(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual Report of the Trustees for the Fiscal Year Ending ..."

Google 



This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 

to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 

to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 

are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other maiginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 

publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing tliis resource, we liave taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 
We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain fivm automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attributionTht GoogXt "watermark" you see on each file is essential for in forming people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liabili^ can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 

at |http: //books .google .com/I 



Di.itradb, Google 



I 



MUS.120.37.4 (26-29) 



TOZZER LIBRARY 



Alfred Marston Tozzer 
1877 - 1954 



HARVARD UNIVERSITY 



Digiized by Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



itiadb, Google 



J, Google 



THE TWENTY-FIFTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 
TRUSTEES 

LIST OF MEMBERS 

For the Year ending May 31, 1901. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Digilzed by Google 



OFFICERS FOR 1901— 1902. 



THEODORE C SEARCH. 



HONORARY VICE- PRKl DENT, 

WILLIAM WEIGHTMAN. 



WILUAM PLATT PEPPER, 



JOHN T. MORRIS. 



TREASUBEB, 

GEORGE H. CLIFF. 



gECRRTARr, 

EDWIN ATLEE BARBER. 



WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER. 



PRINCIPAL OF THE SCHOOL, 

LESLIE W, MILLER. 



JAMES L. ALLAN, 

828 Drexel Building. 



Digilzed by Google 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

EX-OFPICIIS. 

The Govkbnob of the State, The Mayob op the Citt. 

BY APPOINTMENT. 

Byrok p. Moulton, Appoinlfd by the Stale Setiale. 

Harrington Pitzoebald, Appointed by the Houm of Bepramtaliva. 

Charles U. Eardtng, Appointed by Sdrrl CbuiKif. 

Merrill A. Fcrbubb, Appointed by CWimm OauneiL 

Samuel Gitstine TBoxmon, Appointed by On Oommiiaonfn of Fainamml Park, 

ELECTED BY THE MEMBERS. 

To tent /or l\rei ytan, 
JoBN T. Morris, Theodore C Sbabch, 

SruABT Wood, John Stobt Jenks, 

John H. Converse. 



William Wood, 
Georqe W. Eleihs, 

Geoboe H. Cliff. 

To terrefOT otk year. 
BiCBAKD Bo»ieuAKSLBB, Thohas Dolan, 

William Platt Pepper, C N. Weyoandt, 

Chables £. Dana. 



Digilzed by Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



ASSOCIATE COMMITFEE OF WOMEN 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

(FBr th>lr Sapsrt hi ptg* BO.} 



MRS. DANIEL ENGLISH DALLAM. 



Mrs. C. C. Babtol, 
Mbs. (.', William Bbrcinkr, 
}ilim Anna Blanchakd, 
Mrs. William T. Cartrr, 
Miss Makoaret Clydk, 
Miss Maroarrt L. Corlibh, 
Miis Ada M. Crozek, 
Mrs. Wh. L. Elkins, 
Mas. RoD-MAN B. Ellison, 
Mrs. J. C. W. Fbbhmith, 
Mrs. W. W. Gibbs, 
Mrs. Joseph Harribon, 
Mrs. Frank K. Hifple, 
Mas. Robert M. Jannbv, 
Mrs. Morris Jastrow, 



Mrs. J. L. Keiterlinus, 
Mii« M. Atherton Leach, 
Mrs. Craiqe Lippibcott, 
Mi»< Fannie S. Maorb, 
Mi!« Helen L. Mdrfhy, 
Mrs. Dakiel)^. Nkwralii, 
Mri. Richard Pbtebs, 
Mrs, T. a. Rbii.ly, 
Mrs. ThohA-I Roberts, 
Miss Eldiabeth C. Roberts, 

Mas. JoeEPH F. SiNSOTT, 
Mw. John B, Steison, 
Mrs. John Wisteb, 
Mrs. Jones Wistbr, 
Miss H. A. Zbll, 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



Miss Elizabeth Gratz, 
Mrs. Wm. W. Griest, 
Mrs. Sbth B. Stitt, 
Mrs. Wm. A. Stone, 



Mrs. H. C. Townwbnd, 
Mrs. Caspar Wistbr, 
Mrs. Robert K. Wrioht. 



Dpized by Google 



COMMITTEES FOR 1901— 1902. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 
T. C. Search, Oiainaan; William Platt Petpeb, Stuabt Wood, Wil- 
liam Wood, A. C Lahbdin, M.D., C N. Weyoabdt, B. P. Moulton, 
C. H. Haruino, John S. Jenks, John T. Morris, Isaac H. Clothier, John 
H. Coitverse. 

STANDING COMMITTEES* 
ART. 
Charles E. Dana, Chairman; Samuel Oustihe Thompson, Wilson Evre, 
Jr., Cbables Graply, Frank Miles Dav. 

MUSEUM. 

John S. Jesks, Chairman; William Platt Pepper, A. C. Lambdin, M.D., 

John T. Morris, Mrs. Jorh Harrison, Miss Anna Blanchard, Miss 

Elizabeth C. Roberts, Miss Magbe, Mrs. W. T, Carter, Mrs. Jones Wis- 

TEB. Mrs. E. D. QiU.ESPIE, er qgieio. 

INSTRUCTION. 
T. C Search, Chairman; Wm. Wood, J. 8. Jenkh, Isaac H. Clothier, 
John T. Morris, Ckab. E. Dana, C. N. WEvaANDT, A. C Lambdin, M.D., 
William Platt Pepper, Byron P. Moulton, Charles H. Harding, John 
H. Converse, Geo, H. Ci.iff, Geo. W. Elkins, Miss Helen L. Murphy, 
Mrs. Frank K. Hipple, Mrs. John Wister, Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott, 
Mbs. Thomas Boberts, Miss Leach. Mrs. E. D. Gillespie, a offiao. 

FINANCE. 
in ; Stcart Wood, J. S, Jenks, C. H. Hardimo, 



< The President Is a oJUdo a member at all Commluees, 



Di.itradb, Google 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM. 



Wiu-IAM Plait Pepi-Er, Direetor of the .Vmuctiiii. 
Edwin AtLbb Babbeb, Curator. 
MARUABi^r D. WoohNriT. AniMant. 
Mary E. Dawson, Librarian. 

DEPARTMENT OF NUMISMATICS. 
F. D. Lanubmkeix, Hortomry CHralor. 

DEPARTMENT OF TEXTILES. LACE AND EMBROIDERY. 
Mrh. Joh.v Harrison, Himumiy Cnrntor. 

DEPARTMENT OF GOLDSMITH WORK, JEWELRY AND PLATE. 
Cha?. D. Clark, Honorary Ouralor. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL POTTERY. 
Mb* Jokes Wister, i/tmomry (.\rator. 



Digilzed by Google 



THE SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 

CompriseB in its orgnnizalion the following DepartmeDtR ; 
School of Drawino. 

School of Textile Design asd Manitfacture. 
School of Dbcobative Paintiso. 
School op Chehistrv and Dveiko. 
School of Applied DESiiiK. 
School of Cabvino and Wood-Work. 
School op Dbcobativb Scvlptube. 
School of ARCHiTEtTt'KAL Uesion. 
School of Interior Decoration. 
School of Illvstbation. 
School of Kdrhal Art Instruction. 
School of Modern Lanuvaiji^. 

STAFF. 
L. W. Miller, Principal. 

Hon'ARD Fremont Stratton, Director o( Art Scliool. 
K. W. France, Director of Textile Scliool. 
Herman Deioendesck, Professor of Drawing. 
Bradley C. Aloeo, Assistant Director of Textile School and Professor in 

Chai^ of Weave Formation — Aoalveia and Structure of Fabrics. 
Sopirie R Stecl, Instructor in Charge — Illustration. 
Alexander Steklino Calder, ProfeHsorof Sculpture. 
LcDwio E. Faber, Instructor in Drawing, Lecturer on Anatom)' and Processes 

in Illustrative Reproduction. 
J. Merbitt Matthews, Ph.D., i'rofessor in Charge of Cheuiistr; and Dyeing. 
JoREPH F. X. Harold, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 
J. Frank Copelasd, Instructor in Drawing. 
Richard S. Cox, Instructor in Jacquard Design and Color Work. 
Helen A. Fox, Instructor in Color Harmony, Historical Ornament and Design 

Applied to Printed and Woven Fabrics, 
Fanny Darby Sweeny, Instructor in Design Applied to Stained Glass. 
Margarettk I.ippincott, Instructor in Water-Color Painting. 
Herbert G. Coe, Instructor in Elementary Weaving and Related Branches. 
Frederic Pfeiffer, Instructor in Charge of Advanced Weaving and Related 

Branches. 
B. F. Jarrett, Jr., Instructor in Normal and Preparatory Classes, Art School. 
John IjOCKWOOD, Instructor in Charge of Wool Carding and Spinning. 
George W'. Lbffebts, Instructor in Worsted Drawing and Spinning. 
F. M. Jennings, Instructor in Wool Grading and Siirnng. 
Wh. E. Winchester, Instructor in Cotton Carding and Spinning. 
Edward T. Bo«U!', Instructor in Architectural Design. 

William Laibd Ti?rner, Instructor in Jaciiua I'd Design I Evening Classes). 
A. M. Gbillon, Director of School of Modem languages and Instructor in 

French, Italian and Sminish. 
Maiiahe A. M. ScHMiDr-GRiLixiN, Instructor in German. 
Richard B. Douobty, Instructor in Instrumental and Machine Drawing. 
Joseph M. Woelfel, Instructor in Dyeing ami Wet Finishing. 
Alfred Bi'rhouse, Instructor in Drv Finishing. 
Wm. Henry Dewab, Instructor in design .-Applied to Furniture and Interior 

Henry Tobniton, Instructor in Wood Carving. 
Mabv I*. Dow, Instructor in Book- Binding and Leather Work. 
Chas. T, Scorr, Instructor in Drawing. 
laABKLi.E Bradley, Instructor in Drawing. 

Sahl'el Thompson, Jr., Superintendent of Building and Instructor in Wood- 
Work. 
Leonora J. C. Buece, Registrar. 
Kate DeWitt Bero, Librarian. 



iized by Google 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



The year just closed has boon one of continued progress and 
unchecked development in the history of the Institution. The 
School has never before been po well attended ; the work accom- 
plished by the pupils 1?. in several important respects, characterized 
by a distinct improvement over that of any preceding year; and 
what is perhaps still more gratifying, the recognition of the value 
and significance of the School by practical business men was 
never so generous and so cordial as it is to-day. Graduates from 
our Textile courses are eagerly sought by manufacturers, and, 
almust without exception, go directly to lucrative and responsible 
positions, and their influence upon the character of American in- 
dustrial production is as beneficial as it is unmistakable. 

In commenting on the work of the School in my last report, I 
took pleasure in calling s|>ecial attention to the development of the 
Department of Chemistry. In the same spirit, and certainly in the 
hope that the mention of any one department will not be under- 
stood as implying any invidious distinction in regard to others, I 
desire at this time to emphasize the distinct advance that has been 
made this year in the direction of a closer association between the 
Art and Textile Schools. The importance of this association has 
been the fundamental principle on which our whole educational 
organization has been established, and to its recognition and 
enforcement the School owes the undoubted nuccess and un- 
challenged leadership among institutions of its class which it has 
attained. 

To bring into the School the atmosphere and the attitude of ac- 
tive and actual production is the true mainspring of all effort in 
technical education, of course : but the element of culture, the re- 



oy Google 



12 

finiDg and improving influence that gives to all production its 
highest value, is only to be secured through the study of art ; and 
it was to the solution of problems which this association of art and 
technical studies presents, that the earliest and most earnest efforts 
of this School have been directed. 

The problem is by no means simple nor its solution easy. Not 
only is the class of students which an art school naturally attracts 
quite distinct from that to which the appeal of the technical 
school is chiefly directed, but the fundamental importance, in all 
design, of principles which are a^thetic rather than practical, is 
something that is still imperfectly understood by a large and in- 
fluential part of those whose interest in our work is in a general 
way most active and intelligent. To many such the whole prov- 
ince of practical affairs, including even that of practical design, is 
one thing and the entire realm of art is another, about as distinct 
and different from the first one as one thing can possibly be from 
another, and the adjustment of aims and methods of instruction, 
for which so little precedent existed, and the enforcement of les- 
sons whose significance was so little comprehended, has been no 
small task. But the work is being rapidly accomplished, and the 
results achieved this year, mainly through the efforts of instructors 
trained in our own School, furnish evidence of an advance in the 
right direction that is gratifying in the extreme. 

In my last report I took occasion to state at some length the 
financial needs of the Institution, and expressed the hope that 
when those needs were thoroughly understood by the State author- 
ities the support which has hitherto been received from that 
source might be materially increased. It gives me pleasure to re- 
port that the statement of these needs, as published in the last 
report, seems to have received the most careful and friendly con- 
sideration from the members of the present Legislature. The 
School has been visited by delegations from both branches of that 
body, and representatives of your Board of Trustees have repeat- 
edly been received at Harrisburg with the utmost courtesy, and 
have been accorded respectful and attentive hearings, and have 
every reason to believe that the claims of the Institution have 
been recognized and allowed, and that the appropriation will be 
as generous as the resources of the State will permit. 

I feel that it is only just to the members of the present Stale 
Government, Executive as well as Legislative, with whom the, 
presentation of this subject has brought me in contact, to testify 



oy Google 



13 

in this place, to the coHial appreciation of our aims and sympa- 
thetic interest in our work which has, without exception, charac- 
terized the attitude of these oflicials. 

As representatives of the people of the typical American indus- 
trial Commonwealth, tliey have been quick to recognize the tre- 
mendous import of industrial education as one of the moat potent 
agencies on which industrial prosperity depends. 

The provision for free Scholarships for every county in the 
State, which has been embodied in all bills under which the School 
has received State appropriations, has been the means of familiar- 
izing Senators and Representatives of even the most remote sec- 
tions with the work we are doing ; and as appointments to Scholar- 
ships are usually made by the Governor on the recommendation 
of the members of the legislature, such appointments furnish 
to these members personal illustrations, in the success achieved 
by their proteges, of the nature and extent of the influence and 
the immediate and practical results of the methods of instruction 
which distinguish the School. The recognition and appreciation 
on their part has been prompt and cordial, and has found the best 
possible expression in the generous treatment accorded to the 
School. 

Substantial and much-needed repairs have been made to Memo- 
rial Hall, and important improvements have been accomplished 
at the School at Broad and Pine Streets. 

As has been the case ever since it was organized in 1883, the 
Associate Committee of Women has been untiring in its efforts 
for the promotion of the best interests of the Institution. Some 
of the most important improvements to the School building, nota- 
bly the remodelling and relighting of the Textile Designing 
Room, as well as much admirable work in improving the accom- 
modations of the athletic and social features, the beginnings of 
which were recorded in my last report, have been accomplished 
entirely by this Committee. Its work is described in detail in the 
separate report which is submitted with this ; but I desire to re- 
cord in this place the grateful appreciation of the Board of Trus- 
tees of the fidelity and efficiency of the service which, for eighteen 
years, this able and devoted body has rendered to the Pennsylva- 
nia Museum and School of Industrial Art. 

Respectfully submitted. 

THEODORE C. SEARCH, 

President. 



oy Google 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR. 

On the 26th of February, 1901, Mr. Dalton Dorr, Curator of the 
Pennsylvania Museum, died from pneuniunia, aft«r a short illness 
of one week, which was a great and painful surprise to everybody. 

The Trustees, at a special meeting called for the purpose on 
March 2, 1901, adopted this minute, prepared by a special com- 
mittee, to express their sense of the loss sustained by this Institu- 
tion: 

" The Trustees of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of In- 
dustrial Art wish to record their sense of the loss which the Insti- 
tution has sustained in the death of Dalton Dorr, for the last 
twenty years the Secretary of the Corporation and the Curator of 
the Museum. 

"Intelligent and conscientious, systematic and faithful in the 
discharge of all his duties, Mr. Dorr endeared himself to his asso- 
ciates, and his long service has been of very great usefulness to the 
Pennsylvania Museum and to the public to whose enjoyment and 
instruction ills dedicated. 

"The arrangement and care of the varied and constantly in- 
creasing collections in Memorial Hall have been from an early 
period under his immediate direction. He made of this his life- 
work, having few other interests outside his home and a small circle 
of valued friends of his younger days, and his time and thought 
were given to it unreservedly. With a liberal education and cul- 
tivated tastes, he had by constant study acquired much of the 
knowledge indispensable to the office of Curator. He was a man 
of high integrity and honor, fair and just in his dealings, and com- 
bining gentleness with firmness and good judgment. He won the 
respect and confidence of all the employes of the Museum, who 
cheerfully referred any disputes to him for final settlement, and he 
attached to him all who were in any way associated with his Mu- 
seum work, 

" In bearing this public testimony of their appreciation, the 
Trustees direct that copies of this minute be sent to the family of 
Mr. Dorr, and to the guardians of his little children, that they may 



oy Google 



PATE-SUR-PATE VASES. 
M*DE BY MiNTON & Co., England. Decorated by M. L. Solon. 



oy Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



17 

know, when they are older, in what esteem their father was held 
by the Pennsylvania Museum and Scliool of Industrial Art. 
" By order of the Executive Committee. 

(Signed) "ALFRED C. LAMBDIX, 

" Serrelarij, jwo lem." 

At a special meeting held March 9th, to consider the election of 
a successor to Mr. Dorr, Mr. Edwin AtLee Barber was duly elected 
Curator. 

The much-needed repairs to Memorial Hall, begun on April 29th 
by the Commis.nioners of Fairmount Park, will add greatly to the 
comfort of the occupants and the safety of the valuable collec- 
tions on exhibition there. 

For full details aa to the collections, and the additions thereto, 
the number of visitors during the past year, etc., a complete state- 
ment will be found in the Report of the Curator. 

All which is respectfully submitted. 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER, Director, 
Pennsylvania Muneiim and Sckail of Lidusfrial Art. 

July, IftOl. 



Digitized by Google 



REPORT OF THE CURATOR. 

During the twelve months ending May 31, 1901, there were 719 
accesBions to the collections of the Museum by gift, loan and pur- 
chase, and 61 additions to the library. 

The total number of objecte now owned by the 
Museum is ....... . 22,075 

Exclusive of coins, which aggregate . . 4,152 

Making a total of 26,227 

In addition to these, there are objects on loan, ex- 
clusive of coins, 5,101 

And coins on deposit amounting to . . , 10,285 

Making a total of objects loaned , . 15,386 

Or a grand total of separate exhibits 

amounting to 41,61S 

The number of books and pamphlets in the Museum library at 
the end of the year was 1903. Miss Mary E. Dawson, of the Mu- 
seum staff, who was recently appointed librarian, has already en- 
tered upon the work of rearranging, renumbering and cataloguing. 

Among the more important additions to the Museum collec- 
tions during the year are a case of carved meerschaum pipes, the 
bequest of Dr. Theodore H. E. Gruel ; an Italian spinet of the 
sixteenth century, given by Mrs. John Harrison ; a series of large 
burial vessels of the Florida Indians, received from Mr. Clarence 
B. Moore ; a collection of pottery, porcelain and glass from con- 
temporary European and American factories, purchased at the 
Paris Exposition, on account of the Temple Trust, including a fine 
series of Tiffany Favrile glass; a case of Egyptian antiquities, 
presented by Mrs. Jones Wister; and numerous examples of art ■ 
pottery and glass, of domestic and foreign manufacture, the gift of 
Mr. John T, Morris. 

The principal event of the year was the installation of the col- 
lections of American pottery and porcelain in a suite of four 



oy Google 



19 

communicating rooms in the northeastern part of the building. 
Through the generosity of Mr. Morris, suitable cases have been 
built around the entire wall space in two of these apartments. 
These collections of historical and recent wares, which are about 
to be thrown open to the public, are the most complete of the kind 
in existence. 

The work of reclassifying ami concentrating the various classes 
of exhibits in the Museum, and relabelling the same, has already 
been commenced, although somewhat retarded by the repairs to 
the building which are now in prepress. The contemplated re- 
moval of the extensive coin collections from the main gallery to a 
well-lighted room, which has been prepared for them, will greatly 
facilitate this work by adrling some 1800 feet of floor apace for the 
display of the art collectionB. The plana outlined for the re-ar- 
rangement of the collections will occupy the entire Museum force 
during the summer months. 

The number of visitors to the Museum during the year 1900 was 
284,925, of which 134,092, or over 47 per cent, came on Sunday 
afternoons. This attendance was a slight decrease from the pre- 
ceding year, when lai^e crowds of people were attracted to Phila- 
delphia by the.Grand Army Encampment and the National Ex- 
port Exposition, In September of 1899 the admissions numbered 
94,452, the largest monthly record in the history of the Institution, 
With a normal attendance during that month, the total number 
of visitors in 1899 would have been some 20,(KX) less than the 
number regisitered during the past year. 

Following is a list of accessions to the Museum, 
By gift from : 
Mrs. Jobn Harrijion : 

Waistcoat; white silk, i^mbroidereU, 

Specimen of Papyniu plant growo in Sicily, 1900. 

Two embroidered Uiwels ; old Italian. 

Spinet ; Sixteenth Centiirj. Italian. 
Mi)0 Anna Bi.ahciiabd: 

Ek^lesiastical Garments of the Siiteentli Centurr, comprising a Chaauble, 
Stole and Maniple ; also a Chalice Veil and Burse. All of silk brocade 
trimmed with gold braid. 

Kej and Bolt, Iron; old French. 

Door Knocker, Iron ; old Spaaisli. 
Mr. Gkoboe FnofT : 

Embroidered Silk Handkerchief ; Chinese. 

Tea Pot, Cup and Saucer and Bowl ; Chinese Porcelain. 



oy Google 



Plate ; Porcelain. Japanese. 

Tortoise Shell Tnj ; from South Africa. 

Carved Shell ; mother of Pearl. 

Toy model of Chair. 

Small Box of Tea. Chinese. 

Ostrich Egg ; from Egypt. 

Bust of LiDcoln ; made from redeemed I'. S. Tressur; notes. 

Smoking Cap ; from India. 

MrH. JoVBt WiRTER : 

Stone Slela from the Temple of Tel-el -Amama, £^jpt 

Large collection of Antiquities, etc., from Egypt 

Collection of Oriental Costumes, Bugs and Ornaments. 

Stone Wayside lAntem ; from Japan. 
Hb. Thomas MacKei.lar (bequest): 

Large Silver Vase on Marble Pedestal. 
Mr. Clarence B. Moorr : 

Collection of WeapouB ot the Fiji Islanders ; Twenty-three Clubs, Spears, 
Bows and Arrovs, etc. 

Plaslei- Models from life of the four venomous snakes of the U. S. and 
Case for exhibiting the same. 

Coin ; Danish Clipping. Christian IL 

Skull, Bowl and Sand, from Aboriginal grave in Florida. 

Spanish "Olla" found near Mobile, Als. 

Seven large Earthen Vessels from Abori^nal graven and mounds in North- 
western Florida. 

Three small Earthen Vessels from Aboriginal graves and mounds in North- 
western Florida. 
Mr. John T. Morris : 

Sedan Chair ; bought in Florence. 

Eighteen Objects of Venetian Glass, Vases, etc., by the Venesia-Murano 
Co., Venice. 

Vase ; carved glass. Tulips and leaves. By Stumpf. Paris Exposition. 

Plaque ; metallic lustre. By Clement Masaier. Paris Exposition. 

Two OIbsb Vases by Emilc Gall«. Paris Exposition. 

Three Vases from Gustafaberg, Sweden. Paris Exposition. 

Six Examples of Grueby Faience, made in Boston. Paris Expofiition. 

Two Glass Vases, by A. Landier et Fils, Sevres. Paris Exposition. 

Three Vases; Jiookwood Faience. Paris Exposition. One decorated by 
Mr. Shimyamadani, two by Mr. A. B. Valentien. 

Traveller's Box ; laccjuered wood. Japaa 

Four idols; carved and gilded. 

Iron Bit for Horse's Bridle. Antique, from Perugia. 

Ten Earthen Pie Dishes; Sgraffiato and Slip decoration; Pennsylvania 
German, dating from 1796 to 1847. 

One Earthen Pie Dish ; Pennsylvania German, 1800 to 1811. 



oy Google 



J, Google 



itiadb, Google 



Four Earthen Pie Dishes ; PenuajWaDiK Oerman, 1791 to 1820. 

One Earthen Fie Dish ; Pennsrlrant* Oeraun, 1S08. 

Monc,T Safe and Whistle combined. In shape of fowl. Made in Mont- 

gOHiery Co., Pa. ; c 1830, 
Pilcher; earthenware. Prints of Independence Hall. Trenton, N. J., 

1876. 
Stoneware Jar ; salt glaze. Made bj Paul Ciuhman, near Albany, X, Y. ; 

c. IBIO. 
Four Earthen Vases ; by G. E. Ohr, Biloii, Miss., 1900. 
Small Collection of Forei^ and Domestic Postage Stamps. 
Cases and Fittings for two rooms ; to contain the Collections of American 

Pottery and Porcelain, 
Mr. John Mxr.t<>k : 

Three Silver Coins ; Hawaii, 1883, 

EnwAttu N. WttKiiiT, 3bd : 
Silver Coin of Spain, 1881. 
Copper Coin of Holland, 1827. 

Mrs. Samiei. S. White : 

Large Needlework Picture, "The Tribute Money." German, 1864. 

Mb. Edwin a. Baruer : 

Small Tile showing mark of the Rookwood Pottery, 1000. 

Earthenware Plate ; black print of Memorial Hall, Trenton, 187(>. 

Tile, by the Low Tile Co., Chelsea, Mass. 

Four Tickets of Admission to the World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 
1893. 

Collection of Postage, Check and Revenue Stamps. 

Two Coins; Chinese and Japanese, 
Mr. Charl^ H. Cramp : 

Five rare old Point Lace Gillars ; 177.i-1860. 

Mr. Saml'el Dkan, Boston : 
Finial of Wrought Iron, 

Mr, R. E. Difehderfer : 

An anflient Chinese ('annon ; taken from the " Great Wall of China " (by 

the donor) in 1899. 

Mr. John P, Looan: 

Ten Mexican Postage Stamps. 

CoL. J. P. NitHowon : 

Small Medal : " Odd Fellows Temple," Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Caroline C. Furruhh ; 

Two large Covers, or Hangings, of black satin elaborately embroidered in 
colore. Nagasaki, Japan. Exhibited at World's Fair, Chicago, 1893. 



oy Google 



Mum. William Mifflin ; 

Sugar BowL Blue and white. England. B; £. Wood & Sods, StaRord- 
ehire, 

Flower Pot and Saucer ; while, with black prints. Liverpool ware ; c. 1810. 

Pitcher ; porcelain. Sprigged decoratioD. England ; c. 163<l. 
Mis' M. Louiwe McLaitihlin, Cincipnati, O. ; 

Three Vases ; eiperiuiental porcelain. 
Mr. Abel Brintos Hakino, Frenchlcwn, N. J. : 

Collaction at Potter's T<x>l8. Pennsrlvaaia German, 1825-1661. 

MfHSHS. WbIOHT, TTiNDALB & VAN El.BEN : 

Fifteen Colo Dial Plates with Philadelphia Views, by Mintun A Co., Eng- 

TuK RooKwooD Pottery, CiDcinaati, O. : 

Faience Sign, with the word "Rookwood." 
Low Tile Company, Chelsea, Mass.: 

Three Vasea : imiiation of Japanese, 1900. 

Mw. R. L YoiNO, Middletown, Pa. : 

Eighteen Piei«s ot Pottery and Porcelain i mostly old EDglish. 
Painting on Velvet, by Polly Hopkina ; c. 1820. 

Mb. PEW.Y W. L, .\DA-Ms, Tunslnll, England : 

Base of Candelabrum; jasper ware. Made by William Adams (pupil of 
Wedgwood], Tunstall, England, 1787-1820. 
LiBBEY Clash Co., Toledo, O. ; 

Large Cut Gloss Bowl. 
Mrs, John P. Looas : 

Tea Pot; old Staflordshire. Dark blue. "View of Baltimore Alms 

Tea Plate, by Clews, Staffordshire. " Dr. Syntai aDd the Dairy Maid." 

Dk. TiiVAt. H. E. Gkcel (bequest) : 

Carved Walnut Wall Case, contaioing a collectioD of Nine Pipesaod Eleveo 
Cigar Holders of meerschauiu, pon^lain and wood, and Three Tobacco 
I'ouches. 
Mb. Dalton Dorr (bequest) : 

Votive Plaque ; carved peal wood. From church in Antwerp ; c. 1100. 

Mrs. H. C.Davik: 

Cabinet, lacquered and inlaid. Japanese. Brought from Japan, in 1852, 
by Commodore Kelly of the Perry Expedition. 

Pottery Tea Pot and Case. Japanese. 
Mrs. Thomas Roberts, Riverton, N. J. : 

Egyptian Stone Carving. 



Di.itradb, Google 



25 

Mi* SinASNA F. F, Benton, Perth Amboy, S. J. : 
Two Bock[nghB[ii Pitohen ; Perth Amho;, I860. 
One Rockingham Eagle Teapot; PeKh Arabov, 1S60. 
Snuff Jar; jellow ware. 

By loan from ; 

Mtt-a. John IlARniwiN : 

Three Embroiilereil Bags. Eijthleeiith Tentur;. 
Cap ; embroidered uatin. Early Eighteenlh Centur;r. 

C'msa ; silver rppousH^. (lenuan. 
BoK ; iiilver filigree. Genoese. 
Embroidereil Temple Hanging. Japanese. 
Fragment of Hhodian Embroidery. 
Lace Collar ; Irish erochel. 

Two Example!* of Silk Brocnde. l^izteenth and ^seventeenth L' 
Chalice ; silver. Spanish. Siileenlh Century. 
SDMisHATrc isn Ant]<iiiartan Societv l 

Ninety-one Coins and Medals, added to their collection. 

Hit, JlEtCISI.Al'M .MONKIXft'K.'Z : 

Bronse Medal ; Fiftieth Anniversary of Cracow University. 
Caft. andMhh. Wm. II. Saok, Philippine [slands : 

Five Silk Skirls, elaborately embroidered. Chinese. 

Handkerchief of Filipino drawn work and embroidery. 
Mrs. John .\. Wilcox : 

Collection of Fifteen Framed Samplers, dating from l634-tH21. 

One Earthen Pie Plate ; Pennsylvania German, 179.3. 

Twenty Articles of Silver : Apostle Spoons, Reliquaries, Buckles, < 

Cup Plate ; blue, [.og Cabin design. 



Veat of Steel Mail, worn in Franco- Prussian War. 
Mb. ErtiESE JIischleh : 

Large Framed Embroidery, made by Mrs. Helobe Mischler, in Paris, 
France; c. ISO.'i. 
Mr, Edwin A. Barber: 

Sloneflfare Toby Jug. Haddonfield, N. J., 1895. 

Rockingham Pitcher ; Portrait of Daniel O'Connell. Philadelphia, IMS. 

Small Earthen Cup, by David Haring ; c 1840. 

Small Pitcher; " Kelutou " ware. California, 1898. 

Pitcher; Majolica. Phcenixville; c. 1884. 

Sugar Bowl; silver lustre. England; c. 1820. 

Six old American Glass Bottles. 



Digilzed by Google 



C&mp>i^ portraits, ISSS-ISQZ. Wheeling, 

Vase ; black poltery ; carved decoration. Peruvian. 

Two Masonic Aprons — one Sheepskin, one Satin. Illuminated in gold and 
colors. 1813. 
Mb. E. EiwEix Jonb* : 

Seventy-one old American Glass Flasks and Botlles. 

Seventeen small Glass Cup Plates. 

Four Earthen Pie Dishes ; Pennsylvania German, 1822-1830. 

Two Earthen Bowls ; Pennsylvania German ; c. ISm. 

Jar and Cover ; earthen ; Pennsylvania. German ; c. 1830. 

Drinking Cup ; earthen ; Pennsylvania German : c. 1830. 

Collection of old Pewter Plates and Vewsels, etc. tthirty.one pieces). 

Ladle ; Sheffield Plate. 

Two Musical Instruments. Japanese. 

Tea Pot ; Cloisonne, small. Japanese. 

Tea Pot ; Salauma, small, Japanese. 

Jarand Cover; earthenware. Japanese. 

Stove ; earthenware. Japanese. 

Two Painted Bottles. India. Made from camel's stomach. 

Large Shield; brass open wo rL India. 

Blgrim Bottle with Iron Handle. Spain. 

Nine pieces of Porcelain and Earthenware ; American manufacture. 

Cup and Saucer. Fonlaineblcau, France ; c. 1818. 

Thirty -tour pieces of English Earthenware and Porcelain i mostlyold. 

Thirtysii Plates, by Wedgwood & Co., England. Blue and white. Colo- 
nial and other American views. Modern. 

Large Exhibition Wall Case. 
iltf^ Emma K Copper : 

Portion of Porcelain Tea Set (five pieces). French. Once the property of 
Marie Antoinette. 

Vase ; |>orcelain. Japanew. 

Tea Caddy ; tortoise shell inlaid with silver. 

Silver Tea Scoop. Japanese, 1789. 
Mr. J. Edward Carpenter a.vd Dr. Thos. G. .\shton lExeculora of Dallon 
Dorr, deceased) ; 

Plaster Statuette, "The Bather," 

Thirteen Silver Spoons ; early American manufacture. 

Bust ; small. Old Wedgwood. 

Drinking Cup ; head of a Faun. Stafford shire. 

Tea Caddy and Tray. Old Chinese porcelain. 

Pitcher i cream ware. Black printed allegorical pictures. 

Vase ; terra cotta. Kelief decoration by Miss Redifer. 

Clock ; brass, gilded. From Vienna. 

Screen ; carved Jade on teakwood stand. 

Two Colonial Notes, 1776. 



Digilzed by Google 



D„tiidD,Googlc 



WROUGHT IRON GRILLE. 
By L. Beroeotte, Paris, France. From the Paris Exposition of 1900, 



oy Google 



Mb. T. Henby Swemiso ; 

Hano ; mahoganr. Eightsenth Century. EnglUh. 
Mss. Ameue Ware : 

Two Su-el Botlle MouMe. lued more than tliirty vears ago at the Whitaey 
Glast Works-, (ilasslnro, X. J. 
Me, Jokes Winter ; 

"Book of the Dead." Egrptian. 

Sword. Oriental. 

Gnn. Oriental. 

Parchas<>8 for the Museum : 

Account of Joseph E. Tkmpi.k TRfw : 

TwentT-eight GiaBs FIsbIch and Botdra ; old American manufacture- 
Three Glass Cup Plateii. American dettigna. 
Five Glass Tumblers. Political Campaign decoration. 
From Pariw Expohitios ok I'JftO. 

Ten Vases, etc. Hungarian ware. Bv Z»olns;. 

Three V'asea. " KlaramS mat." By Baudy, France. 

Five Va«ea ; porcelain. By A. G. I>aniarre, Paris, France. 

One Vase and one Perforated Bowl ; porcelain. France. By Camille 

Naudot, Fils et Cie. 
Large Grille of Wroirghl Iron ; flowers. By L. Bergeotte. France. 
Three Vases ; porcelain, cryslalliied glaze. From the Royal Porcelain 

MsDufsctory, Copenhugen. 
Three Vases ; porcelain, cryetalliwd glaze, and one Plate; " pftte-sur-pfite." 

From Koyal Porcelain Manufactory, Berlin. 
Four Vases and one Plaque. Gustafsberg, Sweden. 
Six Vases. Eiirstrand, Sweden. 
Bas-relief; porcelain l>iscuiL "Descent from the Cross." By Richard 

Ginori, Milan. 
Bas-relief; terracotta, " Madonna and Child." Manufacture de Signa, 

Florence. 
Ten Vases of Tiffany Favrile Glass. Kew York City. 
Plate and Box of Tiffany Enamel on Metal. New York City. 
Account op A nolo- Amebic an Pottebv Fl-nd : 

Five Plates; blue and white. Modem Wedgwood. England. Colonial 

American views. 
Plate ; blue and white. By Clews, Staffordshire. "Troy, from Mt. Ida, 

Hudson River." 
Plate ; alphabet border. By J. & G. Meakin, Hanley, England. Frank- 
lin's Proverbs; " Keep thy Shop," etc. 
Plate; blue and white. By Mellor, Venables & Co. Butalem ; c 1843. 

"Tomb of Washiugton." 
Pitcher ; cream ware. By E. Wood, Staffordshire ; c 1SI5. Black prints 

of Pike and Hull. 



oy Google 



Luge Pitcher ; Liverpool ware, 1805-10. Black prints : " Tomb of Wagh- 
in^n," etc 

Plate ; blue and white. By R. Stereneon, Cobridge. " Captlol at Wash- 
ington." 

Plale ; black and white. Bj Clewa, StaJotdebire. " Port Montgomerjr, 
Hudson Biver." 

Soup Plate; blue and white. Maker unknown. "Dam and Waterworks," 
with stem- wheel steamboat 

Plate ; red print. By Mellor, Venablea & Co., Bnrglem ; c 1843. " Fort 
Hamilton, New York." 

Soup Plate; purple prim. By Jackson, Staffordshire. "Catskill Moun- 

Pitcher ; cream ware; black prints. Liverpool; c 1809. Cartoon of 

Jefferson, John Bull and Bonaparte. 
I^lcher; cream ware; red prints. I Jverpool ; c. 1814. Portraits of 

Commodores Bainbridge and Perry. 
Plate ; dark blue. By Mayer, Staffordshire. " Arms at Rhode Island." 

Feom Speciai, SuBscaiPTioN, Collected by Mb, Wm. Platt Pepper: 

Six Pieces of American Earthenware, with patriotic decoration commem- 
orating the Spanish War of 189S. 

Following is a list of additions to the Library. 
By gift from : 

Mi!« Anna Blakchakd : 

Catalogne of the Morse Collection of Japanese Pottery, by Prof. Edward 

Pottery and Porcelain ; a Guide to Collectors, by Fred'k Litchfield. 

Ceramic Art in Great Britun, Llewellyn Jewitt 12 vols.). 

Life of Joaiah Wedgwood, by Misa Meteyard (2jVols.). 
Mhs. B. L Yoi-sa : 

Large Bible, New York, 1831. 

Small Bible, Philadelphia, 1827. 
Mr. Karl Lanoenbece : 

The Chemistry of Pottery. 
Coi~ CHAttiJi" B. Lamborn : 

Ten Copies of Mexican Painting and Paintings, by Robert H. Lamborn. 
Mii'M Lyiiia T. Morris : 

Hair Dressing, by L. Shaw, 
Mb^. John IlABBCsfix : 

Lace Pattern Book, by Cesare VeceHio, 1591. 
Mr. Be\jam[n BtTTi^ ; 

Some Cndescribed Spanish- American Proclamation Pieces. 



J, Google 



31 

Madame La Roche Howard : 

German Religious Book, bj Philippus Kegeliut, Leipiig, 1611. 
Ms. EiiwiH A. Babbrr : 

Manuscript Music of th« Mst^ IndiuiB of Yucaian, 1883. 
B«ports and Handbooks of various Museum*. 
Db. Walter Houqii : 

Ad Earlf West Virginia Potteiy. 
Reports asd Cataixkiuem from; 

Pennsjlvania Academ; of the Fine Arts ; Cincinnati Museum Association ; 
Metropolitan Museum of Art ; Boston Museum of Fine Arts ; American 
Water Color Society ; Free Museum of Science and Art ; Field Colum- 
bian Museum ; Fairmonnt Park Art Association ; Museum of Practical 
Oeologj, London; The Llbbey Olasa Compnnj ; The Tiffany Glass and 
Decomting Company. 

By purchase : 

''German and Swiss Settlements of Colonial Peuusjlvania,'' by Oscar 

Kuhns, 
Catalogues of Coins and Medals, by Lyman H, Low. 
"Journal of the Society of Arts," vol. ilix. 
"American Journal of Archseology," vol. iv. 
" American Journal of Xumismatics," vols, zzxiv. and hit. 
"Meehan's Monthly," vols. iz. and z. 
"Birds and Nature," vol. vii. 

Respectfully Bubmitted. 

EDWIN ATLEE BARBER, 

Curator of the Mtiseum. 



Digilzed by Google 



I i ? I ^ 



5 ? ^ % Si K % S. 5 



A. S 



I ^ I g ^ 1 I J 5 1 



^?|||||iE|llsf?|'^iif| 



f •£ I; £ J S, "& 
f ? ^ s" s" iJ R ' 






55%|t||li4:i,s;^cs£ = 'C- 



^I|i5i:r^1 SI Ees. SI'S ^1%1 






§I^S5?Js?,'K^3'&'t'^£' 



tssJI'S^I-^E^" S,l 



M ? 5 I 1 1 4 I ^ f I I "^ I 3 s I 



■ ! 1 1 1 -- H H f I 



^ E ^. '^ *^ *■_ * r ", ^ '^ *i »- ^- "J *^ fi- *i '^ 'O "- "^ 



Digitized by Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



J, Google 



REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL. 

Presented at the Close of the Twenty- fourth School Year, 
June 6, 1901. 

The School has been attended during the past year by 1001 
pupilB, 704 of whom were men and 297 women — an increase of 
104 over the registration for the preceding year. 

The following changes in the staff have been made : 

Miss Frances Louise Farrand, who had been a valued Instructor 
in the Art School since 189.5, died on February 20, 1901, and Mr. 
B. F. Jarrett, Jr., and Miss Mary A. Stevenson were appointed to 
fill the vacancy thus caused. 

Miss Letchworth having resigned as Instructor in charge of the 
Class in Illustmtion, Miss Sophie B. Steel was appointed to the 
position. 

Miss Mary P. Dow has had charge of the Class in Bookbinding. 
She has been assisted by Mr. M. G. Rau as Instructor in Tooling 
and Finishing. 

Miss Margarette Lippincott, Instructor in Water-color Painting, 
resigned temporarily last summer, but will resume her connection 
with the School at the beginning of the next school year, October Ist. 

Mr, Charles T. Scott, Instructor in Drawing, Miss Isabelle 
Bradley, Instructor in Drawing and Modeling in the Junior De- 
partment, and Mr. Henry Torniton, Instructor in Carving, have 
been added to the staff of the Art School. 

In the Textile School, Mr. William E. Winchester has had 
charge of the work in Cotton Spinning; Mr. Herbert C. Coe was 
appointed Instructor in Hand Weaving in place of Mr. Roberta, 
whose resignation was mentioned in the last report, and Mr. Henry 
Kauffman was appointed in October as an assistant in the Weav- 
ing on Power Looms. 

In response to a very genuine demand for the extension of the 
opportunities offered by the School to a younger class of pupils 
than those whom we had been accustomed to receive, a Junior 
Department was opened in October. Its classes have met on Sat- 
urday mornings, and on Monday and Tuesday afternoons. In the 
arrangement of the courses a good deal of importance has been 
assigned to modeling and to work in color. The classes have been 
under the general direction of Miss Isabelle Bradley, and the re- 
sults are gratifying and encouraging. 

Several changes and improvements in the School Building have 



oy Google 



86 

been made, which have added materially to the comfort of pupils 
&B well as to efficiency of administration. The most important of 
these improvements are the construction of a passage which re- 
lieves the Power-weaving Room from the very serious inconvenience 
from which it suffered when it was used as a thoroughfare ; of a 
large skylight for the Textile Designing Room, by which means 
admirable ventilation, as well as the lighting, has been secured, 
and improvements in the basement by which a commodious Gym- 
nasium and Bath-room have been provided. The last-mentioned 
improvements, as well as those to the Textile Designing Room, 
have been made by the Associate Committee of Women. 

On August 23d the Cuban teachers, who had spent the summer 
at Cambridge, Mass., visited the School at the invitation of Presi- 



CHILO'S COACH, ENGLAND, 1763. 

Loaned by Mw» EUaP.Ckapman. Drtaim by Elizabeth YmTiail, aPapUof IheSehool. 

dent Search, and a banquet arranged by a Reception Committee, 
of which he was a member, was served in the South Yard of the 
School Grounds. Upwards of 1500 persons were entertained at 
this time. A Special School Circular was printed in Spanish for 
the use of these visitors. 

The following Lectures, in addition to those given in connection 
with the regular work of the different courses, have been given 
during the year : 

An Illustrated Lecture on " Egypt," by Jones Wister, Esq., on 
December 13th; a Lecture on "Stevenson in Samoa," by Mrs. 
Isobel Strong, on January 25th ; on " Japan and Hawaii," illus- 
trated by Charles M. Taylor, Jr., Esq., on February 27th, and on 
" Household and School Decoration," by Mrs. Sarah \V. Whitman, 
February 28th. 



oy Google 



37 

Competitions in Design, the prizes for which have been offered 
by manufacturers and publishere, have been practically continuoUB 
throughout the year. A list of these, as well as of fjifte, which in- 
dicate in another way an amount of interest in the School on the 
part of those best «ble to appreciate it that is gratifying in the ex- 
treme, are appended. 

One hundred and two l)ook8, pamphlets and photographs have 
been added to the Library during the year, of which eighteen 
were purchased, and the remaining eighty-four were presented by 
the following : Mr. John T. Morris, Mr. L, \V. Miller, Col. Richards 
Muckl^, Messrs. C. M. Taylor, H. T. Bailey, D. S. B. Chew, Charles 
Thackara, the Rhode Island School Board, the United States Gov- 
ernment, the Board of Public Education, the Massachusetts State 
Board of Education, the Women's Educational Association, the 
Students' Club, arid Mr. F. Badia. 

A bust of a child and a statuette of a Boxer were presented by 
Mr, Samuel Murray, of Philadelphia. 

Mr. John T. Morris donated seven vases, a pitcher, an orna- 
mental bracket, and a large cast of sculptured ornament from 
Trajan's Forum, all reproductions from the Vatican Museum. 

Further donations include an engraved wall-paper roller from 
Mr. E. J. Walenta ; a collection of oilcloth patterns from Mr. Alta, 
of Newark, N. J,; and of cretonnes from Mr. Rudolph Blanken- 
bui^; a drawing table from Mr. E. L. Miller; and a lithographic 
press from Mr, Arno Leonhardt, 

A number of ham mock -needles with bobbins and shuttles, and 
several packages of " Pina," pineapple-leaf fibre, witli a handker- 
chief and specimens of the cloth made from this fibre and from 
the banana-tree, fibre, have also been presented to the School by 
Captain and Assistant Surgeon C. Ii. Furbush, 44th Regiment U. 
S. v., P. I, 

Mrs. Edward S. Sanborn presented a piece of Chinese silk. 

A gift of oils from the Vacuum Oil Company, of Rochester, N. 
Y., has also been received. This firm donates all the oils needed 
by the School. 

An oil painting, " Copy of Dead Christ, by Rubens," was loaned 
by Mrs. E. S. Hajjar, of Philadelphia, and now hangs in the Li- 
brary of the School. 

A large Chinese screen of carved teakwood, with embroidered 
panels, has also been loaned by Mr. Thomas W. Barlow, of Phila- 
delphia. 



oy Google 



DONATIONS 

To THE Textile School During the Past Year. 

Cromptoti & Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Maps., one 40- 
inch 20 harness 4x4 box gem dress goods loom ; one gallon green 
paint for looms; also one set of eight wrenches. 

Easton & Burnham Machine Co., Pawtucket, E. I., one improved 
upright spooler for worsted department. 

Branson Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa., one I automatic knit- 
ting machine ; also one ribber. 

Ijowell Machine Shop, Lowell, Mass., one balling creel; one 
hundred and forty-four caps for spinning frames ; also additional 
findings for tension device for worsted aprons on gill boxes. 

Fairmount Machine Works, Philadelphia, Pa., donation of 50 
per cent, on 4 x 1 box loom for fancy cotton work. 

Edward Jetferson & Bro., Philadelphia, Pa., model of roller 
loom. 

John Royle <fc Sons, Paterson, N, J., donation of 875.00 on card 
cutter. 

Draper Company, Hopedale, Mass., one pair of Dutcher's patent 
Knowles' temples. 

American Card Clothing Co., Philadelphia, Pa., twelve hand- 
stripping cards; also one package sheet clothing. 

T. C. Entwistle, Ijowell, Mass., one left-hand catch gear for 
beaming machine. 

Galey & Lord Mfg. Co., Chester, Pa., ten pounds of mercerized 
cotton ; three pounds of silk on bobbins ; odds and ends of yarns ; 
also various kinds and sizes of wire heddles. 

Arasapha Mfg. Co., Chester, Pa., one hundred and thirteen 
pounds of warp yarn. 

D. Trainer & Sons Mfg. Co., Trainer, Pa., forty-one pounds of 
single 14's black cotton yarn. 

Wm, H. Grundy & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., Twenty-five pounds 
of worsted yarn. 

Wm. Clarke, Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa., ten pounds of ^ 
dyed cotton yarn ; lot of various colors of mercerized yarn. 



oy Google 



Guerin Spinning Co., U'oonsocket, R. I., eight pounds of white 
carbonized wool yarn. 

Louie B. Goodall, Sanford, Me., five pounds of single IS's cheviot 
yam. 

Aimnn & Harper, Philadelphia, Pa., small lot of white carbon- 
ized flannel wool yarn. 

Charles Ashoff, Philadelphia, Pa., ten reeds to the value of 
$7.00. 

Kershaw & Co., Manchester, England, five dollars to be ex- 
pended for temples in power weave room. 

C. Moore & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., loom cord and harness twine 
to the value of 86.00. 

Aransea Mfg. Co.. Philadelphia, Pa., six pounds of lasher cord. 

Samuel K. Cohen, Philadelphia, Pa., five pounds of jacquard 
harness twine for carpet looms. 

Dr. C. L. Furbush, Cebu, Philippine Islands, samples of pine- 
apple-leaf fibre and material made from the same. 

H. Bauendahl & Co., New York, N. Y., samples of trousering 
novelties. 

John B. Ellison & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa., book of samples. 

Farbenfftbriken of Elberfeld Co., Philadelphia, Pa., seven pounds 
of dyestuffs and three hundred and thirty samples of dyestufi^s. 

Berlin Aniline Works, Philadelphia, Pa.,' fourteen pounds of 
dyestuffs and two hundred and four samples of dyestuffs. 

Victor Koechl & Co., New York, N. Y., ten pounds of dyestuffs 
and sixty-one samples of dyestufl's. 

Wra. J. Matheson & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., fifteen pounds of 
dyestuffs; two hundred and ten samples of dyestuffs. 

John Horsfall, Philadelphia, Pa., seven gallons of Fankhausine; 
also one gallon of lactic acid. 

Kuttroff, Pickhardt & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., two pounds of dye- 
stuffs ; also book on alizarin color. 

0. S. Janney & Co., Philadelphia, Pa,, two pounds of dyestuffs. 

Sharpless Dyewood and Extract Co., Philadelphia, Pa., samples 
of logwood chips and logwood extracts. 

Andreykovicz & Dunk, Philadelphia, Pa., one pound of sumac 
extract. 

COURTESIES EXTENDED. 

Davison Publishing Co., New York, N. Y. ; Textile World Pub- 
lishing Co., Boston, Mass; Mr. Edmund Ingraham, Philadel- 



oy Google 



40 

phia, Pa. ; Measrs. Patchell & Eavenson, Philadelphia, Pa. ; Albert 
Hellwig & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; Charles Ashoff, Philadelphia, 
Pa,; John Bridge, Chester, Pa.; The Draper Company, Hopedale, 
MaAS. ; Schaum & Uhlinger, Philadelphia, Pa.; Edmund J. Wa- 
lenta, Philadelphia, Pa. ; S.N. D. North, Boston, Mass.; Erben, 
Harding & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. ; Fales & Jenka Machine Co., 
Pawtucket, R. I. ; Jacob Miller, Sons & Co,, Borich Mills, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. ; John & James Dobson, Bradford Mills, Germantown 
Philadelphia, Pa. ; Folwell Bro. & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. ; George 
C, Hetzell Co., Chester, Pa. ; Rowland Croft, Sons & Co., Camden, 
N. J. ; Millville Mfg. Co., Millville, N. J. ; Samuel A. Crozer & Son, 
Upland, Pa.; Aberfoyle Mfg. Co., Chester, Pa.; Firth & Foster Co. 
Philadelphia, Pa. ; J. R. Foster & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. ; M. A 
Furbueh & Son Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa. ; Mr. F. H. Milner, 
Philadelphia, Pa. ; Mr. Edwin Jones, Philadelphia, Pa. ;" Fibre 
and Fabric," Boston, Masa. ; "Textile World," Boston, Mass. 
"Textile Record," Philadelphia, Pa.; "The Manufacturer," Phila- 
delphia, Pa. ; " Textile Manufacturers' Journal," New York, N. Y. 
" Dry Goods Economist," New York, N. Y. 

COMMENCEMENT. 

The Commencement Exercises were held at Horticultural Hall 
on Tuesday evening, June 6th, and were followed by the Annual 
Exhibition of Students' Work in the School Building, Broad and 
Pine Streets. 

An address, " The Riches of a Scholarly Spirit," waa made by 
Frank A. Hill, Litt. D., of Boston, ^lass.. Secretary of the Maesa- 
chusettit State Board of Education, with remarks by the Vice- 
President, William Piatt Pepper, Mrs. E. D. Gillespie, and Mr. 
Henry G. Lord, of the " Textile World." 

DIPLOMAS. 

BcHooL OF Applied Art.— Adeleoe Helen Black, ElU Permitta Kauflman, 
Eileen Anna Knox, 0«car Earoesl Mertt, Mar7 Sbarpe Hemphill, Ida Evelyn 
Macfarlane, Gertrude Harris Seeley. 

Textile Schoou— Armen Peter Aleon, Frederick Brown, John Paul Jones, 
ElUnortb Moore, Jamea Voorbees Ponieroj, Prank Wilson Simons, Harris Aron- 
SOD Solomon, Edvan) Dewev Bloom, ClitTonl Mills Hoff, Edward Mills Maclean, 
Charles Emmons Pervear, Jr., Robert Read Shillingford, Fred Bey Smith. 



oy Google 



ORIGINAL DESIGN FOR ECCLESIASTICAL DECORATION 

BV A PUPIL OF THE SCHOOL 



Digilzed by Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



W^HOOL OF APPLIED ART. 
Associate Commitief. or Womkn'o Prizbi. 

FiBar Pbizb, S20.00. — For the beat wl of drawings eiecnted bj atudents in 
the Coane of Industrial Dnwinx. Avarded to Nellie Q. OrilSn. In conaider- 
ation of the ficl that the Committee was unable to decide between the two tore- 
most competitors, a Special Priie of (20. 00 is awarded this ^ear to Paul Iladle?. 

Skconu Prize, $10.00. — For Original Design. Art School. Awarded to 
Walter G. Myers. 

Hrat mention to Arthur U. Sprenble. Second mention to Frank Albert Sima- 

THiRt> Pri/.£ : For Original Deiign for Printeil Fabrics. Awarded to Jean 
Pritchard Prettvnxan. 

First mention to Bernard Robert LeFort. Second mention to Boy Ellinger 
Blithe. Third mention to Miriam Emilie !<ash. 

Mrs. JoNEa WisrEH Pbize, $26,00.— For General Excellence. Awarded to 
Eileen Anna Knox. 

Honorable meoiion to Oscar E. Merti. 

Mrs. Oeorqe K. Crozer Prike, $20.00. — Offered for the best work in Draw- 
ing. Awarded to M. l^wrvnce Blumenthal. 

Honorable mention lo Jean Helen MacConathj, FAwt Wybrant Smith. 

Mrci. Oboroe K. Ckozer Prize, (20.00.— For the best work in Modeling. 
Awarded to Eileen Anna Knoi. 

First mention to Adelene Helen Black, Oscar Earnest Mertx. Second men- 
tion to Ida Evelvn MacFarlane. 

Cabolihc AxtiiRD Maobb Pri-£E, $20.00. — For Original Design. Awarded 
to Anna Margaret Newbold. 

Honorable mention to Katherine French Steiger. 

Henry Perry Lelasd Prize, $25.00. — Offered by Mrs. John Harriaon tor 
the best Drawing in Pen and Ink. Awarded U- Edna W. Smith. 

Mavek Pottery Company Prizes. For Designs for Printed Table Ware : 

First Prize, $40.00— M. Louise Baker. 

Second Prize, $30.00— Jean Pritchard Prettyman. 

Prize Scholarships for School Year 1901-1902. — Awarded to H. Louise 
Baker, Bertram Sydney Chadwick, Eleanor Seymour Sogers, Edna Wybrant 
Smith, Katherine French Steiger, Isabel Aitken. 

Henry M. Taws Prize: Waler-Color Sketching Outfit. For best Water- 
Color Painting. Awarded to M. Lawrence Blumenthal. 

Honorable mention to Edwin Frank Bayha. 

Charles Ripka Company Prize : Sketching Outfit For best work in Fig- 
ure Sketch Class. Awarded to Eleanor S. Rogers. 

First mention to Theodora Phillips Buah. Second mention to Mary E. 
Clement. 

F. Weber Prize.— Drawing Table. Awarded to Leslie W. Hurray. 

Honorable mention to W. A. Lehman, J. P. Klinger, Jr. 



ub, Google 



TEXTILE SCHOOL 
Associate Committee of Women's Prizes. 

First Paizk, $10.00.— For beat executed work id Jacquard Deiigns. Third 
year. Awarded to Ellsworth Moore. 

The Euzabeth C. Roberts Prize, $10.00.— For best work in Color H&nnoD3r 
and Design. Aw&nied Co Frederick hyae Keen. 

The Miss Clyde Prize, SIO.OO.— -The beat eiecuted work in Jacquard Design. 
Second year. Awarded to Percy Taylor Phillips. 

The "Tkxtile Wokld" Golu Medal— For Thesis: "Action oE Caustic 
Soda on Wool." Awarded to Charles Earle Wasbbum. 

Honorable mention to Frederick Otto Zenke. 

New Enoi-akd Cottos Masufacti'rers' Absociatios Medal. — For Gen- 
eral Excellence. EnUre Course. Awarded to James Voorhees Pomeroj. 

Honorable mention to Ellsworth Moure, John Paul Jones. 

Dvers' Tradk Jovrhal Prize- Chemical Balance. — For results in Final 
EianiinationsandTenn Work in Chemistry. Awarded lo Frederick Otto Zenke. 

Prize SciioLARaiiiPS for School Year 1901-1902 —Awarded to Frederick 
Otto Zenke, Stephen H. Gamer. 

Wm. H. Thorpe. Evening Class. 

Honoi&ble mention to Wm. II. Stafford, Wm. H. Smith, John Kellus, Jr. 

CERTIFICATES SCHOOL OF APPLIED ART. 
Certificate B — Decorative Pajstino Asd Applied Design. — Leater 
Eugene Arment, Roy Ellinger Blithe, Viola Maude Geckeler, Rita Lindsay, 
William Bearer Mayer, Edna Williams Mohler, Miriam Emilie Nash, 
Katheiine French Sleiger, Helen Day Winchester, Cora C'layton, Solomon 
Hess, Francis Bernard McCartney, ,\nna Mar^ret Xewbold, Jean Pritchard 
Prettyman, Evelyn Gladys Straughn, Gertrude Harris Seeley, Helen Abbott 

Illtjmtration.- R Frank Jarrett, Jr., Edna Wybrant Smith, Edwin John 
Prittie, Elizabeth Yamall. 
Interior Decoration.- Louis James Taws. 

CLASS A. 
Industrial Drawino.— Isabel Aitken, Gertrude Burr Alworth, M. Louise 
Baker, Reba Baxter, Emma Clayson, Edith Myrtle Chase, Joseph Deker, Mabel 
W. Eddy, Emmeline Harris Esherick, Nellie G. Griffin, Paul Hadley, Gertrude 
Grace Hark, Sarah Roberts Halter, Anna Bruce Henderson, Ella Lake Hartley, 
Jean Latimer Hoopes, Edwin Francis Hill, Irene M. Huber, Julia Florence 
Knoffiock, W. Irving Knowles, Fannie E. Lloyd, Elgie Miller, Francis B. Mc- 
Cartney, Clara Bell Mitchell, Bertha N. Xagle, L Louis Phelps, Irene S. Rob- 
erts, John P. Ryan, Irene Mildred Rogers, Charles R. Sheeler, Jr., Katherine 
French Steiger, Evelyn Gladys StrauRhn, Grace Lillian Urban, John Williams, 
Esther Elizabeth Wolle, Edith E. Wirt, 



oy Google 



ED TO THE Museum ev Mh. and Mbs. John I- 
Draicn by Mary F. GoodfelloK, a papil of the Si-Jiool. 



oy Google 



44 

Inddstrial Dbawihci. — Teacbess' Course. ~— Isabel Aitkea, Maty Floyd 
GoodtelloiT, B. Frank JarreCt, Jr., Ida EveljD Mactarlane, Eleanor Seymour 
Rogen, Edith Myrtle Chase, Ella Lake Hartley, Elsie Gray Miller, Sue Price 
Paiton, Hay Auna Stevenson. 

Elemshtarv Teachbb's Certificate. — Alice B. Bagotsky. 

TEXTILE SCHOOL. 

Second Year Da; Class : 

Robert Jam«a Carson, Thomas Alexis Masterton, Frederick Otto Zenke, Leon 
Oarfield Meyer, Charles Louis Ross, William Herbert Stafford, Robert Barker 
Easton, William Henry Smith, SUyden Frank Klrksey, Jr., Percy Taylor Phil- 
lips, Clarence Bernard Seal. 

First Year Regntar Day Class : 

Nathan Monroe Bachman, Howard Erneat Greene, Frank William Holmann, 
Benjamin Herr Jenkins, Frederick Lyne Keen, William Joseph Maurer, 
Arthar Clarence Stifel, CliSord Jevett Swift, John Theodore Winkhans, 
Harry Etanisden Broughton, Stephen Holla Gamer, Jamsa Phillips Hooper, 
John Kellars, Jr., Alfred Stanley Lucas, Herbert Wright Spalding, Harr; 
Taylor. 

Second Year Wool Class — Day ; 

Abraham Rosecrans Baldwin, Fred Malcolm Sykes, Harold Wilder Perkins, 
Herman Dakar Werner. 

Second Year Cotton Class— Day : 

Albert Turner Clifton, George Huguley Lanier, George Marion Duval. 

Day Chemistry and Dyeing Class : 

Morley Hey Carpenter, Charles Earle Washburn, .Albert Behm, William John 
Montgomery, Yasujiro Y'nmaji. 

Third Year Regular Evening Class : 

Charles H. Carpenter, W. Derham, Henry Kaufman, J. Warden Noble, Fred- 
erick C. Simpson, William F. Wattins, John N. Nolan, Alfred J, Gordon, 
William J. Lateh, W. J. Simpson, Isaac Y. Tracy, David E. Witen, Reuben 
Morris Leonard. 

Third Year Evening Chemistry Class : 

Louis P. ScboUer. 

One Year Ingrain Course— Day ; 

Frank Edwin Southrey. 

Thirty-three appointmeqts to StateScholarships have been made this year, vii.: 
from Adams, Allegheny, Bedford, Berks, Blair, Bradford, Butler, Cheater, Clar- 
ion, Clearfield, Clinton, Dauphin, Elk, Erie, Huntingdon, Jefferson, Lebanon, 
McKean, Mercer, Montour, Perry, Potter, Snyder, Union, Washington, Wyo- 
ming, York, and four from Philadelphia, and tno from Schuylkill. 

Seventy-nine holders of these scholarships are at present registered in the 
School. 

The scholarships placed at the disposal of the Board of Public Education for 
the Grammar Schools of the cily were filled, as usual, by a competitive exami- 



oy Google 



45 



nation, cotxlucted by (he Principal, each UraDininr School Priacipal being 
authoriied to itend candidatea. 

tn addition to the above, appointments were made as usual to the scholarabip* 
which are annually filled rrom the High, Manual Training and Public Indut- 
trial Art schoola of thb cily. 



Appended are lists of students showin); their previous occupa- 
tions and the localities from which they come : 

Architects, .... 
Artist*. 

Bearaers, .... 
Bookkeepers and Stenographer 

Oerks, 

Carvers and Modelem, . 
Carpenters and Builders, 

Clergyman 

Dentists, .... 
Designers, .... 
Dyers and Finishers, 
Draugblsmen, 

Dressmaker, .... 
DecoraloTB, .... 
Embalmer, .... 
Engravers, .... 

Eppneera 

Foremen, .... 
Grocen, .... 

Hatter 

Housekeeper, 

Illustrators, .... 



Jeweler, 

Jjiborem, 

LoomfiierH, 

Lithographers and Printers, 

.Maker-up, , 

Manolaclurers, , 

Merchants, . 

Machinists, . 

Psintem and Paperhangers, 

I'bysifians, . 

Photographers, . 

Reporters, . 

Students, 

Spinners, 

Superintendents, 

Teachers, 

Tailors, 

Weavers, 
Miscellaneous, . 



LOCAUTIES REPRESENTED. 

Pbiladelphia, 768 

Pennsylrania, 107 

New Jersey, 32 

New York, 16 

Massachusetts 12 

Rhode Island, 9 

Georgia, 6 

Connecticut, 5 

Maryland, 4 

Delaware, 4 

Virginia 4 



oy Google 



North Carolina, . 




. 3 


Ohio 






























Texas 








































England, , 1 


Japan, 1 




1001 
L. W. MILLER, 

Prineipal of tie School. 



Di.itradb, Google 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 

(For Yenr Ending Mb^ 31, 1901.) 

Balance on hand June 1,1004) 

Tnition Fees, An School, 17,27150 

" " Teitile School 13,384 83 

" " language Class, 162 00 

Income of Endowment Fund, 4,237 50 

" " Temple Fond, 2,437 92 

" " Chapman ttiddle Fund, .... 50 00 

" " Clayton French Fund, .... 50 00 

" " F. A. OrtttFund 20 00 

" " Mfa. O. K. Croier Fund 87 50 

" Mrs. W. WdRhlman, Jr., Fund, . . M) 00 

Donations— He*t and Light, 400 00 

Interest on Depo«ite, IM 92 

Appropriation, City ot Philadelphin, 10,000 00 

" State of Pennsylvania, 17,500 00 

" Park Commission, .... 9,521 55 

Annual Members, 1,015 00 

Park Guides and Photos, 64 00 

Ofiertory Boxes at Museum 108 78 

Donations, Special Plale Fund, .... 50 67 

L. W. Miller, sdvance repaid, 200 00 

New Century School Fund, 720 00 

Temporary Loans, 23,500 00 

John T. Morris, advance for purcbaiiing objects from 

Paris Exposition, S, 1 20 S3 

Temple Fund Investment, Bonds paid off, . . 16,500 00 

Donation to Textile Department, .... 109 00 



DONATIONS. 



John Slory Jenka, for caseH, 
ManufactnreTfl' Association, 
Mrs. Strong's Lecture, 
Associate Conimitlee of Women, 
A Friend, for Museum Library, 
University Extension Counte, . 
A Friend, 



Totals, $115,223 06 

Digilizeo by Google 



48 

EXPENDITURES. 

MalDtenance of Museum, 112,532 37 

Temple Fuud Museum Purchue 2,746 25 

School BuitdiD(j Wages and Expen«eB, 4,663 (54 

Repairs and Allerationit, 1,946 94 

AdrertUing, 791 73 

Art School Salaries and Wages, , . r , 9,357 56 

" Eipenees, 498 81 

" " Kquipmenis, 177 50 

Textile School Salsries and Wages, .... 15,230 87 

" " Eipenses. 1,288 68 

" " Equipments, 637 64 

Administration Salaries ind Wages, .... 8,360 00 

" Equipmenls, 36 35 

Language Class, Salaries, 650 00 

Special Plate Fund 196 50 

Gas Account, 734 95 

Coal Account, 1,9.58 03 

Iruunnce, 2,832 95 

Interest, 19,983 15 

General Expenses 2,402 86 

Library, 10 60 

L. W. Miller, Advance, 200 00 

1336 Spring Garden Investment, .... 136 SO 

F. Graff Fnnd. Prices, 40 OO 

Mrs. G. K. CroMf Fund. Priies, .... 90 00 

Temple Fund, Purchases of Bonds, .... 16,965 00 

Temporary Loan, 3,500 00 

Museum Library Fund, 26 OO 

Totals, JI07,974 6 



June 1, 1901, Balance 17,248 3 

BALANCE SHEET, MAY 31, 1901. 

Dr. CV. 

12 Cash, $7,248 38 

28 Temporary Loan $20,000 

47 Office Furniture 729 61 

51 School " 1,500 00 

66 Show Cases, 15,935 37 

fi6 Library 2,700 45 

71 Engravings and Photos 1,187 92 

75 Csrvings, Ivory and Bone, .... 7(i9 41 

79 Mosucs, 300 00 

83 Leather Work, 10 00 

91 Woodwork, 4,252 56 



oy Google 



49 



15 Jewelry and Uoldnmilhs' Work, ... 312 96 

19 Bitversmith Work and Plate 6,742 26 

13 Metal Work 6,217 49 

1 Metal and Plaster Casts 3,448 99 

6 Arms and Armor, 1,7U8 79 

9 CoiiM and Medals, 180 00 

:3 EDtuueU on Metal, 2,014 88 

7 Pottery 6,627 83 

;i Porcelain . 2,893 94 

16 Jointed and Stained UIbm, .... 109 26 

19 QlaaaVewek, 062 82 

il ScalptDTO in Marble, Stone, etc., . 1,820 23 

13 Textile Fabrics and Embroideries, . 6,0S7 M 
i6 Musical Initrnments, 44 94 

17 Lace, 1,190 20 

.9 Oil Paintings, 100 80 

i] Museum Fund Library; 

>3 0flertoi7 Account, 

4 Special Plate FuDd, 

>6 J. T. Morris, Advance for pnrchaw of objects 

at Paris Expoeition, 

6 No. 1336 Spring Garden Inveitment, 

7 Mortgage. 1136 Spring Garden St, 
A Donations for Purchase Broad and Pine Streets, 
17 Temple Fund Museum Purchase Account, 

:2 Profit and Loss 99,793 44 

19 Temple Fnnd Invettment, 64,095 69 

:3 Endowment Fnnd Investment, .... 89,947 60 

14 Endowment Fund 81,906 81 

fi Temple Fund, 53,379 OO 

1 Life Members, 14,990 00 

8 Donation? 62,697 20 

3 W. Weightman, Jr., Scholarship, . . 1,000 00- 

4 Wm. Weightman, Jr., Investment, ... 982 60 

■6 F. GrafI Prize Fund, 500 00 

'6 F. OralT Prize Fund Investment, ... 5U0 00 

7 Centennial Board of Finance 3 12 

9 Beal Estate, Broad and Pine Streets, . . 650,778 99 

i7 Hortgagefl on Broad and Pine Streets, . . 417,000 00' 

2 Chapman Biddle Fund 1,000 00 

2 Chapman Biddle Fund Investment, . . . 1,000 00 
13 Clayton French Fund, 

3 CLsylon French Fund Inveatmenl, . 1,000 00 

4 Mrs. G. K. Crozer Priie Fund 

4 Mrs. Q. K. Crozer Prize Fund Investment, . 1,600 00 

4 MiB. O. K. Crozer Prize Kund Income, 



$74 00 
731 94 
41 92 



22,000 00 

206,171 28 

3,940 69 



1,000 00 

1,600 00 

50 OO 



$890,106 49 $890,106 49 

Digilizeo by Google 



REPORT OF THE ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF 

WOMEN. 

As President of the Associate Committee of Women, I am 
happy to report that I received, during the season of 1900-1901, 
two donations, which were given me to be need for what were, in 
my opinion, the hest interests of the School. 



Total, $1200 00 

Having been spoken to repeatedly by teachers and scholars of 
the lack of light in the Drawing Room of the Textile School, and 
finding that this evil must be remedied as soon as possible, I had 
an estimate made, and found the cost would be 8175.00, This 
work was done at once, and I have had the pleasure to receive 
from the teachers their most grateful thanks to those who gave me 
the power to make the change. 

I have now in my hands one thousand and twenty-five dollars, 
and hope that I shall have the satisfaction to contribute the larger 
part; to the necessary changes in our Dyeing Department. 

E. D. GILLESPIE, 

PrmderU. 

Another year of work has closed for the Associate Committee of 
Women, and it is pleasant to note that the Committee generally 
has shown itself more than usually interested in the work of the 
Institution, and in raising necessary funds for the same. When 
the zeal of any of us has ianguisiied, it has only been necessary 
to rekindle our enthusiiism by coming in close contact with our 
President, whose ardor never flags. 

The monthly meetings have been held regularly, and have been 
in the main well attended. Miss McMurtrie, the Treasurer, has 
reported as follows: 



Digilzed by Google 



51 

Balance from lut MCODDt, 10 SO 

From fines duriog winter, . . 21 50 

From cath tor Potter Prite Z-^ 00 

Tnnsferred from Bailding Acoouot— 

Mn. Thomu BoberU' donation 100 00 

tl47 10 
KipmiUlura- 

Fanenl Wreath for one of (he teuherg, . . $5 00 

For Priua, 50 00 

66 00 

1^2 16 

We have had two intereating lectures delivered during the 
winter, the proceedx of which were given to the School. We heard 
of Samoa from Mrs. laobel Strong, and were made to realize moet 
vividly what a bright spirit had passed away when Ixniis Steven- 
son was called upon to go up higher. 

A second Lecture was most kindly given by Mr. Jones Wister 
on Kgypt, and was most thoroughly appreciated by the large 
audience. 

At the invitation of Mrs. Gillepsie, Mrs. Sarah W. Whitman, of 
Boston, the well-known authority on House Decoration, consented 
to give a Lecture on Interior Decorations before the Students of 
the School, This " talk," coming from auch a source, waa greatly 
enjoyed by all prest-nt. As an acknowledgment of Mrs. Whit- 
man's courtesy, a Reception, to follow the Lecture, had been 
arranged ; hut the invitations were recalled on account of the 
death of Mr. Dalton Dorr. 

The Recreation and Lunch room of the Students' Club has, 
under the unceasing care and labor of its projectors, Mrs. Frank 
Hippie and Miss Leach, been much used and appreciated by the 
Students. The Gymnasium haa been well filled up; and that and 
the Shuffle Board, which has lately been put in position, have 
helped many young people to an evening of innocent pleasure, 
and we hope have kept some from succumbing to the temptations 
which must come to every youth without home tics in a great city 
such as this is. The newest feature of the Recreation room haa 
been the afternoon Tea held there once in two weeks, when the 
pupils of both sexes meet for an hour's chat and social intercourse, 
at which times one of the. Committee having this work in charge 
16 always present. On May 10th the Students gave a Subscription 



oy Google 



Dance, which proved a pleasant occasion. The Lunch room has 
been so arranged that any of the Students can there prepare a 
simple luncheon, and eat it in comfort. 

Ab the School of Industrial Art each year increases in numbers 
(at this date, 1901, the number of Students has reached 1000), the 
necessity for, and advantages of, this Students' Club will increase, 
and we hope will be of immenee good in holding the young people 
of the Institution to a healthy physical and moral life. 

The Committee in charge would, I feel sure, like to enlist the in- 
terest of every woman in Philadelphia in their work. 

These are the main points of the work which has been under- 
taken by the Associate Committee of Women, For these, and, 
most of all, to aid the School financially, the women have worked 
faithfully and harmoniously; and in this work they appeal once 
more to the generosity of Philadelphia to support them. 
Respectfully submitted. 

A. L. DALLAM, 

Secretai-y. 

June 3, 1901. 



REPORT OF STUDENTS' CLUB FUND. 

June 1, 1900, balance on hand, {24 20 

Februaiy, 1901, Bubecriptions, 593 00 

March, 1901, proceeds from Lecture given by Mr. Jones WtBter, . 104 00 
Maj, 1901, received from Students net proceeds of sale of tickets to 

8 00 



f72- 20 

June, 1901, bills paid to date, . 670 29 

( Including (75.00 for Shuffle Boards, upon the 
suggestion of Mr. Wister. ) 

Balance, $66 91 

Regpeclfully submitted. 

SABAH L. HIPPLE, 
JcNE 10, 1901. Chairman. 



Digilzed by Google 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



list of patrons, life members, 
Annual and Honorary Members. 



Persoiu who ma; wish to become memben are invited to send their names and 
addresnes to the Secretary. Blank tonna o( Devise and Bequest will be found 
upon page 60. A check to the order of the Treaaorer will be promptly ac- 
knowledged. 

Patrons, Donors of Five Thousand Dollars and upward, 

whether in money or objects for the Museum. 
Life Membership, . . . One Hundred Dollars. 

Annual Membership, . . A subscription of not less than Five Dollara. 
Honorary Membership, . Those who, on account of their interest in In- 
dustrial .Art Education or thePMne Arts, shall 
be deemed worthy of election, 
"All funds received from Patrons I unless otherwise speciBcally given) and 
from Life Membership shall be permanently invested as part of the Endowment 
Fund. " — Sy-Laas. 



"Baird, John 
'Barton, Mrs. Susan R. 
*BlDom Geld -Moore, Mrs. 
•Chiids, George W. 

Disston, Henry 4 Sons 
*Dreiel, A. J. 
•Drexel, F. A. 

Garrett, W. E., Jr. 
•Gibson, Henry C. 



PATRONa 

•Houston, H. H. 
Lea, Henry C. 
Morris, John T. 
Search, Theodore C. 

"Scott, Mrs. Thomas A. 
Weightman, William 
Weightman, Mrs. Wm., 
Whitney, A. & Sons. 



Digilzed by Google 



LIFE MEMBEBS. 



Allen, Joseph 

Allen, Joseph, Jr. 
•Arnold, Crawford 

Bfteder, Adamson Sc Co. 

Bail;, Joel J. 

Baird, Mrs. Matthew 
•Baker, John E. 
•Baker, W. S, 

Barclay, E. D. 

Barclay, Mrs. R, D. 
•Banol, B. H, 

Bartol, H. W. 

fiaugh, Daniel 
•Bickley, H. W. 

Biddle, Aleisnder 

Biddle, Miaa A. E. 
•Biddle, Cbapman 
•Kddle, Mrs. Chapman 
•Biddle, Clement 
•Biddle, Walter L. C. 

filanchard, Miss A. 

Blanchard, Miss H. 

Blanchard, Miss M. 
•Borie. a & H. 

Bowen & Foi 
•Brown, Alexander 

Bum ham, George 

Bnmham, Parry, Williams & Co. 

Butcher, Henry C 

Buteher. Mre. H. C. 

Button, Coayeis 
•Caldwell, J. E. 

Caldwell, J. E. & Co. 

Campbell, Mrs. St. (leorge T. 
•Carter, W. T. 

Carver, W. Burton 

Cassatt, A. J. 

Utherwood, H. W. 

Chapman, Joseph 
•Chew, Samuel 
•Claghom, James L. 

Claghom, J. Raymond 

Clark, Charles D. 



Clark, Clarence H. 
•Clark, Ephraim 

Clark, E. W. 
•Clark, J. Hinckley 

Clayton, John 
•Clyde, Thomas 
•Coates, Benjamin 

Coat«s, Edward H. 

Cochtan, M. 

Cochran, Thomas 

Coffin, Altemus & Co. 

Coleman, B. Dawson 
•Coleman, Mrs. O. Dawson 

Coleman, Edward P. 

Coles, Miss Mary 

Colket, C Howard 

Collins, H. H. 

Cooper, John H. 
•Cope. Caleb 

Cornelius & Sons 
•Cresson, W. P. 

Croier, George K. 
•Croier, Mrs. George K, 
•Croier, J. Lewis 
•Cuyler, Mrs. Theodore 

Dick, Mrs. F. A. 
•Disston. Albert H. 
•Diaston, Hamilton 

Disston, Mrs. H. C. 
•Dobbins, E. J. 

Dobson, Jolin & James 

Dotan, Thomas 

Dolan, Thomas & Co. 

Dougherty, Jamea 

Dreer, F. J. 

Duhring, Mrs. Henry 

Bddystone ManuFacturing Co. 

Faries, Mrs. Randolph 
•Fenimore, Edward L. 

Fox, Miss Mary D. 
•Fuguet, Stephen O. 

Garrett, Miss E. 

Qarrett, Miss J. 



Digilzed by Google 



Oairett, P. C. 

Gsirett, Mn. Wallet 

Gilson, Miss R 
•Gowcn, Fnnklia B, 
•Grtff, Frederic 
•Graff, Mrs. Frederic 

Green, Stephen 

Hagstoi & Thorpe 

Harrison, A. C. 

Harrison, Havenieyer & Co. 

HarriaoQ, Mrs. JoKeph 

Harriaon, Thoiuu S. 
'Hart, Samuel 
•Heberton, ti. <'r»ig 

Hill, (ieonte W. 
•Hoeklev, Migs Annie E. 

Hockley. Miss Mar? 
*HockLey, Thomas 

Hockley, Aim. Thomas 
•Hockley, William Stevenson 
■Horstmann, F. O. 

HolBtniann, W. H. & Sons 

Houston, Mrs. H. H. 
•Hughes, J. O. 

Hunler, James & John 

lungerich & Smith 
•James, John O. 

Jsyne, David & Sons 
•Jones, Jacob 

Jones, Washingun 

Justice, Batemao A Co. 
•Justice, Miss Cecilia 

Justice, William W. 

Justice, Mn. William W. 

tOemm, Mrs. Maria L. 
•Knight, Edirard C. 
•Lea, Isaac 

Lee, Mrs. I«ighton 
•Lewis. Edwin M. 
•Lewis, Henry 

Lewis, Richard A. 

Little, Amos B. 

Little, Amos R. & Co. 
"Lovering, Joseph 8. 

Lovering, Joseph S., Jr. 



55 

McNeelv, Mis* Florence 

McN'eely, Robert K. 

McXeely, Mrs. RobeH K. 

MacVeagh, Wayne 
*Mu»ey, William 

May, Mrs. Joseph 

Meirs, Mrs. R. Wain 
•Merrick, Mitt E. IL 

Merrick, J. Vaughan 
•Merrick, Misx L. W. 
•Merrick, M™. S. V. 

Merrick, William H. 

Miles, Mrs. M. L. 

.Miles, Thomas 

Milne, David 
•Mil liken, James 
•Moore, James 
•Morris, 1*. Pemberton 
•Morris, Wistar 

Murphy, Frank W. 

Murphy, Miss Helen L. 
•Newbold, Charles 
•Newbold, John a 

Newbold, Mrs. John S. 
•Noblit, Dell 

Norris, Charles 

Norris, Isaac, M.D. 
•Page, Joseph F. 
•Patterson, Joseph 
'Pepper, George S. 
•Pepper, I.Awrence S. 
•Pepper, William, M.D. 

Pepper, William Ptatt 
•Phillips, Henry M. 
•Phillips, Mora 

Piatt, Charles 
■PlatI, Franklin 

Porter & Coatee 
•Poultney, Charles W. 
•Powers, Mrs. Thomas H. 

Price, Eli K., Jr. 

Provident Life and Trust Co. 
•Randolph, Evsji 

Randolph & Jenks 
•Rhoads, Miss Elizabeth 



oy Google 



Roberta, Charles 
"Roberts, Jscob, M.D. 
•Rogers, C H. 
'RogeiB, Fairman 
"Rogers, W. D. 

Santee, Charles 

Scott, James P. 
•Scott, Mrs. James P. 

Scull, D. & Co. 
•Seibert, Henry 

Sellers, Coleman 
•Sbarpless, Charles S. 
•Sbelton, Carlos 

Shelton, F. H. 

Shelton, Frederic R. 
•Shelton, Mrs. F. R. 
•Sherman, Roger 

Shortridge, N. Parker 

Smith, Charles E. 
•Smith, Thomas 

SmTth, Lin d ley 

Solma, S. J. 

Sommerville, Maxwell 
•Spencer, Charles 
•Steele, Edward T. 

Steele, E. T. 4 Co. 

Stevenson, Mrs. Comeliu 

Stniwbridge, J. C. 



Sweatman, V. C. 

Taitt, Mrs. C. G. 
•Temple, Joseph E. 

Thomas, S. Harvey 

Thropp, Mrs. Joseph E. 

Townsend, Mrs. H. C 

Tyler, Geoi^e F. 
»Vaui, William S. 
•Vollmer, Gottlieb 

Wagner, Samuel 
•Wagner, Mrs. T. 

Warden, W. G. 
•Warner, Redwood F. 
•Welsh, Samuel 

Wemwag, Theodore 
' Wharton, Joseph 
•Wheeler, Charles 

Whitall, Tatum & Co. 
•White, Samuel S. 
•Williams, Edward H. 

Wiater, Mrs. Jones 

Wood, Stuart 

Wood, William A Co. 

Wright, Edward N. 
•Wright, James A. 
•Wright, John W. 

Wurti, Charles Stewart, M.D. 



.Digilzed by Google 



Annual Members (for 1900-1901) who have subscribed not less 
than ten dollars. 



AuUiD, Mrs. S. U., . . 
Bement, Clarence S., - - 
Biddle, Cadvallader, . 
Snider, Joseph H., . . 
Borie, Mrs. Uenry, 
Brown, Miss Martha M., 
Brovn, T. Wiatar, . . . 
Bumham, Mr». WillUiD, 
Cadvalader, Mrs. Jobn, 
Caldwell, J. E. A Co., 
Costner, Samuel, . . . 
Chandler, T. P., Jr., . 
Clark, Mlaa France*, ■ 
Cochran, TravJH, . . . 
Cochran, Mrti. Travis, 
Coles, Edward, • . . 
Converse, John H., . 
Cbxe, Alexander B., . 
Cramp, Henry W. , . . 
Croier, MiaaAdaM., , 
Dale, Ricliard C, . . 
Dallaui, MtB. D. K., . 
DenniMon, Mrs, E. E., 
Dickson, Snmael, - - 
Elkina, William L, . 
I^llison, Mrs. Rodman 1 
Felton, Mrs. Samuel M 
Galloway, William, . 
Oillespie, Mrs. E. D^ 
Gillingham, JoKph E., 
Gowen, Mrs. Francis I., 
Oralf, Mies Henrietta, 
Gratz, Miss Elizabeth, 
Guilloii, Victor, . . . 
Hamilton, W. C, ■ . . 
Hance Brothers & White, 
Harris, Mrs. J. Campbell, 
Harrison, Mrs. Joseph, 
Hippie, Frank K., . . 
Hippie, Mrs. Frank K., 
Hutchinson, Miss, , . 
Hunter, T. Comly. . . 
Jack, Dr. Loiiia, . . . 
Janney, Mrs Robert M, 
Jayne, Mrs. David, . 
Jaytie, Dr. Horace, . 
Jenks, Mrs. William F. 
Keen, Dr. W. W., . . 
Keith, Sidney W., . . 
Kennedy, Mrs. Elias D., 



(10 00 
10 00 
10 ou 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 IHI 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 Ou 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 

10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
II) 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 

10 no 

10 00 
10 00 
10 00 



Knowlton, G. H., .... 
Leach, Misa Mary Athertoo, 
Lewis, Edward, . . . 
I.«wis, Enoch, ..... 
Uwis, Dr. F. W., . . 
Lewis, Robert M., . 
Lippincott, Mrs. Craigc. 
Lippincott, Mrs. Hoiaee G. 
IJppincott, Mrs. Joshua, . 
LoverinK, Mrs. Joseph S,, 
Magee, Miss Anna, . . 
Magee, Mies EMta J., 
Magee, Miss Fannie S., . 
Magee, Horace, . . . 
Muulton, Mr«. Byron P., 
McMurtrie, Miss Ellen, 
Neall, Frank L, . , , - 
Newhall, George M., . . 
Ogden, Mre. Mm. H., . 
Paul. Dr. James W., . . 
Paul. Miss M. W., . , , 
Pepper, David, .... 
Randolph. Mri, Evan, . 
Keilly, Mrs. T. A., . . 
Ritchie, Craig D., . . . 
Roberts, Miss E. C, . . 
Roberts, Miss K. \., . . 
Roberts, Mrs. George B., 
liol)ert8, Mrs. Thomas, . 
Rodman, Mrs. Lewis. . . 
Rosengarteu, J. G., . . 
Rowland, Mrs. Benjamin, 
Sanders, Anne N., . . . 
Sliober, Mrs. Samuel L., 
Sinnott, Mrs. Joseph F., 
Smith, Miss Christiana B 
Smith. Edward Brinton, 
Smyth, Mrs. Samuel, . . 
Thomson, Mrs. J. Edgar, 
Townsend, Henry C, . . 
Weightman, Mrs. John Farr, 
Welsh. John Lowtier, 
Welsh, Mrs. John Lowbei 
Weygandt, C. N., . . . 
Wheeler, Mrs. Charles, . 
Williams, Mrs. Francis H, 
Wister, Mrs. Caspar, . 
Wood, Miss Juliana, . 
Wright, Mrs. Robert K. 



<10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 



10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
15 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 



OMzcdoyGoOgle 



Annual Members (1900-1901) who have subscribed not leee than 
five dollars. 



Aiman A Harper, .... 
Ashhurst, Ricbaid L., 


turn 


6 00 


ABhhurat, Mrs. Richard L, 


5 00 


Banol, Mrs. C. Cheynev, . 


o 00 


Bergner, C. W., ..... 
Bergner, Mt8. 0. Willtam, 


5 00 


5 00 


Bergner, Miss Catharine, . 


5 00 


Bigelow, Mre. S. Lsirrence, 
Carter, Mrs. William T., . 


5 00 


6 00 


Clark, MisB Amle Hamptor 


, 5 00 


Clark, Mra. C. Howard, . 


.1 00 


Colket,G. H., 


5 00 


ColtoD, S. W.,Jr., .... 


6 00 


Corlies, MiR8 Margaret L., 
Creaswell, Misa Elliabeth P 


5 00 


. 5 00 


CurUn, Mrs. Roland G., . 


5 00 


Dana, Charles E., . . . . 


5 00 


Dana,MrB. Charles E., . . 


5 00 


Dbt, Frank Miles. . . . 


5 00 


De' Haven, Mra. Holstein, 


h 00 


Diseel, Charles, 


5 00 


Daane, Russell, .... 


5 00 


Geet, Mrs. William P., . . 


■S 00 


Grant, Mrs. W. S., Jr., . 


.=. 00 




5 00 


HarrlBon, Mra. John, . . . 


5 00 



Harrison, Mu8 Mauds.,. 
Howell, Charles H., . . 
Howell, Mrs. Charles H., 
Jastrow, Mn. Morris, . 
Kennanl, Mn*. Fred. K., 
McFadden, Sirs- George, 
Murwitz, Joseph, Jr., 
Newlin, Mm. Richard M., 
Norri», Miss Clara Genevra, 
Norton, Mrs. Charles D,, 
Pearsall, Robert, . . . 
Pepper, Mrs. John W., . 

Pelers, Mrs., 

Randolph, Miss Anna, . 
Revbum, Mra. W. S., . 

Snfler, John, 

Simpson, Mra. William, 
Siter, Mra. E. Hollingswo 
Walker, Mro. R. J. C, 
Weigbtman, Miss Bertha, 
Winpennj, Mrs. J. Bolton 
Wirgnian, Mrs. Cbartes, 
Wisler, Mrs. Jones, . . 
Wrieht, Mra. Joseph, . 
Zell, Miss H. A., . . . 



»5 00 
5 00 

5 00 

6 GO 
5 OO 
5 OO 
5 00 
5 00 
.5 00 
5 00 
5 00 

5 00 

6 00 
6 OO 
5 OO 
5 00 

5 00 
, 5 00 

6 OO 
5 00 

5 00 

6 00 
S 00 
5 00 
5 00 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

Atwood, Eugene, Atvood Machine Co., Stonington, Conn. 

Berry, A. Hun, Boston, Mass. 

Boyd, James, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brown, Edwin, American Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Burnham, Charles C, Easton & Bumham (Stock Company), Pawtucket, R. I. 

Bamham, George W., Easlon & Burnham (Stock Company), Pawtucket, R. I. 

Campbell, Malcolm, Woonsocket Machine and Press Co., Woonsocket, R. L 

Cochmn, J. C, Charlottesville Manufacturing Co., Charlottesville, Va. 

Corains, Frank R, Aerophore Air- Moistening &■ Ventilating Co., Providence, 

R. I. 
Crompton, Charles, Crompton Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Denny, Charles A., .American Card Clothing Co., Worceater, Mass. 
Draper, Geo. A., Hopedale, Mass, 

Easton, Frederic W., Easlon & Bumham, Pawtucket, R. I. 
Easton, Nicholas H., Easton & Burnham, Pawtucket, R. I. 
Fales, Le Roy, Fales & Jeuks Machine Co. , Pawtucket, R, I. 
Firth, William, American Drosopbore Co., Boston, Mass. 
Fleteber, George A., Schaum iUhllnger (Flelcher Works), Philadelphia, Pa. 
Furbush, Merrill A., M. A. Furbosh & Son Machine Co., PliiUdelphia, P%. 



Digilzed by Google 



59 

Orice, Edwin C, M. A. Piirbush A Soa Mschine (>>., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Grianell, Frederic, Aeropliore Air^MoUtening A Ventilating Co., PiovideDCe, 

B. I. 
Hate, F. J., Pette« Machine Works, Xewton I'pper FatU, Mnaa. 
Hartwell, F. W., Aeniphore Air- Moistening & Veotilating Co, Providence, 

R I. 
Hopkins. William S., Wounsocket Machine A Prau Co., Woonsocket, R. I. 
Hntehins, C. H., Knowlw Loom Worki, Worcester, Man. 
Hutchina, G. F., Knowlei Loom Works, Worcester, Man. 
Jenks, Alvin F., Falea A Jenki Machine Co., Pavtucket, B. L 
Jenks, Stephen A., Fales A Jenks Machine Co. , Pawtncket, R. L 
Knowles, F. P., Knoirlee Lo*>m Works, Woraester, Maw. 
Knowhoo, Charles H., M. A. Furbiish A Son Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lasell, C W., Whitin Machine Work*, Whilinsville, Mast 
Lasell, J. M., Whitin Machine Works, Whitinaville, Mass. 
Ma/nard, Lorenzo, Maynard, Mans. 

Merriam, H, H., Knowlea Ijooia Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Murdock, Joseph, American Card Clothinx Co., Wiirpcster, Mass. 
Nevina, David, Pettee Machine Works, Newton Upper Falls, Mass. 
Bometsch, W. H. , Schaiim & Uhliofier ( Fletcher Works ), Philadelphia, Pa. 
Knssell, J. M., Knowles Loom Works, Worcetier, Mass. 
Sargent, C 0., Qraniteville, Mass. 

Schanm, Otto W., Schaura & Uhlinger (Fletcher Works), Philadelphia, Pa. 
Smith, Ohwter E, Woonsocket Machine & Press Co., Woonsocket, R I. 
Smith, SUnlejG., Woonsocket Machine & Press Co., Woonsocket, R L 
Snelling, R P., Petleo Machine Works, Newton Upper Falls, Mass. 
Taft, C. A., Whitin Machine Works, Whitinsville, Mass. 
Taft, W. L., Whitin Machine Co., Whitinsville, Ma><s. 
White, H. Arthnr, American Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Mass. 
Ware, Justin A., Crompton I»om Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Whitin, G. M., Whitin Machine Works, Whitinsville, Mass. 
Wjman, Hoiace, Crompton Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 



Di.itradb, Google 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



I give and bequeath unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School 

of Industrial Art the sum of. ., 

dollars, for the use of the said Corporation. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE. 



I give and devise unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School of 
Industrial Art, its successors and assigns, all that certain [_here insert a 
description of the property] for the use of the said Corporation, 



Digiized by Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



•j'/i*/ 
THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM (^s; 

AND 

SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. ?!» 



THE TWENTY-SIXTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 

OF ^Ht 

TRUSTEES 

LIST OF MEMBERS 

For the Year ending May 31, 1902. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
1902. 



Digilzed by Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



itiadb, Google 



M 



J, Google 



THE TWENTY-SIXTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 
TRUSTEES 

LIST OF MEMBERS 

For the Year ending May 31, 1902. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA, 



Digilzed by Google 



OFFICERS FOR 1902— 1903. 



THbX)DORE C. SEARCH. 



aONORARV vice- P RES] PEST, 

WILLIAM WEIGHTMAN. 



WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER, JOHN T. MORRIS. 



GEOROE H. CLIFF. EDWIN ATLEE BARBER. 



WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER. 



JAMES L. ALLAN, 

£36 Dreiel Building. 



Digilzed by Google 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



EX-OFPICIIS. 

The Governor op the State, The M*yob of the City. 

BY APPOINTMENT. 

BvBON P. Moui.TON, Af^inifd by tiit Stale SenaU. 

Harbinoton Fitzoerau^, AppmnUd by thu Hovm of Repramiativa. 

CaABLBS H. Harding, Appointed by Sdtct Cmndl. 

MeBRiLL a. FvBBUaH, Appoinltd by Qnamon Oauneit. 

Samuel Gdstise TnoicPSOf, Appointed by the Ommittiona-t of Fairmoitnl Park. 

ELECTED BY THE MEMBERS. 

To serve for three yean. 

Richard RocsMARai.EB, Thomas Dolan, 

William Platt Pepper, C N. Weyoandt, 

Charles E. Daha. 

To lerce for hco years. 

John T. Morris, Theodore C. Search, 

Stuart Wood, John Story Jehks, 

John H, Converse. 



Wilj,iak Wood, 
Oeokob W, Elkins, 

Qeorok H. Cliff. 



Digilzed by Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



(For tlialr &*port im p 



MRS. RICHARD PETERa 



MRS. DAVID ENGLISH DALLAM. 



MISS ELLEN McMURTRIE. 



Mbs. C C. Bartol, 


Mrs. Robert M. Jankbt, 


Mrs. C. William EERauER, 


Mas. Morris Jabtrow, 


Miss Anna Blakchabd, 


Mrs. J. L. Ketterlinds, 


Mrs. Rudolph Blankbnburu, 


Misa M. Athertok Leach, 


Mrs. William T. Carter, 


Mrs. Craioe Lippincott, 


Miss Ma aoARBT Clyde, 


Miss Fannie S. Maoee, 


Miss Maroabet L. Coblii«, 


Misa Helen L. Murphy, 


Miss Ada M. Crozer, 


Mrs. Daniel S. Newhali, 


Mks. Edw. p. Davis, 


Mbs. T. a. Reillt, 


Mbs. Wm. L. Elkins. 


Mrs. Thomas Roberts, 


Mbg. Rodhan B. Ellison-, 


Mtss ELizABtn'H C. Roberts, 


Mrs. J. C, W. Frishmlth, 


Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott, 


Mrs. Wm. D. Frishmcth, 


Mrs. Joiis B. SrsrreoN, 


Mbs. W. W. Ginns, 


Mbs. John Wister, 


Mrb. Joseph Uabrison, 


Mrs, Jones Wistek, 


Mbs. Frank K. IIipple, 


Mias H. A. Zbll. 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



Miss Elizabeth Gratz, 
Mrs. Wm. W. Griest, 
Mrs. Sbth B, Stitt, 
Mrs. Wm. A. Stoke, 



Mrs. H. C. Townsend, 
Mrs. Caspab Wister, 
Mrs. Robert K. Wright. 



Digilzed by Google 



COMMITTEES FOR 1902—1903. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Thbodoxe C Searcb, Cfiairman ; WiiXtAH pLATT Peppeb, Sttast Wood, 

WiLiJAM Wood, Alfred C. Lahbdin, M.D., C N. Wbvoandt, fiyitoN P. 

HocLTOM, Ch&bles H. Habiiino, John Stoby Jenes, John T. Hdrris, 

luAc U. Clothier, John H. Converse. 

STANDING COMMITTEES.* 
ART. 
CHAJtLEs E. Dana, Otaimum; Sakdel Gubtink THOMPSON, Wilson Eyre, 
Jb., Chablk QfUfxr, Frank Miles Day. 

MUSEUM. 

John Story Jrnkb, Ouurman; Wiluah Pi^tt Pepper, Ai.prbd C. Lahb- 

DtN, M.D., John T. Mobbis, Mbs. John Harrison, Uish Anna Blanchabs, 

Miss Elizabbtb 0. Boberto, Miss Fannie 8. Magkb, Mbs. W. T. Carter, 

Mbs, Jones Wistbb. Mrs. Edward H. Ooden, ex agiao. 

INSTRUCTION. 
TiibodoreC. Search, Chairman; William Wood, John StobyJenks, Isaac 

B. Clothier, JohnT. Mobbis, Charles £. Dana, C. K. Wevoandt, Airbed 

C. Lambdin, M.D., William Platt Pbppeb, Byron P. Mohlton, Charles 
H. Hardino, John H, Converse, George H. Ci.iff, Georoe W. Elkins, 
Miss Helen L. Mdbphy, Mrs. Frank E. Uipple, Mrs. John Wibieb, 
BIbs. Joseph F. Sinnott, Mrs. Thomas Bobekts, Miss Leach. Mrs. Edwabd 
H. OoDBN, ex offieio. 

FINANCE. 
C. N. Wbyoandt, Chairman; Stuart Wood, John Story Jehrs, Cbablxb 
H. Habdino, Richard Robbhassleb. 



* The Prealdeat la a ojfieio ■ member of sU Committees. 



Di.itradb, Google 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM. 



WiLUAM Plait Pepper, Dirnior o/ilu Mutmm. 
Edwin AtLke Babbeb, Curator. 
MAROARirr D. Woodnctt, AmltUmi. 
■ Hary E. Dawsoh, Librariim, 

DEPARTMENT OF NUMISMATICS. 
F. D. Lanukhheiu, HimoraTy Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF TEXTILES, LACE AND EMBROIDERY. 
Mrs. John Harrison, Honomry CariMr. 

DEPARTMENT OF GOLDSMITH WORK, JEWELRY AND PLATE. 
Charles D. Clare, ifonomry CWotor. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL POTTERY. 
Mrb. JoNBt WiRTBR, llmorary Carator. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARMS AND ARMOR. 
CoRHELirs Stevenson, Honorarg Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 
Mrs. W. D. Frisiiuuth, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF SCl^LPTURE, MARBLES AND CASTS. 
Charles Gbaflv, Honorary Caralor. 

DEPARTMENT OF FURNITURE AND WOODWORK. 
GtotAV Kktterer, Hotwrary OuraU)r. 

DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS, MANUSCRIPTS, BOOK PLATES AND 

HISTORIC SEALS. 

Chari.es E. Dana, Honorary Oiaiitor. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILATELY. 
Edwabd Russell Jones, Honorary Ouralor. 



Digilzed by Google 



THE SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 

Comprbea in ita organizatioa the tollowiDg Departmeals : 

School of Drawing. 

School of Textile Design and MANrrAcruitE. 

School of Decihiative Paintiko. 

School of Chemistry akd Dveiho. 

School of Applied Design. 

School of Carving and Wood-Work. 

School op Decorative Sculptcke. 

School of Abchitectukal Design. 

School of Interior Decoration. 

School of Illustration. 

School op Norual Abt Insteuctjon. 

School op Modern Languages. 

STAFF. 
L. W. Miller, Principal. 
Howard Fbeuokt Stbattok, Director of Art School. 

E. W. France, Director of Textile School. 
Herman Deioendesch, I'rofesBor of Drawing. 

Bradley C. Aloeo, Astuslant Director of Teitile School and Professor in 

CUane of Weave Formation — .Analysis and Structure ot Fabrics. 
Sophie B. Steel, Instructor in Charge — UlustratioD. 
Alexander Sterling Calder, Professor of Sculpture. 
LuDWiG E. Faber, Instnictorin Drawing, Lecturer on Anatomj and Processes 

in Illustrative Reproduction. 
J. Merritt Matthews, Ph.D., Professor in Cbarfi;e of Chemistry and Dyeing. 
JosFJ>H F. X. Harold, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 
Albert Behu, Laixiratory DemonBtratot and Instructor in Dyeing. 
J. Frank Copelakd, Instructor in Drawing. 
Richard S. Cos, Instructor in Jacquard Design and Color Work. 
Helen A. Fox, Instructor in Color Harmony, Historical Ornament and Design 

Applied to Prinl«d and Woven Fabiica. 
Fabity Darbv Sweeny, Instructor in Design Applied to Stained Glass. 
Marqarette Lippiscott, Instructor in Water-Color Painting. 
Herbert G. Coe, Instructor in Elementary Weaving and Belaled Branches. 
Frederic Pfbiffer, Instructor in Charge ot Advanced Weaving and Related 

Branches. 
B. F. Jarrett, Jr., Instructor in Normal and Preparatory Classes, Art School. 
John Lockvvood, Instructor in Charge of Wool Carding and S|>inning. 
George W. L^fferts, Instructor in Worsted Drawing and Spinning. 

F. M, Jennings, Instructor in Wool Grading and Sorting. 

Wh. E. Winchester, Instructor in Cotton Carding and Spiuning. 

Edward T. Boggs, Instructor in Architectural Design. ' 

William I.'aird Turner, Instructor in Jacquard Design (Evening Classes), 

A. M. Grillon, Director of School of Modern Languages and Instructor in 
French, Italian and Smnish. 

Madame A. M. Schmidt-Grillon, Instnictor in German. 

Richard B. Doughty, Instructor in Instrumental and Macliine Drawing. 

Joseph M. Woelfel, Instructor in Dyeing and Wet Finishing. 

Alfred Bubhousb, Instructor in Dry Finishing. 

Ferdinand Marenzana, Instructor in Design Applied lo Furniture and Inte- 
rior Work, 

Henry Torniton, Instructor in Wood Carving. 

Mary P. Dow, Instructor in Book-Binding and Leather Work. 

E. G. Kau, Instructor in Ttwtling and Leather Work. 

Chas. T. Scott, Instructor in Drawing and Color Harmony. 

Isabella Bradley, Instructor in Drawing. 

Samcbl Thohpmn, Jr., Superintendent of Building snd Instructor in Wood- 
Work. 

Leonora J. C. Boeck, Registrar. 

Katherine DeWitt Bero, Librarian. 



Digilzed by Google 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



TWENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



The past year has been one of great activity in all departments 
of the Institution, and has been extremely fruitful in all that con- 
cerns its development and the services for which it ie organized. 

By means of a fund raised for the purpose by friends who ap- 
preciated the nature and extent of the services rendered by Mrs. 
E. D. Gillespie, twelve free scholarships, to be known us the Eliza- 
beth Duane Gillespie Scholarehips, have been established in the 
School for whose advancement she worked so untiringly. 

The death of Mrs. Gillespie, on October 13, 1901, removed one 
of the moat faithful and efficient servants that this Institution has 
ever known. At a special meeting, held October 23, 1901, the 
Board expressed its sense of the loss sustained by her death by 
adopting the following resolution : 

" The Trustees of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of In- 
dustrial Art have met to record ae well their personal sorrow as 
their sense of the loss sustained by this Institution in the death of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Duane Gillespie, 

" The descendant of a man illustrious in the history of Philadel- 
phia, Mrs. Gillespie set an example to both men and women in 
active public spirit and good citizenship. Her work as President 
of the Women's Centeimial Committee contributed in an essential 
degree to the success of the great exhibition of 1876, whose results 
are still felt in the industrial progress of the United States, and in 
the aesthetic and artistic spirit it awakened. 

"This- Institution, founded to perpetuate the influence of the 
Centennial Exhibition, appealed strongly to Mrs. Gillespie's inter- 



oy Google 



12 

est. On her return from a eojourn in Europe, twenty years ago, 
she put unreservedly at its services the same organizing energy 
that already had aroused and directed the patriotic zeal of Ameri- 
can women in support of that great enterprise. The Associate 
Committee of Women was formed by her upon the foundation of 
the Women's Centennial Executive Committee, and became at 
once an important factor in the work of the Institution and a 
leading influence in its growth. 

" It is the privilege of the Board of Trustees to bear testimony 
to the indispensable services rendered by Mrs. Gillespie and the 
Associate Committee of Women throughout these twenty years, in 
the administration of the Museum and the Schools, in raising 
funds for their maintenance and improvement, and in promoting 
the public interest in their work. The successive extensions of 
the Schools would not have been possible without this aid. Par- 
ticularly is it due in large measure to the zea! and energy of Mrs. 
Gillespie that the requisite subscriptions were obtained to make 
available Mr. Weightman's generous offer and acquire the prop- 
erty at Broad and Pine Streets, which has given the School of In- 
dustrial Art of the Pennsylvania Museum its present unexcelled 
opportunities of public usefulness. 

" In expressing the obligations of the Institution to the Asso- 
ciate Committee of Women, the Trustees feel that they are paying 
the truest tribute to the distinguished woman who had been from 
the first its guiding head. Her wide knowledge, her clear percep- 
tion, her courageous foresight and untiring zeal, made Mrs. Gilles- 
pie a most valuable associate in any enterprise of public moment 
such as this. While her influence was felt from time to time in 
many civic activities, the Pennsylvania Museum and School of 
Industrial Art was the object of her constant and her closest care, 
and by continued zeal in its support will her memory be best 
honored in the community that her long and useful life enriched." 

The high standard of work accomplished in the School which 
has been noted with so much satisfaction in former reports has 
been more than maintained, and the results as shown at the close 
of the School year indicate in several lines a distinct advance over 
the work of preceding years. This is especially true of the appli- 
cation, in the Textile School, of the principles of artistic design, of 
which it is the first duty of the Institution to cultivate a knowl- 
edge, and to encourage appreciation. As no precedent whatever 



oy Google 



18 

for the work which the School has undertaken existed in America, 
the task of formulating methods, and, especially, of training teach- 
ers has been a difficult one, and among the sources of the satisfac- 
tion with which the Board contemplates the work accomplished 
by the School, none is regarded as of more importance than the 
service rendered by the corps of efficient and devoted instructors, 
most of whom have received a large part of their professional 
training in the School itself. The splendid results, for example, 
attained this year in the department of weaving on power- as well 
as on hand-looma, results which reflect the greatest credit on the 
instructors in charge, could not have been accomplished without 
a kind of proficiency on their part which is altogether exceptional, 
and it is a pleasure to the Board to record in this place its appre- 
ciation of the spirit in which those in charge of this department 
have worked for its success. 

In the School of Applied Art the results are not less commend- 
able, and in general the School has won not only the highest com- 
mendation from competent judges, but has earned in very full 
measure that sincerest of all praise, the tribute of imitation, the 
distinctive features of which the School was the first Exponent in 
America having been so generally adopted throughout the country 
as to constitute by far the most prevalent, as they are undoubtedly 
the most valuable, additions to the methods of Art- and Technical- 
Schools, the eager multiplication of which throughout the land 
is among the most encouraging signs of the times. 

Under the fostering influence of the Associate Committee of 
Women, the organization formerly known as the Students' Club 
has changed its title to the " Art and Textile Club." 

This club now includes all the clubs of the School and the Wo- 
men's Auxiliary Organization founded in March of this year. It 
is self-supporting and officered entirely by the students. 

The oversight of the Sub-committee of women, who are in deep- 
est sympathy with club spirit, has been most admirable, and the 
organizations are of great moral and physical benefit to the 
students. 

The activities of the Museum have not been less pronounced 
and successful than those of the School. The repairs and thorough 
renovation of the building which were made possible by the gen- 
erous appropriation of about thirty thousand dollars by City 
Councils have made Memorial Hall exceedingly attractive, and 



oy Google 



14 

have added immensely to the educational influence which the 
collections exert. The attendance is now just about double that 
of last year, and the constant use of the collections by studenta, 
for whose accommodation ample facilities are provided, furnishes 
gratifying evidence of the fact that its advantages are appreciated. 
It is part of the requirements of several departments of our own 
School that pupils should work from the collections at the Museum, 
and classes in charge of no less than eight of our instructors have 
made use of the collections this year, — similar use of them being 
made by the other schools of the city. 

This increase of usefulness has also been attended by a most 
encouraging growth in the collections, the popular interest in the 
Museum having resulted in a rapid increase in most valuable ac- 
cessions, in the form of both gifts and loans, which testify abun- 
dantly to the estimation in which the Museum is held by the 
community. The nature and extent of these accessions are fully 
described in the report of the Director and Curator, and it only 
remains to be added in this place that these valuable additions 
have added enormously to the need of more room, which is now 
most pressing at the Museum as well as at the School. 

This is indeed the problem of most immediate importance which 
confronts the Board. The generosity of private benefactors sup- 
plementing a liberal appropriation of City Councils has, during 
the past year, supplied a large number of show-cases, and all the 
available space is now occupied by collections which are arranged 
and displayed with a system and attractiveness that has never 
been possible before ; but a large amount of most valuable mate- 
rial is still stored in the basement, or awaits our disposal in other 
places for lack of room in which to display it. The construction 
of an extension to the Hall in the form of two wings on the north 
front would seem to be the true solution of the problem, and it is 
hoped that means may be found in the near future to make this 
much-needed addition to the facilities of this branch of the 
institution. 

At the School a similar need is not less ui^ent. Special atten- 
tion has already been given in these reports to the growth of 
the department of Chemistry and Dyeing; to the exceptional 
value of the work it is accomplishing, and to the necessity for in- 
creased facilities under whicli it labors at present So congested 
has the situation become that satisfactory work in the Dyeing 



oy Google 



15 

rooms is now impossible, on account of the interference of the 
fumes from the Chemical Laboratory, the two branches being so 
crowded topether as to virtually occupy the same rooms. A tem- 
porary structure for use ns a dye-bousi- to he erected at the Fifteenth 
Street end of the south yard during the summer vacation will re- 
lieve the situation somewhat, but the erection of a suitable addition 
of a pernuinent character for the adequate installation of this de- 
partment cannot long be deferred if the School is to maintain the 
position wliich has umiuestionably been accorded it hitherto. 
Respectfully subnrittcd. 

THEODORE C. SEARCH, 



Digilzed by Google 



RELIEF PANEL IN PORCELAIN BISCUIT, WITH GLAZED PORCELAIN FRAME. 

"The Descent from the Cross." By Richard Ginori, Milan, Ilitly. 

Bouglit Bt Paris Exposilion, 1900. From ihe Joseph E. Temple Truat. 



Digitized by G(Xlg[e 



REPORT OF THE MUSEUM. 

The twelve months ending May 31, 1902, have been marked by 
great prosperity for the Museum. During this period there were 
1659 accessions to the collections by gift and purchase and 2014 
by loan, making a total of 3073 objectB received. Among the 
most important additions are an ancient throne chair from a Per- 
sian mostgue ; a richly chased and inscribed silver vase of histori- 
cal interest, made by Reed, of Philadelphia, and presented by the 
Whigs of the same city, during the Henry Clay Campaign of 1843, 
to Hon. James C. Jones, the Governor of Tennessee, for valuable 
services rendered by him ; a beautifully painted hieu de m ewer 
and bowl of Sevres porcelain, said to have been made for Napo- 
leon in ISOTi ; a collection of Colonial relics illustrating the domes- 
tic, industrial and farm life of our forefathers ; a large collection 
of Colonial and Continental currency ; a valuable collection of 
Oriental pottery and porcelain, the bequest of Dr. Francis W. 
Lewis, with new cases to display the same, presented by the 
Misses Lewis ; also many rare and characteristic pieces of American 
pottery. 

WORK ACCOMPLISHED DURING THE YEAR. 

Since the publication of the previous Report the extensive re- 
pairs to the building have been completed. The interior has been 
thoroughly renovated and painted, and the lighting and ventila- 
tion have been greatly improved. The roof and dome have been 
made water tight and placed in good condition. The sum of 
$2,500 was appropriated by City Councils for much needed cases, 
and with this fund new wall cases have been constructed on the 
east side of the Textile Room and the west side of the Southeast Pa- 
vilion. Through the generosity of Mr. Clarence B. Moore, hand- 
some new wuH cases have been provided for the Northeast Pavil- 
ion of the suite of rooms containing the Bloomiield Moore Collec- 
tion. Other new cases have been built in the Southeast Pavilion 
from funds received from the Mrs. Frederick Graff bequest. The 



oy Google 



18 

Chinese cases from the Centennial have been repaired and newly 
painted and many other cases in the building have been im- 
proved. 

The Coin Collections have been installed in floor and wall cases 
in one of the North rooms. Mrs. W. D. Frishmuth'a extensive 
Collection of Colonial Relics has been placed on exhibition in an 
adjacent room. The collection of American Pottery and Porce- 
lain has been completely rearranged, newly labeled and thrown 
open to the public. Many minor changes in the arrangement of 
the cases and collections have been made in other parte of the 
building. 

A room has been fitted up for the use of students on the second 
floor, and the guards and attendants throughout the building have 
been uniformed. 

While the general collections of art objects on exhibition in the 
building are fairly representative of the industrial progress of 
various countries in ancient and modern times, particularly the 
pottery, glass, enamels, wood and ivory carvings, metal work and 
textile fabrics, the unique historical collection of American pot- 
tery and porcelain has perhaps attracted more widespread atten- 
tion than any other, and since it has been opened to the public in 
its new quarters it has become one of the most popular features of 
the Museum. Of the four rooms which have been set apart for 
this exhibit, the first contains characteristic examples of the pot- 
tery of the ISth and 19th centuries; the second is devoted to por- 
celain and white ware of the United States ; the third to historical 
and art tiles; and the fourth to Aboriginal earthenware of North 
and South America. 

NEW DEPARTMENTS AND HONORARY CURATORSHIPS. 

During the year six additional departments have been estab- 
lished. The Museum has been most fortunate in securing well 
known specialists to fill the several Honorary Curatorships as 
follows ; 

Arms and Armor, Mr. Cornelius Stevenson. 

Musical Instruments, Mrs. W. D. Frisbmuth. 

Sculptures and Casts, Mr. Charles Grafly. 

Furniture and Woodwork, Mr. Gustav Ketterer, 

Prints, Mss., Bookplates, Historic Seals, Prof. Charles E. Dana. 

Philately, Mr. Edward Russell Jones. 



Digiized by Google 



19 

It is expected that each of the ten departments now or^^iiized 
will, with the valuable aeaistance and advice of those who have 
taken charge, prove an important feature in the educational work 
of the Museum. 

PUBLIC RECEPTIONS. 

On December 7, 1901, the day preceding the re-opening of Me- 
morial Hall, the Trustees of the Pennsylvania Museum and School 
of Industrial Art tendered a reception to the Mayor of the City, 
the Commissioners of Faimiount Park and the Finance and Fair- 
mount Park Committees of Councils. On this enjoyable occasion 
the members of these several bodies were given the opportunity to 
inspect the recent improvements and to become better acquainted 
with each other and with the educational work of the Museum. 

On the 3d of May, 1902, a tea and reception was held at the 
Museum by the Museum Committee and Associate Committee of 
Women, Mrs. William T. Carter acting as Chairman of the joint 
committee. A large number of the friends of the Museum were 
in attendance, who were pleased to express their appreciation of 
the greatly improved condition of the building and of the newly- 
arranged exhibits. 

SPECIAL MUSEUM FUND. 

The following circular letter was recently sent to the friends of 
the Museum asking for contributions to a special fund for the pur- 
chase of art objects: 

The actual value of the extensive colleclione of art ubjects in the Penns;?!- 
vania Muaeuo) is conservatively eclimated at (1,000,000. These collections are 
on exhibition, free to the public, every day in the year. The Museum is visited 
by over 250,000 people annually, and it h believed thai during the year 1002 
this number will be doubled. 

The cost of acquiring and adding to these valuable collections has hereto- 
fore been largely borne by a few generous patrons of the institution. Oppor- 
lunitjes are constantly being offered to malte desirable additions to certain of the 
collections on unusually favorable terms. In order to raise a necessary fund to 
enable the Trustees to purchase objects i^oiv procurable, it is proposed to solicit 
contributions of $5.00 to $-'•'>. 00 from the friends of the Museum. The money 
thus obtained will be used solely for the purehsse of the following- named 

1. Eiainples of old English china bearing historical .American designs in 
dark blue and other colors, to complete the already admirable collection of An- 
glo-American pottery now on exhibition— the best public collection now existing. 



oy Google 



20 



2. SpecimcDE of nre and curious raueical inetruments for the new Depart- 
ment of Mnucal Intitruments, recently ettabliehed. 

3. Arms and armor of all timea and countries. 

4. Laces, embroideries and textile fabrics. 

5. Pieces of silver aud gold work. 

6. Furniture aad carvings. 

T. Bare and artistic pieces of potter; and porcelain. 

Are yua willing to contribute $5.00 or upward to tbis special fund ? If so, 
will fou kindly 611 in the enclosed slip and return it, at your convenience, to 
Edwin .4. Barbbh or to William Platt Pepper 

Curalor Penn'a Museum Director Penn'a Museum 

Memorial Hall. Palrmauut Park TOJ Provident Bulldins 

Fhiladelpbla Philadelphia 



In reeponse to the above appeal subscriptions have been received 
as follows : 



Mr. John Story Jenks, . . 


$10 00 


Mn. D. E. I>Bllam,. . . 


5 00 


Miss E. C. Roberts, , . 


25 00 


Mr. Byron P. Moulton, . 
Mr. Theodore C. Seareh, . 


10 ou 


o 00 


Mr, Joseph T. Bailey, . . 


500 


Miss Fannie S. Magee, . . 


20 00 


Mr. J. G. Rosengarten, . 


500 


Mr. A. J. Antelo, . . 


10 00 


Mrs. J. Campbell Harris, . 


10 00 


Mr. n. F. Stratton, . . . 


5 00 


Mr. Alfred C. Harrison, . 


25 00 


Mr. Adolph Segal, . . . 


10 00 


Mr. George C. Tbomas, . 
Mr. W. H. Barnes, . . . 


26 00 


5 00 


Mr, William P. Hensrey, 


25 00 


Mr. John H. Converse . 


25 00 


Mr. Charles E. Dana, . . 


G 01) 


Mr. C. H. Ciark,. . . . 


500 


Mr. Theodore Voorbeea, . 


5 00 


Mr. Henry E. Busch, . . 


5 00 


Mr. Henry J. Thouron, . 


6O0 


Mis9 Mary Coles, ■ . . 


25 OO 



Mr. V, C, Sweatnian, , . 
Mr. Wilson Evre, . . . 
Mr. S. W.Colton, Jr., . . 
Mr. Pbiiip C- Garrett, 
Mr. George L, Harrison, 
Mias Anna Blanchard, 
Mr. Washington Jones, - 
Mr. fi;klev B. Coxe, Jr., 
Mrs. H. H. Houston, . . 
Mrs. John Harrison, 
Mr. John Harrison, . - 
Mr, Thomas 8. Harrison, 



In addition to this amount 
there was collected from the 
contnbution boxes in the 
MuseuDi, duHng the ei^ht 
months when the building 
was open, the sum of 



10 00 

5 00 
10 00 

5 00 
20 00 
25 00 



10 00 
25 OO 
10 00 



Total 



. $513 93 



The offertory fund represented by the last Item is composed of 
small donations from visitors, ranging from one cent to one dollar. 
From these popular contributions in past years many of the most 
interesting objecta on exhibition have been purchased. If each 
person who visits the Museum during the present year should con- 
tribute five cents, this fund would reach a sum between $15,000 and 
$2-5,000. Contributions averaging only one cent each would form a 
purchasing fund of «3,000 to 8r>,000. 



oy Google 



21 

As the Museum collections are open every day in the week (en- 
tirely without any entrance fee) to the public, the foregoing sug- 
gestion is specially recommended by the Director of the Museum : 
Let every one who visits the Museum, from this time out, give 
something in the glass globes placed there for that purpose, and 
thus quietly raise a large yearly sum of money, which will place 
our Museum at the head of such institutions in the United States 
and largely increase its collections and usefulness, 

ATTENDANCE. 

The attendance for l'.)01 shows an apparent falling off from the 
previous year, which was caused by the closing of the building for 
more than four months, from August 5th to December 8th, during 
the progress of repairs. The number of visitors registered while 
the building was open was in reality no less than for the corre- 
sponding period in 190(). Since the opening of the doors on De- 
cember 8th the admissions have been greater than during any cor- 
responding six months in the history of the Museum. For the 
five months of the present year, from January 1st to June 1st, the 
date of this Report, the attendance reached 190,288 which was 
greater than that of any other Museum in the United States, with 
possibly one exception. 

The largest registration for any single day was 16,801. Follow- 
ing is the average daily attendance during the first five months in 
1901 and 1902: 

Weekdays. Sundajs. 

1901, 28a 2908 

1902 423 6439 

This remarkable increase, which is largely due to the improve- 
ments in the building, made possible by the liberal appropriations 
of City Councils, is a gratifying evidence of the growing popularity 
of the Museum. It will be noticed that the average attendance, on 
Sundays, from January 1st to June 1st, was 6439, or over OTt per 
cent, of the total registration for that period, 

A PRESSING NEED OF THE MUSEUM. 

By the rearrangement and concentration of some of the collec- 
tions it has been possible to place on exhibition the greater portion 
of the accessions received during the past year. Every depart- 



oy Google 



ment, however, has become uncomfortably crowded and several 
important collections formerly on exhibition have been tempora- 
rily retired for lack of proper facilities to display thera. The time 
would seem to have arrived when some provision should be made 
for the accommodation of this material and that which may here- 
after be received. The most pressing need of the Museum at 
present is more room for expansion, and it is to be hoped that early 
relief may be afforded either by the conatruction of new wings to 
the building, the roofing and enclosure of the West Arcade, or the 
alteration of a portion of the basement to provide the necessary 
Boor space for the rapidly increasing exhibits. 

ACCESSIONS TO THE MUSEUM. 
Following is a list of objects received during the year; 
By Gift from : 

HiBs SrsAMNA F. F. BeNTOH : 

"Toby" Jug; Rockingham ware. Perth Amboy, 1060. 
Mb. John T. Mobbis : 

Earthen Pie Dish ; Sgiaffiato decoration. Bj David Spinner, Eaeteni 
Penneytvanift ; c. ]810. 

Three Va«ee ; Rookwood Faience. From Pan-American Exposition, Buf- 
falo, 1901. 

A Colleclion illustrating the manufacture of artiticial Pearls. 

Vase ; while ware, painted. Portrait of Stephen Uirard. Kensington, 
Philadelphia, 18.11. (Page23i. 

Earthen Dish ; Slip decoration of fish. Eastern Pennsylvania, dated 1801. 

Earthen Dish ; Slip decoration, man on horse. Monlgomerj County, Ptt., 
dated 1838. 

Bottle; flint enamel, shape of man. Bennington, Vl,; c. 1849. 

Pair of Sleeve Buttons ; Steel inlaid vlth gold. Spanish, 1876. 

Grvebv Faiksce Co., Boston, Mass.: 

Faience Sign, with mark and name of Pottery in low relief. 

Cbittenanoo Pivn-KRvCo., Chittenango, N. Y.: 

Plate and two Vbbcb; porcelain. Souvenir of Pan-.\mericnn Exposition, 

Buffalo, 1901. 

Mb. W. S. Chalpant, Collingswood, S. J. : 

One-pound Shell, from the .Spanish Cruiser " Maria Teresa"; Santiago, 
Cuba, July 4, 1898. 



Digilzed by Google 



VASE IN SOFT WHITE POTTERY, WITH PAINTED PORTRAIT OF 
STEPHEN QIRARD IN WHITE, ON BLACK GROUND. 

Made by Ralph R. Iteech, Ketviaiilon, Pliiladflpkui, in 1851. 
Given by Mr. Jolm T. Morris (see p. 22). 



Digilzed by Google 



Mb. R. J. DiTiON, Biirlinf^n. N. J.: 

Fragment of an Earthern Vessel or Tile: from a 
ton, 1860. 

Mr. John BitADLsy : 

Saucer; earthennare, flow blue print. England, about 1840. 

Mr. Henry C. Mbhckb, Doylestown, Pa.: 

Cup ; reproduction of an old G«ruian piece daled 1793. 

Mef<s)v. Wrkiht, Tvsdalb & VAN RODEN : 

Plate; by Minton & Co., England, ISOl. Blue and wblte; " Landing of 

Lafayette." 

TiFPAsvGLAJW&DEfORATiNoCo., New York: 

Glass SiRii ; iridescent gold and purple, witli words : " Tiffany FaTrile 
Glass." 

Mr. Charleu T. Thompson : 

Old Wooden MorUr with Stone Pestle. 

Mi98 Sarah Stkvesskin Cox : 

Collection of Coins : 37 Copper, 11 Silver, 10 Tokens, 1 Medal. 
An example of old Mechlin e Igiog lace. 

Mrs- n. C. Davis : 

Wine Bottle ; Glass with gold deraraliou. 

Inkstand and Wafer Boi ; Porcelain. 

Jewel Box ; carved in relief. Red lacquer outside, black within. Chinese. 

Panel of Woven Paper, painted in water colors. Chinese. 

Siiuare of Vegetable Fibre ; embroidery and drawn work. Japanese. 

Garters (a pair) ; satin, embroidered. Chinese. 

Card Case ; silver liligree. Chinese. 

Brooch ; silver liligree. Chinese. 

Bouquet Holder; silver liligree, with ring and chain. Chinese. 

Vases (a pair) ; carved alabaster on marble base. 

Mr. Clarence B. Moork : 

Vase ; porcelain. Rorstrand, Sweden. 

Inkstand, made of Anthracite Coal set with Iron Pyrites. Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Edwin A. Barber ; 

Fork; copper, silvered. Modem, India. 

Spoon ; aluminum. Souvenir of the World's Fair, Chiratgo, 1893. 

Forty-nine Campaign Buttons ; portraits of Presidential Candidates, 1896. 

Two Medals: " World's Fair" and "Liberty Bell." 

Fragment of Illuminated Missal of the XIV Century. 

Tea Cup ; porcelain. From Rockingham Works, Swlnton, England ; c. 



oy Google 



Mr. Charlik K. Osbobn ; 

Glass Flwk; " Bryan «nd Se*«II,' l'. S., 1896. 

Mrs. M. E. WniTE : 

Iilat, made of interlaced rings of Sheltnc. 
Mrs. \Y. D. Frihhmitu : 

Two Apolhecary's Jars, with covers. Old Jeroey City Pottery ; c. IMO, 

Two Kgyptian Musical InstnimeaCs. 

large Collection of Colonial Relicti, consisting ot ImplemenU, House Fur- 
nishings, Garments, OrnamenI<, Prints, etc Some WO articles. 
I'siTED State-s Eniaistic Tu.E Co., Indianapolis, Ind.: 

Thirty-sii Tiles of various colors and designs. 

Beavkb Falw Art Tu.E Co., Braver Falls, Pa.: 
Sixteen Tiles, various colors and designs. 

AMERICAN Enc A rwTIc TiLE Co-, Zanesvitle, Ohio: 
Five Tiles, difTerent colon and designs. 

Mrf^ Jmis IIarrimiin : 

Portrait of I'estalozzi, voven in silk ; c. 1840. 
Dr. J. Caknin(i Ali.kn : 

Old Upright Pinno ; made by Julius Fiot, Philadelphia ; c. 1827. 

Mit*. WiLTIAM P. LOOAS ; 

Large Office Desk. Used by the Finance Conimiltee of the Centennial, 
1876. 
Mr. H. R. MiTfirBM.: 

B\m Dial ; stoneware with metal gnomon. Made in the U. H., 1902. 
Meroeh PoiTKKV ( o,, Trenton, X. J.; 

Plate; bine and white. " Porirail of William Penn." 1901. 

Plate; blue and white. " Ludlow's Purchase ot Norwalk, in 1640." 190L 

Uim H. A. Zeli, : 

Two Tea ('ups ; earthenware, white with color decoration. Old English. 

Mr. E. Ri-WELi, Jones : 

Sheet of ]2Fi I'. S. Revenue Stamps, in frame. 

1 6 Postage Stamps ; Transvaal, 

16 Postage Stamps ; New (luinea. 
0.s'ONi>AOA I'OTTERV Co., Sytacuse, S. Y, : 

Plate ; white and green. Souvenir of the launching of Emperor William's 
Yacht, "Meteor," at Staten Island, N. Y., 1902. 

Dr. Fran(,19 W. Leww i bequest) : 

Collection of Japanese and Chinese Pottery and Porcelain, Bronzes and 
Enamels (19'2 pieces). 



J, Google 



n. John Story Jbnks : 
Collection of 738 pieces of Colonial and Conlinental Paper Money, 



Mr. John P. Whitney, Glaasboro, N. J.: 
Five Iron Bottle Moulds, wilh bottler. 
Bottle, aliapeof an Indian Woman. 

Mr. V. Lb Comte Oi'bdan : 

Set ot carved Ivory Chessmen, 32 pieces 

Two Brooches; carved Ivory. 

Two Plum Seeis ; carved. Japanese, 

Card Case ; carved Ivory. 

Seal ; carved Pearl. 

Two Card Trays : solid Silver. French. 

Two Fif^ures ; carved Ivory. Cliinese. 

Mr. Eohin a. Babpeb : 

Pack of Playing t^nis (3 i in |Mickl. (ierman. 

Pack of Playing Cards (Wcar.U) ; Sonvenir uf World's Fair Cliicogo, 1S93. 

Vaae ; Tiffany Favrile Glass. 

Sevenleen pieces of Pottery and Porcelain ; varions manufactures, 

Tn-o Earthen Pie Plates; slip decorations. Eaalern Pennsylvania, 1795 

and 183^. 
Plaster Mold tor Lithopliane; " Pcnn's Treaty." Plmwsville Pottery ; 

c. 1870, 
Cup; enamel on metal. Kouvenir of the Coronation of NieliolasII of 

Bussia, ]R%. 

Mil, K. RitwEi.L JoNE-^ : 

Forty-nine pieces of Pottery and Porcelain ; various countries. 

Five pieces of Metal Work: Shield, Daggers, etc., Persian, Japanese and 

Kine pieces of Woodwork ; carvings, etc, Japanese. 

Seven pieces of Arms and Armor; French, Persian and Japanese. 

Three Blankets ; two .Syrian, one Chine.fe. 

Three Mats ; two Samoan, one Syrian. 

Twelve Hat; ; woven straw, bamboo, etc. Cliiiiese and Japanese. 

Seventeen pairs of Shoes and Sandals. Chinese, JupaDese and East Indian. 

Garment ot Woven Grass. Japanese. 

Shirt ; bamboo. Japanese. 

Table: teakwoud and marble. Japanese. 

Marble Bust and PedesUl ; " Venus of Naples." 

Plate; earthenware. Staffordshire; c, 182J. 

Plate; earihen. Sgraffialo decoration. Bucks County, Pa.; c 1840. 

Three Bottles; old American glass. 



Digilzed by Google 



SILVER PITCHER, CAST AND CHASED. 

Made by Reed, oj Phitaddphia. 
"Presented by the City and County of Philadelphia to (he Hon. James C 
Jones, Governor of Tennessee, as a token of their admiration of his lofty 
eloquence and gratitude for bis gallanl serricea in llie Gubecnatorial canvasa 
of 1843, which resniced in tlie esubliahnient of Whig principles and opened 
the Presidential campaign with sure harbingers of the triumphal election of 
Henry Clay in 18M." From the Joseph E. Temple Trust Isee p. 30|. 



oy Google 



28 

Mr. Johs T. MoftKts : 

Vase, small ; purple, with Iris flower in relief. Cameo fclass, b; Emile 

(ialle, Nancy, France, 1900. From Paris Eipoeilion. 
Two Rifles ; American make. 
Double- Barreled Shot-Guo ; American make. 
Cavalry Sabre. 
Hatcliet ; Japanese. 
Plane ; Japanese. 
Bowl ; copper repouss^. Bombay, India. 

Mr. Cuarles E. Dana : 

Sixty'two Reproductions ot Historic Seals. 

Mrs. H.C. Divisr 

Shawl ; white cr^p?, embroidered. Chinese. 

Mks. John Harrison : 

Reliqnary Casket ; silver and horn. XV Century. 

Crucifix ; iron, ornamented. XIV or XV Century. 

Crucifix ; wood inlaid with pearl. Italian, XVII Century. 

Viniagrette ; leather with silver top. XV or XVI Century. 

Clasp ; Kold filigree. Turkish, XVIII Century. 

Pair ot Silver Bracelets, with coin bangles. American ; c. 1862. 

Mrs. M. E. White : 
Specimen of Drawn Work and Embroidery ; c. 1845. 

Mr. Ehmor B. Lamdorn : 

Old Pewter Plaller ; made in Ixindon, England. 

Misk Bertha Bbrnd Lover : 

Set of Carved Ivory Chessmen and Lacquered Board. Chinese. 

Mi!«i Sarah C. Kaiohs: 

Scent Bottle ; heart shape. Tucker porcelain. 

MJ!« Hki-bs Taywr and Mr. Lowsdes Tavixib : 

Collection of Japanese and Chinese Pottery and Porcelain, Carved Ivories, 

lironzefi and Textiles. (192 pieces). 

Mr. Mover TLEittHER : 

Collection of 78 Antique Watches, 1.525-1800. 

Miw Emily Ditilh : 

Thirty Old Bonnets, 1B3U 1« 1899. 
Gown of Painted Muslin ; c. 1S31. 
Gown o[ Figured Chaltis ; c. 1831. 
Two Veils ot Black Lace- 
Large Bandbox. 



Digilzed by Google 



29 

Mr*', Sara L. Oberiioltzlr : 

Collection of Old Potler'B TooU, Eanhem J«ri »nd Platters, etc. 
(17 pieces.) EaMem PennsjlvaniB, 1806-182). 
From the School of Iswstrial Art : 

Fan of Carved Ivory ; given lo llie Kboul by Miss Sarah Sanfonl. 
l-'ard Case ; carveil ivory ; given to the «choi)l by Miss Sarah Sanfonl. 
Vase ; metal, enamelni ; given to tlie school by Mr, John T. Morris. 
Fourteen Garments, etc, parts of Oriental Costuoiea ; given by Mr. Charles 

H. Cramp. 
Incense Burner ; iron, inlaid with silver ami gold ; given by Mr. Charles 

II. Cramp. 
Sword, Carved Ivory Hilt and Scabbard. Japanese. Given by Mra. Bo- 
ilolpb Blank enburg. 

Nl'MISIMATIC and ANTmVARlAS S(H.IETY : 



EWER AND BOWL, SEVRES PORCELAIN. 
Bleu de Boi Ground nilh Designs painted in natural Coloia and Gold. Supposed 
to have been made for Napoleon in 1805. From the Joseph £. Temple Trust. 

(See p. aO). 

Purchases for the Museum t 

Act:ODNT OF AKOIO-AMERIt'AN PoTTERY Fl'ND : 

Plate; blue and white. "B. &0. Railroad." Made by E. Wood &Sons, 

Staffordshire; c. 1830. 
Pitcher; Liverpool ware. Black prints of Washington, etc. 
Pitcher; cream ware. Liverpool; c. 1830, " Apotheosis of Washington." 
Pitcher; cream ware. Liverpool; c. 1800. "Monument to Washington 

and Map of N. A." 
Pitcher; copjer lustre. ■'Portmit of General Jackson." Staffordshire, 

England. _^ 

Digilizeo by Google 



AcoofNTOF *■ Special MiTsEiM Find:" 

Cream Pilcher; porcelain. White with colored flowers. Made at the 
" Herculaneum Potterj," Liverpool, England ; c. 1800. 

Account of Joseph E. Temple Trust : 

Tlirone Chair ; wood, lacquered and inlaid. Persia. Seat of the Shah in 
a Peraian Mosque. 

Ewer and Bowl ; porcelain. Bleu de Bol. Sevres, 1805, 180G. (Page 29). 

Vase ; porcelain, flowers in relief. Meissen, Saxony ; c. 1896. 

Cup and Saucer ; porcelain. Uld Vienna. 

Ewer ; silver, relief decoration and inscription. Made in Philadelphia, 
1843, (Page 27). 
AccovsT OP Petty Cass : 

Flask; American glass. "Lonell Bailtoad." 

Flask; American glass. "Jackson and Washington." 

Act'OUNT OP OPFERTOBY Fl'SD (CONTRIBI-TIOK BOKEs) : 

Tureen ; dark blue Staffordshire china ; view of Capilol at Harrisbui^, Pa. 
By S. Tams & Co. (Page 31). 

LIBRARY. 
During the year tlie booke and pamphlets were entirely re- 
numbered and catalogued by the Librarian and the dosed book 
cases were fitted with j^Inss doors. 

The total number of titles in the Library on the 31st day of 
May, iy02, was; 

Bound Books 1090 

Unbound pamphlets, caCnlognes, reports, etc 1038 

Total ■ 2128 



Following is a list of additions to the Library of Books, Cata- 
logues and Pamphlets. 

By Gift from : 
Aaron, Carrie B. : 

Biographical Notice of Robert Henry Lamborn. 
AcADEMV OF Natuhal SCIENCES, Philadelphia : 

Annual Beport, 1900. 
American Escacstic Tiling Co., ZaneavUle, Ohio ; 

Artistic Tiles (2 vols.) 

Art Ceramic Mosaic. 

Aroerlcan Mosaic 
Babbeb, Edu'in a. ; 

Potterj- and Porcelain of the United Slates (2d edition), by Edwin A. 
Barber. 

Anglo American Pottery (2d edition), by Edwin A. Barber. 



oy Google 



PLATE, ANGLO-AMERICAN POTTERY, 
ir of Philodelphik Dumb Aijlum, now the Schmil of Induatrial Art 
of tlie Penrwylvania Museum. 
(iirtn by .Wiw Ljidia T, Morris. 



TUREEN. ANGLO-AMERICAN POTTERY. 

Dflrlt-Bhie View of the Capitol at Ilarriabnrg, Pa. 
Purehate I irUh Ftiiulf CV.lntet from fAc MuMiim Conlribulion Bora (se 



oy Google 



American Journal of Philately (3 vols. ) 

Post Card and Letter Card Catalogue, b<r George II. WalsoD. 

Stamped Envelopes, Wrappers and Slieela of the I'. S., by Tiflany, Bogert 
& Rechert. 

Atlaa, " Nombres Geograficos de Mexico," by Penafiel. 

Catalogo Alfabetico Estudin JerogliSco, by PenaGel. 

Loan Exhibition of Old Wedgvood, Burslem, England. 

Board of Education, Philadelphia, 76th Annual Report. 

Historical Sketch of Portrait ot Pauline Bonaparte, by Townsend, 

Old Delawate Clock Makers, by Conrad. 

Ruins of Xkichmook, Yucatan, by Thompson. 

Was Middle America Peopled Erom Asia 7 By Prof. Edward S. Morse. 

Aloeaka Cult of the flopi Indians, by Fewkes. 

Catalogue of Arts and Crafts Eihibit of the Milwaukee Biennial. 

Souvenir of Springli.:ld Art Museum. 

Catalogue of Exhibit in Cincinnati Room, Columbian E.iposilion. 

Loan Exhibition of Society of Decorative Art, New York. 

Potter's Wheel and How it goes Round. 

Terracottas and Pottery of Cesnola Colleution. 

Catalogue of Corcoran Gallery of Art. 

Catalogue of Paintings in Waggaman Collection. 

Catalogue of Oriental Objects in Waggaman Collection. 

Souvenir Booklets (5). 

20 articles from Magazines, on art subjects. 
Board of Pare Comuissionerh, Sacramento, Cal. : 

Reports, 1895-laM. 
RosTOK MusGCM OP FiKR Artr, Boston, Mass. : 

Catalogue, 1901. Report, 1902. 
Briobtok Mi'seum, Brighton, England : 

Catalogue of Birds. 
Bricbton Public Libbarv, Brighton, England : 

Classified List of Books. 

Supplementary Catalogue. 

Reports, I8ST-1890. 
Carnb(!ie Mi'SBttM, Pittsburgh, Pa. : 

Annua! Report, 1901. 

.\nnale, Nos. 1 and 2. 

Memoir.', Vol. 1. "Diplodocus,'' by Hatcher. 
CiHciNNATi MosetiK Association, Cincinnati, O. i 

Report, M)lh Annual. 
Detroit Mumeuh op Art, Detroit, Mich. : 

Annual Reports, 1891-1899. 
DoBSrr CorSTY Mujiel'm, Dorchester, Eng. ; 

Catalogue of Bronze Antiquities. 

Guide for 1901. 
EDiNBDRtm McsEtiM OP Science and Art, Edinburgh, Scotland : 

Guide to Persian Collection. 



oy Google 



Guide U> Scottisli Qeology and Mineralogy. 
Guide to Scottisli Agales. 
Annual Report, 1899. 
Field Columbian Mihirvm, Cliicn^, III. : 

Archsological Inrwtigatioiu on Island of La PUla. 
Orsibi BovhI Ceremony. 
Dinosaor Betis of Orand Kiver Valley. 
Annual Report, 1901. 
Fbiwmuth.Mr^. «-m. D. : 

Catalogue of Chlckering Exhibitioa. 
HoFKiX!*, A. A. I tlic author) : 

Catalogue of Pliotographs of Italian Painlinga. 
Jenk^ Johk Storv : 

Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia (10 vols.) 
Lewis, Mias Mary anh Mish Haraii : 

Marks and Monograms on Pottery and Porcelain, b_v Choffers. 
History of Ancient Pottery, by Birch. 
Lake Dweitings, by Keller. 
Art of Glass Painting, by Winston. 
History of Pottery and Porcelain, by Marryat. 
Keramic Gallery, by Chaffers (a vols. ) 
Potlery and Porcelain, by Prime. 
China Collector's Pocket Companion, by Palliser. 
Pottery and Porcelain Marks, by Hooper and Phillipa. 
Kernraic Art of Japan, by Audsley and Bowes 12 vols). 
Handbook of Painting, by Easllake. 
History of Modem Painting, by Mnther (3 vols.) 
Principles and Practice of Art, by Harding. 
Faiences et Porcelaines, by Demmin (3 vols. ) 
La Verrerie, by Sauzay. 
Histoire de la Ceramlque, by JsC(|iiemart. 
Porcelaine de Chine, by Du Sortel. 
Histoire de la Faience Ancienne, by Paquot (2 vols. ) 
LiBBiB & Co., Boston, Mass. ; 

Catalogue of Haigh Oolleclion of Masonic Pitchers. 
ME.MORIAL MvsEiTH, t^au FiKncisco, Cal. : 

Guide, 190L 
Moore, Clarehce B.: 

Certain Aboriginal Remains of the Tomblgbee River. 
Certain Aboriginal Remains of the Alabama River. 
Certain Aboriginal Mounds of the Georgia Coast. 
Certain Sand Mounds of Florida. 
Certain Sand Mounds of St. John's River (2 vols.) 
Mobrih, JoiiK T. : 

Catalogue of the Dresden Gallery. 
Handbook, Waugli's Italian Views. 
Catalogue of the Treasury of Austria. 



OMzcdoyGoOglC 



84 

CaUlogue of the A. T. Slewart Collection. 

CHtalogae of the Chu. A. Dan* CollectioD. 

Guide U) HerculftQeum. 

Guide to NatioDal Museum of Amsterdam. 
Mouse, Prof. Edward S. (the author) : 

A Bubble -blowing Insect. 
NoTni«;iiAM MrsEUM, Nottiugham, Englsnil : 

Catalogue of Engraved Portraitii. 

Catalogue of Newcastle Fictures. 

Catalogue of Watb< Pictures. 

Catalogue of Original Drawings. 

Catalogue of Art Book Bindings. 

Catalogue of Proof Engravings of Landseer. 

Catalogue of Works of Laslelt Pott. 

Catalogue of Works of Reuben Bussey. 

Catalogue of Deceased Nottingham Artists. 

Catalogue of Works of Thomns Barber. 

Catalogue of Classical Antiquities from Temple of Diana. 

From Whitehall to Nottingham Castle. 

Annual Report, 22d. 
Ohio State UKiYERsriY, Columbus, Ohio : 

Catalogue, 1901, 
Pennsylvania Academy up Fine Arts, Philadelphia: 

Circular of Instruction, 1901. 

Catalogue of Tlst Exhibition. 
Pepper, William Platt. 

Fans of all Countries. 
Petchbobocqh Natural History Society, Peterborough, England: 

Annual Reports, 1898-1900. 
Peterborough Gentlemen's Society. 
Peterborough Customs and their Survival. 
Rath BONE, F : 

Catalogue of Sanderson Collection of Old Wedgwood. 
Sanoioroi, G. : 

Catalogue, Vente du Mu!<ee tiuidi de Faenza. 
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C; 

International Exchange List. 
University op Pennsylvania, Philadelphia : 
Catalogue for 1001. 

By Purchase : 
Pennsylvania German Manual, by Horne. 
German Immigrnlion into Pennsylvania, by DilTenderfFer, 
Fumilureof our Forefathers, by Esther ^^ingleton. (2 vols. I 
Moderne Glaser, by Pazaurek. 
Old English Pottery, by Phillips. 

Antique Watches and how to Establish their Age, by Abbott. 
The Old Cider Mill, by Heilman. 



oy Google 



Periodicals Uiken for Library. 

Catalogue of Auction Sales ot <^'oiii» ami Medaln, by Lyman Low. 

Me«haii'» Monthly, Vol. 9. 

The ConnoiBseur. 

The International Studio. 

Birdaanil NatilK. 

Journal Society of Arts, Vol. 49. 

Oia China. 

American Journal of NiimUmfitics. 
All of wliioh is respectfully aiibmitted. 

WILLI.AM PLATT PEPPER, EDWIN ATl.KR BAIlBEll, 

Din-cUir. Cnmtur. 



Digilzed by Google 



a t 






I ?. 5 I ? i 3 I I I s I ? I I » I € ! 









II^MIllfll'^^l^^ 



:l^5sl55?2:'^f£||i 



IIS'^ffll^^T^lr'^ilj^^!'?? 






i R s s -a 



S S £g £ S S 



i S ^' S' s- S i- s- £ s '^ i 



DiciilizedOy Google 



J, Google 



REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL. 

Presented at the Closk op the Twenty-Fifth School Year 
June 5, 190-2. 

The School has been attended during the past year by 929 
pupils, 600 of whom were men and 329 women. 

Miss Margarette Lippincott, Instructor in Water-color Piiinting, 
who was absent during the preceding yesir, resumed her connec- 
tion with the School in October last, and Mr Albert Behm has been 
appointed instructor in Chemistry; with these exceptions no 
changes have been made in the teaching staff. 

In the larger field of direction and support the School has suf- 
fered an irreparable loss in the death of Mrs. Gillespie, who had, 
as one of the most active and efficient oi^nizers of the great ex- 
position of 187f>, which marks the beginning of the movemeut 
which this School represents, and as one who had, ever since that 
time, given to its development unremitting and untiring service, as 
rare and exceptional in its nature as it was generous and unlimited 
in extent. She was indefatigable alike in her efforts in behalf of the 
School itself and for the individual welfare of the students, a con- 
siderable number of whom were indebted to her for personal direc- 
tion and guidance as well us for the material assistance which made 
possible their attendance at the School, as well as the careers of 
usefulness and honor for which the School was a preparation. The 
memory of her devoted example and the service she rendered will 
long be cherished among the most helpful and inspiring influences 
which have shaped the character and marked the progress of the 
School. 

An important addition to the agencies for promoting the social 
and recreative phase of student life has been made in the organi- 
zation by the ynungwomen students of a club, known as the " Girls' 
Industrial Art League." A room on the first floor of the Broad 
Street front of the School building has been assigned to the use of 
the League, and has been attractively furnished and adapted to 
the uses of the oi^anization, the vitality and resourcefulness of 



oy Google 



ANTIQUE FIGURE, HEROIC SIZE, CALLED " NIO," OR GUARD. 

From OkIc ot Temple at Kara, Japan. From Joaepli K. Temple Trusl. 

Drmm by At. Louiu Bater, a Pupil of the School. 



oy Google 



40 

which have already been manifested by several entertainments 
and meetings which promise much in the way of healthy develop- 
ment and enjoyment. 

The " Art and Textile Club, " composed of young men, has also 
been organized, and the management of the Club Room and Gym- 
nasium, which were added two years ago by the Associate Com- 
mittee of women, has been formally transferred to the student body 
by that Committee. The " Warp and Weft Club " and two frater- 
nities (the " Delta Kappa Phi " and the ■' Delta Phi Psi ") continue 
with undiminished activity the work so well begun a few years ago. 

The first steps have also been taken this year to form an Associ- 
ation of Alumni, and such an organization, numbering upwards of 
a hundred members, has already been effected among the former 
students of the Textile School. Mr. Bradley C. Algeo has been 
elected President, and the first general meeting of the Association 
is to be held in the Auditorium of the School on Friday, June Gth. 
A similar movement is in progress among the former students of 
the School of Applied Art. 

Among the improvements made in the building and grounds, 
one which deserves special mention is the improvement of the 
garden in the Centra] Court, which has been made very attractive 
through the generosity of Miss Helen Taylor.a pupil of the School, 
at whose expense the work has been done, as a memorial to Miss 
Frances L. Farrand, the well-beloved instructor whose death was 
noted in my last Report. 

The development under Dr. Matthews' very efficient direction 
of the Department of Chemistry and Dyeing renders imperative 
the necessity of more adequate accommodations, and I trust that a 
suitable building for this purpose can be erected in season to be 
available at the beginning of the next School year. 

During the year there have been three hundred and twenty-four 
accessions to the Library of the School, divided as follows: 

Books (i3 

Collecliong of pliotographit, prints, etc., .... 74 

Periodicala, .......... 17 

Pamphlets and Reports 171 

324 
Of these, thirty-six books and collections of prints were pur- 
chased, the remainder being (he gifts of the following: 



oy Google 



41 

AoBfieniy Fellowshi|) (Pennsylvania Aca<lemy of Fine Arts), 
Alfred University, American Architect and Building Xews, Applied 
Arts Book, Boston Museum of Fine ArU, Mr. E. A. Barber, P. P. 
Caproni & Bro., Carpet and L'pliolstery Trade Review, Chic^^;o Art 



•^, 



ARBALEST OR CROSS-BOW. 
About Sixteenth Century. Given by Mr. Clarence B. Moore. 

Draien by ElizaUth Yarttall, a FnpU of the School. 

Institute, Cleveland School of Art, Council of Arts and Manufac- 
tures (Province of Quebec), Crockery and Glass Journal, Dry Goods 
Economist, Mr. Theodore N. Ely, Fibre and Fabric, Grolier Club, 
Hebrew Technical Institute, Hull Houee, The Inland Architect, 
Lehigh University, Mr. Edward Longstreth, Miss Fannie S. Magee, 



oy Google 



42 

Prof. William A. Mason, Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Manu- 
facturer, The Manufacturers' Journal, Mr. L. W. Miller, Merritt & 
Co., Mr J. Merritt Matthews, Mechanic Arts High School (Boston). 
Massachusetts State Board of Education, Mr. John T, Morris, Monu- 
mental News, National Association of Wool Manufacturers, New 
England Cotton Manufacturers' Association, Newark Technical 
School, Ohio State University, Painters' Magazine, City of Phila- 
delphia, State of Pennsylvania, Pratt Institute (Brooklyn), Pratt 
Institute Monthly, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arte, Progress, 
Miss Mary Price, Puhlic Education Association (Philadelphia), Mrs. 
Thomas Roberts, Mr. J. Schoenhof, Sir Swire Smith, Mr. T. B. 
Stockwell, Mr. H. F. Stratton.The Textile Record of America, Mr. 
Charles Thackara, Mr. A. T. Thompson, Soule Art Co., The Tex- 
tile World, United States Government, Mr. E. Burgess Warren 
University of Wisconsin, Mr. A. P. Willis, Dr. William P. Wilson 
Mr. P. A.B. Widener. 



Digiized by Google 



DONATIONS 

To THB School of Appi.ikd Art DimiNit the Pabt Year. 

Furniture and Material from a Library and Drawing-School in 
Frankford, presented by Mr, Henry M. Taylor. 

A collection of Ijcyden-ware, and old Dutch metal-work was 
made during the summer of 1901 in Holland by Mr. I.udwig E. 
Faber for Mr. Howard Fremont Stratton, by whom it was pre- 
sented to the School. 

From the estate of the late Mrs. Henry I). Welsh, through Miss 
Ella S. Welsh, and Mrs Laura Welsh Casey, the School has received 
the following articles of furniture and bric-a-hraci 

Piano (circa 1810), cradle, chair, cabinet, lustre, zither, violin, 
musket, revolver, 3 powder-flasks, 12 vases, jewel-box, 2 pearl shells, 
10 pieces of basketry, 30 costumes, 2 fans, 50 samples of stuffs, and 
a rococco table from the same estate has been loaned to the School. 

Mr. Charles II. Cramp presented a Japanese bronze incense bur- 
ner, and a collection of Oriental co.mumes. 

Mrs. Rudolph Blankenburg presented a carved ivory Japanese 
sword and scabbard. 

Jliss Margaret Corlies presented five complete costumes for the 
use of the Illustration Class. 

To THE Textile School Dukini: the Past Year. 

Thomas Halton'sSons, Philadelphia, Pa., one 600-hook Jacquard 
machine. 

John W. Hepworth & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., one hosiery looper, 

H. W. Butterworth & Sons Co., Philadelphia, Pa., one long chain 
dyeing machine, also 40 feet of tenter bar strips. 

Saco & Pettee Machine Shops, Newton, Upper Falls, Mass., one 
complete set of wrenches and gauges for card. 

Sauquoit Silk Mills, Philadelphia, Pa., one organzine silk warp, 
and necessary tram silk filling; also loan of harness and reed 
for same. 

George Butterworth, Philadelphia, Pa., one 3,800-end 2-30 cotton 
warp ; also labor of beaming. 



Digilzed by Google 



44 

Nathan R. S. Yewdall, Philadelphia Pa., two hand combs for 
worsted, used in the establishment of the worsted industry in 
Philadelphia. 

American Card Clothing Co., Philadelphia, Pa,, clothing for two 
fancies for wool card. 

Steel Heddle Mfg. Co., Philadelphia Pa., 3,000 steel heddlea. 

Charles Ashoff, Philadelphia, Pa., five reeds to the value of 
810.00. 

Charles Bond, Philadelphia, Pa., two bundles of leather belt 
lacing. 

Cling Surface Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N. Y., 30 pounds of Cling Sur- 
face belt grease. 

Draper (Jompany, Hopedale, Mass., 120 Speakman patent lever 
screws ; 2 L. H. No. 64 patent shuttles ; and 12 lock screws. 

Fales & Jenks Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. I,, 12 No. 94 bolsters 
for twister. 

Mitch ell- Biasell Co., Philadelphia, Pa., porcelain dye house 
rings. 

Yewdall & Jones, Philadelphia, Pa., 90 pounds of noils. 

Wilson & Bradbury, Philadelphia, Pa., 200 pounds of sample 
yams. 

Hampton Company, Easthampton, Mass., fifty pounds of mer- 
cerized yarn, also another lot of various colors of mercerized 
yarns. 

Galey & Lord Mfg. Co., Chester, Pa., 2."> pounds of various sizes 
and qualities of fine mercerized and unmercerized yarns. 

Andrea? & Co., Yale, Mich., 25 pounds of fancy twist yarn. 

National Association of Manufacturers, Philadelphia, Pa., 10 
pounds of cotton yarn. 

William H. Lorimer's Sons Co., Philadelphia, Pa., five pounds of 
mercerized yarn. 

; pounds Canton tram 

C. Moore & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., loom cord and twine. 

Thomas Oakes & Co., Bloomfield, N. J., samples of Kersey 
overcoatings. 

Farbenfabriken of Elbereld Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 15 pounds 
of dyestufT^, also 324 four ounce, 10 two-ounce, and S one-ounee 
samples of dyestutt's. 

Cassella Color Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 18 pounds of dyestuffs, also 
10 four-ounce and 12 one-ounce samples of dyestuffs. 



oy Google 



45 

Berlin Aniline Works, Philadelphia, Pa., 15 pounds of d 
also 10 four-ounce and 2 one-ounce Maniples of dyeetutfa. 

Harway Dyewood & Extract Co,, New York, N. Y., 13 pounds 
of dyewood extracts. 

Victor Koechl & Co., New York, N. Y., 10 pounds of dyestuffs ; 
also 29 four-ounce and 4 two-ounce samples of dyestuffa. 

Kuitroff, Pickhardt & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., five pounds of dye- 
stuffs ; also 4 four-ounce and 2 two-ounce samples of dyestuffs, 

0. Bischoff A Co., New York, N. Y., 3 pounds of dyestuffs, also 
7 one-ounce samples of dyestuffa. 

New York & Boston Dyewood Co., New York, N. Y., 1 pound 
of Dyewood extract, also 4 four-ounce samples and 2 one-ounce 
aamples of dyestuffs. 

Schoellkopf, Hartford & Hanna Co., Philadelphia Pa., 10 four- 
ounce and 3 one-ounce samples of dyeatuffs. 

Sykes & Street, Philadelphia, Pa., 1 pound of dyestuff, 1 pound 
sample of cotton softener and 4 four-ounce samples of dyestuffs. 

Kalle A Co., New York N. Y., 1 pound of dyestuff; also 3 one- 
ounce samples of dyestuffs. 

A. Klipatein & Co., New York, N, Y., 6 two-ounce and 4 one- 
ounce samples of dyestuffs. 

Read Holliday & Sons, New York, N. Y., 3 one-ounce samples 
of dyestuffs. 

J. J. Keller & Co., New York, N. Y., 2 one-ounce samples of 
dyestuffs. 

J. A. & W. Bird & Co., New York, N. Y., 1 one-ounce sample of 
dyestuff. 

COURTESIES EXTENDED. 

Davison Publishing Co., New York, N. Y. ; Mr. Edmund In- 
grnham, Philadelphia, Pa.; Albert HcUwig & Co., Philadelphia, 
Pa. ; Charlea Ashoff, Philadelphia, Pa. ; John Bridge, Chester, Pa. ; 
The Draper Company, Hopedaie, Mass. ; Schaum & Uhlinger, 
Philadelphia, Pa. ; 9. N. D. North, Boston, Mass. ; Erben, Harding 
& Co., Philadelphia, Pa. ; Fales & Jenks Machine Co., Pawtucket, 
R. I. ; Jacoh Miller's Sons & Co., Borich Mills, Philadelphia, Pa. ; 
John and James Dobson, Bradford Mills, Germantown, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. ; Folwell Bros. & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. ; George C. Hetzell 
Co., Chester, Pa. ; Rowland Croft, Sons & Co., Camden, N. J. ; Mill- 
ville Mfg. Co. Millville, N. J- ; Samuel A. Crozer & Son, Upland, Pa. ; 
Aberfoyle Mfg. Co., Chester, Pa. ; Firth & Foster Co., Philadelphia, 



oy Google 



46 

Pa. ; J. R. Foster & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. ; M. A. Furbush & Son 
Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa. ; Mr. F. H. Milner, Philadelphia, 
Pa. ; Mr. Edwiu Jones, Philadelphia, Pa. ; " Fibre and Fabric," 
Boston, Mass. ; " Textile World," Boston, Mass. ; " Textile Record," 
Philadelphia, Pa.; "The Manufacturer," Philadelphia, Pa.; "Textile 
Manufacturers' Journal," New York, N. Y. ; " Dry Goods Econ- 
omist, New York, N. Y. ; ■' Dixie," Atlanta, Ga. ; " Textile Colorist," 
Philadelphia, Pa. ; Hope Mills Mfg. Co., Hope Mills, N. C.;Sauquoit 
Silk Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

The Institution is also indebted to George Wharton Pepper, Esq., 
for legal advice j to Mr. William Inskip, a former pupil, for service 
in caring for the Exhibit of the School at the Pan-American Ex- 
position at BuiTalo ; and to the Vacuum Oil Co., which has donated 
all the oils used by the Engineers' Department. 

COMMENCEMENT. 

The Commencement exercises were held at Horticultural Hall 
on Tuesday evening, June 5th, and were followed by the Annual 
Exhibition of Students' work in the School Building, Broad and 
Pine streets. The address, "Our Debt tfl the Greater Art " was 
delivered by Talcott Williams, LL. D., the diplomas were awarded 
by Mr. John Story Jenks for the Board of Trustees ; the Associ- 
ate Committee of Women's Prisies, and the individual prizes offered 
by the ladies of that Committee were given by Miss Fannie S. 
Magee, Mrs. Frank K. Hippie, Miss M. Atherton Leach and Mrs. 
Jones Wister ; and the Textile World Gold Medal was awarded by 
Mr. Henry G. Lord. 

DIPLOMAS, PRIZES .\ND CERTIKrC.\TES AW.\RDED AT THE AN- 
NUAL COMMENCEMENT, JUNE -i, 1<J02. 

DIPLOMAS. 

SjHCfOL OF Afplied Art.— Boy Ellinger Blithe, Rita Lindaay. Krancis 
Bernard McCartney, Edna Williams Mohler, Anna Margaret Newbold, Jean 
Prichard Prettyman, Katliarine French Steiger, Evelyn Gladys St rauglin. 

Textilk Sciioiii- — Robert James Carson, Thomas Alexis Masterson, I>eoa 
Oarfield Meyer, Clarence Bernard Seal, Percy Taylor Phillips, Charles Louis 
Ross, WiUiam IIenr>- Smith, William Herbert Stafford. 



oy Google 



HARPSICHORD, SIXTEENTH CENTURY. 

Qiven hj Mrs. John Hnrrison. 

Draum by M. Louiee Baktr, a Pupil of the School. 



Digilzed by Google 



SCHOOL OF APPLIED ART. 

Associate Committk*: of Women's Phiki 
lieat set of drawings uxccutcd by students ii 
Awarded to Alexins Stroup. 

Honorable mention lo Nettie Campbell Cheabire and Dura Klizabetb RubertH. 

Skcomd Prize, $10.03.— For Original Design. .Art School. Awarded to 
Eeba Baxter. 

Honorable mention to John D. Van Aernan, Jr. 

Third Pbizk : For Original Design tor Printed Fabrics. Awarded lo tier- 
trude Alworth. 

Honorable mention to Maude Smith. 

Mrs. Jonks Wihtkr Prixk, Ji'.ljO. — For Original Design tor Interior Deco- 
ration. Awarded to Henry L. Keire. 

First mention to Joseph Deker. Seeond mention to Paul Hadley, 

Mrs. GfxiROK K. Crdzkr Prize, $iO. 00. —Offered tor the beat work in 
Drawing. Awarded lo John Weston Galbnilth. 

First raentioD lo Jean MacConiithy Hetlrick. Second toention lo Philip 
Kasaetl. Third mention to John Eissler, Paul W. Smith, 

Miw. Geoboe K. Criikkr Prizf^ f20,00.— For the best group of work in 
Modeling. Awarded to Edna Williams Mohler. 

First mention to Evelyn Gladys Straughn. Second mention to Roy E. 
Blithe. 

Caroline Axfobd Magkk Pbikk, $20.00.— For Original Design. Awarded 
to Paul Hadley. 

John J. Boyle Phije. — In Modeling. Awarded to Rita Lindsay. 

Frederic Grapf Prize, *2o.OO— For At<;hiteotural Design. Awarded lo 
J. Peter Klingefl, Jr. 

Honorable mention to John L. Coneys. 

He:nry Pebby Leland Prize, $2i.O0. — Offered by Mrs. John Harrison tor 
the tiest Work in Illustration. Awarded t^ Arthur Rodman Bowker. 

Commendations to M. Louise Baker, William J. Server, Thonia't K. Booth. 

Mas. Ei>WARD H. OaD^^!I SfEriAi. Prize, $10.00— For the best Figure 
Sketch. Awarded to William J. Smith. 

Honorable mention lo George Henry Melcher, 

F. Wrber Prize.— Drawing Table. Awarded to Jacob F. Sclieffler. 

Henrv M- Taws Prize: Wateh-Coi.or SKBrcinsnOirFiT. For beat work 
ill Water-Color Painting. Awarded to Edna Smith, 

First mention to Elizabeth Yamall. Second mention lo Jean MacConatliy 
llottrick. 

Mention tot good progress — Solomon Hess, Florence Melissa Cle^, 

Pai/E Scholarships eor -Si.-iiotii, Year 190^-1903.- Awarded to M. Louise 
Baker, Paul Hadley, Isabel Aitken, Emma A. McFeely, Nellie Campbell 
Cheshire. 



oy Google 



THRONE CHAIR. 
n old Peraian Mosque. From (be Juscpli K Temple Trusl. 

Drriun 4y William John Server, a Papil 0/ the Sfhool. 



oy Google 



TEXTILE SCHOOL. 

AesiJciATB Committee op W 
in Jacquard E)eaigDs. Third ji 

Honorable mention to Witliam U. Stafford. 

The Elizabeth C. BoBEitre Pkize, (10.00. — For beat work in Color Harmon; 
and Deaign. Awarded to Herbert M. Bemington. 

Honorable mention to tiouis £. Raehtmann. 

The Mias Clyde Prize, SIO.OO.— The best executed work in Jacquard Design. 
Second year; Awarded to Harry Taylor. 

Honorable mention to Frank W. Hoffman. 

The "Textile Woki.d" Gold Medal.— For Thesia: "Action of Nitric 
Acid on ColtOD," Awarded to Percy T. I'hilHpa. 

New Enoland CoTros Manufactukeiu* Association Medal.— For Gen- 
eral Excellence. Entire Coarse. Awarded lo William H. Stafford. 

Honoralile mention lo Robert J. Canon. 

DvEBs' Tradb Journal Prize— Chemical Balance. —For results in Ap- 
plication of Dyee to Various Textile Fibres. Awarded to Thomas M. Robb. 

Honorable mention W. Leicester DaC. Ward, on Methods of Dyeing Silk. 

I'ftiZE SoHULABSHiPs FOR ScHOOL Year 1902-1903.- A wan led to Stephen 
H. Gamer, Abraham A. Levy, Frederick C. Denkhaus (Evening Claesl. 

Honorable mention to John Kellars, Jr., Wm, J. Maurer, Herbert W. 
Spalding, Herbert M. Remington, Louis E. Ruehlman. 

CERTIFICATES, SCHOOL OF APPLIED ART. 

Certificate B — Decorative Painting and .\ppukdAkt.— Isabel Aitken, 
Gertrude Bun Atworth, Reba Baxter, Ida Belle Bornmann, John Melville 
Deibert, Joseph Deket, Paul Hadtey, Julia Florence Knofflock, W. Irving 
Knowles, Bertha D. Perdue, Charles R Sheeler, Jr., Maude Smith, Grace 
Lillian Uihan, Esther Elizabeth Wolle. 

Special Dekign Certificate. — Mary Calliata Eagaa 

Illcktbation. — M. Louise Baker, .Arthur Rodman Bowker, Thomas Egbert 
Booth, William John Server. 

Architectiral Drawing. —Ralph Buckley Bencker, John Peter Klinges, 
Walter Thomas Mayo, John Llewellyn Coneys, William Lehman, Leslie Walter 
Murray. 

Class A. — Industrial Drawing. — Jennie Ailler, Edna Bartlett, Blanche 
Stanley Brennemau, Bertha Brown, Florence Clhrist Callaghan, Nettie Campbell 
Cheshire, Margaret Custer, Esther Lincoln Fellows, John Donald Hinds, Walter 
Paul Keely, Alice May Long, Edgar Lewis Pearce, Lulu Emilia CaaenoviaRau, 
Edith Harper Smith, Paul Williamson Smith, William Brooke Smith, Alexina 
Stronp, Corallie Philomena Benedict Thoma, Jesnuette Wellierald, Richard 
Berriman, Ida Belle Bornmann, Jason David Broomall, Samuel Preaton Craig- 
hill, Elizabeth MacMillan Campbell, John Melville Deibert, George Albert 
Grant, Orlena lx)i)ise Henderson, Ophelia Eleanor Kenan, Esmond Harper 
King, Emma Augusta McFeely, Howard Lewis Ffersching, Dora Elizabeth 



oy Google 



COLONIAL LANTERNS. 

In the Mrs. W. D. FriBhmiith Collection. 

Draim by Eliiabrth Yanudi, a Pupil of the School. 



Digilzed by Google 



62 

Roberta, Maude Smith, Oraonia Minerva Sbafer, Deborah Hawle; Smedley, 
Helen Thorlow, Joseph Leon WoolTerton, Florence Knowlea Yardl«f , William 
Lewis Zieger, Htram Bueck Wright. 

Indcotriax DsAwtKO. — Teacqebs' Cocbbe. — M. Louise Baker, Blanche 
Stanle; Brenneman, Bita LindaB]', Edna Williams Mohler, Boy Ellenger Blithe, 
M. Irene Huber, Deborah Hawie; Smedle;, Katharine French Steiger. 

Elemehtary TBACHB>t'sCEBTiFiCATK8.—Clotilde Elizabeth Phalen, Emma 
Eliza Sheppard. 

CERTIFICATES, TEXTILE SCHOOL. 

Skcond Year Reoular Day Class : 

Nathan Monroe Bachman, Frank William HoSman, John Kellars, Jr., Wil- 
liam Joseph Maurer, Harrj' Taylor, Stephen Holla Qamer, Frederick Lyne 
Keen, Alfred Stanley Lucas, Herbert Wright Spalding. 

Sbcond Year Silk Clasb— Day : 

John Theodore Winkhaus. 

Second Year Cotton Clab^ — Day : 

Clifford Jewett Swift. 

Second Year Wool Class — Day ; 

C. B. Gilbert, John Visscher Eliot, Edward Ludington ElioL 

Second Year CiiBMrsrRy akd Dyeing— Day : 

Joseph Fred Lieberman, George Raphael Hunter, George SylTester Hen- 
neuy, Thomas Miller Bobb. 

THtRD Year CiiBMiarRY— Evenino : 

David L. Bockius, William Thompson. 

TniRO Yeah Dyeiso — Even I NO : 
- John R Clarke. Adolph Scholler, Jewe Williams. 

Third Year Kboular Ci-ass— Evenino : 

Joseph Rrennian, John F. Gorman, Harry A. Mulholland, Frank Donnelly, 
William Milligan, W. B. Preston, Crawghaw Woireaden. 

Twenty-eight appointments to State Scholanhipa have been made this year, 
vii., for the following counties: Alleglieny, Berks, Bucks, Cambria, Centre, 
Chester, Clinton, Dauphin, Erie, Fayette, Franklin, Indiana, Juniata, Lacka- 
wanna, Lawrence, Northumberland, Pike, Philadelphia (6), Tioga, Union, 
Wayne, Westmoreland, Wyoming, York. 

Seventy-four holders oF llieee Scholaiships were registered this year. 

The scholarships placed at the disposal of tlie Board of Public Education for 
the Grammar Schootx oF the city were filled, as usual, by a competitive exami- 
nation, conducted by the Principal, each Grammar School Principal being 
authorised lo send candidates. 

In addition to the above, appointments were made as usual to the scholanhipa 
which are annually filled from the High, Normal, Manual Training and Public 
Industrial An schools of this city. 

Appended are lists of students showing their previous occupa- 
tions and the localities from which they come : 



oy Google 



Be&men 

Clerks, . , . . 

Caqteotera and Builders, 
Card Stampen and Cutters, , 
Chemists, .... 
Draut^bUmen, 
Designers, . . . . 

BressDwkers Mid Miltiners, . 
Engravers, .... 
Eagineers, .... 
Finishen, . , . . 
IlloBtnitars, .... 
Laborers, .... 
Loom-Fiiera, 
Manufacturers, 



Mechanics, II 

Metal Worfcere, .... 3 
Punters and Decorators, . IS 

Photographers, .... 2 

Printers, 4 

Preachers, ..... 1 
Salesmen, ... . . 20 
Superintendents, . . . .11 

Splitters, 3 

Spinners 4 

Solicitors, 3 

Teachers 37 

Upholsterers, .... 2 

Weavers, 22 

Miscellaneous, ■ .25 
Students, 639 

Total, 929 



LOCAUTIES REPRESENTED. 



Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, 
New Seney, 
New York, . 



Virginia, 6 

Maiyland 6 

Rhode Island, 5 



West Virginia 2 

California, 2 

Oregon, 2 

Georgia, 2 

Delaware, 2 

Alabama, 

Texas, 

Wisconsin, 

Michigan, 

niinois, 

North Carolina, 

Missouri 

Washington, 

District of ColDmbia 

England, 

Total registration, S29 



L. W. MILLER, 



Prine^l of tie ScMfiQlc 



REPOET OF THE TREASURER. 



(For Year Ending Ma; 
B&lance od hand June 1, 1901, 
Tuition Fees, Art School, . 
" " Teitile School, 
" " Language Claas, 

Income of Endowment Fund, 
" " Temple Fund, . 
" " Chapman Biddle Fund, 
" " Clayton French Fund, 
" " F. A. OrafT Fund, 
" " Mrs. G. K. CrozerFund, 

" Mrs. Wra. Weightman, Jr., Fund, 
" " Elizabeth Duane Gillespie Fund, 
Interest on Deposits, 
Appropriation, City of Philadelphi 
" State of Pennsylvai 

" Park 

Annual Members, 
Park Guides and Photos, . 
Offertory BoTes at Museum, 
Final Dividends from SpringGarden National 
New Century School Fund, 
Temporary Loans, ...... 

Bequest, Mrs. F. A. Graff, 

General Expenses, sale of old Materials, etc., 

1336 Spring Garden Street. Net Rent, . 

DONATlONa 
John Story Jenks, New Building Fund, . 
Mn. B. S. J. Randolph, Building Fund, 
John Slory Jenks, Cases and Library, 
Clarence B. Moore, casee, 

H. H. FuraesB, 

Special Collection Cor Museum Objects, . 

Bpecial Plate Fund, 

Muaeum Library Fund, .... 



49 00 . 
4,237 50 
2,104 00 

50 00 
50 00 

40 00 
72 60 
50 00 

142 00 
222 68 
10,000 00 
30,625 00 
9,577 55 
1,015 00 
5 60 

41 86" 
22 28 
70 00' 

16,312 00 

mi 60 

144 14 
1,651 82 



10,000 00 

600,00 

250 00. 

1,276 00 

10 00 
436 00 

11 60 
15 34 



oy Google 



55 



EXPENDITURES. 

MMnteiumce o( Museam $1A,497 66 

Temple Fund Hiueum Pnrcbues, .... 852 28 

School Bailding Wages uid Ezpenae*, . 4,278 41 

lUpaira and Alterations, 489 67 

Adreitising 1,131 86 

Art School SalaHn and Wage«, .... 11,02002 

" Expeoaei, 683 83 

" " Equipments, 157 77 

Textile School Salaries and Wa^es, .... 10,606 04 

" Eipenaes, 1,061 26 

" " Equipments, 130 S4 

Administration Salaries and Wages, .... 9,202 60 ' 

" Equipmenta, 131 00 

LanguBge Class, Salaries, 660 CO 

Special Plate Fand, ...... 43 00 

Gas Aocount, . 646 00 

Coal Account, ........ 1,036 30 

Insnrance, ........ 553 88 

Interest, 20,463 20 

Oeneral Expenses, 4,138 18 

Museum Library Fund, 87 62 

L. W. Miller, advanced to pay bills, ... 200 00 

1336 Spring Oarden Street. Income Account, 1,868 10 

Temporary Loans Repaid 9,120 63 

Offertory Account— Purchawa, 16 00 

Museum Case Fund, 2,248 43 

TotoU, 1101,603 13 

June 1, 1902, Balance (12,058 37 

BALANCE SHEET, MAY 31, 1902. 

Dr. Or. 

12 Cash, $12,068 37 

28 Temporary Ixun, (30,000 00 

47 Office Furniture 729 61 

61 School " 1,500 00 

66 SboT Cases, 16,936 37 

66 Library 2,700 45 

71 Engravings and Photos, 1,187 92 

75 Carvings, Ivory and Bone, .... 76941 

79 Mosiuca 300 00 

83 Leather Work, 10 00 

91 Wood Work 4,252 56 

95 Jewelry and Goldsmiths' Work, ... 312 96 

99 Silversmiths' Work and Plate, .... 5,742 25 

103 Metal Work, 6,217 49 

n I Metal and Plaster Casts, 3,448 99 

115 Arms and Armor, 1,708 79 * 

Digilzed by Google 



56 



9 Coiiw and M«dala, $180 00 

3 EDftmeU OD MeUl, 2,014 88 

7 Pottery 8,627 23 

1 Porcelain 2,893 94 

5 Painted and Stained Glaiw, .... 109 26 

9 Glass Vegsels, 662 82 

1 Sculpture in Marble, Stone, etc., 1,820 23 

3 Textile Fabrics and Embroideries, . 5,087 94 

5 Musical Inatnimenta, 44 94 

7 L«ce, 1,190 20 

9 Oil PainUogB, 100 30 

L. W. Miller, advanced to pay bills, ... 200 00 

1 Museum Fund Library, $69 72 

3 Offertory Account, 767 80 

4 Special Plat* Fund, 10 42 

6 J. T. Morris, advanced to purcliase objects at 

Paris Kiposition, ..... 312 00 

7 Museum Case Fund, 336 17 

5 New Building Fund (Laboratory, etc), . 10,600 00 

6 Special Fund Museum— Purchase new objecU, . 436 00 

6 1336 Spring Garden Street. luTestment, . . 18,311 29 

7 Mortgage. 1S36 Spring Garden St., 22,000 00 

8 1336 i>pring Garden St. Income, ... 39266 
4 DoDBtione for Purchase Broad and Pine Streets, 205,171 28 

2 Profitand Loss, !33,824 69 

6 Mneeum Temple Fund Account, . 4,465 99 

9 Temple Fund. Inve«ment, .... 54,095 69 

3 Endowment Fund Investment, .... 89,947 60 

;4 Endowment Fund. 81,906 81 

16 Temple Fund, 53,379 00 

1 Life Members, 14,990 00 

8 Donstion?, 62,622 20 

>3 Wm. Weightman, Jr., SchoUrsliip, . 1,000 00 

4 Wm. Weightmau, Jr., ScholarHbip Investment, 982 60 

6 F. Graff Architectural Prize Fund, ... 500 00 

'6 F. Graff Architectural Prine Fund Investment, . 5uO 00 

i6 F. Graff Architectural Prize Fund Income, 40 00 

J Centennial Board of Finance 3 12 

9 Seal Estate, Broad and Pine Streets, . 550,778 99 

i7 Mortgage* on Broad and Pine Streets, 417,000 00 

12 Chapman Biddle .Memorial Scholarship, . 1,000 00 

12 Chapman Biddle Memorial Scholarship Investment, 1,000 00 

3 Clayton French Free Scholarship, . . . 1,000 00 

13 Clayton French Free Scholarship Investment, . 1,000 00 

14 Mrs. G. K. Crozer Prize Fund, , . , . 1,500 00 
A Mrs. G. K. Crozer Prize Fund Investment. 1,500 00 

14 Mrs. G. K. Crozer Prize Fund Income, . . 122 50 

i7 Gillespie Scholarship Fund, .... 13,100 00 

(7 Gillespie Scholarship Fund Investment, . 13,100 00 

i8 Gillet^pie Scholarship Fund Income, 142 00 

$922,646 57 $922,646 67 



REPORT OF THE ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF 

WOMEN. 

The Associate Committee of Women has rounded out another 
year of service and it is the Secretary's pleasing duty to report 
that great interest has been shown by its members. The monthly 
meetings have been well attended, at which times reports have 
been read from all the different Committees, so that each member 
has been kept in touch with the work of the organization as a 
whole. 

At the annual meeting the Treasurer reported the amount of 
money on hand from all sources was $1,936.67. 

We have read with special interest of the many gifts given to 
the Museum during the last year, and also of the constantly in- 
creasing number of visitors to the Museum, particularly on Sun- 
day afternoons. 

The Students' Club has prospered, and the reading room with 
its attractive surroundings has been fully appreciated by the stu- 
dents of the School, as has also the pool table and other pleasures 
connected with the athletic side of life, and the Committee feel 
sure that these pleasures help to keep up the moral tone of the 
students. 

A great shadow fell upon the Committee at the October meeting 
when we heard of the illness of our Presidentj Mrs. Gillespie, and 
very shortly afterward the notice of her death came to us. She 
was gone ! She who was the originator, the heart and centre of the 
whole work, and the source from which came the impetus to do 
our best, and for a time we felt as if the end of the work too must 
come; but we took heart of grace and have gone steadily on with 
that work which was so near to her heart. 

The minutes in memory of Mrs. E. D. Gillespie were prepared 
by Miss Fannie S. Magee and have been placed on the minute book. 

At the annual meeting in January Mrs. Edward II. Ogden was 
unanimously elected President, Mrs. Richard Peters, Vice Presi- 
dent, Miss Ellen McMurtrie, Treasurer, and Mrs. David E. Dallam, 
Secretary. 



oy Google 



58 

Mrs. William D. Frishmuth had kindly offered her Colonial 
relics to be exhibited at the School, and we had at the same time 
the promise of a fine collection of textiles from Boston to be 
shown ; so it was decided to combine the two exhibitions. Num- 
bers of beautiful tapestries were also loaned us and the result was 
most gratifying. 

Mrs. John Wister, as Chairman of the Textile Committee, took 
charge of the exhibition, and it was to her untiring energy that 
much of the success was due. 

The exhibition was open free to the public for the month oC 
April, and the number of visitors was great Mrs. Wister bad in- 
terested a number of young girls in the work, and each afternoon 
tea was served by them to the visitors, at which time at least one 
of the Associate Committee was always present. 

In connection with this exhibition there were four lectures 
given for the students on subjects relating to art. Through Mrs. 
Jones Wister we had a most beautiful concert given for us at the 
Gaft'ick Theatre, by Madame Gadski, and the amount raised by 
this method, $600, was given to the fund for the proposed new 
chemical laboratory. 

The only other festivity to note was the afternoon reception at 
the Museum in the month of May, which was very successful. 

It is gratifying to know that all these entertainments became 
the means of interesting many new persons in the Institution. 

The work of the Committee has now ended for the season, and 
with thanks to those who liave " held up their hands " by helping 
them in their work, and looking forward to a renewal of their ef- 
forts in the autumn, this report is 

Respectfully submitted. 

A. L. DALLAM, 

Secretan/. 

June 9, 1902. 



Digilzed by Google 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 
SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



list of patrons, life members, 
Ahnual and Honorary Members. 



FenoDB who ma; wiih to become members are invited to tend their rwmet and 
addreeses to the Secretary. Blank forms of Devise and Bequest will be found 
upon page AO. A check to the order of the Treaaurer will be promptly ac- 
knowledged. 

Patrons Donoraot Fire Thousand Dollars aodnpward, 

whether in mone]' or objects tor the Museum. 
Life Membership, . . . One Hundred Dollani. 
Annual Membership, . . A sabecription of not less than Five Dollais. 
Honorary Membership, . Those who, on account of their interest in In- 
dustrial Art Education or the Fine Arts, shall 
be deemed worthy of election. 
" All funds received from Palrona (unless otherwise gpeci6callj given} and 
from Life Membership shall be permanently inveuted aa part of the Endowment 
Fund. " — By-Lom, 



*Bsinl, John 
•Barton, Mrs. Susan R. 
•Bloom field -Moore, Mrs. 
•Childs, George W. 
Disston, Henry & Sons 
•Dreiel, A. J. 
•Dreiel, F. A. 
•Garrett, W. E., Jr. 
•Gibson, Henry C. 



•Houston, H. H. 

Lea, Henry C. 

Morris, John T. 

Search, Theodore C. 
•Scott, Mrs. Thomas A. 

Weightman, William 

Whitne}r, A. & Sons. 

Wiater, Mrs. Jones 



oy Google 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



Allen, Joseph 
Allen, Joseph, Jr. 
'Araold, Crairtord 
Boeder, Adaauon & Co. 
Baily, Joel J. 
Baird, Mrs. Matthew 
•Baker, John ». 
*Baker, W. a 
Barclaj, B. D. 
Barclay, Mrs. B. D. 
*Bartol, R IL 
Hanoi, H. W. 
Baugb, Daniel 
•Bicklej, H. W. 
"Biddle, Alexander 
Biddle, MisB A. E. 
'Biddle, Chapman 
*Biddle, Mrs. Chapman 
•Biddle, Clement 
•Biddle, Walter L. C. 
Blanchsrd, MUg A. 
Blanchard, Miw H. 
Blsnchard, MIbs M. 
•Borie. a & H. 
•Bowen A Fo« 
•Brown, Alexander 
Burnham, George 
Bumham, Parrjr, WiUiams & Co. 
Butcher, Henry C 
Butcher, Mrs. H. C. 
Button, ConyerE 
•Caldwell, J. E. 
Caldwell, J. E. & Co. 
Campbell, Mrs. St. George T, 
•Carter, W. T. 
Carver, W, Burton 
Cassatt, A. J. 
•Catherwood, H. W. 
•Chapman, Joseph 
•Chew, Samuel 
•Claghom, James L. 
Ctaghom, J. Raymond 
Clark, Charles D. 



Clark, Clarence H. 
•Clark, Ephraim 

Clark, K W. 
•Clark, J. Hinckley 
•Clayton, John 
•Clyde, Thomas 
•Coete*, Benjamin 
Coatee, Edward H. 
Cochran, M. 
•Cochran, Thomas 
Coffio, Al[«mus & Co. 
Coleman, B. Dawson 
•Coleman, Mre. G. Dawson 
Coleman, Edward P. 
Coles, Miss Mary 
Colket, C Howard 
Collins, H. H. 
Cooper, John H. 
•Cope, Caleb 
Cornelius A Sone 
•Creasoo, W. P. 
Croier, George K. 
•Crozer, Mre. George K. 
•Crozer, J. Lewis 
•Cnyler, Mre. Theodore 
Dick, Mrs. F. A. 
•Dieston, Albert H. 
•Dieston, Hamilton 
•DiaoKm, Mrs. H. C. 
•Dobbins, R J. 
Dobson, John & James 
Dolan, Thomas 
Dolan, Thomas & Co. 
Dougherty, James 
•Dreer, F.J. 
Dahring, Mrs. Henry 
Eddystone Manufacturing Co. 
•Furies, Mrs. Randolph 
•Fenimore, Edward L. 
•Fox, Miss Mary D. 
•Fuguet, Stephen O. 
Garrett, Miss K 
Garrett, Miss J. 



Digilzed by Google 



GMTett, P. C. 
Garrelt, Mrs. Waller 
OibtOQ, Miaa Rebecca 
•Gowen, Fnoklia B. 
•Graff, Frederic 
•Graff, Mrs. Frederic 
Green, Stephen 
Hugstoi & Thorpe 
Harrison, A, C. 
Harrison, Havemeyer & Co. 
Harrison, Mrs. Joneph 
Harrison, Thomas S. 
*Hart, Samuel 
•Heberton, (i. Craig 
Hill, George W. 
•Hockley, Miw Annie E. 

Hockley, Miss Mary 
•Hockley, Thomas 

Hockley, Mrs. Thomas 
•Hockley, William Stevenson 
•Horstmann, F. O. 

Horslmann, W. H. A Sons 

Houston, Mrs. H. H. 
•Hughes, J. O. 

Hunter, James A John 

Iiiogerich A Smith 
•James, John O. 

Jayne, David & Song 
•Jones, Jacob 

Jones, Washington 

Justice, Bateman A Co. 
•Justice, Miss Cecilia 

Justice, William W. 

Justice, Mrs. William W. 

Klemu, Mrs. Msria L. 
•Knight, Edward C. 
•Lea, Isaac 

Lee, Mrs. Leigh ion 
•Lenis, Edwin M. 
•Lewis, Henry 

Lewis, Richard A. 

Little, Amos R. 

Little, Amos R. A Co. 
•Lovering, Joseph S. 
•Lovering, Joseph 8. , Jr. 



McNeely, Miss Florence 
McN'eely, Robert K. 
McNeely, Mrs. Robert K. 
MacVeagh, Wayne 
•Massey, William 
May, Mrs. Joseph 
Meirs, Mrs. R. Wahi 
•Merrick, Miss E. H. 
Merrick, J. Vaughan 
•Merrick, Mins L. W. 
•Merrick, Mrs. S. V. 
Merrick, William H. 
Miles, Mm. M. L. 
Miles, Thomas 
Milne, David 
•Mil liken, James 

Moore, Clarence B. 
•Moore, James 
•MorriB, P. Pembertoa 
•Morria, Wlrtar 

Murphy, Frank W. 

Murphy, Miss Helen L. 
*Nevrbold, Charles 
•Ncwbold, John S. 

Newbold, Mrs. John S. 
•Noblit, Dell 

Norris, Charles 

Norris, Isaac, M.D. 
•Page, Joseph F. 
•Patterson, Joseph 
•Pepper, George S. 
•Pepper, Lawrence S. 
•Pepper, William, M.D. 

Pepper, William Plait 
•Phillips, Henry M. 
•Phillips, Moro 

Piatt, Charles 
•Piatt, Franklin 

Porter & Coates 
•Ponltney, Charles W. 
•Powers, Mrs. Thomas H. 

Price, Eli K., Jr. 

Provident Life and Trust Co. 
•Randolph, Evan 

Randolph & Jenks 



J, Google 



■Rhoads, Miaa Eliubetb 
■BobertB, Charles 

Roberts, Mn. Chttrtes 
"RobeHa, Jacob, M.D. 
'Rogers, C. K. 
*Rogen, Fairnian 
•Rogere, W. D. 

Santee, Charles 

Scott, James F. 
*Soott, Mrs. James P. 

Scull, D. & Co, 
•Seybert, Henry 

Sellers, Colemati 
'"Sharpless, Cbarlea S. 
•Shelton, Carlos 

Shelton, F. H, 

Shelton, Frederic K 
•Shelton, Mrs. F. R. 
'"Sherman, Rofter 

Shortridge, N. Parker 
*8uiith, Charles E. 
'"Smith, Thomas 
•Smyth, Lindley 
•Solms, a J. 

Sommerrille, Maxwell 
•Spencer, Charles 
•Steele, Edward T. 

Steele, E. T. & Co. 

Stevenson, Mrs. Cornelius 



62 

Stnwbridge, J. C. 

Sweatman, V. C. 

Taitt, Mrs. C. G. 
•Teinpte, Joseph E. 
•Thomas, 8. Harvey 

Thropp, Mrs. Joseph E. 

TowDsend, Mrs. H. C. 
•Tyler, George F. 
•Vaui, William S. 
•Vollmer, Gottlieb 

Wagner, Samuel 
•Wagner, Mrs. T. 
•Warfen, W. O. 
•Warner, Redwood F. 
•Welsh, Samuel 
"Wernwag, Theodore 

Wharton, Joseph 
•Wheeler, CharleH 

Whitall, Talum & Co. 
•White, Samuel S. 
"Williams, Edward H. 

Wister, Mrs. Jones 

Wood, Stuart 

Wood, WiUiara A Co. 

Wright, Edward N. 
•Wright, James A. 
•Wright, John W. 

Wurta, Charles Stewart, M.D. 



Digilzed by Google 



Annual Members (fur 1901-1902) who have subecribed not leB8 
than ten dollars. 



Bemeni, Clarence S., . . . . $10 00 

Bergiier, C. W., 10 00 

Biddle, CsdiraliBder, . '" " 

BUkiston, Mrs. Pre»kj, 
hone, Mr*. Henry P., . 
Brazier, Joseph H., . . 
Brown, MiM Martha M.. 
Browa, T. Wistar, . . . 
Biimhara, Mrs. AViltiain, 
Cadwalader, Mn. John, 
Caldwell, J. E. A Co., 



10 00 
10 00 
JO 00 
10 00 

10 w 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
Castner, Samuel 10 00 



Chandler, T. P., Ji 
Clark, .M 188 Fiances, . . . 

Cochran, Travis 

Cochran, Mn. Travix, . . 

Coles, EdvBitl, 

ConTerse, John IL, . . . 
Core, Aleiander B., . . . 
Croier, MiisAdaM., . . . 
Dale, Richard ('.,.... 
Dallam, Mrs. D. E., . . . 
Denniston, Mrs. E. E., . . 
Dickson, Samuel, .... 
Elkins, William L., , . . 
Ellison, Mis. Rodman B., 
Felton, Mrs. Samuel M., . 
OallovHv, William, . . . 
•Uillespie, Mrs. E. D., . . 
Gillingbam, Joseph E., . . 
Oowen, Mrs. Francis I., 
Rrair, Miss Uenrietla, . . 
Gratx. Miss Etlubeth, . . 

Guilloti, Victor, 

Hamilton, W. C, ... 
nance Brothera & While, ■ 
Harris, Mrs. J. Campbell, 
Harrison, Mrs. Joseph. . 



10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 



Hippie, Frank K., 10 00 

Hippie, Mrs. Fiank K., . . 10 00 

Hntchinson, Miss, 10 00 

Hunter, T. Comly 10 00 

Jack, Dr. Ixinis, 10 00 

Jannej, Mrs Robert M., . . 10 00 

Jsyne, Mrs. David, .... 10 00 

Jayne, Dr. Horace, .... 10 00 

JenkB, Mrs. William F., . . 10 00 

Jones. Bdw. EuascU, .... 1000 

Justice, Wm. W., 10 00 

Justice, Mrs. Wm. W., . . . 10 00 



Kwn, Dr. W. W., 
Keith, Sidnev W., 
Kennedy, Mrs. Elii 
Knowilon, G. II., 
Learh.Miss Mary Atherton, . 

l^iewiH, Enoch, 

•Lewis, Dr. F. W., . . 
Lewis, Robert M., . . 
Lippincoll, Mrs. Craige. 
Ijppincott, UiB. HoraceG., 
*Lippinc«tI, Mra. Joshua, 
Loverina, Mrs. Joseph S., 
Magee, Miss Anna, 
Mafee, MissEliiaJ., 
Ma^ee, Miss Fannie S. 
Mai^H.', Horace, ■ . 
Miller, Jacob, Sons & 
MonlKm, Mrs. Byron 1 . 
McMuririe, Miss Ellen, 
Neall, Frank L., . . . 
Newhall, George M., . 
tlgden M«. l-3w. II., 
Paul, I>r. James W., 
Paul. MiwM. W., . 
Pepper, David, . . 
Randolph. Mrs. Evan, 
Rcilly, Mrs. T. A., 
Ritchie, Craig D., . 
Roberts, Miss E. C, 
Roberts, Miss F. A., 
Roberts, Mrs. George B., 
Roberts, Mrs. Thomas, . 
Rodman, Mrs. Lewis. 
Rosengarten, J. G. , 
Rowland, Mrs. Benjar 
Sanders, Anne N., . . . . 
Shober, Mrs. Samuel L., . 
Sinnott, Mnt. Joseph F., . 
Smith, Miss Christiana B., 
Smith. Edward Brlnio 
Smvlh, Mrs. Samuel, . 
Thomson, Mrs. J. Edgar, . . 
WeiRhtman, Mrs. John Fsrr, 
Welsh, John Lowber, . . . 
Welsh, Mrs. John Lowlier, . 
Weygandt, C N., . . . 
Wheeler, Mrs. Charles, . 
Wister, Mrs. Caspar, . . 
Wood, Miss Juliana, - . 
Wright, Mrs. Robert K., 



Digilzed by Google 



Annual Members (1901-1902) who have subBcribed not less than 
five dollars. 



Aiman & Harper, .... 
Asbhant, Richard L., . . 
Ashhurst, Mra. Richard L., 
Bartol, Mrs. C. Chevner, . 
Bergner, Mrs. C. Willj&m, 
Bergner, Miss Catharioe, . 
Bigelow, Mrs. S. I^awreoce, 
CEirter, Mrs. WilllBm T., , 
Clark, MiM Amie Hampton, 
Clark, Mrs. C. Howard. 

Colket,G. H., 

Colton, S. W., Jr., . . . 
Corliea, Miss Margaret I 
CrewH-ell, Miss Eliubeth P., 
CurtiD, Mrs. Bolaad G.. 
Daoa, Charles E., . . . 
Bana, Mrs. Charles K, . 
Dav, Frank Miles, . 
De' Haven, Mrs. Holstei 
Diesel. Charles, .... 
Duane, Russell, . . . 
Gest, Mrs. William P., . 
Grant, MtB. W. 8., Jr., 
HarrisoD, John, .... 
HarrisoD, Mr8. John, . . 



(3 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
S 00 

5 00 

6 00 
6 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 

a 00 



Hovell, Mra. Charles H., 
Jastrow, Mrs. Morris, . 
Eennard, Mrs. Fred. K., 
McFadden, Mrs. George, 
Morwili, Joseph, Jr., 
Newlio, Mrs. Richard M. , 
Norris, Miss Clara Genevra, 
Norton, Mis. Charles D., 
Pearaall, Mrs. Robert, . 
Pepper, Mrs. John W., . 
Pelera, Mia. Richard, . 
Randolph, Miss Anna, . 
BeTbum, Mra. W. S., . 

Sailer, John, 

Simpson, Mrs. William, 
Siter, Mrs. E. Hollinmirorth, 
Walker, Mra. R. J. C., 
Weightman, Miss Bertha, 
WinpeDD7, Mrs. J. Bolton, 
Wirgman, Mrs. Charles, 
Wister, Mrs. Jones, . . 
Wright, Joseph, . - . 
Zell, MissH. A 



(5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
b 00 
S 00 
5 00 
S 00 
5 00 
5 00 
g 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 



6 00 

5 00 

a 00 

6 00 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

Atwood, Eugene, Atirood Machine Co., Stonington, Conn. 

Berry, A. Hun, Boston, Mass. 

Boyd, James, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brown, Edwin, American Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Bumham, Charles C., Easton & Burnham (Stock Company), Pawtucket, R. I. 

Burnham, George W., Easlon A Burnham (Stock Corapanyl, Pawtucket, R. I. 

Campbell, Malcolm, Woonsocket Machine and Press Co., Woonsocket, R. I. 

Cochran, J. C, Charlottesville Manu^turing Co., Charlottesville, Vi. 

Comins, Frank R, Aerophore .\ir-MoiBlening & Ventilating Co., Providence, 

R. 1. 
Crompton, Charles, Crompton Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Denny, Charles A., American Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Mtx. 
Draper, Geo. A., Hopedale, Mass. 

Easton, Frederic W., Eastern & Burnham, Pawtucket, R. I, 
Easton, Nicholas R., Easton & Burnham, Pawtucket, R. I. 
Falea, Le Roy, Fales & Jenke Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. 1. 
Firth, William, American Drosophore Co., Boston, Mass. 

Fletcher, George A., Schaum &Uh1inger (Fletcher Works), Philadelphia, Pa, 
Furbush, Merrill A., M. A. Furbush & Son Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 



oy Google 



Oric«, Edwin C, M. A. Furbu»h 4 Son Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Orinnell, Frederic, Aerophore Air-Moiat«ning A Ventilating Co., Providence, 

R. I. 
Hale, F. J., Pettee Machine WorH Newton t:pper Falls, Maw. 
Hartwell, F. W., .\erophore Air-Moiglening & Ventilating Co., Providence, 

R. I. 
Hopkins, WillUm a, Woonsocket Machine A Press Co., Woonsocket, R I. 
Hutchins, C, H. , Knowles Loom Works, Wotvetter, Miss. 
Hntchint, G. F., Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mau. 
Jenka, Alvin F., Falea A Jenks Machine Co., Pawlucket. R. I. 
Jenka, Stephen A., Falea A Jenka Machine Co., Fawtucket, R. I. 
Knowlea, F, P., Knowlea Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Knowhon, Charles H., M. A. Furbush A Son Machine Co., Phlladelpbia, Pa. 
I'sell,-C. W., Whitin Machine Works, WhiUnsrille, Mass. 
luell, J. M., Whitin Machine Works, WhiUasville, Mats. 
Maynard, Lorenio, Majrnard, Mass. 

Merriam, H. H., Knowles Loom Works, Worceater, Mass. 
Mordock, Joseph, American Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Mass. 
Nevins, David, Pettee Machine Works, Nevrton Upper FalU, Mass. 
Eometsch, W. H., Schaum A Uhlinger {Hetcher Works), Philadelphia, Pa. 
Russell, J. M., Knowles IxKim Worka, Worcester, Mass. 
Sargent, C. G.. Graniteville, Mass. 

Schaum, Otto W., Schaum A Uhlinger (Fletcher Works), Philadelphia, Fa. 
Smith, Chester E, Woonsocket Machine A Frees Co., Woonsocket, R. I. 
Smith, Stanley O., Woonsocket Machine A Press Co., Woonsocket, R. L 
Snelling, R. P., Petlee Machine Works, Newton Upper Falls, Mass. 
Tatt, C. A., Whitin Machine Works, Whitinsville, Mass. 
Taft, W. h., Whitin Machine Co., Whitinsville, Masa. 
White, H. Arthur, American Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Mass. * 

Ware, Justin A., Cromplon IxK>m Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Whitin, O. M., Whitin Machine Works, WhitinsTille, Mass. 
Wyman, Horace, Cromplon Loom Works, Worcester, MasR. 



Digilzed by Google 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



I give and bequeath unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School 

of Industrial Art the sum of. 

dollars, for the use of the said Corporation. 



FORM OK DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE. 



I give and devise unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School of 
Industrial Art, its successors and assigns, all that certain ^here insert a 
description of the properly] for the use of the said Corporation. 



Digiized by Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



THE LATE DALTON DORR. 
For Twenty-Tivo Years Curator oF the Museum. 

Died February 26, 1901. 



Digilzed by Google 



THE TWENTY-SEVENTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 
TRUSTEES 

WITH THE 

LIST OF IVIENIBERS 

For the Year ending May 31, 1903. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
1903. 



Digilzed by Google 



OFFICERS FOR 1903— 1904. 



WILLIAM WEIC.HTMAN. 



WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER, JOHN T. MORRIS. 



TRRASUBER, SECIIETARV, 

GEORGE n. CLIFF. EOWIX ATLEE BARBER. 



DIRECrOE OF THE MVMEUM, PIIISCIPAL OP THE SCBOOL, 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER. LESLIE W. MILLER. 



JAMES L. ALLAN. 

saa Drexel Building. 



Digilzed by Google 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

BX-OrFICllS. 

Hon. Samuel W. Pennvpackeb, 
QoVEKHOB oy TUB State, 

BY APPOINTMENT. 

James Butterworth, Appointed by iht State Staalr. 

Uabbihgtoh Fitzgerald, Appoiaint by the Hoiuk 0/ Rrprrxnlativtt. 

Charles H. Habdinw, Appainud bg Sdta Ontndl. 

John Q. CaRRUTH, Appointed by Oimmoa Qnmeil. 

Samuel Gcstime Thompmk, Appointed by tJie Onnmimonen of Fairmount Part. 

ELECTED BY THE MEMBERS. 

To wiTe/or ihree yean. 
William Wood, Alfred C. Lambdin, M.D., 

Geoboe H. Cliff, Isaac H. Clothikb, 

Mrs. Edward H. Ooden. 



Charles E. Dana. 

To arrir/nr one year. 

Theodore C Search, 
John Story Jssko, 
John H. Converse. 



Digilzed by Google 



itiadb, Google 



ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

(Tar UmIt B*port Mt pt^ GT) 



MBS. EDWARD H. CKiDEX. 



MRS. DAVID ESGLISH DALLAM. 



Mrs. C. C. Bartoi., 


Mrs. Josefh Harrison, 


Mrs. C. Wiluak BerijNkr, 


Mrs. Frank K. Ripple, 


Mias AssA Blanch ARD, 


Mb.s. Robert M. Janney, 


Mrs. Rudolph Blankesburo, 


Mrs. Morris Jastrow, 


Mrs. William T. Carter, 


Mrs, J. L. Kfttbrlinus, 


Miss Mahoarbt Clyde, 


MissFANsre S. Maube, 


Miss Margaret L. Corlies, 


Mite Helen L. Mcrphy, 


Miss Ada M. Croker, 


Mrs. Daniel S. Newhall, 


Mrs. Edw. P. Davis. 


Miss Elikabetb C, Roberts, 


Mrs. Wh. L. Elkiss. 


Mits. Thomas Roberts, 


Mrs. Rodman B. Ellison, 


Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott, 


Mrs. J, C. W. Frishhuth, 


Mrs. John R Steisos, 


Mrs. Wm. D. Frishmuth, 


Mrs. John Wwter, 


Mrs. Frank H. Getchell, 


Mrs. Jones Wbter, 


Mrs. W. W. Gibbs, 


Mi99 H. a. Zell. 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 
Mrs. Hampton L. Carson, Mrs. Slth B. Stitt, 

Miss Euzabbth Gkatz, Mrs. H. C. Townseno, 

Mrs. Samfel W. Pennypacker, Mrs. Caspar Wibter. 



Digilzed by Google 



COMMITTEES FOR 1903—1904. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Thbodorb C. Search, Chairman ; John O. Cabbutb, John H. Convebse, 

Charles E. Daka, Charles H. HACtiiiNa, Jouk Storv Jeneb, Alfred C. 

Lahbdin, M.D., John T. Morris, William Platt Pepper, C. N. Wey- 

OANDT, Stuart Wood, William Wood. Georoe H. Clitf, a officin. 

STANDING COMMITTEES.* 
ART. 
Charles EL Dana, Chairman; Frake Miles Day, Wilson Evre, Jr., 
Charles Qrafly, Samtel Gustine Thohphon. 

MUSEUM. 
John Storv Jen Ks, CSuiinnaa; Alfred C. Laubdin, M.D., JohnT. Morris, 
Willi AK Platt Pepper. 

SeprtttNling the Aitoeiale Ojmmiltet of Women: 
Miss Anna Blanchard, Mrs. William T. Carter, Mrs. William D. 
Frisrmitth, Mrs. John Harrison, Miss Fannie S. Maoee, Miss Elizabeth 
C. Roberts. Mrs. Edward H. Oopen, a officio. 

INSTRVCTIOX. 

TiIEODORK C. Seakcs, Chairman; Jambs Bdttbrworth, Geoboe H. Cuff, 

Isaac H. CwyrHiEB, John H. Converse, Charles E. Dana, Charles H. 

Hardihu, John Stort Jenes, Alfred C. Lambdin, M.D., William Plait 

Pepper, C. S. Weyoanbt, William Wood. 

Rrpresenling the Auoeialt CommiUte of Wmntn : 

Mrs. Frank E. HirpLB, Miss Helen L. Murphv, Mrs. Thomas Roberts, 
Mrs. Joseph F. Sihnott, Mrh. John Wister, Mrs. Jones Wistcr. Mrs. 
Edward H, Ooden, tc o^e-.io. 

FIXAyCE. 
C. N. WEYaANDT, Chairman; Charles H. Harding, John Story Jebks, 
Richard Rosshassler, Stuart Wood. 

* The Prealdent it a offlclo a luembeT of all Comml(l«cs. 



Di.itradb, Google 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM. 



William Platt Peppeb, DirtOor o/dtr AAumim. 
Edwin AtLke Barber, fumlor. 
Hary £. DAniOH, Amietaitt. 
Elizabeth Dawaon, Librarian. 

DEPARTMENT OF XCMISMATICS. 

F. D. LaNOESHEIM, Honorary Ouralar. 

DEPARTMENT OF TEXTILES. LACE AND EMBROIDERY. 
Mnx. John Habbimn, Hoimmry Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF (iOLDSMITH WORK, JEWELRY AND PLATE. 
Charles D. Clabk, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL POTTERY. 
Mbh. JosBi WiSTER, Honorary Curalor. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARMS AND ARMOR. 

Ci)RNKHt'8 Stei'BNSoS, Honorary Cvralor. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSICAL INSTRrMENTS. 
Mrs. W. D. Frikhmittk, Honorary Curofor. 

DEPARTMENT OF SCT'LPTITRE, MARBLES AND CASTS. 
Charles Grafly, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF FURNITURE AND WOODWORK. 

GuSTAV Krttkrer, Honorary Cnralor. 

DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS, MANUSCRIPTS, BOOK PLATES AND 

HISTORIC SEATS. 

Ckarle.1 R Dana, Honorary Chiralor. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILATELY'. 
Edward Russell Jokis, Honorary Curulor, 



Digilzed by Google 



THE SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 

CompriBes Id ils orgnDization the following Departmentx : 

School of Drawing. 

School of Textile Design and Mamufacttre. 

School of Decorative Paintino. 

School op CHeuisTtiy and DvEiNa. 

School of Applied Desi<!N. 

School of CARViBa and Wood-Work. 

School op Decorative Sculpture. 

School op Architectcraj, Dbsion. 

School of Interior Decoration. 

School of Illustration. 

School of Normal Art Instruction. 

School of Modern Lahciuaois. 

STAFF. 
L. W. Miller, Principal. 
Howard Fremont Stratton, Director of Art School. 

E. W. France, Director o( Textile School. 
Herman Dcioendbscs, Professor of Drawing. 

Bradlbv C. Alceo, .Yssiutant Director of Textile School and Professor in 

Cha^e of Weave Formation — A.naljais and Structure of Fabrics. 
Sophie a. Steel, Instructor in Charge—llluBtiation. 
Alexander Sterlino Calukr, Professor of Sculpture. 
LuDWio E. Fabbr, Instructor in Drawing, Lecturer on .inaWimy and Processes 

in Illustrative Beproduction. 
J. Mbrritt Matthews, Ph.D., Professor In Cliarfce of Chemistry and Dyeing. 
Joseph F, X. Harold, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 
Albert Behm, Laboratory Demonstrator and Instructor in Dyeine. 
J. Frank Copelakd, Instructor in Water-Color, Painting and Design. 
Richard S. Coi, Instructor in JacquanI Design and Color Work. 
Helkk a. Fos, Instructor in Color Harmony, Historical Ornament and DeaigD 

Applied to Printed and Woven Fabrics. 
Fanny Darby Sweeny, Instructor in Design Applied to Stained Glass, Stencils 

and Mosaic. 
Margahettb Lippincott, Instructor in Water-Color Painting. 
Herbert G. Uoe, Instructor in Elementary Weaving and Belated Branches. 
Frederic Pfeiffer, Instructor in Charge of Advanced Weaving and Related 

Branches. 
John Lockwood, Instructor in Charge of Wool Carding and Spinning. 
George W. Lefferm, Instructor in Worsted Drawing and Spinning. 

F. M. Jennings, Instructor in Wool (iradins and Sorting. 

Wm. E. Winchester, Instniclor in Cotton Carding and Spinning. 

Edward T. Bo»us, Instructor in Architectural Design. 

A. M. Grili,on, Director of School of Modem Languages and Instructor in 
French, Italian and Spanish. 

Emma Schmidt, Instructor in German. 

RtCBARD B. Douahty, Instructor in Instrumental and Machine Drawing. 

Alfred Borhovse, Instructor in Dry Finishing. 

Ferdinand Marenzana, Instructor in Design Applied to Furniture and Inte- 
rior Work. 

Henry Torsiten, Instructor in Wood Carving. 

Mary P. Dow, Instructor in Book-Binding and Leather Work. 

E. G. Rau, Instructor in Tooling and Leather Work. 

Chas. T. SixnT, Instructor in Drawing and Color Harmony. 

Isabella Bradley. Instructor in Drawing. 

Albert W. Barker, Instructor in Drawing. 

J. Edoar Hill, Instructor in Building Construction. 

Isabel Aitken, Instructor iu Bnsketrv. 

Kabi. G. Nacke, Instructor in Meial-'Work, Bepouss^, Chasing, etc. 

Samitbl Thompson, Jr., Superintendent of Building and Instructor in Wood- 
Work. 

Leonora J. C. Boeck, Registrar. 

Katharine DeWitt Bebo, Librarian. 

Clara M. Kace, Secretary, Textile School. 



Digilzed by Google 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT. 

To the Mi-mberi of the Pi;n>n/lra,iia Mii«ritm and Sfhimt of Indmlriat 
Art. 

Ladies and Geiith-mai : Your President hae the honor to submit 
herewith the reports of the Curator of the'Museum, the Principal 
of the School, the Treasurer of the organization, and the Associate 
Committee of Women. 

A careful reading of these reports discloses several interesting 
and important features. Under the able censorship of the Com- 
mittee on Museums and the Curator, the work haa taken on new 
phases of development, resulting in marked progress during the 
year- Not only have tlie donations been of a high character, but 
an unusual outride interest has been manifest. City Councils 
have wisely made further appropriations for alterations and im- 
provement in the building, which will result in the exhibition of 
objects of art that have hitherto occupied our storerooms for lack 
of sufficient space for display. That the expenditure by City 
Councils has been approved by the people is abundantly evi- 
denced by the large number of visitors for the year, aggregating 
nearly 500,000 persons, equal to fully one-third of our city's entire 
population. 

It is doubtful if any other public utility could be created that 
would prove so valuable an adjunct to the pleasure and welfare 
of our community. Slowly but surely our citizens are becoming 
impressed with the idea that this Museum baa an educational 
value which stands for far more than the mere entertainment in- 
volved ill pleasantly passing away a few idle momenta. 

We greet with pleasure this change in the hearts of the people 
and take delight in the progress of the work. The systematic 
order prevailing everywhere throughout the Museum is very im- 
pressive. A distinctly literary feature has been inaugurated dur- 
ing the past year by the publication of the BuUelin and a aeries of 
Art Handbooks. This work, under the charge of the Curator, Dr. 
Edwin Atlee Barber, has proved very interesting. The columns 
of the paper have been strictly devoted to their proper fields of 
work, and we anticipate much profit to be derived from the publi- 
cation. 

The series of Art Handbooks have been successfully inaugu- 
rated by the issue of the first volume, on "Tulip Ware of the 
Pennsylvania-German Potters." This work will undoubtedly 



oy Google 



10 

serve, as its author indicatee, as a standard text-book oa this 
subject. 

During the year an effort has been made to increase the cor- 
porate membership, and is meeting with considerable favor. 
Further success can be largely aided by personal eflbrt among 
■our friends, and it is earnestly hoped that the memberabip of the 
<;orporation will be materially increased. 

The needs of the Museum are well set forth in the report, to 
which special attention is asked. The field of its usefulness la 
ever widening, and the necessity for funds to carry on the work 
-cannot be misunderstood. 

The report of Principal Miller, showing that the registration of 
the School reached lOiX) during last year, needs no further com- 
ment to assure us of its popularity, and that the work done is of 
the most thorough character. 

The eshibitions held at the close of each year have uaiformly 
represented a progressive excellence, and in both art and textile 
■exhibits the judgment of the people distinctly marks results of 
this year as being in advance of those of any previous period. 

The demands upon the School for trained men and women con- 
tinue without any abatement. It may be safely asserted that the 
uniform excellence of the training given to the students is becom- 
ing widely known and the circle of its influence greatly enlarged, 
for no other hypothesis will account for the steady and persistent 
<;alls for trained young men and women. 

The sum of all this effort is, that we have occupied the various 
fields with intelligence, sincerity and earnest discrimination of 
purpose. We have won the right to open other doors of oppor- 
tunity. The suggestion made by Principal Miller for the estab- 
lishment of a School of Pottery is one that should receive our 
hearty co-operation, and it is sincerely to be hoped that means 
jnay be provided during the present year for this purpose. 

The Treasurer's report for the year ending May 31, 1903, shows: 

Total expenditures for current eipensea, . . . (95,060.02 
Receipts for current expenses, 84,421.71 

Excess of expenditures over receipts, . . . .(10,638.31 
In addition to this amount there remains the unpaid 
salaries to Maj 31st. These were paid in June and 
amount to, 3,395.22 

Making total deficiency tor the year, .... $14,033.68 



oy Google 



11 

With this deficiency in view a very earnest efifort was made to 
secure an appropriation of HOO.OOO from the Stat«, covering the 
next two years' work. The Bill passed the House to appropriate 
♦80,000 for the purpose, and was returned by the Senate increasing 
the amount to $100,000 and asking for concurrence of the House. 
The committee having the matter in charge did not concur, and 
the measure was finally passed appropriating $80,000, which sum 
was reduced to 175,000 by the Governor before signing the Bill. 
So, notwithstanding the needs of the School, its friends are again 
compelled to limit the scope of the work of an institution which 
distinctly represents the art and industrial interests of the State. 

The only way the diflicult position can be remedied or avoided 
is by curtailing the work, or, through the assistance of kind 
friends, provide for the deficiency. Neither of the alternatives is 
pleasant to contemplate, nor was it intended by our legislators 
that either of them should become a part of our inheritance. The 
uniform treatment our institution has received at the hands of the 
State legislators evidences the high regard in which it is held by 
the people at large, and it is to be hoped that the time is near 
when State aid shall be commensurate with the Sthoors needs, 
and the high position it fills in the Commonwealth's economy. 
Respectfully submitted. 

THEODORE C. SEARCH, 

Pre--ddetit. 



Digiized by Google 



™n 



Qi I ol r lo I n I [ L 




GROUND PLAN OF MEMORIAL HALL. 



A. South Ves 

Models, etc. 

B. BOTCKDA. Porcelain, Models, 

etc 

C. West Galijby. Wilatach Col- 

lectioD of PsiatingB. 

D. Eaht Gallebt, Oeramira, Met- 

al Work, Carvings, Lacqaers, 
Furniture. 

E. Wrer CoRRiDOB. Wilst&ch Col- 

lection of Paintings. 

F. East Corridor. Bloom Geld - 

Moore Collection. 

0. Southwest Pavilion. Greek, 

Roman and Egyptian Antiqui- 

H. Southeast Pavilion. Hector 
Tjndale Memorial Collection. 
Oriental Pottery and Porcelain. 

1. Northeast Pavilion. Bloom- 

field-Moore Collection. 



[. Northwest Pavilion. Musical 
Inatrumenti. Lambom Collec- 
tion of Mexican Paintings. 

L. Coins and Armor. 

J. North Vestibule. Exhibition 
of Work of Students of tbe 
School of Industrial AK Cod- 
necte<I with the Hueeum. 

i. The Mm. W.D. Frishmoth Col- 
lection of Colonial Relics. 

!'. LlBKARY. 

I, P, Q. Offices, 

I. Women's Toilet Room. 

i. Men's Toilet Room. 

', U, V, W. American PoUery. 

[. Pompeian Views and Baird Cen- 

tenniol Model. 
r. North Corridor. Iron Work, 

Pholognphs and Prints. 
'•■ Tettiles and Costumes. 



oy Google 



REPORT ON THE MUSEUM. 

The year which haa come to a close has been an important one 
in the history of the Museum, Many valuable additions have 
been made to the collections by gift, purchase and loan, as shown 
by the list which is appended to this Report. Among the most 
interesting of these are a series of antique wood carvings from dis- 
mantled palaces of Japan, presented by Mr. John T. Morris and 
Mr. John Story Jenks; examples of stained glass from old Eng- 
lish cathedrals, from Switzerland and Italy, belonging to the 17th 
and 18th centuries, added by Miss Mary and Miss Sarah Lewis to 
the Dr. Francis W. Ijcwia collection; three handsomely carved 
cabinets of the 17th and 18th centuries donated by the same, in 
the name of Elizabeth W. Lewis; a collection of amulets and 
charms and European wood carvings of the 16th and 17th centu- 
ries, collected by the late Charles Godfrey Leland and presented 
in his name by Mrs. John Harrison. 

WORK ACCOMPLISHED DURING THE YEAR. 

Since the publication of the previous Annual Report a large 
amount of work has been accomplished in the Museum, 



oy Google 



14 

A professioual printer was employed for several weeks to assist 
in relabeling the exhibits, and this work is progressing rapidly. 

The collections of Oriental pottery and porcelain, which, with 
the assistance of a ceramic expert, have been correctly attributed 
and classified, are now arranged in the eastern end of the build- 
ing. The collections of metal work, pottery, glass, carvings, lac- 
quer and furniture have been systematically rearranged, so far as 
the plan of the building and the space at command will at pres- 
ent permit. 



THE CHINESE CASES, EAST GALLERY. 

From tlie Centennial Exposition of 1876. 

Contnining the Uriental Collections. 

An appropriation has been made by City Councils for the pur- 
pose of enclosing the western Arcade of the building and the new 
apartment, whicli is now under roof, will be used for the collec- 
tions of textiles and costumes, which will at once be moved from 
the west end of the building to provide much needed wall apace 
for the overflow of paintings in the Wilstach collection. 

On the second floor, above the administration offices, two capa- 
cious rooms, formerly used for the Storage of exhibits, have been 



Digilzed by Google 



15 

vacated and repaired nad painted, and are now available for exhibi- 
tion purposes. Here will be placed the collections of postage 
stiimps, paper money, book plates, liistoric at-als, manuscripts, his- 
torical badges and objects of a similar nature. By the use of this 



CAST OF THE COLUMBUS DOORS IN THE CAPITOL AT WASHINGTON. 

Deaignrd by BnniMph E-jgert. 
From the Josepli E. Temple Tnist. 

additional floor space the congestion of the Museum will be con- 
siderably relieved. 

Handsome railings, checking stands and new turnstiles have 
been erected at the south entrance by the Fairmonnt Park Com- 
missioners, which greatly improve the appeiinince of the interior. 



Digilzed by Google 



MUSEUM PUBLICATIONS. 

At the beginning of the year 1903, a new departure was insti- 
tuted by the establish m en t of a periodical Bulletin, for the pur- 
pose of bringing the members of the Corporation and the public 
into closer touch with the work which is being done at the Museum. 
Three numbers have already been issued, and it is the intention 
to continue the publication quarterly. Copies may be procured, 
free of charge, on application to the Curator. 

A series of Art Handhooh is now in course of preparation which, 
while based principally on the valuable art collections in the 
Museum, shall serve as standard text-books on the various sub- 
jects treated. The first of these Handbooks, on the Tulip Ware of 
the Pennsylvania- Oerman Pi'tlem, has recentlj' appeared, and is now 
on sale at the Museum. Others will follow in rapid succession. 

MEMBERSHIP. 
For the purpose of increasing interest in the Museum and School 
by securing new members of the Corporation, the following circu- 
lar letter was recently issued : 

MEMORIAL HALL, FAIRMOUNT PARK, 
PHILADELPHIA. 

April, 1903. 
The Trustees ot the PenDsyWanU Musemu and School of Industrial Art, de- 
siring the active co-operation oE public spirited citizeua who are known to be 
■n B^mpatlij with ita educational irork, cordially invite you to become a mem- 
ber of the Corporation. 

The School of Industrial Art was the firat institution of ita kind established 
in this country, and it continues to stand at the head of industrial art schools. 

The Pennsylvania Mnseani, located in Memorial Hall, Fairmount Park, the 
outgrowth of the Centennial Exhibition, non ranks among the foremost art 
museums in the L'niled States. Both richly deserve the sympathy and encour- 
agement of all who are interested in art education. 
Oaioiification of .Vcmhtrf. 
1st. — Patron Members who shall contribute $5000, whether in money or ob- 
jects for the Museum. 

2d.— Life Members who shall contribute $100 or more at one time. 
3d. — Annual Members who shall contrihnte not less than $o yearly. 

Memb-:K are EalUltd h the Fotl'm:ing BenefiU ; 
The right to vote and transact business at the Annual Meeting, 

o all general rece|itiuns held at the Museum and the School. 
;s to the Museum and School Libraries. 



Digilzed by Google 



17 

A I 'ops y E'icli nf thr Fnlloirliig Pablirailoru : 
The AddusI Report of the Corporation. 

The Annual Circulars ul the School o( Applied Art urn] ot the Philidelphitt 
Textile School. 

The Art Handbooks, isaued from time lo lime li* the Museum. 
The BuUrtin ot the Mufeum. 

A complete Hat ot Memberx is published each year in the Annual Beport. 
Should yon desire to become a member, kindly fill in the enclosed blank and 
forward it to the Sect«tary. A check to the order of the Pennjlvania Museum 
and School of Industrial Art trill be promptly acknowledged. 

EDWIS ATLEK BARBER, 

Sejrelary. 

As a result of tliis invitiitioii from the Trustees the menibership 
has been enlarged by the atldition of forty-nine Annual and nine 
Life members. 

Efforts to increase the membership will be continued, and it is to 
be hoped that during the coming year many more of our influen- 
tial and appreciative citizens will show their interest in the 
Museum and School by becoming annual contributors. 

ATTENDANCE. 

The admissiona to the Museum during the year 1902 reached 
the unprecedented figure of 457,617. Of this number 267,273, or 
over -58 per cent., were registered on Sunday afternoons. 

The average daily attendance was as follows : 

For each day in the year, 1253 

On weekdays 003 

On Sundays, 5140 

This record, which is exceeded by only one other Art Museum 
in the United States, abundantly proves that the laboring classes, 
whose only free day is Sunday, appreciate the efforts of the friends 
of the Institution to increase and improve the valuable art exhi- 
bitions which may be seen here. 

NEEDS OF THE MUSEUM. 
The rapid increase of the Museum collections makes it impera- 
tive that early provision shall be niade for the eare of new mate- 
rial recently received and that which may be expected in the near 
future. The immediate pressure for additional case room has 



Digilzed by Google 



Sll 

III 

° la 

o --« 
K i « 



iized by Google 



19 

been somewhat relieved by the weeding-out process, whereby 
much of the lees desirable material from the cases has been with- 
dmwD and permanently retired. Exhibition cases, however, are 
greatly needed in several parts of the building to permit the car- 
rying out of the plan of classification and rearrangement which 
has been adopted. 

The Museum is also greatly in need of a Publication Fund to 
enable the Curator to print the series of handbooks, art booklets 
and catalogues which are now in course of preparation. Of even 
greater importance than the acquisition of new material, after n 
Muaum has grown to the proportions of this, is the publication 
of original works which shall be accepted as authoritative con- 
tributions to the literature of art. A moderate fund would en- 
able the Curator to carry on this important work without embar- 
rassment. 

ACCKSSIOXS TO THE MISKITM. 

Following is a list of objects rcceiveil during the year ; 
By (lift from: 
Mrs. Vi. D. Frikhmtth : 

Fitleen Musical Inatruments of vnrloua Couiilries. 
Kiuetv-Eiglit Articles added lo her Collecliun of Coliininl tidies. 
JoHS Story Jbnks ; 

Table Cover ; Old Bulgarian Knilipoidery. 
Wood CarvinK, " Shrine Jlomma." Old Japaiieac. 

Pitcher; cream color. Black prinUof Perry's and McDonougli's " Victorv.' 
StafTordBhire ; c. 181). 
Db. Frascis W, Lbww (iKiiueal) : 

Bottle; glass, decorated. Japanese. 
Four large (ireco-Koman Vajies. 

Sixteen pieces of Pattery and Purcelain. Oriental and Italian. 
One Silver "Skald" Cnp. Xorwegian. 
Mis." Mary and Miss Sarah LKwrw; 

Four Exhibition Coses; to hold the Len-ia Bequest of Oriental Porcelain. 
Figure; "Charity." Wood Carving from a Church in Nuremberg. 
Three Panels ot old Suined Glass. Italian (for Dr. F, W. I^iwis Col 

lection). 
Bronze Figure ; troni the Laocoiin group (for Dr. F. W. Lewis Collection). 
Cabinet ; wood and tortoise-shell, brass mountings. Spanish (in the name 

of Elizabeth W. Lewis). 
Cabinet ; carved oak, German (in the name of Elizabeth W. Lewis). See 



Di.itradb, Google 



Cabinet: walnut, elabi>rai«lv carved in higli relief. Italian (in llie n 
of Elizabeth \V. Lewis). ' 



ITALIAN CABINET, 
rved Black 'Watnut, Pixleenth Centii 
i Mary Lcuis and Miss Sarah Lewis, 

Eliinbeth W. Lewis. 



D, Google 



AVhitehkad, Hoa<i a Co., S*wnrk, X. J. : 

TfH Celluroi'd "Coronation Biillona" (King tMward VII. V 
C'LARrst'E B. MiwRE : 

Eight frnme<l Ph<ito)(n(phi ; iRnilitcape and Gkilk snbji-cU. 

Compartment Vriwl of earthenware. .Aboriginal. Krom Mound in Levy 
Co., Florida. 
MKft. Thein- : 

Mangle; wood. Oiil (iercuan. 

Edwin A. Babheb : 
Six Book PlaU«. 

Cup and Saucer ; Belleck. Mndc hy Ott A Brewer, Trenton. IWM. 
Medallion ; slonewnre. Insert for liil of Beer -Mng. Bv M'inj^nder Bros., 

Haddonfitid, X. J. ; c. ISHS. 
Four Fragments of Potlery from .Inelent Ruina in .\riiona and I'lali. 
Vase; porcelain. ''lA>Mnti" ware. Made bv Miss M. I»ins« Mrl^ugli- 

lin, Cin 



Mark Wilks ChLi.bt: 

Kan; gold-spa nj; I fit and puinUnl. French; c. 17(10. 

John- T. Mdhhm : 

\'a*e ; ennhvnware. Carveil ileniralion in low relief. Made liy Mm. C. 

\. Plimpton, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1877. 
Vase; "Tepo" ware. Made liy the Chicnuo Terra Cotta Co., IHilJ. 
Si.tteen Anliqiie Wood Ciirvinjis, from Temples and Paiaci-s of Old Jupun. 
I.arge Porcelain Vase, by Doiillon A Co., IW2. lK>coraIod by lIopkin», 

'■ Highland Cattle" (see (wge 221. 
Dish; earihenware, sgraffito 1 1 ceo rat ion. Pt-nnsylvnnia (Ji'mian, 18'23. 
Plate ; eartbentrare, egraffito decoration. >Jigle and Scroll. ?:aBtem Penn- 
sylvania ; c. 1840. 
Large Bowl ; earthenware. Ocean Waves and Mermaids. EtKikwond Pot- 
lery, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Bowl and Pitcher ; flint enamel. Bcniiinglon, Vt., 1840. 
DvKfs CotLBoms; 

Seven Arrow and Spciir Heads from Caroline Co., Md. 
A Friend: 

Fifteen Japanese Tobacco Pi|>es ; ancient and modem. 

IS of the Temple at Der-el-Bahri, li^ypt. 
lASD LoDOE OF Frek Masonh Of Pesn8YLva.via ; 
Plate; souvenir of the Sesqui-Centennial of Washington's Initiation as a 

Free Maaon. 
FaC'Simile of Washington's Masonic Apron ; on wliite satin. 
Bronze Medal ; souvenir of the .Sesqni-Cenlenniai. 



Di.itradb, Google 



PORCELAIN VASE. 

Und(.-rglaie',Fninling ot " Highland CftUle," by C, B, Hopkins 

'ilnde bw D-ulloa * Oi., i-.nrf™, England. 

Given by Mr. Juhn T. Morris (page 21). 



Digilzed by Google 



Mb. and Mrh. Amos K. Lnri.E ; 

I^rge gold-lacquered Bowl, with Frame and Kosel. Japan. 
Mrs. Travis Cocmran : 

UsDdkercbief ; Kaea mull- Eiiibroider7 and drawn work ; c. 1S32. 
Edr-abd LvcBTt, Atlanta, G«urgia : 

Va«e ; hard porcelain, decoraled by hiniBelf. Meullic Lnetre and Jewel 



Mrs. Harriet F. Bbowseli., Providence, R I. : 

Pair of Salt Cellars; pressed jrlaas. Biiita of Wasliinglon and Lafavelte. 
EnRlish or American : c. 1S25-40. 
Mrs. John W. Field (beiniesll : 

Two Bronze Biisls and a Plargue ; by BarbeiJienne. 

Chair; mahogany, claw and ball feet. 

Two Brass Can dle-slj cits, with metal shades. 

Taburet ; inlaid with ivory, wihmI and metal. 

Pair of Gilded Brackets ; from old Peters' Mansion, Belmoiit. 

Two small Wood Sland.f ; for vases. 
Mrs. a. K Lewknbrrci ; 

Decanter ; engraTMl tcliss. Made by J. Palme, I»iulon, ISftS. 

(ioblet; en^traved elass. Made by J. Palme, I«iidon, 188)*. 

WineglsBs; engraved glass. Made by J. Palme, Liindon, \>^S*. 
Edwarp Bi-i«Ki.L JoM>: 

Six small Enamel Plaques; illiistraliiiK the manufacture of Cloisonne 
Enamel. Japanese. 

Seventeen pieces ot Confederate Paper Money. 

Seventy-Five old American (llnsH llottk's. 
Mils Thoma!* Hockley (in the name ot Thomas Hockley) : 

Mosaic of Stone: framed. Warriors and Horses. Roman. Time of He- 

A. V. BovciHNEB: 

Twine Box ; sloneviare. Greensboro, Pa., 18(5(1. 

Drug Jar; stoneware. Greensboro, Pa., 1S60. 

Jug; earthenware, hroivn. (ireensboro. Pa., recent. 
Dr. E. S. Vandeb^lice : 

Twenly-lhree pieces of Japanese Pottery and Metal Work. 
Mi8S Ha.vnah a. Zell: 

Plate ; white. Black printed porlrail of Gariield. By X. J. Poltery Co., 
Trenton, N. J., 1880. 
John Harbison : 

Gothic Chest, 15th century ; carve<i oak. From Florence, Italy. 
A pRiESD or Mb*. E. D. GirxrapjE : 

Two Japanese Garments ; silk, embroidered. Said to be a Dainiio's Court 
Dress. 



OMzcdoyGoOgle 



24 

Suh ; silk and cloth of gold. EgjpUan. 

Sboes (pair) ; white cottOD. Japanese. 

Wrillen Scroll ; paper. From Buddhist Monastery in Ceylon. 

Saki Bottle ; earthenware, lacquered. Japanese, 

Cup and Saucer ; Wedgwood. Sage green, with reliefs of festoons of 

Howere and fruil in white. 
Cnp and Saucer ; porcelain. Brown and gold. With painting of Orpheus 

and Eurydice. Vienna. 

C. DoRFi.iNdER & Sons, New York : 
Vase ; cut glass, ruby cased. 
Vase ; cut glass, emerald cased. 
Two (joblets; cut glass. 

ELBiiii>OE Ij. SmuT: 

Eight jiietcs of U. S. Fractional Currency. 

GKiiHiiE F. BASsfm & Co., Kew York : 

Six Plates; earthenware, blue and white. Uibson prints in black. 
I>oulton 1^ Co., Burulem, England. 

CHARLBM M.iRsnALi.; 

Cnp and Saucer ; porcelain, while with gold decoration. French ; c. 1830. 

Mrs. John Harrison (in the name of Charles (io<1frey Leland): 

Collection of Italian 16th and 17th Century Bns-reliefs and Carvings; 
Amulets, etc. 11.5 pieces (see page '25). 

Edward I. H. HowF.Lt : 

Tea Pot ; soft porcelain. Corn flower deconilion. English ; c 1835. 
Sii«arBowl; hard porcelain. Com Hower decoration. Made at Tucker 
factory, Philadelphia; c. 1832. 

Mrs. n. C. Davis: 

Shawl; while cri'pe, enibroiilereil. Chinese. 

By Loini froiri i 
Mi!^ Ei,i.A S. Wki.-h : 



F. P. Kaubwkis : 

Jug ; red earthenware. From Zuni, New Me.'s 



Mrs. Josis* Wistek : 

Collection of 4.? Siamese Coins. 

Mug; earthenware. From Jamaica. Shape of bead of Que 
Coronation st 



Di.itradb, Google 



CoMHissioNERS OP Faibjcoint Pabk : 

Collection of Bronzes, Purcelain, Silverware, etc. Fitty-SeTsn pieeea. The 
Bequest of Henry M. PhillipB. 

Table, with PIsskt Top ; pninted Beiiuest of IlRanali S. ToliinJ. 
HARI'MAtLt Otaici: 

Eleven pieces of Corenn Pottery. 

Two Magic Mirrors I metul. Jupanese. 

One large Book ; illustrated. Japanese. 



WOOD CARVINGS. 

Sixteenth and Seventeenth (.'enturies. Italian. 

Given by Mrs. John Harrison ia the name of the late Charles Godfrey Inland (page 24). 

Mb8. W. D. FRlHHMt'TH ; 

Fifty-Seven Articles added to her Collection of Colonial Relics. 

Rocking-Chair; si nl back, rush bottom. 

Sampler of the Htolt family. 
Henbv T. S«-ecting : 

Cradle; wood, painted with Biblical aubjecl!'. Old Dnteh. 
Miss Helen Boutf.tt : 

Piano; mahogany, inlaid. London, enrly 1 fill century. 



Digilzed by Google 



H. G. Lord : 

Old CartiMiTi ot the " Long Embargo," IBO'-ISOD. 
H. A. MosER : 

Toothpick Holder ; beaded. Cierman. 

Bracelet ; cr^pe and ribbon embroidery on velvel. lierman. 
Chableh E, Dasa: 

Great Seal of lh« Province ol Pennsylvania, 1S9!I. 

Document ot Thoma:* and Richard Penn with Seal of Pennsylvania, 1743. 

Document with Seal of the State of Georgia, 1777. 
Mover Fi.f.isiibb (added to bin eollec-tion) : 

Eighteen Watcbea ; old Eurojiean. Gold, silver, enamel and brass"ca«ee. 

Seven Keys for watclieii. 

One small brass Sun Dial. 

SlOCKTllN W. JONK^; 

Two old Branding Irons, c. 1801). 
Brass-Keyed Bugle, I8lh century. 
Edward Rl-sskll Josf>: 

Large Culleclion ot objectK ot various liinds ineluding : 
'2^ Kibbon Badge"; presidential and political. 
173 Campaign Buttons. 

124 Envelo|ies and Cards with Ciril War designs, 1S<11. 
10 Pewter and Alchemy Spoons. 
43 pieces ot Porcelain and Pottery. 
10 ptecfs ot Campaign Glassware. 
.5"2 Weapons ; Uuns, Pistuls, Swords, etc. 
231 pieces of Paper Currency ; .\merican and Foreign. 
Mis.- Helkn Taylor : 

Nine examples of Tucker & Hemphill Porcelain. While, with Gold 
"Spider" decoration. 
From School op Isdustkiai, Art : 

A Japanese Clock ; given to the School by Mra. Rudolph Bla:ikeabarg. 
Mrs. Thonam Roberts : 

Two Silver Spiions ; made from silver dollars, by Chilcat Indians, Atnska. 
Charles M. Burns; 

Pair of Vases; porcelain, decorated. French ; c. 1825. 
Vase ; blown gloss, .\mljcr color. Venetian. 
Nl-mishatic and Asthiiarian Society: 

Six Coins added to their collection. 
John T. Mokbih ; 

Three large Wood Curvinga. From Temples and Palaces of Old Japan. 
Mrs. <iEonoE B. Li-kens: 

Vase; pottery. Mot he r-of- pearl inlay in black enatne',. Made by Ralph 
B. Beech, Philadelphia, 1^1. 



Digilzed by Google 



Purchases for the Museum : 

ACCOCNT OF A^liLO-AMERII^AN PoTTERV FuSD : 

Fbt«; pink luslK, wilh porlrail of Andrew Jackson, Staftonl shire, Eng- 
land ; c. lS3i). 
AccofST OF Petty Cach : 

Water Jar; «arthenvrare. CheslerCo., Ps. ; r. t^■''^0. 

Creamer ; aliape of a eow, brown motlled earthenware. Made at the pot- 
tery (if John Spiejci'l, PliiUdelphia, 

Glass Milk-Bowl. \Va»liin((t(m, I>, C, isr. 

Pewler Bowl ; made by Thotuan Danfotlh, Philadelphia; c. 180T. 

Pewler Basin; made by B. Bams, Philadelphia ; c. 1815. 

Pitcher ; tarthenHire. Decoratiiin in copper lustre and green. SlaRord- 
ahire, c. 1810. 
AciovNT OK Spkcial Mi-seim Find: 

Soup Plate; dark blue with Arms of Sew York, Made hvT. Msyer, Staf- 
fordshire; c. 1830. 

Plate ; cream ware with black prinli. Ilerculaneum Pnttery, Liverpool, 
England ; c. IKOO. 

Plate; green border, with portrait of Lafayette. By Jamra Clewa, Cn- 
bridge, I82-'>. 

Plate; blue and white. Boston Stale House in centre. By Rogers, Staf- 
ford eh ire, 

Plate ; blue and white. Slalea border. By Clews, StafTordnhire | c. l^'l'i. 

Cross Bow ; for projecting atonm. 

Chair ; carved oak. Italian, ICth century. 

(>>ffeel'<>t; earthenware: silTer lustre. Knglish. 

Cup and Siiuter ; porcelain. Medallion of Waxhington. By W. T. Cope- 
land a i^'ons, Slaflordxhire, iMTIi. 

Apple-Butter Jnr; pottery, green enanicl ware. Made by Thoniaa Vicker!<, 
near Downinglown, Pa., 1807. 
AccoiKT OF Offertorv Flsd; 

Old Temple Table ; profusely carved. Japan. (See page 'IS. ) 

Old Shrine Table ; carved. Jnimn ; c. Hi-if. 

Acquired by Exchange: 
Musical InHlriiment. Hautboiade Poitoii. French, 18[h century. 
Musical Instrument. Oboe. French, 18ih century. 

MlSKl-M UliliAUY. 
Total number of lilies in the I.ibriiry (in llie 31st tlav of Miiv, 
1903 ; 

Bound Books, 1163 

Unbound Pamphlets, Catalogues, Kepiirl!^, etc., . . . U83 



oy Google 



II 

- $ 

UJ I O 



J, Google 



Following is the list of additions to the Library of Bookw, Cata- 
logues and Pamphlets. 
. By Gift from : 
Av.L, Dr. p. S.: 

Souvenir Views of Waaliinntun mid Atlnnlic Ciu. 
Babber, Er>wiK A.; 

Tnjloe Collection in the Corcoran Gallery. 

Pan-American Miigatioe. 

Prngraniaie of MHe. Jenny Lind's Grand Concert, 1851. 

Souvenir Ouide-Bouk to Virginia Historical Society. 

Cutalogueof the Nickerwm Collection. 

"The Museum" (4 numhersl. 

BeUmft^ zur (iescliiclite tier Topferkunsl in Deutscliland, by Brinckmnnn. 

Annual Keportof the SmithMnian Institution, ISW. 
Bdik, J. H.: 

Old Plate, iti Mftkers and Marke, by Buck. 
CARNBdiE Ikstitute, Pittsburgh, Pa. : 

Seventh Celebration of Founder's Day. 
CAIt^'Ba[E MusEL'M, Pittsburgh, Pa.: 

Annual Report, 1902. 

Priie Essay Contest, 1902. 
CisciSNATi MfsEi'M .'\.'4»K[.\TI0N, Cincinnati, O.; 

Twenty-First Annual Beport, 1902. 
Daka, Phiif. Chahlks V,. ; 

Proceedings of the Nuroismalic and Antiquarian Society. 

Pennsylvania Archives, 6th series ( 12 vols. ). 
Dbtroit MvsiECM OF ART, Detroit, Mich.: 

Handbook of Detroit Museum. 
DoRVLiNOER Glass Co. : 

Development of the Cut Ghss Business in the V. &., by >Vm. F. Dorflinger. 
Elsins, William L. : 

Catalogue of Paintings in the Elkins Collection {2 vols.). 
FiELii Columbian Musei;m, Chicago, III. ; 

Meteorite Studies, by Farringtun. 

Mishongnovi Ceremonies of the Snake and Antelope Fraternities, by Dor- 
sey and Voth. 

Annual Report, 1903. 
Glabtosbchy Antiquary Siicibty, Glastonbury, England. 

Report of the Society, 1902, 

British Lake Village, near Glastonbury. 
Grahu Lodge op Frke Ma»<os» of Pennhvlvasia : 

CatalniEue of Loan Exhibition of Woshingtoniana, 1002. 
Jenks, Johs Story : 

tilfllogue of Works of An in Collection of William B. Bemeni. 



oy Google 



30 

Jones, Edward Kvjsell: 

Postage Stamps of the United Stamps, b<r Luff. 

Bulletin ot the Free Mueeum ol Science and Art i 4 nos. I. 

Fmgment ot the Bibjlonian " Dibbarra " Epic, b/ Justrow. 

Hecent Archicologicsl Eiplorntionii iii tlie Valley ot the Delaware, by Ab- 
bott. 

Observations on the Platforrn al Persepoli^ by Kastoii. 

Primer ot Mayan Hieroglyphics, by firinton. 

Antiquity of Man in Delaware Valley and Eistern U. S., by Mercer. 

Modem Pen Drawinjn; Kuropean and American, by Holme. 

Modem Etching and Engraving; European and American, by Holme. 

Modem British Waiei^Color Drowinge. 

Files ot An Magazines, consisting ot '2i complete volumes. 
Lblahd, Charles (ioofkev (through Mrs. John Harrisonl ; 

Collection ot 143 books, containing many rare old editions in Latin, Dutch, 
(ierman and French texts. 

Musical Instruments, by A. J. Hipkins. 
Lewih, Ml^s Mary and Mie." Sarah: 

Oriental Collection ot W. T. Wallers, ot Baltimore. 

Collector's Handbook of Marks and Monograms, by Chaffers. 

Ancient Chinese Vases ot Shang Dynasty, by Thorns, 

Pottery and Porcelain, by Elliott. 

HandbtHik ot Ceramic Art, by I«ck«ood. 
Metropolitan Mi'sed.m of Art, New York City : 

Cxtalogue ot Crosby Brown Collection of Musical Instruments (European'. 

Catalogue of Collection ot Spoons made by >[rs. S. P. Avery. 
MiLWAUKEK Public Museum, Milwaukee, Wis.: 

Catalogue of the Xunnemncher Collection. 

Annual Keporls, 1900, 19U2. 
Mookk, CiARBsrE B.; 

Certain .iburiginal Kemains of X. W. Florida, by Moore. 
Morris, John T, : 

Catalogue of Art and Literary Property of Henry (i. Man[uand. 
>[l'sel'm of Fine Arts, Boston; 

Annual Itei>orI, I1HI2. 

Museum Bulletin, 1903 (2 ruye.j. 
Otaki, IIakvmasa : 

Crosby Brown Collection of !klnsieal Instruments in Metropolitan Museum. 

Modern English Writers on Japan. 
Pennsylvania Acai.emy ok Fine Art^, Phi!adel[.hia : 

Circular ot Inittruclion Committee, IU03. 

Sinety-Fifth Annual Report. 
Pkpi'KR, William Pi.att : 

Catalogue ot Antir]ue Carvings ot Old Japan, 



Digitized by Google 



31 

pETKBeoRorcH Soi'itrrv, Peterborough, Englaad : 

Tlurtielli Annual Be|>ort of the Society. 
Rea, Mrs. Elizabeth: 

Reprint at CJUler Couoty Ci>u>ttc, Jinunry 4, 18(N>. 
frtOTT Stamp & Chin Ca, Sew York : 

ArDericftn Jctiirnnlof Philately |I4 vols.). 

<'alnliiglle for Advanced Collecliini |3 vul!.!, by Collin and Caiman, 
v. S. BiRKAL- UP ETHNiii.uoy, Wasliington, 1). C: 

N'ineleenih Annual Il«pi>rl :2 vuls.l. 
V. S. NATrosAL MisEi-M, Wnshinfrtim. D. C: 

Ceramic Art in China and CalalDgue of the Hippiaiey Collecliun. 
WiLKSER, V. A. B.: 

Catalogue of PainlingH in llie Widener Collection ('i vols.). 

By I'urchiiHe ; 
Japanese-Knglish Dictionary, by Hepburn. 
Besclireibung der Eurofmisclien Pay«ncen, by Brinckninun. 
Encyclopiedia of Ceramics, by Jervi». 
Delltacliea (iegnngbiich, by SchnfT. 
Domestic Life and Characteristics of tlie Pt^nnsylvaniii-lierman Pioneer, by 

International Addre»sbucli, by Seelig. 

Old English Plate, il.-^ Maken and Marks, hy Cripps. 

By Exchange; 

Justus Falckoer, Mystic and Scholar, by Sachse. 
Music of the Kphmtii Cloister, hy Saehse. 

PfriodicitlM taken for the Library : 
American Journal of A rcliii-olo^y, vol. 5. 

Cataloj^ue of Auction Sales of Coins and Mcdnls, by Lyman Low. 
Meehan's Monthly, vol. 2. 
Old China. 
The Oonnois'Cur. 
The International Studio. 
.Vmerican Journal ot Xumisniatin'. 
Journal of the S.iciely of .Arls, vc)l. 50. 

All of tvliich is respectfully siibiiiilteil. 
WILLIAM PLATT PEPPKR, EDWIN ATLEE BAHBKR, 



Digiized by Google 



;:.S i. l: ^ a ?■ R £ ■ 






5.:;,^ Z, S % S £ . 



= 5 ^ 5 :^ ? ■? 



; i < i, i < ^. s, 4 % i. i. % -i, f ' 2 



i-ig^'StR-ii.'iS-s^is^itii 



'^, '^ S_ % ^ ? ^ ^ % % S €_ % i_ s £_ -% f: t I'&l 









oy Google 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART, BROAD AND PINE STREETS. 



REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL. 

Presented at the Cliwf. of the Twenty-Sixth School Year. 

The School has been Jittendcd during the past year by 1000 
pupils, of whom (>54 were men and 346 women. 

The followin;; additions have been made in the teaching staff; 
Mr. Albert \V. Barker, Instructor in Drawing, to fill the vncancy 
caused by the resigniitiun of Mr. B. F. Jarrett. 

Mr. J. Edgar Hill, lustruttor in Architectural Drawing. 

Miss May S. Haydock, Instructor in Wood -engraving and 
Color printing. 

Miss Emma Schmidt, Instructor in (ierman. 

The experiment of mailing the instrnction in Modern Lan- 
guages free to all regular students in either the Art or Textile 
Schools has been discontinued, as it was found to be a posi- 
tive hindrance to the department in whose interest it was tried. 
Conducted as it had been for several years before, as an independ- 
ent department, the Scliool of Languages had done excellent 
work, and was well attended. It had come to be felt, however, 
that even the very small fee that was charged for this instruction 
might prevent the attendance of some who were most likely to be 
benefited by it, and the fee was accordingly abolistied in 1898 in 
the case of all students regularly entered for the year either in tlie 
.^rt or Textile Schools. The effect of this action on the work of 
the School proved to be ex;ictly the opposite of what was hoped for. 



Digitized by Google 



34 

The pupils failed to appreciate the advantages of an opportunity 
so freely offered theui, and a return to the original arrangement 
has been made, solely with reference to promoting a deeper inter- 
est and a more serious purpose in this part of their education on 
the part of the students. The results of the change are already 
gratifying, and the promise of still further improvement next year 
is encouraging. The courses have been admirably arranged and 
adapted to the needs of our students by the Professor in chaise; 
the conversational method is employed almost exclusively, and 
every effort will be made to give to this instruction the place which 
it certainly ought to occupy in a school of this charocter. 

The most pressing needs of the department of Chemistry and 
Dyeing, which were referred to in my last Report, have been pro- 
vided for by the erection of a commodious dye-house, which is fur- 
nished with every appliance necessary to put the work on a thor- 
oughly practical basis. 

An Association of the Alumni of the .\rt School has been or- 
ganized during the year, and has already accomplished a great 
deal of good work. A room for meeting and exhibitions that has 
been assigned to its use in the School Building has been attract- 
ively fitted up by the Association, and a series of most successful 
meetings and receptions has been held. The first reception, on 
the evening of December 10, 1902, marked also the twenty-fifth 
anniversary of the opening of the School. 

The Association of the Alumni of the Textile School, which 
was in process of organization when tiie last report was presented, 
has also ])roved to be an active and enthusiastic body, animated 
by a spirit which is full of promise for the future of the School. 

The work of the various student organizations continues with 
undiminished activity. 

By request of the Western Drawing Teachers' Association an 
exhibit of the work of the School, which was made at Minneapolis 
a year ago, was continued in a number of other Western cities, 
and a similar exhibition has been made at Syracuse and Roches- 
tor, N. Y. 

Among the extensions of our work along practical lines which 
have oftenest been discussed by the officers and friends of the 
School, no addition more important or desirable has been sug- 
gested than a School of Pottery. This industry is so pre-eminently 
and unc(|ui vocally artistic in character as to entitle it to the very 



Digilzed by Google 



86 

first consideration when the nims of such u School rb tills are iiii' 
der discussion. It aeems to ine eminpntly desirable that the ef- 
forts which have been made in former years for the establishment 
of such a department should he renewed, and that the next en- 
largement of the facilities of the School should be in this direc- 
tion. The field which it would enter is at present quite unoccu- 
pied, so far, at least, as the Kaetem States are concerned, and there 
would seem to he no reason why a leadership in this respect, sim- 
ilar and equal to that which attended the cstahlishment of the 
Textile School, should not be assured. With so large a part of the 
necessary instruction already provided, and with ample room on 
our spacious lot for the necessary building, the School of Indus- 
trial Art would seem to have advantages for the establiehment of 
such a department which are possessed by no other institution, 
and I respectfully recommend the subject to the earnest consider- 
ation of the members of the corporation. 

The Library of the School haw received during the year the 
following accessions : 

Pun; hated. I'rc»enled 

Bookn, 18 55 

Periodicals, . 10 5 

Portfulioa of Photographs, Prints, etc., ... 3 10 

Pamplilets, SH 

The total number of titles in the Librarv of the Mchool on 
May 31, 1903, was as follow:^ : 

Bound Volumes, 1092 

"Unbound Volumes, 431 

Fsmphlets, . ' 620 

Pholographa nnil Prints 2804 

Gifts to the Library during the past year have been made by 
the following : 

Misses Mary and Harnh Lewis, Mrs. John Harrison, Mrs. Frank 
K. Hippie, Mr. E. A. Barber, Mr. H. F. Slratton, Mr. James G. 
Barnwell, Mr. William L. Klkins, Mr. Henry Taws, Mr. John 
Story Jenks, Mr. Henry B. Kiimmel, Mr. L, W. Miller, University 
of Chicago, Wilmerding School of Industrial Art, Norwich School 
of Art (Connecticut), John Crerar Library (Chicago), California 
School of Mechanical Arts (So. San Francisco), Pennsylvania 



Digiized by Google 



GERMAN CABINET. 
Carved Wnliiul, Seventeenth Ccnlurv. 
n by Mi»9 Mary Ijewis and Mias Sarah Lewis, in Meraorj of 
Eliiabelh W. Lewis. 

n Ihavingb^ Edgiir Pmrcp, a Pupil (,/ the Schvol (see p. 19). 



Digilzed by Google 



37 

Academy of Fine Arts, Boston Museum of Fine Arte, Memnrifil 
Hall, Lewis Institute (Chicago), tit. Louis University. Cincinnati 
Museum As-sociation, Underwood & Underwood (New York), 
Photo Era, Instructor Publishing Co., Art Institute of Chicago, 
Carnegie Museum (Pittsburgh), Lawrence Scientific School (Har- 
vard University), Simmons Collie (Boston), United Stiites (iov- 
ernment, State of New Jersey, Numismatic and Antiquarian So- 
ciety of Philadelphia, Maryland Institute (Baltimore), Clifford A 
Lawton, City jf Philadelphia, State of Pennsylvania, Massnchu- 
actte Slate Board of Kducation, St. Louia World's Fair Associa- 
tion, The Twentieth Century Club of Boston, City Parka' Associa- 
tion, Philadelphia School of Design for Women, Western Draw- 
ing Teachers' Association, Art Students' Ixtague ( Sew York), Mu- 
nicipal Technical Inatitnle (Belfast), Central Ontjirio School of 
Art and Industrial Design, Art Studentti' League ( Buffalo, N, Y,), 
Rhode Island School of Design, Bates & Guild Co., Detroit Mu- 
seum of Art, McGill University (Montreal), Art Club of Philadel- 
phia, Corcoran Gallery of Art (Washington, I>. C), Educational 
Club of Philadelphia, [..ehigh rniversity,8mitbsonian Institution, 
Dickinson College, Mechanics' Institute (liochestcr, N, Y. ), South- 
ern Educational Board, Fairmount Park Art Association, Colby 
College, Summer School of Art (Fort Washington), Plastic Club, 
T. S. Clarkson School of Technology (Potsdam, N. Y.). 



Digiized by Google 



DONATIONS 

To THE SCH(M»L OF APPLIED ArT. 

From Miss M. AthtTton Lcncli, 3 liooks, examples of ?)Oofc- 
biiiding ; also 8 book covers. 

From Mrs. Rudoliih Blmikenlmrg, a Japanese clock. 

Fnmi Miss Margarette Lippineott, 7 casts. 

From Mi-s. John Harrison, 2(> objects of industrial art. 

To THE Textile School Dl'kixo the Year. 

Draper Company, Hopedale, Mass., 1 46-inch Dra[)er maga- 
zine loom, with 'ii-harncKS Dobhy (latest pattern); 1 Modern 48- 
spindle cotton twister; 12 change gears for twister; 12 lock screws; 
637 tilling hohbins, and 2 holsters, steps, etc., for spindles on 
twister. 

Crompion & Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass., 1 40-inch, 
2(l-harnes8, 4x4 liox Gem dress-goods loom ; also 2 warp beams ; 
1 '20-hook selvage Jacquard, wittr liH cards ; 1 card punch ; 1 
pair of loom trucks, an<l 32 Jacquard cards. 

Klauder Woldon Dyeing Machine Co., Amsterdam, X. Y., 1 
combination skein dyeing and scouring machine; also services of 
man to erect same. 

National Knitting Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 1 full automatic knitting 
machine; also 1 sjieciai pulley for driving the same. 

E. Jenckea Mfg. Co., Pawtucket, U. I., 1 "Invincible" fully- 
automatic knitting machine, with accessories. 

Atw 00 d- Morris on Co., JStonington, Conn., 1 silk doubling ma- 
chine. 

L'niversal Winding Co., Boston, Masr:., 1 six-gang Universal 
cone-winding machine. 

H. W. Butterworth A Sons Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 1 long-chain 
dyeing machine. 

Phoenix Silk Mfg. Co., Aliontown, Pa., 1 silk-warping machine 
and creel; also a short taffeta silk warp, harness and reed included. 

Lowell Jlachine Shop, Lowell, Mass., 1 box of bronze bushings 
for roller bearings on various machines in worsted department ; 
also tension devices for worsted aprons on double-can gill box. 



oy Google 



39 

J. li. Keim & Clo., Philiidelphia, I'ii., donation of *-25. 

John Roylc & Sons, pHterson, N. J., 1 4-inch carrier frame, with 
pulleys, etc., for angle drive; also 1 stool for jiiano card cutter. 

Chas, C, Klein, Philndeliihin, Pn., 1 ;}-inch Universal carrier 
frame, with pulleys, etc., for angle drive. 

The Pnirpoiiit Cktrjioration, New Bedford, Mass., .">1K) Universal 
No. 5 (iray cones for winder. 

John Story Jenks, Philadelphia, Pa., 1 students' microscope. 

Thomas Halton'e Sons, Philadelphia, Pu., 1 special coniberlioard 
for ingrain loom ; also Jacquard findings to the value of $(>, 

Charles Ashoff, Philadelphia, Pa., reeds of various numbers and 
widths for power looms. 

Saco & Pettee Machine Shops, Newton Upper Foils, Mass., 1 
complete set of wrenches and gauges for card. 

E. F. Houghton it Co., Philadelphia, Pa., one-half value on 2 
barrels of wool oil. 

Osborn & Wilson, New York, N. Y., KtOO 3i x 161 Jacquard 
card.". 

R. Sergcson it Co., Philadelphia, Pn., 2 dozen shuttles. 

Fales A Jenks Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. 1., S gears for cotton 
department. 

Justice, Bateman & Co., Philadelphia, Pa,, .'S.S7 pounds of wool 
samples. 

Rowland Croft, Sons & Co., Camden, N. J., 150 pounds of LTs 
noils. 

John H. Dearnley, Philadelphia, Pa., 141 pounds garnetted 
white worsted waste. 

S. B. & B. W. Fleisher, Philadeli>hiii, Pn., 137 pounds of fine 
noils. 

H. T. Thompson A- Co., Chicago, 111., 10" pounds of scoured wool. 

John G. Wright, Boston, Mass., 10(1 pounds of scoured wool. 

Wm. H. Grundy A Co., Philadelphia, Pa.. HHi pounds No. 1 (i's 
soft waste. 

Hampton Company, E:isthampt<m, Mass., liS pounds of mercer- 
ized cotton yarn. 

Aberfoyle Mfg. Co., Chester, Pa., -i'l pounds of various colors 
2-40'8 mercerized cotton yarn ; also 21 pounds of spun silk. 

Botany Worsted Mills, Passaic. N. J., )40 pounds of fine colored 
Blubbing waste. 

Hallowcll, Donald & Co., Boston, Ma.es., OS pounds of fine wool 
in the grease. 



Digilzed by Google 



41) 

Edward T. Sleel & Co., Philadelphia, I'n., I'l jiounds of fleece 
wool in the urease. 

Goodall Worsted Co., Sanford, Me., &> pounds of wool samples. 

Stafford & Co., Mnnnyunk, Philadelphia, Pa., oO pounds of light 
super yarn. 

Wm. H. Ix)rimer's Sons Co., Philadelphia, Pa,, .^ pounds of 2-20 
mercerized yarn. 

Cope & Co., Gerniantown, Philadelphia, Pa., 9 cases of mis- 
cellaneous yarns on bobbins, ranging in lots and colors from 1 
pound to 4 pounds. 

Joseph H. Wheelock & Co., Boston, Mass., samples of wool, 

Eisemanii Bros., Boston, Mass., samples of wool, 

H. .1. Maynard, Philadelphia, Pa., samples of silk ribbons from 
Epitiilon, France. 

C. Moore & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., oO feet of i-inch cotton 
banding. 

Theodore C. Search, Philadelphia, Pa., 1 large American flag, 
20 X 36 feet. 

Furhenfabriken of Klberfeld Co., Phibidelphia, Pa., 27 pounds 
of various samples of dyestuffs ; 42 2-ounce samples of dyestuffs ; 
also sample book on printing, 

CiisscUn Color Co., Philadelphia, Pa., ;13 pounds of various- 
samples of dyestuffs; also 5 2-ounce samples of dyestufTs. 

Kuttrotr, Pickhurdt & Co,, Philadelphia. Pa., 16 pounds of various 
samples of dyeatufis; 2 4-ouncc samples, and 2 2-ouncc samples 
of dycstuCTc. 

Harway Dyewood and Extract Co,, Xeiv York, S. Y., 13 pounds 
of dyewood extracts. 

Berlin Aniline Works, Philadelphia, Pa., 7 1-pound samples of 
dyestufls ; also 9 4-ounce samples of dycstuffs, 

Hykes A Street, Philadelphia, Pa., 7 1-pound samples of dye- 
stuflW ; also one barrel Wyandotte soda. 

(.ieneral Chemical (.'o,, Pliiladelphia. Pa., o carboys acids ; also 1 
carboy ammonia. 

H. A. Metz & Co., New York, N. Y., S J-pound samples of dye- 
stufls. 

C. Bischofl" & Co., New York, N. Y., 3 1-pound samples of dye- 
stuffs ; also 7 1-onnce samples of dyestufi's. 

Peter Sj)ence & Sons, Manchester, England, 4 pounds Titanium 
salts. 



Digilzed by Google 



41 

Schoellkopf, Hartford A- Hanna Co., Buffalo, N. Y., 1 keg urinn- 
mine ; also o pounds of djestuffs. 

John Horsfall, Philadelphiti, ['a., 1 ke^ fnnkhau^inc. 

New York and Bo»!ton Dyewood Co., New York, N. Y., 1 i>ound 
of dye wood extract. 

A. Klipstein & Co., New York, N, Y,, 8 2-oiince samples of dye- 
stuffs. 

Read Holliday & Sons. New York, N. Y., 6 ■iounce samples of 
dyestuffe, 

Victor, Koechl & Co., New York, N. Y., 3 2-ounce Haniples of 
dyestuffs; 1 4-oiince sample of dyestiiff. 

J. A. & W. Bird & Co., New York, N. Y., "2 2-ounce wimples of 
dyestuffs. 

Eddystone Mfg. Co.. Eddystonc, Pa., ^ engraved printing rollers. 

Edward H. Best A Co., Boston, Ma.is.. one printer's blanket. 

Arabol Mfg. Co., New York, N. Y., 1 ho.x of assorted finishing 
and sizing materials. 

COIRTESIEH EXTENDED. 
Albert Hellwig & Co,, Philadelphia, Pn, ; Charles Ashoff, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. ; John Bridge. Cbe.'iter, Pa. ; The Draper Company, 
Hopedale, Mass. ; Schaum & I'hUnger, Philadelphia, Pa. ; H. X. D. 
North, Boston, Mass.; Erben, Harding & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Fales & Jenks Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. I, ; John and James 
Dobson, Bradford Mills, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa.; Folwell 
Bros. & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. ; Geoi^e C. Hetzell Co., Chester, Pa. ; 
Howland Croft, Sons A Co., Camden, N. J.; Millville Mfg. Co., 
Millville, N. J. ; Samuel A. Crozer A Son, lipland. Pa. ; Aberfoyle 
Mfg. Co., Chester, Pa.; Firth & Foster Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; J. R. 
Foster & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. ; F. H. Milner, Philadelphia, Pa. ; 
"Fibre & Fabric,'' Boston, Mass.; "The Manufacturer," Phila- 
delphia, Pa.; " Dry Goods Economist," New York.N. Y.; "Dixie," 
Atlanta, Ga. ; " Textile Colorist," Philadelphia, Pa. ; " Textile Ex- 
celsior," Charlotte, S. C. ; " Textile \V()rld- Record," Boston, Mass.; 
IjOivell Machine Shop, Lowell, Mass. ; Adelaide Silk Milts, Allen- 
town, Pa. ; Wm. H. I^orimer's Sons C()., Philadelpliia, Pa. ; John 
Forrest, Philadelphia, Pa.; Eavenson & Levering, Philadelphia, Pa. 

The institution is also indebted to Mrs. W. \\'. Gibbs, who has 
borne the expenseof rebuilding the grand piano in the Auditorium 



Digiized by Google 



42 

of the School, and of the construction, under the auspices of the 
Associate Committee of Women, of a tennis-court in the north 
yard ; and also to the Vacuum Oil Company, whicli has donated 
all oils used by the Engineer's Department. 

A full-size cast of Donatello's St, George has lieen presented to 
the School by a fund raised among students, teachers and em- 
ployes in memory of Miss Frances L. Farrand. 

COM MKN CEMENT. 
The Commencement Exercises were held at Horticultural Hall 
on Thursday evening, June 4th, and were followed by the Annual 
Exhibition of Students' work, at the School Building. Broad and 
Pine Streets. The Commencement Address, "'Art for Life's Sake," 
was delivered by Edward Howard (iriggs; the diplomas were 
awarded by President Sejircli ; the jirizes of the Associate Com- 
mittee of Women and the individual prizes offered by ladies of 
that Committee were awarded by Miss Fannie S. Magee. Mrs. 
■ Edward P. Davis, Mrs. John Wister, Mrs. Frimk K. Hippie and 
Miss Clyde; the prize of the Pennsylvania Society of Colonial 
Diimi'S of America was awanlod by Miss Magee ; the prize of the 
■Girls' Industrial Art League by Miss K. Elizabeth WoUe; and the 
various other prizes by the Principal of the School. 

DIPLOMAS, PKIZfB AXI» CERTIFfCATES AWARDED AT THE AN- 
NUAL COMMENCEMENT, JL'NE 4. 1903. 

DIPLOMAT. 
ScHiWi. OF Applied .\rt,— Itelm Claiborne Ilsxier, Ida Belle Burnmann, 
Bertlifi Brown, Joseph Deker. ElKJe Minerta Miller, Grace billjan Urban. 

Textile Schoiil. — Nathan Monroe Baehman, Stephen Holla Garner, Frank 
'VVlllinui Ilofuiann, John Kdlai^ Jr., Williniii Joseph Manrer, Herbert Wright 
Spalding, Harry Taylor. 

PRIZES. 

SCHOOL OF API'LIKD ART. 

Pesssvlvasia Soi-iETYi)FCiii,ONiAr. Dajib* iiF AMERICA. — Prizi^, $25. 00. 

For (iencnil Excellence, .^warded lo Ixirello Marj Tooiner. 

Honorable mention lo Blanche .Annelle Schafer. 

AswiATE CoiiMiTrEB OF Women's Pri/.e-^.-Fiil^t Prize, t2O.0O.— For 
the best work in the Course in Industrial Drawing. Awarded lo Jesaie Clarke 
Grinnell. 



Digilzed by Google 



ORIGINAL WATER-COLOR DESIGN FOR A SCREEN. 

By Richa^t S. B,-r,-in.n«, n P':p!l :/ llie AVAn.i/. 

Adaptation of liist^ric .Motive, from Siiiiiieti in the Pcnnsvlvmiia Miiwim 



Digilzed by Google 



44 

Honorable m«nlbn to Earl J. Earlr, Jauob Rifil Fox, Jr., Robert Burton 
'CIiHa. Keeler, Geurjje McDonuiigh. 

Sbcosi) Prize, SlO.uO. — For Original Design. Awarded to Kdith Harper 

Honorable mention tu Bertram Sydney Cliadwick. 

Thikd Prize, SIO.Oj.— For Ori;;lniil Design. Awarded to George A. Grnnl, 

Honorable mention lo Deborah Hatvley Sinedley. 

Mrs. Jones Wisteb Pkizk, S J5.U0. -$1->.00 to William Lewis Zieger, tor 
Applied Design. HID.OU lo Helen Taylor, for Uookbindinfi. 

Emua S. Cbo7.rr Pbi/e, 8W .00. —Offered for tlie best work in Drawing. 
JIO.OO to Edwin Fraocb Hill. SIO.OO d. William J. Sener. 

Honorable oiemion to Paul W. .Smith. 

Emma S. CnoitKR I'rize, J^'iO.OD. — For the best groU[> of nork in Modeling. 
Awarded Co Eurelta Kirkbride. 

Firat mention Co John M. nateman. l-^jiial Heiond mention lo Ida Belle 
Bommann and Bertha Brown. 

KETrERBR Prize, $20.0). — OHered by Mr. (.iuslav Kellerer, of tbe Advisory 
-Cunimittue, for best adaptation of a Historic Motive tmnt studies at Memorial 
Hull. Awarded tu E<lnu Bartlctt. 

H.itiorable mention lo Aleiina St. Paul Stroup, Florenee Ynnlley. 

Jon.-) J. Bu^LK Prize, $5.00.— OHeredby Mr. J..hn J. Boyle of the Advisory 
Committee, tor Modeling. Awarded to Juaepli Deker. 

Cakoune Axpiird MaiiBE Prize, ^20. 00. — For Deuorative Flower Painting. 
Awarded to Gertrude Wilson. 

Fredkhic Gbapp Prize, *io.OO.— For .Areliitectural Design. Awarded to 
M> reel I us Eugene WHgbi. 

IIemrv Pebkv Lei^nd Prize, tSo.OO. Offered .by Mrs. John Harrison tor 
the best Work in Illustration, .^warded to William J. Server. 

Honorable mention to Clara Bell Mitchell. 

GiRls' Inol-striai, Art Lkai'UF. Pbikj, ClO.OO.-For the best finished article 
made from a design by a Student Member of the League. $5 OO to Margaret 
Custer, tor Bookbinding, *5.0l) lo Reba Cl.ilborne Bauer, for Tabouret 

Honorable mention to Dora Eliialieth Roberts, for Stenciled Table-Cover. 

F. Weber Prize. — Drawing Table, for bent work in In^tnimenlal Drawing- 
Awarded to Harry R. Filzpnlrick, 

Prize eciioLAR'HiPS pok Sciiooi. Yeah 1003-IOOt.— Awanled to Jessie 
Clare (irinnell, (ieorge T. Hamilton, Maude Smith, IkiWI .A.itken, Gertrude 
Gmee Hark. 

TEXTILE SCHOOL. 

ASSOCIATE CllMMITrEE OF WoMES 

in Jarqtiard Design. Thlnl year. A 

Hiinorable meniioii to John Kellars, Jr. 

The Mis» Ci.vdk Prize, $10.00.— For be=t executed work in Jacquard De- 
sign. Second year. Awarded to J. Tilns Aun^e<t. 

Honorable mention to I.ouis K. Kueblman. 

Mrs. Frask K. Hippi.e Prize, ?IO.OO.-For Special Work. Awarded to 
Eugene Parks Bradley. 



Di.itradb, Google 



DESIGN FOR A POSTER. 

Jlij William J. AVrrfi-, a Pu.pil of tht Srhou'. 

Original Coili|>i)silion, in Cului?. 



Di.itradb, Google 



46 

The ELIKABtTK C. Roberth Prizb, $tO.OO.— For best work in Color Har- 
mony and Design. Firul yeur. Awarded to J. Everett Emerson. 

llonomble mention to F^van G. Mclver, iijcliuvler J. Taylor. 

The "Textile World Kecokd" Gold Medal.— For General Excellence 
Cliemistry and Dyeing Course. Anarded to Leicester DaCoHia Ward. Thesis : 
Tlie Api>licBtion of Solpliiir Dyes to Teitile Fibres. 

Honorable mention to Arlliur Clarence Stifel. 

New England Cottos MASCFAcri'REEts' Askociatlos Mkpai- — For Gen- 
eral Excellence. Regular Course. Third year. Annrded lo William Joseph 
Manrer. 

Honorable mention lo Hteplien H. Gamer, Harry Taylor. 

"DvERs' Tkade Joi'hkal" Prim:— Chemical Balance. — For best results 
in Textile Printinfi:. Awarded to Arthur Clarence !Stifel. Thesis; Calico 
Printing. 

Honorable mention lo Dnvid Leonard Malcolm. 

Prize ScHOLAHHHirs kor Schiwl Year 1103-1904.— Awarded lo Abraham 
A. Levy, Evan G. Mclver, Frank M. Kaufmann (EvenioK Class). 

CKUTIFICATEH. 
SCHOOL OF APPLIED ART. 

Certificate B— Applied Debion.— Bertha Brown, Elgie Minerva Miller. 

IntkriorDecoratiiin-.- Frank ShiirannBittenbender. 

iLi-isTRATiON.— Clara Bell Mitchell. 

Arc'HItEutubal Drawinus.— Daniel Everett Sutton, Marcellus Engene 
Wright. 

Normal Art Coitrsk.- Edna Tartlelt, Mnud Joseidiine Coan, Alice Leedom 
Cresson, lluth Sanderson Dalziel, Emma .\ngusla McFeely, William Seltzer 
Rice, Helen Thnrlow, Edith Elizabeth Wirt, Eather Elizabeth Wolle. 

Draivinh for Teacher." —Mary Camilla Bisser, Mubel Line Hart, Eliza- 
beth Elv Uallonell, Blanche Annetie Schafer, Lorelio Mnry T-oomer. 

Clash A— Industrial Drawixci.— Hannah Miller Bnird, Margaret Wilkinson 
Bender, Waller Garfield Cliew, Matic Ionise Craven, Beatrice Croke, Rulh San- 
derson Dalziel, Nancy Ijtnrienc Dougherty, James Chester Dolphin, Harriet 
Elizabeth Dolby, Lillian Hunt Dunglss)<, Jane Itl.icbly Driver, Pearl Verona Eb- 
iier. Earl Joshua Early, Anna Law Estell, Calvin Ciiarles Fine, Horence May 
Tiedcrick, Jacob Rifil Fox, Jr., Ida Itates GrofI, Florence Irwin Griffith, Jessie 
Clare Grinneti, F'lorenee Lincoln Hele, Mabel Line Hart, Mary Elizabeth 
Hunt, Elizabeth Ely Hallonell, Robert Burton Charles Keeler, Edna Mabel 
Kerr, Sam Leopold (Jeorge JJorlon McDonougli, Abbott McClure, George 
Henry Melcher, Robert !:>tTaley Oberlander, Anna l.anning Pndgelt, Jennie 
Pearson, Henry Kdwin Reiger, Kophie Ringe, (ieorge Elias ^chmick, Blun, he 
-Vnnette Schafer, Alphonse Leon Sebcsi, May Klizabeih Smiley, Britoinarle 
f^^nilll, William Schmidlmeier, Mark MncDonnld Sheridan, Carmen Fra 
Skerrett, Lorelio Mary Toomer, Florence Qiroiine Turner. 



Digilzed by Google 



47 

TEXTILE StHCH)L. 
Second Yeas— Reoular Dat Clash : 

Jay Titae Aiinggt, James Townaend Hickman, Jr., Albert Edward Lakj, 
Abraham Albert Lev;, Robert Carl Liehr, Herbert Matcolm BcmingtOD, 



A. R C 

SILK BROCADES. 

Designed and Woven by Students (if the Philadelphia Textile School, of the 

School of Industrial Art. 

A. By F. W. ifo>«i«n. B. Bj K P. Ihadlry. C. By R. J. Oir»v«. 

Harold Edward Richmond, I.ouis Kdward Riieblman, Frederick Julius Sie- 
brechl, Clayton Palmer Steams, Kdmnnd John Wacliter, Daniel Joseph Wade, 
George W. Wittenberg. 



oy Google 



48 

Second Yeab Sii.k Clahi — Day ; 

Eugene Parks Bradley. 

Second Year Cotton Clam — Day ; 

Wilejr Legeoe Baldirin, Joseph Wenk Sanger. 

Second Year Wool, and Worbted Class — Day ; 

Bojal Thomas Bishop, CUnnce Morton Bishop, Harry Lincoln Henrj', 
Hampton Sidney Marchsnt. 

Second Year Chemistry and Dveino — Day : 

Lewis Hermsa Komhrodt, David Leonard Malcolm, Davis Albert Provost, 
Arthur Clarence Slifel, Leicester DsCoata Ward. 

Second Year Yarn Manufacture — Day: 

Watson Thomas Dunmore, Jr. 

Third Year Cbevistry — Evening : 

James G. Carville, Elvin H. Kilheffer, Louis C Spring. 

Third Year Reoular Class— Kve.vino : 

Alexander Costine, Frederick C. Denbhaus, Paul M. Uhlich. 

PARTLAL COURSES— EVENING CLASS. 
Weave Formation— Thbbb Years : 

William H. Murphy, Ivan H. Scovill, A1i)ert Garfield Shercood. Christian 
H. Weisbecker. 
Fabric Analysis' and CALcuLATfOK — Thbeb Years! 
William H. Murphy, Ivan B. Scovill. 

JACIJT'ARD DeSIQN— Two YcABB; 

Harry G. PfaB, Albert Garfield Sherwood. 

Cabpitt Deswh- Two Years : 

Howard Ahn, A. Beard. 

Worsted Drawing and Spinning — One Year : 

Harvey H. Hetherington, Horace E. Farra, Frank M. Ferguson, Max Hofl^ 
man, Howard S. Laird, Waller McCook, Charles W. Masland, William A. 
Mohre, William C. PfeiBer, S. L. Presburg, J. Dobson Schofield, James Henrv 
Stephenson, Lawrence Stolt, William J. Walson, Charlei White. 

Coi»B Habmo-ny — Onk Year : 

Janes R. Lappin, Charles H, Wolfe, 

Cotton Yarn MANucAcritBE— One Year: 

Alexander Dunlap, Charles C. Jones. 

WoolGradino and Blending — One Year : 

P. T. Fitch, Max Hoffman, Walter McCook, Geor«e Stivers. 

The following students of the Textile School hnve <(ali3factorily completed 
the work of the year in classes for which no certificates are awarded. 

First Year— Regular Day Class : 

Charles E. Kaltenbach, Allan W. Gilmour, Schuyler J. Taylor, Frederic J. 
Coe, Paul Benninghofen, Jas. O. Stewart, John C. Headman, J. Ererett Emer- 
son, J. W. Brown, Comelins Maher, Jr., Francis V. O-Hara, Mitchell S. Sabel, 
Evan O. Mclver. Benjamin W. Chanalls, Harold H. Hart, H. W. Eddy, Jr., 
Wm. P. Price. 



Digilzed by Google 



FiBST Yeas— Crxmistrv and DTBitia— Dat Ci.ah: 

Fra.Dk Dvjet, James J. Wittenberg, Joha Keenftn, Ua^iih IshibMhi, T. 
Albert Smith, Horace Smith. 

Thirtj appoiDtmenta 1^ State Scholanhipi have bMn made this 7ear for the 
followiog counties: Allegheny (3), Annatrung, Bearer, Blair, Bradford, Butler, 
Cambria, Carbon, .Centre, Chester, Clearfield, ('olumbia, Crawford, Dauphin, 
Delaware, Forest, Fulton, Lancaater, Lehigh, Mercer, Mifflin, Monroe, Mont- 
gomeiy, N'orthampton, Philadelphia (2), Someraet, Susquehanna. 

Seventy holden of these Scholarships were regialered (his year. 

The Scholarship!) placed at the disposal ot the Board of Kducation of Phila- 
delphia were filled, as usual, by a competitive examination, conducted by the 
Principal, each Uraumar School Prioeipal being autboriied to send can- 
didates. 

tu addition to tlie above, appointments wen made, as usual, to the Scholar- 
ships which ore annually filled from the High, Normal, Manual Training and 
Public Industrial Art Schools of this city. 

Appended are lists of students showing their previous occupa- 
tions and the localities from which they come: 



0CCUPATI0JI8 

Advertisers, .... 4 

Agents, 3 

Apprentices, .... 3 

Beamcts, 8 

Bookbinders, .... 2 

Bricklayers, .... 3 
Captain, U.S. A., . .1 
Card Lacers, Stani|>era and Cut- 

Urs, 6 

&rdeiB, 2 

Carpenters and Cabinetmakers, . & 

Carvers, 6 

Clerks, TO 

Chemists, 3 

Decorators, .... 4 

Dedgners, 43 

Draughtsmen, . 2S 

Drawers-in, .... 3 

Druggists, ..... 2 

Dyers, 20 

Employ^, ..... 3 

Engravers 4 

Finishers 7 

Illustrators, .... 4 

Jewellers, 3 



BEPRE8ENTED. 
Knitter, . 
Laborers, . 
Librarians, 
Loom- Fixers, 
Manufacturers, 
Merchants, 
Machinists, 
Photographers, 

F^inters and P 

Reporteis, 
Splitters, . 
Spinners, . 
Stenographers, 
Superintendent?, 
Tailors, . 
Teachers, . 

Weavera, . 

Miscellaneous, 
Students, . 

ToUl, . 



oy Google 



50 

LOCALITIES REPRESENTED. 

Philadelphia, 713 

Pennsjrlvania, 151 

New Jersey, 52 

New York, 13 

Maseachusetts, 10 

Connecticut, 6 

Ohio. 6 

Maryland, 5 

Bhode iBland, ............ 5 

Delaware, .... ......... 5 

Michigan, .... 9 

■Wisconsin, 3 

Diatriclof Cohiuihia, 3 

North Carolina, 3 

Orefcon, 3 

Illinois, . .3 

Indiana, 2 

deocgia, 2 

Kentuckj, I 

Texas, 1 

South Carolina, ............ I 

Porto Rico, ■ . 1 

Canada, . . ' 1 

Japan, 1 

Total, 1000 

Respectfully submitted, 

LE-SLIE W. MILLER, 
Jl*\E 8, 1003. Pi-incipal. 



Digilzed by Google 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 

(For Year Ending May 31, 1903.) 



Balance od band June 1, 1902, 
Tuition Fees, An School, . 

" " Textile School, . 
Income of Endowment Fund, 

" " Tcmp)e Fund, , 

" " Chapman Bidd)e Fund, 

" " ClarloD French Fund, 
" F. A. Graff Fund, . 

" " Emma 8, Croier Fund, 

" " Mr*. Wm. Weightman, Jr., Fund, 

" " Elitabelh Duane Gillespie Fund, 

IntereBt on Deposits 

Appropriation, City of Philadelphia, 
" State of Pennaylvania, 

" Park Commisaion, 

Annual Afembera, .... 
OSertor; Boxes at Museum, 
Temporary Loans, .... 
General Expenses, .... 
1336 Spring Garden Street Net Rent, 

" " " " Sale of Property, 

DONATIONS. 
Special Fund Museum for Purchase New Objects, 

Bequest, Estate G. S. Pepper 

Life Members, 

Heat and Lighting, 

For Museum Purchases, 

Special Plate Fund, 

Muaenm Library Fund, 

From Key Account, 



(8,32a »6 

10,086 50 

1,456 25 

2,244 00 

ftO 00 

00 00 

20 00 

101 25 

bO 00 

659 00 

536 S4 

10,000 00 

35,000 00 

10,209 82 

1,430 00 

133 69 

7.000 00 

66 00 

1,360 79 

32,042 00 



10 20 
1,100 00 
1,000 00 

10 00 
139 00 

18 34 

S5 48 
1,500 00 



Totals 

EXPENDITURES. 

Maintenance of Museum, (14,153 40 

School Building Wages and Expenses, . . . 6,174 66 

Repairs and Alterations 2,109 96 

AdTertising, 6,020 50 



Digilzed by Google 



52 



Art School 8«lariea and Vftga, 9,206 4S 

" " Expenws, 613 43 

" " Equipment!, 318 20 

Textile School 8alari«« and Wage*, .... 18,603 94 

" " Eipenees 1,240 23 

" " Equipment*, 536 70 

AdminUtration tSalariea and Wages, .... 10,335 SO 

" EquipmeoU, 10 60 

BpecUl Plate Fnpd, 21 00 

G«a Account, 779 60 

Coal Account, 2,416 84 

Inmiiance 993 40 

Interest, 13,310 26 

General Eipeofles 3,011 25 

MiiMnm Library Fund 19 00 

1336 Spring Garden Street. Income Account, . S54 J6 

J. T. Morris Loan Repaid 312 00 

MuseDm Case Fund, 343 77 

Annual Membera, 405 53 

New Buildini; Investment, 10,421 25 

Special Fund Museum for Purchase Nev Objects, . 134 00 

" " Purchase Rare PotUr; and Porcelain, 6 00 

Mortgage 1336 Spring Garden Street paid off, . . 22,000 00 

Temple Fund Investtnent, 3,830 00 

Emma S. <'rowr Kuud Income lor Prizes, ... 60 00 

F. A. GrafI Fund tor Prixes, 50 00 

June 1, 1903, Balance 

BALANCE SHEET, MAY 31, 1903. 

Dr. 

12 Cash S(!,310 81 

28 Temporary Loans 

47 Office Furniture 729 61 

51 School " 1,500 00 

56 Show Cases, ]5,93.i 37 

66 Library 2,700 45 

71 Engravings and Photos, 1,187 92 

75 Carvings, Ivory and Bone, 769 41 

79 Mosaics, 300 00 

83 Leather Work 10 00 

fll Wood Work, 4,252 56 

95 Jewelry and Guldaoutht' Work, ... . 312 96 

99 Silvewmiths' Work and Plate, .... 5,742 26 

103 MeUl Work, ' 6,217 49 

111 Metal and Plaster Casts 3,443 99 



Digilzed by Google 



5 Arm» »nd Armor, 1,708 79 

B Coini and Medsla 180 00 

3EiumeliionMetk], 2,014 88 

7 Polteiy, 8,627 23 

1 PorceUin 2,893 M 

5 Painled uid Stained Qlan, 109 2Q 

9 Glan Vessels, 062 82 

1 Sculpture in Marble, Stone, etc 1,820 28 

S Textile Fabrics and Embroideries, . . ■ 5,087 94 

5 Musical Instruments, 44 94 

7 Lace, 1,190 20 

9 on Paintings 100 30 

L. "W. Miller, advanced to pay bills, ... 200 00 

1 Muaeiim Libnirj Fund, 

3 OfTertor; Account 

4 Special Plate Kund 

7 Museum Case Fund, 7 60 

9 Special Museum .Annual Fund, .... 

5 New Building Fund (I-sboiatorj, etc.), 

9 " " " Investment, . . 10,421 25 
:it Special Fund Museum — Purchase New Objects, 

6 " " Purcliase Rare Pottery and Por- 



ze\t.\ 



7 " " Purchase Musical Instrumeots, 

7 " " " Textiles and Laces, 

S 1330 Spring (ionlen Street. Investment, . 

i " " " " Income, 

1 Donations for Purchase Broad and Pine Streets, 

2 Profit and Loss, rJ6,9l'> 10 

S Museum Temple Fund Account, .... 

9 Temple Fund Investment 57,9W Ii9 

!t Endowoieni Fund Investment, .... 89,947 sO 

4 Endoivment Fund, 

') Temple Fund, 

1 Life Members, 

it Donations, 

3 Wra. Weightman, Jr., Scholarship, . 

1 Wm. Weiehtman, Jr., Scholarship Investment, 982 .^0 

5 F. Graff Architectural Prize Fund, . 

B F. Graff Architectural Priie Fund Investment, . 500 00 

7 Centennial Board of Finance, .... 

9 Real Estate, Broad and Pine Streets, . . . 550,778 09 

9 Mortgage on Rroail and Pine Streets, . 

2 Chapman Biddle Memoriul Scholarehip, 

2 Chapman Biddle Meniorial Scholutship Invest- 

ment, 1,000 00 

3 Clayton French Free Scholarship, 



206 20 

4 00 

35 00 

25 00 

13,730 71 

898 19 
206,171 28 

5,821 94 



500 00 
3 12 



417,000 00 
1,000 00 



Digilzed by Google 



303 CUjtoQ French Free Scholarship Investment, 
364 Emms S. Crozer Prize Fuod, 
364 Emma S. Crozer Prize Fund InTCstment, . 
364 Emma 8. Crozer Prize Fund Income, 

366 F. Gnff Archilectuntl Prize Fund Income, 

367 Gillespie Scholarahip Fund, 

367 GiUe«pi« Scholaisbip Fund Investinent, . 

368 Gillespie ScboUtsbip Fund Income, . 



143 75 

10 00 

13,100 00 



CuBRENT Expense AccordT Fob Yk, 
lUaipi 

Tuition Fee*, 

Tolal Income from Investment, . 
Interests on Deposits, .... 
Appropriations — Ciiy ol Philadelphia, 
" Slate of Pennsylvania, 

" Park Commiuion, . 

Annut^ Members' Dues, 
Donation to General Expenses, . 
Income Spring (iarden Street Property, 



t«26,133 98 S9:>6,133 98 
: Ekdino Mat 31, 1903. 



(19,313 1o 
4,630 50 
536 84 
10,000 oo 
35,000 00 
10,209 S2 
1,430 00 
66 00 
1,359 79 



Donations (or Vai 



sUses, 



Museum 

School Wages and Expenses, 

Advertising, 

Art School Salaries, etc.. 
Textile School Salaries, etc., 
Administration Salaries, etc., 
Purcha»e8 — Plate Fund and Library, . 

Gas, 

Coal, 

Insurance, 

Interest on Mortgsges, etc., - ... 
General Expenses, .... 
1336 Spring Garden Street, , 
3. T. Morris I*an Repaid, . 
Museum CaM! Fund, .... 
Museum — Borroweil from Annuals, 
I>urchase Pottery, etc.. 



SI4,153 40 
5,174 56 
2,109 96 
5,020 50 



10,1. 



i 12 



20,380 87 

10,345 80 

40 00 

T79 60 

2,416 84 

998 40 

18,310 26 

3,011 25 

654 16 

312 00 

343 77 

405 53 

140 00 

130 00 



Digilzed by Google 



Forward, 

Due for Salaries Ma; SIst, liut not paid nnlil June, 



L«M Income, 84,421 71 

Deeciency (14.033 63 



The ccwt of niainlainin); the Museum was ... 114,153 40 

Amount received from the Citj of Philadelphia 
through Farb WarranU for this account, . 10,209 82 

f3,e43 &8 
Purcbaaes tor Mu«eum amounted to ... . 9920 30 
I,ew amount received from Special Donations for this 

account, 227 61 

701 69 

^et de6cienc}' in maintenaiK'e of Museum, . . ^,M5 117 

Set " " " " School, . . 9,388 26 

Total deficiencv, (14,033 63 

GKORGK H. CLIFF, 



Digilzed by Google 



THE LATE ELIZABETH DUANE GILLESPIE. 



Digilzed by Google 



REPORT OF THE ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE 
OF WOMEN. 

In lookiDf; over the year just passed, few landmarks utanJ 
out by which to measure the work done by the Committee. But 
that need not trouble us, as the best work that the world has ever 
seen has been done on such (|uiet lines, as to be little noticed 
or commented upon by the outside public. For this reason it can. 
be hoped that the work done by us has struck deep roots, and will 
grow and strengthen as the years roll on. 

At the stated meeting in November, 1902, a new by-law ii> 
reference to the election of members of the Committee, and of offi- 
cers of the same, was voted upon and carried unanimously. 

There were three lectures given in December, through the in- 
strumentality of Mrs. Jones U'ister, for the benefit of the proposed 
new auditorium. These were well attended, and the amount 
raised wasover four hundred dollars. 

At the Annual Meeting in .January, 1903, all members of the 
Committee, as well as the officers, were re-elected for the ensuing 
year. 

The Treasurer reported a balance on hand from the various 
funds, aggregating two thousand and twenty-three dollars and 
fifty cents (82023.50). 

In February the Committee received a most courteous invi- 
tation from Mr. Edwin A. Harber to visit the Museum on any date 
which suited the Committee, and the invitation was accepted for 
March 2d at 10.30. At that time those of the Committee who- 
were fortunate enough to be able to be present had a most de- 
lightful visit to the Museum, where they were received by a com- 
mittee of three of the Trustees, and by them were shown the many 
additions to the Museum, and the better arrangement of the col- 
lections. The social side of the visit was also emphasized, aa the 
women were asked up-stiiirs to a private room, and there beauti- 
fully entertained with cake and lemonade. 

Those of the Committee who were unable to be present upon 
this festive occasion have never ceased to regret their ill-luck. 



Digilzed by Google 



58 

Having gone to the AEuseuin once for pleasure, we decided to go 
again, but this time for work, and having received permission 
■from Mr Barber, we held our April meeting there. 

The Scholarship Committee has met monthly, from October 
to June, inclusive, with Mrs. Thomas Roberts as ite Chairman, and 
its work has grown to large proportions under the Eli^tabeth Duane 
Gillespie foundation. Scholarships for the year 1902-03 were 
awarded to Miss Hazelhurst, Miss Marie Craven, Miss Mary Hunt, 
and two other applicants who, however, were obliged to decline 
the honor. 

By the advice of the Instruction Committee, a systematic ef- 
fort has been made to offer a number of free scholarships as 
prizes to such students as have shown exceptional ability in ele- 
mentary and evening schools and other educational institutions, 
and wish to make practical use of the course of study offered, 
with the requirement that not less than twenty hours a week be 
given to the work. Fifteen institutions were thus notified, and 
several have responded by sending the names of students eligible 
for the scholarships. 

The Committee has also offered a competitive annual scholar- 
ship to graduates of colleges belonging to the Association of Col- 
legiate Alumnie, with special reference to entering the Textile 
Department of our School for the study of Chemistry. 

In the early spring a committee was appointed to arrange for 
a tennis court and tether ball for the students of the School. As 
one of the committee, Mrs. \V. W. Gibbs generously offered to pay 
for the tennis court, the work was finished, and through the 
beautiful spring weather it gladdened our hearts to know that this 
innocent enjoyment had been afforded the students, which prob- 
ably added to their health as well as happiness. The Associate 
■Committee especially desire to record their appreciation of the 
fact that workmen connected with the School gave their time and 
labor free in preparing the tennis court, thus reducing its cost. 

Mrs. W. \V. Gibbs has also made the students happy by put- 
ting in thorough order the piano at the School, 

From Mrs. Frank K. Hippie, Chairman of the Students' Club 
Committee, we have heard with pleasure of the freshening up of 
the students' dining room, the walls of which have been artisti- 
■cally stenciled. This work was done entirely by the students. 

The members of the Committee as a whole have attended 



Digilzed by Google 



the meetings with regularity, and have worked hard, through 
flub-comraittces. 

Therefore, remembering what has been done in the past, the 
Committee can look forward with steadfast faith to the work 
which lies before them in the coming year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALEXINA L. DALLAM, 

Seen til ly. 
June 8, 1903. 



Digilzed by Google 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



list of patrons, life members, 

Annual and Honorary Members. 



Pereons who iub; wish to become membere are invited to send their Dames 
-and luldreases to the Secretary. Blank foriDB of DeTiee and Bequest will b« 
fouDd upon page 08. A check lo the order ot the Treasurer will be promptlv 
-Bck now led feed. 

Patrons, Donors ot Five Thousand Dollars and upward, 

whether in monev or objects tor the Museum. 
. One Hundred Dullars. 

. A subscription ot not less than Five Dollars. 
riiose who, on account ot their interast in In- 
dustrial -irt Education or the Fine Arts, shall 
be deemed worthy of election. 
"All funds received from Patrons lunless otherwise specifically given) and 
-from Life Membership shall be permanently invested as part of the Endowment 
Fund ." — By- La 11. 



Life Membership 
Annual Memberahip, . 
Honorary Membership, 



*Baird, John 
'Barton, Mrs. Susan R. 

Blanch ard, Miss Anna 
■Bloomfield- Moore, Mrs. 
•Cbilds, George W. 

Disslon, Henry & Sons 
•Urenel, A. J. ' 
•Dreiel, F. A. 
•Garretl, W. E., Jr. 
"(Jibson, Henry C. 
*HouBlon, H. H. 



Jenks, John Story 

Lea, Henry C. 
"Lippincott, Mrs. J. Dundas 

Morris, John T, 

Search, Theodore C. 
•Scott, Mrs. Thomas A. 
•Temple, Joseph E. 

Weifthtman, William 

Whitney, A. & Sons 

\Vister,'Mni. Jones 



OMzcdoyGoOglc 



LIFE MEMBERS. 



Allen, JoHeph 

Allen, JoMph, Jr. 
•Arnold, Crawford 

Baeder, Adamson & CVi. 
*BailT, Joel J. 

BainI, Mrs. Mnttliew 
*Baker, John R. 
•Baker, W. S. 

Barclay, R D. 

Barclay, Mrs. R. D. 
'Barlol, B. H. 

Bartol, H. W. 

Bau)(h, Daniel 
"Bickloy, H. W. 

Bickley, Mm. II. W. 
*Biddle, Alexander 

Biddle, Mist Annie K. 
*Biddle, Chnpnian 
*Biddle, Mrs. Cliapmnn 
"Biddle, Clement 
•Biddle, Waller L C. 

Blanchard, Miss A. 

Blanchard, Miss M. 

BUnchard, Miss M. 
•Bone, C. A H. 
•Bowen & Foi 
•Brown, Alexander 

Burnham, George 

Bnmham, Parr.y, Wil1iuiil!)& Co. 

Butcher, Hen ry C. 

Butcher, Mrs H. C. 

Button, Cony era 
•Caldwell, J. E. 

Caldwell, J. E. & Co. 

Campbell, Mra. St. George T. 
•Carter, W. T. 

Carver, W. Burton 

Caasalt, A. J. 
•Catherwooii, H. W. 
•Chapman, Joseph 
•Chew, Samuel 
•Clsghorn, James L, 

Claghorn, J. Raymond 

Clark, Charles D. 

Clark, Clarence It. 



•Clark, Ephraim 

Clark, E, W. 
•Clark, J. Hinekley 
•Clayton, John 

Clothier, Isaac H. 
•Clyde, Tliomas 
■Coatee, Benjamin 

CWtex, Edward H. 

Cochran, M. 
*Cocbr»n, Thomas 

Coffin, Altemus ACo. 

Coleman, Mrs. B. Dawson 
•(Pieman, Mrs. 0. Dawson 

Coleman, Edward P. 

G>lea, MissMary 

Colkel, C. Howard 

Collins, H. H. 

Cooper, John H. 
•Cope, Caleb 

Cornelius & Rons 

Coxe, Eckley B., Jr. 
•CresBon, W. P. 

Croier, George K. 
•Croier, Mrs. George K. 
•Croier, J. Lewis 
•Cuyler, Mrs. Theodore 

Dick, F. A. 
•Dixaton, Albert H. 
•Disston, Hamilton 
•Dis».ton, Mra. H. C. 
•Dubbins, R, J. 

Dobson, John & James 

Dolan, Thomas 

Dolan, Thomas A Co. 

Dougherty, Jamea 
•Dreer, F.J. 

Duhring, Mrs. Henry 

Eddy si one Manufacturing Co. 
•Faries, Mrs. Randolph 
•Feniniore. F.dward L. 
•Field, Mrs. FJi» W. 
•Fox, Miss Mary D. 

Furbush, Merrill A. 
■Fnguet, Stephen O. 
•Garrett, Miss Elizabeth 



Digilzed by Google 



Oarrett, Miss Julia 
Gu-rett, P. C. 
Girrell, Mra. Waller 
Gibson, Miss Rebecca 
*Gowen, Franklin B. 
•Graff, Frederic 
"GrafT, Mrs. Frederic 

Green, Stephen 

Hagsloz ^'i Thorpe 

Harrison, A . C. 

Harrison, Havemever & Co. 

Harrison, Mrs. Joseph 

Harrison, Thomas t^. 
*Hirt Samuel 
•Heberton, (j. Crsig 

Henszey, Mrs. Wm. I'. 

Hill, George W. 
'Hockley, Miss Annie E. 

Hockley, Mrs. John 

Hockley, Miss Mary 
*Hockley, Thomas 

Hockley, Mrs. Thomas 
•Hockley, William Stevenson 
"Horstmann, F. 0. 

Horstmann, W. H. & Sons 

Houston, Mrs. U. H. 
•Hughes, John O. 

Hunler, James & Jolin 

lungerich & Smith 
•James, John O. 

Jayne, David & Sons 
•Jones, Jacoli 

Jones, Washington 

Justice, Balenian & Co. 
•Justice, Miss Cedlia 

Justice, William W. 

Justice, Mr:.. William W. 

Klemm, Mrs. Maria L. 
"Knight, Edward C 
•Lea, Isaac 

I..ee, Mm. I«ighton 
•l^wia, Edwin M. 
•I-ewis, Henry 

LewiH, Miss Mary 

Lewis, Kichard A. 
Lewis, Miss Sarah 



Little, AmosR. 

Little, Amos R. & Co. 
•Lovering, Joseph S. 
•Lo^■ering, Joseph S., Jr. 

McKean, Mrs. Thomas 

McXeelv, Miss Florence 

McNeely, Robert K. 

McNeely, M.a. Robert K. 

MacVeigh, Wayne 

Magee, Miss Fannie S. 
•Massey. William 

May, Mrs. Joseph 

Meirs, Sirs. R. Wain 
•Merrick, Miss E. H. 

Merrick, J. Vaughan 
•Merrick, Miss L. W. 
•Mtrrick, Mrs. S, V. 

Merrick, William IL 

Miles, Mrs. M. L. 

Miles, Thomas 

Milne, David 
•Milliken, James 

MoorCi Clarence B. 

Morris, Miss Lydia T. 
•Morris, P. Pemberton 
•Morris, Wistar 

Murphy, Frank W. 

Murphy, Miss Helen I. 
•Jiewbold, CliarleH 
•Xewbold, John S. 

Sewbold, Mrs. John S. 
•X..blit, Dell 

Xorris, Charles 

Xorris, Isaac. M.D. 
•["aRe, Joseph V. 
•Patterson, Joseph 
•Pepper, George S. 
•Pepper, Lawrence S. 
•Pepper, William, M.D. 

Pepper, William Piatt 
•Phillips, Henry M. 
•Phillips, Moro 

Piatt, Charles 
•Piatt, Franklin 

Porter A Coaies 



Digilzed by Google 



•Poultney, Clinrles W. 
•Powers, Mrs. Tliomn" IE. 

Criee, Eli K., Jr. 

Provident Life and TriKit Co. 
*Itan(Iolph, Evan 

Bandolph, Mrs. Evan 

Randolph & Jenks 
*Rhoa<le, Mia« Elizabeth 
•Roberts, Charles 

Roberta, Mrs. Clinrles 
•RoberlB, Jacob, M.D. 
•Kogers, C U. 
•Rogers, Fiiiriiian 
•Kogew, W. D, 

Santee, Charles 

ScoU, Edgar 

Scot!, James P. 
•Scotl, Mre. James P. 

Scull, D. & Cfl. 
•Seyberl, Henry 

Sellers, Oileman 

Sellers, Willinm 
•Sharplees, Charles 8. 
•Shellon, Carlos 

Shelton, F. H. 

Shelton, Frederick K. 
•Shelton, Mrs. F. R. 
•Sherman, Roger 

Shortridge. N. Parker 
•Smith, Charles E, 
'Smith, Thomas 
•Smyth, Lindley 
•Solms, S. J. 

Sommerville, Maxwell 
•Spencer, Charles 



tJ3 

•Steel, h:(lwBnlT. 

Steel, K, T, A Vo. 

Stevenson, Mrs. <'<imeliiiH 

Stniwbridge, J, C-. 

Sweatman, V. C. 

Tailt, Mr;.. C. G. 
Temple, Joseph £. 
•Thomas, S. Ilarrcy 

Thropp, Mra. Joseph E. 

Towrwend, Mrs. K. C. 

Turner, Mrs. ClinrW P. 
•Tyler, IJeurge F. 

Vhiix, \Villi.-in. S. 
•Viillmer, (iiinlieh 

Wiij(ner, Samuel 
•VYimner, Mrs. T. 
■Warilen, W. (1. 
•Warner, Kedwood F. 
■Welsh, Satuiiel 
•WVriiwHjt, The.Kl.i« 

Whart.>n, Joseph 
•Wheeler, Charlen 

Whilall, 'KitiimttCo. 
■White, Samuel H. 

Whitney, Miss Margarelta V. 
•Williams, Edward l[. 

Wisler, Mrs. Jones 

Wood, Sin art 

Wood, William 

Wood, William A Co. 

Wright, Paward N. 
•Wright, Jamea A. 
•Wright, John W. 

Wurts, Charles Slewarl, .\1.I). 



Digilzed by Google 



ANNfAI. MEMBEKS. 
HUHSCRIl'TIOS, $25.00 
Tnrner, Mre, Charles P. 

sunscRiPTioy, $20.00 

Gratz, MUs Klimbcth. 
.HUIiSVRU'TION, $10.00 



Kail;, JoalijR I. 
Bemeot, Clarence S. 
•Bergner, C. W. 
Blakiston, Mrs. Presley 
Brazier, Joseph H. 
Bronitey, Juaeph Jl. 
Brown, Miss Martha M. 
Brown, T. WiMnr 
Burnhnm, William 
Bumbaiu, Mra. William 
Cadvalader, Mrs. John 
Caldwell, J. F. & Co. 
Castner, Samuel, Jr. 
Chandler, T. P. 
Clapp, B. Frank 
Clark, Miss F. 
Clyde, Miss Margaret 
Cochran, Triivis 
Cochran, Mrs. Travis 
Coles, Edward 
Converse, John H. 
Coxe, Alexander B. 
Cmzer, Miss Ada M. 
Dale, Hicbard C. 
Dallam, Mrs. David E. 
Denntston, Mis. E. £. 
Dickson, Samuel 
Elkins, Mm. William L. 
p:iliH»n, Mrs. Rodman B. 
Felioii, M«. 8. M. 
Gal Iowa V, William 
Gillingliam, J. E. 
Gralf, Misg Henrietta 
Hamilton, W. C. 



Harris, Mrs. J. Campbell 
Harrison, Mrs. Joseph 
Hippie, Frank K. 
Hippie, Mrs. Frank K. 
Hnntcr, T. Conily 
Hutchinson, Miss Margaretla 
Jack, Dr Ixiiiis 
Jnnnej, Mrs Robert M. 
Japie, Mrs. David 
Javne, Dr. Hornce 
Jenks, Mrs. William F. 
Jones, Edward Russell 
Justice, William W. 
Justice, Mis. William W. 
Keen, Dr. W. W. 
Keith, Sidney W. 
Kennedy, Mrs. Eliaa D. 
KcllerlinuB, J. L. 
KetierlinuB, Mni. J. L. 
Leach, Miss M. AthertoD 
•Ijewis, Enoch 
l.ippincott, Mis. Craige 
I'ippincott, Mrs. Horace G. 
Lovering, Mrs. J. S. 
Magce, Miss Anna 
Magee, Miss Elim J. 
Magee, Horace 
McMurlrie, Miss Ellen 
Miller, Jacob Sons & Co, 
Moultoii, Mra. Byron P. 
Murphy, Miss Helen L. 
Neall, Frank L. 
Newhall, George M. 
Ogden, Mrs, Edwaid H. 



oy Google 



SVHSCRWTIO: 
Paul. Dr. Jaiuei 
Paul, Miaa M. W. 
Pepper, ItaTid 
Randolph, Mn. Evan 
Reillf, Mrs. Thos Akxandi 
Ritchie, Craig D. 
Roberts, MiiB Eliiabcth V,. 
Roberts, Miw Fraiiixa A. 
Roberts, Mrs. (ieurge R 
Roberts, Mra. Tbomas 
Sod man, Mrs. Lewi* 
Roaeni^rten, Min Fannj 
Rosengarfen, J. 11. 
Shober, Mrs. Somuel 1- 
jjinnoll, Mr». Ju»epli F. 



6S 

.V, $10.00 (<1>i>(i'hiu^i. 
Smith, Mrs. Chriatiana R 
Smith, Kdwanl B. 
Smvth, MiiuJMen 
SlelHon, Mra. John II. 
Thoniaon, Mrs. J. »]){ar 
Weightman, Mrs. John F. 
Welsh, John l»wbvr 
Welsh, Mra. John b.wlier 
Weygandt, C, N. 
Wlieeler, Mre. CharU-s 
WiUbank, Mra. W. W. 
Wisttr, Mrs. John 
Wooil, MisH Juliana 
Wright, Mra. Kohert K. 



SVBHVRIPridX, J5.00 



Ainian, Richard II. 
Andrews, Mra. Win. U. II. 
Austin, Richard L. 
Barber, Kdwiti AtLee 
Bart4)l, Mrs. C. Cliuyney 
BerKner, Mrs. C. W. 
Blancbard, Miss Anna 
Blankenbiirg, Mrs. Rudolph 
Caldnrell, Miss Florence F. 
Carter, Mrs. William T. 
Cbahoon, Mre. Joseph S. 
Clark, Miss Aniie Hampton 
Qark, Mrs. C. Howard, Jr. 
Colket, George H, 
Colton, 8. W., Jr. 
Corliet, Miss M. L. 
Creaswell, Miss £. P. 
Curtin, Mra. Kolaml U. 
Dana, Charles M 
Dana, Mra. Charles E. 
Davis, Miv. Edwanl P. 
Daj, Frank Miles 
De Haven, Mrs. Ho I stein 
lyinvilliers, Charles E. 
Dkset, Charles 
Erben, Miss Helen 
Fels, Maurice 
Fela, Samuel S. 
Frishmulh, Mrs. J. C. W. 



Friahmiilh, Mra. W. I). 
(Jaiey, W, T. 
(Jest, Mrs. W. P. 
Uihbs, Mrs. William Wnn 
(irant, Mrs. William S., J 
(iilcker, Frank T. 
Harrison, John 
Harrison, Mra. John 
Howell, Mra. Charles II. 
IIowcll, Cooper 
Howell. Eilward 1. H. 
Jastrow, Mrs. Morris, Jr. 
l.ogan, Mra- John P. 
I«lt. Mrs. Fr«d Bmwn 
Mason, Edward F, 
McFndden, Mra. George 
McIllieDuy, Miss.^-linnR 
Miller, U'slieW. 
Mitchell, Mrs. Sara P. S. 
Morwitt, J<)«!|»h 
Newhall, Mrs. Daniel S. 
Newpoit, Mrs. William C. 
Norti)n, Mrs. C-harles D. 
Park, Mra. RichaH 11. 
Pepper, Mra, John W. 
Petera, Mrs. Richani 
RamborKer, William K. 
Randolph, Miss Anna 
Richardson, Thomas D. 



J, Google 



SUBSCRll'TIOS, t6.00 {0>^imad). 

Risler, Dr. Samuel D. Weiglitmin, Mi«B Bertlin C. 

Sailer, John Williama, Kills D. 

Sunders, Miiis Anne N. Wilson, James L. 

Schaefer, Mrs. Ilenrv \Vin|>ennv, Mrs. J. Bolton 

$im|)!H)n, Mrs. William, Jr. Wright, Jusepli 

Slaml>acli, S. ]>. Zell, Miss llannnli A. 

Stout, KlbridKe C. Zimniermati, Dr. M. W. 
Walker, Mrs. R. J. C. 

HONORARY MEMBERS. 
AtwonI, Eagene, AtvromI Macliiite Co., Stonington, Conn. 
Iterry, A. Hiin, Boston, Mass. 
Boyd, James, Pliiliilelpbiii, Pa. 

Brown, Edwin, .Americitn Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Mass. 
BiirnbHm, ChaTles C, Kaston & Bumliam (Slock Company), Pawlncket, B. I. 
Bumhani, George W., Enstoa & Bumham {.Stock Company), Pawlueket, R. I. 
Campbell, Malcolm, Wooneocket Machine and Press Co., Wooniiocket, R. I. 
Cochran, J. C, Cliarlottesville, ManuTseturingCo., Charlottesville, Va. 
CiHiiitis, Frank B., Aerophore Air-Moistening & Ventilating Co., Providence, 

R. I. 
Cromptoo, CharleH, Crumpton Loom Works, Worcester, Klaw. 
Denny, (Charles A., American (in) Clothing Co., Worcester, Moss. 
Draper, (ieo. A., Hopedale, Mass. 

(^ton, Freileric W., Kaston & Bumham, Pawtuckel, R. I. 
(Gaston, Nicholas 11., Kaston & Bnmham, I'awlucket, R. 1. 
Fales, I>e Roy, Fales L*t Jenks MacLine Co., Pawtucket, K. I. 
Kirlh, William, American DroHopliore Co., Boston, Maea. 
Flek'her, (reorge A., Schaum & Uhliiiger (Fletcher Worka), Ptiitadelpbia, Pa. 
Furbush, Merrill A., M, A. Fnrbush & Son Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
(irice, Edwin C, M. A. Furbusli & Son Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
lirinnell, Frederic, Aerophore Air-Moistening & Ventilating Co., Providence, 

R. I. 
Hale, F, J., Felloe Mschine Works, Kewton Upper Falls, Mass. 
Ilartwell, F, W., Aer<ii)hore Air- Moistening & Ventilating Cn., Providence, 

R. 1. 
H..pkins, William S., Woonsockel Machine & Press Co., Woonsocket, R I. 
Unlchliis, C. H., Kiiowles l-ocnn Works, Worcester, Mass. 
lIutchin.H, (i. F., Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Jenks, Alvin F., Fnlus A Jenks Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. I. 
Jenks, Stephen A., Fales & Jenks Machine Co., Pawtucket, R I. 
Knonles, F. P., Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Knowlton, Charles U., M. A. Furbtieh & Son Machine Co., Pbiladelphia, I'a. 
Lasell, C. \V'., Wbitiri Macbine Works, Wbitinsvllle, Mass. 
Ijisell, J. M., Whitin Machine Works, Wbitinsvllle, Mass. 
Maynard, Lorenio, Maynard, Mass. 



Digilzed by Google 



67 

Merriani, H. H., Knawl«s Loom Works, Worcester, Uaas. 

Munlack, Joseph, American Card Clothiof( Co., Worcester, Miu. 

Nevins, David, Pettee Machine Works, N'ewton Upper FnUs, Mm». 

Rometsch, W. H., Schium & Ulilinfter (Fletcher Works), Philadi-lphis, Pa. 

Kussell, J. M., Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 

Sargent, C, li., (iraniteville, Mass. 

Schaum, Otio W., Schaum & tlhlinger (Fletcher Workd), Philadelphia, Pa. 

Smith, t'liester B., Woonsocket Machine & Press Co., Woonsocket, R. I. 

Smith, Sunle; Ci., Woonsocket Machine A Press Co., Woonsocket, R. I. 

Snelling, R. P., Pettee Machine Works, NewU)D Upper Falls, Mass. 

Tah, a A., Whitin Machine Works, Whltinsville, Mass. 

Taft, W. L., Whitin Machine Co., Whitinsville, Man. 

While, H. Arthur, American Card Clothing (>>., Worcester, Mass. 

Ware, JuetiD A., Crompton Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 

Whitin, O. H., Whitin Machine Works, Whitinsville, Mass. 

Wyman, Horace, Crompton Ixiom Works, Worcester, Mass. 



Digilzed by Google 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



I give and bequeath unto the Pennsylvania Museum and Schoo) 
of Industrial Art the sum uf. 
dollars, for the use of the said Corporation. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE. 



I give and device unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School of 
Industrial Art, its successors and assigns, all that certain \_Aere insert a 
description of /lie property] for the use of the said Corporation. 



Digiized by Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



D„tiidD,Google 



J, Google 



THE TWENTY-EIGHTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 
TRUSTEES 

LIST OF MEMBERS 

For the Year ending May 31, 1904. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
1904. 



Di.itradb, Google 



OFFICERS FOR 1904— 1905. 



THEODORE C. SEARCH. 



BOKOBABV Vlt'B-PBBSlDENT, 

WILLIAM WEIGHTMAN. 



WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER, JOHN T. MORRIS. 



EDWIN ATLEE BARBER 



PRINCIPAL OF THE SCHOOL, 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER. LESLIE W, MILLER 



JAMES L. ALLAN, 

S36 Drexel Rullding. 



FRANKLIN SPENCER EDMONDS, E1<q. 



Digilzed by Google 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



BX-OFFICIIS. 

W. Pknhyfaceer, Hon. John Weitkb, 



BY APPOINTMENT. 

JiiMEB BuTTERwoBTH, AppoinUd by t\f tilaU Smalt. 

Hasrihoton FlTzaERALTi, Appointed by Iht Houi ef Btpreamlaliett. 

<^jUtLE»< H. IIabdino, Appointed by Sdeet Cfaimni. 

John G. Cabrutu, Appointed by CWmon ihtatcit. 

Samuel Gdstinb Thompson, Appoinledby theCbnmiuionertof FairvtowUPatk. 

ELECTED BY THE MEMBERS. 

To MTM for Ihre* yeart. 
John T. Morris, Theodore C Skikch, 

BOBEBT C. H. Brocb, John Stort Jenes, 

John H. CoNVERiE. 



To rervefoT (wo yeart. 
WiLUAM Wood, .VLrBEs C. Lambdim, H.D., 

Oeoroe H. Cliff, Isaac H. Clothier, 

Mb8. Edward H, Ooden. 

To tervt for one year. 
Sicharh Ko8eHJ:»>LBR, Thomas Dolan, 

William Platt Pkpfkr, C. N. Wetoamdt, 

Cbarlbh E. Dana. 



Digilzed by Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



(Tbr UmIt Saport tw p«g« 57) 



MRS. D^VID ENGLISH DALLAM. 



Miw. C. C. Bartol, 


Mr*. John Habbiwk, 


Mrs. C. William BeBciSEi., 


Mrs. Jusbph Habbisoh, 


Miss Anna Blanciiard, 


Mr.-^ Frank K. Hippl^ 


Mrs. Bi-DOLFB BLANKENsrita. 


Mr8. Kobert M. Jakkev, 


Mrs. Jobn H. Brikton, 


Mrs, Morris Jastrdw, Jr., 


Mrh. Wii.ijam T. Carter, 


Mrs. J. L. KCTTRRLixua, 


Miss Mai.(;aret Clyde, 


Miw Nina Lka, 


Mi^ Haroaret L. Corubs, 


Mi« Fannie. S. Maqee, 


Miss Ada M.Crokbr, 


Mr& Danibi. 8, Nbwhall, 


Mrs. Edward P. Davis, 


Miss Eltzaheth C. Rorbris, 


Mrs. Wm. L. Elkins, 




Mrh. Rudman B. Ellisox. 


Mrs. Joseph P. Sinnott. 


Mrs. J. C. W. t'RBHMlTTIl. 


Mrs. Johk B. Stittsos, 


Mrs. Wm. D. Friskmi'th, 


Mrs. John Wister, 


Mrs. Frank H. G«rr(.HEi.L, 


Mrs. Jokb* Wi^eb, 


Mrs. W. W. Gibbp, 


MibbH. A.Zell. 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 

Mrs. HamptuH L. Car.so!!, Mrs. Sbtr B. Stitt, 

Ma& H. C. TowsHEHD, 



Digilzed by Google 



COMMITTEES FOR 1904—1905. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

TrxodorbC SsAitCH, (Aaimm; Jamh Botterwohth, JohnU. Carruth, 

John H. Convbrse, Charlbs E. Dana, Charlbb H. Habding, John Story 

Jkhks, AlprbdCLahbdim, H.D.,JobhT. Hobris, William Platt Pepper, 

C N. Wbyoandt, William Wood. Qkorob H. Cuff, er oJUdo. 

STANDINO COMMITTEES." 
ART. 
Charles E. Dana, Chairman; Frank Miles Dav, Wilson Eybb, Js., 
Charles Oraflt, Samuel Oustine Thompson. 

MUSEUM. 



Reprttentiag At AttodaU GnnmitUe of Women ,- 
Mks Anna Blanchard, Mrs. William T. Carter, Mke. William D. 
Fbisbmuth, Mrs. John Harrison, Miss Fannie S. Maoee, Mii« Elizabf^'H 
C B0BBBIS. Mrs. Edward H. Oodbh, ei offitio. 

INSTRUCTION. 

Tbbouobb C Search, Chairman ; Bobert (.'. H. Brock, Oeoroe H. Clipp, 

Isaac H. Clotribk, John H. Convxrbb, Cbablbs E. Dana, Charles H. 

Habdtho, John Story Jenks, Alpbed C. Lambdin, >LD., William Plait 

Pepper, C. N. Weyoandt, William Wood. 

Repraxniing the Aigoeiale OotnmilUe ^ Women .- 

Mbs. Fbake K. Hipple, Mrs. Thomas Roberts, Mrs. Joseph F. Sinkott, 

Mbs. John WiarBR, Hrb. Jones Wibtbr. Mrs. Edward H. Oodbn, ex officio. 

FINANCE. 
C. N. Wbtoandt, Chmrman; Charles H. Hardino, John ©toby Jbhjcs, 

RiCHABD BOf^MASSLER, WiLLIAK WOOD. 



Digilzed by Google 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM. 



WiLLIAH Platt Pkppbr, Dir<nirr iffilu .Vu-min. 
Edwin AtLes Barbkr, Curnuir. 
Hart E. Dawhoh, AuitbaL 
EUHABKTH Dawdon. Librarian. 

DEPARTM>:XT OF NUMIKMATHN. 
F. D. LANdENHEllf, /fnnorary QirtUor. 

DEPARTMENT OF TEXTILES. LACE AND EMBROIDERY. 
Mrs. Johh IIarhikun, llonomry Vtiralor. 

DEPARTMENT OF <WUWMITII WORK, JEWELRY AND PLATE. 

, llmuirarf Curalor. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL POTTERY. 

Mrs. JoNEi' WiiTBR, Ilonnrary t'uralor. 

DEPARTMENT OF EUROPEAN PORCELAIN. 
RI^■. Alfred Diank P»:li., Ilniufrmy (Sirator. 

DEPARTMENT OF AMERICAN POTTERY AND PORCELAIN. 
Edwin AtLk»: Barbkk, Cumior. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARMS AND ARMOR. 

CtiBNEUfR StEvBnwiN, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF MI'SICAL IKSTHIMENTS. 
Mm. W. D. Frihiiiiiitii, Honorary Cvralor. 

DEPARTMENT OF WCILPTIRE, MARBLES AND CASTS. 

, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF FURNITURE AND WOODWORK. 
Gl'stav Kkttereb, Honoran/ Ouralar. 



Chari-i* E. Dana, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILATELY. 
Edward Rcbsell Jonb', Honorary Cvralor. 



iized by Google 



THE SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 

Compriwfl in iu orgiDiiation the following Departmenla ; 
Dbawinq. 

Textile Deaiaii and HAnrFAcruBE. 
Decor ATiTE Paintihg. 

CilEMimtV AKD DtEINO. 

Apflied Desion. 
CARViNa AMD Wood-Work. 
Decorative Sculptube. 

POTTKEY. 

Abcbitbctvsal Design. 

tuTERioK Decoration. 

Illdotsation. 

Normal Art Ikstbuction. 

HoDEBN L&HODAaEB. 

STAFF. 
Leslie W. Miller, Principal. 
Howard Fremont Stratton, Director of Art School. 

E. W. France, Director of Textile School. 
Herman DeiOENDEHcn, Profe«aor of Drawing. 

Bradley (.'. Aloeo, AasiBUnl Director of Teitile School and Professor in 

Charge of Weave Formation — Analysis and Structure of Fabrics. 
LeoN VoLKUAR, Instructor in Charge — Department of Potter;. 
Sophie B. Steel, Instructor in Charge — Illustration. 
LuDWia E. Fabeb, Instructor in Drawing, Lecturer on Anatomy and ProcesMS 

in Illustrative Reproduction. 
J. MERRn-T Matthews, Ph.D., Prufeosor in Charge of Chemistry and Dyeing. 
JoeepB F. X. Harold, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry. 
Albert Brhm, Laboratory Demonstrator and Inxtructor in EWeing. 
J. Frank Cdpbland, Instructor in Water-Color Paintint; and Applied Design. 
Chai^ T. Si^iTT, Inatruclor in Modelling and Structural Design. 
BiCHARD S. Cox, Instructor in Jacquard Design and Color Work. 
Helen A. Fox, Instructor in Color Harmony, Historical Ornament and Design 

Applied to Printed and Woven Fabrics. 
Fanny Darby Sweeny, Instructor in Design Applied to Stained Glass, Stencils 

and Mosaic. 
.-Vlbbbt Jean Aiiolpbb. Inatructoi^—Interior Decoration. 
Herbert a. Cor, Instructor in Elementary Weaving and Belated Branches. 
Frederic Pfeiffeb, Instructor in Charge of .Advanced Weaving and Belated 

Branches. 
John Lockwood, Instructor in Charge of Wool Carding and Spinning. 
(ieottoE W. Lefferts, Instructor in Worsted Drawing and Spinning. 

F. M. Jenninos, Instructor in Wool Grading and Sorting. 
JottEPii H. Shinn, Instructor in Cotton Carding and Spinning. 
Edward T. Booof, Instructor in Architectural Design. 

A. M. tiniLLOH, Director of School of Modarn I-anguages and Instructor in 

French, Italian and Spanish. 
Mmk. .\. M. Schmidt-Grillok, Instructor in German. 
BiCHARD B. DorciBTY, Instructor in Instrumental Drawing. 
Alfred Bi'rhol'se. Instraclor in Dry Finishing. 
, Instructor in Design Applied to Furniture and Interior Wood- 

Henrv Tornitkn, Instructor in Wood Carving. 

Mary P. Dow, Instructor in Historic Ornament. Book-Binding. Tooling, and 
Leather Work. 

ISABEi.LE Bradley. Instructor in Drawing, Instructor in Charge — Junior De- 
partment. 

Albkrt W. Barker, Instructor in Drawing, Instructor in Charge — Teacher's 
Classes. 

C. Wharton Chukchman, Instructor in Building Construction. 

, Instructor in Basketry. 

Kabl U. Nacke. Instructor in Meial-Work, Bepouss^, Chasing, et«. 

Pebcy C. Miller, Assistant to the Principal. 

Wm. F. Hiohis, Superintendent of Building. 

Leonora J. C. Boeck, Begistrar. 

Katharine DeWitt Berq, Libtarian. 

Clara M. N'aoe, Secretary, Textile School. C^^^,.,!.-, 

Dniitzcdoy^jUOyiC 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT. 

Zb the sVember^ of thf Penwyh-auin M-i^fiim and Scfui-l of Indiwtrial 
AH. 

Your President has the honor to aubmit herewith the reports of 
the Curator of the Museum, the Principal of the School, the Treas- 
urer of the organization, and the Associate Committee of Women. 
The first named of tliese reports, dealing with the affairs of the 
Museum, shows the continuance of the successful work which was 
inaugurated last year. The organiutiou and classification of ex- 
hibits continue, and as they approach completion the beauty and 
utility of the Museum becomes more and more impressive. 

Through the liberal help of City Councils and the Park Commis- 
sioners, the West Arcade has been enclosed and now forms a very 
substantial addition to the space for exhibits. 

The Bulletin of the Museum keeps the members advised of the 
progress of the Museum's affairs and increases an interest with 
each issue. It is worthy of note that sevenil other Museums have 
since adopted similar official sheets. 

Under the heading of " Immediate Needs of the Museum," the 
Curator's report deals with the question of space and alludes to 
further e.xtension of the building, as well as the immediate fitting 
up of rooms in the basement. 

Without doubt a great necessity exists for the discovery of some 
means that will enable the Museum to display nil the gifts which 
are in its possession, and thus encourage accessions and growth. 
The immediate display of objects donated by our citizens is only 
a reasonable expectation to which every one is entitled, and the 
ability of the Curator to at once make these exhibits would result 
in securing still greater interest from those interested in such work. 



KEPOUT OF THE PRINCIPAL. 

The report of Principal Miller on the work of the School shows 
the Itti^eat attendance in its history : 



Digiized by Google 



1891, . 

1892, . 



1891, . 



1896, . 
1897, . 



1900, 992 

1901, 1001 

1902 931 

1903, 998 

190) 1029 



The record of twenty-seven years is given herewith, nud is 
worthy of perusal as showing a healthy and steady progress, be- 
ginning with S3 students in 1877 and ending with 1029 in 1904. 
This report further shows that forty different trades and occupa- 
tions, covering a very wide range of our industries, have contrib- 
uted to the student body. 

Twenty-six States are represented, as well as the islands of Porto 
Rico and Jamaica, the Dominion of Canada and the Empire of 
Japan. 

Out of the whole number of students, it will be noticed that 
Pennsylvania furnished 890, or 86 per cent. Nothing could speak 
more eloquently of the real hold the School has upon the people 
of our own Commonwealth, and of the genuine need of such work 
as it is doing. At the same time, the presence in the School of 133 
students from other States in the Union, and of 6 studente from 
other countries, is no slight indication of widespread popularity. 
It is with no small degree of satisfaction that we note the increas- 
ing number of college and university graduates in attendance. 

EXCELLENCK IN WORK. 

The exhibits of work done by the graduating class, as well 
as by the one and two year men, show marked advance over those 
of any other year. The class of competitive work is uniformly 
higher and the artistic development of design and color gives 
every evidence of the most healthy instruction along these lines. 

The work in silk fabrics exhibits remarkable artistic value, 
manifested by a masterly grasp of color harmony and thorough 



oy Google 



employment of the most artistic design. Such work is impossible 
except to thoee who build upon foundfttions of real skill in every- 
thing that pertains to the Textile Science and Art- 

THE POTTERY SCHOOL. 

The Pottery School, established during the last year, has met 
with most wonderful success, and the impression created by il« 
first efforts encourages us to believe that we are laying the founda- 
tion for an industry destined to produce results which will have 
an important bearing on our future prosperity. 

Each of these auccesses contributes to strengthen the School, 
not only because they exhil>it advantages to the parent seeking 
the best place for educating his child, but because they impress 
the manufacturer with the work of trained men and demonstrate 
to him the ability and entire reliability of specific training in 
every line of liis work. 

THE TREASURERS REPORT. 
The Treasurer's report for the year IJXM, shows : 

Beceipls, $87,5149.73 

Eipenditures 98,80B.20 

Excess expenditures (11,239.47 

Thin loss simply repeats the history and experience of last year 
and emphasizes our inability to conduct our work in our present 
location upon our present income without increase of debt. 

We need an appropriation of $100,000 from the State, and <20,- 
000 from the city. Seven hundred and forty-four students of the 
School year now closing, out of a total of 1029, were from the City 
of Philadelphia, and it certainly would not be inappropriate for 
the city to double its appropriation in view of the facta here pre- 
sented. Unless the appropriation be increased it will be advis- 
able to change our location for some less expensive site. 

While recognizing the great value of the present location, which 
permits of easy access, and the fact that the great business section 
of our city in which we are now established needs the presence of 
such a School, j-et financial reasons make it almost obligatory that 
some such change should be made. During the past year our 
deficit was partly met by one of the members of our Board of 
Trustees giving $10,000 toward the deficiency created. For this 



Digitized by GtXlglc 



14 

we are extremely thankful, but we certainly would not be acting 
judiciously or wisely not to endeavor to obviate such necessity in 
the years to come, 

MEMBERSHIP. 

The great success of an organization lies primarily in its mem- 
bership. From this source comes the public sentiment and inspi- 
ration which must underlie every successful public enterprise. 
Without a strong membership it is not possible to properly im- 
press, safeguard and guide any great public benefaction. 

From the membership ranks come the selection of those officials 
whose duty it is to promote and direct the public work. From the 
membership is derived the moral and financial power, which is 
absolutely necessary to the proper conduct of the activities be- 
longing to organizations, and, finally, without such membership, 
support weakens, progress gradually loses its initiative, and ent«r- 
prise halts and fails because the element of human sympathy and 
support is lacking. These things being assumed to be truths, it 
then follows that the membership of all public organizations be- 
comes an incentive to success, and therefore worthy of close and 
earnest consideration. 

In 1877 the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art 
was inaugurated for the promotion of work of a specific character, 
a work destined to influence the artistic taste and sentiment of 
this country. During the intervening years its purposes have re- 
mained true to the original idea, and the School has assumed a 
dignity and importance far beyond the hopes of its founders. 

Its work in applied art, as shown by its exhibits in the various 
crafts, such as Pottery, Book-binding, Wood-working, Modelling, 
Decoration, Illumination, Color work, Architecture, Spinning, 
Dyeing, Weaving and Finishing of all kinds of Textiles, is a 
revelation to all who see them. The possibilities of a wonderful 
system of practical training are fully demonstrated ; that such a 
work should not be assisted and sustained by a membership of 
a large and powerful personality cannot for a moment be enter- 
tained. 

The recent success of the Scliool of Pottery, established only 
five months ago, seems to emphasize this conclusion. There is no 
doubt but this work is a great success, and Philadelphia will, 
doubtless, become the home of an industry to which it has hith- 
erto been a stranger, and one which is destined to give it glory 



iized by Google 



15 

and reoown. le there a good citizen of Philadelphia who would 
not desire to asaist in a work which produces such tremendous 
poBsibilities ? Surely no one can withhold his hand where the 
objects to be gained are only those which reflect glory and honor 
upon our city! Good citizens areeverywhere tobefound, whoare 
waiting and anxious to be a part of a body which seeks nothing 
for itself, but everything for the cause. The only thing lacking is 
the solicitation of those, who already understand the objectH of 
the organization, to explain and request co-operation. 

Friends of the School can do this to the greatest advantage. The 
solicitude of those who know the truth whereof they speak is in- 
finitely more valuable than that of a solicitor who must be paid 
to perform his work. How much time and effort would it cost 
the hundreds of Mends of our School and Museum to simply re- 
quest their friends to join our ranks and become annual sup- 
porters, not merely by the payment of $10, but to encourage the 
work by their presence and advice. 

It is easily possible, as we believe, for 1000 new members at 
tie per annum to be obtained during the present year by those 
who have shown themselves to be friends and warm supporters of 
the work. This would mean a 110,000 membership fund and great 
possibilities of larger service for a greater Museum and School. 
There is no preparation for the work necessary. The request is 
made to our officers and members to consider this a personal duty 
for the summer, to be followed by a report to the Executive Com- 
mittee at its first meeting in the fall of 1904. 

Respectfully submitted. 

THEODORE C. SEARCH, 

l^esident. 



Digilzed by Google 



iifrSHHl] 




GROUND PLAN OF MEMORIAL HALL. 



A. 


SoiTH VoTiBrLB. Vehicles, 


J. 


Northwest Pavilion. Musical 




Models, etc. 




InBtriimenlB. 


R 


Rotunda. Porcelain, Models, 


K. 


Coins and Armor. 




etc. 


L. 


North Vestibole. Exhibition 


C. 


West Gai.i.bbv. Wilstach Col- 




ot Work ot Students of the 




lection of Paintings. 




School of Industrial Art Con- 


D. 


East Gallery. Ceramioi, Met- 




nected with the Museum. 




al Work, Carvings, Lacquers, 


M. 






Furniture. 




lection of Colonisl Relics. 


E. 


WEsrCoBaiixm. WiUiach Col- 


N. 


Library. 




lection ot Paintings. 


0. 


P, Q. Officfa 


F. 


East Corriwb. Bloontfield 


R. 


Women's Toilet Boom. 




Moore Collection. 


S. 


Men's Toilet Room. 


G. 


SiH'THWEST Pavilios. Greek, 


T, 


U, V, W. American Pottery. 




Roman and Egyptian Antiqui- 


X. 


Ponipeian Views and Baird Cen- 




ties. 




tennial Model. 


U. 


SorTHEA^T Pavilion. Hector 


Y. 


North Corriihir. Iron Wofk, 








Photographs, Prints and Lam- 




Oriental Pottery and Porcelain. 




born Collection of Mexican 


I. 


NdRTIlEArTT PAVILION. Bloom- 




I'aintings. 




field Moore (.'ollection. 


Z. 


Textiles and Costumea. 



J, Google 



J, Google 



REPORT ON THE MUSEUM. 

Within the past two or three years the art museums of this 
country have shown a hiudable tendency toward co-operation, by 
the adoption of a more liberal policy, which mtist result in the 
extension of the educational influence of these institutions. Un- 
friendly and jealous competition has largely given place to gen- 
erous rivalry and a spirit of reciprocal helpfulness, whereby the 
best results obtained by practical experience have been generously 
placed by many of the museums at the disposal of others. By 
this means the entire museum system throughout the country has 
been greatly benefited. It has been the aim of this Museum to 
secure, by patient investigation and experiment, an improvement 
of methods relating to classification and arrangement of exhibits. 
An interchange of ideas with the Directors of other progressive 
museums has been mutually helpful. Perfection can never he 
reached through that narrow self-sufficiency or conservatism 
which has generally obtained in the past, and which eventually 
must lead to inaction, if not decay. 

WORK ACCOMPLISHED. 
It is most gratifying to be able to report for the Museum a con- 
tinuftuce of prosperity and a steady growth in every department. 



oy Google 



19 

Considerable progreids haa been made in the rearrangement and 
relabeling of the exhibits, and the entire Museum staff has labored 
faithfully and unceasingly toward this end. The Oriental reramic 
collections have finally been brought together from various parts 
of the Museum and placed in the eastern end of the building, where 
they are now in condition to be intelligently studied. This much- 
desired result haa been made possible by the purchase of several 
new exhibition oases of the latest and most appropriate pattern. 
By the retirement of many of the least meritorious objects in the 
various departments the value of the collections has been greatly 
enhanced and room has been secured for the accommodation of 
the more desirable material recently aeiiuired. By this weeding- 
out process many imitation}^, reproductions and counterfeits of 
well-known ceramic wares, such as unavoidably creep into every 
collection, have been withdrawn, and these will be utilized to serve 
a useful purpose by being displayed together in such manner as 
will enable investigators to distinguish genuine from spurious 
wares- This feature of the exhibits will be a distinct advance in 
museum work. 

As already announced in the Museum Bl'I.LETIN, the entire 
collection of textiles, embroidery and costumes was installed the 
first of the year in the West Arcade, which hns been enclosed and 
roofed, the cost of which was defrayed l)y a liberal appropriation 
of City Councils. By this enlargement of the building ample space 
has been provided for the present needs of this department which, 
under the efficient honorary curatorship of Mrs. John Harrison, 
has been greatly improved. 

In the Department of Musical Instruments great progress has 
been made through the valuable assistance and advice of Mrs. 
William D. Frishmuth, the Honorary Curator. The collection, 
which a year ago was little more than a nucleus, has grown to re- 
spectable proportions by tlie addition of a large number of repre- 
sentative and rare examples. The collection now occupies a large 
portion of the Northwest Pavilion. 

The examples of furniture and woodwork have been rearranged 
along the two sides of the large East Gallery and now form one 
of the moat extensive public collections of the kind in this coun- 
try. Through the valuable co-operation of Mr. Gustav Ketterer, 
the Honorary Curator, this department will become one of the 
most instructive features of the Museum after plans, now in course 
of formulation, shall ha^'e been carried out. 



oy Google 



The collection of American Pottery and Porcelain has been con- 
siderably enlarged and many gape have been filled in, bo that the 
collection ie now practically complete, so far as concerns chrono- 
logical continuity. This is the only important collecUon of his- 
torical American wares that has ever been brought t<^ether. It 
will hereafter prove invaluable to the student and historian of 
American ceramics, ae well as to the progressive American potter. 

The Bloomfield Moore collection is now in course of rearrange- 
ment. New cases placed in the spaces beneath the two large win- 
dows in the Northeast Pavilion complete the wall-casing around 
the room and make it possible to gather into this apartment all of 
the pottery and porcelain. In the East Corridor the other Bloom- 
field Moore exhibits are being entirely reclassified. When this 
work shall have been finished, this valuable exhibit will form one 
of the most attractive features in the building. 

New cases have been provided for the collection of silver, now 
exhibited in the central aisle of the East Gallery. For the first 
time since the establishment of the Museum, this interesting class 
of objects is now suitably installed. 

In all other departments the work of reorganization and classi- 
fication has been continued, and the various groups of objects may 
now be studied in their respective places, without the necessity of 
exploring different partfi of the building in search of scattered 
exhibits. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

The increase in membership for the twelve months ending May 
31, 1904, was as follows: New Annual Members, 27; new Life 
Members, 4. This is perhaps not a very satisfactory showing as a 
result of the earnest efforts which have recently been made to in- 
terest the community in the purposes of this Institution. This 
Museum is at the foot of the list of all great public art museums 
in this country in the number of its subscribing members. In- 
creased efforts will be put forth during the coming year to secure 
the co-operation of a larger number of public-spirited citizens in 
the good work which is being done, both at the Museum and 
School, and it is to be hoped that by this means the lethargy 
which has existed among the people of this city, in r^ard to 
worthy educational institutions of this kind, will be largely over- 
come. 



Digilzed by Google 



21 

ATTENDANCE. 
During the year 1003, the number of visitora who entered the 
doors of the Muacum was 409,726. Of this number 215,310 at- 
tended on Sunday afternoonB. The average daily attendance was 
aa follows : 

For each Aaj Id the ;ear, 1123 

On each week d%j, S21 

Od eub 8uiida;r 4141 

Had it not been for the unusually large number of inclement 
Sundays during the year, the attendance would have probably 
exceeded half a million. 

From January lat to June let of the present year the admissions 
were 154,525, an excess of 21,175 over the corresponding period of 
the previous year. 

BUREAU OF IDENTIFICATION. 
A valuable feature of museum work has been added since the 
appearance of the previous Annual Report, by the establiahment 
of a Bureau of Identification, through which possessors of art ob- 
jects may obtain desired information. The Curator, with the gen- 
erous assistance of several specialists and authorities in various 
departments of art, has undertaken to furnish such data as may be 
obtainable relative to specimens submitted for an opinion. Many 
collectors, from all sections of the country, have already availed 
themselves of this opportunity to obtain assistance in their studies, 
and a large number of examples, particularly of pottery and por- 
celain, have been identified for them. Information is furnished to 
applicants free of charge, the only requirements being that they 
assume the expenses of postage and expresssge. 

THE MUSEUM BULLETIN. 
On January 1, 1903, the first number of the BULLETIN of the 
Museum was issued, and since that date it has appeared regularly 
as a quarterly publication. This innovation in the museum work 
of this country has met with gratifying success. Several other Mu- 
seums have quickly fallen into line and are now issuing similar 
periodicals, and the time is not far distant when every important 
museum in the country will have its official sheet, which at stated 
intervals will appear for the information of its patrons and friends. 



Digiized by Google 



An awakened interest in this Museum is already directly traceable 
to the publication of the BULLETIN, and a number of valuable 
exhibits and many new members have been obtained through its 
diseemi nation. Until recently copies have been distributed among 
the visitors without charge, but as a large proportion fell into un- 
appreciative hands, the Committee of the Museum has decided to 
restrict the distribution hereafter to those who are especially inter- 
ested, by 6xing a nominal charge of one cent a copy, 

OTHER PUBLICATIONS. 

The Catalogue of the Mrs. William D. Frishmuth Collection of 
Colonial Relics has been completed and will be issued before the 
end of the present year. It will be attractively illustrated. 

An illustrated handbook of the Collection of Historical Seals, by 
Prof. Charles E. Dana, will be published during the autumn. 

The manual on Marks of American Potters, prepared by the 
Curator, with /ac gimileg of over 1000 marks and new material re- 
lating to the history of American ceramics, which was to have been 
published as one of the series of Museum Handbooks, has been 
withdrawn for lack of funds to publish. 

IMMEDIATE NEEDS OF THE MUSEUM. 
Memorial Hall has already grown too small, both for the proper 
exhibition of the art treasures which it now contains and which 
are constantly being added to, and for the comfortable accommo- 
dation of the public, who, on holidays and Sundays visit the Mu- 
seum in such great throngs. On several days recently the atr 
tendance exceeded 15,000. In order to keep abreast with other 
public museums and to accommodate the valuable collections of 
art treasures which have already been promised, or may be ex- 
pected in the near future, the most pressing need of this Museum 
is increased space. Almost every other important museum in this 
country is being enlarged, either through public or private enter- 
prise. It is to be hoped that some provision will soon be made for 
the extension of Memorial Hall by the erection of wings on the 
northern side of the building. Until these much needed additions 
can be secured, however, there is a way whereby considerable ad- 
ditional exhibition space could be obtained in a short time and 
with a comparatively small outlay of money. In the basement 
are some ten rooms, extending along the northern side of the build- 



Digiized by Google 



23 

ing, which could be utilized for exhibition purposes by flooring, 
plastering and knocking out windows in the northern wntl above 
the ground. The epace which could be added in this mnnner 
would be sufficient to provide for the expnnnion of the Museum 
for several years to come. There is also ample spac<; in the base- 
ment for the construction of a much-necdcil restaurant for the ac- 
commodation of the public, People who desire to spend the entire 
day in the >[U8eum in Fairmount Park are forced to shorten their 
visits because there is no place where they can secure a light 
repast. 

Scarcely less urgent is the need of new cases for the better dis- 
play of certain valuable collections which are now practically hid- 
den in antiquated surroundings. A fund of SIO/XK) for casing the 
entire wall space of the East Gallery would enable the Curator to 
carry out long-cherished plans for the more effective arrangement 
of the collections of ceramics, carvings, metal work and furniture. 
By these suggested improvements, and at an inconsiderable outlay, 
this conid be made one of the most completely appointed art mu- 
seums in the country. In no other way could so small a sum of 
money be expended in the public interest with equally satisfactory 
results. 

ACCESSION'S TO THE MUSEUM. 

A complete list of accessions to the AEuseum collections and the 
library, by gift, purchase and loan, during the past year, is ap- 
pended hereto. Among the more important groups of objects may 
be especially mentioned the following: 

A series of Pennsylvania-German slip-decorated and sgraffito 
plates of the 18th and early 19th centuries, added by Mr. John 
T. Jlorris to his coUection of American pottery ; collection of 
Navajo Indian blankels formed by the late Dr. Thomas J. Yarrow ; 
group of old European glass, from Mr. John T. Morris; a valuable 
and repre-scntative exhibit of rare old and modern European por- 
celains, presented by Rev. Alfred Ouane Pell of New York City, 
the first instalment toward a comprehensive historical collection 
of the best products of foreign factories. Among the numerous 
loans received during the year, special attention is called to the 
Ozeas, Rnmborger and Keehnik- collection of old cut glass and 
ceramics, which has been distributed in the various departments 
to which the objects properly belong, and the interesting group of 
old samplers deposited by Mrs. William D. Frishmuth and now on 
exhibition in the Textile Kooni. 



oy Google 



J, Google 



25 

FollomQg is a list of objects received during the year : 
By Gift from i 
Mbs. Jobh Habkiboh : 

JiBTge eboniied cue for exhibiting (he Charles Qodtra; LeUnd Collection 

ofBooka. 
Jdk; itonewkre. Doullon Factorj. EDglith, 1877. 
Jug ; pottery. Chrome yellow. Kngliib, 19th century. 
Toby Jog; pottery. From Bennett Factory, Baltimore, Hd.; c. 1890. 
Mug; porcelain. "Lowettott'' itjle- Chineae, t8th century. 
Preeentation Cap ; siWer reponM«. By Tifft & Whiting, North Attleboro, 

HaM., 1850. 
Plate ; pink loitre. English, 1850. 
Boae water aprinkler ; colored glaaa. Old Venetian. 
Handkerchief; embroidered linen. Formerly the property of Queen Harie 

Fonr tpecimeng of old lace. 

Two patterns for Berlin worsted work. 1860-1860. 

Jng; pottery. Belief design. Phrenixrille, Pa.; c. 1880. 
Mrs. Fkank K. Uipplk : 

Laceaquare; "Punto a Magiia." Italy, 15th century. 
Mr. Robert B. Long: 

Thirteen aboriginal atone implement*- 

Twenty-five aboriginal arrow heads. 
Mrs. B. I. YouKo: 

Bowl and pitcher ; pottery. Staffordshire, England ; c. IH36. 

Small table ; walnut. Checker board tolay. 

Table; mahogany. Folding leaf. 
Miaa EhvaGilunobam (in the name of Klahlon and Susan C. Oillingham); 

Pair of vasea ; porcelain. French ; c. 182.5. 

Sii decanters ; cut glass. Part of set ordered for President Jackson, 1825. 

One wine glasa ; cut glass. Part of aet ordered for President Jackson, 1823. 

Three lemonade cnps ; cut glass. 

Two tans ; silk embroidered ; ivory mount, t'hinese, early 19th century. 

Large mirror in gilt frame. 
Mr. Edwin A. Barber : 

Two miniature jugs; pottery. From the Biloii Factory, Biloii, Mi«s., 
1901. 

Sleeve button ; tortoise shell with silver inlay, 1876. 

Fan ; from Centennial E:ihibition. Chinese, 1870. 

Sugar bowl ; pewter. By James Dixon & Sons, SbefHeld, Eng.; c. 1832. 
Messrs. ^C. Dorflinoer & Sons : 

Wineglass; cut glass. From the White House service; Roosevelt Admin- 

(las9. From the While House service ; Harrison Adminis- 



oy Google 



iie tiger embroidered in >ilk. Old Japuiese. 
Mb. Isaac H. Clothier : 

Large WKler jar and stand ; white marble. Egj'ptian, 16th century. 
Mis C. a Wbite : 

Figfure ; carved steatite. Chinese- 

Wanmopeb Pottery Co., New Miltord, Codd. : 
Salad dish ; pottery. Form o( lettuce lear, 1903. 

Mr. John T. Morris: 

Three wine glasses ; old Norwegian. 

Four glw9 cordial bottles ; old Norwegian. 

One enameled glass bottle ; old German. 

Thirteen pieces ot pott«rj ; slip and sgraffito decoration. PenoB^lvania- 
German, 1TG0-tS4O. 

Hall clock in lacquered case. Bj Joseph Davis, Wapping Dock, England, 
iSth century. 

Vaae ; pottery. Made at Newcomb Pottery, New Orleans, La. 

Ten examples of glass ; old Swedbh. 

Three covered gobleta; glass ; old Gernian. 

Six vases; pottery; modem Swedish. 

Two door knockera ; wrought iron ; old Swedish. 

Bowl ; Belleek. By Ott & Brewer, Trenton, N. J., 1876. 

Cup and saucer ; Belleek. By Ott & Brewer, Trenton, N. J., 1885. 

Two figures ; Parian. By Ott & Brewer, Trenton, N. J., 1876. 

Cup ; enameled glass. Modem reproduction of the Campanile Cap. 
Italian, 15th century. 
The Desver China aso Pottery Co., Denver, Col. 

Two vases; pottery. "Denaura" ware, 1903. 
Mr. F. E. Marshall; 

Eighty-six book plates. 

Mr. Charles A. Kvrlbaum : 

Tea pol ; porcelain, white and gold. By Kurlbaiin) & Schwartt, Philadel- 
phia, 1853. 
Four cups and saucers ; white and gold. By Kurlbaum & Schwartz, Phila- 

delpliia, 1863. 
One waste bowl ; porcelain, white and gold. By Kurlbaum & Schwartz, 
PhiUdelphia, 1853. 
M[ss Hannah A. Zeli. ; 

Jug ; pottery. Made by the Cook Pottery Co., Trenton, N. J., 1899. 
Lamp chimney ; glass; etched decoration. U.S., 1898. 
Miss E. F. Gilmah : 

Pickledish; porcelain. Madeby Smith, Fife&Co., Philadelphia;^ t33a 



Digilzed by Google 



27 

The E. E. Smith Costractim; Co, : 

Wooden water pipe and joinL Section ot oriKinal pipe laid from Fair- 
moant Water-Works to Centre Square ; c. 1820. 
Mb. S. a. Wbixes : 

Vaae i potlerj. Metallic loatre giaie. "Sicanlu- Wetter" ware. Zanee- 
Tille, Ohio, 1903. 



Mbs. W. D. Fbishmdth : 

Seventy-nine articlea added to her collection of C-ulonial Relin 

Dulcimer ; in upright caw. German, 16th ceniurj. 

Three pbotographi ot Japanese girla plajiog nali 

Cavalry bugle ; brass. Germany, 18th century. 

Baas dnim ; Prunian model. Made by Gsutrot of FariB. 

Triangle ; iron ; 19th century. 



Digilzed by Google 



28 

Mbs. Jane D. Cope, Mis8 Mary C. Yarrow, Dr. akd Hr4. T. J. Yar- 
row, Ja: 
Nine Navajo Indian blankeU ; collecUid by Dr. Thonu* Yarrow, 1897, 1898. 
Miniature loom showing blanket in proceos of wearing. 
Mr. DanielOHara: 

Seven small tniyt ; enamel on meMl. Made by The CfHaMi Dial Co., 
Waltham, Masii. 
Mbs. Welsb : 

Two babj caps ot Limerick lace. 
Mr. GEOBac P. Rcpp : 

Two plate> ; potter/. Masonic emblems. Made bj the Mercer Pottery 
Co., Trenton, N. J,, 11»3. 
Ur. JoaEPH M. Hdstoh : 

Plate; bine and white. View of New PennBylvania State Capitol. Eng- 
liih, 1003. 
MSSBBS. GiLLINDBB A SoHa : 

Vbm ; cameo ghui. From Franklin GIsm Works, Philadelphia ; c. 1880. 
Berry diab ; cut glass. From Franklin Glass Works, Philadelphia, 1903. 
Bust of President McKinley ; opal glass. Prom Franklin Olaas Works, 
Philadelphia, 1900. 
Mr. a. H. Hadlbv : 

Feur watch movements. English and Swiss ; c. 1300-1830. 

(IRS. JONBS WiSTBR : 

Screen ; carved wood. Modem Egyptian. 

Two panels ; carved wood. Old Damascus. 
Mr. Edward Bussell Joneh : 

Pitcher; Parian. Bennington, Vt., 1853. 

Pie plate ; i>otteri-. From Vickera' Pottery, Lionville, Pa.; c. 1850. 

Dish; "Avalon Faience." Made by the Chesapeake Pottery Co., Balti- 
mnre, Md., ISS3. 

Two jugs i pottery. Made by slaves at the pottery ot Colonel Thomas J. 
Davies, Bath, S. V., 1862. 

Mug ; pottery. Copper lustre. Enjilisb ; c, 1820. 

Seven book plates. 
Rev, Alfred Dl'ake Pell, New York City : 

One hundred and twenty-eight eiampleii of raro porcelain ; French, Eng- 
lish, Dutch, German and BussUn. 
Mb*. MaryC. Blplev: 

Two eiaroples of pottery ; " Roblin " ware. San Francisco, Cal., 1899. 

Vase ; pottery. From Stockton Pottery, Stockton, Cal., 1903. 
Mb.Samvel B. Deak, Boston ; 

Twelve examples of old lace. 
Mrs. Ch41M(.'EV H. Brush : 

Cup ; porcelain. " Lowestoft '' style. Chinese, ISth century. 



J, Google 



Hr. WiLUAJi Simon : 

Toj goblet ; glua. UniMd SutM, old , 
Mrs. Owkn Jonrs Wiimni; 

TbiM large pi«0M ot lace ; Venetian Rooe Point ; c 1625. 
Mr. Hkbmav C. Muellbb : 

Jug ; pottery. Underglua decoration. From pottery ot Mall Morgan, 
Qncinnati, O., 1B86. 
Mrs. E. C Palmeh and Mw Mabv C Yaiaow: 

Prayer rug ot ZuBi Indian! ; deer skiD, New Mexico. 
Mb. Karl Fbeunc : 

Jug : creamware. StaRordBhire, England ; c. 1S30. 
MiM Mary Chamb Perry : 

Tbree example* ot potterj ; " Pevabic" ware. Made by the donor, De- 
troit, Micb. 
Mrh. E. S. Hall : 

Tea caddj ; lead. Cbineiw ; c IT70. 
Pbof. CaABLBS E. Daha ; 

Fitty-three book plates ; tureign and domestic. 
Mr. Williau Beko : 

ColleciioD of poiiage itampa. 
Mb. John Harriron ; 

Jog ; poitery. Copper loMre with painted medallions. English ; c 1S20. 
Mr. Hbnry C. Mebckr : 

Nine tile« (framed) ; pottery. Made by the donor at tbe Monvian Potterj 
and Tile Works, Doyleetown, Pa., 190S. 
MnmRS. P. J. Doyle and Petbk McMenamim ; 

Cbain ; carved sandstone. U. B., 1904. 
Mrs. Elizabith Warmer, Hinersville, Pa.: 

Lai^o doll baby. U. S., 18«. 

By Loan from : 

Mr. H. F. Stbattok : 

Four baskets ; woven straw. American Indian. 

One flask case ; woven straw. South American. 

Two cigar cases ; woven straw. South American. 
Mm Mary C Trabert : 

Spinning wheel. German ; c. 1785. 
Mb. Cbarlbs M. Burns : 

Drinking glass ; cameo cut and engraved. German, 18ih century. 

Fan: carved ivory. Chinese, ISth century. 



Digilzed by Google 



Mr. David B. Elder : 

Wedding dresti ; Bilk brocnde. U. .S., 1790. 

Reticule; silk. V. S.old. 
Mb. Eowi:< A. B^tRSER: 

Traf ; enamel oa copper. B&tteraea, EngUnil, ISth century. 
Mise DoBA Keene : 

Three specimens of Hangarian embroiderj, 16th century. 
JuKUER Mabnnbrciior : 

Kaiser prize; silver and gilL Won at the SiingerfesI in Baltimore, June, 
1903. 
Mitf. JoN'Es WiSTER ; 

Eight stone carTiogs, ancient Mexican. 
Numismatic and Antkiuabian Society ; 

Thirtj-four coins added to their collection. 
Mrs. William D. Fai»mii.-TK : 

Four pieces of old silver. 

Collection of eighty-two embroidered aamplera, foreign and domestic. 
Mre. Francis Bacon : 

Reticule ; bead work. U. S., old. 

Valance ; quilted linen. U. S., old. 
Mr. Sheldon P. Ritter : 

Kalpis; pottery. From factor; of P. Ipsen, Copenhagen, Denmark. 
Mi88 Helen Taylor: 

Collection of Japanese art objects consisting of sixty examples. 
Mrs. M. Theri^a Keehmle (The Ozetu, Ramborger & Keehmli^ Collection) : 

Twenty-two specimens of old cut gla«s, French and German, 

Thirty-one examples of pottery and porcelain, Chinese, English and 
French. 
Dr. Clement Biddle : 

Seven specimens of ivory, bronze and enamel, Chinese and Japanese. 
Mr. JauI':s Vick, Bristol, Pa. : 

Copy of the "Vinegar Bible,'' 2 vols. Published by James Baaketl, Oxford, 
England, 1717. 
Mrs. John Harriimin : 

Casket ; silver. In form of melon. 

Two plaques (framed) ; silver and gill, old. 

Purchases for the Museum ; 

AccorSTOF Anolo-American Pottery Fund: 

Jug ; copper lustre. Portrait of General Jackson. Staffordshire, EngUnd ; 

c. 1820. 
Jug ; creamware. Black printa, Liverpool, England ; c. 1800. 
Mag ; Liverpool ware. Print of map of Eastern United SiAtes, Ijverpool, 
England ; c 1795. 



Di.itradb, Google 



Account of Petty Cash : 

Plate ; pewter. Marked "F. Baaaett. N. Y.", 1786. 

Goblet ; dark blue glass. Made b; Baron William H. Stiegel, Manheim, 
Pa. ; c. 1769. 
Account op JoeEPn E Templk Tm*!^ : 

Mug ; ailTet lustre. Englaod ; c. 18'iO. 

Jug; copper lustre. Kigland ; c. 18'20. 
ACC-OUNT OF SPECUt. MV*EVM FfSD : 

Plate; pottery. View of Columbia <*olle|t«; bj A. Ktevenson, Stailnrd- 

ihire, England ;c. ISIK 
Dish ; pottery. View of Upper Ferry Bridgv, Philadelphia ; by Jacksoo, 

Slaffordihire, EDglaiulic. 1^3-5. 
Plate; ironstone china. Arms of some ot the original States. Staffordshire, 

England ; a 1 840. 
Two cupa and saucers; porcelain. Decorated in "Lowestoft" style. 

Chinese, ISth century. 
Cream jug; porcelain. Decorated in " Lowestoft " style- Chinese, 181h 

century. 
Tray ; porcelain. Decorated in " Lowestoft" style. Chinese, 18th century. 
Teapot; porcelain. Decorated in "Lowestoft" style. Chinese, 18th cen- 

Two pitchers; porcelain. Made at the Tucker Factory, Philadelphia; c. 
1832. 

Jug; yellow ware. Portraits of Washington and Lafayette in black ; c. 
1825. 

Collar and cuffs ; embroidery. Made in a nunnery. French ; c. l!4oO-]860. 

Dulcimer; Hungarian, 18th century. 

Bassoon or Fagott, old. 

Plate ; pewter. Inscribed : " Sanct Leodigari, 1647." 

Pair of Sceaux vases. French ; c. 179Q. 

Mug; porcelain. Decorated in "Lowestoft" style. Chinese, IHtb century. 

Two sampleia ; embroidered. Dated 1775 and 1773. 

Plaque ; white salt glaze ware. English, ISth century. 

Two drums ; bamboo. Burnt decoration. Island of Java. 

Kit or Pochette. Dancing Master's pocket fiddle. French, I8th century. 

Plate ; pottery. View ot Water- Works, Philadelphia ; by Ralph Steven- 
son and Williams, L'obridge, England ; c. 1320. 

Lute ; ivory and tortoise-shell inlay. Oenoa, Italy, 1639, 

Harp ; gilt. Italian, ISth century. 

MUSEUM LIBRARY. 
Total number of titles in the Library on the 31st day of May, 
1904: 

Bound Books, 1235 

Unbound Pamphlets, Catalogues, Repuria, etc., . 1174 

2409 



oy Google 



Following 18 the list of additions to the Library of Books, Cata- 
logues and Pamphlete. 

By Gift from : 

Bbooklth Institute op AsTe and SctENcn, BrooklTn, N. Y. : 

PiOBpectnB 

Pictares of the Life of Christ, b^ 'HHOt. 

Oood^ear CoUectioii of Photographs of Iu1i«n Architecture. 

A BenaiaBUice LeEoiog Facade *t Oeooa. 

Architectural Refinements in FndcH Gothic CethedraU. 

Architectural Refinemeuts of St Mark'f, Veaice. 
Barbkr, EtowiN A. : 

Biit7-8iz Ceramic Art CitUoguet, Pamphlets, etc. 
Cabnboie Inbtitttb, Pittsburgh, Pa. :' 

Seventh Annual Reitort- 
Carxbqik Museum, Pitttburgh, Pn.: 

Annual Report for 1903. 

Fifth Celebration of Founder's Day. 
CsiCAOO Public Librarv, Chicago, 111. : 

Thirtj-firat Annual Report. 
Cincinnati Museum Association, Cincinnati, O.: 

Twenty -second Annual Beport. 

Catalogue o( Art Academy. 
CtTT Librarv Association, Springfield, Mass. : 

Forty-second Annual Report. 
Dana, Pbof. Cbabus £. : 

Artists and Engravers of British and American Book Plates, by Fincbnian. 
Dbtkoit Museuk op Art, Detroit, Mich. : 

Two Numbers of the Museum Bulletin. 
Field Columbian Museum, Chicago, Dl. ; 

Anpaho Sun Dance, by Dorsey. 

Tradilioiu of the Crows, by Simms. 

Oraibi Oaqol Ceremony, by Voth. 

Oraibi Summer Snake Ceremony, by Voth. 

Annual Report for 1903. 
Fribhmutb, Mite. Wiluam D. : 

Muuc Explained to the World, by Fetis. 
Jeneb, John Btory ; 

History and Description of Old French Faience, by Solon. 
Jones, Edward Rossell : 

Bookbindings o( Ralph R. Adams. 

General Catalogue of the Art Institute of Chicago. 



Digiized by Google 



Sixteenth Ananal Exhibition of Ihe Aii Inslitatc of Chicago. 

Cataloftue of Piintingi in Metropolltaa Muaeum. 

Book PUt«s — Origin, Design, Eieciilion and Cott 
Lambdin, Alfred C. : 

Old China Boole, b; Moore. 

How lo Idcntifj Old China, bj Hodgson. 

Marks on Old FewMr and Sheffield P)al«, bj Redman. 
Leland Stakford UinvEHSITr, California : 

Thirteenth Annual Begiater. 
Mebceb, Hknry C : 

Moravian Potter; and Tile Works. 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City ; 

Catalogue of Ke/- Board Miuicat Instruments in the Croaby Brown Collec- 

MiLWAUKEE Public Mvsbvu, Milwaukee, Wis. : 

Twentr-first Annnal Report. 
Museum of Fine AttTJ^ Boston, Mass.: 

Four Numbers of the Museum Bnlletin. 

Twenty- eighth Annnal Report. 
Pennovlvania Academy of the Fisb Art^, Philadelphia: 

(.'aialogne of the Committee on Inoimciion. 
Smithsonian Ikstitdtios, Wiuhington, D. C. : 

Annual Report for 1SU2. 
I). 9. Bureau of Ethnoloov, Washington, D. C. : 

Naiick Dictionary, by TmmbiilL 

By PurchiiBe; 
Art Enameling upon Metals, by < 'unynRliarae. 
American Art Annual. l(Ki3. 

Historr and Description of English Porcelain, by Burton. 
History of Old English Purcelwn, by t-olon. 
History ot the Pewterera' Company, by Welch. 
Sanderson Collection of Old Wedgwood, by Ralhbone. 
Pewter Plate, by Mass^. 
Pewter and Sheffield Plate, by Redman. 
Color Blue in Pottery and Porcelain, by Ripley. 

Periodicals taken for the Library ; 
Old China. 
The Connoisseur. 
American Journal of Numisnistics. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER, EDWIN ATLEE BARBER, 

Director. Curator . 



oy Google 












5|i|lr^js, 



: I I I I f ? I I I I f . Ill 









'ii'iii^i??'*!' 



3: ■S. S S i ' 



5 s r c M I ? ? I 



£ i - 
I i S 



-?ss,??M3«l^?l^sKf.sg; 






S 3 £ ^ ^ 



^§S'S-'$'S^^ii%. 



oy Google 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. SROAD AND PINE STREETS. 



REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL. 

Presented at the Clomk ok the Twknty-Seventh Scii<x)L Yeah. 

During the past year the School has been attended by 1029 
pupils, of whom 683 were men and 346 women. 

The following changes and additions have been made in the 
teaching staflf: in the Art School, Mr. Albert Jean Adolphe has 
taken chaise of the evening clasa in Interior Decoration, Mr, Leon 
Volkmar has been engaged to conduct the clasB in Pottery, and 
Mr. Carl G. Nacke, that in Metal Work. In the class in Archi- 
tectural Drawing, Mr. C. Wharton Churchman takes the place of 
Mr. J. Edgar Hill, whose professional work compelled him to re- 
linquish his work here. In the Textile School, Mr. J. Harry Shinn 
has taken charge of the work of Cotton Carding and Spinning, in 
place of Mr. William E. Winchester, who resigned at the close of 
last year, and Mr. Robert J. Carson succeeded Mr. Edward J. 
Roberts in the Designing Department, evening class. In the lan- 
guage classes, Mmc. A. M. Schmidt-Grillon has taken the place of 
MisB Emma Schmidt as Instructor in German. 

The proposition to establish a Department of Pottery which was 
contained in the last report was favorably received by the Officers 
and Trustees, and especially by the Associate Committee of Women, 



OyGlJOgIc 



a special committee of which body began immediately after the 
close of the School, a year ago, the work of soliciting funds for the 
erection of a suitable building, and to provide for the maintenance 
of such a department. The necessary funds were promptly raised 
and the department was organized soon after the opening of the 
new school year. An enthusiastic class of pupils, already well ad- 
vanced in general art work, was enrolled, and actual instruction, 
under Mr. Leon Volkmar, instructor in charge, was begun on De- 
cember 5, 1903. A suitable kiln for the firing of bodies as well as 
glazes has been constructed, and very interesting results have al- 
ready been obtained in this important branch of Industrial Art. 
Meanwhile, the plans for the new building have been perfected 
and the work of construction has already begun. During the year 
just closing the class has been conducted in rooms temporarily pro- 
vided in the modeling department of the present building. 

Another branch of Applied Art added this year is that of metal 
work, a class in which was organized at the opening of the school 
year, in October, 1903. The class is in charge of Mr, Carl G, 
Nacke, who, after completing his studies at our own School, at- 
tended the School of Industrial Art in Munich, devoting himself 
to the course in metal work. Since his return from Europe, Mr. 
Nacke has been engaged in the practice of this beautiful art, but 
has generously consented, as a mark of his appreciation of, and 
interest in, the School, to devote a portion of his time to the work 
of instruction. 

A valuable collection of Architectural casts has been presented 
to the School of Applied Art by Mr. John T. Morris, and a good 
deal of new machinery, including looms, card cutters, etc., has 
been added to the equipment of the Textile School, for most of 
which the School is indebted to the same generous interest on the 
part of the manufacturers which has so often placed the School 
under obligations before. The installation of these additions to 
the facilities for instruction has involved several improvements in 
the building, the most important being the remodeling and light- 
ing by skylights of the third story of the wing occupied by the 
Textile School, which has made it possible to concentrate and 
greatly increase the efficiency of the department of Jacquard De- 
sign and Weaving. A detailed description of the additions to the 
equipments of this department, as well as those which have been 
made in the departments of Power, Weaving, Spinning, and Dye- 
ing, will be found in the Annual Report of the Corporation. 



oy Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



itiadb, Google 



87 

The Alumni Aaaociation of the Art School has held a continu- 
ous series of exhibitions and reunions durinf; the year which have 
been most ioterestiiig in themselves, and have performed a valu- 
able service in strengthening the ties between the School and its 
graduates, and in the inspiration and encouragement which have 
come to the younger students through these exhibitions of the 
work of their predecessors. 

The Association of the Alumni of the Textile School has also 
done excellent work of quite equal importance in promoting, by 
means of meetings and reunions, that reaction between school 
activity on the one hand and experience in the world of aSairs on 
the otJier, which constitutes the very perfection of educational 
effort as understood at the present day. 

The work of the various student organisations, the Art and Tex- 
tile Club, the Athletic Association and the Girls' Industrial Art 
Jjeague, continues with undiminished activity, the one last named 
deserving especial mention for the very eflScientwork which it has 
done in conducting, on its own initiative, an excellent lunch ser- 
vice for the benefit of the School as a whole. 

The various meetings, receptions, lectures and other entertain- 
ments which ha^'e, from time to time, been arranged by the stu- 
dents themselves or by members of the Associate Committee of 
Women, notably a very delightful reception to the entire student 
body which was given by Mrs, W. W. Gibbs, on the evening of 
February 13th, have strongly emphasized the need of a much 
larger auditorium than the School possesses at present. A fund 
for the erection of such an addition to the building has already 
been started, and a substantial addition to it was made this year 
from the proceeds of a lecture on February ISth, by Professor An- 
gelo Ileilprin, on "The Tragedy of Martinique." Another occa- 
sion on which the inadequacy of our only room that is available 
for public meetings was keenly felt was the Meeting of Apprecia- 
tion in memory of Charles Godfrey Leland, on the evening of 
March 14th. An address on Mr. Leland's life and work was de- 
livered by Tnlcott Williams, LL.D., and the meeting was made the 
occasion of presenting to the School by Mrs. John Harrison a 
foundation providing for the maintenance of two Memorial Schol- 
arships, to bear Mr. Iceland's name. 

An exhibition of the work of pupils* has been sent to the Louisi- 
ana Purchase Exhibition as a part of the Educational Exhibit of 
the State of Pennsylvania. 



oy Google 



38 

The system of prizes for Furniture Design and allied work con- 
tributed this year by several manufacturers, and those awarded to 
students of the Pottery School through the generosity of Mr. H. H. 
Battles, all of which are included in the list of prizes awarded to- 
day, furnish gratifying evidence of the growing appreciation by 
practical men of the work accomplished by the School. The long 
list of other prizes, steadily renewed by their donors from year to 



Designed and Modelled by Meta Van:i Warrick, » Pupil nf the School. 

year, and of gifts and benefactions to the Art and Textile Schools, 
all of which will be included in the published report of the Cor- 
poration, bear similar witness to the interest of business and prac- 
tical men in the aims which the institution represents. 

The Library of the School has received during the year the fol- 
lowing accessions ; 

PowhsBed. I'rBsenWil, ToUil. 

Booke, 135 112 247 

Periodicals, 16 22 38 

I'nbound Voliiines tincluding Portfo- 
lios of Photugniphs and Prints), .4 53 57 



Digilzed by Google 



Pamphlets, 2b» 3C9 

SiDgle Phokogrspht, .... 636 3 637 

The total number of titleB in the Library of the School on May 
31, 1904, wa« as follows: 

Bound Volumeg, 1339 

Unbouad Volumet and Porttolioe, 526 

Pamphlelis 879 

PhotogrBphs aod Priote, Dot included In the list of Port- 
folios, 3242 

Gifts to the Library during the past year have been made by the 
following: 

Mias Hannah Fox, Mrs. John Harrison, Mrf>. Frank K. Hippie, 
Mr. Benjamin Sh.rbow, Mr. Albert P. Willis, Mr. Victor T. Wil- 
son, Albert S. BoUes, Ph.D.. LL.D., Mr. Henry Taws, Mr. James 
Phinney Monroe, Hon, David S. B. Chew, Col. M. Kichards Muckle, 
Mr. L. W. Miller, Mr. Henry W. Poor, Mr. Charles M. Burns, Jr., 
Mr. William T. Galey, Mr. Isaac H. Clothier, Messrs. P. Blakis- 
ton's Sons & Co., Messrs. N. W. Ayer & Son, Mr. John B. McPher- 
Bon, University of Chicago, Parkway Assot-iation of Philadelphia, 
St. Ignatius' College, San Francisco, Cal., State Normal School, San 
Fruncieeo, Cal., City Parks' Association, Philadelphia, Eastern Art 
Teachers' Association, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Mass., Teach- 
ers' College, Columbia University, Architectural Record Co., New 
York, Simmons College, Boston, Muss., Armour Institute of Tech- 
nology, Chicago, III., Spring Garden Institute, Philadelphia, Ohio 
Mechanics' Institute, Cincinnati, 0., Norwich Art School, Norwich, 
Conn., Lewis Institute, Hampton Institute, Maryland Institute, 
Baltimore, Md., Minneapolis School of Fine Arts, Mechanics' In- 
stitute, Rochester, N. Y., School of the Pennsylvania Academy of 
the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Art Students' League, New York, 
Cleveland School of Art, State of Pennsylvania, National Associa- 
tion of Wool Growers, Natural History Scientific and Archajologi- 
cal Society of Peterborough, Art Academy of Cincinnati, Territo- 
rial Normal School, Oklahoma, I. T., Ct-ntral Ontario School of 
Art and Industrial Design, Philadelphifl, School of Design for 
Women, T-Sqoare Club, City of Manchester (England), Municipal 
School of Art, Public Education Association, Philadelphia, United 
States Government, Brown University, Philadelphia Art Club, 
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Plastic Club, Philadelphia, 
Dickinson College, Lehigh University, Ohio State University, He- 
brew Technical Institute, New York. Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N.Y. 



oy Google 



CABINET. 

Deaigned bj Edith C. Kirk. 

Pmnel by Reba C. Baiter. Metal Work bj Jacob R. Foi, Jr. Pollerj Vise by 

Joiephine Hnrtwell. Potlery Bowl by Isabel Aitken. Pupils of the School. 



oy Google 



DONATIONa 

DuBiNo THE Year to thb School of Applied Art. 

From Mrs. Jones Wister, 35 objecte of iniiustrial art. 
From Mrs. Frank K. Hippie, S5 objects of induatrial art 
From Mr. John T. Morris, a collection of 53 architectural casts. 

To THE Textile School. 

Crompton & Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass., 1 20-har- 
neas 4x4 box towel loom ; 1 4 x 4 box dress-gooda loom, with 600 
double-lift Jacquard ; also various loom supplies. 

John Royle & Sons, Paterson, N. J., I latest model power piano 
card cutter ; also racks and akip plates. 

Thomas Halton's Sona, Philadelphia, Pa., 3 Jacquard machines, 
with necessary levers and fixtures. 

Geo. S. Harwood & Son, Boston, Mass., 1 latest improved Ap- 
perly feed for finisher card. 

Philadelphia Water PurificaUon Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 1 500- 
gallon filter. 

Draper Company, Hoi)edale, Mass., 2 pairs No, 30 improved 
Dutchers' patent temples; 3 pairs Hardaker's temples; 1 pair 
Knowles' temples, and change gears for twister. 

Schaum & Uhlinger, Philadelphia, Pa., 1 6-8pace ribbon loom, 
with all the latest improvements. 

Klauder-Weldon Dyeing Machine Co., Amsterdam, N, Y., 1 stock 
dyeing machine. 

The Torrance Mfg. Co., Harrison, N. J., 1 small wool sampling 
card. 

American Card Clothing Co., Philadelphia, Pa., card clothing for 
above card. 

James Barker, Philadelphia, Pa., 1 48-inch apron condenser rub 
motion (complete), for use on Furbush cards. 

Emmons Ix)om Harness Co., Lawrence, Mass., 24 harnesses ; also 
shafts and hooks. 

Charles AshofF Weavers' Supply Co., Philadelphia, Pa., reeds of 
various numbers and widths for power looms. 



Digilzed by Google 



42 

F, Bailey, Cedar Brook P. O., N. J., (Rl dye sticks for dye house. 

Justice, Bateman tfe Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 445 pounds grease 
wool ; also 23 pounds scoured noils. 

The Hampton Company, Easthampton, Mass., 2<l pounds Sea 
Island cotton, gased and mercerized. 

Richard H. Airaan, Philadelphia, Pa., 30 pounds Novelty 
woolen yarn. 

Southwark Mills Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 24 pounds wool yarn. 

Kennebec Worsted Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 10 pounds wool. 

Alhert Sherwood, Philadelphia, Pa., 10 pounds various colors of 
warp yarn. 

Champlain Silk Mills, Whitehall, N. Y., 4 pounds 13-ounce spun 
silk. 

B. Hooley & Son, Philadelphia, Pa., 2 pou^ids of silk yarn. 

The Sauquoit Silk Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa., li pounds of fine 
silk yarn. 

Albert Tilt, Xow York, N. Y., sample skeins of Italian silks. 

R. Hoermann, New York, N, Y., 3 cases of samples of wool and 
cotton fabrics. 

Cassella Color Co., Philadelphia, Pa., and New York, N. Y., 22 
pounds of various samples of dyeatafifs; also 43 4-ounce and (i 2- 
ounce samples of dyestuffB. 

Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co., Philadelphia, Pa., and New 
York, N. Y., 4 pounds of various samples of dyestuffs ; also '26 8- 
ounce, 'i2 4-ounce and 10 2-ounce samples of dyestuffs. 

Kuttroflf, Pickhardt & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., and New York, 
N. Y., 11 pounds of various samples of dyestuffs and 18 4-ounce 
samples of dyestuffs; also book on cotton dyeing. 

H. A. Metz & Co., New York, X. Y,, 4 pounds of various samples 
of dyestuffs; 2 pounds Mordant salts; 20 i-pound packages and 
14 4-ounce packages of dyestuffs. 

General Chemical Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 1 barrel Glauber's salt; 
1 carboy acetic acid ; 1 carboy sulphuric acid ; 1 carboy muriatic 
acid ; and 1 carboy a<iua ammonia. 

Arnold, Hoffman & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 11 1-pound samples 
of starches, dextrins and gums used in finishing. 

Society of Chemical Industry, Basle, Switzerland, 260 4-ounce 
samples of dyestuffs. 

Berlin Aniline Works, Philadelphia, Pa., 2 pounds of dyestuffs ; 
42 4-ounce and 2 2-ounce samples of dyestuffs. 



Digilzed by Google 



43 

Roeseler, Hafislacher Chemical Co., New York, N. Y., 10 pounds 
sodium peroxide. 

Kalle & Co., New York, N. Y., '29 4-ounce samples of dyeetuffs : 
25 sample bottlee of dyestuffs ; and a lot of sample cards. 

India Alkali Co., Boston, Mnsu., 1 barrel of wool savogran. 

J. M. & J. S. Nicol, North Paterson, N. J., Ti pounds amylo gum. 

A. Klipstein & Co., New York, N. Y., 3 pounds antimony sails 
and 1 pound dyestufT. 

Sykes & Street, Philadelphia, Pa., 1 pound of dyestuff and 9 4- 
ounce samples of dyestuffs. 

Farbwerke Weiler-Ter-Meer, Widingen, Germany, collection of 
11 samples coal-tar products for dyestuffs. 

C. Bischoff & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., and New York, N. Y., 8 4- 
ounce samples of dyestuffs. 

Read, Hollidey & Sons, New York, N. Y., 2 4-ounce samples of 
dyestuffs. 

Schoellkopf, Hartford & Hanua Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 2 4-ounce 
samples of dyestuffs. 

Tiie Selling Co., New York, N. Y., 2 samples of titanium salts. 

COURTESIES EXTENDED. 
The Draper Company, Hopedale, Mass.; Schaum & Uhlinger, 
Philadelphia, Pa.; Erben, Harding & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Fales & Jenks Machine Co., Pawlucket, R. I. ; Howland Croft, 
Sons & Co., Camden, N. J.; Aberfoyle Mfg. Co., Chester. Pa.; 
Pirth & Foster Co., Philadelphia, Pa. ; J. R. Foster & Sons, Phila- 
delphia, Pa.; F. H. Milner. Philadelphia, Pa.; " Fibre & Fabric," 
Boston, Mass.; "The Manufacturer," Philadelphia, Pa.; "Dry 
Goods Economist," New York, N. Y. ; " Dixie," Atlanta, Oa. ; " Tex- 
tile Colorist," Philadelphia, Pa. ; " Textile Excelsior," Charlotte, 
N. C; "Textile World-Record," Boston, Mass.; Lowell Machine 
Shop, Lowell, Mass. ; Adelaide Silk Mills, Allentown, Pa. ; \Vm. 
H, Lorimer's Sons Co., Philadelphia, Pa. ; John Forrest, Phila- 
delphia, Pa.; Eavenson & I.*vering, Philadelphia, Pa. ; Philadel- 
phia Tapestry Mills, Philadelphia, Pa.; L, S. Watson Mfg. Co., 
Leicester, Mass. ; Thomas Halton's Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. ; Phil- 
adelphia Textile Machinery Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; John Royle & 
Sons, Paterson, N. J. ; Crompton & Knowles Loom Works, Wor- 
cester, Mass. ; Peerless Silk Dye Works, Philadelphia, Pa. ; Barrett 
Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. ; Albert Hellwig & Co., Philadelphia, 



Digitized by Google 



44 

Pa. ; EMdyBtone Print Works, BMdystone, Pa. ; Philadelphia Water 
Purification Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; Edward H. Sanborn, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. ; Sauquoil Silk Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

The IcBtitution is also indebted to the Vacuum Oil Compaay, 
which has donated all oils used by the Engineer's Department, 
and to the Thackara Manufacturing Company, for refiniehing the 
gaa fixtures in the School lobby. In addition to these benefac- 
tions the Art and Textile Schools are under increased obligations 
each year to the generous interest of the donors of the various 
prizes, the list of which is continually being increased, which are 
awarded at the Annual Commencement Exercises ; on page — and 
following, under the account of this year's exercises, will be found 
a full list of these prizes, several awarded this year for the first 
time, many others steadily renewed by the donors from year to 
year, all alike combining to form one of the most authoritative 
and valuable testimonials to the value of the School's work and 
influence. 

COMMENCEMENT. 

The Commencement Exercises were held at the Acadenay of 
Music on Thursday evening, June 2d, and were followed by the 
Annual Exhibition of Students' work at the School Building, 
Broad and Pine Streets. The Invocation was delivered by Rev. 
Wayland Hoyt, D.D., LL.D., the Commencement Address, 
"Current Educational Ideals," by Prof. Martin G. Brumbaugh, 
Ph.D., LL.D., and the Diplomat and Prizes were awarded by 
President Search, who also delivered an address to the graduates. 

DIPLOMAS, PRIZES AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED AT THE 
ANNUAL aiMMENCEMENT, JUNE 2, 1904. 

DIPLOMAS. 
School of Afplif.d Art.— iMbel Aitken, Edna Rirtlett, B. Frank Jarrett, 
Jr., Maude Smith, Anns Maj' Tbumlert. 

Textile School, KntiULAB Textile Coubse. — J«y Titus Aunget, James 
Townsend Hickman, Jr., Abraham Albert Levy. Robert Carl Liehr, Herbert 
Malcolm Remington, Louis Edward Ruehlman, Frederick Julius Siebrecht, 
Clayton Palmer Stearns, Daniel Joseph Wade, George W. Witt«nberg. 
i- ANiJ DvKiKO Course.— Leicester DaCosta Ward. 



Digilzed by Google 



PRIZKS. 
SCHOOL OF APPLIED ART. 
AffiocrATE Committee op WokenV Pbizeh.— Fiiwt, $aO.OO.— (Eliiabeih 
Duane Gillespie Priie. ) For th« bait work in ihe courae in Induilriil Draw- 
ing. Awarded to Anna Garrett 

Honorable mention to Frances Madeline IJchten, George Wilmer Beinbold. 
Second, (10.00.— Fur General Excellence in Design. Awarded to Deborah 
Bawley Smedley. 
Honorable roenUon lo Donald M. Ely. 



BASKET WORK. 
By PupiU.if the School. 

Third, flO.OO.— For Original Design, Stencils. Awarded to Robert Burton 
Charles Keeler. 

Honorable mention to Edgar W. Pearee. 

MttB. Jokes Wicteii Prize, $2-'>.00.— $15.00 awarded to Curallie Thonia, for 
Water Color. Honorable mention lo Reba Baiter, Ruth Dalziel. 

SIO.OO awarded Donald H. Ely, Cor Book Cover Designs. 

Emma S. Croker Prize, 120.00.— Offered for the best work in Drawing. 
Awarded to Edgar W. Pearee. ' 

Firel Honorable mention to Rudolph Freund. Second Honorable mention 
to Earl J. Early. 

Emma S. Croker Prize, $20.00.— For the best group oF work in Modelling. 
Awarded to ^tallde Smith. 

First mention to Beatrice Fenton. Second mention lo Isabel .\itken. Special 
mention for work not in Competition lo Salvadore Bilolti. 

Kbttereh Pri/.e, $20.00.— Offered by Mr. Gustav Ketlerer, ot the Advisory 
Committee, for best adaptation of a Historic Motive from studies at Memorial 



oy Google 



46 

Hall. {10.00 awarded to Bertnm Sydney Chadwick. SIO.OO awarded to 
Corallie Thoma. 

Jons J. BoYLB Prize, (lO.OU. -Offered by Mr. John J. Boyle, of the Ad- 
Tisory Committee, for Modelling. Awarded to George McDonough. 

Caroline Axford Maobe Phcze, fSO. 00. —A warded to Edith Harper Smith 
for DeBJgD lor Eccleaiastical Kmbroidery. 

Honorable racntiuo to Aleiina Sballiis Paul Stroup. 

PREDEIIICK Graff Prize. $2j.00. — For Architectural Deaigo. Awarded to 
Charles Q. Anderson. 

Honorable mention to John Pugliese, Tony Nardy. 

Hkhry Perry Lrland Pbi/b, S'>5.00. — Offered by Mrs. John Harrison for 
the best work in Illustration. Awarded to Gertrude G. Hark. 

Honorable mention to Anne Pearson While. 

Girlh' Imdijiitriai. Art LcjiatE Prize, (10.00. — For the best finished arti- 
cle made from a design hj a Student Member of the League. Awarded to Maude 
Smith, for Pottery. 

F. Weber Prize.— Drawing Table, for best Work in Instrumental Drawing. 
Awarded to Claude B. Mervine. 

Battles Prizes.— Offered by Mr. H. H. Battles to Students in Pottery. 

For a Jardinbre — FiBin' Pkike, (25.00.— Awarded to Meta Vaui Warrick. 

Second Prize, flJi.OO. — Awarded to Edna Bartlett. 

For a Vabb, Bowl Type. — First Pbikb, $20.00,— Awarded to Maude Smith. 

Second Prize, $10.00,— Awarded to Isabel Aitken, 

Fob a Vame, Slender Tvpk, $20.00,— Awarded to Anna May ThuiulerL 

Fob General Excellbnce, Group of Wobk, $10.00.— Awarded to John 

PooLEY Pbizes. — Offered by the Pooley Furniture Co. 

1. $20.00,— For Carved Wood Panel in a given style. $10.00 awarded to 
Manning Thompson, $10,00 awarded lo Elieabelh E. Hatlowell. Honorable 
mention to Edna Bartlett. 

2. $20.00, — For futl-siEed detail drawing of original design for carved pane), 
in German or Italian Renaissance. Awarded to William L. Ziegler, 

3. $20.00.- For a Modelled Panel for Mantelpiece, for carver's model- 
Awarded to S. Preston Craighill. 

4. $15.00,— For the l>eet General Work in the Wood-carving class. Awarded 
to Gertrude L. Mann. 

Stdlb Prize, $20.00.— Offered by Mr, Robert Stulb, for best original design, 
rendered in color, in the Art Nouveau style, for the decoration of a Dining- 
Boom, $10.00 awarded to S. Preston Craighill. $10.00 awarded to Maude 
Clock. 

Dewar PRizea.— Offered by William H, Dewar. 

1. $10.00. — For best original Gothic Chest [executed). Awarded to Manning 
Thompson. 

2. $10.00.— For best original Record-Boi (executed). Awarded lo Jacob R. 
For, Jr, 

Hunt, Wilkinson & Co, Prizes.— Offered by Hunt, Wilkinson & Co. 
1. $15,00.— For best original design, in plan or elevation, rendered in color, tor 
the Reception Hall of a country house. Awarded to Abbot McClure. 



oy Google 



ORIGINAL DESIGN FOR EMBROIDERED HANGING. 

Bjizaatine Style. 

Bj Bertram Sydney Chadwick, a I'upil of the School. 

AdaptatioD from ilistoric Motives in tbe PennsylTania Museum. 

Gusiav Ketterer Prize CompetitioD. 



Digilzed by Google 



48 

2. tlO.OO. — For beet original dcflign in color, for a Dutch Boom. Awarded 
to Maude Clock. 

Q. Gbralp Etamb Pbize. — Offered bjMr. G. Gerald Evans of the Advi- 
sory Committee. For best original design for a Bulletin Board. Awarded lo 
Jacob F. Bcbeffler. 

Mm. Thomib Bodebts Pbizb, f 10.00.— Awarded to Jacob B, Fox, Jr., for 
Metal Work. 

Pbizb ScHOLABSHiPS FOB School Yeab, 1904-1905.— Awarded to Donald H. 
Ely, Aleiina 8. P. Stroup, Jacob B. Foi, Jr., Dora Eliiabeth Bobert*, S. Pres- 
ton CiBighill. 

Charles Godfrbv- Lelahd ScHOLiBfiuiP fob School Year, 1904-1905. — 
Awarded hj the Alumni AssociatioD of the School of Industrial Art lo Deborah 
Hawley Bmedlej. 

TEXTILE SCHOOL. 

Associate Committee op Women's Prize, 910.00. — For best executed work 
in Jacquard Design. Third Year. Awarded to Cieorge W. Wittenberg. 

Honorable mention to Abraham Albert Levy. 

The Misb Clvdb Prize, $1u.OO.— For beat executed work in Jacquanl De- 
sign. Second Year. Awarded to Benjamin Nelson Chanalis. 

Honorable mention to Schuyler J. Taylor, J. Everett Emerson. 

Mrs. Frank K. Hipple Prize, f 10.00.- For Special Work. Awarded to 
Charles Allan Oehm. 

Honorable mention to William J. Lockett. 

The Elizabeth C. Roberts Prize, $10.00.— For best work in Color Har- 
mony and Design. First Year. Awarded to Louis Hart Talcott. 

Honorable mention lo Robert L. Dawsoo, Robert E. Brooke, Casimir 
Mehsiras. 

The "Textile World REa>Ri>" Gold Medau — Chemistry and Dyeing 
Course. Awarded lo James Julius Wiltenberg. For Thesis : DiazotiaatioD and 
Development of Wool. 

Honorable mention to John Joseph Keenan. 

New England Cotton Mani7facti;rer8' Associatiok Medal. — For Gen- 
eral Excellence. Regular Course. Third Year. Awarded to Abraham Albert 

Honorable mention to Louis Edward Ruehlnian, J. Tuwnseiid Hickman, Jr. 

"DyBBs' Trade Journal" Prize — Chemical Balance.— For best seminar 
work in Chemistry. Awarded to James Julius Wittenberg. 

Honorable mention to Horace Smith. 

Prize Schoi^rships for Sch<h)L Yeah, 1904-1905.— Awarded to Louis 
Hart Talcott, Evan G. Mclver, Edward Kaufman (Evening Class), Ernest B. 
Gary (Evening Oass). 

CERTIFICATES. 
SCHOOL OF APPLIED ART. 

Certificate B — Afpi.i£D DBSiaN. — Edna Bartlelt, Florence Christ Callag- 
han, Elizabeth McMillan Campbell, Walter Garfield Chew, Esther Lincoln 
Fellows, John Dontiid Hinds, Sara Leopold, Dora Eliuibeth Roberts, Deborah 



oy Google 



49 

Hawlej Smedley, Edith H«rper i^mith, Williim Brooke Siukh, Aleiiiu Shftl- 
Idi Paul Slraap, Conillie Philomena B. Thoma. 

Spkcial Desiok Certificatk. — Bertram SjdntJ Chailwick. 

Interior Decoration.— Samuel Preston Craighill, Hearj Louis Keire, 
Maude Sraitb. 

iLLvin-BATiON.— Nellie Gerlmde Griffin, Gertrude Grace Hark, Irene Mil- 
dreil Bogcra, Kathrine Eliiabeth Steen, Jeannette Wetherald, Anne Peanon 
White. 

ABCHiTficrrvRAL DRAWiNa.—l'karleB OilTord Anderson, Louis I>omev, 
George Schreiber. William A. Welsh. 

Bl'iLDIHO CuNSTHi'iTiON.— Edvard Joseph Qallafher, Charlra Francis 
Seipp, Arthur Slater. 

Normal Abt Coo rhe.— Bertha Brown, Florence Christ Callsghan, Anna 
Beatrice Croke, Earl Joebua Earl;r, Pearl Verona Ebuer, Esther Lincoln Fel- 
lows, Elitabeth EI7 Hallowell, Edna Mabel Kerr, Carmen Franciaca Skerrelt, 
Haj Eliiabelh Smiley, Florence Caroline Turner, Jeannette Wetherald, Flor- 
ence Know lee Yard ley, 

I'LAss A— lNDrt>TRiAL Drawinq.— Otilie Phillips Bachman, Minnie Anne 
Bailey, John James Berilla, Annie Mabel Bawden, Katherine Barbara Brown, 
Mary Louisa Bray, .\lbert Worth Clark, Florence May Delweiler, Jessie Mer- 
rill Eogard, Anna Garrett, Mary Alta Garrison, Mabel Stowe GrigfCi George 
Theodore Hamilton, Bertha Adelia Heergeist, lirace E. Jamen, Gertrude Gra- 
ham Jarrett, Frances Madeline Lichlen, Charles Hartley Waller Mactagne, 
Carl William Muhley, Mary Louise McCoy, Claude Benjamin Mervine, Wil- 
liam Gordon Nye, Nellie Eliubeth Park, Mary Lovrien Price, Franklin Rua- 
ling Rainear, Lialette Heading, George Wilmer Reinbold, Mary Ethel Rue, 
Elma gtreeper Ritter, Clara Sautter, Charles Frederick Schaef, Ethel Amelia 
Smith, Estella Euphemia Smith, David Howard Smyaer, Edith Van Fossen, 
Eleanor Wilkinson, Frank Chester Woodard, Adelina Zerga. 

TEXTILE SCIIOOI.. 

Sec'osd Yeab— Reovlar Day Claw* : 

Paul Benninghofen, Benjamin Nelson Chanalis, Arthur Freeland Clark, 
Frederic James Coe, Jerome Everett Emerson, Allan Walton Gilmour, Harold 
Hawkins Hart, John Clarence Headman, Evan Gordon Mclver, FrnnciH Valen- 
tine O'Hara, Mitchell Samson Sabel, James Oliver Stewart, Schuvler Justice 
Taylor. 

Seoind Year Silk Class— Day : 

Charles Allan Oehm, Henry Anthony Soleliac. 

Seco.vd Year Comis Class — Day : 

Charles Randolph Bennett, Henry Walter Eddy, Jr., William Pryor Price. 

Second Year Chemistry and Dvbino— Day : 

Magoichi Ishibashi, John Joseph Keenan, Horace Smith, Thomas Albert 
Smith, James Julius Wittenberg. 

Third Year Regular Clabb — Evehino : 

Aleiander Dunlap, Horace E. Farra, Charles C. Jones, William C- Pfeifler. 



oy Google 



SILK BROCADE. 

Sixteenth Century Italian Deeign. 

The work of Henry A. Soleliac. a Pupil of the School. 



Di.itradb, Google 



Third Year Chemi^'Trv— Evekiwi : 
Joseph H. Flreng, Jr., Herbert Uolt. 
Third Year DvBis<i— Evesinu : 
F>«d. EiMinan. 

PARTlAl, (XJl'RSiX-EVKNINU CI.ASN. 

Weave Formation— Three Years : 

t'nnk M. Kititmtui, Emil KahD, Charlea Mdiiritj, lUrr; U. PTalT, J. II. 
Thorpe. 

Fabric Analysis ash Cautlatios—Tbreb Yearm: 

Emil Kahn, Frank M. KaufmaD, Cbarle* Mctiarily. 

Jacquard Desion— Two Yearm : 

Joseph Collier, James R. Lappin, Harm I»ckwood, William Kubertshaw. 

Worsted Yarn Manvfacture— One Year: 

Philip Arensmajer, C. W. Butterworth, Robert J. Bainl, Charlea R. IVtak, 
H. a Drake, Fred Fischer. William H. Mariner, H. <J. Newell, Harry Hed- 
msD, Fraok A. D. Schoepfer, Albert W. Whitaker, John K. Wiley. 

WooLES Yarn Manifacurb— Two Yrabh: 

Charles H. Carpenter, Floyd Haruhom, Andrew J. Miller, Waller J. Roffel, 
Sylvester Taylor, C. W. Schwarti, Jr. 

The toUowing atudenu of the Textile School have satisfactorily completed the 
work of the year in claavea tor which no certificates ere awarded. 

Day Clashes— First Year : 

Penrose Markley, Charles T. Rehfass, J. Ellsworth Fite, Spencer B. <ireene. 
Nelson J. Ker«haw, Robert L. Dawson, Robert E. Brooke, l^uis il. Talcott, 
Roger Harold Nichols, Hans Iloermann, Harold H. Phillipx, Casiniir Mekuras, 
Charles A. Foi, Wayiand B. Pickard, J. Arthur Ckjpoole, Robert L. Henry, 
C. a A. Henry, Henry WahU, Paul Beckwith, Wm. T. Lockett, Lawrence A. 
Stead, John E. Fiebiger, Bernard Killais, Samuel D. McCausland, Joseph 
CoUingwood, Howard E. Mancill. 

SCHOOL OF MODERN LANOlAtJlS. 

Normal Certificate in French, German and Spanish, Harry K. Weber, 

Appointments to State scholarships have been made this year for the follow- 
ing counties: Adams, Beaver, Bedford, Berks, Bradford, Cameron, Clarion, 
Clinton, Cumberland, Elk, Erie, Fayette, Franklin, Fulton, Greene, Hunting- 
don, Jefferson. Juniata, Lanceeter (2), Lebanon, Luterne, Lycoming, McKean, 
Montour, Northumberland, Perry, Pike, Potter, Philadelphia (2), Schuylkill (2), 
Snyder, Sullivan, Venango, Warren, Washington. 

Sixty-nine holders of these Scholarships were registered this year. 

The scbularships placed at the disposal of the Board of Education of Phila- 
delphia were filled, as usual, by a competitive examination conducted by the 
Principal, each Grammar School Principal being authorized to send candidates. 

In addition to the above, appointments were made, as usual, to the scholar- 
ships annually filled from the High, Normal, Manual Training, and Public In- 
dustrial Art Schools of this city. 



Digilzed by Google 



Appended are lists of students showing their previous occupa- 
tions and the localities from which they come : 

OCXX'PATIOSS REPRESENTED. 



ArtbU, . 






13 MachiniBls, 








9 


BewDere, . 






3 Mannbctureni, 








23 


Clerks, 






118 Hecbanica, 








25 


Cbemiste, . 






2 Merchants, 










Card Cultere, . 






4 Miner, . 










Carve™, . 






7 Musjdan, . 










Cutter*, . 






5 Printere, . 
















4« Photogr«pher, 










Decorators, 






19 Spinners, . 
















6 Superintendents 








15 


Domestics, 






















2 Teachere, . 








52 


Dnuigbtsmen, . 






25 Teamster, . 










D^era and FioiBhen, 






21 Tailors, . 










Engineers, 






2 Twisters, . 










Engravers, 






7 Warpers, . 










Hotel-keepers, . 






1 Weavers, . 








27 


IHustratora, 






3 Wool Sorter, 










Jewelers, . 






2 Students, . 








518 


Librariaiis, 






2 


Loom Fixers, . 






19 


Laborers, . 






4 Total 1029 


LOCALITIES REPRESENTED. 


PbiUdelphia, .... 744 District of Columbi», 2 








146 Washington, .... 2 


New Jersej, 






67 Kentucky, , . . . 1 


New York, 






16 Colorado, 1 


Masiiachuaetis, . 






10 Geoi^a, 1 


(^Connecticut, 






6 Maine 1 


Virginia, . 






7 Iowa, 1 


Ohio, 






5 Miwouri, 1 


Rhode Island, . 






3 Michigan, 1 


Indiana, . 






3 West Virginia, .... 1 


Wisconsin, 






3 Porto Rico, .... 1 


North Carolina, 






3 Canada, 3 


Delaware, . 






2 Jamaica, 1 


lUinois, . 






2 Japan 1 


California, 






2 


Maryland, 






2 Total, 1029 


Eespeetfully submitted. 


LESLIE W. MILLER, 


JrsB 2, 1904. 












Priadpd. 



J, Google 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 

(For Year Eading Maj 31, 1M4.) 

BaUDceoDhsDdJuDel, 1903 16,310 81 

ToitioD Fee*, Art School, ...... $8,4S& 25 

" Teilile School, 10,723 00 

Income of EndowmeDt Fund, Mn 00 

" " Temple Fund, 2,379 00 

" " Chapmsn ffiddle Fund 25 00 

" " Clapton French Fund, .... 26 DO 

" " F. A. Una Fond, 20 00 

" " Mn. Wm. WeightmkD, Jr., Fund, . . 60 00 

" " Elizabeth Duane Uillespie Fund, . . 6S4 00 

Jnt«r«« on DepoMli, 118 16 

Appropriation, City ot Philadelphia, 10,000 00 

Slate of PennsjlTMiia, . 36,875 00 

" Park r«mminion 10,716 30 

Annual Members, 1,404 00 

Offertory Boi« at Muwuro 161 14 

Temporary Loans, 16,000 OO 

New Building Fund Income, 51 1 67 

Temple Fund Museum— Intereat 132 03 

DONATIONS. 

From Textile Atsocialion, 1,202 20 

For Textile Expenses, 58 50 

For BoUer Fund, 1,390 74 

For Museum Maintenance 50 00 

For Museum Library Fund, 48 39 

For Mnseum Case Fund 135 00 

For Museum Publication Food 250 00 

For Anglo-American Pottery Fund, .... 23 29 

For Special Museum Fund, 155 50 

Life Members, 400 00 

For Heat and Lighting ISO 00 

Charlea Godfrey Leiand Scholarship Fund, . 2,000 00 

John Slorv Jcnks, 10,000 00 

1116,000 07 

Totals $121,310 88 



Digilzed by Google 



54 

EXPENDITURES. 

Maintenance of Mu«enm, tl4,80T 94 

School Building Wages and Eipeniee, . , 5,643 33 

BepaiiB and Alterations, l,2t(l 24 

Advertising, 664 33 

Art School Salariea and Wages, 10,532 65 

" Expenses, 814 17 

" " Equipments, f 248 01 

Textile School Salaries and Wages, .... 20,263 30 

" " Eipen»es 1,544 45 

" " Equipments, 1,084 47 

Administration Salariee and Wages, 11,739 96 

" Equipments, 67 10 

Anglo-American Pottety Fund, ..... 37 00 

Gas Account, 773 20 

Coal Account 2,492 75 

Insurance, 1,428 95 

iDteresl, 17,935 92 

General EipenHcs 2,925 88 

Museum Library Fund, 70 05 

Maaeum Case Fund 135 00 

Annual Memben, 610 2.') 

Special Museum Fund, 329 50 

Special Porcelain Fund, 4 00 

Emma 8. Crozer Fund Income for Piiies, ... 40 00 

F. A. Graff Fund tor Prizes 25 00 

Museum Annual Fund, 461 97 

Lace and Textile Fund, 25 00 

Mosical Instrument Fund, 27 10 

Temporary Loans, 15,000 00 

June 1, 1904, Balance, 

BALANCE SHEET, MAY 31, 1904. 

Dr. 

28 Temporary Loans, 

47 OfSce Furniture 1720 61 

51 School " 1,500 00 

56 Show Cases, 15,935 37 

66 Library 2,700 45 

71 Engravings and Photos, 1,187 92 

78 Carvings, Ivorj and Bone 768 41 

79 Mosaics, 300 00 

83 Leather Work, 10 00 

91 Wood Work, 4,2i2 66 

95 Jewelry and Goldsmiths' Work, .... 312 96 



Digilzed by Google 



55 



19 Silvenmitba' Work tad Plate, .... 0,742 2S 

13 Metal Work, 6,217 49 

1 Metal and Plaster CaM 3,418 9ft 

6 ArmiaDilArmor, 1,708 79 

9 Coins and Medal* 180 00 

3 Enamda «t, Metal, 2,014 88 

7 Pottery, 6,627 23 

I PortxiUin 2,893 94 

6 Fainted and Stained Glass, 109 26 

9 Ulan Vtssels, 662 82 

1 Sculpture in Marble, StODe, etc., . 1,820 23 

3 Textile Fabrics and Embroideries, . 6,087 94 

5 Musical Instruments, 44 94 

7 Lace 1,190 20 

9 Oil PairliogB 100 30 

L. W. Miller, advanced to pav bills, ... 200 00 

1 Mnseuni Librarr Fnnd, 

3 Offertory Account 

7 MuseuiD Case Fund, 7 60 

8 Boiler Fund, 

9 Special Museum Annual Fund, .... 

Cash, 10,318 36 

3 Special Plsie Fund, 

8 New Building Fund, 

9 New BaildJDg Fund Investmenl 10,421 25 

h Museum Publication Fund, 

6 Special Fund Mnseum — Purcbase New Objects, 

7 " " Purchase Musical InslrnmeDta, 

:4 Donations for Purchsse Broad and Pine Btreeu, 

2 Profit and Low, 118,087 34 

6 Museum Temple Fund Account, .... 

9 Temple Fond InTestmenc 53,925 69 

3 Endowment Fund Investment, .... 89,947 60 

4 Endowment Fund, ...... 

5 Temple Fund 

1 Life Members, 

5 Donations, 

3 Wro. Weightmsn, Jr., Scholarship, , 

4 Wm. Weightman, Jr., Scholarship Inveatmenl, 982 50 

6 F. GraS Architectural Prize Fund, . 

6 F. Grafl Architectural Prize Fund Investment, . 500 00 

9 Beal Estate, Broad and Pine Str«et8, . . . 550,778 99 
9 Mortgage Broad and Pine Streets, 

2 Chapman Biddle Memorial Scholarship, . 

2 Chapman Biddle Memorial Scholarship Invest- 

ment, 1,000 00 

3 Clayton French Free Scholarship, 



250 OO 

32 20 

7 90 

205,171 28 

7,348 27 



83,006 81 
53,379 00 
16,390 00 
62,522 20 
1,000 00 

600 00 



oy Google 



363 Clarion French Free Scholsrship InTestineiit, 

364 Emma S. Cnner Prize Fund, 

364 Emma S. Croier Priie Pand Inyestineiil, . 
364 Emma S. Crozer Prixe Fund Income, . 

366 F. Graff ArehiWctural Priw Fund locoine, 
867 Gilleepie Scholarehip Funil, 

367 Oilleipie Scholarship Fund InyeHtmeot, 

370 Charles Godfrey Leland Memorial Scholanbip, 



$917,316 77 «17,316 77 

JAMES L. ALLAN, 

Attittant Trea$urer. 



Digilzed by Google 



REPORT OF THE ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE 
OF WOMEN. 

It 13 with a senae of encouragement in their work through the 
past year that the following report is presented by The Associate 
Committee of Women : 

The meetings havtt been held with great regularity each month 
from October, 1903, to June, 1904. The attendance has been moet 
excellent. The work has been done through sub-committees, and 
the chairmen of such committees report at the monthly meetings 
of the Associate Committee, so that each member is kept in touch 
not only with the branch of the work in which she is particularly 
engaged, but also informed of the work of all the other commit- 
tees as well. 

At the monthly meetings the reports of all branches of the gen- 
eral work of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial 
Art are courteously sent to us by the Trustees ; and the very full 
reports of the work of the School and of the Museum are read 
with interest, and the constant additions to the Museum through 
gifts and loans are noted with pleasure. 

One of the principal things accomplished by the Associate 
Committee in the past year has been the collection of sufficient 
funds to construct a building and kiln for pottery work in connec- 
tion with the School. 

The idea of this School of Pottery waa suggested to the Asso- 
ciate Committee at one of the spring meetings of 1903, by the 
Principal of the School, and it was proposed that our committee 
should raise the necessary money. As the outgrowth of this, 
Mrs. Frank K. Hippie was appointed Chairman of the Committee 
on Pottery. She employed the summer months with such success 
that by the autumn she reported that S2.'>00 had been subscribed, 
and at the January meeting we were told that the entire sum 
needed — $3000 — had been obtained, and also $1500 towards the 
maintenance of the School for the first year. 

The idea of the School of Pottery is to turn out work on artistic 
lines, each piece of work to represent an individual idea of the 



Digilzed by Google 



58 

workman, or, in other words, the work turned out is to represent 
pottery as an art, as against pottery simply for market value. 

Twelve scholarships have been awarded by the Associate Com- 
mittee during the year on the Elizabeth Duane Gillespie Founda- 
tion, through the Scholarship Committee, with Mrs. Thomas 
Roberts as its Chairman, and Mr, Stratton has each month sent to 
Mrs. Roberts the standing of each pupil. Thus these students 
have been enabled to take a course of instruction in the School 
which they would have been unable to do without this financial 
aid. 

Through the influence of Mrs. Jones Wister, Professor Heilprin 
gave at the School a delightful lecture on Mt. Pelee for the benefit 
of the Auditorium Fund, and Mrs. Louis Ketterlinus, as Chairman 
of the Lecture Committee, turned into our treasury at the March 
meeting over 1200 as the result. 

Much is being done by the Committee in the interest of the 
students, many of whom are far from their homes, and the club 
rooms fitted up in the basement and adorned artistically by them 
are the scene of much innocent recreation and refreshment. 

The Students' Lunch Club has been an entire success through 
the winter, and absolutely self-supporting. 

In February, Mrs. W. W. Gibbs kindly gave the students a 
dance in the Auditorium, which was decorated for the occasion 
and the affair was a most enjoyable one. 

The Committee for some time has felt that a large and com- 
fortable boarding house nbould be obtained and used in connection 
with our work, as each year it becomes harder for a student to find 
a cheap, and at the same time refined, place in which to lodge. 
Perhaps some kind friend in the great unknown public may feel 
inspired to stretch out a helping hand and give the committee 
a financial start to make such a scheme possible. 

This outline of the work of the Associate Committee is respect- 
fully submitted by its Secretary, 

ALEXINA L. DALLAM. 
Jdne 13, 1904. 



Digilzed by Google 



ELLEN McMI;RTBIE,TEEASIBEB,IX A(<(HKT WITH ASSOCIATE 

IX)MMITTEE OF WOMEN, PENNSYLVANIA MISEUM 

AND W^HOOL OF INDISTEIAL AKT. 

RscEirR<L 

OcL, 1903. To (uh, Sabauriplioiu Received, t^i 00 

Jmo., 1904. " -' Bilancee from 1903, ... 72 4« 

'■ '■ In Eme^nc; Fund, . . 1,076 73 

" " In Special Fund, . 170 00 

" -' lu Biiilding Fund 664 83 

'- " Id Auditorium FuodB, . . 1,100 00 

" " Subacriptioiu Kec«ivecl, 86 00 
" " FiDesforNon-AltendanceiiMeet- 

ing» 9 75 

'A Friend of Mrs. Gillespie,' . 50 00 

" " MisH BlaDcbard for Boilera, 300 00 
" " Interest on Depoitita, ... 29 91 
" " Proceedi Lecture tor Auditorium, 200 00 
" " Collected by Mrs. Hippie tor Pot- 
tery bailding 3,000 00 

" " Sobecriptions for Running £x- 

penxee of Pottery, . . 1,085 00 
" ■' Froin Tuition Fee. of Pottery 

Studenti, 66 00 

18,163 68 

ExrEKDITCREH. 

By itab, Subecriptions forwarded to Treae- 

nrer, 1276 OO 

" " Printing, Postage, etc., 11 25 

" " Subscriptions forwarded in Treaa- 



urer, 




85 00 


Donation to Boiler Fund, . 


1,390 74 


PriK* from AsBociate ( 




M 00 


Eipenaes of Pottery 


Building, 




Mortar, 


SIO 00 




" Roof to Kiln 






BuildiuK, 


T9 40 




■' City Building 






Permits, 


300 


92 40 


InMructor'a Salarv, 


377 00 




Potter's Wheel and 






Eiprewage, . 


m 25 




Clay and Eipreaeage, . 


26 00 




Color*, Oil, etc., . 


66 24 




Tooh, Stamps, etc., 


9 11 




Seger'flCollectedWrit- 






inps ... 


15 00 


501 60 
$2,406 99 


Balance, 




. 5,767 69 



J, Google 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



LIST OF PATRONS, LIFE MEMBERS, 
ANNUAL AND HONORARY MEMBERS. 



P«nons who may wish lo become members kk invited to iieiid thmr Damei 
and tiddreMea to the Secretarj. Blank fonDB of DeviK and Bequert will be 
fouod on laat page. A check to the order of the Treasurer wilt be proniptiv 
acknowledfted, 

Patrons, Donors of Five Thousand Dollars and upward, 

whether in money or objects for the Museum. 
. One Hundred DolUre. 

. A subscription of not less than Five Dollars. 
. Those who, on account of their interest in In- 
dustrial Art Education or the Fine Arta, shall 
be deemed worthy of election. 
"All funds received from Patrons (unless otherwise specifically given) and 
from Life Membership shall be permanently invested as part of the Endowment 
Fund."— Bji-Lni-. 



Life Membership, . . 
Annual Membership, 
Honorary Membership, 



•Baird, John 
*Barton, Mrs. Susan R. 

Blanchard, Miss Anna 
*BloomBetd-Moore, Mrs. 
■Childs, George W. 

Disston, Henry tVi Sons 
•Dreiel, A.J. 
•Draiel, F. A. 
•Garrett. W. E., Jr. 
•Gibson, Henry C. 
•Houston, H. H. 



Jenks, John Story 

Lea, Henry C. 
•Lippincoil, Mrs. J. Dundas 

Morris, John T. 

Search, Theodore C. 
*3cott, Mrs. Thomas A. 
•Temple, Joseph E, 

Weightman, William 

Whitney, A. & Sons 

Wister, Mra. Jones 



Di.itradb, Google 



LIFE MEMBEK8. 



Allen, Joseph 

Allen, Joseph, Jr. 
•Arnold, Crawford 

Baeder, AdamMn & Co. 
•Baily, Joel J. 

Bairr], Mf«. Mfttlliew 
*Baker, JohnR. 
•Baker, W. S. 

Bat«l«r, K D. 

Bardajr, Mra. it D. 
•Bariol, B. H. 

Bartol, H. W. 

Baugb, Daniel 
'Bickley, n. W. 

Bickley, Mrs. U. W. 
*Biddl», Aleiaoder 

Biddle, Misa Annie E. 
■Biddl«, Chapman 
*Biddle, Mn. Chapman 
•Biddle, Clement 
•Biddle, Waller L. C. 

Blanehard, MiM A. 

Blanchard, Min H. 

Blanchard, Mies M. 
•Bone, C. & H. 
•Bowen & Foi 
•Brown, Alexander 

Buraham, George 

Bumham, Parry, WilliamB A Co. 

Buteher, Henry C. 

Butcher, Mra. H. C 

Button, Conyera 
•Caldwell, J. E. 

Caldwell, J. K & Co. 

Campbell, Mrs. St. Geoi^ T. 
•Carter, W. T. 

Carver, W. Barton 

Casmlt, A. J. 
•Catherwood, H. W. 
•Chapman, Joseph 
•Chew, Samuel 
•Claghorn, James L. 

Claghorn, J. Raymond 

Clark, Charles D. 

Clark, Clarence H. 



•Clark, Hphraim 
•Clark, E. W. 
'dark, J. Hinckley 
•Clayton, John 

Clothier, Isaac U. 
•Clyde, Thomaa 
•('(«teB, Benjamin 

CoBicH, t^lward H. 

Cochran, M, 
•Cochran, Thoma.- 

CoSd, Altemus A Co. 

Coleman, Mrs. B. Dawson 
•Coleman, Mrs. U. Dawson 

Coleman, Edward P. 

Colee, Miss Mary 

Colkel, C. Howard 

Collins. H. H. 

Cooper, John H. 

•Cope, Caleb 

Cornel ins & ^ons 

Cose, Ecklev B., Jr. 
•Cresson, W.'p. 

Croser, Geoi^ K. 

CroMr, Mrs. George K. 
•Croier, J. Lewis 
•Cuyler, Mrs. Theodore 
•Dick, F. A. 
•DIuton, Albert H. 
•Disston, Hamilton 
•Disaton, Mra. H. C. 
•Dobbins, R. J. 

Dobson, John & James 

Dolan, Thomas 

Dotan, Thomis A Co. 

Dougherty, Jani«fl 
•Dreer, F. J. 

Dub ring, Mrs. Henry 

Eddyslone Manufacturing Co, 
•Faries, Mrs. Randolph 
•Fen i more. Edward L. 
•Field, Mra. Eliia W. 
•Foi, Miss Mary D. 

Furbush, Slerrili A, 
•Fuguet, Stephen O. 



Digitized by G(Xlg[e 



*Garrett, Mias Eliiabeth 
Garrett, Mjsa Julia 
Garretl, P. C. 
Garrett, Mra. Walter 
Gibson, Miss Rebecca 
*Gowe[i, Franklin B. 
"Graff, Frederic 
•Graff, Mrs. Frederic 
Green, Stephen 
Ha^toz & Thorpe 
Harrison, A. C. 
Harrison, Havemever & Co- 
Harrison, Mrs. Joseph 
Harrison, Thomas 8. 
•Hart Samuel 
Haiipt, Mrs. Wm. K. 
•Heberton, G. Craig 
Henszev, Mrs. Wm. P. 
Hill, G^rge W. 
'Hockley, Miss Annie E. 
Hockley, Mrs. John 
Hockley, Miss Mary 
"Hockley, Tbonias 
Hockley, Mrs. Thomas 
•Hockley, Wiiliam Stevenson 
•Hoistmann, F. O. 
Horstmann, W. H. &Sons 
Houston, Mrs. H. H. 
•Hughes, John O. 
Hunter, James & John 
luDgerich & Smith 
•James, John O. 
Jayne, David & Sons 
•Jones, Jacob 
Jones, Washington 
Justice, Bateman & Co. 
Vustice, Miss Cecilia 
Justice, William W. 
Justice, Mrs. William W. 
Klemm, Mrs. Maria L. 
•Knighl, Edward C. 
•Lea, Isaac 

I.ee, Mra. Leighlon 
•Lewis, Edirin M. 
•Lewis, Henry 
Lewis, Miss Mary 



Lewis, Richard A. 

Lewis, Misa Sarah 

Little, Amos R. 

Liltle, Amoa R A Co. 
•Love ring, Joseph S. 
•Levering, Joseph S., Jr. 

McKean, Mrs. Thomas 

McNeelv, Misa Florence 

McXeely, Robert K. 

McNeely. Mra, Robert K. 

MacVeagh, Wayne 

Magee, ^[iss Fannie S. 
•Massey, William 

May, Mrs. Joseph 

Mdrs, Mrs. R. Wain 
•Merrick, Miss £. H. 

Merrick, J. Vanghan 
•Merrick, Miss L. W. 
•Merrick, Mrs. S. V. 

Merrick, William H. 

Miles, Mrs. M. L. 

Miles, Thomas 

Milne, David 
•Milliken, James 

Moore, Clarence B. 
•Moore, James 

Morris, Miss Lydia T. 
•Morris, P. Pemberton 
•Morris, Wislar 
•Murphy, Frank W. 
•Murphy, Miss Helen L. 
•Newbold, Charles 
•Newbold, John 8. 

Newbold, Mrs. John S. 
•Nohlit, Dell 

Norris, Charles 

Norris, Isaac, M.D. 
•Page, Joseph F. 
•Patterson, Joseph 

Pell, Rev. Airred Duane 
•Pepper, George S. 
*Pepper, Lawrence S. 
•Pepper, William, M.D. 

Pepper, William Piatt 
•Phillips, Henry M. 
•Phillips, Moro 



OMzcdoyGoOglC 



PlatI, Charles 
•Plait, Fmoklin 

Porter .S Coates 
•PoallDey, Charlee W. 
•Powers, Mrs. Thoma* H. 

Price, Eli K. 

Provident Life and Trust Co. 
*Rajidolph, Evan 

fiandolph, Mrs. Evan 

Randolph t<i Jenka 
*Rh<iad9, Misa Klizabelh 
'Roberts, Charles 

Roberts, Mrs. Charles 
'Roberts. Jacob, M.D. 
•Rogers, C. H. 
•Rogers, Fainuan 
•Rogers, W. P. 

San tee, Charles 

Scolt, Edgar 

Scotl, James P. 
•Scott, Mrs. James P. 

Scull, D. & Co. 
•Sejbort, Henrv 

Sellers, Coleman 

Sellere, William 
•Sbarpless, Charles S. 
•She I too, Carlos 

Shelton, F. H. 
•Shelton, Frederick R. 
•Shelton, Mrs. F. R. 
•Sherman, Roger 

ShoKridge. N. Parker 
•Smith, Charles E. 
•Smith, Thomas 
•Smyth, Lindlej 
■Solms, S. J. 
•Sommerville, Maxwell 



■Spencer, Charles 
•Steel, Edward T. 

Sieel, K. T. A Co. 

Stevenson, Mrs. Cornelius 

Straw bridge, J. C. 

Sweatman, V. C. 

Taitt, Mrs. C. G. 
•Temple, Joseph E. 
■Thomas, 8. Harvey 

Thropp, Mrs. Joseph E. 

Townsend, Mrs. H. C. 

Turner, Mrs. Charles P. 
•Tyler, George F. 
•Vaux, William S. 
•Vollmer, Gottlieb 

Wsgner, Samuel 
•Wagner, Mrs. T. 
•Warden, W. G. 
•Warner, Redwood F. 
•Welsh, Sam Del 
•Wemwag, Theodore 

Wetherill, Samuel Price 

Wharton, Joseph 
•Wheeler, C'harles 

Wbiull, Tatnm & Co. 
•White, Samuel S. 

Whitney, Miss Margaretta V. 
•Williams, Edward H. 

Wister, Mrs. Jones 

Wood, Stuart 
Wood, William 
Wood, William ft Co. 
•Wright, Edward N. 
•Wright, James \. 
•Wright, John W. 
WurU, Charles Stewart, M.D. 



Digilzed by Google 



ASNUAL MEMBERP. 

SUBSCRIPTION, J25.00 
Turoer, Mrs. Charles P. 

SUBSCRIPTIOS, 120.00 
Gntz, Mi«3 Eliubeth. 



SUBSCRIPTION, tl5M 
Aiman, Kichard H. 
WiUbank, Mre. W. W. 



SUBSCRIPTION, flO.ftO 



Bail}-, Joshua L. 
B«meDt, (-'larence S. 
Biazier, Joseph H. 
Bromlev, Joaeph H. 
Brown, Mim Muthft M. 
Brown, T, Wistar 
Burn ham, William 
Burnham, Mrg. William 
Cadwalail«r, Mrs. John 
Caldwell, J. E. & Co. 
(^tner, Samuel, Jr. 
Chandler, T. P. 
Clapp, B. Frank 
Clark, Miaa F. 
Clyde, Miss Mar^ret 
Cochran, Travis 
Cochran, Mrs. Travis 
Coles, £dward 
Converse, John H. 
Coie, Alexander B. 
Crozer, Miss Ada M. 
•Dale, Kicliard C. 
Dallam, Mrs. David E. 
Denniston, Mrs. E, K 
Dickson, Samuel 
Elkins, Mrs. William L 
Ellison, Mrs. Rodman B. 



Fellor 



;. M. 



Galloway, William 



Getchell, Mra. Frank H. 
Gillingham, J. E. 
Graft; Miss Henrietta 
Hamilton, W. C. 
Harris, Mrs. J. Camphell 
HaTrison, Mrs. Joseph 
Hippie, Frank K. 
Hippie, Mrs. Frank E. 
Hunter, T. Comly 
Hutchinson, Miss Margaretta 
Jack, Dr. I<iub 
Janney, Mrs. Kobert M. 
Jayne, Mrs. David 
Jayne, Dr. Horace 
Jenks, Mrs. William F. 
Jones, Edward Rumell 
Justice, William W. 
Justice, Mrs. William W. 
Keen, Dr. W, W. 
Keith, Sidney W. 
Kennedy, Mrs. Elias D. 
Ketterlinas, J. L. 
Ketlerlinus, Mrs. J. L> 
Lea, Miss Nina 
Lippincott, Mrs. Horace G. 
Lovering, Mrs. J. 8. 
Magee, Miss Anna 
Magee, Miss Eliza J. 
Magee, Horace 



Di.itradb, Google 



65 



SVHSCBIPTIO. 
^tcMunrie, Miu Ellen 
Miller, Jacob Son* A Co. 
-Moulton. Mrt. Byron P. 
Keall, Frank L. 
Newhall, George M. 
Ogden, Mra. Edwftrd H. 
Paul, Dr. James 
Paul. MissM. W. 
Pepper, David 
Stuidolpfa, Mrs. Eraa 
Reilt;, Mrs. Thoa Aleianiter 
Ritchie, Craig D. 
Roberta, Mias Eliubelh ('. 
Roberts, Miu Francea \. 
Roberts, Mra. Oeotge B. 
Roberto, Mrs. Thomsa 
Rodman, Mrs. l^wis 



.V, tlO.OO ((Wtn«<rfi, 
RonenKarten, Miaa Fann; 
Rnaengarten, J. (t. 
Sinnoit, Joseph P. 
Sinnott, Mm. Joseph F. 
Smith, Mrs. Christians R 
Smith. Edward B. 
Smvth, MIsa Helen 
StciBon, Mra. John B. 
Thomson, Mra. J. E<lK»r 
■WeiKhtmao, Mra John F. ( .\ubrey H. 

Weight man, Eiecutor) 
Welah, John I^wber 
Welsh, Mra. John Lowber 
Weygandt, C. S. 
Wheeler, Mn. Charles 
Wister, Mr*. John 
Wood, Miss Juliana 



.Vndrews, Mra. Wm. II. EI. 
Austin, Richard L. 
Barber, Edwin AtLee 
Bartol, Mrs. C. Cheyiiey 
Bergner, Mra ('. W. 
Blakiston, Miaa Rmnia 
Blanchard, Miss Anna 
Blankenbiirg, Mra. Rudolph 
Brinton, Mrs. John H. 
Caldwell, Miss Florence F. 
Carter, Mra William T. 
Clark, Miss Amie Hampton 
Clark, Mra. Clarence H., Jr 
Clark, Mrs. C. Howard. Jr. 
Colket, George H. 
Collon, 8. W., Jr. 
Corliea, Mies M. L. 
CresBwell, MissE, P. 
('roier, Samuel A. 
•t^rtin, Mrs. Roland G, 
Dana, Charles E. 
Dana, Mra Uliarles E. 
Davis, Mra Edward P. 
Davis, Edward T. 



•RIPTrOK, KM 

Day, Frank Miles 

De Haven, Mrv. Holilein 

Dick, Mra Wm. A. 

D'Invilliers, Charles £. 

Fiissel, (.'harlea 

Erben, Misa Helen 

Pels, Maurice 

Pels, Samuel R 

Freeman, Mra. C. K. 

Frishmiith, Mrs. J. C. W. 

Frishmnlh, Mrs. W. D. 

Oaley, W. T. 

Geat, Mra W. P. 

Gibba, Mrs. William Warrei 

Gihson, Alfred C, 

Gibson, Miss M. K. 

Graff, Charles P. 

G^an^ Mra William S., Jr. 

(iucker, Frank T. 

Hale, H. Warren K. 

Harrison, George L. 

Harrison, John 

Harrison, Mrs. John 

Henry, Mrs. Charles W, 



Di.itradb, Google 



SUBSCRIPTION, $5.00 {OrnHnutd). 



Hickman, Louis C 
Howell, Mrs. Chirlca H. 
Howell, Cooper 
Howell, Edward I. H. 
Jacobs, Mrs. Edward B. 
Jastrow, Mrs. Morris, Jr. 
Jenks, William H. 
Logan, Mrs. John P. 
Mason, Edward F. 
McFadden, Mrs. George 
Mcllhennj, Misa Selina B 
Miller, Leslie W. 
Mitchell, Mis. Sara P. S. 
Morwitz, Joseph 
Newhall, Mrs. Daniel S. 
Newport, Mrs, Willi 
Horton, Mrs. Charles D. 
Park, Mrs. Richard G. 
Pepper, Mrs. John W. 
Peters, Mrs. Richard 
Ramboi^r, William K. 
Randolph, Miss Anna 
Richardson, Thomas D. 



C. 



Risley, Dr. Samuel D. 
Rumpp, H. C. 
Sanders, Miaa Anne N. 
Scattergood, Thomaa 
SchHffhRover, Mre. Charles 
Schell, John W. 
Sellers, John, Jr. 
Simpson, Mrs. William, Jr. 
Stambacii, S. P. 
Slout, Eibridge G. 
Swain, Mrs. C. M. 
Walker, Mrs. R. J. a 
Weigbtman, Misa Bertha a 
Whitne;, W. Beaumont 
- Williams, Ellis D. 
Wilson. James L. 
Wing, Asa S. 

Winpenny, Mrs. J. Bollon 
Wister, Mrs. Alexander 
Wright, Miss Helen J. 
Wright, Joseph 
Zell, Miss Hannah A. 
Zimmerman, Dr. M. W. 



HOSORARY MEMBERS. 
Atwood, Eugene, Atwood Machine Co., StoningLon, Conn. 
Berry, A. Han, Boston, Mass. 
Bojd, James, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brown, Edwin, American Cord Clothing Co., Worcester, Mass. 
Bumbnm, Charles C, Easton & Bumhaai, Pawtucket, B. L 
Biimham, George W., EsstOD & Bumham, Pawlucket, R. I. 
Campbell, Malcolm, Woonsocket Machine and Press Co., Woonsocket, R. I. 
Cochran, J. C, Charlottesville, ManuracturingCo., Charlottesville, Va, 
Comins, Frank B., Aerophore Air-MoisLening A Ventilating Co., Providence, 

R. L 
Cromp'ton, Charles, Crompton and Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Denny, Charles A., American Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Mass. 
Draper, iieo. A., Hopedale, Mass. 

Easton, Frederic W., Easton & Bumbniu, Pawtucket, R. T. 
Easton, Nicholas H., Easton & Bumliam, Pawtucket, R. I. 
Fales, Le Roy, Fales & Jenks Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. t. 
Firlh, Willutm, American Droeophore Co., Boston, Mass. 
•Fletcher, George A., Schaum & Uhlioger (Fletcher Works), Philadelphia, Pa. 
Furbush, Merrill A., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Grice, Edwin C, Philadelphia Textile Machinery Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Digilzed by Google 



67 

CJrinoeU, Frederic, Aeropbore Air-Moiiilei>iDg & VeDtilatingCo., ProTidenoe, 

B. I. 
Hale, F. J., Saco and Petlee Macbine Works, Newton Upper P&lla. Mam. 
Hartwell, F. W., Aeropbore Air-Moisteaiag A VentiUtiog Co.. Proridence, 

R I. 
Bildreth, Cbarlet L., Low«l] Machiofl Shop, Lowell, Ma«a. 
Uopkiiu, William a, Wooiuochet Machine & Frew Co., WooMocket, R. I. 
Hulchine, C. H., Cromptoa and Knowle* Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Hnlchins, G. F., Cromptou and Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Jenka, AWin P., Fales & Jenks Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. 1. 
Jenkt, Stephen A., File* A Jenks Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. L 
Knowles, F. P., Croiupton and Knowles Loon Works, Worcester, Ma8i> 
KnowUon, Charles H., Philadelphia, I'l. 
Lasell, C. W., Whitin Machine Co., Whitinsville, Usss. 
Lasell, J. M., Whitin Machine Co., Whltinsrille, Mass. 
Haynard, Lorenzo, Majnard, Mass. 

Merriani, H. H., Crompton and Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Munlock, Joseph, American Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Msss. 
Nevins, Darid, Saco and Pett«e Machine Works, Newton Upper Falls, Mass. 
Bometsch, W. H., Schaum & UlilinKCr (Fletcher Works), Philadelphia, Pa. 
Biusell, J. U., Cromptoa and Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 
Saif^eot, a U., Graniteville, Moss. 

Schaum, Otto W., Schaum & Ufalinger (Fletcher Works), Philadelphia, Pa. 
Smith, Cheater B., Woonsocket Machine & Press Co., Wooosocket, R. 1. 
Smith, Suuilef U., Woonsocket Machine A Press Co., Woonsocket, R. J. 
Snelling, R. P., Saco and Pettee Macbine Works, Newton Upper Falls, Mass. 
Tatt, C. A., Whitin Machine Co., Wbitinsville, Mass. 
Taft, W. L., Whitin Machine Co., Wbitinsville, Mass. 
White, H. Arthar, American Card Clothing Co., Worcealer, Mass. 
Ware, Justin A., Worcester, Mass. 

Whitin, G. M., Whitin Machine fa, Whitinsville, Mass. 
Wvman, Horace, Crompton and Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass. 



Digilzed by Google 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



I give and bequeath unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School 

of Industrial Art the sum of 

dollars, for the use of the said Corporation. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE. 



I give and devise unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School of 
Industrial Art, its successors and assigns, all that certain [here insert a 
description of the property] for the use of the said Corporation, 



Digitized by Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



THE LATE RICHARD R05SMAS5LER. 

Trustee of the Peunsylvaria Museum and Sclioul of Industrial An. 

Died April 2.% 190.i. 



Digilzed by Google 



THE TWENTY-NINTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 

TRUSTEES 

LIST OF MEMBERS 

For the Year ending May 31, 1905. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
■90S- 



D„tiidD,Google 



OFFICERS FOR 1905— 1906. 



THEODORE C. SEARCH. 



WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER, JOHN STORY JENKS. 



SECBETARV, 

EDWIN ATLEE BARBER. 



WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER. 



JAMES L. ALLAN, 

s:l« DTCiel Bull ding. 



FRANKLIN SI'KNCEK KDMONIK, E«i. 



Digilzed by Google 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



EX-OPPICIIS. 
HON. SAMUKL W. PEXXYPACKKK. ]1(IN. JOHN WKAVKK. 



BY APPOINTMENT. 
Jaheh Bi-'TTKBWoRTii, Appointtd hf lAe Sale Smalt. 
IIarbimotuk Fit»<erild, AppoinlM Ay Ike Hntut of Repraifntatimi. 
Charles IT. Hardino, Appointed by Seltel CouikU. 
John G. Carrlth, Appointed byGommim Chimeil. 
SAMrni. GinTiSF Thompros, Appnitilad by the OmwHwiiuxni of l-airmouiil Pail.: 



Charles E. Daka, 
Thouas Dolan, 



ELECTED BY THE MEMBERS. 

To "f rw for tiiTtt gtar». 

William Pla 
C. N. Weyga[ 



Mrs. Jiihn H. 



John Storv Je; 
JoHS T. MottRif 
i. C Seabih. 



Uborme II. Clif>'. 
Isaac H. Clothier, 

Mr.". Ei.\ 



Digilzed by Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

(For th«lr Btport hi p>|« 61) 



MKS. .lOHX HARRISON. 



MBS. FRANK K. HIPPI-E. 



Mrs. e. C. Babtol, 
MRfi. C. WiLUAM Bewiseb, 
Mias Anna Blanchard, 
Mrs. Rudolph Blankcnbur 
Mrs. John H. Brinton, 
Mbh. WrLLiAH T. Carter, 
MiNS Haroaret Clyiik, 
Mias MABaARGT I.. Cori-ies, 
MiHx Ada M. Cbozeb, 
Mrs. Edwari) P. Davis, 
Mrs. Rodman B. Eli.isos, 
Mtee Cornelia L. Ewinh, 
Mrs. Wm. D. Frishmutii, 
Mrs. W. W. Gibbs, 
Mrs. Joseph Harbison, 



MISS ELLEN Mi-ML'HTRIE. 



Mrs. J, L. KErrERLisi-s. 
MisfiNi^JA Lea, 

;, Miss Fannib S- MAnse, 

Mrs. Francis F. Milme, 
Mrs. S. p. S. Mitchell. 
Mrs. Daniel S. Newhall, 
Mrs. Edward El, Oudek, 
Mrs. Richard rKTER-'>. Jr., 
Miss Elixabcth C. Roberts, 
Mrs. Thomas Koberi?, 
Mrs. Joseph F- Sinnott, 
Mrs. John Wister, 
Mrs. Jones Wibter, 
Mrs. (tEoroe Wood, 

Miss H. A. Zell. 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



Mbs. Hampton L. Carson 
Miss Elizabeth Gratz, 
Mr.". Samuel W. Pennvp, 



Digiized by Google 



COMMITTEES FOR 1905—1906. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

TheoimjreC. Search, Chairman ; Jameji Butterworth, JoHNG.CARRfTii, 

John H. Converse, Charles E. Dana, Charles H. Uardiko, Johk Storv 

Jenks, Alfred C. Lamedis, M.D., John T. Morri?, William Platt Pefpkb, 

C. N. WEYtiASDT, William Wood. George JI. Cliff, ex officio. 

STANDING COMMITTEES.* 
ART. 



;, M.D., JoiikT. Morris, 
Wii 

Repretejilinii the Aitoeiate Commitlte nj Women : 
Mias Anha Bla»:hard, Mrs. William T. Carter, Mrs, William D. 
Prishhuth, MissPas'nibS. Magee, Mi^ Eluabrtii C. Roberts. Mrs. John 
Harri!ion, ex officio. 

JXSTRUCTION. 

TiiEOi>ORB C. Search, Chairman ; Rorert C H. Brm^k, Georoe II, Cliff, 

Isaac H. Clothier, John H. Converse, Charleh E. Daka, Charle^; H. 

Haruino, Johd Story Jenks, Alfred C. Lambmn, M.D., William Platt 

Pepper, C. S. Wetgandt, William Wooi>. 

RtpreKcMing tht Asiocinit Cnrnmiltee of Wovkh : 
Mrs. Frank K. IIipple. Mrb. Thomas Roberts, Mrs. Joseph F. Sinsott, 
Mrs. John Wister, Mrs. Joses Wisteh. Mrs. John Harbison, er officio. 



I.'. N. Wev(iandt, Ck'ilimii 
Jons Stort Jenks, Williai 



FISAXCK. 
Isaac H. Cloti 



Digilzed by Google 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM. 



William Platt I'kpper, /»„Yrt.., of the .I/u*-m<i. 
Ei>n-is AtI.kk Barber, i'mahir. 
Mary H. Shafpneh, Amttanl. 
Elisabeth Dawso}(, Li6piiri'in. 

DEPARTMENT OF Nl'MlSMATKS. 

F. U. LasuesheIM, »™>r.iry OiiiUw. 

DEPARTMENT OF TEXTILES. LACE AND EMBEOinERY. 
Mrs. John IIarrihciN, Hoaortiry Ciiralor. 

DEPARTME.\T OF (K)LnsMITH WORK, JEWELRY AND PLATE. 
Charles 0EDKEV Kiso, Iloaonirg Camior. 

DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL POTTERY. 

Mrs, Joxd WiSTER, Ihnomry Carator. 

DEPARTMENT OF EUROPEAN PORCELAIN. 
Rbv. Alfred Dvasb Pbli., H'laorari/ Caralor. 

DEPARTMENT OF AMERICAN POTTERY AND PORCELAIN. 
Edwik AtLke Barber, Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARMS AND ARMOR. 
Cornelius Stevenson, Honorary Cnroior. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 
Mrs. W. D. Frishmuth, ITonorarg Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF SC^ULPTURE, MARBLES AND CASTS. 
Alexander Stiklisg Cai.her, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF FURNITURE AND WOODWORK. 
GusTAV Krtterer, Honorary Curator, 

DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS, MANUSCRIPTS, BOOK PLATF>S AND 

HISTORIC SEAIaS. 

Charles E. Dana, Honorary Curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF I'HILATELY^. 
Edward Rcssei.l Jones, H.moniry Camtar. 



Digilzed by Google 



THE SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 

lupriset ID its organiialion the following Depirtmenis : 

DRAWimi. Pottery. 
Textile Debion AND ManI'Factvre. Metal- Work. 

Dbcohativb Paibtino. ARCHiTEcrrBAi. Dewos. 

CMEHiaTRy AUD DvEiKo. Ihteriob Dkcoratiou. 

Applied Deskin. Iixustration. 

Carviho and Wood-Work. Normal Art Instruction. 

Dbcobative ScrLPTCRC Modern Lan(iuaoB)>. 

STAFF. 

-t Department. 
E. W. France, Director of Textile DepaKment. 
Herhah Deioenpesch, Professor of Drawing. 

Bradley V. Alggo, AsHiitiant Director of Textile Department and Professor 
in Chai^ of Weave Formation, Analvals and Structure of Fabrics. 
lR, Instnictor in Charge of t>epartnient of Pottery. 
- ■ '- - ■ ™ ^of llluBlr--'-- 



SopiiiK B. Stbki,, Instructor in Charge of 

Ll'dwio el Faber, Instniclor in Drawing, lecturer on .\natomy anil Processes 
in Illustrative Reproduction. 

J. Mbrritt MATTHEWfi, Pn.D., Professor in Charge of Chemistry and Djeing. 

Jdhepb F. X, IIaroi-d, Ph.D., Inst nictor in Chemistry. 

.\lbert Behm, Laboratory Demonstrator and Instructor in fWeing. 

J. Frakk Copei.and, Instructor in Water-Color Painline and Applied Design. 

Cham. T. Scott, Instructor in Modelling and Stniciural Design. 

Richard S. Coi, Instructor in Jacquam Design and Color Work. 

IlEt.EN A. FoJi, Inslnictor in Color Ilarnioiiy, Historical Omamenl and Design 
Applied to Printed and Woven Fabrics. 

Frances Darby .Sweeny, tnstnictor in Design Applied lo Stained (ilai*. Sten- 
cils and Mosaic. 

Albert Jean AtH^LPHF., Inslnictor in Interior recoralion. 

Herbert (i. (,'oe, Instructor in Elementary ^Vcariug and Related Branches. 

Frederic Pfeiffer, Instructor in Charge of Advanced Weaving and Relaleil 
Branches. 

John Ixkkwood, Instructor in Charge of Wool Carding and Spinning. 

(iEOBOE W. Lefkerts, Instructor in Worsted Drawing and Spinning. 

F. M. Jennino?, Instructor in Wool (irading and Sorting. 

JoKErtI H. Sbiss, Instructor in Cotton Carding and Spinning. 

Edward T. Bodiu', Inslnictor in ArchilecturalDesign. 

A. M. Orillon, Instructor in French, Spanish and Mathematics. 

Mhk. A. M. 8oHMiDT-<iRiLi»K, Instructor in Oerman, 

Richard B. Doi^hhty, Instnictor in Instrumental Drawing. 

.'Vlfred Birhovhe, Instructor in Dry Finishing. 

Hksry Tobnites, InKtruclor in Wood Carving. 

Maby p. Dow, Inntnicti)r in Hisloric Ornament, Book- Binding, Tooling, and 
[.gather Work. 

IitARhXLE Bradley, Instructor in Drawing, in Charge of Junior Department. 

.\lbert W. Barker, Instructor in Drawing, in Charge of Teachers' Classes. 

C. WiiAHTOS Chcbchman, Instructor in Building Construction. 

Karl (i. Xaokf, InstmclDr in Meial-Work, Repouss^, Chasing, etc. 

Percy C. Miller, .Assistant to the Principal. 

Wm. F, Hkmis, Superintendent of Building. 

Leonora J. C. Boeck, Kegistrar. 

ABINE DeWitt Bkho, Librarian. 

1 M. Sacf, Secretary, Textile Department. 



itradb, Google 



EICHAHD KOSSMASBLEK. 

Since tlie publicatinn of llie previous Aiinuiil Koport, Richard 
Kossmiissler, a widely known manufacturer and for many years a 
Trustee of this institution, passed away at iiis liome in Phila- 
delphia. 

The establishment of the Textile Department in 1884 was the 
occasion of bringing the School to Mr. Rossmiissler's attention, and 
he at once manifested the greatest interest in its work and aims 
and became one of its moat generous supporters. Prom that time 
to the day of his death Mr. RoBsmiiesier remained one of tlie most 
loyal friends, as well as one of the most intelligent advisers, that 
the School has known. For personal reasons he felt compelled to 
decline to serve on the Committee on Instruction, but lie wnw none 
the less always ready to give advice, encouragement and assist- 
ance, especially to such portions of the work of the School as were 
most directly related to his own experience, and regarding which 
hiii judgment was therefore especially valuable. 

He was an admirable example of the capable and successful 
business man who does not allow the pressure of business duties, 
nor the accumulation of material prosperity, to stifle his interest 
in other things or to obscure the vision of his duty and privilege 
to serve that educational effort on which all progress so largely de- 
pends. 

At a recent meeting of the Executive Committee the following 
Memorial was adopted : 

"Mr. Kichanj RossniiiMler, a membrr uf tlie Boani ot Truetees of the 
PeDne;kania Muaeum aod School of Industrinl Art, died on April 25, 1905, 
beloved and honored by his ansociateii and co-worltere, who present the follow- 
ing Memorial : 

" By the death of Mr, Bossmiiseter this School has lost a most valued adviser 
and helper, one of the lev men whose sympathetic nature, artistic sentiment, 
rare judgment and desire to promote the common good, rendered his association 
with the School work especially fltting and helpful. 

"His numerous donations were made vithout osteninlion. lie clieerfulty 
co-operated in every effort to secure higher efficiency and gaie helpful en- 
courattement whenever burdens were to he borne, 

"The Board of Trustees of The Pennsylvania Musenm and SchcHil of In- 
dustrial Art unite in eipressing the sense of their great pervinal loss and of 
the high ealeem in which they hold the memory nf their Inte fellow-Member," 



oyGlH)g[c 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT. 

7b the Mcmbfrs of the Pi-nneylrania Mnveuvi and Srhml of Indtt--^n'nl 
Art. 

Your President has the honor to submit herewitii the reports of 
the Curator of the Museum, the Principal of the School, the Treas- 
urer of the Organization, and the Associate Committee of Women. 

These reports will all show that the year just closed has been 
one of great progress in all departments of the Oi^anization's 
work. 

The attendance in the various schools for 1904-1905 was equal 
to that of 1903-1904, which, up to that period, was the largest the 
School ever enjoyed. 

The personnel of the classes for the first-named time is perhaps 
in advance of those of former years in maturity and ability. The 
results obtained in all departments of school work have been most 
satisfactory. No exhibition of students' work in the Art Depart- 
ment has ever been made equal to the work of this year. 

The Furniture exhibit is more representative than any other 
ever made by this department. The success of one of our gradu- 
ates in connection with the fitting up of the Bel levue-Strat ford 
Hotel has given much additional impetus to this department and 
awakened an interest that argues well for future growth. 

The possibilities of the Pottery Department are strongly out- 
lined by the production of a large variety of objects which show 
the pecular power and ability of tlie School, and gives promise of 
a very large field of usefulness. 

The exhibition of Model-Work in wax and clay of hardware 
specialties for building purposes is well worthy of study as illus- 
trating the scope and possibilities of art training in this direction. 

The final results achieved by the graduating classes in the Tex- 
tile Department are exceedingly rich, and illustrate most forcibly 
the value of art training to the Textile interests. 

In this department of School work several new features have 
been added, none of which give greater promise than the attention 
now being given by the Chemical Department to the production 
of dyc-stiifis, many examples of which are shown this year for 
the first time. 



Digilzed by Google 



13 

The Museum, under the spocinl care of Dr. Edwin A. Hiirher, 
shows the most gratifying results. The report of the Curator is 
very interesting and emphasizes the fact that the Museum has 
gained a place among the foremost institutions of the world. Tiie 
work of the past year in classifying and rearranging the exhibits 
has greatly enhanced their value to the public. The withdrawal 
of imitation copies and forgeries of European and Oriental pot- 
tery and porcelain from the collections, and installing thc^e pieces 
in a separate case, marks one of the recent advances in methods 
employed. 

The labelling of the collections has resulted in weeding out re- 
productions and forgeries, and the interesting statement is made 
by the Curator that the Ceramic collection, as arranged, is now the 
moat representative in the country, and furnishes the best material 
for study now accessible to American students and collectors. 

The effort made last year to increase the membership, and, at 
the same time, doubling the annual fee, resulted in the withdrawal 
of a number of the old members, but the loss has been more than 
balanced by the new members enrolled. 

There should be, and doubtless will be, a continued effort to in- 
crease the membership, for not only does it augment the mem- 
bership fund and increase the interest of individuals in our work, 
but decidedly strengthens us in the estimation of kindred institu- 
tions elsewhere. 

A Museum that has gained a foremost place among the great 
Art Institutes of the country and of the world is certainly in po- 
sition to confer honor upon those who are enrolled among its sup- 
porters and members. 

The Museum publications continue to illustrate the strengtli 
and importance of the work. During the last year an illustrated 
handbook, The Grent fknlx oj' England and Some Otker;^, has been 
prepared by Charles K. Dana, one of the Honorary Curators, and 
published. 

A Manual •>/ MaHs of Avterlcan Pollers, by Dr. Barber, has also 
been published, at his own expenKc. Other manuals are in manu- 
script, awaiting funds to cover their issue. 

It is greatly to be hoped that during the coming year the 
Museum will be in possession of funds to supply the eases so 
badly needed to complete the classification and rearrangement. 
Every dollar placed in the Museum is yielding ample return 
under the present management. 



oy Google 



FINANCIAL. 

The report of the Treasurer shows that the usual deficit has 
again confronted jour Board of Trustees, and has been largety 
provided for by private subscription from friends of the Museum 
and School. 

That this deficit would occur was manifest a year ago. It was 
then believed the State legislature would increase the appropria- 
tion for the School's support. The Legislative Coraiaittees from 
Senate and House visited the School and carefully looked over 
the work and presented favorable reportii. Delegations from your 
Board visited Harrisburg and laid the matter before tlie Finance 
Committee. The result of this work was that a bill passed both 
branches of the Legislature, appropriating <125,000 toward the 
next two years' maintenance. The Governor, without giving any 
opportunity for a hearing, vetoed the entire increase providetl 
thereby, reducing the appropriation to $75,000, and placing us 
upon the same basis as we have hitherto occupied. This means 
that an additional sum of *12,500 per year will have to be sup- 
plied from sources other than those already provided for the 
maintenance of the School, while the loss of $25,000 to renew the 
power plant, which was also a part of the bill, renders it quite im- 
possible to make the badly needed improvements. Just what form 
of relief can be offered is not now apparent, and it is hoped that 
the incoming Board of Trustees will find some way of providing 
for the contingency. 

Respectfully submitted. 

THEODORE C. SEARCH, 

PreMdeitl. 



Digiized by Google 




GROUND PLAN OF MEMORIAL HALL. 



II. 



South Vestibule. VefaiclM, 

Models, etc. 
Rotunda. Porcelain, Models, 

West Gali^bv. Wihtacli Col- 
lection o( FaiDtingg. 

East Gallery. CeramiesOlass, 
Metal Work, Carvingn, 1,ac- 
quers. Furniture. 

West Corbidor. Wilstach Col- 
lection of Paintings. 

East Corridor. Bloomfield 
Moore Collections. 

Southwest Paviuos. Greek, 
Rornxn and Egyptian Antiqui- 

Sol'thea.st Pavilion. Hector 
Tyndale Memorial Collection. 
Dr. Francis W. Lewis Collec- 
tion. Oriental Pottery and 
Porceliun. 
I. Northeast Pavilion. Bloom- 
Geld Moore Collection of C 



KORTHWJKT Pavilion. Musical 
Inatnimenla. 

Coins and Medals. 

North V^ibule. Exhibition 
of Work ol Students of tht 
School of Industrial Art Con- 
nected with the Museum. 

The Mrs. W. D. Frishmnlh Col- 
lection of Colonial Relics, 

O, P, Q. Of 



R. Woi 



8 TOILI 



■ Bo, 



S. Meh'h Toilet Boom. 

T, U, V, W. American Pottery. 

X. Pompeian Views and Baird Cen- 
tennial Model. 

Y. North Corridor. Anns and 
Armor, iron Work, Photo, 
graphs, Prints and Lam bom 
Collection of Mexican Paint- 



oy Google 



REPORT ON THE MUSEUM. 

It should be gratifying to the friends of this Miieeum to learn 
that it has already gained a foremost place afnong the great art 
institutions of this country and of the civilized world. Its in- 
oreasing reputation as the storehouse of many valuable collections, 
some of which are unique, has attracted the attention of art lovers 
and connoisseurs in many parts of Europe, as well as throughout 
the United States. For some years past it has been the purpose 
of the Museum authorities to give particular prominence to Amer- 
ican art, while not neglecting the artistic progress of other coun- 
tries and of all times by the collection and exhibition of the best 
work procurable in all departments of human handicraft. During 
the past year the Museum has received visits from some of the 
foremost art experts and manufacturers of England and Germany, 
while others of equal eminence in the art world, in France and 
other parts of Europe, have advised the Curator of their intention 
of visiting the Museum before the close of the present year. The 
policy of illustrating the history and development of American 
art, by giving it the important place which it deserves, will be 
continued in the future. 



oy Google 



MAJOLICA TILE PANEL. 

Il;ilian, Probably Kiglilecntb Cenlury, 

l!i.iight with Income from Ihe Joseph E. Temple TriHt. 



Digilzed by Google 



WORK ACCOMPLISHED. 

The work of classification and re-arrangement lias been carried 
on unceasingly during the past year and the collections are now 
in better condition for study than they have been since the 
Museum was first opened to the public. Many new cases have 
been provided to accommodate the recent accessions, and the 
value of the collections has been greatly enhanced by the substi- 
tution of much good material for less desirable objects received in 
past years. The examples of silver have been cleaned and 
grouped tc^ether in separate cases. The arms and armor have 
been arranged together in wall cases in the North Corridor. The 
Rev. Alfred Duane Pell collection of European porcelains has 
been largely increased and now fills three large wall cases on the 
north side of the East Gallery. In the Northeast Pavilion a case 
has been filled with imitations, copies and forgeries of European 
and Oriental pottery and porcelain from the Bloomfield Moore 
collection, forming an instructive exhibit for purposes of compari- 
son and study. All of the examples of pewter ware from different 
countries have been gathered together in a large new case in the 
North Corridor, and the exhibit of work of the students of the 
School now occupies the entire space in the North Vestibule. Con- 
spicuous in this greatly improved display is a case of pottery de- 
signed and executed by the pupils of the new pottery department 
of the School. 

In most of the departments of the Museum there has been a 
marked improvement and growth. Through the efTorts of Mrs. 
William D. Frishmuth, the honorary curator, the collection of 
musical instruments has been greatly enlarged and re-classified, 
and now occupies the entire space in the Northwest Pavilion. 
Under the efficient supervision of Mrs. John Harrison the collec- 
tions of textiles, laces and embroideries have been re-arranged. 
Mr. Edward Russell Jones has been indefatigable in building up 
the collection of postage stamps, and witli the assistance of Prof. 
Charles E. Dana the collection of book-plates has grown to re- 
spectable proportions. 

LABELING THE COLLECTIONS. 

The re-labeling of the collections has progressed rapidly and 
several experts have assisted in the work of identifieation and at- 



oy Google 



1% 



Si .5 






H. 



J, Google 



tributioti. With the kind assistance of Mr. Frederick Ralhbone 
of London, England, the eminent Wedgwood authority, who in 
March of this year visited the Museum, the examples of old 
Wedgwood hnve been thoroughly re-arranged and accurately 
labeled. In the collection were discovered a number of unmarked 
pieces, which prove to have been made by some of Josiah Wedg- 
wood's best imitators, including Turner, Neale & Palmer, Adams, 
Spode and the Sevres factory. Home of these are fully equal in 
workmanship and material to the genuine productions of the 
great English potter, and are of even greater rarity. The Rev, 
Alfred Duane Pell, of New York City, the foremost authority in 
this country on old European porcelains, has, in his capacity of 
Honorary Curator of that department, rendered valuable aid in 



SAMPLE OF LABEL USED IN MUSEUM. 
Black Card willi Uold Lelt«ra, Showing Wooden Mount. 

weeding out reproductions and forgeries and correcting the labels 
of uncertain specimens. It is believed that the ceramic collections 
of this Museum, as now arranged, are the most representative in 
this country and furnish the best material for study which is ac- 
cessible to American students and collectors. 

The labels which have been adopted, after a careful study of the 
subject, combine the best features of those in use at other museums. 
They consist of black cards of various sizes, with rounded cor- 
ners and beveled gilt edges, printed in gold lettering. These are 
mounted on black blocks, resting in grooved headings, showing 
only a narrow edge of the black wood. The labels, while incon- 
spicuous, are exceedingly rich and the lettering is distinct. The 
subjoined illustration shows the separate wooden mount and a 
label Bs it appears when inserted in the groove. 



Digitized by GOOC^IC 



21 
MEMBEIISHIP. 

Since the appearance of the previous Annual Report a change 
in the By-Ijiws of the Corporation lias fixed the annual member- 
ship dues at $10, the result of which has been that some of the 
members have withdrawn their valued support. A sufficient 
number of new members, however, has been obtained to offset the 
loss of income from those who have resigned and the work of in- 
creasing the membership list is being actively prosecuted. In a 
city of the size of Philadelphia, it should be possible to secure a 
much larger subscribing membership, and all public-spirited citi- 
zens who ate in accord with the far-reaching educational work 
which is being accomplished by the Museum and School are cor- 
dially invited to lend their countenance and encouragement by 
the contribution of $10 a year. The Museum is largely depend- 
ent upon the income from this source to increase, install and main- 
tain its valuable art collections, the burden of which has been 
almost entirely borne heretofore by a few generous friends of the 
institution. 

ATTENDANCE. 

The number of visitors recorded during the year 1904 was 384,- 
321, a decrease from 1903 of 25,405, caused by the unusually large 
percentage of inclement days, particularly during the autumn and 
winter months. The same conditions seem to have prevailed at 
other museums throughout the countryj as their annual reports 
show a material falling off in attendance from the previous year. 
The average daily admissions were as follows: 

for each dsy in tlie vear, 1053 

For each w^k da;, 529 

For each Sunday, 42l)6 

The Sunday attendance aggregated nearly 76 per cent, of the 
total registration for the year. On Sunday, May 7, 1905, 18,320 
persons were admitted to the building. This was the largest at- 
tendance in any single day. 

THE MUSEUM BULLETIN. 

The January number of the BULLETIN inaugurated a new de- 
parture in museum literature. For two years this modest sheet 
had appeared at regular intervals of three months as the official 



OyGlH)C^|i. 






is: 



J, Google 



organ of the Museum, the purpose of which, us announced in the 
first number, was to bring the members of the Corporation into 
closer touch with the work of the Museum and to keep them ad- 
vised of its development and progress. The publication has been 
enlarged and the literarj- feature given greater prominence hy the 
introduction of illustrated papers of a popular nature by the Hon- 
orary Curators of the Museum staff and others whose interest has 
been enlisted in this work. The editors have been much encour- 
aged by the cordial manner in which their efforts to extend the 
educational influence of the Museum beyond the restricted circle 
of its local clientele have been received. The current news of the 
Museum and School will continue to be a prominent feature, 
while special articles, covering all departments of industrial art 
and illustrated by characteristic examples from the Museum's col- 
lections, will, it is hoped, appeal to the interest 'of the general 
public. The scope of the magazine will be enlarged from time to 
time, as the financial support accorded it may warrant. 

OTHER PUBLICATIONS. 

A handbook of The Great SeaU of England and Some Others, illus- 
trated hy eight full page plates, by Charles E, Dana, Honorary 
Curator of the Department of Prints, Manuscripts, Book Plates and 
Historic Seals, has been published since the appearance of the 
Twenty -Eighth Annual Report. 

Monographs on Tin Eanmeted Pitlteri/ (Maiolica, Delft and Stan- 
niferous Faience), and Sail Glaze Warev, by the Curator of the 
Museum, have been prepared and are now awaiting publication. 
Other handbooks of this series are in course of preparation. 

BUREAU OF IDENTIFICATION. 
During the past year a large number of people have availed 
themselves of the opportunity offered by the Museum to obtain 
reliable information relative to objects in their possession belong- 
ing to many branches of industrial art. This department of 
museum work has now become firmly established and has gained 
for the Museum much publicity. Requests for information have 
been received from many distant points and scarcely a week has 
passed without bringing a number of inquiries regarding doubtful 
specimens. Several hundred objects have been fully identified 
for their owners, amongst which not a few have proved to be of 



oy Google 



MODERN PEWTER VASE OR POKAL. 
Ily Anton Sclireiner, Nabbur^, Bavaria, rurchased at the Chicago Elpusiti 

1893. 
(Cut useil liy Ooiirlesy of the I'lMxahen iiS H'-v-f and Oatiltn.) 



J, Google 



26 

the greatest rarity. Among the things submitted for an opinion 
have been examples of old Sevres porcelain ; Anglo-American pot- 
tery, of which many have proved to be recent forgeries; pieces of 
Philadelphia hard paste porcelain made by William KlHs Tucker ; 
eo-called "I^westoft" china, which in the majority of instances 
has turned out to be of Chinese workmanship ; old American glass- 
ware ; European and Oriental lacquer ; Bnttersea and Limoges 
enamels, and specimens of Meissen, Wedgwood, lustre and Ori- 
ental ceramic wares, genuine and spurious. For the present, in- 
formation will continue to be furnished without charge, but when 
articles are sent by express the owners will be expected to pay the 
expenses of transportation. 

PRESSING NEEDS OF THE MUSEl'M. 

Nothing extends the influence of a Museum so widely, or con- 
tributes so much to its reputation, as the publication of handbooks 
or text-books, which shall be generally accepted as authoritative 
contributions to the literature of art. The printing of such mono- 
graphs, on subjects not hitherto treated to the satisfaction of the 
average student or collector, is the surest and quickest way to at- 
tain a high place among the progressive Museums of the world. 

Several catalogues and brochures, prepared last year, still re- 
main in manuscript, and a manunl on Marks of American Potters, 
containing much new material relating to early American ceramic 
wares, which was announced in the previous Annual Report, has 
since been published at the Curator's personal expense. Several 
other important works on special subjects, based on the collections 
in the Museum, have since been completed. Before these can be 
printed, however, it is necessary to raise an adequate publication 
fund. The opportunity is here presented to those who have the 
interests of the Klusenm at heart to furnish the amount required 
for this purpose. The Museum at present has no greater need. 

In Inst year's report attention was calleil to the pressing need of 
new wall cases in the East Gallery, to permit the carrying out of 
long-cherished plans for the more effective arrangement of the 
collections of ceramics, carvings, metal-work, enamels, glass and 
furniture. The latter is one of the most valuable public collec- 
tions of the kind in this country, but the inadequate space, which, 
under existing conditions, is available for it, has prevented its 
proper installation. The furniture of all countries and periods is 



oy Google 



26 

now crowded together on narrow platforms at each side of the 
tlallery, while the central space is entirely occupied by clumsy 
floor-caseB which are unsuitable for the effective display of the 
other coUectiona. By erecting new cases of the moBt approved 
design around the entire wall space, for the accommodation of the 
collections mentioned, the central floor space of the apartment 
could he 6tted up with appropriate booths for the geographical 
and chronological arrangement of the furniture. By making these 
changes the installation of the Siamese temple and Japanese 
house, which for many years have been stored in the basement, 
would be made possible. It is believed that an expenditure of 
85000 for cases would be sufHcient to permit these plans to be car- 
ried out. There is, however, at present no available fund that can 
be appropriated for this purpose, and the Museum is dependent 
on the generosity of its friends for raising the sum required. 

Each year the need of a restaurant for the accommodation of 
visitors becomes more urgent. The large basement is now de- 
voted to storage purposes. With a comparatively small outlay a 
portion of the unused space could be utilized for a caf4 where 
visitors who desire to spend the day at the Museum could procure 
a light repast. 

ACCESSIONS TO THE MUSEUM. 

Among the more important acquisitions of the past year are the 
following ; 

Pottery, porcelain, glass, metal-work and musical instruments, 
Oriental and European, purchased at the St. Louie Exposition out 
of the income from the Joseph E. Temple fund ; the Ozeas, Ram- 
borger and Keehml^ collections of jewelry, miniatures and antique 
costumes; the James Dundas Lippincott and Agnes Dundas Lip- 
pincott collections of statuary and ceramics; the Samuel H.Austin 
collection of arms and armor, and the collection of Phoenician glass 
deposited by Mrs. Samuel H. Austin ; European porcelains added 
to the collection of Rev. Alfred Duane Pell ; a group of Tiffany 
Favrile glass purchased on account of the Joseph E. Temple 
Trust; Oriental porcelains added to the Dr. Francis \V. Lewis col- 
lection, and the Elizabeth \V. Lewis collection of rare old European 
pottery and porcelain, both given by Miss Mary and Miss Sarah 
Lewis ; a collection of gold, silver and silk laces, fringes and gimps 
of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, presented by Mr. 
Samuel B. Dean. 



oy Google 



St 



J, Google 



Following is a complete list of accessions : 
By GIFT: 
Barbrk, Edwin A, ; 

Water bottle; black iioUerj. Ancient Peniriaii. 
Beaichamp, Rev. W. M., Syractise, X. Y. : 

Jew's Harp ; from Indian grave. Onondaga County, N. Y. ; c. 1670. 
Brigus, Mrs. John A. ; 

Five exampleB of pottery and porcelain. Old English. 

Five specimens of lace and embroidery, 1831, 1844. 
Clarke, Bequest of Edward S : 

CollectioD ut porcelain, bronzes and enamels. Chinese and Japanese, 160 
examptee. 
CouLBOVRN, Dukes; 

Celt; stone; alxiriginal. From Caroline Co., Md. 
Davids, Richard W. : 

Plate; "Nankin Stone china." StaRordshire, England; c. 1820. 
Davii', Mrs. Edward R ; 

Baa-relief. Portrait of Mrs. E. D. Gillespie. 
Dean, Samuel B., Boston : 

Collection of gold, silver and silk gioipa and lace. Frencli and Italian, 
I'lh and I8th centuries ; 124 specimens. 
Di Brazza Savobosak, Covntesb : 

Pillow lace ; " Punto di Rsgnsa." Italy, 16th century. 
DiFEyDEREER, R. E. ; 

Brass padlock. Chinese. 

Two pigeon whistles. Chinese. 
Fos, BbijI'Est of Mary B. Ssiith : 

Necklace ; gold. Made by Castellani, Rome, ISTEi. 

Bracelet ; mosaic mounted in gold. Made by Castellani, Rome, 1876. 
Frbusd, Karl : 

Cup; porcelain. French; c 1830. 

Panel, copper ; with modeled «aK design. France. Loiiia XV. 
Frinhmuth, Mrs. W. D. : 

Goat bell ; metal. German. 

Eleven small bells. From old Japanese temples. 

Accordion; marquetry. Frencli, 18th century. 

Flute. By J. Ptafl, Philadelphia, 1830. 

Facsimile of Koto music, with translation. Japanese. 

Oboe (K'ai-tiV Chinese, 

Fifteen articles added to her collection ot Colonial Eelic?. 
Harrison, John : 

Plate ; tin enamel. By Jan l.audin k Limoges, France. 

Digilzeo by Google 



Tbezb ; maiolica. Tnlav^ra, Spain, IStli cenltiry. 
Goblet ; glass ; engrnTed decoration. Old 0«rniaii. 



Japan E.'chibition Association, Si. LoiiU, Mo.: 

Figure of Ape ; sheet iron ; showing process o( repoiiss^ work. 

JoSES, Edwabd RffeELi. : 

Cup ; porcelain. By Charles Cartlidge. GreenpoinI, K. Y. ; e. 1H4S. 
Cup and saucer ; pottery. Glasgow Tollerv, Trenlon, S. J., 1873. 

Keehmlb, Mes. M. Th bursa : 

Three vralchea. French and Swiss, 19th centiirv. 

Seven fans. Fn>ncli, 1840, I860. 

MagniFfing glass ; shagreen case ; 18th century. 

Jewel box ; plush. French, 1835. 

Casket ; tortoise shell : 18th century. 

Two work-boxes. V. S., 1830. 

Five glast gobUts ; 18th century. 

Cup and saucer ; pottery. StaRordshire, England, IK.SO. 

Cup and saucer ; porcelain. Chinese, 18tb century. 

Two exhibition cases. 

Lelaht>, Walter : 

High comb ; carved tortoise shell. 

Lewis. Ei-izabeth W., Collection (ihrougli Miss Mary and Miss Sarah 
Lewis) : 

Forty-three examples of rare porcelains, stoneware and glass. OI<l Euro- 
Hanging ; silk embroidered. Chinese. 
Chair ; can-ed teakwood. India. 
Square ; silk embroidered. Persian. 

Lewis, Dr. Francis W., Collection (through Miss Mary and Mi>B Sarah 
Thirly-sii examples of rare porcelains. Old Chinese and Siamese. 

LippiscoTT, Mrs. J. DuNnAs: 

Autograph letter from George WaHhington to John West in re division of 
land. Dated Mt. Vernon, September 12, 1773. 

Matthews, Theodore 1'. : 

Two czamplea of art needlework. Philadelphia; c. 17S0. 

Maithbws, Mrs. Theodore P. ; 

Too oil paintings', portraits of Gen. and Mrs. Hector Tyndale. By T. 
Buchanan Read. 



Digilzed by Google 



30 

Merrick, Miss Laura T, : 
Four bookcases ; oak. 
Desk ; leakwood. Inilia. 
Two large marble pede:.tals. 

Oil painling; " Eniigranl's Farewell to tlie Familv Grave." By Carl Hiili- 
ner, Dusseldorf. 18J8. 
Miller, Leslie W. : 

, Martha'a Vlnernrd, Mas'., 

MoRRrs, John T. : 

Vase; pottery; "Sicardo " lustre. By S. A. Weller, Zaneaville, Ohio. 

Pitcher ; porcelain ; marked " William Ellis Tucker," l>liiladclpl<ia, 1330. 

Goblet ; Bril&nnia metal. F.nglisti, 19th century. 

Toby jug ; potlery. By the American Pottery Co., Jereey City, X. J. ; v. 
1840, 

Goblet ; glass. Swedish, 18th century. 

Goblet ; glass. Bohemian, ISth century. 

Chair ; carved wood. Swiss; dated 1787. 

Jar ; pottery. Ancient Peruvian. 

Jar; pottery. Made at Vicker's Pottery, Downingtown, Pa., 1805. 

Box ; lacquer ; figure scenes. Old Peniian. 

Model or a " Bidarka." Sitka, Alaska, ISgS. 

Mummified Cat Luior, Egypt. 

Four vases ; pottery ; mat glaie. From the Van Briggle Pottery, Colorado 
Springs, Colo, 

Jug ; pottery. By the Chelsea Keramic Art Co., Chelsea, Mass., ISSO. 
Morris, Miss Lydia T. ; 

Four examples of glass. English, ISth century. 

Three examples of pottery. English ; c 1810. 

PaTTERHON, CflARLESl.: 

Plate ; p tCery ; view of Stale Capitol, Columbus, Ohio. Modem English. 
Pell, Rev, Alfred Duahe, New York City : 

Sixty-one examples of rare porcelain. European and Chinese. 
Renner, Miss Marv : 

Dish ; carved steatite. Chinese ; c. 1850. 
BOBiNEAU PoTTERV, Syracuse, X. Y. : 

Two vases; porcelain; crystalline and mat glaie. 
SOMMERVn.LE, BBltrKST OF HR-*^ Ma.vwell : 

Urn ; Oiallo Anlico. Italian. 

Twelve Sevres porcelain plates. 

Four vasea ; modern reproductions nt Capo di Monte. 

Shawl ; camel's hair. India. 



Digilzed by Google 



TiioMrsos, BiiX(u»>T of Mjss <.\irnelia ; 

Collection of ceramics, bronzei) and ennmels, Kiiro|>ean and OrieDtal, 112 
samples. 
Thompson-, Mrs. Sophia : 

Poke bonnet; leghorn. U. S., 1810. 

TiTBNER, Mias Harriot S. ; 

Jar: potterj ; dark Kreen glaie. Strashurf;, Va. 



Weller, S. a., Zaoesville, Ohio: 

Vase ; pottery ; " Eocian " ware, ^fade li; the donor. 

By IX) AN : 
Avgrns, Savdel II. : 

Large caae contMnin^ collection of arms and armor. 

Austin, Mrs. Samuel H. : 

Thirty-three eiamples of Phranician slass. 
Model of a Pagoda, gold lacquer, Japanese. 

Bbhim, Mi«s Caroline I. : 

Bowl ; potlerj ; " Lowestoft " style. OhI Englisli. 



FLEiSHER, MOYEH : 

Two watches added to his collectioD. 

Frishmvtii, Mrs, W. D. : 
Flnte. By Oelb, N. Y. 
Hautbois. Br Floth, Dresden, Germany, ISth century. 

JoKE^ Edward RuiDiRLr. : 

Vase ; pottery ; classical figure scene. Modern Italian. 

Jones', Mrs. Edward Ritssell: 

Bowl ; pottery ; blue and while. Old English. 
Square Piano. By Bibcock, Boston; c. 182^. 

Lanornheih, F. D, : 

Lithophane ; porcelain biscjue, Berlin ; c. 1815. 

Leeds, Mrs. John B. : 

Slatne ; marble ; " The Wept of the Wish-ton-Wisli." 



oy Google 



■, Mrs. J. DCS das: 
Ootleclion of marble and bronie statuary. 
Collection of French and Chinese porcelain. 
Epergne ; silver and cut glasa. 
Medicine cbest ; mahogany, 18th century. 
Table ; tortoise shell and brats inlay. Buhl. 

Mow, John, Jr. ; 

Watch ; gold. Early IQth century. 

Newman, Mbs. W. B. : 

Oil paintJDg ; " Passing the Hoty Bread." By 
Oil painting; " Kn Penitence" By Mrs. Ne« 



OzEAS, Ramdokoer and Keehhle Collection : 

Forty-geTen exBioptes of pottery, porcelain, glass and plate. European and 

Collection of miniatures, jewelry and costumes (100 examples), 1745-1850. 
Peall, Miss Elizabeth K. ; 

Square Piano, Philadelphia, 1825. 

"Stbbn, &TATE OP Simon A. r 

Seventy examples of ivory carving. Japanese. 

Thirty specimens of silk embroidery, (,'hinese and Japanese. 

By PURCHASE : 

Various Funds : 

Pitcher ; cteainnare ; Arms ol U. S. in black. Liverpool, England ; c. 
ISOO. 

Bowl ; creamware ; portraits of Washington, .Vdams and Franklin. Liver- 
pool, England, dated 1800. 

Two Lutes. Italian, 17th century. 

Mandolin. Italian, 17th century. 

Statuette ; pottery ; Benjamin Franklin. Meiborough, England ; c. 1820. 

Jug ; pottery. Made at Salamander Works, N. Y., 1850. 

Five examples of lustre ware. Old English. 

Vase ; stoneware. By Doulton & Co., England. 

Crock ; stoneware. Bennington, Vt. ; c. 1870. 

Cup and saucer ; porcelain ; " Lowestoft " style- t^hinese, 18th century. 

Two cups and saucers ; pottery ; souvenir of Centennial, Trenton, N. J., 
187 6. 

Vase ; pottery ; rose and copper lustre. Old English, 

* These collections have since been presented to the Museum. 



Digilzed by Google 



ti3 



J, Google 



8i 



Museum CoNTRiBrTioN Box Fukd : 

Large vue ; cloisonne enamel ; decorated with bird^ and foliage. Japanese. 
Purchased at St. Loais Expoaition. 
JoeEFH E. Tehple Trust: 

Tvo vase* ; stoDBware ; rouge Samb^. Doiilton factarj, England, 1901. 
Plate ; porcelain. By Korneloffe Bros., Sl Petersburg, 

fifteen muaicnl inatru men Is. Various coun- 



LARGE CLOISONNE VASE, 

JAPANESE. 

Bought at St. Louis EipoaitioQ, 

1904, with Money from the 

Museum Coniributiou Boies. 

Group of ducks; porcelaii 
Vase ; pottery ; t^atauma. 



Dish ; delft; polychrome decoration. Hol- 
land, 18th century. 
Panel; maiolica ; Virgin and Child ; 17th 



Same Account (from St. Louia Eipoaition) : 
Jar; pottery; enameled. Persian, ITth 

century. 
Plaque ; pottery. Bhodian, ISth century. 
Twenty- nine musical instrumenta. Oriental. 
Nine tnusica! instruments. Siamese. 
Ewer vase ; pottery. By Th. Deck, France. 
Plaque ; porcelain ; pate-aitr-|>ate. By 

Doat, Sivres, France. 
Vase ; porcelain ; pate.sur-pete. By Doet, 

Sivres, France. 
Vaae ; pottery. By Auguste Delaherche, 

Fiance. 
Fourteen examples of pottery from the 

Holland Department. 
Vase ; glass ; dragon fly decoration. By 

Emile GalM, Nancy, France. 
Vase; pottery; leaf decoration in open 

work. Japanese. 
Censer ; pottery ; Satsuma ; carved and 

reticulated. Japanese. 
Ape; sheet iron ; repouss^. Japanese. 
Elephant ; bronze. Jap:tnese, 
Vase ; pottery ; rose pink. From Ruskin 

Pottery, England. 
Seven eiamples of blown glass. White- 

triars Glass Works, England. 
Royal Factory, Copenhagen, Denmark. 
Decorate<l by Meixan, Oaka, Japan. 



MUSEUM LIBRARY. 
Total number of titles in the Library on the 31st day of May, 
1905: 



Digilzed by Google 



Bound Boob, 

UDboDnd PimphletB, Cauloguea, Keporta, e 



Following ia the list of additions to the Library of Books, Cata- 
logues and Pamphlets : 

By GIFT from: 
Ahericah iNerriTUTE of ABCHiTacn ; 

Four Numbera of Bulletin. 

Tbirt;-sevenlh Annual Convention. 
Art Clvb of PhiiuIdelphia ; 

Fourteenth Exhibition of Water Colors. 



BRONZE ELEPHANT, JAPANESE. 
Bought at St. LoiiiB Exposition, 1904, with Income from the 
Joseph E. Temple TruHt. 
Art Institute of Chicaoo : 
Catalogues of Exbibilionn. 
AuOTiN, Sahuel H. : 

Catalogue of the Austin Collection of Arms and Armor. 
Babbeb, Edwin a. : 

Marks of American Potters. 
BtTREAc OF Ethnologv, Washington, U. C. : 

Twenty-second Annual Report. 
Carnegie Institcte, Pittsburgh, Pa, : 
Eighth Annual Report, 1904. 
Ninth Celebration of Foundersi' Day. 



Di.itradb, Google 



36 

Cabheoie MlsEuv, Pillsburgh, Pa. : 

Price Eeuj CoaUat, 1904, 
Crawford, AkdiIew W. ; 

Development of Public Grounds for Greater BHltimore. 
Detroit Mukbuh of Art, Detroit, Mirb. : 

Four Numbere of Bulletin. 

Annual Keport, 1902-1904. 
Dbbxel In»ititutr, Fhlladelpbia, Pa. : 

Pour Numbers of Bulletin. 
Pairmoust Park Art AesociATioN, Philadelphia, Pa. : 

Thin^-third Annual Keport 
FtEtD CoLDHsrAN MUBEVH, Chicago, 111. : 

Geology and Oeograpby of Western Meiico, by Farrin^ton. 

Traditions o( tbe Os«ge, by Dorsey, 

Structure and BeUlionehip of Episthocieliitn Dinoasura. 

Annual Report, 1904. 
Oesei.l, Padl, Meiaaen, Germany : 

Koniglich Sacbaiacbe Ponellan Maniitactur. 
JoNEB, Mitf. Edward Bossell : 

Files of Art Magasines. 
Mptropolitan MiiSEUU uf Art, Sew York City ; 

Catalogue of Paintings. 

Four Annual Beporta, 1902-1905. 

Charter and By-laws, 1905. 

MOBOAN, J. PlERPOKT : 

Catalogue of tbe Morgan Collection of Chinese Porcelain. 



Mt'SEUM FVR Kuti8T AND Gewerbf, Hamburg, Germany : 

Annual Repoit, 1903. 
National Academy op Desiuk, New York Cityr 

Catalogue of Eightieth Exhibition. 
NCMiBMATrc AND Antk^uarian SotiETY, Philadelphia, Pa. : 

Proceedings of the Society, 1902-1903. 
Pkns.xylvania Academy of the Fikb Arts, Philnilelphia, Pa.: 

Xinety-serenth Annual Report . 
Pessypacker, Hon. Samlel W. : 

Address upon Penunylvania Day at Si, Louis Kxposition. 
Petehborouok Satirai. History Society. Pelerborough, England: 

Thirty-second .Annual Report. 



Digilzed by Google 



37 

SmTHaoNiAK I.vsTiTUTiox, M'asliinglon, D. ('. r 

BotldiDgs of L'. S. Xfttlonal Mumuiu. 
Simon, Wilijam : 

Two DBTolional Books, Germany. 1791, 1803. 
Stille, Mrs. Charles J. : 

History d( Veneli»n I^ces. by I'rbaoi. 
U. S. Department of tub Interior, WaiihingUin, D. C. : 

N<f rito9 ot Zambales, by Reed. 

By PURCHASE : 
Hispano- Moresque Wure, by Van de I'lit. 
Age of Fable, by Bulfinch. 
History of Ceramic Art, by Jacquemarl. 
Dutch Pottery «ud Porcelaip, by Knowlcs. 
Art of the Japaoeae Stencil (.'utter. 

By SUBSCRIPTION i 
The Connoisseur. 

American Journal of Nuraismalics. 
The Burlington Magaiine. 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER, EDWIN ATLEE BARBER, 

Diirctor. Curator. 



Digilzed by Google 






I i 



f i I ^ H ^ 1 1 H- i 



i I II a 1 1 H n ! ^ 



= ^ K R :i |- S I 



- i 









I I I I I ! I ^ ^ I "^ 1 ! S I I I 1 H I ^* 1 f 



S££^1|t^S;?'|?s€|s,55'f?s 1^ 



' € i i s l! i 



s ?l 






J, Google 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART, BROAD AND PINE STREETS- 



REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL. 

Presented at the Close of the Twksty-Eighth School Year. 

During the pnst year the School has been attended by 1018 
pupils, of whom 637 were men and 381 were women. The corps 
of instructors in the Art School has been strengthened by the ad- 
dition of Mr. Philip Muhr, an artist of very thorough training and 
acknowledged ability. Mr. Albert J. Adolph, whose recent work 
has also won diatinguiahed recognition, and who had charge of 
the evening class in interior decoration last year, has this year bad 
charge of this work in the day class as well. On the resignation 
of Mr. Calder, which was accepted with much regret, the Depart- 
ment of Modelling was reorganized under Mr. Chas. T. Scott, on a 
basis of closer association with the other classes and of more com- 
plete identification with the aims and methods which characterize 
the School. This means that less attention hns been paid to the 
study of the human figure and much more to the correlation of 
the modelling with the work in carving, in metal-work, and in 
pottery and similar branches, as well as giving added emphasis to 
the study throughout the course of architectural and structural 
ornament, and the development of power in original design. 

The new building of the Pottery School was erected during the 
summer of 1904 and forms a most commodious addition to the fa- 



Digilzed by Google 



40 

eilities of the frchool. This acUHUon to the room available for the 
clay working branches has also made possible the installation of 
the wood-working classes in two of the rooms on the first floor 
that had formerly been devoted to the work in modelling, thus 
making a much better arrangement of all these classes than had 
over been possible before. The development of the wood-working 
classes in the direction of furniture making, under Mr. Tomiten, 
which these increased facilities have made possible, is one of the 
noticeable advances of the year. A hanging gallery on the side 
of the building that overlooks the courtyard was also built during 
the summer, and provides a means of communication between the 
front and back buildings without the annoyance and loss of much 
needed space, which were inevitable when the class rooms on this 
floor had to be used as thoroughfares. 

The building has also been improved by the introduction of a 
large window in the main drawing room on the first floor and by 
some important work in the wing occupied by the Textile School, 
including more adequate heating and ventilating of the dye house, 

Several valuable additions to the equipment of both the Art and 
Textile departments have been made. In the case of the Art 
School these consist Ini^ely of casts and photographs, and in the 
Textile School, of much new machinery in the Spinning, Dyeing 
and Weaving departments, especially in that of Jacquard Weav- 
ing, which has been much strengthened, and developed, so that a 
considerable advance in the production of the highest class of fab- 
rics, in which the design is most distinctly artistic, has been 
achieved. In this development of the work of the Textile School 
in the direction of combining with its practical aims the methods 
and ideals of the School of Applied Art, most efficient service and 
generous support has been rendered by the Associate Committee 
of Women. 

The additional demands upon the power plant which the growth 
of the Textile School has necessitated have been partly met by 
the installation of a new gas engine. This relief is only partial, 
however, as quite apart from any question of power the old 
boilers and boiler house badly need to be renewed aiid recon- 
structed in the interest of economy and efficiency of the heating 
system, and such a renewal is among the most urgent of the pres- 
ent needs of the School. 

Considerable additions to the equipment are also needed, espe- 



oy Google 



41 

cially in the Textile School, if the researeh work wliich has Wen 
80 well begun and for which the demaiiil is continually increasing 
is to go on. Numerous opportunities to jiursue investigations and 
make tests regarding textile material and nii-thods, not only for 
industrial establishments but for the V. S. Governinont, have 
recently had to be declined for want of proper facilities. That 
such service should be solicited is in itself a kind of tribute to the 
usefulness of the Bchool which is extremely gratifying, and indi- 
cates very clearly the growing estimation in which the kind of 
education of which this institution is the earliest and foremost ex- 
ponent in America is coming to be held. 

The work of the Associated Alumni has been continued with 
unabated activity. The Alumni of the School of Applied Art 
have hfld a continuous series of exhibitions, receptions, sales and 
entertainments throughout the year. On their initiative and 
through their efforts, generously aided, as all our work has been, 
by the Associate Committee of Women, much substantial encour- 
agement has been given to the more advanced students in the 
form of opportunity to carry out their designs, some very inter- 
esting furniture having been produced in this way which will be 
placed in the roomn occupied by the Alumni Association, in addi- 
tion to several rather important pieces which are to be used in 
furnishing the lobby of the School. 

Through the same agencies a very substimtial fund has l)een 
created, the income of which is to be available for the assistance 
of needy students, of whom there are always a number in a school 
of this kind. The delicate and tactful administration of this fund 
by a board of trustees, in which the Associate Committee of 
Women, the Alumni Association and the teaching staff are repre- 
sented, has already been productive of much pood and cannot 
fail to prove a means of increasing helpfulness in the future. 

The exhibit of work which was made at the Louisiana Purchase 
Exposition at St. Ix)ui8 has, at the re(|uei-t of the State authorities, 
been transferred to Harrisburfr, where it will be installed as part 
of the permanent Hducational Exhibition which is to be estab- 
lished there. 

Two Prize Scholarships in the Textile School have been estab- 
lished by the finn of Ab. Kirschbaum & Co., and a similar scholar- 
ship in the School of Applied Art has been endowed by Miss 
Mary Williams and Mrs. Walter R. Stenger in the name of their 
father, the late Rvnear Williams, Jr. 



oy Google 



42 

A nearly continuous series of competitions in Industrial Design 
and Commercial Illustration has served to keep the classes in 
touch with the practical requirements of the interests which the 
School is organized primarily to serve and has furniahed gratifying 
evidence of the growing appreciation on the part of men of affairs, 
of the fundamental fact on which our system of instruction ia 
based, that the connection between Industrial Art Education 
properly understood and applied and the kind of efficiency in 
which the success of even commercial enterprises depends is direct 
and vital. 

The list of gifts and benefactions which are the concrete expres- 
sions of this interest and appreciation is appended. 

The Library of the School has received the following accessions 
during the year just closed : 

Purchued. Presented. TdIhI. 

Books, 131 121 252 

Period icalB, 18 II 29 

Unbound Volumes 6 

Pamphlets IM 154 

Single PhotognphB ot PrinU, . ■ 1807 47 1854 

Collections of Prinu, ... 4 11 15 

The total number of titles in the Library of the School on May 
31, 1905, was as follows: 

Bound Volumes, 1591 

Unbound Volumes, 561 

Pamphlets 1033 

Photognipha anil Prints, not included in tlie list of Porl- 



Gifts to the Library during the past year have been made by the 
following : 

Mrs, John Harrison, Miss M. Atherton Leach, Miss Sophie B. 
Steel, Miss Meta V.iux Warrick, Mrs. E. Randolph, Col. M. Rich- 
ards Muckle, Col. E. DeV. Morrell, Mr, J. H. Bridge, Mr. H. B. 
Kiimmel, Mt. T. H. McAllister, Mr. Emile Terquem, Mr, Theodore 
C. Search, Dr. E. A. Barber, Mr. Charles E. Dana, Mr. Howard F. 
Stratton, Mr. Clarence S. Bement, Mr. E. A. Smith, Mr. L. \V. Mil-. 
ler, Mr. A. W. Barker, Messrs. Charles A. Strelinger & Co., Messrs. 
Elkington & Co., Public Education Association, Philadelphia, 
Holnian School, Philadelphia, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 
University of Wisconsin, Plastic Club of Philadelphia, Cleveland 



oy Google 



43 

School of Art, New York Trade School, National Academy of 
Sciences, Manhattan Trade School for Girls, New York, Cincin- 
nati Mueeum of Art, Armour Institute of Technology, Chicago, 
Norwich (Conn.) Art School, Eastern Manual Training Associa- 
tion, Rochester (N. Y.) Mechanics' Institute, Art Students' Irfa([ue, 
New York, Merchants' and Travelers' Association, Philadelphia, 
Port Sunlight Arts and Crafto, Superintendent of Immigration, Ot- 
tawa, Canada, New York School of Applied Design, Southern 
Education Board, Girls' Industrial College, Denton, Texas, Royal 
Normal School of Drawing, Budapest, Minneapolis School of Fine 
Arts, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, Maryland In- 
stitute, Baltimore, Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, Carnegie 
Institute, Pittsburgh, National Association of Wool Manufacturers, 
Philadelphia School of Design for Women, College of Surgery, 
Detroit, Drexel Institute, Philadelphia, United States Govern- 
ment, Pennsylvania State Government, Philadelphia City Govern- 
ment, Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadelphia, Library 
Company of Philadelphia, Art Students' League, Buffalo, N. Y., 
American Art Association, Paris, France, Numismatic and Anti- 
quarian Society of Philadelphia, Library of Congress, Washing- 
ton, D. C, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Rookwood Pottery 
Co., Taplin Rice Co., Crossley Manufacturing Co., Abb^ Engineer- 
ing Co,, Rockland Engineering Co., 3. Marsching ife Co., Garden 
Clubs, International Text Book Co., Scranton, Pa., Brown Univer- 
sity, Colby College, Boston Art Club, Davenport (la.) Academy of 
Sciences, The Normal Instructor, Primary Plans, The Artsman, 
The Art Student, Painters' Magazine, Crockery and Glass Journal, 
Fibre and Fabric, Textile Colorist, American Wood and Cotton 
Reporter, Dyers' Bulletin. 



Digiized by Google 



DONATIONS 

During thk Year to the School of Applied Art. 

From Mr. Jolin T. Morria, 8 vases and 2 plates, Chinese porce- 
lain. 

From Mias Lydia T. Morris, collection of shells and case of 
stufl'ed birds. 

From Mrs. Jones Wister, Alaskan basket and tourist's helmet. 

From Miss Margaret L. Corliep, piece of Van Briggle pottery. 

From Mrs, E. Randolph, model of Pisa Duomo and collection 
of plaster medallions. 

From Mr. Howard F. Stratton, matting for passajtewnys. 



METAL CHEST (SWEET PEA MOTIVE). 
Designed and Executed by Harry S. Wood, a Pupil of tlie School. 

To THE Tkxtii.e School. 

Lowell Machine Shop, Lowell, Mass., 2 sets of fluted steel 4-inch 
rollers, 144 in number, 18 sections, and other necessary working 
part«, for spinning frame ; also services of one man to apply the 
same. 

Crompton Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Mass., discount on 
the purchase of 1 heavy worsted loom. 



Digilzed by Google 



45 

Saco & Pettet; Machine Shops, Newton Upper Fall?, Mji»i<., 1 
railway head (complete) with metallic toUp. 

McMichael & Wildman, Norrietown, Pa., 1 single feed welt rih- 
ber with Wilcomb stop motion attachment. 

Thomas Halton's Sons, Philadelphia, Pa., 1 600 single lift Jnc- 
quard machine, with levers and fixtures. 

Fales & Jenks Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. I., 2 brass plate ring 
rails, 15 spindles each ; also 30 '2j-inch common flange ringt>. 

Associate Committee of Women of P. M. S. I. A., Philadelphia, 
Pa., donation of $rj'>, to be used in purchasing additional ecjuip- 
ment for the Jacquard Department. 

Cheney Bros., South Manchester, Conn., 169 pounds of various 
sizes and colors of spun, organzine and tram silks ; also 10 pounds 
of 30-2 spun silk. 

Sauquoit Silk Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 45 yards of organzine 
silk warp ; also harnesses ; small amount of tram silk and 4 pounds 
of extra fine Canton tram silk, 

B. Hooley & Son, Philadelphia, Pa,, 2 pounds extra fine Canton 
tram silk. 

Hampton Company, Kasthampton, Mass., quantity of 2-()0's and 
2-30's cotton yarn. 

Leatheroid Mfg. Co., Kennebunk, Me., 12 12-inch diameter 
roving cans. 

Rush ton -Carroll Co., OlneyviUe, R. I., 1 waste end conveyor. 

Schaum & Uhlinger, Philadelphia, Pa., quantity of harni'ss 
cords; also 1 pair of card plates with punches. 

Sipp Electric & JIachine Co., Paterson, N. J., 1 twist counter. 

L. S. Watson Mfg. Co., Leicester, Alass., 60 flush end harness 
frames. 

Charles Ashoff, Philadelphia, Pa., quantity of rewls. 

John W. Fries, Winston-Salem, N. C, 2 clean-air machines. 

Barbour Flax Spinning Co., Paterson, N. J., samples of linen 
twine, jute, hemp, etc. 

Lincoln Mfg. Co., Chester, Pn., 50 pounds of comber waste. 

Schoen & Schlechter, Hamilton, Ohio, 1 keg of wool oil. 

Klauder-Weldon Dyeing Machine Co., Amsterdam, X. Y., 1 cop- 
per bucket and fittings for dyeing machine. 

General Chemicol Co., Philadelphia, Pa., acids and general 
chemicals to the value of 4100. 

Farbenfabriken of Ellierfeld Co., New York, N. V., lU 1-pound 



oy Google 



WOODEN SEAT, IN ROMANESQUE STYLE. 

(O, Gerald Evana Prize, 1W5.) 

DesigDed and Executed bjr Pearl Verona Ebner, a Pupil of the ScbouU 



Digilzed by Google 



samples of dyestuflfs, 79 4-ouQce and H 2-ounce samples of dye- 
stuffs. 

Kuttroff, Pickhardt & Co., New York, N. Y., 4 1-pound sam- 
ples of dyestuffs and 29 4-ounce samples of dyestuffs. 

National Chemical Co., Toledo, Ohio, 1 barrel washing soda. 

C, Bischoff & Co., New York, N, Y., 11 4-ounce samples of dye- 
stuffs. 

The Selling Company, New York, N. Y., 2 gallons chemicals. 

Andreykovicz & Dunk, Philadelphia, Pa., 1-pound bottle of oxy- 
chlorine and 83 4-ounce samples of dyestuffs. 

Read, Holliday & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa., 6 4-ounce samples of 
dyestuffs. 

Sj'kes & Hall, Philadelphia, Pa., 9 pounds of sample dyestuffs 
and 11 4-ounce samples of dyestuffs. 

Geisenheimer & Co., New York, N. Y., 7 4-ounce samples of 
dyestuffs. 

Kalioii Chemical Co., Philadelphia, Pa,, 400 pounds of chem- 
icals. 

O. 8. Janney & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 1 barrel Wyandotte soda. 

Jonathan Horafall, Philadelphia, Pa., i barrel fankhausine. 

Roessler, Hasslacher Chemical Co., New York, N, Y., 5 pounds 
sodium peroxide, 1 carboy formaldehyde, 1 bleaching vat and 26 
pamphlets on bleaching. 

A. Klipstein & Co., New York, N. Y., 14 3-pound samples of 
chemicals; 2 pounds of dyestuffs; 41 4-ounce samples of dye- 
stuffs. 

Kalle & Co., New York, N. Y., 2 10-pound, 2 2-pound and 16 4- 
ounce samples of dyestuffs. 

Berlin Aniline Works, Philadelphia, Pa., 6 1-pound somples ot 
dyestuffs; 1 8-ounce and 20 4-ounce samples of dyestuffs. 

Cassella Color Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 6 pounds of dyestuffs; 
also 63 4-ounce samples of dyestuffs. 

H. A. Metz & Co., New York, N. Y., 2 pounds of chemicals ; 4 1- 
pound and 60 4-ounce samples of dyestuffs. 

COURTESIES EXTENDED. 

The Draper Company, Ho pedal e, Mass. ; Schaura & Uhlinger, 

Philadelphia, Pa.; Erben, Harding & Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; 

FalcB & Jenks Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. I. ; Howland Croft, 

Sons & Co., Camden, N. J.; Aberfoyle Mfg. Co., Chester, Pa.; 



oy Google 



48 

Firth & Foster Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; J. R. Foster & Sons, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. ; F. H. Milner, Philadelphia, Pa. ; " Fibre and Fabric," 
Boston, SlaBB. ; "The Manufacturer," Philadelphia, Pa.; "Dry 
(joode Economist," New York, N.Y.; " Dixie," Atlanta, Ga.; "Tex- 
tile Colorist," Philadelphia, Pa.; "Textile Excelsior," Charlotte, 



DESIGN FOR FOUNTAIN. 
Modelled by Enrl J. Early, a Pupil of the School. 

N. C. ; "Textile World-Record," Boston, Mass.; "Textile Manu- 
facturers' Journal," New York, N. Y. ; " American Wool and Cot- 
ton Reporter," Boston, Maes.; "American Silk Journal," New 
York, N. Y. ; Ix)well Machine Shop, Lowell, Mass. ; Adelaide Silk 
Mills, AUentown, Pa. ; \Vm. H. Ijorimer'a Sons Co., Philadelphia, 
Pa. ; Eavenson & I^verinp. Philadelphia, Pa. ; Philadelphia Tapes- 



oy Google 



J, Google 



try Milla, Philadelphia, Pa.; L. S. Watson Mfg. Co., Leicester, 
Mass.; Thomas Halton's Sous, Philadelphia, Pa.; Philadelphia 
Textile Machinery Co., Philadelphia, Pa. ; John Royle & Sons, Pat- 
ereon, N. J.; Crnmpton & Knowles Ijooni Works, Worcester, 
Mass.; Peerless Silk Dye Works, Philadelphia, Pa. ; Barrett Mfg. 
Co., Philadelphia, Pa. ; Eddystone Print Works, Eddy stone, Pa.; 
Sauquoit Silk Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. ; The Hellwig Silk Dye- 
ing Co., Philadelphia, Pa. ; R. Greenwood &■ Bault, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Stoddard, H a serlck, Richards * Co,, Philadelphia, Pa. ; C. 
G. Sargent's Sons, Graniteville, Masp. ; Argo Mills Co., Gloucester. 
N. J. ; Atwood-Morrison Machine Co., Stonington, Conn. ; Mr. F. 
Edgewood, Chester, Pa. ; Dill & Collins, Philadelphia, Pa. ; Thomas 
Hood, Paterson, N. J. 

The Institution is also indebted to Mr. John T. Morris for the 
large skylight in the room devoted to the drawing of ornament 
from the cast, and for the radiator-shields in the Committee 
Room ; to the Vacuum Oil Co., which baa furnished all oils used 
by the Engineers' Department during the year ; and to the donors 
of the various prizes, — the list of which is continually growing, — 
which are awarded at our Annual Commencement Under the ac- 
count of this year's exercises, which is appended, will be found a 
full list of these prizes, which furnishes one of the most authorita- 
tive and valuable testimonials to the value of the School's work 
and influence. I also have pleasure in reporting gifts from Miss 
Mary Williams and Mrs. Walter R. Stenger to found a Scholar- 
ship in the Art School in memory of their father, the late Rynear 
Williams, Jr., and also the .establishment by the firm of Ab. 
Kirschbaum & Co. of a system of scholarships in the Textile 
School by which a scholarship, good for the remainder of the 
course, if the student's record remains satisfactory, is to be 
awarded each year to that member of tlie regular first-year class 
attaining the highest rating in the year's work, including the pre- 
liminary and final examinations. 

COMMENCEMENT. 

The Commencement Exercises were held at the Academy of 
Music on Wednesday evening. May 31st, and were followed by 
the usual jirivate view of the Exhibition of Students' work at the 
School Building, Broad and Pine Streets. 

The Invocation at the Commencement Exercises was delivered 



OMzcdoyGoOgle 



51 

by the Rev. Wayhmd Hoyt, D.I)., the Comnieiitenient Address 
by Franklin Spencer EdmontU, Eeii-, on " American Ideals," nnd 
the diplomae and prizes were awarded by President Searcli, who 
also delivered an address to tlic ^crnduates. 

DIPLOMAS, PRIZES AKD CEBTIKICATI-B AWARDED AT THE 
ANNUAL CX)MMEN(KMEST, MAV31, 1«06. 

DIPLOMAT. 

School of ApfukdAkt.— Florence Christ Callaghan, Waller Garlield Chew, 
Joseph Fnak Copelaoi), Samuel PreatoD Craighill, Anna Beatrice Croke, Esther 
Lincoln Fellows, Ida Bates Uroff, John Donald Hinds, San Leopold, Dora 
Elizabeth Roberts, Deborah Hawlej Smedlev, William Brooke Smith, Alexins 
Shallus Paul Stronp, C'orallie Philomena fienedicia Thoma, Florence Knowles 
Ystdtey. 

Textile Schooi^ Kkiiular Textile Cki'ime. — Paul Benningbofen, Benja- 
min Nelson Cbanalis, Frederick James Coe, Jerome Everett Emerson, Harold 
Hawkins Hart, John Clarence Headman, Evan Gordon Mclver, Fnncis Valen- 
tine (VHara, James Oliver Stewart, Schuyler Justice Tajlor. 

PRIZKH. 
SCHOOL OF APPLIED ART. 

AaeociATE Committee of Womem's Prizb 
Duane Oillespie Price. ) For the beat work in 
ing. Awarded to Gregorio Alindao Paredet. 

Honorable mention to Grant Milee Simon, Grace Paul Leaw. 

Second, HO.OO,— For General Original Design for Carpet Awarded to Han- 
nah Miller Baird. 

Honorable mention to Donald Hubert Elj. 

Thiko, flO.OO,— For Original Design, Stencilled Frieie. Awarded to Claudius- 
B. Mervine. 

Mrs. JoNEa Wister Pbizb, (25.00. — Awarded toHarrjE. Wood tor Original 
Designs and Applications. 

Honorable mention to Mary Alta Garrison. 

Emma S. C'rozer Pbize, $20. 00. —Offered for the best work in Drawing. 
Awarded to Leroy Litienberg. 

First mention to William 2Iothe. Second mention to Harlej Emeet Mecusker, 

Emma S. Crozer Prize, $20.00. — For the best group of work in Modelling. 
Awarded to Helen Stanton Fiske. 

Firat mention to Samuel Preaton Craigliill. Second mention to Aleiina Shal- 
lus Paul Stroup. Third mention to Earl Joshua Early. 

Ketteebr Prize, (20. 00. —Offered by Mr. Gustav Ketterer, of the Advisory 
Committee, fur best adaptation of a Historic Motive from studies at Memorial 
Hall. Awarded to Donald H. Ely for Hanging. 

Honorable mention to Esther Lincoln Fellows. 



Digilzed by Google 



STENCIL WALL DECORATION. 
Designed anil Executed by William F. Zieger, a Pupil of the Scliool. 



oy Google 



53 

JuiiK J. BoVLE Prize, $10.00.— Ofler^ by Mr. John J. Bojie, ol tbe Ad- 
visory Committee, for Modelling. Awarded to William Brooke Smith. 

Carouke .4.\p(iki> Mauke Prize.— For work in Kepoues^ Metal. $10.00 
awarded to Jacob Rilit Fox, Jr. $10.00 awarded to John Donald Hinds. 

Frederic Graff Prixb, $20.00. — For .Architectural Design. Awarded to 
Lewis M. Dorsey, Jr. 

Honorable mention to W. Percy Dawson. 

Henry Perrv Leland Pbixe, fZ.'i. 00.— Offered by Mrs. John HarriHon for 
the best work in Kluck and AVhite lllustratiuD. .Awarded lo Edwin John Prittie. 

Firal Honorable mention to William Mohr. Second Honorable mention to 
William Xje. 

OlBLs' iKUi^TRiAL ART Leaoce Pkize, $10.00. ~~For the best finished arti- 
cle designed and made by a Stndent Member of the League. Awarded to 
(.'orallie Phibmena Benedicta Thoma fur Pottery. 

F. Weber Prize. ^Drawing Table, tor best Work in Inslrumental Drawing. 
.Awarded to Isabel Lower. 

Battleu Prizes.— Offered bj Mr. H. H. Battles to Students in Pottery. 

For a Terra Cotta Gardbn Vase.— Made from Drawing. First Fbizk, 
$40.00.— Awarded to Corallie Philomena Benedicta Thoma. 

SlcosI) Prizk, $20.00.— Awarded to Sara Ugpold. 

Foe Thk Bbut tittoip (3 lo 5 pie<;ea). — From the year's work by any one 
Student. First Prize, $16.00.- Awarded to Anna May Thumlen. 

Second Prize, $10.00.— Awarded to Maude Smith. 

Honorable tiieotion to Earl Joshua Knrlj. 

For a Flat Shallow 1>isb for Watkk Plants —Fihi-t Prize, $10.00.— 
.Awarded to Florence Christ Cullaghan. 

Secosd Prize, $i.LiO. — Awarded to Anna Beatrice Croke. 

Honorable mention to Ida Bates Groll. 

PooLEV I'hizb, $20.00. — Offered by the Pooley Furniture Co. for the best 
original design (esecoiedl for a piece of Gothic or Byzantine Furniture. $10.00 
avardedtoClaudiusB. Meri-ineforliolhic Cheat. $10.00 awarded to H. Edwin 
Rieger for Byiantine Bench. 

Honorable mention lo Sara Leopold, John James Berilla. 

Dewab Prize, $20.00.— Offered bv Willi.m H. Dewarforthe best original 
deaign tor a Music Room, in the Art Xouveau sivle, drawn in perspective and 
rendered in color. Awarded lo Claudius B. Mervine. 

Hist, Wilkisson & Co. Prize, $25.00.— Offered by Hunt, Wilkinson & Co. 
tor best original design for a small Library in Bfzantiue style, drawn in per- 
spectiTe and rendered in color. Awarded to II. Edwin Rieger. 

G. Gerald Evans Prize, $10.00.— Offered by Mr. G. Gerald Evaus, of tbe 
Advinorj Committee, for a piece of t'abinet work, meritorious in design and ex- 
ecution. Awarded lo Pearl Verona Ebner. 

Honorable mention to Jacob Kilit Fox, Jr., Antonio Minerva. 

Mrs. Thomas Roberts Prize, $10.00. — Awarded to Howard M. Coots. For 
Group of work in Applied Design. 

Prize 8i:holarshjps fob Si-hool Year, 190S-1B06.— .Awarded to Harry E. 
Wood, Donald H. Ely, Howard M. Cools, Henry Edwin Rieger, Earl Joshua 
Early. 



oy Google 



54 

Charles GomfBEY Leland Scholarship fob Schooi, Year, 1905-1906 — 
Awarded by the Alumoi Agsocialion of ihe School of InduBlrial Art to Robert 
Burton Charles Keeler. 

TEXTILE SCHOOL. 

AsHociATE Committee of Women's Prize, 110.00. — For best executed work 
in Jacquard Design. Third Year. Awarded to Jerome Everett EineraoD. 

Tre MisB Clyde Prisse, $10.00. — For best executed work io Jacqusrd De- 
sign. Second Year. Awarded to Haos Henrv Hoermann. 

Honorable mention to Robert Emmett Brooke. 

Mrs. Frank K. Hipple Prize, $10.00. —For beat special executed work in 
Jacquaid De«gn. Awarded to William Thomas Lockett. 

Honorable meHiion to Charles P. A. Bosetti. 

The Mrs. Thomas Roberts Prize, $10.00.— For best group of Designs for 
Decorative Fabrics. Awarded to Lawrence M. Pegnm. 

The Elizabeth C Roberts Prize, tlO.OO.— For best work in Color Har- 
mony and Design. Fint Year. Awarded to Caryl A. Orammer. 

Honorable mention to Alan V. Young, Alfred Vi'. Haywood, Jr. 

Thb "Textile World Record" Gold Medal.— For general excellence 
and thesis, Chemistry and Dyeing Course. Awarded to Joseph Collingwood. 

Honorable mention to John Henry Fiebiger. 

New Enoland Cotton Manlfactueers' Association Medal.— For Gen- 
eral Excellence. Regular Course. Third Year. Awarded to Evan Gordon 
Mclver. 

Honorable mention to Jerome Everett Emerson, Schuyler Justice Taylor. 

"Chemical Trade Review" Prize— Chemical Balance.— For best sem- 
inar work in Chemistry. Awarded to I^wrence Anthony Stead. 

Ab. Kirschbaum & Co. Scholarship. — For highest rating in first year reg- 
ular course. Awarded to Myron S. Freeman. 

Prize Scholarships fob School Year, 1905-1900.- Awarded to Louis Hart 
Talcott, Joseph Collingwood, Frederic U. Kennedy (Evening Class), Thomas 
K. Ouerin {Evening Class). 

CERTIFICATES. 
SCHOOL OF APPUED ART. 

Certificate B— Applied Desion.- Harriet Elizabeth Dolby, Donald Hu- 
bert Ely, Ida Bates Groff, Elizabeth Ely Hsilowell, Jennie Pearson. 

Certificate C — Modelling. —Earl Joshua Early, Pearl Verooa Ebner, 
Helen Stanton Fiske, Florence Caroline Turner. 

Illustration. — Florence M. Frederick, Florence Helf', Mary Elisabeth 
Hunt, Ophelia Eleanor Kenan, George Wilmer Reinbold, Cecil Whittier Trout. 

Architectural Drawing. — William Perey Etawsoo, Walter Irving Dot bard, 
Paul J- Henon, Jr., Antonio di Nardo, Charles Francis Seipp. 

Kormal Art Course.— Margaret Wilkinson Bender, John James Berilla, 
Florence Irwin Griffith, Ida Bates (iroff, Laura Evans Stanfoid, Eslella Eu- 
phemia Smith, George Theodore Ilnmilton, Adelene Zerga. 



Digilzed by Google 



DESIGN FOR BOOK COVER. 

By Edwin John Prittie, a Pupil of the School. 

Ilenr,- Perr; LeIamI Priz« for B«st Work in IlluEtrntion, 1905. 



oy Google 



Drawing for Teachers. — Maiy Agaes Brecht, Florence Violet- Cannon, 
Lucy Marie Chubbuck, Florence May Detwiler, Harriet Elizabeth Dolby, Qrace 
Paul Lea*, Ruth Elinor Newton. 

CL4SR A — Indi'stbial Drawing. — Delia May Adams, Irene Balliet, Clara 
Anna Basse t, Helen Amdt Bickel, Mary Agnes Breciit, Arthur Edwin Bye, 
Florence Vio'et Cannon, Milt' n Henry Carman, Lucy Marie Chubbuck, Frank 
Joseph ClifTord, Jr., Carl Frederic De Planque, Jules Frederic Doriot, Fred 
Carl tick, Fred Mahlon Fling, Mary Elta Forsyth, Lura Louise Frame, Martha 
Yardley GtaS, Helen Deborah Haines, Hannah Linton Hallowell, Olive lone 
Hes% Joseph Robert Higgins, Pearl Lavina Hill, Elsie Williams Lawrence, 
Grace Paul Lea«, Bertha Sandera Levi, Isabel Lower, Raymond Hilary Marion, 
Harley Ernest Mecusker, Allen Raymond Megary, Mary Regina Miller, Debo- 
rah Morris, Mary Elizabeth Mott, Willis Benjamin Musser, Jr., R>ith Elinor 
Newton, Gregorio Alindao Parades, Ada Townsend Paiton, Clarence Garfield 
Pease, Mildred Perkins, Granl Miles Simon, Alice Francis Schramm, I^ura 
Evans Stanford, Lena Stern, Manning Thompson, Margaret Titus, Marlon 
(Jarrison Tomlinson. Edwin Coraly Trego, Ruth Anna Trimble, Jessie Doris 
Walters, Horace Deritt Welsh, Emily Williams, Anna Marie Wurtz, Lenore 
Baker Wright, William Andrew Zwick. 

TEXTILE SCHOOL. 

Second Year— Hcovlar Day Class: 

Robert Emmett Brooke, Robert Leslie Dawson, John Ellsworth File, Charles 
Adam Foi, Hans Henry Iloermann, Nelson James Kershaw, Howard Earle 
Mancill, Penrose Markley, Casimir Joseph Mekszras, Roger Harold Nichols, 
Charles Theis Rehtues, Louis Hart Talcott. 

Second Year Jacchjard Desion Class— Day : 

William Thomas Lockett. 

Second Y'ear Silk Class— Day : 

Charles P. A . Bossetti, Henry Charles Wahls. 

Sbcon-d Year Cottdn Class— Day : 

CharleaSamuelAshby Henry, Ribert Evelyn Henry, Wayland Barber Pickard. 

Second Year Wool Class— Day : 

James Arthur Claypoole. 

Second Year Chbmi!*trv and Dveimi Class— Day ; 

Joseph Collingwood, John Henry Fiebiger, Lawrence Anthony Stead. 

Third Year Reoulau Clash— Evening : 

Joseph Hanson, James R. Lappin, Walter J. Raflel, Sylvester Taylor. 

Third Year Chemistry — Evekihg ; 

E. P. Brooks, W. W. Connelly, Frank Crossley, John M. Schultz. 

PARTIAL COURSES— EVENING CLASS. 
Weavk Formation— Three Years: 

Charles Fremont Crowtlier, James Harvey, Edward Mauley, Frank Robin- 
son, Thomas Seel, Charles W. Shanks, John D. Sbaw. 



Digilzed by Google 



SILK BROCADE. 

Deeigned and Executed by P. BenninghoFen and tl. H. Hart, Pupil)!i of 

the School, 

Prom n Seventeenth t'<nliiry Italian Dcaign. 



Digilzed by Google 



58 



Fabbic Analysis and Caix^ulation — Thbee Yeaw^ : 

Frank RobiDBOn. 

jActirARD Desioh— Two Yeabs : 

J. C. AoderBon, Ivan B. Bcovil. 

WooLEB Yarn Manufactcbe— Two Ybabm: 

Frank Kuenstaer. 

WoBBTBD Yabh Manufactvre— One Year : 

Albert E. FcMler, Richard Grosser, Harry Ralclifle, William Ridler, James 
T. Suteliffe, Louis R Wliitby. 

The tolloviDg students of the Textile School have satisfactorily completed 
the work of the year in rlaasea tor which no ceitlficatee are awarded. 

Day Claiweb — First Year : 

Joel B. Baker, Frederick Breiriter, John J. Collins, Parker Cummings, 
Irving A. Firth, Myron S. Freeman, Caryl A. Orammer, Joseph GegaaB, Jr., 
Alfred W. Hayvood, Jr., Ilat. T. HuDter, Charles B. Ketcham, Waller F. 
Klemer, Benson McDowell, Melville B. Melendy, Eugene Hunger, Charles B. 
Mufgrave, George W. Ott, Samuel P. KuS, Jr., George N. Sidman, John N. 
Stevens, Edward T. Switter, John 0. Tebbetts, Jr., Benjamin B. Underbill, 
Edward J. Wade, Maxwell H. Wagner, Orrin A. White, J. Penman J. Wood, 
Alan Vernon Young. 

Appointments to State Bcbolaiahips have been made thb year for the follow- 
ing counties: Allegheny (2), Armstrong, Bedford, Bucks, Cambria, Carbon, 
Cenlie, Columbia, Cumberland, Foreet, Oreene, Indiana, Lackawanna, Law- 
rence, Lebanon, Lehigh, Mercer, MltBin, Monroe, Ferry, Pike, Potter, Phila- 
delphia (5), Somerset, Tioga, Union, Venango, Wayne, Westmoreland, Wyo- 
ming, York. 

Seventy-nine holders of these Scholarships were registered this year. 

The Scholarships placed at the dispoaa] of the Board of Education of Phila- 
delphia were filled, as usual, by a competitive examination conducted by the 
Principal, each Grammar School being authoriied to send candidates. In ad- 
dition (o the above, appointments were made, as usual, to the Scholarships an- 
nually filled from the High, Normal, Manual Training and Public Industrial 
Alt Schools of this city. 

Appended are tables ehowing the previous occupations of stu- 
dents and the localities from which they come: 



OCCUPATIONS REPRESENTED. 

Agentif, 2 Clergymen, 

Artists, 13 Confectioners, . 

Beamera, 3 Cloth Exa 

Carpenters, .... 8 Decorators, 

Carvers, 5 Designers,. 

Chemists, 1 Draughlsmei: 

Clerks, 102 Drawers-iu, 



Digilzed by Google 



Dressmaken aod Mililnerf 




8 








3 


Druggisto 


1 


Overeeers, . 






9 


Die Cutters and Sinkers 




3 


Openlora, . 






B 


Djere, . . . 




17 


Paltem Maker-. 






2 


Eofrineen', 








Printers, . 






3 


Engraven, 








Perchers, . 






1 










Spinners, . 






6 


Jewelen, . 








Tailors, . 






1 


Knitters, . 








Teachers, . 






84 


Laborers, . 








Teamsters, 






1 


Lawyer*, . 








Weavers, . 






21 


Librarians, 








Wwpers, . 






4 


Loom Filers. 






19 


Students, . 






M9 


Lithographere, 




















Manohcturers, 






13 


Total, 10J8 


LOCALITIES REPRESENTED. 


Fhil»de1phia, . . .Tit 


Maryland 8 


Pennsylvania, 








153 


District of Colnmhin 








New Jereey, 








81 


Wasbington. . 








New York, 








16 


Maine, . 








MaBsachusetts, 








H 


Missouri, . 








Connecticnl, 








4 


Oregon, . 








Virginia, . 








6 


Canada, . 








Ohio, 








7 


Jamaica, . 








Indiana, . 








7 


Minnesota, 








Wisconsin,. 








1 


Alabama, . 








Nortli Carolins 








3 


Tennessee, 








Delaware, . 








7 


Philippine Islands, 








Kansas, . 








1 


France, . 








Illinois, . 








3 




Louisiana,. 








1 




California, . 








1 


Total, 1018 




Respectfully submitted, 




LESLIE W. MILLER, 


MAV3I, 19a 














Princ 


pal. 



Di.itradb, Google 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 

(For Year Ending May 31, 1905.) 

Balance on tiand June 1, 1905, 

Tuition Fees, AH School. $8,276 00 

" " Textile Departmeiil, .... 10,156 00 

Income of Endowment Fund, 4,406 to 

" " TerapleFund, 2,494 00 

" " C^hapman Biddle Fund, .... 50 00 

" " Clayton French Fund, .... 5000 

" " F. A. Graff Fund 20 00 

" " Mrs. Win. Weightman, Jr., Fund, . . 60 00 

" " Elizabelli Duane Gillespie Fund, . . 584 00 

" " Bmma S. Croier Fund, . . , , 101 25 

" ■' New Building Fund, 245 00 

Interest on Depofltts 227 59 

Appropriation, City of Philadelphia, 11,250 00 

" State of PeDnsylvania, . . 37,.'i00 OO 

" Park Commission, .... 10,88005 

Annual Menibera, I,7t5 00 

" Contributions, 60 00 

Offertory Boips al Museum, 60 03 

Xew Building Fund— Bonds sold, .... 10,335 00 

DONATIONS. 

From Textile Associal ion, 1,375 63 

For Museum Library Fund, 315 10 

" Museum Publicnlion Fund 306 25 

" Anglo-American Pottery Fund, . . . . 14 24 

" Heat and Lighting, 60 OQ 

Life Members, 500 00 

From Key Account, 800 00 

Donalion for Mortgage, 2,000 00 

" " Museum, 35 00 

From Committee of Women tor Pottery Dept. , . . 3,S76 90 

Bequest Mary C. Griffith, 1,000 00 

Bynear Williams, Jr., Scholanihip, .... 1,000 00 

Totals, $ 



Digilzed by Google 



EXPENDITURES. 



ifainienanee nj .l/Tutewm, . 
Mainttnaner of Arl Sfhool : 

Salarin and Wages, 

RxpeneeB, 

Eiiuipments, . 

Coil (eetimated gbar«), 



Jfainltnanee Trxlilt Drpl. : 
Salaries and Wages, 
Expenses, 
EqaipmenU, . 
Coal (ettimated share', 



21,352 77 
1,406 07 
1,479 08 
1,661 92 
764 04 



Joint Sthool Eipentft: 

AdmiDistratioD Salaries, . 
General Kxpeivies, . 
AdvertisiDg, > 
School Building Wages aod E\- 

Repairs and Alterations, 
Interest Account, . 
Insurance, 



651 '>7 

5,272 24 
1,686 40 
20,869 12 
1,061 07 



Special Museum Fund, . 
Musical Instnimeiit Fund, . 
Hiiseiim Library Fund, 
F. A. GtafI Fund-Priies, . 
Emma S. Ctoier Fund — Prizes, . 
Anglo-American Pottery Fund, . 
Temple Fund Museum, 
Museum Publication Fund, ■ 
Offertory Account Purchases, 
Annuals — Expenses, 
Pottery Department, . 
C. Godfrey Leiand Fund Investmi 



516 00 

54 02 

20 00 

40 00 

6 00 

3,849 77 

400 27 

611 50 

249 43 

3.576 90 

1,944 89 



Balance, . 



Digilzed by Google 



BALANCE SHEET, MAY 3], 1»05. 

Dr. Or. 

2!) Temporary Loans, $38,000 00 

47 Office Furniture $T29 61 

51 School " 1,500 00 

56 Show Cases ... 15,9ai 37 

66 Library, 2,700 00 

71 Engraving kndPliotoB, 1,1S7 92 

75 CiirvingB, Ivorj and Bone, . ... 76fl 41 

79 Moeaics 300 00 

83 Leatlier Work 10 00 

91 Wood Work, 4,252 56 

95 Jewelry and Goldsmiths' Work, .... 312 96 

99 SilTersmiths' Work and Plate, .... 5,742 25 

103 Metal Work, 6,217 49 

111 .Melal and Plaster Casta, 3,448 99 

115 Arms and Armor, 1,708 79 

119 Coins and Medals 180 00 

123 Enamel* on Metal, 2,014 88 

127 Pottery, 6,627 23 

131 Porcelain, 2,893 94 

135 Painted and Stained Olaw, 109 26 

139 Glaaa Vewels, 662 82 

141 Sculpture in Marble, Stone, etc., 1,820 23 

143 Textile Fabrics and Embroideiiea, . 5,087 94 

145 Musical Instruments, 44 94 

147 Lace 1,190 20 

149 Oil Paintings, ., 100 30 

150 L. W. Miller, advanced to pay bills, ... 200 00 

151 Museum Library Fund 307 08 

153 OHertory Account 532 41 

166 J. T. Morris Fund 35 00 

167 Museum Case Fund, 7 611 

168 Boiler Fund, 1,390 74 

189 Special Museum Annual Fund 530 16 

190 Cash, 10,016 01 

193 Special Plate Fund, 37 29 

235 Museum Publication Fund, 268 48 

236 Special Fund Museum— Purchase New Objects, . 1 95 

237 " " Purchase Musical Instruments, . 33 15 
284 Donations for Purchase Broad and Pine Streets, 205,171 38 
323 Profit and LoM, 116,643 35 

326 Museum Temple Fund Account 4,717 52 

329 Temple Fund InTesimenl, 53,925 69 

333 Ei-dowment Fund Investment, .... 89,947 50 

334 Endowment Fund, 83,006 81 

335 Temple Fund 53,379 00 



oy Google 



1 Life Membem, 

8 DontlionB, 

3 Mrs. Wm. VVeighIiu>D, Jr., S4-holarslii|i, 

i Mrs. Wm. Wpightniin, Jr., Scholsriliip Iiive»t- 

6 F. Uraff Architectural I'riie Fund, . 

6 F. GtbR Architectural Prise Fund InveMment, 

9 Real Eslnle, Broad ind Pine SlreeU. . 
9 MoTlKage Ftroad and Pine Streets, 

2 Chapman Biddle Memorial Scholarship, . 

2 Chapman Biddle Memorial Sehularehip Invest- 

3 CU;tnn French Free Scholarship. 

3 Clayton French Free Scliolanbip Invealnient, 

4 Emma 8. Croter Prize Fund, 

4 Emma a Crowr Priie Fund Investment, . 
8 F. Graff Archilectaral Priie Fund Income, 

7 Gilleapie Scholarship Fund, 

7 Gilleapie Scholarship Fund Inveatment, 

Charles Godfrej Leland Memorial Scholarship. 

Charles Godfrey Letand Memorial 8chalarahip 

InveslmenC, 

1 Rjnear Williams, Jr., Scholarship Fund, . 

2 Fint Mortifage Liquidation Fund, 

2 Emma S. Croier Fund Income 



18,890 OO 
62,522 20 

1,(100 00 



MS 50 
.^(O 00 



417,000 (0 
1,000 00 



1,(100 00 
l,&00 00 



1,000 00 
],.W0 CO 



1,000 00 

2,000 00 
165 00 



J907,O»3 07 (907,083 07 

.TAMES L. ALLAN, 

Attitlant 7V«an(r«r. 



Digilzed by Google 



REPORT OF THK ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE 
OF AVOMEN. 

The work of the Associate Committee from October, 1904, to 
June, 1905, has been conducted on the usual quiet, unobtrusive 
lines; and so there are no marked events by which to compute 
what has been accomplished by the Committee. 

Nine stated meetings have been held, besides the Annual Meet- 
ing. Warm interest has been shown by the members present at 
the meetings, and the reports sent to us by the Trustees are always 
read and enjoyed, and thus the won)en have been able to follow 
in detail the work of the Corporation. 

At the Annual Meeting in January, the President and Vice- 
I'reeident having declined renomination, Mrs. John Harrison was 
elected President and Mrs. Frank K, Hippie Vice-President of the 
Committee. The former Treasurer and Secretary and members of 
the Committee were re-elected. 

Our Treasurer's Report showed a balance on hand on December 
31, 1904, of $5719.46, 

The work has been carried on mostly through the sub-commits 
tees, which are appointed by the President. There are ten of these 
sub-committees: Pottery Committee, Students' Club Committee, 
Illustration Committee, Instruction Committee, Mu sen ni Commit- 
tee, Scholarship Committee, Printed and Woven Fabrics Commit- 
tee, Prize Committee, Committee on Artistic Furniture, Students' 
Loan Committee. 

All of these sub-committees have done good work, but in a brief 
report only the work of one or two can be touched on. 

A new branch of our work has been started for the benefit of our 
students, and is called " The Students' Ijoan Fund." Its object is 
to loan small sums to students during their course. Many of them 
are educated by our Scholarships, and have not suflBcient means 
to enable them to supply materials, as well as pay for the neces- 
saries of life, and are frequently compelled to leave the school be- 
fore their course is ended on this account, when a small loan would 
enable them to continue with us. 



Digilzed by Google 



66 

The Pottery Committee has done most excellent work, and its 
BUccess hoa been unprecedenteil. 

The Scholarship Committee has awarded twelve f-chohirehipB on 
the Elizalieth Duane Ciilleepie Foundation, and has taken a per- 
sonal interest in the work and general conduct of each holder of a 
Scholarship. 

The Students' Club Committee has exercised great tact and skill 
in the general oversight of the various organizations among the 
students, which are for their comfort, amusement and improve- 
ment. 

Included in these is the "Art and Textile Club," which num- 
bers 48 members. This little club has paid all its expenses during 
the year. The students are desirous now of an addition of n 
Bowling Alley, which could be conveniently placed in the Gymna- 
sium. Another improvement desired is the decorating and fitting 
up of another room for recreation, aa at present the Club Room is 
uncomfortably crowded. 

The other organization under the Students' Club Committee is 
the Girls' Industrial Art League. This numbers 110 members 
(treasury, 833.94). 

In January a i>lay was given by the League in connection with 
the Art and Textile Club, which netted them ?3(). 

Later the two clubs together gave a dance, the profits of which 
were 120. 

There were also six receptions during the year, and three literary 
evenings. 

A Basket Ball League has been formed by the girls. 

Thus it can readily be seen that the Students' Club Committee 
does much towards helping the students to live a rational life, 
physically and morally, which is of importance, as many of the 
students here have no home ties in the city. 

In closing this brief statement I would like, in tiie name of the 
Committee, to appeal to every eamest-minded woman in Philadel- 
phia to help the Committee in the work which it is trying to do, 
and we feel sure that if the women thoroughly understood the 
scope of the work of art aa applied to domestic uses, they would 
moat generously help, not only by subscriptions, which are greatly 
needed, but also by their personal influence and their sympathy. 
ALEXINA L. DALLAM, 

JrnE 12, ]90j. 



oy Google 



66 



•n McMurirk, Treaaurtr, in Account with Assodaie Com- 
mittee of Women, Pennsf/lcania Museum and School 
of Industrial Art. 

, 1904. To Balince as per Last Seport, 

" Less Balance in Hands of Chairman of 
CoiumttUe on Potlery Department, 



To Cash from Annual Subecriptione Be- 
" " " LifeMemberghipSubflcrip- 



15,757 (>9 

3,546 OU 

(2,211 69 

405 00 





■■ •' for StudenU' Loan Fund, , 




635 00 




• " from Fines, .... 




850 




" " " Interest, .... 




46 22 




" BuildinRFund, . 




13 15 




' Studenta' Loan 








Fund, . 




2 25 




H.KPENDLTUK BS, 




(3,421 81 


1904. 


By Cash, Subscriptions Paid ii> Treasurer 












8505 00 




" Printing and Postage, 




3 25 




" Accuuntof Students' Loan Fund, 




210 00 


igas. 


'■ Balances Transferred to Mrs. F. K. 
Hippie, Treasurer, viz. : 








General Fund, .... 


$56 01 






Students' Loan Fund, 


649 IS 






Building Fund, .... 


674 2S 








1,324 12 










2,703 56 



(3,421 1^ 

Sarah L. Hippie^ Treasurer, in Account icith Associate Com- 
mittee of Women, Penitsi/lvania Museum and Sc/iool 
of Iiidiislrial Art. 
Rkceipth. 
May 25, 190-^. To Caah Received from Miss Ellen 



McMurtri 
For Account General Fund, . 

" " Students' Loan Fund, 

'' *' Building Fund, . 

" " Auditorium Fund, 



(56 01 
649 15 

674 28 
1,324 12 



oy Google 



«7 

May 25, IWtt. To Life Membenbip, , 

" Anoiuil Sub«cri[ittiin», 
" Mrs. Thomu Robert*' Students' 

PriM, 

■' Mrs. Frank K. Hiiiplc'ii SUi- 

denW Priie, .... 

" I>onation, 



May 29, tS05. By AvsucUte Committee of Women's 

Priws $50 00 

' Mrs. Thomu Koberts' I'riM, . . 20 00 

" Mrs. Prank K. Hippie's Priie, 10 CO 

" " " Memberabip Subscriptiuns Paid oTer 

to Treasurer of Corporation, . 200 00 

" " " Balance, viz. : 

(ieneralFuncI, . $11 01 

Studetitti' Loan Pund, 649 15 

Biiild'iDK Fund 671 28 

.Vuditoriiim Fund, . 1,824 12 

2,ti.'i8 66 

$2,938 66 
POTTEKY DEPARTMENT. 

Sarah L. Hippie, Chairman, iti Areount with Assoeiale Com- 

mittee of Women, Pennsyhania Museum avd School 

of In<(uMr!<d Art. 

Recbipt.i, 



June 9, 1905. By Cash, fcir Building, .... $3,07530 

" " " " " Running E;tpenae», . 1,209 28 

" ■' ■' Balance, 651 97 

$4,936 55 
" " " Subscriptionsnot EeceiTcd, . $225 00 

The Committee on Pottery Department, supplementing ils 
financial report, desire to state tliat the balance on hand of 
$6-51.97, with the subscriptions unpaid and available when needed, 
will be sufficient for the support of this department for another 



oy Google 



year if the expenses be no greater than those of the past fourteen 
months of its existence. Having accomplished the objects of the 
establishment of the department, the erection of building and kiln, 
and the support of the same for its first year, the Committee re- 
linquishes its work, and in addition turns over to the School the 
wherewithal to sustain the department for another year, without 
expense to the Trustees. 

Respectfully submitted. 

SARAH L. HH'I'LE, 

Chairman, 
June 12, 1905. 



Digilzed by Google 



CHARTER 

,1 Amended June tS. }f*'. 



Tub Pennsylvasia Mlseiu and School of 
In DV STRIA L Art. 



The Subscribers* citizens of the Commonwealth of Pcnnsylva- 
nifl, desiring to develop the Art Industries of the Conimonwcflllb, 
and for that purpose to acquire and enjoy for themselves and 
such other persons as are (or may hereafter become) members of 
the Pennsylvania Museum and gchool of Industrial Art, the powers 
and immunities of a corporation, or body politic in law, under the 
Act of the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Pennsyl- 
vania, approved the twenty-ninth day of April, A. D. 1874, enti- 
tled "An Act to provide for the incorporation and regulation of 
certain corporations," hereby associate themselves for the purposes 
and objects, and under the conditions and name specified in the 
following articles : — 

The name of the said Corporation shall be " The Pennsylvania 
Museum and School of Industrial Art." 

II. 

The purpose for which the Corporation is formed is to establish 
for the State of Pennsylvania, in the City of Philadelphia, a 
Museum of Art, in all ila branches and technical application, and 
with a special view to the development of the Art Industries of the 

• The TrusteeB named in Article VI. of the original charter were: "The 
Governor of the Stale, tlie Mayor of the City, John Welsh, \Villiam Bigler, 
John Sartain, George 'W. Child?, Thomns Dolan, G. Dawson Coleman, John 
Baird, William P. Pepper, John L. Slioemaker, Theodore Cuyler, James 
Hunter, Charles Platl, Morton McMichael, Henry C. Gibson, William Pepper, 
M.t). , Coleman Sellers, Chapman Biddle, James L. Claghome, Thomas Cochran, 
Samnel Wagner, Jr." Of tlieso gentlemen, Morton McMichael, Theodore Cuy- 
ler and William Plait Pepper were chosen by the others to subscribe as incor- 
porators before the Kecorder of Deeds. 



Digilzed by Google 



70 

State, to provide instruction in Drawing, Painting, Modelling, De- 
signing, etc., through practical schools, special libraries, lectures, 
and otherwise. The institution to be similar in its general features 
to that of the South Kensington Museum of London. 

III. 

The business of the Corporation shall be transacted in the City 
of Philadelphia. 

IV. 
The Corporation ia to have perpetual succession. 

V. 
The Corporation shall be managed by a Board of Trustees, who 
shall be chosen, at the time fixed, in number and in the manner 
prescribed by the By-Laws. 

The Corporation shall be composed of persons who may become 
members upon such terms as the Trustees shall determine. Per- 
sons of either sex shall be eligible to membership. The right of 
voting and transacting business shall be confined to members 
other than Honorary and Corresponding. 

VII. 
The Trustees, ot a majority of them, shall have power to make 
and adopt any By-Laws, and the same to alter and amend, and 
make such regulations for the government and management of the 
Corporation a& shall be deemed expedieni, not inconsistent with 
the Constitution and Laws of the United States and of the Com- 
monwealth of Pennsylvania. 



Digiized by Google 



BY-LAWS. 

<Ai Amended NovemWr ^J. 



I, Classikkatios of Mgmrrrs. 

1. Piilnm Members, who elinll contribute $50(K) or more to tlie 
Corporation. 

2. Life MemlieTx, who shall contribute $100 or more iit one time. 

3. Annual Memhfru, viho shaW contribute not less than ten dol- 
lars yearly. 

4. Oyrregjumding Me^nliers, who do not rcfide in the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania, and are deemed worthy of election. 

5. Himoriirif Unnberg, who, on account of their interest in in- 
dustrial art education or the fine arts, shall be deemed worthy of 
election. 

Any person may be elected a Life or a Patron Member who 
shall have made a gift other than money, valued and accepted by 
the Trustees at the sum requisite for admission to that class. 

Members in any of the above classes shall be nominated and 
elected at the stated meetings of the Executive Committee. Three- 
fourths of the votes cast shall be necessary to elect members. 

Patron and Life Members shall not be liable to annual dues. 

All funds received from Patron Klembers shall be permanently 
invested as a part of the endowment fund, unless otherwise spe- 
cifically given. 

All funds received from Life Membership shall be permanently 
invested as a part of the endowment fund. 

The yearly dues of Annual Members shall be due and payable 
on the first day of January in advance. 

Members in arrears for two years shall be considered as having 
resigned, and their names may be stricken from the list by the 
Executive Committee. 

IL Trl'.stkks. 

A Board of Trustees consisting of fifteen members shall be 
elected by the Corporation as hereinafter provided : The Governor 
of the State and the Mayor of the city, ex officih, and one repre- 



OMzcdoyGoOglC 



72 

eentotive of each of the five following bodies, provided they shall 
make such appointment, viz., the Senate and the House of Rep- 
resentatives of the Slate, the Select and Common Council of the 
city, and the Commissioners of Fairmount Park. Of the fifteen 
Trustees elected by the Corporation, five shall be chosen to serve 
for one year, five to serve for two years, and five to serve for three 
years; and at each annual meeting five Trustees to serve for three 
years shall be elected to fill the places of those whose terms shall 
have then expired. 

In case of the failure in any year of any of the bodies above 
named to choose a representative, the person already chosen, if 
any, shall continue to be a Trustee until a successor is appointed. 

Any Trustee who shall have been absent from two successive 
stated meetint^s of the Board, without a sufficient reason given 
therefor, may, after dne notice, be dropped from the list of Trus" 
tees. 

Any vacancy in their number may be filled by the Trustees at 
any meeting by appointment to serve until the next annual meet- 
ing of the Corporation. 

III. Officers. 

The officers of the Corporation shall be u President, two Vice- 
Presidents, a Treasurer (all of whom shall be chosen from the 
Board of Trustees), and a Secretary (not necessarily a member of 
that body). 

The officers shall be elected by ballot by the Trustees at their 
first meeting after the annual meeting of the Corporation, and 
shall hold their offices for one year or until the election of their 



Any vacancy among the officers may be filled by the Trustees 
at any meeting of the Board ; and until so filled shall be filled by 
the Executive Committee. 

The Preaident shall preside at all meetings of the Board of 
Trustees, and be c£ officio a member of all committees. In his 
absence a Vice-President, or in the absence of both Vice- Presidents 
one of the Trustees, shall be chosen to perform that duty. 

The Treamrer shall have charge of the funds, securities and 
the evidences of title of the Corporation, and shall deposit them 
in such institution as the Executive Committee shall from time to 
time direct. 

He shall keep accurate accounts of the receipts and expendi- 



Digilzed by Google 



73 

ture^ during the year, and simll, at each etalcil meeting; of llie 
Execiilive Cominittee, present a detailed statement of the same. 
He shall prepare an annual report of the financial condition of tlie 
Corporation, which shall have been auditt^'d by a auh-comniittee 
apiwinted for the purpose by the Executive Coninuttee. lie sliall 
keep a register of the naniee and addreBfcs of all the nienibera of 
the Corporation and shall report in writing to the Kxeculive Com- 
mittee, at the end of t'lich year, the names of all those who are at 
the date of the report in arrears for dues. He shall issue all cer- 
tificates to members, which shall be signed by the President and 
countersigned by the Secretary. He shall j)repare warrants cor- 
responding with bills to be paid, wbicli warrants shall be signe<l 
by the Chairman of the Executive Committee and countersigned 
by the Secretary, He shall attend to the collection of all dues 
and shall make such payments ns may be ordered by the Execu- 
tive Committee. He shall give bond for the faithful performance 
of his duties in such form and amount as the Executive Commit- 
tee may require. 

The Treasurer shall be ex officio a member of the Executive 
Committee. 

The Secretary shall attend all meetings of the Corporation, of the 
Trustees, and of the Executive Committee, and also any meeting 
of any Standing Committcea when required. He shall send notice 
of meetings to each member thereof at least two days before such 
meeting, and shall keep a record of their proceedings. He shall 
give notice to those bodies which have the right to appoint Trustees 
one month before the expiration of the term of the Trustees ap- 
pointed by them. He shall have the custody of the seal of the 
Corporation, and shall receive such annual compensation for his 
services as may be decided upon by the Executive Committee. 

The Executive Committee shall elect a Director of the Museum, 
a Principal of the Schools, an Assistant Treasurer, and such other 
officers as may be necessary, and shall*define their respective 
duties and fix their compensation. 

IV. Committees. 

The Board of Trustees shall in each year elect by-ballot twelve 

of their members to serve as an Executive Committee, of which 

five members shall constitute a quorum with full authority to 

transact business. 



Digilzed by Google 



74 

It shall select its Chairman and shall have power to extinguish 
ground rents, satisfy mortgages, transfer stock and loans, and gen- 
erally to transact the current business of the Board of Trustees. 
It shall make a full report of its actions to each stated or special 
meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

The Executive Committee shall elect four of their members to 
serve as Chairmen of the Standing Committees. These Chairmen 
shall appoint their own Standing Committees. 

Any member of the Corporation may be appointed to the 
Standing Conimitteea. 

The Standing Committees shall be: — 

1. A CmnmitUe on Art, of five members, whose Chairman must 
he a Trustee, and, whenever possible, a professional painter, sculp- 
tor, architect, or recognized art expert. He shall select, when 
possible to do so (not necessarily from the Corporation), a repre- 
sentative of each of the before-mentioned professions. To this 
Committee shall be referred, for their opinion and advice, all pro- 
posed purchases for the Museum Collections. 

The Committee on Art shall have charge of the Gallery of Paint- 
ings and Sculpture, and with the Director of the Museum arrange 
for their propel- care and display. 

2. A Cummitlee on the Museum, of ten members, who shall have 
charge of all objects in the Museum, and of their arrangment and 
exhibition. 

3, A Committee on Instruction, of eighteen members, who shall 
have charge of the conduct and management of the School, 

4, A Committee oii Finance, of five members, who shall devise 
plans for the maintenance of the Museum and School, and attend 
to all other financial matters which may be referred to them by 
the Executive Committee or by the Board of Trustees. 

The Standing Committees shall examine and approve, if cor- 
rect, all hills relating (o their respective departments, and make 
reports of their proceedings by minutes or otherwise at the stated 
meetings of the Executive Committee. 

Any member of the Executive Committee, or of any Stfinding 
Committee, who shail have been absent from two successive meet- 
ings without a sufficient reason given therefor, may, after due 
notice, be dropped from the Committee and another person a\i- 
pointed to fill the vacancv. 



Digilzed by Google 



75 

Any vacancy in thi- Executive Cumnnttee shnll be filleil hy the 
President. 

Any vacancy in a Standing; Committee nhall be filled by the 
Chairman of that Committee. 

V. iNDEBTEDNEfB. 

No contract involvinfc an expenditure exceeding 81110 shall be 
incurred except by authority of the Executive Committee. All 
bills previous to payment shall be approved by the Committee 
having chaise of the department to which they relate, and i)re- 
sented to the Executive Coinmittee, on whose approval wnrrnnts 
for their payments shall be drawn on the Treasurer. 

VI. Mketincis. 

At all meetings of the Corporation the number of members 
present in person necessary to constitute a quorum for tlic trans- 
action of business shall be fifteen, and at such meeting every 
Annual Member who is not in arrears for dues for one year, and 
every Life and Patron Member for each one hundred dollars con- 
tributed, shall be entitled to one vote in person. 

The annual meeting of the Corporation shall be held on the 
second Monday of June in each year, at such place and hour as 
the President shall determine. The annual reports of the Board 
of Trustees and the Treasurer shall be submitted to such meeting, 
and after their consideration the election of Trustees to fill the 
place of those whose term of office expires and of any place made 
vacant during the year shall then be held. The Chairman shall 
appoint two tellers to conduct the election, which shall be by ballot. 

The Board of Trustees so elected shall meet for organization 
immediately after the annual meeting of the Corporation, or as 
Boon thereafter as possible, and thereafter quarterly or monthly, 
as they may elect. 

Stated meetings of the Executive Committee shall be held on 
such day or days in each month, except July and August, as may 
be from time to time determined by the Committee. 

Each Standing Committee shall meet once every month, except 
in July and August, at such time and place as shall be appointed 
by its Chairman. 



Digiized by Google 



76 

VII. Special Meetisgs. 

Special meetings of the Corporation shall be called at anj' time 
upon an order of the President, or upon the written demand of 
five members, stating the object of the meeting. 

Special meetings of the Board of Trustees shall be called at any 
time upon an order of the President, or upon the written demand 
of three members thereof, stating the object of the meeting. 

Special meetings of the Executive Committee shall be called at 
any time upon an order of the President, or of its Chairman, or 
upon the written demand of three members thereof, stating the 
object of the meeting. 

At special meetings no other subjects than those specified in 
the written demand, which shall also be expressed in the notices, 
shall be considered. 

VIII. Order of Bcsi.vess. 
At the annual meeting of the Corporation: — 
Reading the minutes. 
Report of the Board of Trustees, 
Report of the Associate Committee of Women. 
Report of the Treasurer. 
Election of Trustees. 

At the stilted meetings of the Executive Committee : — 

Reading the minutes. 

Report of the Treasurer. 

Reports of Standing Committees. 

Reports of Special Committees. 

Deferred business. 

New business. 

IX. Amendments. 

New By-Laws, or amendments or repeal of any By-Laws, may 
be proposed at any stated meeting, or at a special meeting of the 
Board of Trustees called for that purpose, and such new By-Laws, 
amendments or repeal shall be submitted for adoption at a subse- 
quent stated or special meeting of the Board of Trustees ; Pro- 
rided, that at least two weeks' notice of the proposed action shall 
be sent to each member of the Board of Trustees. And at such 
subsequent meeting the proposed new By-Laws, amendments or 
repeal may be adopted by a vote of the majority of three-fourths 
of the members of the Board present. 



oy Google 



List of Patrons, Life^ Annual and Hcnotary Members. 



&Ca 



*Beint, John 
•Barton, Mrs, Suaan K. 

Blanchsrd, Mils Anna 
*B1oowSelcl Moore, Mre. 
•Childs, George W. 

Di«ton, Henry & Sons 
•Dreiel, A. J. 
*Dresel, F. A. 
•(inrrelt, W.E. Jr. 
•Gil»on, Henrj C. 
•Houitun, H. H. 



Allen, Jotieph 

Allen, Joseph, Jr. 
•Arnolil, Crawford 

Baeder, Ailatu 
•Baily, Joel J. 

Bain), Mre. Mattliew 
*Bsker, John B. 
•Baker, W. S. 

Barclay, K. D. 

Barclay, Mrs. B. I). 
"Band, B. H. 

Band, H. W. 

Batilea, H. H. 

Bniigh, Daniel 
•Biokley, H. \V. 

Bickley, Mrs. JI. \V. 
•Biddle, Alexander 

Biddle, Miss Annie I 
"Biddle, Chapman 
•Biddle, Mre. Chapnit 
•Biddlt, Clenitnt 
•Biddle, Walter L. C. 

Blaiiclinrd, Miss A. 

Blanclianl, Mias H.' 



Jenks, John Stury 

'Lippincflit, Mm. J. Dumlas 

Morris, John T. 

Search, The<Kiot« C. 
•Scott, Mre.Thoinai> A. 
•Temple, Joieph K. 
•Weightnian, William 

Whitney, A. &twaa 

Wialer, Mm. Jonea 



LIKE MEMBERS. 



Blanchan], Misa M. 
•Borie, C. A H. 
•Bowen & Foi 
•Brown, Alexander 

Bum ham, Oeorge 

Bumhani, Parry, Williams & Co 

Buicher, Henry C. 

Butcher, Mrs H. C. 

Button, Cunyers 
•Caldwell, J. K. 

Caldwell, J. E. & Co, 

Campbell, Mra. St. George T. 
"Carter, W. T. 

Carver, W. Burton 

Caaaatt, A J. 
•Catherwood, H. W. 
•Chapman, Joseph 
•Chew, Samuel 
•Claghom, James L. 

Claghorn, J. Raymond 

Clark, Charles D. 

Clark, Clarence II. 
•Clark, P]phraim 
•Clark, E. \V. 



oy Google 



•Clark, J. Hinckley 
"Clayton, John 

Clothier, Isaac H. 
*Clyde, Thomas 
'Cuates, Benjamin 

Coales, ^>lwa^d H. 

Cochran, M. 
'Cochran, Thomas 

Coffin, Alleroua &Co. 

Coleman, Mra. B. Dawson 
"Coleman, Mre. G. Dawson 

Coleman, Edward P. 

Coles, Miss Mary 

Colket, C. Howarl 

Collins, H. II. 

Cooper, John II. 

L'ope, Hiss Annette 
*Cope, Caleb 

Cornelius & Sons 

Coxe, VAMley B., Jr. 
'CresBon, W. P, 

Croze r, George K. 

Crozer, Mrs. George K. 
•Crozer, J. Lewis 
•Cuyler, Mrs. Theodore 
*Dick, F. A. 
•DisBlon, Albert H. 
*Disston, Hamilton 
•Distton, Mrs. H. C. 
'Dubbins, R J. 

Dobson, John A James 



Dolar 



Thoi 



Dolan, Thomas & Co 

Dougherty, Jatnes 
•Dreer, F. J. 

Du bring, Mrs. Henry 

Kddystone Manufacluring Co. 
•Fari'es, Mre. Randolph 
"Feniniore. Edward L. 
"Field, Mrs Eliia W. 
•Fojt, Miss Mary D. 

Furbush, Merrill A. 
•Foguet, Stephen O. 
"Garrett, Miss Elizabeth 

Garrett, Miss Julia 

Garrett, P. C. 



Garrett, Mrs. Walter 
Gibson, Miss Rebecca 
"Gowen, Franklin B. 
•Graff, Frederic 
•Graff, Mre. Frederic 
Green, Stephen 
Hagsloz & Thorpe 
Harrison, A. C 
Harrison, Havemeyer & Co. 
Harrison, Mrs. Joseph 
Harrison, Thomaa S, 
•Hart Samuel 
•Haupt, Mrs, Wm. K. 
•Heberton, G, Craig 
llenszey, William P. 
Henszey, Mre. William P. 
Hill, George W. 
■Hockley, Miss Annie E. 
Hockley, Mr?. John 
Hockley, Misa Mary 
•Hockley, Thomas 
Hockley, Mrs. Thomas 
•Hockley, William Stevenson 
•Horstmann, F. 0. 
Horstmann, W. H. & Sons 
Houston, Mrs. H. H. 
•Hughes, John O. 
Hunter, James & John 
lungerich & Smith 
•James, John O. 
Jayne, David & Sons 
•Jones, Jacob 
Jones, Washington 
Justice, Bateman & Co. 
''Justice, Miss Cecilia 
Justice, William W. 
Justice, Mrs. William W. 
Kleinm, Mrs. Maria L. 
•Knight, Edward C. 
•Lea, Isaac 

Lee, Mrs. Ijclghlon 
•Lewis, Edwin M. 
•Ijcwia, Henry 
Lewis, Miss Mary 
Lewis, Richard A. 
Lewis, Miss Sarah 



oy Google 



79 



Litlle, Amos R. 

Little, Amos R. & Co. 
'Lovering, Joseph S. 
•Loveriog, Joseph S., Jr. 

McKean, Mnt. Thoniui 

McNeely, Misa Florence 

McXeelj, Robert K. 

McNeely, Mra. Robert K. 

MacVeagh, Wajne 

Magee, Misa Eliza J. 

Magee, Miss Fannie S. 
•Jtasaey, ^Villiam 

May, Mrs. Joseph 

Meira, Mrs. R. Wain 
■Merrick, Misa K. H. 

Merrich, J. Vaiighan 
•Merrick, Misa L. W. 
"Merrick, Mrs. S. V. 

Merrick, William H. 

Miles, Mrs. M. L. 

Miles, Thomas 

Milne, David 
'Millikcn, James 

Moore, Clarence IS. 
•Moore, James 

Morris, Miss Lydia T. 
•Morris, P. Pemberlon 
•Morris, Wistar 
•Murphy, Frank W. 
•Murphy, Miss Helen L. 
•New bold, Charles 
•Newbold, John S. 

Kewbold, Mm. John H. 
•Xoblil, Dell 

Norris, Charles 

Norris, Isaac, M.D. 
•Page, Joseph F. 
•Patterson, Joseph 

Pell, Rev. Alfred Duane 
•Pepper, George 8. 
•Pepper, Lawrence S. 
•Pepper, William, M.D. 
Pepper, William Plait 
•Phillips, Henry M. 
•Phillips, Moro 
Plfltt, Charles 



•PUtt, Franklin 

Porter & Coatcs 
•Poultney, Charles W. 
•Powers, Mrs. Thomas H. 

Price, Eli K. 

Provident Life and Trust Co, 
•Randolph, Eran 

Randolph, Mrs. Evan 

Randolph & Jenks 
•Rhoads, Miss Elizabeth 
•Roberts, Charlea 

BobeKs, Mrs. Charlea 
•BoberiB, Jacob, M.D. 
•Bt^rs, C. H. 
•Rogers, Falrnian 
•Rogers, W. D. 

Santee, Charles 

Scott, Edgar 

Scott, James P. 
•Scutt, Mn. James P. 

Scull, D. & Co. 

Segal, Adolph 

Sellers, Coleman 
•Sellew, William 
"Sejberl, Henry 
•Sharpless, Charles S. 
•Shelton, Carlos 

Shelton, P.H. 
•Shelton, Frederick K. 
•Shelton, Mrs. F. R. 
"Sherman, Roger 

Shortridge, N. Parker 
•Smith, Charles E. 
■Smith, Thomas 
•Smyth, Lindley 
•Solms, S. J. 
•Somuierville, Maxwell 
•Spencer, Charlea 
•Steel, Edward T. 

Steel, E. T. & Co. 

Stevenson, Mrs. Cornelius 

Strawbridge, J. C, 

Sweatman, V. C. 

Taiit, Mrs. C. G. 
•Temple, Joseph E. 
•Thomas, S. Harvey 



Digitized by Google 



Tliropp, Mrs. Joseph H 

Townsend, Mrs. H. C. 

Turner, Mw. Cliarles P. 
*Tjler, George F. 
*Vaux, Milium S. 
•Vollmer, Gottlieb 

^Vagner, Samuel 
•Wagner, Mrs. T. 
•Wanlen, W. G. 
*\VHrner, Redwood F. 
•WeUli, Samuel 
"Wemwag, Theodore 
' Wetherill, Samuel Price 

Wliarlon, Joseph 



•Wheeler, Chailes 

Whitall, Tatuu ACo. 
•While, Samuel S. 

Whitney, Miu Margaretta V, 
•Williams, Edward II. 

Wister, Mrs. Jones 

Wood, Sluart 

Wood, William 

Wood, Willism & Co. 
•Wright, Edward K. 
•Wright, James A. 
•Wright, John W. 

Wnrta, Charles Stewart, MD. 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 
SUBSCRIPTIOS, $25.00 
Hippie, Mrs. Vnxik K. 
Turner, Mrs. Charles P. 



SVHSCRIPTION, $20.00 



SUBSCRIPTION, $10.00 



Austin, Richard L. 
Baily, Joshua L. 
Barber, Edwin AlLec 
Barnes, Miss Anne Ilamplon 
Barlol, Mrs. C. Cheyiiey 
Bement, Clarence S, 
Benson, G. S., Jr. 
Blakiston, Miss Kiuma 
Blanchard, Miss Anna 
Blanker burg, Mrs. Rudolph 
Borden, Edward P. 
Brazier, Joseph H. 
Brinton, Mrs. John H. 
Broralev, Joseph II. 
Brown,.Miss Martha M. 
Brown, T. Wistar 
Burnham, William 
Burnbam, Mrs. William 
Cadwalader, Mrs. John 



Caldwell, Miss Flot«nce F. 
Caldwell & Co., J. E. 
Carter, Mrs. \V. T. 
Castncr, Samuel, Jr. 
Chahoon, Mrs. Joseph S. 
Chandler, T. P. 
Clapp, B. Frank 
Clark, Miss Amie Hampton 
Clark, Mrs. C. Howard, Jr. 
Clark, MissF. 
Clyde, Miss Margaret 
Cochran, Travis 
Cochran, Mra. Travis 
Coles, Edward 
Colket, George H. 
Colton, S. W., Jr. 
Converse, John H. 
Oorlies, MisE- M. L. 
Coie, Alexander B. 



oy Google 



81 



Cremrell, Miw Elimbeth P. 
Croier, Mi» Ada M. 
Croier, Samuel A. 
Dallam, Mis. David K. 
Dana, Cbarlen E. 
Dana, Mra. Cbirlee K 
Davis, Mra. Edwani P. 
Davis, [■:dward T. 
Denniston, Mrs. E. E. 
Dick, Mrs. William A. 
Dickson, Samuel 
ly Invilliera, Charlea E. 
Elkins, Mrs. William L. 
ElliHon, Mrs. Rodoian B. 
Emlen, John Thompson 
Eving, Mist C. L. 
Fearon, Charles 
Kels, Maurice 
Fels, SaQiuel a 
Fellon, Mrs. & M. 
Flagg, Mrs. Stanley Griswold 
Freeman, Mn. C. K. 
French, Mis. Harry B. 
Frishmuth, Mrs. W. D. 
Galey, W. T. 
Galloway, William. 
GibU, Mrs. William W. 
Gibson, Alfred C. 
Gibson, Miss Mary K. 
Gillingluuti, J. E. 
Graff, MisB Henriella 
Giant, Mrs. William S., Jr. 
Grove, Mrs. Henry S. 
Gucker, Frank T. 
Hale, n. Warren K. 
Harris, Mrs. J. Campbell 
Harrison, George L. 
Harrison, John 
Harrison, Mrs. Jolin 
Harrison, Mnt. Joseph 
Henry, Mrs. Charles W. 
Hippie, Fmnk K. 
Howell, Mrs. Charles II. 
Howeli, Cooper 
Howell. Edward I. H. 
Hunter, T. Couily 
Hutchinson, Miss Mar^retta 



Jack, Dr. Louis 
Jacobs, Mis. Edward B. 
Janney, Mra. Robert M. 
Jenks, Mrs. William F. 
Jenks, William H. 
JusUce, William W. 
Justice, Mrs. William W. 
Keen, Dr. W. W. 
Keilh, Sidney W. 
Kennedy, Mrs. Ellas D. 
Kellerlinus, J. I^ 
Ketterlinus, Mrs. J. I. 
Lea, Miss Kina 
LippincotI, Mrs. Craige 
LippincotI, Mrs. Horace (i. 
Lloyd, Mrs. Malcolm 
iMgan, Mrs. John P. 
Lovering, Mrs. J. S. 
McMurlrie, Miss Ellen 
Magee, Miss Anna J. 
Ma|;ee, Horace 
Miller Sons A Co., Jacob 
Miller, Leslie W. 
Miller, Theodore F. 
Milne, Mrs. F. F. 
Mitchell, Mre. & P. S. 
Morwiti, Joseph 
Moultim, Mra. Byron P. 
Neall, Frank L. 
Newhall, George M. 
Norton, Mrs. Nathaniel Read 
Ogden, Mrs. Pklward H. 
Paul, Dr. James 
Paul, Miss M. W. 
Pepper, David 
Pepper, Mrs. John W. 
Peters, Mrs. Richard 
Randolph, Miss Anna 
Randolph, Mrs. Evan 
Reilly, Mrs. Thomas A. 
Ristey, Dr. Samuel D. 
Ritchie, Craig D. 
Roberts, Miss Elizabeth C. 
Roberts, Miss Frances A. 
Roberta, Frank C. 
Roberts, Mrs. George B. 
Roberts, Mrs. Tliomaa 



Digilzed by Google 



82 

Rodman, Mrs. I^wia Thomas, George C. 

Bosengarten, Misa Kanoy Trotter, Mrs. Edward H. 

RoBengartcn, J. G. Walker, Mra. R. J. C 

Rumpp, H. C. Wetherill, Mra. Samuel Price 

*SiinderB, Mias Anne N. Weygandl, C N. 

Sanders, Miaa Ilenrietla W. Wheeler, Mrs. Charles 

Scattergood, Thomas Whitney, W. fieaiimonl 

Schell, John W. WilUama, Ellis D. 

Sellen, John, Jr. Wilson. James L. 

SioDOtt, JoKph P. Wiltbank, Mrs. W. W. 

Sinnott, MrH. Joseph F. Wing, Abu S. 

Smith, Charles Wiater, Mrs. John 

Smith, Miss Christiana B. Wood, Mrs. George 

Smith, Edward B. Wood, Miss Juliana 

Stetson, Mra. John B. Zell, Misa Hannah A, 

Sloiit, Elbrittge G. Zimmerman, Dr. M. W. 

HONORARY MEMBERS. 

Atwood, Eugene, Atwood Machine Co., Stoninglon, Conn. 

Berry, A, llun, Boston, Mass. 

Boyd, Jame.s, Phila^ielphia, Pa. 

Brown, Edwin, .American Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Burnham, Charles C, Easton & Bumham, Pawtucket, R. I. 

Buraham, George W., Easton & Bumham, Puwtucket, R. I. 

Campbell, Malcolm, Woonaocket Machine and Press Co., Woonaocket, R. I. 

Cochran, J. C, Charlottesville Manufacturing Co., Charlottesville, Va. 

Comins, Frank B., Aerophore Air-Moistening A Ventilating Co., Providence, 

It. I. 
Crompton, Charles, Crompton and Knowles Ijooni Works, Worcester, Maw. 
IJenny, Charles A., .\inerican Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Mass. 
Draper, Geo. A., Hopedale, Mass. 

Easton, Frederic W., Easton A Bnmham, Pawtucket, B. I. 
Eaat^n, Nicholas M., Easton & Rurnham, Fawtucket, B. I. 
Fales, Le Roy, Fales & Jenks Machine Co., Pawtncket, R. L 
Firth, William, American Drosopliore Co., Boston, Mass. 

*Fletcher, George A., Scliaum & Uhtinger (Fletcher Works), Philadelphia, Pa. 
Furbush, Merrill A., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Grice, Edwin C, Philadelphia Textile Machinery Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Grinnell, Frederic, Aerophore Air-Moistening A Ventilating Co., Providence, 

R. I. 
Hale, F. J., Saco and Pettee Machine Works, Newton Upper Falls, Mass. 
IlartKell, F. W., Aerophore Air-Moislening & Ventilating Co., Providence, 

R, I. 
Hiidreth, Charles L., Lowell Machine Shop, Lowell, Mass. 



Ij 3 It 9 b 

Di.itradb, Google 



Ilopkiiu, William S., Woonwicket Machine & Prcu Co., Woonsocket, R. I. 

Hutcbina, C. H., Crompton and Knuwleii Loom Works, Worcester, Mbss. 

Hutchins, <j. F., rrompton and Knowle* Loom Works, WorcMter, Mans. 

Jenk», Alvin F., Falea .% Jenlu Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. 1. 

Jenks, Stephen A., Fales & Jenka Machine Co., Pawtucket, R. I. 

Knowles, F. P., I'ruiiiptnn and Knowlea loom Works, Wnrresler, Mass. 

Kiiowlton, Cliarle» II., PhiladelphU, I'm. 

UmcII, C. W., Whitin Machine Co., WhitintTille, Masa. 

IakU, J. M., Whitin Machine Co., WhilinaTille, Mass. 

Maynard, Lorenzo, Maynard, Mass. 

Merriani, li. H., rromptim and Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, Maas. 

Munlock, Jotieph, American Card Clothing Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Kevins, David, Haco and Pettee Machine Works, NewUin Upper Falls, Mass. 

Roinetach, W. H., Schanni & Uhlinser (Fletcher Works), Philadelphia, Pa. 

Riusell, J. M., Crompton and Kno\v)eti I.o«m Works, Worcesler, Mass. 

Sargent, C. (i., Uraniteville, Mass. 

Schaum, Otto W., Schaum & Uhlinger (Flelcher Works). Philadelphia, Pa. 

Smith, Chester B., Woonsocket Machine A Press Co., Woonsocket, R. 1. 

Smith, Stanley li., Woonsocket Machine A Press Co., Woonsocket, R. I. 

Snelling, R. P., Saco and Petlee Machine Works, Newton Upper Falls, Mass. 

Taft, C. A., Whitin Machine Co., Whilinsville, Mass. 

Taft, W. L., Whitin Machine Co., Whitinsville, Mass. 

White, H, Arthur, American Card Clothing Co., Worcesttr, Mass. 

Ware, Justin A., Worcester, Mass, 

Whitin, O. M., Whitin Machine Co., Whitinsville, Maaa. 

Wyman, Horace, Craiuplon and Knowlea Ixiom Works, Worcester, Maaa. 



Di.itradb, Google 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



I give and bequeath unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School 

of Industrial Art the sum of.... 

dollars, for the use of the said Corporation. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE. 



I give and devise unto the Pennsylvania Museum and School of 
Industrial Art, its successors and assigns, all that certain [here insert a 
description of the property\ for the use of the said Corporation, 



Witnesses,.... 



Digitized by G(Xlg[c 



Di.itradb, Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



Di.itradb, Google 



3 2044 041 987 967 



This book is not to be 
talcen from the Library 



1 



D„tko» Google 



Di.itradb, Google