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Full text of "Annual reports, Town of Acton, Massachusetts"

For Reference 

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REFERENCE BOOK 

ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
ACTON, MASSACHUSETTS 01720 



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ANNUAL REPORT '^^'^ 



OF THE 



Several Boards of 1 OAvn Officers 

OF THE 

TOWN OF ACTON 
MASSACHUSETTS 

For tne i ear Ending' February 1 



1911 




HUDSON, MASS. 

PRINTED BY THE NEWS 

1911 



REFERENCE BOOK 



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A (^Tr\K I » /. I- « 



C.2_ 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1910. 



Selectmen 

Asaph Merriam James B. Tuttle Cliarles B. Stone 

Town Clerk 
Horace F. Tuttle 
Town Treasurer 

Jonathan K. W. AYetherbee 

Assessors 

William F. Stevens Term expires 1911 

James B. Tuttle Term expires 1912 

William F. Kelley Term expires 1913 

Overseers of the Poor 

Oclavus A. Knowlton. J. Sterling Moore. William F. Kelley 

Auditor 

Waldo E. Whiteomb 

Collector of Taxes 
William F. Stevens 

Tree Warden 
William H. Kingsley 



4 



Constables 

AJIxTt S. HrfKlley O. Ellsworth llouuhtou 

.1. Liinvood Richardson William P. Stevens 

Fence Viewers 

Asai)h McM^riani James R. Tnttle Edwin T. Swift 

Field Drivers 

AVilliam F. Kelley Levi AV. Perkins Edgar T. Riv^e 

George T. AVeaver 

Road Commissioners 

William II. Kingsley Term expires 1911 

Albert II. Perkins Term expires 1912 

Alfred AV. Davis Term expires 1918 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Herbert T. Clark Term expires 1911 

Jnlian Tiittle Term expires 1912 

Horace F. Tnttle Term expires 1913 

School Committee 

Edwin A. Phalen Term expires 1911 

Sanniel A. Christie Term expires 1912 

Allen Brooks Parker Term expires 1918 

Board of Health 

Frank E. Tasker Term expires 1912 

James B. Tnttle Term expires 1911 

Asaph Merriam Term expires 1918 

Trustees of Memorial Library 

(Chosen by the Town) 

John Sidney White Term expires 1911 

Lncins A. Ilesselton T.u'm expires 1912 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1918 



TOWN WARRANT. 




COMMONWEALTH OF :\rAS8ACIIUSETTS. 

IMiddlesex. ss. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in the 
County of Middlesex, GREETING : 

In the name of the Commonwealth of ^[assaehnsetts 
you are directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of ttn^ 
Town of Acton, qualified to vote in elections and town 
aflPairs, to assemble in the town hall, in snid town, on jMoncUiy, 
the twent^'-seventh day of March, 1911, at nine o'clock in 
the forenoon. Then and there to act on the folloAving 
articles, to wit : 

Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at. said 
meeting. 

Article 2. To bring in their votes on one l)allot for 
town oflScers. 



6 



Article 3. To see if the town will change the term of 
its selectmen so that hereafter one shall be chosen annually 
for the term of three years. 

Article 4. To choose all necessary town officers not. 
named in article 2 and fix salaries. 

Article 5. To see if the town will accept the reports- 
of the selectmen, overseers of the poor, school committee,, 
library trustees and other town officers. 

Article 6. To hear and act upon the report of any 
committees chosen to report at this meeting. 

Article 7. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for the due observance of Memorial Day. 

Article 8. To see what amount of money the town will" 
raise for the repairing and building of roads and bridges., 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 9. To see if the town will authorize the- 
treasurer, with the approval of its selectmen, to borrow" 
money for the town, if necessary, in anticipation of taxes 
the current year. 

Article 10. To see what amount of money the town wiir 
raise for the support of Memorial library the present year^ 

Article 11. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for the support of schools the present year. 

Article 12. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise and appropriate for the purchase of school supplies 
and repairs and improvements upon school buildings and 
grounds. 

Article 13. To see if the town will appropriate a sum 



of money for the enforcement of the liquor laws, or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 14, To see what amount of money the town 
will appropriate for the care of cemeteries, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 15. To see if the town will appropriate a sum 
of money to copy for the State Archives, and for publication 
by the New England Historic Grenealogical Society, under 
Chapter 470 of the Acts of 1902, the vital records of the 
town to the year 1850. 

Article 16. To see if the town will take any action in 
reference to building a high school building the present year, 
or rescind any vote or votes passed at any previous meetings 
in reference to location or building of a high school building 
in town, or act anything thereon. 

Article 17. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for maintenance of fire department, or act thereon. 

Article 18. To see what action the town will take in 
reference to the extermination of the gypsy and brown tail 
moth. 

Article 19. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for town charges. 

Article 20. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to the collection of taxes. 

Article 21. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to street lamps the present year. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to instruct the 
selectmen to contract with the American Woolen Co. for one V) ' n 
hundred electric street lights, or act anything thereon. v"^ a r 



Article 23. To see what aetioii the town will take in 
ree^ard to the extermination of the elm leaf beetle. 

Article 24. To see if the town will accept the provisions- 
of Chapter 624, Acts of 11)10. relative to the appointment of 
town acconntant, and tix scdnry of same, or act anything- 
thereon. 

Article 25. To see if the town wilj vote to macadam 
the StoAv road from th^ South Acton Coal & Lumber Co's 
yard to the cross road near'W. A. P'lint's bani. or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Article 26. To see if the toAvn will take action to 
furnish tablet for soldiers that went to Spanish-American 
war of 1898, or act anything thereon. 

Article 27. To see if the toAvn Avill instruct the over- 
seers of the poor to contract out the. medical attendance for 
the poor the (Misuing year. 

Article 28. To see if the town will instruct the select- 
men to order gates established at the Andrew TIapgood 
crossing and the crossing near house of Sidney L. Richardson 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 29. To see if the town will vote to bond 
treasnr(^r and collector in an Indemnity Company, appro- 
priate money for the same, or act anything thereon. 

Article 30. To see if the town will vote to expend a 
sum of money for sidewalks in any or all of its villages, or 
accept the ^lassachusetts sidewalk statntes, or act anytliing 
thereon. 

Article^ 31. To see if the town Avill vote to Aviden the 
bi'idgc near the cemetery at AVest Acton, and the approaches 
tluu-eto. or act anvthing thereon. 



9 



And you arc directed to serve this warrant by i)ostin«i' 
copies, attested ])y yon, in the following places, one in each 
of the Post Offices and Railroad Stations, one in each of the 
stores of C. IT. ]\Iead & Co., W. E. Whitcomb, M. E. Taylor 
& Co., Tnttle & Newton, Finney & lloit. George II. Reed, 
and one at the Nagog- House, seven days at least before the 
time appointed for holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due return of this Warrant 
with your doings thereon, to the Selectmen or the Town 
Clerk on or before the time of holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands in Acton this twentieth day of 
March in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred 
eleven. 

ASAPH merria:\i, 

JAMES B. TUTTLE, 
CHARLES R. STONE, 

Selectmen of Acton. 
A true copy. Attest: 

Constable of Acton. 



10 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL MEETING,, 
MARCH 28, 1910. 



Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Allen Brooks Parker was chosen moderator. 

Article 2. To bring in their votes on one ballot foir 
town officers. 

The following town officers were chosen : 

Town Clerk— Horace F. Tuttle. 

Selectmen — Asaph ]\Ierriam, James B. Tnttle, Charles- 
B. Stone. 

Assessor — William F. Kelley. 

Overseers of the Poor — William F. Kelley, Octavus A.. 
Knowlton, J. Sterling Moore. 

Treasnrer — Jonathan K. W. Wetherbee. 

Collector of Taxes — William F. Stevens. 

Anditor — Waldo E. Whitcomb. 

Constables — Albert Bradley. O. Ellsworth Houghton,. 
J. Linwood Richardson, William F. Stevens. 



11 

Road Commissioner — Alfred W. Davis. 

Field Drivers — William F. Kelley, Levi W. Perkins, 
Edgar T. Rice, George T. Weaver. 

Fence Viewers — Asaph Merriam, Edwin T. Swift, James 
B. Tuttle. 

School Committee, for three years — Allen Brooks 
Parker. 

School Committee, for one year — Edwin A. Phalen. 

Cemetery Commissioner — Horace F. Tuttle. 

Board of Health — Asaph Merriam. 

Trustee of Memorial Library, three years — Horace F. 
Tuttle. 

Trustee of Memorial Library, one year — J. Sidney 
White. 

Tree Warden — William H. Kingsley. 

On the question, "Shall licenses be granted for the 
sale of intoxicating liquors in this town," the vote was: 

Whole number of ballots cast 392 

Yes 193 

No 174 

Blanks 25 

Article 3. To choose all necessary town officers not 
named in Article 2 and fix salaries. 

Voted : That the selectmen be instructed to appoint 
surveyors of lumber, wood, hoops and staves. 



12 



Voted: To choose three trustees of the Goocliiow Pund^, 
one for one year, one for two years, and one for three years, 
and that hereafter one shall be chosen atumally for three 
years. 

Choose Luther Con ant for one year, I. Warren Flagg 
for two A^ears, Horace F. Tuttle for three years. 

Voted: That the salary of the road eonniiissioners be- 
two and one-half dollars per day, nine hours to constitute 
a day. 

Voted: That the salary of the tax collector be one 
per centum of the amount collected and that he j)erform all 
the duties hitherto performed by said otlcer. 

Voted: To fix the salary of the town treasurer at two 
hundred dollars per annum. 

Article 4. To see if the town will accei)t the reports, 
of the selectmen, overseers of the poor, school connnittee,, 
library trustees and other town officers. 

Voted: To accept the reports of the several town 
officers. 

Article 5. To hear and act ui)()n the report of any 
committee chosen to report at this nu^eting. 

Heard the rei)ort of Luther Conant for the committee 
chosen by the town in the matter of the chiim of the estate 
of Abram Jones for land damages. 

Voted: To accept the report. 

Article 6. To see what amount of nu)ney the town will 
raise for du(^ observance of Memorial da\'. 



Voted: To raise the sum of fifty ($50) dollars. 

Article 7. To see what amoimt of mouey the town will 
raise for the repairing and building of roads and bridges, 
or act anxthing thereon. 

Voted : To raise five thousand ($5,000) dollars. 

Article 8. To see if the town will authorize the 
treasurer, with the approval of its selectmen, to borrow 
money for the toAvn, if necessary, in anticipation of taxes, 
the current year. 

Voted: To authorize the treasurer, with the approval 
of the selectmen, to borrow money for the town, if necessary, 
in antici[)ation of taxes the current year. 

Article 0. To see what amount of money the town Avill 
raise for the support of ]\Ienu)rial library the present year. 

Voted : To raise four hundred dollars for current 
expenses and two hundred dollars for books. 

Article 10. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for support of schools the present year. 

Article 11. To see what amount of money the town 
will rais(^ for school suppli(^s. 

Voted : For conunon schools $4,750.00 

High school 4,200.00 

School supplies 625 . 00 

Transportation of pupils 1,360.00 

Salary of superintendent 510.00 

.Medical ins])ection of i)upils 100.00 



$11,545.00 



14 



Article 12. To see if the town will appropriate a sum 
of money for the enforcement of the liquor laws, or act 
anything thereon. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Article 13. To see what amount of money the town 
wdll appropriate for the care of cemeteries. 

Voted: To appropriate five hundred ($500) dollars. 

Article 14. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for maintenance of the fire department, or act 
thereon. 

Voted: To raise the sum of four hundred dollars. 

Voted: That the proper officials publish in the annual 
town report the location of all hand chemical fire extin- 
guishers belonging to the town. 

Voted: That the fire wardens be instructed to furnish 
hand chemical fire extinguishers and hand force pumps to 
any individual in town paying one-half of the cost, the said 
fire apparatus to be for public use. 

Article 15. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to the extermination of the brown tail and gypsy 
moth. 

Voted: To raise the percentage of the assessed valua- 
tion of the town required by law. 

Article 16. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for town charges. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 



15 



Article 17. To see what action the town will take irt 
regard to the collecting of taxes. 

Voted: That the collector charge interest at the rate 
of five percent per annum on all taxes remaining unpaid 
after the first day of November next. 

Voted : That poll and personal tax only be payable on 
demand. 

That the collector shall issue summons for all poll and 
personal taxes only, remaining unpaid September 1st. 

That the collector shall collect all taxes committed to- 
him within the municipal year in which they are assessed. 

Article 18. To see what action the tow^n will take in 
regard to street lamps the present year. 

Voted : To raise one thousand dollars to be expended 
by the selectmen. 

Article 19. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to the extermination of the elm leaf beetle. 

Voted : To appropriate the sum of four hundred dollars, 
to be expended at the discretion of the tree warden. 

Article 20, To see if the town will provide a suitable 
vault and safes for the preservation of the town records, or 
act anything thereon. 

Voted: That the matter be referred to the selectmen 
with power to act. 

Article 21. To see if the town ^vill vote to build a 
high school building the present year, or act anything 
thereon. 



16 



Voted: That the toAvii build a high school bidding the 
})resent year. Yes 83. No 77. 

Article 22. To see if the town will sell the town farm, 
or take any action thereon. 

\'oted : To pass over the article. 

Article 23. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
fifteen dollars to paint the iron flag holders in the different 
cemeteries in Acton. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
two hundred dollars to be used in making proper repairs 
on the road leading from Maple street to the home of Walter 
Hay ward in South Acton. 

Voted: To refer the matter to the road commissioners. 

Article 25. To see if the town Avill expend three 
hundred dollars on the highway leading from East Acton 
to Mr. Pope's corner on the Carlisle road. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of two 
hundred fifty dollars to repair said road. 

Article 26. To see what action the town will take in 
mnking proper sanitary arrangements in the town hall. 

Voted: To refer the nuxtter to the selectmen with 
power to act. 

Article 27. To see if the town will vote to instruct the 
collector of taxes relative to making a report to the board of 
selectmen, or act thereon. 



17 



Voted : That the collector of taxes shall render to the 
selectmen once in every four months commeiiciiio- with th(^ 
thirtieth day of November next and each snceeding year, a 
full statement of his accounts as collector, giving- amount 
committed for collection and interest collected, abatements 
made by the assessors, and money paid into the treasury by 
him. In addition to this statement he shall furnish the 
selectmen on the thirty-first day of IMarch of each year a 
true list of all unpaid taxes together Avith the names of de- 
linquent tax payers. 

Article 28. To see if the town will accept the laying 
out by the road commissioners of a road in West Acton from 
the terminus of the Kinsley road, so called, to land of James 
Hurley and heirs of ^lary Ilaniford and build said road, or 
take any action in relation to the same. 

Voted: To accept the laying out by the road com- 
missioners of a road in West Acton from the terminus of the 
Kinsley road, so called, to land of James Hurley and 
heirs of Mary Haniford. 

Voted : To instruct the road conunissioners to build 
the road. 

Voted: To raise four hundred dollars to build tlie road 
and pay the land damages. 

Article 29. To see if the town will recind the vote pass- 
ed at their meeting April 8, 1899. whereby they voted to 
choose three road commissioners cuid accept the provisions 
of law relative thereto. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Article 30. To see if the town will choose a connnittee 
to confer with the water commissioners of the town of Con- 
<;ord in regard to said town laying a pipe from its main in 



18 



East Acton, to or near the residence of Abel Cole, or act anj^- 
thing thereon. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Article 81. To see if the town will instruct the assessors, 
to have printed a valuation list for the year 1910. 

Voted : • To instruct the assessors to print the assessed 
valuation of the town for the vear 1910. 



STATE ELECTION, NOVEMBER 8, 1910. 

Party designations : R., Republican ; D., Democratic ; 
D. P., Nom. Paper, Democratic Progressive Nomination 
Paper; P., Prohibition; S. L. Socialist Labor; S., Socialist. 

Precincts 
12 3 Total 

Whole number of ballots cast 108 137 130 370 

Grovemor. 



Eben S. Draper, R., 78 


85 


81 


239 


Eugene N. Foss, D., 24 


41 


37 


102 


Eugene N. Foss, no designation 1 


8 


3 


7 


Eugene N. Foss, D. P. Nom. Paper, 1 


1 


4 


6 


John A. Nicholls, P., 


2 


2 


4 


:\Ioritz E. Ruther, S. L., 











Daniel A. White, S., 1 


2 





3 


Blanks 3 


3 


3 


9 


Lieutenant Governor. 








Thomas F. Cassidy, D., 23 


30 


33 


86 


Louis A. Frothingham, R., 69 


90 


74 


233 



19 



Henry C. Hess, S. L., 
Patricy Mahoney, S., 
William G. Merrill, P. 
Blanks 



1 


2 





3 


2 


4:. 


4 


10 


7 


11 


19 


37 



Secretary. 



Harriet D'Orsay, S., 


1 


2 





3 


Charles J. Martell, D., 


21 


35 


35 


91 


Andrew Mortenson, S. L., 














William M. Olin, R., 


74 


88 


79 


241 


Wiliam E. Thomas, P., 


1 


5 


1 


7 


Blanks 


6 


7 


15 


28 


Treasurer. 










Carl Fredrikson, S. L., 





2 





2 


Thomas A. Frissell, P., 





3 





3 


Sylvester J. McBride, S., 


1 





1 


2 


Penjamin F. Peach, D., 


20 


34 


32 


86 


Blmer A. Stevans, R., 


75 


91 


78 


244 


Planks 


7 


7 


19 


33 


Auditor. 










John Holt, P., 





6 





6 


Jeremiah P. McNally, S. L., 





1 





1 


Ambrose Miles, S., 


1 








1 


Charles C. Paine, D., 


21 


34 


29 


84 


Henry E. Turner, R., 


71 


87 


78 


236 


Planks 


10 


9 


23 


42 


Attorney General. 








Dennis McGoff, S. L., 


1 


1 





2 


Harold Metcalf, S, 





3 


1 


4 


John B. Ratigan, D., 


19 


29 


30 


78 


James M. Swift, R., 


77 


90 


81 


248 


Planks 


6 


14 


18 


38 



20 



Congressman (regular term) 



John J. Mitcliell. D.. 
James I). Evan. S.. 
AViliani II. Wilder, R., 
Blanks 



81 


49 


47 


127 





1 


() 


1 


6S 


78 


76 


222 

20 



Congressman (To fill vacancy), 



John .J. Mitchell. D., 


81 


46 


48 


125 


William 11. Wilder, R., 


66 


78 


78 


217 


Blanks 


6 


18 


!) 


28 


Councillor. 










Herbert E. Fletcher. R.. 


72 


98 


79 


244 


J. Kelso Mairs. D., 


22 


80 


29 


81 


Blanks 


9 


14 


22 


45 



Senator. 



b^rank P. Bennett, Jr. 


. R., 


75 


88 


74 


287 


Philip A. Kiely, I)., 




20 


84 


•^r^ 


89 


[blanks 




8 


15 


21 


44 



Representative in General Court. 



Edward Fisher. D., 
James II. AVilkins, R.. 
Blanks 



26 


42 


87 


105 


78 


81 


74 


228 


4 


14 


19 


87 



County Commissioner (regnlar term 



Charles II. Richardson, R.. 
Dexter C Whittemore, D.. 
Blanks 



71 86 

25 86 

7 15 



77 284 
:]H 94 
20 42 



21 
County Commissioner (To till vacancy). 



Winthrop II. Fairbanks, D.. 


26 


38 


32 


96 


Chester H. Williams, R.. 


70 


80 


76 


226 


Blanks 


7 


19 


22 


48 



Associate Commissioners. 

Leauder V. Colahan. D., 

Joseph L. Marin, D.. 

Frank A. Patch, R.. 

Edward Everett Thompson. R., 

Blanks 

District Attorney 
John J. Iliggins, R.. 
James J. Irwin, D.. 
Blanks 



Sheriff. 



John R. Fairbairn. R. 

Whitfield L. Tuck, D. 

C. E. Wood. 

J. L. Richardson, 

Blanks 



Vote for Representative in Eleventh Middlesex District, 
November 8, 1910. 



15 


30 


21 


m 


13 


25 


21 


59 


68 


70 


m 


207 


55 


64 


54 


173 


55 


85 


95 


235 


T 

73 


87 


70 


230 


23 


36 


39 


98 


7 


14 


21 


42 


75 


92 


77 


244 


23 


33 


28 


84 








2 


•> 








1 


1 


5 


12 


22 


39 



Edward Fisher, of AYestford. R.. |105|249|345| 34|103|240|1076 
JamesH. Wilkins of Carlisle. D.. |228|165|258| 81| 71|129| 932 

Blanks I 37| 46| 44| 3| 16| 21| 167 

■ ' "' |370|460|647|118|190|3f)0|2T75 



22 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



Births. 

Whole number recorded 39 

Born in Acton 37 

Males 22 

Females 17 

Native parentage 16 

Foreign parentage 12 

Mixed parentage 11 

Marriages. 

Whole number recorded 17 

Residents of Acton 2:i 

Residents of other places 11 

Deaths. 

Whole number recorded 39 

Residents of Acton 31 

Residents of other places 8 

Occurring in Acton 35 

Occurring in other places 4 

Average age 57 plus 

Note. The town clerk I'equests information of any 
omission or error in the lists of births, marriages and deaths. 

The town clerk hereby gives notice that he is prepared 
±0 furnish blanks for the returns of births and deaths. 

HORACE F. TATTLE, 

Town ChM-k. 



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29 



PERSONS HAVING DOGS LICENSED IN 1910. 



Adams, Daniel 11 $2. CO 

Allen, Louis E 2.00 

Brown, Ralph G 2.00 

Bulette, Frank W. ... 2.00 

Bovce, Charles E 2.00 

Brill, Fred E 2.00 

I^rown, Lizzie J 2.00 

Bradley, Mary 2.00 

Burroughs. S. R 2.00 

Bradbury, Rolfe 2.00 

Booth, Thomas E 2.00 

Burgess, J. W 2 . 00 

Brown, Caroline (2) .. 4.00 

Brooks. Marv D 2.00 

Baird, Edson 2.00 

Bresth, Simon 2 . 00 

Brooks, George H. ... 2 . 00 

Bailey, Fred L 2.00 

Bailev, Frank E 2.00 

Baker, Martin S 2.00 

€allahan. Charles IL .. 2.00 

Craig, W. G 2.00 

€hase, S. R 2.00 

Coughlin, John F 2.00 

Calder, Maria 2.00 

Cole, James R 2.00 

Chiekering, C. D 2.00 

Coughlin, W. F 2.00 

Clark, Charles H 2.00 

Downey, John 2.00 

Dow, William F 5.00 

Davis, Charles E 2.00 

Dow, Charles E 2.00 

Durkee, J. E 2.00 

Davis, Wendell F 2.00 

Durkee, Charles A. ... 5.00 



Dusseault. Mildred . . . 2.00 

Dole, Cyrus G 2.00 

Densmore, Joseph A. . 7.00 

Davis, :\rarv E 2.00 

Drurv, :\rrs. Warren . . 2.00 

Emery, F. E 2.00 

Enneguess, ]\Iichael . . 4.00 

Frost, Clarence 5.00 

Ford, L S 2.00 

Fairl)anks, C. H 2.00 

Farrar, Dani(4 IT 2.00 

F()l)es, E. 8 5.00 

Farrar. Al)el 5.00 

Fullonton, Llewellyn .2.00 
Freeman, Robert C. ... 2.00 
Fletcher, Lester N. (2), 7.00 

Gallagher, Joseph 2.00 

Green, Fred W 2 . 00 

Gallant, Joseph P 2.00 

Gilmore, Almon IL ... 2.00 

Gradv, Rov 5.00 

Hoit. F. W 2 . 00 

Harris, Hattie B 5.00 

Houghton, Ellsworth . 2.00 
Holden, F. H. (2) .... 4.00 
Hollowell, William T. .2.00 

Holden, Willis L 2.00 

Hardv, A. C 2.00 

Haves, Michael G 2.00 

Hardv, A. C 2.00 

Hawlev, Henrv H. Jr. . 2 . 00 

Jones, Samuel 2 . 00 

Jones, Warren 2.00 

Jones, Ralph T 2.00 

Kellev, Marvin 2.00 

Kimball, Charles M. .. 7.00 



30 



Lothrop, Thomas C. 


.. 4.00 


Robbins, Solon A. . . 


.. 2.00 


Lewis, Herbert W. 


.. 2.00 


Richardson, J. L. (2) 


..4.00 


Livermore, J. William, 2.00 


Reed, George H. (2) 


.. 7.00 


Lucier, Joseph .... 


.. 2.00 


Robbins, W. C. (2) . 


.. 4.00 


Locklin, John M. . . 


.. 2.00 


Schnair, Charles H. . 


.. 2.00 


Laffin, Sidney 


.. 2.00 


Smith, Albert 


.. 2.00 


Lawrence, A. L. ... 


.. 2.00 


Stevenson, John M. . 


.. 5.00 


Libby, George A. . 


.. 7.00 


Staples, Hall 


.. 2.00 


Moore, J. Sterling . 


.. 2.00 


Shapley, Eva C 


.. 2.00 


Miller, Charles I. . . . 


.. 2.00 


Stevens, William F. 


.. 2.00 


Murphy, John P. . . 


.. 2.00 


Sanborn, E. R 


.. 2.0O 


Merriam, Asaph . . 


.. 2.00 


Spinney, E. L 


.. 2.00 


Murphy, George E. . 


.. 2.00 


Schofield, Harris C. 


[2),4.0O 


MacMillan, Daniel . 


. .. 5.00 


Smith, Chester R. . . 


.. 2.00 


Mahoney, M. J. ... 


.. 5.00 


Stiles, Frank L 


.. 2.0O 


McCarthy, Thomas 


.. 2.00 


Smith, Robert J. . . . 


.. 2.00 


Morrison, F. D. ... 


.. 4.00 


Taylor, Simon D. . . . 


.. 2.00 


McAllister, Oscar . 


.. 2.00 


Tuttle, Arthur 


.. 2.00 


Moore, Thomas A. D 


. . 2.00 


Thompson, Timothy j 


\., 2.00 


Mason, Bertha F. . 


.. 2.00 


Taylor, S. H *. . 


.. 5.0O 


Noyes, A. L 


.. 5.00 


Withrow, Jacob . . . . 


.. 2.00 


O'Neil, Patrick . .. 


.. 2.00 


Weaver, George T. . 


.. 2.00 


O'Connell, Michael 


.. 2.00 


White, Eugene L. . . 


.. 2.00 


Olsen, Simon 


.. 2.00 


Wetherbee, Ellis . . . 


.. 2.00 


Palma. John 


. . 2 . 00 


Williams, F. G 

Worden, Martin H. . 


5.00 


Pratt, Francis .... 


.. 2.00 


.. 2.00 


Priest, H. L 


.. 5.00 


Worster, George W. 


. . 2.00 


Perkins, Levi 


. . 2 . 00 


Whitcomb, Fred S. . 


.. 2.00 


Perkins, A. 11 


.. 2.00 


Watkins, J. H. and 


F. 


Porter, R. W 


.. 2.00 


W. (4) 


. . 8.00 


Pennell, Edmund IT. 


. . 2.00 


Woods, Eleanor H. . 


.. 2.00 


Pratt, Mrs. F. A. (2 


) .10.00 


Wheeler, Charles H. 


.. 5.00 


Pope, Benjamin (5) 


. .16.00 


Willis, Edward (2) . 


.. 4.00' 


Rawitzer, William . 


. . 2 . 00 






1.S6 licenses at ^ 


t?2.00 eact 


I $272 . 00 




24 licenses at 


5.00 eacli 


I 120.00 








$392.00^ 


Deduct fees, 160 lie 


enses at 


20 cents 




each 






32.00 



Balance paid to county treasurer .... 



$360.00 



31 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT 



High School. 

Paid Mabel C. Barnes $45.00 

Alice N. Mclntyre 270.00 

Elizabeth K. Paine 285.00 

Town of Concord, tuition 2,561 . 00 

Town of Stow, tuition 19 . 50 

Transportation high school schol- 
ars 1,775 . 45 



South School. 

Paid Elizabeth A. Hinckley $465.50 

Julia L. McCarthy . . '. 465.50 

Jennie E. Stowell 494.00 

Elizabeth K. Paine 266.00 

Bertha B. McLean 266.00 

Fred S. Glines, janitor 336.00 

American Woolen Co., electric 

current 7 . 80 

Thomas E. Downie, wood 27.25 

South Acton Goal & Lumber Co., 

coal 206.33 

A. C. Piper, wood 13.00 



$4,955.95 



$2,547.38 



West School. 

Paid E. Sophia Taylor $475.00 

Ethel G. Evans 465.50 

Harriet II. Gardner 551.00 

Thomas Seanlon. janitor 230.00 

Arthur Blanehard. wood 18.00 

George H. Reed, coal 106.86 

IlaJl Bros., wood 1.25 

A. II. Perkins, sawing wood 4.50 



Center School. 

Paid Martha F. Smith $494.00 

Ella L. Miller 494.00 

:Minnie Gamble 494.00 

Asaph Parlin, janitor 201.00 

Asaph Parlin, cleaning 5.00 

Sonth Aeton Coal & Lumber Co., 

coal 189.70 



School Supplies. 

Paid G. L. Xoyes, expressing $26.20 

P. S. Glines. expressing 7.57 

Russell Quimby, expressing 4.25 

Asaph Parlin, expressing 1 .60 

Tuttle & Newton, expressing .... .75 

0. E. Houghton, expressing 2.80 

Evangelical of Acton, storage 

school supplies 10.00 

Huntley S. Turner, printing 7.25 

J. L. Hammett Co 80.S . 64 

Ginn & Co 5.00 

Finnev & Hoit 5 . 75 



$1,852.11 



$1,877.70 



$874.81 



33 

Miscellaneous School Expenses. 

Paid A. B. Webber, postage, telephone 

and stationery $13.75 

Frank H. Hill, superintendent 

schools 320.00 

Frank H. Hill, postage, etc 2.00 

F. W. Brackett, drawing instruc- 
tor 225.00 

E. X. C. Barnes, musical instruc- 

tor 100.00 

Alice M. Genthner, musical in- 
structor 100.00 

F. S. Glines. express, etc 1.50 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 3.08 

Michael Foley, carrying water .. 14.50 
W. W. Gough, repairing four 

clocks 4.00 

E. S. Fobes, truant officer 4.00 

Thomas Scanlon, truant officer . . 2 . 00 

Asaph Parlin, truant officer 2.00 

A. Brooks Parker, telephone, 

postage, etc 5 . 05 

E. F. Conant. school census 15.00 

Samuel A. Christie, telephone, 

postage, etc 10.95 

Samuel A. Christie, school phy- 
sician 

Frank E. Tasker, school physician, 
Frederick K. Shaw, school phy- 
sician 



25 


.00 


25, 


.00 


25 


.00 



$897.83 



34 
Repairs on School Grounds and Buildings. 

Paid A. H. Perkins, repairs West 

school $2.00 

George H. Decoster, repairs West 

school 3.00 

Hall Bros., repairs West school . . 12.24 

W. S. Kelley, repairs West school, 6.35 

George H. Reed, repairs West 

school 6.55 

John S. Hoar, repairs West school, 6.00 

Benjamin A. King, repairs West 

school 22.33 

Joseph Breck & Son, step ladder. 

West school 2.24 

H. H. Hawley Jr., repairs Center 

school 3.75 

Charles Edwards, repairs Center 

school 3 . 25 

Horace F. Tuttle, repairs Center 

school 3.15 

Pratt & Forest Co., repairs West 

school 4 . 63 

Pratt & Forest Co., repairs Center 

school 22.24 

E. A. Phalen, repairs Center 

school 245 . 55 

Thomas McCarthy, repairs Center 

school 69.00 

Andrew Edwardson, repairs Cen- 
ter school 21 . 05 

Andrew Edwardson, repairs West 

school 33 . 45 

Asaph Parlin, repairs Center 

school 44.20 

J. W. Livermore, repairs Center 

school 3.00 



35 



Stone-Underhill Heating & Ven- 
tilating Co., repairs Center 
school 1,273.00 

Stone-Underhill Heating & Ven- 
tilating Co., repairs West 
school 1,350.00 

Thomas Scanlon, repairs West 

school 106.10 

Fred S. Glines, repairs South 

school 64.70 

Sidney Laffin, repairs South 

school 6 . 05 

B. F. Townsend, repairs South 

school 1 . 35 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

repairs South school 47 . 54 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

repairs West school 64.54 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

repairs Center school 48.27 

Tuttle & Newton, repairs South 

school 14.04 

J. V. Gately, repairs South school, 2.75 

Mrs. A. Sweet, repairs South 

school 9.00 

L. T. FuUonton, painting South 

school 193.88 

Daniel Beach, work on woll South 

school 197.06 

Daniel Beach, work on well West 

school 9.22 

George W. Kimball, repairs South 

school 4.60 

E. T. Rice, repairs South school . . 12.65 

G. B. Robbins Disinfectant Co., 

cleaner 1 . 75 



36 



D. J. Hennessey, repairs South 

school 6 . 50 

Henry C. Doiig^hty, repairs South 

school 20.00 



Transportation of Scholars. 

Common Schools. 

Paid Walter M. French $187.50 

Andrew Christof orsen 5 . 00 

Ora J. Willis 16.50 

Charles Edwards 329.40 

Jens Mekkelsen 322.00 



Gypsy and Brown Tail Moth Account. 

Paid Thomas F. Parker, supplies $29.75 

A. Hosmer, printing 16.50 

James O'Neil, labor 2,439.43 



Roads and Bridges. 



Paid E. P. Gates, repairs . . . 




$15.02 


John Temple, stone .*. . . 




6.40 


J. P. Brown, repairs .... 




8.55 


N. H. Tenney, repairs . . 




157.46 


Hall Bros., post, etc 




6.66 


Barrett Mfg. Co., 10 barrels tarvia. 


29.60 


D. C. Harris, stone 




13.30 


l^u+Talo Steam Roller Co., 


repairs. 


26.00 



$3,946.98 



$860.40 



$2,485.68 



37 



W. C. Robinson Son & Co., oil ... 36.46 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 11 .29 

American Powder IMills, powder, 

etc 9.33 

A. H. Perkins, labor 2,067.48 

A. H. Perkins, labor on Hurley 

road 122.16 

W. H. King'sley, labor 883.28 

W. H. Kingsley, running roller . . 153.75 
W. H. Kingsley, labor on Pope 

road 92.62 

A. W. Davis, labor on Pope road . 50.75 

A. W. Davis, labor 1,544.66 

A. W. Davis, labor on Hurley 

road 64.25 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

supplies 90.99 

James Kingsley, land for Hurley 

road 200.00 

A. C. Piper, labor 11.97 

Finney & Hoit, supplies 10.50 

Martha A. Lawrence, Hurley road, 10.00 

J. T. McNiff, repairs 2.95 

T. F. Parker, supplies 9.21 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies .... 176.49 
Good Roads Machinery Co., re- 
pairs 91.80 

Thomas McCarthv, stone 16.00 



$5,918.93 

Support of Poor on Farm. 

"Expenses per report of overseers of 

poor $2,184.41 

Outside Poor. 

Expenses per report of overseers of 

poor $582.36 



38 

Street Lamps. 

Paid Vernon McGreen, care of lamps, $8.50 

David Foley, care of lamps 34.00 

F. W. Green, care of lamps 224.40 

F. W. Green, repairs 3 . 75 

A. W. Morse, care of lamps 52.50 

Walter Morse, care of lamps .... 48 . 00 

George F. Lawrey, care of lamps, 64.00 

Everett Reed, care of lamps .... 42 . 50 

Howard Quimby, care of lamps . . 91 . 50 

Whiting Mfg. Co., repairs 38.35 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

repairs 5 . 20 

American Woolen Co., electric 

lights 68.04 

Hall Bros., repairs 2.00 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 81.54 

E. T. Rice, repairs 5.30 

E. P. Gates, repairs .25 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 37.37 

A. E. Payson 4.00 

D. C. Harris 4.00 

Simon Bresth 4.00 

S. L. Richardson 4.00" 

Julian Tuttle 4.00 

H. W. B. Proctor 4.00 

I. F. Duran 4.00 

John Cahill 4.00 

Walter E. Havward 4.00 



$843. 2a 



39 

Printing. 
Paid The Enterprise Co., selectmen's 
notices 

Hobbs & Warren Co., assessors' 
books 

A. W. Brownell. assessors' notices 
and record book 

P. B. ]\Iurphy, dog blanks and 
posters 

Henry M. Meeks Publishing Co. . . 

The News Publishing Co., town 
and school reports 

The News Publishing Co., town 
warrants 

The News Publishing Co., town 
ballots 

The News Publishing Co., 500 
folders 

The News Publishing Co., poll tax 
list 

The News Publishing Co., valua- 
tion reports 

The News Publishing Co., voting 
lists 

The News Publishing Co., war- 
rants 

A. Hosmer, printing caucus 
notices 

A. Hosmer. printing envelopes . . . 

A. Hosmer, printing, town treas- 
urer 4.75 

A. Hosmer, printing dog license 

cards 5.00 

A. Hosmer, printing jury list .... 1.25 

A. Hosmer, printing, town clerk, 1.50 

A. Hosmer, printing, tax collector, 8.65 



$1 


.05 


7 


.50 


6 


.00 


2 


.00 


1 


.75 


11 


.40 


3 


.00 


14 


.00 


4 


.75 


14 


.00 


64, 


,00 


14. 


,00 


3. 


00 


1. 


,40 


1. 


25 



$270.25 



40 

Library Books. 

Paid W. B. Clark Co $135.89 

Herman Goldberger 40.75 

W. A. Wilde Co 4.17 



Library Expenses. 

Paid A. F. Davis, librarian $95.00 

A. F. Davis, extra cataloging ... 10.00 

Dennison Mfg. Co., labels .57 

E. Z. Stanley, repairs 14.25 

S. H. Taylor, janitor 118.16 

S. H. Taylor, repairs on furnace . 1.50 

E. F. Conant, insurance 50.67 

0. E. Houghton, earring books ... 45 . 83 

Dura Binding Co., repairs 35.05 

A. Hosmer, printing slips 9 . OO 

American Woolen Co., electric 

current 27 . 90^ 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

coal, etc 38.31 

W. S. Kelley, repairs 19.43^ 

Charles Twitchell, carrying books, 5.00 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies .... 7.87 



Cemetery Expenses. 

Paid Julian Tuttle, labor in North ... $2.25 

Julian Tuttle, labor in Woodlawn, 101.05 
Julian Tuttle, for plants and 

flovrers 10.07 

J. W. Livermore. labor in Wood- 
lawn 15.75 

N. G. Brown, labor in Woodlawn, 72.63 

N. G. Brown, labor in North 1.75 

Asaph Parlin. labor in Woodlawn. 6.20 



$180.81 



$478.54 



41 



Asaph Parliii,, labor iu North .... 1.(5 

H. T. Clark, labor in Mt. Hope ... 34.00 

F. W. Green, labor in Mt. Hope . . 17.85 

A. H. Perkins, labor in :\[t. Hope, 71.69 
Albert Batley & Son. plants for 

Mt. Hope 12.52 

M. G. Hayes, painting markers . . 14.80 



Perpetual Care of Lots. 

Paid Julian Tattle, care of Woodlawn, $155.36 
Julian Tuttle, plants at Wood- 
lawn 60.21 

Julian Tuttle, care of North 6 . 75 

H. T. Clark, care of Mt. Hope 50.50 



Fire Department. 
Paid West Acton department, allow- 
ance $117.00 

South Acton department, alloAV- 

ance 117.00 

J. P. Brown, attending fire 2 . 00 

J. P. Brown, issuing permits, etc., 2.50 

F. W". Green, cleaning vault, West, 1.00 

Hall Bros., repairs 1.50 

Hall Bros., fighting fire 21.00 

William W. Charter, watching fire, 2.50 
H. W. Johns-Manville Co., fire 

extinguishers 6.75 

Badger Fire Extinguisher Co., 20 

extinguishers 140.00 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 3.92 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 5.75 



$362.31 



$272.82 



$420.92 



42 

Police Department. 

Paid A. S. Bradley, court fees $122.51 

A. S. Bradley, special duty 80.35 

E. S. Fobes, special duty 1.00 

James Kinsley, court fees 24 . 97 

James Kinsley, special duty ..... 11.00 

A. A. Fillebrown, court fees 5.26 

George A. Libby, special duty ... 65 . 50 
J. Linwood Richardson, special 

duty 6.00 

0. E. Houghton, special duty .... 11.59 



Board of Health. 

Paid E. S. Fobes, inspecting cattle and 

meat $68.90 

E. S. Fobes, labor and expense . . 13.00 
Nellie E. Baker, rent 12.00 

F. K. Shaw, M. D 1.50 

F. E. Tasker, M. D 4.50 

Henry Warden, teaming wood ... 1.00 

F. D. Morrison, supplies 11.41 

W. E. Whitcomb, supplies 17.67 

J. Sterling Moore, supplies 7.64 

James Kinsley, inspecting beef . . 98.05 
James Kinsley, burial permits, 

etc 13.37 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies .... 57.24 

City of Boston, aid furnished ... 70 . 00 
Fred S. Whitcomb, inspecting 

cattle 16.40 

Charles L. Woodward, inspecting 

cattle 42.00 



$328.18- 



$434.68 



43 

Liquor Account. 

Paid George W. Worster, use of team, $1 . 00 

E. S. Fobes. special duty 4.00 

W. F. Stevens, expenses 28.22 

W. H. KingsleVj use of team .... 5.00 



$38.22 

State Aid. 

Total amount paid for state aid $816.00 

State and Military Aid. 

Paid Town of Hudson, aid furnished, $60.00 

Town Buildings and Grounds. 

Paid G. W. Daniels, repairs, hall $1.00 

S. H. Taylor, care of hall 89.30 

S. H. Taylor, repairs on clock ... 5.50 
S. H. Taylor, care of clock and 

flag 25.00 

J. W. Livermore, cleaning vault, 

hall 2.50 

E. A. Phalen, labor on hall 16.50 

E. A. Phalen, labor on ice house, 

farm 50.00 

American Woolen Co., electric 

current, hall 30.30 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

coal and lumber for hall .... 34.53 

C. H. Persons, tuning piano 2.00 

B. F. Townsend, plumbing in hall, 232.19 
W. H. Kingsley, labor on cesspool, 

hall 18.90 



44 



A. ]\rerriam Co., stool for hall ... 3.00 
John S. Hoar, putting in cases, 

library 153.87 

Library Bureau, revolving shelf 

pins, librar}^ 3 . 13 

Dexter Spinney, wood for hall . . 5.00 
Benjamin A. King, installing nine • 

lights, library 27.00 

Benjamin A. King, installing extra 

lights, hall 15.00 

General Fireproofing Co., vault 

cases, library 122.90 

0. E. Houghton, cartage vault 

cases, library 2 . 10 

S. H. Taylor, care of clock 10.00 

N. H. Tenney, repairs town clock, 3.00 

N. H. Tenney, repairs hall 2.00 

R. W. Porter, care of hall 8. 10 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies hall, 5.93 



Satlaries. 

Paid W. E. Whitcomb. auditor $6.00 

Samuel A. Guilford, registrar of 

voters 12.00 

James jMcGreen, registrar of 

voters 12.00 

Fritz Hawes, registrar of voters . . 12.00 

Clarence D. Cram, election officer, 2.50 

Abram Tuttle. election officer ... 5.00 

Ijyman C. Taylor, election officer . 2.50 

W. T. ]\Ierriam, election officer . . 2.50 

Ernest R. Teele. election officer . . 2.50 

Charles E. Smith, election officer, 2.50 

E. C. Cheney, election officer .... 2.50 

Aaron W. Foster, election officer, 2.50 



$868.75. 



45 



John P. Coughlin, election officer, 


2.50 


Horace F. Tuttle. election officer, 


2.50 


Hiram J. Hapgood, election officer, 


2.50 


N. J. Cole, election officer 


2.50 


Theron F. Xewton, election officer, 


2.50 


A. Brooks Parker, election officer, 


2.50 


James Kinsley, election officer . . . 


2.50 


W. F. Kelley, election officer .... 


2.50 


Chas. B. Stone, election officer . . . 


2.50 


Chas. B. Stone, selectman 


50.00 


James B. Tuttle, selectman 


50.00 


A. Merriam, chairman of se- 




lectmen 


125.00 


W. F. Stevens, chairman of 




assessors 


75.00 


W. F. Kelley, clerk board of 




assessors 


60.00 


James B. Tuttle, assessor 


50.00 


Horace F. Tuttle, town clerk .... 


30.00 


Horace F. Tuttle, registrar of 




voters 


15.00 


Horace F. Tuttle. election officer. 




recount 


2.50 


Horace F. Tuttle, cemetary com- 




missioner 


7.00 


W. F. Kelley, chairman overseers 




of poor 


50.00 


J. Sterling Moore, overseer 


25.00 


0. A. Knowlton, overseer 


20.00 


J. K. W. AVetherbee, town treas- 




urer 


200.00 


Allen Brooks Parker, chairman 




school committee 


62 . 50 


W. F. Stevens, collecting taxes. 




1908 


4.96 


W. F. Stevens, collecting taxes. 




1909 


69.29^ 



46 



'W. F. Stevens, collecting taxes, 

1910 312.01 



Loans and Interest. 

Paid E. Jones. Est. interest on note, . . $80.00 
F. C. Hayward, interest on ceme- 

tary fund 17 . 50 



Snow Bills. 

Paid Walter M. French, labor $4.42 

Thomas McCarthy, labor 8 . 57 

W. H. Kingsley, labor 24.08 

Geo. H. Reed, labor 3.50 



Tree Warden. 

Paid Stephen B. Church, spraying 

outfit for elm leaf beetle .... $185.95 

E. R. Teele, arsenate of lead 32.30 

W. H. Kingsley, labor and 

supplies 98 . 24 

A. Hosmer, printing poison cards, 1.00 

N. H. Tenney, piping for sprajdng, 7.05 



Miscellaneous Accounts. 

Paid F. K. Shaw, M. D., return 11 

births $2.75 



$1,295.26 



$97.50 



$40.57 



$324.54 



47 



F. E. Tasker, M. D. , return 8 

births 2.00 

S. A. Christie, M. D., return 8 

births 2.00 

Hall Staples. M. D.. return -i 

births 1.00 

H. H. Braley. M. D., return 1 birth .25 

F. H. Grady. M. D., return 1 birth, .25 

J. W. Godfrey. M. D.. return 1 

birth .25 

I. L. Pickard, M. D., return 1 

birth .25 

F. U. Rich, M. D., return 1 birth. . .25 

F. S. Glines, opening school for 

registrars 2 . 00 

George B. Parker, for Memorial 

day 50.00 

F. F. Chandler, painting auto 

signs 1 . 50 

W. 11. Kingsley, placing auto 

signs 26.50 

Tuttle & Newton, dippers .10 

Dura Binding Co., binding to"svn 

reports 1 . 20 

Finney & Hoit, flags for ]Memorial 

day 5 . 00 

Finney & Hoit, envelopes for 

treasurer 2 . 60 

F. W. Green, erecting election 

booths 1.50 

B. F. Townsend, repairing pump. 

South 2.25 

E. P. Gates, repairing pump. 

Center 1.85 

E. T. Rice, expense field driving . 39.90 

J. P. Brown, pump handle .50 

Universalist society, rent of vestry, 3.00 



48 



The News Publishing Co., notice 

in paper .40 

Charles B. Stone, car fare and 

postage 10 . 00 

A. Merriam, express on town re- 
ports and postage 4.56 

W. F. Kelley, postage and car 

fare 2.56 

0. A. Knowlton, postage .30 

J. K. W. Wetherbee, postage and 

stationery 15 . 51 

W. F. Stevens, copying valuation 

book 15.00 

W. F. Stevens, expense to Cam- 
bridge, Boston and Hudson . 7.82 

W. F, Stevens, telephone, express 

and postage 24.59 

W. F. Stevens, killing three dogs. 3.00 

W. F. Stevens, delivering election 

returns 1 . 50 

W. F. Stevens, notifying officers- 
elect 1.50 

W. F. Stevens, stationery for 

assessors 1 . 85 

W. F. Stevens, expense to Boston, 

moth and tax department ... 1 . 80 

W. F. Stevens, abatement taxes, 

1908 7.23 

W. F. Stevens, abatement taxes, 

1909 18.47 

W. F. Stevens, abatement taxes, 

1910 54.64 

Horace F, Tuttle, copying records, 

town reports 5 . 00 

Horace F. Tuttle, attending meet- 
ing, Ayer 2 . 50 

Horace F. Tuttle, collecting and 

recording 37 births 18 . 50 



;}.oo 



49 



Horace F. Tuttle, recording 15 
marriages 

Horace F. Tuttle, collecting and 

recording 39 deaths 7.80 

Horace F. Tuttle, transmitting 6 

deaths and 2 births 2 . 00 

Horace F. Tuttle, postage, tele- 
phone and express 15.48 

Horace F. Tuttle, services, road 

commissioner 12 . 50 

Horace F. Tuttle, writing warrant, 

state election 1 . 00 

Horace F. Tuttle. locating line 

near gravel pit 1 . 00 



$386.41 



Receipts for Year Ending February 1, 1911. 

Balance due from treasurer $4,581.75 

Balance due from collector 5.116.70 

Appropriation : 

For Memorial day 50 . 00 

For ^Memorial library 600 . 00 

For roads and bridges 5,000.00 

For common schools 4,750.00 

For high school 4.200 . 00 

For school supplies 625.00 

For transportation of pupils .... 1,360.00 

For salary of superintendent .... 510.00 

For medical inspection 100.00 

For cemeteries 500 . 00 

For fire department 400.00 

For extermination of moths 782.25 

For street lamps 1,000.00 

For special repairs Pope road . . . 250.00 

For Hurley road 400.00 

For overlayings 452 . 75 



50 



Raised : 

For state tax 3,080.00 

For state highway tax 269 . 00 

For count}^ tax 2,136.08 

For grade crossing assessment . . . 2,376.00 

Received as per report of treasurer . . . 10,155.44 

Farm products 2,449.32 

December, 1909, assessment 2,460.00 

December, 1910, assessment 4,849.70 

Interest on taxes 201 . 04 

Interest on deposits 98 . 35 

Extermination of moths (private) 138.10 

Street railroad tax, C, M. & H. . . 17.34 

Street railroad tax, L., A. & M. . . 112.31 



$59,021.13: 



Expenditures. 

High school $4,955.95 

South school 2,547.38 

West school 1,852.11 

Center school 1,877 . 70 

School supplies 374.31 

Miscellaneous school expenses 897 . 83 

School repairs 3,946.98 

Transportation of scholars 860.40 

Gypsy and brown tail moths 2,485 . 68 

Roads and bridges 5,918.93 

Support of poor on farm 2,184.41 

Outside poor 582.36 

Street lamps 843.20 

Printing 270.25 

Library books 180.81 

Library expense 478 . 54 

Cemetery expenses 362.31 

Perpetual care of lots 272.82 

Fire department 420.92 



51 



Police department 328 . 18 

Board of health 434. 68 

Liquor account 38 . 22 

State aid 816.00 

Military aid 60.00 

Town buildings and grounds 868 . 75 

Salaries 1,295.26 

Loans and interest 97.50 

Snow bills 40.57 

Tree warden 324.54 

Miscellaneous accounts 386.41 

Total selectmen's orders $36,003.00 



Paid state tax $3,080.00 

Repairs state highway 269.00 

Abolition grade crossing 2,200.00 

Interest 176.00 

County tax 2,136.08 

Corporation tax 17 . 08 

One-fourth liquor license 325 . 00 

Est. E. Jones, note 2,000.00 

Interest on note 156.44 

Cemetery funds deposited in bank : 

Lowell Five Cents Savings bank. 1,000.00 

City Institution for savings 2,000 . 00 

Mechanics Savings bank 1,000.00 

Central Savings bank 1,000.00 

Middlesex Institution for savings, 400.00 

Cash on hand 4,402.43 

Uncollected taxes 2,856.10 

$59,021.13 



52 

Financial Statement for Year Ending February 1, 1911. 

Due from treasurer $4,402.43 

From collector 2,856.10 

State aid 816.00 

Gypsy moth work 1,736.91 

Inspection of animals 29 . 20 



,840.64' 



Liabilities. 

Unexpended balance, cemetery fund. $384.60 

Unexpended balance, library fund . . 655.03 

Fund for enforcement liquor law .... 1,817.00 



$2,856.63 
Balance in favor of town $6,984.01 



ASAPH MERRIAM, 
JAMES B. TUTTLE, 
CHARLES B. STONE, 

Selectmen of Acton. 
February 1, 1911. 



53 



Report and Recommendations of the Selectmen of the Town 
of Acton for the Year of 1910 and 1911. 



We have attended to the business of our office to the 
best of our judgment. 

The town hall has been put in a sanitary condition to 
the approval of the state inspector. 

Closets and sinks were put in both the ladies' and gents' 
rooms, also pump and sink in lower hall, making it much 
easier than bringing water from town pump. 

The library has also been furnished with metalic vaults 
and drawers for commercial papers. 

Have straightened out the account with the moth 
department of the state, thereby gaining for the town 
between six and seven hundred dollars. 

We would respectfully recommend that the town take 
action to have every officer meet in joint session at least 
twice a year and by so doing help promote the town's 
interest. 

That the town demand that bills from whatever source 
be so itemized, that the party signing order may know the 
full detail before order for payment be made, so that exery 
voter of the town may know cost of each outlay. 

That selectmen be elected for three years same as other 
boards. 

That the town could be better served by a superintendent 
of streets, with full power under the direction of selectmen, 
than by the present system. 

ASAPH :\1ERRIAM, 
JA:\rES B. TUTTLE. 



54 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



1910. 

March 1. Cash on hand $4,581 . 75 

Receipts : 
State treasurer, corporation tax, pub- 
lic service 686 . 32 

Corporation tax, business 1,133.54 

National bank tax 319 . 61 

State aid 731.00 

Reimbursement for loss of taxes on 

land 119.15 

Income of Massachusetts school fund. 1,201.22 

^Supervision of schools 375.00 

Suppression of gypsy and brown tail 

moths 1,269.47 

Suppression of gypsy moths on state 

highway 76 . 77 

Compensation for inspection of ani- 
mals 23.50 

Burial of state paupers 15 . 00 

County treasurer, on account of high- 
ways 500.00 

County treasurer, on account of dog 

licenses 345.60 

Alice A. Donnelly, liquor license 1,300.00 

Alice A. Donnelly, special police ser- 
vice 200.00 

Cemetery fund 1,100.00 

Income of cemetery fund 208.23 

Income of librarv fund 241 . 58 



00 



Memorial library, for fines 21.39 

Herbert Hale, for tuition of Martha F. 

Hale 20.00 

Rebate on school tickets 11.99 

Horace F. Tuttle, for lots sold in 

Wooclla\Aai cemetery 35.00 

H. T. Clark, for lots sold in Mount 

Hope cemeterv' 18 . 00 

Acton grange, for rent of town hall . . 70.00 

For use of dishes 1 . 00 

Rent of town hall and cellar 53.00 

William H. Kingsley, road commis- 
sioner 34 . 00 

A. W. Davis, for stone sold 3.00 

District court of Central Middlesex, 

for fines 14.97 

E. A. Phalen. for old iron sold from 

Center schoolhouse 7 . 35 

Ely Gruber. pedler's license 8.00 

William F. Stevens, for arsenate of 

lead 1.75 

James O'Xeil, for arsenate of lead ... 7.00 

Arthur F. Blanchard, abattoir license, 1.00 

James H. Walker, abattoir license .... 1 . 00 

W. M. :\rcDonald Co.. abattoir license. 1.00 



$14,737.1^ 



Received from town farm : 

Milk $1,226.81 

Apples 935.72 

Cows 59.86 

Calves 31 . 50 

Hog 12.39 

Fowls 3.25 

Eggs 24.82 

Peas 12.85 



r,(i 



:i(), 


,50 


4 


.!)cS 


1, 


,00 


r- 

0. 


,64 


100, 


.00 



Potatoes ........ 

Strawberries . . . 

Use of bull 

Use of telephone 
J^oard 



Received from William F. Stevens, 
Collector of Taxes : 

Interest on taxes A. D. 1907 $5.69 

Taxes collected for A. D. 1908 465.00 

Interest on taxes A. D. 1908 38.59 

Taxes collected for A. D. 1909 4,362.47 

Additional assessment for 1909 2,460.00 

Interest on taxes, 1909 125.61 

Taxes collected for A. D. 1910 26,376.77 

December, assessment for 1910 4,848 . 45 

Interest on taxes, 1910 30.65 

Moth taxes for A. D. 1908 36.79 

Interest on taxes, 1908 .50 

Concord, ]\Iaynard & Hudson Street 

Railway, taxes for A. D. 1910 ... 17.34 
Lowell, Acton. & Maynard Street Rail- 
way, taxes for A. D. 1909 51 . 87 

Lowell, Acton & Maynard Street Rail- 
way, taxes for A. D. 1910 60.44 

International Trust Co., interest on 

deposits 98 . 35 



$2,449 . 32 



$38,978.52 
$56,165.03 



57 

Expenditures. 

Paid state treasurer, corporation tax. $17.08 

One-fonrth of liquor license 325.00 

State tax A. D. 1910 3,080.00 

Abolition of grade crossing' 2,200.00 

Interest 176.00 

Repairs on state highway 269.00 

County tax A. D. 1910 2,136.08 

On selectmen 's orders 36,003 . 00 

Cemetery fund deposited in banks : 

Lowell Five Cents Savings bank 1,000.00 

City Institution for Savings 2,000.00 

^Mechanics Savings bank 1,000.00 

Central Savings bank 1.000.00 

^Middlesex Institution for Savings .... 400.00 

Estate of E. Jones, note 2,000.00 

Interest 156.44 

Cash on hand and in bank 4,402.43 



$56,165.03 
J. K. W. WETHERBEE, Treasurer. 



58 

Treasurer's Report of Money Held for Care of Lots in 

Cemeteries. 

1911. Dr. 

Pel). 12. To cash in North End Savings 

bank $2,175.00 

Warren Institution for Savings 1,000.00 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings bank, 1,000.00 
Middlesex Institution for Savings .... 900 . 00 
Lowell Five Cents Savings bank .... 1,000.00 

Mechanics Savings bank 1,000.00 

Central Savings bank 1,000.00 

City Institution for Savings 2.000.00 

Luke Blanchard cemetery fund: 
Cash in North End Savings bank .... 500 . 00 

For care of tomb : 
Cash in Charletown Five Cents Sav- 
ings bank 100.00 

For care of memorial tablet : 
Cash in Charlestown Five Cents Sav- 
ings bank 50 . 00 

Warren Institution for Savings 50 . 00 

Amount deposited $10,775.00 

Income unexpended March 1, 1910... 315.40 

Income for 1910-1911 363 . 52 



$11,453.92 
Cr. 
By cash paid cemetery commissioners 

for care of lots $276.82 

Cash paid Frank C. Hay ward 17.50 

Principal of cemetery fund 10,775 . 00 

Balance of income unexpended 384.60 



$11,453.92 
J. K. W. WETHERBEE, Treasurer. 



59 

Report of the Wilde Memorial Library. 

1911. Dr. 
Mar. 1. To cash in North End Sav- 
ings bank $1,000.00 

Home Savings bank 1,000.00 

Warren Institution for Savings 1,000.00 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings bank, 1,000.00 
Middlesex Institution for Savings ... 1,000.00 
Mortgage bond of West Shore Rail- 
road Co 1,000.00 

Received for interest on money in 

banks 201.58 

For interest on mortgage bond 40.00 

For fines 21.39 

Town appropriation for books 200.00 

Unexpended balance March 1, 1910 . . . 372.87 



$6,835.84 

Cr. 

By cash in banks $5,000.00 

By Snsan, Augusta and Luther Conant 

fund 1,000.00 

Paid for books and magazines : 

W. B. Clarke Co 135.89 

Herman Goldberger 40.75 

W. A. Wilde Co 4.17 

Bahnice unexpended 655.03 

$6,835.84 

J. K. W. WETHERBEE. Treasurer. 



GO 



ASSESSOR'S REPORT. 



Valuation, April 1, 1910. 

Buildings, exclusive of land $1,055,070.00 

Land, exclusive of buildings 472,260.00 

Personal estate 679,295.00 

Total valuation $2,206,625 . 00 

Valuation May 1, 1909 1,955.645.00 

Increase $250,980.00 

Rate of taxation $12.50. 



Tax Assessed as Follows: 

Real estate $19,029 . 20 

Personal estate 8,490.88 

Polls 1.258.00 

$28,841.08 

Moth tax $138.10 

December assessments 4,849 . 70 

Available for paying 1911 bills. 



61 

Amount of Money Raised. 

For state tax $3,080.00 

For state highway tax 269.00 

For county tax 2,136.08 

For grade crossing assessment 2,376.00 

For town grant 20,527.25 

Overlayings 452 . 75 

$28,841.08 

Number of horses 419 

Number of cows 874 

Number of sheep 4 

Number of neat cattle 154 

Number of swine 43 

WILLIAM F. STEVENS. 
JAMES B. TUTTLE, 
WILLIAM F. KELLEY, 

Assessors of Acton. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 

I have examined the accounts of tax collector, selectmen 
und treasurer of the town of Acton, and to the best of my 
knowledge I find them correct. 

WALDO E. WHITCOMB, Auditor. 

March 6, 1911. 



COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



For Fiscal Year Ending February 1, 1911. 

Dr. 

Balance uncollected 1908, taxes $465.00 

Interest collected 38.59 



$503.59 



Cr. 



Paid treasurer $496.36 

Abatements 7 . 23 



$503.59 



Dr. 



Balance uncollected 1909, taxes $4,614.91 

December assessments 2,460.00 

Interest collected 125. 61 





$7,200.52 


Cr. 




Paid treasurer 


. .. $6 929.61 


Abatements 


18.47 




$6,948.08 


Uncollected February 1, 1911 


$252.44 



63 



Dr. 

iovrn, state and county taxes com- 

TTiitted to collector July 15, 1911 . . $28,841.08 
3r«.th tax 138.10 

Total tax levy $28,979 . 18 

Interest collected 30 . 65 



$29,009.83 



Cr. 

Paid treasurer $26,352 . 78 

Abatements 54. 64 

$26,407.42 

Uncollected February 1, 1911 $2,602.41 

Dr. 

December assessments $4,849 . 70 

Paid treasurer, available for paying 

1911 bills 4.848.45 

Uncollected February 1, 1911 $1.25 

1908 Moth Tax. 

Dr. 

Uncollected February 1, 1910 $36.79 

Interest .50 

$37.29 

Cr. 
Paid treasurer $37 . 29 

WM. F. STEVENS. Collector. 



64 



REPORT OF ROAD COMMISSIONERS 



Appropriations. 



Repairing roads and bridges $5,000.00 

Building Hurley road 400.00 

Repairing Pope road 250.00 



Expenditures. 

HURLEY ROAD. 

J. Kinsley, land and gravel $200.00 

M. A. Lawrence, land 10 . 00 

A. W. Davis, labor 64.25 

A. H. Perkins, labor 122 . 16 



POPE ROAD. 

A. W. Davis, labor $50 . 75 

William H. Kingsley, labor 92.62 

A. II. Perkins, labor 165.75 



$5,650. CC 



$396.41 



$309.12 



65 

REPAIRING ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

Paid William II. Ejngsley, 35 days' 

work $87 . 50 

William H. Kingsley, 115 days, 

71/2 hours 550.30 

C. R. Smith. 61i/^ days, running 

roller ". 153.75 

I. McDonald. 65 days, 5 hours . . . 114.72 

P. Gensen, 46 days, 6I/2 hours .... 81 .76 

Man, 28 days 49.00 



A. W. Davis, lOli/o days' work . . $253.75 
A. W. Davis, team, 150 days, 6 

hours 715 . 65 

P. Foley, 139 days, 1 hour 278.22 

Penderore, 251/2 days 44. 62 

J. Kenney, 21 days 36.75 

Quinlan, 97 days, 3 hours 170.35 

Extra men, 10 days 17.50 

Gravel 21.40 

Express 3.42 



A. H. Perkins, 94 days, 1/2 hour $235.14 

A. H. Perkins, team 236 days, 21/2 

hours 1,122.33 

J. Coughlin, 116 days, 1 hour 232.22 

C. Smiley, 84 days, 8 hours 148.56 

H. Cotton, 17 days, 8 hours 31.31 

O. Griffin. 18 days, 7y2 hours 32.96 

Extra men, 28 days, 41/2 hours 49.87 

Gravel 8.75 

Supplies 23.58 

Two horses, 5 davs, 6 hours 17.00 



$1,037.03 



$1,541.66 



$1,901.72 



66 



W. C. Robinson, oil $36.46 

American Powder Mills 9 . 33 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co 90.99 

Tuttle & Newton 11 . 29 

Finney & Hoit 10.50 

T. F. Parker 9.21 

J. T. McNiff 2.95 

M. E. Taylor 176.49 

Good Roads Machinery Co 91.80 

T. McCarthy, stone 16.00 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co 26.00 

D. C. Harris, stone 13.30 

Hall Brothers 6.66 

J. Temple, stone 6.40 

E. P. Gates 15.02 

J. B. Brown 8.55 

N. E. Tenney 155.24 

A. C. Piper 11.97 

Barritt Manufacturing Co 29.60 



$727.76 



Total $5,913.69 



We recommend that $5,000.00 be raised for the repair 
of roads. 



WM. H. KINGSLEY, 
A. H. PERKINS, 
A. W. DAVIS, 

Road Commissioners. 



67 



REPORT OF TREE WARDEN. 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

I submit my first report as tree warden. 

The town one year ago raised $400.00 for the extermina- 
tion of the elm leaf beetle, to be expended by the tree 
warden, which I have done as follows. Finding it necessary 
to have a power sprayer, and not having enough money to 
buy one, I built one on my wagon at the following cost: 

Paid S. B. Church, pump, hose and 

supplies $185 . 95 

T. F. Parker, hose 29.75 

William H. Kingsley, labor 20.00 

William H. Kingsley, one steam 

gauge 3.75 

William H. Kingsley, lumber .... 4.50 

William H. Kingsley, tank 2.00 

William H. Kingsley, blacksmith, 1.75 

N. C. Tenney, labor and stock ... 7.05 



$254.75 



Cost of Spraying. 

E. A. Teele, arsenate of lead $32.30 

A. H. Hosmer, printing 1.00 

William H. Kingsley, labor 66.24 



$99.54 



$354.29 



If the town wishes to protect all of the elm trees in the 
limits of the highways from the ravages of the elm leaf 
T)eetle. There should be at least $400.00 placed at the 
-disposal of the tree warden. 

WILLIAM. H. KINGSLEY, 

Tree Warden. 



68 

REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Town of Acton for the Year 1910. 



The board of health submits the following report for 
the year ending February 1st, 1911 : 
Whole number of deaths recorded to December 31st, 

1910 39' 

Number occurring in Acton 35- 

Number occurring in other places 4 

Residents of Acton 31 

Residents of other places 8 

Average age, 57 plus. 

List of contagious diseases reported by board of health 
from February 1st, 1910. to February 1st, 1911: 

No. of Cases No. of Deaths. 

Diphtheria 

Small Pox 

Scarlet fever 4 

Typhoid fever 

Measles 51 

Cerebro spinal meningitis .... 

Tuberculosis 1 

Tubercular meningitis 1 1 

Whooping cough 

Total for the year 57 1 



FRANK E. TASKER, M. D., 
JAMES B. TUTTLE, 
ASAPH MERRIAM, 

Board of Health. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF BEEF. 



Beef, Veal, Pork and Mutton Inspected at A. F. Blanchard's 

and Other Places From May 1, 1910, to February 1, 1911. 

Inspected Destroyed 

Teal 1035 51 

Beef 278 26 

Pork 109 9 

Mutton 15 

Total U37 S6 

JAMES KINSLEY. 

Inspector of Beef. 



CATTLE INSPECTOR'S REPORT. 



Tk^hole number of cattle inspected 985 

Whole number of swine inspected 203 

"Whole number of sheep inspected 6 

Condemned 8 with tuberculosis which were taken by 
the state and killed. 

F. S. WHITCOMB. Inspector of Cattle. 



70 



OVERSEERS OF POOR. 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

The report of the overseers of the poor for the year 
ending February 1, 1911, is herewith submitted: 

The request for outside aid from this department during* 
the year has been light and the figures show a gratifying- 
decrease in expenses. 

We are forbidden by law this year to print names of 
persons aided, which accounts for omission of same. 

The farm property and stock have been maintained at 
the usual high standard. 

A new ice house has been built to replace the one in 
the carriage house cellar, which failed to furnish ice when 
most needed. The new one was substantially built at a 
reasonable expense, the lumber being obtained on the farm. 

Two inmates have remained at the almshouse during- 
the year. Their welfare has been considered and they have 
been maintained in reasonable comfort. 

The farm has paid all expenses and a good balance 
remains to its credit, enough to pay for the extra or per- 
manent improvements and still be on the right side. 

We feel that a word of commendation should here be 
spoken of the warden and matron, Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Callan^ 
whose energetic and faithful work has largely contributed 
to the good results. 



71 



Aid Furnished Outside Poor. 
W. E. Whitcomb, meat and provisions. $50.49 
Tnttle & Newton, groceries and sup- 
plies 116 . 51 

M. E. Taylor Co., groceries and sup- 
plies 292.21 

City of Lawrence, hospital and medical 

attendance 14 . 70 

City of Cambridge, groceries and fuel, 106.95 

J. M. Shaw, copy of settlement laws . . 1.50 



$582.. 36; 
Inventory of Stock at Farm February 1, 1911. 

12 Cows $720.00 

13 Tons hay 260.00 

2 Horses 375.00 

Harnesses and horse collars 50.00 

Wagons, carts and sleds 330.00 

Farming implements 197.65 | 

Pump 125.00 

Grain and oyster shells 35 . 00 

Keg of lime .60 

Barrels 4.00 

Lumber . 20.00 

Coal 7.00 

Wood cut for stove 100.00 

Set measures 1 . 00 

Salt .50 

Horse blankets 5 . 00 

63 Hens 47.25 

Potatoes and apples 32.25 

Preserves, pickles, meats 1 1 . 00 

Household goods and kitchen 

utensils 286.90 

Groceries and supplies 35 . 05 

4 Rolls roofing paper 7.00 

$2,650.20 



72 

Support of Poor on Farm. 

J. S. Moore, meat and provisions $176.51 

W. E. Whitcomb, meat and provisions, 12.38 
Tuttle & Newton, groceries and sup- 
plies 55 . 31 

I\[. E. Taylor Co., groceries and sup- 
plies 126.69 

C. H. Mead & Co., groceries and sup- 
plies 61 . 32 

S. B. Ineson, fish 30.86 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal, 38.82 
South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

lumber and nails for repairs .... 18.31 
John McNiff, horse shoeing and re- 
pairs 33.16 

J. P. Brown, horse shoeing and repairs, 1.15 

E. P. Gates, horse shoeing and repairs, 12.25 

George H. Reed, grain 251 . 74 

E. T. Rice, repairs and plumbing .... 23.25 

E. Z. Stanley, repairs and plumbing . . 12.68 

W. B. Newell, salary 65 . 75 

P. J. Callan, salary 375.00 

W. F. Kelley, hired man 190.40 

H. F. Robbins, labor 3.75 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone 

service 1 5 . 44 

0. A. Knowlton, 1 ton fertilizer 28.00 

O. A. Knowlton, 14 rolls paper roofing, 24.50 

0. A. Knowlton, postage and carfare . 1.41 

Hall Bros., sawing pine lumber 16.00 

James B. Tuttle, hay 36.52 

F. R. Knowlton, hay 16.16 

E. A, Teele. sprajdng apparatus 14.80 

N. J. Tenney, repairing barrel and 

spray pump 1 . 50 

A. H. Perkins, sawing wood 12.00 



73 



P. J. Callan. tomato plants and saw- 
dust .93 

P. J. Callan. barrels, seed corn, saw- 
dust and sand 8 . 35 

P. J. Callan. killing pigs and filing 

horses teeth 3 . 75 

A. F. Blanchard. bull 30.00 

Dexter Spinney, 2 cows 162.50 

John Watkins. pigs 7.00 

Joseph DeSouza, 1 2-horse cart 85 . 00 

J. P. Tenney, use of corn planter 1 . 50 

A. Merriam Co., sawing and planing, 1.90 

Dr. J. ]\r. Slurry, attending cow 6.00 

Dr. J. ]\I. Murry, attending horse .... 9.00 

M. O'Connell. B. & M. R. R. ties 1.50 

A. D. Fessenden, 300 barrels and liners. 109 .25 
Finney & Hoit. men's furnishings and 

household goods 49.73 

Hall Staples. :\r. D 52.00 

J. S. Moore .34 

.$2,184.41 

Expenditures $2,184.41 

Inventory 1910 2,609.30 

$4,793.71 

Inventory 1911 $2,650.20 

Receipts from farm 2,449 . 32 

$5,099.52 

$305.81 

W. F. KELLEY. Chairman. 
J. S. MOORE, Clerk, 
0. A. KNOWLTON, 

Board of Overseers of Acton, 



74 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS. 
For the Year Ending February 1, 1911. 



We present the following schedule showing the amounts: 
of the several funds for the perpetual care of cemetery lots 
and the income and expenditures on account of each fund, 
for the year. 

HERBERT T. CLARK, 
JULIAN TUTTLE, 
HORACE F TUTTLE, 

Cemetery Commissioners^ 



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80 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE GOODNOW FUND. 



For the Year Ending February 1, 1911. 

Investments. 

Warren Institution for Savings, Book 

88,531 $1,000.00 

Unexpended income for care of ceme- 
tery lot 26.20 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank, 

Book 71,200 1,000.00 

City institution for Savings, Book 

84,244 1,000.00 

$3,026.20' 

Receipts — Income. 

Warren Institution for Savings, divi- 
dends, 1909 $5.00 

Warren Institution for Savings, divi- 
dends. 1910 41.20 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank, 

dividends, 1910 42. 50 

City Institution for Savings, dividends, 

1910 40.00 

$128. 7a 



81 

Payments. 

Paid Julian Tuttle. care of Goodnow 

lot in Woodlawn cemetery . . -i^lCOO 

Unexpended income for care of 
cemetery lot, deposited with 
Warren Institution for Sav- 
ings 11.20 

Lyman C. Taylor, treasurer of the 

Evangelical Society of Acton, 25.00 

Herbert F. Robbins, treasurer of 
the Evangelical Congrega- 
tional church in Acton 82.50 



$128.70 

LUTHER (X)NAXT, 
L WARREN FLAGG, 
. HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Trustees of the Goodnow P^md. 



82 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF ACTON MEMORIAL 



LIBRARY, 1910-1911. 



LUTHER CONANT, President. 

E. FAULKNER CONANT, Secretary. 

HORACE F. TUTTLE 

]\rOSES TAYLOR DELETTE HALL 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD CHARLES J. WILLL\]\rS 

L. A. HESSELTON FRANK R. KNOWLTON 



The service of the library lias gone on during the i)ast 
year as usual with the regular increase in accessions and a 
moderate gain in the patronage. The new shelves installed 
l)etween the alcoves have proved a great c()nveniene(\ 

We have been compelled to decline some donations 
because of their ultra socialistic tendencies. (Oiie of these 
books was to advertise a stock sAvindle.) We are not of 
those who regard the possession of property honestly 
obtained, a crime or an injury to the community at large. 

We ])elieve that there is little difference betAveen politi- 
cal i^ai'loi* or practical socialism. They are alike in this, th.it 



83 



the earnings and savings of the industrious and prudent 
are to be shared hy the spendthrift and the idler. 

We have received a large number of volumes of town 
and city vital records of this state giving births, marriages 
and deaths from the first settlement to the year 1850. 

The State practically pays for the printing and binding 
so that the only expense to the town will be the cop>dng and 
arranging of the lists which must be done in the manner 
required by the commissioner of i)ublic records and the board 
of free public library commissioners, acting jointly, and we 
have valuable assistance from the officers of the New Eng- 
land Historic Genealogical Society who furnish forms and 
stationery. 

AVe are glad that the attention of the voters of the town 
at their annual meeting will be asked that an article be in- 
serted in the warrant so they may take such action as they 
think proper. 

By the Avording of the article only the sum of fifteen 
thousand dollars will be expended in any one year by the 
state. The trustees recommend the town to raise and ap- 
])ropriate the usual sums; two hiuidred dollars for new 
books, and four hundred dollars for current expenses of the 
library. 

Aj)p('nded is the cinnnal report of the librarian. 

LUTHER COXAXT. 



84 
TWENTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT. 

Accessions — Number of volumes in the library February 
1, 1910, 10974; increase by purchase 163, of which 29 were 
obtained by binding magazines; increase by gift 64. Total 
increase 227. Number of volumes in the library February 
1, 1911, 11201. 

Circulation — Number of days the library was opened 
108. Number of volumes circulated 6405. Daily average 
circulation 62. Largest daily circulation 105 on March 
12th, 1910. Smallest daily circulation 28 on December 
21, 1910. 

Received for catalogues, fines, etc $21 .96 

Expended for postage .57 



$21.3!) 

Gifts of books have been received from the following 
sources: U. S. Government, 5; State of Massachusetts. 23; 
Hiram Livermore, 11; Mrs. J. M. Brown, 8 ; E. S. Abbott, 2; 
V. C. Gillette, 2; E. G. Acheson, 1; Allen Arnold, 1; Mrs. 
A. E. Brown, 1 ; Sir Edwin Durning-Lawrence. 1 ; J. D. 
Green, 1 ; Mrs. L. Edna Martin, 1 ; J. C. INIelvin, 1 ; Mrs. Clara 
H. Nash, 1; A. C. McClurg, 1; Geo. L. Raymond, 1; Henry 
Segel, 1; Slason Thompson, 1 ; Henry E. Woods, 1. 

Periolicals subscribed for and in the reading room, 22: 
r\Tonthly — American, Atlantic, Century, Cosmopolitan, Cur- 
rent Literature, Everybody's, Harper's, IMcClure's, ^luu- 
sey's, National, New England, l\)pular IMechanics, RevicAV 
of Reviews, Scribner's, St, Nicholas. World's Work, AVorld 
Today, Woman's Home Companion. 

Weekly — Independent, Outlook, Youth's Companion. 
Scientific American. 

Mr. H. B. Livermore has contributed the Literary Digest, 
for 1910. 

ARTHUR F. DAVIS. 

Librarian. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee and Superintendent 
of Schools 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 
MASSACHUSETTS 

For tlie Years 1910-1911 

1911 




HUDSON, MASS. 

PRINTED BY THE NEWS 

1911 



THE SEVENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE AND THE REPORTS OF 

THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

OF THE TOWN OF ACTON, MASS., 

FOR THE YEAR 1910-1911. 



SCHOOL CALENDAR. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

March 24. 1911. Winter term closes 15 weeks 

Vacation One Week. 

April 8, 1911. Spring term opens. 

June 28. 1911. Spring term closes 12 weeks 

Sept. 5. 1911. Fall term opens. 

Xov. 22. 1911. Fall term closes 12 weeks 

Nov. 27, 1911. Winter term opens. 

Vacation from December 15 to January 1 — Two Weeks. 

]\Tarch 22. 1912. Winter term closes 15 weeks 

Vacation from March 22 to April 1 — One Week. 

April 1. 1912. Spring term opens. 

June 21. 1912. Spring term closes 12 weeks. 

Total school weeks, 39. 



4 

COMMON SCHOOLS. 
^Tareh 24. 1911. Winter term closes 15 weeks 

Vacation One Week. 

April 3, 1911. Spring term opens. 

■June 16, 1911. Spring term closes 11 weeks 

Summer Vacation. 

Sept. 5, 1911. Fall term opens. 

Nov. 22, 1911. Fall term closes 12 weeks 

Nov. 27, 1911. Winter term opens. 

Vacation from December 15 to January 1 — Two Weeks. 

March. 22, 1912. Winter term closes 15 weeks 

Vacation from March 22 to April 1 — One Week. 

April 1, 1912. Spring term opens. 

June 14, 1912. Spring term closes 11 weeks 

Total school weeks, 38. 



SCHOOL OFFICERS AND TEACHERS. 

School Committee. 

Edwia A. Phalen Term expires 1911 

Samuel A. Christie, Secretary Term expires 1912 

Allen Brooks Parker, Chairman Term expires 1913 

Superintendent. 

Frank H. Hill, Residence, Littleton, Mass. 



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School Physicians. 

Samuel A. Christie, M. D., Address, South Acton, Mass^ 
Frank E. Tasker, M. D., Address, West Acton, Mass. 
Frederick K. Shaw, M. D., Address, Acton Center, Mass.. 

Truant Officers. 

Albert S. Bradley. Address, South Acton. 
Thomas Scanlon, Address, Wycst Aciton. 
Asaph Parlin. Address, Acton Center. 

Janitors. 

Fred S. Glines, Address, South Acton. 
Thomas Scanlon, Address, West Acton. 
Asaph Parlin, Address, Acton Center. 



STANDING RULES. 



*Rule 1. Children under five years shall not be ad- 
mitted to the public schools. 

Rule 2. Pupils shall be promoted from grade to grade 
and school to school, according to merit. Thorough and 
satisfactory work will be required of pupils in a lower grade 
or school before entering a higher grade or school. 

Rule 3. Children who have not previously attended 
any school shall be admitted to the public schools only at 
the begining of the fall term. 

Rule 4. Pupils shall be held responsible for books 
loaned to them until such books shall have been returned to 
the teacher. 

Rule 5. No repairs shall be made upon the public pro- 
perty in the care of the school committee except by their 
authorized agents. 

*When the birthday of a child falls on or before the 
15th day of the month it is reckoned as falling upon the- 
first dav of that month. 



THE TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF ACTON. 



"To the citizens of Acton : 

The work of superintendency and teaching has gone on 
throughout the year successfully. In March of last year 
(1910), superintendent Webber resigned to accept the posi- 
tion of head of the schools of Stoneham. The District Com- 
mittee feel fortunate in having secured the services of Mr. 
Frank H. Hill to fill the vacancy and his efficient work has 
the hearty endorsement of the entire committee. At the be- 
gining of the school year ]Miss Elizabeth K. Paine, who 
taught the grammar school at South Acton last year, took 
the place of ]\[iss Alice N. Mclntyre as teacher of the first 
year in the high school located at West Acton, Miss Mclntyre 
having resigned. ]\riss Bertha B. ]\IcLean, from the Eastern 
college in Virginia, took the South grammar school in place 
of ]\Iiss Paine. 

There has been an increase in some of the salaries paid 
to the teachers. This course seemed warranted by the 
desirability of retaining efficient teachers instead of running 
the risk of losing them because of more inviting offers else- 
where and the consequent necessity of finding substitutes 
of perhaps less ability, who must needs take up partially 
completed work at disadvantage to themselves and what is 
worse, at great disadvantage to the scholars in those 
particular schools. 

In September, 1909, the state police, through one of its 
inspectors, ordered the construction of additional means of 
egress in both the South and West schoolhouses, or as is com- 
monly understood, fire escapes. Nothing was, however, done 



8 



until in July, 1910, when the matter was again called to the- 
attention of the committee by the inspector and duplicate 
orders were issued. On the same day orders were issued 
from the same source requiring the committee to provide 
additional means of ventilation in both the West and 
Center schoolhouses. These orders were issued after an in- 
spection of the buildings in which a chemical analysis of 
the air showed 'bad contamination.' It was apparent to the 
committee that these orders could not be lightly considered 
and accordingly plans and specifications were at once pro- 
cured and submitted to the state police. After their 
approval by that department contracts providing for the 
heating and ventilating of these two schoolhouses w^ere let 
to The Stone & Underbill Heating and Ventilating Company, 
of Boston. This is the same concern which had the contract 
for similar Avork on the South schoolhouse a few years ago. 
In the opinion of the committee this company is one of the 
largest and most competent concerns engaged in this kind of 
business. Its work upon schoolhouses has been very ex- 
tended and successful The contract for the work on the 
West schoolhouse was for the sum of $1,350, and upon the 
Center schoolhouse $1,273. In both these cases the contract 
did not call for any carpentry, mason or painting work, as it 
was deemed by the committee that this class of work could 
be obtained for less money in this territory than by being 
furnished by the contractor from out of town. In neither 
case did the contract call for new furnaces, the old ones 
being deemed satisfactory. Necessary repairs upon the same 
were, however, included in the contract. Work did not 
progress to the complete satisfaction of the committee and 
school was somewhat delayed in opening and it was some 
time after school was opened before the systems were 
completed. 

Upon the request of the committee the state police did 
not press the niatter of the construction of the fire escapes 
on the South and West schoolhouses and the matter has gone 
over until summer. It will have to be done then. We ask 



an appropriation of $400 to accomplish this work. We avi^ 
assured that no additional means of egress from the Center 
school will be re({uired on account of the fact of there being 
two such means already. 

As is common knowledge the three upper grades of the 
higli school attend the Concord high school, where they 
appear to be doing good work and are ranking high. The 
number attending there now is about 56. 

We call your attention to the report of the superin- 
tendent and reports following his. 

We have been obliged to make some repairs upon the 
well at West Acton school and to dig an entirely new well 
at the South school to avoid sewage contamination. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES ON ACCOUNT OF 
SCHOOLS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1910-1911. 

Receipts. 

Appropriation for common schools ... $4,750.00 

Appropriation for high schools 4,200.00 

Appropriation for school supplies ... 625.00 

Appropriation for transportation of 

pupils 1,360.00 

Appropriation for salary of superin- 
tendent 510.00 

Appropriation for medical inspection 

of pupils 100.00 

Received from state treasurer for 

supervision of schools 375.00 

Received from state treasurer income 

Massachusetts school fund 1,201.00 

Received from county treasurer on ac- 
count of dog tax 345 . 00 

$13,466.60 



10 

Disbursements. 

Expenditures for common schools .. $6,277.19 

Expenditures for high schools 4,955.95 

Expenditures for school supplies ... 374.31 
Expenditures for transportation of 

pupils 860.40 

Expenditures for salary of superin- 
tendent 320.00 

^ledical inspection of pupils 75.00 

$12,862. 8S. 

Total receipts $13,466.60 

Total expenditures 12,862 . So 

Balance unexpended $593.75 



ESTi:\IATE8 FOR THE SUPPORT OF SC^HOOLS FOR 

THE FISCAL YEAR 1911-1912. 

For common schools $6,000.00 

For high schools 5,800.00 

For school supplies 550.00 

For transportation of pupils 1,600.00 

For salar}' of superintendent 135.00 

For medical inspection of pupils ... 75.00 
For repairs upon school buildings 

and grounds 300 . 00 

For the erection of fire escapes 

(ordered by state police) 400.00 

For miscellaneous school expenses . . 100.00 

$14,960.00= 



n 



SUPERIXTENDEXT'S REPORT. 



OeDtlemen of the Committee : 

I here^Wth submit my first annual repor, it being the 
nineteenth in the series of such reports. 

School progress is not always to be measured by radical 
changes in courses of study, text books, etc., nor by over- 
turning previous policies of administration ; nor by the 
introduction of new subjects or departments. One or all 
of those changes may be made, but only when the demand 
for them becomes insistent, or conditions in the schools 
become such that the schools would profit by such changes. 
My predecessor left me a course of studj^ Avell adapted to 
the needs of our pupils and text books which I have had 
no occasion to attempt to improve upon ; the administration 
of the schools of ^Massachusetts is practically the same in 
all sections, crystalizing each year into greater uniformity 
and more definite proportions through the influence of the 
State Board of Education. Superintendents' and Teachers' 
Conventions, Normal Schools. Round Tables and Superin- 
tendents' Reports: while the introduction of new subjects 
into the smaller towns usually comes only after they have 
been thoroughly tested in the larger places. All these are 
but changes in outward conditions which react favorably 
upon the inner life of the school only when teacher, pupil 
and community are ready for them. The real work of the 
school is done in the quiet of the school room, without 
ostentation, requiring not volumes for its expression, but 
the simple phrase: Our today has prepared us for a better 
tomorrow. 



12 
Working for Thoroughness. 

That I might be better able to advise and assist the 
teachers in their work, and to bring to their attention some 
of the things I consider of importance in a pupil's equipment 
if the work is to be well done and quickly done, I have 
personally conducted ten-minute tests in grades three, four 
five and six for proficiency in the fundamental processes of 
arithmetic, with the result that systematic work in the four 
operations is now" being done in every school, orally, with 
quick, snappy, businesslike precision that will rob the 
problem Avork of the later grades of many of its terrors. 
Later I tested the pupils of grades seven and eight in the 
vocabulary of mathematics, the terms peculiar to the subject 
and without a knowledge of which pupils express themselves 
with difficulty, and sent tabulated results to all the 
principals for their consideration. I shall extend this work 
to the other subjects of the curriculum. I believe that if 
a thing is worth teaching it is worth retaining, and shall 
expect to find that not alone is the work of a certain grade 
well done, but that the work of the previous grades is 
remembered and that their terms are constantly in use. 
Only in this way can the Avork of one grade be preserved 
and utilized in succeeding grades; and no teacher should 
blame another for Avhat a pupil has forgotten Avhen five 
minutes each day devoted to systematic rcA^icAV of the Avork 
of previous years Avill go far toAvard correcting the 
condition. 

Keeping Pupils After School. 

The custom has been and is noAv prevalent in Massa- 
chusetts' toAAms and cities to keep pupils after school for 
periods varying from fifteen minutes to an hour and a half 
for one reason or another. I recently iuA^ted the teachers 
to express themselves in Avriting upon this subject. From 
those teachers AA'ho usually respond promptly T find that 



13 



tardiness, slovenly Avork in the school room, the need of 
individual help and naughtiness in one form or another are 
considered good reasons for keeping a pupil after school. 
There are, however, in my opinion, real objections to this 
custom, and I will briefly state them. 

1. Tardiness, in more than 75 cases out of 100, is due 
to the fault of the mother. I eliminate the father, because 
he is usually away from the house at work when the child 
prepares for school, and because the teacher herself has. 
gotten into the habit of addressing all communications 
concerning the pupil to the mother. Why punish the pupil 
for the parent's fault? The teacher, as the executive school 
room officer, records the tardiness in her register as a 
matter of permanent record. She is justified in admonish- 
ing a pupil against a repetition of the tardiness inasmuch 
as the habit of being always late at an appointment is one 
of the meanest of habits and one of the most insidious and 
menacing as it invariably leads to carelessness and dis- 
regard of all obligations. But the mother, who is usually 
at fault, should have as keen an interet in her child's wel- 
fare as the teacher who deals Avith all pupils alike, not 
from personal motives or from individual motives, but for 
the welfare of the community in which the child is later to 
])e absorbed with all his faults and virtues to be an infiuence 
for good or ill, to uplift or pull down ; yes, a keener interest, 
for it is the parents Avho are to be honored or disgraced by 
the child whose habits, good or bad, the}^ are encouraging, 
by deliberately teaching him to disrespect the school laAVS 
and incidentally the teacher's authority, or carelessly 
allowing him to have his own way, trusting to luck that it 
Avill not lead him into serious difficulties. In this connection 
I suggest that it is as wrong to send a child off to school a 
half hour too early, in which ease the opportunity to loiter 
and play and acquire a habit of saying "time enough" is 
given, as to give him scant time to get there before school 
opens. The parent should allow for only a few minutes 
]nore than sufficient time to reach the school house, thus. 



14 



furnishing the child from his earlier years a compelling 
motive to keep moving, furnishing him a purpose which he 
can accomplish without hurry or fear but which, neverthe- 
less, admits of no interruption from any cause. 

2. Slovenly work in school, in at least 75 cases out 
of 100, may be traced directly or indirectly to some 
teacher, usually the present one. I have seen many schools 
where slovenly work has been done, entirely transformed 
in a single term by another teacher. I have seen the 
opposite result: a school of careful, precise workers de- 
generated into indifferent and slovenly drones. It is another 
matter when the pupil is a mental or physical defective; 
but such a pupil should not be punished for what he has 
no power to correct. As for other children the correction 
of the habit of slovenly work lies within the teacher's 
power. For the fault of the teacher no pupil should be 
punished. 

3. Occasional naughtiness can never be permanently 
corrected by keeping after school. Cases of incorrigibility 
should be dealt with more severely than by retention after 
school, and then only to save the school from the bad 
influences of one or two pupils. A word of kindly caution, 
at the time any disorderliness occurs, usually suffices to bring 
the pupil into working attitude, all in the correct spirit. 
The teacher who begins to keep pupils after school usually 
finds more and more in the room after school hours as 
the year progresses. This is proof, in my mind, that the 
custom has no permanently good results. 

4. Some pupils ask to stay after school for help. They 
early learn to depend upon others and never experience the 
strong exhiliaration that comes from self reliance. Later 
on they either lose interest altogether in the work or join 
the army of those Avho know how to "work" their teachers 
for good marks. 

5. The most serious objection, however, to this custom 
is, that parents never know when to expect their children 
home from school. Now the schools, standing in the relation 



15 



of parents to the child from the time he leaves school until 
he arrives home, should recognize the possibility^ of danger, 
from a moral standpoint, in the child's dallying along over 
country roads with another child or other children. The 
parent should know, to a minute, almost, when to expect 
the child home. He could not then offer the excuse, if he 
came home late, that the teacher kept him after school for 
some indefinite time. I have known children to dally 
along and offer this excuse falsely. To the opportunity 
for wrong-doing is added the enormity of falsehood, and 
the child is soon on the downward road where it will be 
difficult to check him. The one moral function of the 
school that predominates over all others is to eliminate the 
opportunity to do wrong, and it should be held responsible 
for immoral acts only when it gives the opportunity for 
them. 

I have been thus explicit in my presentation of this 
matter because I think that the parents as well as the 
committee and teachers should know how I feel concerning 
certain phases of school work and my reasons therefor. 
No hard and fast rules can be allowed to govern any case, 
however, each should be settled on its own merits and with 
all reasonableness, holding the ultimate good of the child 
in mind at all times. 

Promotions. 

At this point in the school year it is easy to predict 
what pupils will probably not be promoted in June. Here 
arises a most necessary cooperation between the home and 
the school. In order to reduce the number of such pupils, 
if possible. I am sending to the parents a special report 
sho^^^ng the situation clearly and asking for their coopera- 
tion. I realize that about the only help the parents of 
first grade children who are likely not to be promoted can 
give is in the matter of regularity in attendance. But in 
the intermediate and higher grades the parents may assist 



16 



very materially. They may see that a little home study 
is done, that no other interests are allowed to interfere with 
the school work, that the teacher is supported in every 
endeavor to help the child, and that the child attends regu- 
larly. One result of such special notice will be to save 
us from the charge that the parents have not known the 
situation and therefore could not prepare for it. With 
the hearty cooperation of the home many of the higher 
grade pupils may yet get through with credit, who might 
otherwise fail. 

I rather favor a system of partial promotion, where a 
child advances as rapidly as he is able in such subjects 
as he understands readily, taking as much time for his 
difficult subjects as will assure their being done thoroughly. 
This will necessitate work in two rooms in some cases, but 
so few pupils in a building would be taking the work in 
this way that no inconvenience would result. Pupils would 
thus advance l)y subjects rather than by grades, and when 
certain required work is finished admission to the high 
school would be allowed. There would then not be the 
temptation to pass a pupil on before he were thoroughly 
prepared for promotion. For instance, relying upon a 
system of averages, a pupil might drag a failure in arith- 
metic into the next higher grade through the sheer force of 
high marks in all his other subjects. The proper thing 
for such a pupil to do is to go on in all subjects except 
arithmetic and take that subject with the grade below. 

Where a pupil is manifestly below grade it is a wrong 
to him, to teacher, superintendent and school committee to 
let him go on. He should repeat the work. To do other- 
wise is to menace the confidence of the community in the 
school. The community Avishes the standards of the schools 
to be kept up and the only way to keep high standards is 
to have them and adhere to them. A grammar school 
graduate who is deficient in the common branches adver- 
tises to the community the lowering of the standards to 
let him by. It might have been the last year of his school 



17 



life, or the sixth or the fourth that the wrong against him 
was permitted — but the wrong against the school and 
against us, its executive officers, did not appear until his 
deficiences advertised it. We, who are directly responsible 
for the schools to the community, must be very careful 
not to risk our professional reputations by letting the lazy 
and the deficient through. 

A request for a double promotion after the completion 
of the work of grade four should be granted only after the 
most careful investigation. The pupil's age, health, past 
record, present application and even his future plans should 
be carefully considered. Important principles underlie the 
structure of each grade and in the logical sequence of the 
grades cannot be omitted without serious consequences 
unless in the case of an exceptionally strong, able child, 
mentally and physically. Grades tw^o or four might be 
omitted by many pupils who have been careful and efficient 
in grades one and three without serious loss either of 
material or power, but the average pupil requires all the 
grades in order to complete the work at the top satis- 
factorily. 

Age and Schooling Certificates. 

The age and schooling certificate was amended in 1910 
by adding: "I further certify that in my opinion (or in 

the opinion of the physician 

by w^hom said minor has been examined in accordance with 
section fifty-eight of the above chapter) he (or she) is in 
sufficiently sound health and physically able to perform the 
work which he (or she) intends to do." 

We are using a transfer card system containing all the 
information necessary to be known about the child during 
the time he is in school, on one side of which it is designed 
to have the school physician's report of the physical condi- 
tion of the child each year, with the further certification, 
after the child has reached the fourteenth year that he is 
physically able to work, or not able, as the case may be. 



18 



Upon this report, which is a part of the record of the school, 
the superiutendent, or one appointed by him to issue the- 
certificates, may base his opinion as to whether the child is 
entitled to the certificate, except when illness has inter- 
vened between the last school record and the demand for a 
certificate, when a special examination should be required. 

Thrift. 

One of the subjects authorized to be taught in the- 
public schools (Acts of 1910) is '' Thrift." 

The child should be taught, by doing it, how difficult 
it is to earn a dollar; by saving it, how it may be made to 
grow; or, spending it, the reRtive merits of the different 
things it will purchase. The opportunity for earning it, 
a cent at a time, perhaps, may be furnished by the home 
or the community; for saving it by the institution of the 
School Savings Bank, either under the direction of the 
school committee or some local organization ; while instruc- 
tion in the relative values of the things a child needs and 
the things he can get along without may be provided in the 
schools. And I herewith invite your attention to the 
matter of a School Savings Bank, ask you to investigate 
its merits, and if convinced of its value, authorize its intro- 
duction into your schools, either through the necessary 
expenditure of seven or eight dollars per year of the town's, 
money or through some local organization which will cause 
the schools to be visited by an authorized agent at stated 
periods for the purpose of collecting the children's cents,, 
or nickels or dimes, as the case may be. Avithout solicitation 
further than a reasonable explanation of the purpose of the 
visit from time to time. The money so collected will be 
deposited to the pupil's credit in some savings bank and 
the child will be given stamps as evidence of the money 
brought in until enough has been brought to entitle him 
to a bank book. 



19 

Music and Drawing. 

The purpose of music and drawing is not primarily to 
make artists or professionals of our childen ; and only a 
small proportion w^ill ever use either for commercial pur- 
poses. They are to train ultimately to a better appreciation 
of the beautiful and ennobling in art and music and in a 
practical way to a more universal demand for the beautiful 
in home surroundings and in the appearance of public 
grounds and highways. The schoolhouse should be the 
most attractive spot in the town. A surrounding lawn of 
sufficient width to give the schoolhouse a charming setting, 
with walks bordered by shrubbery or small garden plots 
is an essential feature in any plan to improve the appearance 
of the building. If children come to be accustomed to the 
beautiful and ennobling they seldom fail to find satisfaction 
in the best when they go out into the world, and for them 
the unlovely and the low have no attractions. They 
naturally, or rather habitually gravitate toward the highest 
expressions of art, music, literature and character in what- 
ever situations they find themselves and are quick to detect 
the true and the false, the real and the sham. For a 
detailed report of these subjects as taught in this town, I 
refer you to the reports of the supervisors of drawing and 
music which follow mine. 

Text Books in Use. 

Reading — Grades 1, 2, 3, 4, Aldine, with supplementary 
readers. Grades 5, 6, 7, 8, No basal readers, several selected 
texts. 

Arithmetic — Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, Nichol's Pro- 
gressive. 

Language and Grammar — Gilbert & Harris, Guide to 
English. 

Geography — Tarr & McMurry. 



20 



History — Grade 5, Eggleston's First Book; grade 6. 
Montgomery's 'pegiimer's; grade 7, Channing, (West 
Acton) : Fiske, (Acton Center, Sonth Acton) ; grade 8^ 
Fiske, (West, Center and South). 

Spelling— Grades 2, 3, 4. 5, 6, 7, S, 9, Bailey-Manly. 

Physiology — Grades 6, 7, 8, 9, Gulick Hj^giene Series.. 

I shall recommend for use at the beginning of the next 
school year a single text book in history for the several 
sections of the town, that the requirements may be more 
uniform. It is well, of course, to have several desk copies 
of different histories for reference and research, but the 
basal text in each school should be the same. 

In one of the school rooms of the town a complete set 
of the several texts should be kept for the use of the 
superintendent, that he may follow closely the work in 
each subject, and to serve as a basis of such tests and 
examinations as he may give from time to time. 

The High School. 

An effort has been made and further efforts will be 
made to make the transition from our first year high at 
West Acton to the second year high at Concord as natural 
and logical as possible. It will come, if at all, by keeping 
our school up to the Concord standards and this can be 
effected only by an interchange of Avritten work and by 
giving practically the same tests, from time to time, as^ 
Concord gives in its first year high. We have made a 
beginning in that direction and I hope to see a still larger 
degree of cooperation as the year advances. 

The question of a high school maintained entirely by- 
Acton will not, I think, be settled by professional or expert 
knowledge or on its merits, but by expediency alone. So 
long as the people of the town are satisfied that their 
children receive more advantages in Concord than the town 
can offer in a comparatively small high school, and so long 
as they are satisfied that the cost of maintaining the pupils 
at Concord is reasonable, there will, probably, be a con- 



21 



tinuance of the present policy. Should the present legis- 
lature give the State Board of Education what it has asked 
for in the matter of independent agricultural high schools 
and agricultural departments in other high schools, with 
the proposed state aid, the time might be opportune for 
Acton to build apd maintain a high school that would be a 
monument to its spirit of progressiveness. 

So long as the present arrangement prevails I shall 
leave no opportunity untried to make it as successful as 
possible. 

Conclusion. 

In conclusion let me thank the teachers for their kindly 
spirit of cooperation, and you for the helpful attitude you 
have taken toward the schools and my work in them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK H. HILL. 
Acton, February 6, 1911. 



22 



DRAWING REPORT. 



Mr. F. H, Hill, Superintendent of Schools: 

Dear Sir — I herewith submit the report of the super- 
visor of drawing for the Town of Acton. 

In the primary grades the work has been the same as 
last year; the drawing of simple forms to gain control of 
the hand, and make it do as the mind dictates. A child 
w^rites poorly, not because he does not know a good letter 
w^hen he sees it, but because he cannot make his hand form 
a good letter. Therefore, control of the hand is necessary, 
and much time has been spent in drawing straight lines in 
various positions, circles, ellipses, and ovals, to gain control 
of that hand. These various forms were reviewed, and a 
new interest obtained, by drawing various natural forms 
which involve them. The straight lines were reviewed in 
drawings. Other work has been done to stimulate the 
imagination, and teach the pupil to be resourceful. 

In the intermediate and grammar grades, the study of 
color has been taken up; each grade studying one of the 
simpler harmonies ; and, after working it out, applying it 
to a color scheme for dress and also for room furnishings. 
Some very good work was done along these lines. 

Nature dra^\"ing was taken up, both for the accurate 
representation of the parts of the plant, and for the artistic 
disposition of the plant forms within a given space. More 
time was spent in the study of the common geometric solids. 
Various forms were developed in the various grades after 
a study of pattern developement, and then working-draw- 
ings were made, each pupil using his own model. 



23 



The Avork before Christmas was composed of various 
forms to be made of card-board and cover-paper. These 
forms were planned by the pupils and worked out by them. 
Each problem Avas to be original and of some practical 
value : this tends to strengthen and develop resourcefulness 
in the pupil. 

]\Iuch time and energy has been spent in trying to over- 
come the natural tendency towards inaccuracy and care- 
lessness. This is one of the greatest difficulties in the Avay 
of getting good results, and I feel that a great deal has been 
done in the way of improvement along that line. 

In speaking of the work as a Avhole, I can say that there 
has been great improvement over the work of last year, es- 
pecially in the High School. 

I wish to extend my hearty thanks to the Superin- 
tendent, the Committee, and the teachers for their hearty 
and kindly support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. W. BRACKETT. 
Januarv 23, 1911. 



24 



MUSIC REPORT. 



Mr. F. II. Ilill, Superintendent of Schools, 
Littleton, Massachusetts. 

Dear Sir — In public school music we are striving to dcj- 
Telop in the children a love for good music and to teach as 
many in the principles of music as is possible under the con 
ditions. 

A change in the supervisors often means some difference 
in method and although the underlying principles remain 
the same, this sometimes makes it difficult to see results 
for the first few Weeks. However, I feel that the work 
being accomplished in the Acton schools at present is very 
gratifying and shows concientious endeavor on the part of 
both teachers and children. 

At South Acton the first and second grades under Miss 
Hinckley are already able to sing from dictation, also easy 
exercises from the staff; and their note-songs are well 
learned. 

Miss McCarthy is doing especially good work with the 
third and fourth, there being a marked improvement in 
quality of tone. Miss McLean has the music in grammar 
and intermediate rooms and her work shows good results. 
Where there are three grades in a room, as here, the seventh, 
eighth and ninth, the third reader is new to the seventh 
but review to the eighth and ninth ; so I have given them 
the fourth readers, as part 1 of this reviews the principles 
of the third reader, and I have found that they manifest 
much more enthusiasm in the new songs and exercises. 

At the Center School the work in music is progressive. 
In the primary. Miss Smith's third grade is using first 



25 
Eeaders while grades one and two are able to read from 
the staff. 

The work in the Intermediate shows careful teaching 
on the part of Miss Miller. 

Miss Gamble has a small class, but their three part work 
is excellent; here also we have used the fourth readers since 
December. 

At West Acton, Mrs. Gardner is using first Readers' 
for the third grade and creditable work is being done in 
the first and second grades in sight reading and rote-songs. 

The fifth and sixth grades under Miss Evans' careful 
training are making a steady advance; these two years in- 
volve many of the chief principles of music. 

In the grammar school Miss Taylor's work shows earn- 
est endeavor and good results. Here, too, we use the fourth 
readers. 

jMiss Paine 's class or first year high is doing very good 
three part chorus work. At present we are reviewing some 
of the principles of last year's work. 

From the third grade up, we are having individual sing- 
ing from the Weaver slips, every two weeks at least, and 
some work in ear-training. 

I find the use of breathing exercises before the music 
period helpful and singing exercises with Koo or Loo 
after the syllables greatly improves the quality of tone. 

In the upper grades we cannot always acquire the 
results expected on account of boys with changing voices 
and at this period the voices require careful watching. 

At the beginning of the year, T tested all voices from 
the fourth grade up, made a record of the range, etc., and 
placed it in the hands of the teachers. 

T wish to thank the teachers for their co-operation in 
my work and to extend my sincere gratitude to the Superin- 
tendent and committee for their support and all favors. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALICE MARION GENTHNER. 



26 
ROLL OF HONOR. 

High School. 

For three terms — Florence A. Merriam. 

For two terms — Mabel A. Berganson. 

For one term — Walter P. Morse, Chester E. Wood, Mil- 
dred E. Shattuck, Frank E. Oreenough, Clifton H. Davidson. 

South Acton. 

For three terms — Dora Fletcher, Patrick Foley, Hazel 
Hoit, Theron Lowden. 

For two terms — Herbert Merriam, Sherman Warren. 
Annie Foley, Vida Thomas. 

For one term — Mary Hearon, Henry Eva us, John 
Fletcher, Rnsan Fletcher, Dorothy Lowden, Lanra Donnelly, 
Anthony Foley, Ruth Littlefield, Roy Thomas, Osgood 
Tuttle, Louise Tobin, Harold Coolidge, Edward Pender gas t. 
Otis Reed. 

West Acton. 

For two terms — James Bernese, Naomi Schnair, Willie 
Schnair, Richard Schnair, Florence Schnair. Isabelle Greer, 
Roger Brown, James Kinsley, Hazel Coolidge, Trma Durkee, 
Ruby Greer, Mary Benere, Annie Benere. 

For one term — Francis Hopps, Burton Littlefield, Alice 
Millett, Kenneth French, Harry French, Alta Teele, Mar- 
garet Hall. William McCharles. Ethel Spinney, Trmn Bro^vn. 
Lillian Spinney. 



> 27 

Acton Center. 

For three terms — Rebecca Fredrikson, Ernest 
Greenough. 

For two terms — Loren H. Mekkelson, Ray L. Harris,. 
F. Earle Farrar, Gunnar F. Fredrikson, Ernest L. Whit- 
comb. Edith R. Lawrey, Florencte M, Morse, Katherine 
Hayes, Marion Spinney, Jennie Tuttle, Edith Tuttle. 

For one term — Raymond F. Farrar, Abbie E. Coughlin,, 
Nellie i\I. Stiles, Merritt L. Farrar, Florence R. Cheney,, 
Annie J. Conghlin, Florence A. Prentiss, Helen B. Robbins,. 
Marion L. Tnttle, Leonard Worden, Ebba I. Fredrikson, 
Walter Stiles. Agrnes Coughlin, John Mekkelson, Ralph 
Smith, George Smith, Grace Freeman. 



28 



TRUANT OFFICERS' REPORT. 



I'o the School Committee of Acton, Massachusetts : 



The Truant Officers submit their ninth annual report 
to the School Committee for the year ending February 1, 
1911. 

Whole number of pupils looked up 23 

Causes of absence. West South Center 

Sickness 1 

Kept at home 2 2 

Returned 3 

Truants 2 

Left town 13 

Yours respectfully, 

ALBERT S. BRADLEY, 
THOMAS SCANLON, 
ASAPH PARLIN, 

Truant Officers. 



29 






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30 



Statistics — Three Upper Grades High School. 



Number admitted to the High school, Acton . . 
Number graduated from the Grammar school . 
Number admitted to the High school, Concord, 

Number in Concord, 2d year High 

Number in Concord, 3d year High 

Number in Concord, 4th year High 

Number graduated from Concord, 1910 

Number repeating the year's work 



o 


09 

3 


03 

O 
Eh 


1 ^ 


17 


24 


1 9 


21 


30 


1 3 





3 


1 12 


13 


25 


i 9 


12 


21 


1 4 


6 


10 


1 2 


5 


T 


1 


1 


1 



REPORT OF SIGHT AND HEARING TESTS. 



Number enrolled in school . . . 
Number defective in eyesight 
Number defective in hearing 



A.C. 


W. A. 


S.A. 


Total 


80 


124 


129 


333 


6 


4 


11 


21 


3 


5 


10 


18 



Number of parents notified 9 



20 



37 



SCHOOL CENSUS, SEPTEMBER, 1910. 



Number of boys between the ages of five and fifteen, 167 
Number of girls between the ages of five and fifteen, 173 



Total 340 

Number of boys between the ages of seven and fourteen, 106 
Number of girls between the ages of seven and fourteen, 119 

Total 225 

Number of illiterate minors 



31 



INDEX 

Town Officers 3 

Town Warrant 5 

Town Meetings 10 

State Election 18 

Town Clerk's Report 22 

Births 23 

Marriages 24 

Deaths 26 

Non-Resident Burials 28 

Dog Licenses 29 

Selectmen 's Report 31 

Treasurer's Report 54 

Assessors' Report 60 

Auditor's Report 61 

Collector's Report 62 

Road Commissioners 64 

Tree Warden 67 

Board of Health 68 

Beef Inspector's Report 69 

Cattle Inspector's Report 69 

Overseers of the Poor 70 

Report of Cemeter}^ Commissioners 74 

Trustees Goodnow Fund 80 

Acton Memorial Library 82 

SECOND SECTION 

School Report 1 

School Calendar 3 

Committee 4 

Standing Rules 6 

Financial Statement 9 

Superintendent's Report 11 

Supervisor of Drawing 22 

Roll of Honor 26 

Truant Officers 28 

'Supervisor of Music 24 

Statistical Tables 29 



.ff\y- xAv5?«>oc^ 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Several Boards of Town Officers 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 
MASSACHUSETTS 

For. tne Year Enamgf February 1. 



1912 




THE NEWS.ENTERPRISE 
1912 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Several Boards of i own Officers 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 
MASSACHUSETTS 

For 1 ear Ending Feoruary 1. 

1912 




THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 
1912 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1911. 



Selectmen 

Edgar H. Hall James P. BroVn Willis L. Holden 

Town Clerk 

Horace F. Tuttle 

Town Treasurer 

Frank W. Hoit 

Assessors 

William F. Stevens Term expires 1914 

William F. Kellrn^ Term expires 1913 

James B. Tuttle Term expires 1912 

Overseers of the Poor 
William F Kelley Ed^ar H. Hall Willis L. Holden 

Auditor 
William T. Merriam 

Collector of Taxes 
William F. Stevens 

Tree Warden 

William H. Kingsley 



Constables 

Albert S. Bradley William C. Coughlin 

J. Linwood Richardson William F. Stevens 

Fence Viewers 

Edgar H. Hall Willis L. Holden Lyman C. Taylor 

Field Drivers 

Albert S. Bradley William C. Coughlin 

J. Linwood Richardson William F. Stevens 

Road Commissioners 

William H. Kingsley Term expires 1914 

Albert H. Perkins Term expires 1912 

Alfred W. Davis Term expires 1913 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Herbert T. Clark Term expires 1914 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1913 

Julian Tuttle Term expires 1912 

School Committee 

Allen Brooks Parker Term expires 1913 

Edwin A. Phalen Term expires 1914 

Samuel A. Christie Term expires 1912 

Board of Health 

Frank E. Tasker Term expires 1912 

James B. Tuttle Term expires 1914 

Asaph Merriam Term expires 1913 

Trustees of Memorial Library 

(Chosen by the Town) 

J. Sidney White Term expires 1914 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1913 

Lucius A. Hesselton Term expires 1912 



TOWN WARRANT 




COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
Middlesex, ss. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in the 
County of Middlesex. GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
you are directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the 
Town of Acton, qualified to vote in elections and tow^i 
affairs, to assemble in the town hall, in said town, on 
Monday, the twenty-fifth day of March, 1912, at nine o'clock 
in the forenoon. Then and there to act on the following 
articles, to wit: 

Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2. To bring in their votes on one ballot for 
the following town officers : Town clerk for one year, one 



6 



selectman for one year, one selectman for two years, one 
selectman for three years, three overseers of the poor, town 
treasnrer, collector of taxes, anditor, tree warden, four 
constables, four field drivers, three fence viewers, all for 
one year. 

One assessor, one road commissioner, one trustee 
Memorial library, one member of the school committee, one 
cemetery commissioner, and one member of the board of 
health, all for three years. 

Also on the same ballot with the above named officers 
to vote upon the following question: ''Shall licenses be 
granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this town?" 

The polls will be opened at 9.30 a. m. and may be closed 
at 4 o'clock p. m. 

Article 3. To choose all necessary town officers not 
named in article 2, and fix salaries. 

Article 4. To see if the town will accept the reports 
of the selectmen, overseers of the poor, school committee, 
library trustees, and other town officers. 

Article 5. To hear and act upon the reports of any 
committees chosen at any previous meeting that have not 
already reported. 

Article 6. To see Avhat amount of money the town will 
raise for the due observance of Memorial day. 

Article 7. To see Avhat amount of money the town 
vnll raise for the repairing and building of roads and 
bridges, or act anything thereon. 

Article 8, To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for the support of Memorial library the current 
year. 

Article 9. To see what amount of money the town 
will appropriate for the care of cemeteries, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 10. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for maintenance of fire department, or act any- 
thing thereon. 



Article 11. To see if the town will pay for fighting 
brush fires, and fix price, or act anything thereon. 

Article 12. To see if the town will appropriate a sum 
of money for the enforcement of the liquor laws, or 
act anj^thing thereon. 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to contract 
with the American Woolen Company for additional electric 
street lights, or take any action in reference to lighting 
the streets of the town. 

Article 14. To see if the town will build a new bridge 
to replace the wooden one at East Acton, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 15. To see if the town will authorize the 
treasurer, mth the approval of its selectmen, to borrow 
money for the town, if necessary, in anticipation of taxes 
the current year. 

Article 16. To see if the town will vote to bond its 
collector in an Indemnity Company and raise and appro 
priate money for payment of premiums on treasurer's and 
collector's bonds, or act anything thereon. 

Article 17. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to build the road across the common 
in West Acton as laid out by the county commissioners, and 
for the damages as assessed, or act anything thereon. 

Article 18. To see if the town will appoint a town 
accountant, and fix salary of same, or act anything thereon. 

Article 19. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to the extermination of the elm leaf beetle. 

Article 20. To see what action the town will take in 
reference to the extermination of the gypsy and brown 
tail moth. 

Article 21. To see what amount of money the town 
will vote to raise and appropriate for the support of schools, 
the purchase of school books and supplies, the expense of 
operating the school plants, repairs and improvements upon 
school grounds and buildings, the transportation of scholars 



8 



and for any other expense relating to the maintenance of 
the school department, or do or act anj^thing thereon. 

Article 22. To see if the town Avill vote to contract 
with the Town of Concord for a certain number of hydrants 
in East Acton, or act anything thereon. 

Article 23. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for town charges. 

Article 24. To see what action the toAvn will take in 
regard to the collection of taxes. 

Article 25. To see if the town will vote to place a 
two-cell steel cage in the fire house at AYest Acton, for a 
lockup, or act anything thereon. 

And you are directed to serve this Avarrant by posting 
copies, attested by you, in the following places: One in 
each of the post offices and railroad stations, one in each 
of the stores of C. H. Mead & Co., W. E. Whitcomb, M. E. 
Taylor & Co., Tuttle & Newton, Finney & Hoit, George H. 
Keed, and one at the Nagog House, seven days at least 
before the time appointed for holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands in Acton this eleventh day of 
March, in the year one thousand nine hundred twelve. 

EDGAR H. HALL, 
JAMES P. BROWN, 
WILLIS L. HOLDEN, 

Selectmen of Acton 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL MEETING, 
MARCH 27, 1911 



Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Allen Brooks Parker was chosen moderator. 

Article 2. To bring in their votes on one ballot for 
town officers. 

The following town officers were chosen: 

Town Clerk— Horace F. Tuttle. 

Selectmen — Edgar H. Hall, James P. Brown, Willis L. 
Holden. 

Assessor — William F. Stevens. 

Overseers of the Poor — Edgar H. Hall, Willis L. Holden, 
William F. Kelley. 

Treasnrer — Frank W. Hoit. 

Collector of Taxes — William F. Stevens. 

Auditor — William T. Merriam. 

Constables — Albert S. Bradley, William C. Conghlin^ 
J. Linwood Richardson, William F. Stevens. 



10 

Road Commissioner — William H. Kingsley. 

Field Drivers — Albert S. Bradley, Y/illiam C. Coughlin, 
J. Linwood Richardson, William F. Stevens. 

Fence Viewers — Edgar H. Hall, Willis L. Holden, Ly- 
man C. Taylor. 

School Committee — EdAvin A. Phalen. 

Cemetery Commissioner — Herbert T. Clark. 

Board of Health — James B. Tnttle. 

Trustee of Memorial Library — J. Sidney White. 

Tree Warden — William H. Kingsley. 

On the Question, "Shall licenses be granted for the sale 
of intoxicating liquors in this town," the vote was: 

Whole number of ballots cast 393 

Yes 152 

No 221 

Blanks 20 

Article 3. To see if the town will change the term of 
its selectmen so that hereafter one shall be chosen annually 
for the term of three years. 

Voted: That the town accept the provisions of Sec. 
367 Chap. 560 of the Acts of 1907 so far as it relates to the 
election of selectmen and at its next annual meeting elect 
one for the term of one year, one for the term of two years 
and one for the term of three years, and at each annual 
meeting thereafter one for the term of three years as the 
term of office of one expires. 



11 



Article 4. To choose all necessary town officers not 
named in Article 2 and fix salaries. 

Voted: That the selectmen be instructed to appoint 
surveyors of lumber, wood, hoops and staves. 

Choose Luther Conant trustee of the Goodnow fund for 
tliree years. 

Voted : That the salary of the road commissioner be 
two and one-half dollars per day nine hours to constitute 
a day. 

Voted : That the salary of the tax collector be one per 
centum of the amount collected and that he perform all the 
duties hitherto performed by said officer. 

Voted : That the salary of the treasurer be two hun- 
dred dollars per annum. 

Voted: To leave the matter of the auditor's salary 
with the selectmen. 

Article 5. To see if the town will accept the reports 
of the selectmen, overseers of the poor, school committees, 
library trustees and other town officers. 

Voted : To accept the reports of the several town 
officers. 

Article 6. To hear and act upon the report of any 
committee chosen to report at this meeting-. 

Xo reports presented. 

Article 7. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for the due observance of Memorial dav. 



12 



Voted : To raise fifty dollars. 

Article 8. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for the repairing and building of roads and bridges 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise five thousand dollars for roads and 
bridges and eight hundred dolalrs to purchase a new engine 
for the stone crusher. 

Article 9. To see if the town will authorize the treas- 
urer with the approval of its selectmen to borrow money for 
the town, if necessary, in anticipation of taxes the current 
year. 

Voted : To authorize the treasurer with the approval 
of the selectmen to borrow money for the town, if necessary, 
in anticipation of taxes the current year. 

Article 10. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for the support of Memorial library the present year. 

Voted — To raise two hundred dollars for books and 
four hundred dollars for current expenses. 

Article 11. To see w^hat amount of money the town 
will raise for the support of schools the present year. 

Article 12. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise and appropriate for the purchase of school supplies 
and repairs and improvements upon school buildings and 
grounds. 

Voted: To raise for common schools $6,000.00 

High school 5,800.00 

School supplies 550.00 

Transportation of pupils 1,600.00 

Salary of superintendent 1-^5.00 

Medical inspection of pupils 75.00 

Repairs on school buildings and grounds 300.00 

Fire escapes 400 . 00 

Miscellaneous school expenses 100.00 

$14,960.00 



13 



Article 13. To see if the town will appropriate a sum 
of money for the enforcement of the liqnor laws or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Voted : That the unexpended balance of money for the 
enforcement of the liquor laws be appropriated for the 
the enforcement of the liquor laAvs the current year. 

Article 14. To see what amount of money the town 
will appropriate for the care of cemeteries, or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of five 
hundred dollars. 

Article 15. To see if the town will appropriate a sum 
of money to copy for the state archives, and for publication 
by the New England Historical Genealogical society, under 
Chapter 470, of the Acts of 1902, the vital records of the 
town to the year 1850. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate the sum of one 
hundred and fifty dollars to copy the vital records for the 
state archives, and that the moderator appoint a committee 
of three to carry out the vote. 

The following committee was appointed by the mod- 
erator: Horace F. Tuttle. Luther Conant. Edgar H. Hall. 

Article 16. To see if the town will take any action in 
reference to building a high school building the present 
year, or rescind any vote or votes passed at any previous 
meetings in reference to location or building of a high 
school building in town, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To build this year a high school building on 



14 



Moses Reed's hill near Acton Center, at a cost of $15,000. 
By a hand vote 90 voted in favor, 86 against. 

Voted: To rescind all votes of previons meetings 
relating to the location and building of a high school build- 
ing, including the choice of a building committee. By hand 
vote 107 in favor, 47 opposed. 

Voted: That the town raise and appropriate the sum 
of fifteen thousand dollars for the purchase of a site and the 
erection of a high school building. 

Voted: To choose a building committee to consist of 
the three selectmen, the three members of the school com- 
mittee and three to be chosen by the meeting. 

Horace F. Tuttle, Arthur F. Blanchard and L. A. Hes- 
selton were chosen members of this committee by the meet- 
ing. Horace F. T^ittle was excused and E. Faulkner Conant 
chosen to fill the vacancy. 

Article 17. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for maintenance of fire department, or act thereon. 

Voted: To raise four hundred dollars and one hundred 
dollars additional to provide for the purchase of hand ex- 
tinguishers, in accordance with a vote passed last year. 

Article 18. To see what action the town will take in 
reference to the extermination of the gypsy and brown tail 
moth. 

Voted: To raise the sum required by the state law. 

Article 19. To see what amount of money the town 
^^'i!1 raise for town charges. 



15 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Article 20. To see what action the town ^^dll take in 
regard to the collection of taxes. 

Voted : That the collector charge interest at the rate 
of five percent per annum on all taxes remaining unpaid 
after the first day of November next. 

Voted: That poll and personal taxes only be payable 
on demand. 

That the collector shall issue summons for all personal 
and poll taxes only, remaining unpaid September 1st. That 
the collector shall collect all taxes committed to him within 
the municipal year in which they are assessed. 

Article 21. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to street lamps the present year. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to instruct the 
selectmen to contract with the American Woolen Company 
for one hundred electric street lights, or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted: That the town accept the conditions and prices 
as submitted by the American Woolen Company, and that 
the selectmen be instructed to install one hundred electric 
street lamps, with authority to contract for eighteen 
additional lamps if found necessary to light the territory 
now lighted by the town, the distribution and location of 
said lights to be left to their discretion and that two thous- 
and dollars be raised and appropriated for this purpose, and 
for maintaining such other lamps as in their judgment they 
deem expedient to continue. 



16 



Article 23. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to the extermination of the elm leaf beetle. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate four hundred dollars. 

Article 24. To see if the town will accept the provi- 
sions of Chapter 624, Acts- of 1910, relative to the appoint- 
ment of town accountant and fix salary of same, or act 
anything thereon. 

Voted: To accept the provisions of Chapter 624, Acts 
of 1910, relative to the appointment of a town accountant. 

Article 25. To see if the town will vote to macadam 
the Stow road from the South Acton Coal & Lumber Com- 
pany's yard to the cross road near W. A. Flint's barn, or act 
anything thereon. 

Voted : To leave the matter to the road commissioners. 

Article 26. To see if the town will take action to fur- 
nish tablet for soldiers that went to Spanish-American war 
of 1898, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: That the matter be referred to a committee of 
three to be appointed by the moderator, to report at the next 
annual meeting. 

The moderator appointed the following committee: Rev. 
P. P. Wood, Augustine Hosmer, Bertram D. Hall. 

Article 27. To see if the to"\vn will instruct the over- 
seers of the poor to contract out the medical attendance for 
the poor the ensuing year. 

Voted : That the matter be referred to the overseers of 
the poor. 



17 



Article 28. To see if the town will instruct the select- 
men to order gates established at the Andrew Hapgood 
crossing and the crossing near house of Sidney L. 
Richardson, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : That the selectmen be requested to order gates 
at the Andrew Hapgood railroad crossing in West Acton, 
the railroad crossing near the residence of Sidney L. Rich- 
ardson, and the Martin street crossing in South Acton, 

Article 29. To see if the town will vote to bond treas- 
urer and collector in an indemnity company, appropriate 
money for the same, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: That the town bond its treasurer in an 
indemnity company. 

Voted: To appropriate the sum of fifty dollars to 
provide for a bond to secure the sum of ten thousand dollars. 

Article 30. To see if the town will vote to expend a 
sum of money for sidewalks in any, or all of its villages, or 
accept the Massachusetts sidewalk statutes, or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Article 31. To see if the town will vote to widen the 
bridge near the cemetery at West Acton and the approaches 
thereto, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To refer the matter to the road commissioners. 

Article 32. To vote by ballot. Yes or No on the ques- 
tion : "Shall licenses be granted in this town for the sale 
of intoxicating liquors?" 



18 

Voted: Yes, 152. No, 221. 

Voted : Unanimously the following resolution : That 
the inhabitants of Acton in town meeting, assembled March 
27, 1911, in recognition of the courtesy, ability and faithful- 
ness of the retiring town treasurer, Mr. Jona. K. W. Wether- 
bee, who has served the town in that capacity for more than 
thirty years, hereby express their thanks to him and their 
best wishes for the present and future. 

Voted : That the town clerk be directed to send to Mr. 
AA-etherbee a copy of these resolutions and that the same be 
placed upon the records of this meeting. 

Voted: To adjourn. 



Proceedings of the Special Town Meeting Held 

April 20, 1911 

Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Allen Brooks Parker Avas chosen moderator. 

Article 2. To see if the town will vote to rescind its 
votes of Alarch 27, 1911, whereby it voted to build this year 
a high school building on Aloses Reed's hill, near Acton 
Center, at a cost of $15,000, and to raise and appropriate 
said sum for the purchase of a site and the erection of a high 
school building, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : Not to dismiss the article. 

A^oted: On a motion to divide the article, so that the 



19 



question of rescinding the vote to raise the money shall be 
acted upon first; 114 in favor: 127 opposed. 

Voted: To rescind the votes of March 27. 1911. 
whereby the town voted to build this year a high school 
building on Moses Reed's hill, near Acton Center, at a cost 
of $15,000. and to raise and appropriate said sum for the 
purchase of a site and the erection of a high school building. 

Article 3. To see if the town will vote to build an 
addition to either of its school houses for the use of its high 
school, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Article 4. To see if the town will vote to locate and 
build a high school building this year and to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for such site and building, or 
for such additions, or borrow such money on a term of years, 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted: That the article be referred to a special 
committee, that said special committee be chosen as follows : 
The moderator shall name three gentlemen as a nominating 
committee. Said nominating committee shall name nine 
gentlemen as candidates to be voted upon by the town at 
this meeting. Should the town reject any so nominated, 
said nominating committee shall name others until nine are 
chosen by the town. The nine so chosen shall constitute said 
special committee. 

Voted: That said special committee be and is hereby 
instructed to inquire into all matters which may properly 
come before the town for action under said article and shall 
report in writing to the town at its next annual meeting 
their recommendations together with their reasons for the 
same. 



20 



Voted: That said report shall be printed at the 
expense of the town. 

Voted: That said committee be allowed to report to 
the town at their discretion. 

William H. Kingsley, William Rawitzer and Bertram 
D. Hall were appointed a nominating committee by the 
moderator. The nominating committee reported the follow- 
ing named persons to act as a special committee : Webster 
C. Robbins, Asaph Merriam, Frederick C. Nash, J. Sidney 
White, Frank W. Hoit, Edgar H. Hall Luther Conant, J 
Sterling Moore, Arthur M. Whitcomb. Webster C. Robbins 
was excused and James B. Tuttle chosen to fill the vacancy. 

Voted: That the persons named by the nominating 
committee, with the substitution of James B. Tuttle for 
Webster C. Robbins, constitute the special committee. 

Voted: To adjourn. 



STATE ELECTION, NOVEMBER 7, 1911 

Party designations : S,, Socialist ; D., Democratic ; D. 
P., Democratic Progressive; R., Republican; S. L., Socialist 
Labor; P., Prohibition. 

Precincts 
12 3 Total 

Whole number of ballots cast ... Ill 143 138 392 



Governor 

James F. Gary. S 

Eugene N. Foss, D 25 

Louis A. Frothingham. R 84 

Dennis McGoff, S. L 

Frank N. Rand, P 

Blanks 2 



1 





1 


43 


36 


104 


95 


98 


277 











4 


2 


6 





2 


4 



21 



Lieutenant Governor 



Walter S. Hiitchins, S 

Eobert Luce, E 80 

William G. Merrill, P 1 

Patrick Mulligan. S. L 

David I. Walsh. D 28 

Blanks 2 



1 


.0 


1 


101 


95 


276 


1 


2 


4 











35 


35 


98 


5 


6 


13 



Secretary 



^'W 



David Craig. S. L 

Frank J. Donahue, D 26 

Alfred H. Evans. P 3 

Rose Fenner. S 

Albert P. Langtry, R 79 

Blanks 3 



4 





4 


23 


30 


79 


3 





6 


2 





2 


98 


93 


270 


13 


15 


31 



Treasurer 



Joseph :\L Coldwell, S 

Jeremiah P. :\reXally. S. L 

Charles E. Peakes. P 

Elmer A. Stevens. R SO 

Augustus L. Thorndike, D 26 

Blanks 5 



2 





2 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


3 


99 


96 


275 


28 


27 


81 


n 


13 


29 



Auditor 



Karl Lindstrand. S. L 





2 





2 


Sylvester J. :\IcBride. S. . . . 





1 





1 


William W. Nash. P 


1 


4 


2 


7 


Charles B Strecker, D 


^^3 


25 

98 
13 


27 
89 
20 


75 


John E. White. R 


78 


265 


Blanks 


9 


42 



County Commissioner 



32 


85 











2 


89 


271 


17 


34 



22 

Attorney General 

George W. Anderson, D 25 28 

Henry C. Hess, S. L 

George E. Roewer, Jr., S 2 

James M. Smft, R 80 102 

Blanks 6 11 

Councillor 

Leander V. Colahan, D 20 24 

Herbert E. Fletcher. R 84 108 

Blanks 7 11 

Senator 



Frank P. Bennett, Jr., R 81 102 99 282 

Philip A. Kiely, D 24 33 32 89 

Blanks 6 8 7 21 

Representative in General Court 

Edward Fisher, D 37 53 49 139 

Samuel L. Taylor, R 70 85 76 231 

Blanks 4 5 13 22 



24 


68 


96 


288 


18 


36 



Charles J. Barton. D 23 


36 


28 


87 


Levi S. Gould. R 80 


98 


90 


268 


Blanks 8 


9 


20 


37 


Clerk of Courts 








William C. Dillingham. R 80 


101 


88 


269 


Thomas F. Kearns. D 24 


31 


26 


81 


Blanks 7 


11 


24 


42 



28 

Register of Deeds 

Edwin 0. Childs, R 82 105 91 278 

Charles Leo Shea, D 20 24 23 67 

Blanks 9 14 24 47 

Amendment Authorizing Voting Machines 

Yes 50 73 55 178 

No 23 25 19 67 

Blanks 38 45 64 147 

Amendment Increasing Power of Legislature to Take Land 
for Streets and Highways 

Yes 44 62 51 157 

No 25 34 25 84 

Blanks 42 47 62 151 

Referendum of Act Authorizing Counties to Establish 
Retirement Systems 

Yes 25 56 46 127 

No 41 38 32 111 

Blanks 45 49 60 154 

Vote for Representative in Eleventh Middlesex District, 
November 7, 1911 

< < ^ -^ ^ ^ ^ 

Edward Fisher of Westford . . . . !139!232|59|341| 88|222|1081 
Samuel L. Taylor of Westford . . i23ljl96|35|356| 87|159|1064 

Blanks I 22| 27| 2| 54| 11| 20| 136 

|392|455|96|751|186|40l!2281 



24 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 



Births 

Whole number recorded 33 

Born in Acton 32 

Males 13 

Females 20 

Native parentage 13 

Foreign parentage 13 

Mixed parentage 7 

Marriages 

Whole number recorded 22 

Residents of Acton 27 

Residents of other places 17 

Deaths 

Whole number recorded 47 

Residents of Acton 41 

Residents of other places 6 

Occurring in Acton 49 

Occurring in other places 7 

Average age 51.8 



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PERSONS HAVING DOGS LICENSED IN 1911. 



Aiken. Alice H. . . 


.. $5.00 


Adams, Daniel H. 


.. 2.00 


Allen. Louis E. . . . 


.. 2.00 


Bulette, Frank W. 


.. 2.00 


Bovce, Charles E. 


.. 2.00 


Brill. Fred E 


.. 2.00 


Brown. Lizzie J. . 


.. 2.00 


Bradlev. Marv . . . 


.. 2.00 


Burroughs, S. R. . 


.. 2.00 


Booth, Thomas E. 


.. 2.11U 


Burgess, J. W. ... 


.. 2.00 


Brown, Caroline (2 


) . 4.0U 


Brooks, Mary D. . 


.. 2.00 


Baird. Edson .... 


. .. 2.00 


Bresth. Simon . . . 


.. 2.00 


Bailey, Fred L. (2) 


.. 4.00 


Baker, Martin S. . 


. . 2 . OU 


Bartlett. Fred L. ( 


2), 4.00 


Brown. Charles . . 


.. 2.00 


Baxter, Charles T. 


.. 2.00 


Callahan, Charles I 


L. 2.00 


Craig. W. C 


.. 2.00 


Chase. S. R 


.. 2.00 


Coughlin, John F. 


.. 2.00 


Calder, Maria . . . 


.. 2.00 


Chickering, C, D. 


.. 2. no 


Coughlin, W. C. . . 


. . 2 . 00 


Clark. Charles H. 


. . 2 . 00 


Cavanaugh, Alice 


.. 2.UC? 


Cullen, Harry M. 


.. 2.00 


Cornell. Harrv F. 


.. 2.00 


Clark. Fred E. . . . 


.. 2. Or? 


Davis, Charles E. 


.. 2.00 


Durkee. J. E 


. . 2 . 00 


Durkee. Raymond ] 


P.. 2.00 


Davis, Wendell F. 


.. 2.00 



Durkee, Harold 5.00 

Dusseault. Mildred .. 2.0u 

Dole, Cyrus G 2.00 

Densmore, Joseph A.. 2.00 

Davis, Mary E 2.00 

Drurv. Warren 2.00 

Dixon. M. S 2.00 

Emery, F. E 2.00 

Enneguess, ]\Iichael. 2.00 

Edney, Charles F. . . . 2.00 

Frost, Clarence 5.00 

Ford, L S 2.00 

Fairbanks, C. H 2.00 

Farrar. Daniel H. . . . 2.00 

Fobes, E. S 5.00 

Farrar, Herman .... 5.00 

Fullonton. Llewellvn. 2.00 

Fletcher. L. X. (2)... 7.00 

Fiske, Wilbur 2.00 

G-allagher, Joseph ... 2.0(/ 

Green, Fred W 2.00 

Gallant, Joseph P. . . . 2 . 00 

Gilmore, Almon H. . . 2 . 00 

Grady. Rov 5.00 

Hoit. F. W 2 . on 

Harris. Hattie B. . . . 5.00 

Houghton, Ellsworth, 2.00 

Holden, F. H 2.00 

Hollowell, Wm. T. . . 2.00 

Holden, Willis L. . . . 2.00 

Hawley. Henry H. Jr.. 2.00 

Jones, Samuel 2.00 

Jones. Warren 2.00 

Kelley. Marvin 2.00 

Kellev. Wm. F 2. Or? 

Kimball, Chas. M. (4) 11.00 



32 



Lothrop, Mrs. T. C. (2) 4 . 00 


Lewis, Herbert W. . 


. 2.00 


Livermore. J. Wm. . 


. 2.00 


Lucier, Joseph 


. 2.00 


Laffin, Sidney 


. 2.00 


Lawrence, A. L 


. 2.00 


Moore. J. Sterling . . 


. 2.00 


Miller, Charles I. . . . 


. 2.00 


Merriam, Asaph . . . 


. 2.00 


Murphy, George E. . 


. 2.00 


MacMillan, Daniel . 


. 5.00 


Mahoney, M. J. . . . 


. 5.00 


McCarthy, Thomas 


. 2.00 


Morrison, F. D. ... 


. 2.00 


Moore. Thomas A. I 


)., 2.00 


]\Inrray, James B. . 


.' 2.00 


Mill an, Albion L. . 


. 2.00 


Murro, Nicholas . . 


. 2.00 


McAllister, Geo. 0. 


. 2.00 


Noyes, A. L 


. 5.00 


Nixon, Herman . . . 


. 5.00 


Nagle, Elizabeth . . 


. 2.00 


O'Neil, Patrick . . . 


. 2.00 


O'Connell, Michael 


. 2.00 


Palma. John 


. . 2.00 


Pratt, Francis .... 


. . 2.00 


Priest, H. L 


. . 5.00 


Perkins, Levi 


. . 2.00 


Perkins, A. H 


. . 2.00 


Pennell, Edmund H. 


. 2.00 


Pope, Benjamin (5) 


. . 16.00 


Prescott. 0. C 


. . 2.00 


Rawitzer, William 


. . 2.00 


Robbins, Solon A. . 


. . 2.00 


Richardson, J. L. (2 


). 4.00 



134 licenses at $2.00 each 
24 licenses at $5.00 each 



Reed. George H 2.00 

Robbins, W. C 2.00 

Reed, Robert G 2.00 

Rush, Barney 2.00 

Smith, Albert 2.00 

Stevenson, John M. . 5.00 

Staples, Hall 2.00 

Shaplev, Eva C 2.00 

Sanborn, E. R 2.00 

Spinnev, E. L 2.00 

Smith, Chester R. . . . 2.00 

Stiles, Frank L 2.00 

Stonev, Reginald ... 2.00 

Sawyer, Jeff. T 2.0cr 

Shaw, A.Francis ... 5.00 

SAveet. Craig 2.00 

Tavlor, Simon D. . . . 2.00 

Tuttle, Arthur 2.00 

Thompson, T. A 2.00 

Taylor. S. H 5.00 

Tavlor, Walter L .. . 2.00 

Tavlor, Charles A. . . 2.00 

Weaver, Geo. T. (2). 10.00 

White, Eugene L. . . . 2.00 

Wetherbee, Ellis 2.00 

Williams, F. G 5.00 

Worden, Martin H. . 2.00 

Worster. George W. . 2.00 

AAHiitcomb, Fred S. . . 2.00 

Watkins, J. H. (2)... 7.00 

■\A'oods, Eleanor H. . . 2.00 

AVheeler, Chas. H. (2) 7.00 

Willis, Edward 2.00 

Willis. Carl 2.00 

Wheeler, Elbridge L., 2.00 

$268.00 

120.00 



Deduct fees, 158 licenses at 20 cents 
each 



$388.00 
31.60 



Balance paid to couiity treasurer 



$356.40 



33 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT 



Moth Department 

Paid James O'Neil, labor $2,492.25 

Roads and Bridges 

A. H. Perkins, labor and supplies ... $1,976.56 

A. W. Davis, labor and supplies 1,951.55 

W. H. Kingsley, labor 358.80 

G. E. Greenough, labor 47.50 

A. S. Bradley, labor 11.20 

J. P. Brown, labor 14.47 

J. T. McNiff, labor 12.20 

N. H. Tenney, repairing 32.75 

North Acton Granite Co., covering 

stone 25.20 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 11.24 

American Powder ^lills Co., bridge 

plank 83.64 

W. C. Robinson & Son Co., supplies ... 10.30 

Hall Brothers Co., posts and planing . . 23.87 

T. F. Parker, oil 2.40 

Finney & Hoit, batteries 3 . 00 

C. H. Mead, supplies 13.87 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies .97 

E. T. Rice, gasoline 2.10 

Good Roads Machinery Co., repairs . . 80.65 
South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

supplies 232.91 



34 



Buffalo Steam Roller Co., supplies 8.86 

Lunt Moss Co., engine supplies 900.00 

Lunt Moss Co., supplies 52.31 

George H. Reed, coal 9 . 07 



$5,865.42 

Support of Poor on Farm 

Expenses per report of the overseers, $2,607.53 

Outside Poor. 

As per report of the overseers 901. 39 

State Aid. 

Total amount paid for state aid 914.00 

Soldiers and Military Aid. 

Paid town of Hudson, aid furnished. . $60.00 
Paid expenses of Lorenz Carberg .... 38.00 



Street Lamps. 

Paid Howard L. Quimby, care of lamps $51.00 

David Foley, care of lamps 42.50 

Walter Morse, care of lamps 55 . 00 

Geo. F. Lawrey, care of lamps ... 88.00 

Fred W. Green, care of lamps .... 101,30 

Fred W. Green, oil 3.57 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 23.73 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

supplies 2.16 



$98.00 



35 



M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies, Cen- 
ter \ 13.17 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies, East 15.50 

C. H. Mead, supplies, back bill ... 88.41 

C. H. Mead, supplies, 1911 22.67 

American Woolen Co., lights on 

bridge 56.70 

American Woolen Co., street 

lights, 3 months to Feb. 1 411 . 99 

Julian Tuttle, maintaining 1 

lamp, 1911 4.00 

Simeon Bresth, maintaining 1 

lamp, 1911 4.00 

D. C. Harris, maintaining 1 lamp, 

1911 4.00 

I. F. Duran, maintaining 1 lamp, 

1911 4.00 

H. W. B. Proctor, maintaining 1 

lamp, 1911 4.00 

W. E. Hayward, maintaining 1 

lamp, 1911 4.00 

A. E. Payson, maintaining 1 lamp, 

1911 4.00 



Cemetery Expenses 

Paid Julian Tuttle, labor in North $3.25 

Julian. Tuttle, labor in. Wood- 
lawn 102.08 

N. G. Brown, labor in Woodlawn. 79.63 

A. H. Smith, labor in Woodlawn.. 14.80 

Asaph Parlin, labor in Woodlawn 5.25 

M. C. Hayes, painting fence 10.00 

A. H. Perkins, labor in Mt. Hope.. 160.05 

F. W. Green, labor in Mt. Hope. .. 27.18 



$1,003.70' 



36 



Wilfred Wheeler, labor in Mt. 

Hope 28.00 

H. T. Clark, labor in Mt. Hope . . 77.25 

A. Batley & Son, plants in Mt. 

Hope 15.90 

Hall Brothers Co., lumber in Mt. 

Hope 3.00 

H. F. Tiittle, laying out lots in Mt. 

Hope 10.00 

H. F. Tuttle, laying out lots in 

Woodlawn 5.00 

H. F. Tuttle, recording deeds 4.50 

H. F. Tuttle, annual report 5.00 



Perpetual Care of Lots. 

Paid Julian Tuttle, North $6.00 

Julian Tuttle, Woodlawn 216.43 

H. T. Clark, Mt. Hope 72.17 



Printing 

Paid The News Publishing Co., 750 
town reports, 50 school re- 
ports $144.00 

The News, ballots town meeting.. 12.00 

The News, town warrants, March 

27 4.50 

The News, town warrants, April 

20 3.50 

The News, poll tax lists 14.00 

The News, 50 voting lists 14.00 

The News, 24 caucus warrants. . . 3.50 



$550.89 



$294.60 



6, 


,50 


; 2, 


.00 


1 


.25 


4, 


,85 


4. 


,00 



37 



The News, election warrants .... 4.00 

Brookside Printing Co., caucus 

notices 1 . 50 

Brookside Printing Co., vouchers, 

orders 

Brookside Printing Co., envelopes 
Brookside Printing Co., jury lists 
Brookside Printing Co., notices . . 
Brookside Printing Co., poll tax 

bills 



Library Expenses. 

Paid American Woolen Co., electric 

current. 1910 $13 . 65 

American Woolen Co., electric 

current, 1911 39.64 

William D. Tuttle, expenses 14.53 

E. F .Conant, insurance 53.01 

E. A. Phalen, labor 1.50 

W. G. Craig, 8 chairs 8.00 

E. Z. Stanley, labor 2.61 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 5.62 

Finney & Hoit, electric bulbs 1 . 30 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

coal 59.28 

Arthur F. Davis, librarian 108.75 

S. Hammond Taylor, janitor 108.50 

O. E. Houghton, transportation 

of books 50.00 

A. F. Davis, cataloging . . .-. 5.00 

Dura Binding Co 43.50 



$219.60 



$514.89 



38 

Library Books. 

Paid W. B. Clark Co $520.19 

Oneil Adams Co 13.75 

William D. Tuttle, books 4.30 

Young Folks Educational league. 15.44 

Frend & Co 15 . 75 

Pearson & Marsh 15.75 

R. V. Towne 6.25 

Herman Goldberger, magazines.. 44.50 

A. E. Payson 3.50 

D. Appleton & Co 9.75 

W. A. Wild Co 4.00 



Fire Department. 



Paid J. S. White, fighting fire, April 




and May 


$24.00 


Tuttle & Newton, supplies 


2.00 


A. Merriam & Co., fighting fire .. . 


9.50 


W. H. Kingsley, fighting fire, 




North Acton 


93.00 


H. H. Hawley, fighting fire. North 




Acton 


7.00 


L. H. Tuttle, fighting fire, North 




Acton 


5.00 


J. W. Livermore, fighting fire. 




North Acton 


6.25 


J. W. Livermore, fighting fire. 




Robbins lot 


5.00 


Badger Fire Extinguisher Co., 




extinguishers 


133.50 


Fred W. Green, cleaning ashes 




and vault 


1.50 



$653.18 



39 



Fred W. Green, moving chemical 

from South Acton 1 . 00 

B. D. Hall, running expenses. 

West Acton 117.00 

Snow & Noll, soda and acid 3.60 

American LaPrance Fire Engine 

Co., bottles 7.20 

Boston Coupling Co., repairing 

hose .73 

J. T. McNiff, repairing hose wagon 1.00 
N. J. Cole, running expenses, 

South Acton 117.00 

N. J. Cole, soda 3.30 

C. H. Mead, soda 13.80 

Geo. E. Greenough, fighting fire. . 2.00 



Town Buildings and Grounds 

Paid American Woolen Co., electric 

current, town hall, 1910 $24.60 

American Woolen Co., electric 

current, town hall, 1911 42.63 

R. W. Porter, care of hall 81.25 

R. W. Porter, care of block 25.00 

R. W. Porter, care of flag 5.00 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

coal 38.33 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

lumber 22.05 

Dexter Spinney, wood 10.00 

E. F. Conant, insurance on chapel. 7.20 

Finney & Hoit, wax .25 

B. A. King, labor 2.00 

Chas. H. Persons, tuning piano . . 2 . 50 
Nelson H. Tenney, repairing 

heater 8.00 



$553.38 



40 



E. P. Gates, repairing pump seats, 

etc 5.85 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies .... 9.13 



Police Department. 

Paid Albert S. Bradley, court fees $91.16 

Albert S. Bradley, special duty . . 36.73 
Albert S. Bradley, care of lockup 

and fuel 5 . 00 

Geo. A. Libby, police duty 28 . 00 

W. C. Coughlin, police duty 9.00 

W. C. Coughlin, court fees 10.46 

J. Linwood Richardson, special . . 2.50 

C. J. Holton, special 2.50 



Enforcement of the Liquor Law. 

Paid cash, E. H. Hall, service of detec- 
tive agency $507 . 05 



Miscellaneous Account. 

Paid J. F. Duren, returns 18 deaths. . $4.50 
Fred S. Glines, opening school- 
house 2.00 

A. Merriam, car fare, postage, 
telephone 9 . 13 

Geo. B. Parker, Memorial day ... 50.00 

Henry M. Meek Publishing Co., 

birth return books 1 . 25 

B. F. Townsend, repairing pump, 

South Acton 4.50 

Frank W. Hoit. treasurer's bond. 50.00 



$283.79 



$185.35 



$507.05 



41 



Frank AV. Hoit, state ex 3.00 

The Enterprise, advertisement ... .75 

Finney & Hoit, memorial flags ... 5.00 

W. & L. E. Gurley, weights and 

measurers 98 . 95 

Sweeney & Wilson, Learer vs. 

town 30.00 

D. C. Palmer, yardstick nickel ... 8.00 
J. K. AV. AYetherbee, postage, sta- 
tionery 4.73 

J. K. W. A\^etherbee, use of vestry 5.00 

Fred AA". Green, putting up booths 1.50 

J. P. Brown, repairing pump .... 2.35 

A. B. Parker, professional services 44.63 

Horace F. Tuttle, copying for 

town report 5 . 00 

Horace F. Tuttle, representative 

vote at Ayer 2 . 50 

Horace F. Tuttle, collecting and 

recording 32 births 16.00 

Horace F. Tuttle, recording 22 

marriages 4.40 

Horace F. Tuttle, recording 51 

deaths 10.40 

Horace F. Tuttle. postage, ex- 
press, telephone 10.70 

Horace F. Tuttle, locating lines of 

streets 5.00 

AA^. F. Stevens, postage, express, 

dog officer 24.01 

AA". F. Stevens, expense, register 

of deeds 6 . 70 

AA^ F. Stevens, killing dog 1.00 

AA^. F. Stevens, transportation of 

returns and notifications.... 4.00 
W. F. Kelley. postage, carfare, tel- 
ephone 2 . 96 



42 




Boston Nickel Plate Co., nickeling 




weights 


4.35 


F. E. Narsh, dry measure guage . 


^.00 


Frank W. Hoit, postage, freight, 


etc 


20.37 


F. K. Shaw, M. D., returning 8 




births 


2.00 


S. A. Christie, M. D., returning 14 




births 


3.50 


Hall Staples, M. D., returning 6 




births 


1.50 


F. E. Tasker, M. D., returning 2 




births 


.50 


F. U. Rich, M. D., returning 2 




births 


.50 


W. L. Farrer Co., returning 2 




deaths 


.50 


Hobbs & Warren Co., assessors' 




books 


7.25 


A. W. Brownell, assessors' notices 




and returns 


3.50 


Willis L. Holden, perambulating 




3 days 


7.50 


James P. Brown, perambulating 




2 days 


5.00 


James P. Brown, postage 


3.00 


James P. Brown, fire warden per- 




mits 


2.50 


E. H. Hall, perambulating 5 days. 


12.50 


E. H. Hall, conveyance, 5 days . . 


6.25 


Fred W. Green, moving safe 


1.25 


E. H. Hall, fares, Boston 


1.60 


E. H. Hall, stamps, ink, station- 




ery, telephone 


20.47 



$524.00 



43 

Tree Warden. 

Paid Stephen B. Church, hose and re- 
pairs $37 . 10 

E. R. Teel, arsenate of lead 159.81 

William H. Kingsley. spraying . . 144.47 



$341.38 



Loans and Interests. 

Paid Frank C. Hayward, interest on 

invested fund $17 . 50 

Geo. H. Decoster, interest on in- 
vested fund 10.50 

First National Bank of Boston . . . 11,000.00 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

certificate 3 . 00 



$11,031.00 



Board of Health. 

Paid Frank E. Tasker, services 

James Kinsley, inspector of beef.. 
James Kinsley, burial permits . . . 

James Kinsley, fumigation 

Eastern Drug Co., supplies 

E. T. Rice, labor 

John Watkins, inspector of beef.. 
John Watkins, setting posts 

around dump 

E. S. Fobes fumigating 

E. S. Fobes, agent 

E. S. Fobes, inspection of beef... . 
E. S. Fobes, postage, telephone, 

burial permits 5 . 83 



$7. 


.00 


30 


.75 


2. 


.25 


16 


.79 


3 


.20 


4.50 


34 


.80 


8, 


.62 


14 


.54 


27, 


.52 


83 


.25 



44 



W. E. Whitcomb, supplies 4.25 

Warren Hayward, milk 1 . 19 

Mrs. Fred Gilmore, nurse 3.00 

H. L. Alderman, attendance at 

shoddy mill 10.00 

Minnie L. Decoster, labor during 

quarantine 12 . 00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

branding outfit 2 . 65 

F. S. Whitcomb, inspector of cat- 
tle 64.80 



Salaries. 

Paid S. A. Guilford, recount, 1910 .... $2.50 
James McGreen, recounts, 1908- 

1910 5.00 

Charles E. Smith, election officer, 2.50 

Abram Tuttle, election officer ... 2.50 

Clarence D. Cram, election officer. 2.50 
Herbert F. Bobbins, election 

officer 2 . 50 

AVilliam T. ]\lerriam, election of- 
ficer 2.50 

Samuel A. Guilford, registrar, 

1910 12.00 

Samuel A. Guilford, recount 2.50 

James ]\IcGreen, recount 2.50 

elames ]\IcGreen, registrar, 1910.. 12.00 

Fritz B. Hawes, registrar, 1910. . . 12.00 

Fritz B. HaAves, recounts 5.00 

W. E. Whitcomb, auditor 6.00 

E. A. Phalan, election officer, 

primary 2 . 50 

J. B. Tuttle, election officer, 

primary 2 . 50 



$336.94 



45 



E. C. Cheney, election officer, 

primary 2 . 50 

H. F. Tuttle, election officer, pri- 
mary 2 . 50 

T. F. Newton, election officer, 

primary 2 . 50 

Anson Piper, election officer, pri- 
mary 2 . 50 

Abram Tuttle, election officer, 

primary 2 . 50 

N. J. Cole, election officer, primary 2.50 

E. H. Hall, election officer, pri- 
mary 2 . 50 

S. R. Burroughs, election officer, 

primary 2 . 50 

John McNiff, election officer, pri- 
mary 2 . 50 

William Tenney, election officer, 

primary 2 . 50 

H. F. Tuttle, election officer 3.00 

J. F. Coughlin, election officer ... 3.00 

A. W. Foster, election officer 3.00 

A. F. Davis, election officer 3.00 

T. F. Newton, election officer 3.00 

Anson Piper, election officer 3.00 

Abram Tuttle, election officer ... 3.00 

C. O'Neil, election officer 3.00 

A. B. Parker, election officer 3.00 

F. S. Whitcomb, election officer . . 3.00 
James Kinslej^ election officer.... 3.00 
W. F. Kelley, election officer .... 3.00 
S. A. Guilford, registrar, Iflll . . . . 12.00 

S. A. Guilford, recount 2.50 

James McGreen, recount 2 . 50 

James McGreen, registrar, 1911.. 12.00 

Fritz B. Hawes, registrar, 1911 . . 12.00 

G. E. Holton, recount 2.50 



46 



H. F. Tuttle, registrar, 1911 15.00 

H. F. Tuttle, recounts 5.00 

H. F. Tuttle, primary service .... 10.00 

H. F. Tuttle, town clerk 30.00 

J. B. Tuttle, assessor 55.00 

W. F. Stevens, assessor 75.00 

W. F. Stevens, collecting taxes, 

1909 2.53 

W. F. Stevens, collecting taxes, 

1910 24.50 

W. F. Stevens, collecting taxes, 

1911 305.24 

W. F. Stevens, abatement taxes, 

1910-11 59.53 

Hall Staples, M. D., town physi- 
cian 52.00 

W. F. Kelley, assessor 60.00 

W. F. Kelley, overseer of the poor 50.00 

F. W. Hoit, treasurer 200.00 

W. L. Holden, selectman 50.00 

W. L. Holden, overseer of the poor 20.00 

J. P. Brown, selectman 50.00 

E. H. Hall, selectman 125.00 

E. IT. Hall, overseer 25 . 00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 
Receipts. 

Due from treasurer $4,402 . 43 

Due from collector 2,856. 10 

Appropriations : 

Memorial day 50.00 

Roads and bridges 5,000.00 



$1,395.30 



47 



Engine for crusher 800. 00 

Memorial library, books 200 . 00 

Memorial library expenses 400.00 

Cemeteries 500 . 00 

Copying town records 150.00 

Street lighting 2 ,000.00 

Bond for treasurer 50.00 

Extermination elm beetles 400.00 

Extermination of moths 882.65 

Fire department 400.00 

Fire extinguishers 100 . 00 

Schools 14,960.00 

Raised : 

For state tax 3,080.00 

Grade crossing 2,288 . 00 

State highway 269.00 

County tax 1,966.49 

Overlayings 462 . 84 

Received : 

Treasurer's report 20,260.36 

Farm receipts 1,569 . 43 

Interest on taxes 123.03 

C. M. & H. St. Railway tax 109 . 85 

December assessment -195.51 

Moth tax 186.13 



$63,661.82 

Financial Statement for Year Ending February 1, 1912 

Due from treasurer $3,183 . 69 

From collector 4.031 . 89 

From state aid 981.00 

From gypsy moth work 606 . 70 

From inspection of aniuuils 32.40 

$8,835.68 



48 

Expenditures. 

"School board accounts $17,459 . 64 

Moth department 2,492 . 23 

Roads and bridges 5,865 . 42 

Town farm 2,607.53 

Outside poor 901.39 

State aid 914.00 

Soldiers' aid 98.00 

Street lamps 1,003.70 

Cemeteries 550 . 89 

Perpetual care 294. 60 

Printing 219 . 60 

Library expenses 514.89 

Library books 653 . 18 

Fire department 553 . 38 

Buildings and grounds 283 . 79 

Police 185 . 35 

Enforcement liquor law 507.05 

Tree warden 341 . 38 

Loans 11,031.00 

Board of health 336.94 

Salaries 1,395.30 

Miscellaneous 524 . 00 

State tax 3,080.00 

Grade crossing 2,288 . 00 

Repairing state highway 269.00 

Corporation tax 109 . 49 

County tax 1,966.49 

Cash on hand 3,183.69 

Uncollected taxes 4,031 . 89 



$63,661.82 



49 
Liabilities. 



Unexpended balance cemetery fund 
Unexpended balance library fund ., 
Fund for enforcement liquor law . . 
Cemeterv fund in treasury 



$464.11 
472.23 

1.309.95 
150.00 



Balance in favor town 



$2,396.29 



),439.39 



EDGAR H. HALL, 
JAMES P. BROWN, 
WILLIS L. HOLDEX, 

Selectmen. 



We have carried out the votes of the town intrusted to 
us to the best of our judgment and ability. 

Gates have been establshed at the Andrew Hapgood, 
Sidney Richardson, and Moran, railroad crossings so-called. 

The illegal sale of intoxicating liquors has been sup- 
pressed as far as possible. 

We have contracted upon the most favorable terms pos- 
sible with the American Woolen Company to furnish the 
town with street lights for a term of five years, and while 
ir^e extensions have not been as rapid as we would have 
lik.fd, they will be completed as soon as possible. 

The interest of the town has been conserved in the ac- 
tion of the town of Concord taking town's land at Xagog 
lake by petitioning the court for a settlement of damages. 

EDGAR H. HALL, 
WILLIS L. HOLDEX, 
JAMES P. BROWX, 



50 



TREASURER'S REPORT, YEAR ENDING FEB- 
RUARY 1, 1912. 



Receipts. 

Cash on hand $4,402.43 

State treasurer, corporation tax, pub- 
lic service 1,630.93 

Corporation tax, business 1,325.92 

National bank tax 407 . 13 

State aid 808.00 

Street railway tax 12 . 39 

Reimbursement for loss of taxes on 

land 121.38 

Supervision of schools 312 . 50 

Income of Massachusetts school fund. 1,084.47 

Suppression of moths account 1,666.52 

Suppression of moths on state high- 
way 261.26 

Inspection of animals 29 . 20 

House of correction, fines 5.00 

County treasurer, dog license 342.80 

Cemetery fund 150.00 

I. F. Duren, for burial of F. G. Smith . . 28 . 00 

Rent of town hall 121.50 

Half payment on fire extinguisher. ... 63.40 

A. F. Blanchard, license 1.00 

Use of road roller 95 . 00 

Crushed stone 5 . 00 

Street dirt 12.50 

Rebate on school tickets 13.33 



51 



H. F. Tuttle, lots sold in Woodlawn 

cemetery • . . 119 . 00 

H. T. Clark, lots sold in Mt. Hope cem- 
etery - 42.00 

Memorial library, fines 26.57 

District court of Central ^Middlesex, 

fines 14.99 

Income of cemetery fund 362 . 08 

Income of library fund 241 . 60 

Herman Goldberg, discount on maga- 
zines 2.21 

First National Bank of Boston, 

$6,000.00 loan (discount $121.33) . 5,878.67 

First National Bank of Boston 

$5,000.00 loan (discount $60.28) . . 4,939 . 72 

International Trust Co., interest 91.29 

N. H. Tenney, old engine 45 . 00 

$24,662.79 
Receipts from town farm: 

Milk $1,093.59 

Calves 38.00 

Eggs 42.61 

Apples 294.35 

Fowl 12.46 

One cow 17 . 62 

Pears 11.30 

Board 36.00 

Vegetables 2.20 

One roll paper 1 . 75 

Pig 15.50 

Potatoes 1.25 

Ice .50 

Telephone 2 . 05 

Corn .25 

$1,569.43 



52 

Received from William F. Stevens, 
Collector of Taxes : 

Taxes collected, 1909 $232.74 

Interest on taxes, 1909 20 . 47 

Taxes collected, 1910 2,394.07 

Interest on taxes, 1910 72.71 

Taxes collected, 1911 30,538.02 

Interest on taxes, 1911 29 . 85 

C. M. & H. St. Railway tax 109.85 

$33,397.71 

Total receipts $59,629.93 

Expenditures. 

Paid state treasurer state tax 3,080.00 

Abolition of grade crossing 2,200.00 

Interest on above 88 . 00 

Repairs state highway 269.00 

Corporation tax, public service 109.49 

County tax 1,966.49 

Paid selectmen's orders 31,273.62 

Paid school board orders 17,459 . 64 

Cash on hand 3,183.69 



$59,629.93 
FRANK W. HOIT, Treasurer. 



53 



Treasurer's Report of Money Held for Care of Lots in 

Cemeteries 

1912. Dr. 

Feb. 1. To cash in North End Savings 

Bank $2,175.00 

Warren Institution for Savings 1,000.00 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings bank. 1,000.00 

Middlesex Institution for savings .... 900.00 

Lowell Five Cents Saving bank 1,000.00 

Mechanic Savings bank 1,000.00 

Central Savings bank 1,000.00 

City Institution for Savings 2,000.00 

Cash in treasury 150 . 00 

Luke Blanchard cemetery fund : 

North End Savings bank 500 . 00 

For care of tomb : 

Charlestown Five Cents Saving bank. 100.00 

For care of memorial tablet: 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings bank 50.00 

Warren Institution for Savings 50.00 

Total funds $10,925.00 

Income, 1911-1912 386.61 

Income unexpended February 1, 1911.. 384.60 



$11,696.21 



Cr. 

By cash paid cemetery commissioners 

for care of lots $289 . 60 

Cash paid F. C. Hayward 17.50 

Principal, cemetery fund 10,925.00 

Income unexpended 464.11 



$11,696.21 
FRANK W. IIOIT. Treasurer. 



54 



Treasurer's Report of the Wilde Memorial Library 

1911. 

Feb. 1. To cash in Charlestown Five 

Cents Savings bank $1,000.00 

To cash in Warren Institution for 

Savings , 1,000.00 

To cash in Home Savings bank 1,000.00 

To cash in North End Savings bank, 1,000.00 
To cash in Middlesex Institution for 

Savings 1,000.00 

Bond of West Shore Railroad" Co 1,000.00 

Received interest on money in banks . 201.60 

Interest on bond 40 . 00 

For fines 26.57 

Appropriation for books 200.00 

Unexpended balance, February 1, 1911 655.03 

Herman Goldberg, discount 2.21 



$7,125.41 



1912. 

Feb. 1. By cash in bank $5,000.00 

By bond, Susan, Augusta and Luther 

Conant fund 1,000.00 

Paid for Books: 

W. B. Clark Company 520. 19 

Neil, Adams & Company 13 . 75 

Young Folks' Ed. League 15.44 

Frend & Company 15 . 75 

Pearson & Marsh 15.75 

R. V. Towne 6.25 

Herman Goldberg 44.50 

A. E. Payson 3 . 50 



55 



D. Appleton Company 9.75 

W. D. Tiittle 4.30 

W. A. Wilde & Company 4.00 

Balance unexpended, February 1, 1912 472.23 

$7,125.41 
FRANK W. HOIT, Treasurer. 



56 



ASSESSOR'S REPORT 



Valuation, April 1, 1911 

Buildings, exclusive of land $1,077,320.00 

Land, exclusive of buildings 490,765.00 

Personal estate 720,405.00 

$2,288,490.00 
Valuation, April 1, 1910 2,206,625.00 

Increase in valuation $81,865.00 

Rate of taxation, $14.25. 



Tax Assessed as Follows: 

Real estate $22,345.21 

Personal estate 10,265 . 77 

Polls 1,348.00 

$33,958.98 

Moth tax $186 . 13 

December assessments 195.51 



D( 



Amount of Money Raised 

For state tax $3,080.00 

For grade crossing tax 2,288.00 

For state highway tax 269.00 

For county tax 1,966:49 

For tOAvn grant 25,892.65 

For overlay 462.84 

$33,958.98 

Number of horses assessed 406 

Number of cows assessed 852 

Number of sheep assessed 11 

Number of neat cattle, other than cows 132 

Number of swine assessed 108 

Number of dwelling houses assessed 562 

Number of poll taxes assessed 673 



WILLIAM F. STEVENS, 
WILLIAM F. KELLEY, 
JAMES B. TUTTLE, 

Assessors of Acton. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 



I have examined the accounts of tax collector, school 
committee, selectmen, and treasurer of the town of Acton, 
and to the best of my knowledge I find them correct. 



WILLIAM T. MERRIAM, Auditor. 



March 11, 1912. 



58 



COLLECTOR'S REPORT 



For Fiscal Year Ending February 1, 1912 

Dr. 

Balance uncollected 1909 taxes, 

February 1, 1911 $252.44 

Interest collected 20.47 

$272.91 

Cr. 

Paid treasurer $253 . 21 

Uncollected Fel;>ruary 1, 1912 ... $19.70 

(Estate Joe DeBendette.) 

Dr. 

Balance uncollected 1910 taxes, 

February 1, 1911 $2,603.66 

Interest collected 72.71 

$2,676.37 



59 

Cr. 

Paid treasurer $2,450 . 28 

Abatements 16.50 

$2,466.78 

Uncollected February 1, 1912 ... $209.59 

Dr. 

Town, state and county taxes com- 
mitted to collector, August 15, 

1911 $33,958.98 

Moth tax 186.13 

December assessments 195.51 

$34,340.62 
Interest collected 29 . 85 

$34,370.47 

Cr. 

Paid treasurer $30,524.84 

Abatements 43 . 03 

$30,567.87 

Uncollected February 1, 1912 ... $3,802.60 

WILLIAM F. STEVENS, Collector. 



60 



ROAD COMMISSIONERS' REPORT 



Paid Good Roads Machine Company . $80.65 
South Acton Coal & Lumber Com- 
pany, lumber supplies 232.91 

E. T. Rice, repairs 2. 10 

Buffalo, Pitts Company, repairs . 8.86 

D. C. Harris, stone 25.20 

G. E. Greenough, labor 47.50 

Lunt ]\Ioss Company, engine ... 900.00 

Lunt Moss Company, belt 43 . 20 

Lunt Moss Company, repairs ... 9.11 
American Powder Company, lum- 
ber and labor 83 . 64 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 11.24 

W. C. Robinson, oil 10.30 

A. S. Bradley, repairs 11.20 

Finney & Hoit, batteries 3.00 

T. F. "Parker, supplies 2.40 

George H. Reed, coal 9 . 07 

J. P. Brown, repairs 14.47 

Hall Brothers, lumber and planing 23 . 87 

J. T. McNiff, repairs 12.20 

M. H. Tenney, repairs 32.75 

M. E. Taylor, supplies .97 

C. H. Mead & Company, supplies, 13.87 



$1,577.51 



61 



Paid A. W. Davis, labor $273.59 

A. AY. Davis, teams 824.13 

P. Foley, labor 270.22 

J. Quinlan, labor 195.02 

W. Charter, labor 207.12 

C. E. Wood, labor 98.00 



Paid A. W. Davis, express and tele- 
phone $5 . 93 

A. W. Davis, repairs 12.73 

A. "\Y. Davis, inspection boiler.. 5.00 

A. W. Davis, gravel 25.30 

A. W. Davis, stone delivered ... 34.50 



Paid AY. H. Kingsley, labor $17.50 

W. H. Kingsle}^ teams 244.38 

W. H. Kingsley, men 90.12 

W. H. Kingsley, freight and sup- 
plies 6.80 



Paid A. H. Perkins, labor $242.50 

J. Coughlin, labor 244.00 

Teams 1.128.13 

R. Spinney, labor 54.25 

Other men 157.58 

Gasoline 120.80 

Gravel 29.30 



$1,868.08 



$83.46 



$358.80 



$1,976.56 
$5,864.41 



62 
Cr. 



Use of roller $65.00 

Stone sold 4.00 

Street dirt 12.50 

Use of roller 30.00 

Engine 45 . 00 



$156.50 

We recommend that the town rebuild the bridge over 
Nagog brook on the road leading from the W. C. Robbins 
place to the state farm, as the present bridge is beyond 
permanent repair and is unsafe for travel. 

We recommend the raising of $5,000 for the repair of 
roads. 

The Alamo gasoline engine purchased in May is giving 
good satisfaction and is in first-class condition at present 
time. 

A. W. DAVIS, 
A. H. PERKINS, 
W. H. KINGSLEY. 



63 



REPORT OF TREE WARDEN 



I submit my report as tree warden. 

Town raised for this department .... $400 . 00 
Received for arsenate of lead and 

labor on private trees 22.28 



Expended as follows: 

S. B. Church, supplies $37.10 

E. R. Teele, arsenate of lead 159.81 

A. H. Hosmer, printing 3.50 

William H. Kingsley. labor spraying. . 123.50 

Removing dead trees and trimming . . 43.25 



$422.28 



$367.16 

There is from seventy to eighty miles of road in Acton, 
and there is hardly a mile that has not got elm trees on it. 
I have endeavored to spray the most important ones. I 
would also call your attention to the fact that all of the 
shade trees need trimming and that some will have to be 
trimmed to get the full benefit of the electric lights. There 
should be at least $400.00 placed at the disposal of the tree 
warden. 

WILLIAM H. KINGSLEY, 

Tree Warden. 



64 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Burial permits issued in Acton 25 

Burial permits issued in other places 17 

Contagious diseases reported by Board of Health: 

Diphtheria 2 

Scarlet fever 2 

Measles 5 

Typhoid fever 1 

Tuberculosis 1 

No deaths from contagious diseases. 

Cattle inspected: 

Inspected Condemned 

Veal 1,095 50 

Cattle 191 22 

Hogs 165 12 

E. S. FOBES, Agent. 



G5 



CATTLE INSPECTOR'S REPORT 



Number of cattle inspected: 

Cows, milch 601 

Cows, dry 154 

Cows, young 220 

Bulls 48 

Number of swine inspected 140 

Number of sheep inspected 6 

Number of goats inspected 1 

Quarantined twelve, which were taken by the state. 

F. S. WHITCOMB, Inspector. 



66 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

The report of the overseers of the poor for the year 
ending February 1, 1912, is herewith submitted: 

The expense of outside poor has increased a little this 
year caused partl}^ by sickness and accidents to persons 
having a settlement in this town. 

A new law passed last year -^vill greatly simplify the 
matter of legal settlements, and lessen the liability of cities 
and towns in the case of persons residing elsewhere. 

Upon the resignation of Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Callan we 
secured the services of Mr. M. W. Emrick and wife as 
warden and matron of the towTi farm and they have 
worked faithfully during the year and looked carefully 
after the welfare of the inmates who have been two in 
number. A few transient and emergency cases have also 
l)een cared for. 

While the net cost of supporting the poor on the farm 
has increased it is not so much owing to any increase in 
running expenses as to a light apple crop upon which this 
farm depends largely for revenue. 

The warden and matron are to continue their duties 
for another vear. 



67 



Aid Furnished Outside Poor 

M. E. Taylor & Co., groceries and 

supplies • $325 . 80 

Tuttle & Newton, groceries and 

supplies 109.67 

W. E. Whitcomb, meat and provisions, 69.22 

Fred Morrison, milk 10.82 

E. C. Page, burial expenses 20.00 

City of Cambridge, groceries and fuel, 160.14 

City of Boston, hospital charges 5.71 

City of Lawrence, hospital charges . . 33.00 

Town of Randolph, rent and supplies, 101.58 

Town of Leominster, rent and supplies, 65.45 



$901.39 
Due from state 15 . 00 



$886.39 



Inventory of Stock at Fann February 1st, 1912 



11 Cows $660.00 

11 Tons hay and fodder 225.00 

2 Horses 350.00 

Harnesses 50 . 00 

Wagons, carts and sleds 330.00 

Farming implements 175.00 

Pump 100.00 

Grain and oyster shells 55.00 

Phosphate 5.00 

Barrels 5.00 



68 



Coal 8.00 

Wood cut for stove 25 . 00 

Set measures 1 . 00 

Salt .50 

Horse Blankets 5 . 00 

35 Hens 35.00 

Potatoes 60.00 

Apples 10.00 

Preserves, pickles, etc 25 . 00 

Household goods and kitchen 

utensils 275.00 

Groceries and supplies 25.00 

Robes 6.00 

Ice 10.40 

15 Cords wood at house 52 . 50 

11 Cords kindling at school houses . . 49 . 50 

Vinegar 5 . 00 

Salt pork 30.00 

Pig 6.00 



Support of Poor on Farm 

W. E. Whitcomb, meat and provisions, $7 . 18 

J. S. Moore, meat and provisions .... 156.05 
M. E. Taylor & Co., groceries and 

supplies 202.95 

C. H. Mead & Co., groceries and grain, 269.89 
Tuttle & Newton, groceries and 

supplies 13 . 68 

George H. Reed, grain, etc 495.68 

George H. Reed, grain, balance 1910, 308.00 

E. Z. Stanley, plumbing and repairs . 41.85 

Finney & Hoit, household goods 53 . 70 

Rider Ericsson Co., repairs on engine 

and pump 20 . 34 

S. B. Ineson, fish and groceries 76.29 



$2,583.90 



69 



P. J. Callan, salary 80.36 

M. W. Emrick, salary 372.50 

M. W. Emrick, sundries 7.20 

M. W. Emrick, setting eggs 2.00 

M. W. Emrick, boots for man 3.87 

M. W. ',Emrick. medical attendance 

horse 5 . 00 

M. W. Emrick. cranberries and killing 

pigs 2.50 

M. W. Emrick, 1 bushel onions 1.00 

M. W. Emrick, 1 hand saw 1 .25 

X. E. Tel. and Tel. Co 17.80 

W. F. Kelley, paid G. L, Noyes carting 

milk 12.85 

W. F. Kelley, paid for help 140.17 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co 6.94 

W. L. Holden, pigs 11.00 

Charles Calder, labor 4.88 

H. T. Clark, repairs 1.50 

George H. Cash, ice and labor 16.73 

O. A. Knowlton, fertilizer 35.50 

E. R. Teele, arsenate of lead 8 . 60 

F. S. Whitcomb, mowing machine 

repairs 6 . 50 

E. L. Spinney, cow 68 . 00 

E. L. Spinney, labor 16.50 

Fritz Oelschlegel, new collar and re- 
pairing harness 14.97 

H. W. Covell, hay 55.50 

Dr. J. X. Murray, professional services. 12 . 00 

A. H. Perkins, sawing wood 10.00 

J. T. McXiff , shoeing and repairs .... 9 . 10 

E. P. Gates, shoeing and repairs .... 30.80 

M. L. Brown, 2 clippers, can and brush, 5.40 

J. P. Brown, shoeing 1 . 50 



$2,607.53 



70 



Expenditures $2,607 . 53 

Inventory 1911 2,650.20 

$5,257. 7? 

Inventory 1912 $2,583.90 

Receipts from farm 1,569.43 

$4,153. 3;-5 

$1,104.40 
Bills 1910 not received in time for last 

report 352.46 

Cost of supporting poor on farm for 

year $751.94 



W. F. KELLEY, Chairman, 
E. H. HALL, Clerk, 
W. L. HOLDEN, 
Board of Overseers of the Poor. 



71 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS. 



For the Year Ending February 1, 1912. 



We present the following schedule showing the amounts 
of the several funds for the perpetual care of cemetery lots 
and the income and expenditures on account of each fund 
for the year, 

HERBERT T. CLARK, 
JULIAN TUTTLE, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Cemeterv Commissioners. 






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77 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE GOODNOW FUND. 



For the Year Ending February 1, 1912. 



Investments. 



Warren Institution for Savings, Book 

83,531 $1,000.00 

Warren Institution for Savings, unex- 
pended income for care of cem- 
etery lot 39 . 70 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank, 

Book 71,200 1,000.00 

City Institution for Savings, Lowell, 

Book 84,244 1,000.00 

$3,039.70 

Receipts. 



Warren Institution for Savings, divi- 
dends $40.00 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank, 

dividends 40.00 

City Institution for Savings dividends 40.00 



$120.00 



78 

Payments. 

Paid Julian Tnttle, care of Goodnow 

lot in Woodlawn cemetery. . , $6.50 
Unexpended income for care of 
cemetery lot, deposited wdth 
Warren Institution for Sav- 
ings 13.50 

Herbert F. Robbins, treasurer of 
the Evangelical Congrega- 
tional church in Acton 100.00 



$120.00 
f 

I 

LUTHER CONANT, 

I. WARREN FLAGG, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Trustees of Goodnow Fund. 



79 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF ACTON MEMORIAL 
LIBRARY 1911-1912 



Trustees 

LUTHER COXAXT, President 
E. FAULKNER COXAXT, Secretary 
HORACE F. TUTTLE 
MOSES TAYLOR DELETTE H. HALL 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD J. SIDXEY WHITE 

LUCIUS A. HESSELTOX FRAXK R. KXOWLTON 



In presenting their tAventy-second annual report the 
trustees would call attention to the growth of the library. 
At the time of opening in 1890 it contained about 4.000 
volumes, in 1900 about 7,000 volumes, and at the present 
time about 12.000 volumes. 

The income of the funds donated for the use of the 
library together with the annual appropriation of the toAvn 
of $200, have made it possible to add several hundred 
volumes of the best of current literature to the library 
each year. 

A catalogue of the new books added the past year 
will be found on the last pages of the annual town report, 
which we trust Avill be a convenience appreciated by our 
townspeople. The last general catalogue printed was in 



80 



1897. The large number of books added since that time 
necessitates a recataloguing of the whole library in order 
to make its volumes accessible to readers. 

The trustees are now considering ways and means to 
provide for this work. 

The trustees believe that not alone is it important to 
expend in the best possible manner the money intrusted 
to them but they are under obligations to make the best 
arrangements for the largest usefulness of the library. To 
this end they would like to be able to provide better facili- 
ties for the distribution of books in the West and South 
villages. It has been suggested that a branch library and 
reading room under the care of a librarian might be 
provided for in each of these villages. We invite 
suggestions from the friends of the library as to what can 
be done to extend its usefulness. Books are now received 
and delivered every Saturday at the stores of C. H. Mead 
■& Co., and Finney & Hoit, where catalogues and cards will 
be found for the accommodation of any one desiring to 
take books. 

The library is open afternoons and evenings every 
Wednesday and Saturday. 

In 1895 Mr. William A. Wilde gave to the town $5,000 
on condition that the income should be annually expended 
for books and magazines and that the town should annually 
appropriate $200, to be expended for the same purposes. 

The financial report will be found in the reports of 
the selectmen and treasurer. 

We recommend for the support of the library for the 
ensuing year $400 for current expenses and $200 for the 
purchase of books. Appended is the annual report of the 
librarian. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

For the Trustees. 



81 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT 



Accessions — Number of volumes in the library February 
1, 1911, 11,201 ; increase by purchase 485, of which 42 were 
obtained by binding magazines; increase by gift 23. Total 
increase 508. Number of volumes in the library February 
1, 1912, 11,709. 

Circulation — Number of days the library was opened 
103. Number of volumes circulated 7.115. Daily average 
circulation 69.95 plus. Largest daily circulation 131 on 
April 22, 1911. Smallest daily circulation 28 on October 
4, 1911. 

Received for catalogues, fines, etc $26.81 

Expended for postage .24 



$26.57 

Gifts of books have been received from the following 
sources : U. S. Government, 3 ; State of Massachusetts, 15 ; 
Walter Baker & Co., 1 ; A. C. Coolidge, 1 ; J. A. Balback, 1 ; 
W. L. Adams, 1; D. M. Tipton, 1. 

Periodicals subscribed for and in the reading room, 21 : 
Monthly, American Atlantic, Century, Cosmopolitan, Current 
Literature, Everybody's, H^arper's, Munsey's, McClure's, 
National, Popular Mechanics, Review of Reviews, Scribner's, 
St. Nicholas, World's Work, World Today. 

Weekly — Independent, Living Age, Outlook, Youth's 
Companion, Scientific American. 

ARTHUR F. DAVIS, Librarian. 



82 

LIST OF BOOKS ADDED 

1911-1912 



ARTS, AND SCIENCES, ETC. 



Abbott, Lyman — The Home Builder 953.11 

Abbott, Lyman — The Spirit of Democracy 951.21 

Abbott, W. J. — The Story of Our Navy for Young 

Americans 255.16 

Addams, Jane — Twenty Years at Hull House . . . 447.18 

Allen, N. B. — Industrial Studies, United States, 271 Al 
Ames, E. S. — The Psychology of Religous 

Experience 962.19- 

Andrews, C. M., Gambill, J. M., Tall, L. L.— 

A Bibliography of History for Schools 

and Libraries 211A2 

Angell, Norman — The Great Illusion 915.17 

Anon — A Living without a Boss 271A28 

Anon — Letters to a Ministerial Son 363A6 

Anon— Profits in Poultry 952.12 

Ashenhurts, J. O. — The Day of the Country 

Church 962.8 

Bangs, M. R.— Jeanne D'Arc the Maid of France, 433.27 

Beers, H. A. — From Chaucer to Tennyson 361A4 

Bellock, Hilarie— The French Revolution 263.13 

Bennett, Arnold — How to Live on Twenty-Four 

Hours a Day 915.19 

Bennett, Arnold— Mental Efficiency 361A9 

Benson, A. C. — John Ruskin 437.19 

Benson, A. C— The Silent Isle 953.12 

Bingham, Hiram — Across South America 312A2 

Bisland, E.— At the Sign of the Hobby Horse . . . 953.13 

Black, Hugh— Comfort 962.13 

Black, Hugh — Happiness 363A1 



83 



Bolles, Albert S. — The Home of Library of Law, 

6 Vols 916.17 

Borup, George — A Tenderfoot with Peary 312A7 

Bowne, B. P.— The Essence of Religion 962.9 

Brierly, J.— Life and the Ideal 363A7 

Brooks, J. G. — An American Citizen, Life of 

William Henry Baldwin, Jr 437.37 

Brooks, Robert C. — Corruption in American 

Politics and Life 271A12 

Brower, Harriette— The Art of the Pianist 271A21 

Brown, Frederick — (Al Priddy) Through the 

Mill 437.21 

Bruce, H. A. — Daniel Boone and the Wilderness 

Road 255.17 

Bryce, James — Social Institutions of the United 

States 915.24 

Building Trades Handbook 951.20 

Burns, E. E.— The Story of Great Inventions . . . 951.9 

Busbey, K. C. — Home Life in America 255.18 

Butterfield, K. L. — The Country Church and the 

Rural Problem 962.17 

Byington, M. F. — Homestead, the Households of 

a Mill Town, Russell Sage Foundation . . 271A2 

Cabot, E. L.— Ethics for Children 915.18 

Caffin, Charles H.— The Story of French Printing, 841.16 

Caffin, Charles H.— The Story of Spanish Printing, 857.17 

Campbell, W. and Martin, T. M.— Canada 311A14 

Carlton, William— One Way Out 952.3 

Carnegie, Andrew — Problems of Today 915.25 

Chatterton, E. K.— The Romance of the Ship 951.10 

Chesterton, G. K. — What's Wrong with the 

World 944.18 

Clark, Alfred— Ceylon (Peeps Series) 311A7 

Collier, Price— The West in the East 312A10 

Coman, K. — The Industrial History of the United 

States 952.4 



84 



Comer, William A. — Landmarks in the Old Bay- 
State 312A3 

Compton, E. H. and Baillie, Grohman W. A. — 

Tyrol 334.16 

Corbin, T. W.— Engineering of Today 952.5 

Conslon, C. J. D. — Korea (Peeps Series) 311A10 

Creelman, James — Diaz Master of Mexico 312A3 

Crook, Col. William H. — Through Five Adminis- 
trations 437.15 

Crothers, S. M. — Among Friends 953.14 

Cundall, H. M.— Birket Foster 841.14 

Curtis, William E.— Around the Black Sea 312A9 

Curtis, William E. — Turkestan, the Heart of Asia, 312A8 

Doane, R. W. — Insects and Diseases 952.6 

Dorr, R. C— What Eight Million Women Want, 915.20 
Duncan, R. K. — Some Chemical Problems of 

Today 272A1 

Dunne, F. P. — Mr. Dooley Says 953.15 

Dyer, L. F. and Martin, T. C— Edison, His Life 

and Inventions, 2 Vols 951.11 

Dyer, Walter A.— The Richer Life 363A8 

Edwards, D. M.— The Toll of the Arctic Seas . . . 323.19 
Eliot, Charles W. — The Conflict Between Indivi- 
dualism and Collectivisms in a Democ- 
racy 952.7 

Eliot, Charles W. — The Durable Satisfaction of 

Life ' 361A1 

Elkington, E. W.— Canada, the Land of Hope . . 311A22 

Enock, C. R.— The Great Pacific Coast 311A15 

Paris, John T.— Making Goods 361A5 

Fernow, B. E.— Care of Trees 952.8 

Field, Eugene — Complete Poems 734.11 

Finck, H. T. — Success in Music and how it is won, 271A4 
Fitch, J. A.— The Steel Workers, (Russell Sage 

Foundation) 271A-: 

Fletcher, C. R. L. — An Introductory History of 

England, 2 Vols 211 A4 



85 



Fletcher, C. R. and Kipling, Rndyard — A History 

of England 211A7 

Forbes, E. A.— The Land of the White Helmet . . 311A11 
Frank, H. A. — A Vagabond Journey Around the 

World 311A9 

Eraser, John F. — Australia, the Making of a 

Nation 311A16 

French, Allen— The Book of Vegetables 271A5 

French, Allen— The Siege of Boston 255.20 

Funston, Frederick — Memories of Two Wars . . . 211A6 

Geddes Pond, Thompson, J. A.— Evolution 271A19 

Gilbert, George and Collins, W. W. — Cathedral 

Cities of England 311A17 

Gilbey, Sir Walter — George Morland 841.15 

Gilder, R. W. — Grover Cleveland, a Record of 

Friendship 432.36 

Gilliat, E.— Heroes of the Elizabethan Age 431.25 

Goss, W. L.— A Life of Grant for Boys and Girls, 437.38 
Graham, White — Claude, the Story of the Aero- 
plane 271A25 

Grayson, David — Adventures in Friendship .... 953.16 

Griffis, William E.— China's Story 312A4 

Griffith, W. L.— The Dominion of Canada 312A11 

Haddon, A. C. — History of Anthropology 271A15 

Haggard, H. R. — Rural Denmark and its Lessons, 312A12 
Halligan, James E. — ^Fundamentals of Agri- 
culture 271A22 

Hamilton, C. G. — Piano Teaching, its Principles 

and Problems 271A6 

Hart, A. B.— The Obvious Orient 312A5 

Hart, A. B.— The Southern South 255.19 

Haultain, Arnold E. — Reminiscences of Goldwin 

Smith 432.38 

Henry, W. A. — Feeds and Feeding New Edition, 271A23 

Hill, J. J. — Highways of Progress 952.9 

Hillis, Newell D.— The Contagion of Character . . 363.A2 

Hillis, Newell D.— The Quest of Happiness .... 962.12 



86 



Hissey, J. J.— The Charm of the Road 311A18 

Kitchens, Robert— The Spell of Egypt 312A13 

Hobson, J. A.— Science of Wealth 271A28 

Hodges, George — Everyman's Religion 363A3 

Holland, R. S.— Historic Girlhoods 236.21 

Howells, W. D.— My Mark Twain 432.27 

Huntington, Ellsworth — Palestine and its Trans- 
formations 312A6 

Husband, Joseph — A Year in a Coal Mine 271A7 

Ilbert, Sir Courtenay — Parliament, its History, 

Constitution and Practice 272A2 

Jefferson, Charles E. — Why we may Believe in 

Life after Death 363A4 

Jenks, Tudor — The Book of Famous Sieges 237.12 

Jewett, S. 0. — Letters edited by Annie Fields . . . 437.18 

Johnson, A. — American Politics 952.10 

Johnson, Clifton — The Pietuiesque St. Lawrence, 311A12 

Johnson, Clifton — The Rocky Mountains 311A19 

Johnson, Sir H. H. — The Opening up of Africa . . 312A14 

Jordan, D. S. — Leading American Man of Science, 431.24 

Jordan, W. G. — Little Problems in Married Life, 953.17 
Kent, Charles F. — Biblical Geography and 

History 962.14 

Kipling, R.— Collected Verse 721.8 

Laurence, R. M. — Primitive Psycho-Therapy and 

Quackery 944.13 

Lindsay, Forbes — Cuba and her People of Today, 313A4 
Lossing, B. J. — History of the United States, 4 

Vols 211A1 

Lounsbury, Thomas R. — The Early Literary 

Career of Robert Bro-wniing 361A7 

Lyman, William D. — The Columbia River 211A3 

Lynd, Robert — Home Life in Ireland 311A23 

Mahan, A. T. — America's Interest in Inter- 
national Conditions 951.14 

Map of Eastern Massachusetts and Southern New 

Hampshire 271 A14 



87 



Marshall H. and Milton G. E.— The Scenery of 

London 311A20 

Martin, F. T.— The Passing of the Idle Rich 271A24 

Marvin, F. R.— Love and Letters 361A8 

Masson, R. — Edinburgh (Peeps Series) 311 A8 

Maude, Aylmer— The Life of the Tolstoy, 2 Vols., 435.16 

Mayo, N. S. — Diseases of Animals 951.12 

McClung, N. L. — Sowing Seeds in Danny 126A1 

McGiffert, A, C— Martin Luther, the Man and 

his Work 437.21 

Mempes, Mortimer and Mempes, Dorothy — Paris, 334.15 

Noyes, William, Hand work in Wood 952.11 

Ostrogorsky, M. — Democracy and the Party 

System in the United States 915.21 

Ostwald, William — Introduction to Chemistry . . 271A26 

Packard, Winthrop— Florida Trails 311A21 

Prine, H. E.— Old People 361A2 

Paine, Ralph D.— The Book of Buried Treasure . 313A1 

Paterson, Smyth J. — The Gospel of the Hereafter, 962.11 
Pearson, H. G. — An American Railroad Builder, 

John Murray Forbes 437.16 

Peary, Robert E.— The North Pole 323.22 

Peixotto, Ernest — Romantic California 311A13 

Pennell, E. R.— Our House and the People in it, 953.18 

Penniman, James H. — Making the Most of Books, 361A6 

Pinchot, G.^The Fight for Conservation 951.15 

Price, O. W.^The Land we Live in, the Boys' 

Book of Conservation 271A16 

Redgrave, G. R. — Water Color Painting in 

England 857.19 

Report of the Commission on Country Life 271A20 

Roberts, Charles C. G. (Editor)— The World's 

Best Poetry, 5 Vols 713.5 

Roe, E. T. and Loomis, E. G. — Business and Law, 261A1 
Rogers, J. S.— Earth and Sky Every Child Should 

Know 952.13 

Ross, E. A.— Latter Day Sinners Hiid Saints 951.16 



88 



Sadler, William S. — The Science of Living, or 

the Art of Keeping Well 944.14 

Schreiner, Olive — Woman and Labor 271A17 

Selons, Edmund — The Wonders of the Insect 

World 271A8 

Shackleton, R. and E. — Adventures in Home 

Making 951.18 

Shumaker, E. E.— God and Man 962.10 

Singleton, Esther — A Guide to Great Cities 313A2 

Skelton, 0. D. — Socialism, a Critical Analysis . . 271A11 

Slattery, C. L. — Alexander Viets Griswold Allen, 437.34 

Slosson, E. E. — Great American Universities .... 944.19 

Stanley, Henry M. — Autobiography 437.20 

St. Augustine Confessions 962.15 

Steiner, E. A. — Against the Current 447.27 

St. John, T. M.— Things a Boy Should Know 

About Wireless 271A13 

Stockwell, H. C. — Essential Elements of Business 

Character 271.A18 

Stoddard, J. L.— Lectures, 15 Vols 312A1 

Storey, Morfield and Emerson, E. W. — Ebenezer 

Rockwood Hoar 437.35 

Stowe, C. E. and L, B. — Harriet Beecher Stowe . 437.36 
Taft, Marcus L. — Strange Siberia, along the trans 

Siberian Railway 313A5 

Tappan, Eva M.— The Story of the Roman People, 237.14 

The Mechanics Handbook 95L19 

Thomas, J. J. — The American Fruit Culturist . . 271A9 

Thomson, M. P.— Denmark 323.16 

Tipton, D. M.— An Honest Effort 962.16 

Torry, George A. — A Lawyer's Recollections . . . 447.28 

Tucker, W. J.— The Church in Modern Society . 363A5 

Van Dyke, J. C— What is Art 857.20 

Van Hise, C. R. — The Conservation of Natural 

Resources in the United States 951.17 

Various Authors — Stories of the Republic 211A5 

Various Authors— The Church and Life of Today, 962.18 



89 



Villard, 0. G. — John Brown, a Biography Fifty 

Years After 447.29 

Walker, Hugh — The Literature of the Victorian 

Era 361A3 

Wallis, F. E.— How to Know Architecture 857.18 

Walter Baker & Co., Cocoa and Chocolate 915.23 

Walter, L. E.— Russia 323.17 

Washburn, C. C. — Pages from the Book of Paris, 334.14 

Watson, George C— Farm Poultry 271A10 

Weatherford, W. D.— Negro Life in the South . . 915.22 

Wheeler, H. F. B.— The Boys of Napoleon 237.13 

Whitney, Harry — Hunting with the Eskimos . . . 323.23 
Williams, A. — The Wonders of the Modern Rail- 
way 951.13 

Williams, M.— Paris 334.13 

Winter, N. O.— Brazil and her People of Today, 323.15 

Wood, Edith E.— An Oberland Chalet 335.18 

Wright, Helen S.— The Great White North 323.24 

FICTION AND JUVENILE 

Abbott, E. H.— Molly make-believe 512.31 

Adams, I. W. — Yodogima in Feudalistic Japan, 221A1 

Altsheler, J. A. — The Horsemen of the Plains . . . lllAl 

Altsheler, J. A.— The Riflemen of the Ohio 517.21 

Anon— The Corner of Harley Street 221A2 

Bacon, E. M.— The Boys Drake 112A4 

Bacon, Joseph D. — While Caroline was Growing, 112A9 

Balback, Julia A.— Cupid Intelligent 517.29 

Barclay, F. L.— The Mistress of Shenstone 512.28 

Barclay, F. L.— The Following of the Star 222A1 

Baroness, Orczy — The Heart of a Woman 515.27 

Barrie, J. M.— Peter and Wendy 112A10 

Bartlett, F. O.— The Forest Castaways 112A11 

Bartlett, F. 0.— The Prodigal Pro Tem 517.22 

Beach, E. L. — Midshipman Ralph Osborn at Sea, 112A5 

Beach, Rex— The Ne'er-do-well 222A2 



90 



Heiinett, Arnold— Buried Alive 517.23 

Bennett, Arnold— Clayhanger 512.29 

Bindloss, Harold— Masters of the Wheatlands . . 512.30 

Bindloss, Harold — Sidney Carteret-rancher 522.31 

Bindloss, Harold — The Boy Ranchers of Puget 

Sound 112A6 

Bold, Robert— One Hundred Bible Stories 112A13 

Blanchard, Grace— Phil's Happy Girlhood 112A7 

Bosher, Kale L.— Miss Gibbie Gault 517.27 

Brady, C. T.— Bob Dashaway 112A12 

Brown, Edna A. — Four Gordons . . . .* 112A14 

Burnett, F. H.— The Secret Garden 112A8 

Burnham, C. L.— Clever Betsy 517.24 

Carruth, H.— Track's End 113A6 

Cathenwood, M. H.— Rocky Fork 113A3 

Channon, Frank E. — An American Boy at Henley, 113A1 

Child, R. W.— Jim Hands " .\ 521.27 

Coe, F. E. (Editor)— The Louisa Alcott Story- 
book 113A2 

Coleman, G. P. — A Captain of Fifteen 113A5 

Coolidge, A. C— Our Nations Altar 517.28 

Comfort, W. L. — Routledge Rides Alone 517.25 

Coombs, F. L. — Young Crusoes of the Sky 113A4 

Cotes, Mrs. Everard— The Burnt Offering 517.26 

Crichton, F. E.— The Soundless Tide '. . . 547.5 

Crockett, S. R. — Love's Young Dream 522.13 

Cutting, M. S.— The Unforeseen . 522.12 

Deland, Margaret — The Iron Woman 515.21 

Duncan, Norman — Billy Topsail and Company . . 114A2 

Elliott, Emilia— A Texas Blue Bonnet . 522.22 

Elliott, Emilia— Patricia 522.23 

Farnol, Jeffrey— The Broad Highway 522.32 

Ferber, Edna — Dawn 'Hara 547.6 

Forrester, Izola L. — Those Preston Twins 116A1 

French, A.— Stories That End Well 223A1 

Glasgow, Ellen— The Miller of Old Church 522.25 

Grey, Lane — The Heritage of the Desert 522.24 



91 



Harben, W. N.— Dixie Hart 533.26 

Harker, L. A. — Miss Esperance and Mr. 

Wycherly 515.22 

Harpers & Brothers, Harpers Novelettes 545.29 

Harris, Cora— A Circuit Rider's ^ife 522.26 

Harrison, H. S.— Queed • 522.27 

Henry, O.— Heart of the West 533.27 

Henry, 0.— The Four Million 532.33 

Henry, 0. — The Trimmed Lamp 515.24 

Henry, O.— The Voice of the City 515.23 

Hill, Marion— Harmony Hall, a Story for Girls . . 225A1 

Holmes, M. J.— Aikenside 522.14 

Holmes, M. J.— Edith Lyle's Secret 522.15 

Holmes, M. J.— Homestead on the Hillside 522.16 

Holmes, M. J.— Marian Grey 522.17 

Holmes, M. J.— Meadow Brook 522.18 

Holmes, M. J.— The Rector of St. Mark's 522.20 

Hoover, Bessie R.— Opal 532.34 

Hoover, Bessie R.— Pa Flickinger's Folks 532.35 

Hopkins, William J.— The Indian Book 121A2 

Hoyt, E.— The Little Charm Club 121A1 

Johnston, Annie F. — Mary Ware in Texas 123A2 

Johnson, Mary— The Long Roll 522.28 

Kelly, Mira— The Little Young Ladyship 226A1 

Kenneth, Brown R. — Two Boys in a Gyrocar . . . 124A2 

Kester, Vaughan — The Prodigal Judge 522,29 

flings] ey, F. M. — The Transfiguration of Miss 

Philura 226A1 

Kipling, R. — Rewards and Fairies 533.28 

Kirkland, Winifred— The Home Comers 533.24 

Knowles, R. E.— The Handicap 533.29 

Knowles, R. E. — The Singer of the Kootenay . . . 515.25 

Lagerl of Selma, Further Adventures of Nils . . . 124A15 

Lant, A. C— Freebooters of the Wilderness 533.30 

Lucas, E. v.— The Slow Coach 533.31 

MacGowan, A. — The Sword of the Mountains . . . 533.32 

Marks, Jeanette~The End of a Song 515.30 



92 



^larriott. Charles— Now 533.33 

Marshall, A.— The Eldest Son 227 Al 

IMason, A. B. — Tom Strong, Washington's Scout, 126A7 

]\laugham and Grey — Smiths 515.26 

McClung, N. L.— The Second Chance 538.25 

IMcDonald, E. B. and Dalrymple, J. — Boris in 

Russia 126A3 

]\IcDonald, E. B. and Dalrymple, J. — Hassam in 

Egypt 126A8 

]\IcDonald, E. B. and Dalrymple, J. — Manuel in 

Mexico 126A2 

McDonald, E. B. and Dalrymple, J. — Ume Sam in 

Japan 126A4 

Mclntyre, J. T. — The Young Continentals at 

Bunker Hill 126A5 

]\[ontgomery, L. M.— The Story Girl 522.30 

]\Iorris, Gouverneur — The Spread Eagle 533.34 

IMuller, J. W.— Rulers of the Surf 533.35 

Napier, Rosamond — The Faithful Failure 515.29 

Nicholson, M. — The Siege of the Seven Suitors . . 5^3.36 

Norris, Kathleen— Mother 227A2 

Oppenheim, E. P. — Havoc 227A3 

Otis, James — Bo}^ Scouts in the Maine Woods . . 171A6 

Otis, James — Mary of Plymouth 171x\2 

Otis, James — Peter of New Amsterdam 171A3 

Otis, James — Richard of Jamestown 171A5 

Otis, James — Ruth of Boston 171A1 

Otis, James — Stephen of Philadelphia 171 A4 

Paine, A. B. — The Hollow Tree and Deep Wood 

Book 127A3 

Paine, A. B. — The Hollow Tree and Snowed-in 

Book 127A4 

Paine, R. D.— A Cadet of the Black Star Line . . . 127A2 

Pier, A. S.— The Juster of St. Timothy 127A5 

Rhoades, Nina — Victorines' Book 176A1 

Richards, Laura E. — Up to Calvins' 545.25 

Richmond, G. S. — Strawberrv Acres 176A2 



93 



Rolland, Romain — Jean Christophe 545.26 

Seton-Thompson, E.— Rolf in the Woods 161A7 

Sheehan, Canon— The Queen's Fillett 547.10 

Sidney, ]\Iargaret — Five Little Peppers and their 

Friends 161A4 

Sidney. ]\Iargaret — Five Little Peppers at School 161 A3 
Sidney. ^Margaret — Five Little Peppers in the 

Little Brown House 161A5 

Sinclair, May— The Creators 545.27 

Smith, C. C— Bob Knight's Diary on a Farm .... 161 A8 

Sparhawk, D. B. — Dorothy Brooke's Experiments 161A6 
Stevens. W. 0. and Barclay McKee — The Young 

Privateersman 161A2 

Storr, Francis— Half a Hundred Hero Tales 161A9 

Stratton, Porter Gene— Freckles 545.28 

Stratton, Porter Gene — The Harvester 515.20 

Taggart, M. A.— Betty Gaston, the Seventh Girl. . 162A1 

Tallentyre, S. G. — Basset, a Village Chronicle . . . 545.30 

Tappan, Eva M. — Letters from Colonial Children, 162A3 

The Children's Hour, 10 volumes 175A1 

The Children's Library of Work and Play, 10 

volumes 174A1 

Thurston, K. C— Max 546.3 1 

Tomlinson, E. T. — Lighthouse Harry's Legion . . 162 A2 

Tompkins, J. W. — Mothers and Fathers 547.4 

Train. Ethel— Son 547.11 

Tynan. K.— Freda 547.3 

Various Authors — Almost True Tales 111A2 

Warde, Margaret — Betty Wales Decides 165A6 

Warner, Anne — When Woman Proposes 515.19 

Watts. Mary S.— The Legacy 547.7 

Webster, Jean — Just Patty 547.8 

Wells, Carolyn— Patty's Motor Car 547.9 

Wells, Carolyn— Patty's Success 515.16 

Wheeler, F. R.— The Boy With the United States 

Foresters 162A4 

Whitcomb, V. L. — Concerning Himself 515.18 



94 



Wliite, S. E.— The Rules of the Game 515.17 

Whiting, Robert R. — Four Hundred Good Stories 515.31 

Wiggin, K. D.— Mother Carey's Chickens 165A5 

Wright, Harold B. — The AVinning of Barbara 

Worth 515.2a 

Young Folks Library of Vocations, 10 volumes. . . 175A2 



MAGAZINES AND REFERENCES 



American — June to November, 1910 1144.12' 

American— December, 1910, to May, 1911 1144.13 

Atlantic— July to December, 1910 1145.8 

Atlantic — January to June, 1911 1145.9 

Century— May, 1910, to October, 1910 1143.3 

Century— November. 1910, to April, 1911 1143.4 

Century— May to October, 1911 1143.5 

Cosmopolitan — June to November, 1910 1111.14 

Cosmopolitan— December, 1910, to May, 1911 .. . 1111.15 
Current Literature— July, 1910, to December, 

1910 1133.8 

Current Literature — January to June, 1911 1133.9 

Everybody's— July to December, 1910 : . . . 1146.4 

Everybody's — January to June, 1911 1146.5 

Harper's Monthly— June to November, 1910 1134.5 

Harper's Monthly— December, 1910, to May, 1911 1134.6 

McClure's— May, 1910, to October, 1910 1211.2 

McClure's— November, 1910, to April, 1911 1211.3 

McClure's— May to October, 1911 1211.4 

Munsey's— May to October, 1910 1136.3 

Munsey's— November, 1910, to April, 1911 1136.4 

Munsey's— May to October, 1911 1136.5 

National— April to September, 1910 1131.17 

National— October, 1910, to March, 1911 1131.18 

National— April, 1911, to September, 1911 1213.1 

New England— March to August, 1910 1142.3 



95 



New England — September, 1910, to February, 

1911 1142.4 

Popular Mechanics — January to June, 1911 .... 1214.1 
Keview of Reviews — July, 1910, to December, 

1910 1212.3 

Eeview of Reviews — Januarj^ to June, 1911 .... 1212.4 
Scientific American — July to December, 1910. . . . 1147.15 
Scientific American — January to June, 1911 .... 1147.16 

Scribner's— July to December, 1910 1137.3 

Scribner's — January to June, 1911 1137.4 

St. Nicholas— May to October, 1910 1213.1 

St. Nicholas— November, 1910, to April, 1911 .... 1213.2 

World's Work— May to October, 1910 1135.4 

World's Work— November, 1910, to April, 1911. 1135.5 

World's Work— May to October, 1911 1135.6 

World Today— July, 1910, to December, 1910. . . 1132.12 

World Today— January, 1911, to June, 1911 1132.13 

Youths' Companion — July to December, 1910 . . . 1117.21 

Youths' Companion — January to June, 1911 .... 1216.1 

Vital Records of Andover, ]\Iass., to 1850. Volume 1. 

Vital Records of Chester, Mass., to 1850. 

Vital Records of Foxborough, Mass., to 1850. 

Vital Records of Hanson, Mass., to 1850. . 

Vital Records of Ipswich, Mass., to 1850. 

Vital Records of Leominster, Mass., to 1850. 

Vital Records of Newbur>T)ort, Mass., to 1850. 

Vital Records of Pembroke, Mass., to 1850. 

Vital Records of West Boylston, Mass., to 1850. 

Vital Records of Wrentham, Mass., to 1850. 

Annual Report Smithsonian Institution, 1905. 
Appleton's New Practical Cyclopedia. Six volumes. 
Census of Massachusetts. Volume 2 — 1905. 
Manual for the General Court, 1911. 
Massachusetts Reports— Volumes 205 and 206—1910. 
Proceedings United States National Museum. Volume 38 — 
1911. 



96 

The New International Encyclopedia. Seventeen volumes. 

The Railway Library, 1910. 

The Standard Dictionary of Facts. 

Twenty-fourth Annual Report Interstate Commerce 

Commission, 1910. 
Seventy-fourth Annual Report Board of Education, 1909- 

1910. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee "^^ Superintendent 
of Schools 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 
MASSACHUSETTS 

For Year EnJmg January 31. 



1912 




THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 
1912 



SCHOOL CALENDAR. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 
1912. 

March 22. Winter term closes 15 weeks 

Vacation, One Week. 

April 1. Spring term opens. 

June 21. Spring term closes 12 weeks 

Summer Vacation, Ten Weeks. 

Sept. 3, Fall term opens 

Nov. 27. Fall term closes 13 weeks 

Thanksgiving Recess, Four Days. 

Dec. 2. Winter term opens. 

Vacation from December 20 to January 6, 1913 — Two Weeks 

1913. 

March 28. Winter term closes 15 weeks 

Vacation, One Week. 

April 7. Spring term opens. 

June 27. Spring term closes 12 weeks 

Total school weeks, 40. 

COMMON SCHOOLS. 

1913. Same as above, except as follows: 

June 13. Spring term closes 10 weeks 



Total school weeks, 38. 



SPECIAL EXERCISE DAYS AND HOLIDAYS 



Lincoln exercises, one hour. 
Washington exercises, one hour. 
Washington's Birthday, holiday. 
Longfellow exercises, half -hour. 
Patriotic exercises, one hour. 
Patriot's day, holiday. 
Arbor day exercises, half-hour. 
Emerson exercises, half -hour. 
Patriotic exercises, one hour. 
Memorial day, holiday. 
Flag day exercises, half-hour. 
Columbus exercises, one hour. 
Thanksgiving exercises, one hour. 
Thanksgiving day, holiday. 
Holiday in the schools. 

Lincoln exercises, one hour. 
Washington exercises, one hour. 
Patriotic exercises, one hour. 
Arbor day exercises, half-hour. 
Patriotic exercises, one hour. 
Memorial da v. holidav. 



1912. 




Feb. 


12. 


Feb. 


21. 


Feb. 


22. 


Feb. 


27. 


April 


18. 


April 


19. 


April 


26. 


May 


24. 


May 


29. 


May 


30. 


June 


14. 


Oct. 


11. 


Nov. 


27. 


Nov. 


28. 


Nov. 


29. 


1913. 




Feb. 


12. 


Feb. 


21. 


April 18. 


April 


25. 


May 


29. 


May 


30. 



Teachers are expected to devote a reasonable amount 
of time in preparation for all patriotic exercises. Other spe- 
cial exercise periods are for study and explanations suitable 
to the occasion. Each teacher above grade four should de- 
vote a ful hour each term to an investigation of local history, 
local interests and local improvement plans. 



SCHOOL OFFICERS AND TEACHERS. 

School Committee. 

Samuel A. Christie Term expires 1912 

Allen Brooks Parker. Chairman Term expires 1913 

Edwin A. Phalen, Secretary Term expires 1914 

Superintendent. 

Frank H, Hill, Residence, Littleton, Mass. 
Telephone No. 26-2 Littleton. 

School Physicians. 
Samuel A. Christie, ]\L D.. Address, South Acton, Mass. 
Frank E. Tasker, M. D., Address, West Acton, Mass. 
Frederick K. Shaw, ^l. D.. Address, Acton Center, Mass. 

Truant Oflacers. 
Albert S. Bradley i^ddress, South Acton. 
Thomas Scianlon, Address, West Acton. 
Asaph Parlin, Address, Acton Center. 

Janitors. 

Fred S. G-lines, Address, South Acton. 
Thomas Scanlon, Address, West Acton. 
Asaph Parlin, Address, Acton Center. 









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STANDING RULES. 



*Rnle 1. Children under five years shall not be 
admitted to the public schools. 

Rule 2. Pupils shall be promoted from grade to grade 
and school to school, according to merit. Thorough and 
satisfactory work will be required of pupils in a lower grade 
or school before entering a higher grade or school. 

Rule 3. Children who have not previously attended 
any school shall be admitted to the public schools only at the 
beginning of the fall term. 

Rule 4. Pupils shall be held responsible for books 
loaned to them until returned to the teacher. 

Rule 5. No repairs shall be made upon the public 
property in the care of the school committee, except by 
their authorized agents. 

Rule 6. There shall be no signal for "no school" on 
stormy or other inclement days, but parents shall determine 
in their individual cases whether it is expedient to send 
their children to school or not. 

^When the birthday of a child falls on or before the 15th 
day of the month it is reckoned as falling upon the first day 
of that month. 



GENERAL REPORT. 



Accounts. 

Previous to the beginning of the town year. February 1^ 
1911, the school accounts had been kept by the selectmen. 
In the minds of your committee this system was not a satis- 
factory one. The work performed by the selectmen in these 
matters was exclusively clerical. 

Several reasons suggested themselves to the committee 
for changing the former system, among which were the 
following : An occasional mistake on the part of the select- 
men in keeping the accounts rendered it annoying to the 
school committee, who were usually called upon to furnisii 
the explanation. The extra time consumed by the passage 
of the school bills through the hands of the selectmen before 
the Avarrant for their payment could reach the treasurer 
was annoying to the creditors of the town whose bills were 
against the school department. The fact that the state 
board of education had required towns to adopt a new 
system of keeping school accounts entirely different from the 
one formerh^ in use in this town and a system somewhat 
complicated and requiring something of a special knowledge 
of school administration, was another reason why it seemed 
to your committee that it was the only proper board to keep 
these accounts and handle its vouchers. However, before 
making any changes in this matter your committee made 
careful inquiry both at the state board of education and at 
the state bureau of statistics and we were advised that the 
majority of small towns were following the practice of hav- 
ing school accounts kept by their committees. We were also 
advised by the attorney general of the state that the select- 
men of towns had no power whatever in the matter of dis- 



9 



iDursement of school funds and performed a needless function 
in towns where bills passed through their hands. We ac- 
cordingly decided that school accounts should be kept by 
the school committee and that orders for the payment of 
;school bills should be drawn upon the town treasurer direct- 
ly by the committee. The system has been in use now for 
one year and has met with entire satisfaction. The new 
system required by the State Board of Education is radically 
•different from the system formerly in use in this town. 
Formerly it was the practice to tabulate the expenditures 
under the following heads, viz : High School, South School, 
West School, Center School, School Supplies, Miscellaneous 
School Expenses, Repairs on School Grounds and Buildings, 
and Transportation of Scholars in the Common Schools. 
The account which we render herewith follows the form me- 
quired and in our opinion is much more scientific. 

Appropriations and Disbursements. 

We have not attempted to make a close comparison be- 
tween the appropriations and the disbursements in detail, 
because of the fact that the form by which the appropria- 
tions were m.ade is wholly different from the form by which 
w^e are required to account for the disbursements. We have 
tabulated our estimates for expenses the current year in the 
form required in accounting for disbursements. Hereafter 
there ought to be no difficulty in connecting any appropria- 
tion with the disbursements on its account. We have re- 
ceived on account of appropriations and money received 
from various other sources, including the state, $16,713.10, 
and have expended altogether $17,459.64, an overdraft of 
$746.54. In the main, this overdraft has been occasioned by 
the following facts: 

We have received from the state treasury for income 
of Massachusetts School fund $1,084.47. where we received 
^1.201.00 last year, a decrease of $116.53. We have received 
from the state treasurer for superintendence^ $312.50, whero 



10 



we received $375 last year, a decrease of $62.50. In addi- 
tion to this decrease in receipt we have had to meet an in- 
crease of $71.20 on account of the superintendent's salary, 
making a total overdraft for this purpose of $133.79. The 
facts relating to this matter are more particularly explained 
in that part of this report entitled, "The Reorganization of 
the Superintendency District." We have expended for re- 
pairs upon the school buildings something like $235.00 more 
than was anticipated, a large part of which was unfinished 
work from the previous year. The transportation of com- 
mon school scholars has cost $139.50 more than was appro- 
priated. We have expended for disinfectants in the water 
closets $120.40; $30 of this came from 1910, and there 
is on hand approximately $30 worth to be carried over for 
use in 1912. An additional teacher in the South Primary 
had to l)e employed at the opening of school in the fall and 
has cost the town $126, not anticipated. It is possible that 
some of the expenditures might have been better classified 
under different heads, but further experience with the sys- 
tem will undoubtedly facilitate the proper classification. 

High School. 

The statistics of the high school appear in the superin 
tendent's report as well as those of the elementary schools. 
The tuition of all pupils attending Concord high school from 
other towns was raised at the beginning of the present 
school year from $48 per year to $55. 

Water for the Schools. 

The problem of furnishing drinking water for the West 
and Center schools is still a perplexing one. There seems 
no other way at present than to hire it carried. We hope 
that the putting of water into the streets for public use 
will solve this question. 



11 

Reorganization of Superintendency District. 

In June, 1911, the State Board of Education compelled 
a reorganization of this superintendeDcy district so as to 
include the town of Carlisle. The "^ -wii of Carlisle had for- 
merly been in a district with Chelmsford aud Dunstable, 
but Chelmsford having attained a valuation su:ficiently large 
to enable it to withdraw from that district and elect its own 
superintendent, paying him and having his time exclusively, 
elected to do so. This practically d ssolved the district and 
left the tw^o remaining towns without adequate provision 
for superintendency. The State Board of Education decided 
to put Carlisle into this district. The joint committee pro- 
tested and made every possible effort to persuade the State 
board to find some other place for Carlisle, but it was un- 
availing, and as the law gave this power to the State board 
the joint committee submitted with as much grace as could 
be commanded. The dissolution of that district and the re- 
orgarization of the new has resulted in a saving of $1250 to 
the state, the amount allowed each district for superin- 
tendency. and has also resulted in an increased burden upon 
each of the towns forming the new district. The $1250 
which each district receives from the state toward the pay- 
ment of the salary of the superintendent is divided among 
the towns composing the district in the snnie proportion as 
that by which any balance of such salary is raised. Prior 
to reorganization of the district, Acton paid 12-40 of the 
salary of the superintendent, or $510, of the $1800 paid him, 
received 12-40 of the money coming from the state, or $375. 
This required the town to raise $135 to meet its proportion- 
ate part. Under the reorganization the superintendent's 
salary is $2,000, of which Acton pays 11-40, or $550, $40 
more than formerly, and receives 11-40 of the money coming 
from the state, or $343.75, $31.25 less than formerly. With 
$40 more to be paid by the town and $31,25 less received, 
the town must raise $71,25 more for this purpose than for- 
merly, or altogether $206,25. The additional work to be 



12 



done by the superintendent of the district as reorganized 
necessitated that the superintendent furnish himself with 
some other and more adequate means of travel, and he now 
covers the district by means of an automobile. His effi- 
ciency is thereby considerably increased and it is possible 
that the increased expense to the town will b'e entirely bal- 
anced by this greater efficiency. Mr. Frank H. Hill still con- 
tinues to serve the district as superintendent and has the 
confidence of your committee. By the reorganization of the 
district the financial year begins with July 1, instead of 
September, as formerly. On this account the district and 
consequently the town has received during the past year 
only 11-12 of the amount yearly received for superintend- 
ency, or $62.50 less than would have been received had the 
year been twelve months long instead of ten. This smaller 
amount, to receipt together with other facts related, ac- 
counts for a larger expenditure than the appropriation for 
this purpose. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALLEN BROOKS PARKER, 

For the Committee. 



13 

ESTIMATES FOR THE SUPPORT OP SCHOOLS FOR 
THE FISCAL YEAR, 1912-1913. 

For general expenses : 

Salaries and other expenses of the 

committee $125.00 

Salaries and other expenses of the 
superintendent and truant of- 
ficers 225.00 

For expenses of instruction : 

Salaries of high school teachers, 
including tuition of pupils at- 
tending Concord 4,275.00 

Salaries of elementary school 

teachers 5,000.00 

For textbooks : 

High school (It is anticipated that 
the amount to be received 
from dog tax will cover this 

item) nothing 

Elementary schools (It is antici- 
pated that the amount to be 
received from dog tax will 

cover this item) nothing 

For stationery and supplies : 

High school 25.00 

Elementary schools 460.00 

For expenses of operating school plants : 

Wages of janitors 1,050.00 

Fuel 900.00 

For miscellaneous expenses 50.00 

For maintenance and repairs; upon 

school buildings and grounds. . . . 375.00 
For auxiliary agencies : 

Health 115.00 



14 



Transportation of scholars: 

High school 1,750.00 

Elementary schools 1,750.00 



$16,100.00 

In addition to the above appropriations we ask the 
town to vote to allow us to transfer any unexpended bal- 
ance of any appropriation to any other w^hich may become 
exhausted and have proven insufficient. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES ON ACCOUNT OF 

SCHOOLS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1911-1912. 

Receipts. 

For common schools $6,000.00 

Eor high schools 5,800.00 

For school supplies 550.00 

For transportation of pupils 1,600.00 

For salary of superintendent 135.00 

Eor medical inspection of pupils 75 . 00 

For repairs upon school buildings and 

grounds 300.00 

For erection of fire escapes 400.00 

For miscellaneous. school expenses . . . 100.00 

From Massachusetts school fund 1,084.47 

From state treasurer for supervision 

of schools 312 . 50 

From county treasurer on account of 

dog tax 342 . 80 

Erom rebate on school tickets 13 . 33 

$16,713.10 



15 

EXPENDITURES 

General Expenses 

School Committee 
Salaries : 

Paid Allen Brooks Parker, chair- 
man $75.00 

Paid E. Faulkner Conant, taking 

school census 15.00 

$90.00 
Other Expenses: 

Paid Allen Brooks Parker, tele- 
phone, postage, stationery, 
etc $11.30 

Paid Samuel A. Christie, tele- 
phone, postage, stationery, 
etc 2.67, 

Paid The Enterprise Company, 

printing 2 . 20 

Paid The Brookside Printing 

Company, printing 8.25 

Paid Wright and Potter, state 

printers, blanks .50 , 

$24.92 

Superintendent of Schools and Enforcement of Law. 

Salaries : 

Paid Frank H. Hill, superintendent . $565.81 

Paid Asaph Parlin, truant officer, 3.00 

Paid Thomas Scanlon, truant 

officer 1.00 

$569.81 



16 



Other Expenses : 

Paid Frank II. Hill, telephone, 

postage, stationery, etc $15.48 



$15.48 



Expenses of Instruction 

Salaries 

High School: 

Paid Town of Concord, tnition of 

high school scholars $2,924.00 

Paid Elizabeth K. Paine 580.00 

Paid P. W. Brackett (1-11 of 

whole salary), drawing .... 21.70 

Alice M. Genthner (1-11 of whole 

salary) , music 18 . 20 



JElementary Schools: 

Paid E. Sophia Taylor, West 

Grammar $488 . 80 

Paid Ethel G. Evans, West Inter- 
mediate 484 . 50 

Paid Harriet H. Gardner, West 

Primary 570.00 

Paid Bertha B. McLean, South 

Grammar 532.00 

Paid J[ennie E. Stowell, South 

Intermediate 503 . 50 

Paid Julia L. McCarthy, South 

Primary 484 . 50 

Paid Elizabeth A. Hinkley, South 

Primary 484. 50 

Paid Eva E. M. Gray, South 

Primary 126.00 



$3,543.90 



17 



Paid Minnie Gamble? Center 

Grammar 426.50 

Paid Ella P. Miller, Center Inter- 
mediate 503 . 50 

Paid Martha P. Smith, Center 

Primary . . .• 503 . 50 

Paid Lena P. Loker, Center 

Grammar, substitute 19.25 

Paid Eva T. Puller, Center Gram- 
mar, substitute 81.00 

Paid P. Ward Brackett (10-11 of 

whole salary), drawing .... 228.30 

Paid Alice M. Genthner (10-11 of 

whole salary), music 181.80 

Paid Town of Carlisle, tuition of 

George Kerrigan 3 . 50 





Text Books 




High School: 






Paid Ginn 


& Company 


$37.70 


Paid J. L. 


Hammett Company . . 


24.12 


Paid EdAV. 


W. Babb & Company, 


9.59 


Paid Globe 


! Book Company 


5.34 


Paid Fred 


S. Glines, trucking 




books 




1.50 



Elementary Schools : 

Paid Edw\ W. Babb & Comi)any, $146.07 

Paid Silver, Burdett & Company, .44 
Paid Samuel A. Christie, freight 

and express on books 1.25 

Paid C. C. Birchard & Company. 1.28 

Paid Ginn & Company 38.61 



$5,621.15 



$78.25 



18 



Paid 0. E. Houghton, trucking 

books 2.40 

Paid J. L. Hammett Company . . 18 . 31 
Paid Fred S. Glines. freight, ex- 
press and labor on books ... 10.11 
Paid American Book Company . . .90 
Paid Benjamin H. Sanborn & 

Company 3 . 35 



Stationery and Supplies 

High School: 

Paid J. L. Hammett Company . . . $23 . 70 

Paid C. C. Birchard & Company, .64 

Paid Fred S. Glines, trucking 

supplies 1 . 25 



Elementary Schools: 

Paid J. L. Hammett Compan}^ . . $368 . 68 

Paid Edw. E. Babb & Company. . 72.27 
Paid Fred S. Glines, trucking 

supplies 6 . 10 

Paid Milton Bradley Company.. 3.40 

Paid F. Ward Brackett, supplies, .80 

Paid C. H. Persons • 2.00 

Paid 0. E. Houghton, trucking 

supplies 2 . 40 

Paid Samuel A. Christie, express 

and freight 1 . 50 

Paid Allen Brooks Parker, express .40 
Paid Bernstein Cowen, trucking 

supplies 1 . 50 



$223.62 



$25.59 



$460.05 



19 

Expenses of Operating School Plants 

Wages of Janitors? Etc. 

High School: 

Paid Thomas Scanlon (% total 

for West school building) . . $89 . 31 



$89.31 



Elementary Schools: 

Paid Thomas Scanlon (% total 

for West school building) .. $267.94 
Paid Fred S. Glines, South school 

building 478.90 

Paid Asaph Parlin, Center school 

building 307 . 97 



$1,054.81 



Fuel 
High School: 

Paid George H. Reed, coal (i/4 
total for West school build- 
ing) $68.54 

Paid Samuel R. Burroughs, wood 

(1/4 total for West building), 4.50 

Paid Hall Brothers, wood (^4 to- 
tal for West school building) .67 

Paid A. H. Perkins, cutting wood 

(1/4 total for West building). 2.12 



$75.83 



Elementary Schools : 

Paid George H. Reed, coal (% to- 
tal for West school building) , $205 . 64 

Paid Samuel R. Burroughs, 
wood {% total West build- 
ing) 13.50 



20 



Paid Hall Brothers, wood {% to- 
tal for West building) 1.83 

Paid A. H. Perkins, cntting wood 

(3^ total "West building) ... 6.38 

Paid South Acton C. & L. Co., 

coal, South school building . 310.88 

Paid Thomas E. Downie, wood, 

South school building 10.25 

Paid Anson Piper, wood, South 

school building 9 . 00 

Paid Fred S. Glines, cutting 

Avood, South school building, 1.00 

Paid South Acton C. & L. Co., 

coal, Center school building . 252.38 

Paid Dexter Spinney, wood. Cen- 
ter school building 15.00 



^Miscellaneous 

High: 

Paid C. H. Mead & Co., (% total 

West building) $2.97 



Elementary : 



Paid C. H. Mead & Co., {% total 

West building) $8.92 

Paid American Woolen Co., elec- 
tric current, South building. 13.17 

Paid Fred S. Glines 8.20 

Paid J. L. Hammett Co., desks . . 75.50 



$825.86 



$2.97 



$110.04 



1 


.50 


2 


.52 


1 


.00 




.50 



21 
Maintenance 

Repairs, Etc. 

High School (1/4 West School Building) : 
Paid W. S. Kelley, painting and 

papering $41 . 71 

Paid C. H. Mead & Company, 

incidentals 5 . 60 

Paid George Decoster, repairing 

clocks 

Paid E. T. Rice, repairs .... 
Paid B. F. King, repairing bells, 
Paid A. H. Perkins, labor . . 



Elementary Schools: 

Paid C. H. Mead & Co., West 

school building (%), incidentals, $16.77 

Paid A. H. Perkins, West school 

building (34), labor 1.50 

Paid W. S. Kelley, West school 
building (%), painting and 
papering 125 . 14 

Paid George Decoster, West 
school building (%), repair- 
ing clocks 4 . 50 

Paid B. A. King, West school 

building (%), repairing bells 3.00 

Paid South Acton Coal & L. Co., 

West building 4.85 

Paid South Acton Coal & L. Co., 

South building 28 . 81 

Paid E. T. Rice, repairs. West 

school building {%) 16.98 

Paid Fred S. Glines, repairs. 

South school building 2.85 



$52.83 



22 



Paid Tuttle and Newton, inciden- 
tals, South building 14.34 

Paid Finney and Iloit, inciden- 
tals, South building 4.00 

Paid F. E. Harris, labor, South 

building 3.84 

Paid Samuel Jones, labor, South 

building 5 . 16 

Paid Thomas Scanlon, labor. 

South building 8.75 

Paid B. F. King, labor on bells, 

South building 4.00 

Paid W. A. Snow Iron Works, 

fire escape, South building . . 152.00 

Paid Anson Piper, sand, South 

building 2.50 

Paid 0. D. Wood, labor. Center 

building 2.63 

Paid Asaph Parlin, labor. Center 

school building 9 . 65 

Paid M. E. Taylor, incidentals, 

Center school building 22.62 

Paid W. S. Kelley, painting and 
papering at Center school 
building 131.05 

Paid Andrew Edwardson, labor, 

Center school building 24.25 

Paid Finney & Hoit, incidentals. 

Center school building 4.74 

Paid South Acton Coal & L. Co., 
lumber. Center school build- 
ing 129.17 

Paid E. A. Phalen, labor, Center 

school building 94.25 

Paid E. Z. Stanley, labor. Center 

school building 23 . 50 



23 



Paid C. L. Chase & Son, floor 

dressing 27. 60 

Paid H. C. Doughty, floor dress- 
ing 15.00 

Paid Thomas Scanlon, labor. 

West school building 2.00 



Auxiliary Agencies 

Libraries 

Paid Young Folks' League, books . . . $15.44 
Paid R. V. ToAvne, books 19.50 



Health 

George B. Bobbins Disinfecting Co. . . $120.00 

Fred S. Glines, express on disinfectant, .40 
Paid Samuel A. Christie, school 

physician 25 . 00 

Paid Frank E. Tasker, school physi- 
cian 25.00 

Paid P. K. Shaw, school physician ... 25 . 00 



Transportation 



High School: 



Paid New York, New Haven and 

Hartford R. R. Co $280.40 

Paid Boston and Maine Railroad, 1,169.60 

Paid J. Sidney White 130.00 



$884.94 



$34.94 



$195.40 



24 



Paid Thomas McCarthy 

Paid C. H. Mead 

Paid I. K. Mackenzie 


65.00 
12.53 

11.80 


Paid Mrs. Walter 8. Young 

Paid Fred Nagle 

Paid George Hodgen 


12.65 
11.76 
20.15 


Paid Walter C. Hayward 

Paid Edith Johnson 


4.10 
3.75 


Paid Robert L. Randall, 

Paid H. P. Nims 

Paid Edward Burke 


5.25 
6.70 
6.75 




$1,740.44 



Elementary Schools: 

Paid Walter M. French, South 

school $325 . 00 

Paid Andrew Christoferson, South 

school 256.50 

Paid Jens Mekkelsen, Center 

school 578.00 

Paid Charles Edwards, Center 

school 580.00 



Total expenditures for all purposes . 



$1,739.50 
$17,459.64 



ALLEN BROOKS PARKER, 

For the Committee. 



25 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



Gentlemen of the Committee : 

Following is my second report, it being the twentieth 
in the series of such annual reports. 

The schools of Acton entered upon the work of the 
school year of 1911-1912 with no change in the teaching force 
of 1910-1911. As those teachers add experience to training, 
and to both an intimate acquaintance with their pupils and 
their peculiar needs, it is hardly necessary to state that each 
year ought to see better service and larger results. 

In September IMiss Hinckley's room at South Acton was 
so large — numbering 47 in grades 1 and 2 — that it seemed 
necessary to give her an assistant. ]\Iiss Eva Gray was se- 
cured for the position and has been able to render valuable 
service. 

SEWIXG AND RAFFIA- WORK. 

]Miss Gamble's pupils in Acton Center became interested 
in sewing projects last term and under the teacher's direc- 
tion an entertainment was given and a sewing machine pur- 
chased. 

In ]\Iiss Hinckley's room a start has been made in braid 
ing and weaving with raffia. 

]Mrs. Gardner, at West Acton, has undertaken to teach 
her little ones some of the simple stitches in serving. 

These, and other projects of a similar nature, will be 
continued and undertaken as fast as sufficient enthusiasm 
on the part of teachers, children, and parents warrant a 
measurable prediction of success. 



26 

TEXT BOOKS. 

]\Iany of tlie geography text-books were in a really 
dilapidated condition, and a new edition of the Tarr & Mc- 
Murry text was introduced. It is not economj^ for children 
to use text-books that are dirty and dropping to pieces, for 
the constant handling of snch books leads to carelessness 
towards other books, and the habit thus acquired is perni- 
cious in its influence upon the children's attitude toward all 
forms of public property. Tn the final analysis in any feat- 
ure of school activity, it is the child's training for future 
trustworthiness and efficiency that engage our attention 
every moment of the time. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

We are using the work accomplished in the several sub- 
jects last year as the basis of the work this year. It is 
pretty definitely understood by the teachers and is followed 
as closely as individual classes and pupils permit. Between 
grades four and seven we are trying to do more than last 
year, in order that in the grammar rooms a more careful 
review of the work may be undertaken previous to entering^ 
the high school. On the whole, the work is consecutive, 
hangs together well, and provides a series of steps by which 
a child may advance from position to position with ever 
widening intelligence and ever extending horizon. Each 
year ought to make more plain the interdependence of the 
several subjects and their necessity and adaptability to the 
actual life of the child. The busy wheels of the school 
mill must turn ; their hum of the machinery of arithmetic 
drills, etc., must go on; but in the midst of apparent con- 
fusion the teacher must stand un confused, knowing the ma- 
terial she is weaving and the purposes to which the finished 
product is to be put. It is indeed only the real teacher who 
can use a course of study as it should be used; that is, 



27 



as a chart to guide her in preparing and sending out into 
various walks of life capable, self-confident, efficient, clean- 
minded and trustworthy young men and young women. 

EXERCISES RECOMMENDED TO VITALIZE COURSE. 

I shall enumerate a few of the things that may be 
worked into the course of study in order to work out such 
products : 

L Exercises to make children acquainted with the use 
of their several senses. Hearing, sight, touch, taste, smell, 
must be quickened, that children may recognize, locate, iden- 
tify, compare, and finally approve and reject accurately. 

2. Exercises to give children better control of the 
muscles of speech, of standing and sitting positions, of writ- 
ing and simple manual work, of breathing; and of the re- 
laxation of the muscles. 

3. Exercises to give children control of the memory, 
the power of concentration, the ability to get the thought of 
the paragraph and to express that thought in his o^vn words. 

4. Exercises to teach the child the place he occupies 
in the world, his duties and his opportunities. In other 
words, his ethical and moral relations to the members of the 
family, the school, the social life of the community and the 
civic life of the town. 

5. Patriotic exercises : study of men and periods of 
luitional history with the animating and underlying moral 
motives involved. 

6. Exercises for developing responsibility and leader- 
ship. 

7. Exercises in which recognition shall be given for 
real things, worth-while things, done in the home or any- 
where outside the school. 

8. Exercises leading to the desire to be thrifty and the 
way to accomplish the purposes of thrift. 

9. Exercises to develop an inquiring mind. 

10. Exercises to develop habits of personal cleanliness. 



28 

THE TEACHER'S PLACE IN THE COURSE. 

When the teacher shall be filled with the spirit of these 
needs she will read into the course of study the truly vitaliz- 
ing principles whose absence is so universally deplored and 
•so justly. She will see that it is possible to learn many things 
from the efficient men and women of the community, and 
the home and school will cooperate to a degree heretofore 
thought impossible. There is no such thing as an elastic 
course of study; but children are truly elastic. Note the 
fact that a dozen children having the same teacher for 
years, the same text-books, the same school environment and 
following the same course of study, will develop a dozen 
individualities and a dozen different degrees of proficiency 
and efficiency. 

CHANGES THAT MAY BE EXPECTED. 

That the course of study maj^ be remodelled to give 
definite direction to the demand for industrial and voca- 
tional activities, not only in Acton but all over Massachu- 
setts, seems to be an assured fact. But at this writing 
it is too early to say just what will be recommended along 
those lines. It is safe to say that nothing will be proposed 
to narrow a child's selection of such opportunities as may be 
suited to his natural abilities. In a way, it is the hand, and 
the intelligent use of it, that differentiates the human from 
other animals and has made possible the tremendous prog- 
ress of the human race. The brain alone may conceive, but 
the hand must execute. It may be that the school has done 
its duty but partially toward the training of the hand. The 
school of the near future will demonstrate whether the 
school of the past has neglected an important duty. 



29 



DUTY OF PARENTS. 

It is said that America means opportunity : but it is no 
less true that America is full of failures. Xot to take the 
opportunity for self-improvement is to invite failure. The 
school, in spite of its short comxings. has, in the past, proven 
to be the surest road to success. Parents who are indifferent 
to their children's attendance at school are morally respon- 
sible if those children prove dull and disinterested pupils 
and later fail to promotion ; and that they become indifferent 
citizens is, in general, true ; while they who obey the law 
through fear of it are scarcely less accountable to the com- 
munity for acts of recklessness and violence that occasion- 
ally shock even our quietest and most peaceful towns. Par- 
ents share with school officials the responsibility of super- 
vision to the extent that cooperation, cheerful and whole- 
souled, may reasonably be expected of them in the enforce- 
ment of school laAvs. 

THE FIRST YEAR HIGH. 

In this school a very high standard, both in school work 
and in morals, has been attempted. There are some in the 
school who will not be fitted to go on into the Concord 
high school. It may be said they were not fitted to enter 
this school : Granted, but they are those few who would 
have dropped out of school altogether at the end of the gram- 
mar school course had I not f(4t that the single year in the 
high school offered opportunities for training and develop- 
ment that should not be refused in a school supported so lib- 
erally at public expense. The course in agriculture, ^vith its 
investigations and experiments will awaken these children 
as nothing offered in the common school course can do. 

CONX^LUSIOX. 

Tables appearing elsewhere in this report will present 
such statistics as the law demands as well as others of in- 
terest to the people of Acton. They are fully as important 



30 



as anything I have presented for they give summarized facts 
while this is more or less an expression of my own opinions 
and conclusions and deal with the unseen machinery of the 
school system rather than with the product of it. 

Thanks are due the committee for their cordial support 
during the year. I shall endeavor to merit that support if 
intelligent and conscientious effort count for anything. 



Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK H. HILL, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



Acton, February 14, 1912. 



31 
REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF DRAWING. 



Superintendent F. H. Hill: 

Dear Sir — I herewith submit the report of the supervisor 
of drawing- for the town of Acton, Mass. 

During the past year time has been spent on nature study 
as a means of creating a love for the beauties of nature, and 
as a step towards design. This work has been followed 
through in designs which have been applied to various useful 
articles, planned and executed by the pupils themselves. In 
the application of the designs to the various articles, the 
principles of color harmony, taught in the fall term, were 
brought into play and used in the practical working out of 
the problem. The above was the burden of the work for the 
spring term of last year, following my last report. 

For some unknown reason, teachers as a whole have 
come to look upon drawing as an easy subject; upon the 
drawing period as a time in which to make pretty things 
which will do to hang upon the wall at exhibition time, and 
which do not require a great amount of preparation. Teach- 
ers like the subject when it is of this character. The pupils 
like it, because they get a result that is pleasing to them, 
easily, and without any expenditure of mental energy. For 
this reason it is easy to teach, thereby pleasing the teacher. 
Such work as tricks of folding, cutting, or washing in color 
upon a wet paper and then dabbing in other colors, before 
the first is dry. and letting the whole mix as fate may decide, 
Yi\H produced, when mounted upon an appropriate mat, many 
pretty results. But, what good are these results? Have 
tbev a market value? Has the pupil acquired a knowledge 
which will be of any practical use to him ? Has the pupil 
even been required to think for himself? If we must have 
that kind of drawing in our schools, I for one say, ''Out 
with it." The time might better be spent on some other 
study. 



32 



However, I believe that the subject has a very sound 
and practical educational value, when taught properly, and 
with the right point of view, or aim in 'mind. Drawing 
should and can be taught so as to stimulate the pupils to 
higher ideals, so as to create in the minds of the pupils a 
preference for all that is good in color and design, together 
with the power to discriminate understandingly between 
that w^hich is good and that which is not, in these things. 
This applies, not only to pictures and vases, but more prac- 
tically to the furnishing of the home, with its carpets, rugs, 
draperies, pictures, and furniture ; to the choice of colors, 
material, and design of an entire costume. This does not 
mean a desire to ape the rich ; but instead, it means the 
wish and power to make the best of what one has. Good 
taste in these things is not necessarily costly. To continue : 
drawing should and can be taught so as to give the pupils 
skill of hand, or the power to make things. In the making 
of any one thing, if the work is properly taught, the pupils 
plan and reason out the construction of the object, therebv 
gaining the power to think and reason for themselves. In 
other words, they become resourceful. 

What kind of employes do business men want in their 
employ? The kind that must be told just how and when to 
do a thing, and more than that, be told it each time it is done> 
or each time the problem is in the slightest degree different? 
or do they want the kind that is resourceful, and once under- 
standing the principles governing the problem, or work, are 
able to go ahead on all problems that involve these or similar 
principles? To develop in the pupils the poAver to do these 
things, are some of the aims of the drawing course as 
planned for your schools, and if there is no pretty work to 
hang upon the wall at exhibition time, or to take home, we 
have done something at least for the future welfare of the 
pupils. 

The establishing of a vocabulary of terms and forms, 
and the drawing of simple objects for control of the hand, 



33 



are the first steps towards these aims, and are taken up in 
the lower grades. This, I believe, when properly done, forms 
the best possible foundation for the pupils' future work. 
Naturally, discipline of any kind is not particularly interest- 
ing for pupils of the age which we find in these grades. 
Since the subject as outlined for these grades, is no more 
interesting to the pupils than the reading, writing, or num- 
ber work, it is just as hard to teach, and requires, on the part 
of the teacher, just as much and as careful preparation as 
any other subject, a most potent reason why teachers do not 
like drawing. 

The work for the fall term in the lower grades has been, 
and will continue to be throughout the remainder of the 
school year, the establishing of a working vocabulary of 
terms and forms and gaining control of the hand. 

In the intermediate grades the work becomes more diffi- 
cult as the pupils' ability and knowledge advance. The vo- 
<3abulary is gradually enlarged and the reasoning power in- 
creased, until, when the grammar grades are reached, the 
work is quite difficult and may involve many principles of 
color, design, representation, construction, and technique 
or the method of working out the problem. With the fore- 
going aims in mind, the pupils of the grammar grades have, 
besides other things, worked out problems in costume de- 
sign, and interior decoration. The various color harmonies 
are taken up in the grades, suiting the difficulty of the prob- 
lem to the acquired knowledge of the grade. All grades 
have done some construction work and will do more. In the 
upper grades, working drawings have been studied for an 
understanding of their use, value, and construction. 

At the present time the subject is free-hand printing, 
and in connection with this the pupils will study the prin- 
ciples governing page design, or spacing. They will dis- 
criminate between good and poorly arranged advertisements 
and pages of printed matter. It is to be hoped that they will 
apply these principles of good spacing to all their written 



34 



work, and in so doing, improve greatly the tone of the writ- 
ten work. 

FoHomng the work in printing will come the study of 
the various forms of perspective, according to the grade. 
This work, besides giving the pupils the powder to represent 
various objects, and, in doing so, gaining a new form of 
expression, offers an excellent opportunity for the training 
of the eye to judge distances and proportions. Here is 
where the early training in control of the hand show^s, in 
proving the ability of the pupil to make the hand do w^hat 
the mind dictates, i. e., draw a line of a certain length. For 
the spring term, nature study Avill be taken up for its bear- 
ing on design and decoration. 

For the present school year I feel that I can justly say 
that some advance has been made. The advance has not been 
as strongl}^ marked as I had wished, but it gives good 
grounds for expecting better work to follow. 

In closing I wish to thank all those w^ho have helped to- 
advance the work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. W. BRACKETT. 
January 17, 1912. 



35 
REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC. 



Mr. F. H. Hill, Superintendent of Schools, Acton, Mass. : 

Dear Sir — I herewith submit my second report on music 
in the public schools of Acton. 

The work in the lower grades is, perhaps, a little in ad- 
vance of that done last year at this time ; it requires the 
first five or six years in school to teach the main principles 
of music and here we are trying to lay a solid foundation 
for the children to work upon in the higher grades and 
high school. 

This year we have placed the introductory sight-singing 
melodies in the second grade at South Acton and Acton Cen- 
ter; in the third at West Acton, as many in this grade were 
promoted from first grade. 

By the use of these simple exercises the children are 
gradually learning to read and are better prepared for the 
work of the First Reader. 

The first three grades have learned many new rote- 
songs this year and for special days all grades have had 
songs outside those furnished by the readers. 

With three grades in one room we often expect too much 
of the lowest grade, and it is impossible for grade teachers 
to take each grade alone as in other studies. 

This is especially true with the fourth, fifth and sixth 
grades, and we forget that those in grade four are not as 
quite to comprehend as grade six. 

However, most children love to sing, and the main ob- 
ject is to develop the best side of the child nature by a love 
of good music and create a spirit of good fellowship by 
singing together. We have made use of the Weaver individ- 
ual sight-singing slips from third grade up to the seventh 
and eighth. 



36 



The intermediate grades, using the second reader, have 
done very little two-part singing thus far this year, but have 
reviewed a good deal and are better prepared to take up the 
tAvo-part work now. 

The grammar grade sing from the third reader and oc- 
casionally from the fourth. We started work on the folk- 
songs in these grades, but were handicapped by lack of books 
containing all the old songs. 

The seventh and eighth grades at the Center recently 
bought a collection of folk-songs with their own school 
money and are preparing some of these songs for a concert 
in the spring. 

I hope to continue work on national and folk-songs in 
the West and South schools later on, for it is a deplorable 
fact that the children are taught very few of these old songij 
or hymns that would be of practical value outside of school. 

We have a four-part chorus in first year high, this 3^ear, 
and they are singing well for a small chorus. 

In all grades we find some children who are almost 
wholly lacking in musical abilit}^, but the effort is good and 
we give to these all the individual aid possible. 

I wish to thank the teachers for their hearty cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALICE M. GENTHNER, 

Supervisor of Music. 



37 

ROLL OF HONOR. 

For Three Terms 

West Acton — Hazel Coolidge, James Benere, Naomi 
Schnair. 

Acton Center — Ray L. Harris, Florence M. Morse, Eve- 
lyn Farrar. 

South Acton — Patrick Foley, Hazel Hoit, Herbert Mer- 
riam, Annie Foley. 

For Two Terms. 

West Acton — Leland Campbell, Thelma McGregor, Ruth 
Davis, Harr}^ French, Kenneth French. 

Acton Center — Norman Livermore. 

South Acton — Edward Burke, Irene Merriam, Clarence 
Taylor, Sherman Warren. Anthony Foley, Gladys Warren, 
John Fletcher, Mary Hearon. 

For One Term. 

High school — Gertrude Benere, Lois Moore, Mabel 
Willis. 

West Acton — Isabel Greer, Ruth Hall, Fannie Davis, 
Helen Bezanson, James Hurley, Annie Benere, Francis 
IIopps, Burton Littlefield, George ^McAllister, Isabelle Joy, 
]\Iargaret Hall, Martina Benere, Richard Schnair, Willie 
Schnair, Edith Smith, Norman Clayton, Beulah French, Dan- 
iel Hurley, Dorothy Greer, Frank Gallant, Stuart McGregor, 
Hazel Beach. Katherine Kinsley, Brooks Parker, Jr. 



38 



Aeton Center — Raymond F. Farrar, Raymond Morse, 
Florence A. Prentiss, Charles R. Campbell, Dorothy Z. Dus- 
seaiilt, George D. Smith, Abbie E. Coughlin, Gunnar F. Fred- 
riksou, Florence E. Mannion, ]Marjorie H. Wetherbee, Elia 
M. Fredrikson, Edith R. Lawry, Leonard Worden, F. Earle 
Farrar, Leland B. Currier. Grace S. Freeman, Ralph Smith, 
Francis Wetherbee, Roger Shaw, Jennie Tuttle, Rebecca 
Fredrikson, John Chick, Chester Daily, Clesson Pierce, Caro- 
lyn Shaw, Herbert Thompson, Agnes Coughlin, John Mek- 
kelsen. 

South Acton — ]\Iiehael Foley. Vida Thomas, Theron 
Lowden, Nettie Nimms, Edward Pendergast. William Hayes, 
Thomas Foley, Lizzie IMason, Mary Hennessey, Philip Low- 
den, Nathalie Leach, Helen Donahue, Roj^ Thomas, Margaret 
Whitney, Ernest Greenough, Susan Fletcher. Lester Stiles, 
Cecilia Carney, Dorothy Lowden, Henry Evans. 



39 



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40 



High School Statistics. 

Number graduated from grammar schools: 

Boys. Girls. Total. 

Acton Center 3 1 4 

South Acton 11 5 16 

West Acton 2 5 7 

16 11 27 



Number entering Acton first year high . . 16 
Number promoted to Concord second year, 6 
Number in Concord second year high ... . 8 

Number in Concord, junior year 10 

Number in Concord, senior vear 5 



Total in Concord high 23 35 58 



14 


30 


12 


18 


14 


22 


11 


21 


10 


15 



41 



Courses Taken in Concord High. 

College 

General. Preparatory. Scientific. 

Second year high 11 9 2 

Junior 15 3 3 

Senior 12 2 1 

38 14 6 

Number graduated from Concord high, June, 1911, four 
boys, six girls. 



42 



SCHOOL CENSUS, SEPTEMBER, 1911. 

Number of boys between the ages of 5 and 15 165 

Number of girls between the ages of 5 and 15 171 

Total 336 

Number of boys between the ages of 7 and 14 ^. 120 

Number of girls between the ages of 7 and 14 116 

Total 236 

Number of illiterate minors 



43 



REPORT OF SIGHT AND HEARING TESTS 



^ be 

'g '^ .2 r« 

1 H K -g 

tH > > rr, 

2 ^ 4J -^i 

C 03 O © 

^ C fi P4 

South Acton 123 4 1 5 

West Acton 103 3 3 6 

Acton Center 85 7 1 7 

High School 27 8 2 6 

Total 338 22 7 24 



44 



TRUANT OFFICER'S REPORT 



To the School Committee of Acton: 

The truant officers submit their tenth annual report for 
the year ending February 1, 1912. 

Whole number of pupils looked up 13 

Causes of Absence West South Center 

Sickness 1 

Kept at home 6 

Returned 6 

Truants 2 

Left town 

Yours respectfully, 

ALBERT S. BRADLEY, 
THOMAS SCANLON, 
ASAPH PARLIN, 

Truant Officers. 



45 



Age and Schooling Certificates 

"No child under the age of fourteen years, and no 
child who is over fourteen and under sixteen years of age 
who does not have a certificate as required by the four 
following sections certifying to the child's ability to read 
at sight and to write legibly simple sentences in the English 
language shall be employed in any factory, workshop or 
mercantile establishment." Section 56, Chapter 514, Acts 
of 1909. 

Number certificates issued to children 14 years of age: 
boys, 0; girls, 0. 

Number certificates issued to children 15 years of age: 
boys. 0; girls, 1. 



INDEX 

Town Officers 3 

Town Warrant 5 

Town ^Meetings 9 

State Election 29 

Town Clerk's Report 24 

Births 25 

^Marriages 26 

Deaths , 28 

Xon-Resident Burials 30 

Dog Licenses 31 

Selectmen's Report 33 

Treasurer's Report 50 

Assessors' Report 56 

Auditor's Report 57 

Collector's Report 58 

Road Commissioners 60 

Tree Warden 63 

Board of Health 64 

Cattle Inspector's Report 65 

Overseers of the Poor 66 

Report of Cemetery Commissioners 71 

Trustees Goodnow Fund 77 

Acton ^Memorial Library 79 

List of Books Added 82 

SECOND SECTION 

School Report . . : 1 

School Calendar 3 

Special Exercises and Holidays 4 

School Officers 5 

Teachers 6 

Standing Rules 7 

General Report 8 

Financial Statement 14 

Superintendent's Report 25 

Supervisor of Drawing 31 

Supervisor of ^Music 35 

Roll of Honor 37 

Statistical Tables 39 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Several Boards of Town Officers 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 



FOE THE YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY J 



1913 




PRINTED BY THE NEWS-ENTDRPRISB 

HUDSON, MASS. 

1913 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Several Boards of Town Officers 



OP THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 



FOE THE YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY J 



1913 




PRINTED BY THE NEWS-ENTERPRISB 

HUDSON, MASS. 

1913 



TOWN OFFICERS 1912 



Selectmen 

Edgar H. Hall Term expires 1915 

James P. Brown Term expires 1914 

Willis L. Holden Term expires 1913 

Town Clerk 

Horace F. Tnttle 

Town Treasurer 

Frank W. Hoit 

Assessors 

William F. Stevens Term expires 1914 

William F. Kelley Term expires 1913 

James B. Tnttle Term expires 1915 

Overseers of the Poor 
William F. Kelley Edgar H. Hall Willis L. Holden 

Auditor 
William T. Merriam 

Collector of Taxes 

William F. Stevens 

Tree Warden 

William H. Kingsley 

Constables 

Albert S. Bradley William C. Conghlin 

James Kinsley AYilliam F. Stevens 

Fence Viewers 
Edgar H. Hall Willis L. Holden James P. Brown 

Field Drivers 

George W. Daniels Daniel H. Farrar 

J. Alfred Goding Fred S. Whitcomb 

Road Commissioners 

William H. Kingsley Term expires 1914 

Albert H. Perkins Term expires 1915 

Alfred W. Davis Term expires 1913 



Cemetery Commissioners 

Herbert T. Clark Term expires 191-4 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1913 

Julian Tuttle Term expires 1915 

School Committee 

Allen Brooks Parker Term expires 1913 

Edwin A. Phalen Term expires 1914 

Samuel A. Christie Term expires 1915 

Trustees of Memorial Library 

(Chosen by the Town) 

J. Sidney White Term expires 1914 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1913 

Lucius A. Hesselton .Term expires 1915 

APPOINTED BY THE SELECTMEN 

Town Accountant 
William T. Merriam 

Registrars of Voters 

Samuel A. Guilford James I\IcGreen 

Horace F. Tuttle George E. Holton 

Election Officers 

Precinct 1 

Warden John F. Coughlin 

Deputy Warden Edwin A. Phalen 

Clerk Horace F. Tuttle 

Deputy Clerk ]Moses E. Taylor 

Inspector Republican Elmer C. Cheney 

Deputy Inspector Republican Moses A. Reed 

Inspector Democratic Aaron W. Foster 

Deputy Inspector Democratic J. S. White 

Precinct 2 

Warden Theron F. Newton 

Deputy Warden L. A. Hesselton 

Clerk . Abram Tuttle 



Deputy Clerk George R. Keyes 

Inspector Republican L. C. Hastings 

Deputy Inspector Republican Frank Merriam 

Inspector Democratic Constantiue O'Neil 

Deputy Inspector Democratic N. J. Cole 

Precinct 3 

Warc'en Allen B. Parker 

Deputy Warden Eugene L. Hall 

Clerk William F. Kelley 

Deputy Clerk William L. Tenney 

Inspector Republican Fred S. Whitcomb 

Deputy Inspector Republican Samuel R. Burroughs 

Inspector Democratic James Kinsley 

Deputy Inspector Democratic John McNiff 

Cattle Inspector 

Fred S. Whitcomb 

Forest Warden 
William H. Kingsley 

Fire Wardens 

D. H. Farrar J. P. Brown Waldo E. Whitcomb 

J. Sidney White William H. Kingsley 

Surveyors of Wood, Lumber, Hoops and Staves 

J. W. Dupee Charles E. Smith E. C. Cheney 

H. T. Clark J. Linwood Richardson F. A. Merriam 

J. P. Fletcher 

Public Weighers 

J. P. Fletcher E. F. Conant Thomas Hearon 

Moses E. Taylor E. C. Cheney George H. Reed 

William H. Teele 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Raleigh Beach 

Local Superintendent of Moth Department 

James O'Neil 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss. 




To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in the 
County of Middlesex. GREETING: 

In the name of the CommonAvealth of Massachusetts you 
are directed to notify and Avarn the inhabitants of the Town 
of Acton, qualified to vote in elections and town affairs, to 
assemble in the town hall in Sv^id town, on Monday, the 
thirty-first day of March, 1913, at nine o'clock in the fore- 
noon. Then and there to act on the following articles, to 
wit : 

Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2. To bring in their votes on one ballot for the 
following town ofScers : town clerk for one year, one select- 
man for three years, one selectman for two years (to fill 
vacancy), three overseers of the poor, town treasurer, col- 
lector of taxes, town accountant, tree warden, four 
constables, four field drivers, three fence viewers, all for one 
year. One assessor, one road commissioner, one trustee of 
Memorial librarv, one member of the school committee, one 



cemetery commissioner, and one member of the board of 
health, all for three years. Also, on the same ballot, with 
the above named officers to vote upon the following question : 
"Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this town?" The polls will be opened at 9.30 
a. m., and may be closed at 4 o'clock p. m. 

Article 3. To choose all necessary to^\^l officers not 
named in Article 2. and fix salaries. 

Article 4. To see if the town will accept the reports of 
the selectmen, overseers of the poor, school committee, 
library trustees, and other town officers. 

Article 5. To hear and act upon the reports of any 
committees chosen at any previous meeting, that have not 
already reported. 

Article 6. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for the due observance of ^Memorial day. 

Article 7. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for the repairing and building of roads and bridges, or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 8. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for the support of the ^Memorial library the current 
year. 

Article 9. To see what amount of money the town 
will appropriate for the care of cemeteries, or act anything 
thereon. 

xVrticle 10. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for the maintenance of the fire department, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Article 11. To see if the town will contract with the 
"West and South Water Supply District of Acton" for 
rental of their hydrants, not to exceed one hundred in num- 
ber at $25.00 per year, for fire purposes only. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to purchase 
new hose and hose carriages, or act anything thereon. 

Article 13. To see if the town will appropriate a sum 
of money for the enforcement of the liquor laws, or act 
anything thereon. 



8 



Article 14. To see if the town will authorize the 
treasurer, with the approval of its selectmen, to borrow 
money for the town, if necessary, in anticipation of taxes 
the current year. 

Article 15. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to the extermination of the elm leaf beetle. 

Article 16. To see what action the town will take in 
reference to the extermination of the gypsy and brown tail 
moth. 

Article 17. To see if the town will appropriate the 
sum of $600.00 to purchase a power sprayer of the state. 

Article 18. To see if the town will appoint a town 
accountant for the current year, and fix salary of same, or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 19. To see what amount of money the town 
will vote to raise and appropriate for the support of schools,, 
the purchase of school books and supplies, the expense of 
operating the school plants, repairs and improvements upon 
school grounds and buildings, the transportation of scholars, 
and for other expenses relating to the maintenance of the 
school department, or do or act anything thereon. 

Article 20. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to the collection of taxes. 

Article 21. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for town charges. 

Article 22. To see if the town will authorize putting 
water in the schoolhouses and watering troughs, or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 23. To see if the town will vote to instruct the 
school committee to demand of the trustees or managers of 
institutions having children attending the schools of this 
town, to pay the tuition or other extra expense incurred by 
reason of the same, in accordance with Section four of Chap- 
ter 44, of the Revised Laws as amended by Section two of 
Chapter 268, of the Acts of 1911. 

Article 24. To see if the town will authorize having 
six more electric lights, three extending from opposite A. 



Merriam company's factory to Lothrop's factory, and 
three from the corner at Walter Heyward's house to W. A. 
Flint's. 

Article 25. To see if the town will name its streets 
and have the names put up at the street corners in a proper 
way, or act anything thereon. 

Article 26. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for the following purposes, namely: 

First. For the repair of the engine house in South 
Acton, or act anything thereon. 

Second. For the purchase of an automobile truck for 
fire protection, or act anything thereon. 

Third. For the proper installing of a system of fire 
alarm, or act anything thereon. 

Fourth. For the disposal of the present fire apparatus 
at South Acton, or act anything thereon. 

Article 27. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate money to pay a portion of the expense to be 
incurred by its villages in the construction and repair of 
sidewalks during the current year, or act anything thereon. 

Article 28. To see if the town Avill vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of one hundred dollars for the payment 
of premiums on treasurer's and collector's bonds. 

Article 29. To see what action the to^\Ti will take on 
the recommendation of the state to appoint George E. 
Holton, assistant fish and game warden, with a salary of 
fifty dollars. 

Article 30. To see if the town will vote to dispose of 
the old scraper and other road implements not in use, or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 31. To see if the town will vote to oil the 
streets through the villages of Acton, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 32. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of installing 
a fire alarm system in town, or take any action thereon. 



10 



Article 33. To see whether the town will vote to 
rescind the action providing for the election of selectmen by 
rotation for periods of three years and revert to the system 
of simultaneous elections for the period of one year, as 
provided under certain acts of the Revised Statutes. 

Article 34. To see if the toAvn will vote to put electric 
lights equal distances apart from East Acton depot on Great 
road, to head of street leading to residences of Mrs. G. 
Daniels and Luther Davis, or act anything thereon. 

Article 35. To see if the town will rescind the vote 
passed at their meeting, April 3rd, 1899, whereby they 
voted to choose three road commissioners, and accept the 
provisions of Section 364, Chapter 560, of the Acts of 1907, 
relative to the election of a highway surveyor. 

Article 36. To see if the town will choose a financial 
committee, which shall consider and make recommendations 
relative to all appropriations of money. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting 
copies, attested by you, in the following places: One in 
each of the post offices and railroad stations, one in each of 
the stores of C. H. Mead & Co., W. E. Whitcomb, M. E. 
Taylor & Co., Tuttle & Newton, Finney & Hoit, George H. 
Reed, and one at the Nagog House, seven days at least before 
the time appointed for holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands in Acton this eleventh day of 
March, in the year, one thousand, nine hundred and thirteen. 



JAMES P. BROWN, 
WILLIS L. HOLDEN, 

Selectmen of Acton. 



11 



Proceedings of the Annual Meeting March 25, 1912 



Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Allen Brooks Parker was chosen moderator. 

Article 2. To bring in their votes on one ballot for 
town officers. 

The following town officers were chosen : 

Town Clerk— Horace F. Tuttle. 

Selectmen — Edgar H. Hall, James P. Brown, Willis L. 
Holden. 

Assessor — James B. Tuttle. 

Overseers of the Poor — Edgar H. Hall, Willis L. Holden. 
William F. Kelley. 

Treasurer — Frank W. Hoit. 

Collector of Taxes — William F. Stevens. 

Auditor — William T. Merriam. 

Constables — Albert S. Bradley, William C. Coughlin, 
James Kinsley, William F. Stevens. 

Road Commissioner — Albert H. Perkins. 

Field Drivers — George W. Daniels, Daniel H. Farrar, 
J. Alfred Coding, Fred S. Whitcomb. 

Fence Viewers — James P. Brown, Edgar H. Hall, Willis 
L. Holden. 

School Committee — Samuel A. Christie. 

Cemetery Commissioner — Julian Tuttle. 

Board of Health— Frank E. Tasker. 

Trustee of Memorial Library — Lucius A. Hesselton. 

Tree Warden — William H. Kingsley. 

On the question, "Shall licenses be granted for the sale 
of intoxicating liquors in this town," the vote was: 

Whole number of ballots cast 288 

Yes 86 

No 180 

Blanks 22 



12 



Article 3. To choose all necessary town officers not 
named in article 2, and fix salaries. 

Voted : That the selectmen be instructed to appoint 
surveyors of lumber, wood, hoops and staves. 

Chose I. Warren Flagg trustee of the Goodnow fund 
for three years. 

Voted: That the salary of the road commissioner be 
two and one-half dollars per day, nine hours to constitute a 
day. 

Voted: That the salary of the tax collector be one 
per centum of the amount collected and that he perform all 
the duties hitherto performed by said officer. 

Voted: That the salary of the treasurer be two hun- 
dred dollars per annum. 

Voted: To leave the matter of the auditor's salary 
wdtli the selectmen. 

Voted : That the salaries of the selectmen and over- 
seers of the poor be the same as last year. 

Article 4:. To see if the town will accept the reports 
of the selectmen, overseers of the poor, school committee, 
library trustees and other town officers. 

Voted: To accept the reports of the several town 
officers. 

Article 5. To hear and act upon the reports of any 
committees chosen at any previous meeting that have not 
already reported. 

The committee on High School reported in writing- 
through its secretary Frank W. Hoit. The report was 
accepted and filed. A report was presented by Mr. 
Augustine Hosmer for the committee on a memorial to the 
Spanish War veterans. 

Voted: That the committee chosen last year be 
authorized to erect a monument to the Spanish War veterans 
enlisting from Acton at a cost not exceeding five hundred 
dollars. 



13 



Voted: That the location be left with said committee, 

A report was presented by the committee on copying- 
the vital records of the town to 1850. 

Voted: That the unexpended appropriation of last 
year be appropriated for the same purpose the current year. 

Article 6. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for the due observance of Memorial day. 

Voted : To raise one hundred twenty-five dollars ($125.) 

Article 7. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for the repairing and building of roads and bridges, 
or act an^ything thereon. 

Voted : To raise six thousand dollars ($6,000), the same 
to include all work on roads and bridges except the building 

of the road in West Acton ordered by the count}^ com- 
missioners. 

Article 8. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for the support of .Memorial Library the current year. 

Voted: To raise four hundred dollars for current 
expenses and tw^o hundred dollars for books. 

Article 9. To see what amount of money the town 
will appropriate for the care of cemeteries, or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate six hundred dollars. 

Article 10. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for maintenance of fire department, or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate five hundred fifty 
dollars for maintenance and purchase of supplies. 

Voted: To appropriate one hundred dollars for pro- 
viding hand extinguishers in accordance with a previous, 
vote. 



14 



Voted : That the fire warden publish in the town report 
a list of persons who have received fire apparatus under 
said vote. 

Article 11. To see if the town will pay for fighting 
brush fires, and fix price, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To pay to all who assist in putting out forest 
fires and who report to the forest warden, twenty-five cents 
per hour. 

Article 12. To see if the town will appropriate a sum 
of money for the enforcement of the liquor laAVS, or act 
anything thereon. 

Voted: That the unexpended balance of any money 
previously appropriated for the enforcement of the liquor 
laws be appropriated. 

Voted: That the selectmen be instructed to enforce 
the law. 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to contract 
with the American Woolen company for additional electric 
street lights, or take any action in reference to lighting 
the streets of the town. 

Voted: That the selectmen be authorized to contract 
with the American Woolen company for such number of 
additional street lights as will make the total number one 
hundred fifty. Fifty lights to be placed in each precinct. 

Voted : To appropriate the sum of twenty-four hundred 
dollars. 

Article 14. To see if the town will build a new bridge 
to replace the wooden one in East Acton, or act anything 
thereon. 



15 



Voted : That the road commissioners build a new 
bridge to replace the wooden one in East Acton westerly of 
the residence of I. Warren Flagg. 

Article 15. To see if the town will authorize the 
treasurer, Avith the approval of its selectmen, to borrow 
money for the town, if necessary, in anticipation of taxes 
the current year. 

Voted : That the town treasurer, with the approval 
of the selectmen, be and is hereby authorized to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the taxes of the 
municipal year beginning February 1, 1912, to an amount 
not exceeding in the aggregate fifteen thousand dollars, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor payable within one year, 
any debt or debts incurred under this vote to be paid from 
the taxes of said municipal year. 

Article 16. To see if the town will vote to bond its 
collector in an Indemnity Company and raise and appro- 
priate money for payment of premiums on treasurer's and 
collector's bonds, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To bond the collector of taxes in an Indemnity 
Company. 

Voted : To appropriate one hundred dollars for the 
payment of premiums on collector's and treasurer's bonds. 

Article 17. To see if the town will raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to build the road across the Common 
in West Acton as laid out by the county commissioners, and 
for the damages as assessed, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate seven hundred dollars. 

Article 18. To see if the town will appoint a town 
accountant and fix salary of same, or act anything thereon. 



16 



Voted: To pay the town accountant thirty cents per 
hour employed. 

Voted : To appropriate a sum of money sufficient to 
pay said accountant. 

Article 19. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to the extermination of the elm leaf beetle. 

Voted: To appropriate five hundred dollars. 

Article 20. To see what action the town ^Yill take in 
reference to the extermination of the gypsy and brown tail 
moth. 

Voted : To raise the sum of money required by the 
state law. 

Voted: That the selectmen be instructed to appoint 
the tree warden superintendent of moth work. 

Article 21. To see what amount of money the town 
will vote to raise and appropriate for the support of schools, 
the purchase of school books and supplies, the expense of 
operating the school plants, repairs and improvements upon 
school grounds and buildings, the transportation of scholars 
and for any other expense relating to the maintenance of the 
school department, or do or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise the sum of sixteen thousand one 
hundred dollars for the purposes specified in the school com- 
mittee's estimates for the support of schools for the fiscal 
year 1912-1913, to be found on pages 13 and 14 of the 
annual report of the school committee for the j^ear ending 
January 31, 1912. 

Voted: To allow the committee to transfer any un- 
expended balance of any appropriation to an}^ other which 
may become exhausted and have proven insufficient. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to contract 
with the Town of Concord for a certain number of hydrants 
in East Acton, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: That the selectmen be authorized to contract 
with the Town of Concord for the erection and maintenance 
of not more than eight hydrants in East Acton along the 
line of the main pipe from Nagog Pond, for a term of ten 



17 



years at an annual rental of twentj^-three dollars per 
hydrant. 

Article 23. To see what amount of money the to^^m 
will raise for town charges. 

Voted: To appropriate five thousand dollars to be 
expended as follows : 

Town farm $600.00 

Outside poor 1,000.00 

Soldiers' aid 100.00 

Printing 300.00 

Buildings and*grounds 300.00 

Police 100.00 

Board of health 350.00 

Salaries of town officers 1,500.00 

Salary of to^^Ti accountant .... 200.00 

Miscellaneous 550.00 

Article 24. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to the collection of taxes. 

Voted: That the collector charge interest at the rate 
of five percent per annum on all taxes remaining unpaid 
after the first day of November next. 

Voted: That poll and personal taxes only be payable 
on demand. 

Voted: That the collector shall issue summons for all 
personal and poll taxes only remaining unpaid September 
1st. That the collector shall collect all taxes committed to 
him within the municipal year in which they are assessed. 
Article 25. To see if the town will vote to place a 
two-cell steel cage in the fire house at West Acton, for a 
lockup, or act anything thereon. 
Voted: To dismiss the article. 
Voted: To adjourn. 



STATE ELECTION, NOVEMBER 5, 1912 

Party designations: P., Prohibition; S., Socialist; S. 
L., Socialist Labor; Prog., Progressive; R., Republican; D,, 
Democratic. 



18 



Whole number of ballots cast 



Precincts Total 

12 3 

131 147 141 419 



Electors of President and Vice President 



Chafin and Watkins, P 1 

Debs and Seidel, S 

Reimer and Gillhans, S. L 

Roosevelt and Johnson, Prog. ... 38 

Taf t and Sherman, R * 59 

Wilson and Marshall, D 31 

Blanks 2 

Governor 

Charles S. Bird, Prog 38 

Eugene N. Foss, D 25 

Patrick Mulligan, S. L. . 

Frank N. Rand, P 1 

Roland D. SaAvyer, S 

Joseph Walker, R 57 

Blanks 10 

Lieutenant Governor 

Daniel Cosgrove, Prog 29 

Alfred H. Evans, P 1 

Robert Luce, R 64 

Robert B. Martin, S 

Dennis McGoff, S. L 

David I. Walsh, D 25 

Blanks 12 

Secretary- 
Frank J. Donahue, D 21 

Ellen Hayes, S 1 

Albert P. Langtry, R 57 

Karl Lindstrand, S. L 

William W. Nash, P 1 

Russell A. Wood, Prog 32 

Blanks 19 









1 


1 





1 











53 


63 


154 


54 


42 


155 


33 


30 


94 


6 


6 


14 


44 


58 


140 


30 


31 


86 














1 


2 


2 





2 


64 


44 


165 


7 


7 


24 


36 


38 


103 


1 


1 


3 


66 


58 


188 


1 





1 











32 


32 


89 


11 


12 


35 


23 


27 


71 


4 





5 


67 


54 


178 














1 


2 


36 


34 


102 


17 


25 


61 



19 



Treasurer 



Charles A. Chace, P 1 

David Craig, S. L 

Eldon B. Keith, Prog 31 

Joseph L. P. St. Coenr, D 19 

Elmer A. Stevens, R 63 

Louis F. Weiss, S 

Blanks 17 

Auditor 

James F. Carens, D 18 

Herbert B. Griffin, P 1 

Octave A. LaRiviere, Prog 29 

Sylvester J. McBride, S 

Jeremiah P. McNally, S. L 2 

John E. White, R 65 

Blanks 16 






1 


2 


1 





1 


32 


33 


96 


21 


24 


64 


74 


60 


197 


2 





2 


17 


23 


57 


25 


25 


68 


2 


1 


4 


32 


31 


92 


1 


1 


2 








2 


68 


56 


189 


19 


27 


62 



Attorney General 



George W. Anderson, D 21 

Frank Bohmbach, S. L 

Freeman T. Crommett, P 1 

H. Huestis Newton, Prog 32 

George E. Roewer, Jr., S 1 

James M. Swift, R 63 

Blanks 13 

Congressman — Fifth District 

William J. Carroll, S 2 

William N. Osgood, Prog 25 

Humphrey 'Sullivan, D 22 

John Jacob Rogers, R 72 

Blanks 10 



22 


27 


70 











1 


1 


3 


34 


36 


102 


2 





3 


69 


57 


189 


19 


20 


52 



2 


1 


5 


39 


41 


105 


25 


28 


75 


68 


58 


198 


13 


13 


36 



20 



Councillor — Sixth District 



Henry G. Burke, S 1 

John J. Hogan, D 21 25 

Harrie C. Hunter, Prog 29 40 

G. Frederick Simpson, R 63 66 

Blanks 17 16 

Senator — Seventh Middlesex District 

Edward Fisher, D 25 38 

John E. Macy, Prog 34 46 

Alonzo G. Walsh, R 61 49 

Bfanks 11 14 






1 


26 


72- 


40 


109 


51 


180 


24 


57 



35 


98 


45 


125 


48 


158 


13 


38 



Representative in General Court — Eleventh Middlesex 

District 



John D. Carney, D 21 25 

Samuel L. Taylor, R 57 57 

James B. Tuttle, Prog 42 51 

Blanks 11 14 

County Commissioner — Middlesex County 

Winthrop H. Fairbank, D 33 30 

Robert I. Kelley, S 3 

Chester B. Williams, R 72 80 

Blanks 26 34 

County Treasurer — Middlesex County 

Nicholas H. Flynn, S 1 3 

Joseph 0. Hayden, R 75 82 

Thomas F. Royle, D 19 23 

Blanks 36 39 ; 



30 76 

53 167 

46 139 

12 37 



30 


93 


1 


4 


73 


225 


37 


97 






4 


70 


227 


19 


61 


52 


127 



21 

Vote on Amendment Disqualifying Voters, etc. 

Yes 64 61 58 183 

No 13 13 14 40 

Blanks 54 73 69 196 

Vote on Amendment Relative to Taxation of Forest Lands 

Yes 54 52 53 159 

No 13 17 12 42 

Blanks 64 78 76 218 

Vote on Act Pensioning Laborers 

Yes 33 41 37 111 

No 41 43 33 117 

Blanks 57 63 71 191 

Vote for Representative in Eleventh Middlesex District, 
November 5, 1912 






M -^ o 



^ S "T •^ TS !» 
^ >. fe ^ 5 v^ 



<1 <5 O O ^^ f^ 

John D. Carney of Ayer | 76|215| 32|193| 40|123 

Samuel L. Taylor of Westford |167|140| 46|291| 85|173 

James B. Tuttle of Acton |139|126| 24|218| 74| 54 

Hugo Paige of Westford | 0| 0| 0| 0| 0| 1 

Blanks I 37| 37| 15| 87| 23| 59 

Totals |419|532|117|789|222|410 

Total vote in the district, 2489. 



22 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 



Births 

Whole number recorded 42 

Born in Acton 37 

Males 213 

Females 19 

Native parentage 21 

Foreign parentage 11 

Mixed parentage 10 

Marriages 

Whole number recorded 15 

Residents of Acton 19 

Residents of other places 11 

Deaths 

Whole number recorded 46 

Residents of Acton 42 

Residents of other places 4 

Occurring in Acton 41 

Occurring in other places 5 

Average age, years 59.9 



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29 



PERSONS HAVING DOGS LICENSED IN 1912 



Town Clerk's Report, 
Adams, Daniel H. . . . 

Akin, Alice H 

Allen, Louis E 

Bacon, Francis H. . . . 

Bailey, Fred L 

Baird, Edson 

Booth, Thomas E. . . . 
Boyce, Charles E. . . . 

Bradley, Mary 

Bresth, Simon 

Brill, Fred E 

Brown, Lizzie J 

Brown, Murray 

Brooks, Marv D. . . . 
Bulette, Frank W. . . 

Burgess, J. W 

Burroughs, Samuel R. 

Calder, Maria 

Chase, Sidney R 

Clark, Fred E 

Coughlin, John F. . . . 
Coughlin, William C, 
Davis, Mrs. John .... 

Davis, W. F. (2) 

Densmore, Joseph A., 
DeSousa, Bernardino, 

Dixon, M. S 

Dole, Cyrus G. . . . 
Durkee, Harold . . 
Dusseault, Mildred 
Davis, Charles E. 
Edney, Charles F. 
Emerick, Melvin W. , 
Enneguess, Michael . 



Gal. 7 


Ford, Isaac S 


2.00 


$2.00 


Fiske, Wilbur 


2.00 


5.00 


Farrar, Daniel H. . . . 


2.00 


2.00 


Fobes, Edward S. . . . 


5.00 


2.00 


Fletcher, Lester N. . . 


5.00 


2.00 


Fairbanks, Charles H. 


2.00 


2.00 


Farrar, J. Herman . . 


5.00 


2.00 


Fullonton, Llewellyn. 


2.00 


2.00 


Frost, Clarence A. . . 


2.00 


2.00 


Gilmore, A. H. (2) . . 


4.00 


2.00 


Gallant, Joseph 


2.00 


2.00 


Grady, Roy 


5.00 


2.00 


Houghton, Ellsworth. 


2.00 


5.00 


Harris, Hattie B 


5.00 


2.00 


Hardy, F. E 


2.00 


2.00 


Hunt, Harrv 


2.00 


2.00 


Holden, F. H 


2.00 


2.00 


Hanson, Henrv 


2.00 


2.00 


Holden, Willis L. . . . 


2.00 


2.00 


Hollowell, William T. 


2.00 


2.00 


Hoit, Frank W 


2.00 


2.00 


Hayes, Michael G. . . . 


2.00 


2.00 


Hawley, Henry H. Jr. 


2.00 


2.00 


Jones, Samuel 


2.00 


4.00 


Jones, Ralph 


2.00 


2.00 


Jones, Warren H. . . . 


2.00 


2.00 


Kellev. William F. . . 


2.00 


2.00 


Kimball, B. Milton (3) 


9.00 


2.00 


Kelley, ]\Iarvin 


2.00 


5.00 


Laffin, Sidney 


2.00 


2.00 


Lawrence, A. L 


2.00 


2.00 


Lewis, Herbert W. . . 


2.00 


2.00 


Lucier, Joseph 


2.00 


2.00 


Livermore, J. William 


2.00 


2.00 


Moore, J. Sterling . . . 


2.00 



30 



Murray, James B. . . . 


2.00 


Reed, George H. . . . 


2.00 


Millan, Albion L. ... 


2.00 


Stoney, Reginald . . 


2.00 


Miller, C. I 


2.00 


Sweet, Craig 


2.00 


Mekkelsen, Jens .... 


2.00 


Shapley, Eva C 


2.00 


Morrison, Fred D. . . . 


2.00 


Stevenson, John M. 


5.00 


]\Iurphy, George E. . . 


2.00 


Smith, Stella D 


2.00 


MacMillan, Daniel . . 


5.00 


Sanborn, E. R 


2.00 


Mauro, Nicholas .... 


2.00 


Schofield, Harris C. 


2.00 


Moore, William J. . . . 


2.00 


Smith, Albert 


2.00 


Mason, William E. . . 


2.00 


Spinney, E. L 


2.00 


Nealy, E. P 


2.00 


Smith, ' Chester R. . . 


2.00 


Nagle, Elizabeth .... 


2.00 


Schnair, Charles . . . 


2.00 


Olsen, Simon 


2.00 


Shaw, A. F 


5.00 


O'Neil, Constance ... 


2.00 


Tuttle, Arthur 


2.00 


Priest, Henry L 


5.00 


Taylor, Charles A. . 


2.00 


Perkins, Albert H. . . 


2.00 


Taylor, Walter I. . . 


2.00 


Perkins, Levi W. . . . 


2.00 


Taylor, Simon D. . . 


2.00 


Pennell, Edmund H. . 


2.00 


Thompson, Timothy 


2.00 


Pratt, Est. of Francis, 


2.00 


Wetherbee, Ellis .'. . 


2.00 


Penniman, W. H. ... 


2.00 


White, Eugene L. . . 


2.00 


Palma, John 


2.00 


Williams, Frank G. . 


5.00 


Pope, Benjamin (4) . 


17.00 


Whitcomb, Fred S. . 


2.00 


Prescott, E. II 


2.00 


Weaver, George T. . 


2.00 


Rawitzer, William . . 


2.00 


AVatkins, John H. (5 


) 10.00 


Bobbins, Solon A. . . . 


2.00 


Worster, George W. 


2.00 


Richardson, Geo. A... 


5.00 


Willis, Edward .... 


. 2.00 


Reed, Joseph 


5.00 


Word en, Martin H. . 


2.00 


Richardson, J. L. (2), 


4.00 


Wheeler, Charles H. 


5.00 


Reed, R. G 


2.00 


Willard, Edgar L. . . 


. 2.00 


Robbins, W. C. (4) . . 


8.00 






123 licenses at $2.00 each $246.00 




20 licenses at $5 


.00 eac 


h 100.00 






< 


me. 00 


Deduct fees. 143 licenses at 20c each. 


28.60 



Balance paid to county treasurer 



$317.40 



31 



REPORT AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE SELECT- 
MEN OF THE TOWN OF ACTON 



We have carried out the votes of the town intrusted to 
us to the best of our ability. 

Our town accountant has been a great improvement to 
the work. We would recommend trying one another year. 

We recommend that the town could be better served 
by a superintendent of streets, with full power under the 
direction of the selectmen, than by the present system. 

JAMES P. BROWN, 
WILLIS L. HOLDEN, 

Selectmen of Acton. 



32 



REPORT OF THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, Acton, Mass. 

Gentlemen : At the town meeting held on March 25th, 
1912, it was voted to authorize the selectmen to appoint a 
town accountant. 

In compliance with that vote the subscriber was 
appointed to the office, but owing to delays the town 
accountant did not assume the duties of the office until 
June 1st. 

I wish to mention the courtesy and cooperation of the 
different departments, without exception, in carrying out 
the instructions of the new system. 

I would recommend to your honorable board that a 
system be introduced whereby all bills against the town 
must be rendered at least once a month. 

I herewith submit my report for the fiscal year of 1912. 

EXPENDITURES 
General Government 

Appropriation : 

For salaries $1,500.00 

For accountant 200 . 00 

For surety bond 100 . 00 

From miscellaneous account, for town 

officers ' expenses 138 . 69 

From printing account, for town 

officers' expenses 28.45 

$1,967.14 



33 



Selectmen 's Department 

Salaries and Wages: 

E. H. Hall, chairman $125.00 

J. P. Brown 50.00 

Willis L. Holden 50.00 



Other Expenses: 

Printing $3.85 

Postage carfares, etc 30.01 



Auditing and Accountant Department 

Salaries and Wages: 
Auditor, W. T. Merriam, 1911-1912 .. $15.00 
Accountant, W. T. Merriam 51.00 



Other Expenses: 

Books, Finney & Hoit $9.75 

Postage, carfare, etc 2.16 



Treasurer's Department 

Salaries and Wages : 
Treasurer, F. W. Hoit $200.00 



Other Expenses : 

Printing supplies $1 . 75 

Postage, carfares, etc 18.73 

Surety bond 50.00 

Certifying three notes 9 . 00 



$225.00 



$33.86 



$66.00 



$11.91 



$200.00 



$79.48 



34 



Collector's Department 

Salaries and Wages: 
Collector, W. F. Stevens $316.74 



Other Expenses: 

Postage, carfares, etc $17.35 

Printing, Brookside Printing Co 9 . 90 

Surety bond 50.00 



Assessors' Department 
Salaries and Wages: 

Assessor, W. F. Stevens $75.00 

Assessor, W. F. Kelley 60.00 

Assessor, J. B. Tattle 55.00 



Other Expenses: 

Postage, etc., W. F. Stevens $11.88 

Printing, books, etc 15 . 80 

Blanks, Hobbs & Warren 7.83 



Town Clerk's Department 
Salaries and Wages: 

Town Clerk, Horace F. Tuttle $30.00 

Copying town report records 5 . 00 



Other Expenses: 

Postage, etc., Horace F. Tuttle $10.69 

Ink .50 

Attending clerk meeting at Ayer .... 2 . 50 



$316.74 



$77.25 



$190.00 



$35.51 



$35.00 



$13.69 



35 



Election and Registration 

Salaries and Wages: 

Registrar, H. F. Tiittle $25.00 

Registrar, S. A. Guilford 20.00 

Registrar, James McGreen 20 . 00 

Registrar, George E. Holton . 20.00 



$85.00 



Election Officers 

H. F. Robbins $2.50 

E. R. Teele 2.50 

S. A. Guilford 2.50 

H. F. Tuttle 8.00 

J. F. Coughlin 8.00 

Aaron Foster 8 . 00 

E. E. Cheney 8.00 

T. F. Ne^\i:on 8.00 

L. C. Hastings 8.00 

Abram Tuttle 10.50 

Constantine O'Neil 8.00 

A. B. Parker 5.50 

E. L. Hall 2.50 

W. F. Kelley 8.00 

F. S. Whitcomb 8.00 

James Kinsley . 5 . 50 

J. T. McNiff 2.50 

James McGreen 2 . 50 

George E. Holton 2.50 

C. D. Cram 2.50 

Primary election, H. F. Tuttle $10.00 

State election. H. F. Tuttle 10.00 



$113.50 



$20.00 



36 



Other Expenses: 
Kent for voting, J. K. W. Wetherbee, 
Putting up voting- booth, J. W. Green, 



$9.00 
1.50 



Overseers of Poor Department 



$10.50 



Salaries and Wages: 
Overseer, W. F. Kellev 


$50.00 


Overseer W. I. Holden 

Overseer E. H. Hall 


25.00 
20.00 


Other Expenses: 
Postage, etc., W. F. Kelley 


$7.44 


Total General Government 

Unexpended 





$95.00 



$7 


.44 


$1,615 


.88 


351. 


,26 


$1,967 


.14 



Buildings and Grounds 

Appropriation for buildings and 

grounds $300.00 

Received for rent, town hall 126.00 

Tov^rn Hall Maintenance : 

Janitor, R. W. Porter $95.00 

Fuel, G. H. Reed 8.29 

Fuel, So. Acton C. & L. Co 17.79 

Light, American Woolen Co 27.59 

Supplies, M. E. Taylor & Co 5.47 

Supplies, E. P. Gates 2.45 



$426.00 



37 

Supplies, Fottler. Fiske & Rawsoii .. 9.50 

Repairs, 0. D. Wood 10.12 

Repairs. So. Acton C. & L. Co 1.08 

Repairs. N. H. Tenney 18.80 

Labor on grounds, E. S. Fobes 6.15 



Other Town Buildings : 
Repairs, fire house. West Acton. J. S. 

Hoar $51 . 05 



$202.24 



$51.05 



Total for buildings and grounds $253.29 

Unexpended 172.71 



$426.00 



Protection Persons and Property 

Police Department 

Appropriation $100.00 

Paid: 

A. S. Bradley, court fees $13.05 

A. S. Bradley, expenses 5.50 

A. S. Bradley, care lockup, etc 8.00 

William C. Coughlin, special duty ... 11.75 

R. L. Randall, special duty 11.99 

R. L. Randall, court fees 17.25 

George H. Reed, special duty 2 . 50 

James Kinsley, special duty 55.00 

Ralph Jones, special duty 2.50 

A. G. Fairbank, care prisoner 3.00 

Hall Staples, medical attendance .... 2.50 

William Craig, special duty 6.40 

J. Willard Jones, special duty 4.85 

Finney & Hoit, supplies lockup 8.80 

So. Acton C. & L. Co., fuel, lockup . . 2.00 

Total police department $155.09 



38 

Appropriation overdrawn 55.09 

Enforcement of Liquor Law 

Fund on hand $1,309.95 

Paid : 

E. F. Knight, services $141 . 25 

Unexpended 1,168.70 



Fire Department 

Appropriation $550 . 00 

For hand fire extinguishers 100.00 

For hydrant service. East Acton .... 184.00 
Received from one-half price fire 

extinguishers 31 . 50 



Paid : 

F. W. Green, labor at fire $3 . 50 

F. W. Green, teaming ashes, W. A. . . 1.50 

J. L. Richardson, labor at fire 1 .50 

B. A. King, wiring Center house .... 15.00 

Badger Fire Ex. Co., bottles 3 . 50 

Maintenance for West fire house .... 117.00 

Maintenance for South fire house .... 117.00 

So. Acton Woolen Co., acid .75 

J. W. Livermore, watching fire 2 . 50 

J. W. Livermore, returning hose ... 1.00 
Bay State Belting Co., hose. East 

Acton 264.25 

J. T. McNiff, repairs 7.50 

George W. Worster, team 2.00 

W. L. Holden, freight on hose, E. 

Acton .* .55 

D. H. Farrar, repairs, E. Acton ..... 2.50 



$1,309.95 



5.50 



39 



Town of Concord, hydrant service, E. 

Acton 30.67 

J. P. Brown, repairs 3 . 50 

Boston Coupling Co ,60 

Total fire department $574 . 82 

Unexpended on hand fire extinguish- 
ers 100.00 

Unexpended on hydrant service, E. 

Acton 153 . 33 

Unexpended 37 . 35 



$865.50 



Moth Department 

Appropriation $915 . 00 

Received private moth work 227.98 

Received state highway work 186.17 

Received, state treasurer, moth work, 997.85 



$2,327.00 
Paid James O'Neil, labor and expense 2,372.61 

Unpaid private moth work 104.52 

Unpaid from state, moth work 504.00 

Elm Tree Beetle 

Appropriation $500 . 00 

Paid : 

W. H. Kingsley, labor $138.93 

E. R. Teele, arsenate lead 140.00 

$278.93 
Unexpended 221.07 

$500.00 



40 

Health and Sanitation 

Appropriation $350 . 00 

Received from Town Boxboro 15 . 00 

Received from Mr. McDonald, inspec- 
tion 161.50 

Received from state cattle inspection, 32.40 



Paid : 

E. S. Fobes, fumigating, etc $335.89 

E. S. Fobes, inspection, McDonald .. 161.50 

E. S. Fobes, inspection, Blanchard .. 220.00 

Flora Shatf ord, nurse '. 22 . 94 

Eastern Drug Co., formaldehyde, etc., 22.25 

Warren Hayward, milk 9.91 

C. H. Goldthwaite, generator, etc. ... 41 . 30 

W. E. Whitcomb, supplies 33.65 

Irving Duran, quarantine 24.00 

C. H. Mead & Co., supplies 21 . 34 

Harry Wambolt, quarantine 27 . 00 

Dennison Mfg. Co., fume-tite 4.50 

F. E. Tasker, professional service .. 211.10 
F. E. Tasker, school inspection .... 25.00 
F. K. Shaw, professional services ... 34.50 

F. K. Shaw, school inspection 25.00 

S. A. Christie, school inspection 25.00 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 10.87 

Hall Staples, professional services ... 75.00 

J. S. Moore, supplies 7 . 30 

Mrs. Fred Gilmore. nursing 45 . 00 

W. B. Clark Co., books, replace ones 

destroyed 10.37 

The News-Enterprise Co., notices .... 2,06 

A. Hosmer, printing 1.00 

F. S. Whitcomb, cattle inspection ... 46.80 



$558.90 



Total health and sanitation $1,443.28 



41 



Overdrawn 884.38 

Due from state, cattle inspection .... 23.40 



Highway and Bridges 

Appropriation : 

For repairing roads and bridges .... $6,000.00 

For new road, West Acton 700.00 

Received for road dust and stone ... 79.25 

Received for use steam roller 88 . 00 

Received for cement, etc., from bridge 48.90 



$6,916.15 
New Road, West Acton 
Paid : 

A. H. Perkins, labor $204.05 

A. W. Davis, labor 156.41 

Est. 0. W. Mead, land damages 200.00 

Boston & Maine R. R., land damages . 50.00 

H. F. Tuttle, locating bounds 2.00 

D. C. Harris, bound stones 2.40 

A. H. Perkins, gravel 44.85 

So. Acton C. & L. Co., lumber 10.80 

$670.51 
Unexpended 29.49 

New Bridge, East Acton 

Paid : 

W. H. Kingsley, labor $661 . 16 

A. C. Harvey Co., steel beams 273.24 

So. Acton C. & L. Co., cement, etc. . . . 196.65 

D. C. Harris, stone 30.00 

N. H. Tenney, pipe, etc 66.90 

$1,227.95 



42 

Credit, cement, bags and plank 48 . 90 



Net cost of bridge $1,179.05 

Repairing Roads 

Paid: 

A. H. Perkins, labor $2,099.41 

A. H. Perkins, inspection roller .... 5 . 00 

A. H. Perkins, gasoline 96 . 00 

A. H. Perkins, repairing roller 5.00 

A. W. Davis, labor 1,621.93 

A. W. Davis, gravel 29.30 

A. W. Davis, two road scrapers .... 160.00 

W. H. Kingsley, labor 545.88 

So. Acton C. & L. Co., supplies 164.56 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 7.43 

Finney & Hoit, supplies 3 . 00 

Hall Bros. Co., supplies 10.81 

C. H. Mead & Co., supplies 14.45 

W. E. Whitcomb, tools and supplies . . 4.29 

W. C. Robinson Co., oil 9.18 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co., repairs .... 1 . 68 

J. T. McNiff, repairs 11.25 

Good Roads Mch. Co., repairs 91.75 

Lunt, Moss Co., repairs 14.11 

J. P. Brown, repairs 5 . 30 

E. T. Rice, repairs .70 

N. H. Tenney, repairs 7 . 55 

Standard Oil Co., treating road from 

Acton to Woodlawn 40.73 

$4,949.31 

Unexpended, repairing roads 38.89 

Total highways and bridges $6,847.77 

Unexpended 68 . 38 

$6,916.15 



43 

Street Lighting 

Appropriation $2,400.00 

Paid : 

American Woolen Co $1,951.34 

So. Acton C. & L. Co., supplies .48 

Finney & Hoit, supplies 11 . 25 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 10.06 

H. W. Proctor, lighting one lamp .... 4.00 

A. E. Payson, lighting one lamp 4.00 

Julian Tuttle, lighting one lamp .... 4.00 

George F. Lawrey, lighting lamps ... 32.00 



Total street lights $2,017 . 13 

Unexpended 382 . 87 



$2,400.00 



Charities 
Town Farm 

Appropriation $600 . 00 

Sale of produce and stock 1,535.87 



Paid: 

M. W. Emrick, warden $450.00 

M. W. Emrick, labor 35. 66 

M. W. Emrick, hogs 8.00 

F. H. Wilson, labor 144.00 

J. S. Moore, provisions 210.31 

S. B. Ineson, supplies 61.20 

W. F. Kelley, telephone 18 . 85 

E. Z. Stanley, repairs 4.50 

George H. Cash, ice 2.40 

Finney & Hoit, supplies 31 . 59 



$2,135.87 



44 



George H. Reed, hay and grain 300.02 

C. H. Mead & Co., supplies 475.99 

J. T. McNiff, repairs 3.25 

So. Acton C. & L. Co., fuel, etc 42.92 

Tlittle & Newton, supplies 22.94 

A. H. Perkins, sawing wood 8 . 00 

E. F. Conant, trees 4.07 

J. W. Livermore, use corn planter ... 1.63 

E. L. Spinney, trimming trees 4.50 

E. A. Phalen, repairing 13.00 

AV. E. AA-'hitcomb, supplies 3.24 

W. H. Kingsley, moving shed 6.00 

H. L. Priest, pigs 6.00 

H, L. Priest, sulphur and lime 9.18 

W. L. Holden, sulphur and lim ^ 8.65 

Hall Bros. Co.. sawing lumber 3.55 

E. T. Rice, repairs 43.60 

R. F. Durkee, services 2 . 00 

C. H. Clark, repairing harness 3.30 

E. P. Gates, repairs 39.05 

D. H. Farrar, grinding corn 3.42 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 240.20 

Total town farm $2,211.02 

OverdraA\m 75 . 15- 

Outside Poor 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Reimbursement town of Woburn ... 8.81 

Reimbursement town of Boxboro ... 66.00 

Reimbursement burial state paupers. 30.00 



$1,104.81 



Paid: 

W. E. Whitcomb, supplies $102.29 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 155.77 

F. L. Morrison, milk 33.28 



45 



W. T. S. Bartlett, rent 58.00 

Hall Staples, town physician 25.00 

City of Cambridge 46 . 44 

City of No. Adams 310.00 

City of Boston 7.14 

Finney & Hoit, supplies 33.14 

W. F. Kelley, printing 2.50 

E. C. Page, services 20.00 

Harriet Rudolph, rent 12.00 

F. A. Phalen, rent 8.00 

George H. Reed, coal 4.50 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 225.52 

Total outside poor $1,043.58 

Unexpended 61 . 23 



$1,104.81 

Soldiers' Benefit 

State Aid 

Received from state treasurer $900.00 

Amount due from state, Feb. 1, 1912 . $981.00 

Amount paid out 848 . 00 

Balance due from state 929.00 



$1,829.00 $1,829.00 



Military Aid 
Appropriation $100 . 00 

Paid : 

F. E. Tasker, medical attendance $26.00 

]\Irs. Nellie Norris, nurse 35.00 

Town of Hudson 60.00 



Total military aid $121.00 

Overdrawn 21 . 00 



46 



Education 

Appropriation $16,100 . 00 

Received for tuition, Boxboro 6 . 50 

Received state treasurer, tuition .... 103.40 
Received state treasurer, Mass. fund, 1,488.80 
Received county treasurer, dog tax . . 310.78 



Paid: 

Report of school committee 

Unexpended 



$18,009.48 

$16,994.52 

$1,014.96 



Memorial Library 

Library Expenses 

Appropriation $400 . 00 

Received from fines 18 . 63 

Paid: 

E. F. Conant, insurance $50.97 

American Woolen Co., light 29.79 

0. D. Wood, repairs 12 . 25 

0. E. Houghton, transportation of 

books 50.00 

S. Hammond Taylor, janitor 96.83 

A. F. Davis, librarian 77.00 

Finney & Hoit, supplies 2.50 

So. Acton C. & L. Co., fuel 90.25 

M. E. Taylor & Co., expense 2.50 

H. F. Tuttle, expense 2.50 

Total library expense $414.25 

Unexpended 4 . 38 



$418.63 



$418.63 



47 



Library Books 

Appropriation $200 . 00 

Unexpended balance, Feb. 1, 1912 ... 472.23 

Interest on librarv fund 239 . 04 



Paid : 

Jennie E. Reed, typewriting $8.25 

A. Hosmer, printing 23 . 25 

W. B. Clark Co., books 123.71 

A. F. Davis, cataloging 119.00 

Dura Binding Co 61.30 

Dennison Mfg. Co 9 . 33 

Review of Reviews 32 . 30 

Library Bureau 169 . 35 

Remington Typewriter Co 14.25 

Marion C. Taylor 38.18 

L. D. White 69 . 50 

Lena G. Towne 186.48 

Herman Goldberger 40 . 60 

Effie E. Pickens 2 . 10 

Thorpe & Martin Co 2.50 

Finney & Hoit 3 . 68 

W. A. AYilde Co 6.14 

Total library books $909 . 92 

Unexpended 1 . 35 



$911.27 



$911.27 

Unclassified 

Appropriation . $550 . 00 

Less town officers' expenses 138.69 

$411.31 
Received from tax suit 3 . 50 

$414.81 



48 



Paid: 

E. T. Rice, repairing pumps $6.25 

F. S. Glines, opening school for regis- 

trars 2.00 

F. W. Greene, teaming safe and put- 
ting up booths 2 . 00 

Ralph E. Joslin, counsel fees 35 . 00 

Henry M. Meeks Pub. Co., birth return 

books 1.25 

R. W. Porter, care clock and flag 30.00 

J. P. Brown, signs for bridge. So. 

Acton 5.00 

H. F. Tuttle, collecting and recording 

40 births 20.00 

H. F. Tuttle, recording 15 marriages, 3.00 

H. F. Tlittle, recording 45 deaths ... 9.00 

H. F. Tuttle, measuring oil road .... .75 
H. F. Tuttle, transfer two certificates 

of death .50 

F. K. Shaw, returning 12 births 3.00 

S. A. Christie, returning 8 births 2.00 

F. E. Tasker, returning 6 births 1.50 

Hall Staples, returning 7 births 1 . 75 

F. J. Barker, returning 2 births .50 

Isaiah Pickard, returning one birth . . .25 

H. H. Brayley, returning one birth ... .25 

E. A. Mayell, returning one birth .... .25 
M. E. Taylor & Co., manure monument 

grounds 3 . 40 

W. T. Farrar Co., returning death 

certificate .25 

W. F. Stevens, making moth list ... 3 . 00 
W. F. Stevens, expense account dog 

tax 2.25 

W. F. Stevens, notifying officers-elect 1.00 
W. F. Stevens, transporting election 

returns 3 . 00 

W. F. Stevens, cost Williams case .. 3.50 



49 

W. F. Stevens, abatements 152 . 10 

Total $292.75 

Unexpended 122.06 

Memorial Day 

Appropriation $125 . 00 

Paid George B. Parker 125.00 

Copying Town Records 

Appropriation $150 . 00 

Paid Marion C. Taylor 78.00 



Unexpended $72.00 

Spanish War Memorial 
Appropriation $500 . 00 

Paid: 

Julian Tuttle, foundation $15 . 00 

D. C. Harris, monument stone 200.00 

A. L. Noyes, lunch at dedication 7.50 

B. D. Hall, music at dedication 4.00 

Harry E. Tuttle, carriage at dedication 4.00 

Total Spanish war memorial .... $230.50 

Unexpended 269.50 

Cemetery Department 

Appropriation $600 . 00 

Sale lots, Mt. Hope 18.00 

Interest on cemetery fund 402 . 82 

Unexpended balance, Feb. 1, 1912 ... 436.11 

$1,456.93 



50 



Paid : 

N. G. Brown, labor, Woodlawn $72.63 

H. F. Robbins, labor, Woodlawn 17 . 38 

J. W. Livermore, labor, Woodlawn .. 22.75 

A. H. Smith, labor, Woodlawn 25.38 

Julian Tuttle, labor, Woodlawn 109.22 

Asaph Parlin, labor, Woodlawn 12.25 

M. G. Hayes, painting signs 2.50 

F. W. Green, labor, Mt. Hope 16.49 

H. T. Clark, labor, Mt. Hope 35.75 

A. W. Davis, labor, Mt. Hope 71.73 

A. H. Perkins, labor, Mt. Hope 120.80 

Finney & Hoit, flags 4. 00 

Finney & Hoit, sail cloth 5.00 

A. Batley & Son, flowers, Mt. Hope . . 12.70 

So. Acton C. & L. Co 8.44 

West and South Water Co., installing 

water, Mt. Hope 72.75 

West and South Water Co., rent .... 6.00 
H. F. Tuttle, writing and recording 

deeds 3.50 

H. F. Tuttle, preparing annual report 5.00 
H. F. Tuttle, attending meeting. West 

Acton 1 . 50 

H. F. Tuttle, laying out lots, Wood- 
lawn 2.00 



Perpetual Care Lots 

Paid: 

Julian Tuttle $256.46 

H. T. Clark 61.00 

F. C. Hay ward, interest on fund 17 . 50 



$627.77 



$334. 9<> 



51 



Unexpended balance for perpetual 

care lots, Feb. 1, 1913 503.97 



$1,466.70 

Overdrawn $9.77 

Interest 

Receipts from collector $146.44 

Balance of interest, cemetery fund ... 16 . 89 

Treasurer's deposit 63.00 

$226.33 
Paid First National bank 230.55 

Municipal Indebtedness 

Loans, First National bank $13,000.00 

Paid First National bank 13,000.00 

Printing 

Appropriation $300 . 00 

Less amount taken for officers' ex- 
penses 28 . 45 



$271.55 



Paid: 

News-Enterprise, annual reports .... $177.60 

News-Enterprise, school reports 7.00 

News-Enterprise, four lots warrants. 23.50 

News-Enterprise, caucus notices 1.40 

News-Enterprise, annual meeting bal- 
lots 19.75 

News-Enterpirse, board of health no- 
tices 8.35 

News-Enteprise, poll tax list 15 . 25 



52 



News-Enterprise, 50 voting lists 

P. B. Murphy, blanks 


15.00 
1.50 




Total printing 


— 


$269.35 


Unexpended 


$2.20. 



Financial Statement 

Receipts 

Due from treasurer $3,183.69 

Due from collector 4,031 . 89 

Appropriation : 

Memorial day 125 . 00 

Highway and bridges 6,700 . 00 

Memorial library, books 200.00 

Memorial library, expense 400 . 00 

Fire department 550 . 00 

School department 16,100.00 

Extermination of moth 915.00 

Raised: 

For state tax 3,500.00 

State highway 269.00 

County tax 1,926.34 

Overlay 933.29 

Received treasurer's report 22,577.11 

Farm receipts 1,535 . 87 

Interest on taxes 146.44 

C. ]\r. & H. St. Railroad tax 110.10 

Moth tax 332.50 

Cemetery fund 700.00 

December assessment 352.31 



$64,588. 54r 



53 

Expenditures 

State tax $3,500.00 

County tax 1,926.34 

State highAvay 269.00 

General government 1,869 . 17 

Police department 155.09 

Enforcement liquor law 141.25 

Fire department 574.82 

Moth department 2,372 . 61 

Elm tree beetle 278 . 93 

Health and sanitation 1,443 . 28 

Highways and bridges 6,847.77 

Street lighting 2,017.13 

Charities, town farm 2,213.52 

Outside poor 1,041.08 

Soldiers' benefit, state aid 848.00 

Military aid 121.00 

Education 16,994.52 

Library, expense 414.25 

Books 909.92 

Unclassified 726 . 25 

Cemetery, 627 . 77 

Perpetual care 334.96 

Interest 230 . 55 

Loans 13.000.00 

Printing 26^). 35 

L^ncoUected +axes 4,653.44 

Cash on hand 808 . 54 

^$64,588.54 

Financial Statement for Year Ending February 1, 1913 

Due from treasurer $308 . 54 

Due from collector 4,653.44 

Due from state aid 929.00 

Due from moth work 504 . 00 

Due from inspection cattle 23.40 

$6,918.38 



54 

Liabilities 

Unexpended balance cemetery fund . $503.97 

Unexpended balance library fund ... 1 . 35 

Fund for enforcement liquor law .... 1,168.70 

Cemetery fund in treeasury 850 . 00 

Due M. E. Taylor & Co., outside poor, 199.91 

Town of Randolph 37.00 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies, road 

department 11 . 68 

E. P. Gates, repairs, road department, 9.75 

S. Hammond Taylor, janitor library, 16.66 

Arthur F. Davis, librarian 25 . 20 

M. E. Taylor & Co., library expense, 9.50 

Edward C. Page, return deaths 7 . 50 



,841.22 



Balance in favor of the town $4,077.16 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM T. MERRIAM, 

Town Accountant. 
Acton, Mass., February 10, 1913. 



I have examined the accounts of the tax collector and 
treasurer of the Town of Acton, and find them correct to 
the best of my knowledge. 

WILLIAM T. ]\IERRIAM, 

Town Accountant. 



00 



TREASURER'S REPORT YEAR ENDING 
FEBRUARY 1. 1913 



Cash on hand $3,183.69 

State treasurer, corporation tax. pub- 
lic service 2,140.69 

Corporation tax, business 1,241 . 10 

National bank tax 344. 68 

State aid 900.00 

Street railway tax 87.42 

Reimbursement for loss of taxes on 
land used for public institu- 
tions 121 . 65 

Income of Mass. school fund 1,145.05 

Supervision of schools 343 . 75 

Tuition of children 103.40 

Corporation tax 178.83 

Motor vehicle fund 20.00 

Burial of paupers 30.00 

Inspection of animals 32.40 

County treasurer, dog tax 310.78 

Rent of town hall 126.00 

^Memorial library, fines 18. 63 

Cemetery fund, Daniel Fletcher, lot, 100.00 

Simon Hartwell, lot 100.00 

Asa Parker, lot 100.00 

W. N. Wood, lot 100.00 

Emerson F. Fuller, lot 100.00 

John Porter, Priest lot 100.00 

Harriet Davis, Brown lot 100.00 

Suppression of moths account 1,184.02 



56 



School account, tuition of Clinton 

Stickney 6.50 

Cemetery lots sold 18 . 00 

Board of health, William McDonald, 161.50 

Town of Boxboro 15.00 

First National Bank, Boston, loan . . . 3,000.00 

Loan 5,000.00 

Loan 5,000. OC 

Overseers of poor, outside poor 74.81 

Koad commissioners, crushed stone . . 9.0C 

409 Cement bags 40.90 

'Cement 3 . 50 

Road dust 70.25 

Labor water district 88 . 00 

Income of cemetery funds 419.71 

Income of library funds 239.04 

W. F. Stevens, collector, expense on 

tax suit 3 . 50 

International Trust Co., interest on 

deposit 63.00 

One-half payment on fire extin- 
guishers 31 . 50 

Road department, old plank 4.50 

$26,460.80 
Town farm receipts : 

Milk $1,072.07 

Apples 228 . 36 

Eggs 30.98 

Two cows 65.00 

One Bull 37.00 

Hogs 42.00 

Fowl 12.84 

Calves • 27.50 

Vegetables 7 . 22 

Telephones 6 . 00 

Blankets 3.00 

Old copper 2.40 



57 



Use of wheel chair 1 . 00 

Service .50 

$1,535.87 
Received of William F. Stevens, collector : 

Taxes collected 1909 $19 . 70 

Interest 1909 3.00 

Taxes collected 1910 209.59 

Interest 1910 15.43 

Taxes collected 1911 3,298 . 04 

Interest 1911 108 . 85 

Taxes collected 1912 28,154.56 

Interest 1912 19 . 16 

C. M. & H. St. Railway tax 110.10 

$31,938.43 

$59,935.10 

Paid orders " $59,126.56 

Cash on hand February 1, 1913 808.54 

$59,935.10 



FRANK W. HOIT, 

Treasurer. 



58 



Treasurer's Report of Money Held for Care of Lots in 

Cemeteries 

To cash in North End Savings bank, $2,175.00 

Warren Institution for Savings 1,000.00 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings bank 1,000.00 

Lowell Five Cents Savings bank 1,000.00 

Mechanic Savings bank 1,000.00 

Central Savings bank 1,000.00 

City Institution for Savings 2,000.00 

Middlesex Institution for Savings ... 900.00 

Cash in treasury 850 . 00 

Luke Blanchard Cemetery fund in 

North End Savings bank 500.00 

Tomb fund in Charlestown Five Cents 

Savings bank 100.00 

Memorial Tablet funds in Charlestown 

Five Cents Savings bank 50.00 

Warren Institution for Savings 50.00 

Total funds $11,625.00 

Income 1912-1913 402.82 

Unexpended balance February 1, 1912, 464.11 

$12,491.9 5 

By amount expended $362.96 

Principle cemetery fund 11,625.00 

Income unexpended 503 . 97 



$12,491.93 

FRANK W. HOIT, 

Treasurer. 



59 
Treasurer's Report of Wilde Memorial Library. 

1913 
Feb. 1. Cash in Charlestown Five 

Cents Savings bank $1,000.00 

Cash in Warren Institntion for Sav- 
ings, 1,000.00 

Cash in Home Savings bank 1,000.00 

Cash in North End Savings bank .... 1,000.00 
Cash in Middlesex Institution for 

Savings 1,000.00 

Bond of West Shore Railroad Co. ... 1,000.00 

Received interest on money in banks, 199.04 

Received interest on bond 40.00 

Unexpended balance February 1, 1912, 472.23 

Appropriation for books 200.00 



1913 

Feb. 1. By cash in banks $5,000.00 

West Shore Railroad bond 1,000.00 

Cash paid Jennie Reed 8.25 

Cash paid A. F. Davis 119.00 

Cash paid Dura Binding Co * 61.30 

Cash paid Dennison Mfg. Co 9.33 

Cash paid Library Bureau 169.35 

Cash paid Remington Typewriter Co.. 14.25 

Cash paid A. Hosmer 23 . 25 

Cash paid Marion C. Taylor 38.18 

Cash paid L. D. White 69.50 

Cash paid Lena G. Towne 186.48 

Cash paid Effie Pickeus 2.10 

Cash paid Thorp & Martin Co 2.50 

Cash paid Finney & Hoit 3. 68 



$6,911.27 



$6,707. n 



60 



Library books : 

Cash paid W. B. Clark & Co $123.71 

Cash paid Review of Reviews 32 . 30 

Cash paid H. Goldberger 40.60 

(^ash paid W. A. Wilde Co 6.14 

$202.75 

I'^nexpended lil)rary balance 1.35 



$6,911.27 

FRANK W. HOIT, 

Tri^asurer. 



61 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



VALUATION APRIL 1. 1912 

Buildings, exclusive of land $1,103,510.00 

Land, exclusive of buildings 505,610.00 

Personal estate 816,210.01^ 

$2,425,330.00 
Valuation April 1, 1911 2,288,490.00 

Increase in valuation $136,840.00 

Rate of taxation $12.50. 
Tax assessed as follows : 

Eeal estate $20,114.00 

Personal estate 10,202.63 

Polls 1.302.00 

$31,618.63 

Moth tax $332.50 

December assessment 352 . 31 

Excise tax 110.10 

AMOUNT OF MONEY RAISED 

For state tax $3,500.00 

For state highway tax 269.00 

For county tax 1,926.34 

For town grant 24,990.00 

For overlay 933.29 

$31,618.63 



62 



Number of horses assessed 399 

Number of cows assessed 789 

Number of neat cattle, other than cows 113 

Number of swine assessed 57 

Number of dwelling houses assessed 563 

Number of poll taxes assessed 651 

Number of fowls 4,030 

WILLIAM F. STEVENS, 
JAMES B. TUTTLE, 
WILLIAM F. KELLEY, 

Assessors of Acton. 



63 



COLLECTOR'S REPORT 

For Fiscal Year Ending February 1, 1913 

1909 Dr. 

Uncollected February 1, 1912 $19.70 

Interest collected 3.00 

$22.70 

Cr. 
Paid treasurer $22 . 70 

1910 Dr. 

Uncollected February 1, 1912 $209.59 

Interest collected 15.43 

$225.02 

Cr. 

Paid treasurer $225.02 

1911 Dr. 

Uncollected February 1, 1912 $3,802.60 

Interest collected 108 . 85 

$3,911.45 



64 
Cr. 



Paid treasurer $3,301.46 

Abatements 105 . 43 

$3,406.89 

Uncollected February 1, 1913 $504.56 

Town, state and county taxes com- 
mitted to collector July 15, 1912, $31,618.63 

Moth tax 332.50 

December assessments 352 . 31 

$32,303.44 
Interest collected 19 . 16 

$32,322.60 

Cr. 

Paid treasurer $28,127.05 

Abatements 46. 67 

$28,173.72 

Uncollected February 1, 1913 $4,148.88 

WILLIAM F. STEVENS, Collector. 



65 



REPORT OF TREE WARDEN 



Town raised for this department .... $400 . 00 
Received for labor on private trees . . 19.34 



Expended as follows : 

E. R. Teele, arsenate of lead $140.00 

W. H. Kingsley, labor 180.93 



$419.34 



$320.93 

The condition of the elm trees remain the same. Where 
they are sprayed they are looking well and where they are 
not sprayed they are dying. 

I recommend that $400.00 be placed at the disposal of 
the tree warden. 



WILLIAM H. KINGSLEY, 

Tree Warden, 



66 



REPORT OF FIRE WARDEN 



By vote of town at annual meeting March, 1912, I 
submit the list of those having fire extinguishers : 

L. Conant 2 

William H. Kinsley 1 

William Kelley 1 

F. S. Whitcomb 3 

L. Taylor 2 

H. H. Hawley 1 

W. L. Holden 1 

F. H. Holden 1 

J. P. Fletcher 1 

A. W. Flint 1 

F. R. Knowlton 4 

W. E. Whitcomb 2 

W. E. Hayward 2 

A. H. Perkins 1 

E. F. Conant 1 

M. E. Taylor 1 

Left in South Acton fire house 6 

Left with E. H. Hall 4 

WILLIAM H. KINGSLEY, 

Fire Warden. 



67 
REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH 



Year Ending February 1, 1913 

Burial permits for Acton 26 

Burial permits issued for other places 13 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES REPORTED 

Diphtheria 6 

Scarlet Fever 35 

Measles 144 

lyphoid fever 1 

Tuberculosis 1 

Vericella 52 

Whooping cough 10 

Two deaths from contagious diseases. 

CATTLE INSPECTED FOR THE TOWN 

Inspected Condemned 

Veal 860 28 

Cattle 174 11 

Hogs 92 3 

Lambs 3 

Cattle inspected: 

Blackstone Beef Co., McDonald License 

Inspected Condemned 

Cattle 1258 54 

Veal 34 5 

Hogs 18 

I would recommend that there be $1,500.00 appro- 
priated for the use of the board of health and that J;he 
members of the board be paid $50.00 each a year for their 
services. 

E. S. FOBES, Agent. 



68 



REPORT OF CATTLE INSPECTOR 



I have inspected in 1912: 

Milch and dry cows 709 

Young cattle 198 

Bulls 31 

Swine 137 

Sheep 9 

Goat 1 

Cow stables 104 

I have quarantined six head of cattle for tuberculosis 
which were taken by the state and killed. 

FRED S. WHITCOMB, Inspector. 



69 
ROAD COMMISSIONER'S REPORT 



Cost of buildino: new bridge at East 

Acton, per report of accountant. $1,179.05 
Cost of building new road at West 

Acton, per report of accountant. 670.51 

Rebuilding the Flint road 1,705.45 

General repairs and scraping roads . . 2,591.07 

Repairs on tools and roller 137.34 

Supplies 213 . 72* 

Gasoline 96.00 

Two road scrapers 160.00 

Treating road from Acton to Wood- 
lawn cemetery by the Standard 

Oil company 40 . 73 

Inspection of roller 5.00 

Total amount expended for roads 

and bridges $6,798.87 

Credit 

For road dust and stone $79.25 

For use of steam roller 88.00 



$167.25 

We recommend that the to^\Ti rebuild the road from 
Kelley's corner to Acton Center. 

We recommend that the road from Stow to Littleton 
have a coat of crushed stone. 

We recommend that the sum of $6,000.00 be raised for 
the repairs of roads and bridges. 

A. H. PERKINS, 
A. W. DAVIS. 
W. H. KINSLEY, 
Road Commissioners. 



70 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



To the Citizens of Acton: 

The report of the overseers of the poor for the year 
ending Felpruary 1, 1913, is herewith submitted: 

There has been a slight increase in the amount of aid 
furnished outside poor during the year, a larger number 
being aided. 

The cost of support at town farm has remained about 
the same, this however, includes the addition of a milk 
room and installing a new hot water boiler to replace the 
old one which had become useless. 

Mr. and Mrs. Emrick, warden and matron, have been 
faithful to their duties and the inmates, who were three 
in number, two men and one woman, have been kindly 
cared for. 

Further detailed report of this apartment appears in 
the report of the town accountant. 

In pursuance of a plan, which will undoubtedly be 
adopted, we recommend that all bills against this depart- 
ment be rendered monthly. 

We recommend the same appropriation as last year, viz : 

Outside poor $1,000.00 

Farm 600.00 

AID FURNISHED OUTSIDE POOR 

Expenses per report of accountant .. $1,043.58 
Receipts 104.81 

$938.77 



71 

SUPPORT OF POOR ON FARM 

Expenses per report of accountant .. $2,211.02 

INVENTORY OF STOCK OF FARM FEBRUARY 1st, 1913 

8 Cows $480.00 

2 Heifers 30.00 

2 Horses 350.00 

S Tons hay 200.00 

Harnesses 50 . 00 

Wagons, carts and sleds 325.00 

Farming implements 175.00 

Pump 100.00 

Orain and oyster shells 53.00 

Barrels and boxes 5.00 

Coal 5.00 

Wood cut for stove 30.00 

Set of measures 1.00 

Salt .40 

Horse blankets 5 . 00 

58 Hens 58.00 

Potatoes 30.00 

Apples 5 . 00 

Preserves, pickles, etc 15 . 00 

Household goods and kitchen 

utensils 275.00 

Wheel chair 20.00 

Groceries and supplies 28.00 

Robes 6.00 

12 Cords wood at house 50.00 

18 Cords of wood for school houses, 81.00 

Vinegar 3.00 

Salt pork 35.00 

2 Pigs 10.00 

Corn on ear 4 . 00 

Lumber 12.00 

$2,441.40 



72 



Expenditures $2,211.02 

Inventory 1912 2,583.90 

$4,794.92 

Inventory 1913 $2,441.40 

Receipts 1,535.87 

Wood supplied schools and town hall, 49.50 

$4,026.77 

Cost of supporting poor on farm .... $768 . 15 

W. F. KELLEY, Chairman, 
W. L. HOLDEN, Clerk, 
E. H. HALL, 

Board of Overseers of Poor. 



73 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



For the Year Ending February 1, 1913 

We present the following schedule showing the amounts 
of the several funds for the perpetual care of cemetery lots 
and the income and expenditures on account of each fun^l 
for the year. 

HERBERT T. €LARK, 
JULIAN TUTTLE, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Cemetery Commissioners. 



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79 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE GOODNOW FUND 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY 1, 1913 

Investments 
Warren Institution for Savings, Book 

83,531 $1,052.70 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank, 

Book 71,200 1,000.00 

City Institution for Savings, Lowell, 

Book 84,244 1,000.00 

$3,052.70 
Receipts 
Warren Institution for Savings, divi- 
dends $40.00 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank, 

dividends 40.00 

City Institution for Savings, dividends, 40 . 00 

$120.00 
Payments 
Paid Julian Tuttle, care of Goodnow 

lot in Woodlawn cemetery $7 . 00 

Unexpended income for care of ceme- 
tery lot, deposited with Warren 

Institution for Savings 13.00 

Herbert F. Robbins, treasurer of the 

Evangelical church in Acton .... 100 . 00 

$120.00 
LUTHER CONANT, 
I. WARREN FLAGG, 
HORACE P. TUTTLE, 
Tl-ustees of Goodnow Fund. 



80 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF ACTON MEMORIAL 
LIBRARY, 1912-1913 



Trustees 
LUTHER CONANT, President 
E. FAULKNER CONANT, Secretary 
HORACE F. TUTTLE 
MOSES TAYLOR DELETTE H. HALL 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD J. SIDNEY WHITE 

LUCIUS A. HESSELTON FRANK R. KNOWLTON 



At the recommendation of the Massachusetts Library 
Commission the Trustees voted to allow each applicant 
taking books from the library, two books on each card; 
one a work of Fiction and the other any book in Non- 
Fiction which they desired; to be issued at the discretion 
of the librarian. This new arrangement seems to be very 
satisfactory to the patrons of the library and must be looked 
upon as a success. The recommendation was made upon 
the fact that the library now contained a large number 
of books of value which were not reaching the public as 
they should. This will make more useful the large class 
of non-fiction which is well worth a greater consideration 



81 



by the public. It will also materially increase the circula- 
tion of the library which is regarded by the state commission 
as very low in percentage as compared with other towns. 
This recommendation does not contemplate discrediting 
any worthy works of fiction as there are many, such as 
the works of Robert Grant and others, where the vital 
relations of life are powerfully treated. ^Marriage and 
divorce, capital and labor, etc., are graphically portrayed 
in these writings. Likewise history has no more truthful 
and illuminating writer than Victor Hugo in Les Miserables, 
where he describes the battle of Waterloo, making vivid 
by his art the terrible charge of the French into the fatal 
sunken roadway and of the subsequent resolute repulse by 
the British. This book is considered a classic in literature. 

The patrons of the library should not forget that the 
impelling motive of Mr. Wilde in erecting and donating 
the library was to leave to the town a permanent memorial 
to the Soldiers of the Civil War credited here, and to 
sustain in its literature the truth historically concerning 
the deeds and events of that war, that there might not 
pass down to the young people a false idea of that great 
era in American history. The writer is moved to mention 
this b}^ the fact that in a book by Thomas Nelson Page 
on General Robert E. Lee, recently published, he glorifies 
and defies Lee and distorts the facts of history for Lee's 
benefit — for example ; he states that General Lee had a 
much smaller army at the battle of Gettysburg than he 
really had, giving the southern soldiers the appearance 
of greater valor than the truth shows. On the authority 
of the Count de Paris, an impartial historian. General Lee 
had 68,000 or more men there instead of 40,000 as stated 
by Page. The longer forced marches by the northern 
troops rendered their somewhat greater numbers less 

effective than the figures would indicate. 

• 

In other ways also he casts a glamor over the conditions 
of slavery which give a one-sided and biased view of the 
south at that period. Slavery had some features which 



82 

were not oppressive to those in bondage in individual 
eases but of the great mass of slaves no such ameliorating- 
statement can be made as is Avitnessed by the whipping 
post and the auction block. These things appeared very 
different to those in power than to the oppressed. Condi- 
tions in the border states in households were very unlike 
those experienced by the field hands as is seen in the 
writings of Harriet Beecher Stowe and others, and the 
constant dread of the negro was that he might be sold 
south into the cotton fields and cane brakes, there to suffer 
under the lash of the field driver. 

The trustees decided this year to recatalog the library 
according to the Dewey Decimal Classification, using for 
this purpose the accumulated surplus of book funds, un- 
expended. Mr. Leonard D. White was secured for this 
work and at its conclusion he prepared a clear and very 
useful statement of this system. This statement, much 
abbreviated, is here given: 

This system is an arrangement for cataloging books 
by subjects, grouping together in one section all books 
contained in the library on a given topic. To accomplish 
this, the field of knowledge is divided arbitrarily into ten 
classes, to which the numbers from to 9 are assigned. 
Each of these classes is divided into ten divisions. In 
some classes further sub-division is necessary. The SA^stem 
gives with the card catalog immediate information of what 
the library has for your use. 

Our librarian, Mr. Arthur F. Davis has been in the 
service ten years, and it is an act of simple justice, in which 
all will join, to express our appreciation of his unvarying 
courtesy and kindly assistance in the selection of books 
for the children and also children of a larger growth,, 
including the writer. 

Very respectfully, 

LUTHER CONANT, 

For the Trustees^ 



83 



Estimates for Memorial Library 1913-1914 

Current Expenses 

Deficiency 1912-1913 $50 . 00 

Miscellaneous 35 . 00 

Insurance 50 . 00 

Electric lights 35.00 

Coal and wood 80.00 

Transportation 50. 00 

Janitor 100.00 

Librarian 100 . 00 



$500.00 
Purchase of books to comply with 

condition of Wilde donation $200 . 00 



84 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT 



Accessions — Number of volumes in the library February 
1, 1912. 11,709 ; increased by purchase 134, of which 31 were 
obtained by binding magazines; increase by gift 17. Total 
increase 151. Number of volumes in the library February 
1, 1913, 11,860. 

Circulation — Number of days the library was opened 
102. Number of volumes circulated 7,135. Daily average 
circulation 69. 95^ Largest daily circulation 147 on ]\Iarch 
23, 1912. Smallest daily circulation 28 on November 6. 19] 2. 

Received for fines, etc $19.22 

Expended for postage .59 



$18.63 

Gifts of books have been received from the following 
sources: U. S. Government 1, State of Massachusetts 11, 
E. H. Barney 1, Francis Blake 1. J. IT. Edwards 1, Anson 
R. Graves 1, H. I. Sheldon 1. 

Periodicals subscribed for and in the reading room 20: 
Monthly — American, Atlantic, Century, Cosmopolitan, Cur- 
rent Opinion, Everybody's, Harper's, Hearst's, McClure's, 
Munsey's, National, Popular Mechanics, Review of Reviews, 
Scribner's, St. Nicholas, World's "Work. 

Weekly — Independent. Outlook, Scientific American, 
Youth's Cdmpanion. 

ARTHUR F. DAVIS, Librarian. 



85 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE MEMORIAL LIBRARY IN 1912 



XOX-FICTIOX 



Adams, AVm. F. — Commodore Joshua Barney, 922-B2(il»' 

Bennett, I. D. — The vegetable garden 63-B471r 

Berle, A. A. — The school in the home 37-B514s 

Blauvelt, :\r. T.— In Cambridge backs 81-B64oi 

Braecj. J. ('. — France under the Rei)ublic .... 944-B797f 

Bradford, Jr. G.— Lee the American 922-L4791) 

Brearley, II. C. — Animal secrets told 59-B82Sa 

Brierlcy, J.— The secret of living 20-B853s 

Brown, C. R. — The modern man's religion 20-B877m 

Butler. X. M. — AVhy should we change our 

form of government 32-B986w 

P>uxton. K. }.[. W.— The story of the crusades. 940-B99Is 
Cadman. S. P. — Charles Darwin and other 

p]nglish thinkers 81-C124- 

Clarke, William X.— The ideal of J(^sus 23-C612i 

Cox. Ken\-on — The classic point of vi(^w 70-C877c 

Crampton, II. E. — -The doctrine of evolution . . . 57-C889d 
DeMilt. A. R.— Ways and days (mt of London, 914.2-D381w 

Dyer. II.— Evolution of industry 33-D996e 

Edward, J. II. — Essays and verses 8I-E26e 

Elias. Frank— Peeps at the Far East 915-E42f 

Elson. IT. W.— Guide to English history .... J9-E.49g 

Evans. W. — Medical science of today ()1-E928m 

Fisher. S. G.— The true Daniel Webster 922-W378f 

Garlanda. F — The lunv Italy 945-G2:a:3n 

Geiui. C; T.— Peeps at Ronre . 914.r)-G3;3;^i- 

Giles, n. A.— Civiliza.tion of China 9I5.1-G47:^f 



86 



Gillpatrick, W.— The man who likes :\Iexico . . . 917.2-G483m 

Gladden, W.— Labor question 33-G5421 

Gooch, G. P.— History of our time 909-G645h 

Gostling, F. M. — Auvergne and its people .... 914.4-G682a 
Graves, A. R. — Farmer boy who became a 

bishop 922-G776g 

Green, J. B. — ^Law for the American farmer . . . 34-G7961 
Grist, William A. — Historic Christ in the faith 

of today 23-G869h 

Haskins, F. J. — The American government . . . 32-H351a 
Hawthorne, H. — Peeps at great cities. New 

York 1 917.3-H399n 

Hill, F. T.— On the trail Grant and Lee J9-H645o 

Hourticq, L. — Art in France 70-H841a 

Howell, C. F. — Around the clock in Europe . . . 914-H859a 

Hungerford, E. — The modern railrood 62-H936m 

Hutchinson, W. — We and our children 61-H978w 

Hyde, W. D. — The five great philosophies of 

life 14-H995f 

lies, George— Leading American inventors . . . 921-1271 
Kirwan, T.— The 17th Massachusetts A^olun- 

teers in the Civil War 973.7-K61m 

Koebel, W. H. — Argentina past and present . . 918-K77a 

Lane, C. B.— The business of dairjdng 63-L265b 

Longford, J. H. — Japan of the Japanese 952-L8533 

Meriwether, L. — Seeing Europe by automobile, 914-M563s 
Miller, F. T. — Photographic history of the 

Civil War. 10 vols 973.7-M647p 

Mitton, G. E.— Peeps at London 914.2-M685b 

Myers, F. A.— The future citizen 30-M996f 

Oberholtzer, E. P.— The referendum in 

America 32-012r 

Olsen, J. C— Pure foods 64-052p 

Peloubet, F. N. — Select notes on the Inter- 
national lessons, 1913 

Pennell, T. L. — Things seen in Northern India, 915.4-P413t 

Richards, C. C— Village life in America 920-R514v 

Ross, E. A.— The changing Chinese 915.1-R823c 



87 ' ' 

Scott, Sir Walter — Complete poems 82-S431c 

Sheldon, H. I. — Notes on the Nicaragua Canal, 38-S544n 

Short, J. H. — Chosen days in Scotland 914.1-S559c 

Siepen, E. — Peeps at great cities, Berlin 914.3-S572b 

Simons, A. M. — Social forces in American 

history 973-S611s 

Slattery, M.— The girl in her teens 39-S631g 

Steiner, E. A.— The broken wall 30-S822b 

Talbot, F. A. — The railway conquest of the 

world 62-T138r 

Tarbell, Ida— The tariff in our times 33-T179t 

Taussig, F. W. — Principles of economics 33-T228p 

Thomas, R. F.— Memoirs of Theodore Thomas, 922-T462t 

Thomson, J. A. — An introduction to science . . 50-T483i 
Van Antwerp, William C. — The stock exchange 

from within 33-V217s 

Watts, R. L.— Vegetable gardening 63-W348v 

Whitcomb. C. E. — Histor}^ of the 2nd Massa- 
chusetts light artillery, 1861- '65 973.7-W581h 

Wilcox, E. V. and Smith, C. B.— Farmers 

cyclopedia of agriculture 63-W667f a 

BOUND :magazines 

American, June-November, 1911. 
American, December, 1911-May, 1912. 
Atlantic, July-December, 1911. 
Century, November, 1911-April, 1912. 
Cosmopolitan, June-November, 1911. 
Cosmopolitan, December, 1911-May, 1912. 
Current Literature, July-December, 1911. 

Acton Librarian's Report, Galley 3 
Current Literature, January-June, 1912. 
Everj^body's, July-December, 1911. 
Everybody's, January- June, 1912. 
Harper's, June-November, 1911. 
Harper's, December, 1911-May, 1912. 
McClure's, November, 1911-April, 1912. 



88 

Munsey's, November, 1911-April, 1912. 
National, October, 1911-Mareh, 1912. „ 

New England, March- An gust, 1911. 
Popular Mechanics — July-December, 1911. 
Popular Mechanics, January-June, 1912. 
Review of Reviews, July-December, 1911. 
Review of Reviews, January-June, 1912. 
Scientific American, July-December, 1911. 
Scientific American, January-June, 1912. 
Scribner's, July-December, 1911. 
Scribner's, January- June, 1912. 
St. Nicholas, ^May-October, 1911. 
St. Nicholas, November, 1911-April, 1912. 
World Todaj^, July-December, 1911. 
World Today, January-June, 1912. 
World's Work, November, 1911-April, 1912. 
Youth's Companion, July-December, 1911. 
Youth's Companion, Januarj^-June, 1912. 

FICTION 

Abbott, E. H.— The sick-a-bed lady A131s 

Allen, F. N. S.— The plain path A425p 

Barclay, F. — Through the Postern gate B244t 

Bosher, K. L. — The man in lonely land B743ma 

Bradley, M. H.— The favor of kings B811f 

Brown, H. D.— How Phoebe found herself B878h 

Birmingham, G. A. — The major's niece B619m 

Birmingham, G. A. — Priscilla's spies B619p 

Birmingham, G. A. — The Simpkins plot B619s 

Curtis, L. G. — The woman from Wolverton C984w 

DeMorgan, William— A likely story D3861 

Farnol, J. — The money moon F235m 

Gordon, C. W. (Ralph Connor pseud) — Corporal 

Cameron G662c 

Harker, L. A.— ]\Ir. Wycherly's wards H282mr 

Johnson, M. — Cease firing J73c 

Kester, V. — The just and the unjust K42j 



89 



King, Basil — The inner shrine K521in 

King, Basil — The street called straight K521s 

Laughlin, C. A. — The penny philanthropist L374p 

Lincoln, J. C. — The postmaster L7372p 

Montgomery, L. M. — Chronicles of Avonlea M787c 

Nicholson, M. — A Hoosier chronicle N627ho 

Noris, K. — The rich Mrs. Burgoyne N856r 

Oppenheim, E. P. — Peter Rnff and the double 

four 062pe 

Porter, E. H. — Miss Billy's decision P844m 

Porter, G. S.— A girl of the Limberlost P845g 

Pryce, R.— Christopher P973c 

Richards, L. E. — On board the Mary Sands R516o 

Sedgwich, A. D.— Tante S448t 

Smith, F. H.— The arm chair at the Inn S647a 

Stanley, C. K. — The master of the oaks S787m 

Sullivan, T. R.— The heart of us S952h 

Webster, J.— Daddy-long-legs W381d 

Wells, C— Patty's butterfly days W453pd 

Woodbridge, E. — The Jonathan papers W882j 

Wright, H. B.— Their yesterdays W949t 

JUVENILE FICTION 



J 

Barker, B. — Young honesty politician B255y 

Bartlett, H. P. 0.— The lady of the lane B2891 

Beach, E. L. — Ensign Ralph Osborn B365e 

Beach, E. L. — Lieutenant Ralph Osborn aboard a 

torpedo destroyer B3651 

Channon, P. E. — Henley's American captain .... C4584h 

Daviess, M. T. — Sue Jane D256s 

Deland, E. D.— The future of Phoebe D337fo 

Dix, B.— Betty-bide at home D619b 

Dowd, E. C— Polly of the hospital staff D745p 

Eaton, W. P. — The boy scouts of Berkshire El 4b 

Grey, Z.— Ken Ward in the jungle G842k 

Haines, A. C. — Partners for fair H153p 



90 



Johnson, C. — When mother lets us travel in 

France J664w 

Johnson, 0. — Stover at Yale J68s 

Jordan, E. — May Iverson tackles life J82ma 

Leonard, M. F. — Everyday Susan L581e 

Paine, R. D. — The dragon and the cross P146d 

Sawyer, E. A. and Walmsley, A. P. — Madge at 

Camp Welles S271m 

Spearman, F. H. — The mountain divide S741mo 

Taggart, M. A.— Six girls and Betty T125c 

Taggart, M. A. — Six girls grown up T125sl 

Wade, M. H.— White Bird, the little Indian .... W121w 

Weir, H. C— With the flag at Panama W425w 

Weir, H. C. — The young shipper of the Great 

Lakes W425y 

Wheeler, F. R.— The boy with the U. S. Fisheries W562bp 

White, S. E.— The adventures of Bobby Orde . . . W588a 

REFERENCE, NOT FOR GENERAL CIRCULATION 



Briggs, M. J. — List of subject headings for catalogues. 
Catalogue of the Lowrey Collection, Library of Congress. 

Dewey, M. — Decimal Classification 02D510d 

Manual of the General Court, 1912. 

Marquis, A. N. — Who's who in America. 

Massachusetts Reports, Vol. 207— 1910- '11. 

Seventy-fifth Annual Report Board of Education, Mass., 

1910- '11. 
Fifty-fourth Annual Report of the G. A. R., 1911. 
Andover Vital Records — Vol. 2. 
Haverhill Vital Records— Vol. 2. 
Ipswich Vital Records — Vol. 2. 
Newbury Vital Records — Vols. 1 and 2. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee ^^^ Superintendent 
of Scnools 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 
MASSACHUSETTS 

For the Year EnJmg January 31 



1913 




PRINTED BY THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 

HUDSON, MASS. 

1913 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE'S REPORT 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

HIGH SCHOOL 
1913 • 

March 28. Winter term closes 15 weeks 

Vacation, One Week 
April 7. Spring term opens 

June 27. Spring term closes 12 weeks 

^ Summer Vacation, School Year 1913-1914 
Sept. 2. Fall term opens 

Nov. 26. Fall term closes 13 weeks 

Thanksgiving Recess, Four Days 
Dec. 1. Winter term opens 

Vacation from December 19 to December 29. One Week 
1914 

March 20. Winter term closes 15 weeks 

Vacation, One Week 
March 30. Spring term opens 

June 19. Spring term closes 12 weeks 

Total, 40 weeks. 

COMMON SCHOOL 

Same as above with the following exceptions : 
The' winter vacation ^vi\\ be two weeks in length, from 

December 19 to Januarj^ 5. 
Close June 12 instead of June 19. 
Total number of weeks, 38. 



SPECIAL EXERCISE DAYS AND HOLIDAYS 

1913 

Feb. 12. Lincoln exercises, one hour. 
Feb. 21. Washington exercises, one hour. 
Feb. 27. Longfellow exercises, half hour. 
April 18. Patriot's Day exercises, one hour. 
April 25. Arbor Day exercises, one hour. 
May 29. Memorial Day exercises, one hour. 
May 30. Memorial Day, holiday. 
June 13. Flag Day exercises, half hour. 

Columbus Day exercises, one hour. 
Thanksgiving exercises, one hour. 



Oct. 


10. 


Nov. 


26. 


Feb. 


12. 


Feb. 


20. 



Lincoln exercises, one hour. 

Washington exercises, one hour. 
April 17. Patriot's Day exercises, one hour. 
April 24, Arbor Day exercises, one hour. 
May 29. Memorial Day exercises, one hour. 



SCHOOL OFFICERS AND TEACHERS 

School Committee 

Allen Brooks Parker, Chairman Term expires 1913 

Edwin A. Phalen, Secretary Term expires 1914 

Samuel A. Christie Term expires 1915 

Superintendent 

Frank H. Hill, Residence, Littleton. Mass. 
Telephone No. 36-3 Littleton. 

^ Truant Officers 

Robert Randall, Address, South Acton. 
Thomas Scanlon, Address, West Acton. 
Asaph Parlin, Address, Acton Center. 

Janitors 

Fred S. Gline^, Address, South Acton. 
Thomas Scanlon, Address, West Acton. 
Asaph Parlin, Address, Acton Center. 



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STANDING RULES 

*Rule 1. Children under five years shall not be 
admitted to the public schools. 

Rule 2. Pupils shall be promoted from grade to grade 
and school to school, according to merit. Thorough and 
satisfactory" work will be required of pupils in a lower grade 
or school before entering a higher grade or school. 

Rule 3. Children who have not previously attended 
an}' school shall be admitted to the public schools only 
at the beginning of the fall term. 

Rule 4. Pupils shall be held responsible for books 
loaned to them until returned to the teacher. 

Rule 5. No repairs shall be made upon the public 
property in the care of the school committee, except by 
their authorized agents. 

Rule 6. There shall be no signal for "no school" on 
stormy or other inclement days, but parents shall determine 
in their individual cases whether it is expedient to send 
their children to school or not. 

*When the birthday of a child falls on or before the 
15th day of the month it is reckoned as falling upon the 
first dav of that month. 



GENERAL REPORT 



We have caused to be inserted in the warrant an 
article under which we ask the town to vote to give the 
committee authority to collect the expense of education 
provided children from institutions who attend our schools. 
By statute a vote of this character is a necessity pre- 
requisite to collecting such expense. 

We have added to the estimate for the support of the 
high school the sum of fifteen hundred dollars to meet the 
expenses incident to sending to Concord first year high 
school pupils, who elect one of the vocational courses. This 
matter is gone into in the report of the superintendent. 
In view of this situation it is a serious question from the 
standpoint of economy, whether the entire first year class 
ought not to be sent to Concord. We, however, do not 
feel prepared at this time to recommend it. 



ESTLMATES FOR THE SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS FOR 
THE FISCAL YEAR 1913-1914 

For general expenses : 

Salaries and other expenses of 

the committee $125.00 

Salaries and other expenses of 
the superintendent and truant 

officers 250.00 

For expenses of instruction : 

Salaries of high school teachers 
including tuition of pupils at- 
tending Concord 6,000.00 

Salaries of elementary school 

teachers 5,000.00 

For textbooks : 

For high and elementary schools 
it is anticipated that the 
amount to be received from 
dog tax will cover this. 
For stationery and supplies: 

High school 25.00 

Common schools 350.00 

For expenses of operating school plants : 
Wages of janitors, fuel and mis- 
cellaneous expenses 1,925.00 

Maintenance and repairs 250.00 

For auxiliary agencies : 

Health .' 50.00 

For transportation : 

High school scholars 1,750.00 

Elementary scholars 1,775.00 



Total $17,500.00 



10 



In addition to the above appropriations, we ask the 
town to vote to allow the committee to transfer any unex- 
pended balance from any fund to any other proving 
insufficient. 



RECEIPTS ON ACCOUNT OF SCHOOLS FOR FISCAL 
YEAR 1912-1913 

Appropriations 

For general expenses : 

Salaries and other expenses of 

the committee $125.00 

Salaries and other expenses of 
the superintendent and truant 

officers 225.00 

For expenses of instruction: 

Salaries of high school teachers 
including tuition of pupils at- 
tending Concord 4,275.00 

Salaries of elementary school 

teachers 5,000.00 

For textbooks: 

High school — (It is anticipated 
that the amount to be re- 
ceived from dog tax will 
cover this item) nothing 

Elementary schools — (It is anti- 
cipated that the amount to be 
received from dog tax will 

cover this item) nothing 

For stationery and supplies: 

High school 25.00 

Elementary schools 460.00 

For expenses of operating school plants : 



11 



Wages of janitors 1,050.00 

Fuel 900.00 

Miscellaneous expenses 50.00 

Maintenance and repairs upon 

school buildings and grounds, 375.00 

For auxiliary agencies : 

Health .* 115.00 

For transportation of scholars : 

High school 1J50.00 

Elementary 1,750.00 

Outside sources: 

Tuition 109 . 90 

From state for supervision 343 . 75 

Income Mass. school fund 1,145.05 

Dog tax 310.78 



Total receipts $18,009.48 



EXPENDITURES 
General Expenses 

School Committee 



Salaries : 

Paid A. B. Parker, chairman $75.00 

E. F. Conant, taking census 15.00 



$90.00 



Other expenses: 
Paid A. B. Parker, telephone, postage, 

stationery, etc $19 . 55 

Wright and Potter Co., blanks . . 1.26 

Bertha B. McLean .40 



$21.21 



12 



Superintendent of Schools an«l Enforsement of Law 

Salaries : 

Paid Frank H. Hill, superintendent . . $549 . 96 

Thomas Scanlon, truant officer .. 6.50 

Robert L. Randall, truant officer, 5.75 

Asaph Parlin, truant officer .... 3 . 50 



Other expenses : 
Paid Frank H. Hill, telephone, sta- 
tionery, postage, etc 

Expenses of Instruction 



$565.71 



$15.89 



Salaries — High School : 
Paid Town of Concord, tuition of high 

school scholars $2,916.00 

Elizabeth K. Paine 126.00 

Alice N. Maclntyre 474.00 

F. W. Brackett 10.85 

Marion C. Taylor 9 . 00 

Alice M. Genthner 18 . 61 

City of Lowell 40.00 

Elementary Schools : 

Paid Harriet H. Gardner $580.00 

Agnes C. Greenhalge 235.20 

E. Sophia Taylor 525.10 

Martha F. Smith 526.50 

Ella L. Miller 526.50 

Minnie Gamble 526 . 50 

Bertha B. McLean 546.00 

Jennie E. Stowell 491.40 

Julia L. McCarthy 511 . 60 

Elizabeth K. Hinkley 517.00 



$3,594.52 



13 



Ethel G. Evans 234.00 

Eva E. M. Gray 133.00 

Helen M. Devlin 26 . 50 

Miss Prescott 4.00 

Ethel Whittier '. . 5.40 

F. K. Braekett 114. 15 

Marion C. Taylor 90.94 

Alice M. Genthner 186 . 69 

Mrs. Lawrence 13 . 50 



Textbooks 
High School: 

Paid Edward E. Babb & Co $6.77 

Boston Book Supply Co 41.89 

Ginn & Co 20.41 

Allyn & Bacon 5.24 

Fred S. Glines 3.40 

Silver, Bnrdett & Co 2.74 



Elementary Schools; 

Paid Edward E. Babb & Co. $170.82 

Ginn & Co 5.44 

Boston Book Supply Co 5.30 

Thompson, Brown Co 3.20 

C. C. Birchard .84 

Fred S. Glines 11.40 

Charles Scribners Sons 5.37 



Stationery and Supplies 
High School : 

Paid Edward Babb & Co $4.92 

Ginn & Co 2.62 

C. C. Birchard .65 

Fred S. Glines 4.65 



$5,794.48 



.45 



$202.37 



14 

Charles H. Persons & Co .50 



Elementary Schools : 

Paid Edward E. Babb & Co $92.92 

Ginn & Co 3.61 

American Book Co 3.56 

]\I. A. Armstrong 1.26 

C. H. Persons & Co 3.50 

Fred S. Glines 19.59 

J. L. Hammet Co 60.59 

Bradley Milton Co 1.20 

Boston School Supply Co 2.70 

C. C. Birchard .78 

White Smith Music Co 1.07 



$13.34 



$190.78 

Expenses of Operating School Plajits 

Wages of Janitors 

High School: 

Paid Thomas Scanlon $93.44 

Elementary Schools : 

Paid Thomas Scanlon $280.31 

Fred S. Glines 513.60 

Asaph Parlin 200.85 



$1,091.76 



Fuel— High : 

Paid Hall Brothers $1.47 

A. H. Perkins 1.25 

George H. Reed 48.59 



$51.31 



15 



Elementary : 

Paid G. E. Greenough $8.50 

Aaron Fletcher 24.00 

S. A. C. & L. Co 336.67 

L. W. Richardson 5.00 

Thomas DoAvnie 14.00 

George H. Reed 322.59 

A. H. Perkins 3.75 

Fred S. Glines 3.65 

Hall Brothers 4.40 



Miscellaneous — High : 

Paid John S. Hoar $4.08 

E. T. Rice 2.69 

George H. Gutteridge 1 . 00 



Elementary : 

Paid Tuttle and Newton $8 . 99 

American Woolen Company .... 11.47 

M. E. Taylor 13.76 

J. S. Hoar 4.09 

Fred S. Glines 7.05 

E. T. Rice 8.10 

J. W. Livermore 1 . 50 

G. E. Greenough 3.45 

George H. Gutteridge 2.00 



Maintenance 

Repairs 
High: 

Paid E. T. Rice $.12 

Thomas Scanlon .50 



$722.56 



$7.77 



$60.41 



16 



S. A. C. & L. Co .94 

W. & S. Water Supply District, 4.85 

E. A. Phalen 9.21 

B. A. King 1.00 

Pratt and Forrest 9 . 32 

W. A. Snow Iron Works 65 . 50 

Elementary : 

Paid E. T. Rice $16.08 

Thomas Scanlon 2 . 50 

Fred S. Glines 3.95 

S. A. C. & L. Co 46.88 

Asaph Parlin 1 . 75 

E. A. Phalen 47.69 

W. W. Gough 6.50 

F. S. Taylor 2.10 

L. T. Fullonton 14.41 

B. A. King 7.00 

Tuttle and Newton .69 

L. E. Reed 39.38 

Thomas McCarthy 53.50 

Pratt and Forrest 27.96 

C. H. Persons & Co 2.00 

Ed. Jewett 2.00 

W. & S. Water Supply District . . 14.55 

W. A. Snow Iron Works 196.50 

Finney and Hoit 1.15 



$91.44 



Auxiliary Agencies 



Health 



$486.59 



Paid George B. Robbins Co. 
Samuel A. Christie . . . . 



$30.00 
8.00 



$38.00 



1" 



Transportation 
High School: 

Paid Boston & Maine R. R $1,115.59 

X. Y, N. H. & H. R. R. Co 292.85 

Edward Pendergast 8 . 60 

Thomas McCarthy 130 . 00 

Walter C. Hayward 8.30 

Lawrence Clark 8.00 

E. L. Burke 5 . 25 

William Hayes 15.00 

John Cahill 12.75 

Herbert A. Gray 11 . 75 

Harriet E. Gibbs 13 . 35 

Earl Randall 9.73 

Albert W. Evans 14. 03 

Mrs. M. J. Foley 20.50 

Winnona E. Hayden 15.00 

Herbert ]\Ierriam 4.50 

Willis H. Daisy 4.50 

H. F. Robbins 60.00 

Arthur S. Lowden 4 . 50 

Hugh Hodgen 7.00 

Patrick Foley 5 . 50 

$1,166.69 
Elementary : 

Paid Walter M. French $460.00 

A. J. Christofferson 492.00 

Jens Mekkelsen 532.00 

Charles Edwards 531 . 80 

$2,015.80 

Total expenditures $16,994.52 

Balance unexpended $1,014.96 

ALLEN BROOKS PARI^ER. 

For the Committee. 



18 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



Gentlemen of the Committee: 

Following is my third report, it being the twenty-first 
in the series of such annual reports : 

Since the last report the following changes in teachers 
are to be recorded: In the high school Miss Maclntire 
succeeded Miss Paine. Miss Greenhalge takes the place 
of Miss Evans in the West Intermediate school. Miss. 
Marion Taylor is supervisor of drawing in place of Mr. 
Brackett, and Miss Gray's services are no longer required 
as an assistant in the South Lower Primary by reason of a 
reduction in the number of pupils there. The work is 
going on satisfactorily and steadily advancing to a higher 
standard. 

HIGH SCHOOL 

The enrollment at the opening of the fall term, 1912, 
was 34. Two have left town and one has dropped out by 
reason of illness, leaving the enrollment February 1, 1913, 31. 

About half this number are taking the classical course, 
and will be able to go on through the Concord high school 
and enter college or normal school if they wish. Of course 
this assumes that the work will be done faithfully all along 
the line, for no one, without special effort, can do the college 
preparatory work as it should be done. The schools can 
but furnish the opportunity and the reasonable stimulus — 
the pupils must do the rest. 

What of the remainder of the class who, when they 
enter the Concord high, break up into as many divisions as. 



19 



there are special courses in that school? It is not merely 
a question of the presentation of facts; a condition now 
exists that must be met deliberately and with the most 
careful judgment. 

The College Preparatory, Scientific Preparatory and 
General courses we can prepare our pupils to enter in 
the second year high in Concord. Superintendent Hill 
assures me that Concord will accept the present class in 
the second year Commercial, Domestic Arts and Mechanic 
Arts courses, but succeeding classes must have had the first 
year's preparatory work in these courses or enroll in the 
first year classes at Concord. This means an extra year 
for these pupils in Concord at the expense of the town of 
Acton. 

No one teacher can be so versatile in her attainments 
as to give the several courses offered at Concord in a 
manner to compare favorably with the work done by the 
several specialists in that school. It is not reasonable to 
expect to get one teacher to combine in herself expertness 
in college preparatory work, scientific preparatory work, 
commercial work, domestii? arts work and mechanic arts 
work. It is little more reasonable to expect such a teacher 
to be an expert in the three last named courses. Besides, 
these new courses require special equipment and room that 
we do not have in Acton. Of the pupils now attending Con- 
cord 24 take the three special courses named last above, and 
27 take the first named three courses. (See table elsewhere 
in report.) It is likely that about the same proportion 
of the Acton pupils will be found in these courses, year 
after year. 

Since it is difficult to prepare the classical and scientific 
students for the second year at Concord, and because we 
have the necessary equipment which consists mostly of 
books; and since we have absolutely no equipment or room 
for entering upon the kind of work that will be demanded 
in the second year vocational courses at Concord after next 



20 

June, I feel that we ought seriously to consider sending the 
non-classical division directly from the grammar schools 
into the first year high at Concord. The other alternatives 
seem to be, to send all our high school pupils to Concord 
and discontinue our present first year high, or establish in 
Acton a high school of its own. 

The time may come when high schools in adjoining 
towns with easy means of communication and transportation 
will be able to effect an exchange of pupils, one high school 
doing all the classical work and the other all vocational 
and dividing all expenses in proportion to pupils and cost 
of maintenance. This plan does not seem possible of 
execution at present in Acton. 

I call your attention to the report of Miss Maclntire,. 
principal of the high school, on her work in agriculture. 
It strengthens my assertion that one teacher cannot do 
the work demanded by the classical and vocational courses 
given at Concord, for her work even now is quite varied 
enough with a single vocational course in addition to the 
classical. 

PROFESSIONAL WORK FOR TEACHERS 

It is no more than reasonable to condition a teacher's 
employment upon a certain amount of professional work 
to be done during the year. I feel that this is coming in 
Massachusetts. The teachers who need this most are the 
teachers of our rural schools upon whom devolves all the 
work that in larger places is done by special supervisors. 
This means superior planning as well as prompt and 
energetic execution, and only those teachers broadly 
equipped with professional knowledge and spirit can respond 
efficiently to the many demands made upon them outside 
the requirements of the old-line subjects. I have this year 
furnished all teachers with weekly plan books, and have 
explained to them collectively and individually just what 
I hope to accomplish through these books. I wish them to> 



21 



record, in the briefest possible way, the progress of the 
grades through the books furnished in the several subjects^ 
the collateral material used to enrich a lesson or a subject, 
new ideas and how they are worked out, every effort made 
to incorporate the requirements of the tentative course 
offered by the state board of education for the first six 
grades, and finally, the specific exercises used to carry out 
the purposes outlined in my 1912 report under the heading, 
'^ Exercises recommended to vitalize course." The least of 
the reasons for keeping this plan book I enumerated first 
above, but thus far it occupies the largest space. The 
growth of professional spirit will change this, and the plan 
book will record the evidence of the progression of the 
teacher instead of the progression of the pupil, merely. 



CORRESPONDENCE COURSES IN AGRICULTURE 

The ^lassachusetts Agricultural College, through its 
extension service, offers two attractive courses, especially 
valuable fo teachers: Course 15, Agriculture in the Elemen- 
tary Schools, and Course 16, Community Cooperation in 
Elementary Education. There is a growing interest in 
school and home gardens, cooking, sewing, poultry raising, 
etc., and to further stimulate this interest the N. "W. Middle- 
sex Co. Fair Association offered liberal prizes and manj^ of 
them, at the fair held in Chelmsford in the fall of 1912. 
There is reason to believe that the same competition will be 
encouraged this year. Acton pupils did not compete last 
year, but a few pupils in each of my other towns did compete 
and carried off prizes aggregating $8.75. A committee 
of three citizens should be appointed to encourage prepara- 
tion for this fair, inspect the work as it goes on, provide 
for transportation of exhibits and for return of same to the 
exhibitor when requested. A half holiday should be given 
exhibitors to attend this fair without loss of school 
attendance. . ' 



22 

PHYSICAL BIPROVEMENTS 

The addition of fire escapes to the South and West 
school buildings has reduced to a minimum all danger from 
fire in those schools. Frequent fire drills are given to 
familiarize the children with the sensation of stepping from 
a solid floor onto an iron grating several feet from the 
ground. At the first drill I witnessed it took three minutes 
to empty the West school, on account of the timidity of the 
little ones in making that first step from the room. It 
ought to take not more than one minute to get them out in 
safety. Practice will do this. 

Now that town water has entered the West and Center 
schools another source of dissatisfaction has been removed. 
The convenience of the schools has been served by this 
addition, and the menace of fire has been lessened. 

atti:ndance 

Scarlet fever and other contagious diseases will be 
responsible for a large shrinkage in attendance during the 
present school year. Incidentally it is likely to affect 
our promotion in June. This is a special reason why we 
should be very firm in following up cases of non-attendance 
and make sure that none are absent without sufficient 
excuse. 

CONCLUSION 

Acton is fortunate in having a very faithful corps of 
teachers. Generally speaking, the longer a teacher remains 
in a school the more valuable she becomes. Acton teacher* 
are not given to roving; they work hard; they are happy 
in their schools; they have deserved promotion, financially, 
even if at this time the town cannot afford to grant it. 

For their and your cooperation throughout the year 
I wish to extend my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK H. HILL, 
Superintendent of Schools. 
Acton, March 3, 1913, 



23 

REPORT OF HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL ON COURSE 
IN AGRICULTURE 



It is aimed to accomplish the following : 

1. To complete Wjarren 's Elements of Agriculture. 

2. To take special topics from Daugherty & Jackson's 
Agriculture. 

3. To keep note books corrected by teacher weekly. 
These books contain teacher's dictation on special topics 
of live interest gleaned from several different books on 
agriculture. The class also record their own personal 
observations on insects, birds, weeds, and so forth. 

4. Pamphlets are used from the Bureau of Agriculture 
and the leaflets from Cornell University. Pupils give 
written or oral resume of these pamphlets. 

5. Germination tests of seeds planted in room. 

6. Distribution of seeds for summer gardens. 

7. Discussion of topics on local farming and products. 

8. Home projects, like potatoes, poultry, etc. 

ALICE N. MacINTIRE, Principal. 

Note. For admission to the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College a year's course in agriculture counts for one of 
fourteen required units. The student will be required to 
bring a* statement from the principal of the amount and 
kinds of work accomplished and of the text books used. 
The examination will be based somewhat upon this informa- 
tion. Note book required as part of preparation will be 
credited as part of the examination, which will be given 
in September only. 



24 
REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC 



To the Superintendent of Schools, Acton. Mass. 

I herewith submit my third annual report on music in 
the public schools. 

In all grades where sickness has not broken into the 
work, the progress in music has been very good this year 
thus far. Following nearly the same plan of study in 
the main principles of music as the year previous: 

The first three grades are taught about two Rote songs 
•a month, the first grade reading simple intervals from the 
staff and the second grade more difficult exercises; third 
grade singing from Introductory Sight Singing Melodies. 

Grades 4. 5 and 6 are studying from second readers 
with songs for especial occasions from other sources. We 
are using at the "West and South schools in 7th and 8th 
grades the New Normal Readers, which the 8th grades 
find a pleasant change from the song studies of the year 
previous. 

Grades 7 and 8 at the Center school have the collection 
of songs purchased last year. 

We continue the breathing exercises to maintain the 
habit of deep breathing, which of course is beneficial to 
the health, and in singing pure tone is especially dependent 
on good breath support. 

From 3rd grade up, some time each week is devoted 
to certain written work, such as scale writing, placing Do 
after different key signatures, placing bars for different 
time signatures, naming intermediate or chromatic tones 
and placing sharps and flats for key signatures. 

As much individual work is done with Weaver slips as 
is possible with two and three grades in a room, and limited 
time for music. 



• 



The high school is taking hold of the chorus work with 
good spirit and we occasionally have the addition of the 
violin with the chorus. 

As in the previous two years. I find the teachers ready 
to cooperate with me, making work a pleasure, and I take 
this opportunity to thank them all heartily. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALICE :\r. GENTHNER. 



26 
REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF DRAWING 



Mr. Frank H. Hill, Superintendent of Schools. 

Dear Sir: I herewith submit the report of the super- 
visor of drawing. 

I entered upon this work in September, 1912. I have 
visited each school once a week. One week I go through 
the work with the pupils and the next week I criticize their 
work and give the teachers help if it is needed. 

The fall and winter work has been the same as that 
of the last year, but the remainder of the year's work will 
be somewhat changed. 

The primary grades have been working along lines 
that train the muscles of the hand and arm. The child 
must learn to make his hand w^ork Avith his mind. 

Free hand paper cutting of various forms is being 
taught at the present time. Their first attempt at this work 
was very crude, but with practice better results came. 
This work teaches the child to observe the shapes of different 
objects about him, and cutting trains his motor muscles. 

Design work will be carried out in the spring, by cutting 
two colored squares of paper into tiny squares, circles, 
oblongs, etc., to form a tile design. 

The spring nature work will be done by using the brush 
and ink or water color, representing the mass instead of 
detail. 

The intermediate and grammar grades spent three 
weeks in the fall studying color, and applied the harmoniz- 
ing colors to various designs and fashion plates. A know- 
ledge of pleasing combinations of color is necesary, if one 
wishes to make his home artistic or his garments and the 
school room attractive. Nature drawing has been studied 



27 



for the artistic arrangement of plant forms within a given 
space, and for accurate representation of the parts of plants. 
Some time has been spent on geometric solids, developing 
various forms in the different grades. Working drawings 
of different solids foUow^ed the pattern development. 
Various forms were developed from cover paper for making 
Christmas things and each child has made a folio to hold 
his work. 

The past month has been spent on freehand printing, 
studying good spacing, page designing and learning to 
apply these principles to all their w^ritten work. Object 
drawling and various perspective forms will follow the 
printing. Object drawing trains the eye to judge distances 
and proportions. Nature work and color will be studied 
again in the spring for its decorative values. A little study 
of historic ornament ^^^ll be taken up for designing purposes, 
in building up our homes and the schools, making them 
appear more attractive. 

The work in the high school has been mostly mechanical 
drawing. The pupils have been taught how^ to use the 
drawing kit. Many geometrical problems have been given 
to the pupils, and free hand printing including a Shop 
Skeleton. Posters have been made of various descriptions 
using different styles of printing. The work along this 
line has been unusually good. AYorking drawings of 
various models and possibly a little machine drawing will be 
studied the latter part of the year. 

Carelessness and inaccurate work seems to prevail in a 
number of grades, but a great improvement has been made 
along that line lately. I wish to thank the teachers, super- 
intendent and committee for their kind support throughout 
the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARIAN CELESTE TAYLOR. 



28 

ROLL OP HONOR 

For Three Terms 

High School — None. 

West Acton — Grades 7 and 8, James Kinsley; 4, 5, 6, 
none; 1, 2, 3, Mary Kinsley. 

Acton Center — 6, 7, 8, Florence Morse, Helen Robbins; 
4, 5, none ; 1, 2, 3, Dora Livermore, Norman Livermore, John 
Chick, Herbert Thompson, Chester Daily, Evelyn Farrar, 
Caroline Shaw. 

South Acton — 7, 8, Annie Foley; 5. 6, Anthony Foley; 
3, 4, none; 1, 2, none. 

For Two Terms 

High School — Ray Harris, Raymond Farrar. 

West Acton — Grades 7, 8, Isabella Geer, Lyman Wether- 
bee, Bessie Davis, Ruth Hall; 4, 5, 6, Richard Schnair: 1, 
2, 3, Beulah French, Gerald Rubin, Gladys Schnair. 

Acton Center — 6, 7, 8, Leonard Worden, Ella Fredrik- 
son, Ebba Fredrikson ; 4, 5, none; 1, 2, 3, Alfred Cote, Delia 
Cote, Spencer Murphy, Thelma Noyes, Roger Shaw. 

South Acton — 7, 8, Patrick Foley, Hazel Hoit, Herbert 
Merriam, Irene Merriam; 5, 6, Ernest Greenough; 3, 4, 
Mar}^ Hearon; 1, 2, none. 

For One Term 

High School — Hazel Coolidge, Thomas Foley, Edward 
Burke, Irma Durkee. 

West Acton — 7, 8, Leland Campbell, James Hurley, 
Thelma MacGregor, William McCharles, Roger Brown, 
Fannie Davis; 4, 5, 6, Grace Bezanson, Eileen Hurley, John 



29 



Iliirlpy, Gordon ]\Iacomber, Emelie Goiicher, Naomi Schnair. 
'May Bradford. Perry Willis, Henry Hall, AVillie Schnair; 
1, 2. 3. John Peach, Martha Decoster, Minetta Decoster, 
Edward Goncher. Elizabeth Hall, Evelyn Smith, Clyde 
Rnssell, Kenneth French, Dorothy Geer. 

Acton Center — 6, 7, 8, Florence Prentiss, Laurence 
Smith, ]Merritt Farrar, Florence Cheney. Annie Coughlin : 
4, 5, Rebecca Fredrikson, Edith Tuttle, Agnes Coughlin, 
Gunnar Fredrikson, John ]\Iekkleson, Ralph Smith, Jennie 
Tuttle, Abbie Coughlin; 1, 2, 3, James Downey. ]\Iargaret 
Rayner, Adelaide York, Mary Andries, Lillian Fredrikson, 
Carrie Peterson, Anfin Anderson. 

South Acton — 7, 8, Nettie Nimms. John Hardy, Nathalie 
Leach, Theron Lowden; 5, 6. Helen Anderson, Arthur 
Desorcy, Philip Lowden; 3, 4. Irving Smith. ^Margaret 
V'hitney, ]Mary Hearon, Dorothy LoAvden, Laura Donnelley ; 
1. 2. Edward Carnev. Edith Anderson, Arthur Donnellev. 



30 






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31 

High School Statistics 

Number graduated from Grammar Schools June, 1912 : 

Boys Girls Total 

Acton Center 

West Acton 

South Acton 






8 


8 


7 


7 


14 


7 


6 


13 


1 


21 


35 


912 


13 


22 35 



Total 11 

Xo. entering Acton first year high, Sept. 191* 
No. promoted to Concord second year high. 

June, 1912 16 11 27 

No. graduated from Concord high school, 

June, 1912 6 9 15 

Concord High School Statistics, February 20, 1913 

Courses Seniors Juniors 2nd Year Pupils Total 

College Preparatory .47 3 14 

Scientific Preparatory, 10 1 2 

General 8 3 11 

Commercial 7 13 20 

Domestic Arts 3 3 

Mechanic Arts 1 1 

Total 14 17 20 51 

SCHOOL CENSUS. SEPTEMBER. 1912 

Number of boys between 5 and 15 155 

Number of girls between 5 and 15 154 



Total 309 

Number of boys between 7 and 14 105 

Number of girls between 7 and 14 107 



Total 212 

Number of illiterate minors 



32 
REPORT OF SIGHT AND HEARING TEST 



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South 

Center 





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314 22 8 26 
TRUANT OFFICERS' REPORT 



February 1. 1913. 
To the School Committee of Acton : 

Number of cases of truant children investigated 35 

Number of cases brought to trial 

Respectfully submitted, 

ASAPH PARLIN, 
THOMAS SCANLON, 
ROBERT RANDALL. 



INDEX 

Town Officers 3 

Town Warrant 6 

Town Meetings 11 

State Election 17 

Town Clerk 's Report 22 

Births 23 

Marriages 24 

Deaths 26 

Non-Resident Burials 28 

Dog Licenses 29 

Selectmen's Report 31 

Town Accountant's Report 32 

Treasurer's Report 55 

Assessors ' Report 61 

Collector's Report 63 

Tree Warden 65 

Fire Warden 66 

Board of Health 67 

Cattle Inspector's Report 68 

Road Commissioner 69 

Overseers of the Poor 70 

Report of Cemetery Commissioners 73 

Trustees Goodnow Fund 79 

Acton Memorial Library 80 

List of Books Added 85 

SECOND SECTION 

School Report 1 

School Calendar 3 

Special Exercises and Holidays 4 

School Officers 5 

Teachers 6 

Standing Rules 7 

General Report 8 

Financial Statement 10 

Superintendent's Report 18 

High School Principal 23 

Supervisor of Music 24 

Supervisor of Drawing 26 

Roll of Honor 28 

Statistical Tables 30 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Several Boards of Town Officers 



OP THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING JANUARY 31 



1914 




THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 
1914 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Several Boards of Town Officers 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING JANUARY 31 



1914 




g- A€lT0M.') ^ 



THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 
1914 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1913 



Selectmen 



James P. Brown Term expires 1914 

Fred S. Whitcomb Term expires 1915 

Edward Z. Stanle}^ Term expires 1916 

Town Clerk 

Horace F. Tiittle 

Town Treasurer 
Frank W. Hoit 

Assessors 

William F. Stevens Term expires 1914 

James B. Tnttle Term expires 1915 

William F. Kelley Term expires 1916 

Overseers of the Poor 
William F. Kelley Edward Z. Stanley Lyman C. Taylor 

Collector of Taxes 

William F. Stevens 

Tree Warden 

James O'Neil 

Constables 
James Kinsley William F. Stevens 

Fence Viewers 

James P. Brown Edward Z. Stanley Fred S. Whitcomb 



Field Drivers 



George W. Daniels 
J. Alfred Go ding 



Daniel H. Farrar 
Fred S. Whitcomb 



Road Commissioners 

William H. Kingsley Term expires 1914 

Albert H. Perkins Term expires 1915 

Term expires 1916 



William B. Franklin 



Cemetery Commissioners 

Herbert T. Clark Term expires 1914 

Julian Tuttle Term expires 1915 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1916 



Edwin A. Phalen 
Samuel A. Christie 
Bertram E. Hall 



School Committee 



Term expires 1914 
Term expires 1915 
Term expires 1916 



Trustees of Memorial Library 

(Chosen by the Town) 
J. Sidney White Term expires 1914 

Lucius A. Hesselton Term expires 1915 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1916 



James B. Tuttle 
Frank E. Tasker 
Edward C. Page 



Board of Health 



Term expires 1914 
Term expires 1915 
Term expires 1916 



5 

APPOINTED BY THE SELECTMEN 

Town Accountant 

William T. Merriam 

Registrars of Voters 

Samuel A. Guilford James McGreen 

George E. Holton Horace F. Tuttle (ex-officio) 

Election Officers 

Precinct 1 

Warden John F. Coughlin 

Deputy warden Edwin A. Phalen 

Clerk Horace F. Tuttle 

Deputy clerk Moses E. Taylor 

Inspector Arthur F. Davis 

Deputy inspector Willis L. Holden 

Inspector Elmer C. Cheney 

Deputy inspector IMoses A, Reed 

Inspector William H. Kingsley 

Deputy inspector John S. White 

Precinct 2 

Warden T. F. Newton 

Deputy warden L, A. Hesselton 

Clerk Abram Tuttle 

Deputy clerk Anson C. Piper 

Inspector Louis C. Hastings 

Deputy inspector Frank A. Merriam 

Inspector Constance 'Neil 

Deputy inspector Nelson J. Cole 

Inspector J. S. Moore 

Deputy inspector George E. Clapp 

Precinct 3 

Warden Charles J. Holton 

Deputy warden Eugene L. Hall 

Clerk William F. Kelley 

Deputy clerk William L. Tenney 

Inspector Fred S. Whitcomb 



6 



Deputy inspector S. R. Burroughs 

Inspector James Kinsley 

Deputy inspector John T. McNiff 

Inspector Charles A. Durkee 

Deputy inspector Bertram E. Hall 

Cattle Inspector 

Fred S. Whitcomb 

Forest Warden 

William H, Kingsley 

Fire Wardens 

Daniel H. Farrar John S. White James P. Brown 

William H. Kingsley George H, Reed 

Surveyors of Lumber, Wood, Hoops and Staves 

J W. Dapee Charles E. Smith E. C Cheney 

Bertram D. Hall F. A. :Merriam H. T. Clark 

Public Weighers 

J. P. Fletcher M. E. Taylor E. C. Cheney E. F. Conant 

Thomas Hearon George H. Reed William H. Teele 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Edward C. Page 

Local Superintendent of Moth Work 

James O'Neil 

Police Officers 
F.dward S. Fobes Herbert R. Moore 



COMMONWEALTH OF :\rASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss. 




To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in the 
County of Middlesex, GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you 
are directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town 
of Acton, qualified to vote in elections and town affairs to 
assemble in the town hall, in said town, on Monday, the 
thirtieth day of March, 1914, at nine o'clock in the forenoon. 
Then and there to act on the following articles, to wit : 

Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2. To bring in their votes on one ballot for 
the following town officers : Town clerk for one year, one 
selectman for three years, one selectman for one year (to 
fill vacancy), three overseers of the poor, town treasurer, 
collector of taxes, tree warden, four constables, four field 
drivers, three fence viewers, all for one year. One assessor, 
one road commissioner, one trustee of Memorial library, one 
member of the school committee, one cemetery commissioner, 



8 



and one member of the board of health, all for three years. 
Also, on the same ballot with the above named officers to 
vote upon the following question: ''Shall licenses be 
granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this town?" 
The polls will be opened at 9.30 a. m., and may be closed at 
4 o'clock p. m. 

Article 3. To choose all necessary town officers not 
named in Article 2, and fix salaries. 

Article 4. To see if the town will accept the reports 
of the selectmen, overseers of the poor, school committee, 
library trustees, and other town officers. 

xVrticle 5. To hear and act upon the reports of any 
committees chosen at any previous meeting, that have not 
already reported. 

Article 6. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for the due observance of Memorial day. 

Article 7. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for the repairing and building of roads and 
bridges, or act anything thereon. 

Article 8. To see what amount of money the to^vn 
will raise for the support of the Memorial library the 
current year. 

Article 9. To see what amount of money the town will 
appropriate for the care of cemeteries, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 10. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for the maintenance of the fire department, or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 11. To see if the town will appropriate a sum 
of money for the enforcement of the liquor laws, or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 12. To see if the town will petition the 
director of the bureau of statistics for an audit of its 
accounts, in accordance with the provisions of chapter five 
hundred and ninety-eight of the acts of the year nineteen 
hundred and ten and the amendments thereof. 

Article 13. To see if the town will authorize the 
treasurer, with the approval of its selectmen, to borrow 



mone}' for the town, if necessary, in anticipation of revenue 
the current year. 

Article 14. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to the extermination of the elm leaf beetle. 

Article 15. To see what action the town will take in 
reference to the extermination of the gypsy and brown tail 
moth. 

Article 16. To see what amount of money the town 
will vote to raise and appropriate for the support of schools, 
the purchase of school books and supplies, the expense of 
operating the school plants, repairs and improvements upon 
school buildings and grounds, the transportation of 
scholars, and for other expenses relating to the maintenance 
of the school department, or do or act anything thereon. 

Article 17. To see if the town will vote to build a 
Pligh School building the present year, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 18. To see if the town will vote to contribute 
funds for the erection at Washington, D. C, of a National 
Civic Hall as a Peace Memorial to the Father of Our 
Country, or act anything thereon. 

Article 19. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to the collection of taxes. 

Article 20. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for town charges. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of one hundred dollars for the pay- 
ment of premiums on treasurer's and collector's bonds. 

Article 22. To see if the town will raise fifty dollars 
for an assistant fish and game warden, as recommended by 
the state, or act anything thereon. 

Article 23. To see if the town will appropriate a sum 
of money to be expended for setting out shade trees, or 
act anything thereon. 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to have the 
name of Luther Blanchard placed on the monument, or act 
anything thereon. 



10 

Article 25. To see if the town will insure its help, or- 
act anything thereon. 

Article 26. To see if the town will vote to put three 
electric lights on the road leading to W. H. Teele's, one 
near the residence of Daniel Beach on Central street, one 
at the electric road near S. L. Richardson's, and one at the 
jDridge near the cemetery, all in West Acton ; also, two on; 
Stow road, and some on Maynard street. South Acton, or- 
act anything thereon. 

Article 27. To see if the town will vote to change the 
name of the Town Farm to the name of Simon Tuttle- 
Home, or some appropriate name, or act anything thereon. 

Article 28. To see if the town will vote to change the- 
name of the Town Farm road, or act anything thereon. 

Article 29. To see if the town will vote to oil the 
streets through the villages of Acton, or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 30. To see whether the town will vote to 
rescind the action providing for the election of selectmen 
by rotation for periods of three years, and revert to the 
system of simultaneous elections for the period of one year, 
as provided under certain acts of the Revised Statutes. 

Article 31. To see if the town will contract with the 
''West and South Water Supply District of Acton" for 
rental of their hydrants, not to exceed one hundred in 
number at $25.00 per year, for fire purposes only. 

Article 32. To see if the toAvn will pay for fighting 
brush fires, and fix price, or act anything thereon. 

Article 33. To see if the town will vote to have all 
bills approved by the selectmen before payment, or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 34. To see if the town will rescind the vote 
passed at their meeting April 3rd, 1899, whereby they 
voted to choose three road commissioners, and accept thfr 
provisions of Section 364, Chapter 560, of the Acts of 1907, 
relative to the election of a highway surveyor. 

Article 35. To see if the town will vote to extend its; 



11 



electric street lighting to North Acton, or act anything 
thereon. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting 
copies, attested by you, in the following places : One in 
each of the post offices and railroad stations, one in each 
of the stores of C. H. Mead & Co., W. E. Whitcomb, M. E. 
Taylor & Co., Tuttle & Newton, Finney & Hoit, George H. 
Reed, and one at the Nagog House, seven days at least 
before the time appointed for holding said meeting. 

Given under our hands in Acton this seventeenth day 
of March, in the year one thousand nine hundred and 
fourteen. 

JAMES P. BROWN, 
FRED S. WHITCOMB, 
EDWARD Z. STANLEY, 

Selectmen of Acton. 



12 



Proceedings of the Annual Meeting March 31, 1913 



Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Allen Brooks Parker was chosen moderator. 

Article 2. To bring in their votes on one ballot for 
town officers. 

The following town officers were chosen : 

Town Clerk— Horace F. Tuttle. 

Selectmen — Edward Z. Stanley, for three years, Fred 
S. Whitcomb, for two years, (to fill vacancy.) 

Assessor — William F. Kelley. 

Overseers of the Poor — William F. Kelley, Edward Z. 
Stanley, Lyman C. Taylor. 

Treasurer — Frank W. Hoit. 

Collector of Taxes — William F. Stevens. 

Constables — James Kinsley, William F. Stevens, James 
B. Tuttle, William B. Franklin. 

Road Commissioner — William B. Franklin. 

Field Drivers — George W. Daniels, Daniel H. Farrar, 
J. Alfred Goding, Fred S. Whitcomb. 

Fence Viewers — James P. Brown. Edward Z. Stanley, 
Fred S. Whitcomb. 

School Committee — Bertram E. Hall. 
Cemetery Commissioner — ^Horace F. Tuttle. 
Board of Health — Edward C. Page. 
Trustee of Memorial Library — Horace F. Tuttle. 
Tree Warden — James O'Neil. 

On the question, ''Shall licenses be granted for the 
sale of intoxicating liquors in this town," the vote was: 



13 



Whole number of ballots cast 277 

Yes 84 

No 181 

Blanks 12 

Article 3. To choose all necessary town officers not 
named in article 2, and fix salaries. 

Voted: That the selectmen be instructed to appoint 
surveyors of lumber, wood, hoops and staves. 

Chose Horace F, Tuttle trustee of the Goodnow fund 
for three years. 

Voted : That the salary of the road commissioners be 
two and one-half dollars per day, nine hours to constitute 
a day. 

Voted: That the salary of the tax collector be one 
per centum of the amount collected, and that he perform 
all the duties hitherto performed by said officer. 

Voted : That the salary of the treasurer be two hun- 
dred dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the chairman of the select- 
men be $100 per annum, and the other members $50 per 
annum. 

Article 4. To see if the to\^^l will accept the reports 
of the selectmen, overseers of the poor, school committee, 
library trustees, and other town officers. 

Voted: To accept the printed reports of the several 
town officers. 

Article 5. To hear and act upon the reports of any 
committees chosen at any previous meeting, that have not 
already reported. 

No reports were presented. 

Article 6. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for the due observance of Memorial day. 

Voted: To raise one hundred dollars ($100.) 

Article 7. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for the repairing and building of roads and 
bridges, or act anything thereon. 



14 



Voted: To raise four thousand dollars ($4,000), for 
repairing roads and bridges. 

Voted: To appropriate one thousand dollars ($1,000), 
additional for building roads, provided the town shall 
receive an allotment of one thousand dollars ($1,000), from 
the state under the Small Town Act, so called. 

Article 8. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for the support of the Memorial library the 
current year. 

Voted: To raise the sum of five hundred dollars 
($500), for current expenses, and two hundred dollars 
($200), for purchasing books. 

Article 9. To see what amount of money the town 
will appropriate for the care of cemeteries, or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate six hundred dollars ($600.) 

Article 10. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for the maintenance of the fire department, or act 
anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise four hundred dollars ($400) for 
maintenance of fire department. 

Voted: To raise one hundred eighty-four dollars 
($184), for hydrant service in East Acton. 

Article 11. To see if the town will contract with the 
^'West and South Water Supply District of Acton" for 
rental of their hydrants, not to exceed one hundred in 
number at $25.00 per year, for fire purposes only. 

Voted: That the selectmen be instructed to contract 
with the "West and South Water Supply District of Acton" 
for the service of not more than one hundred hydrants, 
for fire purposes only, at the rate of twenty-five dollars 
($25), each per annum. 

Voted: To raise twenty-five hundred dollars ($2,500); 
for the hydrant service covered by this article. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to purchase 
new hose and hose carriages, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate five hundred dollars ($500), 



15 



to supply the Acton Center Fire Department with hose and 
hose carriage. 

Article 13. To see if the town will appropriate a sum 
of money for the enforcement of the liquor laws, or act 
anything thereon. 

Voted: To reappropriate the unexpended balance of 
the amount appropriated last year for the enforcement of 
the liquor laws. 

Voted : That the selectmen constitute the committee 
to enforce said laws. 

Article 14. To see if the town Avill authorize the 
treasurer, mth the approval of its selectmen, to borrow 
money for the town, if necessary, in anticipation of taxes 
the current year. 

Voted: That the town treasurer, with the approval of 
the selectmen, be and is hereby authorized to borrow money 
from time to time in anticipation of the taxes of the 
municipal year beginning February 1, 1913, to an amount 
not exceeding in the aggregate $15,000, and to issue a note 
or notes therefor, payable ^\dthin one year, any debts or 
debt incurred under this vote, to be paid from the taxes 
of said municipal year. 

Article 15. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to the extermination of the elm leaf beetle. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate four hundred dollars 
($400), to be expended by the tree warden. 

Article 16. To see what action the town will take in 
reference to the extermination of the gypsy and brown 
tail moth. 

Voted: To raise the sum of money required by the 
state law. 

Article 17. To see if the town Avill appropriate the 
sum of $600 to purchase a power sprayer of the state. 

Voted: To refer the matter to the selectmen, with 
power to act. 

Voted: To appropriate $600 to provide for the cost of 
the sprayer, if purchased. 

Article 18. To see if the town will appoint a town 



IG 



accountant for the current year, and fix salary of same, or 
act anything thereon. 

Voted: To fix the salary of the town accountant the 
same as last year, thirty cents per hour employed. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate a sufficient sum of 
money to pay the same. 

Article 19. To see what amount of money the town 
will vote to raise and appropriate for the support of schools, 
the purchase of school books and supplies, the expense of 
operating the school plants, repairs and improvements upon 
school grounds and buildings, the transportation of scholars, 
and for other expenses relating to the maintenance of the 
school department, or do or act anj^thing thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate the sum of seventeen 
thousand five hundred dollars ($17,500), and the dog tax 
for the current year, for the purposes specified in the school 
committee's estimates for the support of schools for the 
fiscal year 1913-1914, to be found on page 9 of the annual 
report of the school committee for the year ending January 
31, 1913. 

Voted: To allow the committee to transfer any un- 
expended balance of any appropriation to any other which 
ma}^ become exhausted and have proven insufficient. 

Voted: To instruct the school committee to require 
physiology to be taught in the elementary schools. 

Article 20. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to the collection of taxes. 

Voted: That the collector charge interest at the rate 
of five percent per annum on all taxes remaining unpaid 
after the first day of November next. 

Voted: That poll and personal taxes only be payable 
on demand. 

Voted: That the collector shall issue summons for 
all poll and personal taxes only remaining unpaid September 
1. That the collector shall collect all taxes committed to 
him within the municipal year in which they are assessed. 

. Article 21. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for town charges. 



17 

Voted: To appropriate for town charges six thousand 
dollars ($6,000), to be expended as follows: 

Town farm $600.00 

Outside poor 1,000.00 

Soldiers' aid 100.00 

Printing 300.00 

Buildings and grounds 300.00 

Police 150.00 

Board of health 1,000.00 

Salaries of town officers and expenses . . 2,000.00 

:Miscellaneous 550 . 00 

Voted : To raise for street lighting two thousand three 
hundred dollars ($2,300.) 

Article 22. To see if the town will authorize putting 
water in the school houses and w^atering troughs, or act 
anything thereon. 

Voted : To raise and appropriate two hundred fifty 
dollars ($250), to extend the water service* into the school 
houses in the town, and to raise and appropriate one hun- 
dred fifty dollars ($150), to connect the water service with 
the public watering troughs in the villages, to be expended 
by the selectmen. 

Article 23. To see if the tOAvn will vote to instruct 
the school committee to demand of the trustees or managers 
of institutions having children attending the schools of this 
town, to pay the tuition or other extra expense incurred by 
reason of the same, in accordance with section four of 
chapter 44, of the Revised Laws, as amended by section two 
of chapter 268, of the Acts of 1911. 

Voted: To instruct the school committee to demand 
of the trustees or managers of institutions having children 
attending the schools of this to^vn, to pay the tuition or 
other extra expense incurred by reason of the same in 
accordance with section four of chapter 44, of the Revised 
Laws, as amended by section two of chapter 268, of the 
Acts of 1911. 

Article 24. To see if the town mil authorize having 
six more electric lights, three extending from opposite A. 



18 



Merriam company's factory to Lothrop's factory, and three 
from the corner at Walter Hayward's house to W. A. 
Flint's. 

Voted : That the selectmen be instructed to contract 
for six additional electric lights, to be located on the streets 
as specified in the article. 

Article 25. To see if the town will name its streets, 
and have the names put up at the street corners in a proper 
way, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Article 26. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for the following purposes, namely: 

First. For the repair of the engine house in South 
Acton, or act anything thereon. 

Second. For the purchase of an automobile truck for 
fire protection, or act anything thereon. 

Third. For the proper installing of a system of fire 
alarm, or act anything thereon. 

Fourth. For the disposal of the present fire apparatus 
at South Acton, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : Under the first section of the article, to raise 
one hundred fifty dollars ($150), to repair the fire house 
in South Acton. 

Voted : To pass over the remaining sections of the 
article. 

Article 27. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate money to pay a portion of the expense to be 
incurred by its villages in the construction and repair of 
sidewalks during the current year, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Article 28. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of one hundred dollars ($100), for the 
payment of premiums on treasurer's and collector's bonds. 

Voted: To raise the sum of one hundred dollars 
($100.) 

Article 29. To see what action the town will take 
on the recommendation of the state to appoint George E.. 



19 



Holton assistant fish and game warden, with a salary of 
fifty dollars. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Article 30. To see if the town will vote to dispose of 
the old scraper and other road implements not in use, or 
act anything thereon. 

Voted: That the road commissioners be instructed 
to dispose of the old scraper and other road implements 
which have ceased to be used by the road department. 

Article 31. To see if the town will vote to oil the 
streets through the villages of Acton, or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted : To raise the sum of three hundred dollars 
($300), for oiling the streets through the villages of South 
and West Acton and Acton Center. 

Article 32. To see if the town w411 vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money fori the purpose of installing 
a fire alarm system in town, or take any action thereon. 

Voted: That the matter be referred to a committee 
to consist of the fire wardens of the three principal villages, 
with instructions to report at a future meeting. 

Article 33. To see whether the town will vote to 
rescind the action providing for the election of selectmen 
by rotation for periods of three years, and revert to the 
system of simultaneous elections for the period of one year, 
as provided under certain acts of the revised statutes. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Article 34. To see if the town will vote to put electric 
lights equal distances apart from East Acton depot on 
Great road, to head of street leading to residences of Mrs. 
G. Daniels and Luther Davis, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : That the selectmen be instructed to contract 
for additional electric lights along the Great road from 
the East Acton R. R. station to the street leading to the 
residences of Mrs. G. Daniels and Luther Davis. 

Voted: To raise two hundred dollars ($200), for these 
additional lights. 

Article 35. To see if the town will rescind the vote 



20 



passed at their meeting April 3rd, 1899, whereby they voted 
to choose three road commissioners, and accept the provi- 
sions of section 364, chapter 560, of the Acts of 1907, rela- 
tive to the election of a highway surveyor. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Article 36. To see if the town will choose a financial 
committee, which shall consider and make recommendations 
relative to all appropriations of money. 

Voted : That at the next annual town meeting a 
financial committee of five be chosen by the town, on the 
official ballot, for the term of one year. 

Article 37. To see what instructions the town will 
vote to give the town officers respecting the performance 
of their duties. 

Voted: That the selectmen be instructed not to grant 
any licenses to druggist for the sale of intoxicating liquors, 
nor any licenses or permits to express companies for the 
transportation of intoxicating liquors into this to^\Ti this 
year. 

Voted: That the current financial year of this town 
end March 1. 1914, instead of February 1, 1914. 

Voted : To instruct the selectmen to install lights from 
the Lowell road to North Acton, also to carry out the vote 
of last year, providing for placing fifty lights in each 
precinct. 

Voted : To adjourn. 



Proceedings of the Special Town Meeting August 5, 1913 

Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting 

Samuel A. Guilford was chosen moderator. 

Article 2. To see if the town will vote to purchase 
necessary apparatus and supplies for the fire departments, 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted: That the town borrow one thousand dollars 



21 



for one year, for the purchasing of necessary apparatus 
and supplies for the fire departments. Fifty-seven votes 
in favor, none against. 

Voted: That the selectmen, fire wardens, and Charles 
J. Holton be a committee to purchase said apparatus and 
supplies. 

Voted: That the fire wardens be instructed to have 
the fire apparatus of the town inspected at least once a 
month, expenses of such inspection to be paid on approval 
of the bills by the selectmen. 

Article 3. To see if the town will vote to rescind the 
vote passed at the annual town meeting of ]\Iarch 31. 1913, 
whereby it was voted to put the unexpended balance of the 
appropriation for the enforcement of the liquor laws into 
the treasury, and appropriate it to the use of the fire 
department, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To dismiss the article. 

Voted : To adjourn. 

State Election November 4, 1913 

Party designations: D.. Democratic: I.. Independent; 
Prog., Progressive: P., Prohibition: R., Republican; S., 
Socialist: S. L.. Socialist Labor. 

Precincts Total 
12 3 

Whole number of ballots cast .. . 110 142 139 391 

Governor 



Charles Sumner Bird. Prog 
Alfred H. Evans, P. . . . 

Eugene N. Foss, I 

Augustus P. Gardner. R 
Arthur E. Reimer, S. L. 

David I. Walsh, D 

George H. Wrenn. S. . . 
Blanks 



35 


5 

56 


14 





58 

9 

47 


25 

3 



57 

1 

55 


26 





150 


15 

158 



65 



3: 



22 



Lieutenant Governor 



Edward P. Barry. D. . . . 
Daniel Cosgrove, Prog. . 
August H. Goetting, R. . 

Albert J. Orem, P 

Peter O'Rourke, S. L. ... 
George E. Roewer, Jr., S. 
Blanks 



15 


25 


23 


63 


29 


53 


49 


131 


62 


60 


61 


183 


1 


1 





2 


1 








1 


1 


1 





2 


1 


2 


6 


9 



Secretary 



Frnni: J. ronahue, D. . 
William S. Kinney, R. 
John A. Nicholls, P. . . 
Fred E. Oelcher, S. L. 
Ella M. Roberts, S. . . . 
Russell A. Wood, Prog. 
Blanks 



15 
60 
2 


26 
7 



25 
60 
1 


41 
5 



26 
55 



52 
6 



66 

175 

3 





119 

18 



Treasurer 



Charles L. Burrill, R. . . . 
Charles E. Fenner, S. . . . 
Thomas A. Frissell, P. . . 
Warren R. Keith, Prog. . 
Frederick W. Mansfield. D 

Dennis McGoff, S. L 

Blanks 



Auditor 



Herbert S. Brown, P 

David Craig, S. L 

Octave A. LaRiviere. Prog. 
Samuel P. Levenberg, S. . 

Frank H. Pope, D 

John E. White, R 

Blanks 



63 

1 
27 
15 
1 
3 



3 


25 


15 
60 

7 



57 

2 

50 

22 
1 

10 



1 

41 

24 
64 
11 



60 

1 

45 

23 


10 



2 

43 

25 
57 
12 



180 

4 

122 

60 

2 

23 



6 



109 



64 

181 

30 



23 

Attorney General 

Thomas J. Boynton, D 17 

Freeman T. Crommett, P 1 

John McCarty, S 

H. Huestis Newton, Prog 26 

Ingvar Paulsen, S. L 

James M. Swift. R 60 

Blanks 6 

Councillor — Sixth District 

John J. Hogan, D 12 

Harrie C. Hunter. Prog 27 

G. Frederick Simpson. R 62 

Blanks 9 



Senator — Seventh Middlesex District 



20 


23 


60 





1 


2 


1 





1 


47 


46 


119 


1 





1 


65 


60 


185 


8 


9 


23 



23 


21 


56 


49 


45 


121 


58 


57 


177 


11 


16 


36 



William F. Belcher. Prog 


23 


43 


35 


101 


Edward Fisher, D 


27 


43 


44 


114 


Otto Reither, R 


52 


51 


49 


152 


Blanks 


8 


5 


n 


24 



Representative in General Court — Eleventh Middlesex 

District 

James P. Dunigan. D 12 17 20 49 

John L. Kennison, Prog 24 48 47 119 

Charles A. Kimball, R 67 67 65 199 

Blanks 7 10 7 24 

County Commissioner — Middlesex County 

Erson B. Barlow, R 59 59 

John B. McCloskey, D 15 19 

Charles H. Mclntire, Prog 31 55 

Blanks 5 9 



52 


170 


20 


54 


57 


143 


10 


24 



24 



Associate Commissioners 



Charles W. Atkins, Prog 19 35 

Frederic P. Barnes, R 59 59 

John J. Butler, D 9 20 

George W. Enwright, D 10 11 

Edwin P. Fitzgerald, R 45 34 

Albert F. Parker, Prog 22 44 

Blanks 56 11 

District Attorney 

Philip M. Clark, Prog 23 50 

William J. Corcoran, D 15 18 

John J. Higgins, R 63 58 

Blanks 9 15 

Register of Probate and Insolvency 

James T. Barrett, D 13 23 

William E. Rogers, Prog, and R., 84 100 

Blanks 13 19 

Register of Deeds (to fill vaeancy) 

J. Frank Facey, D 15 23 

Thomas Leighton, Jr., R 65 65 

Albin M. Richards, Prog 24 46 

Blanks 6 8 



35 


89 


46 


164 


17 


46 


15 


36 


32 


111 


41 


107 


92 


159 



44 


117 


25 


58 


51 


172 


19 


53 



22 


58 


88 


272 


29 


61 



21 


59 


59 


189 


40 


110 


19 


33 



Vote on Amendment Making Women Eligible as Notaries 

Public 



Yes 33 

No 53 

Blanks 24 



55 


49 


137 


46 


41 


140 


41 


49 


114 



25 
Vote on Amendment Authorizing the Referendum 



Yes , 42 



59 


54 


155 


21 


12 


61 


62 


73 


175 



No 28 

Blanks 40 



Vote on Acceptance of Act Relative to the Compensation 
of Certain Laborers 



Yes 38 

No 33 

Blanks 39 



62 


51 


151 


28 


23 


84 


52 


65 


156 



Vote for Representative in the Eleventh Middlesex District 
November 4, 1913 



Oi 



o 
m 



"X U. -r^ ^ ^ -t-^ -Zl 

-US P t: ^ tr o -5 

'^ ^. X ^ ."ti; K^ ^ 

< < o o h:: p^ ^ 

James P. Dunigan, ChelmsforclD. I 49|146|23|325| 39| 98| 680 

John L. Kennison, Aver, Prog. . |119|146|22|176| 32| 65| 560 

Charles A. Kimball. Littleton, R. |199|126|44|185|135|201| 890 

Blanks 1 24| 35| 5| 37| 6| 29| 136 

Totals |391|453|94|723|212|393|2266 



26 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



Births. 

Whole number recorded 37 

Born in Acton 34 

Males 17 

Females 20 

Native parentage 14 

Foreign parentage 17 

Mixed parentage 6 

Marriages. 

Whole number recorded 21 

Residents of Acton 20 

Residents of other places 22 

Deaths. 

Whole number recorded 40 

Residents of Acton 37 

Residents of other places 3 

Occurring in Acton 31 

Occurring in other places 9 

Average age, years 55 . 8 

Note. The town clerk requests information of any 
omission or error in the lists of births, marriages and deaths. 

The town clerk hereby gives notice that he is prepared 
to furnish blanks for the returns of births and deaths. 

HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Town Clerk. 



27 









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34 



PERSONS HAVING DOGS LICENSED IN 1913. 



Aiken, Alice H 


$5.00 


Allen, Louis E 


2.00 


Bulette, Frank W. . . 


2.00 


Bovce, Charles E 


2.00 


Brill, Fred E. 


2.00 


Brown, Lizzie J 


2.00 


Bradley, Mary 


2.00 


Burroughs, S. R 


2.00 


Burgess, Mrs. J. W. . 


2.00 


Brooks, Mary 


2.00 


Baird, Edson 


2.00 


Bresth, Simon 


2.00 


Berrv, J. W 


2.00 


Cuttell, Arthur 


2.00 


Chase, S. R 


2.00 


Coughlin, John F. . . 


2.00 


Calder, Maria 


2.00 


Coughlin. W. C. . . . 


2.00 


Davis, William E. . 


2.00 


DeTinno Angelo . . . 


2.00 


De Souza Bernardino 2.00 


DeFegueredo Antonio 2.00 


Davis. Charles E. . . . 


2.00 


Durivee, Raymond F. 


2.00 


Davis, Wendell F. (2] 


4.00 


Durkee, Harold .... 


5.00 


Densmore, J. A 


2.00 


Emrick, Melvin W. . 


2.00 


Enneguess Michael . 


2.00 


Edney, Charles F. . . 


2.00 


Frost C. A 


5.00 


Ford, I. S 


2.00 


Fairbank, C. H. ... 


2.00 


Farrar, Daniel H. . 


2.00 


Fobes, E. S 


5.00 



Farrar, Herman .... 5 . 00 

Fletcher, Lester N. (2) 7.00 

Foster, Samuel J. . . . 2.00 

Gallagher, Joseph ... 2.00 

Green, Fred W 2.00 

Gilmore, Almon H. ( 2 ) 4.00 

Gradv, Roy 5.00 

Hunt, Harrv 2.00 

Hardv, Mrs. F. E. (2) 4.00 

Hoit, F. W 2.00 

Harris, Hattie B. . . . 5.00 

Houe:hton ,Ellsworth . 2.00 

Holden, F. H 2.00 

Holden, Willis L 2.00 

Hawley, Henry H. Jr. 2 . 00 

Jones, Samuel 2.00 

Jones, Warren 2 . 00 

Jones, Ralph T 2.00 

KnoAvlton, F. R 2.00 

Kellev, William S. . . 2.00 

Kimball. Elnathan (2) 4.00 

Kerrigan, Michael .. 2.00 

Lawrence. Harland . . 2.00 

Lewis, Herbert W. ... 2.00 

Livermore, J. William 2.00 

Lucier, Joseph 2 . 00 

Laffin, Sidnev 2.00 

Moore, J. Sterling ... 2.00 

:\riller, Charles 1 2.00 

ATurphv, George E. . . 2.00 

Afoore, William J. . . . 2.00 

^nilan, Albion L. . . . 2.00 

ALnson. William E. . . 2.0'^ 

Mekkelsen. Jens .... 2.00 

Morgan, William E. . 2.00 



35 



Marsh, A. W 2.00 

Noyes, G. L 2.00 

Nagle, Elizabeth .... 2.00 

Nealev, Edward F. . . 2.00 

O'Neii, Rose 2.00 

Olsen, Simon 2.00 

O'Neil. Patrick 2.00 

O'CoDnell. Michael .. 2.00 

Palma, John 2.00 

Pratt, Est. of Francis 2.00 

Priest, H. L 5.00 

Perkins, Levi 2.00 

Perkins, A. H 2.00 

Pennell, Edmund H. 2.00 

Pope, Benjamin (3).. 9.00 

Penniman, W. H. . . . 2.00 

Page, E. C 2.00 

Reed, George H 2.00 

Reed, Joseph 5.00 

Rnssell, John 11 2.00 

Rivers, E. E 5.00 

Robbins, F. W 2.00 

Richardson. Georq-e A. 2.00 

Rin^, John E. . .^ 5.00 

Robbins. W. C. (4).. 8.00 

Smith, Albert 2.00 

Stevenson, John ]\r. . . 5.00 



Shapley, Eva C 


2.00 


Sanborn, E. R 


2.00 


Shaw, Francis A 


5.00 


Stearns, C. S 


5.00 


Smiley, William A. . . 


2.00 


Samsel, Nicholas .... 


2.00 


Smith, Stella D 


2.00 


Sebastian, L. A 


5.00 


Schofield, Harris C. (2) 7.00 


Taylor, Simon D 


2.00 


Tuttle, Arthui 


2.00 


Thompson. T. A 


2.00 


Taylor, Walter I. .. 


2.00 


Taylor, Charles A. . . 


2.00 


Thayer. Arthur L. . . 


2.00 


Tyler, Webster 


2.00 


Weaver, George T. (2) 


10.00 


Willis, Oro A 


2.00 


White, Eugene L. . . 


2.00 


Wetherbee, Ellis 


2.00 


Williams, F. G 


5.00 


Worden, Martin H. . . 


2.00 


Worster, George W. 


2.00 


Whitcomb, Fred S. . . 


2.00 


Watkins, J. H. (3) . . 


6.00 


Wheeler, Charles H. . 


5.00 


Willis, Edward 


2.00 



116 licenses at $2.00 each 

22 licenses at $5.00 each 


$232.00 
110.00 




educt fees, 138 licenses at 20c each 


— 


$342.00 
27.60 


aid to county treasurer 

ue county treasurer 


$314.40 

$312.60 

1.80 



$314.40 



36 



REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN 



We have carried out the votes of the town to the best 
of our ability. 

During the year new watering troughs have been placed 
in each of the villages, which, besides being very useful, 
are very ornamental as well. 

It now looks as if a settlement would be made soon 
with the Town of Concord in the town farm land datmage 
matter. 

EDWARD Z. STANLEY, 
FRED S. WHITCOMB, 
JAMES P. BROWN, 

Selectmen of Acton. 
March 18, 1914. 



37 



REPORT OF THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, Acton, Mass. 

Gentlemen : I herewith submit my report for the fiscal 
year of 1913 : 

EXPENDITURES 

General Government 
Appropriations : 

For salaries and expenses $2,000.00 

For surety bonds 100.00 

$2100.00 
Selectmen's Department 
Salaries and Wages : 

J. P. Brown, chairman $100.00 

E. Z. Stanley 50.00 

Fred S. Whitcomb 50.00 

$200.00 
Other Expenses: 
Postage, carfare, etc $18.07 

$18.07 
Auditing and Accountant Department 
Salaries and "Wages : 
Accountant, W. T. Merriam, balance 

1912-1913 $37.50 

Accountant, W. T. ^Merriam, balance 

1913-1914 100.00 

$137.50 



38 



Other Expenses: 

Printing $12.75 

Postage 2.10 



Treasurer's Department 

Salary and Wages: 
Treasurer, F. W. Hoit $200.00 



Other Expenses: 

Surety bond . . . : $50.00 

Printing supplies 9 . 10 

Postage, carfare, etc 16.49 

Certifying five notes 15.00 



Collector's Department 

Salaries and Wages : 
Collector, W. F. Stevens *$365.30 



Other Expenses: 

Surety bond $50.00 

Printing supplies 13 . 90 

Postage, carfare, etc 9 . 70 



Assessors' Department 

Salaries and Wages: 

Assessor, Wm. F. Stevens $75 . 00 

Assessor, W. F. Kelley 60.00 

Assessor, James B. Tuttle 55.00 



$14.85' 



$200.00 



$90.59 



$365.30 



$73.60 



$190.00 



39 



Other Expenses: 

Printing supplies $4 . 75 

Postage, carfare, etc $18.36 



Town Clerk's Department 

Salaries and Wages: 

Town Clerk, Horace F. Tuttle $40.00 

Copying town report records 5.00 



Other Expenses : 

Ink .50 

Supplies, Hobbs & Warren 8 . 50 

Postage, carfare, etc . 9.31 

Attending meeting at Ayer 2.50 



Election and Registration 
Salaries and Wages : 

Registrar, H. F. Tuttle $25.00 

Registrar, S. A. Guilford 20.00 

Registrar, James ^I. Green 20.00 

Registrar, Geo. E. Holton 20.00 



Election Officers : 

Charles E. Smith 5.00 

H. F. Robbins 2.50 

C. A. Durkee 5.00 

T. F. Newton 5.50 

L. C. Hastings 5.50 

C. O'Neil 5.50 

Abram Tuttle 8.50 

C. D. Cram 2.50 

C. .T. Holton 5.00 

E. R. Teele 2.50 



$23.11 



$45.00 



$20.81 



$85.00 



40 



James Kinsley 5 . 00 

AV. F. Kelley 5.50 

IT. F. Tuttle 5.00 

John F. Coughlin 5.00 

W. H. Kingsley 5.00 

A. F. Davis 5.00 

E. C. Cheney 5.00 



Other Expenses : 

F. S. Glines, opening school for regis- 
tration $2.00 

W. F. Stevens, transporting election 

returns 3 . 00 

F. S. Whitcomb, inspector for primary 

and state election 5 . 00 

F. W. Green, setting up booth 1.50 

Universalist Society, rent for voting, 6.00 



Overseers of Poor Department 

Salaries and Wages: 

Overseer, W. F. Kelley $50.00 

Overseer, E. Z. Stanley 20.00 



Other Expenses: 

Postage, carfare, etc 9 . 74 

Blanks, Hobbs & Warren 2.10 



$83.00 



$17.50 



$70.00 



$11.84 



Total General Government $1,646.17 

Unexpended 453.83 

$2,100.00 



41 

Buildings and Grounds 

Appropriation $300.00 

Received for rent, town hall 110.00 



$410.00 

Town Hall Maintenance : 

Janitor. R. W. Porter $89 . 20 

American Woolen Co.. light 29 . 64 

West and South Acton Supply Dis- 
trict, pipes and water rent 67 . 20 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal, 32.25 

William H. Kingsley, sawing wood . . 5.00 

Dexter Spinney, wood 8.75 

E. S. Fobes, labor on common 9.00 

E. Z. Stanley, repairs 39.29 

Davis, King Co., repairs 5.00 

O. D. Wood, repairs 22.25 

E. P. Gates, repairs 4.35 

C. H. Persons, repairs piano 1.00 

W. C. Robinson Co., oil .85 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 4.92 

Total for buildings and grounds $318.70 

Unexpended 91 . 30 



$410.00 



Protection Persons and Property 

Police Department 

Appropriation $150 . 00 

Received for court fines 39.32 

Received rebate, C. E. Wood 1.50 



$190.82 



42 



Paid: 

William C. Coughlin, special duty ... $3 . 75 

E. S. Fobes, special duty 28.50 

E. S. Fobes, court fees 54.86 

William F. Stevens, court fees 8 . 08 

James Kinsley, court fees 5 . 84 

James Kinsley, special duty 18 . 00 

George Libby, special duty 2 . 50 

James P. Brown, special duty 2.50 

W. J. Benere, special duty 3.00 

J. L. Richardson, special duty 4.75 

H. R. Moore, special duty 10.25 

N. J. Driscoll, special duty 31 . 75 

N. J. Driscoll, court fees 6 . 85 

E. Z. Stanley, expense 12.21 

Total police department $192.84 

Appropriation overdrawn 2.02^ 

Enforcement of Liquor Law 

Fund on hand $1,168.70 

Paid : 

N. Samsel $15.00 

J. P. Brown .75 

Unexpended 1,152.95 



$1,168.70 



Fire Department 

Appropriation $400 . 00 

Appropriation, special to^vn meeting, 1.000.00 

For hydrant service, East Acton .... 184.00 

For hydrant service, fire district 2,500.00 

For hose, etc., Acton Center 500.00 

For repairs fire house. So. Acton .... 150.00 



$4,734.00 



43 



Paid: 
Town of Concord, hydrant service E. 

Acton $184.00 

Badger Fire Extinguisher Co 118.10 

West and South Water Supply Dis- 
trict, hydrant service 2.250.00 

Mathieson Alkali Works 4.48 

Tuttle & Newton, soda 3 . 64 

George H. Reed, freight .50 

J. P. Brown, freight .48 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 5.14 

E. P. Gates, repairs 1 .75 

William H. Kingsley, watching fire . . 18.50 

So. Acton Woolen Co., acid 7.09 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., So. 

Acton, repairs 11 . 82 

S. B. Ineson, repairs. So. Acton 120.85 

American Woolen Co., supplies 1.08 

J. P. Brown, repairs 2.25 

F. W. Green, taking out ashes 1.00 

Maintenance for West fire house .... 117.00 

Maintenance for South fire house .... 117.00 

D. H. Farrar, repairs 8 . 50 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., repairs, 

East Acton 16.12 



Fighting Brush Fires 
Paid: 

ToAvn of Concord, fire Powder Mills, $26.82 

J. S. White 24.63 

J. P. Brown 9.05 

William H. Kingsley 14.80 

A. C. Perham 9.22 

Town of Westf ord 15 . 00 

George E. Greenough 4.00 



$2,989.30 



$103.52 



44 

New Hose, Etc. 

Boston Coupling Co., hose, etc $644.73 

C. C. C. Fire Hose & Eubber Co., hose, 

etc 772.90 



West Acton Fire, July 22nd, 1913 
Paid: 

Fitchburg Fire Dept $92.00 

W. E. Whitcomb, supplies 1 . 54 

J. S. Hoar, repairs, fire house 26.04 

C. A. Durkee 7.00 

James Grimes 4 . 50 

George Ackley 4.50 

W. A. Davis 4.50 

Howard Reed 4 . 50 

D. Kinsley 3.00 

N. Wambolt 7.00 

L. Kempton 6 . 50 

F. Moan 4.50 

W. Coolidge 4.50 

J. Young 3.50 

M. Wheeler 4.25 

D. Moan 1.25 

T. McDonald 4.25 

A. Hawes ' .50 

A. Greenwood .50 

F. W. Green 6.25 

J. Hopps 2.50 

F. Williams 3.00 



$1,417.63 



$196.08 



Total fire department $4,706.53 

Unexpended 27 . 47 

$4,734.00 



45 



Moth Department 



Appropriation '. $970.00 

Power spray 600 . 00 

Received, state highway work 151.01 

Keceived, state treasurer, moth work, 550.00 

Received, private moth work 285 . 50 

Received, for spray pump 3 . 00 

Received, from state, arsenate of lead, 100.00 



Paid James O'Neil, labor and expense. 

Unpaid private moth work 

Unpaid from state, moth work 

Elm Tree Beetle 

Appropriation $400 . 00 

Received, private work 19.34 

Paid: 

W. H. Kingsley. labor . $42 . 00 

James O'Neil, labor 314.46 

State, arsenate of lead 100.00 

Overdrawn 

Health and Sanitation 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Received, inspection of animals 23.40 

Received ^Mr. McDonald, inspection . . 259.50 

Received town of Rowlev 32. 50 



$2,659.51 

2,608.16 

139.46 

313.19 



$419.34 



$456.46 
37.12 



$1,315.40 



46 



Paid: 

Eastern Drug Co., supplies $13.13 

Hall Staples, professional services .... 114.00 

A. F. Blanchard, supplies 3.38 

W. E. Whitcomb, supplies 66.28 

James Hurley, quarantine 57.09 

E. S. Fobes, fumigating, etc 99.35 

E. S. Fobes, inspection, McDonald .. 259.50 

E. S. Fobes, inspection, Blanchard .. 217.50 
Est. E. F. Barker, use of land, public 

dump 8.00 

Chester Smith, labor at dump 2 . 00 

E. C. Page, fumigating, etc 123.45 

F. E. Tasker, supplies, etc 3.70 

Miss Z. Miner, nurse 45 . 00 

W. G. Lawrence, quarantine 9 . 00 

James B. Tuttle, expenses to Town 

Rowley 6.00 

0. S. Fowler, fumigating 4.00 

W. B. Clark Co., books 3.56 

Carter Carter Meigs Co., supplies .... 27.32 

F. S. Whitcomb, inspection animals . . 100 . 00 

F. E. Tasker, school physician 25.00 

S. A. Christie, school physician 25 . 00 

F. K. Shaw, school physician 25.00 

Total health and sanitation $1,237.26 

Unexpended 78 . 14 



$1,315.40 
Due from state cattle inspection 50.00 

Highway and Bridges 

Appropriation $4,000 . 00 

Oiling roads 300.00 

Received for gasoline and road dust, 15.00 

$4,315.00 



47 



Paid: 

A. H. Perkins, labor $1,965.03 

W. H. Kingsley, labor 1,097.21 

W, B. Franklin, labor 385.25 

A. H. Perkins, gasoline, supplies 124.55 

A. H. Perkins, gravel 15.80 

A. H. Perkins, liability insurance .... 25.00 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 11.68 

E. P. Grates, repairs 9 . 75 

A. H. Perkins, inspection roller 5 . 00 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 17.44 

Lunt, Moss Co., repairs 31.36 

Davis, King Co., supplies 1.00 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co., repairs .... 9 . 84 

Good Roads Machine Co., supplies .. 24.85 

Standard Oil Co., oiling roads 514.01 

W. C. Robinson & Son, oil 20.89 

Thomas McCarthy, stone 6.00 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co 57.46 

Ole Granberg, gravel 5.00 

Finney & Hoit, supplies 1 . 00 

W. A. Flint, gravel 5.00 

J. P. Brown, repairs 1 . 50 

W. H. Kingsley, repairs crusher 31 . 00 

Total highway and bridges $4,365.62 

Overdrawn 50 . 62 

Street Lighting 

Appropriation $2,300 . 00 

Appropriation for lights, E. Acton... 200.00 



$2,500.00 



Paid: 

American Woolen Co $2,542 . 64 

D. C. Harris, lighting one lamp 4.00 

Simon Bresth, lighting one lamp .... 4.00 



48 



E. Z. Stanley, lighting one lamp 4 . 00 

Bernardino De Souza, lighting lamp 

three years 12 . 00 



Total for street lighting . ; $2,566.64 

Overdrawn 66 . 64 

Charities 

Town Farm 

Appropriation $600 . 00 

Sale of product and stock 1,421.47 



$2,021.47 



Paid : 

M. W. Emrick, warden $475.00 

M. W. Emrick, labor 114.40 

M. W. Emrick, carting milk 7.50 

M. W. Emrick, ladder 2.75 

Joseph Norwich, labor 18 . 55 

James Lawton, labor 25 . 00 

V. Adamonski, labor 15.75 

Fred Wilson, labor 70.00 

S. B. Ineson, fish 4.08 

Ralph Jones, fish 1. 15 

George H. Reed, grain 288.45 

George H. Reed, coal 42.60 

J. S. Moore, provisions 245 . 86 

Finney & Hoit, supplies 46 . 25 

E. Z. Stanley, repairs 31 . 66 

W. E. Whitcomb, supplies 3.37 

C. H. Mead & Co., grain 442.81 

W. F. Kelley, telephone 41 . 30 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

repairs 20.92 

Fred Grenier 3.50 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 3.94 



49 



W. H. Kingsley, sawing wood 6.88 

W. K. Emerson, supplies 21 . 00 

E. A. Phalen, repairs 22.00 

J. T. McNiff, repairs 5.50 

Fritz Oelschlegel, repairs 7 . 40 

0. D. Fessenden. barrels 28.74 

L. H. Tiittle, barrels 10.50 

Hall Bros. Co., sawing lumber, etc. . . 11.97 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 52.03 

Total town farm $2,070.86 

Overdrawn 49.39 

Outside Poor 

Appropriation $1,000 . 00 

Received from town of Boxboro 98 . 89 



$1,098.89 



Paid: 

Town of Randolph $37.00 

City of Lawrence 22 . 00 

City of No. Adams 36.00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts .... 29 . 50 

Town of Leominster 78.41 

E. A. Phalen, rent 24.00 

Harriet Rudolph, rent 44.00 

W. T. S. Bartlett, rent 52.00 

Mrs. Roullard, rent 15 . 00 

City of Boston 20 . 00 

Hall Staples, town physician 25.00 

F. D. Morrison, milk 35 . 67 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 296.22 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 187.16 

W. E. Whitcomb, supplies 95.89 

J. S. Moore, supplies 23 . 39 

L. Da^ds 5 . 50 

George H. Reed, coal 6. 39 



50 
E. C. Page 15.00 



Total outside poor $1,048.13 

Unexpended 50 . 76 



$1,098.89 
Soldiers' Benefit 

State Aid 

Received from state treasurer $859 . 00 

Amount due from state Feb. 1, 1913. $929.00 

Amount paid out 928 . 00 

Balance due from state Mar. 1, 1914, 998.00 



$1,857.00 $1,857.00 
Military Aid 

Appropriation $100.00 

Paid for aid $20.00 

Unexpended 80.00 



$100.00 



Education 

Appropriation $17,500 . 00 

Received from Concord, rebate tuition 28.80 

Received rebate on ticket 1 .74 

Received state treasurer, tuition .... 109.70 

Received state treasurer, Supt. fund, 343.75 

Received state treasurer. Mass. fund, 1,238.35 

Received county treasurer, dog tax . . 301 . 65 



$19,524.99 
Paid: 
Report of school committee $19,357.85 



Unexpended 167 . 14 



51 

Memorial Library 

Library Expense 

Appropriation ., . $500 . 00 

Eeceived from fines 27.00 



Paid: 

L. D. White, cataloging $50.40 

W. B. Clarke Co., books 168.29 

Dura Binding Co 1 . 55 

W. D. Tuttle. express 1.12 

H. F. Tuttle, expense cataloging .... 14.18 

H. F. Tuttle, book 1 . 39 

J. H. Janson, book 1 .00 



$527.00 



Paid: 

E. F. Conant, insurance $52 . 09 

American Woolen Co., light 40.82 

O. E. Houghton, transportation of 

books 50.00 

S. H. Taylor, janitor 116.65 

A. F. Davis, librarian 138.20 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., fuel. 72.03 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 13.62 

E. Z. Stanley, repairs 19.55 

A. Hosmer, printing 10 . 00 

W. A. Raynor 8.00 

W. H. Kingsley, wood 2.50 

Total library expense $523 .46 

Unexpended 3 . 54 

Library Books 

Appropriation $200 . 00 

Unexpended balance February 1, 1913, 1 . 35 

Interest on library fund 241 . 60 



$442.95 



52 



F. H. Dyer, book 10.00 

James T. White & Co., books 104.00 

Herman Goldberger 42 . 56 

David Farquhar 35 . 50 

W. A. Wilde & Co 7.16 

Total library books $437.15 

Unexpended 5 . 80 

Unclassified 

Appropriation $550 . 00 

Appropriation water supply in water- 
ing troughs 150 . 00 



Paid : 

E. C. Page, return deaths $15.25 

Compensation insurance, moth dept. . 64.25 

J. Chattilion & Son., sealer weights 

and measures supplies 1 . 75 

W. & L. E. Gurley, sealer weights and 

measures supplies 10.17 

N. Samsel, services 2.00 

F. S. Whitcomb, watering trough 

West Acton 50.00 

Board of water commissioners, con- 
necting to watering trough .... 5.82 
W. H. Kingsley, watering trough, 

Acton 50.00 

J. P. Brown, watering trough, South 

Acton 50.00 

A. F. Davis lettering monument .... 2.50 

W. F. Stevens, express and delivering 

reports 2 . 20 

W. F. Stevens, expense account dog 

tax 2.60 

J. P. Brown, repairs pump 1.25 

R. W. Porter, care clock and flag 30.00 

J. P. Brown, express and delivering 

reports 3 . 17 



$700.00 



53 



J. P. Brown, notary fee .50 

H. F. Tuttle, collecting and recording 

37 births 18.50 

H. F. Tnttle, recording 21 marriages . 4.20 

H. F. Tnttle, recording 39 deaths 7.80 

H. F. Tnttle, transmitting 3 deaths, 1 

birth 1.00 

Hall Staples, returning 7 births 1.75 

F. K. Shaw, returning 8 births 2.00 

F. E. Tasker, returning 6 births .... 1.50 

S. A. Christie, returning 6 births .... 1 .50 

L. D. Sullivan, returning 1 birth .... .25 

F. H. Brady, returning 1 birth .25 

F. P. Flagg, returning 1 birth .25 

HowaTd Hamlin, returning 1 birth . . .25 

F. J. Barker, returning 2 births .50 

I. L. Pickard. returning 1 birth .25 

James D. Christie, returning 1 birth . . .25 

Boston Nickel Plating Co 7.35 ^ 

M. E. Taylor & Co., rope for flag 1.80 

M. E. Taylor & Co., asphaltum for 

cannons .25 

M. E. Taylor & Co., paint band stand, 2.30 
W. F. Stevens, checking corporation 

tax 1.20 

W. F. Stevens, abatements 138.38 

Total unclassified $482.99^ 

Unexpended 217 ..OT 

Memorial Day- 
Appropriation $100 . 00 

Paid Isaac Davis post 100.00 

Cemetery Department 

Appropriation $600.00 

Sale lots, Woodlawn 90.00 

$690. orr 



54 
Paid : 

Julian Tuttle, labor, Woodlawn $134.50 

Julian Tuttle, labor, North 12.00 

Julian Tuttle, plants, Woodlawn .... 7 . 21 

S. H. Taylor, labor, Woodlawn 37 . 63 

A. H. Smith, labor, Woodlawn 95.28 

Pinney & Hoit, flags, Woodlawn .... 6 . 25 

E. T. Rice, repairs pump, Woodlawn, 3.25 

A. Parlin, labor, Woodlawn 8 . 75 

E. T. Rice, pipes, etc., Mt. Hope 143.15 

A. H. Perkins, labor, Mt. Hope 49.97 

A. Batley & Son, flowers, Mt. Hope . 15.71 

E. R. Teele, spraying Mt. Hope 9.15 

West and South Water Supply Dis- 
trict, rent 6 . 00 

H. F. Tuttle, attending meeting West 

Acton 3.00 

H. T. Tuttle, preparing report 5.00 

H. F. Tuttle, writing two deeds 1.00 

Total cemetery department .... $537.85 

Unexpended 152 . 15 



$690.00 



Perpetual Care Lots 
Unexpended balance February 1, 1913, $503.97 
Income on fund 436 . 75 



Paid: 

Julian Tuttle, plants $62.08 

Julian Tuttle, labor 175.75 

A. H. Perkins, labor 42.30 

F. C. Hayward, interest 17 . 50 

George H. DeCosta, interest 3 . 50 



^940.72 



Total perpetual care $301 . 13 

Unexpended March 1, 1914 639.59 

$940.72 



55 



Interest 

Receipts from collector $154.72 

Received interest grade crossing .... 126.73 
Treasurer's deposit 68.30 

^ ■ $349 . 75 

Paid: 

Old Colony Trust Co $86.57 

First National Bank 222.67 

Cemetery fund 11 . 58 

• $320.82 

Municipal Indebtedness 

Loans, Old Colony Trust Co $3,000.00 

First National Bank . . . 1 3,000 . 00 

$16,000.00 
Paid: 

Old Colony Trust Co $3,000.00 

First National Bank 12,000.00 

$15,000.00 

Note unpaid . . . .' 1,000.00 

Printing 

Appropriation $300 . 00 

Paid: 

News-Enterprise, ballots $19.50 

News-Enterprise, 4 lots warrants .... 21 . 75 

News-Enterprise, annual reports .... 151.20 

News-Enterprise, school reports 7.00 

News-Enterprise, tax list 17 . 00 

News-Enterprise, voting list 15.00 

News-Enterprise, notice to voters ... 2.00 

A. Hosmer. caucus notices 1 .50 

P. B. IMurphy, dog license blanks ... 1 .00 

Total for printing $235.95 

Unexpended 64 . 05 

$300.00 



56 



Financial Statement 
Receipts 

Due from treasurer $808 . 54 

Due from collector 4,653.44 

Appropriation : 

Memorial day 100.00 

Highway and bridges 4,300.00 

Memorial library, books 200.00 

Memorial library, expense 500 . 00 

Fire department 400 . 00 

Hydrant service East Acton 184.00 

Hydrant service 2,250.00 

Repairing South fire house 150.00 

Extermination moth 970 . 00 

Elm leaf beetle 400.00 

Water supply schools 250 . 00 

Water supply watering troughs 150.00 

Bond, collector and treasurer 100.00 

School department 17,500.00 

Street lighting 2,500.00 

Raised: 

For state tax 4,480.00 

For state highway tax 301.50 

For county tax 2,260.09 

For overlay 276.64 

Received: 

Treasurer's report 28,049.49 

Farm receipts 1,421 . 47 

Interest on taxes ." 154.72 

Moth tax 320.44 

C. M. & H. railroad tax 115.88 

Cemetery fund 1,625.00 

-$74,421.21 

Expenditures 

State tax $4,480.00 

County tax 2,260.09 

State highway tax 301 . 50 

Corporation tax, public service 9 . 90 



57 



General government 1,646.17 

Buildings and grounds 318.70 

Police department 192 . 84 

Enforcement liquor law 15 . 75 

Fire department 4,706 . 53 

Moth department 2.608 . 16 

Elm tree beetle 456.46 

Health and sanitation 1,237.26 

Highway and bridges 4,365. 62 

Town farm 2,070.86 

Street lighting 2,566. 64 

Outside poor 1,048.13 

State aid 928.00 

Military aid 1 20.00 

Education 19.357.85 

Library expense 523 . 46 

Library books 437. 15 

Unclassified 482.99 

Memorial day 100.00 

Cemetery 537 . 85 

Perpetual care 301 . 13 

Interest 320.82 

^Municipal indebtedness 15.000.00 

Printing 235.95 

Uncollected taxes 5,847 . 17 

Cash on hand 2,044.23 

$74,421.21 
Financial Statement for Year Ending March 1, 1914 

Due from treasurer $2,044.23 

Due from collector 5,847 . 17 

Due from state aid 998.00 

Due from moth work 313 . 19 

Due from inspection cattle 50.00 

Due from town of Boxboro 40.21 

Due from state, outside poor 31 . 10 

$9,323. 9a 



58 



Liabilities 

Unexpended balance cemetery fund . $639.59 

Unexpended balance library fund ... 5.80 

Fund for enforcement liquor law .... 1,152.95 

Cemetery fund in treasury 2,475 . 00 

W. B. Clarke Co., library books 77.35 

A. Christofferson, schools 132^^00 

Town of Stow, schools 50.00 

Oeorge E. Greenough, schools 18.00 

E. S. Fobes, inspection 46.50 

E. C. Page, board of health 7.12 

American Woolen Co., street lights . . 237.33 
American Woolen Co., town hall 

lights 1 . 30 

A. H. Perkins, snow bill 94. 10 

W. B. Franklin, snow bill 69 . 50 

W. H. Kingsley, snow bill 33.33 

T. F. Parker, supplies, road depart- 
ment 5 . 67 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies, road 

department 7 . 29 

Hall Brothers Co., supplies, road de- 
partment 4 . 25 

Davis, King Co., supplies, road depart- 
ment 3.00 

E. P. Gates, repairs, road department, 21.30 

C. H. Mead & Co., supplies, farm 129.70 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies, farm . . . 179.55 

W. H. Kingsley, sawing wood, farm. . 8.75 

Finney & Hoit, supplies, farm 16.75 

J. S. Moore, supplies, farm 20 . 92 

E. Z. Stanley, repairs, farm 1 . 50 

George H. Cash, ice, farm 4.00 

E. T. Rice, repairs, farm 2.00 

F. W. Robbins, ice, farm 8.25 

E. A. Phalen, rent, outside poor 8.00 

Town of Randolph, outside poor .... 85.21 

W. H. Kingsley, wood, outside poor . . 5 . 50 



59 

J. S. Moore, supplies, outside poor .. 6.80 

W. E. Whitcomb, supplies, outside 

poor 9 . 50 

Mrs. Margaret Rouillard, rent, outside 

poor 15 . 00 

City of Boston, outside poor 21.43 

Harriet Rudolph, rent, outside poor . . 4.00 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies, outside 

poor 18.48 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies, outside 

poor 398.97 

$6,025.69 

Balance in favor of the town $3,298.21 

Respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM T. MERRIAM, 

Town Accountant. 
Acton, Mass., March 10, 1914. 



I have examined the accounts of the tax collector and^ 
treasurer of the Town of Acton, and find them correct, to' 
the best of my knowledge. 

WILLIAM T. MERRIAM, 

Town Accountant, 



fio 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



Year Ending March 1st, 1914 



Cash on hand February 1st, 1913 ... $808.54 

Received : 
State treasurer, corporation tax, pub- 
lic service 1,665 . 50 

State treasurer, corporation tax, busi- 
ness 4,360.65 

State treasurer, national bank tax .. 488.91 

State treasurer, state aid 859 . 00 

State treasurer, inspection of animals, 23.40 

State treasurer, tuition of children . . 109.70 

State treasurer, Mass. school fund . . . 343 . 75 
State treasurer, income of Mass. school 

fund 1,238.35 

State treasurer, moth work 550 . 00 

State treasurer, reimbursement for 
loss of taxes on land used for 

public institutions 121 . 31 

State treasurer, excess interest on 

grade crossing account 126.73 

State treasurer, street railway tax . . 132 , 29 

State treasurer, state highway work, 109.76 

^State treasurer, state highway work . 41.25 

County treasurer, dog license 301 . 65 

Concord, ]\Iaynard & Hudson Street 

Railway, excise tax 115.88 

Town of Concord, refund of tuition . 28.80 



61 



Middlesex Central court, fines 39 . 32 

Boston & Maine K. R., refund school 

transportation 1 . 74 

Old Colony Trust Co., loan ? 3,000.00 

First National Bank Ayer, loan 12,000.00 

First National Bank Ayer, fire de- 
partment loan 1,000 . 00 

Police department, refund 1 . 50 

Pool license, C. J. Holton 2.00 

William Kingsley, tree warden 19 . 34 

Rent of town hall 110.00 

Slaughter license, William McDonald, 1.00 

Slaughter license, A. F. Blanchard .. 1.00 

Memorial library, fines 27.00 

Board of health, William I\IcDonald . 259 . 50 

Board of health, Town of Rowley ... 32.50 

Road department, gasoline 9.00 

Road department, stone dust 4.00 

Road department, road dust 2.00 

Moth department, old spray pump ... 3 . 00 
Moth department, elm leaf beetle 

account 100.00 

Cemetery lots sold, H. F. Tuttle 90.00 

Interest account, International Trust 

Co 11.90 

Interest account. First National Bank 

Ayer 56.40 

Overseers of poor, outside poor account 98 . 89 

Cemetery fund, Leonard Bulette, lot, 100.00 

Ruth Robbins, lot 100.00 

Henry T. Billings, lot 100.00 

Frank B. Lothrop, lot 200.00 

Oliver Mead, lot 100.00 

Lewis Wood, Jr., lot 100.00 

Aaron Fletcher, lot 50.00 

Bessie E. Brown, lot 100.00 

George Conant, lot 100.00 

George Gardner, lot 100.00 



62 



Hiram J. Hapgood, lot 100.00 

Charles Robinson, lot 75.00 

Emma A. Johnson, lot 100.00 

Mrs. F. E. Flint, lot 100.00 

H. Lewis Bush, lot 100.00 

George H. Harris, lot 100.00 

Income from cemetery fund 436.75 

Income from library fund 241 . 60 



$30,598.91 



Town Farm Receipts: 

Milk $885.05 

Eggs 57.52 

Apples 328 . 10 

Pigs : 32.00 

Cow 45.00 

Telephone - 8.83 

Fowl 13.60 

Calves 24.50 

Vegetables 4.37 

School wood 22.50 



$1,421.47 



Received of William F. Stevens, Collector 

Taxes collected 1910 $0.00 

Interest 1.12 

Taxes collected 1911 504.56 

Interest 44 . 08 

Taxes collected 1912 3,592.04 

Interest 91 . 48 

Taxes collected 1913 32,302.34 

Interest 18 . 04 



$36,553.66 
$68,574.04 



63 



Paid approved orders $66,529.81 

Cash on hand March 1, 1914 2,044.23 



$68,574.04 



FRANK W. HOIT, 

Treasurer. 



Treasurer's Report of Wilde Memorial Library Funds 

To cash in Charlestown Five Cent 

Savings Bank $1,000. 00 

Cash in Warren Institution for Sav- 
ings 1,000.00 

Cash in Home Savings Bank 1,000.00 

Cash in North End Savings Bank 1,000.00 

Cash in ^Middlesex Institution for 

Savings 1,000.00 

Bond of West Shore railroad 1.000.00 

Received interest on money in bank . 201.60 

Received interest on bond 40.00 

Unexpended balance February 1, 1913, 1.35 

Appropriation for books 200.00 

$6,442.95 

By cash in banks $5,000.00 

West Shore Railroad bond 1,000.00 

Expended for books, etc 437.15 

Balance unexpended 5.80 



,442.95 



FRANK W. HOIT, 

Treasurer. 



64 

Treasurer's Report of Money Held for Care of Lots in 

Cemeteries 

To cash in North End Savings Bank, $2,175.00 

Warren Institution for Savings 1,000.00 

Charlestown Five Cent Savings Bank, .1,000.00 

Lowell Five Cent Savings Bank 1,000.00 

Lowell Mechanics Savings Bank .... 1,000.00 

Lowell Central Savings Bank 1,000.00 

Lowell City Institution for Savings . . 2,000.00 

Middlesex Institution for Savings .... 900.00 
Luke Blanchard fund, in North End 

Savings bank 500.00 

Tomb fund in Charlestown Five Cent 

Bank 100.00 

Memorial tablet fund in Charlestown 

Five Cent Savings Bank 50.00 

"Warren Institution for Savings 50.00 

Cash in town treasury 2,475 . 00 

Total funds $13,250.00 

Income 1913 436.75 

Unexpended balance February 1, 1913, 503.97 



$14,190.72 



By amount expended $301 . 13 

Principal cemetery fund 13,250.00 

Income unexpended 639.59 



$14,190.72 

FRANK W. HOIT, 

Treasurer. 



65 



ASSESSOR'S REPORT. 



Valuation, April 1, 1913. 

Buildings, exclusive of land $1,098,575.00 

Land, exclusive of buildings 526,385.00 

Personal estate 814,785.00 

Total valuation $2,439,745.00 

Valuation April 1, 1912 2,425,330.00 

Increase in valuation 14,415 . 00 



Rate of taxation $14.75. 



Real estate . . . . 


Tax Assessed 


as Follows: 


23,968.16 

12,018.07 

1 286 00 


Personal estate 
Polls 














Moth tax 


$37,272.23 
$320.44 


Franchise tax . 






115.88 



66 



Amount of Money Raised. 

For state tax $4,480.00 

For state higliAvay tax 301.50 

For county tax 2,260.09 

For town grant 29,954.00 

For overlay 276. 64 



$37,272.23 



WILLIAM F. STEVENS, 
JAMES B. TUTTLE, 
WILLIAM F. KELLEY, 

Assessors of Acton. 



67 



COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



For Fiscal Year Ending March 1, 1914. 



1911 Dr. 

Balance uncollected February 1, 1913, $504.56 
Interest collected 44.08 

$548.64 

Cr. . 

Paid treasurer 548. 64 

1912 Dr. 

Balance uncollected February 1, 1913, $4,148.88 
Interest collected 91 . 48 

$4,240.36 

Cr. 

Paid treasurer $3,633.52 

Abatements 50 . 00 



$3,683.52 
Uncollected March 1, 1914 $556. 84r 



68 

1913 Dr. 
Town, state and county taxes com- 
mitted to collector July 15, 1913, $37,272.23 
Moth tax 320.44 

$37,592.67 
Interest collected 18 . 04 

$37,610.71 

Cr. 

Paid treasurer $32,232.00 

Abatements 88.38 

$32,320.38 

Uncollected March 1, 1914 $5,290.33 

WM. F. STEVENS, Collector. 



69 



REPORT OF TREE WARDEN. 



To the Citizens of Acton: 

I submit my report as tree warden. 

The town raised for this department $400.00, expended 
as follows : 

Paid James O'Neil, labor, team, ex- 
penses $134 . 83 

State, arsenate of lead, expenses, 100.00 

Bert Perkins, team, expenses .... 30 . 00 

Patrick Pickett, labor, expenses, 70.88 

Martin Brown, labor, expenses. . . 38.00 

John Murphy, labor, expenses... 27.00 

Bert Reed, labor, expenses 13.75 



$414.46 

I would recommend the raising of $400.00 at least for 
this department, as there is some dead trees to be removed 
and also a lot of trimming to be done. 

JAMES O'NEIL, 
Tree Warden. 



70 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Town of Acton for the Year 1913. 



The board of health submits the following report for 
the year ending February 1st, 1914: 

Burial permits issued in Acton 32 

Burial permits issued in other places 

List of contagious diseases reported by board of health 
from February 1st, 1913, to February 1st, 1914: 

Diphtheria 1 

Glanders} 1 

Measles 11 

Scarlet fever 18 

Tuberculosis 2 

Whooping cough 2 

Deaths from contagious diseases 2 

Beef Inspected for the Town. 

Inspected Condemned 

Cattle 146 10 

Veal 717 33 

Hogs 60 2 

Lambs 6 



71 

Blackstone Beef Co., McDonald, License. 

Inspected Condemned 

Cattle 1939 80 

Veal 107 9 

Hogs 32 2 

Lambs 

Your board has established a new Public Dump in the 
south part of the town on the land of W. A. Flint in rear of 
his gravel pit on right side of the road leading from South 
Acton to Stow. 

Your board would very much appreciate the habit of 
dumping on low ground only at the West Acton Public 
Dump, as otherwise a needless expense is put upon the town 
in overhauling and clearing away so that even an entrance 
may be had. 

In view of the constantly increasing woik and expense 
of this department I would recommend that $1500.00 be 
appropriated for the use of the board for the present year. 

EDWARD C. PAGE, Secretary. 



72 



REPORT OF CATTLE INSPECTOR 



I have inspected in 1913 : 

Milch and dry cows 675 

Young cattle 177 

Bulls 25 

Swine 75 

Sheep 5 

Goats 1 

Cow stables 115 

I have quarantined eleven head of cattle for tuberculosis 
which were taken by this state and killed, also one horse 
killed and buried with the glanders. 

F. S. WHITCOMB, Inspector of Cattle. 



73 



RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE ROAD COMMISSIONERS 



We recommend that the town rebuild the bridge at the 
Powder Mills, as the present bridge is beyond permanent 
repair and is unsafe for travel. And also replank the 
bridge over the railroad at South Acton. 

We recommend the raising of $5,000.00 for the re- 
pair of roads. 

A. H. PERKINS, 
WILLIAM H. KINGSLEY, 
WILLIAM B. FRANKLIN, 

Road Commissioners. 



74 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

The report of the overseers of the poor is herewith sub- 
mitted : 

There has been a further increase in the expense of 
outside poor during the year, largely due to hospital cases^ 
and also the act giving aid to mothers with dependent 
children for which the town will be partly reimbursed 
later on. 

The expense at the farm has also increased, but included 
in this are some permanent repairs on the barn and a fur- 
ther improvement in the condition of the farm which must 
result favorably in the future. 

Largest number of inmates during year 3 

Number at present time (men) 2 

We recommend appropriations as follows : 

Outside poor $1,200.00 

Farm 800.00 

Aid Furnished Outside Poor. 

Expenses per report accountant $1,048.13 

Receipts 98.89 

$949.24 
Support of Poor on Farm. 

Expenditures per report of accountant, $2,070.86 



75 

Inventory of Stock at Farm February 1, 1914 

6 Cows $390.00 

4 Heifers 100.00 

2 Horses 300.00 

13 Tons hay 300.00 

Harnesses 50.00 

Wagons, carts and sleds 325.00 

Farming implements 200.00 

Pump I'O.OO 

Grain 16.00 

Barrels and boxes 4.00 

Coal 14.00 

Wood cut for stove 100.00 

Set measures 1 . 00 

Salt .75 

Horse blankets 15.00 

60 Hens 60.00 

Potatoes 23.00 

Apples 10.00 

Preserves, pickles, etc 20.00 

Household goods and kitchen 

utensils 275.00 

Wheel chair 20.00 

Groceries and supplies 23 . 00 

Robes 6.00 

3 Cords wood at farm 13.50 

Salt pork 3.00 

Corn on ear 8 . 00 

Lumber 70.00 

Stone lifter 20.00 

Pulley blocks and ropes 4.00 

Cross cut saw 4 . 00 

Ice, 200 cakes 20 . 00 

Seed corn 4 . 00 



$2,499.25 



76 



Expenditures $2,070. 86 

Inventory 1913 2,441.40 

$4,512.26 

Inventory 1914 $2,499.25 

Receipts 1,421.47 

Wood delivered 31.50 

$3,952.22 

$560.04 



WILLIAM F. KELLEY, 
EDWARD Z. STANLEY, 

Board of Overseers of the Poor. 



77 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



For the Year Ending, February 1, 1914. 

We present the following schedule showing the amounts 
of the several funds for the perpetual care of cemetery lots 
and the income and expenditures on account of each fund 
for the year. 

HERBERT T. CLARK, 
JULIAN TUTTLE, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 

Cemetery Commissioners. 



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84 
REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE GOODNOW FUND 



For the Year Ending, March 1, 1914. 

Investments. 
Warren Institution for Savings, Book 

83,531 $1,067.78 

Charlestown Five Cents Saving Bank, 

Book 71,200 1,000.00 

City Institution for Savings, Lowell, 

Book 84,244 1,000.00 

$3,067.78 

Receipts 
Warren Institution for Savings, divi- 
dends $42.08 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank, 

dividends 40.00 

City Institution for Savings, divi- 
dends, 40.00 

• $122.08 

Payments. 
Paid Julian Tuttle, care of Goodnow 

lot in Woodlawn Cemetery. . $7.00 
Unexpected income for care of 
cemetery lot, deposited with 
Warren Institution for Sav- 
ings 15.08 

Herbert F. Robbins, treasurer of 
the Evangelical church in 

Acton 100.00 

. $122.08 

LUTHER CONANT, 
I. WARREN FLAGG, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 
Trustees of the Goodnow Fund. 



85 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF ACTON MEMORIAL 
LIBRARY, 1913-1914 



Trustees 

LUTHER CONANT, President 
E. FAULKNER CONANT, Secretary 
HORACE F. TUTTLE 
MOSES TAYLOR DELETTE H. HALL 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD J. SIDNEY WHITE 

LUCIUS A. HESSELTON FRANK R. KNOWLTON 



The service of the Acton Memorial Library has gone 
on very smoothly the past year, and there is but little of 
interest to mention. 

Among the accessions of importance is The National 
Cyclopaedia of American Biography, thirteen volumes. 
The next volume due this year will contain a biographical 
sketch of Mr. William A. Wilde, also a lifelike portrait. 

About the same time the Genealogy of the Everett. 
Hosmer (of Acton) and Barney families was received from 
]\Ir. George ^Murray Barney of Springfield. ]Mass. This 
book, by reason of the richness of its illustrations, binding, 
and general makeup, is well Avorthy of an examination. 

Another book of interest is a volume sent by the state,, 
giving the names of all soldiers who enlisted in defence of 
the country in the war with England in 1812-1815. 

This is indexed very crudely, giving names only of men, 
not of localities, or organizations, and the list would benefit 



86 



most people but little, yet we think the matter of sufficient 
interest to copy the names of the Acton Company, whose 
term of service was in the last half of 1814, just one 
hundred years ago. 

Capt. S. Jones' Company, Lieut. Col. J. Valentine's Regiment. 

Prom Sept. 10 to Oct. 30, 1814. Raised at Acton 
and vicinity. 

Service in Boston, 



Rank and Name 
Silas Jones, Captain 
James Jones, Lieutenant 
Aaron Haywood, Ensign 
Jonathan Hosmer, Sergeant 
John Fletcher, Sergeant 
Samuel Conant, Sergeant 
John Hendly, Sergeant 

Luther HayAVOod, Corporal 

James Fletcher, Corporal 
Jonathan B. Davis, Corporal 

James Hayward, Corporal 

:Silas Piper, Musician 
Paul Conant, IMusician 

Abner Wheeler, Musician 
Privates 

Adams, Josiah H. 

Barber, James or Joseph, Jr. 

Billings, Ephraim, Jr. 

Bright, Josiah, Jr. 

Chaffen. John 

Chamberlain, Ezekiel 



Chamberlain, Joseph B. 
Conant, Joel 
Conant, James 
Conant, John 
Davis, Ebenezer 
Davis, Luther 
Fletcher, John S. 
Forbush, Abel 
Hap good, Nathaniel 
Harris. John, Jr. 
Hayward, ]\Ioses 
Hosmer, Silas 
Keves, James 
Reed. William 
Richardson. Allen 
Fobbins, George 
Robbins, George W. 
Robbins. Joseph 
Weatherbee, Oliver 
Wheeler, Jonathan 
Whitnev, Samuel 



The reader will observe that Captain Jones' Company 
was recruited from Acton and vicinity. The two oldest 
members of the Board of Trustees, on looking over the list, 
iind that thirty-eight of the forty-one men were from Acton. 

Those familiar wdth the genealogy of the old families 
in this town will recognize that the ancestors of some of the 
men took part in the War of the Revolution, and also that 
some of their descendants in the war for the Union — the 
making and saving of the Nation. 



87 



Some of these men in after years were not only "fathers 
of the town," but pillars of the church as well. 

The men of Acton, from the first organization of the 
town, have been distinguished for their valor, promptness, 
and patriotism, in time of danger, and we think it well to 
gather the fragments of unwritten history, that the record 
of these services may not be lost. 

I have hoped that some permanent memorial might 
be erected to the memory of Captain Gershom Davis, who 
raised a company in Acton and vicinity in 1745, to take part 
in the capture of the fortress of Louisburg. 

At the age of sixty years Captain Davis, in making his 
will says: "Being Providentially called to go into the 
Public Service of my Country" — ^He died in that service 
and his will was probated a few months later. 

I cannot close this somewhat desultory report without 
expressing an earnest wish that, under no possible conditions 
will any young men from Acton be called upon to go to 
IMexico, to risk their lives in a contest with a half civilized 
country, in obtaining territory and population that we do 
not need, and would only bring us heavy responsibilities. 

The trustees recommend the usual appropriations. 
Very respectfully, 

LUTHER CONANT, 

For the Trustees. 



ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

Estimates for the Year, 1914-1915 

Current expenses j|;450 . 00 

Books 200.00 

HORACE F. TFTTLE, 

For the Trustees.. 



S8 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



Accessions — Number of volumes in the library February 
1, 1913, 11,860; increase by purchase 275, of which 35 were 
obtained by bindiag magazines; increase by gift 30. Total 
increase 307. Number of volumes in the library February 
1, 1914, 12,167. 

Circulation — Number of days the library was opened 
103. Number of volumes circulated 7536. Daily average 
circulation 734. Largest daily circulation 123, on the loth 
of IMarch, 1913. Smallest daily circulation 27, on the 24th 
of December, 1913. 

Received for fines $26.52 

Expended for postage .52 



$26.00 

Ijrifts of books have been received from the following 
sources: U. S. Government 5, State of Massachusetts 14, 
Chamber of Commerce of San Diego, California 1, I. W. 
Adams 1, E. H. Barney 1, Carnegie Peace Society 2, Double- 
day, Page & Co. 1, F. L. Greene 1, A. L. Noyes 1, G. P. Put- 
nam's Sons 1, Francis H. Robertson 1, H. W. Southworth ^1, 
Slason Thompson 2. 

Periodicals subscribed for and in the reading room 22. 
Monthly — American Atlantic, Century, Cosmopolitan, Cur- 
rent Opinion, Everybody's, Harper's, Hearst's, Munsey's, 
McClure's, National, Popular Mechanics, Scribner's St. 
Nicholas, World's Work. 

Weekly — ^Harper's Weekly, Independent, Outlook, 
Rural New Yorker, Saturday Evening Post, Scientific 
American, Youths' Companion. 

ARTHUR F. DAVIS, 

Librarian. 



89 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE MEMORIAL LIBRARY IN 1913 



NON-FICTION 



973.2- A225r 

30-A358d 

64-A437p 

922-A629a 

924-J69ba 

922-B259b 

917.3-B471V 



Abbott, L.— Letters to Unknown Friends, 20-A1321e 

Abbot, W. J.— Panama and the Canal, 917.28-A129p 

Addison, A. C. — The Eomantie Story of the 

Puritan Fathers, 
Alden, P. — Democratic England, 
Allington, S. M. — Practical Sewing and Dress 

making. 
Antin, M. — The Promised Land, 
Bailey, J. — Doctor Johnson and His Circle, 
Barnebee, H. C. — My Wanderings, 
Bennett, A. — Your United States, 
Blakie, J. G.— The Personal Life of David 

Livingston, 924-B634p 

Booth, W. S. — Wonderful Escapes by Americans 910-B7255w 
Bradley, G. D.— Winning the Southwest, 921-B811w 

Brooks, J. G. — American Syndicalism, 33-B873a 

Brown. C. R.— The Quest of Life. 25-B877q 

Bullard, F. L. — Historic Summer Haunts from 

Newport to Portland, 917.3-B935h 

Burroughs, J.— The Summit of the Years, 81-B972su 

Burton, M. L. — Our Intellectual Attitude in an 

Age of Doubt, 17-B974o 

Carlton, W.— New Lives for Old, 63-C281n 

Chamberlain, F.— The Philippean Problem, 919.1-C443p 

Channing, E. — History of the United States, 

Vol. 3, 973-C458h 

Chase, J. S.— California Coast Trails, 917.3-C487c 

Collier, P. — Germany and the Germans, 914.3-C699g 



90 



Corneilson, I. A. — The Natural History of 

Religious Feeling, 20-C814n 

Cornford, L. C— William, Ernest Henley, 924-H514c 

Dewey, G. — Autobiography of Admiral George 

Dewey, 922-D519d 

Driver, S. R. — An Introduction to the Litera- 
ture of the Old Testament, 22-D782i 
DuPay, W. A.— Uncle Sam's Wonder Worker, 35-D945u 
Edwards, A.— The Barbary Coast, .916.1-E26b 
Eliot, C. W.— Some Roads Toward Peace, 17-E42s 
Enock, C. R. — The Republics of Central and 

South America, 918-E59r 

Eliott, H.— The Truth About the Railroads, 38-E46t 

Fairford, F.— Peeps at Cuba, 917.29-F166c 

Forbes, E. A.— Twice Around the World, 910-F692t 

Forbush, E. H. — A History of the Game Birds, 

Wild Fowl and Shore Birds of Massachusetts, 59-F696h 
Fosdick, H. E.— The Assurance of Immortality, 23-F748a 
Franck, H. A.— Zone Policeman 88, 917.28-F822z 

Freer, A. G.— Things Seen in Palestine, 915.6-PS56t 

Garvie, A. E. — The Christian Certainty Amid 

the Modern Perplexity, 20-G244c 

Geer, T. T.— Fifty Years in Oregon, 917.3-G298f 

Gordon, G. A. — Revelation and the Ideal, 23-G663r 

Gibbs, P. and Grant B.— The Balkan War, 949-G442b 

Goodwin, P. A. — Biography of Andrew Jackson, 922-J12g 
Gregory, J. W.— The Making of the Earth, 55-G822m 

Greno, F .L.— Obed Hussey, 922-II972g 

Gribble, F.— The Romance of the Men of Devon, 914.2-G846r 
Griffis, W. E.— Belgium the Land of Art, 914.9-G852b 

Hall, F. H.— Boys, Girls and Manners, 39-111 7nb 

Hedin, S.— From Pole to Pole, 910-II454f 

Howe, F. C— European Cities at Work, 32-H855e 

Hutchinson, W, — Common Diseases, 61-H978c 

Hyde. W. D.— The Quest of the Best, 37-H9^5q 

Jackson, F. G. — Theory and Practice of Design, 74-J12t 
Johnson, C, — Highways and Byways from the 

St. Lawrence to Virginia, 917.3-J66ho 



91 



Koester, F. — Electricity for the Farm and Home, 62-K78e 

LaFarge, J.— The Gospel Story in Art, 75-L159g 

Laut, A. C. — Through the Unknown South- 
west, 

Lee, G. S. — Crowds, 

Lodge, H. C. — Early Memories, 

London, J. — John Barlecorn, 

Lowell, A. L. — Public Opinion and Popular 
Government, 

Lucas, E. V. — A Wanderer in Florence, 

IMarks, J. — Vacation Camping for Girls, 

Martin, E. C. — Our Own Weather, 

Martin, E. S. — The Unrest of Women, 

McMasters, J. B.— History of the U. S., Vol. 8, 

Mills, E. A.— In Beaver World. 

Moore, W. L. and Carpenter, F. A.— The Cli- 
mate and Weather of San Diego, Cali., 

Moore, B. — The Origin and Nature of Life. 

Muir, J.— The Story of My Boyhood and Youth 

Newson, J. H. — Homes of Character, 

Norton, S. and Howe, M. A. D.— Letters 
Charles Eliot Norton, 

Osborne, A. B. — Finding the North While 
Europe, 

Palmer, G. H. — Self Cultivation in English, 

Perry, B. — The American Mind, 

Permell, J. — Pictures of the Panama Canal, 

Rappoport, A. S. — Home Life in Russia, 

Roberts, C. D.— Children of the Wild, 

Robertson, F. H. — ^Famous Italian Pictures and 
Their Story, 

Roosevelt, T. — Theodore Roosevelt and Auto- 
biography, 

Sanderson, E. D. — Insect Pests of the Farm and 

Orchard, 63-S216i 

Sears, A. W. — Two on a Tour in South America, 918-S439t 

Seton, E. T.— Wild Animals at Home, 59-S495wi 

Smart, G. T.— The Temper of the American People, 30-S626t 



of 



m 



917.3-L389t 

30-L478C 

922-L822I 

922-L847I 

32-L914p 
914.5-L933W 
79-]\r345v 
55-M3790 
17-:\I379u 
973-M16711 
59-M657i 

55-:\I825c 

50-M821O 

, 922-M961S 

• 72-N558h 

922-N882n 

914-081f 
40-P174S 
81-P462a 
75-P413J 
914.7-R221h 
59-R643C 

75-R649f 

922-R781ro 



92 



Southworth, H. W.— Divine Love Vindicated, 23-S728d 

Straus, 0. S.— The American Spirit, 30-S912a 

Steveni, W. B.— Things Seen in Russia, 914.7-S843t 

Thompson, S. — Railway Library, 3rd series, 38-S476ra 

Thompson, S. — Railway Library, 4th series, 38-S476rb 

Thurston, E. T.— The Open Window, 82-T545o 

Tower, C— Germany of Today, 914.3-T738g 
Underwood, J. J. — Alaska, an Empire of Today 

and Yesterday, 917.3-U56a 
Van Loon, H. W.— The Fall of the Dutch 

Republic, 949-V261f 
Verrill, A. H.— Harper's Wireless Book, 62-V555h 
Washburn, S. — Nogi, a Man Against the Back- 
ground of a Great War, 929-N774-.V 
Wedmore, Sir F. — Painters and Painting, 75-W393p 
Winter, N. 0. — The Russian Empire of Today 

and Yesterday, 9]5.7-W786r 

BOUND ^MAGAZINES 

• 
American, May-November, 1912. 
Atlantic, January-June, 1912. 
Atlantic, July-December, 1912. 
Atlantic, January-June, 1913. 
Century, May-October, 1912. 
Century, November, 1912-April, 1913. 
Cosmopolitan, June-November, 1912. 
Cosmopolitan, December, 1912-May, 1913. 
Current Literature, July-December, 1912. 
Everybody's, July-December, 1912. 
Everybody's, January- June, 1913. 
Harper's, June-November, 1912. 
Harper's, December, 1912-May, 1913. 
Hearst's, July-December, 1912. 
Hearst's, January- June, 1913. 
McClure's, May-October, 1912. 
McClure's, November, 1912-April, 1913. 
Munsey's, May-September, 1912. 



93 



Munsey's, October, 1912-March, 1913. 

National, April-September, 1912. 

National, October, 1912-March, 1913. 

New England, September, 1911-Feb^iiary, 1912. 

Popular Mechanics, July-December, 1912. 

Popular Mechanics, January-June, 1913. 

Review of Reviews, July-December, 1912. 

Review of Reviews, January-June, 1913. 

Scribner's, July-December, 1912. 

Scribner's, January- June, 1913. 

Scientific American, July-December, 1912. 

Scientific American, January-June, 1913. 

St. Nicholas, May-October, 1912. 

St. Nicholas, November, 1912-April, 1913. 

World's Work, May-October, 1912. 

World's Work, November, 1912-April, 1913. 

Youth's Companion, July, 1912-June, 1913. 

FICTION 

Abbott, E.— The White Linen Nurse, A131w 

Adams, I. W.— Kainolani, A213k 

Altsheler, J. A.— Apache Gold, A469a 

Barclay, F.— The Broken Halo, B244b 

Beach, R.— The Iron Trail, B365i 

Bell, J. J.— Courtin' Christina, B433c 

Bindloss, H. — Prescott of Saskatchewan, B612p 

Birminghan, G. A. — Adventures of Dr. Whitty, B619a 

Bosher, K. L.— The House of Happiness, B743h 

Buckrose, J. E. — Because of Jane, B925b 

Buckrose, J. E. — A Bachelor's Comedy, B925ba 

Burgess, G. — The Maxims of Methuselah, B955m 

Burnett, F. H.— T. Tembarom, B964tx 

Butler, E. P.— The Jackknife Man, B986j 

Cameron, M.— The Golden Rule Dollivers, C182g 

Comford, W. L. — Down Among Men, C732d 

Crockett, S. R.— Patsy, C938pa 

Churchill, W.— The Inside the Cup, C563i 

Davies, M. T.— Andrew the Glad, D255a 



94 



Deland, M.— Partners, D337pa 

Dixon, T.— The Southerner, D621s 

Edwards, A. — Comrade Yetta, E255c 

Farnol, J. — The Amateur Gentleman, F235a 

Fox, J.— The Heart of the Hills, F7925h 

Gale, Z.— Christmas, G152c 

Gilmore, I. H. — Phoebe Ernest and Cupid, G482p 

Glasgow, E. — Virginia, G548v 

Grand, S. — Adnam's Orchard, G751a 

Grey, Z.— Desert Gold, G842d 

Harker, L. A.— The Ffolliots of Redmarley, H282f 

Harrison, H. S.— V V's Eyes, H319v 

Herrick, R, — One Woman's Life, H566o 

Hutchinson, A. S. M.— The Happy Warrior, H975h 

Johnson, M. — ^Hagar, J73h 

King, B.— The Way Home, K521wa 

Lincoln, J. C— Mr. Pratt's Patients, L7372m 

Locke, W. J.— Stella Maris, L814st 
Locke, W. J. — The Joyous Adventures of Aristide 

Pujol, L814J 

London, J.— The Valley of the Moon, L847r 

London, J. — Smoke Bellew, L847sm 

Lutz, G. L. H.— Lo Michael, L9751 

McCutcheon, G. B.— A Fool and His Money, M133f 

l^Jitchell, S. W.— Westways, M682w 

Montgomery, L. M.— The Golden Road, M787g 

Nicholson, M. — Otherwise Phylis, N627o 

Xorris, K. — Poor Dear Margaret Kirby, N856p 

()'C.;rnor, Mrs. T. P.— Little Thank You, 0181 

Pago. T. N.— The Land of the Spirit, P1331 

Parker, G.— The Judgement House, P239j 

Phillpotts, E.— Widecombe Fair, P556wi 

Porter, E.— Miss Billy, P844mi 

Poi ter, G. S.— Laddie, a True Blue Story, P8451 

Rir^hards, L. E. — Miss Jimmy, R516mi 

Robins, E. — My Little Sister, R567m 

Rowland, G. C— The Apple of Discord, R883a 

Sinclair, M. — The Combined Maze, S616co 



95 



S741m 

■W258C 

W258mb 

"W453pf 

W453pe 

W453pg 

W453ph 

W453pi 

W553c 

W655s 



J-AlOOh 

J-B216a 

J-B639e 

J-B6394ph 



Spearman, F. H. — Merrilie Dawes, 

^wVard, Mrs. H. — The Coryston Family, 

Ward, Mrs. H.— The Mating of Lydia, 

Y:ells, C— Patty Fairfield, 

Avells, C— Patty at Home, 

Wells, C— Patty's Friends, 

Wells, C— Patty's Pleasure Trip, 

Wells, C. Patty's Social Season, 

Wharton, E. — The Custom of the Country, 

Wiggin, K. D.— The Story of Waitstill Baxter, 

JUVENILE FICTION 

Anon — The Boy Mechanic, 
Bangs, E. M. — At the House on the Ground, 
Blanchard, A. E. — Elizabeth, Betsy and Bess, 
Blanchard, G.— Philleda 's Glad Year, 
Brady, C. T.— Bob Dashaway in the Frozen Seas, J-B812be 

Brooks, A. — Dorothy Dainty's Vacation, J-B8725d 

Brown, E. A.— Uncle David's Boys, J-B8774ii 

Brown, R. H.— At the Little Brown House, J-B879a 

Burgess, T. W.— Boy Scouts on Swift River, J-B955b 

Caldwell's Boys and Girls at Home, J-C147b 

Deland, E. D.— Country Cousins, J-D3372c 
Dickson, A. D. and Skinner, A. M. — Children's 

Book of Christmas Stories, J-D552c 
Duncan, R. — Brave Deeds of Revolutionary Soldiers J-D911b 

Eaton, W. P. — Boy Scouts in the Dismal Swamp, J-E14bo 
Fitzhugh, P. K. — For Uncle Sam Boss, or Boy 

Scouts at Panama, J-F555f 

Foster, 0. H. — ^Housekeeping for Little Girls, J-F756h 

Gale, Z.— When I Was a Little Girl, J-G152w 

Harris, G. — Joe, the Book Farmer. J-H3135J 

Hough, E. — Young Alaskans in the Rockies, J-H838y 

Hoyt, E.— After School, J-H868a 

Lincoln, J. W. — The Young Homesteaders, J-L7375y 

Moffett, C— The Land of Mystery, J-M6951 

Paine, R. D.— The Steam Shovel Man, J-P146st 

Porter, E. H.— Pollyanna, J-P844p 



96 



Prouty, 0. E.— Bobbie, General Manager, J-P968b 

Remiek, G. M. — Jane Stuart, Twin, J-R387J 

Rhoades, N. — The Girl from Arizona, J-R474g 

Seton, E. T.— The Book of Woodcraft, J-S495bo 

Stevens, W. 0. — Messmates, J-S846m 

Taggart, M. A.— Her Daughter Jean, J-T125h 

Thompson, J. M. — Three Bears of Porcupine Ridge, J-T473t 
Turpin, E.— Happy Acres, J-T957h 

Wade, M. H.— Dolls of Many Lands, J-W121d 

Wheeler, R. T.— The Boy With the U. S. Indians, J-W562br 
Yates, S. — A United States Midshipman in the 

South Seas, J-S961u 

REFERENCE, NOT FOR GENERAL CIRCULATION 

Acts and Resolves of INIassachusetts, 1912. 

Acts and Resolves of Massachusetts, 1913. 

Census of the United States, 1910. 

Compendium of the War of the Rebellion. 

Everett Hosmer Barney and Son. 

International Sunday School Lessons, 1913. 

Journal of the House of Representatives, Massachusetts, 
1913. 

Journal of the Senate of Massachusetts, 1913. 

Manual of the General Court of Massachusetts. 1913. 

Proceedings of the U. S. National Museum, 1912 and 
1913. 

Reports of the Smithsonian Institution, 1912 and 1913. 

Record of the Massachusetts Militia of the War of 
1812-1814. 

Report Commission of Education of the U. S. 

The National Cyclopedia of American Biography. 

Vital Records of Carver, Duxbury, Framingham, Hop- 
kinton, Hull, Newburyport, Sherborn, Stow and 
Worthington, Massachusetts. 

Yearbook Carnegie Foundation for International 
Peace, 1912. 

Twenty-sixth Report of the Board of Education, 
Massachusetts. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee and Superintendent 
of Sckools 



OP THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 
MASSACHUSETTS 

For tke Tkirteen Montlis Ending February 28 



1914 




THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 
1914 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE'S REPORT 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

COMMON SCHOOLS 

1914 
March 20. Winter term closes 

Vacation, One Week 

March 30. Spring term opens 

June 19. Spring term closes 12 weeks 

Summer Vacation, School Year 1914-1915 

Sept. 8. Fall term opens 

Nov. 25. Fall term closes 12 weeks 

Thanksgiving Kecess 

Nov. 30. Winter term opens 

Vacation from December 18 to January 4, Two Weeks 

1915 

March 12. Winter term closes 13 weeks 

Vacation, One Week 

March 22. Spring term opens 

June 18. Spring term closes 13 weeks 

Total 38 weeks 



4 

SPECIAL EXERCISE DAYS AND HOLIDAYS 

1914 

Feb. 20. Washington exercises, one hour. 

April 17. Patriots' Day exercises, one hour. 

April 24. Arbor Day exercises, one hour. 

May 29. Memorial Day exercises, one hour. 

Oct. 9. Columbus Day exercises, one hour. 

Nov. 25. Thanksgiving Day exercises, one hour. 

1915 

Feb. 12. Lincoln exercises, one hour. 

Feb. 19. Washington exercises, one hour. 

April 16. Patriots' Day exercises, one hour. 

May 28. Memorial Day exercises, one hour. 



LEGAL HOLIDAYS 



The words ''legal holiday" shall include the twenty- 
second day of February, the nineteenth day of April, the 
thirtieth day of May, the fourth day of July, the first 
Monday of September, the twelfth day of October, Thanks- 
giving day and Christmas day, or the day following when 
any of the four days first mentioned, the twelfth day of 
October, or Christmas day occurs on Sunday. 

Arbor Day occurs on the last Saturday in April, and 
is not a legal holiday. 

Flag Day occurs on June 14, and is not a legal holiday. 
It should be observed by any school then in session. 



SCHOOL OFFICERS AND TEACHERS 



School Committee 



Edwin A. Phalen, Chairman Term expires 1914 

Samuel A, Christie Term expires 1915 

Bertram E. Hall, Secretary Term expires 1916 

Superintendent 

Prank H. Hill, Residence, Littleton, Mass. 
Telephone No. 36-3 Littleton 

Attendance Officers 

Robert Randall, Address, South Acton 
Thomas Scanlon, Address, West Acton 
Asaph Parlin, Address, Acton Center. 

Janitors 

Fred S. Glines, Address, South Acton 
Thomas Scanlon, Address, West Acton 
Asaph Parlin, Address, Acton Center. 



Teachers in Service February 1, 1914 



Name 

Martha Smith 
Ella Miller 
Minnie Gamble 
Elizabeth Hinckley 
Julia McCarthy 
Jennie Stowell 
Bertha B. McLean 
Harriet H. Gardner 
Agnes C. Greenhalge 
Eula S. Taylor 
Alice M. Genthner 
Marion C. Taylor 



Position 

Center Primary 
Center Intermediate 
Center Grammar 
South Lower Primary 
South Upper Primary 
South Intermediate 
South Grammar 
West Primary 
West Intermediate 
West Grammar 
Supervisor of Music 
Supervisor of Drawing 



Appointed Educated 



1902 
1899 
1905 
1909 
1906 
1907 
1910 
1889 
1912 
1909 
1910 
1912 



Lowell Normal 
Framingham Normal 
Woburn Training 
Hyannis Normal 
Fitchburg Normal 
Fitchburg Normal 
Eastern College, Va. 
Ayer, Mass. 
Fitchburg Normal 
Mt. Holyoke College 
N. E. Con. of Music 
Mass. Normal Art 



Home Address 

Acton, Mass. 
North Acton, Mass. 
Woburn, Mass. 
Hyannis, Mass. 
South Acton, Mass. 
South Acton, Mass. 
Graniteville, Vt. 
West Acton, Mass. 
Maynard, Mass. 
South Acton, Mass. 
Foxcroft, Me. 
Acton, Mass. 



STANDING RULES 



*Rule 1. Children under five years shall not be 
admitted to the public schools. 

Rule 2. Pupils shall be promoted from grade to grade 
and school to school, according to merit. Thorough and 
satisfactory work will be required of pupils in a lower grade 
or school before entering a higher grade or school. 

Rule 3. Children who have not previously attended 
any school shall be admitted to the public schools only 
at the beginning of the fall term. 

Rule 4. Pupils shall be held responsible for books 
loaned to them until returned to the teacher. 

Rule 5. No repairs shall be made upon the public 
property in the care of the school committee, except by 
their authorized agents. 

Rule 6. There shall be no signal for ''no school" on 
stormy or other inclement days, but parents shall determine 
in their individual cases whether it is expedient to send 
their children to. school or not. 

*When the birthday of a child falls on or before the 
15th day of the month it is reckoned as falling upon the 
first day of that month. 



GENERAL REPORT 



'On April 5th, 1913, the committee met and organized. 
TIr. E. A. Phalen was chosen chairman, and B. E. Hall, 
secretary. 

The committee voted to hold monthly meetings and this 
plan was carried out through the year. Superintendent of 
Schools Frank H. Hill has been present at all of our meet- 
ings and has given us valuable assistance. 

During the summer vacation, water systems were 
installed in the West and Center schools. It was the opinion 
of the committeeman from South Acton that this expense 
"w^as not necessary for the South school this year. 

Pursuant to a vote at the last town meeting, the com- 
mittee has taken up with the Avon Home the matter of 
reimbursement for out-of-town scholars attending our 
schools. A bill has been rendered and a satisfactory 
settlement is expected. 

At the meeting on June 6th, 1913, Superintendent Hill 
reported that of the twenty-six pupils who would enter 
high school in the fall, only six had chosen the college pre- 
paratory or scientific courses. The committee deemed it 
inadvisable to continue the expense of a local high school 
for six pupils and it was therefore voted to send all high 
school scholars to Concord. 

Since our last report, the town of Concord has increased 
the price of tuition from $55.00 to $70.00 per pupil : this, 



8 



together with the increase in the number of pupils and the 
cost of transportation, has raised the total cost of high 
school instruction to the very large amount of approximately 
$7,000.00 for the year. 

Superintendent Hill in his report, has entered into the 
high school situation at some length. The committee unani- 
mously endorse his views of the matter and feel that some 
definite action should be taken towards the establishment of 
a high school in Acton. 

Following is a detailed report of the receipts and 
disbursements from February 1st, 1913, to March 1st, 1914 
(13 months), and an estimate of the expenses for the 
ensuing year. 



ESTIMATES FOR THE SUPPORT OP SCHOOLS FOR 
THE FISCAL YEAR 1914-1915 



For general expenses: 

Salaries and other expenses of 

the committee $125 . 00 

Salaries and other expenses of 
the superintendent and truant 

officers 250.00 

For expenses of instruction: 

Tuition of pupils attending Con- 
cord 6,000.00 

Salaries* of elementary school 

teachers 5,500.00 

For textbooks: 

For elementary schools it is antici- 
pated that the amount to be 
received from dog tax will 
cover this. 
For stationery and supplies: 

Common schools 350.00 

For expenses of operating school plants: 
Wages of janitors, fuel and mis- 
cellaneous expenses 1,950.00 

Maintenance and repairs 250.00 

For auxiliary agencies : 

Health 50.00 

For transportation : 

High school scholars 2,000.00 

Elementary scholars 1,775.00 

Total $18,250.00 



10 



RECEIPTS ON ACCOUNT OF SCHOOLS FOR FISCAL 
YEAR 1913-1914 



Appropriations 



For general expenses: 

Salaries and other expenses of 

the committee $125.00 

Salaries and other expenses of 
the superintendent and truant 

officers 250.00 

For expenses of instruction : 

Salaries of high school teachers 
including tuition of pupils at- 
tending Concord : 6,000 . 00 

Salaries of elementary school 

teachers 5,000.00 

For textbooks : 

High school — (It is anticipated 
that the amount to be re- 
ceived from dog tax will 

cover this item) nothing 

Elementary schools — (It is anti- 
cipated that the amount to be 
received from dog tax will 

cover this item) nothing 

For stationery and supplies: 

High school 25.00 

Elementary schools 850.00 



11 



Por expenses of operating school plants : 

Wages of janitors, fuel, miscella- 
neous expenses 1,925.00 

Maintenance and repairs upon 

school buildings and grounds, 250.00 
Por auxiliary agencies : 

Health 50.00 

For transportation of scholars : 

High school 1,750.00 

Elementary 1,775 . 00 

Special appropriation for water $250 . 00 : 

Amount used 247 . 70 

Outside sources : 

Tuition 109 . 70 

From state for supervision 343 . 75 

Income Mass. school fund 1,238.35 

Income Mass. school fund, balance 

1913 1,014.96 

Dog tax 301.65 

Town of Concord, return tuition, 28.80 

B. & M. R. R. Co., rebate on 

scholar's ticket 1,74 

Total receipts $20,786.65 



12 



DISBURSEMENTS 

General Expenses 

School Committee 

Salaries : 

Paid A. B. Parker, balance due $12.50 

B. E. Hall, secretary 50.00 



$62.50 
Miscellaneous : 
Paid Wright & Potter Printing Co., 

stationery 1 . 25 

A. B. Parker, telephone .65 



$1.90 



Superintendent of Schools and Enforcement of Law 

Salaries : 

Paid Frank H. Hill, superintendent. . $595.79 

Robert L. Randall, truant officer, 18.00 

Asaph Parlin, truant officer 6.50 

Marion C. Taylor, taking census, 15.00 



$635.29 



Miscellaneous: 
Paid Frank H. Hill, telephone, postage 

and stationery $15.55 

J. L. Hammett Co., stationery... 3.24 



$18.79 



13 

Expense of Instruction 

Salaries — ^High School: 

Paid Town of Concord, tuition of high 

school scholars $4,905.50 

City of Lowell tuition of indus- 
trial school 200.00 

Alice N. Maclntyre 285.00 

Marion C. Taylor 9.08 

Alice M. Genthner 8.52 



Elementary Schools : 

Paid Harriet H. Gardner $634.50 

E. Sophia Taylor 567.00 

Agnes C. Greenhalgh 528.00 

Bertha B. McLean 588.00 

Jennie E. Stowell 567.00 

Julia L. McCarthy 567.00 

Elizabeth A. Hinckley 567.00 

Martha P. Smith 567.00 

Ella L. Miller 561.60 

Minnie Gamble 561 . 60 

Alice M. Genthner 212.58 

Marion C. Tavlor 210.92 



Text Books 



High School: 



Paid Boston School Supply Co $15.63 

Edward E. Babb & Co 7.50 



$5,408.10 



$6,132.20 



$23.1? 



14 



Elementary Schools: 

Paid Edward E. Babb & Co $122.60 

J. L. Hammett Co 62.48 

Boston School Supply Co 36.77 

American Book Co 10.00 

Ginn & Co 24.28 

Silver, Biirdett & Co 8 . 13 

The A. M. Palmer Co 37.60 

Johnson, Bladgen & McTurnan, 

Inc 1.95 

Fred S. Glines .70 

Stationery and Supplies 
High School: 

Paid Boston School Supply Co .14 

J. L. Hammett Co 4.34 

C. C. Birchard & Co 4.42 

Fred S. Glines .25 

Elementary Schools: 

Paid Edward E. Babb & Co $59 . 59 

J. L. Hammett Co 264.97 

C. L. Chase & Son 12.00 

Silver, Burdett & Co .88 

American Book Co .77 

C. C. Birchard & Co .17 

Ginn & Co 5.33 

Oliver Ditson Co 3.54 

Boston School Supply Co 17.92 

Henry C. Doughty 39 . 50 

Curtis Standard Tests 4.73 

A. N. Palmer Co 8.00 

Fred S. Glines 9.90 

Thomas Scanlon 1 . 90 

Bertha B. McLean .76 

Martha F. Smith '.30 



$304.51 



$9.15 



$430.26 



15 

Expenses of Operating School Plants 

Wages of Janitors 

High School: 
Paid Thomas Scanlon $16.00 $16.00 

Elementary Schools : 

Paid Fred S. Glines $430.00 

Thomas Scanlon 248.00 

Asaph Parlin 301.00 



Fuel — Elementary : 

Paid Geo. H. Reed ."^ $578.31 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co ... . 45.52 

Thomas E. Downie 17.25 

Town of Acton, overseer of poor, 22.50 

Wm. H. Kingsley 9.00 

L. W. Richardson 6.00 

A. H. Perkins 5.00 



Miscellaneous — ^High : 
Paid West and So. Acton Water Sup- 
ply District $1.50 

Thomas Scanlon 3.25 

Fred S. Glines .64 

0. E. Houghton .62 

Geo. B. Robbins Dis. Co .18 



Elementary : 
Paid West and So. Acton Water Sup- 
ply District $33 . 50 

American Woolen Co 13.65 

Tuttle & Newton 12.37 

M. E. Taylor & Co 17.88 



$979.00 



$683.58 



$6.19 



16 



G. E. Greenough 6.00 

0. E. Houghton 6.18 

Geo. B. Bobbins Dis. Co 1.82 

Thomas Scanlon 39 . 35 

Asaph Parlin 44. 33 

Fred S. Glines 78.45 



Maintenance 

Repairs 
High: 

Paid Thomas Scanlon $ . 75 

Elementary : 

Paid Thomas Scanlon $12.75 

Asaph Parlin 1 . 00 

E. T. Rice 20.50 

S. A. Coal & Lumber Co 3.51 

Penn. Metal Co 75.00 

Hall Bros. Co 4.31 

E. A. Phalen 27.75 

Davis King Co 4.00 

Andrew Dutton Co 7.00 

John S. Hoar 1.00 

E. Z. Stanley 12.85 

Chas. H. Persons 4.00 

West and So. Acton Water Sup- 
ply District 28 . 18 



Auxiliary Agencies 

Health 
Paid Geo. B. Robbins Disinfecting Co. $62.00 
Thomas Scanlon 2 . 25 



$253.53 



$.75 



$201.85 



$64.25 



17 

Transportation 
High School: 

Paid Boston & Maine R. R. Co $1,437.40 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Co 358.70 

T. E. Hardy 6.30 

Hazel White 12.30 

Frank A. Merriam 14 . 90 

M. J. Foley 13.88 

Walter E. Hay^vard 6 . 85 

Herbert W. Merriam 7.00 

Helen Hardy 7.50 

Willis H. Daisey 9.00 

Geo. Hodgen 7.00 

E. H. Carey 11.00 

Marion H. Gibbs 13 . 00 

Michael Ennergess 9.00 

Arthur S. Lowden 9.00 

Hazel Hoit 14.63 

Dora Fletcher 13.50 

Patrick Foley 9.00 

H. F. Robbins 127.00 



Lowell Industrial: 

Paid Boston & Maine R. R. Co $4.00 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Co 76.75 

Kate W. Sawver 9.46 



Elementary : 

Paid Jens Mekkelsen $560.00 

W. M. French 300.00 

Chas. Edwards 554.00 

A. Christoffenson 288.00 



$2,086.96 



$90.21 



$1,702.00 



18 



Outlays 
New Equipment: 

Paid S. A. Coal & Lumber Co $9.88 

E. Z. Stanley 124.17 

Patrick O'Neil 4.50 

A. H. Perkins 19.35 

E. T. Rice 89 . 80 



Total receipts 

Total disbursements . . . 

Balance unexpended 



$247.70 

$19,357.85 

$20,786.65 
19,357.85 

$1,428.80 



Respectfully submitted. 



EDWIN A. PHALEN, 
SAMUEL A. CHRISTIE, 
BERTRAM E. HALL, 

Committee. 



Acton, March 10, 1914. 



19 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



Members of the Committee : 

Following is my fourth report, it being the twenty- 
second in the series of such annual reports. 

]\ry purpose is to make this report of informational 
value, through statistics and an enumeration of the differ- 
ent lines of activit}^ that have made the present year an 
exceedingly busy one for superintendent, teachers and 
pupils. 

Al^ilS OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 

1. To place in the hands of each teacher in the grades 
at more or less regular intervals definite instructions as 
to the work to be done and the manner of doing it. Also, 
to check up this work according as having been done well, 
poorly, or not at all. He has sent out four such outlines 
to each grade below the seventh, and two to the seventh 
and eighth ^grades, since September. He has carefully 
checked the work twice. The result has been to put him in 
possession of definite information as to the progress of the 
work and to stimulate the teacher to more painstaking ef- 
forts along the lines he believes to be essential. 

2. To bring about a balanced programme wherein the 
moral, patriotic, physical, social, mental (intellectual and 
aesthetic) qualities of the children shall be developed in 
proper proportions and in harmony with modern ideals. To 
this end memory gems, patriotic exercises, physical exer- 
cises, inspection for cleanliness, instruction in hygiene, pic- 
ture study, directed outside reading, local history, study 
of the weather map, fire drills, etc., have been made an es- 
sential part of all the outlines. 

3. To emphasize the essentials. Daily drills are re- 



20 



quired in the four fundamental processes in arithmetic, and, 
to secure uniform thoroughness, Thompson's Minimum 
Essentials have been provided for all the schools. Through 
the same medium drills in language fix the proper use of 
words and expressions so often mutilated by the children, 
in and out of school. Palmer Method drills in writing are 
required daily, and this system will soon begin to demon- 
strate its value, as it has already done in the towns under my 
supervision where it has been used longer. It was put into 
the schools here at the opening of the fall term of this school 
year. 

4. To visit no school without a definite purpose, re- 
garding inspection as incidental, relating to the work of the 
school or to some problem affecting its welfare. These 
purposes are too numerous to classify. Only occasionally, 
I am happy to state, have they been required to settle dif- 
ferences between teachers and parents. 

5. To know as much as possible about those depart- 
ments of the schools not directly under his care. I give here 
a few important facts collected from ten barge drivers in 
this superintendency district. The average cost of trans- 
portation per pupil is 75 cents. The highest cost in any 
barge is $1.00. The lowest cost is 45 cents. One barge 
driver reports that his barge has been delayed by pupils 
detained after school, or children on his route have been 
compelled to walk home by reason of such detention, 25 
times. The aggregate of all other cases reported is seven. 
The average distance from the school to the point where 
barges are not required to take on pupils is one and one- 
half miles. Two take on children one-half mile from the 
school-house, and two report this distance as more than 
two miles. The average time of the barges on the road after 
beginning to take on pupils is 53.5 minutes. The shortest 
time is 35 minutes, the longest. 90 minutes. 

6. To keep such records as may be necessary to en- 
able him to do the work without waste of time and energy. 
In accomplishment, this is the least satisfactory of his en- 
deavors this vear. There should be available in his office a 



21 



complete record of every pupil from the time he enters 
school until he arrives at the age of 21 years, showing the 
kind of work he does after leaving school, and the compen- 
sation, when possible. Out of such a record as this might 
well grow a complete reorganization of the school system 
adapted to the needs of the community. Any reorganiza- 
tion not based on such information is likely to be theoreti- 
cal and useless. 

7. To keep his correspondence up to date. He has re- 
ceived 91 communications from the State Boaid of Educa- 
tion, 54 from the Department of the Interior and public in- 
stitutions of Massachusetts, besides uncounted letters from 
teachers and other sources. Many of these communications 
have asked for information that has taken hours to collect, 
classify and forward. He has written 1023 letters in the 
performance of this work alone. 

8. To know with some degree of accuracy what is 
being done in other school systems, through conventions, 
visitations, .town reports, professional reading, etc. He has 
attended six conventions or conferences, and visited three 
school systems since September. 

9. To visit the schools often enough to keep in sympa- 
thetic touch with the progress of the work. In the school 
year ending February 1, he has visited the 40 rooms in this 
district an aggregate of 978 times, and the 11 rooms in 
Acton an aggregate of 279 times. The schools visited 
oftenest throughout the district receive the shortest time 
per visit. In most schools a half-hour would be a fair aver- 
age. In many, requiring special help, he has stayed as long 
as two hours. 

A COURSE OF STUDY 

The direct result of the aim first enumerated will be a 
course of study which I hope to have ready for the approval 
of the committees in April. There \^nll then be no further 
necessity to pursue this line of work, except so much of it 
as relates to checking results. In checking, my method has 



22 

been, not to ask the teacher what has been done, but to let 
individual pupils demonstrate it. We have worked for the 
essentials, and to give power in expressing and doing. We 
have accomplished much, and failed in part. Failures are 
as convincing as successes and I am sure the course of study 
will get benefit from both. 

VISITS BY PARENTS. 

It would be an inspiration to our schools if more parents 
visited them. I wish they would do so, and ask to see the 
work in oral arithmetic, oral language, reading, writing and 
spelling. Children like to show what they can do. They 
like an audience, though that audience be only one person. 
A visitor quickens a teachers' perception of her own faults. 
He will not see perfection, or near-perfection, but he will 
see earnest striving and some attainment. 

THE TEACHERS 

We are fortunate to retain our teachers for so long a 
time that their service reaches its highest value to the 
schools. They do not have to learn what we are trying to 
do, but the best way to do it. I commend our teachers for 
faithful, loyal and efficient work. 

SCHOOL SAVINGS 

Elsewhere in this report is an account of the school 
savings system recently instituted in South and West 
Acton. As soon as a practicable way of getting the funds 
from the school to the bank has been devised, it is expected 
that the school savings plan will be started in Acton Center. 
It is not the amount of collections that we are striving for, 
but rather to extend the habit of saving to as large a per- 
centage of the pupils as possible. 

THE HIGH SCHOOL PROBLEM 

In round numbers the cost of providing the high school 



23 



pupils of Acton a single year's education in Concord is 
$7000, The two items of expense are tuition at $70 per 
pupil and transportation. Two first-class assistants or a 
very good principal could be secured for the cost of trans- 
portation alone. In the following tables I shall show some 
facts concerning towns that are in the same class with Acton 
that ought to be considered in determining the policy of 
this town in the final disposition of this problem. 

I. 

No. Cost, Per 

Town Population Valuation Pupils Support Pupil 

Doudas 2,152 $1,378,758 30 $1,881 $63.00 

Holden 2,147 1,781,958 61 3,587 59.00 

Shirley 2.139 1,254.941 37 2.224 60.00 

ACTOX 2,136 2,425.330 85 7.000 83.00 

Williamsburg . . 2.132 1.080.869 61 2,176 36.00 

Harwich 2,115 1,487.644 58 4,184 72.00 

II. 

No. Cost. Per 

ToAvn Valuation Pupils Support Pupil 

Deerfield .... $2,349,851 103 $2,000 $19.00 

Shrewsburv . 2,401,257 52 3.607 69.00 

:Marshfield . . . 2,661,386 49 2,872 58.00 

ACTOX 2,425,330 85 7,000 83.00 

III. 

State Acton 

X^umber Pupils in High School .... 71,583 85 

Cost-Support in High School $4,292,395.00 $7,000.00 

Cost-Per Pupil in High School .... 59.00 83.00 

The first table groups six towns of practically the same 
population. The second groups four towns of practically 
the same valuation. The third table compares Acton with 
the state as a whole. In each table it appears that the per 
capita cost is considerably larger than that required in 
other towns for the support of high school advantages. 

Acton has about 300 pupils in the elementary schools, 
or nearly four times as many as in the high school. The 
total cost of the support of these elementary schools is about 
$12,000. or less than twice the cost of supporting one-fourth 
the number of pupils in the high school. The average cc^st 



24 

per pupil in the elementary schools of Acton is $40.00. The- 
average in the state is $38.91. The avera^ cost in the^ 
towns of Group I. is $30.48. In the towns of Group II., 
it is $33.16. It will thus be seen that Acton is extremely 
liberal in its support of the elementary schools. Is there 
not some reason for the feeling in some quarters that in the 
rsupport of the high school membership Acton is not only 
-liberal, but rather, extravagant? 

The courses decided upon by the pupils about to enter 
the high school last fall seem to justify the committee in 
closing the high school in West Acton. A glance at the 
table of pupils in Concord high school — those to graduate 
in 1917 — will show this conclusively. 

I do not yield to any one in my loyalty to the high 
school as an institution. It is the crowning effort of a town^s 
people to endow their children with all the advantages that 
shall make for a larger, broader, happier life, and equip 
them with the qualities and the resources that will enable 
them to meet successfully the severe competition that they 
are sure to encounter when they go out to win their way in 
the world of men and machines. But I urge upon you and 
the people of Acton the value of a high school within the 
town, and my firm belief that a first-class institution of this' 
kind could be maintained within Acton at a cost much less 
than you are now meeting without the town. I hope the 
matter will not be lost sight of in the coming town meeting. 
and that a thorough and impartial investigation of the cost 
of building and maintaining such a school as will meet all 
necessary modern requirements will be authorized without 
delay. 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion I wish to extend my thanks to the teach- 
ers who have been so loyal and efficient, and to the com- 
mittee who have been so ready to assist in all propositions 
looking to the good of the schools. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK H. HILL, 

Acton, March 7, 1914. Superintendent of Schools. 



25 



REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC. 



To the Superintendent of Schools, Acton, Mass. : 

I herewith submit my fourth annual report on music in 
the public schools of Acton, Mass. 

In the primary grades, the outline of work is practically 
the same as last year varied by new songs. 

Our first aim in Grade 1 is to develop in the child the 
ability to hear and imitate tones correctly, teaching phrase 
by phrase, the rote songs that are within their understand- 
ing. 

When they are able to follow correctly, we begin with 
tones of the scale, placing a picture of the same in notes on 
the staff. Next comes the development of time, taught by 
first-time motion or "one tone to a beat, slow and steady,'^ 
and represented by the quarter-note, then the quarter-rest 
and two-beat note. 

By mid-year the first grades are able to sing diatonic 
exercises from the board. For work in Grades 1 and 2 a 
carefully selected list of exercises containing certain inter- 
vals in different keys (from Introductory Sight Singing 
Melodies) is placed in the hands of the teacher. 

At the beginning of the third year, First Readers are 
given the children; a few songs and many exercises in the 
first nine keys are studied from Part 1 and later on, from 
Part 2 are introduced, second-time motion and the two in- 
termediates, sharp four and flat seven. 

The Intermediate Grades are required to cover more 
ground than any others. We study during the 4th, 5th and 
6th years: third and fourth time motions or types in dif- 
ferent combinations, all the intermediate tones or names of 



26 



sharps and flats, beside a continual review of keys and the 
introduction of two-part music from Second Reader. 

Thus far this year we have been able to accomplish 
more, where the grouping of grades was the same, than 
last year at this time. 

The grammar grades are taking three-part work from 
Fourth Readers, spending the latter half of the year in the 
study of formations of relative minor keys, learning to 
distinguish major from minor, when sung or played. 

These grades are also required to study bass clef so 
that the boys may be able to sing more readily on entering 
a high school chorus. 

Since the Acton high school has been discontinued, I 
have divided some of the octavo music used by the chorus 
last year among the seventh and eighth grades of the three 
schools and these selections add to the interest of the 
classes. 

Beside this general outline, Weaver slips are used 
occasionally for individual work and written work is re- 
quired from the third grade up. 

We try to have the children make practical application 
of their mathemathics to the arithmetic of music, also to 
apply their knowledge of language to clearer enunciation, 
phrasing and general expression. 

I wish to thank the corps of teachers who so faithfully 
co-operate with me in my work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALICE M. GENTHNER, 

Supervisor of Music. 
West Acton, Mass, Feb. 7, 1914. 



27 



REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF DRAWING. 



]\rr. Frank H. Hill. Superintendent of Schools. 

Dear Sir: I herewith submit my second report of the 
supervisor of drawing for the Town of Acton. 

In the primary grades the work has been very much 
like that of last year. Simple forms, such as lines, ellipses, 
ovals, circles, scjuares and oblongs have been drawn to gain 
control of the hand. These forms have been used in bor- 
ders, cover decorations and on ornaments cut from paper. 

Paper folding and cutting has been done with great 
success. Stories have been illustrated by cut-out forms and 
later booklets will be made including picture stories cut 
from paper and colored. The children use the colored 
crayons in a very good manner, so their work is improved 
in most cases by a touch of color. 

Paper cutting teaches the child to be careful, accurate 
and he learns to observe forms about him, A little paper 
construction work has been tried and in most cases came 
out successful. 

The Avork in the intermediate grades, has been very 
good in most cases; a vast improvement has been made at 
South Acton. 

The work this year includes nature work with pencil 
and crayons, object drawing, from vases, solids, fruit forms 
and baskets, compass practice for accuracy, working draw- 
ings of solids, construction work, and development of solids, 
designing, including color, center work and printing. The 
aim in this work is to train the child to be accurate, neat, 
observe nature and all which is beautiful about him. 

The work in the grammar grades has been successful 



28 



South Acton — Susan Fletcher, Anthony Foley, Ernest 
Greenough, John Fletcher, Mary Hearon, Nicholas Samsel, 
Kimball Sanborn. 

West Acton — Katherine M. Kinsley, Ruth Hall, Marion 
Davis, Perry Willis. 

High School — Fannie Davis, Dora Fletcher, Hazel Hoit, 
Theron Lowden, Raymond Merrill, Lyman Wetherbee. 

One Term 

Acton Center — Anfue Anderson, Blanche Cote, James 
Downey, Evelyn Farrar, Edwin Fobes, Francis Manion, 
Spencer Murphy, Edward Peterson, Carolyn Shaw, Anna 
Strobeck, William Tuttle, Gilbert Buchanan, S. Rebecca 
Fredrickson, Leon Marsh, Leonard 'Toole, Ivar Peterson, 
Roger Shaw, Ralph Smith, John Strobeck, Edith Tuttle, 
Jennie Tuttle, Abbie Coughlin, Earle Farrar, Leonard 
Worden, Edith Laurey, Marion Leary, Edgar F. Wells. 

South Acton — Grace Iveson, Annie Foley, Harry Clark, 
Arthur Desorcy, Helen Dickinson, Laura Donelly, Ray 
Thomas, Marjorie Dickinson, Laurence Shea, Osgood Tuttle, 
Margaret Whitney, Henry Evans, George Ziegler, Dorothy 
Lowden, Gladys Dickinson, Samuel Iveson, Ralph Samuel, 
Alice Kelley, Betty Sanborn. 

West Acton — Beulah French, Margaret Broughall, 
Margaret Webster, Ruth Davis, James Benere. Orland 
Spinney, Evelyn Brown, Willis Hopps, Gerald Rubin, 
Wallace Carey, Richard Davis, Margaret Hall, Richard 
Schnair, Eileen Hurley. 

High School — Leland Campbell, Florence Cheney, 
Annie Coughlin, Elba Fredrikson, Thelma MacGregor, 
Herbert Merriam, Irene Merriam, Florence Morse, Pauline 
Mead, Florence Prentis, Helen Robins, Alta Teele. 

Number Graduated From Grammar Schools, 1913 

Boys Girls Total 

Acton Center 5 2 7 

South Acton 5 5 10 

West Acton 5 4 9 

15 11 26 



29 



in every way. There is a great deal of interest in the 
work, and the work is carefully thought out first before 
placing it on the paper. 

In the fall nature work was taken up with brush and 
ink, and pencil, object drawing from models in the school 
room, illustrative dra^dng, telling some story, historic orna- 
ments in the form of borders, still life groups of objects 
such as vegetables and a dish, compass practice, to teach 
accuracy, working drawings of solids, construction of 
boxes for Christmas work, designing, color harmony, letter- 
ing and center work. Stencilling will come in the late 
spring work. At South Acton embroidery was taught at 
Christmas time and some of the work was very good. 

I visit the schools every week teaching in at least two 
rooms a half hour each week, and checking up what has 
been done the past week. An hour and a quarter at least 
is spent each week upon the drawing. 

In speaking of the work as a whole, I can say there has 
been a great improvement over last year's work in most 
every division. 

I wish to thank the superintendent, the committee and 
teachers for their support through all the work. 
Respectfully submitted, 

MARION CELESTE TAYLOR. 

February 12, 1914. 



ROLL OF HONOR 
Three Terms 

Acton Center — Dora Livermore, Norman Livermore, 
Ella Frederickson. 

South Acton — None. 

West Acton — Isabelle Greer, James Kinsley. 

High School — Ethel Spinney, Patrick Foley. 
Two Terms 

Acton Center — Delia Cote, Chester Daily, Dorothy 
Marsh, Thelma Noyes, Carrie Peterson, Margaret Rayner, 
Miriam Stafford, Simon Stiles, Walter J. Reed, Marion F. 
Spinney. 



30 



Number Entering Concord High 

Boys Girls 

Acton Center 3 2 

South Acton / 5 5 

West Acton 5 4 



13 



11 



1914 

Commercial Course 6 

College Course 2 

General Course 6 

Scientific Course 1 



Total 
5 

10 
9 



24 



Concord High School Statistics, 1913-1914 

ACTON 

1915 

Commercial Course 8 

College Course 3 

General Course 1 

Scientific Course 1 

— Domestic Arts Course .... 3 

15 Undecided 1 



1916 

Commercial Course 6 

College Course 6 

General Course 1 

Domestic Arts Course .... 8 

Mechanic Arts Course .... 3 

Agriculture Course 3 



17 

1917 

Commercial Course 8 

College Course 4 

Domestic Arts Course .... 5 

Mechanic Arts Course .... 5 

Scientific Course 1 

Agriculture Course 2 



27 



25 



REPORT OF SIGHT AND HEARING TEST 



School Examined 



West 
South 
Center 








it 

w 


Defectiv 
Hearing 
Parents 
Notified 


82 


5 


3 7 


122 


1 


1 2 


83 


9 


3 8 


287 


15 


7 17 



31 

SCHOOL CENSUS, SEPTEMBER, 1913 

Number of boys between 5 and 15 164 

Number of girls between 5 and 15 163 

Total 327 

Number of boys between 7 and 14 124 

Number of girls between 7 and 14 105 

Total 229 

Number of illiterate minors 

EMPLOYMENT AND EDUCATIONAL CERTIFICATES 

Employment certificates 1 

Educational (literate) 25 

Educational (illiterate) 7 

Total 33 

SCHOOL SAVINGS 

No. Depositors Amt. Collected 

West Acton 67 $134.63 

South Acton 62 87 . 66 

Totals 129 $222.29 



ATTENDANCE OFFICERS' REPORT 

March 2, 1914. 
To the School Committee of Acton: 

Number of cases investigated 33 

Number of cases brought to trial 

Respectfully submitted, 

ASAPH PARLIN, 
THOMAS SCANLON, 
ROBERT RANDALL. 



32 



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INDEX 

Town Officers . . . ' : , 3 

Town Warrant 7 

Town Meetings 12 

State Election 21 

Town Clerk's Report 26 

Births 27 

Marriages 29 

Deaths 31 

Non-Resident Burials 33 

Dog Licenses 34 

Selectmen 's Report 36 

Town Accountant's Report 37 

Treasurer's Report 60 

Assessors ' Report 65 

Collector's Report 67 

Tree Warden 69 

Board of Health 70 

Cattle Inspector's Report 72 

Road Commissioners 73 

Overseers of the Poor 74 

Cemetery Commissioners 77 

Trustees Goodnow Fund 84 

Acton Memorial Library 85 

List of Books Added 89 

SECOND SECTION 

School Report 1 

School Calendar 3 

Special Exercises and Holidays 4 

School Officers and Teachers 5 

Standing Rules 6 

General Report 7 

Financial Statement 10 

Superintendent 's Report 19 

Supervisor of Music 25 

Supervisor of Drawing 27 

Roll 9f Honor 28 

Statistical Tables 29 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Several Boards of Town Officers 

OP THE 

t 

TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 
FOR THE TEN MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 81 

1914 




THE NEWS ENTERPRISE 
1915 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Several Boards of Town Officers 



OP THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR THE TEN ]MONTHS ENDING DECEIMBER 31 



1914 




THE NEWS-KNTERPRISE 
1915 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1914 



Selectmen 

Xicholas Sanisel Term expires 1917 

Charles J. Ilolton Term expires 1915 

KdwHi'd Z. StMiile\' Term expires 1916 

Town Clerk 

Horace F. Tiittle 

Town Treasurer 
Frank W. Hoit 

Assessors 

William F. Stevens Term expires 1917 

James B. Tnttle Term expires 1915 

William F. Kelley Term expires 1916 

Overseers of the Poor 

William F. Kelley Edward Z. Stanley Fred S. Whitcomb 

Collector of Taxes 

William F. Stevens 

Tree Warden 

Jamos O'Neil 

Constables 
Edward S. Fobes John T. McNiff 

Herbert R. ^Moore William F. Stevens 



Fence Viewers 

Charles J. Holton Nicholas Samsel Edward Z. Stanley 



Field Drivers 



Frank Bulette 

Herbert R. Moore 



Henry L. Haynes 
John t! :\[eNiff 



Road Commissioners''' 

William H. Kingsley Albert H. Perkins 

William B. Franklin 
^Office terminated bv vote of the town annual meetino^ 1914 



Cemetery Commissioners 



Julian Tuttle 
Fred W. Green 
Horace F. Tuttle 



Term expires 1915 
Term expires 1917 
Term expires 1916 



Edwin A. Phalen 
Samuel A. Christie 
Bertram E. Hall 



School Committee 



Term expires 1917 
Term expires 1915 
Term expires 1916 



Trustees of Memorial Library 

(Chosen by the Town) 



J. Sidney White 
Lucius A. Hesselton 
Horace F. Tuttle 



Term expires 1917 
Term expires 1915 
Term expires 1916 



Edwin A. Phalen 
Frank E. Tasker 
Edward C. Page 



Board of Health 



Term expires 1917 
Term expires 1915 
Term expires 1916 



Finance Committee 

James B. Tuttle Edgar H. Hall 

Asaph Merriam Arthur i\I. Whitcomb 

Horace F. Tuttle 



5 
APPOINTED BY THE SELECT.AIEX 



Town Accountant 

William T. ^lerriam 



Registars of Voters 

Samuel A. Guilford James McGreeii 

George E. Helton Horace F. Tuttle. ex-officio 

Election Officers 

Precinct 1 

Warden John F. Coughliii 

Deputy warden Edwin A. Phalen 

Clerk Horace F. Tuttle 

Deputy clerk Moses E. Taylor 

Inspector Arthur F. Davis 

Deputy Inspector Willis L. Holden 

Inspector Elmer C. Cheney 

Deputy Inspector Moses A. Reed 

Inspector AYilliam H. Kingsley 

Deputy Inspector John S. White 

Precinct 2 

Warden L. A. Hesselton 

Deputy warden Louis C. Hastings 

Clerk Lorenzo E. Reed 

Deputy clerk Anson C. Piper 

Inspector Wm. B. Franklin 

Deputy Inspector Frank A. ^lerriam 

Inspector Constance O'Xeil 

Deputy Inspector Xelson -I. Cole 

Inspector J. S. Moore 

Deputy Inspector George K. Clapp 



6 

Precinct 3 
Warden 

Deputy wMi-deu Charles J. Holton 

Clerk Engene L. Hall 

Deputy clerk AA'illiam F. Kelley 

Inspector William L. Tenney 

Deputy Inspector Fred S. Whitcomb 

Inspector David R. Kinsley 

Deputy Inspector John T. McNiff 

Inspector Charles A. Durkee 

Deputy Inspector Bertram E. Hall 

Cattle Inspector 

Fred S. Whitcomb 

Forest Warden 

William H. Kingsley 

Fire Wardens 

Daniel H. Farrar John S. White William II. Kingsley 
James P. Brown William Bennere 

Surveyors of Lumber and Measurers of Wood and Bark 

J. W. Dupee Charles E. Smith E. C. Cheney 

Bertram D. Hall F. A. :\rerriam II. T. Clark 

Public Weighers 

J. P. Fletcher M. E. Taylor E. C. Cheney E. F. Conant 

Thomas Hearon George H. Reed Willian; 11. Teele 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Edward C. Page 

Superintendent of Moth Work 

James O'Neil 

Police Officers 

Edward S. Fobes Herbert R. Mooi-c^ John T. :\IcNiff 







■CO.M.ArOXWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss. 




To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton. 
Conntv aforesaid. GREETING: 



in the 



In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you 
are hereby required and directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the town of Acton aforesaid, who are qualified 
to vote in elections and in town affairs therein, to meet in 
the town hall, in said town, on Monday, the twenty-ninth 
day of March. 1915, at nine (9) o'clock in the forenoon, then 
and there to act on the following articles, to ^vit: 

Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2. To bring in their votes on one ballot for the 
following named toAvn officers, to wit: One town clerk for 
one year; one selectman for three years; three ovei*seers of 
the poor for one year ; one town treasurer for one year : five 
members of the finance committee for one year: one 
collector of taxes for one year; one tree warden for one 
vear: four constables for one vear; four field drivers for one 



year; three feJit-e viewers for one year; one assessor for 
three years; one trn.stee of the ^Feniorial library for thi-ee 
years; one ]neinl)er of the scho(~)l eommittec^ for three years; 
one cemetery commissioner for three years; one member of 
the board of|health for three years. Also on tlie same ballot 
to vote "Yes," or "No" on the following qnestion, viz: 
"Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liqnors 
in (his town?" The polls will he opened at 9.80 a. m., and 
may be closed at -i p. m. 

Article 3. To choose all necessary town officers not 
named in Article 2, and to fix the salaries of all town officers. 

Article 4. To see if the town will accept the reports of 
the selectmen, overseers of the poor, school committee, 
library trnstees, and other town officers. 

Article 5. To hear and act npon the reports of any 
committees chosen at any previons meeting, that have not 
already reported. 

Article 6. To see what sums of money the town will 
raise by taxation and appropriate to defray the necessary 
and nsual expenses of the several departments of the town. 

Article 7. To see what amonnt of money the town 
will raise for the dne observance of ^Memorial day. 

Article 8. To see if the town Avill appropriate a snm 
of money for the enforcement of the lirpior laws, or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 9. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to the extermination of the elm leaf beetle. 

Article 10. To see what action the town will take in 
reference to the extermination of the gy|~)sy arid brown tail 
moth. 

Article 11. To see what action the toAvn will take to 
raise and appropriate $150. for the George Washington 
]\remorial bnilding. AA^ashington, D. C. 

Article 12. To see what action the town Avill take in 
regard to thp collection^ of taxes. 

Article 18. To see if the to"\\Ti Avill vote to oil the 
striM'ts throngh tlic villages of the town, or act anything- 
thei-eon. 



Article 14. To see if the toAvn will pay for fi^-hting 
hriisli fires, and fix price, or act anything- thereon. 

Article 15, To see if the tovrn will vote to resi-ind the 
action providing for the election of selectmen by rotation 
for periods of three years, and revert to the system of 
simnltaneons elections for the period of one year, as 
provided nnder certain acts of the Revised Laws. 

Article 16. To see if the tovni will vote to establish 
and maintain four (4) electric lights from near the house of 
Isaac W. Flagg. to land of the Commonwealth, n.ear the 
house of Patrick O'Xeil, appropriate money for the .same, 
or act anything thereon. 

Article 17. To see if the town will vote to antborize 
the selectmen to organize a fire departm.ent, appoint engi- 
neers, and establish the pay of firemen, or do or act anything 
thereon. 

Article 18. To see what sum of money the tov\-ii will 
raise and appropriate for the maintenance of the fire 
department, or do or act anything thereon. 

Article 19. To see if the to^^i will vote to expend one- 
fifth of the appropriation for roads to improve the Lower- 
road from the state road to the end of the town line, and the 
Carlisle road from junction of Lowell road to end of town 
line and to allow the removal and setting up of the stone 
crusher, if necessary, "to be used in said work, or do or act 
anvthing thereon. 

Article 20. To see if the town will vote to choose or 
ail thori 70 the appointment of a special committee to inves- 
tigate the various matters connected with the present street 
lighting system, the furnishing of electric current to private 
individuals within the town, the expediency of the town's 
voting to engage in the busmess of supplying electricity for 
liffht and powder, and any otlier matters relating to the 
foregoing, or do or act anything thereon. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to insure the employes of the 
town, or do or act anything thereon. 



10 



Article 22. To see if the town will vote to change the 
date of holding the annual town meeting, or do or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 23. To see if the town will vote to discontinue 
the road leading from the house of Mrs. Gertrude C. Daniels 
to the house of Lyman Tuttle, or do or act anything thereon.. 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to choose or 
authorize the appointment of a special committee to prepare 
and draft by-laws and report at the next annual town 
meeting, or do or act anything thereon. 

Article 25. To see if the town will vote to instruct the 
selectmen to dispose of the fire apparatus at South Acton, 
or do or act anything thereon. 

And you are hereby commanded to serve this warrant 
by x)osting an attested copy thereof in each of the post 
offices and railroad stations in said toAvn, and one in each of 
the stores of C. H. Mead & Co., W. E. Whitcomb, M. E. 
Taylor & Co., Tuttle & Newton, Finney & Hoit, George H. 
Reed, in said town, and one at the Nagog House, in said 
town, seven days at least before the time appointed for 
holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due return of this warrant 
with your doings thereon, to the town clerk, or the select- 
men, at or before the time appointed for holding said 
meeting. * 

Given under oui; hands at Acton, this fifteenth day of 
March, in the year one thousand, nine hundred and fifteen. 
r'"' . ' . 

NICHOLAS SAMSEL, 
EDWARD Z. STANLEY, 
CHARLES J. HOLTON, 

Selectmen of Acton. 



11 



Proceedings of the Annual Meeting, March 30, 1914 



Ai'ticlc 1. To L'hoose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Allen Brooks Parker was chosen moderator. 

Article 2. To bring in their votes on one ballot for 
town officers, also to vote on the question, shall licenses be 
granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this to^^^l? 
and other questions. 

The following town officers were chosen: 

Town Clerk— Horace F. Tuttle. 

Selectmen — -Nicholas Samsel, for three years, Charles 
J. Holton. for one year, (to fill vacancy.) 

Assessor — William F. Stevens. 

Overseers of the Poor — William F. Kelley, Edward Z. 
Stanley, Fred S. Whitcomb. 

Treasnrer— Frank W. Ho it. 

Collector of Taxes — William F. Stevens. 

Constables— Edward S. Fobes, John T. McNiff. Herbert 
R. ^loore, William F. Stevens. 

Road Commissioner — AVilliam H. Kingsley. 

Field Drivers — Frank W. Bulette, Henry L. Hayn;'S, 
Herbert R. Moore, John T. McNiff. 

Fence Viewers — Charies J. Holton, Nicholas Samsel, 
Edward Z. Stanley. 

School Committee — Edwin A. Phalen. 

Cemetery Commissioner — Fred W. Green. 

Board of Health— Edwin A. Phalen. 

Trustee of ^Memorial Library — John S. White. 

Tree Warden — James O'Neil. 



12 



Finance Committee — James B. Tuttle, Edgar II. Hall 
Asaph ]\rerriam, Arthur M. Whitcomb, Horace F. Tuttle. 

On the acceptance of Chap. 807 of Acts of 1913, relat- 
ing to compensation of laborers for injuries 

107 voted yes 28 voted no 

On the acceptance of certain acts which provide that 
eight hours shall constitute a day's work for town 
employees. 

45 voted yes 67 voted no 

On the ([uestion "Shall licenses be granted for the sale 
of intoxicating liquors in this town? 

11 voted yes 155 voted no 

Article 3. To choose all necessary town officers not 
named in article 2, and fix salaries. 

Voted: To instruct the selectmen to appoint sui-vc^yors 
of lumber, wood, hoops and staves. 

Chose Luther Conant trnstee of Gootlnow fund for 
three years. 

Voted: That the salary of the road commissioners be 
two and one half dollars per day. 9 hours to constitute a 

(lay- 
Voted: That the salary of the tax collector be one 
per centum of the amount collected, and that he ])erform 
all the duties hitherto performed by said officer. 

Voted: That the salary of the treasurer be two hun- 
dred dollars per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the chairman of the select- 
men, be one hundred dollars per annum, and tlu^ other mem- 
bers, fifty dollars, per annum. 

Article 4. To see if the town will accept tiu^ reports 
of the selectmen, overseers of the ])oor. school commiltee. 
library trustees, and other town officers. 

Voted: To accept the reports of the several town 
officers. 



13 



Article 5. To hear and act upon the reports of an\- 
committees chosen at any previous meeting, that have not 
already reported. 

No reports presented. 

Article 6. To see Avhat amount of money the towji will 
raise for tlie due observance of IMemorial day. 

Voted : To raise one hundred and twenty-five dollars. 

Article 7. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for the repairing and building of roads and bridges, 
or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate ($5,000) five thou- 
sand dollars. 

Voted: To appropriate ($1,000) one thousand dollars 
additional upon the condition that the town receive an al- 
lotment of ($1,000) one thousand dollars from the State, 
under the "Small Town Act," so called. 

Voted; That the selectmen petition the State for an 
allotment, under the "Small Town Act." 

Article 8. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise for the support of the ^lemorial library the current 
year. 

Voted: To raise ($450) four hundred and fifty dol- 
lars, for current expenses, and ($200) two hundred dollars 
for books. 

Article 9. To see what amount of money the toAvn will 
appropriate for the care of cemeteries, or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate ($600) six hundred dollars. 

Article 10. To see what amount of money the town 
"vvill raise for the maintenance of the fire department, or 
act anything thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate ($400) four hundred dollars, 
and to raise ($184) one hundred and eighty-four dollars, 
for hydrant service in East Acton. 

Article 11. To see if the town will appropriate a sum 
of money for the enforcement of the liquor laws, or act 
anything thereon. 



14 



Voted: To re-appropriate the unexpended balance in 
the treasury. 

Voted: That the selectmen be instructed to enforce the 
law. 

Voted: That the selectmen be instructed not to grant 
any licenses to druggists for the sale of intoxicating liquors, 
nor any licenses or permits to express companies for the 
transportation of intoxicating liquors into this town this 
year. 

Article 12. To see if the town will petition the director 
of the bureau of statistics for an audit of its accounts, in 
accordance with the provisions of chapter five hundred and 
ninety-eight of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and 
ten, and the amendments thereof. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Article 13. To see if the tOAvn will authorize the 
treasurer, with the approval of its selectmen. nC' l^orrow 
money for the town, if necessary, in anticipation of revenn-) 
the current year. 

Voted : That the town treasurer, with the ap]n-oval 
of the selectmen, be and is hereby authorized to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenues of 
the municipal year, beginning Feb. 1. 1914, to an amount 
in the aggregate not exceeding (20,000) twenty thousand 
dollars, and to issue a note or notes therefor payable within 
one year, any debts or debt incurred under this vote to be 
paid from the revenues of said municipal year. 

Article 14. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to the extermination of the elm leaf beetle. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate f$400) four hun- 
dred dollars. 

Article 15. To see what action the town will take iu 
reference to the extermination of gypsy and brown tail 
moths. 

Voted: To raise the sum of money required by the 
State law. 

Article 16. To see what amount of money the town 
will vote to raise and appropriate for the support of schools. 



15 

the purchase of school books and supplies, the expense 
of operating the school plants, repairs and improvements 
upon school buildings and grounds, the transportation of 
scholars, and for other expenses relating to the maintenance 
of the school department, or do or act anything thereon. 

^^oted: To raise and appropriate the sum of ($18,250) 
eighteen thousand and two hundred and fifty dollars and 
the dog tax for the current year, for the purposes specified 
in the school committee 's estimate for the support of schools 
for the fiscal year 1914-1915 to be found on page 9 of the 
annual report of the school committee for the year 1913-1914. 

Article 17. To see if the town will vote to build a High 
School building the present year, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : That the town build a high school building the 
present year. 

On the motion of E. F. Conant that it be built on the 
hill in Acton Center, known as the Noyes, Payson and 
Rouillard site. 

62 voted yes 78 voted no. 

A motion to refer the matter of location to a committee 
of persons outside of Acton did not prevail. 

A motion to take an informal ballot on the matter of 
choice between the Kimball lot and tlie Franklin lot in South 
Acton did not prevail. 

A motion to postpone action one year did not prevail. 

A motion that the cost of a lot including grading shall 
not exceed ($600) six hundred dollars, did not prevail. 

Voted: That the building be located either on the 
Kimball lot or Franklin lot in South Acton. 

Voted: That when this meeting adjourns, it adjourn 
to meet in the Town Hall two weeks from today, at on*^ 
o'clock in the afternoon. 

Voted : That a committee of five be appointed by the 
moderator, to investigate the matter of building a high school 
building, to recommend a lot, describing it by metes and 
bounds, to ascertain tlie cost of the lot, to procure plans 



1() 



<\ud estimates of the cost of a building and report at thr- 
iidjourned meeting. 

The moderator appointed the following- persons as the 
committee : 

Edwin A. Phalen, Edgar 11. Hall. Charles J. Holton, 
William Rawitzer, Fred L. Burke. 

Article 18. To see if the town will vote to contribute 
funds for the erection at Washington. D. C, of a National 
Civic Hall as a Peace Memorial to the Father of Our Coun- 
try, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Article 19. To see what action the town Avill take in 
regard to the collection of taxes. 

Voted: That all taxes shall be payable not later than 
Oct. 15, 1914 and on all taxes remaining unpaid after Nov. 
1, 1914, interest shall be charged at the rate of six per cent 
per annum from Oct. 15, 1914 until such taxes are paid. 

Voted: That poll and personal taxes only l)e pavable 
on demand. 

Voted : That the collector shall issue summons for all 
poll and personal taxes onl}' remaining unpaid Sept. 1. that 
the collector shall collect all taxes committed to him within 
the municipal year in which they are assessed. 

Article 20. To see what amount of mon.ey the town 
Avill raise for town charges. 

Voted: To appropriate ($6,250) six thousand two liun- 
dred and fifty dollars, to be expended as f oUoavs : 

Town farm $600.00 

Outside poor 1.000.00 

Military aid 100.00 

Printing 250.00 

Buildings and grounds 250.00 

Police 200.00 

Board of Health 1.000.00 

Salaries of town officers 2,000.00 

Unclassified 450.00 

Snow bills 200.00 

Brush fires 200.00 



17 

Voted: To raise ($1,500) fifteen hundred dollars for 
a reserve fund. 

Voted: T.o raise and appropriate ($3,500) thirty-five 
hundred dollars for lighting streets. 

Voted: To raise one thousand dollars ($1,000) to pay 
the loan authorized hy vote of the toAvn. Aug. 5, 1918. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of one hundred dollars for the pay- 
ment of premiums on treasurer's and collector's bonds. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate one huivdred dol- 
lars, ($100). 

Article 22. To see if the town will raise fifty dollars 
for an assistant fish and game warden, as recommend by 
the state, or act anything thereon. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Article 23. To see if the to^^Ti will appropriate a sum 
of money to be expended for setting out shade trees, or act 
anything thereon. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to have the 
name of Luther Blanchard placed on the monument, or act 
anything thereon. 

Voted: That the matter be referred to a committee 
of three to be appointed by the mxoderator to report at a 
future meeting. 

The moderator appointed the committee as follows : 
Bertram D. Hall, E. F. Richardson, "William H. Kingsley. 

Article 25. To see if the town will insure its help, or 
act anything thereon. 

Voted: To raise one hundred dollars ($100). to insure 
laborers employed by the town. 

Article 26. To see if the town will vote to put three 
electric lights on the road leading to W. H. Teele's, one 
near the residence of Daniel Beach on Central street, one 
at the electric road near S. L. Richardson's, and one at thc^ 
bridge near the cemetery, all in West Acton; also, two on 
Stow Road, and some on ]\faynard street, South Acton, or 
act anything thereon. 



18 



Voted : To pass over the article. 

Article 27. To see if the town will vote to change the 
name of the Town Farm, to the name of Simon Tuttle 
Home, or some appropriate name, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Article 28. To see if the town will vote to change the 
name of the Town Farm Road, or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Article 29. To see if the town will vote to oil the 
streets through the villages of Acton, or act anything there- 
on. 

V^)ted: To appropriate five linndred dollars for oil- 
ing roads. 

Article 80. To see whether the town will vote to re- 
scind the action providing for the election of selectmen by 
rotation for periods of three years, and revert to the system 
of simultaneous elections for the period of one year, as 
provided under certain acts of the revised statutes. 

Voted: To pass over tlie article. 

Article 81. To see if the town will contract with the 
West and South Water Supply District of Acton, for 
rental of their hydrants, not to exceed one hundred in num- 
ber at ($25) per year, for fire purposes only. 

Voted : That the selectmen be instructed to contract 
with the West and South Water Supply District of Acton, 
for the rental of its hydrants, for the term of ten years, at 
an annual rental of twenty-five dollars ($25) per hydrant. 

Voted: To raise and appropriate ($2,850) twenty- 
three hundred and fifty dollars for hydrant service in the 
water district. 

Article 82. To see if the town will pay for fighting 
brush fires, and fix prices, or act anything thereon. 

Voted to pay twenty-five cents per hour, for fighting 
brush fires. 

Article 3?). To see if the town will vote to have all 
bills approved by the selectmen before payment, or act 
anything thereon. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 



19 



Article 34. To see if the town will rescind the vote 
passed at their meeting April 3, 1899, whereby they voted 
to choose three road commissioners, and accept the pro- 
visions of* section 364. chapter 560, of the acts of 1907, re- 
lative to the election of a highway surveyor. 

Voted: T(^ rescind the vote passed April 3, 1899, 
whereby the town voted to elect three road commissioners, 
and that the selectmen be instructed to appoint a superin- 
tendent of streets. 

Article 35. To see if the town will vote to extend its 
electric street lighting to North Acton, or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted : That the selectmen confer with the American 
Woolen Co., putting the matter up to them vigorously, and 
report at the next meeting, April 13th. At the adjourned 
meeting, a report was presented by the selectmen in ac- 
cordance with the instructions of the last meeting, and it was 

Voted: That the selectmen be instructed to extend 
the electric light service to North Acton, by the way of the 
North Acton R. E. station, ten lights to be installed in the 
north part of the towm, and the remaining fifteen to be 
placed at the discretion of the selectmen in any part of the 
town. 



20 



Proceedings of the Adjourned Annual Meeting, April 13, 1914 



Article 17. To see if the town will vote to build a 
high school building the present year, or act anything there- 
on. 

The special committee appointed at the last meeting 
presented a report in writing through its chairman, Edwin 
A. Phalen. 

Voted : To accept the report of the special committee. 

Voted : On motion of ]\Ir. Phalen : 

That the town purchase the Kimball lot, so called, 
situated in South Acton, and more particularly described as 
follows : 

A certain piece or parcel of improved land situated in 
the southerly part of Acton called South Acton, on the 
westerly side of Prospect street, so called, bounded and de- 
scribed as follows, viz : Beginning at the southeasterly corner 
of the premises at a corner of a wall at said Prospect street, 
and at land now or late of Elnathan Jones, thence running 
westerly by land of said Jones, and land of J, K. W. Wether- 
bee two hundred and ninety seven ft.. (279 ft.) to a stake, 
thence running north 82° 25' west, by land of Waldo Tuttle. 
and by land now or late of Varnum Tuttle, one hundred 
and eighty-seven and 55-100 (187.55ft.) feet, thence running 
north 0° 55' — by land now or late of said Varnum Tuttle, 
two hundred and six and V2 (206.5) ft., to land now or 
late of said Varnum Tuttle; thence north 81° 55' east ninety 
five feet (95ft.) : thence north 77° 20' east (37ft.) thirty 
seven feet; thence north 81° 55' east one hundred and fifteen 
and 8-10 feet, (115.8) ft; thence north 85° 15' east one 
hundred and forty-seven feet (147), on said land of V. 



21 



Tattle to a corner at land of J. P. Fletcher; thence south 
12° 30' west 73 5-10 feet to a proposed street, thirty-on<- 
and 3-]0 feet, (31.3), thence running easterly on said pro- 
posed street one hundred forty-eight r.nd 5-10 ft. to said 
Prospect street, thence running- southerly on said Prospect 
St., one hundred and ninety-eight feet (198). to the corner 
and hound first mentioned, and that town build on said 
lot a high school ; the building to cost not over thirty one 
thousand dollars, ($31,000), including eriuipment and land^ 
that the land shall cost not to exceed two thousand dol- 
lars ($2,000). 

The following amendment offered by Luther Conant did 
not prevail : 

Provided that any committee chosen to carrs' out this 
vote shall expend no money and enter into no contract or 
other obligation vrhereby the town is sought to be bound, 
until a deed conveying a good and sufficient title to the pr-)- 
posed location, shall have been first presented to the town 
^vithout any charge or obligation on the part of the town 
and have first been recorded in the registry of deeds foi- 
^Middlesex County. 

Voted: On motion of Mr. Rawitser that a committee 
of five be chosen to purchase said site and to erect said 
school building and to have full power and discretion to do 
all things necessary or proper in connection therewith, no 
site other than the Kimball lot, so called, located in Soutli 
Acton, shall be purchased bj' the committee chosen under 
this vote without referring to the town for further 
instructions. 

The following motion w.is nlso presented 1)y Mr. 
Pawitser : 

That the sum of thirty-one thousand dollars ($31,000). 
be and hereby is appropriated for this purpose and that this^ 
sum be raised by the issuing of twenty notes or bonds of the 
town of Acton in amounts of ($1550), fifteen hundred and 
fifty dollars each therefor, said notes or bonds to be payable 
one each year, beginning not more than one year after the^ 
dat<^ of issne of the first note or ])iui(h so tliat tlie whole 



22 



loan shall be paid in not more than twenty years: from tlie 
date of issue of the first note or bond. 

All notes or bonds issued under the authority of this vote 
shall be at a rate of interest not exceeding four percent per 
annum. 

Voted: That the vote on this motion be taken by 
ballot. The result of the ballot taken, was: Yes, 147; no, 83. 

A motion offered by Mr. Nash that the town raise and 
appropriate the sum of thirty-one thousand dollars ($31,000) 
to build a high school, did not prevail. 

A motion to adjourn did not prevail. 

The chairman of the school committee asked for instruc- 
tions relative to making a contract with the town of Concord 
for the tuition of Acton pupils admitted to its high school- 
Voted : To leave the matter with the school committee. 

(Qn motion of Mr. Merriam a vote of thanks was given 
to th^ special committee. 



23 



Proceedings of the Special Town Meeting, May 7th, 1914 



Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Allen Brooks Parker was chosen moderator. 

Article 2. To see if the town will vote to choose or 
appoint a committee of five citizens to purchase a certain 
parcel of land commonly called the Kimball lot, situated on 
the westerly side of Prospect street, in the part of Acton 
called South Acton, and erect on said lot, a building to be 
used for a high school ; and to equip the same and to have 
full power and discretion to do all things necessary or 
proper in connection therewith; also to raise and appro- 
priate or borrow the sum of thirty-one thousand dollars 
($81,000), for the purpose of purchasing said parcel of land 
and erecting thereon a building to be used for a high school 
and to equip the same, or act anything thereon. 

It was moved by Mr. Rawitser that the sum of thirty- 
one thousand dollars ($31,000), be and is hereby appro- 
priated for the purpose of purchasing a suitable site, and 
erecting thereon a building to be used for a high school and 
ef|uipping the same, and that for this purpose the treasurer 
is hereby authorized and directed to borrow the sum of 
thirty-one thousand dollars ($31,000), and to issue twenty 
bonds or notes of the town therefor, ten of said notes or 
bonds to be of sixteen hundred dollars each, and ten of fif- 
teen hundred dollars each, said bonds or notes to be payable 
one each year, beginning not later than one year after the- 
date of the issue of the first note or bond, so that all of said 
notes or bonds shall be paid in not more than twenty years: 
after the date of issue of the first note or bond (bo!u1s < r 



24 



notes of the larger denomination being payable first), with 
interest thereon at a rate not exceeding four per centum per 
annum; payable semi-annually. 

Voted: That the vote on the motion of Mr. Rawitser 
be taken by ballot, printed or written, yes or no. 

The vote on the motion was as follows : Yes 160, no 162. 

Voted: To adjourn. 



State Election, November 3, 1914 

Party designations: D., Democratic; Prog., Progressive; 
R., Republican; S., Socialist; S. L.. Socialist Labor; P., 
Prohibition. 



Whole number of ballots cast 



Precincts Total 
12 3 

105 12S 164 397 



Governor 



Alfred H. Evans, P 1 

Samuel W. McCall, R 80 

Arthur E. Reimer, S. L 

Sam^uel C. Roberts, S 

Joseph Walker, Prog 10 

David I. Walsh, D 13 

Blanks 1 

Lieutenant Governor 

Edward P. Barry, D 12 

Grafton D. Gushing, R 82 

Arthur Howard, P 1 

James P. Magenis, Prog 7 

Sylvester J. McBride, S 

Patrick Mulligan, S. L 

Blanks ^ 



2 







78 


118 


276 





1 


1 











15 


11 


36 


32 


34 


79 


1 





2 



27 


27 


66 


80 


lis 


280 


1 





2 


12 


11 


30 











1 





1 


7 


8 


18 



25 



Secretary 



Percy B. Ball. ^ 

Frank J. Donahue. D. . 
James W. Ilolden. S. L. 
Albert P. Langtry. R. . 
William G. :\Ierrill. P. . 
Russell A. Wood. Prog. 
Blanks 





n 


82 
1 
9 
2 



1 
29 


76 


18 

4 




29 

() 
112 

1 
12 
10 



1 

69 



270 

2 

39 

16 



Treasurer 



Charles L, Burrill. R. . . . 
Joseph M. Coldwell. S. . 
Frederick Fosdiek, Prog 
Thomas A. Frissell, P. . . 
Karl Lindstrand. S. L. . 
Frederick W. Mansfield, D. 
Blanks 



83 

7 
1 


11 
3 



76 



17 




28 
7 



112 



12 





27 

13 



271 



36 

1 



66 

23 



Auditor 



Alonzo B. Cook, R 

Daniel R. Donovan. S. . . 

John Drysdale, P 

Frederick P. Glazier. Prog. 
Fred E. Oelcher. R. L. . . . 

Frank IP. Pope. D 

Blanks 






73 


106 


259 


























8 


16 


14 


38 


1 








1 


4 


33 


29 


76 


2 


6 


IT) 


23 



Attorney General 



Ilenrv C. Attwill. R 


84 


75 

28 


108 
27 


•^67 


Thomas J. Boynton. D 


10 


6r, 


John Hildreth Proo- 


8 


18 



13 




39 


Howard B. Rand. P 








John Weaver Sherman, S. . . . 





1 





1 


William Tavlor. S. L 














Blanks 


3 


6 


16 


25 



26 


6:^ 


17 


60 


99 


239 


22 


35 



26 

Congressman 

J. Joseph O 'Connor, D 11 23 25 59 

WilJiam N. Osgood, Prog 7 14 10 31 

John Jacob Rogers, R 86 86 119 291 

Blanks 1 5 10 16 

Councillor 



John J. Ilogan, D 11 26 

Harrie C. Hunter, Prog 12 31 

Henry C. Mulligan, R 78 62 

Blanks 4 9 

Senator 

Henry P. Dunn, D 9 23 

Charles A. Kimball, R 84 82 

Allen Brooks Parker. Prog 11 15 

Blanks 1 8 

Representative in General Court 

Edgar H. Hall, R 86 ^ 

Charles F. Johnson, D 12 26 

John L. Kennison, Prog 7 28 

Blanks 8 

County Commissioner 

George A. Goodwin, Prog 8 18 

Levi S. Gould. R ^ 82 77 

Charles F. McCarthy. D 12 28 

Blanks 3 5 



Shall an act j^nsscd by tlic General Court in the year 
1914, entitled: "An act relative' to vacations to laboi'cis 
jsmployed by cities and towns," be accepted? 



18 


50 


105 


271 


32 


58 


9 


18 



25 


277 


24 


62 


13 


48 


9 


10 



18 


44 


103 


262 


30 


70 


13 


21 



27 



Yes 23 87 U 104 

Xo 54 59 54 167 

Blanks 28 82 66 126 

Shall an act passed ])>- the General Court in tln^ year 
1914, to make Saturday a half-holiday without loss of pay 
for laborers, workmen, and mechanics employed by, or on 
behalf of the Commonwealth, and otiierwise to regulate their 
employment, be accepted? 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 

S]iall the act passed by the General Court in the year 
1914. providing for the abolition of party enrollment at 
pi'imary elections be accepted? 

Yes 48 67 62 172 

Xo 25 28 30 83 

Blanks 87 :V.^ 72 142 

Total number of ballots cast .... 105 128 164 897 



26 


46 


58 


125 


56 


54 


51 


161 


28 


28 


60 


111 



Vote of Representative in the Eleventh Middlesex District, 
November 3, 1914 



<v 



73 



:2 = -g 



O 



^ '4 ~ -z: "r- 

<• I £ 3 ^ 



Edgar H. Hall of Acton. R |277!l42|60|868| 77|202|1126 

Charles F. Johnson of Littleton, Dj 62ll56|18il68|112| 98| 614 
John L. Kennison of Aver. Prog.l 48|140! 6|108| 83| 40i 375 

Blanks I 1Q| 23| 3| 55| 5| 27| 123 

Totals .' . 7 |397|461 |87:699|227|367l2288 



28 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



Births 

Whole number recorded 42 

Born in Acton 39 

Males 23 

Females 19 

Native parentage 22 

Foreign parentage 10 

Mixed parentage 1 1) 

Marriages 

Whole number recorded 19 

Residents of Acton 28 

Residents of other places K^ 

Deaths 

Whole number recorded 33 

Residents of Acton 33 

Residents of other places 

Occurring in Acton 31 

Occurring in other places 2 

Average age, years 49 plus 

Note. The toAvn cleric requests infornuition of any 
error or omission in the lists of births, marriages and deaths. 

The town clerk hereby gives notice that he is prepared 
to fvn-nish blanks for the returns of births and deaths. 

HORACE F. TUTTLE. 

Town Clerk. 



29 



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T— C^lCC'TfinCDt-CC 



PEBSONS HAVING DOGS LICENSED IN 1914 



Aiken, Alice H. (2) . . 


$7 . 00 


Allen, Louis E 


2.00 


Baker, Ralph G. . . . 


2.00 


Baveur, Eli 


2.00 


B alette, Frank W. . . 


2.00 


Brill. Fred E 


2.00 


Brown, Lizzie J. . . . 


2.00 


Bradley, jMarv 


2.00 


Burgess, Mrs. J. W. 


5.00 


Berry, J. N 


2.00 


Brooks, Charles .... 


2.00 


Bent, James 


2.00 


(^ittell. Arthur 


2.00 


(\)ughlin, W. C 


2 . 00 


Crosbv, Clarence L 




(2) 


4.00 


Davis, AVm. E .^ 


2.00 


DeTinno, Angelo . . . 


2.00 


I)e Souza Bernardino 


5.00 


DeFegueredo Antonio 2.00 


Davis, Charles E. . . . 


2.00 


Durkee, Raymond F. 


2.00 


Davis, Wendell F. . . 


2.00 


Davis, Minnie 


2.00 


Dole. Cyrus Gr 


2.00 


DeTinno, Gabriel . .. 


2.00 


Densmore, J. A. ... 


2.00 


Enneguess, ^lichael . 


2.00 


Ednev, Charles F. . . 


2.00 


Fairbanks, C. H. . . . 


2.00 


Farrar, Daniel H. . . 


2.00 


Farrand, Wm. H. ... 


2.00 


Fletcher. Lester N. (2; 


7.00 


Fobes. E. S 


5.00 



Foster, Samuel J. ... 2.00 

Gallagher, Joseph A. 2.00 

Green, Fred W 2.00 

Gilmore, Almon H. (2) 4.00 

Gradv, Rov 5.00 

Greenleaf, kennels (4) 17.00 

Ilardv, Mrs. F. E. . . . 2.00 

Hoit. F. W 2.00 

Harris, llattie B 5.00 

Houghton, Ellsworth 2.00 

Holden, F. II 2.00 

Holden, Willis L 2.00 

Hazel, .Marv 1) 2.00 

Jones, Samuel 2.00 

Jones, Warren 2.00 

Jones, Ralph T 2.00 

Knowlton. F. R 2.00 

Kimball. Elnathan (2) 4.00 

Kellev. Wm. F 2.00 

Lewis, Herbert AV. . . 2.00 

Livermore. J. William 2.00 

Laffin. Sidnev 2.00 

Libbv, George A 5.00 

MacGovern, Hugh ... 2.00 

MacLityre. AValter . . 2.00 

Mason, Rotr(>r 2.00 

Afason, William E. . . . 2.00 

Manro. N 2.00 

Morrison, F. D 2.00 

Moore. J. Sterling ... 2.^^ 

Miller, Charles T 2.0'^ 

:\rurphv, Georo-e E. . . 2.00 

Mekkelseii. Jens .... 2.00 

^lillan, Albion L 2.00 



37 



Nims, J. Buchanan .. 2.00 

Noyes, G. L 2.00 

Na^le, Elizabeth .... 2.00 

Nealev, Edward F. . . 5.00 

O'Neil, Rose 2.00 

O'Connell, Lena J. . . . 2.00 

O'Connell, Michael .. 2.00 

Olsen. Simon 2.00 

Pratt, Frank A 5.00 

Palma, John 2.00 

Pratt, Est of Francis 2.00 

Priest, H. L 5.00 

Perkins, Levi 2.00 

Perkins, A. H 2.00 

Pennell, Edmund PL . 2.00 

Pope, Benjamin (5) . 13.00 

Page, E. C 2.00 

Rivers, Edward E. (2) 7.00 

Reed, Howard 2 . 00 

Reed, George H 2.00 

Reed, Joseph 5.00 

Robbins. Solon 2.00 

Russell, John H 2.00 

Robbins, F. W 2.00 

Richardson, George A. 5.00 

Robbins, W. C 2.00 

Smith. Albert 2.00 

115 licenses at $2.00 each 
2"^ licenses at $5.00 each 



Deduct fees. 188 licenses at 20c each 
Paid to countv tr*easnrer 



Smith, Chester R. . . 


2.00 


Sheehan, John H. ... 


2.00 


Smith, John D 


2.00 


Scott, Annie J 


2.00 


Shapley, Eva C. . . . 


2.00 


Stearns, C. S 


2.00 


Smiley, Wm. A 


2.00 


Samsel, Nicholas . . . 


2.00 


Smith, Stella D 


2 . 00 


Sebastian, L. A 


2.00 


Tucker, George S. . . 


2.00 


Tavlor, Charles A. (2) 


7.00 


Taylor, Moses E. . . . 


2.00 


Tuttle, Arthur 


2.00 


Thayer, Arthur L. . . 


2.00 


Tyler, Webster 


2.00 


West, Mrs. I. C 


5.00 


Willis, Edward E. . . 


2.00 


Willis, Ora A 


2.00 


Worden, Martin H. . 


2.00 


Worster, George W. 


2.00 


AVhitcomb, Fred S. . 


2.00 


AVatkins, J. H. (3) . 


9.00 


Weaver, George T. (2^ 


4.00 


Wheeler, Chas. PI. (21 


7.00 


Williams, F. G 


5.00 


$2:^0.00 




115.00 




$345.01) 


\' each 


$27 . 60 



$317.40 



38 



REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN 



We respectfully subinit the following report: 

LIGHTING 

Acting" under the vote of the town, we have extended" 
the electric light service to North Acton, where ten lights 
have been placed. The other fifteen lights for which we had 
to contract, have been placed in various parts of the town 
where needed the most. 

HYDRANTS 

We have contracted, on behalf of the town, with the 
West and South Water Supply District for the rental of not 
more than one hundred hydrants for a period of ten years 
at an annual rental of $25.00 per hydrant. 

HIGHWAYS 

In accordance with the vote of the town, we petitioned 
the State Highw^ay Commission for an allowance under the 
Small Towns Act, for the purpose of constructing the road 
from West Acton to Stow. A large and representative dele- 
gation of citizens appeared with us at the hearing in Boston. 
The Commission decided that as the town has a number of 
miles of state road the state could give us no further aid. 

POLICE 

The laws relating to the illegal sale and transportation 
of intoxicating liquors have been rigidly enforced. 



39 

ACCOUNTANT 

We regret to report that Mr. William T. Merriam Iims 
felt it necessary to resign from the office of town accountant, 
Mr. ]Merriam has been a most efficient public servant and is 
entitled to the « ommendation of the town. 

NICHOLAS SA:\rSEL. 
EDWARD Z. STANLEY. 
CHARLES J. HOLTON, 

Selectmen, 



40 



REPORT OF THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, Acton. ^Mass. : 

Gentlemen — I herewith submit my report for the fiscal 
year of 1914. 

You will notice that the departments of ToAvn Farm and 
Outside Poor have overdrawn their appropriation. This is 
due to the fact that these departments have been running 
behind for the past few years and bills have been held back 
so not to overrun the appropriation. Consequently the first 
of the year 1914 showed bills for previous year anion nting 
to almost $1,000.00, not approved. 

There are also bills amounting to $2,511.45 approved 
but not paid by treasurer, about $1,000.00 of this amount 
belongs to the Overseers of Poor department. 

EXPENDITURES 

General Government 

Appropriations : 

For salaries and expenses $2,000.00 

For suretv bonds 100 . 00 



$2,100.00 



Selectmen's Department 

Salaries and Wages : 

Nicholas Samsel, chairman $95.00 

E. Z. Stanley 55.00 

C. J. Holton 50.00 



$200.00 



41 

Other expenses : 

Postage, carfare, etc $13.38 

Statioiierv 3.00 



Auditing and Accountant Department 

Salaries and Wages: 

Accountant W. T. Merriam, March 

1914, to January. 1915 $87.60 



Other Expenses : 

Supplies $1 . 62 

Postage 1.86 



Treasurer's Department 
Salaries and Wages: 
Treasurer. F. AV. Hoit $200.00 



Other Expenses : 

Surety bonds $50.00 

Printing, etc 8 . 50 

Certifying four notes 8.00 

Postage, carfare, etc 26.89 



$16.38 



$87.60 



$3.48 



$200.00 



$93.39 



42 

Collector's Department 

Salaries and Wages : 
Collector. W. F. Stevens $404.60 



Otlier Expenses : 

Surety bond $50.00 

Printing- and snpplies 3.50 

Postage, carfare, etc 8.50 



Assessors' Department 

Salaries and Wages: 

Assessor. W. F. Stevens 75.00 

Assessor, W. F. Kelley 60.00 

Assessor. Janics B. Tnttle 55.00 



Other Ex})enses : 

Printing, snpplies $3 . 75 

Postage, carfare, etc 18.35 



Town Clerk's Department 
Salaries and Wages: 
Town dcrk. IT. F. Tnttle $40.00 



$404.60 



$62. 00 



$190.00 



$22.10 



$40.00 



43 

Other Expenses : 

Printing $2 . 35 

Postage, carfare, etc 11.21 

Attending meeting at Aver 6.00 

Overseers of Poor Department 

Salaries and Wages : 

Overseer, AY. F. Kelley $50.00 

Overseer. E. Z. Stanley 20.00 

Overseer F. S. Whitcomb 20.00 

Overseer. Lvman C. Tavlor. 1913 .... 15.00 



Other Expenses : 

Blanks, Hobbs & Warren $4.50 

Postage, telephone, etc 6.42 



Town Physician 
Hall Staples $25.00 

Election and Registration 

Salaries and Wages : 

Registrar, H. F. Tuttle $25.00 

Registrar, S. A. Gnilford 20.00 

Registrar, George E. Holton 20.00 

Regristrar, James ]\lcGreen 20.00 



$19.56 



$105.00 



$10.92 



$25.00 



$85.00 



44 



$2, 


.50 


2 


.50 


2 


.50 


5 


.00 


5 


.00 


5 


.00 


5, 


.00 


5 


.00 


5, 


.00 


') . 


.00 


2 


.50 


2, 


.50 


2, 


.50 


2 


.50 


7, 


.50 



Election officers : 

C. D. Cram 

H. F. Robbiiis 

E. R. Teele 

David Kingsley 

C. O'Neil 

L. E. Reed 

L. C. Hastings 

L. A. Hessleton 

F. S. Whitcomh . . . . 

C. J. Ilolton 

George E. Ilolton . . . 

C. E. Smith 

C. A. Durkee 

S. A. Guilford 

Tl. F. Tntll(' 



Other Expenses: 

F. S. Glines, opening seliool for regis- 
tration . . ■ $20 . 00 

R. W. Porter, opening hall for regis- 
tration, and putting up booths . . 2.50 

W. F. Stevens, transporting election 

returns '1. 00 

F. W. Green, putting up bootli 1 .50 

Total general government 

Unexpended 

Buildings and Grounds 

Appr()i)riati()ii $250. 00 

Rec(Mved for rent, town hall 80.00 



$60.00 



$9.00 



$1,684.03 
465.07 

$2,100.00 



$330.00 



45 



T(3\vn Hall ^Maintenance : 



R. W. Porter, janitor 

American Woolen Co., light 

American ^Yoolen Co.. supplies 

West and Sonth Water Supply 

District of Acton, water rent. . . . 

So. Acton Coal and Lumber Co., coal. 

Wm. IT. Kingsley. wood 

Wm. II. Kingsley. labor on grounds . . 
J. W. Livermore. labor on common . . . 

C. H. Persons, tuning piano 

C. A. Coolidge. repairing clock 

Dexter Spinney, wood 

:\r. E. Taylor & Co.. supplies 

E. P. Gates, repairs 

Total for l)niddings and grounds 

Unexpended 



$71.00 




20.72 




.90 




6.00 




39.59 




3.50 




2.50 




6.87 




2.00 




25.00 




6.00 




2.36 




2.65 






$189.09 




140.91 




$330.00 



Protection Persons and Property 

Police Department 

Appro])riation $200 . 00 

Received for court fees 42.96 



Paid 



$242.96 



IT. R. Moore, special duty $26.50 

E. S. Fobes. court fees 73.85 

E. S. Fobes. special duty 19.75 

Hall Staples, services 3.75 

J. P. Brown, special duty 2.50 

Craig Sweet, special dnty 2.50 



46 



W. B. Franklin, special duty 2.50 

Lester Sawyer, special duty 2 . 50 

Thos. Dunahy, special duty 2 . 50 

E. Z. Stanley, special duty 2 . 50 

Nicholas Samsel, special duty 2 . 50 

Nicholas Samsel, court fees 1.01 

J. T. McNiff, special duty 18.21 

James N. Berry, special duty 2.50 

Finney & Hoit, supplies 41 . 00 



Total paid out. police department, $204.07 

Unexpended 38.89 



$242.96 



Enforcement of Liquor Law 



Fund on hand 


1 


$1,152.95 


Paid: 






Nicholas Saiiisel 


$75.00 
10.00 




E. J. Lyons 




John Connors 


10.00 




E. S. Fobes 


57.40 
19.50 




H. R. Moore 




J. T. IMcNiff 


30.00 




B. J. Ineson 


7.00 




"William Craig 


5.00 




E. W. Ford 


6.00 




George W. Worster 


5.50 








Total enforcement liquor law . . . 




$225.40 


Unexpended 




927.55 



$1,152.95 



47 

Fire Department 

Appropriation $400.00 

Received from fire extinguishers .... 77.00 



Paid: 

F. AV. Green, drying hose $3.00 

Badger Fire Extinguisher Co 52.00 

J. P. Brown, express .60 

Coniliinati(m Ladder Co.. and R. I. 

Coupling Co 41.00 

E. T. Rice 24.84 

Boston Coupling Co 14.00 

Hall Bros. Co 4.18 

So. Aeton Woolen Co .70 

Finney & Hoit 6.03 

Maintenance West Fire House 117.00 

Maintenance South Fire House 117.00 

Watching West Aeton Garage fire: 

F. W. Green 2 . 00 

Joe Brenier 2.00 

Jack :\rurray 2.00 

Martin Brown 2.00 

A. Greenwood 2.00 

:\[artin Baker 2.00 

Louis Urban 2.00 

C. A. Durkee 2.00 

F. G. Williams 2.00 

Watching other fires : 

Harry AYambolt . . . f 2 . 50 

AVilliam :\[oore 2 . 50 



$477 . 00 



Total maintenance fire de]~>artment $403.35 

T'nexpended 73 . 65 

$477.00 



*8 

' . Fighting Brush Fire 

Appropriation $200 . 00 

Transferred from reserve fund 147 . 52 



Paid: 

Town of Concord $17 . 15 

H. Thatcher 2.00 

Clifford Fiske 7.50 

J. S. White 1.40 

Howard (Gallagher 3 .00 

H. Gallagher 3.00 

F. Holden 1.00 

L. McCarthy 3.00 

D. Spinney's man 4.50 

C. Miller 5.50 

J. B. Tuttle's man 2.25 

Allen Frost 8 . 50 

Roy L. Harris 7 . 00 

A. T. Harris 5.00 

E. H. Hallowell 9.50 

Mr. Grady 2.40 

H. Byan .50 

Hall Bros. Co 27.25 

W. H. Kingsley 78.05 

Arnold Perham 4 . 38 

W. J. Benier 29 . 70 

W. E. Davis 3.25 

A. H. Perkins 3 . 75 

J. B. Tuttle 2.50 

C. H. "Wheeler > 11.40 

J. Downie 1 . 75 

H. J. Coughlin 16.00 

J. P. Brown 27 . 51 

L. W. Perkins 3.75 

D. Foley .75 

Joel F. Parmenter 19.00 



$347.52 



49 



1 


.00 


30 


.50 




.75 


2 


.28 




.75 



H. F. Robbins 

George Ham 

Thos. Foley 

M. E. Taylor & Co. 
F. E. Greenough . . 



Hydrant Service 

Appropriation, fire district $2,350.00 

Appropriation, East Acton 184.00 

Transferred from reserve fnnd 4.16 



Paid: 

Town of Concord 184.00 

West and South Water Supply 

District of Acton 2,354. 16 



Moth Department 

Appropriation $975 . 90 

Private work 275.00 

Received. State Highway work 156 . 63 

Received, from state, arsenate of lead, 100.00 



Paid : 

James O'Neil, labor $1,767.78 

State Highway work 109 . 13 

Standard Oil Co., gasoline 18.50 

W. F. Stevens, notices and mailing. . . 10.95 
Balance due from state. March 1, 

1914 576.06 



$347.52 



$2,538.16 



$2,538.16 



$1,507.53 



$2,482.42 
Balance due from state, Jan. 1, 1915, $974.89 



50 

Elm Tree Beetle 

Appropriation $400 . 00 

Paid : 

James O'Neil, labor $303.25 

State, for arsenate of lead 100.00 

Total Elm Tree Beetle $403.25 

Overdrawn • 3 . 25 

Health and Sanitation 

Appropriation $1,000.00 

Received, inspection of animals 50.00 

Received, Biackstone Beef Co., inspec- 
tion 121.50 

Received, A. J. Sargent, inspection .. 5.60 



$1,177.10 



Paid: 

E. C. Page, fumigating, etc $61 .95 

E. S. Fobes, Biackstone Beef Co., in- 
spection 121 . 50 

E. S5. Fobes, Blanchard inspection . . . 259.50 

E. S. Fobes, other inspection 27.00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts .... 46.50 

Hall Staples 28.00 

State Board of Charity 22.00 

IT. S. Turner, printing 3.00 

Billy Di Benedetti, quarantiEe 8.17 

F. E. Tasker 23.00 

W. A. Flint, use of dump 6.00 

P. S. Whitcomb. inspection of animals, 100.00 

F. K. Shaw, school physician 25.00 



51 



F. E. Tasker, school physician 25.00 

S. E. Christie, school physician 25.00 



Total Health and Sanitation $781.62 

Unexpended 395.48 



$1,177.10 
Due from state cattle inspection 50.00 

Highway ajid Bridges 

Appropriation $5,000 . 00 

Oiling roads 500 , 00 

Snow bills 200.00 

Received for road dust, etc 38.25 



$5,738.25 



Paid: 

Good Roads Machinery Co $25.50 

Davis, King Co 3.00 

Hall Bros. Co 7.40 

E. P. Gates 21.30 

M. E. Taylor & Co 18.73 

T. F. Parker .., 5.67 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co 90.64 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co 5 . 37 

N. E. Road Machine Co 8.00 

E. T. Rice 2.93 

Town of Concord, use sprinkler 9 . 00 

George H. Reed 4.49 

Arthur F. Davis, signs 2 . 20 

W. H. Kingsley, repairs .35 

A, H. Perkins, gasoline and supplies, 89.10 

J. P. Brown 2.20 

W. E. Whitcomb 1 . 30 

C. H. Mead& Co 4.51 



52 



J. T. McNiff 8.65 

N. H. Teimey 2.25 

A. H. Perkins, labor ! . . . 1,771 . 65 

W. H. Kingsley, labor 1,176.84 

W. B. Franklin, labor 172.50 

Lunt Moss Co 4.90 



Expense Planking Bridge. Sonth xVcton 

A. H. Perkins, labor $175 . 80 

Tnttle & Newton, snpplies 10.02 

So. Acton Coal & Lnmber Co., himber, 

etc 895.79 



W. B. Franklin 
A. H. Perkins . 
W. H. Kingsley 
W. :M. French . 



SnoA^^ Bills 


$69 . 50 




94.10 




33.33 




14.28 






Oiling Roads 





N. E. Road Mch. Co., tank and 

sprayer $412.20 

Standard Oil Co.. oil 302.00 

A. H. Perkins, freight 29.80 



$3,438.48 



$1,081.11 



$211.21 



$744.00 

Total highway and bridges $5,474.80 

T'^nexpended 263.45 

$5,738.25 



53 
Street Lig'hting 

Appropriation - $3,500.00 

Paid : 

AmericMii WooJeii Co $2,654.63 

1). r. Harris, liglitiiig one lamp 4.00 

S. Bresth, lighting one lamp 4.00 

II. W. Porter, lighting one lamp, 2 

years 

Julian Tnttle, lighting one lamp. 2 

years 



.00 
.00 



Total for street lighting . $2,678.63 

Unexpended 821 . 37 



$3,500.00 



Charities 

Town Farm 

Appropriation $600 . 00 

Sale of product and stock 1,148.47 



$l-,748.47 



Paid : 

]\I. W. Emrick, warden $79.60 

M. W. Emrick. labor 16.50 

L. Q. Amadou, warden 337.50 

L. Q. Amadou, supplies 5.80 

L. Q. Amadon, labor 122.65 

AA^ F. Kelley, labor 23.00 

W. F. Kelley, su])plios, etc 22.70- 

AV. F. Kelley, cow 80.00" 

AY. F. Kelley, inn- 8.00 

F. \V. Robbins. ice 8.25 



54 



E. T. Rice, repairs 

George H. Cash, ice 

E. Z. Stanley, repairs 

Einney & Hoit, supplies 

E., P. Gates, repairs 

W. H. Kingsley, sawing wood 

J. S. Moore, supplies 

George H. Reed, grain, etc , , 

E, R. Teele, lime and sulphur 

R, T. Barrow 

C. H. Mead & Co., grain, etc 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 

F. H. Ilolden, lime and sulphur 

M. E. Tajdor & Co., supplies 

W. E. Whitcomb, supplies 

N. E. Telephone & Telegraph Co 

F. S. Whiteomb 

W. H. Jones, pigs 

li.'. H. Tuttle, barrels 

S. B. Ineson, fish 

A. C. Piper, plants 

J. T. McNiff. repairs 

F. C. Grenier, wagon 

Davis, King & Co., boxes 

Town of Acton, lead 

Fritz Oelschlegel, repairs 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., comI 

etc 

O. D. Fessenden, barrels 

Barrett Mfg. Co., paint 

J, P. Brown, repairs 

Hall Bros. Co., sawdust 

Total for town farm 

Overdrawn 



2.90 




Ir.OO 




16.63 




115.79 




54.10 




8.75 




253.60 




434.08 




8.50 




3.00 




255.00 




58.77 




26.00 




424.78 




51.97 




11.39 




3.70 




20.00 




22.40 




15.75 




2.10 




1.50 




48.00 




7.44 




15.00 




3.70 




49.28 




38.85 




4.25 




19.75 




11.85 






it^2,696.83 




948.36 



00 



Land Damage Tovrii Fariif 

Received town of Concord $1,500.00 

Paid : 

Nicholas Samsel. legal service $125.00 

Bracket, Shaw & Lunt Co.. engine, etc. 329.76 

W. J. ?iloore. stoning well 6.00 

E. Z. Stanley, pump 53. OG 

AV. F. KeiJey. freight on engine, etc.. 8.46 

AY. F. Kelley. dynamite, etc 4.07' 

L. Q. -Amadon, labor digging Avell and 

trenches 50.0'* 



Total paid $576 . 29 

Unexpended 923 . 71 

$1,500.00 

Ontside Poor 

A])propriation $1 .000 . 00 

Received from town of Boxboro 174.58 

Received from >;tate 94.22 



$1,268.80 



Paid : 

Tuwn of Randolph $204.17 

City of Boston 21 .43 

CommonAvealth of Alassachnsetts .... 45.00 

State board of charity 60.50 

City of AValtham 48.32 

To\v)i of Leominster 42.10 

Tnttle & Xewton 246.72 

AV. n. Kingslex- 5.5r 

J. S. jloore 60.07 

E. A. Phalen 96.00 

AV. E. AVhit-omb 104.75 



56 



i\la]-garet Roulhird 2] .0(i 

Harriet Rudoli)h 48.00 

F. D. Morrison 8.10 

M, E. Taylor & Co 784.98 

W. T. S. Bartlett 52.00 

E. C. Page 85.75 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co 9.75 

Julian Tuttle 5.00 

Luther Davis 19 . 28 ! 

F. W. Green 2.50 

Total for outside poor $1,970.87 

Overdrawn 702 . 07 

Due from state $1 12 . 50 

Due from town of Boxboro 29 . 08 

Soldiers' Benefit 

State Aid 

Received from treasurer $854. Oi^ 

Amount due from state. Mar. 1, 1914, $998.00 

Amount paid out 608.00 

Balance due from state, Jan. 1, 1915, 752.00 



$1,606.00 $1,606.00 



Military Aid 

Appropriation $100.00 

Paid for aid $50.00 

Unexpended 50 . 00 

$100. 0;^ 



57 
Education 

Appropriation $18,250.00 

riiexpeiided 3Iarch 1, 1914 1.428.80 

Received state treasurer, industrial 

school 147.50 

Received state treasurer, tuition chil- 
dren 170.10 

Received state treasurer. Supt. fund. 343.75 

$20,340.15 
Paid : 

R.-port of school committee $18,472.33 



Tnexpended $1,867.82 

Memorial Library 

Library Expenses 

Appropriation $450 . 00 

Received from fines 21 .00 

Received rebate on insurance 9.53 



$480.53 



Paid 



E. F. Conant, insurance $37.60 

American Woolen Co.. light 29.57 

O. E. Houghton, transportation books 45.84 

S. IT. Taylor, janitor 92.67 

?>. II. Taylor, repairs .35 

A. F. Davis, librarian 94. 75 

A. F. Davis, extra cataloging 10.00 

S^o. Acton Coal & Lumber Co.. fuel . . 73.37 

IT. F. Tuttle, expenses 1 1 . 68 

Davis, King Co wiring b.50 



58 



Brookside Printing Co., supplies . 

Allen Chair Co., repairs 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 

Total for library expense . . . 
Unexpended 



Library Books 

Appro])riation $200 . 00 

Unexpended March 1, 1914 r>.SO 

Interest on library fnnd 246. 70 



12.50 

16.18 

6.98 






$487 . 94 
42.59 



Paid: 

W. B. Clark Co $228. 16 

H. F. Tuttle 1.98 

Dura Binding Co 2.S.0n 

Herman Coldberger 89 . 71 

Oranite State Pub. Co 2.25 

Library Bureau 82.70 

W. A.'wilde Co 6.8i) 

Bnlnnee unex]H^nded paid to library 

fund 118.45 



Cemeteries 

Appropriation , $600 . 00 

Sale of lots, Woodlawn 187.00 

Sail' of lots. M\. Hope Ill .00 



$480.58 



$452.50 



$452.50 



s v-! 8 . 00 



59 

Paid : 

Julian Tuttle. labor $112.75 

Julian Tuttle. plants 6.85 

AVilliam IMitchell. labor 79. 62 

Carl Pickings, labor 17.50 

Albert II. Smith, labor 64.36 

S. II. Taylor, labor 8.75 

Finney & Iloit. flags 4.80 

H. F. Tuttle. attending meeting .... o.50 
II. F. Tuttle. writing and recording 

deeds 7.50 

II. F. Tuttle, laying out lots, Wood- 
lawn 2.00 

H. F. Tuttle, laying out lots, :\It. Hope 3.00 

A. 11. Perkins, labor 78.80 

F. W. Green, labor 113.11 

H. T. Clark, labor 59.05 

So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co., lumber. 

etc 7.82 

E. T. Rice, pipe, etc 23.35 

E. F. Conant, insurance 7.20 

A. Batley & Son, plants 14. 14 

West and South Water Supply Dist. 

of Acton 24 . 1 1 

Total for cemetery expense $633.21 

Unexpended 214.79 



$848.00 



Perpetual Care Lots 

Unexpended balaiice. :\[arch 1. 1914 . $639.59 
Income on fund 473 . 12 



$1,112.71 



m 



f)() 



Paid : 

Julian Tiittle, labor and plants $248.67 

D. 0. Harris, repairs 4.00 

F. W. Clreen, labor 84. 75 

A. Batley & Son, flowers 5.75 

F. C. Hayward, interest 17.50 

George XL DeCosta, interest :> . 50 

Balance unexpended paid to cemetery 

fund 748.54 



$1,112.71 



Unclassified 



Appropriation $450. 0(» 

Appropriation liability insurance .... 100.00 



Paid 



$55(;.(H) 



J. P. Brown, express and delivering' 

town report^ $:r 46 

J. P. Brown, repair pump .50 

Nicholas Samsel, legal service 5.00 

Robert S. Osterhout, advertisement . . 4.70 
Hobbs and Warren, books, sealer 

weights and measures 2.00 

S. M. Spencer Co., weights aiul 

measures :> . :)4 

Fairbaidvs Co., weights and measures, 1.18 

E. C. Page, weights aiul measures . . . 8.50 

Stark Tool Co., express .50 

Morris-Ireland Safe Co., safe 25.00 

N. Y., N. II. & II. R. R., freight on safe 1 . r,S 

George E. Greenough, moving safe . . 4.00 

II. R. Moore, field drivci- 1.00 



61 



W. F. Stevens, (^xpense .83 

W. F. Stevens, expense cheeking cor- 
poration tax 

W. P. Stevens, killing dog 

X, IT. Tenney. repairs ballot box .... 

II. F. Tuttle, repairs ballot box 

II. F. Tuttle. collecting and recording 
U births 

IT. F. Tnttle, recording HO deaths 

II. F. Tuttle. recording 19 marriages . 

I^. W. Porter, care clock and flag .... 

Hall Staples, professional services . . 

TTall Staples, reporting 6 births .... 

F. E. Tasker. reporting 8 births .... 

S. E. Christie, reporting 7 births .... 

F. K. Shaw, reporting 14 births 

AV. F. Stevens, abatements 

A. M. Whitcom!), liability insurance . 

W. A. Hamilton Co., liability insur- 
ance 1 .92 



I 


.:^>^ 


I 


.00 


8, 


.00 


3 


.50 


17 


.00 


6. 


.00 


8 


.80 


80 


.00 


21 


.00 


1 


.50 


2, 


.00 


1 


.75 


3 


.50 


32 


.51 


99 


. 99 



Total for unclassified $391.44 

I^nexpended 158.56 



$550.0(1 



Memorial Day 

Ap})i'opriation $125.00 

l^iid Isaa.' Davis post 125.00 

Interest 

Receipts from collector $197.33 

Received treasurer deposit 75.59 



$272.9: 



62 

Paid: 

First National bank $326. 11 

Cemetery fund 45 . 29 



$371.40 



Municipal Indebtedness 

Appropriation $1.000 . 00 

Loans, First National bank 20,000.00 

Loans, cemetery fund 2,475 . 00 



$23,475.00 



Paid: 

First National bank $21,000.00 

Cemetery fund 2,47^ . 00 



$23,475.00 



Reserve Fund 



Appropriation $1,000.00 

Transferred to fire department ac- 
count, brush fire $147 . 52 

Transferred to fire department ac- 
count, hydrant seryice 4.16 



$151.68 



Printing 



Appropriation $250 . 00 

Paid: 

P. B. Murph}^, license blanks $4.50 

Robert S. Osterhout, caucus notices . . 2.25 

Robert S. Osterhout, 3 lots warrants . . 16.25 

Robert S. Osterhout, tax list 17.00 

Robert S. Osterhout, yoting list 15.00 

Robert S. Osterhout, notices 8.25 

Robert S. Osterhout, annual reports . 158.40 

Robert S. Osterhout, school reports . . 7.00 



14.75 

2.50 
3 . 00 






$248.90 
1.10 



63 



R()l)ert S. Osterliout, ballots 

Robert 8. Osterhoiit. school ballots . . 
Robert S. Osterboiit, specimen ballots 

Total for printino; 

rnexi^ended 



Financiai Statement 

Receipts 

Due from treasurer $2,044.23 

Due from collector 5.847 . 1 7 

Appropriation : 

^Memorial day 125 . 00 

HighAvays and bridges 5.000.00 

^Memorial library, books 200 . 00 

]\remorial librar\'. expense 450.00 

Elm leaf beetle 400.00 

Extermination moth 970.00 

School department 18.250.00 

Fire department, loan 1912 1,000.00 

Reserve fund 1,500.00 

Bond, collector and treasurer 100.00 

Liability insurance 100.00 

Hydrant service 2.350.00 

Hydrant service. East Acton 184.00 

Street lighting 3,500.00 

Raised : 

For state tax 4,900.00 

For county tax 2,687.16 

For state highway tax 481 .25 

For overlay 328 . 1 8 

Received : 

Treasurer's report 30,306.92 

Farm receipts 1,148.47 

Interest on faxes 197. 33 

Moth tax 657.40 



$250.00 



64 



December assessment 1,076.47 

Bills approved but not paid 2,511.45 

$86,315.03 
Expenditures 

State tax $4,900.00 

County tax 2,687 . 16 

State highway tax 481 . 25 

General government 1,634.03 

Buildings and grounds 189.09 

Police department 204.07 

Enforcement liquor law 225.40 

Fire department 3,289.03 

Moth department 1,906.36 

Elm tree beetle 403 . 25 

Street lighting 2,678 . 63 

Highways and bridges 5,474.80 

Health and sanitation 781 . 62 

Town farm 3,273.12 

Outside poor 1,970.87 

State aid 608.000 

Military aid 50.00 

Education 18,472.33 

Library expense 437 . 94 

Library books 334 . 05 

Cemetery 633.21 

Perpetual care 364. 1 7 

Unclassified 391 .44 

Memorial day 125 . 00 

Interest 371.40 

Ahinicipal indebtedness 23,475.00 

Printing 248.90 

Cemetery funds 748 . 54 

Library funds 118 . 45 

Uncollected taxes 9,710.82 

Cash on hand 127.10 

$86,315.03 



65 



Financial Statement for Year Ending January 1, 1915 

Due from treasurer $127 . 10 

Due from collector 9,710.82 

Due from state. ^Mass. school fund .. 1,103.83 

Due from eouuty, dog tax 292.01 

Due from moth work 974.89 

Due from inspection cattle 50.00 

Due from state, outside poor 1 1 2 . 50 

Due from to"v\Ti of Boxboro 29.03 

Due from state aid 752.00 

Due from C. M. & II. railroad tax ... . 241.80 

$13,393.98 
Liabilities 

Fund for enforcement liquor law ... $927.55 

Bills approved, iiot paid 2.511.45 

Uinexpended balance, school appro- 
priation 1,867.82 



$5,306.82 

Balance in favor of town $8,087.16 

Kespectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM T. MERRIAM, 

Town Accountant. 

Acton. :\rass.. .March 1, 1915. 



I have ( xamined the accounts of the tax collector and 
treasurer of the Town of Acton, and find them correct, to 
the best of my knowledu'e. 

WILLIAIM T. MERRIAM, 

Town Accountant. 



(){] 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



Year Ending December 31st, 1914 



RECEIPTS 



Cash on hand, March 1st, 1914 $2,044.23 

State treasurer: 

Corporation tax, public service . 1.287.92 

Corporation tax, business 3,364.66 

National bank tax 402.07 

State aid 854.00 

Inspection of animals 50 . 00 

Reimbursement for loss of taxes 
on land used for public insti- 
tutions 1 22 . 46 

Aid of mothers with dependent 

children 94.22 

Tuition of children 170.10 

Independent educational indus- 
trial schools 147.50 

Moth work, state highway 156.63 

Street railway tax 93.88 

Mass. supt. of school fund 343.75 

Town of Concord, town farm laiid 

damage 1,500.00 

First National Bank of Aver, loans . . 20.000.00 



67 



Cemetery lots sold. II. T. Clark 

Fred W. Green 

H. F. Tuttle 

Rebate on library insnrance 

Wm. Kingsley, 22 fire extinguishers 

sold 

Moth department, elm tree beetle work 
Road department. Lumber 

Road dust 

Stone 

Outside poor department 

Interest on bank deposit 

Pool license 

Slaughter house licenses 

Drug license, ] 918 

Li])rary fines 

Town hall, rent 

Board of health dopt. "McDonald," 

"Sargent" 

.Middlesex Central Cou.rt, fines 

Income of cemetery fund 

Income of lil")rarY fund 



69 


.00 


42 


.00 


187 


.00 


9 


.53 


5 

77 


.00 ■ 


: 100 


.00 


18 


.50 


16 


.75 


3 


.00 


174, 


.58 


75 


.59 


2 


.00 


2, 


.00 


1, 


,00 


21. 


,00 


80, 


,00 


121, 


,50 


5. 


,60 


42. 


,96 


473, 


,12 


246. 


.70 




$32,351.15 



Town Farm Recei]>ts: 

-Milk $764.92 

Ap])h^s 285.49 

Cow 50.00 

Calves 26.00 

Eggs 18.32 

Telephone 2.74 

Laboi- 1 . 00 



$1,148.47 



68 



Received of AVilliam F. Stevens, Collector : 

Taxes and interest, 1911 $2.30 

Taxes, 1912 556.84 

Interest, 1912 42.73 

Taxes, 1913 4:.ld6.5r) 

Interest, 1913 140.44 

Taxes, 1914 :'5.082.42 

Interest, 1914 11.86 



$40,593.14 

Total receipts $74.092 . 76 

Approved orders to Jan. 1st, 1915 . . . $76,477.11 
Less orders nnpaid elan. 1st, 1915 .... 2,511.45 

$73,965.66 
Cash on hand Jan. 1st, 1915 127.10 



$74,092:76 



FRANK W. HOIT, 

Treasurer 



69 



Treasurer's Report of Wilde Memorial Library Funds 



Cash in Charlesto^vji Five Cent Sav- 
ings Bank $1,000.00 

Warren Institution for Sai^ngs . . 1.000.00 

Home Savings Bank 1.000.00 

Middlesex Institution for Savings, 1,000.00 

North End Savings Bank 1,000.00 

Bond of West Shore Railroad 1,000.00 

Received interest on bank deposits . . 206.70 

Interest on bond 40 . 00 

Income unexpended 5.80 

Appropriation for hooks 200.00 



By casli in banks $5.000 . 00 

West Shore Railroad bond 1,000.00 

Amount expended for books .... 834.05 

Balance unexpended 118.45 



$6,452.50 



*6.45: 



FRANK AT. ITOTT. 

Treasnrer. 



70 

Treasurer's Report of Money Held for Care of Lots in 

Cemeteries 



Cash in North End Savings Bank . . . $2,175.00 

Warren Institution for Saving . . 1,000.00 

Charlestowni Five Cent Savings . . 1,000.00 

Lowell Five Cent Savings 1.000.00 

Lowell Mechanics' Savings 1,000.00 

Lowell Central Savings 1,000.00 

Lowell City Institution for Sav- 
ings 2.000.00 

Middlesex Institution for Savings. 900.00 
Luke Blanehard fund. North End 

Savings 500.00 

Tomb fund, Charlestown Five 

Cent Bank 100. (Ki 

.Memorial tablet fund, Charles- 
town Five Cent Bank 50.00 

AVarren Institution for Savings . . 50.00 

Cash in town treasur^^ 2,475.00 

Cash : Nahum Littlefield lot 50.00 

Francis Haywood lot 100.00 

Charles S. Twitchell lot 50.00 

Herbert S. Lane k)t 100.00 

Francis Pratt lot 50.00 

Zoeth Taylor lot 50.00 

Total funds $13,650.00^ 

Income, 1914 $473 .12 

TTnexpended ])alaiice, March 1. 1914. 639.59 

$14,762.71 



71 



By amount expended $864. 1 < 

West and Sonth Water Supply 

District of Acton bonds 91)00.00 

Balance Cemetery funds 4,650.00 

Income unexpended Jan. 1. U)15 .... 748.54 



$14,762.71 

FRANK W. IIOIT, 

Treasurer. 



72 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



Valuation, April 1, 1914 

Buildings, exclusive of laud $1. 108,485. OQ- 

Land, exclusive of buildings r);n,440.00 

Personal estate 785,110.00 

Total valuation $2.425.035 . 00 

Valuation April 1. 1918 2.489.745.00 

Decrease in valuation 14.710.00 



Kate of taxation. $17.00. 



Tax Assessed 
Real estate ... . 


as 


Follows : 


$27,878.72 


Per onal estate 






18.346.87 


Polls 






1,284.00 


December assessments 






$42,509.59 
$1,076.47 


Moth tax 






657 . 40 


Excise tax 






241.80 



73 
Amount of Money Raised 



For state tax 

For state highway tax 

For county tax 

For to^\Ti grant 

For overlav 



$4,900.00 


481. 


,25 


2.687, 


.16 


34,129, 


,00 


312, 


.18 



$42,509.5!) 

WILLIAM F. STEVENS. 
JAMES B. TUTTLE, 
willia:^! F. KELLEY. 

Assessors of Acton. 



74 



COLLECTOR'S REPORT 



For Fiscal Year Ending December 31st, 1914 



1912 Dr. 

Balance uncollected March 1. 1914 . . . $556.84 
Interest collected 42.73 

$599.57 

Cr. 

Paid treasurer 599.57 

1913 Dr. 

Balance uncollected March 1, 1914 .. $5,290.33 

Added 4.00 

Interest collected 140.44 

$5,434.77 
Cr. 

Paid treasurer $4.841 . 83 

Abatements 55.16 



$5,396.99 



Balance uncollected December 31. 1914 $537.78 



1914 Di\ 

Town, state and county taxes com- 
mitted to Collector July 15, 1914, $42,509.59 

December assessments 1.076.47 

Added 12.00 

jloth tax 657 . 40 

$44,255.46 
Interest collected 11 .86 

$44,267.32 
Cr. 

Paid treasurer $35,016.98 

Abatements 77 . 35 

\ $35,094.28 

Reliance niMM-Hocted December 31, 1914 $9,173.04 

WM. F. STEVENS, Collector. 



76 



REPORT OF TREE WARDEN 



To the Citizens of Acton: 

I submit m}'- report as tree warden. 

Tlie town raised for this department $400.00, expende(i 
as folloAvs : 

Paid James 0' Neil, labor, team, ex- 
penses $148.00 

Martin Brown, labor 66.00 

Patrick Pickett, laboj' 51 .75 

Bert Reed, labor 1 2 . 50 

Bert Perkins, team 80.00 

State, for lead 100.00 

$408.25 

I wonld recommend $400.00 be raised for this depart- 
ment. 

JAMES O'NETL, 

Tree Warden. 



77 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH 



January 2, 1915. 

The board of health submits the following report for the 
year ending December 31, 1914: 

Burial permits issued in Acton 32 

Burial permits issued in other places 22 

List of contagious diseases reported by board of health. 
February 1, 1914, to December 31, 1914: 

Anterior poliomyelitis 2 

Diphtheria 1 

Measles (German) 1 

Scarlet fever 4 

Tuberculosis 1 

Typhoid fever 2 

Whooping cough 2 

Death from contagious diseases 1 

Meat Inspected for the Town 

Inspected Condemned 

Cattle 135 5 

Veal 821 17 

Hogs 109 5 

Lambs or sheep 21 



78 

Blackstone Beef Co., McDonald, Licensee 

Inspected Condemned 

Cattle 598 21 

Veal 976 37 

Hogs 37 2 

Your board would again request all using the public 
dumps to dump back from the entrances and thus save the 
town the needless expeuse of overhauling the refuse and 
malnng an entrance way. 

Your board would recommend that $1,500.00 be 
ap[)ropriated for use of the board for the present year. 

ACTON BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Bv E. C. PAGE. Secretarv. 



REPORT OF SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



January 2, 1915. 

Your sealer will report the following work done in this 
department for year ending December 31, 1914: 



I— H 

c3 

<D 

Liquid measures, other than milk jars, 34 

Number of scales 63 

Weights 213 

Dry measures 7 

Automatic pumps 8 

Yard sticks 6 



Total 331 70 7 3 

Your sealer has made forty-seven test weighings and 
measurements of manufacturers' and dealers' packages and 
found of that number thirty-seven correct; three under 
weight, and seven over weight. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. C. PAGE, Sealer. 







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80 



REPORT OF THE ROAD COMMISSIONERS 



We recommend that the town rebuild the bridge at the 
powder mill, as the present bridge is beyond permanent re- 
pair and unsafe for travel. 

We recommend the raising of $5,000 for the repair of 
roads. 

A. H. PERKTNS;. 
WILLIAM H. KINGSLEY, 
WILLIAM B. FRANKLIN, 

Road Commissioners. 



81 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

The report of the Overseers of the Poor is herewith sub- 
mitted : 

Since April 1, 1914 the Town Home has been in charge 
of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Q. Amadon as warden and matron, 
who have also been engaged for another year. 

Their services during this period has given satisfaction 
and we feel that good results will be show^n under their man- 
agement in the future. 

Owing to an unusually dry season the water supply at 
the home gave out, thereupon we dug a new well and in- 
stalled an entirely new water system which we believe will 
prove ample for all requirements for years to come. 

It consists of a pressure tank and a four and one-half 
horse-power gasoline engine with equipment for sawing 
wood, the expense for all of which was allowed from the 
land damage account. 

The Town of Concord settled the claim for damages on 
account of land taken from the farm bordering on Lake 
Nagog by payment of $1500.00 to the Town of Acton. 

Dr. Hall Staples has served as town physician during 
the year and has discharged his duties to the satisfaction of 
the board. 

Number of inmates cared for during the year. . . 5 

Largest number at one time 3 

Number at present time (women) 2 



82 

Aid Furnished Outside Poor 

Expenses per report accountant .... $1,970.87 

Receipts $268.80 

Amount due 141 . 53 



$410.33 

$1,560.54 
Amount carried from 1913-14 account, 572.89 



Net cost for financial year $987.65 

Inventory at Town Home, January 1, 1915 

8 Cows $625.00 

3 Heifers . 65.00 

2 Horses 250.00 

6 Pigs 107.00 

15 Tons hay 345.00 

Corn fodder 25 . 00 

Harnesses 50 . 00 

Wagons, carts and sled.s 350.00 

Farming implements 200 . 00 

Hot air engine 25 . 00 

Grain 43.00 

Barrels and boxes 9.00 

Coal 52.00 

Wood cut for stove 45 . 00 

Set measures : 1 . 00 

Salt .75 

Horse blankets . 15.00 

53 Hens 53.00 

Potatoes 25.00 

Apples 12.00 

Preserves, pickles, etc 50.00 

Household goods and kitchen uten- 
sils 275.00 



88 



20, 


.00 


30, 


,00 


10 


.00 


80, 


.00 


25. 


.00 


60 


.00 


20, 


,00 


4, 


.00 


4, 


.00 


32, 


.00 


2 


.25 




$2,910.00 



Wheel chair 

Groceries and supplies . 

Robes 

20 Cords wood 

Corn on ear 

Lumber 

Stone lifter 

Pulley blocks and ropes 

Cross cut saw 

lee, 320 cakes 

Carriage lamp 



Support of Town Home 

Expenditures $3,148 . 12 

Inventory. 1914 2,499 . 25 



Inventory, 1915 $2,910.00 

Receipts 1,148.47 

Wood delivered 13.50 

Allowance for new water supply, ac- 
count Town of Concord, land 

damage 451 . 29 



$5,647.3 



$4,523.26 

$1,124.11 
Amount carried from 1913-14 account. 416.00 



Net cost for financial year $708.02 

willia:m f. kelley. 
edward z. stanley, 
fred s. whitco:\ib, 

Board of Overseers of the Poor. 



84 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1914 

We present the following schedule showing the amounts 
of the several funds for the perpetual care of cemetery lots 
and the income and expenditures on account of each fund 
for the year. 

JULIAN TUTTLE, 
FRED W. GREEN, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 
Cemeterv Commissioners. 



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91 

REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE GOODNOW FUND 
For the Year Ending Dec. 31, 1914 

Investments 

Warren Institution for Savings, Book 

88.531 $1,083.46 

Cluu'lestown Five Cents Savings Bank 

Book 71,200 1.000.00 

City Institution for Savings. Lowell 

Book 84,244 1.000.00 

$3,083.46 
Receipts 
Warren Tnstihitio}] for Savings, divi- 

^^'^"^Is $42.68 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank. 

dividends 45 . 00 

City Institution for Savings, dividend 20.00 

$107.68 
Payments 
Paid JrUian Tuttie, care of Goodnow 

lot in Woodlawn Cemetery . . $7.00 
I^nexpected income for care of 
cemetery lot, deposited with 
Warren Institution for Sav- 
ings 15.68 

Herbert F. Rol)hins, treasurer of 
the Evangelical church in 
-■^f-tun 85.00 

$107.68 
LUTHER CONANT, 
I. WARREN FLAGG, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE. 

Trustees of Gooduow i''nnd. 



92 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF ACTON MEMORIAL 
LIBRARY, 1914-1915 



Trustees 

LUTHER CONANT, President. 

E. FAULKNER CONANT. Seeretai'v 

HORACE F. TUTTLE 

MOSES TAYLOR DELETTE IT. HALL 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD J. SIDNEY WHITE 

LUCIUS A. HESSELTON FRANK E. KNOWLTON 



In 1915 the Acton Memorial Library rounds out its first 
quarter century. Of those who witnessed the ceremonies at- 
tending the dedication of this splendid gift, many have 
turned life's final page; among them the donor, Hon. William 
Allan Wilde. It was, however, Mr. Wilde's fortune to 
live to see the library firmly established as one of the chief 
features of the town life. It may not be amiss to recall that 
he insisted that the construction of the library building 
■should be of the best. It is a tribute to the substantial char- 
acter of his gift in this, as in other respects, that the first 
twenty-five years of service have hardly loft a trace upon the 
:structure. 



93 



In 1895, Mr. Wilde supplemented his original gift by a 
donation of $5000, the income to be expended for books and 
magazines, on condition that the town appropriate the sum 
of $200 annualh^, for the same purpose. This has been done 
and the library closes the first twenty-five years of its career 
with over 12,000 volumes on its shelves. This is a highly 
favorable showing. Few towns in the state, of the same 
population, can report so large a number. The selectiou, for 
which especial thanks are due to Mr. William D. Tuttle, long 
a member of the board of trustees, and the librarian, Mr. 
Arthur F. Davis, is an excellent one. Mention may here be 
made of an exceptionally attractive list of accessions during 
the past year. 

Deeply as the library is appreciated, however, it must 
be confessed that its advantages are not being used to their 
full extent. AA^hile ranking high in the number of volumes 
per capita, it is a regrettable fact that in circulation Acton 
stands relatively low. For this, the distances between vil- 
lages, a source of difficulty in many other matters as well. 
is no doubt largely responsible. Presumably, too, many of 
our school children secure books out of town. Yet there is 
room for distinct improvement in the use of the library 
facilities. It may be well to remind the younger generation 
that the shelves of the library afford an opportunity for 
self-education which fifty years ago was out of the question 
in most rural communities. Now, these advantages are open 
to all. How complete has been the change in IMassachusetts 
is indicated by the fact that whereas, when the Acton Memo- 
rial Library was founded, there were in the state 105 towns 
without free public libraries, today there is but one. It is 
to be hoped that this abundance of opportunity will not en- 
courage a spirit of indifference. 

The trustees recommend the town to raise and appro- 
priate the usual sums; $200.00 for new books and $450.00 
for current expenses of the library. 

Appended is the annual report of the librarian. 



LUTHER CONANT, For the Trustees. 



94 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT 



Accessions — Number of volumes in the library, Feb- 
ruary 1, 1914, 12,167; increase by purchase 156, of which 34 
were obtained by binding magazines; increase by gift 33; 
total increase 189. Number of volumes in the library, 
January 1, 1915, 12,356. 

Circulation — Number of days the library was opened, 
93. Number of volumes circulated, 6,596. Daily average 
circulation, 71. Largest daily circulation, 147, on February 
21. Smallest daily circulation, 27, on September 16th. 

Received for fines ^21 . 29 

Expended for postage .29 



$21 . 00 

The money drawer was broken into late in December and 
a small sum taken by person or persons unknown to the 
librarian. 

Gifts of books have been received from the following 
sources: U. S. Government 6, State of Massachusetts 17, 
Carnegie Peace Endowment 2, Christian Science Church 1, 
Theodore Christian 1. Frank J. Firth 1, Margaret Harwood 
1. Slason Thompson 1. Rev. F. W. Tingley 1, Leonard D. 
White 2. 

Periodicals subscribed for and in the reading room 23. 
AVeekly — Illustrated London News, Independent, Outlook, 
Rural New Yorker, Scientific American, Youth's Companion. 
lAIonthly — Atlantic, Century, Country Life in America, Cos- 
mopolitan, Delineator, Everybody's, Garden Magazine, Good 
Health, Harper's, Ladies' Home Journal, Little Foll<s. 
National, Popular iMechanics, Review of Reviews, St. 
Nicholas, Scribner's, World's Work. 

ARTHUR F. DAVIS, Librarian. 



05 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE MEMORIAL LIBRARY IN 1914 



NON-FICTION 



Anon — The Germany army from within. 35-AlOOg 

Anon— Radcliffe college, 37-AlOOr 

Anon — The writer's handbook, 42-ArOnw 

Bell, R. IT.— Art talks with Ranger, 75-B435a 

Bernhardi, F. Von — Germany and the next war, 914.3-B527g 

Blanehard, M. M.— Basketry book, 67-B689b 
Blinchfeld, E. H.— A Mexican jonrney. f)17.2-B648m 

Brown, F. E.— The everyday life of Lincoln, 922-L786]) 
Bnrton, ^l. L. — Our intellectual attitude in an 

age of criticism, 17-Bf)74o 
Butler. N. iM. — Carnegie Peace Endowment; 

report on the Balkan w^ars, 949-B986r 

Cabot, R. C— What men live by, 17-C116w 

Casey, R. E.— The declaration of independence. 973.8-C837d 

Cramb, J. A.— Germany and England, 904-C889g 

Crandell, L. A. — Days in the open, 81-C891d 
Dillaw^ay, J. iM. — Decorations of the home and 

school. 72-D598d 
Farwell, P. J. — Village improvement, 85-F247v 
Firth, F. J.— Holy Gospel, Catholic and Pro- 
testant versions, 22-F827h 
Fox, F.— England, 914.2-F791e 
Gladden. W. — Live and learn, 13-G5421 
Graham, S. — With poor immigrants to AmoricM, 32-G742\v 
Graves, A. K. — The secrets of the German war 

office, 9U.3-G776S 

Grinnell, G. B.— Beyond the old frontier, 79-G868b 
Hall, M. A. — Care and operation of automobiles, 62-H178c 

Hart, A. B.— The war in Europe, 940-H325w 

Haskins, F. J.— The Panama Canal, 38-11351 p 

Ilazen, C. D.— Europe since 1815, 940-H431e 



96 



Henderson, E. F. — Germany's fighting machine, 

Home, G. — France, 

Howells, W. D.— Familiar Spanish travels, 

Lawrence, T. J. — International law, 

Lee, Mrs. J. C. — Across Siberia alone, 

Mabie, E. C. and White, L. D. — Compulsatory 

arbitration of labor disputes on interstate 

railroads, 
Mabie, E. C. and White, L. D. — The courts and 

social reform, 
Marks, Mrs. J. P. P.— The wolf of Gabbo. 
Meade, E. S. — The careful investor, 
Miller, N, — ]\Ianual of style in w^riting English, 
Morley. ]\r.— The Carolina mountains, 
Munroe, W. S. — Bulgaria and her people. 
Osborne, M. — Within prison w^alls, 
Phelps, W. L. — Teaching in school and college. 
Porter, R. P. — Ten Republics (South America). 
Putnam, Z. W. — Gasoline engines on the farm, 
Reyes, R.— The tAvo Americas, 
Robertson. A. T. — Grammar of the New Testa- 
ment in the light of historical i-esearch. 
Roe, A. S. — The thirty-ninth regiment, ^lass. 

Volunteers. 1862-5, 
Shackleton, R. — Unvisited places in Old Europe. 
Simonds, F. H. — The great war, 
Sladen, G. and Loav. M.— The . nil truth about 

Germany, 
Sonneck. 0. G. T. — The star spangled banner, 
Stinson. A. L. — Woman under the law, 
Tayler, A. T. W. — Refrigeration, cold storage 

and ice making, 
Thompson, S. — Railway library. 1913. 
Usher. R. G. — Pan Germanism, 
Webb, W. L. and Gibson, W. H.— Reinforced 

concrete, 
AVestman. W. L. — The story of the aneipnt 

nations. 



35-H469g 
914.4-H765f 
914.6-H859f 

34-L423p 
915.7-L455a 



37-:\rii2c 

37-M112CO 

81-M346W 

33-]\I479c 

42-M649m 

917.3-M864C 

914.9-M753b 

34-081W 

37-P541t 

918-P848t 

62-P993g 

918-R457t 

22-B649g 

973.7-R698t 

914.9-W59811 

940-S6ng 

914.3-S631r 

78-S699S 

34-S859AV 

62-T211r 

38-T476rc 

914.3-TT85p 

62-W368r 

f)30-W527s 



97 



Whitman, R. B. — Motorcycle priueiples and the 

light car, 62-W615ui 

Whiting, L, — Athens, the Violet crowned. 914.9-S524a 

Wilbur, S.— Life of :\rarv Baker Eddv, 922-E21w 



FICTION 



Adams, S. H. — The clarion, A217c 

Barclay, F.— The wall of partition, B244w 

Beach, R.- — The auction block, B365i 

Bindloss, H. — For the Allison honor. B612i* 

Bindloss, H. — The intriguers, B612i 

Bowen, B. ]\I. — The ranch at the Wolverine, BTSGr 

Caine, AVilliam — But she ment well, C153b 

Christian, T. — Other sheep I have, C555o 

Connolly, J. B. — Sonnie boys' people, C743c 

Couch. A. T. Q.— News from the Duchy, C853n 

Crockett, S. R.— Sandy. C938sa 

Dix, B. M.— Mother's sou, D619mo 

Dull. E. :M.— The rocks of Valpre, D883r 

Footner, IT.— The sealed valley. F687s 

Grey, Z.— The light of the western stars, G8421 

Haggard, H. R. — The wanderer's necklace, 11145w 

Harben, W. X. — The new clarion, H255n 

Hutchinson, A. S. ^l. — The clean heart. H97r)c 

Johnson, :\[.— The witch. J73w 

Keith, :M.— The end of the rainbow, K28e 

King, B.— The letter of the contract, K5211 

Lee. J. — The woman in the alcove, L478av 

Lincoln, J. C. — Cap'n Dan's daughter, L7372ca 

Livingston, G. — The man of the desert, L975m 

Locke, AY. J.— The fortunate youth. L814f 

Lynde. F. — The city of numbered days, L988c 

:\rcCutcheon, G. B.— The prijice of Graustark, M133p 

Alarriot, C— The ward of Tecumseth, M359w 

Nicholson, M.— The poet, N627p 

Norris. K.— Saturday's child. N8n6s 

Peck, T.— AVhite dawn. P367w 



98 



Porter, E, — Miss Billy married, P844mj 

Prichard, H. V. — November Joe, P9475m 

Rhodes, E. M. — Bransford in Arcadia, R4765b 

Rinehart, M. R.— The afterhouse, R579a 

Rinehart, M. R. — The street of the seven stars, R579s 

Stanle}^, C. A. — The keeper of the vineyard, S787k 

Wallis, W. F.— Idonia, W214i 

Wells, H. G.— The world set free, W454w 

White, E. C— The first step, W583f 

Wiliamson, C. N. — It happened in Egypt, W729i 

Wodehouse, P. G.— The little nugget, W8381 

Wright. H. B.— The eyes of the world, W949(' 

JUVENILE 

Altsheler. J. A.— The guns of Bull Ruu, J-A469gu 

Altsheler, J. A.— The guns of Shiloli, J-A469g 
Bailey, C. G. — The children's l)ook of games 

and parties, J-B155c 

Barbour, W. H.— Benton's venture, J-B239b 

Barbour, W. H.— Partners three. J-B239p 
Bates, K. L.- — In sunny Spain with Pilisicn nnd 

J-B329i 

-The young gnnbearer. J-B8824y 

-With Rogers rangers, J-BS824wi 

-The wood rangers, J-B8824w 
Adventures of Uncle Billy Possum, J-B955m 

-Adventures of Peter Cottontail, J-B955ad 

-]Mother westwind's neighbors, J-B955m 

Camp, W. C— Danny Fists. J-C186d 

Cave, E.— Boy scouts hike book, .J-C378b 

Comstock, H. J. — Camp brave pine, J-C739e 

Dowd, E. C— Polly at Lady Gay cottage, J-D745po 
Eldred, W. L. — The Townsend twins camp 

directors. ^ J-E37t 

Forrester, I. L. — Polly Page motor club, J-F731p 

Gilchrist, B. B. — Helen and the uninvited guests, J-G467h 

Gould, E. L. — Polly Prentiss goes a visiting. J-Gr)96!) 

Hill, G. B.— The young farmer, J-lTn46y 



Rafael, 




Browne, G. 


W 


Browne, G. 


W 


Browne, G. 


W 


Burgess. T. 


W. 


Burgess, T. 


W. 


Burgess, T. 


W. 



99 



Ilornibrook. I. — -A scout of today, J-H816s 

Lang, ]\lrs. A. — Strange story book, J-L269s 

Mason, A. P. — Tom Strong, boy captain, J-M398tp 

Pearson, E. L. — Voyage of the Hoppergrass, J-P361v 

Pratt. L. — Ezekiel expands, J-P915e 

Pj'le. K.— Tales of two bunnies, ' .J-P9965t 

Schultz. J. W.— On the warpath, J-S562p 
Shiite, H. A. — The misadventures of three good 

boys, J-S5625m 

Tarkington, B.— Peurod, J-T176p 

Tomlinson. P. G.— To the land of the Cariboo, J-T6595t 

Wheeier. S. K.— The bov with the U. S. Census, .J-W562bx 



MAGAZINES 



Atlantic, July-December, 1918. 
Atlantic, January- June, 1914. 
Century, May-October, 1913. 
Century, November, 1913-April, 1914. 
Century, ]\Iay-October, 1914. 
Cosmopolitan, June-November, 1913. 
Cosmopolitan, December, 1913-May, 1914. 
Everybody's, July-December, 1913. 
Everybody's, January- June, 1914. 
Harper's, June-November, 1913. 
Harper's, December, 1913-May, 19U. 
Hearst's. July-December, 1913. 
Hearst's, January-June, 1914. 
Munsey's, April-September, 1913. 
lyiunsey's. October, 1913- January, 1914. 
:\runsey's, February, 1914-May, 1914. 
^Funsey's, June-September, 1914. 
National, April-September, 1913. 
National. October, 1913-March, 1914. 
National, April-September, 1914. 
Popular Mechanics, July-December, 1913. 
Popular ^Mechanics. January-June, 1914. 
Review of Reviews. Julv-December, 1913. 



100 



Review of Reviews, Jaiuuiry-Juiie, 1914. 
St. Nicholas, May-October, 1913. 
St. Nicholas, November, 1913-April. 1914. 
Scribner's, Juh^-December, 1913. 
Scribner's, January-June, 1914. 
Scientific American, July-December, 1913. 
Scientific American, January- June, 1914. 
World's Work, May-October, 1913. 
World's Work, November, 1913-April. 1914. 
Youth's Companion, July-December, 1913. 
Youth's Companion, January-June, 1914. 

REFERENCE 

Acts and Resolves of ^lassachiisetts. 1914. 

Carnegie International Peace Endowment Year Book, 
1913. 

Encampment of the G. A. R., Massachusetts, 1914 

Journal of the House of Representatives, Massachusetts, 
1914 

Journal of the Senate of IMassachusetts, 1914. 

^Manual for the General Court of Massachusetts, 1914. 

Proceedings of IT. S. National Museum, 1914. 

Report on Municipal Finances of ]\rassachusetts, 1911. 

Report of the Interstate Commerce Commission, 1912. 

Report Board of Education, IT. S., 1918, 2 vols. 

Seventy-seventh Report Board of Education. ^lassachu- 
setts. 1912-1913. 

Twenty-seventh Report Board of Education, ^lassachu- 
setts, 1913. 

Vital Records of Abington, ]\Iass., 2 vols. 

Vital Records of Brockton, Mass. 

Vital Records of Dunstable. ^lass. 

Vital Records of Kingston, oNTass. 

Vital Records of Reading, ]\rass. 

Vital Records of Tewksbury, Mass. 

Vital Records of Wakefield, Mass. 

Vital Records of West Bridgewater, ^lass. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 

School Committee and Superintendent 
of Schools 

OF THE 

TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 
FOR THE TEN MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31 



1914 




THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 
1915 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE'S REPORT 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

1915 

March 12. Winter term closes 13 weeks 

Vacation, One Week 

March 22. Spring term opens 

June 18. Spring term closes 13 weeks 

Summer Vacation 

Sept. 7. Fall term opens 

Nov. 24. Pall term closes 12 weeks 

Thanksgiving R-ecess 

1015-1916 
Nov. 29. AVinter term opens 

Vacation from December 17 to January 3, Two Weeks 

1916 

^March 10. Winter term closes 13 weeks 

Vacation, One Week 

^larch 20. Spring term opens 

June 1 6. Spring term closes 13 weeks 

Total 38 weeks 



4 
SPECIAL EXERCISE DAYS AND HOLIDAYS 



Lincoln exercises, one hour. 
AVashington exercises, one hour. 
Patriots' Day exercises, one hour. 
Arbor Day exercises, one hour, 
^lemorial Day exercises, one hour. 
Columbus Day exercises, one hour. 
Thanksgiving Day exercises, one hour. 

Lincoln exercises, one hour. 
Washington exercises, one hour. 
Patriots' Day exercises, one hour. 
Memorial Dav exercises, one hour. 



1915 




Feb. 


12. 


Feb. 


19. 


April 


16. 


April 


23. 


May 


28. 


Oct. 


11. 


Nov. 


24. 


1916 




Feb. 


11. 


Feb. 


21. 


April 


18. 


Mav 


29. 



LEGAL HOLIDAYS 

The words "legal holiday" shall include the tAventy- 
second day of February, the nineteenth day of April, the 
thirtieth day of IMay. the fourtli day of July, the first 
IMonday of September, the twelfth day of October, Thanks- 
giving day and Christmas day, or the day following Avlieu 
any of tlie four days first mentioned, the twelfth day of 
October, or Christmas day occurs on Sunday. 

Arbor Day occurs on the last Saturday in April, and is 
not a legal holiday. 

Flag Day occurs on June 14. and is not a legal holiday. 
It should be observed bv anv school then in session. 



SCHOOL OFFICERS AND TEACHERS 



School Committee 



Samuel A. Christie Term expires 1915 

Bertram E. Hall. Secretary Term expires 1916 

Edwin A. Phaleii, Chairman Term expires 1917 

Superintendent 

Frank H. Hill, Residence, Littleton. ]\rass. 
Telephone No. 36-3 Littleton 

Attendance Officers 

Thomas Scanlon, Address, West Acton 
Asaph Parlin. Address, Acton Center 

Janitors 

Fred S. Glines. Address, South Acton 
Tliomas Scanlon, Address, West Acton 
Asaph Parlin. Address, Acton Center 



Teachers in Service January 1, 1915 



Name 
Martha Smith 
Ella Miller 
Minnie Gamble 
Elizabeth Hinckley 
Julia McCarthy 
Jennie Stowell 
Emma M. Halliday 
Harriet H. Gardner 
Esther M. Vance 
Eula S. Taylor 
Alice M. Genthner 
Marion C. Taylor 



Position Appo 

Center Primarj' 1902 

Center Intermediate 1899 

Center Grammar 1905 

South Lower Primary 1909 

South Upper Primary 1906 

South Intermediate 1907 

South Gramm.-xr 1914 

West PrimaiT 1889 

West Intermediate 1914 

West Grammar 1909 

Supervisor of Music 1910 

Supervisor of Drawinc 1912 



inted Educated 

Lowell Normal 
Framinshani Normal 
Woburn Traininsc 
Hyaunis Normal 
Fitchburg Normal 
Fitchburg Normal 
Gnrhnm, Me. Normal 
Aver. Mass. 
Fithcburg Normal 
Mt. Holvoke College 
N. E. Com of Music 
Mass. Normal Art 



Home Address 

Aotou. Mass. 
North Aeton. Mass. 
Woburn. Mass. 
Hyannis, Mass. 
South Acton, Ma3^- 
South Acton, Mass. 
Calais, Me. 
West Acton. Mass. 
Norwood, Mass. 
S()t:iIi Acton, Mass. 
Faxcroft. Me. 
Acton. Mass. 



STANDING RULES 

*Rule 1. Children under five years shall not be admittea 
to the public schools. 

Rule 2. Pii])ils shall be promoted from grade to grade 
and school to school, according to merit. Thorough and sat- 
isfactory work will be required of pupils in a lower grade 
or school before entering a higher grade or school. 

Rule 3. Children Avho have not previously attended any 
school shall be admitted to the public schools only at the be- 
ginning of the fall term 

Rule 4. Pupils shall be held responsible for books 
loaned to them until returned to the teacher. 

Rule 5. No repairs shall be made upon the public pro- 
perty in the care of the school committee, except by tljeir 
authorized agents. 

Rule 6. There shall be no signal for "no school" on 
stormy or other inclement days, but parents shall determine 
in their individual cases whether it is expedient to send 
their children to school or not. 

*When the birthday of a child falls on or before the 15th 
day of the month it is reckoned as falling upon the first day 

of that month. 



GENERAL REPORT 



On April 3d, 1914 the committee met and organized. Mr. 
E. A. Phalen was chosen chairman and Mr. B. E. Hall, sec- 
rectary. 

The committee has followed the plan of the previous 
year in holding monthly meetings. 

The joint committee from this school district met at 
Littleton on April 19, 1914. The matter of choosing a super- 
intendent of schools came up at this meeting. Mr. Hills' 
work in our schools was highly commended by the entire 
committee and he was again chosen to serve for three years. 

During the summer vacation the Center school house 
was given a much needed coat of paint and the desks and 
seats in all the schools were thoroughly cleaned and 
varnished. 

The town of Concord has again increased the price of 
tuition from $70 to $80, which accounts for the increase in 
this item in our report. 

Owing to the increased number of pupils in the South 
Acton school it has been necessary to hire an assistant in 
the first grade. 

Following is the detailed report of receipts and disburse- 
ments from ^Farcli 1 to December 81. 1914 (10 months) and 
;i!i estimate of the expenses for the ensuing year. 



I 



8 

ESTIIMATES FOR THE SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS FOR 

THE FISCAL YEAR 1915 



For general expenses : 

Salaries and other expenses of 

the committee $1 25 . 00 

Salaries and other expenses of 
the superintendent and truant 

officers 250.00 

For expenses of instruction : 

Tuition of pupils attending out 

of town schools 7.200.00 

Salaries of elementary school 

teachers 5.850.00 

For textbooks : 

For elementary schools it is antici- 
pated that the amonnt to be 
received from dog tax will 
cover this item. 
For stationery and supplies: 

Elementary schools 250.00 

For expenses of operating school plants : 
Wages of janitors, fuel and mis- 
cellaneous expenses 1.950.00 

Maintenance and repairs 250.00 

For auxiliary agencies: 

Health 75.00 

For transportation : 

High school scholars 2.000.00 

Elementary scholars 1.826.00 

Total $19,776.00' 



9 

iiECEIPTS OX ACCOUNT OF SCHOOLS :\rARCH 1. 1914 

TO DECEMBER 81, 1914 



Appropriations 

For general expenses: 

Salaries and other expenses of 

the committee $125.00 

Salaries and other expenses of 
the superintendent and trnant 

officers 250 . 00 

For expenses of instruction: 

Tuition of pupils attending Con- 
cord 6,000.00 

Salaries of elementary school 

teachers 5,500 . 00 

For textbooks : 

For elementary schools it is antici- 
pated that the amount to be 
received from dog tax will 
cover this. 
For stationery and supplies: 

Common schools 350 . 00 

For expenses of operating school plants : 
Wages of janitors, fuel and mis- 
cellaneous expenses 1,950.00 

Maintenance and repairs 250.00 

For auxiliary agencies: 

Health 50.00 

For transportation : 

High school scholars 2.000 . 00 

Elementary scholars 1,775.00 

Outside sources: 

Income Mass. School fund unex- 
pended balance IMar. 1, 1914 1,428.80 



10 



Prom State for supervision 343 . 75 

From State for industrial school . 147.50 
From State for tuition 170.10 



Total $20,340.15 



DISBURSEMENTS 

Greneral Expenses 

School Committee 

Salaries : 
Paid B. E. Hall, secretary, bal. 1913 

salary, and salary for 1914 $100. Oa 

Miscellaneous : 
Paid Wright & Potter Printing Co. . . $4.63 
B. E. Hall, telephone, postage, etc. 6.03 
E. A. Phalen, miscellaneous ex- 
penses 2.48 

Samuel "Ward Co., stationery .... 2.20 

Brookside Printing Co., printing, 1.65 

G. W. Worster 1 . 50 

$18.49* 

Superintendent of Schools and Enforcement of Law 

Salaries : 

Paid Frank H. Hill superintendent . . 472.08 

Thomas Scanlon, truant officer . . 10.00 

Edw. C. Page, truant officer 9.25 

$491.33 



11 



Miscellaneous : 
Paid Marion C. Taylor, school census, $18.00 
Frank H. Hill, stationery, postage, 

telephone, etc 16.10 



Expense of Instruction 

Paid Town of Concord, high school . . $6,217.50 

Town of Concord, agricultural . . 567.00 

City of Lowell, industrial 265.00 

Town of Stow, high 50.00 



Elementary Schools : 

Paid Harriet H. Gardner $435.00 

E. Sophia Taylor 391.50 

Agnes C. Greenhalgh 182.00 

Bertha B. McLean 196.00 

Jennie E. Stowell 391 . 50 

Julia L. McCarthy 391 . 50 

Elizabeth A. Hinckley 391.50 

Martha F. Smith 391.50 

Ella L. Miller 391.50 

Minnie Gamble 391.50 

Esther Vance 180.00 

Emma M. Halliday 202.50 

Emily Nagle 70.00 

Eva E. M. Gray 28.00 

Alice M. Genthner 152 . 69 

Marion C. Taylor 158.98 



$34.10 



$7,099 . 50 



$4,345.67 



12 



Text Books 




aid American Book Co 


$14.90 


Houghton, ^lifflin Co 


22.33 


Ginn & Co 


37.90 


Edward E. Babb & Co 


142.24 


Silver, Biirdett & Co 


2.16 


E. P. Button & Co 


30.33 


J. L. Hammett Co 


3 . 02 


P. S. Glines 


.25 


Boston School Supply Co 


5.42 


J. Fischer & Bro 


2.38 


Oliver Ditson Co 


2.16 



Stationery and Supplies 



Paid Edward E. Babb & Co. 
Huntley S. Turner . . . . 

Fred S. Glines 

Thomas Scanlon 

J. L. Hammett Co 

Ginn & Co 

G. E. Greenoutjh 



$62 


.91 


15 


. 20 


6 


.78 




.38 


100, 


.85 


18, 


.06 


1, 


.00 



Expenses of Operating- School Plants 

Wages of Janitors 

Paid Fred S. Glines $300.00 

Tliomas Scanlon 312.00 

Asaph Parlin 1 82 . 00 



$263.09 



$205.18 



$794.00 



13 



Fuel: 

Paid So. Acton Coal & Lumber Co. . . $743.0:3 

Geo. H. Reed 68.36 

T. C. DoAvnie 10.50 

G. E. Greenough 25.00 

Hall Brothers Co 3.75 

L. W. Richardson 2.25 



Miscellaneous : 

Paid American Woolen Co $8.58 

Tuttle & Newton 9.86 

Fred S. Glines . 1 . 75 

Thomas Scanlon 15.00 

Asaph Parlin 8 . 50 

Hopkinson & Holden 15 . 82 

Daniel Hennessey 3 . 00 

W. & S. Water Supply District 

of Acton 12.00 

Napoleon S. Hoagland 21.65 

Geo. H. Gutteridge 5.50 

E. T. Rice 14.15 

Alma Stowell .50 



Maintenance 



Repairs 



$852. 8^^ 



$116.31 



Paid Davis King Co $28.50 

G. E. Greenough 18.00 

Charles H. Persons 2.00 

Arthur B. Day 2.00 

John S. Hoar .85 

E. T. Rice 10.60 

Solon A. Robbins 91.10 



14 



Fred F. Chandler 125.00 

Thomas Scanlon 47 . 75 

Asaph Parlin 15 . 50 

Fred S. Glines 33.00 

S. A. Coal & Lumber Co 6. 10 

L. E. Reed 3.75 

E. A. Phalen 2.20 

E. Z. Stanley 6.05 



Auxiliary Agencies 

Health 

Paid Thomas Scanlon $4.50 

Geo. B. Robbins Disinfectant Co. 75.00 

Fred S. Glines .92 



Transportation 

High School : 

Paid Boston and Maine R. R. Co. .... $1,285.80 

N. Y. N. H. & H. R. R. Co 241.80 

E. H. Carev 24.20 



Iiowell Industrial School : 

Paid N. Y. N. H. & H. R. R. Co $62.15 

B. & M. R. R 12.00 



$392.40 



$80.42 



$1,551.80 



$74.15 



15 



Elementary : 

Paid A. Christofferson $576.00 

Walter M. French 430.00 

Jens Mekkelsen 518.00 

Chas. Edwards 529.00 

$2,053.00 
Total $18,472.33 

Total receipts $20,340.15 

Total disbursements 18,472 . 33 



Balance, Dec. 31, 1914 $1,867.82 

Due from State: 

Income ^Vlass. School funds $1,103.83 

Income from dog tax 292.01 



$1,395.84 



$3,263.66 



Respectfully submitted. 



EDWIN A. PHALEN. 
SAIVrUEL A. CHRISTIE. 
BERTRAM E. HALL, 

Committee. 



Acton. Feb. 24, 1915. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 



Members of the Committee : 

Following is my fifth report, the twenty-third in the 
series of such annual reports. 

At the end of the school year 1913-1914 two of our 
teachers left us to engage in other work, Miss Bertha B. 
McLean after four years of faithful labor as principal of 
the South Acton schools and Miss Agnes C. Grreenhalge after 
two years of equally faithful work in the intermediate 
school at West Acton. It was my good fortune to be able 
to secure as Miss McLean's successor ^liss Emma M. Hal- 
liday of Calais, Maine, a graduate of Gorham, Maine, Nor- 
mal School, and Miss Esther M. Vance of Norwood, a gradu- 
ate of Fitchburg Normal School, to take Miss Greenhalge's 
place. Miss Halliday had already demonstrated her ability 
under my supervision in Carlisle, and Miss Vance is ex- 
hibiting qualities that make her a welcome addition to the 
Acton corps of teachers. Of the work of the other teachers 
in town I have repeatedly expressed my appreciation in 
former reports, and still believe them worthy of our support. 

The school year ending in June, 1914, was in many 
ways a very satisfactory one. Something was attempted 
and something done towards establishing a standard of 
work possible to be done in the ordinary subjects taught in 
the grades. I refer to the course of study worked out in 
the schools and prepared for distribution late in the school 
year. It was made to be definite, in the sense that terms 
and materials familiar to teachers and commonly provided 
in school rooms were not avoided, nor were limits as meas- 
ured by pages omitted. But it was not made to be final, for 



17 

it would be possible, by better teaching and better pupil- 
co-operation to widen the limits assigned, or by poorer teach- 
ing and less pupil-co-operation to narrow those limits. Yet 
I shall be better pleased to continue the limits as assigned, 
and, mth better teaching and better pupil-co-operation, do 
more thoroughly and more completely the work that we at- 
tempt to do. In the place of more of a given subject, I urge 
my teachers to get better reading, better writing, better 
arithmetic, etc. "More", as a slogan in education should 
be dropped, and "Better"' substituted. Then only will the 
slow and average pupil come into his own. 

In order that I may assist in making good teachers bet- 
ter teachers I am introducing for their thoughtful considera- 
tion a copy of a sheet recently issued from the office of an 
agent of the State Board of Education. After due oppor- 
tunity for absorbing the meaning of these suggestive quali- 
fications as applied to themselves, I shall take up with each 
teacher, under the several headings, her own work, man- 
ner, interest, etc., as it appears to me. It goes without say- 
ing that this work will be done sympathetically but with 
firm impartiality. 

I shall follow this outline, for the present at least, in 
giving my estimate of the teacher to any inquiring superin- 
tendents or agencies, and shall keep on file a copy for the 
inspection of the teacher herself. 

I shall ask the special teachers to report their own ob- 
servations, along the lines of this sheet, and believe that in 
this process we may all discover something to our own ad- 
vantage with respect to our own shortcomings, and possibly 
find some excellencies which it may do us good to know 
definitely. 



18 



TEACHING ABILITY 



SCHOOL ROOM MANNER 



Logical. Illogical. 

Systematic. Unsystematic. 

Concentrated. Diffuse. 

Original. Imitative. 

Holds active attention of chil- 
dren. 

Power of correlation — Excel- 
lent. Good. Fair. Poor. 

GOVERNING ABILITY. 

Firm. Variable. Weak. 
Secures respect of pupils. 
Secures co-operation of pupils. 
Commands obedience. 
Successful. Unsuccessful. 



Orderly. Pleasant. Kindly. 
Easy. Forceful. Dictatorial. 
Antagonistic. Self-control — 
Excellent. Good. Fair. Poor.. 

SCHOOL ROOM APPEARANCE. 

Neat. Untidy. Slack. 
Tasteful in dress. Lacks taste 

in dress. 
Excellent. Good. Fair. Poor. 

PROFESSIONAL INTEREST. 

Strong. Progressive. 
Slight. Deficient. 



PHYSIQUE. 

Tall. Medium. Short. 
Robust. Vigorous. Weak. 

TEMPERAMENT. 

Calm. Impulsive. 
Self -controlled. Nervous. 
Energetic. Slothful. 
Tactful. Lacks tact. 
Purposeful, Lacks definite 
purpose. 



COOPERATIVE RELATION- 
SHIPS. 

With superintendent. Recep- 
tive. Profits by sugges- 
tions. Apathetic. Opposes. 

With parents. Secures co- 
operation. Does not secure 
co-operation. Antagonizes. 

With fellow-teachers. Agree- 
able. Popular. Helpful. 
Neglectful. Unpopular. 
Antagonizes. 



VOICE. 



HABITUAL USE OF ENGLISH. 



Soft. Well-modulated. 

Agreeable. 
Strong. Harsh. Disagreeable. 

REMARKS. 



Correct. Precise. Well-chosen. 
Incorrect. Careless. Slovenly. 
Enunciation — Good. Fair. 
Poor. 



19 
THE CARD SYSTEM OF CENSUS TAKING 

By the new method of census taking each child's name 
appears on an individual card which is cumulative, in its 
nature and designed to trace the child's school record 
throughout his course in the schools. As a child is required 
to attend school 130 days after his 13th birthday before he 
can leave school for employment or otherwise, (until he 
reaches the age of 16), the teachers, acting under my in- 
struction have taken these cards and in the case of children 
becoming 13 during the school year, have drawn a diagonal 
line through the space showing the school attendance for 
that year, above which line they have entered the number 
of days attended before 13, and beneath the line the number 
of days attended since becoming 13 years of age. By fol- 
lowing this plan it will not be necessary to go back to the 
registers to get necessary information concerning attendance 
since the 13th birthday. In this w^a^^ a certain kind of cler- 
ical work that heretofore has required more or less time in 
research will be much simplified. 

I wish to call the attention of all attendance (or tru- 
ant officers to section 13. chapter 779. of the acts of 1913. 
This section, with its references, will give a pretty clear 
idea of the scope of such officers' duties and his responsibili- 
ties. It will be seen that these officers shall inquire into all 
cases arising under certain sections of this chapter; shall 
make complaints and serve legal processes issued under the 
provisions of this chapter; shall have oversight of children 
placed on probation under the provisions of section seven ; 
shall have oversight of children suffering want as provided 
in chapter 356, of the acts of 1914, of minors licensed by 
the school committee under the provisions of chapter 419 of 
the acts of 1910, and its amendments, and of children ad- 
mitted to or attending shows or entertainments contrary to 
the provisions of chapter 532 of the acts of 1910. Also, 
that an attendance officer may apprehend and take to school 
without a warrant any truant or absentee found wandering 
about in the streets or public places. 



20 



Teachers should promptly notify the attendance officers 
of any unexplained absence from school, but the burden of 
getting the absentees back into, the school clearly appears 
to be upon the attendance officers. 

There is a little tendency to blame the schools for as- 
serting what is not only a right but an obligation imposca 
by law. With this explanation I look to see all parents 
gladly co-operating with the school authorities in this mat- 
ter of attendance. 

I have noted with satisfaction the enthusiasm which 
has resulted in the purchase of victrolas in the Center and 
West schools. I do not think this is a fad, but a permanent 
necessity. It can be a fad only if the many opportunities 
offered by the victrolas be neglected. In many ways, in- 
doors, at all seasons, we expect to find the victrolas con- 
tributing to the educational advantages of these schools. 
We shall seek, not to amuse, but to inspire and uplift our 
pupils — to add grace and beauty to the physical child 
througli physical exercises to the accompaniment of appro- 
priate and stirring music, and give to the mental and spirit- 
ual possessions higher standards for emulation. If judici- 
ously used, as we hope and expect, a feature has been added 
to the school work that will be rich in good results. 

The school savings system is now in operation in all the 
schools of the town. I urge parents to unite with us in 
encouraging their children to begin to save systematically. 
It is not the large savings we ask for, with few depositors : 
it is not dollars that count in this system, but numbers. I 
hope every boy and girl will begin to bring his pennies and 
start a real bank account. The law approves this movement 
and provides for having it carried along. 

For a statement of the actual present condition of 
school savings in Acton I call your attention to a report 
entered elsewhere under an appropriate heading. 

In conclusion I wish to thank you, for myself and 
teachers, for the interest you have taken in the schools and 
in us. We have been sustained by friendly co-operation 



21 



and have endeavored to merit it. and shall endeavor to merit 
it in tlie future. 

Respectfully submitted. 

FRANK H. HILL, 
Superintendent of Rehools. 
Aeton. January 18. 1915. 



90 



REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF DRAWING 



Superintendent F. H. Hill: 

Dear Sir : — I herewith submit my third report as super- 
visor of dra^ving for the town of Acton, Mass. 

The subject of drawing in the public schools should 
liave a sound and practical educational value when taught 
properly. Drawing should stimulate pupils to higher ideals, 
-SO that they will have a desire for all that is beautiful and 
good in design and color. 

Pupils should be able to choose good costumes, home 
furnishings, wall papers, well designed furniture and pic- 
tures. They must be choice in color and material ])ut not 
necessarily costly. 

The child must be taught to be resourceful and after 
understanding the principles of the work, be able to go 
ahead alone, and involve these principles in other things. 

The course in drawing this year is to teach pupils these 
things, and at the present time has been successful in all 
:Schools. 

The work in the primary grades is very simple, drawing 
straight lines, to gain control of the hand and arm. The 
lines are applied to all sorts of objects about the home ana 
school so that a good variety of drawings is made. 

The Munsell crayons and paints are used in most of 
the schools, but not in every room, so that a mixed color 
system is taught this year. Free-hand paper cutting of ob- 
jects of interest has been done successfully in the three vil- 
lages. Throughout the year the work is of this nature, only 
the principles are applied to more difficult problems, such as 



23 



borders, rosettes, tiles, object drawino-. lettering, measuring-, 
memory work and nature study. 

The intermediate and grammar grade work is similar, 
l)ut the work becomes more difficult as the pupil advances 
in ability. ]\lany principles of designs, color, representation, 
construction and methods of working out problems are in- 
volved. Nature work involving flowers, fruit and vegetables 
have been draAvn and studied carefully in all grades. Object 
drawing has been tried in all the schools with very good 
results in the grammar grades. The intermediate schools 
do not have as good results as I should like, there being a 
lack of interest in the work. The paper construction in all 
grades has been done very well. Designing has been tried, 
working out wall paper patterns, tiles, borders and cover 
designs. Page designing, spacing and free-hand lettering 
will be done in the spring and a study of good advertising. 

The perspective drawing in the grammar grades is a 
hard subject for it involves street scenes, still life, objects 
of every description, drawn at different levels to the eye.. 
In this work the child learns to judge distances and pro- 
portions. 

There has been a decided gain in the work at Actou' 
Center and South Acton, but in some subjects the West 
Acton sixth grade has pulled the work down to a low 
standard because of lack of interest in drawing. I feel en- 
couraged this year, for all the teachers try to nmke the 
work successful and interesting, so that by the end of the 
year I feel my aim in the work will be gained. 

I wish to thank all who have helped in the advance- 
ment of the work. 

Respectfully submitted. 

:\1ARI0X C. T.WLOR,. 
Jannarv 2. 1915. 



2\ 



REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC 



Mr. F. H. Hill, Superintendent of Schools: 

I herewith submit my fifth annual report on music in 
the schools of Acton. IMass. 

There is little to report, at this time, concerning the 
work in music, as the outline of study is similar to the one 
of last year and there have been few changes in the schools. 

The teachers and pupils join in an effort to carry out 
the work required by the outline and the interest/ in the 
^subject is always excellent. 

I wish to encourage individual singing, beginning early 
in the lower grades, so the children may gain the confidence 
to sing alone and be able to express themselves through the 
medium of music as they would in other recitations. 

This would be of great value after the study of two and 
three-part music is taken up, for, if a pupil is an independ- 
ent singer, he or she should be able to carry a part against 
the whole class. 

A child who can read music rapidly, individually, has 
-developed the power to stand before people and "think." 

Smooth singing, beside making a pleasant, tuneful 
sound, puts the child into a calm, harmonious physical state 
that allows the mind to work in the same calm, unruffled 
manner. 

Much credit is due the teachers and pupils of the Center 
and West Schools, who, through their perseverence have 
raised money for, and purchased two school victrolas. 

The Center School gave a Hiawatha entertainment dur- 
ing the spring term, then repeated it at West Acton, divid- 



25 



ing the proceeds with the West School as a beginning of 
the victrola fund. 

The children of the West School gave a Christmas oper- 
etta, Dec. 15, 1914, entitled ''Santa in Southland," proceeds 
of which are to buy records. 

The preparation and presentation of these little school 
entertainments, beside bringing pleasure to the children, 
gives them a practical application of music, of careful enun- 
ciation and expression in both singing and speaking parts 
and other things helpful in all lines of education though not 
always found in books. 

•Should the South Acton School decide to purchase a 
victrola, I am sure the other two schools would be glad to 
help in any way possible. 

I hardly need speak of the value of a victrola in school 
w^ork. 

For the children are not only enabled to hear their own 
songs from the educational books, sung correctly, this being 
of especial advantage in tAvo and three part work, but all 
children now have the opportunity to become familiar with 
and appreciate the standard and classical selections which 
we cannot teach in the limited music period. 

If a careful selection of records is made, a school will 
gain much of educational worth, by using the victrola for 
marching, calisthenics, folk-dancing, patriotic songs, stories, 
and readings, also from instrumental numbers will they 
learn to distinguish the tones of different instruments of an 
orchestra. 

The grouping of the grades for music is the same, with 
the exception of grade six at West School, this year study- 
ing with grades seven and eight. 

I thank all the teachers most heartily for their help ana 
interest, also the superintendent and committee for their 
support. 

' Respectfully submitted. 

ALICE M. GENTIINER. 



26 

KOLL OF HONOR 
Three Terms 

r 

West Acton — Warren Boyce, Margaret Hall. 
South Acton — Ralph Samsel, Mary Hearon. 
Acton Center — None. 

Two Terms 

West Acton — Marion Davis, Perry Willis, Stuart Beacli. 

South Acton — Ra3^mond Johnson, Nicholas Samsel. 

Acton Center — IMarion Leary, Gilbert Buchanan, Edith 
Tuttle, Francis Webb, Ralph Smith. Anfin Anderson. Dora 
Livermore, Leon Marsh. 

One Term 

West Acton — John Beach, Gladys Schnair, Eileen Hur- 
ley, Gladys Chapman, Willie Schnair, Henry Hall. Dorothy 
Greer, Daniel Hurley, Norman Carey, Hazel Beach, Valma 
Carey, Ivar Peterson, Harry French, Naomi Schnair, ^Tabel 
Dewey. Warren Davis, Donald Littlefield. Ruth Davis. 

South Acton — Catherine Hearon, Dorothy Stouey. ]\rir- 
iam Whitney, Lawrence Shea, Ruth Fullerton, Bertha Mer- 
Tiam, Norman Macy, Francis Page, William Cahill, John 
Fletcher, John Sullivan, Donald Fullerton, Irving Smith, 
Margaret Whitney, Dorothy Lowden, Gladys Warren. 
Ernest Greenough, Osgood Tiittlo. Hope Kimball, Anthony 
Foley. 

Acton Center — Jenuie Tuttle, Rebecca Fredrikson, 
'Marion Spinney. John ^lekkelsen, ^Morris Sluyski, George 
Smith, Leslie Loomer. Alfred Cote, Chester Daley. Evelyn 
Farrar. Norman Livonnore. Sj^encer Murphy, ]\Lirgaret 
Ravner, Carolvn Shaw, Walter Tnim])le, Rosella Webb. 



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27 
REPORT OF SIGHT AND HEARING TEST 

School Examined 



West 89 

Center 90 

Sonth 138 



Totp.l 817 21 7 23 

SCHOOL CENSUS, SEPTE:\IBER, 1914 

Boys 
Number of children between 5 and 7 

years of age 42 

Number of children between 7 and 14 

years of age 129 

Number of children betAveen 14 and 

1 6 years of age 24 

Number of minors between 14 and 16 

years of age wiio cannot read at 

sight and write legibly simple sen- 
tences in the English language . . 
Number of illiterate children sixteen 

years of age or over and under 

twenty-one years of age 

Total 195 194 389 



Girls 


Total 


47 


89 


110 


239 


37 


61 



28 



EMPLOYMENT AND EDUCATIONAL CERTIFICATES 
AND HOME PER^MITS 

Boys Girls Total 

Employment certificates 

Educational certificates, (literMte) ... 9 7 16 

Educational certificates, (illiterate) . . 10 1 

Home permits 2 2 

Total 12 7 19 

SCHOOL SAVINGS 

Nn. Depositors Amt. Collected 

South Acton 68 $161 . 79 

West Acton 81 243.98 

Acton Center 30 81 . 25 

Totals 174 $487.02 

ATTENDANCE OFFICERS' REPORT 

South West Center 

Number of cases investigated 4 10 I 

Number returned to school 4 9 1 

Number committed to truant school . . •) 

Cost $9.25 $4.00 $2.00 

Nnmber Graduated from Grammar Schools, 1914 

Boys Girls Tot-1 

Acton Center 3 4 7 

West Acton 4 I 8 

South Acton ^ 7 11 

11 15 26 



29 



Number Entering Concord High 



Boys Girls 


Total 


■.\ 2 


5 


H 5 


8 


:] 3 


6 



Aeton Center 
South Acton . 
\Yest Acton . 



9 10 19 

Acton Pupils in Concord High 

1915 1916 1917 1918 Total 

Commercial course 6 4 7 4 21 

College course 1 -1 2 10 17 

General course 2 1 3 

Scientific course 1 1 2 1 5 

Domestic arts course 3 8 4 4 19 

Mechanic arts course 2 3 4 9 

Agricultural course 1 2 2 4 9 

Total U 22 W W 83~~ 

Acton Pupils in Stow High School 

1915 1916 1917 1918 
College course 1 1 

Lowell Industrial school 2 Pupils 



30 



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South 







INDEX 

Aeton ]\Ieifiorial Library 92 

List of Books Added 95 

Assessors ' Report 72 

Board of Health 77 

Cemetery Commissioners HI 

Collector's Report 74 

Overseers of the Poor 81 

Road Commissioners 80 

Sealer of Weights and i\Ieasures 79 

Selectmen 's Report 38 

State Election 24 

ToAvn Accountant's Report 40 

To^^Ti Clerk's Report 28 

Births 81 

Deaths ;]3 

Dog Licenses 36 

Marriages 29 

Non-Resident Bnrials 35 

Town Officers 3 

Town Meetings 11 

Town Warrant 7 

Treasurer's Report 66 

Tree Warden 76 

Trustees GoodnoAv Fund 91 

SECOND SECTION 

School Report 1 

School Calendar 3 

Special Exercises and Holidays 4 

School Officers and Teachers 5 

Standing Rules (i 

General Report 7 

Financial Statement 8 

Superintendent's Report 16 

Supervisor of Music 24 

Supervisor of Drawing 22 

Roll of Honor 25' 

Statistical Tables 27 



\ 



■^ 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



SEVERAL OFFICIAL BOARDS 



OP THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR THE TWELVE MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31 



1915 




THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 

HUDSON, MASS. 

1910 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



SEVERAL OFFICIAL BOARDS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR THE TWELVE :\IONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31 



1915 




THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 

HUDSON, MASS. 

1910 



TOWN OFFICERS, 1915. 



Selectmen. 



Nicholas Samsel Term expires 191T 

Charles J. Holton Term expires 1918 

Edward Z. Stanley Term expires 1916 

Town Clerk 

Horace F. Tuttle 

Town Treasurer 
Frank W. Hoit 

Assessors 

William F. Stevens Term expires 1917 

James B. Tiittle Term expires 1918 

William F. Kelley Term expires 1916 

Overseers of the Poor 

William F. Kelley Edward Z. Stanley Fred S. Whitcomb 

Collector of Taxes 

William F. Stevens 

Tree Warden 

James O'Neil 

Constables 
John T. IMcNiff Charles A. Taylor 

William F. Stevens Oliver D. Wool 



Albert H. Perkins 
Benjamin Ineson 



Charles J. Holt on 



Field Drivers 



Fence Viewers 

Nicholas Samsel 



Alfred S. Carey 
Charles A. Taylor 



Edward Z. Stanley 



Cemetery Commissioners 

Julian Tuttle Term expires 1918 

Fred W. Green Term expires 1917 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1916 

School Committee 

Edwin A. Phalen Term expires 1917 

Herbert W. Lewis Term expires 191S 

Bertram E. Hall Term expires 1916 

Trustees of Memorial Library 

(Chosen by the Town) 

J. Sidney White Term expires 1917 

L/ucius A. Hesselton Term expires 1918 

Horace F. Tuttle Term expires 1916 

Board of Health 

Edwin A. Phalen Term expires 1917 

Frank E. Tasker Term expires 1918 

Edward C. Page Term expires 1916 



■James B. Tuttle 

Asaph Merriam 



Finance Committee 

Edgar H. Hall 
Arthur M. Whitcomb 
Horace F. Tuttle 



APPOINTED BY THE SELECTMEN 



Supt. of Streets 
Albert H. Perkins 

Town Accountant 
Howard L. Jones 

Registars of Voters 

Samuel A. Guilford Term expires 1916 

James McGreen Term expires 1918 

George E. Holton Term expires 1917 

Horace F. Tuttle, ex-officio 

Election Officers 

Precinct 1 

Warden James W. Coughlin 

Deputy Warden Edwin A. Phalen 

Clerk Horace F. Tuttle 

Deputy Clerk Moses E. Taylor 

Inspector Arthur F. Davis 

Deputy Inspector Willis L. Holden 

Inspector Elmer C. Cheney 

Deputy Inspector Moses A. Reed 

Inspector William H. Kingsley 

Deputy Inspector John S. White 

Precinct 2 

Warden L. • A. Hesselton 

Deputy AVarden T. F. Newton 

Clerk Lorenzo E. Reed 



6 



Deputy Clerk Anson C. Piper 

Inspector L. C. Hastings 

Deputy Inspector Frank A. Merriam 

Inspector Constance 'Neil 

Deputy Inspector Nelson J. Cole 

Inspector J. S. Moore 

Deputy Inspector George E. Clapp 

Precinct 3 

Warden Charles J. Holton 

Deputy "Warden Eugene L. Hall 

Clerk William F. Kelley 

Deputy Clerk William L. Tenney 

Inspector Fred S. Whitcomb 

Deputy Inspector C. H. Mead 

Inspector David T. Kinsley 

Deputy Inspector John T. McNiff 

Inspector Charles A. Durkee 

Deputy Inspector Bertram E. Hall 

Cattle Inspector 

Fred S. Whitcomb 

Fire Engineers 

Precinct 1 
William H. Kingsley, Chief, for the Town 
Dexter L. Spinney, 1st Asst. Arthur F. Harris, 2d Asst.. 

Precinct 2 

James P. Brown. 1st Asst. W. 11. Jones, 2d Asst. 

Nelson J. Cole, 3d Asst. 

Precinct 3 

Wm. J. Benere, 1st Asst. Edgar T. Rice, 2d Asst. 

Wm. J. Costello, 3d Asst. 

Forest Warden 
Wm. H. Kingsley 



Deputy Forest Wardens 

All the above named assistant Fire Engineers 

Surveyors of Lumber and Measurers of Wood and Bark 

J. W. Dupee Bertram D. Hall E. C. Cheney 

Charles E. Smith Frank A. Merriam 

Public Weighers 

J. P. Fletcher M. E. Taylor E. C. Cheney E. F. Conant 

Thomas Hearon George H. Eeed Wm. H. Teele 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Lowell H. Cram 

Supt. of Moth Work 

James O'Xeil 

Police Officers 
Charles A. Taylor Herbert H. Moore Oliver D. Wood 

Inspector of Slaughter Houses 
Charles A. Dudley 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Middlesex, ss. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Acton, in the 
County aforesaid. GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required and directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the town of Acton aforesaid, who are quali- 
fied to vote in elections and in town affairs therein, to meet 
in the town hall, in said town, on Monday, the sixth day of 
March, 1916, at nine (9) o'clock in the forenoon, then and 
there to act on the following articles, to wit : 

Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2. To bring in their votes on one ballot for the 
following named town officers, to wit: One town clerk for 
one year; one selectman for three years; one selectman for 
one year (to fill unexpired term) ; three overseers of the 
poor for one year; one town treasurer for one year; five 
members of the finance committee for one year; one collec- 
tor of taxes for one year ; one tree warden for one year ; four 



constables for one year; four field drivers for one year; 
three fence viewers for one year; one assessor for three 
years; one assessor for one year (to fill unexpired term); 
one trustee of the Memorial library for three years ; one mem- 
ber of the school committee for three years; one cemetery 
commissioner for three years ; one member of the board of 
health for three years. Also on the same ballot to vote "Yes" 
or *'No" on the following question, viz: "Shall licenses be 
granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this town?" 
The polls will be opened at 9.30 a. m., and may be closed at 
4 p. m. 

Article 3. To choose all necessary town officers not 
named in Article 2, and to fix salaries of all town officers. 

Article 4. To see if the town will accept the reports of 
the various town officers. 

x\rticle 5. To hear and act upon the reports of any 
committees chosen at any previous meeting, that have not 
already reported. 

Article 6. To see what sums of money the town will 
raise by taxation and appropriate to defray the necessary 
and usual expenses of the several departments of the town. 

Article 7. To see what amount of money the town will 
raise and appropriate for the due observance of Memorial 
day. 

Article 8. To see if the town will appropriate a sum 
of money for the enforcement of the liquor laws, or act 
anything thereon. 

Article 9. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to the extermination of the elm leaf beetle. 

Article 10. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to the extermination of the gypsy and brown tail 
moth. 

Article 11. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to the collection of taxes. 

Article 12. To see if the town will vote to oil the 
streets in the villages of the town, or act anything thereon. 

Article 13. To see if the town will pay for fighting 
brush fires, and fix the price, or act anything thereon. 



10 



Article 14. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to insure the employes of the 
town, or do or act anything thereon. 

Article 15. To see what sum of money the town will 
raise and appropriate for the maintenance of the fire de- 
partments, or do or act anything thereon. 

Article 16. To see if the town will appropriate a sum 
of money not exceeding $500, towards the water main that 
is to connect Woodlawn cemetery with the town water sys- 
tem, or do or act anything thereon. 

Article 17. To see if the town will vote to discontinue 
the road leading from the State road at a point a few rods 
east of the house of A. W. Davis, to the house of G. T. Sisson 
(known as the Gould farm), or act anything thereon. 

Article 18. To see if the town will appropriate a sum 
of money to have the hands and figures on three faces of the 
town clock gold-leafed. 

Article 19. To see what action the town will take in 
reference to securing the removal of the partially burned 
building situated on the hotel property in Acton Center. 

Article 20. To see if the town will vote to spend fif- 
teen hundred dollars of the money raised and appropriated 
for highways, for the repair of the so-called Lowell road, 
from the Great road to the place where it was repaired last 
year; provided the state and county will each appropriate 
like amounts for said road, or take any action thereon. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to close or dis- 
continue the two pieces of road leading from the so-called 
Daniel Tuttle road, one by Dr. Allen's house, and the other 
crossing over by the town hall. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to have the old 
stone watering trough that stands at the old town pump 
moved to some other part of the town, where it can be used 
for the public's benefit. And appropriate a sum of money 
for doing the same. 

Article 23. To see if the town will vote to tint the 
walls and ceilings of the town hall, including ante rooms, 
and paint the woodwork, patch the plastering and such 



11 



other work to make the job complete. And appropriate a 
sum of money for the same. 

Article 24. To see what amount of money the town 
\\dll raise and appropriate for payment of premium on 
treasurer and collector, or act anything thereon. 

Article 25. To see if the town will vote to sell the town 
farm, or act anything thereon. 

And you are hereby commanded to serve this warrant 
by posting an attested copy thereon in each of the post 
offices and railroad stations in said town, and one in each of 
the stores of C. H. Mead & Co., W. E. Whitcomb, M. E. 
Taylor & Co., Tuttle & Newton, Finney & Hoit, George H. 
Reed, in said town, and one at the Nagog House, in said 
town, seven days at least before the time appointed for 
holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not, and make due return of this warrant 
with your doings thereon, to the town clerk, or the select- 
men, at or before the time appointed for holding said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands at Acton, this twenty-first day 
of February, in the year one thousand, nine hundred and 
sixteen. 

NICHOLAS SAMSEL, 
EDWARD Z. STANLEY, 
CHARLES J. HOLTON, 

Selectmen of Acton. 



12 



Proceedings of the Special Town Meeting, February 4, 1915 



Article 1. To choose a moderator to perside at said 
meeting. 

William H. Kingsley was chosen moderator. 

Article 2. To see if the town will authorize the 
treasurer with the approval of the selectmen to borrow 
mone}^ from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of 
the financial year beginning January 1, 1915, and to issue 
a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, any debt 
or debts incurred under this vote to be paid from the 
revenue of said financial year. 

Voted: That the town treasurer, with the approval 
of the selectmen, be and is hereby authorized to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of 
the financial year, beginning January 1, 1915, and to issue 
a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, any debt 
or debts incurred under this vote to be paid from the 
revenue of said financial year. 

Voted : To adjourn. 



13 



Proceedings of the Annual Meeting, March 29, 1915 



Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Allen Brooks Parker was chosen moderator. 

Article 2. To bring in their votes on one ballot for 
town officers, also to vote on the question "shall licenses 
be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this 
town?" 

The following town officers were chosen : 

Town Clerk— Horace F. Tuttle. 

Selectman — Charles J. Holton, for three years. 

Assessor — James B. Tuttle. 

Overseers of the Poor — William F. Kelley, Edward Z. 
Stanley, Fred S. Whitcomb. 

Treasurer — Frank W. Hoit. 

Collector of Taxes — William F. Stevens. 

Constables— John T. McXiJff, William F. Stevens, 
Oliver D. Wood, Charles A. Taylor. 

Field Drivers — Albert H. Perkins, Benjamin Ineson, 
Alfred S. Carey, Charles A. Taylor. 

Fence Viewers — Charles J. Holton, Nicholas Samsel, 
Edward Z. Stanley. 

School Committee — Herbert W. Lewis. 

Cemetery Commissioner — Julian Tuttle. 

Board of Health— Frank E. Tasker. 

Trustee of Memorial Library — Lucius Hesselton. 

Tree Warden — James O'Neil. 

Finance Committee — James B. Tuttle, Edgar H. Hall, 
Asaph Merriam, Horace F. Tuttle, Arthur M. Whitcomb. 

On the question, "Shall licenses be granted for the 
sale of intoxicating liquors in this town?*' 

65 voted yes 220 voted no 



14 



Article 3. To choose all necessary town officers not 
named in Article 2, and to fix the salaries of all town 
officers. 

Voted: To instruct the selectmen to appoint survey- 
ors of lumber, wood, hoops and staves. 

Chose I. Warren Flagg trustee of the Goodnow Fund 
for three years. 

Voted: That the salary of the tax collector be one 
per centum of the amount collected, and that he perform 
all the duties hitherto performed by said officer. 

Voted: That the salary of the treasurer be two hun- 
dred dollars ($200) per annum. 

Voted: That the salary of the chairman of the 
selectmen be one hundred dollars ($100) per annum and 
the other members, fifty dollars per aunum. 

Voted : That the salary of the superintendent of 
streets be fixed by the selectmen. 

Voted: That the board of health be instructed to 
appoint only one school physician and that the salary of 
said physician be fixed at fifty dollars per annum. 

Article 4. To see if the tow^n will accept the reports 
of the selectmen, overseers of the poor, school committee, 
library trustees, and other town officers. 

Voted: To accept the reports of the several town 
officers. 

Article 5. To hear and act upon the reports of any 
committees chosen at any previous meeting, that have not 
already reported. 

Mr. E. F. Richardson, for the committee appointed at 
the annual meeting March 30. 1914, to consider the matter 
of placing the name of Luther Blanchard upon the Davis 
Monument, reported that the committee unanimously 
recommended that the names of all the members of Capt. 
Isaac Davis' company be placed upon the monument. 

Voted: To accept the report. 
Voted: That the same committee be instructed to carry 
-out the recommendations made in their report and that a 



15 



sum not exceeding seventy-five dollars ($75) be appropri- 
ated to defray the expense. 

]Mr. James B. Tuttle made a report for the Finance 
committee which report was accepted. 

Article 6. To see what sums of money the town will 

raise by taxation and appropriate to defray the necessary 

and usual expenses of the several departments of the town. 

Voted: To raise for 

Repairing roads and bridges, including the 

oiling of roads $5,000 . 00 

]\Iemorial Library, current expenses 450 . 00 

Purchase of books . . . ; 200.00 

Schools 15,000.00 

Hydrant service 2,700 . 00 

Street lighting 2,700.00 

Voted: To appropriate for street lighting 

the unexpended balance of last year .. 821.37 
Voted to appropriate for 

Salaries of Town officers 1,800.00 

Buildings and grounds, including painting 

Town hall 425.00 

Police department 150 . 00 

Fire department 400 . 00 

Brush fires 200.00 

Board of Health 500.00 

Town farm 500.00 

Outside poor 1,000.00 

Military aid 50.00 

Cemeteries 600 . 00 

Printing 250.00 

Snow bills 200.00 

Unclassified 500.00 

Reserve fund 1,500.00 

Special committee on street lighting 75 . 00 

Insurance of Town employees 100.00 

Voted: To reappropriate for the enforcement of the 



16 



liquor laws the unexpended balance in the treasury 
($927.55). 

Voted: To raise for Memorial Day ($100.00). 

Voted: To raise for Moth work the sum required by 
the State law. 

Article 7. To see what amount of money the town 
will raise for the due observance of Memorial Day. 

Voted: To raise one hundred dollars ($100). 

Article 8. To see if the town will appropriate a sum 
-of money for the enforcement of the liquor laws, or act 
anything thereon. 

Voted: To reappropriate the unexpended balance of 
last year. 

Article 9. To see what action the town will take in 
Tegard to the extermination of the elm leaf beetle. 

A motion to pass over the article did not prevail. 

A motion to appropriate ten dollars did not prevail. 

No further action taken. 

Article 10. To see what action the town will take in 
reference to the extermination of the gypsy and brown tail 
moth. 

Voted : To raise the sum required by state law. 

Article 11. To see what action the town will take to 
raise and appropriate $150, for the George Washington 
Memorial building, Washington, D. C. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Article 12. To see what action the town will take in 
regard to the collection of taxes. 

Voted: That all taxes shall be payable not later than 
October 15, 1915, and on all taxes remaining unpaid after 
November 1, 1915, interest shall be charged at the rate of 
six per cent per annum from October 15, 1915 until such 
taxes are paid. 

Voted: That poll and personal taxes only be payable 
on demand. 

Voted: That the collector shall issue summons for all 
poll and personal taxes only, remaining unpaid September 1, 



17 



and that the collector shall collect all taxes committed to him 
within the municipal year in which they are assessed. 

Article 13. To see if the town will vote to oil the 
streets through the villages of the town or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted: That the selectmen be instructed to oil the 
roads the same as last year. 

Article 14. To see if the town will pay for fighting 
brush fires, and fix price; or act anything thereon. 

Voted: That twenty-five cents per hour be paid for 
fighting brush fires; this vote to be effective until re- 
scinded. 

Article 15. To see if the town will vote to rescind the 
action providing for the election of selectmen by rotatioq 
for periods of three years, and revert to the system of 
simultaneous election for the period of one year, as provided 
under certain acts of the Revised Laws. 

A^oted: To pass over the article. 

Article 16. To see if the town will vote to establish 
and maintain four (4) electric lights near the house of 
Isaac W. Flagg, to land of the Commonwealth, near the 
house of Patrick O'Neil, appropriate money for the same or 
act anj^thing thereon. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 

Article 17. To see if the town will vote to authorize 
the selectmen to organize a fire department, appoint engin- 
eers, and establish the pay of firemen ; or do or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted: That the selectmen be instructed to organize 
a fire department and appoint engineers. 

Article 18. To see what sum of money the town will 
raise and appropriate for the maintenance of the fire 
department; or do or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate $400. 

Article 19. To see if the town will vote to expend one- 
fifth of the appropriation for roads to improve the Lowell 
road from the State road to the end of the town line and to 
allow the removal and setting up of the stone crusher, if 



18 



necessary, to be used in said work; or do or act anything- 
thereon. 

Voted: That one-fifth of the appropriation for roads 
and bridges be expended for the improvement of the Lowell 
road from the State highway to the town line and the Car- 
lisle road from the Lowell road to the Acton-Carlisle town 
line. 

Article 20. To see if the town will vote to choose or 
authorize the appointment of a special committee to investi- 
gate the various matters connected with the present street 
lighting system, the furnishing of electric current to private 
individuals within the town, the expediency of the town's 
voting to engage in the business of supplying electricity 
for light and power, and any other matters relating to the 
foregoing; or do or act anything thereon. 

Voted: That a committee of five be appointed to 
investigate the matters mentioned in the article and report 
at the next annual meeting. 

Voted: That the moderator be the chairman of this 
committee and that the remaining members of the commit- 
tee be appointed by the moderator. 

The following were appointed as the committee : Allen 
Brooks Parker, chairman; John S. White; William Rawit- 
ser; Nelson J. Cole, Waldo E. Whitcomb. 

Voted : To appropriate $75 for the use of the com- 
mittee. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to insure the employees of the 
town; or do or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate $100. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to change 
the date of holding the annual town meeting; or do or 
act anything thereon. 

Voted to change the date of the annual town meeting 
to the first Monday in March. 

Article 23. To see if the town will vote to discontinue 
the road leading from the house of Mrs. Gertrude C. 



19 



Daniels to the house of Lyman Tuttle; or do or act any- 
thing thereon. 

Voted: To pass over the article. 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to choose or 
authorize the appointment of a special committee to prepare 
and draft by-laws and report at the next annual town 
meeting; or do or act anything thereon. 

Voted: That the moderator appoint a committee of 
three to consider the matter of by-laws and report to the 
town such as they deem expedient. 

The moderator appointed Horace F. Tuttle, Nicholas 
Samsel and Arthur M. Whitcomb the committee on by-laws. 

Article 25. To see if the town will vote to instruct 
the selectmen to dispose of the fire apparatus at South 
Acton; or do or act anything thereon. 

Voted: That the selectmen be instructed to dispose of 
the hand fire engine at South Acton. 

Voted: That the selectmen be instructed to use such 
amount of the proceeds from the sale of said engine as 
they deem expedient for new equipment at South Acton. 



Proceedings of the Special Town Meeting, September 2, 

1915 

Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Allen Brooks Parker was chosen moderator. 

Article 2. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate an additional sum of money for the support 
of schools; the purchase of school books and supplies; 
the expense of operating the school plants; repairs and 
improvements upon school buildings and grounds; the 
transportation of scholars and for other expenses relating 
to the maintenance of the school department; or do or act 
anything thereon. 



20 



Voted : To appropriate the unexpended balance of 
last year for the support of schools. 

Article 3. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money to pay for the tuition and 
transportation of scholars taking the agricultural course 
at the Concord high school; or do or act anything thereon. 

Voted: To appropriate $277.95 to pay the amount 
due the Town of Concord for tuition of pupils who have 
taken the Agricultural course at the Concord high school. 

Voted that the school committee be instructed to pay 
the transportation of pupils taking the Agricultural course 
in the Concord high school and pupils attending the Lowell 
Industrial school. 

Artice 4. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate an additional sum of money for the support 
and maintenance of the town farm; or do or act anything 
thereon. 

Voted: That $300 be transferred from the reserve 
fund to the appropriation for the maintenance of the town 
farm, to be returned as soon as possible. 

On motion of Luther Conant it was voted that the 
town assume the support and care of Misses Susan and 
Martha Oliver, that they be cared for in the same manner 
that they now are, and that the sum of $170 be appro- 
priated to meet the expense for the remainder of the 
financial year. 

Article 5. To see if the town will authorize the treas- 
urer to borrow money for any of the purposes named in 
this warrant. 

Voted : To pass over the article. 



21 



State Election, November 2, 1915 

Party designations: D,, Democratic; Prog., Progress- 
ive; R., Republican; S., Socialist; S. L., Socialist Labor; P., 
Prohibition. 



Whole number of ballots cast . . . 

Governor 



Precincts Total 
12 3 

116 155 166 437 



Nelson B. Clark, Prog 2 

Walter S. Hutchins, S 

Samuel W. McCall, R 95 

Peter O'Rourke, S. L 

William Shaw, P 2 

David I. Walsh, D 17 

Blanks 

Lieutenant Governor 

Edward P. Barry, D 16 

Calvin Cooldige, R 97 

Alfred H. Evans, P 1 

James Hayes, S. L 

Chester R. Lawrence, Prog 1 

Samuel P. Levenberg, S 

Blanks 1 

Secretary- 
Edwin A. Grosvenor, D 16 

Albert P. Langtry, R 93 

Thomas J. Maher, S. L 1 

Clarion E, Sproule, S 

Willard 0. Wylie, P 1 

Blanks 5 



5 


5 


12 


1 





1 


11 


125 


331 





1 


1 


7 


2 


11 


22 


31 


70 


9 


2 


11 



27 


26 


69 


116 


132 


345 


4 


3 


8 


1 





1 


3 





4 











4 


5 


10 



24 


24 


64 


20 


130 


343 


2 





3 





1 


1 


4 


1 


6 


5 


10 


20 






2 





2 














L4 


24 


22 


60 


1 


6 


1 


8 


9 


5 


21 


35 



22 

Treasurer 

Henry L. Bowles, D 14 24 23 61 

Charles L. Burrill, R 95 121 132 348 

'Charles E. Fenner, S 1 1 

William E. Marks, P 1 5 6 

Jeremiah P. McNally, S. L 

Blanks 6 4 11 21 

Auditor 

Alonzo B. Cook, R 92 118 122 332 

James W. Holden, S. L 

Henry C. Iram, S 

Jacob C. Morse, D 

William G. Rogers, P 

Blanks 

Attorney General 

Henry C. Atwill, R. 
Prank Auchter, P. . 
Joseph Joj'^ce Donahue, D 
John McCarthy, S. . 
William Taylor, S. L 
Blanks. 



Joseph H. McNally, D 14 

Henry C. Mulligan, R 91 

Blanks 11 

Senator 

Frederick W. Burke, D 14 

Charles A. Kimball, R 95 

JBlanks 7 





95 
2 

13 


6 


117 
5 

20 
2 


11 


126 
3 

21 



16 


338 




10 


3 


54 
2 









33 


Councillor 





25 


24 


63 


112 


121 


324 


18 


21 


50 



24 


27 


65 


125 


133 


353 


6 


6 


19 



23 



Representative in General Court 



Edgar H. Hall, R 98 

Blanks 18 

Scattering 

County Commissioner 

Alfred L. Cutting, R 88 

John Lathrop Dyer, N. P 4 

George A. Goodwin, Prog 1 

Michael M. O'Connor, D 10 

William H. Walsh, N. P 3 

Blanks 10 

County Treasurer 

DeWitt Clinton Clapp, N. P 1 

Joseph 0. Hayden, R 91 

David A. Keef e, D 14 

Blanks • 10 

Sheriff 

John J. Donovan, D 16 

John R. Fairbairn, R 90 

Blanks 10 



25 


138 


361 


30 


26 


74 





2 


2 



115 


122 


325 


1 


3 


8 


6 


2 


9 


19 


18 


47 


7 


6 


16 



15 32 



5 


2 


8 


17 


118 


326 


23 


18 


55 


10 


28 


48 



19 


19 


54 


25 


124 


339 


11 


23 


44 



Shall the proposed amendment to the constitution 
empowering the general court to authorize the taking of 
land to relieve congestion of population and to provide 
homes for citizens be approved and ratified? 



Yes 36 

No 42 

Blanks 38 



66 


60 


162 


36 


40 


118 


53 


66 


157 



38 


55 


120 


107 


95 


274 


10 


16 


43 



24 



Shall the proposed amendment to the constitution en- 
■abling women to vote be approved and ratified? 

Yes 27 

No 72 

Blanks 17 

Shall the proposed amendment to the constitution rela- 
tive to the taxation of incomes and the granting of reason- 
able exemptions be approved and ratified? 

Yes 57 

.No 24 

Blanks 35 



79 


72 


208 


35 


26 


85 


41 


68 


144 



Vote for Representative in the Eleventh Mddlesex District, 
November 2, 1915 



■73 

0^ «+-! S ^ 



ri 



u 






o 



CO 



3 OJ "TJ '^ ^ ^, S 

<^ <^ o o h3 ^ e 
Edgar H. Hall of 

Acton, R 361 275 62 534 163 280 1675 

Scattering 2 6 1 9 

Blanks 74 227 33 265 59 122 780 

Totals 437 508 95 799 223 402 2464 



25 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 



Births 

Whole number recorded 39 

Born in Acton 34 

Males 17 

Females 22 

Native parentage 14 

Foreign parentage 11 

Mixed parentage 14 

Marriages 

Whole number recorded 15 

Residents of Acton 15 

Residents of other places 15 

Deaths 

Whole number recorded 35 

Residents of Acton 31 

Residents of other places 4 

Occurring in Acton 29 

Occurring in other places 6 

Average age, years 55 plus 

Note. The town clerk requests information of any 
errors or omission in the lists of births, marriages and 
deaths. 

The town clerk hereby gives notice that he is prepared 
to furnish blanks for the returns of births and deaths. 

HORACE F. TTTTTLE, 

Town Clerk, 






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33 



PERSONS HAVING DOGS LICENSED IN 1915 



Brown, James A $2.00 

Bradford, Fred W. R. 2.00 

Baird, Edson 2.00 

Bragan, Thomas B.... 2.00 

Brown, ^Murray 2.00 

Bursaw, H. W 2.00 

Benjamin. W. W 2.00 

Baker, Ralph G 2.00 

Bulette, Frank W 2.00 

Brill, Fred E 2.00 

Brown, Lizzie J 2.00 

Bradley, John 2.00 

Burgess, Mrs. J. W. . . 2.00 

Berry. J. N 2.00 

Bent, James 2.00 

Carter, John L 2.00 

Cabot, Geraldine .... 2.00 

Conrad, William 2.00 

Crosby, William C. . . . 2.00 

Charter, William W. . . 2.00 

Cole, Thomas W 2.00 

Crosby, Clarence L. . . 2.00 

Daniels, G. E 2.00 

Daniels, Isabella B. . . . 2.00 

De Tinno Angelo 2.00 

Davis. William E 2.00 

De Fegneredo Antonio 2.00 

Davis, Charles E 2.00 

Davis, Wendell F. (2) 4.00 

Davis, Minnie 2.00 

Doles, Cyrus G 2.00 

Densmore, J. A 2.00 

Enneguess, Michael . . 2.00 

Edney, Charles F 2.00 



Ford, Isaac S 2.00 

Frost, Allen B 5.00 

Flagg, Harland 2.00 

Flint, W. A 2.00 

Foley, David 2.00 

Freeman, Robert C. . . 2.00 

Farrand, W. H 2.00 

Farrar, Daniel H 2.00 

Fletcher, Lester N. (2) 7.00 

Fobes, E. S 5.00 

Foster, Samuel J 2.00 

Green, Fred W 2.00 

Gilmore, Almon H. (2) 4.00 

Greenleaf Kenviels .... 25.00 

Hall, L. J 2.00 

Hanson, Henry 5.00 

Hayes, Michael G 5.00 

Hoit, F. W 2.00 

Harris, Hattie B 5.00 

Holden, F. H 2.00: 

Holden, Willis L 2.00 

Johnson. Sanfrid K. . . 2.00 

Jones, Samuel 2.00 

Jones, Warren 2.00 

Jones, Ralph T 2.00 

Knowlton, Helen A. . . 2.00 

Kimball. Evelyn 5.00 

Kimball, Elnathan (2) 4.00 

Kelley, Wm. F 2.00 

Lewis, Herbert W 2.00 

Livermore, William J. 2.00 

Laffin. Sidney 2.00 

Liliby, George A 5.00 

Marsh, A. W 2.00 



34 



Maynard, F. B. (2) . . . 


7.00 


Robbins, Solon 


. 2.00 


Mekkelsen, Soren .... 


2.00 


Russell, John H. . . . 


2.00 


McCarthy, Thomas . . . 


2.00 


Richardson, George A 


. 5.00 


Sanson, Charles (3) . . 


9.00 


Robbins, W. C 


2.00 


Moore, William J 


2.00 


Smith, Albert 


2.00 


Mason, William E. . . . 


2.00 


Smith, Eva M 


. 2.00 


Mauro, N 


2.00 


Schofield, Harris C. . 


2.00 


Morrison, F. D 


2.00 


Shattuck, T. P 


2.00 


Moore, J. Sterling (2) 


4.00 


Smiley, William E. . . 


2.00 


Mekkelsen, Jens 


2.00 


Sheehan, John H. . . . 


2.00 


Millan, Albion L 


2.00 


Smith, John D 


2.00 


Nagle, Elizabeth 


2.00 


Shapley, Eva C 


2.00 


Nealey, Edward F. . . . 


5.00 


Samsel, Nicholas .... 


2.00 


Osborn, Edsrar W 


2.00 


Sebastian, L. A 


2.00 


O'Connell Michael . .. 


2.00 


Tucker, George S. (3; 


12.00 


Olsen, Simon 


2.00 


Taylor, Charles A. (2; 


7.00 


Pratt, Frank A 


5.00 


Taylor, Moses E 


2.00 


Pollard, Leon 


2.00 


Tuttle, Arthur 


2.00 


Prescott, 0. C 


2.00 


Tyler, Webster (2) . . 


7.00 


Palma, John 


2.00 
5.00 


Weeks, Elinor F 

AVhitney, Cora A. ... 


2.00 


Priest, H. L 


2.00 


Perkins, Levi 


2:00 


Wood, F .W 


2.00 


Perkins, A. H 


2.00 


West, Mr.s I. C 


2.00 


Pennell, Edmnnd H. . . 


2.00 


AVillis, Ora A 


2.00 


Pope, Benjamin (6) . . 


12.00 


Worden, Martin H. . . 


2.00 


Page, E. C 


2.00 


Whitcomb, Fred S. . . 


2.00 


Ring, Mrs. John E. (2) 


7.00 


Watkins, J. H 


2.00 


Rivers, Edward E. (2) 


7.00 


Weaver, Geors^e T. . . 


5.00 


Reed, Howard 


5.00 


Wheeler, CharlesH.(2; 


7.00 


1 license at $25 00 . . 






$25.00 


122 licenses at $2 00 






244.00 


23 licenses at $5.00 . . 






115.00 




^ 


^384.^0 


Deduct fees, 146 license 


is at 2( 
asurer 


)c each 


29.20 








Paid to connty tre. 


i 


^354.80 



35 



REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN 



We respectfully report that we have carried out tlie 
vote of the town to the best of our ability in the various 
departments in our charge. 

The Lowell road has been improved so far as the amount 
appropriated for this purpose and the amounts contributed 
by the county commissioners and highway commissioners 
would allow. We recommend that the town appropriate 
$1,000.00, to be used in continuing this work the current 
year. The highway commission and county commissioners 
have already expressed willingness to contribute each a like 
amount. 

NICHOLAS SAMSEL, 
EDWARD Z. STANLEY, 
CHARLES J. HOLTON. 



36 



TREE WARDEN'S REPORT 



To the Citizens of Acton : 

1 submit my report as tree warden : 

Paid James O'Neil, labor team, ex- 
penses $115 . 81 

Patrick Pickett 59 . 63 

Martin Brown 53.00 

$228.44 
Received for private trimming 20.00 



$208.44 



The elm trees were not sprayed this year. Some of the 
trees were badly stripped by the elm beetle and we should 
not let this happen again. 

I would recommend the raising of $400.00 for this 
department. 

JAMES O'NEIL, 

Tree Warden. 
Fei>ruary 3, 1916. 



37 
REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH 



Jan. 1, 1916. 



The board of health submits the following report for 
the year ending Dec. 31, 1915. 

Burial permits issued in Acton 29 

Burial permits issued in other places 5 

List of contagious diseases reported by the board of 
health, Jan. 1, 1915, to Dec. 31, 1915. 

Diphtheria 5 

Measles 3 

Mumps 1 

Scarlet fever 1 

Tetanus 1 

Tuberculosis 5 

Scarletina 1 

Whooping cough 1 

Deaths from contagious diseases 

Meat Inspected for the Town 

Inspected Condemned 

Cattle 140 1 

Veal 664 26 

Hogs 142 4 

Lambs or sheep 15 

Your board would recommend that $1,250 be appro- 
priated for use of the board for the present year, as the 
state board has added the duty of inspecting stables and the 
issuing of permits for the production and sale of all milk 
used in the town, the expense to be borne by the town. 

Respectfully submitted. 
ACTON BOARD OF HEALTH, 

By E. C. Page, Sec*y. 



38 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS REPORT 



Owing to the outbreak of foot and mouth disease this 
year I am not able to make a very full report. 

I had my inspection nearly completed when I was 
stopped by the department. In the year I have quarantined 
14 head with tuberculosis, which were taken by the state and 
killed. 

FRED S. WHITCOMB, 

Inspector. 



39 



REPORT OF THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, Acton, Mass. : 

Gentlemen — I herewith, snbmit my report for the year 
1915: 

General Government 

Appropriation $1,800 . 00 

Selectmen's Department 

Paid: 

Nicholas Samsel, salary $100 . 00 

E. Z. Stanley, salary 50.00 

C. J. Holton, salary 50.00 

Nicholas Samsel, postage, express. 

telephone, etc 20 . 72 

E. Z. Stanley, postage 3 . 88 

$224.60 

Auditing and Accountant Department 

Paid: 

William T. Merriam, salary, January 

to March $25 . 00 

Howard L. Jones, salary, March 1. to 

November 30 85 . 00 

Howard L. Jones, postage and sup- 
plies 2.67 

$112.67 



40 
Treasurer's Department 

Paid : 

Frank W. Hoit, salary $200.00 

American Surety Co., bond 50.00 

Frank W. Hoit, certifying notes 10 . 00 

Frank W. Hoit, postage, telephone, 

etc 29.85 



Collector's Department 

Paid: 

William F. Stevens, salary $403.78 

American Surety Co., bond 50 . 00 

W. F. Stevens, stationery, postage, ex- 
press 8.00 



Assessors' Department 

Paid: 

"W. F. Stevens, salary $75.00 

W. F. Kelley, salary 60.00 

James B. Tuttle, salary 55 . 00 

W. F. Stevens, transportation of as- 
sessors ' 2 . 00 

W. F. Stevens, checking corporation 

tax 2.50 

W. F. Stevens, postage, express, etc. . 4.50 

E. W. Prescott, services in regard to 
stockholders in various foreign 
corporations 39 . 65 



$289.85 



$461.78 



$238.65 



41 

Town Clerk's Department 
Paid: 

Horace F. Tuttle, salary $45.00 

Horace F. Tuttle, attending meeting 

at Aver 2.50 

Horace F. Tuttle, services relating to 

repairing ballot box 2.00 

Horace F. Tuttle, postage, express 

and telephones 13 . 95 

Horace F. Tuttle, collecting and re- 
cording births 23 . 50 

Horace F. Tuttle, recording deaths .. 7.40 

Horace F. Tuttle, recording marriages 3.00 



Overseers of Poor Department 
Paid: 

W. F. Kelley, salary $50.00 

F. S. Whitcomb, salary 20.00 

E. Z. Stanley, salary 20.00 

W. F. Kelley, postage, carfares 10.20 

Hobbs & Warren, blanks 1.06 



Town Physician 
Paid: 
Hall Staples, salary $25.00 



Election and Registration 
Paid : 

Horace F. Tuttle, registrar $25.00 

G. E. Holton, registrar 20.00 

S. A. Guilford, registrar 20.00 



$97.35 



$101.26 



$25.00 



$65.00 



42 



Horace F. Tuttle, election officer 


$5.00 


A. F. Davis, election officer (1914) . . . 


5.00 


W. F. Kelley, election officer (1914) . . 


5.00 


H. F. Robbins, election officer 


2.50 


C. D. Cram, election officer 


2.50 


C. E. Smith, election officer 


2.50 


Isaac Ford, election officer 


2.50 


John Conghlin, election officer (1914), 


2.50 


David R. Kingsley, election officer . . . 


5.00 


L. E. Reed, election officer 


5.00 


L. C. Hastings, election officer 


5.00 


Cornelius O'Neil, election officer .... 


5.00 


Lucius Hesselton, election officer . . . 


5.00 


W. H. Kingsley, election officer (1914) 


5.00 


A. F. Davis, election officer 


5.00 


C. J. Holton, election officer 


5.00 


W. F. Kelley, election officer 


5.00 


F. S. "Whitcomb, election officer 


5.00 


John Coughlin, election officer 


5.00 


E. C. Cheney, election officer 


5.00 


C. A. Durkee, election officer 


2.50 


F. S. Glines, opening schoolhouse for 




registration 


$2.00 


L. C. Hastings, placing booths 


2.50 


Universalist society, rent of vestry . . 


6.00 


A. W. Porter, placing booths 


2.50 


W. F. Stevens, transporting election 




returns 


3.00 




$106.00 


Total general government 


$1,722.16 


Unexpended 


77.84 



$1,800.00 



43 

Buildings and Grounds 

Appropriation $425 . 00 

Received from rent 96.00 

Transferred from reserve fund 9.98 



Paid: 
R. W. Porter, care of town hall and 

grounds $86.75 

R. W. Porter, care of clock 25.00 

American Woolen Co., lighting 26.58 

West and South Water Supply district 12.00 
W. H. Kingsley, teaming and sawing 

wood 7.50 

J. H. Livermore, labor on Common . . 8.20 

L. T. Fullonton, painting town hall . . 260.00 
South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal 

and lumber 50 . 45 

H. R, Moore, repairs on lockup 9 . 09 

George Daniels, repairs on boiler .... 2.50 

E. A. Phalen, labor 28.50 

E. Z. Stanley, repairs 3. 60 

0. D. Wood, repairs 4.90 

E. P. Gates, repairs 2.10 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 3.81 



Protection Persons and Property- 
Police Department 

Appropriation $1 50 . 00 

Received for court fines 35.50 

Transferred from reserve fund 166.96 



$530.98 



$530.98 



$352.46 



44 

Paid: 

E. S. Fobes, special duty $53.42 

E. S. Fobes, court fees 40.59 

James N. Berry, special duty 4.50 

E. C. Page, use of automobile 10.00 

W. M. Barteaux, use of automobile . . 8 . 00 

J. T. McNiff, court fees 48.61 

James C. Herring, court fees 1 . 80 

C. A. Taylor, court fees .' 29 . 67 

Patrick Callan, special duty 3 . 50 

Edson Baird, special duty 3.50 

H. R. Moore, special duty 38 . 15 

H. R. Moore, court fees 8.97 

C. A. Taj^lor, special duty 53.50 

0. D. Wood, general duty 21.50 

J. T. McNiff, general duty 26.75 



Enforcement of Liquor Law 



Unexpended 



$352.46 



Appropriation, unexpended balance, 

1914 $927.55 



Paid : 

E. J. Lyons .... 
E. S. Fobes .... 
C. A. Taylor ... 
M. W. Barteaux 
W. R. Moore . . . 
J. T. McNiff .... 



$10.00 




10.00 




24.50 




10.00 




27.75 




15.00 






$97.25 




830.30 



$927.55 



45 

Fire Department 

Appropriation $400 . 00 

Received from fire extinguishers .... 14.00 



$414.00' 

Paid : 

J. T. MeXiff, repairs $2.00 

Davis, King Co., wiring at West Acton 

house 2.00 

Hall Bros. Co., lumber 1 . 85 

James Grimes, labor .85 

E. T. Rice, keys 2.75 

F. Oelschlegal, belts 4.25 

E. T. Rice, labor and supplies 22 . 56 

James P. Brown, wrenches and wood, 10.00 
West & South Water Supply District 

of Acton 40.35 

Boston Coupling Co 1 . 57 

William Lawrence, watching fire ... 1 . 25 

David Foley, glass and labor 1.50 

A. F. Harris, repairs on truck 9 . 50 

Finney & Hoit, soda 3 . 05 

West Acton Fire Co., salaries 105.00 

Total maintenance fire depart- 
ment $208.43 

Unexpended . 205.52 

$414.00 



46 
Hydrant Service 

Appropriation $2,700 . 00 

Paid: 
"West & South Supply District of 

Acton $2,500 . 00 

Town of Concord 184.00 

Total $2,684.00 

Unexpended 16 . 00 



$2,700.00 

Brush Fires 

Appropriation $200 . 00 

Paid: 

Hall Bros. Co $4.50 

James Kjngsley 1 . 25 

James J. Hurley 1 . 00 

John Hurley 1.00 

David Hurley .50 

E. T. Rice .25 

Harold Gallagher 2.31 

Arthur Harris 2.02 

Raj^mond Harris 1 . 25 

C. I. Miller .75 

Allen Frost 5 . 75 

Fred Holloway .25 

Leo McCarthy .50 

Oliver Dutton 2.25 

Oeorge Murphy .25 

J. S. White 3.00 

Frank Holden 1 . 38 

C. B. Robbins .50 

Joe Buager .38 

Leo Buager .50 

Robert Freeman 2 . 00 



47 



Frank Rawse 2.00 

J. W. Livermore 10 . 25 

William H. Kingsley 30.75 

Nelson J. Cole 1.55 

Edw. C. Page 2.75 

Fred Clark .75 

George Hayward .50 

Percy Sweet 2 . 50 

Frank Greenough .75 

James P. Brown 3 . 25 

Earl Randall .50 

James Cole 1 . 00 

George Worster 3 . 00 

Lawrence Clark .50 

B. A. King 1.00 

F. R. Bradford 1.25 

Fred Cleymour 2.00 

R. Brown . 2.25 

Levi Perkins 1 . 00 

W. J. Benere 6.70 

Echv. Jewett .50 

W. Barteanx 2.75 

C. Taylor 2.75 

E. S. Fobes 2.50 

J. Downey 1 . 25 

J. McDonald 1.00 

J. Smith 1.25 

H. J. Conghlin .75 

Thomas Foley 4.50 

William C. Conghlin 2.75 

John F. Conghlin .75 

Patrick Foley .75 

W. H. Jones .35 

V. McGreen 1.00 

George Clapp .25 

H. E. Willis .50 

John Pederson 2.00 

Edson Baird 2.00 



48 



"Smith Finney 2 . 00 

Echv. Cahill 2.25 

W. B. Currier .75 

Pliney Nims 3 . 00 

Abe Granberg .75 

H. Hanson 2 . 00 

Abe Anderson 3 . 00 

L. Campbell 1.00 

Lyman Wetherbee 1 . 00 

Clarence Frost .50 

Amos Bennett 1 . 75 

Don Ditino .25 

Angelo Ditino .25 

Lugro Vito .25 

Patrick Callan .25 

W. J. Costello .35 

Charles Boyce .25 

Joseph Brunier .25 

L. Kempton .25 

Richard Downs .25 

Lewis Urban .25 

M. E. Taylor & Co 2.60 



$156.64 
Unexpended 43 . 36 



$200.00 



Health and Sanitation 

Appropriation $500 . 00 

Received inspection of animals 50.00 

'Transferred from reserve fund 23 . 94 

^ $573.94 



49 



Paid: 

E. S. Fobes, inspection $97.50 

E. C. Page, fumigating, etc 69.88 

A. M. Whitcomb, inspection 64.75 

F. E. Tasker, inspection 19.50 

C. A. Dudley, inspection 101.50 

H. S. Turner, printing 6 . 50 

Carter, Carter & Meigs 5 . 64 

F. E. Tasker, medical attendance .... 15.75 

J. Mauro, account quarantine 14.17 

F. Benere, account quarantine 28 . 00 

Dennison Mfg. Co 4.65 

Hall Staples, medical attendance .... 19.00 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal, 2.00 

Hobbs and Warren, permits and book 2.75 

J. McCrossland, labor 2.00 

J. Bent, account quarantine 9.51 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 3 . 34 

R. S. Osterhout, printing 1 . 50 

W. A. Flint, use of land for dump ... 6 . 00 

F. S. Whitcomb, inspection of animals 100.00 



$573.94 
Due from state, cattle inspection 50.00 



Moth Department 

Liability, Sec. 4, Chapter 381, Acts 

1905 $970.00 

Received state treasurer, gypsy moth 

work 803 . 89 

Received state treasurer, state high- 
way work 202.00 

Private work 139.40 

Lead sold 291.80 

$2,407.09 



50 



Paid: 

James O'Neil, labor $1,922.08 

Standard Oil Co., gasoline 16.75 

W. F. Stevens, notices and mailing . . 10.55 

Balance due from state, Jan. 1, 1915, 974.89 



$2,924.27 
Balance due from state, Jan. 1, 1916, 517.18 

Highways and Bridges 

Appropriation $5,000 . 00 

Received for road dust 5 . 25 

Received town of Carlisle, use of roller 10 . 00 

Received George Worster, oiling .... 1.00 



y 

Paid: 

A. H. Perkins, pay rolls $1,700 . 69 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co., repairs ... 9.76 

W. H. Kingsley, repairs 89 . 25 

N. E. Road Machinery Co., repairs .. 8.50 

W. E. Whitcomb, tools 2.73 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 

lumber 183.42 

H. L. Bond Co., diaphragm 1.80 

E. P. Gates, jobbing 20.43 

W. J. Costello, signs 3.00 

J. T. McNiff, repairs 13.10 

T. F. Parker, lead 8.31 

Charles Skogland, boiler inspection .. 5.00 

E. T. Rice, repairs 2.75 

American Powder Co., post and 

repairs 1-25 

0. D. Fessenden, pipe 5.00 

Hall Bros., lumber 15.25 

J. P. Brown, repairs and lumber 12 . 95 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 25.50 



$5,016.25 



51 



A. H. Perkins, gravel and oil 38 . 65 

B. F. Townsend, pipe 3 . 20 



Oiling Eoads 
Paid: 

John F. Baker, Jr., oil $694.02 

A. H. Perkins, pay rolls 701.09 

Demurrage 6 . 00 



North Acton Road 
Paid: 

A. H. Perkins, pay rolls $2,459.36 

A. H. Perkins, gravel 45 . 30 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., lum- 
ber and coal 287.19 

Corrigated Bar Co 22.11 

W. J. Costello, signs 6.75 

Whitney Coal & Grain Co., coal 27.75 

George H. Reed, coal and cement .... 23.68 

Hall Bros. Co., posts 107.35 

J. T. McNiff, rail irons 4.50 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 10.94 



$2,150.54 



$1,401.11 



$2,994.93 

Total highways and bridges .... $6,546.58 

Overdrawn 1,530.33 

Due from state, account North Acton 

road $998.31 

Due from county, account North 

Acton road 998 . 31 

$1,996.62 



52 

Snow Bills 

Appropriation $200 . 00 

Unexpended 200 . 00 

Street Lighting 

Appropriation $2,700 . 00 

Unexpended balance, 1914 821.37 

$3,521.37 
Paid: 

S. Breasthe, one light, 1914 $4.00 

Raymond Farrar, one light, 1914-1915 8.00 

Patrick Foley, one light, 1914 4.00 

B. De Souzy, one light, 1914-1915 8.00 

American Woolen Co 3,239 . 94 

$3,263.94 
Unexpended 257.43 



$3,521.37 



Charities 

Town Farm 

Appropriation $500 . 00 

Received sale of product and stock . . 2,173.04 

Transferred from reserve fund 2 . 53 



Paid: 

L. Q. Amadon, warden $472.50 

L. Q. Amadon, supplies 11.00 

L. Q. Amadon, labor 253.55 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 58.26 

George 11. Reed, grain 876.27 



$2,675.57 



53 



E. Z. Stanley, repairs 9 . 65 

F. S. Whiteomb, cow 52.50 

F. S. Whitcomb, tools 40.95 

S. B. InesoD, supplies 1.20 

W. F. Kelley, telephone 2.25 

"W. F. Kelley. labor 15.40 

J. S. Moore, supplies 250.11 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., service 13.94 

W. E. Whitcomb, supplies 95.17 

Brackett. Shaw & Lunt, supplies .... 3.36 

Finney & Hoit, supplies 60 . 21 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 288.89 

Davis, King Co., boxes 21.00 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal 

and supplies 23 . 22 

J. P. Brown, repairs 25.62 

F. A. Wakelin, supplies 4.64 

E. T. Rice, supplies 1.25 

C. H. Mead & Co., lime sulphur 41.13 

Town of Acton, lead 15.00 

R. F. Durkee, service of bull 22.00 

C. W. Fletcher, sawdust 1.15 

F. S. Whitcomb. supplies 2.15 

Hall Bros. Co., sawdust 6.25 

E. P. Gates, repairs 6.95 



Outside Poor 

Appropriation $1,000 . 00 

Appropriation, additional 200.00 

Received from state 254.80 

Received, town of Orange 51.10 

Received, city of Boston 16.25 

Received, town of Boxboro 181.52 

Received, town of Dartmouth 33.60 

Transferred from reserve fund 98.63 



$2,675.5: 



$1,835.90 



54 



Paid: 

Elizabeth J. Ring, "board and care . . . $208 . 00 

Luther Davis, rent and milk 83.64 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal, 21.13 

W. E. Whitcomb, supplies 193.16 

Tuttle & Newton, supplies 127.54 

W. F, Kelley, supplies and transpor- 
tation 18.00 

F. E. Tasker, services 28.60 

C. H. Mead & Co., supplies 93 . 12 

Mrs. J. W. Livermore, services 16.25 

Finney & Hoit, supplies 6 . 50 

M. E. Taylor & Co., supplies ' 380.17 

W. T. S. Bartlett, rent 39.00 

Dexter Spinney, wood 11.00 

City of Lawrence 164.00 

City of Waltham 48.54 

Town of Leominster 82.46 

Frank Chapman, auto 5.00 

City of Boston 7 . 14 

E. C. Page, services 27.00 

Julian F. Tuttle, services 2.00 

Ida Pratt, transportation 2 . 22 

J. A. Priest, milk 9.38 

Hobart Mead, rent 17.00 

M. Diskin, rent 10.00 

Town of Braintree 31 . 00 

J. S. Moore, supplies 46 . 00 

Harriet Rudolph, rent 16.00 

A. W. Davis, rent 26.00 

E. A. Phalen, rent 96.00 

C. H. Mead & Co., supplies 20.05 

Due from state 

Due from town of Templeton 



$1,835.90 
10.83 
75.49 



55 
Soldiers' Benefits 

State Aid 

Received from state treasurer $752 . 00 

Amount due from state, Jan. 1, 1915, $752.00 

Amount paid out 740 . 00 

Balance due from state, Jan. 1, 1916, 740.00 



$1,492.00 $1,492.00 

Military Aid 

Appropriation $100 . 00 

Unexpended 100.00 

Education 

Appropriations $15,000 ,00 

Unexpended balance, 1914 1,867.82 

Received Massachusetts school fund . 1,103.83 

Received county dog tax 292.01 

Received state treasurer, industrial 

school : 567 . 38 

Received state treasurer, superinten- 
dent fund 343.75 

Received state treasurer, tuition of 

children 158.60 

Received old paper sold 1.07 

Received tuition, Enid Sadler 13.50 

Received tuition, Charlotte Gouch ... 9.00 

Received ticket refund 2 . 00 

Received ticket refund 4.80 

$19,363.76 
Paid : 
Report of school committee $19,363.76 



5G 
Memorial Library 

Library Expenses 

Appropriation $450 . 00 

Received from fines 20 . 00 



Library Books 

Appropriation $200.00 

Interest on library fund 348 . 56 



Paid: 

Home Correspondence School $2.25 

Dura Binding Co 64.90 

J. Q. Adams Co 18.50 



$470.00 



Paid: 

American Woolen Co., lighting $25.48 

Davis, King Co., repairs .50 

E. F. Conant, insurance 42.43 

S. H. Taylor, janitor 99 . 99 

A. F. Davis, librarian 103.00 

A. F. Davis, cataloging 10.00 

0. E. Houghton, transportation books, 45.84 

Brookside Printing Co., cards 9.75 

.'South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., coal 66.38 

D. Spinney, wood 3 . 50 

E. Z. Stanley, repairs 18.37 

S. H. Taylor, repairs on mower 1.00 

31. E. Taylor & Co., supplies 3.55 

H. F. Tuttle, freight and express .... 3 . 84 

$433.63 
Unexpended 36 . 37 



$470.00 



$5^8.56 



57 



W. B. Clarke Co 372.17 

De Wolfe, Fiske Co 6.50 

Thorp & Martin Co 9 . 00 

H. F. Tuttle 11.00 

Herman Goldberger 36.86 

John H. Williams 1 . 13 

Association American Portland Ce- 
ment Mfgs 1.75 

W. A. Wilde Co 7.43 

W. A. Rayner 8 . 00 

F. W. Tingley 9.07 

Cemeteries 

Appropriation, $600.00 

Received sale of lots, Woodlawn ... 56.00 

Received sale of lots Mt. Hope 78.00 



Paid: 

A. H. Smith, labor $79.63 

William Mitchell, labor Ill .11 

E. S. Fobes, labor 5.00 

H. F. Robbins, labor 4.00 

J. W. Livermore, labor 5.25 

M. A. Reed, labor 4.00 

Julian Tuttle, labor 96.00 

Julian Tuttle, flowers 6.48 

Finney & Hoit, flags 6.50 

E. Z. Stanley, repairs 1 .50 

H. E. Fiske, repairs 1 . 50 

H. F. Tuttle, key 1.05 

H. F. Tuttle, services 10 . 00 

L. J. Mason, labor 40.33 

Jesse Briggs, labor 8.75 

F. W. Green, labor 104.87 

A. H. Perkins, labor 37.00 

West & South Water Supply District, 12.00 



$548.56 



$734.00 



58 



A. Batley & Son, flowers 10. 63 

E. T. Rice, repairs 3 . 95 

J. T. McNiff, wheelbarrow 5.25 



$554.80 
Unexpended 179.20 



$734.00 



Perpetual Care 
Received interest on cemetery fund . . $394.62 

Paid: 

Julian Tuttle, labor and plants $272 . 37 

F. W. Green, labor and plants 101 . 25 

F. C. Hayward, interest 17.50 

G. H. De Costa, interest 3.50 



Unclassified 

Appropriation $500 . 00 

Appropriation, liability insurance ... 100.00 
Received town of Boxboro, use of 

sprayer 20 . 00 

Received state treasurer, account tree 

warden 20.00 

Received state treasurer, burial of in- 
digent soldier 50 . 00 

Transferred from reserve fund 345 . 26 



$394.62 



$1,035.26 



Paid : 

C. J. Williams, settlement of suit ... $439.41 

Howard Wilson, legal services 129.25 

Morris, Ireland Co., two safes 50.00 

Howard L. Jones, freight and moving 

safe 3.53 

Enterprise Co., advertising 1.00 



59 



N. Samsel, advertising and express .. 1.35 

W. F. Stevens, express 7.13 

J. P. Brown, iron bars 2 . 75 

A. M. Whitcomb, liability insurance, 106.62 

S. M. Spencer Mfg. Co., stamps 2.50 

Hobbs & Warren, book 1.00 

Dover Stamping Co., measures 2.28 

E. Z. Stanley, freight .25 

Badger Fire Extinguisher Co 24.00 

American Woolen Co., lighting lockup 4.50 

J. 'Neil, tree warden work 228 . 44 

W. F. Farrar, returning one death 

notic^ .25 

R. W. Porter, care of flag 5.00 

Badger Fire Extinguisher Co., four 

extinguishers, forest warden .... 26.00 



$1,035.26 
Memorial Day- 
Appropriation $1 00 . 00 

Paid: 
Isaac Davis Post $100.00 

Agricultural School 

Appropriation $277 . 95 

Paid town of Concord, tuition 277 . 95- 

Printing 

Appropriation $250 . 00 

Transferred from Reserve Fund 23.12 



$273.1; 



I 



Paid R. S. Osterhout, warrants $16.50 

Robert S. Osterhout, applications 4.25 
Robert S. Osterhout, licenses ... 5.50 
Robert S. Osterhout, town reports 163.20 
Robert S. Osterhout, school re- 
ports 5.00 



60 



R. S. Osterhout, treasurer's war- 
rants 6 . 50 

R. S. Osterhout, caucus notices. . . 18.75 
R. S. Osterhout, voting lists .... 15.00 
Hobbs & Warren, collector's and asses- 
sors ' books 7 . 37 

Hobbs & Warren, licenses 1.51 

P. B. Murphy, dog licenses .75 

H. M. Meek & Co.. book 1.30 

W. S. Greenough & Co., vouchers. ... 5.00 

W. F. Stevens, poll tax list, tax bills. . 11.26 

Brookside Printing Co., note heads . . 2.25 

W. M. Sargent, warrants 2 . 50 

H. S. Turner, letter heads, envelopes. . 6.48 



$273.12 

^ Electric Light Committee 

Appropriation $75 . 00 

Unexpended 75 . 00 

Committee on Memorial to Capt. Davis Company 

Appropriation 75 . 00 

Unexpended 75.00 

Reserve Fund 

Appropriation $1 ,500 . 00 

Transferred to buildings and grounds $9.98 

Transferred to Police Department. ... 166.96 

Transferred to Health Department ... 23 . 94 

Transferred to Town Farm 2 . 53 

Transferred to Outside Poor 98 . 63 

Transferred to Printing 23.12 

Transferred to Unclassified 345 . 26 

$670.42 
Unexpended 829.58 

$1,500.00 



61 



Interest 
Received from Collector, interest on 

taxes $385.27 

Received interest on deposits 52.82 



$438.09 

Paid First National Bank of Aver $490.54 

Municipal Indebtedness 
Loans, First National Bank of Aver. . . $25,000.00 

Paid First National Bank of Ayer 20,000.00 



Balance not paid $5,000.00 

Financial Statement 
Receipts 

Due from treasurer, Jan. 1, 1915 $127.10 

Due from collector, Jan. 1, 1915 9,710.82 

Raised : Memorial Day $100 . 00 

Highways and Bridges 5,000 . 00 

■Memorial Library, expense 450.00 

iMemorial Library, books 200.00 

Moth department 970.00 

School Department 15,000.00 

Hydrant service 2,700.00 

Street lighting 2,700.00 

State tax 5,460.00 

County tax 2.838.78 

Overlay tax 512.96 

State highway tax 899.55 

Received: Treasurer's report $36,586.13 

Farm receipts 2.173.04 

Interest on taxes 385.27 

Moth tax 432.65 

December assessment 381 .89 



1,628.19 
* Less error in amount raised. ... 20.00 



$86,608.19 



62 

Expenditures 

State tax $5,460.00 

County tax 2,838.78 

State highway tax 899 . 55 

State treasurer, account public service 

and National Bank tax 23 . 01 

General government 1,722. 16 

Buildings and grounds 530 . 98 

Police department 352.46 

Moth department 1,949.38 

Fire department 3,049 . 12 

Street lighting 3,263.94 

Highways and bridges 6,546. 58 

Health department 573 . 94 

Outside poor 2,675 . 57 

Education 19,363.76 

Library expense 433 . 63 

Library books 548 . 56 

Cemetery 554.80 

Cemetery, perpetual care 394.62 

Unclassified 1,035.26 

Memorial Day 100.00 

Agricultural school 277. 95 

State aid 740.00 

Printing 273.12 

Enforcement of liquor law 97 . 25 

Municipal indebtedness 20.000.00 

Interest 490.54 

Outside poor 1,835.90 

Abatements 422.63 

Bills of 1914 paid 2,511.45 

Uncollected taxes 7,034. 55 

Cash on hand 608.70 



$86,608.19 



63 
Financial Statement for Year Ending Dec. 31, 1915 



Due from treasurer $608 . 70 

Due from collector 7,034.55 

Due from county, dog tax 319.32 

Due from county, North Acton high- 
way 998.31 

Due from state, North Acton high- 
way 998.31 

Due from state, moth work 517.18 

Due from state, inspection of animals 50.00 

Due from state, state aid 740.00 

Due from state, outside poor 10.83 

Due from town of Templeton 75 . 49 

$11,352.69 

Liabilities 

First National Bank of Ayer, note 5,000 . 00 

Balance in favor of town $6,352. 69 

Respectfully submitted, 

HOWARD L. JONES, 

Town Accountant. 



Acton, Mass.. F('bruary 8, 1916. 

I have examined the accounts of the tax collector and 
I reasurer of the town of Acton, and find thorn correct to the 
i)est of my knowledge. 

HOWARD L. JONES, 

Town Accountant. 



64 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



Year Ending December 31, 1915 
■ RECEIPTS 

Cash on hand, January 1, 1915 $127.10 

State treasurer: 

Corporation tax, public service . . 1,178.44 

Corporati6n tax, business 3,238.61 

National bank tax 480 . 62 

State aid 752.00 

Burial of indigent soldiers 50.00 

Street railway tax 95 . 66 

Tuition of children 158 . 60 

Aid of mothers with dependent 

children 254.80 

Corporation tax 7 . 79 

Independent Educational Indus- 
trial schools 567.38 

Highway Commission, moth work 202.00 

Gypsy and brown tail moth work 765.31 

Gypsy and brown tail moth work 38.58 

Inspection of animals 50.00 

Reimbursement for loss of taxes 

on land for public institutions 182 . 72 

Massachusetts school fund ...... 1,103.83 

Superintendent of school fund . . 343 . 75 

County treasurer, dog tax 292.01 

Cemetery lots sold by F. W. Green ... 78.00 

Bv H. F. Tuttle 56.00 



65 



Court fines 35 . 50 

Library fines 20 . 00 

Road department, road dust 5.25 

Use of roller 10.00 

Oiling- private yard 1.00 

Town hall rents 96.00 

Loans. First National bank. Aver 25,000.00 

Fire extinguishers sold 14.00 

Tree warden, trimming trees 20.00 

Use of sprayer 20 . 00 

Slaughter license, A. F. Blanchard Co. 1.00 

Murphy & Mahoney 1 . 00 

Interest on deposits 52 . 82 

School department, old paper sold ... 1.07 

X. Y.. X. H. & H. R. R., rebate on 

tickets 4.80 

B. & M. R. R., rebate on tickets . . 2. CO 

Tuition of Enid Sadler 13.50 

Tuition of Charlotte Gouch 9.00 

Outside poor department, Boston .... 16.25 

Orange 51 . 10 

Boxboro 181.52 

Dartmouth 33 . 60 

Library account, interest 348.56 

Cemetery account, interest 394.62 

Excise tax, C, M. & H. St. Ry 241.80 

C, M. & H. St. Rv 115.64 



$36,713.23 



66 



Town Farm Receipts : 

Milk $997.05 

Apples 985.93 

Pigs 78.25 

Pork 73.23 

Fowl 17.92 

Calves 10.00 

Bags 7.46 

Telephone 3.20 



$2,173.04 



Received of William F. Stevens, Collector: 

Taxes, 1913 $537.78 

Interest, 1913 52.72 

Taxes, 1914 ^ 8,660.74 

Interest, 1914 317.54 

Taxes, 1915 31,103.58 

Interest, 1915 15.01 

$40,687.37 

Total receipts $79,573.64 

Paid bills carried over from 1914 $2,511.45 

Approved orders, 1915 76,453.49 

€asli on hand, January 1, 1916 608.70 



$79,573.64 

FRANK W. HOIT, 

Treasurer. 



67 



TREASURER'S REPORT OF WILDE MEMORIAL 
LIBRARY FUND 



Cash Charlestown Five Cent Savings 

bank $1,000.00 

Warren Institution for Savings, 1,000.00 

Home Savings bank 1,000.00 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 1,000.00 

North End Savings bank 1,000.00 

Interest on deposits 204.15 

Bond, "West Shore R. R.," of Susan 

Augusta and Luther Conant fund 1,000.00 

Interest on bond 40 . 00 

Unexpended balance 118.45 

Appropriation for books 200.00 



By cash in banks $5,000.00 

Bond, 'Tonant Fund" 1,000.00 

Amount expended for books 548.56 

Balance unexpended 14.04 



$6,562.60 



$6,562.60 

FRANK W. HOIT. 

Treasurer. 



68 



TREASURER'S REPORT OF MONEY HELD FOR CARE 
OF LOTS IN CEMETERIES 



Bonds of West and South Water 

Supply District of Acton $9,000.00 

Balance of cemetery funds '. . . 4,650.00 

Unexpended balance 748 . 54 

Received cash : 

Francis Hosmer lot 50.00 

Marcus M. Keyes lot 500.00 

A. P. Bean lot 100.00 

Mary W. Fletcher lot 100.00 

John J. Lothrop lot 50.00 

Bancroft Whitcomb lot 100.00 

Franklin P. Wood lot 100.00 

Hobart E. Mead lot 100.00 

Israel H. Giles lot 100.00 

Interest on bonds 354 . 00 

Interest on deposits 157.25 



$16,109.79 



By amount paid for care of lots $394 . 62 

West and South Water Supply Dis- 
trict of Acton bonds 8,700.00 

Lowell Central Savings bank 1,000.00 

North Middlesex Savings bank 1,000.00 

Maynard Trust Co 1,000.00 

Tomb fund, Charlestown Five Cent 

Savings bank 128 . 53 



69 



Memorial Tablet fund, Charlestown 

Five Cent Savings bank 64.20 

Luke Blanchard fund. North End Sav- 
ings bank 532.68 

Monument fund. Warren Institution 

for Savings 63 . 90 

Middlesex Institution for Savings ... 900.00 

Balance cemetery funds 1,463.59 

Unexpended balance 862 . 27 



$16,109.79 

FRANK W. HOIT, 

Treasurer. 



70 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



Valuation April 1, 1915 

Buildings, exclusive of land $1,124,350.00 

Land, exclusive of buildings 539,345 . 00 

Personal estate 823,835.00 

Total valuation $2,487,530.00 

Valuation April 1, 1914 2,425,035 . 00 

Increase in valuation , .• $62,495.00 



Rate of taxation, $14.25. 



Tax Assessed as Follows: 

Real estate $23,707.65 

Personal estate 11,739 . 64 

Polls 1,364.00 

$36,811.29 

December assessment $381 . 89 

Moth tax 432.65 

Excise tax 115 . 64 



71 

Amount of Money Raised : 

For state tax $5,460 . 00 

State highway tax 899.55 

County tax 2,838.78 

Town grant 27,100.00 

Overlay 512 . 96 



$36,811.29 



WM. F. STEVENS, 
JAMES B. TUTTLE, 
WM. F. KELLEY, 

Assessors of Acton. 



72 



COLLECTOR'S REPORT 



For Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1915. 



1913 Dr. 

Uncollected January 1, 1915 $537.78 

Interest collected 52 . 72 



Cr. 

Paid treasurer $578 . 45 

Abatements 12 . 05 



1914 Dr. 

Uncollected January 1, 1915 $9,173.04 

Interest collected 317 . 54 



$590.50 



$590.50 



$9,490.58 



Cr. 

Paid treasurer $8,567 . 70 

Abatements 410 . 58 

$8,978.28 
Uncollected January 1. 1916 $512.30 



73 

1915 Dr. 

Town, state and county taxes, com- 
mitted to collector, July 15, 1915, $36,811.29 

Moth tax 432.65 

December assessment .381.89 

$37,625.83 
Interest collected 15.01 



$37,640.84 
Cr. 
Paid treasurer $31,118.59 



Uncollected December 31. 1915 . . $6,522.25 



74 



REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



To the Citizens of Acton: 

The report of the overseers of the poor is herewith sub- 
mitted : 

The cost for support of outside poor has been about the 
same as usual, excepting a sharp increase in the local ex- 
pense, which was approved and provided for by vote of the 
town. 

With this increased expense we believe that $1,500.00 
is the least sum that will be required for this department 
and recommend that amount be appropriated. 

The town home has been in charge of Mr. and Mrs. L. Q. 
Amadou as warden and matron, and the usual good condi- 
tions have been maintained. 

Number of inmates cared for during year 3 

Number at present time (woman) 1 

We recommend that $600.00 be appropriated for this 
department. 

Dr. Hall Staples has served as town physician during 
the year and has promptly and efficiently performed all ser- 
vices required of him. 



75 

Aid Furnished Outside Poor 

Expenses $1,835 . 90 

Receipts $537.27 

Due from town of Templeton 75.49 

Due from state 10 . 83 

623.59 



Net cost for financial year $1,212.31 



Inventory at Town Home, January 1, 1916 

9 Cows $680.00 

4 Heifers 130.00 

1 Bull 20.00 

2 Horses 200.00 

2 Pigs 15.00 

16 Tons Hay 370.00 

Harnesses 50 . 00 

Wagons, carts and sleds 350.00 

Farming Implements 220.00 

Grain 50.00 

Hot Air Engine 10.00 

Barrels and Boxes 10 . 00 

Coal 7.50 

Wood cut for stove 120.00 

Set Measures 1 . 00 

Salt .75 

Horse Blankets 15 . 00 

60 Hens 60.00 

Potatoes 20.00 

Apples 18.00 

Preserves, Pickles, etc 50.00 

Household goods and kitchen uten- 
sils 275 . 00 

Salt Pork 20.00 



76 



Vinegar 2.50 

Lime-Sulphur 10.00 

Wheel-Chair .' 20.00 

Groceries and Supplies 20.00 

Robes .' 10.00 

Cords Wood 20.00 

Lumber 60.00 

Stone lifter 20.00 

Pulley Blocks and Rope 4.00 

Crescent Saw 4 . 00 

Ice 10.00 

Carriage lamp 1 . 00 

Grass Seed 6.00 

Seed Corn 1 . 75 

Spray Pump 20.00 



Support of Town Home 

Expenditures $2.675 . 57 

Inventory, 1915 2,910.00 



$2,901.50 



$5,585.57 



Inventory, 1916 $2,901 . 50 

Receipts 2.173.04 

Wood delivered school houses 66.25 

$5,140.79 

Net cost for financial year $444.78 

WILLIAM F. KELLEY, 
EDWARD Z. STANLEY, 
FRED S. WHITCOMB, 
Board of Overseers of the Poor. 



77 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1915 



We present the following schedule showing the amounts 
of the several funds for the perpetual care of cemetery lots 
and the income and expenditures on account of each fund 
for the year: 

HORACE F. TUTTLE, 
JULIAN TUTTLE, 
FRED W. GREEN, 

Cemetery Commissioners. 



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8") 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE GOODNOW FUND 



For the Year Ending Dec. 31, 1915 



Investments 



Warren Institution for Savings, Book 

83,531 $1,100.20 

Charlestovrn Five Cents Savings Bank, 

Book 71,200 1.000.00 

City Institution for Savings, Lowell, 

Book 84,244 1,000.00 



$3,100.20 
Receipts 

Warren Institution for Savings, divi- 
dends $43.74 

Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank. 

dividends 42.95 

City Institution for Savings, dividend 20.00 

$126.69 



86 

Payments 

Paid Julian Tuttle, care of Goodnow 

lot in Woodlawn Cemetery $7.00 

Unexpended income for care of ceme- 
tery lot deposited with Warren 
Institution for Savings 16 . 74 

II. F. Bobbins, treasurer of the Evan- 
gelical Church in Acton 102 . 95 



$126.69 

LUTHER CONANT, 
I. WARREN FLAGG, 
HORACE F. TUTTLE, 
Trustees of Goodnow Fund. 



87 



TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BOARD OF 

TRUSTEES OF THE ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

FOR THE YEAR 1915 



Trustees 

LUTHER CONANT, President 

E. FAULKNER CONANT, Secretary 

MOSES TAYLOR* LUCIUS J. HESSELTON 

HORACE F. TUTTLE J. SIDNEY WHITE 

HIRAM J. HAPGOOD FRANK R. KNOWLTON 

DELETTE H. HALL 



The pleasant circle of the board of trustees has again 
been broken by the death of one of our number. Mr, Moses 
Taylor, one of the charter members, passed away at the ripe 
age of ninety-three years. To show what a single life may 
include of our country's history, we record that he was born 
during the administration of James Monroe, the fifth presi- 
dent of the United States, and died in the term of Woodrow 
Wilson, the twenty-eighth. Texas, California, New Mexico 
and Arizona, Alaska and our vast insular possessions all 
were added to the area of our country during his life. 

♦Died June 10, 1915. 



88 



It is not easy for one who has h)st a lifetime loyal friend 
to keep within proper limits in this brief notice, for a record 
'Of Mr. Taylor's public services would almost require a his- 
tory of the tow^n for the past sixty years. We mention his 
help to Mr. Wilde in clearing the lot on which the public 
library is located; that he carried the subscription papers 
for building the Congregational church in 1847, and gave 
largely to the remodeling of the church building in 1898; 
that he built several of the houses in the village; that for 
many years he carried on a large farm, and set out extensive 
orchards, that he made many blades of grass grow w^here 
none had grown before. 

His attendance at the town primaries and town m' et- 
ings was so faithful that once when illness kept him away 
from a caucus, a vote of sympathy was passed and conveye:! 
to him with the signatures of the chairman and secretary. 

He bore the afflictions which befell him in his advanced 
years with fortitude and never lost that sunniness of temper- 
ament which was one of his leading traits. He lived to see 
his children's children and a goodly number of still another 
generation. He had the friendship and even the affection of 
his fellow townsmen to an unusual degree. Much more 
might be said of many kindly acts and liberal support to 
numerous good causes, but this will, perhaps, suffice. We 
would observe, however, that while noted for his personal 
generosity, he consistently opposed the extravagance, state, 
municipal and social, that is sapping the life blood of our 
people. 

A somewhat careful examination of the twenty-sixth 
report of the Free Public Library Commission of the state 
shows that the circulation of our library in comparison with 
others falls considerably below the average, although the 
number of volumes is above. We should note some causes : 
We have in the town a competitor with a large circulation.; 
a large part of the population of the town resides at a dis- 



89 



taiiee of two or three miles or more from the Center village, 
where the library building is located. In addition, the town 
sends its high school pupils to Concord, where they have ac- 
cess to one of the oldest and best libraries in the state. 

The board has accepted all the suggestions of the state 
officials in this matter. We shall be glad to receive from any 
of our patrons advice that would tend to bring an increase 
in the circulation, and thereby add to the usefulness of Mr. 
Wilde's munificent gift. 

We have learned with much pleasure of a bequest of five 
hundred dollars in the will of the late Mr. Luke Tuttle, the 
income of which will soon become available. We are glad to 
report that ]\Ir. Hoit, our town treasurer, will in the futur** 
render a separate statement of the income from this and 
other similar funds. 

Two years ago we copied from the ]\Iassachusetts 
archives a list of the members of the militia company that 
Acton sent out in the war of 1812. From the same sources, 
we, this year, print a list of the Acton minute men of 1775, 
who led in the attack that made the old North Bridge at 
Concord one of the famous landmarks of American history. 

John Hayward. Captain Reuben Law. Private 

John Heald, Lieutenant Benja Hayward, Private 

David Furbush. 2nd Lieut. Simon Hunt. Jr., Private 

William Mackfield, Sergeant Elijah Davice, Private 

Oliver Emerson, Sergeant Ephraim Furbush, Private 

John Davis. Corporal Abraham Hapgood, Private 

David Davis, Corporal Ezekiel Davis, Private 

John Barker, Corporal Ebenezer Edwards. Private 

Thomas Darby, Private John Robbins, Private 

John Harris, Private Joseph Barker, Private 

Ebenezer Heald. Private William Johnson, Private 

James Davis, Private Reuben Davis, Private 

Phillip Piper, Private Joseph Reed, Private 



90 



Stephen Shepherd, Private Joseph Chaffin, Private 

Thomas Thorp, Private Samuel Tempel, Private 

Solomon Smith, Private Abraham Young, Private 

Jonas Hunt, Private Francis Barker (Drummer) 

Moses Wood, Private Luther Blanchard (Fifer) 
Ephraim Billings, Private 

It should be noted that the official payrolls from which 
this list was copied do not include the names of those three 
Acton martyrs in the cause of American Independence: 
Captain Isaac Davis, James Hayward and Abner Hosmer. 

This payroll was made up and sworn to in December, 
1775, or a few months after the fight, by Captain John Hay- 
ward, who succeeded to the command of the company, after 
the death of Captain Davis. 

We wish that every son and daughter of Acton would 

read the tenth chapter of the fourth volume of Bancroft's 

history, in our library. They will soon see whom this recog- 

.nized authority considered the real heroes of the Concord 

ifight. It is no exaggeration to say that in leadership, dis- 

fcipline, training, equipment and daring this company had 

•mo superior among the various organizations of minute men 

in existence at the commencement of the American 

Revolution. 

The trustees recommend the usual appropriations. 
Very respectfully, 

LUTHER CONANT, 

For the Trustees. 



91 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT 



Accessions: Number of volumes in the library Jan. 1^ 

1915, 12,356. Increase by purchase, 341, of which 12 were 
obtained by binding magazines. Increase by gift, 46. Total 
increase 387. Number of volumes in the library, Jan. 1, 

1916, 12,743. 

Circulation : Number of days the library was opened, 
103. Number of volumes circulated 8,010. Dail}^ average 
circulation 77 plus. Largest daily circulation 147, on Aug. 7. 
Smallest daily circulation. 31, on Aug. 4. 

Received for fines $20 . 79 

Expended for postage .79 



$20.00 
Gifts of books have been received from the following 
sources: United States government, 8; state of Massachu- 
setts, 13 ; P. Andreae, 1 ; Association of American Portland 
Cement Manufacturers, 2; Mrs. ]\I. J. Brown, 10;' Carnegie 
Peace Foundation, 1; General Education Board, 1; Massa- 
chusetts Society, S. A. R., 1 ; H. G. S. Noble. 1; A. L. Noyes, 
1 ; 0. W. Norton, 1 ; Hispanic Society, New York, 1 ; P. E. 
Sargent, 1; F. W. Whitridge, 1; Woman Suffrage head- 
quarters, 1 ; Forty-ninth encampment, G. A. R., 1 ; 1 volume 
Acton town reports. Total, 46. 

ARTHUR F. DAVIS, 

Librarian. 



92 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE MEMORIAL LIBRARY IN 1915 



NON-FICTION 



Adams, F. U. — Conquest of the Tropics 
Adams, J. C. — Nature studies in Berkshire 
Anderson, F. I. — Electricity for the farm 
Angeli, A. — New Spanish English dictionary 
Anon — Factories and warehouses of concrete 
Anon — King Albert's book 
Anon — Manual training course in concrete 
Anon — Massachusetts Society, S. A. R. 

members 
Andreae, P. — The prohibition movement 
Angel, N. — Arms and industry 
Antonius, M. A. — Writings 
Bailey, E. H. S. — A textbook of sanitary 

chemistry 
Baker, E. A. — History in Fiction 
Bancroft, H. H. — History of Mexico 
Banks, E." J. — The Bible and the Spade 
Beard, D. C. — Shelters, shacks and shanties 
Benson, A. C. — The orchard pavilion 
Bergling, J. M. — Art alphabets and lettering 
Berget, A.— The earth, its life and death 
Bjorkman, F. M., and Porrit, A. G. — Woman Suffrage 

82-B626W 
Boardman, H. A.— Discourse on the life and character of 

Daniel Webster 922-W378b 

Bond, A. R. — Handy man's workshop and laboratory 

68-B7nh 



917.28-A212C 

917.3-A194n 

62-A546e 

46-A582n 

69-AlOOf 

940-AlOOk 
69-AlOOm 
register of 

36-AlOOm 

32-A556p 

32-A583a 

87-A635t 

and applied 

66-B154t 
02-B167h 

972-B213h 
22-B218b 
79-B36SS 
82-B4740 
74-B498a 
55-B495e 



93 



Borrow, G.— Wild Wales 914.2-B737w 

Borrow, G. — The Zineali, an account of the gypsies of 

Spain 914.6-B737Z 

Brame, J. S. S. — Fuel, solid, liquid and gaseous 66-B815f 
Burns, J. — How to play tennis 79-B967h 

Cahalane, C. F. — Police practice and procedure 35-C132p 
Cato-Varro — Roman farm management 63-C366r 

Chase, J. C. — Decorative design 74-C487d 

Clark, F. E.^-The charm of Scandinavia 914.8-C592c 

Cobb, T.— Busting 'em 81-C653b 

Collins, A. F.— The book of the wireless 62-C712b 

Cote, G. D. H.— The world of labor 33-C689w 

Crapsey, A. S. — The rise of the working class 33-C893r 

Crawford, M. C. — Social life in old New England 

973.2-C899S 
Dall, W. H.— Spencer Fullerton Baird 922-B163d 

Dumbell, K. E. M.— California and the far west 917.3-D898c 
Dupuy, W. A. — Uncle Sam's modern miracles 35-D945un 
Embury, A. 2nd— Early American churches 973.2-E53e 

Emerson, H.— Efficiency 33-E53e 

Enenkel, A. — A new dictionary of the English and 

Italian languages 45-E56n 

Ewart, J. A., and Field. W. S. — A civil service manual 

3 vols 35-E94C 

Fabre. J. H. — Bramble bees and others 59-F123b 

Fabre, J. H. The mason bees 59-F123m 

Fiske, A. K.— Honest business 33-F541h 

Gardner, M. T.— Winners of the world 920-G227w 

Gilman, L.— Edward McDowell 922-:\ri38g 

Goya— Drawings 75-G724d 

Graves, F. P. — A history of education in modern times 

37-G776h 
Haddock, F. C— Power of will 15-H127p 

Harbison, E. G. — Low cost receipts 64-H2551 

Harris, G. — Audel's answers on practical engineering 

62-H314a 
Hartt, R. L.— Understanding the French 914.4-H385u 



94 

Hepburn, A. B. — Artificial waterways of the world 

38-H529a 
Herrick, M. T.— Rural credits 33-H566r 

Hicks, A. M.— The craft of hand-made rugs 67-H631c 

Hoeber, A. — The Barbazon painters 925-H693b 

Hopkins, J. C. — French Canada and the St. Lawrence 

917.1-H794f 
Homaday, W. T.— Wild life conservation 59-H813w 

Howe, M. A. D. — The Boston Symphony Orchestra 

78.H857b 
Howes, B. A.— Building by a builder 69-H855b 

Hungerford, E. — The personality of American cities 

917.3-H936p 
Hunt, G. — The department of state of the United States 

35-H941d 
Ingalese, R. — The history and power of mind 15-I44h 

James, W. — Psychology 15-J29p 

Johnson, M. — Through the south seas with Jack London 

917.3-J68t 
Johnston, C. H. — The modern high school 37-J66m 

Kains, M. G.— Culinary herbs 63-K13c 

Kane, E. K.— Adrift in the Arctic ice pack 919.8-K16a 

Kellog, C. L. — Memoirs of an American prima donna 

922-K295k 
Kenlon,J. — Fires and fire fighters 62-K38f 

Lea, H.— The day of the Saxon 32-L433d 

Lee, A. — Little stories of big men 81-L4771 

Lewis, H. R. — Productive Poultry Husbandry 63-L674p 

Lithgow, R. A. D. — Nantucket, a history 974.5-L975n 

Lloyd, J. "W. — Productive vegetable growing 63-L793p 

Logan, Mrs. J. — Reminiscences of a soldier's wife 922-L8811 
McCall, S. W.— Life of Thomas B. Reed 922-R326m 

Macomber, B.— The jewel city 60-M171J 

Maehugh, R. J.— Modern Mexico 917.2-]\ri51m 

McKready, K. — Beginners' star-book 52-M159b 

Maeterlinck, M. M. — The girl who found the bluebird 

922-K29m 
Marlowe, C— Dramas 82-M349d 



95 



Marot, H. — American labor iinioDs 33-M355a 

Masters, E. L. — Spoon-river anthology 81-M423s 

Mendel, A. — Indoor merrymaking and table decorations 

64-:\r537i 
:\mes, X. A.— Serving the republic 922-M643m 

Mitchell, S. W.— Complete poems 81-M682c 

Moorhead. W. K. — The American Indian in the United 

States, 1850-1914 970-M819a 

Morris. C— The nations of Europe 940-M875n 

Muir, J.— Travels in Alaska 917.3-M953t 

Murray, J.— Autobiography 922-:\I981m 

Norton, 0. W. — The attack and defence of Little Round- 
Top, Gettysburgh, July 2, 1863 973.7-N886a 
O'Connell. "W. H., archbishop of Boston; sermons and 

addresses, 4 vols. 25-018s 

Olcott, C. S.— The lure of the camera 910-0431 

Paul, N. B.— The heart of Blackstone 34-P324h 

Pennell. J. — In the land of temples 75-P41330 

Pier. A. S.— The story of Harvard 973-P615s 

Plotinus— Select works 88-P729s 

Plowman, G. T.— Etching 76-P732e 

Powell. G. H.— Cooperation in agriculture 63-P883c 

Powell, J. W. — First through the Grand Canyon 

917.3-P884f 
Prout. E. — Harmony, its theory and practice 78-P968h 

Putnam, G. P. — The southland of North America 

917.28-P9918 
Putnam. P. — Alsace and Lorraine, from Caesar to Kaiser 

944-P992a 
Quint. W. D.— The story of Dartmouth 973-Q7s 

Reed. C. A.— Bird book 50-R323b 

Rihbany. A. M.— A far journey 922-R571r 

Riis, J. A.— Neighbors 30-R572n 

Rolland. R. — Musicians of today 78-R749m 

Russell, W. S. C. — Iceland; horseback tours in Saga land - 

919.8-R968i 
Sears. F. C. — Productive orcharding 63-S;439p 

Sears, L.— John Hay 922-H412s 



96 

Serviss, Gr. P. — Astronomy with the naked eye 52-S492a 

Sinclair, A. — Locomotive engine running and manage- 
ment 62-S6161 
Slingerland, M. V., and Crosby, C. R. 63.S633m 
Sloan, M. M. — The concrete house and its construction 

69-S634C 
Small, W. H.— Early New England schools 973.2-S635e 

Smith, L. P.— The English language 42-S654e 

Stein er, E. A. — From alien to citizen 922-S822st 

Stevenson, B. E.— The charm of Ireland 914.16-S847c 

Sylvester, H. M. — Indian wars of New England (3 vols.) 

973.2-S955i 
Theocritus and Virgil— Echlogues 88-T386i 

Thayer, W. R.— Life of John Hay (2 vols) 922-114121 

Treitsehke, H. Von — Selections from lectures on polities 

32-T787g 
Tupper, W. and J. W. — Representative English drama 

82-T928r 
Tuttle, C. R.— Alaska 917.3-T967a 

Van Denburgh, E. D. — My voyage in the United States 

frigate Congress 910-V227m 

Van Slyke, L. L.— Fertilizers and crops 63-V279f 

Vauthier, C. M. — The technique of painting 75-V38U 

Vedder, H. C. — The gospel of Jesus and the problems 

of democracy 30-V415g 

Walcott, A. S.— Java and her neighbors 919.1-W156J 

Ward, F. E.— Practical real estate methods 33-W258p 

Webster, D.— Works (9 vols.) 81-W378w 

Wells, H. G. — Social forces in England and America 

30-W454S 
White, S. E.— The rediscovered country 916.6-W588r 

Whitridge, F. W. — One American's opinion of the 

European war 940-W577o 

Wiley, H. W.— The lure of the land 63-W6761 

Wiley, H. W.— 1001 tests of foods, etc. 64.W676t 

Williams, H. S.— Miracles of science 50-W723m 

Winter, N. 0. — Argentina and her people of today 

918-W786a 



97 



AVinter,N.O.— Chile and her people of today 918-W786c 

Withers, H.— Poverty and waste 33-W824p 

Wood, R. K— The tourists' California 917.3-W878t 

Woodberry, G. E. — North Africa and the desert 

916.1-W881n 
Woodson, C. G. — The education of the negro prior to 

1861 973-W894e 

Wright, W. P.— The new gardening 63-W954n 

FICTION 



Aiken, E. — The river 

Allen, F. N. S. — The invaders 

Allen, J. L. — The sword of youth 

Atherton, G. — Before the Gringo came 

Bailey, T. — Contrary Mary 

Barclay, F. L. — My heart's right there 

Beach, R. — The net 

Bindloss, H. — Alton of Somasco 

Bindloss, II. — Ranching for Sylvia 

Bindloss, H, — The gold trail 

Bindloss, H. — The secret of the reef 

Bordeaux, II. — The woolen dress 

Brady, C. T.— Britton of the seventh 

Brebner, B. J. — Christopher Quales 

Brebner, B. J. — The turbulent duchess 

Burney, F. — Evelina 

Cable, G. W.— Gideon's band 

Gather, W. S.— The song of the lark 

Churchill, W. — A far country 

Cobb, I. S. — Back home 

Connolly, J. B. — The trawler 

Conrad, J. — A set of six 

Crockett, S. R. — Silver sand 

Cullum, R. — The way of the strong 

Curtiss, P.— The ladder 

Curwood, J. 0. — Kazan 

Day, H. — The landloper 



A-291r 
A425i 

A427sw 
A868b 
B158c 

B244my 

B365ne 
B612a 
B612r 
B612g 
B612se 
B727w- 
B812b 
B828c 
B828t 
B065e 

. C115gi 
C3638 
C563f 

C6535b 

C743t 

C754s 

C938si 

C967wa 

C9811 

C982k 

D2731 



98 



Doyle, A. C— The valley of fear D754v 

Edgar, G.— The red colonel E23r 

Fielding, H.— Tom Jones F4595t 

Fillmore, P.— The rosie world P487r 

Fox, J., Jr. — The little shepherd of kingdom come F79251 
Fraser, Mrs. H. and Stahlman, J, I. — The honor of the 

house F841h 

Fraser, T.— The call of the east F8425c 

Froest, F.— The Grell mystery F926g 

Gale, Z. — Neighborhood stories G152n 

Galsworthy, J.— The freelands GlTSfr 

George, W. L. — The second blooming G-349s 
Gordon, C. W. — The patrol of the Sun-dance trail G662pa 

Gorkey, M. — Tales of two countries G669t 

Grayson, D.— The friendly road G784f 

Grey, Z. — The lone-star ranger G8421o 

Haines, D. H. — The last invasion H15251 

Hardy, A. S. — Diane and her friends H263d 

Herrick, R.— Clark's field H566cl 

Kitchens, B. S.— Bye ways B626b 

Johnson, M. — The fortunes of Garin J73f 

King, B.— The giant's strength K521g 

King, B. — Let not man put asunder K5211e 

King, B.— The steps of honor K521st 

Kingsley, H. — Geoffrey Hamlyn K554g2 

Kingsley, H. — Ravenshoe K554r2 
Lighton, W. R. — Letters of an old farmer to his son 

L7241 

Lincoln, J. C. — Thankful's inheritance L7872t 

London, J. — The mutiny of the Elsinor L847m 

London, J. — The star rover L847st 

Lynde, P. — Scientific Sprague L988s 

McCarter, M. H. — Winning the wilderness M1235w 

McCutcheon, G. B.— Mary Midthorne M133ma 

McCutcheon, G. B.— What's his name M133w 

MacGrath, H.— Pidgin island M147pi 
Mclntyre, J. T. — Ashton Kirk, special detective M1585a 

Melville, G. J. W.— The gladiators M531g 



99 



Melville, G. J. W.— Katerfelto M531K 

Montgomery, L. M. — Anne of the island M787ao 

Onions, 0. — Gray youth 0585g 

Oppenheim, E. P.— Mr. Grex of Monte Carlo 062mr 

Oppenheim, E. P. — The vanished messenger 062v, 

Orczy, B. — The laughing cavalier 0631 

Parrish, R. — Beyond the frontier P261b 

Parrish, R.— The red mist P261r 
Piper, M. R. — Sylvia's experiment - P665s 

Poole, E.— The harbor P822h 

Porter, G. S.— Michael O'Halloran P845m 

Porter, E. H. — Pollyanna grows up P844p 

Pouskin, A. — Prose tales P878p 

Raine, W. N. — A daughter of the Dons R155d 

Rinehart, M. R.— K. R579k 

Roberts, C. G. D.— Hoof and claw R643h 

Sedwick, A. D. — The encounter S348e 

Smith, F. H.— Felix 'Day S647f e 

Steele, F. A.— The mercy of the Lord S813m 

Stockley, C— Wild honey S86ow 

Stoothoff, E.— The nightingale S882n 

Stowe, E. — Nancy, the joyous S891n 

Sue, E. — The wandering Jew S044w 

Vachell, H. A.— Quinney's V118q 

Van Schaick, G. — Sweetapple cove V278s 

Van Vorst, W. — Big Tremaine V284b 

Warner, A. — Sunshine Jane W2792su 
Wason, A. R. — Happy Hawkins in the Panhandle W312ha 

Wells, C— Patty's suitors W453pj 
Williamson, C. N. and A. M.— The heather moon W729h 

Wood, Mrs. H.— The Channings WS755c 

Wood, Mrs. H. — East Lynne W8755e 

Wood, Mrs. H.— Roland Yorke W87r)5r 

Zangwill, I. — Plaster saints Z29p 



100 



JUVENILE 



Altsheler, J. A.- 
Altsheler, J, A- 
Altsheler, J. A.- 
Altsheler, J. A- 
Altsheler, J. A.- 
Barbour, R. II.- 
B arbour, R. H.— 
Barbour, R. H.- 
Bassett, S. W.— 



—The forest runners 

-The free rangers 

—The last of the chiefs 

-The Texan star 

—The young trailers 

-Left end Edwards 

-The brother of a hero 

-The story my doggie told me 

Story of wool 



Blaisdell, M. F.— Pretty Polly Flinders 
Blanch ard, A. E. — Elizabeth, Betsy and Bess, 

mates 
Blanchard 



J-A469f 

J-A469fr 

J-A4691 

J-A469t 

J-A469y 

J-B2391 

J-B239br 

J-B239S 

J-B319S 

J-B635p 

school- 



A. E. 



J-B639el 
The camp fire girls of Brightwood 

J-B639C 
Bond, A. R. — With the men who do things J-B711w 

Brady, C. T.— The little angel of Canyon creek J-B812b 

Brooke, L. L. — A nursery rhyme picture book J-B872n 

Brooks, A.— Dorothy Dainty's visit J-B8725do 

Brown, A. P.— The lucky stone J-B8771 

Burgess, T. W. — The adventures of Jerry Muskrat J-B955ae 
Burgess, T. W.— The adventures of Johnnie Chuck 

J-B955nb 
Burgess, T. W. — The adventures of Mr. Mocker J-B955ng 
Burgess, T. W.— The adventures of Reddy Fox J-B955af 
Burgess, T. W. — Mother West Wind's animal friends 

J-B955mp 
Burgess, T. W.— Old Mother West Wind's Children 

J-B955mo 
Burgess, T. W.— Old Mother West Wind J-B955o 

Chamberlain, A. C— The Bailey Twins J-C442b 

Curtis, E. S.— Indian days of long ago J-C9785i 

Doubleday, R. — Cattle ranche to college J-D727c 

Dyer, W. A.— Pierrot dog of Flanders J-D996p 

Eastman, C. A. — Indian scout talks J-E13in 

Eaton, W. P.— Boy scouts in theWhite mountains J-E14bp 



101 



Eaton, W. P. — Boy scouts of the Wildcat patrol J-E14bq 
Ellis, E. S.— The three arrows J-E47th 

Gilchrist, B. B.— Helen and the Find Out club J-G467he 

Gray, P.— Little Sir Galahad J-G7811 

Higgins, A. C. — Little princess of the ranche J-IT6361 

Hoyt,E.— Little stories for little people J-II8661k 

Kelland, C. B.— Mark Tidd in the backwoods J-K291m 

Kilbourne, C. E. — Baby elephant and the zoo man J-K48b 
Kilbourne, C. E.— Baby monkey and Wily Wolf J-K48ba 
Mathewson, C. — Pitching in a pinch J-]M4382p 

Meade, L. T.— Bad little Hannah J-M481b 

Meade, L. T.— Girls of the true blue J-:\r481gi 

Meade, L. T.— Good luck J-M481go 

Meade, L. T. — Polly a new fashioned girl J-M481po 

Morgan, A. P.— The boy electrician J-I\r847b 

Mullins, I. M. — Anne of the blossom shop J-M959a 

Munroe, K. — Cab and caboose J-]M968ca 

Olcott, F. J.— The jolly book for boys and girls J-043J 

Otis, J. — Across the range J-088ac 

Parker, T. D. — Young heroes of the American navy 

J9-P234y 
J-Q7b 
J-S898d 
J-T125he 
J-T12r)bf 
J-T ^76h 
J-T:376i 



Quirk, L. W. — Baby Elton, quarter back 

Strathemeyer, E. — Dave Porter at Oak Hall 

Taggart, M. A. Beth's wonder winter 

Taggart, M. A. — Beth 's old home 

Theiss, L. and M. — His big brother 

Theiss, L. E. — In camp at Fort Brady 

Thompson, J. M. — Wild kindred of fur, feather and fin 

J-T473W 
Tomlinson, E. T. — Four boys and a fortune J-TGoOt't 

Tomlinson, E. T. — Four boys in the land of cotton ■ J-T6")0fs 
Tomlinson, E. T.— Four boys on Pike's Peak J-TGoOfr 

Trowbridge, J. T.— A start in life J-T8n3.si 

Trowbridge, J. T.— Biding his time J-T863b 

Trowbridge, J. T. — The adventures of David Vano ptt^ 

David Crane J-T86 \t 

Trowbridge, J. T.— The kelp-gatherers J-TSGSk 

Trowbridge, J. T.— The lottery ticket • J-T8G31o 



102 



Trowbridge, J. T. — The scarlet tanager and other bipeds 

J-T863SC 
Weir, H. C— Cinders J-W425c 

Weir, H. C. — The young wheat scout J-W425yo 

Wheeler, F. R.— The boy with the United States ex- 
plorers J-W562ba 

MAGAZINES 

Atlantic, July-December, 1914. 
Cosmopolitan, June-November, 1914. 
Everybody's, July-December, 1914. 
Harper's, June-November, 1914. 
National, October-March, 1914-15. 
Popular Mechanics, July-December, 1914. 
Review of Reviews,. July-December, 1914. 
Scientific American, July-December, 1914. 
Scribncr's — July-December, 1914. 
St. Nicholas, May-October, 1914. 
World's Work, May-October, 1914. 
Youth's Companion, July, December, 1914. 

REFERENCE 

Acton town reports, 1904-1909. 
Carnegie Peace Endowment Year Book, 1915. 
General Education Board. 

Journal House of Representatives, Massachusetts, 1915. 
Journal of the Senate, Massachusetts, 1915. 
Manual for the General Court, Massachusetts, 1915. 
Massachusetts Society, S. A. R., report for 1913. 
Municipal Finances, Massachusetts, 1912. 
Proceedings United States National Museum, 1915. 
Reference Atlas of the World. 

Report Commissioner of Education, United States, 1912 
volume 1, and 1914. 

Report Smithsonian Institution, 1914. 



^ 



103 



The best private schools in the United States and 
Canada. 

Webster's New International Dictionary. 

Twenty-sixth Ailnual Report on Railways in the United 
States. 

Forty-ninth Encampment of the G. A. R., 1915. 

Vital Records of Amesbury, Mass., to 1850. 

Vital Records of Cambridge, Mass., to 1850. 

Vital Records of Chelmsford, Mass., to 1850. 

Vital Records of Heath, Mass., to 1850. 

Vital Records of Rochester, Mass., to 1850. 

Vital Records of Tyngsborough, Mass., to 1850. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee and Superintendent 
of Schools 



OF THE 



TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 
FOR THE TWELVE MONTHS ENDING DECE:\rBER 31 

1915 




C<° ACTaiM^ 



THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 

HUDSON, MASS. 

1916 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE'S REPORT 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 
1916 



THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

March 10. Winter term closes 13 weeks- 

Vacation, One Week 

March 20. Spring term opens 

(Tune 16. Spring term closes 13 weeks 

Summer Vacation 

1916-1917 
Sept. 5. Pall term opens 

Nov. 24. Fall term closes 12 weeks 

Vacation, One Week 

Dec. 4. Winter term opens 

Vacation (Dee. 22-Jan. 1) One Week 

March 10. Winter term closes 14 weeks 

Vacation, One Week 

March 26. Spring term opens 

June 15. Spring term closes 12 weeks 

Total 38 weeks- 



SPECIAL EXERCISE DAYS AND HOLIDAYS 



1916 




Feb. 


11. 


Feb. 


21. 


Apr. 


18. 


May 


29. 


Oct. 


11. 


1917 




Feb. 


12. 


Feb. 


21. 


Apr. 


18. 



Lincoln exercises, one hour. 
Washington exercises, one hour. 
Patriots' Day exercises, one hour. 
Memorial Day exercises, one hour. 
Columbus Day exercises, one hour. 
Thanksgiving Day exercises, one hour. 

Lincoln exercises, one hour. 
Washington exercises, one hour. 
Patriots' Day exercises, one hour. 
May 29. Memorial Day exercises, one hour. 

LEGAL HOLIDAYS 

The words, "legal holiday," shall include the twenty- 
second day of February, the nineteenth day of April, the 
thirtieth day of May, the fourth day of July, the first Mon- 
day of September, the twelfth day of October, Thanksgiving 
day and Christmas day, or the day following when any of 
the four days first mentioned, the twelfth day of October, 
or Christmas day occurs on Sunday. 

Arbor day occurs on the last Saturday in April, and is 
not a legal holiday. 

Flag day occurs on June 14. and is not a legal holiday. 
It should be observed by any school then in session. 



SCHOOL OFFICERS AND TEACHERS 



School Committee 



Bertram E. Hall, Secretary Term expires 1916 

Edwin A. Phalen, Chairman Term expires 1917 

Herbert W. Lewis Term expires 1918 

Superintendent 

Frank H. Hill. Residence, Littleton, Mass. 
Telephone No. 36-3, Littleton 

Attendance Officers 

Thomas Scanlon. Address, West Acton 
Asaph Parlin. Address, Acton Center 
Walter M. French. Address, South Acton 

Janitors 

Fred S. Glines. Address, South Acton 
Thomas Scanlon. Address, West Acton 
Asaph Parlin. Address, Acton Center 



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STANDING RULES 



Rule 1. ^Children under five years shall not be ad- 
mitted to the public schools. 

Rule 2. Pupils shall be promoted from grade to grade 
and school to school, according to merit. Thorough and 
satisfactory work will be required of pupils in a lower grade 
or school before entering a higher grade or school. 

Rule 3. Children who have not previously attended 
any school shall be admitted to the public schools only at 
the beginning of the fall term. 

Rule 4. Pupils shall be held responsible for books 
loaned to them until returned to the teacher. 

Rule 5. No repairs shall be made upon the public pro- 
perty in the care of the school committee, except by their 
authorized agents. 

Rule 6. There shall be no signal for '*no school" on 
stormy or other inclement days, but parents shall determine 
in their individual cases whether it is expedient to send their 
children to school or not. 

*When the birthday of a child falls on or before the 
15th day of the month it is reckoned as falling upon the first 
dav of that month. 



GENERAL REPORT 



The committee met and organized on April 2nd, 1915. 
Mr. E. A. Phalen was chosen chairman, and Mr. B. B. Hall, 
secretary. Meetings have been held nearly every month 
during the year. 

Through advice from Superintendent Hill, it was learned 
that many books were lying idle and useless in the South 
Acton schools. The committee therefore deemed it best to 
dispose of these books, and accordingly bids were asked for 
from several book dealers. The prices offered, however, 
were so low that the committee did not think it advisable to 
accept any of these offers. Later, arrangements were made 
with Finney & Hoit for the sale of these books on a commis- 
sion basis to the toAvnspeople. At this writing, we learn that 
there has already been received more money from a sale 
of part of these books than was offered by the dealers for 
the whole lot, and furthermore the books have remained at 
home to be a source of education and pleasure for our own 
people. 

In presenting the following financial report, we wish to 
call your attention to the fact that, although the town 
finance committee at the regular town meeting in March, 
1915, recommended a cut in the school appropriations to 
$15,000.00. and the town so voted, it was very apparent to 
this committee that such a sum would be insufficient to carry 
the schools through the year. With the idea of finding out 
how the finance committee proposed to save this much money, 
they were invited to attend the first meeting of this commit- 
tee after the town meeting. A general discussion of the 
situation was had but no tangible solution of the problem of 



how to save on school expenses was brought out. It seemed 
to this committee that nothing short of some drastic action, 
such as closing the schools, etc., could bring the expenses 
down to the figure recommended by the finance committee. 

A careful analj^sis of the following disbursements will 
show that nearly one-half of the total expenses for the sup- 
port of our schools is for out-of-town pupils. In other words, 
it costs nearly as much to maintain approximately eighty- 
five pupils out of town as it does something like three hun- 
dred forty scholars at home. Fully realizing this very dis- 
proportionate cost, this committee was loath to take any 
action which would be detrimental to our elementary schools 
in favor of those attending outside schools, where the com- 
mittee has practically no jurisdiction. Therefore, at a 
special town meeting in September, we asked for an addi- 
tional appropriation, and even this, with receipts from out- 
side' sources amounting to almost $2,500.00, was insufficient 
to cover the total cost, which came very close to the original 
estimate of this committee. In fact, with the addition of one 
tuition bill to the town of Concord for agricultural scholars, 
which was paid from other sources, our estimate was only 
a few dollars from the actual expenditures. 

Our estimates for the coming year have been prepared 
with equal care, and in view of the probable addition of 
about twenty pupils to the Concord high school, we feel that 
the additional amount asked for in the following estimate is 
fully warranted, and we ask your careful consideration. 

The committee wishes to publicly thank the donor of the 
beautiful old engraving, called "Cornelia and Her Jewels," 
which adorns the wall of our South Acton grammar school. 
This picture was the gift of Mrs. Sophia Faulkner Campbell 
in memory of her sister, Lottie Faulkner, who was once a 
teacher here. 

Following is our estimate of expenses for 1916, and the 
details of receipts and disbursements for 1915: 



10 



ESTIMATES FOR THE SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS FOR 
THE FISCAL YEAR 1916 



For general expenses: 

Salaries and other expenses of 

the committee $100.00 

Salaries and other expenses of 
the superintendent and truant 

officer 600.00 

For expenses of instruction : 

Tuition of pupils attending out 

of town schools 8,000.00 

Salaries of elementary school 

teachers 5,890.00 

For textbooks : 

For elementary schools it is antici- 
pated that the amount to be 
received from dog tax will 

cover this item 290.00 

For stationery and supplies: 

Elementary schools 313.00 

For expenses of operating school plants : 
Wages of janitors, fuel and mis- 
cellaneous expenses ....: 1,795.00 

^Maintenance and repairs 375.00 

For auxiliary agencies: 

Health 75.00 

For transportation: 

High school scholars 2,300.00 

Elementary scholars 1,850.00 

Total $21,588. Oa 

Less estimated income from various 

outside sources 2,500.00 



$19,088.00 
*In eludes installing town water in South school and 
electric lights in basements of West and Center schools. 



11 



EECEIPTS ON ACCOUNT OF SCHOOLS FOR THE YEAR 

1915 



Appropriations 



At regular town meeting in March, 

1915 $15,000.00 

At special town meeting in September, 

1915 ; unexpended balance in 1914 1,867 . 82 

Outside sources : 

Income ^lassachusetts school fund $1,103.83 
Superintendent of school fund . . . 343 . 75 

Massachusetts state treasurer: 

Tuition of children 158.60 

Educational Independent Indus- 
trial school 567 . 38 

Tuition of Enid Sadler 13 . 50 

Tuition of Charlotte Gooch 9.00 

B. & M. R. R., refund on ticket . . 2.00 

Dog licenses 292.01 

Sale of old papers 1 . 07 

$2,491.14 



Total $19,358.96 



12 



DISBURSEMENTS 

General Expenses 

School Committee 

Salaries : 
Paid B. E. Hall, salary for nine months 

to December 31, 1915 $56.25 

Miscellaneous : 

Paid Rumford Supply Co $1.00 

Wright & Potter Printing Co. . . . 1.57 

Samuel Ward Co .85 

$3.42 

Superintendent of Schools and Enforcement of Law 

Salaries : 

Paid Frank H. Hill, superintendent . $577.50 

Asaph Parlin 2.00 

Thomas Scanlon , 4.00 

$583.50 
Miscellaneous : 

Paid Rumford Supply Co $2 . 06 

J. L. Hammett Co 1 . 26 

Frank H. Hill, telephone, postage 

and stationery 14.35 

Eleanor L. Hill, secretary to sup- 
erintendent 36.73 

$54.40 



13 



Expense of Instruction 



Paid Town of Concord, high school . . $5,718.54 

Town of Stow, high school 100.00 

Town of Concord, agricultural .. 616.75 

City of Lowell, industrial 90.00 

Elementary Schools : 

Paid Harriet H. Gardner $561.00 

E. Sophia Taylor 494.10 

Esther Vance 268.80 

Ella L. Miller 513.00 

Martha F. Smith 513.00 

Minnie Gamble 310.50 

Emma M. Halliday 527.00 

Elizabeth A. Hinckley 513.00 

Julia L. McCarthy 513.00 

Jennie E. Stowell 513.00 

Emily Nagle 154.00 

Mrs. Frank K. Howe 37.60 

Alice M. Genthner 200.18 

Marion C. Taylor 200.18 

Ruth L. Harrington 185.00 

Marion H. Barrett 187.50 



$6,525.29 



Text Books 
id E P Button & Co 


$5,690.86 
$2.36 


Edward E Babb & Co 


205.20 


Boston School Supply Co 

J L Ilammett Co 


25.24 

1.07 


Ginn & Co 


22.14 


Silver Burdett & Co 


17.49 


H. II. Gardner 


.72 



$275.12 



14 

Stationery and Supplies 

Elementary : 

Paid Edward E. Babb & Co $^73.81 

J. L. Hammett Co 11 . 61 

Fred S. Glines 2.89 

Ginn & Co 2.44 

Boston School Supply Co 3 . 54 

Finney & Hoit 5.86 

Oliver Ditson Co 1.87 

H. H. Gardner .49 

G. L. Noyes 1.65 

Thomas Scanlon .96 

A. Flanagan Co 2.25 

Huntley S. Turner 11 . 60 



Expenses of Operating School Plants 

Wages of Janitors 
Elementary : 

Paid Fred S. Glines $360.00 

Thomas Scanlon 337.00 

Asaph Parlin 291.00 



Fuel 

Paid T. C. Downie $7.00 

Fred S. Whitcomb 18.00 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 38.75 

George H. Reed 647.46 

Hall Bros. Co 2.50 



$318.97 



$988.00 



$713.71 



15 

Miscellaneous 

Paid Tuttle & Newton $4.53 

W. & S. Water Supply District of 

Acton 24.00 

J. T. McNiff 1.00 

Asaph Parlin 15.83 

American Woolen Co 7.28 

Thomas Scanlon 13.00 

Fred S. Glines 12.90 

D, Hennessey 3 . 00 

Finney & Hoit .50 

Hopkinson & Holden 3.75 



Maintenance 

Repairs 

Paid E. T. Rice $33.84 

M. E. Taylor & Co 49.08 

George H. Gutteridge 4.00 

Alma Stowell .85 

Tuttle & Newton 4.72 

George H. Reed 5 . 63 

South Acton Coal & Lumber Co., 6.13 

Finney & Hoit .36 

E. Z. Stanley 4.50 

Thomas Scanlon 3.00 

E. C. Page 8.67 

B. E. Hall 1.00 



$85.79 



$121.78 



16 

Auxiliary Agencies 

Health 

Paid Thomas Scanlon $2.83 

George B. Robbins Disinfectant 

Co 87.50 

H. W. Lewis .44 

D. Hennessey 5 . 00 

J. W. Livermore 1 . 50 

F. S. Glines .47 



$97.74 



Transportation 
High School: 

Paid N. Y., N. H & H. R. R. Co $355.15 

B. & M. R. R. Co 1,530.28 

Helen E. Hard}^ 2.40 

E. H. Carey 30.80 

H. W. Bursaw 11 . 10 



$1,929.73 



$65.40 



Lowell Industrial School: 

Paid N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Co $41.10 

B. & M. R. R. Co 20.00 

Herbert W. Merriam 2 . 58 

J. B. Nims 1.72 



Elementary : 

Paid A. Christoff erson $418 . 00 

Walter M. French 354.00 

James Mekkelsen 532 . 00 

Charles Edwards 545.00 

$1,849.00 

Total transportation $3,844.13 



17 



Total disbursements $19,358.96 

Total receipts 19,358.96 

Unpaid Bills 

Town of Concord, balance of tuition 

bill $208.26 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWIN A. PHALEN, 
HERBERT W. LEWIS, 
BERTRAM E. HALL, 

Committee. 
Acton, January 14, 1916. 



18 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 



tjentlemen of the Committee: 

Following is my sixth report, the twenty-fourth in the 
series of such annual reports. 

Since issuing my last report two changes have taken 
place in the teaching force of this town. After a long term 
of faithful service, Miss Minnie Gamble resigned in June 
from the Acton Center grammar school, and Miss Marion H. 
Barrett, a graduate of McGaw Normal Institute and of the 
Plymouth, N. H., Normal school, was appointed teacher of 
grades 7 and 8 in that school. Miss Esther Vance of the 
West Acton Intermediate school having resigned to take a 
position in her home town of Norwood, Miss Ruth Harring- 
ton of Fitchburg Normal school was appointed in her place. 
Thus two teachers in a force of twelve (including special 
teachers) are new teachers, not a large percentage of loss 
for a town accessible to larger and wealthier communities 
paying higher salaries and offering other inducements in the 
way of fewer grades, longer school year and systematic 
increases of salary for continued and successful service. 

As the subject of thrift is authorized by the state, and 
since it is quite as important in its effect upon the future 
welfare of the pupil as many other subjects in the school 
program, I feel that the school savings bank system, intro- 
duced several years ago as a direct means of encouraging 
thrift, should be recognized as a legitimate school enterprise 
to the extent that any expense in the collecting and deposit- 
ing of school savings shall be borne by the school appro- 
priation. I think the sum of fifteen dollars will be sufficient 



19 



for this purpose and recommend its appropriation. The 
present collectors are entirely satisfactory, but their ex- 
penses to and from the bank should be borne by the schools 
instead of by themselves or by organizations. One collector 
living at Acton Center could well stop at West and South 
Acton for the collections in those schools, and still further 
reduce the cost of carrying on this excellent system. 

There seems to be a need for more constant and effective 
interpretation of the laws of truancy. I recommend an 
additional truant officer with enough leisure time to attend 
promptly and vigorously to reported cases of truancy, I 
further recommend that when explanation of the law and a 
return to school of the offender shall not result in permanent 
attendance, without reasonable excuse, that the offending 
parent be taken to court for a clearer understanding of the 
law of truancy, and that the truant officer, in receiving his 
appointment shall be assured of our moral support in such 
an emergency. 

With many holidays coming in term time, with many 
conventions and an occasional visiting day, the school year 
is all too short. I recommend that the week containing 
Thanksgiving be a vacation week, thus saving two days to 
the schools. Another day might be saved by beginning the 
school year the Monday following Labor day, and extending 
the closing of the school j^ear one week later into June. 

The longer I am associated with the schools the more 
convinced I am that, that the responsibility for getting the 
children to school on stormy days should rest with the par- 
ents; that, so long as other people go about their business, 
with trains running and roads and sidewalks open, the 
schools should be open for business; that parents should ask 
themselves, not, will there be a school today, but, are my 
children properly equipped with health and clothes to go to 
school through this storm. Upon this answer the school at- 
tendance for that session should depend. It might happen 
that the school would be so manifestly inaccessible by reason 
of snow or mud and rain, that common sense would rule 
against the opening of the school. There would be no at- 



20 



tendance on such a day and the school would close auto- 
matically. Should a system of closing the schools on stormy 
days be adopted, less rigorous than that I have proposed, 
some method should be devised whereby all the schools 
should close, either for a half or a whole day. Heretofore 
the lack of concerted action has kept some teachers at their 
desks, while others bave enjoyed a whole or half-holiday. 
I recommend that a no-session system be devised to make 
the closing of schools uniform on stormy days; or that par- 
ents be instructed to use their own judgment on stormy 
days, knowing that the schools will be in session. 

I am interested in a home work system of awards de- 
vised to bring about a closer cooperation between the home 
and school. The system would add somewhat to the cost of 
administration, and impose an extra burden upon the 
teachers. The result, however, must show a contribution of 
benefit to our present efforts in the teaching of thrift, effi- 
ciency, art, hygiene, music; and a more positive vocational 
guidance, inasmuch as qualities and aptitude, so little recog- 
nized under our present system of education, must come out 
into the open under this treatment. The plan is to give 
credits for home work of various kinds. I will cite a few of 
the different kinds to make the meaning of the plan clear : 

Work Credits 

Building fire in the morning 1 

Milking cow 1 

Currying a horse 2 

Mending a chair 4 

Making biscuits 2 

Getting an entire meal 6 

Wiping the dishes 3 

Bathing 6 

Washing, ironing and starching own school-clothes, 20 

Clean hands, face and nails 3 

Retiring before 9 o 'clock 1 

Sleeping with window open 1 



21 



There are certain rules to be observed, chief of which 
are such rules as help in carrying out important and desir- 
able school regulations : Pupils who are absent without pro- 
per excuse from parents will lose ten credits, for instance; 
or a certain number of credits will add a certain per cent to 
a pupil's other rank. The expense comes from the printed 
awards issued, samples of which I will submit to you as soon 
as received from the publishers. 

Without in any sense finding fault, I would like to ex- 
press the opinion that school-barge drivers should very 
promptly heed the signals of automobiles coming up behind, 
and leave a large margin for such automobiles to pass. Also, 
that they should do a little more than their share toward 
dividing the road with approaching automobiles. The human 
instinct is to keep and take what belongs to one. But in the 
case of barges carrjdng school children the human instinct 
would not be justified in taking any chances of a mistake on 
the part of the other driver. They are charged with the pro- 
tection of the children, not with the assertion oi their legal 
rights-to-the-road. I am writing this in all of my reports as 
the expression of a principle, not as a complaint against any 
driver in any town. 

I have gone carefully over the financial report of the 
schools for the year 1914-1915, with a view to determining 
approximately the cost per pupil for the several agencies 
that are concerned in the elementary education of the town. 
Deducting the state aid in the superintendent's salary, and 
the Massachusetts school fund from teachers' salaries, 
following is the result obtained : 

School committee and expenses, per pupil $ .38 

Superintendent, per pupil 40 

Enforcement of law and census, per pupil 11 

Instruction, per pupil 9 . 29 

Text books, per pupil 83 

Stationery and supplies, per pupil 65 

Janitor service, per pupil 2.52 

Fuel, per pupil 2.72 



22 

Miscellaneous, per pupil 37 

Repairs, per pupil 1 . 25 

Health, per pupil .25 

Transportation, per pupil 6 . 54 

This is exclusive of state aid. The per pupil cost of 
transportation would be considerably larger if apportioned 
among the actual number riding on the barges instead of on 
the whole enrollment. The total per pupil cost to the town 
is approximately $25.00. 

Should none of the pupils in grade eight fail of promo- 
tion, and should all go to Concord high school next Septem- 
ber, the number in Concord high next year would exceed the 
number now in that school by twenty-two. Forty-one pupils 
are preparing to go in, and nineteen are preparing to grad- 
uate. There would then be one hundred three pupils in 
Concord high school, from the town of Acton, requiring 
approximately an increase of $2,200.00 in tuition and 
transportation. 

In previous recommendations relating to the high school 
question I have expressed no fault-finding with the instruc- 
tion in the Concord high school, or with the variety of the 
courses offered. I have not been able to promise a high 
school in Acton that would give equally efficient service. 
The problem has been mainly one of finance, wherein about 
half the people of Acton think it is costing the town too 
much for its high school privileges, and the other half seem 
willing to stand for even a greater cost than at present. To 
me, having the elementary schools alone to care for, the cost 
between maintaining three hundred forty pupils in the ele- 
mentary schools and some eighty-one pupils in the hio^h 
school seems disproportionate. We are not increasing the 
salaries of our elementary teachers, we are having no new 
apparatus, few new books; we have no sewing, cooking, 
manual training in our seventh and eighth grades, as we 
should, for there is where such subjects should be taken up, 
rather than in the high school (unless indeed they are 
commenced even lower down in the grades). Many of 



23 



our teachers have been with us many years at substantially 
the same salary they were receiving five years ago. I 
present the situation without comment for the consideration- 
of the townspeople. 

A 1915 Bulletin of the Board of Education, Bulletin 
No. 4, entitled Reorganization of Elementary Education 
for Older Children should be read by every citizen of 
Acton, for it contains the explantion of a plan that might 
help to solve the high school problem for Acton. I will 
quote from portions of this pamphlet : 

"A new plan of reorganization and one which is prob- 
ably best adapted to conditions in Massachusetts, consists of 
a six years' program for the elementary school, the program 
of four years for the high school remaining as at present 
as regards the entering age and qualifications of pupils, 
while a new form of school, to be known as the intermediate 
school, the courses in which shall require for completion 
two or three years' time, according to the qualifications 
of various groups of pupils is proposed. Courses in the 
intermediate school are intended for pupils who have fin- 
ished the work of the first six grades, and also for pupils 
of less attainment who have nevertheless passed the age 
of twelve. 

"The most effective organization of the intermediate 
school involves the provision of a building especially 
devoted to this purpose, apart from buildings used for 
pupils in the first six grades, and, in smaller communities, 
adjoining the high school if possible, since this arrange- 
ment permits to some extent a common use of laboratories 
and of the services of special teachers for the pupils in the 
intermediate school. 

<<**** Another plan is to house the intermedinte 
school in the high school building, the administration of the 
intermediate school being kept separate and distinct from 
that of the high school. 

<«**** At present, when manual training and house- 
hold arts find a place in the school program, those subjects 
are usually taught by departmental teachers. * * * * Ir 



24 

any inteTmediate school a part of the teaching, at least, 
should be on the departmental basis. The opportunity for 
beginning a foreign language, for example, should be offered 
to those pupils who at the age of twelve desire it. Such a 
subject can be taught effectively only by a special teacher. 
Manual training and household arts are also departmental 
•subjects. Probably any development of the intermediate 
idea would extend the range of departmental teaching. 

" * * * * The intermediate school would be situated 
in a central position in each town * * * * g^d thus neces- 
sarily at some distance from the homes of many of the pupils. 
Children over twelve years of age, it may be assumed, could 
readily walk at least a mile to school. The intermediate 
school would be housed in a large building, with adequate 
provisions for shops, laboratories, library and gymnasium. 
Much of the teaching would be organized on the depart- 
mental plan, and such subjects as history, mathematics and 
practical arts for boys would be in charge of men because 
of their experience in practical and civic activities. Such 
subjects as English language, English literature and house- 
hold arts for girls might be taught by women teachers. The 
foreign languages if included in the program might also be 
taught by a woman. An intermediate school would of neces- 
sity be in charge of a supervising principal, who, in a small 
community, might also be principal of the high school. The 
latter arrangement would be preferable if the intermediate 
school were situated near, or housed in, the high school 
"building. ' ' 

The intermediate school is sometimes called a junior 
high school. The reorganization of the lower grades into 
a six grade complete unit, but connecting closely with the 
intermediate school, would be necessary. The reorganiza- 
tion of the schools of Acton on this plan would bring 
together all the pupils of the to^^m above the sixth grade 
for departmental work and high school work suited to their 
needs from an early age, settle forever the present high 
school problem, take care of the transportation question, 
and make Acton one of the pioneer towns in the Common- 



25 



wealth in the complete reorganization of its school system 
on the most approved modern plan. 

I am not prepared to recommend the adoption of this 
plan, as above described, but feel it my duty to bring if 
before you and the people of the town as the last movement 
in public school reorganization, and well worthy of your 
consideration, as it seems adapted to the needs of Acton 
in a very peculiar manner, as there would be no school 
buildings to discontinue, and none to remodel. 

In closing this report I wish to thank the committee and' 
the teachers for their continued and courteous cooperation, 
all through the year. 

Respectively submitted, 

FRANK H. HILL, 
Superintendent of Schools. 

Acton, December 28. 1915. 



20 



REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF DRAWING 



Superintendent F. H. Hill : 

Dear Sir: — I herewith submit the report of the super- 
visor of drawing for the town of Acton, Mass. 

There are many reasons why drawing should be taught 
in the schools. I could give at least forty reasons, if time 
and space were allowed in this report, and most of the 
reasons are given by prominent art critics of the country, 
namely, Henry Turner Bailey, Theodore M. Diliaway, 
Walter Sargent, Fred H. Daniels, Frederick Whitney, 
Xatherine M. Ball, Helen E. Lucas, Annette J. Warner, etc. 
I will state here a few of the reasons, so parents may see 
what they are, if they don't already know. 

I. Drawing helps to establish good habits of thought 
;and action. 

;2. Gives skill of hand. 

3. Gives power to express beauty. 

4. Encourages originality or individuality. 

5. Gives command of the language for expressing 
ideas of form. 

6. Develops appreciation of the beautiful. 

7. Develops the creative faculty. 

8. Furnishes many a means of livelihood. 

9. Increases interest in commonplace things. 

10. Promotes enjoyment of life. 

II. Is a help in other school studies. 

12. Develops judgment. 

13. Increases the desire for beautiful surroundings. 



27 



14. Drawing helps largely in the direction of industry, 
affects commerce and enriches life. 

15. It helps to acquire good habits of thought and 
action, and it teaches forethought, concentration, self 
reliance and persistence. 

The drawing in the schools this year has been a great 
success in nearly every class and school. 

The grammar grades have shown a great improvement 
in their work. Nature drawing from berries, flowers, fruit 
and vegetables was completed early in the fall with good 
results. The color work is not as good as I would like to 
have it, but before the Spring term it will improve. Con- 
struction work, making projects suitable for gifts was very 
well done in all schools. Drawing from objects is the most 
difficult problem for a child, and I hope by the end of this 
year they will enjoy it, as much as they do construction 
and color work. The remainder of the year will be devoted 
to printing, mechanical drawing, designing for cloth, dishes, 
wall papers, etc. , 

The intermediate grades have improved in many things 
this year; namley; neatness, accuracy, and in originality. 
Some are still weak in color harmony, and originality, but 
as a whole there is an improvement over last year's work. 

Man}^ projects have been made for the holidays such as 
calendars, boxes, match scatchers and cards of all sorts. 
Nature drawing was not as succesful as I expected to have 
it. The remainder of the year will be devoted to designing, 
object drawing, printing, mechanical drawing, stencilling 
on cloth or paper, color harmony, nature draAving and cover 
designing. 

In the primary grades the pupils are first taught to 
use the pencil correctly, then simple objects are drawn and 
colored. The pupil is trained to use color as carefully as 
his pencil. Color harmony is taught a little in these errades 
and rug designs, borders, wall paper designs are made and 
colored. 

IMany objects are made by folding, cutting and pasting, 
but later in the year measuring is used instead of foldings. 



28 



The primary department has advanced rapidly this year^ 
but there is still a chance for better work. 

In closing my report, I wish to extend to our towns- 
people a cordial invitation to visit the schools and look 
over the work already completed by the pupils. It is en- 
couraging for a child to have his friends and parents look 
at his work and visit the school. 

I wish to thank all who have helped to advance the 
work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARION CELESTE TAYLOR, 

Supervisor of Drawing. 



29 



REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC 



Mr. F. H. Hill, Superintendent of Schools: 

I submit the following as my sixth annual report on 
music in the schools of Acton, Mass. 

Having written for last year's report, a general outline 
of the study of music as followed in these schools, I shall 
take it for granted that all who are interested in the subject 
read that outline and shall make this as brief as possible 
since we are working out similar problems in our classes 
by nearly the same methods and in like order, with the 
addition of new material for song study. 

Through the efforts of the teachers of the West Acton 
school, a public exhibition of marching, singing. Folk-danc- 
ing and the May-pole dance, was given at the school building 
by the pupils, showing the educational value of the school 
Victrola. 

There is a decided improvement in the two-part and 
three-part song study of the grammar grades of the South 
and West schools this year, perhaps more noticeable 
in these grades because we are not always as successful 
in stimulating the interest and effort necessary to well- 
balanced singing, at this period. 

It is a recognized fact that a child's musical education 
begins with the study of music, rather than the study of 
notation and technique, that the first thing to do is to 
interest the child in music and then help him to make music. 

The home environment may have supplied this interest 
and even the beginning of expression. 

In that case, the work of the teacher is comparatively 
easy. If one element be taken at a time, there is no parti- 



30 



cular reason why expression and notation may not be 
studied at the same time. 

In regard to rhythm or time, I find, in all classes where 
time-tapping has been required, a manifest gain, not only 
in the rhythm but in the reading. 

The following extract I borrow from an article on 
'"Elementary Music" written recently by J. L. Erb of 
University of Illinois. 

"In the presentation of rhythm, working out the time 
values of notes is not enough, for that is merely a mathe- 
matical problem. Nothing short of actual tapping of the 
rhythm in strict time will accomplish the result. I know of 
no better cure for rhythmical uncertainty than a combina- 
tion of metronone and pencil for tapping, backed by a 
persistent teacher 'behind the gun,' as it were." 

In closing I would say that great credit is due the 
corps of Acton teachers for the conscientious effort in their 
music classes and I wish to thank all connected with me 
in the work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALICE M. GENTHNER, 



31 

ROLL OF HONOR 

Not Absent or Tardy for One Year.* 

South Acton — Upper Primary — Ralph Samsel. 
South Acton — Intermediate — John Sullivan. 
South Acton — Grammar — Essie Rudolph. 

West Acton — Intermediate — Warren Boyce. 

Acton Center — Primary — Ruth Mayell, Louis Liver- 
more, Frederick Shaw, Jr. 

Acton Center — Grammar — Edith S. Tuttle. 

*The present State School register does not require the 
division of the school year into terms as formerly, and that 
division is not made in Acton. 

REPORT OF SIGHT AND HEARING TEST 

School examined 





5n C5 




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b£ 


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West 


95 


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84 


10 
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3 


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South 


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8 


Total 


315 


23 




6 


21 



32 

SCHOOL CENSUS, SEPTEMBER, 1915 

Boys Girls Total 
Number of children between 5 and 7 

years of age 35 41 76 

Number of children between 7 and 14 

years of age 127 113 240 

Number of children between 14 and 

16 years of age 26 24 50 

Number of minors between 14 and 16 

years of age who cannot read at 

sight and write legibly simple 

sentences in the English lan- 
guage 6 

Number of illiterate children 16 years 

of age or over and under 21 years 

of age 



Total 188 178 376 



ATTENDANCE OFFICERS' REPORT 

South West Center 

Number of cases investigated 9 4 

Number returned to school 9 4 

Number committed to truant school. .00 

Estimated cost $4.50 $3.50 

SCHOOL SAVINGS 

No. Depositors Amt. Collected 

South Acton 70 $249.97 

West Acton 74 190.37 

Acton Center 29 104.14 

Totals 173 $544.48 



33 
Number Graduated from Grammar Schools, 1915 

Boys Girls Total 



5 


3 


8 


7 


1 


8 


4 


4 


8 



Acton Center 
West Acton . 
South Acton 



Totals 16 8 24 

Acton Pupils in Concord High 

1916 1917 1918 1919 Total 

Commercial course 3 6 4 4 17 

College course 4 4 2 10 

General course 1 2 2 5 

Scientific course 2 1 1 4 

Domestic Arts course 7 4 5 7 23 

Mechanic Arts course 1 1 5 6 13 

Agricultural course 1 2 2 4 9 

Total 19 15 23 24 81 



34 



Number Entering Concord High, September, 1915 

Boys Girls Total 

Acton Center 4 2 6 

South Acton 6 1 7 

West Acton 5 4 9 

East Acton 2 2 

North Acton 1 1 



Totals 16 9 25 



35 



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INDEX 

Assessors'' Report ■'i-r.!. c. -;■-.-. 

Board of Health , : ,| 

(Cemetery. Commissioners X*j.. jl_. 

(Collector's Report . ..^ T7, . . . . 

Inspector of Animals . . . . ./. t . .:.... 

Library Trustees" Repprt . . ~ .;,•.• • • 

Librarian's Repari ... A ^v:-. -i? 

• List of Books Ay ded .:a9: j?i<^;i^^^.z . . .^ 
Overseers; of the Poor 7,. . . . .-..v-r-r-v-r-j-r-.-t-r-.i 

Selectmen's Report ^^ ". .'-.%? .4 . . : . J 

Town Accountant ^Report '■'. .-^\^t^^^ j . .; 
Town Clerk 's -Report . . T 

Birtlis . .- . , .; .1.^.. ...... .^ ,*T.r^-« 



''.^^^^^^injm'r : ' 1; 






I)og* Lic^n&esT'. i 

Marriages -V- ^v=i 
- - :Njpn.^Re;sident .-Burial^ 
T^WH ?Oiicers J . ^ .r^. .... 

Town , iMeetings^- 

TQwn.-.WaTxant...,'^\^. . . . . 
Treasurer's Report ...T~. 

Wilde Library Fund :..f^^l%':'l^. i . jj. 

Cemetery Funds . ; X??^^^.® . I : ;!;' 

Tree Warden . . . 77 . i|. ; ;t z-rrr-.-r-. .- .- r-v- ^ -.- ':■ . 
Trustees Goodnow EuM^^ M'^P^VmPP. . I. 









•i 



il m 






f^, 



70 
87 
77 
72 
8^ 
87 
91 
92 
74 
35 
39 
25 
26 
30 
3's 
28 
32 

3 
Y> 

8 
64 
67 
68 
36 
85 



1 

...V... '3 
4 

...:... 5 

6 

8 

Financial Statement 1^^ 

Superintendent's Report 18 

Supervisor of Music 2') 

Supervisor of Dramn^ 26 

Roll of Honor .\ -^^ 

Statistical Tables 31 



"^^JteRit: feTHJrt":^7 ^TT-m. .... ,7. : .v. .v. . . . . . 

"^2 l^^^^^l, Cafemlar^:: k'-'.h .::'.. :r: . .1: . i. 

" ^f^pecial ^Kx^rcises and' Holida^^ '. .-. vi; . 

School Officers' and Teachei's. f . ? . . :. . i' . 

Stailtling RiiIct- T : rT-rrr-r-rT-rr-r-^ ;.-.-. , . 
General Report 



r-^ 



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WELLS BINDERY, INC. 

REFERENCE BOOK ^^^ ^^^^ 

ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY WALTHAM, MASS. 02154 

ACTON, MASSACHUSETTS 01720