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Full text of "Annual report Town of Hollis, New Hampshire"

F 



Town of Hollis 

New Hampshire 

2002 Annual Report 




Town Hall Offices and Hours 



Town Hall 

Deborah Adams, Secretary 

Email townhall@hollis.nh.us 

Cathy Hoffman, Secretary/Receptionist 

Email gis@hollis.nh.us 

Assessing Office 

Connie Eva, Assistant to the Assessor 

Email assessing(g),hollis.nh.us 

Building Inspector 

Richard C. Jones, Building Inspector 

Email building@hollis.nh.us 

Finance Department 

Paul Calabria, Finance Officer 

Email accounting@hollis.nh.us 

Information Technology 

Dawn Desaulniers, IT Specialist 

Email pcsupport(g),hollis.nh.us 

Planning Department 

Virginia MiUs, Assistant Planner 

Email planning@hollis.nh.us 

Selectmen's Office 

Catharine W. Hallsworth, Administrative Assist. 

Email selectmen(a).hollis.nh.us 

Tax Collector 

Barbara Townsend, Tax Collector 

Email tax(g),holIis.nh.us 

Town Clerk 

Nancy Jambard, Town Clerk 



465-2209 
465-3701 Fax 
8 AM to 3 PM 



465-9860 

8 AM to 3 PM 

465-2514 

8 AM to Noon 

Inspections 1-5 PM 

465-6936 

8 AM to 3 PM 

465-2209 

8 AM to 3 PM 

Mon., Wed., Fri. 

465-3446 

8 AM to 3 PM 

465-2780 

8 AM to 3 PM 

(Call for appointment) 

465-7987 

8 AM to 3 PM 

465-2064 

Mon, Wed, Fri 8 to 1 

Monday eve. 7-9 PM 

r' and 3^^^ Tues 

evening 7-9 PM 

V Saturday 8-11 AM 



Visit the Town's World Wide Web page at www.hollis.nh.us 



Annual Report 

for the Town of 

HoUis 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 




Two Thousand Two 

Annual Reports 

of the 

Officers and Committees 

of the Town of 

HOLLIS, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2002 

with Reports of the 

Hollis School District 

and the 

Hollis /Brookline 

Cooperative School District 



DEDICATION 

We are pleased to honor Daniel D. McManus with this dedication of the 2002 Annual 
Town Report. 

After graduating from high school, Dan joined the Marine Corps. He was involved 
in the Korean War and attained the rank of Sergeant before leaving the military. He 
was a member of the Manchester Post 79 Veterans Association. 

Dan became interested in pursuing a career in electrical engineering after training 
and then working on the electrical components of jet planes while in the marines. 
To further this interest he attended Northeastern University where he received both 
his Bachelors and his Masters degrees. He accepted a job with Public Service of 
New Hampshire where he remained until his retirement in 1991. 

The Town of Hollis was most fortunate when Dan and his wife Marie, together 
with their two daughters, Terrie and Karen, built their home on Ranger Road in 
1972. During their first year in Hollis two more daughters joined the McManus 
household. Cheryl and Lisa were born at what was then called Memorial Hospital, 
where Marie worked as a nurse. 

After building their home (doing all of the electrical wiring himself), Dan set out to 
join the community. He was elected to the school board in 1 975 and served (including 
as chairman) on that board for several years. His daughters, students at that time, 
were not sure they appreciated their "Dad" being a member of the school board. 
In the end, all four of the McManus children graduated from the Hollis School 
system. 

Many committees and boards have received the benefit of Dan's presence: 
Hollis School Board 1975-1979 

Planning Board 1979-1986 

Zoning Board 1992-1997 

Budget Committee 1997 

Board of Selectmen 1998-2002 (2001 as Chairman) 

Dan also was involved with the Nashua Regional Planning Commission, the Historic 
District Commission, the Trails Committee, the Highway Safety Committee, the 
Heritage Commission Study Committee and the Hollis 250*7\nniversary Celebration. 
He and fellow Selectman Tom Jambard were instrumental in the rebirth of the 
Hollis Old Home Day Celebration. Dan , working with the VFW and a citizens' 
group, helped to make the "American Flags around the Town Common" a reality. 
We also can not forget his contribution to the community through his active 
membership in the Hollis Brookline Rotary Club. 



-i- 



You might think that it is impossible to do all of these things and still care for a wife 
and family, but to Dan, his loving wife and daughters always came first. He was a 
devoted husband, father and grandfather. 

Dan embodied much that is unique about Hollis. His community spirit, work ethic 
and ability to solve problems, no matter how complex, are legend. His integrity has 
been a guide for us all to emulate. His genial demeanor and kindness touched all 
who knew him. 

For his dedication and devotion to the Town of Hollis, the 2002 Annual Report is 
dedicated to Daniel David McManus, Jr. To those of us who knew him, he will 
always be remembered as "Dan". 




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TABLE OF CONTENTS 

TOWN OF HOLLIS 

Town Offices and Post Office Back Cover 

Dedication 1 

Town Administration, 2002-2003 5 

Selectmen's Report 9 

Warrant, 2003 Official BaUot Items and Elections 11 

Planning Board Sample Ballot 2003 12 

Warrant, 2003 Annual Town Meeting 19 

Budget, 2003 27 

Budget Committee Supplemental Statement 33 

Tax Rate Calculation, 2002 34 

Budget, 2002, Comparative Statement 35 

Town Clerk's Report 37 

Tax Collector's Report 38 

Treasurer's Report 41 

Statement of Bonded Debt 42 

Charles J. Nichols Fund Financial Report 43 

Conservation Fund Comparative Statement 44 

Old Home Day Special Revenue Fund 45 

Ambulance Fee Special Revenue Fund 47 

Forest Maintenance Fund 47 

Heritage Fund 48 

Police Private Details Special Revenue Fund 49 

Zylonis Fund 49 

Trust Funds, Trustees' Report (MS-9) 50 

Capital Reserve Accounts, Trustees' Report (MS-9) 57 

Investments, Trustees' Report (MS-10) 58 

Inventory of Town-Owned Property 59 

Auditor's Report, 2001 Financial Statements 64 

Mollis Social Library 84 

Financial Report 87 

Circulation 88 

Budget Committee 89 

Building Department 90 

Cable Advisory Committee 93 

Cemetery Trustees 95 

Communications Department 97 

Conservation Commission 98 

Department of Public Works 101 



Fire Department 104 

Forest Fire Warden and State Fire Ranger 108 

Heritage Commission 109 

Historic District Commission Ill 

Hollis Facilities Space Needs Smdy Committee 112 

Information Technology 113 

Land Protection Study Committee 114 

Old Home Day 116 

Planning Board 117 

Police Department 120 

Animal Control Department 122 

Recreation Commission 123 

Recreation Fields and Facilities Study Committee 124 

Supervisors of the Checklist 125 

"Windows on Hollis Past" Website 126 

Town Forest Committee 129 

Trails Committee 130 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 131 

Minutes, 2002 Annual Town Meeting 138 

Minutes, 2002 Special Town Meeting 11/20/02 144 

VITAL STATISTICS 

Marriages 148 

Births 149 

Deaths 151 

HOLLIS SCHOOL DISTRICT HOLLIS BROOKLINE 

COOPERATIVE SCHOOL 

Balance Sheet SD-16 DISTRICT 

Budget SD-11 

Financial Report SD-14 Balance Sheet SD-65 

Minutes, Annual Meeting SD-7 Budget SD-60 

Officers SD-3 Class of 2002 SD-76 

Principals' Report SD-21 Financial Report SD-63 

Report of the Business Minutes, Annual Meeting SD-38 

Administrator SD-31 Officers SD-33 

Report of the Director Principal's Report, Mid Sch SD-74 

of Curriculum and Instruction ... SD-26 Principal's Report, High Sch SD-72 

Revenue SD-13 Revenue SD-62 

Special Ed. Director's Report SD-29 Teacher Roster SD-67 

Superintendent's Report SD-25 Warrants SD-34 

Teacher Roster SD-17 

Warrants SD-4 



TOWN ADMINISTRATION 

Town Administration 
March 2002-March 2003 

ELECTED OFFICIALS OF THE TOWN 

Selectmen, Assessors, Overseers of the Poor 

Donald Ryder, Chairman, 2004 Thomas Jambard, 2003 

Richard Walker, Vice Chairman, 2005 Lorin Rydstrom, 2003 
Vahrij Manoukian, Clerk 2005 Daniel McManus, res. 

Staff: Catharine Hallsworth, Administrative Assistant 
Cathy Hoffman, Secretary 

Town Clerk Nancy Jambard, 2005 

Treasurer Edward Lehoullier, 2003 

Moderator James W. Squires, 2004 

Town Budget Committee (Town and Hollis School District Budgets) 

MeHnda Willis, Chairman, 2003 Michael Harris, 2003 

Craig Jones, Vice Chairman, 2004 Scott Bartis, 2005 

Ed McDuffee, 2003 Morton E. Goulder, 2005 

Lorin Rydstrom, Ex-Officio, Selectmen 

Doug Cleveland, School Board Representative 

Staff: Deborah Adams, Secretary 

Hollis /Brooldine Cooperative School District Budget Committee 

Harry Haytayan (HoUis), 2003 Richard Bensinger (HolHs), 2004. 

Raymond VaUe (HoUis), 2003 Forrest Milkowski (Br), 2005 

Doug Cecil (Br), 2004 Tom Enright, School Board 

William Matthews (Hollis), Chairman, 2005 

Library Trustees 

Gordon Russell, Chairman, 2004 J. Howard Bigelow, 2003 

Ann Shedd, 2005 Dorothy Hackett, 2003 

Norma B. Woods, 2005 Marcia Beckett, 2005 

Wendy VaUch, 2004 

Supervisors of the Checklist 

JuHa L. McCoy, 2006 
Lydia L. Schellenberg, 2008 
Jessica "Jan" Squires, 2004 



Trustees of the Trust Funds 

John Eresian, 2003 

F. Warren Coulter, 2004 

Charles Hildreth, 2005 

Trustees of the Cemeteries 

Kathy Albee, Chairman, 2005 

Sharon Howe, 2004 

Nancy Bell, 2003 

Staff: Deborah Adams, Secretary 



Jeffrey Snow, 2005 
Jack Maguire, 2003 



STATE GOVERNMENT 



Governor 
Executive Council 
Senate 
General Court 



Jeanne Shaheen 

David K. Wheeler 

Jane O'Hearn 

Richard B. Drisko 
Carolyn M. Gargasz 



APPOINTED OFFICIALS OF THE TOWN 



Planning Board 

Ed Makepeace, Chairman, 2004 
David Petry, Vice Chairman, 2004 
Teresa Rossetti, 2005 
Don Ryder, Ex Officio 
Susan Leadbetter, res. 
Staff: Virginia Mills, Assistant Planner 
Mark Archambault, NRPC 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 

John Andruszkiewicz, Chairman, 2004 

Richard Walker, 2005 

Mark Johnson, 2005 

Raymond Lindsay (Alt), 2005 

Jim KeUey (Alt), 2004 

Staff: Deborah Adams, Secretary 



Cathy Hoffman, 2003 
Arthur LeBlanc, 2005 
Richard Hardy, 2003 
Doug Tamasanis (Alt), 2005 



Brian Major, Vice Chairman, 2003 
S. Robert Winer (Alt), 2003 
Allan Miller, 2003 
Jim Belanger (Alt), 2005 
Erwin Reijgers (Alt), res. 
Richard Jones, Building Inspector 



'6- 



Historic District Commission/Sign Board 

Miriam Giilitt Winer, Chairman, 2004 James Cram, Vice Chairman, 2005 

Martha Valicenti, res Paul Hemmerich, 2003 

Hugh Mercer, 2005 Daniel McManus, res 

Ed Makepeace, Planning Board Kevin McDonnell res 

Betty Fyfe res Virginia Martin ,Clerk, 2004 

Marilyn Wehrle (Alt), 2004 Liz Barbour (Alt), 2005 

Vahrij Manoukian, Selectmen's Representative 
Staff: Richard Jones, Code Enforcement Officer 
Cathy Hoffman, Secretary 



Heritage Commission 

Sharon Howe, Chairman, 2004 

William Lawrence, deceased 

Robert Leadbetter, Finance Officer, 2003 

Lori Law, (Alt), Clerk, 2003 

Richard Walker, Selectman 



M. Honi Glover, 2005 
Lucy Husk (Alt), 2005 
Jim Cram, HDC 
Jennifer Nelson (Alt), 2005 



Conservation Commission 

Peter Baker, Chairman, 2005 
Richard Brown, Secretary, 2004 
Carl Hills (Alt), 2003 
John Lumbard,(7\lt), 2005 
Kathleen Johnson, res 



Donald Ryder, 2003 

Thomas Dufresne, ViceChr, 2004 

Thomas Davies, Treasurer, 2005 

Lynne Simonfy, 2003 

Susan Durham, 2005 



Cathy Hoffman, Planning Board (non-voting) 
Richard Walker, Selectman (non-voting) 



Recreation Commission 

Gary Valich, Co-Chairman, 2003 

David Golia, Co-Chairman, 2003 

Jonathon Wienslaw, 2005 

Alexis-Ann Bundschuh, 2003 

Vahrij Manoukian, ExOfficio 

Staff: Kevin McDonnell, Program Director 



Martha Dufresne, Clerk, 2003 
Ed McDuffee, res 
Michael Moran, 2004 
Teresa Rosetti (Alt), 2005 



Forest Committee 

Stephen R. Beaulieu, 2004 
George R. "BiU" Burton, 2003 
Steven P Briggs, 2005 



Edward Chamberlain, 2005 
Craig H. Birch, 2003 



Nashua Regional Planning Commission 

Frank Ballou, 2005 
John Eresian, 2004 



-7- 



Building Code Board of Appeals 

Richard Brown, 2004 

Bob Cormier, 2007 

Richard Casale, 2003 

Rick Jones, Building Inspector 



Roger Parsons, 2004 
Paul Hemmerich, 2004 
Donald Smith (Alt.), 2003 



Trails Committee 

Sherry Wyskiel, Chairman, 2003 

Richard KaUn, 2005 

Steve Realmutto 

Art Kinsley (Alt), 2005 

Debee Vecchiarelli, 2005 



Gerry Haley (Alt), 
Greg Larkin (Alt), 2005 
Doug Cleveland, Co-Chr 2004 
Lauren Heiter (Alt), 2003 



Charitable Funds Committee 

Marge Weston, res 
Mary Anne Smith 
Millie Bonati, Chairman 



Debbie Shipman 
Eleanor Whittemore 



Cable Advisory Committee 

Ray VaUe, Chairman, 2003 
Erwin Reijgers, 2004 
Don Ryder, Selectman 
Lukasz Tomczyk, 2003 
Michael Jeynes, 2005 



Allan Miller, 2004 

Carolyn Gargasz, 2005 

Erwin Reijgers, 2004 

Cynthia Rogers-McConney, 2003 



Mollis Land Protection Study Committee 

John Eresian, Chairman, 

Jerry Gartner 

Peter Baker, Clerk 

Roger Saunders 

Tom Jambard, Selectman 



Lorin Rydstrom, res 
Bruce Hardy 
Mort Goulder 
June Litwin 



Town Facilities & Space Needs Study Committee 



Steve Heuchert, NRPC, Chairman 
Jim Cram, Heritage Commission 
George Woodbury 
Eleanor Whittemore 
Susan Leadbetter, res 



Mark Johnson, ZBA 
Paul Hemmerich, HDC 
Chris Dejoie, res 
Ann Conway 
Jim Belanger 



Souhegan Regional Landfill District 

Arthur LeBlanc 
Richard Sneden 



'8- 



DOINGS OF THE SELECTMEN 

Every year allows for the continuation of projects from the previous year and also 
brings new challenges for the Board of Selectmen. This year was no exception. 

The Town of Hollis became a pioneer at the 2001 Annual Meeting. It was the first 
time in New Hampshire's history that a Warrant Article was brought before the 
voters of the Town of Hollis for the purpose of raising and appropriating Two 
Million Dollars through the issuance of bonds for the purchase of land or other 
property interest therein for the protection of the natural heritage and rural character. 
In 2002 HoUis continued it's pioneering tradition and brought a warrant article before 
the voters for 3.5 Million Dollars for the same purpose. Out of the original Two 
Million, $707,000 was spent for 21 acres along the western shore of Dunklee Pond 
and the developmental rights on 39 acres of farmland in south Hollis. On November 
20, 2002 a Special Town Meeting was held. At this meeting the voters approved 
$470,000 for the purchase of 46 acres in northern Hollis along Nevins Road and 
also approved $740,000 for the purchase of an interest in up to 50 acres of land 
surrounding the southern shore of Parker Pond. The details of these purchases are 
currently being studied. A similar Warrant Article is being proposed for this year, 
2003, in the amount of Five Million Dollars. 

During 2002 the Board of Selectmen also supported the Hollis Conservation 
Commission's purchase of a Conservation Easement on property off South 
Merrimack Road in northern Hollis consisting of 125 acres. Contributing to this 
purchase was money from a Department of Environmental Services Water Supply 
Grant as well as funds from the Hollis Conservation Commission. 

The revaluation process has been completed. Property owners saw the value of 
their property increase to reflect the true market value. There were many questions 
and concerns about the values and we continue to address each one individually. We 
recognized immediately property owners, qualified for an elderly exemption, were 
experiencing a large increase in their property tax, even after the present deductions 
were taken into consideration This placed a severe hardship on this population. The 
Board met on a number of occasions and reviewed the levels of deductions, income 
limits and asset limits of surrounding towns and cities. This year we encouraged 
each qualified elderly property owners to apply for an abatement on their 2002 
taxes. We have subsequendy written a warrant article (#5) and stress the urgency in 
its support. We extend a heartfelt thank you to all property owners for your patience 
during this revaluation process. 

The next phase of sidewalk construction, occurring along Main Street from Cavalier 
Court north to the Farley Building, has been started with engineering studies, with 



construction being proposed to start in 2003. This project is supported with 80% 
of Federal money. 

Each year changes occur among the personnel. The biggest change was the absence 
of Daniel McManus from the Board of Selectmen. He served as the chairman until 
the elections in mid-March, but due to health reasons had to take a leave of absence. 
He realized he would be unable to return to the Board in a full capacity and regretfully 
resigned his position in August. After interviews, the Board appointed Lorin Rydstrom 
to fill the vacancy for the remainder of this year. We also miss the guidance of Eric 
Demas who left the position of Finance Officer to take a position at Melanson 
Heath and Co. After an extensive search and many interviews, Paul Calabria was 
hired to take this position. Dave McMullen left the position of Assessor to work in 
the City of Claremont and Connie Cain was promoted to Assistant Assessor. The 
outside assessing firm, Assessment Associates, Inc. has been contracted to work 
with her on all assessing matters. Richard Melvin and Joan D'Esopo were replacement 
hires for the DPW; Daniel Gorman was hired for the new firefighter position, Tracy 
Dunne was a replacement hire for the Police Department and Jayne Belanger replaced 
the former Animal Control Officer. We welcome you all. 

While acting as Chairman, Dan McManus began a project to fly our American flags 
around the Town Common on appropriate national holidays. He worked with the 
Veterans of Foreign Wars and Public Service of New Hampshire to allow for the 
flags to be flown from the utility poles surrounding the Town Center. Although he 
did not live to see his project in full glory, we ask each of you to remember Dan 
when you see these flags flying proudly. 

There are many other activities accomplished by the Board of Selectmen during 
this past year. Many of these activities could not have been done without the support 
and active involvement of many volunteers throughout the community. The Board 
extends a heartfelt thank you to all that have assisted or helped to complete the 
many tasks during this past year; for the many hours of dedication to make our 
town a better place to live. 

To aU who serve - THANK YOU! 

Board of Selectmen 

Donald Ryder, Chairman, 

Richard Walker, Vice Chairman 

Vahrij Manoukian, Clerk 

Thomas Jambard 

Daniel McManus, Resigned 

Lorin Rydstrom 



10- 



2003 Town Warrant - Elections 

THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

THE POLLS WILL BE OPEN FROM 7:00 AM TO 7:00 PM 
Tuesday, March 11, 2003 

To the Inhabitants of the Town of Hollis in the County of Hillsborough in said 
State, qualified to vote in Town Affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Wahers Auditorium in the Hollis 
Brookline Middle School at 25 Main Street on Tuesday, March 11, 2003, betiPeen the 
hours of 7:00 AM and 7:00 PM . to act on the following subjects: 

1. To choose all necessary Town Officers for the year ensuing. 

2. To conduct other business by official ballot. 

Given under our hands and seal, this 19*^ day of February, year two thousand 
three. 

Board of Selectmen, Town of Hollis 

Donald Ryder, Chairman 

Richard Walker, Vice Chairman 

Thomas Jambard 

Vahrij Manoukian 

Lorin Rydstrom 



A true copy of the Warrant ^Attest: 



Board of Selectmen, Town of Hollis 

Donald Ryder, Chairman 

Richard Walker, Vice Chairman 

Thomas Jambard 

Vahrij Manoukian 

Lorin Rydstrom 



■11- 



PLANNING BOARD SAMPLE BALLOT 2003 

AMENDMENTS TO THE MOLLIS ZONING ORDINANCE 



AMENDMENT (1) ARE YOU IN FAVOR OF ADOPTION OF 

AMENDMENT (1) AS PROPOSED BY THE PLANNING BOARD FOR 
THE TOWN OF HOLLIS ZONING ORDINANCE AS FOLLOWS: 

Amend Section X: Zoning Districts - A.4.h, B.2.i, C.3.g, E.3.g, F3.g, G3.g, 
H.4.g, I.4.g, J.4.g by adding a reference to the definition of building area in the 
dimensional requirement sections for each zoning district. 
BUILDING AREA: No lot shall be subdivided unless it contains a 
compliant building area as described in Section VIIL6 (Definitions) of 
the HoUis Zoning Ordinance. (Insert and renumber section accordingly.) 
(The purpose of this amendment is to spell out the requirement for a 
compliant building area in the area and height requirements for each zoning 
district.) 

YES D NO D 

AMENDMENT (2) ARE YOU IN FAVOR OF ADOPTION OF 

AMENDMENT (2) AS PROPOSED BY THE PLANNING BOARD FOR 
THE TOWN OF HOLLIS ZONING ORDINANCE AS FOLLOWS: 

Amend Section XI.C: Wetiand Conservation Overlay Zone (WCO). Section 
\. PURPOSE: Add additional item j. Preventing those uses that could 
harm or degrade the wetland buffer, the wetlands, or surface waters. 
Section 7. PROHIBITED USES WITHIN THE WETLAND 
CONSERVATION OVERLAY ZONE. Sec. 7.a (v) Delete: Oiliei land uses 
llial puse a paitimlai lliieaL Lu wedauds and suiface waLeis including buL nuL 
lirniled Lu : Replace with: Any land use that harms or degrades the 
wetlands buffer, the wetland or surface waters, including but not 
limited to: Add two additional buUeted items: *Storage or disposal of 
animal waste or byproducts and *Trails, paths, tracks, or other ways, if 
the traffic caused by these uses compacts and erodes soils in the 
w^etlands buffer or the wetlands. (The purpose of this amendment is to 
broaden the scope of prohibited land uses that harm or degrade the wetiand 
buffer and/ or wetiands.) 

YES n NO n 



12- 



AMENDMENT (3) ARE YOU IN FAVOR OF ADOPTION 

OF AMENDMENT (3) AS PROPOSED BY THE PLANNING BOARD 
FOR THE TOWN OF HOLLIS ZONING ORDINANCE AS FOLLOWS: 

Amend Section VIII: DEFINITIONS to include: 

OPEN SPACE: Any area of essentially unimproved land designated 
on a plan as reserved for public or private use. 

IMPROVED LAND: Land that is occupied by a principal or accessory 
structure, utilities, roads or driveways suitable for automobiles, or other 
manmade improvements, including impervious surfaces, related to 
occupation of the land for habitation or commercial uses. 
UNIMPROVED LAND. Land that has not been developed with a 
principal building or other structures, utilities, roads or driveways 
suitable for automobiles, or other manmade improvements, including 
impervious surfaces, related to occupation of the land for habitation or 
commercial uses. (Insert and renumber accordingly.) (The purpose of 
this amendment is to provide definitions for terms used in various sections 
of the Ordinance.) 

YES D NO n 

AMENDMENT (4) ARE YOU IN FAVOR OF ADOPTION OF 

AMENDMENT (4) AS PROPOSED BY THE PLANNING BOARD FOR 
THE TOWN OF HOLLIS ZONING ORDINANCE AS FOLLOWS: 

Amend Section IX.J HOLUS OPEN SPACE PLANNED 
DEl'ULOPMENT, 5.d. Open Space Requirements. Add new item (i). 
(i) Open space, as defined in Section VIII of the Hollis Zoning 
Ordinance, shall have a shape, dimension, character and 
location suitable to assure its use for park, recreation, 
conservation or agricultural purposes. In determining 
whether the intent of this section has been satisfied, the 
Planning Board shall consider the extent to which land having 
one or more of the following characteristics is included in the 
proposed open space: 

• Preservation of land for the town greenway system as 

described in the Hollis Master Plan 

• Preservation and utilization of areas designated as prime 

agricultural soils as mapped by the NRCS (Natural 
Resources Conservation Service) in their latest report 

• Preservation and utilization of active farmland or orchards 



'13- 



• Preservation of large tracts of interconnected woodlands, 

wetlands, or other wildlife habitat, or preservation of open 
lands that connect to protected land in adjacent parcel(s). 

• Provision of active and/or passive outdoor recreational 

areas 

• Protection of land along scenic roads and highways 

• Protection of existing trail networks on land on which new 

trails will be developed as part of the HOSPD for 
integration into an existing trail network. 

(Insert and reletter remaining sections.) 

(The purpose of this amendment is to add language to insure that the open 

space in Hollis Open Space Planned Developments will be useable for park, 

recreation, conservation or agricultural purposes.) 

YES n NO n 

AMENDMENT (5) ARE YOU IN FAVOR OF ADOPTION OF 

AMENDMENT (5) AS PROPOSED BY THE PLANNING BOARD FOR 
THE TOWN OF HOLLIS ZONING ORDINANCE AS FOLLOWS: 

Amend Section XI.A: AQUIFER PROTECTION OVERLAY ZONE 
(APO) Delete existing INTENT section and replace as follows: INTENT: 
By the authority granted in New Hampshire RSA 674:16-17 and 674:20, 
the Aquifer Protection Overlay Zone is intended to protect, preserve 
and maintain existing and potential groundwater supply and 
groundwater recharge area of known aquifers, as delineated by the 
United States Geological Survey (as identified on the HoUis stratified 
drift aquifer map available in the Planning Department) thereby 
assuring the proper use of natural resources and thus protecting public 
health, safety and general welfare of the people in the Town of Hollis 
from adverse development, land uses, practices and activities which 
might result in their depletion or contamination. Additional purposes 
of the APO Zone include, but are not Umited to: 

a) assuring adequate private and pubUc drinking water supply 

b) assuring the hydrologic integrity of surface waters and wetlands 

c) protecting in-stream habitat for fish and wildUfe 

d) reducing the effects of non-point source pollution 

e) Umiting the development of structures and land uses which 

contribute to the pollution of groundwater by sewage and 
hazardous substances 
£) encouraging those uses that can be safely and appropriately located 
in the APO Zone 



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g) assuring adequate water supply for domestic, agricultural, 

commercial and industrial uses 
h) assuring adequate water supply for recreational uses 

The standards used in the Aquifer Protection Overlay Zone reflect the 
recommendations of the Town of HoUis Master Plan, 1998, the Town 
of HoUis Water Resources Management Plan, 1989, and the 
recommendations of the Town of Mollis Conservation Commission 
Water Resources Subcommittee. The Aquifer Protection Overlay Zone 
is a zoning overlay district, which imposes additional requirements and 
restrictions to those of the underlying district zoning. In all cases the 
more restrictive requirement(s) shall apply. 
Add new Section 2 (and renumber remaining section) as follows: 
DEFINITIONS: For purposes of the Aquifer Protection Overlay 
Zone, the following definitions shall apply: 

a. Groundwater: Subsurface water that occurs beneath the water table 

in soils and geologic formations. 

b. Surface Water: Those waters which have standing or flowing water 

at or on the surface of the ground. This includes but is not 
limited to, rivers, streams, lakes, ponds and tidal waters. 

c. Water Related Resources: A natural resource that is dependent on 

water, such as fish, amphibians and plants. 

d. Wetland: Areas as defined in Section VIII of the HoUis Zoning 

Ordinance 
Section 4. PERFORMANCE STANDARDS IN THE AQUIFER 
PROTECTION OVERLAY ZONE. Section a. Add or as amended 2i{ttr 
each resource document. Section c. Amend as follows: The Planning Board 
may require that the applicant provide data or reports prepared by a 
professional engineer or qualified groundwater consultant, hydrologist, or 
fisheries biologist to assess any potential damage to the aquifer that may 
result from the proposed use. When assessing impacts, the following 
may be required: 

(i) Preliminary water resource and water related resource use and 

inventory 
(ii) Estimation and verification of effects of the activity. Based 

upon the potential for impacts, monitoring shall be conducted 
to verify worst-case conditions (i.e. low flow summer 
conditions, maximum impact). Monitoring may have a range 
of sampUng designs, including but not Umited to single 
season evaluation or pre and post implementation evaluation, 
(iii) Final water resources and water related resources and uses 
inventory 



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(iv) Description of the impacts to water resources and water 
related resources used and inventory. 
(The purpose of this amendment is to better protect water resources and 
water-related resources. Changes include an expanded Intent section, 
addition of a Definitions section, and expansion of the Performance 
Standards section to specify what additional studies may be required.) 

YES D NO D 

AMENDMENT (6) ARE YOU IN FAVOR OF ADOPTION OF 

AMENDMENT (6) AS PROPOSED BY THE PLANNING BOARD FOR 
THE TOWN OF HOLLIS ZONING ORDINANCE AS FOLLOWS: 

Add new section HOLLIS RUIML SCENIC CHARACTER AND 
RURAL ENVIRONMENT CHARACTER PRESERVATION 
ORDINANCE. (The purpose of this section is to enact a new ordinance 
which provides a mechanism to identify areas within the Town of Hollis that 
are characterized by ridge lines, meadows, streams, farms, forests, wildlife 
habitats, greenways and other unique environmental characteristics, scenic 
beauty and rural charm and to insure that if these areas are presented as the 
subject of a major development proposal that the Planning Board will be 
able to require such steps as are reasonably available to protect and preserve 
the Town's unique visual character. The ordinance requires that development 
be carried out in the most visually unobtrusive and environmentally sound 
manner, while permitting landowners to exercise their property rights. The 
ordinance applies to designated properties (list is available at the Hollis Town 
Hall), hillside areas with slopes greater than 15%, and areas which have been 
clearcut over the last 1 years. The underlying use and dimensional standards 
of the zoning ordinance are not being changed; however, the Planning Board 
is empowered to modify dimensional standards through the granting of 
waivers in order to achieve the objectives of this ordinance. The ordinance 
provides specific standards for development in subject areas, however, such 
standards can be flexibly applied by the Planning Board in order to achieve 
the objectives of the ordinance.) 

YES D NO D 

AMENDMENT (7) ARE YOU IN FAVOR OF ADOPTION OF 

AMENDMENT (7) AS PROPOSED BY THE PLANNING BOARD FOR 
THE TOWN OF HOLLIS ZONING ORDINANCE AS FOLLOWS: 

Amend Section X.A.2. OTHER RELATED PERMITTED USES IN THE 
AGRICULTURAL AND BUSINESS ZONE: Delete a. Home ucLupaUuiis 
as defined and desciibed in Sec don IX.M . Add new section 3. SPECIAL 



■16- 



EXCEPTIONS IN THE AGRICUITURAL AND BUSINESS ZONE. 

a. Home occupations as defined and described in Section IX.M and b. 
Accessory dwelling units according to Section IX.O. (Renumber section 
accordingly.) Section X.D.3. SPECIAL EXCEPTIONS IN THE MOBILE 
HOME-1 ZONE. Add new item b. Home occupations according to 
Section IX.M. Section X.E.I. PERMITTED USES IN THE MOBILE 
HOME-2 ZONE. Delete i. lluirie uLCupalions ■ aLCUidiiig Lu Secliuii IX.N . 
Section X.E.2 SPECIAL EXCEPTIONS IN THE MOBILE HOME-2 
ZONE: Add new item 1. Home occupations according to Section IX.M. 
Section X.F.I PERMITTED USES IN THE RECREATIONAL ZONE: 
Delete g. Home occupations aLcuidiiig Lo scclion IX.N . and i. Accessoiy 
dwelling uiiils aLLuidiiig Lu SecLiuii IX.P . Section X.F.2. SPECIAL 
EXCEPHONS IN THE RECREATIONAL ZONE: Add new item c. 
Home occupations according to Section IX.M and new item d. 
Accessory dwelling units according to Section IX.O. Section X.G.I. 
PERMITTED USES IN THE RESIDENTIAL AND AGRICULTURAL 
DISTRICT: Delete i. lluuie uccupaUuiib ULcuiding Lo Section IX.N. and 
item k. Accessoiy dwelling unlLs accoiding Lo Section IX.P . Section X.G.2. 
SPECIAL EXCEPHONS IN THE RESIDENTIAL AND 
AGRICULTURAL DISTRICT: Add new item 1. Home occupadons 
according to Section IX.M. and new item m. Accessory dwelling units 
according to Secdon IX.O. Section X.H.2. ACCESSORY USES IN THE 
RURAL LANDS ZONE: Delete b. Home occupations, accoiding Lo 
Section IX.N . and d. Accessoiy dwelling unlLs accoiding Lo Section IX.P . 
Section X. H.3. SPECIAL EXCEPTIONS IN THE RURAL LANDS 
ZONE: Add new item h. Home occupations according to Section IX.M. 
and new item i. Accessory dwelling units according to Section IX.O. 
Section X.I.2. ACCESSORY USES IN THE TOWN CENTEK Delete b. 
Home occupations accoiding Lo Section IX.N . and d. Accessoiy dwelling 
uiiiLs accoiding Lo Section BtP. Section X.I.3. SPECIAL EXCEPTIONS IN 
THE TOWN CENTEK Add new item k. Home occupations according 
to Section IX.M. and new item 1. Accessory dwelling units according to 
Section IX.O. Section X.J.2. ACCESSORY USES IN THE WATER 
SUPPLY CONSERVAHON ZONE. Delete b. Home occupations 
accoiding Lo Section IX.N . Section X.K.3. SPECIAL EXCEPTIONS IN 
THE WATER SUPPLY CONSERVAHON ZONE: Add new item b. 
Home occupations according to Section IX.M. and new item c. 
Accessory dwelling units according to Section IX.O. 



-17- 



(The purpose of this "housekeeping" amendment is to revise the listing of 
Home Occupations and Accessory Dwelling Units in the various zoning 
districts as being permitted by Special Exception rather than Permitted Uses 
or Accessory Uses, Home Occupations and Accessory Dwelling Units had 
previously been erroneously listed as Permitted Uses or Accessory Uses, and 
this amendment corrects that error. A Special Exception is required for any 
and all Home Occupations and Accessory Dwelling Units.) 

YES D NO n 



■18- 



2003 Town Warrant 

THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Annual Meeting, Town of Hollis 

Wednesday, March 12, 2003 

7:00 PM, Hollis/Brookline Middle School Walters Auditorium 

To the Inhabitants of the Town of HoUis in the County of Hillsborough in said 
State, qualified to vote in Town Affairs, 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Walters Auditorium in the Hollis Brookline 
Middle School at 25 Main Street on Tuesday. March 11, 2003, between the hours 

of 7:00 AM and 7:00 PM . for the purposes of choosing town officers elected by 
an official ballot and other action required to be inserted on said official ballot 

and, further, 
to meet at the Walters Auditorium in the HoUis Brookline Middle School of 25 
Main Street in Said Hollis on the next day, Wednesday, March 12, 2003 at 7:00 
PM, for the second session of the town meeting for the transaction of all other 
town business, specifically to act on the following subjects: 

Article 1. Official Reports. To hear reports of Selectmen and other Town 

Officers and Committees. 

Article 2. Bond for Land Acquisition. To see if the Town wiU vote to 

raise and appropriate Five Million Dollars ($5,000,000) (Gross Budget) for the 
purchase, of land or other property interests therein, as the Selectmen deem 
appropriate for the protection of the natural heritage and rural character in the best 
interest of the Town, including any buildings or structures incidental to such land; 
and to authorize the issuance of not more than Five MilUon Dollars ($5,000,000) of 
bonds, in accordance with the provisions of the Municipal Finance Act, (RSA 33:1 
et seq. . as amended), and, further, to authorize the Selectmen to issue, negotiate, sell 
and deliver said bonds and to determine the rate of interest thereon and the maturity 
and other terms thereof, and to take any other action they deem appropriate to 
effecmate the sale and/or issuance of said bonds, subject, however, to the following 
limitations: 

• No such bonds shall be issued earlier than July 1, 2003; and, 

• Any of such bonds shall have appropriate terms and maturities such that 
no principal or interest payments shall become due and payable prior to 
January 1, 2004; and, 

• No such bonds shall be issued with a term of maturity of less than fifteen 
(15) years. 



19- 



PROVIDED, FURTHER, that the Selectmen SHALL NOT ISSUE SUCH 

BONDS until such time as they have presented to either an annual or special town 
meeting, a warrant article asking the meeting to ratify, by a simple majority vote, the 
particular parcel and the parcel ownership interest chosen by the Selectmen for 
purchase and said meeting has approved such warrant article. BY SELECTMEN. 

• Recommended by Selectmen 

• Recommended by Budget Committee 

(This is a Special Warrant Article and is intended to be non-lapsing as to any 
purchase that has been ratified by a regular or special town meeting held 
prior to December 31, 2003. Pursuant to RSA 33:8 a supermajority of two- 
thirds (2/3) ballot vote is required to adopt this article). 

Article 3. Collective Bargaining Agreement Cost Items. To see if the 

Town will vote to approve the cost items included in the collective bargaining 
agreement reached between the town and AFSCME Local 3657 (Police, Fire and 
Communications employees), which calls for the following increases in salaries and 
benefits: 

YEAR ESTIMATED INCREASE 

2003 $ 29,064 

2004 $ 38,999 

2005 $ 28,079 

and further to raise and appropriate the sum of Twenty Nine Thousand Sixty Four 
Dollars ($29,064) for the current fiscal year, such sum representing the additional 
costs attributable to the increase in salaries and benefits over those of the appropriate 
at current staffing levels paid in the prior fiscal year. BY SELECTMEN. 

• Recommended by Selectmen 

• Not Recommended by Budget Committee 

Article 4. Optional Special Town Meeting. To see if the Town will under 

the provisions of RSA 31:5, III, if Article 3 is defeated, authorize the governing 
body to call one special meeting, at its option, to address Article 3 cost items only. 
BY SELECTMEN. 

Article 5. Modification of Optional Adjusted Elderly Exemptions. To 

see if the town will vote, pursuant to RSA 72:43-h, to modify optional adjusted 
elderly exemptions from property tax. The optional exemptions, based on assessed 
value, for qualified taxpayers shall be as follows: for a person 65 years of age up to 
75 years, $125,000; for a person 75 years of age up to 80 years, $150,000; for a 
person 80 years of age or older, $175,000. To qualify the person must have been a 
New Hampshire resident for at least 5 years; own the real estate individually or 



-20- 



jointly, or if the real estate is owned by the spouse, they must have been married for 
at least 5 years. In addition, the taxpayer must have a net annual income of less that 
$30,000 or, if married, a combined net annual income of less than $40,000; and own 
net assets not in excess of $100,000, excluding the value of the person's residence, 
including minimum acreage required by ordinance. (Pursuant to RSA 72:39-b a 
simple majority by ballot vote is required to adopt this article.) 
BY SELECTMEN 

• Recommended by Selectmen 

• Recommended by Budget Committee 

Article 6. Two New Positions of Firefighter. To see if the town will 

vote to raise and appropriate Seventy Three Thousand Two Hundred Dollars 
($73,200) for the purpose of hiring two new full time Firefighter employees, including 
estimated benefit expenses for the remainder of the calendar year 2003. BY 
SELECTMEN 

• Recommended by Selectmen 

• Not Recommended by Budget Committee 



Article 7. One New Position of Communications Dispatcher. To see 

if the town will vote to raise and appropriate Thirty Two Thousand Dollars ($32,000) 
for the purpose of hiring one new full time Communications Dispatcher employee, 
including estimated benefit expenses for the remainder of the calendar year 2003. 
BY SELECTMEN 

• Recommended by Selectmen 

• Recommended by Budget Committee 

Article 8. Weigh Scales Purchase. To see if the town will vote to raise 

and appropriate Eighty Thousand Dollars ($80,000) for the purchase and construction 
of scales to weigh vehicles before and after dumping construction materials at the 
Stump Dump for the Department of PubHc Works. BY SELECTMEN 

• Recommended by Selectmen 

• Not Recommended by Budget Committee 

Article 9. Birch Hill Tower Antennas for the Town of Hollis. To see if 

the town will vote to raise and appropriate Forty Six Thousand Dollars ($46,000) 
for the purchase, construction and installation of antennas and related equipment 
for the Police, Fire and Communications Departments at the location known as 
Birch Hill Tower. BY SELECTMEN 

• Recommended by Selectmen 

• Recommended by Budget Committee 



-21- 



Article 10. Expansion of Recreation Fields. To see if the town will vote 

to raise and appropriate Two Hundred Sixty Thousand Dollars ($260,000) for the 
purpose of expanding recreations fields and parking on land known as Nichols 
Field and the Hardy Land. This will be a non-lapsing appropriation per RSA 32:7, 
VI and will not lapse until the project is completed or by December 31, 2004, 
whichever is sooner. BY SELECTMEN. 

• Recommended by Selectmen 

• Recommended by Budget Committee 

Article 11. Engineering Studies for Town Buildings. To see if the town 

will vote to raise and appropriate Eight Thousand Dollars ($8,000) for the purpose 
of engineering studies for the fire station expansion. BY SELECTMEN 

• Recommended by Selectmen 

• Recommended by Budget Committee 

Article 12. Beautification of Memorial Park. To see if the Town will vote to 
raise and appropriate Twelve Thousand Dollars ($12,000) for the purpose of 
renovating Memorial Park on Broad Street. BY SELECTMEN. 

• Recommended by Selectmen 

• Recommended by Budget Committee 

Article 13. Major Highway Equipment Capital Reserve. To see if the 

Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Forty Five Thousand Dollars 
($45,000) to be placed in the Major Highway Equipment Capital Reserve fund 
established for this purpose at the 2002 annual meeting. BY SELECTMEN. 

• Recommended by Selectmen 

• Not Recommended by Budget Committee 

Article 14. Major Fire Equipment Capital Reserve. To see of the Town 

will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Hundred Twenty Five Thousand 
Dollars ($125,000) to be placed in the Major Fire Equipment Capital Reserve fund 
established for this purpose at the 2002 annual meeting. BY SELECTMEN. 

• Recommended by Selectmen 

• Not Recommended by Budget Committee 

Article 15. Compensated Absences Payable Trust Fund. To see if the 

Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000) 
to be added to the Compensated Absences Payable Expendable Trust Fund 
established at the 2002 Annual Town Meeting. BY SELECTMEN. 

• Recommended by Selectmen 

• Recommended by Budget Committee 



-22- 



Article 16. Ambulance Fee Fund Appropriation. To see if the town will 

vote to appropriate Fifty Thousand Dollars ($50,000) for the purpose of funding 
ambulance services and equipment, and to authorize the withdrawal from the 
Ambulance Fee Special Revenue Fund established for this purpose at the 2000 annual 
meeting. None of this money is to come from general taxation. BY SELECTMEN. 

• Recommended by Selectmen 

• Recommended by Budget Committee 

Article 17. Old Home Day Fund Appropriation. To see if the town will 

vote to appropriate Thirty Thousand Dollars ($30,000) for the purpose of funding 
the annual Old Home Day celebration, and to authorize the withdrawal from the 
Old Home Day Special Revenue Fund established for this purpose at the 1999 
annual meeting. None of this money is to come from general taxation. BY 
SELECTMEN. 

• Recommended by Selectmen 

• Recommended by Budget Committee 

Article 18. Police Private Details Fund Appropriation. To see if the Town 

will vote to appropriate One Hundred Thousand Dollars ($100,000) for the purpose 
of funding police private details and to authorize the withdrawal from the Police 
Private Details Special Revenue Fund established for this purpose at the 2001 annual 
meeting. None of this money is to come from general taxation. BY SELECTMEN. 

• Recommended by Selectmen 

• Recommended by Budget Committee 

Article 19. Support of LCHIP. To see if the Town will vote to send the 

following resolution to the New Hampshire General Court: Resolved, in its first 
two years of operation the Land and Community Heritage Investment Program has 
helped communities throughout New Hampshire preserve their natural, cultural 
and historic resources and, therefore, the State of New Hampshire should maintain 
funding for LCHIP in it next biennial budget. BY SELECTMEN 

Article 20. Support of Regional Water Acquisition. To see whether the 

Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into a joint agreement, 
pursuant to RSA 53-A, or other available enabling authority, with such other 
municipalities as have joined in a Memorandum of Understanding, (including any 
additional municipalities that may be added pursuant to the terms of said 
Memorandum of Understanding), on such terms and conditions as the Selectmen 
deem fit, the purpose of which agreement shall be to join with said municipalities in 
an effort to collectively acquire the assets or the stock of the Pennichuck Corporation, 
or its successors, to the extent permitted by law. There will be no impact on the 
municipal budget or property tax rate as the result of this warrant article. This 
warrant article requires a simple majority vote for passage. BY SELECTMEN. 



-23- 



Article 21. BY PETITION: Designation of Baxter Road a "scenic 

road". To designate Baxter Road of Hollis, NH a "scenic road" according to RSA 
231:157-158 and to add it to the Town of Hollis, NH "scenic road" list according to 
RSA 231:157. 

Article 22. BY PETITION: The Health Care for New Hampshire 

Resolution. 

Whereas, New Hampshire residents pay the 12''' highest costs of insurance 

in the country; and 

Whereas, the cost of health insurance premiums for families has increased 

by 45% over the past three years; and 

Whereas, 100,000 New Hampshire residents have no health coverage 

and 77% of them have a full-time worker at home; and 

Whereas, due to these rising cost almost half of New Hampshire's small 

businesses cannot afford health coverage for their employees, therefore be 

it resolved 

That we, the citizens of HOLLIS, New Hampshire, call on our elected officials 
from all levels of government, and those seeking office, to work with consumers, 
businesses and health care providers to ensure that: 

■ Everyone, including the self-employed, unemployed, un - and underinsured, 
and small business owners has access to an affordable basic health plan 
similar to what federal employees receive; 

■ Everyone, including employers, consumers, and the state, local and federal 
government makes a responsible and fair contribution to finance the health 
care system; 

■ Everyone receives high quality care that is cost efficient and medically 
effective; and 

■ That these efforts help control the skyrocketing cost of health care. 

The above language represents a resolution signed by the required number of 
HOLLIS registered voters. We request that this be placed on the 2003 Warrant for 
town consideration. The resolution is non-binding and represents no fiscal impact. 

Article 23. Operating Budget. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

appropriate the sum of Four Million Three Hundred Eighty Three Thousand Nine 
Hundred Thirty Three DoUars($4,383,933) which represents the operating budget 
of the Town for the year 2003. Said sum does not include special or individual 
articles addressed. BY SELECTMEN. 

• Recommended by Selectmen 

• Recommended by Budget Committee 



-24- 



Given under our hands and seal, this 1 9* day of February, in the year of our Lord 
two thousand three. 

Board of Selectmen, Town of Hollis 

Donald Ryder, Chairman 

Richard Walker, Vice Chairman 

Thomas Jambard 

Vahrij Manoukian 

Lorin Rydstrom 

A true copy of the Warrant— Attest: 

Board of Selectmen, Town of Hollis 

Donald Ryder, Chairman 

Richard Walker, Vice Chairman 

Thomas Jambard 

Vahrij Manoukian 

Lorin Rydstrom 



-25- 



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-32- 



BUDGET COMMITTEE SUPPLEMENTAL SCHEDULE 
MUNICIPAL BUDGET ACT 

(RSA 32:18, 19, and 21) 
Fiscal Year Ending December 2002 



1. Total RECOMMENDED by Budget 
Committee 



A 


B 


C 
DIFFER- 




AMOUNT 


ENCE 


RECOM- 


VOTED 


(Col. B 


MENDED 


(Complete) 


minus 


AMOUNT 


at meeting 


Col. A) 


$9,978,432 







LESS EXCLUSIONS: 

2. Principle: Long-Term Bonds & Notes 

3. Interest: Long-Term Bonds & Notes 

4. Capital Oudays Funded from Long- 
Term Bonds & Notes per RSA 33:8 & 
33:7-b 

5. Mandatory Assessments 

6. TOTAL EXCLUSIONS (Sum of rows 
2-5) 

7. AMOUNT RECOMMENDED LESS 

RECOMMENDED EXCLUSION 
AMOUNTS (Line 1 less Line 6) 

8. Line 7 dmes 10% 

9. MAX. ALLOWABLE APPR. PRIOR 
TO VOTE (Line 1 + 8) 

10. Collective Bargaining Cost Items, RSA. 
32:19 &273-A:l, IV, 
RECOMMENDED AND VOTED 
Complete Col. A prior to meeting and 
(Col. B and Col. C at meeting) 

1 1 . Mandatory Water & Waste Treatment. 
FaciHties (RSA 32:21). 

RECOMMENDED & VOTED 
(Complete Col. A prior to meeting & 
Col. B and Col. C at meeting) 
MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE 
APPROPRIATIONS VOTED 
(At meeting, add Col. A, Line 9 + 
Col. C, Line 10, and Col. C in Line 
11. Note: Add Col. C amounts only 
if positive. 



$25,000 
$12,500 



$5,355,000 

$0 

$5,392,500 



$4,938,196 
$493,820 

$10,824,516 



$0 



$0 



-33- 



2002 TAX RATE CALCULATION 

Town of Hollis 

DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE ADMINISTRATION 

Municipal Services Division, Concord, NH 03302-1122 
Town Portion Rates 



Appropriations 


8,479,344 






Less: Revenues 


6,628,705 






Less: Shared Revenues 


11,395 






Add: Overlay 


500,515 






War Service Credits 


35,200 






Net Town Appropriation 




2,374,959 




Special Adjustment 









Approved Town Tax Effort 






2,374,959 


Municipal Tax Rate 






2.56 


School Portion 








Net Local School Budget 




7,276,150 




Regional School Apportionment 




6,986,162 




Less: Adequate Education Grant 




(1,307,949) 




State Education Taxes 




(4,386,486) 




Approved School Tax Effort 






8,567,877 


Local Education Tax Rate 






9.19 


State Education Taxes 








Equalized Valuation (no utilities) x 




5.80 




756,290,642 






4,386,486 


Divide by Local Assessed Valuation 






4.73 


(no utiUties) 926,743,032 








Excess State Education Taxes 








to be Remitted to State 









County Portion 








Due to County 




1,303,935 




Less: Shared Revenues 




(5,160) 




Approved County Tax Effort 






1,298,775 


County Tax Rate 






1.39 


Combined Tax Rate 






17.87 


Total Property Taxes Assessed 






16,628,097 


Less: War Service Credits 






(35,200) 


Add: Village District Commitment(s) 









Total Property Tax Commitment 






16,592,897 


PROOF OF RATE 




Net Assessed Valuation 


Tax Rate 


Assessment 


State Education Tax 926,743,032 


4.73 


4,386,486 


All Other Taxes 931,857,132 


13.14 


12,241,611 








16,628,097 



-34- 



TOWN BUDGET, 2002 

Comparative Statement of Appropriations and Expenditures for 
Year Ending December 31, 2002 



EXPE]\L>lTUKt:S 


BUDGET 


EXPENDI- 
TURES 


UNEXR 
BALANCE 


OVER- 




DRAFT 


general government 










Executive 


$277,004 


$199,299 


$77,705 




Town Clerk/Elections & Registr. 


$66,821 


$73,083 




-$6,262 


Financial Administration 


$191,768 


$174,978 


$16,790 




Legal Expenses 


$35,000 


$34,115 


$885 




Employee Benefits 


$611,671 


$536,241 


$75,430 




Planning & Zoning 


$126,108 


$116,792 


$9,316 




Town Buildings and Grounds 


$171,044 


$119,291 


$51,753 




Cemeteries 


$29,051 


$14,123 


$14,928 




Liability Insurance 


$96,949 


$76,706 


$20,243 




Municipal Association 


$5,305 


$5,305 






Information Systems 


$34,802 


$34,561 


$241 




Subtotal 


$1,645,523 


$1,384,494 


$261,029 




public SAFEIY 










PoUce 


$572,829 


$613,662 




-$40,833 


Fire & Ambulance 


$423,745 


$348,485 


$75,260 




Communications 


$234,664 


$235,958 




-$1,294 


Building & Septic Inspection 


$71,504 


$73,629 




-$2,125 


Emergency Management 


$800 


$668 


$132 




Subtotal 


$1,303,542 


$1,272,402 


$31,140 




HIGHWAYS AND STREETS 










Highway Administration & Roads 


$818,178 


$786,033 


$32,145 




Street Lighting 


$16,520 


$14,678 


$1,842 




Subtotal 


$834,698 


$800,711 


$33,987 




SANITATION 










Solid Waste Collection 


$148,641 


$120,674 


$27,967 




SoUd Waste Disposal 


$265,922 


$265,922 






Subtotal 


$414,563 


$386,596 


$27,967 




HEALTH & WELFARE 










Admin. & Pest Control 


$11,352 


$8,478 


$2,874 




Health Agencies and Hospitals 


$18,950 


$18,950 






Direct Assistance 


$7,900 


$9,180 




-$1,280 


Subtotal 


$38,202 


$36,608 


$1,594 




CULTURE & RECREATION 










Parks and Recreation 


$74,481 


$75,798 




-$1,317 


Library 


$165,524 


$165,524 






Patriotic Purposes 


$7,750 


$7,500 


$250 




Subtotal 


$247,755 


$248,822 




-$1,067 


CONSERVATION 










Conservation Comnmission 


$9,500 


$9,500 






DEBT SERVICE 










P/Long Term Bonds and Notes 


$25,000 


$25,000 






I/Long Term Bonds and Notes 


$12,288 


$12,288 






I/Short Term Notes 


$14,000 


$21,756 




-$7,756 


Bond Issuance Costs 


$25,000 


$0 


$25,000 





'35- 



Subtotal 




$76,288 


$59,044 


$17,244 




CAPITAL OUTLAY 




$3,661,037 


$1,347,622 


$2,313,415 




Capital Reserve 




$180,000 


$180,000 






TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 


$8,411,108 


$5,725,799 


$2,685,309 




REVENUES 




BUDGETED 


ACIUAL 


BUDGET 


BUDGET 






REVENUE 


REVENUE 


DEFICIT 


EXCESS 


TAXES 












Land Use Change Tax 




$74,475 


$315,338 




$240,863 


Yield Tax 




$20,000 


$25,416 




$5,416 


Interest and Costs 




$79,000 


$82,627 




$3,627 


Excavation Tax 




$240 


$114 


$126 




Excavation Activity Tax 




$0 


$0 






Subtotal 




$173,715 


$423,495 




$249,780 


LICENSES AND PERMITS 










Motor Vehicle 




$1,000,000 


$1,415,333 




$415,333 


Building & Septic 




$50,025 


$81,842 




$31,817 


Other Licenses, Permits, 


&Fees 


$21,650 


$29,239 




$7,589 


Subtotal 




$1,071,675 


$1,526,414 




$454,739 



STATE/FEDERAL 
REVENUES 

Federal FEMA 
Shared Revenue 
Meals & Rooms Tax 
Highway Block Grant 
State/Federal Grants 
Forest/Railroad Tax 
Subtotal 

TOWN DEPARTMENTS 

OTHER SERVICE CHARGES 

SALE OF MUNICIPAL PROP 

INTEREST INCOME 

OTHER MISC. REVENUES 

CAPITAL RESERVE W/D 

TRUST & AGENCY FUNDS 

TOTAL REVENUES 



$0 


$2,113 


$34,308 


$50,571 


$182,794 


$205,564 


$164,241 


$132,968 


$0 


$0 


$91 


$91 


$381,434 


$391,307 


$132,008 


$167,154 


$25,000 


$31,799 


$500 


$500 


$185,000 


$91,277 


$0 


$2,180 


$0 


$0 


$5,025 


$6,448 


$1,974,357 


$2,640,574 



$31,273 



$93,723 



$2,113 
$16,263 

$22,770 



$9,873 

$35,146 

$6,799 



$2,180 

$1,423 
$666,217 



-36- 



TOWN CLERK 
JANUARY 1, 2002 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2002 

DOG LICENSES 

Received for: 

1,452 Dog Licenses $10.044.50 

Total $10,044.50 

37 Dog Fines @ $25.00 S925.00 

Total $10,969.50 

Paid to Edward Lehoullier, Treasurer $10,969.50 



AUTOMOBILE PERMITS 

Received for 9,496 Automobile registrations $1,415,332.50 

Paid to Edward Lehoullier, Treasurer $1,415,332.50 



MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTIONS 

Received for Local & State Filing Fees Filing Fees $20.00 

Received for 62 Marriage Licenses for State @ $38.00 $2,356.00 

Received for 91 DC-MC-BC for State @ $8.00 $728.00 

Received for 12 DC-MC-BC for State @ $5.00 $60.00 

Received for Boat Permits $2,325.34 

Received for 16 Bounced Check Fines @ $25.00 $400.00 

Received for Mail-in Postage $7,129.00 

Received for Tides, UCC, Dredge & Fill Permits, Etc S6.176.00 

Total $19,194.34 

Paid to Edward Lehoullier, Treasurer $19,194.34 



Nancy Beal Jambard 
Town Clerk 



-57- 



TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT 

MS-61 
DEBITS 

Uncollected Taxes — Prior Levies 

Beginning of Year: 2002 2001 2000 

Property Taxes XXXXXX 667,727.78 

Land Use Change Taxes XXXXXX 19,990.00 

Yield Taxes XXXXXX 2,899.86 171.41 

Excavation Tax XXXXXX 

Excavation Activity Tax XXXXXX 

Taxes Committed This Year 

Property Taxes 16,651,949.00 

Land Use Change Taxes 437,013.00 
Yield Taxes 25,416.56 

Excavation Tax 114.00 

Excavation Activity Tax 

Other 

O/P Property Taxes 

O/P Land Use Change 

O/P Yield Taxes 

Interest — Late Taxes 50,239.36 

Penalties 2,321.37 

TOTAL DEBITS 17,167,052.73 690,617.64 171.41 



-38- 



CREDITS 

Remitted to Prior Levies 

Treasurer 2002 2001 2000 

Property Taxes 15,940,599.69 507,675.21 

Land Use Change Taxes 269,423.00 

Yield Taxes 24,660.91 1,208.53 

Excavation Tax 114.00 

Penalties 2,321.37 

Interest 50,239.36 

Costs 

Conversion to Lien(principal only) 155,987.57 

ABATEMENTS MADE 

Property Taxes 64,682.00 4,065.00 

Land Use Change Taxes 6,000.00 
Yield Taxes 20.18 692.98 

Current Levy Deeded 

UNCOLLECTED TAXES— END OF YEAR 

Property Taxes 646,677.31 

Land Use Change Taxes 161,590.00 19,990.00 

Yield Taxes 734.91 998.35 171.41 

Excavation Tax 

Excavation Activity Tax 

TOTAL CREDITS 17,167,052.73 690,617.64 171.41 



-39' 



Redemptions 

Debits 

Prior Levies 

2001 2000 1999 1998 

Unredeemed Liens-Beg. of Yr. 86,429.11 42,930.51 2,315.95 

Liens Executed During Year 168,725.01 

Interest & Costs CoUected 2,994.72 10,022.55 13,510.91 103.86 

445.50 380.00 584.82 23.50 

TOTAL DEBITS 172,165.23 96,831.66 57,026.24 2,443.31 



Credits 

REMITTED TO Prior Levies 

Treasurer 2001 2000 1999 1998 

Redemptions 78,632.61 49,820.05 42,930.51 2,315.95 

Interest & Costs Collected 2,994.72 10,022.55 13,510.91 103.86 

445.50 380.00 584.82 23.50 

Abatements of Unredeemed Taxes 

Liens deeded to Municipality 

Unredeemed Liens Bal EOY 90,092.40 36,609.06 



TOTAL CREDITS 172,165.23 96,831.66 57,026.24 2,443.31 



Respectfully Submitted, 
Barbara C. Townsend 
Tax Collector 



■40- 



TREASURER'S REPORT TO THE TOWN OF HOLLIS 

February 5, 2003 

The balance of cash and cash equivalents for the Town of Hollis General Fund as 
of December 31, 2002 was $8,050,086 which compares to $8,676,417 for the year 
ending December 31, 2001. Interest on overnight and other short-term cash 
investments produced income of $93,723.32, which compares to $208,428.24 earned 
in 2001 and $299,419.86 earned in 2000. 

During 2002, the Town purchased from the Tax Collector $155,988 in delinquent 
taxes and accruals, up $13,218 from $142,770 in 2001. At December 31, 2002, the 
amount of unpaid taxes was $646,667, $90,092 and $36,609 for the years 2002, 2001 
and 2000 respectively. (See the Tax Collector's Report for more details.) 

For the ninth year in a row, the Town incurred no short-term borrowing costs 
associated with the issuance of Tax Anticipation Notes. 

Delinquent Taxes Purchased 
From the Tax Collector 

2002 $155,988 

2001 $142,770 

2000 $174,251 

1999 $143,492 

Delinquent Taxes outstanding for year-end 2002 

2002 2001 2000 



2002 


646,667 


— 


— 


2001 


90,092 


667,728 


— 


2000 


36,609 


86,429 


527,006 


1999 


— 


42,931 


79,278 


1998 


— 


2,316 


44,042 



Total 773,368 799,404 650,326 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Edward Lehoullier, Treasurer 



-41- 



STATEMENT OF BONDED DEBT 
TOWN OF HOLLIS, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

As of December 31, 2002 
ANNUAL MATURITIES OF OUTSTANDING DEBT 



I. Police Station Bonds 

(General Obligation Bonds) 
Issue Date:: 1987 

Initial Indebtedness $535,000 

Interest Rate: Variable 



Amortization Schedule 





Maturity 


Year of Maturity 


Amount* 


2003 


$25,000 


2004 


$25,000 


2005 


$25,000 


2006 


$25,000 


2007 


$25,000 


Balance Due at 




12/31/02 


$125,000 



II. open Land Purchase 

(Bond Anticipation Notes) 
Issue Date: 2002 

Initial Indebtedness $707,000 

Interest Rate 2.1% 



Amortization Schedule 



Year of Maturity 

2003 



Maturity 
Amount* 

$707,000 



Balance Due at 

12/31/02 



$707,000 



*exclusive of interest 



-42- 



CHARLES J. NICHOLS FUND 

Financial Report 2001 

The present members on the Governing Committee of the Nichols Fund, 
established in 1985 and amended May 10, 1989 consists of: Steve Luce, Town of 
Hollis Recreation Commission; Shirley Cohen, Beaver Brook Association; Richard 
R. Husk, Charles J. Nichols Fund; Cheryl Beaudry, Louise King, Representatives at 
large; and Richard Walker, Selectmen's Representative. 

MONEY MARKET ACCOUNT 

Beginning Balance 12/31/01 $11,000.99 

Receipts: 

Interest Earned $90.67 

Nichols Trust Payments $8,1 74.02 

Gift— Private Donation $3,558.39 

$11,823.08 

Payments: 

Button's Lawn Care ($13,115.00) 

Checkbooks ($12.17) 

($13,127.17) 

Ending Balance 12/31/02 $9,696.90 

PASSBOOK ACCOUNT 

Beginning Balance 12/31/01 $48,157.19 

Interest Earned $451.37 

Ending Balance 12/31/02 $48,608.56 



43- 



CONSERVATION FUND 

Statements of Revenues, Expenditures, and Changes in Fund Balance 
For the fiscal years ended December 31, 2002 and 2001 

2002 2001 



REVENUES 






Pool Interest Income 


$6,341 


$8,772 


Bank Interest Income 


$1,754 


$1,791 


Preferred Account Interest Income 


%— 


$14 


Land Use Change Tax 


$315,337 


$118,225 


Town Appropriation 


$— 


$7,500 


Grants 


$106,838 


$— 


Donations 


$— 


$— 


Forest View Greenway 


$— 


$— 


Total Revenues 


$430,270 


$136,302 


EXPENDITURES 






Non-LMnd 






Supplies and Equipment 


$558 


$ 


Postage 


$12 


$— 


Dues and Publications 


$647 


$353 


Public Notices 


$— 


$— 


Seminars 


$100 


$150 


Educational Materials 


$— 


$— 


NHACC Annual Meeting 


$— 


$— 


Maps and Mapping 


$2,518 


$820 


Bank Charges 


-$10 


$10 


Other 


$125 


$ 


LmhcI 






Legal Fees 


$19,063 


$640 


Surveys 


$14,385 


$— 


Appraisals 


$1,000 


$7,098 


Studies 


$— 


$— 


Land Acquisition 


$150,000 


$— 


Total Expenditures 


$188,398 


$9,071 



Excess (deficiency) of Revenues 

over (under) Expenditures $241,872 $127,231 

Fund Balance, January 1 $453,786 $326,555 

Fund Balance, December 31 $695,658 $453,786 



OLD HOME DAY SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 

Statements of Revenues, Expenditures, and Changes in Fund Balance 
For the fiscal years ended December 31, 2002 and 2001 



REVENUES 


2002 


2001 


Town Appropriation 


%— 


$— 


Donations 


$4,036 


$3,754 


Vendors 


$1,922 


$1,230 


Buttons for Balloon Rides 


$— 


$1,035 


BBQ Tickets 


$4,937 


$4,951 


Balloon Rides 


$75 


$600 


T-Shirts 


$1,949 


$1,524 


Concession Rides 


$2,038 


$2,157 


Calendar 2000 


$ 


$— 


Daily Interest 


$75 


$175 


Sale of Merchandise 


$70 


$120 


Silent Auction 


$1,533 


$1,291 


Bike Raffle 


$— 


$36 


T-BaU Ride 


$373 


$ 


Sponsorship 


$— 


$675 


Miscellaneous 


$7,775 


$22 


Total Revenues 


$24,783 


$17,569 


EXPENDITURES 






T-Shirts 


$1,854 


$1,934 


Printing 


$472 


$823 


Postage 


$423 


$560 


Signs /Banners 


$168 


$8 


Chicken Barbeque 


$2,072 


$2,141 


Entertainment (Music) 


$850 


$850 


Fireworks 


$7,500 


$7,500 


Rentals 


$3,187 


$2,522 


Sound System 


$1,125 


$370 


Police Details 


$1,512 


$745 


DPW Hours 


$1,387 


$915 


Entertainment (Performers) 


$125 


$1,350 


Balloon Rides 


$— 


$— 


Silent Auction 


$— 


$12 


Parade 


$1,450 


$2,000 


Demonstrators 


$940 


$800 


Miscellaneous 


$393 


$415 



-45- 



Total Expenditures 


$23,457 


$22,944 


Excess (deficiency) of Revenues 






over (under) Expenditures 


$1,326 


$(5,375) 


Fund Balance, January 1 


$9,882 


$15,257 


Fund Balance, December 31 


$11,208 


$9,882 



-46- 



AMBULANCE FEE SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 

Statements of Revenues, Expenditures, and Changes in Fund Balance 
For the fiscal years ended December 31, 2002 and 2001 



REVENUES 


2002 


2001 


Insurance Billing 


$73,538 


$88,654 


Interest Income 


$569 


$578 


Trust Income 


$566 


$— 


Total Revenues 


$74,673 


$89,231 


EXPENDITURES 






Ambulance purchase 


$— 


$— 


Ambulance expendable supplies 


$25,489 


$18,887 


Ambulance training 


$2,521 


$4,107 


Ambulance Services 


$23,104 


$12,006 


Total Expenditures 


$51,114 


$35,000 



Excess (deficiency) of Revenues $23,559 $54,231 

over (under) Expenditures 

Fund Balance, January 1 $54,826 $45,81 1 

Fund Balance, December 31 $78,385 $100,042 

FOREST MAINTENANCE FUND 

Statements of Revenues, Expenditures, and Changes in Fund Balance 
For the fiscal years ended December 31, 2002 and 2001 



REVENUES 


2002 


2001 


Proceeds from Town Forest 


$— 


$10,217 


Interest Income 


$160 


$192 


Total Revenues 


$160 


$10,409 


EXPENDITURES 






Current 


$60 


$— 


Total Expenditures 


$60 


$— 



Excess (deficiency) of Revenues $100 $10,409 
over (under) Expenditures 

Fund Balance, January 1 $25,510 $15,101 

Fund Balance, December 31 $25,610 $25,510 



-47- 



HERITAGE FUND 

Statements of Revenues, Expenditures, and Changes in Fund Balance 
For the fiscal years ended December 31, 2002 and 2001 



REVENUES 


2002 


2001 


Donations 


$5,330 


$— 


Interest Income 


$58 


$73 


Town Appropriation 


$4,602 


$3,500 


Proceeds from Old Home Day 


$— 


$55 


Misc. Merchandise Sales 


$15 


$56 


Total Revenues 


$10,004 


$3,684 


EXPENDITURES 






Trailer Purchase 






Public Awareness 


$— 


$500 


Supplies 


$165 


$245 


Conferences & Seminars 


$140 


$30 


OHD Registration 


$332 


$320 


Dues & Publications 


$215 


$165 


Equipment 


$— 


$53 


Miscellaneous Lawrence Barn 


$1611 


$100 


Miscellaneous 


$— 


$77 


Total Expenditures 


$2,463 


$1,489 



Excess (deficiency) of Revenues $7,541 $2,195 
over (under) Expenditures 

Fund Balance, January 1 $6,388 $4,193 

Fund Balance, December 31 $13,929 $6,388 



-48' 



POLICE PRIVATE DETAILS SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 

Statements of Revenues, Expenditures, and Changes in Fund Balance 
For the fiscal years ended December 31, 2002 and 2001 

REVENUES 

Police Detail Income 
Bank Interest Income 
Total Revenues 

EXPENDITURES 

Police Details 
Miscellaneous 
Total Expenditures 

Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over $1,943 $11,583 

(under) Expenditures 

Fund Balance, January 1 $9,099 $— 

Fund Balance, December 31 $11,042 $9,099 

ZYLONIS FUND 

Statements of Revenues, Expenditures, and Changes in Fund Balance 
For the fiscal years ended December 31, 2002 and 2001 



2002 


2001 


$25,921 


$84,722 


$130 


$259 


$26,051 


$84,981 


$24,108 


$73,398 


$— 


$— 


$24,108 


$73,398 



REVENUES 


2002 


2001 


Trust Income 


$1,707 


$2,655 


Bank Interest Income 


$13 


$42 


Total Revenues 


$1,720 


$2,698 


EXPENDITURES 






Bank Fees 


$— 


$12 


Airfare to Lithuania 


$— 


$4,648 


Teaching Supplies 


$— 


$— 


Shipping 


$— 


$— 


Computer/ Accessories 


$— 


$— 


Scholarship 


$3,000 


$2,000 


Miscellaneous 


$— 


$— 


Total Expenditures 


$3,000 


$6,660 


Excess (deficiency) of Revenues over 


($1,280) 


($3,962) 


(under) Expenditures 






Fund Balance, January 1 


$3,255 


$7,217 


Fund Balance, December 31 


$1,975 


$3,255 



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-58- 



INVENTORY OF PROPERTY 
OWNED BY THE TOWN OF HOLLIS 

MAP-LOT-SUBLOT LOCATION ACRES 

RECORDED OWNER: TOWN OF HOLLIS 

000-000 MAIN STREET GRAVEYARD 0.00 

001-009-010 IRON WORKS LANE 0.44 

001-009-020 IRON WORKS LANE 1.86 

001-032 LAWRENCE LN & WORCESTER RD 4.00 

002-010 NISSITISSITT RIVER 5.00 

003-014 DEER RUN RD - SUBLOT D-5-5 1.92 

004-050-A TWISS LN FIRE POND 0.42 

004-077 CLINTON DR - CUL DE SAC 0.37 

005-020 RT 1 1 1 FACING NASHUA RIVER 21 .06 

006-002 WEST HOLLIS RD - WEST SIDE 0.90 

006-009 WEST HOLLIS RD/BROOKLINE LINE 6.83 

006-022 CONSERVATION AREA 3.51 

008-024 BLACK OAK DR-OPEN SPACE 3.38 

008-034 BALDWIN LN - CUL DE SAC 0.58 

008-034-001 50' STRIP BALDWIN/BLACK OAK 0.00 

008-078 DOW & DEPOT RD-HALL (development rts) 20.25 

009-004 FIELDSTONE DR - OPEN LAND 11.84 

009-029-01 A JEWETT LN - SCHOOL DIST LOT 7 0.25 

009-068 DEPOT RD SMITH LT 6.41 

009-069 SO SIDE DEPOT RD 4.86 

010-002 RUNNELLS BRIDGE 1.34 

010-003 RUNNELLS BRIDGE RD 0.46 

010-018 NASHUA RIVER 40.70 

010-034 NASHUA RIVER LOT 4.62 

013-017 MAIN ST - CEMETERY 1.17 

013-032-001 MERRILL LN 1.73 

013-034 DEPOT RD 3.36 

013-035 ORCHARD DR PARCEL A 3.26 

013-036 ORCHARD DR - OPEN SPACE NORTH 1.68 

013-064 DOW & DEPOT RD (development rts) 18.75 

014-076 S/S HIDEOUT RD 11.89 

014-077 RIDEOUT RD/NASHUA RIVER 23.51 

014-099 FRENCH MILL & WRIGHT RDS 1.21 

015-001 NASHUA RIVER 10.90 

015-015 SUMNER LN - FLINT BROOK 23.24 

015-021-010 CUMMINGS LANE 25.3 

015-029 HANNAH DR 35.18 

015-040 HANNAH DR CUL-DE-SAC/FIRE PD 4.07 



■59- 



INVENTORY OF PROPERTY 
OWNED BY THE TOWN OF MOLLIS 

MAP-LOT-SUBLOT LOCATION ACRES 

01 5-044 HANNAH DR - PLAYGROUND 1 .50 

015-061 HILLSIDE DR 1.05 

016-003 ROCKY POND RD - BROOI<a.INE LINE 6.92 

017-013-002 ROCKY POND ROAD 6.53 

017-015-001 PROCTOR HILL RD 2.02 

018-013 42 DEPOT RD 9.01 

018-014 WEST SIDE DEPOT RD 27.00 

018-015 DEPOT RD 1.60 

019-023 FLINT POND DR - BOWMAN LAND 31.50 

019-028 W/B FLINT BROOK S/O BROAD ST 14.70 

019-041 HIDEAWAY LN 0.85 

019-058 W SIDE HIDEAWAY LN-HUSSEY PD 2.80 

020-006 SUMNER LN - HUSSAY 2.00 

020-017 BROAD ST-FLINT BK WRIGHT/GILSN 43.39 

020-048 CUMMINGS RD 0.43 

022-031 ROCKY POND MILL LOT 1 1 .50 

022-032 ROCKY POND RD 8.00 

022-053-A WEST END ROCKY POND RD 0.71 

023-026 A ROCKY POND RD 0.11 

023-036 N/O ROCKY POND RD 0.00 

023-037 NO OF ROCKY POND RD 0.00 

023-040-001 ROCKY POND RD 0.66 

023-055 POUND RD & SPAULDING-SCHL ROW 1.54 

023-08 A-000 DEACON LN 0.12 

023-12A-000 ROCKY POND RD - FUTURE ACCESS 0.12 

024-031 WHEELER RD 5.89 

025-035 STRIP OFF CAMERON DR 0.29 

025-040 TOWN FIREPOND/PARK 1.48 

025-051 CRESTWOODDR-LOT15 5.94 

025-058-009 PINE HILL ROAD 0.18 

026-029 LOUISE DR - LOT 6 2.38 

026-032 LOUISE DR - FORMER CUL-DE-SAC 0.00 

028-029 FOREST VIEW DR - LOT 20 4.23 

028-035 HAYDEN RD - FOREST VIEW DR 20.1 1 

029-006 W FEDERAL HILL RD 4.50 

029-014 HAYDEN RD 49.90 

029-017 OPEN LAND FOREST VIEW DR 8.63 

029-026 FOREST VIEW DR - CUL DE SAC 0.72 



-60- 



INVENTORY OF PROPERTY 
OWNED BY THE TOWN OF HOLLIS 



MAP-LOT-SUBLOT LOCATION 



ACRES 



029-031 

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031-021 

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032-037-001 

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E/O HAYDEN RD 0.00 

E/O HAYDEN RD 29.86 

NORTH OF ROCKY POND RD 0.00 

BAXTER RD 11.70 

BAXTER RD - CUL DE SAC 0.72 

PINE HILL ROAD 4.48 

MENDELSSOHN DR - FIREPOND 0.69 

PART SWETT COREY LOT E SIDE 19.50 

226 FEDERAL HILL RD 2.43 

FEDERAL HILL RD 0.79 

FEDERAL HILL RD 14.30 

SILVER LAKE - OPEN SPACE 3.64 

DUNKLEE PL 8.50 

SILVER LAKE ROAD 21 .38 

HARDY LN 1.37 

HARDY LN - WINDMILL LOT 10.00 

STEARNS LOT/PARKER PD BROOK 29.20 

17 FARLEY RD 1.06 

NARTOFF RD - CEMETt^RY 1.49 

TODDY BROOK RD 4.83 

TODDY BROOK RD - CUL DE SAC 0.00 

SILVER LAKE RD 2.31 

SILVER LAKE RD - CEMETARY 5.37 

E/S MOOAR HILL RD - FIRE POND 0.20 

E SIDE MOOAR HILL RD 1 .00 

SARGENT RD - FUTURE ACCESS 0.20 

MOOAR HILL RD - CUL DE SAC 0.75 

MARION DR - CUL DE SAC 0.46 

15 MARION DR 1.16 

FORRENCE DR - FIREPOND 1.93 
FARLEY RD - CLARK WHEELER LAND 47.60 

FARLEY RD/MUDDY BROOK 1.40 

6 LAUREL HILL RD 0.20 

CUL-DE-SAC FOX DEN RD 0.02 

LAUREL HILL RD 2.96 

WITCHES SPRING RD - CAVE LAND 8.47 

ALSUN DR - CUL DE SAC 0.58 



■61- 



INVENTORY OF PROPERTY 
OWNED BY THE TOWN OF HOLLIS 



MAP-LOT-SUBLOT LOCATION 



ACRES 



046-050 

047-014 

047-041 

049-003 

050-012 

050-021-001 

050-024 

052-027 

052-036 

052-037 

052-050 

052-051 

052-054 

054-016 

055-010 

055-014 

056-013 

056-017 

057-005 

058-018 

059-032 

888.67 



E/S MOOAR HILL RD 3.37 

ALSUN DR PARK 3.74 

WITCHES SPRING RD 13.60 

WITCHES BROOK AREA 5.00 

7 MONUMENT SQ - TOWN HALL 0.52 

MONUMENT SQ - TOWN COMMON 0.41 

POLICE STATION 0.13 

9 SILVER LAKE RD 2.74 

10 GLENICE DR - FIREHOUSE 2.12 
OLD TOWN SHED 0.50 
MONUMENT SQ 1.13 
MONUMENT SQ - LIBRARY 0.84 
MONUMENT SQUARE - GRAVEYARD 0.81 
156 BROAD ST 8.00 
47 ROCKY POND RD 3.05 
OFF ROCKY POND RD-SCHOOL WELL 0.15 
10 MUZZEY RD - HIGHWAY GARAGE 3.35 
SILVER LAKE RD - WATERHOLE 3.84 
SPRINGVALE DR 0.72 
END OF STAT ROW ON POND 0.25 
WINDING VALLEY RD 0.75 
134 Parcels. Total Acres 



002-009 
014-070 
014-071 
014-072 
015-003 
017-022 
017-023 
019-029 
023-022 
023-056 
026-018 
026-019 



Recorded Owner: HolHs Conservation 
Commission 

PARKER AND WITCHER MEADOW 

FRENCH MILL RD 

E SIDE WRIGHT RD 

WEST OF RIDEOUT RD 

NASHUA RIVER 

RTF 130 

RTF 130 

WRIGHT RD - FLINT BROOK 

ROCKY POND RD 

EAST OF ROCKY POND RD 

N 170 PINE HILL RD 

N PINE HILL RD 



10.00 

6.32 

19.22 

22.00 

11.00 

0.75 

3.00 

6.84 

13.28 

7.53 

3.70 

5.00 



-62- 



INVENTORY OF PROPERTY 
OWNED BY THE TOWN OF HOLLIS 



Recorded Otvner: HoUis Conservation 
Commission 
MAP-LOT-SUBLOT LOCATION 



ACRES 



031-068 
042-035 
042-073 
047-054 
047-057 
049-004 
054-034 
054-035 
055-005 
055-008 
055-009 

368.30 



NARTOFF RD 7.50 

MOOAR HILL 4.00 

GARDNER LAND (development rts) 125.00 

PENNICHUCK LAND 32.00 

OFF OAKWOOD DR 29.00 

SANDERSON WITCHES BROOK 2.43 

FLINT POND DR & BROAD ST 0.33 

BROAD ST 4.00 

WINDING VALLEY RD 2.90 

ROCKY POND RD - C B SPAULDING 47.50 

SPAULDING SAND PIT 5.00 
23 Parcels. Total Acres 



030-013 
036-027 
041-010 
041-011 
041-012 
041-024 

403.90 



Recorded Owner: HoUis Town Forest 

N OF WHEELER RD - DUNCKLEE 17.00 

DUNKXEEPL 311.00 

ROGERS LOT - DICKERMAN 18.25 

HAYDEN RD - WORCESTER LOT-DICK 12.00 

HAYDEN RD - DICKERMAN LOT -W 30.75 

OFF SILVER LAKE RD 14.90 
6 Parcels. Total Acres 



1,660.87 



163 Parcels. Total Acres 



-63- 



MH&Co 



Melans gn Heath & Com pany, tc 

Chrtified Public Accountants 
Management Advisors 

II Trafagar Square » State loi 

Nashua, NH 03063-1974 

Tel (603)882-1 III o Fax (603)882-9456 



INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT 



Board of Selectmen 

Town of Hoilis, New Hampshire 



We have audited the accompanying general purpose financial statements of the 
Town of Hoilis, New Hampshire, as of and for the year ended December 31 , 2001 , 
as listed in the table of contents. These financial statements are the responsibility 
of the Town's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these 
financial statements based on our audit. 

We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted 
in the United States of America. Those standards require that we plan and perform 
the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements 
are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, 
evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An 
audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant esti- 
mates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement 
presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion. 

The Town does not maintain a record of its general fixed assets and, accordingly, 
a statement of general fixed assets, required by generally accepted accounting 
principles, is not included in the financial statements. 

The Town recognizes property tax revenues on the accnjal basis in the General 
Fund, which is not in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles. 
Generally accepted accounting principles require recognition of property taxes 
on the modified accrual basis. 

In our opinion, except for the issues discussed in the previous paragraphs, the 
general purpose financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all mate- 
rial respects, the financial position of the Town of Hoilis, New Hampshire, as of 



Additionai Cfficas: 

' GTsenfieid, .VL-\ ' Eihwonti. ME 



-64- 



December 31 , 2001 , and the results of its operations for the year then ended in 
conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of 
America. 



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Nashua, New Hampshire 
February 6, 2002 



-65- 



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-(^7- 



statement of Revenues and Other Sources, 
and Expenditures and Other Uses - 
Budget and Actual - General Fund 

For the Year Ended December 31 , 2001 



Revenues and Other Sources: 
Taxes 

Interest, penalties and other taxes 
Licenses, permits and fees 
Intergovernmental 
Departmental 
Investment income 
Miscellaneous 
Transfers - in 

Other sources (fund balance) 
Total Revenues and 
Other Sources 







Variance 






Favorable 


Budqet 


Actual 


(Unfavorable) 


1 15,539,590 


$ 15,732,501 


$ 192,911 


174,715 


222,782 


48,067 


1,071,375 


1,499,011 


427,636 


409,406 


416,524 


7,118 


157,309 


224,304 


66,995 


185,000 


208,428 


23,428 


500 


8,591 


8,091 


361,000 


361,000 


- 


760,000 


760,000 
19,433,141 


- 


18,658,895 


774,246 



Expenditures and Other Uses: 
Current: 
General government 
Protection of persons and property 
Highways and streets 
Health and welfare 
Library and recreation 
Capital outlay 
Debt service 
Assessments 
Transfers - out 

Total Expenditures and 
Other Uses 



1,661,163 


1,572,279 


88,884 


1,367,918 


1,326,530 


41.388 


1,203,352 


1,180,586 


22,766 


38,003 


28,872 


9,131 


92,652 


88,868 


3,784 


285,001 


279,999 


5,002 


95,778 


95,775 


3 


13,669,562 


13,669,562 


- 


245,466 


245,466 

18,487,937 


- 


18,658,895 


170,958 



Excess of Revenues and Other 
Sources Over (Under) Expenditures 
and Other Uses 



945,204 



The notes to the financial statements are an integral part of this statement. 

5 



945,204 



-68- 



TOWN OF MOLLIS, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Statement of Revenues, Expenses and Changes in Fund Balance 
Non-Expendable Trust Funds 

For the Year Ended December 31 , 2001 



Revenues: 

Contribution revenue $ 8,264 

Investment income (loss) (52,412) 

Total Revenues (44,148) 

Expenses: 

Miscellaneous 



Excess of revenues over expenses before transfers (44,148) 

Transfer out (3,000) 

Excess of revenues over expenses after transfers (47,148) 

Fund Balance, January 1, 2001 956,113 

Fund Balance, December 31, 2001 $ 908,965 



The notes to the financial statements are an integral part of this statement. 



-69- 



Notes to General Purpose Financial Statements 



1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 

The accounting policies of the Town of Mollis, New Hampshire (the Town) 
conform to generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) as applicable 
to govemmental units, except as indicated in Note 2. The following is a 
summary of the more significant policies: 

A. Reporting Entity 

The govemment is a municipal corporation governed by a Board of 
Selectmen. As required by generally accepted accounting principles, 
these financial statements present the government and applicable com- 
ponent units for which the government is considered to be financially 
accountable. In 2001 it was determined that no entities met the required 
GASB-14 criteria of component units. 

B. Basis of Presentation - Fund Accounting 

For reporting purposes, the financial activities of the Town are accounted 
for through the use of several funds and account groups. Each fund is a 
separate accounting entity with self-balancing accounts. The following 
types of funds and account groups are used by the Town: 

Governmental Fund Types 

Governmental funds are those through which most governmental func- 
tions of the Town are financed. The acquisition, use and balances of the 
Town's expendable financial resources and the related liabilities (except 
those accounted for in fiduciary funds) are accounted for through govern- 
mental funds. The measurement focus is based upon determination of 
changes in financial position, rather than upon net income determination. 
The following are the Town's governmental fund types: 

General Fund - To account for all financial activities of the Town, except 
those required to be accounted for in another fund. Most revenues and 
expenditures of a general governmental nature are accounted for in this 
fund. 

Special Revenue Funds - To account for the proceeds of specific revenue 
sources (other than expendable trusts or for major capital projects) that 
are legally restricted to expenditures for special purposes. 



-70- 



The Town maintains the following special revenue funds: 

Ambulance 

Forest Maintenance 

Police Detail 

Heritage 

Old Home Day 

Zylonis 

Capital Proiect Funds - Transactions related to resources obtained and 
used for the acquisition, construction, or improvement of major capital 
facilities are accounted for in capital project funds. Such resources are 
derived principally from proceeds of general obligation bond issues. 

Fiducian/ Fund Types 

Fiduciary funds are used to account for assets held by the Town in a 
trustee capacity. The Town maintains the following fiduciary fund types: 

Expendable Trust Funds - These funds are accounted for in essentially 
the same manner as governmental funds. 

The Town maintains the following expendable trust funds: 

Library 

Conservation Commission 

Capital Reserve 

Nichols Expendable Trust 

Common Trust 

Nonexpendable Trust Funds - These funds are used to account for 
assets held by the Town in a trustee capacity. The principal balance 
cannot be spent; however, investment earnings may be spent for intende 
purposes. 

The Town maintains the following non-expendable trust funds: 

Common Trust Funds: 

High School 

Library 

Public Welfare 

Cemetery 

Nichols Fund 

Pearl Rideout Endowment 



-77- 



Agency Funds - These funds are custodial in nature (assets equal 
liabilities) and do not involve measurement of results of operations. 

Account Groups 

Account groups are used to establish accounting control and account- 
ability for the Town's general long-term obligations. The following account 
group is maintained by the Town. 

General Long-Term Debt Account Group - This account group is used to 
account for all long-term obligations of the Town. 

C. Basis of Accounting 

The basis of accounting used for each fund is as follows: 

Modified Accrual Basis (Governmental, Expendable Trust and Agency 
Funds) 

The accounting and financial reporting treatment applied to a fund is 
determined by its measurement focus. All governmental and expendable 
trust funds are accounted for using a current financial resources measure- 
ment focus. With this measurement focus, only current assets and 
current liabilities generally are included on the balance sheet. Operating 
statements of these funds present increases (i.e., revenues and other 
financing sources) and decreases (i.e., expenditures and other financing 
uses) in net current assets. 

The modified accrual basis of accounting is applied in all governmental, 
expendable trust and agency fund types. Accordingly, revenues other 
than property taxes and certain other departmental revenues are recorded 
when susceptible to accrual, that is, both measurable and available to 
finance expenditures of the current period. Available means collectible 
within the current period or soon enough thereafter to be used to pay 
liabilities of the current period. Property tax revenue, however, is reported 
on an accrual basis (total actual tax commitment less abatements and 
refunds). This method of recognition is contrary to generally accepted 
accounting principles which require property tax revenue be recognized 
on the modified accrual basis of accounting. 

In applying the susceptible to accrual concept to intergovernmental reve- 
nues, the legal and contractual requirements of the numerous individual 
programs are used as guidance. There are essentially two types of 
these revenues: (1) revenues recognized based upon the expenditures 
recorded, and (2) revenues recognized at the time of receipt or earlier, 
if the susceptible to accrual criteria is met. 



■72- 



other revenues (except investment earnings) are recorded as revenues 
when received in cash because they are generally not measurable until 
actually received. Investment earnings are recorded as eamed since 
they are measurable and available. 

Expenditures, except for interest on long-term debt which is recorded 
when due, and most vacation, sick and pension costs because these 
amounts are not expected to be relieved within the current accounting 
period, are recorded when the related fund liability is incurred. 

Accrual Basis (Nonexpendable Funds) 

All nonexpendable trust funds are accounted for on a flow of economic 
resources measurement focus. With this measurement focus, all assets 
and liabilities associated with the operation of these funds are included 
on the balance sheet. Nonexpendable fund type operating statements 
present increases (e.g., revenues) and decreases (e.g., expenses) in 
net total assets. 

The accrual basis of accounting is used by nonexpendable trust funds. 
Their revenues are recognized when they are earned, and their expenses 
are recognized when they are incurred. 

D. Cash and Cash Equivalents 

Cash balances from all funds, except those required to be segregated 
by law, are combined to form a consolidation of cash. Cash balances are 
invested to the extent available, and interest earnings are allocated to the 
various funds. Certain fiduciary funds segregate cash, and investment 
earnings become a part of those funds. 

Deposits with financial institutions consist primarily of demand deposits, 
certificates of deposits, and savings accounts. 

For purposes of the statement of cash flows, the nonexpendable trust 
funds consider investments with original maturities of three months or less 
to be cash equivalents. 

E. Investments 

State and local statutes place certain limitations on the nature of deposits 
and investment available to the Town. Deposits in any financial institution 
may not exceed certain levels within the financial institution. Non-fiduciary 
fund investments can be made in securities issued by or unconditionally 
guaranteed by the U.S. Government or agencies that have a maturity of 
less than one year from the date of purchase and repurchase agreements 



■73- 



Investments for the Trust Funds consist of marketable securities, bonds 
and short-term money market investments. Investments in the Trust 
Funds are carried at market value. 

F. Interfund Transactions 

The accompanying financial statements reflect numerous transactions 
between the various funds. These transactions represent operating 
transfers and do not constitute revenues nor expenditures of the 
funds. 

G. Fixed Assets 

Property, plant and equipment acquired or constructed for general 
government services are recorded as expenditures in the fund incurring 
the expenditure. Generally accepted accounting principles require 
that such assets also be accounted for in a "general fixed assets group 
of accounts". The Town does not maintain such an account group. 

H. LonQ-Term Oblipations 

The government reports long-term debt of governmental funds at face 
value in the general long-term debt account group. 

/. Vacation, Sick Leave and Other Compensated Absences 

Town employees are entitled to earned and sick leave based on actual 
hours worked. At year end, unused time carhes forward to the new year, 
up to 500 hours for earned leave and 80 hours for sick leave. Upon 
termination, unused sick leave lapses. 

J. Fund Equity 

Reservations of fund balance represent amounts that are not appropriable 
or are legally segregated for a specific purpose. 

K. Encumbrance Accounting and Reporting 

Encumbrance accounting is employed in governmental funds. Encum- 
brances (e.g., purchase orders, contracts) outstanding at year end 
are reported as reservations of fund balances and do not constitute 
expenditures or liabilities. 



■74- 



Total columns on the general purpose financial statements are captioned 
as "memorandum only" because they do not represent consolidated fin- 
ancial information and are presented only to facilitate financial analysis. 
The columns do not present information that reflects financial position, 
results of operations, or cash flows in accordance with generally accepted 
accounting principles. Interfund eliminations have not been made in the 
aggregation of this data. 

M. Statement of Cash Flows 

No statement of cash flows is presented for the nonexpendable trust 
funds since the only change in cash flows was derived from operating 
income. 



2. Departures from Generally Accepted Accounting Principles 

The significant departures of the Town 's financial statements from generally 
accepted accounting principles are as follows: 

• General fixed asset acquisitions are not capitalized in a general fixed 
asset group of accounts. 

• Property tax revenue is reported on an accrual basis of accounting. 
This method of recognition differs from generally accepted accounting 
principles which requires property tax revenue to be recognized on 
the modified accrual basis of accounting. 

3. Stewardship, Compliance and Accountability 

A. Budgetary Information 

The Town's budget is originally prepared by the Selectmen's office with 
the cooperation of the various department heads. It is then submitted to 
the Budget Committee, in accordance with the Municipal Budget Law. 
After reviewing the budget, the Committee holds a public hearing for 
discussion. 

The final version of the budget is then submitted for approval at the 
annual Town meeting. The approved budget is subsequently reported 
to the State of New Hampshire on the statement of appropriation form in 
order to establish the current property tax rate. 

The Selectmen cannot increase the total of the approved budget, however, 
they have the power to reclassify its components when necessary. 



-75- 



The General Fund appropriation appearing on page 5 of the financial 
statements represents the final amended budget of the Town and was 
authorized at the annual Town meeting. 

C. Budqet/GAAP Reconciliation 

The budgetary data for the general fund is based upon accounting prin- 
ciples that differ from generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). 
Therefore, in addition to the GAAP basis financial statements, the results 
of operations of the general fund are presented in accordance with 
budgetary accounting principles to provide a meaningful comparison 
with budgetary data. 

The following is a summary of adjustments made to the actual revenues 
and other sources, and expenditures and other uses, to conform to the 
budgetary basis of accounting. 

Revenues Expenditures 

and Other and Other 

Financing Sources Financing Uses 

General Fund 

Revenues/Expenditures 

(GAAP basis) $18,312,141 $17,856,060 

Other financing sources/uses 

(GAAP basis) 361,000 245,466 

Reverse beginning of year 

appropriation carryforwards 

from expenditures - ( 112,054) 

Add end of year appropriation 

carryforwards - 498,465 

Recognize use of fund balance 

as funding source 760,000 - 



Budgetary basis $ 19.433.141 $ 18.487.937 



4. Cash and Cash Equivalents 

The carrying amount of the Town's deposits with financial institutions at 
December 31 , 2001 was $ 9,571 ,268. The bank balances, which do not 
include reconciling items, such as deposits in transit and outstanding checks, 
are categorized as follows: 



■76- 



Amount insured by the FDIC and DIFM, 

or collateralized with securities held by 

the Town in its name $ 1 ,297,551 

State investment pool 8,273,139 

Total Bank Balance $ 9.570,690 



5. investments 

The Town's investments are categorized into the following three categories 
of credit risk: 

(1 ) Insured or registered, or securities held by the Town or its agent in 
the Town's name. 

(2) Uninsured and unregistered, with securities held by the counter- 
party's trust department or agent in the Town's name. 

(3) Uninsured and unregistered, with securities held by the counterparty, 
or by its trust department or agent but not in the Town's name. 

At year end, the government's investment balances were as follows: 

Category 





1 


2 


3 


Total 


U.S. Government securities 
Corporate equity 
Corporate bonds 


$251,756 
267,490 
176,218 

$ 695.464 


$ 


$ 


$251,756 
267,490 
176,218 


Subtotal 

Investments not subject 
to categorization: 
Mutual funds 


$ - 


. $ - 


695,464 
213,724 



Total Investments $ 909.188 

6. Taxes Receivable 

The Town bills property taxes semi-annually, in May and November. 
Property tax revenues are recognized in the fiscal year for which taxes 
have been levied. Property taxes billed or collected in advance of the year 
for which they are levied, are recorded as a prepaid tax liability. 

Property taxes are due on July 1 and December 1 . Delinquent accounts 
are charged 12% interest. At the time of tax sale, in March of the next 



-77- 



year, a lien is recorded on the property at the Registry of Deeds. The Town 
purchases all the delinquent accounts by paying the delinquent balance, 
recording costs and accrued interest. The accounts that are liened by the 
Town will be reclassified from property taxes receivable to unredeemed tax 
liens receivable. After this date, delinquent accounts will be charged interest 
at a rate of 18%. 

The Town annually budgets an amounts (overlay for abatements) for property 
tax abatements and refunds. 

Taxes receivable at December 31 , 2001 consist of the following: 

Property taxes: 

2001 levy $ 667,728 

Unredeemed taxes: 

2000 levy 86,429 

1999 levy 42,931 

Prior Levies 2,316 

Yield tax 3,071 

Land use change 19,990 

Allowance for abatements ( 177,499 ) 

Total taxes receivable, net $ 644.966 

Taxes Collected for Others 

The Town collects property taxes for the Mollis School District, the Hollis- 
Brookline Co-op, and the County of Hillsborough. Payments to the other 
taxing units are normally made throughout the year. The ultimate respon- 
sibility for the collection of taxes rests with the Town. 



7. Due From Other Governments 

This balance represents reimbursements requested from Federal and State 
agencies for expenditures incurred in fiscal 2001. 



8. interfund Fund Receivables/Payables 

The Town maintains self-balancing funds; however, most transactions flow 
through the general fund. In order to obtain accountability for each fund, 
interfund receivable and payable accounts must be utilized. The following 
is an analysis of the December 31, 2001 balances in interfund receivable 
and payable accounts: 



■78- 



Fund 


Due From 
Other Funds 


Due To 
Other Funds 


General Fund 
Capital Projects Fund 
Trust and Agency Funds 


$ 21,013 
507,000 


$ 507,000 
21,013 


Total 


$528,013 


$528,013 



9. Other Assets 

This balance consists primarily of prepaid expenses and departmental 
receivables. 



10. Vouchers Payable 

Vouchers payable represent 2001 expenditures paid subsequent to 
December 31, 2001. 



11. Due to School Districts 

The total school district assessments for the period July 1, 2001 through 
June 30, 2002 were $ 12,376,656. The school district assessments are paid 
in monthly installments. As of December 31, 2001, a total $ 7,519,098 was 
paid, leaving a balance of $ 4,857,558 to be paid through June 30, 2002. 



12. Bond Anticipation Notes Payable 

The Town had the following notes outstanding at June 30, 2001: 

Interest Date of Date of Balance at 

Rate Issue Maturity June 30, 2001 

Bond anticipation 2.94% 12/28/01 07/25/02 $ 707.000 

13. Landfill Closure and Postclosure Care Costs 

The Town is a member of the Souhegan Regional Landfill District, which 
closed and capped its landfill in 1990. The District is required by state 
and federal laws and regulations to perform certain maintenance and 
monitoring functions at this site for 30 years. The Town estimates its share 
of the remaining landfill postclosure costs at approximately $ 92,416 at 
December 31 , 2001 . Actual costs may differ due to inflation, changes in 
technology, or changes in regulations. 



'79- 



14. Long-Term Debt 

A. General Obligation Bonds 

The Town has an outstanding bond payable issued in June 1987. The 
bond is payable over twenty years with the interest rate varying (5.40% 
to 8.25%). The principal payment will be $ 25,000 per year for the next 
six years. 

Balance December 31 , 2000 $ 1 75,000 

Maturing principal payment ( 25,000 ) 

Balance December 31, 2001 $ 150,000 

B. Future Debt Sen/ice 

The annual principal and interest payments to retire all general obligation 
long-term debt outstanding as of December 31, 2001 are as follows: 



Governmental 


Principal 


Interest 


Total 


2002 


$ 25,000 


$12,288 


$ 37,288 


2003 


25,000 


10,261 


35,261 


2004 


25,000 


8,225 


33,225 


2005 


25,000 


6,188 


31,188 


2006 


25,000 


4,125 


29,125 


Thereafter 


25,000 


2,063 


27,063 


Total 


$ 150.000 


$43,150 


$193,150 



The general fund has been designated as the source to repay the general 
obligation long-term debt outstanding as of December 31 , 2001 . 

C. Overlappinci Debt 

The Town's proportionate share of debt of other governmental units which 
provide services within the Town 's boundaries, and which must be borne 
by the resources of the Town, is summarized below: 



Related Entitv 


Total 
Principal 


Town 's 
Percent 


Town 's 
Share 


Hollis-Brookline Co-op 
Mollis School District 


$ 19,300,048 
6.265.344 


65.71% 
100.00% 


$ 12,682,061 
6.265.344 


Total 


S 25.565.392 




$ 18,947,405 



This liability is appropriately not reported in the accompanying financial 
statements. 



'80- 



15. Other Liabilities 

This balance consists primarily of performance bond escrow accounts. 



16. Reserves and Designations of Fund Equity 

The Town has established "reserves" of fund equity to segregate fund 
balances which are either not available for expenditure in the future or 
are legally set aside for a specific future use. 

The Town reported the following types of reserves and designations at 
December 31, 2001. 

Reserved for Endowments - Represents the principal of the nonexpendable 
trust fund investments. The balance cannot be spent for any purpose; how- 
ever, it may be invested and the earnings may be spent. 

Reserved for Encumbrances - An account used to segregate that portion 
of fund balance committed for expenditure of financial resources upon 
vendor performance. 

The following is a summary of general fund appropriations and reserves to 
be carried fonA/ard to 2002: 

Special studies $ 4,000 

Revaluation 185,458 

Police equipment 2,000 

Fire equipment 130,000 

Fire radios and pagers 24,230 

Emergence management expense 490 

DPW-Annual road rebuilding 47,500 

Dump-demolition removal 16,800 

Nichols Field improvement 22,750 

Bond issuance costs 25,000 

Communications console 40,237 

Total $ 498.465 



17. Commitments and Contingencies 

Outstanding Lawsuits - There are several pending lawsuits in which the 
Town is involved. The Town's management is of the opinion that the poten- 
tial future settlement of such claims would not materially affect its financial 
statements taken as a whole. 



-81- 



Grants - Amounts received or receivable from grantor agencies are subject to 
audit and adjustment by grantor agencies, principally the federal government. 
Any disallowed claims, including amounts already collected, may constitute 
a liability of the applicable funds. The amount of expenditures which may 
be disallowed by the grantor cannot be determined at this time, although the 
Town expects such amounts, if any, to be immaterial. 

18. Retirement System 

The Town follows the provisions of GASB Statement No. 27, Accounting 
for Pensions for State and Local Government Employees, with respect to 
employees' funds. 

A. Plan Description 

The Town contributes to the New Hampshire Retirement System (the 
"System"), a cost-shanng, multiple-employer, defined benefit pension 
plan administrated by the state retirement board. The System provides 
retirement, disability and death benefits to plan members and bene- 
ficiaries. Revised Statutes Annotated 100-A41-a of New Hampshire 
Law assigns the system the authority to establish and amend benefit 
provisions of the plan and grant cost-of-living increases. The System 
issues a publicly available financial report which can be obtained through 
the New Hampshire Retirement System at 4 Chenell Drive, Concord, 
New Hampshire 03301-8509. 

S Funding Policy 

Plan members are required to contribute between 5% of their gross 
earnings to the pension plan. The Town makes annual contributions 
to the pension plan equal to the amount required by Revised Statutes 
Annotated 100-A: 16, and range from 3.8% - 6.8% of covered compen- 
sation. The Town's contributions to the system for the years ended 
December 31, 2001, 2000, and 1999 were $ 75,626, $66,614, and 
$ 62,019, respectively, which were equal to its annual required 
contributions for each of these years. 



19. Risk Management 

The government is exposed to various risks of loss related to torts; theft 
of, damage to and destruction of assets; errors and omissions; and natural 
disasters for which the government carries commercial insurance. There 
were no significant reductions in insurance coverage from the previous year 
and have been no material settlements in excess of coverage in any of the 
past three fiscal years. 



-82- 



20. GASB Statement No. 34 

In June 1999, the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) 
unanimously approved Statement No. 34, Basic Financial Statements - and 
Management's Discussion and Analysis - for State and Local Govemments 
(Statement). Certain of the significant changes in the Statement include the 
following: 

• For the first time the financial statements will include: 

- A Management Discussion and Analysis (MD&A) section 
providing an analysis of the Town's overall financial position 
and results of operations. 

- Financial statements prepared using full accrual accounting 
for all of the Town's activities, including reporting infrastructure 
assets (roads, bridges, etc.). 

• A change in the fund financial statements to focus on the major 
funds. 

The general provisions of GASB Statement No. 34 must be implemented by 
the Town of Mollis no later than the fiscal year ending December 31 , 2003; 
the retroactive reporting of infrastructures must be implemented no later than 
the year ending December 31 , 2007. 



-83- 



HOLLIS SOCIAL LIBRARY 

Report to the Town of Hollis, 2002 

The year 2002 was a busy one at the Library, with a 35% increase in building attendance 
and a 20% increase in books and audio-visual materials circulated. To meet increased 
demand, the Library's collection increased by over 3600 tides. A number of programs 
were offered for children and for adults. 

The Library maintains an active web-site at www.hollis.nh.us /library . The web-site 
includes information about Library hours and services, and a schedule of up-coming 
programs. An on-line Library catalog is available, so that any patron may check the 
availability of tities from home or the workplace. Also available as of this year, at the 
Library or from home, is EBSCO HOST, an on-line periodical database, with full- 
text articles from over 1900 periodicals as well as from over 300 health-related journals 
and from children's and young adults' publications. Another feature is AncestryPlus, 
a geneaology database. For fiction-lovers, EBSCO also includes a service called 
NoveList, which identifies books related to an author, tide, or subject of interest. 

Highlights of the year included: 

• The collection grew by over 3600 tities, with particular focus on updating the 
non-fiction collection. The Friends of the Library made a donation that allowed 
addition to the video/DVD collection of the films included in the American 
Film Institute's list of the "Top 100 Greatest American Films" and in Roger 
Ebert's book The Great Movies . Another new service for readers is a series of 
booklists organized around "If you liked you might want to try " 

• A very active Children's program was conducted through the year. In addition 
to the weekday morning pre-school story hours, a Saturday morning story hour 
was introduced. Art Nights were very popular, with as many as 55 participants 
at some of the sessions! A Friday afternoon "Quiet Time" Story Hour for early 
elementary children continued, as well as book discussion groups for 4'^ — 6* 
graders and the Great Stone Face Group for adolescents. 

• The summer Children's Program, "Lions and Tigers and Books, Oh My", 
registered 189 participants, and a series of programs was enthusiastically received 
by young patrons. 

• Adult programs included ongoing book-discussion groups on Tuesday mornings 
and Thursday evenings, the latter in conjunction with the NH Humanities 
Council. A series of financial-planning workshops was well attended. There 
were several Sunday afternoon concerts at the Library, and the meeting room 
was the site of month-long art, photography, and historical exhibits. 

• In the late winter 85 DVDs were stolen from the Library's collection. The 
responsible party was apprehended and taken to trial. Some but not all of the 
missing DVDs were recovered, and insurance covered the loss of most of the 
remaining items. A donation by J. Howard and Janis Bigelow has since expanded 



-84- 



the DVD collection. Preliminary research into the need for a Theft Detection 
System has been initiated, in the aftermath of the DVD thefts and a sampling 
that indicated annual loss of an estimated 3.3% of the collection (valued at 
approximately $6400). 

• The Department of Public Works addressed issues with mold in the Library's 
basement by installing a dehumidifier and by treating the walls. A major 
maintenance project in 2003 will be exterior painting of the building, to be 
completed by the Town; this was to happen in the 2002 season, but has been 
deferred until next year. 

• Cooperation with the Hollis and Hollis-Brookline school libraries continues, 
with the schools notifying the Hollis Social Library when classes have projects 
assigned on particular subjects such as New Hampshire history. Of note is the 
fact that the High School Library's reference collection is available to any town 
resident. 

The Library's collection benefited from a number of generous donations, and 
volunteers continued to help the Library in several capacities. 

• The Library appreciated private donations from the Colonial Garden Club, 
Lloyd and Susan Deenik, J. Howard and Janis Bigelow, Gene Sidore, Sheila 
Ruscitti, and Larry Finkelstein. A 54-volume set of "Great Books" was given 
by an anonymous donor. Dan Wolaver donated a framed photograph of the 
Apple Festival. The Library was especially appreciative of the efforts of a 
group of 4 first-graders, who held a candy sale at Old Home Day and 
donated their proceeds to the Library. 

• The Friends of the HoUis Library again made generous donations toward the 

expansion of the collection, as well as supporting the Summer Reading Program. 
Membership in the Friends is open to anyone with an interest in the Library. 

• Volunteers provided assistance with services such as staffing the circulation desk, 

shelving books, and mending books. Their contributions of time and effort to 
the Library are invaluable. 

There have been several staffing changes this year. Pages Sara Meess and Alan Witt 
graduated and have moved on to university study. Nancy Duncan resigned her position 
as Aide. Children's Librarian Jenn Costas resigned in order to pursue her artistic and 
literary endeavors. Staff at the end of 2002 include Director Steve Russo, Children's 
Librarian Mary-jo Zeising, Aides Carole Gasch, Edie Harris, Jack Maguire, and 
Deborah Markarian, and Pages Sarah Ferguson and Kevin Kong. The entire staff is 
functioning admirably, and their efforts are greatly appreciated. 

The Board of Trustees has initiated a Long-Range Planning process, to anticipate 
the future needs and growth of the Library. A member of the State Library Staff 
conducted a presentation for the Board, on the Long-Range Planning Process as it 
relates to Libraries. Members of the Board reviewed the Planning Guidelines of the 



-85- 



American Library Association. Community Focus Groups were conducted in the 
late spring, with participation by representatives from the community as well as from 
the elementary, middle, and high-school libraries. Several members of the Board 
made visits to the Libraries of other local towns of comparable population. A 
representative of the State Library, using accepted national standards, provided 
calculations indicating that the Library is already operating in a space insufficient for 
the collection and for the Town's current population. The Board presented this 
information to the Town's Space Needs Study Committee, and began discussion 
with this group. Development of a Long-Range Plan will remain a priority in 2003. 

The Board of Trustees of the Mollis Social Library is eager to hear your feedback 
about the Library. Please feel free to contact any member of the Board with your 
comments, your suggestions, or your compliments. 

Gordon Russell, chairman 
Marcia Beckett 
Howard Bigelow 
Dorothy Hackett 
Ann Shedd 
Wendy Valich 
Norma Woods 



'86' 



HOLLIS SOCIAL LIBRARY 

Annual Financial Report, 2002 



OPERATING ACCOUNT 



Beginning Balance 1/1/01 


$15,981.79 


RECEIPTS 




Transfer from Savings 


$7,200.00 


Town Allocatdons-four quarters 


$166,737.40 


Fines 


$8,392.33 


Trust Payments 


$105.39 


Copier Income 


$538.30 


Gifts 


$5,510.00 


Interest Income 


$21.33 


Refunds/Reimbursements 


$563.58 


Non-resident Card Purchases 


$280.00 


Miscellaneous 


$811.08 


(insurance ck for stolenDVDs=$751.33 


Sales of Peter Powers books=$45. 




Book jacket credit=$4.75) 




TOTAL RECEIPTS 


$189,595.41 


EXPENDITURES 




Wages, salaries 


$102,173.94 


Library materials 


$53,586.29 


Utilities 


$9,784.42 


Postage 


$792.14 


Furnishings and supplies 


$4,450.18 


Copier Contract 


$1,111.00 


Computer & Automation 


$2,606.95 


Programs 


$2,224.29 


Staff Development 


$1,413.10 


Miscellaneous 


$1,280.77 



(Legal Expenses = $450, 
Volunteer & Staff Recognidon=$296.45, 
Classified Ads= $320.32, 
BookPage=$144., Credit card fees =$70.) 



SAVINGS ACCOUNT 

Begmning Balance 1/1/02 $9,937.73 

RECEIPTS 

Interest Income $88.71 

Trust Payment 

(Rideout End=$4,350.) $4,726.08 

TOTAL RECEIPTS $4,814.79 

EXPENDITURES 

Transfer to Operating Account $7,200.00 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES $7,200.00 

FINAL BAL., 12/31/02 $7,552.52 



Pearl Rideout Endowment Fund 

BEGINNING BAL 1/1/02 $78,202.09 

EXPENDITURES $4,350.00 

♦♦Ending Balance 12/31/02 $58,133.78 
**This is an investment account D28 handled 
and maintained by A.G. Edwards & Sons, Inc 



TOTAL EXPENDITURES 



$179,423.08 



RespectfuUy Submitted, 
Norma Woods, Treasurer 



■87- 



Hollis Social Library 
Statistical Report for 2002 













% Change 




1999 


2000 


2001 


2002 


'01 to '02 


Cardholders 


3,210 


3,544 


3,190* 


3,711 


+ 16 


Building Attendance 


44,892 


48,752 


39,584 


53,495 


+35 


Circulation: 












Adult Fiction 


15,498 


11,398 


11,936 


12,181 


+2 


Adult Nonfiction 


4,478 


3,850 


5,184 


7,607 


+32 


Adult Video & DVD 


3,178 


5,043 


7,248 


10,638 


+32 


Adult Audio 


2,280 


2,591 


3,009 


3,366 


+ 11 


Children's & YA 


20,914 


22,631 


22,402 


26,128 


+ 17 


(Books, Audio, Video) 












Periodicals 


1,311 


1,216 


1,074 


1,275 


+ 16 


(Adult, CH, YA) 












Renewals 


4,870 


5,737 


3,250* 


3,941 


+ 18 


(Adult, CH, YA) 












TOTAL CIRCULATION 


47,659 


52,466 


54,103 


65,136 


+20 


Other Uses of Library 










Reserves 


1,232 


979 


1,082 


1,105 


+2 


Reference Questions 








1,119 
(from Aug) 




Meeting Room 


178 


131 


152 


87 


-43 


Bookings 












Internet Use 


951 


760 


954 


1,148 


+ 17 


Museum Passes 


25 


29 


37 


12 


-66 


Adult Programs 


26 


15 


20 


25 


+25 


Children's & 


69 


70 


81 


68 


-16 


YA Programs 












ILL & Club Borrowed 


409 


544 


631 


498 


-20 


ILLs Loaned 


269 


208 


268 


292 


+8 


Acquisitions: (includ 


es donations) 








Books 


1,449 


2,226 


3,389 


2,853 


-16 


Audio 


108 


125 


213 


206 


-3 


Videos 


101 


188 


400 


555 


+28 


&DVDs 













♦Cardholders - Beginning in 2001 we annually delete cardholders who have not used their 
cards in the past 3 years. 

♦Renewals - In 2001 we lengthened the loan period for books from 2 to 3 weeks, which 
resulted in a decline in Renewals. 



-88- 



BUDGET COMMITTEE 

The purpose of the Mollis Budget Committee is to assist the voters in the prudent 
annual appropriation of public funds. The committee draws its authority from NH 
RSA 32:1. Members of the Mollis Budget Committee are dedicated to serving their 
community as "watch dogs of the tax rate". We work to keep the tax rate no higher 
than the annual increases in inflation and valuation, so as to have no effective impact 
on the taxpayer. This means that the amount of monies collected will increase from 
the prior year, but not at a rate greater than the increase in property valuation and 
inflation. 

Each year the committee presents recommended budget amounts to the Selectmen 
and the School Board. These amounts consider the increase in town and school 
populations and the demands that these increases necessitate, while at the same time 
keeping an eye on the bottom line so that it does not exceed the increase in valuation 
and inflation. In addition to the budget, of concern are the Warrant Articles. It is in 
the best interest of the taxpayer that the Warrant Articles also not increase in amount 
beyond an adjustment for valuation and inflation from the prior year. 

The budgets and Warrant Articles first presented by the Selectmen and the School 
Board often exceed these recommendations. After a number of meetings and 
adjustments, we come closer to agreement. Public input is an important part of this 
process. At the Public Mearings in February, citizens of Mollis have the opportunity 
to formally present their positions. It is important for citizens to take part in this 
process. 

It is the right of the voters present at the March meetings to override the 
recommendations of the Budget Committee and to vote for a higher or a lower 
budget and/or Warrant Articles than are being presented at the meetings. It is the 
position of the Mollis Budget Committee that to vote for amounts higher than being 
presented is not fiscally prudent. In doing so the voters, with a majority vote, can 
receive the services they are requesting, but at an added cost to all of the citizens of 
Mollis. This is a concern, especially for our senior citizens on fixed incomes and our 
citizens who have been affected by the current economic downturn. 

When creating, analyzing, and voting upon our Town and School Budgets and Warrant 

Articles, it is the role of the Budget Committee and the citizens and voters in Mollis 

to look beyond their respective priorities and households. We need to remember 

that we are voting for services supported by monies collected from all of the taxpayers 

in our Town. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Melinda B. N. Willis, Mollis Budget Committee Chair 



-89- 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

The Hollis Building Department issued a total of Six Hundred Seventy Seven (677) 
permits for the year 2002. Of these, Thirty One (31) permits were issued for New 
Single Family Homes (SFR). New Single Family Home starts have fallen during 2002. 
The trend for larger homes continues with the average 4 bedroom home exceeding 
3,200 square feet. This year the town also issued 13 building permits for 35 elderly 
housing units, a sign that empty nesters are downsizing. The economical down turn 
and sluggish economy are having an effect on the regions growth. The demand for 
affordable housing will be an issue in the next decade, as the price for land and 
building materials increase. Construction of additions and renovations to existing 
homes remained the same, as compared to 2000. On the brighter side, mortgage 
interest rates have dropped since May 2002, the average fixed rate has been around 
5.5% and hopefully will continue to remain low well into the coming year, giving 
prospective homebuyers a chance to enter the housing market. The northeast, 
including the southern NH region, has seen slow growth over the past year. The threat 
of a conflict with Iraq is felt here and around the world. The northeast region will 
probably see slow to modest growth into next year and into 2004. 

Construction Activity for 2002 



Residential 




2002 


2001 


2000 


1999 


1998 


SFR 




31 


40 


56 


50 


59 


Elderly Housing 


Permits 


13 


24 


- 


- 


- 


Foundations 




3 


9 


3 


10 


5 


Additions 




36 


32 


37 


24 


48 


Alterations 




1 


2 


3 


2 


3 


Renovations 




13 


22 


26 


20 


15 


Barns 




6 


5 


3 


8 


7 


Garages 




14 


12 


7 


12 


9 


Porches 




19 


20 


20 


9 


19 


Decks 




17 


17 


12 


17 


15 


Gazebo 




- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


Repair 




2 


5 


3 


2 


9 


Demolition 




1 


1 


8 


2 


1 


Roof 




- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


Sheds 




32 


23 


25 


24 


16 


Mobile Homes 




2 


- 


- 


3 


1 


Swimming Pools 


- In-ground 


19 


11 


10 


16 


9 




Above ground 


8 


4 


15 


8 


6 


Chimney 




4 


4 


5 


7 


5 


Woodstove 




~ 


~ 


1 


1 


4 



-90- 



Residential - (Continued) 


2002 


,2001 


2000 


1999 


1998 


Separate Permits 












Electrical 


183 


156 


187 


188 


187 


Mechanical 


118 


116 


117 


125 


121 


Plumbing 


80 


92 


98 


88 


95 


Automatic Sprinkler Systems 


16 


17 








Permit Application 


- 


- 


- 


1 


14 


Accessory Dwelling Unit 


3 


4 


1 


1 


4 


Temporary Quarters 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


Certificate of Occupancy 


- 


1 


1 


- 


4 


Extension of Permit 


1 


4 


- 


1 


- 


Change of Use 


- 


1 








Expired 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


Other 


1 


1 


1 


2 


- 


New Non Residential 












PubHc Utility 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Telecommunication Tower 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


Church 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Addition 


- 






1 


_ 


Community Center 




1 








Town Property 




1 


- 


- 


1 


School District 


1 


- 


2 


1 


4 


Other 


1 


1 








Commercial 












Business/ Office (New) 


1 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Tenant Fit-up 


6 


3 


2 


4 


1 


Storage/ Accessory Bldg. 


1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Additions/ Renovations 


1 


- 


7 


3 


10 


Signs 


6 


3 


7 


5 


4 


Electrical 


13 


74 


11 


8 


19 


Mechanical 


11 


10 


4 


8 


10 


Plumbing 


11 


2 


4 


7 


8 


Other 


1 


3 








Total Permits 


677 


693 


677 


641 


758 



-91- 



Monthly distribution of Single Family Residential Permits (SFR) 

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 

2002 006 83 062220 2 

2001 262 76 702152 2 

2000 293 94 82 10 034 

1999 024 10 4 723874 1 

1998 332 89 432559 6 



Respectfully submitted, 

Richard C. Jones, Building Inspector/ Code Enforcement 



-92- 



CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

The Cable Advisory Committee was established by the selectmen to monitor the 
compliance of Charter Communications' nonexclusive contract with the Town, to 
advise the Board of Selectmen on matters relating to cable services, and to try to get 
citizens to assist in broadcasting a wider variety of town events and Committee 
meetings. 

As the Town is in the formal process of contract renewal, this committee is moving 
on a wide variety of fronts. We have set up a standardized comment form in order to 
be able to document all future comments on cable service in town. This form is 
available in print at town hall or electronically at <http://www.hollis.nh.us/cac/ 
comments.htm>. We invite all residents to comment whenever they feel it appropriate. 
These comments help us in contract renegotiations. We have also met on a few 
occasions with our sister committee in Brookline and have been in contact with 
other communities' cable committees. 

In accordance with Federal regulations, we have held a public ascertainment hearing 
which was broadcast over the Government Access Channel (12) and have sought, 
and continue to seek, comments from citizens and various town departments and 
school boards regarding future cable needs and wants. The public is invited to continue 
to comment via the web site mentioned in the above paragraph. 

Due to the complexities of Federal regulations, the Selectmen, acting on the 
committee's recommendation, retained an attorney (Donahue, Tucker & Ciandella) 
specializing in municipal telecommunications franchises, in a consortium agreement 
with Brookline. A separate Consortium has been formed and Ray Valle and Allan 
Miller were selected by the Board of Selectmen to represent Mollis there. Hollis & 
Brookline renewals are being treated as a joint effort to both increase the leverage of 
each town and to control costs. We are the only two New Hampshire towns with 
service from our current cable provider's Worcester MA based network. 

The committee has an informative link from the Hollis home page <http:// 
www.hollis.nh.us/cac/index.htm> where residents are encouraged to follow both 
our minutes and ongoing discussions, which they may also contribute to. We have 
followed and implemented the recommendations of the Computer and 
Communications Infrastructure Committee for all town committees and are 
maintaining an open and public reflector site <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ 
holliscac> so that aU committee related communications between members are public, 
in accordance with the State Right to Know Law. We invite comments and suggestions 
on improving our web based activities. The Committee meets the second Tuesday of 
each month in Town Hall. 



-93- 



Ray Valle (chair) 

Allan Miller (vice-chair and secretary) 

Don Ryder (Selectmen's representative) 

Carolyn Gargasz 

Mike Jeynes 

Erwin Reijgers 

Cynthia Rodgers 

Lukasz Tomczyk 



-94- 



CEMETERY TRUSTEES 

The Cemetery Trustees meet regularly on the third Thursday of each month. During 
the summer months, meetings are held at each of the Town's 5 cemeteries. At all 
other times the meetings are held at Town Hall. 

This year the Trustees had a portion of the East Cemetery resurveyed to allow 
additional 2-grave monument lots to be created. All 4 grave lots must be purchased 
in an 8' x 20' configuration with the monument placed in the center. The 2-grave 
monument lots are slightly longer to accommodate placement of the monument. 
The Trustees have noticed a growing trend where large family burial plots are no 
longer needed, as family members are moving to other parts of the country and 
starting their own families. These new lots provide a final resting place for a couple 
also wishing to have a monument placed on their graves. 

During 2002, Public Works performed the following burials. 
Type of Interment Date of Interment Deceased 

Cremation 







4/20/2002 




Eaton, Rose Margot 






4/20/2002 




George, Anna "May" 






7/6/2002 




Thorp, Helena Elizabeth Hardy 






10/12/2002 




Hills, Henry Corey 


Number 


of Cremations 




4 




Full 




1/3/2002 
1/3/2002 
1/24/2002 
4/2/2002 
4/9/2002 
4/24/2002 




Nunez, Oliver Emilio 
Allen, Fred Henry 
Warren, Harold Raymond 
Marvell, Maurice C. 
Philibotte, Glenna Blanche 
O'Connell, Marjorie F. 


(Jameson) 




6/12/2002 
8/9/2002 
8/26/2002 
10/1/2002 
10/2/2002 
10/28/2002 
11/8/2002 
11/13/2002 
12/2/2002 




Moore, James Frederick Sr 
Bunce, Ronald 

Manoukian, Nazareth Manuel 
Mores, Barbara Jane 
WiUiams, Lillian Harris 
Lawrence, William L 
Jameson, Mary (Hyde) 
McManus, Daniel David Jr 
Bunce, Dianne White 


Number 


of Full Interments 


15 




Total Interments: 




19 





-95- 



A total of 32 lots were sold in the North and East Cemeteries, including 8 of the 2- 
grave monument lots. All other cemeteries are closed for lot purchases. Currendy 
the Town of Hollis owns the following tracts of land for cemeteries: 

South Cemetery - Main Street 1,17 acres 

Churchyard Cemetery - Monument Square .81 

North Cemetery - Rte. 122, Silver Lake Road 5.37 

East Cemetery - Wheeler Road 5.89 

Pine Hill Cemetery - Nartoff Road 1.49 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kathy Albee, Chairman 

Nancy Bell 

Sharon Howe 

Jack Maguire 

Jeff Snow 

Deborah Adams, Secretary 



-96- 



COMMUNICATIONS DEPARTMENT 

The Communication Center, located at 9 Silver Lake Road, is your link to all of the 
town's services, both emergency and non-emergency situations. The center is open 
24 hours, every day and is staffed with professional communications personnel to 
service your needs. 

Your needs may be as simple as requesting information or as complex as requesting 
the needs of an emergency unit. We are here and will be able to assist you. The 
center is staffed with 5 full-time communication specialists who have in excess of 
50 years dispatching experience. 

This experience along with continuing education makes them a formidable team and 
an asset to the residents and is looked upon as "The Team" within the communications 
community. 

During the past year we completed upgrades to the communication center, which 
now enables us to dispatch from two console positions and gives us the ability to 
handle two different emergencies at once with more confidence and surety. 

I would like to thank the residents of Hollis along with the Board of Selectmen for 
their continuing support of the Communications Department. In addition. Rick 
Todd has completed his 20* year of part-time service as a dispatcher for which we 
truly thank him. 

Michael Pischetola 
Communications Director 



-97- 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

The purpose of the Hollis Conservation Commission is to protect the natural heritage 
and rural character of Hollis, with special emphasis on agricultural and forest 
resources, aquifers and waterways, greenways and views. 

Land/Easement Purchase 

In November, we purchased a conservation easement from Mr. Herbert Gardner on 
the 125-acre Spaulding Lot on South Merrimack Road. The easement permanentiy 
protects this mature forest, aquifer recharge area, and wildlife habitat and is now 
known as the Millicent Gardner Memorial Conservation Easement. 

Even donations of land require some expenses, such as legal and transfer fees, 
environmental inspections, surveys, and baseline monitoring. We have paid the 
environmental inspection fee and will pay the survey costs for a pending gift of land 
from the Annabel Johnson heirs. The property is eight acres of historic mill site 
along Bailey Brook at Federal Hill Road. The Hollis Heritage Commission will be 
stewards for the gift. 

Funding 

Our major source of funds is 50% of the land use change tax penalties that the 
Town receives each year. At year end, our conservation fund consists of three 
reserve accounts, for stewardship defense, Flint Pond restoration, and payment of 
the Gardner easement. The rest of the conservation fund, $407,400, is available for 
commission projects and land/easement acquisition. 

Regulations Process 

New developments and subdivisions are presented to the commission through the 
Planning Board processes. Commission members take site walks, review conceptual 
design plans, and report to the Planning Board any conservation opportunities or 
issues concerning the subdivisions. Cathy Hoffman of the Planning Board is their 
liaison with us, attending our meetings. 

New subdivisions and existing lot developments may have wetiands or wetiand buffer 
impacts, often resulting in a State "dredge and fill" application/permit, which must 
be processed by both the Town and the State of New Hampshire. The commission 
reviews dredge and fill applications for the Town: in 2002 processed six of them. 

Stewardship 

An important part of our work is the continuing protection of the properties and 
easements we hold for the Town. We survey and monitor our properties, noting and 
fixing problems when they occur. This year, we formed a Stewardship subcommittee 
to help focus the work. The Stewardship subcommittee completed an extensive 



-98- 



baseline monitoring report for the Millicent Gardner Memorial Conservation 
Easement. The baseline is a record of the property's condition, particularly its 
conservation values, when it was obtained. The baseline is the basis on which all 
future change and activities are judged. 

Also, we wrote management plans and monitored the following properties: 
Ranger-Rideout lot on the Nashua River 
Henry Hildreth conservation Area off Federal Hill Road 
Forest View conservation easement and Worcester lot off Rock Pond Road 
Coughlin lot on Merrill Lane 
High School wetiands easement on Cavalier Court 

Water Resources Issues 

With the permission of the Selectmen, we reestablished the Water Resources 
subcommittee to work with Town leaders and residents. Our goal is to gain a better 
understanding of water issues in order to better manage water resources in Hollis 
today, and in the future. This year, the Water Resources subcommittee reviewed its 
purposes and goals, set short-term objectives and represents Hollis at the Pennichuck 
Watershed Council. 

Most importantiy, the subcommittee introduced to the Planning Board additional 
standards in the Town's Aquifer Protection Overly Zone intended to protect and 
maintain existing and potential groundwater supplies and groundwater recharge areas 
within known aquifers; ensuring adequate drinking water and water supply for 
domestic, agricultural, commercial and industrial uses, protecting in-stream water 
flows and near shore habitat for tish and wildlife, limiting land uses which contribute 
to the pollution of groundwater, and ultimately giving Hollis the ability to protect 
itself from large groundwater withdrawals. 

The subcommittee is working, on behalf of the Selectmen, with the Flint Pond 
Association, NH Fish and Game, and others to resolve Flint Pond issues of exotic 
weeds and water flow. 

Nancy Leland, a former resident, noted potential problems at Silver Lake concerning 
algae there, a cyano (blue) bacterial bloom that can create toxicity. We sponsored 
Nancy at a Land Use Board meeting in February to introduce the problem to the 
Town. In September, we had another pubUc information session that discussed the 
issue and we mailed information brochures about the bacteria to all residents in the 
Silver Lake area. 

Outreach 

We encourage visitors to our meetings at 7:00PM on the first and third Wednesdays 

of each month. We meet in the Lower Town Hall. 



-99- 



Three community volunteers have been working with the commission on our projects 
this year: Mary Jeffery and Richard Roach work with the Water Resources 
subcommittee on aquifer protection and zoning issues; Robin Beaudette is working 
with the Stewardship subcommittee on trails issues. 

We sponsored two community volunteers, who attended a day-long NH Association 
of Conservation Commissions annual meeting for conservation training. 

In April, Scott Decker of NH Fish and Game made a presentation to us about the 
results of our stream and trout survey, which we completed in 2001. There are 
naturally reproducing trout populations in Flint Brook and Witches Spring Brook, 
NH Fish and Game is nominating both areas as catch and release streams for 2003. 
Locally, the health of the trout populations is an indicator of the groundwater health 
in the aquifers under the brooks. Data gathered in this study helps form a baseline 
for both wildlife and water resource health in Town. 

At the Hollis Old Home Day, the commission displayed maps and photos showing 
conservation land and water resources. We emphasized the history and founding of 
the commission with a tribute to the late Jeff Smith. 

Membership 

We have nine members, including two alternates. Six of our members attended the 
annual meeting of the NH Association of Conservation Commissions in November 
to attend seminars and training about NH conservation issues. 

We funded GPS training for three members; the training is scheduled for January, 
2003. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Dick Brown, Secretary 



100- 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

In the first half of this year, we had a lot of freezing rain fall, causing considerable 
difficulties in maintaining the roads for safe passage. In September, there was a 
major windstorm creating a lot of downed trees. The first snow fell October 23, 
which amounted to 2 inches and began a series of storms that didn't let up until into 
the New Year. 

Classes: Our employees are encouraged to attend classes that improve their 
knowledge and abilides to provide you with better and safer services. This past year 
the classes attended (not by everyone, each time): Dig Safe Seminar, Mine Safety and 
Health Administration class. Working Safely T2 Workshop, Manual on Uniform Traffic 
Control Devices, T2 Mountain of Demo's workshop. Flag Man Safet}^, Northeast 
Resource Recycling Association Workshop, Asbestos workshop. Safe Chainsaw 
Operation for Municipal Employees, Burnpit Workshop, 8-Hour Household 
Hazardous Waste Refresher. We have 4 employees who are certified with the 
Department of Environmental Ser\dces as Solid Waste Facilit}' Operators, with annual 
workshops. Three of these employees have Household Hazardous Waste 
endorsement. The insurance carriers for the Town presented seminars for all 
employees. 

In early December, we took delivery of our new 2003 International Dump Truck, 
Model 7400, with a plow and sander. 

Dead tree work with PSNH continued on Ridge Road, Farley Road, Pine Hill Road 
as well as Jewett Lane, Hayden Road and Dow Road. We also cleaned up the blow 
downs on the roadsides in the spring. 

Our resurfacing projects included South Merrimack Road, a portion of Mooar HiU 
Road, Truell Road, Toddy Brook Road, Southgate Road, Lund Lane, and a section 
of Pine HiU Road. Resurfacing projects include graveUing the shoulders, repairing 
or repaving swales and driveway aprons. 

Drainage repairs were done on Nartoff Road, Rideout Road, Pierce Lane, Howe 
Lane as well as the installation of culverts on Farley Road, South Merrimack Road 
and Federal Hill Road. 

There was a water line break on Depot Road that was complicated by the fact that it 
was under the sidewalk, which was removed and then replaced during the repairs. 

Outside contractors cleaned 300 catch basins, swept aU the streets in the spring and 
continued our roadside mowing program. 



101- 



Stop lines were painted on Howe Lane, Ranger Road and Pine Hill Road, as well as 
a bike path on Farley Road and Pine Hill Road. 

We assisted in the enclosure of the spillway at the Jewett Lane dam to prevent 
anyone from falling in. 

The Blood Road project was completed this year when the finish coat of asphalt 
was applied in August, and the driveway aprons were completed in September. 
The realignment and construction of approximately 600 feet of road locally known 
as Ham's Corner on Federal Hill Road was completed early this year. 

All the gravel roads received build-up of gravel at one point or another during the 
year. The road grading was very time consuming, because of the extremely hot, dry 
weather. 

After the Town took possession of the land at the Transfer Station, we cut trees, 
hauled fill, graded, and installed drainage to expand the area for the dump trailers. 
An old lean-to was reclaimed and expanded to store the used oil tanks, batteries and 
scrap metals. Steps were installed to reach the rear of the facility. In November, we 
installed concrete pads and stone work in anticipation of expanding the area for 
recycling materials for the glass, aluminum and co-mingle collections. We also paved 
aprons at the entrances to further facilitate drainage. We installed new signs at the 
Stump Dump.During the past year, at both facilities, we sent out 9.54 tons of tires, 
5463 feet of fluorescent bulbs, 227 freon containing devices, 3220 gallons of used 
oil, 187.18 tons of shingles, 329.85 tons of demolition materials, 400 propane tanks, 
330 gallons of antifreeze, and 377.91 tons of metals. We sent out 2685 tons of trash 
last year. We also recycled 190 tons of co-mingles, 333 tons of newspapers and 103 
tons of old corrugated containers. We sold 7.85 tons of aluminum cans. (Incidentally, 
the Souhegan Landfill Regional District collected $.40 per pound for the aluminum, 
which filters down to savings to the taxpayers). 

There were 44 driveway permits issued on Town roads. There are presendy 7 streets 
under construction with a total capacity of 83 houses. 

We assisted other departments. We helped the Recreation Department with the ice 
rink, laying and picking up the tarp. We also poured the pads for the baseball dugouts 
at Nichols Field. We raked the horse rink and maintained the parking lot. At Town 
Hall, we assisted the Garden Club by excavating, regrading and landscaping along 
with the replacement of the trees on the south side of the building. At the Police 
Station, members of the staff fitted plywood to block the lower part of window at 
Comm. Center and hung brackets and fitted plywood for shelving. 

There were 3 elections this past year. We laid out the chain barriers, as well as 
erecting and breaking down the voting booths. 

-102- 



At Old Home Days, we participated in the parade with the grader and the excavator, 
erected the signs and provided manpower throughout the festivities, as well as assisting 
in the publication of the history of the street names. 

A staff member, as well as the Director served on the safety committee for the 
Town. 

Whenever a member of the public calls for the DPW, whether it be at Town Hall, the 
DPW, or at the Communications Center (they answer our phone after 4 rings, 24 
hours a day, 7 days a week) the request is recorded on a triplicate work order. This 
order is then reviewed by the Director or Supervisor and forwarded to the appropriate 
employee for attention. When the work has been completed, the work order is 
signed off and filed. We encourage the public to continue calling whenever they 
have a DPW related problem. Be sure to include the following information: name, 
daytime telephone number, address, problem, the location of the problem. Our 
telephone number if 465-2246. 

My sincere thanks to the residents of Hollis, Town employees, contractors, vendors 
and volunteer for their assistance and cooperation in 2002, 

Respectfully, 

Arthur LeBlanc, Director 
DPW 



-103- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

In the past year the HoUis Fire Department has continued to strive meeting the 
increased demands and challenges of providing professional quality fire, rescue and 
emergency medical service. We have been progressive in the attempt to meet our 
goals and objectives, to provide effective resources and staffing so that we may deliver 
a high level of preparedness and effectiveness that the community expects and 
deserves. 

Over the last few years we have been very active with fire prevention, presenting 
many programs to children's groups at the fire station, as well as at the schools. 
Because of positive results that have occurred from fire prevention, we have been 
proactive this year developing a plan and setting goals on the implementation of a 
good injury prevention program for children. 

After considerable research, we felt that the best way to reach the most children was 
to use a program developed by the National Fire Protection Association called 
Risk Watch. This is a comprehensive program that is implemented in the school 
system based on the theory that injuries are not "accidents"- they are predictable 
and preventable. This is a key injury prevention philosophy and is the most important 
reason for using an educational component. With school support and a committed 
coalition of local safety experts, this program will be able to grow, benefiting not 
only the child but also his or her family, classmates and friends, and the entire 
community. 

Because bicycles are associated with more childhood injuries than any other consumer 
product except the automobile, in August we held a bike rodeo for all ages at the 
high school parking lot. Under the direction of Assistant E.M.S. Director Sandra 
Bohling, the department members and family members constructed and ran a very 
successful bike rodeo. Because of the turnout, this will likely be an annual event. 

Our babysitting class still continues to be very popular. It is a ten-week course, 
conducted one afternoon a week between 3 PM and 5 PM; we offer this class in the 
fall and spring. Under the direction of firefighter EMT I Susan Deyo, the students 
receive certification in the Red Cross Babysitting class along with additional training 
utilizing the Family Safety House, infant & child CPR, and having a police officer 
instruct on the proper way to handle a "stranger at the door." As this class usually 
has a waiting list, please have your student reserve a space a soon as possible. 

We continue to offer CPR classes to the community, either every other month or on 
an as needed basis, as well as local business groups, daycare and school staff Along 
with the standard CPR class, instruction in the use of the automated external 
defibrillator is now taught in each class. If you would like to sign up for a class, 
either individually or as a group, please call the station to place your name on the list. 

-104- 



Also ongoing is the Vial of Life program. This is simply a small vial into which you 
place a list of any current medical problems, medications, allergies, doctors name 
and any other pertinent information. It is placed in a designated spot in the refrigerator, 
with a red heart decal on the refrigerator door to alert the responding medical 
personnel of its location. For the responding medical crew to have this information, 
it immediately improves your care. To obtain a vial and list, please call the station and 
we will be happy to bring one out to you. 

In May we were happy to receive our new Pierce ladder truck. After a month of 
attending training, the truck was put into service. This truck will contribute gready 
to firefighter safety, rescue and fire suppression for many years. 

The Hollis Fire Association, comprised of aU members of the fire department, led 
by President Joe White, worked tirelessly on fundraising organizing events. With the 
financial assistance that we received from the generosity of the citizens of Hollis, we 
were able to have a sophisticated steering system built into the new ladder truck, 
enabling the unit to access driveways easily. The assistance also enables us to purchase 
items for safety programs, as weU as sponsor the Hollis Fire Department Explorer 
Post. 

The Hollis Fire Association also continues to administer the Warren H. Towne 
Memorial Scholarship. This year the recipient of the award was Timothy Marquis 
whom is attending the New Hampshire Community Technical CoUege at Laconia. 
Tim has been a member of the Explorers and has since moved up to become a 
valued member of the Hollis Fire Dept. 

The Explorer Post provides an opportunity for students to experience the profession 
of firefighting and emergency medical service. With advisors Ron DeBlois, Rob 
Boggis, Peter DoUoff, Joe Brulotte, Chip Brisk and Alison & John Brackett they 
meet every other Wednesday evening. Any student who is at least fourteen years old 
and has completed the eighth grade is welcome. 

In October, we lost our good friend and Fire Inspector, retired Deputy Fire Marshal 
Allan Britton. Al contributed countiess hours of his own time, reviewing plans and 
conducting fire inspections, as well as helping with our fire prevention programs. His 
professionalism, enthusiasm and love of the fire service will always live in our hearts. 

As October is fire prevention month, most of our efforts were concentrated at the 
Primary and Upper Elementary schools, conducting programs within and outside 
our Family Safety House. Though we had to move our open house to the first of 
November, the weather held out and we did not get called out to a fire as happened 
the previous year. It was still well attended, with everyone enjoying ice cream, 
balloons, fire truck rides and hot cider. Sparky the Fire Dog and Smoky Bear were 
on hand to greet every one. 

-105- 



This year long time members Ted Chamberlain and Dave Duncan retired from the 
Fire Department. Both Ted and Dave were valued members of the department and 
their dedication and experience will be greatiy missed. Together they served over 86 
years. 

We respond to many accidental smoke alarms, usually caused from cooking. However, 
every year we also respond to alarms that activate because of a real fire or carbon 
monoxide leak. Please do not disconnect your smoke detectors because they seem a 
nuisance at times; they will save your life! 

Remember, if you have battery-operated smoke and CO detectors, place one on 
each floor and every bedroom. Test all detectors monthly and replace the batteries 
twice a year. 

A leading cause of home fires are unattended, abandoned or inadequately controlled 
candles. Almost half of all home candle fires start in the bedroom. Do not forget to 
extinguish your candles before leaving the room or going to sleep. 

Another common type of call we are going to are carbon monoxide incidents. Because 
most homes are air tight, just a small leak could become a tragedy. Every home 
should have a CO detector on every level. 

We have responded to some tough calls this year that have each taken a considerable 
amount of time as well as taking a toll emotionally. This department is very formnate 
to have members who are dedicated and unselfishly give their time when someone is 
in need. In order to accomplish this, they also put in many hours of training. I am 
thankful for all their assistance and support. 

Respectfully Submitted, 



Richard Towne 
Fire Chief 



106- 



2002 FIRE DEPARTMENT CALL LOAD 



ALARM: 



FIRE: 



MEDICAL: 



GOOD INTENT: 



SERVICE: 



HAZARDOUS CONDITION: 



Unintentional 


56 


Malfunction 


47 


Building 


3 


Mobile Home 


1 


Brush 


4 


Vehicle 


2 


Appliance 


2 


Electrical 


8 


Tree 


10 


Chimney 


3 


Pole 


1 


Propane 


1 


Oil Burner 


8 


Trash 


3 


Trauma 


61 


Medical 


216 


Search/Rescue 


5 


MVA 


41 


Smoke in building 


16 


Smoke check 


12 


Public Assistance 


29 


Mutual Aid 


12 


Unauthorized burning 


11 


Water problem 


3 


Lockout 


3 


CO Incident 


4 


Hazardous condition 


12 


Hazmat investigation 


2 


Oil spiU 


2 


Gasoline spill 


2 


Propane leak 


4 


Chemical spill 


1 


Wires down 


18 



603 



■107- 



FOREST FIRE WARDEN AND STATE FOREST RANGER 

Your local Forest Fire Warden, Fire Department, and the State of New Hampshire 
Division of Forests and Lands cooperate and coordinate to reduce the risk of wildland 
fires in New Hampshire. To help us assist you, contact your local Forest Fire Warden 
or Fire Department to find out if a permit is required before doing ALL outside 
burning. Fire permits are mandatory for any open burning unless the ground where 
the burning is to be done (and surrounding areas) is completely covered with snow. 
Violations of RSA 227-L:17, the fire permit law and the other burning laws of the 
State of New Hampshire are misdemeanors punishable by fines up to $2,000 and/or 
a year in jail., plus suppression cost. 

A new law effective January 1, 2003 prohibits residential trash burning (RSA 125-N). 
Contact New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services at (800) 498-6868 
or www.des.state.nh.us for more information. 

Help us to protect you an our forest resources. Most New Hampshire wildfires are 
human caused. Homeowners can help protect their homes by maintaining adequate 
green space around the house and make sure that the house number is correct and 
visible. Contact your local Fire Department or the New Hampshire Division of 
Forests and Lands website at www.nhdfl.org or call 271-2217 for wildland fire safety 
information. 

ONLY YOU CAN PREVENT WILDLAND FIRES 
2002 FIRE STATISTICS 

(All fires reported thru November 10, 2002) 
Totals Reported By County Causes of Fires Reported 

# of Fires Acres 



Belknap 52 


13.5 


CarroU 80 


10.5 


Cheshire 39 


17 


Coos 3 


2.5 


Grafton 53 


21 


HiUsborough 108 


54.5 


Merrimack 94 


13.5 


Rockingham 60 


25.5 


Strafford 31 


23 


Sullivan 20 


6 


Total Fires Total Acres 


2002 540 


187 


2001 942 


428 


2000 516 


149 



Arson/ Auspicious 


43 


Camp fire 


31 


Children 


32 


Smoking 


32 


Rekindle of Permit 


3 


Illegal 


7 


Lightning 


36 


Misc* 




*(Misc: powerlines, fireworks 


railroad, ashes, debris. 


structures 


equipment) 





-108- 



HERITAGE COMMISSION 

The consequences of continued population growth in our community reveal 
themselves not only in the loss of open space but also in the loss of our historic 
built environment. Our community's heritage, one that has been so strongly tied to 
the land, is represented in the history and evolution of farming land use and the 
family farms and buildings that sustained the core economy of our community for 
nearly three centuries. This heritage is recorded in the history books but the visual 
qualities of open fields, the structures — stone walls, farmhouses, barns and 
outbuildings are slipping away - a seemingly inevitable consequence of single family 
residential construction taking over the landscape. 

The mission of the HC is to identify, preserve and protect, to our best ability, these 
valued resources of our historic built environment. One of these buildings, the 
Lawrence Barn, a double English-style barn, has a timber frame that we consider to 
be the most significant and valuable of any historic building in our town. It is a 
museum quality artifact that has drawn the attention of preservation experts from 
all over New England and has a value far beyond any comparably sized building of 
modern construction. The quality of the materials, the craftsmanship and the 
complexity of its construction simply could not be duplicated by any carpenter or 
builder today. As a result, the HC has spent a great deal of time this past year in 
developing a plan for the reuse of this remarkable building. When the Recreation 
Fields and Facilities Study Committee finalized their plans for the recreation fields 
on Depot, we were able to identify an appropriate location for the Lawrence Barn on 
Nichols field south of the horse ring. It would replace the current recreation building 
that would be converted for storage. 

We commissioned architectural student, Nathaniel Cram, to build a scale model of 
the Lawrence Barn. This model was used as the centerpiece of the HC's booth at 
Old Home Day and to introduce the concept of the barn as a community center. 
We also commissioned the firm of BMA Architectural Group of Amherst, NH to 
develop the preliminary concept design, complete a code review and prepare 
development budget estimates. This work is now in progress. 

Other preservation projects included deed research and deed preparation for the 
"Annabelle S. Johnson Preserve" which includes the Bailey Mill site on Federal Hill 
Road. Pending a pubHc hearing in February of 2003, this property will be deeded as 
a gift to the Town, under the stewardship of the Heritage Commission, by the Johnson 
heirs. 

Collaboration with the owners of the Noah Dow cooper shop on Broad Street and 
Van Dyke Road was halted when the property changed hands in the spring. However, 



-109- 



recent contact with the new owners leads us to believe that we may be able to assist 
them in preservation plans for this landmark building. 

As part of our ongoing stewardship responsibilities we took site walks including one 
to the Shedd Mill site on Witches Brook. Again, as noted last year, we found evidence 
of continued campfire activity in the area of the mill and further upstream near the 
footbridge. The potential for a forest fire is a matter of serious concern especially 
during these periods of drought. 

We invited Dale Guinn from the NH Dam Bureau to come inspect the Worcester 
Mill Pond Dam to help assess measures needed to reverse the deterioration of the 
dam due to vegetation growth along the dam and resultant leaks. If the dam fails, 
the millpond will be lost and the archaeological remains of the mill downstream will 
be impacted. The HC hopes to work with the Conservation Commission and others 
to secure the dam and develop the area into an historic site along the Hollis trail 
system. 

Transitions: The Wright Farm barn collapsed this summer. This farm has been in 
the hands of the Wright family for longer than another family farm in Hollis. Several 
other barns are showing outward signs of failure with bulging walls or leaking roofs. 
For those with older farm barns or buildings, please contact the Town Hall for 
information on a new law, RSA 79-D, which authorizes municipalities to grant property 
tax relief to barn owners. The law encourages owners to maintain and repair their 
buildings by granting them specific tax relief and assuring them that tax assessments 
will not be increased as a result of new repair work. 

Members attended the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance's Spring Workshop, 
"Saving Community Landmarks and Landscapes" and the roundtable discussion on 
NH barns. Two new books have been added to the HC loan library, "The Granite 
Kiss", Traditions and Techniques of Building New England Stone Walls, by Kevin 
Gardner; and "Preserving Old Barns", Preventing The Loss Of A Valuable Resource, 
by John C. Porter and Francis E. Oilman 

In March we accepted the resignation of Jennifer Nelson. In October, our Vice 
Chairman, William Lawrence passed away after a brave struggle with cancer. His 
family owned the Lawrence barn for nearly a century and generously requested that 
donations in his memory be made the Commission's Heritage Fund for the restoration 
of the barn. Lucy Husk joined us as an alternate member. 

Sharon M. Howe, Chairman Robert Leadbetter, Finance Officer 

William Lawrence, Vice Chairman (deceased) M. Honi Glover 

Lori Law, Clerk Lucy Husk (alt.) 

James Cram, HDC Representative Richard Walker, Selectmen's Rep 



110- 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

The HDC continued its role as a review board for all demolition, remodeling and 
new construction in the Historic District, as well as being the Sign Commission for 
the entire Town as it has since the Town enacted the enabling ordinance in 1971. 
There was a total of 27 applications in 2002, 15 for signs, the rest for a variety of 
purposes: new construction, alterations and additions to existing structures, erection 
of antennas, a pavilion, vinyl siding and minor changes to properties in the District, 
All accepted applications were carefully reviewed and approved. 

As always, the HDC worked closely with the applicants and encouraged them to 
come to us with a conceptual plan before making a formal application. We also 
advise applicants to check with the HDC Secretary to make sure their application is 
complete. In this way, the applicant can be sure that when the fmal application is 
submitted it will be accepted and contain all the information the Commission needs 
to make an informed decision. 

It has always been the goal of the HDC to treat every application fairly and consistentiy. 
We make every effort to ensure applications are heard as speedily as possible and 
that time sensitive work such as re-roofing and painting is expedited. We continue to 
review the booklet Design Guidelines and Regulations and make changes as the need 
arises, particularly with regard to simplifying the application process. Additionally, 
we are preparing a questionnaire which will be sent to aU residents and business 
owners in the District asking for their perceptions and suggestions as to how the 
process can be improved. Of course, all our meetings are open to the pubUc and we 
urge all those interested to attend. 

Finally, we are saddened to report that our Selectmen's Representative, Dan McManus, 
passed away this Fall. We remember him with great fondness and respect. We also 
thank Marti VaUcenti, Kevin McDonnell and Betty Fyfe for their service to the 
Commission and welcome our new Selectmen's representative, Vahrij Manoukian. 

Historic District Commission 

Miriam Gillitt Winer, Chair 

Jim Cram, Vice Chair 

Virginia Martin, Clerk 

Paul Hemmerich 

Hugh Mercer 

Marilyn Wehrle, Alternate 

Liz Barbour, Alternate 

Ed Makepeace, Planning Board 

Vahrij Manoukian, Board of Selectmen 



■111- 



HOLLIS SPACE NEEDS AND FACILITIES STUDY 
COMMITTEE 

The Hollis Space Needs and Facilities Study Committee was formed to review the 
space needs of the Town departments (not including the schools) and work 
cooperatively to formulate a plan to address the facility needs of the town while 
considering the issues of space, budget, historical design and preservation. The 
Committee operated based on a warrant article approved at the March 2001 Town 
Meeting and a scope of work. The warrant article, scope of work, agendas, minutes, 
and the final report are available on the web site at: www.hollis.nh.us/FaciHties.htm. 
The committee consisted of a volunteer group of eight residents and a representative 
from the Nashua Regional Planning Commission who acted as the non-voting Chair. 
The committee met twice monthly. 

Since the first meeting was held in June 2001, the committee developed an inventory 
of existing town facilities, oversaw the development of a Buildout Analysis, procured 
an architectural analysis of the Town Hall, projected future needs for each Town 
facilit); and completed the final Facilities Space Needs Study report. 

The Buildout Analysis, developed with the assistance of the Nashua Regional Planning 
Commission, estimates the future housing units and population that could be 
accommodated in Hollis when all of the remaining vacant unconstrained land is 
developed. The Buildout Analysis enabled the committee to estimate the provision 
of future town services and facilities as the town grows. A copy of the Buildout 
Analysis is available from the Planning Department . 

The final Facilities Space Needs Study report was completed on December 12, 2002 
and includes a description of existing conditions, a projection of future needs, and 
provides recommendations for the following facilities: 1) Town Hall; 2) Library; 3) 
Recreation; 4) Public Works; 5) Fire Department; and 6) Police Department. The 
final report is available on the web site. 

Members of the committee continue to work with the Selectmen to implement the 
recommendations. Thanks are extended to the committee members who have 
contributed their efforts over the past 1 8 months. 

Steven Heuchert, Chair, Hollis Facilities Space Needs Study Committee 



■112- 



INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 

The Town's Informadon Technology Specialist preforms day-to-day systems upkeep 
and troubleshooting. In addition, we are continually expanding and improving 
information systems in all Town departments. The Vision Appraisal system went 
live in September and a computer was setup for public access to property card 
information. A duplex laser printer was just added to assessing to allow printing this 
information in their office. 

For next year, we are currently waiting to see if a grant goes through to upgrade the 
Police department to a new Records and Dispatch software system including 
upgrading computers. 

Review of 2002: 

Replaced 4 computers: finance desktop and laptop, communications, 

building coordinator 

Setup old desktop for police, public access at townhall and old laptop for 

fire department 

Replaced 3 monitors: DPW, townhall, communications 

Replaced 2 printers: fire, laser for communications 

Added a duplex laser printer for assessing 

Purchased fixed asset software for finance department 

Continued maintenance and support of in house software, including Police 

and Communications 

Replaced scanner for building department 

Upgraded MS Works versions 

Purchased and installed MS FrontPage for fire department and Adobe 

PageMaker for townhall 

Replaced two computers at the library 

Added software to public internet access computers to prevent changes 



■113- 



LAND PROTECTION STUDY COMMITTEE 

The Selectmen appointed the Hollis Land Protection Study Committee in 2000 to 
recommend acquisitions of open land for protection with specially issued municipal 
bonds. Its members are Peter Baker (member Hollis Conservation Commission and 
Committee Secretary), John Eresian (Chairman), Gerald Gartner, Morton Goulder 
(member Hollis Budget Committee) Bruce Hardy, Thomas Jambard (Hollis 
Selectman), June Litwin and Roger Saunders. The Committee has generally directed 
its efforts to protecting parcels prioritized by the Hollis Conservation Commission. 

The 2002 Town Meeting approved Warrant Article 2 authorizing bonding of up to 
$3.5 million for open land acquisition to protect the natural heritage and rural character 
of the Town. The bonding authority was limited to calendar 2002 and required that 
each specific purchase be ratified by majority vote at a Special Town Meeting. The 
language of Warrant Article 2 established a legal precedent in New Hampshire because 
it allows calling Special Town Meetings for this purpose throughout the year without 
seeking the permission of the Superior Court. 

Such a Special Town Meeting was held on November 20 and approved purchasing 
the 46 acre Glover property on Nevins Road for $470,000. The purchase price was 
below the land's appraised value and the Town is grateful for Honi Glover's generosity. 
The November meeting also approved purchasing the 32 acre Parker Pond property 
off Long Hill Road for the professionally evaluated price of $740,000, subject to 
subdivision approval by the Hollis Planning Board. An Article to acquire 90 acres of 
Woodmont Orchard property was defeated. On December 31 the unapproved 
remaining balance of 2002 bonding authorization expired. 

As reported last year the 2001 Town Meeting authorized bonding of up to $2 million 
for open land acquisition and approved purchasing the 21.4 acre Dunklee Pond 
property off Silver Lake Road for $200,000 and 39 acres of development rights on 
the Hall property on Depot Road for $507,000. Both purchases were at the appraised 
value and have since been completed. The deed for the Hall property specifies that 
the restrictions of the development rights shall run with the land "in perpetuity" and 
cannot be altered. 

Thus, during 2001 and 2002 the Town has approved spending a total of $1,917,000 
of municipal bonded funds to protect 138.4 acres of open land, impacting the tax 
rate by about twenty cents ($.20) per thousand assessed valuation. Special thanks go 
to Bruce Hardy, Roger Saunders and Gerald Gartner for serving as the Committee's 
chief negotiators for the various purchases. 



-114- 



During the year Lorin Rydstrom resigned from the Committee and was appointed 
to the Board of Selectmen. Lorin contributed importandy to the efforts of the 
Land Protection Study Committee and we gready appreciate his services. 

John G. Eresian, Chairman 



■115- 



OLD HOME DAY 

September 13™ and 14™ 

Old Home Day for 2002 was held on Friday and Saturday, September 13* and 14*. 
As always, this year's events were successful due to the continued support of the 
people and businesses of Hollis. The weather cooperated and all of the events were 
heavily attended and enjoyed by all. 

The theme for OHD 2002 was the "Roads of Hollis - 250 years of Family History". 
Over twenty five of our local roads were represented in our theme tent which included 
actual street signs and posters depicting the history of each road. The theme also 
saluted the Hollis DPW and all that they do in their job as the keepers of local roads. 
The theme was also represented in the parade, which featured DPW trucks along 
with creative floats, one which cleverly depicted Witches Spring Road. 

Friday night was filled with entertainment for both young and young at heart. The 
evening featured tethered balloon rides, concession stands and amusement rides. 
The bands and DJ kept everyone dancing until well after 10:00PM. 

Saturday's events kicked off with the parade followed by the opening of the booths 
with craftsman, demonstrators, theme tent, over 90's and 60's hospitality tents along 
with many of our local groups and businesses. The barbecue was better than ever 
and the team served apple wood cooked chicken until it was gone. Although Samrday 
was very warm it did not hamper people enjoying all of the days entertainment. The 
town celebration ended with a dazzling fireworks display. 

Respectfully submitted by, 

Mary P. Smith 

Chairman 

Hollis Old Home Day Committee 



■116- 



2002 PLANNING BOARD REPORT 

The Planning Board met twenty-two times during 2002 to review seven subdivisions, 
nine site plans, three lot line adjustments, three conceptual plans and two scenic road 
hearings. The Board reluctantly accepted Susan Leadbetter's resignation in August. 
Susan frequently took the extra time to attend statewide planning conferences, giving 
her broad focus and the latest information on Statewide planning issues. She also 
served on the Master Plan committee and provided a critical link between that 
committee and the Planning Board. We thank Susan for her hard work and dedication. 

Two potential major subdivisions have required considerable time and effort on behalf 
of the Planning Board and staff The projects are Sky View III, a proposed 19-lot 
HOSPD (Hollis Open Space Planned Development), and a major subdivision for Z 
& L Development on a large parcel of land once used as an apple orchard by 
Woodmont Orchards. Both of these projects raise a number of complex issues. 
The configuration of the Sky View plan is dependent upon a waiver of an important 
subdivision regulation designed to minimize devastation of the landscape to achieve 
the required 8% road grade. As this report goes to press the planning board is 
conducting hearings and has scheduled a site walk to review the full implications of 
the developers' requests for this waiver. One of the primary issues surrounding the 
Z & L project is the environmental question concerning development of an old 
orchard site. Preliminary studies have been conducted and more review will follow 
as the project unfolds. 

As in past years, the Planning Board spent a great deal of time on ongoing ordinance 
review. This never-ending process is one of the most important tasks facing the 
Board. The objective is to develop legally sound ordinances and regulations designed 
to uphold the goals and objectives of the Master Plan, and in particular, preservation 
of the rural character of our town, while at the same time recognizing the right of 
landowners to develop their property. For the past year, the Board has been working 
on an innovative ordinance designed to protect the scenic character and rural 
environment of the Town. Specific objectives of the ordinance are to preserve 
Hollis' woodlands and fields, leave scenic views uninterrupted, eliminate new 
construction on hilltops and ridges, and promote development that is designed to fit 
into the landscape rather than altering the landscape to fit the development. The 
ordinance will apply to any subdivision or site plan application that takes place on 
any property included in a list of critical properties first identified in the Master Plan 
and currentiy being updated, as well as to any property that has been the subject of 
a clear cut timber removal operation with ten years from the date of the application. 
The Planning Board and staff, with the assistance of our town attorney, Bill Drescher, 
has spent a tremendous amount of time and effort in development of this innovative 
land use ordinance, and looks forward to bringing it to the voters. The Board is also 



■117- 



constantly monitoring and reviewing the wetland buffer and aquifer protection 
ordinances for changes to make them as up-to-date and user friendly as possible. 
A list of Planning Board activity for 2002 follows this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ed Makepeace, Chairman 

On behalf of the entire Planning Board and staff (Ed Makepeace, Chairman, David 
Petry, Vice Chairman; Rick Hardy, Cathy Hoffman, Arthur LeBlanc, Teresa Rossetti, 
Don Ryder, Ex Officio; Susan Leadbetter (Alt.), Doug Tamasanis (Alt.). Staff: Mark 
Archambault, NRPC; Virginia Mills. 

PLANNING BOARD ACTIVITY - 2002 



MONTH 

JAN 



NAME 



PROJECT 



# OF LOTS 



Sailing Assoc. /Manoukian Site Plan-Pharmacy N/A 

M&K Johnson Lot Line Relocation N/A 

Public Hearing Lighting Regulations N/A 

K. Tully Wetiand Buffer Waiver N/A 

Workshop Adult Entertainment/ 

Back Lots in Indus. Zone N/A 



FEB 



MARCH 



APRIL 



MAY 



Public Hearing 

Lone Pine Hunters Club 

Hollis/Brookline Coop 

Allen/Graves 
L & H Trust 
Town of Hollis 
Workshop 

Thibeault Corp. 
P&J Scott 

Thibeault Corp. 
PB Workshop 



Amend Wetiands OrdinanceN/A 

Site Plan (Withdrawn) N/A 

Site Plan - Track N/A 

Subdivision 2 

Subdivision 5 

Site Plan-Radio Antenna N/A 

Lighting Regulations N/A 

Conceptual Dis. Subdiv N/A 

Subdivision 2 

Conceptual Dis. (cont) N/A 
Adult Entertainment, 
Lighting Regs, Innovative 

Land Use Concepts N/A 



-118- 



MONTH 


NAME 


PROTECT # OF LOTS 


JUNE 


Holt Lumber 


Site Plan 


N/A 




PB Workshop 


Adult Entertainment, 
Lighting Regs, Innovative 
Land Use Concepts 






Public Hearing 


Tree Cutting, Flagg Road 


N/A 




Public Hearing 


Min. Road Standards, 








Driveway Permit Regs 


N/A 




MScB Weston 


Subdivision (Withdrawn) 


2 




PB Workshop 


Lighting Regs, Innovative 
Land Use Concepts 




JULY 


E Woods 


Subdivision 


2 




P&B Scott 


Lot Line Relocation 


N/A 




LeMay Trust 


Subdivision 


2 


AUGUST 


Town of Hollis 


Site Plan-radio antenna 


N/A 




Z&L Development 


Conceptual Discussion 


N/A 




Public Hearing 


Zoning Revisions 


N/A 


SEPT 


J Graves 


Lot Line Relocation 


N/A 




Z&L Development 


Conceptual Dis. (cont) 


N/A 




Scenic Road Hearing 


Tree Cutting 


N/A 




PB Workshop 


Viewscape Ordinance 


N/A 


OCT 


Raisanen Homes 


Subdivision 


3 




Z&L Development 


Conceptual Discussion 


N/A 




O'Shaughnessy 


Subdivision 


2 




PB Workshop 


Viewscape Ordinance 


N/A 


NOV 


Flintrock Corp. 


Wedands Permit 


N/A 




PB Workshop 


Viewscape Ordinance 


N/A 




HoUis Pre-School 


Site Plan (revisit parking) 


N/A 




Hollis Elementary 


Site Plan (playground pavilion)N/A 




PB Workshop 


Viewscape Ordinance 


N/A 


DEC 


Hollis Vet Hospital 


Site Plan 


N/A 




PB Workshop 


Viewscape Ordinance, 








Other Zoning Changes 


N/A 




Overlook Golf Course 


Conceptual Discussion 


N/A 



■119- 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

As discomforting as it may be to the taxpayers of the town, a hard fact 
that needs to be considered, as we contemplate the allocation of town funds for the 
coming year, is this: AS THE TOWN GROWS, SO MUST THE TOWN'S 
DEPARTMENTS GROW 

Nowhere is this more apparent than with our schools. As the population 
of our town has increased dramatically over the past twenty years, we have recognized 
the need to provide adequate schools to educate our children. However, the schools 
are not alone in their need to increase staff and space in order to serve the needs of 
an increasing population. 

The police station, which also houses the Communications Department, is 
experiencing a serious space crunch. As our staff increases in number, we are 
quickly running out of office space, locker room space and work space. Due to the 
lack of office space, our secretary has been relegated to what was previously a file 
storage area. It is important that we not allow this problem to reach a crisis level. 
When our station was built in 1988, future expansion was provided for, and there is 
approximately 6,000 square feet of unfinished office space on the second floor of 
our building. Hopefully, the town fathers will recognize the need to do this work as 
soon as possible, thereby providing us with the room we need to properly do our 
work. 

In the meantime, we remain committed to provide the Town of HoUis 
with the very highest level of professional police services. Our citizens, on a daily 
basis, support us in our efforts in every way, and that support is greatiy appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Richard H. Darling 
Chief of Police 



■120- 



SUMMARY OF POLICE ACTIVITY 





1999 


2000 


2001 


2002 


Requests for Service 


3,833 


3,879 


4,258 


4,260 


Response to Alarms 


530 


510 


480 


448 


Motor Vehicle Accidents 










Without Injury 


157 


156 


176 


217 


With Injury 


38 


21 


32 


30 


With FataHty 














Burglaries 


22 


16 


7 


8 


Thefts 


65 


59 


65 


73 


Narcotic Investigation 


19 


44 


51 


3 


Runaway/Missing Person 


13 


21 


11 


21 


Miscellaneous 










Police Service 


520 


593 


793 


732 


Motor Vehicle Complaint 


280 


275 


287 


295 


Suspicious Activity 


191 


159 


173 


184 


Vandalism/Criminal Mischief 


142 


192 


144 


166 


Suicide/ Attempts 


2 


2 


1 


2 


Alcohol Related Offenses 










DWI 


22 


16 


29 


32 


Protective Custody 


12 


5 


4 


66 


Arrests 










Felonies 


39 


46 


77 


50 


Misdemeanors 


105 


95 


112 


113 


Violations 


715 


594 


599 


560 



-121- 



ANIMAL CONTROL DEPARTMENT 

The year 2002 brought several changes to the Hollis Animal Control Department. 
Mary Ellen Lozoides moved out of town and was replaced by Jayne Belanger, who 
held that position from 1989 to 1997. Leslie Bensinger continues in her position as 
assistant Animal Control Officer and Jennifer Belanger was hired as an additional 
assistant. 

The Animal Control Department continues as a part-time, "on-call" Department. 
This requires the availability of an animal control officer and the inherent delay 
required to "call" one by means of a radio pager before you can expect a response to 
request for assistance. In the event that an animal control officer is not available, 
when you need one, the on duty police officer will respond, depending on his/her 
other work load at the time. The wait for a Police Officer to clear up his other call 
load often results in a long delay period before an animal control call is answered. 

Although both Town and State laws require all dogs to be licensed, the number of 
unlicensed dogs has increased this year. Licensing and ID tags will almost guarantee 
that your dog will be returned to you safely if it should stray. Such license and ID 
tags are extremely helpful if your pet is injured & needs medical treatment. A dog 
with a current tag always gets treatment quicker than one without. 

The number of lost cats has also increased this year. Because there is no Town or 
State leash law on cats, we are not allowed to pick up any cats whether strays or a 
neighbors problem cat. If you are having a problem with a cat, you must talk with 
your neighbors & try to find the owner. If you think it is a stray, and you want 
something done about it, your only option is to take it to a Humane Society on your 
own. The Town kennel is not equipped to handle cats and we are limited to only 
picking up injured cats & transporting them to a Veterinarian or Humane Society. 

The number of nuisance dogs, dogbites, injured animals & at large horses has 
decreased this year, but, the number of "at large" dogs has increased. This is, in part, 
due to the fact that Hollis no longer patrols the streets for loose dogs on a regular 
basis as it once did. 

I would like to thank all residents for your support & cooperation in the past year. 
After having been away since 1997, 1 am getting back into the routine of the Animal 
Control Dept. This job, to me, is Like riding a bicycle or driving a standard shift 
vehicle, once you learn how, you never forget. All my prior training has not gone to 
waste nor been in vain. I wish all residents a pleasant & safe 2003! 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jayne Belanger , Animal Control Officer 



-122- 



RECREATION COMMISSION 

The Recreation Commission has been busy this year expanding recreational programs 
available to the town residents. This year the commission introduced both boys and 
girls lacrosse for 10-14 year olds. A new High School basketball program was introduced 
and based upon its success will be expanded next year. This year we have plans to 
improve the condition of all the recreational fields. Improved and expanded grounds 
maintenance and a new irrigation system will cover all areas currentiy not watered. 

The Recreation Commission would like to thank all the parent volunteers, without 
whom, the programs offered would not be possible. The combined support of the 
town and volunteers helps the commission keep the cost of all of its programs afford- 
able. A special Thank You to the Cal Ripken program and its parent volunteers who 
financed the refurbishment of both baseball fields with new sod, infield clay and dug- 
outs. 

Kevin McDonnell, Recreation Program Director 

Recreation Commission Members 

Martha Dufresne 

Teresa Rossetti 

Mike Moran 

Gary Valich, Co-Chair 

Dave Golia, Co-Chair 



-123- 



RECREATIONAL FIELDS & FACILITIES STUDY 
COMMITTEE 

The Recreational Fields and Facilities Study Committee was established to review the 
"Hardy Lot" as it exists on Depot Road and Nichols Field (in keeping with the original 
vision of Hollis Nichols) and to determine which recreational "spaces" should be devel- 
oped to best benefit Hollis. 

The committee occasionally met over the summer to firm up prices and review the 
proposed development plan. A plan was submitted to the Selectmen and will be voted 
on during town meeting. 

Sincere thanks are extended to all committee members and volunteers who have con- 
tributed to this committee over the past year. 

Kevin McDonnell, Co-Chair 

Doug Cleveland, Co-Chair 

Tom Davies 

Tom Enright 

Steve Luce 

Steve Simons 

Cheryl Beaudry 

Anne Burke 

Paul Deterling 

Honi Glover 

Steve Realmutto 

James Petropoulis 



124- 



SUPERVISORS OF THE CHECKLIST 
ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR 2002 

Nancy Jambard, Town Clerk, stated after the 2002 State General Election that Hollis 
always has a big voting turnout. /'We're a big voting town, we really are." Hollis held 
the record in the local town area for the State General Election with 81.7% of the 
registered voters turning out. We, as Supervisors of the Checklist, always wonder 
where the other 1 8.3% are that do not show up to vote? The best we have ever done 
in Hollis is when Ronald Reagan ran for President in 1 980 and 95% of those registered 
showed up at the polls. The Supervisors hope that someday we can beat the record 
of 1980. This year created great interest in voting because of the new district that 
was formed. We had eight people running for four places in the House of 
Representatives from the towns of Hollis, Brookline and Mason. 

There is usually a big influx of people that register on any given election day. The 
Supervisors always hope that more people would register before Election Day. The 
public is reminded that they can register at the Town Clerk's office or when the 
Supervisors are in session. These times are always published in the local papers and 
on the cable TV channel. In 2002 forty-two people registered on Town Election 
Day in March; fifty-four registered at the State Primary Election in September; one 
hundred-sixty registered at the 2002 State General Election in November. 

As of November 2002, when a Special Town Meeting was called, there were 787 
registered Democrats; 1,893 registered Republicans; and 1,715 Undeclared voters, 
giving a total of 4,395 registered voters in the town of Hollis, NH. 

Julia L. McCoy "J^^^Y" 
Lydia L, Schellenberg 
Jessica Squires "Jan" 
Supervisors of the Checklist 



125- 



"WINDOWS ON HOLLIS PAST" WEBSITE 

"Windows on Hollis Past" is a computerized museum of over 200 historic Hollis 
properties on the Town's website at www.hollis.nh.us /windowsonhollispast . Funded 
by a three year grant from the Department of the Interior through New Hampshire's 
Department of Historic Resources^ "Windows" has for the first time gathered, 
accurately mapped and fully documented the pictures and histories of Hollis's most 
important historical places in a computerized database which is easily accessible and 
permanendy preserved. Those without computers or internet access can use the 
Town Library's computer or borrow discs containing all information. 

Since opening on September 25 the innovative site has been named as Website of 
the Week by NH.com and is referenced on several related websites around New 
England and the Country including that of the National Park Service. The $55,000 
cash grant was completely matched on a 60/40 basis by volunteer time of over 100 
residents and Hollis Town Hall employees with generous help from the Nashua 
Regional Planning Commission. It would not have been possible without the willing 
cooperation of the property owners. Properties not wishing to be on the web are in 
hard copy at Town Hall. 

The virtual museum is interactive. Visitors can click on the six panes of an authentic 
Eighteenth Century window frame and open "places to visit," "historic sites," 
"architecture," "resources," "people and oral history," "mission, credits, and contact 
us." These in turn offer more window links to oral histories, scrapbook of personages- 
biographies, private collections, kid's page. The Wheeler House (the Historical Society), 
Monson, mills, cemeteries. Old Home Day and Ag Ed Day demos. "Historic Sites" 
has interactive maps and clicking on the map-lot numbers opens that property's 
written and photographic history. Many aspects of Hollis history and culture are 
documented with text, photographs, old maps, original documents, collections, and 
sound file stories and pictures of how farm tasks were done. Design allows expansion. 

In gathering scattered historic information Town volunteers made intensive studies 
of four prototypes of old farm buildings including the Lawrence Barn^, assisted 
professional archeological documentation^ of three sites leading to an easement on 
a Native American Indian site, and prepared several nominations to the State and 
National Register of Historic Places (see example, "Woodmont"). Precise mapping 
enables locating several sites lost since 1999. 

"Windows" was created with no cash cost to HoUis taxpayers. The "Technology 
Applied to Historical Survey" grant purchased a digital camera, PowerPoint projector, 
laptop computer, tape recorders, and computer software, which remain Town property. 
It paid for professional help: organizational, archeological, technical and website 
design services. Matching volunteer time was devoted primarily to gathering and 
organizing the wealth of historic information, accurately mapping the properties 



-126- 



I 



with GPS technology, and seeking permission from property owners for their sites 
to be included identified only by map-lot for privacy. After State budget cuts, the 
contract for website design was supplemented by private donations. 

Heartfelt thanks go the many people who gave skills, memories, and time. Because 
of space only a few can be named here and not enough can be said about the depth 
of their gifts'^: • first and foremost: property owners; • second the Selectmen who 
backed the project allowing use of Town equipment and a place on the Town Website 
and the use of about 1.6 hours each week collectively of Town Employees' time; • 
the local DAR wrote the basic history used; • the Historical Society lent old photos 
as did individuals; • the Heritage Commission (HHC) prioritized locations to be 
mapped (agiricultural properties 1730-1830) and did mapping the first year with 
NRPC's John Vogl; • Director Singelakis, donated NRPC time and equipment beyond 
the contract; • Field Coordinator, Gerry Haley, with Trails Committee GPS equipment, 
mapped, "sleuthed" and documented many locations and their backgrounds; • The 
Historic District Commission obtained permission to show some properties and 
allowed use of the map of the Historic District newly listed on the National Register; 
• John Leslie Computing generously hosted the site; • Robin Loveland efficientiy 
organized the web material; • long hours and expert information and knowledge 
were given by: Hilda Hildreth, Bob Hanley, Sharon Howe, John Butier, Tim Desclos, 
Eleanor Whittemore and Ruth Sifert, Harriet Hills, Woodbury Bell, Joseph Goldberg 
and Allan Miller • The oral history project with Mabel Hills, interviewed Honi Glover, 
Bob Gould, Hilda Hildreth, Harriet Hills, Mabel Hills, Dick Walker, Irene West, and 
Elsie Worcester. Interviewers were Joan Dunn, Liz MacMillan, Marty Rogers, Becky 
Crowther, John Sias, and others still at work. A sample is on the web (a volunteer 
with sound file editing experience is desired to add more); all histories are on CDs at 
the Library; • Representative Dick Drisko was liaison assuring promises on fuU financial 
reimbursement were met by the State. 

Based on the number of visits (c.3000) and the email responses (all positive), 
awareness of Town historic and cultural resources has increased; interesting questions 
(The Heritage Commission and Historical Society are helping to answer) and valuable 
new information has been emailed. I hope you will visit www.hollis.nh.us/ 
windowsonhollispast and see what you know or can learn of our very special town. 

Van Eresian, Project Coordinator 

'This survey was financed in part with a federal "Historic Preservation Fund " matching grant from the 

National Park Service of the US Dept. of the Interior, through the NH Div. of Historical Resources/ 

State Historic Preservation Office. However, the contents and opinions do not necessarily reflect the 

views or policies of the Dept. of the Interior or the State of NH. 

^The grant funded honorarium to timber frame specialists on the Lawrence Barn and the Barn 

Reconnaissance by the Heritage Commission. 

^Sargent Museum of Archeology, Wes Stinson; Gary Hume State Archeologist 



127- 



"^Debbie Adams, Denise April, Karen Alexander, Frank Ballou, Woodbury Bell, Nancy Bibbins, Sue Birch, 
Mary Brickley, John Buder, Connie Eva Cain, Paul Calabria, Douglas Cleveland, Shirley Cohen, Ruth and 
Bob Coleman, Jim Cram, Becky Crowther, Bob Cudworth, Kevin Chisholm, Dick Darling, Martha Davis, 
Eric Demas, Dawn Desaulniers, Tim Desclos, Geri and Russ Dickerman, Candy Dochstader, Cynthia 
Dokmo, Bill Drescher, Dick Drisko, Joan Dunn, Frank and Sue Durham, Nancy Dutton, Janet EHades, 
John and Dave Eresian, Chrisdne Fonda, Julie and Randy Forgaard, Ben Frost, Carolyn Gargasz, Gerry 
Gartner, Jim Gavin, Anna and John Gelazauskas, Fred Gemmill, Honi Glover, Joseph Goldberg, Bob 
Gould, John and Ruth Greenaway, Cay Gregg, Gerry Haley, Cath Hallsworth, Jim Hartley, Elwin and Chip 
Hardy, Helena Hayden, Steve Heuchert, Hilda Hildreth, Carl Hills, Harriet Hills, Henry Hills, Mabel Hills, 
Cathy Hoffman, Sharon and Marion Howe, Gary Hume, Lucy and Dick Husk, Jim Isaak, Nancy and Tom 
Jambard, Annabelle Johnson, Richard Kalin, Louise King, Lori Law, Bill and Janet Lawrence, Brian Lawrence, 
Doris Lindgren, Robin Loveland, Katherine Lumbard, Kevin McDonnell, John McAlister, Liz MacMillan, 
Dan McManus, Dick Mehlhorn, Allan Miller, Virginia Mills, Sheila Mitchell, Lynn Emerson Munroe, 
Jennifer Nelson, Nancy Phillips, Marcia Poulin, Dotsie Prozeller, Joe Quinn, Diane Rizzo, Marty Rogers, 
Steve Russo, Don Ryder, David Seager, John Sias, Ruth Sifert, Alice Simonds, Lynne Simonfy, Andrew 
Singelakis, Don Smith, Pete Smith, Jennifer Starr, Wes Stinson, Bud Swanson, Joan Tinklepaugh, Hilda 
Tolles, Dick Tolstrup, Barbara Townsend, Debbie VecchiareUi, John Vogl, Dick Walker, Diane West, Irene 
West, Eleanor and Frank Whittemore, Linda Wilson, Miriam and Bob Winer, Elsie Worcester. 



-128- 



TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 

Early freeze up and snow hindered our efforts to install the "Beaver Stop" culvert on 
the causeway road this fall, but it will be installed in the spring. This should eliminate 
the problem of the pesky beavers on one trail! 

A timber harvest was planned on Tyng Hill and Potato Hollow, but it was not carried 
out in 2002. This will hopefully be put out to bid in the spring of 2003. 

With the help of Matt Dutile, a Hollis Troop 12 Boy Scout, and the help of a number 
of other Scouts, the Trails Committee was able to open up some trails and put in a 
bridge on Parker Pond Brook to create an access to the Town Forest across the 
Wright land on Wheeler Road. The Town Forest Committee thanks the Boy Scouts 
and the Hollis Trails Committee for their efforts. 

Respectfully submitted: 

Craig Birch 
Bill Burton 
Ted Chamberlain 
Steve Briggs 
Steve Beaulieau 



-129- 



TRAILS COMMITTEE 

The Mollis Trails Committee was formed by the Board of Selectmen, at the urging 
of the State, to preserve and protect the multi-use trails in Mollis. There is a well 
established trail network in Mollis which has met the recreational needs of Mollis 
citizens for many years. Mowever, many of the trails have been lost in recent years 
due to development. The Trails Committee, a volunteer group of dedicated Mollis 
citizens, is concerned with the protection, identification, mapping and maintenance 
of existing trails, as well as the relocation of trails lost due to development. 

The year 2002 brought member changes with the appointment of Sherry Wyskiel as 
Chairman. Doug Cleveland who has served as Chairman remains on the committee 
as Co-Chairman. Doug has donated countiess hours to the Trails Committee and 
the Committee would not be what it is today without Doug's dedication. Art Kinsley 
and Greg Larkin joined the committee and brought the computer expertise needed 
for mapping and the website. 

Due to the heavy rains in June, high humidity in the summer, strong winds in 
September the trails were overgrown and impassable in many areas. The Trails 
Committee along with volunteers from the Mollis Area Equestrians and Nor'easters 
Snowmobile Club worked all through the fall to clear existing and open new trails. 

Specific accomplishments in 2002: 

• New trail established in the Rocky Pond Road Conservation area. 

• Trails Committee website updated 

• GPS mapping problems with Nashua Regional Planning resolved. 

• GPS of trails continued. 

• Cleared new trails in the Town Forest to connect from Dunklee Pond to a new 

trail and bridge over Parker Brook built by the Boy Scouts. 

• Took apart the Elementary School playground saved wood for future projects 

• Worked on protection of Parker Pond from development, a critical link in town 

wide trail system. :^J 

• Flagged new trail to connect Woodmont to Mildreth Conservation Land. 

• 1 St annual Town Wide Trails Maintenance Day held in October. 

• Trails off of Rideout Road cleared 

• Mission Statement issued 

A sincere thank you to all Trails Committee members. Special thanks to those 
volunteers from the Mollis Area Equestrians and the Nor'easters Snowmobile Club. 
Thank you to all who helped clear trails on Town Wide Trails. The Mollis Trails 
system is one of the many reasons that make Mollis a special place to live. 

Sherry Wyskiel, Chairman Mollis Trails Committee 



130- 



ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 

The Zoning Board of Adjustment is a quasi- judicial board which functions under 
very specific guidance established by the Mollis ordinance and New Hampshire law 
The Hollis ZBA typically meets on the second Thursday of each month to decide on 
presented cases. The ZBA received a total of 51 applications during 2002; 38 appeals 
were granted, 8 appeals denied, 2 cases tabled, 1 application was withdrawn prior to 
the hearing, 1 application was dismissed by the Board and the Board refused to 
consider 1 application. 

This year the Zoning Board of Adjustment has seen an increase in the number of 
applications for home occupations, with a record number of 5 applications being 
granted. A home occupation is any business that is conducted on the premises by 
the resident of the dwelling, is conducted in a manner which does not impact the 
character of the neighborhood, meets the specific requirements of the home 
occupation ordinance and complies with the general provisions of the zoning 
ordinance. 

The Zoning Board of Adjustment is comprised of 5 voting members and 5 alternates. 
These volunteers donate their time and energy to hear the many appeals for variances, 
special exceptions, equitable waivers and administrative decisions. The Board must 
consistentiy interpret the Hollis zoning ordinance as it applies to each specific case. 

Hollis Zoning Board of Adjustment - Membership 

John Andruszkiewicz, Chairman Brian Major, Vice-Chairman 

Mark Johnson, Member Allan Miller, Member 

Richard Walker, Member Jim Belanger, Alternate 

Jim Kelley, Alternate Ray Lindsay, Alternate 

S. Robert Winer, Alternate Vacancy 



Respectfully submitted, 
Deborah Adams, Secretary 



131- 



2002 Zoning Board of Adjustment Cases 

Hearing 
Case # Date To Permit 

Appeal from an Administrative Decision 

Denied 

106 WITCHES SPRING RD 

2002-23 6/13/2002 Installation of Crematorium as an 
accessory use to Pet Cemetery 

Total' 1 

Granted 

7 PINE HILL RD 

2002-25 7/11/2002 Creation of minor subdivision 

Total' 1 

Equitable Waiver 

Granted 

22 CRESTWOOD DR 

2002-39 10/10/2002 Location of shed encroaching upon front 
yard setback 
66 CRESTWOOD DR 

2002-43 11/14/2002 Location of garage 
Total' 2 

Motion for Rehearing 
Denied 

118 WHEELER RD 

2002-05a 4/ 1 1 /2002 Rehearing of Case 2002-05a 
Total' 1 

Granted 

69 HANNAH DR 

2002-10 5/9/2002 Rehearing of application for construction 

of inground swimming pool. 
15 WOOD LN 

2002-33 11/14/2002 Rehearing of application for Variance to 
permit construction of Single Family 
Total 2 

Special Exception 
Granted 

106 WITCHES SPRING RD 

2002-22 6/13/2002 EstabHshment of a Pet Cemetery 
Total' I 



-132- 



Hearing 
Case* Date To Permit 

Special Exception - Accessory Dwelling Unit 

Granted 

7 NEVINS RD 

2002-02 1/10/2002 Construction of accessory dwelling unit. 
40 FLAGG ROAD 

2002-17 5/9/2002 Construction of accessory dwelling unit. 

Total 2 

Withdrawn 

57 FEDERAL HILL RD 

2002-03 1/10/2002 Construction of accessory dwelling unit. 

Total 1 

Special Exception - Home Occupation 

Denied 

118 WHEELER RD 

2002-01 1/10/2002 Kitchen/bath showroom and design 

Total 1 

Granted 

118 WHEELER RD 

2002-05a 2/14/2002 Kitchen/bath design studio 
101 BROAD ST 

2002-07 3/12/2002 Computer software consultant 
219 FEDERAL HILL RD 

2002-11 4/25/2002 Custom quilting services 
28 OLD RUNNELLS BRIDGE RD 

2002-19 5/9/2002 Home occupation, namely; Prospect Cards 

Direct 
118 BROAD ST 

2002-27 8/8/2002 EstabHshment of Bed & Breakfast 

Total 5 

Refused 

71 NARTOFF RD 

2002-04 3/12/2002 Storage of landscape equipment 

Total 1 



133- 



Hearing 
Case* Date To Permit 

Special Exception - Nonconforming Lot & Structure 

Granted 

123-2 SILVER LAKE RD 

2002-08 4/11/2002 Demolitdon of existing SFR and 
construction of new SFR. 
28 RIDGE RD 

2002-38 10/10/2002 Construction of garage, living room and 
master bedroom addition 
Total' 2 

Special Exception - Nonconforming Lot 

Granted 

118 WHEELER RD 

2002-05 2/14/2002 Alterations and repairs to barn 
87 SILVER LAKE RD 

2002-06 2/14/2002 Renovadon of existing unfinished portion 
of basement for use as recreation room, 
computer room and storage. 
163 DEPOT RD 

2002-09 4/11/2002 Construction of handicap ramp 
118 WHEELER RD 

2002-15 5/9/2002 Construction of enclosed swimming pool. 

17 TWISS LN 

2002-16 5/9/2002 Construction of storage shed. 

327 BROAD ST 

2002-18 5/9/2002 Construction of inground swimming pool. 

90 HOWE LN 

2002-20 5/9/2002 Construction of master bedroom and 

family room and renovation of 2 existing 
bedrooms into bathroom and closet and 
renovation of existing family room into 
guest room. 
93 BROAD ST 

2002-30 8/22/2002 Construction of front and rear porches. 
77 MAIN ST 

2002-32 8/22/2002 Construction of new single family home 
20 SILVER HILL PARK 

2002-34 9/12/2002 Construction of shed. 



-134- 



Hearing 
Case # Date To Permit 

38 SILVER HILL PARK 

2002-35 9/12/2002 Construction of addition to expand 
existing bedroom. 

Total' 11 

Special Exception - Nonconforming Structure 

Denied 

112 HAYDEN RD 

2002-41 10/10/2002 Enlargement of existing shed 
Total 1 

Granted 

202 WHEELER RD 

2002-21 6/13/2002 Demolition of existing porch and barn 

and the construction of garage, family 
room and master bedroom. 
168 SOUTH MERRIMACK RD 

2002-36 9/26/2002 Construction of farmers porch 
11 SILVER LAKE RD 

2002-37 10/10/2002 Construction of handicap ramp and 
covered porch for veterinary business 
84 MAIN ST 

2002-45 12/12/2002 Construction of breezeway and attached 
garage 

Total' 4 

Special Exception - Nonconforming Use & Lot 

Granted 

145 RUNNELLS BRIDGE RD 

2002-14 4/25/2002 Construction of lumber storage buildings 
Total: 1 

Variance 
Dismissed 

7 PINE HILL RD 

2002-12 5/9/2002 Building area deviating from specified 

shapes. 

Total' 1 



-135- 



Hearing 
Case* Date To Permit 

Granted 

106 WITCHES SPRING RD 

2002-24 6/13/2002 Installation of Crematorium as an 
accessory use to Pet Cemetery 
WITCHES SPRING RD 

2002-31 8/22/2002 Construction of 20' wide easement for 

driveway access. 
Total 2 

Tabled 

118 BROAD ST 

2002-28 8/8/2002 Establishment of Bed & Breakfast 

Total' 1 

Variance - APO Zone Impermeable 

Denied 

453 SILVER LAKE RD 

2002-29 9/26/2002 Construction of office buUdings and 
related parking. 
453 SILVER LAKE RD 

2002-44 12/12/2002 Construction of office buildings and 
related parking. 
Total 2 

Variance - Setbacks 
Denied 

69 HANNAH DR 

2002-10 4/11/2002 Construction of inground swimming pool. 
15 WOOD LN 

2002-33 9/12/2002 Construction of Single Family Home 
Total 2 

Granted 

69 HANNAH DR 

2002-lOa 5/23/2002 Construction of inground swimming pool. 
38 RIDEOUT RD 

2002-13 4/25/2002 Construction of detached garage. 
168 SOUTH MERRIMACK RD 

2002-26 8/8/2002 Construction of farmers porch. 

145 DOW RD 

2002-40 11/14/2002 Construction of addition 



136- 



p 





Hearing 


Case* 


Date To Permit 


69 DEACON LN 




2002-42 


WlXAll^^l Construction of addition 


Total 5 




Tabled 




15 WOOD LN 




2002-33A 


12/12/2002 Construction of Single Family Home 


rofai- 1 





TotalCases for 2002: 51 



137- 



HOLLIS TOWN MEETING 

MARCH 12, 2002 

TOWN ELECTIONS 

The meeting was called to order by Moderator James Squires, at 7:00AM for 
voting on the following subjects: 

1 . To choose all necessary Town Offices for the year ensuing. 

Results: 

Town Clerk-3 yrs-Nancy B. Jambard 

Selectmen-3 yrs-Vahrij Manoukian & Richard A. Walker 

Moderator-2 yrs-James W. Squires 

Trustee of the Trust Funds-3 yrs- Charles A. Hildreth 

Budget Committee- 3 yrs- Scott Bartis & Morton E. Goulder 

Supervisor of the Checklist- 6 yrs-Lydia L. Schellenberg 

Library Trustee-3 yrs-Marcia Beckett, Ann C. Shedd & Norma 

B. Woods 

Cemetery Trustee-3 yrs-Kathleen Ann Albee & Jeffrey L. Snow 

Ballot Questions-Planning Board: 

1 . Off Street Parking- 
Yes-1,074 No-254 

2. Maximum Driveway Slope 
Yes-1,005 No-354 

3. Wedand Conservation Overlay 
Yes-970 No-330 



Meeting adjourned, at 8:30PM until Wednesday, March 13, 2002 at 7:00PM 

A True Copy of Record- Attest: 

Nancy B. Jambard 
Town Clerk 



138- 



HOLLIS TOWN MEETING 

WEDNESDAY 

MARCH 13 

The meeting was reconvened at 7:00 PM, by Moderator James Squires, at the Hollis/ 
Brookline Cooperative School District. Matt Casazza, accompanied on the piano by 
Jean Burns, sang "God Bless America." Next, James Belanger and Richard Bensigner 
presented the annual VFW Citizen of the Year Award, to June Litwin. She spearheaded 
the project to save the building we all know now as the "The Always Ready Museum." 
June was out of town, so Shirley Cohen accepted this award on her behalf 

ARTICLE 1 -Motion by Thomas Jambard to hear reports of Selectmen and other 
Town Officers and Committees. Seconded by James Belanger. CARRIED. Card 
vote. 

ARTICLE 2-Motion by John Eresian to see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate Three Million Five Hundred Thousand Dollars ($3,500,000) (Gross 
Budget) for the purchase, of land or other property interests therein, for the protection 
of the natural heritage and rural character in the best interest of the Town, including 
any buildings or structures incidental to such land; and to authorize the issuance of 
not more than Three Million Five Hundred Thousand Dollars ($3,500,000) of bonds, 
in accordance with the provisions of the Municipal Finance Act, (RSA 33:1 et seq., 
as amended), and, further, to authorize the Selectmen to issue, negotiate, sell and 
deliver said bonds and to determine the rate of interest thereon and the maturity and 
other terms thereof and to take any other action they deem appropriate to effectuate 
the sale and/or issuance of said bonds, subject, however, to the following limitations: 

No such bonds shall be issued earlier than July 1, 2002; and. Any such 

bonds shall have appropriate terms and maturities such that no principal or 

interest payments shall become due and payable prior to January 1, 2003; 

and. 

No such bonds shall be issued with a term of maturity of less than fifteen 

(15) years. 
PROVIDED, FURTHER, that the Selectmen SHALL NOT ISSUE SUCH BONDS 
until such time as they have presented to either an annual or special town meeting, a 
warrant article asking the meeting to ratify, by a simple majority vote, the particular 
parcel and the parcel ownership interest chosen by the Selectmen for purchase and 
said meeting has approved such warrant article. BY SELECTMEN. Seconded by 
James Belanger. 

Recommended by the Board of Selectmen. 

Recommended by the Budget Committee. 
(This is a Special Warrant Article and is intended to be non-lapsing as to any purchase 
that has been ratified by a regular or special town meeting held prior to December 



-139- 



31, 2002. Pursuant to RSA 33:8 a super majority of two-thirds (2/3) is required to 
adopt this article.) 

Polls opened at 8:12 PM. Closed at 9:15 PM. 279 ballots cast. 186 needed to pass 

this article. 

Yes-254 No-25 CARRIED 

ARTICLE 3-Motion by Frank Ballou to see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate Eighty Thousand Dollars (80,000) for the purpose of purchasing a dump 
truck and related equipment for the Department of Public Works. BY SELECTMEN. 
Seconded by Thomas Jambard. 

Recommended by the Selectmen. 

Recommended by the Budget Committee, 
CARRIED. Card Vote. 

ARTICLE 4-Motion by Frank Ballou to see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate Forty Thousand Eight Hundred Dollars ($40,800) for the construction 
of a sidewalk on Main Street. Seconded by Donald Ryder. 
CARRIED. Card Vote. 

Recommended by the Selectmen. 

Recommended by the Budget Committee. 

ARTICLE 5-Motion by Frank Ballou to see if the Town will vote to establish a 
capital reserve under the provisions of RSA35:1 for the purpose of a Major Highway 
Equipment Capital Reserve Fund, and to raise and appropriate the sum of Fifty 
Thousand Dollars ($50,000) to be placed in this fund and to designate the Selectmen 
as agent to expend. BY SELECTMEN > Seconded by Donald Ryder. CARRIED. 
Card Vote. 

Recommended by the Selectmen. 

Recommended by the Budget Committee. 
Motion by Raymond Valle to restrict reconsideration to ARTICLES 2-3-4&5. 
Seconded by Donald Ryder. CARRIED. Card Vote. 

ARTICLE 6-Motion by Donald Ryder to see if the Town will vote to establish a 
capital reserve under the provisions of RSA 35:1 for the purpose of a Major Fire 
Equipment Capital Reserve Fund, and to raise and appropriate the sum of One 
Hundred Twenty-Five Thousand Dollars ($125,000) to be placed in this fund and to 
designate the Selectmen as agent to expend. BY SELECTMEN. Seconded by Thomas 
Jambard. 

Recommended by the Selectmen. 

Recommended by the Budget Committee. 
CARRIED. Card Vote. 



■140- 



ARTICLE 7-Modon by Thomas Jambard to see if the Town will vote to create an 
expendable general fund trust under the provisions of RSA 31:19-a, to be known as 
the Compensated Absences Payable Fund, for the purpose of funding employee 
compensated absences payable and to raise and appropriate the sum of Five Thousand 
Dollars ($5,000) toward this purpose, and to designate the Selectmen as agents to 
expend. BY SELECTMEN. Seconded by Frank BaUou. 

Recommended by the Selectmen. 

Recommended by the Budget Committee. 
CARRIED. Card Vote. 

ARTICLE 8-Modon by Donald Ryder to see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
Fifty Thousand Dollars ($50,000) for the purpose of funding ambulance services 
and equipment, and to authorize the withdrawal from the Ambulance Fee Special 
Revenue Fund established for this purpose at the 2000 annual meeting. None of this 
money is to come from general taxation. BY SELECTMEN. Seconded by Thomas 
Jambard. 

Recommended by the Selectmen. 

Recommended by the Budget Committee. 
CARRIED. Card Vote. 

ARTICLE 9-Motion by Donald Ryder to see if the Town wiU vote to appropriate 
Thirty Thousand Dollars ($30,000) for the purpose of funding the annual Old Home 
Day celebration, and to authorize the withdrawal from the Old Home Day Special 
Revenue Fund established for this purpose at the 1999 annual meeting. None of this 
money is to come from general taxation. BY SELECTMEN. Seconded by Thomas 
Jambard. 

Recommended by the Selectmen. 

Recommended by the Budget Committee. 
CARRIED. Card Vote 

ARTICLE 10-Motion by Frank Ballou to see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
One Hundred Thousand Dollars ($100,000) for the purpose of funding police private 
details and to authorize the withdrawal from the Police Private Details Special Revenue 
Fund established for this purpose at the 2001 annual meeting. None of this money 
is to come from general taxation. By SELECTMEN. Seconded by Thomas Jambard. 

Recommended by the Selectmen. 

Recommended by the Budget Committee. 
CARRIED. Card Vote. 

Motion by Raymond Valle to restrict reconsideration to ARTICLES 6-7-8-9&10. 
Seconded by Robert Winer. CARRIED. Card Vote. 



■141- 



ARTICLE 11- Motion by Robert Winer to TABLE ARTICLE 11. BY PETITION: 
To see if the Town wiU protect and preserve it FOUR remaining unpaved scenic 
roads as a living reminder of Hoilis' rich history and rural past, by not paving, widening, 
or straightening them, and adopting measures to reduce through traffic, lower speed 
limits, and ban trucks, as much as possible. The affected roads are the unpaved 
sections of Federal Hill Road, North Pepperell Road, Richardson Road, and Ridge 
Road. This measure does not prevent the Town from making safety improvements 
to these roads, but mandates that all work be done with minimal impact on these 
roads' historic scenic character and appearance. Seconded by Frank Durham. 
CARRIED to TABLE. Card Vote. 

ARTICLE 12-Motion by Robert Winer to see if the Town will protect and preserve 
its six remaining unpaved scenic roads as a living reminder of Mollis' rich history and 
rural past, by not paving, widening, or straightening them, and adopting measures to 
reduce through traffic, lower speed limits, and ban trucks, as much as possible. The 
affected roads are the unpaved sections of Federal Hill Road, North Pepperell Road, 
Richardson Road, Van Dyke Road, Flagg Road and Ridge Road. This measure does 
not prevent the Town from making safety improvement to these roads, but mandates 
that all work be done with minimal impact on these roads' historic scenic character 
and appearance. Seconded by Adelaide Saunders. (PETITION) AMENDMENT 
1 -Motion by Denise April to see if the Town will protect and preserve all existing 
unpaved roads as a living reminder of Hoilis' rich history and rural past, by not 
paving, widening, or straightening them, and adopting measures to reduce through 
traffic, lower speed limits, and ban trucks, as much as possible. This measure does 
not prevent the Town from making safety improvements to these roads, but mandates 
that all work be done with minimal impact on these roads' historic scenic character 
and appearance. Seconded by Robert Winer. AMENDMENT CARRIED. Card 
Vote. AMENDMENT 2-Motion by Gordon Russell to insert "by not paving unless 
requested by a simple majority of the residents on the unpaved section of the road." 
Seconded by James Belanger. AMENDMENT DEFEATED. Card Vote. ARTICLE 
12 - CARRIED as amended- AMENDMENT 1. Card Vote. 

ARTICLE 13-Motion by Frank Ballou to see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of Four Million Four Hundred Ninety Eight Thousand Five 
Hundred Forty Four Dollars ($4,498,544), which represents the operating budget of 
the Town for the year 2002. Said sum does not include special or individual articles 
addressed. BY SELECTMEN. Seconded by Thomas Jambard. 

Recommended by the Selectmen. 

Recommended by the Budget Committee. 
Motion by Raymond VaUe to increased the budget by One Hundred Six Thousand 
Dollars ($106,000) for the purpose to fix up Hardy Fields. Seconded by Brian Regan. 
MOTION to move question by Dana Albrecht. Seconded by James Belanger. 
CARRIED. Card Vote. AMENDMENT DEFEATED Card Vote. Motion by Morton 



142- 



Goulder to decrease the budget by Two Hundred Twenty Five Thousand Dollars 
($225,000). Seconded by Mark Johnson. AMENDMENT DEFEATED. Card Vote. 
ARTICLE 13-CARRIED. ($4,498,544). Card Vote. 

Motion by Katharine Lewis to get a sense of this meeting to see if the Hollis 
Conservation Commission should resume negotiations with Herb Gardner for the 
purchase of a conservation easement on the Spaulding Lot even though there will be 
no public access granted. Seconded by Steven Koon. 
YES-58 NO-44 Card Vote. 

Motion by James Belanger to adjourn meeting. Seconded by Thomas Jambard. 
CARRIED. Card Vote. Adjourned at 11:20 PM. 

Nancy B. Jambard, 
Town Clerk 



143- 



HOLLIS SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
NOVEMBER 20, 2002 

The meeting was called to order at 7:03 PM, by moderator James Squires, at Walters 
Auditorium. 

Motion by Mark Johnson to pass over Article 1 & 2. Seconded by Sherry Wyskiel. 
Carried. 

ARTICLE 3 — Motion by Susan Durham to see if the Town will vote, in accordance 
with the procedure established by the adoption of ARTICLE 2 of the March 2002 
Town of HoUis Annual Town Meeting, to authorize the Selectmen to acquire the full 
fee interest in the property identified as the Glover Nevins Road Property, which 
includes a total of approximately 46 acres, of Hollis Tax Map 43, Lot 43, and to 
further authorize the Selectmen to enter into such agreements and execute any and 
all documents necessary to conclude such acquisition, on such terms and conditions 
as the Selectmen deem appropriate, it being intended that approval of the article wiU 
constitute the ratification of a decision to acquire the within described parcels, but it 
shall not be interpreted to constitute the ratification of any other parcels. (Said 
acquisition contemplates the expenditure of Four Hundred Seventy Thousand DoUars 
($470,000) of the 3.5 million dollar, Article 2 Bond for Land Acquisition, approved 
at the March 2002 Town of HoUis Annual Town Meeting.) Seconded by Sherry 
Wyskiel. 

Motion to AMEND ARTICLE 3 - Motion by Sherry Wyskiel to see if the Town will 
vote, in accordance with procedure established by the adoption of Article 2 of the 
March 2002 Town of Hollis Annual Town Meeting, to authorize the Selectmen, in 
their judgement, deem advisable, in the property identified as the Glover Nevins 
Road Property, which includes a total of approximately 46 acres, of Hollis Tax Map 
43, Lot 43, and to further authorize the Selectmen to enter into such agreements and 
execute any and all documents necessary to conclude such acquisitions, on such 
terms and conditions as the Selectmen deem appropriate, it being intended that 
approval of the article wiU constitute the ratification of a decision to acquire the 
within described parcels, but it shall not be interpreted to constitute the ratification 
of any other parcels. It is a condition of this approval the amount which the Selectmen 
may agree to pay for said property shall not exceed the sum of $470,000. (Said 
acquisition contemplates the expenditure of Four Hundred Seventy Thousand Dollars 
($470,000) of the 3.5 Million DoUar, Article 2 

Bond for land acquisition, approved at the March 2002 Town of Hollis Annual 
Town Meeting.) Seconded by Lawrence Finklestein. 

Motion by Jack Law to move the question. Seconded by Carol Stewart. CARRIED 
to move question. CARD VOTE on Amended ARTICLE 3. YES-353 



-144- 



NO-4 CARRIED AS AMENDED. 



ARTICLE 1 - Motion by Sherry Wyskiel to see if the Town will vote, in accordance 
with the procedure established by the adoption of Article 2 of the March 2002 
Town of HoUis Annual Town Meeting, authorize the Selectmen to acquire the full 
fee interest in the property identified as the Parker Pond Parcels which includes a 
total of approximately 32 acres and includes all of Hollis Tax Map 30, Lot 11, Lot 10, 
and Lot 9 and approximately 18 acres of HoUis Tax Map 30 Lot 8, and to further 
authorize the Selectmen to enter into such agreements and execute any and all 
documents necessary to conclude such acquisition, on such terms and conditions as 
the Selectmen deem appropriate, it being intended that approval of the article will 
constitute the ratification of a decision to acquire the within described parcels, but 
it shall not be interpreted to constitute the ratification of any other parcels. (Said 
acquisition contemplates the expenditure of Seven Hundred Forty Thousand Dollars. 
($740,000) of the 3.5 million dollar Article 2 Bond for Land Acquisition, approved 
at the March 2002 Town of HoUis Annual Town Meeting.) Seconded by Lawrence 
Finklestein. 

Motion to AMEND ARTICLE 1- Motion by Sherry Wyskiel to see if the Town will 
vote, in accordance with the procedure established by the adoption of Article 2 of 
the March 2002 Town of Hollis Annual Town Meeting, to authorize the Selectmen 
to acquire the full fee interest, or such lesser interest as the Selectmen, in their 
judgement, deem advisable, in the property identified as the Parker Pond Parcels 
which includes a total of approximately 32 acres and includes all of Hollis Tax Map 
30, Lot 11, Lot 10, and Lot 9, and approximately 18 acres of HoUis Tax Map 30, 
Lot 8, and to further authorize the Selectmen to enter into such agreements and 
execute any and aU documents necessary to conclude such terms and conditions as 
the Selectmen deem appropriate, it being intended that approval of the article wiU 
constitute the ratification of a decision to acquire the within described parcels, but it 
shaU not be interpreted to constitute the ratification of any other parcels. It is a 
condition of this approval that the Selectmen wiU not enter into such agreement 
unless and until the owner has either completed the contemplated subdivision 
appUcation with the Town of HoUis Planning Board or has determined not to be 
present the same and it is a further condition that the amount which the Selectmen 
may agree to pay for said property shaU not exceed the sum of $740,000. (Said 
acquisition contemplates the expenditure of Seven Hundred Forty Thousand DoUars 
($740,000) of the 3.5 miUion doUar, Article 2 Bond for Land Acquisition, approved 
at the March 2002 Town of HoUis Annual Town Meeting.) Seconded by Lawrence 
Finklestein. 

Motion by Susan Culver to amend the amended motion: to take out — or such lesser 
interest as the Selectmen, in their judgement, deem advisable. Seconded by Steve 
Realmuto. NOT CARRIED AS AMENDED. 



■145- 



ARTICLE 1 continued - Motion by Chris Willis to move question as amended. 
Seconded by Rick Kierstead. CARRIED. CARD VOTE. 

Motion by Sherry Wyskiel to - strike out $740,000 and insert $1,000,000. Seconded 
by Richard Wholey. Motion by Chris Willis to move question. Seconded brick 
Kierstead. CARRIED to move question. Motion to amend Article 1 DEFEATED. 

Motion by Ray VaUe to remove application and add final approval. Seconded by i 
Kathy James. Motion by Chris Willis to move question. Seconded by Ray Valle. 
CARRIED to move question. Motion to amend Article 1 - DEFEATED. 

Motion by Mark Johnson to amend $740,000 to $870,000. Seconded by Susan 
Durham. Motion by Chris Willis to move question. Seconded by Larry Finklestein.. 
CARRIED to move question. Motion to amend Article 1 -DEFEATED. 

Motion by Chris Willis to move Article 1 as amended. Seconded by Susan Durham. 
CARRIED. 

Article 1 - Card Vote YES-257 NO-24. CARRIED AS AMENDED. 



ARTICLE 2 - Motion by Bruce Hardy to see if the Town will vote, in accordance 
with the procedure established by the adoption of Article 2 of the March 2002 
Town of Hollis Annual Town Meeting, to authorize the Selectmen to acquire the fuU 
fee interest in the property identified as the Woodmont Orchard Open Space, which 
includes a total of approximately 90 acres, portions of Hollis Tax Map 35, Lot 63 and 
Lot 63-1, and to further authorize the Selectmen to enter into such agreements, on 
such terms and conditions as the Selectmen deem appropriate, it being intended that 
approval of the article will constitute the ratification of a decision to acquire the 
within described parcels, but it shall not be interpreted to constitute the ratification 
of any other parcels. (Said acquisition contemplates the expenditure of Nine Hundred 
Sixty Thousand Dollars ($960,000) of die 3.5 million dollar, Article 2 Bond for Land 
Acquisition, approved at the March 2002 Town of Hollis Annual Town Meeting.) 
Seconded by June Litwin. 

Motion to AMEND ARTICLE 2- Motion by Thomas Jambard to see if the Town 
will vote, in accordance with the procedure established by the adoption of Article 2 
of the March 2002 Town of Hollis Annual Town Meeting, to authorize the Selectmen 
to acquire the full fee interest, or such lesser interest as the Selectmen, in their 
judgement, deem advisable, in the property identified as the Woodmont Orchard 
Open Space, which includes total of approximately 90 acres, portions of Hollis 
Tax Map 35, Lot 63 and Lot 63-1, and to fijrther authorize the Selectmen to enter 
into such agreements and execute any and all documents necessary to conclude 



-146- 



such acquisition, on such terms and conditions as the Selectmen deem appropriate, 
it being intended that approval of the article will constitute the ratification of a 
decision to acquire the within described parcels, but it shall not be interpreted to 
constitute the ratification of any other parcels. It is a condition of this approval that 
the Selectmen will not enter into such agreement unless and until the owner has 
either completed the contemplated subdivision application with the Town of Hollis 
Planning Board or has determined not to present the same and it is further condition 
that the amount which the Selectmen may agree to pay for said property shall not 
exceed the sum of $960,000. (said acquisition contemplates the expenditure of 
Nine Hundred Sixty Thousand Dollars ($960,000) of the 3.5 million dollar, Article 
2 Bond for Land Acquisition, approved at the March 2002 Town of Hollis Annual 
Town Meeting.) Seconded by Donald Ryder. 

Motion by David Freeman to move the question. Seconded by Christopher Hyde. 
CARRIED - to move question. 

ARTICLE 2-as amended - DEFEATED YES-127 NO-177. 

Motion by James Belanger to adjourn the meeting. Seconded by Ray Valle. CARRIED 
Meeting adjourned at 10:15pm. 

A True Copy of Record - Attest: 

Nancy Beal Jambard 
Town Clerk 



-147- 



HOLLIS MARRIAGES 2002 
Date, Name and Residence of Groom, Name and Residence of Bride 

January 23 Robertson L. Murray, Hollis, NH, Christina M. O'Brien, Derry, NH 

January 25 George P. Lanza, Hollis, NH, Joann Bish, Hollis, NH 

February 2 John J. Horman III, Hollis, NH, Carrie L. Rogers, Hollis, NH 

February 17 Lyndon M. Rickards, Hollis NH, Patricia F. Bassett, Hollis, NH 

April 6, Joseph P. McElwain, Hollis, NH, Michele Connell, Pepperell, MA 

April 12 Alain F Favreau, Hooksett, NH, Nancy J. Grieb, Hollis, NH 

April 25 Michael J. Stepanek, Hollis, NH, Nancy Bourque, Hollis, NH 

June 1 Robert M. Hanselman II, HoUis, NH, Pamela A. Webb, HoUis, NH 

June 1 Robert A. Chesebrough, Hollis, NH, Lynn M. Sowerby, Hollis, NH 

June 4 David D Brewer, Hollis, NH, Kimberly G DeWalt, Londonderry, 

NH 

June 8 Christopher A. Bergeron, Hollis, NH, Britta L. Burton, Reno, NV 

June 22 David A. Vaughn Jr., Hollis, NH, Janet Williamson, Hollis, NH 

June 22 Richard R. Dumais, Hollis, NH, Kellie R. Wardner, Hollis, NH 

June 22 Scott C. Bunce, Philadelphia, Pa., Betsy K. Saunders, Hollis, NH 

July 5 Alberto R. Gutierrez Jr., HoUis, NH, Judith A. DeMarco, HoUis, 

NH 

July 13 Ryan A. Whitehouse, South HamUton, Mass., Vanessa N. Cattiaux, 

HoUis, NH 

July 22 Harold R. Toomey, HoUis, NH, Thelma M. HaUett, HoUis, NH 

July 27 Andre L. Andrade, Nashua, NH, Barbara J. Pratt, HoUis, NH 

July 31 Mark T. Pultar, HoUis, NH, Paula J. Eriksen, HoUis, NH 

August 3 Michael E. BraUey, HoUis, NH, Deborah A. Waterman, MUford, 

NH 

August 3 James B. Parsons, HoUis, NH, Nancy E. Greenfield, Milford, NH 

August 1 1 Carl M. Rabickow, Nashua, NH, Susan W McCoole, HoUis, NH 

August 16 Keith M. Jerszyk, HoUis, NH, Charity M. Perkins, HoUis, NH 

August 17 EUis J. Canal, HoUis, NH, Kristen L. MacWiUiams, HoUis, NH 

August 25 Christopher J. Otte, HoUis, NH, Tina M. Larivee, HoUis, NH 

September 9 David E. Sockey, HoUis, NH, Patricia A. Edgar, HoUis, NH 

September 28 Kevin J. Foye, HoUis, NH, Virginia L. Meedzam, Marlboro, MA 

October 10 PhiUip E. VanderKamp, HoUis, NH, EHzabeth S. Johnson, HoUis, 

NH 

October 18 R. B. Clardy, HoUis, NH, Jenny L. LeMay Nashua, NH 

November 17 Jason M. Forbes, HoUis, NH, Kristine A. Stanium, HoUis, NH 

December 15 Dennis M. Ricard, Nashua, NH, Sandra A. Davis, HoUis, NH 



-148- 



BIRTH REPORTS HOLLIS NH 2002 

Date, Child's Name, Name of Father, Name of Mother, Place of Birth 

January 4 Teresa Elizabeth Demaio, Frank Demaio, Jennifer Demaio, 

Manchester, NH 
January 8 Teresa Marie Peik, Ronald Peik, Leslie Peik, Nashua, NH 

January 8 Alexander Edward Peik, Ronald Peik, Leslie Peik, Nashua, NH 

January 10 Elizabeth Anne Monaghan, Robert Monaghan, Ingrid Monaghan, 

Nashua, NH 
January 1 Matthew Joseph Weimer, Craig Weimer, Kelly Weimer, Nashua, 

NH 
January 10 Sophia Rose Kotelly, William Kotelly, Ellen Kotelly, Manchester, 

NH 
January 1 1 Evelyn Audrey Briner, Albert Briner, Nena Grossius, Nashua, NH 

January 13 Laura Elizabeth Lampognana, Thomas Lampognana, Suzanne 

Lampognana, Manchester,NH 
January 1 5 Max Terrence Burns, Stephen Burns, Rhonda Burns, Nashua, NH 

January 22 Grant Paul Snyder, Gordon Snyder, Lisa Snyder, Nashua, NH 

January 25 Siena Isabella Moskun, James Moskun, Erin Riley, Hollis, NH 

February 1 Abby Rose Paquette, Israel Paquette, Kimberly Paquette, Nashua, 

NH 
February 3 Gabrielle Elizabeth Martino, Anthony Martino, Belinda Martino, 

Nashua, NH 
February 5 David Zuocheng Wang, Zhaoyang Wang, Qingxing Zhang, Nashua, 

NH 
February 6 John WilHam W. Rutledge, David Rutledge, Anne Rutledge, 

Nashua, NH 
February 8 Donovan Karl Landolt, Daniel Landolt, Lisa Landolt, Nashua, 

NH 
March 26 Alyssa Ann Lapierre, Christopher Lapierre, Donna Lapierre, 

Nashua, NH 
April 4 Eric Mitchell Chapdelaine, Jeffrey Chapdelaine, Colleen 

Chapdelaine, Nashua, NH 
April 24 Sean William Stearns, William Stearns, Margaret Stearns, Nashua, 

NH 
May 9 Yoscar Olguin Trejo, Sabino Olguin, Azucena Trejo, Nashua, NH 

May 1 8 Thomas John Ackerly, Mark Ackerly, Margaret Ackerly, Nashua, 

NH 
May 20 Meredith Hobbs Yardley, Matthew Yardley, Susan Yardley, 

Manchester, NH 
May 25 Evan Michael LaFrance, Paul LaFrance, Patricia LaFrance, Nashua, 

NH 
May 27 Harrison George Bates, Michael Bates, Tricia Bates, Nashua, NH. 



149- 



May 30 Abby Mairead Tighe, Michael Tighe, Deborah Tighe, Nashua, 

NH 
June 11 leva Joan Colassi, Kenneth Colassi, Oksana Colassi, Nashua, NH 

June 14 Kaleigh Mary Whalen, Thomas Whalen, Krista Whalen, Nashua, 

NH 
June 24 Sarah Rachel Scott, Andrew Scott, Rachel Scott, Nashua, NH 

June 24 Ariella Carly Friedman, Gary Friedman, Mara Friedman, Nashua, 

NH 
July 1 Caroline Beaupre Snyder, Daniel Snyder, Christine Snyder, Nashua, 

NH 
July 12 Nicholas Mark Subbarao, Erik Subbarao, Tara Subbarao, 

Manchester, NH 
July 18 Cole Christopher Doherty, Eric Doherty, Jane Doherty, Nashua, 

NH 
July 30 Cassandra Rose Liu, Faan Hoan Liu, Janice Basiletti, Nashua, NH 

August 5 Benjamin Douglas Zielinski, Douglas Zielinski, Margaret Zielinski, 

Nashua, NH 
August 6 Charlotte Rose Gehan, Thomas Gehan, Michelle Gehan, 

Manchester, NH 
August 22 Austin Robert Etchells, Michael Etchells, Michelle Etchells, 

Nashua, NH 
September 1 Claire Louise Seddon, Charles Seddon, Andrea Seddon, Nashua, 

NH 
September 5 Jacob Michael Webb, Michael Webb, Lisa Webb, Nashua, NH 

October 3 Kyle John Manley, Richard Manley, Rita Manley, Nashua, NH 

October 29 Joel Levy Goodman, William Goodman, Jane Goodman, Nashua, 

NH 
November 6 Hanna Elizabeth Close, Michael Close, Nicole Close, Nashua, NH 

November 12 Katherine Cecilia Jesse, Jonathan Jesse, Stephanie Jesse, Nashua, 

NH 
November 16 Jessica Huan Hu, Wen Hu, Lizheng Wang, Nashua, NH 
November 24 Katelyn Elizabeth Sanzone, William Sanzone, Carol Sanzone, 

Nashua, NH 
November 30 Rianna Lindsey Mann, Robert Mann, Darlene Mann, Nashua, NH 
December 4 Jack Ryan Delaney, Paul Delaney, Laurie Delaney, Nashua, NH 

December 23 Anna Noel Stawasz, Christopher Stawasz, Lara Stawasz, Nashua, 

NH 
December 23 Jack Francis Stawasz, Christopher Stawasz, Lara Stawasz, Nashua, 

NH 
December 23 Benjamin Christopher Stawasz, Christopher Stawasz, Lara Stawasz, 

Nashua, NH 



-150- 



HOLLIS NH DEATH 2002 
Date, Place of Death, Name, Name of Father, Maiden Name of Mother 

January 9 Hollis, NH, Aaron A. Johnson, David Johnson, Pamela Blocksom 

February 13 Florida, Arthur B. Wight, Arthur Wight, Izola Fullerton 

February 1 6 Merrimack, NH, Chandler Brown, Walter Darden, Chandler Wigg 

February 21 Nashua, NH, Andre Krutchkoff, Unknown Krutchkoff, Natalie 

Unknown. 
February 23 Nashua, NH, Muriel E. Ziskowski, Paul Scott, Blanche Laforest 

March 2 Hudson, NH, Margaret G. Lavoie, John Hogan, Sara Guimond 

March 15 Nashua, NH, Charles L. Partridge, Robert Partridge, Marjorie 

Timpe 
March 28 Hollis, NH, Maurice C. MarveU, Frank Marvell, Jennie Colburn 

March 30 Hollis, NH, Albert L. Richard, Walter Richard, Laurea Dupont 

April 23 Nashua, NH, Bronislaus Wesoly, John Wesoly, Helena Moron 

May 3 Nashua, NH, John C. Hughes, Robert Hughes, Lavinia Potter 

May 1 1 Hollis, NH, Gordon B. Small, Blake Small, LiUie SmaU 

May 13 Nashua, NH, Ruth J. Pineo, Frank Beers, Ida Adams 

May 16 Hollis, NH, William M. Riley, WiUiam Riley, Mary Leary 

May 28 Bedford, NH, Dorothy Bristol, Albert Biggs, Lizzie Adams 

May 28 Nashua, NH, Robert J. Hickey, Joseph Hickey, Alice White 

June 3 Merrimack, NH, William H. Hall, Lester Hall, Evangeline Clark 

June 12 Nashua, NH, Gladys M. Cox, Charley Carpenter, Olive Parr 

June 26 Nashua, NH, Thomas N. O'Shaughnessy, James O'Shaughnessy, 

Julia Keane 
August 3 Nashua, NH, Benjamin Marcum, Benjamin Marcum, Ruth Perry 

September 28 Nashua, NH, Henry C. Hills, George Hills, Martha Goodwin 
September 28 Nashua, NH, Lillian H. Williams, Henry Harris, Agnes Tischler 
September 30 Hollis, NH, Marjorie R. Partridge, Roscoe Wade, Birdella Dagg 
October 1 Nashua, NH, Evelyn Cone, John Barenberg, Jennie Weinberg 

October 2 Nashua, NH, John Gelazauskas, Kastanta Gelazauskas, Rachel 

Cippent 
October 13 Nashua, NH, Louis Hill, Reuben Hill, Pauline Pess 

October 24 Hollis, NH, William L. Lawrence, Luther Lawrence, Natalie Ford 

October 26 Merrimack, NH Dorothy C Storm, Francis Cave, Rosella Clinton 

November 10 Hollis, NH, Daniel D McManus Jr., Daniel McManus, Margaret 

Rix 
November 20 Hollis, NH, James M. Kenny, John Kenny, Catherine McCarthy 
December 1 Temple, NH, Anne C. DeMontigny, Fernand Marcoux, Claire 

Quinn 



757- 



NOTES 



-152- 



NOTES 



-153- 



NOTES 



-154- 



MOLLIS SCHOOL DISTRICT 

For the Year Ending June 30, 2002 



HOLLIS SCHOOL DISTRICT 
SCHOOL OFFICERS 

2002 

HoUis School Board 



Mr. Douglas Cleveland 
Mrs. Kathleen de Lacy 
Mrs. Anita Moynihan 
Mr. Harry Haytayan 
Ms. Janet Listowich 



Term Expires 2003 
Term Expires 2003* 
Term Expires 2003*"* 
Term Expires 2005 
Term Expires 2005 



Mrs. Suzanne Shifflit 


Clerk 


Appointed 


Mrs. Claudia Dufresne 


Treasurer 


Term Expires 2003 


Mr. James Belanger 


Moderator 


Term Expires 2003 



SAU #41 Administration 



Dr. Kenneth L. DeBenedictis 
Ms. Carol Mace 
Mrs. Lee Ann Blastos 
Mr. Robert R. Kelly 
Director of Special Education 



Superintendent of Schools 
Director of Curriculum & Instruction 
Business Administrator 
Director of Special Education 



Hollis Elementary School 
Mrs. Eileen Fucile, Supervising Principal 



Hollis Primary School 
Mrs. Ann Windsor 
Associate Principal 



Hollis Upper Elementary School 
Mrs. Carol Thibaudeau 
Associate Principal 



*Appointed for 02-03; 3-year term expires 03-04 
**Appointed for 02-03; end of 3 year term 



-SD-3- 



At press time, the deadline for petition articles had not been reached. The school 

district warrant with petition articles (if submitted) will be posted February 26, will 

be available at the SAU Office and at the Annual District Meeting. 

HOLLIS SCHOOL DISTRICT WARRANT 

The State of New Hampshire 

To the inhabitants of the HoUis School District in the Town of HoUis in the County of 
Hillsborough, State of New Hampshire qualified to vote in District Affairs. 

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED TO MEET AT THE HOLLIS BROOKLINE HIGH 
SCHOOL IN SAID DISTRICT ON THE THIRTEENTH DAY OF MARCH, 2003, AT 
SEVEN O'CLOCK IN THE EVENING TO ACT UPON THE FOLLOWING 
SUBJECTS. 

1 . To elect all necessary school district officers for the ensuing terms by official ballot on 
March 11,2003. 

• Election of two members of the School Board for the ensuing three years. 

• Election of one member of the School Board for the ensuing year. 

• Election of a School District Treasurer for the ensuing year. 

• Election of a School District Clerk for the ensuing year. 

• Election of a Moderator for the ensuing year. 

2. To see if the school district will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of $218,596 to 
fund the increase in cost items relative to professional staff salaries and fringe benefits 
for the 2003-2004 school year which resulted from good faith negotiations with the 
professional staff, and which represents the negotiated increase over last year's salaries 
and fringe benefits. The school board recommends this appropriation. The budget 
committee supports this article. 

3. To see if the school district will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of $84,956 to 
fund the increase in cost items relative to support staff salaries and fringe benefits for 
the 2003-2004 school year which resulted from good faith negotiations with the 
support staff, and which represents the negotiated increase over last year's salaries and 
fringe benefits. Cost items increases in subsequent years will require approval of 
specific warrant articles at future District Meetings. The school board recommends 
this appropriation. The budget committee supports this article. 

4. To see if the school district will vote to raise and appropriate $8,064,156 for the 
support of schools, for the payment of salaries of school district officers and agents 
and for the payment of statutory obligations of the district. The school board 
recommends this appropriation. The budget committee supports this article. This 
appropriation does not include any of the other warrant articles. 



-SD-4- 



p 



To see if the school district will authorize the Hollis/Brookline Cooperative School 
District to access future year and federal catastrophic aid funds in the event that 
special education costs exceed budget limitations. The school board and budget 
committee recommend this article. 

6. To transact any other business which may legally come before said meeting. 

Given under our hands and seals at said Hollis, New Hampshire on this sixth day of 

February, 2003. 

Douglas Cleveland, Chair 
Kathleen de Lacy 
Harry Haytayan 
Janet Listowich 
Anita Moynihan 



A true copy of the warrant - Attest: Douglas Cleveland, Chair 

Kathleen de Lacy 
Harry Haytayan 
Janet Listowich 
Anita Moynihan 



-SD-5- 



SCHOOL WARRANT 

The State of New Hampshire 

PoUs open at 7:00 A.M. - Will Not Close before 7:00 P.M. 



To the inhabitants of the School District in the Town of Hollis qualified to vote in District 
affairs: 

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED TO MEET AT THE HOLLIS BROOKLINE 
MIDDLE SCHOOL IN SAID DISRICT ON THE ELEVENTH DAY OF MARCH, 
2003, AT SEVEN O'CLOCK IN THE MORNING TO ACT UPON THE 
FOLLOWING SUBJECTS: 

1 . To choose a Moderator for the ensuing year. 

2. To choose a Clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To choose a Treasurer for the ensuing year. 

4. To choose two members of the School Board for the ensuing three years. 

5. To choose one member of the School Board for the ensuing year. 

Given under our hands and seals at said Hollis this 6* day of February, 2003. 

Douglas Cleveland, Chair 
Kathleen de Lacy 
Harry Haytayan 
Janet Listowich 
Anita Moynihan 



A true copy of the warrant - Attest: 



Douglas Cleveland, Chair 
Kathleen de Lacy 
Harry Haytayan 
Janet Listowich 
Anita Moynihan 



■SD-6- 



HOLLIS ANNUAL SCHOOL DISTRICT MEETING 
MARCH 14, 2002 

Moderator Jim Belanger called the annual meeting of the Hollis School District 
to order at 7:00 PM on March 14, 2002. 

School Board: Julie Mook, Chair, Paula Fordin, Doug Cleveland, Margaret 
O'Grady, Steve Schmalz. 

Budget Committee: Lorin Rydstrom, Chair, Jim Belanger, Mort Goulder, Craig 
Jones, Melinda Willis, Doug Cleveland (school board rep). Absent: Mike Harris, Dan 
McManus (selectmen rep.) 

Chelsea de Lacy sang the National Anthem and the Boy Scouts led the Pledge of 
Allegiance. 

Moderator Belanger appointed Kathi Lewis as Acting Clerk. Mr. Belanger then 
reviewed the rules of the meeting. 

Board Member Paula Fordin presented outgoing Board Member Stephen 
Schmalz with a plaque and thanked him for his six years of service to the school district. 
Mrs, Fordin then presented outgoing Board Member and Chair, Julie Mook with a plaque 
and thanks for her five years of service to the school district. 

Supervising Principal Eileen Fucile provided an overview of the state of the 
schools. 

Lorin Rystrom, Chair, Hollis Budget Committee, thanked Jim Belanger for 
serving on the budget committee. He presented the proposed budget's tax impact and 
indicated that the Budget Committee takes exception to the overall budget, particularly the 
teacher salaries. Craig Jones also spoke against the budget and explained the Budget 
Committee's reasoning to keep salaries level. 

Article 1 

The first article of the School District warrant follows. 

To elect all necessary school district officers for the ensuing terms by official ballot on 
March 12, 2002. 

• Election of two (2) members of the School Board for the ensuing three years. 

• Election of a School District Treasurer for the ensuing year, 

• Election of a School District Clerk for the ensuing year. 

• Election of the School District Moderator for the ensuing year. 

This article was acted on by ballot voting on March 1 2, 2002. The two board 
members who were elected are: Harry Haytayan and Janet Listowich. School 
district treasurer: Claudia Dufresne. School district moderator: Jim Belanger, 
School district clerk: This position is vacant; therefore Mrs. Kathi Lewis was 
appointed as Acting Clerk. 



-SD-7- 



Article 2 

To see if the school district will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $69,034 to fund 

the foreign language program in the Hollis Elementary Schools, including salary and 

benefits for the 1.5 teachers and materials. Tile program will be for the full 2002-03 school 

year. The school board and budget committee recommend this appropriation. 

Article 2 was moved by Paula Fortin and seconded by Margaret O'Grady. 

Carol Mace, the district's Director of Curriculum and Instruction, was asked to provide an 
overview of the foreign language program. The program was originally funded through 
federal grant money, and it is now time for the district to fund the program. Several 
individuals spoke in favor of the article. The motion carried with a teller card vote. 

Article 3 

To see if the school district will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of $284,532.70 to fund 

the increase in cost items relative to professional staff salaries and fringe benefits for the 

2002-2003 school year which resulted from good faith negotiations with the professional 

staff, and which represents the negotiated increase over last year's salaries and fringe 

benefits. Cost items increase in subsequent years will require approval of specific warrant 

articles at future District Meetings. The school board recommends this appropriation. 

The budget committee does not support this article. 

Article 3 was moved by Margaret O'Grady and seconded by Steve Schmalz. 

Board Member Doug Cleveland provided a history of the negotiation process and 
mediation leading to a new Agreement. The school board recognizes the district's quality 
teachers and wishes to attract and retain them. The Agreement is a two-year contract. 
Change from the previous contract include a retirement incentive of 20 percent of the last 
year's salary. A maximum of four retirement packages would be granted in a year. Health 
insurance coverage allows for a cap of $800 with a minimum employee contribution of 10 
percent of the cost of a premium (Blue Choice); dental was increased to $60/month from 
$45. Base salary was increased 4.2 percent in year 1 and 4.5 percent in year 2. (Year 2 will 
be voted at next year's district meeting.) The agreement is an increase of $284,533 or 3.9% 
of the budget. 

Mrs. Mook reiterated Mr. Cleveland's remarks that the district has exceUent teachers 
and the schools are among the best in the state. Salaries are within the range of 
surrounding areas, but if held level, they would be considerably less. Health care costs are 
increasing thereby taking more of a staff member's salary and making it more difficult to 
keep up. The board feels the need to keep salaries competitive in order to retain the 
district's excellent teachers. 

In response to a question as to why the Budget Committee does not support this 
article, Mr. Goulder referenced business layoffs and most businesses holding their 
employee salaries level. The budget committee felt the economic climate does not support 
salary increases. 
Several voters spoke in support of the article. 

Tom Enright moved the question with Kathy Whitaker seconding. The motion 
carried by teller card vote. 

A vote on Article 3 was taken, and the article passed with a majority of teller 
card votes. 



-SD-8- 



Article 4 

To see if the school district will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of $43,200 to fund the 

increase in cost items relative to support staff salaries and fringe benefits for the 2002- 

2003 school year which resulted from good faith negotiations with the support staff, and 

which represents the negotiated increase over last year's salaries and fringe benefits. The 

school board and budget committee recommend this appropriation. 

Article 4 was moved by Steve Schmalz and seconded by Doug Cleveland. 

Board Member Steve Schmalz informed the voters that this is the second year of the 
two year support staff contract. It includes a base increase of 3 percent and represents .06 
percent of the budget. 
The motion carried by teller card vote. 

Article 5 

To see if the school district will vote to raise and appropriate $7,558,765 for the support of 
schools, for the payment of salaries of school district officers and agents and for the 
payment of statutory obligations of the district. The school board and budget committee 
recommend this appropriation. This appropriation does not include any of the other 
Warrant articles. 
Article 5 was moved by JuUe Mock and Seconded by Paula Fordin. 

Board Chair Julie Mook presented the operating budget which is a $49,000 (.66%) 
over the previous years budget. Increases were in the areas of building operations, 
transportation, SAU assessment, employee benefits, media and special education. 
Decreases occurred in regular instruction and contingency. The total budget including 
warrant articles is a 6.16% increase. Several voters spoke in favor of the article. 

Regina Kozan moved to increase the budget by the amount necessary to cover the 
cost of playground equipment. She queried Mr. Schmalz as to whether it should be 
$75,000 or $80,000. Mr. Schmalz responded that the board's position was to raise 
playground money from private donations and he had promised the budget committee this 
amount would not be included in the operating budget. Mrs. Kozan withdrew her motion, 
A vote on the original amount was taken and the motion carried with a majority of 
teller card votes. 

Article 6 

To see if the school district will authorize the HoUis School District to access future year 

and federal catastrophic aid funds in the event that special education costs exceed budget 

limitations. The school board and budget committee recommend this article. 

Article 6 was moved by Julie Mook and seconded by Margaret O'Grady. 

Mrs. Mook stated that this was a housekeeping item to allow the district to accept 
funds in the event special education costs exceed budgeted amounts. 
Motion carried with a teller card vote. 

Article 7 

To transact any other business, which may legally come before said meeting. 



-SD-9- 



James O'Shay moved to reconsider Article 5. The motion was seconded by Paul Beckett. 
There was no discussion and Moderator Belanger asked for a vote, which was defeated by 
card vote. 

He then asked for a modon to adjourn, which was made and seconded by a number of 
voters. Meeting was adjourned at 9:48 PM. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kathi Lewis 

Hollis School District Clerk 



-SD-10- 





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-SD-13- 



FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE 
MOLLIS SCHOOL BOARD 

July 1,2001 -June 30, 2002 

Revenue All Funds 

Fund Equity July 1, 2001 $267,244.16 

Local Receipts: 

Current Appropriations $3,875,450.55 

Earnings on Investment $11,154.46 

Lunch Program $175,530.40 

Transfer from Capital Projects $0.00 

Other Local Revenue $108,874.38 

Total Local Revenue $4,171,009.79 

State and Federal Receipts: 

Adequacy Aid $2,953,560.00 

Foundation Aid $0.00 

Building Aid $189,556.25 

Catastrophic Aid $22,577.98 

Kindergarten Aid $0.00 

Lunch Program $20,928.00 

Federal Funds $205,229.62 

Total State & Federal $3,391,851.85 

Total Other Financial Sources Bond Proceeds 

$60,000.00 

Total Revenue All Funds $7,622,861 .64 

Total Amount Available All Funds $7,890,105.80 



Statement of Analysis of Changes in Fund Equity 

Total Available All Funds $7,890,105.80 

Less General Fund Expenditures $7,1 19,037.48 

Less Other Fund Expenditures $436,717.61 

Fund Equity June 30, 2002 $334,350.71 



-SD-14- 



HOLLIS SCHOOL DISTRICT 

ACTUAL EXPENDITURES FOR 

SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 

RSA 32:11a* 



XPENSES: 


2000-2001 


2001-2002 


SALARIES 


$610,015 


$673,037 


CONTRACTED SERVICES 


$62,942 


$51,092 


TRANSPORTATION 


$3,243 


$2,317 


TUITION 


$83,352 


$82,545 


MATERIALS 


$4,252 


$6,761 


EQUIPMENT 


$4,129 


$4,521 


SUBTOTAL 


$767,933 


$820,272 


E VENUE: 
CATASTROPHIC AID 


$2,587 


$22,578 


IDEA 


$54,733 


$78,454 


PRESCHOOL 


$5,187 


$4,809 


SUBTOTAL 


$62,507 


$105,841 



NET COST FOR 

SPECIAL EDUCATION $705,426 $714,431 



* Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education requires, under separate cover, 
an accounting of actual expenditures by the district for special education programs and 
services for the previous 2 fiscal years. 



-SD-15- 



BALANCE SHEET 

Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2002 



ASSETS 



General Fund 
Special Revenue Fund 
Food Ser\dce Fund 
Capital Projects 
Agency Fund 
Long Term Debt 

Total Assets 



$305,765.00 

$72,180.00 

$50,526.00 

$15,059.00 

$26,153.00 

S3.812.814.00 



$4,282,497.00 



LIABILITIES 

General Fund $103,054.00 

Deferred Revenue $834.00 

Capital Projects $135.00 

Agency Fund $26,153.00 

Long Term Debt S3.812.814.00 

Total Liabilities $3,942,990.00 

FUND EQUITY 



General Fund $202,711.00 

Food Ser^^ce Fund $121,872.00 

Capital Projects Fund SI 4.924.00 

Total Fund Equity- $339,507.00 
Total Liabilities & Fund Equit}' 



$4,282,497.00 



■SD-16- 



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-SD-20- 



2002-2003 ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 
Hollis Elementary School Community 

'Successful schools are organized around student learning. Schools that support 
these expectations set priorities for what teachers teach and what students learn. 
And they provide a sufficient number of well-qualified personnel to meet school 
goals. Schools that achieve high levels of student performance provide the resources 
and supports that ensure student success. Recognizing that all students do not learn 
at the same pace, schools that support student success give students the time they 
need to meet high academic standards. These schools provide rigorous curricula 
and the instructional strategies that support all students, particularly those who are 
low performing. Classroom observation, continual evaluation of teaching practice 
and review and analysis of student work also ensure equity in the learning of all 
students. In addition, schools that are deliberate about raising the performance of 
all student regularly collect, study and analyze data to improve decision-making 
about instruction and student learning.' 
(excerpted from NAESP, Leading Learning Communities) 

The Hollis School Community continues its work to maintain excellence in 
education. We are pleased with our successes and appreciative of the support we receive 
from parents and the larger Hollis community that allows us to reach this level of excellence. 
As a high-performing, successful school we mirror all that is written in the excerpt above. We 
are especially proud of the quality, integrity and dedication of our staff members who are the 
heart and soul of our school. We hope you enjoy reading about school curricula, student and 
staff accomplishments and some of the exciting events that support our efforts to engage 
and challenge every HoUis Elementary School student. 
Respectfully submitted by E, M. Fucile, C. Thibaudeau, & A, Windsor 
Enrollment 

We have 871 students currentiy enrolled in Kindergarten through grade 6, an increase 
of 25 students from this time in the 2001-2002 school year. To accommodate increased 
enrollment numbers at kindergarten, and maintain the small class size that is critical to meeting 
individual needs, we added an additional sixth session of kindergarten students this year, 
which brings to 44 the number of classes in our district. 
Language Arts Curriculum Notes 

The reading and writing components of language arts are woven into all subject 
areas in the elementary grades. While teachers continue to utilize the Silver Burdett Ginn 
Uterature Works program as the consistent support for the core curriculum, this year our 
focus has been to investigate and learn about working with students in small guided reading 
groups at appropriate instructional levels. To begin this process teachers were trained in reading 
assessment strategies that are used to determine the instructional reading level of each student. 
These assessments provide teachers with a wealth of information regarding a child's reading 
fluency, decoding skills and comprehension level and are used to plan more effective lessons. 

Grant money has supported exciting, high quality professional development 
throughout the year including full day guided reading workshops in October presented by 
national consultants Connie Hebert and Pamela Haack. Teachers received ideas on how to 
manage the literacy block and conduct small guided reading groups emphasizing before, during 
and after reading strategies. Subsequent sessions with consultants modeling guided reading 
lessons in classrooms have increased understanding and added to our knowledge base. To 
support this guided reading method of teaching, multiple copies of books in the trade book 



-SD-21- 



library have been labeled according to reading levels and additional books will be purchased 
to provide necessary resources. 
Mathematics Curriculum Notes 

The Everyday Math Program continues to be effective, with teachers reporting that 
students are gaining a better conceptual understanding of mathematics. This year's 6* grade 
state test scores support these observations. Advanced and Proficient ratings on the NHEIAP 
have increased from 48% before the implementation of Everyday Math to 68%, while Basic 
and Novice scores have decreased from 52% before the implementation of Everyday Math to 
32%. 

Teachers continue to refine their use of the program by compacting and combining 
easier lessons while spending additional time on challenging ones. They continue to differentiate 
by activity, product and method of instruction to meet student needs. Using a story format, 
picture books related to math concepts and adding creative art are just some of the ways 
teachers are enhancing lessons. In the upper grades students and teachers are accessing web 
sites related to unit topics for practice and enrichment. Professional development is being 
provided on metacognition - thinking about your thinking. The purpose of metacognition is 
to teach students how to articulate their thinking during math problem solving and to improve 
their ability to explain their thinking process through writing. 
Foreign Language Curriculum Notes 

This year students in grades 3 through 6 are receiving instruction in Spanish twice 
a week for 30 minutes. Students are meeting the National Foreign Language Standards (the 
Five C's) in a variety of ways. Teachers use active and engaging learning activities at all levels, 
providing visual, auditory, and tactile activities that lead to more effective language learning. 
Students are learning to Communicate with each other about their families and homes and 
about their bodies and clothing. They are also building their own Spanish dictionaries of 
vocabulary words, which they have been encouraged to use at home. In studying other Cultures 
students have Compared their homes and school with the homes and schools of Mexican 
children and Bolivia, the country of origin of Spanish teacher Senora Guzman. They have 
also learned about Bolivian customs and traditions, emphasizing winter holidays, and have 
read about and discussed the Community of Hispanic people within the United States. In 
addition fourth graders Connected with health and the FitKids program in studying about the 
body, inside and out, and learning the laws of health in Spanish. 

To help expand our knowledge of foreign cultures Mrs. Machiko Iwasaki arrived 
in April from Japan as part of the STEP program (Sowing Together for Earthly Peace). She 
spent eight weeks providing a wonderful cultural exchange program for SAU 41 students and 
community members. A Hollis Rotary Grant provided additional sponsorship funds for this 
enrichment opportunity. 
Student Achievement &School Accountability 

Last May Hollis students in the 3'^ and 6* grades again participated in the required 
New Hampshire Educational Improvement and Assessment Program (NHEIAP). This 
program assesses how students and schools are doing in the areas of Language Arts and 
Mathematics, with additional tests in Science and Social Studies administered to 6^^ graders. 
Analyzing these test results and making appropriate adjustments are just two of the ways we 
work towards improving the teaching and learning process. This past year's NHEIAP results 
show both our schools placing first overall when ranked with other elementary schools of 
comparable size. When compared to aU the elementary schools statewide, regardless of size, 
the Primary School ranked sixth overall while the Upper Elementary ranked second. These 



-SD-22- 



results continue to be impressive and help validate the high quality of education that is provided 

here in Hollis. 

The following charts show a breakdown of scores as compared to the state average. 

May 2002 Language Art Mathematics 

End of Gr 3 Rank Advanced & Basic & Rank Advanced & Basic 

Proficient Above Proficient & Above 

HoUis 8 72% 93% 1 69% 96% 



State 


of 250 


41% 


76% 


of 250 39% 


80% 


May 


Language Art 


Mathematics 


Science 


Social Studies 


2002 












End 


Rank Adv. Basic 


Rank Adv. 


Basic 


Rank Adv. Basic 


Rank Adv. Basic 


Of Gr 


& & 


& 


& 


& & 


& & 


6 


Prof Above 


Prof 


Above 


Prof Above 


Prof Above 


Hollis 


14 49% 85% 


1 68% 


96% 


5 47% 76% 


1 51% 94% 


State of 162 28% 64% 


of 162 28% 


73% 


of 162 19% 53% 


of 162 18% 62% 



Students in our 5* grade took the Terra Nova, 2"'^ Edition, which compares students 
with their counterparts nationwide. The Terra Nova, a standardized instrument, is a 
measurement of academic achievement on what is judged to be common national curriculum 
materials, although no national curriculum exists. Again, results were impressive. 



This chart shows how well our students did compared to their peers nationally. 
Local Percentage of our students 
Total Test 

10% of our students scored in the top 
2% nationally 



25% of our students scored in the top 

8% nationally 

50% of our students scored in the top 

21% nationally 

75% of our students scored in the top 

35% nationally 



Reading Language Mathematics 

2% nationally 4% nationally 5% nationally 

10% nationally 10% nationally 11% nationally 

20% nationally 22% nationally 21% nationally 

35% nationally 46% nationally 40% nationally 



Communicating Student Progress 

This year for the first time curriculum pamphlets are being included in each child's 
report card, which reports student progress against grade level norms. The pamphlets outline 
major standards and objectives covered each trimester in each curriculum area. Teachers at 
each grade level and in each specialty have worked diligently to develop these pamphlets. As 
always, their efforts surpassed expectations. The addition of the curriculum pamphlets 
acknowledges both the importance of communication and collaboration between home and 
school and our ongoing effort to improve our reporting system. Individual student progress 
is shown through a collection of works within a student's portfolio, which is shared with 
parents during our April Portfolio Days. Additionally, Positive Principal's Phone Calls recognize 
and celebrate all types of intelligences and creativity. 

Hollis Primary School Celebrates 50 Years! In the fall of 1952, the 'new' building was 
large enough to hold all the town's elementary classrooms. Today, after eight additions and 
renovations, this building houses 457 students in kindergarten through grade 3. To celebrate 
the 50* anniversary staff members, students and parents marched in the Old Home Day 



-SD-23- 



Parade and invited community members to visit a booth set up at Nichols Field to commemorate 

and celebrate the school's history. 

Staff Notes 

We are proud and pleased to welcome the following new staff members: 

Heather Nelson-HPS Reading Specialist 

Sandy Martel -V^ grade 

Cindy Aikens-Special Ed. Para 

Bill Olszewski-Occupational Therapist 

Beth Delacoe-1" grade 

Amy Duprey-Special Ed. Para 

Sandy Lindquist-Half-time Spanish grades 3 & 4 

Amye Campbell-2"'' grade 

Kevin Moore-Special Ed. Para 

Cheri Birch-HPS Environmental Science 

Penny Currier-2"'^ grade 

Lisa Simard-Special Ed. Para 

Robin Fitton-HPS speech 

Ann Marie WeUman-4* grade 

Nancy Gatta-Special Ed. Para 

Allison Annand-Half-time Kindergarten 

Karen Fischer-6* grade 

Margaret Woods-Special Ed. Para 

Elaine Fallon-Half-time Kindergarten 

Kristen Dovidas-6* grade 

Karen Brown-Kindergarten Para 

Deb Stevens-Half-time Special Ed. Coordinator 

Susan LaRocque-Instructional Para 

Sheila O'DonneU-Cafeteria Supervisor 

Christine White-Special Ed. Clerical Para 

Denise Musto-Special Ed. Para 



-SD-24- 



A message from the Superintendent of Schools, 

Dear Parents and Residents, 

It is a distinct pleasure for me to serve as the Superintendent of the Mollis Brookline 
Schools. I am completing eight years in this position and I am appreciative and proud of the 
outstanding learning opportunities available in our schools. This success is direcdy attributable 
to the close and positive school-community relationship that we enjoy. Parents and community 
members are very involved in a variety of activities and projects and are highly supportive of 
our professional, support and administrative staff. 

As you vi^ill read in the reports that follow, each school is committed to providing 
for the wide range of needs of our students. To that end, curriculum and instruction are 
aligned with state and national standards and resources and materials implemented to support 
those needs. Professional development is focused on improving instruction through expanding 
teacher skills and assessment helps us to determine program and instructional effectiveness. 

Our media facilities and networked technology expand learning opportunities and 
support the curriculum, instruction, assessment connections. We have worked hard to bring 
our buildings up to date. With attention to the Middle School at this District Meeting, our 
children at that level will be better served. 

Mollis Brookline students have excelled in a variety of academic, performance, 
athletic and demonstration experiences and are successful at the state and New England 
levels. Our test results further validate this by consistentiy placing us in the range of the most 
successful districts in the state. 

Our students are well prepared for the future. Seventy percent are accepted at 
some of the most competitive colleges and universities in the country and ten percent enroll 
at two year colleges. The balance of our students become responsibly employed or enter the 
Armed Services. 

The Annual Report will provide for you an opportunity to learn more about the 
dynamic programs and activities taking place in our schools. We are proud of them and 
expect that our teachers and administrators will continue to work tirelessly for your children. 

We encourage you to remain involved through the several volunteer opportunities 
available. We understand and appreciate that we are a better school system, as a result, and 
look forward to your continued support. I expect that your child will further grow and 
develop this year and anticipate ongoing success in the years that follow. 

Sincerely, 

Kenneth L. DeBenedictis, Ed.D. 

Superintendent of Schools 



-SD-25- 



Report of the Director of Curriculum and Instruction 

The fundamental purpose of school is to enhance student learning. This is a very simple and 
obvious statement to make. However, learning is a very complex process, and it takes a 
variety of interacting conditions to assure that our students learn as much as possible. I want 
to spend a brief time describing what those conditions are, and talk about how we are doing 
in creating those "learning conditions." 

There is one learning condition that is beyond the school's control, and that is the "condition" 
in which students arrive at the schoolhouse door. Schools whose students arrive well-nourished 
- physically, emotionally and academically, start from a stronger foundation. We are fortunate 
in Brookline and Hollis that our students arrive at school fully prepared to learn what we have 
to offer. Since many of our students arrive so well prepared, our schools start with an 
advantage. I will come back to this point when I conclude about our responsibilities to ALL 
our students. 

Conditions that enhance learning within our schools begin with excellent teachers. Excellent 
teachers are those who have a very good background for what they are to teach, who care 
passionately about their teaching and their students, who constandy reflect upon their practice, 
who understand that what students learn is as important as what they are taught, who are 
constantly looking for new ways to make their instruction better. A good school attracts 
excellent teachers, KEEPS those teachers, and provides the environment and resources within 
which excellent teachers thrive. 

If schools are to attract and keep excellent teachers, they must provide powerful professional 
development programs, a high-quality curriculum as the foundation for teaching, up to date 
and appropriate instructional materials, and support and encouragement. 

Administrative leadership which both insists on high quality teaching, and supports that teaching 
as it occurs, is also an essential condition for student learning. Without excellent administrative 
leadership, school systems have consistentiy foundered. It is virtually impossible to attract or 
keep large numbers of excellent teachers without equally excellent administrative leadership. 

That leadership actually begins with our school boards. School boards set policy; they set 
budgets, and convince the community of the necessity of supporting their schools. Excellent 
school boards make excellent schools possible. 

We each have a responsibility for all our students. For those students who arrive fully prepared, 
and are able to move easily through our curriculum, we owe them the opportunity to pursue 
more challenging opportunities. For those who arrive less prepared, we owe them the respect 
of not mistaking lack of background for lack of abiUty, and we have the duty of helping 
them catch up and then see the opportunities before them. For our students who learn and 
see Hfe in a different way, we owe them the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge in a 
variety of ways. And for our less able students, we owe them the expectation that hard work 
can pay off for them also, and to encourage and assist those students to go as far as they 
possible can. None of the students I have described should feel unwelcome or unvalued in 
our schools. 



-SD-26- 



So- how are we doing in developing these conditions, and how much are our students benefiting 
and learning? In one sense, that is for each of you to decide. I believe that we do have 
excellent teaching and solid support instructionaUy and administratively. I believe we have 
very supportive school boards and communities. Given these conditions, we should do well 
by our students. 

And by and large, we DO do well by our students, as we compare ourselves to any measure 
produced by the State Department of Education. Our dropout rates are among the very 
lowest in the state, and our college attendance rates, as well as our scores on state testing 
programs are consistentiy among the very highest in the state. We can, and should, be proud 
of these accomplishments. But, since so many of our students come to school well prepared 
for that experience, we should do well by those measures. What we know by these statistics 
is that our students are learning, and that our schools are succeeding. 

It is also clear to me that much of our success is due not only to the advantages our students 
bring with them, but also to the dedication and hard work of faculty, staff, administrators and 
school board members. I have witnessed an incredible amount of this work and dedication 
among very many people in both Brooldine and in HoUis. No matter how good our students 
might be, excellence doesn't come without tremendously hard work. 

Since we do well, we now have the ability to look at those things that we could do better. For 
example, a thorough analysis of our state testing results shows that still too many of our 
students are in the novice category One of our goals needs to be to even further reduce the 
number of students whose learning performance places them in this lowest category. While 
the number of our students in the novice category is weU below the state average, it is our 
goal to raise the performance level of these youngsters, not because it wiU look good on our 
"score sheets," but because students who land in this category need to increase their learning 
if they are to succeed later. 

We win also continue to concentrate on improving the writing skills of our students, and their 
ability to respond to open-ended questions, and not simply multiple-choice questions. Life is 
series of open-ended responses, and not simply a multiple choice quiz, and our students need 
more of this sophisticated approach to learning. 

Finally, we need to continue to stretch our students, and challenge them all. Implementation 
of Differentiated Instruction, which focuses on addressing students' varying readiness, 
interests, and learning styles, will also enhance student learning. Providing foreign language 
instruction in our elementary schools is only one example of our approach to providing such 
opportunities. Individual school reports will provide additional specifics of expanding 
opportunities for our students. 



-SD-27- 



It is part of my job to touch on many of these conditions. That is, I am involved in curriculum 
development, professional development programs for our staff, research on learning and 
instructional strategies, finding grants to support the district, and providing support for 
administrators, teachers, and school boards in these areas. It is a pleasure to continue to be 
part of dynamic, thoughtful and supportive school districts, and I look forward to participating 
in the continuing quest for excellence in Hollis and BrookUne. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Carol A. Mace 



-SD-28- 



Report of the Director of Special Education 

The NH State Department of Education conducts periodic reviews of special education 
programs in assessing a district's compliance with all federal and state regulations. SAU 41 
districts underwent the state onsite review process during the 2001 /2002 school year. After 
interviewing a number of parents, students and staff, in addition to assessing numerous files 
and case studies, I am most pleased to report that all three SAU 41 districts received the 
highest of evaluation ratings. Significant commendations were made in each of the targeted 
criteria including: compliance with aU procedural regulations, optimal student access with all 
grade level curriculum, participation of all students in state and district standardized 
assessments as well as the case study documentation of student progress in their respective 
individualized education plans. 

The Special Education Department continues the expansion and specialization of instructional 
programs throughout all SAU 41 districts. As departmental goals, the continued specialization 
of systematic remedial programs in reading, language and study skills has enhanced the overall 
quality of services within our districts in a most cost-effective manner. Congruent with the 
federal mandates of IDEA '97 and the New Hampshire Rules for the Education of 
Handicapped Students, School Administrative Unit (SAU) #41 coordinates a diversity of 
special education programs and related services to meet the unique needs of educationally 
identified students throughout HoUis and BrookUne. This year the department is providing 
services for 281 students K-12 which constitutes approximately 10.5% of the total SAU41 
student body. In addition, special developmental services are also provided for 29 preschool, 
children ages 3-5, as required by state guidelines. 

The predominant goal of special education is to assure all children have an "appropriate 
educational experience." This means that when students have significant deficits in the learning 
process, resulting in significantly delayed achievement relative to their grade level, the school 
system provides a diversity of services to address those factors adversely impacting a student's 
academic performance. Such factors or educational deficits include specific learning disabilities 
in: reading decoding, reading comprehension, listening comprehension, written and oral 
expression, math reasoning and calculation as well as speech and language skills. Orthopedic, 
emotional and health confounds are also addressed by the department when they significantiy 
impact the learning process. 

Special education interventions are twofold: remedial services to enhance growth in the child's 
deficit area(s) and compensatory services to facilitate the student's successful engagement 
with his/her regular classroom instruction. For example, if a student has significant difficulty 
learning to read, the special services personnel provide both reading programs to enhance 
the child's reading skills as well as assistance to classroom experiences so that his/her acquisition 
of knowledge taught in the regular classes is not prevented by their learning difficulties. 

The special education process involves numerous formal meetings accompanied by an extensive 
number of documents to assure the adherence to federal and state regulations. The department 
staff has completed an unprecedented eighth consecutive year of 100% compliance with all 
documents and procedural safeguards. As a result, each district has received its maximum 
entitiement for federal funds. 



-SD-29- 



The special education budgets reflect all expenditures for in-district programs and related 
service therapies including staff salaries, instructional materials, evaluation and placement 
services, out-of-district tuition and specialized transportation costs. Some revenues are received 
annually to assist our districts in providing specialized instructional programs. For the fiscal 
year 02/03, SAU 41 districts will receive a combined $278,056 of federal IDEA funds. The 
department is pleased to report that SAU wide special education budgets continue to be 
relatively stable, with actual reductions in the average cost per student over the last eight 
years, while continuously expanding the quality and diversity of services. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Robert R. KeUy, MA 



-SD-30- 



Report of the Business Administrator, SAU #41 

The Hollis and Brookline schools continue to share in educational successes. As a result, the 
communities and school districts continue to experience growth. As we grow as an SAU 
(School Administrative Unit), our operating budgets and physical facilities must continually be 
affected to accommodate this growth due to success. 

Growth and success are possible through responsible fiscal control. The following areas are key: 

> Detailed budget development 

> Fiscal audits of all school finances in Brookline, Hollis, the Coop and SAU #41 

> Facilities 

^ Food Service Program 

BUDGET 

Our budget process has become both efficient and streamlined. The development of a budget 
does not happen overnight. We begin the budget process in late August and early September. 
Each Building Administrator builds his/her budget electronically through an SAU Accounting 
Software System (Fundsense). As a result, we increase the integrity in our system processing. 
The Business Office oversees this process, making sure that all school boards and town or 
SAU committees receive reliable uniform budget documents for review and discussions. All 
boards and committees receive all the necessary back-up materials dealing with all budgets. 

AUDIT 

The SAU and all of our school district records are audited annually. We are required to follow 
the Generally Accepted Accounting Principals (GAAP), which mandates that we follow all 
accounting principles if we receive more than $300,000 in federal monies annually (which we 
do). We take great pride in the fact that we have successfuUy fulfilled all audit guidelines and 
our audits have shown no material weaknesses or findings. All of our payable, payroll and 
personnel procedures are in full compliance. 

FACILITIES 

Throughout our SAU, there are seven buildings to be maintained. Our buildings and grounds 
departments and staff have done tremendous work through recent renovation projects. The 
day-to-day processes of cleaning and maintaining our school buildings have enhanced our 
learning environment. The recent reorganization of our buildings and grounds position as an 
SAU-wide position has experienced tremendous success that benefits all our facilities. 

FOOD SERVICE PROGRAM 

Each school facility operates a food service program for the benefit of our school students. 
With the appropriate staff in place in these programs, our students experience healthy, well- 
balanced meals that meet the food service guidelines outlined by the Department of Education, 
Food and Nutrition Program. 

Without our hard working professional and support staff and dedicated school boards, our 
successes would not have been possible. As our districts continue to grow, so will our staff, in 
order to keep up with challenging financial changes. We thank the communities of Brookline 
and Hollis for their continued support to make our schools places where the children of both 
communities receive an excellent education and prepare themselves to take their place in 
society as responsible, educated citizens. 

Lee Ann Blastos, Business Administrator 



-SD-31- 



MOLLIS BROOKLINE COOPERATIVE SCHOOL DISTRICT ANNUAL 

REPORT 

for the 
Year Ending June 30, 2002 

School Officers 
Hollis Brookline Cooperative School Board 



Mrs. Lou-Ann Parodi, Chair 




Term Expires 2004 


Mr. Thomas Enright 




Term Expires 2003 


Mrs. Marygrace DiGiacinto 




Term Expires 2003 


Mrs. Pamela Kirby 




Term Expires 2004 


Mr. Stephen Simons 




Term Expires 2004 


Mr. Timothy Bevins 




Term Expires 2005 


Mr. James McBride 




Term Expires 2005 


Mr. James Belanger 


Moderator 


Term Expires 2004 


Mrs. Mary Kay MacFarlane 


Clerk 


Appointed 2002 


Mrs. Julie Simons 


Treasurer 


Appointed 2001 



Hollis Brookline Cooperative Budget Committee 



Mr. William Matthews 
Mr. Harry Haytayan 
Mr. Raymond Valle 
Mr. Richard Bensinger 
Mr. Douglas Cecil 
Mr. Forrest Milkowski 



Chair 



Term Expires 2005 
Term Expires 2003 
Term Expires 2003 
Term Expires 2004 
Term Expires 2004 
Term Expires 2005 



SAU #41 Administration 



Dr. Kenneth L. DeBenedictis 
Ms. Carol A. Mace 
Mrs. Lee Ann Blastos 
Mr. Robert R. KeUy 



Superintendent of Schools 

Director of Curriculum and Instruction 

Business Administrator 

Director of Special Education 



Hollis Brookline Middle School 

Mrs. Patricia Lewis Goyette, Principal 
Mrs. Lena L. Vitagliano, Assistant Principal 



Hollis Brooldine High School 

Mr. Charles Flahive, Interim Principal 
Mr. Robert Ouellette, Assistant Principal 
Mr. Richard Manley, Assistant Principal 



-SD-33- 



HOLLIS/BROOKLINE COOPERATIVE SCHOOL DISTRICT WARRANT 

The State of New Hampshire 



To the inhabitants of the Hollis/Brookline Cooperative School District in the Towns of 
Hollis and Brookline in the County of Hillsborough, State of New Hampshire qualified to 
vote in District Affairs. 

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED TO MEET AT THE HOLLIS BROOKLINE HIGH 
SCHOOL GYMNASIUM IN SAID DISTRICT ON THE FIFTH DAY OF MARCH, 2003, 
AT SEVEN O'CLOCK IN THE EVENING TO ACT UPON THE FOLLOWING 
SUBJECTS. 

1 . To elect all necessary school district officers for the ensuing terms by official ballot on 
March 11,2003. 

Election of one (1) member of the School Board from Hollis for the ensuing three 

years. 

Election of one (1) member of the School Board from Brookline for the ensuing three 

years. 

Election of one (1) Budget Committee Member from Hollis for the ensuing three years. 

Election of one (1) Budget Committee Member from Hollis for the ensuing year. 

Election of one (1) Budget Committee Member from Brookline for the ensuing three 

years. 

2. To see if the Hollis-Brookline Cooperative School District will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $13,425,000 for site development, construction and original 
equipping of a new Cooperative middle school on land, owned by the Brookline School 
District, in Brookline. This sum to include fees and any items incident to and/or necessary 
for said construction, and said sum to be in addition to any federal, state, or private 
funds made available therefore, and to authorize the issuance of not more than 
$13,425,000 of bonds or notes, in accordance with NH RSA 33 (Municipal Finance 
Act), and to authorize the Hollis-Brookline Cooperative School Board to issue and 
negotiate such bonds or notes and to determine the rate of interest thereon; furthermore, 
to authorize the interest earned on the investment of these bond proceeds to be used 
for the above purpose. In addition, to raise and appropriate $300,000 for the first year 
principal and interest payment on the bond (submitted by petition). The school board 
does not support this appropriation. The budget committee has not taken a position on 
this request. 

3. To see of the school district will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $8,550,000 
(gross budget) for Hollis Brookline Middle School renovation/addition and to authorize 
the issuance of not more than $8,550,000 of bonds or notes, in accordance with NH 
RSA 33 (Municipal Finance Act), and to authorize the school board to issue and negotiate 
such notes or bonds and to determine the rate of interest thereon. Furthermore to 
appropriate the sum of $100,000 representing interest earned on the above bond proceeds 
to be used for the above purposes. And to raise and appropriate the sum of $220,644 
for the first interest payment on the bond or note. The school board recommends this 



-SD-34- 



appropriation. The budget committee supports this article. A two-thirds ballot vote is 
required. 

4. To see if the school district will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of $395,700 to fund 
the necessary repairs of the Hollis Brookline Middle School and to purchase replacement 
furniture and equipment. Repair projects totaling $365,700 include roof and boiler 
replacement, instaUation of air circulation equipment and removal of carpeting in several 
classrooms and replacement with vinyl tile. The $30,000 balance in the article covers 
the cost of replacement classroom furniture and audio-visual equipment. The school 
board recommends this appropriation. The budget committee supports this article. In 
the event that Article 2 or 3 pass, this article will be withdrawn. 

5. To see if the school district will authorize the school board to convey an access, drainage 
and sidewalk easement on the west side of Route 122 as shown on the Route 122 sidewalk 
plan of the Town of Hollis. The school board recommends this article. The budget 
committee has not taken a position on this article. 

6. To see if the school district will authorize the HoUis/Brookline Cooperative School 
District to access future year and federal catastrophic aid funds in the event that special 
education costs exceed budget limitations. The school board and budget committee 
recommend this article. 

7. To see if the school district will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of $288,026 to fund 
the increase in cost items relative to professional staff salaries and fringe benefits for the 
2003-2004 school year which resulted from good faith negotiations with the professional 
staff, and which represents the negotiated increase over last year's salaries and fringe 
benefits. Cost items increase in subsequent years will require approval of specific warrant 
articles at future district meetings. The school board recommends this appropriation. 
The budget committee does not support this article. 

8. To see if the school district will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of $107,200 to fund 
the increase in cost items relative to support staff salaries and fringe benefits for the 
2003-2004 school year which resulted from good faith negotiations with the support 
staff, and which represents the negotiated increase over last year's salaries and fringe 
benefits. Cost items increase in subsequent years will require approval of specific warrant 
articles at future district meetings. The school board recommends this appropriation. 
The budget committee supports this article. 

9. To see if the school district will vote to raise and appropriate $1 2,795,997 for the support 
of schools, for the payment of salaries of school district officers and agents and for the 
payment of statutory obligations of the district. The school board recommends this 
appropriation. The budget committee supports this article. This appropriation does 
not include any of the other warrant articles. 

10. To increase the transportation budget, up to a maximum of $55,000, for the purpose of 
changing the schedule of the HoUis-Brookline cooperative schools to accommodate a 
later opening; ideally, 8:30 AM. This budget increase shall only become effective if the 
Hollis and Brookline Elementary schools agree to adjust their schedules in a manner 



-SD-35- 



that allows the co-op schools to open after 7:45 AM (submitted by petition). The school 
board does not recommend this appropriation. The budget committee does not support 
this request. 

11. To transact any other business which may legally come before said meeting. 

Given under our hands and seals at said Hollis, New Hampshire on this fourth day of February, 

2003. 

Lou- Ann Parodi, Chair 
Timothy Bevins 
Marygrace DiGiacinto 
Thomas Enright 
Pamela Kirby 
James McBride 
Stephen Simons 
SCHOOL BOARD 

A true copy of the warrant - Attest: Lou- Ann Parodi, Chair 

Timothy Bevins 
Marygrace DiGiacinto 
Thomas Enright 
Pamela Kirby 
James McBride 
Stephen Simons 
SCHOOL BOARD 



-SD-36- 



SCHOOL WARRANT 

The State of New Hampshire 

PoUs Open at 7:00 AM - Will not close before 7:00 PM (HOLLIS) 
PoUs Open at 8:00 AM - Will not close before 7:30 PM (BROOKLINE) 

To the inhabitants of the HoUis/Brookline Cooperative School District in the Towns of 
Hollis and Brookline qualified to vote in District Affairs. 

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED TO MEET AT THE HOLLIS BROOKLINE MIDDLE 
SCHOOL (HOLLIS) AND CAPT SAMUEL DOUGLASS ACADEMY (BROOKLINE) 
IN SAID DISTRICT ON THE TWELFTH DAY OF MARCH, 2003, SEVEN O'CLOCK 
AND EIGHT O'CLOCK IN THE MORNING, RESPECTIVELY, TO ACT UPON THE 
FOLLOWING SUBJECTS. 

1 . To choose one member of the School Board (from Hollis) for the ensuing three years. 

2. To choose one member of the School Board (from Brookline) for the ensuing three 
years. 

3. To choose one Budget Committee Member (from HoUis) for the ensuing three years. 

4. To choose one Budget Committee Member (from HoUis) for the ensuing year. 

5. To choose one Budget Committee Member (from Brookline) for the ensuing three 
years. 



Given under our hands and seals at said Hollis, New Hampshire on this fourth day of February, 

2003. 

Lou-Ann Parodi, Chair 
Timothy Bevins 
Marygrace DiGiacinto 
Thomas Enright 
Pamela Kirby 
James McBride 
Stephen Simons 

A true copy of the warrant - Attest: Lou- Ann Parodi, Chair 

Timothy Bevins 
Marygrace DiGiacinto 
Thomas Enright 
Pamela Kirby 
James McBride 
Stephen Simons 



-SD-37- 



Hollis/Brookline Cooperative School District Meeting 

Hollis/Brookline High School 

March 6th, 2002 

Hollis/Brookline Cooperative School Board 

Timothy Bevins Pamela Kirby 

Basil Harris, Jr. Lou-Ann Parodi 

Marygrace DiGiacinto Stephen Simons 
Thomas Enright 

Hollis/Brookline Cooperative Budget Committee 

William Matthews Harry Haytayan 

Russell Heinselman Raymond Valle 

Debra Drew Richard Bensinger 

SAU #41 Administration 

Dr. Kenneth L. DeBenedictis Lee Ann Blastos 
Carol Mace Robert R. Kelly 

Moderator 
Jim Belanger 

The Annual District meeting of the Hollis/Brookline Cooperative School District was called 
to order by Moderator Jim Belanger at 7:20 p.m. on Wednesday, March 6*, 2002. Moderator 
Belanger led the audience in the Pledge of Allegiance. 

Moderator Belanger recognized and then introduced Senator Jane O'Hearn, who spoke briefly 
to the voters. Sen. O'Hearn informed the voters that she is working hard on the issues in 
Concord. She also informed the voters that the House had voted to kill the toll booths in 
Nashua. Sen. O'Hearn then encouraged the voters to contact her if they had any questions 
or concerns. 

Moderator Belanger recognized and introduced Chair. Tom Enright. Chair Enright introduced 
the Coop Clerk, Mary Kay MacFarlane and the Coop Board members, Pam Kirby; Lou-Ann 
Parodi; Basil Harris, Jr.; Marygrace DiGiacinto; Steve Simons, Tim Bevins and himself. Chair 
Enright also introduced Dr. Ken DeBenedictis, Superintendent of Schools SAU #41 . 

Moderator Jim Belanger recognized then introduced Bill Matthews of the H/B Coop Budget 
Committee. 

Bill Matthews introduced the Budget Committee Russ Heinselman, Debra Drew, Harry 
Haytayan, Raymond Valle and Richard Besinger. Bill thanked Debra Drew for her 
contributions and many thanks to Russ Heinselman who is retiring after 4 years of service. 

Bill Matthews introduced the members of the Hollis/Brookline Coop Budget Committee; 

-SD-38- 



Russell Heinselman; Debra Drew; Harry Haytayan; Raymond Valle; Richard Bensinger. He 
thanked all of the members of the Budget Committee for their hard work and dedication. 

Chair Enright retook the podium introduce Laurie Gorham, student representative and to 
thank Basil Harris, Jr., who is retiring after four years of service. Chair Enright then presented 
Basil Harris, Jr. with a plaque from the Coop Board. Basil Harris, Jr. thanked the audience 
and the Board for their support. 

Moderator Belanger introduced Kathy Lewis who gave a short presentation. 

Ms. Lewis told the audience that this was a long meeting with many important issues on the 
agenda. She thanked the School Board and Budget Committee for all their time and effort. 
Ms. Lewis said that everyone's hard work shows, as we have schools we can be proud of. 

Moderator Belanger addressed the audience regarding the rules for tonight's meeting. 
Address the moderator 
Speak only once 
Speak only at microphone 
Address one amendment at a time 
Specify money amendments in dollars 
Limit of 2 minutes at the microphone 
State your question clearly 
Stay at microphone until your question has been answered 

Moderator Belanger reviews the agenda for the two day meeting. 

A motion to delay action on articles 2 <& 3 was made by Ernie Hud;(iec. The motion was seconded by Ann 
Caldwell and carried bj majority card vote. 

Article 4. To see if the school district will vote to amend the Articles of Agreement of the 
Hollis/Brookline Cooperative School District by deleting Article 5 as it 
is currentiy written and substituting a new Article 5 as follows: 



Article 5 



"The capital and operating expenses of the Hollis Brookline Cooperative 
School District, payable in each fiscal year, shall be apportioned eighty 
percent (80%) on the average daily membership of the students in each 
of the pre-existing districts in grades 7 through 1 2 during the preceding 
fiscal year and twenty percent (20%) on the most recent equalized 
valuation of the pre-existing districts as calculated by the Department 
of Revenue Administration. Average daily membership shall be calculated 
by the SAU using the figures submitted to the State Department of 
Education on Form A3a or its equivalent. The SAU will submit these 
figures to the Department of Revenue Administration separately. 

To illustrate the intent of this article, the following example is provided. 
The capital and operating expenses for the 2002-03 fiscal year (July 1, 



-SD-59- 



2002 to June 30, 2003) will be apportioned at the time the tax rates for 
each pre-existing district are set (approximately October, 2002). The 
average daily student membership for the 2001-2002 fiscal year (July 1, 
2001 to June 30, 2002) will be used and will be available at the SAU 
office by September 1, 2002. The data concerning all resident pupils 
attending elsewhere will be provided by the special education department, 
the principals of both the middle and senior high schools and confirmed 
by the Superintendent of Schools. Equalized valuation figures for each 
pre-existing district will be the 2001 equalized valuation year calculated 
from data running from October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2001. 
Equalized valuation figures for 2001 are generally available from the 
Department of Revenue Administration in May 2002." The school 
board recommends this article. The budget committee does not support 
this article. 

Tom Enright moves the motion. Steve Simons seconds the motion. 

Chair Enright gave a presentation on apportionment. Apportionment is the formula used to 
split expenses between Hollis and Brookline. The formula considers enrollment (ADM) and 
property valuation (EV). No Cooperative district apportions expenses the same way. They 
vary from 100% ADM to 100% EV. Once a Cooperative district changes the apportionment 
formula, it may not be changed again for five years. The Hollis/BrookJine Cooperative District 
was formed in 1991. The apportionment in 1991 was 50% ADM, 50% EV. In 1996 the 
apportionment formula was changed to 60% ADM and 40% EV. In addition, the method for 
determining ADM was also changed. 

The Apportionment Committee, which consisted of 4 HoUis members and 4 Brookline 
members, came to no consensus on the issue. The options discussed ranged from stay where 
we are at 60/40 all the way to 100% ADM. At 70/30 the vote was 3 yes, 5 no. At 80/20 the 
vote was 4 yes, 4 no. At 90/10 the vote was 3 yes and 5 no. The School Board felt there were 
significant reasons why the apportionment formula should be changed. One of these reasons 
was that the State Aid formula has changed. Hollis receives $611,019 in aid and Brookline 
receives $1,038,282 in state aid. Brookline receives 2.6 times the aid of Hollis because Brookline 
has less property to tax. Brookline has a tax base of $265 million and Hollis has a tax base of 
$585 million. 

Currentiy the Hollis /Brookline Cooperative District apportions its expenses on a 60% ADM, 
40% EV basis. Hollis has 61% of the students and 73 % of the property valuation. Hollis 
pays 69% of the net district costs. A $300,000 home in Hollis is assessed $3,324 in Coop 
taxes. Brookline has 39% of the students and 27% of the property valuation. Brookline pays 
31% of the net district costs. A $300,000 home in Brookline pays $3,032 in Coop taxes. 

The Coop School Board is proposing 80%ADM and 20% EV. Under this scenario, HoUis 
would pay 65% of net district costs and a $300,000 home would pay $3,191 in Coop taxes. 
Brookline would pay 35% of net district costs and a $300,000 home would pay $3,327 in 
Coop taxes. 



-SD-40- 



After Chair Enright's presentation, Moderator Belanger asks if anyone has any questions for 
Tom Enright. 

Jim McBride (B): In 1996 apportionment changed. If the RSA requires written approval 
from the State Board of Education, how did the apportionment issue get into the warrant 
without due process? 

Chair Enright: RSA 195A states that the annual district meeting has the authority to change 
the apportionment. The meeting is the authoritative body in this issue. 

Dexter Decker (B): Is state aid included in the handout? 

Chair Enright: Yes. 

Ernie Hudziec (B): What are the reasons the Brookiine members of the Board feel the 
apportionment formula should change. 

Basil Harris, Jr. (B): The Apportionment committee was divided on the issue with Mollis 
members voting one way and Brookiine members voting the opposite way. Compromise was 
the only fair way of dealing with this issue. 

Lou-Ann Parodi (B): Supports Basil on this issue. 

Tony LeBeck (B): Are state aid grants only relative for the Coop. 

MeHnda WilHs (H): Wants to know the net cost per pupil at 60/40, 80/20 and 100/0. 

Bill Matthews: These figures are net after state aid. 

60/40 80/20 100/0 

Mollis 8,815 8,461 8,108 

Brookiine 5,666 6,217 6,767 

Joe DriscoU (B): Why focus on net costs and not actual costs. State aid benefits Brookiine 
for a reason. There is no guarantee that the state aid will continue. 

Chair Enright: Feels that state aid will continue and that it is fair to include it. 

Doug Cecil (B): Why isn't everyone taxed alike? Does all the money go from the state to the 
Coop. 

BiU Matthews: No, the money goes to the town. 

Marry Rodgers (B): Stated that the state aid formula is in flux, yet apportionment is locked in 
for 5 years. Would like to hear a dissenting opinion. 

Chair Enright: The School Board was unanimous. 



-SD-41- 



Bill Matthews: Some wanted to keep the current formula and others wanted to consider the 
impact per household. The members who voted against this Article did so on principal. 

Chair Enright: The state aid formula is permanent statute. 

Tom Walker (B): State aid compensates Brookline for inequalities. He noted that the Coop 
has no assets in Brookline. 

Dexter Decker (B): The worksheet takes uses the property reevaluation recendy done in 
Brookline, yet HoUis's reevaluation is incomplete. 

Bill Matthews: For HoUis a 3% growth figure was used, as well as, a 3 % for inflation until the 

reevaluation is 

complete. 

Phil Chandler (B): Feels that the data used market value of houses not assessed value of 
houses in Hollis. The current assessed value of a house in Hollis is 75% of market value. 
The reevaluation of HoUis's property will change market value Vs assessed value. The data 
presented used market value not equalized valuation. 

Chair Enright: I don't, think reevaluation is going to effect this formula very much. Usually, 
the assessment increases and the rate decreases, with a net change of very little. We can only 
use the current figures we have and can't work with potential numbers. 

Jim Pope (B): Student population is used in the apportionment formula, however a significant 
portion of the expenses of the Coop goes to a facility located in HoUis. The facilities are 
100% in HoUis and 0% in BrookUne. Is there no consideration of the fact that HoUis gets the 
benefit of the faciUty in their town? 

Chair Enright: FaciUty expenses make up 10% of the budget. 

Keith Alexander ( B): Apportionment is a 5 year commitment. What is the 5 year projection 
for student population. 

Chair Enright: There are no significant changes in the ratio at this time, with our 5 year 
projections. 

Marsha Page (B): WiU the apportionment formula change state aid? For years BrookUne paid 
more money into the Coop. The only fair thing to do is to make the cost the same per house 
no matter where it is located. 

Chair Enright: No, apportionment does not effect state aid. The equal point is roughly 75/ 
25. Using this apportionment figure, the cost is the closest to equal for everyone. 

Marsha Page (B): Why was that figure not put out there? 

Tim Bevins: The number was put out for discussion, but didn't fly. 



-SD-42- 



Eric Power (B): Hollis is a larger town than Brookline. Any majority votes favors Hollis. The 
only real voice Brookline has is on bond votes. 

Steve Coombs (H): Is voting against the apportionment change as he sees marginal utility in 
it. 

Ernie Hudziec (B): If 100% ADM were used would we pay the same amount for each 
student. 

Chair Enright: Yes 

Keith Thompson (B): Why wasn't state aid made a part of the apportionment formula? That 
way if state aid changes the apportionment formula will reflect that. 

Chair Enright: State aid is not going away. It is permanent. 

Mort Goulder (H): Fairness is in the eye of the beholder. When Brookline students first 
came to Hollis they paid 100% ADM plus a 2% kicker. Then the Coop was formed and the 
apportionment was 50% ADM, 50% EV. Then the apportionment formula was changed to 
60%ADM, 40%EV. State aid compensates Brookline for the difference in property valuation. 
He feels the apportionment should be 100% ADM. 

Joe DriscoU (B): If 75/25 is the equal point, why present 80/20? 

Chair Enright: 80/20 was the compromise we felt was most fair. 

Melinda Willis (H): Read a letter from Lorin Rydstrom regarding apportionment. Lorin 
Rydstrom and the Hollis Budget Committee feels that the only fair apportionment is 
100%ADM. State aid compensates for property values. Why does it cost Hollis more per 
student than Brookline? He feels that the Coop would be more stable and less subject to 
disagreement if each student had the same cost. 

Brian Regan (H): Feels Brookline is getting compensated twice. 

Sharon Ryhurt (B): If apportionment goes through, does it entide Brookline to another seat 
on the Board? 

Char Enright: That is unrelated to this article. That issue is taken up in article 9. 

Steve Ridilleo(H): Support the Coop and 100% ADM. Hollis Coop rate has increased over 
last 3 years, while BrookHne's Coop rate went down. 

Peter Stallwell (H): Mope the question. 

Moderator Belanger: Motion out of order. 

Ernie Hud^iiec (B): Moves to amend to the articles of agreement. This amendment proposes gradual 
approach to apportionment: 



-SD-43- 



60/40 


2002-2003 


70/30 


2003-2004 


80/20 


2004-2005 


90/10 


2005-2006 


100/0 


2006-2007 



The motion is seconded by Russ Heinselmen. 

Moderator Belanger: This motion was anticipated, but if this motion passes it may be 
challenged by the DRA, possibly the courts. The Statute is clear that the formula can be 
changed every five years. Comments and questions on the amendment. 

Jennifer Nicosia (H): Doesn't like taking risks and agrees that this amendment raises 
questionable legal issues. Believes in 100% ADM. 

Char Enright: Bill Drescher felt that a staggered change would lead to legal problems. 

Moderator Belanger calls this amendment to a vote. The motion is defeated by a majority 
card vote. 

Jim McBride (B): I would like to amend item tM- in this warrant to read — to vote to amend the Articles of 
Agreement of the Mollis Brookline Cooperative School District by deleting Article 5 as it currently is written 
and substituting a new Article 5 as follows: "The capital and operating expenses of the Mollis /Brookline 
Cooperative School District, payable in each fiscal jear, shall be apportioned 0% on the average daily membership 
and 100% on the most recent equalled valuation of the pre-existing districts as calculated by the Department 
of Avenue and Administration. " 

Doug Cecil (B): Seconded motion of Jim Mc Bride. 

Ken DeBenedictis wants to clarify a conversation with Sarah Browning. She will forward any 
apportionment amendment approved at this meeting to the state for review. 

The motion put forth by Jim McBride was voted and defeated by majority card vote. 

Kathy Lewis (H): Is voting no on the amendment. If $.30 a day saves decisiveness, it is 
worth it. 

Dave Partridge (B): 100% ADM figures do not work out to be the same cost per student. 

Marsha Page (B): Proposes an amendment to Article 4 to have the costs of the M/B Cooperative District 
apportioned 75% ADM and 25% EV. 

Dexter Decker (B): Seconds the motion. 

Mort Goulder (H): A $200,000 house in each town is not equal. 

Dexter Decker (B): Supports this amendment by Marsha Page. It comes as close as you can 
to equal tax rates in each town. 



-SD-44- 



Jennifer Nicosia (H): Supports 100% ADM. Encourages to vote this amendment down. 

Ralph Nicosia: The Coop is a vendor of a service. Charge people what it costs. He supports 
100% ADM and opposes this amendment of 75/25. 

Cal Page (B): Supports 75/25. 

Tim Bevins (H): He originally proposed 75/25 because it was the same tax rate to both 
towns. 

Patricia Thompson (B): Supports 75/25. 

Peter Stallwell: Move the question. The move was seconded. 

The motion ending discussion and carried with a majority card vote. 

Moderator Belanger moves Patricia Page 's apportionment amendment of 75 1 25 to Article 4 to a vote. The 
motion was carried with a majority card vote. 

Melinda WiUis (H): Makes a motion to vote on this issue tomorrow by ballot in an all day vote. 

Audience member: Would you reconsider your motion to include a vote tonight. 

Melinda Willis (H): 7 would like to amend my motion to include a vote tonight as well. 

Char Enright: Defeat this motion. It will extend all of our work. 

Kathy Lewis (H): We must vote on the school addition bond tomorrow. In order to vote the 
bond we must know the apportionment. 

Steve Simons: We can't discuss the Middle School renovation until the ballots are closed on 
apportionment. 

Steve Schmalz (H): Moves the question. 

Kathy Lewis (H): Seconds the move. 

Moderator Belanger: The motion stops debate. A vote was taken and carried by a majority card vote to end 
debate. 

Moderator Belanger called a vote on the amendment by Melinda Willis to extend the voting on Article 4 to an 
all day vote. The motion was defeated by majority card vote. 

Kathy Lewis moves the question.. The motion was seconded. 

Moderator Belanger: The motion stops debate. A vote was taken and carried by majority card vote to end 
debate. 



-SD-45- 



Moderator Belanger calls a vote on Marsha Page 's amendment to Article 4, to change apportionment to read 
75% ADM 25% E V. The motion was carried by a majority card vote. 

A motion was made to restrict reconsideration by Tim Bevins. The motion was seconded by Steve Simons and 
carried by a majority card vote. 

Tom Enright moves to take up Article 2 for discussion and then to adjourn until 7:00 am on March 7"' to 
vote on Article 2 by secret ballot until 6:00 pm at the Mollis /Brookline High School. Steve Simons seconded 
the motion. 

Moderator Belanger called the motion to a vote and it was carried by a majority card vote. 

Moderator Belanger reads Article 2. 

Article 2. To see if the school district will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $7,900,000 
(gross budget) for Hollis Brookline Middle School renovation/addition 
and to authorize the issuance of not more than $7,900,000 of bonds or 
notes, in accordance with NH RSA 33 (Municipal Finance Act), and to 
authorize the school board to issue and negotiate such notes or bonds 
and to determine the rate of interest thereon. Furthermore to appropriate 
the sum of $100,000 representing interest earned on the above bond 
proceeds to be used for the above purposes. And to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $220,505 for the first interest payment on the bond or note. 
The school board recommends this appropriation. The budget 
committee supports this article. A two-thirds ballot vote is required. 



Steve Simons gives the presentation on the $7.9 million dollar bond renovation for the Hollis/ 
Brookline Middle School. Current H/B Middle School enrollment projections are as follows 
for the years 2001-2005: 414, 444, 455, 486, 507, 492. This addition is good for at least 5 
years, more Ukely ten years. The current middle school building was inherited in 1997 to be 
used by the 7th & 8'^ grades. The enrollment in 1997 was 300 students. The cafeteria holds 
1 00 students at a time. The middle school has two buildings, however, the Farley building has 
no handicap access or water on the second floor. 

Today's current enrollment for 7'^ & 8'^ grade is 414 students. The grade teams are scattered 
throughout the two buildings and they currendy have 4 lunches starting at 10:35-12:35. The 
music room and gym are used to capacity 8 periods a day. There are currentiy 3 staff members 
without space, the Spanish, Reading and Health teachers. 

The renovation and addition would address these concerns: 

1. Accommodating the growing enrollment 

2. Fix boiler and sprinkler problems within the school 

3. Eliminate the Farley building for school use 

New Construction Renovation 

1. Cafeteria Music room becomes an Art room 



-SD-46- 



2. 11 Core Classrooms Old Cafeteria would be used for 

Family/Consumer Education 

3. 4 Classrooms Industrial Arts Drafting becomes 

Health Room 

4. 4 Bathrooms Lower Level Classrooms get enlarged 

5. Computer Lab 4 Bathrooms to be updated 

6. 2 Music Rooms 

Total size of new construction 35,800 sq./ft at a total cost of 7.9 milUon dollars 

Pat Goyette did a presentation on the layout of the proposed new addition. 

Bill Matthews, of the Coop Budget Committee, did a presentation of the tax impact at 75/25 
of the $7.9 million dollars in a 20-year bond at 4% interest for HoUis and Brookline. 



02/03 '03/04 04/05 
Apportionment 

Increase in Hollis Tax Rate: .24 .56 .54 (75/25) 

Increase in Brookline Tax Rate: .30 .70 .68 (75/25) 

Inc $300,000 home in HoUis: $72 $168 $162 (75/25) 

Inc $300,000 home in Brookline: $90 $210 $203 (75/25) 

Ernie Hudziec (B): If you need space why expand an old building. Why not build a new 
one? 

Steve Simons: Old building will work fine once renovated. 

Jennifer Nicosia (H): Will the building adapt if we change our teaching method from team 
teaching. 

Steve Simons: Yes. 

Jennifer Nicosia (H): Is there a formal agreement that the Coop wiU stay together at the 
Middle School level? 

Steve Simons: Yes. 

Ernie Hudziec (B): How does the bid process work? 

Steve Simons: Same process as always. The project goes out to bid. 

Ann Russell: Supports the renovation but is concerned about traffic patterns. 

Steve Simons: Traffic pattern to stay the same. The Board has not spend much time on that 
issue. 



-SD-47- 



Don Edson (B): What happens when Hollis Elementary goes to the walls? 

Ken DeBenedictis: Current enrollment projections for HES/HUES show a decrease in 
upcoming years. The school has identified five more potential classrooms if needed. 

Phil Chandler (B): Does an architect prepare plans and the job go out to bid or does a general 
contractor design and build? Is there a building committee. 

Steve Simons: Yes, there is an architect and the job goes out to bid. Yes, there is a building 
committee. 

Meg Knowl: The Coop program is excellent and she supports the renovation. Wants to see 
a state of the art facility where kids don't have to stand on chairs to watch an experiment in 
science class. 

Joe Bouvier (B): If you spend $7.9 million how long would it last 5, 10 years? Wouldn't 
money be better spent on a new building? 

Steve Simons: The Building committee decided this was the most economical way. 

Patricia Thompson (B): Thanks Board and committee for their excellent work. She supports 
the proposal. 

Joan Cole (H): Isn't there a difference in constructing a building for an elementary school 
verses a middle school? 

Steve Simons: Yes 

Audience Member; Move the question. 

The move was seconded and Moderator Belanger called the vote. The motion carried. 

Moderator Belanger announced that the polls would be open for one hour, then adjourn 
until the next day when voting would continue from 7:00am until 6:00pm. The meeting will 
then reconvene at 7:00 pm. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Mary Kathryn MacFarlane 
School District Clerk 



-SD-48- 



Hollis/Brookline Cooperative School District Meeting 

Hollis/Brookline High School 

March 7th, 2002 

Hollis/Brookline Cooperative School Board 

Timothy Bevins Pamela Kirby 

Basil Harris, Jr. Lou- Ann Parodi 

Marygrace DiGiacinto Stephen Simons 
Thomas Enright 

Hollis/Brookline Cooperative Budget Committee 

William Matthews Harry Haytayan 

Russell Heinselman Raymond Valle 

Debra Drew Richard Bensinger 

SAU #41 Administration 

Dr. Kenneth L. DeBenedictis Lee Ann Blastos 

Carol Mace Robert R. Kelly 

Moderator 
Jim Belanger 

The Annual District meeting of the Hollis/Brookline Cooperative School District was called 
to order by Moderator Jim Belanger at 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, March 7*, 2002. 

Frank Bass presents Allen Witt and Jessica Darvon from the H/B High School to sing the 
national anthem. 

Moderator Belanger announces the vote on Article 2. There were 847 votes. The Article 
needed 2/3 vote to pass, which would be 565 votes. The yes votes were 544 the no votes 
were 303. The Article 2 was defeated. 

A motion was made by Tom Enright to take up A.rticle 9 after A.rticle 3. The motion was seconded by Tim 
Bevins and carried in a majority card vote. 

A motion was made by Tom Enright to take up Article 3. The motion was seconded by Steve Simons and 
carried by a majority card vote. 

Moderator Belanger reads Article 3. 

Article 3: To see if the school district will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $650,000 
(gross budget) for construction and equipping a track and playing field, 
and to authorize the issuance of not more than $650,000 of bonds or 
notes, in accordance with NH RSA 33 (Municipal Finance Act), and to 
authorize the school board to issue and negotiate such notes or bonds 



-SD-49- 



and to determine the rate of interest thereon. Furthermore to appropriate 
the sum of up to $5,000 representing interest earned on the above 
proceeds to be used for the above purposes. And to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $16,582 for the first interest payment on the bond or note. 
The school board recommends this appropriation. The budget 
committee does not support this article. A two-thirds ballot vote is 
required. 

Chair Enright gives a presentation on the proposed track. The site is located by Love Lane 
between the high school and the middle school. This site was chosen because it was less 
intrusive and could use all the parking at the middle school and high school. There would be 
no access on Love Lane and they have one abutter who the Board is working with. The site 
is fully engineered. The site has been reviewed by the Conservation and Planning committees 
and is due to meet with the Historical Society. The Historical Society has some concerns 
about the sheds and fencing, however, Enright feels that these issues can be worked out. The 
field would have wells, sheds, fencing, sprinklers and 300 seat bleachers. It would have a 
composite 6 lane track with an interior field suitable for soccer or lacrosse. The cost of this 
project is approximately $650,000. It would be financed in a 10 year bond. The first year's 
interest would be $16,582. 

The Wetlands Board permit will not be expedited as they have concerns. Chair Enright 
believes that the School and the Wetlands Board can work out a satisfactory arrangement. A 
Site permit will be needed as well. Chair Enright believes that all permits will be completed 
by May 1^ 

There is a significant price difference from the track proposed last year. Last year the track 
proposal was for $375,000 in front of the school verses $650,000 on Love Lane. 
The estimates last year were incomplete and sidewalks and storage sheds were not included. 
Love Lane is a more cosdy site because there is more earth to move, more drainage issues and 
power lines need burying. 

Bill Matthews presented the tax impact of Article 3 at 75/25 apportionment. 



Increase HoUis Tax Rate: 
Increase Brookline Tax Rate: 



02/03 

.02 

.02 



'03-04 

.06 

.08 



04/05 

.06 (75/25) 

.08 (75/25) 



$300,000 Home in Hollis: 
$300,000 Home in Brookline: 



$19 

$23 



$19 

$23 



The Coop Budget Committee did not recommend this article as it felt that there were other 
more important issues in the warrant. 

Mike Apfelberg (B): What are ongoing expenses for operating the track? 

Chair Enright: About $1,500 a year. The track surface is good for 10 years. It would 

need to be relined in 10 years at a cost of approximately $50,000. Most of the maintenance 
expenses are for mowing the lawn. 



-SD-50- 



Ernie Hudziec (B): $300,000 for excavation is expensive. How much earth are you going to 
move? 

Chair Enright: 41 ,000 cu yards of earth moving and 7,000 yards of loam. 

Ernie Hudziec (B): What is the slope of the hill that is on one side of the track? 

Chair Enright: Slope of 3 to 1 for about 40 ft. 

Ernie Hudziec (B): Any fencing at the top of the slope? At Captain Samuel Douglas Academy 
they fenced it to keep snowmobilers out. 

Jim McBride (B): Any cost figure for the grandstands? Would that be an additional cost? 

Chair Enright: The school currendy has one grandstand that is unused. Additional grandstands 
would cost about $4,000 and that would be an additional cost, but remember these are estimates. 

Jim McBride (B): $27,000 for sprinklers. What are we watering? 

Chair Enright: The interior field of the track. 

Audience Member: Is the 40% contribution from the state included. 

Chair Enright: The $650,000 is gross less the 40% state contribution. 

Mark Johnson (H): Investing in our schools is a good investment. He supports the warrant 
article. This is an investment in our children and our property values. 

Ernie Hudziec (B): Any tests on any groundwater that might drain to the area? 

Chair Enright: No, but the site has soil that is consistent with the projects that have been 
done on either side of it. 

Kathleen Johnson (H): The Conservation Commission met last night at 6:00 pm. The letter 
from DES reminded them of the 50ft buffer from wetlands. DES wants the track moved so 
it maintains the 50 ft buffer zone. They want to work with the school for the track. The 
Conservation Commission made a mistake and the DES reminded them of that. They feel 
that the track has to be moved. The Conservation Commission needs more time to work on 
the issue. 

Chair Enright: I am shocked to hear about this. We discussed the site with your committee 
and they didn't see a problem. Is this an official correspondence from the Conservation 
Committee? 

Kathleen Johnson (H): Yes. 

Chair Enright: This is a difficult way for the Conservation Commission to communicate with 
me. 



-SD-51- 



Eric Power (B): There is electrical in the plan. Is there lighting? 

Chair Enright: Yes, there is electrical but no lighting is planned. 

Eric Power (B): What was the Budget Committee vote? Who will use this facility more the " 
Middle School or High School? 

Chair Enright: The vote was 1 yes and 5 no. The High School will use it about 2/3 and the 
Middle School 1/3. 

Ray Valle (H): Voted against the track as a Budget Committee member but as a citizen he is 
voting yes for the track. 

Amanda Decker (B): Manager of the cross country winter and spring track team at Hollis/ 
Brookline High School. Coach has been here for 40 years and has won 22 tides in that time. 
Think what we could do with the right facilities. We could actually host a Class I meet with a 
facility like this. It would be good for Hollis and Brookline. 

Dexter Decker (B): Is there any ledge? When would construction start and end? He supports 
the track. 

Chair Enright: No ledge, but the site has not been fuUy excavated. Due to latest regulatory 
issues, construction could be delayed. Was hoping to start this fall. 

Dave Partridge (B): Can a motion be made to revote the Middle School Renovation Bond? 
How far is the tract into the 50 ft. buffer zone? 

Chair Enright: Yes, a motion can be made to revote the Middle School Renovation. The 
track is all the way into the 50ft buffer zone. 

Larry Finkelstein (H): What is the cost after state aid? 

Bill Matthews: Approximately a littie less than $600,000. 

Doug Cleveland (H): Track is the most popular sport. This track is desperately needed and 
long overdue. 

Jack Flanagan (B): Is concerned about wetiand issues for bonding. What about moving the 
baseball field? 

Chair Enright: It is not appropriate to speculate at this time. No money will be spent until all 
the issues are resolved. 

Kirsten Apfelberg (B): Can't understand how we can discuss this track when the $7.9 million 
dollar addition was defeated. 

Roland Breed (B): If a permit is a problem, then no bond will be issued? 



-SD-52- 



Chair Enright: Yes. 

Nancy Keburns (H): Feels badly about what happened with the Conservadon Committee. 

Ernie Hudziec (B): Motion to move the question and stop debate.. 

The motion was seconded by Ray Valle and carried by majority card vote. 

Moderator Belanger reads Article 3. 

Article 3: To see if the school district will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $650,000 
(gross budget) for construction and equipping a track and playing field, 
and to authorize the issuance of not more than $650,000 of bonds or 
notes, in accordance with NH RSA 33 (Municipal Finance Act), and to 
authorize the school board to issue and negotiate such notes or bonds 
and to determine the rate of interest thereon. Furthermore to appropriate 
the sum of up to $5,000 representing interest earned on the above 
proceeds to be used for the above purposes. And to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $16,582 for the first interest payment on the bond or note. 
The school board recommends this appropriation. The budget 
committee does not support this article. A two-thirds ballot vote is 
required. 

Moderator Belanger opened the polls at 8:28 pm for one hour - during which there will be a 
presentation on Article 9. Tim Bevins will make the presentation on Article 9, H/B Coop and 
School Board Composition when activity at he polls begins to die down. 

Moderator Belanger closes the polls at 9:29 pm. 

Currentiy the H/B Coop School Board is made up of 5 members from Hollis and 2 members 
from Brookline. The results of the 2000 US Census is that Brookline has a population of 
4,181 (37.3%) but only gets 29% representation on the Coop Board. Hollis has a population 
of 7,015 (62.7%) and represents 71% of the Coop Board. Article 9 proposes that the H/B 
Coop Board be composed of 4 members from Hollis, 2 members from Brookline and 1 at- 
large member (elected by both towns). 

Ernie Hudziec (B): I don't understand how the at-large person makes it more fair when 
HoUis has the larger population. 

Eric Power (B): A 5 or 7 person Board makes most sense. At large vote makes no sense. The 
Board should have 4 Hollis and 3 Brookline members. 

Kathy Lewis (H/B): Feels the at-large member is best, because you can get the best candidate 
for the job and don't have to vote down town lines. 

Ray Valle (H): The Coop Board is not required to have an odd number of members. 



-SD-55- 



Larry Finkelstein (H): Likes how Kathy Lewis calls herself a member of the Hollis/Brookline 
District. An at-large member has to serve both towns. He feels that the best composition is 5 
Hollis, 3 Brookline Board. 

Doug Cecil (B): Did the Board consider using student population? We pay based on student 
population, why not have the Board set up the same way? 

Tim Bevins: Student population was not considered. 

Michelle Hackler (B): Doesn't believe either town should have the upper hand. Why not an 
8 member Board with 4 Hollis and 4 Brookline members. 

Phil Chandler (B): It is a requirement to change Board by population. Doesn't believe people 
will vote by town lines. He thinks they will vote for the best candidate. Suggests 3 Hollis, 2 
Brookline and 2 At-Large members. 

Gene Cider (H): Worked to start the Coop. Believes in shared governance. Feels Brookline 
needs to be better represented. 

Dexter Decker (B): Favors a 4 Hollis, 3 Brookline Board. He believes the Board has worked 
fairly. 

Jim McBride (B): Thinks an At-Large member from Brookline would serve as fairly as someone 
from Hollis. 

Frank Grossman: We can do whatever kind of School Board composition we like, however, 
it must comply with the law or it could be challenged. 

Mike Apfelberg (B): 2.6% is closer to 3. This position is a three year term. By the time 3 
years is up it will probably be 2.8%-3%. 

Marge Hammond (H): Should round up. A composition of 4 Hollis, 3 Brookline members 
decreases the perception of unfairness. 

Steve Coombs (H): Feels an At-Large member would probably end up being a current Board 
member. He doesn't see the problem with an 8 member Board. 

Moderator Belalnger announced the vote on Article 3. 334 people voted. 220 votes make up 
the 2/3 needed to pass. Yes, 234. No, 100. The motion was carried. 

Steve Schmal^ makes a motion to reconsider Article 2 on March 1 5"' for an all day vote. The motion is 
seconded by Steve Kemudo. 

Shirley Cohen (H): Doesn't Uke reconsideration of articles that have been voted on. 

Chair Enright: The Coop Board doesn't recommend reconsideration because it could open 
up the whole meeting thus far to reconsideration. 



-SD-54- 



Ernie Hudziec (B): Applauds the Boards decision. Do not reconsider Article 2. 

Ann Dumont (B): People don't know where and when to vote. More people would have 
probably turned out to vote if they had been better informed. 

Kathy Logus (H): When only 800 people show up to vote, the community has not spoken. 

Meg Nolan (H): Emotions run high after apportionment. 

Mike Apfelberg (B): If he had voted No, he would feel like his vote had been stolen. The 
meeting was publicized in the paper and on PTO websites. People were aware of the vote. 

Nancy Burns: Feels strongly that people knew when the meeting was. 

Steve Simons (H): Reconsideration is the wrong thing to do. The system has spoken. 

Tim Bevins (H): The Coop Board doesn't want to lose credibility. If the vote is reconsidered 
then the Board loses some of its credibility. 

Steve Remudo (H): This motion is not trying to do something dishonest. The motivation is 
not sour grapes, but low voter turn out. Many people were unaware of the vote. 

Dean Rasco (B): I watched it on TV and thought I could run over and vote. I was wrong. I 
should have been here. My mistake, don't take my vote away. 

Doug Cecil (B): The vote was so close may be a revote should be done. It does, however, 
open up the apportionment can of worms. 

Steve Coombs (H): Urges a no vote on reconsideration. 

Kathy O'SuUivan (B): Explain why it opens up apportionment. 

Moderator Belanger: I can answer that. This meeting can not be adjourned until there is a 
final vote. Because the meeting is not closed, anything is open for discussion. This would 
keep the meeting open until after March 1 S'^. 

Ray Va/Ie makes a motion to end discussion. 

Jim Pope seconds the motion. The motion is carried by majority card vote. 

Moderator Belanger calls the motion to reconsider the vote on Article 2. A new date of Friday March 15"' 
is proposed for a revote for an all day vote from 7:00 am to 6:00 pm. Moderator Belanger call a vote on the 
motion. The motion is defeated by a majority card vote. 

1. Ernie Hudziec (B): Makes a motion to see if the school district will vote to amend the Articles of 
Agreement of the Hollis Brookline Cooperative School Board by deleting Article 2 as it is currently 
written and substituting a new Article 2 as follows: 



-SD-55- 



Article 2 



"The School Board of the Hollis/Brookline Cooperative School District shall consist of seven members. 
Effective with the election of 2003, the Board mil be organised in the following manner: 



Town 


Members, 


Term 


Year Ending 


Brookline 


1 member 


3 years 


2004 




1 member 


3 years 


2005 




1 member 


3 years 


2006 


Hollis 


2 members 


3 years 


2004 




1 member 


3 years 


2005 




1 member 


3years 


2006 



Members of the Cooperative School Board shall be elected by the voters of the pre-existing districts 
they represent and must be residents of those pre-existing districts. All members elected shall be elected to 
three year terms unless that member is filling out the unexpired term of a member who has left the board, 
in which case the term shall be the unexpired term. 

Doug Cecil seconds the motion. 

Moderator Belanger asks for discussion. 

Chair Enright made the comment that they have had a hard time filling positions on the 
Budget Committee from Brookline. 

Doug Cecil (B) offers to serve on the Coop Budget Committee if people will write him in as 
a candidate. Move the issue. 

Moderator Belanger calls a vote on the amendment to Article 9 changing the representation on the Coop Board 
to 4 members from Hollis and 3 members from Brookline. The motion is carried by a majority card vote. 

Moderator Belanger announces that they will now take up Articles 5, 6 ,7 & 8. Moderator 
Belanger reads Article 5. 

Article 5: To see if the school district will authorize the Hollis/Brookline Cooperative School 
District to access future year and federal catastrophic aid funds in the 
event that special education costs exceed budget limitations. The school 
board and budget committee recommends this article. 

A motion was made by Tom Enright to move Article 5 to a vote. The motion is seconded by Steve Simons. 

Moderator Belanger ends discussion and calls for a vote. The motion is carried by a majority card vote. 

Moderator Belanger reads Article 6. 



-SD-56- 



Article 6: To see if the school district will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of $262,196 to 
fund the increase in cost items relative to professional staff salaries and 
fringe benefits for the 2002-2003 school year which resulted from good 
faith negotiations with the professional staff, and which represents the 
negotiated increase over last year's salaries and fringe benefits. The school 
board recommends this appropriation. The budget committee supports 
this article. 

A motion was made by Tom Enright to move Article 5 to a vote. The motion is seconded by Tim Bevins. 

Moderator Be/anger ends discussion and calls for a vote. The motion is carried by a majority card vote. 

Moderator Belanger reads Article 7. 

Article 7: To see if the school district will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of $57,540 to 
fund the increase in cost items relative to support staff salaries and fringe 
benefits for the 2002-2003 school year which resulted from good faith 
negotiations with the support staff, and which represents the negotiated 
increase over last year's salaries and fringe benefits. The school board 
recommends this appropriation. The budget committee supports this 
article 

A motion was made by Steve Simons to move Article 5 to a vote. The motion is seconded by Basil Harris, 
Jr. 

Moderator Belanger ends discussion and calls for a vote. The motion is carried by a majority card vote. 

Moderator Belanger reads Article 8. 

Article 8: To see if the school district will vote to raise and appropriate $11,770,500 for the 
support of schools, for the payment of salaries of school district officers 
and agents and for the payment of statutory obligations of the district. 
The school board recommends this appropriation. The budget 
committee supports this article. The appropriation does not include any 
of the other warrant articles. 

A motion was made by Tom Enright to move Article 5. The motion is seconded by Tim Bevins. 

Chair Enright gives a presentation on the 2002-2003 Hollis/Brookline Cooperative District 
Budget. There is an overall 5.11% increase in the budget over last year, which the Coop 
expects to decrease next year. 



-SD-57- 



Coop Budget Increases 

1. New Positions: 3.4 teachers at the high school, 

.6 teacher at the middle school 



.5 person for maintenance at the high school. 



2. Special Education 

3. Employee Benefits 

4. SAU Assessment 

5. Transfer to Food Service 

6. Office of the Principal 

7. Operation of Plant 



Cost 
$213,000 



$102,000 



94,000 
49,000 
48,000 
49,000 
38.000 



TOTAL 



$573,000 



The new positions include Guidance, Technical Education, Assistant Principal and Social 
Studies. 

Professional and Support Staff increases are included in a separate warrant article and total 
$319,000. This represents a 2.95% increase over last year's budget. 

Budget increases and Professional and Support Staff increases are combined to give you a 
total increase of 8% over last year's budget. This doesn't include the bond issues for the track 
or middle school renovation. 

Bill Matthews did the financial presentation. 



Expenses 

Budget 

Salaries 

Debt 

Total Expenses 



$10,115,725 
$ 319,736 
S 1.654.775 
$12,090,236 



Revenue 

State Building Aid $ 750,921 

$ 536.667 

Total Revenue $ 1,287,588 



District Assessment $10,802,648 

Tax Impact 

Hollis Tax Rate 
Brookline Tax Rate 



9.5% increase 



Apportionment 

$10.77 (75/25) 

$10.87 (75/25) 



$300,000 Home in HoUis 
$300,000 Home in Brookline 



$3,230 
$3,260 



(75/25) 
(75/25) 



% Inc in Tax Rate for Hollis .6% 

% Inc. in Tax Rate for Brookline 5.6% 



-SD-58- 



Dexter Decker (B): The SAU Assessment is 50/50 and part of the Coop operating budget. 

Ron Valle (H): Expressed thanks to Bill Matthews for his quality presentation and reworking 
his numbers after the new apportionment passed. 

Moderator Belanger calls Article 8 to a vote. The motion is carried by a majority card vote. 

Moderator Belanger thank Bill Matthews, Chief Darling, Mark Levey, Dr. Jim Squires, Ann 
Caldwell and everyone else involved. 

A motion was made to name the new track the Lmu Korcoulis Track. The motion was seconded by Tim 
Bevins. 

Moderator Belanger called for discussion and a vote. The motion was carried by majority card vote. 

Jim McBride (B): Thanked all the committees for their hard work. 

A motion was made to adjourn. The motion was seconded and carried by majority card vote at 10:25 pm. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary Kathryn MacFarlane 
School District Clerk 



-SD-59- 







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-SD-62- 



HOLLIS/BROOKLINE COOPERATIVE SCHOOL DISTRICT 

GENERAL FUND RECEIPTS 

For the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2002 



Fund Equity July 1, 2001 



% 248,742.00 



Local Sources: 
School District Assessment 
Earnings on Investments 
Other 

TOTAL LOCAL SOURCES 



$8,721,687.00 

20,926.00 

262,698.00 

$9,005,311.00 



State/Federal Sources: 

Adequacy Aid $1,141,041.00 

Building Aid 548,821.00 

Catastrophic Aid 32,995.00 

Other 94,175.00 

TOTAL STATE/FEDERAL SOURCES $ 1,817,032.00 



TOTAL REVENUE 



$ 10,822,343.00 



TOTAL AMOUNT AVAILABLE 



$11,071,085.00 



-SD-63- 











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-SD-64- 



HOLLIS/BROOKLINE COOPERATIVE SCHOOL DISTRICT 

BALANCE SHEET 

vMl Fund Types and Account Group 

June 30, 2002 

ASSETS 

Total Funds and 

General Fund Account Group 

Cash and Equivalents % 165,257.00 $ 302,672.00 

Investments 21,211.00 383,585.00 

Receivables 18,934.00 371,239.00 

Other Debits - General Long-Term Debt 1 1 ,478,995.00 

TOTAL ASSETS $ 205,402.00 $ 12,536,49L00 

LIABILITIES AND FUND EQUITY 

Payables % 153,696.00 % 281,153.00 

General Obligation Debt Payable 10,907,133.00 

Capital Lease Payable 46,862.00 

Compensated Absences Payable 525,000.00 

Reserved for Debt Service 361,571.00 

Reserved for Endowments 260,602.00 

Reserved for Encumbrances 20,128.00 21,083.00 

Reserved for Special Purposes 2,284.00 
Unreserved Fund Balance 

Designated for Special Purposes 99,225.00 

Undesignated 31,578.00 31,578.00 

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND FUND EQUITY % 205,402.00 % 12,536,491.00 



-SD-65- 



MOLLIS BROOKLINE COOPERATIVE SCHOOL DISTRICT 

ACTUAL EXPENDITURES FOR 

SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 

RSA32:lla* 



2000-2001 



2001-2002 



EXPENSES: 
SALARIES 

CONTRACTED SERVICES 
TRANSPORTATION 
TUITION 
MATERIALS 
EQUIPMENT 
OTHER 

SUBTOTAL 



694,048 


805,321 


110,303 


117,905 


61,483 


51,029 


183,851 


271,228 


6,065 


5,096 


3,078 


5,039 


376 


126 


$1,059,204 


$1,255,744 



REVENUE: 



CATASTROPHIC AID 

IDEA 

SUBTOTAL 
NET COST FOR 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 



37,681 32,995 

73,389 94,175 

% 111,070 $ 127,170 

$ 948,134 $1,128,574 



* Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education requires, under separate cover, 
anaccounting of actual expenditures by the district for special education programs and 
services for the previous 2 fiscal years. 



-SD-66- 



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-5Z)-77- 



HOLLIS BROOKLINE HIGH SCHOOL 

TOWN REPORT FOR 2003 



As a "newcomer" to Hollis Brookline High School, I was most impressed with the warm 
welcome I received and the willingness of the staff and community to share their ideas, 
accomplishments, concerns, and vision with their new administrator. It is quite evident that the 
communities of Hollis and Brookline are committed to providing the best education for their 
students, take pride in their buildings and resources, and support their school system. The 
School Committee and SAU #41 central administration staff work tirelessly to insure quality 
educational opportunities for all students and set challenging goals for the future. 

During the past several months, we have spent a great deal of time examining our structure, 
our accomplishments, our programs, our achievements, and our needs for the future. Many 
new initiatives have been put in place with many still to come over the next several months. 
Our two full-time Deans have been assigned liaisons to academic departments in order to 
strengthen collaboration, differentiated instruction, and lines of communication. 

We will be offering new courses next year including Advanced Placement courses to offer a 
more challenging curriculum and a more attractive school profile and transcript, especially for 
those students applying for admission to the more highly competitive colleges. Mrs. Carol 
Mace, the District Director of Curriculum, will be working very closely with the HBHS 
administration and staff as we examine new textbooks, and materials, and revise, expand, and 
upgrade our curriculum. We are also planning an eight-week evening SAT Review Course to 
help students improve their test scores. 

Our Technology Center, under the direction of Mr. Neil Rosenberg, has drawn the attention 
of students and thus Mr. Rosenberg will become full-time next year and permit HoUis Brookline 
High School to offer several new courses for students at all levels. A great deal of new 
equipment has been funneled into this important initiative. This will be our first year of 
competition in the First USA Competition. Interest and participation flourishes and the 
community has been most supportive both financially and with adult volunteer participation. 

Our participation in the Best Schools Initiative provides an exciting opportunity to expand our 
Mission Statement - "Learning For All". A fifteen member team, comprised of school board 
members, staff, administrators, and students, spent one intensive week at the Best Schools 
Leadership Institute this summer setting goals and making plans for this three-year, on-going 
initiative. 

We experienced high levels of participation in our athletic programs with several teams qualifying 
for tournament play. In response to community and student enthusiasm, the Superintendent 
and School Board approved Club Status for the sport of football beginning with the 2003- 
2004 season. Financial support from a parent booster group enables us to introduce the new 
sport with no increase in the school budget. The Athletic Director, Principal, and parent 
groups are busy working on schedules, field allocation, uniforms, and equipment for the this 
exciting endeavor. 



-SD-72- 



Our Music and Performing Arts Programs continue to draw high levels of interest under the 
direction of Mr. Rod Ferland, Mrs. Karen Sayward, Ms. Elyse Tomlinson, and Mr. Mark 
Illingworth. Several performances have drawn large and enthusiastic audiences, culminating 
with the musical "Annie Get Your Gun" in March. Other exciting activities - to name just a 
few - include: Mr. Maynard's and Mr. Boucher's annual physics Catapult Contest and Bridge 
Building Competition, participation in the Merrimack River Watershed Project, French Bistro, 
Film making, "Cavazine" - the school newspaper, Cinco de Mayo, and seasonal Recognition 
Assemblies to recognize achievement in all areas, i.e. athletics, academics, and leadership. 

Our sophomores performed admirably on the NHEIAP State tests last May, and we look 
forward to even higher scores this year. Hollis Brookline High School has always scored 
among the highest in the state. This fall, led by our Director of Curriculum and Department 
Heads, an in-depth item analysis was conducted by the administration and faculty and presented 
before the School Board. This enables us to closely align the strands with our curriculum and 
improve the teaching and learning process. An important goal is to move more students into 
the upper categories, i.e. from Basic to Proficient and Advanced. 

I am indeed proud to be a part of such an outstanding school and community committed to 
excellence and striving for every student to achieve at their highest possible level. Your enthusiasm, 
support, and input are our motivation. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Charles W.Flahive 
Principal 



-SD-73- 



Annual Report 

2002-2003 
Hollis Brookline Middle School 

As principal of Hollis Brookline Middle School, I am both pleased and proud to submit this 
report to the citizens of Hollis and Brookline. 

ENROLLMENT 

At present there are four hundred and forty-nine (449) students, an increase of thirty- three (33) 
students over last year. One hundred percent of available space is being utilized by our staff 
and student body with three teachers (health, Spanish, reading) who must share classroom 
space and instruct from a cart. 

STAFFING 

We are proud to welcome our new staff members. Their skill, style and compassion have 
served to enhance our educational community. 

Mrs. Paula Fordin - Mathematics Teacher 

Mrs. Teresa Rossetti - Mathematics Teacher (P.T.) 

Mrs. Jennifer Christman - Special Education Case Manager 

Mrs. Jeanne Saunders - Special Education Case Manager 

Mrs. Karen Coutu - Special Education Case Manager 

Mrs. Jean Cairney - Paraprofessional 

Mr. Chris Rheault - Paraprofessional 

Mrs. Denise Jackson - Paraprofessional 

Mrs. Jodi Callinan - Student Assistance Program Coordinator (PT) 

BUILDING INITIATIVES 

Differentiated Instruction continues to be a primary SAU 41 goal. At the building level we 
have spent the majority of our staff development time with Richard Strong. Richard has a 
strong affiliation with the Association of Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD). 
His most recent publications focus on teaching strategies to reach all learners and what he 
identifies as Academic Literacy Skills. Mr. Strong has designed a rubric for rigor, authenticity, 
thought and diversity. A follow up session is planned for spring. 

Block Scheduling was researched, planned for and successfully implemented by an eighth 
grade team. In the design, students met three (out of their five core classes) for 72 minutes. 
The benefits of longer instructional blocks include less transitions during a day, an additional 1 2 
minutes of instructional time, less subjects to focus on nightly for homework and extended 
class time to reach a deeper level of understanding. Currendy aU four teams have adopted 
extended instructional blocks of time. 

Our Best Schools Leadership Initiative is in its second year of a three year plan. An 
Advisory Program is being planned for the 03-04 school year. Research supports the positive 
effects of small groups of students with one adult. The daily time in groups will be spent on 
skill development; organizational, study, note taking, reading and more. 



-SD-74- 



The use of Technology has increased significantly during the last couple of years. Two labs 
are available for student use in addition to a P.C. in each classroom for teacher and student use. 
Grades are all done electronically, communication improved with email and of late, the beginning 
of teacher specific Web pages. 

COMMUNITY OUTREACH 

The Student Council proudly sponsored the Tree of Giving in the Holiday Season to support 
the Nashua Childrens' Home. Tags specific to a male / female, age and wish were selected by 
students, families and staff and gifts purchased. Giving brought a whole new feel to our 
building. 

Our Senior Citizens were invited to dinner and a show. Team 4 students organized a lunch in 
the home economics room and then escorted our guests into the gym for a drama production, 
"Any Body for Tea." The visit began new relationships and ended with lots of laugher. 

Generations continued to be a highlight of our fall. The parent / student workshop day 
showcased close to 40 presenters leading activities and discussions specific to our adolescent 
population. Some topics included communication, independence, goal setting, trust, confidence 
and friends. Ninety parents and seniors joined our learning environment for that special day. 

PARENT, TEACHER, STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

The Quilt Project in grade 7 mathematics has been supported by over 20 volunteers. They 
have shopped for fabric, washed and ironed, cut and stitched squares to support the skills of 
linear equations, geometry and fractions. This is but one example of the many opportunities to 
get involved as a volunteer. 

Our PTSA group meets monthly at the middle school. They are individuals who clearly 
demonstrate their commitment to the students of HBMS. With sincere recognition and respect 
I thank each member, officer, chaperone, baker and aide for their time, energy and support. 

Lasdy, we applaud Laura Garber; coach, advisor, parent for the new Cheerleading Squad. 
Her basic proposal for a club status cheering squad has had a positive ripple effect throughout 
the building. Your many volunteer hours are recognized and appreciated. 

SUMMARY 

We continue to strive for balance with academic rigor and care for our young adolescents. I 
am truly proud to work with the HBMS staff, students, parents and community members 
from Brookline and Hollis. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Patricia Lewis Goyette 
Principal 



-SD-75- 



Hollis Brookline High School Graduation June 15, 2002 
Class of 2002 



Michelle- Anne Aguad de Lafiiente 

Bria Ansara 

Gregory' April 

Keith Archambault 

John D. Archambeault, Jr. 

Ethan T. Bannister 

Brian J. Barry# 

Ryan Michael Bedell 

Jennifer Bevins 

Patrick Boyle 

Angela Joy Brett#+'^ 

Lauren Faith Bridges#+ 

Amanda Bristol 

Emily Bromberg 

Robert William Brooks# 

Nicholas Kring Burns 

Jennifer Alison Busse#'^ 

William J. Cabana, V 

Marie Louise Callahan 

Cortney Lyn Campbell 

Tim Caron+ 

Crystal M. Carrier 

Corinne Julia Chapman 

Corrina Marie Clark 

Joseph Clifford 

Kerri Coleman 

Kathryn Collins 

Justin Connor 

Jessica Corey 

Michael Leonard Costello 

Jacob Creamer 

Adam J. Csakai 

Elizabeth Lee Davies#'^ 

Noreen Lynn Day-Lewis 

Stephanie Demetri 

Alicia deMontigny 

Meaghan Denehy 

Jessica G. DiGiacinto# 

Meghan Donnelly#+ 

Nicole Duffina 

Travis M. Dustin 

Justin Lucas Eastman+ 

Joshua W. Eicher 

Cyndie Marie Ellis#^ 

Louis F. Esposito 

Joseph A. Etlinger 

Andrew Fimbel 

Mark Fuller# 



Seth Levi Getto 
Laura Coerene Gorham# 
Jamie Gow# 
Brian Greenman 
Jennifer Guadagnoli 
Casey Alice Gundersen#'^ 
Stephen Hallmark 
Tiffany Lynne Hamanne 
Derek Owen Hamilton 
Alicia Helene Hansmann 
Tiffany Nicole Hinson#+^ 
Thomas Hodgson 
Eric Gregory Hoppenstand 
Douglas V. Houle 
Joseph B. Hurlburt 
Auditi Akhtari Hussain#+ 
Lindsey Jambard 
Christine M. Jennings 
Erik Christensen Johns 
Kelly Johnson 
Nasrin Cassandra Kalhori 
Lauren E. Karwoski 
Amanda Katz 
Emily Kelley 
Jillian Ketchen 
Kelly KiHnski#" 
Daniel Kirchmaier 
Rhyland M. Klein# 
Christie Leigh Klisz#^ 
Gregory Knights 
Sean Kopka 

Daniel Edward KowaHk 
Christopher Lalmond 
Kristen Allyn Lanoue#'^ 
Travis LaPlante 
Victor Orion Lazo 
Jessica Leonard 
Luke LeStrange 
Andres Lopez-BonagUa 
Cassandra Leigh Lovering+ 
Jonathan Lyons 
Fabian M. Maender* 
Timothy Brian Marquis 
Erienne Jane McCoole 
Joseph Hyland McDonough 
James McMurchy 
Sara Catherine Meess#'^ 
Keith Milkowski 



Daniel Mitsch 
Andrew Gordon Murray 
Benjamin Nardone+ 
Giang Thu Nguyen* 
Aaron Robert Nickerson 
Lauren Marie Nicosia-Rusin 
Hannah R. Onoroski# 
Alexandria Alicia Owens 
Jonathan Adam Pavnick 
Matthew J. Pedro 
Daryl Pelletier 
Scott Piotrowski 
Adam Charles Pitarys 
Ryan Plante 
Rebecca Pope 
Kristin Porter 
Jessica Marie Rattin 
Mary Kathleen Riley# 
Andrew Rosenwinkel 
Julia French Sarber 
Jodi Schwartzberg 
Timothy Sheldon 
Leigh Evans Simons#^ 
Alyson Ames Smets 
Kendel Ryan Snow 
Kyle Jeffrey Snow 
Karla Spence 
David A. Stauble 
Allison Stroili#'^ 
Michael Sullivan 
Amanda Tebbetts 
Alicia Elizabeth Thibeault 
Ethan C. Tomic-Beard 
Maria Torti 
Michael Trakshinsk)-* 
Megumi Umezaki* 
Lindsey Kathryn Valich#^ 
Cara Nicole VecchiareUi 
Laura Kathryn Webb 
Katie-Anne Whitcomb 
Laura Jane Williams 
Douglas Wilson 
Michelle Wilson 
Alan Nicholas Witt+ 
Kerry Kealoha Wrighf^ 
Jill Christine Yarrusso 
Katharine Marie Zore+ 



# National Honor Society 
+ Tri-M Music Honor Society 



'^ Foreign Language Honor Society 
* Foreign Exchange Student 



-SD-76- 



HOLLIS BROOKLINE HIGH SCHOOL 

GRADUATION AWARDS 

JUNE 15, 2002 



National Honor Society 
Brian Barry 
Patrick Boyle 
Angela Brett 
Lauren Bridges 
Robert Brooks 

Jennifer Busse 

Elizabeth Davies 



Cyndie Ellis 
Mark Fuller 
Laurie Gorham 
Jamie Gow 
Casey Gundersen 

Tiffany Hinson 

Auditi Hussain 



Christie Klisz 
Kristen Lanoue 
Sara Meess 
Hannah Onoroski 
Molly Riley 

Leigh Simons 

Allison Stroili 



Jessica DeGiacinto 
Meghan Donnelly 



KeUyKilinski 
Rhyland Klein 



Lindsey Valich 



Tri-M Music Honor Society 

Angela Brett 
Lauren Bridges 
Tim Caron 
Meghan Donnelly 
Justin Eastman 
Tiffany Hinson 

Foreign Language Honor Society 

Angela Brett 
Jennifer Busse 
Elizabeth Davies 
Cyndie Ellis 
Casey Gundersen 
Tiffany Hinson 
KeUyKilinski 



Auditi Hussain 
Cassie Lovering 
Ben Nardone 
Alan Witt 
Katherine Zore 



Christie Klisz 
Kristen Lanoue 
Sara Meess 
Leigh Simons 
Allison Stroili 
Lindsey Valich 
Kerry Wright 



Hollis Women's Club Valedictorian Book Award 

Laurie Gorham 

Salutatorian Book Award 

Sara Meess 

Cavalier of the Year Award 

Jillian Ketchen 

French Honor Scholarship 

Kristen Lanoue 



-SD-77- 



Spanish Honor Scholarship 

Angela Brett 

Student Council Scholarship 

Jamie Gow 

PrincipaPs Leadership Award 

Laurie Gorham 

Honor Award 

Alan Witt 

Hollis Brookline High School Booster Club 

Jamie Gow 
Kelly Kilinski 
Andrew Murray 
Michael Sullivan 

Coach Korcoulis Scholarship 

Justin Connor 

S-TEAM for Youth Scholarships 

Cara Vecchiarelli 
Katherine Zore 

Brookline Women's Club 

Jennifer Busse 
Daniel Kowalik 

Brookline Women's Club Vocational Scholarship 

Matthew Pedro 

Colonial Garden Club of Hollis Scholarship 

Jennifer Guadagnoli 

Community Christmas Card Scholarships 

Noreen Daj-Lems and Adam Pitarys 

DAR Good Citizen Award 

Jamie Gow 

Educational Talent Search Achiever Award 

Matthew Pedro 

Hollis Education Association Scholarship 

Joseph McDonough 



-SD-78- 



Hollis Woman's Club Scholarship 

Jamie Gow 

Hollis Woman's Club Vocational Scholarship 

Adam Pitarys 

Hollis Brookline Chapter of the Dollars for Scholars 

Jamie Gow 
Casey Gundersen 
Christie Klisz 
Rebecca Pope 
Leigh Simons 

Hollis Brookline Rotary Awards 

Jamie Gow Interact — Elizabeth Dumas 

Leigh Simons Vocational — Adam Pitarys 

Hollis Brookline Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 11373 
Lawrence L. Waitt Memorial Scholarship 

Leigh Simons 

NH Elk's Association, Inc. Award 

Leigh Simons 

Angela Adams Memorial Scholarship 

Laura Webb 

Ed Berna Memorial Scholarship 

Andrew Murray 

Erv Blanchette Memorial Scholarship 

Karla Spence 

John M. Doll Scholarship 

Mark Fuller 
Jamie Gow 

WiUiam E. and Lorraine W. Dubbens Scholarships 

Jessica Corey 
Lindsey Jambard 
Alexandria Owens 
Jill Yarrusso 

Alan Frank Memorial Award 

Brian Barry 

The Laurie Harris Memorial Scholarship 

Cyndie Ellis 



-SD-79- 



Richard Maghakian Memorial Scholarship 

Jessica Corey 

Julia T. Pingree Scholarship 

Daniel Kowalik 

Nancy Archambault Ratta Memorial Scholarship 

Corinna Clark 

Warren H. Towne Memorial Scholarship 

Timothy Marquis. 

Ruth E. Wheeler Scholarship 

Angela Brett 

The Charles Zylonis Memorial Scholarship 

Leigh Simons 

Amherst Orthodontics Scientific Woman's Scholarship 

Christi Klisz 

Atrium Dodds Scholarship 

Lindsey Jambard 

Cargill Incorporated Scholarship 

Lindsey Valich 

Shaw's Scholarship 

Hannah Onoroski 

Southern New Hampshire Medical Center Scholarship 

Casey Gundersen 

University Cap & Gown, Mr. Tux and Boston Red Sox 
2002 Salute to Education College Scholarship Program 

Leigh Simons 

American Association of University Women 

Jennifer Busse 

Emerson College Trustees Scholarship 

Hannah Onoroski. 

Hesser College Award 

Stephen Hallmark 

University of New Hampshire Presidential Scholar Award 

Molly Riley 



-SD-80- 



Virginia Wesleyan College Presidential Scholarship 

Corinna Clark 

Woodruff and Callaway Scholarship - Emory University 

Laurie Gorham 



-SD-81- 



Arizona State University 
Assumption College 
Babson College 
Bennington College 
Bucknell University 
Clemson University 
Colgate University 
Colorado State University 
Connecticut College 
Daniel Webster College 
Elms College 
Emerson College 
Emmanuel College 
Emory University 
Endicott College 
Fordham University 
George Mason University 
Green Mountain College 
Grove City College 
Hampshire College 
Hawaii Pacific University 
Hesser College 
Indiana University 
Ithaca College 
James Madison University 
Johns Hopkins University 
Johnson and Wales University 
Keene State College 
Liberty University 
McGill University 
Mcintosh College 
Mount Holyoke College 



College Acceptances 
Class of 2002 

New Hampshire Community Technical College/Nashua 

New Hampshire Technical College/Laconia 

New Hampton School 

Nichols College 

Norwich University 

OberUn College 

Ohio University 

Philadelphia Biblical University 

Plymouth State College 

Quinnipiac College 

Rivier College 

Rochester Institute of Technology 

Saint Joseph's College of Maine 

St. Anselm CoUege 

Tufts University 

University of CaUfornia/Berkeley 

University of Colorado at Boulder 

University of Connecticut 

University of Florida 

University of Hartford 

University of Maine/Orono 

University of Massachusetts/Amherst 

University of Massachusetts/Lowell 

University of New Hampshire 

University of New Hampshire, Thompson School 

University of New Haven 

University of Tampa 

University of Vermont 

Virginia Polytechnic Instimte 

Virginia Wesleyan CoUege 

Wesleyan University 

Wheaton CoUege 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute 



-SD-82- 



Town Offices and Post Office 

Emergency 

PoUce 911 

Fire 

Ambulance 

Town HaU 465-2209 

465-3701 Fax 

Animal Control Officer 465-2303 

Assessing Office 465-9860 

Building Inspector 465-2514 

Communications Center 465-2303 

Department of Public Works 465-2246 

Finance Department 465-6936 

Fire Department (non-emergency) 465-6001 

Health Officer 465-2514 

Hollis Social Library 465-7721 

Information Technology 465-2209 

Planning Department 465-3446 

Police (non-emergency) 465-7637 

Post Office 465-9030 

Recreation Commission 465-2671 

Selectmen's Office 465-2780 

Stump Dump 465-2143 

Tax Collector 465-7987 

Town Clerk 465-2064 

Transfer Station 465-3299 

Welfare 465-2780 

Visit the Town's World Wide Web page at www. hollis. nh. us 

Schools and Superintendent 

HoUis Primary School 465-2260 

Hollis Upper Elementary School 465-9182 

HoUis Brookhne Middle School 465-2223 

HoUis BrookUne High School 465-2269 

HoUis School District 465-7118 

HoUis Brookline Superintendent's Office 465-7118 

Visit the School's World Wide Web page at www, hollis. k 12. nh. us