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ACTON MEMORIAL UHHAHT 




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For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 



/fiEFEREMCE BOOK 

ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 



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TOWN 

OF 
ACTON 



ANNUAL 







OF GENERAL INTEREST 



Incorporated as a Town: July 3, 17 35 

Type of Government: Town Meeting-Selectmen- Town Manager. 

Location: Eastern Massachusetts, Middles ex County, bordered on! 

the east by Carlisle and Concord, on the west by Box- 
borough, on the north by Westford and Littleton, on the, 
south by Sudbury, and on the southwest by Stow an 

Maynard. 

Name: Acton as the name of our Town has several possible 

derivations: the old Saxon word Ac-tun meaning oak 
settlement or hamlet in the oaks, the Town of Acton, 
England, the Acton family of England, a member of 
which supposedly offered a bell for the first meeting 
house in 1735. 



Elevation at Town Hall: 268' above mean sea level. 

Land Area: Approximately 20 square miles. 

Population: Year Persons 



Density 



1910 
1950 
1955 
1960 
1965 
1970 



2136 
3510 
4681 
7238 
10188 
14578 



106 per sq. 

175 

233 

361 

507 



mi. 



Climate: 



Public Education: 



Tax Picture: 



United States Senators in Congress: 



Representative in Congress, 3rd Congressional Dist: 
State Senator, Middlesex and Worcester District: . . 
Representative, General Court, 33rd Middlesex Dist: 
Governor's Council, 3rd District: . . . . 



Normal January temperature 27.7° F. 
Normal July temperature 72.0° F. 

Normal annual precipitation 43.02 inches. 

Pupil enrollment (October 1970): 

Grades 1-6, ,2415; Grades 7-12, 2157 (Regional) 
Number of teachers and administrative staff: 264 
Pupil-teacher ratio: 1 to 30 (avg. elementary grades) 
1 to 20 (avg. Jr. and Sr. High) 

Assessed Valuation 

$18,408,058 
70, 309,795 
74, 262, 745 
79,513, 915 
88, 979, 095 
97,088, 304 

Edward W. Brooke (R), Newton, Massachusetts 
Edward M. Kennedy (D), Boston, Massachusetts 
Philip J. Philbin (D), Clinton, Massachusetts 
William I. Randall, Framingham, Massachusetts 
John A. S. McGlennon, Concord, Massachusetts 
George F. Cronin, Jr., Boston, Massachusetts 



Year 


Tax Rate 


1965 


$92 


1966 


29 


1967 


31 


1968 


34 


1969 


38.50 


1970 


43 



OFFICE HOURS 



Town Office (Selectmen, 
Town Manager, Clerk) 

Treasurer and Collector 

Assessors 

School Superintendent 

Asst. School Superintendent 

Board of Health 

Veterans' Agent 

Library Hours: 

Memorial Library 

Citizens, W. Acton 



7:30 p. m. ) 
7:30-8:30 p. m. ) 
7:30-8:30 p. m. ) 



8-4:30 (Tues. 

8-4:30 (Tues. 

8-4:30 (Tues. 

8-4:30 

8-4:30 

8-4:30 

No Regular Hours 

Mon. -Fri., 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. 
Saturday, 9-5 p. m. 
Mon., 7-9 p.m. 
Tues. -Fri. 10-5 p.m. 



Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

A-B Regional H. S. 

A-B Regional H. S. 

Office at 69 Hayward Rd. 

At Home 



263-2761 
263-7018 
263-5012 
263-5737 
263-3558 
263-4736 
263-4757 

263-2232 



StiS-\s£&- 



ANNUAL REPORTS 




Co\\ , 

q-7f,44 

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TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR ITS 
TWO HUNDRED AND THIRTY -FIFTH 
MUNICIPAL YEAR 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER THIRTY-FIRST 



1970 



/REFERENCE BOOK 

ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
ACTON, MASSACHUSETTS 01720 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportstow19701974acto 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

SELECTMEN -TOWN MANAGER 1 

POLICE 3 

FIRE 4 

CIVIL DEFENSE 8 

INSPECTOR OF WIRES 8 

STREET LIGHT 9 

BOARD OF APPEALS 9 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS 9 

ENGINEERING 10 

PLANNING BOARD 11 

HIGHWAY . - 12 

BUILDING COMMITTEE 14 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 15 

ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 15 

HEALTH 16 

CONCORD AREA COMPREHENSIVE MENTAL HEALTH CENTER 19 

DOG OFFICER 19 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 20 

DOG LICENSES 20 

BIRTHS 21 

SCHOOL REPORT 26 

Report of the Acting Superintendent of Schools 27 

Report of the High School Principal 28 

Report of the Junior High School Principal 35 

Pupil Personnel Services 38 

Report of School Nurses 40 

Report of the School Committee 41 

Acton Adult Education 1970 41 

School Finances 42 

VOCATIONAL REGIONAL SCHOOL 46 

LIBRARIES 47 

RECREATION 50 

1975 CELEBRATION 51 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 51 

ARCHIVES 52 

PUBLIC CEREMONIES 53 

TOWN FOREST 54 

TREE WARDEN 54 

INSECT PEST CONTROL 54 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 54 

CEMETERIES 55 

WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION 56 

GOODNOW FUND 56 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 57 

SEWERAGE STUDY 57 

VETERANS' GRAVES 58 

VETERANS' AGENT 58 

TOWN ELECTION „ 59 

STATE ELECTION 60 

STREET DIRECTORY AND MAP (See Center fold) 

TOWN MEETINGS 62 

March 9, 1970 62 

March 16, 1970 104 

June 29, 1970 104 

September 28, 1970 106 

TOWN OFFICERS & APPOINTMENTS 107 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION Ill 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 112 

TOWN TREASURER 128 

COLLECTOR 140 

ASSESSORS 143 

JURY LIST 144 

INDEX 147 



SELECTMEN— TOWN MANAGER 



On March 31, 1970, the Board of Selectmen reorganized, welcoming Paul R, Nyquist as its newest 
member; the Board elected Vincent M. Russo, Chairman, Paul H. Lesure, Vice -Chairman, and Paul R. 
Nyquist, CLerk, the two additional members: William C. Sawyer and Charles D. MacPherson, 

In September, Selectman MacPherson, for health reasons, submitted his resignation to the Board to 
be effective on October 15, 1970. Mr. MacPherson's civic and public service to the Town of Acton over 
the past twenty years has been outstanding. His involvement in Acton's municipal affairs has steadily con- 
tributed to bettering the Town's government. 

A special election was called for December 7, 1970, to fill the vacancy on the Board; William L. 
Chipman was elected and took office on December 8, 1970. 

The first year of the 1970's provided dramatic evidence of Acton's rapid growth during the past 
decade. Official census reports tell us that the Town's population has doubled over the past ten years, and 
now stands at 14, 578. The ever increasing demands for more municipal services, the constant growth in 
our school population, and the requirements being placed on the Town through legislation, lead us to be- 
lieve that a stabilized tax rate will not become a reality for several years to come. 

While the foregoing facts have had a progressive effect and changed the character of the Town, the 
economic conditions prevailing in 1970 effected many of its citizens and the Town's operations. The spiral- 
ling cost of living, and increasing unemployment rate, particularly in the electronics and related fields, 
resulted in a high mobility rate for Acton residents; many excellent appointed board and committee members 
resigned due to job relocation in other states. The Planning Board, Finance Committee, and Permanent 
Building Committee underwent a great many changes due to resignations. Needless to say these changes 
put a strain on the Town's ability to maintain continuity through orderly change in board or committee 
membership. 

As authorized by the Annual Town Meeting in 1970, Mr. Ralph E. Dodge was appointed Acton's first 
full time assessor. Mr. Dodge's position as Assistant Assessor to the three man part-time Board of 
Assessors provides for the maintenance of records on a current basis. Assessment work done by the 
Assistant Assessor is subject to the review and approval of the three man Board. 

As a part of the Board's overall effort to improve control of expenditures, the Highway Department 
was placed under the administrative control of the Town Engineer this year. 

The organization of the full-time members of Acton's Fire Department as the Acton Permanent 
Firefighters Local 1904, International Association of Firefighters AFL-CIO and of the full-time members 
of the Acton Police Department as the Acton Branch of the Massachusetts Police Association, called for 
collective bargaining. By statute the Town Manager, or his designated representatives, are responsible 
for bargaining with employee organizations; the Manager chose to designate a three member committee 
which, at this time is currently negotiating contracts for 1971. 

Still pending before the Supreme Judicial Court is a suit against the Town relative to the issuance of 
a building permit for the construction of the proposed Minuteman Shopping Center at the intersection of 
Route 2 and Piper Road. The case is scheduled to be heard in March, 1971. 

Another suit brought against the Town in 1969 which questioned municipal exemption from the zoning 
bylaw was resolved with the Supreme Court ruling in favor of the Town. The decision permitted the Perma- 
nent Building Committee to proceed on the construction of a facility to house the Town's Highway and En- 
gineering departments, and the Board of Health. In October the committee received seventeen bids for 
construction of the facility, and immediately after the award to the lowest bidder, work commenced on 
the structure. At this time construction is in full progress, and, weather permitting, the building will 
be ready for occupancy by May 1, 1971. 

After many years of discussion and debate, the Town authorized funds for the demolition and removal 
of the old buildings at the rear of the Town Hall which were formerly occupied by the Acton Agricultural 
Holding Company and later by the Town's Highway Department. The buildings, abandoned for several years, 
had become an eyesore for the Town Common and for the modern library addition which overlooked them. 
The demolition of the buildings not only beautified the area and removed the potential dangers inherent to 
abandoned buildings, but also provided the Town Hall and the Memorial Library with increased parking 
area. 

Early in 1970 the Metropolitan Boston Air Pollution Control District was established and the Town 
of Acton was included in the District. On July 1, 1970, the District adopted rules and regulations effec- 
tively prohibiting open burning. Although the rules and regulations provide for exceptions and exemptions 
to the prohibition against open burning, the effect on many communities required overnight changeover 
from burning dumps to sanitary landfill operations or approved incineration. Acton was one of the more 
fortunate towns in the District having voluntarily implemented a sanitary landfill operation in the latter 
part of 1968. Although abatement of open burning in order to prevent increased air pollution is definitely 



a step in the right direction, we are concerned over the increased dumping of materials at the landfill. 
With the continuing development of the Town we are faced with enormous quantities of brush and tree 
materials which were formerly burned. The Town Manager, Town Engineer and the Regional Refuse 
Disposal Committee are presently investigating all feasible methods of solving this problem. 

This year there was a decrease in the number of building permits issued for new construction, 
however, much of construction begun in late 1969 was completed during 1970. We are extremely concerned 
about the numerous apartment houses which have been constructed along Route 2A. The Board is making 
every attempt to insure that these buildings are properly constructed and safe; we are presently reviewing 
all of the Town's Bylaws in order to maintain the highest standards for construction of multiple family 
and single family dwellings. The Finance Committee and the Planning Board are engaged in similar reviews 
in order to better assess the economic and land use implications of the apartment explosion. 

increased growth continued during the year with several approvals for new businesses and industrial 
buildings; the first large department store in the Town was constructed by the W. T. Grant Company on 
Main Street at the intersection of Route 111; a small development of modular housing units was constructed 
on Arlington Street in West Acton; we have been informed that the Banking Commission has approved the 
establishment of three new banks in Acton and construction is anticipated during 1971, and presently 
under discussion is a proposed business and industrial park including several hundred condominium units 
on Route 2A in North Acton. 

In August, William L. O'Connell, Superintendent of Schools retired after twenty-five years of service 
to the Town. Mr. O'Connell's dedicated hard work and the efforts which he expended for the school system 
were invaluable in placing our local and regional schools among the finest in the commonwealth. His effec- 
tiveness as an outstanding administrator has been reflected over the years in the proper and orderly develop- 
ment of our school facilities. We extend to him our most sincere gratitude for a job well done. 

After extensive dialogue between the Board of Selectmen and the Commissioners of the Water Supply 
District it was determined that no action should be taken at this time to consolidate the District with the 
Town's operations. 

The Water Commissioners have developed and are implementing a program that calls for closer 
coordination with the boards, committees, and departments of the town. This same program provides 
for sounder fiscal control, and more aggressive search for water supplies to meet future needs. 

This has been an effort to acquaint you with some of the nonroutine matters that transpired within 
the past year. The routine load of administrative activity increases each year as the Town grows; 
however, we have managed to maintain the number of Town administrative employees at a stable figure 
through the efficient use of newly developed office machinery and equipment. 

In closing, the Board of Selectmen and the Town Manager wish to thank the numerous members of 
boards and committees, the department heads and the Town employees for the excellent job done in 1970. 
We also note with sorrow the passing of Clinton Curtis, past member of Acton's Board of Public Welfare. 




Vincent M. Russo, Chairman 
Paul H. Lesure, Vice-Chairman 
Paul R. Nyquist, Clerk 
William L. Chipman 
William C. Sawyer 

Board of Selectmen 



Robert W. Dotson 
Town Manager 



Charles D. MacPherson, recipient of the 
"Distinguished Citizen" award for 1970 
presented by the Massachusetts Select- 
men's Association. 



POLICE 



This report reflects an increase in the overall crime picture. This is especially noted under Breaking 
and Enterings. It should be noted that approximately 5% of Breaking and Enterings are solved. This leaves 
an awesome 95% unsolved. 

I feel this is partially due to lack of personnel. Our population has increased from 7,238 in 1960 to 
14,578 in 1970. In this period we have added only four men to the Department. 

The Director of the F.B.I, has indicated that a police department should have one patrolman per five 
hundred population. 

Arrests and Prosecutions for the Following Offenses 



Assault and Battery 7 
Being Present Where a Narcotic Drug is Found 5 
Breaking and Entering and Larceny in the 

Nighttime 4 

Carrying Passenger Without Headgear 1 

Drunkenness 18 

Failing to Cover Load 7 

Failing to Keep Right 3 

Failing to Use Care 10 

Furnishing Alcoholic Beverage to Minor 1 

Kidnapping 2 

Larceny 12 

Leaving the Scene of an Accident 1 

Malicious Destruction to Property 4 

Manslaughter 2 



No License in Possession 

No Inspection Sticker 

Non-support 

Obstructing Registration Plate 

Obstructed View 

Operating so as to Endanger 

Possession of Narcotic Drugs 

Reckless Driving 

Red Light 

Receiving Stolen Property 

School Bus Violation 

Transporting Alcoholic Beverage Being a Minor 

Using Motor Vehicle Without Authority 

Violation Town Bylaw 

Violation Traffic Rules 



1 

6 
3 
1 
1 
23 
1 
1 
6 
2 
4 
3 
2 
4 
1 



Juvenile Offenses: Assault and Battery 



Attaching Plates 

Breaking and Entering in the Nighttime 

False Fire Alarm 

Failing to Use Care in Stopping 

Habitual School Offender 

Larceny 

Operating so as to Endanger 



1 Operating without a License 

2 Perjury 

1 Possession of Marijuana 

1 Stop Sign 

5 Stubborn Child 

2 Transporting Alcoholic Beverage Being a Minor 
4 Using Motor Vehicle Without Authority 



Motor Vehicle Accident Report 
1969 1970 



1969 1970 



Total Number of Accidents covered 

by the Department 
Total Number of Fatal Accidents 



Total Number of Pedestrians Killed 
250 320 or Injured 

5 6 Total Number of Bicyclists Injured 



Miscellaneous Statistics 



Breaking and Entering and Larceny Reported 169 

Bicycles Registered 129 

Cars Checked by Patrol 289 

Cruiser Responses to Acton Medical Center 9 

Cruiser Responses to Emerson Hospital 253 

Firearms ID Registrations 94 

House Checks for Vacationists 729 

Metropolitan State Hospital Trips 19 

Motorists Assisted 113 

Phone Calls 8,175 

Pistol Permits Issued 196 



Radio Calls 

Resuscitator Used 

Summonses Served 

Summonses Sent Out of Town for Service 

Street Lights Reported Out 

Telephone Wires Down 

Town Radio Calls 

Traffic Lights Not Working 

Wires Down, Light 



Officers Time Spent in Court 



(hours) 



7,112 

19 

248 

189 

47 

5 

78 

13 

10 

925 



Personnel 



At present, our compliment consists of a Chief, four Sergeants and ten Patrolmen. There has been a 
noticeable increase in persons interested in becoming Police Officers. This is reflected in recent Civil Ser- 
vice lists that have come to the attention of the Town Manager. 



In my recommendations for 1971, I indicated the need of eleven additional men and the purchase of two 
additional cruisers. This would bring our total patrolmen to twenty-one, far below the F.B.I, standards. 

Education 

Officers George Robinson and John McNiff have been attending Northeastern University taking several 
courses that will greatly improve their knowledge of the law and the methods of enforcement and public 
relations, etc. 

Safety and Juvenile Officer 

At present, Officer William J. Durkin, Jr. , in addition to his regular duties, is our Safety and 
Juvenile Officer. 

Obviously, it is impossible for a working Patrolman to handle either of the above -captioned titles 
properly. This again reflects the need of additional people. 

Prosecuting Officer 

My special thanks to Sergeant David W. Scribner, my Prosecuting Officer, who has done a wonderful 
job in Court and has helped to remove some of the burdens of my office by handling special investigations, etc. 

Training 

Officer David C. Flint was graduated from the State Police Academy with high academic credits. He 
is doing a fine job and is a credit to the Department. 

I am hoping in 1971 to establish an Auxiliary Police Force. This will allow persons who are interested 
in police work to have training prior to being employed. 

General 



Perhaps the most critical of our problems is the ever-increasing traffic. I find our roads are incapable 
of handling the traffic flow in the early morning and evening hours when people are coming and going to work. 
If one would stand at Kelley's Corner from 4 p.m. to 6 p. m. , they would have the feeling they were standing 
on the corner in some large city. 

I cannot at this time, see any means of solving the problem. I have used officers in this area to no avail. 

In closing, I would like to thank all the members of my Department who worked with me in carrying out 
the duties of the Police Department during the year, and to the Town Manager and my Secretary and all others 
who assisted me in any way, I am grateful. 

Edward J. Collins, Jr. 
Chief of Police 



FIRE 



Total number of alarms responded to are as follows: 



Residential 

Churches and Schools 

Mercantile 

Manufacturing 

Storage - Garages 

Grass - Brush - Woods 

Miscellaneous 

Vehicle 

False Alarms 

Accidental Alarms and Smoke Scares 

Emergency 

Investigation 

Special Service 

Mutual Aid Sent 



1969 1970 



29 


32 


3 


2 


2 


5 


3 


3 


6 


5 


89 


43 


34 


52 


25 


27 


8 


11 


18 


15 


49 


50 


84 


87 


142 


112 


17 


11 



509 455 



1969 



1970 



Box Alarms 
Still Alarms 



Fire Loss 



Buildings 
Contents 
Vehicles 
Miscellaneous 



Assessed Value of Property Involvec 

Permits Issued 

Oil and Power Burners 

Blasting 

Liquified Petroleum 

Flammable Liquids 

Miscellaneous 

Outdoor Burning Permits 

Monies Collected 

Permits 

Station Rental & Insurance Claims 

Miscellaneous 



97 
412 



>48, 037.09 

33,411.88 

385.00 

400.00 



66 
389 



$11, 137.00 

977.00 

5,425.00 



32,233.97 $17,539.00 

$2, 220,779.00 



72 


40 


43 


38 


-- 


3 


2 


2 


5 


7 


1,465 


3, 168 



$ 88.00 
444.00 



$532.00 



$ 73.00 
126.00 
115. 00 

$314.00 



Department Operation 

In 1970, the Fire Department had its first "breathing spell" since 1967. The number of alarms 
actually dropped during 1970, however, even with this decline in alarms the number of building fires 
increased. It is still a little early to forecast a continual drop in grass and brush fires due to the imple- 
mentation of the new State "no burning" law. We don't expect this year's figures to hold true in 1971. 

The tempo of Fire Department activity did increase during the year. We are doing more inspection 
work, more fire prevention work, and more training than ever before. We are also becoming more involved 
in work on planning new sub -divisions, working with builders on new construction, working on code revisions 
to insure the Town the best in new construction. A lot of time was spent to find better methods of operations, 
and new equipment that could make our work more efficient with less manpower. It is becoming evident that 
lack of manpower is going to be a continuing problem that will take all of our efforts to overcome. 

During 1970, the Department worked cLosely with the Water District on the improvement of the water 
system. The locating of new wells on High Street and the resulting extensions, connections and improve- 
ments in the High and Parker Street area highlighted the Water District's effort to bring our water system 
up to standards. Plans are in operation to solve the extremely serious conditions that exist in North Acton 
area. When these plans become water mains and hydrants, this department will breathe a great sigh of 
relief as this threat has been hanging over our heads a great many years. 

Training 

The training program under the direction of Captain MacGregor, gave over 2000 man hours of in-department 
training to our fire fighters. In addition to regular drills for the call and paid men, special training was offered 
in First Aid and other subjects by instructors from the Massachusetts Fire Academy. Through the assistance of 
the Acton Water District, a large barn and house was made available for live training at the old Olsen Farm in 
South Acton. During December, the department conducted training sessions over a 2 day period followed by a 
Mutual Aid Drill with Concord and Maynard two weeks later. The program was highly successful and it is hoped 
that more old buildings will be made available for this type of training. 

Fire Fighters Hart, Caouette and Spinney attended an advanced course in fire fighting at the Fire Academy. 
Acton Fire Fighters, Tobin, Craig, Calkins and Call Fire Fighter, Blaisdell are enrolled in Mass. Bay Com- 
munity College working towards an associate degree in Fire Service. These men are attending classes on 
their own time and paying their own expenses to further their education. Several Fire Fighters attended week-end 
sessions put on by the Fire Academy at Walpole and Northbridge. 



In all, the Training amounted to over 2 500 man hours or an average of 50 hours per man in the department. 



Fire Prevention 

From April to November, the Fire Fighters on duty conducted over 150 inspections in commercial and 
industrial property. Apparatus is dispatched three times a week on inspection, weather permitting, and is 
available for fire duty by radio. These inservice inspections not only get fire hazards corrected but help the 
Fire Fighters familiarize themselves with the interiors of these buildings. Over 70 inspections were carried 
out by the Captains on duty. These included required inspections of schools, nursing homes and special inspec- 
tions of high hazard areas. 

For the first time, all Acton school children in grades 1 through 6 were given a fire prevention program 
while in school. This was accomplished through the cooperation of the School Department and an excellent 
program set up and carried out by Fire Fighter, William H. Soar, Jr. . 

Sixty boys and girls completed the "Baby Sitters Training Course" that was given by the department in 
March. This was the second year that this program has been presented and it was most successful. It will 
be continued as an annual event in the town. 

With the assistance of the Acton Fire Fighters Association, the fire retarding of Christmas trees was 
carried out in all the stations just prior to Christmas. Over 175 residents took advantage of this program. 

Fire Prevention Week was a tremendous success with over 1, 000 people visiting the Fire Stations to 
review the displays and equipment. Demonstrations and programs during the week were very well attended. 

We definitely feel that our work in fire prevention is of primary importance and that it is through this 
effort we have been able to prevent the serious fires which seem to plague some towns. 




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1st grade students at the Gates School take the first 
step in learning Fire Prevention. 



A safe and happy Christmas is a fire retarded tree. 



Fire Alarm 

With Town Meeting approval granted for the major improvement of the Fire Alarm Office, work began 
on what was to be a project that was to involve the entire department and would take almost a year to com- 
plete. The project was divided into four sections: specifications and purchase of a new circuit console and 
alarm recorders, building a console desk and installing our present equipment therein, installing over 5 
miles of new alarm cable between stations, and revamping our alarm assignment cards as well as street 
and business cross index files. Fire Alarm Superintendent Frost was in charge of the complete project 
with Fire Fighter Caouette in charge of building the console and Fire Fighter Tobin in charge of the in- 
stallation of equipment. Special mention should be given to Fire Fighters Calkins, Sweet, Perkins and 
Soar, without their skills, these improvements could not have been made. If these improvements were 
done by an outside contractor, the cost would have been at least $10, 000 more than we asked for at Town 
Meeting. The completion of the project will increase our capability to add additional circuits, give us a 
supply of spare parts for our existing equipment, and make our receipt and dispatch of alarms more ef- 
ficient than in the past. 

Normal repairs, improvements and extensions to the Fire Alarm system were also carried out while 
work continued on the Fire Alarm Office. 



In June of 1970, at a special Town Meeting, recommendations were made to the Building Code to re- 
quire new apartment buildings to be equipped with Fire Alarm systems which would be connected to the 
Fire Alarm Office. At the present time, seven new apartment buildings are in the process of meeting the 
new requirements. We expect at the Annual Town Meeting in 1971, to require further compliance with 
these Fire Safety Regulations. 



The work load on the Fire Alarm Section has increased to over 900 hours in 1970, and will continue 
to increase as the town grows. At the present time, over 70% of this work is carried out by Captain Frost 
and his men on other than their duty hours. 

The problem of maintaining and installing new aerial lines was again with us. Our present repair 
vehicle is a van with no means to reach the wires in the poles which means that either the pole has to be 
physically climbed or the Ladder Truck used. Pole climbing is a dangerous and exhausting job which was 
given up long ago by the Utility Companies when they were required to do line work. The use of the Ladder 
Truck is a misuse of an expensive piece of fire apparatus and is discouraged whenever possible. We have 
been able to locate a used alarm repair vehicle that has a short power ladder and we will ask the Town for 
funds to purchase this vehicle this year. Without a vehicle of this type, we will be unable to meet our com- 
mitments in the Fire Alarm Division. 

Personnel 



During the year, call Fire Fighters John McLaughlin, Kenneth Jewell and Fred Kennedy retired from 
the Department. Robert Craig was appointed to permanent Fire Fighter, replacing Richard Scribner. 

The first labor contract was negotiated between the Town of Acton and the Acton Permanent Fire 
Fighters Local 1904. To my knowledge, this is the first time this occurred in the town and has not presented 
any problems and perhaps a better line of communication has been established between the Fire Fighters 
and the Town Government. Again with pleasure, I would like to recognize the several instances when our 
men provided nonfire fighting skills to carry out a project that we could not afford to carry out without 
their help. 



The present department manning is as follows: 

Permanent Paid Personnel 
Fire Chief 
4 Fire Captains 
12 Fire Fighters 



Other - 12 men, Civil Defense Auxiliary 



Call (Part Time) Personnel 

2 Deputy Chiefs 

3 Lieutenants 
31 Call Fire Fighters 



Building and Grounds 

Through the year, the following work was carried out by the men on duty. All apparatus floors were 
painted, the apparatus room was painted in South Acton and two offices and the kitchen were painted in Acton 
Center. Much of the work done in West Acton centered around the Fire Alarm Office although walls were 
washed in the entire station early in the spring. 

Several jobs that were to be done by outside contractors were never carried out due to the difficulty 
of obtaining people to do the work. These jobs will have to be carried out during 1971. 

Equipment 

In September of 1970, the new Rescue Truck was 
delivered and put in operation. The old Rescue Truck was 
assigned to the Civil Defense Auxiliary and will be used as 
a service unit that can provide electric power, floodlights 
or fresh air for our Air Masks. A replacement for the 
Brush Truck (Engine 5) was approved at Town Meeting and 
the contract awarded in August. Delivery is not expected 
until the fall of 1971. 

An air compressor and filter system were purchased 
for the South Acton station and will be used to fill our com- 
pressed air tanks for our breathing equipment. 

I would like to thank the Acton Rotary Club for their 
donation of a high expansion foam maker for the new Res- 
cue Truck. The willingness of the Acton service clubs to 
"lend a hand" for specialized equipment has been most 
gratifying. New Rescue Unit and Equipment 

Frequency of required repairs to our base radio station has increased measureably during the last 
year due to the age of the equipment. The radio is at least 14 years old and twice during 1970 the radio was 
out of commission from four to six hours. I have recommended that the radio be replaced with a new unit 
in 1971. 




Also listed for replacement will be the pick-up truck that was put in service in 1968. The truck was 
built from two wrecked vehicles that were purchased under the surplus program and is used by the Captains 
on duty to carry out inspections, investigations and other required assignments. The present vehicle is in 
pretty rough condition and will require extensive work to keep it in operation if it is not replaced. 



Program of 1971 

In my 1969 annual report, I discussed with growing concern the problems we were facing in the 
North Acton area, I stated that the area would create problems within two years that could not be ignored. 
Unfortunately, the 2A area developed more rapidly than anticipated and a serious condition exists right now. 
The problem is the multiple dwellings, thirty buildings built since 1967, and eight presently under construc- 
tion with shopping centers, an office park and a six hundred unit condominium waiting to start. This does 
not include the industrial or commercial building that has occurred since 1967. This area is primarily 
served by the Acton Center Station which is basically equipped with the same amount and type of apparatus 
as it was in 1946. With the exception of two paid men on duty during the day, the manpower situation is 
worse than 1946. After 4:30 p.m. , the station operates on a call basis. This causes a delay in response 
of the apparatus of five to ten minutes and when we are responding to a multiple dwelling, housing close to 
fifty people, the situation is dangerous. Our Ladder Truck is located in South Acton and after the paid men 
are off duty, it requires close to ten minutes before it could arrive at a fire in the North Acton area. In 
reviewing all the facts, it becomes apparent that with the lack of manpower and Ladder Service, the delay 
in response of apparatus and the distance required to travel from Acton Center to the heavily built-up sec- 
tion, we can no longer provide adequate protection to this area. 

This problem is of great concern to the Town Officials and meetings have been held with the Selectmen 
and the Town Building and Land Acquisition Committee to develop a plan to improve the protection. A fire 
station in the area is the logical conclusion, but I cannot see how this town, faced with many financial prob- 
lems, can afford a fourth fire station plus the men and equipment to staff it. The next solution would be to 
relocate the Center station nearer the Great Road and Main Street area. However, a site is not yet decided 
upon and even if it were, it would be three to four years before the station would be operational. 

The Town must take steps to improve this situation during 1971, and the first step is to man the 
Center station on a 24 hour basis with paid men. This will eliminate having to wait for the call men to 
arrive at the station to drive the apparatus and will cut the response time down considerably. 

Providing additional Ladder service will be next while planning continues to secure an operational 
station in the area no later than 1975. 

I would like to thank the men of the Fire Department, the Auxiliary Department for their excellent 
cooperation and support. I also wish to thank the several Boards and Town Departments for their assistance. 

Thomas J. Barry, Jr. 
Fire Chief 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



Of the $450 appropriated for Civil Defense in 1970, $202. 27 was routine expenses, including telephone; 
$85. 10 was used in expenses for training; $147. 50 was expended for a radio receiver to monitor Fire De- 
partment radio communications. The total expenditure was $434.87. One thousand three hundred dollars 
remains in unexpended articles for Civil Defense use. 

An article has been submitted for inclusion in the annual warrant requesting $300 for the purchase 
of protective clothing for the Auxiliary Fire Department. A budget increase of $50 has also been requested; 
this increase is primarily due to telephone charges. 

Mobile communications units of the Acton Civil Defense Agency were used on October 31st (Halloween) 
to assist the Police Department in protecting town property and schools. 

John F. McLaughlin 
Director 



INSPECTOR OF WIRES 



Two Hundred Fifty-Four permits were issued and fees collected were turned over to the Treasurer. 

Leslie F. Parke 



STREET LIGHT 



We now have within the Town of Acton 598 streetlights. 



In several instances requests for streetlights were not recommended by the Committee since the pro- 
posed location would aid only the petitioner and not materially affect the overall lighting of the town. 

We subscribe to the policy adopted with the formation of the Committee that new streetlights, in most 
instances, will be installed only at street intersections, dangerous curves, fire alarm boxes and locations 
designated as hazardous by the Fire Chief, Police Chief, or this Committee. 

The Committee extends to the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen their sincere appreciation 
for their cooperation during the year 1970. 

Leslie F. Parke, Chairman 
Booth D. Jackson 
H. Stuart MacGregor 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



The Acton Board of Appeals held 13 Public Hearings during the year 1970 on the following matters: 

Petitions for earth removal: 
Granted 2; Denied 1. 

Petitions for specific uses and exceptions: 
Granted 4; Denied 1. 

Variances from requirements of the Protective Zoning Bylaw: 
Granted 3; Denied 0; Pending 1. 

Flood Plain Zoning: 
Granted 1. 

John J. Bush, Jr., Chairman 
H. W. Flood, Clerk 
Edward G. Schwarm 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS 



Total number of devices inspected - 159; sealed - 157; not sealed, not legal in trade - 2. 
Sealing fees collected and paid to Town Treasurer - $281. 80. 

George K. Hayward 



ENGINEERING 



During 1970 the Engineering Department offered its services to the many Town Committees, Com- 
missions, and Boards which requested assistance. We continue to provide the day-to-day service for the 
general public seeking information pertaining to deeds, filed plans, zoning information, and other data 
available through this office. 

Assistance requested by the Board of Selectmen included the following: we undertook several inves- 
tigations and prepared recommendations regarding Hatch Act petitions and apparent violations; prepared 
the Contract Drawings and Specifications for the Reconstruction of Adams Street; performed field survey; 
continued preliminary design for the D. P. W. Building and after a favorable vote by the Annual Town 
Meeting and the favorable decision of the Supreme Judicial Court of a suit filed against the Town relative to 
the use of the "Bursaw Land" on Forest Road for the D. P. W. facility, I became the Permanent Building 
Committee's representative to the architect for the final plans and specifications for the building. The con- 
tract for the building has been awarded and construction is proceeding. In order to minimize costs to the 
Town, I am acting as Clerk of the Works for this project. 

During 1970, many meetings were held with both the Commonwealth of Massachusetts D. P. W. 
Engineers and concerned citizen groups relative to the widening and reconstruction of Route 2. After these 
meetings, I submitted three plans which were alternatives to the plan submitted by the State, to the Board 
of Selectmen. These in turn were sent to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as the Town's proposals for 
changes. These alternative plans were formulated by the consideration and melding of all proposals sub- 
mitted to the Board of Selectmen. 

Specifications were written for the illumination of the softball field and tennis courts at Elm Street 
Playground. Bids were received and were rejected due to insufficient funds. Specifications are now being 
rewritten for the illumination of the softball field only. 

This year more than ever before the Engineering Department worked closely with the Highway De- 
partment. The administration of the Highway Department was assumed by the Town Engineer. The En- 
gineering Department designed several small drainage projects and laid out the sidewalks on Prospect 
Street. We were, as usual, on tap for all the day by day engineering problems which arise in the Highway 
Department. 

The Engineering Department reviewed plans for eleven subdivisions during 1970 and made engineering 
comments and suggestions to the Planning Board. We also performed periodic inspections of subdivisions 
during the construction season. Subdivision Approval not Required plans were also reviewed and comments 
passed on to the Planning Board. 

The Board of Assessors received its Atlas, revised and corrected to January 1, 1970. In conjunction 
with the revisions, the Board was supplied with information necessary for updating the street and parcel 
card file. Copies of all deeds for property transferred in 1969 were filed. Work has been started on revisin| 
the Town Atlas through 1970. Additional help was given to the Board in solving various problems related to 
disputed land ownership and area. Sets and sheets of the Town Atlas, sold by the Assessors, were prepared 
and sent out for printing. 

In addition, the following routine work was done by this Department: maintaining and updating of Town 
Street, Zoning, Fire and Police Maps; issuance of Street Cut Permits, numbering over 150 and inspection of 
these street cuts; supplying the general public with information about properties, roads, drainage and other 
related matters. 

During 1970, Mr. David Abbt and Mr. Richard Bailey attended the Lowell Tech In-Service Training 
Program. Both have achieved excellent academic ratings. 

The amount of work, as well as the accuracy and precision with which this year's program has been 
accomplished are the fruits of our first year as a fully manned department. 

I especially wish to extend my sincere thanks to every member of the Engineering Department, 
Highway Department and secretarial staff, as well as to all Town Committees and Boards which have coop- 
erated with me to make 1970 the most successful year in the Engineering Department's history. 

Anthony L. Galeota, Jr. 
Town Engineer 



10 



PLANNING BOARD 



The Planning Board, during the fiscal year of 1970, has been beset with many adverse and 
controversial problems. Of major significance was the resignation of four members, representing 
many years of experience. Mrs. Beatrice Perkins resigned in April after completing a five year 
term; Mr. David Tinker resigned in October after serving thirteen continuous years; Mr. Cameron 
resigned in November and Mr. Coull in December, each having served two years. A recapitulation 
of the organization of the Board during the year is as follows: 



1970 

Jan. 


(Chairman) 
Beatrice C. 
Perkins 
* April 


(Clerk) 
Edward A. 
Chambers 


D. Pierre G. 
Cameron, Jr. 


David P. 
Tinker 


James M 
Coull 


May 


* John F. 
Pasieka 




(Clerk) 
Chambers 


(Chairman) 
Cameron 

* Nov. 


Tinker 
* Oct. 


Coull 
* Dec. 


Dec. 


(Clerk) 
Pasieka 




(Chairman) 
Chambers 


** Robert H. 
Gerhardt 


** Eric D. 
Bradlee 


(Open) 


* Resigned 
** Replacing * 













Subdivision Control is a major responsibility of the Board and most time consuming. Seven 
preliminary and eleven definitive plans were acted on this year. Of the eleven definitive plans, seven 
were approved, creating approximately 90 additional building lots; one plan of 28 lots was disapproved, 
and the remaining three plans are still under consideration. 

Many extra hours and meetings with various town boards and committees, as well as outside 
consultation services, were necessitated in order to properly evaluate the impact on the town by the 
proposal of two abutting subdivisions on Great Road, North Acton; namely, Minuteman Business and 
Industrial Park and Town Line Industrial and Business Park. Six hundred condominium units with 
recreational facilities, as well as an office park and a 15 to 20 acre shopping center, are being 
proposed in the combined two subdivisions. Conditions to the approval of these subdivisions are 
being finalized at this time. 

Other duties of the Board, including reviewing and signing plans not subject to subdivision control, 
site plan recommendation, road drainage problems, and various routine procedures, left the Board 
little time to consider long range planning. Although the services of Charles Downe, Planning Consultant, 
have been utilized, specifically in the area of apartments and studies of Acton Village Centers, each year 
it becomes more apparent that a planner is needed. The Board once again recommends that this be 
considered. 

Several articles for amending the Protective Zoning Bylaw were presented at the Annual Town Meeting 
and approved by vote of the townspeople. These included: Revised Off-Street Parking and Loading Bay 
Space Requirements for Industrial and Business Districts; Revised Intensity Regulations for Multi -family 
uses; Changing the protection for non- conforming uses from 5 years to 2 years; Adding a section to provide 
protection to lots held in single ownership in the Industrial and Business zones; and a new section for 
Site Plan Approval. Although no amendments to the Zoning Bylaw were recommended for a fall town 
meeting or the 1971 Annual Town Meeting, the Board is continuing its research in the areas of revised 
zoning in the village centers, cluster zoning, and revised land use planning consistent with the Town Master 
Plan. Also to be included in the agenda of 1971 is the updating of the Subdivision Rules and Regulations. 

The Board would like to convey their appreciation to the various Boards, Committees, and Departments 
of the Town for their cooperation during the past year. A special thank you to the Engineering Department for 
their continuing assistance with subdivision control, street acceptances and their attendance at the Planning 
Board meetings, and to our secretary, Mrs. Arnold Woodward. 

Edward A. Chambers, Chairman 
John F. Pasieka, Clerk 
Eric D. Bradlee 
Robert H. Gerhardt 



11 



Highway 



I herewith submit the annual report of the Highway Department for the year 1970, categorized 
as follows: 

Chapter 81 - Maintenance - During the summer a number of streets were scraped, patched, swept 
and then resurfaced with asphalt and sand. They included the following: 



Alcott Street (part) * 

Arlington Street (part) 

Billings Street 

Brook Street 

Carlisle Road 

Cross Street 

Davis Road 

Fletcher Court 

Fort Pond Road 

Hammond Street 

Harris Street 

Hayward Road 

Hosmer Street (1400')* 

Liberty Street 

* Surfaced with Type I Bituminous Concrete 



Maple Street 
Martin Street 
Nagog Hill Road 
Newtown Road 
Pine Street 
Pope Road 
River Street * 
Robbins Street 
Stow Street 
Strawberry Hill Road 
Sylvia Street 
Wampus Avenue 
Wetherbee Street 
Wheeler Lane 



General Highway - During the summer months, the villages were swept when possible, 
the town roads were swept and all the road sides were mowed. 



Most of 



A lot of work was done during this year in the Town Hall area. Three buildings were removed. 
The old Highway Department office became the home of the Fire Department's fire alarm equipment. The 
old Tree Department building became a garage for our bulldozer at the sanitary land fill operation. Our 
wood and storage shop was torn down under the wrecking bar of a contractor. All trees, except three, 
were cut. The land was cleared; fill and gravel were hauled in and the area was graded and rolled. Stone 
dust was applied until the fill settled, then it was hot -topped with a binder course. The top course will be 
laid next year. 

River Street, Arlington Street, from Central Street to Summer Street, were resurfaced with a minimum 
of one and one half inches of Type I Bituminous Concrete. The driveway approaches will be done next year . 

Bulette Road, Esterbrook Road, and 800 feet of Quarry Road were scarified, re -shaped, and processed; 
gravel was added, then they were graded and rolled. Two applications of asphalt were applied with sand cover. 

At the new Department of Public Works Building site, all of the trees were cleared and it was leveled 
for the contractor to start work. 

Signs and Lines - All center -lines and parking areas were repainted. With the help of the Lions Club, 
the crosswalks were also painted. The defaced, stolen, and broken signs were replaced. 

Care of Grounds - At the Elm Street playground, a sidewalk was installed. The area was loamed and 
seeded. The ice skating rink was filled in. The basketball courts received a final playing surface and back 
boards were erected. A few more pieces of play equipment were added. 

Goward Field received a little more playing area by the removal of our wood and storage shed. This 
area was loamed and seeded. 

All of the town grounds received their usual 3-1/2 tons of fertilizer and they were all mowed. 

Chapter 90 - Construction - Our Chapter 90 started this year from the Boxboro town line 2100' 
southerly with a total reconstruction of a 30 foot travelled way. This consisted of an 18" minimum cut 
to a section of 200 feet near the Boxboro line and a cut of 11 feet was incurred to eliminate all the peat. 
In this section of roadway, there were two (2) 60 foot arch pipes, 58" by 36" installed. This was in the 
11 foot cut, which hampered us somewhat. 

There was 112 feet of 18" pipe, 324 feet of 15" and 760 feet of 12" pipe installed, plus 15 structures. 

The road foundation consisted of a good 18 inches of gravel borrow, graded and rolled. Some 3, 697 
gallons of MC-70 asphalt were applied as a penetration. A 3" course of Type I Bituminous Concrete base, 
1, 641 tons, then was applied. 



12 





ADAMS STREET 

August 14, 1970 

Before Construction 



ADAMS STREET 

October 13, 1970 

After Construction 





MINOT AVENUE 

August 14, 1969 

Before Construction 



MINOT AVENUE 

October 19, 1970 

After Construction 



All driveways will be finished next spring. The catchbasins will be raised and all slope work 
will be completed, along with the berm and the top 2-1/2 inches of Type I Bituminous Concrete. 

Chapter 90 - Maintenance - Our Chapter 90 - Maintenance, in conjunction with bond money under 
Article #23 of our annual Town Meeting, was the section of North Main Street from Rte 2A to the Carlisle 
town line. This section received a resurfacing of 1-1/2 inches of Type I Bituminous Concrete, a total of 
2,389 tons. 

Sanitary Land Fill Area - A great portion of the area was cleared of trees in the early spring so 
the gravel could be used for our land fill operation. 



13 



The land fill lifts are filling much faster now that we cannot burn anything at the site any longer. 

The Girl Scouts have the paper concession as you enter the Sanitary Land Fill area. We hope the 
townspeople will keep tying their papers and it would be appreciated, when depositing the bundles in the 
container, if everyone would pile the papers as far front and as high as possible. The Girl Scouts are 
paid on a tonage basis. 

Snow - The most strenuous part of our department's activities is during the snow months. The men 
and machines put in long, hard hours. During a storm we use eight (8) sanders, eighteen (18) plows, two (2) 
front-end loaders, and one (1) sidewalk plow. The department is required to pick up more snow now as the 
sidewalks were put in this year. In addition, we remove snow from one side of Prospect Street, from Main 
Street to Massachusetts Avenue. 

Snow fence was installed on Wetherbee Street, School Street, North Main Street, Summer Street, 
Piper Road, and Central Street. 

Sand and salt were made available to the townspeople, as were snow markers. 

Sidewalks - This fall we constructed a new sidewalk on the west side of Prospect Street, from Main 
Street to Massachusetts Avenue. Some poles had to be moved, two (2) catchbasins had to be relocated, and 
fire structures had to be built. 

In the spring, the sidewalk will be backed up with loam and then seeded. 

New Equipment - At the annual town meeting in March, it was voted to purchase a new sweeper, 
which we received late in the year. It is an Elgin Pelican Sweeper and has worked very well to date. We 
also received two (2) additional pieces of snow equipment. One is a Mack L.J. model ten ton and the other 
an F. W. D. with plow frame wing mast and under scraper. They will be put into operation early in January 
of 1971. We also received two '2) mobile radios and one (1) mud-sucker pump. 

To the men of my department I want to say "thank you" for the long hours put in during the ice and 
snow storms and all the related work done by them. My thanks to the other Town Departments for their 
help in completing our many projects throughout the year. 

Allen H. Nelson 
Superintendent 



BUILDING COMMITTEE 



During the year 1970, the Acton Permanent Building Committee worked on the following projects: 

1. Minot Avenue School: Construction started on the Minot Avenue School in April 1970. Construction 
at the end of the year was about 40% complete. 

2. Public Works Building : Working drawings were completed in the summer of 1970 and the project was 
bid in the early fall. Bids were received and construction started about November 1, and the building 
is scheduled for completion by May 1, 1971. 

3. High School Addition : The Permanent Building Committee was requested to assist on the High School 
Addition. The Permanent Building Committee with four other members representing the Acton-Boxboro 
School Committee has been at work since the first of October on the preliminary planning of the High 
School. 

During the year Richard L. Hodgman, John Boyd and Thomas Rizzo resigned from the Committee. 
Wallace Everest, Donald Perkins and Edward Morrill were appointed as Committee members and 
Mr. Thomas J. Regan was appointed as Chairman. 

Thomas J. Regan, Chairman Donald Perkins 

David G. Hurley Edward Morrill 

Wallace Everest Harry Morse (School Committee) 



14 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 



Single dwellings and multiple dwellings reversed position in 1970 as the number of single dwellings 
constructed in the Town of Acton showed a marked decline. 

While the overall financial outlook shows a decrease of about $700, 000. 00 in estimated cost of total 
construction, apartment construction has, for the first time, exceeded single dwelling construction by 
$1,137,850.00. 

The new Building Code was approved by the Annual Town Meeting, approved by the Attorney General 
on September 25, 1970, printed and available shortly thereafter. The enacting of the new code has done 
much to clarify local requirements as they pertain to construction in the Town of Acton. 



A complete list of permits for the year 1968 is listed below: 

Area No. of Permits 



Residential 

Single Dwellings 

Multi -Family Dwellings 

Additions, repairs 

Garages 

Porches 

Swimming Pools 

Miscellaneous 



Commercial 

Business Buildings 



Total 



Fees for Building Permits 



Violation of Zoning & Building Laws 

8 Use Violations 

1 Intensity Regulation Violation 

2 Setback Violations 
6 Unlicensed Signs 

3 Buildings Constructed without Permit 

1 Swimming Pool in use without Permit 

2 Buildings without Certification of Location 



Estimated Cost 



85 


$2,363, 


150. 00 


30 bldgs. -455 units 


4,401, 


000. 00 


87 


199, 


260. 00 


6 


29, 


600. 00 


17 


52, 


405. 00 


27 


143, 


985. 00 


36 


271, 


675. 00 


7 


557, 


500. 00 


295 


$8, 018, 


575. 00 


Receipts 








$13, 


410.00 




Action 



8 corrected 

1 corrected 

2 changed 

3 removed, 3 licensed 
3 permits issued 

1 permit issued 

2 work stopped until 
certified 



Kenneth E. Jewell 
Building Inspector 



ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 



The Trustees of the Elizabeth White Fund have signed orders to the Town Treasurer totalling $885. 000. 

Hazel P. Vose 
Eleanor P. Wilson 
Helen B. Wood 

Trustees 



15 



HEALTH 



Board of Health 

This year the work of inspection of individual sanitary sewage disposal systems has continued to require 
the majority of the time spent in the performance of my duties. Other aspects of environmental sanitation as 
well as administration of health programs are an ongoing function. 

On December 28, 1970, the Board of Health adopted a comprehensive set of Rules and Regulations in an 
effort to aid the Town of Acton in its population growth. This set of rules and regulations was developed after 
a year of public and private hearings with various State representatives of the Public Health Department, 
local and neighboring town officials and boards, and the general public of the Town of Acton. 

The several areas covered by these rules and regulations include: 

Article I - General applicability and administration. 

Article II - Minimum Standard of Fitness for Human Habitation 

Article III - Housing and Sanitation Standard for Farm Labor Camps 

Article IV - Sanitation Standard for Recreational Camps for Children 

Article V - Minimum Standard for Sanitary Landfill Operation 

Article VI - Minimum Standard for Swimming Pools 

Article VII - Minimum Standard for Bathing Beaches 

Article VIII - Minimum Standard for Developed Family-Type Camp Grounds 

Article IX - Minimum Sanitation Standard for Private Water Supply 

Article X - Minimum Sanitation Standard for Food Service Establishments 

Article XI - Minimum Requirements for Disposal of Sanitary Sewage in Unsewered Areas 

Article XII - Minimum Requirements for the Keeping of Animals 

The published copies will be available at the Board of Health Office, Town Hall and Library for a 
nominal fee of $2. 00. 

In October 1970, the Acton Water District began increasing the concentration of fluorine in Acton's water 
supply to an optimum of one parts per million as ordered by the Acton Board of Health. 

At this optimum concentration of one part per million, fluorine will significantly reduce dental cavities 
in children and adolescents without producing side effects in any age group. The cost for this program is 
relatively small and is borne by the Water District. 

I wish to thank the Board of Health members, Town officials, and all the Town Departments for their 
support. Sincere appreciation is extended to the Health Department staff, the physicians, and the citizens 
who have helped make our programs possible. 

The following report summarizes the services and activities of the Department for 1970. 

Bradford S. Leach, R. S. 
Director 



Septic Tank Care 

All citizens of Acton are reminded of the Board of Health recommendation of the 1967 Annual Report 
on the subject of septic tank care. 

A septic tank system will service a home satisfactorily only if it is properly located, designed, con- 
structed and adequately maintained. Even a good system which does not have proper care and attention may 
become a nuisance and a burdensome expense. 

Neglect of the septic tank is the most frequent cause of damage to the leaching systems. When the tank 
is not cleaned, solids build up until they are carried into the underground leaching pipe system, where they 
block the flow of the liquid into the soil. When this happens, the leaching system must be uncovered, cleaned 
and relocated--a costly undertaking. The precautions of periodic inspection and cleaning of the tank prevent 
this needless expense and work. 



16 



■ \ 7; 



£Z 

INLET 



SCUM 



^ 



CLEAR LIQUID 



SOLIDS 



13 

OUTLET 



The frequency of cleaning depends on the size of the septic tank and the number of people it serves. 
When a garbage grinder is used, more frequent cleaning will be required. With ordinary use and care, a 
septic tank usually requires cleaning every two years. The ho meowner can make measurements and decide " 
for himself when his tank needs cleaning. When the total depth of scums and solids exceeds one -half of the 
liquid depth of the tank, the tank should be cleaned. The accumulated solids are ordinarily pumped out by 
companies that make a business of cleaning septic tanks. Your local health department knows which local 
companies do this work satisfactorily. The solids removed should be buried or disposed of in a manner ap- 
proved by your local health department to avoid obnoxious odors and health hazards. 

There are no chemicals, yeasts, bacteria, enzymes or other substances capable of eliminating or 
reducing the solids and scum in a septic tank so the periodic cleaning is unnecessary. Contrary to some 
beliefs, the addition of such products is not necessary for the proper functioning of a septic tank disposal 
system. 

Home Care Program 

The Advisory Board of the Emerson Hospital Home Care program is made up of a representative 
from the Board of Health from each of the six towns included in the agency. 

Mr. Edwin Richter, a member of the Acton Board of Health represents Acton on this board. 

During the summer, Miss Virginia Whitney, R.N. , resigned from her position as Regional Supervisor 
to return to academic pursuits. Miss Eleanor Madden, R.N. , B. S. , is now the executive officer for the 
Emerson Hospital affiliated Community Nursing Program. 

The Emerson Hospital Home Care Program is available to all residents of Acton. The goal of 
the Home Care Program is prevention of disease and promotion of health administered under the three 
broad categories of: Communicable Disease Control, Maternal and Child Health Care and Adult Health 
Guidance. 

This service promotes an organized plan of follow-up care for hospital patients and for those outside 
the hospital who need skilled nursing care, physical therapy and medical social work services as prescribed 
by their physician. 

The public health nurse is concerned with people as patients and family members, and with how they 
adapt to their environment. When the public health nurse visits a family she is able to include the entire 
family as part of health supervision. The initial visit of the nurse to the home usually involves an assessment 
of the health status of all family members. On succeeding visits the discussion is centered on the illness, the 
care being received, and the changes involved in planning the pattern of care. The age group of members such 
as the children may present a spectrum of health measures which could be introduced in the form of anticipa- 
tory guidance. 

Many of the visits the public health nurse makes are involved in the care of the elderly. The problems 
of increasing disability due to the aging process include physical, mental and emotional changes. Authorities 
believe the aged should live in their own homes and maintain independence as long as possible. The public 
health nurse has the opportunity to promote a safe and comfortable environment, to provide physical care, 
and evaluate the other needs of this age group. These needs and anxieties may include such areas as sup- 
port and encouragement at the loss of a partner, assistance and reassurance in arranging economic matters 
and use of leisure time. 



The Home Care Coordinator working in the hospital has continued as a positive force in providing organized 
home care for the patient. There has been a slow, steady increase in the number of referrals. Case conferences 
have been initiated with the Coordinator, the Hospital Nurse and the Public Health Nurse caring for the patient. 

The Concord Family Service Association and the Emerson Hospital Home Care Program have continued 
their plans in initiating a Homemaker Home Health Aide Program. The Homemaker Home Health Aide will 
give personal care and provide related housekeeping services for the patient in the home. The first training 
class of aides will begin in early 1971. 

17 



The above services are available to all residents of Acton and are supported by town taxes under the 
Board of Health, third party payees such as Medicare, Medicaid, private insurance programs and individual 
fees. Due to continued restrictions in Medicare and Medicaid some patients are no longer eligible for finan- 
cial coverage under these programs. 

The Home Care Program attempts to provide a pattern of care that is accessible and acceptable to 
meet an established need in the community. Home Care may not be the solution to all problems for all 
patients, but for selected patients it may shorten hospital stay, prevent frequent readmission to the hospital 
or forego the need for nursing home care. 



Preventive Bedside Nursing Program 

Maternal and Child Health 232 

Arthritis 235 

Cardio- Vascular Disease 332 

Cerebral Vascular Disease 116 

Cancer 24 

Multiple Sclerosis 73 

Diabetes 24 

Injuries 111 

Other 223 



Total 1,411 



Under 28 days 

28 days to 1 year 

1 year to 4 years 

5 years to 19 

21 years to 44 years 

45 years to 64 years 

65 years and over 



Plus 
Total 



10 
18 
26 
109 
165 
373 
669 



1, 370 

41 not home 

1,411 



Total Individuals 520 

Total Visits 1,411 

Total Physical Therapy Visits - Consultations 13 

Total Social Worker Visits and/or Consultations 25 



Medicare Re-Imbursement 

All Others (Blue Cross, Patient Veterans, Welfare) 

Total for 1970 

Communicable Disease Control Program 

Rubella (German Measles) Vaccine Program 
Preschool 
Grades 1, 5, 6, 7 
Total 

D. T. Booster - Grade 9 

Mumps Immunization - Grades 1, 2, 3, 4 

Tuberculin Screening - Grades 1, 4, 7, 9, and 30 faculty 

Communicable Diseases Reported for 1970 



$5,016.00 
3, 265.01 

$8, 281.01 



120 
951 



1, 071 
175 
683 

1,242 



Chicken Pox 
Mumps 
Animal Bites 
Hepatitis 
Meningitis 



92 

23 

6 

4 

2 



Streptocaccal Infection 7 

Salmonella 1 

German Measles 1 

Tuberculosis 1 



Chapter III, Section 111 of the General Laws, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, requires that all communicable 
diseases must be reported to the Board of Health, 263-4736. 



Births: Premature - 13 



ji Inspections 

I Food Handling Establishments 
I Schools and Kindergartens 

Swimming Pools 
J Slaughtering 

Nursing Homes 

Permits fa Licenses Issued 

Burial or Removal Permits 

Catering Permits 

Kindergarten fa Nursery Schools 

Offal Transport 

Milk Store 

Milk Dealers 



No. 



Permits & Licenses Cont'd. 



No. 



Fees Collected 



24 


Total Collected Misc. Items 




$ 




728. 


36 


12 


Plumbing Permits 


264 




4, 


670. 


50 


27 


Gas Permits 


262 




2, 


600. 


00 





Sewage Works Permits: 












2 


New at $25.00 

Repairs fa Alterations at $5.00 


111 

29 












Total Collected for Sewerage 






2, 


940. 


00 




Installer's Permits 












53 


26 at $10.00 








360. 


00 


1 


1 at $25.00 








25. 


00 


9 

6 

15 


Town Nurse Services 






8, 


281. 


01 


Total Transferred to Town 












6 


Treasurer 




$19, 


604. 


87 



Donald R. Gilberti, Chairman 

Edwin Richter 

John C. Rouse, M. D. 

Board of Health Members 



CONCORD AREA COMPREHENSIVE MENTAL HEALTH CENTER 



Among the services made available to the residents of Acton through the co-operation of the Board of 
Health are those of the Concord Area Comprehensive Mental Health Center which is supported, in part, by 
a modest contribution from our town budget. Adults, teenagers and children who are experiencing difficulty 
in functioning in their day-to-day lives because of emotional problems have a variety of types of professional 
help offered to them through the Center and its component agencies. Outpatient care through individual, 
family and group therapy, as well as a nursery school for emotionally disturbed children and a day care 
center for adults and teenagers are available through the Walden Guidance Association, as is consultation 
service to the schools. For those who are experiencing a life crisis of such dimension that short-term care 
in a therapeutic environment is required, in-patient services are available through the psychiatric unit of 
Emerson Hospital. 

Educational and supportive functions are carried out through the efforts of the Mental Health Associa- 
tion of Central Middlesex which offers: speakers on Mental Health to local groups; seminars for clergy, 
teachers, and lay people; volunteer opportunities for those who would like to help; and a variety of other 
programs which emphasize the outreach of the Center into the communities. 

During the past year, more than a hundred and twenty-five Acton families sought help from the Center, 
of whom some went directly while others were referred by the schools, clergy, physicians, or others. It 
is anticipated that, as community awareness of the Center and its services increases, the number of families 
getting help will increase significantly. 

Walden Guidance Clinic 

Emerson Hospital Psychiatric Ward 

Mental Health Association of Central Middlesex 



DOG OFFICER 



It has been a busy year for the Dog Officer. Early in the year the Harvard Medical School cut way down 
on the number of dogs it needed and this fall stopped taking dogs completely, and since I have never liked to 
destroy a good animal, I have kept many stray dogs much longer than the ten days required and paid for by 
the County, trying to place them in good homes --all of which is costly and time-consuming. At this writing 
I have several unclaimed dogs waiting to be placed and if the present situation continues, should have nice 
dogs available for adoption most of the time. 



19 



My records show that, as of December 7, 1970: 

1. 1360 dog licenses were issued (approximately 100 more than in 1969), necessitating the sending of 
500 reminders. 

2. 49 unidentifiable dogs were picked up, of which number 7 were sent to the Harvard Medical School, 
2 were destroyed, 1 was sold, 8 placed in homes, and 31 eventually claimed by their owners. 

3. 15 dog bites were investigated. 

4. 201 dogs were reported lost, most of which were presumably found. 

5. Innumerable complaints of various kinds were discussed, some at great length, and most of the 
problems resolved to the satisfaction of all concerned. 

May I reiterate that the one single problem causing the most complaints and the only one which I am 
powerless to solve under the present set-up is that of female dogs in season who are confined at home and 
attract males from miles around. Most of the complaints in this regard come from the owners of females, 
who want me to remove the congregating dogs and require their owners to keep them at home. This is clearly 
impossible under these circumstances and has necessitated the owners of the males to kennel their dogs in 
some cases. I firmly believe that the town should adopt a law requiring that all female dogs be kenneled 
during this period. 

Patrick Palmer 
Dog Officer 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



Premises Inspected 


33 


Ponies 


24 


Horses 


48 


Cows over 2 


95 


Cows 1 -2 


15 


Calves 


17 


Bulls 


2 



Goats 






8 


Sheep 






4 


Swine 






5 


Beef Cattle 




5 


Mule 






1 


Dog Bite 


s 




15 


Dogs Quarantined 




12 




Patrick Palmer 






Inspector 


of Animals 



DOG LICENSES 



ALL DOG LICENSES EXPIRE MARCH 3 1, 19 7 1. 
DOGS MUST BE LICENSED ON OR BEFORE 
APRIL 1STOR THE OWNERS OR KEEPERS 
THEREOF ARE LIABLE TO A FINE. THE LAW 
APPLIES TO ALL DOGS THREE MONTHS OLD 
OR OVER, REGARDLESS OF TIME OF YEAR 
OWNERSHIP IS ACQUIRED. NO TAX BILLS ARE 
SENT TO OWNERS OF DOGS. 



1211 Licenses 

186 Licenses 

6 Licenses 

5 Licenses 

1 License 

47 Duplicate Tags @ 

Paid to Town Treasurer 



REPORT OF DOG LICENSES 
ISSUED IN 1970 



a 


$ 2. 00 


$2,422.00 


fo) 


5. 00 


930.00 


& 


10.00 


60.00 


(3) 


25. 00 




o 


50. 00 


50.00 


@ 




11. 75 



$3, 598. 75 



20 



BIRTHS 



Births recorded 305 

Marriages recorded 106 

Deaths recorded 145 



IMPORTANT REQUEST 

Please notify the Town Clerk immediately of any error or omission in the following list of Births. 

Errors not reported at once can be corrected only by sworn affidavit, as prescribed by the General 
Laws, and may cause you inconvenience which can be avoided by prompt attention. 

BIRTHS REGISTERED IN 1970 



Date 



Place 



Jan. 


2 


Concord 


Jan. 


2 


Concord 


Jan. 


5 


Concord 


Jan. 


5 


Chelsea 


Jan. 


6 


Concord 


Jan. 


6 


Groton 


Jan. 


7 


Boston 


Jan. 


9 


Marlborough 


Jan. 


11 


Medford 


Jan. 


13 


Concord 


Jan. 


14 


Concord 


Jan. 


14 


Waltham 


Jan. 


14 


Concord 


Jan. 


17 


Concord 


Jan. 


19 


Concord 


Jan. 


23 


Boston 


Jan. 


23 


Concord 


Jan. 


24 


Concord 


Jan. 


29 


Concord 


Jan. 


29 


Concord 


Jan. 


30 


Concord 


Jan. 


30 


Concord 


Feb. 


1 


Concord 


Feb. 


1 


Concord 


Feb. 


2 


Waltham 


Feb. 


3 


Newton 


Feb. 


5 


Concord 


Feb. 


5 


Groton 


Feb. 


8 


Concord 


Feb. 


8 


Concord 


Feb. 


9 


Concord 


Feb. 


10 


Concord 


Feb. 


12 


Concord 


Feb. 


12 


Concord 


Feb. 


13 


Concord 


Feb. 


14 


Concord 


Feb. 


19 


Concord 


Feb. 


19 


Concord 


Feb. 


19 


Concord 


Feb. 


20 


Boston 


Feb. 


21 


Arlington 


Feb. 


24 


Concord 


Feb. 


24 


Shirley 


Feb. 


25 


Boston 


Feb. 


27 


Winchester 



Name of Child 

Kosiewski, Gary Neil 
Martin, Laura Ann 
Guadagno, Susan 
Perron, Jeanine Lyn 
Lavoid, John Andrew 
Kitchen, Gregory Scott 
Morris, Jeanne Marie 
Bigelow, Donald Richard, Jr. 
Wood, Elizabeth Claire 
Morrison, John David, Jr. 
Penney, Frederick James 
Herrmann, Marc Clifton 
Casey, David Michael 
Colvin, Paul Michael 
Lane, Denise Marie 
Heffernan, Kevin Joseph 
Maher, Paul Gerard 
Smith, William Barrett 
McKee, Heather Sue 
Bishop, Christopher Allen 
Poplaski, Chester Stanley 
LaFoley, Jessica Scott 

Bottai, Mark Louis 
Brown, Caroline Maria 
Guba, Robert Douglas 
Dutton, Robert Hugh 
Huettner, James Andrew 
Reichert, Heather Ray 
Summers, Mark James 
Lange, Julie Paulette 
Gaetano, Andrew Edmund 
Pisinski, Jodi Ann 
Kennedy, Lauren Michelle 
Doyle, Jennifer 
Anderson, Derek Ross 
Dyer, Mark ALlen 
Rotondo, Kathleen Ann 
Burden, Tricia Kathryn 
Hekkala, John Frederick, III 
Forester, Roger Tyler 
Wiese, Nanci Lee 
Mitrano, Marie Susan 
Lawson, Mark Edward 
Campbell, Kim Diane 
O'Brien, Richard Paul, Jr. 



Name of Parents 

Joseph P. and Doris M. Hackler 
Edward H. and Katherine A. Barry 
Angelo R. and Mary Borzelli 
Robert A. and Daryll B. Zeoli 
Joseph A. and Catherine L. O'Loughlin 
Dennis R. and Sharon K. Armstrong 
William H. and Anne M. Carter 
Donald R. and Barbara A. Brooks 
George H. and Patricia E. Delaney 
John D. and Barbara J. Callahan 
John C. and Sally A. Dunlea 
Robert C. and Marie A. Parrella 
Lawrence J. and Mary K. Fratus 
DonaLd W. and Ellen J. Crosby 
Michael and Sharon A. Beard 
Richard J. and Monica M. McBride 
Gerard P. and Judith C. Hansen 
William C. and Alice E. Decker 
Mervyn J. and Linda L. Bussiere 
Roger A. and Linda A. Fenton 
Chester E. and Maryann Levesque 
Michael J. and Beverly L. Heiligmann 

Peter R. and Marilyn L. Potters 
Wilfred E. , III and Karey B. Dudley 
Robert F. and Ann Kroeck 
Richard H. and Roberta F. Dodkin 
Robert E. and Virginia M. Cejka 
James H. and Barbara J. Ray 
Donald J. and Margaret M. Alwine 
Lawrence R. and Frances A. Famularo 
Leonard F. and Suzanne H. Kenney 
Thomas A. and Margaret P. Cusson 
Richard D. and Kathleen S. Roche 
Robert F. and Alice C. Donaghue 
Richard M. and Sandra K. Brockway 
John H. and Sheila M. Maloney 
Joseph M. and Anne C. Doody 
Robert R. and Patricia G. Thompson 
John F. , II and Linda L. Bennett 
Benjamin T. and Carol L. McLean 
James C. and Helen I. Minton 
Salvatore and Patricia A. Patterson 
Edward S. and Judith M. Haynes 
David B. and Karen E. Mantz 
Richard P. and Ann L. McNiff 



21 



Date 



Place 



Name of Child 



Name of Parents 



Mar. 


3 


Concord 


Mar. 


3 


Concord 


Mar. 


3 


Boston 


Mar. 


5 


Waltham 


Mar. 


7 


Northampton 


Mar. 


8 


Concord 


Mar. 


10 


Cambridge 


Mar. 


11 


Newton 


Mar. 


11 


Concord 


Mar. 


14 


Concord 


Mar. 


15 


Concord 


Mar. 


15 


Concord 


Mar. 


16 


Concord 


Mar. 


17 


Concord 


Mar. 


19 


Concord 


Mar. 


20 


Newton 


Mar. 


20 


Shirley 


Mar. 


20 


Concord 


Mar. 


25 


Concord 


Mar. 


28 


Concord 


Mar. 


29 


Concord 


Mar. 


31 


Concord 


Mar. 


31 


Concord 


Apr. 


1 


Concord 


Apr. 


1 


Concord 


Apr. 


1 


Boston 


Apr. 


3 


Concord 


Apr. 


3 


Melrose 


Apr. 


4 


Concord 


Apr. 


5 


Concord 


Apr. 


6 


Concord 


Apr. 


7 


Waltham 


Apr. 


7 


Concord 


Apr. 


8 


Marlborough 


Apr. 


9 


Concord 


Apr. 


9 


Arlington 


Apr. 


11 


Concord 


Apr. 


11 


Concord 


Apr. 


14 


Concord 


Apr. 


17 


Concord 


Apr. 


19 


Fitchburg 


Apr. 


20 


Concord 


Apr. 


20 


Concord 


Apr. 


22 


Concord 


Apr. 


23 


Concord 


Apr. 


23 


Concord 


Apr. 


23 


Concord 


Apr. 


26 


Concord 


Apr. 


27 


Concord 


Apr. 


28 


Concord 


Apr. 


29 


Concord 


Apr. 


30 


Boston 


May 


1 


Concord 


May 


3 


Concord 


May 


6 


Concord 


May 


6 


Concord 


May 


7 


Concord 


May 


11 


Concord 


May 


11 


Concord 


May 


12 


Concord 


May 


12 


Concord 


May 


14 


Concord 


May 


14 


Concord 


May 


15 


Chelsea 


May 


15 


Concord 


May 


16 


Concord 


May 


20 


Concord 


May 


21 


Concord 



Barger, Scott Kelley 
Schontag, Jennifer 
Deutschman, William Alaric 
Gravelle, Peter Andrew 
Mims, Michael Henri 
Johansson, Jeffrey Emil 
Somerville, Carolyn Alden 
Philbin, John Mathew 
Williams, Carol Ann 
Giroux, Dana Brooks 
Loss, Stephen Joseph 
Davis, Jennifer Marie 
Hart, David James 
Wallace, Sean Michael 
Friend, Kimberly Ann 
Montagna, Karen Marie 
Bonner, Jennifer Joan 
Lattuca, Russell Alan 
LeBel, Michael 
McCarthy, Regina Patricia 
Huber, Robert Paul 
Petrigni, Anthony Scott 
Appleton, Robert Brandon 

Lee, Jacqueline Elizabeth 
Kennedy, Kimberly Ann 
Kaz, Louis Jacob 
Swenson, Inge Kirstep 
Thompson, Gary Edward 
Grubb, Frederick Joseph 
MacLeod, John Edward, II 
Bellardino, Lisa Marie 
Keenan, Kimberly Ann 
Sliski, Laura Jean 
Teichholtz, Colin Hugh 
Dionne, George Arcadio 
Kostas, Tricia Ann 
Herlihy, Brian Derek 
'•Chick, Martha Maxwell 
Hosie, Chad Alister 
Quinn, Michael James 
Hosmer, Christine Elizabeth 
Saganich, Lisa Elizabeth 
Evans, Heather Elizabeth 
Piernot, Richelle Marie 
Page, Eric Matthew 
Page, David Michael 
Portante, Gerald Francis, Jr. 
Mannion, Tiffany Jeanne 
Bailey, Kelly Lynn 
Marx, Jennifer Rebecca 
Murphy, Thyme Marie 
Small, John Albert 

Hartwell, David. Author, Jr. 
Witt, Brenda Jean 
Puglia, Meredith 
Geiss, Erik Peter 
Flint, Aaron Thomas 
Walsh, Erinn Lynn 
Wheeler, Charles Peter 
Fowler, Linda Marie 
Halloran, Sean Patrick 
Shanley, Elizabeth Maria 
Ely, Heather Hope 
Roberts, Amy Michele 
Squire, Todd Wayne 
Fait, Peter Fraser 
Sullivan, Tamara Marie 
Loughlin, Amy Eileen 



Harrison C. and Kathleen Kelley 
Russell M. and Diane Ross 
William A. and Elaine M. Moshier 
Francis W. and Carol A. Whitney 
John D. and Suzanne E. LeClaire 
Peter A. and Betty J. Gillson 
Edward L. and Kathryn J. Geiger 
William E. and Jane E. Nash 
James S. and Barbara J. Stoffle 
Chadwick A. and Judith B. Conant 
Gregory E. and Carolyn J. Martin 
George H. and Barbara R. Mattison 
Thomas M. and Janice E. House 
Michael G. and Janet E. O'Dowd 
John F. and Linda L. Carley 
Joseph J. and Constance A. Castano 
Barry C. and Alene J. Casterlin 
Rosario and Ann M. Galvin 
Richard R. and Sandra E. Proctor 
Bruce M. and Mary R. Arroll 
Robert and Janet E. Parsons 
Constantine A. and Victoria E. Sokol 
Charles N. , Jr. and Carol A. Bogle 

William B. and Adele C. Lupien 

Thomas F. S., Jr. and Patricia G. McNulty 

Sidney E. and Rose M. Schramm 

Richard E. and Ellen H. Parker 

Robert D., Sr. and Carolyn Wilson 

Frederick K. and Barbara A. Lambert 

John E. and Donna J. Martin 

Steven G. and Lynn M. Bobysud 

Thomas M. and Diane E. Noe 

Daniel J., Jr. and Deborah A. Fairbanks 

Nathan A. and Rebecca Marks 

George W. and Martha M. Espinosa 

James R. and Judith A. Stickney 

Paul A. and Judith A. Dee 

John B., Jr. and Barbara A. Berg 

James R. and Donna J. Crosby 

Kenneth J. and Patricia M. Delany 

Richard and Ann C. Gould 

John P. and Mary E. Sexton 

Gerald H. and Ingrid M. Larsen 

Richard W. and Caryl M. Schultz 

Raymond L. and Anita E. Sheahan 

Raymond L. and Anita E. Sheahan 

Gerald F. and Frances P. Rubino 

Joseph A. and Judith M. Vidito 

Frank B. and Carol A. Ewen 

Michael H. and Susan T. Super 

Christopher G. and Paula J. Lorden 

Albert W. and Carolynn M. Ostrom 

David A. and Paula B. Riggs 
Steven L., Sr. and Nancy J. Trebendis 
Vincent D. and Charlene MacDonald 
Peter J., Ill and Phyllis E. MacAran 
David C. and Lois T. Wetherbee 
William E. and Maggie E. Kohler 
Charles I. and Catherine P. Cunniff 
Frederick M. and Pamela D. Werner 
Michael R. and Marjorie A. Nichols 
Peter A. and Elaine B. Ostock 
George J. and Valerie H. Folger 
Richard R. and Corrine M. Nunn 
Wayne M. and Lonnette R. Wiebe 
Richard F. and Katalin M. Gyarmathy 
Craig W. and Elaine M. O'Grady 
Richard E. and Barbara K. Limmer 



22 



Date 



Place 



Name of Child 



Name of Parents 



May 


23 


Concord 


May 


26 


Concord 


May 


27 


Cambridge 


May 


29 


Concord 


May 


30 


Concord 


June 


3 


Concord 


June 


4 


Concord 


June 


5 


Boston 


June 


5 


Boston 


June 


6 


Concord 


June 


8 


Arlington 


June 


8 


Waltham 


June 


12 


Concord 


June 


13 


Concord 


June 


16 


Concord 


June 


16 


Concord 


June 


17 


Concord 


June 


17 


Lowell 


June 


18 


Concord 


June 


20 


Chelsea 


June 


20 


Concord 


June 


21 


Concord 


June 


21 


Concord 


June 


21 


Boston 


June 


22 


Concord 


June 


22 


Boston 


June 


22 


Concord 


June 


23 


Boston 


June 


23 


Concord 


June 


24 


Concord 


June 


24 


Concord 


June 


25 


Concord 


June 


25 


Concord 


June 


26 


Montague 


June 


27 


Concord 


June 


30 


Concord 


July 


4 


Arlington 


July 


5 


Concord 


July 


8 


Concord 


July 


8 


Boston 


July 


8 


Boston 


July 


9 


Concord 


July 


9 


Concord 


July 


9 


Concord 


July 


11 


Nashua, N.H 


July 


11 


Concord 


July 


12 


Concord 


July 


12 


Concord 


July 


15 


Chelsea 


July 


15 


Concord 


July 


19 


Concord 


July 


20 


Concord 


July 


21 


Concord 


July 


22 


Concord 


July 


22 


Concord 


July 


23 


Concord 


July 


24 


Concord 


July 


24 


Concord 


July 


27 


Boston 


July 


29 


Concord 


Aug. 


2 


Concord 


Aug. 


3 


Concord 


Aug. 


4 


Concord 


Aug. 


4 


Concord 


Aug. 


5 


Boston 


Aug. 


9 


Concord 



Hannon, Martin Thomas 
Bodendorf, Breta Anne 
Horan, Tobey Elaine 
Boutin, James Michael 
Hansen, Heather Marie 

Harris, Jonathan Bowman 
Steinmann, John Bernard 
Stuart, Gary Joseph 
MacDonald, Timothy Leo 
Lane, Elizabeth Simmonds 
Cuggino, Karen Anne 
Carroll, Kevin Michael 
Riendeau, Michelle Laura 
Flerra, James Joseph 
Herman, Mary Katherine 
Glina, Rachel Louise 
Stapel, Tracy Anne 
Porteous, Gregory William 
Reap, Maura 
Cournoyer, Stephen Scott 
Kett, Jennifer Suzanne 
Ezaz, Yusef Shah Mohammad 
Forster, Jennifer Ann 
Werner, Trevor Kirk 
Lamarre, Gilbert Joseph 
Tharler, Scott Kevin 
Rivet, Paul Steven 
Stuntz, Laurance Newton 
Condon, Jennifer Anne 
Roberts, John Michael 
Forde, John Patrick, Jr. 
Buckland, Monika Adam 
Smith, Tracy Lynn 
Neville, Ian Michael 
Manalan, Juliet 
Rugo, Eric Sten 

Geek, Matthew Joseph 
Bennett, William Edward 
Vigliotti, Michael Robert 
Henry, Michele Marie 
Turton, Joshua Stewart 
Collison, Barbara Marie 
Goodemote, Stephen Douglas 
Keith, Corrine Elizabeth 
Johnson, Christopher Scott 
Lynch, John Joseph, Jr. 
Seale, Kristina Marie 
Hunkins, Geoffrey Alan 
Kulakowski, John Jacob 
Schneider, Greg William 
Gifford, John Weston 
O'Neill, Erin Traci 
Maglioli, Lisa Ann 
Wheeler, Gregory Raymond 
Dunn, Andrew Eric 
Schleusner, Amy Ann 
Kahan, Todd Aaron 
Lee, Jennifer Ward 
Nyberg, David Wesley 
O'Connor, Joseph Vincent 

Smith, Gregory Robert 
Conahan, Jennifer Susan 
Murphy, Don Michael 
Schorn, Laura Anne 
Lorenz, Lance Graham 
Parks, Margery Helen 



Martin J. and Patricia E. O'Leary 
Bruce B. and Marjorie Hyett 
James J. and Diane B. Thompson 
Francis J. and Elizabeth A. Jones 
James P. and Eileen M. Battaglia 

Philip A. and Lorna M. Clark 
Robert P. and Maureen Dee 
Joseph V. and Mary E. Bachrach 
Norman J. , Jr. and Jeanne T. Baxter 
Winthrop W. and Jean P. Simmonds 
Joseph A. and Christine A. Dabrowski 
Kenneth D. and Arlene M. Runci 
Armand D. and Laura L. Fredette 
Paul L. and Eudora A. Troupe 
David V. and Jean E. Robisch 
Robert L. and Karen J. Kohansov 
Thomas W. and Beverly A. Sheridan 
Donald P. and Susan Tantum 
Coleman R. and Judith A. Bonnes 
Gerald A. and Mary L. Dalton 
Walter S. and Suzanne L. K'Burg 
Abdul K. and Bette M. S. Gilks 
Klaus C. S. and Julie A. Mullaney 
Robert E. and Jusy A. Zessin 
Clement D. and Brenda A. Baroody 
Steven R. and Elaine J. Lansky 
Daniel O. , Jr. and Jamie K. Thomas 
Stephen C. and Frances L. Newton 
John T. and Roberta A. Luhaink 
Lawrence R. and Christa H. Buchholz 
John P. and Margaret M. Whelan 
Lawrence F. and Ellen M. T. Adam 
Richard A. and Linda M. Chess 
Michael D. and Linda L. Lester 
David A. and Gena K. Gabrielson 
John L. and Joyce E. Dalbec 

Joseph C. and Barbara F. Kary 

Edward M. and Susan M. Dion 

Paul R. and Joan E. MacDonald 

Mark B. and Mary P. Darnell 

Thomas H. and Catherine Shaw 

Frank- C. and Kendall E. Dean 

James R. and Doris M. Killman' 

Paul D. and Nancy L. Resmini 

Karl D. and Christina E. Lucier 

John J. and Mary L. O'Brien 

John vV. , Jr. and Carol M. Anderson 

Christopher R. and June A. Hanson 

Jacob N. and Janet A. Nadile 

Charles W. and Diane E. Gregory 

Weston B. , Jr. and Mildred E. Ayer 

Patrick K. and Stella M. Furlong 

Michael A. and Linda M. Chaves 

Russell T. and Ingrid E. Bletzer 

Stephen E. and Robin L. Ohs 

Trygve E. and Susan M. Ball 

Mark A. and Elaine A. Fowler 

David S. and Victoria K. Ward 

Wesley C. and Barbara M. Ellis 

Daniel J. , Jr. and Christine R. Kennedy 

Robert A. and Merlene S. Phelps 

Jon M. and K. Susan Annett 

Thomas F. , Jr. and O. Carolyn J. Collyer 

Thomas G. and Joanne L. Gibson 

John J. and Dorothy C. Murphy 

Robert E. and Bertha H. Tomlinson 



23 



Date 



Place 



Aug. 


10 


Boston 


Aug. 


10 


Concord 


Aug. 


11 


Concord 


Aug. 


11 


Concord 


Aug. 


12 


Concord 


Aug. 


14 


Concord 


Aug. 


14 


Concord 


Aug. 


17 


Somerville 


Aug. 


17 


Concord 


Aug. 


17 


Boston 


Aug. 


19 


Concord 


Aug. 


20 


Concord 


Aug. 


22 


Concord 


Aug. 


22 


Concord 


Aug. 


23 


Concord 


Aug. 


25 


Cambridge 


Aug. 


26 


Concord 


Aug. 


27 


Concord 


Aug. 


28 


Boston 


Aug. 


29 


Concord 


Aug. 


30 


Concord 


Aug. 


31 


Concord 


Aug. 


31 


Concord 


Aug. 


31 


Concord 


Sept. 


2 


Concord 


Sept. 


3 


Boston 


Sept. 


4 


Concord 


Sept. 


6 


Concord 


Sept. 


7 


Concord 


Sept. 


7 


Concord 


Sept. 


8 


Concord 


Sept. 


10 


Concord 


Sept. 


10 


Boston 


Sept. 


11 


Concord 


Sept. 


12 


Eramingham 


Sept. 


12 


Concord 


Sept. 


12 


Boston 


Sept. 


13 


Concord 


Sept. 


14 


Concord 


Sept. 


16 


Concord 


Sept. 


17 


Concord 


Sept. 


21 


Worcester 


Sept. 


23 


Maiden 


Sept. 


24 


Concord 


Sept. 


28 


Cambridge 


Sept. 


29 


Chelsea 


Oct. 


2 


Boston 


Oct. 


3 


Concord 


Oct. 


3 


Concord 


Oct. 


3 


Concord 


Oct. 


3 


Concord 


Oct. 


5 


Arlington 


Oct. 


6 


Lynn 


Oct. 


7 


Concord 


Oct. 


7 


Concord 


Oct. 


8 


Concord 


Oct. 


9 


Marlborough 


Oct. 


10 


Winchester 


Oct. 


10 


Concord 


Oct. 


11 


Concord 


Oct. 


13 


Boston 


Oct. 


14 


Boston 


Oct. 


14 


Concord 


Oct. 


14 


Concord 


Oct. 


15 


Cambridge 


Oct. 


15 


Boston 


Oct. 


15 


Concord 



Name of Child 

Chandler, Holly Leigh 
Seidel, Thomas Vaughn 
Welch, Thomas Francis 
Fronk, Alison Marie 
Driban, Daniel Churchill 
Florio, David Paul 
Newman, Michael Clifford 
Bouley, James Norman 
Larson, Jill Aileen 
Harrington, Heather Mary 
Sharp, Marianne 
Pacy, Michael Todd 
Belliveau, Gary Michael 
Shaulis, Kathryn Teresa 
Dyke, Heather C aline 
Daley, Jennifer Katherine 
Bradlee, Sandra Jean 
Reilly, Lee 

O'Grady, Catherine Margaret 
Nanavati, Rajkumar Harit 
McHugh, Jennifer Ann 
Weissman, Robert Howard 
Tobin, Brian Douglas 
King, James Wheeler 

Meleedy, Kathleen Marie 
Rodney, Keith Damon 
Heyliger, Mark Davis 
Bilafer, Patricia Mary 
Herman, Richard John 
Nessman, Christopher Eric 
Knowles, Johanna Beth 
Quebec, Jacqueline Anne 
McComas, Albert Charles 
Budden, Leslie Ann 
Good, Geoffrey Gerald 
Stewart, James Francis 
O'Donoghue, Karoly Foster 
Chapman, Matthew Seely 
Coleman, Donald Brian 
Donnelly, Jeffrey John 
Nason, David Cummings 
Putnam, Brent Victor Wendell 
Foster, Steven Keith 
Richardson, William Ray 
O'Grady, Melina 
Draeger, Eric Christopher 

Fraser, Scott David 
McCarthy, Christine Ann 
Theobald, Karen Lynn 
Hayes, Maura Eileen 
Mahaney, Jennifer Ann 
Whalen, Michael James 
Rifkin, Lauren Ingrid 
Ernst, Scott Steven 
Platine, Jody Beth 
Eggleton, Jeremy David 
Zeh, Valerie Elizabeth 
Theriault, Cheryl Ann 
Roymans, Amy Elizabeth 
Austin, Theodore Matthew 
Johnson, Elizabeth Evelyn 
Bickoff, Lynn Elaine 
Vickery, Teresa Lynne 
Griffin, Amy Lynn 
Zmuda, Jessica Kirsten 
Sharenson, Andrew Harald 
Thomas, Laurie Ellen 



Name of Parents 

Frederick D. and Ann L. Berger 

Gary C. and Marlene K. Dennis 

Paul X. and Mary E. Heanue 

Robert L. and Janet Kertis 

Stanley and Edith Fleck 

Daniel S. and Diane M. Roberts 

Otto R. and Eileen M. Leagy 

Norman A. and Jean E. Gray 

Dennis S. and Linda M. Tobin 

John J. and Lorraine A. Miller 

Douglas W. and Alice K. Older 

John E. and Leslie A. Jeanson 

Gary W. and Sheila R. Sweeney 

William R. and Beverly J. Nesary 

Peter K. and Sandra L. MacMillan 

Richard M. and Katherine A. McNamara 

William J. and Margaret L. Graham 

David F. and Kirsten Simonsen 

Robert J. and Kathleen M. Gallo 

Harit M. and Yasmin H. Daji 

William P. and Irene H. Lenard 

William L. and Joyce E. Ross 

John M. and Mary L. Sawyer 

John J. and Barbara L. Wilson 



Francis J. and Barbara A. Boutin 

Keith R. and Elsie C. Schneider 

Frederick T. , Jr. and Judith L. Jones 

Paul J. and Patricia M. Ryan 

Arnold W. and Margaret M. Gehl 

Dennis E. and Linda R. Cremonini 

Malcolm C. and Judith A. Cornwall 

Robert P. and Sharon L. Edgerly 

Charles A. and Mary Louise A. Kearny 

Robert W. and Judith R. Harbison 

Thomas A. and Diane C. DelGenio 

Gary F. and Donna L. Burns 

Edward H. , Jr. and Dorothy C. Foster 

Wilson K. and Lucille J. Bail 

Steven J. and Kathleen A. Ferron 

John J. and Carolyn Hall 

Malcolm W. , Sr. and Doris C. Tondreault 

Frank W. , III and Jane S. Chevers 

Kenneth A. and Linda Lee Fales 

John A. W. , III and Virginia I. Daisley 

Keven E. and Cynthia M. George 

Wayne H. and Bonnie E. Wendt 

Robert G. and Patricia J. Phillips 
William R. and Susan Dutoit 
Raymond J. and Mary J. Miles 
William N. and Catherine M. Mulligan 
John A. and Carolyn R. Webster 
William B. and Sandra M. Loftus 
Bennett L. and Michele Barinholtz 
Donald M. and Diane M. Goodwin 
Bruce A. and Patricia L. Browne 
Terence L. and Susan Smith 
Joseph P. and Patricia A. Ryan 
Albert E. and Ann M. O'Keefe 
Emil A. and Ruth L. Windheim 
Michael A. and Joyce L. Solito 
Robert W. and Ruth E. Weale 
Charles and Carole S. Weinberg 
William K. and Marilyn J. Downey 
Roger A. and Constance E. Jones 
Paul E. and Dorothea Kostopoulos 
Stanley and Barbara E. Levine 
Calvin R. and Dorothy E. Long 






24 



Date 



Place 



Name of Child 



Name of Parents 



Oct. 


16 


Boston 


Oct. 


16 


Concord 


Oct. 


16 


Concord 


Oct. 


17 


Concord 


Oct. 


18 


Concord 


Oct. 


20 


Winchester 


Oct. 


23 


Concord 


Oct. 


26 


Concord 


Oct. 


27 


Concord 


Oct. 


30 


Concord 


Oct. 


31 


Concord 


Nov. 


1 


Concord 


Nov. 


2 


Concord 


Nov. 


3 


Newton 


Nov. 


5 


Concord 


Nov. 


5 


Con cord 


Nov. 


5 


Concord 


Nov. 


6 


Arlington 


Nov. 


8 


Concord 


Nov. 


9 


Concord 


Nov. 


9 


Chelsea 


Nov. 


10 


Concord 


Nov. 


11 


Boston 


Nov. 


12 


Concord 


Nov. 


13 


Cambridge 


Nov. 


17 


Framingham 


Nov. 


17 


Shirley 


Nov. 


17 


Concord 


Nov. 


19 


Concord 


Nov. 


19 


Concord 


Nov. 


22 


Cambridge 


Nov. 


22 


Concord 


Nov. 


23 


Concord 


Nov. 


24 


Concord 


Nov. 


26 


Concord 


Nov. 


27 


Waltham 


Nov. 


30 


Concord 


Dec. 


1 


Shirley 


Dec. 


2 


Concord 


Dec. 


4 


Concord 


Dec. 


7 


Concord 


Dec. 


8 


Concord 


Dec. 


9 


Concord 


Dec. 


11 


Concord 


Dec. 


14 


Concord 


Dec. 


15 


Concord 


Dec. 


16 


Cambridge 


Dec. 


16 


Concord 


Dec. 


18 


Concord 


Dec. 


19 


Medford 


Dec. 


21 


Concord 


Dec. 


24 


Concord 


Dec. 


25 


Concord 


Dec. 


26 


Waltham 


Dec. 


28 


Concord 


Dec. 


29 


Concord 


Dec. 


29 


Concord 


Dec. 


29 


Concord 


Dec. 


31 


Concord 



Chassman, Joshua Daniel 
Stahl, Laura Elizabeth 
Tabaczynski, David Alan 
Arcieri, Tammy Ann 
Dean, JoAnn Margaret 
Nolan, Eleanor Jane 
Moniz, Joseph Alfred, Jr. 
Cronin, Joseph Patrick 
Hill, Michael David 
Pittorino, John Joseph 
Koenig, Suzanne Mary 

Kish, Steven Scott 
Bullwinkel, Aaron James 
Barilone, Robert Lawrence, 
Weiner, Christine 
Blackburn, Alfred Temple, 
Dormer, David John 
Roecker, William Gillette 
Capone, Kevin James 
Quinn, Jennifer Danielle 
Hill, Jason Bryan 
Hewett, Ashley Kennedy 
Beardsley, Elizabeth Scott 
Nabbefeld, Susan Lynne 
Downey, Robert James, Jr. 
Howell, Sarah Jean 
Chadwick, Jeffrey Thomas 
• Kazokas, James William 
Clark, Pamela Lathrop 
Sharpe, Craig Gifford 
Mann, John Christopher 
Belka, Kristen Anne 
McKinstry, Kevin Wayne 
Duffy, Sharon Marie 
DiPrizito, Elizabeth Amy 
Geraci, Lorraine Marie 
Madore, Tara 

Swain, James Eric 
Freeman, James Ross 
Fragos, George, III 
Stevens, Mark Davidson 
Sundberg, Robert Arnold, III 
Flannery, Sean Patrick 
Landon, Stephanie Lynn 
Foster, Favid Frederick 
Rude, Jessica Courtney 
Aaronson, Jocelyn Ruth 
Decker, David James 
MacGregor, Carol Janet 
Falcione, Andrea Marie 
Barry, Erin Patricia 
Gates, Sharon Louise 
Thatcher, William John 
Lane, Christine Russ 
Taylor, Tracy Lee 
Boyce, Lauren Keene 
McDonald, Brian Patrick 
Cox, Eric Eugene 
Pekkala, Cristy Lee 



Gary M. and Sally A. Shless 

Frederick R. , Jr. and Elizabeth K. Sather 

John A. and Glenda M. Obermeir 

Anthony J. and Susan L. Styles 

Joseph W. and Barbara Hallenbeck 

Bernard V. and Diane E. Flynn 

Joseph A. and Donna L. Hickey 

Peter J. and Helen E. Scollins 

Edward M. and Diane Burkhalter 

Felix and Sandra L. Sablone 

Philip G. and Martha L. Harrison 

Steven R. and Sue A. Wetzel 
Henry J. and Mary C. Dietz 
Jr. Robert L. and Liana B. Pratt 
David and Judith A. Braunfeld 
III Alfred T. , Jr. and Carol A. Sherer 

Thomas, Jr. and Jean A. Parshall 
Robert J. and Catherine M. Gillette 
Peter R. and Donna M. Wilson 
James L. and Johanna T. DeRosby 
Michael G. and Dianne M. Lovett 
Ronald W. and Beverly P. Luther 
James W. and Marcia C. Scott 
Norman C. and Yvonne K. Moreau 
Robert J. and Evelyn T. Clancy 
Richard G. and Gertrude E. Maney 
David W. and Sharon A. Mitchell 
James A. and Pamela W. Sisson 
Laurence E. , Jr. and Judith R. Carpenter 
Wayne G. , Jr. and Shirley J. Barratt 
John E. and Elizabeth A. Showers 
David W. and Marjorie A. Emerson 
Ronald P. and Karen E. Bentsen 
James F. and Gail A. Ford 
Michael and Linda E. Pfisterer 
Philip A. and Nancy L. Berry 
James R. and Pamela M. Green 

James W. and Patricia L. Heffernan 
Theodore L. and Susan Boynton 
George, Jr. and Rita A. Panetta 
Mark T. and Patricia A. Kinney 
Robert A. , Jr. and Karen A. Gravin 
William G. and Marie H. Lambert 
Luther M. and Tekla M. Bulli 
Craig A. and Linda L. Easton 
William P. and Rebecca J. Elliott 
Charles D. and Angela J. Holder 
Wayne A. and Deborah F. Prentiss 
Scott H. and Janet L. Pedersen 
Julio J. and Patricia A. Kent 
Michael J. and Patricia A. Cataldo 
John C. and Marion E. Duggan 
Robert and Beverly J. Jones 
Philip, Jr. and Janet M. Donnelly 
James D. and Sandra Willett 
Manley B. , II and Karen Keene 
William P. and Nancy A. O'Connell 
Richard E. and Barbara A. Kelley 
Peter J. and Lois L. Stapel 



25 



SCHOOL REPORT 






ACTON SCHOOL DEPARTMENT AND ACTON-BOXBOROUGH REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



ORGANIZATION 



Acton School Committee 

Term Expires 

Edith D. Stowell, Chairman 1973 

Beverly W. Lydiard, Secretary 1972 

Parker Harrison, Jr 1971 

Harry B. Morse 1971 

John A. Norris 1972 

Donald E. Westcott 1973 



Acton-Boxborough Regional District School Committee 

Term Expires 

Donald E. Westcott, Chairman 1973 

James L. Donovan, Vice Chairman .... 1973 

Edward L. Converse 1972 

Parker Harrison, Jr 1971 

Beverly W. Lydiard 1972 

Harry B. Morse 1971 

John A. Norris 1972 

Edith D. Stowell 1973 

Robert D. Taylor 1971 



The Acton School Committee holds regular meetings on the third Monday of each month and the Regional 
School Committee meets regularly on the second and fourth Mondays. Both groups convene at the Acton- 
Boxborough Regional High School Library at 7:30 p. m. 

Telephone 

Acting Superintendent of Schools, Alan M. White 263-5737 

263-3558 

Administrative Assistant, Priscilla Felt 263-5737 

Principals: McCarthy School, Alice F. Hayes 263-4982 

Towne School, James Palavras 263-2042 

Merriam School, William V. Sparks 263-2581 

Douglas School, Robert C. Conroy 263-2753 

Gates School, Barbara Parker . 263-9162 

Acton-Boxborough Junior High School, Arthur J. Hayes 263-7716 

Henry J. Wall, Vice-Principal 263-7716 

Acton-Boxborough Senior High School, Raymond J. Grey — 263-7738 

Donald A. MacLeod 263-7738 

Director of Guidance, Ruth R. Proctor 263-2492 

Head Counselor, William J. Petkewich 263-7718 

Director of Music, Henry W. Wegiel 263-7738 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 1971-1972 



Reopening of All Schools 
Winter Recess 
Good Friday 
Spring Recess 
Memorial Day 
Graduation 
Close of School 
Summer Recess 
Teachers' Meetings 
Reopening of All Schools 
Columbus Day 



January 4, 1971 
February 15-19 
April 9 
April 19-23 
May 31 
June 4 
June 24 

September 7, 1971 
September 8 
October 11 



Teachers' Convention 
Veteran's Day 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Christmas Holiday 
Reopening of All Schools 
Winter Vacation 
Good Friday 
Spring Vacation 
Memorial Day 
Graduation 
Close of Schools 



October 20 

October 25 

Noon- Nov. 24, 25, 26 

Noon- Dec. 22-Jan. 1 

January 3, 1972 

February 21-25 

March 31 

April 17-21 

May 29 

June 9 

June 22 



NO SCHOOL SIGNAL 



1-1-1-1 
2-2-2-2 



7:15 A.M. 
7:00 A.M. 



No School Acton Public Schools, Grades 1-6 
No School All Schools All Day , 



26 



REPORT OF THE ACTING SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the SchooL Committees and Citizens of Acton: 

Many of you chose Acton because of the schools. The town can take great pride in its educational effort. 
Educating the children is the greatest responsility you face as a town, and as you well know the major part of 
your local tax dollar goes to support this task. 

What are the problems we face if we are to maintain and improve our schools? The basic problem is to 
gain your confidence that the expenditures are necessary and desirable. The taxes you pay call for a financial 
sacrifice, and for some of you that sacrifice is considerable. But people can and do make sacrifices for those 
things which they consider essential. One step in gaining your confidence is to be as honest and forthright as 
we can concerning problems which face us. In highlighting our problems we are in some cases focusing upon 
our weaknesses. But I am confident that by and large we have spent your money wisely, and have given you 
value for each dollar expended. You must answer for yourselves the question, "Are these sacrifices worth- 
while?" 

You are well aware that educational costs are escalating at a rapid rate. The major reasons are a rap- 
idly growing population, inflation, increased staff and space to meet the needs of children with special problems, 
and greater financial expectations on the part of all school personnel. 

Your concerns are intensified because we do not have adequate long range planning, and our problems, 
goals and procedures lack sufficient visibility. We need to develop and maintain ten year projections for popu- 
lation growth, school construction and cost projections. We need to more clearly define our problems, how we 
pose to solve them and how you will be able to assess our progress. 

Nationally, education is under criticism at all levels, but most intensely at our colleges. Since one of 
our major goals has been to prepare a large percent of our students for college, it is understandable that you 
question your support of a public school system whose major goal is college placement. 

I am confident that our colleges will put their house in order, but we need to develop more attractive 
alternatives to college placement for our students. vVe have been wrong in insisting that the best way of life, 
the most respected way of life, can only be achieved through a college education. This insistence has re- 
sulted in many students who leave our schools feeling that they are failures or just as tragically, students 
who go through college only to find that this achievement has not led them to a happy productive life. We need 
to intensify our efforts to make our schools more comprehensive, more diversified. We need to offer our stu- 
dents attractive, meaningful alternatives. We have made some significant steps in this direction: a work-study 
program, a regional effort in vocational -technical education and the program planned for the new high school. 

We need to resolve a dilemma if we are to gain your confidence. We are not changing fast enough for 
some of you, and we are changing too fast for others. Some people are eminently satisfied with the schools 
as they are, while others are dissatisfied. There is only one solution to this problem, and that is to respect 
differences and to allow them to coexist. It is illogical to talk of a best system of education because one's 
idea of best comes from one's system of values. A compromise in this case can only result in dissatisfaction 
of almost all parties. The dissatisfaction will not be as intense as it would be if the school system developed 
an extreme position, but it is uncomfortable, nevertheless. Since we are a nation built from a diverse popula- 
tion, our schools can and should reflect this diversity. An exploratory elementary school is being proposed 
as a school with a different emphasis for those parents who wish to send their children there. There is no in- 
tent, nor should there be, to change all schools to this model. 

There are two other issues, teacher and student activism, which are disquieting and may be shaking 
your confidence in the schools. Too much attention has been brought to bear on the disruptive, sometimes de- 
structive and often the seemingly unreasonable demands made by these two groups. It is upsetting to have the 
order of things challenged, but there is an exciting, positive side to this activism which in the long run will 
make for better education. After all, education is for the students, and the teacher is the essential factor in 
their education. Learning is an aggressive act, and students have for too long been passive. Students are 
beginning to question their teachers, and teachers are questioning the School Committee just as you are ques- 
tioning the schools. The questioning will result in a confrontation between taxpayers, parents, students and 
teachers, which will result in a vigorous debate on educational issues. Ultimately this process will produce 
a more viable school system. Education is too important to applaud complacency. I can envision some very 
troubled and tense times ahead of us, but we will be the stronger for it. 



Alan M. White 



27 



REPORT OF THE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

The Acton -Boxborough Regional High School was admitted to the New England Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools in 1955. This association is the sole accrediting agency for secondary schools in 
New England and all schools must be evaluated once every ten years. In 1959 the Regional High School was 
evaluated by a team of 20 educators and as a result was voted full accreditation for a ten year period. 

Our second evaluation took place on November 1, 2, 3, and 4. During these four days, twenty-three 
educators from Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and New York examined all departments. In 
December, the Commission on Public Secondary Schools of the New England Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools voted to grant continued membership for a period of five years. If all requirements had 
been met in a satisfactory manner, a ten year accreditation would have been granted. 

It was our intention to present the complete report in the annual town report but this is not possible due 
to a lack of space. Therefore, I shall present the highlights of the evaluation. Any citizen interested in the 
full report, please contact me at the Regional High School and a copy will be made available. 

Summary of Evaluation 
Curriculum 

Commendations : 

1. The Administration and Faculty for recognizing and taking steps to correct the curriculum weaknesses, 

2. The school for grouping practices and for its honors program. 

Recommendations : 

1. The expansion of curriculum offerings in the following areas: 

a. Industrial Arts 

b. Business Education 

c. Home Economics 

d. Art 

e. Music 

2. That Health Education be incorporated in the curriculum. 

Student Activities 
Commendations : 

1. For scheduling three activity periods per week during the school day. 

2. For operating a successful extracurricular drama program. 

Recommendations : 

1. That whenever study halls are scheduled simultaneously in the cafeteria and the auditorium, 
the cafeteria be used as a quiet study and the auditorium as a common area. 

2. That the study body be given greater representation on the Student Council. 

Educational Media 
Commendations : 

1. For the enthusiasm and ingenuity of the library staff in utilizing existing facilities. 

2. For the excellent use of microfilm projectors and a listening center for independent study 
and research. 

Recommendations : 

1. The addition of a professional librarian to the existing staff. 

2. That additional storage space be made available. 

Guidance Services 
Commendations : 

1. For the professional training of the guidance staff. 

2. For having full-time counselors with no extra duties that conflict with the counselor's role. 



28 



Recommendations : 

1. That the facilities be greatly expanded to include the following: 

a. large conference room. 

b. individual testing rooms 

c. larger guidance library 

d. more offices for future expansion 

e. reception and waiting room area 

f. adequate storage area 

g. adequate space for secretaries 

2. That staff be added, as needed, to maintain a 1 to 250 ratio. 

School Facilities 

The Visiting Committee was impressed with the exceedingly high maximum utilization of the total 
space availability in the High School plant. Acton-Boxborough Regional High School was constructed in 
1957 as a result of the regionalization of the two communities. Both Acton and Boxborough are near 
Interstate 495 and are growing rapidly as suburban bedroom communities to Boston. The building, 
initially designed for 600 students of grades 7-12 was expanded to a capacity of 1, 000 in 1962. Presently, 
the enrollment in the building is 1, 306 students in grades 9-12, and this is expected to increase to 
approximately 1, 500 in 1971. Most careful planning was required in order to avoid double sessions or the 
adoption of some alternate plan of school organization for the 1970-1971 year. The site of the Acton- 
Boxborough Regional High School, the exterior decor and the surrounding school grounds area are 
conducive to the desirable school atmosphere which prevails at this school. A shortcoming in evidence 
in the long range planning of the school district is the failure to have acquired a larger central school 
site on which to build their secondary plant. However, it is understood that plans are now being developed 
to add a large new complex to the present Junior High School and convert that building into a new Senior 
High School. This would include the proposed acquisition of 17 acres of adjacent land for site development. 

Commendations : 



1. The school management on the ability to maximize the use of all available space in what is 

obviously an overcrowded situation. 

2. The school committee and administration for the ability to recognize their needs for facilities 
and to plan ahead for a new high school. 

Recommendations : 

1. That construction of new facilities be planned and accomplished at the earliest possible date. 

2. That immediate planning be undertaken of a method of meeting the impact of further increases 

in enrollment until new facilities are provided. It is suggested that an interim operational 
plan for next year, such as the quarter plan or trimester plan of year-round operation of the 
high school, double sessions, or an open campus plan of organization with a longer school day, 
be investigated. 

School Staff and Administration 

Commendations : 

1. The Research and Development program established by the School Committee which provides 

an excellent opportunity for staff members to work during the summer months on the improvement 
of the educational program. 

2. The competitive salary schedule arranged by the School Committee which has attracted a most 

competent, conscientious and cooperative staff of classroom teachers. 

3. The observed good order and cooperative attitude throughout the school. 
Recommendations : 

1. That a program of one or more trained aids be established; through this medium, clerical 
assistance for staff members and department chairmen could be made available. Also, in 
some instances, laboratory assistance might be utilized. 

2. That micro-filming of student records be planned to reduce problems of storage. 



29 



Art 
Commendations : 

1. For having an outstanding Art Facility. 

2. For instituting new and innovated Art Education concepts. 

Recommendations : 

1. That a coordinated Art Program be established in Grades 7-12, headed by a Director. 

2. That adequate storage and display areas be designed and constructed within the present 

school structure. 

Business Education 
Commendations : 

1. The self-evaluation made by the department. It was comprehensive, and indicated a 

cooperative, coordinated effort on the part of the three teachers who worked on it. 

2. The favorable teach-pupil ratio. (The largest class has twenty-five students. ) 
Recommendations : 

1. That a department chairman be appointed to coordinate the program, revise the 

curriculum, and supervise the teachers. 

2. That expansion of facilities be made to meet the present and anticipated enrollment needs. 

English 
Commendations : 

1. The effort of the classroom teacher to enhance active student participation. 

2. The low teacher/ student ratio in non-college classes so that teachers may better meet their 

students' needs and supervise their progress. 

3. The spirit of adaptability toward curriculum change on the part of the English teachers. 
Recommendations : 

1. That the chairman be responsible in terms of curriculum offerings and development at the 

Junior High School level so as to insure the highest possible degree of articulation. 

2. That a greater variety of audio-visual equipment and supplies be available to the teachers 

within the department. The need is urgent. 

Foreign Languages 
Commendations : 

1. The extensive sequences of study available in each foreign language offered and the variety 

of foreign languages taught. 

2. For the grouping of the classes in four ways (AA, A, B, NO to provide for individual differences. 
Recommendations : 

1. That the language classrooms be clustered in the same area. 

2. That more classroom space be made available. 

Home Economics 
Commendations : 

1. For the teacher's ingenuity and ability to work with inadequate space, a heavy teaching load, 

and schedule limitations for courses desired. 

2. For encouraging students to come from a study hall period to take part in the program on an 

irregular basis. 



30 



Recommendations : 

1. That one more room be available for the expansion of the program to provide for more 

course offerings. 

2. That one more teacher be added to the staff to relieve the present teacher load. 

Industrial Arts 
Commendations : 

1. For having a variety of activities to stimulate interest in the field of Industrial Education. 

2. For providing modern equipment in the Woodworking and Drafting areas. 

Recommendations : 

1. That facilities be expanded to accommodate more students in the program. 

2. That the curriculum be expanded to offer new areas of study in the Industrial Arts field. 

Mathematics 
Commendations : 

1. For the enthusiasm and high level of competence of the teaching staff composed of ten 

well -qualified teachers. 

2. For the careful preparation of material as evidenced by the use of overhead projectors 

with previously prepared transparencies. 

3. For their efforts to give students of varying abilities a good foundation in mathematics 

reaching 87% of the school population. 

Recommendations : 

1. That electives be offered to seniors as alternates to Math IV or Math V, such as 

statistics, matrix algebra, etc. 

2. That the experimental two-year program of Algebra I be continued and expanded. 

Music 
Commendations : 

1. For well -organized and well -planned music classes under crowded and undesirable 

conditions. 

2. For the good attitude and enthusiasm for music indicated by the students involved. 

3. For the excellence of the general education and preparation of the music staff. 

Recommendations : 

1. That future building expansion include provision for separate rooms for choral and for 

instrumental music, theory classes, and office space for staff members. 

2. That an effort be made to integrate music with the other arts and related subjects. 

Physical Education 
Commendations : 

1. The dedicated staff, working under conditions less than ideal. 

2. The highly qualified physical education staff. 

3. The excellent interscholastic program. 

Recommendations : 

1. That a full time position of Director of Athletics, Physical Education and Intramurals 

be established. 

2. That additional teaching stations be established. 

3. That teaching staff be increased. 



31 



Science 



Commendations: 



1. For the evidence of good rapport between student and teacher during the evaluation. 

2. For maintaining operational sized classes conducive to investigative laboratory instruction. 

3. For the cooperative efforts among the staff. 

Recommendations : 

1. That the science faculty cooperatively devise a plan for improved utilization of present 

storage and work areas. 

2. That adjacent ecological environment become a direct extension of the classroom. 

Social Studies 
Commendations : 

1. For the sound three -year core program in World and United States history required of 

all students. 

2. For providing a variety of elective courses for junior and seniors. 

3. For the team teaching approach currently being used in the International Relations course. 

Recommendations : 

1. That the present building be expanded to provide additional classroom facilities for the 

Social Studies department. 

2. That additional elective half year courses be offered including courses in: Latin America, 

Asia, Soviet Union, Africa, and the Middle East. 

As I have stated many times in the past, the success of a secondary school in dependent upon the 
hard work and cooperation of all concerned. I feel most fortunate in being associated with an excellent 
staff, Vice Principal, secretaries, custodians, cafeteria, school committee, and above all with a superior 
student body. My deepest appreciation to one and all for their patience, understanding, and sincere 
cooperation. 

Raymond J. Grey 



AGE AND GRADE DISTRIBUTION TABLE (OCTOBER 1, 1970) 



Age 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 18 19 


Total 


Grade 1 


33 


312 


35 






















380 


2 




41 


357 


33 




















431 


3 






37 


302 


39 


2 
















380 


4 








33 


297 


43 


1 














374 


5 










48 


328 


55 


2 












433 


6 












53 


298 


41 


3 










395 


Ungraded 






2 


3 


2 


4 


1 


3 


3 


4 






Elementary 


22 
2415 


Grade 7 














4 


300 


130 


19 


2 






455 


8 
















11 


252 


125 


13 


1 




402 


9 
















3 


45 


272 


41 


7 


1 


369 


10 




















41 


238 


52 


9 3 


343 


11 






















34 


223 


48 8 3 


316 


12 






















4 


48 


182 33 5 


272 
























Re 


gional School District 


2157 




33 


353 


431 


371 


386 


430 


359 


360 


433 


461 


332 


331 


240 44 8 


4572 



32 



GRADUATION EXERCISES - JUNE 5, 1970 

Salutatorian: Gary Lee Imhoff, New England Conservatory Acton Jaycees Scholarship: 

Valedictorian: Diane Fordon, Middlebury College Dona Flood, Dean Junior College 

Acton-Boxborough Regional High School Alumni Scholar- Acton-Boxborough Regional High School Business 
ships: Club Scholarship: 

Linda Wolfendon, Bentley College 
Square Wheelers Square Dance Club Scholarship: 

Diane Fordon, Middlebury College 
Digital Equipment Corporation Scholarship 

Mary Bunting, University of Massachusetts 
Kiwanis Club Scholarship: 

Marylin Patrick, Chandler School for Women 

Edwards -Quimby Post No. 284 American Legion 
Medals: 

Dona Flood, Dean Junior College 
Claus Patterson, Merrimack College 

Harvard Club in Concord Book Prize: 

Robert Leary 

Acton VFW Auxiliary Post 7016 Award: 

Jill Bubier, Smith College 

Gary Imhoff, New England Conservatory 

Bausch and Lomb Medal: 

Deirdre Gavin, Carnegie -Mellon University 

Acton-Boxborough Regional High School Awards 
to the Top Ranking Students of the Class of 
1970: 

Diane Fordon, Middlebury College 
Gary Imhoff, New England Conservatory 
Mary Bunting, University of Massachusetts 
Jill Bubier, Smith College 
Sarah Maleady, Boston College 

Daughters of the American Revolution Award: 
Suzanne LeVan, Lawrence University 

Dr. Samuel Prescott Prize: 
Mark Raffa, Bates College 

Outstanding Senior of the Class of 1970; 
Claus Patterson, Merrimack College 



Timothy Doyle, Providence College 
Deirdre Gavin, Carnegie -Mellon University 
Bernard Polselli, Bentley College 

Blanchard Memorial Scholarships: 

Barbara Lounsbury, Beloit College 
Rhonda Morse, Cape Cod Community College 
Christine Strong, Newton- Wellesley Hospital School 

of Nursing 
Denise Taylor, University of New Hampshire 

Acton Center Woman's Club Scholarship: 
Deborah Shuttle, Newton Junior College 

Rachel Haynes Scholarship, West Acton Woman's Club: 
Jaclyn Dolan, Simmons College 

Acton Rotary Club Scholarships: 

Jennifer Beissinger, Chandler School for Women 
Arlene Borowski, Boston College 
David Durkin, Vermont Technical College 
Beverly Gunter, Institute of Interior Design 
Patricia Neville, Westfield State College 
Claus Patterson, Merrimack College 

Acton Firefighters' Association Scholarships: 

Paula Grosse, Macalester College 
Bruce Kneeland, Plymouth State College 

Acton Lions Club Scholarship: 

Walter Barron, Boston University 

Mary Beth St. Martin, Dean Junior College 

Acton Teachers' Association Scholarships: 

Mary Fairbrother, Framingham State College 
Kathleen Hughes, Wheelock College 

John E. Donelan Scholarship: 

Ben Kishimoto, University of Michigan 

Acton-Boxborough Regional High School Music 
Scholarship: 

Gary Imhoff, New England Conservatory 



Gary Stacy Allard 
Paul Joseph Andrade 
Donald Andrew Arbuckle 
Susan Jean Ashline 
Allen Bachrach 
Mark Currier Bagley 
Walter Albert Barron 



CLASS OF 1970 

Paul Beaudoin 
Laura Jill Beaudry 
David Paul Beddoe 
Jennifer Lee Beissinger 
Alice Josephine Bellamy 
David Michael Belliveau 
Helene Nina Bernard 



Peter Bezanson 
Peter Clifford Boothby 
Arlene Carmen Borowski 
Paul Daniel Bowles 
Ellen Louise Brock 
Jonathan Paul Broughton 
Barbara Lois Brown 



33 



Gary Richard Brzezinski 
Jill Louise Bubier 
David Thayer Bunker 
Mary Ann Bunting 
Sue Ellen Burgess • 
Donna Lynne Burns 
Stephen James Burton 
Cynthia J. Caldwell 
Cheryl Marie Campbell 
Denise Cobleigh 
Kerry Edward Codyer 
Wendy Lynne Colls 
James M. Comey 
Brian L. Coonradt 
Carolyn Elisabeth Craig 
Joseph B. Culkins 
Paul Richard Davis 
Patricia Day 
Thomas Day 
John Steven Desjardins 
Marjorie Louise Dingee 
Jaclyn Anne Dolan 
Michael Charles Donnelly 
Brian Charles Dorris 
Timothy F. Doyle 
David William Durkin 
Dennis Keith Edgin 
Carol Jo-an Erickson 
Peter Morton Erickson 
Marian Eykelenkamp 
Mary Elizabeth Fairbrother 
Deborah Farrell 
Robert Joseph Feeney 
Joan Marie Flannery 
Dona Colvin Flood 
Kristine Susan Foland 
Charlotte Elizabeth Foley 
Diane Fordon 
Nedra King Foster 
Mark David Fredenburgh 
Hans-Ulrich Froehlich 
Deirdre Gavin 
George Patrick Geelen 
John Eugene Gerngross, Jr. 
Bernadette Marie Ann Gibson 
Linda Katherine Glimn 
Mark Carter Goff 
Geraldine Gopoian 
Scott Darwin Gregory 
Kathleen Ann Grenier 
Paula Elizabeth Grosse 
Deborah Lee Guenard 
Beverly June Gunter 
James R. Hamilton 
Joanne Marie Hardin 
Donna Lee Hickey 
Steven Anthony Hill — 
Deborah June Hines 
David M. Hirsch 
Gladys Linda Hodgkins 
Richard A. Hodgson 
Bruce Allan Howe 
Deborah Ruth Howe 
Kathleen Margaret Hughes 
Gary Lee Imhoff 
Elaine C. Ireland 
Pamela Johnston 
Lonnie Jones 



Marjorie L. Jones 
Michael C. Jones 
Thomas W. Jones, Jr. 
Daniel P. Jopling 
Lark Lucretia Jurev 
Nancy Kashuba 
Paul James Kellogg 
James Michael Kelly 
Robert Martin Kelly III 
Christa Ketelaar 
Kevin John Kiely 
Pr is cilia King 
Ben Kishimoto 
Lynn Page Klappich 
Bruce Duncan Kneeland 
Jane Marie Kotlensky 
Patricia Sue Krieger 
Claudia Landell 
James Paul Landry 
David Ernest Lanoue 
David James Law, Jr. 
Barbara Kathryn Lee 
Michael D. Lehrman 
Suzanne Adell LeVan 
Joseph Davis Lidiak 
James Fisher Liebfried 
Peter W. Liebfried 
Pamela Farley Loring - — 
Barbara Lynne Lounsbury 
Jon C. Luchford 
Sarah E. Maleady 
Michael H. McCullough 
Ann Patricia McGinty 
John C. McGoldrick 
Kathleen R. McGoldrick 
Betsy McGregor 
William L. McNutt 
Dwight McShane 
Wynn McTammany 
Neil Meader 
Anne Weston Meigs - 
Robert B. Menapace III 
David T. Mercier 
John Alan Mesrobian 
Elizabeth C. Mitchell 
Donald Craig Moody 
Carol Louise Morrison 
Rhonda Sharon Morse 
Russell Norman Moser, Jr. 
Marsha Moulton 
Paula Jean Murphy 
Alane Elizabeth Murray 
Joseph Nagle, Jr. 
Thomas E. Nash 
Laurie Jane Nelson 
Patricia Marie Neville 
Elaine Norma Newsham 
Elizabeth Nichols 
Jonathan R. Nichols 
Janet Kathleen North 
Lisa Louise Nowlin 
Karen Elizabeth Nyquist 
Barry William Palmer 
Nanette Jean Panetta 
Rebecca Ellis Parsons 
Resad H. Pasic 
Marilyn Ann Patrick 



Claus Andreas Patterson 
William Joseph Pennington 
Barbara Lynn Perkins 
Ronald Alan Pillsbury *• 
Alvin Richmond Piper, Jr. 
Rodney Michael Pogue 
Bernard Frances Polselli, III 
Lawrence Peter Powers 
David W. Prowten 
Janice Purcell 
William S. Putnam " 
Wayne R. Pyrro 
Paul D. Quinlan 
Mark S. Raff a 
Corrine Ann Rahaim 
Alfred Paul Ramos, Jr. 
Steven C. Rawson 
Wendy G. Reed 
Ann Louise Reichle 
James Wayne Richardson 
Donald Michael Ritz 
David A. Roach 
Jane Lurten Robinson 
Kenneth B. Rollins 
Stephen E. Ross, Jr. 
Wendy Jean Rothemund 
Anne Marie Royle 
Ellen Rudenauer 
Andrea Russo 
Lewis R. C. Schell 
Geary A. Schwartz 
Andrew Scott 
Robin Sears 
Deborah Jayne Shuttle 
James C. Sideris 
Joyce M. Sletten 
Kenneth B. Smith 
Diane Lynne Sparrow «p 
Linda M. Stacey 
Christine E. Steinbach 
Brett Stevens 
Dana Lance Stevens 
Jeanne Elizabeth Stevens 
Mary Beth St. Martin 
Christine A. Strong 
Michael Joseph Studer 
Richard P. Sullivan 
Craig Alan Taylor 
Denise A. Taylor 
Steven Tolf 
Susan Marie Tolley 
Dale Louise Vanderhoof 
Jan Albert Vanderhoof 
Harold J. Vath 
Robert D. Vieira 
Edward Hughes Vigliotti 
Raymond Martin Vorce III 
Paul Vincent Walunas 
Deborah Ann Welch 
John Lawrence Wells 
Kathy Marie Whitehead 
Linda Jane Wolfenden 
Andrea Susan Woodward 
David Hood Woodward 
Linda Dorothy Woolard 
Terry Jane Wilton 
Richard J. Zimmer 



CLASS OFFICERS 



President 
Mark Goff 



Vice-President 
Dona Flood 



Secretary 
Wendy Colls 



Treasurer 
Claus Patterson 



34 



NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY MEMBERS 



Paul J. Andrade 
Walter Barron 
Arlene Borowski 
Barbara Brown 
Christine Brundage 
Jill Bubier 
Mary A. Bunting 
Timothy Doyle 
Mary Fairbrother 
Diane Fordon 
Deirdre Gavin 
John Gerngross 
Linda Glimn 
Paula Grosse 



Linda Allen 
Rebecca Beyer 
Pamela Bradley 
Suzanne Clewley 
Elaine Cullinane 
Lucy Dale 
Jon Edwards 
Doyle Foster 
Cynthia Furlong 



Grade XII 

Beverly Gunter 
Gary Imhoff 
Kathleen Hughes 
Lark Jurev 
Ben Kishimoto 
Lynn P. Klappich 
Barbara Lee 
Suzanne Levan 
Lynne Lounsbury 
Jon Luchford 
Sarah 'E. Maleady 
Kathleen McGoldrick 
Neil Meader 
Laurie Nelson 

Grade XI 

Martha Gates 
Sharon Grancy 
Parker Harrison 
Robert Headley 
Timothy Henderson 
Scarlett Hepworth 
Robert Jones 
Judy Kashuba 
Harry Ku 



Patricia Neville 
Elaine Newsham 
Karen Nyquist 
Ronald Pillsbury , 
Bernard P. Polselli 
Mark S. Raffa 
Donald Ritz 
Anne Royle 
Mary Beth St. Martin 
Joyce M. Sletten 
Denise Taylor 
Steven Tolf 
Terry Wilton 
Linda Woolard 



Robert Leary 
Mark Lindsay 
Janet Moore 
Leslie Morrison 
Susan Osborn 
Kim Pivin 
Deborah Portyrata 
Christopher Sorrentino 
Sandra Williamson 



School. 



REPORT OF THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL--1971-72 
I am pleased to present my seventh annual report as Principal of the Acton-Boxborough Junior High 



GRADE 



September 

453 

400 



October 

455 
402 



November 

455 

404 



December 

456 

400 



January 

455 
400 



The Acton-Boxborough Junior High School has operated this year fairly close to capacity. The school 
was designed to hold comfortably 905 students. The building could hold, by overcrowding homerooms and 
classrooms, a gruesome 1050 students. Happily, this last situation is not contemplated. 

In the fall of 1971, this school will open with a projected 896 pupils, but very probably the enrollment 
will be slightly in excess of 900. The addition of scheduling services by Westinghouse Learning Corporation 
and the addition of more teachers will very slightly alleviate crowded rooms, but at this writing (December, 
1970) all available space has been taken by school programs and by specialists on the staff of the Department 
of Pupil Personnel Services, formerly known as the Guidance Department. 

All students in the Junior High School are scheduled in English, mathematics, science and social 
studies. Most students, unless they are in language disability therapy, remedial English sections or in re- 
medial reading, are required to take French in its more elementary forms. All students enrolled in the A-B 
JAY French Program start from scratch in Grade 7. This gives nine out of ten students an academic program 
of five (5) major subjects totaling 25 periods weekly out of a possible 35 periods. When one adds to the regu- 
lar academic periods two periods weekly of music, physical education, industrial arts, mechanical drawing 
or home economics and art to the above schedule, one can readily see that ninety percent of the students at 
A-B JAY have just two (2) so-called "study halls" left to them each week. In other words, most of the pupils 
at the Junior High School are scheduled in a clearly defined classroom activity for 33 periods weekly out of a 
possible 35. 

Since the fall of 1970, all Grade 6 students entering the Junior High School as seventh graders have 
been placed according to their ability and aptitude. These students are all recommended by their Grade 6 
teachers and carefully screened by counselors of PPS. Students are then placed in honors, above average, 
standard or remedial sections. Students whose language problems are already formidable are at once sched- 
uled out of the French Program, thus leaving them with seven periods weekly for language remediation of 
some sort. All other students carry five major academic subjects each week. 



35 



Each major course makes use of a different book for each ability grouping. The subject of mathemat- 
ics, because it arouses such keen interest locally, will be used as an illustration. Students coming into 
Grade 7, and who have been identified as having outstanding mathematical ability, are enrolled in a class 
that uses a text known as Modern School Mathematics: Pre -Algebra. If the student does well in pre -algebraic 
studies, he is enrolled when an eighth grader in the first course in algebra. The book for the Grade 8 algebra 
course is entitled, Modern School Mathematics: Algebra I . 

Above average students in mathematics enter classes in Grade 7 using the newly revised Laidlaw book, 
Junior High School Mathematics --7 . If the above average student succeeds in this course superlatively well, 
he is recommended for inclusion in Grade 8 algebra. If he merely succeeds in the course, he goes on to 
Junior High School Mathematics --8 . 

Students who have shown mediocre ability in mathematics are enrolled in standard sections which now 
use in Grade 7, Sadlier Contemporary Mathematics 7 and will use in Grade 8, Sadlier Contemporary Mathe - 
matics 8. " 

Students who have extreme difficulty in fathoming the mysteries of modern mathematics are assigned 
to sections taught by sympathetic teachers, who use the Singer Mathematics Program, Experiencing Mathe - 
matics, Mathematics: Modern Concepts and Skills (Raytheon) or Stein's venerable but eminently practical 
Refresher Mathematics. As in all of the other major courses at A-B JAY, students do not languish from year 
to year in the same grouping. Late in the spring of every year, students are re -evaluated on the basis of 
their ability and diligence and, if the case warrants, the student is moved "upstairs" to the next best course. 

Courses now available to students in the Junior High School are as follows: English, French, mathe- 
matics, science, social studies, art, music, physical education, ceramics, graphics (silk-screen printing), 
architectural drawing, reading, speech therapy, sculpture and mechanical drawing, and woodworking and 
metalworking. 

Clubs and activities that are perennially available to interested A-B JAY students are The St. Nicholas 
Club (refinishes and repairs toys and dolls for orphanages), the Ski Club, The Warrior (A-B JAY ANNUAL), 
the Photography Club, Boys' Glee Club, Boys' Chorus, Mixed Choir, Girls' Chorus, Annual Concert, Annual 
Operetta, the Airplane Club, Athletic Club (trains boys to be officials in team sports), the Ceramics Club 
(courtesy of Mrs. Virginia Noftle), the A-B JAY Orchestra, the A-B JAY Concert Bands, the Newspaper 
Club, the Library Club, and others that are offered from time to time. It can clearly be seen here that a 
moderately diligent student is in a position to enter Grade 9 very well prepared for the increased work load 
that will be demanded of him. 

A new course was added this year to the A-B JAY Science Dept. The Intermediate School Curriculum 
Study, otherwise known as ISCS, was started to enable students of all ranges of ability to participate actively 
in laboratory experimentation and to record in minute detail the progress and results of their experiments. 

Mr. Bert Hubley, who spent last year at the University of Iowa, is conducting this pilot program to 
determine whether or not this school will retain and expand the program or make other arrangements. As 
this is being written, the new course seems to be very promising and is being actively enjoyed by students 
who participate. The ISCS Program differs from other junior high school programs in that it is (a) aimed 
at general education, giving the student a sequential picture of the structure and process of science; (b) it is 
laboratory centered; (c) it is individualized to take care of the broad range of student ability; (d) it is self- 
pacing, so that the student travels through the activities at his own speed. 

The authors of the ISCS Program, Florida State University, say that their program is better than 
most because "voluminous feedback from both teachers and students involved in the program indicates over- 
whelming support for the philosophy and methods of this individualized approach to junior high school science. " 
This new program is sequential and is supposed to extend through grades 7, 8, and 9. 

In the fall of 1971, the French Department will introduce a new film series in color, Toute la Bande , 
to bolster its already superior laboratory and class work in the subject. French classes must of necessity 
be held to a maximum of 30 students because that is the number of seats in the language laboratory. The 
thirteen new films will expand and enhance the very real understanding of France now apparent from using 
Paul Pimsleur's C'est la Vie . This fine little book is a collection of magazine articles that have appeared in 
outstanding publications such as L'Express , Paris -Match and Realites. Difficult words and constructions 
have been simplified, and complex passages modified or dropped entirely, so that a beginner can read them 
with interest and, gradually, with fluency. It is felt by the author of C'est la Vie that early fluency encourages 
a bona fide student to "think in French" and to discourage the old American game of "language - hopping " In 
the fall of 1971, C'est la Vie will be made available to all students of French at A-B JAY. 

Several other new courses were added during the 1970 school opening. Mr. Furey, a teacher of mech- 
anical drawing, introduced silk-screen printing and architectural drawing into the curriculum for Grade 8 
boys. A course in crafts was offered to Grade 7 boys in lieu of art by Mr. Richard Marion and an arts course 
was developed in home economics and taught jointly by Mrs. Cutler, Mrs. Sproul and Miss McKay. This last 
course featured knitting, embroidery and the creation of decorations for the home and for the table. 



36 



In social studies the old standby, Sol Holt's World Geography and You , is being phased out in favor of 
works dealing with Canada and South America. It is felt that these areas tie in more closely with the American 
historical studies that follow in Grade 8. This past year saw the introduction of the Time -Life book on Canada, 
and this will be followed in 1971 by books on Mexico and the Andean Republics. The factual aspects of geography 
are stressed more than with the old approach by using two excellent paperbacks, Physical Geography , which 
stresses a knowledge of the physical features of the earth, and Map Skills for Today's Geography . These new 
publications, along with an excellent selection of records and filmstrips produced by National Geographic Soci- 
ety teams and some from the Encyclopedia Britannica, give a much more intelligible and relevant preparation 
for the next year than the former potpourri. 

When a change of pace is needed from Canadian and South American topics, "excursions" to Ecuador, 
Nigeria, Tibet, Botswana, East Pakistan and Korea are encouraged by way of the Oxfam Series of Case Studies 
of Developing Nations. But the emphasis will remain on studies of the problems of this hemisphere and the 
United States in relation to her neighbors north and south of the border. 

The library, however, still remains as the heart of any good school, so to complement the ever evolv- 
ing curriculum teachers are requested by the Librarian, Mrs. Detsch, to order any and all books, records, 
films or other supporting materials that are needed to enhance their courses. The A-B JAY library commands 
yearly the largest share of the school budget, and an attempt is being made to acquire library aides to make 
the books and other properties more accessible to students. It is hoped that the library will be open daily dur- 
ing the coming year until three p. m. or later to accommodate those students wishing to do more reading or 
work on research papers. In spite of the ever increasing costs of books, the A-B JAY library each year sur- 
passes the tradition of Coue. 

It is hoped from the few examples given that interested townspeople will understand the role of the junior 
high school in today's rapidly changing world. It is, first and foremost, a vitally important transition period 
during which adolescents leave the shelter of childhood and take their first steps in a highly competitive and of- 
ten harsh adult world. 

The curriculum and the library of the Acton-Boxborough Junior High School are made to evolve to meet 
these stresses. New programs that have been tested elsewhere and found to be sound are sought and used in 
this school. Untried and space -oriented programs of doubtful value, or too plainly labeled with bandwagon red, 
are avoided. We still adhere to the advice of Alexander Pope, which cautions: "Be not the first by whom 
the new is tried, nor yet the last to lay the old aside. " 

A complex operation such as this school could, of course, not go along well without the support and dedi- 
cation of scores of people. My thanks go in particular to the recently retired Superintendent of Schools, 
Mr. William L. O'Connell, and to his successor, the Acting Superintendent of Schools, Mr. Alan M. White. 

All of us are fortunate to have the help of a forward-looking and cooperative Regional School Committee 
to carry on the good works that were begun under the joint leadership of Mr. O'Connell and his deputy, 
Mr. White. 

I am particularly indebted to Mr. Henry Wall, the Vice -Principal of the Junior High School, and to a 
truly outstanding and involved faculty. Nearly all of the teachers at this school relate very well to adolescents 
and unfailingly offer good examples for the students to emulate. 

I express my sincere appreciation also to those unsung heroes who work very hard to make the school 
a comfortable and even enjoyable place in which to work. I refer to the secretaries, the counselors in the 
Department of Pupil Personnel Services, and the very important members of the cafeteria and custodial 
staffs. Because of the interest and hard work of all the people named above, the vessel known as A-B JAY 
has managed to avoid the reefs that abound in the turbulent waters of modern education. 

Finally, supreme among the rewards of teaching is the valued association with members of the rising 
generation. I am certain that I speak for all teachers and staffers at the Acton-Boxborough Junior High School 
when I say that it is a distinct pleasure to be working daily with such a fine group of young people. They and 
the hard-working parents who supply the funds for this whole operation are to be commended. Parents who 
wish to know more about this school, or who desire to become involved in its daily operation, are requested 
to call 263-7716. 

Arthur J. Hayes, Principal 
Acton-Boxborough Junior High School 



37 



PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

During 1970 severaL new people have joined the pupil personnel services staff; programs have continued 
to develop; some changes in approach have been tried; and two programs, one for children with learning 
disabilities, the other for emotionally disturbed children, have been initiated. 

Essential to the operation of all of the programs is the secretarial staff. This had been ably headed 
for nine years by Mrs. Phyllis Sutherland, but a change was necessitated in August when she and her 
husband moved to the western part of the state. Our loss was great. However, Mrs. Dorothy Harding, 
a member of the staff since September, 1965, agreed to assume the responsibility for coordination and 
supervision. One of her first accomplishments was the preparation of a Manual of Procedures covering 
all aspects of the clerical function. 

With the installation of a computerized system designed to save students' time in research about 
colleges, financial aid, and occupations, a clerk was added in September on a part-time basis. When she 
is not operating the computer, she maintains the guidance library, keeping up to date the collection of 
catalogs and other educational and vocational materials. 

Other activities of the secretaries include arranging meetings for college representatives, counselors, 
and students; scheduling parent -teacher conferences in the junior and senior high schools; maintaining 
notices of job openings; keeping an inventory of all test materials; preparing case studies for staffings; 
processing college applications; and keeping the financial records for each of the pupil personnel services. 

One program, first organized and headed by Mrs. Harding early in 1970, has since been expanded 
greatly and is now the responsibility of one of the high school counselors. This is the teacher aide program, 
designed to give senior high students the opportunity to help children in the junior high and elementary 
schools under the supervision of the classroom teachers. All involved have been enthusiastic about the 
beginnings of the program and evaluation of it is ongoing. 

Of note in guidance during 1970, in addition to the computer and teacher aide programs, are the 
following developments or changes: 

1. There seems to have been a significant increase in the number of teacher-counselor and parent- 
counselor interviews for consultation about the needs of students. 

2. More counseling of students in groups has been carried on at both elementary and secondary 
levels than in previous years and, although it is still a relatively new technique in the local schools, it 
appears to have much potential for success in some situations. 

3. Last summer a group of counselors volunteered to prepare a descriptive booklet entitled 
"Counseling" for distribution to parents of all children in grades 1-7 and to new students in grades 8-12. 
Accompanying the booklets sent to parents were letters introducing the students' counselors and inviting 
the parents to be in touch. 

4. In an effort to increase counseling efficiency without adding staff, a modification in approach 
was initiated in September, subject to evaluation at the end of a year. Under the previous system of seeing 
every student, counselors were faced with a problem. They were seeing some students who appeared 

to need no special help at the time and they were unable to give sufficient attention to certain students 
who were experiencing rather serious difficulties. A compromise -alternative was agreed upon; namely, 
that counselors would see all students in grades 3,6,8,11, and 12 and students in the other grades only as 
they themselves sought assistance or were referred by teachers or parents. 

Since the report of the school nurses immediately follows this one, the health program will not be 
covered here. The nurses have been active participants in the staffings held during the past year. (These, 
described in the 1969 Annual Report under the heading of the "team approach" have increased rapidly in 
number and seem to be an effective means of drawing upon the expertise of each staff member and of the 
consultant psychologist in the assessment and alleviation of learning difficulties. ) In addition to this 
involvement, the nurses have attended the pupil personnel services meetings and have had regular 
conferences with the Head Counselor, thus bringing them into somewhat closer contact than in the past 
with their fellow specialists. 

Accepting referrals from classroom teachers and counselors, the remedial reading teachers test 
students and place them in groups of six or less for intensive help according to their needs. At the 
elementary level, concentration is upon skills in which the child is experiencing difficulty. Areas 
include word perception, oral reading, silent reading, sound blending, structural analysis, and study 
skills. The teachers have carefully analyzed materials and have purchased with a view to variety in 
level of difficulty while maintaining high interest. 

The remedial reading program at the secondary level includes continued instruction for students 
deficient in certain skills; in addition, high school students who have experienced no learning problems 
but who wish to improve comprehension, speed, spelling, or general study skills in order to meet their 
potential academic and personal requirements may elect to work with the reading teachers. 

38 



During the past year the reading teachers have made special efforts to provide for communication with 
classroom teachers; it is important that to the extent possible similar materials and methods be used both 
within the classroom and in the remedial group sessions. 

With a similar focus on individualizing as much as possible the instruction within the regular classroom, the 
School Committee authorized for September, 1970, a new learning disabilities program at the elementary level. 
To date we have succeeded in obtaining the services of three learning disabilities resource teachers. There 
remains a vacancy at the Douglas School. 

These teachers add an important new dimension. to the teams in the schools. They participate in staffings 
and carry the primary responsibility for providing assessment and prescriptive teaching plans. They work with 
the children, the classroom teachers, and often the remedial reading teachers in implementing these plans, and 
in periodic follow-up staffings they help to evaluate progress and to suggest modifications in teaching approaches 
as necessary. 

This program is still very new; thorough assessment of individual needs is a slow process; and individualized 
instruction in large classes is difficult. However, we feel that for many disabled children, this approach can 
successfully replace the tutorial method. 

The tutorial approach is still being used with students who have serious difficulties at the secondary level. 
However, the learning disabilities tutor and the remedial reading teachers have proposed a research development 
study which, if granted, will provide for a general evaluation of programs in the junior and senior high schools 
and which may well suggest some alternatives to meeting the needs of adolescents with learning disabilities. 

The special classes for the retarded have continued to grow in size during the past year. Each now has 
eleven children and the legal limit for the class for the trainable children is twelve. 

The children in both classes have participated in many parts of the school program with students from 
regular classes and some are involved with regular classes in academic subjects as well as in such classes as 
physical education, art, and music. 

Members of both classes have also benefitted during the past year from the services of volunteer aides 
including adult members of the community, a college student, and several high school students. A student 
teacher from Boston College has been assigned to the class for the educable retarded for the second quarter of 
the current school year. 

The greatest problem still facing us is the limited educational opportunity for the older children. We 
continue to send high school age educable students to neighboring communities for a work-oriented curriculum 
leading to a work-study program. However, the age range in both of our classes is still very broad, with 
some junior high age students. 

In January, 1970, the School Committee accepted a preliminary report concerning programs for the 
emotionally disturbed and planned for the first time to fund three special classes. An advisory committee composed 
of representatives from the School Committee, the Concord Mental Health Center, the League of Women Voters, the 
Parent Teachers Organization, school faculty and administration, and a number of interested parents was formed. 
This group met throughout the spring to discuss admission policies, objectives, and methods of intervention with 
disturbed children. Specific guidelines were developed and presented to the School Committees. 

Two elementary level programs were initiated in September. A self-contained class at the Blanchard 
Memorial School in Boxborough is composed of five primary-age children. At the Gates School a resource center 
is provided for ten children who need special tutorial assistance. 

The major objective in each class is to return the child to the regular classroom on a full time basis at 
the earliest possible date. The teachers view the following as corollary objectives: 

L. To give children an opportunity to develop an understanding of themselves and of others. 

2. To help children develop a sense of trust by providing firm, consistent limits within a supportive, 

understanding atmosphere. 

3. To help children develop social and academic skills which will strengthen their egos and improve the 

attitudes that others have towards them. 

4. To help children develop and internalize controls (self-discipline) and reality testing abilities. 

The beginning of a class at the secondary level was deferred until September, 1971, because of the small 
number who were considered to be eligible for admission. 



39 



The members of the speech therapy staff have worked closely together during the past year. Meeting 
regularly to discuss cases and approaches, they have developed their own method of articulation therapy which 
combines what they believe to be the most effective parts of several methods. Within the general method 
there is allowance for variation to meet particular needs. 

An evening program for parents was held in the winter for the purpose of describing a particular area of 
speech pathology of interest to the community. The therapists chose the topic, "How a Child Learns to Talk", 
and described the various developmental stages. They stressed the fact that development does not just occur 
naturally but rather requires help from all of those around the child, especially the parents. 

In connection with the administration of the pupil personnel services, the expansion during 1970 of a 
method of differentiated staffing should be noted. This year we continue to have staff members acting on a 
voluntary basis as coordinators of the secretarial, remedial, remedial reading, and speech therapy staffs. 
In addition, for the first time several of the more experienced counselors are carrying varying responsibilities 
such as program planning for meetings, supervision of certain aspects of the testing program, administration 
of the computer service, and consultation on a bi-weekly schedule with less experienced counselors concerning 
objectives and techniques. In this way they have responded to an opportunity to develop their own leadership 
potential and they are contributing significantly to the effectiveness of the programs with which they are involved. 
We are grateful for their dedication and assistance. 

One person deserves my particular thanks. He is Mr. William Petkewich who continues to be an able, 
willing, and cheerful assistant in the over-all administration of the pupil personnel services. 

Finally, on behalf of all of us, I should like to express gratitude to the students and their parents, other 
members of the community, the School Committees, our former Superintendent and the Acting Superintendent, 
the Principals, and the teachers for whom and with whom we work to provide helpful supplementary personal 
and educational services in the schools. 

Ruth R. Proctor 
Director of Guidance 



REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSES 

All of the testing has been completed for the year 1970. From January to June, the vision and hearing 
tests for all students were completed and referrals for corrections made. 

Tuberculin (Tine) testing in grades 1, 4, 7, and 9 included 680 elementary students, 311 junior high 
students, 230 high school students and 63 adult personnel. The Board of Health nurses followed up the positive 
reactors. 

Heights and weights were completed and 14 referrals for dental care were made in the elementary schools. , 

A mumps vaccine clinic was held in April for grades 1, 2, 3, and 4. 683 doses of the vaccine were given. 

A rubella clinic (German measles) was also held in cooperation with the Board of Health. Nine hundred 
fifty-five children in grades 1, 5, 6, and 7 were immunized. 

Diphtheria -Tetanus "boosters" were given to 175 ninth graders this year. 

State law requires physical examinations every 3 years. (The school physician sees students of grades 
1, 4, 7, and 10 annually. ) In June, 1970, we sent forms to the parents of students entering these grades in 
September, 1970, requesting that physicals be done by their private physicians. Only a small percentage 
returned completed physical forms. We hope for a greater response in 1971, as we are sure that a larger 
number of our students are seen by their own doctors. 

In evaluating our testing programs, (especially the Hearing) we found it to be more efficient and effective 
to screen all pupils individually at the elementary level. This was initiated in the fall of 1970. 

Our medication policy was reviewed and a new policy was approved by the School Committees in October, 191 
Notices were sent to all doctors, pharmacists, and parents of elementary school pupils. The high school students 
were informed by routine announcement. 

During 1970, the nurses participated more frequently in school staffings. Also, we found the need for more 
time to discuss problems and policy among ourselves. 



Sect! 

as si 



40 



Representatives of the nursing staff attended several meetings of the newly formed School Nurses 
Section of the National Education Association. We hope that this organization will assist us in our effectiveness 
as school nurses. We are currently in the process of defining our role locally and contact with other systems 
and their nurses should be to our benefit. 



We wish to thank everyone, especially our secretaries, 
Mr. Petkewich for all the help during a very busy year. 



Mrs. Kuipers and Mrs. Larsen, and also 



Eileen Hale, R.N. 
Helen Rhodes, R.N. 
Patricia Wilson, R.N. 

REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

The shifting emphases and the changing philosophies in education in recent years have, not surprisingly, 
been felt in Acton during 1970. A few short years ago the abolishment of the dress code in our schools would 
have caused much consternation; this year it was voted without fanfare and with little adverse reaction in the 
community. The "underground" newspaper and the students' rights movement are other manifestations of the 
students' search for an appropriate and effective way to express their views on the schools. The negotiating 
table has provided a vehicle for the teachers and the administrators to voice their opinions, and, increasingly, 
the parents of our students have evidenced their desire to be heard on major issues. 

It is clear that the vitally important task of educating our young people must be a shared responsibility, 
and the school committee has demonstrated its awareness of this need in several ways during 1970. We have 
endeavored to keep townspeople better informed about the schools through formal publications, wider distribution 
of agendas and official minutes, and frequent direct communications with other town boards. We initiated the 
public hearing on the school budget. We requested citizen participation on such special committees as those 
which would study classes for the emotionally disturbed, future land acquisition, school construction at the 
secondary level, and the school lunch program and have authorized similar committees on public kindergartens 
and school organization. 

Certainly the greatest resource in Acton or in any town which can be utilized for the improvement of our 
educational system is its people. We congratulate the entire school staff -- with a special note of appreciation 
to William L. O'Connell, recently retired from the superintendency after many years of dedicated service to 
the system, and to Alan M. White our Acting Superintendent -- and you, the members of the community, for our 
progress to date. We can look back with pride at our accomplishments, but it behooves all of us to concentrate 
now on the future. We must find new ways to do things which will at the same time preserve that which is good 
in our schools and phase out practices which no longer have validity for today, and we must find the means to 
accomplish these goals in the most economical way possible. This will require the combined efforts of all of 
us who believe that a community's first duty is to provide a superior education for its youth. 

Fully cognizant of the need for clear direction, ongoing evaluation, and comprehensive planning and for 
the administrative organization which must meet these needs, the school committee is presently engaged in 
carrying out two of the most important tasks it will ever be called upon to perform -- the preparation of a 
statement of goals and objectives to serve as a guideline for orderly, directed growth of the system and the 
hiring of a superintendent, whose job it will be to help us realize those aims. We shall solicit the assistance 
of the staff, the students, and the community as we go forward with our work in both areas, but we realize 
that the final decisions must, by law, be ours. We are prepared to make them, keeping foremost in our 
deliberations the welfare of our students -- Acton's most valuable resource. 

ACTON ADULT EDUCATION 1970 

At the March, 1970, Annual Town Meeting, five thousand dollars was appropriated to finance an Adult 
Education Program for the Town of Acton. In July, the Acton School Committee appointed Mrs. Doli Mason 
as Director and the following people were invited to serve on the Acton Adult Education Advisory Council: 



Mr. Warren Newell 
Mr. Edwin Richter 
Dr. Samual Sutcliffe 
Mrs. Beatrice Deloury 
Mrs. Corinne Orcutt 
Mr. Warren Birch 



Mr. Donald Gilberti 
Mr. William Phillips 
Mrs. Janet Murphy 
Mr. Herschel Hadley 
Mrs. Alice McKearney 
Mr. Alan White 



The following philosophy has been adopted as a basis for the total program, the major emphasis being on 
Community involvement in all phases of planning, implementation, and evaluation: 

The purpose of the Adult Education program is to provide educational experiences 
which will help persons increase their abilities and skills in the areas of personal 
development, citizenship, and production and consumption. The increasing rate of 
change in science, technology, and society offers opportunities for individual and 



41 



community growth in all these areas. It also increases the urgency for all members 
of our society to acquire the understanding and skills which enables them to identify 
and guide these forces of change in order to make optimum life adjustments to 
complexities of the present and future. 

In order to help people achieve their growth needs, the major objectives of the 
Adult Education Program are: 

1. To develop public understanding of and involvement in developing 
an Adult Education program which to the fullest extent possible 
meets the needs of the community it serves. 

2. To help people optimize their development as individuals and as members 
of the family, community, and society. 

3. To help people improve their community organization, services, and 
i environment. 

4. To help people raise their level of living and achieve their economic and 
productive goals. 

5. To help people increase creative and fulfilling use of leisure time. 

Eighteen courses were offered based on town wide questionnaire responses. During the fall term two 
courses were discontinued due to lack of interest. A total of three hundred thirty six prople were enrolled 
and one hundred fifteen persons were placed on a waiting list for future courses. 



The 1971 Winter Term will begin in January and continue through March. Those of us who are involved 
in the program sincerely hope that the program will grow through stronger community interest and involvement 

Mrs. Doli Mason 
Director. 






SCHOOL FINANCES 
Acton Public Schools 
Received - To the Credit of Schools 



State Aid for Public Schools, Chapter 70 
State Aid for Transportation, Chapter 71 
Special Education, Chapters 69 and 71 
State Aid for Town in Regional School District 
Federal Aid 



$ 847,320.43 

33, 946.59 

40, 274.00 

110,710.00 

22, 685.00 

$1,054, 936.02 



Appropriated, March 1971 
Federal Funds, Balance 12/31/69 
Gross Operating Budget, 1970 



$1, 738,508. 00 
11, 169.00 



$1,749, 677.00 



Total Expended for Maintenance and Operation in 1970 
Cost per Pupil (2415 as of 10/1/70) 



$1,726,841. 18 
$715.05 



PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 1971 

January 1 - December 31, 1971 

Acton Public Schools 



Administration 

Instruction 

Plant Operation and Maintenance 

Non-Instructional Services 

Outlay 

Transportation 

Out of State Travel 

Contingency 



$ 44, 977.00 

1,598, 930. 00 

169, 908.00 

36, 664.00 

29, 194.00 

126, 995.00 

300.00 

25, 000.00 

$2, 031, 968.00 



42 



Acton-Boxborough Regional School District 
Received to the Credit of the District 

State Aid for Transportation, Chapter 71 $ 113,291.00 

Federal and State Aid 36, 310. 00 



Appropriated for Maintenance and Operation, March, 1970 $1, 800, 050. 00 

Transfers and Anticipated Income: 

Balance 1969 Operating Budget $ 8,526.00 

1969-70 Transportation Reimbursement 104,319.00 

Balance, 12/31/69 Federal Funds 12,137.00 

Special Education Reimbursement, 1969 3, 556. 00 

Miscellaneous Receipts, 1969 1, 224.00 129, 762.00 

Gross Operating Budget, 1970 ' ~" " $1,929,821.00 



Total Expended for Maintenance and Operation in 1970 $1, 882, 584. 17 

Cost per Pupil (2157 as of 10/1/1970) $872.78 

PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 1971 

January 1 - December 31, 1971 

Acton-Boxborough Regional School District 

Administration $ 61,030.00 

Instruction 1, 720, 130. 00 

Plant Operation 146, 184. 00 

Plant Maintenance 35, 500. 00 

Non-Instructional Services 57,450. 00 

Outlay 31,615.00 

Transportation 143,400.00 

Special Charges 12, 573. 00 

Out of State Travel 2, 400. 00 

Contingency Fund 25, 000. 00 

Total Maintenance and Operation $2, 235, 282. 00 

Non-Classified, School Athletic Fund 41,734.00 

Non-Classified, Adult Education 2, 000. 00 

Debt Service (Gross) 239, 890. 00 

Total Budget (Gross) $2, 518, 906. 00 

Gross Operating Budget $2, 235, 282. 00 

Less: (1) Balance 1970 Operating Budget ( 51,506.00) 

(2) 1969-70 Transportation Reimbursement (113,291.00) 

(3) 12/31/70 P. L. 874 Balance ( 31,692.00) 

(4) 12/31/70 Title V Balance ( 56.00) 

(5) 12/31/70 Special Education Balance ( 8,451.00) 

(6) 1970 Miscellaneous Collections ( 3,326.00 ) 

Net Operating Budget $2, 026, 960. 00 

Debt Service 

Interest 54,890.00 

Maturing Debt $ 185,000.00 
Less: Anticipated State Aid (111,200.00) 

Transfer ( 2,500.00 ) 

Net Debt Service 71, 300. 00 

Non-Classified 

School Athletic Fund $ 41,734.00 

2, 000. 00 43, 734. 00 

Total Net Budget $2,196,884.00 

43 



Net Budget 
Gross Budget 



$ 322,022.00 

2, 196,884.00 

$2, 518, 906.00 



Acton-Boxborough Regional School District 



Acton 



Boxborough 



-Operating Expenses, 91% of $2,003,851.00** 
Cost of Transportation 121, 820. 00 

Less Reimbursement (69-70) _ 103, 044.00 
Debt Service, 95% of $126,190. 
Non-Classified, 91% of $43, 734. 

'-Operating Expenses, 9% of $2,003,851.00** 
Cost of Transportation 14, 580. 00 

Less Reimbursement (69-70) 10,247.00 

Debt Service, 5% of $126, 190. 



Non-Classified, 9% of $43, 734. 

!=Acton Student Enrollment 10/1/70 
Boxborough Student Enrollment 10/1/70 



1959 (91%) 
198 ( 9%) 
2157 



$1, 823,504.00 

18,776.00 

119,880.00 

39,798.00 

$ 180,347.00 

4, 333.00 
6, 310.00 
3, 936.00 



$2, 001, 958.00 



$ 194,926.00 



**Gross Operating Budget 
Less: 1970 Title V Balance 
1970 Maintenance and Operation Balance 
1970 Public Law 874 Balance 
1970 Special Education Balance 
1970 Miscellaneous Collections 
Combined cost of current transportation budget 
exclusive of field trips 



$2, 235, 282.00 
( 56.00) 

( 51,506.00) 
( 31,692.00) 
( 8,451.00) 
( 3,326.00) 

(136,400.00) 
$2, 003,851. 00 



44 



ACTON-BOXBOROUGH REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Treasurer's Report 
December 31, 1970 



Balance, December 31, 1969 

Receipts, 1970 

Town of Acton 
Town of Boxborough 
State Aid for Construction 
Construction-Authorized Loan 
Public Law 874 
Public Law 864, Title V 
Public Law 89-10, Title I 
Public Law 89-10, Title II 
Public Law 89-10, Title VI-A 
Special Education 
Transportation Reimbursement 
School Lunch 
School Athletics 
Federal Taxes 
State Taxes 
Teachers' Retirement 
County Retirement 
Teachers' Insurance 
Blue Cross - Blue Shield 
Group Life Insurance 
Acton Teachers Association 
Tax Annuities 
Earned Interest 
Miscellaneous 



51, 762, 238. 00 

188, 165.00 

136, 133. 19 

50,000.00 

31,692.00 

1,263. 50 

3,874.00 

1, 116.42 

4,500.00 

4,618.00 

113, 291.00 

102, 131.40 

4,760.31 

216, 722.63 

43,636.82 

61,914.48 

7,917.08 

1, 104. 15 

6, 030. 56 

798.70 

4,016.65 

8, 730.00 

1,068.87 

3,233. 55 



$ 202,071.35 



Total Receipts 



Total 



$2, 758, 956. 31 
$2, 961, 027. 66 



Disbursements, 1970 

Maintenance and Operation: 
General Control 
Instruction 
Operation of Plants 
Maintenance of Plants 
Non -Instructional Services 
Outlay- 
Transportation 
Blanchard Auditorium 
Contingency 
Construction 
Title I 
Title II 
Title V 
Title VI-A 

Payment of Principal 
Interest on Debt 
School Lunch 
School Athletics 
Federal Taxes 
State Taxes 
Teachers' Retirement 
County Retirement 
Teachers' Insurance 
Blue Cross - Blue Shield 
Group Life Insurance 
Acton Teachers Association 
Tax Annuities 

Total Disbursements 

Balance, December 31, 1970 

Total 



i 46,204.21 

1,429, 299.60 

124,684.96 

26,668.48 

46,008.94 

18,291.60 

131,886. 13 

8, 925.00 

50,615. 25 

35, 100.00 

3, 768.98 

1,277.36 

1,206. 58 

1,662.09 

210,000.00 

61, 385. 00 

101, 780.98 

37,918. 23 

216, 722.63 

43,636.82 

61,960.97 

7,917.08 

1, 104. 15 

5,999.90 

800.10 

4,016.65 

8,780.00 



$2,687,621.69 

273,405. 97 

$2,961,027.66 



Priscilla Felt 
Treasurer 



45 



VOCATIONAL REGIONAL SCHOOL 



During 1970 the Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical Planning Board, including the towns of 
Acton, Arlington, Belmont, Boxborough, Carlisle, Concord, Lexington, Sudbury, Stow, Wayland and 
Weston, continued in their work of last year to prepare a regionalization agreement under which the par- 
ticipating towns would form a regional district and construct a regional vocational technical school. It 
is this agreement which is to be presented to the annual town meetings in March for acceptance. The 
district will come into being upon the ratification of the agreement by the towns of Arlington, Belmont, 
Concord and Lexington. The region will also include such other towns as vote to accept the terms of the 
agreement. In the case of one of the four determining towns not ratifying the agreement, the Planning 
Board is prepared to present an alternate agreement without the dissenting town included for approval 
by the towns within three months. 

The Curriculum Committee developed the basic purpose of the Minuteman School "to provide compre- 
hensive academic and technical subjects which will enable each student to develop to his full potential in 
terms of entering a career or continuing his education. " The recommendation of the committee is for the 
curriculum to be designed to attract and satisfy the vocationally and technically oriented student. At the 
same time it should be structured so that the student with learning problems who can benefit from a 
technical -vocational program will be able to do so. Provision should be made for some students who are 
academically, socially or physically disadvantaged. 

The proposed school is to be located within a five mile radius of the center of the district. The 
opening date of this 1500 pupil school has been set for September 1974. 

A local advisory committee has been formed to assist the Planning Committee in informing the towns- 
people about the district and proposed school. A brochure for distribution in all the towns in the district 
was prepared and included all pertinent data concerning financial commitments and the regionalization 
agreement. 

While actively pursuing the goal of forming a Minuteman district, the members of the Acton Planning 
Committee also seriously investigated the possibility of buying into Nashoba Valley Technical High School 
in Westford. Negotiations for this merger continued throughout the year up to the point of preparing an 
amendment to the existing Regionalization Agreement which would have enabled Acton and Boxborough to 
become members of the district. In October the Nashoba Valley Technical High School Committee voted 
to discontinue talks pursuant to Acton and Boxborough joining the district for a number of reasons. Most 
important was the concern of the committee that the available expansion potential of the school would have 
to be used almost immediately to meet the needs of the member towns. The inclusion of Acton and Box- 
borough would necessitate an additional building program which the members did not feel they would be 
able to sell to their towns. 

The Committee has prepared two Warrant Articles to be presented to the annual town meeting in 
March. The first is the ratification of the regionalization agreement which would commit Acton to mem- 
bership in the district. The second article is an appropriation of funds for the use of the Regional School 
Committee for the balance of the 1971 fiscal year. The appropriation of these funds will be contingent upon 
a favorable vote for the establishment of the region. The funds will be used to hire a superintendent and 
to make the necessary plans for constructing the school. Based upon estimated attendance from each town, 
Acton will be asked to appropriate $1, 680. 

Because Acton does not provide any vocational technical training, there will be an article in the 
Warrant prepared by the Acton Boxborough Regional School Committee for more than $20, 000 for vocational 
tuition and transportation. State law requires the town of Acton to pay this tuition and transportation expense 
of any student who attends a vocational technical school in another town because Acton does not have these 
facilities. 

The responsibility of the Planning Committee ends with the approval or disapproval of the regionali- 
zation agreement at the town meeting. We members have enjoyed serving the town in this capacity and 
hope that through our work broader educational choice will be available to Acton's young people. 

Beverly W. Lydiard Charles Courtwright 
Marilyn Peterson 



46 



LIBRARIES 



A new sculpture in the courtyard, the opening of a separate reference section, and a circulating print 
collection are among the exciting new features at the Acton Memorial Library this year. We feel that your 
library is a great asset to the Town of Acton and that the Library Director and her faithful and loyal staff 
are dedicated to making it one of the finest public libraries in the state. Circulation continues to grow and 
the various services and activities expand steadily. 









Annual Library Statistics 














1970 


1967*** 










Circulation: 


Fiction 


59, 939 


43, 695 Income: 


Fines 


$5, 


409. 


93 




Non-fiction 


46, 964 


26, 913 


Miscellaneous 




374. 


30 




Juvenile 


51,376 


44, 976 


Copy Service** 




174. 


85 




Records* 


1,633 














Prints 
Total 


64 
159, 976 














115, 584 


$5, 


960. 


08 



* Provided by Eastern Massachusetts Regional Public Library System 
** January 1 to July 15 

*** Circulation figures for 1967, the year the library addition was opened, have been included to give a basis 
for comparison. 



Books: 



Adult fiction added to collection 

Adult non -fiction added to collection 

Gifts added to collection 

Total books added to adult collection 

Total books discarded from adult collection 

Juvenile fiction added to collection 

Juvenile non -fiction added to collection 

Gifts added to collection 

Total books added to Juvenile collection 

Total books discarded from Juvenile collection 





575 


1 


542 




279 


2 


396 




870 




414 




453 




25 



892 



Books in library January 1, 1970 
Books added to collection during 1970 
Books withdrawn from collection during 1970 
Books in library as of January 1, 1971 
Inter-library loan requests 484 



32, 112 
3, 288 
1, 175 

34,225 



One of the most significant improvements in 1970 was the official opening, about February 1st, of the 
Reference Room in the original building, thus utilizing that portion of the library more efficiently and providing 
room for a greatly expanded reference collection and improved reference service. In March, the Town Meeting 
approved a separate article on the warrant to provide funds for the installation of air-conditioning in the new 
building. By the first of July, the air-conditioning was operating and adding considerably to the summer com- 
fort of both patrons and staff. 

Other new and improved services include the acquisition of a film projector and screen through the gen- 
erosity of the Friends of the Acton Libraries, Digital Equipment Corporation and the Mary Lothrop Fund. The 
first three items of our new audio-visual program are the Spoken Arts Cassette Library for Young Listeners, 
a circulating print collection and the New York Times on microfilm beginning January 1, 1971. A microfilm 
reader and some foreign language cassettes have also arrived. In addition to records which may be borrowed 
from the Bookmobile, we have started our own record collection, ordering the basic classics first. Other 
than the paperbacks on the swap shelf, we now have books in paperback form for circulation, mainly dupli- 
cates of popular titles and titles appearing on various reading lists at the schools and in the area. A deluge 
of patrons using our copying service necessitated the acquisition of a coin-operated copy machine, placed 
near the desk for easy access. 



47 




We continue to use extensively the inter-library loan service through the Eastern Massachusetts 
Regional Public Library System. Especially increased are the bookings of free films available to groups 
and committees in the town. Also, your staff has benefitted by attending several workshops and seminars 
sponsored by the region. 

Our librarian continued her efforts to improve the coordination of school and public library facilities. 
Several first and second grade classes visited our library this year. In the fall, all of the new teachers 
were invited to the library for a tour of both the town and library, after which the teachers received kits 
with background information. 

Many interesting programs and events were presented at the library throughout the year. 
Acton Conservation Trust generously provided a special photo exhibit entitled "Conservation" for display 
April 18th-May 20th, in conjunction with National Library Week, the theme of which was "Environment". 
Our Patriot's Day program on April 16th included a performance by the Acton Minutemen Fife and Drum 
Corps and a reading by Mr. Paul Zimmer of Longfellow's poem "Paul Revere's Ride". A feature of 
National Teach-in Day, April 22nd, was a lecture by Mr. John Putnam, head of the Environmental In- 
formation Center in Boston, telling us what "we" can do about improving our environment. 

The Sounds and Silences program, an infor- 
mal series of chamber music including both taped 
and live performances, was held on Sunday even- 
ings from May 24th to the end of June. Selection 
and programming was done by a volunteer commit- 
tee originated by Mrs. Donnell Boardman. The 
sound system was lent to the library by the H. H. 
Scott Company. So enthusiastically received was 
the first series that a second series was presented 
on Sunday evenings from July 12th to the end of 
August. Beginning November 6th, live programs 
only are presented on the first Sunday of each 
month. 

Japan and Canada were visited by film during the Summer Reading and Film Programs for children. 
An extension of this was the successful Film Classics Series shown at the Town Hall from August to Decem- 
ber. 

On July 22nd, librarians from all over eastern Massachusetts met here for the Environmental In- 
formation File Workshop to learn more about the clipping service which is provided to us by the Environ- 
mental Information Center. In observance of United Nations Day on Saturday, October 24th, a reception 
was held for all Acton residents who are originally from foreign countries. All who attended enjoyed it 
tremendously. During Fire Prevention week, a fire engine was parked in front of the library during an 
afternoon for inspection by library patrons and a display by the firemen was moved into the library for a 
week. In December, the Camp Fire Girls again erected their Holiday Mitten Tree for the enjoyment of all, 
and the skiing films were shown on December 5th. 

Sponsored by the Friends, a Book Fair featuring the sale of paperback books was held on Friday and 
Saturday, December 4th and 5th. Highlight of the Fair was the dedication of metal sculpture created by a 
local artist, Mr. Robert Livermore, and given to the library by the Friends. 

The Friends continue to play a vital role in the life of the library. In addition to their countless 
volunteer hours without which we could not function, we are also grateful to them for the storytelling hours 
for children, for the regular displays of work by local artists and other interesting programs held periodi- 
cally. This year a special thank you to the Friends for the gift of the sculpture. 

We express our appreciation to the Acton Garden Club for their weekly flower arrangements, decora- 
tions at Christmas time, and the general beautification of the main entrance with the planters, bulbs, and 
prize bed of irises. 

We thank also the Acton Public School art departments for the wonderful and different art displays 
which add considerably to the enjoyment of both library patrons and personnel. 

Publicity of your library has been excellent this year and we are grateful to all those who helped 
make it so. 

This year the staff has remained virtually the same except for the addition of the new reference li- 
brarian, Mrs. Sondra Vandermark, who replaced Mrs. Marsha Valance beginning on October 13th, and 
four new pages who replaced those who left at the end of the school year. We were pleased to have our 
Custodian, Mr. Robert Trafton, return after a few months away, and were fortunate to secure his services 
on a full-time basis. 



48 



Following is a complete list of our current staff: 

Staff Library Assistants Pages 

Library Director Mrs. Wanda Null Mrs. Frances Collins Susan Burton 

Assistant Library Director Mrs. Marion Armstrong Mrs. Ruth Chandler Susan Charter 

Children's Librarian Mrs. Dorothea Miller Mrs. Eleanor Alsing 

Reference Librarian Mrs. Sondra Vandermark Mrs. Jeanne Crawford Custodian 

Cataloger Mrs. Jane Bowie Mrs. Ann Braman 

Mrs. Suzanne Blue Mr. Robert Trafton 

There were no Board changes in 1970. Mrs. Mileva Brown, one of three elected Trustees, was 
re-elected to a three -year term. Through the efforts of Miss Florence Merriam, we are now turning our 
attention to the restoration of the many historic items housed in the attic of the library. We plan to cata- 
log them better, to improve storage space for them and, after restoration, to display some items in the 
library on a rotating basis. 

The Board has revised the book selection policy, a copy of which may be requested at the desk. 
We must insist that requests for permission to display posters, or for other special uses of the library, 
should be submitted to the Board before its regular meeting, the first Thursday of each month at 8 p. m. , 
for due consideration. The limit on poster display is two weeks. 

The Board wishes to thank the Townspeople for their cooperation throughout the year. 

Mileva P. Brown Doris E. Peterson 

Brewster Conant - Margaret Richter 

Hayward S. Houghton Raymond A. Shamel 

Florence L. Merriam- Marvin L. Tolf 
James L. Parker, Chairman 

Board of Trustees 



REPORT OF THE CITIZENS LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF WEST ACTON 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES: Mrs. Betty Boothby, Chairman, Mrs. Joan Gardner, Secretary, Mrs. Barbara 

Nylander. 

LIBRARY HOURS: Monday: 7-9 P. M. , Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday: 10-5 P.M. 

ACCESSION: Number of volumes in Library January 1, 1970 6, 761 

Increase by purchase 198 

Increase by gift 370 

Withdrawn 482 

Number of volumes in the Library January 1, 1971 6, 847 

CIRCULATION IN 1970: Fiction -1,854 Non-fiction - 1, 557 

Juvenile - 4, 614 Total 8,025 

Books borrowed from Bookmobile: 426 

Circulation: 653 

Records received from Bookmobile: 88 

Circulation: 85 

FINES COLLECTED IN 1970: $191. 04 

Steady growth in use of the Library prompted the Trustees to request permission to expand service 
in October from nine to thirty hours weekly. Circulation prior to the new hours increased by over 23% and 
for the full year by over 37%. Contributing to the success of the year were the regular visits of the Eastern 
Massachusetts Regional Bookmobile which enabled the Library to offer many additional fine books and re- 
cordings, an increased book budget permitting it to acquire a better selection of books in steady demand, 
improvements to the building and grounds, and the cheerful help of many lunch hour and other volunteers 
to all the activities of the Library. 

Thanks are due the Acton Boy Scout Troop 11 who rebuilt the Library lawn and to the Friends of the 
Acton Libraries who donated a typewriter and a bicycle rack, as well as providing contributions and help 
to the Library's Fair in May. The Acton Garden Club provided a handsome Christmas wreath. Three 
young people --Phyllis Nelson, David and Lynn Miller--gave much valuable help in repairing books and doing 
clerical chores. The Trustees and their families went beyond the call of duty to do maintenance work and 
many townspeople contributed books and periodicals. 

Thelma C. Hermes 
Librarian 

49 



RECREATION 



The year 1970 has been a very eventful one for the Recreation 
Commission, since we held our first swimming program since Lake 
Walden was closed in 1965, and we began to implement our plans for 
a year-round program to include all age groups, In January, we ran 
a popular children's figure-skating program at the Elm Street skating 
area, in March saw all our articles passed at Town Meeting, and, 
along with our well-attended Summer Playground program, ran a swim- 
ming program at Lake Walden in which 520 children took part. Mrs. 
Richard Moore volunteered to administer this program, and we would 
like to take this opportunity to thank her, and point out that, in spite of 
having very short notice, she organized the classes and bus schedule, 
and provided Acton with a swimming program of which it can be very 
proud. Another very popular activity was the Flag Football program 
for boys in Grades 4 through 8 held this Fall. For the first time, also, 
a co-ed adult evening program was started, which has a small but 
enthusiastic group of men and women playing volleyball and badminton 
at the Blanchard Gym. This year also marked the first time that the 
Town appropriated money under the Recreation budget to provide bus 
trips and other programs for the 600 Senior Citizens of Acton. 
Although the number of programs was small, each one represents a 
large investment of time and energy on the part of Commission mem- 
bers. Because we find it impossible to run all the programs we feel 
the Town needs, we are asking in 1971 for a part-time, year-round 
Recreation Director. This person will be in charge of the summer 
programs on a full-time basis, and will also administer many more 
programs during the rest of the year on a part-time basis. This is 
planned as a half-way step toward the hiring of a year-round, full-time 
director, which we look forward to in 1973. This step is also an impor- 
tant part of our Recreation Master Plan, which will be completed in the 
Spring of 1971. 




Swimming Program at 
Walden Pond 





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35^ 



Playground Program 



The first priority of the Recreation Commission 
continues to be the development of a Swimming Facility. 
With this in mind, last Spring we requested that the Soil 
Conservation Service, an agency of the U. S. Department 
of Agriculture, do a geological survey of the Town to 
determine all sites which would be feasible for a man- 
made swimming pond. This survey was done, and the 
final report will be completed and given to the Commis- 
sion soon. If a piece of land, which is suitable for a 
dug-type pond, is available for purchase, we will recom- 
mend that the Town buy it, and apply for Federal funding. 
The Recreation Commission is also supporting the build- 
ing of an indoor pool in the new High School wing. The 
chance to have such a year-round facility, with 65% 
reimbursement from the State, is one which we feel the 
Town should not pass up. The School Committee has 
assured us that the Town would have full use of this pool 
during after-school hours, and the Recreation Commis- 
sion would be responsible for a Town-wide program. 



Before concluding this report, we would like to thank some of the people who have contributed to our 
successes in the past year: first, Mr. James Walline and Mr. David Michael, members of the Commission 
who resigned during 1970, Mr. Harrington Moore, who ran the figure-skating program last winter, and who 
is now involved in planning an even larger program for this winter; Mr. William Lynch, who is coordinating 
an ambitious program of ski instruction for all ages; Mr. Anthony Galeota and Mr. Allen Nelson and their 
Highway Department employees, who do so much work for us; Mr. Robert Dotson, our long-suffering Town 
Manager, and his staff, who are so patient and helpful; Mr. Alan White, Acting Superintendent of Schools 
and his staff; the members of the Conservation Commission and the Town Building - Land Acquisition 
Committee, who are working hard to provide the Town with land for our expanding recreational facilities; 
and last, but not least, the many conscientious young people who made up the staffs of the Summer Play- 
ground and Swimming programs. 

We look forward to 1971 as a year of great progress for recreation in Acton. 



Gale Jarvis 
James Maclntyre 



Janet Murphy, Chairman 
Eleanor White 
Richard MacAuley, Associate Member 

Recreation Commission 



50 



1975 CELEBRATION 



The Advisory Committee on the 1975 Celebration, appointed by the Selectmen, began monthly meetings 
in December 1969. These meetings are scheduled for the last Monday of the month at 8:00 P. M. in the 
Selectmen's offices at the Town Hall. These are open meetings, which citizens are encouraged to attend. 

Initial activity of the Committee was to appoint appropriate sub -committees to study a number of sub- 
jects which bear on the 1975 Celebration such as program, finances, decorations, events, publicity, and 
liaison with other organizations and towns. A number of members of the Committee are representatives 
from various organizations in Acton, and informal commitments have been obtained from several of these 
organizations as to what contributions they would like to make. Initial efforts at historical research and 
Town beautification are underway. The Acton-Boxboro High School has also cooperated. An award of a 
United States savings bond has been made to Miss Nancy Bernard for her winning design in an art compe- 
tition held at the High School. 

A tentative program is under discussion. Under constant review is the size and the scope of the 1975 
Celebration. Past Town celebrations have been studied and will be adjusted for today's realities in light of 
growth of the Town. 

The sum of $3, 000 was requested in the 1970 Town Warrant, and was voted by town meeting members. 
These funds were added to the $2, 000 previously deposited in a special bank account. The Committee seeks 
$4, 000 in 1971, according to a plan which anticipates raising funds so that the tax burden will not fall heavily 
in any given year. 



Mr. Ahti E. Autio 
Mr. Jerry T. Ballantine 
Mr. E. Wilson Bursaw 
Col. Burton A. Davis 
Mr. David H. Donaldson 
Mr. Donald R. Gilberti 
Mr. Russell D. Hayward 
Mr. Hayward S. Houghton 
Mrs. Roger M. Huebsch 
Mr. T. Frederick S. Kennedy 
Mrs. Donald R. Kinzie 
Mr. Walter R. Laite 

Mr. Brewster 



Representing Concord 



Mr. Malcolm S. MacGregor 
Mrs. Malcolm S. MacGregor 
Mrs. Charles D. MacPherson 
*Dr. Francis C. McDonald 
Miss Florence A. Merriam 
Mr. Richmond P. Miller, Jr. 
Mr. Robert E. Nelson 
Mrs. Edmond H. Newton 
Mr. Norman L. Roche 
Mr. Raymond W. Spicer 
Mr. Alfred F. Steinhauer 
Mr. H. Bradford Sturtevant III 
Conant, Chairman 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



During 1970 the Historical Commission continued its work consistent with its mission for the preserva- 
tion, promotion and development of the historic assets of Acton. Early in the year the Commission initiated 
action with the Selectmen to obtain restoration of certain portions of the town-owned section of the Isaac Davis 
Trail where damage had occurred due to disregardful building operations in the surrounding area. 

With the cooperation of Town Manager Robert Dotson, Town Engineer Anthony Galeota and Town Counsel 
Herbert Wilkins, an agreement was secured from the builder to restore the damaged areas according to spe- 
cifications drawn up by Mr. Galeota and the Historical Commission. This work has begun and is proceeding 
under the supervision of Mr. Galeota and the Commission members. 

The Historical Commission has met with representatives of various groups during the year to talk about 
matters of common interest to these groups and the Town.- Representing the D. A. R. was Mrs. Malcolm 
MacGregor, the Public Celebrations Committee, Mr. Clark McElvein, Chairman, and the Advisory Com- 
mittee on the 1975 Celebration, Mr. Brewster Conant, Chairman. 

The Acton Historical Society was represented by members on the Commission and the Historical 
Society's offer to provide trees for planting along the southerly border of the town-owned portion of the Isaac 
Davis Trail was gratefully accepted. It is planned to have this work go forward in the spring with the coop- 
eration of other interested groups. 

The Commission has also been concerned with an effort to determine the exact route of the Line of March 
of the Acton Minutemen on that section of the Trail between Estabrook and Pope Roads. 



51 



Commission members met at various times during the year with Mr. Alden C. Flagg, Jr. and 
Mrs. Janet Fiagg Turley both of whom drew on their recollections to lead the Commission members over 
what might have been the old road to Concord. The Commission is indebted to Mrs. Alden C. Flagg, 
Mr. Charles B. Johnson, Jr. and Mrs. Robert M. Bowen for permission to cross their land during these 
several exploratory walks. 

Many other matters were considered and some of these are presently being planned, such as an il- 
lustrated brochure locating the important historical sites in Acton for the aid of visitors before and during 
the 1975 Celebration. 

Considerable time was spent on trying to insure the future of the Todd House which is presently in 
the hands of the Regional School Committee. The Isaac Davis homestead site, where our annual Patriot's 
Day ceremonies are held and the march to Concord begins, is up for sale and the Commission is trying to 
find some way to make sure that our future Patriot's Day exercises can continue in this same location. 

All of these matters take a great deal of time and for this reason the work on the historical census 
is proceeding more slowly than we would have wished. However, it does point up the rapidity with which 
change is occurring in Acton and the sobering fact that Acton is losing its character as a New England 
village. 

Many of the old landmarks have already disappeared and Acton as we knew it just twenty short years 
ago may soon be obscured by the bull -dozer. 

There is much that should be saved in Acton and with proper foresight, adequate planning and some 
sacrifice for the common good, we could provide an historical and architectural legacy to be enjoyed by 
future generations. 

The Historical Commission feels that it is time to consider these matters seriously and recommends 
the establishment of an Historic District Study Committee. 

The Acton Historical Commission meets at 8 P. M. , the first Tuesday of each month at the Acton 
Center Fire Station. All meetings are open, and interested residents are cordially invited to attend. 

Jerry T. Ballantine, Chairman 
Marian E. H. Houghton, Clerk 
Robert Nylander 
Stanley L. Smith, Jr. 
Samuel Sutcliffe 



ARCHIVES 



During the past year the Archives Committee has received several letters requesting information in 
regard to the history of the town. Requests have also been received for information on the background of 
Crown Resistance Day. 

The Committee has also received several inquiries on the Todd House with respect to when it was 
built and who the original owner was. 

The dehumidifier in the vault at the South Acton Fire Station was checked several times to be sure it 
was functioning properly. 

The Graphic Microfilm Company of Waltham, Massachusetts, has submitted to this committee a 
suggested program to follow in regard to the microfilming of Town Records. 

The Archives Committee stands ready to cooperate and help the 1975 Celebration in any capacity 
should we be called on to do so. 

Frederick S. Kennedy 
Minetta D. Lee 
Joyce C. Woodhead 



52 



PUBLIC CEREMONIES 



1970 activity of the Public Ceremonies and Celebrations Committee was marked by innovation and change. 
lWe believe that the changes we made in the Memorial Day observance and the addition of a Family Fourth of 
■July were, in general, well received. Our 1971 plans will benefit from the experience gained in making these 
major changes. 

Patriot's Day dawned cool and clear, but by the end of the morning at Buttrick's Meadow we were rather 
■ damp. The highlight of the day was the presentation on the Meadow of the stirring Flag Ceremony by the Acton 
Minutemen, which displays and narrates the history of all the flags which have flown over the United States. The 
weather could not detract, however, from the spirit of enthusiasm and high dedication of the 1000 citizens and 
3000 Cub, Boy, and Girl Scouts who retraced the steps of Isaac Davis to Concord. As in the past, the arrival 
of Dr. Samuel Prescott at the site of the Robbins house and the ride of John Robbins through Acton to the Liberty 
I Tree House were reenacted. Before the march commenced at the Isaac Davis Home, we were honored by the 
remarks of the Lieutenant Commander William A. Will, Chaplain, USN, Portsmouth Naval Base. The Isaac 
jDavis Patriot's Day Flag was also presented at that time to Mrs. Porter Jenks representing the Acton Girl Scouts. 
During the afternoon, the Town Hall, Center Woman's Club, Jones Tavern, and Faulkner House held open house, 
and many citizens viewed the historical displays prepared for the occasion. 

During the past several years, the Committee has become increasingly concerned about the cost of the 
jbusing required to observe Memorial Day in the Center, Quimby Square, Edwards Square, Mount Hope and 
j Woodlawn Cemeteries, in sequence. After discussions with many concerned townspeople, we decided that it 
would be efficient and economical to assign separate decorating parties at North Acton Cemetery, Mount Hope 
I Cemetery, Woodlawn Cemetery, Quimby Square, Fort Pond Brook, and Edwards Square. These observations 
j were conducted with the appropriate dignity and, when coupled with a parade from Charter Road to the Davis 
I Monument where the Memorials around the Common were decorated, provided a very satisfactory and respectful ^ 
observance. We were fortunate in having Wesley Hall as our Marshal for these events. Wes is a Veteran of 
World War I, having served with the 317th Field Signal Battalion. Our services were enhanced by the participating 
members of the Acton Clergy, and we were fortunate that the rain abated temporarily during the ceremonies on 
the Common. As is our usual practice, we provided geraniums and new flags which were placed on the graves 
of all veterans in the Acton Cemeteries through the assistance of the Cemetery Commissioners, their staff, 
and the Scouts. 

Early in 1970, we initiated a series of meetings 
with interested individuals and organizations to determine 
whether we should plan a formal Town observance for 
July 4th. It was eminently clear that we should add this 
item to our program. During the ensuing months, we pre- 
pared an extensive program, which involved the participa- 
tion of virtually every Town service organization. We are 
also grateful for the help and support of many individuals 
too numerous to list here, who endured the morning rain 
and the wet facilities. Baseball games, track and field 
events, horseshoe contests, doll carriage parade, and 
plenty of hotdogs and hamburgers kept Charter Field busy 
all day and well into the evening! The highlight of the 
celebration was a delightful band concert by the Maynard 
Band, provided by Mr. Earle Tuttle to whom we are most 
indebted. Acton's own Dr. Seymour DiMare and Mr. 
Richard Ferrini of Scituate brought the day to a rousing 
conclusion with many rounds of their cannons. Since this 
was the first Town 4th of July in over 30 years, we learned 
a lot about the costs and arrangements required for a new 
and extensive observance. As the saying goes, we expect 
to have a better, if not bigger, 4th in 1971 which may involve 
a Town sponsored fireworks display. 

Mention must also be made in recognition of the efforts of the Acton Minutemen in again observing their 
Crown Resistance Day on September 27. Although weather required that the music and formations be held 
inside Blanchard Auditorium, the afternoon was most pleasing and enjoyed by all those who attended. 

In addition to the several changes noted above, during 1970 we lost three Committee members who, through 
long years of service and hard work, made the Public Ceremonies and Celebrations Committee function smoothly 
and efficiently and who performed their assigned duties with inexhaustible energy and enthusiasm. The Public 
Ceremonies and Celebrations Committee will surely miss the leadership of Clark McElvein and the faithful 
services of Carl Hedin. In addition, we will miss Russ Hayward, a charter member of this Committee, who 
gave us 10 years of devoted service. 




Burton A. Davis 
David H. Donaldson 
Walter R. Laite 



Richmond P. Miller, Jr. 
Robert E. Nelson 
John W. Tierney 



53 



TOWN FOREST 



The access road to the Durkee Lot of the Town Forest was completed this year. This improvement 
makes a safer route for hikers than was provided by the right of way off Route 2. An area for parking cars 
has been provided on Conservation land off Bulette Road. 

The Texas lot in North Acton is used more intensively as open land diminishes. The acquisition by 
the Conservation Commission of the adjacent Wills Hole area puts over seventy acres of wild land in town 
ownership. 

Both areas are used by Scouts, Garden Clubs and other groups for recreation. 

Franklin H. Charter Emery Nelson 

George E. Neagle 

Town Forest Committee 



TREE WARDEN 



The Department has moved to more outside contractual work than town labor this year. A large part 
of this was tree removal, requiring specialized equipment. 

A new truck was acquired by the Department in December. This replaces a 13 year old truck and 
should make for greater efficiency. 

Over 150 new Trees were planted this year. All of these were placed back from the street on private 
property. 



Franklin H. Charter 



INSECT PEST CONTROL 



The Department removed 55 diseased Elms in 1970. Private contractors were used for most of those 
involving utility wires. 

Gypsy Moths continue to build up in forested areas. The Oak Leaf Skeletonizer first appeared in 1969. 
and built up rapidly by October of 1970. This defoliator was last present in this area in 1961. 

Franklin H. Charter 
Superintendent 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Acton Housing Authority came into being in March 1970 by unanimous vote of the Annual Town 
Meeting. The Authority was specifically charged with providing not more than 55 units of housing for elderly 
citizens of low-income status. 

The Authority formally organized and adopted its charter in September 1970. Four members were ap- 
pointed by the Selectmen to serve until the Annual Town Elections in March 1971. The fifth member, 
Mrs. Patience MacPherson, was appointed to a three year term by the Governor of the Commonwealth. 
Other members are Julia Stevens, Chairman; George Moulton, Vice -Chairman; Mary Laffin, Secretary; 
Raymond Page, Treasurer. 

The authority has held four monthly meetings and one special meeting. We have submitted our site 
selections to the Department of Community Affairs which has authorized us to build forty units of housing. 
We are currently awaiting the Department's appraisal and purchase of the proposed site. 

The members of the Authority are hopeful that actual construction of this much needed housing will 
begin by the summer of 1971. 

Julia D. Stevens, Chairman 



54 



CEMETERY 



We herewith submit the annual report of the Cemetery Department, for the year 1970, as follows: 

Mount Hope Cemetery 

The buildings in this cemetery were painted and wire mesh screens were placed over the windows, 
to prevent vandals from breaking them. 

A new area was cleared, the stumps and brush disposed of, two new roads laid out, the area rough 
graded and made ready to loam and seed down this coming year. New water pipes will be installed, as 
well as new lots and single graves, to be completed this coming year. 

As Mount Hope Cemetery expands in area, it will become necessary to install a large water main, 
so there will be sufficient amount of water to supply the sprinkler systems that may be required in the 
very near future. At the present time, the water supply is furnished by a two inch pipe line and it has 
been extended so far out from Central Street that the number of sprinkler heads it can supply at any one 
time is becoming exceedingly limited. 

Woodlawn Cemetery 

In the fall a fairly large area was cleared, the stumps disposed of, area rough graded, and made 
ready for loaming and seeding down in the spring. A large part of this cleared area will be laid out into 
a single grave section, as there seems to be a greater demand for this type of interment space over larger 
lots. The remaining space will be laid out into four grave lots. When the work has been completed in both 
cemeteries, they will be landscaped with trees and shrubs. 

During the year the Commissioners made a survey of several surrounding cemeteries regarding 
present cemetery service charges and learned that almost all had to increase their service charges to 
compensate for the increasing cost of their labor forces. Therefore, the Commissioners have decided 
to make the necessary adjustments in the various service charges in the Acton cemeteries. 

This fall we lost the services of our part time workers, who had been with the cemeteries for the 
past several years. They will have to be replaced this coming year. As both of the cemeteries expand 
in area, it will become necessary to add to our labor force in the very near future. For the coming year 
we are going to try to manage by using several part time workers. 

Several times this past year the Memorial Chapel basement was broken into. We have installed 
steel bars across all the basement windows and a heavy angle iron striker plate for the basement door 
lock, hoping to prevent any future attempts at entry. 

This past year we received our new 18 HP leaf vac and the department built a large leaf box to fit 
inside the dump truck body to accommodate the ground up leaves. With this new machine, the leaves are 
picked up very quickly and compacted to a certain extent, requiring fewer loads to be hauled away. We 
have cleared places in each cemetery where the leaves may be dumped for compost so they can be used 
over again to enrich the topsoil. This new machine has greatly reduced the number of man hours 
required in leaf removal. 

Master Plan 



The Commissioners had the Acton Survey and Engineering, Inc. of Acton make a preliminary survey 
of both cemeteries to determine the most practical and economical way to develop the remaining land in 
each cemetery. In the report it was recommended that a master plan should be made for each cemetery, 
including topographic and planimetric plans by means of aerial photography at a scale of one inch per twenty 
feet with a one foot contour interval. 

The proposed plan would show the layout of roadways, extension of water, drainage, etc. The layout 
of a suitable number of lots to meet future needs would also be included. 

The Commissioners have inserted an article in the warrant asking for money to carry out a master 
plan for the cemeteries. If the article is passed, they propose to hire a competent landscape architect to 
do the necessary work. 



55 



The cemetery personnel have attended several conventions, seminars on ground maintenance, 
shrubs, etc. as well as an equipment show for cemeteries which was held in Roxbury, Massachusetts, 
last October. We have plans for some of the personnel to attend a seminar to be held in February at 
the Waltham Field Station. 

Harlan E. Tuttle 
Howard F. Jones 
Charles F. Putnam 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Fred S. Kennedy 
Superintendent 



WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION 



For the year ending December 31, 1970, there were sixteen (16) accidents reported from the following 
departments: 

School Department 

Acton-Boxborough Regional High School 4 

Acton-Boxborough Regional Junior High School 1 

Acton Elementary— Julia McCarthy School 2 

Acton Elementary - Florence A. Merriam School 2 

Acton Elementary - Paul Gates School 2 

Acton Elementary - Marion L. Towne School 2 

Highway Department 3 

Recreation Department 1 

Nine of the injured required medical attention only, three required hospital and medical attention with 
loss of time. Two required dental work and two required no medical attention. 



Theron A. Lowden 

Workmen's Compensation Agent 



G00DN0W FUND 

For the year ending December 31, 1970 

INVESTMENTS 

Concord Co-operative Bank $3, 000. 00 $3, 000. 00 

RECEIPTS 

Concord Co-operative Bank $ 157.50 $ 157.50 

EXPENDITURES 

Treasurer of the Acton Congregational Church $ 137. 50 $ 137. 50 

Town of Acton for the perpetual card of the Goodnow Lot 

in Woodlawn Cemetery 20. 00 20. 00 

$ 157.50 

Thelma L. Boatman, Tr. 
Clark C. McElvein 

James N. Gates 

Trustees 
56 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 



During 1970 the relative contribution of business and industry to Acton's tax base continued to decline. 
Industry now provides 5-6% of the tax base. This relative decline is the result of continued residential 
growth with the business and industrial sectors remaining static. 

Six members of the I. D. C. attended a seminar on "495 Comes Alive" sponsored by the Massachusetts 
Department of Commerce and Development and five other State Agencies. The seminar was concerned 
with the problems associated with the industrial development of Route 495 and its economic impact on the 
surrounding towns. 

The I. D. C. held several special meetings with other town boards and committees in addition to its 
regular monthly meetings. 

The industrial land in North Acton continues to be the most promising location for future industrial 
development, however, the economic slowdown resulted in few actual inquiries for these sites in 1970. 

William D. McDonald Albert I. Verchot 

Stephen E. Lord Jack H. Batchelder 

Richard J. O'Neil Edward W. Flannery 
John W. Tierney 



SEWERAGE STUDY 



-4 



The members of the Sewerage Study Committee are convinced that a municipal sewerage system is 
inevitable. The question of when the Town of Acton should undertake a sewerage program has been addressed 
by the S. S. C. but there is no definitive answer. Although the State has adopted a schedule for water pollution 
abatement, it has never been imposed on the Town of Acton. However, with increasing population, and with 
increasing pressures to prevent pollution of natural resources and the development of health hazards, we 
are reasonably certain that the Town will be required to begin a sewerage program within a very few years. 

Construction costs, as many other items of our economy, continue to increase at alarming rates. 
The Construction Cost Index, published quarterly in Engineering News Record may be used as a basis of 
estimating costs of construction. The Index was 1000 when Metcalf and Eddy prepared the report on a 
sewerage system for Acton in June 1966. The Index has increased approximately 10% per year end, and 
as of September 1970, was 1434. In terms of dollars, this means that the cost of constructing a sewage 
treatment plant is now estimated to be $1, 400, 000 as opposed to $996, 000 originally estimated. The cost 
of Phase I, which includes the plant and sewers in South Acton, is now estimated to be $4, 500, 000. If 
costs continue to rise at such a rate, the Town should consider beginning a sewerage program before it 
becomes mandatory. 

The S. S. C. has endeavored to find ways of reducing the capital and operating costs of a Town sewerage 
system. One means would be to enter into a cooperative effort with surrounding towns. Not only would costs 
be shared but inter -community sewer mains are eligible for larger construction grants from the Federal 
Government than intra -community mains. 

At the invitation of the Town of Concord, we participated in preliminary discussions with representa- 
tives of the Towns of Lincoln, Littleton, Sudbury, Wayland, and Concord to explore possibilities of regional 
facilities. The Town of Concord presented results of their preliminary investigations. The Metropolitan 
Area Planning Council is also studying "regional" sewerage systems and a report is expected in mid-1971. 
We feel that before the Town of Acton enters into a cooperative effort with other towns, the various forms of 
a "regional system" should be studied to determine that which is the most advantageous to Acton. Formal 
regionalization is not necessary. The S. S. C. is continually monitoring regional activities and will evaluate 
all practical approaches as they evolve. 

Until such time as a municipal sewerage program is realized and individual households are connected 
to sewers, proper installation and care of individual disposal systems are imperative. The Board of Health 
has established regulations concerning the installation of septic tanks and leaching fields. It is the respon- 
sibility of the individual home owners to provide adequate maintenance of their systems to extend their life 
and to prevent them from becoming a neighborhood nuisance and health hazard. With ordinary use and care, 
a disposal system installed in accordance with the regulations of the Board of Health usually requires clean- 
ing every two years. However, individual septic tanks may require cleaning more frequently. Booklets 
providing information on the operation and routine care of septic systems are available from the Board of 
Health. 

57 



The S.S. C. received the resignation of Robert H. Gerhardt as he has taken a position on the Planning 
Board. Mr. Gerhardt has been a very active member of the S. S. C. for five years. His faithful and dedicated 
service is sincerely appreciated. 

Daniel J. Costello David A. Manalan 

Bradford S. Leach Warren S. Orcutt 

Robert H. Gerhardt, Chairman 



VETERANS' GRAVES OFFICER 



There have been ten interments of United States War Veterans in Acton Cemeteries during the year 
1970. The names of the Veterans, the dates and places of burial are as follows: 



Richard Allen 
Frank W. Meakin 
Hugh C. Hodgen 
Sherman W. Frost 
Ralph Spinney 
Everett F. Glenn 
Henry B. Burke 
Joseph L. Aiken, Jr. 
Invald Pederson 
Abel DeGryse 



Ko 


rean War 


W. 


W. 


I 


W. 


w. 


I 


W. 


w. 


I 


w. 


w. 


II 


w. 


w. 


II 


w. 


w. 


I 


w. 


w. 


II 


w. 


w. 


II 


w. 


w. 


I 



•" 



January 29, 1970 
May 26, 1970 
June 9, 1970 
September 13, 1970 
September 16, 1970 
November 13, 1970 
December 9, 1970 
December 13, 1970 
December 17, 1970 
December 26, 1970 



Mount Hope Cemetery 
Woodlawn Cemetery 
Woodlawn Cemetery 
Woodlawn Cemetery 
Mount Hope Cemetery 
Woodlawn Cemetery 
Woodlawn Cemetery 
Woodlawn Cemetery 
Woodlawn Cemetery 
Mount Hope Cemetery 



Veterans' Flag Standards have been placed on all of these departed Veterans' graves and several govern- 
ment markers have been placed on their graves. 

The Bronze Craft Corporation, of Nashua, New Hampshire, who has been our source of supply of Flag 
Standards, has discontinued the casting of standards due to the high cost of casting the standards. The cost 
of the Flag Standards has increased by 100% during 1970. 

T. Frederick S. Kennedy 
Veterans' Graves Officer 



VETERANS AGENT 



For the year ending December 31, 1970, there were fourteen cases aided under Chapter 115 of the 
General Laws at an expenditure of $19, 045. 14. This was an increase of four cases over the previous year. 

Contact Service with the Veterans' Administration was rendered to forty-two veterans or their dependents 
in obtaining various federal benefits to which they were entitled. Advice, counseling, and referrals were 
rendered in countless other instances. 



Norman L. Roche 
Veterans' Agent 



58 



TOWN ELECTION 



March 2, 1970 



Pet. 1 



Pet. 2 



Pet. 3 



Pet. 4 



Whole number of ballots cast 

MODERATOR, One Year 

John W. Putnam 

Blanks 

SELECTMAN, Three Years 

Donald R. Callinan 

Paul R. Nyquist 

Alan J. Waters 

Blanks 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE, Three Years (2) 

Edith D. Stawell 

DonaLd E. Westcott 

Blanks 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE, Two Years (2 vacancies) 

Beverly W. Lydiard 

John A. Norris 

Robert Evans, Jr 

Blanks 

TRUSTEE OF MEMORIAL LIBRARY, Three Years 

Mileva P. Brown 

Blanks 



408 



422 



570 



1400 



363 


384 


492 


1239 


45 


38 


78 


161 


25 


28 


42 


95 


243 


272 


340 


855 


128 


117 


169 


414 


12 


5 


19 


36 


356 


364 


483 


1203 


360 


346 


483 


1189 


100 


134 


174 


408 


276 


300 


408 


984 


267 


260 


409 


936 


203 


178 


216 


597 


70 


106 


107 


283 


371 


371 


525 


1267 


37 


51 


45 


133 



QUESTION 1. 

"Shall the town, in addition to the payment of 
fifty percent of a premium for contributory 
group life and health insurance for employees 
in the service of the town and their dependents, 
pay a subsidiary or additional rate?" 

Yes . 

No . . 

Blanks 



184 


215 


309 


708 


207 


185 


237 


629 


17 


22 


24 


63 



QUESTION 2. 

"Shall the fluoridation of the public water 
supply for domestic use in Acton be continued?" 

Yes . . 
No. . . 
Blanks. 



279 


271 


387 


937 


116 


148 


177 


441 


13 


3 


6 


22 



SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 
December 7, 1970 



Whole number of votes cast 



Pet. 1 



407 



Pet. 2 



303 



Pet. 3 



407 



Total 



1117 



SELECTMAN, to fill unexpired term 
ending, March, 1972 

William B. Allred 

Charles A. Morehouse 

Robert E. Parks 

Richard M. Scribner 

William L. Chipman 

Michael H. Pickowicz 

Blanks 



5 





1 


6 


44 


62 


65 


171 


201 


50 


96 


347 


6 


5 


9 


20 


141 


165 


216 


522 


9 


16 


18 


43 


1 


5 


2 


8 



59 



STATE ELECTION 



R - Republican 



November 3, 1970 
D - Democratic SL - Socialist Labor 



P - Prohibition 



Whole number of votes cast 

SENATOR in CONGRESS 

Edward M. Kennedy D 

Josiah A. Spaulding R 

Lawrence Gilfedder SL 

Mark R. Shaw P 

Blanks 

GOVERNOR and LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

Sargent and Dwight R [ 

White and Dukakis D 

GOVERNOR 

Henning A. Blomen SL 

John Charles Hedges P 

Blanks 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

Albert E. Bates P 

Francis A. Votano SL 

Blanks 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Donald L. Conn R 

Robert H. Quinn D 

Willy N. Hogseth SL 

Blanks 

SECRETARY 

John F. X. Davoren D 

Mary B. Newman R 

Murvin A. Becker P 

Edgar E. Gaudet SL 

Blanks 

TREASURER 

Robert Q. Crane D 

Frederick D. Hannon R *- 

John B. Lauder P 

Roy K. Nelson SL 

Blanks 

AUDITOR 

Thaddeus Buczko D 

Frank P. Bucci R 

Raymond J. Gray SL 

Roger I. Williams P 

Blanks 

CONGRESSMAN 

Robert F. Drinan D 

John McGlennon R 

Philip J. Philbin 

Blanks 

COUNCILLOR 

George F. Cronin, Jr D 

Blanks 

SENATOR 

James DeNormandie R 

Stephen F. Coyle D 

Blanks 



Pet. 1 



1608 



Pet. 2 



1565 



Pet. 3 



1964 



Total 



5137 



555 


651 


762 


1968 


1008 


859 


1145 


3012 


1 


2 


3 


6 


4 


2 


7 


13 


40 


51 


47 


138 


1225 


1071 


1429 


3725 


357 


463 


498 


1318 


1 





3 


4 


1 


1 


1 


3 


24 


30 


33 


87 


1 


1 


2 


4 


2 





2 


4 


23 


30 


33 


86 


962 


795 


1056 


2813 


590 


716 


840 


2146 


11 


13 


8 


32 


45 


. 41 


60 


146 


384 


477 


572 


1433 


1152 


1033 


1312 


3497 


6 


2 


6 


14 


7 


7 


6 


20 


59 


46 


68 


173 


575 


717 


857 


2149 


924 


735 


993 


2652 


7 


10 


2 - 


19 


11 


11 


10 


32 


91 


92 


102 


285 


622 


762 


913 


2297 


868 


685 


922 


2475 


12 


17 


14 


43 


7 


6 


9 


22 


99 


95 


106 


300 


428 


498 


554 


1480 


1004 


861 


1184 


3049 


157 


192 


203 


552 


19 


14 


23 


56 


937 


965 


1229 


3131 


671 


600 


735 


2006 


1069 


889 


1190 


3148 


456 


567 


649 


1672 


83 


109 


125 


317 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Chester G. Atkins D 

George F. Rohan R 

Blanks 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

John J. Droney D 

Blanks 

CLERK OF COURTS 

Edward J. Sullivan D 

Blanks 

REGISTER OF DEEDS 

Vincent D. McCabe R 

John F. Zamparelli D 

Blanks 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER 

John L. Danehy D 

Blanks 

SHERIFF (Vacancy) 

John J. Buckley R 

John F. Dever, Jr D 

Blanks 



QUESTION 1. 



QUESTION 2. 



QUESTION 3. 



QUESTION 4. 



QUESTION 5. 



QUESTION 6. 



B 



D 



QUESTION 7. 



Yes 

No 
Blanks 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 

A 
B 
C 
Blanks 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 



Pet. 1 



860 

720 

28 



986 
622 



966 
642 



1109 
318 
181 

887 
721 



1210 

312 

86 

475 

1001 

132 

1290 
226 

92 

877 
504 
227 

877 
504 
227 

194 

936 

406 

72 

1024 
413 
171 

978 
339 

291 

1134 
223 

251 

1023 
304 
281 

1032 
271 
305 



Pet. 2 



940 

599 

26 



1002 
563 



984 
581 



939 
421 
205 

902 
663 



1076 
383 
106 

450 
938 
177 

1228 
221 
116 

918 
534 
113 

795 
492 
278 

158 
871 
436 
100 

985 
430 
150 

970 
355 
240 

1123 
224 
218 

1038 
285 
242 

983 
239 
343 



Pet. 3 



Total 



1124 

807 

33 


2924 
2126 

87 


1256 
708 


3244 
1893 


1230 
734 


3180 
1957 


1276 
459 
229 


3324 

1198 

615 


1124 
840 


2913 
2224 


1438 
418 
108 


3724 

1113 

300 


613 

1191 

160 


1538 

3130 

469 


1529 
319 
116 


4047 
766 

324 


1177 
684 
103 


2972 

1722 

443 


982 
655 

327 


2654 

1651 

832 


215 

1143 

525 

81 


567 
2950 
1367 

253 


1227 
557 
180 


3236 

1400 

501 


1148 
473 
343 


3096 

1167 

874 


1425 
255 
284 


3682 
702 

753 


1254 
388 
322 


3315 
977 
845 


1278 
320 
366 


3293 

830 

1014 



61 



TOWN MEETINGS 



ABSTRACT OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MARCH 9, 1970 AND ADJOURNED SESSIONS MARCH 16, 1970, MARCH 23, 1970, AND MARCH 30, 1970 

Moderator called the meeting to order at 7:35 P. M. 

ADJOURNMENT 

VOTED: That at the conclusion of the business pending before the meeting at eleven o'clock this evening this 
meeting be adjourned to 7:30 o'clock P. M. on next Monday, March 16th at this same place. 

Article 1. OFFICERS 

To choose all necessary Town Officers and Committees and fix the salaries and compensation of all the 
elective officers of the Town. 



ELECTED 
ELECTED 
ELECTED 
ELECTED 
ELECTED 



Helen B. Wood Trustee of the Elizabeth White Fund for three years. 

Barbara Nylander Trustee of the Citizens Library Association of West Acton for three years. 

Richard A. Lowden Trustee of the Acton Firemen's Relief Fund for three years. 

Thelma L. Boatman Trustee of the Goodnow Fund for three years. 

James B. Wilson Trustee of the West Acton Firemen's Relief Fund for three years. 



(All above votes were unanimous. ) 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: That the 1970 compensation schedule of elected officers of the Town be adopted 
as follows: 

Moderator $20. 00 per each night per meeting 

Board of Selectmen: Chairman $750. 00 

Clerk 650. 00 

Member 650. 00 

Article 2. REPORTS 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the several reports of the Town Officers and Boards as submitted. 

Article 3. REPORTS 

To hear and act upon the report of any Committee chosen at any previous Town Meeting that has not already 
reported. 

No reports. 

Article 4. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Personnel Bylaw as follows: 

(a) By adding the following new Section 1.1: 

"SECTION 1.1 DEFINITIONS 

As used in this bylaw, the following words and phrases shall have the following meanings 
unless a different construction is clearly required by the context or by the laws of the Com- 
monwealth: 

"Administrative Authority," the elected or appointed official or board having jurisdiction 
over a function or activity; 

"Board," the Personnel Board described in Section 2; 

"Class," a group of positions in the Town service sufficiently similar in respect to duties and 
responsibilities so that the same descriptive title may be used to designate each position 
allocated to the class, the same qualifications shall be required of the incumbents, the same 
tests of fitness may be used to choose qualified employees and the same scale of compensa- 
tion can be made to apply with equity; 

62 



"Classification Plan," class titles appearing in Schedule A of Section 15 and the class specifi- 
cations relating thereto which are on file with the Personnel Board; 

"Compensation Grade," a range of salary or wage rates appearing in Schedules B, C, D or E 
of Section 15; 

"Compensation Plan," Schedules B, C, D, E, F and G in Section 15; 

"Department," any department, board, committee, commission or other agency of the Town 
subject to this bylaw; 

"Employee," an employee of the Town occupying a position in the classification plan; 

"Full-time Employee," an employee retained in full-time employment; 

"Increment," the dollar difference between step rates; 

"Maximum Rate," the highest rate in a range which an employee normally is entitled to attain; 

"Minimum Rate," the rate in a range which is normally the hiring rate of a new employee; 

"Part-time Employee," an employee retained in part-time employment; 

"Permanent Employee," an employee retained in continuous employment in a permanent 
position; 

"Permanent Position," a full-time or part-time position in the Town service which has required 
or which is likely to require the services of an incumbent in continuous employment for a 
period of fifty-two calendar weeks; 

"Personal Rate," a rate above the maximum rate applicable only to a designated employee; 

"Position," an office or post of employment in the Town service with duties and responsibilities 
calling for the full-time, part-time or seasonal employment of one person in the performance 
and exercise thereof; 

"Probationary Employee," an employee, except a member of the uniformed force of the Police 
Department, during the first six months of employment. The probationary status of uniformed 
members of the Police Department shall be determined by the Civil Service Law of the Com- 
monwealth; 

"Promotion," a change from a position of lower class and compensation grade to a position with 
greater responsibilities in a higher class and compensation grade; 

"Range," the dollar difference between minimum and maximum rates; 

"Rate," a sum of money designated as compensation for personal services on an hourly, daily, 
weekly, monthly, annual or other basis; 

"Seasonal Employment," employment for less than full-time annual employment; 

"Step Rate," a rate in a range of a compensation grade; 

"Temporary Employee," an employee retained in a temporary position or in a permanent position 
in probationary or acting status; 

"Temporary Position," a position in the Town service which requires or is likely to require the 
services of one incumbent for a period less than fifty-two calendar weeks in continuous employ- 
ment; 

"Town," the Town of Acton." 

(b) By substituting "Town Manager" for the board or official designated or by adding "Town Manager" 
in the following sections: 



63 



Section 


Clause 


3 


(e) 


4 


(c) 


4 


(c) 


4 


(c) 


5 


(b) 


5 


(c) 



Change 
Replacing "department head" 

Adding "and the Town Manager" at the end of paragraph 3 
Replacing "personnel board" in paragraph 8 
Replacing "personnel board" in paragraph 9 
Replacing "personnel board" 
Adding "and Town Manager" after the word, "authority." 

(c) By substituting "G" for "F" in the first sentence of Clause (b) of Section 4. 

(d) By deleting the second paragraph of Clause (c) in Section 4 and substituting the following new 
second paragraph: 

"Employees in the continuous "Full Time Service" of the Town, who have a satisfactory 
performance record, shall be eligible for an advance of one step-rate on the date of the 
employee's anniversary of employment but not more, until the maximum for the employee's 
job is reached, subject to the approval of the employee's Department Head and the Town 
Manager." 

(e) By deleting paragraph 4 of Clause (c) of Section 4 and substituting the following new paragraph 4: 

"An employee receiving a promotion to a vacant position or to a new position shall, upon 
assignment resulting from such promotion, receive the rate in the compensation grade of 
the vacant or new position next above his existing rate. If the resulting adjustment does not 
equal $3.20 per week for a position class assigned to Schedule B, C or D or $.08 per hour 
for a position class assigned to Schedule E, the adjustment shall be to the second rate above 
the existing rate but within the compensation grade of the vacant or new position." 

(f) By deleting paragraph 5 of Clause (c) of Section 4 and substituting the following new paragraph 5: 

"The Town Manager shall be responsible for the employment or appointment of persons 
to fill positions or perform duties subject to the Compensation Plan and shall determine the 
appropriate classification of the positions to which such persons shall be assigned." 

(g) By deleting paragraph 10(b) of Clause (c) of Section 4 and substituting the following new para- 
graph 10(b): 

"At 1-1/2 times the employee's basic hourly rate for such work for positions allocated to 
Schedule C and D except the positions of Chief (Fire) and Chief (Police)." 

(h) By substituting "48" for "56" opposite Fire Department Uniformed Personnel and opposite 
Fire Alarm Operators in Section 5, Clause (a). 

(i) By adding "or special" following "annual" in the first sentence of Section 6. 

Article 5. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Personnel Bylaw by deleting Clauses (c) and (d) of Section 7 and 
by inserting therefor the following: 

(c) Vacation leave of three (3) weeks with full pay shall be granted to any such employee who, 
as of June 1, has been employed by the Town for seven (7) years or more. 

(d) Vacation leave of four (4) weeks with full pay shall be granted to any such employee who, 
as of June 1, has been employed by the Town for fifteen (15) years or more. 

Article 6. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To ratify the action of the Personnel Board on January 6, 1970 in adding to 
Schedule B - General Weekly Salary Schedule of Section 15 of the Personnel Bylaw the following new com- 
pensation grade: 



S-23 



Minimum 




Intermedia 


te S-. 


teps 




Maximum 


A. 


B 


C 






D 


E 


W 217.08 


230.04 


245. 


16 




260. 28 


275.40 


A 11,288.16 


11, 962.08 


12, 748. 


32 




13, 534. 56 


14, 320.80 



64 



Article 7. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To ratify the action of the Personnel Board on January 6, 1970 in reclassifying the 
position class of Town Engineer, as set forth in Schedule A of the Personnel Bylaw from Compensation 
Grade S-21 to Compensation Grade S-23 in Schedule B - General Weekly Salary Schedule of Section 15. 

Article 8. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Personnel Bylaw by deleting Schedules A, B, C, D, E, F and G 
of Section 15 and by inserting therefor the following: 

SCHEDULE A - ALPHABETICAL LIST OF POSITION CLASSES AND ALLOCATION TO 
SCHEDULE AND COMPENSATION GRADE OR DESIGNATED RATE OR RANGE 



Class 



Title 



Schedule Grade 



Class 



Title 



Schedule Grade 



Accounting Clerk 

Administrative Assistant 

Assessor, Board Chairman 

Assessor, Board Member 

Assistant Library Director 

Assistant Town Engineer 

Arts & Crafts Supervisor (Seasonal 

Board of Health Chairman 

Board of Health Member 

Building Inspector 

Chief (Fire) 

Chief (Police) 

Children's Librarian 

Custodian 

Deputy Building Inspector (p.t. ) 

Deputy Chief (Fire) (Call) (p.t.) 

Deputy Elections Clerk (p.t.) 

Deputy Inspector (Elections) (p.t.) 

Deputy Warden (Elections) (p.t.) 

Director of Public Health 

Dog Officer 

Dump Custodian 

Elections Clerk (p.t.) 

Engineering Assistant 

Executive Clerk 

Fire Alarm Maintenance Man (p.t. 

Fire Alarm Operator 

Fire Alarm Superintendent (p.t.) 

Fire Captain 

Fire Fighter 

Fire Fighter (Call) (p.t.) 

Fire Lieutenant 

Fire Lieutenant (Call) (p.t.) 

Heavy Motor Equipment Operator 

Inspector of Animals (p.t.) 

Inspector (Elections) (p. t. ) 

Inspector of Wires (p. t. ) 

Junior Clerk 

Laborer 

Librarian (West Acton) (p.t. ) 

Library Assistant (Jr.) 

Library Assistant (Sr.) 



B 


S-5 


B 


S-22 


F 




F 




B 


S-10 


B 


S-19 


F 




F 




F 




B 


S-16 


D 


F-5 


C 


P-4 


B 


S-7 


E 


W-l 


F 




F 




F 




F 




F 




B 


S-17 


E 


W-2 


E 


W-2 


F 




B 


S-ll 


B 


S-9 


F 




D 


■ F-l 


F 




D 


F-4 


D 


F-2* 


F 




D 


F-3 


F 




E 


W-4 


E 


W-2 


F 




B 


S-13 


B 


S-l 


E 


W-l 


B 


S-9 


B 


S-l 


B 


S-3 



Library Cataloger 

Library Director 

Library Page (p.t. ) 

Maintenance Man (Cemeteries) 

Maintenance Man (Highways) 

Motor Equipment Operator 

Motor Equipment Repairman 

Patrolman 

Patrolman (Special) (p.t. ) 

Playground Instructor (Seasonal) 

Playground Supervisor (Seasonal) 

Plumbing Inspector (p. t.) 

Police Lieutenant 

Police Matron (p.t.) 

Police Sergeant 

Principal Clerk 

Public Health Nurse 

Recreation Director (Seasonal) 

Reference Librarian 

Registrar of Voters (p.t.) 

Rodman 

School Crossing Guard (p.t.) 

Sealer of Weights & Measures (p. t. 

Semi-Skilled Laborer 

Senior Clerk 

Superintendent (Cemeteries) 

Superintendent (Highways) 

Superintendent of 

Insect Pest Control 
Tennis Supervisor (Seasonal) 
Teller (p.t.) 
Town Accountant (p. t.) 
Town Clerk 
Town Engineer 
Town Manager 

Town Treasurer & Town Collector 
Tree Climber 
Tree Warden 
Veterans' Agent & Director of 

Veterans' Services (p.t.) 
Warden (Elections) (p.t.) 
Working Foreman (Cemeteries) 
Working Foreman (Highways) 



B 


S-7 


B 


S-17 


F 




E 


W-3 


E 


W-3 


E 


W-3 


B 


S-15 


C 


P-l 


C 


P-l 


F 




F 




F 




C 


P-3 


F 




C 


P-2 


B 


S-6 


B 


S-ll 


F 




B 


S-7 


F 




B 


S-7 


F 




B 


S-9 


E 


W-2 


B 


S-3 


B 


S-14 


B 


S-17 


E 


W-7 


F 




F 




B 


S-19 


F 




B 


S-23 


G 




B 


S-17 


E 


W-5 


E 


W-7 


B 


S-12 


F 




E 


W-6 


E 


W-6 



^Additional $7.00 per week when assigned to and performing duties relating to the maintenance of fire 
apparatus. 



65 



SCHEDULE B - GENERAL WEEKLY SALARY SCHEDULE 
(Annual rates computed by multiplying weekly rates by 52) 



Compensation 
Grade 


W 
A 


Minimum 
A 

$ 85.54 
4448.08 


B 

$ 89.10 
4633. 20 


Intermediate Steps 
C 

$ 92.66 
4818. 32 


D 

$ 96.23 
5003. 96 


Maximum 
E 


S-l 


$ 100. 98 
5250. 96 


S-2 


W 
A 


89. 10 
4633.20 


92. 66 
4818.32 


96. 23 
5003.96 


100. 98 
5250. 96 


105.73 
5497.96 


S-3 


W 
A 


92. 66 
4818. 32 


96.23 
5003. 96 


100. 98 
5250. 96 


105.73 
5497. 96 


110.48 
5744.96 


S-4 


W 
A 


96.23 
5003. 96 


100. 98 
5250.96 


105.73 
5497. 96 


110.48 
5744. 96 


115. 24 
5992.48 


S-5 


W 
A 


100. 98 
5250.96 


105.73 
5497.96 


110.48 
5744. 96 


115. 24 
5992.48 


119. 99 
6239.48 


S-6 


W 
A 


105.73 
54 97. 96 


110.48 
5744.96 


115. 24 
5992.48 


119. 99 
6239.48 


124.74 
6486.48 


S-7 


W 
A 


110.48 
5744.96 


115.24 
5992.48 


119. 99 
6239.48 


124.74 
6486.48 


130. 68 
6795. 36 


S-8 


W 
A 


115.24 
5992.48 


119. 99 
6239.48 


124.74 
6486.48 


130. 68 
6795. 36 


136. 62 
7104.24 


S-9 


W 
A 


119. 99 
6239.48 


124.74 
6486.48 


130. 68 
6795.36 


136. 62 
7104.24 


142.56 
7413. 12 


S-10 


W 

A 


124.74 
6486.48 


130. 68 
6795.36 


136. 62 
7104. 24 


142.56 
7413. 12 


149. 69 
7783.88 


S-ll 


W 
A 


130. 68 
6795. 36 


136.62 
7104.24 


142.56 
7413. 12 


149. 69 
7783.88 


156.82 
8154.64 


S-12 


W 
A 


136. 62 
7104.24 


142.56 
7413. 12 


149. 69 
7783.88 


156.82 
8154. 64 


165. 13 
8586.76 


S-13 


W 
A 


$ 142.56 
7413. 12 


, $ 149. 69 
7783.88 


$ 156.82 
8154. 64 


$ 165. 13 
8586.76 


$ 173.45 
9019.40 


S-14 


W 
A 


149. 69 
7783.88 


156.82 
8154. 64 


165. 13 
8586.76 


173.45 
9019.40 


181.76 
9451.52 


S-15 


W 
A 


156.82 
8154. 64 


165. 13 
8586.76 


173.45 
9019.40 


181.76 
9451.52 


191. 27 
9946. 04 


S-16 


W 
A 


165. 13 
8586.76 


173.45 
9019.40 


181.76 
9451.52 


191. 27 
9946.04 


201. 96 
10501. 92 


S-17 


W 
A 


173.45 
9019.40 


181.76 
9451.52 


191. 27 
9946. 04 


201. 96 
10501. 92 


213.84 
11119. 68 


S-18 


W 
A 


181.76 
9451.52 


191.27 
9946.04 


201. 96 
10501. 92 


213.84 
11119. 68 


225.72 
11737.44 


S-19 


W 
A 


191. 27 
9946.04 


201. 96 
10501. 92 


213.84 
11119. 68 


225. 72 

11737.44 


238.79 
12417.08 


S-20 


W 
A 


201. 96 
10501. 92 


213.84 
11119. 68 


225.72 
11737.44 


238.79 
12417.08 


253. 04 
13158.08 


S-21 


W 
A 


213.84 
11119.68 


225.72 
117 37.44 


238.79 
12417. 08 


253. 04 
13158.08 


269. 68 
14023. 36 


S-22 


W 
A 


225.72 
11737.44 


238.79 
12417.08 


253.04 
13158. 08 


269. 68 
14023. 36 


286. 31 
14888. 12 


S-23 


W 
A 


238.79 
12417.08 


253.04 
13158.08 


269. 68 
14023. 36 


286. 31 
14888. 12 


302. 94 
15752.88 



66 



SCHEDULE C - POLICE WEEKLY SALARY SCHEDULE 
(Annual rates computed by multiplying weekly rates by 52) 



Compensation 
Grade 


W 
A 


Minimum 
A 

$ 136.62 
7104.24 


B . 

$ 142.56 
7413. 12 


Intermediate Steps 
C 

$ 148.50 
7722.00 


D 

$ 156.82 
8154.64 


Maximum 
E 


P-l 


$ 165. 13 
8586.76 


P-2 


W 
A 


156.82 
8154.64 


165. 13 
8586.76 


173.45 
9019.40 


181.76 
9451.52 


192.46 
10007. 92 


P-3 


W 
A 


165. 13 
8586.76 


173.45 
9019.40 


181.76 
9451.52 


192.46 
10007. 92 


201. 96 
10501. 92 


P-4 


W 
A 


201. 96 
10501. 92 


213.84 
11119.68 


225.72 
11737.44 


237. 60 
12355. 20 


253.04 
13158.08 



SCHEDULE D - FIRE WEEKLY SALARY SCHEDULE 
(Annual rates computed by multiplying weekly. rates by 52) 



Compensation 




Minimum 




Intermediate Steps 




Maximum 


Grade 


W 


A 
$ 118.80 


B 
$ 123.55 


C 

$ 128. 30 


D 
$ 134.24 


E 


F-l 


$ 140. 18 




A 


6177.60 


6424.60 


6671. 60 


6980.48 


7289. 36 


F-2 


W 


131.87 


137.81 


143.75 


150.88 


159. 19 




A 


6857.24 


7166. 12 


7475.00 


7845.76 


8277.88 


P-3 


W 


143.75 


150.88 


159. 19 


166. 32 


173.45 




A 


7475.00 


7845.76 


8277.88 


8648. 64 


9019.40 


F-4 


W 


159. 19 


166. 32 


173.45 


181.76 


192.46 




A 


8277.88 


8648.64 


9019.40 


9451. 52 


10007. 92 


F-5 


W 


201. 96 


213.84 


225.72 


237. 60 


253.04 




A 


10501. 92 


11119.68 


11737.44 


12355.20 


13158.08 



SCHEDULE E - HOURLY WAGE SCHEDULE 

(Weekly rates computed by multiplying hourly rates by 40; annual rates 

by multiplying hourly rates by 2080) 

Intermediate Step 
B 

$ 3. 12 

124.80 

6489. 60 

3.28 

131.20 

6822.40 

3.44 

137..60 

7155.20 

3. 60 

144.00 

7488.00 

3.76 

150.40 

7820.80 

3. 92 
156.80 

8153. 60 

4. 11 
164.40 

8548.80 



Compensation 




Minimum 


Grade 




A 


W-l 


H 


$ 2. 96 




W 


118.40 




A 


6156.80 


W-2 


H 


3. 12 




W 


124.80 




A 


6489.60 


W-3 


H 


3.28 




W 


131.20 




A 


6822.40 


W-4 


H 


3.44 




W 


137.60 




A 


7155.20 


W-5 


H 


3. 60 




W 


144.00 




A 


7488. 00 


W-6 


H 


3.76 




W 


150.40 




A 


7820.80 


W-7 


H 


3. 92 




W 


156.80 




A 


8153. 60 



Maximum 


C 




$ 3, 

131 

6822. 


, 28 
. 20 
,40 


3. 

137. 

7155. 


,44 
60 
20 


3. 

144. 

7488. 


60 
00 
00 


3. 

150. 

7820. 


76 
40 
80 


3. 

156. 

8153. 


92 
80 
60 


4. 

164. 

8548. 


11 
40 
80 


4. 

172. 

8944. 


30 
00 
00 



67 



SCHEDULE F - MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION SCHEDULE FOR 
DESIGNATED PART-TIME AND SEASONAL POSITIONS 



Arts and Crafts Supervisor 

Assessor, Board Chairman 

Assessor, Board Member 

Board of Health Chairman 

Board of Health Member 

Deputy Building Inspector (p. t.) 

Deputy Chief (Fire) (call) 

Deputy Elections Clerk (p.t.) 

Deputy Inspector (Elections) 

Deputy Warden (Elections) 

Elections Clerk 

Fire Alarm Maintenance Man (p.t.) 

Fire Alarm Superintendent 

Fire Fighter 

Fire Lieutenant 

Inspector (Elections) (p.t.) 

Library Page 

Playground Instructor 

Playground Supervisor 

Plumbing Inspector 

Police Matron 

Recreation Director 

Registrar of Voters 

School Crossing Guard 

Tennis Supervisor 

Teller 

Town Clerk 

Warden (Elections) 



2.85 - 2. 97 - 3.09 - 3. 21 



1.45 - 1.50 
21.38 - 24. 95 
47.52 - 53.46 



139.00 - 144.94 



Compensation 



$71. 28 - 77.22 - 



29.70 
59.40 



32. 67 
65. 34 



83. 16 per 
Flat Rate 
Flat Rate 
Flat Rate 
Flat Rate 
Fee Basis 
3.74 per 
2. 67 per 

2.43 per 
2. 67 per 
2. 67 per 
3. 35 per 
4. 50 per 
3. 32 per 

3. 44 per 
2.43 per 
1. 55 per 

28.51 per 

59.40 per 

Fee Basis 

2. 97 per 

152.06 per 

2. 67 per 

35. 64 per 

71.28 per 

2.43 per 

Flat Rate 

2. 67 per 



week 



hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
week 
week 

hour 
week 
hour 
week 
week 
hour 

hour 



Position 



Town Manager 



SCHEDULE G - ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL SALARY 
Minimum 



A 
$15,400.00 



B 
$16, 170.00 



Intermediate Steps 
C 

$16, 978. 00 



D 
$17, 831.00 



Maximum 
E 



$18, 722. 00 



Article 9. WORK CLOTHES 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept section 6L of chapter 40 of the General Laws which, when accepted, 
authorizes the Town to appropriate money for the lease or rental of stormy weather work clothes, including 
rubber boots, and other work clothes for its employees, which lease or rental agreement may provide for 
periodical laundering and repairs. 

Article 10. BUDGET 

To see what sums of money the Town will raise and appropriate to defray the necessary expenses of the 
several departments of the Town and determine how the same shall be raised. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: That the following 1970 Budget Schedule be raised and appropriated for each item 
as indicated except that $1, 809. 50 be appropriated from library receipts reserved for appropriation for 
Memorial Library use: 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Moderator: 

1. Salary 

2. Expenses 

Finance Committee: 

3. Expenses 



140. 00 
20.00 



250. 00 



Selectmen: 

4. Salaries 

5. Expenses 

6. Capital Outlay 

7. Legal Services 

8. Legal Service Expenses 



19, 105. 00 

13, 185.00 

2, 365.00 

12, 500. 00 

500. 00 



68 



9. Appraisals & Surveys $ 1, 000. 00 

10. Out-of- State Travel (All 

Departments) 1,500.00 

Town Office Clerical Staff: 

11. Salaries 70,630.00 

Engineer ing Department: 

12. Salaries & Wages 39,210.00 

13. Expenses 4,400.00 

14. Capital Outlay- 
Town Accountant: 

15. Salary 4,100.00 

16. Expenses 160.00 

Town Treasurer & Collector: 

17. Salary 10,140.00 

18. Expenses 4,400.00 

19. Capital Outlay 400.00 

Town Assessors: 

20. Salaries 11,000.00 

21. Expenses 5,910.00 

Town Clerk: 

22. Salary 2,310.00 

23. Expenses 2,800.00 

Elections and Registration: 

24. Salaries & Wages 5,640.00 

25. Expenses 3,850.00 

26. Capital Outlay 

Planning Board: 

27. Expenses 9,000.00 

Personnel Board: 

28. Expenses 550.00 

Board of Appeals: 

29. Expenses 410.00 

Industrial Development Commission: 

30. Expenses 250.00 

Conservation Commission: 

31. Expenses 500.00 

Archives Committee: 

32. Expenses 50.00 

Public Ceremonies & Celebrations: 

33. Expenses 

Buildings &c Maintenance: 

34. Salaries & Wages 

35. Expenses 

36. Capital Outlay 

Town Report Committee: 

37. Expenses 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT $ 277, 645. 00 
PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 



Fire Department: 

41. Salaries & Wages $ 

42. Expenses 

43. Capital Outlay 

Sealer of Weights & Measures: 

44. Salary & Travel 

45. Expenses 

Insect Pest Control: 

46. Wages 

47. Expenses 

Town Forest Committee: 

48. Maintenance 

Tree Department: 

49. Wages 

50. Expenses 

Inspector of Wires: 

51. Wages & Travel 

52. Expenses 

Inspector of Gas Piping & Appliances: 

53. Wages 

54. Expenses 

Building Inspector fk Agent for Enforce- 
ment of Zoning Bylaws: 

55. Salary & Wages 

56. Expenses 



Dog Officer: 

57. Wages & Travel 

58. Expenses 

Building Committee: 

59. Expenses 

Civil Defense: 

60. Expenses 

Town Utilities: 

61. Hydrant Rental 

62. Street Lighting 

TOTAL PROTECTION OF PERSONS 
AND PROPERTY 

HIGHWAYS 



178,825.00 

20, 195.00 

4, 135.00 



510. 00 
40. 00 



3, 160.00 
6, 000. 00 



100.00 



3, 160. 00 
8, 000.00 



4, 625.00 . 



3, 500.00 



10, 770.00 
1, 945.00 



1, 100. 00 
500.00 



50. 00 



450.00 



21, 550.00 
23,400.00 



$ 475,125.00 







Highway Department: 










2, 100. 


00 


63. Salaries & Wages 


$ 


110, 


910. 


00 






64. Expenses 




130, 


000. 


00 






65. Chapter 81 Maintenance 




22, 


000. 


00 


11,085. 


00 


66. Chapter 90 Maintenance 




27, 


500. 


00 


33, 885. 


00 


67. Capital Outlay 




2, 


330. 


00 


1, 100. 


00 
















TOTAL HIGHWAYS 


$ 


292, 


740. 


00 


3,200. 


00 


HEALTH AND SANITATION 









Police Department: 

38. Salaries & Wages 

39. Expenses 

40. Capital Outlay 



$ 167,275.00 
15, 835.00 



Health and Sanitation: 

68. Salaries 

69. Expenses 

70. Garbage Collection 

Inspector of Animals: 

71. Wages 

72. Expenses 



23, 625.00 
22, 345.00 
31, 350. 00 



170.00 
30.00 



69 



Plumbing Inspector: 

73. Wages 

74. Expenses 



RECREATION 



5, 500. 00 



TOTAL HEALTH AND SANITATION $ 83, 020. 00 

CHARITIES 

District and Local Welfare: 
75. Administration Salaries $ 



Recreation: 

105. Wages 

106. Expenses 

107. Capital Outlay 



TOTAL RECREATION 



$ 13,985.00 

4, 218.00 

629.00 

$ 18,832.00 



CEMETERIES 



76. 


Public Assistance 




-- 




Cemeteries: 




















TOTAL Cl>.\RlT]KN 


$ 


-- 




108. Salaries & Wages 


$ 


38, 


780. 


00 












109. Expenses 




8, 


385. 


00 




VETERANS' AID 








110. Capital Outlay 




2, 


115. 


00 


Vete 


rans' Services: 








TOTAL CEMETERIES 


$ 


4 9, 


280. 


00 


77. 


Salary 


$ 


2, 900. 


00 












78. 


Expenses 




275. 


00 


INSURANCE 










79. 


Aid 




15,000. 


00 


Insurance: 










TOTAL VETERANS' AID 


$ 


18, 175. 


00 


111. Workmen's Compensation 


$ 


14, 


000. 


00 












112. Surety Bond 






800. 


00 




EDUCATION 








113. Fire and Public Liability 

Insurance for Town Bldgs. 




14, 


000. 


00 


Local Schools: 








114. Boiler and Machinery 




1, 


200. 


00 


80. 


Instruction 


$1, 


325, 151. 


00 


115. Motor Vehicle Liability 




6, 


000. 


00 


81. 


Plant Operation h 








116. Group Health 




30, 


000. 


00 




Maintenance 




148,505. 


00 


117. Fire Fighters Insurance 




1, 


100. 


00 


82. 


Transportation 




93, 936. 


00 












83. 


Non-Instructional Services 




36,821. 


00 


TOTAL INSURANCE 


$ 


67, 


100. 


00 


84. 


Administration 




42, 693. 


00 












85. 


Out-of-State Travel 




315. 


00 


PENSIONS 










86. 


Blanchard Auditorium 




15, 385. 


00 












87. 


Capital Outlay 




31,087. 


00 


Pension Fund: 










88. 


Contingency Fund 




60,000. 


00 


118. Expense 


$ 


40, 


040. 


00 


Total Local Schools 


$1. 


753,893. 


00 


TOTAL PENSIONS 


$ 


40, 


040. 


00 


Regi 


onal Schools: 








MATURING DEBT AND INTEREST 






89. 


Instruction 


$1. 


287, 314. 


00 












90. 


Plant Operation & 








Regional School: 












Maintenance 




136, 116. 


00 


119. Maturing Debt 


$ 


51, 


261. 


00 


91. 


Transportation 




27, 085. 


00 


120. Interest 




58, 


316. 


00 


92. 


Non -Instructional Services 




42, 996. 


00 












93. 


Administration 




43,708. 


00 


Julia McCarthy School: 










94. 


Out-of-State Travel 




283. 


00 


121. Maturing Debt 




15, 


000. 


00 


95. 


Blanchard Auditorium 




8,032. 


00 


122. Interest 






700. 


00 


96. 


Capital Outlay 




13,798. 


00 












97. 


Athletic Fund 




31, 500. 


00 


Florence E. Merriam School: 










98. 


Contingency Fund 




61, 829. 


00 


123. Maturing Debt 




40, 


000. 


00 



Total Regional Schools 

TOTAL EDUCATION 

LIBRARIES 

Memorial Library: 
99. Salary & Wages 

100. Expenses 

101. Books 

102. Capital Outlay 

West Acton Library: 

103. Salary & Wages 

104. Expenses 

TOTAL LIBRARIES 



51, 652, 661.00 
;3, 406, 554.00 



49, 100.00 

13, 150.00 

19,000.00 

1, 370.00 



2,455.00 
1,000.00 

56,075.00 



124. Interest 

Elm Street School #1 (Douglas): 

125. Maturing Debt 

126. Interest 

Elm Street School #2 (Gates): 

127. Maturing Debt 

128. Interest 

Police Station: 

129. Maturing Debt 

130. Interest 

Library Addition: 

131. Maturing Debt 

132. Interest 

Sanitary Land Fill Site: 

133. Maturing Debt 

134. Interest 



11, 520.00 



40, 000.00 
19,775.00 



60, 000.00 
42, 025.00 



25, 000.00 
4, 050.00 



41,000.00 
2, 113. 00 



70 



Minot Avenue School: 

135. Interest 

Anticipation of Revenue Notes: 

136. Interest 

TOTAL MATURING DEBT AND 
INTEREST 



Art. 14. Surplus Government 
Property 
15. Central Street 

17. Vocational Tuition 

18. Vocational Regional 

School District 
Planning Committee 

20. Adult Education 

21. Kennedy Land-Lease 

22. Sludge Drying Beds 

23. Highways - Chapter 7 68 

of Acts of 1969 

24. Public Works Facility 
40. Conservations Fund 

43. Adams Street Takings 

44. Adams Street Recon- 

struction 

45. Police Cruisers 
48. Street Sweeper 



From: 

Art. 10. Library Receipts 

15. Free Cash 

16. Surplus Revenue 
19. Stabilization Fund 

Article 2 - 12/18/61 
Article 1 - 10/19/64 
Article 1 - 8/29/68 
Conservation Fund Land 
Machinery Fund 
Cemetery Land Fund 



TOTAL BUDGET 



$5, 303, 846.00 



39. 
46. 
62. 
64. Overlay Reserve 



$ 48, 


500. 


00 


















. Appropriated from Library 








30, 


000. 


00 


Receipts 




1, 


809. 


50 








Amount to be raised and 








$ 489, 


260. 


00 


appropria 


.ted $5, 


302, 


036. 


50 




SPECIAL ARTICLES 
















Art. 49. 


Cab, Chassis, etc. 








$ 2, 


000. 


00 




(Tree Dept.) 


6, 


000. 


00 


7, 


700. 


00 


50. 


Sedan (Eng. Dept.) 


3, 


000. 


00 


11, 


400. 


00 


51. 


Forest Fire Truck 


16, 


500. 


00 








52. 


Fire Alarm 


14, 


300. 


00 








53. 


Lighting - Elm St. 










250. 


00 




Playground 


18, 


000. 


00 


5, 


000. 


00 


54. 


Backstop k Bleachers - 










10. 


00 




(Elm St.) 


1, 


700. 


00 


8, 


000. 


00 


55. 


Tot-Lot Equipment - 
















(Goward Field) 


1, 


050. 


00 


16, 


444. 


95 


56. 


1975 Funds 


3, 


000. 


00 


10, 


000. 


00 


57. 


Painting Town Hall Offices 


2, 


500. 


00 


100, 


000. 


00 


59. 


Air Conditioning - Library 


15, 


600. 


00 


1, 


500. 


00 


63. 


Mount Hope Cemetery 


3, 


000. 


00 


35, 


000. 


00 


TOTAL TO BE RAISED AND 








4, 


500. 


00 


APPROPRIATED UNDER 








18, 


000. 


00 


SPECIAL ARTICLES $ 


304, 


454. 


95 






TRANSFERS 
















To: 
















Memorial Library $ 


1, 


809. 


50 








Central Street 


23, 


100. 


00 








Highways 


27, 


375. 


00 








Minot Avenue School 


100, 


000. 


00 








Mino 


t Avenue School 




429. 


99 








Mino 


t Avenue School 


1, 


000. 


00 








Minot Avenue School 




222. 


80 








Main 


Street to Pope Road 


25, 


000. 


00 






- 


Snow Fighting Equipment 


4, 


200. 


00 








Mount Hope Cemetery 


2, 


000. 


00 








Reserve Fund 


30, 


000. 


00 



TOTAL TRANSFERS 



$ 215,137.29 



BORROW 



Art. 19. Minot Avenue School 
24. Public Works Facility 

TOTAL TO BE BORROWED 



$1,728, 347.21 
265, 000.00 

$1, 993, 347.21 

$7, 814, 975.95 



SUMMARY 



Budget (R. & A.) 

Special Articles (R. & A.) 

Special Articles (Transfers) 

Borrow 

GRAND TOTAL 



$5, 302, 036.50 

304.454. 95 

215, 137.29 

1, 993, 347. 21 

$7,814, 975. 95 



71 



Article 19. SCHOOL - MINOT AVENUE 

VOTED: That $1,380, 000.00 be appropriated for constructing, originally equipping and furnishing an elementary 
school to be located on land of the Town between Taylor Road and Minot Avenue; that to raise this appropriation 
$100,000.00 be appropriated from the Stabilization Fund, $429.99 be transferred from the appropriation 
under Article 2 of the warrant for the Town Meeting of December 18, 1961, $1,000.00 be transferred from the 
appropriation under Article 1 of the warrant for the Town Meeting of October 19, 1964, and $222. 80 be trans- 
ferred from the appropriation under Article. 1 of the warrant for the Town Meeting of August 29, 1968, and 
the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, be authorized to borrow $1, 728, 347. 21 under Chapter 645 
of the Acts of 1948 as amended, provided that the total authorized borrowing shall be reduced by the amount of 
any matching Stabilization Fund payment; and that the Town Permanent Building Committee be authorized to 
take all action necessary to carry out this project. 

Total Vote - 334. 

Adjourned at 11:37 P.M. 

Monday, March 16, 1970. Moderator called meeting to order at 7:32 P.M. 

VOTED: That this annual town meeting be recessed at 8:00 P.M. this evening and be resumed at the conclu- 
sion of the Special Town Meeting called for that hour. 

VOTED: To take up Article 12. 

Article 12. UNPAID BILLS 

VOTED: To take no action. 

Article 13. BORROWING 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue for the financial years beginning January 1, 
1970 and January 1, 1971, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to 
renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year, in accordance with the provisions 
of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

Article 14. SURPLUS PROPERTY 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $2, 000. 00 to be used by the Town Manager for 
the purchase and conditioning of surplus government property for the various Town Departments. 

Article 15. CENTRAL STREET 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $7, 700. 00 for Chapter 90 Construction of 
Central Street from approximately 1, 000 feet southerly of Littlefield Road to approximately 1, 500 feet 
southerly of Littlefield Road and to appropriate from Free Cash the amount of $15, 400. 00 as the State's 
allotment for Chapter 90 new construction and the amount of $7, 700. 00 as the County's allotment for 
Chapter 90 new construction; provided that the reimbursement be credited to the Surplus Revenue Account. 

Article 16. CHAPTERS 81 & 90 ALLOTMENTS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate from the Surplus Revenue Account the sum of $23,375.00 as the 
State's allotment under Chapter 81 Maintenance, the amount of $2,000.00 as the State's allotment for Chapter 
90 Maintenance and the amount of $2,000.00 as the County's allotment under Chapter 90 Maintenance; pro- 
vided that the reimbursement be credited to the Surplus Revenue Account. 



72 



Article 17. TUITION & TRANSPORTATION 

"VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the s.um of $11,400.00 for the payment of vocational 
tuition and transportation according to the provisions of Chapter 74 of the General Laws. 

Article 18. VOCATIONAL REGIONAL DISTRICT 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $250.00 to be expended by the Vocational 
Regional School District Planning Committee in determining the cost to the Town and the feasibility of the 
Town becoming a member of the Nashoba Valley Technical High School District. 

Recessed at 8:00 P.M. to convene Special Town Meeting. 

Reconvened this meeting at 8:55 P.M. 

Article 20. ADULT EDUCATION 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $5,000.00 to establish an adult education program. 

VOTED: That on completion of article under consideration at 11:00 P. M. to adjourn to Monday, March 23, 
1970 at 7:30 P.M. 

VOTED: To take up Article 24. 

Article 24. PUBLIC WORKS FACILITY 

VOTED: To authorize the Permanent Building Committee to enter into contracts on behalf of the Town for the 
planning, constructing and equipping of a public works building, and that the sum of $275,000.00 be appropriated 
for the aforesaid purposes; and that to meet this appropriation the sum of $10,000.00 shall be raised from the 
current tax levy, and the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to borrow the sum of 
$265,000.00 under the authority of Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause (3) of the General Laws and to issue at one 
time or from time to time bonds or notes of the Town thereof, provided, however, that the appeal in Sinn and 
others v. Russo and others is satisfactorily disposed of. 

Total Vote - 604 

Adjourned at 11:30 P.M. 

Monday, March 23, 1970. Moderator called meeting to order at 7:30 P.M. 

Article 11. BUILDING CODE 

VOTED: To adopt a new Building Code and repeal the current Building Bylaw, provided that such new Code 
and the repeal of the old bylaw are to be effective only upon the publication of the new Code as required by 
law and are not to be effective so as to affect any application for a permit theretofor filed or any proceeding 
or other action then pending or thereafter brought in court or elsewhere on the basis of action taken or not 
taken prior to said effective date. The invalidity of any section of the new Code shall not affect the validity 
and effectiveness of the balance of the Code. The new Building Code is as follows: 



73 



BUILDING CODE 

OF THE 
TOWN OF ACTON 



Section 101. TITLE, CONSTRUCTION. 

This bylaw shall be known as the Building Code of the Town of Acton, and it shall be construed to insure 
public safety and health. No provisions of the protective zoning bylaw, of any statute or of any other bylaw 
pertaining to the location, use or construction of buildings or other structures shall be nullified by the pro- 
visions of this code. 

Section 102. SCOPE. 



This Code shall govern the construction, alteration, repair, demolition, removal, use or occupancy, 
and the standards of materials to be used in the construction, alteration and repair of any building or other 
structure specified in Section 103. 

Section 103. APPLICATION. 



This Code shall apply to all buildings or other structures, either existing or proposed, which are 
located within the Town except (a) any building or structure owned or occupied by the United States, the Com- 
monwealth or the county, (b) any bridge, and (c) any building not to be used for residential purposes which 
is less than seven (7) feet high and not over eight (8) feet on any side. 

Section 104. APPOINTMENT OF THE BUILDING INSPECTOR AND 

DEPUTY BUILDING INSPECTORS. 

The Town Manager shall, upon the effective date of this Code and annually in March thereafter, appoint 
a competent Building Inspector who shall hold office until his successor has been appointed and has qualified. 
The Building Inspector shall be an architect, a civil, structural or architectural engineer, a building con- 
tractor or a building mechanic. The Town Manager shall appoint one or more Deputy Building Inspectors to 
assist the Building Inspector. In the event of the absence or disability of the Building Inspector, the Deputy 
Building Inspector or Inspectors shall have all the powers and duties which are herein conferred upon the 
Building Inspector. The term "Inspector" wherever appearing herein shall refer to the Building Inspector or 
the Deputy Building Inspector whenever the latter is acting for or in the place of the Building Inspector. 

Section 105. REMOVAL. 



The Town Manager may remove for cause, the Building Inspector or any Deputy Building 
Inspector. 

Section 106. COMPENSATION, CONFLICT OF INTEREST. 

The compensation of the Building Inspector and Deputy Building Inspector shall be set forth in the Per- 
sonnel Bylaw of the Town. No Building Inspector or Deputy Building Inspector shall in any way be interested 
in the contract for labor upon, or materials or fixtures to be placed in any building or structure subject to his 
inspection except as may be permitted under G. L. c. 268A. 

Section 107. STRUCTURES AND ACTIVITIES FOR WHICH PERMITS ARE REQUIRED. 

Every person intending to construct, alter, repair, demolish or move any building or structure, or 
part thereof, within the Town, shall before proceeding with any work file an application for a permit with 
the Inspector, except that minor repairs on existing buildings may be made without a permit. Without limit- 
ing the foregoing, a permit shall be required for the following: 

Section 107. 1 An alteration or addition to a foundation carried out in the restoration or maintenance 

thereof. 

Section 107. 2 The reroofing of more than ten (10) percent of the roof area of any building or structure. 

Section 107. 3 Maintenance or restoration work affecting the structural framework of a building or 

structure. 

Section 107.4 The installation of exterior sidewalls, including wood and metal shingles and clap- 

boards, which involves more than ten (10) percent of the entire exterior sidewall area of a building or structure. 

Section 107. 5 The construction of a swimming pool with a depth of two (2) feet or more. 



74 



ACTON STREET DIRECTORY 



Adams Street 


A-2 


Agawam Road 


C-4 


Alcott Street 


D-2 


Algonquin Road 


D-5 


Anne Avenue 


C-3 


Arlington Street 


D-4 


Ashwood Road 


C-2 


Azalea Court 


D-l 


Arborwood Road 


C-l 


Balsam Drive 


D-3 


Barker Road 


C-3 


Baxter Road 


B-4 


Bayberry Road 


D-l 


Berry Lane 


D-2 


Betsy Ross Circle 


B-5 


Beverly Road 


C-3 


Billings Street 


A-4 


Birch Ridge Road 


B-5 


Blackhorse Drive 


A-5 


Blanchard Street 


A-4 


Brabrook Road 


D-l 


Bridle Path Way 


E-l 


Broadview Street 


B-2 


Bromfield Drive 


D-2 


Brook Street 


E-2 


Brookside Circle 


B-2 


Brucewood Road 


C-3 


Bulette Road 


D-5 


Captain Brown's Lane 


C-4 


Captain Furbush's Lane 


C-4 


Carlisle Road 


G-2 


Carlton Drive 


A-2 


Carriage Drive 


B-2 


Cedar Terrace 


C-4 


Central Street 


B-3, 


Chadwick Street 


B-2 


Charter Road 


C-4 


Cherokee Road 


D-5 


Cherry Ridge Road 


B-5 


Church Street 


B-4 


Clover Hill Road 


B-2 


Conant Street 


A-2 


Concord Road 


D-2 


Coolidge Drive 


D-4 


Coughlin 


D-3 


Country Club Road 


A-2 


Cowdrey Lane 


D-3 


Craig Road 


C-l 


Cresent Street 


B-2 


Crestwood Lane 


B-4 


Crestwood Road 


C-2 


Cricket Way 


D-2 


Cross Street 


G-2 


Davis Road 


E-2 


Deacon Hunt Drive 


C-4 


Doris Road 


C-3 


Downey Road 


B-4 


Duggan Road 


A-4 


Durkee Road 


B-4 


Elm Court 


C-4 


Elm Street 


C-5 


Eliot Circle 


D-3 



D-5 



Emerson Drive 


D-2 


Esterbrook Road 


E-2 


Ethan Allen Drive 


B-5 


Evergreen Road 


D-3 


Fairway Road 


A-2 


Faulkner Hill Road 


B-3 


Fernwood Road 


C-2 


Fife & Drum Road 


D-3 


Flagg Road 


D-l 


Fletcher Court 


A- 3 


Flint Road 


B-4 


Flintlock Drive 


A-5 


Foley Street 


B-2 


Forest Road 


C-2 


Fort Pond Road 


E-4 


Foster Street 


C-2 


Fox Hill Road 


B-2 


Francine Road 


C-3 


Fraser Drive 


B-4 


Garfield Lane 


D-3 


Giaconda Avenue 


B-2 


Grasshopper Lane 


D-2 


Great Road 


D-l, 


Greenwood Lane 


D-3 


Gristmill Road 


A-5 


Hammond Street 


D-4 


Harris Street 


F-3 


Hatch Road 


B-2 


Harvard Court 


E-2 


Haynes Court 


B-5 


Hawthorne Street 


D-2 


Hay ward Road 


C-4 


Heald Road 


D-3 


Hemlock Lane 


D-3 


Henley Road 


F-3 


Hennessey Drive 


B-3 


Heritage Road 


C-2 


High Street 


A-2 


Highland Road 


A-5 


Hillcrest Drive 


C-2 


Hillside Terrace 


C-4 


Homestead Street 


B-4 


Hickory Hill Trail 


D-3 


Hosmer Street 


C-2 


Houghton Lane 


C-4 


Huckleberry Lane 


D-3 


Huron Road 


D-5 


Independence Road 


B-2 


Iris Court 


D-l 


Isaac Davis Way 


C-3 


Jackson Drive 


D-4 


Jefferson Drive 


D-3 


John Swift Road 


D-3 


Joseph Reed Lane 


C-4 


Juniper Ridge Road 


B-5 


Karner Road 


D-5 


Keefe Road 


D-l 


Kelley Road 


C-3 


Kinsley Road 


B-4 



F-4 



T 



▼ 



BOXBOROUGH 




CONCORD 




PR. IV ATE" vs/AYS 
OatVATC, UMACCEOTCO 
= = = = QOAOS, APPCOVLO uNOCB TUC 

6uM>l-Jl5lOW COWTQOL LAW (CMA9 +/ l. L ) 

AS AMENDED TO JANUARY I, 1970 



MAP OF 

TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 

SHOWING LOCATION OF STREETS 
TCBRUARY 1957 

SCALE IN FEET 

? rr I ° < *' »**» t g* " 



ACTON STREET DIRECTORY (continued) 



Larch Road 


D-3 


Laurel Court 


B-3 


Lawsbrook Road 


C-l 


Liberty Street 


A- 3 


Lilac Court 


B-3 


Lillian Road 


D-5 


Lincoln Drive 


D-4 


Littlefield Road 


C-5 


Longfellow Park 


D-2 


Lothrop Road 


B-4 


Madison Lane 


D-4 


Magnolia Drive 


D-l 


Main Street 


A-2, 


Mallard Road 


C-4 


Maple Street 


B-3 


Marian Road 


B-5 


Martin Street 


B-3 


Massachusetts Avenue 


D-l, 


Mead Terrace 


B-4 


Meadow Brook Road 


D-3 


Merriam Lane 


B-2 


Minot Avenue 


D-2 


Minuteman Road 


D-3 


Mohawk Drive 


C-5 


Mohegan Road 


C-4 


Monroe Lane 


D-4 


Musket Drive 


D-3 


Myrtle Drive 


D-l 


Nadine Road 


C-3 


Nagog Hill Road 


D-2 


Nash Road 


B-4 


Nashoba Road 


C-5 


Newtown Road 


D-3 


North Street 


G-2 


Notre Dame Road 


B-5 


Noyes Street 


A-4 


Oakwood Road 


C-2 


Old Colony Lane 


C-l 


Olde Lantern Road 


A-5 


Old Meadow Lane 


B-2 


Old Village Road 


D-2 


Olde Surrey Drive 


B-2 


Oneida Road 


D-5 


Orchard Drive 


C-5 


Parker Street 


A-2 


Patrick Henry Circle 


B-5 


Patriots Road 


D-3 


Partridge Pond Road 


C-3 


Paul Revere Road 


B-5 


Pearl Street 


B-4 


Phalen Street 


D-2 


Phlox Lane 


D-l 


Pine Street 


A-3 


Pinewood Road 


C-2 


Piper Road 


B-3 


Piper Lane 


B-3 


Pond View Drive 


B-2 


Pope Road 


D-l 


Powder Horn Lane 


A-5 


Powder Mill Road 


A-l 


Proctor Street 


E-l 



H-3 



B-5 



Prospect Street 
Putnam Road 
Putter Drive 

Q Quaboag Road 
Quarry Road 

R Railroad Street 
Redwood Road 
Revolutionary Road 
River Street 
Robbins Street 
Robinwood Road 
Rose Court 
Russell Road 

S Saint James Circle 
Samuel Parlin Drive 
Sandas Trail 
School Street 
Seminole Road 
Seneca Road 
Simon Hapgood Lane 
Simon Willard Road 
Sioux Street 
Smart Road 
Smith Street 
South Street 
Spencer Road 
Spring Hill Road 
Stoney Street 
Stow Street 
Strawberry Hill Road 
Sudbury Road 
Summer Street 
Sylvia Street 
Squirrel Hill Road 

T Taft Lane 
Taylor Road 
Thoreau Road 
Ticonderoga Road 
Townsend Road 
Trask Road 
Tut tie Drive 

U & V Valley Road 

Vanderbelt Road 

W Wachusetts Drive 
Wampus Avenue 
Washington Drive 
Wetherbee Street 
West Road 
Wheeler Lane 
Whittier Drive 
Willow Street 
Wilson Lane 
Windemere Drive 
Windsor Avenue 
Winter Street 
Wood Lane 
Woodbury Lane 
Woodchester Drive 
Wright Terrace 



B-3 

D-3 
A-2 

C-4 
F-3 

B-3 
C-2 
D-3 
B-2 
A-3 
C-2 
D-l 
C-2 

C-3 
D-4 
C-4 
B-3 
C-4 
C-5 
E-l 
D-3 
C-4 
A-4 
E-l 
G-2 
C-4 
F-l 
C-3 
A-3 
E-2 
A-l 
B-5 
A-3 
A-5 

D-4 
C-3 
D-2 
A-5 
B-4 
D-3 
B-3 

B-2 
B-2 

D-5 
F-3 
D-3 
D-l 
C-4 
G-2 
D-2 
B-4 
D-4 
A-5 
B-5 
B-5 
D-3 
D-3 
A-5 
B-5 



Section 107. 6 The construction of a temporary structure, including a platform, stand, observation 

or circus seats, or tent for assembly purposes. Such a structure may be maintained only for a period of time 
stated on the permit. A permit will not be required for any building which is not over eight (8) feet on each 
side and less than seven (7) feet high, provided the building is not to be used for residential purposes. 

Section 108. REQUIREMENTS FOR APPLICATIONS FOR PERMITS. 

An application for a permit shall be on a form furnished by the Inspector. The application shall con- 
tain the following: 

Section 108. 1 A description for the building or structure, either existing or proposed. 

Section 108. 2 The location or proposed location of the building or structure. 

Section 108. 3 In the case of an addition to an existing building or structure, a sketch of the lot show- 

ing the size and location of the building or structure in relation thereto. In the case of a proposed building or 
structure, a plot plan certified to by a registered engineer or surveyor, .showing the dimensions of the pro- 
posed new construction and existing and other proposed structures on the same lot. 

Section 108.4 A description of the work to be done and the materials to be used therein. 

Section 109. FEES FOR PERMITS. 

A fee shall accompany each application for a permit. The fee shall be two dollars and fifty cents ($2.50) 
for the first one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) of estimated building construction cost or fraction thereof, plus 
one dollar and fifty cents ($1.50) for each additional one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) between one thousand 
dollars ($1,000.00) and five hundred thousand dollars ($500,000.00) plus one dollar ($1.00) for every one thou- 
sand dollars ($1,000.00) of estimated construction cost or fraction thereof, in excess of five hundred thousand 
dollars ($500,000.00). The fee accompanying the application for a permit is not refundable. 

Section 110. TIME FOR REPORTS ON APPLICATIONS. 



The Inspector shall, within five (5) working days after receiving an application, from the Board of 
Health, issue or refuse to issue the permit and notify the applicant in writing of his decision. The Board of 
Selectmen may, in special cases, when it deems it necessary in the best interests of the Town, extend this 
period of time for a period up to thirty (30) days and so notify the applicant. If the Inspector refuses to issue 
a permit, written notification of his decision shall be delivered to the applicant in person or sent by registered 
or certified mail to him at the address given in the application and shall set forth clearly and in detail all the 
reasons for such refusal. 

Section 111. APPROVED PLANS. 

One copy of the approved plans and specifications together with a signed permit shall be kept at the site 
of the operation until the operation is completed. After a permit has been issued, the approved plans and 
specifications shall not be altered unless the Inspector first approves any proposed change. 

Section 112. CONTINUED VALIDITY OF A PERMIT. 



A permit shall be void if construction is not commenced within ninety (90) days of its issue or if work 
is abandoned for more than six (6) months. 

Section 113. INSPECTION; NOTICE TO THE INSPECTOR; CHECKLIST OF INSPECTIONS. 

The Inspector shall have the right, in the performance of his duties and at reasonable hours, to enter, 
examine and inspect any building operation. The Inspector shall also inspect each building under construction 
at each of the following stages: (1) before the foundation or footing forms are in place, (2) when the building 
is ready for insulation, or lath, after all rough plumbing and electrical work has been passed and (3) upon 
completion of the building before occupancy. The builder in charge of construction shall notify the Inspector 
when each of the aforementioned stages has been reached and whenever any parts which will be concealed in 
further construction of the building are ready for inspection. The Inspector shall make the inspection promptly 
and in no case shall he delay his inspection for more than forty-eight (48) hours, exclusive of Saturdays, Sun- 
days, and holidays. At the completion of each inspection, the Inspector shall submit to the builder, or post on 
the inspected premises, a copy of an updated checklist of inspection. 

Section 114. ENFORCEMENT OF BUILDING CODE; STOP-WORK ORDERS. 

The Inspector shall enforce the regulations contained in this Code. He shall require that all workman- 
ship and all building materials be of good quality and that the methods of construction comply with generally 
accepted standards of Engineering practice and not be inconsistent with law. In case of violation of this Code 
or in the event of noncompliance with plans and specifications approved hereunder, the Inspector shall, in 
writing, notify the builder or owner, or the representative of either, of such violation or noncompliance. 
Alternately, the Inspector may order the suspension of the work by issuing a stop-work order which shall 
state the conditions under which the work may be resumed. The stop-work order shall be sent to the owner, 
the builder or the representative of either. A copy of the order shall be posted at the site of the building 
operation, and it shall not be removed without the written approval of the Inspector. No oversight or neglect 



75 



of duty on the part of the Inspector shall legalize the use, erection or alteration of a building or structure, in 
a manner not in conformity with the provisions of this code. 

Section 115. VIOLATIONS, PENALTIES. 

Whoever erects, alters, uses, occupies, maintains, demolishes, or moves any building or structure 
in violation of any provision of this Code or causes or permits any such violation to be committed shall be 
liable for a fine of not more than one hundred dollars ($100.00) for each violation. The fine will not be imposed 
if another penalty has been provided for the violation. 

Section 116. BOARD OF APPEALS. 



If a person is dissatisfied with a decision of the Inspector, he may within ten (10) days of the date of 
said decision appeal to the Board of Appeals. No member of the Board of Appeals shall act in any case in 
which he is interested. In cases involving engineering problems, the Board may secure professional or 
expert assistance. Each decision of the Board shall be in writing. 

Section 117. RECORDS. 



The Inspector shall keep a record of all the business of his office and submit a report to be included in 
the Annual Town Report. 

Section 118. CONSTRUCTION OF BUILDINGS . 

The Inspector may permit, on the basis of one or more duly authenticated reports from a recognized 
source or sources, the use of new materials or modes of construction, not prQvided for in this code, and 
may, for the purpose of carrying out the intent of this code, adopt accepted standards of materials or work- 
manship, of federal or state bureaus, national technical organizations or fire underwriters. 

Section 119. EXCAVATION AND FOUNDATIONS. 



All buildings hereafter erected shall have masonry footings and foundations. Footing for masonry walls 
shall be not less than eight (8) inches deep and not less than twenty (20) inches wide unless otherwise author- 
ized or directed by the Inspector. All footings and/or foundations shall extend four (4) feet below finished 
grade and eight (8) inches above grade. 

Section 119.1 FOUNDATIONS. 



Section 119. 11 Dwellings. All dwellings hereafter erected shall have masonry foundations with a 
minimum thickness of ten (10) inches of poured concrete. Reinforcing rods shall be used when the Inspector 
deems conditions warrant their use. The top of all foundations shall be at least eight (8) inches above fin- 
ished grade; this requirement may be waived at the discretion of the Building Inspector where masonry 
construction is employed. Block foundations shall be twelve (12) inches in width below grade and may be 
eight (8) inches in width above grade. Any portion of a foundation above grade shall be laid in and pointed 
with mortar. 

Section 119. 12 Other than Dwellings. The foundation for a building other than a dwelling may be of 
masonry piers, rather than solid masonry, of sufficient size to carry the loads to be imposed on them and 
shall extend four (4) feet below finished grade and eight (8) inches above finished grade. Grade-beam type of 
foundation will be permitted for accessory buildings. 

Section 119.2 CONCRETE SLAB CONSTRUCTION FOR DWELLINGS. 



Concrete slab construction for dwellings must meet the following specifications: 

Slab shall be not less than four (4) inches thick on at least eight (8) inches of 
well compacted gravel covered by a suitable waterproofing membrane or six 
(6) inches of three-quarter (3/4) inch stone or equal, and reinforced with six 
(6) inch by six (6) inch number ten (10) gauge mesh. 

The exterior foundation wall of any slab building must be of at least eight (8) 
inches thick concrete or eight (8) inches thick masonry, carried down at 
least four (4) feet below finished exterior grade and eight (8) inches above 
grade. 

Section 119.3 FOOTINGS. 



When in the opinion of the Inspector, soil conditions and the load to be imposed on the foundation walls 
make the requirements for footings unnecessary, the Inspector may permit footings to be omitted by written 
endorsement on the building permit. 

Section 119.4 PROTECTION AGAINST FREEZING. 



No masonry shall be built when the temperature is below thirty-two (32) degrees Fahrenheit on a falling 
temperature unless a suitable anti-freeze is used in the mix. No frozen materials shall be built upon. Lime 



76 



shall not be used in any mortar in freezing weather in excess of ten per cent (10%) of the cement content. 

Section 119.5 CERTIFICATION OF PLOT PLAN. 

After the foundation of a building for which a permit has been issued has been constructed, and before 
any further work shall be done on said building, a registered engineer's or surveyor's certification shall be 
furnished the Inspector, (unless he waives such requirement) showing the size of the building, and indicating 
that the location of the building is in compliance with the setback regulations set forth in the Protective Zon- 
ing Bylaw of the Town and including a statement signed by the engineer or surveyor that all distances are 
correct. 

Section 119.6 GENERAL REQUIREMENTS. 

All debris, such as stumps, roots, vegetation, and wood scraps, existing within ten (10) feet of the 
building shall be removed. The ground level in unexcavated portions shall be at least three (3) feet from the 
bottom of floor joists or at whatever depth is deemed suitable and approved by the Inspector. 

Section 120. CHIMNEYS. 



All chimneys hereafter erected shall be supported on foundations of masonry or reinforced concrete or 
other non- combustible material having a fire resistance rating of not less than three (3) hours. 

Section 120. 1 CONSTRUCTION. 



All chimneys are to be constructed of brick, solid masonry units or reinforced concrete. Chimneys in 
dwellings, chimneys for domestic type low heat appliances, and chimneys for building heating equipment for 
heating a total volume of occupied space not to exceed twenty-five thousand (25,000) cubic feet shall have the 
walls not less than four (4) inches thick. In other buildings and for other low heat appliances the thickness 
of chimney walls shall be no less than eight (8) inches, except that rubble stone masonry shall be not less 
than twelve (12) inches thick. There must be an eight (8) inch thickness of brick between any woodwork and 
the throat of the fireplace from the lintel at the damper up to the flue lining. 

Section 120. 2 CORBELING. 



Corbeling shall not exceed one (1) inch projection for each course of brick projected. 

Section 120. 3 CHANGE IN SIZE OR SHAPE OF CHIMNEY. 

No change in the size or shape of a chimney, where the chimney passes through the roof shall be made 
within a distance of six (6) inches above or below the roof joists or rafters. All wooden false chimneys built 
above the roof shall be covered with wire lath and not less than one (1) inch of fireproof cement plaster, and 
in addition the chimney enclosed in this false construction shall be plastered in the same manner. 

Section 120.4 LINERS. 



Masonry chimneys for low heat appliances shall be lined with approved fire clay flue liners not less 
than five -eighths (5/8) of an inch thick, or with other approved liner material that will resist without soften- 
ing or cracking at a temperature of one thousand eight hundred (1,800) degrees Fahrenheit. Fire clay flue 
liners shall be installed ahead of the construction of the chimney, as it is carried up, carefully bedded one 
on the other in mortar, or fire clay mortar, with close fitting joints left smooth on the inside. In masonry 
chimneys with walls less than eight (8) inches thick, liners shall be separate from the chimney wall and the 
space between the liner and the masonry shall not be filled; with only enough mortar used to make a good 
joint and hold the liners in position. Flue liners shall start from a point not less than eight (8) inches below 
the intake or, in case of a fireplace, from the throat of the fireplace. They shall extend, as nearly vertical 
as possible, for the entire height of the chimney. 

Section 120. 5 HEIGHT. 



Chimneys for low heat appliances shall extend at least twenty-four (24) inches above the ridge or shall 
extend at least three (3) feet above the roof at the highest point of contact, and at least two (2) feet higher than 
any portion of the building within ten (10) feet of the chimney. 

Section 120. 6 FRAMING AROUND CHIMNEYS AND FIREPLACES. 



All wood beams, joists and studs shall be trimmed away from chimneys and fireplaces. Headers sup- 
porting trimmer arches at fireplaces shall be not less than sixteen (16) inches from the face of the chimney 
breast. Trimmers shall be not less than six (6) inches from the inside face of the nearest flue lining. 

Section 120.7 FIRE STOPPING. 



All spaces between chimneys and wood joists, beams or headers shall be firestopped by placing non- 
combustible material to a depth of at least one inch at the bottom of such spaces. 

Section 120.8 FLUES AND SMOKEPIPES.- 

Section 120.81 If two (2) or more oil burners are installed to use the same chimney, the smokepipes 
of each are to first enter a manifold (which in turn enters the chimney) large enough to accommodate all 

77 



heaters. A vent from a gas heated appliance must enter the chimney at a point above other flues. 

Section 120.82 Where two or more flue liners adjoin each other in the same chimney with only flue 
lining separation between them, the joints of the adjacent flue linings shall be staggered at least seven (7) 
inches. 

Section 120.83 No earthenware pipe shall be used for horizontal flues. No woodwork shall be placed 
less than six (6) inches from any smokepipe or metal flue, unless protected with approved fire-proofing 
material. 

Section 120.84 No smokepipe shall pass through a stud or wooden partition whether plastered or not 
unless protected by a suitable metal collar or thimble with holes for ventilation. 

Section 120. 85 All inside chimneys hereafter erected shall be provided with a cleanout opening fitted 
with metal doors and frames designed to remain tightly closed. 

Section 120. 9 COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL- TYPE INCINERATORS. 

A clearance of not less than four (4) inches shall be provided between the exterior surface of chimneys 
and any combustible material for commercial and industrial type incinerators. 

Section 121. FIREPLACES. 



Section 121.1 CONSTRUCTION. 

Section 121. 11 Fireplaces shall be constructed of solid masonry or of reinforced concrete with back 
and sides of the thickness specified in this section. Where a lining of fire brick at least two (2) inches 
thick or other approved lining is provided, the total thickness of the back and sides including the lining shall 
be not less than eight (8) inches. Where no such lining is provided, the thickness of the back and sides shall 
be not less than twelve (12) inches. 

Section 121. 12 Factory-built fireplaces that are approved by the American Insurance Association 
as a result of tests by a recognized laboratory need not conform to the above paragraph provided they are 
installed in accordance with the conditions of the approval. 

Section 121. 13 Fireplace hearth extensions shall be provided of approved non- combustible material 
for all fireplaces. Where the fireplace opening is less than six (6) square feet, the hearth extension shall 
extend at least sixteen (16) inches in front of, and at least eight (8) inches beyond each side of the fireplace 
opening. Where the fireplace opening is six (6) square feet or larger, the hearth extension shall extend at 
least eighteen (18) inches in front of, and at least twelve (12) inches beyond each side of the fireplace opening. 
Where a fireplace is elevated above or overhangs a floor, the hearth extension shall also extend over the area 
under the fireplace. 

Section 121. 14 Fireplaces constructed of masonry or reinforced concrete shall have a hearth exten- 
sion of brick, concrete, stone, tile or other approved non- combustible material properly supported and with 
no combustible material against the underside. Wooden forms or crickets used during the construction of 
hearth and hearth extension shall be removed when the construction is completed. 

Section 121.2 WOODWORK 



Section 121.21 No woodwork shall be placed within four (4) inches of the back face of afireplace, nor shall 
combustible lathing, furring or plaster grounds be placed against a chimney at any point more than three and 
three-fourths (3-3/4) inches from the corner of the chimney; but this shall not prevent plastering directly on 
the masonry or on metal lath and metal furring; nor shall it prevent placing chimneys for low heat appliances 
entirely on the exterior of a building against the sheathing. 

Section 121.22 The clearance between woodwork and a factory-built fireplace approved by the American 
Insurance Association as a result of tests by a recognized laboratory need not comply with Section 121.11 of this 
code provided the factory-built fireplace is installed in accordance with the conditions of approval. 

Section 121. 23 No woodwork shall be placed within six (6) inches of a fireplace opening and woodwork 
above and projecting more than one and one-half (1-1/2) inches from a fireplace opening shall not be placed 
less than twelve (12) inches from the top of a fireplace opening. 

Section 121. 24 All wood floor and roof framing shall be kept at least one (1) inch away from the 
chimney masonry, except when eight (8) inches of masonry is used outside the flue lining, in which case the 
framing may be built flush with the chimney masonry. The one (1) inch space between the chimney masonry 
and the floor framing shall be filled with fire-resistant material to form a fire stop. In no case shall wood 
framing members bear on the masonry of chimneys, except on piers which are integrated into the chimney 
masonry. 

Section 121.25 All spaces in back of combustible mantels shall be filled with non-combustible material. 
78 



Section 122. WOOD FRAMING. 



The dimensions specified in this Section shall be considered nominal dimensions. Splicing of structural 
wood framing members between bearing points will not be' permitted. In all cases, regardless of location, 
where the structural strength of framing members is definitely impaired by cutting, drilling, or by inherent 
defect, such members shall be replaced or reinforced as required by the Inspector. All framing materials 
shall be of sound merchantable stock of size sufficient to carry the loads imposed on them. 

Section 122. 1 GIRDERS. 



Section 122. 11 All drop or flush girts under the first floor on one and two story buildings shall be at 
least four (4) inches by six (6) inches laid on edge. 

Section 122. 12 Girders may be structural steel, solid wood, built-up wood or reinforced concrete. 

Section 122. 13 All joints of solid and built-up wood girders shall be made over pier or column supports. 

Section 122. 14 Girder Spans. The distance between supports under wood girders shall not exceed 
the following: 

Maximum Clear Span 

Size in Inches 1 & 2 Story Dwellings 2\ and 3 Story Dwellings 

Ft. In. Ft. In. 

5 4 

6 5 2 
6 4 5 6 
8 7 

8 7 

9 8 
10 9 

All first floor girders shall have lally columns under them. Columns 
below grade shall be concrete filled steel pipe, lally-type, and shall be fastened to girders with at least one- 
fourth (1/4) inch thick steel caps and attached to or imbedded in concrete with at least one-fourth (1/4) inch 
steel base. Steel pipe concrete filled columns shall be at least three and one-half (3|) inches in diameter 
and weigh at least thirteen (13) pounds per linear foot, of which the cross section shall include at least one 
and twenty-seven hundredths (1.27) square inches of steel and at least eight and thirty-five hundredths (8.35) 
square inches of concrete. 

Section 122. 2 SILLS AND PLATES. 



4 by 6 




6 by 6 




4 by 8 




4 by 10 




6 by 8 




6 by 10 




6 by 12 




Section 122. 15 


Columns. 



All sills and all bearing plates for roof rafters framing into masonry walls shall be bolted to the 
masonry walls with one-half (1/2) inch bolts bedded firmly in the masonry and spaced not more than eight 
(8) feet apart. 

Section 122. 21 All sills and girders on top of foundation walls and piers shall be leveled, shimmed 
up with slate chips or brick, and thoroughly bedded in cement mortar. All sills shall be at least four (4) 
inches by six (6) inches, laid flatwise, unless otherwise approved by the Inspector. 

Section 122. 22 Top plates shall be not less than doubled two (2) x fours (4's) which shall lap at all 
corners and at all intersecting partitions. All such laps shall be securely spiked. 

Section 122.3 FLOOR JOISTS. 



When floor joists frame into the side of wood girders, the joists shall be supported on metal joists 
hangers or on a bearing strip or spiking strip on the side of the girders. Size of strip shall be at least two 
(2) by three (3) inches. The notch in the end of the joist shall be not more than one -fourth (1/4) of the joist 
depth. Ends of floor joists framing into masonry walls shall have not less than a four (4) inch bearing and 
shall have at least a three (3) inch bevel or fire cut. The ends of floor joists and girders which frame into 
the masonry walls below outside finish grade shall receive a good brush coat of concrete. Each fourth joist 
in wood floor construction framing into masonry walls shall have a metal strap anchor applied on the side and 
near the bottom of the joist and shall extend into the masonry wall. Masonry walls running parallel to the 
floor joists shall be tied to the floor construction with metal strap anchors spaced not over six (6) feet apart 
and extending over and secured to at least three (3) joists. 

Section 122. 31 Headers and trimmers shall be doubled except that headers four (4) feet or less in 
length may be of single thickness provided the header is supported in metal joists hangers or on not less than 

79 



two (2) by three (3) inch ledger boards and the header is secured by spikes driven through one thickness of 
the trimmers into the ends of the header. Headers receiving more than four (4) tail beams shall have ends 
supported in metal joists hangers. 

Section 122. 32 Ends of lapped joists shall rest on girders or on bearing partitions, and shall be 
securely nailed to the plate and to each other. 

Section 122. 33 Floor (including attic floor) and flat roof joists shall be cross-bridged with one (1) 
by three (3) inch bridging at intervals not to exceed eight (8) feet and securely nailed at each end. Metal 
bridging or solid bridging may be used. In flat roof construction, when the ceiling is suspended from the 
roof, the span for the roof joists shall be as required in the floor joist table. The ceiling joists shall be 
two (2) by four's (4's) the same spacing as roof joists and supported by one (1) by four (4) inch hangers spaced 
not more than six (6) feet on center and securely nailed to sides of the roof and ceiling joists. 

Section 122. 34 Maximum spans for all wood floor joists shall be as listed in the tables in Appendix A. 

Section 122. 35 The cutting of floor joists to facilitate the installation of piping and duct work will be 
permitted with the following limitations: 

The top edges of joists may be notched not to exceed one-sixth (1/6) of the joint depth. 
Notching the top edge of joists will not be permitted in the middle third of any joist span. If cutting of a floor 
joist more than one-sixth (1/6) of its depth is found necessary, a header the full depth of the joist shall be cut 
in to support the end of the joist. Where location of pipes necessitates passing through the joists, holes shall 
be drilled to receive the pipes. The diameter of the holes shall be not more than one-half (1/2) inch greater 
than the outside diameter of the pipe and in no case greater than two and one -half (2-1/2) inches. The edge of 
the holes shall not be located nearer than two (2) inches from the top or bottom edge of the joist. 

Section 122. 36 All floor joists shall be covered with one (1) inch sub-flooring. Ends of all subfloor- 
ing shall be cut over joists. Five -eighths (5/8) plywood may be used in place of boards. 

Section 122.4 EXTERIOR WALLS. 

Studding for outside walls and bearing partitions shall be not less than two (2)by four (4) inches spaced not 
over sixteen (16) inches on centers. Non-bearing partitions may be two (2) by three (3) inches. All bearing 
partition studs shall rest on partition caps or shoes of the same size as the studs and capped with double joist 
of the same size. Corner posts shall be four (4) by six (6) inches or may be of three (3) two (2) by four (4) 
inch pieces, continuous for the height of the corner and well spiked together. Corner braces shall be installed 
as near as possible to all corners, except none are needed when plywood is used for exterior sheathing. Exter- 
nal studded walls shall be sheathed with boards three-fourth (3/4) inches thick, one-half (1/2) inch plywood or 
other approved material, laid tight with staggered joints and nailed to studs with eight (8) penny nails, or 
equivalent, in a manner satisfactory to the Inspector. 

Section 122.41 Headers . Lintels over openings in bearing walls or partitions of one (1) and two (2) 
family dwellings shall consist of double joists, not less than herein specified, or trussed construction bear- 
ing on jack studs, or other approved construction affording adequate strength: 

Spans less than four (4) feet Two - Two (2) x Fours (4's) 

Spans four (4) feet to six (6) feet Two - Two (2) x Sixes (6's) 

Spans six (6) feet to eight (8) feet Two - Two (2) x Eights (8's) 

Spans eight (8) feet to ten (10) feet Two - Two (2) x Tens (10's) 

Section 122.5 CEILING JOISTS. 

Maximum spans for ceiling joists shall be as listed in the table in Appendix B. Where the attic space 
above ceiling joists is unfinished but is usable for storage space, or if the space is suitable for finishing into 
future habitable rooms, the spans for the ceiling joists shall be figured the same as for floor joists as speci- 
fied in the tables in Appendix A. Ceiling joists shall, wherever possible, serve as ties for the rafters and 
shall be securely nailed to the rafters. An opening for access into each attic space shall be provided to allow 
for inspection and repair with a minimum size of six (6) square feet, but not less than twenty-two (22) inches 
on any side when trusses are used, located as near to the top of the stairway as practical, but not in a closet 
other than a walk-in closet with a minimum floor area of four (4) feet by four (4) feet. 

Section 122.6 RAFTERS. 

Maximum clear spans of rafters for light and heavy roof covering shall be of sufficient size to carry a 
load of 40 lbs. p. s. f. including dead and live load as listed in the table in Appendix C. Rafters shall be 
securely spiked to the wall plate. Opposing rafters shall be framed directly opposite each other at the ridge. 
There shall be a ridge board of not less than one (1) inch thick at all ridges and a valley rafter at all valleys. 
The depth of the ridge board and valley shall be not less than the cut end of the abutting rafters. Valley rafters 
and hip rafters shall be not less than two (2) inches thick. All openings in roof construction for dormer win- 
dows which are not supported on partitions, shall be framed with double rafters and headers. Roof rafters 
shall be covered with one (1) inch roof boards or one-half (1/2) inch plywood and shall be securely nailed to 
rafters at each bearing. 

80 



Section 122.7 INTERIOR PARTITIONS. 



All bearing partition studs shall be not less than two (2) x fours (4's) spaced not more than sixteen (16) 
inches on center, set the four (4) inch way. 

Nonbearing partition studs may be two (2) by threes (3's) set the three (3) inch way; two (2) by fours 
(4's) may be used, set the two (2) inch way for walls around closets and chimneys. 

Wood bearing partitions in cellars or basements shall incorporate lally columns as specified in Section 
122. 15 of this code. No stud shall be cut more than half its depth to receive piping and duct work. If more 
depth is required, the partition studs shall be increased accordingly. Where the running of piping and duct 
work necessitates the cutting of plates, proper provision, acceptable to the Inspector, shall be made for tying 
together and supporting all structural members affected by such cutting. 

Section 122.71 Stairs. In figuring the main stair run, the treads shall be not less than eight (8) and 
one-quarter (1/4) inches wide, risers shall be not more than eight (8) and one-quarter (1/4) inches high, and 
tread shall be so proportioned to riser that an easy run is obtained. The. width of tread, including the nosing, 
shall be not less than ten and one-quarter (10-1/4) inches. The cutting and framing of all structural members, 
such as stringers and landings, shall be such that the development of their full strength will not be impaired. 
Stringers shall have solid bearings at top and bottom. The minimum effective depth of wooden stair stringers 
shall be three and one-half (3-1/2) inches. If winders are used, the width of treads at eighteen (18) inches 
from the converging end shall be not less than the tread width on the straight stair run. All risers shall be 
the same height for each story. Open basement stairs shall have the stringers not less than two (2) inches 
thick. If treads are less than one and one-eighth (1-1/8) inches thick, a third stringer shall be installed. 

Section 122.8 HANDRAILS. 



Every builder or owner shall provide a safe hand rail and supporting banister or other protective device 
for every stairway having a total rise of thirty (30) inches or more. Every builder or owner shall provide 
wall or protective railings at least thirty-six (36) inches high for every porch, balcony or similar place which 
is more than thirty (30) inches above ground. 



heat. 



Section 122.9 INSULATION. 

No insulation shall be used that supports flames or gives off toxic smoke when exposed to flame or high 

Section 123. GARAGES. 



Any garage built under a dwelling shall have its walls and ceiling covered with wire lathing and cement 
plaster or other fire resisting material as approved by the Inspector. If garage floor and cellar floor are on 
the same level, a sweep shall be installed on the door to prevent fumes from entering the cellar. There shall 
be no greater than a fifteen per cent (15%) grade from garage floor to the street line at the intersection of the 
streetline and the driveway. The opening from a building to a garage shall be restricted to a single doorway, 
provided with not less than a one and three-fourths (1-3/4) inch thick solid door, or panel door, with at least 
two (2) coats of fire retardant paint on the garage side, or an approved fire door of three-fourths (3/4) hour 
fire resistant rating. This door must be equipped with self-closing mechanism and no glass shall be in the 
door except fire glass. Any garage attached to the side of a dwelling directly or with a breezeway shall have 
the wall adjacent to the dwelling or breezeway covered with wire lathing and cement plaster or other approved 
fire resistant material from ridge to floor. 

Any building in which one or more motor vehicles are kept or stored, except as otherwise provided 
above for garages built in connection with a dwelling place, shall be built to conform to the requirements of at 
least a second class building. Buildings requiring class 2 construction include, among others, public garages, 
motor vehicle repair shops, automobile paint shops, service stations, and lubritoriums. 

Section 124. BASEMENTS. 



Provision for sump pump well to be provided at the discretion of the Inspector. All basements shall 
have a bulkhead or other exterior exit and shall have suitable stairs if below grade. All exposed woodwork 
over heating equipment shall be covered with wire lathing and cement plaster or other approved fire resistant 
material for at least five (5) feet from the center of the heater in all directions, or until a fire resistant wall 
is reached. 

No heating equipment shall be installed within six (6) feet of a stairway, unless the stairway is protected 
in such a manner as to stop fire from traveling up stairway. 

Drain tile laid in stone around the perimeter of the foundation of a dwelling shall be laid when in the 
opinion of the Inspector, additional drainage is necessary. 

Section 125. HEATER ROOMS. 



Enclosed heater rooms shall be ventilated as approved by the Inspector. Enclosed heater rooms of less 
than eighty (80) square feet shall be lined with a covering of wire lathing and cement plaster or five-eighths 
(5/8) fire coded sheetrock. 



81 



In public places or places of assembly, such as in churches, hotels, high hazard institutional occupan- 
cies, and apartments and in multi-family house occupancies, the heater rooms shall be separated from the 
rest of the building by eight (8) inch masonry walls, with the ceilings plastered with fireproof cement mortar 
and door openings protected by approved self-closing doors. 

Section 126. HEATING EQUIPMENT. 

Kerosene stoves and portable kerosene heaters (non-flue connected heater types) shall be barred from 
use in a dwelling, a business or an industrial establishment and all other oil or gas fired heaters must bear 
an approval label as a result of tests and listing by a nationally recognized testing laboratory and a permit 
shall have been issued by the head of the Fire Department or the Inspector of Gas Piping and Gas Appliances 
for its use, before a permit of occupancy is issued. 

Approved non-flue connected heaters may be used temporarily during construction on approval of the 
head of the Fire Department. 

Section 127. EGRESSES. 

Every dwelling, apartment or tenement or any other building or structure to be used in whole or in 
part for dwelling purposes, either as a permanent or temporary dwelling, except multiple family dwelling 
houses hereafter erected, altered or remodeled, shall have a minimum of two (2) independent means of 
egress, placed as far apart as practicable, both of which shall be not less than fifteen (15) square feet in 
area and shall terminate at the outside of the building at ground level. One egress may terminate on a 
balcony provided that the balcony extends a minimum of four (4) feet on one side of the egress opening. 

Every multiple family type dwelling house and every dwelling not included in the paragraph above here- 
after erected, altered or remodeled, shall have a minimum of two (2) independent means of egress, placed 
as far apart as practicable, both of which shall be not less than fifteen (15) square feet in area and shall 
terminate at the outside of the building at ground level. One egress may terminate on a balcony provided that 
the balcony extends a minimum of four (4) feet on one side of the egress opening. 

Every multiple family type dwelling house and every dwelling not included in the paragraph above here- 
after erected, altered or remodeled, shall have a minimum of two (2) independent means of egress for each 
apartment or tenement or other dwelling unit, placed as far apart as practicable, one of which shall terminate 
at the outside of the building at ground level. 

Section 128. HEIGHT OF BUILDING. 



No dwelling hereafter erected shall exceed twenty (20) feet in height from sill to eaves. 

Section 129. WALL COVERING. 

Every wooden building hereafter erected shall have its exterior walls covered with a standard exterior 
building material approved by the Inspector; this provision shall not apply to paint or stain. 

Section 130. ROOF COVERING. 



The roof of every dwelling and garage attached thereto shall be covered with slate, asbestos, or asphalt 
roof covering weighing not less than two hundred and ten (210) lbs. per square or approved Class C fire 
resistant treated wood shingles laid according to standard building practice. 

Not more than two (2) reshinglings of asphalt shingles shall be allowed without removal of old shingles 
and no reshingling over wood shingles is allowed. 

Section 131. FIRE STOPPING. 



Where floor beams or studs rest on sills, girders, wall girts or partition caps, fire stopping shall be 
required between such beams and studs from the sills, girders, girts or caps to four (4) inches above the 
plaster ground with brick and mortar or other fire resistant material, or full size blocking shall be installed 
between the studs above and below the floor beams of each story and at the ceiling line of each story. Full 
size blocking means full width of studs and not less than one and one-half (1-1/2) inches thick. 

Section 132. OCCUPANCY PERMIT. 

No building of any type, except as otherwise provided herein, whether of a permanent or portable 
nature hereafter erected, remodeled, restored, or moved shall be occupied or used in whole or in part as 
a dwelling until the same shall have been inspected by the Inspector, Plumbing Inspector and the Board of 
Health, and a permit of occupancy issued by the Board of Health and the Inspector, stating that the'building 
and use thereof complies with the provisions of this Code, the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
and all other laws pertaining thereto. A permit of occupancy shall not be issued unless a building permit 
has been previously issued by the Inspector in accordance with the provisions of this Code. Application for 
a permit of occupancy shall be filed with the Inspector who shall notify the Board of Health of such application. 

Whoever occupies, or allows someone to occupy a dwelling that doe-s not have an occupancy permit shall 
be liable for a penalty of not more than fifty dollars ($50.00) for each violation. Payment of such penalty does 
not absolve any violator from the obligation under this Code to obtain an occupancy permit. 



82 



Section 133. RESTRICTIONS ON CONSTRUCTION WITHIN FIRE LIMITS 

Section 133. 1 GENERAL RESTRICTIONS. 



Except as otherwise provided in Paragraph 133. 5 of this section, no building or structure of wood frame 
construction or of unprotected non- combustible construction shall be erected within the limits established by 
law as the Fire Limits, nor shall wood or other combustible veneers be permitted on buildings or structures 
within such Fire Limits. Prior to approval, construction plans shall be forwarded by the builder to the 
Inspector and to the Fire Chief for review. 

Section 133. 2 ALTERATIONS AND EXTENSIONS. 



Section 133. 21 Within the Fire Limits no building or structure of wood frame construction or of un- 
protected non -combustible construction shall be increased in height. 

Section 133. 22 Within the Fire Limits no building or structure shall be extended on any side by wood 
frame construction or unprotected non- combustible construction. The aggregate area of the building or struc- 
ture including the extension shall not exceed the allowable area for wood frame construction in the following 
table: 

Construction Area of one Area of Building 

Types Story Building Over One Story 

Ordinary 9,000 sq. ft. 6,000 sq. ft. 

Unprotected 

non- combustible 9,000 sq. ft. 6,000 sq. ft. 

Wood Frame 6,000 sq. ft. 4,000 sq. ft. 

Section 133.23 Nothing in this section shall be construed to prohibit other alterations within the Fire 
Limits; provided there is no change of occupancy to a class of occupancy otherwise prohibited. 

Section 133.24 High hazard occupancy, as defined below, is prohibited. High hazard occupancy 
means the occupancy or use of a building or structure or any portion thereof that involves highly combustible, 
highly flammable, or explosive material, or which has inherent characteristics that constitute a special fire 
hazard; including among others, aluminum powder factories; cellulose nitrate plastic factories, warehouses 
and salesrooms; cereal mills; distilleries; explosives manufacture, sales and storage; flour and feed mills; 
gasoline bulk plants; grain elevators; lacquer factories; liquified petroleum gas charging or bulk storage 
plants; mattress factories; paint factories and wastepaper plants. 

Section 133. 3 MOVING BUILDINGS. 



No building or structure of wood frame construction or unprotected non- combustible construction shall 
be moved from without to within the Fire Limits or from one lot to another within the Fire Limits. 

Section 133.4 BUILDINGS PARTLY WITHIN FIRE LIMITS. 

A building or structure shall be deemed to be within the Fire Limits if one-third (1/3) or more of the 
area of such building or structure is located therein. 

Section 133. 5 EXCEPTIONS TO RESTRICTIONS WITHIN FIRE LIMITS. 



Section 133.51 Frame dwellings not exceeding two (2) stories in height and separated by at least ten 
(10) feet from the lot line of adjoining property. 

Section 133. 52 Wood or other combustible veneers on non- combustible backing for show windows 
that do not extend above the first full story above grade. 

Section 133. 53 A building occupied as a private garage, not more than one (1) story in height nor 
more than seven hundred and fifty (750) square feet in area, located on the same lot with a dwelling; provided 
that such building shall be placed at least ten (10) feet from the lot lines of adjoining property. 

Section 133. 54 A building not exceeding two thousand five hundred (2,500) square feet in area when used 
for a business occupancy, or one thousand (1,000) square feet in area when used for other occupancies, nor 
more than one (1) story in height, and having a horizontal separation of not less than ten (10) feet on all sides. 

Section 133. 55 Greenhouses not more than fifteen (15) feet in height erected on the same lot with an 
accessory to a dwelling or a store. 

Section 133. 56 Sheds open on the long side, not more than fifteen (15) feet in height nor more than five 
hundred (500) square feet in area, located at least ten (10) feet from buildings and from adjoining lot lines. 



83 



Section 133.57 Builders' shanties for use only in connection with duly authorized building operation 
and located on the same lot with such building operation, on a lot immediately adjoining on an upper floor of 
the building under construction, or on a sidewalk shed. 

Section 133.58 Piazzas or balconies, not exceeding ten (10) feet in width nor extending more than 
three (3) feet above the second-story floor beams; provided that no such structure shall be located nearer 
than ten (10) feet to an adjoining lot line or be joined to a similar structure of another building. 

Section 133.59 Fences under six (6) feet in height. 

Section 134. WEST ACTON FIRE LIMITS. 

The following area in West Acton shall constitute the "West Acton Fire Limits" and the regulations set 
forth in Section 133 above shall apply; Starting at a point at the center of the intersection of Willow and Sum- 
mer Streets in West Acton; thence in a northwesterly direction to the center of the intersection of Homestead 
and Willow Streets; thence in a northerly direction to the center of the intersection of Arlington Street and 
Massachusetts Avenue; thence northerly to a point in the center of the Boston and Maine Railroad right of way 
located two thousand one hundred (2,100) feet northeasterly from the center of the Massachusetts Avenue cross- 
ing as measured along the right of way; thence one thousand (1,000) feet southeasterly along the railroad right 
of way; thence easterly to the center of the intersection of Elm and Arlington Streets; thence southerly to the 
center of the intersection of a private way known as "Cedar Terrace" and Massachusetts Avenue; thence west- 
erly to a point in the center of the railroad right of way located eight hundred and fifty (850) feet southeasterly 
from the center of the Massachusetts Avenue crossing as measured along the right of way; thence one thousand 
two hundred and fifty (1,250) feet southeasterly along the railroad right of way, thence westerly to the center 
of the intersection of Central and Summer Streets and westerly to the point of beginning at the center of the 
intersection of Willow and Summer Streets. 

Section 135. STREET NUMBERS. 



Street numbers shall be provided for each dwelling, each business building and each industrial building 
by the builder as follows: 

Numbers shall be at least three (3) inches in height and shall be clearly visible from the street or road- 
way upon which the house faces. The numbers shall be placed on the structure itself or on a suitable support 
near the main entrance to the structure. The numbers shall be those shown on the approved definitive plan, 
in the case of a subdivision, or as assigned by the Engineering Department in the case of a structure built on a 
town way. 

Section 136. MULTIPLE DWELLING BUILDINGS. 

Section 136. 1 FOOTINGS. 



Footings for multiple dwelling buildings shall be twelve (12) inches by twenty-four (24) inches with two 
(2) reinforcing rods not less than one-half (1/2) inch in diameter. 

Section 136.2 BOILER ROOMS. 



Boiler rooms should be enclosed with eight (8) inch masonry blocks, or equal fire ratings. 

Section 136.3 STAIRWAYS. 

Stairways shall be enclosed on both sides by masonry block walls of not less than six (6) inches in 
thickness or of equal fire rating. All stairways shall have risers and treads. Block walls shall extend up to 
the roof boards. All doors in the above mentioned fire walls shall be one and three-quarter (1-3/4) inches 
solid flush doors or equal. Fire rating doors will be equipped with self closing mechanisms. 

Section 136.4 BUILDING DIVIDER WALLS. 



Walls which physically connect multiple dwelling buildings shall be constructed as specified in Section 
136, sub-section 136.3 (Stairways). 

Section 136.5 WORKING DRAWINGS. 



Detailed working drawings of multiple dwelling buildings must be prepared by a Registered Architect 
or Engineer, and shall be submitted at least two (2) weeks prior to initiation of construction. 

Section 136. 6 APARTMENT HOUSE INCINERATORS . 

No incinerator shall be constructed in any apartment house. 



84 



Section 137. SWIMMING POOLS . 

Private and commercial pools having a depth of two (2) feet or more will require building permits and 
must comply with the building side line and setback regulations set forth in the Protective Zoning Bylaw of 
the Town. They must be enclosed by a protective fence at least four (4) feet in height with a lockable gate. 
Gates shall lock on closing. Gate locks must be placed on the inside of the fence. Both fence and gate lock 
must meet with the approval of the Inspector. Inspection will be made at excavation and after completion. 
Vertical stays in the fence must not be more than two (2) inches apart. 



85 



APPENDIX A - FLOOR JOISTS 



DOUGLAS FIR, COAST REGION 



FLOOR JOISTS 




40 lb. Live Load 


30 lb. Live Load 


Nominal 
Size 


Spacing 
C to C 


Select. 

Struct. 

1900f 


Construction 
1500f 


Standard 
1200f 


Util 


ity* 


Select. 

Struct. 

1900f 


Construction 
1500f 


Standard 
1200f 


Util 


ity* 


Inches 


Inches 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. 


In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. 


In. 


2x6 


12 
16 
24 


11 2 

10 3 

9 


11 2 

10 3 

9 


11 2 
9 11 
8 1 


7 
6 
4 




1 
11 


12 2 

11 2 

9 11 


12 2 

11 2 

9 11 


12 2 

11 1 

9 


7 
6 
5 


9 
9 
6 


2x8 


12 
16 

24 


14 9 
13 6 
12 


14 9 
13 6 
12 


14 9 
13 6 
11 


11 
9 
7 




7 
9 


16 1 
14 9 
13 1 


16 1 
14 9 
13 1 


16 1 

14 9 
12 4 


12 

10 
8 


4 
8 
8 


3x8 


12 
16 
24 


17 
15 7 
13 10 


17 

15 7 
13 10 


17 
15 7 
13 10 


14 

12 

9 



2 

11 


18 7 
17 
15 1 


18 7 
17 
15 1 


18 7 

17 
15 1 


15 
13 
11 


8 

7 
1 


2 x 10 


12 
16 
24 


18 3 
16 9 
14 10 


18 3 
16 9 
14 10 


18 3 
16 9 
14 


15 
13 
10 


1 


7 


19 11 
18 3 
16 2 


19 11 
18 3 
16 2 


19 11 
18 3 
15 7 


16 
14 
11 


10 

7 

11 


3 x 10 


12 
16 
24 


21 1 
19 4 
17 1 


21 1 

19 4 
17 1 


21 1 
19 4 
17 1 


19 
16 
13 


2 

7 
7 


23 1 
21 2 

18 8 


23 1 
21 2 
18 8 


23 1 
21 2 
18 8 


21 
18 
15 


2 

6 

1 


2 x 12 


12 
16 
24 


21 9 
19 11 
17 7 


21 9 
19 11 

17 7 


21 9 
19 11 
16 11 


17 
15 
12 


7 
3 
5 


23 9 
21 9 
19 2 


23 9 
21 9 
19 2 


23 9 
21 9 
18 11 


19 
17 
13 


8 



10 



"Indicates the grade is not a stress grade. 



HEMLOCK, WEST COAST 



FLOOR JOISTS 




40 lb. Live Load 


30 lb. Live Load 


Nominal 
Size 


Spacing 
C to C 


Select. 

Struct. 

1600f 


Construction 
1500f 


Standard 
1200f 


Utility* 


Select. 

Struct. 

1600f 


Construction 
1500f 


Standard 
1200f 


Util 


Lty* 


Inches 


Inches 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. 


In. 


2x6 


12 

16 
24 


10 8 

9 10 
8 7 


10 8 
9 10 

8 7 


10 8 

9 10 
8 1 


7 
6 1 
4 11 


11 8 

10 9 

9 6 


11 8 

10 9 

9 6 


11 8 

10 9 

9 


7 
6 
5 


10 
9 
6 


2x8 


12 
16 
24 


14 2 
13 
11 6 


14 2 
13 
11 6 


14 2 
13 
11 


11 
9 7 
7 10 


15 5 

14 2 
12 7 


15 5 
14 2 
12 7 


15 5 
14 2 
12 7 


12 

10 

8 


4 
8 
9 


3x8 


12 
16 
24 


16 4 
15 
13 3 


16 4 
15 
13 3 


16 4 
15 
13 3 


14 

12 2 

9 11 


17 10 
16 4 
14 6 


17 10 
16 4 
14 6 


17 10 

16 4 
14 6 


15 

13 

11 


8 
7 
1 


2 x 10 


12 
16 
24 


17 7 
16 1 
14 3 


17 7 
16 1 
14 3 


17 7 
16 1 
13 11 


15 1 
13 
10 8 


19 2 
17 6 
15 6 


19 2 
17 6 
15 6 


19 2 
17 6 
15 6 


16 

14 
12 


10 
8 



3 x 10 


12 
16 
24 


20 3 
18 7 
16 5 


20 3 
18 7 
16 5 


20 3 

18 7 
16 5 


19 2 
16 7 
13 7 


22 1 
20 3 

17 11 


22 1 
20 3 
17 11 


22 1 
20 3 
17 11 


21 
18 
15 


2 

6 
2 


2 x 12 


12 
16 
24 


20 10 

19 1 
16 11 


20 10 

19 1 
16 11 


20 10 

19 1 
16 11 


17 7 
15 3 
12 5 


22 9 
20 10 
18 5 


22 9 
20 10 
18 5 


22 9 
20 10 
18 5 


19 
17 
13 


8 



10 



'Indicates the grade is not a stress grade. 



86 



SPRUCE, EASTERN OR CANADIAN 



FLOOR JOISTS 




40 lb. Live Load 


30 lb. Live Load 


Nominal 
Size 


Spacing 
C to C 


No. 1* 








No. 1* 








Inches 


Inches 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


2x6 


12 
16 
24 


9 4 
8 1 
6 7 








10 5 
9 
7 4 








2x8 


12 
16 
24 


13 2 

11 4 

9 3 








14 8 
12 9 
10 5 








3x8 


12 

16 
24 


15 7 
14 4 
11 9 








17 
15 7 
13 2 








2 x 10 


12 

16 
24 


16 9 
15 2 
12 5 








18 3 

16 9 
14 








3 x 10 


12 

16 
24 


19 4 
17 9 
15 8 








21 2 
19 4 
17 1 








2 x 12 


12 
16 
24 


19 11 
18 3 
15 10 








21 9 
19 11 
17 7 









indicates the grade is not a stress grade. 



SPRUCE, ENGELMANN OR WESTERN 



FLOOR JOISTS 




40 lb. Live Load 


30 lb. Live Load 


Nominal 
Size 


Spacing 
C to C 


Select.* 
Merch. 


Construction* 


Standard* 


Utility* 


Select.* 
Merch. 


Construction* 


Standard* 


Utility* 


Inches 


Inches 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. 


In. 


Ft. In. 


2x6 


12 

16 
24 


9 8 
8 4 
6 9 


9 8 
7 
5 9 


6 6 
5 9 
4 9 


5 3 
4 6 
3 6 


10 7 
9 4 
7 8 


9 
7 10 
6 4 


7 
6 
5 


4 
4 
3 


5 9 
5 
4 


2x8 


12 

16 
24 


12 9 

11 9 
9 6 


12 3 

10 9 
8 9 


9 6 
8 3 
6 9 


8 6 
7 3 
6 


13 11 
12 9 
10 8 


13 9 
11 11 

9 9 


10 

9 
7 


8 
3 

6 


9 6 
8 1 
6 9 


3x8 


12 

16 
24 


14 9 
13 6 
12 


14 9 
13 6 
11 


12 

10 6 

8 6 


10 7 
9 3 
7 7 


16 1 
14 9 
13 1 


16 1 
14 9 
12 6 


13 

11 

9 


7 
9 
6 


12 

10 3 
8 6 


2 x 10 


12 

16 
24 


15 10 

14 6 
12 6 


15 6 
13 6 
11 1 


12 9 
11 1 

9 


11 5 

10 

8 


17 3 
15 10 
14 


17 3 
15 2 
12 6 


14 
12 
10 


3 
6 
1 


12 10 

11 1 

9 


3 x 10 


12 
16 
24 


18 3 
16 10 
14 10 


18 3 
16 10 
14 1 


16 3 
14 1 
11 4 


14 6 
12 7 
10 3 


20 
18 3 
16 2 


20 
18 3 
15 9 


18 
15 
12 


1 

9 
9 


16 2 
14 
11 6 


2 x 12 


12 
16 
24 


18 10 
17 3 
15 


18 10 
16 4 
13 3 


16 3 
14 2 
11 6 


13 10 

12 

9 9 


20 6 
18 10 
16 8 


20 6 
18 3 
15 


18 
15 
12 



6 
9 


15 5 
13 4 
10 10 



*Indicates the grade is not a stress grade. 



87 



APPENDIX B - CEILING JOISTS 



DOUGLAS FIR, COAST REGION 



CEILING JOISTS 






20 lb. Attic 


Storage 






No Attic 


Storage 






Nominal 
Size 


Spacing 
C to C 


Select. 

Struct. 

1900f 


Construction 
1500f 


Standard 
1200f 


Utility* 


Select. 

Struct. 

1900f 


Construction 
1500f 


Standard 
1200f 


Utility* 


Inches 


Inches 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. 


In. 


2x4 


12 
16 
24 


9 5 
8 7 
7 6 


8 2* 
7 1* 
5 9* 


6 3* 
5 5* 
4 5* 


4 1 
3 6 
2 11 


11 10 

10 9 
9 5 


11 10* 

10 9* 

9 5* 


10 10* 

9 4* 
7 8* 


-7 
6 
5 


1 
1 



2x6 


12 
16 
24 


14 4 
13 

11 4 


14 4 
13 
11 4 


14 4 
12 10 
10 5 


9 1 

7 9 
6 4 


18 

16 4 
14 4 


18 

16 4 
14 4 


18 

16 4 
14 4 


15 
13 

11 


8 

7 
1 


2x8 


12 
16 
24 


19 6 
17 9 
15 6 


19 6 
17 9 
15 6 


19 6 
17 5 
14 3 


14 3 
12 4 
10 1 


24 7 
22 4 
19 6 


24 7 
22 4 
19 6 


24 7 
22 4 
19 6 


22 
20 

17 


4 
3 
5 


2 x 10 


12 
16 
24 


24 9 
22 6 
19 7 


24 9 
22 6 
19 7 


24 9 
22 1 
18 


19 6 
16 10 
13 9 


31 2 
28 3 
24 9 


31 2 

28 3 
24 9 


31 2 

28 3 
24 9 


28 
25 
22 


3 

9 
5 



'Indicates the grade is not a stress grade. 



HEMLOCK, WEST COAST 



CEILING JOISTS 




20 lb. Attic Storage 


No Attic Storage 


Nominal 

Size 


Spacing 
C to C 


Select. 

Struct. 

1600f 


Construction 
1500f 


Standard 
1200f 


Utility* 


Select. 

Struct. 

1600f 


Construction 
1500f 


Standard 
1200f 


Utility* 


Inches 


Inches 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


2x4 


12 

16 
24 


9 
8 2 
7 2 


7 9* 
6 8* 
5 5* 


5 11* 
5 2* 
4 3* 


4 1 
3 6 
2 11 


11 4 

10 4 

9 


11 4* 

10 4* 

9 0* 


10 4* 
8 11* 

7 4* 


7 1 
6 1 
5 


2x6 


12 
16 
24 


13 8 
12 5 
10 10 


13 8 
12 5 
10 10 


13 8 

12 5 
10 5 


9 1 
7 9 
6 4 


17 3 
15 8 
13 8 


17 3 
15 8 
13 8 


17 3 
15 8 
13 8 


15 8 

13 6 
11 1 


2x8 


12 

16 
24 


18 8 
16 11 
14 10 


18 8 
16 11 
14 10 


18 8 
16 11 
14 3 


14 3 
12 4 
10 1 


23 6 
21 4 
18 8 


23 6 
21 4 
18 8 


23 6 
21 4 
18 8 


22 4 
20 3 
17 5 


2 x 10 


12 

16 
24 


23 8 
21 6 
18 9 


23 8 
21 6 
18 9 


23 8 
21 6 
18 


19 6 
16 10 
13 9 


29 9 
27 1 
23 8 


29 9 
27 1 
23 8 


29 9 
27 1 
23 8 


28 3 

25 9 
22 5 



'Indicates the grade is not a stress grade. 



88 



SPRUCE, EASTERN OR CANADIAN 



CEILING JOISTS 




20 lb. Attic Storage 


No Attic Storage 


Nominal 
Size 


Spacing 
C to C 


No. 1* 








No. 1* 








Inches 


Inches 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


2x4 


12 
16 

24 


7 2 
6 2 
5 1 








10 9 
9 10 

8 7 








2x6 


12 
16 
24 


12 1 

10 5 

8 6 








16 4 
14 11 
13 








2x8 


12 

16 
24 


16 11 

14 8 
12 








22 4 
20 3 

17 9 








2 x 10 


12 

16 
24 


22 6 
19 8 
16 1 








28 3 
25 9 
22 5 









^Indicates the grade is not a stress grade. 



SPRUCE, ENGELMANN OR WESTERN 



CEILING JOISTS 








20 lb. 


Attic 


Storage 






No Attic 


Storage 


Nominal 
Size 


Spacing 
C to C 


Select.* 

Merch. 


Construction* 


Standard* 


Utility* 


Select.* 
Merch. 


Construction* 


Standard* 


Utility* 


Inches 


Inches 


Ft. 


In. 


Ft. 


In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


2x4 


12 

16 
24 


7 
6 
5 


8 
7 
5 


6 
5 
4 



2 
2 


4 5 
3 9 
3 1 


3 

2 9 
2 6 


10 2 
9 3 
8 1 


10 2 
8 11 
7 3 


7 8 
6 8 
5 4 


5 3 
4 7 
3 9 


2x6 


12 

16 
24 


12 

10 
8 


3 

9 
9 


10 

9 
7 


5 

4 


8 6 
7 4 
6 


6 9 
5 9 
4 9 


15 5 
14 
12 3 


15 5 
14 
12 3 


14 9 
12 9 
10 4 


11 7 

10 1 

8 3 


2x8 


12 
16 
24 


16 
15 
12 


8 
1 

4 


16 
13 
11 



9 
3 


12 3 

10 9 
8 9 


10 10 

9 6 
7 9 


21 
19 1 
16 8 


21 

19 1 
16 8 


21 
18 6 
15 1 


18 10 
16 3 
13 3 


2 x 10 


12 
16 
24 


21 

19 
16 


2 
2 



20 
17 
14 


2 
7 
2 


16 6 
14 2 
11 7 


14 9 
12 9 
10 5 


26 7 
24 1 
21 1 


26 7 
24 1 
21 1 


26 7 
24 1 
20 3 


25 6 
22 1 
18 1 



^Indicates the grade is not a stress grade. 



89 



APPENDIX C - ROOF JOISTS AND RAFTERS 



DOUGLAS FIR, COAST REGION 



LOW SLOPE ROOF JOISTS** 




Supporting Finished Ceilin 


g 


Not Supporting Finished Cei 


ing 




Nominal 
Size 


Spacing 
C to C 


Select. 

Struct. 

1900f 


Construction 
1500f 


Standard 
1200f 


Utility* 


Select. 

Struct. 

1900f 


Construction 
1500f 


Standard 
1200f 


Util 


Lty* 


Inches 


Inches 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. 


In. 


2x6 


12 
16 
24 


14 4 
13 
11 4 


14 4 
13 
10 9 


13 8 

11 10 

9 8 


8 4 
7 3 
5 11 


16 5 
14 10 
13 


16 5 

14 4 
11 8 


14 9 
12 10 
10 5 


9 

7 
6 


1 
9 
4 


2x8 


12 

16 
24 


19 6 
17 9 
15 6 


19 6 
17 9 
14 9 


18 8 
16 2 
13 2 


13 2 

11 5 
9 4 


22 4 
20 3 

17 9 


22 4 

19 6 
15 11 


20 2 
17 5 
14 3 


14 
12 
10 


3 
4 
1 


3x8 


12 

16 
24 


22 10 

20 9 
18 2 


22 10 

20 9 
18 2 


22 10 
20 6 
16 9 


16 9 
14 6 
11 10 


26 2 
23 9 
20 9' 


26 2 
23 9 
20 3 


25 7 
22 2 
18 1 


18 
15 
12 


1 
9 
9 


2 x 10 


12 

16 
24 


24 8 
22 6 
19 7 


24 8 
22 6 
18 8 


23 7 
20 5 
16 8 


18 
15 7 
12 9 


28 4 
25 8 
22 6 


28 4 
24 9 
20 2 


25 6 
22 1 
18 


19 
16 
13 


6 

10 

9 


3 x 10 


12 
16 
24 


29 
26 4 
23 


29 
26 4 
23 


29 
26 
21 2 


22 11 
19 10 
16 2 


33 2 
30 2 
26 4 


33 2 
30 2 
25 7 


32 6 
28 1 
22 11 


24 
21 
17 


9 
5 
6 


2 x 12 


12 

16 

24 


29 11 
27 2 
23 9 


29 11 
27 2 
22 7 


28 7 
24 9 
20 2 


21 1 
18 3 
14 10 


34 3 
31 1 
27 2 


34 3 

29 11 
24 5 


30 11 
26 9 
21 10 


22 
19 
16 


9 
8 




Indicates the grade is not a stress grade. 
* Three inches or less per foot. 



DOUGLAS FIR, COAST REGION 



RAFTERS 




Heavy Roofing 


Light Roofing 


Nominal 
Size 


Spacing 
C to C 


Select. 

Struct. 

1900f 


Construction 
1500f 


Standard 
1200f 


Utility* 


Select. 

Struct. 

1900f 


Construction 
1500f 


Standard 
1200f 


Utility* 


Inches 


Inches 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. 


In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. 


In. 


2x4 


12 
16 
24 


12 3 

10 7 
8 8 


8 2* 

7 1* 
5 9* 


6 3* 

5 5* 
4 5* 


4 
3 
2 


1 

6 

11 


14 4 
12 4 
10 1 


9 6* 
8 3* 
6 9* 


7 4* 
6 4* 
5 2* 


4 
4 
3 


9 
2 
3 


2x6 


12 

16 
24 


18 7 
16 2 
13 2 


16 6 
14 4 
11 8 


14 9 
12 10 
10 5 


9 
7 
6 


1 
9 
4 


21 9 
18 9 
15 4 


19 3 
16 8 
13 7 


17 3 
14 11 
12 2 


10 

9 

7 


7 
2 
6 


2x8 


12 

16 
24 


25 4 
21 11 
17 11 


22 6 
19 6 
15 11 


20 2 
17 5 
14 3 


14 
12 
10 


3 

4 
1 


29 7 
25 8 
20 11 


26 4 
22 9 
18 7 


23 6 
20 4 
16 7 


16 

14 
11 


7 
5 
9 


2 x 10 


12 
16 
24 


32 2 
27 10 
22 8 


28 6 
24 9 
20 2 


25 6 
22 1 
18 


19 
16 
13 


6 

10 

9 


37 6 
32 6 
26 6 


33 4 
28 10 
23 7 


29 10 

25 9 
21 1 


22 

19 
16 


9 
9 
1 



*Indicates the grade is not a stress grade. 



90 



HEMLOCK, WEST COAST 



LOW SLOPE ROOF JOISTS** 




Supporting Finished Ceiling 


Not 


Supporting Finished Ceiling 




Nominal 
Size 


Spacing 
C to C 


Select. 

Struct. 

1600f 


Construction 
1500f 


Standard 
1200f 


Utility* 


Select. 

Struct. 

1600f 


Construction 
1500f 


Standard 
1200f 


Utility* 


Inches 


Inches 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. 


In. 


2x6 


12 
16 
24 


13 8 
12 5 
10 10 


13 8 
12 5 
10 9 


13 8 
11 10 

9 8 


8 4 
7 3 
5 11 


15 8 
14 3 
12 1 


15 8 
14 3 
11 8 


14 9 
12 10 
10 5 


9 
7 
6 


1 
9 
4 


2x8 


12 
16 
24 


18 8 
16 11 
14 10 


18 8 
16 11 
14 9 


18 8 
16 2 
13 2 


13 2 

11 5 
9 4 


21 4 
19 5 
16 5 


21 4 
19 5 
15 11 


20 2 
17 5 
14 3 


14 
12 
10 


3 
4 
1 


3x8 


12 

16 
24 


21 11 
19 10 
17 4 


21 11 
19 10 
17 4 


21 11 

19 10 
16 9 


16 9 
14 6 
11 10 


25 1 
22 9 
19 11 


25 1 
22 9 
19 11 


25 1 
22 2 
18 1 


18 

15 
12 


1 
8 
9 


2 x 10 


12 

16 
24 


23 8 
21 6 
18 9 


23 8 
21 6 
18 8 


23 7 
20 5 
16 8 


18 

15 7 
12 9 


27 1 
24 7 
20 10 


27 1 
24 7 
20 2 


25 6 
22 1 
18 


19 
16 
13 


6 
10 

9 


3 x 10 


12 

16 
24 


27 9 
25 2 
22 


27 9 
25 2 
22 


27 9 
25 2 
21 2 


22 11 
19 10 
16 2 


31 9 
29 
25 4 


31 9 

29 
25 4 


31 9 
28 1 
22 11 


24 
21 
17 


9 

5 

16 


2 x 12 


12 

16 
24 


28 7 
26 
22 8 


28 7 
26 
22 7 


28 7 
24 9 
20 2 


21 1 

18 3 
14 10 


32 9 
29 9 
25 3 


32 9 

29 9 
24 5 


30 11 
26 9 
21 10 


22 

19 
16 


9 
8 




^Indicates the grade is not a stress grade. 
"* Three inches or less per foot. 



HEMLOCK, WEST COAST 



RAFTERS 




Heavy Roofing 


Light Roofing 


Nominal 
Size 


Spacing 
C to C 


Select. 

Struct. 

1600f 


Construction 
1500f 


Standard 
1200f 


Utility* 


Select. 

Struct. 

1600f 


Construction 
1500f 


Standard 
1200f 


Utility* 


Inches 


Inches 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. 


In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. 


In. 


2x4 


12 
16 
24 


11 3 

9 9 
7 11 


7 9* 
6 8* 

5 5* 


5 11* 
5 2* 
4 3* 


4 
3 
2 


1 

6 
11 


13 2 

11 4 

9 3 


8 11* 
7 10* 

6 4* 


6 11* 
6 0* 
4 11* 


4 
4 
3 


9 
2 

3 


2x6 


12 

16 
24 


17 1 
14 9 
12 1 


16 6 
14 4 
11 8 


14 9 
12 10 
10 5 


9 
7 
6 


1 
9 
4 


19 11 
17 3 
14 1 


19 3 
16 8 
13 7 


17 3 
14 11 
12 2 


10 

9 
7 


7 
2 
6 


2x8 


12 
16 
24 


23 3 
20 2 
16 5 


22 6 
19 6 
15 11 


20 2 
17 5 
14 3 


14 
12 
10 


3 

4 
1 


27 2 
23 6 
19 3 


26 4 
22 9 
18 7 


23 6 
20 4 
16 7 


16 
14 
11 


7 
5 
9 


2 x 10 


12 
16 
24 


29 6 
25 6 
20 10 


28 6 
24 9 
20 2 


25 6 
22 1 
18 


19 
16 
13 


6 

10 

9 


34 5 
29 9 
24 4 


33 4 
28 10 
23 7 


29 10 
25 9 
21 1 


22 

19 
16 


9 
9 
1 



^Indicates the grade is not a stress grade. 



91 



SPRUCE, EASTERN OR CANADIAN 



LOW SLOPE ROOF JOISTS** 




Supporting Finished Ceiling 


Not Supporting Finished Ceiling 


Nominal 
Size 


Spacing 
C to C 


No. 1* 








No. 1* 








Inches 


Inches 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


2x6 


12 
16 
24 


11 2 
9 8 
7 10 








12 1 

10 5 

8 6 








2x8 


12 

16 
24 


15 8 
13 7 
11 1 








16 11 
14 8 
12 








3x8 


12 
16 
24 


19 11 
17 3 
14 1 








21 6 
18 8 
15 3 








2 x 10 


12 
16 
24 


21 
18 2 
14 10 








22 8 

19 8 
16 1 








3 x 10 


12 
16 
24 


26 4 
23 1 
18 10 








28 10 
25 
20 5 








2 x 12 


12 
16 
24 


26 9 
23 2 
18 10 








28 11 
25 1 
20 5 









'Indicates the grade is not a stress grade. 
! *Three inches or less per foot. 



SPRUCE, EASTERN OR CANADIAN 



RAFTERS 




Heavy Roofing 


Light Roofing 


Nominal 
Size 


Spacing 
C to C 


No. 1* 








No. 1* 






Inches 


Inches 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In, 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


2x4 


12 
16 
24 


7 2 
6 2 
5 1 








8 4 
7 3 
5 11 








2x6 


12 
16 
24 


12 1 

10 5 

8 6 








14 1 

12 2 

9 11 








2x8 


12 
16 
24 


16 11 
14 8 
12 








19 9 
17 2 
14 








2 x 10 


12 
16 
24 


22 8 
19 8 
16 1 








26 6 
22 11 
18 9 









*Indicates the grade is not a stress grade. 



92 



SPRUCE, ENGELMANN OR WESTERN 



LOW SLOPE ROOF JOISTS** 




Supporting Finished Ceiling 




Not Supporting Finished 


Ceiling 




Nominal 
Size 


Spacing 
C to C 


Select.* 
Merch. 


Construction* 


Standard* 


Utility* 


Select.* 
Merch. 


Construction* 


Standard* 


Utility* 


Inches 


Inches 


Ft. 


In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. 


In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. 


In. 


Ft. 


In. 


2x6 


12 
16 
24 


11 

10 

8 


6 

1 


9 8 
8 4 
6 10 


7 10 
6 10 

5 7 


6 3 
5 5 
4 4 


12 
10 

8 


5 
9 
9 


10 5 

9 
7 4 


8 
7 
6 


6 
4 



6 
5 
4 


9 

9 
9 


2x8 


12 
16 
24 


16 
14 
11 


2 


5 


14 9 
12 9 
10 4 


11 5 
9 11 
8 1 


10 

8 7 
7 2 


17 
15 
12 


5 
1 
4 


16 
13 9 
11 3 


12 

10 

8 


3 

9 
9 


10 

9 
7 


10 

6 
9 


3x8 


12 
16 
24 


19 
17 
14 


7 
9 
6 


18 9 
16 3 
13 3 


14 6 
12 6 
11 3 


12 9 

11 

9 


22 
19 
15 


2 
2 
8 


20 3 
17 8 
14 3 


15 
13 

12 


8 
7 
2 


13 
12 

9 


10 

9 


2 x 10 


12 
16 
24 


21 

18 
19 




2 

10 


18 8 
16 2 
13 3 


15 3 
13 3 
10 10 


13 8 
11 10 

9 8 


22 
19 
16 


8 
8 



20 2 
17 7 
14 2 


16 
14 
11 


6 
2 

7 


14 
12 
10 


9 
9 
5 


3 x 10 


12 
16 
24 


24 
22 
18 


9 

6 

10 


23 9 
20 6 
16 9 


19 4 
16 9 
13 9 


17 4 
15 
12 3 


28 
25 
20 


4 


5 


25 8 
22 3 
18 


21 
18 
14 





9 


18 
16 
13 


9 
2 
2 


2 x 12 


12 
16 
24 


25 
22 
18 


5 




22 7 
19 6 
16 


19 4 
16 9 
13 9 


16 6 
14 3 
11 9 


27 
25 
19 


6 

3 


25 8 
21 3 
17 3 


21 
18 
14 



1 
3 


17 
15 
12 


10 
4 
6 



Indicates the grade is not a stress grade. 
* Three inches or less per foot. 



SPRUCE, ENGELMANN OR WESTERN 



RAFTERS 




Heavy Roofing 


Light Roofing 


Nominal 
Size 


Spacing 
C to C 


Select.* 
Merch. 


Construction* 


Standard* 


Utility* 


Select* 
Merch. 


Construction* 


Standa 


rd* 


Util 


Lty* 


Inches 


Inches 


Ft. 


In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. In. 


Ft. 


In. 


Ft. 


In. 


2x4 


12 
16 
24 


7 
6 
5 


8 

7 
5 


6 
5 2 
4 2 


4 5 
3 9 
3 1 


3 
2 9 
2 6 


9 
7 10 
6 4 


7 
6 
4 11 


5 
4 
3 


2 

7 
7 


3 
3 
2 


6 

2 

10 


2x6 


12 

16 
24 


12 

10 

8 


5 
9 
9 


10 5 

9 
7 4 


8 6 
7 4 
6 


6 9 
5 9 
4 9 


14 6 
12 7 
10 3 


12 2 

10 7 

8 7 


9 
8 
7 


11 
8 



7 
6 
5 


10 

10 

7 


2x8 


12 
16 
24 


17 
15 
12 


5 
1 
4 


16 
13 9 
11 3 


12 3 

10 9 
8 9 


10 10 

9 6 
7 9 


20 4 

17 7 
14 4 


18 7 
16 1 
13 2 


14 
12 
10 


4 
6 
2 


12 

11 

9 


8 




2 x 10 


12 

16 
24 


22 

19 
16 


8 
8 



20 2 

17 7 
14 2 


16 6 
14 2 
11 7 


14 9 
12 9 
10 5 


26 6 
22 11 
18 9 


23 6 
20 5 
16 7 


19 
16 
13 


2 
7 

7 


17 
14 
12 


2 

11 

2 



^Indicates the grade is not a stress grade. 



93 



Article 21. SEWAGE DISPOSAL LEASE 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the Town Manager to enter into a lease for sewage disposal purposes 
for a term of five years, with or without option to renew said lease for one or more terms of up to five years, 
of premises belonging to the Kennedy Land Corporation adjacent to the Town Forest, and that the sum of 
$10.00 be raised and appropriated therefor. 



Article 22. SLUDGE DRYING BED FUNDS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $8,000.00 for the rebuilding of an existing sludge 
drying bed and the construction of other sludge drying beds in order to provide adequate area for the disposal 
of septic tank effluent at the town forest sewage disposal site. 



Article 23. FUNDS FOR HIGHWAYS, ETC. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $16,444.95 to be expended under the provisions 
of Section 5 of Chapter 768 of the Acts of 1969 for reconstruction, maintenance and repair of highways and 
bridges, and for the enforcement of traffic laws; provided that the reimbursements be credited to the surplus 
revenue account. 



Article 25. ZONING BYLAW 



VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town as follows: 

1. By deleting Section V(A)(5) and Section V(A)(6) and substituting therefor the following: 

"5. Off- Street Parking and Loading Bay Space Requirements for 1-1, 1-2 and B Districts 

(a) No land shall be used, nor shall the use of any land be changed and no building or 
structure shall be erected, enlarged, replaced or used, nor its use changed, 
unless the off-street parking and loading bay requirements specified in this section 
are provided. For the purpose of this section an enlargement or replacement of 
any presently existing building shall require the provision of the off-street parking 
and loading bay space requirements only if such enlargement or replacement 
increases the gross floor area of such building by one thousand five hundred (1,500) 
square feet or to more than one hundred twenty-five percent (125%) of the gross 
floor area thereof as of April 1, 1970 (whichever is less) and only then to the 
extent of such increase. 

(b) For the purposes of this Section V(A)(5): 

(i) a parking space is an area having a width of not less than nine (9) feet and a 
length of not less than twenty (20) feet, exclusive of traffic lanes and maneuver- 
ing space. 

(ii) a loading bay is an area of not less than twelve (12) feet in width and fifty (50) 
feet in length, exclusive of traffic lanes and maneuvering space, located at the 
sides or rear of the building with direct access to the building to be served. 



94 



(iii) A driveway is a single access to and from a public way with separate entrance 
and exit lanes having a width of not less than twenty-four (24) nor more than 
thirty-six (36) feet; each lot may have at least one driveway and may have one 
additional driveway for each two hundred (200) feet of frontage on a public way 
in which case driveways shall not be located closer than two hundred (200) feet 
apart. 

(iv) gross floor area is the total floor area designated for occupancy and use, 

including basement and other storage areas, provided however that stairways, 
elevator wells, restrooms and lounge areas, common hallways and building 
service areas shall not be included in the computation of such floor area. 

(v) where the computation of the off-street parking or loading bay space require- 
ments results in a fractional number, only the fraction of one -half (1/2) or 
more shall be counted as one. 



(vi) where one building is used for more than one use, off-street parking space 
requirements shall be computed for each use. 

(c) All required off-street parking and loading bay spaces, including traffic lanes and 
maneuvering space therefor, as well as driveways, shall be paved, shall be located 
entirely on the same lot as and within a reasonable distance of the principal use they 
are designated to serve, and shall be cleaned, plowed and maintained in good condition 
at all times by the owner or occupant thereof as the responsibility between them shall 
have been determined. 

(d) There shall be no parking spaces nor space for loading bays, except for driveways, 
within the first ten (10) feet of the applicable front yard set back requirement. In an 
1-1 and 1-2 District there shall be no off-street parking spaces nor space for loading 
bays within the side yard or rear yard set back requirements except as to any such 
side and rear yard which is adjacent to similarly zoned land, where a single common 
driveway serves both parcels of similarly zoned land. 

(e) The first ten (10) feet in each yard depth shall be maintained open, except for drive- 
ways, with grass, bushes, flowers or trees, and in the case the boundary abuts 
property being used for residential purposes or in a residential district, a fence to 
provide suitable screening between properties shall be erected in such area in addi- 
tion to appropriate landscaping. 

(f) Lighting facilities, both in parking areas and on the exterior of the buildings, shall 
be so arranged that they neither unreasonably distract occupants of adjacent proper- 
ties nor interfere with traffic on any public way. 

(g) A plan or plans showing, as applicable, the location of buildings existing and to be 
erected, of off-street parking and loading bay spaces including traffic lanes and 
maneuvering spaces, of driveways, of signs and of lighting facilities and the 
methods of drainage of surface water from all paved areas, shall be submitted to 
the Board of Selectmen or its representative for prior approval at least 60 days 
before any application for a permit shall be made or any change of use commenced. 



(h) Table of Off- Street Parking Space Requirements 



Principal Use 

One family dwellings 

Multi -dwelling units 

Accessory uses permitted in Section IV-B. 1. d. 

Business and professional offices; banks and 
savings institutions 

Hotels and motels 



Restaurants and other places of assembly or 
of amusement 



Number of Spaces 



Two (2) spaces. 

Two (2) spaces per dwelling unit. 

Three (3) spaces plus three (3) spaces for 
each non-resident employee. 

One (1) space for each two hundred seventy 
(270) square feet of gross floor area, plus one 
(1) space for every two (2) employees. 

Three (3) spaces for each two (2) rental units, 
plus three (3) spaces for each twenty (20) 
square feet of floor area available for meet- 
ings or functions and one (1) space for every 
four (4) employees. 

One (1) space for every four (4) seats, plus 
one (1) space for every four (4) employees. 



95 



Hospitals, nursing homes, convalescent homes, 
rest homes and extended care facilities 



One (1) space for each two (2) beds 



Retail stores, service establishments: 

(a) under 3,000 square feet 

(b) over 3,000 square feet 



Uses permitted in the General Industrial (1-1) 
and the Light Industrial District (1-2), not speci- 
fically provided for hereinabove. 



One (1) space for each two hundred seventy 
(270) square feet of gross floor area. 

One (1) space for each one hundred eighty 
(180) square feet of gross floor area. 

One (1) space per employee plus one (1) space 
for each two thousand (2,000) square feet for 
the first twenty thousand (20,000) square feet 
and one (1) space for each additional ten thou- 
sand (10,000) square feet." 



Article 26. ZONING BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw by deleting in its entirety Section IV (E) 
(2) (a) and substituting therefor the following: 

'a. Parking: Off-street, on-site paved parking shall be provided in accordance with the pro- 
visions of Section V-A, (5)." 

Article 27. ZONING BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw by deleting in its entirety Section IV (E) 
(2) (b) and substituting therefor the following: 

"b. Loading Requirements: All loading requirements shall be provided in accordance with 
the provisions of Section V-A, (5)." 

Article 28. ZONING BYLAW 

VOTED: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw by amending the INTENSITY REGULATION SCHEDULE 
DISTRICT AND USES in Section V (B) by deleting the words "Multi-family uses" and substituting therefor 
the words "Multiple Dwelling Units" and by deleting under the heading "Lot Area (Sq. Ft. )" and opposite 
"Multi-family uses" the figures and words "60,000, 3,500 per D. U. " and substituting therefor "80,000 
with at least 4,500 sq. ft. for the first bedroom, studio or efficiency and at least 3,000 sq. ft. for each 
additional bedroom." 



Total vote - 307. 



Yes - 284 



No - 23 



Needed - 205 



Article 29. ZONING BYLAW 

VOTED: To amend Section II (A) (1) of the Protective Zoning Bylaw by deleting the words "five years", and 
substituting therefor the words "two years" so that Section II (A) (1) will read as follows: 

"1. Nothing in this bylaw shall prohibit the continued lawful use of land or buildings in the 
same or similar manner in which they were used at the time of the adoption of this 
bylaw, but if any nonconforming use shall be discontinued for a period of more than 
two years, it may not be resumed except by a permit granted by the Board of Appeals." 



Total vote - 2 92. 



Yes - 287 



No 



Needed - 195 



Article 30. ZONING BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw by adding a new subsection 3 to Section V 
(B) concerning certain lots in General Industrial Districts (1-1), Light Industrial Districts (1-2) and General 
Business Districts (B) which new subsection reads as follows: 

"3. Any recorded lot in an 1-1, 1-2 or B District which complied with the minimum area and 
frontage requirements applicable at the time of such recording may be built upon or used, 
notwithstanding the adoption of larger area or frontage requirements in such district, or 
both, provided that (1) at the time of building or use, such lot otherwise conforms to the 
regulations of this zoning bylaw and (2) at the time of the adoption of the increased require- 
ments, such lot was held in ownership separate from that of adjoining land in the same 
zoning district. If a lot in an I- 1, 1-2 or B District complies with the requirements of the 
preceding sentence in all respects except that at the time of the adoption of the larger area 
or frontage requirements, or both, such lot was held in ownership not separate from that 
of adjoining land in the same zoning district, such lot shall, in conjunction with all such 
adjoining land in common ownership, be regarded as having sufficient area and frontage." 



96 



Article 31. ZONING BYLAW & MAP 

MOTION: To see if the Town will amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw and the Zoning Map of the Town by 
changing the designation on the map of the following districts to Light Industrial (1-2): 

a. that land presently zoned General Industrial (1-1) immediately south of Hayward Road to a 
depth of 500 feet parallel with the existing southerly sideline of Hayward Road laying 
between Charter Road and Route 2. 

b. that land presently zoned General Industrial (1-1) immediately north of Hayward Road laying 
between Charter Road and Route 2, which is further described as: 

1. The land shown as lots A and B on a plan entitled "Land in Acton owned by the Rex 
Corporation, Horace E. Turtle, C.E., November 20, 1951" and recorded in the 
Middlesex Registry of Deeds, South District, at Book 7832, Page 454; 

2. The additional piece of land immediately north of Hayward Road to a depth of 500 
feet parallel to the existing northerly sideline of Hayward Road laying between 
the aforementioned land and Charter Road. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action. 

Article 32. ZONING BYLAW 

VOTED: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw by adding to Section V Intensity Regulations, a new subsec- 
tion entitled "D, Site Plan Approval: 

No business or industrial building shall hereafter be erected or externally enlarged, and no 
business or industrial use shall hereafter be established or expanded in ground area except 
in conformity with a site plan bearing an endorsement of approval by the Board of Selectmen. 
Said site plan shall show among other things, all existing and proposed buildings, structures, 
signs, parking spaces, driveway openings, driveways, service areas, and other open uses, 
all facilities for sewage, refuse and other waste disposal, and for surface water drainage, 
and all landscape features (such as fences, walls, planting areas and walks) on the lot. In 
the event this section, or any other section, of the Protective Zoning Bylaw shall contain 
provisions with respect to any one or more of the aforegoing site plan requirements, said 
site plan shall be prepared in accordance with such provisions. 

Any person desiring approval of a site plan under this paragraph shall submit said plan to the 
Board of Selectmen who shall thereafter transmit it to the Planning Board for a report and 
recommendations thereon, and no building permit shall be issued until the Board of Selectmen 
shall have approved or disapproved the plan within sixty days after receipt of the plan. The 
Planning Board shall render a report or recommendation within 45 days of receipt of plan by 
Board of Selectmen. Failure to do so shall constitute a favorable report by the Planning Board. 
In considering a site plan under this subsection, the Board of Selectmen shall assure to a degree 
consistent with a reasonable use of the site for the purposes permitted by the regulations of the 
district in which it is located: 

1. protection of adjoining districts against seriously detrimental or offensive uses on the site. 

2. convenience and safety of vehicular and pedestrian movement within the site and in relation 
to adjacent streets and land. 

3. adequacy of the methods of disposal for sewage, refuse and other wastes resulting from the 
uses permitted on the site, and the methods of drainage for surface water from its parking 
spaces and driveways. 

Within fifteen days after the approval of said site plan a copy thereof bearing the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen shall be filed in the office of the Town Clerk; and the plan as approved shall 
be carried into effect and completed by the applicant for such site plan approval or his assigns 
within one year of the date of approval. The Board of Selectmen may at the time of the approval 
of any site plan, or, thereafter, upon an application therefor, grant such extension of the time 
as it shall deem necessary to carry any site plan into effect; and, the Board of Selectmen shall 
certify to the Town Clerk that it has been granted an extension of time and the date on which it 
shall expire. " 

Total vote - 318. Yes - 248 No - 70 Needed - 212 

Article 33. ZONING BYLAW & MAP 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw by changing the following described area, 
which is presently General Business (B-l) or Residence 2 (R-2), to General Business (B-l): 



97 



"Beginning at the Northwesterly intersection of Great Road with proposed Russell Street, as 
shown on a plan entitled "Plan of 'Henley Acres', a Sub-Division of Land in Acton, Mass.", 
dated July 1953 by Snelling & Hilton, Registered Land Surveyors, recorded in Middlesex 
South District Deeds in Book 8121, Page End; thence running 

Northeasterly along said Great Road to land now or formerly of Reed, as shown on said plan; 
thence turning and running 

Northeasterly, Northwesterly, Northeasterly, Northwesterly, Northerly and Northeasterly 
by the stone wall shown on said plan, by land now or formerly of Reed to the B-l Zone line; 
thence turning and running 

Northeasterly and Northerly along said B-l Zone line to its intersection with the 1-1 Zone 
line; thence turning and running 

Southeasterly along said 1-1 Zone line to the stone wall at the Henley Acres boundary; thence 
Southwesterly by said stone wall and by the projection of said boundary to the Northwesterly 
side line of proposed Russell Street, as shown on said plan; thence turning and running 

Southwesterly along said Northwesterly side line of proposed Russell Street to the point of 
beginning. " 

Article 34. ZONING BYLAW & MAP 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw by changing the following described area 
from General Industrial (1-1) to General Business (B-l): 

"Beginning at a point at the intersection of the existing 1-1 - R-2 (to be changed to B-l) Zone 
line with the Southeasterly bound of Henley Acres, as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of 
'Henley Acres', a Sub-Division of Land in Acton, Mass.", dated July 1953* by Snelling &. 
Hilton, Registered Land Surveyors, recorded in Middlesex South District Deeds in Book 
8121, Page End, thence running 

North 52° 11' 18" West one thousand eighty-five and 18/100 (1,085.18) feet; thence turning 
and running 

North 20° 44' 15" West two hundred sixty and 95/100 (260.95) feet to a stone wall; thence 
turning and running 

North 36° 07' 40" East along said stone wall and a projection thereof three hundred seventy- 
eight and 29/100 (378.29) feet to a point; thence turning and running 

South 53° 37' 10" East one thousand three hundred three and 77/100 (1,303.77) feet to a point; 
thence turning and running 

South 36° 10' 40" West four hundred eleven and 18/100 (411.18) feet to a point; thence running 
South 36° 12' 05" West one hundred thirty-five and 89/100 (135.89) feet to the point of beginning. " 

Article 35. ZONING BYLAW h MAP 

"Beginning at a point on the Northwesterly sideline of Henley Road three hundred eighty-nine 
and 35/100 (38 9.35) feet Northeasterly of the point of curve on the Northwesterly intersection 
of Henley Road with the State Highway (Route 2A), as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of 'Henley 
Acres', a Sub-Division of Land in Acton, Mass." dated July 1953 by Snelling & Hilton, Regis- 
tered Land Surveyors, recorded in Middlesex South District Deeds in Book 8121, Page End; 
thence running 

North 53° 37' 10" West one hundred and eighty-five and 25/100 (185.25) feet to a stone wall, as 
shown on said plan; thence turning and running 

North 44° 35' 10" East along said stone wall one hundred fifteen and 04/100 (115.04) feet to a 
corner of the stone wall; thence turning and running 

North 51° 19' 00" West along said stone wall one hundred eighty-four and 78/100 (184.78) feet 
to a corner of the wall as shown on said plan; thence turning and running 

North 01° 54' 50" East seventy-nine and 73/100 (79.73) feet to a point; thence turning and running 

North 36° 22' 50" East six hundred fifty-eight and 466/1000 (658.466) feet to a point; thence turn- 
ing and running 

North 20° 44' 15" West one hundred eighty-nine and 284/1000 (189.284) feet to a point; thence 
turning and running 

North 69° 15' 45" East three hundred eighty-four and 731/1000 (384.731) feet to a point; thence 
turning and running 

South 53° 37' 10" East two hundred eighty-eight and 666/1000 (288.666) feet to a point; thence 
turning and running 



98 



South 36° 22' 50" West two hundred fifty-six and 353/1000 (256.353) feet to a point; thence turn- 
ing and running 

South 53° 37' 10" East one hundred seventy-five and 003/1000 (175.003) feet to a point; thence 
turning and running 

South 36° 27' 50" West one hundred sixty-seven and 195/1000 (167.195) feet to a point; thence 
turning and running 

South 18° 38' 10" West one hundred thirty-one and 24/100 (131.24) feet to a point; thence turn- 
ing and running 

South 36° 22' 50" West one hundred seven and 805/1000 (107.805) feet to a point; thence turning 

and running 

South 53° 37' 10" East forty and 00/100 (40.00) feet to a point; thence turning and running 

South 36° 22' 50" West two hundred sixty-five and 00/100 (265.00) feet to a point; thence turning 
and running 

South 53° 37' 10" East one hundred ten and 000/1000 (110.000) feet to a point; thence turning 
and running 

South 36° 22' 50" West two hundred sixty-five and 000/1000 (265.000) feet to a point; thence 
turning and running 

North 53° 37' 10" West three hundred five and 000/1000 (305.000) feet to a point on the North- 
westerly sideline of Henley Road, as shown on said plan; thence turning and running 

South 36° 22' 50" West eighty-five and 000/1000 (85.000) feet to the point of beginning. " 

Article 36. ZONING BYLAW 

MOTION: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw by adding a new subsection 3 to Section V (B) concerning 
certain lots in General Industrial Districts (1-1), Light Industrial Districts (1-2) and General Business 
Districts (B) which new subsection reads as follows: 

"3. Any recorded lot in an 1-1, 1-2 or B District which complied with the minimum area, frontage, 
intensity, side, rear and front yard requirements applicable at the time of such recording 
may be built upon or used in accordance with such previously existing requirements, notwith- 
standing the subsequent adoption of any such increased requirements as aforesaid in such 
district provided that (1) at the time of building or use, such lot otherwise conforms to the 
regulations of this zoning bylaw and (2) at the time of the adoption of the increased require- 
ments, such lot was held in ownership separate from that of adjoining land in the same 
zoning district. 

If a lot in an 1-1, 1-2 or B District complies with the requirements of the preceding sentence 
in all respects except that at the time of the adoption of the increased requirements, such lot 
was held in ownership not separate from that of adjoining land in the same zoning district, 
such lot shall, in conjunction with all such adjoining land in common ownership, be regarded 
as having sufficient area, frontage, intensity, side, rear and front yards." 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 37. BOWEN LAND GIFT 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept for general municipal purposes a gift from Marguerite Bowen, of approxi- 
mately one acre of land located on the northerly side of Pope Road and to the northeast of the intersection of 
Strawberry Hill Road with Pope Road, described as parcel 23 of plate E5 of the Town Atlas (as amended to 
January 1, 1969). 

VOTED: That on completion of article under consideration at 11:00 P.M. to adjourn to Monday, March 30, 
1970 at 7:30 P.M. 

Article 38. CONSERVATION LAND (CLAPP) 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the conservation commission to purchase that land owned by Robert 
and Priscilla Clapp having approximately 28,125 sq. ft. situated on the southeasterly side of Main Street and 
northeasterly of Nashoba Brook being a portion of land owned by Robert and Priscilla Clapp under deed 
recorded with Middlesex South Registry of Deeds at Book 6495, Page 271. 

Article 39. CONSERVATION LAND (4 PARCELS) 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the board of selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, or other- 
wise acquire for the Town for conservation purposes those four parcels of land located between Main Street 
and Pope Road in the northeast part of the Town, more particularly described as follows: 



99 



1. Parcel 29 on MapD-5 of the Town Atlas, amended to January 1, 1969, believed to be owned 
by the heirs of Amasa Davies, described in a deed recorded with the Middlesex South Dis- 
trict Registry of Deeds, at Book 203, Page 95, dated December 26, 1812 and containing 
approximately 50 acres. 

2. Parcel 35 on Map D-5 of the Town Atlas, amended to January 1, 1969, believed to be owned 
by the devisees of Evelina White, described in two deeds recorded with the Middlesex South 
District Registry of Deeds at Book 257, Page 315, and Book 257, Page 316, both dated 
January 18, 1825, and containing approximately 49.25 acres. 

3. Parcel 4 on Map E-5 of the Town Atlas, amended to January 1, 1969, believed to be owned 
by the heirs of Harriet Davis, described in a deed recorded with the Middlesex South District 
Registry of Deeds at Book 259, Page 7 2, dated January 14, 1819, and containing approximately 
14 acres. 

4. That land shown as parcel 6 on Map D-5 of the Town Atlas, amended to January 1, 196 9, 
believed to be owned by the heirs of William Livingston, described in a deed recorded with 
the Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds, atBook 187, Page 364, dated May 23, 1810, 
and containing approximately 2\ acres. 

that the sum of $25,000.00 be appropriated from the conservation fund for the purpose of paying any expenses 
in connection therewith and any damages for which the Town may be liable by reason of any such taking, and 
that the Town approve application by the conservation commission for reimbursement from the Commonwealth 
under General Laws, chapter 132A, section 11. 

Article 40. CONSERVATION FUND 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $100,000.00 for the conservation fund. 

Adjourned at 11:00 P.M. 

Monday, March 30, 1970. Moderator called the meeting to order at 7:30 P. M. 

Article 41. ACTON HOUSING AUTHORITY 

/VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: That whereas there exists in the Town a shortage of safe sanitary dwellings avail- 
/ / able for elderly persons of low income at rentals which they can afford and whereas a housing authority is 
Is needed for the provision of housing for elderly persons of low income, the Acton Housing Authority shall be 
organized and established under General Laws, Chapter 12 IB for the purpose of providing housing for 
elderly persons of low income. Said housing to consist of no more than 50 units. 

VOTED: To take up Article 43. 

Article 43. ADAMS STREET 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept as a town way Adams Street from Parker Street to High Street as laid 
out by the Board of Selectmen according to plans on file with the Town Clerk, including the taking or accept- 
ance of easements for drainage, utility, road construction, or other purposes where shown on said plans or 
described in said order of layout and that the sum of $1,500.00 be raised and appropriated for the purposes 
of acquiring said land, and easements and for expenses incident thereto, and name said street Adams Street. 

Article 42. FLETCHER GIFT OF LAND 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept with appreciation the gift for highway purposes of that portion of the land 
described which is within the area of the way accepted under Article 43 and accept the gift for general munici- 
pal purposes of the balance of the land described as follows: 

Beginning at a point at the intersection of High Street and Adams Street, thence; 

N 63° - 50' - 15" W by Adams Street a distance of 317.80 feet to a corner of a stone wall, thence; 

N 52° - 14' - 41" E by said stone wall a distance of 30.26 feet to a bend in said wall, thence; 

N 46° - 54' - 35" E by said stone wall a distance of 18.86 feet to a bend in said wall, thence; 

N 51° - 50' - 09" E by said stone wall a distance of 72.40 feet to a bend in said wall, thence; 

N 52° - 32' - 46" E by said stone wall a distance of 63.29 feet to High Street, thence; 

Southeasterly by High Street on a curve to the left of 737.11 foot radius and length of 292.80 feet 
to the point of beginning, containing 23,7 98 square feet. 



100 



Article 44. ADAMS STREET BETTERMENTS 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $35,000.00 for reconstruction of Adams Street from Parker 
Street to High Street in accordance with G. L. c. 44, s.- 7 (5), including surface drainage under either 
G. L. c. 44, s. 7 (1) or 7 (5); and that 75% of the cost of these improvements and of the eminent domain 
damages in connection with the project be assessed as betterments under the provisions of Chapter 80 
of the General Laws. 

Article 45. POLICE CRUISERS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $4,500.00 for the purchase of two new police 
cruisers and authorize the Town Manager to trade in two of the present police cruisers. 

Article 46. SNOW FIGHTING EQUIPMENT 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate from the Machinery Fund the sum of $4,200.00 for the purchase of 
snow fighting equipment for the highway department. 

Article 47. GRADALL 

MOTION: To raise and appropriate the sum of $15,500.00 for the purchase of a reconditioned gradall for the 
highway department. 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 48. STREET SWEEPER 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $18,000.00 for the purchase of a new street 
sweeper for the highway department. 

Article 49. TREE DEPARTMENT EQUIPMENT 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $6,000.00 for the purchase of a new cab, chassis, and appur- 
tenant equipment and for the installation of the present tree department vehicle body on the new chassis. 

Article 50. VEHICLE - ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $3,000.00 for the purchase of a standard sedan automobile for 
the engineering department and authorize the Town Manager to trade in the present engineering department 
vehicle. 

Article 51. FOREST FIRE TRUCK 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $16,500.00 for the purchase of a new forest 
fire truck and equipment for use by the fire department. 

Article 52. FIRE ALARM EQUIPMENT 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $14,300.00 to be expended by the Town Manager 
for the purchase and installation of equipment and expenses incidental to the improvement of the present fire 
department central office fire alarm control equipment and the fire alarm system. 

Article 53. LIGHTS - PLAYGROUND 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $18,000.00 for the purchase and installation of lights at the 
Elm Street Playground. 

Article 54. BACKSTOP & BLEACHERS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $1,700.00 for a backstop and bleachers at the 
Elm Street Playground. 

Article 55. TOT-LOT 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $1,050.00 for a tot-lot at Goward Field. 

Article 56. 1975 CELEBRATION 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $3,000.00 to be placed in a separate account with the Town 
Treasurer to be expended for the celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the battle between the 
citizens of Acton and British troops. 



101 



Article 57. PAINTING - OFFICES 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $2,500.00 for the painting of offices on the first floor of the 
Town Hall. 

Article 58. EASEMENTS EXCHANGE 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the board of selectmen to accept, take by eminent domain or otherwise 
acquire for the Town of Acton, a drainage easement as shown on a plan to be recorded with the Middlesex 
South District Registry of Deeds in, through and under Lot 4B now or formerly owned by Harlan and Nancy C. 
Howe, Jr., and Lot 5C now or formerly owned by Robert S. and Trinidad R. Gilmore and more fully described 
as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the southerly sideline of Minot Avenue 66.31 feet from the P. T. of a 
50.00 foot radius curve at the intersection with Concord Road, thence, 

N 6° - 53' - 46" W a distance of 84.68 feet to a point on the northerly line of an existing 
drainage easement, as shown on Plan 403 of 1969 recorded with the Middlesex South Registry 
of Deeds, thence, 

S 49° - 29' - 41" W a distance of 24.01 feet along said easement, thence 

S 6° - 53' - 46" E a distance of 94.95 feet to a point on the southerly sideline of Minot Avenue, 
being the P. C. of a 640.00 foot radius curve, thence, 

N 74° - 26' - 00" E a distance of 20.23 feet along the southerly sideline of Minot Avenue to the 
point of beginning; 

and in the same action abandon a portion of a drainage easement as shown on said plan to be recorded. 

Article 59. AIR-CONDITIONING LIBRARY 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $15,600.00 to be expended by the Trustees of the Memorial 
Library for the purchase and installation of air conditioning equipment and for expenses incidental thereto. 

Article 60. PIPER ROAD & ROUTE 2 

MOTION: To raise and appropriate the sum of $10,000.00 to be expended by the Town Manager to hire an 
engineering firm to perform an analysis and prepare working drawings for highway modifications at the 
intersection of Piper Road and Route 2 to reduce traffic hazard and congestion at that intersection. 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 61. DESMOND BEQUEST 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the bequest of $3,000.00 under paragraph one of the will of Martha L. 
Desmond, late of Somerville, concerning perpetual care of a lot in Woodlawn Cemetery. 

Article 62. MOUNT HOPE CEMETERY 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate the sum of $2,000.00 from the Cemetery Land Fund for Mount Hope 
Cemetery, for the purpose of clearing, removing of stumps, laying out roads, grading, laying out of lots 
and making the necessary improvements for a new section in said cemetery. 

Article 63. MOUNT HOPE CEMETERY 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $3,000.00 for paving certain roads or avenues 
in Mount Hope Cemetery. 

Article 64. RESERVE FUND 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate the sum of $30,000.00 for a Reserve Fund, pursuant to the provisions 
of the General Laws, chapter 40, section 6, and to meet said appropriation $30,000.00 to be transferred from 
Overlay Reserve. 

Article 65. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate and transfer $ none from Free Cash to be used by the Assessors in 
considering and fixing the 1970 tax rate. 

Article 66. STABILIZATION FUND 

VOTED: To take no action. 



102 



VOTED: To adjourn at 9:40 P. M. 

The following served as tellers at the above meeting: 
Joyce E. Foley, Susan F. Huebsch, Julia D. Stevens, 
McLaughlin, Harold W. Flood, Milford B. Bottomley, 



Ann B. Evans, Carole E. Cochin, Joan N. Gardner, 
Beverlie B. Tuttle, Lynne T. Salisbury, John F. 
Dewey E. Boatman, Jerry T. Ballantine. 



A true copy. Attest: 



Charles M. MacRae 
Town Clerk 



New Building Code (Article 11) voted in the affirmative at the Annual Town Meeting, March 9, 1970 and 
adjourned session March 23, 1970 was approved by Attorney General Robert H. Quinn on July 22, 1970 
and duly posted as required by law. 

Amendments to the Protective Zoning Bylaw (Articles 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 32, 33, 34, and 35 together 
with relating maps) voted in the affirmative at the Annual Town Meeting, March 9, 1970 and adjourned 
session March 23, 1970 were approved by Attorney General Robert H. Quinn on August 28, 1970 and duly 
posted as required by law. 



103 



ABSTRACT OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 16, 1970 

Article 1. REGIONAL SCHOOL LAND 

VOTED: To approve the amount of debt authorized to be incurred by the Acton -Boxborough Regional District 
School Committee on February 16, 1970, namely $100, 000. 00 for the purpose of acquiring by purchase, 
taking by eminent domain or otherwise approximately twenty-three acres of land adjacent to the existing 
property of the District and consisting of two parcels, to wit, the so-called Todd property and the so-called 
Coughlin property for the purpose of providing a site for an addition to the existing Regional Schools and re- 
lated purposes. 

A true copy. Attest: Charles M. MacRae 

Town Clerk 



ABSTRACT OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, JUNE 29, 1970 

Article 1. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To ratify the action of the Personnel Board on May 21, 1970, in reclassifying the 
position of Motor Equipment Repairman, as set forth in Schedule A of the Personnel Bylaw, from Schedule B, 
grade S-15 to Schedule E, grade W-7 and amend Schedule A of the Personnel Bylaw by deleting "B S-15" 
opposite Motor Equipment Repairman and substituting therefor "E W-7". 

Article 2. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To ratify the vote of the Personnel Board on June 4, 1970, to delete the position 
of Dump Custodian, Schedule E, Grade W-2 as set forth in Schedule A of the Personnel Bylaw and to insert 
the position of Disposal Area Operator, Schedule E, Grade W-4 and amend the Personnel Bylaw by making 
corresponding changes in Schedule A. 

Article 3. TRANSFER 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To transfer the sum of $2, 368. 56 from the Insurance Claims Recovery Fund to the 
local schools contingency fund. 

Article 4. REGIONAL REFUSE DISPOSAL 

VOTED: To appropriate from Surplus Revenue the sum of $4, 760. 00 to be expended by the Assabet Regional 
Refuse Disposal Planning Board, as the Town's member share, to retain engineering consultant services for 
the preparation of a master plan of refuse disposal for the region comprising the towns of Acton, Boxborough, 
Maynard, and Stow. 

Article 5. ACTON -BOXBOROUGH REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOLS 

MOTION: That the amount of debt authorized on June 1, 1970, by the Acton-Boxborough Regional District 
School Committee for the purpose of financing to that extent the cost of constructing an addition to the existing 
Regional Schools be approved. 

UNANIMOUSLY DEFEATED. 



104 



Article 6. BUILDING CODE 

VOTED: To amend the Building Code by inserting the following new sections. 

Section 138 FIRE DETECTION SYSTEMS 

Every multiple dwelling of more than four (4) units shall have installed a fire detection system 
which is connected to the Fire Alarm Office through the municipal fire alarm system. 

Section 138. 1 EQUIPMENT AND INSTALLATION 

All equipment used shall be listed with the underwriters laboratories and as specified by the 
Acton Fire Department. Equipment shall be installed in accordance with practices outlined in pamphlet 
72A of the National Fire Protection Association. 

Section 138.2 HEAT DETECTORS 

Rate of rise heat detectors shall be installed in utility rooms, service closets, basements, heating 
rooms, laundry rooms, hallways and stairways in a manner approved by the Fire Chief. 

Section 138. 3 MANUAL PULL STATIONS 

Manual pull stations shall be located in the hallways and connected to the building fire alarm sys- 
tem. The number and location of such stations shall be determined by the Fire Chief. 

Section 138.4 AUDIBLE WARNING DEVICES 

Audible warning devices such as horns shall be installed above each manual pull station. The 
warning devices must be audible throughout the building. 

Section 138. 5 MASTER ALARM BOXES 

The master alarm box shall conform to Acton Fire Department specifications. Where there is more 
than one multiple dwelling located so as to form a complex, one (1) master alarm box may be used provided 
that each building has its own annunciator panel with a visible flashing red light mounted near the main en- 
trance: the light must indicate the location of the building sending in the alarm. 

Section 138.6 ANNUNCIATOR PANELS 

An Annunciator panel of a positive indication type shall be required in each building located adjacent 
to the master box. In complexes having more than one building connected to the master box, a separate 
annunciator panel will be located at each building adjacent to the main entrance. 

Section 138. 7 SUPERVISORY PANELS 

A supervisory panel and auxiliary power source shall be provided to continue operation of the building 
alarm system during a loss of power. Auxiliary power sources shall consist of rechargeable wet cell bat- 
teries or a stand-by generator. The supervisory panel shall supervise the condition of the auxiliary trip 
and may be incorporated in the auxiliary control panel. 

Section 138.8 SYSTEM APPROVAL 

A complete set of plans with an equipment list shall be furnished to the Fire Chief for his approval 
before the second inspection by the Building Inspector. The approval of the system will be a requirement 
of the second inspection of the building. The Fire Chief shall make available a complete list of specifications 
and regulations governing fire protection systems which are to be connected to the Acton municipal fire alarm 
system. 

Article 7. CHAPTER 768 OF THE ACTS OF 1969 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate from Surplus Revenue the sum of $5, 000. 00 to be expended by the Town 
Manager for the purposes permitted for funds received under the provisions of Section 4 of Chapter 768 of the 
Acts of 1969 and credit the funds received under said Section to the Surplus Revenue Account. 

Article 8. INTEREST ON NOTES 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate from Surplus Revenue the sum of $9, 099. 67 to be expended by the 
Treasurer for interest on anticipation of revenue notes. 

VOTED: To adjourn at 8:45 P. M. 

105 



A true copy. Attest: 



Charles M. MacRae 
Town Clerk 



Amendment to the Building Code voted in the affirmative at the Special Town Meeting, June 29, 1970 
(Article 6) was approved by Attorney General Robert H. Quinn on September 25, 1970, and duly adver- 
tised as required by law. 



ABSTRACT OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, SEPTEMBER 28, 1970 

Moderator called the Meeting to order at 8:03 P. M. 

Article 1. DESMOND BEQUEST 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the bequest of $3, 000. 00 under paragraph one of the will of Mary L. 
Desmond, late of Somerville, concerning perpetual care of a lot in Woodlawn Cemetery. 

Article 2. VETERANS BUDGET 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate from Free Cash the sum of $3, 000. 00 for the Veterans' Aid expense 
account. 

Article 3. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To ratify the action of the Personnel Board taken on July 2, 1970, in establishing the 
new position class of Assistant Assessor and by inserting in Schedule A of the Personnel Bylaw said position 
class allocated under Schedule B, Compensation Grade S-17. 

Article 4. HIGHWAY BUDGET 
VOTED: To appropriate from Free Cash the sum of $26, 700. 00 for the Highway Department expense account. 

Article 5. WOOD CHIPPER 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action. 

Article 6. CITIZENS LIBRARY BUDGET 

VOTED: To appropriate from Free Cash the sum of $1, 700. 00 to be expended by the Trustees of the Citizens 
Library Association of West Acton for salaries and expenses for the expansion of library service. 

Article 7. CHARTER ROAD DISCONTINUANCE 

VOTED: To accept the plan of the Selectmen to alter and partially to discontinue Charter Road between 
Massachusetts Avenue and Hayward Road, which plan is on file with the Town Clerk. 

Article 8. ACTON-BOXBOROUGH REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL 

VOTED: To approve the amount of debt authorized to be incurred by the Acton-Boxborough Regional District 
School Committee on August 31, 1970, namely, $200, 000. 00 for the purpose of financing to that extent the 
cost of constructing an addition to the existing Regional Schools. 

VOTED: To adjourn at 11:15 P. M. 



A true copy. Attest: 



Charles M. MacRae 
Town Clerk 



106 



TOWN OFFICERS and APPOINTMENTS 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICERS 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN 





Term 




Expires 


MODERATOR 




John W. Putnam 


1971 


SELECTMEN 




Paul H. Lesure 


1971 


Vincent M. Russo 


1971 


'Charles D. MacPherson 


1972 


'William L. Chipman 


1972 


William C. Sawyer 


1972 


Paul R. Nyquist 


1973 



LOCAL AND REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEES 

Parker Harrison, Jr. 1971 

Harry B. Morse 1971 

John A. Norris 1972 

Beverly W. Lydiard 1972 

Edith D. Stowell 1973 

Donald E. Westcott 1973 

TRUSTEES OF MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

Margaret Richter 1971 

James L. Parker 1972 

Mileva P. Brown 1973 

TRUSTEES OF ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 

Hazel F. Vose 1971 

Eleanor P. Wilson 1972 

Helen B. Wood 1973 

TRUSTEES OF WEST ACTON FIREMEN'S 

RELIEF FUND 

Frederick A. Harris 1971 

H. Stuart MacGregor 1972 

James B. Wilson 1973 



TRUSTEES OF ACTON FIREMEN'S 
RELIEF FUND 
T. Frederick S. Kennedy 
John F. McLaughlin 
Richard A. Lowden 

TRUSTEES OF GOODNOW FUND 
James N. Gates 
Clark C. McElvein 
Thelma L. Boatman 



1971 
1972 
1973 



1971 
1972 
1973 



TRUSTEES OF THE CITIZENS LIBRARY 

ASSOCIATION OF WEST ACTON 

Betty L. Boothby 1971 

Joan N. Gardner 1972 

Barbara Nylander 1973 



Term 
Expires 



ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON 
THE 1975 CELEBRATION 

Jerry T. Ballantine 1971 

E. Wilson Bursaw 1971 

Brewster Conant 1971 

Col. Burton A. Davis 1971 

David H. Donaldson 1971 

Donald R. Gilberti 1971 

Susan F. Heubsch 1971 

Hayward S. Houghton 1971 

T. Frederick S. Kennedy 1971 

Walter R. Laite 1971 

Minetta D. Lee 1971 

Malcolm S. MacGregor 1971 

Natacha F. MacGregor 1971 

Patience H. MacPherson 1971 

-Dr. Francis C. McDonald 1971 

Florence A. Merriam 1971 

Richmond P. Miller, Jr. 1971 

Robert E. Nelson 1971 

Betsyan Newton 1971 

Norman L. Roche 1971 

Raymond Spicer 1971 

Alfred F. Steinhauer 1971 

H. Bradford Sturtevant 1971 

John W. Tierney 1971 

-Barbara A. Birch 1971 

^Carl A. Hedin 1971 

*Clark C. McElvein 1971 

****Representative from Town of Concord 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION 

Philip G. Watts 1971 



ARCHIVES COMMITTEE 
T. Frederick S. Kennedy 
Joyce C. Woodhead 
Minetta D. Lee 

BOARD OF APPEALS 
Harold W. Flood 
John J. Bush 
Edward G. Schwarm 

Associate Members: 

Robert Orner 
Herman Vanderwart 



1971 
1972 
1973 



1971 
1972 
1973 



1971 
1972 



* Resigned 
** Replacing* 



107 



Term 
Expires 
ELECTION OFFICERS 
Precinct I 
Warden Irene F. McLaughlin 

Clerk Dorothy L. Strum 

Inspectors Ernest A. Magoon, Margaret Schene 

Deputy Warden John F. McLaughlin 

Deputy CLerk Violet Perry 

Deputy Inspectors Muriel F. Miller, Helen G. May 
Tellers Frances L. Collins, Marion F. Driscoll 

Lela Balcom, Frances Hirsch 
Mona V. Melymuka, Nancy L. Miller 



Warden 
Clerk 
Inspectors 
Deputy Warden 
Deputy Clerk 
Deputy Inspectors 



Precinct II 

Margaret Larsen 

Bertha Carr Tucker 

Martha I. Lowden, Michael J. Walsh 

Elsie T. Winslow 

Irene Young 

Hazel F. Vose, Helen M. Young 



Tellers Ruth R. Phelps, Barbara V. Woodward 

Alberta B. Knight, Joan E. Nelson 

Jean Ann Dingee, Lorraine O. Condon 



Warden 
Clerk 
Inspectors 
Deputy Warden 
Deputy Clerk 
Deputy Inspectors 

Tellers 



Precinct III 

Barbara J. McPhee 
Phyllis K. Sprague 
Martin J. Duggan, Elsie M.. Godfrey 
Katherine E. Nedza 
Mary H. Prentice 
Genevieve L. Hatch 
Elizabeth Charter 
Minnie C. Veasie, Esther Perry 
Anna G. Mahar, Lydia R. Lesure 
Carl R. Godfrey, Marian J. Meigs 



INSURANCE AUDITING COMMITTEE 

Roger Crafts 1971 

Raymond L. Page 1971 

Allan G. Thompson 1971 

MAYNARD-ACTON JOINT SEWERAGE TREATMENT 

PLANT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Frederick H. Bubier 1971 

Bradford S. Leach 1971 

Warren S. Orcutt 1971 

PERSONNEL BOARD 



Donald McNeish 


1971 


Mary K. Hadley 


1972 


Donald MacKenzie 


1972 


Richard P. O'Brien 


1973 


Henry M. Young 


1973 


PLANNING BOARD 




Edward A. Chambers 


1971 


Robert H. Gerhardt 


1972 


Eric D. Bradlee 


1973 


John F. Pasieka 


1975 


D. Pierre Cameron, Jr. 


1972 


David P. Tinker 


1973 


James M. Coull 


1975 


REGISTRAR OF VOTERS 




James B. Wilson 


1971 


Thomas R. Murphy 


1972 


George H. Wohlmaker 


1973 



Term 
Expires 

REPRESENTATIVE TO THE COMMUNITY 
SERVICE BOARD 
Patience H. MacPherson 1971 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
Donald O. Nylander 1972 

TOWN MANAGER 
Robert W. Dotson 1972 

APPO INTMENTS MADE BY TOWN MANA GER 
REQUIRING APPROVAL OF THE 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




BOARD OF ASSESSORS 




Dewey E. Boatman 


1971 


John H. Loring 


1972 


Carl C. Flint 


1973 


Joan P. Lindquist 


1972 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION 




Robert J. Ellis 


1971 


Chauncey W. Waldron, Jr. 


1971 


Dorothy B. Stonecliffe 


1972 


Peter P. Jorrens 


1972 


Brewster Conant 


1973 


Richard Murphy 


1973 


Bianca M. Chambers 


1973 


Samuel Sutcliffe 


1972 


HISTORICAL COMMISSION 




Jerry Ballantine 


1971 


Marian E. H. Houghton 


1971 


Robert H. Nylander 


1971 


Stanley L. Smith 


1971 


Samuel Sutcliffe 


1971 



TOWN CLERK 
Charles M. MacRae 



1971 



TOWN TREASURER & COLLECTOR 
Wm. Henry Soar 1971 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TOWN MANAGER 

ASSISTANT ASSESSOR 
Ralph E. Dodge 1971 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Donald R. Gilberti 1971 

Edwin Richter 1972 

Dr. John C. Rowse 1973 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Kenneth E. Jewell 1371 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Charles F. Putnam 1971 

Harlan E. Tuttle 1972 

Howard F. Jones 1973 

1970-1971 COLLECTIVE BARGAINING COMMITTEE 

REPRESENTING TOWN MANAGER 
Donald MacKenzie 
Richard P. O'Brien 
Henry M. Young 



Resigned 
: Replacing* 



108 



CONSTABLES 
David J. Allen 
Frederick J. Hryniewich 
T. Frederick S. Kennedy 
Charles A. Morehouse 
Robert S. Rhodes 



CONSTABLE - SPECIAL - DEPUTY COLLECTOR 
William F. Egar 

COUNCIL ON AGING 
Vincent G. Gavin 
Donald R. Gilberti 
E. June Hill 

Patience H. MacPherson 
**Norman Roche 
Peter M. Smoltees 
William M. Toland 
^Barbara J. Tannuzzo 

DEPUTY BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Anthony L. Galeota, Jr. 
H. Stuart MacGregor 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT 
Frederick A. Harris 1971 

Richard A. Lowden 1971 



Term 




Expires 






Firefighters: 


1971 


David Calkins 


1971 


Bernard Caouette 


1971 


Joseph Conquest 


1971 


Robert Craig 


1971 


Milton Hart 




Stephen Huntley 


CTOR 


Hobart King 


1971 


Malcolm Perkins 




Wm. H. Soar, Jr. 




David Spinney 


1971 


Charles Sweet 


1971 


John Tobin 



Term 
Expires 



1971 


Charles Sweet 


1971 


John Tobin 


1971 




1971 




1971 


Lieutenants: 


1971 


William Kendall 


1971 


Richard Gallant 


1971 


Carl Simeone 




Firefighters: 


1971 


Acton Center Station 


1971 


Gilmore Buzzell 



DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 



Robert F. Guba 

DEPUTY FOREST WARDEN 
Richard A. Lowden 
Frederick A. Harris 

DEPUTY INSPECTOR OF GAS 
PIPING & GAS APPLIANCES 
Warren E. Be mis 

DEPUTY INSPECTOR OF WIRES 
Lawrence I. Tucker 

DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
John F. McLaughlin 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC HEALTH 
Bradford S. Leach 



1971 



1971 
1971 



1971 



1971 



1971 



1971 



Patrick Palmer 



David Abbt 



DOG OFFICER 



FENCE VIEWER 



FIELD DRIVER 
William J. Durkin, Jr. 
James Kazokas 

FIRE CHIEF 
Thomas J. Barry, Jr. 

FIREMEN 
(Standing Appointments) 
Captains: 
Edward Belmont 
Donald Copeland 
Clarence G. Frost 
Malcolm MacGregor 

-Resigned -- **Replacing* 



Call Men 



Fisher Hills, Jr. 
Philip Harris 
Everett Putnam 
Frank Putnam 
John Richardson 
Robert Reynolds 
George Sloane 
Gordon Smart 
Richard Swenson 
Robert Young 

South Acton Station 
John Bushek 
Malcolm Fullonton 
Charles Hillman 
Stewart Kennedy 
Allen Nelson 
Robert Nelson 
George Pederson 
Paul Simeone 
William H. Soar, Sr. 
Alan Waters 
Charles Wiles 

West Acton Station 





Timothy Blaisdell 


1971 


Edward Bennett 




Arthur Decker 




Martin Duggan 


1971 


James Kazokas 




Francis Malson 




David Nichols 


1971 


Timothy Pattee 


1971 


Gordon Gravlin 




FOREST WARDEN 


1971 


Thomas J. Barry, Jr. 



1971 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

Jack H. Batchelder 1971 

Richard J. O'Neil 1972 

William P. McDonald 1973 

Albert I. Verchot 1974 

John W. Tierney 1974 

Edward W. Flannery 1975 

Stephen E. Lord 1975 

-Thomas J. Litle 1972 

i'Eric Bradlee 197 3 



109 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 
Patrick Palmer 



Term 
Expires 

1971 



INSPECTOR OF GAS PIPING & GAS APPLIANCES 
Joseph G. Perry 1971 



INSPECTOR OF WIRES 
Leslie F. Parke 



Edward J. 



KEEPER OF THE LOCKUP 
Collins, Jr. 



1971 



1971 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 
John H. Loring 1971 



PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 
*John H. Boyd 

Donald M. Perkins 
! *Wallie Everest 
David G. Hurley 
Thomas J. Regan, Jr. 
s *Edward L. Morrill 
*Thomas E. Rizzo 
*Richard L. Hodgman 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 
(Civil Service - Standing Appointments) 
Chief - Edward J. Collins, Jr. 
Sgt. Chauncey R. Fenton, Jr. 
Sgt. David W. Scribner 
Sgt. Norman L. Roche 
Sgt. Robert S. Rhodes 
Ptl. William J. Durkin, Jr. 
Ptl.. Bernard W. Harrison 
Ptl. William N. Hayes 
Ptl. Joseph P. Sansone 
Ptl. George W. Robinson 
Ptl. Donald M. Bresnick 
Ptl. John T. McNiff 
Ptl. Robert P. MacLeod 
Ptl. Brian R. Goodman 
Ptl. David C. Flint 

Special Officers 
Robert P. Beaudoin 
James P. Conheeney 
William D. Kendall, Jr. 
T. Frederick S. Kennedy 
John E. MacLeod 
Edmond Daigneault 
Oiva T. Kallio 



1971 
1971 
1972 
1972 
1973 
1973 
1973 
1972 



Matrons 



Marjory J. Davis 
Muriel B. Flannery 



Crossing Guards 

Natacha MacGregor 
•*Charles R. Quinn 

Marian E. Quinn 
*Dorothy Wattu 

Special Officer for Edwards Square 
Cedric Thatcher 

Acton Schools Only 
Robert Graham 
Edmund J. McNiff 

'-Resigned -- **Replacing* 





Term 




Expires 


PUBLIC CEREMONIES k 




CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 




Richmond P. Miller, Jr. 


1971 


David H. Donaldson 


1972 


Robert E. Nelson 


1972 


Burton A. Davis 


1973 


John W. Tierney 


1973 


Walter R. Laite 


1971 


Clark C. McElvein 


1971 


: Carl A. Hedin 


1972 


PUBLIC WEIGHERS 




William J. Durkin, Jr. 


1971 


Bernard W. Harrison 


1971 


Robert S. Rhodes 


1971 


George W. Robinson 


1971 


RECREATION COMMISSION 




Janet W. Murphy 


1972 


Gale Jarvis 


1973 


James Maclntyre, 3rd 


1974 


: James Walline 


1971 


David Michael 


1973 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 
George K. Hayward 

SEWERAGE STUDY COMMITTEE 
Daniel J. Costello 
Bradford S. Leach 
David A. Manalan 
Warren S. Orcutt 
-Robert H. Gerhardt 



1971 



1971 
1971 
1971 
1971 
1971 



STREET LIGHTING COMMITTEE 

Booth D. Jackson 1971 

H. Stuart MacGregor 1971 

Leslie F. Parke 1971 

SUPERINTENDENT OF CEMETERIES 
T. Frederick S. Kennedy 1971 

SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 
Franklin H. Charter 1972 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 
Allen H. Nelson 



1971 



TOWN BUILDING-LAND ACQUISITION COMMITTEE 

David Abbt 1971 

Roger M. Heubsch 1971 

Richmond P. Miller, Jr. 1971 

Joseph W. Stevens 1971 

-Christopher W. Brown 1971 

TOWN COUNSEL 

Herbert P. Wilkins 1971 

TOWN ENGINEER 

Anthony L. Galeota, Jr. 1971 

TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 

George E. Neagle 1971 

Emery D. Nelson 1971 

TOWN REPORT COMMITTEE 

John Gourgas 1971 

Christopher C. Kellogg 1972 

Nancy Gay Browne 197 3 



110 



Term 

Expires 



Franklin H. 



TREE WARDEN 
Charter 



VETERANS' AGENT & 
DIRECTOR OF VETERANS' SERVICES 
Norman L. Roche 

VETERANS' BURIAL AGENT 
Norman L. Roche 

VETERANS' GRAVES OFFICER 
T. Frederick S. Kennedy 



1971 



1971 



1971 



1971 



WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION AGENT 
Theron A. Lowden 1971 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY MODERATOR 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Edward W. Berriman 
Robert H. Haeberle 
Arthur Schene 
Griffith L. Resor 
Stephen G. Lewis 
Ahti E. Autio 
William B. Allred 
Walter B. Gates 
: Joseph R. McColgan 
'William L. Chipman 

-"'Resigned -- **Replacing* 



1971 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1973 
1973 
1971 
1972 
1972 
1973 



Term 
Expires 

REGIONAL REFUSE PLANNING COMMITTEE 
Paul F. Gibson 1971 

James C. Donald 1972 

Wilfred A. Fordon 1973 

VOCATIONAL REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Marilyn Peterson 1971 

Beverly W. Lydiard 1972 

Charles E. Courtright 1973 



SPECIAL APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN 
FOR 1970 ONLY 

ACTON HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Mary M. Laffin 1971 

-Patience H. MacPherson 1973 

George W. Moulton 1971 

Raymond L. Page 1971 

Julia D. Stevens 1971 



**Appointed by the Massachusetts Department of 
Community Affairs. 



CONSERVATION 



In 1970, the Conservation Commission continued to implement its Master Plan of 1966, primarily in negotia- 
tions with many landowners. The results of these negotiations will be seen at the 1971 Annual Town Meeting, when 
we will ask the voters to approve the purchase of four or five parcels of land. At least 50% of the cost of this land 
will be reimbursed to the Town from the State's Self-Help Fund; there is also a possibility of 75% reimbursement 
from a combination of State and Federal funds in the case of one of these parcels. 

The Commission did acquire a piece of land from Mr. and Mrs. Robert Clapp, adjacent to Nashoba Brook off 
Route 27 in North Acton. Gary Webb and the other Boy Scouts of Troop #76, as part of their Eagle Scout require- 
ments, worked very hard to clear underbrush and litter from this piece of land, so that it can be used by townspeople 
for fishing and picnicking. 

1970 was also a year of increasing awareness of our natural environment. For the members of the Conservation 
Commission, it meant time - time spent at many public hearings. It is estimated that in 1970 we attended about 50 
such hearings, the majority of these being concerned with the development of marginal land, such as land in the flood- 
plain, or other low and unsuitable areas. Our job at these hearings is to try to prevent further encroachment of the 
floodplains in order to protect our environment. 

As we acquire more and more land for conservation, people ask us, "Where is it?" and '•' What are going to 
do with it?" Both these questions will be answered before the Annual Town Meeting, when every voter in town 
will receive a brochure from us explaining our aims and showing the location of all Conservation land purchased by 
the Town. 

1971 should prove to be an even more productive year for the Conservation Commission, especially we have two 
excellent new members, Mrs. Bianca Chambers and Mr. Peter Jorrens. We sincerely hope that the Town will con- 
tinue to support our efforts. 



Robert Ellis 
Brewster Conant 



Richard Murphy, Chairman 

Chauncey Waldron, Jr. 
Bianca Chambers 



Dorothy Stonecliffe 
Peter Jorrens 



111 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The reports which are submitted herewith represent a statement of the cash disbursements authorized 
during the year ended December 31, 1970, and a Balance Sheet of the Town of Acton as of December 31, 1970. 

The 1971 amortization of bonded indebtedness of the Town, and Acton's share of the Regional School 
District bond amortization are: 



Schools: 

Florence A. Merriam Elementary School 
Julia McCarthy Elementary School 
Carolyn Douglas Elementary School 
Paul P. Gates Elementary School 
Minot Avenue Elementary School 
Regional School District 

Total Schools 

Acton Memorial Library Addition 
Public Works Facility 

Amortization of bonded indebtedness 



$ 40, 000. 00 
10, 000. 00 
35, 000. 00 
60,000. 00 
85, 000.00 
67,735.00 

$297, 735.00 

25, 000. 00 
35, 000.00 

$357,735.00 



The accounts of the Treasurer and Collector have been verified, and I have reviewed the various trust 
funds in the custody of the Treasurer and the Trustees. 

Donald O. Nylander 
Town Accountant 



STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATIONS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
January 1, 1970 to December 31, 1970 



Appropriated 
or 
Available 



Cash 
Disbursed 



Balance 



General Government: 
Moderator: 
Salary 
Expenses 

Finance Committee: 
Expenses 

Selectmen: 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Legal Services 

Legal Service Expenses 

Appraisals 8* Surveys 

Out-of-State Travel 

Town Office Clerical Staff: 
Salaries 

Engineering Department: 
Salaries and Wages 
Expenses 

Town Accountant: 
Salary 
Expenses 

Town Treasurer & Collector: 
Salary - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 
Expenses 



140.00 
20.00 



250.00 



120.00 



250.00 



20.00 
20.00 



19, 105.00 


19, 036.02 


68. 98 


13, 185.00 


10, 031. 91 


3, 153.09 


2, 365.00 


2, 365. 00 


-- 


12,500.00 


12, 500.00 


-- 


500.00 


500.00 


-- 


1, 000.00 


925.00 


75.00 


1, 500.00 


963. 00 


537.00 


70, 630.00 


69, 085. 73 


1, 544.27 


39,210.00 


35,004. 19 


4, 205.81 


4,400.00 


4, 394. 53 


5.47 


4, 100.00 


4, 100. 00 


_. _ 


160.00 


143.72 


16.28 


10, 140.00 






612.30 


10,752. 30 


-- 


4,400.00 


4, 397. 69 


2. 31 



112 



Appropriated 
or 
Available 



Cash 
Disbursed 



Balance 



General Government - continued: 

Town Treasurer & Collector: 
Salary - 

Appropriated 
Reserve Fund Transfer 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay- 
Town Assessors: 
Salaries 
Expenses 

Town Clerk: 

Salary 
Expenses 

Elections and Registrations: 
Salaries and Wages 
Expenses 

Planning Board: 
Expenses 

Personnel Board: 
Expenses 

Board of Appeals: 
Expenses 

Industrial Development Commission: 
Expenses 

Conservation Commission: 
Expenses 

Archives Committee: 
Expenses 

Public Ceremonies &c Celebrations: 
Expenses 

Buildings & Maintenance: 

Salaries and Wages 

Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 

Capital Outlay 

Town Report Committee: 
Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 

Total General Government - 
Appropriated 
Reserve Fund Transfer 



10, 140.00 






612. 30 


10,752. 30 


-- 


4,400.00 


4, 397. 69 


2. 31 


400.00 


270. 00 


130.00 


11,000.00 


8, 207.60 


2,792.40 


5, 910.00 


3,537.89 


2, 372. 11 


2, 310.00 


2, 310.00 


_ _ 


2,800.00 


874. 55 


1, 925.45 


5,640.00 


5, 399.72 


240.28 


3,850.00 


3, 790.78 


59.22 


9, 000.00 


3, 327. 92 


5, 672.08 


550.00 


-- 


550.00 


410.00 


19.75 


390.25 


250.00 


24. 00 


226.00 



500.00 



50.00 



2, 100.00 



11, 085.00 

33,885.00 

604.02 

1, 100.00 



3, 200. 00 
712.29 



277, 645.00 
1, 928.61 



371.77 

18.50 

2, 098.96 

10,898. 34 



31, 363.79 
874.40 



3, 912. 29 



251,869. 35 



128. 23 



31. 50 



1. 04 



186. 66 



3, 125.23 
225. 60 



27, 704.26 



Protection of Persons and Property: 
Police Department: 

Salaries and Wages 
Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 



167, 275.00 

15, 835. 00 
700. 00 



160,085. 93 
16,494.26 



7, 189. 07 



40.74 



113 



Appropriated 
or 
Available 



Cash 
Disbursed 



Balance 



Protection of Persons and Property - continued: 

Fire Department: 

Salaries and Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 

Sealer of Weights & Measures: 
Salary and Travel 
Expenses 

Insect Pest Control: 
Wages 
Expenses 

Town Forest Committee: 
Maintenance 



178,825.00 


$ 178,809.82 


$ 


15. 18 


20, 195.00 


20, 181. 54 




13.46 


4, 135.00 


4, 131.83 




3. 17 


510.00 


510.00 




__ 


40.00 


36.84 




3. 16 


3, 160.00 


2, 984.84 




175. 16 


6, 000.00 


5, 902. 20 




97.80 



100.00 



100.00 



Tree Department: 
Wages 
Expenses 

Inspector of Wires: 
Expenses 

Inspector of Gas Piping & Appliances: 
Expenses 

Building Inspector & Agent for Enforcement 
of Zoning Bylaws: 
Salary and Wages 
Expenses 

Dog Officer: 

Wages and Travel 
Expenses 

Building Committee: 
Expenses 

Civil Defense: 
Expenses 

Town Utilities: 

Hydrant Rental - 



3, 160. 


00 


3, 


078. 


28 


81.72 


8, 000. 


00 


7, 


775. 


18 


224.82 


4, 625. 


00 


3, 


759. 


15 


865.85 


3, 500. 


00 


2, 


565. 


00 


935.00 


10, 770. 


00 


10, 


513. 


24 


256.76 


1, 945. 


00 


1, 


129. 


09 


815.91 


1, 100. 


00 


1, 


100. 


00 


- — 


500. 


00 




500. 


00 


-- 



50.00 



450.00 



24.00 



434.87 



26.00 



15. 13 



Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 




21, 550.00 
45.00 


21, 595.00 









Street Lighting 




23,400.00 


18,402.01 


4, 


997 


99 


Total Protection of Persons and Property: 












Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 




475, 125.00 
745.00 


460, 013.08 


15, 


856 


92 


Highways: 

Highway Department: 

Salaries and Wages 




110, 910.00 


109, 091.44 


1, 


818 


56 


Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 




130, 000.00 
10, 000.00 










Special Town Meeting 9/28/70 


26,700.00' 


166, 691. 21 




8. 


79 


Chapter 81 Maintenance 




22, 000.00 


22,000.00 




-- 




Chapter 90 Maintenance 




27, 500.00 


27,485. 57 




14. 


43 


Capital Outlay 




2, 330.00 


2, 328. 90 




1. 


10 


Total Highways: 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 




319,440.00 
10, 000.00 


327,597. 12 


1, 


842. 


88 



114 



Appropriated 
or 
Available 



Cash 
Disbursed 



Balance 



Health and Sanitation: 



Health and Sanitation: 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Garbage Collection 

Inspector of Animals: 
Wages 
Expenses 

Plumbing Inspector: 
Expenses 

Total Health and Sanitation 



$ 23,625.00 


$ 21,506.03 i 


5 2,118.97 


22, 345.00 


20, 365.96 


1, 979.04 


31, 350.00 


30,247.29 


1, 102.71 


170.00 


170.00 


_ — 


30.00 


30.00 


— 


5, 500.00 


4, 674.50 


825.50 


83, 020.00 


76, 993.78 


6,026.22 



"Veterans' Aid: 



Veterans' Services: 
Salary- 
Expenses 
Aid - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 

Special Town Meeting 9/28/70 

Total Veterans' Aid - 
Appropriated 
Reserve Fund Transfer 



2, 900.00 
275.00 

15,000.00 
894. 14 

3, 000.00 



21, 175.00 
894. 14 



2, 900.00 
275.00 



18, 893.86 



22,068. 86 



.28 



.28 



Education: 



Local Schools: 

Instruction 

Plant Operation & Maintenance 

Transportation 

Non-Instructional Services 

Administration 

Out-of-State Travel 

Blanchard Auditorium - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 
Capital Outlay 
Contingency Fund 
Contingency Fund - 

Special Town Meeting 6/29/70 

Regional Schools: 
Instruction 

Plant Operation & Maintenance 
Transportation 
Non-Instructional Services 
Administration 
Out-of-State Travel 
Blanchard Auditorium 
Capital Outlay 
Athletic Fund 
Contingency Fund 

Total Education - 
Appropriated 
Reserve Fund Transfer 



325, 151.00 

148, 505.00 

93, 936.00 

36, 821.00 

42, 693.00 

315.00 

15, 385. 00 

2, 577.00 

31, 087.00 

60, 000.00 

2, 358.56 



1,287, 314.00 

136, 116.00 

27, 085.00 

42, 996.00 

43, 708.00 
283.00 

8,032.00 
13, 798.00 
31,500.00 
61, 829. 00 



3,408, 912.56 
2, 577. 00 



1, 323, 969. 37 

148,505.00 

93, 936.00 

36,821.00 

35, 208. 63 



17, 917. 57 
22,595.48 



54, 636.70 



1, 287, 314.00 

136, 116.00 

27,085.00 

42, 996.00 

43,708.00 

283. 00 

8,032.00 

13,798.00 

31,500.00 

61,829.00 



3, 386,250.75 



1, 181.63 



7,484. 37 
315.00 



44.43 
8,491.52 



7,721.86 



25, 238.81 



115 



Libraries: 



Recreation: 



Cemeteries: 



Insurance: 



Appropriated 
or 
Available 



Cash 
Disbursed 



Balance 



Memorial Library: 

Salaries and Wages 

Expenses 

Books 

Capital Outlay 

West Acton Library: 

Salaries and Wages - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 
Expenses 

Total Libraries - 
Appropriated 
Reserve Fund Transfer 



$ 


49, 100.00 


$ 47,713.28 


$ 


1, 


386. 72 




13, 150.00 


13, 147.04 






2. 96 




19, 000. 00 


18, 999. 52 






.48 




1, 370.00 


1, 369. 90 






. 10 




2,455.00 












90.00 


2,545.00 






-- 




1, 000.00 
86, 075.00 


1,000.00 






-- 












90.00 


84, 774.74 




1, 


390.26 



Recreation: 

Wages - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 

Total Recreation - 
Appropriated 
Reserve Fund Transfer 



13, 985. 00 

3, 900.00 

4, 218.00 

629.00 



18, 832.00 
3,900.00 



16, 238. 98 

4, 213.56 

629.00 



21,081.54 



1, 646.02 
4.44 



Cemeteries: 

Salaries and Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 

Total Cemeteries - 
Appropriated 
Reserve Fund Transfer 



38,780.00 
8, 385.00 

2, 115.00 
136.20 


37,828. 37 
8, 137.80 

2, 251.20 
48, 217. 37 


951. 63 
247.20 


49, 280.00 
136.20 


1, 198.83 



Insurance: 

Workmen's Compensation 

Surety Bonds 

Fire and Public Liability Insurance 

for Town Buildings 
Boiler and Machinery - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 
Motor Vehicle Liability 
Group Health - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 
Fire Fighters Insurance 

Total Insurance - 
Appropriated 
Reserve Fund Transfer 



14,000.00 


13, 272.00 


728.00 


800.00 


463. 00 


337.00 


14,000.00 


12, 282.79 


1,717.21 


1, 200.00 






20.00 


1, 220.00 


-- 


6, 000. 00 


5, 295. 82 


704. 18 


30, 000.00 






6, 359. 31 


36, 359. 31 


-- 


1, 100.00 


941.06 


158. 94 


67, 100.00 






6, 379.31 


69,833. 98 


3, 645. 33 



116 



Appropriated 
or 
Available 



Cash 
Disbursed 



Balance 



Pensions: 



Pension Fund: 

Expense - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 

Total Pensions - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 

Maturing Debt and Interest: 

Regional School: 

Maturing Debt 
Interest 

Julia McCarthy School:. 
Maturing Debt 
Interest 



$ 40,040.00 
912.76 



40, 040.00 
912.76 



51, 261.00 
58, 316.00 



15, 000.00 
700.00 



40, 952.76 



40, 952.76 



51,261.00 
58, 316.00 



15, 000.00 
700.00 



Florence E. Merriam School: 
Maturing Debt 
Interest 

Elm Street School #1 (Douglas): 
Maturing Debt 
Interest 

Elm Street School #2 (Gates): 
Maturing Debt 
Interest 

Library Addition: 

Maturing Debt 
Interest 

Sanitary Land Fill Site: 
Maturing Debt 
Interest 



40, 000.00 
11,520.00 



40,000.00 
19,775.00 



60, 000.00 
42, 025.00 



25, 000.00 
4, 050.00 



41,000.00 
2, 113.00 



40, 000. 00 
11, 520. 00 



40, 000.00 
19,775. 00 



60,000.00 
42, 025.00 



25,000.00 
4,050.00 



41,000.00 
2, 112. 64 



36 



Minot Avenue School: 
Interest 

Anticipation of Revenue Notes: 
Interest 
Interest - 6/29/70 Special Town Meeting 

Total Maturing Debt and Interest: 

Grand Totals of Appropriations, Reserve Fund 
Transfers, Disbursements and Balances for Budge.t: 
Appropriated - 

Annual Town Meeting 

Special Town Meetings 

Reserve Fund Transfers 

Education: 



48,500.00 



30, 000.00 
9, 099. 67 

498, 359. 67 



$5, 303,846.00 
41, 158.23 
27, 563.02 



39, 099. 67 
449, 859. 31 



$5, 239, 512. 64 



48, 500.00 



48, 500. 36 



$ 133,054.61 



Cafeteria-Revolving Fund 

Federal Grants: 

Public Law 864 - Title 5 
Public Law 874 - Title 1 
Cornerstone - Title 1 
Children - Low Income 



122,804. 96 

1, 523.50 

33, 854.79 

5,590.00 

3, 000.00 



115, 537.84 

1, 218.88 

11, 169. 00 

4, 393.42 

3, 000.00 



7, 267. 12 

304.62 

22, 685.79 

1, 196.58 



117 



Appropriated 
or 
Available 



Cash 
Disbursed 



Balance 



Special Articles: 



Town 




Meeting 


Article 


Date 


No. 


Schools 




10/19/64 


2 


3/13/67 


10 


3/10/69 


39 


10/20/69 


1 


3/09/70 


17 


3/09/70 


19 


3/09/70 


20 


Highways 




3/14/66 


14 


3/14/66 


15 


3/13/67 


9 


3/11/68 


16 


3/11/68 


17 


3/11/68 


33 


3/10/69 


24 


3/10/69 


25 


3/10/69 


26 


3/10/69 


28 


3/10/69 


32 


3/10/69 


33 


3/09/70 


16 


3/09/70 


16 


3/09/70 


23 


3/09/70 


43 


3/09/70 


44 


3/09/70 


46 


3/09/70 


48 


6/29/70 


7 



Various Purposes 



12/05/66 



12 



12/05/66 


19 


3/13/67 


49 


3/11/68 


36 


3/10/69 


29 


3/10/69 


30 


3/10/69 


37 


3/10/69 


46 


3/10/69 


50 


6/23/69 


4 


3/09/70 


14 


3/09/70 


22 


3/09/70 


24 


3/09/70 


38 


3/09/70 


40 


3/09/70 


45 


3/09/70 


49 


3/09/70 


50 


3/09/70 


52 


3/09/70 


53 


3/09/70 


54 


3/09/70 


55 



Purpose 



Douglas School 
Gates School 

Vocational Regional School Dis- 
trict Planning Committee - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 
Minot Avenue School Plans 
Tuition 

Minot Avenue School Construction 
Adult Education 



Hosmer, Prospect Streets 

Construction 
Chapter 90 Construction 
Chapter 90 Construction 
Chapter 90 Construction 
Chapter 90 Construction 
Sidewalks 

Chapter 90 Construction 
Chapter 90 Construction 
Sander and Mower 
Sidewalks - Trunk System 
Minot Avenue Construction 
Town Forest Access Construction 
Chapter 90 Maintenance 
Chapter 81 

Chapter 768 - Acts of 1969 
Adams Street Takings 
Adams Street Reconstruction 
Snow Fighting Equipment 
Street Sweeper 
Chapter 768 - Acts of 1969 



Regional Refuse Disposal 

Planning Committee 
Cemetery Building 
Woodlawn Cemetery 
Government Surplus Property 
Government Surplus Property 
Demolish Buildings 
Public Works Facility Plans 
Fire Rescue Truck 
Fletcher Land & Parker Street 
Britt Land 

Government Surplus Property 
Sludge Drying Beds 
Public Works Facility Construction 
Clapp Land 
Conservation Fund 
Police Cruisers 

Tree Department Cab & Chassis 
Engineering Department Sedan 
Fire Alarm System 
Elm Street Playground Lighting 
Elm Street Backstop & Bleachers 
Goward Field, Tot-Lot Equipment 



9, 145.80 
45, 510. 99 



75.00 

378.00 

32, 079. 38 

11,400.00 

1,826, 652.79 

5, 000.00 



360.44 
14, 510.08 
18, 053.20 

6, 900.00 
1, 003.78 

7, 809.26 
7,700.00 

23, 100.00 

3, 169.00 
3,500.00 

8, 333.25 

4, 005.00 
4, 000.00 

23, 375.00 

16,444.95 

1, 500.00 

35, 000.00 

4, 200.00 
18,000.00 

5, 000.00 



6, 804. 89 

7, 162.44 



411. 53 

32, 079. 38 

8, 206.56 

688, 240. 39 

3, 380. 29 



342.07 

14,510.08 

18,053.20 

6, 900.00 

1,003.78 

7,798.48 

7,700.00 

11, 148.27 

3, 140.00 

3,489.52 

3, 333.25 
2, 923.53 
4,000.00 

23, 375.00 

14,409.91 

91.80 

33,243.02 

4, 200.00 
16, 957.50 

4,522. 39 



2, 340. 91 
38, 348. 55 



41.47 

3, 193.44 

1, 138,412.40 

1, 619.71 



18. 37 



10.78 

11, 951.73 
29.00 
10.48 

1,081.47 



2, 035.04 
1,408.20 
1,756.98 

1,042.50 
477. 61 



70.82 


30. 63 




40. 19 


85. 17 


57.55 




27. 62 


2, 199.50 


1, 232. 00 




967.50 


22.57 


22. 57 




-- 


315.98 


315. 98 




— 


1,700.00 


592. 00 


1, 


108.00 


15, 000.00 


15, 000.00 




-- 


21, 856. 05 


21, 354.48 




501. 57 


637.00 


637.00 




-- 


242.00 


242.00 




-- 


2, 000.00 


1,711. 10 




288.90 


8, 000.00 


8, 000.00 




- 


275, 000.00 


52, 353.00 


222, 


647.00 


2, 175. 00 


2, 175.00 




-- 


100, 000.00 


100, 000.00 




-- 


4,500.00 


3, 900.00 




600.00 


6, 000.00 


5,739.00 




261.00 


3,000.00 


2, 995.00 




5.00 


14,300. 00 


3,861.86 


10, 


438. 14 


18,000.00 


7. 60 


17, 


992.40 


1,700.00 


1, 506.65 




193.35 


1, 050.00 


850.70 




199. 30 



118 



Special Articles - continued: 



Town 
Meeting 
Date 

3/09/70 
3/09/70 
3/09/70 

9/28/70 



Article 
No. 

56 
59 
62 



Purpose 

1975 Anniversary Fund 
Memorial Library Air Conditioning 
Mount Hope Cemetery Improve- 
ments 
West Acton Library Salaries 
and Expense 

Appropriated or Available 
Reserve Fund Transfer 
Cemetery Department - Various Trust Funds 
Conservation Commission - Various Properties 
Snow Emergency - Chapter 44, Section 31 

Total Operating Disbursements 

Other Cash Disbursements: 

Agency: 

State Assessment System 

State Parks and Recreation Areas 

Middlesex County Hospital Assessment 

State Audit 

Metropolitan Planning Area Council 

State Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 

Middlesex County Assessment 

Elderly Retiree Program 

Land Damage Court Judgment 

Federal Grant Medical Assistance 

Middlesex County Dog Licenses, etc. 

County Dog Fund 

Bond Issue Expense 

Board of Appeals - Guarantee Deposits 

Acton Teachers Insurance 

Acton Teachers Annuities 

Acton Teachers Association 

Middlesex County Retirement System 

Federal Income Taxes Withheld 

State Income Taxes Withheld 

Massachusetts Teachers Retirement Fund 

Fire Department Union Dues 

Acton Employees Group Life Insurance 

Blue Cross -Blue Shield 

Refunds: 

Taxes 
Various 

Trust: 

Perpetual Care 
Trust Fund Income 
Library- 
Charity 
Educational 

Investment: 

Certificate of Deposit 

Repayment of Loans in Anticipation of Revenue 

Add - Refund Adjustment 

Total disbursements per Treasurer 



Appropriated 
or 
Available 



3, 000.00 
15, 600.00 

2,000.00 

1, 700.00 

5, 147.759.49 
27, 941.02 



Cash 
Disbursed 



3,000.00 
15,400.00 



Balance 



948.00 
324. 93 



6, 549,516. 11 

5, 366. 69 

1, 968.25 

13, 543.86 

$6, 570, 394. 91 



15, 
9, 
4, 

1, 

99, 

1, 
L 

3, 

5, 

1, 

8, 

4, 

33, 

319, 

65, 

57, 

1, 
9, 



407.52 
423.60 
760.47 
188.58 
757.46 
374.45 
926.72 
599.48 
917. 36 
147.00 
274.50 
417.23 
918. 95 
104.06 
559.75 
918.00 
324.00 
058.27 
854.57 
763.47 
971.75 
441.00 
283. 32 
772. 18 



70,977.27 
47. 00 



7, 335.00 
29, 392.03 
1, 188.75 
1, 685.00 
1,265. 62 



1, 600, 000.00 

1,400, 000. 00 

10, 330,449. 27 

3,736.81 

ilO, 334, 186. 08 



200.00 
1,052. 00 
1, 375.07 



1, 626, 184.40 



119 



TOWN OF 

BALANCE 

DECEMBER 



ASSETS 



Cash: 

Petty Cash Funds 
General Funds 
Certificate of Deposit 

Accounts Receivable: 
Tax Levies: 

1966 Personal Property 

1967 Personal Property 

1968 Personal Property 

1969 Personal Property 

1970 Personal Property 
1970 Real Estate 



Special Assessment: 
Street - 1970 
Committed Interest - 1970 

Motor Vehicle Excise: 
1965 
1966 
1967 
1968 
1969 
1970 

Tax Titles 

Tax Possessions 

Taxes in Litigation 

Departmental: 
Fire 

Cemetery 

Aid to Highways: 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Middlesex County 

Total Accounts Receivable 

Under-estimate of Assessments: 
Middlesex County Tax 
State Recreation Areas 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
Middlesex County Hospital 

Overdrawn Appropriation Balance 

Authorized by General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 31 - Highway Department, Snow 
Emergency 

Due from Conservation Fund for Land Acquisition 

Total Assets 





$ 70.00 

1, 678,492. 95 

300,000.00 


$1, 978, 


562. 


95 


$ 4,659.05 
121, 209. 53 


3,473.61 
2,523.40 
2, 060.40 
2, 186.80 

125, 868.58 

$ 136,112.79 








65. 61 
13. 12 


78.73 








384.00 
3, 604.09 
2, 896.55 
4,440. 96 
8, 191.53 
73, 289.96 


92,807.09 








7, 922.55 
793.72 


8,716.27 
297.20 








336.00 
57.95 


393.95 








79, 987.56 
38, 100.00 


118, 087.56 












356, 


493. 


59 




13, 276.85 

1, 143.40 

253.58 

.02 


14, 


673. 


85 



13, 543.86 

25, 000.00 

$2, 388, 274.25 



DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
Apportioned Street Assessments Not Due 



$ 2,610.97 



120 



ACTON 
SHEET 
31, 1970 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 

Employees' Payroll Deductions - 
See Schedule 1 

Guarantee Deposits - 
Board of Appeals 

Unclaimed Checks 

Trust Fund Income Transfer Balances 
Unexpended - See Schedule 2 

Insurance Recovery - Fire Department 

Federal Grants - See Schedule 3 

Revolving Fund - School Cafeteria 

Old Age Assistance Recovery Not Allocated 

Unexpended Article Appropriation Balances - 
See Schedule 4 

Appropriation from Conservation Fund Authorized: 

Article 39 Annual Meeting, Main Street and Pope Road 
Land Acquisition 

Reserve for Petty Cash Funds 

Over-estimate - Court Judgment, Land Damage for 
Relocation of Central Street 

Middlesex County Dog License Fees 

Receipts Reserved for Appropriation - County Dog Fund 

Receipts Reserved for Appropriation - Library 

Cemetery Land Fund 

Road Machinery Fund 

Tax Title Foreclosure 

Premium on Bonds 

Revenue Reserved Until Collected - 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Tax Titles and Possessions 
Special Assessments - Streets 
Taxes in Litigation 
Departmental Revenue 
Aid to Highways 

Overlays Reserved for Abatements of Tax Liens ;- 
1966 
1967 
1968 
1969 
1970 

Overlay Surplus - Reserve Fund 

Surplus Revenue 

Total Liabilities and Reserves 



92,807.09 

8,716. 27 

78.73 

297.20 

393. 95 

118,087.56 



259. 19 
202.82 
416.62 
204.02 
15, 221. 33 



$ 30,932.31 

72.80 
1, 152.75 

4, 542.75 

230.00 

26, 774.79 

7, 267. 12 
13, 600.00 

1,519, 226. 12 

25,000.00 
70.00 

82.64 

62.25 
4,791.75 
1, 809. 50 
6, 505. 35 
1, 167.02 
335.00 
5,534.45 



220, 380.80 



DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



Street Assessments and Betterments 



16, 303.98 

2,422. 51 

500, 010. 36 

$2, 388, 274.25 

$ 2,610.97 



121 



LOANS AUTHORIZED - NOT ISSUED 



Douglas Elementary School 
Minot Avenue Elementary School 



79,450.00 
103, 347.21 



$ 182,797.21 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 



Net Funded on Fixed Debt 



$3,780, 000.00 



TRUST ACCOUNTS 



Trust Funds - Cash and Securities 

In Custody of the Town Treasurer 
In custody of Trustees 



688, 938.84 
3,000.00 



$ 691,938.84 



122 



LOANS AUTHORIZED - NOT ISSUED 



Douglas Elementary School 
Minot Avenue Elementary School 



79,450.00 
103. 347,21 



$ 182,797.21 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 



Inside Debt Limit: 

Florence A. Merriam Elementary School 
Acton Memorial Library Addition 
Public Works Facility 

Outside Debt Limit: 

Florence A. Merriam Elementary School 
Julia McCarthy Elementary School 
Carolyn Douglas Elementary School 
Paul P. Gates Elementary School 
Minot Avenue Elementary School 



70,000. 00 
100, 000.00 
265,000.00 



210, 000.00 

20, 000.00 

525,000.00 

965, 000.00 

1, 625,000.00 



435, 000.00 



3, 345, 000.00 
$3, 780, 000. 00 



TRUST ACCOUNTS 



In Custody of Town Treasurer - See Schedule 5 
In Custody of Trustees - 

Charlotte Goodnow Fund 



688, 938.84 
3,000.00 



$ 691,938.84 



123 



BALANCE SHEET 

Supporting Schedules 

December 31, 1970 

Schedule 1 
Employees' Payroll Deductions 

Federal Income Taxes $ 18,837.75 

State Income Taxes 6, 908. 80 

Middlesex County Retirement System 3, 093. 25 

Acton Teachers' Association 939.00 

Acton Teachers' Annuities 536.00 

Blue Cross -Blue Shield 496.53 

Group Life Insurance 120. 98 

$ 30,932.31 

Schedule 2 
Unexpended Trust Fund Income Balances 

Perpetual Care $ 2,128.48 

Susan Noyes Hosmer 1, 585. 53 

Ethel Robbins, Fred Robbins and George T. Ames Memorial 100. 00 

Luke Blanchard 73.61 

Carrie F. Wells 71. 19 

Dr. Robert I. Davis 67.54 

A. B. Conant 64. 11 

George T. Ames 56.70 

Hoit and Scott 50. 30 

Frank Knowlton 46. 61 

J. Roland Wetherbee 45.73 

Georgia E. Whitney 45.64 

Sarah A. Watson ' 38.45 

Arlette Appleyard 36.60 

Frank C. Hayward 36.39 

Henry S. Raymond 35.37 

Mrs. Henry O'Neil 32.30 

Elbridge Jones and Descendents 26. 02 

Elb ridge J. Robbins 2. 18 

$ 4,542.75 



Schedule 3 
Federal Grants 

Welfare Administration: 

Medical Assistance $ 83.34 

Old Age Assistance: 

Grant $ 156.63 

Recovery Repayable to Federal 150. 00 306.63 

Medical Assistance 878.15 
Disability Assistance 250. 00 
Aid to Dependent Children 250. 00 

Total Welfare Grants $ 1,768.12 

School Grants: 

Public Law 815 819. 68 

Public Law 864 - Title 5 304. 62 

Public Law 874 - Title 1 22, 685.79 

Cornerstone - Title 1 1, 196. 58 25, 006. 67 

$ 26,774.79 



124 



Schedule 4 
Unexpended Article Appropriation Balances 



Town 
Meeting Article 
Date No. 



6y 


'24/ 


3; 


'09/ 


10; 


'19/ 


12/ 


'05/ 


12/ 


'05/ 


3/ 


'13/ 


3/ 


'13/ 


3/ 


'13/ 


3/ 


'13/ 


11/ 


'18/ 


3/ 


'10/ 


3/ 


'10/ 


3/ 


'10/ 


3/ 


'10/ 


3/ 


'10/ 


3/ 


'09/ 


3/ 


'09/ 


3; 


'09/ 


3/ 


'09/ 


3/ 


'09/ 


3; 


'09/ 


3/ 


'09/ 


3/ 


'09/ 


3/ 


'09/ 


3> 


'09/ 


3/ 


'09/ 


3; 


'09/ 


3; 


'09/ 


3/ 


'09/ 


3, 


'09/ 


3; 


'09/ 


3; 


'09/ 


3; 


'09/ 


3/ 


'09/ 


3 


'09/ 


3/ 


'09/ 


6/ 


'29/ 


6; 


'29/ 


9/ 


'28/ 



/57 
/58 
/64 
/66 
/66 
/67 
/67 
/67 
/67 
/68 
/69 
/69 
/69 
/69 
/69 
/70 
/70 
/70 
/70 
/70 
/70 
/70 
/70 
/70 
/70 
/70 
/70 
/70 
/70 
/70 
/70 
/70 
/70 
/70 
/70 
/70 
/70. 
/70 
/70 



6 
39 
2 
12 
19 
10 
30 
32 
49 
11 
25 
27 
33 
39 
46 
14 
15 
18 
19 
20 
21 
23 
24 
43 
44 
48 
49 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
57 
59 
62 
63 
4 
7 
6 



Purpose 

Civil Defense Power Unit 

Archives Committee 

Douglas School 

Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Committee 

Cemetery Building 

Gates School 

Tennis Courts 

Emergency Operating Center 

Woodlawn Cemetery 

Water District Land Lease 

Chapter 90 Construction 

Street Lights - Main Street 

Construction of Access - Town Forest 

Vocational Regional School District Planning Committee 

Fire Rescue Truck 

Government Surplus Property 

Chapter 90 Construction 

Vocational Regional School District Planning Committee 

Minot Avenue School Construction 

Adult Education 

Kennedy Land Lease 

Highways - Chapter 768, Acts of 1969 

Public Works Facility Construction 

Adams Street Takings 

Adams Street Reconstruction 

Street Sweeper 

Cab,, Chassis, etc. - Tree Department 

Forest Fire Truck 

Fire Alarm Equipment 

Lighting - Elm Street Playground 

Backstop and Bleachers - Elm Street Playground 

Tot-Lot Equipment - Goward Field 

Painting Town Hall Offices 

Air Conditioning - Memorial Library 

Mount Hope Cemetery Improvements - New Section 

Mount Hope Cemetery - Paving Roads 

Assabet Regional Disposal Planning Board 

Highway Department - Chapter 768, Section 4, 1969 

West Acton Library - Salaries and Expenses 



$ 300.00 

792.75 

2, 340.91 

40. 19 

27.62 

38, 348.55 

107.76 

1, 000.00 
967.50 

5.00 
11, 951.73 

2, 500.00 
1, 081.47 

41.47 

501.57 

288.90 

30,800.00 

250.00 

1, 138,412.40 

1, 619.71 

10.00 

2,035.04 

222, 647.00 

1,408.20 

1, 756. 98 
1,042.50 

261.00 

16,500.00 

10,438. 14 

17, 992.40 

193. 35 

199.30 

2, 500.00 
200.00 

1, 052.00 

3, 000.00 
4,760.00 

477. 61 
1, 375.07 

$1, 519, 226. 12 



Schedule 5 
Trust Accounts in Custody of Town Treasurer 



Charity Funds: 

Elizabeth M. White 
Georgia E. Whitney 
Betsey M. Ball 
Varnum Tuttle Memorial 

Cemetery Funds: 

Perpetual Care 

Susan Noyes Hosmer 

Arlette Appleyard 

Henry S. Raymond - Monument 

Henry S. Raymond - Care 

Hoit and Scott 

J. Roland Wetherbee 

Luke Blanchard 

Frank C, Hayward 

Georgia E. Whitney 

Dr. Robert I. Davis 

Frank R. Knowlton 



31, 538.44 
14, 629.40 
21, 285.21 
16, 128.01 



176, 927. 64 
110, 393.04 

2, 292. 17 

1, 577. 97 

3, 345.67 
822. 10 

17,487. 65 
3, 290. 61 

2, 088. 56 
2,409. 65 
1, 396.78 
1, 396. 35 



125 



Schedule 5 - continued: 



George T. Ames 

Mrs. Harry I. O'Neil 

Sarah A. Watson 

Carrie F. Wells 

A. B. Conant 

Elbridge Jones Robbins and Descendents 

Captain Robbins 

Elbridge J. Robbins 

Ethel R. Robbins, Fred Robbins and George T. Ames Memorial 

Martha L. Desmond 



581. 28 

481. 14 

3, 662.45 

4,496.72 

1, 351. 17 

1, 140.25 

2, 721. 35 
1, 632.77 

22, 988.42 

3, 000.00 



Library and Educational Funds: 
Acton High School 
Wilde Memorial 
Georgia E. Whitney Memorial 

Conservation Fund: 



5,445.88 
33, 625.43 
20, 273.32 

144, 715.40 



Firemen's Relief Funds: 
Acton 
West Acton 



18, 067.88 
1,566.53 



Stabilization Fund 
1975 Celebration Fund 



11, 018.43 

5, 161. 17 
$ 688,938.84 



Supplementary Financial Data 

The unexpended balances of the following Articles were closed out during the year and transferred to 
Surplus Revenue. 



Town 




Meeting 


Article 


Date 


No. 


3/09/58 


17 


3/12/62 


60 


6/08/64 


2 


6/08/64 


4 


3/14/66 


14 


3/11/68 


33 


8/29/68 


1 


3/10/69 


28 


3/10/69 


30 


3/10/69 


31 


3/10/69 


45 


3/10/69 


48 


3/10/69 


69 


3/09/70 


17 


3/09/70 


45 


3/09/70 


50 



Description 

Mount Hope Clearing 

Hydrant - Pope Road 

Memorial Library Addition 

Mount Hope Oiling 

Hosmer, Prospect, Charter Road Construction 

Sidewalks 

DeSouza Land 

Sidewalks - Trunk System 

Demolish Buildings 

Minot Avenue Takings 

Fire Chief's Vehicle 

Fluoridation Equipment 

Sander-Mower 

Tuition 

Police Cruisers 

Engineering Department Vehicle 



64.00 

1, 000.00 

15. 68 

29. 94 

18.37 

10.78 

6.00 

10.48 

1, 108.00 

726. 

606. 

8, 258.00 

29.00 

3, 193.44 

600.00 

5.00 



75 

06 



The Finance Committee authorized the following transfers from the Reserve Fund during the year ended 
December 31, 1970. 



Appropriation 



$ 30,000.00 



Transfers: 
Date 
4/09/70 
6/18/70 
6/25/70 
8/13/70 
8/13/70 
9/17/70 
9/17/70 

11/01/70 



Town Report Committee 
West Acton Library - Salaries 
Recreation - Wages 
Treasurer/Collector - Salary 
Highway Department - Expense 
Steam Boiler Insurance 
Cemetery Department - Capital Outlay 
Blanchard Auditorium 



712.29 

90.00 

3, 900.00 

612. 30 

10, 000.00 

20.00 

136. 20 

2, 577.00 



126 



11/01/70 Group Health Insurance 

11/01/70 Vocational Regional School District Planning Committee 

12/20/70 Pensions 

12/20/70 Health Insurance 

12/20/70 Veterans' Aid 

12/20/70 Fire Hydrant Rental 

12/20/70 Police Department - Expense 

12/20/70 Building Maintenance - Expense 

Balance Returned to Overlay Surplus 



3,880.00 
378.00 
912.76 

2,479. 31 

894. 14 

45.00 

700.00 

604.02 



$ 27,941.02 
2, 058.98 



127 



TREASURER 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1970 



Cash Balance January 1, 1970 



$ 523, 123.86 



STATE AND COUNTY RECEIPTS 



State Treasurer 

Disabled Veteran's 

Veteran's Services 

License 

Teachers' Retirement 

Medical Assistance - Federal 

Adult Education Transportation 

Public Welfare 

Corporation Excises 

Public Libraries 

Snow Removal 

Highways Chapter 90 

Highways Chapter 81 

Loss on Taxes 

Education Chapter 69-71 

Transportation Schools 

Regional School Districts 

School Aid Chapter 70 

Valuation Basis 

Land Acquisition Projects 

Education -Handicapped 

Occupational Education 

Education Families Low Income 

National Defense Education T-5 

School Construction - McCarthy 

School Construction - Douglas 

School Construction - Merriam 

School Construction - Gates 

School Construction - Minot Avenue 

Highway Improvement Loan C616-S5 

County Treasurer 

Dog Licenses, refund 
Land Damage, recovery 
Highways Chapter 90 



$ 


172. 


00 


5, 


839. 


82 




15. 


00 




46. 


57 




73. 


50 




53. 


00 




91. 


81 


8, 


388. 


87 


3, 


589. 


36 


1, 


563. 


00 


7, 


311. 


54 


36, 


137. 


44 


3, 


460. 


28 


40, 


274. 


00 


33, 


946. 


59 


110, 


710. 


00 


847, 


320. 


43 


42, 


676. 


14 


10, 


000. 


00 


4, 


850. 


00 




998. 


00 


5, 


590. 


00 


1, 


523. 


50 


5, 


567. 


89 


18, 


750. 


00 


20, 


057. 


63 


30, 


236. 


25 


100, 


000. 


00 


27, 


408. 


25 


2, 


086. 


97 


1, 


917. 


36 


3, 


655. 


77 



1,366,650.87 



7, 660. 10 



DEPARTMENTAL RECEIPTS 



Town Collector 

Personal Property Taxes 1966 

Personel Property Taxes 1969 

Personel Property Taxes 1970 

Real Estate Taxes 1969 

Real Estate Taxes 1970 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise - 1964 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise - 1967 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise - 1968 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise - 1969 

Motor Vehicle & Trailer Excise - 1970 

Farm Animal Excise 1970 

Street Betterments 1970 

Committed Interest 1970 

Interest & Charges - All Taxes, etc. 

Municipal Liens 

Annual Care Cemetery Lots 

Departmental Commitments 



221.40 

2,000.47 

133,959. 79 

101,199.06 

3,878, 200.09 

89.66 

42.90 

477.28 

68, 545.48 

365,277.69 

246.75 

709.95 

122.33 

8,980.62 

1, 193.00 

632.00 

914.01 



4, 562,812.48 



128 



Town Clerk 

Business Certificates 
Sporting License Fees 
Dog License Fees 
Vital Statistics 
Miscellaneous 
Mortgage Fee Recordings 
Dog Licenses 



Board of Assessors 
Assessors Maps 

Board of Selectmen 
Miscellaneous 
Property Rentals 
Licenses 



Board of Health 

Miscellaneous 
Gas Permits 
Sewerage Permits 
Plumbing Permits 
Nurse's Services 



Building Department 
Miscellaneous 
Wiring Permits 
Building Permits 



Board of Appeals 
Hearings Legal 

Planning Board 

Miscellaneous 
Hearings Legal 



Employees Payroll Deductions 
Federal Withholding 
State Withholding 
County Retirement 
Teachers Retirement 
Teachers Insurance 
Teachers Annuities 
Teachers Association 
Group Insurance 
Blue Cross - Blue Shield 
Fire Fighters Association 



Police Department 

Bicycle Registrations 
Dealers Firearm Permits 
Miscellaneous 
Pistol Permits 
Firearm Registrations 



Fire Department 
Permits 
Miscellaneous 
Rentals of Stations 



Sealer Weights & Measures 
Sealers Fees 

Highway Department 
Miscellaneous 
Machinery Account 



56. 50 
176.85 
364. 00 
738.00 
626.75 
1,245.00 
3,234. 75 



261. 50 



573.00 

1, 120.00 

12,828.00 



903. 36 
2, 605. 50 
2, 970.00 
4,670. 50 
8, 328.01 



376. 25 

3,674. 75 

13,917.25 



150.00 



3.00 
275. 00 



336, 099.62 

67,073. 18 

33,881.03 

57, 925. 18 

1, 559. 75 

8,358.00 

5,263. 00 

1, 190.00 

7,250.70 

441.00 



35.00 

55.00 

59.00 

378.00 

210.00 



73.00 
115.00 
136.00 



278.80 



50.00 
850.05 



6,441.85 



261. 50 



14, 521. 00 



19,477. 37 



17,968. 25 



150.00 



278.00 



519, 041.46 



737.00 

324.00 
278. 80 

900.05 
129 



School Department 
Miscellaneous 
School Tuitions - Charges 
Property Rentals 
Adult Education Program 
Public Law 874 Title 1 
Blanchard Auditorium - Reimbursement 
School Lunch Account 



Cemetery Department 
Chapel Fees 
Miscellaneous 
Sale of Lots 
Burials 



West Acton Library 
Library Fines 

Memorial Library 

Mary Lothrop Fund - Bequest 
Library Fines 



Miscellaneous Receipts 

Employees, Group Insurance 

Employees, Blue Cross 

Harvard University - Sale of Dogs 

Recreation Miscellaneous 

Nashoba Public Welfare - Medical Assistant 

Concord District Court - Fines 

Field & Cowles - Insurance Premiums 

Insurance Company, N/A - Claim Recovery 

Town of Bedford - Public Welfare 

Enterprise Press, Inc. - Library 

Theron A. Lowden - Insurance Premiums 

Acton Medical Associates - Veteran's A/C 

Kemper Insurance Company - Claim Recovery 

Acton Minutemen, Inc. Insurance 

Town of Concord - Lieu of Taxes 

H.G. Davis, Inc. - Highway Department 

Engineering Department - Maps 

Assabet Savings - Interest Earned 

Estate of Mary L. Desmond - Cemetery 

Blue Cross - Blue Shield - Premiums 

Arlington Trust Company - Interest Earned 

Arlington Trust Company - Certificate of Deposit 

National Shawmut Bank - Interest Earned 

National Shawmut Bank - Certificate of Deposit 

White Weld & Associates 

Building Bonds 

Minot School 

Accrued Interest 

Premium on Bonds 
Union National Bank of Lowell - Revenue Note 
National Shawmut Bank of Boston - Revenue Note 



400.86 
4, 147.85 
1,292.26 
2,903.00 
22,685. 00 
8,980.00 
121, 503. 83 



120.00 

546.05 

1, 150.00 

2,875.00 



191.04 



100.00 
5, 970.62 



106.44 

1, 180.06 

36. 00 

593. 50 

10. 50 

690.55 

776.00 

2,358.56 

4,470.66 

3. 75 

1,943.00 

151.00 

426.00 

152.00 

270.90 

24.21 

20.00 

2, 132. 52 

3,000. 00 

1,642.81 

5,006. 25 

300,000.00 

16, 916.67 

1,000, 000. 00 

265,000.00 

1,625,000.00 

6, 583.50 

11,453.40 

600, 000.00 

800,000.00 



$ 161,912.80 



4, 691. 05 



191.04 



6, 070. 62 



4, 649, 948. 28 



PERPETUAL CARE - MT. HOPE CEMETERY 



Alice Wamboldt 
Malcolm Perkins 
Richard Munroe 
F. A. Armstrong 
George & Mabel Darrak 
Pauline Allen 
Accurico Catanese 
Kathryn Peterson 
Fred S. Kennedy 
Raymond & Lillian Gallant 



200.00 
200.00 
50.00 
100.00 
200.00 
200.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
200.00 



1,450.00 



130 



PERPETUAL CARE - WOODLAWN CEMETERY 



Marshall Myers 

Martin & Alvretta Duggan 

Stanley Szidat 

Ralph Cataldo 

John W. Tierney 

Edmond & Helen McNiff 

Robert D. Brackett 

Anne Rimbach 

Estate of Charles Mills 

James & Marie Feeney 

Marie D. Hunt 

Frederick & Eleanor Lawrence 

Inga Frost 

Estate of Augusta D. Robbins 



100.00 
100.00 
400.00 
35.00 
50.00 
100. 00 
100.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
300.00 
400. 00 
500.00 



2,885.00 



TRUST FUND INCOME 



Acton High School Library Fund 

Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 

George T. Ames Cemetery Fund 

Arlette Appleyard Cemetery Fund 

Betsey M. Ball Fund 

Celebration 1975 Fund 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund 

A.B. Conant Cemetery Fund 

Conservation Fund Investment 

Dr. Robert I. Davis Cemetery Fund 

Elbridge Jones Robbins & Descendents Fund 

Elbridge Jones Robbins Cemetery Fund 

Captain Robbins Cemetery Fund 

Robbins -Ames Memorial Cemetery Fund 

Elizabeth White Fund 

Georgia E. Whitney Memorial Fund 

Georgia E. Whitney Fund 

Georgia E. Whitney Cemetery Fund 

Frank C. Hayward Cemetery Fund 

Hoit & Scott Cemetery Fund 

Mrs. Harry O'Neil Cemetery Fund 

Frank Knowlton Cemetery Fund 

Luke Blanchard Cemetery Fund 

Henry S. Raymond Monument Fund 

Henry S. Raymond Cemetery Fund 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund 

Varnum Tuttle Memorial Fund 

J. Roland Wetherbee Cemetery Fund 

Memorial Library Fund 

Memorial Library Tainter Fund 

Sarah Watson Cemetery Fund 

Stabilization Fund 

Carrie E. Wells Cemetery Fund 



220.00 

522.64 

22. 95 

110.00 

570.03 

160.42 

8, 538.86 

55.00 

2, 241. 75 

55.00 

55.00 

82.48 

137.48 

1, 166. 56 

1,409.00 

825.00 

769.32 

82. 92 

55. 00 

27.48 

18.37 

64.84 

131.01 

36.01 

173.09 

5,746.61 

550.00 

550.00 

806.26 

655. 34 

138.61 

3,250. 00 

165. 00 



TRUST FUND TRANSFERS TO TOWN ACCOUNT 



George T. Ames Cemetery Fund 

Arlette Appleyard Cemetery Fund 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund 

A.B. Conant Cemetery Fund 

Conservation Investment Fund 

Dr. Robert I. Davis Cemetery Fund 

Elbridge Jones Robbins Fund 

Robbins -Ames Memorial Cemetery Fund 

Elizabeth White Fund 

Georgia E. Whitney Memorial Fund 

Georgia E. Whitney Fund 

Georgia E. Whitney Cemetery Fund 



50.00 

50.00 

3,000.00 

50.00 

5,022.25 

50.00 

50.00 

100.00 

885.00 

1,265. 62 

800.00 

50.00 



29,392.03 



131 



Trust Fund Transfers to Town Account (cont'd) 



Frank C. Hayward Cemetery Fund 

Hoit & Scott Cemetery Fund 

Mrs. Harry O'Neil Cemetery Fund 

Frank R. Knowlton Cemetery Fund 

Luke Blanchard Cemetery Fund 

Henry S. Raymond Cemetery Fund 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund 

J. Roland Wetherbee Cemetery Fund 

Memorial Library Fund 

Sarah A. Watson Cemetery Fund 

Carrie E. Wells Cemetery Fund 

Stabilization Fund 



Total Cash Receipts for the Year 1970 
Cash Balance January 1, 1970 



Paid Selectmen's Orders for the Year 1970 
Cash Balance December 31, 1970 



50. 00 

50. 00 

25.00 

50.00 

100.00 

25. 00 

2,500.00 

150.00 

1,088. 75 

50.00 

50.00 

100,000.00 



Year 


Schools 


1971 


$ 230,000.00 


1972 


230,000.00 


1973 


220,000.00 


1974 


220,000.00 


1975 


220,000.00 


1976 


215,000.00 


1977 


210,000.00 


1978 


170,000.00 


1979 


170,000.00 


1980 


170,000.00 


1981 


170,000.00 


1982 


170,000.00 


1983 


170,000.00 


1984 


170,000. 00 


1985 


170,000.00 


1986 


135,000.00 


1987 


135,000.00 


1988 


80,000.00 


1989 


80,000.00 


1990 


80,000.00 




$3,415,000.00 



OUTSTANDING NOTES AND BONDS 



Highway Building 

$ 35,000.00 
35,000.00 
35,000.00 
35,000.00 
35,000.00 
30,000.00 
30,000.00 
30,000.00 



Library Addition 



115, 511.62 

511,489, 555. 17 
523, 123,86 

12,012,679.03 

10, 334, 186. 08 
1,678,492.95 



Total 



$265,000.00 



$ 25,000. 


00 


$ 


290,000.00 


25,000. 


00 




290,000.00 


25,000. 


00 




280,000.00 


25,000. 


00 




280,000. 00 
255,000.00 
245,000.00 
240,000.00 
200,000. 00 
170,000. 00 
170,000.00 
170,000.00 
170,000. 00 
170,000. 00 
170,000.00 
170,000.00 
135,000.00 
135,000.00 
80,000.00 
80,000.00 






$3 


80,000. 00 


$100,000. 


00 


780,000.00 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



On Deposit December 31, 1970 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



On Deposit December 31, 1970 
132 



ACTON HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



4,000.00 
1, 162.98 



ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



9, 570.00 
7,579.20 



5, 162.58 
282.90 



5,445. 
5,445. 



17, 149. 20 

918.68 

18, 067.88 

18,067. 88 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Town Account 
On Deposit December 31, 1970 



GEORGE T. AMES CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



465.49 
135.54 



601.03 
30.25 



631.28 

50.00 
581.28 
631.28 



ARLETTA APPLEYARD CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



2,000.00 
219.40 



2, 


219. 
122. 


40 

77 


2, 


342. 


17 


2, 


50. 
292. 


00 
.17 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



On Deposit December 31, 1970 



BETSEY M. BALL FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



10,095. 26 
10,087. 24 



20, 182. 50 
1, 102. 71 

21, 285. 21 

21,285.21 



TOWN CELEBRATION 1975 FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



Principal Fund 

Received to Fund 1970, Article #50 

Received Interest for 1970 



On Deposit December 31, 1970 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received to Fund in 1970 
Perpetual Care Bequests 
Interest 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



2,000.00 
3,000.00 



114,843.30 
51,556.23 



4,335.00 
9, 193. 11 



5,000.00 
161. 17 



5, 161. 17 
5,161.17 



166, 399. 53 



13, 528. 11 
179,927.64 

3,000. 00 
176,927.64 
179,927.64 



133 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



A. B. CONANT CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



1, 00.0. 00 
328.37 



1,328. 37 
72.80 



1,401. 17 

50.00 
1,351. 17 



1,401. 17 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received to Fund in 1970 

Article #40 

Interest 



Transfers to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



CONSERVATION INVESTMENT FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



48,471. 73 
1, 584.89 



100,000.00 
2, 312.63 



50,056. 62 



102, 312.63 
152, 369.25 



7,653.85 
144, 715. 40 
152,369. 25 



DR. ROBERT I. DAVIS CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



1, 000.. 00 
372.04 



1,372.04 

74. 74 



1,446. 78 

50. 00 
1,396. 78 



1,446. 78 



MARTHA L. DESMOND CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



Principal Fund - November 1970 
On Deposit December 31, 1970 



3,000. 00 
3,000.00 



ELRIDGE JONES ROBBINS & DESCENDENTS FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



1,000.00 
127.94 



1, 127. 94 
62.31 



1, 190.25 

50.00 
1, 140.25 
1, 190.25 



134 



ELBRIDGE J. ROBBINS CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



On Deposit December 31, 1970 



1, 50.0. 00 
47. 05 



1, 


547. 


05 




85. 


72 


1, 


632. 


77 


1, 


632. 


77 



Prinicipal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



On Deposit December 31, 1970 



CAPTAIN ROBBINS CEMETERY LOT 
Balance January 1, 1970 



2, 500.00 
78.43 



2, 578.43 

142. 92 

2, 721. 35 

2, 721.35 



ROBBINS-AMES MEMORIAL TRUST FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



21,210. 08 
665.49 



21,875. 57 

1,212. 85 

23,088.42 

100.00 

22,988.42 
23,088.42 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Trustee's Orders for 1970 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



25,000. 00 
5, 735.96 



30, 735.96 
1,687.48 

32,423.44 

885.00 

31, 538.44 

32, 423. 44 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



GEORGIA E. WHITNEY MEMORIAL FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



15,000. 00 
5,466.94 



20, 466.94 
1,072.00 

21, 538.94 

1,265.62 

20,273.32 
21, 538. 94 



135 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Selectmen's Orders for 1970 
On Deposit December 31, 1970 



GEORGIA E. WHITNEY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



14,073. 70 
548. 48 



14, 622. 18 

807. 22 

15,429.40 

800. 00 
14, 629. 40 
15,429.40 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



GEORGIA E. WHITNEY CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



1, 500. 00 
832. 95 



2,332.95 
126. 70 



2,459.65 

50.00 

2, 409.65 



2,459.65 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



FRANK C. HAYWARD CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



1,000.00 
1,016.01 



2, 016.01 
122. 55 



"2, 138. 56 

50.00 

2,088. 56 



2, 138. 56 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



HO IT AND SCOTT CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



500.00 
327. 27 



827. 27 
44. 83 



872. 10 

50.00 
822. 10 



872. 10 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 

136 



MRS. HARRY O'NEIL CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



372.39 
109. 51 



481. 90 
24. 24 



506. 14 

25.00 
481. 14 
506. 14 



FRANK R. KNOWLTON CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



On Deposit December 31, 1970 



LUKE BLANCHARD CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



HENRY S. RAYMOND FUND 
MONUMENT PERPETUAL CARE 

Balance January 1, 1970 



1,000.00 
374. 71 



2,419.24 
798. 56 



700. 00 
821.35 



1,374. 71 

71.64 

1,446. 35 

50.00 
1,396.35 



1,446. 35 



3,217.80 
172. 81 



3,390. 61 

100.00 
3,290.61 



3,390.. 61 



1, 521.35 
56.62 



1, 577.97 
1, 577.97 



HENRY S. RAYMOND CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Monument Fund (adjustment) 
Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



$ 


2,000.00 
1, 197.78 


$ 


3, 197.78 

200. 31 

3. 398. 09 




27.22 
25. 00 




52. 22 
3,345.87 
3,398.09 



137 



SUSAN NOYES HOSMER CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



82, 238.95 
24, 591.31 



106, 830. 26 

6,062. 78 

112, 893.04 

2, 500.00 
110, 393. 04 
112,893.04 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



On Deposit December 31, 1970 



VARNUM TUTTLE MEMORIAL FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



10,000.00 
5, 295.92 



15,295.92 

832.09 

16, 128.01 

16, 128.01 



J. ROLAND WETHERBEE CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



10,000.00 
6, 729. 57 



16,729. 57 

908.08 

17,637. 65 

150. 00 
17,487.65 
17,637.65 



ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received to Fund 
Bequest 
Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



27, 583.67 
5,250. 54 



100.00 
1,779.97 



32,834. 21 



1, 879. 97 
34,714. 18 

1,088. 75 

33, 625.43 

34, 714. 18 



138 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Town Account 
On Deposit December 31, 1970 



Principal Fund 

Received Interest for 1970 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



SARAH A. WATSON CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



2, 500. 00 
1,018. 52 



WEST ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



3, 518. 52 
193. 93 



3, 712.45 

50. 00 
3,662.45 



3, 712.45 



1,483. 28 
83. 25 



1, 566.53 
1, 566. 53 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



STABILIZATION FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



$ 80,000.00 
26,423.80 



106,423.80. 

4, 594.63 

111,018.43 

100,000.00 

11,018.43 

111,018.43 



CARRIE F. WELLS CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1970 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1970 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1970 



3,000.00 
1,311.24 



Wm. Henry Soar 
Town Treasurer 



4, 311. 24 
235.48 



4, 546. 72 

50.00 

4,496. 72 



4, 546. 72 



139 



COLLECTOR 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1970 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES - 1966 



Outstanding January 1, 1970 

Payments to Treasurer 
Outstanding December 31, 1970 



Outstanding January 1, 1970 
Outstanding December 31, 1970 

Outstanding January 1, 1970 
Outstanding December 31, 1970 

Outstanding January 1, 1970 

Payments to Treasurer 
Outstanding December 31, 1970 

Commitment per Warrant 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1970 



Outstanding January 1, 1970 
Refunds 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Transferred to Tax Titles 

Outstanding December 31, 1970 



Commitment per Warrant 
Refunds 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Transferred to Tax Titles 

Outstanding December 31, 1970 



221. .40 
3, 473.61 



PERSONEL PROPERTY TAXES - 1967 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES - 1968 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES - 1969 



2,000.47 
2, 186.80 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES - 1970 



REAL ESTATE TAXES - 1969 



133,959. 79 

221.45 

4, 659.05 



102, 731.21 
882.47 

101, 199.06 
572.46 
1,842. 16 




REAL ESTATE TAXES - 1970 



4,035, 956.97 
11,499.94 

3, 878, 200.09 

44, 557.41 

3,489.88 

121,209. 53 



MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE TAXES - 1964 
Abatements rescinded in 1970 
Payments to Treasurer 

MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE TAXES - 1965 
Outstanding January 1, 1970 
Outstanding December 31, 1970 

MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE TAXES - 1966 

Outstanding January 1, 1970 

Outstanding December 31, 1970 
140 



$ 3,695.01 
3,695. 01 

2, 523.40 
2,523.40 

2,060.40 
2,060.40 

4, 187. 27 
4, 187. 27 

138,840.29 

138,840.29 

103,613.68 

103, 613. 68 

4, 047,456.91 



4,047, 


.456. 


91 




89. 


66 




89. 


66 




384. 


00 




384. 


00 


3, 


604. 


09 


3, 


604. 


09 



68, 


545 


48 


14, 


972. 


34 


8, 


191. 


53 



MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE TAXES - 1967 

Outstanding January 1, 1970 $ 2,939.45 

Payments to Treasurer $ 42.90 

Outstanding December 31, 1970 2,896. 55 2,939.45 

MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE TAXES - 1968 

Outstanding January 1, 1970 4,918.24 

Payments to Treasurer 477. 28 

Oustanding December 31, 1970 4,440.96 4,918.24 

MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE TAXES - 1969 

Outstanding January 1, 1970 48,121.84 

Commitment per Warrants 38, 814. 33 

Refunds 4, 773. 18 91,709.35 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1970 8, 191. 53 91, 709. 35 

MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE TAXES - 1970 

Commitment per Warrants 
Refunds 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1970 

FARM ANIMAL EXCISE TAXES - 1970 

Commitment per Warrant 

Payments to Treasurer 

STREET BETTERMENTS ADDED TO TAXES - 1970 

Commitment per Warrant 

Payments to Treasurer 709.95 
Outstanding December 31, 1970 65.61 

COMMITTED INTEREST - 1970 

Commitment per Warrant 135.45 

Payments to Treasurer 122.33 

Outstanding December 31, 1970 13. 12 135.45 

ADDITIONAL INTEREST & COSTS ON ALL TAXES I- 1970 

Collections for 1970 8,980.62 

Payments to Treasurer 8, 980. 62 

CERTIFICATES OF MUNICIPAL LIENS - 1970 

Collections for 1970 1,193.00 

Payments to Treasurer 1, 193. 00 



460, 


927. 


31 


6, 


931. 


50 


365, 


277, 


69 


29, 


291. 


16 


73, 


289. 


96 



467, 


858. 


81 


467, 


858. 


81 




246. 


75 




246. 


75 




775. 


56 




775. 


56 



141 



APPORTIONED STREET ASSESSMENTS - NOT DUE 

Balance due January 1, 1970 3,386.53 

Added to Real Estate Taxes - 1970 377.94 

Apportioned - Payments in Full 397.62 

Balance December 31, 1970 

Due 1971 to 1984 inclusive 2,610.97 3,386.53 

CEMETERY DEPARTMENT - ANNUAL CARE OF LOTS 

Outstanding January 1, 1970 $ 73.00 

Commitments per Warrants 668. 45 $ 741.45 

Payments to Treasurer 632.00 
Abatements 51. 50 
Outstanding December 31, 1970 57. 95 741.45 



Wm. Henry Soar 
Town Collector 



142 



ASSESSORS 



The Board of Assessors have had a year of changes in 1970. In September the Town's first full time 
Assistant Assessor was employed. Ralph Dodge of Saugus comes to Acton with twelve years background in 
the Assessing Field in the Towns of Saugus and Wakefield. He is presently conducting a review of all real 
estate in the Town. This program will take about two years and the updating of valuations will correct any 
inequities that may exist. 

In October, John Loring was appointed as a member of the Board of Assessors. This appointment is 
an asset, as Mr. Loring, a former Selectman, comes to the Board with many years of experience in muni- 
cipal government. 

1970 has been an exceptionally busy year, in the Assessing Department with the increasing number of 
multiple family apartments being constructed. There were 310 building permits reviewed and appraised 
during the year. 

The Assessors office staff has processed hundreds of real estate transfers as well as adjusting motor 
vehicle excise abatements and handling of statutory exemptions as required by law. 

Taxes Assessed as Follows: 



Buildings exclusive of land 

Land 

Personal Property 

Total Valuation January 1, 

Valuation January 1, 1969 

Increase in Valuation 



1970 



$74, 548,205.00 

19, 311, 255. 00 

3,228,844.00 



$97, 088, 304. 00 

88, 979, 095. 00 

$ 8, 109, 209.00 



Rate of Taxation - $43. 00 per $1000. 00 



Real Estate 
Personal Property 
Total Taxes Assessed 



4,035, 956. 97 
138,840. 29 



$ 4, 174, 797.26 



Amount of Money Raised: 

State Parks and Reservations $ 14, 555. 96 

Audit of Municipal Accounts 4, 188. 58 

Metropolitan District Area Planning Council 503. 88 

Elderly Retiree Program 1, 599. 48 

State Assessment System 407. 52 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 1,374.45 

County Tax 94,018.31 

County Hospital 9, 760. 45 
Town Grant 3,988,388.44 

Overlay 60, 000. 19 



$ 4, 174, 797.26 



Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 

Number of Vehicles Assessed - 9636 
Commissioners Value of Motor Vehicles 
and Trailers 



$ 7, 741, 340.00 



Rate of Excise - $66. 00 per $1000 
Total Excise 
Added Excise - 1969 
Number of Vehicles added 1969 Excise 
Value of Vehicles - added Excise 



1094 



460,927.31 
38, 814.33 

1, 345,985.00 



Dewey E. Boatman, Chairman 

Carl C. Flint 

John H. Loring, Clerk 

Board of Assessors 



143 



JURY LIST 



PRECINCT 1 

Carol H. Flagg, 70 Esterbrook Road, Home 

A. Roy Fogelgren, 43 Alcott Street, Programmer 

Donald Foster, 17 Davis Road, Physicist 

Myron I. Holt, 121 Great Road, Quality Control 

John C. Werrbach, 2 Evergreen Road, Sales Manager 

Robert L, Brett, 358 Great Road, Merchant 

Donald R, Burns, 10 Flagg Road, Maintenance Foreman 

E. Wilson Bursaw, 23 Newtown Road, Oil Business 

John L. Knight, 18 Pope Road, Electronic Technician 

Victor Krea, 93 Concord Road, Sales 

Wilson D. LeVan, 37 Old Village Road, Publishing Co. V. P. 

Robert I. Miller, 23 Concord Road, Research Chemist 

Willard A. Muir, 4 Green Wood Lane, Electrical Engineer 

Billy G. Putnam, 15 Hemlock Lane, Engineer 

Thomas J. Regan, Jr. , 99 Concord Road, Structural Engineer 

Wallace A. Semple, 437 Main Street, Electronic Assembler 

Carlyle J. Sletten, 106 Nagog Hill Road, Electronics Scientist 

Raymond C. Stinson, 725 Main Street, Electronics 

Eugene P. Tangney, 2 Magnolia Drive, Personnel Manager 

Paul R. Vigliotti, 30 Carlisle Road, Shovel Operator 

Robert A. Brown, 10 Thoreau Road, Salesman 

Francis L. Carroll, 8 Wilson Lane, Engineer 

Michael B. Cole, 84 Nagog Hill Road, Mechanical Engineer 

Dorothy M. Dicicco, 67 Taylor Road, Secretary 

Clayton L. Hagy, 15 Coughlin Street, Insurance 

Paul C. Hamilton, 4 Wilson Lane, Engineer 

William C. Holway, 48 Alcott Street, Mechanical Engineer 

Stephen G. Lewis, 6 Whittier Drive, Engineer 

Richard E. Loughlin, 7 Balsam Drive, Electrical Engineer 

Richard C. Nylander, 144 Great Road, Museum Curatorial Assistant 

John Ribeiro, 52 Alcott Street, Calibrating Instrument Engineer 

Robert M. Richter, 16 Alcott Street, Sales Engineer 

David L. Waddington, 143 Newtown Road, Engineer 

Elwood S. Wood, III, 41 Washington Drive, General Manager 



PRECINCT 2 

Mary K. Hadley, 45 Martin Street, Consultant 

Roland Boisvert, 40 Central Street, President - Digital 

Morris Breslouf, 10 Beverly Road, Chemist 

Ronald A. Cohen, 60 Conant Street, Scientist 

Peter C. Corbett, 2 Oakwood Road, Physicist 

Peter J. Cronin, 251 School Street, News Supervisor 

John R. Folsom, 47 Piper Road, Draftsman 

Charles R. Furlong, Jr. , 6 Valley Road, Supervisor 

Stanley P. Garmon, 4 Russell Road, Lineman 

Michael V. P. Grace, 10 Faulkner Hill Road, Staff Planner 

Parker Harrison, Jr. , 22 Tuttle Drive, Insurance Agent 

Maurice W. Kirby, Jr., 133 High Street, District Manager 

Leonard L. Kreidermacher, 23 Brucewood Road, Computer Engineer 

Walter Niskanen, 49 Main Street, Cook 

Frank S. Passerello, 50 Maple Street, Foreman 

Richard W. Ahart, 190 Main Street, Office Manager 

Allan R. Amoling, 7 Gioconda Avenue, Assistant Analyst 

Theodore J. Batulin, 9 Railroad Street, Painter 

Harold D. Butts, 20 Brucewood Road, Manager - Tektronix 

Edwin A. Carell, 9 Broadview Street, Engineer 

James W. Carpenter, Crescent Street, Real Estate Broker 

William L. Chipman, 46 High Street, Investments 

John A. Coane, 78 Liberty Street, Electronic Engineer 

Charles R. Fox, Jr. , 29 Martin Street, Auditor 

Ole Garthe, 173 Main Street, Carpenter 

Waino J. Kangas, 31 Parker Street, Maintenance 

Edwin A. Mercer, Jr. , 38 Faulkner Hill Road, Data Processing Manager 

Victor Oskirko, Jr. , 106 High Street, Electrical Assembler 



144 



PRECINCT 2 (continued) 

Francis B. Parker, 85 Hosmer Street, Credit Manager 
Robert P. Quebec, 25 Heritage Road, Engineer 
Frederick J. Strate, 200 Main Street, Truck Driver 
John V. Terry, 45 Faulkner Hill Road, Electrical Engineer 
John A. Thompson, 65 High Street, Engineer 
Paul G. Von Rhee, 20 Oakwood Road, Engineer 



PRECINCT 3 

Charles D. Driscoll, 7 Winter Street, Security Trader 

Wilfred A. Fordon, 22 Orchard Drive, Electrical Engineer 

Christopher C. Kellogg, 5 Orchard Drive, Assistant Manager 

John E. Mutty, Jr., 21 Tuttle Drive, Electrical Engineer 

Bruce B. Nesary, 16 Elm Street, Truck Driver 

Benjamin F. Rice, 44 Nashoba Road, Maintenance Man 

Douglas W. Whitcomb, 108 Summer Street, Draftsman 

George S. Bryant, 6 Baxter Road, I. B. M. Operator 

William A. Castner, 10 Deacon Hunt Drive, Engineering Manager 

Cornelius E. Coughlin, 98 Summer Street, Comptroller 

Flavil R. Edgin, 13 Duggan Road, Mngt. Engineer 

John W. MacDonald, 17 Birch Ridge Road, Salesman 

Wiley Mitchell, 285 Arlington Street, Journalist 

Warren R. Peterson, 350 Arlington Street, Grocery Clerk 

Ralph R. Rollins, 305 Central Street, Post Office 

John W. Baker, 4 Wachusett Drive, Machinist 

Eugene R. Buck, 3 Mohegan Road, Buyer 

Philip G. Clemence, 38 Windsor Avenue, Clerk 

Richard F. Croce, 19 Smart Road, Electrical Engineer 

Grant M. Dodson, 377 Central Street, Salesman 

David H. Donaldson, 28 Mohawk Drive, Purchasing Agent 

John J. Foley, 1 Algonquin Road, Electrical Engineer 

John W. Forrest, 6 Algonquin Road, Mechanical Engineer 

George F. Geisenhainer, 5 Captain Forbush Lane, Sales Supervisor 

James C. Lawson, 3 Betsy Ross Circle, Chemical Engineer 

George H. Locke, Jr. , 235 Arlington Street, Assembly Man 

Ernest F. O' Clair, 5 Seneca Road, Mechanic 

Robert J. Purvis, 8 Ethan Allen Drive, Research Manager 

Francis X. Quinn, 21 Oneida Road, Controller 

John P. Russell, 378 Central Street, Marketing 

Richard J. Scire, 305 Arlington Street, Cable Maker 

Kenneth M. Simpson, 3 Agawam Road, Salesman 

James W. Sweeney, 11 Notre Dame Road, Plant Engineer 

David E. Worrall, 16 Mohawk Drive, Tube Grinder 



145 



INDEX 



Page 



ACCOUNTANT 112 

ANIMALS, INSPECTOR OF 20 

APPEALS, BOARD OF 9 

APPOINTMENTS 107 

ARCHIVES 52 

ASSESSORS 143 

BIRTHS 21 

BUILDING COMMITTEE 14 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 15 

CEMETERY COMMISSION 55 

CIVIL DEFENSE 8 

COLLECTOR 140 

CONCORD AREA COMPREHENSIVE MENTAL HEALTH CENTER 19 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION Ill 

DOG LICENSES 20 

DOG OFFICER 19 

ELECTION, TOWN 59 

ELECTION, STATE '60 

ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 15 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 10 

FINANCE COMMITTEE (See Warrant Supplement) 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 4 

GOODNOW FUND 56 

HEALTH, BOARD OF 16 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 12 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 51 

HOUSING AUTHORITY , 54 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 57 

INSECT PEST CONTROL 54 

JURY LIST 144 

LIBRARY REPORTS 47 

1975 CELEBRATION, ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON 51 

OFFICERS 107 

PLANNING BOARD 11 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 3 

PUBLIC CEREMONIES AND CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 53 

RECREATION COMMISSION 50 

SCHOOL REPORT 26 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 9 

SELECTMEN-TOWN MANAGER 1 

SEWERAGE STUDY COMMITTEE 57 

STREET DIRECTORY AND MAP Center Fold 

STREET LIGHT COMMITTEE 9 

TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 54 

TOWN MEETING PROCEEDINGS: 

March 9, 1970 62 

March 16, 1970 104 

June 29, 1970 104 

September 28, 1970 106 

TREASURER'S REPORT 128 

TREE WARDEN 54 

VETERANS' AGENT 58 

VETERANS' GRAVES OFFICER 58 

VOCATIONAL REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT PLANNING COMMITTEE 46 

WIRES, INSPECTOR OF 8 

WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION 56 



147 



POLICE EMERGENCY 263-2911 

FIRE EMERGENCY 263-9191 

(Emergency Only) 

BE SURE TO GIVE YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS AS WELL AS THE NATURE OF YOUR EMERGENCY CLEARLY. 
DO NOT HANG UP UNTIL YOU ARE SURE THAT YOUR MESSAGE HAS BEEN UNDERSTOOD. 

Town Office - Call 263-2761 



FOR ANSWERS ON: 

Assessments 

Bills and Accounts, Taxes 

Birth, Death, Marriage Certificates 

Building 

Cemeteries 

Dog, Hunting, and Fishing Licenses 

Dog Problems 

Education Information 

Elections, Voting, and Registration 

Engineering 

Fire (routine) 

Garbage and Refuse, Health and Sanitation 

Highways and Streets 

Library 

Licenses 

Nurse (School) 

Nurse (School) 

Nurse (Town) 

Oil Burner Permits 

Permits for Burning 

Plumbing Permits 

Schools: 



CALL THE 



TELEPHONE 



Veterans' Services 
Water Problems 
Welfare Questions 
Zoning 

Electrical Wiring 
Electrical Wiring Permits 



Board of Assessors 263-5012 

Treasurer and Collector 263-7018 

Town Clerk's Office 263-2761 

Building Inspector 263-7545 

Cemetery Superintendent 263-2240 or 263-4428 

Town Clerk's Office 263-2761 

Dog Officer 263-4979 

School Superintendent 263-5737 

Town Clerk's Office 263-2761 

Town Engineer's Office 263-7545 

Fire Department 263-4366 

Board of Health 263-4736 

Town Engineer 263-7545 

Librarian 263-2232 

Selectmen, Town Manager or 263-2761 

Board of Health 263-4736 

School Nurse, Junior High and High Schools 263-7738 

Elementary Schools 263-4982 

Town Nurse 263-4736 

Fire Chief 263-4366 

Fire Department 263-4366 

Board of Health 263-4736 

Carolyn T. Douglas School 263-2753 

Julia L. McCarthy School 263-4982 

Marion L. Towne School 263-2042 

Florence A. Merriam School 263-2581 

Paul P. Gates School 263-9162 

Acton-Boxborough Regional Junior High School .... 263-7716 

Acton-Boxborough Regional High School 263-7738 

Veterans' Agent 263-4757 

**— Water District (not part of Town of Acton) 263-5646 

Welfare Board (Office in Bedford - Call Collect) . . . 275-6668 

Zoning Enforcement Officer 263-7545 

Wire Inspector 263-5555 

Office - 69 Hayward Road 263-4736 



MEETINGS 



DAY & TIME 



PLACE 



Annual Town Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Appeals Board 
Assessors 
Building Committee 
Conservation Commission 
Finance Committee 

Health Board 

Industrial Development Commission 

Library Trustees 

I 'la Lg I >i >.i r> 

Recreation Commission 
School Committee: 

Regional 

i oca] 
Sele c tmen 



1st Monday in March 

2nd Monday in March 

Meet when necessary 

1st Tuesday ea. month, 7-8:30 p.m. 

1st and 3rd Wed. ea. month, 7:30 p.m. 

1st and 3rd Wed. ea. month, 8:00 p.m. 

Oct. thru Feb., Thurs. at 8 p.m. 

Rest of year, Thurs. on call 
2nd and 4th Mon. ea. month, 7:30 p.m. 
1st Wed. ea. month, 8 p.m. 
1st Thurs. ea. month, 7:30 p. m. 
2nd and 4th Mon. ea. month, 8 p.m. 
2nd and 4th Tues. ea. month, 7:30 p.m. 

2nd Mon. ea. month, 7:30 p.m. 
3rd VI on. ea. month, 7:30 p.m. 
I - rj Tues. at 7:30 p.m. 



Precinct Fire Stations 

Blanchard Auditorium 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Center Fi re Station 

South Acton Fire Station 

Office at 69 lla\ ward Rd. 
Town Hall 
M emorial I .ibrarj 
Office at '>'" Haj ward Rd. 
Town Hall 

I ibrar: U'JMIS 

School ( omm. Rm. \ I SR I is 

Town Hal] 



3 wly? 






ACTON 

ANNUAL 

REPORT 

1 97 1 



:;■:■:.■ 




OF GENERAL INTEREST 



Incorporated as a Town: July 3, 1735 

Type of Government: Open Town Meeting-Selectmen-Town Manager. 

Location: Eastern Massachusetts, Middlesex County, bordered on 

the east by Carlisle and Concord, on the west by B 
borough, on the north by Westford and Littleton, on the 
south by Sudbury, and on the southwest by Stow and' 
Maynard. 



Name: 



Acton as the name of our Town has several possible 
derivations: the old Saxon word Ac-tun meaning oak 
settlement or hamlet in the oaks, the Town of Acton, 
England, the Acton family of England, a member of 
which supposedly offered a bell for the first meeting 
house in 1735. 



Elevation at Town Hall: 268' above mean sea level. 

Land Area: Approximately 20 square miles. 

Population: Year Persons 



1910 
1950 
1955 
1960 
1965 
1970 



2136 
3510 
4681 
7238 
10188 
14770 



Density 

106 per sq. 

175 

233 

361 

507 

739 



Climate: 



Public Education: 



Tax Picture: 



Normal January temperature 27.7° F. 
Normal July temperature 72.0° F. 

Normal annual precipitation 43.02 inches. 

Pupil enrollment (October 1971): 

Grades 1-6, 2437; Grades 7-12, 2290 (Regional) 
Number of teachers and administrative staff: 291 
Pupil-teacher ratio: 1 to 27 (avg. elementary grades) 
1 to 20 (avg. Jr. and Sr. High) 

Assessed Valuation 

$70,309,795 
74,262,745 
79,513,915 
88,979,095 
97,088,304 

104,939,555 

United States Senators in Congress: Edward W. Brooke (R), Newton, Massachusetts 

Edward M. Kennedy (D), Boston, Massachusetts 
Representative in Congress, 3rd Congressional Dist: . Robert F. Drinan (D), Newton, Massachusetts 

State Senator, 5th Middlesex District: James DeNormandie, Lincoln, Massachusetts 

Representative, General Court, 33rd Middlesex Dist: . Chester G. Atkins, Acton, Massachusetts 
Governor's Council, 3rd District: George F. Cronin, Jr., Boston, Massachusetts 



Year 


Tax Rate 


1966 


$29 


1967 


31 


1968 


34 


1969 


38.50 


1970 


43 


1971 


45 



OFFICE HOURS 



Town Office (Selectmen, 
Town Manager, Clerk) 

Treasurer and Collector 

Assessors 

School Superintendent 

Asst. School Superintendent 

Board of Health 

Veterans' Agent 

Library Hours: 

Memorial Library 

Citizens, West Acton 



7:30 p.m. ) 
7:30-8:30 p.m. ) 
7:30-8:30 p.m. ) 



8-4:30 (Tues. 

8-4:30 (Tues. 

8-4:30 (Tues. 

8-4:30 

8-4:30 

8-4:30 

No Regular Hours 

Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m. -9 p.m. 
Saturday, 9-5 p.m. 
Mon., 7-9 p.m. 
Tues.-Fri., 10-5 p.m. 



Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

A-B Regional H. S. 

A-B Regional H. S. 

Office at Forest Road 

At Home 



263-2761 
263-7018 
263-5012 
263-9503 
263-9503 
263-4736 
263-4757 

263-2232 



ANNUAL REPORTS 




TOWN of ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 

TWO HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SIXTH 
MUNICIPAL YEAR 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER THIRTY-FIRST 

1971 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

SELECTMEN-TOWN MANAGER 3 

FIRE 5 

POLICE 9 

CIVIL DEFENSE 10 

STREET LIGHT 10 

INSPECTOR OF WIRES 11 

ENGINEERING 11 

PLANNING BOARD 12 

HIGHWAY. 14 

BUILDING COMMITTEE 16 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 17 

BOARD OF APPEALS 18 

WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION 18 

GOODNOW FUND 18 

HEALTH 19 

ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 21 

TOWN CLERK 22 

DOG LICENSES 26 

TOWN FOREST 27 

TREE WARDEN 27 

INSECT PEST CONTROL 27 

DOG OFFICER 27 

SEWERAGE STUDY 28 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS 28 

SCHOOL REPORT 29 

Report of the Superintendent of Schools 30 

Report of the High School Principal ' 32 

Report of the Junior High School Principal 34 

Pupil Personnel Services 38 

Report of School Nurses 39 

Report of the School Committee 40 

School Finances 45 

VOCATIONAL REGIONAL SCHOOL 49 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 49 

LIBRARIES 50 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 52 

YOUTH COMMISSION 53 

RECREATION 56 

1975 CELEBRATION 59 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 59 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 61 

CEMETERIES 61 

VETERANS' AGENT 63 

VETERANS' GRAVES 6 3 

ARCHIVES 63 

ASSESSORS 64 

STREET DIRECTORY AND MAP (see Center fold) 

TOWN MEETINGS 65 

March 10, 1971 65 

June 22, 1971 84 

November 1, 1971 86 

TOWN ELECTION 87 

TOWN OFFICERS AND APPOINTMENTS 88 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 92 

TOWN TREASURER 108 

COLLECTOR 120 

JURY LIST 124 

INDEX 127 



This Annual Report is respectfully dedicated to the late 



CARL C. FLINT 
"Mr. Acton" 




He served the community well as Assessor from March 6, 
1939 to November 15, 1971. 

He was part of the Acton scene since 1892. 

His contributions stem from an abiding respect for his fellow- 
men and his devotion to his community and its people. 

Carl Flint's years in Acton have become part of the tradition 
and the progress of our community. 



SELECTMEN-TOWN MANAGER 



On March 23, 1971 the Board of Selectmen reorganized, welcoming Alfred F. Steinhauer as its newest 
member. The Board elected Paul H. Lesure, Chairman; William C. Sawyer, Vice -Chairman; Alfred F. 
Steinhauer, Clerk. The two additional members: William L. Chipman and Paul R. Nyquist. 

The tenor of the 1971 Annual Town Meeting reflected a continuing increase in the size and complexity of 
our community. Significant actions included: 

1) our entrance into the Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School District with eleven 
other towns; 

2) the establishment of a Youth Commission; 

3) updating of our Building Code to require fire protection systems in all future construction; 

4) appropriation of funds for the purchase of three parcels of land adjacent to our sanitary land- 
fill site which will be used for future municipal use; 

5) authorization to appoint three additional patrolmen as the first step in a three-year program 
to bring our police force up to the recommended national standard of one patrolman per 500 
population. 

The Annual Town Meeting also overwhelmingly supported an amendment to our Protective Zoning Bylaw 
which deleted the construction of apartment houses as a permitted use. This action was taken in the hope that 
the apartment house construction boom which occurred in Acton during 1969 and 1970 could be curtailed. It is 
our opinion that Acton has a more than adequate number of apartments at this time and for the foreseeable fu- 
ture. Their impact upon our need for increased fire and police protection is only now becoming evident. 

Our Town Bylaws were also amended to provide for newly elected town officials taking office at the ter- 
mination of the Annual Town Meeting. This amendment was voted to make the provisions of our Bylaws and 
Charter coincidental. 

Moderator John W. Putnam concluded his term with this Annual Town Meeting and newly-elected Mod- 
erator John W. Tierney assumed the position on March 17, 1971. We would like to thank Mr. Putnam for his 
six years of dedicated service to the Town. 

In June the Town Manager appointed John A. Duclos as our first year-round Director of Recreation. 
Mr. Duclos and the Recreation Commission have formulated expanded recreation plans and programs which 
will hopefully be implemented during 1972. An adult evening recreation program was initiated in 1971 and 
numerous winter programs have recently begun. 

Our Permanent Building Committee was exceptionally busy throughout the year with the construction of 
the Public Works facility on Forest Road, the Luther Conant elementary school on Taylor Road, and the major 
addition to the regional school complex on Charter Road. 

In July the Commonwealth's "no burning" order became final and residents found themselves at the sani- 
tary landfill site more frequently. Leaves, brush, and grass clippings, once burned in the backyard, now had 
to be carried to the landfill site. The volume of material brought to the landfill site increased dramatically. 
We are presently evaluating recommendations concerning a regional refuse disposal district, townwide refuse 
pickup, combination trash-garbage pickup, new landfill sites, and improved equipment for the landfill. We 
believe that every effort must be made during 1972 to resolve the refuse disposal problem which the Town will 
be facing within the next two to three years. 

Unauthorized filling of lowland areas continued to present frequent problems, and we are pleased to note 
that the State Department of Natural Resources seems to have become more responsive to our requests for 
enforcement of the "Hatch Act". For the most part, the Town's Flood Plain Zoning has proven itself effective 
in preventing unwise new development in lowland areas. Beginning in 1972, our Conservation Commission 
will, by law, assume our previous "Hatch Act" duties. 

Some of Acton's most volatile issues involved the rapidly changing manners and mores of youth. Con- 
troversy centered around the Teen Center which was established in the former Unitarian Church at the inter- 
section of Main and Central Streets, the establishment in the same area of a private boarding school for youth 
with special educational problems, and the loitering of youth and young adults in and around the Town Com- 
mon. A great deal of time was spent by the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, Police Chief and Youth Com- 
mission in meeting with area residents and youth in an attempt to coalesce divergent attitudes and promote 
mutual understanding. It is safe to say that this will continue to be a primary concern in 1972 and that a heavy 
responsibility lies with our youth and young adult population in terms of appropriate self-discipline in public 
activity. 

During the first months of the year the Selectmen and other Town bodies met several times with State 
Department of Public Works officials and Acton residents relative to the proposed reconstruction of Route 2. 
After numerous revisions to the original plans presented by the State, the Selectmen and the Department of 



Public Works reached agreement on pLans which reduced the size of large proposed interchanges at Ilosmer 
Street and Taylor Road and reduced the area and number of eminent domain land takings. The suggestions, 
ideas, and information presented to the Board by Route 2 area residents proved extremely valuable in assist- 
ing the Board in its recommendations to the Department of Public Works. 

Other problems which have consumed a great deal of effort and which have been approached by an un- 
usually cooperative group of Town boards and committees include: 

1) controls over and requirement of sewage treatment plant facilities for a major Route 2A 
condominium development; 

2) monitoring of site plans for new commercial and apartment construction (a very vital but 
complicated process); 

3) inspection of State plans for reconstruction of Route 111 (much of our serious concern here 
will extend over into 1972); 

4) the proposed development of both large apartment and residential areas in Boxborough im- 
mediately adjoining the Acton Water Supply District's Whitcomb wells (provoking a joint study 
of the impact on our water supply by the Selectmen of Boxborough and Acton, the Water Com- 
missioners, the Acton Board of Health, and the Acton Planning Board); 

5) the idling of railroad engines during winter months in South Acton with resultant air and noise 
pollution overtones. 

Simple and absolute answers in problem areas such as these just do not pop out of the woodwork. Much time 
and much thought must be applied if we are to carry out our responsibilities to all of our citizens in an accept- 
able fashion. 

We note with sorrow the passing of Carl C. Flint, member of the Board of Assessors for the past 32 
years. Not only did Carl serve the Town faithfully for a most extended period of time, but he had become a 
friend to all those with whom he worked. Helen A. Wood, Trustee of the Elizabeth White Fund since 1953, 
also passed away during 1971. Her service as a trustee benefited many of the town's needy during times of 
hardship. It is always sad to bid a final goodbye to valued and dedicated associates. 

In summary, 1971 has been another active year with your Selectmen meeting well in excess of 100 times. 
The Selectmen, Town Manager, Department Heads and the various Town Boards and Committees have worked 
closely together in an effort to better communication among Town entities, hence to carry out their duties 
more efficiently. We should like to here extend our gratitude to all of the Town's employees and board and 
committee members who have assisted us in attacking the many problems and challenges which were presented 
during the year. 

Paul H. Lesure, Chairman 
William C. Sawyer, Vice-Chairman 
Alfred F. Steinhauer, Clerk 
William L. Chipman 
Paul R. Nyquist 

Board of Selectmen 

and 

Robert W. Dotson 
Town Manager 



FIRE 



Total number of alarms responded to are as follows: 



Residential 

Churches and Schools 

Mercantile 

Manufacturing 

Storage - Garages 

Grass - Brush - Woods 

Miscellaneous 

Vehicle 

False Alarms 

Accidental Alarms and Smoke Scares 

Emergencies 

Investigation 

Special Service 

Mutual Aid Sent 



Box Alarms 
Still Alarms 
Deaths by Fire 

Fire Loss 

Buildings and Contents 

Vehicles 

Miscellaneous 



Assessed Value of Property Involved 
Permits Issued 



1970 



1971 



32 


31 


2 


1 


5 





3 


9 


5 


2 


43 


49 


52 


48 


27 


44 


11 


11 


15 


28 


50 


77 


87 


107 


112 


88 


11 


16 


455 


511 


66 


94 


412 


417 





4 



$12,114.00 
5,425.00 

$17,539.00 
$2,220,779.00 



$ 42,151.46 

5,090.00 

67,500.00 

$114,741.46 
$2,553,260.00 



Oil and Power Burners 

Blasting 

Liquified Petroleum 

Flammable Liquids 

Miscellaneous 



40 

38 

3 

2 

7 



58 

46 

5 

10 

17 



Monies Collected 



Permits 

Station Rental and Insurance Claims 

Miscellaneous 



$ 73.00 
126.00 
115.00 

$314.00 



$ 99.00 
115.00 

$214.00 



Department Operations 

Fire calls in 1971 were again on the increase after a respite in 1970. An increase of 16% was noted in 
all calls with the only drop being in the number of building fires. Even with the drop in this category our fire 
loss in this area was greater. Our largest loss of the year occurred when a helicopter crashed on Minute 
Man Ridge. We were most fortunate that no one was killed as the aircraft missed the house by only 50 feet, 
as well as some children playing nearby. Early in December, four children were killed in a fire on Railroad 
Street. Quick work by the first two arriving Fire Fighters saved another youngster from the third floor but 
efforts to save the others were in vain. 



Our operation during the day with seven men on duty continues to perform well. The day men were able 
to handle several house fires due to the quickness of their arrival. We do have trouble with back-up help dur- 
ing the day due to Call Men not being available. This has led to apparatus not responding, due to this lack of 
manpower. Fortunately we were not hit with any major problems during the days. 

At night our problem is different but potentially more dangerous. During certain hours we have had 
problems with the response of Call Men. After 4:30 P. M. when the paid men go off duty and until about 6:30 
P. M. , when most of the Call Force returns to town, we have had trouble in manning apparatus in Center and 
South. Late at night between 12 midnight and 7:00 A. M., the problem is the delay from the time the alarm 



sounded until the apparatus responds with Call Men. West Acton has continued to cover the Town after 4:30 
P. M. in regard to minor problems; however, I am concerned that this Engine will be out of quarters when a 
serious fire strikes West Acton. At best our operations after 4:30 P. M. can only be called a patch job relying 
on the availability and speed of the Call Force. 

In other areas of operations such as Fire Prevention, Fire Alarm, Training and Maintenance, the four 
Captains continue to do an excellent job. All areas have expanded their operations during the year with con- 
siderable success. I am always amazed by the willingness of our Officers and Fire Fighters to assume new 
and challenging responsibilities to carry out the Department's work. 

In all fairness to the Call Men, their dedication must also be recognized as I am afraid that it may ap- 
pear that they are to blame for the problems of the Fire Department. It is not easy for them to take on the 
responsibilities of fire fighting and training in addition to their own work and family commitments. The Town 
will need Call Men for some time to come and I only hope that we are blessed with the type of men we now have. 

Training 

The Department training program under the direction of Captain MacGregor, again recorded over 2,000 
man hours in training. Over 1,000 hours were spent in training the Call Force alone. The full-time Officers 
and men attended specialized courses in Bomb Incidents, Rescue, Emergency Transport of the Injured and 
Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation. 

Call Officers and men attended courses sponsored by the Massachusetts Fire Academy. In November of 
this year a Special Fire Grounds operations course was conducted by the Fire Academy on an abandoned build- 
ing on Route 2A. This course was attended by 12 of our regular and Call Fire Fighters. 

Fire Fighters are continuing in the Fire Science Program at the Mass. Bay Community College. 

Due to the water supply problems in North Acton, the training officer spent several hours in instructing 
on the use of the Department's new 4" hose. This project involved instruction in pump operations, relay op- 
erations and handling this large size hose. 

Several training programs were offered at the Nursing Home in fire fighting and evacuation procedures. 

Fire Prevention 

During the year Captain Copeland programmed an expanded "In-service" inspection program that enabled 
the Department not only to cover the businesses in town but also multiple inspections in special hazard areas. 
This increased our "In-service" inspections by 50%. During the fall, at least one station was out on inspec- 
tion at any given time. We must also recognize the cooperation of the business community in recognizing the 
value received on these inspections. It is interesting to note that our losses in business property are far be- 
low national averages. 

Required inspections of schools, nursing homes and other places of public assembly were also carried 
out. The school program was set up and carried out by Fire Fighter William Soar with over 2,000 children 
taking part. 

Fire Prevention Week was a great success with our new "Mascot", Sparky the Fire Dog, taking part in 
all activities to the delight of the youngsters. 

Our third Baby-Sitters Training Course was carried out with 70 youngsters completing the six -hour 
course. 

We have asked for funds to provide for additional work in Fire Prevention. This money will provide 
time for special attention to apartment buildings and special programs for the Junior and Senior High Schools. 

Fire Alarm 

The new Fire Alarm Office went into full operation early in February. The changeover from the old to 
the new system was completed without any interruption of service. Our dispatching and operations have been 
greatly improved with the change. 

Fire Alarm Superintendent Frost has reported a busy year with the installation of 18 new alarm boxes, 
the extension of fire alarm lines on Main Street to North Street, and the adding of a new circuit to the Center 
system. 

Considerable work had to be done at the request of the Public Utilities. Our fire alarm lines are on 
their poles and modification or improvement of the electric or telephone system usually require a relocation 
of alarm wires and boxes. 

The greatest impact on the Fire Alarm crew was the results of our Building Code requirements in the 
area of Fire Protection Systems. Other than the installation of the equipment to tie into the municipal sys- 
tem, many hours were spent in planning, approving and inspecting these systems. 



A welcome addition to Fire Alarm Division was the acquisition of a used repair vehicle from the Town 
of Framingham. This vehicle, which was authorized at the 1971 Town Meeting, was a tremendous assist in 
carrying out the line work. Superintendent Frost estimates that the vehicle has enabled his crew to do about 
40% more work than was possible when the poles had to be physically climbed. 

Personnel 

Although permanent personnel remained the same, the Call Force had many changes of personnel. Call 
Fire Fighter Malcolm Fullonton retired after 40 years of service. Resignations due to moving out of town and 
other commitments necessitated the appointment of eight new Call Fire Fighters. Five of the eight were ap- 
pointed from the Auxiliary Department which gave them the benefit of some experience. 

The Department has been fortunate to have a dedicated secretary in the person of Mrs. Barbara Bent- 
sen. Mrs. Bentsen is only scheduled for 20 hours per week and the work load has increased to such a point 
that the job definitely requires a minimum of 40 hours per week. Many projects have had to be postponed and 
at the present, Company Inspection Reports are running two to three weeks behind. 

Availability of Call Men through the day is becoming more and more of a problem. Our response during 
this period has been cut in half in the last four years. A program, backed by the Board of Selectmen, will 
attempt to recruit new personnel that will be available during the day. 



The present Department personnel is as follows: 

Permanent Paid Personnel 

Fire Chief 
4 Captains 
12 Fire Fighters 

Building and Grounds 



Call (Part-Time) Personnel 

2 Deputy Chiefs 

2 Lieutenants 

36 Call Fire Fighters 



Interior painting was carried out in all three stations by the men on duty. All buildings are in good con- 
dition. Station 1 in Acton Center will require painting of the trim next year. We are experiencing problems 
with the deterioriation of the driveways at Center and South. 

In the summer of this year the Recreation Department opened an office in the Center Station. This ne- 
cessitated the restriction of the use of the station by outside groups. The only meeting area still available on 
a limited basis is the South Acton Station, 

Equipment 

In August of 1971, Captain Edward Belmont was given the job of Maintenance Officer, as well as his 
other duties. Captain Belmont has been able to schedule a preventative maintenance program, as well as up- 
date our records in this field. 





Used Fire Alarm Repair Vehicle authorized and 
purchased in 1971. (Photo by G. B. Williams, Jr.) 



New Dodge Pick-Up Truck delivered in 
October 1971. (Photo by G. B. Williams, Jr.) 



The used Fire Alarm Repair Truck was purchased from the Town of Framingham early in May of this 
year. The vehicle was in very good condition and was immediately put into service. A new Dodge pick-up 
was placed in service in the fall. This truck replaced the surplus vehicle that was put in service in 1968. The 
new truck has performed well and has greatly assisted the Captains in carrying out their duties. 



The new base radio was installed in the Fire Alarm Office and has worked fine. The old unit was kept 
as a stand-by. 

As of the first of the year, the Brush Truck ordered in August of 1970 had still not been delivered. De- 
lays such as this raise havoc with our replacement plans, forcing us to move up purchasing dates to allow for 
delayed delivery. 

Increased runs have forced added repairs on our apparatus. This year major engine repairs were 
needed on Engines 1 and 3. Due to the age of Engine 3 (36 years old) it required over three weeks of work to 
just replace a head gasket. When repairs are required on our first-line Engines, these two 1936 pumpers 
have to fill in as a replacement. These two trucks belong to a museum, not a Fire Department. I am asking 
in 1972 that these two trucks be sold and that money be appropriated to add a Class A pump to the new Brush 
Truck to provide us with a decent reserve pumper. 

Also scheduled for replacement in 1972 are the Chief's car and Engine 7 in Acton Center. Engine 7 is 
17 years old and will also go into reserve status on the arrival of its replacement. In looking at the problem 
of apartment buildings in Acton Center, it was decided to purchase a pumper -snorkel combination. This unit 
will combine a 1,000-gallon pumper with a 55-foot basket type boom. The City of Chicago has used these suc- 
cessfully and we feel that it will do the job for us in servicing these garden apartments. The idea is to provide 
the capability to pump water or provide means of rescue with the same manpower. 

Our radio alert system is about 95% complete with about eight radios still lacking. With the purchase of 
24 more units during 1971, we were able to actually count on these radios with favorable results. The main- 
tenance records for the 46 units is very satisfying. 

Program for 1972 

As before mentioned, our apparatus requirements will be a replacement of the Chief's car, modifica- 
tion to the new Brush Truck and the purchase of a pumper-snorkel to replace Engine 7. 

We expect a busy year for Fire Alarm with the addition of new automatic alarm boxes, now required 
under the Building Code. A further updating of the Code will be carried out with hopes that before the end of 
the year the town will have a Fire Prevention Code to insure compliance with good safety practices. 

The Department plans to aim for two in-service inspections on business, apartment and industrial prop- 
erty, rather than the one we are now doing. Plans are being made for a "Home Inspection" program for those 
residents who are concerned with possible fire hazards in their homes. 

The future of the Fire Department and its ability to provide adequate protection to our citizens has been 
my concern over the years. Each year I have expressed concern over our manpower and the growth of North 
Acton area. In 1970-1971 the Board of Selectmen requested the Town Building and Land Acquisition Commit- 
tee to review our problems and offer recommendations. I worked through early 1971 with TBLAC and a joint 
report was submitted, but nothing was done. During the interim the old problems have increased and new 
problems have appeared. There was never any doubt in my mind as to which direction the Fire Department 
had to go to keep up with the growth of the Town. 

I have always believed in planning. We have planned, had our plans checked by others in the Fire Ser- 
vice, conducted surveys of other towns, and did an in-depth study of the problems in Acton Center. We offered 
to work with anybody to see these plans become a reality. Unfortunately, I can only report that we have not 
gained anything significant towards solving these problems. I have urgently requested that nine full-time Fire 
Fighters be appointed in 1972 to cover the Center and South Stations on a 24-hour basis. As of this writing 
the Board of Selectmen have voted against this request and postponed this action until 1973; the Finance Com- 
mittee has taken no action. I agree that the citizen has had it with increased taxes. To this I can only answer 
--What Price Public Safety? 

I would like to thank the men of the Fire Department and the Auxiliary Department for their excellent 
cooperation and support. I also wish to thank the several Boards and Town Departments for their assistance. 

Thomas J. Barry, Jr. 
Chief of Fire Department 



POLICE 



Arrests and Prosecutions for the Following Offenses 



Assault and Battery 11 
Being Present Where a Narcotic Drug is Found 2 

Breaking and Entering and Larceny 14 

Drunkenness 20 

Failing to Cover Load 1 

Failing to Keep Right 11 

Failing to Use Care 14 

Forgery 1 

Indecent Exposure 1 

Larceny 13 
Leaving the Scene after Causing Property 

Damage 2 

Malicious Destruction 1 

Minor Transporting Alcohol 1 



No Inspection Sticker 13 

Non- support 3 

Operating Without a Valid License 8 

Operating so as to Endanger 20 

Operating a Motorcycle Without a License 6 

Operating an Unregistered Motorcycle 1 

Possession of a Harmful Drug 2 

Possession of a Narcotic Drug 22 

Red Light 13 

School Bus Violation 5 

Speeding 75 

Unlawful Sale of a Harmful Drug 2 

Unlawful Sale of a Narcotic Drug 18 

Violation of Traffic Rules and Regulations 10 



Juvenile Offenses 



Arson 1 

Breaking and Entering and Larceny 3 

Being Present Where a Narcotic Drug is Found 1 

Destruction of a Building 6 

Habitual School Offender 2 

Larceny 1 



Total Number of Accidents Covered 

by the Department 
Total Number of Fatal Accidents 



Possession of Marijuana 

Malicious Damage 

Shoplifting 

Stubborn Child 

Stolen Property - Receiving 

Violation of Probation 



Motor Vehicle Accident Report 
1970 1971 



320 



274 

4 



Total Number of Pedestrians Injured 
Total Number of Bicyclists Injured 



1970 

4 
7 



1971 



Miscellaneous Statistics 



Breaking and Entering and Larceny Reported 132 

Bicycles Registered 156 

iCars Checked by Patrol 409 

[Cruiser Responses to Acton Medical Center 13 

tCruiser Responses to Emerson Hospital 317 

i Firearms ID Registrations 117 

jHouse Checks for Vacationists 660 

I Metropolitan State Hospital Trips 12 

Motorists Assisted 76 

! Phone Calls 8,876 

iPistol Permits Issued 140 



Radio Calls 8,553 

Resuscitator Used 29 

Summonses Served 219 

Summonses Sent Out of Town for Service 129 

Street Lights Reported Out 19 

Telephone Wires Down 15 

Town Radio Calls 32 

Traffic Lights not Working 16 

Wires Down, Light 8 

Officers Time Spent in Court (hours) 964 



Personnel 

At present, our complement consists of the Chief, four Sergeants and thirteen Patrolmen. In 1971 we 
added three Patrolmen to our staff- -Officers Lawrence A. DuPont, Edward R. Brooks and Robert L. Parisi. 
These Officers have been doing. a good job. We are also in need of people in plain clothes to stem the tide of 
crime. 

Safety and Juvenile Officer 

It is 1972, the population is approximately sixteen thousand, and we still lack a permanent Safety and 
jJuvenile Officer. 

Prosecuting Officer 

Again, I want to thank Sergeant Scribner in his role as Prosecutor for taking many burdens off my 
shoulders. 



Training 

In 1971 we sent two Officers to the State Police Academy--Officers Lawrence A. DuPont and Edward R. 
Brooks. Both graduated with high honors. 



10 

Town Manager 

I am making special note in relation to our Town Manager, Robert Dotson, who is an asset to the Town 
and has made my job much easier due to his ability to handle personnel, etc. 

In closing, I would like to thank all the members of my Department who worked with me in carrying out 
the duties of the Police Department during the year, and to my Secretary, and all others who assisted in any 
way, I am grateful. 

Edward J. Collins, Jr. 
Chief of Police 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



In 1971 Walter Johnson was appointed Civil Defense Director, assuming the duties of John McLaughlin 
who served so well in this capacity for the past 13 years. 

An evaluation was made of existing facilities. The communications system was changed and updated to 
reflect a savings to the town. A tentative headquarters was established in the upper floor of the Tree Depart- 
ment building for office space, files and storage of equipment. 

The fallout shelter at the Julia McCarthy School was cleaned up and emergency rations were stocked in 
Woodlawn Chapel shelter. Three men attended a Shelter Management Course relating to operation of shelters 
and fallout protection. 

A tentative Natural Disaster Plan has been drafted which encompasses the functions of department heads, 
personnel and equipment in times of emergencies such as flooding, loss of electrical power, hurricanes and 
major conflagrations. 

Many Civil Defense activities were carried out by the Auxiliary Fire Department by relieving the Acton 
Fire Department on water problems and providing emergency lighting and crowd control. The Auxiliary re- 
sponded to brush fires and assisted at multiple alarms where needed. 

These men attended and participated in Acton Fire Department drills and assisted at stations during 
fires and cleanup operations. In addition, two men attended a Firefighting Course held at the Civil Defense 
Training Academy in Topsfield, and five men attended a course in Cardio- Pulmonary Resuscitation. 

Upon examination of present turnout gear by the Director, it is felt that the Auxiliary Firemen do not 
have adequate protective clothing to prevent the many types of injuries which can occur during the perfor- 
mance of their duties. 

In 1971, five pairs of boots and five coats were purchased as a start in properly equipping the men. 
Funds have been requested for additional boots and coats in 1972. 

Walter Johnson 
Director 



STREET LIGHT 



We now have over 600 street lights within the Town of Acton. 

Due to the long strike of Boston Edison, all street lights that were requested by the Committee were not 
installed. These and others will be installed this year. 

The Boston Edison informed the Committee of the high percentage of breakage in Acton compared to sur- 
rounding areas and requests all efforts be made to remedy this situation. 

In several instances, requests for street lights were not recommended by the Committee since the pro- 
posed location would aid only the petitioner and not materially affect the overall lighting of the Town. 



11 

We subscribe to the policy adopted with the formation of the Committee that new street lights, in most 
instances, will be installed only at street intersections, dangerous curves, fire alarm boxes and locations 
designated as hazardous by the Fire Chief, Police Chief, or this Committee. 

The Committee extends to the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen their sincere appreciation for 
their cooperation during the year 1971. 

Leslie F. Parke, Chairman 
Booth D. Jackson 
H. Stuart MacGregor 



INSPECTOR of WIRES 



Two hundred fifty-four permits were issued and fees collected were turned over to the Treasurer. 

Leslie F. Parke 



ENGINEERING 



During 1971 the Engineering Department offered its services to the many Town Committees, Commis- 
sions, and Boards which requested assistance. We continue to provide the day-to-day service for the general 
public seeking information pertaining to deeds, filed plans, zoning information, and other data available 
through this office. 

The Engineering Department became involved in many projects during 1971. The following is a partial 
list: 

Flood Plain Insurance : The Board of Selectmen requested that the Engineering Department obtain infor- 
mation which could allow the Town to be eligible for Flood Plain Insurance. The project included the gather- 
ing of information from the field, plotting this information on the Flood Plain maps. It has also required re- 
search into legislation, both State and Local which would control activity in such areas. We are now prepared 
to make application. 

Hayward Road Layout : Field work over many months, office calculations, plottings, hearings and Town 
Meeting acceptance completed the laying out of Hayward Road. This layout straightens the curves on Hayward 
Road near Arlington Street. The relocation of this portion of the roadway will be accomplished in 1972. 

The laying out of an existing roadway is very difficult. We have considered and achieved a balance so 
as not to adversely affect the abutting properties, except in cases where drastic changes were necessary. 
Bounds were set at points to delineate the new layout. 

Adams Street : With the construction of Adams Street completed, bounds were set to delineate the new 
layout. 

New D. P. W. Facility : The Department engineered the grading plan for the new building, designed and 
wrote specifications for the installation of gasoline and fuel tanks and the construction of a salt storage facility. 

Dunn-Edney-Commonwealth of Massachusetts Property : A complete survey of this property was made 
and a plan showing the parcels with accurate description was drawn. This was necessary prior to the purchase 
of these properties, which was authorized at the 1971 Annual Town Meeting. 

Forest Road-Taylor Road-Minot Avenue Layout : In conjunction with the survey process for the Dunn- 
Edney-Commonwealth of Massachusetts properties, we were able to obtain sufficient information to provide 
layouts for these streets. This will probably be done during 1972. 

Richardson's Crossing Layout : Layout and construction of this section of Central Street was accom- 
plished several years ago. This year we installed bounds to delineate the layout. 

Town Bounds : The Engineering Department assisted the Board of Selectmen in the review of Town 
Bounds. We also replaced the Maynard -Acton Town Bound on Conant Street. This bound had been removed 
many years ago. 



12 

Prospect Street : A smaLl amount of survey remained to establish a layout. This survey was accom- 
plished and a layout should be forthcoming during 1972. 

Street Numbering System : Over the past few years, discrepancies have been noted in our street num- 
bering system. We have updated the system so that we can now assign new street numbers without duplication. 

Woodlawn Cemetery : We have made a traverse and obtained sufficient detail to design a small extension 
to the cemetery. We started with this small area as an experiment as to our capability to perform this type 
of work. We are very pleased with the results. 

Traffic Counts : With the use of the traffic counter we have recorded traffic volume in several areas of 
the Town. 

During 1971 meetings were again held with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Public 
Works and Town Officials relative to the widening and reconstruction of Route 2. The Department of Public 
Works, after review of their plans, accepted one of the alternatives suggested by the Town Engineering De- 
partment and submitted by the Board of Selectmen. 

The Engineering Department reviewed plans for nine subdivisions during 1971 and made engineering 
comments and suggestions to the Planning Board. We also performed periodic inspections of subdivisions 
during the construction season. Subdivision Approval not Required plans were also reviewed and comments 
passed on to the Planning Board. I also submitted a draft revising the Subdivision Rules and Regulations. 
In turn, the draft was sent to their consultant for use in their revision. 

The Board of Assessors received its Atlas, revised and corrected to January 1, 1971. In conjunction 
with the revisions, the Board was supplied with information necessary for updating the street and parcel 
card file. Copies of all deeds for property transferred in 1970 were filed. Work has been started on revis- 
ing the Town Atlas through 1971. Additional help was given to the Board in solving various problems related 
to disputed land ownership and area. Sets and sheets of the Town Atlas, sold by the Assessors, were pre- 
pared and sent out for printing. 

In addition, the following routine work was done by this Department: maintaining and updating of Town 
Street, Zoning, Fire and Police Maps; issuance of Street Cut Permits, numbering 160 and inspection of these 
street cuts; supplying the general public with information about properties, roads, drainage and other related 
matters. 

During 1971, Mr. David Abbt and Mr. Richard Bailey continued their education at the Lowell Tech In- 
Service Training Program. Both have achieved excellent academic ratings. 

During 1971 we moved to our new facility on Forest Road. In my review of the past year and especially 
of the last six months, I ha.ve observed better morale of the employees and a discernible increase in efficiency 
and productivity. I think that the building will be an ongoing investment to the Town due to the above mentioned 
observations. 

I especially wish to extend my sincere thanks to every member of the Engineering Department, Highway 
Department and secretarial staff, who have unselfishly given 110% of their effort. 

Anthony L. Galeota, Jr. 
Town Engineer 



PLANNING BOARD 



The major responsibilities of the Planning Board are establishing and regulating the layout and construc- 
tion of ways in subdivisions, amending the zoning bylaws, and assisting the Selectmen in administering the 
site plan bylaw. In order to fulfill its duties, the Planning Board held 45 open meetings, five public hearings, 
made numerous inspection trips to proposed subdivisions and attended many Board of Appeal and Hatch Act 
hearings. In 1971 the Board approved three definitive subdivision plans and disapproved preliminary plans 
for six subdivisions. The Board also endorsed 68 so-called "subdivision not required" plans. These are 
plans showing subdivision of a tract of land into several lots in which all of the lots have the required frontage 
on existing ways and hence, are technically not subdivisions since no new roads are created. 

In 1971, the Board also reviewed 28 site plans for the Selectmen. This work involved reviewing the 
plans for parking, drainage, lighting, etc., of new sites in business and industrial zoned land. At the begin- 
ning of 1972, there are two site plan's yet to be reviewed for the Selectmen. 

The Planning Board sponsored eight articles to amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw at the three town 
meetings held in 1971. These zoning bylaw changes were mostly concerned with allowed uses in the various 



13 

districts. One change eliminated apartment buildings in the business zone while another restricted the type 
of restaurants allowed in the general business district. One change to the zoning map took place. A tract of 
land in the center of town was changed from R-l designation to'R-3 designation. 

In addition to its usual subdivision control and zoning amendment work, the Planning Board has under- 
taken activities related to town long-range planning. A town-wide survey questionnaire was prepared and dis- 
tributed in cooperation with the League of Women Voters. The results of this survey have been coded for ma- 
chine processing and will be available shortly. The Planning Board undertook this survey to determine what 
aspects of town growth were of most concern to the citizens and to obtain the feeling of how Acton should grow. 

The present rules and regulations on land use in the business zone are appropriate for large, undeveloped 
tracts of land and are less appropriate for our village centers. Therefore, the Planning Board has undertaken 
a study of West Acton Village. We expect the results of this study will be applicable in whole or in part to the 
other village centers in Acton. This study will be completed in 1972 and will result in proposed amendments 
to the zoning bylaw. 

The Planning Board is currently updating and recodifying its subdivision rules and regulations which 
control the development of subdivisions. We will complete this work early in 1972. 

The Planning Board recommended to the Board of Selectmen that they form an Historical District Study 
Commission to consider establishment of an Historical District. 

At the request of the Board of Selectmen, the Board drafted a new sign bylaw. The purpose of this pro- 
posed bylaw is to provide improved administration and aesthetic control of signs. 

Finally, the Planning Board has become concerned about the impact of new development on the Acton 
water supply. The Planning Board, in several situations, has hired a geologist to assess the situation. In 
one case, the geologist recommended a location and performance standards for a sewage treatment plant which 
the developer agreed to build for an apartment complex. 

In January 1971, Dr. George O. Gardner was appointed to fill a vacancy on the Board caused by the res- 
ignation of Mr. James M. Coull. On March 22, 1971, the Board was reorganized; Mr. Pasieka was elected 
Chairman and Mr. Gerhardt was elected Clerk. Mr. Chambers was reappointed to the Board. 

On February 16, 1971, the Planning Board voted to take no action as a result of its 81W hearing on the 
Minuteman Business and Industrial Park, and to approve and sign the plans and restrictive covenant developed 
as a result of the 81W hearing. 

This subdivision is a major element proposed development of North Acton by the Community Concepts 
Corporation. This particular piece represents the land on which the condominiums are to be placed. The 
Planning Board has previously approved this subdivision subject to receipt of a suitable covenant. Upon re- 
view, the Board found insufficient information available upon which a suitable covenant could be instrumented. 
Therefore, the Board voted affirmatively to hold a public hearing on its own motion to undertake an 81W action 
on the subdivision. A hearing date of February 16, 1971 was set. 

An 81W action refers to Article 81W of the State Subdivision Control Law (Chapter 40A of the General 
Laws of Massachusetts) before a Planning Board is chartered with the capability to rescind, modify or amend 
a prior approved subdivision as the result of a public hearing held on its own motion or petitioned. Such ac- 
tions are advisably taken since the subdivision owner has the right to properly sue the Town for damages al- 
legedly resulting from such actions. 

At the public hearing on January 4, 1971, the Planning Board set forth proposed covenant terms and con- 
ditions, and defined related data requirements which it judged as suitably assuring the health, safety and wel- 
fare of the Town and its present and future residents. The Board and the Community Concepts Corporation, 
working conjunctively, revised and/ or fulfilled these terms and conditions in the documents signed on Febru- 
ary 16, 1971. 

This covenant represented a landmark decision in local action control of land development. It contained 
26 articles on 9 pages covering definitive limits on intensity of development, provisions for recreational land, 
performance standards for sewage treatment facilities, protection of water and natural resources, as well as 
the more standard development and financial guarantees. This was the result of the combined efforts of many 
Town Boards, particularly the Selectmen, Board of Health, and Conservation Commission; supporting consul- 
tants, such as Town Counsel, Dr. D. W. Caldwell of Boston University, Soil Conservation Service of the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture, and the State Department of Public Health; as well as the developer, Com- 
munity Concepts Corporation. 

This was an action in which all involved may be well proud! 

John F. Pasieka, Chairman 
Robert H. Gerhardt, Clerk Eric D. Bradlee 

Edward A. Chambers George O. Gardner, III 



14 



HIGHWAY 



Chapter 81 - Maintenance : During the summer a number of streets were scraped, patched, swept, and 
then resurfaced with oil and stone. We used stone this year for the first time with a very satisfactory result. 
There were no complaints about dust, and the stone has made a much better wearing surface. The following 
roads were done: 



Orchard Drive 
Mohawk Drive 
Oneida. Road 
Algonquin Road 
Huron Road 
Cherokee Road 
Seneca Road 
Seminole Road 
Mohegan Road 
Quaboag Road 
Sioux Road 



Agawam Road 
Brucewood Road 
Ashwood Road 
Pinewood Road 
Emerson Drive 
Oakwood Road 
Beverly Road 
Doris Road 
Francine Road 
Kelley Road 
Nadine Road 



Durkee Road 
Flint Road 
Lothrop Road 
Spencer Road 
Tuttle Drive 
Conant Street 
Country Club Road 
Fairway Road 
Phalen Street 
Wood Lane 
Minot Avenue 



Forest Road 
Chadwick Street 
Thoreau Road 
Alcott Street 
Hawthorne Street 
Quarry Road 
Wheeler Lane 
Minuteman Road 
School Street 
Hosmer Street 



General Highway : All of the developments were swept as were most of the town roads. All the roads 
that were oiled were swept of the extra stone. Most of the roadsides were also mowed. 

The Town Hall yard received its final coat of hot top. The Engineering Department laid out the parking 
lot, and the parking spaces were striped. 

A bluestone walk was put in place at the Library from the front walk to the side entrance. 

A portion of Hosmer Street was scarified, reshaped with processed gravel, and drainage installed. A 
dry field stone wall was erected at #11. The road was also widened considerably, and that section from #2 to 
Concord Road was resurfaced with bituminous concrete. 

Berms were replaced where the plows had hit them during the winter. Berms were placed on Joseph 
Reed Lane and on a small section of downtown West Acton on #269 Central Street. A small section of sidewalk 
was installed on Elm Street in front of the school. 

This year one of our projects was moving from our old quarters on Hayward Road to our new Highway 
Building on Forest Road. All the grading and landscaping were worked in by the Department. 

Signs and Lines: All center lines were repainted and parking lots striped. Once again, the Lions Club 
has generously donated the green paint for the crosswalks of the town. Stolen, broken, and defaced signs were 
replaced. Wood beam guard rail was installed in the vicinity of 87 School Street. A great deal of guard rail 
was straightened and repainted. 

Care of Grounds : The grounds received the regular amount of fertilizer and care. 

Chapter 90 - Construction : The portion of Central Street starting at the Boxboro line had 15 structures 
raised and cemented. The binder and top course of Type I bituminous concrete were laid along with the berm. 
All driveway approaches were completed. All the shoulders were graded, loamed, and seeded to complete 
that section of Central Street. 

Chapter 90 - Maintenance : This year's allotment went to the repairing of Main Street from Acton Sup- 
ply to Route 2. A bituminous concrete berm and grass plot were installed in front of the Bowladrome. 

Sanitary Landfill : This area is rapidly being filled. This year containers were placed in the landfill for 
the collection of cans and assorted glass for recycling. Newspapers which are brought to the van should be 
tied securely in an effort to keep this area neat. 

Stickers for access to the Sanitary Landfill area have been available at the new D.P.W. Building since 
October 1st. No charge is made for Acton residents or individuals operating a business within the Town. As 
of December 31, 1971, 3250 residential stickers and 340 commercial stickers had been issued. 



drain. 



Drainage : A portion of Smart Road at the intersection of Marion Road received 150 feet of 6" perforated 



Six hundred feet of 6" perforated drain with stone was installed on Duggan Road from Willow Street. 
Duggan Road between Olde Lantern Road and Squirrel Hill Road received 380 feet of 6" perforated drain. The 
Department started to install 12" pipe on Duggan Road at Olde Lantern Road. Because of the large boulders 
in the road and gas leaks, we were forced to stop until spring. At that time we will finish this project and 
continue in the rear of the homes. 



15 



One catch basin and 220 feet of 12" pipe were installed on Nagog Hill Road at Main Street. Also on Na- 
gog Hill Road at Concord Road, three catch basins, 60 feet of 12-" pipe, and 275 feet of 6" sub-drains and stone 
were put in place. 

On Hosmer Street at Concord Road one catch basin and 250 feet of 12" pipe were installed. At the in- 
tersection of Newtown Road and Main Street, 175 feet of 12" pipe was put in. Three hundred feet of 6" sub- 
drain with stone was installed on Brucewood Road. On Oakwood Road 340 feet of 6" sub-drain with stone was 
installed. Two catch basins and 100 feet of 12" pipe were put in on Francine Road. During the spring, 1350 
catch basins and drop inlets were cleaned. 

The above projects were loamed and seeded where needed. 

New Equipment : The townspeople voted in March to buy us a much-needed pickup truck, a new snowplow, 
and a new two-way radio. At a special town meeting they voted to buy a used Mack platform dump truck. 

Snow : The salt and sand storage shed at the new Highway facility has worked out very well. It is very 
well lighted, and the ramp is a great help. We are cutting down on the amount of salt being used. At the An- 
nual Town Meeting in March, we hope the people will vote for a salt and sand blending machine which would 
blend the salt and sand more evenly. 

Snow fences were installed on Wetherbee Street, School Street, North Main Street, Summer Street, 
Piper Road, and Central Street. Snow markers were placed in the troublesome areas and also made avail- 
able to the townspeople as were sand and salt. 

I wish to say thank you to the men of my department and to Mrs. Helen Mudgett, our secretary, for 
their long devoted hours. My thanks to all the departments that helped us complete our projects during the 
year. 



Finally, thank you townspeople for giving us our new facility on Forest Road. 
to come and inspect our new quarters. 



I hope you will feel free 



Allen H. Nelson 
Superintendent 




New Highway Department Facility on Forest Road 



16 



BUILDING COMMITTEE 



During the year 1971, the Acton Permanent Building Committee worked on the following projects: 

1. Public Works Building : Construction was completed and the building was accepted as substan- 
tially complete in September. The contractor's retainage is being held until formal waivers 
of lien are received from all subcontractors. 

2. Luther B. Conant School : The building was accepted as substantially complete and school 
opened in September. The contractor has minor items to complete and the retainage is being 
held to cover these items. Funds remaining include a reserve fund representing the kitchen 
equipment, which was deleted. This will be held until the town otherwise directs the Com- 
mittee. 

3. Regional High School Addition : Construction started in August and a Regional School. Building 
Committee is administering the project for the Regional School Committee. 

Following is a breakdown of expenditures and budget allowances for all three projects. 

During the year, David Hurley resigned from the Committee and Eric Larson was appointed a member. 



Public Works Building 

Appropriation Art. 24 3-16-70 



$275, 000.00 



Expenditures to date: 

Architect - Fenton G. Keyes Assoc. 
Printing and advertising 

Construction contract - W. E. Gerald Construction Co. 
(including change orders 1 through 6) 

Outstanding bills: 

Contractor's retainage <5% of contract) 

Funds remaining 



Total 



$ 10,000.00 

942.49 

250, 130.00 



13, 164.00 

763. 51 

$275, 000. 00 



Luther B. Conant School 

Appropriations Art. 41 3-10-69 

Art. 1 10-20-69 

Art. 19 3-16-70 



Total 



$ 42,000.00 

50, 000.00 

1, 830, 000.00 

$1,922,000.00 



Expenditures to date: 

Architect - Earl R. Flansburgh & Assoc. 

Clerk of the works 

Survey, borings, testing, printing advertising 

Construction contract- John Tocci & Sons (including 

change orders 1 through 6) 
Equipment and furnishings 

Outstanding bills: 

Contractor's retainage 

Change orders yet to be negotiated (estimated) 

Equipment and furnishings (estimated) 

Funds remaining: 

Contingency 

Reserve fund (from kitchen equipment) 



; 101,675.65 
19, 842. 13 
12,990. 15 

1, 590, 769.75 

89,873.89 



34,229. 60 
6,000.00 
5,000.00 



11,618.83 
50, 000.00 



Total 



$1, 922,000.00 



17 



Regional High School Addition 

Appropriations Art. 8 
Art. 12 



9-28-70 
6-22-71 



School operating funds 



$ 200, 000. 00 

4,225, 000. 00 

20, 000.00 

395, 000.00 

2,000.00 

.$4,842, 000.00 



Budget expenditures to January 1, 1972 are shown in parenthesis: 

Architect - Perley F. Gilbert & Assoc. 

- Equipment and furnishings 
Clerk of the works 

Survey, borings, testing, printing advertising 
Construction contract - M. Spinelli & Sons (including 

change orders 1 and 2) 
Equipment and furnishings 
Contingency 



Totals 



5 232,000.00 

38, 000.00 

25, 000.00 

13, 000.00 

3, 946, 132.90 

480, 000.00 
107, 867. 10 

£4, 842, 000. 00 



($196, 642. 89) 

( (2,210.67) 
( 7,213.95) 
( 375, 702. 19) 



($581, 769. 70) 



Building Committee 

Thomas J. Regan, Jr., Chairman 
Wallace Everest Edward Morriil 

Eric Larson Donald Perkins 



Regional School Building Committee 
Reginald Brown H. G. March 



Raymond Grey 
Porter Jenks 
John Lyons 



Robert Pilsbury 
Walter Shaffer 
Donald Westcott 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 



Nineteen seventy-one was another busy year for the Building Department. Construction is well under 
way on Acton's first condominium units while shopping centers are in progress at three sites. 

As construction methods continue to improve, it has become vital that 1 attend building conferences and 
seminars in order to keep abreast. This I have done at various times throughout the year and have found these 
courses most helpful. 

As of July 15, 1971 all new single dwellings were required to be fully equipped with smoke and heat de- 
tection systems. Hopefully, this action of the Town Meeting will provide greater security for the residents of 
Acton. 

I also extend my thanks to all who did so much to help while I was absent from my office due to proLonged 
illness. 



A complete list of permits for the year 1971 is listed below: 



Area 



Residential: 



Single Dwellings 

Multi-Family Dwellings 

Additions, Repairs 

Garages 

Porches 

Swimming Pools 

Miscellaneous 

Commercial : Business Buildings 

Total 
Receipts : Fees for Building Permits 



Number of Permits 

136 (+ 1 renewal) 
11 (149 dwelling units) 
47 (+ 1 renewal) 
16 (+ 1 renewal) 
33 
23 
67 

16 
349 (+ 3 renewals) 



Estimated Cost 

$4, 109,360. 00 

1, 996, 160. 00 
121, 250. 00 

40, 125.00 
33,820. 00 
94, 294.00 
85, 310. 00 

2, 607, 100. 00 
$9,086, 419. 00 

$13,926. 00 



Kenneth E. Jewell 
Building Inspector 



BOARD of APPEALS 



The Acton Board of Appeals held 23 Public Hearings during the year 1971 on the following matters: 

Petitions for specific uses and exceptions: Petitions for earth removal: 

Granted 3; Denied 1; Withdrawn 1; Pending 1. Granted 4; Pending 1. 

Variances from requirements of the Protec- Flood Plain Zoning: 

tive Zoning Bylaw: Granted 1; Withdrawn 2; Pending 1. 

Granted 5; Continued 1; No Authority 1; Pending 2. 

John J. Bush, Jr., Chairman 
H. W. Flood, Clerk 
Edward G. Schwarm 



WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION 



For the year ending December 31, 1971, there were twelve (12) accidents reported from the following 
departments: 

School Department 

Acton-Boxborough Regional High School 4 

Acton Elementary - J-ulia L. McCarthy School 1 

Acton Elementary - Paul Gates School 2 

Highway Department 5 

Eight of the injured required medical attention, no loss of time. Two required medical and hospital at- 
tention, but no loss of time. Two required medical attention with loss of time; one of these still requires 
medical attention. 

Theron A. Lowden 

Workmen's Compensation Agent 



GOODNOW FUND 

For the year ending December 31, 1971 

INVESTMENTS 
Concord Co-operative Bank 

Concord Co-operative Bank 



Treasurer of the Acton Congregational Church 
Town of Acton for the perpetual care of the 
Goodnow Lot in Woodlawn Cemetery 





$3, 000. 00 


$3, 000.00 


RECEIPTS 








$165.00 


$165. 00 


EXPENDITURES 






. 


$145.00 


$145.00 




$20.00 


20.00 



$165.00 



Thelma L. Boatman, Tr. 
Clark C. McElvein 
James N. Gates 

Trustees 



19 

HEALTH 



Board of Health 

This year, your Director spent a great deal of time with the work of inspecting the construction of indi- 
vidual sanitary sewerage disposal systems. The administration of the Board of Health office and other vital 
public health programs is becoming increasingly important to the health and welfare of the general public of 
the Town of Acton. 

I wish to thank the Board of Health, Town officials, and all the Town Departments for their support. Sin- 
cere appreciation is extended to the Health Department staff, the physicians, and the citizens who have helped 
make our programs possible. 

The following report summarizes the services and activities of the Department for 1971. 

Bradford S. Leach, C.H.O. 
Director of Public Health 

Septic Tank Care 

All residents in the Town of Acton are reminded of their responsibility to maintain their septic tank and 
underground leaching area. 

A septic tank system will service a home satisfactorily only if it is properly located, designed, con- 
structed and adequately maintained. Even a good system which does not have proper care and attention may 
become a nuisance and a burdensome expense. 

Neglect of the septic tank is the most frequent cause of damage to the leaching systems. When the tank 
is not cleaned, solids build up until they are carried into the underground leaching pipe system, where they 
block the flow of the liquid into the soil. When this happens, the leaching system must be rebuilt or relocated 
--a costly undertaking. The precautions of periodic inspection and cleaning of the septic tank can prevent this 
needless expense and work by extending the life of the leaching systems. 

The frequency of cleaning depends on the size of the septic tank and the number of people it serves. 
When a garbage grinder is used, more frequent cleaning will be required. With ordinary use and care, a sep- /^"" 
tic tank usually requires cleaning every two years. The homeowner can make measurements and decide for 
himself when his tank needs cleaning. When the total depth of scums and solids exceeds one-half of the liquid 
depth of the tank, the tank should be cleaned. The accumulated solids are ordinarily pumped out by companies 
that make a business of cleaning septic tanks. Your local health department knows which local companies do 
this work satisfactorily. The solids removed should be buried or disposed of in a manner approved by your 
local health department to avoid obnoxious odors and health hazards. 

There are no chemicals, yeasts, bacteria, enzymes or other substances capable of eliminating or re- 
ducing the solids and scum in a septic tank so that periodic cleaning is unnecessary. Contrary to some beliefs, 
the addition of such products is not necessary for the proper functioning of a septic tank disposal system and 
can be harmful to the leaching field. 

Garbage Collection 

The Town of Acton maintains a municipal garbage collection and is based on a once-a-week collection. 
All garbage shall be stored in a place convenient for removal. Garbage collectors are not allowed to enter 
any building, breezeway, garage, etc., to pick up garbage. Rubbish must not be placed in with the garbage; 
garbage cans should be of adequate size and have tight lids. Paper bags, paper wrapping or other trash shall 
not be deposited with edible garbage. Paths and garbage pail areas must be free of ice and snow and paths 
sanded for safe footing. 

Sanitary Landfill 

The Town of Acton maintains a sanitary landfill for rubbish and trash disposal. It is located on Route 2 
just west of Hosmer Street, and is open six days a week from 8:00 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. and closed on Sundays 
and Holidays. (Check schedule posted at entrance for summer hours.) 

Mosquito Control Program 

Mosquito control consisted of one abate larvicide aerial application in April, and two malathion fogging 
applications for the control of adult mosquitoes during the summer. The exceptionally dry weather made it 
possible to decrease the number of malathion applications from the four that are usually required. 

A revised control program is contemplated, but is dependent upon a factual analysis of the problem and 
a qualified evaluation of the various methods of control. The results of such an investigation are expected to 
lead to the formulation of a control program to meet the specific needs of the Town of Acton. 



20 

Home Care Program 

The Acton Public Health Nursing Service is available to all residents of Acton. The Home Care Nursing 
Agency offers comprehensive nursing care to patients in their place of residence under the supervision of the 
patient's physician. The public health nurse carries out part-time nursing care of the sick, including teaching 
and supervision of that care and provision of other therapeutic services as indicated for the patient. 

The goals of the Home Care Nursing Agency are prevention of disease and promotion of health by in- 
creasing the capacity of patients, families, and the community to cope with problems of health and illness, by 
supporting efforts of other professional workers or agencies in control of disease, restoration and preserva- 
tion of health, by controlling and counteracting as much as possible physical and social environmental condi- 
tions that threaten health, and to plan and evaluate nursing practice to ensure quality professional health ser- 
vices to the community. 

The delivery of health care services has assumed increased importance as the agency attempts to ex- 
pand the scope of present health care programs and to add supportive services. 

Supportive services provided through contractual agreement with Emerson Hospital are physical therapy 
and social service. The Concord Family Service Association makes available the Homemaker Home Health 
Aide Program. The staff of the Acton Public Health Nursing Agency supervises the care given by the Home 
Health Aide in the patient's home. 

The physical therapist provides home care services through consultation and direct service to the pa- 
tient when prescribed by the physician. 

The social service department of the Emerson Hospital also provides part-time services to the patients 
of the Nursing Agency through assistance in placement of patients in nursing homes, financial assessment and 
in referral to other social agencies. 

The Home Health Aide Program provides personal care and related housekeeping services for the patient 
in the home. 

One of the problems encountered in 1971 was the decrease in reimbursement for maintenance care of 
patients by third party payees. This group of patients included the chronically ill and the elderly patients 
whose long-term care places considerable financial burden on the family. 

The Acton Public Health Nursing Agency exists as a part of the community in which it operates. The 
health programs evolve irt response to community health needs. Many of the Acton patients are in the middle 
and older age groups. Some changes affecting this group were: earlier hospital discharge of patients, allow- 
ing terminal patients to be at home, and through the use of supportive personnel as the physical therapist or 
home health aide, to extend the care given by the public health nurse. 

These are a few of the ways the Nursing Agency serves the community. We are looking forward to 
strengthening and expanding our services to meet the challenge of nursing in the community. 

The above services are available to all residents of Acton and are supported by town taxes under the 
Board of Health, third party payees such as Medicare, Medicaid, private insurance programs and individual 
fees. 

Day Care Services 

Day Care Centers in Acton are licensed by the Board of Health. They must comply with the Rules and 
Regulations demanded by the State. Each year they are inspected by the Building Inspector, Director, and 
Nurse of the Board of Health before a license is issued. 

School Immunization Clinics (given by the Board of Health for the year 1971) 

Tuberculin Screening (November) Mumps Immunization (May) 

Grades 1-4-7-9 972 Grades 1-6 137 

School volunteers and employees 163 Other 97 

1,135 234 

D. T. Booster (March) - Grade 9 375 

Communicable Diseases Reported for 1971 

Chicken Pox 15 Meningitis 

Animal Bites 12 Encephalitis 

Mumps 1 Tuberculosis 1 

German Measles 2 Salmonella 1 

Streptococcal Infections 6 Hepatitis 3 

Measles 



21 



Chapter III, Section 111 of the General Laws, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, requires that all communi- 
cable diseases must be reported to the Board of Health, 263-4736. 

Births: Premature - 6 



Preventive Bedside Nursing Program 

Parkinson's 

Anemia 

Maternal and Child Health 

Arthritis 

Cardio -Vascular Disease 

Cerebral Vascular Disease 

Cancer 

Multiple Sclerosis 

Diabetes 

Injuries 

Other 

Total 



41 

55 

132 

200 

479 

55 

30 

34 

27 

83 

322 



Under 28 days 
28 days to 1 year 
1 year to 4 years 
5 years to 19 years 

20 years 

21 years to 44 years 
45 years to 64 years 
65 years and over 



1,458 



Plus 
Total 



19 

28 

5 

31 

5 

119 

432 

779 



1,418 

40 not home 

1,458 



Total Individuals 

Total Visits 

Total Physical Therapy Visits - 

Consultations 
Total Social Worker Visits and/ or 

Consultations 



175 
1,458 



47 



Medicare Reimbursement $6,671.80 
All Others (Blue Cross, Patient 

Veterans, Welfare) 3,162.81 

Total for 1971 $9,834.61 



Inspections 



Food Handling Establishments 29 

School and Kindergartens (+ Public Schools) 9 

Swimming Pools 34 

Nursing Homes 2 



Permits and Licenses Issued 

Burial or Removal Permits 

Catering Permits 

Kindergarten and Nursery Schools 

Offal Transport 

Milk Store 

Milk Dealers 



72 

1 

9 

16 

18 

6 



Permits and Dealers 

Total Collected Misc. Items 
Plumbing Permits 
Gas Permits 
Sewerage Permits 

New - 180 

Repair or Alterations - 21 

Town Nurse Service 
Total for 1971 



915.70 
3,892.00 
2,261.50 
4,805.00 



$11,874.20 
9,834.61 

$21,708.81 



Donald R. Gilberti, Chairman 
Edwin Richter 
John Rowse, M.D. 

Board of Health Members 



ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 



The Trustees of the Elizabeth White Fund have signed requisitions to the Town Treasurer totaling $1,060.00. 



* Deceased - April 1971 



Hazel P. Vose 
Eleanor P. Wilson 
Helen B. Wood- 
Trustees 



22 



TOWN CLERK 



BIRTHS 

Births recorded 283 

Deaths recorded 118 

Marriages recorded 144 

IMPORTANT REQUEST 

Please notify the Town Clerk immediately of any error or omission in the following list of Births. 

Errors can be corrected only by sworn affidavit, as prescribed by the General Laws, and may cause yo 
inconvenience which can be avoided by prompt attention. 



Date 



Place 



BIRTHS REGISTERED IN 1971 
Name of Child 



Name of Parents 



Jan. 


1 


Concord 


Jan. 


1 


Concord 


Jan. 


4 


Concord 


Jan. 


9 


Lowell 


Jan. 


11 


Concord 


Jan. 


12 


Concord 


Jan. 


12 


Natick 


Jan. 


14 


Concord 


Jan. 


15 


Boston 


Jan. 


15 


Concord 


Jan. 


17 


Marlborough 


Jan. 


19 


Cambridge 


Jan. 


21 


Weymouth 


Jan. 


21 


Concord 


Jan. 


24 


Concord 


Jan. 


25 


Concord 


Jan. 


26 


Concord 


Jan. 


27 


Concord 


Jan. 


29 


Concord 


Jan. 


29 


Concord 


Jan. 


29 


Concord 


Jan. 


30 


Concord 


Feb. 


1 


Concord 


Feb. 


2 


Arlington 


Feb. 


4 


Boston 


Feb. 


4 


Waltham 


Feb. 


5 


Concord 


Feb. 


7 


Concord 


Feb. 


11 


Concord 


Feb. 


11 


Concord 


Feb. 


11 


Concord 


Feb. 


12 


Waltham 


Feb. 


15 


Boston 


Feb. 


16 


Marlborough 


Feb. 


19 


Boston 


Feb. 


20 


Concord 


Feb. 


20 


Concord 


Feb. 


21 


Concord 


Feb. 


21 


Concord 


Feb. 


22 


Acton 


Feb. 


24 


Concord 


Feb. 


26 


Concord 


Feb. 


27 


Concord 


Mar. 


1 


Concord 


Mar. 


1 


Boston 


Mar. 


2 


Concord 


Mar. 


2 


Boston 


Mar. 


2 


Concord 


Mar. 


2 


Boston 


Mar. 


4 


Concord 



Frederick, John Vandyke 
Briggs, Mark Richard 
Whynock, Kimberly 
Sullivan, Kathleen Marie 
Beaudoin, Ronald Patrick 
Murphy, Andrea Elizabeth 
Korengel, Karen Denise 
Cormier, Albert Gerard 
Donald, Elliott Judson 
Krebs, Justin Donald 
Geaslen, Adam Kendrick 
Licciardi, Michael Angelo, Jr. 
Polsonetti, Karen 
Gagne, Aimee Heath 
Christian, , Michelle Ann 
Hughes, Kara Elizabeth 
Day, Sheryl Ann 
Grallert, Sarah Ellen 
Barber, Kevin Atkins 
Bates, Sarah Blanchard 
Kane, Gregory Brian 
Dunlap, Amy Jeanne 

Antonucci, Cheryl Susan 
Palmer, Craig David 
Potter, Stephen Kavanagh 
Walline, Matthew Joseph 
Brown, Clay Sheppard 
McQuay, Tracey 
Hobson, Jarrod Robert 
Duren, Matthew Timothy 
Berger, Mark Kagen 
Bond, Pamela Jane 
Zarin, Donna Geanne 
Tuffin, John Barry 
Barnett, Deborah Ann 
Thornton, Mark Joseph 
Auger, Bruce Alan 
McBreen, Erin Murphy 
Kelley, Sean Christopher 
Willis, Alastair David Chartres 
Robinson, Kelly Jean 
Luosalo, Karen Elizabeth 
Blue, Lara Dawn 

Martin, Jennifer Shea 
Reed, Thomas Charles 
Nagy, Suzanne Michele 
Allan, Greg Eduard 
Saunders, Mark Francis 
Gilfeather, Robert Charles, III 
Hull, Sara Lynn 



Thomas G. and Joan K. VanDyke 
Richard F. and Iva M. Res 
Richard H. and Tere A. Harinstein 
Joseph E. and Genevieve E. Younie 
Robert P. and Julia G. Lynch 
David T. and Christine Barrie 
James C. and Sandra J. Wilkinson 
Gerard J. and Huberte M. LeBlanc 
James C. and Mary E. May 
Donald J. and Valerie E. West 
Gary C. and Mary J. Nolan 
Michael A. and Karen L. Kraus 
Robert R. and Patricia A. Coutts 
Kenneth W. and Kathleen A. Kelly 
Theodore T. and Leona G. Meunier 
John W. and Linda L. Munroe 
Harold E., Jr. and Katherine A. Barry 
Walter W. and Margot A. Graham 
John B. and Sindra J. Barnhard 
Myron B. and Jane C. Swanson 
Francis X. and Bernice A. Scaring 
John F., Ill and Jeanne E. Berard 

George J., Jr. and Sheila A. Fleury 
Craig D. and Beverly A. Celata 
David C. and Dianne S. Kavanagh 
James E., Sr. and Marjorie A. Caisse 
William M., Jr. and Margaret D. Brittle 
David D. and Kathleen Schmidt 
Robert E. and Sharon M. Ryerson 
Irving S. and Caroline V. Kangas 
Henry and Sybil L. Kagen 
Charles N. and Myrna G. Semple 
Bernard H. and Sharon A. Walker 
Wilson B. and Janice M. Goeke 
Thomas O. and Elizabeth C. Bunting 
John J. and Beverly J. Fowler 
Edward A. and Maureen Bell 
John E., Jr. and Arlene R. Murphy 
Paul Jr. and Pennie L. Bella 
David K. C. and Margaret E. Stillwell 
George W. and Judith A. Kelly 
Robert W. and Linda L. Christiansen 
Robert E. and Suzanne M. Shepard 

Peter D. and Sharon J. Polubinski 
Walter A. and Nancy L. Cochran 
Bela G. and Agatha M. Titz 
George G. and Elvira Schneider 
Francis S. and Eileen A. Hennessy 
Robert C, Jr. and Kathleen T. Silva 
Charles D. and Carol A. Pekar 



23 



Date 



Place 



Mar. 


4 


Concord 


Mar. 


7 


Waltham 


Mar. 


9 


Concord 


Mar. 


11 


Boston 


Mar. 


12 


Waltham 


Mar. 


13 


Concord 


Mar. 


13 


Concord 


Mar. 


16 


Boston 


Mar. 


18 


Concord 


Mar. 


19 


Concord 


Mar. 


24 


Concord 


Mar. 


24 


Boston 


Mar. 


25 


Shirley 


Mar. 


26 


Concord 


Mar. 


30 


Concord 


Mar. 


31 


Concord 


Apr. 


2 


Cambridge 


Apr. 


5 


Concord 


Apr. 


5 


Concord 


Apr. 


5 


Concord 


Apr. 


9 


Cambridge 


Apr. 


19 


Concord 


Apr. 


19 


Concord 


Apr. 


22 


Concord 


Apr. 


24 


Concord 


Apr. 


24 


Boston 


Apr. 


24 


Newton 


Apr. 


25 


Concord 


Apr. 


26 


Newton 


Apr. 


28 


Framingham 


Apr. 


30 


Concord 


May 


1 


Concord 


May- 


3 


Concord 


May 


5 


Maiden 


May 


5 


Concord 


May 


6 


Concord 


May 


7 


Concord 


May 


8 


Concord 


May 


8 


Concord 


May 


9 


Concord 


May 


9 


Concord 


May 


12 


Boston 


May 


13 


Cambridge 


May 


17 


Concord 


May 


19 


Concord 


May 


19 


Concord 


May 


24 


Concord 


May 


24 


Waltham 


May 


26 


Boston 


May 


26 


Concord 


May 


26 


Boston 


May 


27 


Winchester 


May 


27 


Concord 


May 


30 


Concord 


May 


30 


Concord 


May 


30 


Concord 


June 


2 


Concord 


June 


3 


Boston 


June 


3 


Concord 


June 


5 


Concord 


June 


6 


Newton 


June 


6 


Concord 


June 


7 


Concord 


June 


10 


Boston 


June 


12 


Chelsea 


June 


14 


Concord 


June 


15 


Concord 


June 


15 


Concord 



Name of Child 

Musgrove, Byron Todd 
Gollan, Jason William 
Kirkland, Nicole Elise 
Howe, Brooke Olmsted 
Brooks, Laura Ellen 
Blake, David Edward 
Semple, Jesse B. 
Winslow, Aiden Lassell 
Murphy, Kyle Jason 
Hitchcock, Anne Barrett 
Vaughan, Jill Tolman 
Larsen, Dana Britt 
Collins, Christine Anne 
Holway, Joanna Howland 
West, Katherine Elizabeth 
Burke, Thomas Francis, Jr. 

Mason, Wallace Robinson, III 
Sproul, Jennifer 
Heitman, Andrew David 
Rawson, Scott Matthew 
Urda, William, III 
Kennedy, Thomas Keith 
Galland, Sasha Ann 
Frost, Eric Philip 
Gilbert, Ralph William 
Hyman, Natasha Lynn 
Troup, Elizabeth Page 
Wang, Alicia Shoou-Yi 
Zabierek, Neil Roy 
Shurling, Wayne Michael 
Morison, David Clayton 

Scales, Sean Douglas 
Korteling, Matthew Robert 
Gagne, Robert Andre, Jr. 
Richesson, Carrie Hope 
Duncan, Julie Ann 
Petersen, Scott Benjamin 
Westphalen, Adam E. 
Totillo, Jeffrey David 
Bucknam, Kristen June 
Budiansky, Rachel Anne 
Constantine, Heather Ellen 
Brown, Brendon Edward Olufemi 
MacLeod, Susan Marie 
Manion, Jeremy James 
Boroski, Jo Ann 
Atterbury, Neil Richard 
Gilbert, Jeffrey Michael 
Kraus, Pamela Cheryl 
Chisholm, Anthony John 
Jagel, Jason Weir 
O'Brien, Michael Patrick 
Faulkner, Brian Jordan 
Campbell, Kirstie Lea 
Barnes, Deborah 
Englade, Alison Rima 

Bukowski, Robert John 
Hunscher, Karen Beth 
Millett, Laura Adams 
Tibbetts, Tiffany Anne 
Rodger, Douglas Phillips 
Pooler, David Howard 
Garrity, Wendy Suzanne 
Szafran, Jeffrey John 
Davis, Pamela Elizabeth 
Denneen, Matthew George 
McWilliams, Kevin Michael 
Kirby, Thomas Patrick 



Name of Parents 

Byron F. and Karen D. Sheets 
William F. and Gloria L. Bry 
James L. and Wendy L. Haas 
John P., Ill and Jill B. Olmsted 
Robert M. and Carol L. Kenney 
James L. and Janice R. Gemborys 
Eric A. and Paula J. Cavic 
John A. and Elizabeth A. Lassell 
George B. and Deborah A. Scott 
Frank L. and Elizabeth Joyce 
Laurence M. and Gail M. Tolman 
James L. and Marie P. Dresser 
James R. and Sharon A. McQuaig 
William C, III and Ellen T. Hay 
Joseph T. and Elizabeth A. Cohon 
Thomas F. and Markey Pullen 

Wallace R., Jr. and Mary E. Stanley 
David A. and Janice Graham 
Richard E. and Ann D. Reeves 
Thomas M. and Carol A. Bryson 
William, Jr. and Elaine Fedorchak 
Ernest S. and Elizabeth M. Beavis 
Peter M. and Sheila A. Edwards 
Clarence G. and Diana P. McKinstry 
Ralph H., Ill and Susan M. LaCount 
Morris I. and Rochelle S. Gerratt 
Kenneth F., Ill and Brenda P. Dill 
Chi-Chung and Theresa Y. Teng 
Roy J. and Mary A. Gorman 
Wayne M. and Margaret A. Lombardi 
John D. and Barbara J. Callahan 

Albert A. and Paula L. Cousineau 
Robert B. and Karyn F. Quebbeman 
Robert A. and Rita M. Thomas 
Maurice A. and Judith A. Herbert 
John R. and Francine L. Amaral 
Eric P. and Joan M. Brennan 
Paul C. and Carole A. Franzosa 
Frank A., Jr. and Marian T. Valade 
David W. and Junellen F. Fraser 
Gary P. and Judy Traugot 
Larry L. and Joan M. Kangas 
Edward W. and Nancy E. Sullivan 
Robert P. and Janet K. Priest 
Thomas J. and Nicola M. Hnatio 
John F. and Jonell A. Fritsch 
Gerald F. and Margaret J. Beeston 
Ira H. and Verna L. Massell 
Michael J. and Jane L. Frydman 
Paul J. and Susan F. Garnache 
John W. and Janina Mukerji 
Richard P. and Ann L. McNiff 
Larry R. and Mary A. Jordan 
Melvin L. and Shirley S. Kolks 
James C. and Ruth Vars 
Ronald C. and Regina D. Pocius 

Paul J. and Judith P. Wilcox 
William H. and Anne L. Weadon 
Robert E. and Carolyn J. Wiley 
Theodore R. and Carol A. Wojsznis 
Thomas P. and Carolyn D. Pfeiffer 
Lawrence J. and Sarah A. MacManus 
Michael N. and Judith B. Avia 
John H. and Rosemary Larkin 
Alfred W. and Marzell S. Cottingham 
George F., Jr. and Wendy R. McWilliam 
Eldon K. and Ruth I. Wolfe 
Maurice W., Jr. and Pauline J. Morin 



24 



Date 



PLace 



Name of Child 



Name of Parents 



June 


16 


Marlborouj 


June 


16 


Woburn 


June 


16 


Concord 


June 


16 


Concord 


June 


17 


Concord 


June 


18 


Concord 


June 


20 


Boston 


June 


20 


Concord 


June 


21 


Concord 


June 


21 


Concord 


June 


22 


Concord 


June 


22 


Concord 


June 


23 


Boston 


June 


23 


Chelsea 


June 


23 


Concord 


June 


24 


Concord 


June 


28 


Concord 


June 


28 


Concord 


June 


28 


Concord 


June 


29 


Concord. 


June 


29 


Concord 


July 


1 


Concord 


July 


3 


Acton 


July 


4 


Concord 


July 


5 


Concord 


July 


8 


Concord 


July 


8 


Concord 


July 


8 


Concord 


July 


9 


Boston 


July 


10 


Concord 


July 


11 


Boston 


July 


13 


Concord 


July 


14 


Newton 


July 


17 


Concord 


July 


19 


Concord 


July 


23 


Concord 


July 


24 


Concord 


July 


27 


Concord 


July 


28 


Concord 


July 


28 


Concord 


July 


31 


Concord 


Aug. 


3 


Concord 


Aug. 


3 


Woburn 


Aug. 


6 


Lowell 


Aug. 


7 


Concord 


Aug. 


10 


Concord 


Aug. 


10 


Newton 


Aug. 


12 


Concord 


Aug. 


13 


Natick 


Aug. 


15 


Concord 


Aug. 


19 


Concord 


Aug. 


20 


Cambridge 


Aug. 


20 


Concord 


Aug. 


24 


Concord 


Aug. 


24 


Concord 


Aug. 


24 


Concord 


Aug. 


26 


Concord 


Aug. 


28 


Concord 


Aug. 


29 


Cambridge 


Aug. 


30 


Concord 


Aug. 


31 


Concord 


Sept. 


1 


Newton 


Sept. 


3 


Concord 


Sept. 


5 


Concord 


Sept. 


6 


Concord 


Sept. 


6 


Newton 


Sept. 


6 


Concord 


Sept. 


6 


Concord 



Catton, Christopher Andrew 
MacNevin, Christopher John 
Craig, Robert Carlton, Jr. 
Howland, Jason Seymour 
Trinque, Jason Matthew 
McElman, Dennis George, Jr. 
Robinson, David Winfield 
Bean, Gregory Robert 
Chautin, Barbara Alison 
Scanlan, Liam Anthony 
Ammendolia, Anthony Joseph 
Rogers, Jennifer Lynn 
Kivimaki, Lara Emilia 
Shaughnessy, Linda Marie 
Socash, Diana Lee 
Campbell, Lynne Marie 
Howard, Jeffrey David 
Stott, Darby Ellen 
Shelley, Dawn Marie 
Talbot, Nicole Kenyatta 
Bing, Stephanie Taylor 

Galuhn, Anthony Patrick 
Murray, Peter Sherman 
Morehouse, Scott John 
Santos, Heather Jane 
Weber, Rachel Prudence 
Smith, Tammy Jean 
Brooks, Daniel John 
Caras, Jennifer Robin 
Brown, Sarah Virginia 
Minichiello, Paul Nicholas, Jr. 
Hammond, Melissa Louise 
Piccirillo, Lee Nicole 
Christensen, Karen Michele 
Dangelmayer, Lori Kay 
Demetrick, Joseph John 
Hicks, Kevin Brian 
Saganich, Leslie Marie 
Witt, Stacy Leigh 
Muldowney, Mark Matthew 
Saunders, Todd Vincent 

Osten, Timothy Charles 
Ballou, Kristin Lynn 
Malkowski, Peter Eric 
Wardwell, Douglas Steven 
Grinnell, Jennifer Johnson 
Holly, Michael Patrick 
Thompson, James Francis 
White, Brett Andrew 
■>. Rogers, Amy 

Lee, Kristen Alison 
Sher, Aaron Russell 
Boothby, Jonathan Leslie 
Mayall, Mark Andrew 
Argento, Thomas Joseph, III 
Mannion, Kristy Michele 
tAnestis, George Henry 
DeVivo, Andrew Frank 
Wallace, Christopher James 
Hess, Emily Martha 
Mitrano, Melissa 

Hodges, Catherine Eden 
Kubatko, Justin Edward 
Beers, Kimberley Christie 
Basham, Laura Beth 
James, Catherine Mary 
Blaisdell, Matthew Carlton 
Rosenthal, Michael Shawn 



Gordon P., Jr. and Janice A. Williams 

William A. and Joanne L. Campbell 

Robert C. and Judith I. Mitchell 

John S. and Jane H. Brigadier 

Richard B. and Denise E. Duval 

Dennis G. and Kathleen M. O'Brien 

Winfield F., Jr. and Victoria A. Shellenberg 

Robert G. and Joyce P. Lewis 

Michael D. and Terry J. Hausner 

James C. and Ann M. Finneran 

Dominic J. and Barbara A. Nelson 

John L. and Donna R. McCarthy 

Larry J. and Emilia Walter 

William J. and Paula M. Demers 

Richard R. and Mary D. Graid 

Douglas K. and Erlene J. Jarvi 

Donald L. and Barbara J. Gutt 

Jonathan and Patricia H. Burke 

Robert N. C. and Betty A. Berger 

Hugh J. and Janet K. McNamara 

Stephen R. and Barbara T. McClarin 

William E. and Laura F. Hasenyager 
Paul J. and Carol E. Burger 
Charles A. and Gertrude M. Hartmann 
Paul S. and Amber J. Hayward 
David C. and Mary V. Pasquantonio 
Carl D. and Imogene J. Young 
John D. and Lois A. Babcock 
Robert B. and Joyce V. Parsons 
Wilfred E., Ill and Karey B. Dudley 
Paul N. and Donna C. Barnhart 
Richard O. and Pamela L. Jordan 
Nicholas P. and Patricia L. Gray 
Frederick K. and Joanna Robinson 
Robert R. and Vicki K. Hill 
John, Jr. and Patricia A. Berend 
Kendall B. and Marjorie E. Lukas 
John P. and Mary E. Sexton 
Steven L. and Nancy J. Trebendis 
William J. and Marilyn S. Gornik 
Robert V. and Susan H. MacLeod 

Thomas E. and Patricia A. -Mahoney 
Richard, Jr. and Donna N. Cutter 
Peter C, Jr. and Charlene R. Nied 
Clayton E. and Susan L. Denisevich 
Kenneth L. and Donna M. Johnson 
George R. and Mary A. Priest 
John C. and Pauline F. Bourdeau 
Freddie E. and Patricia C. Novick 
Patrick R. and Andrea Rodday 
Richard D. and Judith A. Smith 
Lawrence D. and Stephanie B. Ellsworth 
Peter C. and Joyce A. Tremblay 
David A. and Marie J. Loughman 
Thomas J., Jr. and Helen F. Ey 
Joseph A. and Judith M. Vidito 
George J. and Doreen Teele 
Paul M. and Joyce D. Cottone 
Richard C. and Dalene L. Wright 
Frederick W. and Martha E. Bean 
Salvatore and Patricia A. Patterson 

Frederick J. and Sheila M. Hertslet 
Edward J., Jr. and Martha K. Rafetto 
Richard R. and Joan H. Fitzhugh 
William M. and Rhonda K. Clingenpeel 
David B. and Marianne N. Mezzanotte 
Timothy R. and Doris A. Butler 
Ronald H. and Patricia J. Merickel 



25 



Date 



Place 



13 


Concord 


13 


Concord 


14 


Concord 


15 


Concord 


19 


Concord 


19 


Concord 


20 


Concord 


21 


Concord 


22 


Stoneham 


22 


Concord 


23 


Lynn 


24 


Concord 


27 


Concord 


27 


Boston 


30 


Concord 


30 


Concord 


30 


Concord 


1 


Shirley 


1 


Concord 


1 


Concord 


2 


Boston 


3 


Boston 


6 


Concord 


10 


Natick 


12 


Concord 


12 


Concord 


16 


Boston 


20 


Cambridge 


22 


Cambridge 


22 


Concord 


23 


Concord 


25 


Newton 


25 


Concord 


28 


Concord 


1 


Boston 


1 


Concord 


2 


Concord 


2 


Concord 


2 


Concord 


4 


Concord 


4 


Concord 


8 


Concord 


8 


Boston 


10 


Waltham 


10 


Newton 


11 


Concord 


11 


Concord 


12 


Boston 


12 


Concord 


13 


Concord 


14 


Shirley 


14 


Concord 


15 


Cambridge 


15 


Boston 


15 


Concord 


16 


Concord 


19 


Concord 


19 


Cambridge 


22 


Boston 


22 


Concord 


23 


Concord 


24 


Cambridge 


24 


Cambridge 


25 


Boston 


27 


Concord 


29 


Concord 


30 


Boston 



Name of Child 

Huntley, Rebecca Ann 
Hynes, Kristen Renai 
Tupper, David Arthur, Jr. 
Jones, Jennifer Ellen 
Troupe, Karl Arthur 
Gaetano, Juliana Suzanne 
^ Lee, Arthur William 
Venditti, Erin Elizabeth 
Dolgin, Craig Steven 
Valiton, Serena 
Feeney, Theresa Mary 
White, James Patrick 
Owens, James Matthew 
Ryan, Jason Anthony 
Bean, David James 
Bilafer, Kevin Michael 
Burton, Tara Jane 

Parks, Jonathan Christopher 
Aldrich, Linda Lisseth 
Herlihy, David Matthew 
Bacon, Victoria Catherine 
Kennedy, Thomas Sean 
O'Neil, James Michael 
Giordano, Julie Ann 
Owens, Michael William 
Christian, Shirley ArLene 
Kleinberg, Jon Michael 
Pfischner, Robert John 
Callahan, Robert Scott 
Merrill, Mary Macaulay 
Grant, Alvah Russell 
Parello, Kristin Jon 
Kranak, Patricia Maria 
Donovan, Brian Michael 

Newton, Christian Hudson 
Nichols, Dana Gerard 
Chapman, Claire Monique 
Millen, Heidi Marie 
Specht, Shawn Donald 
DiMack, Christine Marie 
Friis, Andrew Mogens 
Flagg, Brenden Alden 
Kuosmanen, Lisa Joanna 
Scott, Kristine Marie 
Goranson, Scott David 
Durkee, Elizabeth Agnes 
Dubois, Jeremy Harmon 
Bushnell, Heather Davis 
Sauve, Virginia Brady 
O'Hara, Michael Joseph 
Reinsprecht, Heather 
Sisco, James Arthur, III 
Freeman, Sharon Renee 
Elmuts, Erika 

MacGovern, Stephen Anderson 
Louder, Gregory Bates 
Carson, Michael Douglas 
Bruce, Robert Douglas, Jr. 
Morgan, Susan Eileen 
McDonald, Anne Heather 
Shedd, Diana Meyer 
Reck, Jennifer Elizabeth 
Molloy, John Joseph, Jr. 
Levin, Jennifer Anne 
Panetta, Kimberly Christine 
Arnold, Tracy Romaine 
Gould, Jonathan Bruce 



Name of Parents 

Edmund M. and Nancy K. Strate 
Robert A. and Mary E. Thompson 
David A. and Patricia A. Engebretson 
Robert W. and Janet M. McMullen 
Carleton N. and Linda A. Armstrong 
Leonard F. and Suzanne E. Kenney 
David A. and Susan E. North 
Anthony F. and Jane E. Lee 
Richard T. and Julia E. Supranovicz 
Richard R. and Rosemary Kalich 
Joseph F. and Kathleen M. Nash 
Edward W. and Ann K. Kane 
James M. and Sue A. Kelliher 
William J., Jr. and Ellen M. Wedgeworth 
Charles W. and Julia Y. Battite 
Paul J. and Patricia M. Ryan 
Peter W. and Valerie H. Hurst 

Lawrence E . and Loanne M. Muise 

Douglas M. and Mirtha E. Espinoza 

Paul A. and Judith A. Dee 

Robert W. and Nancy C. Warrington 

David G. and Judith R. Ashe 

James F. and Michele M. Green 

Louis A. and Maywood M. Nisbet 

Billy E. and Karen A. Jones 

Joseph W., Jr. and Catherine A. Deimling 

Eugene M. and Evelyn K. Galland 

Frederick L., Jr. and Charlotte A. Urbanavage 

Robert L. and Deborah J. Milton 

Alan M. and Mary J. Firth 

James L. and Alice I. Stronach 

Ronald R. and Noella M. LeBlanc 

John P. and Myriam H. Gaitan 

Francis and Florence K. Pendleton 

Edmund H. and Betsyan White 
David G. and Mary E. Byrne 
Wilson K. and Lucille J. Bail 
Bruce E. and Deborah J. Aiton 
Richard K. and Barbara L. Howell 
John J. and Linda J. Mains 
Mogens W. and Elizabeth R. de Castro 
Peter H. and Wendie Whitcomb 
Vesa M. and Miriam J. Koski 
Deven L. and Judith A. Langowski 
David A. and Jeanne M. Costello 
Peter B. and Brenda A. Martens 
John L. and Michelle Y. Bale 
Henry D., II and Patricia M. Gray 
Andrew J. and Linda A. Jamison 
Charles F. and Carol A. Gulczynski 
Rudolph and Margaret H. Randall 
James A., Jr. and Elizabeth J. Fullonton 
Ronald A . and Carol A. Glass 
Gunars and Margareta Stromanis 
Alan J. and Elizabeth C. Tweedy 
Harold W. and Deborah S. Smith 
William C, III and Trudi J. Davis 
Robert D. and Lydia M. Meynig 
Richard T. and Eileen A. Bumbly 
Allan R. and Judith A. Morrison 
Walter M. and Eileen M. Shaffery 
Robert H. and Virginia A. Perry 
John J. and Linda D. Dankese 
Harold J. and Myrna Kachinsky 
Salvatore, Jr. and Jean V. Dee 
John W. and Lillian R. Blackwell 
Bruce A. and Holly B. Nickerson 



26 



Date 



Place 



Name of Child 



Name of Parents 



Dec. 


1 


Concord 


Dec. 


3 


Cambridge 


Dec. 


5 


Concord 


Dec. 


5 


Boston 


Dec. 


9 


Boston 


Dec. 


10 


Concord 


Dec. 


10 


Concord 


Dec. 


13 


Concord 


Dec. 


13 


Concord 


Dec. 


15 


Concord 


Dec. 


17 


Boston 


Dec. 


18 


Concord 


Dec. 


20 


Concord 


Dec. 


20 


Concord 


Dec. 


22 


Concord 


Dec. 


26 


Concord 


Dec. 


26 


Concord 


Dec. 


26 


Concord 


Dec. 


28 


Concord 


Dec. 


28 


Concord 


Dec. 


28 


Concord 


Dec. 


28 


Boston 


Dec. 


29 


Concord 


Dec. 


29 


Concord 


Dec. 


30 


Concord 


Dec. 


30 


Winchester 


Dec. 


31 


Concord 


Dec. 


31 


Concord 



Courtright, Michael David 

McSweeney, Keeffe David 

Oliver, Christine Ellen 

Harrington, Jennifer Rita 

Fletcher, Alan Daland 

Fisher, Carolyn Penelope 

Vilela, Stephen Alberto 

Page, Rebecca Ballou 

Landau, Jeanne Marie 

Falco, Elizabeth Anne 

Harrington, Ryan John 

Swick, John Thomas 

Stover, Thomas Scott 

Braman, Matthew Royce 

Buchalter, Deborah Lynn 

Srivastava, Sanjay 

Bacon, Jeanne Ellen 

Backus, David Kenneth 

Baumeister, Jason Francis 
-i Burlingame, Ellen Elizabeth 
^Thatcher, Victoria Kristin 

Bigelow, Alicia Catherine Saunders 

VanValkenburg, Lisa Marie 

Nutter, Scott Robert 

Babcock, Robert Edward 

Campbell, Karen Elizabeth 

Bradlee, Matthew James 

Landry, Wayne Alan 



David J. and Nancy J. Bernier 
David P. and Nora M. O'Keeffe 
Donald S. and Elizabeth A. McCullough 
Michael P. and Virginia King 
Alan W. and Nancy Oldford 
Charles P., Jr. and Kathleen P. O'Brien 
Anthony L. and Elizabeth C. Gillbert 
Robert E. and Barbara B. Heiligmann 
Robert W. and Mary A. Willard 
Vincent and Wendy E. Feldman 
John J. and Lorraine A. Miller 
Thomas J. and Julia A. Ciprotti 
Frank T., Ill and Nola A. Martin 
Walter R. and Ann M. Morgan 
Bernard J. and Carole A. Muller 
Sushanta and Sunita Sinha 
Clyde J. and Catherine E. Reynolds 
Gail H. and Marjorie A. Richards 
Harry F. and Constance B. Labbe 
Andrew F. and Mary L. Hunt 
Robert M. and Ruth A. Harris 
Louis K., Jr. and Helen P. Saunders 
Earle P. and Sandra J. Cain 
William R., Jr. and Carol A. Dee 
William R. and Sue L. Porter 
Thomas E., Ill and Sally A. Kimball 
William J. and Margaret L. Graham 
Charles J. and Carole L. Croft 



DOG LICENSES 



ALL DOG LICENSES EXPIRE MARCH 31, 1972. 
DOGS MUST BE LICENSED ON OR BEFORE 
APRIL 1ST OR THE OWNERS OR KEEPERS 
THEREOF ARE LIABLE TO A FINE. THE LAW 
APPLIES TO ALL DOGS THREE MONTHS OLD 
OR OVER, REGARDLESS OF TIME OF YEAR 
OWNERSHIP IS ACQUIRED. NO TAX BILLS ARE 
SENT TO OWNERS OF DOGS. 

REPORT OF DOG LICENSES 
ISSUED IN 1971 



8 Licenses 


@ 
@ 
@ 
@ 
@ 
@ 
@ 
Tags @ 

reasurer 


$ 2. 00 


$ 16. 00 


3 Licenses 


5. 00 


15.00 


1251 Licenses 


3. 00 


3, 753. 00 


176 Licenses 


6.00 


1, 056. 00 


7 Licenses 


10. 00 


70. 00 


4 Licenses 


25.00 


100. 00 


2 Licenses 


50. 00 


100. 00 


56 Duplicate 
Paid to Town T 


.25 


14. 00 




$5, 124.00 



27 

TOWN FOREST 



This year the boundaries of both Town Forests were cleared of brush. The corner bounds and line trees 
r ere marked with orange paint. Trees were removed where they had fallen across access roads and fire lanes. 

A number of groups and individuals are using these areas for hiking and other recreational uses. The 
lurkee lot has now been in Town ownership for 45 years and the Texas lot for 25. 

Franklin H. Charter Emery Nelson 

George E. Neagle 

Town Forest Committee 



TREE WARDEN 



The Tree Department planted 125 new trees this year. Most of these were planted off the town right of 
r ay on private property. 

We continue to remove dying and dangerous trees along the town ways. Most of these are declining be- 
ause of street widening, sidewalks and rock salt. 

Pruning of dead and dangerous limbs was also done on several streets. 

Franklin H. Charter 



INSECT PEST CONTROL 



The control of Dutch Elm disease continues to be the largest activity of this Department. Approximately 
10 Elms are removed each year with this disease. 

The Oak Skeletonizer was again serious in some sections of the town. The State Entomologist predicts 
hat 1971 will be the last year this pest will be of much consequence. 

The Gypsy Moth continues to build up as it has for about 10 years. Egg clusters have been observed in 
nost sections of the town. 

Franklin H. Charter 
Superintendent 



DOG OFFICER 



Vly records show that in 1971: 

1. 1425 dog licenses were issued (65 more than in 1970). 500 reminder cards were sent out. 

2. 29 dogs were picked up, of which 10 were claimed by their owners, 3 were destroyed, and 16 
were placed in homes. 

3. 124 dogs were reported lost and 37 reported found. 

4. 23 dog bites were investigated. 

5. 69 complaints of various kinds were investigated, and most of the problems solved to the satis- 
faction of those concerned. 

Patrick Palmer 



28 

SEWERAGE STUDY 



Several significant events have occurred during the past year which will have a profound effect on the 
direction of Acton's water pollution abatement program and on the division of costs associated with required 
facilities. 

The Clean Waters Act of 1965, the Federal Law governing the implementation and funding of water pol- 
lution abatement programs, expired on June 30, 1971. In the interim, Congress has voted several short-tern- 
extensions but, as yet, has not formulated a replacement public law. A Senate bill, drafted primarily by 
Senator Edmund Muskie, was passed unanimously by the Senate in November. However, the House Public 
Works Committee and the Executive Branch both objected to several features of the Bill. Consequently, the 
new law is presently stalled in a joint committee review. Indications are, however, that the water pollution 
abatement program will be funded with $14 billion to $27 billion over the next four years. This is a signifi- 
cant increase over the $3. 5 billion authorized by the Clean Waters Act of 1965. Additionally, Federal grant 
participation may be increased to 75 percent, or 20 percent above present levels. Most significant of the 
possible changes, however, is that the Senate bill now provides that sewage collection systems be eligible 
for Federal funding at the same level as treatment facilities and interceptors. Should such financing and 
funding procedures survive the joint committee review, the financial participation required of Acton could 
change considerably. 

Recently, the Massachusetts Water Resources Commission, Division of Water Pollution Control, 
completed their sanitary analyses of the Assabet River of which Fort Pond Brook and Nashoba Brook are 
tributary streams. The Report is addressed to defining the quality of all tributary water courses and to 
identifying pollutional sources. Recommendations for corrective action have not been formulated. The SSC 
has requested copies of this Report for review and evaluation. 

As outlined in our last Annual Report, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council is concurrently formu- 
lating recommendations for the implementation of regional water pollution abatement programs. Two 
alternatives have been proposed for Acton, one encompassing a regional area of Concord, Acton, Littleton, 
Wayland and Sudbury and the other encompassing Concord, Acton and Littleton. In both instances the recom- 
mendations provide for either secondary or advanced waste-water treatment facilities in Concord. The SSC 
reviewed an early draft of the MAPC Report and suggested that alternative procedures for formulating and 
administering regional organizations be included in the final documents. The committee has also requested 
copies of the Report for review and evaluation. The final documents are now expected in mid-1972. 

A Federal directive issued in 1971 now requires the Division of Water Pollution Control to formulate 
River Basin Water Pollution Abatement Programs. Such Basin Plans are intended to coordinate and define 
the future efforts of all programs throughout the Commonwealth and to serve as the basis for both Federal 
and State construction grants. It is the intent of the Division now to meld their study of the Assabet River 
and the MAPC's Regional Report into one comprehensive River Basin Plan. Once the Basin Plans have been 
resolved, firm implementation directives will be issued to individual communities as subsequently deemed 
necessary by the Division. Presumably, Acton will receive such a directive. The SSC intends to maintain 
close liaison with the Division during the formulation of the Basin Plans. 

The SSC remains convinced that a comprehensive water pollution abatement program will be required 
of Acton. When such a program will require implementation, however, still is rather obscure. In the 
interim we will continue monitoring all local, regional, State and Federal activities and participating in 
reviews and discussions as required. 

Until Acton's water pollution abatement program is realized, however, it is imperative that all indi- 
vidual sewerage systems be maintained properly. Booklets addressed to the installation, operation and 
maintenance of septic tanks and leaching systems are available, free of charge, from the Board of Health. 
Do yourself a good deed -- obtain a booklet and follow the recommendations outlined therein. 

Bradford S. Leach David A. Manahan 

Warren S. Orcutt Daniel J. Costello 



SEALER of WEIGHTS 



Total number of devices inspected - 210; condemned - 2; adjusted - 1; sealed - 207. 
Sealing fees collected and paid to Town Treasurer - $366. 00. 

George K. Hayward 



29 



SCHOOL REPORT 



ACTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND ACTON-BOXBOROUGH REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



ORGANIZATION 



Acton School Committee 

Term Expires 

Edith D. Stowell, Chairman 1973 

Beverly W. Lydiard, Secretary ..... 1972 

Robert Evans 1974 

-John A. Norris 1972 

Donald E. Westcott 1973 

Robert Pilsbury 1974 



Acton-Boxborough Regional District School Committee 

Term Expires 

James L. Donovan, Chairman 1973 

Donald E. Westcott, Vice Chairman . . . 1973 

Beverly W. Lydiard 1972 

John A. Norris 1972 

Edith D. Stowell 1973 

Reginald Brown 1974 

John Steele 1972 

Robert Evans 1974 

Robert Pilsbury 1974 



The Acton School Committee holds regular meetings on the third Monday of each month and the Regional 
School Committee meets regularly on the second and fourth Mondays. Both groups convene at the Acton- 
Boxborough Regional Junior High School Music Room at 7:30 P.M. 

Telephone 

Superintendent of Schools, Dr. Norman D. Brust 263-9503 

Assistant Superintendent, Alan M. White 263-9503 

Administrative Assistants, Priscilla Felt 263-9503 

Beatrice Perkins 263-9503 

Principals: Conant School, Alice F. Hayes 263-7407 

Douglas School, Robert C. Conroy 263-2753 

Gates School, James Palavras 263-9162 

Merriam School, William Sparks ,263-2581 

McCarthy-Towne Schools, Parker Damon 263-4982 

Acton-Boxborough Junior High School, Arthur J. Hayes 263-7716 

Henry J. Wall, Vice-Principal 263-7716 

Acton-Boxborough Senior High School, Raymond J. Grey 263-7738 

Donald A. MacLeod, Vice-Principal 263-7738 

Lawrence McNulty, Vice Principal ...... 263-7738 

Director of Guidance, Ruth R. Proctor 263-2492 

Head Counselor, William J. Petkewich 263-7718 

Director of Music, Henry W. Wegiel 263-7738 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 1972-1973 



Reopening of All Schools 
Winter Recess 
Good Friday 
Spring Recess 
Memorial Day 
Graduation 
Close of School 
Summer Recess 
Teachers' Meetings 
Reopening of All Schools 
Columbus Day 



January 3, 1972 
February 21-25 
March 31 
April 17-21 
May 29 
June 9 
June 22 



September 5, 
September 6 
October 9 



1972 



Teachers' Convention 
Veteran's Day 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Christmas Holiday 
Reopening of All Schools 
Winter Vacation 
Good Friday 
Spring Vacation 
Memorial Day 
Graduation 
Close of Schools 



October 18 

October 23 

Noon - Nov. 22, 23, 24 

Noon - Dec. 22-Jan. 1 

January 2, 1973 

February 19-23 

April 20 

April 16-20 

May 28 

June 8 

June 21 



NO SCHOOL SIGNAL 



1-1-1-1 
2-2-2-2 



7:15 A.M. 
7:00 A.M. 



No School Acton Public Schools, Grades K-6 
No School All Schools All Day 



Announcements aired on WBZ - 1030 mc. and WHDH - 850 mc. , starting at 7:00 A. M. 



30 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

In the short time I have been in Acton as your Superintendent, I have learned a great deal about the Acton 
and Acton-Boxborough Regional Schools, fully realizing that there is much more to be learned. 

Acton is a community that has seen rapid growth in the past eight years and with this growth has come 
many demands and problems. High on the list of priorities and problems has been the education of your chil- 
dren. Education in recent years has become a complex matter at best and a town such as Acton, with all of 
its growing pains and change from semi-rural to sophisticated suburban, has often found the process painful. 
One of the exciting things about the town is its diversity of opinion on education. If we can pool our ideas and 
exchange opinions in a meaningful way, we can't help but have successful schools. Acton and its sister town 
of Boxborough have consistently shown a positive attitude in trying to promote the best in education in line with 
sound fiscal policies. 

Generally, I think there are four basic concerns to any taxpayer in a year-end report from the schools. 
They are: 

1. What kind of education are we now providing--does it meet the needs of the community? 
Where will the future take us? 

2. What are the costs of this education and what will the increases be? 

3. How will the future growth of the town or towns affect our building program? 

4. What are our costs for upkeep and repair of the physical plants? What are our costs for 
lunches, transportation and janitorial services? 

The past year has seen many changes. We opened the Conant School and began a 4.5 million dollar con- 
struction on the addition to the Junior High. The so-called Pilot School, better known as the McCarthy -Towne 
School, became a reality and making allowances for minor problems attendant with any new venture, we are 
pleased that this school is meeting the needs of its students in a satisfactory manner. We have seen changes 
in the structuring of the Junior High. We have initiated a volunteer system that is both popular and allows for 
greater flexibility as well as providing many services at no cost to the town. 

During this past year, we have opened classes for the emotionally disturbed children both in Boxborough 
and Acton on a regional basis. We acquired Title 6 funding enabling us to start programs for the learning dis- 
abled student at the secondary level and we have an agreement with Sudbury to send some of our students in 
the Retarded Classes to that town, giving these students broader opportunities for development of their potential, 

In March, the town voted to become part of the Minuteman Vocational Technical Region. Within five 
years this will have a great significance not only on the total school population at secondary level but also in 
terms of more opportunities for the vocationally or technically oriented student, as well as many of the handi- 
capped. We have also expanded use of the Community Advisory Committee. These committees provide in- 
valuable assistance to both the staff and the school committee in terms of research and future goals. 

The biggest problem caused by Acton's fast growth as I see it, is that while we have provided for the 
ever-increasing number of youngsters in the schools in terms of space, we have sacrificed in the area of co- 
ordination and sequence from one level to the next. Our programs lack clearly defined goals, objectives and 
standards. There is little continuity of objectives from primary through to secondary grades. I feel that we 
must establish these goals in order to evaluate not only the performance of the student but the effectiveness of 
our teachers and our programs. 

We have in the past had long-range studies that have not been fully utilized and kept current. This year 
the school committee has provided for an Administrative Assistant who will update and correlate past studies 
and mesh them with newer studies from other town departments as well as the schools', so that we will begin 
to have an on-going evaluation. The 1972 budget has been set up on a program as well as the usual line-item 
basis to assist us in this area. You will note that a sum of money has been placed in each budget in the areas 
of Evaluation Research and Development. We feel that this is a must if we are to bring about change in a de- 
liberate, systematic manner. Ideally, we need a master long-range plan for the total community that would 
involve the schools along with the various town agencies. 

The cost of quality education, unhappily, is never cheap. We have had an increase, not considering 
debt service, of about 18.7% at the local level and 12.9% at the Regional level. There will be a need for a sub- 
stantial increase in operating costs at the High School level when the new building opens in 1973. On the plus 
side, we have had a decrease in number of students per class over last year. At the primary level, we now 
have approximately 27 children per class and at the secondary, about 24 per class. As the economic climate 
becomes more positive, I would assume the student population will begin to increase at a more rapid rate. 
Because of lack of space at the High School, the freshman class is on a staggered basis from the rest of the 
student body. This has been a boon to the late sleepers, if not their parents. This condition will cease when 
the new school opens. 

There are two other factors that I think are of prime importance. One is the state mandate that all 
schools shall have public Kindergarten by September of 1973, which will cause considerable increase in edu- 
cational expenditures. The other is that Boxborough appears to be entering into a period of rapid growth that 



31 



could cause considerable impact in our Regional student population. This is a probability that must be faced 
and only points up the increased need for greater coordination between both the towns and their respective 
agencies. 

Since at least four of the schools in Acton are quite new and in relatively good repair, they have not re- 
quired much in the way of repairs and maintenance. However, this portion of the school budget will need to 
be funded relatively higher than it has in the past. 

The cost of transportation for our students is down and credit for this must go to Alan White who initi- 
ated the program. Acton .was the first town in New England to use computerized bus service. The estimated 
savings since the program has been in effect are the cost of two buses. Incidentally, the State has asked 
Acton for our guidelines in setting up this program for use by other towns throughout the state. 

For a number of years, our custodians have been poorly paid. We are now in the process of bringing 
their salaries into line with other similar town personnel. We are also striving for greater cleanliness in the 
buildings; however, this takes the full cooperation and appropriate attitudes from all students and staff mem- 
bers. 

Our lunch program has had several problems this past year, with numerous complaints from both types 
of systems. Our aim is to provide the students with attractive, nutritious food at the lowest possible cost. 
We have been on a cooperative program with Concord, using their central kitchen facilities. After a brief 
hiatus, we have resumed this program, hopefully with better quality food and at a lower cost than our own 
kitchens could manage. We are looking for increased efficiency and variety in the rest of our lunch program. 
In the elementary schools that are not on the central kitchen, the program is considerably in the red. It is 
certainly not our aim to make a profit, but we hope to find ways of breaking even in this area. At the Secon- 
dary level, the High School lunch program is running in the black, while the Junior High shows a minor deficit. 

In the area of Legislation, Chapter 1010 has provided welcome relief for the town on interest charges on 
our Bond issue for the new high school. The new legislation provides 65% reimbursement. Of added interest 
or concern are the recent State Supreme Court decisions in several states, notably California and New Jersey, 
regarding the use of property taxes to finance education. This may have a great impact on the funding of edu- 
cation in the near future. 



It is certainly appropriate at this point to mention that recently Acton saw the retirement of William 
O'Connell as Superintendent of Schools. Mr. O'Connell did a remarkable job for both Acton and Boxborough 
in the time he served the towns. Following in his footsteps will certainly be a difficult task. Thanks also go 
to Parker Harrison, Jr. and Harry Morse who served on the school committee for nine and four years re- 
spectively. The town owes a great deal to all three of these gentlemen. 

I would also like to express appreciation to both the Finance Committee and the Building Committee. 
The Finance Committee members, chaired by Arthur Schene, have been invaluable in their expert knowledge 
and assistance. The Building Committee, under the able leadership of Tom Regan, did a superb job in over- 
seeing the construction of the Conant School and particularly in presenting a thorough, concise report to the 
town on the Junior High School addition which is presently under construction. Without this kind of assistance, 
we could not have made the progress we have. 

A special note of thanks goes to the school commit- 
tees who work long hours to serve a community of diverse 
ideologies. They have shown a great capacity for hard 
work and support. I would also state my appreciation to 
the volunteers who so ably have helped at the administra- 
tive level. 

And last, but by no means least, I would like to 
personally thank the members of the Administration and 
the Acton Education Association for their support and 
help, not only in the short time I have been in Acton but 
for my predecessor. They are the mainstays of the 
system. 

A large vote of thanks for the supportive personnel 
in the schools, the custodial staff, the secretaries and 
the cafeteria workers who pick up the pieces and make 
the system run a little more smoothly. 




In closing, I would like to say that the door to my 
office is always open. The staff and I welcome your 
comments and concerns, and sincerely state that they 
will be given every consideration. 



Newly appointed 

Superintendent of Schools 

Dr. Norman D. Brust 

(Photo by G. B. Williams, Jr. ) 



Dr. Norman D. Brust 



32 



REPORT OF THE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 



irollment 


statistics for the year 


1971 


were as follows: 








Grade 


January 1971 




June 1971 


September 1971 


December 1971 


September 1972* 


9 


370 




370 


406 


399 


438 


10 


347 




338 


371 


370 


402 


11 


311 




302 


340 


331 


370 


12 


269 




267 


309 


306 


333 



1,297 1,277 1,426 1,406 1,543 

* These figures do not allow for departing students or new students. 

A careful examination of the above figures gives us a good indication of our growth. The big difference 
in our operation in the year 1971 was the extended school day. The creation of a ten-period day enabled us to 
accommodate 1,426 students in a school designed for 1,000. The cooperation from the students and staff has 
been most gratifying and as a result, it is a successful operation. A special thank you should be extended to 
grade 9 students and their parents. 

We have been working with a "Student Rights and Responsibility" committee composed of adults from the 
community, teachers and students. This committee is focusing its attention on the following areas: 

1. School Governance 

2. Curriculum Development 

3. Extracurricular Activities 

4. Utilization of Existing School Plant 

Recommendations from this committee will be presented to the Student Council, Faculty, Principal, Superin- 
tendent and to the School Committee for final approval. Weekly meetings are also being held by the Student 
Council where issues important to the students are being discussed in great detail. 

The addition of Mr. Lawrence McNulty as Vice Principal has really helped us to meet the needs of addi- 
tional students. Mr. McNulty is responsible for grades 9 and 12, and Mr. MacLeod is concerned with grades 
10 through 12. 

The year 1972 will find us, i.e., students, teachers and administrators, looking forward to making our 
move to a new senior high school complex. We shall be spending the year focusing our attention on the follow- 
ing improvements: 

1. Curriculum 6. Expanded Home Economics, Industrial Arts, Art, 

- T Mechanical Drawing and Music 

a. New courses b 

b. New methods of teaching „ n 

c. Deletion of courses 



2. Time Schedule 



Flexibile modular 



a. New courses 

Athletics 

a. Addition of gymnastics, swimming, wrestling, golf 



3. Team Teaching 

., 9. Physical Education 

a. Small group — « 

b. Independent study a. Electives and half-year courses 

c. Open laboratories 

10. Student Commons 



11. 



4. 


Expanded Library Facilities 




a. 


Study carrels 




b. 


Listening areas 




c. 


Research areas 




d. 


Reading for leisure 




e. 


Filmstrips 




f. 


Films 




g- 


Records 


5. 


Expanded Business Department 




a. 


New courses 




b. 


Data center 



a. 


Its effective 


use 


b. 


No study halls 


Intramural s 




a. 


Swimming 




b. 


Volleyball 




c. 


Basketball 




d. 


Soccer 




e. 


Track 




f. 


Gymnastics, 


etc 



As Principal of the Senior High School, I realize we have a great deal of work to perform prior to our 
entering the new school in 1973, but I feel that we shall meet our goal of providing the type of secondary school 



33 



that we all desire, i. e., a school for the students, a school that the parents will be proud of, and a school 
which the staff and administration will find intellectually stimulating. All this can be achieved because we 
know we have a great student body and an excellent staff. 

Raymond J. Grey 



CLASS OF 1971 



Carl H. Adams 

Sheila R. Adams 

Naiem S. Ahmad 

Linda S. Aldrich 

Linda Susan Allen 

Karen A. Alward 

Willard A. Andersen 

Pamela G. Anderson 

Jorge A. Arias 

Denice A. Bacher 

Eileen M. Barry 

Richard C. Bateman, Jr. 

Susan M. Berg 

Pamela A. Bergin 

Christopher N. Berlied 

Rebecca Lynn Beyer 

James R. Bezanson 

Cynthia Louise Blodgett 

Nicholas Paul Boccio 

Kathryn Marie Bolger 

Patricia E. Boothby 

Gary Paul Boothman 

Elinor Gayle Boyden 

Pamela Joan Bradley 

Andrea Marion Breslouf 

Debra J. Brine 

Thomas Milton Brown 

William P. Brown 

Chandler K. Burns 

Donna A. Burns 

Diane J. Byers 

Daniel Joseph Byrd 

Ronald James Calkins 

Thomas Edward Cann 

Robert F. Carroll, Jr. 

David George Casteline 

Glenn C. Castner 

Deborah Anne Ceglowski 

Douglas John Chabinsky 

Susan Carol Charter 

Nina I. Chernak 

Jerome Raymond Christian 

Suzanne Esther Clewley 

Brenda Lee Coffey 

Lawrence Collins 

Martin Joseph Conroy 

Beth Anne Crosby 

Elaine Charlene Cullinane 

Deborah Jean Cummings 

Edward J. Cummings 

Paul R. Cuthbert 

Karen A. Daigle 

Lucy M. Dale 

John Dargin 

Gayle Anne Davis 

Karl Richard Davis 

Paula Evelyn Davis 

Michael Day 

Cynthia Jean Deacon 

Robert Paul Delaney 

Susan Marguerite Desjardins 

David S. Deveau 

Ellen Marie Dill 

John F. DiMase 



John Jeffrey Dodson 
Kathleen Mary Dudziak 
Lois Ann Durkin 
Jon Russell Edwards 
Curtis G. Emmons 
Diane Carol Erikson 
Mary B. Falvey 
Lester L. Fanning 
Janice Blair Finley 
Randall F. Flerra 
Steven Frederick Foote 
Doyle R. Foster 
Joyce Elizabeth Foster 
Bruce Raymond Fox 
Cynthia Marie Furlong 
Marie Frances Galluzzo 
Martha Jane Gates 
Michael Rolin Gebelein 
Cynthia Ann Glover 
Brenda J. Goodwin 
Mary Ann Gordon 
Sharon Anne Grancey 
Herbert Alfred Grekula 
Norman Arthur Grekula 
Pamela Rae Grey 
Patricia Evelyne Grieve 
Susan Mary Haley 
James Edward Haller 
Robert Philip Hamilton 
Richard Hansen 
Parker Harrison, III 
David W. Hartwell 
Gregory B. Haskell 
Christopher L. Hatch 
Robert Bennett Headley 
Myies F. Heffernan, III 
Timothy Charles Henderson 
Roberta Lynn Henry 
Jeffrey Erwin Hermes 
Paul Richard Hess 
Alice Cummings Heustis 
Cynthia Marie Heyner 
Dawn R. Hibbard 
Charles R. Hillman 
Maureen Ann Hitchins 
Timothy J. Hoey 
Kathryn Ann Hogle 
Thomas Edward Hollywood 
Susan Hooper 
David James Home 
Diann Howland 
Rebecca Hryniewich 
William J. Hryniewich 
Jeffrey Paul Hugel 
Sandra Lee Humphries 
Thomas R. Illsley 
Edward Jackson 
Arthur S. Johnson 
Barbara Jones 
Gregory Jones 
Robert Trela Jones 
Laura Lee Kangas 
Richard J. Kangas 
Stephen Karr 



Judy E. Kashuba 

William L. Kendall 

Josiah John Kirby, Jr. 

Joanne Klauer 

Carolyn Kondrat 

William Kramer 

Harry T. Ku 

Joan LaFoley 

Janice E. Lambert 

Debra Anne Lanoue 

Robert Dadman Leary 

George P. LeGault 

Mark Phillips Lindsay 

Debra Jeanne Locke 

Betsy Lee Look 

Daniel J. Lord 

Luellen M. Lougee 

Stephen P. Lougee 

Gregory Lucas 

Douglas P. Lynn 

Malcolm Stuart MacGregor, Jr. 

Ralph L. MacLure 

Ian MacPherson 

Jean Elizabeth MacRae 

David Madison 

Richard Robinson Major, II 

Joan Elisabeth Mason 

Michael M. Mathews 

Charles Joseph Mayer 

Keven E. McCauley 

Robert Forrest McCluer 

Robert C. McFarland 

Shauna Jean McGregor 

Eileen Ann McKnight 

Matthew Menapace 

Stephanie Ann Merrill 

Joan Carol Metzger 

Vernon Lee Miller 

David L. Moore 

Janet M. Moore 

Leslie Anne Morrison 

Kathryn A. Moscariello 

Sheila Joyce Mulvey 

Deborah Ann Myers 

Stephen R. Nelson 

Glen L. Nichols 

Loretta Kay Nichols 

Barbara L. Nihen 

Leena Nummela 

Walter Edward O' Clair 

Gregory Ohlson 

Nancy L. Oman 

Cynthia L. O'Neil 

Susan Helen Osborn 

James Nelson Page 

Tenley A. Page 

Wayne A. Page 

Carol A. Palazzi 

Steven C. Palmer 

Susan Jane Panetta 

John F. Perry 

Doreen Peterson 

Wendy Jane Peterson 

Kimberley Ann Pivin 



34 



Catherine L. Platte 
Ann Marie Polselli 
Ashley R. Pomeroy 
Deborah M. Portyrata 
Colleen Ann Powers 
Elizabeth Pratt 
Rose L. Priest 
Christine Pruneau 
Sue Anne Rahaim 
Celeste Ann Rejewski 
Richard Ramos 
William C. Rawson 
Holly Anne Reagan 
David Michael Regan 
Karen L. Reichle 
Kenneth B. Reidy 
Stephen K. Richter 
Debra G. Rimbach 
Debra Kay Robinette 
Karen Ann Roche 
Karen W. Rogers 
Michelle Ann Rollins 
Francis Edward Roy, Jr. 
Dana M. Sanford 
Paul C. Sanford 
Gregory Sariotis 



Douglas B. Schad 
Carl Peter Schell 
Thornton C. Schoch, Jr. 
Melissa M. Scott 
Stephen W. Scribner, Jr. 
Thomas C. Searle, Jr. 
Cynthia Seward 
Debra Arline Shaw 
Stephen W. Shook 
Kimberley C. Smith 
John E. Snyer 
Christopher M. Sorrentino 
Kyle Anne Sprain 
Thomas Hunt Stafford 
Judith A. Stenzel 
Donald M. Sturtevant 
Janet L. Sullivan 
Nancy Lee Suther 
Eileen M. Sweeney 
Robert B. Taber 
Carol Jeanette Thompson 
Erik S. Tolf 
Melinda L. Tolley 
Stephen Harrington Tolman 
Keven Edward Tompkins 
Steven Bengt Tornell 



Rebecca S. Towne 
Russell M. Turner 
William Tuttle 
Camille Twyford 
Carolyn Joan Marie Vanaria 
Kenneth C. Vettrus 
Paul D. Vieira 
Mary Ellen Vorce 
C. Barry Walker 
Richard B. Warren 
Thomas E. Weeks 
James Werrbach 
Brandon B. Westley 
Robert H. Wetherbee 
JoAnne Whipple 
Charles W. Whitehead 
Constance A. Whitney 
Julianne Beatrice Widmayer 
Michael Alan Williams 
Sandra E. Williamson 
Joseph T. Wilson, Jr. 
Juliana C. Wootton 
Barry S. Worcester 
Robert Alan Wright 
Pamela Joyce Zimmer 



CLASS OFFICERS 



President 



David Moore 



Vice President 



Janice Finley 



Secretary 
Sue Hooper 



Treasurer 



Stephanie Merrill 



REPORT OF THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 




Junior High School addition, which will become the new Senior High School when completed. 

The Acton -Boxborough Junior High School is now completing its sixth year in the new building on Charter 
Road. By the fall of 1973 the former A-B Regional Junior High School will become the new high school and 
Grade 7 and 8 pupils will move into the former high school on the hill. 



35 



The Junior High School offers a fairly rich variety of subjects to students preparing for high school. 
There are at this time no electives, but subjects available to all students at this time are crafts, graphic arts, 
mechanical drawing, architectural drawing, foods, clothing, general music, woodworking, painting and draw- 
ing, ceramics, metal enameling, band, string orchestra, chorus, orchestra, metalworking, welding, foundry 
practice and silk screening of prints. 

The required academic subjects are English, French, mathematics, science and social studies. In the 
fall of 1972, Spanish will be offered to certain classes so that students may choose between French and another 
language on entering junior high school. 

It is hoped also that a course in crafts will be operating to accommodate those students not enrolled in a 
language course. 

Individualized instruction enters its third year with the continuance and expansion of the Intermediate 
Science Curriculum Study to give science students a choice between general science and individual experimen- 
tation. 

Social studies has been completely revamped to concentrate on this hemisphere, the United States, Can- 
ada, Mexico and South America in preparation for Grade 8 history. The latter subject is "sweetened" with 
generous doses of material on anthropology, major social problems, landmark cases of the Supreme Court, 
and pertinent outside reading to reinforce the texts. 

In the fall of 1971, the whole academic program was strengthened and more tightly coordinated with the 
high school by the appointment of the following Assistant Department Chairmen to work closely with the De- 
partment Chairmen at ABRHS: 



English - Mrs. Robert Nizel 
French - Miss Dorothy Stewart 
Mathematics - Mr. Robert Rooney 



Science - Mr. Bert Hubley 

Social Studies - Mr. Frank Blomberg 



Mr. Arthur Hayes was appointed Principal in the fall of 1965 and was joined a year later by Mr. Henry 
Wall as Assistant Principal. Both administrators have been blessed with the help and support of a first-rate 
faculty and staff. The support of the various superintendents and school committees has been appreciated. 

Arthur Hayes 



REPORT OF THE CONANT SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 




The Luther Conant School which was opened in September 1971. 

Luther Conant School opened September 8, 1971, with an enrollment of 493 pupils in grades 1-6 with 
Mrs. Alice Hayes as Principal. Dedication exercises were held October 3, 1971. 



36 

In addition to the regular classrooms, the Conant School houses a transition class which was established 
for children lacking "readiness" for the usual first grade program. It is felt that special programming in the 
transition class is the best means of getting them ready for first grade. This program will be evaluated in 
the spring of 1972. 

The Language Arts program has been updated and strengthened by the adoption of the new "Reading for 
Meaning" program, published by Houghton Mifflin. This program constantly works toward two major goals: 
(1) the development of an ever-increasing control of those specific skills that will enable the child to read well 
independently, and (2) the development of an enthusiastic and ever-broadening interest in reading. 

Spelling and Handwriting (1971 editions) by Noble and Noble is being piloted in grades 1-6 in view of 
adoption. This is the first and only series that combines complete spelling and handwriting instruction in one 
strikingly designed program. The program ensures high interest and guarantees success. An evaluation will 
be done in the spring. 

Science, Social Studies and Math are pilot programs--the outgrowth of research and development pro- 
grams. Ongoing evaluations are being conducted in view of adopting the best programs in all subject areas. 

Supplementary programs in all areas provide for enrichment for the children who need challenge, and 
extra help for the slow learners. 

Pupil personnel services - guidance, health, remedial reading, speech, and language disabilities - are 
available for children who are in need of these services. 

Tutorial programs, using volunteers, have been established to give extra help on the basic skills in an 
attempt to prevent failure. 

Our teachers have welcomed the opportunity to be part of a new program titled "Practicum in Education". 
Eight students from State College at Framingham have participated. It is a laboratory experience which is 
adjunct to the professional preparation courses. It enables the student to conceptualize the principles, tech- 
niques and approaches presented in the professional preparation courses by direct application to classroom 
practice. 

We have had high school students helping in the classrooms. It has been a very satisfactory program- - 
a big help to classroom teachers, and a means of helping young people to decide on a career in teaching. 

Parents are encouraged to visit classrooms and to become involved as teacher, library and office aides. 

Mrs. Alice Hayes 



REPORT OF THE DOUGLAS SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

The Douglas School began the new school year with 498 pupils, a reduction in enrollmentof 128 pupils 
from the 1970-71 school year. The number of classroom teachers was reduced to 19, including three classes 
per grade level one through five and four sixth grade classes. A learning disability specialist was added to 
the staff, while other special services available to meet the needs of the children include speech, remedial 
reading, guidance, health, art, music and physical education. 

The addition of MacMillan texts and the new Houghton Mifflin program to our reading materials gives us 
a wide range of current instructional materials designed to meet the varying needs of the children. 

In social studies the Laidlaw program has been adopted in the primary grades, while grades 4, 5 and 6 
are piloting new programs for adoption next year. 

In arithmetic, both the Addison-Wesley and Houghton Mifflin programs are being extensively tested and 
evaluated with an adoption anticipated in the near future. 

Science and social studies programs have both been strengthened by the supportive services of resource 
teachers. 

A motor training program has been instituted and remedial instruction is provided for students in need 
of it. 

In all areas of the curriculum, efforts are being made to develop more individualized instructional tech- 
niques by organizing the programs and materials in a manner appropriate to such instruction. 

The corps of volunteers has more than 30 members who perform a wide range of clerical, tutorial and 
supportive services in the classrooms, library and school office. The Library -Learning Center continues as 
another major resource to teachers and children by providing easy access to a wide variety of audio-visual 
materials and equipment in addition to books and standard references. 



37 

Our major thrust this year is directed towards selecting new materials and adapting older materials for 
use with instructional techniques that foster the personal and academic development of each child on an indi- 
vidualized basis. 

Robert Conroy 



REPORT OF THE GATES SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

Enrollment as of October 1, 1971 -- Grade 1 - 71; Grade 2 - 69; Grade 3 - 80; Grade 4 - 72; Grade 5 - 86; 
Grade 6 - 91; Educable Mentally Retarded - 7; Trainable Mentally Retarded - 9; Total - 485. 

Curriculum Changes 

A. Language Arts 

1. Introduction of new readiness program, Alpha One, in Grade 1. 

2. Updating basal and supplementary reading programs in Grades 1-6. 

3. Start in developing a language arts resource area. 

B. Social Studies 

1. Introduction of The Silver Burdett Primary Social Studies Program in Grades 1-3. 

2. Piloting of programs in Grades 4-6. 

3. Start in developing a social studies resource area. 

C. Mathematics 

1. Piloting of programs in Grades 1-6. 

2. Inter-classroom grouping in Grades 1, 2, 3, 5. 

3. Start in developing a mathematics resource area. 

D. Other 

1. Increased use of games as educational and recreational activities. 

2. Introduction of Friday afternoon "Activity Period" for all students. 

3. Library: Multi-media resource area. 

We have increased the use of parent volunteers as tutors and clerical assistants. 

James Palavras 



REPORT OF THE MCCARTHY-TOWNE SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

The McCarthy-Towne School has experienced a mixture of challenges, rewards, and frustrations. Al- 
though seventeen of the twenty-seven full-time professional staff are new to the Acton Public School System, 
only one is a first year teacher. The twenty classroom teachers have had to learn how to best use the Words 
in Color and Algebricks materials from Educational Solutions (ESI) along with helping continue the development 
of science and social studies programs begun in the other elementary schools. Unfortunately there have been 
shortages of materials and supplies that have frustrated some of our efforts. 

For the staff, the school year began in August with a three-week workshop to begin to learn how to use 
the ESI materials. Since then, there have been a series of in-service workshops conducted by the two consul- 
tants - one for reading and one for mathematics - for the staff, volunteers, and interested parents. There 
has also been the first of three two-day workshops conducted by Dr. Gattegno. It should be noted that the cost 
of the ESI programs and personnel are provided for by not having certain staffing arrangements which exist in 
other elementary schools. 

The McCarthy-Towne School began the school year with 495 students representing 306 families. By De- 
cember 31, 1971, we had 486 students; 7 students were withdrawn from the r jhool and placed in other Acton 
schools, and 8 students were withdrawn when the families moved away from Acton; 4 students were enrolled in 
the school during this time; and 7 put on the waiting list for entrance in September 1972. 

We have a very effective volunteer program comprised of parents and college, high school, and junior 
high school students. In all, we have 180 volunteers working in the school each week. Our programs in the 
following areas would not be possible without them: art curriculum, classroom individualization and attention, 
library operation, lunchroom supervision, music curriculum, physical education curriculum and visiting day 
program. 

The parents and friends of the school have also shown their support through their donation of things and 
services to the school, and by their attendance at the five morning "coffees" and the several P. T.O. evening 



38 

meetings. The school staff is very appreciative of this support and looks forward to a continuation and exten- 
sion of working with everyone interested in improving education in Acton. 

Parker Damon 



REPORT OF THE F. A. MERRIAM SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

The Merriam School reopened in September, 1971, with an enrollment of 467 pupils, grades one through 
six. There are three classrooms at each grade level, making a total of eighteen classrooms. 

This year has seen the opening of a new library which has added greatly to the educational program. At 
the present time, there are 4,000 volumes of books of varying interests available for pupil use. Audio-visual 
materials to supplement subject areas have also been provided to be utilized by teachers on a loan basis. The 
entire library program continues to grow not only in material value but in importance as concerns the overall 
curriculum. 

The installation of playground equipment for the primary grades by volunteer Merriam School parents 
has provided the pupils a better opportunity to improve their physical skills as well as to allow more play- 
ground enjoyment than heretofore. 

A new program in social studies has been added to the primary grades of the school. (The same pro- 
gram was introduced simultaneously in all elementary schools in the town.) It emphasizes the likes and dis- 
likes of the diverse groups of people that comprise our country and the world with a particular concentration 
on the comparisons of cultures of specific peoples in various regions and countries. 

Teachers at all grade levels are in the process of "piloting" new arithmetic programs. Grades 4, 5 and 
6 teachers continue to pilot social studies materials--a program to be decided upon for the entire elementary 
school system by September, 1972. 

The addition of new supplemental reading programs has added considerable strength to the reading 
curriculum. 

Classes of the school have adopted a weekly club activity period whereby pupils are encouraged to select 
an interest or hobby which is pleasing to them. The clubs are supervised by faculty members. Teacher and 
student aides have been of considerable service during class periods, recess and lunch periods. 

The above, coupled with the many classroom activities, plays, field trips, art projects, music pro- 
grams, physical education programs, pupil personnel programs, and the varied services provided by the 35 
volunteer parents working in the library, classrooms, and office area have afforded the Merriam pupils and 
staff a most productive year. 

William V. Sparks 



PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

Administration 

William Petkewich, who has assumed, under Ruth Proctor, responsibility for leadership in several of the 
services, was granted a sabbatical leave for the period from September 1, 1971 to August 31, 1972. In his 
absence, three members of the counseling staff- -Mrs. Martha Deraney, Charles Bennett, and Robert L. 
Clever- -are ably assisting in the administration while also continuing actively in their role as counselors. 

Guidance 

In conjunction with ongoing evaluative efforts of the counseling staff, a survey of attitudes towards guid- 
ance was completed last summer under an R & D grant. Consensus of the staff in the fall was that because of 
the unrealistic number of students counselors were trying to see on an individual basis, they were "spreading 
themselves too thin". Therefore, a general reordering of priorities took place, and currently there are four 
areas of major emphasis, as follows: 

1. Counseling of students identified as having the more severe problems who need to be seen 
on a regular basis and around whom staffings and much consultation with teachers and par- 
ents are indicated. 

2. Counseling of other students in response to specific requests for help by the students them- 
selves or by teachers, principals, or parents. 

3. Group contacts to initiate communication and to develop familiarity with guidance services. 



39 

4. Group counseling to help certain students with similar special needs. All of these may in- 
volve attention to personal, social, educational, or vocational matters or to a combination 
of these. 

Learning Disabilities 

Full staffing of the consultant program was accomplished so that since September a specialist has been 
available in'each of the four regular elementary schools. The importance of early identification led to exten- 
sive screening of incoming first graders last fall. In addition, for individual children in all grades, diagnostic 
evaluation is followed by practical assistance to teachers. Specific plans are offered for curriculum adjust- 
ment and remediation within the classroom. 

Federal Title VI funds made possible in September an additional program for those elementary chil- 
dren whose problems were so severe that classroom instruction alone was not sufficient. These children 
come to the especially equipped resource room for a part of each day in order to have remedial help from the 
resource teacher or the volunteer aides working with her. Title VI funds also provided the impetus for a new 
program approach at the secondary level as recommended in an R & D project last summer. One additional 
specialist is working with two former staff members in resource room settings, where the emphasis is on 
compensatory learning rather than remediation. 

In the programs at all levels, close communication with teachers, other support personnel, and parents 
is considered vital to success in meeting the special needs of the learning disabled students. 

Reading 

An evaluation of the reading program during the spring of 1971, together with the R&D project referred 
to under learning disabilities (above), resulted in a rewriting of roles focusing on a team approach of the learn- 
ing disabilities and reading specialists and certain changes in the reading program. Only at the primary level 
(grades 1-3) are the reading teachers continuing to place emphasis on remediation to develop basic skills. 
From grade 4 on, they are offering help primarily to students who want and need to improve reading rate and 
comprehension. They are also available to teachers who request help in developing study skills in subject 
areas. The inability to date to replace one reading specialist has resulted in curtailment of the program at 
the secondary level. 

Special Education 

In September, a resource room program for the emotionally disturbed was added at the Junior High 
School to fill the need of these students for help in the academic areas and in the development of a sense of 
trust and of socialization skills. 

The possibility of a regional program with other communities in the local mental health center area for 
students in need of special education is currently being explored. Basic to the philosophy of the regionaliza- 
tion committee is the thought that every student to the extent possible should participate in the "normal" activi- 
ties of the school. In addition to the financial savings to member towns, it is felt that regionalization would 
result in a narrower age range within classes and more relevance and continuity in curriculum. The Mental 
Health Center would offer diagnostic and supportive services. 

Finally, during the past year, the School Committees appointed the Advisory Committee on Special Edu- 
cation composed of parents, administrators, teachers, and representatives of the Mental Health Center. Its 
primary purpose is to assist in creating an atmosphere of mutual trust and in maintaining programs for chil- 
dren with special needs in keeping with the high standards set forth for the total school population. Meetings 
up to now have been devoted to discussions of current programs, concerns, and thought for the future, and to 
the establishment of working sub -committees to seek, collect, and disseminate information which will be help- 
ful to all concerned. 

Speech Therapy 

Highlight of the year was accreditation of the Acton speech therapy program by the American Speech and 
Hearing Association. Few school systems in the country meet the standards of A. S.H. A., and the Acton pro- 
gram was accepted after an extensive evaluation. 

A new program was a "Teacher Workshop" held in the fall as in-service training for teachers. Other 
"firsts" for speech therapy were the acceptance of a therapist in the exploratory school and a summer R&D 
project through which new materials and an original speech test were developed. 

Ruth R. Proctor 
Director of Guidance 

REPORT OF THE SCHOOL NURSES 

All the testing has been completed for the year 1971. From January to June, the vision and hearing 
tests for all students were completed and referrals for corrections made. 



40 

There were two Tuberculin Testing Programs during 1971, February and November. Grades 1, 4, 7, 
and 9 included 405 high school students receiving the test, 500 junior high school students, and 56 faculty 
members. The elementary schools tested 1,128 students in the first and fourth grades and 141 adults. The 
adults included school personnel and volunteers. 

Mumps vaccine was offered to grades 1, 6, and 7 for a total of 341 recipients. The diphtheria tetanus 
boosters were given to 142 ninth graders this year. 

We were gratified by the parents' response to having their children's physical examinations completed 
by their family physicians. We plan to continue sending out these requests for grades 1, 4, 7 and 10. 

With the growth of the schools (we added the Conant School in September), scheduling is still a problem. 
Mrs. Miller, R. N., joined the staff in September to give better coverage for the junior high and the split high 
school schedules. We still find it difficult to attend meetings, staffings and at the same time cover the health 
offices. 

The description of the position and duties of the school nurse has been submitted for approval. The 
nurses have attended the Massachusetts School Nurses Organization spring and fall meetings and are actively 
involved with the Acton Education Association. 

We wish to thank everyone who has helped us during the year, especially the secretaries. 

Eileen Hale, R. N. Patricia Wilson, R. N. 

Helen Rhodes, R.N. Nancy Miller, R.N. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



The nationwide search for a Superintendent of Schools brought unexpected benefits to the School Commit- 
tee in 1971. In the planning, screening, interviewing, and visiting process, the pattern for the growth and 
direction of our schools began to emerge in greater detail than the Committee had ever had an opportunity to 
define before. Armed with a strong sense of the appropriate direction for the school system, the finding of 
just the right man to carry out our plans proved not to be as difficult as anticipated. We set our sights high; 
we made no compromises; and we were unanimous in our final choice. We welcome Dr. Norman D. Brust to 
this challenging position, and we look forward to a productive and exciting working relationship with him and, 
through his leadership, with the entire staff. The Committee would like to take this opportunity to publicly 
express its thanks and appreciation to Mr. Alan M. White, who so capably performed as Acting Superintendent 
in the interim period, giving the Committee the needed time to make an unhurried and thoroughly considered 
decision on the appointment of a Superintendent. 

Some of the areas to which the School Committee and the administration have been and will continue to 
be directing their thoughts and energies are briefly mentioned in the following paragraphs. 

Encouragement of the Concept of Diversity 

Realizing that Acton's children and their parents have many differing ideas about what constitutes a 
"good education", the Committee authorized the establishment of McCarthy-Towne School as a pilot project, 
where the testing of new ideas and approaches is facilitated by the fact that parents requested enrollment for 
their children in the school and can themselves participate in the total program. An excellent start has been 
made, and the Committee will soon explore the possibilities of open enrollment for all elementary schools as 
a means of fostering diversity. 

Establishment of Goals and Objectives 

We have discussed this topic as it pertains to each child's individual progress, and behavioral goals and 
objectives are to be set for each discipline. Also, they will be established for the staff and the administration 
and finally, for the entire school system. Only when the latter has been accomplished will we be able to eval- 
uate total program. 

Need for Evaluation 

We have already begun an evaluation by Boston College of the reading and math programs in all elemen- 
tary schools. Additional money for Evaluation Research and Development has been budgeted--one of the few 
categories to be increased appreciably in 1972. The first year of budgeting according to programs is also a 
step toward better evaluation. The decision can now be made as to whether the expenditure of monies in a 
specific area has produced the hoped-for returns. 

Greater Student and Community Participation 

A system -wide program for volunteers in the schools --volunteers not only in the libraries but in the 
classrooms and offices--was started in 1971. A policy on Advisory Committees was voted by the School 






41 



Committee, and we now have committees working on Students' Rights and Responsibilities, Special Education, 
and Centrally-prepared Lunches. At this writing, a Kindergarten Study Committee is also being formed. The 
Regional Committee seats four student representatives at all public meetings, the students having no vote but 
full rights to debate the issues. 

Greater Decision-Making Powers at Lower Levels of Administration 

A start was made in this area at budget time this year. With limited funds available, rather than making 
a top level decision on how each school's share of the budget should be spent, the School Committee authorized 
the principals to recommend any internal budgetary shifting they wished in order to spend allotted monies to 
best benefit the individual schools. This procedure will not only give the principals a greater degree of auton- 
omy, but it will also aid the concept of diversity, simply by giving each school staff an opportunity to establish 
its own priorities which will inevitably differ somewhat from school to school. It should be noted, however, 
that system -wide standards for curriculum content and academic proficiency will be maintained while methods 
and procedures may vary. 

Long-Range Planning 

The School Committee has budgeted for an administrative assistant to the Superintendent, a large part 
of whose job will be research oriented, gathering data and furnishing the Superintendent and the Committee 
with vitally needed information to facilitate long-range planning. 

The Acton School Committee looks forward enthusiastically and optimistically to further work in these 
areas and in many others during the coming year. 



ACTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND ACTON -BOXBOROUGH REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

ENROLLMENTS AS OF JANUARY 1 



Grade 



1968-1969 



1969-1970 



1970-1971 



1971-1972 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 
Educable 
Trainable 

Total 1-6 



377 
350 
396 
369 
390 
340 
6 
8 



459 
374 
371 
437 
390 
407 
8 
11 



2,236 



2,457 



390 
436 
385 
379 
438 
399 
11 
U 

2,449 



411 
365 
438 
386 
388 
443 
9 
7 

2,447 



9 
10 
11 
12 

Total 7-12 

Grand Total 



359 
356 
319 
299 
225 
231 



1,789 
4,025 



392 
367 
354 
311 
274 
225 



1,923 
4,380 



454 
399 
370 
347 
311 
269 

2,150 

4,599 



435 
438 
402 
370 
333 
308 

2,286 

4,733 



ACTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS FACULTY 
YEARS OF SERVICE IN ACTON AS OF SCHOOL YEAR 1971-72 



Helen deCoste 28 

Madeleine Kingston 20 

Salvatore Lipomi 18 

Nancy Joslin 15 

Alice F. Hayes 13 

James Palavaras 13 

Phyllis Foss 13 

Louise Piper 12 

Jennifer Johnson 12 

Shirley Cahill 10 

Dorothy Bunker 10 

Patricia Davis 10 

Agnes Manning 10 



Lois Nichols 9 

Anne Jones 8 

George Revelas 8 

Susan Melander 7 

Mary Lou O'Connor 7 

Richard Marion 7 

Sally Strangman 7 

Geraldine Farrell 7 

Ann Jocobs 7 

Helen Dooling 7 

Edwin Zwicker 6 

Robert C. Conroy 6 

Marguerite Mazzone 6 



Rebecca McCrudden 6 

Mary Lou Parker 6 

Charlene Imbernino 6 

Doris Peterson 6 

Karen Madaras 6 

Suzanne Kissell 6 

Nadine Yates 6 

Joan Roche 6 

Margaret Benoit 5 

Bruce Byam 5 

Mary Budge 5 

Margot Romberg 5 

Lynda Butt 5 



42 



Geraldine Healy 
Edith Mason 
Linda Telfer 
Joyce Toomey 
Margaret DesLauriers 
Lenore Kahn 
Margery Thurber 
Sharon DeCaprio 
Gladys Mason 
William Sparks 
Ursula Konde 
Suzanne Ballantine 
Charles Bennett 
Mary Ann McGovern 
Mary Ann Crosby 
Elaine Graves 
Alexandra Dwyer 
Karen Napoli 
Catherine Klinck 
Josephine Carlson 
Peter Hildebrand 
Shirley Kosko 
Elizabeth Eldridge 
Evelyn Jones 
Parker Damon 
Jessica Doyle 
Constance Hervey 
Susan Page 
Virginia McGrath 
Ruth Rumage 
Bonnie Cameron 
Linda Chellis 
Judith Hopkinson 
Lauraine Riel 
Matthew Grzyb 



5 


Judith Bernstein 


2 


5 


Elizabeth Lucca 


2 


5 


Joanne Morgan 


2 


5 


Cynthia Popolizio 


2 


5 


Jeanne Dadarria 


2 


5 


Carole Powers 


2 


4 


Judith Barboni 


2 


4 


Janet Nedza 


2 


4 


Linda Gould 


2 


4 


Ellen Kramer 


2 


4 


Berta Voorhees 


2 


4 


Walter McGrail 


2 


4 


Caroline Kettner 


2 


4 


Linda MacDonald 


2 


4 


Joy Ham el 


2 


4 


Judith Leger 


2 


4 


Susan McGrail 


2 


4 


Jeanne Dagdigian 


2 


4 


Rita McAvoy 


2 


4 


Charlotte Pickowicz 


2 


4 


Ellen Janerrico 


2 


4 


Christine Walker 


2 


4 


Deborah Panitch 


2 


4 


Dewey White 


2 


3 


Mary Reis 


2 


3 


Elizabeth Cobery 


2 


3 


Virginia LoDuca 


2 


3 


Louise Chani 


2 


3 


Susan Sawyer 


2 


3 


Kathleen Long 


2 


3 


Marilyn Donaldson 


2 


3 


Barbara Cleary 


2 


3 


Carol Meyer 


2 


3 


Robert Blue 


2 


3 


Jean Britton 


1 



Linda Moran 
Charlotte Sidell 
Charlene Twente 
Sylvia Circo 
Janet Efron 
Mary Seager 
Penny Schwanbeck 
Steve Shuller 
John Hall 
Irene Herman 
David Ackerman 
Ann Harrington 
Penny Dunning 
Leslie Apt 
Judith Lund 
Linda DiMatteo 
Michaeline DellaFera 
Margery Lewis 
Deborah Wesson 
Suzanne Wren 
Sister Ruth Ann Brighton 
Marjorie Lewis 
Joyce Koop 
Margaret Roberts 
Margaret Archie 
Charles Bassett 
Sheila Duffy 
Loretta Grushecky 
— John Diiclos 
Rosemary White 
Corinne LaRoche 
Richard Bartolomeo 
Howard Bassett 
Susan Waterman 
Catherine Marrone 



ACTON-BOXBOROUGH REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT FACULTY 
YEARS OF SERVICE IN ACTON AS OF SCHOOL YEAR 1971-72 



Ralph Stetson 
Ruth Proctor 
Isadore Stearns 
Raymond Grey 
James Dadoly 
Arthur Hayes 
Mary Campbell 
Helen Detsch 
Mason King 
Henry Wall 
Frances Boyle 
Francis Pratt 
Robert Morris 
Charles Battit 
Jacqueline Phaneuf 
Barbara Parker 
Daniel Boylen 
Mary Keefe 
William Petkewich 
Francis Holahan 
Joanne Garduno 
Frank Blomberg 
Donald MacLeod 
Robert Mahoney 
Bert Hubley 
James Gifford 
Robert Coan 
Lawrence McNulty 
Robert Clever 
John Brodie 
Joseph Flagg 
Nancy Nizel 



25 
22 
20 
20 

18 
17 
17 
17 
17 
16 
15 
14 
14 
14 
14 
13 
13 
12 
11 
11 
11 
10 
10 
10 
9 



Frank Soracco 7 

Janice Bacon 7 

Edward Leary 7 

Christine Cluney 6 

Richard Gunzelmann 6 

Robert Rooney 6 

Elizabeth Washburn 6 

Martha Deraney 6 

Charles Gittins 6 

Gerald Duggan 6 

Nancy Ousley 6 

Daniel Madden 6 

Francis Riley 6 

Elizabeth Alt 5 

Anita Dodson 5 

Florence Richman 5 

Winslow Smith 5 

Edward Buswick 5 

Margaret Cullen 5 

Joseph Devine 4 

Dawn Evans 4 

Janice Sproul 4 

Dorothy Stewart 4 

Edward White 4 

Henry Wegiel 4 

Robert Beauregard 4 

Joan Canning 4 

Iris Fordon 4 

George Frost 4 

Donald Gilberti 4 

Susan Kaelin 4 

Paul McDermott 4 



Ruth Rose 
Mary Jo Blanchard 
Lois Hopper 
Alice Palubinskas 
Patricia Roberts 
George Abodeely 
William Berndt 
Joan Bradley 
Stephen Cornwall 
Richard Dow 
Catherine Ferry 
Eleanor French 
Edward Gruskowski 
Mary Guerette 
Thomas Hitchcock 
Carol Maymom 
Betsy McElvein 
Bruce Parker 
Elizabeth Rickert 
Newton Saarinen 
Virginia Skinger 
Joanne Spicer 
Armand Swajian 
Joean Taschner 
Denise Blumenthal 
Carla Brockmeir 
Ann Carpenter 
Jacqueline Chisholm 
Thomas Christie 
John Furey 
John Hughes 
Marlene Loeb 



43 



Catherine McKay 
Loretta Roscoe 
Carol Schene 
Margaret Schofield 
Dorothy Werst 
Susan Williams 
Daniel Young 
Grace Burke 
LaVonne Wright 
Judith Abrams 
William Betourney 
Frank Calore 
Janet Celi 
Mary Cormier 
Roberta Doyle 
Esther Folts 
Steven Galper 



2 


Carol Maciorowski 


2 


Jean Peterson 1 


2 


John Nacke 


2 


Nancy Bates 1 


2 


Mary Paisley 


2 


Karen Bengston 1 


2 


Linda Paulson 


2 


Elian Budd 1 


2 


Rosemary Sheppard 


2 


Grace Day 1 


2 


Donna Sims 


2 


Debora Liebermann 1 


2 


Richard Tansey 


2 


Marie Linnell 1 


2 


Ellen Burke 




Nancy Lotz 1 


2 


Kathleen Chick 




Diane Porcari 1 


2 


Flavia Cigliano 




Debora Price 1 


2 


David Emerson 




Lorna Rush 1 


2 


Edward Gadbois 




John Schofield 1 


2 


Antonia Lazott 




David Snelson 1 


2 


Elizabeth McDonald 




Jane Starr 1 


2 


Anne Recchio 




Mary Sullivan 1 


2 


Marlene Smith 




Grant Swenor 1 


2 


Gail Wells 







ACTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
STAFF POSITIONS 



Music 

Physical Education 

Art 

McCarthy-Towne Special 

Special Education 

Speech 

Emotionally Disturbed 

Learning Disabilities 

Remedial Reading 

Guidance 



1971- 


72 


1970- 


71 


1969- 


70 




1971- 


72 


1970-71 


1969-70 


8 




7 




7 




Classroom Teachers: 










4 




5 




6 




Conant 


20 




- 


- 


4 




4 




4 




Gates 


18 




18 


18 


2 




- 




- 




Douglas 


19 




20 


20 


2 




2 




2 




Merriam 


18 




19 


19 


3 




3 




3 




McCarthy-Towne 


20 




12 M 


12 M 


2 




2 




- 










12 T 


12 T 


5 




2 




- 




Library 


2 




1 


1 


4 




4 




4 




French 


- 




- 


1 


8 




9 




9 




Perceptually Handicapped 


- 




- 


1 



ACTON-BOXBOROUGH REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
STAFF POSITIONS 







Junior High 






Senior High 






1971-72 


1970- 


71 


1969-70 


1971-72 


1970- 


71 


1969-70 


Art 


2 


3 




2 


2 


2 




2 


Business 


- 


- 




- 


4 


3 




3 


English 


7 


6 




5 


13 


12 




11 


Emotionally Disturbed 


1 


- 




- 


- 


- 




- 


General Music 


3 


2 




2 


2 


1 




2 


Guidance 


3 


3 




3 


6 


4 




5 


Home Economics 


3 


3 




2 


2 


2 




2 


Industrial Arts 


3 


3 




2 


2 


2 




2 


Learning Disabilities 


2 


- 




- 


- 


- 




- 


Library 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 




1 


Math 


7 


6 




5 


13 


10 




10 


Mechanical Drawing 


- 


- 




- 


1 


1 




1 


Languages 


6 


6 




4 


11 


11 




11 


Physical Education 


3 


2 




2 


4 


4 




4 


Remedial Reading 


1 


2 




2 


- 


1 




1 


Science 


6 


6 




6 


11 


10 




10 


Social Studies 


6 


6 




5 


14 


14 




11 


Speech 


1 


1 




1 


- 


- 




- 



44 



ACTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
BASE ANNUAL SALARY 

January - August, 1972 



Step 


Bachelor's 
Degree 


Bachelor's 
Degree + 15 

$7, 750 


Master's 
(or Bachelor's 

+ 36, 2/3 in 
Major Subject) 

$8, 150 (1) 


Master's + 15 
$8,350 (1) 


Master's + 30 


1 


$7, 550 (1) 


$8, 750 (1) 


2 


$7,950 (7) 


$8, 150 (2) 


$8, 550 (5) 


$8,750 


$9, 150 


3 


$8,450 (5) 


$8,650 (2) 


$9,050 (7) 


$9, 250 


$9,650 


4 


$8,850 (12) 
(6 hours) 


$9,050 (4) 
(6 hours) 


$9,450 (4) 
(3 hours) 


$9,650 
(3 hours) 


$10,050 
(3 hours) 


5 


$9,250 (11) 


$9,450 (1) 


$9,850 (3) 


$10,050 


$10,450 


6 


$9,675 (11) 


$9,875 


$10,275 (5) 


$10,475 


$10,875 


7 


$10, 105 (3) 
(3 hours) 


$10,305 (1) 
(3 hours) 


$10, 705 (5) 
(3 hours) 


$10,905 
(3 hours) 


$11,305 (1) 
(3 hours) 


8 


$10,615 (5) 


$10,815 (1) 


$11, 215 (1) 


$11,415 (1) 


$11,815 


9 


$11, 150 (3) 


$11,350 (1) 


$11, 750 (4) 


$11,950 


$12,350 (1) 


10 


$11,670 (2) 
(3 hours) 


$11,870 (2) 
(3 hours) 


$12, 270 (2) 
(3 hours) 


$12,470 
(3 hours) 


$12,870 
(3 hours) 


11 


$12, 185 (1) 


$12,385 (1) 


$12, 785 (1) 


$12,985 


$13,385 


12 


$12, 750 (5) 


$12,950 (3) 


$13,350 (9) 


$13, 550 


$13,950 (2) 



Doctorate 
(or Master's 
+ 60, 2/3 in 

Major Subject) 


$9, 


350 


$9, 


750 


$10, 


250 


$10, 


650 


$11, 


050 


$11, 


475 


$11, 


905 


$12, 


415 


$12, 


950 


$13, 


4 70 


$13, 


985 


$14, 


550 



ACTON-BOXBOROUGH REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
BASE ANNUAL SALARY 

January - August, 1972 



1 


$7, 550 (9) 


$7, 750 (2) 


$8, 150 (3) 


$8,350 


$8, 750 


$9,350 


2 


$7,950 (11) 


$8, 150 (1) 


$8, 550 (3) 


$8, 750 


$9, 150 


$9,750 


3 


$8,450 (2) 


$8,650 (2) 


$9, 050 (5) 


$9,250 


$9,650 


$10,250 


4 


$8,850 (14) 
(6 hours) 


$9,050 (1) 
(6 hours) 


$9,450 (3) 
(3 hours) 


$9,650 (1) 
(3 hours) 


$10,050 
(3 hours) 


$10,650 


5 


$9,250 (4) 


$9,450 (1) 


$9,850 (4) 


$10,050 


$10,450 


$11,050 


6 


$9,675 (6) 


$9,875 (1) 


$10,275 (4) 


$10,475 (2) 


$10,875 (1) 


$11,475(2) 


7 


$10, 105 (2) 
(3 hours) 


$10,305 (3) 
(3 hours) 


$10,705 (4) 
(3 hours) 


$10,905 (2) 
(3 hours) 


$11,305 (1) 
(3 hours) 


$11,905 


8 


$10, 615 (2) 


$10,815 (1) 


$11,215 (5) 


$11,415 (1) 


$11,815 (1) 


$12,415 


9 


$11, 150 


$11,350 (1) 


$11, 750 (6) 


$11,950 (1) 


$12,350 


$12,950(1) 


10 


$11,670 (2) 
(3 hours) 


$11,870 (1) 
(3 hours) 


$12,270 (1) 
(3 hours) 


$12,470 (1) 
(3 hours) 


$12,870 (1) 
(3 hours) 


$13,470 


11 


$12, 185 


$12,385 (1) 


$12, 785 (2) 


$12, 985 


$13,385 


$13,985(1) 


12 


$12, 750 (2) 


$12,950 (2) 


$13,350 (4) 


$13,550 (5) 


$13,950 (5) 


$14. 550(2) 



45 



SCHOOL FINANCES 

Acton Public Schools 

Received - To the Credit of Schools 



State Aid for Public Schools, Chapter 70 
State Aid for Transportation, Chapter 71 
Special Education, Chapters 69 and 71 
State Aid for Town in Regional School District 
Federal Aid 



>Jc jjc jj: % sfc sfc # ^ H c & 



Appropriated, March 1971 
Federal Funds, Balance 12/31/70 

Gross Operating Budget, 1971 



$2,008,979.00 
22,989. 00 



$2,031,968. 00 



# SJC S|C 5|C 5J: >£ >£ 5^ 5&C Sjc 



Total Expended for Maintenance and Operation in 1971 
Cost per Pupil (2438 as of 10/1/71) 



$1,990,205.92 
$816.33 



PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 1972 

January 1 - December 31, 1972 

Acton Public Schools 

By Line Item 



Administration 

Instruction 

Plant Operation and Maintenance 

Non-Instructional Services 

Outlay 

Transportation 

Out-of-State Travel 

Contingency 

Total 



School Committee and Central Office 

Building Administration 

Art 

Contingency 

Educable Mentally Retarded 

Elementary 

Emotionally Disturbed 

Evaluation, Research and Development 

General Music 

Guidance 

Health 

Home Instruction 

Industrial Arts 

Learning Disabilities 

Library 

Lunch Program 

Physical. Education 

Remedial Reading 

Science 

Social Studies 

Speech Therapy 

Transportation 

Building Maintenance 

Building Operation 

Intramurals 

Total 



$ 67,350.00 

1,875,303.00 

251,910.00 

56, 186. 00 

9,650.00 

131,311. 00 

1, 500. 00 

25,000.00 

$2,418,210.00 



By Program 



$ 71, 


150. 


00 


157, 


250. 


00 


42, 


083. 


00 


25, 


000. 


00 


38, 


456. 


00 


1, 171, 


737. 


00 


43, 


222. 


00 


25, 


000. 


00 


94, 


805. 


00 


92, 


519. 


00 


22, 


336. 


00 


2, 


991. 


00 


13, 


511. 


00 


58, 


162. 


00 


31, 


350. 


00 


26, 


264. 


00 


39, 


304. 


00 


56, 


237. 


00 


3, 


000. 


00 


4, 


000. 


00 


49, 


977. 


00 


115, 


000. 


00 


52, 


110. 


00 


172, 


500. 


00 


5, 


000. 


00 


$2,412, 


964. 


00 



46 

Acton-Boxborough Regional School District 
Received to the Credit of the District 

State Aid for Transportation, Chapter 71 $ 97,959.00 

Federal and State Aid 16, 215. 00 

Appropriated for Maintenance and Operation, March 1971 $2, 026, 960. 00 

Transfers and Anticipated Income: 

Balance 1970 Operating Budget $ 51, 506. 00 
1970-71 Transportation Reimbursement 113,291.00 

Balance 12/31/70 Federal Funds 31,748.00 

Special Education Reimbursement 1970 8,451.00 

Miscellaneous Receipts, 1970 3,326. 00 208, 322. 00 

Gross Operating Budget, 1971 $2,235,282.00 

Total Expended for Maintenance and Operation in 1971 $2, 198, 926. 95 

Cost per Pupil (2290 as of 10/1/71) $960. 23 

PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 1972 

January 1 - December 31, 1972 

Acton-Boxborough Regional School District 

Administration $ 72,850.00 

Instruction 1,911,260.00 

Plant Operation 202, 120. 00 

Plant Maintenance 36, 586. 00 

Non-Instructional Services 61, 011. 00 

Outlay 15,335.00 

Transportation 132,200.00 

Special Charges 14, 047. 00 

Out-of-State Travel 2, 400. 00 

Contingency 25,000. 00 

Total Maintenance and Operation $2, 472, 809. 00 

Non-Classified, School Athletic Fund 76, 599. 00 

Debt Service (Gross) 893,770. 00 

Total Budget (Gross) $3, 443, 178. 00 

By Program 

School Committee and Central Office $ 76, 550. 00 

Building Administration 267, 836. 00 

Art 53,878.00 

Business Education 41, 768. 00 

English/ Language Arts 200,475.00 

Dramatics and Yearbook 2, 280. 00 

Emotionally Disturbed 20,415.00 

Evaluation, Research and Development 30, 000. 00 

General Music 66,111.00 

Guidance 123, 505. 00 

Health 25,237.00 

Home Economics 58, 366. 00 

Home Instruction 600. 00 

Industrial Arts 66, 774. 00 

Learning Disabilities 32,791.00 

Library 46,254.00 

Lunch Program 8, 964. 00 

Mathematics 211, 198. 00 

Mechanical Drawing 14, 735. 00 

Modern Languages 172, 260. 00 

Physical Education 84, 462. 00 



47 



Remedial Reading 

Science 

Social Studies 

Speech Therapy 

Transportation 

Work Study 

Building Maintenance 

Building Operation 

Special Charges - Blanchard Auditorium Rental 

Intramurals 

Athletics 

Contingency 

Debt Service (Net) 

Total 



$ 16,224.00 

209, 516.00 

231,086.00 

11,609.00 

131,200.00 

3,287. 00 

41,856.00 

184,525.00 

14,047.00 

7,260. 00 

69,339.00 

25,000.00 

406, 162.00 

$2,955, 570.00 



£ jje s|< % :fc 



* * * 



Gross Budget, 1972 
Gross Operating Budget 

Less: (1) Balance 1971 Operating Budget 

(2) 1970-71 Transportation Reimbursement 

(3) 1970-71 Transportation Reimbursement Balance 

(4) 12/31/71 P. L. 874 Balance 

(5) 12/31/71 Special Education Balance 

(6) 1971 Miscellaneous Collections 

Net Operating Budget 

Debt Service 

Interest 

Less: Anticipated State Aid 

Maturing Debt 

Less: Anticipated State Aid 

Premium on Bond Issue Balance 

Net Debt Service 

Non-Classified 

School Athletic Fund 

Total Net Budget 



$3,443, 178.00 



( ) 

Net Budget 

Gross Budget 



$ 670,813.00 
2,772,365.00 

$3,443, 178.00 



$2,472,809.00 

(15,070.00) 
(97,959.00) 
(40,011.00) 
(16,215.00) 
(10, 192.00) 
(3,758.00) 



238, 770.00 
(67,678.00 ) 

655,000.00 
(413, 775.00) 
(6, 155.00) 



$2, 289,604. 00 



171,092.00 



235,070.00 



76,599.00 
$2, 772,365. 00 



Apportionment of the Charges to be Assessed 
Against the Towns of Acton and Boxborough 

Year 1972 



Acton *Operating Expenses, 91. 2% of $2, 289, 604. 00** 

Debt Service, 95% of $406, 162. 00 
Non-Classified, 91. 2% of $76, 599. 00 



$2,088, 119.00 

385,853.00 

69,858.00 



$2, 543,830. 00 



Boxborough *Operating Expenses, 8. 8% of $2, 289, 603. 00 
Debt Service, 5% of $406, 162. 00 
Non-Classified, 8. 8% of $76, 599. 00 



201,485.00 

20,309.00 

6,741.00 



$ 228,535.00 



*Student Enrollment 10/1/71 



Acton 
Boxborough 



2088 (91.2%) 
202 (8. 8%) 



2290 



**Gross Operating Budget $2, 472, 809. 00 

Less: 1971 M & O Balance (15,070.00) 

1971 Transportation Reimbursement Bal. (5,770.00) 

1971 P. L. 874 Balance (16,215.00) 

1971 SpeciaL Education Balance (10, 192. 00) 

1971 Miscellaneous Collections (3,758.00) 

Amount Budgeted for Transportation (132, 200. 00 ) 

$2, 289, 604. 00 



48 



ACTON-BOXBOROUGH REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 
Treasurer's Report 
December 31, 1971 



Balance, December 31, 1970 

Receipts, 1971: 

Town of Acton 

Town of Boxborough 

State Aid for Construction 

Construction 

Public Law 874 

Public Law 89-10, Title I 

Public Law 89-10, Title II 

Title II Special Purpose Grant 

Public Law 91-230, Title VI 

Special Education 

Transportation Reimbursement 

Vocational Education, Chapter 74 

School Lunch Fund 

School Athletic Fund 

Adult Education 

Federal Taxes 

State Taxes 

Teachers' Retirement 

County Retirement 

Teachers' Insurance 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield 

Group Life Insurance 

Acton Education Association 

M. T. A. Credit Union 

Tax Annuities 

Premium on Bond 

Earned Interest 

Miscellaneous 



$ 273,405.97 



$2,001,958.00 
194,926.00 

111, 291. 32 
4,690,000.00 

16, 215.00 

4,428. 00 

2,377.90 

4,000.00 

10, 000. 00 

10, 192. 00 

97,959.00 

7,951.00 

112, 882.80 
5,684.66 
7, 721.00 

234, 146. 99 

57, 560.37 

72, 513. 17 

10, 212. 56 

1, 165.69 

5,652. 50 

898. 10 

6,988.65 

1,370.00 

10, 150.00 

16, 589.95 

627. 71 

4,007. 72 



Total Receipts 



Total 



$7, 699,470. 09 
$7,972, 876. 06 



Disbursements, 1971: 

Maintenance and Operation 

Construction 

Land Acquisition 

Title I 

Title II 

Title II Special Purpose Grant 

Title VI, P. L. 91-230 

Payment on Principal 

Interest on Debt 

School Lunch Fund 

School Athletic Fund 

Adult Education 

Federal Taxes 

State Taxes 

Teachers' Retirement 

County Retirement 

Teachers' Insurance 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield 

Group Life Insurance 

Acton Education Association 

M. T. A. Credit Union 

Tax Annuities 

Premium on Bond 

Total Disbursements 
Balance, December 31, 1971 
Total 



$2, 198, 711.95 

824, 772.49 

7, 500.00 

4,428.00 

1, 720. 10 

2,405. 55 

7,000.97 

185, 000. 00 

54, 890.00 

109, 700. 57 

45,707.21 

5, 901. 65 

234, 146.99 

57, 560. 37 

72, 513. 17 

10,212. 56 

1, 165.69 

5,672. 77 

898. 10 

6,988. 65 

1, 370. 00 

10, 150. 00 

10, 434. 50 



$3, 858, 851. 29 

4, 114,024. 77 

$7, 972, 876. 06 



Priscilla Felt 
Treasurer 



49 



VOCATIONAL REGIONAL SCHOOL 



At the annual 1971 Town Meetings Acton, Arlington, Belmont, Boxborough, Carlisle, Concord, Lexing- 
ton, Lincoln, Stow, Sudbury, Wayland, and Weston ratified the Regionalization Agreement as prepared by the 
Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical High School Planning Board. With this ratification the Minuteman 
Regional Vocational Technical School District came into being. 

The School Committee, composed of one representative appointed by the Town Moderator from each of 
the member towns, established the regular meeting time to be the first and third Tuesdays of the month at 
8:00 p.m. in Room S-17 of the Concord-Carlisle Regional High School. 

The first order of business for the newly formed Committee was a search for a Superintendent-Director 
of the District. After an intensive investigation of more than 75 applicants, the Committee selected Samuel 
Sains of Long Island, New York, for this position. He assumed his duties as of September 1, 1971. 

Another important charge to the Committee was to locate a suitable site for the proposed school. Al- 
ready existing facilities as well as parcels of land suitable for constructing a 1500 pupil school were investi- 
gated. With guidance from the State Department of Education, a minimum acreage requirement was estab- 
lished at 45 acres with 60 acres representing the optimum amount. Location, availability of sewerage and 
easy access to the site were other important considerations. 

On October 5, 1971, the Committee voted to incur debt in the amount of $900,000 for the purpose of ac- 
quiring land and preparing architectural and engineering plans and for other preliminary expenses in connec- 
tion with constructing and equipping a regional vocational technical school. Each of the member towns had 
30 days within which to hold a Town Meeting to approve or disapprove this debt. The towns of Acton, Arling- 
ton, Boxborough, Concord, Lincoln, Stow, Sudbury and Wayland voted to approve the debt with the remaining 
towns providing authorization by not holding meetings. With the authorization of debt monies became available 
for final site analysis, site acquisition and architectural services. 

An extensive search for an architect was undertaken with the intent of locating one who would be able to 
translate the educational philosophy of the school into a workable facility within budget requirements. Fifty- 
»six interested firms have submitted their qualifications to the Committee for evaluation. 

During the year, to effectively accomplish its task, the School Committee has structured itself into the 
following working committees: Superintendent Selection, Education Philosophy, Site and Architect Selection 
and Budget. The School Committee created an Advisory Committee consisting of the Superintendents in the 
member towns of the District. Their function is to recommend on educational matters. In addition, an Ad- 
visory Committee was established with a representative from each of the member towns to assist and recom- 
mend to the School Committee on matters concerning the selection of site, the architect and the building of the 
school. 

Marilyn Peterson, Secretary - Acton 
, Walter Verney - Arlington 
v Henry L. Hall, Jr., Chairman - Belmont 

Roger H. Morse - Boxborough 

Kenneth L. Bilodeau - Carlisle 

Anna Manion - Concord 

Erik Mollo-Christensen, Vice Chairman - Lexington 

Ruth Wales - Lincoln 

Glen F. Pippert - Stow 

Alfred C. Cron - Sudbury 

Paul Alphen - Wayland 

Charles Sutherland - Weston 



INSPECTOR of ANIMALS 



Premises Inspected 


30 


Ponies 


30 


Horses 


53 


Cows over 2 


92 


Cows 1-2 


56 


Calves 


28 



Bulls 


2 


Beef Cattle 


11 


Swine 


3 


Sheep 


3 


Dog Bites 


23 


Dogs Quarantined 


23 



Patrick Palmer 
Inspector of Animals 



50 



LIBRARIES 



ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

An all-time high of 15,500 books were circulated in the month of March, and the Acton Memorial Library 
is now the tenth busiest medium-sized in the state. 



Circulation: 



Books: 



Fiction 
Non -fiction 
Juvenile 
Records 
Prints 
Total 



Annual Library Statistics 








1971 








56, 602 Income: 


Fines 


$5, 


74'7. 45 


51, 880 


Miscellaneous 




541.03 


45,912 


Total 


$6, 


288.48 


3,203 








196 









157, 793 



Adult fiction added to collection 

Adult non-fiction added to collection 

Gifts added to collection 

Total books added to adult collection 

Total books discarded from adult collection 

Juvenile fiction added to collection 

Juvenile non-fiction added to collection 

Gifts added to collection 

Total books added to Juvenile collection 

Total books discarded from Juvenile collection 

Books in library January 1, 1971 
Books added to collection during 1971 
Books withdrawn from collection during 1971 
Books in library as of January 1, 1972 
Inter-library loan requests 632 



626 

1,478 

183 



2, 


,287 


1, 


, 033 




305 




357 




21 




683 




269 


34, 


225 


2, 


970 


1, 


299 



35,896 



Service to patrons continues to expand. In February the new microfilm reader arrived and back issues 
of the New York Times and selected magazine titles have subsequently been purchased on microfilm. This is 
the beginning of what we hope will be a very respectable microfilm collecticn. 

The library rules were revised and published in an attractive orange folder entitled "User's Guide to Li- 
brary Services". The inventory has been completed, after twenty-six months. After much diligent searching, 
we have received ten matching chairs, which were badly needed, for the children's area. Useful as well as 
beautiful is the new cemented flagstone walk around the library from the front to side doors, set in the fall. 

Restoration and registering of the many historic items housed in the attic has begun and most of the 
items have been recorded on beautiful colored slides. The refinishing of the storage area is proceeding very 
well, thanks to the efforts of Custodian Bob Trafton. 

This year was full of varied and interesting programs and events held at the library. A very timely 
"Job Clinic", a lecture-discussion on how to find new employment, was held on two Sunday afternoons in Feb- 
ruary. During Earth Week in April, the Audubon Society sponsored an educational exhibit. We are especially 
grateful to the "Davis Blues" of the Acton Minutemen. under the direction of Col. Walter Johnson, who per- 
formed for the April 19th program. The program was completed appropriately with a reading by Mr. Paul 
Zimmer of Longfellow's poem "Paul Revere' s Ride". 

The semi-monthly musical programs sponsored by the Sounds and Silences Committee continued through 



June. Funds were not available for their continuance, 
resumed in 1972, perhaps under private sponsorship, 
for an environmental information file workshop. Mr. 
the clipping service to which our library subscribes, 
tions Day was held on October 23rd. 



but it is hoped that similar musical programs can be 
In August, librarians from Eastern Massachusetts met 
John Putnam, from Boston Environment, Inc., explained 
An International Reception in observance of United Na- 



51 

On November 4th, librarians from nine surrounding towns met here to initiate intra-subregional cooper- 
ation. The Friends of the Acton Libraries held a reception on November 7th for all of the artists from the 
community who had exhibited at the library throughout the year, and on November 19th and 20th sponsored a 
very successful Paperback Book Fair, 

The annual Campfire Girls Mitten Tree was on display during the first part of December, Three 
Christmas concerts completed the year--the Acton-Boxboro Regional High School chorus and ensemble on 
Sunday, December 12th; the "Polyphonic Singers" on Saturday, December 18th; and caroling by Brownie 
Troop 1021 on Monday evening, December 20th. 

Without the volunteers of the Friends of the Acton Libraries, the library could not function as effectively 
or be open for so many hours. January through December, the Friends also sponsored weekly story hours 
for four and five -year -olds which were very well attended. The Friends, in addition, are responsible for the 
outstanding art exhibits which are lent by adults in the community and by children in the Acton Public Schools. 
Our sincere thanks to all of the Friends. 

Appreciation is also extended to the Acton Garden Club for the weekly flower arrangements and decora- 
tions at Christmas time. 

The Library Director, Mrs. Wanda Null, has been granted a leave of absence for the year 1972. Mrs. 
Marion Armstrong has agreed to assume the duties of Acting Library Director during Mrs. Null's absence. 
With constantly increasing circulation and a sixty-nine hour work week, the library must provide for more 
staff coverage. The library is therefore asking for twenty more clerical hours a week and a new professional 
position to help both the reference and children's librarians. These areas are now staffed only forty hours out 
of the six days that the library is open. 

The Trustee roster has changed slightly this year. In March, Mrs. Margaret Richter was reelected for 
a three-year term. In October, the Board of Trustees accepted the resignation of Marvin L. Tolf with great 
regret and sincere thanks for his able, loyal and effective service to the library for over seventeen years. 
Mrs. Richter has now been appointed a permanent Trustee to replace Mr. Tolf. In December, Mrs. Doris 
Peterson submitted her resignation. There are currently two vacancies on the Board, one elective and one 
appointed. 

During 1971, the greatest concern of both the Trustees and the staff has been the loitering of young peo- 
ple in and around the library. Empty beer and wine containers left on the grounds and obstruction of the front 
entry by prone bodies has all been .part of the problem. The library has suffered more malicious vandalism 
in the last six months than it has during its entire history. The large panes of glass in back have been etched, 
the library has been broken into and the stereo system stolen, screens on window wells have been cut, and 
someone attempted to set the bookdrop on fire--not to mention eggs, apples, oranges and tomatoes thrown 
against the building. On Wednesday morning, December 22nd, the effects of these activities were dramati- 
cally felt when the wind blew out a large pane of glass at the rear of the building. This occurred, according 
to the glass company, because the glass had been weakened by a rock which had been thrown at the window 
sometime earlier. 

The Revolutionary and Civil War plaques at the Main Street entrance have also suffered somewhat at the 
hands of vandals. Through the aid and cooperation of the Town Public Ceremonies and Celebrations Commit- 
tee, plans are in operation toward the reconditioning of the plaques and improvement of the lighting above them. 

Brewster Conant James L. Parker 

Hayward S. Houghton Margaret Richter 

Florence L. Merriam Raymond A. Shamel 

Mileva P. Brown, Chairman 

Board of Trustees 
REPORT OF THE CITIZENS LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF WEST ACTON 



Board of Trustees : Mrs. Betty Boothby, Chairman; Mrs. Joan Gardner, Secretary; Mrs. Barbara Nylander. 

Library Hours : Monday: 7-9 P. M.; Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday: 10-5 P.M. 

Accession : Number of volumes in the Library January 1, 1971 6, 847 

Increase by purchase 1 193 

Increase by gift 126 

Withdrawn "" 309 

Number of volumes in the Library January 1, 1972 6, 857 

Circulation in 1971 : Fiction 2, 967 Records - 163 Books borrowed from Bookmobile: 505 

Juvenile 4,417 Circulation: 725 

Non-fiction 2,093 Records received from Bookmobile: 90 

Total 9,477 Circulation: 102 

Fines Collected in 1971: $272.93 



52 

This was the first year the Library has been open 30 hours a week. This enabled kindergarten classes 
to visit mornings, many new mothers and young children to browse, and business people to prepare work. 
The longer hours benefited students, and with the increased use of the Library, circulation continued to rise. 
Contributing to the success of the year were the regular visits of the Eastern Massachusetts Regional Book- 
mobile which enabled the Library to offer many additional fine books and recordings, an increased book budget 
permitting it to acquire a better selection of books in steady demand, improvements to the building and 
grounds, and the cheerful help of many lunch hour and other volunteers to all the activities of the Library. 

Thanks are due the Acton Boy Scout Troop 11 who rebuilt the Library lawn and to the Cadette Girl Scout 
Troop 9 and many patrons who helped to make the Fair held in May a success. An air conditioner was pur- 
chased with the proceeds. The Friends of the Acton Libraries continued their support with a Bake Sale, the 
gift of many new books, volunteer help, and numerous items for the Fair. The Acton Garden Club provided a 
handsome Christmas wreath; the Trustees and their families did maintenance work; and many townspeople 
contributed books and periodicals. 

The Trustees wish to remind people that their meetings are usually held on the fourth Thursday of the 
month, at 7:30 P. M,, in the Citizens Library. 



Books may be renewed by telephone. 



Thelma C. Hermes 
Librarian 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



During 1971, the Acton Historical Commission continued its work in the cataloging and preservation of 
the historical assets of the Town. 

Much time was spent by the Historical Commission in an effort to find a practical means of preserving 
and using the Todd House. This building is now in the hands of the Regional School Committee, and many meet- 
ings were held with the School Committee and Dr. Brust, Superintendent of Schools, seeking a solution to the 
problem. In order to prevent further deterioration of the building from weather and vandalism, the doors and 
windows have been boarded up by the School Department. Prior to this, much of the rubbish was cleaned out 
by the Acton Minutemen, under direction of the Historical Commission, in order to reduce the fire hazard. 

This house is important as one of a very few early salt-box types remaining in the area. Although much 
work is necessary for restoration, the building is structurally sound. 

Several meetings were held with the Town Engineering Department and with the Land Acquisition Com- 
mittee in an effort to find a means of assuring that the Isaac Davis Homesite would be available in the future 
to the Town for its Patriots' Day ceremonies. The house and land were up for sale at the time; however, no 
definite conclusion has been reached. 

The Historical Commission met with Acton's Representative in the State Legislature, Chester Atkins, 
and discussed various efforts being made by the State concerning legislation for historical preservation, and 
some of the things which might be done. Mr. Atkins offered his help in any way possible at the State level. 

The Historical Commission recommended to the Board of Selectmen that a Historic District Study Com- 
mittee be appointed, according to State law. This is a very important step in assuring that some of Acton's 
historical and architectural heritage be preserved for the future. This is one means of acting before the bull- 
dozers have done the damage. 

During the year, Mr. Samuel Sutcliffe resigned from the Commission and was replaced by Mrs. Anita 
Dodson. Mr. Sutcliffe spent many long hours working on the Historical Commission and its predecessor, the 
Historical Advisory Committee, and his efforts will be missed. Mr. Jerry Ballantine moved out of state and 
also resigned. He, too, was a member of the Historical Advisory Committee and was Chairman of the His- 
torical Commission for the past two years. The Commission and the Town will miss the leadership and ser- 
vice given by Mr. Ballantine in his efforts to preserve the Town's historical heritage. 

The Acton Historical Commission meets at the Public Works Building on the second Wednesday of the 
month at 8:00 P. M. , and welcomes attendance by all interested citizens. 

Stanley L. Smith, Jr., Chairman 
Marion E. H. Houghton, Clerk 
Anita Dodson 
Robert Nylander 



53 



YOUTH COMMISSION 



Introduction 

The Acton Youth Commission held its first formal meeting on May 20, 1971. The power to form the 
commission and initial funding was provided by vote of the town at the previous .Town Meeting. Commission 
members were appointed by the Town Manager with approval of the Board of Selectmen under the power as- 
cribed to him in the Town Charter. 

The Commission met on a weekly basis for the first three months of its existence, moving into an every 
other week format at the end of that period. The purpose of this report is to describe the activities of the 
Commission during the six-month period since its inception and to outline its plans for the coming year. 

Membership 

The members of the Commission at its incep- 
tion were as follows: Bruce M. McCarthy, Alan B. 
Flood, Ann T. Evans, Charles G. Kadison, Charles 
D. MacPherson, and Nancy C. Howe. McCarthy was 
elected Chairman, Flood -Vice President, and Evans - 
Clerk. There was one vacancy. 

Since then Howe and MacPherson have resigned 
and been replaced by: Charles A. Schook and Ernst A. 
Keppel. There continues to be one vacancy. 

The Town Manager has experienced difficulty in 
filling the seventh seat on the Commission. The Com- 
mission has recommended that the vacancy be filled 
by an individual who is twenty-one years of age or un- 
der and has submitted the names of a number of can- 
didates for consideration. 




Identifying the Problem(s) 



Dr. Charles A. Schook, Alan B. Flood, 

and Chairman Bruce M. McCarthy meet with 

School Committee Chairman Edith D. Stowell. 

(Photo by G. B. Williams, Jr.) 



Due to the absence of any specific job description or outline of direct responsibility, the Commission 
decided at the outset to direct its energies to the gathering of pertinent information in an attempt to identify 
specific youth-related problem areas in the town. The idea was to establish the most pressing areas of need 
to which the Commission should address itself. 



The vehicle adopted to develop the needed information was the open meeting. The Commission invited 
to each meeting specific individuals or groups involved in and/ or knowledgeable of the problems of the young 
in the community. In addition, the Commission extended an open invitation to any and all residents of the town 
to attend and participate in open discussion of the problems of the young. 

This approach proved fruitful throughout the summer months and many divergent groups participated in 
the open meeting discussions. The following groups or individuals participated: 

1. The Recreation Commission 12. Link-up 



2. The Town Manager 13. 

3. The Board of Selectmen 14. 

4. The League of Women Voters 15. 

5. The Clergy 

6. CODE 16. 

7. Living Alternatives 17. 

8. The School Committee 18. 

9. The Police Department 19. 

10. Acton Medical Associates 

11. The Teen Center 



Interested Parents 

Drug Users 

The Massachusetts Committee on 
Children and Youth 

The Conservation Commission 

Teachers 

Student's Rights Leaders 

Large numbers of young people repre- 
senting many divergent points of 
view. 



The open meeting vehicle was extremely successful but is beginning to reach the point of diminishing re- 
turns. It has become obvious that certain groups are unwilling to participate in such meetings and although 
the meetings will continue to be held, the Commission plans to actively seek out reluctant groups and meet 
with them on their own ground. This will be discussed more fully later in this report. 

In a further attempt at gathering information, the Commission has corresponded with and received infor- 
mation and/ or literature from: 



1. Congressman Drinan 

2. Massachusetts Committee on 

Children and Youth 



National Clearinghouse for Mental 
Health Information 

The Middlesex County District Attor- 
ney's Office et al. 



54 

In addition, members of the Commission have spoken directly with: 

1. The University of Massachusetts 3. The U. S. Department of Health, 

2. Boston University Education and Welfare 

4. The ABRHS Guidance Department 

Programs, Projects, Activities 

Based on the data gathered from the above sources of information, the Commission was able to establish 
some specific areas of need to which it has addressed itself. The following is a description of the specific ac- 
tions taken by the Commission since its inception: 

1. Police-Youth Relations : Based on information gathered at open meetings during the 
summer, the Commission identified a rapidly growing feeling of alienation between the 
Acton Police Department and a certain segment of the young community. Acting to head 
off a potentially explosive situation, the Commission sponsored an open discussion be- 
tween the two groups. 

It is the judgment of the Commission that the meeting was successful in opening channels 
of communication between the two groups and in so doing establishing greater mutual 
understanding. 

2. Drug Education : It was established that drug abuse is a very real problem in the commun- 
ity and the Commission has taken the following steps to alleviate the situation: 

a. One member of the Commission has been assigned to follow-up on specific proposals 
for both short and long-range drug education program proposals now before the 
School Committee. 

b. The Commission sponsored an open discussion between CODE, Acton Medical Asso- 
ciates and Living Alternatives on the subject of pooling resources in the battle 
against drug abuse. The meeting was moderately successful. 

c. The Commission has agreed to support CODE by paying specific operating expenses 
up to $500. 

3. Disenfranchised Youth : It was established that many of the young people felt that they had 
little or no rights as citizens. This feeling was prompted, in most cases, because of a 
total ignorance of how to go about obtaining their rights, i. e. , how to work within the polit- 
ical system to achieve their goals. 

This belief that they had been disenfranchised led to apathy in some cases, frustration in 
others, and the frustration was leading some to believe they should fight the system a la 
the SDS. In this case the Commission took a dual approach: 

a. The Commission formally proposed that the School Committee institute a course on 
"practical politics" at the high school level. The course would emphasize methods 
and techniques that can be used to attain specific goals by working within existing 
governmental structure at all levels but with emphasis on local government. This 
proposal has been passed on to the high school principal for study. 

b. The Commission has voted to support the League of Women Voters' Voter Regis- 
tration Drive among young people and has developed a plan of action in cooperation 
with the League which will be discussed later in this report. 

4. Youth Advisory Board : It was the judgment of the Commission that participation by young 
people in the work of the Commission was vital to success. Such participation would pro- 
vide the Commission with continual input from the young community and additional help 
with the rapidly growing workload. 

With these thoughts in mind the Commission formed a "youth advisory board" of four young 
people who represent various groups within the young community. The members of the 
board and the groups they represent are as follows: 

a. Nancy Darlington - Student's Rights c. Heather Brunton - Student Council 

b. Linda Starr - Teen Center d. Patrick Lawson - Young Adults 

5. Youth Activities : One firmly established fact is that there is a woeful lack of constructive 
out-of-school activities available to the young people of the town. In addressing itself to 
this problem, the Commission has become involved in the following activities: 

a. Town Swimming Pool: The Commission supported the construction of a town swim- 
ming pool at the last town meeting. 

b. Job Pool: The Commission has formally proposed to the School Committee that a 
job placement service be instituted at the high school level. The proposal has been 
turned over to the Guidance Department at the high school for implementation. 



55 



c. Acton Common Controversy: With little to do and no "acceptable" place to gather, 
many young people began using the common as a hang-out during the summer. The 
controversy over the use of the common reached Such a point that the Commission 
felt a public meeting between all concerned parties might be helpful in cooling emo- 
tions. The meeting met with little success. 

d. Recreation Commission: The Youth Commission has gone on record as supporting 
the efforts of the Recreation Commission in their attempts to provide constructive 
outside activities for the young people of the community. The two commissions have 
agreed to exchange minutes and to support each other in areas of mutual interest. 

e. Teen Center: Because it provides one of the only places in town where young people 
can gather and become involved in constructive outside activities, the Teen Center 
has been of great interest to the Commission. The problems, activities and pro- 
grams of the Teen Center have been followed closely and will continue to be. A spe- 
cific proposal regarding the Teen Center will be discussed later in this report. 

Future Plans 

The more we learn, the more the job before us seems to grow. However, we are committed to directing 
our energies toward the ultimate goal of making Acton a healthy, happy place for young people to grow and de- 
velop. We have chosen to work on specific projects on a relatively small scale while continuing to study the 
overall problem from all angles. The following is a brief description of the activities we intend to pursue dur- 
ing the coming year: 

1. The search for knowledge must continue. The Commission plans to continue its open meeting 
concept but in addition to seek out those individuals who cannot or will not come to us. We hope 
to attend meetings of other youth commissions, to visit with various church-sponsored youth 
groups, to meet with the student council, the School Committee, the Recreation and Conserva- 
tion Commissions, civic organizations and, of course, continue to meet with the Board of Se- 
lectmen periodically. 

In addition, we would hope to attend pertinent educational seminars and conferences and will 
continue to solicit information and literature from the various private and public agencies con- 
cerned with the problems of the young. 

2. Continuing Projects: The Commission will continue its work on the proposed course on "prac- 
tical politics" and the job pool, as well as the drug education programs for the schools. 

3. Voter Registration: In cooperation with the League of Women Voters, the Commission plans 
to sponsor a combination candidates night and voter registration night for the young people of 
the town. Complete plans for this event will be made public in the near future. 

4. Youth Day: At the urging of various town officials, the Commission has discussed with the 
youth advisory board the possibility of sponsoring a Youth Day or Fair complete with pie -eating 
contest, sack races, etc. The youth advisory board has reacted favorably to the proposal 
prompting the Commission to give it serious consideration for the coming year. 

5. Summer Job Program: During the summer months the combination of school vacation and high 
unemployment among the young resulted in the creation of a large, unstructured group of young 
people with no constructive outlet for their energies. The aimless activities of this group 
caused considerable consternation among the adult citizens of the town. 

In an attempt to provide the young people of the town with the opportunity to engage in construc- 
tive summer activity, the Commission has developed plans for a town-supported summer job 
program. 

As a result of a recent meeting with the Recreation and Conservation Commissions, the Con- 
servation Commission has agreed to fund summer jobs for ten young people who would be as- 
signed the task of preparing conservation land for public use. 

Similar meetings will be held with the other town commissions and departments. Those jobs 
that are not covered by existing budgets will be funded through an article on the Town Warrant. 
Further details on this proposal will be forthcoming soon. 

6. Teen Center Proposal: It has been established that the Teen Center (The Church) provides one 
of the only gathering places for Acton's young people - a gathering place where they can get in- 
volved in constructive outside activity. Unfortunately, it is also true that the Teen Center is in 
danger of closing due to financial difficulties. 

These financial problems have caused those involved in the Teen Center operation to expend all 
their energies in the direction of fund raising thus causing the vital work of developing programs 
and activities to suffer. 



56 



Given these facts, the Commission has developed a three-pronged plan of action: 

a. To keep the Teen Center operating for the present, the Commission proposes to rent 
and maintain the Universalist Church building. This would at once relieve the finan- 
cial burden on the Teen Center and provide a building open to all youth organizations 
of the town including, of course, the Teen Center itself. The Commission proposes 
to do this on a one-year trial basis. 

b. During this trial period, the Commission proposes to carry out a complete study and 
evaluation of the Teen Center operation. The information from this study would be 
turned over to a professional youth agency for review and recommendations. 

c. In addition, the Commission will use this trial period to evaluate all possible loca- 
tions (including the present one) for a Teen Center in town. 

At the end of the trial period, all of the collected data will be weighed and evaluated and the 
Commission will come forth with its findings, including recommendations for further action, if 
any, in this area. This approach to the Teen Center problem has the distinct advantage of al- 
lowing the Teen Center board of directors to remain autonomous while effectively lessening the 
heavy financial burden. 

It is the hope of the Commission that the Teen Center board will use the time and energy pre- 
viously expended in search of financial support to develop a complete program of activities to 
offer the young people of the town. 

Summary 

It has been a difficult, often frustrating period of adjustment for the Youth Commission but, with it all, 
it has been very rewarding. We have barely scratched the surface in our search to identify problems and 
work towards their ultimate solution, and we are fully cognizant of the enormity of the job ahead. 

We do feel that we have made a good start. We have been in existence for only six months and our scope 
of activity, as described in this report, bears witness to this claim. We realize that not everyone will agree 
with the direction we have chosen. To those who disagree, we offer an open mind and a willingness to listen. 
Come work with us. We need and will accept all the help we can get. 

We ask your support, both moral and financial, in our efforts to make Acton a better place for your 
children. 

Bruce M. McCarthy, Chairman Charles G. Kadison 

Alan B. Flood, Vice-Chairman Charles A. Shook 

Ann T. Evans, Clerk Ernst A. Keppel 

Acton Youth Commission 



RECREATION 



A Master Recreation Plan is a primary goal for 1972. The plan will provide a scheme for an orderly 
development in planning, financing, program coordination and development of facilities and maintenance. It 
will lend direction towards redefining the purpose and function of the Department, as related to the year-round 
needs of all children, young people, adults, and senior citizens. A list of priorities will evolve to meet im- 
mediate and future needs of our growing community. 

A special vote of appreciation goes to Gale Jarvis, who resigned from the Recreation Commission this 
past year. Gale has contributed greatly to the development of the Babe Ruth and Little League Programs. 
Serving for a period of eight years as a member, Gale Jarvis has given unselfishly of his time. Recognition 
also goes to Mrs. Elinor White who resigned as commissioner this year. Both have made a real contribution 
to the progress and excellence of our Recreation Program. 

The Commission is always in search of actively concerned Actonians interested in serving in various 
capacities within the scope of the Recreation Commission. The year 1972 will create a need for additional as- 
sociate commissioners to establish special committees to fulfill special assignments. Reliable and conscien- 
tious applicants ranging from young people to senior citizens will also be needed to fulfill current and future 
vacancies on the Commission. The Commission needs your help. 

The Recreation Commission and your Director have been meeting with many Town Committees during 
1971. Among them are Selectmen, Finance Committee, Conservation Commission, Planning Board, and Re- 
gional School Committee. It has been rewarding to see these committees working together to solve Recreation 
problems while seeking to continue to improve our Recreation Programs. 



57 

Before I close this report, I should like to convey my whole-hearted appreciation to the Acton Recrea- 
tion Commission and Associate Committees for their support in our effort to continue the betterment of the 
Recreation Program for all Acton citizens. Special recognition goes to Charles Biechler, Chairman of the 
Bikeways Planning and Development Committee; to William Lynch and Stephen Cornwall and the Acton-Boxboro 
Cross-Country Ski Team for developing a Ski Touring Trail; to William Sparks, Principal of the Merriam 
School, for his assistance in developing the Merriam School Playground; to Mrs. Richard Moore who coor- 
dinated registration of the Swimming Program; and to Allen Flood for his enthusiastic volunteer assistance 
with the reorganization of the Men's Basketball League. 

In conclusion, I should like to express my sincere appreciation to various Town Department Supervisors 
and Summer Staff, and to the many men and women and high school students behind the scenes. Their loyalty 
and effort are deeply appreciated. 

FACILITIES 



Baseball Fields (available by permit): Jones Field; A. B. Regional High School (completion for 1973). 

Little League Baseball Fields (available by permit): Jones Field; Goward Field, Gates School, Conant School 
(completion for 1972); McCarthy-Towne School. 

Softball Fields (available by permit): Elm Park (lighted); A. B. Regional High School (completion for 1973). 

Basketball Courts : Gates (one court); Conant School (one court, completion for 1972); Merriam School (one 
court); Elm Park (two courts proposed for 1972). 

Soccer/ Football Fields : McCarthy-Towne School; Gates School; Elm Park (lighted); Conant School (comple- 
tion for 1972); A. B. Regional High School (two fields, completion for 1973). 

Tennis Courts (available by permit): Charter Road (four courts); Elm Park (two courts); A. B. Regional High 
School (four courts to be completed for 1973). 

Ice Skating Rinks : Charter Road Tennis Courts (two areas proposed for 1972); Elm Park (proposed for 1972); 
Jones Field (proposed for 1972). 

Hockey Rinks : A. B. Regional High School Tennis Courts (proposed for 1973). 

Ski Touring Trails : Spring Hill Area (completion for December 1972). 

Bikeway Trails : Newtown Road; Arlington Street; Massachusetts Avenue; Nagog Hill Road (completion for 
1972). 

Playgrounds : Merriam School; Goward Field; Jones Field; Elm Park; Conant School (proposed for 1973); 
Gardner Field. 

Swimming Pools : A. B. Regional High School (completion for late 1973). 

At the present time the use of certain facilities can not meet the demand placed upon them by Acton resi- 
dents. A permit system as well as rules and regulations in the use of various facilities have been instituted in 
order to effectively control the efficient use of the areas. The following regulations will go into effect this 
spring for all tennis courts: 

1. Tennis shoes must be worn. 

2. Street Hockey is prohibited. 

3. Maximum playing time is one hour. 

4. Adults 16 years and up have priority on holidays, weekends, and weekdays after 6:00 P.M. 

5. Permits will be required for all Tournaments and private lessons. 

Permits will also be required for the use of all Baseball, Little League, and Softball Fields. 

Future of Recreation : The decision to place the Recreation Department on a part-time, year-round operation 
will greatly affect the total Recreation picture. 

PROGRAMS OFFERED DURING 1971 

Winter/Spring Summer/ Kail 

Alpine Skiing Supervised Playgrounds Swimming Soccer 

Figure Skating Baseball Junior Tennis Junior Golf 

Co-Ed Volleyball Special Events Adult Tennis Adult Golf 

Men's Basketball Bowling Sports Clinics Men's Softball 

Day Camp for Mentally Handicapped 



58 



MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS FOR 1971 

1. Part-time, year-round professional leadership. 

2. Development of three new skating areas. 

3. New school use policy with the Acton-Boxboro School Committee. 

4. Development of an Intramural Program for Acton and Acton-Boxboro students. 

5. Development of a Bikeway Trail. 

6. Development of a Ski Touring Trail. 

7. Utilization of commercial recreational facilities for programs. 

8. Increased development of self-supporting programs. 

9. Passage of funds for the construction of an indoor Community Swimming Pool. 

10. Installation of lighting and drainage at Elm Park. 

11. Development of the Merriam School Playground. 




Charter Road Tennis Courts were transformed into 

30,000 sq. ft. of ice skating area. The area was open until 

dusk due to a lack of lighting. 



The new installation of lights at Elm Park next to the 
Douglas School will be operative this spring when the 
Acton Men's Softball League begin their season. 



Janet Murphy, Chairman 
Richard McCauley Thomas Burke 

Harrington Moore, Jr. John Duclos, Director 

Recreation Commission 



f<->l 





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59 



1975 CELEBRATION 



The Advisory Committee on the 1975 Celebration, appointed by the Selectmen, held nine meetings in 
1971, its second year of operation. These meetings, scheduled for the last Monday of the month at 8:00 P, M, 
in the Selectmen's offices at the Town Hall, are open meetings which citizens are invited to attend. 

The Committee has been charged by the Selectmen with coordination of activities with surrounding towns. 
Presently, minutes of meetings are being exchanged with Concord, Stow, and Lincoln. Contacts will soon be 
initiated with newly appointed committees in other towns. The Maynard Centennial Committee has been con- 
tacted to study finances and other facets of that event. 

Subcommittees appointed in 1969 have been augmented by additional committees for specific program events. 
Further efforts in historical research have been made both by the Advisory Committee and other organizations 
in Acton. The winning design for letterhead or other purposes has been refined, and progress has been made 
in determining what an official medallion should look like. A permanent memorial is still under discussion. 

The program for 1975 has been determined, tentatively, as shown below. Generally speaking, activities 
and events now celebrated will continue to be celebrated in 1975. The program is under constant review and 
study. 

Crown Resistance Day (September 27, 1974 - initial event) 

February 23, 1975 - Isaac Davis' Birthday (pageant or ball) 

April 18, 19, 20 (march to Concord, open house and other events) 

Memorial Day 

June 14 (Flag Day parade) 

Crown Resistance Day (September 28, 1975 - closing event) 

The sum of $4,000 was requested in the 1971 Town Warrant, and was voted by town meeting members. 
These funds were added to the $5,000 previously deposited in a special bank account. The Committee seeks 
$5,000 in 1972, according to a plan which anticipates raising funds so that the tax burden will not fall heavily 
in any given year. A tentative budget totaling a net expenditure of about $26,500 has been drawn up for the 
Celebration. Individual budgets for each event include added expense for police, fire, highway department 
and other expenses occasioned by these events. 



Mr. Ahti E. Autio (ex officio) 
Mr. E. Wilson Bursaw 
Col. Burton A. Davis 
Mr. David H. Donaldson 
Mr. Donald R. Gilberti 
Mr. Russell D. Hayward 
Mr. Hayward S. Houghton 
Mrs. Hayward S. Houghton 
Mr. Roger M. Huebsch 



Mrs. Roger M. Huebsch 
Mr. Mark A. Kahan 

- Mr. T. Frederick S. Kennedy 
Mrs. Donald R. Kinzie 

Mr. Walter R. Laite 

Mr. Malcolm S. MacGregor 

Mrs. Malcolm S. MacGregor 

- Miss Florence A. Merriam 
Mr. Richmond P. Miller 



Mr. Charles A. Morehouse 
Mrs. Ronald N. Morris 
Mr. Gilbert S. Osborn 
Mr. Palo A. Peirce 
Mr. Norman L. Roche 
Mr. Raymond W. Spicer 
Mrs. John W. Tierney 
Mr. Earle W. Tuttle 
Mr. Brewster Conant, Chm. 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



The objective of the Conservation Commission is to assist the Town in maintaining plentiful water sup- 
plies, preventing future flooding, obtaining recreational areas, providing educational opportunities for children 
of the area, and maintaining aesthetic values so that our Town remains a desirable place in which to live and 
raise families. 

In furtherance of this objective, the Conservation Commission continued in 1971 with its Master Plan for 
land acquisition. At the March 1971 Town Meeting, the Town approved the action of the Conservation Com- 
mission in purchasing the following: 

1. Plamondon land, 3.4 acres, adjacent to Will's Hole Quaking Bog. 

2. Martin land, 3.54 acres off Spring Hill Road. 

3. Hollowell land, 10.33 acres off Spring Hill Road. 

4. Waldo Wilson land, 15.39 acres off Spring Hill Road. 

5. Monson land, 10 acres off Central Street. 

6. 90 acres taken by eminent domain for conservation purposes by the Selectmen. 

7. 5.8 acres transferred to us by Selectmen off Spring Hill Road. 



Papers have been passed on this land, and it now belongs to the Town for conservation purposes. 



60 



At the March 1972 Town Meeting, approval, will 
be requested of the Conservation Commission's action 
in purchasing an additionaL 100 acres of land in South 
Acton completing a 186-acre parcel for which we are 
appLying to the Federal Bureau of Outdoor Recreation 
for reimbursement. The total cost of all the land 
mentioned here is $268,710.00, of which 75%, or 
$134,355.00 is reimbursable by B.O.R., plus an addi- 
tional 25%, or $67,177.00 is reimbursable by the 
Massachusetts Department of Natural Resources. 
Final approval will result in a total of $201,532.00 of 
the purchase price of this land being returned to the 
Town of Acton. 

The Plamondon land is an addition to the Will's 
Hole and Town Forest area which is used for passive 
recreation and nature study. The Martin, Hollowell 
and Wilson lands are additions to the Spring Hill Tract. 
The Conservation Commission has worked closely with 
the Recreation Commission on plans for recreation 
here. Trails are being cleared and it wilL be available 
for cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. Other uses 
will include horseback riding, hiking, nature traiLs 
and passive recreation. Plans are also being made 
with the Recreation Commission for a majority of the 
South Acton land to be used for active recreation such 
as baseball and skiing. 




Town Manager R. W. Dotson accepts reim- 
bursement check from Dept. of Natural 

Resources for Town Conservation purchase; 
Conservation Commission Chairman Richard 
Murphy indicates area purchased near Spring 
Hill Road. (Photo by G. B. Williams, Jr. ) 



In addition to regularly scheduled meetings, the volunteer members of the Conservation Commission 
attended Board of Selectmen Hatch Act Hearings, Board of Appeals Hearings, and meetings with the Planning 
Board, Recreation Commission, Board of Health, and the Water District to support conservation measures. 
They attended a series of Annual ConservatiorrSchools held during September and October in Northborough, 
Charlton and Harvard. They supported the Nashoba Brook Project, Senate Bill No. 757, which was a proposal 
to acquire and develop a major state recreation facility in the area for swimming, picnicking, fishing, hiking, 
camping and winter sports. 

In May 1971, the Conservation Commission sponsored a special pro- 
gram at the ABRHS in conjunction with "Earth Week". Two conservation 
films, "So Little Time" and "Air Pollution", were shown followed with a 
discussion period. In August 1971, the Conservation Commission sup- 
ported the Recycling Program of the Act for Ecology Committee of the 
Conservation Trust by paying the cost of a rental container. 





Cubs, Boy Scouts, and Girl Scouts on Town Clean-up. (Photos by G. B. Williams, Jr.) 

Teacher's Curriculum Guides to Conservation Education, entitled "People and Their Environment", 
were furnished to all 4th grade teachers in the Acton school system. This purchase supplemented similar 
guides provided by the Acton Garden Club for teachers in grades 1, 2 and 3. 

With the continued support of the Acton townspeople in 1972, the Conservation Commission will be work- 
ing to help you maintain and preserve your environment. 



Dorothy Stonecliffe, Clerk Chauncey Waldron 

Brewster Conant Robert Ellis 

Richard Murphy, Chairman 



Bianca Chambers 
Peter Jorrens 



61 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 



This has been a busy year for the Authority as we have proceeded with the many necessary details which 
have been preliminary to the actual construction of Acton's first housing units for elderly persons of low income. 

Elected in March to a five-year term were Mary Laffin, Secretary; four-year term, Julia Stevens, Chair- 
man; two-year term, Thomas Ahern, Treasurer; and one-year term, George Moulton, Vice-Chairman. Pa-^-' 
tience MacPherson has continued in her three-year term as Governor's appointee. 

We have chosen as our architects for the project the firm of Johnson-Hotvedt & Associates, 9 Park 
Street, Boston. They have already been very helpful to us in choosing suitable land and in our discussions 
with the Massachusetts Department of Community Affairs (DCA) which oversees all housing projects in the 
State. 

Thomas R. Morse of Parker, Coulter, Daley & White, 50 Congress Street, Boston, will represent us as 
counselon this state-aided project. 

As the Massachusetts General Court has recently voted $150,000,000 for the Housing for the Elderly con- 
struction program, we have been assured that funding for Acton will be available soon. The DCA will there- 
fore be able to purchase the property of our choice, and we will begin construction of at least 48 units in 1972. 

In response to several inquiries, the Authority has also applied for state rental assistance funds, which 
are available for elderly persons and large families of low income. Although it is mandatory for all Housing 
Authorities to participate in this program, we have not as yet received funding from the DCA. 

The Authority is now accepting applications for the proposed housing units. Applicants must be at least 
65 years of age, citizens of the United States, with incomes totaling $2,500 a person or $3,000 a couple. Phys- 
ically handicapped persons are also encouraged to apply, as several apartments will be especially designed 
for them. 

We are looking forward to actual construction of housing for the elderly during 1972 and hope that the 
project will fulfill the housing needs of a vital segment of Acton's population. 

Julia D. Stevens, Chairman 



CEMETERIES 



Mount Hope Cemetery 

During the past year we have continued the project of removing corner posts in the old part of the ceme- 
tery, thereby cutting down the cost of maintenance. Also, several old marble monuments were repaired and 
placed in a cement foundation, and a number of Large monuments were cleaned as provided for in specific 
funds. 

In the fall most of the roads in the newer sections of the cemetery, along with some others near the 
front, received coats of hard top. Unfortunately, the amount of money appropriated was not sufficient to com- 
plete all of the roads; therefore, we have inserted an article for $2,500.00 to complete this work. 

During the winter months another area will have to be cleared in Mount Hope Cemetery to complete the 
planned extensions. This section will then be graded and seeded. Roads will be completed, and trees and 
shrubs will be planted in this new area. Water pipes will be installed in the new section. 

Woodlawn Cemetery 

As in the other cemetery, we have, during the past year, continued the project of removing corner posts 
in the old part of the cemetery, thereby cutting down the cost of maintenance. Also, several oLd marble mon- 
uments were repaired and placed in a cement foundation, and a number of large monuments were cleaned as 
provided for in specific funds. 

Two catch basins were installed and drainage pipe was extended. The Highway Department supplied and 
hauled gravel for a number of roads being graded in preparation for hard top. The roads were then completed 
and paved. 



32 

A large area was graded, fertilized and seeded this past fall for future use. Trees and shrubs will be 
planted in this area next spring. In addition to this particular section already completed, the Cemetery De- 
partment plans to clear and grade another area this winter. This will then complete the current planned ex- 
tensions for Woodlawn Cemetery. 

During the night of July 19th, persons unknown broke into the building in this cemetery. They gained 
entrance by cutting the locks off two metal doors to get to the garage downstairs. When the Superintendent 
arrived for work in the morning, he found all the doors open. Two trucks, two tractors, a snowblower, gen- 
erators, plus miscellaneous tools and equipment were taken. 

The pickup truck was found a few days later in Hudson, Massachusetts, without any damage. The dump 
truck was found twenty-eight days later in Carlisle, Massachusetts. It was left about a mile into the woods. 
It had been stripped of wheels, tires, battery, etc. None of the other equipment has been recovered to date. 
It became necessary to get a transfer of money to replace the equipment stolen. Since the theft we have been 
locking the cemetery gates at sundown. We have taken steps with locking devices that we hope will prevent 
future attempts at breaking into the building. 

There seems to have been a rash of breaking and entering into cemeteries this past year. The following 
cemeteries are a few of the ones broken into: Stow, Carlisle, Hudson, Lowell, Framingham, and several 
others. In the Framingham cemetery, a building was set on fire. 

The cemetery personnel have attended several conventions and seminars on grounds maintenance, as 
well as a cemeteries' equipment show held last October at Mount Auburn Cemetery. 

In February the Superintendent attended a seminar at the Waltham Motor. Inn on Management Labor Rela- 
tions. The seminar was given by Mr. Nelson Ross, Attorney, a management consultant at Ropes and Gray, 
Boston, Massachusetts. His address dealt with both the state and national laws regarding involvement with 
union elections in any cemetery in the State. 

At the annual meeting of the Massachusetts Cemetery Association, Mr. Robert L. Babis of J. C. Milne 
Company gave a very interesting talk on the use of Mausoleums in New England. Many large cities are seri- 
ously considering this method because of the lack of available land for cemetery use. 

This last year the Commissioners had a Cemetery Consultant come in and make a general survey of 
both cemeteries to determine the most practical and economical way to develop the remaining land in each 
cemetery. The consultant was very surprised to see that the cemeteries had been so well developed without 
a master plan; however, he very quickly pointed out some of the problems we were going to be faced with in 
the near future. 

He felt that the Commissioners would feel much more confident in making their plans for future de- 
velopment of areas if they receive information from the following: 

1. A topographical plan by a professional surveyor. 

2. An indication of master planning by a competent landscape architect. 

3. An idea of costs of development from a competent construction engineer and contractor. 

4. Extension of cemetery roads and the location and width thereof. A minimum width of 20 feet 
for all new roads has been approved by most cemeteries. 

5. How much area is needed for burial space, how many square feet per grave space, double 
burials, green belt buffer zone, and planting for scenic beauty? 

6. Is the land covered with a growth of large diameter trees that will be costly to remove? Will 
the total perimeter need a fence or wall; or will the existing cover act as a natural divider for 
the area? Can existing trees be saved to provide good specimens? What type of top soil (from 
analysis) exists, and how shall it be improved and at what cost? 

Because of the above-mentioned problems which will have to be faced in the near future, the Cemetery 
Board is requesting funds for development of a Master Plan for each cemetery which would enable us to better 
understand future needs and costs. 

The Board of Cemetery Commissioners wishes to extend their appreciation and thanks for the very gen- 
erous gift of $26,000.00 from the Jenks Charitable Association. The income from this fund will be used for 
improvement and beautification of Mount Hope Cemetery. 

The Department wishes to express their thanks to the Engineering Department and the Highway Depart- 
ment, as well as all others that assisted us during the year. 

Harlan E. Tuttle Howard F. Jones T _ Frederick s> Kenn edy 

Charles F. Putnam 

Cemetery Commissioners Superintendent 



ACTON STREET DIRECTORY 



Adams Street 


A-2 


Agawam Road 


C-4 


Alcott Street 


D-2 


Algonquin Road 


D-5 


Anne Avenue 


C-3 


Arlington Street 


D-4 


Ashwood Road 


C-2 


Azalea Court 


D-l 


Arborwood Road 


C-l 


Balsam Drive 


D-3 


Barker Road 


C-3 


Baxter Road 


B-4 


Bayberry Road 


D-l 


Berry Lane 


D-2 


Betsy Ross Circle 


B-5 


Beverly Road 


C-3 


Billings Street 


A-4 


Birch Ridge Road 


B-5 


Blackhorse Drive 


A-5 


Blanchard Street 


A-4 


Brabrook Road 


D-l 


Bridle Path Way 


E-l 


Broadview Street 


B-2 


Bromfield Drive 


D-2 


Brook Street 


E-2 


Brookside Circle 


B-2 


Brucewood Road 


C-3 


Bulette Road 


D-5 


Captain Brown's Lane 


C-4 


Captain Furbush's Lane 


C-4 


Carlisle Road 


G-2 


Carlton Drive 


A-2 


Carriage Drive 


B-2 


Cedar Terrace 


C-4 


Central Street 


B-3, 


Chadwick Street 


B-2 


Charter Road 


C-4 


Cherokee Road 


D-5 


Cherry Ridge Road 


B-5 


Church Street 


B-4 


Clover Hill Road 


B-2 


Conant Street 


A-2 


Concord Road 


D-2 


Coolidge Drive 


D-4 


Coughlin 


D-3 


Country Club Road 


A-2 


Cowdrey Lane 


D-3 


Craig Road 


C-l 


Cresent Street 


B-2 


Crestwood Lane 


B-4 


Crestwood Road 


C-2 


Cricket Way 


D-2 


Cross Street 


G-2 


Davis Road 


E-2 


Deacon Hunt Drive 


C-4 


Doris Road 


C-3 


Downey Road 


B-4 


Duggan Road 


A-4 


Durkee Road 


B-4 


Elm Court 


C-4 


Elm Street 


C-5 


Eliot Circle 


D-3 



D-5 



Emerson Drive 


D-2 


Esterbrook Road 


E-2 


Ethan Allen Drive 


B-5 


Evergreen Road 


D-3 


Fairway Road 


A-2 


Faulkner Hill Road 


B-3 


Fernwood Road 


C-2 


Fife & Drum Road 


D-3 


Flagg Road 


D-l 


Fletcher Court 


A- 3 


Flint Road 


B-4 


Flintlock Drive 


A-5 


Foley Street 


B-2 


Forest Road 


C-2 


Fort Pond Road 


E-4 


Foster Street 


C-2 


Fox Hill Road 


B-2 


Franc ine Road 


C-3 


Fraser Drive 


B-4 


Garfield Lane 


D-3 


Giaconda Avenue 


B-2 


Grasshopper Lane 


D-2 


Great Road 


D-l, 


Greenwood Lane 


D-3 


Gristmill Road 


A-5 


Hammond Street 


D-4 


Harris Street 


F-3 


Hatch Road 


B-2 


Harvard Court 


E-2 


Haynes Court 


B-5 


Hawthorne Street 


D-2 


Hay ward Road 


C-4 


Heald Road 


D-3 


Hemlock Lane 


D-3 


Henley Road 


F-3 


Hennessey Drive 


B-3 


Heritage Road 


C-2 


High Street 


A-2 


Highland Road 


A-5 


Hillcrest Drive 


C-2 


Hillside Terrace 


C-4 


Homestead Street 


B-4 


Hickory Hill Trail 


D-3 


Hosmer Street 


C-2 


Houghton Lane 


C-4 


Huckleberry Lane 


D-3 


Huron Road 


D-5 


Independence Road 


B-2 


Iris Court 


D-l 


Isaac Davis Way 


C-3 


Jackson Drive 


D-4 


Jefferson Drive 


D-3 


John Swift Road 


D-3 


Joseph Reed Lane 


C-4 


Juniper Ridge Road 


B-5 


Karner Road 


D-5 


Keefe Road 


D-l 


Kelley Road 


C-3 


Kinsley Road 


B-4 



F-4 




A 



CONCORD 




■KZbZ PR.IVATET ~/AY£ 

^aivATc, unacccotco 

-:== QOAOb, APCCovU) unqlD TMC 

SubOtvlsiOW COMTBOL LAW (CM A* ♦/ 

AS AMENDED TO JANUARY I. 1970 



MAP OF 

TOWN OF ACTON 

MASSACHUSETTS 

SHOWING LOCATION OF STREETS 

FEBRUARY »57 
SCAL£ IN FCET 



ACTON STREET DIRECTORY (continued) 



Larch Road 


D-3 


Laurel Court 


B-3 


Lawsbrook Road 


C-l 


Liberty Street 


A-3 


Lilac Court 


B-3 


Lillian Road 


D-5 


Lincoln Drive 


D-4 


Littlefield Road 


C-5 


Longfellow Park 


D-2 


Lothrop Road 


B-4 


Madison Lane 


D-4 


Magnolia Drive 


D-l 


Main Street 


A-2, 


Mallard Road 


C-4 


Maple Street 


B-3 


Marian Road 


B-5 


Martin Street 


B-3 


Massachusetts Avenue 


D-l, 


Mead Terrace 


B-4 


Meadow Brook Road 


D-3 


Merriam Lane 


B-2 


Minot Avenue 


D-2 


Minuteman Road 


D-3 


Mohawk Drive 


C-5 


Mohegan Road 


C-4 


Monroe Lane 


D-4 


Musket Drive 


D-3 


Myrtle Drive 


D-l 


Nadine Road 


C-3 


Nagog Hill Road 


D-2 


Nash Road 


B-4 


Nashoba Road 


C-5 


Newtown Road 


D-3 


North Street 


G-2 


Notre Dame Road 


B-5 


Noyes Street 


A-4 


Oakwood Road 


C-2 


Old Colony Lane 


C-l 


Olde Lantern Road 


A-5 


Old Meadow Lane 


B-2 


Old Village Road 


D-2 


Olde Surrey Drive 


B-2 


Oneida Road 


D-5 


Orchard Drive 


C-5 


Parker Street 


A-2 


Patrick Henry Circle 


B-5 


Patriots Road 


D-3 


Partridge Pond Road 


C-3 


Paul Revere Road 


B-5 


Pearl Street 


B-4 


Phalen Street 


D-2 


Phlox Lane 


D-l 


Pine Street 


A-3 


Pinewood Road 


C-2 


Piper Road 


B-3 


Piper Lane 


B-3 


Pond View Drive 


B-2 


Pope Road 


D-l 


Powder Horn Lane 


A-5 


Powder Mill Road 


A-l 


Proctor Street 


E-l 



H-3 



B-5 



U & V 



Prospect Street 


B-3 


Putnam Road 


D-3 


Putter Drive 


A-2 


Quaboag Road 


C-4 


Quarry Road 


F-3 


Railroad Street 


B-3 


Redwood Road 


C-2 


Revolutionary Road 


D-3 


River Street 


B-2 


Robbins Street 


A-3 


Robinwood Road 


C-2 


Rose Court 


D-l 


Russell Road 


C-2 


Saint James Circle 


C-3 


Samuel Parlin Drive 


D-4 


Sandas Trail 


C-4 


School Street 


B-3 


Seminole Road 


C-4 


Seneca Road 


C-5 


Simon Hapgood Lane 


E-l 


Simon Willard Road 


D-3 


Sioux Street 


C-4 


Smart Road 


A-4 


Smith Street 


E-l 


South Street 


G-2 


Spencer Road 


C-4 


Spring Hill Road 


F-l 


Stoney Street 


C-3 


Stow Street 


A-3 


Strawberry Hill Road 


E-2 


Sudbury Road 


A-l 


Summer Street 


B-5 


Sylvia Street 


A-3 


Squirrel Hill Road 


A-5 


Taft Lane 


D-4 


Taylor Road 


C-3 


Thoreau Road 


D-2 


Ticonderoga Road 


A-5 


Townsend Road 


B-4 


Trask Road 


D-3 


Tuttle Drive 


B-3 


Valley Road 


B-2 


Vanderbelt Road 


B-2 


Wachusetts Drive 


D-5 


Wampus Avenue 


F-3 


Washington Drive 


D-3 


Wetherbee Street 


D-l 


West Road 


C-4 


Wheeler Lane 


G-2 


Whittier Drive 


D-2 


Willow Street 


B-4 


Wilson Lane 


D-4 


Windemere Drive 


A-5 


Windsor Avenue 


B-5 


Winter Street 


B-5 


Wood Lane 


D-3 


Woodbury Lane 


D-3 


Woodchester Drive 


A-5 


Wright Terrace 


B-5 



63 

VETERANS' AGENT 



For the year ending December 31, 1971, this department aided nine cases under Chapter 115 of the 
General Laws at an expenditure of $23,911. 89. This represents a decrease of four cases from the previous 
year. Unforeseen and extraordinary medical expenses account for the budget increase requested for 1972. 

Contact Service with the Veterans' Administration was rendered to fifty veterans or their dependents 
in obtaining various federal and state benefits to which they were entitled. 

Norman L. Roche 
Veterans' Agent 



VETERANS' GRAVES 



There have been two interments of United States War Veterans in the Acton Cemeteries during the year 
1971. The names of the Veterans, the dates and places of burial are as follows- 

Bernard Roger Slocomb W. W. II January 27, 1971 Mount Hope Cemetery 

Albert I. Verchot Korean War August 21, 1971 Mount Hope Cemetery 

Veterans' Flag Standards have been placed on these departed Veterans' graves and two bronze govern- 
ment grave markers have been ordered for these Veterans. 

T. Frederick S. Kennedy 
Veterans' Graves Officer 



ARCHIVES 



During the past year Archives Committee has received several letters, requesting a list of the names 
of the members of Captain Davis Company Minutemen who were at the battle of the North Bridge, April 19, 
1775. 

A letter was received requesting information on the depositions made in 1835 by Thomas Thorp, Charles 
Handley and Soloman Smith in regard to what they saw happen that day at the battle of the North Bridge. 

Another request was received from Mr. T. L. Tallentire of New York, who is gathering material for a 
book on early fire fighting in New England, and he asked if we could give him some information in regard to 
Acton Early Firefighting. A copy of H. S. MacGregor' s paper on the history of the Acton Fire Department 
was forwarded to him. 

In March of 1971, the Committee received a request from Early Massachusetts Records, of Boston, 
Massachusetts, for permission to microfilm our records up to the year 1830. This same group microfilmed 
records of the towns of Bedford, Carlisle, Concord, Lexington and Lincoln, Massachusetts. This project 
was done to gather information in preparation for the 1975 celebration. 

The Committee also received a request from the Genealogical Society of the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-Day Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, to microfilm the town records up to a certain date. This Society 
was interested in the following: vital records to 1840, probate records to 1865, Church records to 1850, 
town records to 1850 and deed records to 1850. 

The above projects were completed without cost to the town. The Church of Latter-Day Saints will fur- 
nish the town, free, a positive film of the records microfilmed. 

Frederick S. Kennedy 
Minetta D. Lee 
Joyce C. Woodhead 



64 



ASSESSORS 



The Board of Assessors are continuing their program of assessing all new property and upgrading 
assessments where necessary. 

All apartment buildings in the Town have been assessed accordingly and the income method of assessing 
has been used as a guide to determine these values. It is the opinion of the Board that the apartment owners 
are paying their fair share of the cost of government. 



There will be a considerable amount of work to be done in 
shopping centers and the condominium project on Route 2A. 



1972 with the construction of three new 



The Board of Assessors and the Assessors staff were saddened with the loss of veteran Assessor Carl 
Flint after thirty two years of dedicated service. We extend our deepest sympathy to his family. 

Taxes Assessed as Follows: 



Buildings Exclusive of Land 

Land 

Personal Property 

Total Valuation January 1, 1971 

Valuation January 1, 1970 

Increase in Valuation 

Rate of Taxation - $45. 00 per thousand 

Real Estate 
Personal Property 
Total Taxes Assessed 

Amount of Money to be Raised: 

Town Charges 

School Lunch Program 

Free Public Libraries 

Natural Resources-Self Help Program 

Snow '& Ice (Chapt. 44 Sec. 31) 

State Parks & Reservations 

Metropolitan District Area Planning Council 

Elderly Retiree Program 

State Assessment System 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 

County Tax 

County Hospital 

Overlay 

Total 

Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 

From Various Sources 
Net Amount to be Raised by Taxation 



80,917, 620.00 

20, 189,970.00 

3,831,965.00 



Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 
Number of Vehicles Assessed 
Commissioners Value 
Total Excise 



10,356 



4, 549,841. 55 
172,438. 60 



6, 592, 782. 67 

15, 672. 76 

1,809. 50 

3,550.00 

13,543.86 

22,002.81 

982.04 

1,088.01 

590.80 

1, 660. 65 

132,000.25 

6,490.92 

65,000. 17 



36. 00 per thousand 

7,882,978.00 
488,861.87 



$104,939, 555.00 

97,088, 304.00 

$ 7,851,251.00 



$ 4,722,280.15 



$ 6,857,174.44 

2, 134,894.29 
$ 4,722,280.15 



Dewey E. Boatman, Chairman 

John H. Loring, Clerk 

Ralph Dodge, Ass't. Assessor 



Board of Assessors 



65 

TOWN MEETINGS 



ABSTRACT OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MARCH 8, 1971 AND ADJOURNED SESSIONS, MARCH 10, 1971, MARCH 15, 1971 AND MARCH 17, 1971 

Moderator called the meeting to order at 7:33 P. M. 

ADJOURNMENT 

VOTED: That at the conclusion of the business pending before the meeting at eleven o'clock this evening this 
meeting be adjourned to 7:30 o'clock P.M. on next Wednesday, March 10th, at this same place. 

Article 1. OFFICERS 

To choose all necessary Town Officers and Committees and fix the salaries and compensation of all the elec- 
tive officers of the Town. 



ELECTED 
ELECTED 
ELECTED 
ELECTED 
ELECTED 



Hazel P. Vose Trustee of the Elizabeth White Fund for three years. 

Betty L. Boothby Trustee of the Citizens Library Association of West Acton for three years. 

T. Frederick S. Kennedy Trustee of the Acton Firemen's Relief Fund for three years. 

James N. Gates Trustee of the Goodnow Fund for three years. 

Frederick A. Harris Trustee of the West Acton Firemen's Relief Fund for three years. 



(All above votes were unanimous.) 

VOTED: That the 1971 compensation schedule of elected officers of the Town be adopted as follows: 

Moderator $20.00 per each night per meeting 

Board of Selectmen: Chairman $750.00 

Clerk 650.00 

Member 650.00 

Article 2. REPORTS 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept the several reports of the Town Officers and Boards as submitted. 

Article 3. REPORTS 

To hear and act upon the report of any Committee chosen at any previous Town Meeting that has not already 
reported. 

No reports. 

Article 4. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To ratify the action of the Personnel Board on December 3, 1970 in reclassifying 
the single position classes of Children's Librarian and Reference Librarian from Compensation Grade S-7, as 
set forth in Schedule A, Section 15, of the Personnel Bylaw to Compensation Grade S-ll. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take up Articles 5, 6 and 13 together at this time. 

Articles 5, 6 and 13. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take affirmative action under Articles 5, 6 and 13 by making the amendments in 
the Personnel Bylaw indicated in Articles 5, 6 and 13, except that in Article 5 the class title Assistant Library 
Director is deleted and the Grade for Public Health Nurse is E-l instead of E-2 as printed in Article 5. 

Article 5. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

Amend Schedule A (Alphabetical List of Position Classes and Allocation to Schedule and Compensation Grade 
or designated Rate or Range) set forth in Section 15 of the Personnel Bylaw by changing the schedule designation 



66 



from "B" to "B-l" and by striking out the present grade designation and inserting therefor the new grade desig- 
nation set forth below, for each of the following class titles: 



Class Title Grade 

Administrative Assistant E-12 

Assistant Assessor E-7 

Assistant Town Engineer E-9 

Building Inspector E-6 

Children's Librarian E-l 

Director of Public Health E-7 

Library Director E-7 



Class Title Grade 

Public Health Nurse E-l 

Reference Librarian E-l 

Superintendent (Cemeteries) E-4 

Superintendent (Highways) E-7 

Town Accountant (p. t.) E-9 

Town Engineer E-13 

Town Treasurer and Town Collector E-7 



Article 6. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

Amend the Personnel Bylaw by adding "B-l" following "B" in paragraph (b) of Section 4, in Clauses 4 and 8 of 
paragraph (c) of Section 4 and in Clause 1 of paragraph (c) of Section 5. 

Article 13. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

Amend clause (a) of Section 4 (c) (10) of the Personnel Bylaw so as to require each full-time employee whose 
position is allocated to Schedule B (except a department head, professional employee or employee providing 
inspection duties as continuous service) to be paid for overtime work at 1-1/2 times the employee's regular 
rate, by deleting the words "Compensation Grades S-l through S-9 inclusive" therefrom. 

Article 7. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend Section 7, Clause (b) of the Personnel Bylaw by striking out the word and 
figure "ten (10)" and substituting therefor the word and figure "seven (7)" so that Clause (b) shall read as follows: 

"(b) Vacation leave of two (2) weeks with full pay shall be granted to- any such employee who as of 
June 1 has been employed by the Town for more than thirty (30) weeks but less than seven (7) 
years." 

Article 8. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the first sentence of the third paragraph of Section 8 of the Personnel By- 
law, Section 8, third paragraph, by adding the words "or 1-1/2 times regular pay if in a position class allo- 
cated to SCHEDULE E" so that the third paragraph shall read: 

"When a Holiday falls on the employee's regularly scheduled work day and the employee is required 
to work, he shall be paid Holiday pay, plus regular pay or 1-1/2 times regular pay if in a position 
class allocated to SCHEDULE E for the hours actually worked. In no case will the number of vaca- 
tion days plus the paid Holidays exceed thirty (30) days per year." 

Article 9. PERSONNEL BYLAW 
VOTED: To amend Section 9 (a) of the Personnel Bylaw by 

(a) deleting "one (1) day" in the first sentence of Section 9 (a) and substituting therefor "one and 
one-quarter (1-1/4) days", and 

(b) deleting "twenty-four (24) days" in the fourth sentence of Section 9 (a) and substituting therefor 
"one hundred (100) days", 

and amend the fifth sentence of said Section 9 (a) so that said fifth sentence will read as follows: 

"For each day accumulated at the start of a single continuous, prolonged illness, a regular full- 
time employee or a regular part-time employee may receive three (3) days' sick leave, if neces- 
sary, up to a maximum of one hundred (100) days on recommendation of the department head, with 
a written statement from the employee's doctor of the nature of the illness and the probable dura- 
tion thereof, with the approval of the Town Manager." 



Article 10. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Personnel Bylaw, Section 10, by adding the words "and all Permanent 
Part-Time employees whose regularly established work week is 20 hours or more," so that Section 10 shall 
read as follows: 



67 



"Section 10. GROUP LIFE INSURANCE 

In accordance with Chapter 32B of the General Laws, as amended, and the terms of the in- 
surance contract, all permanent full-time employees and all permanent part-time employees 
whose regularly established work week is 20 hours or more, who shall have completed six (6) 
months of continuous service for the Town shall be provided with Group Life Insurance coverage 
not to exceed $2,000.00 of which the Town will pay 50% of the premium and the employee the other 
50%." 

Article 11. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend Section 11 of the Personnel Bylaw by adding the words "and permanent 
part-time employees whose regularly established work week is 20 hours or more" so that Section 11 shall 
read as follows: 

"Section 11. HOSPITALIZATION AND SURGICAL INSURANCE 

For permanent full-time employees and permanent part-time employees whose regularly 
established work week is 20 hours or more, who are, or become, members of the existing Blue 
Cross -Blue Shield group, the Town will pay 90% of the cost of such membership and the employee 
the other 10%. Coverage includes both individual and family basis." 

Article 12. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Personnel Bylaw by adding the following class title to Section- 15, 
Schedule A (ALPHABETICAL LIST OF POSITION CLASSES AND ALLOCATION TO SCHEDULE AND COM- 
PENSATION GRADE OR DESIGNATED RATE OR RANGE): 

Library Assistant (Principal) B S-7 

Article 14. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend Schedule A of the Personnel Bylaw by adding a double asterisk after the 
grade designation opposite Superintendent (Highways) and by adding the following footnote at the end of Sched- 
ule A: 

"**An additional $125.00 per month during the months of December, January, February and 
March." 

Article 15. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Personnel Bylaw by deleting Schedules B, C, D, E, F and G of Section 
15 and inserting therefor Schedules B, B-l, C, D, E, F and G as printed in the warrant with the following ad- 
ditions to Schedule C relating to the Police Weekly Salary Schedule: 

(1) Insert an asterisk at the end of the heading, and 

(2) Place the following footnote at the end of Schedule C: 

* The weekly and annual salaries shown above are for the shift from 8:00 A. M. to 4:00 P. M. 
Such salaries for the shifts from 4:00 P.M. to 12:00 P.M. and from 12:00 P. M. to 8:00 A. M. 
shall be at a rate of payment ten cents per hour higher. 

SCHEDULE B - GENERAL WEEKLY SALARY SCHEDULE 
(Annual rates computed by multiplying weekly rates by 52) 



Compensation 




Minimum 




Intermediate Steps 




Maximum 


Grade 




A 


B_ 




C_ 


JD 




_E 


S-l 


W 


$ 90.33 


$ 94.09 


$ 


97. 85 


$ 101.62 


$ 


106.63 




A 


4697. 16 


4892.68 




5088. 20 


5284.24 




5544. 76 


S-2 


W 


94.09 


97.85 




101. 62 


106.63 




111. 65 




A 


4892.68 


5088.20 




5284. 24 


5544. 76 




5805. 80 


S-3 


W 


97.85 


101.62 




106. 63 


111.65 




116. 67 




A 


5088. 20 


5284. 24 




5544. 76 


5805. 80 




6066.84 


S-4 


W 


101. 62 


106.63 




111. 65 


116.67 




121. 69 




A 


5284.24 


5544. 76 




5805. 80 


6066.84 




6327. 88 



68 



Compensation 
Grade 


W 
A 


Minimum 
A_ 

$ 106.63 
5544. 76 


B_ 

$ 111. 
5805. 


65 
80 


Intermediat 
C^ 

$ 116. 
6066. 


e Steps 

67 

84 


_D 

$ 121. 
6327. 


69 
88 


Maximum 
_E 


S-5 


$ 126.71 
6588.92 


S-6 


W 
A 


111. 65 
5805.80 


116. 
6066. 


67 

84 


121. 
6327. 


69 
88 


126. 
6588. 


71 

92 


131. 73 
6849.96 


S-7 


W 
A 


116.67 
6066.84 


121. 
6327. 


69 
88 


126. 

6588. 


71 
92 


131. 
6849. 


73 
96 


133. 00 
7176. 00 


S-8 


W 
A 


121. 69 
6327.88 


126. 
6588. 


71 
92 


131. 
6849. 


73 
96 


138. 
7176. 


00 
00 


144. 27 
7502. 04 


S-9 


W 
A 


126. 71 
6588.92 


131. 
6849. 


73 
96 


138. 
7176. 


00 
00 


144. 
7502. 


27 
04 


150. 54 
7828. 08 


S-10 


W 
A 


131. 73 
6849.96 


138. 
7176. 


00 
00 


144. 
7502. 


27 
04 


150. 
7828. 


54 
08 


158. 07 
8219. 64 


S-ll 


W 
A 


138.00 
7176.00 


144. 
7502. 


27 
04 


150. 
7828. 


54 
08 


158. 
8219. 


07 
64 


165. 60 
8611. 20 


S-12 


W 
A 


144.27 
7502.04 


150. 
7828. 


54 
08 


158. 
8219. 


07 
64 


165. 
8611. 


60 
20 


174.38 
9067. 76 


S-13 


W 
A 


150. 54 
7828.08 


158. 

8219. 


07 
64 


165. 
8611. 


60 
20 


174. 
9067. 


38 
76 


183. 16 
9524.32 



SCHEDULE B-l - TECHNICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE WEEKLY SALARY SCHEDULE 
(Annual rate computed by multiplying weekly rates by 52) 



Compensation 
Grade 


W 
A 


Minimum 
A_ 

$ 138.00 
7176.00 


$ 144.27 
7502.04 


Intermediate Steps 
C^ 

$ 150.54 
7828.08 


JD 

$ 158.07 
8219.64 


Maximum 
E_ 


E-l 


$ 165.60 
8611. 20 


E-2 


W 
A 


144. 27 
7502.04 


150. 54 
7828. 08 


158.07 
8219.64 


165.60 
8611.20 


174. 38 
9067. 76 


E-3 


W 
A 


150. 54 
7828.08 


158.07 
8219. 64 


165.60 
8611.20 


174. 38 
9067. 76 


183. 16 
9524. 32 


E-4 


W 
A 


158.07 
8219.64 


165.60 
8611.20 


174. 38 
9067. 76 


183. 16 
9524.32 


191. 94 
9980. 88 


E-5 


W 
A 


165.60 
8611.20 


174.38 
9067. 76 


183. 16 
9524.32 


191.94 
9980.88 


201.98 
10502. 96 


E-6 


W 
A 


174. 38 
9067.76 


183. 16 
9524.32 


191. 94 
9980. 88 


201.98 
10502.96 


213.27 
11090. 04 


E-7 


W 
A 


183. 16 
9524.32 


191.94 
9980. 88 


201. 98 
10502. 96 


213.27 
11090. 04 


225. 82 
11742. 64 


E-8 


W 
A 


191.94 
9980.88 


201.98 
10502.96 


213. 27 
11090. 04 


225.82 
11742.64 


238.36 
12394. 72 


E-9 


W 
A 


201.98 
10502. 96 


213. 27 
11090.04 


225.82 
11742. 64 


238.36 
12394. 72 


252. 16 
13112. 32 


E-10 


W 
A 


213.27 
11090.04 


225. 82 
11742.64 


238.36 
12394. 72 


252. 16 

13112.32 


267. 21 
13894. 92 


E-ll 


W 
A 


225.82 
11742.64 


238.36 
12394. 72 


252. 16 
13112. 32 


267.21 

13894.92 


284. 78 
14808. 56 


E-12 


W 
A 


238. 36 
12394. 72 


252. 16 
13112. 32 


267. 21 
13894.92 


284. 7!) 
14808. 56 


302. 34 
15721. 68 


E-13 


W 
A 


252. 16 
13112.32 


267.21 
13894.92 


284. 78 
14808. 56 


302.34 
15721. 68 


319. 90 
16634. 80 



69 



SCHEDULE C - POLICE WEEKLY SALARY SCHEDULE* 
(Annual rates computed by multiplying weekly rates by 52) 



Compensation 
Grade 


W 
A 


Minimum 
A_ 

$ 144.27 
7502. 04 


B_ 

$ 150. 54 
7828. 08 


Intermediate Steps 
C_ 

$ 156.82 
8154. 64 


D^ 

$ 165.60 
8611.20 


Maximum 
E 


P-l 


$ 174.38 
9067. 76 


P-2 


W 

A 


165.60 
8611.20 


174.38 
9067. 76 


183. 16 
9524.32 


191.94 
9980.88 


203. 24 
10568.48 


P-3 


W 
A 


174.38 
9067. 76 


183. 16 
9524.32 


191.94 
9980. 88 


203.24 
10568.48 


213. 27 
11090. 04 


P-4 


W 
A 


213.27 
11090. 04 


225. 82 

11742.64 


238. 36 
12394. 72 


250.91 
13047. 32 


267. 21 
13894. 92 



* The weekly and annual salaries shown above are for the shift from 8:00 A. M. to 4:00 P. M. Such salaries 
for the shifts from 4:00 P. M. to 12:00 P. M. and from 12:00 P. M. to 8:00 A. M. shall be at a rate of payment 
ten cents per hour higher. 

SCHEDULE D - FIRE WEEKLY SALARY SCHEDULE 
(Annual rates computed by multiplying weekly rates by 52) 



Compensation 
Grade 


W 
A 


Minimum 
A. 

$ 125.45 
6523.40 


$ 130.47 
6784.44 


Intermediate Steps 
C^ 

$ 135.48 
7044.96 


D^ 

$ 141.76 
7371. 52 


Maximum 
E 


F-l 


$ 148. 03 
7697. 56 


F-2 


W 
A 


139.25 
7241.00 


145. 53 
7567. 56 


151. 80 
7893. 60 


159.33 
8285. 16 


168. 10 
8741. 20 


F-3 


W 
A 


151. 80 
7893.60 


159.33 
8285. 16 


168. 10 
8741.20 


175. 63 
9132.76 


183. 16 
9524.32 


F-4 


W 
A 


168. 10 
8741.20 


175.63 
9132. 76 


183. 16 
9524.32 


191.94 
9980.88 


203.24 
10568.48 


F-5 


W 
A 


213.27 
11090.04 


225.82 

11742.64 


238.36 
12394. 72 


250.91 
13047.32 


267. 21 
13894. 92 



Compe 


nsation 




Minimum 


Grade 


H 


A_ 
$ 3. 




W- 


-1 


13 






W 


125. 


20 






A 


6510. 


40 


W- 


•2 


H 


3. 


29 






W 


131. 


60 






A 


6843. 


20 


w- 


•3 


H 


3. 


46 






W 


138. 


40 






A 


7196. 


80 


w- 


-4 


H 


3. 


63 






W 


•145. 


20 






A 


7550. 


40 


w- 


•5 


H 


3. 


80 






W 


152. 


00 






A 


7904. 


00 


w- 


■6 


H 


3. 


97 






W 


158. 


80 






A 


8257. 


60 


w- 


■7 


H 


4. 


14 






W 


165. 


60 






A 


8611. 


20 



SCHEDULE E - HOURLY WAGE SCHEDULE 
(Weekly rates computed by multiplying hourly rates by 40; 
Annual rates computed by multiplying hourly rates by 2080) 

Intermediate Step 
B_ 

$ 3.29 

131.60 

6843.20 

3.46 

138.40 

7196.80 

3.63 

145. 20 

7550.40 

3. 80 
152. 00 

7904.00 

3.97 

158.80 

8257.60 

4. 14 
165. 60 

8611.20 

4.34 
173.60 

9027. 20 



Maximum 
_C 

$ 3. 46 

138.40 

7196. 80 

3. 63 

145.20 

7550. 40 

3. 80 

152.00 

7904. 00 

3. 97 
158. 80 

8257. 60 

4. 14 
165.60 

8611. 20 

4.34 

173. 60 

9027. 20 

4. 54 

181. 60 

9443. 20 



70 



SCHEDULE F - MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION SCHEDULE FOR 
DESIGNATED PART-TIME AND SEASONAL POSITIONS 



Position 

Arts and Crafts Supervisor 

Assessor, Board Chairman 

Assessor, Board Member 

Board of Health Chairman 

Board of Health Member 

Deputy Building Inspector (p. t.) 

Deputy Chief (Fire) (call) 

Deputy Elections Clerk (p. t.) 

Deputy Inspector (Elections) 

Deputy Warden (Elections) 

Elections Clerk 

Fire Alarm Maintenance Man (p. t.) 

Fire Alarm Superintendent 

Fire Fighter 

Fire Lieutenant 

Inspector (Elections) (p. t.) 

Library Page 

Playground Instructor 

Playground Supervisor 

Plumbing Inspector 

Police Matron 

Recreation Director 

Registrar of Voters 

School Crossing Guard 

Tennis Supervisor 

Teller 

Town Clerk 

Warden (Elections) 



Compensation 



$75. 27 - 81. 54 



3.01 - 3. 14 - 3. 26 - 3.39 



1. 53 - 1. 58 
22. 58 - 26. 35 
50. 18 - 56.45 



146. 78 - 153.06 - 

31.36 - 34. 50 - 
62. 73 - 69. 00 - 



87. 
Flat 
Flat 
Flat 
Flat 
Fee 

3. 

2. 

2. 

2. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

3. 

3. 

2. 

1. 

30. 

62. 

Fee 

3. 
160. 

2. 
37. 
75. 

2. 
Flat 

2. 



82 per 
Rate 
Rate 
Rate 
Rate 
Basis 
95 per 
82 per 
57 per 
82 per 
82 per 
54 per 
75 per 
51 per 

63 per 

57 per 

64 per 
11 per 
73 per 
Basis 
14 per 

58 per 
82 per 
64 per 
27 per 
57 per 
Rate 
82 per 



week 



hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
week 
week 

hour 
week 
hour 
week 
week 
hour 

hour 



SCHEDULE G - ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL SALARY DETERMINATION 



Position 



Minimum 
A 



Intermediate Steps 
C 



D 



Maximum 



Town Manager 



All Step Rates determined by the Board of Selectmen subject to the appro- 
priation of necessary funds. 



Article 16. BUDGET 

To see what sums of money the Town will raise and appropriate to defray the necessary expenses of the sev- 
eral departments of the Town and determine how the same shall be raised. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: That the following 1971 Budget Schedule be raised and appropriated in its entirety 
except that $1,809.50 be appropriated from Library Receipts reserved for appropriation for Memorial Library 
use: 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Moderator: 

1. Salary 

2. Expenses 

Finance Committee: 

3. Expenses 

Selectmen: 

4. Salaries 

5. Expenses 

6. Capital Outlay 

7. Legal Services 

8. Legal Service Expenses 

9. Appraisals and Surveys 
10. Out-of-State Travel (All 

Departments) 



140. 00 
20.00 



70.00 



20,980. 00 

12, 585. 00 
1,630. 00 

13, 500.00 
500. 00 

1,000.00 

1, 500.00 



Town Office Clerical Staff: 

11. Salaries 

Engineering Department: 

12. Salaries and Wages 

13. Expenses 

14. Capital Outlay 

Town Accountant: 

15. Salary 

16. Expenses 

Town Treasurer and Collector: 

17. Salary 

18. Expenses 

19. Capital Outlay 



$ 82,305.00 



47, 160. 00 

4,800. 00 

150.00 



4,355.00 
160. 00 



11, 590. 00 
4, 800. 00 



71 



Town Assessors: 

20. Salaries $ 13,940.00 

21. Expenses 4,930.00 

Town Clerk: 

22. Salary 2, 550. 00 

23. Expenses 800. 00 

Elections and Registration: 

24. Salaries and Wages 3, 720. 00 

25. Expenses 3,850.00 

26. Capital Outlay 

Planning Board: 

27. Expenses 9, 200. 00 

Personnel Board: 

28. Expenses 100.00 



Board of Appeals: 

29. Expenses 

Industrial Development Commission: 

30. Expenses 

Conservation Commission: 

31. Expenses 



Archives Committee: 

32. Expenses 60. 00 



Public Ceremonies and Celebrations: 

33. Expenses 

Buildings and Maintenance: 

34. Salaries and Wages 

35. Expenses 

36. Capital Outlay 

Town Report Committee: 

37. Expenses 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND 

Police Department: 

38. Salaries and Wages 

39. Expenses 

40. Capital Outlay 

Fire Department: 

41. Salaries and Wages 

42. Expenses 

43. Capital Outlay 

Sealer of Weights and Measures: 

44. Salary and Travel 

45. Expenses 

Insect Pest Control: 

46. Wages 

47. Expenses 

Town Forest Committee: 

48. Maintenance 

Tree Department: 

49. Wages 

50. Expenses 

Inspector of Wires: 

51. Wages and Travel 

52. Expenses 



100.00 



3,465. 00 
8,480. 00 



4,000. 00 



Inspector of Gas Piping and 
Appliances: 
■53. Wages 

54. Expenses 

Building Inspector and Agent for 
Enforcement of Zoning Bylaws: 

55. Salary and Wages 

56. Expenses 

Dog Officer: 

57. Wages and Travel 

58. Expenses 

Building Committee: 

59. Expenses 

Civil Defense: 

60. Expenses 



3,000. 00 



11 
1 



345. 00 
820. 00 



100.00 
500. 00 



50. 00 



750.00 



165. 


00 


Town Utilities: 










61. Hydrant Rental 21, 


600. 


00 






62. Street Lighting 24, 


030. 


00 


750. 


00 


TOTAL PROTECTION OF PERSONS 










AND PROPERTY $ 536, 


845. 


00 


500. 


00 









HIGHWAYS 

Highway Department: 

63. Salaries and Wages 



$ 125,955.00 







64. General Expenses 




30, 


000. 


00 


2, 100. 


00 


65. Drainage 




20, 


000. 


00 






66. Snow and Ice Control 




70, 


000. 


00 






67. Machinery Expenses 




39, 


080. 


00 


13, 740. 


00 


68. Chapter 81 Maintenance 




25, 


450. 


00 


36, 165. 


00 


69. Chapter 90 Maintenance 




27, 


500. 


00 


250. 


00 


70. Capital Outlay 
TOTAL HIGHWAYS 




3, 


360. 


00 




$ 


341, 


345. 


00 


4,300. 


00 
















HEALTH AND SANITATION 






$ 304,365. 


00 


Health and Sanitation: 










PROPERTY 




71. Salaries 

72. Expenses 


$ 


24, 
25, 


595. 
700. 


00 




00 






73. Garbage Collection 




32, 


300. 


00 


$ 197,645. 


00 












18, 540. 


00 


Inspector of Animals: 










1, 500. 


00 


74. Wages 

75. Expenses 






170. 
30. 


00 
00 


200,995. 


00 


Plumbing Inspector: 










23,200. 


00 


76. Wages 






-- 




4,350. 


00 


77. Expenses 




5, 


000. 


00 






TOTAL HEALTH & SANITATION 


$ 


87, 


795. 


00 


510. 


00 












40. 


00 


VETERANS' AID 
Veterans' Services: 










3,465. 


00 


78. Salary 


$ 


3, 


240. 


00 


6,360. 


00 


79. Expenses 






275. 


00 






80. Aid 




20, 


000. 


00 



TOTAL VETERANS' AID 

EDUCATION 

Local Schools: 

81. Instruction 

82. Plant Operation and 

Maintenance 

83. Transportation 



$ 23, 515. 00 



$1, 575,941.00 

169,908. 00 
126, 995. 00 



72 



84. 


Non-Instructional Services 


$ 36,664.00 


117. Boiler and Machinery 


$ 


1,600. 


00 


85. 


Administration 


44,977.00 


118. Motor Vehicle Liability 




6, 500. 


00 


86. 


Out-of-State Travel 


300.00 


119. Group Health 




50,000. 


00 


87. 


Blanchard Auditorium 


21,225.00 


120. Fire Fighters Insurance 




1, 100. 


00 


88. 


Capital Outlay 


29, 194.00 










89. 
otal 


Contingency Fund 
Local Schools 


25,000. 00 
$2,030,204.00 


TOTAL INSURANCE 

PENSIONS 


$ 


90,875. 


00 


egional Schools: 




Pension Fund: 








90. 


Instruction 


$1, 505,234.00 


121. Expense 


$ 


50, 540. 


00 


91. 


Plant Operation and 














Maintenance 


165,321.00 


TOTAL PENSIONS 


$ 


50, 540. 


00 


92. 


Transportation 


23,474. 00 










93. 


Non- Instructional Services 


50,578.00 


MATURING DEBT AND INTi;i J 




94. 


Administration 


50,362. 00 










95. 


Out-of-State Travel 


2, 184.00 


Regional School: 








96. 


Blanchard Auditorium 


11,442. 00 


122. Maturing Debt 


$ 


67, 735. 


00 


97. 


Capital Outlay 


28, 575.00 


123. Interest 




52, 145. 


00 


98. 


Athletic Fund 


37,978.00 










99. 


Adult Education 


1,820.00 


Julia McCarthy School: 








100. 


Contingency Fund 


5, 110.00 


124. Maturing Debt 




10,000. 


00 



Total Regional Schools 
TOTAL EDUCATION 



LIBRARIES 



Memorial Library: 

101. Salary and Wages 

102. Expenses 

103. Books 

104. Capital Outlay 

West Acton Library: 

105. Salary and Wages 

106. Expenses 

107. Capital Outlay 

TOTAL LIBRARIES 



RECREATION 



Recreation: 

108. Wages 

109. Expenses 

110. Capital Outlay 

TOTAL RECREATION 

CEMETERIES 

Cemeteries: 

111. Salaries and Wages 

112. Expenses 

113. Capital Outlay 

TOTAL CEMETERIES 

INSURANCE 

Insurance: 

114. Workmen's Compensation 

115. Surety Bond 

116. Fire and Public Liability In- 

surance for Town Bldgs. 



$1,882,078.00 
$3,912,282.00 



58,450.00 

13,050.00 

19,000.00 

185.00 



4,720.00 

1,330.00 

260.00 

$ 96,995.00 



17,310.00 

5,375.00 

950.00 



Florence E. Merriam School: 

126. Maturing Debt 

127. Interest 

Elm Street School #1 (Douglas): 

128. Maturing Debt 

129. Interest 

Elm Street School #2 (Gates): 

130. Maturing Debt 

131. Interest 

Police Station: 

132. Maturing Debt 

133. Interest 

Library Addition: 

134. Maturing Debt 

135. Interest 

Sanitary Land Fill Sites: 

136. Maturing Debt 

137. Interest 

Minot Avenue School: 



400. 00 



40, 
10, 



35, 
18, 



60, 
39, 



000. 00 
080.00 



000.00 
375.00 



000. 00 
565.00 



25, 
3, 



000.00 
150.00 



$ 


23,635. 


00 


138. Maturing Debt 

139. Interest 




85,000.00 
92,625.00 


$ 


40,670. 
9,000. 


00 
00 


D. P. W. Building: 

140. Maturing Debt 

141. Interest 

Anticipation of Revenue Notes: 

142. Interest 




35,000.00 
15, 105.00 








45,000.00 


$ 


49,670. 


00 


TOTAL MATURING DEBT 












AND INTEREST 


$ 


634, 180.00 








TOTAL BUDGET 


$6, 


152,042.00 


$ 


15,000. 
675. 


00 
00 


Appropriated from Library 
Receipts 




1,809. 50 



16,000.00 



Amount to be raised and 
appropriated 



$6, 150, 232. 50 



73 



SPECIAL ARTICLES 



Art. 33. Conservation Fund 

35. Surplus Government 

Property 

36. Youth Commission 

38. Purchase - State and Edney 

Land 

39. Purchase - Dunn Land 

44. Council on Aging 

45. 1975 Funds 

47. Pick-up Truck (Highway) 
49. Gasoline and Oil Storage 

Tanks and Pumps 
51. Resurfacing - High, Adams 

and Parker Streets 

53. Sidewalks 

54. Central Street 

56. Painting Inside Police Station 

57. Police Cruisers 

58. Fire Alarm Repair Truck 



From: 

Art. 16. Library Receipts 

46. Art. 39 of 1970 Annual Town Meeting 

48. Stabilization Fund 

54. Surplus Revenue 

55. Surplus Revenue 
77. Free Cash 



100,000.00 


Art. 


59. 
60. 


Pick-up Truck (Fire Dept.) 
Base Radio, etc. (Fire 


$ 3,300. 


00 


2,000.00 






Dept.) 


2,000. 


00 


1,000.00 




61. 


Paving Roads in Mount 












Hope Cemetery 


2,000. 


00 


12,000.00 




62. 


Regional Vocational School 


1, 680. 


00 


30,000.00 




63. 


Swimming Program 


5, 500. 


00 


1, 500. 00 




64. 


Picnic Facilities at 






4,000.00 






Town Forest 


750. 


00 


3, 500.00 




65. 


Playground Equipment 












(Charter Road) 


1, 500. 


00 


8, 500.00 




66. 
67. 


Vocational Tuition 
Repair Roof (Blanchard 


25,051. 


00 


6,500.00 






Auditorium 


8, 500. 


00 


29,000. 00 




76. 


Reserve Fund 


40,000. 


00 


7, 700.00 












3,000.00 


TOTAL TO BE RAISED 






4,500.00 


AND APPROPRIATED UNDER 






1, 500.00 


SPECIAL ARTICLES 


$304,981. 


00 


TRANSFERS 











To: 

Memorial Library 

Land - Main Street to Pope Road 

Salt Shed, etc. 

Central Street 

Highways 

Budget 



TOTAL TRANSFERS 



$ 1,809.50 
25,000. 00 
10,300.00 
23, 100.00 
27, 100.00 
200,000.00 

$287,309. 50 



SUMMARY 



Budget (R. & A.) 

Special Articles (R. & A.) 

Special Articles (Transfers) 

GRAND TOTAL 



$6, 150,232. 50 
304,981.00 
287,309. 50 

$6, 742, 523.00 



Article 17. ADDITIONAL PATROLMEN 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action. 



VOTED: To take no action. 



Article 18. UNPAID BILLS 



Article 19. BORROWING 



VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to 
borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue for the financial years beginning January 1, 
1971 and January 1, 1972, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to 
renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year, in accordance with the provisions 
of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

VOTED: To adjourn at 10:47 P.M. to Wednesday, March 10 at 7:30 P.M. 

Wednesday, March 10, 1971. Moderator called the meeting to order at 7:35 P.M. 



ADJOURNMENT 

VOTED: That at the conclusion of the business pending before the meeting at eleven o'clock this evening this 
meeting be adjourned to 7:30 o'clock P.M. on next Monday, March 15, 1971, at this same place. 



74 

Article 20. ZONING BYLAW 

VOTED: To delete clause (d) of Section IV-C(l) of the Protective Zoning Bylaw and substitute therefor the fol- 
lowing new clause (d): 

"d. Hotel or motel" 

Total vote - 439. Yes - 358 No - 81 Needed to carry - 299+. 

Article 21. ZONING BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To delete clauses (a) through (i) of paragraph B-2 of Section IV of the Protective 
Zoning Bylaw (but not the footnote) and substitute therefor clauses (a) through (f) as set forth in the Warrant 
and the following new clause (g): 

"g. Multiple dwelling units for the elderly operated under the jurisdiction of the Acton Housing 
Authority." 

Article 22. ZONING BYLAW 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action. 

Article 23. ZONING BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw by striking out paragraph V-B2 relating to 
frontage exceptions for larger lots and by renumbering paragraph V-B3 to paragraph V-B2. 

Article 24. ZONING BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw by striking out clause (c) of paragraph IV-E2 
relating to lot coverage in a Light Industrial District (1-2) and substituting therefor the following new clause 
(c): 

"c. Lot Coverage: No building shall cover in excess of 35% of the land area. The area 

covered by all buildings and parking areas shall not exceed 75% of the land area. Park- 
ing areas include parking spaces, traffic lanes, maneuvering spaces, loading bays, but 
exclude entrance and exit drives." 

Article 25. ZONING BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To strike out the first sentence of Section V-D of the Protective Zoning Bylaw and 
substitute therefor the following new first sentence: 

"No business, industrial or office building and no multiple -dwelling unit shall hereafter be 
erected or externally enlarged, and no business, industrial, office or multiple dwelling use 
shall hereafter be established or expanded in ground area except in conformity with a site 
plan bearing an endorsement of approval by the Board of Selectmen." 

Article 26. ZONING BYLAW 

To see if the Town will amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw by striking out clause (a) of paragraph IV -B 1 and 
substituting therefor the following new clause (a): 

"a. A dwelling for one family, including garaging for not more than four private vehicles, 
and an accessory apartment of not more than 600 square feet of floor area, which may 
include separate kitchen and bath facilities, for the use by the family or its domestic 
employees." 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

MOTION: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw by adding a new clause (h) to Section IV-B, paragraph 2 
reading as follows: 

"h. A dwelling for one family, including garaging for not more than four private vehicles, 
with an accessory apartment of not more than 600 square feet of floor area which may 
include separate kitchen and bath facilities for the use by the family or its domestic 
employees." 



75 

VOTED: To amend motion by striking out "or its domestic employees". 

VOTED: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw by adding a new clause (h) to Section IV -B, paragraph 2 read- 
ing as follows: 

"h. A dwelling for one family, including garaging for not more than four private vehicles, 
with an accessory apartment of not more than 600 square feet of floor area which may 
include separate kitchen and bath facilities for the use by the family." 

Total vote - 400. Yes - 375 No - 25 Needed to carry - 266+. 

Article 27. ZONING BYLAW 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action. 

Article 28. MERRIAM LAND 

VOTED: To authorize the purchase by the Conservation Commission, for conservation purposes, from 
Florence A. Merriam and Irene E. Merriam of a parcel of land containing approximately 55 acres situated on 
School Street, which parcel is the major portion of parcel 1 of plate H3-A of the Town Atlas (as amended to 
January 1, 1970) and further to approve application by the Conservation Commission for reimbursement from 
the Commonwealth under General Laws, Chapter 132A, Section 11 and from the Federal Government under 
PL88, 578 (78 ST 897). 

Article 29. PLAMONDON LAND 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the purchase by the Conservation Commission, for conservation pur- 
poses, from Donat Plamondon of a parcel of land containing approximately 3.2 acres adjoining Wills Hole and 
other land of the Town of Acton, said parcel being the most northerly part of parcel 10 of plate C-5 of the 
Town Atlas (as amended to January 1, 1970) and further to approve application by the Conservation Commis- 
sion, for reimbursement from the Commonwealth under General Laws, Chapter 132A, Section 11. 

Article 30. MONSEN LAND 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the purchase by the Conservation Commission, for conservation pur- 
poses, from Sally Monsen of six (6) adjoining parcels of land containing approximately 9.7 acres situated on 
Central Street and described as parcels 164, 165, 172, 173, 178 and 179 of plate G-2 of the Town Atlas (as 
amended to January 1, 1970) and further to approve application by the Conservation Commission for reimburse- 
ment from the Commonwealth under General Laws, Chapter 132A, Section 11. 

Article 31. MARTIN LAND 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the purchase by the Conservation Commission, for conservation pur- 
poses, from Dorothy Wyman Martin of a parcel of land containing approximately 2.43 acres situated between 
Spring Hill Road and Carlisle Road and described as parcel 23 of plate D-5 of the Town Atlas (as amended to 
January 1, 1970) and further to approve application by the Conservation Commission for reimbursement from 
the Commonwealth under General Laws, Chapter 132A, Section 11. 

Article 32. HOLLOWELL LAND 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the purchase by the Conservation Commission, for conservation pur- 
poses, from Elwin H. Hollowell of two (2) parcels of land containing approximately 10.33 acres situated be- 
tween Spring Hill Road and Carlisle Road and described as parcels 38 and 24 of plate D-5 of the Town Atlas 
(as amended to January 1, 1970) and further to approve application by the Conservation Commission for reim- 
bursement from the Commonwealth under General Laws, Chapter 132A, Section 11. 

Article 33. CONSERVATION FUND 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $100,000.00 for the Conservation Fund. 

Article 34. REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

VOTED: To accept the provisions of sections sixteen to sixteen I, inclusive, of chapter seventy-one of the 
General Laws, providing for the establishment of a regional vocational -technical school district, to consist of 
the towns of Arlington, Belmont, Concord and Lexington, together with such of the towns of Acton, Boxborough, 



76 

Carlisle, Lincoln, Stow, Sudbury, Wayland and Weston as vote to accept such sections, and the construction, 
maintenance and operation of a regional school by the said district in accordance with the provisions of a pro- 
posed agreement filed with the Selectmen. 

Ballot Vote. Total - 479. Yes - 457 No - 22. 

Article 35. SURPLUS PROPERTY 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $2,000.00 to be used by the Town Manager for 
the purchase and conditioning of surplus government property for the various town departments. 

Article 36. YOUTH COMMISSION 

VOTED: To accept Section 8E of Chapter 40 of the General Laws, and, effective April 1, 1971, establish a 
Youth Commission consisting of seven members to be appointed for terms of three years by the Town Manager, 
subject to the approval of the Selectmen, provided, however, that as of April 1, 1971, the Town Manager shall 
appoint two members for a term of one year, two members for a term of two years, and three members for a 
term of three years, and that the sum of $1,000.00 be raised and appropriated to be expended by the Youth 
Commission for the purpose of carrying out programs designed or established to meet the opportunities, chal- 
lenges and problems of the youth of the Town. 

Article 37. JULY 4TH 

MOTION: To raise and appropriate the sum of $2,000.00 to be expended for materials and expenses related to 
a fireworks display to be held for the celebration of Independence Day in July, 1971. 

MOTION LOST. 

VOTED: To adjourn at 10:55 P.M. to Monday, March 15, 1971. 

Monday, March 15, 1971. Moderator called the meeting to order at 7:32 P.M. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take up Article 44. 

Article 44. COUNCIL ON AGING 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $1,500.00 to be expended by the Council on Aging 
for the purpose of coordinating and conducting programs dealing with the problems of the aging and to promote 
facilities for the health, education, welfare and recreation of the aging. 

Article 45. 1975 CELEBRATION 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $4,000.00 to be placed in a separate account with the Town Trea- 
surer to be expended for the celebration of the 200th anniversary of the battle between the citizens of Acton 
and the British troops. 

Article 38. STATE AND EDNEY LAND 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the Board of Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain or other- 
wise acquire for municipal buildings the following described parcels of land located on Route 2 between Taylor 
Road and Hosmer Street: 

(a) a portion of parcel 75 shown on Map G-4 of the Town Atlas (as amended to January 1, 
1970) believed to belong to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, containing approximately 8 acres 
(See deeds recorded with the Middlesex South Registry of Deeds, in Book 7738, at Page 181 and in 
Book 7763, at Page 234), and 

(b) parcel 67 shown on Map G-3 of the Town Atlas (as amended to January 1, 1970) believed 
to belong to James P. and Marion S. Edney, containing approximately 10 acres (See deed recorded 
with said Deeds on May 28, 1953 in Book 9154, at Page 353), 

and raise and appropriate therefor, and for expenses incidental thereto, the sum of $12,000.00. 



77 

Article 39. DUNN LAND 

VOTED: To authorize the Board of Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain or otherwise acquire for 
municipal, buildings the parcel of land shown as parcel 42 on Map G-3 of the Town Atlas (as amended to Janu- 
ary 1, 1970) believed to belong to Malcolm R. and Judith Dunn, containing approximately 14 acres (See deed 
recorded with the Middlesex South Registry of Deeds on July 5, 1956 in Book 8065, at Page 313), and raise 
and appropriate therefor, and for expenses incidental thereto, the sum of $30,000.00. 

Total vote - 263. Yes - 241 No - 24 Needed to carry - 175+. 

Article 40. CLINICS 

MOTION: To raise and appropriate the sum of $900.00 to be expended under the direction of the Board of 
Health for providing cooperative or complementary facilities to out-patient clinics established, or to be estab- 
lished in accordance with Chapter 19 of the General Laws, in cooperation with the Department of Mental 
Health (including the therapeutic residence for adolescents of Living Alternatives, Incorporated) and for pro- 
viding payment for services rendered or to be rendered by such public or private agencies. 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 41. TOWN BYLAWS 

VOTED: To amend Article 1 of the Bylaws of the Town by adding to Section 1 of Article 1 a second sentence 
concerning the terms of elected officers of the Town so that Section 1 of Article 1 will read as follows: 

"Section 1. The annual Town meeting for the election of Town officers shall be held on the 
first Monday of March in each year. The terms of elected officers shall be as stated in Section 1 
of Chapter 255 of the Acts of 1966 (entitled an act establishing a selectmen-manager form of gov- 
ernment for the Town of Acton). The term of each such officer shall commence upon the final ad- 
journment of the annual town meeting at which he is elected and shall extend until the final adjourn- 
ment of the annual town meeting at which his successor is elected." 

Article 42. TOWN BYLAWS 

VOTED: To amend Article 3 of the Bylaws of the Town of Acton by striking out "$1,000.00" in the first para- 
graph of Article 3 and by substituting therefor "$2,000.00" and by conforming the language of Article 3 to Sec- 
tion 39M of Chapter 30 of the General Laws, as recently amended, so that said Article 3 will read as follows: 

"No contract for any work or service to be performed for the Town, other than professional ser- 
vices performed by a person regularly employed by the Town as part of the duties of such em- 
ployment, or for the purchase of materials, supplies or equipment, the actual or estimated cost 
of which amounts to $2,000.00 or more, shall be awarded unless proposals for the same have 
been invited by advertisement in at least one newspaper published in the Town, or, if there is no 
such newspaper, in a newspaper of general circulation in the county, such publication to be at 
least one week before the time specified for the opening of said proposals; such advertisement 
shall state the time and place for opening the proposals in answer to said advertisement and shall 
reserve to the Town the right to reject any or all such proposals. All such proposals shall be 
opened in public. No bill or contract shall be split or divided for the purpose of evading any pro- 
visions of this section." 

Article 43. FOREST ROAD 

MOTION: To accept the plan of the Selectmen to alter and partially to discontinue Forest Road as shown on a 
plan which is on file with the Town Clerk. 

MOTION LOST. 

Article 46. CONSERVATION LAND 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the Board of Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, or other- 
wise acquire for the Town for conservation purposes certain parcels of land located between Main Street and 
Pope Road in the northeast part of the Town, more particularly described as follows: 

1. Land of the Heirs of Amasa Davies bounded and described as follows: Westerly by land of 
Alden C. Flagg, six hundred fifty-nine and 64/100 feet; Northwesterly by land of John E. 
Murphy, two thousand five hundred eighty-one and 75/100 feet; Northeasterly by land of 
Mary Dobie and William J. Milligan, seven hundred six and 82/100 feet; and Southeasterly 
by land of the devisees of Evelina White, two thousand eight hundred seventy-one and 53/100 



78 

feet. Said premises being shown as "Land of the Heirs of Amasa Davies" and containing 
36.199 acres on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Acton, Mass. showing land to be ac- 
quired by the Town of Acton" dated November 16, 1970 by Acton Survey & Engineering, 
Inc. 

2. Land of the Devisees of Evelina White being bounded and described as follows: South- 
westerly by land of Janet F. Turley, two hundred fifty-one and 13/100 feet; Westerly by 
land of Alden C. Flagg, five hundred seventy-seven and 50/100 feet; Northwesterly by 
land of the heirs of Amasa Davies, two thousand eight hundred seventy -one and 53/100 
feet; Northeasterly by lands now or formerly of Mary Dobie and William J. Milligan, 
Elwin H. Hollowell and land of Dorothy W. Martin, seven hundred twenty-three and 
31/100 feet; and Southeasterly by land of Ethlyn E. Gerow and Waldo D. Wilson, the 
Town of Acton and the heirs of Harriet Davis, three thousand sixteen and 22/100 feet. 
Said premises being shown as "Land of the Devisees of Evelina White" and containing 
49.651 acres on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Acton, Mass. showing land to be ac- 
quired by the Town of Acton" dated November 16, 1970 by Acton Survey & Engineering, 
Inc. 

3. Land of the Heirs of Harriet Davis being bounded and described as follows: Southwesterly 
by land of Janet F. Turley, seven hundred sixty-two and 57/100 feet; Northwesterly by 
land of the devisees of Evelina White, one thousand thirty-six and 22/100 feet; Northeast- 
erly by land of the Town of Acton (formerly of Harold Reynolds) six hundred ninety-six and 
36/100 feet; and Southeasterly by land of the Town of Acton (formerly of Laurence E. 
Richardson) six hundred forty-seven and 06/100 feet. Said premises being shown as 
"Land of the Heirs of Harriet Davis" and containing 13.369 acres on a plan entitled "Plan 
of Land in Acton, Mass. showing land to be acquired by the Town of Acton" dated Novem- 
ber 16, 1970 by Acton Survey & Engineering, Inc. 

4. Land of the Heirs of William Livingston bounded and described as follows: Southwesterly 
by land of John E. Murphy, two hundred thirty and 50/100 feet; Northerly and Northwest- 
erly by Nashoba Brook; Northeasterly by land of Bellows Farm, Inc., one hundred thirty 
and 11/ 100 feet; and Southeasterly by land of Mary Dobie and William J. Milligan, five 
hundred fifty-three and 42/100 feet. Said premises being shown as "Land of the Heirs of 
William Livingston" and containing 1.8 acres plus or minus on a plan entitled "Plan of 
Land in Acton, Mass. showing land to be acquired by the Town of Acton" dated Novem- 
ber 16, 1970 by Acton Survey & Engineering, Inc. 

and that the sum of $25,000.00, which was appropriated from the Conservation Fund under Article 39 of the 
Warrant for the 1970 Annual Town Meeting, be transferred for the aforesaid purpose. 

Article 47. TRUCK - HIGHWAY 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $3,500.00 for the purchase of one pick-up truck 
for the Highway Department and authorize the Town Manager to trade-in one existing pick-up truck. 

Article 48. SALT SHED, ETC. 

MOTION: To authorize the Town Manager to arrange for or to enter into contracts for the construction of a 
salt shed at the site of the new public works facility, for paving and landscaping at the site of said facility, for 
certain heating equipment in the new facility, and for accessory equipment and materials and for items inci- 
dental to each of the foregoing at the facility, and to raise and appropriate the sum of $28,590.00 therefor. 

VOTED: To delete previous motion and substitute the following: Authorize the Town Manager to arrange for 
or to enter into contracts for the construction of a salt shed at the site of the new public works facility, in- 
stalling a water line and hydrant, and constructing a partition for a tool shed, and transfer $8,700.00 from the 
Stabilization Fund therefor. 

VOTED: To amend substitute motion by deleting $8,700.00 and inserting $10,300.00. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To authorize the Town Manager to arrange for or to enter into contracts for the con- 
struction of a salt shed at the site of the new public works facility, installing a water line and hydrant, and 
constructing a partition for a tool shed, and transfer $10,300.00 from the Stabilization Fund therefor. 

ADJOURNMENT 

VOTED: That at the completion of the article under discussion at 11:00 P. M. this meeting be adjourned to 
Wednesday, March 17, 1971 at 7:30 P.M. at this same place. 



79 

Article 49. STORAGE TANKS, ETC. 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $8,500.00 to be expended by the Town Manager for the purchase 
and installation of gasoline and diesel oil storage tanks and pumps for the new Town public works facility. 

Article 50. TOWN COMMONS 

To see if the Town will raise and appropriate, or appropriate from available funds, a sum of money, for the 
renovation of the Town Center Common, the West Acton Center Common, and Quimby Square in South Acton, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action. 

Article 51. HIGH AND PARKER STREETS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $6,500.00 for the resurfacing of High Street 
from Adams Street northerly for a distance of approximately 3000 feet and for the resurfacing of Parker 
Street from Carlton Drive easterly for a distance of approximately 3600 feet. 

Article 52. VEHICLE 

To see if the Town will raise and appropriate, or appropriate from available funds, the sum of $3,300.00, or 
any other sum, for the purchase of a utility vehicle for the Superintendent of Streets and authorize the Town 
Manager to trade in the present vehicle, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action. 

Article 53. SIDEWALKS 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $29,000.00 for the construction of sidewalks. 
VOTED: To adjourn at 10:54 P.M. to Wednesday, March 17, 1971. 
Wednesday, March 17, 1971. Moderator called the meeting to order at 7:30 P. M. 

Article 54. CENTRAL STREET 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate the sum of $30,800.00 for Chapter 90 Construction on Central Street 
from approximately 1,500 feet southerly of Littlefield Road to approximately 2,000 feet southerly of Littlefield 
Road, said money to be used in conjunction with funds to be allocated by the County and by the State, and to 
meet the appropriation that the sum of $7,700.00 be raised and appropriated and that the sum of $23,100.00 be 
transferred from Surplus Revenue. 

Article 55. CHAPTERS 81 AND 90 ALLOTMENTS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate from the Surplus Revenue Account the amount of $2,000.00 as the 
State's allotment for highway maintenance under Chapter 90, $2,000.00 as the County's allotment for highway 
maintenance under Chapter 90, and $23,100.00 as the State's allotment for highway maintenance under Chap- 
ter 81, provided that any reimbursement be credited to the Surplus Revenue Account. 

Article 56. PAINTING POLICE STATION 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $3,000.00 to be expended by the Town Manager for painting the 
interior of the Police Station. 

Article 57. POLICE CRUISERS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $4,500.00 for the purchase of two new police 
cruisers and that the Town Manager be authorized to trade in two of the present police cruisers. 

Article 58. ALARM REPAIR TRUCK 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $1,500.00 for the purchase and reconditioning of 
a used fire alarm repair truck and authorize the Town Manager to dispose of the present fire alarm repair 
truck. 



80 

Article 59. PICK-UP TRUCK 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $3,300.00 for the purchase of a pick-up truck 
for the Fire Department and authorize the Town Manager to trade in the existing pick-up truck. 

Article 60. RADIO - FIRE DEPARTMENT 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $2,000.00 for the purchase and installation of a 
new base radio and accessories for the Fire Department. 

Article 61. MOUNT HOPE CEMETERY 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $2,000.00 for the purpose of paving certain roads and avenues in 
Mount Hope Cemetery. 

Article 62. REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $1,680.00 for the purpose of paying the Town's 
apportioned share of the initial operating and maintenance costs of the proposed Regional Vocational Technical 
School District. 

Article 63. SWIMMING 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $5,500.00 for the swimming program at Waiden 
Pond. 

Article 64. TOWN FOREST 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $750.00 to be expended by the Town Manager for 
the purchase and installation of picnic facilities at the Town Forest off Bulette Road. 

Article 65. PLAYGROUND - CHARTER ROAD 

VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $1,500.00 to be expended by the Town Manager for the purchase 
and installation of playground equipment at Charter Road. 

Article 66. TUITION AND TRANSPORTATION 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $25,051.00 for the payment of vocational tuition 
and transportation according to the provisions of Chapter 74 of the General Laws. 

Article 67. BLANCHARD AUDITORIUM 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $8,500.00 to be expended by the Acton members 
of the Regional School District Committee for the repair of the roof on the Blanchard Auditorium 

Article 68. BUILDING CODE 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Building Code by making reference to "common stairways" and "com- 
mon corridors" in the title and in the first sentence of Section 136.3 so that the title and the first sentence of 
said section will read as follows: 

"Section 136.3 COMMON STAIRWAYS AND COMMON CORRIDORS 

Common stairways and common corridors shall be enclosed on both sides by masonry block 
walls of not less than six (6) inches and thickness of equal fire rating. All stairways shall have 
risers and treads. Block walls shall extend up to the roof boards. All doors in the above men- 
tioned fire walls shall be one and three-quarter (1-3/4) inches solid flush doors or equal. Fire 
rating doors will be equipped with self-closing mechanisms." 

Article 69. BUILDING CODE 
VOTED: To amend the Building Code by adding after Section 138.8 the following new section: 



"Section 139. RIGHT OF ENTRANCE 

The Chief of the Fire Department and/ or his designated representative shall have the right 
of entrance to any building covered by Section 138 for the purpose of enforcement, inspection, test- 
ing or any other matter concerned with compliance with this section." 

Article 70. BUILDING CODE 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Building Code by adding the following paragraph to Section 124: 

"On and after April 1, 1971, all mercantile buildings, places of public assembly and struc- 
tures to be used for similar occupancy erected or remodeled, shall have installed in the floor 
above any basement, suitable plates of glass, at least fifteen inches square, and spaced not over 
fifteen feet apart in each aisle, or as specified by the Fire Department, and having a suitable open- 
ing into said basement, for the purpose of proper fire fighting and ventilation operations in case of 
fire in the basement. Basement glass plates shall not be covered with any material which would 
prohibit their use." 

Article 71. BUILDING CODE 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Building Code by striking out Section 127 in its entirety and substitut- 
ing therefor the following new Section 127: 

"Section 127. EGRESS 

Every multiple -family dwelling house shall have a minimum of two (2) independent means of 
egress, placed as far apart as practicable, both of which shall be not less than fifteen (15) square 
feet in area and shall terminate at the outside of the building at ground level. 

Each balcony shall have a total width at least four feet greater than the total width of all wall 
openings leading to the balcony." 

Article 72. BUILDING CODE 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Building Code by deleting Section 138 in its entirety and substituting 
therefor the following: 

"Section 138. FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS 

Any building in use as a multiple dwelling of more than six (6) units having a common base- 
ment or common hallway or in use as a boarding or lodging house having more than 10 occupants 
shall be protected throughout with an automatic sprinkler system which shall automatically trans- 
mit an alarm to the Fire Alarm office through the municipal fire alarm system, or a Fire Detec- 
tion system of a design approved by the Fire Chief and installed as specified under Sections 138.1 
through 138.8 which will automatically transmit an alarm over the municipal fire alarm system to 
the Fire Alarm Office. Any building existing and in use for any purpose specified in this paragraph 
shall comply with this requirement not later than July 1, 1972. 

Any new building or existing building hereafter converted for a business or industrial use 
having more than three thousand (3000) square feet of floor area shall be protected by the owner 
with a standard automatic sprinkler and alarm system or an automatic fire detection system and 
alarm system as specified herein and shall be installed as specified in Section 138.1. 

This section shall also apply to any existing buildings used for business or industrial pur- 
poses whenever an addition is made thereto which has the effect of increasing the floor area so that 
the total area, both old and new, is in excess of 3,000 square feet. Both the old and new section of 
the building will be covered by the Fire Protection system as outlined in this section. 

All schools, public or private, institutions, public buildings or places of assembly, con- 
structed or converted after adoption of this section, shall be protected with a standard automatic 
sprinkler and alarm system or an automatic fire detection system and alarm system as specified 
in this section." 

Article 73. BUILDING CODE 
MOTION: To amend the Building Code by adding the following new section: 



82 

"Section 138.9 FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS - SINGLE DWELLINGS 

All new dwellings shall be protected by smoke and heat detecting devices bearing the label 
of approval by a nationally recognized testing agency. Materials and equipment shall be installed 
in a neat and workmanlike manner in conformity with the requirements of the N. F. P. A. Standards 
Nos. 72 and 74 and the Massachusetts Electrical Code. No electrical work in connection with the 
installation of a system shall be installed or an original system expanded without first obtaining a 
permit from the Inspector of Wires. All detection devices shall be connected to a local alarm so 
located and sufficiently loud so as to arouse all persons residing in the dwelling." 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend original motion by adding the following words to the title: "AND MULTI- 
PLE DWELLINGS OF SIX (6) OR LESS UNITS" and adding after the word "new" in the first sentence, the fol- 
lowing: "single family dwellings and new multiple dwellings of six (6) or less units." 

VOTED: To amend the Building Code by adding the following new section: 

"Section 138.9 FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS - SINGLE DWELLINGS AND 
MULTIPLE DWELLINGS OF SIX (6) OR LESS UNITS 

All new single family dwellings and new multiple dwellings of six (6) or less units shall be 
protected by smoke and heat detecting devices bearing the label of approval by a nationally recog- 
nized testing agency. Materials and equipment shall be installed in a neat and workmanlike man- 
ner in conformity with the requirements of the N. F. P. A. Standards Nos. 72 and 74 and the Massa- 
chusetts Electrical Code. No electrical work in connection with the installation of a system shall 
be installed or an original system expanded without first obtaining a permit from the Inspector of 
Wires. All detection devises shall be connected to a local alarm so located and sufficiently loud so 
as to arouse all persons residing in the dwelling." 

Total vote: 172. Yes - 88 No - 84. 

Article 74. BUILDING CODE 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Building Code as it relates to multiple dwelling buildings by adding the 
following new Section 136.7: 

"Section 136.7 EXTERIOR WALLS 

All exterior walls shall be constructed of masonry or of materials, the combination of which, 
offer the equivalent fire resistive rating of two (2) hours as tested under the provisions of ASTM- 
E119 or NFPA-251 Standard Fire tests, except for window and door openings; provided, however, 
that multiple dwelling buildings not exceeding two (2) stories in height above grade, containing not 
more than ten (10) dwelling units, and separated by at least thirty (30) feet, may have exterior walls 
of frame construction." 

- Article 75. DRAINAGE EASEMENT 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To accept from Joseph A. and Nancy B. Nastasi a drainage easement granted by 
deed dated July 8, 1970, shown on Plan 780 (A of 2) of 1970 recorded with the Middlesex South District Regis- 
try of Deeds. 

Article 76. RESERVE FUND 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To raise and appropriate the sum of $40,000.00 for the Reserve Fund, pursuant to 
the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6. 

Article 77. BUDGET 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To appropriate and transfer $200,000.00 from Free Cash to be used by the Assessors 
in considering and fixing the tax rate for the current year. 

Article 78. STABILIZATION FUND 

To see if the Town will raise and appropriate, or appropriate from available funds, a sum of money for a sta- 
bilization fund, pursuant to the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 5B, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action. 



83 



The following served as tellers at the above meeting: Milford B. 
Tuttle, Marianna E. Croy, Joan N. Gardner, Ann B. Evans. 

VOTED: To adjourn at 9:31 P. M. 



Bottomley, Walter J. Johnson, George F. 



A true copy. Attest: 



Charles M. MacRae 
Town Clerk 



Amendments to the Building Code (Articles 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73 and 74) and amendments to the Protective 
Zoning Bylaw (Articles 20, 21, 23, 24, 25 and 26) voted in the affirmative at the Annual Town Meeting, 
March 8, 1971 and adjourned sessions were approved by Attorney General Robert H. Quinn on June 11, 1971 
and duly advertised as required by law. 




Retiring Town Moderator John W. Putnam accepts plaque from 
Chairman of the Board of Selectmen Vincent M. Russo 




Newly elected Town Moderator John W. Tierney accepts Gavel from 

retiring Moderator John W. Putnam at the adjournment of the Meeting. 

(Photos by G. B. Williams, Jr. ) 



84 



ABSTRACT OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, JUNE 22, 1971 



Moderator called the meeting to order at 7:30 P.M. 

Article 1. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED: To ratify the action of the Personnel Board on April 15, 1971 in reclassifying the position class of 
Accounting Clerk from Compensation Grade S-5, as set forth in Schedule A, Section 15, of the Personnel By- 
law, to Compensation Grade S-6 and amend the Personnel Bylaw accordingly. 

Article 2. PERSONNEL BYLAW 

VOTED: To ratify the action of the Personnel Board on May 6, 1971, in reclassifying the position class of 
Recreation Director from Schedule F to Schedule B-l, Compensation Grade E-5, as set forth in Schedule A, 
Section 15, of the Personnel Bylaw and amend the Personnel Bylaw accordingly. 

Article 3. DRAINAGE EASEMENT 

VOTED: To accept a perpetual easement for drainage purposes described in a deed from Robert E. Sweeney, 
Trustee of Nashoba Realty Trust, dated March 12, 1971. 

Article 4. TOWN BYLAWS 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend Section 2 of Article 9 of the Bylaws of the Town by deleting said Section 2 
in its entirety and substituting therefor the following new Section 2: 

"Section 2. The Town Manager shall appoint a public ceremonies and celebrations commit- 
tee consisting of nine members. The terms of the committee members shall be for three years. 
The term of three members shall expire on March 31st each year." 

Article 5. CONSERVATION LAND 

VOTED: To approve the purchase by the Conservation Commission from Ethyln E. Gerow and Waldo D. Wilson, 
of a certain parcel of land containing approximately 15.39 acres described in a deed recorded with Middlesex 
South District Registry of Deeds in Book 5475, at Page 205, said parcel being situated in North Acton adjoin- 
ing the "Spring Hill Tract" conservation land and shown as Parcels 37 and 37-1 on sheet D5 of the Town Atlas, 
and further to approve application by the Conservation Commission for reimbursement from the Commonwealth 
under General Laws, Chapter 132A, Section 11. 

Article 6. ZONING BYLAW 

VOTED: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw and the Zoning Map of the Town by changing to R-3 the desig- 
nation on the map applicable to all that land presently zoned R-l located within the area bounded as follows: 

NORTHEASTERLY by Great Road (Route 2A), 

SOUTHERLY by Brook Street, Main Street (Route 27), Nagog Hill Road, Hammond Street, Newtown 
Road, and Arlington Street, 

WESTERLY by Route 2, and 

NORTHERLY by the Acton-Littleton Town Line. 

Total vote - 505. Yes - 475 No - 30 Needed to carry - 336. 

Article 7. ZONING BYLAW 

VOTED: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw by striking out clause (f) of Paragraph (1) of Section IV-C, 
which reads "f. Restaurant", and substituting therefor the following new clause (f): 

"f. Restaurant where food and beverages are consumed indoors or, if consumed outdoors, are 
consumed on a patio closed on all sides with entrance to the patio normally available only 
from the building." 

Total vote - 662. Yes - 448 No - 214 Needed to carry - 442. 



85 

Article 8. HIGHWAY FUNDS 

VOTED: To accept the provisions of Chapter 616 of the Acts of 1967 relative to the accelerated highway pro- 
gram and transfer from surplus revenue the sum of $10,693.30, which was received pursuant to section five 
of said Chapter 616, to be expended for the highway purposes described in said section five. 

Article 10. HIGHWAY TRUCK 

VOTED: To appropriate from surplus revenue the sum of $2,500.00 for the purchase and reconditioning of a 
used truck chassis and the reconditioning of a dump truck body for the Highway Department. 

Article 9. HAYWARD ROAD 

VOTED: To accept as a town way Hayward Road as laid out by the Board of Selectmen according to plans on 
file with the Town Clerk, including the taking or acceptance of land and easements for drainage, utility, road 
construction, and other purposes as shown on said plans or described in the order of layout and appropriate 
$16,100.00 from surplus revenue for the purpose of acquiring said land, and easements and for expenses inci- 
dental thereto, and name said street Hayward Road. 

Article 11. PAVING AT PUBLIC WORKS 

VOTED: To appropriate the sum of $10,000.00 from surplus revenue for paving at the Town public works 
facility. 

Total vote - 787. Yes - 413 No - 374. 

Article 12. REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

VOTED: To approve the amount of debt authorized to be issued by Acton-Boxborough Regional School District 
to finance the cost of constructing, equipping and furnishing additions to the existing junior high school, namely, 
$4,225,000.00. 

VOTED: To approve the amount of additional debt authorized to be issued by the Acton-Boxborough Regional 
School District to finance the cost of air conditioning the auditorium and the exterior classrooms in the new 
additions, namely, $20,000.00. 

VOTED: To approve the amount of additional debt authorized to be issued by the Acton-Boxborough Regional 
School District to finance the cost of a swimming pool, namely, $395,000.00. 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: Be it resolved that it is the desire of this meeting that the citizens of the Town of 
Acton wish to be recorded as expressing their appreciation to those citizens of Acton and Boxborough who have, 
during the past year, served as members of the Acton-Boxborough Regional School Building Committee. 

Be it further resolved that this meeting wishes to be recorded as expressing a special note of apprecia- 
tion to Thomas J. Regan, Jr., Chairman of Acton's Permanent Building Committee and Raymond J. Grey, 
Principal of the Acton-Boxborough Senior High School for the extraordinary amount of time and effort which 
they have expended in the planning for the new regional school addition which has come before this meeting 
this evening. 

VOTED: To adjourn at 10:45 P. M. 

The Moderator appointed the following persons who served as tellers at the above meeting: Lyman H. Goff, Jr., 
Lorens A. A. Perssons, Charles G. Rogers, James F. Megee, Nancy R. Mutty, Katherine A. Meyer, Jane C. 
Litchfield, Daniel J. O'Connor, Jr., B. David Deloury, Jr., Michael V. P. Grace, Suzanne E. Sandock, 
William C. Ray. 

A true copy. Attest: Charles M. MacRae 

Town Clerk 

Amendments to the Town Bylaws (Article 4) and Protective Zoning Bylaw (Articles 6 and 7) voted in the affir- 
mative at the Special Town Meeting, June 22, 1971, were approved by Attorney General Robert H. Quinn on 
September 14, 1971, and duly advertised as required by law. 



86 



ABSTRACT OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, NOVEMBER 1, 1971 

Moderator called the meeting to order at 8:00 P. M. 

Article 1. TRANSFER 

VOTED: To transfer the sum of $526.45 from the Insurance Claims Recovery Fund to the Fire Department 
Expense Account. 

Article 2. TRANSFER 
VOTED: To appropriate $8,000.00 from Surplus Revenue for the Group Health Insurance Account. 

Article 3. ZONING BYLAW 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw by deleting sub-clause dd. in Section VI B 3c 
and substituting therefor the following: 

"dd. In accordance with Chapter 40A, Section 20 of the General Laws, no appeal or petition for 
a variance from the terms of this bylaw with respect to a particular parcel of land or the 
building thereon, and no application for a special exception to the terms of this bylaw, 
which has been unfavorably acted upon by the Board of Appeals, shall be considered on 
its merits by the Board within two years after the date of such unfavorable action, except 
with the consent of all but one of the members of the planning board; provided, however, 
that an annulment of a favorable decision of the Board by a court shall not constitute un- 
favorable action within the meaning of this section." 

Article 4. TRANSFER 

VOTED: To appropriate $9,700.00 from Surplus Revenue for the Highway Department Salary and Wages 
Account. 

Article 5. CONSERVATION LAND 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To transfer from the Board of Selectmen the care, custody, management and con- 
trol of a parcel of land consisting of approximately 5.8 acres, located westerly of Spring Hill Road and abut- 
ting land owned by the Town, more particularly described in a deed recorded with the Middlesex South Regis- 
try of Deeds in Book 11270, at Page 552, to the Conservation Commission to be held for conservation purposes. 

Article 6. MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To approve the $900,000.00 indebtedness authorized by the Regional District School 
Committee of the Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School District on October 5, 1971, for acquiring 
land and preparing architectural and engineering plans and for other preliminary expenses, all in connection 
with constructing and equipping a regional vocational technical school and, to the extent of any remaining bal- 
ance, for constructing the school. 

Article 7. STREETS 
VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To take no action. 

Article 8. CONSERVATION LAND 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To approve the purchase from H. Daniel and Lenore S. Flanagan of a parcel of land 
containing approximately 14.7 acres situated at 219-223 Main Street and described as parcel 124 of plate G-2 
of the Town Atlas (as amended to January 1, 1970) and approve application by the Conservation Commission 
for reimbursement from the Commonwealth and from the Federal Government under Public Law 68-578. 



87 

Article 9. CONSERVATION LAND 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY: To approve the purchase from Jenks Charitable Foundation of a parcel of land con- 
taining approximately 16.8 acres situated on Main Street and described as parcel 152 of plate G-2 of the Town 
Atlas (as amended to January 1, 1970) and approve application by the Conservation Commission for reimburse- 
ment from the Commonwealth and from the Federal Government under Public Law 68-578. 

RESOLUTION 

RESOLUTION: The voters of Acton, assembled for the Special Town Meeting on Monday evening, November 1, 
1971, know that Charles MacPherson would like most of all to be with us tonight. We remember his sincere 
devotion to the interests of his community and we wish him a speedy recovery and a return to good health. 

VOTED: To adjourn at 8:45 P.M. 

A true copy. Attest: Charles M. MacRae 

Town Clerk 

An amendment to the Protective Zoning Bylaw (Article 3) voted in the affirmative at the Special Town Meeting, 
November 1, 1971 was approved by Attorney General Robert H. Quinn on December 9, 1971 and duly adver- 
tised as required by law. 



TOWN ELECTION 

March 1, 1971 

Pet. 1 Pet. 2 Pet. 3 Total 

Whole number of ballots cast 641 470 736 1847 

MODERATOR, One Year 

Richmond P. Miller 

John W. Tierney 

Blanks 

SELECTMEN, Three Years (2) 

Paul H. Lesure 

Robert E. Parks 

Alfred F. Steinhauer 

Blanks 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE, Three Years (2) 

Robert Evans, Jr 

Howard L. Parsons 

Robert B. Pilsbury 

Blanks 

TRUSTEE OF MEMORIAL LIBRARY, Three Years 

Margaret Richter 

Blanks 

HOUSING AUTHORITY (4) 

Thomas J. Ahern, Jr 

John R. Folsom 

Mary M. Laffin 

George W. Moulton 

Raymond L. Page 

Michael H. Pickowicz 

Julia D. Stevens 

Hugh J. Talbot 

Blanks 






191 


131 


205 


527 


433 


325 


515 


1273 


17 


14 


16 


47 


466 


368 


617 


1451 


361 


212 


299 


872 


325 


250 


459 


1034 


130 


110 


97 


337 


447 


312 


487 


1246 


263 


170 


341 


774 


392 


300 


432 


1124 


180 


158 


212 


550 


567 


409 


688 


1664 


74 


61 


48 


183 


355 


214 


343 


912 


231 


184 


224 


639 


394 


264 


512 


1170 


291 


209 


321 


821 


192 


127 


266 


585 


165 


99 


190 


454 


379 


254 


496 


1129 


165 


173 


183 


521 


392 


356 


409 


1157 



88 



TOWN OFFICERS & APPOINTMENTS 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICERS 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY MODERATOR 



MODERATOR 



John W. Tierney 



SELECTMEN 
William L. Chipman 
William C. Sawyer 
Paul R. Nyquist 
Paul H. Lesure 
Alfred F. Steinhauer 

ACTON HOUSING AUTHORITY 
George W. Moulton 
Thomas J. Ahern, Jr. 
* Patience H. MacPherson 
Julia D. Stevens 
Mary M. Laffin 



Term 




Term 


Expires 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


Expires 


1972 


Theodore Jarvis 


1972 




Arthur Schene 


1972 




Harold G. Marsh 


1972 


1972 


Griffith L. Resor 


1973 


1972 


Stephen G. Lewis 


1973 


1973 


Ahti E. Autio 


1973 


1974 


Edward W. Berriman 


1974 


1974 


Robert Haeberle 


1974 




Martha L. Ring 


1974 



1972 REGIONAL REFUSE PLANNING COMMITTEE 

1973 *James C. Donald 1972 
1973 Frank B. Kaylor 1972 

1975 **Wilfred A. Fordon 1973 

1976 Paul F. Gilbson 1974 



LOCAL AND REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEES 

Beverly W. Lydiard 1972 

John A. Norris 1972 

Edith D. Stowell 1973 

Donald E. Westcott 1973 
Robert Evans, Jr. 
Robert B. Pilsbury 



TRUSTEES OF ACTON FIREMEN'S . 
RELIEF FUND 
John F. McLaughlin 
Richard A. Lowden 
T. Frederick S. Kennedy 

TRUSTEES OF THE CITIZENS LIBRARY 
ASSOCIATION OF WEST ACTON 
Joan N. Gardner 
Barbara Nylander 
Betty L. Boothby 

TRUSTEES OF ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 
Eleanor P. Wilson 
:=*Helen B. Wood 
Hazel P. Vose 

TRUSTEES OF GOOD NOW FUND 
Clark C. McElvein 
Thelma L. Boatman 
James N. Gates 

TRUSTEES OF MEMORIAL LIBRARY 
James L. Parker 
Mileva Brown 
Margaret Richter 



TRUSTEES OF WEST ACTON FIREMEN'S 

RELIEF FUND 

H. Stuart MacGregor 1972 

James B. Wilson 1973 

Frederick A. Harris 1974 



MINUTEMEN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL 

TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Marilyn Peterson 1974 

APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN 



1974 






1974 


ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON THE 
1975 CELEBRATION 






E. Wilson Bursaw 


1972 




Brewster Conant 


1971 


1972 


Col. Burton A. Davis 


1972 


1973 


David H. Donaldson 


1972 


1974 


Donald R. Gilberti 


1972 




Hayward S. Houghton 


1972 




Roger M. Huebsch 


1972 




Susan F. Huebsch 


1972 


1972 


Mark A. Kahan 


1972 


1973 


T. Frederick S. Kennedy 


1972 


1974 


**Margaret B. Kinzie 


1972 




Walter R. Laite 


1972 




Malcolm S. MacGregor 


1972 


1972 


Natacha F. MacGregor 


1972 


1973 


Florence A. Merriam 


1972 


1974 


Richmond P. Miller, Jr. 


1972 




Charles A. Morehouse 


1972 




Linda A. Morris 


1972 


1972 


** Marion E. H. Houghton 


1972 


1973 


Gilbert S. Osburn 


1972 


1974 


Palo A. Peirce 


1972 




Norman L. Roche 


1972 




Raymond Spicer 


1972 


1972 


**Mary S. Tierney 


1972 


1973 


**Earle W. Tuttle 


1972 


1974 


*Jerry T. Ballantine 


1972 




^Patience H. MacPherson 


1972 




*Minetta D. Lee 


1972 




H. Bradford Sturtevant 


1972 



ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION 
Philip G. Watts 1972 



* Resigned 
; * Replacing* 
-* Deceased 
: * Appointed by Department of Community Affairs 



89 



ARCHIVES 
Joyce C. Woodhead 
Minetta D. Lee 
T. Frederick S. Kennedy 

BOARD OF APPEALS 
John J. Bush 
Edward G. Schwarm 
Harold W. Flood 



Associate Members: 
Herman Vanderwart 
*Robert Orner 



Term 




Term 


Expires 


REGISTRAR OF VOTERS 


Expires 


1972 


Thomas R. Murphy 


1972 


1973 


David E. Driscoll 


1973 


1974 


James B. Wilson 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 


1974 


1972 


Donald O. Nylander 


1972 


1973 






1974 


TOWN MANAGER 






Robert W. Dotson 


1972 


1972 


APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TOWN MANAGER 


1974 


REQUIRING APPROVAL OF THE 





ELECTION OFFICERS 
Precinct I 
Warden Irene F. McLaughlin 

Deputy Warden John F. McLaughlin 

Clerk Barbara N. Mulvey 

Deputy Clerk Violet Perry 

Inspectors Barbara Nylander, Margaret Schene 

Deputy Inspectors Muriel F. Miller, Helen G. May 
Tellers Frances L. Collins, Marion F. Driscoll 
Lela Balcom, Frances Hirsch 

Mona V. Melymuka, Nancy L. Miller 



Precinct II 
Warden 

Deputy Warden 
Clerk 

Deputy Clerk 
Inspectors Martha I 



Margaret Larsen 

Elsie T. Winslow 

Bertha Carr Tucker 

Irene Young 

Lowden, Michael J. Walsh 



Deputy Inspectors Hazel P. Vose, Helen M. Young 

Tellers Ruth R. Phelps, Barbara V. Woodward 

Charlotte E. Wetherbee, Joan E. Nelson 

Jean Ann Dingee, Lorraine O. Condon 



Warden 

Clerk 

Inspectors Martin J 

Deputy Warden 

Deputy Clerk 

Deputy Inspectors 

Tellers 



Precinct III 

Barbara J. McPhee 
Phyllis K. Sprague 
Duggan, Elsie M. Godfrey 
Katherine E. Nedza 
Mary H. Prentice 
Genevieve L. Hatch 
Elizabeth Charter 
Minnie C. Veasie, Esther Perry 
Anna G. Mahar, Lydia R. Lesure 
Carl R. Godfrey, Marian J. Meigs 



INSURANCE AUDITING COMMITTEE 

Raymond L. Page 1972 

*Roger Crafts 1972 

*Allan G. Thompson 1972 

PERSONNEL BOARD 

Mary K. Hadley 1972 

Donald MacKenzie 1972 

Richard P. O'Brien 1973 

Henry M. Young 1973 

Donald McNeish 1974 

PLANNING BOARD 

Robert H. Gerhardt 1972 

Eric D. Bradlee 1973 

George O. Gardner 1974 

John F. Pasieka 1975 

Edward A. Chambers 1976 



* Resigned 
**# Deceased 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
John H. Loring 
-Carl C. Flint 
Dewey E. Boatman 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Dorothy B. Stonecliffe 
Peter P. Jorrens 
Brewster Conant 
Richard H. Murphy 
Bianca M. Chambers 
Robert J. Ellis 
Chauncey W. Waldron, Jr. 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Anita E. Dodson 

Robert H. Nylander 

Stanley L. Smith 

Marian E. H. Houghton 
;: Samuel Sutcliffe 
lc Jerry Ballantine 



Charles M. 



TOWN CLERK 
MacRae 



TOWN TREASURER AND COLLECTOR 
Wm. Henry Soar 

YOUTH COMMISSION 

Alan B. Flood 

Charles A. Schook 

Ernest A. Keppel 

Ann T. Evans 

Charles G. Kadison 

Bruce M. McCarthy 
; =Charles D. MacPherson 
'•' Nancy C. Howe 



1972 
1973 
1974 



1972 
1972 
1973 
1973 
1973 
1974 
1974 



1972 
1973 
1973 
1974 
1972 
1974 



1972 



1972 



1972 
1973 
1973 
1974 
1974 
1974 
1972 
1973 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TOWN MANAGER 



ASSISTANT ASSESSOR 
Ralph E. Dodge 

BOARD OF HEALTH 
Edwin Richter 
Dr. John E. Rowse 
Donald R. Gilbert! 



Kenneth E. 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Jewell 



1972 



1972 
1973 
1974 



1972 



90 





Term 




Expires 


CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 




Harlan E. Tuttle 


1972 


Howard F. Jones 


1973 


Charles F. Putnam 


1974 



1971-1972 COLLECTIVE BARGAINING COMMITTEE 

REPRESENTING TOWN MANAGER 
Donald MacKenzie 
Richard P. O'Brien 
Henry M. Young 



CONSTABLES 
David J. Allen 
Frederick J. Hryniewich 
T. Frederick S. Kennedy 
Charles A. Morehouse 
Robert S. Rhodes 



1972 
1972 
1972 
1972 
1972 



CONSTABLE - SPECIAL - DEPUTY COLLECTOR 
William F. Egar 1972 



COUNCIL ON AGING 
Vincent G. Gavin 
Donald R. Gilberti 
E. June Hill 

Patience H. MacPherson 
Norman L. Roche 
Peter M. Smoltees 
Carol R. Major 

DEPUTY BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Anthony L. Galeota, Jr. 
H. Stuart MacGregor 



1972 
1972 
1972 
1972 
1972 
1972 
1972 



1972 
1972 



DEPUTY CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT 
Frederick A. Harris 1972 

Richard L. Lowden 1972 

DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
Robert F. Guba 1972 



DEPUTY FOREST WARDEN 
Richard A. Lowden 
Frederick A. Harris 

DEPUTY INSPECTOR OF GAS PIPING 
AND GAS APPLIANCES 
Warren E. Bemis 

DEPUTY INSPECTOR OF WIRES 
Lawrence I. Tucker 

DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
Walter J. Johnson 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC HEALTH 
Bradford S. Leach 



Patrick Palmer 
David Abbt 



DOG OFFICER 

FENCE VIEWER 
FIELD DRIVERS 



James Kazokas 
William J. Durkin, Jr. 

* Resigned 
*#* Deceased 



1972 
1972 



1972 



1972 



1972 



1972 



1972 



1972 



1972 
1972 



FIRE CHIEF 
Thomas J. Barry, Jr. 

FIREMEN 
(Standing Appointments) 



Term i 
Expires ' 

1972 



Edward Belmont 
Donald Copeland 



Charles Sweet 
Hobart King 
David Spinney 
Malcolm Perkins 
Wm. H. Soar, Jr. 
Joseph Conquest 



Captains 
Firefighters 



Hobart King 
Call Men 



Lieutenants 



Clarence G. Frost 
Malcolm MacGregor 



Stephen Huntley 

Milton Hart 

Bernard Caouette 

David Calkins 

John Tobin 

Robert Craig 



Richard Gallant 



Carl Simeone 



Acton Center Station 



Forrest Bean, III ~ 
Gilmore Buzzell, Jr. 
Ronald Calkins 
Philip Harris 
Everett Putnam 
Frank Putnam 



John Bushek 
Charles Hillman 
Stewart Kennedy 
William Klauer 
Allen Nelson 



Fisher Hills 



South Acton Station 



Robert Reynolds 

John Richardson 

George Sloane 

Gordon Smart 

Richard Swenson 

Norman C. Taylor 



George Pederson 

Robert Puffer 

Paul Simeone 

Wm. Henry Soar 

Alan J. Waters 



Robert Wetherbee 



West Acton Station 



Edward Bennett 
Timothy Blaisdell 
Arthur Decker 
Martin Duggan 
Gordon Gravlin 



Francis Malson 

FOREST WARDEN 
Thomas J. Barry, Jr. 



James Kazokas 

David Nichols 

Timothy Pattee 

Armand Riendeau 

Stephen Tolman 



1972 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

Josiah Kirby 1972 

Richard J. O'Neil 1972 

Mark Imbimbo 1973 

Edward W. Flannery 1975 

Stephen E. Lord 1975 

*John W. Tierney 1974 

***Albert I. Verchot 1974 

*William P. McDonald 1973 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 
Patrick Palmer 



1972 



INSPECTOR OF GAS PIPING AND GAS APPLIANCES 
Joseph G. Perry 1972 



91 



INSPECTOR OF WIRES 
Leslie F. Parke 



Edward J. 



KEEPER OF THE LOCKUP 
Collins, Jr. 



Term 
Expires 

1972 

1972 



Term 
Expires 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 

William C. Sawyer 1972 

*John H. Loring 1972 

PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Wallie Everest 1972 

**Eric L. Larson 1972 

Thomas J. Regan, Jr. 1973 

Edward L. Morrill 1973 

Donald M. Perkins 1974 

*David G. Hurley 1972 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 
(Civil Service - Standing Appointments) 

Chief 
Edward J. Collins, Jr. 



Sergeants 
Chauncey R. Fenton, Jr. 
David W. Scribner 



Norman L. Roche 
Robert S. Rhodes 



Patrolmen 



William J. Durkin, Jr. 
Bernard W. Harrison 
William N. Hayes 
Joseph P. Sansone 
George W. Robinson 
Donald M. Bresnick 



John T. McNiff 

Robert P. MacLeod 

Brian R. Goodman 

David C. Flint 

Lawrence A. Dupont 

Edward R. Brooks 



Robert L. Parisi 

Special Officers 

William D. Kendall, Jr. James P. Conheeney 

T. Frederick S. Kennedy John E. MacLeod 

Robert P. Beaudoin Oiva T. Kallio 

Edmond Daigneault 



Matrons 



Marjory J. Davis 



Muriel B. Flannery 



Crossing Guards 

Natacha MacGregor ~ *Charles R. Quinn 

Marian E. Quinn 

Special Police Officer for Edward Square 
Cedric Thatcher 

Acton Schools Only 
Edmund J. McNiff Robert Graham 

PUBLIC CEREMONIES AND 
CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

David H. Donaldson 1972 

-*Robert M. Huebsch 1972 

Burton A. Davis 1973 

Walter R. Laite 1974 

Richard P. Miller, Jr. 1974 

*Robert E. Nelson 1972 
*John W. Tierney 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
George K. Hayward 1971 

* Resigned 
** Replacing* 



PUBLIC WEIGHERS 
William J. Durkin, Jr. 
Bernard W. Harrison 
Robert S. Rhodes 
George W. Robinson 

RECREATION COMMISSION 
Janet W. Murphy 
Elinor White 
Richard McCauley 
♦♦Harrington Moore, Jr. 
Thomas F. Burke 
-'Gale Jarvis 
*James Maclntyre, 3rd 

SEWERAGE STUDY COMMITTEE 
Daniel J. Costello 
Bradford S. Leach 
David A. Manlan 
Warren S. Orcutt 

STREET LIGHTING COMMITTEE 
Booth D. Jackson 
H. Stuart MacGregor 
Leslie F. Parke 

SUPERINTENDENT OF CEMETERIES 
T. Frederick S. Kennedy 



1972 
1972 
1972 
1972 



1972 
1973 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1973 
1974 



1972 
1972 
1972 
1972 



1972 
1972 
1972 



1972 



SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 
Franklin H. Charter 1972 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 
Allen H. Nelson 



1972 



TOWN BUILDING-LAND ACQUISITION COMMITTEE 



David Abbt 
Paul D. Hamilton 
Roger M. Huebsch 
Richmond P. Miller, Jr. 
Joseph W. Stevens 

TOWN COUNSEL 
Herbert P. Wilkins 

TOWN ENGINEER 
Anthony L. Galeota, Jr. 

TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 
George E. Neagle 
Emery D. Nelson 

TOWN REPORT COMMITTEE 
Christopher C. Kellogg 
Nancy Gay Browne 
John Gourgas 

TREE WARDEN 
Franklin H. Charter 



1972 
1972 
1972 
1972 
1972 



1972 



1972 



1972 
1972 



1972 
1973 
1974 



1972 



VETERANS' AGENT AND DIRECTOR OF 

VETERANS' SERVICES 

Norman L. Roche 1972 

VETERANS' BURIAL AGENT 
Norman L. Roche 1972 

VETERANS' GRAVES OFFICER 
T. Frederick S. Kennedy 1972 

WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION AGENT 
Theron A. Lowden 1972 



92 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

The reports which are submitted herewith represent a statement of the cash disbursements authorized 
during the year ended December 31, 1971, and a Balance Sheet of the Town of Acton as of December 31, 1971. 

The 1972 appropriation for amortization of the bonded indebtedness of the Town will include the final 
amount for the Julia McCarthy Elementary School. The complete amortization requirements are as follows: 



Schools: 

Florence A. Merriam Elementary School 
Julia McCarthy Elementary School 
Carolyn Douglas Elementary School 
Paul P. Gates Elementary School 
Luther B. Conant Elementary School 
Regional School District 

Total Schools 

Acton Memorial Library Addition 
Public Works Facility 

Amortization of bonded indebtedness 



$ 40,000.00 
10,000.00 
35,000.00 
60, 000. 00 
85, 000.00 
223,316.00 

$453,316.00 

25,000. 00 
35,000.00 

$513,316.00 



The accounts of the Treasurer and Collector have been verified, and I have reviewed the various trust 
funds in the custody of the Treasurer and the Trustees. 

Donald O. Nylander 
Town Accountant 

STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATIONS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
January!, 1971 to December 31, 1971 



Warrant 
Budget Item 

General Government : 
Moderator: 

1. Salary 

2. Expenses 

Finance Committee: 

3. Expenses 



Appropriated 

or 

Available 



140.00 
20.00 



70.00 



Disbursed 



140.00 



70.00 



Balance 



20.00 



Selectmen: 


4. 


Salaries 


5. 
6. 


Expenses 
Capital Outlay - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 


7. 

8. 

9. 

10. 


Legal Services 
Legal Service Expenses 
Appraisals and Surveys 
Out-of-State Travel 



Town Office Clerical Staff: 

11. Salaries 

Engineering Department: 

12. Salaries and Wages 

13. Expenses 

14. Capital Outlay 

Town Accountant: 

15. Salary 

16. Expenses 



20,980.00 


20,972. 63 


7.37 


12, 585.00 


10,921.91 


1,663.09 


1,630.00 






655.00 


2,273.60 


11.40 


13, 500.00 


12,618.75 


881.25 


500.00 


500.00 


-- 


1,000.00 


-- 


1,000.00 


1, 500.00 


859. 15 


640.85 


82,305.00 


79, 757. 51 


2,547.49 


47, 160.00 


46,925.26 


234. 74 


4,800.00 


4, 785.42 


14.58 


150.00 


135.00 


15.00 


4,355.00 


4,355.00 





160.00 


158.90 


1. 10 



93 



Warrant 
Budget Item 

Town Treasurer and Collector: 

17. Salary 

18. Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 

19. Capital Outlay 

Town Assessors: 

20. Salaries 

21. Expenses 

Town Clerk: 

22. Salary 

23. Expenses 

Elections and Registration: 

24. Salaries and Wages - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 

25. Expenses 

26. Capital Outlay 

Planning Board: 

27. Expenses 

Personnel Board: 

28. Expenses 

Board of Appeals: 

29. Expenses 

Industrial Development Commission: 

30. Expenses 

Conservation Commission: 

31. Expenses 

Archives Committee: 

32. Expenses 

Public Ceremonies and Celebrations: 

33. Expenses 

Buildings and Maintenance: 

34. Salaries and Wages 

35. Expenses 

36. Capital Outlay 

Town Report Committee: 

37. Expenses 

Total General Government - 
Appropriated 
Reserve Fund Transfer 



Appropriated 

or 

Available 



$ 11,590.00 

4,800.00 
400. 00 



13,940. 00 
4,930. 00 



2,550.00 
800.00 



Disbursed 
11, 590.00 
5,200.00 



13,874.40 
3,450.25 



2, 550.00 
726.09 



Balance 



65.60 
1,479. 75 



73. 91 



3, 720.00 






2,213.20 


5, 518.63 


414. 57 


3,850. 00 


2,954.35 


895. 65 


9,200.00 


9,050.96 


149.04 


100.00 


40.00 


60.00 


165.00 


73.20 


91. 80 


750. 00 


272. 62 


477. 38 


500. 00 


500. 00 


-- 


60.00 


25.00 


35.00 


2, 100.00 


1,835.81 


264. 19 


13, 740.00 


13,373.27 


366. 73 


36, 165.00 


36, 164. 74 


. 26 


250.00 


248.00 


2.00 


4,300.00 


3,640.48 


659. 52 


304,365.00 






3,268. 20 


295, 560.93 


12, 072. 27 



Protection of Persons and Property : 
Police Department: 

38. Salaries and Wages 

39. Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 

40. Capital Outlay 

Fire Department: 

41. Salaries and Wages - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 



197,645.00 


194, 144.62 


3, 500. 38 


18, 540.00 






2, 580.00 


21, 114. 06 


5.94 


1, 500.00 


1, 492. 00 


8. 00 


200,995.00 






4,000.00 


204, 508. 89 


486. 11 



94 



Warrant 
Budget Item 

42. Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Special Town Meeting 11/ 1/71 

43. Capital Outlay 

Sealer of Weights and Measures: 

44. Salary and Travel 

45. Expenses 

Insect Pest Control: 

46. Wages 

47. Expenses 

Town Forest Committee: 

48. Maintenance 

Tree Department: 

49. Wages 

50. Expenses 

Inspector of Wires: 

51. Wages and Travel 

52. Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 

Inspector of Gas Piping and Appliances: 

53. Wages 

54. Expenses 

Building Inspector and Agent for Enforce- 
ment of Zoning Bylaws: 

55. Salary and Wages - 



Appropriated 










or 










Available 


D 


isbursed 


Bal. 


ance 


5 23,200.00 


$ 




$ 




526. 45 




23, 723. 88 




2. 57 


4,350. 00 




4,298.00 




52.00 


510.00 




510.00 






40.00 




32. 52 




7. 43 


3,465.00 




3,376. 84 




88. 16 


6,360.00 




6,346. 65 




13.35 



100. 00 



3,465.00 
8,480. 00 



4,000. 00 
69.25 



3,000.00 



51.36 



3, 131.43 
8,219.86 



4,069.25 



2,396.00 



48.64 



333. 57 
260. 14 



604.00 





Appropriated 


11,345.00 








Reserve Fund Transfer 


700.00 


12,028.01 


16.99 


56. 


Expenses 


1,820.00 


1,376.33 


443. 67 


Dog Officer: 








57. 


Wages and Travel 


1, 100.00 


1, 100.00 


-- 


58. 


Expenses 


500. 00 


500.00 


-- 


Building 


Committee: 








59. 


Expenses 


50.00 


-- 


50.00 


Civil Defense: 








60. 


Expenses 


750.00 


750.00 


— 


Town Utilities: 








61. 


Hydrant Rental 


21,600.00 


21, 595.00 


5.00 


62. 


Street Lighting 
otection of Persons and Property - 


24,030.00 


23, 559. 53 


470.47 


Total Pr> 








Appropriated 


536,845.00 








Reserve Fund Transfer 


7,349.25 








Special Town Meeting 


526.45 


538,324.23 


6,396.47 


Highways: 




Highway 


Department: 








63. 


Salaries and Wages - 
Appropriated 


125,955.00 








Special Town Meeting 11/ 1/71 


9,700.00 


129,494. 72 


6, 160.28 


64. 


General Expenses 


30,000.00 


29,808.28 


191.72 


65. 


Drainage 


20,000.00 


19,990. 56 


9.44 


66. 


Snow and Ice Control - 
Appropriated 


70,000.00 








Reserve Fund Transfer 


1,737. 15 


71,342. 19 


394.96 


67. 


Machinery Expenses - 
Appropriated 


39,080.00 








Reserve Fund Transfer 


4,600.00 


43,675.68 


4.32 



95 



Warrant 
Budget Item 

68. Chapter 81 Maintenance 

69. Chapter 90 Maintenance 

70. Capital Outlay 

Total Highways - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 

Special Town Meeting 



Health and Sanitation : 

Health and Sanitation : 



Appropriated 

or 

Available 

$ 25,450.00 

27, 500.00 

3,360.00 



341,345.00 
6,337. 15 
9,700.00 





Disbursec 


1 


$ 


25, 


074. 


83 




27, 


497. 


27 




2, 


585. 


95 



BaLance 



349,469.48 



375. 17 

2. 73 

774.05 



7,912.67 



71. Salaries 


24,595.00 


23,856.26 




738. 


74 


72. Expenses 


25,700.00 


24,056.90 


1, 


643. 


10 


73. Garbage Collection 


32,300.00 


31, 168.65 


1, 


131. 


35 


Inspector of Animals: 












74. Wages 


170.00 


170.00 




-- 




75. Expenses 


30.00 


30.00 




-- 




Plumbing Inspector: 












76. Wages 


-- 


-- 




-- 




77. Expenses 


5,000.00 
87,795.00 


4,010. 50 
83,292.31 




989. 


50 


Total Health and Sanitation 


4, 


502. 


69 


Veterans' Aid: 












Veterans' Services: 












78. Salary 


3,240.00 


3,240.00 




-- 




79. Expenses 


275.00 


275.00 




-- 




80. Aid - 












Appropriated 


20,000.00 










Reserve Fund Transfer 


4, 000. 00 


23,911.89 




88. 


11 


Total Veterans' Aid - 






Appropriated 


23,515.00 










Reserve Fund Transfer 


4, 000. 00 


27,426.89 




88. 


11 


Education: 












Local Schools: 












81. Instruction 


1,575,941.00 


1,556, 538.28 


19, 


402. 


72 


82. Plant Operation and Maintenance 


169,908.00 


169,908.00 




-- 




83. Transportation 


126,995.00 


126,901.44 




93. 


56 


84. Non-Instructional Services 


36,664.00 


36,664.00 




-- 




85. Administration 


44,977.00 


41,521.30 


3, 


455. 


70 


86. Out-of-State Travel 


300.00 


269.31 




30. 


69 


87. Blanchard Auditorium - 












Appropriated 


21,225.00 










Reserve Fund Transfer 


3, 040. 00 


23, 106.67 


1, 


158. 


33 


88. Capital Outlay 


29, 194. 00 


9,948.62 


19, 


245. 


38 


89. Contingency Fund 


25, 000. 00 


25,000.00 




-- 




Regional Schools: 












90. Instruction 


1,505,234.00 


1, 505,234.00 




-- 




91. Plant Operation and Maintenance 


165,321.00 


165,321.00 




-- 




92. Transportation 


23,474.00 


23,474.00 




-- 




93. Non-Instructional Services 


50,578.00 


50,578.00 




-- 




94. Administration 


50,362.00 


50,362.00 




-- 




95. Out-of-State Travel 


2, 184.00 


2, 184.00 




-- 




96. Blanchard Auditorium 


11,442.00 


11,442.00 




-- 




97. Capital Outlay 


28,575.00 


28, 575.00 




-- 




98. Athletic Fund 


37,978.00 


37,978.00 




-- 




99. Adult Education 


1,820.00 


1,820.00 




-- 




100. Contingency Fund 


5, 110.00 


5, 110.00 




-- 




Total Education - 










Appropriated 


3,912,282.00 










Reserve Fund Transfer 


3,040. 00 


3,871,935. 62 


43, 


386. 


38 



96 



Warrant 
Budget Item 



Libraries: 



Memorial Library: 

101. Salary and Wages 

102. Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 

103. Books 

104. Capital Outlay 

West Acton Library: 

105. Salary and Wages 

106. Expenses 

107. Capital Outlay 

Total Libraries - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 



Appropriated 

or 

Available 



Disbursed 



Balance 



$ 


58,450. 00 
13.050.00 


$ 56,904.20 


$ 


1, 


545.80 




1. 545.00 


14.490. 10 






104.90 




19.000.00 


18.955.06 






44.94 




185. 00 


175.30 






9. 70 




4.720.00 


4. 114.44 






605. 56 




1,330. 00 


1.281. 64 






48. 36 




260. 00 
96,995.00 


-- 






260. 00 














1, 545.00 


95.920.74 




2, 


,619. 26 



Recreation: 



Recreation: 

108. Wages 

109. Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 

110. Capital Outlay 

Total Recreation - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 



17.310.00 

5.375.00 

2, 191.24 

950.00 


13, 520.39 

7, 566.08 
950.00 

22,036.47 


3, 789. 61 
. 16 


23,635.00 
2, 191.24 


3,789. 77 



Cemeteries : 

Cemeteries: 

111. Salaries and Wages 

112. Expenses - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 

113. Capital Outlay - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 

Total Cemeteries - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 



40,670.00 

9,000.00 
645.00 



3,965.00 



49, 670. 00 
4,610. 00 



40,605. 10 
9, 566.72 

3,947.85 

54, 119.67 



64.90 



78. 28 



17. 15 



160.33 



Insurance: 



Insurance: 

114. Workmen's Compensation 
Surety Bond 

Fire and Public Liability Insur- 
ance for Town Buildings 
Boiler and Machinery 
Motor Vehicle Liability - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 
Group Health - 

Appropriated 

Special Town Meeting 11/ 1/71 
Fire Fighters 



115. 
116. 

117. 
118. 



119. 



120. 



Total Insurance - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 

Special Town Meeting 



15,000.00 


15, 


000.00 


-- 


675.00 




497.00 


178. 00 


16,000.00 


16, 


000.00 


__ 


1,600.00 


1, 


247.00 


353. 00 


6, 500. 00 








275.00 


6. 


764. 54 


10.46 


50, 000. 00 








8, 000.00 


57, 


720. 13 


279. 87 


1, 100.00 




941.06 


158.94 


90,875.00 






275.00 








8,000.00 


98, 


169.73 


980. 27 



97 



Warrant 
Budget Item 



Pensions: 



Pension Fund: 

121. Expense 

Total Pensions 



Appropriated 

or 

Available 



$ 50, 540. 00 
50, 540. 00 



Disbursed 



$ 50,538.21 
50, 538.21 



Balance 



1. 79 



1. 79 



Maturing Debt and Interest : 
Regional School: 

122. Maturing Debt 

123. Interest 

Julia McCarthy SchooL: 

124. Maturing Debt 

125. Interest 



67, 735.00 
52, 145. 00 



10,000.00 
400.00 



67, 735.00 
52, 145.00 



10,000.00 
400.00 



Florence E. Merriam School: 

126. Maturing Debt 

127. Interest 

Elm Street School #1 (Douglas); 

128. Maturing Debt 

129. Interest 

Elm Street School #2 (Gates): 

130. Maturing Debt 

131. Interest 

Police Station: 

132. Maturing Debt 

133. Interest 



40, 000. 00 
10,080.00 



35,000.00 
18,375.00 



60,000.00 
39,565.00 



40,000.00 
10,080.00 



35,000.00 
18,375.00 



60,000.00 
39, 565.00 



Library Addition: 

134. Maturing Debt 

135. Interest 

Sanitary Landfill Sites: 

136. Maturing Debt 

137. Interest 

Minot Avenue School: 

138. Maturing Debt 

139. Interest 

D.P.W. Building: 

140. Maturing Debt 

141. Interest 

Anticipation of Revenue Notes: 

142. Interest 

Total Maturing Debt and Interest 



25,000.00 
3, 150.00 



85,000.00 
92,625.00 



35,000.00 
15, 105.00 



45,000.00 
634, 180.00 



25,000.00 
3, 150.00 



85,000.00 
92, 625. 00 



35,000.00 
15, 105.00 



17,911. 17 
607,091. 17 



27,088.83 
27,088. 83 



Grand Totals of Appropriations, Reserve Fund 
Transfers, Disbursements and Unexpended 
Balances of Budget Items: 

Appropriated: 

Annual Town Meeting 
Special Town Meetings 
Reserve Fund Transfers 



$6, 152,042.00 
18,226.45 
32,615.84 



Totals 



$6, 202,884. 29 



$6,093,885.45 



$ 108,998. 84 



98 



Education: 



Cafeteria - Revolving Fund 

Federal. Grants: 
Title 2 

Public Law 864 - Title 
Public Law 874 - Title 
Cornerstone - Title 1 



Appropriated 

or 

Available 


Disbursed 


BaLance 




B 130,988.84 


$ 130,671.68 


$ 317. 


16 


6,026.97 

304.62 

34,965.79 

6,389. 58 


5,902, 60 

304.00 

22,685.00 

5, 193.00 


124. 

12,280. 
1, 196. 


37 
62 

79 
58 



Special Articles 

Town 
Meeting Article 
Date No, 



Schools: 



Purpose 



10/19/64 


2 


3/13/67 


10 


3/09/70 


18 


3/09/70 


19 


3/09/70 


20 


3/08/71 


62 


3/08/71 


66 


3/08/71 


67 


Highways : 




3/10/69 


25 


3/09/70 


15 


3/09/70 


43 


3/09/70 


44 


3/09/70 


48 


3/08/71 


47 


3/08/71 


48 


3/08/71 


49 


3/08/71 


53 


3/08/71 


55 


3/08/71 


55 


6/22/71 


8 


6/22/71 


9 


6/22/71 


10 


Various Purposes: 


12/05/66 


12 


12/05/66 


19 


3/13/67 


30 


3/13/67 


49 


3/10/69 


33 


3/10/69 


46 


3/09/70 


14 


3/09/70 


24 


3/09/70 


49 


3/09/70 


51 


3/09/70 


52 


3/09/70 


53 


3/09/70 


54 


3/09/70 


62 


3/09/70 


63 


6/29/70 


4 



Douglas School 
Gates School 

Vocational Regional School Dis- 
trict Planning Committee 
Minot Avenue School Construction 1, 
Adult Education 
Regional Vocational School 
Tuition 
Blanchard Auditorium Roof 



Chapter 90 Construction 
Chapter 90 Construction 
Adams Street Takings 
Adams Street Reconstruction 
Street Sweeper 
Pick-up Truck 
Salt Shed - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 
Gasoline and Oil- Storage Tanks/ Pump 
Sidewalks 

Chapter 81 Maintenance 
Chapter 90 Maintenance 
Chapter 616 - Section 5 
Hayward Road Layout 
Used Truck and Dump Body 



Regional Refuse Disposal Plan- 
ning Committee 

Cemetery Building 

Tennis Courts 

Woodlawn Cemetery 

Town Forest Access 

Fire Rescue Truck 

Surplus Government Property 

Public Works Facility 

Tree Department Cab & Chassis 

Forest Fire Truck 

Fire Alarm Equipment 

Elm Street Playground Lighting 

Elm Street Playground Backstop 
and Bleachers 

Mount Hope Cemetery Improve- 
ments for New Section 

Mount Hope Cemetery Paving Roads 

Assabet Regional Refuse Disposal 
Planning Board 



2,340.91 


1. 599.26 


741. 65 


38,348. 55 


21, 638. 58 


16,709.97 


250.00 


130. 77 


119.23 


138,412.40 


1.021,244.24 


117, 168. 16 


1, 619. 71 


1,619. 55 


. 16 


1,680.00 


1,494.00 


186.00 


25,051.00 


25,047.67 


3.33 


8,500.00 


304. 15 


8,195. 85 


11,951. 73 


11,951. 73 




30,800.00 


10,370.31 


20,429.69 


1,408.20 


550.00 


858.20 


1,756.98 


1, 749. 63 


7.35 


1,042.50 


1,023.40 


19. 10 


3,500.00 


3,434. 50 


65.50 


10,300.00 






600. 00 


10,575.00 


325.00 


8, 500. 00 


8, 094. 64 


405.36 


29, 000. 00 


2,563.82 


26,436. 18 


23, 100.00 


23, 100.00 


-- 


4.000.00 


4, 000. 00 


-- 


10,693.30 


3,528.00 


7,165.30 


16, 100.00 


16, 100.00 


-- 


2,500.00 


2,465.00 


35.00 



40.19 


11.82 


28.37 


27.62 


27. 50 


. 12 


107.76 


107.76 


-- 


967. 50 


965.00 


2.50 


1,081.47 


135. 18 


946.29 


501.57 


500.00 


1.57 


288.90 


288.90 


-- 


222,647.00 


208, 719.49 


13,927.51 


261.00 


62.40 


198.60 


16, 500.00 


7, 664. 00 


8,836.00 


10,438. 14 


10,313.25 


124. 89 


17,992.40 


17,071. 50 


920.90 


193.35 


193.35 


-- 


1,052.00 


160.00 


892.00 


3,000.00 


2,996.40 


3.60 


4,760.00 


3,805.80 


954.20 



99 



Town 




Meeting 


Article 


Date 


No. 


9/28/70 


6 


3/08/71 


33 


3/08/71 


35 


3/08/71 


36 


3/08/71 


44 


3/08/71 


45 


3/08/71 


46 


3/08/71 


57 


3/08/71 


58 


3/08/71 


59 


3/08/71 


60 


3/08/71 


61 


3/08/71 


63 


3/08/71 


65 


6/22/71 


11 



Purpose 

West Acton Library Salaries 

and Expenses 
Conservation Fund 
Surplus Government Property 
Youth Commission 
Council on Aging 
1975 Town Celebration Fund 
Land - Main Street to Pope Road 
Police Cruisers - 

Appropriated 

Reserve Fund Transfer 
Fire Alarm Repair Truck 
Fire Department Pick-up Truck 
Fire Department Base Radio 
Mount Hope Cemetery Paving Roads 
Swimming Program 
Charter Road Playground Equipment 
Public Works Facility Paving 

Appropriated or Available 
Reserve Fund Transfers 



Cemetery Department - Various Trust Funds 
Conservation Commission - Various Properties 
Library Department 
1975 Town Celebration 

Total Operating Disbursements 

Other Cash Disbursements: 



Appropriated 










or 










Available 


Disbursed 


Balance 




$ 1,375.07 


$ 1,375.07 


$ 







100,000.00 


100,000.00 




-- 




2,000.00 


1, 585.44 




414. 


56 


1,000.00 


7. 14 




992. 


86 


1, 500. 00 


969.00 




531. 


00 


4,000. 00 


4,000. 00 




-- 




25,000.00 


20,994.00 


4, 


006. 


00 


4, 500. 00 










899.00 


5,399.00 




-- 




1, 500.00 


1, 500.00 




-- 




3,300. 00 


3,292. 50 




7. 


50 


2,000.00 


1,994. 15 




5. 


85 


2,000.00 


1,999. 51 






49 


5,500.00 


5, 500. 00 




-- 




1, 500.00 


1, 500. 00 




-- 




10,000. 00 


10, 000.00 




-- 




$8, 164,833.50 










34, 114.84 


$7,844,364. 14 
12,631. 60 


$ 354, 


584. 


20 












40,546. 14 










1,992. 19 










18. 75 









$7, 899, 552. 82 












Agency: 

Middlesex County Assessment 

State Parks and Recreation Areas 

Metropolitan Planning Area Council 

Metropolitan Air Pollution Assessment 

State Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 

Middlesex County Hospital Assessment 

Elderly Retiree Program 

State Assessment System 

Blanchard Foundation/ Church Teen Center 

Middlesex County Dog Licenses, etc. 

Board of Appeals Guarantee Deposits 

Guarantee Deposit - Adams Street Betterment 

Federal Income Taxes Withheld 

Massachusetts Income Taxes Withheld 

Acton Teachers' Retirement 

Middlesex County Retirement 

Acton Teachers' Association 

Acton Teachers' Annuities 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield Deductions 

Acton Teachers' Insurance 

Group Life Insurance Deductions 

Fire Department Union Dues 

Refunds: 
Taxes 

Trust: 

Trust Fund Income 
Perpetual Care 
Charity 
Library 

Repayment of Loans in Anticipation of Revenue 

Investment: 

Certificates of Deposit 



114,926.73 

17,300.39 

738.35 

441. 99 

1,660. 65 

6,490.90 

1,088.01 

590. 80 

1,929. 79 

4,654. 15 

202. 59 

913.69 

378,376. 98 

94,849.95 

66, 118.09 

41, 688. 90 

10,305.85 

9,054.00 

8, 017.48 

2,054. 14 

1,374.96 

752. 00 

21,375.90 

31,922.39 

4, 725. 00 

2, 110.00 

100.00 

1, 800, 000. 00 



Add - Refund Adjustments 

Total Disbursements per Treasurer 



1, 


300, 


000. 


00 


11, 


823, 
21, 


316. 

592. 


50 
44 


$11, 


844, 


908. 


94 



100 



Cash: 



Petty Cash Funds 
General Funds 



ASSETS 



70. 00 
795, 176.28 



TOWN OF 

BALANCE 

DECEMBER 



$ 795,246.28 



Accounts Receivable: 
Tax Levies: 

1966 Personal Property 

1967 Personal Property 

1968 Personal Property 

1969 Personal Property 

1970 Personal Property 

1971 Personal Property 
1971 Real Estate 



Special Assessment - 

Street Betterments 



2,208.60 
150,316.49 



3,362. 86 
2, 523.40 
2,060.40 
2, 186.80 
946.00 

152, 525.09 

163,604. 55 



24,681.61 



Motor Vehicle Excise 
1965 
1966 
1967 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 



384.00 
3,604.09 
2,896. 55 
4,331.71 
7, 106. 19 
13,396.35 
75, 126. 12 



106, 845.01 



Tax Titles 

Tax Possessions 

Taxes in Litigation 



2,964. 15 
793.72 



3,757.87 
449. 42 



Departmental - 
Cemetery 
Fire 
School 



Aid to Highways - 

Middlesex County 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 



Total Accounts Receivable 



Underestimate of Assessments - 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
Metropolitan Air Pollution 



74.45 






880. 00 






1,600.00 


2, 554.45 




32,000.00 






83,312. 56 


115,312. 56 
9.89 


417,205.47 




441.99 


451.88 



Total Assets 



$1,212,903. 63 



DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
Apportioned Street Assessments Not Due 



$ 1, 167. 10 



101 



ACTON 
SHEET 
31, 1971 

LIABILITIES, RESERVES AND SURPLUS 

Employees' Payroll Deductions - 
See Schedule 1 

Guarantee Deposits - 
Board of Appeals 

Unclaimed Checks 

Trust Fund Income Transfer Balances 
Unexpended - See Schedule 2 

Federal Grants - See Schedule 3 

Revolving Fund - School Cafeteria 

Old Age Assistance Recovery Not Allocated 

Unexpended Article Appropriation Balances - 
See Schedule 4 

Reserve for Petty Cash Funds 

Overestimates of Assessments - 
Middlesex County Tax 
State Parks and Recreation Areas 
Court Judgment, Land Damage for Reloca- 
tion of Central Street 

Cemetery Land Fund 

Receipts Reserved for Appropriation - County Dog Fund 

Premium on Bonds 

Receipts Reserved for Appropriation - Library 

Road Machinery Fund 

Tax Title Foreclosure 

Middlesex County Dog Licenses 

Beautification of Mount Hope Cemetery - Jenks Charitable Fund 

The Church Teen Center - Blanchard Foundation 

Overlays Reserved for Abatements of Tax Levies - 
1966 
1967 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 

Revenue Reserved Until Collected - 

Special Assessments - Street Betterments 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Tax Titles and Possessions 

Taxes in Litigation 

Departmental Revenue 

Aid to Highways 

Overlay Surplus - Reserve Fund 

Surplus Revenue 

Total Liabilities, Reserves and Surplus 

DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
Street Assessments and Betterments $ 1, 167. 10 





$ 4,623.22 




100.21 




1, 152. 75 




6,286. 15 




16, 190. 16 




317. 16 




13,600. 00 




312,747.40 




70. 00 


$ 3,796.67 




3,559.02 




82.64 


7,438.33 




7,605.35 




6,282. 37 




5, 534.45 




1,809. 50 




1, 167.02 




335.00 




119. 05 




26,000. 00 




70. 21 


259. 19 




126.87 




333.32 




109.69 




946.00 




24, 182.60 


25,957. 67 


24,681.61 




106,845.01 




3, 757.87 




449. 42 




2, 554.45 




115,312. 56 


253,600.92 




16, 122.07 




505,774.64 




$1, 212,903. 63 



102 



LOANS AUTHORIZED - NOT ISSUED 



Douglas Elementary School 
Minot Avenue Elementary School 



79,450. 00 
103,347. 21 



$ 182, 797. 21 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 



Net Funded or Fixed Debt 



$3,490,000. 00 



TRUST ACCOUNTS 



Trust Funds - Cash and Securities 
In Custody of Town Treasurer 
In Custody of Trustees 



762,387. 74 
3,000.00 



$ 765,387.74 



103 



LOANS AUTHORIZED - NOT ISSUED 



Douglas Elementary School 
Minot Avenue Elementary School 



79,450.00 
103,347.21 



$ 182,797.21 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 



Inside Debt Limit - 

Florence A. Merriam Elementary School 
Acton Memorial Library Addition 
Public Works Facility 

Outside Debt Limit - 

Florence A. Merriam Elementary School 
Julia McCarthy Elementary School 
Carolyn Douglas Elementary School 
Paul P. Gates Elementary School 
Luther B. Conant Elementary School 



60,000. 00 

75,000.00 

230,000.00 



180,000.00 

10,000.00 

490,000.00 

905,000.00 

1, 540,000.00 



$ 365,000.00 



3, 125,000.00 
$3,490, 000. 00 



TRUST ACCOUNTS 



In Custody of Town Treasurer 

See Schedule 5 
In Custody of Trustees 

Charlotte Goodnow Fund 



$ 762,387.74 

3,000. 00 $ 765,387.74 






104 



BALANCE SHEET 
Supporting Schedules 
December 31, 1971 

ScheduLe 1 
EmpLoyees' Payroll Deductions 

Middlesex County Retirement System $ 3, 543. 35 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield 770. 47 

Group Life Insurance 173. 40 

Acton Teachers' Annuities 136. 00 

4,623. 22 



Schedule 2 
Unexpended Trust Fund Income Balances 

Susan Noyes Hosmer $ 3, 108. 93 

Perpetual Care 2, 309. 63 

Ethel Robbins, Fred Robbins and George T. Ames Memorial 100. 00 

J. Roland Wetherbee ' 78.91 

Elbridge J. Robbins 59. 28 

Elbridge Jones Robbins and Descendents 58. 20 

Frank. Knowlton 56. 84 

Luke Blanchard , 53. 19 

Georgia E. Whitney 51. 27 

Henry S. Raymond 50. 00 

Frank C. Hayward 49. 08 

George T. Ames 46. 70 

A. B. Conant Family 37. 24 

Carrie E. Wells 35.38 

Henry S. Raymond 32. 32 

Hoit and Scott 31. 30 

Dr. Robert I. Davis 29. 97 

Sarah A. Watson 28. 54 

Mary Desmond 25. 59 

Arlette Appleyard 22. 18 

Mrs. Henry O'Neil 21. 60 

$ 6,286.15 



Schedule 3 
Federal Grants 

Welfare Administration: 

Medical Assistance $ 83. 34 

Medical Assistance 878. 15 

Old Age Assistance: 

Grant $ 156.63 

Recovery - Repayable to Federal 150. 00 306. 63 

Disability Assistance 

Aid to Dependent Children 

Total Welfare Grants 

School Grants: 

Public Law 815 
Public Law 864 - Title 5 
Public Law 874 - Title 1 
Title 2 - Library 
Cornerstone - Title 1 





250.00 
250.00 


819.68 

.62 

12,280. 79 

124.37 

1,196. 58 


1, 768. 12 
14,422.04 



$ 16, 190. 16 



Schedule 4 
Unexpended Article Appropriation Balances 



105 



Town 




Meeting 


Article 


Date 


No. 


6/24/57 


6 


3/09/58 


39 


10/19/64 


2 


12/05/66 


12 


3/13/67 


10 


3/13/67 


32 


11/18/68 


11 


3/10/69 


33 


3/10/69 


39 


3/09/70 


15 


3/09/70 


18 


3/09/70 


19 


3/09/70 


21 


3/09/70 


23 


3/09/70 


24 


3/09/70 


51 


3/09/70 


53 


3/09/70 


55 


3/09/70 


57 


3/09/70 


59 


3/09/70 


62 


6/29/70 


4 


6/29/70 


7 


3/08/71 


35 


3/08/71 


36 


3/08/71 


38 


3/08/71 


39 


3/08/71 


44 - 


3/08/71 


46 


3/08/71 


48 


3/08/71 


49 


3/08/71 


51 


3/08/71 


53 


3/08/71 


54 


3/08/71 


56 


3/08/71 


62 


3/08/71 


64 


6/22/71 


8 



Purpose 

Civil Defense Power Unit 

Archives Committee 

Douglas School 

Regional Refuse Disposal Committee 

Gates School 

Emergency Operating Center 

Water District Land Lease 

Town Forest Access Construction 

Vocational Regional School District Planning Committee 

Chapter 90 Construction 

Vocational Regional School District Planning Committee 

Minot Avenue School Construction 

Kennedy Land Lease 

Highways - Chapter 768, Acts of 1969 

Public Works Facility 

Forest Fire Truck 

Lighting - Elm Street Playground 

Tot-Lot Equipment - Goward Field 

Painting Town Hall Offices 

Air Conditioning Memorial Library 

Mount Hope Cemetery - New Section 

Assabet Regional Refuse Disposal Planning Board 

Highways - Chapter 768, Section 4, 1969 

Government Surplus Property 

Youth Commission 

State and Edney Land Purchase 

Dunn Land Purchase 

Council on Aging 

Main Street to Pope Road Land 

Salt Shed 

Gasoline and Oil Storage Tanks and Pumps 

High, Adams and Parker Streets Resurfacing 

Sidewalks 

Chapter 90 Construction 

Painting Inside Police Station 

Regional Vocational School 

Picnic Facilities at Town Forest 

Highways - Chapter 616, Section 5, 1967 



$ 300. 00 

792. 75 

741. 65 

28. 37 

16,709.97 

1,000.00 

5.00 

946. 29 
41.47 

20, 429. 69 

119. 23 

117, 168. 16 

10. 00 

2,035. 04 

13,927. 51 

8, 836.00 

920. 90 

199. 30 
2, 500. 00 

200.00 

892.00 

954. 20 

477.61 

414. 56 

992. 86 

12, 000. 00 

30,000. 00 

531. 00- 

4,006.00 

325. 00 

405. 36 

6, 500. 00 
26,436. 18 
30,800.00 

3,000.00 
186. 00 
750. 00 

7, 165. 30 

$ 312, 747.40 



Schedule 5 
Trust Accounts in Custody of Town Treasurer 



Charity Funds: 

Elizabeth M. White 
Georgia E. Whitney 
Betsey M. Ball 
Varnum Tuttle Memorial 



32,339. 31 
14, 559. 71 
22,497.88 
17, 059. 98 



Cemetery Funds: 

Perpetual Care 
Susan Noyes Hosmer 
Arlette Appleyard 
Henry S. Raymond - Monument 
Henry S. Raymond - Care 
Hoit and Scott 
J. Roland Wetherbee 
Luke Blanchard 
Frank C. Hayward 
Georgia E. Whitney 
Dr. Robert I. Davis 
» Frank R. Knowlton 
George T. Ames 
Mrs. Harry I. O'Neil 



186, 110. 95 

109, 193.98 

2,378.82 

1, 724.45 
3,478. 30 

867. 20 

18,242. 36 

3,419.37 

2, 157. 07 
2,491. 73 
1,473. 33 
1,409. 84 

611. 61 
506. 26 



106 



Cemetery Funds (continued): 
Sarah A. Watson 
Carrie F. Wells 
A. B. Conant 

Elbridge Jones Robbins and Descendents 
Captain Robbins Lot 
Elbridge J. Robbins Lot 

Ethel R. Robbins, Fred Robbins and George T. 
Martha L. Desmond 

Library and Educational Funds: 
Acton High School 
Wilde Memorial 
Georgia E. Whitney Memorial 

Firemen's Relief Funds: 
Acton 
West Acton 

Conservation Fund 

Stabilization Fund 

1975 Celebration Fund 

Eminent Domain Deposits: 

Heirs of William Livingston 
Heirs of Harriet Davis 
Heirs of Amasa Davies 
Devisees of Evelina White 



Ames Memorial 



3, 710. 20 
4, 759. 24 
1,430.48 
1, 107. 60 
2,884. 14 
1, 680. 44 
24,359. 68 
3, 113.08 



5,764.82 
33,566. 24 
21,461.48 



19, 100. 78 
1,654.45 

185,305. 11 

1,448. 13 

9,525.72 



365.00 
2,551.00 
9, 130.00 
8,948. 00 

$ 762,387. 74 



Supplementary Financial Data 

The unexpended balances of the following Articles were closed out during the year and transferred to 
Surplus Revenue. 



Town 




Meeting 


Article 


Date 


No. 


12/05/66 


19 


3/13/67 


49 


3/10/69 


27 


3/10/69 


46 


3/09/70 


20 


3/09/70 


43 


3/09/70 


44 


3/09/70 


48 


3/09/70 


49 


3/09/70 


52 


3/09/70 


63 


3/08/71 


47 


3/08/71 


59 


3/08/71 


60 


3/08/71 


61 


3/08/71 


66 


3/08/71 


67 


6/22/71 


10 



Description 

Cemetery Building 

Woodlawn Cemetery 

Street Lights - Main Street 

Fire Rescue Truck 

Adult Education 

Adams Street Takings 

Adams Street Reconstruction 

Street Sweeper 

Tree Department - Cab, Chassis, etc. 

Fire Alarm Equipment 

Mount Hope Cemetery - Paving Roads 

Highway Department - Pick-up Truck 

Fire Department - Pick-up Truck 

Fire Department - Pick-up Truck 

Mount Hope Cemetery - Paving Roads 

School Tuition 

Blanchard Auditorium - Roof Repairs 

Used Truck and Dump Body 



. 12 

2. 50 

2, 500.00 

1.57 

. 16 

858.20 

7.35 

19. 10 

198. 60 

124. 89 

3.60 

65. 50 

7. 50 

5.85 

.49 

3.33 

8, 195.85 

35.00 



$ 12,029.61 



The Finance Committee authorized the following transfers from the Reserve Fund during the year ended 
December 31, 1971: 



Appropriation 



$ 40,000.00 



Transfers: 
Date 

5/27/71 
6/01/71 



Account 

Article 57 - Police Cruisers 
Cemetery Department - Capital Outlay 



899. 00 
315. 00 



107 



Transfers: 

Date Account 

7/21/71 Article 48 - Public Works Facility 

9/09/71 Elections and Registrations - Salaries and Wages 

9/09/71 Cemetery Department - Expense 

9/09/71 Cemetery Department - Capital Outlay 

10/07/71 Motor Vehicle Liability Insurance 

10/25/71 Treasurer/ Collector - Expense 

11/22/71 — Veterans' Aid 

11/22/71 Highway Department - Machinery 

12/01/71 Memorial Library - Expense 

12/01/71 Building Inspector - Salary 

12/01/71 Police Department - Expense 

12/08/71 Fire Department - Salaries 

12/15/71 Building Inspector - Salary 

12/29/71 Recreation - Expense 

12/29/71 Memorial Library - Expense 

12/29/71 Selectmen - Capital Outlay 

12/31/71 Blanchard Auditorium 

12/31/71 Highway Department - Snow and Ice Control 

12/31/71 Inspector of Wires - Expense 



600.00 
2,213.20 

645.00 
3,650.00 

275.00 

400.00 
4,000.00 
4,600. 00 
1,070.00 

600.00 
2, 580.00 
4, 000. 00 

100.00 
2, 191.24 

475. 00 

655.00 

3,040.00 

1, 737. 15 

69.25 



$ 34,114.84 



Balance Returned to Surplus Revenue 



5,885. 16 



108 



TOWN TREASURER 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1971 



Cash Balance January 1, 1971 



$1, 678,492.95 



STATE AND COUNTY RECEIPTS 



State Treasurer: 

Concrete Pipe Antitrust 

Transportation - Vocational 

Tuition - Vocational 

Transportation - Children 

Snow Removal 

Education - Cornerstone T-2 

Library Public - Title 2 

Land Acquisition Projects 

Veterans' Services Recovery 

Veterans' Benefits 

Lieu of Taxes, Chapter 58, Section 7 

Highways #25730 

Highways #24109 - 1966 

Highways - Chapter 81 

Highways #081201 

Highway Improvement Loan - 1969 

Highways - Chapter 90 

Corporation Excises - Machinery 

Valuation Basis 

Education - Chapter 69-71 

Regional School Districts 

School Aid - Chapter 70 

School Construction - McCarthy 

School Construction - Douglas 

School Construction - Merriam 

School Construction - Gates 

School Construction - Conant 



State 



36.90 

1,677.00 

2, 101.00 

710. 12 

1, 721.00 

5, 193.00 

6,056. 61 

7,992.00 

4,642.05 

3,692.71 

3,276. 22 

2,000.00 

6,900.00 

23,375.00 

13,670.39 

5,481.65 

129.61 

8, 388. 87 

46, 555.40 

57,805.00 

176, 231. 80 

887, 090. 19 

5, 567.89 

18, 750.00 

20,057. 63 

30,236.25 

43,000.00 



$1,382,338. 29 



County Treasurer: 

Dog Licenses - Refund 
Highways #24191 - 1966 



1,490. 62 
6,900.00 



8,390. 62 



DEPARTMENTAL RECEIPTS 



Town Collector: 

Personal Property Taxes 1966 

Personal Property Taxes 1970 

Personal Property Taxes 1971 

Real Estate Taxes 1970 

Real Estate Taxes 1971 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise Taxes 1962 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise Taxes 1968 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise Taxes 1969 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise Taxes 1970 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise Taxes 1971 

Farm Animal Excise Taxes 1971 

Street Betterments - North 1970 

Committed Interest - North 1970 

Street Betterments - North 1971 

Committed Interest - North 1971 

Street Betterments - Adams 1971 

Street Betterments - Minot 1971 

Betterment Interest Added 

Annual Care of Cemetery Lots 

Special Taxes - Watershed and Forest 

Municipal Liens 

Interest and Charges - All Taxes 



110. 75 

3,394. 85 

169,546.29 

118, 705. 84 

4,369, 199.29 

36.30 

109.25 

1,085.34 

87,456. 15 

367,038.89 

259. 75 

65.61 

13.20 

258. 10 

93.94 

1,016.93 

5,314.95 

60.44 

730.00 

326. 70 

2,208.00 

10, 726.02 



5, 137,756. 59 



109 



Town Clerk: 

Business Certificates 
Sporting License Fees 
Dog License Fees 
Vital Statistics 
Miscellaneous 
Mortgage Fee Recordings 
Dog Licenses 

Board of Assessors: 
Assessors Maps 

Board of Selectmen: 
Miscellaneous 
Property Rentals 
Licenses 

Board of Health: 
Miscellaneous 
Gas Permits 
Sewerage Permits 
Plumbing Permits 
Nurse Services 

Building Department: 
Miscellaneous 
Wiring Permits 
Building Permits 

Board of Appeals: 

Hearings - Legal 

Employees' Payroll Deductions: 
Federal Withholding Taxes 
State Withholding Taxes 
County Retirement 
Teachers' Retirement 
Teachers' Insurance 
Teachers' Annuities 
Teachers Association - Dues 
Group Insurance 
Blue Cross-Blue Shield 
Fire Fighters Association - Dues 

Police Department: 

Bicycle Registrations 
Dealers Firearm Permits 
Miscellaneous 
Pistol Permits 
Firearm Licenses 
Firearm Registrations 

Fire Department: 
Permits 
Miscellaneous 
Rental of Stations 

Sealer of Weights and Measures: 
Sealer's Fees 

School Department: 
Miscellaneous 

Vandalism - McCarthy-Towne School 
Property Rentals 
Public Law 874 - Title 1 
School Tuition Charges 
Blanchard Auditorium - Reimbursement 
School Lunch Account 

Cemetery Department: 
Chapel Rentals 
Miscellaneous 
Sale of Lots 
Burials 



66.00 
164.85 
416. 05 
881. 00 
648. 00 
1, 536.00 
4,707.95 



86.00 



1,033. 61 

735.00 

12,649.00 



1,073.20 
2,229.00 
4,837. 50 
3, 892. 00 
9,665.81 



291. 75 

4, 102.40 

14, 562. 50 



230.00 



359, 


539. 


23 


87, 


941. 


15 


42, 


139. 


00 


66, 


118. 


09 


2, 


054. 


14 


7, 


968. 


00 


9. 


366. 


85 


1, 


281. 


70 


6, 


629. 


99 




752. 


00 




43. 


00 




33. 


00 




66. 


12 




284. 


00 




44. 


00 




210. 


00 




83. 


50 




5. 


66 




95. 


00 



366.00 



98. 66 

750.00 

935.00 

12, 280. 00 

3,452. 15 

12, 573.00 

123, 721. 72 



40. 00 

747. 60 

1, 100.00 

3,340.00 



8,419. 85 
86. 00 

14,417. 61 



21, 697. 51 



18, 956. 65 



230. 00 



583, 790. 15 



680. 12 

184. 16 
366.00 



153,810. 53 



5, 227. 60 



110 



West Acton Library: 
Library Fines 

Memorial Library: 

Mary Lothrop Fund - Bequest 
Library Fines 

Miscellaneous Receipts: 

Employees' Group Insurance 

Employees' Blue Cross 

Concord District Court - Fines 

Recreation Department - Miscellaneous 

Recreation Department - Bus Service 

Veterans' Aid Recovery 

Norfolk Agricultural School - Tuition 

Engineering Department - Maps 

Wheeler Recreation Area - Rental 

Fire Department - Services 

Registrar of Deeds - Treasurer Refund 

Tackney' s Express - Treasurer Refund 

Acton Supply Inc. - Celebrations 

Cemetery Department - Auto Machine Service 

Planning Board - Miscellaneous 

Leo Allen Inc. - Contract Adjustment 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield - Premiums 

Minuteman Regional Vocational School - Refund 

School Department - Vandalism 

Wilson & Orcutt - Adams Street Betterment 

Patrick Palmer, Dog Officer 

Kemper Insurance Co. - Claim Recovery 

American Motors Insurance Co. - Highway 

Town of Concord - School Lunch Account 

School Instruction #81 - Adjustment 

Teachers' Annuities - Adjustment 

Theron A. Lowden, Workmen's Compensation Agent 

Boston Mutual Life Insurance - Premiums 

Thomas F. Garrity - Veterans' Services 

Blanchard Foundation - Teen Center 

Jenks Charitable Fund - Mt. Hope Cemetery 

Assabet Savings - Investment 

Assabet Savings - Interest Earned 

Arlington Trust Company - Certificate of Deposit 

Arlington Trust Company - Interest Earned 

Union National Bank - Certificate of Deposit 

Union National Bank - Interest Earned 

National Shawmut Bank - Certificate of Deposit 

National Shawmut Bank - Interest Earned 

National Shawmut Bank - Notes 472-473 Revenue 

Middlesex Bank, N.A. - Note 474 Revenue 

Lexington Trust Company - Notes 475-476 Revenue 

Paul and Jean Bernard - Tax Title 



272. 93 



100.00 
6,299.48 



Assabet Valley Estate - 



John and Greta Fisher 



Nashoba Enterprises 



Kenneth E. Davis 



Armando Porrazzo 



Interest 

Tax Title 

Interest 

Charges 

Tax Title 

Interest 

Charges 

Tax Title 

Interest 

Charges 

Tax Title 

Interest 

Charges 

Tax Title 

Interest 

Charges 



145.68 

1, 745.45 

578.20 

614.50 

355.25 

119.00 

437. 50 

4.00 

15.00 

50.00 

4.72 

2. 58 

2.00 

22.59 

28.25 

42.00 

316.00 

145.99 

250.00 

913.69 

3.00 

296.45 

95.05 

3,713.36 

17,266.60 

686.00 

1,723.00 

1,499.00 

4,335.00 

2,000.00 

26,000.00 

100,000.00 

2,407.25 

200,000.00 

1,916.67 

200,000.00 

1,833.33 

1, 100,000.00 

8,458.33 

600,000.00 

600,000.00 

600,000.00 

2,330. 71 

35.80 

413.40 

42.15 

4.00 

1,368. 57 

216.00 

4.00 

405.60 

53.85 

8.00 

1,592.24 

141.73 

4.00 

2,899. 52 

9. 70 

24.00 



$ 272.93 



6,399.48 



3,487, 578. 71 



PERPETUAL CARE - MT. HOPE CEMETERY 



Helen L. DeGryse 
W. Henry Teele 



100.00 
800.00 



Ill 



Perpetual Care - Mt. 

Frank M. O'Connell 
Earle R. Spinney 
Richard P. Bursaw 
Nathan R. Roberts 
Albert I. Verchot 
William M. Hansen 
Jay A. Gibbs 



Hope Cemetery (continued) 



PERPETUAL CARE - WOODLAWN CEMETERY 



Margaret Cox 

Paul J. Chisholm 

Estate of David and Julia Barry 

Richard I. Knowles 

Robert M. Kelly, Jr. 

Robert G. Willett 

Ursula M. Goerigk 

Robert M. McGarigle 

Ralph F. Cataldo 

Alice T. Fairbanks 

Bettena H. Straw 

Amleta Miccoli 

Mrs. W. L. Prowse 

Mrs. Kenneth V. Kimball 

James E. Bell 

Winslow H. Smith 

George W. Turner 



100.00 
200.00 
150. 00 
150.00 
150.00 
75.00 
75.00 



200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200.00 
200. 00 

50.00 
100.00 

15.00 
110.00 
200. 00 

75. 00 
200. 00 
200.00 

75.00 
300. 00 
400.00 



1, 800.00 



2,925.00 



TRUST FUND INCOME 



Acton High School Library Fund 
Acton Firemen's Relief Fund 
George T. Ames Cemetery Fund 
Arlette Appleyard Cemetery Fund 
Betsey M. Ball Fund 
1975 Celebration Fund 
I? Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund 
A. B. Conant Cemetery Fund 
Conservation Fund Investment 
Dr. Robert I. Davis Cemetery Fund 
Elbridge J. Robbins and Descendents Fund 
Elbridge Jones Robbins Cemetery Fund 
Captain Robbins Cemetery Fund 
Robbins-Ames Memorial Cemetery Fund 
Martha Desmond Cemetery Fund 
Elizabeth White Fund 
Georgia E. Whitney Memorial Fund 
Georgia E. Whitney Fund 
Georgia E. Whitney Cemetery Fund 
Frank C. Hayward Cemetery Fund 
Hoit and Scott Cemetery Fund 
Mrs. Harry O'Neil Cemetery Fund 

v Frank Knowlton Cemetery Fund 

VLuke Blanchard Cemetery Fund 
Henry S. Raymond Monument Fund 
Henry S. Raymond Cemetery Fund 
Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund 
Varnum Tuttle Memorial Fund 
J. Roland Wetherbee Cemetery Fund 
Memorial Library Fund 
Memorial Library Tainter Fund 
Sarah Watson Cemetery Fund 
Stabilization Fund 
Carrie E. Wells Cemetery Fund 



238. 
570. 

23. 

119. 

606. 

371. 

9,393. 

59. 
6,099. 

55. 

59. 

89. 
149. 
1, 259. 
161. 
1, 533. 
895. 
838. 

83. 

59. 

27. 

19. 

41. 
131. 
131. 
191. 
5,794. 
596. 
596. 
813. 
697. 

34. 



67 

86 

82 

33 

23 

66 

24*- 

67 

78 

00 

67 

50 

17 

89 

50 

29 

00 

97 

04 

67 

48 

06 

40 

66 ' 

62 

64 

00 

67 

67 

26 

02 

12 



179. 83 



31,922. 39 



TRUST FUND TRANSFERS TO TOWN ACCOUNT 



Arlette Appleyard Cemetery Fund 
1975 Celebration Fund 



50. 00 
18. 75 



112 



Trust Fund Transfers to Town Account (continued) 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund 

Conservation Fund Investment 

Elbridge J. Robbins and Descendents Fund 

Elbridge J. Robbins Cemetery Fund 

Elizabeth White Fund 

Georgia E. Whitney Fund 

Georgia E. Whitney Cemetery Fund 

Martha Desmond Cemetery Fund 

Frank Knowlton Cemetery Fund 

Luke Blanchard Cemetery Fund 

Frank C. Hayward Cemetery Fund 

Henry S. Raymond Monument Fund 

Henry S. Raymond Cemetery Fund 

Susan Noyes Hosmer Fund 

J. Roland Wetherbee Cemetery Fund 

Memorial Library Tainter Fund 

Memorial Library Fund 

Memorial Library Building Fund 

Sarah Watson Cemetery Fund 

Stabilization Fund 

Total Cash Receipts for the Year 1971 
Cash Balance January 1, 1971 



Paid Selectmen's Orders for the Year 1971 
Cash Balance December 31, 1971 



6,000. 00 

65, 546. 14 

100. 00 

50. 00 

1, 160.00 

950. 00 

50. 00 

50. 00 

50. 00 

50. 00 

50. 00 

75. 00 

50. 00 

7, 500. 00 

250. 00 

340. 00 

1,229. 50 

422. 69 

50.00 

10,300.00 



94,342.08 



$10, 


961, 


592. 


27 


1, 


678, 


492. 


95 


$12, 


640, 


085. 


22 


11, 


844, 


908. 


94 



$ 795,176.28 



OUTSTANDING NOTES AND BONDS 



Year 


Schools 




1972 


$ 230,000. 


00 


1973 


220,000. 


00 


1974 


220,000. 


00 


1975 


220,000. 


00 


1976 


215,000. 


00 


1977 


210,000. 


00 


1978 


170,000. 


00 


1979 


170,000. 


00 


1980 


170,000. 


00 


1981 


170,000. 


00 


1982 


170,000. 


00 


1983 


170,000. 


00 


1984 


170,000. 


00 


1985 


170,000. 


00 


1986 


135,000. 


00 


1987 


135,000. 


00 


1988 


80,000. 


00 


1989 


80,000. 


00 


1990 


80,000. 


00 



Highway Building 

$ 35,000.00 
35,000.00 
35,000.00 
35,000.00 
30,000.00 
30,000.00 
30,000.00 



Library Addition 

$25,000.00 
25,000.00 
25,000.00 



$3, 185,000.00 



$230,000.00 



$75,000. 00 



Total 

$ 290,000.00 
280,000.00 
280,000.00 
255,000.00 
245,000. 00 
240,000.00 
200,000.00 
170,000.00 
170,000. 00 
170, 000. 00 
170, 000. 00 
170,000.00 
170,000. 00 
170,000.00 
135,000.00 
135,000.00 
80,000.00 
80,000.00 
80,000.00 

$3, 490,000.00 



ACTON HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



On Deposit December 31, 1971 



4,000.00 
1,445.88 



5,445.88 
318.94 



5,764. 82 
5,764.82 



113 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



On Deposit December 31, 1971 



ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



9, 570.00 
8,497. 88 



18, 067. 88 

1.032.90 
19, 100. 78 

19, 100. 78 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



On Deposit December 31, 1971 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



On Deposit December 31, 1971 



GEORGE T. AMES CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



ARLETTE APPLEYARD CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



465.49 
115.79 



2,000.00 
292. 17 



581. 28 
30.33 



611.61 
611. 61 



2, 292. 17 
136. 65 



2,428.82 
2,428. 82 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



On Deposit December 31, 1971 



BETSEY M. BALL FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



10,095. 26 
11, 189.95 



21, 285. 21 

1,212.67 
22,497. 88 

22,497. 88 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 
Received to Fund, Article #45 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



TOWN CELEBRATION 1975 FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



5,000.00 
161. 17 



383. 30 
4,000. 00 



5, 161. 17 





4, 


383. 30 




9, 

9, 


544.47 

18. 75 
525. 72 


$ 


9, 


544.47 



114 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 
Perpetual Care Bequests 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



$ 119,159.92 
57, 767. 72 

10,458. 31 
4, 725. 00 



$ 176,927.64 



15, 183. 31 
192, 110. 95 

6,000.00 
186, 110. 95 

$ 192, 110.95 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



On Deposit December 31, 1971 



A. B. CONANT CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



1,000.00 
351. 17 



1,351. 17 
79.31 



1,430.48 
1,430. 48 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 
Received to Fund, Article #33 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



CONSERVATION INVESTMENT FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



$ 143,967.73 
747. 67 

6,215. 50 
100, 000. 00 



$ 144,715.40 



106.215. 50 
250,930. 90 

65,625. 79 
185,305. 11 

$ 250,930.90 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



On Deposit December 31, 1971 



DR. ROBERT I. DAVIS CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



1,000. 00 
396. 78 



1,396. 78 
76. 55 



1,473.33 
1,473. 33 



Principal Fund 

Received Interest for 1971 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



MARTHA L. DESMOND CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



3,000.00 
163.08 



3, 163.08 

50.00 
3,113. 08 

3, 163. 08 



115 



ELBRLDGE JONES ROBBINS & DESCENDENTS FUND 
BaLance January 1, 1971 



Principal Fund 
Income BaLance 

Received Interest for 1971 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



PrincipaL Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



On Deposit December 31, 1971 



1,000. 00 
140. 25 



ELBRIDGE J. ROBBINS CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



1, 500.00 
132. 77 



CAPTAIN ROBBINS CEMETERY LOT 
Balance January 1, 1971 



2, 500. 00 
221.35 



1, 140. 25 



67. 35 



1,207. 60 

100.00 
1, 107. 60 



1, 207. 60 



1,632. 77 
97. 67 



1, 730. 44 

50. 00 
1, 680. 44 



1, 730. 44 



2, 721. 35 
162. 79 



2, 884. 14 
2, 884. 14 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



On Deposit December 31, 1971 



ROBBINS-AMES MEMORIAL TRUST FUND 
BaLance January 1, 1971 



$ 21,210.08 
1, 778.34 



22, 988. 42 

1.371. 26 
24, 359. 68 

24,359. 68 



PrincipaL Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



Trustee's Orders for 1971 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



$ 25,000.00 
6,538.44 



$ 31,538.44 

1. 960. 37 
33, 499. 31 

1, 160. 00 
32, 339. 31 



499. 31 



116 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



On Deposit December 31, 1971 



GEORGIA E. WHITNEY MEMORIAL FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



$ 15,000.00 
5,273.32 



20, 273. 32 
1. 188. 16 



21,461. 48 
21,461.48 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



Selectmen's Orders for 1971 
On Deposit December 31, 1971 



GEORGIA E. WHITNEY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



14,073. 70 
555. 70 



$ 14,629.40 

880. 31 

15,509.71 

950. 00 
14, 559. 71 

$ 15, 509. 71 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



GEORGIA E. WHITNEY CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



1, 500. 00 
909.65 



FRANK C. HAYWARD CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



1,000.00 
1, 088. 56 



2,409. 65 
132. 08 



2, 541. 73 

50. 00 
2,491. 73 



2,541. 73 



2, 088; 56 
118. 51 



2,207.07 

50.00 
2, 157. 07 



2,207. 07 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



On Deposit December 31, 1971 



HOIT AND SCOTT CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



500. 00 
322. 10 



822. 10 
45. 10 



867.20 
867. 20 



117 



MRS. HARRY O' NEIL CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



On Deposit December 31, 1971 



$ 


372. 


39 










108. 


75 


$ 


481. 
25. 


14 








12 










506. 


26 








$ 


506. 


26 



FRANK R. KNOWLTON CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



1,000. 00 
396. 35 



LUKE BLANCHARD CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



2,419.24 
871. 37 



1, 396. 35 
63.49 



1,459. 84 

50.00 

1,409. 84 



1,459. 84 



3,290. 61 
178. 76 



3,469. 37 

50. 00 

3,419. 37 



3,469. 37 



HENRY S. RAYMOND FUND 
MONUMENT PERPETUAL CARE 

Balance January 1, 1971 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



Transfer to Town Account 

Transfer to H. S. Raymond Cemetery Fund 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



700.00 
877.97 



1, 577. 97 
239. 01 





1, 


816. 


98 






75. 


00 






17. 


53 




1, 


724. 


45 


$ 


1, 


816. 


98 



118 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



HENRY S. RAYMOND CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



2,000. 00 

1,345.87 



SUSAN NOYES HOSMER CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



82,238. 95 
28, 154.09 



3, 345. 87 
182.43 



3, 528. 30 

50. 00 
3,478.30 



3, 528. 30 



$ 110,393.04 

6,300. 94 
116,693.98 

7, 500. 00 
109, 193. 98 

$ 116,693.98 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



On Deposit December 31, 1971 



VARNUM TUTTLE MEMORIAL FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



10,000. 00 
6, 128.01 



16, 128. 01 

931.97 
17,059.98 

17,059.98 



J. ROLAND WETHERBEE CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received to Fund: 

Bequest Mary Lothrop Fund 
Interest for 1971 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



$ 10,000.00 
7,487. 65 



ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



27,213.94 
6,411.49 



100.00 
1,833.00 



$ 17,487.65 

1.004. 71 
18,492.36 

250.00 
18,242.36 

$ 18,492. 36 



$ 33,625.43 



1,933.00 
35, 558.43 

1,992. 19 
33,566. 24 

$ 35,558.43 



119 



SARAH ALBERTIE WATSON CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



Principal Fund 

Received Interest for 1971 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



2,500. 00 
1, 162.45 



WEST ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



3,662.45 



97. 75 



3,760.20 

50.00 
3, 710.20 



3, 760. 20 



1, 566. 53 
87. 92 



1,654.45 
1,654.45 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



Transfer to Town Account 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



STABILIZATION FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



11,018.43 



$ 11,018.43 

729. 70 

11,748.13 

10,300. 00 
1,448. 13 

$ 11,748. 13 



Principal Fund 
Income Balance 

Received Interest for 1971 



On Deposit December 31, 1971 



Principal Fund December 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



CARRIE F. WELLS CEMETERY FUND 
Balance January 1, 1971 



THE HEIRS OF WILLIAM LIVINGSTON 
EMINENT DOMAIN FUNDS 



3,000.00 
1,496. 72 



4,496. 72 
262. 52 



4,759. 24 
4, 759.24 



365. 00 
365. 00 



Principal Fund December 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



THE HEIRS OF HARRIET DAVIS 
EMINENT DOMAIN FUNDS 



2, 551. 00 
2, 551. 00 



120 



Principal Fund December 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



Principal. Fund December 

On Deposit December 31, 1971 



THE DEVISEES OF EVELINA WHITE 
EMINENT DOMAIN FUNDS 



THE HEIRS OF AMASA DAVIES 
EMINENT DOMAIN FUNDS 



Wm. Henry Soar 
Town Treasurer 



COLLECTOR 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1971 



8, 948. 00 
8,948. 00 



9, 130. 00 
9, 130. 00 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 1966 



Outstanding January 1, 1971 

Payments to Treasurer 
Outstanding December 31, 1971 



Outstanding January 1, 1971 
Outstanding December 31, 1971 

Outstanding January 1, 1971 
Outstanding December 31, 1971 

Outstanding January 1, 1971 
Outstanding December 31, 1971 

Outstanding January 1, 1971 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1971 

Commitment per Warrant 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1971 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 1967 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 1968 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 1969 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 1970 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 1971 



110. 75 
3,362. 86 



3,394.85 
318.20 
946.00 



169,546.29 

683. 55 

2,208.60 



3,473. 61 
3,473. 61 



2, 523.40 
2,523.40 



2,060.40 
2,060.40 



2, 186.80 
2, 186.80 



$ 4,659.05 



$ 4,659. 05 



$ 172,438.44 



$ 172,438.44 



121 

REAL ESTATE TAXES 1970 

Outstanding January 1, 1971 $ 121,209.53 

Refunds 509.33 $ 121,718.35 

Payments to Treasurer 118, 705. 84 

Abatements 105. 35 

To Taxes in Litigation - Chapter 60, Section 95 152. 22 

Transferred to Tax Titles 2, 755. 44 

Outstanding December 31, 1971 -- $ 121,718.35 

REAL ESTATE TAXES 1971 

Commitment per Warrant $4, 549, 841. 71 

Refunds 10, 700. 44 $4,560,542.15 

Payments to Treasurer 4, 369, 199. 29 

Abatements 40, 134. 02 

Transferred to Tax Titles 892. 35 

Outstanding December 31, 1971 150,316.49 $4, 560,542. 15 

SPECIAL TAXES - WATERSHED AND FOREST LAND 

Commitment per Warrant $ 326. 70 

Payments to Treasurer $ 326. 70 

Outstanding December 31, 1971 -- $ 326. 70 

FARM ANIMAL EXCISE TAXES - 1971 

Commitment per Warrant $ 259. 75 

Payments to Treasurer $ 259. 75 

Outstanding December 31, 1971 -- $ 259. 75 

MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE TAXES - 1965 
Outstanding January 1, 1971 $ 384. 00 

Outstanding December 31, 1971 $ 384. 00 

MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE TAXES - 1966 
Outstanding January 1, 1971 $ 3,604.09 

Outstanding December 31, 1971 $ 3,604.09 

MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE TAXES - 1967 
Outstanding January 1, 1971 $ 2, 896. 55 

Outstanding December 31, 1971 $ 2,896.55 

MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE TAXES - 1968 

Outstanding January 1, 1971 $ 4,440.96 

Payments to Treasurer $ 109. 25 

Outstanding December 31, 1971 4,331. 71 $ 4,440.96 

MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE TAXES - 1969 

Outstanding January 1, 1971 $ 8,191.53 

Payments to Treasurer $ 1, 085. 34 

Outstanding December 31, 1971 7, 106. 19 $ 8, 191. 53 



367, 


038. 


89 


52, 


825. 


06 


75, 


126. 


12 



122 

MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE TAXES - 1970 

Outstanding January 1, 1971 $ 73,289.96 

Commitments per Warrants 36,447. 53 

Refunds 3, 784. 36 $ 113,521.85 

Payments to Treasurer 87,456. 15 

Abatements 12,669.35 

Outstanding December 31, 1971 13, 396. 35 $ 113,521.85 

MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE TAXES - 1971 

Commitment per Warrant $ 488,861.87 

Refunds 6, 128. 20 $ 494, 990. 07 

Payments to Treasurer 

Abatements 

Outstanding December 31, 1971 75, 126. 12 $ 494, 990. 07 

STREET BETTERMENTS ADDED TO TAXES - 1971 

Commitment per Warrant $ 323. 71 

Payments to Treasurer $ 258. 10 

Outstanding December 31, 1971 65.61 $ 323. 71 

COMMITTED INTEREST ON STREET BETTERMENTS - 1971 

Commitment per Warrant $ 104. 43 

Payments to Treasurer $ 93. 94 

Outstanding December 31, 1971 10. 49 $ 104. 43 

STREET BETTERMENTS - MINOT AVENUE - 1971 

Commitment per Warrant $ 17,818.38 

Payments to Treasurer $ 5,314.95 

Abatements 1, 120. 16 

Outstanding December 31, 1971 11,383.27 $ 17,818.38 

STREET BETTERMENTS - ADAMS STREET - 1971 

Commitment per Warrant $ 27, 374. 93 

Payments to Treasurer $ 1, 016. 93 

Abatements 14,255.92 

Outstanding December 31, 1971 12, 102. 08 $ 27,374.93 

ADDITIONAL INTEREST COSTS - ALL TAXES - 1971 
Collections for 1971 $ 10,726.02 

Payments to Treasurer $ 10,726.02 

CERTIFICATES OF MUNICIPAL LIENS - 1971 
Collections for 1971 $ 2,208.00 

Payments to Treasurer $ 2, 208. 00 

APPORTIONED STREET ASSESSMENTS - NOT DUE 

Balance January 1, 1971 $ 2,610.97 

Payments to Treasurer $ 

Added to Real Estate Taxes 1971 258. 10 

Balance December 31, 1971 

Due 1972 to 1984 Inclusive 2,352. 87 $ 2,610.97 



123 

CEMETERY DEPARTMENT - ANNUAL CARE OF LOTS 

Outstanding January 1, 1971 $ 57.95 

Commitment per Warrant 746. 50 $ 804. 45 

Payments to Treasurer 730. 00 

Outstanding December 31, 1971 74. 45 $ 804. 45 

Wm. Henry Soar 
Town Collector 



124 



JURY LIST 



PRECINCT 1 

Robert L. Brett, 358 Great Road, Merchant 
Donald R. Burns, 10 Flagg Road, Employment Agency Owner 
■* E. Wilson Bursaw, 23 Newtown Road, Oil Business 
Peter J. Cronin, 90 Nagog Hill Road, News Supervisor 
John L. Knight, 18 Pope Road, Real Estate 
Victor Krea, 93 Concord Road, Sales 
Wilson D. LeVan, 37 Old Village Road, Retired 
Willard A. Muir, 4 Green Wood Lane, Electrical Engineer 
Billy G. Putnam, 15 Hemlock Lane, Engineer 
Wallace A. Semple, 437 Main Street, Electronic Assembler 
Paul R. Vigliotti, 30 Carlisle Road, Shovel Operator 
Francis L. Carroll, 8 Wilson Lane, Engineer 
Michael B. Cole, 84 Nagog Hill Road, Mechanical Engineer 
Dorothy M. DiCicco, 67 Taylor Road, Secretary 
Clayton L. Hagy, 15 Coughlin Street, Self-employed 
Stephen G. Lewis, 6 Whittier Drive, Engineer 

- Richard C. Nylander, 144 Great Road, Museum Curatorial Assistant 
Robert M. Richter, 16 Alcott Street, Sales Engineer 

Elwood S. Wood, III, 41 Washington Drive, Vice-President 
Richard C. Bateman, 32 Concord Road, Engineer 
Forrest E. Bean, Jr. , 40 Wood Lane, Beef Merchandiser 
Allen C. Brown, 25 Keefe Road, Engineer 
Daniel C. Buchnam, 9 Wampus Avenue, Marketing -Sales 
Frank J. Clerico, 6 Jefferson Drive, Salesman 
John C. Dawson, 19 John Swift Road, Car Dealer 
Robert F. Driscoll, 69 Taylor Road, Data Management 
Henry J. Frederickson, 12 Bayberry Road, Engineer 
J. Bradley Fuller, Jr. , 14 Thoreau Road, Engineer 
Walter B. Gates, 10 Wood Lane, Treasurer 
I. Lee Gelles, 179 Great Road, Scientist 
Alden R. Gilman, 15 Musket Drive, Chemist 

Walter S. Harrington, 15 Evergreen Road, Mechanical Engineer 
Glenn L. Hermansen, 6 Phlox Lane, Management 
Frank L. Hitchcock, 8 Jefferson Drive, Salesman 
Harlan Howe, Jr., 83 Concord Road, Engineer 
Alex Ivanov, 63 Hammond Street, Electrical Engineer 
Peter P. Jorrens, 107 Newtown Road, Engineer 
William L. Kingman, 65 Esterbrook Road, Investment Counsellor 
Josiah J. Kirby, 7 Thoreau Road, Manager 
Peter F. Lipari, 18 Patriots Road, Engineer 
-. W. Lawrence Marshall, Jr. , 42 Carlisle Road, Banker 

Paul M. McPherson, 527 Main Street, Precision Instruments 

Edward L. Morrill, 16 Pope Road, General Contractor 

Earl Nadeau, 54 Pope Road, Carpenter 

Harold F. Ordway, 83 Hammond Street, Credit Manager 

Edward A. Poor, 9 Wheeler Lane, Advertising 

Paul K. Shefsiek, 10 Minot Avenue, Physicist 

William H. Shenk, 14 Town House Lane, Engineer 

- Dorothy B. Stonecliffe, 6 Phalen Street, Home 

John S. Wollam, 53 Alcott Street, Research Scientist 

PRECINCT 2 

Roland Boisvert, 40 Central Street, President - Digital 

Morris Breslouf, 10 Beverly Road, Chemist 

Ronald A. Cohen, 60 Conant Street, Scientist 

John R. Folsom, 47 Piper Road, Draftsman 

Charles R. Furlong, Jr. , 6 Valley Road, Supervisor 

Stanley P. Garmon, 4 Russell Road, Lineman 

Michael V. P. Grace, 10 Faulkner Hill Road, Staff Planner 

Parker Harrison, Jr. , 22 Tuttle Drive, Insurance Agent 

Leonard L. Kreidermacher, 23 Brucewood Road, Engineer 

Walter Niskanen, 49 Main Street, Cook 

Richard W. Ahart, 190 Main Street, Inventory Control 

Allan R. Amoling, 7 Gioconda Avenue, Assistant Analyst 



125 



Theodore J. Batulin, 9 Railroad Street, Painter 

Edwin A. Carell, 9 Broadview Street, Engineer 

James W. Carpenter, 140 Parker Street, Real Estate Broker 

Ole Garthe, 173 Main Street, Carpenter 

Waino J. Kangas, 31 Parker Street, Maintenance 

Victor Oskirko, Jr., 106 High Street, Electrical Assembler 

Francis B. Parker, 85 Hosmer Street, Credit Manager 

Robert P. Quebec, 25 Heritage Road, Engineer 

John V. Terrey, 45 Faulkner Hill Road, Electrical Engineer 

John A. Thompson, 65 High Street, Engineer 

Walter O. Barron, 20 Billings Street, Printer 

Thomas J. Burke, 229 School Street, Truck Driver 

John H. Bushek, 8 Tuttle Drive, Insurance Inspector 

James A. Carlan, Jr. , 7 Fairway Road, Auditor 

David T. Chang, 8 Billings Street, Research Scientist 

Robert J. Collagan, 17 Carriage Drive, Cost Programmer 

Stanley Driban, 6 Carriage Drive, Engineer 

John F. Dunlap, III, 192 Parker Street, Insurance 

Harold W. Flood, 183 Main Street, Chemical Engineer 

Paul M. Haskell, 101 Stow Street, Technical Writer 

Richard J. Heffernan, 34 Central Street, Assigner 

William T. Kendrick, 9 Hillcrest Drive, Purchasing Agent 

Walter J. Klappich, 6 Beverly Road, Engineer 

James R. Kostas, 56 Main Street, Computer Operator 

Richard A. LaFrance, 18 Pond View Drive, Insurance Agent 

Richard P. LaJuenesse, 45 Parker Street, Advertising Engineer 

William P. Lynch, 57 Robbins Street, Engineer 

Lome R. MacLure, 153 Main Street, Machinist 

Robert B. Menapace, Jr., 34 Conant Street, District Sales Manager 

Charles A. Morehouse, 5 Oakwood Road, Service Manager 

George W. Moulton, 6 Redwood Road, Systems Engineer 

William M. Progen, 8 Lilac Court, Shipping Inspector 

Helen E. Pyrro, 110 Stow Street, Home 

Lawrence Schwartz, 13 Oakwood Road, Contract Manager 

David P. Tinker, 90 School Street, Insurance Broker 

Alan J. Waters, 4 Broadview Street, Sales Manager 

Thomas E. Wetherbee, 44 Prospect Street, Real Estate 

Paul K. Zimmer, 12 Billings Street, Maintenance 



PRECINCT 3 

George S. Bryant, 6 Baxter Road, Computer Operator 

Cornelius E. Coughlin, 98 Summer Street, Comptroller 

Flavil R. Edgin, 13 Duggan Road, Management 

John W. MacDonald, 17 Birch Ridge Road, Salesman 

Warren R. Peterson, 350 Arlington Street, Grocery Clerk 

John W. Baker, 4 Wachusett Drive, Machinist 

Eugene R. Buck, 3 Mohegan Road, Buyer 

Philip G. Clemence, 38 Windsor Avenue, Clerk 

Grant W. Dodson, 377 Central Street, Salesman 

John J. Foley, 1 Algonquin Road, Electrical Engineer 

John W. Forrest, 6 Algonquin Road, Mechanical Engineer 

George F. Geisenhainer, 5 Capt. Forbush Lane, Sales Supervisor 

George H. Locke, Jr., 235 Arlington Street, Shipper-Receiver 

Ernest F. O' Clair, 5 Seneca Road, Mechanic 

Richard J. Scire, 305 Arlington Street, Cable Maker 

Kenneth M. Simpson, 3 Agawam Road, Salesman 

David E. Worrall, 16 Mohawk Drive, Tool Grinder 

Arthur H. Anderson, 9 Lillian Road, Architectural Draftsman 

Jerry T. Ballantine, 57 Mohawk Drive, Film Producer 

Eric D. Bradlee, 13 Tuttle Drive, Banker 

-Victor E. Cornellier, 68 Willow Street, Salesman 
Kenneth A. Goff, 10 Mohawk Drive, Civil Engineer 
Robert C. Green, 31 Oneida Road, Engineer 

Charles R. Husbands, 24 Black Horse Drive, Electrical Engineer 
John C. Inman, 15 Birch Ridge Road, Insurance Adjuster 
Leon Jones, 142 Central Street, Millwright 

-,Ruth T. Kretschmar, 46 Summer Street, Home 
Stephen A. Kallis, 112 Central Street, Public Relations 
Richard J. Makin, 31 Ethan Allen Drive, Marketing Manager 
Charles J. Marsden, 40 Mohawk Drive, Treasurer 



126 



Roscoe D. McDaniel, 5 Lillian Road, Field Engineer 

R. Dana McPherson, 19 Oneida Road, Electronics Engineer 

David S. Nixon, Jr. , 6 Black Horse Drive, Electrical Engineer 

Juergen H. Nordhausen, 92 Arlington Street, Electrical Engineer 

Donald S. Oliver, 19 Capt. Brown's Lane, Engineer 

Robert D. Olthoff, 3 Cherry Ridge Road, Salesman 

Warren S. Orcutt, 33 Nashoba Road, Insurance Broker 

John P. Perry, 12 Mohegan Road, Physicist 

K. Gordon Platine, 339 Arlington Street, Contractor 

Brian A. Prentiss, 215 Arlington Street, Welder 

Frank Primiano, 387 Central Street, Plant Engineer 

Paul Revere, 35 Agawam Road, Salesman 

Bernard H. Reynholds, 20 Capt. Brown's Lane, Sales Manager 

Lloyd C. Sanford, 5 Townsend Road, Photo Optical 

Francis W. Seller, 24 Orchard Drive, Meat Cutter 

Eugene G. Spurr, 16 Juniper Ridge Road, Banker 

Joseph V. Stuart, 5 Powder Home Lane, Insurance Representative 

Roger L. Towne, 601 Massachusetts Avenue, Instructor 

John J. Trebendis, 62 Nashoba Road, Supervisor of Silk Screening 

Peter R. Whitcomb, 144 Hayward Road, Carpenter 



127 

INDEX 

Page 

ACCOUNTANT. 92 

ANIMALS, INSPECTOR OF 49 

APPEALS, BOARD OF 18 

APPOINTMENTS 88 

ARCHIVES 63 

ASSESSORS 64 

BIRTHS 22 

BUILDING COMMITTEE 16 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 17 

CEMETERY COMMISSION 61 

CIVIL DEFENSE 10 

COLLECTOR 120 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 59 

DOG LICENSES 26 

DOG OFFICER 27 

ELECTION, TOWN 87 

ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 21 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 11 

FINANCE COMMITTEE (See Warrant Supplement) 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 5 

GOODNOW FUND 18 

HEALTH, BOARD OF 19 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 14 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 52 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 61 

INSECT PEST CONTROL 27 

JURY LIST 124 

LIBRARY REPORTS 50 

1975 CELEBRATION, ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON 59 

OFFICERS 88 

PLANNING BOARD 12 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 9 

RECREATION COMMISSION 56 

SCHOOL REPORT 29 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 28 

SELECTMEN -TOWN MANAGER 3 

SEWERAGE STUDY COMMITTEE 28 

STREET DIRECTORY AND MAP Center Fold 

STREET LIGHT COMMITTEE 10 

TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 27 

TOWN MEETING PROCEEDINGS: 

March 10, 1971 65 

June 22, 1971 84 

November 1, 1971 86 

TREASURER'S REPORT 108 

TREE WARDEN 27 

VETERANS' AGENT 6 3 

VETERANS' GRAVES OFFICER 6 3 

VOCATIONAL REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT PLANNING COMMITTEE 49 

WIRES, INSPECTOR OF 11 

WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION 18 

YOUTH COMMISSION 53 



POLICE EMERGENCY 263-2911 

FIRE EMERGENCY 263-9191 

(Emergency Only) 

BE SURE TO GIVE YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS AS WELL AS THE NATURE OF YOUR EMERGENCY CLEARLY. 
DO NOT HANG UP UNTIL YOU ARE SURE THAT YOUR MESSAGE HAS BEEN UNDERSTOOD. 

Town Office - Call 263-2761 



FOR ANSWERS ON : 

Assessments 

Bills and Accounts, Taxes 

Birth, Death, Marriage Certificates 

Building 

Cemeteries 

Dog, Hunting, and Fishing Licenses 

Dog Problems 

Education Information 

Elections, Voting, and Registration 

Engineering 

Fire (routine) 

Garbage and Refuse, Health and Sanitation 

Highways and Streets 

Library 

Licenses: 

Nurse (School) 

Nurse (School) 

Nurse (Town) 

Oil Burner Permits 

Permits for Burning 

Plumbing Permits 

Schools: 



CALL THE 



TELEPHONE 



Veterans' Services 
Water Problems 
Welfare Questions 
Zoning 

Electrical Wiring 
Electrical Wiring Permits 



Board of Assessors 263-5012 

Treasurer and Collector 263-7018 

Town Clerk's Office 263-2761 

Building Inspector 263-7545 

Cemetery Superintendent 263-2240 or 263-4428 

Town Clerk's Office 263-2761 

Dog Officer 263-4979 

School Superintendent 263-9503 

Town Clerk's Office 263-2761 

Town Engineer's Office 263-7545 

Fire Department 263-4366 

Board of Health 263-4736 

Town Engineer 263-7545 

Librarian 263-2232 

Selectmen-Town Manager 263-2761 

Board of Health 263-4736 

School Nurse, Junior High and High Schools 263-7738 

Elementary Schools 263-4982 

Town Nurse 263-4736 

Fire Chief 263-4366 

Fire Department 263-4366 

Board of Health 263-4736 

Carolyn T. Douglas School 263-2753 

Julia L. McCarthy-Marion L. Towne School 263-4982 

Florence A. Merriam School 263-2581 

Paul P. Gates School 263-9162 

Luther B. Conant School 263-7407 

Acton-Boxborough Regional Junior High School . . . 263-7716 

Acton-Boxborough Regional High School 263-7738 

Veterans' Agent 263-4757 

Water District (not part of Town of Acton) 263-5646 

Welfare Board (Office in Concord) 369-1290 

Zoning Enforcement Officer 263-7545 

Wire Inspector 263-5555 

Office - Forest Road 263-4736 



MEETINGS 



DAY & TIME 



PLACE 



inual Town Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Appeals Board 
Assessors 
Building Committee 

iservation Commission 
Finance Committee 

Health Board 

Industrial Development Commission 

Library Trustees 

Planning Board 

Recreation Commission 

School Committee: 

Regional 

Local 

•etmen 



1st Monday in March 

2nd Monday in March 

2nd Mon. ea. month or when necessary 

1st Tuesday ea. month, 7-8:30 p.m. 

1st and 3rd Wed. ea. month, 7:30 p.m. 

1st and 3rd Wed. ea. month, 8:00 p.m. 

Oct. thru Feb., Thurs. at 8:00 p.m. 

Rest of year, Thurs. on call 
1st and 3rd Tues. ea. month, 7:30 p.m. 
1st Wed. ea. month, 8:00 p.m. 
1st Thurs. ea. month, 7:45 p.m. 
2nd and 4th Mon. ea. month, 8:00 p. m. 
2nd and 4th Tues. ea. month, 7:30 p. m. 

2nd and 4th Mon. ea. month, 7:30 p. m. 
3rd Mon. ea. month, 7:30 p.m. 
Every Tues. at 7:30 p.m. 



Precinct Fire Stations 

Elanchard Auditorium 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Hearing Room at Forest Road 

Center Fire Station 

South Acton Fire Station 

Hearing Room at Forest Road 

Town Hall 

Memorial Library 

Hearing Room at Forest Road 

Center Fire Station 

Jr. High School Music Room 
Jr. High School Music Koom 

Town Hall 



1972 ANNUAL REPORT 
TOWN OF ACTON 
ACTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



3' r ' 






->. •? ** ' ' .:.: 



. ._- 



I fa 



HI 






,*-w 



3* ■ \^ 











AT YOUR SERVICE 

EMERGENCY NUMBERS 

POLICE 263-2911 

FIRE 263-9191 

AMBULANCE 263-2911 



Be sure to give your name and address as well as the nature of your emergency clearly, 
until you are sure your message has been understood. 



Do not hang up 



FOR ANSWERS ON: 

Assessments 

Bills and Accounts 

Birth, Death, Marriage Certificates 

Building 

Cemeteries 

Dog Licenses 

Dog Problems 

Education Information 

Elections, Voting and Registration 

Engineering 

Finance 

Fire (Routine and Permits) 

Garbage and Refuse 

Health and Sanitation 

Highways and Streets 

Hunting and Fishing Licenses 

Library 

Licenses 

Mosquito Control 
Nurses (School) 
Nurses (School) 
Nurses (Town) 
Oil Burner Permits 
Planning 

Plumbing Permits 
Public Works 
Schools 



263-2240 



Selectmen 

Snow Removal 

Tax Collections 

Veterans' Services 

Water Problems 

Welfare Questions 

Wiring 

Wiring Permits 

Zoning 



CALL THE: 

Board of Assessors 

Town Treasurer and Collector 

Town Clerk's Office 

Building Inspector 

Cemetery Superintendent 

Town Clerk's Office 

Dog Officer 

School Superintendent 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Engineer's Office 

Chairman of the Finance Committee 

Fire Department 

Board of Health 

Board of Health 

Town Engineer 

Town Clerk's Office 

Librarian 

Selectmen-Town Manager 

Board of Health 

Board of Health 

School Nurse, Junior High and High Schools 

Elementary Schools 

Town Nurse 

Fire Chief 

Chairman of the Planning Board 

Board of Health 

Office - Forest Road 

Carolyn T. Douglas School 

Julia L. McCarthy-Marion L. Towne School 

Florence A. Merriam School 

Paul P. Gates School 

Luther B. Constat School 

Acton- Boxborough Regional Junior High School 

Acton-Boxborough Regional High School 

Town Office 

Highway Department 

Treasurer and Collector 

Veterans' Agent 

Water District (Not part of the Town of Acton) 

Welfare Board (Office in Concord) 

Wire Inspector 

Office - Forest Road 

Zoning Enforcement Officer 



TELEPHONE: 



263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
or 263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263'- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
263- 
369- 
263- 
263- 
263- 



2966 
•7018 
2761 
7545 
•4428 
•2761 
4979 
9503 
•2761 
7545 
•5510 
4366 
4736 
■4736 
7545 
2761 
2232 
2761 
4736 
4736 
7738 
4982 
4736 
4366 
•7545 
4736 
■4736 
2753 
4982 
2581 
9162 
7407 
7716 
7738 
2761 
5332 
7018 
4757 
5646 
1290 
5555 
4736 
7545 



1972 

ANNUAL REPORTS 




TOWN of ACTON 



MASSACHUSETTS 



TWO HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SEVENTH 
MUNICIPAL YEAR 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER THIRTY-FIRST 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

NATIONAL, STATE AND COUNTY OFFICIALS 1 

ACTON: STURDY AND PROUD ! 3 

ADMINISTRATION 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN AND TOWN MANAGER 5 

TOWN GOVERNMENT ORGANIZATIONAL CHART 8 

TOWN OFFICIALS AND APPOINTMENTS 9 

TOWN SERVICES 

BUILDING COMMITTEE 19 

BOARD OF APPEALS 21 

CEMETERY COMMISSION 21 

ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 22 

GOODNOW FUND 23 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 23 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 24 

LIBRARY REPORTS 26 

PLANNING BOARD 28 

RECREATION COMMITTEE 30 

SEWERAGE STUDY 43 

STREET LIGHT COMMITTEE 44 

TOWN ENGINEER 44 

TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 46 

TOWN GOVERNMENT WATER DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTEE 46 

TREE WARDEN 49 

YOUTH COMMISSION 49 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

ANIMAL INSPECTOR 53 

BOARD OF HEALTH 53 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 57 

CIVIL DEFENSE 58 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 58 

DOG OFFICER 59 

INSECT PEST CONTROL 59 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 60 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 64 

HOMEOWNER'S INVENTORY 67 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 6 9 

VETERANS' AGENT 6 9 

VETERANS' GRAVES 70 

INSPECTOR OF WIRES 70 

WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION 70 



Page 

OUR HERITAGE 

ACTON HISTORICAL DISTRICT STUDY COMMISSION 71 

ARCHIVES 71 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 72 

1975 CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 73 

THE OFFICE OF TOWN CLERK 

BIRTHS 7 5 

DOG LICENSES 79 

ELECTIONS AND TOWN MEETINGS 80 

JURY LIST 113 

EDUCATIONAL REPORTS 

ACTON ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 116 

ADULT EDUCATION 121 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 123 

DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 123 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 125 

PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 125 

SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 128 

SCHOOL FINANCES 133 

ORGANIZATION 138 

CALENDAR 138 

SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 139 

VOCATIONAL REGIONAL SCHOOL 141 

FINANCES 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 143 
FINANCE COMMITTEE (See Warrant Supplement) 

OFFICE OF THE TAX COLLECTOR 145 

TOWN TREASURER 149 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 164 

STREET DIRECTORY AND MAP 182 

INDEX 186 



Credits 



Cover: Acton Town Hall pencil sketch by Mary P. Wootton, a Freshman at Acton- Boxborough 
Regional High School. 

Photos: Courtesy of Mr. G. B. Williams, Jr. and Patrolman Robert P. MacLeod, Acton Police 
Department. 



NATIONAL, STATE AND COUNTY OFFICIALS 



President 
RICHARD M. NIXON 



Vice-President 
SPIRO T. AGNEW 



Governor 
of the 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

FRANCIS W. SARGENT 
Dover 



Lieutenant Governor 
Secretary of the Commonwealth 
Treasurer and Receiver General 
Auditor of the Commonwealth 
Attorney General 
Senators in Congress 

Representative in Congress 
3rd Congressional District 

Councillor, 3rd Councillor District 

Senator 5th Middlesex District 

Representative in General Court 

38th Middlesex Representative District 

County Commissioners 



Clerk of Courts, Middlesex County 

Register of Deeds, Middlesex South District 

County Treasurer 

Register of Probate and Insolvency 

District Attorney 

County Sheriff 



Donald R. Dwight, Wayland 

John F. X. Davoren, Milford 

Robert Q. Crane, Boston 

Thaddeus Buczko, Salem 

Robert H. Quinn, Dorchester 

Edward W. Brooke, Boston 

Edward M. Kennedy, Boston 

Robert F. Drinan, Newton 

George F. Cronin, Jr., Boston 

James DeNormandie, Lincoln 

Ann C. Gannett, Wayland 

John F. Dever, Jr., Woburn 

Frederick J. Connors, Somerville 

John L. Danehy, Cambridge 

Edward J. Sullivan, Cambridge 

John F. Zamparelli, Medford 

Thomas B. Brennan, Medford 

John V. Harvey, Belmont 

John J. Droney, Cambridge 

John J. Buckley, Belmont 



Effective, 1973 



Representative in Congress 
5th Congressional District 

State Senator 

5th Middlesex District 

Representative in General Court 
33rd Middlesex District 

County Commissioners 



Paul Cronin, Dover 

Chester G. Atkins, Acton 

John H. Loring, Acton 

S. Lester Ralph, Somerville 

Paul Tsongas, Lowell 

John L. Danehy, Cambridge 



CHARTER OF THE UNITED NATIONS 

We, the peoples of the United Nations, determined to save 
succeeding generations from the scourge of war, which twice in our 
lifetime has brought untold sorrow to mankind, and to reaffirm faith 
in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human 
person, in the equal right of men and women and of nations large and 
small. . . 

And for these ends to practice tolerance and live together in 
peace with one another as good neighbors. . . 

Have resolved to combine our efforts to accomplish these 
aims. 

Preamble (June 1945) 
based on the draft written by 
Jans Christian Smuts 1870-1950 



ACTON: STURDY AND PROUD! 



"We, the people. . . " have again spoken. On November 7, 1972, by a process that has been in 
practice for nearly 200 years, we elected county, state and federal officers. We do likewise for Acton; 
by a process that has been in practice here for 237 years. 

Do "we, the people" ever pause for a moment to be grateful for the goodly number of capable, 
outstanding men who have carried the burden of governing Acton? The written records which they left 
behind, attest not only to initiative, integrity, and a keen sense of civic responsibility but also show 
that these men gave years of faithful service to both town and state government. Acton is indeed for- 
tunate to have Town Meeting records that are not only well-preserved and legible but also quite com- 
plete. The first records were from the church. They were written in longhand on sheets of paper - 
sometimes three or four sheets fastened together - and posted in a conspicuous place. (Remarkable 
that so many survived the years ! ) The first printing of the reports of the Selectmen and Overseers of 
the Poor was attempted in one booklet in 1853. The first School Committee report was given orally in 
1836. In 1837, it also was printed in booklet form; a custom which was followed until the early 1860's 
when all annual reports were bound in one book. 

The first Town Meeting, October 13, 1735, easily settled two of its four articles: one, to have 
its land taxed, and two, to choose John Heald to petition the General Court for a tax rate and to vote 
30 pounds for the first budget. However, articles three and four - to build their church and to decide 
where "to pitch a place to set it on" - was a different matter! That took many meetings beset with 
many opposing opinions and strong arguments before the church became a reality. 

At this first Town Meeting, twenty town officers were chosen to manage town affairs. Their titles 
sound strange and their services have long been forgotten. There were five Surveyors of Highways, 
three Hogreeves, two Fence Viewers, one Surveyor of Hemp and Flax, two Constables, and one Tything- 
man. Three Selectmen served as Assessors. The remaining three officers were the same as today - 
Moderator, Clerk and Town Treasurer. The Officers and Committees listed in successive Town Reports 
give a history of town services rendered as the town grew. Twelve Surveyors of Lumber and seven Sur- 
veyors of Wood were added about 1880. Later, Surveyors of Hoops and Stayes, and Field Drivers, etc., 
were added. For many years, Town Meetings were held during the daytime upstairs in the Town Hall. 
Dinner was served at noon by the women in the lower hall. Schools were closed and it was a day for 
social enjoyment as well as for town business. 

The following give an idea of the earliest problems. The form of expression is quaint. 

1735-36 - To see if the town will build a bridge at or near John Shepard's and Jones sawmill 
to accommodate Dr. Shepard. Voted to build. 

1738 - Voted to keep the bridge over Law's Brook in repair. 

1739-40 - To know whether ye town will insist on Mr. Faulkner opening his dam thirty 

days in a year as the law directs where alewives and other fish pass in plenty. 

1762 - To see if the town will accept the way from the great stump at the corner of the 

iron work farm through the Rev. John Swift's farm to the meeting house. 

The following brief statements of town proposals and events show progress in various areas: 

1774 - Company of Minute Men formed under Isaac Davis. 

First proposal for a poorhouse. 

1780 - Voted to adjourn the meeting to the residence of Caroline Brooks because of 

severe weather. (There was no heat in the church.) 

1781 - First resident physician from without the town - Dr. Abraham Skinner. 
1791 - Voted to build a workhouse to support the poor. 

1802 - Voted NOT to permit hogs to run at large. 

1828 - First town Post Office - Silas Jones is the first Postmaster. 



1842 - Voted to supply heat and light for town affairs only. 

1859 - Purchase of the church for town meetings and armory. 

1862 - Great fire at Acton Center. 

1863 - Present Town Hall, with armory facilities, erected. 

1866 - Town bought a new hearse. 

1882 - Voted to provide pails, ladders, fire hooks for each of the five villages and pay 

half the expense for buying hand pumps for any citizen wanting one. 

1884 - First recognition of street lighting problem. . . .lamplighters. 

1889 - Voted to discontinue use of oxen on road work. 

1890 - Voted to accept the Public Library given by William A. Wilde, a native of Acton, 

born in South Acton. 

1894 - Town laid out in three precincts. 

1895 - First interest in Nagog Pond for a water supply. 

1901 - Voted more fire protection. 

First tree warden appointed. 
First Board of Health appointed. 

1902 - Alvin Lothrop gave the town a stone crusher. 

1903 - Voted $100 for a Peace Celebration, April 19th. 

1905 - Voted to instruct the Selectmen to enforce the State Law relative to the speed of 

automobiles. 

1907 - Electricity put in the Town Hall and Acton Memorial Library. 

1910 - Town accepted the Chapel in Mt. Hope Cemetery, erected by George C. Wright of 

West Acton. 

1917 - Voted that a committee of five be chosen to consider the matter of military pre- 

paredness. 

1919 - Voted unanimously that a committee of fifteen, five from each precinct, be chosen 

to make arrangements for "a welcome home" to all from this town who served in 
the "Great War". 

1934 - Voted that the Selectmen and six others be appointed by the Moderator as the com- 

mittee to make arrangements for observance of the 200th anniversary of the incor- 
poration of the town, in July. 

The 1934 vote resulted in an enthusiastic three day celebration on the Town's birthday in 1935. 
Leading newspapers began their publicity with. . . . "The little town of Acton, almost forgotten but sturdy 
and proud;" "Little Acton, the peaceful, pleasant Middlesex County Town that looms so large in Ameri- 
can history." One newspaper even referred to the. . . . "sleepy little town of Acton." 

Acton has since progressed into the 37th year of its next one hundred. It is neither "little" nor 
"sleepy". It is a large town which is very much alive with the problems of keeping up with the needs 
and activities of its fast-growing population. Let "we the people" remember to keep Acton "stury and 
proud" - a fitting tribute to the years of dedication each generation contributes to the welfare of our 
town. 

Miss Florence A. Merriam 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN AND TOWN MANAGER 

Paul R. Nyquist, Chairman Robert W. Dotson, Town Manager 




Paul H. Lesure Stephen G. Lewis Paul R. Nyquist William C. Sawyer Alfred F. Steinhauer 




Robert W. Dotson 



On April 11, 1972 the Board of Selectmen reorganized, welcoming Stephen G. Lewis as its newest 
member. The Board elected Paul R. Nyquist, Chairman; Alfred F. Steinhauer, Vice-Chairman; Stephen 
G. Lewis, Clerk. The two additional members are Paul H. Lesure and William C. Sawyer. The Board's 
first action was the reappointment of Robert W. Dotson to his second three -year term as Town Manager. 

The 1972 Annual Town meeting reflected increased voter interest in municipal affairs. The busi- 
ness sessions which initially convened on March 13, 1972 were finally adjourned with the seventh session 
on April 5, 1972. Record attendance of close to 1300 voters required the use of both the Blanchard Audi- 
torium and the auditorium of the Regional High School during the early sessions. Moderator John W. 
Tierney arranged for a professional sound system service to be used at all sessions of Town Meeting; 
the service has proven invaluable during 1972. 

Among the many issues considered, the Annual Town Meeting authorized funds for nine additional 
firefighters to provide for around-the-clock coverage at all three fire stations, rejected proposal to 
fund a kindergarten program in September 1972, authorized funding of a Summer Youth Employment Pro- 
gram sponsored by the Youth Commission, adopted a definitive sign bylaw for better control of signs and 
advertising devices in the Town and authorized the formation of the Town Government-Water District 
Committee to devise a plan for the closer coordination of the Acton Water District and the Government 
of the Town of Acton and to submit such plan, together with appropriate organizational and financial 
studies and drafts of any required Warrant articles, to the Board of Selectmen and the Water Commis- 
sioners prior to December 15, 1972. 

The rapid growth of the Town continued during 1972 with an increase in the construction of business 
establishments, apartments and condominium units. Three large shopping centers were opened, a fourth 
containing two motion picture theatres is presently under construction, a condominium complex contain- 
ing approximately 500 units continues under construction on Route 2A across from Nagog Pond and a 
large apartment development is being constructed on the site of the former Bellows Farms on Route 2A. 



A trend toward construction of private recreational facilities also has evidenced itself. Private 
enterprise completed an indoor tennis facility in North Acton, approval was given for the construction 
of an ice skating rink on Powdermill Road in South .Acton and plans are now under consideration for a 
privately owned public golf course to he constructed on Route 2A in East Acton. 

One of the major concerns of Town officials is that of solid waste disposal. The existing sanitary 
landfill site located on Route 2 is filling rapidly and it is estimated that the life of the landfill site will 
end duririg the latter half of 1973. The Selectmen, Planning Board, Solid Waste Disposal Committee, 
Town Building-Land Acquisition Committee and other Town officials have been working throughout the 
year on the acquisition of a new landfill site which would be suitable. Several sites are under consider- 
ation at the time of this writing and it is hoped that a recommendation for the acquisition of a new site 
will be presented to the Town at a special town meeting in early 1973. 

The problems related to the reconstruction of Route 2 continued throughout the year. Numerous 
meetings were held between officials of the Massachusetts Department of Public Works and the Board of 
Selectmen. The opening of a large shopping center at the intersection of Route 2 and Piper Road com- 
pounded the traffic problems. During the year several accidents occurred at the Route 2 intersections 
at Weatherbee Street-School Street, Hosmer Street and Piper Road-Taylor Road resulting in 3 deaths 
and 11 injuries. The Board of Selectmen has urged the Massachusetts Department of Public Works to 
take all steps necessary to proceed on the reconstruction of Route 2 and to provide traffic safety devices' 
immediately. The Department has initiated action to rectify, on a permanent basis, the hazardous traf- 
fic situation which exists on Route 2 at Piper Road. The project was halted with the winter weather con- 
ditions. 

Plans for the reconstruction of Route 111 (Massachusetts Avenue) were under discussion through- 
out the year. The proposal of the Massachusetts Department of Public Works for reconstruction of the 
road from its present width of 24 feet to that of 44 feet met strong opposition by residents. The Boards 
of Selectmen in Acton and Boxborough have appointed a committee to investigate the possibilities of 
alternative proposals. The Acton Board of Selectmen believes that reconstruction of Route 111 is neces- 
sary, however, a width of 44 feet appears excessive and the Board suspects that should the road be so 
widened heavy trucking traffic would tend to funnel from Route 495 onto Route 111 on its way to Concord 
and Boston. As a temporary measure, the Massachusetts Department of Public Works repaved the road 
surface in November. Agreement on the width of the road is presently under discussion. 

Due to litigation which was brought against the Massachusetts Department of Civil Service relative 
to alleged discriminatory practices in Civil Service testing for police examinations, the Town Manager 
has been unable to hire the three additional full-time permanent patrolmen authorized at the 1972 Annual 
Town Meeting. The United States Court of Appeals has recently ruled on the case and a revised exam- 
ination has been held; the Manager expects to be able to appoint the additional men as soon as the Massa- 
chusetts Department of Civil Service has issued an eligible list of those who have taken the examination. 
The need for a larger police force has become increasingly evident with the rapid increase in the Town's 
population. 

The workload of the Personnel Board increased considerably during 1972. Aside from routine 
matters associated with revaluation of job positions, the Personnel Board negotiated three union con- 
tracts within the "wage-price" guidelines of the Federal Government. In connection with personnel mat- 
ters and collective bargaining, the Board of Selectmen strongly opposed State legislative bills which 
would have mandated cities and towns to implement certain personnel practices or pay scales. A bind- 
ing arbitration bill was eventually vetoed by the Governor, however, a State statute which effectively 
sets the salary of Fire and Police Chiefs was passed. The Board of Selectmen continues to oppose legis- 
lation of this nature which completely negates the "home rule" concept. 

A thorough inventory of capital equipment for all Town departments exclusive of Schools was com- 
pleted in November for planning and insurance purposes. It is anticipated that the inventory will prove 
quite valuable in programming future capital outlay expenditures. 

At the time of this writing Town officials are preparing an eighteen month budget to cover a period 
commencing on January 1, 1973 and ending on June 30, 1974. The eighteen month budget is being pre- 
pared in accordance with the requirements of the "Fiscal Year" law which takes effect on January 1, 
1973. In effect the "Fiscal Year" law will change the existing fiscal year cycle from the January 1- 
December 31 calendar year to a July 1-June 30 fiscal year. Taxpayers will receive two tax bills during 
the eighteen month period; one bill for a twelve month period shall be due and payable on November 1, 
1973, and one bill for a six month period shall be due and payable on May 1, 1974. The Board believes 
that the implementation of this bill may confuse the fiscal operation of the Town and. has consisiently 
opposed it. 



In 1972 the Massachusetts Legislature passed a'bill which will require all municipalities to con- 
form to a State-wide building code by 1975. The proposed State code will standardize and improve the 
quality of construction throughout the Commonwealth. The Board believes that the State code will prove 
extremely beneficial to all Massachusetts communities. 

The Selectmen held several hearings during the latter half of 1972 on petition of business, com- 
mercial and industrial firms for installation of aboveground propane tanks at newly constructed buildings. 
A shortage of natural gas has required the Boston Gas Cdmpany to limit new installations to residential 
development only. Officials of the Boston Gas Company believe that normal service will be resumed by 
the end of 1973. 

During 1972 numerous Town officials retired or resigned from public office. Most notable were 
the resignations of Dewey Boatman from the Board of Assessors, Edward J. Collins, Jr. as Chief of 
Police, Anthony L. Galeota, Jr. as Town Engineer, Kenneth E. Jewell as Building Inspector, Bradford 
S. Leach as Director of Public Health, James B. Wilson as Registrar of Voters and Herbert P. Wilkins 
as Town Counsel. Most of those who left Town office had served the Town for many years and both the 
Board of Selectmen and the Town Manager wish to take this opportunity to express their gratitude for 
the many years of dedicated service which these officials have given to the Town. Although the resigna- 
tion of Town Counsel Herbert P. Wilkins was accepted with regret, we are pleased to congratulate Mr. 
Wilkins on his appointment to the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth. 

The November State Elections placed two Acton residents in State office. Chester G. Atkins, our 
present representative in the House of Representatives was elected State Senator for the 5th Middlesex 
District and John H. Loring, former member of the Board of Selectmen and present Chairman of the 
Board of Assessors, was elected Representative for the 33rd Middlesex District. 

We would finally note with sorrow the passing of our friend and associate, Porter G. Jenks, 
former member of the Finance Committee, the School Building Committee and the Town Administration 
Study Committee.. Porter Jenks' knowledge and expertise proved invaluable in assisting Town officials 
over the years. 



********************* 




Acton Fire Department 



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TOWN OFFICIALS AND APPOINTMENTS 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICERS 



John W. Tierney 



MODERATOR 



SELECTMEN 



Term 
Expires 

1973 



Paul R. Nyquist 


1973 


Paul H. Lesure 


1974 


Alfred F. Steinhauer 


1974 


Stephen G. Lewis 


1975 


William C. Sawyer 


1975 


LOCAL AND REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEES 




Edith D. Stowell 


1973 


Donald E. Westcott 


1973 


Robert W. Haeberle 


1973 


Robert Evans, Jr. 


1974 


James T. O'Rourke 


1973 


Robert B. Pilsbury 


1974 


Edgar B. Gravette 


1975 


Helen K. Ray 


1975 


TRUSTEES OF MEMORIAL LIBRARY 




Mileva Brown 


1973 


Nancy K. Gerhardt 


1974 


Robert J. Brandon 


1975 


ACTON HOUSING AUTHORITY 




Thomas J. Ahern, Jr. 


1973 


Patience H. MacPherson 


1973 


Julia D. Stevens 


1975 


Mary M. Laffin 


1976 


Kenneth C. Stowell 


1977 


TRUSTEES OF ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 




Helen B. Allen 


1973 


Hazel P. Vose 


1974 


Eleanor P. Wilson 


1975 


TRUSTEES OF WEST ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 




James B. Wilson 


1973 


Frederick A. Harris 


1974 


H. Stuart MacGregor 


1975 


TRUSTEES OF ACTON FIREMEN'S RELIEF FUND 




Richard A. Lowden 


1973 


T. Frederick S. Kennedy 


1974 


John F. McLaughlin 


1975 


TRUSTEES OF GOODNOW FUND 




Thelma L. Boatman 


1973 


James N. Gates 


1974 


Clark C. McElvein 


1975 



Resigned 
^-Replacing 
Appointed by Department of Community Affairs 



10 



Term 
Expires 

TRUSTEES OF THE CITIZENS LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 

OF WEST ACTON 

Barbara Nylander 1973 

Betty L. Boothby 1974 

-Joan N. Gardner 1975 

"Evelyn W. Lapierre 1973 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY MODERATOR 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Griffith L. Resor 1973 

Harold G. Marsh 1973 

Ahti E. Autio 1973 

Edward W. Berriman 1974 

Theodore Jarvis 1974 

**William L. Kingman 1974 

Joan L. Gardner 1975 

Arthur Schene 1975 

Thomas E. Wetherbee 1975 

*Robert W. Haeberle 1974 

REGIONAL REFUSE PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Wilfred A. Fordon 1973 

*Paul F. Gibson 1974 

*Frank B. Kaylor 1975 

**Oscar Kress 1974 

**Alan J. Waters 1975 

MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL 

SCHOOL DISTRICT 

-"Marilyn Peterson 1974 

**Charles E. Courtright 1974 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN 



ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON THE 1975 CELEBRATION 

E. Wilson Bursaw 1973 

Brewster Conant 1973 

Col. Burton A. Davis 1973 

Davis H. Donaldson 1973 

Donald R. Gilberti 1973 

Hay ward S. Houghton 1973 

Roger M. Huebsch 1973 

Susan F. Huebsch 1973 

Mark A. Kahan 1973 

T. Fredericks. Kennedy 1973 

Margaret B. Kinzie 1973 

Walter R. Laite 1973 

MalcolmS. MacGregor 1973 

Natacha F. MacGregor 1973 

Richmond P. Miller, Jr. 1973 

Charles A. Morehouse 1973 

Linda A. Morris 1973 

Marion E. H. Houghton 1973 

Gilbert S. Osborn 1973 

Palo A. Peirce 1973 

Norman L. Roche 1973 



11 



Term 
Expires 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON THE 1975 CELEBRATION (cont'd.) 
Raymond Spicer 1973 

Mary S. Tierney 1973 

Earle W. Tuttle 1973 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION 
Philip G. Watts 1973 

ANCILLARY MANPOWER PLANNING BOARD 
Raymond A. Shamel Standing Appointment 

ARCHIVES COMMITTEE 

Minetta D. Lee 1973 

T. Frederick S. Kennedy 1974 

Joyce C. Woodhead 1975 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

Edward G. Schwann 1973 

Harold W. Flood 1974 

John J. Bush 1975 

Associate Members 
Herman Vanderwart 1973 

William B. Allred 1974 

ELECTION OFFICERS 

Precinct I 
Warden Irene F. McLaughlin 

Deputy Warden John F. McLaughlin 

Clerk Barbara N. Mulvey 

Deputy Clerk Violet Perry 

Inspectors Barbara Nylander, Margaret Schene 

Deputy Inspectors Theresa M. Carroll, Gail Roche 

Tellers Frances L. Collins, Marion F. Driscoll 

Lela Balcom, Frances Hirsch 
Mona V. Melymuka, Nancy L. Miller 

Precinct II 
Warden Margaret Larsen 

Deputy Warden Elsie T. Winslow 

Clerk Bertha Carr Tucker 

Deputy Clerk Irene Young 

Inspectors Martha I. Lowden, Michael J. Walsh 

Deputy Inspectors Hazel P. Vose, Helen M. Young 

Tellers Ruth R. Phelps, Barbara V. Woodward 

Charlotte E. Wetherbee, Joan E. Nelson 
Jean Ann Dingee, Lorraine O. Condon 

Precinct III 
Warden Barbara J. McPhee 

Deputy Warden Katherine E. Nedza 

Clerk Phyllis K. Sprague 

Deputy Clerk Mary H. Prentice 

Inspectors Martin J. Duggan, Elsie M. Godfrey 

Deputy Inspectors Genevieve L. Hatch, Elizabeth Charter 

Tellers Minnie C. Veasie, Esther Perry 

Anna G. Mahar, Lydia R. Lesure 
Carl R. Godfrey, Marian J. Meigs 



12 



HISTORIC DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTEE 
:<Robert W. Parks 
Robert H. Nylander 
Katherine B. Crafts 
Norman R. Veenstra 
Dorothea Harrison 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



Richard P. O'Brien 
Henry M. Young 
-Donald McNeish 
Donald MacKenzie 
Norman J. Magnussen 



PLANNING BOARD 



Eric D. Bradlee 
George O. Gardner 
John F. Pasieka 
Edward A. Chambers 
Robert H* Gerhardt 

REGISTRAR OF VOTERS 
David E. Driscoll 
-James B. Wilson 
Elizabeth A. Barbadoro 



Term 


Expires 


1973 


1974 


1974 


1975 


1975 


1973 


1973 


1974 


1975 


1975 


1973 


1974 


1975 


1976 


1977 


1973 


1974 


1975 



SUBREGION INTERTOWN LIAISON COMMITTEE 
Vincent H. Corbett 



1973 



Donald O. Nylander 



Robert W. Dotson 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



TOWN MANAGER 



1975 
1975 



TOWN GOVERNMENT - WATER DISTRICT COMMITTEE 

Frederick H. Bubier (Nominee of Water District) 1973 

Edward H. Berriman (Nominee of Selectmen) 1973 

Dana B. Hinckley (Nominee of Petitioners) 1973 

William A. Deutschman 1973 

:=Daniel J. O'Connor 1973 

*John C. Dalton 1973 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TOWN MANAGER 
REQUIRING APPROVAL OF THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Richard W. Remmy 
-Lorens A. A. Persson 

John H. Loring 
-Dewey E. Boatman 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Brewster Conant 
Richard H. Murphy 
-Ragner Gustafson 
Robert J. Ellis 
Chauncey W. Waldron, Jr. 
Dorothy B. Stonecliffe 



1973 
1974 
1975 
1974 



1973 
1973 
1973 
1974 
1974 
1975 



13 



Term 
Expires 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION (cont'd.) 

Peter P. Jorrens 1975 

-Bianca M. Chambers 1973 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Robert H. Nylander 1973 

Stanley L. Smith 1973 

Marian E. H. Houghton 1974 

William Klauer 1975 

Anita E. Dodson 1975 

TOWN C LERK 

Charles M. MacRae 1973 

TOWN COUNSEL 

*Acheson H. Callaghan, Jr. 1973 

^Herbert P. Wilkins 1973 

TOWN TREASURER & COLLECTOR 

Wm. Henry Soar 1973 

YOUTH COMMISSION 

^Leonard S. Selman 1973 

^Kathleen K. Barger 1973 

Ann T. Evans 1974 

Charles G. Kadison 1974 

Bruce M. McCarthy 1974 

Stephen R. Bing 1975 

Alan B. Flood 1975 

*Charles A. Schook 1973 

* Ernest A. Keppel 1973 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY TOWN MANAGER 



ASSISTANT ASSESSOR 

Ralph E. Dodge 1973 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Dr. John C. Rowse 1973 

Donald R. Gilberti 1974 

Edwin Richter 1975 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 

: ; Don P. Johnson 1973 

:=Kenneth E. Jewell 1973 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Howard F. Jones 1973 

Charles F. Putnam 1974 

Harlan E. Tuttle 1975 

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING COMMITTEE 

Richard P. O'Brien 1974 

Henry M. Young 1974 

Norman J. Magnussen 1974 



14 



Term 
Expires 

CONSTABLES 

David J. Allen 1973 

Frederick J. Hryniewich 1973 

T. Fredericks. Kennedy 1973 

Charles A. Morehouse ' 1973 

Robert S. Rhodes 1973 

CONSTABLE - SPECIAL - DEPUTY COLLECTOR 
William F. Egar 1973 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Vincent G. Gavin 1973 

Patience H. MacPherson 1973 

Josephs. Mercurio 1973 

Vincent M. Polo 1973 

Sylvia A. Remmy 1973 

Norman L. Roche 1973 

DEPUTY BUILDING INSPECTOR 
**John T. Condon 1973 

**David F. Abbt 1973 

*H. Stuart MacGregor 1973 

^Anthony L. Galeota, Jr. 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT 
Frederick A. Harris 1973 

Richard A. Lowden 1973 

DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
Robert F. Guba 1973 

DEPUTY FOREST WARDEN 
Richard A. Lowden 1973 

Frederick A. Harris 1973 

DEPUTY INSPECTOR OF GAS PIPING & GAS APPLIANCES 
Warren E. Bemis 1973 

DEPUTY INSPECTOR OF WIRES 
Lawrence I. Tucker 1973 

DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 
*Walter J. Johnson 1973 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC HEALTH 
Steven Calichman 1973 

DOG OFFICER 
Patrick Palmer 1973 

FENCE VIEWER 
David Abbt 1973 

FIELD DRIVER 
James Kazokas 1973 

William J. Durkin, Jr. 1973 

FIRE CHIEF 
Thomas J. Barry, Jr. 1973 



15 



Edward Belmont 
Donald Copeland 



Charles Sweet 
Hobart King 
David Spinney 
Malcolm Perkins 
Wm. H. Soar, Jr. 
Joseph Conquest 
Timothy Blaisdel 
William F. Murphy 
Timothy Pattee 
Paul Simeone 



FIREMEN 
(Standing Appointment) 

Captains 



Firefighters 



Term 
Expires 



Clarence G. Frost 
Malcolm MacGregor 



Stephen Huntley 

Milton Hart 

Bernard Caouette 

David Calkins 

John Tobin 

Robert C. Craig 

William Klauer 

David G. Nichols 

Carl Robinson 

Robert Wetherbee 



Richard Gallant 



Forrest Bean 
Philip Hills, Jr. 
Robert W. Reynolds, 
Gordon Smart 



George B. Williams, III 



CALL FIREMEN 



Lieutenant 



Firefighters 
Acton Center Station 



Jr. 



James D. Young 



South Acton Station 



John Bushek 
Frederick L. Harris 
Stewart Kennedy 
Allen Nelson 
Robert W. Puffer, III 



Edward M. Bennett 
Steven Foote 
Francis Malson 



Thomas J. Barry, Jr. 



Alan J. Waters 
West Acton Station 

George Sloane 
FOREST WARDEN 



Carl Simeone 



Ronald Calkins 

Everett Putnam 

Alan B. Davis 

Richard Swenson 



Wayne Decker 

Charles Hillman 

Richard Lowden 

James Patton 

Carl Simeone 



Arthur Decker 

Gordon Gravlin 

Peter A. Robinson 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 
Mark Imbimbo 
Edward W. Flannery 
Stephen E. Lord 
Josiah Kirby 
Richard J. O'Neil 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



Patrick Palmer 



1973 



1973 
1975 
1975 
1977 
1977 



1973 



16 



INSPECTOR OF GAS PIPING & GAS APPLIANCES 
Joseph G. Perry 



Leslie F. Parke 



Norman L. Roche 



INSPECTOR OF WIRES 



KEEPER OF THE LOCKUP 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 
William C. Sawyer 

PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 
Thomas J. Regan, Jr. 
Edward L. Morrill 
Donald M. Perkins 
Wallace Everest 
Eric L. Larson 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 
(Civil Service - Standing Appointments) 



Term 

Expires 

1973 
1973 
1973 
1973 



1973 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1975 



*Edward J. Collins, Jr. 



Norman L. Roche 



Chauncey R. Fenton, Jr 



William J. Durkin, Jr. 
William N. Hayes 
George W. Robinson 
John T. McNiff 
Brian R. Goodman 
Lawrence A. Dupont 



Chief 

Acting Police Chief 

Sergeants 

Robert S. Rhodes 

Patrolmen 



William D. Kendall, Jr. 
T. Frederick S. Kennedy 
James P. Conheeney 
Oiva T. Kallio 



Robert L. Parisi 
Special Officers 



Marjory J. Davis 
Natacha MacGregor 



Matron 

Crossing Guard 
Marian E. Quinn 



David W. Scribner 



Bernard W. Harrison 

Joseph P. Sansone 

Donald M. Bresnick 

Robert P. MacLeod 

David C. Flint 

Edward R. Brooks 



John V. Gregory 

Robert P. Beaudoin 

John E. MacLeod 

Edmond Daigneault 



Muriel B. Flannery 
Mary E. Hynes 



Edmund J. McNiff 



Special Police Officer for Edwards Square 
Cedric Thatcher 

Speo.al Police Officer - Acton Schools Only 



Robert Graham 



17 



Term 

Expires 

PUBLIC CEREMONIES & CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

Burton A. Davis 1973 

Patricia McMillan 1973 

Linda A. Morris 1973 

Walter R. Laite 1974 

Richmond P. Miller, Jr. 1974 

David H. Donaldson 1975 

Robert M. Huebsch 1975 

Mary K. Donnelly 1975 

PUBLIC WEIGHERS 

William J. Durkin, Jr. 1973 

Bernard W. Harrison 1973 

Robert S. Rhodes 1973 

George W. Robinson 1973 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

William P. Lynch 1973 

Charles A. Morehouse 1973 

"Warren Orcutt 1974 

Thomas F. Burke 1975 

Janet W. Murphy 1976 

"Harrington Moore, Jr. 1974 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

George K. Hayward 1973 

SEWERAGE STUDY COMMITTEE 

Daniel J. Costello 1973 

David A. Manalan 1973 



STREET LIGHTING COMMITTEE 
Booth D. Jackson 
H. Stuart MacGregor 
Leslie F. Parke 



1973 
1973 
1973 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CEMETERIES 
T. Fredericks. Kennedy 1973 

SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 
Franklin H. Charter 1975 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 



Allen H. Nelson 



1973 



TOWN BUILDING - 
David Abbt 
Roger M. Huebsch 
Richmond P. Miller, Jr. 
Joseph W. Stevens 
"Paul D. Hamilton 



LAND ACQUISITION COMMITTEE 



1973 
1973 
1973 
1973 
1973 



"John T. Condon 
"Anthony L. Galeota 



TOWN ENGINEER 



1975 
1975 



TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 
George E. Neagle 
Emery D. Nelson 
Franklin H. Charter 



1973 
1973 
1973 



18 



Term 
Expires 

TOWN REPORT COMMITTEE 

-Nancy Gay Browne 1973 

: *Ann G. Hosmer 1974 

Betsyan Newton 1975 

-John Gourgas 1974 

TREE WARDEN 
Franklin H. Charter 1973 

VETERANS' AGENT & DIRECTOR OF VETERANS' SERVICES 
Norman L. Roche 1973 

VETERANS' BURIAL AGENT 
Norman L. Roche 1973 

VETERANS' GRAVES OFFICER 
T. Fredericks. Kennedy 1973 

WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION AGENT 
Theron A. Lowden 1973 



-Resigned 
-^Replacing 
: -*Appointed by Department of Community Affairs 



BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Thomas J. Regan, Chairman 

During the year 1972 the Acton Permanent Building Committee worked on the following projects: 

1. Public Works Building : Final payment was made on all outstanding bills, the Contractors 
retainage was released and several small items were added. There are no funds remaining of the 
original appropriation of $275, 000.00 and the account is closed. 



2. Luther 
tractor, 
planned 



B. Conant School : Items still remain which have not been completed by the Con- 



In early summer the school committee elected to install the kitchen essentially as originally 
Plans and specifications were prepared and put out to bid and a contract awarded to the 

low bidder. The total installed cost was slightly less than the amount of credit received in 1971. 

The appropriated funds have been essentially used; an accounting of all expenditures is presented 

below. 



3. Repair Projects : During the year the Committee assisted in preparing plans and specifica- 
tions and the awarding of contracts for replacement of the leeching field at the Senior High and for 
roof reparis at the Merriam, Town, Senior High and Junior High Schools. A settlement was negotiated 
whereby Johns Manville Company agreed to pay $12, 000 towards the repair of the Junior High School 
roof. 

4. Regional High School Addition: This project started in August 1971, is scheduled for com- 
pletion by early summer. The academic building will be complete early in 1973 and the gymnasium- 
swimming pool later in the spring. Bids for all equipment and furnishings are being taken on a 
scheduled basis to allow installation after the general construction. At this time it does not appear 
that there will be any problem in opening complete in September 1973. The appropriated funds 

also appear to be sufficient to complete the project. The breakdown of budget items and expenditures 
is given below. 

During the year Robert Pilsbury and Donald Wescott were replaced as representatives from 
the Regional School Committee by James O'Rourke. We were all saddened by the death of Porter 
Jenks. No member of the Committee worked harder and gave more of himself to the town of Acton 
than did Porter. 



Luther B. Conant School 

Appropriations Art. 41 

Art. 1 

Art. 19 



Expenditures: 



3-10-69 

10-20-69 

3-16-70 



Total 



$ 42,000.00 

50, 000.00 

183,000.00 

$1, 922, 000.00 



Architect - Earl R. Flansburgh & Assoc. 

Clerk of the Works 

Survey, borings, testing, printing & advertising 

Construction contract - John Tocci & Sons 

Equipment and furnishings 

Kitchen - Jacob Licht, Inc. 

Kitchen - Dawson Michaels & Assoc. 

Kitchen equipment and furnishings 

Outstanding bills: 

John Tocci & Sons retainage 
Architect - E. R. Flansburgh 
Jacob Licht, Inc. 
Outstanding purchase orders 

Funds remaining: 



Total 



i 102,236.85 

19,842.13 

12, 990. 15 

1,617, 769.75 

105, 561.36 

30, 870.00 

750.00 

6, 807.41 



15, 164. 10 

369.37 

6, 625.00 

1, 034.02 

1, 979.86 

$1, 922, 000.00 



20 



Regional High School Addition 

Appropriations Art. 8 9-28-70 
Art. 12 6-22-71 



School operating funds 



$ 200,000.00 

4, 225, 000.00 

20, 000.00 

395,000.00 

2, 000.00 

$4, 842, 000.00 



Expenditures : 

Architect - Perley F. Gilbert, services 

- Furnishings and equipment 
Clerk of the works 

Other Costs : Survey, borings, testing, 
printing, etc. 

Contractor : 

M. Spinelli & Sons 

Change Orders 1 thru 19 

Revised Contract Total 

Equipment and furnishings 

Sub -total 

Contingency 



Remarks: $251, 445 Under Contract 
Change Orders 



Totals 



1. 


Le'dge 143 c.y. 


$ 2, 


831. 


40 


2. 


Blacktop walk 


1, 


612. 


50 


3. 


Ledge 14 c.y. 




277. 


20 


4. 


Boulders 192 c.y. 


3, 


439. 


66 


5. 


Ledge (trench) 147 c.y. 


4, 


204, 


20 


6. 


Boulders 20 c. y. 




199. 


70 


7. 


Tree stumps 


2, 


500. 


00 


8. 


Exhaust - Room 214 


1, 


343. 


97 


9. 


Ledge 1221 c.y. 


24, 


175. 


80 


10. 


Piping - Laundry Room 




534. 


09 


11. 


Additional Ceramic Tile 




279. 


50 


12. 


Additional Resilient Tile 




456. 


88 


13. 


Electrical conduit 




412. 


16 


14. 


Change Bus Duct 


-4, 


000. 


00 


15. 


Plumbing-Teachers Dining 


1, 


087. 


52 


16. 


Gas Connections 


1, 


048. 


79 


17. 


Plumbing-Swimming Pool 




-581. 


44 


18. 


Neutralizing Tank 


2, 


701. 


88 


19. 


Duct Insulation 


1, 


733. 


44 



221, 539.89 

9, 674.81 

22, 642.62 

10, 790.27 



$2,471, 288.76 



$2, 735, 936.35 



Total 



*Not accepted as of 12-31-72 



$44, 257.25 



232, 000.00 
38,000.00 
25, 000.00 

13, 000.00 



$3, 941, 689.00 

44, 257.25 

3, 985, 956.25 

480, 000.00 

$4, 773, 946.25 

68,053.75 

$4, 842, 000.00 



Equipment and Furnishings 

Metal Cabinets 

Grade-Aid Mfg. Co. $ 99,719.00 

Stage rigging & draperies 

Capron Lighting Co. 18, 983. 00 

Steel Lockers 

Lyon Metal Products 13, 964. 00 

Gymnasium Seating 

Hussey Products Co. 21, 000. 00 

Lecture Room Seating 

Henry S. Walkins Co. 4,400.00 

Auditorium Seating 

American Seating Co. 40, 296. 00 

Science Lab. Equipment 

Nil 12,202.00 

Hampden 5, 270. 00 

Kitchen Equipment 

United Restaurant Equip. 9, 800. 00 

Gym Equipment 

Hampden 3, 133. 00 

Modernfold 6,826.00 

Porter Equipment Co. 15, 852. 00 

Total $251,445.00 



Building Committee 



Wallace Everest 
Eric Larson 



Edward Morrill 
Donald Perkins 



Regional School Building Committee 



Reginald Brown 
Raymond Grey 
John Lyons 



H. G. Marsh 
James O'Rourke 
Walter Shaffer 



21 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



John J. Bush, Jr., Chairman 
H. W. Flood, Clerk Edward G. Schwarm 

The Acton Board of Appeals held 22 Public Hearings during the year 1972 on the following matters: 

Petitions for earth removal: Granted 1. 

Petitions for specific uses and exceptions: Granted 2; Denied 2. 

Variances from requirements of the Protective Zoning Bylaw: Granted 6; 
Denied 3; Withdrawn 1. 

Flood Plain Zoning: Granted 3; Denied 1. 

Petition for comprehensive permit: Denied 1. 

Petition for review of Selectmen's decision: Pending 1. 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 

T. Frederick S. Kennedy, Superintendent 



MOUNT HOPE CEMETERY 



During the past year we have continued the project of removing corner posts in, the lower part of 
the older section of the cemetery as well as removing several built up lots and the curbing around them. 
Several old marble monuments were repaired and reset. Several of the larger monuments had to be 
straightened and cleaned, the expense for this work was covered by specific funds. 

In the fall the Engineering Department laid out a new section into lots, and also made some very 
good suggestions for future expansion. Also, this fall a large amount of fill was hauled in and leveled 
off to make another single grave section, and in the spring it will be loamed over and seeded. 

It was necessary to remove several large trees, which were dangerous to the surrounding 
monuments and this coming year several other large pine trees will have to be taken down. 

The Commissioners have been working on plans for making further improvements in this 
cemetery this coming year. 

WOOD LAWN CEMETERY 

It was necessary in this cemetery, to remove three very large pines and two large maple trees, 
that were dying. The stumps were ground out by a stump machine. Also a number of large oak trees 
were pruned. A retaining wall of field stone a hundred foot long was laid along the side of a steep 
embankment, to improve the appearance of this part of the cemetery. The expense of the above work 
was covered by cemetery funds. 

In the fall the large hill of sand was leveled off and in the spring the pile of loam will be spread 
over this area and then seeded. When the roads are laid out by the Engineering Department, the pile 
of gravel salvaged from the hill will be used to make the road beds ready for paving, in this section. 



22 

Plans have been made for the Superintendent to attend the New England Cemetery Association 
Convention to be held in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and in the fall a seminar to be held at the New 
England Center for Continuing Education at the University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire. 

The cemetery personnel have attended several conventions and seminars on cemetery main- 
tenance, as well as a cemetery equipment show held at the Newton Cemetery in the fall. 

In November the Superintendent attended a seminar, which dealt with some of the following subjects. 
The effects of an eighteen month budget, labor contracts, federal and state laws, concerning municipal 
cemeteries. Also improving the cemetery's public image, care of trees and shrubs, reclaiming waste 
land, preventive maintenance of light equipment. 

Due to the increased interest in stone rubbing of old slate monuments in the Revolutionary section 
in Woodlawn Cemetery, the Commissioners have made a ruling that any person that desires to do rubb- 
ings, obtain a permit at the cemetery office. This action was taken due to the fact that in several 
instances, persons not using the proper material, left marks and scratches on the slate monuments which 
were very difficult to remove. 

The Cemetery Board has submitted two articles in the annual Town Warrant: one requesting funds 
for development of a master plan for each cemetery which would enable us to better understand future 
needs and the cost; and the other for money to replace a 1961 International Truck which has seen a lot of 
use and needs to be replaced. 

The department wishes to express its thanks to the Engineering Department, the Highway Depart- 
ment, as well as all others that assisted us during the year. 

Harlan E. Tuttle ) 

Howard F. Jones ) Cemetery Commissioners 

Charles F. Putnam) 






ELIZABETH WHITE FUND 



Hazel P. Vose, Trustee Eleanor P. Wilson, Trustee 

Helen B. Allen, Trustee 

The Trustees of the Elizabeth White Fund have met several times during 1972 to discuss referrals 
and to sign requisitions to the Town Treasurer totaling $1,000.00. 

We are happy to report the acceptance of Helen B. Allen to serve on the Board replacing Helen B. 
Wood who passed away in April of 1971. 

(Note of Interest: This fund, the 1923 legacy of George R. White, in memory of his mother Elizabeth, 
is set up. . . "to aid the unfortunate of Acton." The principal has been invested and the Trustees use the 
interest to aid. . . "widows, orphans or the elderly" or any case "in which the town is morally obligated." 
Cases can be referred to the Trustees by the Public Health Office, a clergyman, a physician or even a 
concerned neighbor. In 1972, fifteen Acton residents received aid from the Elizabeth White Fund.) 



23 



GOODNOW FUND 

Thelma L. Boatman, Trustee 

INVESTMENTS 
Concord Cooperative Bank $3,000.00 $3,000.00 

RECEIPTS 
Concord Cooperative Bank $ 165.68 $ 165.68 

EXPENDITURES 

Treasurer of the Acton Congregational Church $ 145.68 $ 145.68 
Town of Acton for the perpetual care of the 

Goodnow Lot in Woodlawn Cemetery $ 20. 00 $ 20. 00 

$~ 165.68 

Clark C. McElvein 
James N. Gates 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Thomas J. Ahern, Jr., Chairman 

This year the Legislature finally made funding credit available for low-income housing for the 
elderly in Acton. Accordingly our focus of attention has been on completing site development plans 
in connection with a 5. 5 acre site near Elm Court, selected by us and approved by the Department 
of Community Affairs of the Commonwealth. Upon our Application and with the approval of the Town 
Meeting, the scope of the project was increased from 48 to 68 units. 

After our engineers and architects had completed the necessary site and design plans, we 
filed an application for Comprehensive Permit with the Acton Board of Appeals. Prior to the public 
hearings before the Board, numerous meetings were held with the Town Board and officials affected 
by the Application. The Application was formally presented to the Board of Appeals in public hear- 
ings which occurred in June and July. In September the Board of Appeals disapproved the Application 
and after consulting with counsel, the Housing Authority appealed the decision to the Housing Appeals 
Committee. Evidentiary hearings have been completed and a decision is expected from the Housing 
Appeals Committee early in 1973. 

Limited funding was made available this year to the Housing Authority through the State Rental 
Assistance Program. After screening applicants and negotiating with landlords, a lease was executed 
and the funds committed to aid a qualified family. 

Joint meetings have been held with the Council on Aging to explore areas of mutual concern and 
particularly the creation of a shuttle service for the elderly of the Town. 

We look forward to 1973 with the hope that our appeal will have an early and favorable termina- 
tion so that we can proceed to make housing for the elderly a reality in Acton. 

Julia D. Stevens, Vice Chairman 
Mary Laffin, Secretary 
Kenneth C. Stowell, Treasurer 
Patience MacPherson 



24 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Allen H. Nelson, Superintendent 

I herewith submit the annual report of the Highway Department for the year 1972, categorized 
as follows : 

General Highway : During the spring, the sidewalks were swept, lawn damages were loamed 
and seeded, and the road sides were swept free of the winters sand. 

The Town Common and other grounds were raked and fertilized. 

Hayward Road, at the intersection of Arlington Street, was completed with the installation 
of a large culvert. A drainage system was installed and a portion of the street was relocated, 
graveled, hot-topped, and then the slopes were loamed and seeded. 

A walk-way was installed between the Acton- Boxborough Regional High School and Capt. 
Brown's Lane. This was made with a gravel base and covered with stone dust. 

On Hayward Road a sidewalk was placed. Some trees had to be removed, but the majority 
of them were left. Berm had to be placed where the walk was next to the road surface. Three 
culverts were extended. Some guardrail had to be removed and the slopes widened and rip -rapped. 
Then a guardrail was installed and painted. Driveways were regraded and the slopes and lawns 
were loamed and seeded. The island at Hayward Road and Main Street will be loamed and seeded 
come spring. 

Most berms were replaced where the snow plows had damaged them. New berm was added 
along Concord Road in front of the cemetery chapel. 

Chapter 81 -Maintenance: The summer months brought us into our oiling and hot-topping. 
All of the following streets were scraped, patched, swept and then resurfaced with oil and stone: 

Arlington Street Martin Street 

Billings Street Maple Street 

Bulette Road Liberty Street 

Central Street Nash Road 

Charter Road Nashoba Road 

Downey Road Norte Dame Road 

Duggan Road Robbins Street 

Esterbrook Road Smart Road 

Haynes Court Stow Road 

Homestead Road Strawberry Hill Road 

Lillian Road Taylor Road 

Littlefield Road Townsend Road 

Marion Road Willow Street 

Hot-top of 1 1/2" was placed on 6, 200 feet of Parker Street and 3, 600 feet of High Street in 
conjunction with the Water District and the Boston Edison Company. 

On all the streets that were sealed, the excess stone was swept up. 

Pope Road from Strawberry Hill Road to Braebrook Road - a distance of 4, 900 feet - had a 
cold machine mix of stone placed on it, which will be sealed in 1973. 

Signs and Lines : All center lines were repainted and parking lots striped. Center lines were 
added to Willow Street this year. The crosswalks were also painted green on the streets. 

The guard-rail on High Street and Route 62 was scraped and painted with the help of the Neighbor- 
hood, Youth Corps. 

A section of Hosmer Street had a steel beam guard-rail installed. Also, a section of Parker 
Street, had a wood beam guard-rail placed there. 



25 



Chapter 9Q -Maintenance : A section of North Main Street, from Newtown Road to the Water 
District Pumping Station (a distance of 4, 600 feet), received a good leveling coarse and a top course 
of 1 1/2" of Type I bituminous concrete. This was accomplished with the assistance of the Water 
District and the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company. There is a small portion left 
from the pumping station to Route #2A, which will be done in 1973. 

Drainage : A drainage system was installed on a portion of High Street between Parker Street 
and 201 High Street. The drainage system was improved at the intersection of Arlington and Summer 
Streets. A structure and additional pipe was. placed on a small portion of Nashoba Road. 

A catch basin and pipe was installed at the intersection of Hayward and Charter Roads. On 
Evergreen Road a sub-drain was installed; as were catch basins and sub-drains at the intersection 
of Concord and Nagog Hill Roads. 

During the spring, 1, 300 catch basins and drop inlets were cleaned. 

Sanitary Land Fill : This is an area that is growing by leaps and bounds. More re-cycling 
is being done. Glass, iron, tires, paper and plastics are welcome at the sight. Under the watchful 
eye of "Westy", the land fill area is kept in top shape. 

New Equipment: Through the annual Town Meeting, our department received a much needed 
bulldozer for the land fill sight, which is working out well. A new 5 ton dump truck was ordered, 
but has not been delivered as yet. 

We have received one of our two new sand spreaders, which works fine and is much needed. 

One new snow plow, a power reverse type, is working very well. 

A new base station, which replaced the old antique one, and two remote radios are being used 
constantly. 

Our salt blender is not operating as yet, but will be in mid-January of 1973. This will show a 
great reduction in the amount of salt used with the sand. 

Snow : Snow markers were placed around town in the curbed areas that give us problems. 
Snow fence was put up on Central Street, Piper Road, Summer Street, North Main Street, School 
Street and Wetherbee Street. 

Salt and sand is available to all townspeople at the rear of our facility. 

I want to thank our two mechanics, Pete and Jimmy, for holding together our antique equipment. 
Also, thanks to the rest of the men for their long and devoted hours. My thanks to our secretary, 
Mrs. Helen Mudgett, for keeping the books and reports, and to all other departments who helped us 
through the year. 



26 



LIBRARY REPORTS 



ACTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 



Brewster Conant, Chairman 



A 



. •** * 



j*,. 




iif 




tJ 



Mrs. Marion Armstrong 



This annual report is dedicated to Mrs. Marion Armstrong, who 
is retiring December 31, 1972 after nearly thirteen years of service 
to the Acton Memorial Library. Mrs. Armstrong has been Acting 
Library Director for the past year. The Trustees which to thank her 
for her loyal, effective, and pleasant association over the years, and 
hope that they will see her many times again in the future. 

Welcomed to the staff this year were Mrs. Janet Smith, Assist- 
and Library Director, Mr. Thomas N. Jewell, Reference Librarian, 
and Mrs. Winnie Woo, Cataloger. Mrs. Francis Moretti has been 
appointed Assistant Reference Librarian, and Miss Debra McMullen 
has been appointed Assistant Children's Librarian. Also, a welcome 
back to Mrs. Wanda Null, our Library Director, after a year's leave 
of absence. 

Your Library could never function as it does without the volun- 
tary help of many in the community in addition to the fine staff. Again 
this year, sincere thanks to the Friends of the Acton Libraries for 
giving freely of their time and finances. The Friends have sponsored 
story hours given weekly for four and five -year -olds. A much needed 
vacuum sweeper was purchased in part from proceeds from the annual 
Book Fair held by the Friends, April 14th and 15th. Appreciation is 

due the Acton Garden Club for maintaining the fine iris bed at the building entrance, adding a cotoneaster 
further enhancing the planting, and providing weekly flower arrangements and Christmas decorations. 
Thanks also to the Boy Scouts, who have helped to keep the grounds presentable. 

Changes to the building and grounds this year have not been extensive. Special mention should be 
made, however, of great progress in construction of a much needed storage room in the attic, thanks 
to the diligent effort of our Custodian, Bob Trafton. Better outside lighting has been installed. With 
the assistance of the Public Ceremonies and Celebrations Committee, the memorial plaques have been 
cleaned and refinished. A new card catalog section and a new borrower's file have been added in the 
main Library. The League of Women Voters has deposited and will maintain a file of current Acton 
Elementary and High School information. 

The problems of loitering and vandalism have abated. The Trustees wish to thank the Selectmen 
and Police Department for their assistance in controlling these problems. 

Functions this year at the Library include continuous art displays under the auspices of the Friends 
of the Acton Libraries, a concert given December 17th by students of the Acton- Boxborough Regional 
High School under the direction of Mr. Henry Wegiel, and the Mitten Tree displayed at Christmas time 
by the Campfire Girls. 

Two new members were elected to the Board of Trustees in 1972. Welcomed are Mrs. Nancy 
Gerhardt and Mr. Robert Brandon. Mr. James Parker was elected a Corporate Trustee. 



Circulation: 


Fiction 


55, 526 




Non -fiction 


51, 240 




Juvenile 


42, 813 




Records 


5, 737 




Prints 


206 



Total 



Annual Library Statistics - 1972 

Income: 



155, 522 



Fines 
Miscellaneous 

Total 



$5, 703. 93 

640.79 

$6, 344. 72 



27 



Books: Adult fiction added to collection 522 

Adult non-fiction added to collection 1,413 

Gifts added to collection 92 

Total added to adult collection 2,027 

Total discarded from adult collection 106 



Juvenile fiction added to collection 

Juvenile non-fiction added to collection 

Gifts added to collection 

Total added to Juvenile collection 

Total discarded from Juvenile collection 



Books in Library January 1, 1972 
Books added to collection during 1972 
Books withdrawn from collection during 1972 
Books in Library as of January 1, 1973 
Inter-library loan requests - 628 



35, 896 

2, 509 

141 

38, 264 



Board of Trustees 



206 
259 

17 
482 

35 



Robert Brandon 
Mileva P. Brown 
Nancy Gerhardt 
Hayward S. Houghton 



Florence A. Merriam 
James L. Parker 
Margaret Richter 
Raymond A. Shamel 



CITIZENS LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF WEST ACTON 
Thelma C. Hermes, Librarian 



During the year, Mrs. Joan Gardner resigned from the Board of Trustees upon her appointment 
to the Finance Committee. Sincere thanks are extended for her effective and able service as 
Secretary for several years. Mrs. Evelyn Lapierre was elected to serve the remainder of her term. 

Circulation of books and records continued to rise. Much credit must be given to the Friends 
of the Acton Libraries for the gift of many new books and to the visits of the Eastern Massachusetts 
Regional Bookmobile which enabled the Library to offer many additional fine books and recordings. 

The Board has many plans for the improvement of the property and facilities and had new lighting 
fixtures installed in 197 2. 

Without the volunteer services of many patrons, the Library could not be open as many hours. 
The Friends of the Acton Libraries continued their support at annual Fair time with contributions 
and volunteer help. Thanks are also due the Acton Garden Club, who provided a handsome Christmas 
wreath, the Trustees and their families for loyal, unpaid services, and many townspeople for 
contributing books and periodicals throughout the fiscal year. 



Board of Trustees: 

Library Hours: 
Accession: 



Circulation in 1972: 



Mrs. Betty Boothby, Chairman; Mrs. Barbara Nylander, Mrs. Jean 
Gardner, and Mrs. Evelyn Lapierre, Secretary 

Monday, 7-9 P.M., Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, 1Q-5 P.M. 

Number of volumes in the Library, January 1, 1972 

Increase by purchase 

Increase by gift 

Withdrawn 

Number of volumes in the Library, January 1, 1972 

Records: 190 Books: 10,097 

(Fiction - 3,437; Juvenile - 4,313; Non-fiction - 2,347) 

Books borrowed from Bookmobile: 628; Circulation: 826 

Records received from Bookmobile: 66; Circulation: 25 

Records presented to Library: 98 

Fines collected in 1972: $239.20 



6, 857 
141 
218 
284 

6, 932 



28 

PLANNING BOARD 

Robert H. Gerhardt, Chairman 

The Planning Board's responsibilities and duties include zoning, minicipal planning and sub- 
division control which are defined by state statute. In addition certain specific responsibilities and 
duties are assigned under the Protective Zoning Bylaw adopted by the Town. In fulfillment of these 
duites, the Planning Board has held 47 regular meetings and five public hearings, made numerous 
inspections of subdivision roads and either attended or provided written comment to many Board 
of Appeals and Hatch Act hearings. 

Under Subdivision Control the Board approved one business and industrial subdivision and 
disapproved preliminary plans for one residential and one industrial subdivision. A definitive plan 
for a residential subdivision (Central Estates) was disapproved and a revised definitive plan is under 
review at this time. 

In addition to review of plans, the Board has inspected and recommended acceptance of the 
following roads: 

Vanderbelt Road in Chadwick Estates Subdivision 

Washington Drive in Patriots Hill Section IV Subdivision 

Minuteman Road extension in Deacon W.W. Davis Farm Subdivision 

Highland Road in Colonial Acres Subdivision 

These roads were accepted at the special town meeting of October 11, 1972. 

In 1972 the Board also reviewed 23 site plans and provided comments to the Selectmen. This 
work involved reviewing the plans for parking, drainage, lighting, etc., of new sites in business and 
industrial zoned land. Special attention was given to the Bellow Farm 400 unit apartment complex 
because of its potential impact on town roads and the water supply. 

The Planning Board sponsored articles to ammend the Protective Zoning Bylaw to provide 
further restrictions for trailers, to provide further definition of yard requirements, and to require 
a special permit or exception from the Board of Appeals for a place of amusement or assembly 
of more than 500 persons. These provisions were accepted by the Town at the Annual and Special Town 
Meetings last year. 

Under its responsibility for planning, the Board in cooperation with the League of Women Voters 
undertook a town-wide survey of the townspeople's thoughts, opinions, and desires with respect 
to current operations and future growth of the Town. The results were tabulated and printed in the 
newspapers. 

Some of the major conclusions are that many of the townspeople wish to retain the rural character 
of the town and to slow its rapid development. 

The present Protective Zoning Bylaws appear to be overly restrictive with respect to our village 
centers. Most of the business within the West Acton Center are "non conforming" in that they do not 
conform to the setback and off-street parking requirements. These businesses were established 
prior to adoption of the zoning within the town and as a "non conforming use" can only be maintained 
in their present state. They cannot be rebuilt or enlarged without conforming to present bylaws. 
In 1971 the Planning Board undertook a study of the West Acton Village Center and in 1972 have pre- 
pared changes to the zoning bylaw which will be proposed at the Annual Town Meeting in March. It 
is hoped that these new laws will encourage development and redevelopment of small businesses 
into a New England style village center meeting the needs of the surrounding community. The pro- 
posed changes have been discussed with concerned residents, businessmen and the Selectmen. 

The Board has engaged consultants from the Geological Department of Boston University to 
perform a geological survey of the Town. The principal purpose of this survey is to determine areas 
within the Town which exhibit geological characteristics such that there is a high probability of 



29 



bacteriological or chemical pollution of underground water. Chemical pollution may effect ground 
water over a far wider range than bacterial pollution. Dissolved chemicals are generally unaffected 
by passage through the soils while bacteria may be removed by the filtering action of some soils, 
This may eventually cause pollution of our water supply. With this information we expect to develop 
regulations which will restrict development of these areas while allowing normal development in 
other areas. 

At the request of the Selectmen our consultants have temporarily directed their efforts toward 
finding suitable sites for a sanitary land fill. Several possible sites were considered. A number 
of these sites were excluded from further consideration because they have already been developed 
or were located poorly. Seismic studies to determine the geological characteristics of the two 
remaining sites were conducted. Our recommendations were given to Selectmen and Refuse 
Disposal Planning Committee. Ultimate selection of a site will depend on numerous other factors 
such as capital and operating costs and are being studied by the Refuse Disposal Planning Committee. 

During the year the Board appointed a Watershed Protection Subcommittee. The purpose of 
this group is to work with the Planning Board to develop zoning bylaws which will provide protection 
of the entire watershed area in addition to those areas subjected to periodic or seasonal flooding 
now protected under Flood Plain Zoning. 

Because of the work load presented under Subdivision Control Law and Site Plan review, the 
Board is proposing to hire a full-time assistant. We are proposing that this assistant assume the 
ministerial duties of the Planning Board. He would be responsible for reviewing and preparing 
comments on a subdivision and site plans for approval by the Planning Board, researching zoning 
practices in other towns, and preparing legislation for eventual adoption by the Town. 

Planning Board members also attend several conferences sponsored by the Massachusetts 
Association of Planning Board Members. These conferences primarily were concerned with the 
potential impact of proposed state legislation changing the Zoning Enabling Act as well as how the 
new Wetlands Protection Laws could be administered. The Planning Board met with the Conservation 
Commission regarding their new responsibilities with respect to enforcing Wetland Protection Laws. 

On May 1, 1972 the Board elected to reorganize and at that time Mr. Gerhardt was elected 
Chairman; Mr. Bradlee, Vice -Chairman; and Mr. Gardner, Clerk. During 1972 Mr. Gerhardt 
was also reappointed for another five-year term. 



Mr. Bradlee, Vice -Chairman 
Mr. Gardner, Clerk 



30 



RECREATION COMMISSION 



Thomas F. Burke, Chairman 



RECREATION MASTER PLAN 
Synopsis 




Recreational Areas 



Existing (includes schools) 
Proposed 



Acton Recreation Commission 
December 1972 



A. 



Introduction 



It seems somewhat paradoxical that recreation in Acton has operated as a Town Department for 
more than ten years without guidance from a long-range or "master" plan. Conceptually, at least, such 
a plan would appear to be fundamentally no different from any other scheme one might devise for advanc- 
ing from one point to another. Furthermore, almost no one disputes the notion that recreation should 
play an important role in the development of any well-rounded community. Nevertheless, past Recrea- 
tion Commissions have found the long-range planning task an exercise in frustration; moreover, a sur- 
vey of similar communities in this area reveals that Acton's experience in this regard is not unique. 

In retrospect, most efforts to produce a long-range plan appear to have failed, not for. lack of 
method or enthusiasm, but for lack of consensus or agreement regarding what the plan should accom- 
plish. Disagreement and, subsequently, frustration seem to derive from certain concepts which have 
shaped public attitudes toward recreation in general. 

(1) Recreation is highly individualized - in fact, apparent community enthusiasm for 
recreation is really little more than a vast collection of enthusiasms for personal 
preferences. 

(2) Suburban locations tend to reinforce the notion that individual enthusiasms can be 
freely pursued - almost without regard or sensitivity to the interests of others. 

(3) By and large, therefore, individuals tend to approve of expenditures for their own 
recreation interests - but not for those of others. 

That these attitudes would conspire to defeat any community-wide recreation plan is self-evident. This 
is not, however, to dismiss them as invalid. To the contrary, if these attitudes constitute the consen- 
sus of the community regarding recreation, then it is the task of planners to devise programs and con- 
truct facilities which conform to this mandate. 



31 



What is worth examining is the degree to which the community as a whole can afford to cherish 
and exercise their strict interpretation. Consider, forexample, how workable these attitudes would be 
if strictly interpreted and applied to recreation in the heart of a large metropolitan area; clearly, only 
wealthy residents would be able to pursue their recreational interests. Progressive attitudes toward 
recreation, then, are shaped by the community as a whole, specifically, its size and character. When- 
ever these elements change, attitudes must be modified in proporation. 

Acton is changing very rapidly from a small, rural farming community to a medium-sized, middle- 
class residential suburb. The development of recreation in Acton, however, has not kept pace with this 
rate of change - in fact, the status of recreational programs and facilities in the Town has not progress- 
ed much beyond what it was ten years ago. One of the basic tenets of this plan, therefore, is that unless 
the Town is willing to change the collective attitudes that have shaped its perspective on recreation in 
the past, the community will, at some point in the not -too-distant future, find itself in the position of 
having only a few high-cost alternatives from which to choose in meeting its recreational needs. 

Fortunately, as this plan will show, Acton still has a variety of relatively low-cost alternatives 
available to meet its present and projected recreational requirements. This plan synopsis is intended 
to outline what these alternatives are, how they might be developed, what policies are suggested as 
guidelines for this development effort and, finally, what recreation in Acton will look like if this plan is 
carried out over the next five years. 

B. Planning Guidelines 

Ten or fifteen years ago, recreation objectives were relatively easy to articulate: recreation 
meant "sports" in those days and planning was directed at providing suitable outlets for organized, team- 
oriented activities such as baseball, basketball and football. A plan based exclusively on "traditional" 
programs of this type would almost certainly be universally rejected today and this can be attributed to 
the fact that recreation has evolved from a narrow, almost parochial, "sports" concept to a broader con- 
cept better classified as "leisure time activity". As far as a Master Plan is concerned, acceptance of 
this broader meaning has important implications, the most significant of which is that a plan of this type 
must, above all, be both comprehensive and flexible if it is to address 

(1) the incredible variety of leisure time activities that individuals within a community 
routinely pursue and 

(2) the fact that these activities are constantly changing in popularity, emphasis, etc. 

It is also useful to recognize that "activities" imply "facilities" and that both are related to each 
other through "costs". This interrelationship and the balance that must prevail between them is illus- 
trated in Figure 1. Thus, to the extent that a variety of activities and programs are provided or planned, 
flexibility must be built into the facilities/ sites for these activities and into the means of building and 
supporting them as well. The planning guidelines set forth in Figure 2 are designed to reflect these con- 
siderations and to serve as a frame of reference for specific tasks outlined in the balance of the plan. 



Figure 1. 

ACTIVITIES /PROGRAMS 

FACILITIES /SITES 

I 




32 




C. Activities /Programs 

Over the past ten years, a census of recreation interests has been included in a number of general 
surveys conducted by civic organizations within the town. Figure 3 presents a combined summary of the 
most popular youth and adult recreational preferences expressed in these surveys along with the status 
of programs designed to address these interests. The relative importance of each interest is indicated 
by the "score" it achieved on an arbitrary rating scale devised to interpret the results of the surveys. 
Several important conclusions can be drawn from this chart. 



(1) Although private or commercial outlets are available in the area for those wishing to 
pursue the four most popular interests, the Town of Acton itself provides no publicly- 
sponsored programs which address these interests. The reason for this is quite 
straightforward: the Town simply has no facilities or sites where such activities 



33 



might be carried out. Thus, if the Recreation Master Plan accomplishes nothing else, 
it must address the task of identifying and developing land areas that at least partially 
respond to these four recreational interests. 

(2) Swimming has consistently ranked more than twice as important as any other activity 
(the aspect of personal safety probably contributes to the very high preference for this 
particular activity). Of greater significance, however, is the observation that the two 
most popular activities, swimming and skating, are "water" sports. In fact, incredi- 
ble as it may seem, Acton presently has no water resources available for recreational 
purposes - despite the fact that this very point was emphasized in a special section of 
the Master Plan developed for the Planning Board ten years ago ! The seriousness of 
this deficiency is only reinforced by further observing that lack of recreation-oriented 
water resources impacts items 10 and 14 as well. 



Figure 3 



SUMMARY OF YOUTH AND ADULT RECREATIONAL ACTIVITY PREFERENCES 

Scale of Relative Importance 



Rank 


Activity 


1 


Swimming 


2 


Skating 


3 


Skiing 


4 


Sledding 


5 


Tennis 


6 


Horseback 


7 


Adult Educa. 


8 


Baseball 


9 


Biking 


10 


Boating 


11 


Playgrounds 


12 


Arts /Crafts 


13 


Bowling 


14 


Fishing 


15 


Picnicking 


16 


Hiking 


17 


Golf 


18 


Camping 



Presently 
Available 
in Acton 




34 



(3) While the list as a whole represents a healthy mix of year-round and passive as well as 
active interests, the majority of activities listed reveal several characteristics in com- 
mon: 

(a) All but three are classified as outdoor activities; 

(b) The list contains a high proportion of individual or pairs activities and very 
little emphasis on team-oriented activities. 

None of these observations, of course, make the task of planning for adequate facilities any easier. 
What they do suggest, however, is that the main thrust of this plan must lie in the development of a vari- 
ety of multi-purpose recreational sites so that over the next five-year period proper balance between 
activities and facilities can be restored. In fact, the character of this plan will necessarily have to be 
facilities -oriented, not programs -oriented. 

Although most of the long-range planning effort will be focussed on site development, programs in 
several important areas will be developed or improved. Fundamentally, program plans call for contin- 
uing along the course established two years ago, i.e., that of evolving a program of year-round activi- 
ties. The thrust of this portion of the plan is illustrated in Figure 4. Within this framework, emphasis 
will be placed on consolidating and improving existing programs (rather than introducing many new ones) 
in the following areas. 

Figure 4. Illustration of the Gradual Evolution of Recreation 
Department Sponsored Programs 



rts/Cratts ^^ 
laygrouhd's"' 



1973 




(Swim^ning) 
(La'cros 1 



kating 



Gynjnastics . -■' 
(Wrestling) 



Existing 
(Planned) 



Ski. Touriftg- . ___ 

Youth Basketball 
" "-"— -- ...„ J ,A4»tr'fiasketball 
(Swimming) 



35 



Swimming . With the completion of the regional high school in the fall of 1973, the 
swimming pool and gymnasium facilities will be made available to the Acton- Boxborough 
public on weekends and after school hours during the week. In effect, the Town has made 
an investment in, not just a school, but a community center as well and every effort will 
be made to allow the public to exercise, this concept. A specific plan to accomplish this 
objective is being developed by the Recreation Commission and will be presented later in 
the year. 

Summer Playground Program . This program will be concentrated in four locations 
and hours of operation extended to 9-3 daily during a six-week period in July and August. 
Emphasis will be placed on providing more learning and instructional activities, such as 
arts/crafts and field trips, so as to develop a better balance with the predominantly sports- 
oriented activities presently offered. 

School Intermural Programs . The role that the Recreation Department plays in 
offering a series of intermural programs for elementary school schildren is illustrated in 
Figure 5. A typical program is "biddy-basketball". The purpose of these programs is to 
offer a low-level competitive outlet for youngsters whose main recreational interests lie 
outside the intramural programs offered at their respective school locations. 

Figure 5. Illustration of the Recreation Department's Role in Planning 
Programs for Participants of All Ages and Skill Levels. 

Programs 



Youth 



Adult 



c 




o 




■-* 




-*-J 




ert 




.— < 




3 


t—i 


Q, 


a> 


£ 


> 

0) 


<M 




o 


X! 


c 


CI 


M 


W 






u 


«w 


o 


o 


a 




o 




u 




PLh 





Inter - 
Scholastic 




High level 
Competition 



Low-Medium 
Competition 



Participation in 
Organized Activity 

Develop Motor Skills 




Advanced 



Intermediate 



Beginner 



Responsibility 
School Programs 



j j Recreation Dept. (and 
' other civic organizations) 



D. 



Facilities/Sites 



Although it is obvious that the Town must set aside and develop more land for recreational pur- 
poses, it is not at all clear how much, what kind or where. As a starting point, the Recreation Com- 
mission has adopted the land use standards recommended by the National Recreation and Parks Asso- 
ciation. These guidelines, developed by professionals in the recreation field, are detailed in Figure 6. 

The illustration in Figure 7 was then developed as a means of comparing recreational land-use in 
Acton today to what would be needed five years from now in order for the Town to comply with the 



36 



minimum standards set forth in Figure 6. The total area of the square represents a requirement of 
roughly 120 acres, divided into 20 acres of small, locally-distributed sites and 100 acres of large 
centrally-located sites. The shaded areas indicate existing land-use in each category. 



Figure 6. Summary of NRPA Standards for Recreation Land 
Use by Classification and Population Ratio. 



Classification 
Playlots 

Vest pocket parks 

Neighborhood parks 

District parks 
*Note applicable 



Acres/ 


Size 


Population 




1000 People 


Range 


Served 


Service Area 


* 


2500 sq. ft. 


500-2500 


Sub -neighborhood 




to 1 acre 






* 


2500 sq. ft. 
to 1 acre 


500-2500 


Sub -neighborhood 


2.5 


Min. 5 acres 
up to 20 acres 


2000-10,000 


1/4-1/2 mile 


2.5 


20-100 acres 


10,000- 
50,000 


1/2-3 miles 



Figure 7. 



Illustration of NRPA (Minimum) Standards Applied 
to 1977 Acton Population of 20, 000. 



Goward 
Jones 
Elm 
Gardner 



Total Projected Land Area: 120 Acres 




Local Sites 
( < 1 acre) 




Central Sites 



( > 5 acres) 



Projected Requirement 



/\ Existing 



37 



Faced with the prospect of both acquiring and developing a sufficient acreage to meet these mini- 
mum standards, the community might properly consider whether it wanted to support any recreation at 
all! Fortunately, such was not the case. Over the past five years, largely through the efforts of the 
Conservation Commission, the Town has been making an investment in "open areas". For the most 
part, the objectives of this land investment program have been conservation-oriented, not recreation- 
oriented, and most of the property acquired as a result of this program is not suitable for recreational 
purposes. Nevertheless, among the parcels purchased thus far, several sites have portions suitable 
for development as recreation sites. In effect, this portion of the Recreation Master Plan may be con- 
sidered by the community as a second phase in the land investment program initiated by the Conserva- 
tion Commission. 

Spring Hill Site . Working with the Conservation Commission, the Recreation Department has 
laid out a 3-mile path through this woodland area depicted in Figure 8. This effort was accomplished 
primarily by volunteers including the high school ski team; town funds accounted for only a small por- 
tion of the effort. In the winter, ski enthusiasts can participate in one of the fastest growing sports in 
this part of the country: ski touring. (The site is not suitable for alpine skiing.) During the rest of the 
year the site offers a variety of active and passive recreation outlets, among them hiking, camping, 
horseback riding, and picnicking. 



Figure 8. Spring Hill Site 




Property: Conservation Commission 
Description: Heavily wooded; rolling terrain 



Activities 



Winter: 
Spring 
Summer 
Fall 



Ski touring 
Hiking 

Horseback riding 
Picnicking 
Camping 



n 



W 







S4£ 

■j -9% 



3 Mile Trail 



Y-'S' ( r^ : :\ 



ffr 






M? 



Spring Hill 



Road 





Great Hill Site . In contrast to the Spring Hill Site, Great Hill is a more general-purpose and 
centrally located site and, as such, has potential for satisfying a wider variety of recreational interests. 
These interests, many of which were suggested to the community by the Conservation Commission as 



38 



part of the basis for purchasing the property, are illustrated in Figure 9. The first phase of develop- 
ment of this property will consist of clearing trails suitable for hiking, biking, horseback riding, etc., 
and conducting professional surveys of the area to determine its potential as a possible alpine skiing 
site. Subsequent phases will involve development of flat playing areas and, if feasible, construction of 
a modest alpine skiing run. The upper portion of the area will be reserved as a nature trail area. 



Figure 9. Great Hill Site 




Great Hill Site 

Property: 185 acres (Conservation 

Commission) 
Description: Wooded hills and flat open 

spaces; scattered wetland areas. 



Activities 



Possible alpine skiing 
Ski touring 
Ice skating 
Walking /nature trail 



Camping 
Playgrounds 
Horseback 
etc. 



39 



Taylor Road-Landfill Site. This site, illustrated in Figure 10, is appealing because it is cen- 
trally located on the north side of Route 2 and contains large flat areas which would cost very little to 
convert into multi-purpose playing fields. Plans for the first phase of development call for creating a 
15 -acre site in the lower portion of this tract adjacent to the Conant School. The development of this 
parcel of land would almost immediately alleviate the field-availability pressure which has built up in 

Figure 10. Taylor Road-Landfill Site 




Property: 25 Acres (Selectmen; 
Commonwealth) 

Description: Two large relatively flat 

plains separated by 50 ft. 
in elevation and connected 
by a gradually sloping, 
heavily wooded area. 



Conant 




Expans 
Buffer 



Activities 



Spring, Summer, Fall 

Field Sports 

Baseball 

Football 

Soccer 

Field Hockey 
Fairs and Town Celebrations 
Campsite 



Winter 



Nature Trails 
Picnicking 
etc. 



Skating 

Snowmobile Gymkhana 
etc. 



40 



the Little League program. Activities requiring any large open area - including Town functions such 
as fairs, etc. - could be scheduled in this area. Because the land has some wet portions within it, plans 
call for draining one end of the property into a shallow pond which would be maintained as a publis skat- 
ing area during the winter months. In subsequent phases of development, the upper portion which is now 
the Sanitary Landfill, would be converted to a similar large flat area suitable for a variety of team and 
ball-oriented sports. Eventually, plans call for acquiring the heavily-wooded intermediate parcel of land 
which is presently owned by the Commonwealth and developing an interconnecting, passive recreation- 
oriented site between these two "active" areas. 

Neighborhood Playgrounds . At the present time there are four playgrounds that constitute neigh- 
borhood playgrounds in either the "play lot" or "vest pocket" sense described by the NRPA. These sites 
are depicted in Figure 11 along with the centers of population density that currently exist in Acton. 

Figure 11. Town Parks and Playgrounds 







Existing Playgrounds: <-*» 8 Acres 
Areas of Highest Population Density 



41 



It is immediately obvious that, while neighborhood playgrounds have been allocated, they have not been 
allocated in areas of greatest need. Unfortunately, ft is equally obvious that it is difficult to acquire 
and develop one ortwo acre sites in residential areas which are already well-developed. Nevertheless, 
one of the long range objectives of this plan is the development of scattered neighborhood playgrounds, 
typically one or two acres in size and suitable for a variety of pick-up games as well as activities for 
preschool youngsters. Cooperative policy from the Planning Board regarding land-use in future hous- 
ing development areas has given this portion ofthe plan a strong start. 

School Playgrounds . School playgrounds constitute a major portion of the large centrally -located 
recreational sites which Acton now has. For the most part, however, these sites have not been fully 
developed and plans call for the Recreation Commission to work with the School Committee in an advi- 
sory capacity to bring these sites up to their full potential. 

Town Forests . Many residents are apparently unaware that the Town owns two forest area pre- 
serves in the northwest section of Acton. These sites are presently suitable for passive recreation 
interests such as walking and picnicking; there are no plans to change the character of these natural 
locations. 

E. Costs 

This plan is' designed to be executed in annual phases corresponding to the Town's fiscal year. 
As illustrated in Figure 12, a capital appropriation of approximately $25,000 will be requested to imple- 
ment Phase I which covers the first stages of development of the Great Hill and Taylor- Landfill Sites. 
The costs of subsequent phases cannot be determined at this point, of course, because they are for the 
most part contingent upon results achieved in Phase I, i.e., the findings of the alpine skiing survey at 
Great Hill. Nevertheless, to the extent possible, the Commission plans to organize future development 
of these sites in such a way as to restrict requests for annual capital appropriations to the $25-35,000 
range. 

Figure 12. Illustration of Proposed Phases of Development 
for Recreation Land Sites. 



1973 



1974 



1975 



1976 



1977 



Great Hill Site 

Taylor-Landfill 
Site 

Vest-Pocket 
Playgrounds 

Existing 
Playgrounds 



'aV>ViV»*aViV-*,**** Wt!iVi'iViVtV.'iV .v.v.*. , .*.*I*.»X'. , !*.*j l'!*.yv*!*.**'V*v.''*.y 



***** .'. .. i. 



' . ' .V.'. ' .'.'.'. ' .'.'.' 



* * ■ **« VaY i '*•*-*-*-* .'-'-*-'-'-'.'- y,*, 



Cost Projections 



£"*• 25 - 




nj to ^o - 




/ y 


£ v, 






3 5 




s . 






/ , 


-H 3 




yS 


ctl O 




' y 


.t; j= 




s^ 


a H 






U~ - 




' y 



V, 



Undetermined 



-L^L 



LESS - B.O. R. Funds 

Volunteer Support (labor and materials) from other 
civic organizations. 



42 



To accomplish this objective of limiting tax-base supported development costs, the Recreation 
Commission will actively solicit the volunteer support of various civic organizations, particularly those 
groups who would be in a position to benefit directly from the development of these sites. Certain gov- 
ernment funds are also available on a cost-sharing basis so that the ultimate net cost to the community 
will be substantially less than the capital appropriations requested as part of the Town budget. 

Summary 

If all elements of this plan are carried out according to schedules presently conceived, the distri- 
bution of recreational facilities and sites in the Town of Acton will look something like Figure 13 by the 
year 1977. By NRPA standards, Acton would be a wealthy community indeed, with recreational proper- 
ties exceeding standards for a population of 20,000 by a comfortable margin. In fact, it seems probable 
that no additional investments in land for recreational purposes alone would be required until well into 
the next decade. 

Figure 13. Long Range Overall Park Development Program 




Key to Recreation Areas 

1. Jones Field - Playground 

2. Gardner - "Vest Pocket" Playground 

3. Elm St. Complex - including Gates and Douglas Schools 

4. High School - Merriam-Towne -McCarthy Complex 

5. Great Hill Site 

6. Taylor Road-Conant-Landfill Site 

7. Goward - "Vest Pocket" Playground 

8. Spring Hill Site 

9. Golf Course (Apartment Complex) 
10. Town Forests 




43 



In actuality, of course, almost no plan proceeds over a period of time without some modification 
or revision. At the outset, therefore, this development plan was conceived as a flexible instrument 
capable of providing a variety of alternatives to meet whatever patterns of change in community inter- 
ests evolve over the next five years. Thus, for example, should the community decide in 1975 that it 
wanted a large outdoor swimming pool, several alternative locations will be available in the Great Hill 
Site, the Taylor -Landfill Site or other locations. The plan's schedule is flexible as well: phases -of 
development can proceed at whatever pace the Town wishes and believes it can afford. 

The Recreation Commission does feel, however, that the plan should be inflexible in one aspect: 
its implementation should begin in 1973. We hope that this synopsis presents the community with suffi- 
cient reason to support this view. 

William Lynch, Vice-Chairman Charles Morehouse 

Janet Murphy Warren Orcutt 



SEWERAGE STUDY 

Daniel J. Costello, P.E., Chairman 

On October 18, 1972, Congress enacted Public Law 92-500, the Federal Water Pollution Control 
Act, Amendments of 1972. This legislation, which sets as a national goal the elimination of the dis- 
charge of pollutants by 1985, is expected to influence significantly the direction of Acton's Water Pollu- 
tion Abatement Program. 

The legislation authorizes expenditures of up to $5, $6, and $7 billion for fiscal years 1973, 1974, 
and 1975, respectively. However, to date, Congress has appropriated only $2 billion for fiscal year 
1973. The old fund allocation procedures based on population and per capita income have been changed 
to an allocation on the basis of need. For Massachusetts, this means an increase of Federal funding 
from $54 to $75 million, if authorized funds are appropriated. 

The major features of PL 92-500 include: 

1. Federal participation in eligible components has been increased from 55% to 75%, the remain- 
ing 25% to be provided by the State and community. In Massachusetts, we expect a 15% State contribu- 
tion and a 10% local contribution. However, the new law does not require a State grant program. 

2. Eligible components for Federal participation now include all components of the sewerage 
system. However, because of limited funding, a priority system has been established which now con- 
siders that collection systems have last priority after treatment facilities and interceptor systems. 

3. All systems must conform to established regional basin plans. 

4. All grant agreements must include equitable cost recovery programs which provide that the 
municipality's share of construction plus operation and maintenance costs be recovered through user 
costs and, further, that all industrial users of municipal treatment plants must pay, also, their propor- 
tional share of the capital cost of the Federal share of the complete treatment facilities. 

During the course of the year a meeting was held with officials of the Division of Water Pollution 
Control, Town of Concord, and Town of Littleton regarding initiating discussions for forming regional 
facilities conforming to the recommendations of the Metropolitan Area Planning Council. However, be- 
fore one of the participating communities can apply to the Division of Water Pollution Control for grant 
funds to study such a system in detail, it will be necessary for Concord and Littleton to complete their 
respective engineering reports, similar to that completed for Acton several years ago. To date, such 
reports have not been completed - however, the SSC will continue participation in the discussions regard- 
ing regional plans. 

To date, the Division of Water Pollution Control has not notified the Town of a new implementation 
schedule for initiating our Water Pollution Abatement Program, so construction still remains obscure. 



44 



In the interim, it still is imperative that all individual sewerage systems be maintained properly. 
Periodic inspection and cleaning of septic tanks will prevent the costly expense of replacing your sys- 
tem. The Board of Health has free booklets available on the proper care and maintenance of septic 

systems. 



STREET LIGHT COMMITTEE 

Leslie F. Parke, Chairman 
Booth D. Jackson H. Stuart MacGregor 

The Street Lighting Committee continued its program of adding new installations where needed and 
the changeover to the new Mercury Vapor Lamps. In the coming year we hope to complete those instal- 
lations that were not fulfilled this past year. 

The Boston Edison informed the Committee of the high percentage of breakage in Acton and requests 
all efforts be made to remedy this situation. 

We subscribe to the policy adopted with the formation of the Committee that new street lights, in 
most instances, will be installed only at street intersections, dangerous curves, fire alarm boxes and 
locations designated as hazardous by the Fire Chief, Police Chief or this Committee. 

The Committee extends to the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen their sincere appreciation 
for their cooperation during the year 1972. 



TOWN ENGINEER 

John T. Condon, Town Engineer 

Major personnel changes occurred in the Engineering Department during the year 1972. In July, 
I was appointed Town Engineer replacing Mr. Anthony L. Galeota, Jr. who resigned for outside employ- 
ment. Mr. Galeota served the town in many capacities during a tenure of about five years and we wish 
him success in his new career. Subsequently, the Assistant Town Engineer and an Engineering Assist - 
and also resigned leaving Mr. David Abbt, having served the town in the capacity of Engineering Assist- 
ant for eight years, was promoted to Assistant Town Engineer'in August. 

In November, Eric K. Durling was hired as an Engineering Assistant. Mr. Durling is a graduate 
of Worcester Polytechnic Institute with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Civil Engineering. He is pres- 
ently pursuing a Master's Degree in Sanitary Engineering at WPI in the evening division. 

On January 2, 1973 William D. Boston was hired as Engineering Assistant. Mr. Boston is pres- 
ently attending Northeastern University and is a fourth year Civil Engineering student participating in 
the cooperative plan of education which includes alternate periods of class study with outside employ- 
ment. 

The present staff in the Engineering Department consists of: 

John T. Condon, P. E., Town Engineer Eric K. Durling, Engineering Assistant 

David Abbt, Assistant Town Engineer William D. Boston, Engineering Assistant 

Norine Christian, Secretary 



45 



Because of the many personnel changes and especially due to a limited staff the Engineering De- 
partment did not undertake a number of projects that were scheduled during the past year. With the 
proper administration we propose to reschedule these postponed projects in 1973, and to resume 
projects that have been delayed because of insufficient manpower. 

Many factors contributed to an unusual workload on the limited staff during the past year. During 
the absence of a Building Inspector the Engineering Department assumed the additional duties of this 
office which included the inspection of the construction of new homes, condominiums, apartments, shop- 
ping centers and other business establishments, as well as review of permit applications and plans. 
However, despite the workload and the turnover of personnel a number of significant projects were com- 
pleted in 1972 and these include: 

Hayward Road: Reconstruction of this road in the vicinity of Arlington Street was completed 
including the installation of drainage and sidewalks. 

Patriots Road: Installation of subsurface drainage. 

Sanitary Land- Contours of the landfill site were established in order to estimate the re- 
fill Site: maining life of this area for solid waste disposal. 

North Main Design of a culvert at Nonset Brook to eliminate the restriction in the road- 

Street: way and replace the existing culvert which is inadequate and in poor condition. 

DPW Facility: The foundation was placed for the installation of the sand/ salt conveyor sys- 
tem purchased for the purpose of obtaining a more uniform blending of these 
materials. 

Woodlawn & Designed and surveyed a system of roads for the necessary extention of 

Mt. Hope these cemeteries. 

Cemeteries: 

Taylor Road & Additional survey of the road layouts was obtained and calculations continued 
Minot Avenue: for the layout of portions of Taylor Road and Minot Avenue. 

Jackson Land: A survey was made and a plan drawn for the purchase of this property. 

Subdivision plans and site plans were reviewed and comments submitted to the Planning Board and 
Board of Selectmen respectively for their consideration. The Town Atlas, Flood Plain Maps, Street 
Numbering Maps, Zoning Maps, Highway Maps and "Town Owned Land" Maps were updated to reflect 
all new developments and property transfers. As requested, the Engineering Department was repre- 
sented at various board meetings to provide engineering assistance and advice. One of the ongoing 
studies is the selection of a new sanitary landfill site and its proposed operation. 

A considerable amount of time is devoted to inspection of new subdivisions at various stages of 
construction. The installation of drainage facilities, underground utilities, roadbed construction and 
appurtenant features were inspected to insure compliance with the Town's requirements. Routine tasks 
performed throughout the year consisted of issuing and follow-up inspections of Street Cut Permits, 
providing the general public with information, responding to requests for inspection of minor problems 
related to drainage, road conditions and new construction. We inspected roads and prepared the neces- 
sary documents for the roads accepted at the two Town Meetings this past year. 

During the forthcoming year a number of projects are scheduled and with the proper staff and 
equipment budgeted the Engineering Department will renew its efforts to accomplish several outstanding 
projects. A partial list of the activities scheduled are: 

Prepare plans for renovation of Town Common — prepare plans for construction of drainage 
projects scheduled this year — prepare the layout for improvement of Davis Road — complete 
the bounding of Edney-Dunn property, Jackson property and Hayward Road — prepare the 
layout of Piper Road adjacent to the shopping center — prepare plans for sidewalk construc- 
tion — prepare plan and field layout of additional roads and lots at the cemeteries. 



46 



The past six months have been very interesting in my career as a Civil Engineer. The Town offers 
many challenges that remain to be resolved and significant problems are coming into focus that will re- 
quire an active part by the Engineering Department. We find ourselves involved in the investigation of a 
suitable new sanitary landfill site, the development of engineering information to assist in the decision- 
making process for improving unsafe road conditions related to poor intersections, sight distance and 
poor alignment; the future reconstruction of Route 2 through Acton, the preparation of a master plan 
showing all existing drainage facilities in the town for the purpose of expanding and improving the sys- 
tems in the future and traffic studies to assist in the establishment of priorities. 

As in the past, we will continue to make the resources of this department available to meet the 
needs of the town. 



TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 



The bounds of both Town Forests were marked by blazing and painting of trees and the fire lanes 
cleared of brush. 

The areas were used by the Boy Scouts and by classes from the Boston Mycological Society. 

George E. Neagle 
Emery Nelson 

(Note of Interest: The Acton Town Forests are: (1) off of Bulette Road and (2) off of Quarry Road in 
North Acton. ) 



TOWN GOVERNMENT - WATER DISTRICT STUDY COMMITTEE 

W. A. Deutschman, Chairman 

The Town Government -Water District Study Committee was formed in May of this year as a result 
of passage of Warrent Article 24 at the annual Town Meeting. We were charged with finding ways for 
better coordination between the Water Supply District of Acton and the Town of Acton. In order to achieve 
this goal, we met with the Selectmen, the Commissioners of the Water District, the petitioners for Articl 
24, the major Boards in the Town, persons recommended by either the Selectmen or the Commissioners, 
and any citizens interested in discussing the problem. We listened to all suggestions and comments from 
these persons and after much discussion, we reached the following conclusions. 

1. The general operation and "esprit de corps" of the Water District is excellent, and the service 
that it is now providing is equal to that of any of the surrounding towns. 

2. The future plans of the Water District, as stated in the Dufresne -Henry Report, appear to be 
adequate to supply the short-term (10 year) needs for Acton; but the potential for long-range planning for 
the development of the water system in Acton (20-50 years) is hampered by lack of meaningful communica 
tion between the Selectmen and the Commissioners. 

3. The apparent lack of coordination between the two groups does not occur in their day-to-day wor 
ing relations; it only appears in the long-range planning efforts of the two groups. 



47 



4. The attendance at the annual Water Meeting is very poor when compared to the annual Town Meeting 
attendance this lack of participation results either from general satisfaction with the operation of the 
Water District or from the inconvenience of attending a separate meeting at a different time and place than 
the Town Meeting. 

5. One Commissioner and all of the Water District Officers are elected at the annual Meeting by a 
small fraction of the eligible voting members of the district. A larger number of voters should participate 
in the election. 

We, therefore, recommend that the Town of Acton take no action to merge with the Water Supply 
District of Acton. This recommendation is subject to implementation of the following: 

a) the annual meeting of the Water District be changed to the first Wednesday following the first full 
meeting of the annual Town Meeting (Note: we realize that the first session of the annual Town Meeting 

is the election), and that the annual Town Meeting re -convenes following the adjournment of the Water 
District meeting. (If the town moves the date of the annual Town Meeting then the Water District should 
also move its meeting. ) 

b) the Water District election take place at the same time and place as the annual town elections. 

c) the legal notification procedures for calling a Water District Meeting be changed to conform to 
those used by the Town of Acton. 

d) The Commissioners must meet with the Selectmen at least once a year, well in advance of the 
annual Water District Meeting, to give the Selectmen sufficient information so that the Selectmen can 
place their recommendations (in the printed Water District Warrant) on all Water District Articles 
except the Water District Budget. Additionally, we suggest more frequent meetings, perhaps regularly 
scheduled, between the Selectmen and Commissioners. 

We also feel strongly that we should recommend another step for the coordination of the various 
authorities and boards in the Town of Acton, including the Water District. It became apparent during 
our study that no long-range unified plan for the development of Acton exists nor was there one group 
looking out for the future of Acton. Many groups have ideas on the way Acton should develop and the way 
that they can shape this development. Furthermore, several Boards suggested that information flow 
between the Town Boards was not as good as it should be, and that many Boards were not using their 
full capabilities to regulate the orderly development of Acton. 

The Planning Board, while trying to fulfill this function, is over-committed to their day-to-day 
tasks. They are solving the specific and not the strategic problems for Acton. 

We further recommend, 

e) that the Selectmen create a new Committee to map a coordinated land -use plan for the Town of 
Acton. This group should quickly formulate a policy statement for the growth of Acton, then generate a 
long-range land use plan, and finally concentrate on marshalling the Town's resources to ensure the 
implementation of this plan. We recommend that this Committee be formed by the Town by favorable 
action on the following proposed Warrant Article: 

Land Use Planning Committee : To see if the Town will raise and appropriate, or appropriate 
from available funds a sum of money and will vote to authorize the Selectmen to appoint a permanent 
Land Use Planning Committee to define long range land use policy for the Town of Acton, such 
Committee to be responsible for completion of the following program within two years. 

1. The development of a policy statement and land use plan based on an inventory and evaluation 
of present land use, to serve as a guide-line for future Town development and decisions concerning 
community problems; 

2. the preparation of a long range Land Use Plan with details and recommended program rela- 
ting to specific community priorities and needs, as expansions of the initial policy statement and plan; 

3. the development of long range fiscal, legal and community action procedures to carry out 
this plan and the initiation of steps to provide the feed-back necessary to maintain a continuing long 
range plan. 



48 



The Committee shall consist of seven members to be appointed by the Selectmen as follows: 

a) one member shall be appointed from each list of nominees submitted by each of the following: 

Conservation Commission 
Board of Health 
Planning Board 

b) two members shall be appointed from the business - commercial - industrial interests within 
the Town. 

c) two members shall be appointed from the Town at large. 

These conclusions were reached as a result of our six-month study. The remainder of this report 
discusses the positive and negative aspects of a merger between the Water District and the Town of Acton. 
Two appendices are included: one contains all documents that we received during our study, and the other 
contains condensed minutes of our meetings. (Note: the appendices are available for reading at the Town 
Hall. ) 

There are many arguments for merger and all involve closer coordination of the Water District 
and the various boards of the Town Government. Of particular concern are the areas of land use, 
future water supply, water costs, orderly growth of the Town and questions of abundance of water for 
fire fighting and avoidance of water bans. 

The arguments against merger were also many and tended to stress the advantages of autonomy 
for the Water Commissioners. Past performance of the Water District was defended spiritedly". The 
quality of water, continuity of service, acquisition of new wells and particularly the advantageous arrange- 
ments pertaining to the Lawsbrook Road well, the reasonable and competitive cost of water in Acton, 
esprit of staff and satisfaction of customers were all cited as reasons against merger. 

Acquisition of land for future wells is critically important. The record of the Water District in 
this respect is satisfactory to date. Future, needs may well require well sites be located beyond Acton's 
boundaries in neighboring towns. Question has been raised that outside land acquisitions would be more 
difficult if not impossible to accomplish were the District to merge with the Town. In any event, no evi- 
dence was produced to show that future land or well site acquisitions would be eased by merger. 

The problem of temporary water bans during recent dry summers resulted primarily from flow 
restrictions in narrow trunk lines. Development of anew standpipe and replacement of existing lines 
with larger bore lines should effectively address the questions of temporary bans. 

The recent Dufresne -Henry report will have a major impact on future plans and operations. Inter- 
views with Commissioners, Counsel, Engineering Consultant and Staff indicate the District's agreement 
with Dufresne -Henry report and specific provisions to comply with its recommendations. 

Testimony by witnesses both pro and con merger failed to impress the committee that day to day 
operations of the Water District would be improved by merger. Operations are now conducted by com- 
petent and generally esteemed staff with a reasonable overhead. It is extremely doubtful that merger 
could reduce the cost or efficiency of daily operations. 

In the matter of operations, then, there are no strong or compelling arguments for merger. 
Indeed, the weight of testimony would favor, however closely, the position against merger. 

The committee feels that there are areas for potential improvement. Sparsely attended Water Dis- 
trict meetings are the rule and not exception and could hardly be cited as examples of 'democracy in 
action' ! Increased citizen participation is encouraged and meetings should be arranged to attract maxi- 
mum attendance and comment. Responsibility for participation rests with the citizen and not with the 
Commissioners ! 

Implicit in the call to merger is the assumption that merger would, in fact, produce a more coor- 
dinated effort for planning and operations. Testimony before the committee refuted this critical assump- 
tion. Most witnesses conceded that their respective boards were so engrossed with the demands of today 
that they lacked the capacity to engage in meaningful long range planning. Further, the patterns of activ- 
ity of the boards already under the Town umbrella do not indicate, at present, that integrated effort is a 
primary concern or perhaps, possibility. 



49 



One theme persisted throughout all of the hearings and discussions, and the committee 
feels that the proposed merger is an incomplete attempt to confront this theme of long range 
planning. The committee further feels that the Town should address and answer this question 
of long range planning and have made recommendations to this end. 



F. H. Bubier, Secretary 
E. W. Berriman 
D. B. Hinckley 
D. J. O'Connor 



TREE WARDEN 

Franklin H. Charter 

The Department has continued its program of using outside contractors for most all tree removals 
and pruning. This type of work requires specialized equipment which the Department does not have. 

Over 125 new trees were planted this year. Most of these were planted on private property adja- 
cent to the street. This work is also done by private contractors. 



YOUTH COMMISSION 

Bruce McCarthy, Chairman 



Introduction 



1972 marks the first full year of operation for the Acton Youth Commission. The Commission's 
first report to the Town (December 1971) outlined the course of action taken in the previous six months 
to identify specific problem areas relating to the youth population of Acton. In addition, the. report 
described some specific objectives the Commission intended to pursue during 1972. 

The purpose of this report is threefold: to describe the structure and organization of the 
Commission established during 1972, to advise the citizens of Acton of the progress the Commission 
has made in regard to its established objectives and to outline the direction the Commission intends 
to take in 1973. Reference will be made to two Commission studies nearing completion. These studies 
will be published and available to the public prior to the March Town Meeting. 

Structure and Organization 

Because of the increasing workload, the seven-man Youth Commission decided early in 1972 
to define specific areas of responsibility for each of its members. This exercise resulted in the 
development of a committee structure. Each committee was charged with the responsibility of defining 
its own objectives within its area of interest. 

In addition, the committees carry the responsibility of developing a plan of action geared to achieve 
the stated objectives. It was agreed that both the objectives and plans of action" had to receive the approval 
of the full Commission. Each of the seven Commission members took on the chairmanship of a committee 
and with it the responsibility of recruiting volunteers to fill out individual committe membership. 



50 



The nine committees and their responsibilities are as follows: 

1. Education Committee : Charged with establishing and maintaining an effective 
working relationship with the Acton-Boxboro School Committee, the school 
administration and staff, the Committee on Drug Education and the medical 
community. Specific objectives- are to develop an effective Drug Education 
Program, a Voter Registration Program aimed at new voters and a course 
on "Practical Politics" to be included in the ABRHS curriculum. 

2. Recreation Committee : Charged with establishing and maintaining an effec- 
tive working relationship with the Acton Recreation Commission. Specific 
objectives are to provide pertinent information to the Recreation Commission 
to be used in the development of the Master Plan for recreation and to co- 
ordinate activities of the two commissions in areas of mutual concern. 

3. Youth Employment Committee : Charged with organizing and managing a job 
placement service for the young people of Acton and to aid in the develop- 
ment of an effective career guidance program. 

4. Teen Center Committee : Charged with establishing and maintaining an 
effective working relationship with the Teen Center Board, the Friends 
of the Teen Center and the Acton Boxboro Lay Ecumenical Group. 
Specific objectives are to administer Commission funds slated for Teen 
Center Support, to carry out a study of the Teen Center operation in con- 
junction with the Massachusetts Committee on Children and Youth, and to 
survey the Town for the best possible location of a Teen Center. 

5. Police-Youth Relations Committee : Charged with establishing and main- 
taining an effective working relationship with the Acton Police Department. 
Specific objectives are to develop programs relating to juvenile delinquency 
and police -youth relations. 

6. Funding Committee : Charged with establishing and maintaining an effective 
working relationship with state, federal and private funding agencies. 
Specific responsibilities include the preparation and submission of applica- 
tions for funds to these agencies and the development of alternative methods 
of funding Commission projects. 

7. Public Relations Committee : Charged with the responsibility of developing 
programs designed to inofrm the various public groups of the progress and 
activities of the Acton Youth Commission and to establish and maintain a 
good working relationship with the newspapers and other publications serving 
the Town. 

8. Executive Committee: Charged with the overall organization and administra- 
tion of business of the Commission, the preparation of the Commission's 
Annual Report and establishing and maintaining an effective working relation- 
ship with the Town Manager, Selectmen and the Acton Finance Committee. 

9. Youth Advisory Committee : Charged with establishing and maintaining 
effective communications between the Commission and the youth population 
of Acton. 

Identifying the Problem(s) 

The Youth Commission's 1971 report to the Town describes in detail the effort expended to identify 
and define specific problem areas relating to Acton's youth population. The process followed emphasized 
the open meeting concept wherein interested individuals and groups met with the Commission to share 
ideas and information, register complaints and offer suggestions. 

During 1972 the Commission continued to seek information and ideas but followed a somewhat 
different course of action. The data gathering process became more structured with two formal studies 
carried out during the year. In addition, arrangements were made with the Acton Police Department 
to receive pertinent data on a regular basis. 

De-emphasizing the open meeting concept was a decision based on necessity rather than any 
desire of the Commission. The size of the workload and the time available to handle it dictated that 
meetings be spent handling the week to week business of the Commission. Although the workload 
continues to grow, the Commission sees a need to reinstitute the open meetings and plans are now 
underway to do so - perhaps on a monthly basis. These meetings will be in addition to the twice a 
month business meetings. 



51 



Programs, Projects, Activities 

The following is a brief summary of the activities of the Commission during 1972 broken down by 
Committee. This summary will not cover all the objectives of each Committee, but only those where 
specific progress has been made. 

1. Education Committee : As reported earlier, this Committee has spent con- 
siderable time and energy conducting a study of the needs of Acton's young 
people that can be best met through the school system. In the course of 
their study they solicited information from public and private social agencies 
the medical community, students, teachers, counselors and school adminis- 
trative personnel. 

Preliminary results of their study show Drug and Health Education as two major 
areas of concern. As a first step in dealing with these problems, the Commission, 
on the Committee's recommendation, has elected to support the hiring of a 
Health -Physical Education Coordinator for the Acton-Boxboro School System. 

The Education Committee is chaired by Ann Evans. The members of the Com- 
mittee are Sally Hinckley and Eleanor Phillips. 

2. Recreation Committee : This Committee prepared a report containing suggested 
activities to be included in the Master Plan for recreation. Based on the infor- 
mation available to. and developed by, the Youth Commission, this committee's 
suggestions emphasized non-organized sports facilities which would lend them- 
selves to individual and family activities. The report was submitted to the 
Recreation Commission. 

In addition this Committee will study all Recreation Commission proposals 
to the Town in order to identify those of mutual concern that can be officially 
supported by the Youth Commission at the Town Meeting. 

The Recreation Committee is chaired by Bruce McCarthy. The members 
of the Committee are Brian Richter, Nancy Darlington and Paul Viera. 

3. Youth Employment Committee : This Committee organized and ran the Youth 
Commission's Summer Employment Program. It was generally agreed 
that this Program was a success and the Commission has decided to begin 
the Program again early in 1973 to run on a year-round basis. 

A booklet has been prepared detailing the results of the Summer Employ- 
ment Program and will have been distributed to the citizens of Acton by 
the time this report is published. 

The Youth Employment Committee is chaired by Charles Kadison. 

4. Teen Center Committee : This Committee carried a very heavy workload 
during 1972. In addition to administering Commission funds ear-marked 
for support of the Teen Center they worked closely with the Massachusetts 
Committee on Children and Youth in the research stage of their study, 
doing most of the gathering of data themselves. 

The Commission's recommendations to the Town concerning future support 
for the Teen Center will be based on the recommendations outlined in this 
report. 

The Teen Center Committee was co -chaired by Leonard Selman and 
Kathleen Barger. Mr. Selman was responsible for the administration 
of .Commission funds used to support the Teen Center and Mrs. Barger 
worked with the Massachusetts Committee on Children and Youth on the 
Teen Center Study. The members of Mrs. Barger 1 s Committee were 
Catherine Ricci, Gayle Phillips, Jean Lane, Bryan Barlow, Joan Selman 
and Jacqueline Mapletoft. 



52 



5. Police Youth ReLations Committee: This Committee has established a 
working relationship with the Acton Police Department and has arranged 
to receive periodic reports on incidents involving youthful Acton 
citizens. These reports will form the basis of any programs recommended 
by this Committee relating to juvenile delinquency and/or police -community 
relations. 

Alan Flood and Stephen Bing are co-chairmen of the Police -Youth Relations 
Committee. 

6. Funding Committee : This Committee has developed a complete funding 
proposal to pay the salary of a full-time, professional Youth Director 
for the Teen Center. The proposal was submitted to the Commonwealth 
through its Department of Youth Services. The Commission is presently 
awaiting word as to the disposition of the proposal. 

The Committee has further plans to seek funds through private foundations 
as well as other public agencies. The Funding Committee is chaired by 
Stephen Bing. 

7. Public Relations Committee: This Committee has handled the preparation 
of all news releases from the Commission during 1972 doing an especially 
good job in publicizing the Summer Employment Program. It has handled 
the production and distribution of the booklet explaining the results of the 
Program as well as the week to week news articles that appeared in the 
local newspapers. 

The Public Relations Committee is chaired by Kathleen Barger. 

8. Executive Committee : This Committee developed and implemented the 
Committee structure presently in use by the Commission. It developed 
the agendas for Commission meetings and produced this report. This 
Committee will handle all deliberations with the Acton Finance Committee, 
Board of Selectmen and Town Manager relative to the Commission's pro- 
posed budget for 1973 and any Commission-sponsored Articles appearing 
on the Warrent for the March Town Meeting. 

The Executive Committee is chaired by Bruce McCarthy. He is assisted 
by Marion Maxwell, the Clerk of the Commission. 

9. Youth Advisory Committee : This Committee has recently been re-instituted 
and will be responsible for developing and making the necessary arrangements 
for a series of open-meetings to be held during 1973. 

Co-chairmen of the Committee are Stephen Bing and Kathleen Barger. The 
members of the Committee are Nancy Darlington, Brian Richter and Brian 
Barlow. 

Future Plans 

The more research and study the Commission-does in an attempt to identify and define problems, 
the more apparent it becomes that this process can never end. Basic problem areas have emerged 
but there is a constant shifting of emphasis requiring re -examination and a fresh outlook. Because 
of this the Commission will continue its efforts in this area through the various means available to it. 

While research and study must continue, the Commission must remain actively involved in 
developing and implementing new programs in an attempt to help the young people of Acton. 1973 
will see a greater emphasis on Commission activity in the areas of Drug and Health Education, 
Youth Employment and Police -Youth Relations. 

Based on the preliminary results of the Massachusetts Committee on Children and Youth Study, 
the Commission will continue to support the Teen Center and CODE pending Town approval of the 
1973-74 budget request. The Teen Center will be supported at least at the same level as at present 
while support of CODE will be increased to allow them to expand their services. Funds for con- 



53 



tinuing the Youth Employment Program on a year-round basis will be requested through a separate 
article on the Warrant. If the article is passed that program will also be continued. 

Summary 

The Commission members remain committed to the difficult task of easing the transition of 
Acton's young people into a fast moving, often difficult adult world. While the problems continue to 
exist, progress is being made if ever so slowly. 

The Commission wishes to thank all those groups and individuals who have maintained an interest 
in its activities during these past 18 months. The Commission remains committed to an open-door 
policy and continues its standing invitation to all the citizens of Acton to attend and participate in it's 
regular meetings. 



Alan Flood, Vice -Chairman 
Kathleen Barger 
Stephen Bing 



Ann Evans 
Charles Kadison 
Leonard Selman 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR 



Patrick Palmer 



Premises Inspected 


34 


Ponies 


24 


Horses 


52 


Cows 2 years and over 


95 


Cows 1-2 years 


15 


Calves 


17 


Bulls 


2 


Beef Cattle 


4 



Goats 


6 


Sheep 


8 


Swine 


5 


Mules 


2 


Dogs quarantined: 




for biting 


10 


for chasing cars and going 




on school grounds 


15 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Steven Calichman, Director 



This year, your Director spent a great deal of time with the work of inspecting the construction of 
individual sanitary sewerage disposal systems. The administration of the Board of Health office and 
other vital Public Health programs is becoming increasingly important to the health and welfare of the 
general public of the Town of Acton. 

I wish to thank the Board of Health, Town officials, and all the Town Departments for their sup- 
port. Sincere appreciation is extended to the Health Department staff, the Physicians, and the citizens 
who have helped make our programs possible. 

The following report summarizes the services and activities of the Department for 1972. 

Septic Tank Cafe 

All residents in the Town of Acton are reminded of their responsibility to maintain their se"ptic 
tanks and underground leaching areas. 



54 



A septic tank system will service a home satisfactorily only if it is properly located, designed, 
constructed and adequately maintained. Even a good system which does not have proper care and atten- 
tion may become a nuisance and a burdensome expense. 

Neglect of the septic tank is the most frequent cause of damage to the leaching systems. When the 
tank is not cleaned, solids build up until they are carried into the underground leaching pipe system, 
where they block the flow of the liquid into the soil. When this happens, the leaching system must be 
rebuilt or relocated - a costly undertaking. The precautions of periodic inspection and cleaning of the 
septic tank can prevent this needless expense and work by extending the life of the leaching systems. 

The frequency of cleaning depends on the size of the septic tank and the number of people is serves. 
When a garbage grinder is used, more frequent cleaning will be required. With ordinary use and care, 
a septic tank usually requires cleaning every two years. The homeowner can make measurements and 
decide for himself when his tank needs cleaning. When the total depth of scums and solids exceeds one- 
half of the liquid depth of the tank, the tank should be cleaned. The accumulated solids are ordinarily 
pumped out by companies that make a business of cleaning septic tanks. Your local Health Department 
knows which local companies do this work satisfactorily. The solids removed should be buried or dis- 
posed of in a manner approved by your local Health Department to avoid obnoxious odors and health 
hazards. 

There are no chemicals, yeasts, bacteria, enzymes or other substances capable of eliminating 
or reducing the solids and scum in a septic tank so that periodic cleaning is unnecessary. Contrary to 
some beliefs, the addition of such products is not necessary for the proper functioning of a septic tank 
disposal system and can be harmful to the leaching field. 

Garbage Collection 

The Town of Acton maintains a municipal garbage collection and is based on a once-a-week collec- 
tion. All garbage shall be stored in a place convenient for removal. Garbage collectors are not allowed 
to enter any building, breezeway, garage, etc., to pick up garbage. Rubbish must not be placed in with 
the garbage; garbage cans should be of adequate size and have tight lids. Paper bags, paper wrapping 
or other trash shall not be deposited with edible garbage. Paths and garbage pail areas must be free of 
ice and snow and paths sanded for safe footing. All garbage complaints shall be directed to Mr. Dear- 
born's Enterprise number. To get this number, contact the operator and ask for Enterprise Number 
0364. There is no charge on Enterprise calls. If you do not have satisfaction after contacting Mr. Dear- 
born, call the Board of Health at 263-4736, and we will try to remedy the situation. 

Sanitary Landfill 

The Town of Acton maintains a sanitary landfill for rubbish and trash disposal. It is located on 
Route 2 just West of Hosmer Street, and it is open six days a week from 8:00 a. m. to 3:45 p. m. and 
closed on Sundays and Holidays. (Check schedule posted at entrance for summer hours.) 

Mosquito Control Program 

Mosquito control consisted of one Abate larvicide aerial application in May, and four malathion 
fogging applications for the control of adult mosquitos during the summer. 

Due to the extremely wet spring and summer, we had a tremendous increase in the mosquito pop- 
ulation. According to State entomologists, mosquito eggs that were dormant for up to 12 years hatched 
during the high water period last season. 

The Board of Health hired a Biological Consultant to study the problem of effective mosquito con- 
trol measures that would not degrade the environmental quality of life. The report is forthcoming, and 
we hope to incorporate the suggestions into an effective, ecologically sound control program. 

Day Care Services 

Day Care Centers in Acton are licensed by the Board of Health. They must comply with the Rules 
and Regulations demanded by the State. Each year they are inspected by the Building Inspector, Director, 
and Nurse of the Board of Health before a license is issued. 



55 



Communicable Disease Control Program 

D. T. Booster: Grade 9 - April - 182 children 

Tuberculin Screening: Grade 1 - 233 children; Faculty - 118 

Flu Clinic for the elderly: November - 1st Clinic - 76; 2nd Clinic - 74 

Rubella (German Measles) Vaccine Program: February - 1st Grade - 138 children 

Other Clinics 

Lazy Eye Clinic: September - 22 children referred 
Premature Births: 15 



Communicable Diseases Reported for 1972 



Measles 4 

Salmonella 3 

Syphillis 1 

Amebic Dysentery 1 

Meningitis 1 



Chapter III, Section 111 of the General Laws, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, requires that all 
communicable diseases must be reported to the Board of Health, 263-4736. 



Animal Bites 


43 


Chicken Pox 


39 


German Measles 


2 


Gonorrhea 


3 


Mumps 


2 


Strep 


3 



Permits and Licenses Issued 

Installers Permits 22 

Sewerage Disposal Permits 114 

Food Establishments 14 

Retail Food Establishments 9 

Milk and Cream Licenses 33 

Mobile Food Server Permits 1 

Oleomargarine License 10 

Milk Dealers 6 



Acton Day Care Centers 9 

Offal Transport 1 

Commercial Haulers Permit 6 

Well Permits 21 
Public and Semi-Public 

Swimming Facilities 19 

Sewerage Transporter Permit 4 

Burial or Removal Permits 95 



Public Health Nursing Service 

The presentation of this report is primarily to summarize as concisely as possible the nature and 
availability of the "Acton Public Health Nurses' Services". 

The purpose of the "Home Care Nursing Service" is to meet the challenge of quality nursing which 
provides opportunities for a patient to function at his optimum level of health, within his particular dis- 
ease category, age level, and home environment. 

Acton Public Health Nursing Service has demonstrated the effectiveness of the Public Health Ser- 
vice by: 

Casefinding: Preschool vision program and nursery school inspections 

Preventive Services: Available through immunization programs for communicable diseases - 

1. Diphtheria-Tetanus -Whooping Cough 

2. Influenza vaccine for elderly 

3. Measles vaccine 

4. Polio vaccine 

5. Rubella vaccine 

Direct Services: Carries out nursing skills contributing to treatment and rehabilitation. 

Teaching and Supervision of: Family members of home health aides to provide service 

Follow-up: Postoperative patients, chronic disease patients, high risk groups as premature 
infants 



56 



The goal is to point the way for the establishment of additional services to prove that prevention 
of illness is a wide investment. 

Service Support: Town Taxes, Board of Health 

Third Party Payees: Medicare, Medicaid, Private Insurance Programs 
Individual Fees 

The Future: To increase the use of supportive services: (a) home health aides; (b) physical 
therapy, and (c) social service. 

To continue follow-up of high risk groups: (a) premature infants; (b) the elderly; 
(c) the mentally retarded; and (d) maternal and child care. 

To continue work with other agencies to identify: (a) alcoholism; (b) child abuse; 
(c) drug addiction; and (d) venereal disease. 

To be alert to all health related needs within the community of Acton. 

For further information regarding the Acton Public Health Nursing Service, please call the Acton 
Board of Health at 263-4736. 



Preventive Bedside Nursing Program 



Parkinson's 


53 


Anemia 


39 


Maternal and Child Health 


103 


Arthritis 


140 


Cardio-Vascular Disease 


518 


Cerebral Vascular Disease 


78 


Cancer 


52 


Multiple Sclerosis 


6 


Diabetes 


40 


Injuries 


88 


Other 


2 96 


Total 


1,413 


Total Individuals 


154 


Total Visits 


1,413 



Total Physical Therapy 
Visits - Consultations 

Total Social Worker Visits 
and/ or Consultations 

Total Home Health Aide Visits 



Under 28 days 
28 days to 1 year 
1 year to 4 years 

5 years to 19 years 

20 years 

21 years to 44 years 
45 years to 64 years 

6 5 years and over 



Total 



19 

27 

4 

29 

2 

138 

235 

959 



1,413 



34 
13 



Medicare 
All Others 



$5, 541.21 

3, 092.67 

$8,633.88 



Permits and Dealers 

Total collected - Miscellaneous Items 

Plumbing Permits 

Gas Permits 

Sewerage Permits - New - 114; Repair or Alterations - 38 



$1, 013.00 
4, 233.50 
2, 319.00 
4, 532.00 

$12, 097.50 



On behalf of the Board of Health, we would like to thank the ladies of "Fish", especially Mrs. 
Anne Davis, who have given us a great deal of time and assistance in many situations. The service 
they render by visiting shut-ins, preparing meals and providing transportation has been invaluable 
to us. "Fish" is an outstanding ladies service organization in this community. 



57 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 



Don P. Johnson, Inspector 



As your new Building Inspector, having been 
appointed in late August of this year, I have found the 
last four months to be extremely demanding, though 
equally satisfying. Living in town for five years as a 
private citizen (as I have) gives little insight into the 
workings, obligations, responsibilities and activities 
which must be performed in order that a town might 
function. 

Shortly after assuming my new responsibilities 
I was fortunate to attend a conference of New England 
Building Officials which I found to be very informative. 
Although I have been unable to attend subsequent semi- 
nars due to the work load, I hope to participate in sev- 
eral during the coming year. Conferences of this type 
are conducted on a technical level and primarily involve 
building code and zoning studies and interpretations. 

In addition to building code and zoning regulations, 
this department is now charged with enforcement of the 
new sign bylaw, thereby freeing the Selectmen for more 
important administrative functions. 




Don P. Johnson 



I am presently reviewing policies and procedures with all other applicable departments and boards, 
as they relate to the Building Department, in an attempt to streamline our efforts to provide maximum 
efficiency. 

It is a pleasure to be an employee of the Town of Acton and I pledge my efforts toward the better- 
ment of our community for our children and ourselves. 



A complete list of Building Permits for the year 1972 is below: 

Area Number of Permits 



Residential: Single Dwellings 

Mult i- Family Dwellings 

Additions, Repairs 

Garages 

Porches 

Swimming Pools 

Miscellaneous 

Commercial: Business Buildings 

Total 



Estimated Cost 



Receipts: Fees for Building Permits 



104 


$3,478, 045.00 


10 (129 D. U.) 


1, 646,360.00 


46 


153, 314.00 


6 (+ 1 renewal) 


15, 600.00 


34 


41, 800.00 


17 


87, 245.00 


35 


462, 171.00 


16 


1,344, 562.00 


349 (+ 1 renewal) 


$7, 229, 097.00 




$ 11, 137.25 



CIVIL DEFENSE 

Walter Johnson, Director 

Many citizens believe that Civil Defense is set up only for Nuclear Warfare and Fallout Shelter 
Programs. This is not so. The four major responsibilities of Civil Defense are: 

1. To provide for education about disasters. 

2. To provide means for warning the public in case of approaching disasters. 

3. To provide the basis for the continuity of local government during and after a 
disaster. 

4. To provide skilled manpower, materials, and equipment to alleviate or ease 
after effects. 

Although there have been no major disasters in Acton, on February 19, 1972 our coastal areas 
were declared a disaster area by the Federal Government. At this time 'Acton's Auxiliary Firemen 
volunteered their services. They went immediately to Revere, Massachusetts where they spent long 
hours evacuating endangered families and pumping out homes. They later received an official letter 
of commendation from the Chief of the Revere Fire Department. 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Dorothy Stonecliffe, Chairman 

After years of planning and paperwork, Phases I and II of the Great Hill Project are completed and 
we can now offer 185 additional acres of land for conservation and recreation to the people of Acton. This 
land is located in South Acton and is generally bounded by School Street on the south, Piper Road on the east,' 
Massachusetts Avenue on the north and Main Street on the west. Through the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation,' 
federal and state reimbursements returned to the town on Great Hill are expected to be 75<p on every $1. 00 
spent. 

The Middlesex Soil Conservation Service was asked to develop a resource analysis of all town lands in 
cooperation with the Recreation Commission and the Conservation Commission. Potentials for camping, 
bridal paths, ice skating, skiing, sledding, togogganing, field sports, hiking, nature study, picnicking, 
playground and wild life preservation were the items selected for study. 

Permanent granite markers have been placed on cement to identify the entrances to town land at 
Grassy Pond, Wills Hold, Bulette Road and Great Hill. 

Chemical supplies were purchased for a selected group of supervised chemistry student volunteers 
to do water quality monitoring along selected portions of Acton streams. 

Commissioners volunteered when requested for the recycling program at the Sanitary Landfill 
and presented a program at school during Earth Week. 

Scout Kenneth Dodson earned conservation credits by organizing and leading a group to clear a trail 
to conservation land. 



59 



The Wetlands Protection Act, which combines the Hatch Act and Jones Act into one comprehensive 
piece of legislation for the protection of wetlands, became effective October 16, 1972. There are many 
interesting changes in the' new law which will provide a new impetus in regulation and protection of our 
coastal and inland areas. The most salient change is that the responsibility for wetland protection and 
the legal authority to issue orders of condition now rest with the Conservation Commission. We plan to 
exercise this new responsibility with great care and the cooperation of other town officials and agencies. 

Lack of funds sharply curtailed our land acquisition plans in 1972. A sub -committee of members 
of the Conservation Commission and the Finance Committee was formed to investigate financing alternatives 
for conservation land purchases. A plan for a five year minimum essential acquisition program has been 
discussed. 

This year our 1973 Warrant articles ask your continued support for land acquisition in South Acton 
and West Acton. 

Brewster Conant Peter Jorrens 

Robert Ellis Richard Murphy 

Ragnar Gustafson Chauncey Waldron 



DOG OFFICER 

Patrick Palmer 



My records show that: 

1. 1407 licenses were issued (18 less than in 1971). 600 reminder cards were 
sent out. 

2. 99 dogs were picked up, 60 of which were claimed by their owners, 30 were 
placed in homes, and 9 were destroyed. 

3. 10 dogs were quarantined for biting, and the circumstances investigated. 

4. 43 complaints were registered with this office, most of which concerned 
barking dogs, dogs at schools, and dogs chasing cars and bicycles. All 
of these complaints were investigated and we hope that satisfactory solu- 
tions were found. 



INSECT PEST CONTROL 

Franklin H. Charter, Superintendent 

The Department removed 75 diseased Elms in 1972. Private contractors were used for most of 
this work. The stumps were ground out below ground for greater safety. 

The Gypsy Moth continues to build up in Crested areas. Most of the damage is done in May and 
June and should not be confused with later infestations of Tent Caterpillar or Fall Webworm. 



60 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Thomas J. Barry, Chief 




School Street Barn - December 21, 1972 

The year 1972 brought increases again in the number of all calls particularly building fires and 
their associated losses. A new dimension was added with Arson and Malicious False Alarms. The 
False Alarms started early in the year and reached a peak in September when 18 False Alarms were 
received in a 48 hour period. This continual harassment required the Department to reduce the response 
of apparatus on Box Alarms received from the street. Although arrests were made, the problems have 
continued. 

There were 10 fires directly attributed to Arson. Three buildings were completely destroyed and 
several were heavily damaged. Although the loss in this area was fairly low, the indirect cost due to 
lost services and manpower was tremendous. Not only the cost of the actual firefighting was heavy but 
expenses for investigation, surveillance and extra men on duty raised havoc with our budget. 

The big change in Fire Department operations came in June when we went on full 24 haur opera- 
tions as a result of the adding of nine new men. These men in both the Center and South Stations were 
able to prevent several fires from getting out of hand with their quick response and positive action. We 
hate to think of what this year would have brought without this change. 

Early in December the Insurance Services Office started a complete survey of the Fire Protection 
System in Acton. The survey will terminate in April of 1973 with a final report available in the summer. 
The results of this survey will be used by the Insurance Company to determine the insurance rate for 
property in the Town and it will be used by the Fire Department as a planning guide for future develop- 
ment. 

Fire Prevention 

The Fire Prevention Division was- reorganized in July. In the past it was the responsibility of one 
Officer to coordinate the Fire Prevention activities of the entire Department. After the reorganization, 
the Division was established around a three-man unit working on a part-time basis. Definite responsi- 
bilities in the area of commercial inspections, special hazard inspections,, arson and photography and 
finally school programs were assigned to the Division. In the six months of operation overall improve- 
ment has been shown in all areas and many loose ends were finally tied together. With three major 
shopping centers opening in 1972 and with the Nagog Woods project fully under way, the work load 
increased in all areas of the Division. 



61 



The Present Department Personnel is as follows: 

Permanent Personnel - 1 Chief 

4 Captains 
21 Firefighters 

Call (Part-Time) Personnel - 2 Deputy Chiefs 

2 Lieutenants 
26 Call Firefighters 

Station Coverage with Paid Men - 24 hours per day - Station 1 (Center) - 2 Firefighters 

Station 2 (South) - 2 Firefighters 
Station 3 (West) - 1 Officer 

1 Firefighter 
1 Dispatcher 

Equipment 

Two new pieces of equipment were delivered this year. Engine 5 (Forest Fire Truck) was put 
into service late in October. This is the truck that had been on order since August of 1970. A new 
Chief's Car was delivered and put into service on June 1. 

The contract for the Snorkel-Pumper was signed in August and delivery is expected in April 1973. 

A complete pump replacement was necessary on Engine 6, a 1961 model. The truck normally 
stationed in South Acton was at the factory for 2 months. During this period we had to "borrow" a 
Fire Truck from the Town of Maynard to provide coverage for South Acton. This points out our continued 
lack of reserve or, stand-by apparatus. 

I requested in 1972 that funds be appropriated to add a 750 gallon per minute pump to the new Engine 5, 
to make it available as an additional engine. Needless to say the money was not forth-coming and the 
Engine cannot be used for a back-up. The request has been made again for 1973. 

Program for 1973-74 

The arrival of the 18 month Budget has forced a hard look at Fire Department plans for this 
period. With the realization that the 73 Town Meeting would have to hold until July 1974, careful planning 
had to be carried out in all areas. 

Additional Men Requested 

April 1, 1973 - 3 men to maintain coverage with reduction in work week, 48 hrs. to 42 hrs. 

January 1, 1974 - 4 men to add 1 man to each shift in West Acton. 

Additional Equipment 

750 GPM pump to be installed on Engine 6. 

Due to the forecasted rapid delivery of the Snorkel-Pumper we feel safe in putting off the 
replacement of Engine 1 until after July 74. 

I have nothing to report on progress locating a station in the Great Road area. We are still at 
the same stage as we were in 1970. We expect the results of the Survey being conducted to greatly 
aid in getting this station program off the ground. We have already lost out Target Date of 1975. 
Unfortunately the development of Route 2A has continued on. 

Since 1968 the Town had expended many thousands of dollars in improvements or building the Fire 
Department. Three new pieces of apparatus, full time men and several capital projects were necessary 
to match the growth of the town. A look back through the past five years shows a growth that few towns 
have had to cope with. This growth can be realized with a look at Building Permits issued from 1968 to 
1972. Single residence 635, Apartment Building 101, Multi Units 1353, Commercial Buildings 76. This 
increase in both number of building and the resulting population increase has resulted in 100% increase 
in alarms over the five year period. Although growth is hard to predict, impact of growth is not. Problems 
and solutions have been found in other towns faced with these same facts. We must continue to identify these 
problems and seek the solutions through planning and implementation. This takes time and involvement 



62 



at all levels of Town Government and'must be looked at with a realistic attitude. 

I would like to thank the men of the Fire Department, the Auxiliary Department for the excellent 
cooperation and support. I also wish to thank the several Boards and Town Departments for their 
assistance. 



Total number of alarms responded to. are as follows: 



Residential 

Churches and Schools 

Mercantile 

Manufacturing 

Storage - Garages 

Grass - Brush -Woods 

Miscellaneous 

Vehicle 

False Alarms 

Accidental Alarms and Smoke Scares 

Emergencies 

Investigation 

Special Service 

Mutual Aid Sent 



1971 

31 

1 



9 

2 

49 

48 

44 

11 

28 

77 

107 

88 

16 

511 



1972 

46 

7 

3 

5 

4 

44 

50 

32 

49 

28 

178 

122 

114 

13 

695 



Box Alarms 
Still Alarms 
Deaths by Fire 



Fire Loss 



94 

417 

4 



149 

446 





Building and Contents 

Vehicles 

Miscellaneous 



Assessed Value of Property Involved 

Permits Issued 

Oil and Power Burners 

Blasting 

Liquified Petroleum 

Flammable Liquids 

Miscellaneous 

Monies Collected 

Permits 

Station Rental and Insurance Claims 

Miscellaneous 



$ 42, 


151. 


.46 




$78. 


249. 


,00 


5, 


090. 


00 




9, 


185. 


,00 


67, 


500. 
741. 


00 

46 






-- 




$114, 


$87, 


434. 


,00 


$2, 553, 


260. 


do 

58 
46 
5 
10 
17 


$5, 


585, 


630. 


,00 

75 
49 
14 
11 

44 


$ 99. 


00 




$153. 


,50 




115. 


.00 






65. 


,00 




-- 








332. 


,17 



$214.00 



$550.67 



63 





Fire -Prevention Week Exhibition at 
Conant School - October 1972 



Stolen car is retrieved from Clearview 
Pond - October 1972 



Training 

The Department Training Program was expanded in the areas of on-duty training for the paid men. 
This was accomplished by adding an Institution Drill as well as the combined operations drill carried 
out at the McCarthy -Towne School during the summer months. 

We were fortunate to have our new recruits attend the 6 weeks basic Firefighter's Course at the 
Massachusetts Fire Academy in Stow. This training was accomplished before the men were assigned 
to their stations. Severe cutbacks in State funds have curtailed the Academy thereby' shutting off our 
source of specialized training for both the Paid and Call Departments. It does not look like there will 
be any help in this area for quite some time. 

Fire Alarms 

The Fire Alarm Division had another busy year with the addition of 28 new alarm boxes. Nineteen 
of these boxes were the automatic type connected to building Fire Protection Systems. Other work was 
still carried out, such as line repairs, alarm box testing, subdivision installations, and plan approval 
on new buildings. 

Inspections in association with our Building Code requirements took considerable time and 
reached the point where it has become necessary to use an additional man to inspect just the single 
dwellings. Over 200 inspections were necessary in this area alone. The increased number of alarm 
boxes associated with the Great Road area has forced a redesigning of the circuits in this area. Money 
has been requested for 1973 to carry out these improvements. 

Personnel 



The Department personnel saw many changes during 1972. The addition of 9 full-time men in- 
creased the paid force to 25. Of the new men appointed, 8 came from the Call Force and the others had 
extensive military experience. 

Call Firefighters Henry Soar and Martin Duggan retired after many years of service to the Town. 
These men will be missed for their experience and reliability. 

A survey of out response by Call men and off-duty men showed another drop in the number of men 
responding to alarms. This has become a matter of great concern. We can only rely on adequate man- 
power between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. The rest of the time we are dealing with an un- 
known quantity. 



64 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Norman L. Roche, Acting Chief of Police 




Airplane Crash - 1972 



Adequate police manpower requirements for a specific city or town can only be determined follow- 
ing careful study and analysis of the local stiuation, together with a thorough evaluation of the numerous 
factors which effect police needs. With this in mind, I recommend the addition of six patrolmen to the 
force during the next two years. This would bring our strength up to twenty-seven officers. 

At the present time we are short four men from our allocated strength of twenty-one men due to a 
Federal Court injunction against the Massachusetts Department of Civil Service and to the retirement of 
Chief Collins. Until the Department of Civil Service establishes an eligible list of candidates, the Town 
is unable to employ permanent full time officers for these four vacant positions. 

As the Department is growing to meet the demands of an 
expanding population there is now a need for another level of 
supervision above that of Sargeant as well as a full-time Juven- 
ile/Safety Officer. 



I have recommended in my 1973-74 budget request that 
promotions be made to establish the position of Lieutenant so 
that an improved chain of command could be implemented in 
the Department and detail work delegated. 

On September 30, 1972, Chief Edward J. Collins, Jr. 
retired from the Department after having served over 23 years. 
Chief Collins joined the Acton Police Department on December 
8, 1948 as a patrolman. In November of 1956 he was promoted 
to the rank of Sergeant, and on Octo