fund 241 60 

Memorial library, for fines 25 00 

Trustees, Lyman and Industrial 
school, instruction in public 

schools 77 50 



62 



Town of Concord, for board of James 

Kerrigan 185 00 

District Court of Central Middlesex, 

for fines 27 65 

Compensation for inspection of animals 31 15 

Acton Grange, for rent of Town Hall. 47 50 

For rent of town hall and cellar 45 50 

William H. Kingsley, for use of stone 

crusher 100 00 

Road commissioners, for broken stone 

sold 14 50 

Eoad Commissioners, for street dust 

sold 3 50 

Road Commissioners, for use of pump 1 00 
Road Commissioners, for gasoline.... 33 00 
Charles J. "Williams, for school sup- 
plies sold 7 16 

Charles J. Williams, for floor dressing 

sold 1 00 

Charles J. Williams, for old iron sold. 4 80 
Town of Stow, for three sets book- 
keeping 5 94 

Ely Gruber, pedlar's license 8 00 

Arthur F. Blanchard, slaughter house 

license 1 00 

Moses A. Reed, for formaldehyde .... 1 50 

For junk sold from South school house 82 
For breaking collar on steam pipe, 

South school house 25 

For milk sold from Town farm 1,148 64 

Cows sold from Town farm 79 77 

Calves sold from Town farm 21 25 

Apples sold from Town farm 174 40 

Cauliflower Fold from Town farm 72 05 

Cauliflower plants sold from Town 

farm 75 

Poultry sold from Town farm 12 20 



63 



Eggs sold from Town farm 39 30 

Pears sold, from Town farm 5 25 

Parsnips sold from Town farm 75 

Potatoes sold from Town farm 4 45 

Corn sold from Town Farm 50 

Old iron sold from Town farm 5 63 

Bags sold from Town farm 2 50 

Labor, Town farm 165 

Telephone, Town farm 20 

F. H. Donnelly, for police department 

special duties 200 00 

Estate of D. J. Wetherbee, taxes A. D. 

1904-1905 93 91 

Wm. F. Stevens, collector of taxes for 

A. D. 1903 14 10 

Interest on taxes 1903 2 40 

Wm. F. Stevens, collector of taxes A. 

D. 1904 16 40 

Interest on taxes 1904 1 85 

Wm. F. Stevens, collector, taxes A. D. 

1905 310 65 

Interest on taxes 1905 30 72 

Wm. F. Stevens, collector, taxes A. D. 

1906 2,065 79 

Interest on taxes 1906 71 33 

Wm. F. Stevens, collector, taxes A. D. 

1907 21,631 47 

Interest on taxes 1907 19 63 

Wm. F. Stevens, collector, moth tax. . 461 58 

Interest 06 

Concord, Maynard & Hudson Street 

Railway, tax 1907 17 34 

Lowell, Acton & Maynard Street Rail- 
way,, tax 1907 36 28 

International Trust Company, interest 

on deposit 148 47 



$50,210 21 



64 

Expenditures. 

Paid State tax $2,320 00 

For abolition of grade crossing. . 1,185 49 

Interest 163 18 

Repairs on State Highway 142 68 

One fourth of liquor license 325 00 

County tax • 2,046 77 

On Selectmen's orders 41,508 01 

Cash on hand and in bank 2,519 08 

~$50,210 21 
J. K. W. WETHERBEE, Treasurer of Acton. 



Treasurer's Report of Money Received for care of 
Lots in Cemeteries. 

1908. Dr. 
March 1. To cash in North End Sav- 
ings Bank $2,175 00 

Cash in Charlestown Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank 1,000 00 

Cash in Warren Institution for Sav- 
ings . ./ 1,000 00 

Cash in Middlesex Institution for 

Savings 500 00 

Cash in Town Treasury, March 12,1907, 2,625 00 

Cash received in 1907-1908 700 00 

Unexpended balance, March 12, 1907. 198 20 
Income for 1907-1908 271 56 

" $8,469 76 
Cr. 
By cash paid Cemetery Committee for 

care of lots $226 53 

Cash paid F. C. Hayward 17 50 

Cash paid heirs of Varnum Tuttle ... 8 75 
Principal of cemetery fund, March 1, 

1908 8,000 00 

Balance of income unexpended 216 98 

" $8,469 76 
J. K. W. WETHERBEE, Treasurer. 



65 



Report of the Wilde Memorial Library. 

1908. Dr. 
March 1. To cash in North End Sav- 
ings Bank $1,000 00 

Cash in Home Savings Bank 1,000 00 

Cash in Middlesex Institution for Sav- 
ings 1,000 00 

Cash in Warren Institution for Savings 1,000 00 
Cash in Charlestown Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank 1,000 00 

Mortgage Bond of the West Shore 

Railroad Co 1,000 00 

Received for fines 25 00 

Received for interest on money in 

banks 201 60 

Received for interest on mortgage 

bond 40 00 

Town appropriation for books 200 00 

Unexpended balance, March 12, 1907. 229 03 



Cr. 

By cash in banks $5,000 00 

By Susan, Augusta and Luther Con- 
ant fund 1,000 00 

Paid for Books and Magazines. 

W. B. Clark & Co 428 89 

Tabard Inn Library 41 15 

W. H. Guild & Co 42 30 

P. B. Noyes 14 47 

W. A. Wilde & Co 5 84 

William D. Tuttle 1 71 

Balance unexpended 161 27 



$6,695 63 



$6,695 63 
J. K. W. WETHERBEE, Treasurer. 



66 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



I have examined the accounts of the Selectmen, Tax Col- 
lector and Treasurer of the Town of Acton and to the best of 
my knowledge I find them correct. 

W. E. WHITCOMB, Auditor. 
March 16, 1908. V 



67 
ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



Valuation May 1, 1907. 

Real estate (buildings) ' $965,085 00 

Real estate (land) 475,095 00 

Value of assessed personal estate 358,365 00 

Total vaulation $1,798,545 00 ^ 

Valuation May 1, 1906 1,816,845 00 

Decrease $18,300 00 

Rate of taxation, 1907, $13.25 on a thousand. 

Tax Assessed as Follows:* 

On real estate $19,081 72 

On personal property 4,748 33 

On polls 1,272 00 



$25,102 05 



Amount of Money Raised. 

For State tax $2,320 00 

For State highway tax 142 68 

For County tax 2,046 77 

For crossing assessment 1,348 67 

For Town grant 18,815 00 

Overlayings 428 93 



$25,102 05 



WM. F. STEVENS, 
JAMES B. TUTTLE, 
HARRY E. CLOUGH, 



Assessors of Acton. 



68 



COLLECTOR'S REPORT FOR 1903-1904-1905-1906. 



1903 Dr. 

Uncollected March 12, 1907 $15 20 

Interest collected 2 40 

Cr. $17 60 

Paid Treasurer 16 50 

Uncollected March 1, 1908 $1 10 

1904 Dr. 

Uncollected March 12, 1907 $17 63 

Interest collected 1 85 

Cr. $19 48 

Paid Treasurer 18 25 

Uncollected March 1, 1908 $1 23 

1905 Dr. 

Uncollected March 12, 1907 329 74 

Interest collected 30 72 

Cr. $360 46 

Paid Treasurer [ $341 37 

Charged to D. J. Wetherbee estate . . 3 07 

$344 44 

Uncollected March 1, 1908 $16 02 



1906 Dr. 

Uncollected March 12, 1907 $2,349 96 

Interest collected 71 33 

Cr. $2,421 29 

Paid Treasurer $2,137 12 

Uncollected March 2, 1908 $284 17 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR 

For Fiscal Year Ending March 1, 1908. 

Amount committed for collection $25,102 05 

Interest collected 19 63 

$25,121 68 
Cash paid Treasurer $21,651 10 

Uncollected due town March 2, 1908 $3,470 58 

Moth Tax. 

Dr. 
Amount committed to the Collector by the 

Selectmen $978 33 

Interest collected 06 

Cr $978 39 

Paid Treasurer $461 64 

Uncollected March 2, 1908 $516 75 

W. F. STEVENS, Collector. 



70 



REPORT OF ROAD COMMISSIONERS. 



Receipts. 



Appropriation $5,000 00 

Street dirt 3 50 

Broken stone 14 50 

Use of pump 1 00 

Gasoline 33 00 

Received of "W. H. Kingsley, use of 

crusher 100 00 



$5,152 00 



Expenditures. 



Cost of building 2,465 feet of stone road at Pow- 
der Mills : 

"W. H. Kingsley, for labor, men and teams $246 50 

A. C. Piper, for labor, men and teams 434 10 

A. H. Perkins, for labor, men and teams 760 42 

L. E. Tice, for labor, team 94 50 

American powder mills, for men 19 44 

Coal for roller 42 50 

Man to run roller 76 25 

Blacksmith 37 70 

Gasoline and oil 110 00 

M. A. Reed, teaming stone 6 50 

Repairs for crusher 115 00 

$1,942 91 



71 

Amount of material used, 1,284 tons of broken stone, 
492 loads filling. 

Building 550 ft. of stone road in South Acton. 

Wm. H. Kingstey, for labor, men and teams $75 50 

A. C. Piper, for labor, men and teams 31 50 

A. H. Perkins, for labor, men and teams 119 30 

Man to run roller 15 00 

Reairs, coal and gasoline 50 00 



$291 30 



Amount of material used, 240 tons of broken stone. 

Building 3,350 ft. of stone road from East Acton 
toward the center : 



Wm. H. Kingsley, for labor, men and teams $419 62 

A. C. Piper, for labor, men and teams 278 50 

A. H. Perkins, for labor, men and teams 691 50 

Blacksmith 20 80 

M. E. Taylor, gasoline and supplies 97 37 

"Repairs on crusher 45 00 

Man to run roller 60 00 

Coal 41 72 

$1,654 51 

Amount of material used, 1,553 tons of broken stone, 175 
loads of filling. 

Whole number of feet of stone road built, 6.365. 

Amount of stone used, 3,077 tons. 

Total cost, $3,888 72. 



VI 

For scraping, including the removal of 264 loads 

of street dirt $437 90 

County commissioners order, stone bounds and 

setting 15 25 

Graveling roads for which we used 797 loads, 
building and repairing fence, cutting brush, 
picking cobbles, cleaning catch basins, re- 
pairs and lumber for crusher, repairs for 
scraper, for tools, including all the small 
items necessary for the proper running of 
this department . . 1,239 08 

$5,580 95 



$5,152 00 

Inventory of Tools on Hand, March 1, 1908. 

Crushing plant $1,600 00 

One track 100 00 

One iron roller 275 00 

One snow roller 100 00 

Two road machines 150 00 

One sewer pump 40 00 

20 feet of hose 40 00 

One plow ; 30 00 

Small tools 10 00 

Watering cart 300 00 

2 gasoline tanks 20 00 

One steam roller 3,000 00 

$5,665 00 

We recommend that $1,500 be raised for widening the 
road in South Acton, as ordered by the County Commis- 
sioners ; that $5,000 be raised for the repairs of roads and 
bridges. 

WM. H. KINGSLEY, 
ANSON C. PIPER, 
ALBERT H. PERKINS, 

Road Commissioners. 



73 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Town of Acton for the Year 1907. 



The Board of Health submit the following report for 
the year ending March 1st, 1908 : 

Whole number of deaths recorded to December 31, 1907 49 

Number occuring in Acton 42 

Number occuring in other places 7 

Residents of Acton 44 

Residents of other places 5 

Other than an epidemic of Measles — 115 cases reported 
— all with the exception of one case in South Acton, occur- 
ing in West Acton and 10 cases of Scarlet Fever confined to 
two families in West Acton, our Town has been free from 
contagious diseases during the past year. 

The character and number of each as reported to the 
Board from March 1, '07 to March 1, '08, are as follows : 



Diseases 
Diphtheria 
Small Pox 
Scarlet Fever 
Typhoid Fever 
Measles 
Cerebro-spinal Meningitis 



This Board desires to call the attention of our citizens 



No. of Cases 


No. 


of Deaths 


















10 




1 


1 




1 


115 
















74 

to the fact that all contagious and infectious diseases — 
Measles, Whooping-cough, etc. — sometimes not considered 
serious enough to require the attention of a Physician, must 
be reported to the Agent of the Board by the House-holder 
and that all persons suffering from such disease must not 
attend school or public gatherings. Also to the fact that 
Tuberculosis or Consumption has been added by Statute to 
the list of diseases considered to be dangerous to the public 
health and required by Law, to be reported to this Board by 
the attending Physician or House-holder and subject to con- 
trol by the Board of Health. 

In dealing with the outbreak of Scarlet Fever this 
Board has been handicapped — as it was in 1902 during the 
Small Pox epidemic then prevailing — by not having at our 
command suitable Quarantine facilities. 

Considering the disadvantages under which we labored 
the fact that a disease of this character was successfully 
confined to the two families in which it originated shows 
wonderfully prompt and thorough work on the part of the 
attending physician aud our most efficient agent of the 
board. 

The difficulty which the Board experienced in comforta- 
bly housing the family of Mr. Miner during the time neces- 
sarily occupied in cleaning and fumigating the premises 
where the greater number of the cases (8) were confined dur- 
ing their illness should induce the voters of this Town to 
seriously consider some plan to aid us in our work. 

The arbitary condemning and seizure of property for 
quarantine purposes which might under certain circum- 
edly be a much more expensive procedure for the tax payers 
than the erection and maintenance of an adequate quarantine 
station for such emergencies. As we are now situated we 
have absolutely no means of efficiently carrying out pro- 
visions of certain laws of this state that say we must — not 
may — but must protect our citizens from the ravages of con- 
tagious diseases that may at any time be brought into our 



75 

midst. You all want that protection ; You all look to this 
Board for such protection : then why not as individuals, 
interested in the health of your own immediate family and 
collectively as voters interested in the welfare of the Town 
give this Board something to work with ? 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES J. WILLIAMS, 
F. E. TASKER, M. D. 
P. J. BARKER, M. D. 



76 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF POOR. 



Inventory of Stock and Provisions on Hand, March 1, 1908. 

11 cows $550 00 

2 heifers 50 00 

15 tons hay 270 00 

2 horses 300 00 

Double harness 20 00 

Express harness 15 00 

Light harness 3 00 

Horse collars 7 00 

Express wagon 85 00 

Hay wagon 25 00 

Wood wagon and rack 110 00 

2 sleds 80 00 

Farming tools 10 00 

Grain 6 00 

1 Two-horse cart 25 00 

Horse rake 3 00 

2 harrows 38 00 

1 iron collar 1 25 

Cultivator 4 00 

7 ladders 12 00 

Wheelbarrow 3 00 

Hay cutter 2 00 

Hay fork 20 00 

Roller .. 4 00 

Sail-cloth 1 00 

Plows 25 00 

Feed trough 2 00 

Bush, boxes 1 80 



77 



Barrel boxes 

Corn on cob 

Pung 

Democrat wagon 

Baskets 

Apple barrels 

Watering trough 

Mowing machine 

Grindstone 

Spray pump 

Wood cut for stove 

Cord wood 

Saws 

Carpenter tools 

Wagon jack 

Saw clamp 

Ladder hooks 

Set measures 

Salt 

Lumber 

Barrel header 

Snow shovel 

Wrench 

52 hens 

45 bush, potatoes 

Soft soap and barrel 

Pork and barrel 

Apples 

Washing machine 

Horse's blanket 

Kange and water front 
3 rockers 

1 lantern , 

Couch and two easy chairs 

2 coal hods 

Lamps 

Soap 



11 


50 


20 


00 


5 


00 


30 


00 


1 


50 


2 


00 


5 


00 


32 


00 


4 


00 


8 


00 


24 


00 


94 


50 




50 


6 


00 


1 


50 


1 


00 




60 


1 


00 




50 


3 


00 


1 


00 




50 




75 


39 


00 


45 


00 


5 


00 


2 


50 


6 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


60 00 


3 


00 




90 


18 


00 




50 


2 50 




25 



78 



Molasses 

1 axe 

Stone drag 

Grass seed 

Keg lime 

100 lbs. oyster shells .... 

Tarred rope 

75 chicken wire 

Paint and oil 

Ton coal 

Lard 

Spice 

Butter 

Flour 

Sugar , 

Crackers , 

Fruit jars 

Brooms 

Crockery and tinware 

Tea and coffee 

Oil and tank 

Pail and tubs 

Tree pruner 

4 stoves 

2 cabinet chairs 

3 tables 

Ice 

Chamber sets 

Air cushion 

Beds and bedding 
Bed pan 

5 traps 

Trunks 

"Wheel chair * . . . 

2 clocks 

8 chairs 

Cereals s 



50 


25 


2 50 


1 00 


80 


75 


80 


2 85 


1 50 


7 00 


25 


30 


1 75 


3 50 


30 


25 


3 25 


50 


•9 00 


50 


1 60 


3 00 


1 00 


15 00 


2 00 


5 50 


25 00 


12 00 


1 00 


70 00 


3 00 


1 50 


2 00 


22 00 


6 00 


4 00 


75 



79 

Bread mixer 2 00 

Clothes line 75 

Refrigerator 18 00 

Ice tongs 50 

Vinegar 40 

Clothes wringer 3 00 

Meat chopper 1 25 

Pump 125 00 

Canned fruit 6 00 

Inventory, March 1, 1908 $2,485 35 

Support of Poor on Farm. 

Paid Chas. Calder, salary $366 74 

M. Thompson, 1 month salary 31 25 

Joe Pholix, labor 35 00 

J. S. Moore, meat and provisions 77 71 

W. E. Whitcomb, meat and provisions 3 21 

S. B. Ineson, fish 23 68 

M. E. Taylor, groceries and supplies 133 37 

C. H. Mead, groceries and supplies 115 97 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal 15 00 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., lumber, lime, 

laths and spikes 5 50 

E. C. Parker & Co., grain 214 66 

J. Cushing & Co., grain 214 25 

F. M. Hopkins, iron work and repairs 3 55 

S. A. Guilford, shoeing and repairs 20 32 

Fritz Oelschlegal, repairing express and 

carriage harness 2 25 

C. H. Clark, repairing harness and harness 

oil 90 

O. A. Knowlton, mail-box for Farm 1 00 

O. A. Knowlton, 1,250 lbs. fertilizer 17 82 

O. A. Knowlton, Cauliflower seed 5 00 

O. A. Knowlton, Ex. to Boston and Emp. 

office fees 2 79 



80 

L. W. Perkins, 2 cows 95 00 

Edw. Stanley, plumbing and repairs 2 75 

Edw. Stanley, repairing faucets 75 

Edw. Stanley, heater part for Erickson 

engine and labor on same 9 00 

Edw. Stanley, repairs on pump, stove and 

engine 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co 

Chas. Calder, two days ' work 

Chas. Calder, filing saws 

Chas. Calder, labor on Farm 

Chas. Calder, freight on boxes 

Chas. Calder, carfare to Boston for C. Kane. 

Chas. Calder, repairs on clock 

Chas. Calder, sawdust 

Chas. Calder, use of bull 

Chas. Calder, labor on ice 

J. S. Moore, boxes 

Frank Pratt, damage done by cows 

O. D. Fessenden, 35 barrels 

Mrs. Chas. Heath, boarding C. Kane 2 weeks 

Finney & Hoit, clothing 

Jackson & Bulette, pasturing 

H. L. Priest, use of bull 

Dr. Tasker, medical attendance furnished 

Michael (Dugan 10 00 

Dr. Barker, medical attendance furnished 

Susan Fisk 

C. H. Mead, steel plough 

C. H. Mead, wheel harrow 

C. H. Mead, grass seed 

C. H. Mead, chicken wire 

C. H. Mead, paint 

C. H. Mead, Farm furnishings 

C. W. Liveringston, soap 

O. A. Knowlton, postage and telephone. 
J. S. Moore, postage and telephone 

$1,583 36 



5 


20 


11 


01 


3 


00 


1 


00 


20 


65 




75 


2 


00 


1 


00 




40 


2 


00 


2 


00 




60 


1 


50 


12 


25 


8 


00 


6 75 


10 00 


3 


00 



10 50 


15 00 


23 00 


22 33 


3 57 


3 20 


2 17 


2 50 


1 50 


1 01 



81 

Expenditures $1583 36 

Interest on Farm 105 00 

Inventory, 1907 2,467 45 



Inventory, 1908 $2,485 35 

Receipts from Farm 1,569 29 

Due on milk 75 95 

Victualizing 7 tramps 1 75 



$4,155 81 



$4,132 34 
Cost of supporting poor on Farm .... $23 47 

Inmates at Farm During Year. 

Susan Fisk, 12 months. 
Jas. Quinlan, 8 months. 
Frank Harris, 3 months. 
Christopher Kane, 2% months. 
Michael Dugan, 1 month. 



REMARKS. 



To fill the vacancy caused by Mr. and Mrs. Thompson 
resigning last spring, the Overseers of the Poor were fur- 
tunate in securing Mr. and Mrs. Calder as Warden and 
Matron on the Farm. 

Although not experienced in the duties of the farm, 
they performed them faithfully and well and the Board were 
^orry not to be able to engage them another year. 

O. A. KNOWLTON, 

WM. F. KELLEY, 

J. STERLING MOORE, 

Overseers of the Poor. 



82 

Aid Outside Poor. 

Paid City of No. Adams, Mass., aid furnished 

Margaret Gough and family 219 10 

City of Marlboro, Mass., aid furnished Her- 
bert Rickaby 11 00 

City of Cambridge, Mass., aid furnished Mary 

Hill and family 73 31 

M. E. Ta} T lor, groceries and supplies fur- 
nished Mrs. D. Gallagher and family. . . 117 59 

M. E. Taylor, groceries and supplies fur- 
nished Geo. Brooks and family 104 00 

Jas. Bent, eight months' board furnished 

Jas. Kerrigan 40 00 

Mrs. D. Dean, board furnished Jas. Kerrigan 165 00 

Dr. Tasker, medical attendance furnished 

Bertie Gay Sleep 6 75 

Lemuel Sleep, care and board furnished 

Bertie Gay Sleep 15 00 

I. F. Duren, funeral expenses of Bertie Gay 

Sleep 22 00 

$773 75 



83 



REPORT OF THE TREE WARDEN. 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

The work of this department has been of the usual 
routine character during the past year. A few young trees 
have been planted near Mt. Hope cemetery and a badly 
inclined tree in West Acton has been brought to a vertical 
position, a young tree being planted near it in order to re- 
place it in the event that the "righting up" process shall 
prove a failure. 

As it happens the Tree Warden is also, by appointment 
of the Selectmen, the Local Superintendent of moth work it 
may not be out of place to say a few words here upon the 
subject of the important insect pests which have recently 
appeared among us. The brown-tail moth nests are found 
this year in decreased numbers in the northerly and easterly 
parts of the Town. In the southerly and south easterly 
districts there is but little change from the conditions of 
last year. Every effort is making to clear our trees of these 
pests. 

The gypsy moth has been kept in check in all parts of 
the Town, 'in the woodlands as well as in the orchards and 
among the shade trees. This year, as last every orchard 
and shade tree and every rod of woodland in the Town has 
been carefully inspected and the location of practically 
every gypsy moth egg cluster is known. The early colonies 
of this moth, found in Town in 1905, have been completely 
destroyed. 

I desire here to express my apprciation of the faithful, 
intelligent and efficient work done by the men of the moth 
department during the past year. 



84 

The San Jose scale has been the cause of widespread 
loss and destruction among the fruit and ornamental trees 
of this state during the past few years and has lately ap- 
peared in this Town. A very valuable bulletin upon the 
San Jose scale has been prepared by Professor Fernald of 
the Amherst Experiment Station and may be obtained, free 
of cost, upon application to the Station. 

An interesting paper upon the same subject by Profes- 
sor Stene of the Rhode Island College of Agriculture, etc., is. 
here printed for your information. 

CHARLES J. WILLIAMS, 

Tree Warden. 



NOTE — Upon application to the tree warden, or to a 
deputy tree warden by persons desiring to cut trees growing 
within the limits of a public way along their lands and out- 
side of village limits, such trees as the Town desires to per- 
manently retain will be marked, and a permit given to cut 
the remainder. 

Although the laws relating to the protection of shade 
trees have been annually published in this report for sev- 
erals years, a number of our citizens appear to be unaware of 
the fact that the old "spiked tree law" so-called, has been 
repealed and that under the law now in force all trees with- 
in the limits of any public way or place are public shade 
trees belonging to the Town for its use and benefit until such 
use and benefit is relinquished in writing by the Town 
through its agent, the tree warden. 

Any growth measuring one inch in diameter at the 
butt is a tree within the meaning of the statute. 

Deputy Tree Wardens. 

Moses A. Reed, Acton Center ; Albert H. Perkins, West 
Acton. 



85 

The San Jose Scale. 

Doubtless one of the worst insect pests with which the 
fruit-growers of the United States have to contend is the 
San Jose scale. It is scattered all over the country, from 
the Atlantic to the Pacific, and from the Gulf to the north- 
ern tier of states. This little insect, less than one-fourth 
the size of an ordinary pinhead is causing millions of dol- 
lars of damage to our fruit plantations, and hundreds of 
thousands perhaps to a variety of ornamental trees and 
shrubbery. 

In Rhode Island it is found in every section where 
nursery stock has been planted in the last ten or twelve 
years, and where special precautions have not been taken to 
guard against its introduction. Many of our people feel 
that it is a great deal worse than the notorious gypsy moth, 
but they should remember that we have not yet experienced 
a real attack of the moth such as it is capable of making, 
and that this pest is omniverous in its appetite, besides caus- 
ing a great deal of personal discomfort in crawling over 
and into everything, while the scale has very few food plants 
and remains unnoticed except in so far as it destroys the. 
trees. 

The scale is a tremendous factor and it is revolutioniz- 
ing fruit growing. The old-fashioned way of planting or- 
chards and expecting them to bear good fruit without care 
is disappearing. Fruit growing is becoming one of the in- 
tensive lines of agriculture. The professional fruit grower 
with a good up-to-date spraying outfit, a knowledge of how 
to spray and of other factors of culture and marketing, is 
going to succeed in spite of the scale, and we may perhaps 
be compelled to say, will succeed better because of the scale. 
There are vast quantities of facts and principles yet un- 
learned or undiscovered regarding fruit-growing, and the 
San Jose scale is a force that will compel the fruit-grower 
to learn many of them. The small fruit-grower and the 
householder who has only a few trees for his own use is the 
one on whom the struggle will bear the hardest, but even he,. 



86 

by adopting some of the principles of the large grower and 
substituting perhaps dwarf trees for standards, will be able 
to succeed. 

The San Jose scale was imported from China into the 
San Jose Valley, California, about thirty-five years ago and 
from there it has been carried all over the country in nurs- 
ery stock, almost before its dangerous character was real- 
ized. Unlike the Scurfy and Oyster-shell scales which have 
troubled the fruit-growers for a century or more, and which 
lay eggs in the fall of the year that hatch at some definite 
time the following summer, the San Jose scale lives over the 
winter in the larval stage, and after maturing in the spring 
produces young which hatch eggs inside the body of the fe- 
male. This process may go on for five or six weeks before 
the insect dies. The larvae soon settle down, insert their 
sucking tube into the bark and, in a few days, secrete a waxy 
covering or scale which protects them from injury. The 
young mature in about 35 or 40 days and then begin to give 
birth to a new generation. 

The Oyster shell and Scurfy bark scales can be treated 
with an ordinary kerosene emulsion at the time when the 
eggs hatch in early summer, and if thoroughly done, every 
one of the young scales will be destroyed. This method 
cannot be used for the San Jose scale. Solutions which 
would destroy the female scales would be too strong for the 
foliage of the tree. It is possible to kill the young larvae 
with the same solutions as used for other scales, but it is evi- 
dent from the life history already given that applications 
would have to be made once or twice a week throughout the 
summer in order to reach all that are born before they have 
time to form the protective covering. 

As the insect has few enemies, most of the young scale 
live to mature and reproduce and with the several genera- 
tions which appear during one season, it is possible for one 
female which winters over to have more than three billion 
descendants at the end of the season. This illustrates the 
force of what we wish to impress upon all who expect to 



87 

battle with this insect on fruit and ornamental stock, that 
spraying, as ordinarily carried on, is inefficient and almost 
certain to lead to disappointment and the idea that the scale 
cannot be controlled. A very few scales which may escape 
a careless application of the spray remedy may have progeny 
enough to lead the fruit-grower to think, when the fall 
comes, that the application of spray remedies the previous 
season was of absolutely no avail, when, as a matter of fact, 
he may have killed 95 percent of those wintering over. 

The precaution is obvious. Every portion of the tree 
must be covered with the spray to the very tips of the twigs, 
and from all sides. This can only be accomplished with a 
good spraying outfit. The first requisite is a good spray 
pump with which a pressure of 75 to 125 pounds can be 
maintained at the nozzle. If the Vermorel type of nozzle is 
used, this pressure will produce a fine, mist-like spray, which, 
if intelligently directed, will strike and adhere to all parts 
of the tree. As an illustration of the efficiency of a misty 
spray over a coarse one, notice how much more thoroughly- 
a tree is dampened by a heavy fog than by a brisk shower. 

The best remedy today is the lime-sulphur wash pre- 
pared as follows : Slake 20 pounds of good stone lime in a 
small quantity of hot water. While the slaking is in pro- 
gress, sift into the lime 15 pounds of Flowers of Sulphur 
and mix the mass thoroughly. When the ebullition has 
ceased, add 20 to 25 gallons of hot water and boil from 40 to 
50 minutes. Pour through a strainer having 20 to 24 meshes 
to the inch into a tank or barrel and add water, hot prefer- 
ably, enough to make fifty gallons. The mixture should be 
applied while hot, and if any of it is left standing over night, 
it should be heated before being applied. 

Where boiling is impracticable, a good spray mixture 
can be produced without it by adding five pounds of caustic 
potash to the lime and sulphur above mentioned when the 
slaking has ceased. This will of course make the mixture 
more expensive and it also renders it more disagreeable to 
handle. 



88 

When it is impracticable to make the lime-sulphur wash 
:in any of these forms, fairly good results can be obtained by 
the use of one of the miscible oil sprays now on the market. 
Scalecide, is one of the best of these and Kill-o-Scale is an- 
other which is quite highly recommended. These oil sprays 
mix readily with cold water and are very easily applied. 

To recapitulate : Fruit-growing is becoming a business 
which will require close attention and thorough knowledge 
of all facts and principles whereupon depend a successful 
fight against fungous diseases and injurious insects and the 
production of first-class fruit. Eternal vigilance is the 
price of good fruit, and we may well add, "To the victor be- 
long the spoils." 

The spraying must be done with good spray mixtures 
and up-to-date apparatus. The work must be thorough. If 
a wind blows, only one side of the tree can be sprayed. The 
other side must be treated when the wind is from the oppo- 
site direction. Have pressure enough to produce a fine mist 
as the spray leaves the nozzle. Cover ever spot on the tree 
to the very tips of the twigs. A good sprayer will do this 
without deluging the tree so that the liquid runs down the 
stem or drips from the branches. 

Use the boiled lime-sulphur wash if possible. If not, 
use lime-sulphur potash ; or one of the miscible oils. Spray 
as soon as the leaves have fallen in the autumn, and if the 
trees are badly infested, again just before the leaves come 
out in the spring. 

A. E. STENE, 

Rhode Island College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 
Kingston, Rhode Island. 



89 

REVISED LAWS. 
Chapter 53. 

Section 12. The tree warden may appoint and remove 
deputy tree wardens. He and they shall receive such com- 
pensations as the Town determines or, in default thereof, as 
the selectmen allow. He shall have the care and control of 
all public shade trees in the Town, except those in public 
parks or open places under the jurisdiction of the park com- 
missioners, and of those, if so requested in writing by the 
park commissioners, and shall enforce all the provisions of 
law for the preservation of such trees. He shall expend all 
money appropriated for the setting out and maintenance of 
such trees. Regulations for their care and preservation 
made by him, approved by the selectmen and posted in two 
or more public places, imposing fines and forfeitures of not 
more than twenty dollars in any one case, shall have the 
force and effect of Town by-laws. All shade trees within 
the limits of a public way shall be public shade trees. 

Section 13. Public shade trees outside the residential 
part of a Town, as determined by the selectmen, shall not 
be cut or removed, in whole or in part, except by the tree 
warden or his deputy or by a person holding a license so to 
do from the tree warden. Public shade trees within said 
residential part shall not be cut, except for trimming by the 
tree warden, nor shall they be removed by the tree warden 
or his deputy or other person without a public hearing at 
a suitable time and place, after notice thereof posted in two 
or more public places in the Town and upon the tree and 
after authority granted by the tree warden therefor. Who- 
ever violates the provisions of this section shall forfeit not 
less than five nor more than one hundred dollars to the use 
of the Town. 

Chapter 208. 

Section 102. Whoever wantonly injures, defaces or des- 
troys an ornamental or shade tree in a public way or place, 



90 

or negligently or willfully suffers an animal, driven by or 
for him or belonging to him, and lawfully in a public way 
or place, to injure, deface or destroy such tree, or whoever, 
by any other means, negligently or willfully injures, defaces 
or destroys such tree, shall forfeit not less than five nor 
more than one hundred dollars, one-half to the use of the 
complainant and one-half to the use of the city or town in 
which said act is committed ; and shall in addition thereto 
be liable to said city or town or other person interested in 
said tree for all damages caused by said act. 

Section 103. Whoever negligently or willfully suffers 
an animal, driven by or for him or belonging to him and 
lawfully on the highway, to injure, deface or destroy a tree 
which is not his own, standing for use or ornament on the 
highway, or whoever, by any other means, negligently or 
willfully injures, defaces or detroys such tree, shall forfeit 
not less than five nor more than one hundred dollars, one- 
half to the use of the complainant and one-half to the use 
of the city or town in which said act is committed ; and shall 
in addition thereto be liable in damages to the owners or 
tenant of the land in front of which the tree stands. 

Section 104. Whoever affixes to a tree in a public way 
or place, a playbill, picture, announcement, notice, advertise- 
ment or other thing, whether in writing or otherwise, or cuts, 
paints or marks such tree except for the purpose of pro- 
tecting it and under a written permit from the officers hav- 
ing the charge of such trees in a city or from the tree warden 
in a town, shall be punished by a fine of not more than fifty 
dollars for each offence. The tree warden shall enforce the 
provisions of this and the preceding two sections in towns. 



91 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 
For the Year 1907-1908. 



We present the following schedule showing the amounts 
of the several funds for the perpetual care of cemetery lots 
and the income and expenditures on account of each fund for 
the year. 

HERBERT T. CLARK, 
JULIAN TUTTLE, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Cemetery Commissioners. 



3 

ft 
O 

< 

o 
o 

Q 

Ph 

H 
H 






8061 'l qo«H 
punq UQ 




OWOlflMlflOOOTjKNiliOlMOlflOOOOOO 

iflHint»HMiniomo(Nwt-MOt-HO^w 

OHHO(N05HC0H(MmTtlH(N(M(MC0O>nH 
lOOOLOOT-HOOOOOOOOOOOOt-O 
•€£■1— I t— 1 (MlOHHHHIMHHHHHHH tH 


p9pu9dxg; 


OOOO<X>C0OOOOCXD<X>OOOOO(MOO 

wifliniflioooooifloooNOOOoifl^mo 

HCOCOHQOCOCOCOCCWCD^COCOCOCO(NCO(NW 


anioouj 


LOOOiOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO(MO 

HCOCOHl>l>COWCOCOI>COWWCOCOCOCO(MCO 


Z06I 'IT qojBH 
pnnq n() 


IOIOOOC5COOOO^OOUO(MOIOOOCOO 
(MHlCincDOOlOlOlOHOClOOlOlMHOWO 

OHHOMinnNHHWlOHHHlNINOlflCO 
U^OOOOHOOOOOOOOOOOOt-O 
•€©-1— 1 tH OQ lO t— 1 t— It— 1 tH OQ t— 1 t— 1 tH t— IHHr 1 tH 


p9;isod9Q 
^unouiy 


oooooooooooooooooooo 
oooooooooooooooooooo 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 
lOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 
•€£-t— 1 rH (MlOHr- It— 1 tH 03 t— I t— It— !t— IHHr 1 r-4 


1 


1 

Woodlawn Cemetery. 


Hepsabeth Piper 

Frederick Rouillard 

William W. Davis , 

Jedediah Tuttle 

Mary Skinner 

Nancy K. Handley 

Mary Severance 

Mary W. Chaffin 

Warren Robbins 

Henry Loker 

Henry Lothrop 

Luther W. Piper 

James Temple 

Fidelia Wheeler 

Wm. H. Chapman 

Mary A. Robbins 

Daniel Wetherbee 

James Tuttle 

Julia Morrison 

Elbridge J. Robbins 


^ISOd9Q 
JO 9^Q 


ClONND3COt-t»l>OOlOlOOOHHTHHN 

cooimasaoioioiooioiffioooooooo 
ooooooooocoocooooocoooooaiOiOjaiOiOiaia 

o~ co~ co" o~ o~ o" of o" co en co o~ of o" t*T of of 2 ^ cT 

CCt— 1 tOHH H t— IOIOIOIt— IC003i—l03 r ^030J 

5 a; 3 cu P, Oh « £ ^ Pnpj o oj =3 o £ 3 ^ a;^ 


| 'ON 


| 


t— ItHtHt— IrHT— ItHt-Ht-It-hOQ 



OHOMOt-OOC5(MN(NC5t>OOWNOMnCNHCOOO 
lOH(M^CCOiOt-t>N(N^COlOinOlOHO^I>HNHCOO 



rHtMOOmrHOt- 
O O O O 



_OCOlCHr-O^OLON^OCDNHlOO 
OOOuOOOOQiOOiOt-OUOiOOOt-OOt-O 



CO 

in 
in" 



Or-iOOOOb-OOUOOOOOOOO 

o h ifl lo w o to o o w o o o w w ifl m 

00t>COCO(NCOC0(Mr- 1 H W O H CO H CO CO 



o o o o 
in O O o 

in CO r-i ! 



oooocMOOomooo»nom(MOininoo(MT— icoo 
m w w lo co lc o w i> o w m t> in o co m o t- o io co w r- i co 

COCOWWCqcnCOCOHCOCOI>HCCHC<ICnQOHt>eOC<IC<lr- 1 



■ee- 



OfNOCOOONLOCr.OONCllMOLOONCNinO 
OtXMCOHrH(MM^Cit>HOiinCvlQLnrtCOat- 

r-iunOOinrHOCOOt-CMGOOi-^OCOOinO(MO 

ooooi>oooiooo»H»oomi>oiomoo 

rH rH rH iH rH i— i i— HHlfl iH r- CQ CXI r- 



&r 



© o o o o 
o o o o o 



o o o o 

o o o © 



iOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO© 
>©00©0©©0©00©©©00©©0 

©©©©©©©©©©in©©©©©m©©m© 

OOO«5OOO«5Ol0t«O»0i0OOt»OOt-O 

t— t— r- Hr-LO r- 1 ^ CM CM r- . r- 1 rH r-\ 



© 

co 

GO 

© 



© 
© 

m 

CM 

■ee- 



c 
.5 S 



£3 



-2 S 



— 

- 



d 

d 

c 

O 

cd 



00 










d 


a 

— 




Fh 


- 






(1 


_^ 


~ 




pq 


P 


— 


03 
ft 


- 


> 


OS 


cS 


rf 


laci 


H 


— 


> 

1-1 

.— 


o 


£ 


< 



cd 

s « 



cd 

ui d 

SI 



enf>n^^ 



CD o 

tic 2 

M 

o o 
OS 



d C5 
oS Si 

02kH 



,£> d ^ rj O'gH 

^ d g a cS 3 cc 



F-i 

CD 

CD O 

3 5 

s^ 

d d 

d c 
u u 

>< 



o 




+J 




larring 

Jones 

haffin 


CD 


~ =0 


d 


ary J. 

1 natha 
a than 


- 


- 

d 



c 



d © 

c72 73 



: d 



§S 



^K^H;dCb 



b c 



c\ic^csiT^r^Tr:^rti^T^inincocococococococot^t^b-t>-t~co 

©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©o©©©©©©©©©© 

© in go co~t>~in~CTTin~©~c>^TH"rH~in~oo"co"crrrH~©~^ 

(MrHrH (N n CM CO CO ri N H (M H CO H 

^ do cd a; ^ a^ d^^do3^,f35d^ &« §^3 9 ° «l2 



^c^co^ocot^coc^©^c<ico^incot--Qocri©'- | c>5cO'HHinco 

WWWNCqWNNWcOCOcOCOCOCOOOCOCOCO^^^^^H/^ 



OiniOMOOOOOOOWlCWtCHNNMOOHO 
OOOGOCOWOOOOCOLOHCD^t^Oir- lO CO ri M O 

l0C000OC0HHHH05Wt>Cit>(M(M(MOOC0HO 
C^# OOCMOOOOLOTjHiOrflOOOlOOOOmO 

•€©■ HWHr It— IHH i— I t— I i— I rH rH i— It— I i— I t— I 



CO 

C5 

LO 
CO 

of 

■ee- 



o o o 

gCOCM 



o o o o o 



o o o o o o 
10 uo lo lo to m 



o o 

LO U0 



CM CM CM CM CM CO CO CM U3 CM <M CM CM 



CMoOOOOOOOuOlOlOUOOOOUOOOCOi— I 

(Nicwt-cocowrocoHHinHcowcowcowmH 

■€©■ 1-1 



o 
o 

o 
co 

•€©■ 



COlOlOwOOOOOlClflOOW^HtXMCO 
"XXMOOCO^OOOOICCM^^^IX^OO^QO 

IOOh05t-OOOOh0000005HHHOC5 

t^i— loofMOCooiOTtjwwooowao 

-€£■ HLOr I t— I t— I i— I t- I i—l HHr It- I 



o^oooooooooooooooooooo 
oWoooooooooooooooooooo 

WqSOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

<&, HlOHHHrln i— ! i— It— I iH i— It— It— It— I t— I 



C/2 



a 

o 

g* 

W 

1 

O 



i-s 






03 e3 ^ 2 

.S ^ ko be 

^ c3 O O 
. f-i G) <X 



PI 

o 

02 

be • 

5 <D 



+= fin 



o^g 



." <X> 



<D 






a IS a 

^W O * 

I* I 8 



00 

o 

= 

c 



c/2 

cS 



CO 



<x> 






PI ^ 

o <v 
o . 



3« 



a 

PI 2 

o 5 S S . J2 ' . 5> Js . .'§3 



n3 



CO 

co^ o 
o §£ 

Sag 

-§^£ 

G C H 
P ^ be 

O o *h 

£^ £ 



COCOt>r- IrflTtlT^T^ThlTjHC^QOOCOCXl'rOOlCXlCXJr^T-C: 
CM CM CO HCMIMHCM i— t— i-i i— I CM 



bo be > 

P.O 









g^^^^^^^^^g^P^pr^S^^^^fe 



co 

CO 

CO 
CO 



CM 

CO 

Ci 
O 
CM 

cnT 



C 

c 



CM 

■err 



UOOTHiH^CMCMCMCMCMTtlTtiTtlCOUOlOCOCOCOb-b-CO 

c^ooooooooooooooooooooo 
cooioc^crio^csc^c^cio^o^ciCiO^cysc^ciC^ctcTiCTi 

T— It— It— It— It— It— It— It— It— IHHn i— It— It— It— It— It— It— It-^t— It— I 



H(NM^IC^I>C0050H(MCC^LCCDI>XCCt-(N 
i— It— It— |t— Ii— It— it— It— It— It— ICMCMCM 



Th ^ OS (M 
<M lO t- LO 

O O O O 

10 o m o 



CO 

o 
eg 



co 
c~i 
od 



o o o o 

ift O LO o 



i— ' (M rH CQ 



O 
O 



UO LO UO L0> 
t* t> l> t- 



■6©- 



N t' LO t> 



o o 

k_0 L-O 



Oi 



eg 

o 



CO 



*© 



o 

.2 
a 



o o o 
o o o 



o o o o 

LO LO LO L.O 



o 
o 

o 
o 
03 



o 
o 

o 
o 
o 
<xT 

■€©■ 



T3 
o3 

03 






i 

I 



— 

- 



SI'S* 

i 2^3 



CO CO CO r^ 

o o o o 

Oi C5 C5 Ci 



(M(N(Nr- 




- 






d d d S 

03 ce 03 pj 



i— I <M CO Tfl 



96 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 
OF THE ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY, 1907-1908. 



LUTHER CONANT, President. 

E. FAULKNER CONANT, Secretary. 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 
MOSES TAYLOR DELETTE HALL 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD CHARLES J. WILLIAMS 

L. A. HESSELTON FRANK R. KNOWLTON 



In presenting this report the Trustees would call your 
attention to the fact that since the library was opened to the 
public in 1890, a new generation has been born to enjoy the 
opportunities for education and self-culture that it affords 
its patrons. And it is from the constant new accession of 
readers that we look to see its influence widen and increase 
in the future. 

Five years have now passed since the death of its donor, 
the Hon. William A. Wilde, and as evidence of his far-reach- 
ing foresight and sagacity, we think we may truly say that the 
business that he founded, that the institution that he builded 
and endowed, and others that he helped to build and endow 
mighty engines for good as we believe, have continued to 
move on without the loss of a single throb in their pulsations. 

We know with what, a thrill of pleasure, Mr. Wilde, 
were he living, would have read in the report of the libra- 



97 

rian that the number of volumes on its shelves had gone 
above the 10,000 mark. 

We pay this brief tribute to the memory of Mr. Wilde 
that these younger recipients of his bounty, may not be 
lacking in gratitude for the magnificent gift not only to 
them, but to those who in their turn will come after them. 

We have a far less pleasant duty to perform in calling 
to the attention of some rude boys, who we regret to say are 
inclined to abuse the privilege of entering the book-room, 
that notices have been posted and that the librarian has been 
instructed to enforce these rules to the letter. 

No change has taken place during the year in the per- 
somel of the Board of Trustees or their assistants. We 
would request the Town to raise and appropriate the usual 
sums : $200.00 for new books, and $400.00 for current ex- 
penses of the library. 

Appended is the report of the librarian, Mr. Arthur F. 
Davis. 

LUTHER CONANT, 

For the Trustees. 



98 



Eighteenth Annual Report. 



Accessions — Number of volumes in the library, March 
12, 1907, 9,636 ; increase by purchase 489, of which 27 were 
obtained by binding magazines ; increase by gift 42. Total 
increase 531 Number of volumes in the library, March 1, 
1908, 10,167. 

Circulation — Number of days the library was opened, 
100. Number of volumes circulated, 5,669. Daily aver- 
age circulation, 56 : largest daily circulation 117, on Feb- 
ruary 29, 1908 : smallest daily circulation 16, on July 3, 1907. 

Received for catalogues and fines $25 16 

Expended for postage 16 



$25 00 

Gifts of books have been received from the following 
sources : U. S. Government, 9 ; State of Massachusetts, 27 ; 
City of Boston, 4 ; John H. Edwards, Brooklyn, N. Y. 1 ; J. 
H. Howard, Marblehead, Mass., 1. 

Periodicals subscribed for and in the reading-room, 22, 
viz : Monthly — American, Appleton's, Atlantic, Century, 
Cosmopolitan, Current Literature, Dilineator, Everybody's, 
Harper's, McClure's, Munsey's, National, New England, Re- 
view of Reviews, Scribner's, St. Nicholas, World's Work, 
World Today. Weekly — Harper's Weekly, Independent, 
Scientific American, Youth's Companion. 

ARTHUR F. DAVIS, Librarian. 



7 1ST ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

AND THE REPORT OF THE 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

OF THE 

TOWN OF ACTON 

Massachusetts 
FOR THE YEAR 1907-1908 



HUDSON, MASSACHUSETTS 

NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY. PRINTERS 

1908 



SCHOOL CALENDAR. 



Spring Term, 1908. 
High School. 

Term begins March 23rd, closes June 19th ; 13 weeks. 

Common Schools. 

Term begins March 23rd, closes June 12th : 12 weeks. 

Year 1908-1909. 
High School. 

Fall term begins September 8th, closes November 25th ; 12 

weeks. 
*Winter term begins November 30th, closes March 19th ; 14 

weeks. 
Spring term begins March 22nd, closes June 18th ; 13 weeks. 

Common Schools, 38 Weeks. 

Fall term begins September 8th, closes November 25th ; 12 

weeks. 
^Winter term begins November 30th, closes March 19th ; 14 

weeks. 
Spring term begins March 22nd, closes June 11th ; 12 weeks. 

*Recess, December 18th to Januarv 4th. 



102 



School Committee. 

Charles J. Williams, chairman, Term expires 1908 ; 

Samuel A. Christie, secretary, Term expires 1909 

Arthur F. Blanchard Term expires 1910 



Superintendent of Schools. 

Arthur B. Webber, Residence, Littleton, Mass. 



Truant Officers. 
Moses A. Reed, Geo. C. Turner, Thomas Scanlon 



103 



STANDING RULES. 



*Rule 1. Children under five years of age shall not be 
admitted to the public schools. 

Rule 2. Pupils shall be promoted from grade to grade 
and school to school, according to merit. Thorough and 
satisfactory work will be required of pupils in a lower grade 
•or school before entering a higher grade or school. 

Rule 3. Children who have not previously attended 
any school shall be admitted to the public schools only at 
the beginning of the fall term. 

Rule 4. Pupils will be held responsible for books 
loaned to them until such books shall have been returned to 
the teacher. 

Rule 5. No repairs shall be made upon the public prop- 
erty in the care of the school committee except by their 
■authorized agents. 

*When the birthday of a child falls on or before the 
loth day of the month it is reckoned as falling upon the first 
dav of that month. 



104 



EXTRACTS FROM THE STATUTES— REVISED LAWS. 



Chapter 43. 

Section 11. The several school teachers shall faithfully 
keep the registers of attendance daily, and make due return 
thereof to the school committee, or to such person as the 
committee may designate. No teacher of a public school 
shall receive payment for services for the two weeks preced- 
ing the close of any term, until the register, properly filled 
up and completed, is so returned. All registers shall be 
kept at the schools, and at all times during school hours 
shall be open to the inspection of the school committee, the 
superintendent of schools, the truant officers and the secre- 
tary and agent of the board of education. In reckoning 
the average membership and the percentage of attendance 
in the schools, no pupil's name shall be omitted in counting 
the number of such persons belonging to the school and the 
number of absences of such persons until it is known that 
such pupil has withdrawn from the school without intention 
of returning or, in the absence of such knowledge, until 
ten consecutive days of absence have been recorded ; but 
the foregoing provision for computing the average member- 
ship and the percentage of attendance shall not affect pro- 
ceedings against habitual truants, absentees or school 
offenders, or other persons, under the provisions of section 
one of chapter forty-four and sections three, four and five 
of chapter forty-six. A pupil who is not present during 
at least half of a session shall be marked and counted as 
absent for that session. 

Chapter 44. 

Section 1. Every child between seven and fourteen 
years of age, and every child under sixteen years of age 



105 

who cannot read at sight and write legibly simple sentences 
in the English language, shall attend some public day school 
in the city or town in which he resides during the entire 
time the public day schools are in session, subject to such 
exceptions as to children, places of attendance and schools 
as are provided for in section three of chapter forty-two 
and sections three, five and six of this chapter. The super- 
intendent of schools or, if there is no superintendent of 
schools, the school committee, or teachers acting under au- 
thority of said superintendent or committee, may excuse 
cases of necessary absence. The attendance of a* child upon 
a public day school shall not be required if he has attended 
for a like period of time a private day school approved by 
the school committee of such city or town in accordance 
with the provisions of the following section, or if he has been 
otherwise instructed for a like period of time in the branches 
of learning required by law to be taught in the public 
schools or if he has already acquired such branches of learn- 
ing, or if his physical or mental condition is such as to 
render such attendance inexpedient or impracticable. Every 
person having under his control a child as described in this 
section shall cause him to attend school as herein required ; 
and if he fails for five day sessions or ten half day sessions 
within any period of six months while under such control to 
cause such child, whose physical or mental condition is not 
such as to render his attendance at school harmful or im- 
practicable, so to attend school, he shall, upon complaint by 
a truant officer and conviction thereof, be punished by a fine 
of not more than twenty dollars. Whoever induces or at- 
tempts -to induce a child to absent himself unlawfully from 
school or employs or harbors a child who, while school is 
in session, is absent unlawfully from school shall be punished 
by a fine of not more than fifty dollars. 

Section 6. A child who has not been vaccinated shall 
not be admitted to a public school except upon presentation 
of a certificate signed by a regular practising physician that 
he is not a fit subject for vaccination. A child who is a 



106 

member of a household in which a person is ill with small- 
pox, diphtheria, scarlet fever or measles, or of a household 
exposed to such contagion from another household as afore- 
said, shall not attend any public school during such illness 
or until the teacher of the school has been furnished with a 
certificate from the board of health of the city or town, or 
from the attending physician of such person, stating that in 
a case of smallpox, diphtheria or scarlet fever at least two 
weeks, and in a case of measles, at least three days, have 
elapsed since the recovery, removal or death of such person, 
and that danger of conveying such disease by such child 
has passed. 

Section 3. Any child between seven and fourteen years 
of age who wilfully and habitually absents himself from 
school contrary to the provisions of section one of chapter 
forty-four shall be deemed to be an habitual truant, and, 
upon complaint of a truant officer and conviction thereof, 
may, if a boy, be committed to a county truant school for 
not more than two years, and, if a girl, to the state industrial 
school for girls, unless such child is placed on probation as 
provided in section seven of this chapter. 

Section 4. A child between seven and sixteen years of 
age who may be found wandering about in the streets or 
public places of any city or town having no lawful occupa- 
tion, habitually not attending school, and growing up in 
idleness and ignorance, shall be deemed an habitual ab- 
sentee, and, upon complaint by a truant officer or any other 
person and conviction thereof, may, if a boy, be committed 
to a county truant school for not more than two years or to 
the Lyman school for boys, and, if a girl, to the state in- 
dustrial school for girls, unless such child is placed on pro- 
bation as provided in section seven. 

Section 5. A child under fourteen years of age who 
persistently violates the reasonable regulations of the school 
which he attends, or otherwise persistently misbehaves there- 
in, so as to render himself a fit subject for expulsion there- 
from, shall be deemed to be an habitual school offender, and,. 



107 

upon complaint by a truant officer and conviction thereof, 
may, if a boy, be committed to a county truant school for 
not more than two years or to the Lyman school for boys, 
and, if a girl, to the state industrial school for girls, unless 
such child is placed on probation as provided in section 
seven. 

Section 13. Truant officers shall inquire into all cases 
arising under the provision of sections one and six of chapter 
forty-four and sectk>ns three, four and five of this chapter, 
and may make complaints and serve legal processes issued 
under the provisions of this chapter. They shall have 
the oversight of children placed on probation under the 
provisions of section seven. A truant officer may appre- 
hend and take to school, without a warrant, any truant or 
absentee found wandering about in the streets or public 
places thereof. 

Chapter 106. 

Section 28. Xo child under the age of fourteen years 
and no child who is over fourteen and under sixteen years 
of age who does not have a certificate as required by the 
following four sections certifying to the child's ability to 
read at sight and to write legibly simple sentences in the 
English language shall be employed in any factory, work- 
shop or mercantile establishment. Xo child under the age 
of fourteen years shall be employed at work performed for 
wages or other compensation, to whomsoever payable, during 
the hours when the public schools of the city or town in 
which he resides are in session, or be employed at work 
before six o'clock in the morning or after seven o'clock in 
the evening. 

Section 2. Xo certificate as provided for by sections 
twenty-nine or thirty-two inclusive of chapter one hundred 
and six of the Revised Laws shall be approved by any person 
for a minor under the age of sixteen years who intends to be 
employed in a factory, workshop or mercantile establish- 
ment, unless such person is satisfied that such minor is able 



108 

to read at sight and to write legibly simple sentences in the 
English language. 

Section 31. An age or schooling certificate shall not be 
approved unless satisfactory evidence is furnished by a cer- 
tificate of birth or baptism of such minor, or by the register 
of birth of such minor with a city or town clerk, that such 
minor is of the age stated in the certificate, except that other 
evidence, under oath, may be accepted in case the superin- 
tendent or person authorized by the sahool committee, as 
provided in the preceding section, decides that neither the 
certificates of birth or baptism, nor the register of birth is 
available for the purpose. 



ACTS OF 1906. 

Chapter 499. 

An Act Relative to the Illegal Employment of Minors and ta 
the Duties of Truant Officers. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. Whoever employs a minor under the age of 
sixteen years, and whoever procures or, having under his 
control a minor under such age, permits such minor to be 
employed in violation of the provisions of sections twenty- 
eight or twenty-nine of chapter one hundred and six of the 
Revised Laws, as amended by chapter two hundred and 
sixty-seven of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and 
five, shall for each offence be punished by a fine of not more 
than three hundred dollars, or by imprisonment for not more 
than six months, or by both such fine and imprisonment ; 
and whoever continues to employ a minor in violation of the 
provisions of either of said sections as so amended, after 
being notified thereof by a truant officer or by an inspector 
of factories and public buildings, shall for every day there- 
after while such employment continues be punished by a 



109 

fine of not less than twenty nor more than one hundred 
dollars, or by imprisonment for not more than six months. 

Section 2. Inspectors of factories and public buildings 
shall visit all factories, workshops and mercantile establish- 
ments within their respective districts, and ascertain whether 
any minors are employed therein contrary to the provisions 
of chapter one hundred and six of the Revised Laws and 
amendments thereof or additions thereto, or contrary to the 
provisions of this act, and shall enter complaint against 
whomever is found to have violated any of said provisions. 
Any inspector of factories and public buildings who know- 
ingly and wilfully violates any provision of this section may 
be punished by a fine of not more than one hundred dollars. 
Section 3. A truant officer may apprehend and take to 
school, without a warrant, any minor under the age of six- 
teen years who is employed in any factory, workshop or mer- 
cantile establishment in violation of the provisions of sec- 
tions twenty-eight or twenty-nine of chapter one hundred 
and six of the Revised Laws, and of any amendments there- 
of or additions thereto, and such truant officer shall forth- 
with report to the police, district or municipal court or 
trial justice within whose judicial district the illegal employ- 
ment occurs, the evidence in his possession relating to the 
illegal employment of any child so apprehended, and shall 
make complaint against whomever the court or trial justice 
may direct. Any truant officer who knowingly and wilfully 
violates any provision of this section may be punished by a 
fine of not more than one hundred dollars for each offence. 

Section 4. Inspectors of factories and public buildings, 
and truant officers may require that the age and schooling 
certificates and lists of minors who are employed in factories, 
workshops or mercantile establishments shall be produced 
for their inspection. A failure to produce to an inspector 
of factories and public buildings or to a truant officer an age 
and schooling certificate or list required by law shall be 
prima facie evidence of the illegal employment of any person 
whose age and schooling certificate is not produced or whose 



110 

name is not so listed. A corporation or other employer or 
any agent or officer thereof, who retains an age and school- 
ing certificate in violation of the provisions of said certifi- 
cate shall be punished by a fine of not less than ten nor more 
than one hundred dollars. 

Section 5. Police, district and municipal courts and 
trial justices shall have jurisdiction of offences arising 
under the provisons of this act. A summons or warrant 
issued by any such court or justice may be served, at the 
discretion of the court or magistrate, by an inspector of 
factories and public buildings, or by a truant officer, or by 
any officer qualified to serve criminal process. 

Section 6. Section thirty-three of chapter one hundred 
and six of the Revised Laws, and all other acts and parts of: 
acts inconsistent herewith, are hereby repealed. (Approved 
June 20, 1906.) 



Ill 



CO 

o 



Q 

W 

H 
Eh 

s 

CO 

W 

H 

l-H 



as 



r^ W 



-§> 






S^ 



la 



Eh £ 03 



S3 P 



eg o* 

4j '55 "S 

OJ BO N 



03 § 



PQ^ 



'y P a> 



^^P 



03 

bDr^ 
^ P 

O o3 
03 L-, 



w'^- 



<ag 



13 l5 ^ 

03 k^s g3 

dc c3 •;- 
1^ § 

S * « 

03 • a3 
T3 bC 

'£ p, fl 

^ O rt 






03 
C3 



^ p 
— PQ 



03 03 

c3 ^ 



XT. 

03 r 

P c3 



8?» 

C3 03 



«£S 






x< 



S3 

03 

-§* 

p3 1-3 

• P 
t> 03 



rP HH 

03 5 

DC pP 

o o 



r-j 03 ' 



03 

■p 9 

,=, +^> p 

-, £ 03 ^ 

*■£«■■§ 

^ £ • 

rP O °? ►> 



bJD^ 
t-> P3 

JS rP 

go 

S * 

03 



Ph 03 

SS a3 

° 0Q 



03 



03 C) 

cS 






03 o 

p 03 03 £ 

^ P £ r- 

W <! fe H^ 



03 
03 S 

C ^ 

o 
_- ^ 

b o 



DC ^3 

c3 E-t 

O 03 

c3.£ 

P P 
03 o 

K 03 



rO ^ flH 



^^ 



P 
P 



< 






>,^ 


<:3 






© 


c 


c3 
T3 


-P 

'3 


03 

> 




c 
c 


7C 


X 


p 

c 


(11 


CO 

p 


03 


DE 

h- 1 


X 

^ 


cp 


1 — 

eg 


ed 
be 


— 
Ph 


> 
p 


03 

DC 


> 


kH 




03 


P 03 

PhPh 



C3 ^ 03 

S ^ bC P >> m 
03 03 £ P 03 E" 

^£^•§03^ 
05 r EI N T 03 

b* S/ -^ IC u DC 

f> QC ^ U & O 

P 03 Qj ^ Hj 

O P 02 ^ 

eg j_ be =c « ^ 

o^<;goPH 



(MCOt>Cit>COCOHt>COt>OCOC3COWOaiCO'* 
(MNHN CQ (M tH NnH(M(M 



>s >* >^ >-. ^ Sh 
^i ^ ^i ^ c3 03 _ 

aj 03 c« cfi S 5-Sp 



4J -+J 

DC 50 

P 






H, H, H, ^ - - ^ ^ ^^^ ^ ^ ^ 



p p 



o3 co 03 ?3 r ?-' r .03^ 1 ^;'-^ hm^ ^pppp^^r-;'-; 



H(MOO^lOCOt-OOC5CH(MCO"*lOCONX050 
,HrHrHr-lrHiHr-l»HT-iTHCQ 



112 



09 ,—. 
03 N 

S rv. 



,P 
CO 3 >>'— ^ 

.Slfefe 1 



03 



fi 



09 03 

CO ^i 

a o 

09 pH 



09 
03 ^2 



03 

o3 O 



s 



cfl 



P^ o3 



£ a 



£^o 



09 



o S 



CO +j 

09 CO 



p ^3 p ^ 

03 P ^ Cfi^rrt 

o3 h-3 a3 as 



o 



*H H * S 

^ P ^ rH rZt ^O 'O 



o1p4fe 
§ p p 

2 rP ^ 



09 /- — s ' 

p ^ G 
03,3 '3 

A^p 

^C* 03 o 
• > fe 

P tfT* fl 
o3 q o3 

„ • Cxi * ^ 

09 CD , 

co o o3 *-< 



M 

o 

09 ^-s 

_Q CO 

C5J0"> 
P 03 



ife 



CD 

P 

m 



o3 

w 

p 

0= 



T3 TJ 
P P 
as c2 

p + 
.2 S 



09 o 

03 ^ 

••s 

p 

09 pP 
P 09 

<ri P o 
09O£ 

r^3 CP -S 

03=2^ 



p 

O 

c3 



09 

P 
P 

C2JD . 



p 
o 

'p 

P 03 
O^H 
f-i ^ 
c3 

cu 



co 



p 

O 

QQ 

CO o3 
£^3 p <j -p 

t-3 ^P ^H 

^ a r» 03 
o rp fe a 



^ 



,p 

o 5 

£ +3 >» o3 W 

13 o3 09 .S ^1 

K H (rt O 

2 P-S P P 

p 2 2 03 ,q 



6C 

09 

P 



P 
O 
CO 

p 
^.5 



09 



P^ 



p ° 
o?'p- 



lOH^(MOOOqcO«D(NCOCOHO(NOOCO 



CO 



1— IHH(MHH<M(N 



^, ^ ^ ^ tH 



J-t p ^ ^ £; 

09 o> Q9 09 09 



|L| h h 

09 09 09 

eg co 

^IpUph-2-2-2 333 > - 
<l<1cca2^000000^;QQQQ 



ggS0909O909O909fl r Pqqc! 
Si3J3ciOOOOO a; 09090909 



HfMCO^lCCOOCOOiOHlNW^lO^ 
C^<^(^C<l(^C^OQC^(>1COCCCCCOCOCOCO 



113 



SEVENTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the Citizens of Acton: 

The year just closing has been a somewhat eventful 
one in the annals of your schools. 

Early in the year we were notified by the inspectors of 
public buildings of the State police that the hall at South 
Acton, which, for several years, has served for the accommo- 
dation of the Grammar School, could no longer be used for 
that purpose and must be vacated at the end of the spring 
term. The number of children in the grades at South Acton 
imperitively demanded the establishment of another school 
there. Thus we were confronted with the problem of pro- 
viding accommodations for two grades, schools with every 
room in the school building occupied and no other building 
suitable for the purpose procurable. The Town was there- 
fore appealed to and at its meeting June 4th, it was pointed 
out to you that if the High School, which occupied the two 
upper rooms in the school building, could be provided for 
elsewhere the problem would be solved and the graded 
schools could be gathered under the roof originally designed 
to shelter them. After a long and very thorough discussion 
of the subject the Town voted unanimously to delegate all 
its authority in the matter to the School Committee. Your 
Committee did not ask for this authority, did not desire it 
and most unwillingly accepted the trust imposed upon 
them. 

Howeover, something must be done and someone must 
do it. If the Town would act only through its agent, then 
the circumstances signified that those agents should act and 



114 

act as seemed to them wisest and for the best interests of 
the schools and therefore of the Town. Four possible 
methods of action presented themselves for consideration. 

1st. The High School might be left in possession of 
the upper rooms of the school building at South Acton, a 
portion of the children in the upper grades there be sent to 
West Acton where there was a vacant room and the condi- 
tion of over crowding which had obtained at South Acton 
for years be allowed to continue for an indefinite period 
during which this condition would become steadily worse. 

The urgent needs of the graded schools at South Acton 
determined us against the adoption of this plan. 

2nd. The forty or fifty pupils of the High School 
might be placed in the single vacant room at West Acton^ 
under two teachers where pupils and teachers alike should 
work under the greatest possible disadvantages. Doubt- 
less such an arrangement would be entirely satisfactory to 
the State Board of Education and would receive its cordial 
approval both from an educational and legal standpoint ; it 
did not, however, commend itself to your Committee. 

3rd. An addition to the schoolhouse at South Acton 
of sufficient size to furnish the needed room for both the 
High and the graded schools might be built. 

This would require an investment of several thousand 
dollars and would, in all probability, permanently locate the 
High School in South Acton and in a place where it ought 
not to be in, in the same building and upon the same grounds 
with the graded schools. 

The last consideration together with the fact that the 
Town had on several occasions, during a period extending 
over ten or a dozen years, decisively refused to take any 
action looking to the permanent establishment of the High 
School in South Acton determined the rejection of this plan. 

4th. The High School pupils might be sent to the 
High School of a neighboring town. This plan, which 
insured suitable instruction, which involved no expenditures 
save for tuition and transportation, and which left the Town 



115 

free to recall these pupils to a home of their own here when- 
ever it should be minded to do so, was adopted and arrange- 
ments made for their reception in the Concord High School. 

Later, in deference to the opinion of the Town Counsel, 
the plan was so far modified that the first year class was 
provided for in the vacant room at West Acton, while the 
three upper classes were received in Concord. Now comes 
the attorney-general of the Commonwealth with an opinion 
that this arrangement is not lawful. 

Early in January we received a letter from the State 
Board of Education enclosing a copy of the opinion of the 
attorney-general and both this letter and the opinion are 
here printed for your information. 

January 10, 1908. 

Mr. Samuel A. Christie, Secretary, School Committee, South 

Acton, Mass. 

My Dear Sir : I enclose a copy of an opinion recently 
given to me by the Attorney-General regarding the statutory 
requirements for high schools. It would appear from this 
opinion that the Town of Acton, having 548 families, is not 
complying with the requirements of section 2, Chapter 42 of 
the Revised Laws. 

Very Truly Yours, 

Signed 1 GEO. H. MARTIN, 

Secretary. 

(Copy) 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Office of the Attorney-General. 

Boston, December 13, 1907. 
George H. Martin, Esq., Secretary, State Board of Education. 
Dear Sir : Your letter of December 11th states that 



116 

the State Board of Education desires my opinion upon cer- 
tain questions relating to the maintenance of high schools- 
by towns containing five hundred families or householders r 
as provided in Revised Laws, chapter 42, section 2. 
You inquire specifically : 

1. Is a town having more than five hundred 
families which provides only for instruction in the 
studies belonging to the first year of a high school 
course, and sends all of its pupils to another town 
for the remaining three years of the course main- 
taining such a high school as the law requires ? 

2. If the answer to this question is in the 
affirmative, may the school committee decide what 
part of the course shall be maintained at home or 
has the town a voice in the matter ? 

The statute in question is as follows : 
" Every city any every town containing, ac- 
cording to the latest census, state or national, five 
hundred families or householders, shall, and any 
other town may, maintain a high school, adequately 
equipped, which shall be kept by a principal and 
such assistants as may be needed, of competent 
ability and good morals, who shall give instruction 
in such subjects designated in the preceding section 
as the school committee consider expedient to be 
taught in the high school, and in such additional 
subjects as may be required for the general pur- 
pose of training and culture, as well as for the pur- 
pose of preparing pupils for admission to state 
normal schools, technical schools and colleges. 
One or more courses of study, at least four years 
in length, shall be maintained in each such high 
school and it shall be kept open for the benefit of 
all the inhabitants of the city or town for at least 
forty weeks, exclusive of vacations, in each year. 
A town may cause instruction to be given in a 



117 

portion only of the foregoing requirements if it 
makes adequate provision for instruction in the 
others in the high school of another city or town." 

I am of opinion that it was the purpose of the statute 
that the high schools therein provided for should furnish to 
such pupils as desire them complete courses of study in the 
several subjects designated in section 1 of said chapter, and 
in such additional subjects as may be required for the 
general purpose of training and culture, as well as for the 
purpose of preparing pupils for admission to state normal 
schools, technical schools and colleges. That such is the 
effect of the statute is clearly shown by the requirement 
that "one or more courses of study, at least four years in 
length, shall be maintained in each such high school," a 
requirement which obviously could not be fulfilled if a high 
school established in any such town provided only for 
instruction in the first year of the so-called high school 
course, thereafter sending pupils elsewhere for the re- 
mainder of such course. The provision to which you refer, 
that a town may cause instruction to be given in a portion 
only of the foregoing requirements, must, in my opinion, be 
construed to mean that complete courses in certain of the 
subjects required may be omitted, such pupils as desire 
instruction therein being sent elsewhere at the expense of 
the town to receive it. 

The answer to the above question being in the negative 
renders it unnecessary to consider the second inquiry sub- 
mitted by your communication. 

Very Truly Yours, 
(Signed) DANA MALONE, 

Attorney-General. 

At the same time that we were required to discontinue 
the use of the hall at South Acton as a school room we were 
notified that a heating and ventilating plant, together with 



118 

-satisfactory sanitaries must be presently installed in the 
South sehoolhouse, according^ a contract was made early in 
June with the Fuller, Warren company and the plant in- 
stalled during the summer vacation. 

In the spring a tract of land, containing about one acre, 
in the rear of and adjoining the South school-yard was pur- 
chased by a committee of the Town and has since been en- 
closed and cleared and partly graded. 

When the State Board of Education is not engaged in 
the serious labor of collecting statistics, it not infrequently 
occupies itself in doing, or attempting to do, an injury to the 
public schools ; hence the fact that the Town was, this year, 
very near to losing temporarily at least, its proportion of 
the income of the Massachusetts school fund, amounting to 
about $1,100, and would have done so but for the good 
offices of the superintendent of schools. 

The 'detailed report of the superintendent of schools is 
commended to your attention. 

The enrollment of pupils in the graded schools at the 
beginning of the school year, September, 1907, was as fol- 
lows : South schools, 137 ; West schools, 111 ; Center 
school, 86. For the high school : Concord, 36 ; West Ac- 
ton, 14. 

The establishment of another school in South Acton, as 
well as the increase in salaries necessitated by the enhanced 
cost of living and by other causes, compels us to ask a larger 
appropriation for the common schools. The sum of $375 
has been received from the State on account of salary of 
superintendent of schools. 

It is, of course, impossible to present, at the present 
writing and pending actions by the Town, any estimate of 
the cost of support of the high school during the coming 
year. If the present arrangements were to be continued, 
the cost would be approximately $4,200. The report of the 
purchasing agent and of the truant officers are appended. 



119 

Estimates for the Support of Schools for the Fiscal Year, 

1908-1909. 

For common schools $4,750 00 

High school 

School supplies 625 00 

Transportation of pupils 1,360 00 

Salary of superintendent of schools 480 00 

Medical inspection of pupils 100 00 

$7,315 00 

For the School Committee of Acton, 

CHARLES J. WILLIAMS, Chairman. 



Receipts and Expenditures on Account of Schools for 
the Fiscal Year, 1907-1908. 

RECEIPTS. 

Appropriation for common schools $4,100 00 

Appropriation for high school 2,300 00 

Appropriation for school supplies 625 00 

Appropriation for transportation of pupils 1,360 00 

Appropriation for salary of superintendent of 

schools 480 00 

Appropriation for medical inspection of pupils. 100 00 

Received from Massachusetts school fund 1,079 98 

Received from dog licenses 402 32 

Received from trustees Lyman school 77 50 

$10,524 80 



120 

EXPENDITURES. 

For common schools $5,864 06 

High school 2,277 37 

School supplies 618 04 

Transportation of pupils 1,409 50 

Salary of superintendent of schools 480 00 

Medical inspection of pupils 75 00 

Transportation of high school pupils 264 10 

$10,988 07 

Overdraft $463 27 



121 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Committee : 

Gentlemen : Herewith I submit my second annual 
report ; it is the 16th in the series of Superintendents' re- 
ports. 

Our creed is this, — We believe that the object of teach- 
ing is to prepare boys and girls for life. Preparation for 
life must necessarily go beyond the acquisition of the old 
three R's. It must include an acquaintance with the world 
in which living will be done — acquaintance with the world's 
good art and good literature, with its good music, with its 
history and geography, with nature and with civic life. 
In so far as a boy or girl fails to get this acquaintance just 
so far will his life be dwarfed and narrowed. Unless he 
gets it in school it is a matter of chance if he ever gets it. 

A still more important essential in this preparation 
for life is the awakening of the mind to realities. Things 
taught in the schools must be real : things presented vividly, 
and capable of being put to use outside school. Learning 
reached for and drawn in by the pupil will count for far 
more than learning crammed in by the teacher. Self 
activity should be the key note in all education. Indi- 
viduality must be fostered. Our work is to prepare pupils 
to live in a world outside of school, and we must hold fast 
to the idea that the primary object of our teaching is to 
enable the child to get along on his own responsibilities. 

In carrying out this creed certain lines of work have 
been attempted the past year which are, I believe, leading 
to the desired results. The work in arithmetic has been 
modified in the lower grades to introduce more comparison 



122 

and more individual thought. This work will be advanced 
by the introduction of new texts with the coming year, and 
a more decided improvement may be looked for with ad- 
ditional equipment in some schools in the line of measures, 
scales and weights — only a few rooms being now equipped 
for practical work. In one third grade a store has been 
fitted up with sand, blocks, and paper to represent merchan- 
dise, price lists, scale, measures, and toy money. The pupils 
are interested. They are learning real things ; they are 
learning arithmetic, too, they are learning it better than 
they ever did when it was taught abstractly and bore no 
relation to life. I am confident that one of the greatest 
needs of our schools today is the relating of all our arith- 
metic to life, so that figuring may follow, and grow out of 
actual business practice. 

To make our geography more real the pupils are taking 
imaginary journeys and corresponding with pupils in 
different parts of the world. Each grade is at work upon 
some special industry connected with their grade work in 
the subject, collecting specimens, pictures, descriptions of 
processes in the manufacture of the raw material and map- 
ping the areas of production, routes of transportation and 
centers of manufacture. Sand modelling and the making 
of relief maps are giving excellent returns in making more 
definite the ideas of land and water forms. 

The work in English in all grades seemed too technical 
and failed to produce the result which is to be desired, 
namely, a freedom of expression both in oral and written 
work. To remedy this the Guides to English and the 
Baker-Carpenter Readers were introduced. This step 
gives a wider range of material and offers an admirable 
scheme of correlation in the language work. The best 
preparation for writing is writing. Fluency comes first, 
correctness afterwards, and by giving abundant exercise in 
composition both oral and written, thus leading the child 
to see his own errors and correct them, we secure work 
which is greatly superior and far more lasting than by fur- 



123 

nishing outlines which must be followed, and returning blue 
pencilled papers. Throughout the work we strive to secure 
the closest correlation between the composition work and 
the lessons in literature, history, geography, nature study 
and personal experiences. 

In several classes the "book plan" is being developed. 
The idea here is that the pupil will be more interested and 
so do better in a real thing than in a mere exercise. Special 
papers in history, literature, science and geography are 
written involving not only the material found in the school 
books, but bringing in matter gathered in library research, 
magazine articles and many other sources. These sketches 
are illustrated by drawings, pictures collected from maga- 
zines, original photographs, and many are embellished with 
decorative initial letters, and head and tail pieces. Appro- 
priate covers are designed, and many pupils have taken 
great pride in the finished result. 

The work in music and drawing is now upon a thorough 
basis, and the results reflect the greatest credit upon the 
supervisors in those branches. The arrangement by which 
we secure the services of our supervisor of drawing is due 
to the enthusiasm of the man, and the helpful intercession 
of Mr. Frederic Burnham, the State Agent for the Industrial 
Arts. We have, I feel sure, established the value of good 
supervision and it is to be hoped that the Town may see 
its way clear to making such appropriation for the subject 
that we may be able to hold to the standard established. 
I invite your careful consideration of the reports herewith 
appended. 

The improvements in the South school have greatly in- 
creased the efficiency of the service. The change in teachers 
whereby the entire force was new to the situation made it 
difficult to get underway, but the work is now proceeding in 
a satisfactory manner. The usual expense of board for the 
teachers has made it difficult to secure teachers. Three 
teachers engaged, accepted offer before the school opened at 
places where living was less expensive, thus a severe handi- 



124 

cap was placed upon us in securing a corps of teachers for 
the opening of the fall term. 

The work of the intermediate grades is the least satis- 
factory, but improvement is beginning to manifest itself and 
in the majority of cases a satisfactory standard should be 
reached with the end of the year. The West school will suf- 
fer by reason of the epidemic of measles, which has seriously 
delayed the classes in their work ; many will undoubtedly 
be unable to make up the deficiency and will thus be forced 
to repeat the work. In view of this, I am considering the 
possibility of revision of the course of study to meet the 
semi-annual promotion idea. 

The high school problem remains in an unsatisfactory 
state. The course which we offer under the present condi- 
tions must be limited to a single line, so that upon going to 
Concord, the pupil finds his work definitely prescribed. This 
year the pupils entering the Concord high school were at a 
decided disadvantage, owing to the diverse lines of prepara- 
tion. We are now endeavoring to make the work meet the 
requirements of the Concord classical course. Since we are 
notified by the State Board that our action is illegal and that 
unless the Town furnishes a high school, we are liable to 
have the State fund money withheld, would it not be better 
to send all the high school pupils to Concord, thus opening to 
them the election of any course offered there ? The expense 
certainly would not be increased, and the legality of the ac- 
tion would remain unchanged. 

If the Town is to furnish suitable quarters for a high 
school, I would call attention to the opportunities offered by 
the present law relating to the establisment of agricultural 
high schools, and to Senate Bill No. 44, which if passed will 
open the fund now available only upon acceptance of agri- 
cultural high schools to those offering courses in mechanic 
arts or domestic science. Would it not be to the advantage 
of the Town to offer such course to those who have not the 
taste for collegiate training ? Under this bill, one-half of 
equipment and maintenance is reimbursed by the State. 



125 

The subject of music as a compulsory study in the 
•grades may not be clearly understood by many of our citi- 
zens. By the report of a committee of the State Board of 
Education in 1905, it was shown that 94.5 percent of all the 
schools in the State and 96.8 percent of all the pupils re- 
ceived systematic instruction in music. In the remaining 
places there is no systematic work because the scattered 
schools, mostly ungraded, make it impossible to secure pro- 
per supervision without too great an expense. 

Every subject in the school curriculum should hold its 
place there, because of some general and obvious need ; it 
should render some recognizable service. Does music meet 
the conditions f In the fullest sense music is a means of ex- 
pression ; it is the language of feeling. From its study we 
derive a developed sense of rhythm. The social results of 
this developed rhythmical sense are far reaching. It culti- 
vates a feeling for order, and regularity ; it helps to distin- 
guish between what is fitting and what is unfitting. With 
our prevailing condition of life there certainly is need to cul- 
tivate this power. Within its sphere, nothing that we can 
teach in our schools adds more to the joy of living, or con- 
tributes more powerfully to the creation of a refined social 
atmosphere than music. 

Can anyone learn music ? All supervisors agree that 
anyone given proper instruction and opportunities can reach 
a degree of proficiency as great and with as much ease as in 
other branches of the curriculum. A further development 
is found in the sense of harmony. This sense is daily per- 
verted by the discordant noises of the street and by the dis- 
regard for natural beauties. 

Again we find in the instruction in music, more perfect 
training of the ear, the eye, the hand and the voice. It has 
more than once been pointed out that civilized man in con- 
trast to the savage, tends to lose perceptive power. For the 
recovery of these neglected powers, music instruction rend- 
ers a peculiarly efficient service. It contributes a training 
of the perceptive senses without which, the other branches 



126 

can scarcely be taught to the full advantage. It must al- 
ways be one of the chief functions of music to minister to 
the social enjoyment. 

The excessive cost of living in this locality renders it 
advisable to increase the salaries of our grade teachers. A 
maximum salary of $15 per week ought to be met easily by 
the Town, and placing the teachers upon a merit system, 
making salary increase and the maximum dependent upon 
professional growth rather than length of service, we should 
be able to secure excellent teachers and retain them for sev- 
eral years. This is a highly essential point. Education to- 
day is not merely the pouring in of facts. It is not so much 
what we teach as how we teach. Abstract knowledge 
counts for little in life ; it is knowledge that is convertible 
into power that we want — ideas and ideals that shall be liv- 
ing in character. To secure this, the teacher must do more 
than cover a prescribed amount of reading, writing, number 
and nature study imposed from without. To make of every 
child the biggest measure of a human being that his power 
and his possibilities allow, the teacher must identify herself 
with the real instincts and needs of the child. This cannot 
be done in the first year. It takes time to get into the lives 
of children, and unless we can hope to hold our teachers for 
longer periods, we must expect to lose this most essential 
element in teaching. 

In closing, I desire to thank all the teachers and the 
members of the committee for the cordial support which has 
been given me ; and in the future as in the past, I shall strive 
to give my best efforts to the service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR B. WEBBER, 
Littleton, Mass., February 20, 1908. 



127 



Mr. A. B. Webber, Superintendent of Schools : 

Dear Sir — It is with pleasure that I submit the follow- 
ing report of the condition of drawing for the schools of Ac- 
ton, Mass. 

A systematic and logical course in the principles of free- 
hand, mechanical and decorative drawing are now in vogue 
in these schools. 

The course in drawing is planned upon definite prin- 
ciples to meet the mental condition of pupils according to 
grade. These principles as far as possible are to be demon- 
strated in original constructions in wood and metal for the 
development of hand skill and creative power. 

It is at this point that I desire the co-operation of par- 
ents as well as teachers, for the fact remains that unless we 
encourage and allow the pupil to work out these problems 
for himself, to a very great extent, will have the tendency to 
weaken his natural powers, and the subject matter, instead 
of having the dignity of a study, will be but another toy in 
the school course to tickle the fancy of pupils, teachers, and 
parents. 

In view of the results attained in these schools during 
the fall term, I anticipate no trouble in this direction. It is 
the exception in these schools that good, sound, definite pro- 
gress has not been attained. In some of the schools excep- 
tional progress has been demonstrated and I cannot speak 
too highly of the teachers' and pupils' work. 

In closing, I desire to thank the superintendent, teachers 
and pupils in their efforts to maintain a high ideal for this 
department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. L. ADAMS, 

Supervisor of Drawing. 



128 



To the Superintendent and School Committee: 

Gentlemen — The musical work of the schools has progressed 
in a most encouraging way during the year. 

Not only have the pupils been taught independence of 
thought musically, by use of the Weaver slips, and the fun- 
damentals, such as scale and note song singing, tune, rhythm, 
accent, etc., but they have also been instructed in the art of 
chorus singing under the direction of the teacher or super- 
visor. 

To know how to respond to the baton of the director is 
very essential to those who are to use the knowledge gained 
in the schools in adult choruses in later years. 

The response of the children in all the middle and upper 
grades has been most gratifying, as has also the interest and 
co-operation of the teachers. 

To work with the children has been a pleasure to the 
supervisor and judging by his reception the pleasure has 
been mutual. 

Much has been accomplished in laying a foundation for 
better and more effective work another year. 

My thanks are due to the superintendent and committee 
for unfailing courtesy and co-operation in the matter of 
supplies, etc. 

Hoping for even better things musically for the children 
of Acton in coming years, I am 

Yours sincerely, 

EDWIN N. C. BARNES. 
March 6, 1908. 



129 



ROLL OF HONOR, 1907. 



Harold Coolidge 
Hazel Hoit 



For Three Terms. 

Helen Robbins 



For Two Terms. 



Mary Benere 
Helen Bezanson 
Roger Brown 
Robert Cheney 
Earle Farrar 
Raymond Farrar 
Frances Foley 
Elizabeth Harris 
Natalie Leach 
Pauline Mead 
Bertha Mekkelsen 



Ida Mekkelsen 
Walter Morse 
Florence Prentiss 
Russel Quimby 
Hazel Robbins 
Muriel Sleep 
Nellie Shuyski 
Lena Stanley 
Fred Swett 
Varnum Tuttle 
Grace Welsh 



For One Term. 



Irma Brown 
Florence Cheney 
Willie Clifton 
Elizabeth Dailey 
Marie Davis 
Alice Evans 
Merritt Farrar 
Patrick Foley 
Ebba Fredrikson 
Gunar Fredrikson 



James Kinsley 
Theron Lowdon 
Hazel Manley 
Loren Mekkelsen 
Herbert Merriam 
Thelma MacGregor 
Aleada McNeil 
Margaret Moair 
Lauretta Moore 
Lena J. O'Connell 



Ella Fredrikson 
Ruth E. French 
Ralph Gates 
Lillian Gilmore 
Frank Greenough 
Edith Greer 
Isabel Greer 
Ethel Griswold 
Georgianna Griswold 
Ruth Hall 
Maud Harris 
Ray Harris 
Raymond Hayes 
Una Holden 
Francis Hopps 
Allen Hoit 



130 



Hardy Payson 
Roland Pipeman 
Everett Reed 
Kenneth Reed 
Harold Richardson 
Florence Schnair 
Harriet Schnair 
Richard Schnair 
Morris Shuyski 
Wanda Shuyski 
Mary Smiley 
Alta Teele 
Richard White 
Samuel Williams 
Helen Wood 
Florence Worden 



131 



STATISTICS FROM SEPTEMBER, 1906, TO JUNE, 1907. 



School 



Grades 





ft 












CO 

U 


G 
c3 


CO 
© 

P 

© 










P LO 




s 


© 


8 - 




0) 


< 






£ 


be 


be 


+3 

c 
© 
© 
Eh 


C£ LO 




08 


OS 




o 


Sh 


u 


DQ 


CO 


^ 


© 


tt) 


►» 


Pi 


a 


>• 


!> 


0) 


o 


W 


<1 


^ 


CL 


w 


5 






CO CO 

o 
PQ O 



05 
>. 

O 

pq 



o 



Center Primary I. -III. 
Center Intermediate IV.-VI. 

Center Grammar VII.-IX. 

South Primary I. -III. 

South Intermediate IV.-VI. 

South Grammar VII.-IX. 

West Primary I. -III. 

West Intermediate IV.-VI. 

West Grammar VII.-IX. 

High X.-XIII. 



34 

29 
22 
52 

48 
27 
43 
40 
27 
41 



32.90 
25.40 
20.90 
49.90 
40.04 
23.04 
40.80 
38.20 
21.40 
37.68 



29.30 
23.70 
17.88 
44.10 
35.83 
19.75 
35.30 
33.40 
18.10 
35.31 



89.06 
93.3 
85.1 
89.5 

88.8 

85.7 

86.4 

87.48 

82.1 

93.4 



11 
13 
11 
24 
30 
16 
21 
10 
12 
3 



23 

12 

8 

28 
18 
11 
22 
30 
15 
11 



7 
13 

7 

14 
30 
12 
11 

9 
11 

2 



16 
12 

7 

17 
18 
10 
14 
29 
12 

2 





1 






15 



Totals 



363 



331.26 292.67 



85.3 



151 



178 



116 



137 



14 



16 



132 



STATISTICS FOR 1907-1908. 



School 



Grades 





2 


o 

a 

C6 




2 




CD 


^ 




r^ 


r 




a 


CD 








R 


a 


< 


CD 






n 


O) 


CD 


be 


be 


^ 


c3 


03 


o 


*h 


Fh 


*H 


<v 


CD 


a 


> 


k 


H 


< 


^ 



Ct) 

o 

R 

R 
CD 



R 
CD 

bit* 



R uo 



CD 

eg 

1! 



Center Primary I.-III. 

Center Intermediate IV.-VI. 
Center Grammar VII.-IX. 
South Lower Primary I.-II. 
South Upper Primary III.-IV. 
South Intermediate V.-VI. 
South Grammar VII.-IX. 
West Primary I.-III. 

West Intermediate IV.-VI. 
West Grammar VII.-IX. 

High X. 



27 


25.2 


23.0 


33 


32.9 


31.3 


23 


22.7 


21.8 


33 


28.4 


24.6 


41 


36.3 


33.1 


32 


30.0 


27.6 


37 


32.2 


29.9 


42 


38.2 


31.9 


38 


34.6 


29.8 


31 


26.7 


21.7 


14 


13.5 


1 12.7 


351 


320.7 


267.4 



91.5 
95.0 
95.9 
85.1 
91.5 
92.1 
92.8 
83.3 
85.3 
80.1 
94.1 



27 
33 
21 
33 
41 
32 
33 
42 
38 
31 
5 



15 
33 
21 
11 
41 
29 
28 
25 
38 
31 
9 



Totals 



83.3 



336 



281 



00 

o 
o 

i 

o 



w 

w 

o 

W 
H 

o 

H 
CO 



02 
<U 

g 

C 


Acton 

North Acton 

Woburn ^ 

CO 

Needham cs 
South Acton 
South Acton 
Gloucester 
West Acton 
South Acton 
Portland, Me. 
Lawrence 


53 


Framingham Normal 
Woburn Training 
Gorham Normal 
Fitchburg Normal 
Fitchburg Normal 
Gloucester Training 
Ayer 

Fitchburg Normal 
Gorham Normal 
Boston University 


c 
"o 

ft 

< 


(M os irt t- CO t— l>- Ct L— t— CO 

OC5OOOOO00OOO 
03 OC OS Ofe OS CT. 05 CC CT. CT- OS 


u 
© 
Eh 


Martha F. Smith 
Ella L. Miller 
Minnie Gamble 
Pauline D. Berthold 
Julia L. McCarthy 
Margaret D. Quimby 
Edith Guins 
Harriet II. Gardner 
Jennie E. Stowell 
Mollie 0. Freeman 
Alice J. Maclntyre 


School 


Center Primary 
Center Intermediate 
Center Grammar 
South Primary 
South Upper Primary 
South Intermediate 
South Grammar 
West Primary 
West Intermediate 
West Grammar 
High 



134 



Graduation Exercises of the Acton High School, at Town 

Hall, Acton, Mass., Thursday Evening, June 20, 

1907, at 7.45 O'clock. 



1 . March 

Orchestra 

2. Selection — The Miller's Wooing Faning 

Chorus 

3. Invocation 

Rev. T. M. Miles 

4. Selection — The Heavens are Telling Hayden 

Chorus 

5. Address — "Expansion" 

Henry Goodwin Smith 

6. Overture — The Bridal Rose Lavalle 

Orchestra 

7. Selection — Columbia Beloved Dovizetti 

Chorus 

8. Presentation of Diplomas 

Superintendent A. B. Webber 

9. Selection— Bridal Chorus , . . Cowen 

Chorus 

10. March— The Chief Executive Heagney 

Orchestra 



135 



"Virtute non Verbis." 

"By Virtue not by Words." 



Graduates. 

CLASSICAL COURSE 

Ethel May Griswold, Harold Vernon Symonds, 

Ethel Elizabeth Thompson. 

ENGLISH COURSE. 
Ralph Waldo Piper. 



Colors : Cardinal and White. 
Class Flower : The Carnation. 



136 



School Census of 1907. 



Number of boys between the ages of 5 and 15 151 

Number of girls between the ages of 5 and 15 189 



Total 340 

Number of boys between the ages of 7 and 14 105 

Number of girls between the ages of 7 and 14 144 



Total 249 

Number of male illiterate minors over 14 years — 

Number of female illiterate minors over 14 years 2 



Total 



137 



TRUANT OFFICERS' REPORT 

For the Year Ending March 1, 1908. 



To the School Committee of Acton, Mass. : 

The Truant Officers submit their sixth annual report to 
the School Committee for the year ending March 1, 1908. 
The Truant Officers submit the following list of pupils looked 
up for the year, the cause of their absence, and if truants, the 
number that have been returned to school : 

Whole number of pupils looked up 15 

Cause of absence C. S. S. S. W. S. 

Sickness 3 4 

Kept at home by parents 2 2 

Returned to school 5 6 4 

Reported truants 4 

Yours respectfully, 

C. G. TURNER, 
THOMAS SCANLON, 
MOSES A. REED, 



Truant Officers. 



138 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL SUPPLIES. 



Report of the Purchasing Agent. 

To the School Committee : 

The following report of the expense account of this de- 
partment for the financial year ending March 1, 1908, is re- 
spectfully submitted : 

J. L. Hammett Co. 

Feb. 14. 6 packages sandpaper disks $ 75 

2 boxes Adam's pegs, No 475 32, 

$1 07 

Mar. 16. 1 dozen Mem. books, No. 1,430%. ... $2 25 

April 5. 10 packages No. 3 practice paper.... $3 00 
10 packages No. 1 gray drawing pa- 
per, 6x9 3 20 

1 pound No 120 rubber erasers 55 

5 packages blotters, 6x8 1 50 

1 dozen quarts Treasury ink 2 50 

$9 75 

April 24. 10 dozen No 140 note-books $2 70 

4 boxes Bl water colors 96' 

4 No. 6 brushes 20 

1 gross Dennison hooks, No. 25 27 

$4 13 



J 39 

May 6. 12 boxes Dennison hooks, No. 25 $3 24 

12 boxes Niagara clips 1 44 

2 No. 56 call bells 1 12 



$5 80 

Sept. 4. 2 pounds No. 120 rubber erasers .... $1 10 

6 boxes toy money 72 

15 packages white drawing paper, 

8xl0y 2 v. 6 75 

20 packages white drawing paper, 

6x9 5 00 

10 packages No. 1 gray drawing pa- 
per, 6x9 3 20 

25 packages No. 19 examination paper, 7 50 

15 packages No. 25 hectograph paper, 5 25 

40 packages No. 3 white practice paper, 8 00 

10 packages No 1 white practice paper, 2 00 

5 packages blotters, 6x8 1 50 

550 No. 140 note-books 12 38 

500 No. 12 spelling blanks 4 50 

10 gross No. 800 pencils 9 50 

5 dozen No. 30 rulers 1 00 

2 pounds No. 120 rubber erasers. ... 1 10 

1 dozen bottles Treasury mucilage.. 40 



$69 90 

Sept. 19. 1 dozen quarts Treasury ink $2 50 

Sept. 24. 400 report envelopes $2 00 

10 dozen Gem B. B. erasers 4 17 

2 Gem pencil sharpeners 6 00 

4 Congdon pitch pipes 1 50 

6 dozen No. 23 primary rulers 75 

1 gross No. 1,407 penholders 1 00 

1 dozen bottles purple hectograph 

ink 1 80 



140 



1 box No. 314 Estabrook pens 56 

15 boxes Bl water colors 3 60 

16 No. 6 brushes 45 

5 pans Devoe paints 11 

$21 94 

Sept. 19. 100 packages arithmetic paper $13 00 

6 dozen No. 30 rulers 1 20 

2 pounds No. 120 rubber erasers. ... 1 30 
2 packages Manila drawing paper, 

12x18 1 20 

10 packages Manila drawing paper, 

i 12x9 3 00 

500 Manila envelopes, No. 6^ 45 

% case Waltham white crayons 5 00 

10 packages No. 19 examination 

paper 3 00 

5 dozen No. 2 table cards 1 40 

5 dozen No. 9 table cards 1 20 

50 sheets wrapping paper 1 00 

$18 75 

Oct. 1. 6 boxes Bl paints $1 44 

1 copper ink filler 80 

5 boxes 1 oz. rubber bands, No. 27. . 60 

$2 84 

Nov. 1. 4 gross No. 724 B pencils $7 00 

Sept. 12. 1 dozen quarts Treasury ink $2 50 

Nov. 20. 100 sheets white Bristol board, 22x28. $3 50 

50 sheets Chockolate tag. 17x28 1 00 



$4 50 



141 

Jan. 10. 20 packages No. 3 white paper... 
10 packages No 1 white paper... 

1 pound No. 120 rubber erasers . . 

2 Alvine series, First Readers . . . 
1 Wentworth new school algebra 

Y 2 dozen medium brush holders . . 



Credit 



$4 00 


2 00 


55 


58 


1 01 


50 


$8 64 


174 57 


80 



$173 77 



Ginn & Co. 
April 10. 

60 Cach Codas, Xos. 135. 201, 240, $8 40 

1 Cach Codas, Xos. 199, 251, 264, 

266, 184 00 

$8 40 
Less 1-6 1 68 

$6 72 
Express 25 

April 23. 

4 Text Ed. Vergil $1 40 

Less 1-6 23 

$1 17 
Express 17 

Jan. 30. 

1 Weaver No. 1 $ 42 



$6 97 



$1 34 



$ 42 



142 

Aug. 1. 

12 Cyr's Primers $2 88 

24 Cyr's 2d Readers 8 64 

10 Cyr's 3d Readers 5 00 

$16 53 
Less 1-6 2 95 

Aug. 28. 

10 Jones 3d Readers $4 50 

Less 1-6 75 

Sept. 15. 

15 doz. Medial Writing books, 

No. 1 $9 00 

15 doz. Medial Writing books, 

No. 3 9 00 

12 doz. Medial Writing books, 

No. 6 7 20 

$25 20 
Less 1-6 4 20 

Oct. 12. 

6 Wentworth New School Algebra $6 72 

1 Wentworth New School Algebra 

Key 1 75 

$8 47 
Less 1-6 1 12 



$13 77 



$3 75 



$21 00 



$7 35 



143 

Jan. 14. 

42 New Ed. 1st Music Readers 
18 New Ed. 3d Music Readers 
40 New Ed. 4th Music Readers . 



Less 1-6 



$12 60 

6 30 

16 00 


$34 90 
5 82 



D. C. Heath & Co. 
March 27. 

4 Iliad $1 20 

Less 1-6 20 



$29 08 



$83 68 







$1 00 


April 13. 

1 McCurdy Algebra and answers 

Aug. 1. 


$ 50 


$ 50 


Biglow's Primary Number Man- 
uals 

Express 


63 
12 








$ 75 


Oct. 8. 

3 Frazer & Squires Grammar . . . 
Less 1-6 


$3 36 
56 










$2 80 





$5 05 



144 

W. B. Pierce. 
May 7. 

2 lbs. Mercury $1 75 

1 Drawing Kit 50 



June 12. 

Apparatus for Wireless Tele- 
graphy 12 65 



Silver, Burdett & Co. 
Jan. 31. 

63 Beacon Series, No. 192 $2 60 

Less 1-6 43 



$2 17 
Postage 15 



April 16. 

50 Beacon Series, No. 193 $3 00 

Less 1-6 50 



$2 50 
Express 15 



Aug. 9. 

125 Guides to English, No. 1 $56 25 

95 Guides to English, No. 2 57 00 

$113 25 
Lesi 1-6 18 87 



$2 25 



$12 65 



$14 90 



$2 32 



$2 65 



$94 38 



145 



Sept. 18. 




2 Guides to English, No. 1 


$ 75 


5 Guides to English, No. 1 


2 25 


Less 1-6 


37 







$1 88 



$101 98 



Edward E. Babb & Co 




Feb. 16. 




12 Tarr & McMurray Geog. Pt. 2. 


$4 00 


Jan. 21. 




12 Tarr & McMurray Geog. Pt. 4. 


$5 00 


12 Tarr & McMurray Geog. Pt. 2. 


4 00 


12 Silas Marner 


2 50 


Aug. 26. 




45 Albion Series 1st Readers 


$12 00 


52 Tarr & McMurray Geog. Pt. 1. 


17 43 


12 Tarr & McMurray Geog. Pt. 2. 


4 00 


32 Tarr & McMurray Geog. Pt. 3 


20 00 


7 Tarr & McMurray Geog. Pt. 4. 


2 92 


Sept. 27. 




3 Aldine Composition charts .... 


$16 50 


Less 1-6 


2 75 






Oct. 24. 




45 Albine Series 2d Readers .... 


$14 40 


Less 1-6 


2 40 







$4 00 



$11 50 



$56 35 



$13 75 



$12 00 



146 



Sept. 20. 



5 Tarr & McMurray Geog. Pt. 1 
3 Tarr & McMurray Geog. Pt. 4 
5 Tarr & McMurray Geog. Pt. 5 

5 Tarr's New Phys. Geog 

10 Larned Hist, of England . . . 



$1 00 


1 25 


2 08 


6 67 


10 63 



Charles Scribner's Sons. 
Aug. 2. 

45 Stevenson 's Readers 

Less 1-6 



$18 00 
3 00 



$21 63 



$119 23 



$15 00 



$15 00 



Easterbrook Steel Pen Co. 
Aug. 8. 

15 gross No. 702 pens 



$4 80 



Little, Brown & Co. 
Sept. 19. 

8 Algebra for Common Schools. . 
Less 1-5 



$4 00 
80 



$4 80 



$4 80 



$3 20 



$3 20 



147 

American Book Co. 
Sept. 27. 

21 Webster's Com. Sch. Dictionary $15 12 
Less 20 per cent 3 02 



Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
Sept. 27. 

10 Fiske U. S. History $10 00 

Less 15 per cent 1 50 



Walter N. Hadley. 
Sept. 24. 

11 Triplicate Record Books $1 65 



Milton, Bradley Co. 




Nov. 2. 




7 1-3 doz. No. A 13 water colors. 


$14 67 


1% doz. tubes, water colors.... 


1 32 


9% doz. Excelsior Compasses.. 


9 00- 


108 No. 1 Drawing Kits 


27 00 







$12 10 



$12 10 



$8 50 



$8 50 



$1 65 



$1 65 



$51 99 
$51 99 



148 



Express Charges. 

Paid W. A. Raynor $10 95 

G. L. Noyes 17 00 

Thomas Scanlon 1 05 

Geo. C. Turner 35 



$29 35. 



$29 35 



$625 20 
Credit supplies sold $7 16 



$618 0± 



CHAS. J. WILLIAMS. 

Purchasing Agent. 



149 



INDEX. 

Town Officers 3 

Town Warrant 5 

Town Meetings 9 

State Election 22 

Town Clerk's Report 26 

Births 2T 

Marriages 29 : 

Deaths 31 

Xon-Resident Burials 33- 

Dog Licenses 34 

Selectmen 's Report 37 

List of Jurors 60 

Treasurer's Report 61 

Auditor's Report 66 

Assessors ' Report 67 

Collector's Report 68 

Road Commissioners 70 

Board of Health , ., 73 

Overseers of the Poor 76 

Tree Warden 83 

Report of Cemetery Commissioners 91 

Acton Memorial Library 96 ; 

School Report 99 

School Calendar 101 

Organization 102 

Committee 113 

Financial Statement 119 

Superintendent 's Report 121 

Supervisor of Drawing 127 

Supervisor of Music 128 

Roll of Honor 12£ 

Statistical Tables 131 

Graduation Exercises 134 

School Census 136 

Truant Officers 137 

Department of School Supplies 1 38. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 

OF THE TOWN OFFICERS OF THE TOWN 

OF ACTON, MASSACHUSETTS : FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 1, 1909 

TOGETHER WITH THE SCHOOL REPORT 




?W5^Errrr- 



HUDSON, MASS. 

NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY, PRINTERS 

1909 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1908. 

Selectmen. 
James B. Tuttle, Bertram D. Hall, Asaph Merriam. 

Town Clerk. 
Horace F. Tuttle. 

Town Treasurer. 
Jona. K. W. Wetherbee. 

Assessors. 

James B. Tuttle Term expires 1909 

William F. Kelley Term expires 1910 

Wililam F. Stevens Term expires 1911 

Overseers of the Poor. 
Octavus A. Knowlton. J. Sterling Moore, William F. Kelley. 

Auditor. 
Waldo E. Whitcomb. 

Collector of Taxes. 

William F. Stevens. 

Tree Warden. 

William F. Stevens. 

Constables. 

Albert S. Bradley, James Kinsley, Moses A. Reed, 

William F. Stevens. 

Fence Viewers. 
Bertram D. Hall, Asaph Merriam, James B. Tuttle. 



Field Drivers. 

Albert S. Bradley, James Kinsley, Moses A. Reed, 

William F. Stevens. 

Road Commissioners. 

Albert H. Perkins Term expires 1909. 

Anson C. Piper Term expires 1910. 

William H. Kingsley Term expires 1911. 

Cemetery Commissioners. 

Julian Tuttle Term expires 1909. 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1910. 

Herbert T. Clark Term expires 1911. 

School Committee. 

Samuel A. Christie Term expires 1909. 

Arthur F. Blanchard Term expires 1910. 

Charles J. Williams Term expires 1911. 

Board of Health. 

Frank E. Tasker Term expires 1909. 

Frank J. Barker (Removed from Acton) .Term expires 1910. 
Charles J. Williams Term expires 1911. 

Trustees of Memorial Library. 
(Chosen by the Town.) 

Lucius A. Hesselton Term expires 1909. 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1910. 

Charles J. Williams Term expires 1911. 



TOWN WARRANT. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Middlesex ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in the 

County of Middlesex. 

Greeting: You are hereby required in the name of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Acton qualified to vote in elec- 
tions and Town affairs, to assemble in the Town Hall in said 
Town, on Monday, the twenty-ninth day of March, A. D. 
1909, at nine o'clock in the forenoon, then and there to act 
on the following articles as they may think proper, viz : 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2. To bring in their votes on one ballot for the 
following Town Officers: Town Clerk, three Selectmen, 
three Overseers of the Poor, Town Treasurer, Collector of 
Taxes, Auditor, Tree Warden, four Constables, four Field 
Drivers, three Fence Viewers, all for one year ; one Assessor, 
one Road Commissioner, one Trustee of Memorial Library, 
one Member of School Committee, one Cemetery Commis- 
sioner, one Member of Board of Health, all for three years, 
also one Member of Board of Health for two years to fill a 
vacancy and one Member of Board of Health for one year 
to fill a vacancy. Also on the same ballot with the above 
named Town Officers, to vote upon the following question : 

"Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in the Town?" 

The polls will be opened at 9.30 A. M. and may be closed 
at 4 o'clock P. M. 



6 



Article 3. To vote by separate ballot, Yes or No, in 
answer to the following question: "Shall an act passed by 
the General Court in the year nineteen hundred and eight, 
entitled, "An Act to provide for the protection of forest or 
sprout lands from fire," be accepted by this town?" 

Article 4. To choose all necessary Town officers not 
named in Article 2, and fix salaries. 

Article 5. To see if the Town will accept the reports of 
the Selectmen, Overseers of the Poor, School Committee, 
Library Trustees and other Town Officers. 

Article 6. To hear and act upon the reports of any 
Committees chosen to report at this meeting. 

Article 7. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for due observance of Memorial Day. 

Article 8. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for the repairing and building of roads and bridges, or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will authorize the Treas- 
urer, with the approval of its Selectmen, to borrow money 
for the Town, if necessary, in anticipation of taxes the cur- 
rent year. 

Article 10. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for support of Memorial Library the present year. 

Article 11. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for the support of Schools the present year. 

Article 12. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for School supplies. 



Article 13. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum 
of money for the enforcement of the Liquor Laws, or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 14. To see what amount of money the Town 
will appropriate for the care of Cemeteries, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 15. To see if the Town will accept the legacy 
of three thousand dollars ($3,000) given the Town in trust 
by the will of Charlotte L. Goodnow, late deceased of Wor- 
cester, Mass., for the purposes as in said bequest set forth; 
or pass such votes in relation thereto as the Town may deem 
proper. 

Article 16. To see if the Town will choose Trustees, to 
be known as the "Trustees of the Goodnow Fund," to ad- 
minister the fund of three thousand dollars ($3,000) given 
the Town in the legacy under the will of Charlotte L. Good- 
now, according to the provisions of said bequest; or pass 
such votes in relation thereto as the Town may deem proper. 

Article 17. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for maintenance of Fire Department, or act 
thereon. 

Article 18. To see what action the Town will take in 
regard to the extermination of the brown tail and gypsy 
moth. 

Article 19. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for Town charges. 

Article 20. To see what action the Town will take in 
regard to the collection of taxes. 

Article 21. To see what action the Town will take in 
regard to street lamps the present year. 



8 



Article 22. To see what action the Town will take in 
reference to contesting or settling the suit brought against 
it by Oscar A. Jones and others, now pending in the Superior 
Court for the County of Middlesex, and numbered 14,888 
therein. 

Article 23. To see what action the Town will take in 
regard to the extermination of the elm leaf beetle. 

Article 24. To see if the Town will accept as a Town 
way, the laying out by the Road Commissioners of a town 
road in West Acton, from a point on Arlington street, so 
called, near the house of George B. Parker to the Union 
Turnpike, connecting with the road leading to house of 
James Kinsley and others, or pass such votes in relation 
thereto as the Town may deem proper. 

Article 25. To see if the Town will provide a suitable 
Vault and Safes for the preservation of the Town Records, 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 26. To see if the Town will accept the Calvin 
and Luther Blanchard Memorial and the premises belonging 
thereto, given to the Town by the will of Luke Blanchard; 
also, to see if the Town will accept from the trustees under 
the will of Luke Blanchard, the sum of five hundred dollars, 
the income of which is to be expended in the care of the 
burial lot of said Blanchard; also, the sum of one hundred 
dollars, the income of which is to be expended in the care of 
the Calvin and Luther Blanchard Memorial, and the sum of 
one hundred dollars, the income of which is to be expended 
in the preservation and care of the family tomb, formerly 
belonging to Simon Blanchard of Boxboro, and invest said 
funds, and expend the income thereof in accordance with the 
provisions specified in the will of said Blanchard. 

Article 27. To see if the Town will instruct the Over- 



9 



seers of the Poor to contract out the medical attendance for 
the poor the ensuing year, or act anything thereon. 

Article 28. To see if the Town will instruct the Road 
Commissioners to repair the road in front of I. 0. 0. F. hall, 
or thereabout, or act thereon. 

And you are hereby directed to serve this Warrant by 
posting copies, attested by you, in the following places : one 
in each of the Post Offices and Railroad Stations ; one in each 
of the stores of C. H. Mead & Company, W. E. Whitcomb, 
M. E. Taylor and Company, Tuttle & Newton, Finney & Hoit, 
J. Cushing & Company, and one at the Nagog House, at 
least seven days before the time appointed for holding said 
meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due return of this Warrent 
with your doings thereon, to the Selectmen or the Town 
Clerk, on or before the time of holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands in Acton, this eighteenth day of 
March, in the year of our Lord, one thousand, nine hundred 
and nine. 

JAMES B. TUTTLE. 
BERTRAM D. HALL, 
ASAPH MERRIAM, 

Selectmen of Acton. 
A true copy attest: 

Constable of Acton. 



10 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL MEETING, MARCH 

30, 1908. 



Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Allen Brooks Parker was chosen Moderator. 

Art. 2. To bring in their votes on one ballot for the 
following Town Officers: 

The following Town Officers were chosen on one ballot: 

Town Clerk— Horace F. Tuttle. 

Selectmen — James B. Tuttle, Bertram D. Hall, Asaph 
Merriam. 

Assessors — William F. Stevens for three years; William< 
F. Kelley for two years ; James B. Tuttle for one year. 

Overseers of the Poor — William F. Kelley, Octavus A. 
Knowlton, J. Sterling Moore. 

Treasurer — Jona. K. W. Wetherbee. 

Auditor — Waldo E. Whitcomb. 

Collector of Taxes — William F. Stevens. 

Constables — Albert S. Bradley, James Kinsley, Moses A.. 
Reed, William F. Stevens. 

Field Drivers — Albert S. Bradley, James Kinsley, Moses 
A. Reed, William F. Stevens. 

Fence Viewers — Bertram D. Hall, Asaph Merriam, 
James B. Tuttle. 

Road Commissioner — William H. Kingsley. 

School Committee — Charles J. Williams.. 



11 

Cemetery Commissioner — Herbert T. Clark. 

Board of Health — Charles J. Williams. 

Trustee of Memorial Library — Charles J. Williams. 

Tree Warden — William F. Stevens. 

Also on the same ballot the vote on the question : "Shall 
licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in' 
this Town ? ' ' was : 

Whole number of ballots cast 383 

Yes 186 

No 182 

Blanks \ j 15 

Art. 3. To choose all necessary Town Officers not 
named in Article 2, and fix salaries. 

Voted: That the Selectmen appoint surveyors of lum- 
ber, wood, hoops and staves. 

Voted : That the' salary of the Collector of Taxes be 
one percent of the amount collected and that he perform all 
the duties hitherto performed by said officer. 

Voted : To fix the salary of the Auditor at six dollars. 

Voted : That the salary of the Road Commissioners be 
two and one-half dollars per day, nine hours to constitute a 
day. 

Article 4. To see if the town will accept the reports of 
the Selectmen, Overseers of the Poor, School Committee, 
Library Trustees and other Town Officers. 

Voted : To accept the reports of the Selectmen, Over- 
seers of the Poor, Road Commissioners, Cemetery Commis- 
sioners and Trustees of the Memorial Library. 

Voted : To. accept the report of the School Committee 
as printed, excepting therefrom the following paragraphs : 



12 



(1) Page 114 of the Annual Report of Town Officers,, 
1908: 

"Doubtless such an arrangement would be entirely sat- 
isfactory to the State Board of Education and would receive 
its cordial approval both from an educational and legal 
standpoint." 

(2) "When the State Board is not engaged in the se- 
rious labor of collecting statistics it not infrequently occu- 
pies itself in doing or attempting to do an injury to the pub- 
lic schools." 

Art. 5. To hear and act upon the reports of any com- 
mittee chosen to report at this meeting. 

The Selectmen made a verbal report on the matter of 
accepting the provisions of law relating to sidewalks. 

Voted: To accept their report. 

Art. 6. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for the due observance of Memorial Day. 

Voted : To appropriate fifty dollars. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will accept the jury list as- 
revised by the Selectmen. 

Voted: To accept the jury list as revised by the 
Selectmen. 

Art. 8. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for the repairing and building of roads and bridges, or 
act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise five thousand dollars ($5,000). 

Art. 9. To see if the town will authorize the Treasurer 
with the approval of its Selectmen, to borrow money for the 
town if necessary, in anticipation of taxes the current year. 



13 



Voted : To authorize the Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Selectmen, to borrow money for the town, if neces- 
sary, in anticipation of taxes the current year. 

Art. 10. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for support of Memorial Library the present year. 

Voted: To raise four hundred dollars ($400) for cur- 
rent expenses and two hundred dollars ($200) for books. 

Art. 11. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for the support of schools the present year. 

Art. 12. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for school supplies. 

Art. 11 and 12. Voted : To raise for 

Common schools $4,750.00 

School supplies 625.00 

Transportation of pupils... 1,360.00 

Salary of superintendent... 480.00 

Medical inspection 100.00 

High school 4,200.00 



$11,515.00 

Art. 13. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money for the enforcement of the liquor laws, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Voted: That the Selectmen, F. C. Nash, Edgar H. Hall 
and O. A. Knowlton constitute a committee to enforce the 
liquor laws. 

Voted : That three-quarters of the amount paid to the 
town for liquor licenses be appropriated for the enforcement 
of the liquor laws ; that not more than five hundred dollars 
be expended the current year, the balance to remain in the 
treasury for future use. 



14 



Art. 14. To see what amount of money the town will 
appropriate for the care of cemeteries, or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate five hundred dollars ($500). 

Art. 15. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for maintenance of fire department, or act thereon. 

Voted: To raise three hundred and fifty dollars ($350). 

Art. 16 To see if the town will raise a sum of money 
for the purpose of widening Acton street, South Acton, as 
laid out by the County Commissioners, or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted: To raise sixteen hundred dollars ($1,600), and 
to leave the matter of building with the Road Commissioners. 

Art. 17. To see what action the town will take in re- 
gard to the extermination of the brown tail and gypsy 
moths. 

Voted: To raise seven hundred dollars ($700). 

Art. 18. To see if the town will vote to rebuild the road 
leading from the D. Hennessey place to the new state road, 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To dismiss the article. 

Art. 19. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for town charges. 

Voted: To raise three thousand dollars ($3,000). 

Art. 20. To see what action the town will take in re- 
gard to the collection of taxes. 

Voted: That the Collector charge interest at the rate 
of five percent per annum on all taxes remaining unpaid 
after the first day of November next. 

Art. 21. To see what action the town will take in re- 
gard to street lamps the present year. 



15 



Voted: To raise one thousand dollars to maintain 
street lamps, to be expended under the direction of the 
Selectmen. 

Voted : That the town consider the agreement made 
between it and the American Woolen Company, relating to 
street lighting, terminated by reason of the failure of said 
American Woolen Company to accept the proposition. 

Voted : That the Selectmen notify the American 
Woolen Company of this action. 

Art. 22. To see if the town will vote to build a suitable 
building for the purpose of storing the steam roller and 
other road machinery. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate three hundred dollars 
($300) to erect a building in which to keep the steam roller 
and other road machinery. 

Art. 23. To see what action the town will take respect- 
ing the maintaining of a high school and the transportation 
of high school scholars. 

Art. 24. To see what action the town will take in re- 
gard to building a high school building, or the building of an 
addition to either of its present buildings. 

Art. 23 and 24. Voted: To raise and appropriate ten 
thousand dollars ($10,000) to build a high school building. 

Voted: That the Assessors be instructed not to assess 
a tax exceeding fourteen dollars per thousand the current 
year. 

Art. 25. To see what action the town will take in re- 
gard to furnishing water for the watering trough at West 
Acton. 

Voted: That the Selectmen be instructed to secure if 
possible, a supply of good water for the watering trough at 
West Acton. 



16 



STATE ELECTION, NOVEMBER 3, 1908. 



Party designations: E., Republican; D., Democratic; 
P., Prohibition; I. L., Independence League; S., Socialist; 
S. L., Socialist Labor. 

Precincts 
12 3 Total 

Whole number of ballots cast, 104 140 141 385 

Electors of President and Vice President. 



Bryan and Kern, D., 


17 


31 


29 


77 


Chafin and Watkins, P., 








2 


2 


Debs and Hanford, S., 


2 


1 





3 


Gillhaus and Munroe, S. L., 














Hisgen and Graves, I. L., 


1 


4 


4 


9 


Taft and Sherman, R., 


76 


95 


103 


274 


Blanks, 


8 


9 


3 


20 


Governor. 










James F. Carey, S., 


1 


2 





3 


Eben S. Draper, R., 


76 


85 


87 


248 


Walter J. Hoar, S. L., 





2 





2 


William N. Osgood, I. L., 


2 


8 


4 


14 


James H. Vahey, D., 


18 


31 


33 


82 


Willard 0. Wylie, P., 





2 


3 


5 


Blanks, 


7 


10 


14 


31 



Lieutenant Governor. 



Charles J. Bartow, D., 
Joao Claudino, S. L., 



18 

1 



22 





27 




67 
1 



17 



Louis A. Frothingham, R., 


76 


93 


94 


263 


John Hall, Jr., S., 


1 








1 


Robert J. McCartney, I. L., 


1 


7 


4 


12 


Frank N. Rand, P., 





1 


2 


3 


Blanks, 


7 


17 


14 


38 


Secretary. 










James F. Aylward, D., 


14 


21 


26 


61 


Herbert B. Griffin, P., 





1 


2 


3 


George Nelson, S. L., 














William M. Olin, R., 


79 


85 


94 


258 


Squire E. Putney, S., 


1 





1 


2 


John F. Williams, I. L., 


1 


6 


4 


11 


Blanks, 


9 


27 


14 


50 


Treasurer. 










Charles E. Butterworth, I. L., 


2 


6 


5 


13 


Arthur B. Chapin, R., 


77 


85 


90 


252 


Henry C. Hess, S. L., 














Charles C. Hitchcock, S., 


1 








1 


Edward Kendall, P., 


1 


2 


2 


5 


Erwin H. Kennedy, D., 


12 


20 


25 


57 


Blanks, 


11 


27 


19 


57 


Auditor. 










Frank Bohmbach, S. L., 














John E. Dempsey, I. L., 


2 


6 


4 


12 


George G. Hall, S., 


1 








1 


Wilbur D. Moon, P., 


1 


3 


3 


7 


Henry E. Turner, R., 


72 


85 


93 


250 


Simeon Viger, D., 


14 


20 


23 


57 


Blanks, 


14 


26 


18 


58 


Attorney General 








Henry M. Dean, P., 





2 


4 


6 


Elliot C. Harding, S. L., 





1 





1 



18 



Dana Malone, R., 




73 


91 


88 


252 


John McCarty, S., 




1 








1 


Richard J. Talbot, I. L., 




2 


5 


4 


11 


John Alden Thayer, D., 




20 


22 


30 


72 


Blanks, 




8 


19 


15 


42 


Congressman 










John J. Mitchell, D., 




24 


51 


43 


118 


Charles Q. Tirrell, R,, 




72 


78 


84 


234 


Charles E. Wood, 










1 


1 


Blanks, 




8 


11 


13 


32 


Councillor. 










Harry H. Hill, I. L., 




3 


8 


3 


14 


Seward W. Jones, R., 




78 


85 


86 


249 


William J. McCluskey, D. 


i 


13 


19 


25 


57 


Blanks, 


Senator. 


10 


28 


27 


65 


William H. Brown, I. L., 




1 


10 


2 


13 


Isaac E. Graves, D., 




19 


21 


33 


73 


James W. Grimes, R., 




73 


82 


83 


238 


Blanks, 




11 


27 


23 


61 


Representative in General Court. 






James B. Carr, S., 










1 


1 


James E. Smith, D., 




20 


21 


31 


72 


Elisha D. Stone, R., 




76 


89 


91 


256 


Blanks, 




8 


30 


18 


56 


County- 


Commissioner. 








Edward Gallagher, D., 




12 ' 


20 


22 


54 


Levi S. Gould, R., 




74 


78 


91 


243 


Charles F. Walcott, I. L., 




6 


12 


6 


24 


Blanks. 




12 


•SO 


22 


64 



19 

County Commissioner. 

(To fill vacancy.) 



George R. Duren, D., 


18 


22 


28 


68 


Andrew W. Jones, I. L., 


1 


10 


4 


15 


Charles H. Richardson, R., 


74 


79 


92 


245 


Blanks, 


11 


29 


17 


57 


Register of Probate and Insolvency. 






John F. Holland, D., 


16 


23 


23 


62 


William E. Rogers, R., 


75 


77 


88 


240 


Roswell C. Ross, I. L., 


1 


11 


5 


17 


Blanks, 


12 


29 


25 


66 


Associate Commissioner. 








James F. McCarthy, Jr., D., 


11 


20 


22 


53 


Alfred W. Parnell, I. L., 


1 


10 


4 


15 


Frank A. Patch, R., 


83 


82 


95 


260 


Blanks, 


9 


28 


20 


57 



Vote for Representative in 11th Middlesex District Novem- 
ber 3, 1908. 





o 
o 

< 


u 

< 


o 


T3 

u 

O 
1 


a 
o 

o 

'2 


73 

O 
O 


03 

4-5 

o 


James B. Carr of Chelmsford. S., 
James E. Smith of Littleton, D., 

Elisha D. Stone of Ayer, R 

Blanks 


1 

72 

256 

56 


3 

139 

321 

71 


4 
25 

48 
25 


29| 2 
167| 63 
395|127 
141 31 

1 


12 

75 

212 

95 


51 

541 

1359 

419 






Totals 


385l534l102l732l223l394l2370 












i 







20 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



Births. 

"Whole number recorded 46 

Males 22 

Females 24 

Born in Acton 45 

Native parentage . 16 

Foreign parentage 16 

Mixed parentage 14 

Marriages. 

Whole number recorded 20 

Residents of Acton 23 

Residents of other places 17 

Deaths. 

Whole number recorded 36 

Residents of Acton 36 

Residents of other places 

Occurring in Acton 30 

Occurring in other places 6 

Average age 47 minus 

Note — The Town Clerk requests information of any 
omission or error in the lists of births, marriages and deaths. 

The Town Clerk hereby gives notice that he is prepared 
to furnish blanks for the returns of births and deaths. 

HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Town Clerk. 



21 



00 

s 



a 

03 

•<- 
03 



02 
03 

s 



% I 

o- c 
o PH 

^ ' o3 u 
. 03 o3 

2^^ 03 

£ ^ p-H £ 

o> > o> o 
-B S^fe 

^ B £ S 

§ * *^ 

-4-s "— j ph 



'5 ^'a 

03 £ co 

p-i pQ 03 
03 o3 'B 

»»| 



p-s 03 
O # o 

'§,"3 

I 1 

H » ^ 
P^ B o3 

— ' pH W-l 
03 I^H 

a 



03 



ao 



ph p" OJ ^ L, 03 



03 o3 

*«; 

P*i >> ^ 

3 ^\2 

^ cc G 



B 

£ 3 

0> ^~" 



M 03 B 

fe C -B N 

^ & £P3 

Sh ae S 

^-H £ 03 

^OpQ 



TJ 




Pi 


l*i 


sti 








rB 


0J 


ft 

03 




3 




hs 


rt 



'—-- p* 
be a) 

r& O CO 

*-. Ph S'T 
o3 w B B 

03 03 . rg 

^ g Ph B 

£3 ^d 
t^'3 

03 Sh ^ - 

rB O 03 

.S 3 §ii 



B 
O 

02 
'o 03 T5 

7"\ 03 



^ o3 



a ^ 03 ^ 

,s r 1 +j ^ 



5.5 



< B ^ 

03 rH OC 
ph >* g 



^ nH uj B 

^ 03 ^ -^ 03. 

§<^^ c: 

'B ^ Q, . 

p,.S ETB 

-H pC OJ pCj 

p5 ^ ° c 

Pi<^^ 



C 02 

o3 *£, 



g 

3 
w 

W 

s 

HH 



-B 

o 

O 



03 



-B - 
+s B 

5.2 

03^3 

H 

O Pj 

03 03 

0£ 
. 50 

B'W 
°5 . 

h a3 
o3 0J 
p£C£ 



^3 ^B 

►| 

r^ o3 +s 

W 03 

03 ^ •— I 
^ 2 ^ 

o3 pB ^ 

?h 03 03 

p:oo 



03 

&jd 

"S 



B O 
^^ 

03 <5 



03 O g 

^ ^ B 

<^ 03 03 

p3 ° 

^"^ .s 

5 'E > 

--B * 
OOP 



2 * 

pD +3 

03 03 
O'n 

C B 
o3 p3 

03 ^ 
B o3 

\™ 

o O^ 

O) 03 

03 Oj 
03 03 

PC CQ 

03 03 

PP) 



02 ^ 

03 P 



^5W 

ie ^ _ 



03 C3 2 -2 



03 fB 
p-i "t- 3 

«W 03 

^ B@ 



pM OC rrj p- 

o3 02 pi; cc 

.2 3 .-§ IS 






o3 ^ v^; 

S 03 o3 
03 ^ p- 



03 fl 

>T3 r-H 

p3 !>s 

03 03 

B^ 
° :>' 



w« o o 



03 

B 
B 
03 

i 
m 

03 O 
• B 03 

03 O 
^P^ 

, c 

a: a: 



03 
&£ 

pH 

02 O 

• rH 0J 

03 B 
03 pq 



B 






u 

Cq | 

03 03 

B £> 

B 03 






f" 1 *"< O 03 j. 

*a ^'^pQpD-p^ a Q 



S-i GO ^ 
03 C^ 03 * 

pQ pQ "" 



N 



CO 



o\ 



CO r; (N 02 

? ° ^ p.p. 

£JD ^ ^ C3JD ^ o 

B J5 i5 B ft 03 'B 



03 
HrCI> 

p-< s^ 



O o 



03^ 

gp-7 

03 P 

•-SI--3 



BD 



u 

03 

pQ 

a B 



CM pC 

^ 5' 

.p. 03. 

B u 

ft 0,'. 



r- W K -* Lt W 1^ 00 C O 



i-O cr; L- GO Cl O r- CAJ re' 

p. p. p- P- p. ?1 ? , ?) -r, 



22 






3 09 



^ ^ £ ft 

£P£S 
c« ^ a3 09 



a 
w 






09 

CO w 'O 
09 ^K 



cc 



PQ 

n - w c8 



O 

H'd^ 



!>>Ph 
re ^ 



J 3.3:3 



H 



P °, 

* d 



•CO t-i <j H ^ ^ 



* s 1 

0) ^ > 
02 2 o 



s ^ 

<3 "P 09 

v -- ' s ° 

P o3 

S P r- 

ts.g.s 

"£p£ 



CO M 
09 7h 
.ft C6 

CO 



as c3 

09 d 

d ^ 

. 03 

CO " 
09 CO 

o3 S 

6^? 



t> co o3 -p -^ 



p a 

S.2 

2 fl 
-£ p 

CO o3 
03 Ec! 



P «2 
o3 Q> 



a P 
"3S 

^p 

o3 Vp 



09 

p 

^ O CO ,—. 

P &C r ,* 09 



d 



11 



tf^_ 



r=3 o3 



. 09 CO 
O 09 & % 



03 ff 
03 



ftt^d" 



CO r^ 

09 S 

fl 03 



03 
=! 09 



03 

'3 



o3 

^09 
33 

C9 



O 





<1 


03 








rjzj 


co n3 


P 


S 




0? 


O 

P 






or 


ti 


h 


"rH 




^ 





r-: 



09 

g 

Ph 09 

09 o 
gli 
^ I— I 

>» 03 

?H i—l 

o3 O 






03 .ft 



09 C 

a ^3 
2'S 

03 09 



09 
o3 

^-i 09 

09 ^5 

W 09 
,^ 

.9 55 

o3 'S 

O 09 



r-^ r-^ ^ r-; ^ 



as 
o 

C9 

nS 03 ^ 
h © i— < 

09 W r-j 09 

gogg 

i^ ,. co co 

o o ^ 
^i co 03 cc 

cfi ? o o 



s S 2 

LT 4 .H 09 ^Z 

•^^>co^ 
of45if.9 

I 1 -J"* 09 rC 

•^- p; 09 o 
COCO Eh £h 



p G3 

09 r_! 

t-4 ' 1 



c 3 



co d 

O 09 

^ 03 09 

a ^ td 

09 -^ 
^ O 



09 ^ ^ 



03 ^ 



H 



o 



^s??s 






09 d 






C- frj 09 rH 09 

-^ ^ d -^ 

CO d d CO » CO 



^>S 



r^9 ,£> j. O ^2 _| CO 

09 d 09 £ rO £ Qi n _ 



d 09 STd 



'19 



09 O 



09 

JS 09 09 

Ph d d 

09 d d 



^^O^H^h-aH^cO^H^QcO^CO^Ii-^O^COH-,)-) 



o 



!M 



- 

Ph 



H^lOCOI>COOiOHfMCO^lO^>l>OO^On(MCO'HinCD 
C^(^C^(^C^OClCOCOC>0C^COC>0COCOCOCOTtlTjHTtlT}HTtHTtHT^ 






23 



" 7 



MARRIAGES REGISTERED IN 1908, 



No. 


Date Place 


Names 


Residences 


1. 


January 17 


Adams, James L. 


Concord 




Acton 


Fletcher, Jennie P. 


Acton 


2. 


November 28 


Brown, Alfred Lee 


Acton 




New Bedford 


Grant, Elizabeth Ellen 


Nova Scotif* 


3. 


May 5 

Maynard 


DeSousa, Joseph 
Silveira, Julia E. 


Acton 
Acton 


4. 


June 3 

Maynard 


Flannery, Michael J. 
Moore, Mary Helena 


Concord 
Acton 


5. 


February 17 
Concord 


Forbush, Otis H. 
Taylor, Elizabeth 


Acton 
Acton 


6. 


May 6 

Acton 


Hammond, Horace N. 
Simonds, Annie E. (Goodwin) 


Maynard 
Maynard 


7. 


July 4 

Acton 


Jenks, George 

Moore, Josie (Chapman) 


Lebanon, N. 11 
Lebanon, N. II 


8. 


March 1 

Maynard 


Kennedy, John 

Driscoll, Julia 


Acton 
Acton 


9. 


March 4 


Lothrop, Frank B. 


Acton 




Everett 


Curtis, Mary H. (Richardson) 


Everett 


10. 


June 27 


Merriam. Frank A. 


Acton 




Acton 


Whitney, Nellie S. 


Acton 


.1. 


December 30 


Owen, Herbert William 


Acton 




Acton 


Patterson, Bessie Augusta 


Acton 



24 



12. November 26 

Acton 

13. January 2 
Providence, R. I. 

14. June 16 

Acton 

15. October 25 

Acton 

16. June 24 

Maynard 

17. April 20 

Acton 

18. July 8 

Medford 



rerkms, Levi Wood 
Rice, Alice M. 


Acton 
Acton 


Sims, Frederick Garfield 
Tuttle, Alice Maud (Walch) 


Maynard 
Acton 


Tule, Frank Rawle 
Hastings, Ethel Brown 


Brookline 
Acton 


Tuttle, Julian 
Dobbins, Sarah 


Acton 
Acton 


Weaver, George T. 
Sullivan, Sadie H. 


Acton 
Acton 


Wilbur, Arthur Lowell 
Jones, Mary Elizabeth 


Keene, N. H, 
Acton 


Willis, Sidney Joel 
Tucker, Sara Lapham 


Acton 
Medford 



25 



r/- t* (M -tf r^ Ci t» 



CM H(N I n(M 



CO O I OOWt- 
<M <M C\l CM 











< 




OOOCN 


CC i— 1 


N 




Z 










•A 


o co co 1 

iO r*. rH 1 


O GO 
U3 CC 


1 




> 









Irt C- t- r^ L.O Tf 



CC CC 



c: co 



co ex Tt» 



r* CC t- ^ tJH CO I CO t- CO Tf t- t- X 



CO 

o 



Q 
W 

H 
H 

3 

BO 

H 

<J 
H 
P 



o3 



c^ 



o3 



w 



r £cr 



CC ^ ^ 

^ d « 

sop 



csW §^ 

^ S „£ 

C &j >■ cC 

S ^ 3 ■ 

« C cS .5 

o c - ; 



.9 

'■+2 

Ik 
^ * «, 
e-S-S 

< ~ (fi- 
re .,- 

».& 5 

F c o 

CC .— <T) 



>. 


hH 


FH 


DR 


ad 


03 


s 


£ 




s 


;>> 


~ 


— 

— 


— 


— 




CC 


CD 


o£ 


a 


c 


^ 



CC CC 
2 






P3 Eh >>^ 
5 a> f-i g 

g g § - 



CO ^ 

CO CC 



n3 n3 

cd a 

pip; 



CO 

- 



en 

o 

CD 

+3 

- 
Q 



o 

CM 



?! 



fc- 



UO 



CO ^ _j "H^ 1 UO 

^ CD ^ ,2 ^ CD ^~ (MOO © 



2 . 
2 ..J 



- S 






CO 
CM r^ 



o 

CM ^ 






CO rO 
CC CD 



u: 



- 
9 5 

6 g 



^-^ 



-ti-: "Ot-x r. c-'Nrr-ti: 



COt*00050THCXICO'* 



l>l>NOl>ai I O 00 <M o 

(NlMHH t— I I ^h <m tH r-i 



O^HCOHHt^ 



Oit^QO I CO I lO H r^ COCO 



26 



02 

a> 

o 
^> 
cd 
be 

DQ 



PI 

O c6 

o3 



o-s sw 



a IS 

CD CD ^ 

fl C CD .2 

.y .in & cc 



CD O g 



CD 

w 

-£ pi 

c 

CD £> 



■X 






H 



D 



O P 



W 



+a 

c 

•l-H CO 

CD CD a 



h.eh£ 



to 



^co 



13 a Ph^s Ph 





o 


o 


CO 




" CD 


CD Pj £ 




fl P- 


cd cd 



lOCDNCOOlO^tMCC^LOX 
"MWNNiMTCWCCCOCOCCCC 



27 



5 



CP CP > CP > 



o o 
o o 



o * 
o 



pa c fl cj fl r c 

CP^CPCPCpCP^CPCPCP^CP^^r^^ 

o ««%%* §\5J &| &§"&&« g.g-g.5 £S S* J & 

cp o o "cooo"oo'"^oo^o© 



.2 ^^^^^^^JP^^^^^^^-^^^JB+^JP^^J? 



cc 

r- ^ 

O O CP 

H> +- Tj 

K m r 
o o ^ 

PQPQS 






£ 



o 

fr" G S « O 
Cv S 2 c3 



% ^ 5 3 tf o 

» - ^ .2 o 2 S 



cc 

03 43 

pa pa 

a, ." 



cp 






o 

c 

s -° 

cC M CO 
C C 






iH r-l 

cc K 

03 S^ 



>• c ^ 

P3 C ^ CP cC 03 CP 



K^as^^hT cc ,2 cc p-i O C ^ O <3 o'r^ cS^^H > > 






pa 

CP 

•a 



i 



t>> CO -* CO I CO lO CO CM I CO I l>O0 
Q N [ rH rH I I <M CM 



b- I CO Ci CI t- £^ GO CO 

rH t~H i~H 



c 

I — I 



CD 



UO CM I CO 00 ^ CO I H 



c; co cc h 



OOH^lOO 



CM LO I LOCOiCCOlCOJlCCOHOOCCClCOlOLOHOOCl^OlC 

cm |uot>CMrt<cMc:coco 



COCOH^CCt^CCCOCOCM 



00 t* 



o 

03 



m 



. j 43 cc 

Js-«s 

<j PL] C^r-H! 

O O »o 

<» rc S ^ 
►^ ;=a pn ?_ as 



GJ 



a 



*-5 

pao 

CP 



<! <^ 



Has 

O CD 

cC ^ 

42 ~ cp 

r-i cC 2 
WOO 



so 13 ffi H a Pa .2 rQ r -; 

^ 5. .CO CC 5^ ^ fl .^a CP 






r-l 

s ^ 
go 



H ^^> 



CC" 

p 
5 

CO cc 
CP cc 



* s ^ 



o 



- « cp £ . c Pi 

Cc^?nCCCPOg3^C^._ 



5P ^a 

CP o 



fe Jr^r^ 



^ CP r^ r^J 

^C CO 

2 o c o 



COOOCOCOOOOOOOCDOOCOCOOOOOCOOOOOOOCOOOOOOCO^OOOO' 

oooooooooooooooooooooocooo 

CiO^CiCiCiC^O^CiC^C^O^C^C5(^O^CJiO^C^C^C^CiC^GO 

rHiHrHi— IHHr- 1 H H r- ItHt— ! i— I H H i- IHHHHr I H r- IHH 

o" tjh" o" t-T r^T o" r-T oo" t-" of co cxf crT a:" t>»" uo" t-T cd" aT t-" c<T t>-" oo" cT cc 



CI 



<M iH 



CO <Cq i-H CM rH 



CV1 t— rH CO CXI 



CM i—l rH CM r- CM 



CP CP 

a a 

T3 cp cp 



cp 



CP 
CP w ^ 



CP 



CC CP _, 

g42^ 



CP 
4^ 

CP r- , 



cc cp 

2 C » "S rt 

-. «« ^ S b -2 ?h 



r-l 

CP >S 

42 ^ 



CP 



>- . 

CC ^ 

H cC 

, ® 5 ^ C d 

^ b* 42 J^*4D G 



>. >. 



bOP^Saj^^feOScc^^fc^O^^fe^fe^^^ 



^ rH* CNJ* CO HH L^' CO L-* CO OS 



O r- CM CC tH »C "X> l^ CO C: O i— CM CO HH i(C 

rt H H - r- r- r- r- r- r- CI CJ CI M W CI, 



28 



PERSONS HAVING DOGS LICENSED IN 1908. 



Allen, Louis E. 
Adams, Daniel H. 
Aiken, Alice H. 
Brown, Lizzie J. 
Baird, Edson 
Burroughs, Samuel R. 
Bradley, Mary 
Brooks, Mary D. 
Boyce, Charles E. 
Bulette, Frank W. 
Brooks, George H. 
Byron, James F. 
Bailey, F. L. 
Bresth, Simon 
Bent, H. P. 
Barker, Frank J. 
Bradbury, Rolfe 
Carberg, L. C. 
Cole, James 
Coussens, F. C. 
Coughlin, William C. 
Coughlin, John F. 
Calder, Maria 
Colpitt, C. H. 
Dusseault, George A. 
Durkee. Charles A. 
Davis, Charles E. 
Dole, Cyrus G. 
Dow. Charles E. 
Davis, Mary 
De Jayne, Joseph 
Donnelly, Frank H. 
Davis. Wendell F. 
Densmore. Joseph A. 
Enneguess, Michael 
Emery, F. E. 



$2.00 


Finney, Smith 


5.00 


2.00 


Fairbanks. C. H. 


2.00 


7.00 


Ford, I. S. 


2.00 


2.00 


Ford, Charles L. 


4.00 


2.00 


Farrer, Daniel H. 


2.00 


2.00 


Fletcher, Lester N. 


2.00 


2.00 


Fobes, Edward S. 


5.00 


2.00 


Fullonton. Llewellyn 


2.00 


2.00 


Farrar, Abel 


5.00 


2.00 


Gilmore. A. H. 


2.00 


2.00 


Gallagher. Joseph 


2.00 


2.00 


Gallant. Joseph 


2.00 


2.00 


Gates, Hiram 


2.00 


2.00 


Green. Fred W. 


7.00 


2.00 


Grady, Roy 


5.00 


5.00 


Gray. Florence A. 


2.00 


2.00 


Harris, Hattie B. 


5.00 


2.00 


Hawes, George A. 


2.00 


2.00 


.Holden. Willis L. 


2.00 


2.00 


Houghton, Oliver E. 


2.00 


. 2.00 


Hoit, Frank W. 


2.00 


2.00 


Hollowell. William 


2.00 


2.00 


Hayes. Michael G. 


2.00 


2.00 


Hardy, Arthur C. 


2.00 


. 2.00 


Johnson. John M. 


5.00 


5.00 


Jones. Samuel 


2.00 


2.00 


Kelly. William F. 


2.00 


2.00 


Kennedv. Duncan S. 


5.00 


5.00 


Kellv. John M. 


2.00 


2.00 


Kimball, C. M. 


7.00 


2.00 


Laffin, Sidney 


2.00 


2.00 


Lawrence. A. L. 


2.00 


2.00 


Lawrey. George F. 


2.00 


7.00 


Libby, George 


10.00 


4.00 


Lewis, Henrv 


4.00 


2.00 


Lothrop, T. C. 


4.00 



29 



Livermore, Wm. J. 


2.00 


Stooss, H. J. 


2.00 


Meecham, Minnie 


5.00 


Schofield, H. C. 


2.00 


McCarty, Thomas 


2.00 


Scott, Thomas A. 


2.00 


Merriam, A. 


2.00 


Sweet, Perev 


2.00 


Morrison, F. D. 


4.00 


Sweet, W. H. 


2.00 


Murphy, George E. 


2.00 


Symonds, Esteane 


2.00 


Miller, Charles I. 


2.00 


Smith, Est. of H. M. 


2.00 


Merrill, William F. 


5.00 


Stevenson, John M. 


5.00 


Moore, J. Sterling 


2.00 


Stevens, William F. 


2.00 


Noyes, A. L. 


5.00 


Tuttle & Newton 


2.00 


O'Connell, M. 


2.00 


Taylor, Charles A. 


4.00 


O'Xeil, Patrick 


2.00 


Thompson, T. A. 


2.00 


Parker, J. H. 


2.00 


Tavlor, M. E. 


2.00 


Palma, John 


2.00 


Taylor, S. H. 


5.00 


Pratt, Francis 


2.00 


Taylor, C. Carlton 


5.00 


Pratt, Frank A. 


5.00 


Willis. Ed. 


2.00 


Pays on, Arthur E. 


2.00 


Willis, Ora A. 


2.00 


Pope, Benjamin 


21.00 


Watkins. John H. 


4.00 


Perkins, Albert H. 


2.00 


Wilder, M. B. 


2.00 


Perkins, Arnold H. 


2.00 


Willard, F. H. 


5.00 


Perkins, Levi 


2.00 


Warren. W. S. 


2.00 


Richardson, J. L. 


2.00 


Whitcomb, Fred S. 


2.00 


Robbins, Solon A. 


2.00 


Weaver, George T. 


2.00 


Rudolph, H. H. 


2.00 


Woods, R. A. Mrs. 


2.00 


Richardson, S. L. 


5.00 


Worster, George W. 


4.00 


Reed, Robert G. 


2.00 


Wetherbee, Ellis 


2.00 


Robbins, W. C. 


2.00 


White, Eugene L. 


2.00 


Smith. F. G. 


2.00 


Wheeler, Charles H. 


2.00 


118 licenses at $2.00 each $236.00 




28 licenses at 


5.00 eac 


h 140.00 








$376.00 


Deduct fees, 146 licenses at 20 cents . . 


29.20 



Balance paid to County Treasurer . 



$346.80 



30 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



High School. 

Paid Alice Maclntyre $555 . 00 

Town of Concord, tuition 1,759.98 

Town of Stow, tuition 18 . 75 

Transportation High School schol- 
ars, two terms 817 . 19 

Janitor 73.00 

Coal 47.18 

Cleaning 4.00 

George C. Turner .50 

Musical Instructor, E. N. C. 

Barnes 50.00 

Drawing Instructor, W. L. Adams 37.50 



South School. 

Paid Margaret Quimby $143 . 00 

Edith Ginns 182.00 

Julia McCarthy 396.00 

Pauline D. Berthold 396 . 00 

Sadie R. Whitney 322.00 

Jennie E. Stowell 276.00 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal 265.08 

G. C. Turner, janitor 390.00 

American Woolen Co., electric 

current 7.95 

James Byron, Jr., carrying water 4.50 

G. C. Turner, wood 1.75 

W. H. Kingsley, wood 16.50 



$3,363.10 



31 



E. N. C. Barnes, music instruction 50.00 

W. L. Adams, drawing instruction 37 . 50 



West School. 

Paid Mary 0. Freeman $468.00 

Jennie E. Stowell 156.00 

Harriet H. Gardner 505.00 

Ethel G. Evans 240.00 

Thomas Scanlon, janitor 127.04 

Thomas Scanlon, cleaning 22.00 

E. C. Parker, coal 94.37 

E. N. C. Barnes, music instruction 50.00 

W. L. Adams, drawing instruction 37.50 



Center School. 

Paid Martha F. Smith $442.00 

Minnie Gamble 408.00 

Ella L. Miller 442.00 

Asaph Parlin, janitor 150.60 

Asaph Parlin, cleaning 13.40 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal 217.29 

W. H. Kingsley, wood 16.50 

E. N. C. Barnes, music instruction 50.00 

W. L. Adams, drawing instruction 37.50 



Miscellaneous School Expenses. 

Paid Arthur B. Webber, superintend- 
ent schools $480 . 00 

Arthur B. Webber, postage and 

stationery 16 . 75 



$2,488.28 



$1,699.91 



$1,777.29 



32 



Arthur B. Webber, telephone 

rental 10.60 

Charles J. Williams, postage and 

telephone 6.98 

L. C. Taylor, storage school sup- 
plies 10.00 

Tuttle & Newton, incidentals .... 2 . 45 

American Woolen Co., electric 

current 2 . 00 

W. L. Adams, supplies manual 

training 15 . 00 

S. A. Christie, postage, telephone 7.75 

G. C. Turner, truant officer 7.00 

Moses A. Reed, truant officer .... 4.25 
Frank E. Tasker, school physician 25.00 
Samuel A. Christie, school phy- 
sician 25 . 00 

Frederick K. Shaw, school phy- 
sician 25 . 00 

E. F. Conant, school census 15 . 00 



$652.78 



School Supplies. 

Paid J. L. Hammett Co $237.82 

E. E. Babb & Co 146.12 

Ginn & Co 167.53 

Estabrook Steel Pen M'f g. Co. . . 6.40 

American Book Co 9 . 00 

Rand McNally & Co 4.80 

Charles Scribner's Sons 24.70 

Silver, Burdett & Co 28.50 

Thompson, Brown & Co 125.59 

W. H. Hadley 1.50 

Sibley & Co 17.91 

Educational Pub. Co 1 . 50 

Houghton, Mifflin Co 3 . 40 



33 



D. C. Heath & Co 1.20 

M. E. Taylor & Co 4. 61 

C. J. Williams 1.80 

Tuttle & Newton .10 



G. C. Turner, freight and express $ .75 

W. A. Raynor, freight and express 11 . 59 

Thomas Scanlon, express .25 

George L. Noyes, freight 20.45 



Repairs on School Grounds and Houses. 

Paid F. S. Glines, labor, South $46.95 

George C. Turner, oiling floors, 

South 3.50 

C. L. Chase & Son, floor dressing, 

South 27.00 

J. L. Hammett Co., repairs black- 
board 17.50 

Thomas F. Parker, rotary pump 

and motor complete, South.. 98.00 
J. R. Cummings, repairs, South . . 4.16 
J. J. Vanderveer, labor and fit- 
tings, South 45.05 

E. T. Rice, repairs 5.35 

Charles Leach, labor, South 13.12 

J. dishing & Co., seed and fertili- 
zer, South 2 . 65 

Walter I. Young, labor, South ... 15.17 

Tuttle & Newton, repairs, South . . 7.51 
James R. Cole, labor and team, 

South 47.25 

L. T. Fullonton, repairs, South ... 50.15 

E. E. Miles, labor, South 1.75 



$782.48 



$33.04 



$815.52 



34 



G. C. Turner, labor and supplies, 

South 32.25 

Fuller & Warren Co., balance 
heating and ventilating ap- 
paratus, South 528 . 80 

Benj. A. King, labor and electric 

supplies, South 32.25 

B. F. Townsend, South 11 . 55 

Anson C. Piper, labor, South .... 5.50 

Solon A. Robbins, repairs, South . . 75 

Finney & Hoit, repairs, South .... 5 . 36 

F. Z. Taylor, repairs, South .80 

Sidney Laffin, labor, South 10.00 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

lumber, South .88 

S. A. Christie, labor, South 9.44 

Asaph Parlin, labor, Center 31.48 

E. A. Phalen, labor, Center 13.25 

M. A. Reed, cleaning vault, Center 2.00 

G. W. Daniels, repairing bells, 

Center 1.25 

Thomas Scanlon, cleaning vault, 

etc., West 3.75 

John S. Hoar, labor, West 19.50 

Thomas Scanlon, labor, West 33.30 

B. F. Townsend, repairs, West ... 14.50 

F. E. Harris, labor, West 36 . 66 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

lumber, West 52.59 

C. H. Mead, repairs, West 9.34 

Hall Bros., lumber, West 3.50 

George H. Gutteridge, cleaning 

clock, West 2.50 

F. F. Chandler, painting exit signs 7.00 
"So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

repairs 1 . 96 

American Seating Co., repairs ... 7.20 



35 



J. L. Hammett Co., repairs 2.40 

Tuttle & Newton, repairs 8.48 



Transportation of Scholars. 

Common Schools. 

Paid Walter M. French $285.00 

Jens Mikkleson 515.20 

George E. Greenough 527.20 

A. Christofferson 70.00 



Gypsy and Brown Tail Moth Account. 

Paid F. W. Billings, labor 511.19 

J. P. Murphy, labor 512 . 54 

George McCarthy, labor 474.01 

James O'Neil, labor 419.25 

Martin L. Brown, labor 500 . 69 

Barney Rush, labor 486.13 

A. H. Perkins, labor and expense, 801.40 

John Keyes. labor 81 . 90 

Harold Norris, labor 81.00 

Sumner Merrill, labor 89.00 

John Bowen, labor 14.40 

H. O. Hartwell, labor 5.00 

Harold Littlefield, labor 5.40 

William Dow, labor 55.80 

James Coughlin, labor 46 . 80 

Harry Carroll, labor 52.20 

M. A. Reed, expense and labor. . 71 15 

W. A. Raynor. labor 3.50 

C. J. Williams, superintendent... 155.00 
C. J. Williams, supplies and ex- 
penses 10.72 



$1,273.35 



$1,397.40 



36 



M. G. Hayes, painting 2.00 

Joseph Breck & Son, supplies... 21.38 
Wm. H. Claflin & Co., burlap and 

jute ' 191.00 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 18.17 

Boston Harness Co., supplies.... 2.40 

Bowker Insecticide Co., supplies. 22.00 

W. G. .Hallock, supplies .75 

Samuel Cabot, supplies 6.15 

C. H. Mead, supplies 17.02 

D. H. Farrar, repairs and supplies, 22.80 
Frost Insecticide Co., supplies... 18.88 

Clarence E. Bailey, supplies 14.70 

Jenney Mfg. Co., supplies 3.08 

Sexton Can Co., supplies 4.20 

W. C. Robbins, use of horse 81.99 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 22.07 

A. Hosmer, printing 28 . 25 

Bliss Bros., supplies 3.40 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

supplies 1 . 62 , 

E. P. Gates, supplies .70 

A. J. Wilkinson, supplies 10.00 

Collins Hdwe. Co., supplies 3.60 

N. H. Tenney, repairs 2.75 

Finney & Hoit, supplies 1.32 



$4,877.31 

Received from State, on account of 

Work $3,194.19 

Received from taxes and interest.... 1,084.50 

Due from State 1,722.14 

Due on account of unpaid taxes 351.08 



37 



Roads and Bridges. 

Paid A. H. Perkins, labor $1,637.66 

A. H. Perkins, labor, county 1,137.92 

W. H. Kingsley 1,233.54 

W. H. Kingsley, county 720.34 

A. C. Piper * 1,127.23 

A. C. Piper, county 625 . 05 

Commercial Oil Co., oil, etc 36.53 

M. G. Hayes, painting 30.00 

S. A. Guilford, repairs 3 . 50 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co., repairs, 9.35 

Stephen B. Church, supplies 37.97 

A. Merriam Co., babbitt 1.80 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

supplies 192.21 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 9.52 

W. E. Whitcomb, two iron rakes, 1.15 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 203.87 

Good Roads Mch. Co., supplies.. 47.14 

Thomas F. Parker, supplies 12 . 81 

J. P. Brown, repairs 20.61 

Ole Granberg, 508 loads gravel.. 25.40 

Hall Bros., supplies 2.00 

C. H. Mead, supplies 25 . 16 

Finney & Hoit, supplies 7 . 50 

E. P. Gates, blacksmithing 44.13 

N. H. Tenney, repairs 164.18 

Received from road material 



$7,356.57 
252.92 



Support of Poor on Farm. 

Expenses per report of Overseers of 
Poor 

Received from farm products, per 
Treasurer's report. 



$2,136.22 



38 



Farm Repairs. 

Paid Edw. Z. Stanley, repairs and 

plumbing $47.00 

E. T. Rice, repairs and plumbing, 5.25 

E. T. Rice, 33 lbs. of castings. ... 3.30 

Edw. Price, mason work 5.50 

W. A. Mack & Co., No. 28 Glen- 
wood furnace 200.00 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 230 

feet 1" spruce 6 . 44 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co; 

lumber, etc 15 . 23 

H. L. Whitcomb, paper and 

border 13.08 

Chas. Calder, 50 ft. chestnut plank, 1 . 25 

P. E. Harris, labor 14.64 

W. S. Kelley, paint and labor... 62.65 



Outside Poor. 



$374.34 



Expenses per report of Overseers of 

Poor $902.06 

Received from State Board of Charity, $15.00 

Due from Town of Concord 20.00 

Due from Town of Philipston 10.00 

Due from Town of Taunton 13.98 

Due for support of Nickolas Murphy, 66.70 

Due for temporary aid Kinnard family 4.72 



39 



Street Lamps. 

Paid Fred W. Green, care of lamps. . . $226.80 

Fred W. Green, repairs 4.00 

W. G. Lawrence, care of lamps.. 37.00 

H. R. Phalen, care of lamps 44.50 

H. R. Phalen, repairs 2.00 

Geo. Laurey, care of lamps 92.00 

Everett Reed, care of lamps 96.50 

Allen Hoyt, care of lamps 59.00 

A. W. Morse, care of lamps 51.00 

American Woolen Co., electric 

lights 28.35 

National Express. Co., express... .95 

Valvoline Oil Co., gasoline 54.88 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 98 . 51 

Whiting Mfg. Co., supplies 17.30 

Bertram D. Hall, repairs and 

freight 3.92 

E. T. Rice, repairs 1.25 

S. A. Guilford, hooks .60 

Blair Light Co., repairs 20.15 

Globe Gas Light Co., glass 7.20 

J. P. Brown, repairs 2.00 

John T. McNiff, repairs .65 

C. H. Mead, supplies 60.40 

N. H. Tenney, repairs .50 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies.... 51.64 

A. J. Prentise, 1907 6 . 00 

Walter E. Hayward 2.00 

L. T. Fullonton 4.00 

John Cahill 4.00 

I. F. Duren 4.00 

H. W. B. Proctor 4.00 

S. L. Richardson 4.00 

Simon Brest 4.00 

D. C. Harris 4.00 

L. C. Tavlor 2.00 



40 



Charles Wheeler . 



4.00 



Printing. 

Paid News Publishing Co., warrants.. $ 3.50 
News Publishing Co., reports and 

school reports 151 . 30 

News Publishing Co., voting list 

and ballots 15 . 75 

News Publishing Co., town war- 
rants 3.00 

The Worcester Press, 25 poll tax 

lists 17.00 

Wright & Potter Printing Co., 

assessors' notices 2.50 

A. Hosmer, caucus notices 1 . 00 

A. Hosmer, printing for Selectmen, 1 . 00 

A. Hosmer, printing for Assessors 11.90 

A. Hosmer, printing for Treasurer 8.13 
A. Hosmer, printing for Town 

Clerk 1.50 

A. Hosmer, printing for Regis- 
trars 1 . 75 

Library Books. 

Paid Tabard Inn Book Co $ 20.87 

W. B. Clark Co 309.72 

Herman Goldberger 36.80 

McDevitt & Wilson 22.30 

David McKay 6.54 

W. A. Wilde Co 4.33 

Munn & Co 11.75 

William D. Tuttle 2.00 

Frederick Loeser & Co 7.50 



$1,003.10 



$218.33 



$421.81 



41 



Library Expenses. 

Paid E. F. Conant, insurance ■ $ 68.20 

S. H. Taylor, janitor 103.50 

S. H. Taylor, cleaning 4.50 

A. F. Davis, librarian 104.00 

A. F. Davis, expenses 6.50 

Finney & Hoit, matting, etc 20.34 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co, ... ■ 70.06 

O. D. Wood, repairs 9.30 

A. Hosmer, printing 11.50 

Charles Twitchell, carrying books 90.00 

Dura Binding Co 45 . 15 

J. Rufus Wales 8.70 

W. H. Kingsley, wood 5.50 

Wm. D. Tuttle, expenses 10.64 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 15.36 

Cemetery Expenses. 

Paid Julian Tuttle, labor in Woodlawn $61.84 

Julian Tuttle, plants in Woodlawn 48.90 

N. G. Brown, labor in Woodlawn 46.38 

E. S. Fobes, labor in Woodlawn. . 7.50 

M. A. Reed, labor in Woodlawn. . 4.25 

Asaph Parlin, labor in Woodlawn 10.50 

E. T. Rice, pump and repair, 
Woodlawn 11.25 

Finney & Hoit, flags, Woodlawn. 3.50 

N. G. Brown, labor in North 1.75 

Asaph Parlin, labor in North. ... 1.75 

H. T. Clark, labor in Mt. Hope. . . 43.30 

N. H. Perkins, labor in Mt. Hope. 90.86 
John H. Haniford, labor in Mt. 

Hope 52.13 

F. W. Green, labor in Mt. Hope. . 12.80 
H. F. Tuttle, laying out lots, etc.. 7.50 



$573.25 



$404.21 



42 



Perpetual Care of Lots. 

Paid Julian Tuttle, care of Woodlawn $163.86 

Julian Tuttle, care of North 6.50 

H. T. Clark, care of Mt. Hope. ... 43.00 



Fire Department. 

Paid West Acton department, allow- 
ance $117.00 

Paid South Acton department, al- 
lowance 117 . 00 

George I. Libby, repairs, South.. 1.00 

E. B. Badger & Sons Co., repairs 

chemical engine, West 44 . 85 

Bertram D. Hall, repairs and ex- 
press, West 5 . 50 

Rex. Fire Extinguisher Co., re- 
pairs chemical, West 25 . 50 

F. W. Green, labor, West 2.45 

So. Acton Woolen Co., vitriol, 

West 3.74 

Fritz Oelschlegel, supplies and re- 
pairs. West 2.35 

N. H. Tenney, repairs on chemi- 
cal, West 2.75 

James Devane, watching fire 1.25 

Fred Gilmore, watching fire 1.25 

Nelson Wambolt, watching fire. . 4.00 

Thomas Devane, watching fire... 4.00 

Ernest Smith, watching fire 1 . 25 

William W. Charter, watching fire 1.25 

W. G. Davis, watching fire 2.50 

Percy Sweet, watching fire 2.50 

Karl R. Jones, watching fire 2.50 

I. S. Ford, watching fire 2.50 



$213.36 



43 



Revere Rubber Co., hose for pump, 




Center 


25.00 


E. T. Rice, tank for South 


7.00 


J. P. Brown, repairs, South 


1.50 


N. H. Tenney, repairs on engine, 




South 


.75 


Geo. E. Greenough, attending fire 




with truck 


4.00 


C. H. Mead & Co., supplies, West. 


11.33 


Tuttle & Newton, oil, East 


.20 



$394.92 



Police Department. 

Paid A. S. Bradley, court fees $73.37 

A. S. Bradley, special duty 77.00 

Geo. Libbey, special duty 77.50 

M. A. Reed, court fees 10.11 

M. A. Reed, constable fees 5.75 

M. A. Reed, special duty 5.00 

E. J. Lyons, court fees 8.50 

William Craig, court fees 11.68 

Chester B. Smith, special duty. . . 2.50 

W. S. Kelley, special duty 2.50 

George H. Decosta, special duty. . 2.50 



Heceived from F. H. Donnelly for spe- 
cial police expenses 

Board of Health. 

Paid M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies, 

Miner family $ 4.26 

George N. Gove, baker's goods, 

Miner family 2 . 30 

L. T. Fullonton, labor, Blanchard 

house 49.72 



$276.41 
200.00 



44 



A. F. Blanchard, rent, Miner 

family 25.00 

George W. Worster, use of hacks, 

Miner family 10.00 

E. T. Rice, rent of stove, Miner 

family 5 . 25 

W. E. Whitcomb, supplies. Miner 

family 3 . 04 

Emma E. Bigelow, nursing. Miner 

family 61.42 

W. F. Stevens. Est. G. H. S. 

Houghton, use of land, public 

clump 2.00 

Edwin Barker, use of land, public 

dump 2 . 00 

Moses A. Reed, labor and expenses 193.15 
Moses A. Reed, inspection of beef 104.20 
C. H. Goldthwait & Co., supplies. 68.96 

C. J. Williams, telephone 85 

W. E. Whitcomb. supplies, Mrs. 

Fredrickson 9.78 

Frederick K. Shaw, medical at- 
tendance 55 . 25 

George E. Greenough, milk, Mrs. 

Fredrickson 3 . 50 

William Harris, carrying water, 

Whitcomb family 12. 50 

James F. Coughlin, lost time on 

account of quarantine 58.50 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies, Mrs. 

Fredrickson 30.09 

The Acton News, printing 1 . 80 

Snoll & Noll 1.35 

Acton Enterprise Co., expense... 7.00 



$711.92- 



45 



Town Buildings and Grounds. 

Paid S. H. Taylor, care of hall and 

grounds $94.30 

S. H. Taylor, care of nag 5.00 

S. H. Taylor, care of trough 5 . 00 

S. H. Taylor, care of clock 21.00 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal 

and supplies for hall 49 . 18 

G. W. Daniels, grinding 2 mowers 1.50 

M. A. Reed, cleaning vaults twice 4.25 

Tuttle & Newton, fixtures for hall . 99 

F. E. Harris, repairs on hall 1.56 

N. IT. Tenney, labor on hall and 

clock 6.25 

W. H. Kingsley, wood for hall.. 5.50 
M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies for 

hall * 29.90 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

steam roller house 154.38 

F. E. Harris, labor, steam roller 

house 59.67 

E. P. Gates, labor, steam roller 

house 2.70 

N. H. Tenney, labor, steam roller 

house .98 

W. H. Kingsley, labor, steam 

roller house 52.23 

Solon A. Robbins, painting roller 

house and fire escape 18.18 

F. E. Harris, labor, fire escape, 

hall 118.65 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., fire 

escape, hall 100 . 06 

S. H. Taylor, labor, fire escape, 

hall 27.85 

E. P. Gates, labor, fire escape, hall 6.20 



46 



N. II. Tenney, labor and stock, 

fire escape, hall.... 34.45 



State Aid. 

Paid Emma F. Blood $48.00 

Susan H. Clough 48.00 

Aaron S. Fletcher 48.00 

Ephraim B. Forbush 40.00 

Lydia Handley 48.00 

Mary A. Parlin 48.00 

Mary I. Richardson 48.00 

Mary A. Wood 48 . 00 

Addison B. Wheeler 48 . 00 

Walter O. Holden 48.00 

Isaiah S. Leach 60.00 

Almira M. Willard 48.00 

Bridget Mann 48.00 

John T. Sibley 60.00 

Fred A. Norris 48.00 

Edward Willis 72.00 



State and Military Aid. 

Paid Emma E. Bigelow, nurse for Mrs. 

E. Willis $ 36.00 

Fred L. Whitcomb, nurse for E. 

Willis 191.81 

F. E. Tasker, medical attendance, 

E. Willis 141.50 

Town of Hudson, aid furnished 

Mrs. Lucy Wood 65.00 



$799.78 



$808.00 



$434.31 



47 



Salaries. 

Paid Lyman Tuttle, election officer... $2.50 

L. C. Taylor, election officer 5.00 

Abram Tuttle, election officer... 5.00 

E. R. Teele, election officer 2.50 

Fred S. Whitcomb, election officer 2.50 

James Kingsley, election officer. . 2.50 

William F. Kelley, election officer 2.50 

A. B. Parker, election officer 2.50 

N. J. Cole, election officer 2.50 

T. F. Newton, election officer 2.50 

Aaron W. Foster, election officer, 2.50 

F. P. Wood, election officer 2.50 

Edwin A. Phalen, election officer. 2.50 

Hiram J. Hapgood, election officer 2.50 

Horace F. Tuttle, election officer. 2.50 
Charles J. Williams, chairman, 

School Committee 80.45 

W. F. Stevens, chairman, Asses- 
sors 75 . 00 

J. B. Tuttle, Assessor 55.00 

W. F. Kelley, Assessor 55.00 

Horace F. Tuttle, Town Clerk ... 30.00 
Horace F. Tuttle, Registrar of 

Voters 15.00 

O. A. Knowlton, chairman, Over- 
seers of Poor 50.00 

J. S. Moore, Overseer of Poor... 25.00 

W. F. Kelley, Overseer of Poor. . . 20.00 
James B. Tuttle, chairman of 

Selectmen 125.00 

Bertram D. Hall, Selectman 50.00 

Asaph Merriam, Selectman 50.00 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, Treasurer. . . 150.00 
W. F. Stevens, collecting taxes, 

1905 .42 

W. F. Stevens, collecting taxes, 



48 



1906 3.81 

W. F. Stevens, collecting taxes, 

1907 29.64 

W. F. Stevens, collecting taxes, 

1908 257.90 

W. F. Stevens, collecting moth 

tax, 1907 20.00 

W. F. Stevens, making moth tax, 

1908 5.00 

$1,139.72 

Loans and Interest. 

Paid First National Bank of Ayer, 

note $3,500.00 

First National Bank of Ayer, note 3,000.00 

Interest on notes at 4 percent .... 120 . 00 

Charlotte F. Tollman, note and 

interest 2,021 . 57 

Isaiah Reed Est., note and in- 
terest 527.09 

E. Jones Est., interest on note ... 80.00 

F. C. Hayward, interest on ceme- 

tery fund 17.50 

M. Medora Tuttle, interest on 

cemetery fund 8 . 75 

$9,274.91 
Miscellaneous Accounts. 
Paid A. H. Perkins, setting and trim- 
ming trees $18 . 50 

I. F. Duren, returns 31 deaths ... 7.75 

J. H. and F. W. Watkins, acre 

land, public pump 100.00 

Hobbs & Warren Co., assessor and 

collector books 7.00 

George B. Parker, for Memorial 

Day 50.00 



49 

Hobbs & Warren Co., books of 

Sealer Weight and Measure . 5.57 

W. & L. E. Gurley, supplies Sealer 

Weight and Measure 70.70 

Pneumatic Hand Stamp Co., 

Sealer Weight and Measure . .79 

Maiden Specialty Co., Sealer 

Weight and Measure 1 . 50 

H. F. Tuttle, surveying and writ- 
ing deed 5 . 00 

Joslin & Mendum, legal advice, 

Mr. Hoit 35.00 

Joslin & Mendum, publishing 

notices 7.88 

Joslin & Mendum, legal advice, 

taxable cost 39 . 02 

W. H. Kingsley, labor and sup- 
plies town well, West 50 . 33 

E. T. Rice, labor and supplies 

town well, West 13.88 

H. T. Clark, pipe, town well, West 18.05 

F. W. Green, putting up booths, 

etc 1.50 

F. F. Chandler, exit signs, Town 

hall 1.25 

C. H. Persons, tuning piano 2.50 

F. W. Hoit, express, Town reports 2.53 
F. W. Hoit, electric railroad hear- 
ing 8.88 

Howard Hamblin, M. D., return 1 

birth .25 

I. L. Pickard, M. D., return 3 

births .75 

Frank E. Tasker, M. D., return 12 

births 3.00 

F. U. Rich, M. D., return 5 births 1.25 

George C. Turner, opening rooms 

board of registrars 1 .00 



50 



Horace F. Tuttle, collecting and 

recording 47 births 23 . 50 

Horace P. Tuttle, recording 18 

marriages 3 . 60 

Horace F. Tuttle, recording 36 

deaths 7.20 

Horace F. Tuttle, attending meet- 
ing at Ayer 2 . 50 

Horace F. Tuttle, copying and 

expense 26 . 07 

Horace F. Tuttle, examining 

records Overseers of Poor ... 1 . 00 

Horace F. Tuttle, services, Com- 
missioners of Public Record . 4.00 

A. Merriam, postage and express . 1 . 75 

J. B. Tuttle, postage, car fare, etc. 9.50 

Bertram D. Hall, expense 4.05 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, treasurer 

supplies 20 . 15 

Moses A. Reed, inspection of cattle 50.00 

W. F. Stevens, postage account 

Assessor 5 . 92 

W. F. Stevens, attending meetings 9.85 

W. F. Stevens, postage account 

Collector 14.94 

W. F. Stevens, election expenses . 3.00 

Finney & Hoit. stationery for 

Treasurer 4 . 60 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies for 

Registrars .17 

Acton Enterprise Co., Town 

charges for Selectmen .70 

W. F. Stevens, abatement taxes 

1907 72.56 

W. F. Stevens, abatement taxes 

1908 32.66 



$751.60 



51 



Receipts for Year Ending March 1st, 1909. 

Balance due from Treasurer $2,519 . 08 

Balance due from Collector 3,773 . 10 

Appropriation : 

For Memorial library 600 . 00 

For roads and bridges 5,000.00 

For County road, Acton Street . . 1,600.00 

For steam roller house 300 . 00 

For common schools 4,750.00 

For High school 4,200.00 

For school supplies 625 . 00 

For Superintendent of Schools . . 480 . 00 

For transportation 1,360.00 

For medical inspection 100.00 

For extermination of moths .... 700.00 

For Fire Department 350.00 

For Town charges 3,000.00 

For street lamps 1,000.00 

For overlayings . . . . . 476 . 96 

Raised for State tax 3,190 . 00 

For State highway tax 221 . 55 

For County tax 2,011 . 51 

For crossing assessments 1,508.00 

Received from State Treasurer: 

Corporation tax 3,811 . 30 

National Bank tax 771 . 16 

State aid 690.00 

School fund 868.81 

Moth work 3,194.19 

Street Railway tax 14.85 

Grade Crossing fund 205.51 

Burial State pauper 15.00 

Inspection of Animals 25. 68 

Tutition children in small towns 25.00 

Received from County Treasurer, dog 

license 313.85 



52 



First National Bank of Ayer, loan 6,500.00 

Mrs. Charlotte F. Tollman, loan . . 2,000.00 

Frank H. Donnelly, liquor license 1,300.00 
Frank H. Donnelly, special police 

services 200.00 

Supervision of Schools 375 . 00 

Lyman and Industrial schools ... 15.00 

Cemetery funds 425 . 00 

Income of cemetery fund 193.98 

Income of library fund 241.60 

Memorial library for fines 22.41 

Town of Concord, aid Miner 

family 716.91 

Worcester Mutual Fire Insurance 

Co., dividend 7.37 

Rent of hall 62.50 

Rent of hall and cellar 136.00 

District court, fines 12.91 

Sidney Laffin, outhouse 10.00 

School Committee, over-payment 

high school tuition 5.34 

W. F. Stevens, poll tax list sold. . 1.75 

A. F. Blanchard, slaughter license 1.00 

Road Commissioner, road material 252.92 

Lots sold in Woodlawn 45.00 

Lots sold in Mt. Hope 18.00 

Farm products 1,616 . 18 

Interest on taxes 151 . 69 

Interest on deposits 73 . 03 

Gypsy moth tax 1,082.24 

Interest moth tax 2.26 

Street railway tax, C, M. & H.. . 16.56 

Street railway tax, L., A. & M.. . 34.22 



$63,219.42 



53 



Expenditures. 

High school $3,363.10 

South school 2,488.28 

West school 1,699 . 91 

Center school 1,777.29 

Miscellaneous school expense 652.78 

School supplies 815 . 52 

School repairs 1,273 . 35 

Transportation of scholars 1,397.40 

Gypsy and brown tail moths 4,877 . 31 

Roads and bridges 7,356.57 

Support of poor on farm 2,136.22 

Farm repairs 374 . 34 

Outside poor 902 . 06 

Street lamps 1,003 . 10 

Printing 218.33 

Library books 421 . 81 

Library expense 573 . 25 

Cemeter3 r expenses 617 . 57 

Fire department 394.92 

Police department 276.41 

Board of Health 711 . 92 

Town buildings and grounds 799.78 

State aid 808.00 

Military aid 434.31 

Salaries 1,139 . 72 

Loans and interest 9,274.91 

Miscellaneous accounts 751 . 60 

Total Selectmen's orders $46,539.76 



54 



Paid State tax $3,190.00 

Payment, abolition grade crossing 1,300.00 

Interest 208.00 

Repairs on state highway 221 . 55 

State, one-fourth liquor license . . 325 . 00 

County tax 2,011.51. 

Cash on hand 3,450.16 

Uncollected taxes 5,973.44 



$63,219.42 

Financial Statement for Year Ending March 1, 1909. 

Due from Treasurer $3,450. 16 

From Collector 5,968.17 

From Town of Concord 20.00 

From Town of Philipston 10.00 

From Town of Taunton 13 . 98 

State aid 808.00 

Inspection of animals 25 . 00 

Gypsy moth work 1,722 . 14 

Uncollected moth taxes 351 . 08 

Corporation tax 120. 39 

For support, sick, Nicholas 

Murphy 66.70 

For temporary aid, Kinnard 

family 4.72 

$12,560.34 



55 

Liabilities. 

E. Jones, Est., note $2,000.00 

Cemetery fund 3,750.00 

Unexpended balance, cemetery fund. 271.82 

Unexpended balance, library fund . . . 203.47 
Transportation, high school scholars 

for winter term, "estimated"... 250.00 



$6,475.29 
Balance in favor of Town $6,085.05 

JAMES B. TUTTLE, 

BERTRAM D. HALL, 

ASAPH MERRIAM, 

Selectmen of Ad ■ 
March 1, 1909. 



56 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



1908. 

March 12. Cash on hand $2,519.08 

Eeceipts : 

State Treasurer, corporation tax.... 3,811.30 

State Treasurer, national bank tax. . . 771.16 

State Treasurer, state aid 690 . 00 

State Treasurer, income of Mass. 

school fund 868.81 

State Treasurer, for suppression of 

gypsy and brown tail moths 3,194.19 

State Treasurer, on account of grade 

crossing fund 205 . 51 

State Treasurer, street railway tax. . . 14.85 
State Treasurer, burial of state pauper 15 . 00 
State Treasurer, compensation for in- 
spection of animals 25.68 

State Treasurer, for tuition of children 

in small towns 25 . 00 

County Treasurer, on account of dog 

licenses 313 . 85 

First National Bank of Ayer, tempo- 
rary loan 6,500.00 

Mrs. Charlotte F. Tolman, temporary 

loan 2,000.00 

Frank H. Donnelly, liquor license... 1,300.00 
Frank H. Donnelly, for special police 

service 200.00 

For supervision of schools 375 . 00 

Trustees of Lyman and Industrial 
schools, for instruction in public 

schools 15 . 00 



57 



Cemetery fund 425.00 

Income of cemetery fund 193 . 98 

Income of library fund 241 . 60 

Memorial library, for fines 22.41 

Town of Concord, for aid furnished 

Miner family 716.91 

Worcester Mutual Fire Insurance Co., 

dividend 7.37 

Acton grange, for rent of town hall. . . 62.50 

Rent of town hall and cellar 136 . 00 

District Court for Central Middlesex, 

for fines 12.91 

Sidney Laifin, for outhouse 10.00 

School Committee, for over-payment 

of high school tuition 5.34 

William F. Stevens, for two poll tax 

lists sold 1.75 

Arthur F. Blanchard, slaughter house 

license 1 . 00 

Road Commissioners, for road material 

sold 252.92 

Horace F. Tuttle, for lots sold in 

Woodlawn cemetery 45 . 00 

H. T. Clark, for lots sold in Mount 

Hope cemetery 18 . 00 

For milk sold from Town farm 1,141.96 

Cows sold from Town farm 116 . 63 

Calves sold from Town farm 28.75 

Apples sold from Town farm 172.32 

Cauliflowers sold from Town farm... 102.22 

Eggs sold from Town farm 22.46 

Potatoes sold from Town farm 23 . 60 

Corn sold from Town farm .40 

Chickens sold from Town farm 1.00 

Stove sold from Town farm 2 . 00 

Labor. Town farm 2 . 00 

Telephone, Town farm 2.84 



William F. Stevens, collector, taxes 

for A. D. 1903 1.10 

William F. Stevens, collector, taxes 

for A. D. 1904 1.23 

William F. Stevens, collector, taxes 

for A. D. 1905 16.02 

Interest on taxes, 1905 1.77 

William F. Stevens, collector, taxes 

for A. D. 1906 284.17 

Interest on taxes, 1906 24. 60 

William F. Stevens, collector, taxes 

for A. D., 1907 3,055.74 

Interest on taxes, 1907 98.11 

William F. Stevens, collector, taxes 

for A. D., 1908 25,914.42 

Interest on taxes, 1908 27.21 

William F. Stevens, collector, moth 

tax, A. D. 1907 469.44 

Interest on taxes, 1907 1 . 83 

William F. Stevens, collector, moth 

tax, A. D. 1908 612.80 

Interest on taxes, 1908 .43 

Concord, Maynard & Hudson street 

railway taxes, A. D. 1908 16.56 

Lowell, Acton & Maynard street rail- 
way taxes, A. D. 1908 34.22 

International Trust Co., interest on 

deposits t 73 . 03 



$57,245.98 



59 

Expenditures. 

Paid State tax. A. D. 1908 $3,190.00 

For abolition of grade crossing.. 1,300.00 

Interest £08.00 

Repairs on State highway 221.55 

One-fourth of liquor license .... 325 . 00 

County tax, A. D. 1908 2,011.51 

On Selectmen's orders 46,539.76 

Cash on hand and in bank 3,450.16 



$57,245.98 
J. K W. WETHERBEE, Treasurer. 



60 



Treasurer's Report of Money Held for Care of Lots in 
Cemeteries. 



1909. Dr. 
March 1. To cash in North End Sav- 
ings Bank $2,175.00 

Cash in Warren Institution for Sav- 
ings 1,000.00 

Cash in Charlestown Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank 1,000.00 

Cash in Middlesex Institution for Sav- 
ings 500.00 

Cash in Town Treasury, March 12, 1908 3,325 . 00 

Cash received in 1908 425.00 

Income unexpended March 12, 1908.. 216.98 
Income for A. D. 1908-1909 294.45 



Cr. 
By cash paid Cemetery Committee for 

care of lots $213.36 

Cash paid F. C. Hayward 17.50 

Cash paid Mrs. Varnum Tuttle 8 . 75 

Principal of cemetery fund, March 1, 

1909 8,425.00 

Balance of income unexpended 271.82 



$8,936.43 



$8,936.43 



J. K. W. WETHERBEE. Treasurer. 



61 



Report of the Wilde Memorial Library. 
1909 Dr. 
March 1. To cash in North End Sav- 
ings Bank $1,000.00 

Cash in Home Savings Bank 1,000.00 

Cash in Warren Institution for Savings 1,000.00 
Cash in Charlestown Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank 1,000.00 

Cash in Middlesex Institution for Sav- 
ings 1,000.00 

Mortgage Bond of West Shore Rail- 
road Co 1,000.00 

Received for interest on money in 

banks 201.60 

Received for interest on mortgage 

bond 40.00 

Received for fines 22.41 

Town appropriation for books 200.00 

Unexpended balance March 12, 1908. 161.27 

Cr. 

By cash in banks $5,000.00 

By Susan, Augusta and Luther Conant 

fund 1,000.00 

Paid for books and magazines : 

W. B. Clarke Co 309.72 

Tabard Inn Library 20.87 

Herman Goldberger 36 . 80 

McDevitte & Wilson 22.30 

Daniel McKay 6.54 

W. A. Wilde Co 4.33 

Frederick Loeser 7.50 

Munn & Co 11.75 

W. D. Tuttle 2.00 

Balance unexpended 203.47 



$6,625.28 



$6,625.28 



J. K. W. WETHERBEE. Treasurer. 



62 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



I have examined the accounts of the Selectmen, Treas- 
urer and Tax Collector of the Town of Acton, and to the best 
of my knowledge I find them correct. 



W. E. WHITCOMB, Auditor. 



March 15, 1909. 



63 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



Valuation May 1, 1908. 

Real estate (buildings) $986,610.00 

Real estate (land) 463,430.00 

Value of assessed personal estate 381,940.00 



Total valuation $1,831,980.00 

Valuation May 1, 1907 1,798,545.00 

Increase $33,435.00 

Rate of taxation, 1908, $16.50 on a thousand. 

Tax Assessed as Follows: 

On real estate $23,925.66 

On personal property 6,307 . 36 

On polls 1,240.00 

$31,473.02 

Amount of Money Raised. 

For State tax $3,190.00 

For State highway tax 221 . 55 

For County tax 2,011.51 

For crossing assessment 1,508.00 

For Town grant 24,065.00 

Overlayings 476 . 96 

$31,473.02 

WM. F. STEVENS, 
WM. F. KELLEY, 
JAMES B. TUTTLE, 

Assessors of Acton. 



64 



REPORT OF COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 
For Fiscal Year Ending March 1, 1909. 



Amount committed for collection $31,473 . 02 

Interest collected 27 . 21 

$31,500.23 

Abatements $32.66 

Paid Treasurer 25,908.97 

$25,941.63 

Uncollected due Town March 1, 1909 $5,558.60 

1907 Moth Tax. 

Uncollected March 1, 1908 $516.75 

Interest collected 1 . 83 

$518.58 
Paid Treasurer $471.27 

Uncollected March 1, 1909 $47.31 

1908 Moth Tax. 

Amount committed to Collector $916 . 57 

Interest collected* .43 

$917.00 
Paid Treasurer $613.23 

Uncollected March 1, 1909 $303.77 

WILLIAM F. STEVENS, 

Collector. 



65 
COLLECTOR'S REPORT FOR 1903-1904-1905-1906-1907 



1903 Dr. 

Uncollected March 1, 1908 $1.10 

Cr. 
Paid Treasurer $1 . 10 

1904 Dr 

Uncollected March 1, 1908 $1.23 

Cr. 
Paid Treasurer $1 . 23 

1905 Dr. 

Uncollected March 1, 1908 $16.02 

Interest collected 1.77 

$17.79* 
Cr. 
Paid Treasurer $17. 79 

1906 Dr. 

Uncollected March 1, 1908 $284.17 

Interest collected 24. 60 

$308.77 
Cr. 
Paid Treasurer $308.77 

1907 Dr. 

Uncollected March 1, 1908 $3,470.58 

Interest collected 98.11 

$3,568.69 
Cr. 

Abatements $72 . 56 

Paid Treasurer 3,081.29 

$3,153.85 
Uncollected March 1, 1909 $414. 84 



66 



REPORT OF ROAD COMMISSIONERS. 



Receipts for Roads and Bridges. 

Appropriation $5,000.00 

Gasoline 1 . 80 

Broken stone 4 . 50 

$5,006.30 
Expenditures $4,842.02 

Stone road built, 5,657 feet. 
Gravel road built, 6,440 feet. 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS' ORDER. 
Receipts. 

Appropriation $1,600 . 00 

Wood sold 1.00 

Dirt sold, and labor 200.37 

Broken stone and labor 45.25 



$1,846.62 



Due from County $500.00 

Due for dirt sold 37.05 



$537.05 
$2,383.67 



67 

Expenditures. 

For labor and supplies $2,514.55 

Due A. H. Jones Est 300.00 



$2,814.55 

Mr. A. Conant graded school house hill in the Center 
using thousands of loads of filling, making a road that he 
and the town can well be proud of at a cost of $600. 

Inventory of Tools on Hand March 1, 1909. 

Crushing plant $1,500.00 

One track 100.00 

One iron roller 275 . 00 

One snow roller 100 . 00 

Two road machines 150 . 00 

One sewer pump 40 . 00 

20 Feet of pipe 40.00 

One power pump 40 . 00 

One plow 30.00 

Small tools 15.00 

Watering cart 300.00 

Two gasoline tanks 20 . 00 

One steam roller 3,000.00 



$5,610.00 



We recommend that $5,000 be raised for the repairs 
of roads and bridges. 

WM. H. KINGSLEY, 
ANSON C. PIPER, 
ALBERT H. PERKINS, 

Road Commissioners. 



68 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 
Town of Acton for the Year 1908. 



The Board of Health submit the following report for the 
year ending March 1st, 1909: 



Whole number of deaths recorded to December 31, 1908, 36 

Number occurring in Acton 30 

Number occurring in other places 6 

Residents of Acton 36 

Residents of other places 

Average age, 47 years. 

No deaths from contagious diseases. 

List of contagious diseases reported to the Board of 
Health from March 1, 1908 to March 1, 1909 : 

No. of Cases No. of Deaths 



Diphtheria, 










Small Pox, 










Scarlet Fever, 




19 





Typhoid Fever, 










Measles, 




5 





Cerebro-spinal 


Meningitis, 








Tuberculosis, 




5 






Total for the year, 29 



69 

BEEF INSPECTOR'S REPORT. 

Beef, Veal, Pigs and Mutton Inspected at A. F. Blanchard's 
From March 17th, 1908 to March 1st, 1909. 

Beef 164 

Veal 1,232 

Pigs 24 

Mutton 2 

Total for the year 1,422 

Condemned as Unfit for Food. 

Beef 4 

Veal 37 

Pigs 

Mutton 

41 
Taken by Lowell Rendering Co. 

MOSES A. REED, 

Inspector of Beef. 



FRANK E. TASKER, M. D. 
CHARLES J. WILLIAMS. 

Board of Health. 



70 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF POOR. 



Inventory of Stock and Provisions on Hand March 1, 1909. 

12 Cows $600.00 

6 Tons hay 108.00 

2 Horses 300.00 

Double harness 20 . 00 

Express harness 15 . 00 

Light harness 25 . 00 

Horse collars 7 . 00 

Express wagons 85 . 00 

Hay wagons 20 . 00 

Wood wagon, rack 110 . 00 

2 Sleds 80.00 

Farming tools 10 . 00 

Grain 24.00 

1 Two-horse cart 20.00 

Horse rakes 15 . 00 

2 Harrows 38.00 

1 Iron collar 1 . 25 

Cultivator 4.00 

7 Ladders 12.00 

"Wheelbarrow 3.00 

Hay cutter 2 00 

Horse hay-fork 20.00 

Roller 2.00 

Plough 25.00 

Peed trough 2.00 

100 Bushel boxes 10.00 

Pung 5.00 

Democrat wagon 20 . 00 

Baskets 1 .50 

Apple barrels 20.00 



71 



"Watering trough 5 . 00 

Mowing machine 25 . 00 

Grindstone j 4.00 

Spray pump 8 . 00 

Wood cut for stove 75 . 00 

Cord wood 40.00 

Saws .50 

Carpenter tools 6 . 00 

Wagon Jack 1 . 50 

Saw clamp 1 . 00 

Ladder hooks .60 

Set Measures 1 . 00 

Salt .90 

Barrel header 1 . 00 

Snow shovel .50 

40 Hens 30.00 

10 Bush, potatoes 10.00 

Soap barrels 5 . 00 

Pork and jar 2.00 

Washing machine 5 . 00 

Horse blankets 4 . 00 

Range and waterfront 60.00 

3 Rockers 3 .00 

1 Lantern .90 

Couch and 2 easy chairs 15 . 00 

1 Coal hod .50 

Lamps 2 . 50 

Soap .25 

Coal shovel 1.25 

Molasses 1 . 00 

2 Axes 2.00 

Stone drag 2.50 

Keg lime .75 

Oyster shells .25 

Ton coal 7.00 

Lard ,. . .75 

Spices 2.00 



72 



Butter 1.40 

Flour 4.00 

Sugar 1 . 50 

Crackers 25 

Fruit jars 3 . 25 

Brooms .50 

Crockery and tinware 10 . 00 

Tea and coffee .85 

Oil and tank 1 . 60 

Pails and tubs 3.00 

Tree pruner . 75 

4 Stoves 15.00 

2 Cabinet chairs 2.00 

3 Tables 5.50 

Ice 25.00 

Chamber sets 12.00 

Air cushion 1 . 00 

Beds and bedding 70.00 

Bed pan 3.00 

5 Traps 1.50 

Trunks 2.00 

Wheel chair , 22.00 

1 Clock 6.00 

8 Chairs 4.00 

Cereals .75 

Beans .40 

Lantern globe .25 

Bread mixer 2 . 00 

Clothes line .75 

Refrigerator 18 . 00 

Ice tongs .50 

Vinegar and jar .25 

Clothes wringer 3 . 00 

Meat chopper 1 . 25 

Pump 125.00 

Inventory March 1, 1909 $2,278.65 



73 

Support of Poor on Farm. 

Paid John McDonald, salary $232.91 

Charles Calder, labor 197.41 

John Welsh, labor 35.40 

Angus McDonald, labor 103.70 

George Salmon, labor 13 . 32 

J. S. Moore, meat and provisions 107.21 

Samuel Ineson, fish 35 . 53 

Tuttle & Newton, groceries and 

supplies 43 . 36 

M. E. Taylor & Co., groceries and 

supplies 291.94 

C. H. Mead, groceries and supplies 106.19 

E. C. Parker, grain 180.85 

George Reed, grain 157.94 

J. Gushing & Co., grain 105.50 

W. E. Woodward, sawing wood . . 13.65 

Constantine O 'Neal, cow 46 . 00 

W. C. Robbins, cow 50.00 

Chester B. Robbins, cow 60.00 

Chester B. Robbins, hay rakes ... 10.00 
Brookside Printing Co.. printing 

envelopes and note heads ... 2.65 

E. R. Teele. 125 apple trees 28.75 

O. A. Knowlton, ton fertilizer ... 28.00 

John McDonald, eggs for setting 1.50 

John McDonald, soft soap 3.00 

John McDonald, express on har- 
ness .40 

John McDonald, repairs on clock 1.00 
Boston Harness Co., harness .... 23.00 
S. A. Guilford, shoeing horse .... 5.50 
E. P. Gates, shoeing horse and re- 
pairs 13 . 55 

John McNiff, shoeing horse and 

repairs 4 . 50 



74 



New England Tel. & Tel. Co., tele- 
phone services 17 . 66 

L. A. Tuttle, 80 apple barrels ... 22.40 

Charles Edwards, 6 large boxes . 1.20 

Charles Edwards, 2 bunches raffia 1.15 
Charles Calder, 75 lbs. pork and 

jar 6.75 

Charles Calder, labor on ice . . . . 2.00 

Charles Calder, sawdust 2.50 

Charles Calder, use of bull 1.50 

C. H. Mead, grass seed and farm 

supplies 33 . 15 

Charles Clark, repairing harness 2.25 
A. IT. Perkins, pasturing cows ... 34.23 
Finney & Hoit, bedding and cloth- 
ing 15.54 

O. A. Knowlton, paid A. Allen, 

labor 4.50 

O. A. Knowlton, telephone, ex- 
press and stamps 2.20 

O. A. Knowlton, flower seed 15.00 

O. A. Knowlton, fare to Tewks- 

bury for Thomas Mullen .... .50 
O. A. Knowlton, expense to Boston 

in Bertie Sleep's case 1.54 

O. A. Knowlton, horse hire .75 

H. T. Clark, repairs on wheels . . 4.00 

J. S. Moore, postage .70 

F. J. Barker, M. D., professional 
services rendered Christopher 

Kane 37.50 

F. J. Barker, M. D., medical ser- 
vices rendered Christopher 

Kane 3.50 

F. J. Barker, M. D., medical ser- 
vices rendered Wm. Quinlan 10.75 



75 



Frederick Shaw, M. D., medical 
services rendered Christopher 
Kane 2.90 

Frederick Shaw, M. D., medical 
services rendered William 
Quinlan 4 . 40 

Frederick Shaw, M. D., medical 
services rendered Frank Har- 
ris 1 . 75 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
professional services rendered 
Christopher Kane 3 . 14 

$2,136.22 

Expenditures $2,136.22 

Inventory, 1908 2,485.35 

$4,621.57 

Inventory, 1909 $2,278.65 

Receipts from farm 1,616.18 

Due on milk 113.75 

Victualizing 18 tramps 4.50 

$4,013.08 

Cost of supporting poor on farm .... $608.49 

Inmates at Farm During Year. 

Susan Fisk, 12 months. 
William Quinlan, 12 months. 
Frank Harris, 12 months. 
Christopher Kane, 12 months. 

O. A. KNOWLTON, 

WM. F. KELLEY, 

J. STERLING MOORE, 

Overseers of Poor. 



76 
Outside Poor. 

J. S. Moore, meat and provisions fur- 
nished F. G. Smith $64.46 

Tuttle & Newton, groceries and sup- 
plies furnished F. G. Smith 117.92 

Frank Tasker, M. D., medical attend- 
ance furnished F. G. Smith 149.00 

O. S. Fowler, funeral expenses fur- 
nished Mr. Kannard 22.00 

Frank Tasker, M. D., medical aid fur- 
nished Mrs. Kannard . 1 . 50 

Samuel Christie, M. D., medical at- 
tendance furnished Mrs. Kannard 6.00 

J. S. Moore, meat and provisions fur- 
nished Mrs. Kannard 1.00 

Tuttle & Newton, groceries and sup- 
plies furnished Mrs. Kannard .... 1.87 

City of Cambridge, aid furnished Mrs. 

Mary Hill and family 176.50 

Tuttle & Newton, groceries and sup- 
plies furnished Charles Leach .... 52.86 

M. E. Taylor & Co., groceries and sup- 
plies furnished Mrs. D. Gallagher 103.12 

M. E. Taylor & Co., groceries and sup- 
plies furnished George Brooks . . . 104.00 

Frank Willard, medicine furnished 

Nicholas Murphy .50 

John Cahill, board and care furnished 

N. Murphy 24. 69 

Mrs. Wm. Tobin, nursing N. Murphy 4.50 

James Richardson, nursing N. Murphy 5.00 

Daniel Goodenow, M. D., consultation 

in N. Murphy 's case 2 . 00 

Samuel Christie, M. D., medical at- 
tendance furnished N. Murphy .. 31.00 



77 



John Kenney, expense to Concord in 

Nicholas Murphy's case .70 

City of Salem, hospital aid furnished 

Eva Harris 4 . 50 

Frederick Shaw, M. D., medical at- 
tendance furnished Henry Bur- 
gess 5 . 00 

Ernest Woodward, board furnished 

Henry Burgess 5 . 00 

Dexter Spinney, rent furnished George 

Wood 5.00 

O. A. Knowlton, horse hire in George 

Wood case 1 . 50 

M. E. Taylor & Co., groceries and sup- 
plies furnished George Wood ... 7.48 

W. E. Whitcomb, meat and provisions 
furnished Mrs. Frederickson and 
family 4.90 



Cost of supporting outside poor $902.06 



78 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS. 
For the Year 1908-1909. 



We present the following schedule showing the amounts 
of the several funds for the perpetual care of cemetery lots 
and the income and expenditures on account of each fund 
for the year. 

HERBERT T. CLARK, 
JULIAN TUTTLE, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Cemetery Commissioners. 



CO 

H 
O 
i-J 

Eh 

o 

H 

o 
o 

CO 

Q 

p 
Eh 

W 
Eh 

s 

H 

o 



6061 'l qarew 
pireq no 


lflkOOOMlO»OOO^T|tOOt»0 

NHLOOOOCOLOLOlCCO^COlC 

OHOHOWHMHHIOWNNN 
k£5OOU5OC<lOOOOOOOO0 
■€©• rH rH CQlftrHTH»HTH<MiHTHi-lrH 


pepuedxg; 


OOOOOOiOOOOXtHWIOO 

LO O LC UO CC CO (M C O C X CC (M M O 


■Q& 1 rH 


araoouj 


lOOOlOOOOOOOOOOOO 
b-»OW5|>OWlO»fllOlOO»jO tfl kfl O 


■«£- rH 


8061 "l ip^K 
pneq no 


OWOWCOWOOOilN^lOCQO 
U3 HlOt-HCOWOlOONNt-WO 


OHHOCQOJHCOHNIO^HNN 
IftOOlOOrHOOOOOOOOO 

■66- TH iH 'Ml-^l—T— t— r-'Mr-i— — ^ 




ooooooooooooooo 
ooooooooooooooo 


pa^isodaQ 
^unouiy 


$50 

100 
100 
50 
200 
500 
100 
100 
100 

100 

200 
100 
100 
100 
100 




Woodlawn Cemetery. 

Hepsabeth Piper 
Frederick Rouillard 
William W. Davis 
redediah Tuttle 
Mary Skinner 
Nancy K. Ilandley 
Marv Severance 
Mary W. Chaffin 
Warren Robbins 
Henry Loker 
Henry Lothrop 
kuther W. Piper 
lames Temple 
Fidelia Wbeeler 
William II. Chapman 


■+3 

"oB 

O 

a? 

Q 

«4H 

o 

p 

6 


cs^ cqcocob- _ ^ c> ^ ^ 

00O(NoCSC5C5C~£:2oCiOOO 

C09C3C0000000CJ59S00C:OOO 

HCOcOHHnriOOCO^HQOO^a) 

y— 1 i— I rH '-t ' _H r— I rH rH rH 


- W K *t i" 'X l^ X J: C -- M re ^ i" 



iOOCOOOOHOeOMl>COOit>(Mt>Cl(MOLO^(NO(MinO 
(MHHCDlOO^D(MCO'*TJHHlCa>M'*H^OI>HmHCO^(N 




K>^O«0H(MC0OOlO(MOC0O00HG0(MWOl0Hl0C0CDH 
OOOL^OOOOOL^OOOLOOOCMu^OLOt-OLOLOOO 
rH rH rH i— 1 i— IHHH t— IrHrH H H lO t— 1 rH CM CM r- 1 





OOfMOOOOOOOOCMOOOOOOOOOOLOOOO 
OlO^iCmOO^iOlDO^OlOlONOOOlOLOLOt-WOO 


a 


M(MCOHCOCO(MCOMCqCOCOt>H ID lO r- 1 00 H CO (M CO LOCO 


OOOCMOOOOOCMOOOu^OOOLDOLOC^OLOLOOO 


r> 


MCOCO^C0O0COC0O0WO0COCOHCO00^HC0HC<10000Ht>C0 

rH * 


GO 


L0O0000OOHOC0Ot'00OiN(MC<lO5^OO(MNOt-l0O 
t>HO^miCH(MCOCOaiOl>^(MNCOCDinnOOiDHO^t> 


o 
'3 


(MCOOkOHH(MOOiOHOhOOCOlOHHO^OiOO^^O 
OOOt^OOOOOl^OOOLOOOCMLOOLOL^OLOLOOO 
HHH rH rH r- IHH HHH rH rH LO rH rH CM CM rH 



oooooooooooooooooooooooooo 
oooooooooooooooooooooooooo 

oooloooooolo'ooooooooooloooooo 

©OOl^OOOOOl^OOOLOOOOLOOLOt^OLOLOO© 

rHrHrH rHrHrHrHrH rHrHrH H H ID r-\ r— CM CMrH 



T3 

o 

is «jS 

d o .d g 
.2 o 8 

'Tl GO Ti o3 d 



co <v 

d rQ 

•d ^ 

^ ^5 ^ 

fe fl s 

03 TO H 

^ ^ to 

r- 1 ^ Q r— , 



.2 "83 3 



o 
o 
•+J 

d d 



^ F-l ^ 



TO 

d 

u b n 

d TO <i) 

d^ .£ 

TO £h H 

wSgg 

l- c <u O 



Fh 

co d 
II 

i — l CO 

2 re 

TO ?h 



p 

d 
c 
O 

,4 



•d rO £ CO 

■§ g^ d § 

« - -? ^ '3 

k g £ TO s 

£' tic s 'S 5 

02 d to ;q to 

S ^ td ■ H 5Z 



^ d 

-4-< CD 

d£ 



d 
Eh 

CO 

g a; 

PH +-> 
0) 



be 



^H -H V! 



HH^^ 



X 



c 

CO 

5 d 

cX>CD 



G r^ - H 



TO TO 

X 



H 



rH rH rH 

o o o 


S3 


CM CM 

o o 

© Oi 

rH rH 


CM 

O 


HH 

^9 


O 








LO 


LO 

— 


CO 


^> co o o 

O O C5 Oi 


CO 

o 

rH 


CO 

O CO 


C5 C^> C7i 


rH 2 


_. 


o 2 


Oi 


OS 


rH 


o c^> 


CTs 


o 


O C7i rH rH 


H050 


rH 


rH rH 




rH 


Oi rH 


rH 


H 




Ci rH 


rH 


OS 


rH rH 


rH OS 


CI 

rH 


of ©~ 
CM rH 




cTtc 

CM rH 


00 


rH ^ 
CO CM 


its - 

rH OS 


CM 


o 

CO 


rH „ 
CM CO 


— i 


rH 
LO 


,. ^ ctT h 

00 CO rH CM 


O 


CM~^ 
CM O - 

rH rH 


di.JfS,rO 

TO ^h « ^ 
t-S Ha ^ CC Ph 


d ^P^rd^ 

p P O O) d) 


TO 

i — i 


P. 




a; TO 




n' n' § 2 

TO TO £ ~ 


If "^^ o 



tDN0005OH(MC0^mC0l>Q005OH(NC0rt<inc0l>00OOn 
HHHHNNNNNNNNINGNIOOCOOOCOXOO'OOOOOOOO^rH 



T^r-ico<MOcocococoir5 


o 


(M (M CD l> O tJ< t> CO CO TO 


CO 


COHTt<LOHH(Mm(MH 


OS 


C-OOt-OLOOCMOO 


HH 


i—l i—l 


i— 1 




i—l 


1—1 1— I 


CD 

io~ 
■ee- 


O O O O 








i— i 


lO m ICO 








co 


(N Tti CM 


M 








<M 

i—l 
■€©■ 


(MOOMOOOCOOOOOW 


O 


COUOLOCOLOTflt^COCOCO 


CO 


CM CO CO CM CO i—l CM 


CM rH 


GO 












OS 












rH 












3& 


CM i— 1 CO O O 








y—>. 


HIMHCDO 








CO 

co 


CO N H i.O O 


t- o o t— o 








HH 


7-\ 1—1 


1 — 








lO 

■€£■ 


OOOOOOOOOO 


o 


oooooooooo 


o 


UOOOUOOOOUOOO 


d 


C-OOt-OOOMOO 


o 


1— I 1—1 


rH 




i— ! 


i— 1 i—l 


GO 








03 


<r> 




>> 






P 


*o 




U 






# o 


Q 




rO 






"•+2 


02 




h3 






^ 


P 




c 






T3 


*H "£ 




o 






C3 


S 52 




i ■a ^ ■ J 


03 


00 

03 


ant 
ffin ( 
Park 




13 «^ 

^H '^ CD 


+3 


m 


P cS 
o ,p 






an C 
than 
Jami 
y M, 
n Tu 
s E. 


. W P 
"S C3 




+j c > O 


.* 


a 
5 


P rP 
03 t£ 




td q 4J CO 


fe»a 


c3 


jh je ^ cp 




twtr 




CO 


CO co CO ^ 




O ° t- t- 


co c; 


o o ooo 




Co^OO 


o <Ji 


C^OlOlO 




„ „r-\ i-i 


1— 1 


iH 


rH^H 


.^ 




H^ .. „ 


n 


t> 


co"i— ( 


IOJ 




CO rH cm ci 


CM CM 


rH CM 


CM^J 




>* >* > 6 


M 


^ 


>» >, 


>»*5 




c^" o cu 


d 


ft 


cC c= 


rt "g 




S^fcA 


^ 


< 


t— i — i 


^O 




c<i co tJh »o coVcod 


O T— t 




-f-t-t-f-H^^^OLO 





(NlflOCOOCOOOWiOCOiM!Cn(NNMCOCDOM 
^NCOTCiCOlOiCinO(NC505Ci(N^H(X)«tOLOlCO 



t-rH 1 -HO(MOOOOCO'*UO'+OOOLOOOOuOO^ 

■€©■ T— I Ut> 1— I T-1 T— ' T— I 1— I 1—1 1— ' 1— I T— 1— IT— I 1— 1 1— l 1— I 



i 

o 

o 



OS^^LOWCOO © in m © © © co m © © o 






NNHNNNWWKWH rH 



(NoOOCOOOOOiOiCiOOOOLCOOOLOOCO 



co >o co t— cc cc cc 



t— ' in t— * CC CC CC m cc cc cc 



© 


ir 


oo 


t> 


LO 


r 


t- 




^r 




© 


— r 


© 


tf 


UC 


tf 


l> 




£©-pq 




<X> 




- 




TO 




^ 




X 



OCOOOOCOOCiniCNCOHMNCOOOHO 

oocoiocooo«ioh'vD^i>o:h?dgohwc 

QOff500HHHHOiCCI>a)t-M(MC<lCOO:r-*0 

© © cm © © © © m tjh in t»< © © © o © © © co © 



©©©©©©©ooooooooo©©©©© 
©ooooooooooo©©©©©©©©© 



©ooooooo©© © © © © © © 

© © © © © © © 1-C LC LC lO © © O lO © 



© m © lo 



.si 

O) as 

s-g 

.a j 



cc^ § 

<D CD 

G Sh !h 
cC O C 
V, 0> <D 



03 

a 

a: 

■> 

Q 
o 

cc ^ 
fl ro w 

c/.-~ -d • 

r QJOT^ C5J0 . 

►-; cb ta cs co 



X 



c 
o 

■+■3 

X 

cc io 
CC cc 



rrl ^ 



CC £ 

H 



.3 <- ~ a> ^3 



■4-3 a> __, 

eg -PS 

h k ai 

° £ 

a> c 



X 






73 =: 

©Pd 



pq 



CO- J ob..S 
X fc <i »-r 1^ C/5 



, H ° 
2 « fe 

(V. f- ~ 
c c 

CP cp 
C5t! 






-T3 
CC 

cC 

d 



© 

© £} 

QO ^ 



.. CO b- t— I . 
OO <M CM CO LO t* «* 



© © (M (M <M CM 

© © © © 

HHC5Q 



T* 



© T* 



CO t- 



2S oo 



r ^r ^h ^" £ cS o^ £2 <m" ^ N " ^ ^ H" -T ffi °' 






=:^ccccccJ5^a)CCcv©-r-©^.- : ^c 



C) 



iC © !^ X. © © t— C3 cc -h >c x; t- OC © © i— CI cc 

r-T-r-T-T-r-T-r-T-r-O 0!CMN 





Oi Oi r}i t> 


© 


<M 




C- t- © CM 


oo 


QO 




O O i-l © 


(M* 


© 




LOlCLO lO 


© 


© 




49- 


CM 


«o 






«■ 


-ee 




© © © © 


© 


rH 




LO to LO © 


LO 


© 




rH rH r- 1 CX) 


CO 


© 




■ee 


•ee 


CO 
CXI 

■ee 




LO to to LO 


© 


LO 




t>t-t-b- 


© 


"* 




r- 1 rH rH r-i' 


i> 


TjJ 




■ee- 


^=e 


© 

^e 




HH HH © <M 


© 


QO 




LO LO t^ LO 


CO 


© 




©'©'©© 


cxi 


© 




LO LO tO LO 


© 


rH 




-ee 


CXI 


CXI 






-ee 


00 

^e 




© © © © • 


© 


© 




© © © © 


© 


© 




©'©'©©" 


© 


LO 




LO LO tO LO 


© 


CXI 




-ee 


(M 


rH 






^e 


QO*" 


£ 








o> 








-** 








o> 








a 








a> 








O 


o o 






.d 


w jo 

4.3*8 






1 






?|4g 








<U rH Q, 








H^tf £ 








-3.|^ W 








3 § "S b 














CO CO CO o 








© © © C5 








© © © r-i 








M r-! H 








-r— I 








MMIMh 








t— 1 rH rH 








d d d ^ 








c3 c5 C3 ^ 

i-o^)^o<l 








rH CM* CO H-" 







84 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF ACTON MEMORIAL 
LIBRARY, 1908-1909. 



LUTHER CONANT, President. 

E. FAULKNER CONANT, Secretary. 
HORACE F. TUTTLE 
MOSES TAYLOR DELETTE HALL 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD CHARLES J. WILLIAMS 

L. A. HESSELTON FRANK R. KNOWLTON 



The Trustees wish to call the attention of the town to 
the fact that we have just received a very acceptable addi- 
tion to the Art Treasures of the Library in the form of a 
bronze statuette of Milton, the poet, from the late Mrs. M. 
E. A. Williams. This is the first bronze that the Library 
has ever received, and as there is room for more, we hope 
that other gifts will be forthcoming. 

The Trustees recommend the Town to raise and appro- 
priate the usual sums : $200 for new books and $400 for 
current expenses of the Library. 

Appended is the annual report of the Librarian. 

FOR LUTHER CONANT, 

By Arthur F. Davis. 



35 



Nineteenth Annual Report. 

Accessions — Number of volumes in the library March 1, 

1908, 10.167; increase by purchase 465, of which 51 were 
obtained by binding magazines ; increase by gift 37. Total 
increase 502. Number of volumes in the library March 1, 

1909, 10,669. 

Circulation — Number of days the library was opened 
100. Number of volumes circulated 6,332. Daily average 
circulation 63, and largest daily circulation 118, on May 23, 
1908; smallest dail} T circulation 1, on November 11, 1908. 

Received for catalogues and fines $22.66 

Expended for postage .25 



$22.41 
Gifts of books have been received from the following 
sources : U. S. Government, 6 ; State of Massachusetts, 23 ; 
City of Boston, 1 ; Grand Army of the Republic, 1 ; C. G. 
Dole, 1 ; George L. Raymond, 3 ; Allison A. Stewart, 1 ; 
Bureau of American Railroad News, 1. 

Periodicals subscribed for and in the reading room. 23 : 
Monthly — American, Appleton's, Atlantic, American Boy, 
Century, Cosmopolitan, Circle, Everybody's, Harper's, Mc- 
Clure's. Munsey's. New England, National, Review of 
Reviews, Scribner's, St. Nicholas, Woman's Home Com- 
panion, World's Work, World Today. Weekly — Harper's 
Weekly, Independent, Scientific American, Youth's Com- 
panion. 

ARTHUR F. DAVIS. 

Librarian. 



SEVENTY-SECOND 

ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee and the Report of 

the Superintendent of Schools of the 

Town of Acton, Massachusetts 

FOR THE YEAR 1908-1909 




HUDSON, MASS. 

NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY, PRINTERS 

1909 



SCHOOL CALENDAR. 



Spring Term, 1909. 
High School. 
Term begins March 29th, closes June 25th ; 13 weeks. 

Common Schools. 
Term begins March 29th, closes June 18th ; 12 weeks. 
Year 1909-1910. 
High School, 39 Weeks. 

Fall term begins September 7th, closes November 24th; 12 

weeks. 
*Winter term begins November 29th, closes March 18th ; 14 

weeks. 
Spring term begins March 28th, closes June 24th ; 13 weeks. 

Common Schools, 38 Weeks. 

Fall term begins September 7th. closes November 24th; 12 

weeks. 
*Winter term begins November 29th. closes March 18th ; 14 

weeks. 
Spring term begins March 28th, closes June 17th: 12 weeks. 

*Recess December 17th to Januarv 3rd. 



90 



School Committee. 

Charles J. William, chairman, Term expires 1911 

Samuel A. Christie, secretary, Term expires 1909 

Arthur F. Blanch ard Term expires 1910 



Superintendent of Schools. 
Arthur B. Webber, Residence, Littleton, Mass. 



Truant Officers. 
Moses A. Reed, Geo. C. Turner, Thomas Scanlon 



91 



STANDING RULES. 



*Rule 1. Children under five years of age shall not be 
admitted to the public schools. 

Rule 2. Pupils shall be promoted from grade to grade 
and school to school, according to merit. Thorough and 
satisfactory work will be required of pupils in a lower grade 
or school before entering a higher grade or school. 

Rule 3. Children who have not previously attended 
any school shall be admitted to the public schools only at 
the beginning of the fall term. 

Rule 4. Pupils will be held responsible for books 
loaned to them until such books shall have been returned to 
the teacher. 

Rule 5. No repairs shall be made upon the public prop- 
erty in the care of the school committee except by their 
authorized agents. 

*When the birthday of a child falls on or before the 
15th day of the month it is reckoned as falling upon the 
first dav of that month. 



92 



EXTRACTS FROM THE STATUTES— REVISED LAWS. 



Chapter 43. 



Section 11. The several school teachers shall faithfully 
keep the registers of attendance daily, and make due return 
thereof to the school committee, or to such person as the 
committee may designate. No teacher of a public school 
shall receive payment for services for the two weeks preced- 
ing the close of any term, until the register, properly filled 
up and completed, is so returned. All registers shall be 
kept at the schools,, and at all times during school hours 
shall be open to the inspection of the school committee, the 
superintendent of schools, the truant officers and the secre- 
tary and agent of the board of education. In reckoning 
the average membership and the percentage of attendance 
in the schools, no pupil's name shall be omitted in counting 
the number of such persons belonging to the school and the 
number of absences of such persons until it is known that 
such pupil has withdrawn from the school without intention 
of returning or, in the absence of such knowledge, until 
ten consecutive days of absence have been recorded; but 
the foregoing provision for computing the average member- 
ship and the percentage of attendance shall not affect pro- 
ceedings against habitual truants, absentees or school of- 
fenders, or other persons, under the provisions of section 
one of chapter forty-four and sections three, four and five 
of chapter forty-six. A pupil who is not present during 
at least half of a session shall be marked and counted as 
absent for that session. 

Chapter 44. 

Section 1. Every child between seven and fourteen 
years of age, and every child under sixteen years of age 



93 



who cannot read at sight and write legibly simple sentences 
in the English language, shall attend some public day school 
in the city or town in which he resides during the entire 
time the public day schools are in session, subject to such 
exceptions as to children, places of attendance and schools 
as are provided for in section three of chapter forty-two 
and sections three, five and six of this chapter. The super- 
intendent of schools, or, if there is no superintendent of 
schools, the school committee, or teachers acting under 
authority of said superintendent or committee, may excuse 
cases of necessary absence. The attendance of a child upon 
a public day school shall not be required if he has attended 
for a like period of time a private day school approved by 
the school committee of such city or town in accordance 
with the provisions of the following section, or if he has been 
otherwise instructed for a like period of time in the branches 
of learning required by law to be taught in the public 
schools or if he has already acquired such branches of learn- 
ing or if his physical or mental condition is such as to 
render such attendance inexpedient or impracticable. Every 
person having under his control a child as described in this 
section shall cause him to attend school as herein required ; 
and if he fails for five days sessions or ten half days sessions 
within any period of six months while under such control to 
cause such child, whose physical or mental condition is not 
such as to render his attendance at school harmful or im- 
practicable, so to attend school, he shall, upon complaint by 
a truant officer and conviction thereof, be punished by a fine 
of not more than twenty dollars. Whoever induces or at- 
tempts to induce a child to absent himself unlawfully from 
school or employs or harbors a child who, while school is 
in session, is absent unlawfully from school shall be punished 
by a fine of not more than fifty dollars. 

Section 6. A child who has not been vaccinated shall 
not be admitted to a public school except upon presentation 
of a certificate signed by a regular practising physician that 
he is not a fit subject for vaccination. A child who is a 



94 



member of a household in which a person is ill with small- 
pox, diphtheria, scarlet fever or measles, or of a household 
exposed to such contagion from another household as afore- 
said, shall not attend any public school during such illness 
or until the teacher of the school has been furnished with a 
certificate from the board of health of the city or town, or 
from the attending physician of such person, stating that in 
a case of smallpox, diphtheria or scarlet fever at least two 
weeks, and in a case of measles, at least three days, have 
elapsed since the recovery, removal or death of such person, 
and that danger of conveying such disease by such child has 
passed. 

Section 3. Any child between seven and fourteen years 
of age who wilfully and habitually absents himself from 
school contrary to the provisions of section one of chapter 
forty-four shall be deemed to be an habitual truant, and, 
upon complaint of a truant officer and conviction thereof, 
may, if a boy, be committed to a county truant school for 
not more than two years, and, if a girl, to the state industrial 
school for girls, unless such child is placed on probation as 
provided in section seven of this chapter. 

Section 4. A child between seven and sixteen years of 
age who may be found wandering about in the streets or 
public places of any city or town having no lawful occupa- 
tion, habitually not attending school, and growing up in 
idleness and ignorance, shall be deemed an habitual ab- 
sentee, and, upon complaint by a truant officer or any other 
person and conviction thereof, may, if a boy, be committed 
to a county truant school for not more than two years or to 
the Lyman school for boys, and, if a girl, to the state in- 
dustrial school for girls, unless such child is placed on pro- 
bation as provided in section seven. 

Section 5. A child under fourteen years of age who 
persistently violates the reasonable regulations of the school 
which he attends, or otherwise persistently misbehaves 
therein, so as to render himself a fit subject for expulsion 
therefrom, shall be deemed to be an habitual school offender, 



95 



and. upon complaint by a truant officer and conviction 
thereof, may, if a boy, be committed to a county truant 
school for not more than two years or to the Lyman school 
for boys, and, if a girl, to the state industrial school for girls, 
unless such child is placed on probation as provided in sec- 
tion seven. 

Section 13. Truant officers shall inquire into all cases 
arising under the provision of sections one and six of chapter 
forty-four and sections three, four and five of this chapter, 
and may make complaints and serve legal processes issued 
under the provisions of this chapter. They shall have 
the oversight of children placed on probation under the 
provisions of section seven. A truant officer may appre- 
hend and take to school, without a warrant, any truant or 
absentee found wandering about in the streets or public 
places thereof. 

Chapter 106. 

Section 28. Xo child under the age of fourteen years 
and no child who is over fourteen and under sixteen years 
of age who does not have a certificate as required by the 
following four sections certifying to the child's ability to 
read at sight and to write legibly simple sentences in the 
English language shall be employed in any factory, work- 
shop or mercantile establishment. No child under the age 
of fourteen years shall be employed at work performed for 
wages or other compensation, to whomsoever payable, during 
the hours when the public schools of the city or town in 
which he resides are in session, or be employed at work 
before six o'clock in the morning or after seven o'clock in 
the evening. 

Section 2. No certificate as provided for by sections 
twenty-nine or thirty-two inclusive of chapter one hundred 
and six of the Revised Laws shall be approved by any person 
for a minor under the age of sixteen years who intends to be 
employed in a factory, workshop or mercantile establish- 
ment, unless such person is satisfied that such minor is able 



96 



to read at sight and to write legibly simple sentences in the 
English language. 

Section 31. An age or schooling certificate shall not be 
approved unless satisfactory evidence is furnished by a cer- 
tificate of birth or baptism of such minor, or by the register 
of birth of such minor with a city or town clerk, that such 
minor is of the age stated in the certificate, except that other 
evidence, under oath, may be accepted in case the superin- 
tendent or person authorized by the school committee, as 
provided in the preceding section, decides that neither the 
certificates of birth or baptism, nor the register of birth is 
available for the purpose. 



ACTS OF 1906. 
Chapter 499. 



An Act Relative to the Illegal Employment of Minors and to 
the Duties of Truant Officers. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. Whoever employs a minor under the age of 
sixteen years, and whoever procures or, having under his 
control a minor under such age, permits such minor to be 
employed in violation of the provisions of sections twenty- 
eight or twenty-nine of chapter one hundred and six of the 
Revised Laws, as amended by chapter two hundred and 
sixty-seven of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and 
five, shall for each offence be punished by a fine of not more 
than three hundred dollars, or by imprisonment for not more 
than six months, or by both such fine and imprisonment; 
and whoever continues to employ a minor in violation of the 
provisions of either of said sections as so amended, after 
being notified thereof by a truant officer or by an inspector 
of factories and public buildings, shall for every day there- 



97 



after while such employment continues lie punished by a 

fine of not less than twenty nor more than one hundred 
dollars, or hy imprisonment for not more than six months. 

Section 2. Inspectors of factories and pnblic buildings 
shall visit all factories, workshops and mercantile establish- 
ments within their respective districts, and ascertain whether 
any minors are employed therein contrary to the provisions 
of chapter one hundred and six of the Revised Laws and 
amendments thereof or additions thereto, or contrary to the 
provisions of this act. and shall enter complaint against 
whomever is found to have violated any of said provisions. 
Any inspector of factories and public buildings who know- 
ingly and wilfully violates any provision of this section may 
be punished by a fine of not more than one hundred dollars. 

Section 3. A truant officer may apprehend and take to 
school, without a warrant, any minor under the age of six- 
teen years who is employed in any factory, workshop or mer- 
cantile establishment in violation of the provisions of sec- 
tions twenty-eight or twenty-nine of chapter one hundred 
and six of the Revised Laws, and of any amendments 
thereof or additions thereto, and such truant officer shall 
forthwith report to the police, district or municipal court or 
trial justice within whose judicial district the illegal employ- 
ment occurs, the evidence in his possession relating to the 
illegal employment of any child so apprehended, and shall 
make complaint against whomever the court or trial justice 
may direct. Any truant officer who knowingly and wilfully 
violates any provision of this section may be punished by a 
fine of not more than one hundred dollars for each offence. 

Section 4. Inspectors of factories and public buildings, 
and truant officers may require that the age and schooling 
certificates and lists of minors who are employed in factories, 
workshops or mercantile establishments shall be produced 
for their inspection. A failure to produce to an inspector 
of factories and public buildings or to a truant officer an age 
and schooling certificate or list required by law shall be 
prima facie evidence of the illegal employment of any person 



98 



whose age and schooling certificate is not produced or whose 
name is not so listed. A corporation or other employer or 
any agent or officer thereof, who retains an age and school- 
ing certificate in violation of the provisions of said certifi- 
cate shall be punished by a fine of not less than ten nor more 
than one hundred dollars. 

Section 5. Police, district and municipal courts and 
trial justices shall have jurisdiction of offences arising 
under the provisions of this act. A summons or warrant 
issued by any such court or justice may be served, at the 
discretion of the court or magistrate, by an inspector of 
factories and public buildings, or by a truant officer, or by 
any officer qualified to serve criminal process. 

Section 6. Section thirty-three of chapter one hundred 
and six of the Revised Laws, and all other acts and parts of 
acts inconsistent herewith, are hereby repealed. (Approved 
June 20, 1906). 



99 



O 



.a 

a> 
& 

•a 

o> 

CO 



03 p 

lis 

.HHw-H 

p a +3 
fl fl ^j 

SQ 

03 r— I 2 

c< aS ?h 



o3 g 
.O o3 



03 

<p 



H 



^CO 



p g 

^ j <j rd ^ 

08 ^ ^ r-H § 

"d __ "d rrj 2f_r=. 

p >s 

o3 <^ 2 T 



o 

• CO 

P Ph 
03 ^ 



s£w 



03 03 



03 

03 



CO P ""H 
03 S3 ^ 



03 03 Pj ^ 
i— i K». i— • . r- i__i r^n 03 i__: 



03 13 



r~. 

03 


03 

pi 


""— ' 


< 


0,' 


03 


if. 


esj 


<ri 


N 


Fh 


J 


pq 


nd 


Tl 


p 


P 


c: 


ed 




/- 


w 



03 f-rt P 



03 C 



o3 
£^ 

Pi T3 

^ O p| 

° W .1h 

r ° 03 'o3 

fe Pi ^ 

. 03 
03 ,°3 03 

» d^ 

Tj • • 

PPQQ 

03 , 

"'S d 

3 3 

03 03 ^ 



03 
03 

^-n r-l 
CO ^ 

03 ^ 
■M 
03 



r-. 

§ « 

C s 

03 03 

CO P 



■a 

c3 

i—H 

^^ 'd 

• o P? 

S rd 03 
r-l 03 P 

-rt| 

p O^ 

<§■£ 

B ^ 03 

ce g 03 

M O r^H 

»^ 03 
H3 Pj 

fepQ.2 



^ 



03 'r-i P 03 

r^ ^ £ r U ^ 

fc <q H-) pH I"-} 



S 3 © 

— Si 

f) 03 HH 

P==< P rrt 

03 o pj 
o P 

Pi CO -d 

•-5 << "^ 






8| 

03 rj 

o 



w 



c3 




£ 


03 


a 


P 


w 


p 

03 


Td 

p 

03 


hB 


r2 


p 

rP 

o 

(-3 


CJ 

p 
< 



03 03 03 

03 -J-? C3 

6.a£ 
« g § 

§ e 



03 

nd o 
rpl ^ 

rdPQ 

^^ 

03 r ^ 

S W 
o3 ^i 

Id 



03 
<P 

r^ j- 
rC| 



r^ 



03 r^ CC ^ 

« ^^ rS 

03 O 2 03 
P ^ 03 W 

r-qP^W 



H 



p 

rS ™ 03 

_f3 03 J 

"* rQ 

P * 03 

03 ^^ 

rC ^^ 

03 K 03 

'g rH^ 

O CO rj 

2 53JD P 

rP i ^ r- 



p 

I- 

Eh 03 

03 P-l 

P 



03^ 

2 ^ -S Si 8 



03 



03 

CO P 03 

H,EH O 

03 >i 03 

rH ^1 > 

o3 o3 ^ 



03 ^ 

"3 8 

r2 ^ 

rd a 

^^ 

^ P 

I? 

03 ?h 



03 rt 

8 " 

O 03 
03 P 

S M 

03 -^ 

S p 

03 P 

rd 03 

0QJZ2 



l § 



P 

oj 

CO 

r-( 

03 



?-( CO 



eg c8 +3 rpj 

rd t3 tl -S 

m o) pq co 

03 p >, 

^ c3 03 ?h 

^ r-l T" ^ 

@6^^ 



r=H rH 
. 03 



Pi 03 
03 U 

c 



P P pt 



Tf. 

03 .8 

p p 
rj p 

03 03 
03 



_oj c3 nd 



o g 

5^5 



^3 



^ ^ > o tc S 



>•« ■ VJ 1Z 

^ 53D 03 rP cc 

CC^Pl 03 r^ 






i-( LO rH 



(M 



CO 



CQ CO cq CO U H 
l> rH (M ,_, 

>% r>i r^C\I Jq 

C003CSrjrjrjrH F M | |) _ | rj ^ jj J) AJ r^ 

O 



w ^ ^1 t-< 

P* 03 03 Q3 

Cxl rH fM cxj "S g PJ 

03 03 



r-l r-l 
03 03 



r?r?r?feftfe^^<l|<|g§gK?r,bbb<lCCKCCOO 



^ 03 03 

rirO-C 

s s s 

r? 03 03 

-2 > > 

O O C 

O^^r^flP 



HOiH 

Jn ^ ^ 
03 CD 03 

^rQrO 

§ s s 

O) n3 03 
t> o 03 
O 03 03 



|2 rH CM* CO -+' tf5 «J t"- CO CJ5 O r-" C^i 



Lft ^c t-^ CO C: O '— ' (M* co ^ ic «o t- CO cr: o 
r- r- r- r— r- (M Ol <M CM <M (M CM CM CM CM CO 



100 



SEVENTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE. 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

The year just closing- lias been an uneventful one in your 
schools and little need be written here in addition to the 
report of the superintendent included herein, except to say 
that the work of the schools has been good and that much 
credit is due, as always, to the superintendent, the teachers, 
and the special instructors. 

The high school membership is steadily increasing. The 
attendance at present, is as follows : Concord, 38 ; West 
Acton, 28. It appears probable that next year the second, 
third and fourth year classes of this school will number 
nearly sixty pupils. 

The amount received from the Massachusetts School Fund 
is $868.81. compared with $1,079.98 Inst year and from dog 
licenses, $313.85, compared with $402.32 last year; a reduc- 
tion of income from outside sources of $299.64. 

The usual sum of $375 has been received from the State 
on account of salary of the superintendent of schools. 

The overdraft in the school supply account is due to the 
unusually large number of text books fonnd to be worn out 
and defective and requiring immediate replacement. 

The report of the truant officers is appended. 

The School Committee of Acton, by 

CHARLES J. WILLIAMS, Chairman. 



101 



Receipts and Expenditures on Account of Schools for the 

Fiscal Year 1908-1909. 

RECEIPTS. 

Appropriation for common schools .. $4,750.00 

Appropriation for high school 4,200.00 

Appropriation for school supplies.... 625.00 
Appropriation for transportation of 

pupils 1.360.00 

Appropriation for salary of superin- 
tendent 480.00 

Appropriation for medical inspection 

of pupils 100.00 

Received from Mass. school fund 868.81 

Received from dog licenses 313.85 

Received for tuition 40.00 

$12,737.66 

Expenditures. 

For common schools $6,070.66 

High school 3,237.92 

School supplies 815.52 

Transportation of pupils 1,397.40 

Salary of superintendent 480.00 

Medical inspection of pupils 75.00 

$12,076.50 

Balance unexpended $661 . 16 

Estimates for the Support of Schools for the Fiscal Year 

1909-1910. 

For common schools $4.750. 00 

High school 4,200.00 

School supplies 625.00 

Transportation of pupils 1.360.00 

Salary of superintendent 480.00 

Medical inspection of pupils .... 100.00 

$11,515.00 



102 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 



Members of the School Committee of Acton : 

Gentlemen — I have the honor to present for your con- 
sideration my third annual report of the Acton public 
schools, it being the seventeenth in the series of Superin- 
tendent's reports. 

The teaching force remains much as it was last year. 
Miss Stowell 's transfer from the West Acton Intermediate to 
the same grade at South Acton has proved advantageous, and 
we were fortunate in securing Miss Ethel J. Evans, who has 
taken up the work at the West School with an energy and 
tact that promise well. 

Miss Ginn's resignation late in the summer handicapped 
us to a degree. Miss Sadie R. Whitney formerly of Harvard, 
was at last secured to take her place. 

The old system of education was largely a pouring-in 
process. This is gradually being superceded by a new con- 
ception that life is an unfolding from within in response to 
influences from without. Under the former system, and in 
much of the work still carried on, the trend was along lines 
of imitation. This has led to a narrowing of the individual. 
Imitation leads to conformity; it kills the creative instinct 
and it is the exceptional man or woman who at maturity is 
not hopelessly bound by the shackles of convention. 
Creative work on the other hand transforms the individual. 
Through it, alone, one grows till he has gained a personality 
that makes him different from others. 

Anything which involves the hand immediately arouses 
the creative instincts. For this reason we seek in nearly 
all subjects of the curriculum to make some application of 
the constructive idea. It is with this in mind that we have 



103 



attempted to make the work in geography more vital by 
the study of an industry in each grade from the practical 
side, following the raw product through the various stages 
to the finished product, tracing its transportation and map- 
ping the routes. 

In some classes correspondence with distant localities 
has been a valuable feature of the work. Facts at first 
hand seem more real, and the spirit of mutual helpfulness 
finds a natural outlet in the exchange of material suggested 
by this line of work. 

The growing tendency to allow children to grow up 
with no regular home tasks, thus giving little or no oppor- 
tunity to gain a knowledge of domestic duties, and little 
training in handicraft is a misfortune no thoughtful person 
can doubt. The loss of training of the motor activities is 
serious, both from a psychological and a practical stand- 
point, and still more serious is the attitude which results 
from lack of appreciation of the dignity of labor, with its 
honest pride in well executed work of the hands, and that 
ambition that increases with every successful effort. The 
seriousness of the present condition has called for the most 
thoughtful study by all educational workers. Addresses 
from the leading men and women in the professional, busi- 
ness and social world show the strong convictions of the 
day in regard to this matter. 

In response to this movement, and in view of the need 
of our pupils an effort has been made through the introduc- 
tion of work in raffia and wood to train the hand as well as 
the mind. Some criticism has been made in regard to the 
apparent loss of time from other studies. It has been said 
that the schools of the past, knowing nothing of these things 
were able to focus all their attention upon the history, 
geography and arithmetic and thus accomplish better results. 
The true value of history and geography as school subjects 
does not lie in the number of facts that may be gathered, 
for these soon fade from memory without constant drill. 
Their real value lies in the mental discipline in the gain in 



104 



judgment, power of comparison, firmness of mental grasp — 
otherwise they have little value. But mental discipline is 
just as surely gained through manual work when properly 
directed, and accuracy, judgment, power of comparison and 
mental acuteness are developed to a more marked degree by 
this line of work than by the purely cultural studies. 
Wherein, then, is this loss that some lament? 

Much has been done in this line in Littleton by the 
generous cooperation of the Woman's Club in conducting 
the work in sewing. Is it not possible that some of the 
ladies can be induced to take up the work in their respective 
centers ? 

In consideration of the fact that the pupils of our eighth 
grades who gave evidence of more than average ability are 
eligible for admission to the freshman class of the Concord 
High School it seemed only fair to offer admission to the 
freshman class which is maintained at West Acton under the 
same conditions. This resulted in the increase of that class 
to twenty-nine pupils and the dropping of the ninth grade 
at both the West and the Center. At the former the condi- 
tion of the intermediate grades was such, owing to the epi- 
demics of last winter that it was found advisable to place 
the sixth grade in the grammar room and regrade the fourth 
and fifth grades. 

The work in Music and Drawing has continued under 
the direction of the same supervisors, and a marked gain is 
manifest in the work. Your attention is called to the re- 
ports of the supervisors herein appended. 

Teachers' meetings have been held for instruction in 
manual work, and for the discussion of methods and the 
problems of the day as occasion demanded. Superintendent 
Carr addressed the meeting in February. Those teachers 
interested in development along broader professional lines 
are meeting twice a month for the study of Arnold's School 
Management. 

Respectfully submitted, 

arthur b. Webber. 



105 



Mr. A. B. Webber, Superintendent of Schools. 

Dear Sir: At your request I submit the following re- 
port upon Drawing : 

At the present time the work in the schools of Acton 
may be termed wholesome. The results from last September 
to January have equalled and in some instances excelled the 
highest point attained during the last year. Your assistance 
in conjunction with the school board in striving for the in- 
troduction of as much handicraft as possible has been very 
beneficial. The experience gained has more than repaid 
the amount expended. I would suggest that for next year 
the sum of twenty dollars be set aside for this branch of the 
work which includes work in reed, raffia, cane, wood, card- 
board and clay. 

In most of the Primary grades the work has been ex- 
ceptionally strong and this will materially help and strength- 
en the Grammar grades which at the present time are the 
weakest, owing, no doubt, in a certain extent to pupils not 
having had the previous training in the Primary grades and 
the introduction of work that was new to many of the 
teachers. 

The results in the High School have been excellent and 
I desire to commend to you the pupils and teachers for what, 
I term, their class spirit and for the unity and neatness of 
their work. 

In closing. T wish to express to you and the teachers, 
pupils and committee my appreciation of the interest and 
cooperation that all have rendered during the year. 

Respectfully submitted. 

W. LORTNG ADAMS. 

Supervisor. 
Saxonville, Februarv 2. 1009. 



106 



To the Superintendent and School Committee. 

Gentlemen: The musical work of the school moves 
steadily forward. Regular graded work, upon the founda- 
tions laid last year is being successfully carried on in all 
intermediate and grammar grades. 

The written tests of last year, the first ever given in 
music in our schools, were productive of many really splen- 
did papers. 

The Weaver slips are used in connection with thf uchr. 
cal work on day and part work from the books the following 
day. 

The work of the primary grades shows a steady ad- 
vance, rote song work being an especial feature. At West 
Acton, under the direction of the Supervisor, the cantata, 
"The Carnival of the Flowers," was successfully given, 
thereby giving the children an opportunity for public chorus 
work and netting a good amount for pictures for the build- 
ing. In both the Center and South Schools there has been 
public chorus work, and this has proved most helpful in 
inspiring confidence and encouraging united work. 

May I say in closing how thoroughly I am sensible of 
the earnest efforts of the teachers and how grateful I am 
for their words of appreciation as well as the kindly expres- 
sions of approval from officers and parents. 

With faith in the ability and purpose of the children, 
which cannot but be productive of rich fruitage in later life, 
I am. 

Yours sincerely, 

EDWIN N. C. BARNES, 

Supervisor of Music. 



107 














STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1907-1908 ENDING 




JUNE, 1908. 


















m 


th 












i— i 


tH 














m 


T3 








a, 


03 


03 


d 


a 

e3 








^ 


p. 


d 


IC 


t- 








u 


C6 


c3 


d 


d 








o 


•73 


^ 


<D 


03 


iO 






r^ 


P 


c 


<D 


03 


T-\ 


School Grade 




B 


03 


03 


► 


i 


u 






c 


+3 




4J 


4-2 


03 




a 


3 


«j 


< 


03 

pq 


03 


> 

o 




8 




03 


4-3 


Fh 

03 


03 


03 




', 3 


OS 


c3 




r^ 


r^ 


rQ 




c 
£-1 


0) 


F-i 
CO 


O 


a 


| 


s 




c 


> 


> 


o 


a 


2 


d 




H 


< 


< 


PM 


£ 


£ 


fc 


Center Primary I. — II. — III. 


30 


25.2 


23.3 


92.8 


30 


12 





Center Intermediate IV. — VI. 


35 


31.9 


30.8 


96.5 


33 


33 





Center Grammar VII. — IX. 


24 


20.9 


19.9 


95.2 


21 


15 





South Lower Primary I. — II. 


33 


28.7 


26.1 


86.1 


33 


11 





South Upper Primary III. — IV. 


42 


35.6 


32.9 


91.9 


42 


42 





South Intermediate V. — VI. 


33 


30.9 


28.6 


92.6 


29 


29 





South Grammar VII.— IX. 


36 


31.5 


29.5 


93.7 


31 


27 


4 


West Primary I.— II.— III. 


44 


39.4 


34.2 


86.4 


42 


23 





West Intermediate IV.— VI. 


38 


34.3 


30.1 


86.9 


38 


37 





West Grammar VII. — IX. 


31 


26.1 


25.2 


89.0 


31 


26 


1 


Hl gh X. 


14 


12.7 


11.9 


93.7 


6 


8 







360 


317.2 


292.5 


92.5 


336 


263 


5 



















Graduates from the Grammar School. 

Number of boys 13 

Number of girls 8 

Admitted to the High School 29 

Number of boys 14 

Number of girls 15- 



108 



STATISTICS FROM SEPTEMBER, 1908 to 
FEBRUARY, 1909. 



School 



Grade 



> 
< 



- 



r-i 
0! 

pq 



0> 

pq 



I 

Center Primary I. — III. I 32 

Center Intermediate IV. — VI. I 30 

Center Grammar VII— VIII.| 21 

South Lower Primary I. — II.I 25 

South Upper Primary III.— IV. | 32 

South Intermediate V.— VI.j 35 

South Grammar VII.— IX.! 42 

West Primary I. — II. — III.| 40 

"West Intermediate IV.— V.j 35 

West Grammar VII.— VIII.| 31 

High X.l 29 



27.0 
24.!) 
16.7 
24.5 
27.8 
33.1 
38.3 
36.5 
32.9 
27.1 
26.2 



25.2 

23 . 1 
15.7 
21.3 
25.9 
30.8 
36.1 
33.7 
30.4 
25.7 
24.7 



93.4 

92.6 

93 

85 

93 

93 

1)4 

92 

92 

94.9 

94.0 



32 
30 
20 
20 
32 
35 
41 
40 
35 
31 
19 



16 
30 

20 

5 

32 

IT) 
37 
22 
3.1 
31 
5 



I 

| 352 

I 



I I 

315.01292.6102.8 



335 



248 



School Census, September, 1908. 

Number of boys between 5 and 15 150 

Number of girls between 5 and 15 189 

Total 339 

Number of boys between 7 and 14 113 

Number of girls between 7 and 14 136 

Total 249 

Number of illiterate minors . . . 



109 









_ 






— 






CD* 




CD 




o 






2 S c 







<H 




p d 




S3 




2 

as 
03 


* « ^ 


CD 




- CD 




< 


d 




= 


<1 <5 S 




Q3 


X CD 

— ^ 




CD 


3 


•+-3 

- 


o 


■g -H § 


CD 


£ 


t, d 




w 


«4 £ 


== 


CD 


X W. ^ P- 


O 
- 


O aS 












X 




















s 






F— ^H 














n 


tt 




X X 






>> 




r^< 








,__, 


s 2 






-M 




CD 
58 






'3 




1 1 




la 


a; "do 

S S3 
8.S 






£ 


xl 


s- 


x 






1 




© 




p 


- 


1 


- 


O « 


Fh 

CD 


^ 

^ 


1- 
00 




i_3 


fx< 


^z 

^ 


£ j£ 


< 


3 


c pq 


o 






















13 

0) 


















m 


^> 


















VI 


p 


<m 


£E 


• rt 


c*" 


O C— GO 


05 


OC 


c- <o 


tf 


' P 


o 


OS 


~ 


PI 


© . © O 


a 


~ 





ft 


3 


GO 








00 


~ 


a^ as 


W 








W 
o 


«1 




























CD 

r". p 


CD 




p CD 










^ 




— 




aS j>. 

2 ~ M " 


O 

H 

W 

»— i 


CD 


GG 


— 


s 

CD 


CD 

21 

CD 


I! '2 

3^ 

CD 


as 

1 


- 

OS 


CD S 

^ 


J 




+^ 




p 


•JE 


x -s .2 


'S 


'~ r 


>. c 






J-H 
X 


86 


J? 


a-' 


— p ~ 

— 33 x 

»-3 ^ X 


^ XI 

x q^ 


^-1 CD 

o: •'- 












>> 


l>> 














CD 




*H 


F-i 










_l 




-*J 




Cfl 


c3 cp 




03 






O 
O 
X| 


$ 


CD 

s 


- 




n 


« X 

£ ^ & 

H^ CD X 


►» 

^ 


-1-3 

X 

CD 

s 


oS 

2 






'C 


CD 

a 


- 
Fh 


CD 


CD U P 

C~ CD " 


X 


CD 


oS 






- 


i— i 


i 


o 


— d J- 
£ - O 


'u 


c 


f+ 






"#H 


s- 




t-H 


- 


^^ 


O 






— 


CD 


Z 


J^ 


_P — — 


t -, 


+J 


■4-^ . 






"S 


fl 


q 


-*— 


"S "S 1h 


T. 

CD' 


- 


S 'Hb! 






^ 


09 


« 


X 


XXX 


* 


^ 


> G ; 



110 



Abbie Coughlin 
Earle Farrar 
Raymond Farrar 



Alfred Anderson 
William Byron 
Ava E. Chapman 
Florence E. Cheney 
Robert B. Cheney 
Fannie Davis 
Merritt L. Farrar 
Patrick Foley 
Frank E. Greenough 
Maud V. Harris 



ROLL OF HONOR, 1907-1908. 

For Three Terms. 

Ernest Greenough 
Loren M. Mekkelsen 
Florence M. Morse 
Walter R. Morse 
For Two Terms. 

Ray L. Harris 
Hazel Hoit 
Elwin Hollowell 
Theron Louden 
Elma Leavitt 
Annie McCarthy 
Fred Nagle 
Florence A. Prentiss 
Florence M. Worden 



Martinia Benere 
Etta L. Brooks 
Esther Brown 
Roger Brown 
Leland Campbell 
Eleanor Chapman 
Natalie Chapman 
Robert Christie 
Edwin Christofferson 
Harold Coolidge 
Jessie Copp 
Annie Coughlin 
James Coughlin 
William Coughlin 
Annie Cousens 
Bernstein Cowan 
Carl Davidson 
Clifton Davidson 
Gertrude Davis 



For One Term. 

Marie Davis 
Marjorie Davis 
Jennie Durkee 
Albert Evans 
Alice Evans 
David Foley 
Mary Foley 
Ebba Fredriksen 
Ella Fredriksen 
Esther Fredriksen 
Gunur Fredriksen 
Lillian Gilmore 
Edith Greer 
Ruth Hall 
Wesley Hall 
Elizabeth Harris 
Raymond Hayes 
William Hayes 
Francis Hopps 



Ill 



Edith Lawrey 
Louis Leveronia 
Philip Lowden 
Florence Mannion 
Nora McCarthy 
John McCrossin 
Gladys McGregor 
Eva McNeil 
Dorothy Mead 
Pauline Mead 
Alice O'Connell 
Aurin Payson 
Edward Pendergast 
Wilbur Peterson 
Harold Richardson 
Willie Schnair 



Morris Shuyski 
Helen Robbins 
Florence Schnair 
Richard Schnair 
Nellie Shuyski 
Wanda Shuyski 
Mary Smiley 
Lena Stanley 
Olga Thoresen 
Edith Tuttle 
Varnum Tuttle 
Richard White 
Forrest Wilder 
Mabel Willis 
Leonard Worden 



TRUANT OFFICERS' REPORT. 

To the School Committee of Acton, Mass. : 

The Truant Officers submit their seventh annual report 
to the School Committee for the year ending March 1, 1909. 
The Truant Officers submit the following list of pupils 
looked up for the year, the cause of their absence, and if 
truants, the number that have been returned to school : 

Whole number of pupils looked up 25 

Cause of absence C. S. S. S W. S. 

Sickness 3 1 

Kept at home by parents 7 8 

Returned to school 8 8 1 

Reported truants 3 

Left town 2 2 1 

Yours respectfully, 
C. G. TURNER, 
THOMAS SCANLON, 
MOSES A. REED. 

Truant Officers. 



INDEX. 

Town Officers 3 

Town Warrant 5 

Town Meetings 10 

State Election 16 

Town Clerk 's Report 20 

Births 21 

Marriages 28 

Deaths . . 25 

Non-Resident Burials 27 

Dog Licenses 28 

Selectmen 's Report 30 

Treasurer's Report 56 

Auditor's Report 62 

Assessors ' Report 63 

Collector 's Report 64 

Road Commissioners 66 

Board of Health 68 

Overseers of the Poor 70 

Report of Cemetery Commissioners 78 

Acton Memorial Library 84 

School Report 87 

School Calendar 89 

Organization 90 

Committee , 100 

Financial Statement 101 

Superintendent's Report 102 

Supervisor of Drawing 105 

Supervisor of Music 106 

Statistical Tables 107 

Roll of Honor 110 

Truant Officers Ill 



ANNUAL REPORTS 

OF THE TOWN OFFICERS OF THE TOWN 

OF ACTON, MASSACHUSETTS: FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 1, 1910 

TOGETHER WITHsTHE SCHOOL REPORT 







HUDSON, MASS. 

PRINTED BY THE NEWS 

1910 



; t 







,,>•■*..;■■■■■.■■.-■ ■--•■■•. •■• .■■••'.■■ -..■ : - ■■■..■ :-sy :-- .^"^'- .. ;-:■:?; 



ANNUAL REPORTS 

OF THE TOWN OFFICERS OF THE TOWN 

OF ACTON, MASSACHUSETTS : FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING MARCH 1, 1910 

TOGETHER WITH THE SCHOOL REPORT 




HUDSON, MASS. 

PRINTED BY THE NEWS 

1910 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1909. 






Selectmen. 

James B. Tuttle Asaph Merriam William F. Stevens 

Town Clerk. 

Horace F. Tuttle. 

Town Treasurer. 
Jon a K. W. Wetherbee. 

Assessors. 

William F. Stevens Term expires 1911 

James B. Tuttle Term expires 1912 

William F. Kelley Term expires 1910 

Overseers of the Poor. 
Octavus A. Knowlton, J. Sterling Moore, William F. Kelley 

Auditor. 
Waldo E. Whitcomb. 

Collector of Taxes. 
William F. Stevens. 

Tree Warden. 
David C. Harris. 



Constables. 

Albert S. Bradley. James Kinsley. William II. Kingsley, 

William F. Stevens. 

Fence Viewers. 
Asaph Merriam. William F. Stevens. .James B. Tuttle. 

Field Drivers. 

Albert S. Bradley. James Kinsley, ^William II. Kingsley, 
William F. Stevens. 

ROAD COMMISSIONERS. 

William H. Kingsley Term expires 1911. 

Albert H. Perkins Term expires 1912. 

Anson C. Piper Term expires 1910. 

Cemetery Commissioners. 

Julian Tnttle Term expires 1912. 

Herbert T. Clark Term expires 1911. 

Horace F. Tnttle Term expires 1910. 

School Committee. 

Charles J. Williams Terms expires 1911. 

Samuel A. Christie Term expires 1912. 

Arthur F. Rlanehard Term expires 1910. 

Board of Health. 

Frank E. Tasker, M. D Term expires 1912. 

James B. Tuttle Term expires 191 1 . 

Asaph Merriam Term expires 1910. 

Trustees of Memorial Library. 

(Chosen by the Town.) 

Charles J. Williams Term expires 1911. 

Lucius A. Hesselton .Term expires 1912. 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1910. 

* Did not qualify. 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL MEETING, MARCH 

29, 1909. 






Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Allen Brooks Parker was chosen moderator. 

Article 2. To bring in their votes on one ballot for 
Town Officers : 

The following Town Officers were chosen: 

Town Clerk— Horace F. Tnttle. 

Selectmen — James B. Tnttle, Asaph Merriam. William 
P. Stevens. 

Assessor for three years — James B. Tnttle. 

Overseers of the Poor — Octavns A. Knowlton. J. Ster- 
ling Moore, William F. Kelley. 

Treasurer— Jonathan K. W. Wetherbee. 

Auditor— Waldo E. Whitcomb. 

Collector of Taxes— William F. Stevens. 

Constables — Albert S. Bradley. .lames Kinsley. W. IT. 
Kineslev, William F. Stevens. 



Field Drivers — Albert S. Bradley, James Kinsley. W. 
II. Kingsley. William F. Stevens. 

Fence Viewers — Asaph Merriam, James B. Tuttle, 
William F. 'Stevens. 

Road Commissioner for three years — Albert H. Perkins. 

School Committee for three years — Samuel A. Christie. 

Cemetery Commissioner for three years — Julian Tuttle. 

Board of Health — Frank E. Tasker for three years. 
James B. Tuttle for two years. Asaph Merriam for one year. 

Trustee of Memorial Library — Lucius A. Hesselton. 

Tree Warden — David C. Harris. 

On the question, "Shall licenses be granted for. the 
sale of intoxicating liquors in this town?" the vote was: 

Whole number of ballots cast 422 

Yes 170 

Xo 238 

Blanks 14 

Article 3. To vote by separate ballot Yes or No in 
answer to the following question: Shall an act passed by 
the General Court in the year 1908 entitled "An act to pro- 
vide for the protection of forest or sprout lands from fire." 
be accepted by this town? 

Voted by a separate ballot to accept the act. Yes 28, 
No 17. 

Article 4. To choose all necessary Town Officers not 
named in article 2 and fix salaries. 



Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2. To bring in their votes on one ballot for 
the following Town Officers: Town Clerk, three Selectmen, 
three* Overseers of the Poor, Town Treasurer, Collector of 
Taxes, Auditor, Tree Warden, four Constables, four Field 
Drivers, three Fence Viewers, all for one year; one Assessor, 
one Road Commissioner, one Trustee of Memorial Library r 
one Member of School Committee, one Cemetery Com- 
missioner, one Member of Board of Health, all for three 
years, also, one Member of School Committee for one year 
to fill a vacancy. Also on the same ballot with the above 
named Town Officers, to vote upon the following question: 
"Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in the Town?" 

The polls will be opened at 9.30 A. M. and may be 
closed at 4 o'clock P. M. 

Article 3. To choose all necessary Town Officers not 
named in Article 2, and fix salaries. 

Article 4. To see if the Town will accept the reports 
of the Selectmen, Overseers of the Poor, School Committee, 
Library Trustees and other Town Officers. 

Article 5. To hear and act upon the reports of anj 
Committees chosen to report at this meeting. 

Article 6. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for due observance of Memorial Day. 

Article 7. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for the repairing and building of roads and 
bridges, or act anything thereon. 

Article 8. To see if the Town will authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of its Selectmen, to borrow 
money for the Town, if necessary, in anticipation of taxes 
the current vear. 



v^ 



Article 9. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for support of Memorial Library the present year. 

Article 10. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for support of Schools the present year. 

Article 11. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for School Supplies. 

Article 12. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum 
of money for the enforcement of the Liquor Laws, or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 13. To see what amount of money the Town 
will appropriate for the care of Cemeteries, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 14. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for maintenance of Fire Department, or act 
thereon. ^ 

Article 15. To see what action the Town will take in 
regard to the extermination of the brown tail and gypsy 
moth. 

Article 16. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for Town charges. 

Article 17. To see what action the Town will take in 
regard to the collection of taxes. 

Article 18. To see what action the Town will take 
in regard to street lamps the present year. 

Article 19. To see what action the Town will take 
in regard to the extermination of the elm leaf beetle. 

Article 20. To see if the Town will provide a suitable 
Vault and Safes for the preservation of the Town Records, 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 21. To see if the Town will vote to build a 
High School the present year, or act anything thereon. 

Article 22. To see if the Town will sell the Town 
Farm, or take any action thereon. 



Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2. To bring in their votes on one ballot for 
the following Town Officers : Town Clerk, three Selectmen, 
three Overseers of the Poor, Town Treasurer, Collector of 
Taxes, Auditor, Tree Warden, four Constables, four Field 
Drivers, three Fence Viewers, all for one year ; one Assessor, 
one Road Commissioner, one Trustee of Memorial Library, 
one Member of School Committee, one Cemetery Com- 
missioner, one Member of Board of Health, all for three 
years, also, one Member of School Committee for one year 
to fill a vacancy. Also on the same ballot with the above 
named Town Officers, to vote upon the following question: 
"Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in the Town?" 

The polls will be opened at 9.30 A. M. and may be 
closed at 4 o'clock- P. M. 

Article 3. To choose all necessary Town Officers not 
named in Article 2, and fix salaries. 

Article 4. To see if the Town will accept the reports 
of the Selectmen, Overseers of the Poor, School Committee, 
Library Trustees and other Town Officers. 

Article 5. To hear and act upon the reports of any 
Committees chosen to report at this meeting. 

Article 6. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for due observance of Memorial Day. 

Article 7. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for the repairing ,and building of roads and 
bridges, or act anything thereon. 

Article 8. To see if the Town will authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of its Selectmen, to borrow 
money for the Town, if necessary, in anticipation of taxes. 
the current year. 



Article 9. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for support of Memorial Library the present year. 

Article 10. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for support of Schools the present year. 

Article 11. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for School Supplies. 

Article 12. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum 
of money for the enforcement of the Liquor Laws, or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 13. To see what amount of money the Town 
will appropriate for the care of Cemeteries, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 14. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for maintenance of Fire Department, or act 
thereon. 

Article 15. To see what action the Town will take in 
regard to the extermination of the brown tail and gypsy 
moth. 

Article 16. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for Town charges. 

Article 17. To see what action the Town will take in 
regard to the collection of taxes. 

Article 18. To see what action the Town will take 
in regard to street lamps the present year. 

Article 19. To see what action the Town will take 
in regard to the extermination of the elm leaf beetle. 

Article 20. To see if the Town will provide a suitable 
Vault and Safes for the preservation of the Town Records, 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 21. To see if the Town will vote to build a 
High School the present year, or act anything thereon. 

Article 22. To see if the Town will sell the Town 
Farm, or take any action thereon. 



Article 23. To sec if the Town will vote to appro- 
priate $15.00 to paint the Iron Flag Holders in the different 
Cemeteries in Acton. 

Article 24. To see if the Town will vote to appro- 
priate Two Hundred Dollars to be used in making proper 
repairs on the road leading from Maple Street to the home 
of Walter Hayward in South Acton. 

Article 25. To see if the Town will spend Three Hun- 
dred Dollars on the Highway leading from East Acton to 
Mr. Pope's corner on the Carlisle road. 

Article 26. To see what action the Town will take in 
making proper sanitary arrangements in Town Hall. 

Article 27. To see if the Town will vote to instruct 
the Collector of Taxes relative to making report to the 
Board of Selectmen, or act thereon. 

Article 28. To see if the Town will accept the laying 
out by the Road Commissioners of a road in West Acton 
from the terminus of the Kinsley Road, so called, to land 
of James Hurley and heirs of Mary Haniford, and build 
said road, or take any action in relation to the same. 

Article 29. To see if the Town will rescind the vote 
passed at their meeting April 3, 1899, whereby they voted 
to choose three road commissioners and accept the provisions 
of the law relative thereto. 

Article 30. To see if the Town will choose a Committee 
to confer with the Water Commissioners of the Town of 
Concord in regard to said town laying a pipe from its main 
in East Acton to or near the residence of Abel Cole, or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 31. To see if the Town will instruct the 
Assessors to have printed a valuation list for 1910. 



Article 23. To see if the Town will vote to appro- 
priate $15.00 to paint the Iron Flag Holders in the different 
Cemeteries in Acton. 

Article 24. To see if the Town will vote to appro- 
priate Two Hundred Dollars to be used in making proper 
repairs on the road leading from Maple Street to the home 
of Walter Hayward in South Acton. 






Article 25. To see if the Town will spend Three Hun- 
dred Dollars on the Highway leading from East Acton to 
Mr. Pope's corner on the Carlisle road. 

Article 26. To see what action the Town will take in 
making proper sanitary arrangements in Town Hall. 

Article 27. To see if the Town will vote to instruct 
the Collector of Taxes relative to making report to the 
Board of Selectmen, or act thereon. 

Article 28. To see if the Town will accept the laying 
out by the Road Commissioners of a road in West Acton 
from the terminus of the Kinsley Road, so called, to land 
of James Hurley and heirs of Mary Haniford, and build 
said road, or take any action in relation to the same. 

Article 29. To see if the Town will rescind the vote 
passed at their meeting April 3, 1899, whereby they voted 
to choose three road commissioners and accept the provisions 
of the law relative thereto. 

Article 30. To see if the Town will choose a Committee 
to confer with the Water Commissioners of the Town of 
Concord in regard to said town laying a pipe from its main 
in East Acton to or near the residence of Abel Cole, or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 31. To see if the Town will instruct the 
Assessors to have printed a valuation list for 1910. 






Voted : That the Selectmen appoint Surveyors of Lum- 
ber, Wood. Hoops and Staves. 

Voted: That the salary of the Road Commissioner be 

two and one-half dollars per day. nine hours to constitute a 
day. 

Voted : That the salary of the Tax Collector be one 
percentum of the amount collected, and that he perform all 
the duties hitherto performed by said officer. 

Voted : To fix the salary of the Auditor at six dollars. 

Article 5. To see if the Town will accept the reports of 
the Selectmen. Overseers of the Poor, School Committee. 
Library Trustees and other Town Officers. 

Voted : To accept the reports of the several Town 
Officers. 

Article 6. To hear and act upon the report of any com- 
mittees chosen to report at this meeting. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Article 7. To see what amount of money the Town will 
?-aise for the due observance of Memorial day. 

Voted: To raise one hundred ($100.00) dollars. 

Article 8. To see what amount of money the Town will 
raise for the repairing and building of roads and bridges, 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise three thousand ( $8,000.00) dollars. 

Article 0. To see if the Town will authorize the Treas- 
urer with the approval of its Selectmen, to borrow money 



for the Town, if necessary, in anticipation of taxes the cur- 
rent year. 

Voted: To authorize the Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Selectmen, to borrow money for the Town it" necessary 
in anticipation of taxes the current year. 

Article 10. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for the support of Memorial Library the present 
year. 

Voted: To raise four hundred ($400.00) dollars for 
current expenses, and two hundred ($200.00) dollars for 
books, provided that a sum not exceeding fifty ($50.00) dol- 
lars shall be appropriated for the transportation of books. 

Article 11. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise 1 for the support of schools the present year. 

Article 12. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for school supplies. 

Voted: To raise eleven thousand ($11,000.00) dollars 
for support of schools and school supplies. 

Voted : That the school committee be requested to 
provide for the two lower grades of the high school in the 
town, and the other grades be sent to Concord. 

Article 13. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum 
of money for the enforcement of the liquor laws, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Voted: That the unexpended balance of the money 
appropriated for the enforcement of the liquor laws for the 
year ending March 1, 1909, be appropriated for the enforce- 
ment of the liquor laws the current year. 






Voted: That three-fourths of the amount reeeived for 
liquor licenses during- the year ending May 1, 1909, if the 
Town votes no-license, constitute a fund for the enforce- 
ment of the liquor laws, otherwise to constitute a fund for 
police protection. 

Article 14. To see what amount of money the Town 
will appropriate for the care of cemeteries, or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate four hundred ($400.00) dollars. 

Article IT). To see if the Town will accept the legacy 
of three thousand ($3,000.00) dollars given the Town in 
trust by the will of Charlotte L. Goodnow, late deceased of 
Worcester. Mass.. for the purposes as in said hequest set 
forth, or pass such vote in relation thereto as the Town may 
deem proper. 

Voted: To accept the legacy of three thousand 
($5,000.00) dollars given the Town in trust by the will of 
Charlotte L. Goodnow for the purposes set forth in said 
he niest. Following is a copy of said bequest : To the Town 
of Acton, .Mass., I give $3,000.00 in trust, twenty dollars of 
the interest to he spent yearly for the care of the family 
burial lot in the cemetery at Acton. Mass., and the 
remainder of the income to be applied to the support of the 
Fvangelieal preaching in the Congregational Trinitarian 
church of said Town." 

Voted : To choose three trustees to serve for one year 
to be known as the trustees of the Goodnow fund to admin- 
ister said fund according to the provisions of said be- 
quest, to serve without pay and make an annual report to 
the Town. 

Luther Conant, Isaac W. Flagg and Horace F. Tuttle 

were chosen as said trustees. 



10 



Article 17. To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for maintenance of fire department, or act thereon. 

Voted: To raise three hundred and fifty ($350.00) 
dollars. 

Article 18. To see what action the Town will take in 
reference to the extermination of the gypsy and brown tail 
moth. 

Voted: To appropriate one twenty-fifth of one percent 
of the assessed valuation of the Town for the year 1908. 

Article If). To see what amount of money the Town 
will raise for town charges. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Article 20. To see what action the Town will take in 
regard to the collection of taxes. 

Voted: That the Collector charge interest at the rate 
of five percent per annum on all taxes remaining unpaid 
after the first day of November next. 

Article 21. To see what action the Town will take in 
regard to street lamps the present year. 

Voted: To raise one thousand ($1,000.00) dollars to be 
expended by the Selectmen. 

Article 22. To see what action the Town will take in 
defence of the action at law brought against the Town by 
it by Oscar A. Jones and others now pending in the Superior 
Court for the County of Middlesex, and numbered 14,888 
therein. 



11 



Voted: That the Selectmen and three gentlemeD to be 
named by the Moderator be a committee to undertake the 
defecnce of the action at law brought against the Town by 
Oscar A. Jones and others, now pending in the Superior 
Court for the County of Middlesex, with authority to hire 
counsel and contest the action or to make a settlement 
thereof, if in the judgment of the committee a settlement 
can be made which shall be just and equitable and preserve 
the rights of the Town. 

The Moderator appointed Luther Conant, Jona P. 
Fletcher and Arthur P. Blanchard members of said com- 
mittee. 

Article 23. To see what action the Town will take in 
regard to the extermination of the elm leaf beetle. 

Voted: That the matter be placed in the hands of the 
local superintendent of the moth work. 

Voted: To appropriate one hundred ($100.00) dollars. 

Article 24. To see if the Town will accept as a town 
way the laying out by the Road Commissioners of a town 
road in West Acton from a point on Arlington street, so 
called, near the house of George B. Parker to the Union 
Turnpike, connecting with the road leading to the house of 
James Kinsley and others, or pass such votes in relation 
thereto as the Town may deem proper. 

Voted: That the Town accept the laying out by the 
Road Commissioners of a town way from Arlington street 
to the Turnpike, so called, as described in their return, 
dated March, 1909, and build said road provided the matter 
of land damages can be settled satisfactory to the Road 
Commissioners, and provided the total cost of said road 
including construction and land damages shall not exceed 
seven hundred ($700.00) dollars. 



12 



Voted: To raise seven hundred ($700.00) dollars for 
the purpose of laving out and building said road. 

Article 25. To see if the Town will provide a suitable 
vault and safes for the preservation of the Town records, or 
act anything thereon. 

Voted: To leave the matter with the Selectmen with 
power to act. 

Article 26. To see if the Town will accept the Calvin 
and Luther Blanchard memorial and the premises belonging 
thereto given to the Town by the will of Luke Blanchard ; 
also to see if the Town will accept from the trustees under 
the will of Luke Blanchard. the sum of five hundred 
($500.00) dollars, the income of which is to be expended in 
the care of the burial lot of said Blanchard, also the sum of 
one hundred ($100.00) dollars the income of which is to be 
expended in the care of the Luther and Calvin Blanchard 
memorial and the sum of one hundred ($100.00) dollars the 
income of which is to be expended in the preservation and 
care of the family tomb, formerly belonging to Simon Blan- 
chard of Boxboro, and invest said funds and expend the 
income thereof in accordance with the provisions specified 
in the will of said Blanchard. 

Voted: To accept the Calvin and Luther Blanchard 
memorial and the premises belonging thereto given to the 
Town by the will of Luke Blanchard. 

Voted: To accept from the trustees under the will of 
Luke Blanchard five hundred ($500.00) dollars, the income 
to be expended in the care of the burial lot of said Blan- 
chard. also the sum of one hundred ($100.00) dollars, the 
income to be expended in the care of the Calvin and Luther 
Blanchard memorial, and the sum of one hundred ($100.00) 
dollars, the income to be expended in the preservation and 



13 



care of the family tomb, formerly belonging to Simon Blan- 
chard of Boxboro, to invest said funds and expend the 
income thereof in accordance with the provisions specified 
in the will of said Blanchard. 

Article 27. To see if the Town will instruct the Over- 
seers of the Poor to contract out the medical attendance 
for the poor the ensuing year. 

Voted: That the Overseers of the Poor be authorized 
to contract out the medical attendance for the poor the 
ensuing year. 

Article 28. To see if the Town will instruct the Road 
Commissioners to repair the road in front of T. O. 0. F. hall 
or thereabout, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To leave the matter with the Road Com- 
missioners. 

Voted : To raise two hundred ($200.00) dollars for the 
purpose set forth in the article so far as it may be necessary. 

Voted: Unanimously the following resolution: 

Whereas, our fellow-townsman, George C. Wright of 
West Acton, has erected a chapel in Mt. Hope cemetery and 
has presented it to the Town, and it has been accepted in 
behalf of the Town by its Selectmen and Cemetery Com- 
missioners, 

Resolved, That we, the citizens of Acton, in Town 
Meeting assembled, do hereby recognize the generosity and 
public spirit of Mr. Wright and express to him our thanks 
for his gift. 



14 
STATE ELECTION, NOVEMBER 2, 1909. 



Party designations: R., Republican; D., Democratic; 
P., Prohibition; S.. Socialist; S. L., Socialist Labor. 

Precincts 
12 3 Total 

Whole number of ballots cast 87 105 110 302 

Governor. 



Eben S. Draper, R., 


65 


69 


69 


203 


John A. Nicholls, P., 


1 


1 


3 


5 


Moritz E. Ruther, S. L., 








1 


1 


James H. Vahey, D., 


19 


31 


35 


85 


Daniel A. White, S., 





1 





1 


Blanks 


2 


3 


2 


7 



Lieutenant Governor. 



Eugene N. Foss, D., 


23 


33 


37 


93 


Louis A. Frothingham, R., 


60 


68 


69 


197 


George G. Hall, S., 


1 


1 





2 


Ernest R. Knipe, P., 


1 





2 


3 


Lawrence Yates. S. L., 





2 


1 


3 


Blanks 


2 


1 


1 


4 



Secretary. 



David T. Clarke, D., 


12 


22 


26 


60 


Harriet D. Orsay, S., 





3 





3 


Henry C. Hess. S. L., 








9 


2 


William G. Merrill, P., 


1 





3 


4 


William M. Olin, R., 


67 


74 


73 


214 


Blanks 


7 


6 


6 


19 



15 










Treasurer 










James II. Bryan 






..13 


23 


23 


59 


James B. Carr 









1 





1 


David Craig 












1 


1 


Daniel Parlin . 






1 


1 


4 


6 


Elmer A. Stevens 






66 


75 


76 


217 


Blanks 




Auditor. 


7 


5 


6 


18 


Alexis Boyer. Jr.. 


D. 


? 


12 


22 


25 


59 


Charles A. Chace, 


P.. 




2 


1 


3 


6 


Sylvester J. McBride. 


S.. 





2 





2 


Jeremiah P. McN* 


illy, 


S. L., 








1 


1 


Henry E. Turner. 


R., 




64 


73 


73 


210 


Blanks 






9 


7 


8 


24 



Attorney General. 






Henry M. Dean. P., 


1 





3 


4 


John A. Frederiekson. S. L., 





1 


1 


2 


Dana Malone. R.. 


66 


72 


73 


211 


Harvey X. Shepherd, D.. 


12 


25 


23 


60 


John Weaver Sherman, S., 





1 


1 


2 


Blanks 


8 


6 


9 


23 


Councillor. 










Henry G. Burke. S.. 





2 


1 


3 


Charles H. Callahan. D.. 


13 


20 


23 


56 


Herbert E. Fleteher. R.. 


66 


78 


76 


220 


Charles E. Wood 








4 


4 


Blanks 


8 


.") 


6 


19 


Senator. 










Prank P. Bennett, Jr.. R.. 


67 


71 


57 


1!).") 


James Kinsley. D., 


14 


24 


49 


87 


William S. TretYy. S.. 





2 





2 


Blanks 


6 


8 


4 


18 



16 



Representative in General Court. 



John M. Fletcher of Westford, IX, 15 
Elisha D. Stone of Aver, R., 66 

Blanks 6 



23 


26 


64 


75 


73 


214 


7 


11 


24 



County Commissioner. 



Patrick Conlon, D., 


13 


21 


26 


60 


Robert J. Kelley, S., 





3 





3 


Samuel 0. Upham, R. 


67 


77 


76 


220 


Blanks 


7 


4 


8 


19 



County Treasurer. 



Joseph 0. Hayden, D., 
Anson B. Hobbs, S., 
Dexter C. Whittimore, D., 
Blanks 



67 



76 



to 



218 

3 

60 

21 



Vote for Representative in Eleventh Middlesex District, 
November 2, 1909. 









tt 






© 
+3 








o 


to 

O 

«4-i 
GO 






as 

O 


O 


'J5 


£ 



3 



J. M. Fletcher, of Westford, D., | 64|126| 21|193| 39|158| 601 

Elisha D. Stone of Aver, R., |214|260| 50|333| 93|146|1096 

Blanks | 24| 29| 11| 46| 9| 29| 148 

"Totals 77. |302|415| 82|572|141|333|1845 



17 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



Births. 

Whole number recorded 34 

Born in Acton 34 

Males 19 

Females 15 

Native parentage 16 

Foreign parentage 7 

Mixed parentage 11 



Marriages. 



Whole number recorded 14 

Residents of Acton 18 

Residents of other places 10 

Deaths. 

Whole number recorded 31 

Residents of Acton 27 

Residents of other places 4 

Occurring in Acton 30 

Occurring in other places 1 

Average age 56 

Note. The Town Clerk requests information of any 
omission or error in the lists of births, marriages and deaths. 

The Town Clerk hereby gives notice that he is prepared 
to furnish blanks for the returns of births and deaths. 

HORACE F. TUTTLB, 

Town Clerk. 



is 



O 



P 

w 
w 

3 

« 

02 
W 

Eh 
« 



p 

- 
X 

Oh 
o 

03 
g 



-P 
Q 

O 
03 

a 



o • o . 




CO • &£ • 




fl • Jh . 


CD 


OS • © • 




N 03 ■ 


'3J 


£^5 : 


CO 



q 

o x 



p 

s p *~ 
© o> 

CO 



CO 



03 hP "3 M ^ CjjO 



s n pq pq Efts « >s >.qq q ^ ^ bd' g g . JS -g "C 
£f3 *5®i?2»3-2<i>»5j s^^sjb^ts s^s 



03 X! "tl " "^ ^ « 03 

• i-i 03 
Si •- 

Si " 

^^ 

X * Jg «g « Sj^J >g 
£UD C3 S fc ^ fe 



5? Krl 

03 C 

rpfr 



!> P5 

i? S 



Si 

- 

X 



fe.: 



Q fe W 03 W _ ^ 

X cu 



Oj jli ^ Jgr PQ 03 



wo 



^'p^pPcP^p'-jpp 2 P ~ p ii r~ ^ < 



x 03 -h r c v — • - 

S ^ 5 ° 3 ^ * 



<L X +_, U, 



05 55JD^ 

O) ^ ^ 

3 O X 

Si 03 ^q *3 ^ i-Q 



f,h 05 






x c --. 



, 03 X 

-f = 

a. 



^ ^ <! W & f§ -? 5 O 5 £ «5< J t? ^ 



2 5 JH n= 13 x 
-H 43 .{Jed g ► « 

x sh ^ "^ hh -*-i z: 

W ^ Q C W £ g 
0303^§§SfSa^^ 

o fc 

X ^ ^ <d 



o • 
co 

ft 

2 'U 



x ^c 

4^ 03 

2 p ^ Sh 
x ^ p 



X 



^^^ 



PC np 



8 B'O B'h 
^ ^ ^. ~ P ~fe 

* W « ^ > K ' "2 

T/l i r i- r p 

33 w cb ^ ^ ^ »5 



If 



-P T! 



X X c 



2 W 5 .- .£ W -M Si 



co 



13 



Si i-Q s. 

«>h B«S 080^3; 



g 'as o t ^ 5 

n § « = - = K ■ 

^ P P ? 'cc ^ 

KH uZ; C ~ Cv Cv , 



x O 



x y 



.2 • 03 

H ^ ^ 
a x 

r -P -P 



1 x — > 
Q > 

T3p1 
IE 

& s ^ 



, 7J 



Sh x P^ 
03 03 03 

g I o 



CO . rP 



^ C Si 

Si J- 03 

p_ p^ ■»- 
c 
03 



03 
CC 



-M 



I- 

P 1—i T— 1 



03 



s^:r 



23 

p " p ^ M <5 

0) p 0; « O S S 8 P^P- p- P p P 



"M 



CO 



00 

^ CM 

Sh >. 

x m 



->\ 



Si 
03 t^ 



o up; 



03^^ 
•g 03 X 



o 

►^ r- ^1 ^ -+ IO CD I- 



oo c: 



»ct to h-' co aj o 1-4 oq cc "* 

^ »— -— 1— r- <M -M 'M ^': CM 



19 



' u 


b 


^ o3 

p* pP 


P 

C 


03 


_• 


02 
C 


£ 


5 
Pi 


S3 
0Q 


^ 


PI 


■> — ' 


cfl 


pH 


03 


pq 


a 


•» — ^ 


eg 




c3 




H 


&JDpP 
S-i "*J 
C6 « 


S fe 


a; 


— 








■3 


^z 


n: 


8 


1 — 1 


cc 








^ 


qq 


7Z 


E 


T3 








P T3 


~~z 

73 


w 


'"P 
— 


cd 


Pi 
as 


m 


05 




S 


-r 


+a 


03 


p" 




03 


DC 


EC 


g 


^£ 



93 

C 
PI 
03 

13 

'3 

03 

PS 



lS -5 ^ O &J 



r-T' N 
03 pP 

6 «fc 

O; .— ^^ 

*5 £ 

73 03 pP 



M -P 



C g 

*>, 0w 

03 ». 
P P 

a o 
22 e 



03 
pH 

c 

03 

o 
Pi 

0) 

u 

c3 



CO 
(M 

-(J 
GO 

P 



r- CO 

^ P P pQ 



P ^ a3 0) o 



73 



03 

p- 
C 

c? 

03 
pH 

03 
> 






P 

w 
w 

s 

H 

a 

s 



<<a 



lO o t^ « c 

(M (M (M <M Ol 



PI 

O 

o 

PI £pP 

°v2 .9 






c 



^W»2-*Ma5QQPQZ 



*H 



3.2 
p pi 
^ pi 
Hi 



c J^ 



.2 ^ 

t: g 
o 

1 O 03 






T3 


03 




^ 


+a 


•_. 


U 





Hi 


/. 


hJ 


a 


03 


c 


pi 

03 


^ 


>. 


03 


art 


Fh 


QE-O 



G C 



03 a) 

PL n_ 



03 03 



o o 

03 O 



a: a: 

03 03 



fr 



o? ^-: ph 
a O S 

O) C3 ^ S3 



- 



^3 r^ 



«3rrt 



?3JD 03 -j-1 
03 p Z3 i— I 

O 03 x . h^ , ^ 

r a 03 JT' »> o P 

^ S s: J^ ce s: 03 



■ pi -M • g 

. o • o o 

£ g S 
S; S « 

c 



p. 

03 



Ph 
03 



p 
c 
-1-3 
o 



rH 



IP o 

03 -r5 
P 






03 

pC 

c 

-l-a 

03 

c 



03 -t-3 

P 
03 ■ 



20 






X ^ 



C£ 



"3 t. 



7 * > - 

~- x C ~ 



X X p p <j < p £ ^ ^ £ 



^ 



d 



0) 









^ g 1 o . .--d 
d £ EH x = x J PC 

-r g W u -So.* 

cu^pcp^a>a. 



— 



pc : 






«6 _H 



1- 

h£ a; 



c • c 
■^ >~ -^ o 



Pi 



Oi 
O 

C5 



Q 

W 

P3 

w 

Eh 

H-l 

H 

P4 

02 

w 

H 
<J 

W 
Q 



<j 



MO I L- |H I <M *1 <M 

• GCCOM I 



'■+ c: so 



Fh l> 00 oo 



3WHCO) )>'Ht» 

- ^ - -f M N |> b- 



c d 

I ^1 

« s r-S I J d - § °- « 

x cu^r - x a) £JciS-o 



d g 



83 : : ^^^ 

r- O^ ^l ^i Fl 

£ §3 (M r-i a) a> cp 

oo B c a " 

d 33 3^ V 



S S 2 

O O r^ r^ 

a* a> d d 



C ft ^— • 

<U "J 0J 



o — 

s s 



hQ^^KXM^P 



ii 'X n x r. c 



2i 



<N I <N 



— C£ X -M — SC 



c: cr. x; b- cr. 






:i •+ i- r: x x i: x 'N t- on ~ x t- x 



? ~ — 



/ 



If * J s ■§ 1 5 '~ ^ ^ ^ « 1 1 ~ 


| 


"^^r-^^-^^-^x" 1 " • r HjO j" 




w o3 5 ^ S »" P S ^ 


— 



t u £ ? ~ >•= g 3 

.9 8>® £-' = -- = 
SmwwStSsspS 



© <-i +e 



-* P — bo, 



0*Ph go x x ^ 



«£> . T* 



S'- s-^ fc,*" 1 



v 2 - c; 



° ■£ ^ . t- iH <N ,5 lO CC ^ >.^ >.^£ >. - 

I _, 2 rH <N ,£ Xi E *"" ^ i 03 6 03 £ OS r~ 

E "gE OD >? b !2 *5 > ** b £ fi >* P « P w 

< X < < -=i % S S £ < S O hj £ ^ - ^ 



HN»^lf5COI>00<3iOH(NCCTt<lCi«OI> 

^ p. ,. r. r- r- r. r- r- :i :i :i n n :i :i :i 



pq 



4 

•i-t 

CO 

1 



• — 

PQ 

2 | 8.1 1 8,8.* S.| 8.&S 8.8.1 | | 8. 

f 

Q as ^ c 

^ X £ ^ &£ • » 3 * fl '2 

£ o » c SiS S ?i 3 5 ^ ^" x x ^?- 

I I |SS iS IS IS^.S. I I 182 

05 
. , , |t , ,„ |lo |H 2 , W 0»0,. 

u ^ <M I cc M x t- i- i- t> o b-j t- l> X ift 



^ aj 



a 

a 
x 

-7 



5uM w « fe.2 



.2 m ^ 

£ ^ ~ _ ce ^ x £»es J3 

^ rz: ^ as - - 



rz3 "C x- +J ^ 



02 tfSWfc^ 



>-w . 



x * P 



a« .S « 



>■ " fJ-i H BO 

X ^ X X ~ 4) - 
^ — ~ ~ Z > ~ ~ ~ -^ 









BE 
X 








X 






s 






















a; 

- 


—- 




X 


N 






■2 




« 


X 
OS 


£ 


^ 


r 


_ 


Fh 


— 


— 


~x 


^, 


— 
















< 


5 JS 


- 


N 


g 


71 


c 


'^. 


:-' 


-^ 

X 


W^ 


1 


~ 


OJ 


X 


3 


f 


- 








pq x xn x 



r^ 



X 

X 



ai Oi Oi o c: C5 a: c r. x r. c: c: x r. r. r. r. 
oooooooooooooooooo 



H t- H M W W C<1 03 ^- ^ ^ r- r— "M 



X r-< .,-t 



X H 



- c- 

2 x 



&-►» 



SSx £„- 



S>3 



~ r-/ = ~ 



'-rC-r<:<;"-f^-r^-r-r-r^-r^- 



g -<N 



o i- x o o r- <>j re -f »t w i- x 



23 



PEKSONS HAVING DOGS LICENSED IN 1909. 



Allen. Louis E 


$2 . 00 


Adams. Daniel H. . . . 


2.00 


Laird, Edson 


2.00 


Burroughs, S. R. ... 


2.00 


Bradley, Mary 


2.00 


Brooks, Mary D 


2.00 


Boyce, Charles E. . . . 


2.00 


Bulette, Frank W. . . 


2.00 


Bailey, F. L 


2.00 


Bresth, Simon 


2.00 


Bent. H. P 


2.00 


Bradburv. Rolfe .... 


2.00 


Baker, Martin S. ... 


2.00 


Brown. Lizzie J 


2.00 


Brown, R. G 


2.00 


Brown, Eliza M 


2.00 


Bent, Mrs. J. M. (2) . 


4.00 


Brill. Frederick E. . . 


2 . 00 


Conant, Luther (1908) 


, 2.00 


Conant, Luther 


2.00 


Condon, Timothy . . . 


. 2.00 


Christensen. Fred A. 


2.00 


Callahan, C. H. (2) . . 


4.00 


Chiekering, CD. ... 


2.00 


Clark, Charles H. ... 


2.00 


Col.-. Abel 


2.00 


Coughlin, Wm. C. ... 


2 . 00 


Coughlin, John F. . . . 


2 . 00 


Calder, Maria 


2.00 


Colpitt. C. IT 


2.00 


Durkee, J. E 


2.00 


Dusseault. George A. 


2.00 


Durkee, Charles A. . 


2 . 00 


Davis, Charles E. . . . 


2.00 


Dole. Cyrus G 


2 . 00 


Dow, Charles E 


2.00 


Davis, Marv E 


2.00 


DeJavne, Joseph 


2.00 


Donnelly, Mrs. F. H. 


2.00 


Davis. Wendell F. . . 


2 . 00 


Densmore, Joseph A. 


2.00 



Emery, F. E 2.00 

Enneguess, Michael (2), 4.00 

Frost. C. A 2.00 

Fletcher, Willie S. ... 2.00 

Fiske, Wilbur 2.00 

Fairbanks. C. IT 2.00 

Ford, I. S 2.00 

Ford. Charles L. (2) . 4.00 

Farrar, Daniel II 2.00 

Fletcher, Lester N. . . 2.00 

Fobes. Edward S 5.00 

Fullonton, Llewellyn . 2.00 

Farrar. Abel 5.00 

Green. Bertha F 2.00 

Gilmore, A. II 2.00 

Gallagher. Joseph ... 2.00 

Gallant, Joseph 2.00 

Green, Fred W 2.00 

Gradv. Roy 5.00 

Grav. Florence A 2.00 

ITolden. F. II. (2) ... 4.00 

Iloit. Frank W 2.00 

Harris, Ilattie B 5.00 

Ilolden. Willis L 2.00 

Houghton, Oliver E. . . 2.00 

Hollowed. William ... 2.00 

Haves, Michael G. ... 2.00 

Hardy, Arthur C 2.00 

Jones. Warren (1908), 2.00 

Jones, Warren 2.00* 

Jones. Samuel 2.00 

•Jones. Ralph T 2.00 

Johnson, John 2.00 

Kennedy, John (1008). 2.00' 

Kellev. Marvin 2.00' 

Kelley. Win. F 2.00' 

Kennedy, Duncan S. . . 5. on 
Kimball, C. M. (3) ..12.00' 

Lawson, A. T 5.00 

Lalfin. Sidney 2.00' 

Lawrence, A. L 2.00) 



24 



Lawrey, George F. 
Libby, George (3) 
Lewis, Henrv (2) . 
Lothrop, T. C. (3) 
Livermore, Wm. J. 
Moore, Wm. J. (2) 
McAllister, Oscar . 
Murphy, John P. . 

Merriam, A 

Morrison, F. D. (2) 
Murphy, George E. 
Miller,* Charles I. . 



Merrill, Wm. F 5.00 

Noyes, A. L 5.00 

Olsen, Simon 2.00 

O'Connell. M 2.00 

O'Neil, Patrick 2.00 

Priest, Henrv L 5.00 

Percy, L. H.' 2.00 

Perkins. Levi 2.00 

Perkins, Arnold H. . . 2.00 

Porter, Albert 2.00 

Prentiss, Avard F. ... 2 . 00 

Pratt, Frank A 5.00 

Pratt. Mrs. F. A. (2) .10.00 

Pratt, Francis 2.00 

Palma, John 2.00 

Pavson, Arthur E 2.00 

Pope, Benjamin (3) .. 9.00 
Reed, George H. (2) . 4.00 
Richardson, J. L. (2) .4.00 

Robbins, Solon A 2.00 

Reed, Robert G 2.00 

Robbins. W. C. (2) .. 4.00 

Shaplev. Eva C 2.00 

Stevens, Wm. F 2.00 

152 licenses at $2.00 each 
24 licenses at 5.00 each 



2.00 Sanborn, E. R. ... 
12.00 Stiles, Frank L. .. 
4.00 Smith. Chester R. . 
6.00 Smith, Robert J. .. 
2.00 Smith. Albert H. .. 
4.00 Sawver, Leslie S. . 

2.00 Staples. Hall 

2.00 Spinnev, Everett L. 
2.00 Schoneld, H. C, ... 

4.00 Swett. W. H 

2.00 Stevenson, John M. 
2.00 Tuttle, Arthur 

Turco. Francis . . . 

Tavlor. Charles A. 

Thompson. T. A. . . 

Tavlor, S. D 

Tavlor, S. H 

Tavlor, C. Carlton 

Williams, F. G. ... 

Withrow. Jacob . . 

Whitcomb, Fred S. 

Watkins, J. II. and 
W. (4) 

Willard. Leonard G 

Worden, Henry . . . 

Woodman. Ernest . 

Willis. Ed. E. (2) . 

Willard, F. II 

Warren, W. S. ... 

Weaver, George F. 

Woods. Eleanor H. 

Worster. George \V 

Wetherbee. Ellis . . 

White, Eugene L. . 

Wheeler. C. H. (2) 



$804.00 
120.00 



2.00 

2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
5.00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
5.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 

2.n 

2.00 
5.00 
5.00 
5.00 
2.00 
2.00 

8.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
4.00 
5.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
7.00 



Deduct fees. 17b' licenses at 20 cents 
each 

Balance paid to county treasurer .... 



$424.00 
85.20 

$888.80 



25 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



High School. 



Paid Alice Maelntyre $495.00 

Town of Concord, tuition 2,256.00 

Transportation high school schol- 
ars 1.122.37 



South School 

Paid Elizabeth K. Paine 

Pauline D. Berthold 

Sadie R. Whitney 

Julia L. McCarthy 

Jennie E. Stowell 

Elizabeth A. Hinckley 

Bessie G. Hurlbutt 

Marion A. Veits 

George C. Turner, janitor .... 
South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

Fred S. Glines. janitor 

coal 

Anson C. Piper, wood 

James Byron. Jr.. carrying water 

R. B. Moore 

Airs. Anthony Sweet, cleaning . . 

T. E. Downie. wood 

Michael Foley, carrying water . . 
Fred S. Glines. cleaning 





$3,873.37 


28 


.00 


165 


.00 


210 


.00 


393 


.00 


427 


.00 


228 


.00 


238 


.00 


5 


.00 


121 


.60 


153 


,00 


245 


.31 


21 


00 


23 


.75 


12. 


90 


10, 


00 


13, 


,00 


12. 


00 


11 


, 00 



$2,317.56 



26 



West School. 

Paid Ethel G. Evans 368.00 

Harriet II. Gardner 462.00 

Mary Freeman 182.00 

E. Sophia Taylor 228.00 

A. F. Blanehard. wood 18.00 

George II. Reed, eoal 100.88 

Thomas Scanlon, janitor 232.66 

Thomas Scanlon, cleaning ...'... 12.00 

W. E. Woodward, sawing wood, 4.00 









$1,607 


.54 


Centre 


School. 








Paid Martha F. Smith 




455.00 






Ella L. Miller 




455.00 
439.00 






Minnie Gamble 






Asaph Pari in, janitor . 




145.00 






Asaph Parlin, cleaning 




24.77 






George II. Reed, eoal . 




179.60 






W. II. Kinggley, wood . 




16.50 







$1,714.87 



Miscellaneous School Expenses. 

Paid Arthur B. Webber, superin- 
tendent schools $500.00 

Arthur B. Webber, postage and 

stationery 28 . 61 

E. N. C. Barnes, musical in- 
structor 180.00 

W. L. Adams, drawing instructor, 60.00 

F. W. Brackett, drawing instruc- 

tor 100.00 



27 



0. E. Houghton, carting school 

scats 1.00 

L. C. Taylor, storage school sup- 
plies 10.00 

P. I. Luce glasses for May 

Macomber 3.50 

American Woolen Co., electric 

current 5.65 

George C. Turner, truant officer . 1.00 

A. S. Bradley, truant officer 1.00 

E. S. Fobes, truant officer 5.00 

Charles J. Williams, postage and 

telephone 9.91 

Thomas Scanlon, truant officer . . 4.00 

Thomas Scanlon, incidentals .... .25 

C. H. Persons, tuning piano 6.00 

E. F. Conarit, school census 15.00 

Frederick K. Shaw, school phy- 
sician 25.00 

Samuel A. Christie, school phy- 
sician 25.00 

Samuel A. Christie, postage and 

telephone 8 . 69 

Frank E. Tasker. school phy- 
sician 25.00 



$1,014.61 
School Supplies. 

aid J. h. Hamraett Co $119.40 

E. E. Babb & Co 20.40 

C. L. Chase & Co 20.00 

J. B. Pearson & Co 45.00 

Estabrook Steel Pen Co 6.40 

.Milton Beadley Co *. . . 1.50 

A. S. Barnes Co 12.60 

Thompson. Brown & Co I.(M) 

Houghton, Mifflin Co 63.78 



28 



American Book Co 15. 7b' 

Ginn & Co 139.48 

Benjamin H. Scanlon Co 2.08 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co 8.72 

Tuttle & Newton .24 

M. E. Taylor & Co 3 . 61 



Repairs on School Grounds and Houses. 

Paid W. S. Keller, painting West 

school $174.25 

Benjamin A. King, repairs West 

school 5.50 

Benjamin A. King, repairs South 

school 4.00 

J. P. Brown, repairs South school, 1.47 

George C. Turner, repairs South 

school 8 . 75 

L. E. Reed, labor South school . . 3.50 

Asaph Parlin. repairs Center 

school 21.98 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

repairs South school 22.68 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

repairs West school 138.56 

Thomas Scanlon, labor and re- 
pairs West school 38.40 

Thomas Scanlon. labor South 

school 2.50 

E. T. Rice, repairs South school . 7.05 

E. T. Rice, repairs West school . 18.56 
Fred S. Glines, repairs South 

school 21.96 

F. E. Harris, repairs AVest school. 90.13 
B. F. Townsend, repairs South 



$462.97 



29 



school 

B. F. Townsend. repairs West 
school 

Frank Priest. repairs South 

school 

F. Z. Taylor, repairs South school, 
A. C. Piper, repairs South school. 
Tuttle & Newton, repairs South 

school 

Hall Brothers. repairs West 

school 

E. A. Phalen, repairs Center 

school 

W. H. Kingsley. repairs Center 

school 

C. H. Mead, repairs West school 
William Moore, repairs West 

school 

Finney & Hoit. supplies 



Transportation of Scholars. 

Common Schools. 

Paid George E. Greenough $545.00 

Jens Mekkelsen 532 . 00 

Walter M. French 277.50 

A. Christofferson 65.00 



Gypsy and Brown Tail Moth Account. 

Paid John Murphy, labor .' $317.00 

Barney Rush, labor 223.87 

James O. Neil, labor 786.91 



12 


,68 


4. 


50 


i 

16. 


50 


17 


,68 


5 


.00 


10 


.49 


4 


25 


6 


.90 


7 


.50 


59 


.02 


22 


.33 


14 


.92 



$741.06 



,419.50 



30 



George McCarthy, labor 218.37 

Martin L. Brown, labor 324.63 

Herbert F. Bobbins, labor 167.50 

Herbert F. Bobbins, use of horse, 60.25 

Aurin Payson, labor 65.25 

James Conghlin, labor 13.00 

Kingsley Cochrane, labor 31.00 

Albert H. Perkins, labor 197.48 

John C. Keyes, labor 5.40 

Webster C. Bobbins, use of horse. 28.29 
Herbert F. Bobbins, freight on 

supplies 5 . 19 

Boston Harness Co., life belts ... 4.50 

Jenny Mfg. Co., supplies 5.92 

Joseph Breck & Sons, supplies . . .50 

Clarence E. Bailey, supplies .... 10.20 
Frost Insecticide Co., arsenate 

lead 45.00 

D. F. Munroe Co., burlap 162.63 

Boss Brothers, pump and supplies, 8.50 

E. T. Bice, 50 ft. hose 6.00 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

lumber and cement 21 .00 

A. Hosmer, printing 4.50 

Gateh% pump and supplies 10.00 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies .... 6.66 

M. G. Hayes, storage of tools ... 15.00 

Barrett Mfg. Co., creosote 8.30 

Fred W. Billings, labor . .' 60.00 



Roads and Bridges. 

Paid W. II. Kingsley, labor $1,005.66 

A. II. Perkins, labor 936.85 

A. C. Piper, labor ' 914. 67 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 



$2,812.85 



31 



supplies 

Good Roads Mch. Co., supplies . 
M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies . . . . 

E. P. Gates, repairs 

A. H. Perkins, gravel 

Ole Granberg, gravel 

Mrs. C. H. Whitney, gravel 

"W. H. Kingsley, repairs 

D. II. Farrar. repairs 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 

J. T. McNiff, repairs 

A. S. Bradley, repairs 

N. H. Tenney, repairs 

C. H. Mead, supplies 

Finney & Hoit, supplies 

"W. H. Kingsley. miscellaneous 

expense 



134 


61 


30 


49 


55 


85 


14 


75 


14 


90 


20 


40 


17 


30 


120.00 


3 


50 


. 8 


46 


6 


19 


1 


15 


28 


09 


5.76 


3 


85 


2 


77 



$3,325.25 



Support of Poor on Farm. 



Expenses per report of overseers of 

poor $2,545.42 

Outside Poor. 

Expenses per report of overseers of 

poor $743.89 

Street Lamps. 

Paid A. W. Morse, care of lamps $73.00 

A. K. Hoyt. care of lamps 47.00 

Everett Reed, care of lamps .... 73.00 

F. W. Green, care of lamps 174.97 

George H. Lawrey. care of lamps, 72.50 



32 



Howard L. Quimby, care of 
lamps 

American Woolen Co., electric 
lights 

Valvoline Oil Co., gasoline 

Whiting Mfg. Co., repairs 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 
repairs 

F. W. Green, repairs 

H. L. Quimby, repairs 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 

A. S. Bradley, repairs 

C. H. Mead, supplies 

Walter E. Hay ward 

John Cahill 

T. F. Duren 

H. W. B. Proctor 

Julian Tuttle 

S. A. Richardson 

Simon Bresth 

D. C. Harris 

A. E. Payson 

Finney & IToit, supplies 



26.50 



62 


.37 


7 


.42 


8 


.00 


54 


.02 


1. 


95 


3 


.00 




.75 


41 


.60 




.75 


86 


.79 


4 


.00 


4 


.00 


4 


.00 


4 


.00 


4 


.00 


4 


.00 


4. 


.00 


4 


.00 


2, 


.00 


4 


.20 



$771.88 



Printing. 



Paid News Publishing Co., voting 

list and ballots $26 . 00 

News Publishing Co., town re- 
ports 110. 20 

News Publishing Co., town war- 
rants 6 . 50 

News Publishing Co., school re- 
port cards 5 . 00 



33 



News Publishing Co., poll tax 

lists 14.00 

A. Hosmer. printing for regis- 
trars 2.75 

A. Hosmer, printing caucus 

notices 1.25 

A. Hosmer. printing for select- 
men 12.75 

A. Hosmer, printing for school 

committee 7 . 00 

A. Hosmer, printing jury list ... 1.00 

A. Hosmer. printing for board of 

health 2.25 

A. Hosmer. printing tax bills .. 5.10 

A. Hosmer, -printing, moth de- 
partment 16.50 

A. Hosmer. printing, town treas- 
urer 2 . 50 

A. Hosmer, printing, assessor and 

collector 4. 15 

A. Brownell. printing, assessor . 9.55 

Knowlton Press, printing, fire 

warden 5 . 50 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

registrar's book 2.25 

Enterprise Co.. selectmen's 

notices .70 

Library Books. 
Paid Current Literature Publishing 

Co $4.25 

McDavitt & Wilson 11 . 53 

W. B. Clark Co 237.90 

Herman Goldberger 38.30 

W. D. Turtle 2.00 

W. A. Wilde Co 4.67 



$234.95 



$298 . 65 



34 



Library Expenses. 

Paid E. F. Conant, insurance $50.25 

A. F. Davis, librarian 103.00 

A. F. Davis, miscellaneous ex- 
penses 1 1 . 25 

S. H. Taylor, janitor 101 .00 

S. H. Taylor, labor 1 .00 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

coal 66 . 24 

A. Hosmer, printing cards 3.50 

E. Z. Stanley, repairs 12.38 

O. E. Houghton, carrying books . 41.68 
American Woolen Co.. electric 

current 1 . 65 

Dura Binding Co., repairs 34.05 

W. . D. Tuttle, express and 

postage 5 . 69 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 6.53 



Cemetery Expenses. 

Paid Julian Tuttle, labor in Wood- 
lawn $86.50 

Julian Tuttle, plants in Wood- 
lawn 9.88 

H. T. Clark, labor in Mt. Hope . . 92.41 

A. H. Perkins, labor in Mt. Hope. 45.65 

F. W. Green, labor in Mt. Hope . 26.45 

A. Parlin, labor in Woodlawn ... 20.13 

N. G. Brown, labor in Woodlawn. 35.00 

H. T. Clark, express 2.25 



$447.22 



•$318.27 



35 



Perpetual Care of Lots. 
Paid Julian Tuttle, eare of Wood- 
lawn $210.35 

Julian Tuttle, care of North .... 6.00 

H. T. Clark, care of Mt. Hope ... 82.50 



Fire Department. 

Paid West Acton department, allow- 
ance $117.00 

South Acton department, allow- 
ance 117.00 

J. P. Brown, repairs 15.75 

Bay State Belting Co., hose. 

South 126.50 

W. H. Kingsley, fighting- fire. 

North 22.50 

H. P. Dutton, fighting fire. North. 12.00 

E. P. Gates, repairs, Center 3.00 

F. W. Green, cleaning vault. 

West 1.00 

C. H. Stead, supplies. West 12.33 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies. East. .57 



Police Department. 

Paid G. S. Libbey. special duty $21.50 

A. S. Bradley, special duty 53.00 

A. S. Bradley, court fees 14.00 

James Kinsley, court fees 5.40 

James Kinsley, special duty .... 11 .00 

George E. Holton, special duty . . 5.00 

J. T. McNiff, special duty 2.50 

E. S. Fobes, special duty 18.50 

E. S. Fobes, court fees 8.12 

O. E. Houghton, use of horse ... 1 .00 



$298.85 



$427.65 



$140.02 



36 

Board of Health. 

Paid E. S. Fobes, inspecting meat .. $181.45 

E. S. Fobes, labor and expenses . 31.74 

E. S. Fobes, supplies 3.65 

M. A. Reed, inspecting meat .... 18.00 
M. A. Reed, miscellaneous ex- 
penses 10 . 91 

F. E. Tasker, reporting con- 
tagious diseases 6 . 00 



Town Buildings and Grounds. 

Paid South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

coal and repairs, hall $50.50 

American Woolen Co., electric 

current, hall 33.33 

Benjamin A. King, wiring library 

and hall 78.22 

O. D. Wood, repairs, hall 12.05 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies, hall, 7.84 

Dexter L. Spinney, wood, hall .. 10.00 

S. H. Taylor, care hall and 

grounds 94 . 20 

S. H. Taylor, care clock and flag, 25.00 

C. H. Mead, repairs, roller house 

and fire escape 20 . 54 

B. D. Hall, wiring West fire 

house 10.00 

J. S. Hoar, repairs West fire 

house 1 . 00 

C. S. Twitchell, repairs West fire 

house 7.70 

F. W. Green, cleaning West fire 

house 1 . 00 



$251.75 



$351.38 



37 

State Aid. 

Paid Emma P. Blood 

Susan H. Olough 

Aaron S. Fletcher 

Mary A. Parlin 

Mary I. Richardson 

Mary A. Wood 

Addison B. Wheeler 

Walter O. Holden 

Isaiah S. Leach 

Bridget Mawn 

John T. Sibley 

Fred A. Norris 

Edward Willis 

Lydia Handley 

Lorenz Carberg 

Thomas J. Sawver 



$44.00 
44.00 
44.00 
44.00 
44.00 
44.00 
44.00 
44.00 
55.00 
20.00 
45.00 
44.00 
66.00 
28.00 
20.00 
32.00 



State and Military Aid. 

Paid Town of Hudson, aid furnished 

Mrs. Lucy Wood $60.00 

F. IT. Rich, M. D., medical atten- 
dance, Warren Ball. 1908 .. 14.75 



$662.00 



$74.75 



Salaries. 



Paid Horace F. Tuttle. registrar of 

voters $15.00 

Fritz Hawes, registrar of voters, 14.50 

S. A. Guilford, registrar of voters, 14.50 
James McGreen, registrar of 

voters 12.00 



88 



H. F. Robbins, election officer ... 2.50 

Abram Tuttle, election officer . . 5.00 

James L. Richardson, election 

officer 2.50 

Willis L. Holden, election officer, 2.50 

8. H. Taylor, election officer 2.50 

John F. Coughlin, election officer, 2.50 

E. F. Barker, election officer 2.50 

Theron F. Newton, election 

officer 2.50 

Hiram J. JTapgood, election 

officer 2.50 

C. B. Stone, election officer 2.50 

E. Brooks Parker, election 

officer 2.50 

W. F. Kelley, election officer 2.50 

Edwin T. Swift, election officer . 2.50 
Horace F. Tuttle, election officer. 2.50 
Horace F. Tuttle, town clerk .... 30.00 
Horace F. Tuttle, cemetery com- 
missioner 8 . 00 

James B. Tuttle. eh airman of 

selectmen 

Asaph Merriam, selectman 

William F. Stevens, selectman . . 
William F. Stevens, chairman 

assessors 

William F. Kelley. assessor .... 

James B. Tuttle, assessor 

O. A. Knowlton, chairman over- 
seers of poor 

J. S. Moore, overseer 

W. F. Kelley, overseer 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, town treas- 
urer 

Charles J. Williams, chairman 
school committee 



125 


.00 


50, 


00 


50 


,00 


75, 


,00 


55 


.00 


55 


,00 


50 


.00 


25 


.00 


20 


.00 


150 


.00 


48 


.00 



39 



W. F. Stevens, collecting taxes. 

1907 4.41 

W. F. Stevens, collecting taxes. 

1908 53.48 

AY. F. Stevens, collecting taxes 

1909 207.86 

W, F. Stevens, moth tax, 1908 .. 15.00 

W. E. Whitcomb, auditing town 

books in 1908-09 12.00 

$1,129.75 

Loans and Interest. 

Paid First National Bank of Aver, 

two notes $6,000.00 

Interest on notes 90.00 

James B. Tuttle, note and in- 
terest 1.020 . 00 

F. C. Hayward. interest on ceme- 
tery fund 17.50 

M. Medora Tuttle. interest on 

cemetery fund 8.75 

$7,136.25 

Snow Bills. 

Paid W. A. Flint, labor $11 .69 

A. C. Piper, labor 30.04 

Walter M. French, labor 9.25 

A. H. Perkins, labor 64.80 

$115.78 



40 



Tree Warden. 

Paid James 0. Neil, labor and sup- 
plies $5 . 09 

John P. Murphy, labor -4.00 

Barney Rush, labor 4.00 

Martin L. Brown, labor 4.00 

Aurin Payson, labor 4.00 

George McCarthy, labor 4.00 

Thomas F. Parker, arsenate of 

lead 7.65 

Webster C. Robbins, use of team, 8.00 



Liquor Account. 

Paid E. S. Fobes, police duty $131 .37 

E. C. Wood, police duty 17.49 

E. J. Lyons, police duty 24.00 

Fred Brown, police duty 5.50 

A. S. Bradley, police duty 10.20 

F. W. Hollowell, services ren- 
dered 10.50 

W. F. Stevens, court fees 2.20 

John Connors, police duty 5 . 00 

E. C. Wilson, police duty 5.50 

G. W. Worster, use of team .... 2 . 25 
O. E. Houghton, use of team ... .50 



$40.74 



$214.51 



Miscellaneous Accounts. 



Paid S. A. Christie, M. D., return 24 

births, 1908-09 $6.00 

F. J. Barker, M. D., return 2 

births, 1908 .50 



41 



F. K. Shaw, M. D.. return 18 

births. 1908-09 4.50 

F. H. Grady. 1|. D.. return 2 

births .50 

E. J. Alley. M. D., return 1 birth, .25 
H. H. Braley, M. D., return 1 

birth .25 

F. T. Rich, M. D.. return 2 births. .50 
J. W. Godfrey, M. D.. return 1 

birth .25 

George Titcomb, M. D., return 1 

birth .25 

Hall Staples, M. D., return 1 

birth .25 

L. E. Allen. M. D., return 1 birth, .25 

F. E. Tasker. M. D.. return 9 

births 2.25 

I. F. Daren, return 44 deaths ... 11.00 

C. IT. Persons, tuning piano, hall. 2.00 

South Acton Coal ft Lumber Co.. 

posts for public dump 12.75 

A. TT. Perkins, pruning trees, 

AVest 4.00 

Asaph Merriam. express on town 

warrants 1 . 52 

George B. Parker, for Memorial 

Day 100.00 

Arthur B. Curtis, three safes 100.00 

Georee W. Daniels, sharpening 

mowers 1 . 50 

W. II. Kingsley. moving safes ... 3.50 

North Acton Granite Co., guide 

posts 25 . 00 

Fred F. Chandler, auto signs ... 9.00 

F. E. Marsh, dry measure gauge, 1.50 

Blanchard & Gould, posts for 

auto signs 24.00 



42 



Hall Brothers, boards for auto 

signs 3.50 

James Devane, painting auto 
signs 

E. Z. Stanley, repairs town pump, 

Finney & Hoit, flags for Memorial 
Day 

E. F. Townsend, repairs town 
pump. South 

Ralph Joslin, road damages to 

Jones' heirs 

Ralph Joslin, town counsel 

F. W. Green, erecting election 
booths 

Tnttle & Newton, drinking cups. 
Universalis! Society, rent of 

vestry, 1908-09 '. 

W. F. Stevens, killing dog 

F. S. Whitcomb. inspecting cattle, 
.lames Kinsley, use of Hurley 

road, 1908- '09 

Horace F. Tnttle, collecting and 

recording 34 births 

Horace F. Tnttle, collecting and 

recording 31 deaths 

Horace F. Tnttle, recording 14 

marriages 

Horace F. Tnttle, transmitting 4 

deaths 

Horace F. Tnttle, copying records, 

town reports 

Horace F. Tnttle, attending meet- 
ing. Aver 

Horace 1 F. Tnttle, services, road 

commissioner 

Horace F. Tnttle. postage and 

supplies 



2 


.95 


2 


.30 


4 


.50 


4 


.25 


500 


.00 


35 


.00 


1 


.50 




.51 


6 


.00 


1 


.00 


47 


.00 


16 


.00 


17 


.00 


6, 


.20 


2 


80 


1. 


00 


5. 


00 


2. 


50 


8. 


00 


15. 


68 



43 



W. F. Stevens, abatement taxes, 

1908 16.00 

W. F. Stevens, abatement taxes, 

1909 96.88 

W. F. Stevens, delivering election 

returns 1 . 50 

\Y. F. Stevens, notifying* officers- 
elect 1.50 

W. F. Stevens, postage and ex- 
press, selectmen 1.94 

W. F. Stevens, postage and ex- 
press, assessor 13.49 

W. F. Stevens, miscellaneous ex- 
pense 5.03 

W. F. Stevens, collector's and 

assessors' books 18.48 

James B. Tuttle. carfares and 

postage 1 5 . 33 

J. K. W. Wetherbee. postage and 

stationerv 19.27 



$1,183.63 



Receipts for Year Ending February 1, 1910. 

Balance due from treasurer $3,450.16 

Balance due from collector 6.016.44 

Appropriation : 

For Memorial library 600.00 

For roads and bridges 3,000.00 

For special road work 200.00 

For common schools 7,400.00 

For high school 3,600.00 

For extermination of moths 

(town) 732.79 

For fire department 350.00 

For streel lamps 1.000.00 



44 



For Memorial day 100.00 

For overlayings 120.08 

Raised for state tax 2,610.00 

For state highway tax 268.20 

For county tax 2,236.24 

For crossing assessments 2,511.22 

Received as per report of treasurer. . . 17,076.67 

Farm products 1,348.15 

Interest on taxes 197 . 34 

Interest on deposits 105.90 

Gypsy moth tax 314.29 

Street railway tax, C, M. & H. . . 17.85 

Extermination of moths (private) 759.47 



$54,014.80 



Expenditures. 

High school $3,873.37 

South school 2,317 . 56 

West school 1,607.54 

Center school 1,714.87 

Miscellaneous school expense 1,014.61 

School supplies . 462.97 

School repairs 741 . 06 

Transportation of scholars 1,419.50 

Gypsy and brown tail moths 2,812.85 

Roads and bridges 3,325.25 

Support of poor on farm 2,545 . 42 

Outside poor 743.89 

Street lamps 771 . 88 

Printing 234.95 

Library books 298. 65 

Library expense 447 . 22 

Cemetery expenses 318.27 

Perpetual care 298 . 85 

Fire department 427 . 65 



45 



Police department 140.02 

Board of health 251 . 75 

Town buildings and grounds 351.38 

State aid 662.00 

Military aid 74. 75 

Salaries 1,129.75 

Loans and interest 7,136.25 

Snow bills 115.78 

Tree warden 40 . 74 

Enforcement of liquor law 214.51 

Miscellaneous accounts 1,183.63 

Total selectmen's orders $36,676.92 

Paid State tax 2,610.00 

Payment, abolition grade crossing 2,511.22 

Repairs on state highway 268.20 

County tax 2,236.24 

Cash on hand 4,581.75 

Uncollected taxes 5,116.70 

Corporation tax 13.77 

$54,014.80 

Financial Statement for Year Ending February 1, 1910. 

Due from treasurer $4,581 . 75 

From collector 5,116.70 

State aid 662.00 

Inspection of animals 23.50 

Gypsy moth work 1,379.72 

From countv 500.00 



$12,263.67 



46 

Liabilities. 

E. Jones, Est., note $2,000.00 

Interest on note 73 . 33 

Cemetery fund .4,300.00 

Unexpended balance, cemetery fund. 249.85 

Unexpended balance, library fund... 372.87 

Fund for enforcement liquor law .... 1,817.00 



,813.05 



Balance in favor of town $3,450 . 62 

JAMES B. TUTTLE. 
ASAPH MERRIAM, 
WILLIAM F. STEVENS, 

Selectmen of Acton. 

February 1, 1910. 



47 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



1909. 

March 1. Cash on hand $3,450.16 

Receipts : 

State treasurer, corporation tax .... 3,602.36 

National bank tax 330.46 

State aid 816.00 

Income of Massachusetts school fund, 1,127.80 
Suppression of gypsy and brown tail 

moths 1,815.27 

Support of Nicholas Kane 66.70 

Temporary aid furnished Mrs. Kan- 

nard 4.72 

Tuition of children 85.09 

Compensation for inspection of ani- 
mals 25.00 

Street railway tax 45.69 

County treasurer on account of dog 

licenses 373 . 25 

First National Bank of Aver tempor- 
ary loan 6,001). 00 

James B. Tuttle, temporary loan 1,000.00 

For supervision of schools 375.00 

For cemetery fund . . . 550.00 

For income of cemetery fund 195.74 

Income of library fund 239.05 

Memorial library for fines 29.00 

Acton grange for rent of town hall . . 62.00 

Rent of town hall and cellar 74.00 



48 



District court of Central Middlesex for 

fines 80.93 

City of Taunton for aid furnished 

George Wood 13 . 98 

Town of Essex for medical attendance 

for Ada Hector 13.25 

Horace F. Tuttle for lots sold in 

Woodlawn cemetery 100 . 00 

H. T. Clark for lots sold in Mt. Hope 

cemetery 18 . 00 

Elie Gruber for pedlar's license 8.00 

C. H. Goldthwaite. for bottles re- 
turned 9.00 

Arthur F. Blanchard, for slaughter- 
house license 1 . 00 

C. J. Williams, for school supplies 

sold 6.63 

Rena Keyes, for fumigating house .... 5.00 

Anson C. Piper . for road dust 3.75 

$20,526.83 
Received from town farm : 

Milk $962.62 

One cow '20.37 

Calves 44.50 

Apples 221 . 66 

Pears 5.20 

Cauliflowers 16 . 79 

Horse 60.00 

Eggs 9.75 

Teaming ice 60 

Telephone 6 . 66 



$1,348.15 



Received from William F. Stevens, 
Collector of Taxes : 

Interest on taxes A. D. 1905 $1.20 

Taxes collected for A. D. 1906 7.00 

Taxes collected for A. D. 1907 414.84 

Interest on taxes, 1907 26.41 

Taxes collected for A. D. 1908 5,093.60 

Interest on taxes, 1908 ' 151 . 39 

Taxes collected for A. D. 1909 20,872.30 

Interest on taxes, 1909 10.50 

Moth taxes for A. D. 1907 47.31 

Interest on taxes, 1907 1 . 35 

Moth taxes for A .D. 1908 266.98 

Interest on taxes, 1908 6.49 

Concord, Maynard and Hudson Street 

Railway taxes for A. D. 1909 17.85 

International Trust Co., interest on 

deposits 105.90 



$27,023.12 



$48,898.10 



Expenditures. 

Paid State treasurer. Corporation tax. $13.77 

State tax A. D. 1909 2,610.00 

For abolition of grade crossing . . 2,224.74 

Interest 286.48 

Repairs on State highway 268.20 

County tax A. D. 1909 2,236.24 

On Selectmen's orders 36,676.92 

Cash on hand and in bank 4,581 .75 

$48,898.10 
J. K. W. WETHERBEE. Treasurer. 



50 



Treasurer's Report of Money Held for Care of Lots in 
Cemeteries. 



11)10. , Dr. 

Feb. 12. To cash in North End Savings 

Bank $2,175.00 

Warren Institution for Savings .... 1,000.00 
Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank. 1,000.00 
Middlesex Institution for Savings .... 500.00 

Luke Blanchard cemetery fund: 
Cash in North End Savings Bank .... 500.00 

For care of tomb : 
Cash in Charlestown Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank 100.00 

For care of memorial tablet : 
Cash in Charlestown Five Cents Sav- 

Bank 50.00 

Cash in Warren Institution for Savings 50.00 

Cash in town treasury Feb. 12. 1910 . . 8, 750. 00 

Cash received in A. D. 1909 550.00 

Income unexpended March 12, 1909 . . 271 .82 

Income for 1909-1910 819.68 



$10,266. 5a 



Cr. 
By cash paid cemetery commissioners 

for care of lots $249 . 85 

Cash paid F. C. Hayward 17.50 

Cash paid Mrs. Varnnm Tuttle 8.75 

Principal of cemetery fund Feb. 12, 

1910 ; ... 9,675.00 

Balance of income unexpended 815.40 



$10,266.50 
J. K. W. WETHERBEE, Treasurer. 



51 
Report of the Wilde Memorial Library. 

1910. Dr. 

Feb. 12. To cash in North End Sav- 
ings Bank 1,000.00 

Cash in Home Savings Bank 1,000.00 

Cash in Warren Institution for Sav- 
ings 1,000.00 

Cash in Charlestown Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank . . . 1,000.00 

Cash in Middlesex Institution for Sav- 
ings 1,000.00 

Mortgage bond of West Shore Rail- 
road Co 1,000,00 

Received for interest on money in 

banks . 199.05 

For interest on mortgage bond, 40.00 

For fines 29.00 

Town appropriation for books 200.00 

Unexpended balance March lj 1909 . . 203.47 

$6,671.52 
Cr. 

By cash in banks $5,000.00 

By Susan, Augusta and Luther Conant 

fund 1,000.00 

Paid for books and magazines : 

W. B. Clarke Co 237.90 

Herman Goldberger 38.30 

McDevitt & Wilson 11 . 53 

W. A. Wilde Co 4.67 

Current Literature Publishing Co. .. 4.25 

W. D. Tattle 2.00 

Balance unexpended 372.87 

$6,671.52 
J. K. W. WETHERBEE, Treasurer. 



.v> 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



Valuation, May 1, 1909. 

Buildings $1,033,510.00 

Land 498,860.00 

Personal estate , 447,225.00 

$1,979,595.00 

Exemptions 23.950.00 

Net valuation $1,955,645.00 

Valuation May 1. 1908 1,831,980.00 

Increase $123,665.00 

Rate of taxation $12.00 per $1,000.00. 

Tax Assessed as Follows: 

Real estate $18,101.04 

Personal estate 5,366.70 

Polls 1,260.00 

$24,727.74 



53 

Amount of Money Raised. 

For State tax $2,610.00 

For State highway tax . 268 . 20 

For County tax 2,236.24 

For grade crossing assessment 2,511.22 

For Town grant 16,982.00 

Overlayings 120.08- 



$24,727.74 



WM. F. STEVENS, 
WM. F. KELLEY, 
JAMES B. TUTTLE. 

Assessors of Acton. 



AUDITORS REPORT. 

I have examined the accounts of Tax Collector, Select- 
men and Treasurer of the Town of Acton, and to the best 
of my knowledge, I find them correct. 

WALDO E. WHITCOMB, Auditor. 

February 28. 1910. 



54 



REPORT OF COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



For Fiscal Year Ending February 1, 1910. 

Dr. 

Town, State and County taxes $24,727.74 

Moth tax 759.47 

Total tax levy $25,487 . 21 

Interest collected 10. 50 

$25,497.71 

Cr. 

Abatements . $96.88 

Paid treasurer 20,785 . 92 

$20,882.80 
Uncollected Feb. 1. 1910 $4,614.91 

Dr. 

Balance uncollected 1907 taxes $414.84 

Interest collected 26.41 

$441 . 25 
Cr. 

Paid treasurer „ $441 . 25 



.).> 



Dr. 



Balance uncollected 1907. moth tax . . $47.31 

Interest collected 1.35 

$48.66 
Cr. 

Paid treasurer $48 . 66" 

Dr. 

Balance uncollected 1908 taxes $5,558.60 

Interest collected 151 .39 

$5,709.99 
Cr. 

Paid treasurer $5,228 . 99 

Abatements '. . 16.00 

$5,244.99 

Balance uncollected Feb. 1. 1910 $465.00 

Dr. 

Balance uncollected 1908. moth tax .. $303.77 
Interest collected 6.49 

$310.26 

Or. 

Paid treasurer $273.47 

Balance uncollected Feb. 1. 1910 $36.7!) 

\VM. F. STEVENS, 

Collector. 



56 



REPORT OF ROAD COMMISSIONERS. 



Receipts for Roads and Bridges. 

Appropriation $3,000 . 00 

Appropriation special work 200.00 

Use of pnmp 2 . 00 

•Old junk 5.00 

Use of roller 20.00 

Crushed stone 7 . 00 

Street dirt 3.75 



$3,237 . 75 
Tools same as last report. 

Expenditures $3.325 . 25 

We would call your attention to the condition of the 
wooden bridges at the Powder mills, and also the one at 
East Acton. They will soon need rebuilding, and we would 
recommend that they be replaced with cement or steel. We 
think the town would be taking a step backward if we dis- 
continue the building of stone roads. We have built a small 
piece this year, and hope that the voters will feel that 
money spent for good roads is well spent. 

W. H. KLXGSLEY. 
For the Road Commissioners 



57 

REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Town of Acton for the Year 1909. 



The Board of Health submits the following report for 
tin 1 year ending February 1, 1910: 

Whole number of deaths recorded to December 31, 1909, 31 

Number occurring in Acton 30 

Number occurring in other places ■ 1 

Residents of Acton 27 

Residents of other places 4 

Average age. 56 years. 

List of contagious diseases reported by Board of Health 
from March 1, 1909 to February 1. 1910: 

No. of cases No. of deaths 

Diphtheria 

Small Pox 

Scarlet fever 2 

Typhoid fever 1 

Measles 13 

Oerebro-spinal meningitis 

Tuberculosis 2 1 

Whooping cough 2 

Total for the year 20 1 

FRANK E. TASKER. M. D.. 
JAMES B. TUTTLE. 
ASAPH MERPTAM. 

Board of Health. 



o8 



BEEF INSPECTOR'S REPORT. 



Beef, Veal, Pigs and Mutton Inspected at A. F. Blanchard's 
and Other Places from March 1, 1909 to February 1, 1910. 

Beef 217 

Veal 1,477 

Pigs 127 

Mutton 6 

Total for the year 1.827 

Condemned as Unfit for Food. 

Beef 17 

Veal 48 

Pigs 1 

Mutton 

Total 66 

Taken by Lowell Rendering Co. 

EDWARD S. FOBES. 

Inspector of Beef. 



59 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Inventory of Stock and Provisions on Farm, Feb. 1, 1910. 

12 Cows $600.00 

7 Tons of hay 150 . 00 

2 Horses 450.00 

Harnesses and horse collars 59.00 

Wagons, carts and sleds 330. 00 5 

Farming implements . 204.90 

Pumps 125.00 

Grain and oyster shells 45. 60 

Keg lime 75 

Bushel boxes and barrels 14.00 

Lumber 100.00 

Coal 7.00 

Wood cut for stove (50.00 

Cord wood 48.00 

Set measures 1 . 00 

Salt 50 

Horse blankets 4.00 

47 liens 35.00 

Potatoes, apples and cabbage 25.75 

Preserves, pickles and meats 20.80 

Household goods and kitchen utensils 286.90 

Groceries and supplies 41 . 10 

$2,609.30 



60 



Expenditures $2,545.42 

Inventory, 1909 2,278 . 65 



Inventory, 1910 $2,609.30 

Receipts from farm 1,348.15 

Due on milk 110.00 

Yictualizing two tramps .50 



$4,824.07 



$4.067 . 95 



$756.12 



Inmates at Farm During Year. 



Susan Fisk, 12 months. 
Christopher Kane, 12 months. 
Frank Harris, 6 months. 
William Quinlan, 1 month. 



A. A. KNOWLTOX, 

WM. F. KELLEY, 

J. STERLING MOORE, 

Overseers of Poor 



Support of Poor on Farm. 

Paid Charles Calder, salary $38.33 

Waldo B. Newell, salary . 375.00 

Waldo B. Newell, hired man 177.30 

J. S. Moore, meat and provisions, 152.07 
W. E. Whitcomb, meat and pro- 

isions 2.43 

Samuel Ineson, fish 30.04 

Tuttle & Newton, groceries and 

supplies 34 . 37 



61 



"M. E. Taylor & Co., groceries and 

supplies 226.23 

C. II. Mead & Co.. groceries and 

supplies 102.10 

C. H. Mead & Co., hay 152.94 

C. H. Mead & Co., grain and farm 

supplies 38 . 44 

G. H. Reed, coal 19.62 

O. H. Reed, grain 455.84 

J. Cushing & Co., grain 62.75 

South Acton C. & L. Co., coal .... 20.93 

South Acton C. & L. Co., lumber 

and supplies 15 . 43 

E. T. Rice, plumbing and furnish- 
ing \ 42.11 

John McNiff, horse shoeing and 

repairs 30 . 15 

Albert Bradley, horse shoeing and 

repairs 2 . 50 

E. P. Gates, horse shoeing and re- 
pairs 2.00 

11. T. Clark, repairing wagon . . 6.55 

II. T. Clark, bar and saws 1.60 

C. II. Mead & Co., shoes and hose 2.40 
Finney & Hoit, blankets and cot- 
ton cloth , 7.29 

Finney & Hoit, clothing, etc 13.84 

E. C. Cheney, agent for grange 

grain 29 . 7b 

Charles Calder, pump hire and fil- 
ing saw 70 

Fritz Oelschlegal. harness oil, etc., 1.70 

Fritz Oelschlegal. ankle boot and 

yoke strap 3 . 65 

O. A. Knowlton, postage and tel- 
ephone 1.16 

O. A. Knowlton, adv. for warden, 1.00 



62 



(). A. Knowlton, cart and mowing 

machine pole 6 . 00 

O. A. Knowlton, pasturing cows . . 5.50 

O. A. Knowlton, cauliflower seed, 8.00 

O. A. Knowlton. fertilizer 40.25 

W. C. Robbins, horse 300.00 

W. E. Whitcomb, supplies for corn 

planter 1 . 20 

Tuttle & Newton, door spring, 

netting, etc 1 . 27 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co. telephone 

service 

P. W. Cunningham, cow 

O. D. Fessenden, 53 barrels 

A. H. Perkins, sawing wood .... 
A. EL Perkins, pasturing cattle 26 

weeks 

J. S. Moore, postage 

E. W. Greenwood 4 loads sawdust, 

PI. L. Priest, use of bull 

Frederick Shaw. M. D., medical 

attendance furnished C. Kane. 1 .20 

Frederick' Shaw. M. D., medical 

attendance furnished Win. 

Quinlan 1.00 

T. F. Duran. burial expenses of 

William Quinlan 28.00 



17 


.47 


41 


.50 


18 


.55 


9 


.00 


13 


.00 


1 


.26 


1 


.00 


1 


.00 



$2,545.4: 



63 

Aid Furnished Outside Poor. 
Paid M. E. Taylor & Co., groceries and 

supplies furnished Mrs. Fred- 

eriekson and family $121 .52 

M. E. Taylor & Co., groceries and 
supplies furnished George 
Brooks and family 99 . 78 

M. E. Taylor & Co.. groceries and 
supplies furnished Mrs. Galla- 
gher and family 76.50 

"W. E. Whiteomb, meat and provi- 
sions furnished Mrs. Freder- 
ickson and family 46.79 

Frederick Shaw. M. D.. profes- 
sional service rendered Ada 
Hector 11.25 

Frederick Shaw. M. D.. profes- 
sional service rendered Henry 
Lewis 1 . 50 

0. A. Knowlton. expenses on Ada 

Hector's ease 2.00 

City of North Adams, aid fur- 
nished Mrs. Margaret Gough 

and family : 192.00 

City of Marlboro, hospital treat- 
ment furnished Charles 

Rickaby 2.00 

Frank Tasker. M. D.. medical 
attendance furnished Mrs. F. 
G. Smith 3.00 

1. F. Duran, burial expenses of F. 

G. Smith 28.00 

Tuttle & Xewton. groceries and 

supplies furnished Mrs. Peter 

Dean 88.56 

City of Cambridge, aid furnished 

Mrs. Marv Hill and family . . 70.99 



$743.89 



64 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS. 
For the Year 1909-1910. 



We present the following schedules showing the 
amounts of the several funds for the perpetual care of 
cemetery lots and the income and expenditures on account 
of each fund for the year. 

HERBERT T. CLARK. 
JULIAN TUTTLE, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Cemetery Commissioners. 



o l': c ^ ^ i> l* c c ^ c x c t» o rt o 

Or-CNCOCt-lft^Ci-CCOWNr! 

_ ^ t— t— « C r— t^- i— < ^1 i-~ y— '"*' »— i i— M »— ^1 1^ 

0X61 P"«M "0 SooiooSooooooooooc 

■ffr t— "-■" C^ Lft ^~" *~™ ^~ i -- T^l t- - ^~ '~ _l t— , ~~ ,_ ~ 



papuadxg; 



6061 'I WK 
pueq no 



ooooooooooooocaooooc 

ifl lt lc l-: c x ua ic ifl c x r. i: c w m in 






kOOOlOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

t* ut l": t» c c m Lt m w 3 w m m m w m 



OIUODUJ ,- r 



ifllOOOCOlOlOOO^^QOt-OlOG 
t»HWOCOOt>lOlOWM^OWlONH 

C HOHOCOHCOHHIOCONNCMCO"^ 
lOOOiOOCQOOOOOOOOOOO 



c ~ - 



pa^isodeQ 



s 

o 



o 
o 



o 

<D 






O 



IC O O m O © O C 
£©-rH — tM lO tH »H 




OB rrt !3 £ > - - ^ ■"• ~ - - ~ - ~ — " ••- 

? — ha. 33 J2 ~ _1I _H ^ 5 ? — 03 •*■• fc>. l2 * 
- [x, £ % - X 7Z~^ ~ - -^f fo^^Q 

05 = ZJ 2J w w ** £r ^" ° Z- ^ ^ ° ° z: rH 
x>ooaoooaoQOooQOoocoQOQC 03 ?. as o: OS 



OhWOOONWW05WONOt|<NC: 

CO tH oohhh hnwnhconhn 



u d -<- u - - i- a -■ - a +j — ' £• *j 

• v -. : v ^ - •• ^ •■ i : ^ : •• v 



HNOD^WtOt- X O! 3 



r* in co t> 



CD(MCOHOC0^t-CD0i(M(MOt>l>OOC)(MCl>OO(NHC0 
HNOlOHNCCmOiHlO(MI>CJ)(MCOOO^CHOCt-Ct-n 



>~ 



H(MCOOOOHOMHOHCDH(MHLO(MIOCCI>HHHCO 
OOOOOt-OOOLOOOrHLOOU^t^OOUOOOOOO 
r- 1 rH r- 1 r- It— I t— I rH rH tHt— ILO t— I lH C3 (Mr- 1 ,-H t-H t— ' 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOCMOOOOOlCOOOOO 

m o lo o o m lo 10 o w m m o o ^ lo l': w c o t- lo lo c u: c 

CM # 

OCMOOOOOCMOOOLOOOOutOLCCMOirtLrroOOOO 

ic cd ic lo lo o ic co lo o w o lo in ifl t> it t- co in i— b- o l~ i« l^ o 

COOOOr-(OCO<Nt>COOt*(Mt»a><MOL^ -nTcM C !N W C N H CO 

HcoioccoNw^^HWoscQ^H^ct-r-L'tr-^^iMc.yqco 

OCOHNCOOOLONOCOOWr^QOCMMOLOr-i.^^C'-r-r-^ 

ot^ooooot^oociooc;'Mi':c;i^b-c;i'r».r:c:c:c;oo 

rH rHr-HHH rHr-ii— H H Ifl ^- r- CM CM r- r- rH r- 



ooooooooooooooooooooo-oooooo 
oooooooooooooooooooooooooo ~ 



OiCOOOOOiOOOOO 



OOOOOOiOOOOOOOOO 

c c c 1.0 c i": h c i: i: c c c c c 





R 


© 


o 




r 


+J 




-t-> 


fH 


d 


Ph 


H 


3 


rr> 




<u 


- 


= 




a3 


~ 


- 


— 



r3 

O ^ 

3 ^ 

—i o 



p 

bD g 
^ r-R 



r o 



- - 



cu ^ ^3 ^ • <5 



o P3 ^ c 

<! £ h? £ < CJ3 - :r. 



s. 

U R 

- -s 



Eg 



- 

73 d 



- — 



£ +1 — ft += 



Q ._ 



- *H'43^ 



5 >. 



R 

be R 






| - 



R R 

•I -Z. 
- - 



be 



~ S R 

■-'1 ±1 
~ — "^ 



.> 



R - 
- - 



HHNNNW^^T^^^^^lfiLCOCDCOCD 
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOOC^ 

c c^ c> cn Oi 05 ci c c c: c: c c cr. c^ r. r. r. r: 


r. 


ccccc 
— 3 — 
cr: 05 c; 


t- t- t- L— 
O O O <3 

05 CT. 05 05 


a^oOLOooco^LCCincNriT-ifiooooc: 

t— CM CM CM t— r- CMt— fM CO CC rH 


CM 


. Alio-. 10 
. Sept. 22 
. Oct. 1»> 


r— t— CM CM 

-T r^ — r? 



GOOCH'M^-t'i.'twl-X'r.OHlNCC^^ChXCCHINCCT)* 



TtOCCCOCCUOCCCM^UO t> 

CCWOOHCOHlXMC "+ 

tOCOIMHOHHHHO ta 
t-OL~OOOLCJOOO 05 

-X- 



o o o c o o 
c l': tt lo o 10 



Tfl CD CC 



UO 



CM 



HCOCO^-'-r- 



CM O CC CD CO L.O 
fr- LO Th t~ CD CC 



W H H !M N H 
t- O UC O O O 



<D 



CM O LO O O O CO CM Tt- W <M - 

CD O l> L': LO LO rn 0(M T. C kj. 



CM 



X 2 

o — 



■^ in ic ■.■: c c '_ c ; c o \rs id cm 

ONCOKCWCCCODlOCOHC 

t-TtlCMCr^-C-'+rJ J Tt J ClCOCMOO 

hHT-CrCCOO(D^COlCr 



I-O 
© O fr- 


OOOOOO 
LO O O O O O 




0000 

i-O UC IO LO 


Ol N 


1—1 


fr- (N CM CI CI 

* 


N 




— CI 


T— iH 


CO 


1' 


§ 


U2 


1" 


- 


LO 


in 


LC kfl LTC 
fr- fr- CM 


lO O 


cm ia 




fr- 






CC 


CC 




,H 


— LC 


1— | qq 


CM IO O 

Tt^ CM CD 


ee 


1 c 


000 

O Ifl IC 


LC 


m i-t cm 

ci — en 



CD 1— O O CC CM CM CM CM 1— CC O CC X 
fr- r-i— OCMOOOOCD^LnrtiO 

-*- - L- - r- ^-. r-> r- ,— ,_ 



■€©■ C3 



OOOOOOOOOO 






CD 



o ^ OOO OOOOOOOOO 
~ — 3 — OOOOOOOOOO 

iO r£ o © o © o" ©* o © © © © © 

fr- ' O O O O O O © ut IT >C 1 ~ 



ac - - 



< J: g ^ 



•.8*11 &5 



s- 

s 

Q 

o 



y. 



o r r- ? ^ 



s 1 s « I % 



fi ~ ' .- c "E 



•g £ >• ^ > 5 « > ^ > bd - - - 



£^£ 



x C 



O^ 



~ ci .<fj .QSg 



cXJ ^O 



ex iL^ b;.-- be • - l* 

cc~ Z ~ Z~ ^ ^ 

a ~ £ c r s . c 



~~-^:I^^£x~-^ 


HPuodfeOOi-sOWOPQtfHi^ 


t-cooooocococccc 

OOOOOOOOOO 
CC CJ5 CC. OJ OS OOOO OS 


OOOOOOOOOOOOOO 
GO O O CC. CC. CC. CC. CC CC. CC. CC. 


aT of t-' CO IO r-' t-" CO O f CC 

(M rH <M 1M CI C! 


/ ::' I -' y— ' ic -t -C -h -t -f' of cc O cc 

C) Cl CC — Cl Cl iH 


Dec. 

Mar. 

April 

May 

May 

Oct. 

July 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 


^ ^ < < x. x x fc 1 1 i x ± ~ 


»C CO t~ QC O 3 <— CI CC -t 

■t -t i 1 -t -t 1: 1: 1: i: l: 




H««Tj<lOWfrQC CC C — CJ CC -C 



-,o©t><McooorH©coto© 

fHOHWHOOOlOt-O 


OHOjCO 


© 


lO CO CO CO (M CD H t- 05 00 H 
OOiOOOOOO^OO 
tH y-H r-\ tH rH rH t— I lO H 


HHOr' 
OlOlOO 
rH i—l 


^4 








'.V 


© to © © © © © lO 

o t- o o to o to <m 




to 

t— 


O 

o 








to 









OOlOOOOtOOtOtOO 
tOtO(MtOlOtOt^tOt-t^O 



O CO CI CM CO 

OHOOO.W 



COCOlOCCCOCOHCOHCOr- 



©rH(MC<lCOGO©©CO 
CAlTttrHCOCOCOtOLOO 



^ItJHt^t— li— It^Ii— ICOOi 
OOtOOOOtOO'* 



+£~ 



ooooooooooo 
ooooooooooo 



o o o o 
o o o o 



CO 



ooooooooooo 
o o io o o o to o to o o 



o o o o 

OlOiOO 



© t^ HH t>- Tf O 
t— O O CM t-I t*< 



O rH i— I O 

to to to to 



to o to to ItO 


o 

r-4 


rH r-i r-i y-\ CO 

•as- 


co 
t- 

CM 


to iO to to © 
l>t>t-l>|0 


00 

CO 



b- !© 

■■ee- r^ 

CO 

■€©■ 



© © T^H t>- 

b- t>- O CM 



© CM 
GO 00 



O O rH O 

lO to to to 



CM jCO 

o I© 

CM |CO 

"^ oo" 

•ee- 



o o o o o o 
o o o o © © 



o o o o 
ifi to io to 



O to 
O it- 

CM ; CO 

* © 



















-§ 




























J- 


CD 










c 




























03 


a 










H ?H 




























p 


o 










CD 




























+i 










'd a 


■4-9 
























O 


CO 












X 
























O 

d 


CD 
X 










* P 




CD 


| 


- 


f 

+J 


















t-i 










/r^ X 


CO 




X 


CD 
















CO 


PQ 










— p co "r 1 




£ 


s 
















t3 


ts 


44 






o£'g| 


c 




as 


cu 
















(—1 


a 


cd 




fl -H C 'w 
















GO 

p 


3 «8 • J3 *-• 
H -M <D _, 

_, d V- , +J +- i — i 

H 9 m 'o cri CO CD 


•5 * s w 


GO 

p 




t 




P P 

o o 

co co 




rah A. Hutch 
D. Walcott . 
Louise Warre 
hn R. Hought 
illiam A. Cuth 
non Blanchar 
neeler and Sh 
orge H. Deco 
nderson Row 
ke Blanchard 
ke Blanchard, 
ke Blanchard 
Blanchard ]\ 
hn Temple an 
. K. Daw .. 


,r d 

X 




c 
+-> 

-r 

'x 

- 


o 


muel Temple 
ancis Ilutchin 
i nrietta Ander 
try llapgood 


J»&I-<»?r^?wfcd5*JlJlJ ^ ^ 3 








X H ^ ^ 


totocococot— c- oo oo © © © © © © 








CO CO CO "H/i 


oooooooooooo ooo 








© © © © 


Oi05GlOJC5CiCia50iC!CiQ © © © 








© © © © 


HHHHHHHHHr^HH HHH 








rH rH rH r-l 


$Q~W~N~<N <N V iH*rH S OS~©~©~©~©' ©"©~CO" 
CM rHrHrHrH (M H CO CO CO rH CM 








<N~(>fc<fr-< 








r-\ 7—i i—{ y—i 


r _, . . . 


















P P P S? 

x x x -; 

^^T>^0 < 


to" © t-' GO* © © H CM* CO* HH lO ©' t^ GO © 








rH CM* CO Tf 




TH 


rH rH 


T— CM 


-M 


oi 


01 


01 


CM (M 


OJ 


OJ 


CM 



















69 

REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE GOODNOW 

FUND. 



For the Year Ending February 1, 1910. 
Investments. 

Warren Institution for Savings, Book 

83,531, deposited April 16, 1909 . $1,000.00 

Accrued interest 20.00 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings 

Bank, Book 71,200 1,000.00 

City Institution for Savings, Book 

84,244, deposited July 31, 1909. . . .1,000.00 
1909 1,000.00 

$3,020 00 
Receipts — Income. 
City Institution for Savings. January 

dividend . . $20.00 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank, 

October dividend 20.00 

$40.00 
Payments. 
Paid Julian Tuttle, care of Goodnow 

lot in Woodlawn cemetery $5 . 00 

Lyman C. Taylor, treasurer, on 
account of the Evangelical Society 
in Acton 35.00 

$40.00 
LUTHER CON A NT. 
T. WARREN FLAGG, 
HORACE F. TUTTLK 
Trustees of Goodnow Fund. 



70 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF ACTON MEMORIAL 
LIBRARY, 1909-1910. 



LUTHER CONANT, President. 

E. FAULKNER CONANT, Secretary. 
HORACE F. TUTTLE 
MOSES TAYLOR DELETTE HALL 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD CHAE LES J. WILLIAMS 

L. A. HESSELTON FRANK H. KNOWLT'ON 



Upon the coming fourteenth of June, twenty years will 
have elapsed since the dedication and opening of the Acton 
Memorial library. 

Though the earthly life of the donor came to an end 
December 2nd, 1902, so well had he planned its future, the 
service went on without interruption. 

When opened 3,973 volumes were on its shelves. At 
the present over 11,000 books are at the call of its patrons. 

Of the fourteen gentlemen who have served the library 
as trustees, eleven are now living. One of them who 
resigned from active duty some years since, Mr. William 
D. Tuttle, continues to give us his valuable experience in 



71 



the purchasing of the new books. It is given to few men 
past four score years to retain their physical and mental 
vigor to the degree, as does our Trustee Emeritus, Mr. 
Tuttle. 

It Avill be necessary in the near future to provide more 
l>ook room. This may be done by arranging a double row 
of shelves between the alcoves. Perhaps something of 
convenience could be gained by having the new books, or 
those purchased within a year, placed on these shelves, and 
patrons could find the new books more readity. To do this. 
a small appropriation, if the town thought proper, might 
be made at the annual meeting. 

Among the old manuscripts brought to light, in rumag- 
ing the contents of a garret in an old homestead in East 
Acton, was one that revealed the existence of a library in 
Acton in 1801 ; more than one hundred years ago. The 
trustees -took the duties of their office very seriously and 
administered the fines without fear or favor. 

"Acton. June 1st. 1801, to Mr. Seth Brooks. Collector 
for Social Library in Acton, you are directed to collect the 
following fines of the several persons hereafter named and 
to pay in the same to Capt. John Robbins, Treasurer for 
said Social Library, within six months for the use of said 
Library: 

Seth Brooks, Eveling. Vol. 1. kept one day too long . . $ .03 
Capt. Joseph Brown, Pilgrims Progress, soiled page 

194. 195 04 

David Davis, Stack house Vol., kept 5 days too long, .15 
John Dexter, Spectator, Vol. 2, grease spot on edge 

p. 49 to 59 05 

Capt. Steven ITayward, Hunter, Vol. 3, 2 days too long, .06 

John Hunt, Hunter, Vol. 2. one day too long 

John Hunt. Hunter, Vol' 3. last day after 1 Monday 

of Mav 28 



72 



Nathsu Hayward, Stack house. Vol. 1, 4 days after 

last Monday of May 1.00 

Amos Noyes, Blair, Vol. 3d. 1 day after last Monday 

of May 24 

John Prescott, Hunter. Vol. 3d, too long, 4 days 12 

Doctor A. Skinner. Morse. Vol. 1, spot p. 200 03 

Lt. Samuel White, Stack house. Vol. 6. 2 days too 

long 06 

Samuel Wright, Jr., X. E. Farmer. 14 days too long, .42 
Paul Hayward. Moors Journal. Vol. 1. leaves loosed 

at beginning r 06 

James Coolidge, Gordon, Vol. 3, 1 day too long 03 

Deacon Simon Hunt. Stack house, Vol. 4, spot on 

page 421 06 

Moses Wood, Doddridge, Vol. 1, spot page 265 03 



ABRAHAM SKINNER, 
SAMUEL PARLIN, 
DAVID BARNARD, 
AARON JONES, 
JOHN EDWARDS, 

Trustees. 



The first city or town free public library, of which we 
have record, was established in Peterboro, New Hampshire, 
in 1831. Tlie Acton Social library was of a date thirty 
years earlier. Though a subscription library, it probably, 
in a large measure, performed the services of the other 
mentioned. 

More than half the names of patrons, as well as of 
the officers, may be found in the Woodbury list of Acton's 
soldiers of the Revolution. These books, in the memory of 
men still living, were kept in the old hotel in Acton Center. 



n 



which was destroyed in the fire which swept over part of 
the Common on the 24th of October. 1862. 

The trustees recommend the town to raise and appro- 
priate the usual sums: $200.00 for new books, and $400.00 
for current expenses of the library. 

Appended is the annual report of the librarian. 

LUTHER CONANT, 

For the Trustees. 



Twentieth Annual Report. 

Accessions — Number of volumes in the library March 
1, 1909, 10,669; increase by purchase 210, of which 33 were 
obtained by binding magazines; increase by gift 95. Total 
increase 305. Number of volumes in the library February 
1. 1910, 10.974. 

Circulation — Number of days the library was opened 
95. Number of volumes circulated 5,953. Daily average 
circulation 62VL>- Largest daily circulation 121 on March 
13. 1909. Smallest daily circulation 28 on June 23, 1909. 

Received for catalogues, fines, etc $29.17 

Expended for postage .17 



$29.00 



Gifts of books have been received from the following 
sources: U. S. Government, 7; State of Massachusetts, 16; 
W. A. Boyd, 42; G. L. Raymond. 11 ; L. C. Carber- 8; Towle 
Mfg. Co., 4; Mrs. J. C. Munroe, 4; Herbert N. Casson, 1 ; 
James H. Moon, 1. 



74 



Periodicals subscribed for and in the reading room, 21 : 
Monthly — American, Atlantic, Century, Cosmopolitan, 
Current Literature, Ever}- body's, Harper's, Munsey's, 
McClure's, National, New England, Review of Reviews, 
Scribner's, St. Nicholas, World's Work, World Today, 
Woman's Home Companion. 

Weekly — Independent, Outlook, Scientific American, 
Youth's Companion. 

Mr. H. B. Livermore has donated two years of the 
Literary Digest, 1908 and 1909. 

ARTHUR F. DAVIS, 

Librarian. 



SEVENTY-THIRD 

ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

School Committee and the Report of 

the Superintendent of Schools of the 

Town of Acton, Massachusetts 

FOR THE YEAR 1909-1910 




HUDSON, MASS. 

PRINTED BY THE NEWS 

1910 



SCHOOL CALENDAR. 



High. 
1909-1910. 

Spring term begins March 28th, closes .June 24th. 

1910-1911. 

Fall term begins September 5th, closes November 23rd r 
12 weeks. 

Winter term begins November 28th, closes March 24th ; 
15 weeks. 

Spring term begins April 3rd, closes June 23rd; 12 weeks. 
Common Schools. 

1909-1910. 
Spring term begins March 28th, closes June 11th; 11 weeks. 

1910-1911. 

Fall term begins September 5th, closes November 23rd; 
12 weeks. 

•Winter term begins November 28th, closes March 24th r 
15 weeks. 

Spring term begins April 3rd, closes June 16th; 11 weeks 
•Vacation from December 16th to January 2nd. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Samuel A. Christie, M. T., Secretary Term expires 1912 
Charles J. Williams, Chairman Term expires 1911 

Arthur F. Blanchard Term expires 1910 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 
Arthur B. Webber. Residence. Littleton. Mass. 



TRUANT OFFIERS. 
Thomas Scanlon, Albert S. Bradley, Edward S. Forbes 



5 
STANDING RULES. 



*Rule 1. Children under rive years of age shall not be 
admitted to the public schools. 

Rule 2. Pupils shall be promoted from grade to grade 
and school to school, according to merit. Thorough and 
satisfactory work will be required of pupils in a lower grade 
or school before entering a higher grade or school. 

Rule 3. Children who have not previously attended any 
school shall be admitted to the public schools only at the be- 
ginning of the fall term. 

Rule 4. Pupils will be held responsible for books loaned 
to them until such books shall have been returned to the 
teacher. 

Rule 5. Xo repairs shall be made upon the public prop- 
erty in the care of the school committee except by their auth- 
orized agents. 

*YYhen the birthday of a child falls on or before the 
15th day of the month it is reckoned as falling upon the first 
clav of that month. 



EXTRACTS FROM THE STATUTES— REVISED 

LAWS. 



Chapter 43. 



Section 11. The several school teachers shall faithfully 
keep the registers of attendance daily, and make due return 
thereof to the school committee, or to such person as the com- 
mittee may designate. Xo teacher of a public school shall 
receive payment for services for the two weeks preceding 
the close of any term, until the register, properly filled up and 
completed, is so returned. All registers shall be kept at the 



schools, and at all times during school hours shall be open 
to the inspection of the school committee, the superintendent 
of schools, the truant officers and the secretary and agent of 
the board of education. Tn reckoning the average member- 
ship and the percentage of attendance in the schools, no pupil's 
name shall be omitted in counting the number of such persons 
belonging to the school and the number of absences of such 
persons until it is known that such pupil has withdrawn from 
ihe school without intention of returning or, in the absence 
of such knowledge, until ten consecutive days of absence have 
been recorded ; but the foregoing provision for computing the 
average membership and the percentage of attendance shall 
not affect proceedings against habitual truants, absentees or 
school offenders, or other persons, under the provisions of 
section one of chapter forty- four and sections three, four and 
five of chapter forty-six. A pupil who is not present during 
at least half of a session shall be marked and counted as ab- 
sent for that session. 

Chapter 44. 

Section 1. Every child between seven and fourteen years 
of age, and every child under sixteen years of age who cannot 
read at sight and write legibly simple sentences in the English 
language, shall attend some public day school in the city or 
town in which he resides during the entire time the public 
day schools are in session, subject to such exceptions as to 
children, places of attendance and schools as are provided for 
in section three of chapter forty-two and sections three, five 
and six of this chapter. The superintendent of schools, or, if 
there is no superintendent of schools, the school committee, 
or teachers acting under authority of said superintendent or 
committee, may excuse cases of necessary absence. The at- 
tendance of a child upon a public day school shall not be re- 
quired if he has attended for a like period of time a private 
day school approved by the school committee of such city or 
town in accordance with the provisions of the following sec- 



tion, or if he has been otherwise instructed for a like period 
of time in the branches of learning required by law to be taught 
in the public schools or if he has already acquired such 
branches of learning or if his physical or mental condition is 
such as to render such attendance inexpedient or impracticable. 
Every person having under his control a child as described in 
this section shall cause him to attend school as herein required ; 
and if he fails for five days sessions or ten half days sessions 
within any period of six months while under such control to 
cause such child, whose physical or mental condition is not 
such as to render his attendance at school harmful or im- 
practicable, so to attend school, he shall, upon complaint by 
a truant officer and conviction thereof, be punished by a tine 
of not more than twenty dollars. Whoever induces or at- 
tempts to induce a child to absent himself unlawfully from 
school or employs or harbors a child who, while school is in 
session, is absent unlawfully from school shall be punished by 
a fine of not more than fifty dollars. 

Section 6. A child who has not been vaccinated shall 
not be admitted to a public school except upon presentation 
of a certificate signed by a regular practising physician that 
he is not a fit subject for vaccination. A child who is a mem- 
ber of a household in which a person is ill with smallpox, 
diphtheria, scarlet fever or measles, or of a household ex- 
posed to such contagion from another household as aforesaid, 
shall not attend any public school during such illness or until 
the teacher of the school has been furnished with a certificate 
from the board of health of the city or town, or from the at- 
tending physician of such person, stating that in a case of 
smallpox, diphtheria or scarlet fever at least two weeks, and 
in a case of measles, at least three days, have elapsed since 
the recovery, removal or death of such person, and that danger 
of conveying such disease by such child has passed. 

Section 3. Any child between seven and fourteen years 
of age who wilfully and habitually absents himself from school 
contrary to the provisions of section one of chapter forty- 
four shall be deemed to be an habitual truant, and. upon com 



8 



plaint of a truant officer and conviction thereof, may, if a boy, 
be committed to a county truant school for not more than two 
years, and, if a girl, to the state industrial school for girls, 
unless such child is placed on probation as provided in section 
seven of this chapter. 

Section 4. A child between seven and sixteen years of 
age who may be found wandering about in the streets or pub- 
lic places of any city or town having no lawful occupation, 
habitually not attending school, and growing up in idleness 
and ignorance, shall be deemed an habitual absentee, and, 
upon complaint by a truant officer or any other person and 
conviction thereof, may, if a boy, be committed to a county 
truant school for not more than two years or to the Lyman 
school for boys, and, if a girl, to the state industrial school 
for girls, unless such child is placed on probation as provided 
in section seven. 

Section 5. A child under fourteen years of age who 
persistently violates the reasonable regulations of the school 
which he attends, or otherwise persistently misbehaves therein, 
so as to render himself a ht subject for expulsion therefrom, 
shall be deemed to be an habitual school offender, and, upon 
complaint by a truant officer and conviction thereof, may, if 
a boy, be committed to a county truant school for not more 
than two years or to the Lyman school for boys, and, if a girl, 
to the state industrial school for girls, unless such child is 
placed on probation as provided in section seven. 

Section 13. Truant officers shall inquire into all cases 
arising under the provision of sections one and six of chapter 
forty-four and sections three, four and five of this chapter, 
and may make complaints and serve legal processes issued 
under the provisions of this chapter. They shall have the 
oversight of children placed on probation under the provisions 
of section seven. A truant officer may apprehend and take to 
school, without a warrant, any truant or absentee found wan- 
dering about in the streets or public places thereof. 



Chapter 106. 

Section 28. No child under the age of fourteen years 
and no child who is over fourteen and under sixteen years 
of age who does not have a certificate as required by the fol- 
lowing four sections certifying to the child's ability to read 
at sight and to write legibly simple sentences in the English 
language shall be employed in any factory, workshop or mer- 
cantile establishment. No child under the age of fourteen 
years shall be employed at work performed for wages or other 
compensation, to whomsoever payable, during the hours when 
the public schools of the city or town in which he resides are 
in session, or be employed at work before six o'clock in the 
morning or after seven o'clock in the evening. 

Section 2. No certificate as provided for by sections 
twenty-nine or thirty-two inclusive of chapter one hundred 
and six of the Revised Laws shall be approved by any person 
for a minor under the age of sixteen years who intends to be 
employed in a factory, workshop or mercantile establishment, 
unless such person is satisfied that such minor is able to read 
at sight and to write legibly simple sentences in the English 
language. 

Section 31. An age or schooling certificate shall not be 
approved unless satisfactory evidence is furnished by a cer- 
tificate of birth or baptism of such minor, or by the register 
of birth of such minor with a city or town clerk, that such 
minor is of the age stated in the certificate, except that other 
evidence, under oath, may be accepted in case the super in 
tendent or person authorized by the school committee, as pro- 
vided in the preceding section, decides that neither the cer- 
tificates of birth or baptism, nor the register of birth is avail 
able for the purpose. 



10 
ACTS OF 1906. 

Chapter 499. 

An Act Relative to the Illegal Employment of Minors and to 
the Duties of Truant Officers. 

T>e it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Whoever employs a minor under the age of 
sixteen years, and whoever procures or, having under his 
control a minor under such age, permits such minor to be 
employed in violation of the provisions of sections twenty- 
eight or twenty-nine of chapter one hundred and six of the 
Revised Laws, as amended by chapter two hundred and sixty- 
seven of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and hve, shall 
for each offence be punished by a fine of not more than three 
hundred dollars, or by imprisonment for not more than six 
months, or by both such fine and imprisonment ; and whoever 
continues to employ a minor in violation of the provisions of 
either of said sections as so amended, after being notified 
thereof by a truant officer or by an inspector of factories and 
public buildings, shall for every day thereafter while such 
employment continues be punished by a fine of not less than 
twenty nor more than one hundred dollars, or by imprisonment 
for not more than six months. 

Section 2. Inspectors of factories and public buildings 
shall visit all factories, workshops and mercantile establish- 
ments within their respective districts, and ascertain whether 
any minors are employed therein contrary to the provisions 
of chapter one hundred and six of the Revised Laws and 
amendments thereof or additions thereto, or contrary to the 
provisions of this act, and shall enter complaint against 
whomever is found to have violated any of said provisions. 
Any inspector of factories and public buildings who know- 
ingly and wilfully violates any provisions of this section may 
be punished by a fine of not more than one hundred dollars. 

Section 3. A truant officer may apprehend and take to 
school, without a warrant, any minor under the age of six- 



11 

teen years who is employed in any factory, workshop or mer- 
cantile establishment in violation of the provisions of sec- 
tions twenty-eight or twenty-nine of chapter one hundred 
and six of the Revised Laws, and of any amendments 
thereof or additions thereto, and such truant officer shall 
forthwith report to the police, district or municipal court or 
trial justice within whose judicial district the illegal employ- 
ment occurs, the evidence in his possession relating to the 
illegal employment of any child so apprehended, and shall 
make complaint against whomever the court or trial justice 
may direct. Any truant officer who knowingly and wilfully 
violates any provision of this section may be punished by a 
fine of not more than one hundred dollars for each offence. 

Section 4. Inspectors of factories and public buildings, 
and truant officers may require that the age and schooling 
certificates and lists of minors who are employed in factories, 
workshops or mercantile establishments shall be produced 
for their inspection. A failure to produce to an inspector 
of factories and public buildings or to a truant officer an age 
and schooling certificate or list required by law shall be 
prima facie evidence of the illegal employment of any person 
whose age and schooling certificate is not produced or wdiose 
name is not so listed. A corporation or other employer or 
any agent or officer thereof, who retains an age and school- 
ing certificate in violation of the provisions of said certifi- 
cate shall be punished by a fine of not less than ten nor more 
than one hundred dollars. 

Section 5. Police, district and municipal courts and 
trial justices shall have jurisdiction of ofTences arising 
under the provisions of this act. A summons or warrant 
issued by any such court or justice may be served, at the 
discretion of the court or magistrate, by an inspector of 
factories and public buildings, or by a truant officer, or by 
any officer qualified to serve criminal process. 

Section 6. Section thirty-three of chapter one hundred 
and six of the Revised Laws, and all other acts and parts of 
acts inconsistent herewith, are hereby repealed. I Approved 
June 20, 1906). 



12 



TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

There is again little necessity to add anything to the 
able report of the Superintendent regarding the condition of 
your schools, their present needs and some of their probable 
future requirements. A word added here, however, lest we 
fail to realize or lest realizing, we forget, may not be inappro- 
priate. Times change and with them manners. The schools 
of today are in many ways unlike those of yesterday and it 
is certain that the schools of tomorrow will be equally or per- 
haps in a greater degree unlike those with which we are now 
familiar. 

The ever changing conditions and demands of society im- 
pose corresponding" changes in courses of study and methods 
■of instruction in the schools in order that the child may be 
equipped, when he shall enter that society, to fairly maintain 
himself in what is sometimes spoken of as the struggle of life. 
At present and for some time past, the question of affording 
to the children of the public schools a certain amount of in- 
dustrial training, that they, or a large proportion of them, may 
be the better. fitted to meet successfully the conditions that will 
confront them in later life, has occupied the attention of states 
and municipalities as well as of manufacturers and that great 
body of men and women who are intimately associated with 
the work of education. 

The Massachusetts State Board of Education has just 
been reorganized for the purpose mainly of ensuring a full 



13 



and careful consideration of this question of industrial edu- 
cation. 

It is a question well worthy also of the careful con- 
sideration of the parents and other citizens of this community. 

The increase in the estimate for the support of high school 
is induced by the prospectively greater attendance at that school 
the coming year. 

The increase in estimate for salary of Superintendent 
($30) is made necessary by the action of the District Com- 
mittee in increasing the Superintendent's salary from Si 500 
to $1600. Of the amount appropriated for this purpose $375 
is repaid by the state and that sum has been secured for the 
year 1908-1909. 

The report of the truant officer is appended. 

The School Committee of Acton, 

By CHAS. J. WILLIAMS. 

Chairman. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES ON ACCOUNT OF 

SCHOOLS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1909-1910. 



Receipts. 

Appropriation for common schools . . . .$4,835 00 

Appropriation for high school 3,600 00 

Appropriation for school supplies 625 00 

Appropriation for transportation of pu- 
pils 1.360 

Appropriation for salary of Superinten- 
dent 480 00 

Appropriation for medical inspection of 

pupils 100 00 

Received from Mass. School Fund 1.127 80 

Received from dog licenses 373 2? 

Received from tuition, state 85 09 



SI 2.586 14- 



14 



Expenditures. 

For common schools S3, 939 97 

For high school 3,873 37 

For school supplies 462 97 

For transportation of pupils 1,419 50 

For salary of Superintendent 500 00 

F\)r medical inspection of pupils 78 50 

$12,274 31 

Unexpended balance $311 83 



ESTIMATES FOR THE SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS FOR 
THE FISCAL YEAR 1910-1911. 

For common schools $4,750 00 

For high school 4,200 00 

For school supplies 625 00 

For transportation of pupils 1,360 00 

For salary of Superintendent 510 00 

For medical inspection of pupils 100 00 



$11,545 00 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 

Gentlemen of the Committee: 

I have the honor of submitting to you, as Superintendent 
of Schools of this town, my fourth annual report, it being 
the 18th in the series of superintendents' reports. 

We are fortunate in having secured efficient successors 
for the places made vacant by the resignations of Sadie R. 
Whitnev and Pauline Berthold at the South School, and of 



15 



Mary O. Freeman at the West. Miss Hurlbutt, who succeeded 
Miss Whitney, resigned in January to accept a better position 
in Aver. We are very fortunate in securing Miss Elizabeth 
Paine, a Smith College girl of several years' experience, who 
has entered upon her duties in a way which promises a marked 
degree of success. ■ 

Aside from delinquent attendance the schools are in good 
condition, showing a considerable improvement in the spirit 
of work over last year. The attendance is very irregular and 
parents seem to allow their children to remain at home for 
very trifling ailments and often for no reasonable cause. Tardi- 
ness is especially marked in our schools and drastic measures 
seem necessary unless the home comes to a proper realization 
of the necessity for prompt, regular attendance. 

The work of the Freshman class in the High School has 
been greatly handicapped by the absence of the regular teacher. 
If the arrangement with Concord is to continue I should ad- 
vise the discontinuance of that class and its fusion with Con- 
cord from the start. 

For some time objections to the present system of mark 
ing have been urged. At the last meeting of the Massachu- 
setts Superintendents' Association the matter was freely dis- 
cussed and the result was a strong plea for a change in the 
system. The system now in vogue presents several objection- 
able features : 

1. Xo teacher can hope to mark all pupils with absolute 
accuracy. The teacher who depends upon her general im- 
pressions and records the marks of each pupil once a week 
will frequently be deceived. A pupil who makes a poor recita- 
tion just before the time for marks to be recorded will re- 
ceive a lower mark than he deserves; on the other hand the 
pupil who is generally poor, but who makes a good recitation 
just before the time for recording the marks will be apt to 
be marked higher than he deserves. Teachers who, in the 
effort to avoid the possibility of such errors, record their 
marks after each recitation, place an impassable barrier be- 
tween themselves and their pupils. The habit of noting crit- 



16 



ically every imperfection, marking coldly every error may 
tend to make an accurate marking machine, but it precludes 
the teacher's doing the kind of work our best teachers desire 
tc do; it cuts off all chance of her giving hope, encouragement 
or inspiration to her pupils. 

2. A pupil's success in his studies depends upon two 
factors: (a) Natural ability and (b) Effort. A pupil fortu- 
nate enough to be born with a superior mind should not bear 
the conviction forced upon him by the marking system that he 
is better and more worthy than his less gifted associates. 
Nor, on the other hand, should a pupil of medium ability be 
made to feel that he is less highly esteemed because of condi- 
tions wholly beyond his control. Both should be taught in 
every way possible that to use one's powers faithfully, be they 
great or small, for worthy ends is the only honor, and to fail 
to use them is the only disgrace. The present system of mark- 
ing makes it extremely difficult, if not impossible, to make 
these truths clear to the child's mind. 

3. The present system opens the door to petty jealousies 
among children, leads to misunderstandings between children 
and teachers, and between parents and teachers. It is prob 
able that more than half of all the friction between parents and 
teachers, and between pupils and teachers can be traced to 
the report card. 

4. The mark is far too often made so prominent in the 
child's mind that the real thing for which it stands is entirely 
shut from view and the pupil comes to work for marks rather 
than for an education. The "A" becomes the only conscious 
aim of the child's endeavor. Accumulation of facts rather 
than power to do becomes the sole object of his effort. No 
worthy work can be done in pursuit of so unworthy an end. 
To use a mark as a threat or a bribe is to do an injustice. To 
appeal to pride and fear so largely during the formative 
years of a child's life is to cut off all chance of instilling in the 
minds of the future citizens of our republic the high sens. 1 o\ 
duty which our schools should engender. 

5. Experience has shown clearly that children whose 



17 



natural and wholesome appetites have never been perverted by 
a false taste for marks, do not need them. Nowhere in school 
do we find such eager, enthusiastic workers as in the grades 
where marks are unknown, and nowhere do we find the lack 
of these qualities in so marked a degree as in the upper grades 
where marks have been longest in use. 

6. The last objection is not urged primarily out of con- 
sideration for the teachers, but out of consideration for the 
pupils. The mere mechanical effort of posting up marks and 
making out report cards under our present system consumes 
an enormous amount of valuable time and strength which 
might better be used for the benefit of the children. 

For the past year a new system of marking has been tried 
at the Frost school in Westford Center. This system is essen- 
tially as follows : 

1. Marks are recorded in scholarship once a month. 
This record is to be kept as entirely private and should not 
be shown to the pupil, 

2. Once a month a report card is issued showing fa), 
Statistics of attendance, sessions absent, times tardy, times 
dismissed; (b), List of studies pursued; (c). a plain simple 
statement by the teacher in regard to the work of the pupil. 

3. In addition to the regular report sent home once a 
month a special report is sent home the moment a pupil falls 
below a proper standing in any subject. In this way the par- 
ent is kept informed immediately of any deficiency. 

4. Much of the written work in all subjects is kept on 
file and may be sent home frequently for inspection or parents 
may see upon visiting the school, the character of the work 
done and note the improvement month by month. 

The new system has worked so well that I would rec- 
ommend that it be adopted for the schools of this town. 

The problem of training for future citizenship would 
seen to be well met by the development of organized play. This 
line of work is especially needed in such a community as ours 
because so many of our children have no opportunity at home 
for real play. Joseph Lee, "the father of public playgrounds" 



18 



■writes very tersely and instructively on this matter as follows : 

"Why have playgrounds? Why? Why does a flower 
need the light? The child needs a playground because his 
growth is through activity, through whose specific forms of 
activity which his nature has prescribed ; and because, ac- 
cordingly, he will never grow up — or will grow up stunted and 
perverted — if he is denied those opportunities and objects to 
which his vital, instinctive and formative activities relate." 

"The thing that needs most to be understood about play 
is that it is not a luxury but a necessity. It is not simply some- 
thing that a child likes to have ; it is something that he must 
have if he is ever to grow up. It is more than an essential 
part of his education ; it is a part of the law of his growth, of 
the process by which he becomes a man at all." 

"Is play a necessity? Yes, if the boy lives and is a whole 
boy. If he is above ground and the best part of him has not 
been starved quite out of him, play there is bound to be if not 
in one form then in another." 

"Does it pay? Volumes of testimony could be cited to 
show that playgrounds greatly cut down the amount of juvenile 
law-breaking. Doctors will testify to the necessity of play to 
health and growth, and to its essential importance as a mean^ 
of righting the great white plague." 

"These are pecuniary benefits of no mean order even if 
we confine ourselves to the money side of the question. And. 
then besides, children are worth something in themselves." 

That attention to school yard play may ai:l in the disci- 
pline of the school is unquestioned. In one school, the record 
for the year before organized play was introduced showed 281 
cases of truancy and 99 cases of corporal punishment. The 
school yard had been covered with loam which made it unfit 
for play in damp weather. The chief role of the principal 
under such conditions quite naturally and easily fell into that 
of policemen. By covering the yard used for play with a mix- 
ture of broken stone and sand it was made fit for use. A 
wooden frame containing four pairs of rings and two hor- 
izontal bars were erected. From time to time other pieces of 



19 



•apparatus were added until the equipment included punching 
tags, medicine bags, basket balls, shot, skittles, a jumping and 
vaulting pole, and a race track. 

The results secured were remarkable. Truancy dropped 
to thirty-three cases. Corporal punishment was essentially 
discarded. The tone of the school was raised ; teachers were 
brought into closer touch with the children, and by increasing 
their knowledge of them strengthened their influence over 
them. 

The effect of play upon school work in general is worthy 
of mention. There is a close inter-dependence of the muscu- 
lar and nervous systems. In the development of the race the 
nervous system has advanced as the muscular system has ad- 
vanced, and the same is apparently true of the individual. 
There can be no well balanced development of the nervous 
system without a corresponding development of the muscular 
system. 

Teachers who have regularly made use of games in the 
middle of the session are unanimous in saying that the games 
revived the children, gave an added zest to their study and 
made them more quiet and responsive. Tests of the amount 
and accuracy of work done after the afternoon games show 
a decided gain in favor of the use of games. 

In view of such testimony is it not wise to plan for the 
equipment of our school grounds, and the instituting of organ- 
ized play under the direction of the teachers? In a small 
hamlet in Ohio, of 250 inhabitants, the committee has voted 
$160 for the equipment of the school grounds for play. Can 
we not do as much for our children ? 

The compulsory eye and ear tests for this year show the 
following results : 

Number of pupils examined — 32?. 

Number with defective sight — 39. Per cent. — 12 

Number with defective hearing — 13. Per cent. — \. 

The response to the notices sent to parents has not been 
as good as it should be. That defective eyesight, enlarged 
tonsils, or adenoids are responsible for much of the retardation 



20 



of pupils, is an established fact. To require a child to do what 
he is unable to do by reason of physical defects is cruelty. The 
results in those places where proper examinations have been 
made show most alarming conditions. In New York City, in 
a school for so-called incorrigibles — the truants, the idle, the 
stupid, the troublesome — 150 in number, all were found on 
examination to be physically defective. One hundred thirty - 
seven had adenoids, or enlarged tonsils, or both. These were 
operated upon and in six months seventy-six of the eighty- 
one operated upon first, were reexamined and without ex- 
ception it was found that they had been promoted and were 
doing well in their advanced grades. 

Parents should give immediate attention to the physical 
condition of their children and give every possible aid to the 
schools in following the suggestions of the teachers and the 
medical inspectors. 

The problem of a closer union between the home and the 
school is an important one with us. Very few parents have 
visited the school to see what their children are doing, and 
still fewer have sought to establish friendly relations with the 
teachers and thus aid them in a better understanding of the 
children. Every parent should make strenuous efforts to 
come into personal touch with the teacher, and lend the heart- 
iest support to our efforts to lead the child to appreciate the 
value of strict application to his school work. Our aim is to 
train our pupils to study by themselves, to look up material 
connected with their lessons from other sources than their 
regular text-books, thus putting them in touch with the widest 
fields of education. The teacher is not in school to carry the 
children, but to train them to right habits of thought, and to 
establish power to observe, to reason, and to work effectively. 
The chief end of the school is not acquisition of knowledge, 
but the power to think and act along right lines. Thus, by 
forming good habits we seek to build up a strong character, 
to make citizens who shall be worthy of the name of Amer- 
icans. 

Obedience is the first essential in all school life. Tt is not 



21 



for the pupil to question what the teacher says. His business 
is to act promptly and graciously. If having given prompt 
obedience he feels aggrieved, no teacher will refuse to explain 
the necessity for the command when such explanation is 
sought in a polite manner. It is here the home can come 
to the teacher's aid most effectively. Let the pupil be im- 
bued with the idea that the teacher's word is law and must 
be obeyed. Let the parents get in close touch with the 
teacher and this attitude will become easier. 

The work in music and drawing is progressing in a very 
satisfactory manner. The reports of our supervisors are 
appended. I would urge the extension of manual work. 
Sewing for the girls and basketry or wood-work for the 
boys of the upper grades should find a place in the curri- 
culum. This is a line which the children need and which 
towns of less size and wealth than ours are establishing. 
It is to be hoped that the necessary funds will be appropriated. 

Teachers' meetings are being held monthly for the dis- 
cussion of educational matters. Superintendent Paull, of 
Pepperell, spoke in January upon the "Teacher as Student," 
and Superintendent Briggs. of Chelmsford, in February upon 
"Moral Education." The reading circle is at work upon 
"Teaching Children to Study." 

In conclusion I wish to express my appreciation of the 
teachers' co-operation, and of the assistance and helpful 
direction of the members of the school committee to whom 
this report is respectfully submitted. 

ARTHUR B. WEBBER. 
February 8, 1910. 



Mr. A. B. Webber, Superintendent of Schools. 

Dear Sir: I herewith submit the report of the Super- 
visor of Drawing for the Town of Acton, Mass. 

I entered upon the work in September, 1909, after serv- 
ing under Mr. W. L. Adams, from February to June, 1909, 
as his assistant. Number of visits to each school, to date of 



22 



the present school year, 10. Number of teachers' meetings, 
held for special instruction, 1. 

In the primary grades little has been undertaken in the 
way of design or pictorial drawing. Here the work has been 
chiefly that of training the motor muscles. 

1. To train the hand to work with the mind; by mas- 
tering the most simple problems. 

2. To train the eye to observe, and then to record its 
observations through the hand. 

3. To stimulate the mind and the imagination,, and to 
be resourceful ; the ideas- developed to be worked out through 
the fingers with pencil ; and paper construction, with twigs, 
bits of cloth, clay, etc. 

The work in the intermediate and grammar grades has 
been as follows. Three weeks were given to the study of 
color harmony : 

1. That the pupils may appreciate, and know how to 
put together, good and pleasing combinations of color. In 
the hope that such knowledge would in some degree improve 
their tastes and influence their choice in the use of colors 
about them, in their home, in their school, and in their dress. 

Two weeks were given to nature drawing: 

1. In an analytical study of the main parts of the plant, 
for their application and value in design. 

2. In pictorial representation, — involving the principles 
of good spacing in the disposition of form within an en- 
closed space. This requires forethought and study on the 
part of the pupil, and so should increase the habit of plan- 
ning a piece of work as well as the appreciation of the 
beautiful in design. 

Four weeks were given to mechanical drawing: 

1. For a finer degree of accuracy in workmanship. 

2. To construct and understand working drawings of 
simple objects. 

3. For the ability to put upon paper, the accurate plans 
or working drawings of their own original models to be 
constructed later. 



23 



The last weeks before the Christmas vacation were given 
over to the construction of the above forms in metal, and 
cardboard, involving some skill of hand as well as the previous 
careful planning. 

I feel that the work as a whole has moved forward as 
well as could be wished, with one exception. The greatest 
difficulty in the way of obtaining the best work and con- 
sequently the greatest problem to be overcome, is that of 
carelessness on the part of the pupil. The pupil will not 
do his best, if that best requires special effort on his part. 
This is especially noticeable in mechanical drawing where 
exact work is possible. It is also found in the other branches 
where it is more difficult to contend with. The problem of 
how to do away with this defect and still cover the required 
amount of subject matter in the time alloted to the drawing 
is one that is still before us, and to my mind it is a great 
one. In the grades where carelessness is most apparent, 
steps are being taken by which we hope to overcome it in 
some degree. 

In the primary grades, where the tendency towards care- 
lessness is less noticeable, the work has advanced smoothly. 
At West Acton and Acton Center the work is characterized 
by its usual degree of excellence ; while at South it shows 
a very marked advance over last year and continues to im- 
prove. 

In the grammar grades the teachers have worked hard 
throughout the schools ; some with more success than others, 
but all have shown an interest and effort for which they 
deserve much credit. To them the success of the work is in 
a great part due. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. WARD BRACKETT. 



24 

ROLL OF HONOR, 1908-1909. 
Center School. 

For Three Terms — Ray Harris, Florence Morse, Florence 
Prentiss, George Smith. 

For Two Terms — Abbie Coughlin, Margery Davis, How- 
ard Gallagher, Ernest Greenough, Raymond Farrar, Raymond 
Hayes, Edith Lawrey, Walter Morse, Morris Shuyski, Wanda 
Shuyski, Edith Tuttle, Jennie Tuttle, Marion Tuttle, Leonard 
Worden. 

For One Term — Florence Cheney, Robert Cheney, Agnes 
Coughlin, Virginia Coughlin, Merritt Farrar, Ella Fredrikson, 
Rebecca Fredricksen, Frank Greenough. Elizabeth Harris, 
Florence Mannion, Helen Robbins, Sylvia Robbins, Nellie 
Shuyski, Nellie Stiles, Arthur Thoreson. Richard White, 
Florence Worden. 

South School. 

For Three Terms — Dora Fletcher. Hazel Hoit, Grace 
Ineson. 

For Two Terms — Annie Foley. Theron Lowden. Walter 
Morse. 

For One Term — Jeremiah Anderson, Margaret Byron, 
John Cahill, John Carney, Mary Davidson, Alice Evans, An- 
thony Foley, Esther Heath, Natalie Leach, Philip Lowden. 
George Moult, Edward Pendergast, Osgood Tuttle, Fred 
Willard. 

West School. 

For Three Terms — Martina Benere, Stuart MacGregor, 
Lauretta Moore. Naomi Schnair, Richard Schnair. Willie 
Schnair. 

For Two Terms — Mary Benere, Irma Brown. Roger 
Brown, Marion Davis, Ruby Greer, Henry Hall, Thelma 
MacGregor, Harriet Schnair. 

For One Term — Annie Benere, James Benere, Helen 
Bezanson, Elsie Blaisdell, Leland Campbell, Fannie Davis, 
Ruth Davis, Lillian Gilmore, Isabelle Greer, Margaret Hall, 



25 



Francis Hopps, Burton Littlefield, Dominic Moore, Gladys 
Sargent, Florence Schnair, Percy Willis, Mabel Willis, Ade- 
laide Womboldt. 



TRUANT OFFICERS' REPORT. 

To the School Committee of Acton, Mass. : 

The Truant Officers submit their eighth annual report to 
the School Committee for the year ending February 1, 1910. 

The Truant Officers submit the following list of pupils 
looked up for the year, the cause of their absence, and if 
truants, the number that have been returned to school. 

Whole number of pupils looked up 16 

Cause of absence C. S. S. S. W. S. 

Sickness 2 2 

Kept at home by parents 5 3 

Returned to school 4 1 8 

Reported truants 1 3 

Eeft town 1 

Yours respectfully, 

ALBERT S. BRADLEY, 
THOMAS SCANLON, 
EDWARD S. FORBES, 

Truant Officers. 



26 
MUSIC REPORT. 

Superintendent and School Committee : 

Gentlemen — The work in music has made decided gains 
in the past year. At the Centre the work moves steadily 
forward. With the same teachers year after year, who under- 
stand the methods of the Supervisor, it is possible to do good 
systematic work. 

The work of the whole building is progressive. In Miss 
Gamble's room, the three part work is really exceptionally 
good for such a small class. 

Miss Miller and her classes have been doing that steady 
work which counts so much. In one branch they have led 
all the schools this year. The children of the first, second 
and third grades under Miss Smith are doing some really 
wonderful work in ear training, many of them being able to 
give you the names of any two notes of the scale when played 
on the organ. Some can do good work along this line with 
a three note chord. At South Acton the work of the gram- 
mar and intermediate grades has suffered through change of 
teachers, but is now growing under Miss Paine. Miss 
McCarthy's work continues to grow ; in fact the record of 
the past two years in her room has been one of continual 
growth. The primary work has taken on new life with the 
guiding hand of Miss Hinkley. 

At West Acton the spirit of the musical work in Miss 
Taylor's room has been good. The work in Miss Evans' 
room has been one of steady building on the foundation of 
last year. 

The primary room, under the watchful eye of Mrs. 
Gardner, has made gratifying progress. All parts of the 
work, technical, slips and books have been well taken care of 
with especial attention to rote song and musical appreciation 
work. 

In the High School the work has received a new impetus 
through the introduction of new books. 

The name, "Songs everyone should know," describes the 



27 



book perfectly. It is a fine collection of the best songs — 
classic, school and popular. Miss Mclntyre brings to the 
work of the High School music all the strength of her own 
musical training. 

As a result of the course taken by the Supervisor at the 
Ionic Sol-fa College, London, England, last summer, some 
new lines have been developed this year, noticeably, work 
in rhythm, illustrated by the tapping of songs and different 
kinds of time movements, and work in musical appreciation. 
All the grades have had lessons with the piano, at least once 
in a month or six weeks, which not only made the work more 
attractive, but also brought it up to a higher plane than here- 
tofore. I am sure the outlook for the musical work in the 
schools was never brighted. My earnest thanks is due to the 
Superintendent, teachers and committee for their kindly sup- 
port. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWIN N. C. BARNES. 



28 



STATISTICS FOR THE FALL AND WINTER, 1909-1910. 



School Grades, 


+9 

a 












> 

o 






be o> 


£X'r^< 




<U C 


o> c 


o> 




jzj 


7S£2 


- - 




^2 QJ 


rfl M 


,fl 




o 






- +a 


= t 


£.2 


1 


Center Primary I. -I IT. 


29 


23.05 


21.90 


94.9 


29 


18 




Center Intermediate IV. -VI. 


32 


28.60 


27.00 


94.5 


32 


31 




Center Grammar V1I.-VIII. 


15 


13.20 


12.50 


95.5 


15 


13 




South Lower Primary I. -II. 


39 


37.46 


32.23 


86.5 


39 


9 




South Upper Primary III.-IV. 


28 


26.70 


24.10 


91.0 


28 


28 




South Intermediate V.-VI. 


29 


26.20 


24.60 


93.6 


29 


29 




South Grammar VII.-IX. 


38 


34.50 


33.10 


91.0 


38 


26 


2 


West Primary I. -III. 


30 


28.00 


24.80 


88.4 


30 


18 




West Intermediate IV.-V. 


29 


28.60 


27.10 


93.2 


29 


29 




West Grammar VI.-VIII. 


34 


32.20 


30.00 


93.3 


32 


30 


2 


High X. 


22 


22.01 


19.80 


90. 


19 




3 




325 


3(10.52 


277.13 


92.02 


320 


231 


7 



SCHOOL CENSUS, SEPTEMBER, 1909. 

Number of boys between 5 and 15 149 

Number of girls between 5 and 15 171 

Tola] 320 

Number of boys between 7 and 14 109 

Number of girls between 7 and 14 122 

Total 231 

Number of illiterate minors 



29 



STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE, 1909. 



cul Grades 


r 


j) /; 


c - 


_ n 


;_ - 


:_ — 


:_ 






t£ Z 


Zi.— 


= rg 


Z, Z 








~ 


~ — 


7Z — 




-^ w 


_^ Z* 


^ 




p 


T ~ 


r m 


a Z 


c £ 


E ^ 


d 














— 43 






















-^ 


< ~. 


.^ ^ 


— <J 


y. s 


/i 


y 


Center Primary [.-111. 


33 


26. (J 


21.9 


93.0 


33 


15 




Center Intermediate IV.- VI. 


30 


24.6 


23.2 


90.2 


30 


30 




Center Grammar YJI.-YIII. 


21 


18.5 


17.5 


91.5 


21 


19 





South Lower Primary [.-II. 


25 


23.1 


2Q.6 


83.1 


23 


5 


2 


South Upper Primary III.-iY. 


31 


27.0 


21.9 


92.1 


31 


30 




South Intermediate V.-VI. 


35 


31.5 


29.5 


93.(3 


37 


37 




South Grammar VII.-IX. 


12 


38.1 


35.8 


93.9 


11 


37 


1 


West Primary I. -III. 


38 


35.6 


31.7 


88.9 


38 


22 




West intermediate IV.-V. 


33 


31.9 


29.1 


92.3 


3:; 


33 




West Grammar VI.- VIII. 


29 


26.9 


25.5 


93.2 


25 


20 


2 


High X. 


29 


25.5 


23.80 


93.2 


19 


5 


l(i 




346 


309.6 


286.8 


92.3 


331 


253 


15 



Number graduated front the Grammar School : 

Boys 23 

Girls 14 



37 

Number admitted to the High School : 

Boys 13 

Girls 14 



Zi 



30 



o 

rH 






-. ^. ffl 

^ £ «« <t< T3 ^ 

^ c 2 3 

^ S"S Uf w fe: 

, si S S ^ a) ^ 
' i>* g 2 q <-T O 

[£ W as oq P4 f> h! 



<J o 



5 

PQ 

H 
O 

> 

w 

CO 

« 
O 

<C 
H 
Eh 



-SB-SIB I 

3 .S S S 5 



OX) 
03 ^ 

5 2 



I 



.a g s^^! 

a g a ,a j: 

~ -2 si o o 



m a> £ 



jfr^W^GQ^i^PG 



CM OS IQ3-. 'J I- C: ff. X 05 CD 

o a c c : — ^hocooo 
os oc os oi os os os oc os os os 



<u g h 

+J oi cs 

oj g g 

a P s 



; 03 03 

■3& 



T3 j- 



i a 1 1 3 



Q30303OOO Ob>b* *>^ 



fc£ 



o^ g a j; 

5^ 2j 03,2* 08^ 



?' 



I— I °3 

w 

H 

en 

o 
w 

CO 

HI 
H 

3 § 



o 
u 

E 



R 
U 



8>« 



a; 



- 



-5 « 



w 22 



o •- 



ju r^ CO 
2 £ n c 



S - -S £ c^ 

cq -^ C 



S2* 



gil.Sm 



Ml 3 

»- (u ~ = 

O o 'J « 
O < < U 



' 15 S 

fcvg H 8«: to 

^ *g Jj ^ -g § 

— rf wj ^ -* 

g >^ . pq — . <~ 

|jg ^^ §« 

>»-M r^ rt <L> 4> 

rt J- o u, ■— ' s- 



• til 

03 ^ C 



•6 o^ 



US.2 5 

S si « 

^ -G 2 > 

t- 3 Jg rt 

< O x c 



'S 

J2 W i! c ,. 
5 .£ '5 lz £ 

§ £ — , § rt 
a3 



aJ 



C *C 
i C C 

1) U t, fi -M 

C OS <d S k! 



U ^ pq 



o ^ 

u C ^ 
<L) u aJ 

"° -5 -° 

P-i ^ *y 









U 

U 



^ 8 S 

o co 

^ u rt 
K CC <U 

< CC 23 



E 



a ^ P 

WW 







^ j: n rt c a> 

5;' 3 -M rt [JL| »i Vi r* 

5 5 5 2 2 § o .5 



"8.1 - 









^,§ «i2 g-S 

<L> C W ^ < ^ 

5 b g s § tf 

3 — ; / 5 r rt C 

hJ ^ ^ ^5 PU Oh 



<L> 0^ 



W^& 



00 <N a\ m t^ ^2 l ° ° 3C <M 

^ CN1 (\) CO ,— ' T ^ O 

^^s J5 £$ ^o < a ^ ^o s < ^ c): q < x a a -. 

O, ^ ^ ^ _j. irj ^ X - o ^ CO co 2 '^ ^ 1^ 3S S S S ?i S 



^ k ^ c ^h2^^ 



I 

i 

o ^ 

^ 3 s 






2 3 « 

nJ co q 

3 IS 



S3 
. H ^ 



UWK 





•d 





















o 








cti 


£ 








CO 


p 


















'1- 


eg 




^ 




c 

o 

2 








05 




o 






!3 c 


h 


o 
2 


.9 


1 


Richards 
Stearns, 
Swift, E 
Teele, W 



0\ <^ O rH K 



3* u~, \Q t^ 00 
CM CN CM CM CM 



INDEX. 

jr - * I 

Town Officers 3 

Town Meeting's 5 

State Election 14 

Town Clerk's Report 17 

Births 18 

Marriages 19 

Deaths 20 

Non-Resident Bnrials 22 

Dog Licenses 23 

Selectmen's Report 25 

Treasurer's Report 47 

Assessors ' Report 52 

Auditor 's Report 53 

Collector's Report 54 

Road Commissioners 56 

Board of Health 57 

Beef Inspector's Report 58 

Overseers of the Poor 59 

Report of Cemetery Commissioners 64 

Trustees Goodnow Fund 39 

Acton Memorial Library 70 

SECOND SECTION. 

School Report 1 

School Calendar 3 

Committee 4 

Standing Rules 5 

Financial Statement 13 

Superintendent's Report 14 

Supervisor of Drawing 21 

Roll of Honor 24 

Truant Officers 25 

Supervisor of Music 26 

Statistical Tables 28 



' REFERENCE BOOK 
ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
Ar-rnN MASSACHUSETTS 01720 



WELLS BINDERY, IMC. 

OCT 1976 
WALTHAM, MASS. 02154