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Full text of "Annual statement of the trade and commerce of Saint Louis .."

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■ ^-' OF THE 



i«n 



REPORTED TO THE 






BY 



Ciooglc 



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ANNUAL STATEMENT 



Trade and Commerce of St. Louis 

FOR THE YEAR 1894, 



Merchants' Exchange of St. Louis, 



Geo. H. Morgan, Secretary. 



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OFFICERS OF THE MERCHA24TS' EXCHANGE OF ST. LOUIS 
SINCE ITS ORGANIZATION. 



Tmt. 






18S2 


Henry J. Hoora. 


C. S. Greeley. 


A. W. Fagin. 


676 


1863 


Gflorge Partridite. 


C. S. Greeley. 


A. W. Fagin. 


618 


186i 




Barton Able. 


C. L. Tncker. 


736 


1866 


Barton Able. 


E. O. Stanard. 


H. A. Homeyer. 


990 


1866 


E. 0. Stanard. 


Alex. H. Smith. 


D. G. Taylor. 


1110 


1867 


C. L. Tncker. 


Edgar Amee. 


D. G. Taylor. 


1068 


1868 


John J. Boe. 


Geo. P. Plant. 


H. A. Homeyer. 


1368 


1869 


Goo. P. Plant. 


H. A. Homeyer. 


Nathan Cole. 


1333 


1870 


Wm. J. Lewis. 


G. G. Waggaman. 


H. C. Yaeger. 


138B 


1871 


C^rard B. Allen. 


B. P. Tansey. 


Geo. Bain. 


128S 


1873 


R. P. Taniey. 


Wm. H. Scndder. 


C. H.TeJchman. 


1S6B 


1873 


Wm. H. Scadder. 


S. H. Edgell. 


WebM. Bamnel, 


1868 


1874 


Web M. Samuel. 


L. L. Ashbrook. 


Jno. F. Tolle. 


1807 


1875 


D. P. Bowland. 


Juo. P. Meyer. 


Wm. M. Senter. 


1443 


1876 


Nathan Cole. 


John Wahl. 


F. B. DavidMn. 


1897 


1877 


John A. Scadder. 


N. Schaeffer. 


Geo. Bain. 


1837 


1878 


Geo. Bain. 


H. C. Haaretlck. 


Craig Alexander 


. 1390 


1879 


John Wahl. 


Michael McEnnla. 


W. J. Lemp. 


1360 


1880 


Alex. H. Smith. 


Chae. E. Slayback. 


J. C. Ewald. 


1S08 


1881 


Michael UcEnnia. 


John Jackaon. 


A. T. Harlow. 


368S 


1882 


Chas. E. Slajback. 


Chae. F. Orthwein. 


Frank Gaiennle. 


3666 


1883 


J. C. Ewald. 


D. R. FraDcdB. 


J>. P. Grier. 


8666 


1884 


D. B. FranciB. 


John P. Keiaer. 




3666 


1886 


Henry C. HaanUck 


. S. W. Cobb. 


D. P. eiattery. 


3606 


1886 


8. W. Cobb. 


Chas. H. Teicbmanu 


. J. Will Boyd. 


8864 


1887 


Prank Galenaie. 


Lonis FnBz. 


Thomaa Booth. 


381S 


1888 


Chaa. F. Orthwein. 




Chaa. A. Cox. 


S296 


1889 


Chaa. A. Cox. 


Hngh Rogera. 


Alex. Eoston. 


3361 


1890 


John W. Eanfiinan, 


. Uarcns Bernheimer. 


G. M. Flanagan 


.3190 


1891 


Marcna Bernbeimer. Geo. H. Plant. 


S. R. FranciB. 


8116 


1892 


Isaac H. Masoo. 


Wm.T. Anderson. 


WallaceDelafield.8001 


189S 


W. T. Anderson. 


Roger P. Annan. 


L. C. Doggett. 


3913 


1894^ 


JA. T.Harlow. 
fWm. G. Boyd. 


S Wm. G. Boyd. 
J Geo. H. BrnaU, 


\ E. A. Pomeroy. 


3807 


1895 


Thoe. Booth. 


C.MarquardForeter, 


, Geo. D. Barnard. 


3647 



SccnUiT and Treasarer. 
1863 - - - - CUnton B. Fisk. 
1863-64 - - • J. H. Alexander. 
1866-96 - - - Geo. B. Morgan. 



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IN MEMORIAM. 



President A. T. Harlow. 



RCSOLUTtONS 

Prepared t>r a CommlttoeooiialaUiiarot Meosra. B.O. StMiaard, 

Nathan Oole, and Jooeph 8. Nanaon, and adopted by 

tlie Bxohanffs Feb. Bth, 1S&4. 

For tho fint Clmr Id Ihe tilslor; of the MeKliante' Exchange of 
Ibis city, Its memberti ikre called together to give exprMBlrm to Its 
sorrow for the dcntk of its President. 

OnWedhMdaypJunuary 31st, at eleven o'clock, A. M., oar beloved 
President, Alonio T. narlov, departed this life. M his borne in 
Ktminswlck, snrronaded bj tbe loving teuderiiKsa of those neiireat to 
bis heart,— In vrhoae inconsolable grief we deeply share. 

For a generation our brother bas been a member of this Justly 
InHaentlal body. 

We have iratched irlth becoming approclatlon and sincere pride 
his sturdy Integrity, his spotless honesty, his Impartial Justice, his 
boundless benevolence, and his intense devotion to the iDteiestsoC 
this Chamber, and his fidelity to his correcpondents. 

We have felt the Influenre of his great loving heart In his ever 
cheertal ways, his disinterested charities and his high admlnlstra- 
w In each of the various offices held under the charter of 



In the realms of citizenship, bis example and InSaence was ever 
used tor the best good of all. 

AsaOhrlstian, he always honored his high profeseloD by his great 
purity of life, by bis intelligent activity In behalf of BufTerliig 
humanity, and his slDcere and unaffected love of his fellow men. 

Of the love which downed his home lite, we will not dwell upon : 
ltd sacted custody and affection no words of ours can falthtnlly pic- 
ture or describe. 

With saddened hearts we part from one so truly honored and 
loved, and here to-day we will strive to draw Inspiration from his 
splendid life. 

To bis bereaved widow and chlldieo, we offer the condolence of 
oar heartfelt sorrow In this dark hour of their afflctloD. 

We will inscribe this memorial of our departed brother upon the 
records of this Exchange, and transmit a copy thereof to his family. 



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MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE OF ST. LOUIS. 
OTFIOOBS 70B THB TllAB 1894. 



A. T. HAfiLOW, to Jannaiy 3Ut. 
WM. G. BOYD, from rebraary l«th. 

F1B8T ViCB P8E8IDEMT, WM. G. BOYD, to Feb. l«th. 

" " " GEO. H. SMALL, from Feb. 2«th. 

Seoomd Tick pBtsn)«5T, E. A. POMEHOY. 



DIBECIORS. 



TM. T. ANDERSON, 
H. B. BlLBItO, 
H- B. SLAUGHTER, 
WM. K. STANASD, 
C. J. UANEBRINK, 



ISAAC M. MASON, 

D. I. BUSHMELL, 

AMEDEE B. COLE, 

C. MARQUABD FOB8TEB 

B. L. SLACK. 



SEOBBTABT AND TKKABCRKB. 

GEO. H. MOBGAN. 

A88UTANTB. 

D. B. TTHITMORE. S. H. HEWLETT. 

OiUer— JOSEPH P. GARB. i)iH>rJ:Mp«r--JAMES P. NBWBLL> 

Attorney— F. N. JUDSON. 

COMUITTEE OF APPEAIA, 



DANIEL E. SMITH, 
R. P. ARCHER, 
SAMUEL GORDON, 
HENBT NICOLAUS, 
SOL. J. QDINLIVAN, 
MAX. M. BODENHEIMER, 



B. F LAMB, 

C. W. BERGESCH. 
DELOS R. HATNES. 
GILBERT SBAHS. 
FREDERICK 8. PLANT, 
CONRAD BCHOPP. 



OOMinTTBK OP ARBITRATION. 



J. K. SAVAGE, 
JULIUS HOLLMANN, 
W. G. MOORE, 
JOHN J. POPE. 
UENBY C. HOLLMANN, 

OFFICIAL MABKBT BBP'B. 

MABC. J. OAnTIEB. 

EITSR CLERK. 

E. T. WALTON, 



ADOLPHU8 BUSCH, JK. 
FRED DEIBEL, 
TH03. B. TEASDALE, 
JOHN BIRD. 
BENJ. ALTUEIUER. 



FRANK T. MUDGE. 



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COMMITTEES AND INSPECTORS FOR 1894. 



■ COMMITTEE ON ohkin inspection: 

B.B.BII.BBO,Chuuu)i. B.L.8LA0K. C. U. FOB3TEB. 

WHEAT inspection: 



CORN. OAT AND RYE INSPECTION: 

r. B. hakkibon. 



H&NBY GBIE8KDIBCK. JB. PHILIP BKOCEHAN. 

ORAIN INSPECTORS: 

O. O. DUTOHEB, Ohibf Ihsfbctos. T. L. OURKIB, ABS'T Chiif IhSfeotob. 

J. E. BOB! y SON. 

rLOuR iNSPECTtoN: 

O. J. HANBBRINS, Obubmui. 

C. BEKNBT. AOG. J. BULTE. 

JNO. W. LANLET, C. A. EBBKLE. 

■OARo or FLOUR inspectors: 

VICTOR GOETZ. ^RBSU>I:^T. AUGUST BDHP, Sbcbbtadt. 

memsership: 

WM.K.ETANABD, Chairman. D. 1. BUSH NELL, £. A. FOMEBOY. 

rules: 

OEO.B. SHALL, Chairman. H. F. LANGENBERG. THOMAS AKIN. 

MARKET reports; 
h.b. slaltghtek.cnaiiiman. amedee b. cole. wm. g. bovd. 
contracts: 

AHBDEE B. COLE, CBAIBMAK. WM. A.GABDN'ES. JOHN' U. GAti'NBTT. 

POSTAL affairs: 

E. A. POMEROY, CHAnulAX. 
OHAS.B.FLACK. N.L.MOFriTr. T.C.TAYLOE, 

O. a KALB. P. M. HAKSON. HESBY C. HAABBTIOB:. 



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(7) 

COMMITTEES AfID INSPECTORS FOR \9M-~CimHnw>d. 



PHOVimiON INBrECTION: 
i. A. POMKBOT, CBUBMAH. 



RBDHOKD CLKABT. 



SCIOiMiCAVTOIIBEi 



I iNSPCCTon UD weibhcr: 



W. F. CBUIBEBLAiN. 



IIOKRIS I^PTWICH, OaUBlU)). 
OBO. P. GODDABD, JNO. 



MFkBittSiPPi Riven; 



IRAAC M . HASON'. Chai 
rSAXK GAIKNXIK. 



). B. FRAKCIS. 



I. C. HAARSTIOK. 



WEB. H. SAMUEL. 



JOHN WAHL. 



BICHARD HOSrSS. 



H. B. SLAUGHTKfi.GHI 

CLINTON KOWCLI. HT. B. WHTTHOBE. 
W. B. ANItEBSON. JOHN P. QBIBR. 



TRANePORTATION: 



W. K. STAKARD, CbaIUI IH. 

D. C. BALI. 

lODIS FUSZ. 

C. G ORTHWBIN. 



S. L. BIGGKRS. 



BOGKRP. ANNAN. 



ID CENT. AND SOUTH amcricantrade: 

D. t. BUSBNELIq OHAISlUtl. 

HE NKT STANLEY. F. W. SMITH. 

A, mrTGUEIREIK). I 



EV. E. CABRERA S. 

METEOHOLOaV: 

ISAAC M. MASON. Ca^tBlUK. 

JOHN A. VARREN. C. MgD. BOBINSON. 
CONRAD PATH. WM.P. SAMUEL. 



R. E. FUNSTBN. 
K, T. H0LLI8TKR. 



E. 3. WALTON. 
P. G. HAUEISEN. 
JACOB MJHOPP. 



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MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE OF ST. ZOU/S. 
07FI011BB FOB THB TELAB 1686. 

FSESIDENT. 

THOMAS BOOTH. 

VICE-PBB3IDEM T3. 

Firat Vice President, C. MABQDARD FORSTER. 
Socoud Vice President, GEO. D. BABNAKD. 

DIRECTORS. 



WM. T. ANDERSON. 
H. B. BILBRO. 
H. F. LANGENBERG. 
WIS.. K. 8TANABD. 

c. J. banebrinb:. 



WM. G. BOYD. 
WM. A. GARDNER. 
SOL J. QDINLIVAN. 
CHRIS. SHARP. 
CHAH. L. HEITZEBEBG. 



SECBSTABT AMD TRZASURBR. 

GEO. H. MORGAN. 



ASSI3TANT6. 



D. R. WHITHORE, 



S. H. HEWLETT. 



JOS. P. CABR. 



JAMES P. NEWELL. 
Attorney— F. H. JUDSON. 



OOHUITTEE OF AFFEALS. 



ARTHUR BROCEMAN. 

V. P. KEKNET. 

B. J. HcSORLET. 

BENJ. ALTHEIUER. 

WM. BULL. 

H- C. HOLLMANN. 



J. W. BECK. 
CHRIS. BEBNET. 
HERMAN BIENENSTOCE. 
E. E. SCHARPF. 
WM. J. LEMP, JR. 
WM. P. NELSON. 



comnrxBE of arbitratiok. 



THOS. B. GETTY8. 
WM. WOODS. 
T. B. BALLARD. 
J. B. BUTLER. 
C. S. FREEBORN. 

OFFICIAL UARCKT REF'B. 

MABC. J. GAUTIER. 



GEO. A. BOTH. 
E. L. BUSCHMAN, 
D. R. POWELL. 
JOHN M. GANNETT. 
JOHN P. OWENS. 

TKLEGHArB AKD CALL BOABD OLBBS. 

CHAS. H. -WHITMORE 



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COMMITTMBS AND INSPECTORS FOR 1895. 



CXCCUTIVC COMMITTIC ON aRMN 
H.F.LA}IGBNBEIt6,CBJUB]iUi. CHBIS. SHABP. 

WHEAT inspiction: 



U. HARQITAXD rOSTBIt. 



IN, dAT AND RVC pnikction: 



;. BBBGHANN. 



CHAB. H.TEICHBIANN 



AiN inspectors: 



FLoun inspection: 

C. J. HAimiEBKrNE, CBAtRMA!!, 

MATT. WOELFliE. A. D. HARDIR. 

GBU. F. GODDARD. CHAltUES HKZBI^ 

soARD OF FLOUR inspectors: 

VICTOB GOBTZ, PbkSidbhT. AUOUBT RUMP, 8BCKBTABV, 

HEMBERSMIP. 
GBO. D. BARNARD, ChaUHUI. B. B. BILBRO, SOL. J. QUIMUVAN. 



W. K. STANARD, CHAIBIUM. D. L BUSHNELU 

MARKET reports: 
W3f.A.GARbKEB.CHAiRiiAH. P. F. WILLIAMS. 

contracts: 

B. B. BILBRO, Chairjia!!. G, F. LAN0ENBBR6. 

1. BRCK. 

inspection: 
c. l. heitzebebg, chaibjian. jakes mragheb. 
o. b. htersom. f. b. zblls. 

w. t. baktlev, jr. 



JSO. M. GANNETT. 



TBoe. AKIN. 



N. L. MOFFITT. 



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(10) 

COMMITTESS AND INSFBCTOBS FOB I89S—Ooiai»\ted. 



■ EEOS AND CASTOR BCANS; 



«BA8, E. PKCMlV. 



J. IL JATXBS. 



ISAAO M. MASON. CBll 
D. B. FRANCIS. 
T. T. I.BWI8. 
WU. H. BENTBB. 



REDHOMD CLRABY. 



ASTon aiAN invfectohuii WEiaHEn: 

WIL p. CBAMBBBUAIN. 



MissiasiPPi RiVEn: 

H. 0. BAAB^TIOE, 



JAUBS RHAHP. 
JXO. P. GBIEB. 
a H. WOLLBBINOE. 



FRANK QAIEIfNIK, 



MICHAEL HcBNHIB. 
NATHAN OOLK. 
C. a. BAMPSUN. 



NATIONAL BOARD OP TR 

WM.T. ANDEBSON,Chi.ir>un. K. 0. STANABD. 
W. D. OBTHWBIN. ISAAC U. MASON, 

LOUIS PUSZ. JOHN WAHU 

<3EO. D. BABNARD. 

LEaiSLATIVE: 

<>B0. D. BABNARD, OhiishAH. C. J. HANKEBRINK. CHA8. HODGMAN. 

F. N. JUDRON. GEO. H. HMAIX, B. B. WBtTMORG. 

QEO. E. LEiaHTON.. WM. T. ANUEB^ON. H. B.WBBNSE. 

TRANSPORTATION: 



W, T. HAAB8TI0K. 
ROGER P. ANNAN. 
J. H. KBAOKE. 



EV. E. CABRERAS. ChaIBMAN. 
P. P. CONNOR. 
HENRY STAHLEY. 



ID SOUTH AMERICAN TRADE; 



GEO. H. PLANT. 



W. G. UUELLKK. 



F. G. HAUEt8£N. 



E. T. H0LU3TEB. 
O. H. DEAN. 
L. GaBVEY. 



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REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 



UERCHANTS' EXCHANGE, 

St- Louis, Jakuabi 7, I89S. 
To the Members of the Merchants' Exchange : 

Gektlsmbm.— Section 7 of Rnle 6 requires that "The Board ofDiree- 
tors shall prevloas to the annnal meeting of the Excbaoge, fix the 
sBaesBment to he paid hv each member for the coming ^eari and at the 
annual meeting report to the Exchange the amount ho assessed, and the 
pecuniary condition of the Exchange." 

In compliance with this rule, yonr Board report that at a meeting 
held on the 3d inat., by a unanimous vote, the assessment to be ptdd by 
each member for the year 1895 was fixed at Twenty Dollars ($30). 

CUBBKNT ACCODHT. 

The pecuniary condition of the association is set forth in detail in the 
report of the Treasurer hereto annexed. The current account shows 
groBB receipts of $59,950.71, and that, after meeting all expenses, the 
sum of $12,000 was transferrad to the Real Estate account, leaving a 
balance on hand at the close of the year of $1,126.12. 

REAL ESTATE ACCOUNT. 

When your Board assumed office in January last, it took up the work 
connected with the contemplated improvements which had been so 
wisely planned and so suoceasfnlly inaugurated by the Board of 1893. 
The plans agreed upon by the former Board wei-e carried out with some 
few changes and additiouH, and the work completed iii September. 
These improvements have, iu the opinion of your Board, added much 
to the beauty and convenlencCB of your building, and as far as they 
have been able to ascertain, have the approval of the members, with 
hardly an exception. 

Tlie vote of the Exchange taken on May 25, 1893,aathorized " the Board 
to carry out the plans prepared (or the improvement of the property of 
the Exchange and to borrow the sum of $150,000, or so much thereof 



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12 TRADE AND COMMBKOB OF 

&a mjg:ht be necessary to pay the cost thereof." When the plana vera- 
prepared and bids received, it was estimated that the full ainoant of 
$160,000 would be needed, and a lo&n was made for that amonnt. 
Sabseqnently, after a careful revision of the plans, it was found that 
some changes, which would not materially altar the result, could be 
made in the interest of economy; and consequently, new bids were 
asked for, which resulted in a considerable redaction from the first 
estimates. 

The attentioD of yonr Board had been called to the unsafe condition 
of the steam boilers, which had been in continual nee for nearly tweniy 
years, and, when it was ascertained tliat the full sum of $150,000 
would not be needed for the Improvements as planned, it was deemed 
wise in the interest, firot, of safety, and second, of economy, to put in 
a new boiler plant, and if sufficient funds remained, an entire new steam 
heating system, the old system being antiquated and nearly worn out. 
Upon invealjgatlon it was found that to pnt in a new steam heating 
system throughout the entire building, would involve an expense 
graater than present resources would justify, therefore the Board con- 
lined itself to that part which was an actual necessity for the protection 
of life and property, and contracted for three new Heine boilers of 120 
horse power each, leaving the changing of the piping and heaters to 
another time. While the new boilers were being pnt in, it was found 
tbatcenain piping and radiators for the new system could be pnt in at 
that lime at much less expense than at some future time and remove 
the necessity of tearing up the new marble courtway and approaches; 
consequently the work was ordered and the heating of the building is 
now being done by two systems. This is not satisfactor]' or economi- 
cal, and your Board hopes that the Directory of the present year will 
install the new system throughout tlie entire building. 

It was deemed wise also to have the boiler room in a sate and reput- 
able condition, and a new metallic ceiling and new granitoid door were 

The premises on the first fioor, fronthig on Pine street, were leased 
to Dan & Co. for a term of years on condition that certain alterations 
would be made. The cost of same was $6,601.20, and while not a part 
of the contemplated improvements, was a necessary expense. 

The total sum expended during 1894 for all these items was 
$166,987.06. Of this amonnt, $132,081.70 is property chargeable to the 
new improvements voted for by the exchange, $20,861.16 to the neces- 
sary expense of new boilers and connections, and floor and ceiling of 
boiler room, and (6,601.20 to the changes In Dnn & Co.'e room. 

The total of extraordinary expenditures since the purchase of the 
property in 1892, is as follows: 



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THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 13 

1893. 

^iringforelectriollgbtaiid telephoDss . $ 1,B03 40 

PaiDttng, pai>eiing and new floors S,D61 SS 

Annan & Son, Architects 2,800 00 

1894. 

Completed improTements as planned 13S,Q81 TO 

New boilers snd oonneotlns work 20,364 IS 

jUteratloDS, Dun & Co.'t office 8,601 20 

Total $169,391 71 

The property is nov in flrst-claes condition, requiring only ordinary 
repairs from time to Ume, so that the surplns can from aow on be nsed 
ibr xba exlinguiabmeDt of the debt. 

It will be remembered that when the loan of 9160,000 was made in 
December, 1893, there was a debt of $56,000 fbr balance of money bor- 
rowed to complete the payment for the property. The Board Tery 
wisely determined to pay this obligation and save interest thereon, the 
amoQDt so taken to be replaced as needed. As payments for the work 
became doe yonr Board authorized the President to borrow trom time 
to Ume the money necessary to meet snch obligations, and the snm of 
$&6,000 was borrowed on demand notes, so that the indebtedness of 
the Exchange now is as follows : 

S150,000. Loan for seven years from N. Y. Life Inanrance-Co. 
$ 65,000. Dne on demand notes. 

The income from rentals for the past year was $47,348.67, the ordina- 
ry expenses $44,023.07, which woald show a surplns of $3,326.60. 

Sbonld the present year show the same resnltn and the snm of 
$12,0u0 be available from current acconnt, the debt conld be decreased 
$16,000 daring the year. 



At the banning of the year the property was insured for $436,000. 
During the work of Improvement $60,000 additional insnrance was 
taken oat to cover the risks of contractors and the Exchange jointly. 
After the completion of the work, the total insurance was reduced to 
$450,000, which is the amount now carried on the property, exclusive 
of $7,500 on ftarnitnro, flxtures, etc. Of this amount $940,000 was 
lemwed during tbe year for a term of three years, which, with the 
$50,000 temporarily carried during the work of improvement involved 
an outlay of $9,966.70 on this account. The balance of $210,000 will ex- 
pire iu December of the present year. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



14 TBADE AND COHHEBCB OF 

HBHBBS8HIP. 

At the begiuningr oflhe year the onmber of members apou oar rolls 
was 2,807. The certificates of 40 deceased members have been re- 
deemed at tt3A eacU and 120 memberahipH were forreited for non-pay- 
ment of dnes, learing the present enrollmeot 2,617. Thirteen of the 
members whose certificates were redeemed died in 1893, and under ibt 
rules, the dnes of 1694 were not reqnired to be paid, wbich added to 
the nnmber forfeited, makes 133 membershipB on which does of the 
present year were not collected, showing 2,674 as the number of payiDf 
members. 

Your Board has taken an active interest in all matters pertaining to 
the Weliitre of our city and the well being of our members. 

AMTI-OPTIOK LEG18LATI0H. 

One of the prominent features of the year was the renewal in Con- 
gress of legislation looking to the passage of what was known as the 
anti-option bill. BelieTing that the principles of this bill were pernic- 
ious and would work injory to the groin, prorision and cotton trade 
of the country, your Board took most aggressive meaBures to defeat sach 
unwise legislatiou and believe that their efforts did maoh towards pre- 
venting the bill lW>m becoming a law. Tbe varloos reeoiatiooB 
adopted and other action taken will be found on following pages to 
which year attention is directfid. 

TKAKS-UIBSISSIPPI COUHKRCIAL COXOHBSS. 

In January last, your Board appointed two delegates to the meeting 
of the Trans-Uississippi Commercial Congress to be held in San Fran- 
cisco on February 18th, and subsequently instructed its delc^i&tes to 
invite the Congress to hold its next setsion in St. Loois. The invita> 
tion was accepted, and the Congress met here on November 26th. The 
sessions were well attended and incited much interest. A Conunitteo 
was appointed fW)m the various commercial organizations of the dty 
to arrange for the expenses of the Congress and the entertainment of 
tbe delegates. The attention- shown was much appreciated and tbe 
reputation of St. Louis for hospitality was maintained. 

STEAMSHIP ST. lODIS. 

The coustraclion of tbe third largest merchant marine steamstiip in 
existence by the International Navigation Co. of Philadelphia, of 
American material, and by American workmen, to float the American 
fiag and the nunlng of the ship after our city was an event of no ordi- 
nary importance, and your Board were of the opinion that the occasion 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. l& 

■boold be properly recognized. The President called & meeting of the 
Preaidenta of tbe commercial bodies of ibe cf ty, at which it ma deter- 
mined that a aaitable testimonial shoold be preaented En tbe name of 
tbe (dtizens of St. Looia and that a committee ahoald bo preseat at tlie 
laanGhing on November 12th. A large delegation went to Philadelphia 
and were present when the great ship slid into the Delaware river, and 
were coorteoasly received and most generously entertained by the 
offloers of tbe International Line and the Pennsylvania Railroad. Snb- 
seqaenUy it was agreed that libraries for both the first and second 
class cabin should be presented, together with a tail set of colors, also 
that the windows in the library cabin should bo ornamented with pio 
tares of prominent baildlngs and places of onr city. The Committee 
are now at work carrying out these plans, and we believe that the dty 
will be advertised thereby in a most efi'ective muiner. 

POOLIKQ BILL. 

Toot Board believing that it would be iot the interest both, of the 
■Upper and the carrier to permit poollDg by railroads onder the saper- 
virion of the Interstate Commerce Gommiesion, thereby secnring 
•tabllitjr of rates, in Jane last sent delegates to a meeting of ropresen- 
tative bodies held In the rooms of the Interstate Commerce Commission 
in Vasbington. The bill known as the "Patterson bill" was endorsed 
at this meeting, and In December when it was before the House of Bep- 
resentatives, your Board urged the members of Cougresa from Missonri 
to tsTor its passage. The bill passed the House without amendments 
and is now before the Senate. 



In July last your Board were waited upon by delegatloD represent 
log the labor orgaaiiation of the city and ashed to enlist the support of 
tbe Exchange in reqaesting the Pullman Palace Car Company to arbi- 
trate its differences with Its employes. A hearing was granted the 
delegaUoD, and, after a somewhat protracted dlscuseiou, the Board 
passed a aeries of resolutions printed herewith, taking the ground that 
while heartily sympathizing with all lawful efforts of laboring men to 
improve their condition, it recognized that the observance of the law 
was the paramount duty of all and that the Interruption of free com- 
mercial InterconrBa was disostroua to all the people, and fnrtber, that 
the boycott then existing on railroad traffic was illegal and tyrannidU, 
and Involved a despotic power to which no free people wonld submit. 

This action of the Board met with the approval of the hasiness com- 
mnnity generally, both in St. Louis uid elsewhere. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



U TBADB AND CO»UEBCE OF 

Yonr Board favored the passage of a uatloDsl bankniptoy bill; the 
Nlcarafcaa Canal bill, provided the GoTerDment was amply gecared for 
the credit extended; an amendmeDt to the Interstate commeroe law 
whereby fines may be Inflicted on corporations Instead of indiTidoals 
fbr vlolatJon of any portion of the act to regnlate commerce; and 
opposed the passage of a bill anthorizing another bridge acroBS the 
Tirer at St. LoniSi unless bo amended as to provide that, ti erected be- 
twees the Eads Bridge and Merchants Bridge, it should be a sospensloo 
bridge, 10 as not to Interfere with the safe navigation of that portion 
of the harbor, and later asked that the amendment offered by Senator 
Coctcrell be accepted, providing that the bridge should not l>e located 
within a distance of two miles from the Eads Bridge. 

OKAIH INSPECTION. 

The increase In fees for the inspection and weighing of grain ordered 
by the State Board totakeeffbot Sept. Ist, was so nnreasonable and 
n^jost that yoor Board entered a strong protest before the Eailroad 
Rod Warehoase Commissioners without, however, securing any action, 
and it is now proposed to carry the qnestlou to the State Legislature 
and ask an amendment to the state law flzlng the maximum charges at 
BDch a rate as will corrsspoud with the fees charged In competing 
markets. 

TEXAS COTTON FALACE. 

In October an invitation was received ftom the officials of the Texas 
Cotton Palace at Waco, to send a delegation to visit Waco on Novem- 
ber 30th, which had been designated as "St. Louis Day." The Presi- 
dent was requested to bring the matter to the attention of the mer- 
chants and mannfactarers of the dty, and the resnlt was that an excnr- 
slou of over one hundred business men visited Waco and were reodved 
with great cordiality, not only at Waco, but all the principal cities en 
roate in Texas and Arkansas, and the cordial relations which bad 
always existed between St. Lonis and these states were further 
extended and cemented. Another result was the organlzaUoD by Qie 
excaraionparty of the "Inters(ate Commercial Club" for the purpose 
of cultivating closer trade relations by the receipt and extention of 
sodal courtflsiei). 

DEATH OF PRESIDENT HAELOW. 

The death of President Harlow eu January Slst, wltiiin a month of 
his onanimouB election to the Presidency of the Exchange, was a matter 
of universal regret and sorrow. Vour Board, voicing the wishes of the 
msmben took such action as was appropriate in honor of his memory, 
and the Exchange was closed on the day of Iiis funeral. On February 
ith the members assembled and adopted reaolntiona expressive of their 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THB CITY OF ST. I.OUIS. 17 

great loss and of persoaal sorrow at the death of their esteemed friend 
and presiding officer. 

The pleasant custom of inTitlng to onr rooms d't a tingai shed visitors 
tiom abroad has been followed daring the year, and we have had the 
pleasnre of greeting and heariog from, the FresB Clnb of Colnmbas, 
Ohio, tbe Minister of the Argentine Bepablic, Got. Hogg and party of 
Texas, Hon. Wm. McKinley, Governor of Ohio, and Hon. Thos. B. 
Beed of M^ue. 

In coQclnding this review of the pHnclpal events of the year, your 
Board takes occasion t« express their appreciation of the support given 
them hy the members generally and to express the hope that contJnned 
peace and prosperity may rest apon oar association, and that it may in 
the fntare as in the past, hold its prond position as the gaardian and 
conservator of the intci^ests of the great city of which we are all so 
proad. 

The duties of the Secretary and assistants have been fidthftelly per- 
formed and the Board bears cheerfal and willing testimony to their 
falthfnliiesa and efflclencj'. 

Respect ftally sabmitted, 

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS, 

By WM. G. BOYD, 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



RESOLUTIONS 

ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS DURING 1B94. 



NATIONAL BOARD OP TRADE. 

Jan. 8. The Board appoinled UesBrs. W. T. Audersou, D. E. 
Francie, Web- M. Samael, Isaac H. Mason and Chas. Parsons, as dele- 
gales to represent Ihe Merchants' Exchange at the meeting of the 
National Board ofTrade to be held in Washington January 2lBt. 

TRANS-UISSISSIPFl COMMERCIAL CONGRESS. 

Jam. 8. The Board appointed Messrs. Henry B. Whitmore and 
Henry F. Laogenberg as delegates to represent the Exchange at the 
meeting of the Trans-Mississippi Commercial Congress to be held in 
San Francisco on February 13th, and the delegates were requested to 
use alt proper efforts to secure action by the Congress endorsing 
appropriations by the Congress of the United States for the permanent 
Improrement of the Mississippi River. 

TARIFF BILL 

Jah. 8. To the Honorable Senators and Bepreaentativea from MIb- 
sourl, Washington, D. C.: 

The Board of Directors of this Exchange being of the opinion th&t 
one cause, and perhaps the principal oaQse of tbe stagnation In all linea 
of business, is the uncertainty as to what action will be taken by Con- 
gress In reference to the Wilson tariff bill, and betlevlDg further that 
speedy action, either by the passage of the bill, or by its rejection, 
thereby settling tbe vexed qnestion, will be of the greatest benefit to 
the commercial interests of this country, respectibliy request yon tonse 
yonr best endeavors to have a vote taken thereon in the Honse and 
Senate at the earliest opportunity. 

TRANS.MISSIBSIPPI COMMERCIAL CONGRESS. 

Jak. 1&. The Board instructed its delegates to extend an invitation 
to the Trans^Mississippi Commercial Congress to hold Its next session 
in St. Louis. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP 8T, LOUIS. 
INTERNATIONAL MARITINB 

Fib. 12. The Board endorsed H. R. Bill 4182 "Providing for an 
IsleniaUonal M&riUae Conference for the better protection and care of 
inimala in tranBit." 

BANKRUPTCY BILL. 

Feb. 13. The Board confirmed the acUon of the National Board of 
Trade faToring the Immediate paeeage of the Torrey Bankniptoy Bill. 

NtCARAOUA CANAL. 

FEB.lg. The Board endorsed the memorials to CongreBefromihe 
Philadelphia Board of Trade and the Chamber of Commerce of San 
Francisco nixing the importance of an early completion of the NIcaragaa 
Cual. 

ANTI-0I>T10N BILL. 

Marcb 6. The Board appointed iSr. H. B. Slaughter a delegate to 
the CoDfereDce to be held this day before the Committee on Agrlcnltnre 
at lYaBhliigton in rererence to the anti-option bill, and the following 
resolution was adapted : 

"The Board of Directors of the Merchants' Exchange of St. Loaie 
joint with the re preeenta tires of other commercial bodies in protesting 
igiiiat the passage of House of Representatives Bill No. e,66S, entitled 
'An act regalatlng the sale of certain agricnltural products, defining 
opUons and fntnres and imposing taxes thereon,' or any bill of a similar 
nature, ae unjust, unwarranted and nnconstitntioiial, as being class 
l^ialation tending to hamper or prohibit the free trading in the princi- 
pal agricoltaral prodncts of the country, to the great detriment of both 
prcdacers and consumers. 

"This Board, therefore respectfully urges apoa the honorable Sena- 
tois and Bepreaentatives from Uissonri to oppose in every way the 
enactment of such unwise and injurious le^slation," 

BOULEVARDS. 

1£uch1. The Board appointed a committee consisting of Messrs. 
D. E. Francis, Chas Parsons, Geo. H. Small, Jao. V. Kaoffman and F. 
II- Jodson, to co-operate with other committees in securing proper 
utioQ by the city for the establishment of boulevards. 

POSTIf AST&R JOHN B. HARLOW. 

l^ASGH 1. The Board of Directors of the Merchants' Exchange of St. 
Louis desires to express to Maj. John B. Harlow in view of his early 
retirement fh>m the position of Postmaster their high appreoiation of 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



20 TRADE AKD COMMERCE OF 

Ihe excellent eervice be has rendered to the city of St. LoniB, And 
especiallr to the mercsutiie commauity during bis iDCDmbeiic; of said 
offloe, an well as dmiii^ the twenty-flve years be has been connected 
with the postal service in this city. 

Tuat Major Harlow has been energetic, progressiTe and honorable, In 
Ihe discharge of his duties, and has made many valuable improve me nta 
in the service, Is admitied by all. 

This Board extends to Major Harlow Its thanks for valuable service 
rendered and its best wishes lor his future. 

RECIPROCITY. 

March 13. Tbe Board of Directors of the Merchants' Exctiaage of 
St. Louis having been called upon by a lai^e number of merobants, 
millers and mannfacturers, members of the Exchange, prominent In 
the lines of basiuese which they represent, to join them in petitioning 
the Senate of the United Slates to eliminate from the tariff bill now 
before, the Senate section 101 which abrogates certain reciprocity 
traaiies with the La tin- American States, does most heartily join in such 
petition and most respectfully, bat earnestly, urges tiie honorable Sen- 
atnrs to abst&lu from Imposing upon the commerce of thiB country sach 
nn injur]' as the proiiosed legislation would inflict, and begs them not 
to disturb the commercial relations now existing and which are of such 
a marked benefit to the basluess of tbe country. 

NATIONAI, TRANSPORTATION ASSOCIATION. 

April 9. The Board applied for tlio reiustatemeut of the Merchants' 
Exctiange as a memi>er of the National Transportation Associallou. 

A NTI -OPTION BILL. 

Apsil 9. To the Honorable Senators and Be present at! ve« of tlte 
Bute of Missouri. Wasbinglon.D. C: 

Gemtlbkek — The Board of Dirccloi's of the Itlercliants' Exchange of 
St. Louis, after due consideration of the bill known as the anti-option 
bill by Mr. Hatch, in lien of H. K. .1,668, respectfully asks that yoa use 
all honorable and lawful means to defeat its paesAgc. 

It it becomes a law is now framed, it will be hannfal in its effects in 
a commercial way to a greater extent than it is postsible to conoeive by 
those not actually engaged la the handling of grain and farm products. 
While it is claimed the bill Is introduced to reach tbe illegitimate or 
gamblingelementof the trade as conducted under the present system, 
which has been long established, it in realty places bucket shops and 
boards of trade on the same plane, and does not prohibit buck(;t shop 
dealing, but does entail a great hardship on tbe legitimate specutatlTC 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF BT. LOUIS. 21 

tndeofexchuigee, and wtll vii-tnally wipe ont or esiBteuce or confine 
tbebneiness to a few wealthy firms and force men of moderate means 
loretire, and thas add the leading branch ol commerce to the other 
monopolies of the conntry. 

"Wesnggest by way of i)lm»lration,Tia,: Brown & Jones, coparlnera 
in btuiness, llceneed to conduct busloees as ilealcra in futares under the 
provisions of this bill, may buy during Suptember, October and Novem- 
ber, 1891, for account of A, B, C, D and odiers in tlie aggregate 
1,000,000 bushels of wheal, to bo delivered daring the month of May, 
1S95, at, say, 60 cents per bnshel and in the month of December, 1691, 
•ell out the same under the instrur.tions of A, B, C, D and others at, 
ny, 70 cenla per buabel. The profit arising from this trnnsactiou 
tigregates th« aum or <tOO,000, which was dne and paytible to A, B, G, 
Dtndoibers when the sale is concluded. As the Ijill prohibits the 
ringing ont, settlement or sabstitutiou of other contracts, the original 
WDlracts moat be carried to maturity before Brown & Jones can come 
into poseesaion of money rightfully theirs, and which they have already 
ptidontlo (heir customers; and they are made liable in addition to 
mIIb for margins on both the purchase and sale contracts, which, under 
Qwralei of our exchange, would airgregale the amount of ♦120,000, or 
» total otitlay by Brown & Jonea during the life of these contracts of 
t3^,000. Thus no man or firm of moderate means could possibly live 
under the requirements imposed. 

Af[erihe healing accorded the rapreseutativea of the leading ex- 
diuiges of the United States before Ihe Committee of Agriculture of 
the House of Representatives, and the arguments there submitted — to 
wUch we would respectfully call yonr e^pci'Ial attention — it is surpris- 
ing to ns that a bill so utterly devoid of merit and combining ao much 
of Injury to a bi-anch of trade ^o vitally nllied to all Ihe material intcr- 
e«ts, andirhlch forms the basis of all prosperity of our conntiy, should 
in good faith be put before Congress and its passage urged. 

The requirements of this bill are such aa Hre imposed on no other 
branch of husineas (and every cent of taxaiion connected therewith 
eomea directly fi'om the pocket of the producer) , and even though the 
bill be anconatitntional, if passed, it would cause demoralization in 
eommercial channels, which might not be confined alone to the gndn 
fade. It is oppressive, arbitrary, iuqnisitorlnl, unjust, and calculated, 
as arguments submitted before the Agricultural Committee of the Honae 
ot Bepresentativea show, to entail great hardship and loss to the pro- 
dncer, in ivhoae Interest it b cliumed the bill is framed, and also to a 
la^ Dumber of merchants, who have devoted their livea and capital 
*" the perfecting of the present method of handling the farm products 
of tbe couiitrj-. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



22 TRA.DB AKD COMMERCE OF 

Knowing the bill to l>e a bad one, and not io conformity with the 
constitntiou&t rights of American citizenship as defined in the Couetita- 
Uonofonr conn try, we protest againet its passage and denoaaceitas 
i Diqni ton N, harmful and demoralizing measare, calculated to do great 
injary to the commercial interests, without the redeeming feature 
claimed by its champiotia. We, therefore, urge you as above to use all 
lawful means to defeat its enactment. 
We reepectfally call yoar attention to the paper submitted herewith, 
■ which wa9 presented to the Committee of Agriculture by llio lepresen- 
tatlve of the Merchants' Exchange of St. Louie on niarch 6, 189(. 

A NTI- OPTION BILt^ 

Mat 8. The following was adopted by the Board and a copy sent to 
the Hon. S. W.Cobb: 

Deab Sir. — In an interriew published on the 6th inst., Hon. Wm. H. 
Hatch is reported to have made the following statement: 

"All of the objectionable features which have heretofore caused the 
anti-option bill to be antagonized have been eliminated. The only 
aections which will now meet with any serioua opposition are those 
relating to backet shops. The regular dealers in futures are pretty well 
aatiefled with the bill." 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the Merchants' Exchange 
of St. Louis, held this day, the above utterance, as far as this body is 
concerned. Is denounced as unqualifiedly fulse and misleading, and the 
position taken by this board April 9 in a protest to the BcpresentativeB 
of our State is reaffirmed. 

Please see that evei? member of Congress is thoroughly informed as 
to the position of the exchanges and boards of trade of the country. 

ANTI-OPTION BILL. 

Mat 14. To the Honoi-able Senators and Kepresentatives of the 
United States, in Congress assembled: 

Gektlkmek.— In submitting the following matter in answer to the 
report of Mr. Hatch accompanying the snti-optiun Bill (which repon 
consists of seven sections or clauses which could have been coudensed 
into one and his meaning understood, as bis vision of justice seems to 
be obscured by his animosity to the "short seller") the Board of Direc- 
tors of the Merchants' Exchange of St. Tiouis have omitted any extended 
arguments, as the ground has been completely covered by the various 
representatives of the different exchanges, as well as members of the 
ast Congress who were opposed to the bill then befora ihem, and have 
confined themselves largely lo comparisons and resulting conditions 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 23 

«ctiudly existing in this and other countHas. In so doiag Uief have 
«boBen the Chicago market as the repreeentative one of this countr;, it 
being the market where more "short Helling" and the heavieat apecala- 
tive trading ia done. The replies are seriatim. 

■Washihgtok, D. C, May 7. 

"Ur. Hatch, of MisBonri, fh>m the Ckrromittee on Agriculture, to 
vhoDi WM referred the bill regulating the sale of certain agricntLnval 
prodacts, defining options and fnturee and imposing taxes thereon, 
and npoD dealers therein, made a report to-day in support of the mcas- 
^re. The objects Bought by the proposed legislation are : 

"1. To obtain reTcnue. At this time additional revenue is desira- 
ble and imperaCiTe. Unlike former billi reported by the House oover- 
■ng the Bobjects embraced in this measure, it will more surely and 
steadily provide a constant revenne to the Government, and that with- 
out an additional corps of revenne officers and at a minimum cost for 
Its collection." 

I. We deny this bill to be one of revenue. The restrictions and 
pfohibltions imposed are such that trading would be seriously con- 
tracted as to furnish little revenue on the basis of the tax specified. On 
the face of what It Is claimed the bill will acoomplish, in ClauseNo. 3 
of the report of Mr. Hatch accompanying the bill, where he would 
restrict sales of products upon "Exchanges," "where not to exceed otie- 
tenth of the grain is marketed," the bill is diearly not one of revenue, 
a( the following figures demonstrate. The largest crops this country 
«ver produced of the difiierent cereals traded in are given : 

<Jrop of Wheat, 1891 bueheU, eil,TBO,000 

Crop of Com, l(Bn " 2,112,893,000 

CroporOata, 1889 " TSl,ei^,000 

Or total produL'tion of " 3,*76,1H7,000 

One-tenth of this total to which Mr. Hatch would restrict trading 
would amount to 347,618,700 bushels. The tax for buying at 1 cent 
per 1000 bushels and the lax for selling at 1 cent per 1000 bosliele, 
which is the tax imposed in this bill, would make a 

Total tax on the nvimber of bushels as abore mentioned of $8,9fi2 38 

With addf tionnl tax Tor revenue stamps of 3,7M0 96 

Or a grand total of J8,T33 34 

which would uot pay the expense of collecting. Clearly this is not a 
bill for revenue. Allowing, however, such to be the intent of the bill, 
it would simply add another borden to the already overtaxed produc- 
ing classes which nothing but the urgency of "last resort" would 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



24 tba.de and cohmgbcb of 

justify. This tax ia a direct one npon them, aa they really pay alF 
charges between themselveB aud the consntner. 

"S. To relieve the producer of the deetmctive competition to which 
be is now HDbjected by the oQeriQj; npon Exchanges of Illimitable 
quantitiea of flatorflctitions products by those who do not intend to, 
and can not, terminate the contract by actnal delivery of the articles 
which they pretend to offer aud sell." 

2. Actual experience, daily demonstrated in the leading markets or 
the country, shows this point to be poorly taken. In the market of 
Chicago, the largest speculative grain centre in the world, "destructive 
competition" clearly shows in results. Wticat there, where "short 
selling" is indulged, is relatively higher than all other markets of tbia 
country (with exception of the milling centres of Minneapolis and 
Dninth) by from one to three cents per bnshel and higher relatively 
than any foreign market by from three to six cents per bushel. There 
can be no "short sellers" where there arc no "long buyers," and 
"fie titions prod nets" are not ti-aded in, baton the contrary under the 
rules and regnlations and contracts in vogne on the Exchanges of tho 
country, actual delivery of articles sold is required except wherein- 
releases are given where settlements are made by purchase and sales 
direct to parties to the contracts. 

"8. To restore to the law of supply and demand that free actio» 
which has been destroyed by the practices of 'short selling,' which has 
become the one mode of detei'mining the price of such agricultural 
staples as can be graded, while the ordinary methods of commerce are- 
found to suffice for those which can not. By 'short selling,' now aO 
common npon the Exchanges, where not to exceed one-tenth of the 
grain grown is marketed, prices are determined for the entire product, 
and olteu months in sdvsDce of sowing the seed, thus despoiling the 
farmer and planter of that voice in fixing the price to bo received for 
the product of his labor aud capital which is accorded to other pro- 
ducers." 

8. The law of snpply and demand as applied to the grain trade, if 
divorced IVom speculative dealing, woald clearly result in a lesser piice 
of the article. In the city of Chicago there are stored over twenty 
million bushels of wheat, or nearly one-tbii-d the total "visible snpply" 
of the United States, audit ia selling at a price of from three to six 
cents per bushel, as before mentioned, above what it would sell for if 
shipped to any foreign market in the world. Speculative trading is 
the oanse of this and "short selling," now so common upon the "Ex- 
changes" is only one factor. This condition exists as a condition and 
not a theory, and the producers ara the heneHciaries. Prices are not 
determined at any time "months In advance" of sowing the seed, but 
on esistiiig conditions at the moment, which consists of supply and 



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demmnd, fltiftDclal matters and the ontlook fbr growlns crop* the world 
over. Gr^Dhmstt valae Always as other articles or prodacte, but for 
ninenwntbaof the year "graded" gralo will salt for from one to two 
eenta per bashel more, owing to its being "graded," than the same 
grain can be M>ld for by sample, becanae speculatioii gives that addi- 
tional valne to !t throogb its oses in filling contracts mad&by the "short 
seller,*' who Is the best buyer, whereas if sold by sample it woald not 
have the protection of "graded" grain and wonid be sold at the buyer's 
price. 

"4. That market qnotatioas now made by the limitless offers of flat 
prodacts by the 'short seller,' regardless of (be volnme of actoat pro- 
dnct in existence, may again be determined by the offerings of rcul 
products by the owners thereof or by those who have acquired from 
snch owner the right to the future possession of the aitlcles offered or 
can terminate their contracts by actual delirery and thereby limit to (he 
atnoant actually existing, the offerings of the staple products of (lie 
form." 

4. The "market quotaltous now made by the limitless offers of fiat 
products by the short sellei-" are governed entirely by supply and 
demand, except prices are forced to a higher level than demand war- 
rants oae hundred (imes where forced below once. If one sella what 
he does not owu with the expectation of acquiring the property to make 
Kich sale good, he is forced to either acquire the property for delivery 
orsatisiy the party to whom sale is made, the rules of the Exchanges 
bting very rigid in this regard. ConliDing sales of futures to the "limit 
oftbe amount actnally existing of the staple prodaclof the farm" would 
deprive the producer of all the good results of legitimate epeculalion 
and place him entirely at tha mercy of the millcL-s and neaUhy combin- 
ations at home and the foreign buyer. 

"5. To prevent the overloading of domestic markets and the break- 
ing down of prices of farm prodacis by 'shori' iiales made by foreign 
merchsntfl for the purpose of insuring Ihom against (he possible loss on 
parcbases of Indian, Egyptian, Sontli American, Anstralian and Russian 
prodocts, whereby the American farmer and planter are made under- 
writers of commercial risks of the European, by whom no iMDua or 
premium is paid for assnming Insurance risks tliat destroy the value of 
oor products." 

6. In this clause the good results of speculation arc unconsiously 
acknowledged. If onr prices were not held at a parity above what the 
product conld be bought for elsewhere, there would be no necessity of 
"prevenling the overloading of domestic markets and the breaking 
down of prices of farm prodncts by 'short' sales made by foreign mer- 
diants for the purpose of insuring them against the possible loss on 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



26 TKADE AND C03IMEBCE OF 

parchase of Indian, Egyptiaii, South American, Aastrallan and Russian 
products." 

The Jnnorican "fsrmer and plantar" are not made "uuderwritera of 
commercial risks of the European," as in the legitimate line of tbeir 
bnsiuess they are not the buyers of "futures" but aivars tlie setleni ot 
farm products; and if the European buyer finds our market so much 
higher than others in which he can secure his supplies and uses the 
markets of this country in nhich to make "short sales," it is because 
the speculators of this conntry are, by their speculations, holding prices 
here at a higher range than otherwise would be if we were deprived of 
such speculation and forced to sell to the European buyer as the other 
countries mentioned, where they have no such organized a&d system- 
atized methods of trading in grain futures as prevail hera. 

"6. Thatby restoring the functions of the law of supply and demand, 
now inoperative by reason of the limitless offers of the 'short seller,' a 
measureof relief will be given and prosperity partially restored to tlie 
great class constftntiug more than 40per cent, of our populaljou who 
inhabit the forms and whose declining prosperity Ur. Hatch's committee 
believe is due in no inconsiderable degree to the practice of 'short sell' 
ing,' whereby the prices oF the products of the farm have been deter- 
mined and fixed during recent years at an unremunerative level." 

"7. To restore to the producer an honest market and such prices as 
will follow the unfettered operation of the law of supply and demand, 
which the committee believe will he sufQciently remunerative to restore 
in part the power of the farmer and planter and thus bring prosperity 
to the artisan, mauo&ctnrer, distributor and transporter." 

6 and 7. The exportable surplus of grain, over and above home 
requirements, largely establishes the value of our whole crop. The 
price such grain will bring iu foreign markets is fixed not by what the 
United States can spare for sale to them, but is based on the crops of 
thediff'erent parts of the world which have a surplus to sell and the 
quantity. Russia, with improved railroad facilities which are being 
conlinuously extended Into territories heretofore inaccessible; India, 
with her railroads building over lieretofore unavailable lands and bring- 
ing them under wheat cultivation ; and Argentine Republic, as largely 
increasing her exportable surplus of grain, are gradually underselling 
and supplanting us in tlie foreign markets. Overproduction the world 
over is canaiug depression In bU products. This country even uow is 
carrying into the new crop, which is almost npon us, over sixty million 
bushels of wheat in the public visible supply, witii a smaller demand 
than In ordinary years, even with reduced prices. The countries above 
mentioned are underselling ns even at the ruinous low prices now pre- 
vailing. Our minds are best saUsfled by practical comparisons. We 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST, LOUIS. 27 

will therefore make comparison here by way ot lIluitratEng the benefita 
offtituTe tmding as compared to sections where it does not obudn. 

In the Chicago market futare trading is carried on In a volome 
nneqaalled and unknown anywhere iu the worJd. The price of wheat 
in that market is at a parity of three to six cents higher than could be 
realized to ship to any roreign market. With the oxtraordinary stocks 
held there, with no epecnlation in fntares, with capital timid and 
niactant to carry the grain without the protection that speculation 
affords, no one will dare say with the gieat depression existent for 
past year, that (his slate of affairs would obtain except for the beneficent 
resQlts of speenlative trading. 

On the other hand, the Argentine Republic (which country is now 
entering largely in the wheat raising and exporting husiness) laoka 
hcilities in way of speculative future trading and for lack of them their 
wheat Heeks a market and is sold for what it will bring and at a price 
filed by the foreign bnyer, which price in Liverpool is relatively six 
cents lower to-day than wheat can be laid down there ft'om Chicago, 
bued an prices now prevailing in the latter market. 

On Mb; 10, ISM, ArgentiQe wheat was worth in Liverpool, tor 

June delivery. W.i cents. 

Oil Ma; 10, laH, Chicago wheat waa worth in Chicago. . ST cents. 

Tbe charges Chicago to Liverpool, not including com- 

misfioD and shrinkage <u weight 6X " 

Miking Chicago wheat cost delivered Liverpool 66X " 

It it to ihe Ijasie of Argentine Republic the advocates of the anti- 
option bill desire to condemn the producers of this country. To place 
oareDtire producing cIbbb in the power of rich combinations at home 
*ud abroad, who acting as a Trust or Monopoly, would dictate to and 
^neeiasnd virtually place them in serfdom. 

^iiia bill is in the interest of the wealthy classes, although claimed 
'"^ >be farmer. It Is a backward step that fhontd be revolting, abhorrent 
^"^ not acceptable to the inlelHgent manhood and honor of the repre- 
•""•tives in the Congress of this conntry, 

JOHN T. DAVIS. 

Mat IJth, Resolutions of respect to the memory of John T. Davis, 
prepared by a Committee consisting of Messrs Gbas. Parsons, Thos. H. 
1fe«t and E. S. Rowee were adopted by the Board. 

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION. 

ll*r H. The Board endorsed the action ol the Toledo Pioduce Ex- 
cbaogc in favor of an effort to influence the Interstate Commerce Corn- 



ed byGoO^^lc 



TRADE AMD COMMBBCE OF 



miMiou to ioflict fiDes on corporations Instead of indtvidnals or ft|reiit» 
who may be convicted of riolatlng any provisions of the act to regulate 
oommerce. 

MARKET REPORTS. 

Hat U. The Board addressed a letter to the leading papers of the 
Ui^r cities saggesting that they call lor atid nae the United Press 
. reports of the St. Lonia markets. 

INTERSTATE COMMERCE. 

June i. This Board Is thoronghly of the opinion that the malnle* 
nance and stability of rates sought by the interstate commerce act ia 
desirable for the best Interests of this city ; therefore. 

This Board indorses the Patterson bill and will send representatives 
to the conference to be held in Waahinfitan on the 13th lust. 

Uessra D. C. Ball and C- N. Osgood were appointed as such repre- 
sentatives. 

KANSAS, OKI,AHOMA CENTRAL A SOUTHWESTERN R. R. CO. 

Joke 4. Whereas, This Exchange has always been and is now heartily 
in accord with any proper measares calculated to more closely unite 
St. Loais with the fbrtile territories and prosperous cities of Oklahoma ; 
and 

Whereas, The citizens of that vigorons and most promising common, 
wealth have beeu untiring in their efforts to promote the same ond- 
recognizlng our natnriil mutuality of interests; therefore 

Resolved, That this Board learns with pleasure of the proposed con- 
strnctian of tiie I^nsas, Oklahoma Central & Sonthwestern Kvilroad, 
realizing that the incorporators of that company are animated by the 
same purpose and recognize the Importance and slgnlflcance of the 
mutual desire indicated. 

Resolved, That this Exchange takes a hearty Interest in the project 
and hopes for its early consummation, believiag that it will res nit in 
great benefit both to the interests of St. Louis and Oklahoma. 

Resolved, That inquiry be instituted to ascertain if any modification 
of the plansof the company, of such a character as tomoi'e surely seonre 
the result desired by both Oklahoma and St. Louis, is possible. 

TRANS-MISSISSIPPI COMMERCIAL CONGRESS. 

June 11. This Board recommends that the next meeting of the 
Trans-MissUsippi Commercial Congress be held In St. Louis during the 
last hair of November next and reqaeats the president of the Exchange 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. hOVlB. 



^^ffAott commiltee and to Invite tlic olhcr commercial organizations 
oftbe city to appoint similar committees to conler wltli Mr. Henry R. 
VUtmore, President of Ihe Congress, as to Ifacdste. 

OOVBRNMENT CROP REPORTS. 

•TuMEll. JleeolTcd, That it is tlic tense of this Board tliat there 
thould be iRsaed not to exceed fonr crop reports a year, giving acreage 
SDdfiiiBl crop, and that Ihlx action of the Board ho communicated to 
other coDimarcial bodies and tiielr opinion in tlie matter requested. 

QRAOES OP ORAIN. 

JniEll. The matter of grades of grain vas refeiTpd to the Execa- 
tin Committee on Grain Inspection, and the committee reqneetedto 
^^BpoiiiiTe means to have onr grades of grain placed on a bigtier 
pluK tbiD at present, and to liave the rnles and standards so amended 
tbu not to exceed ten per cent of blighted grain and do bnnied wheat 
besdmiiled in the grade of No. 2 wheat. 

JOHN R. LIONBBRQBR. 

'insi II. Reeointious of respect to the memory ot the late Jno. R, 
■^nbsrger prepared by a committee consisting of Messrs. James U. 
fniKEKDB, James E. Yealman and Wm. G. Clark, were adopted by the 

MISSOURI HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

JcHEll. The Board preseuled eo the UI»sonri Historical Society 
(WDnd copies of the daily papei-s for twenty-nine years. 



ivn 14. Resolved, By the Board of Directors of the Merchanta' 
Enhange of St. Lonis, that it regards with especial favor the attempt 
of tin Cotton States and International Exposition, in 1893, at Atlanta, 
^ilogrsgp for the United States the vast trade of the South American 
ContlDfiDt and its neighbors, as a national benefaction, and of vit«t 
intarMi to the immense llississippi Valley, forming 16 per cent of onr 
•^Mtry'B irea. 

Bttolved, That St. Jjonls, as the most imporUnt city of the Missis- 
^Ppi Vatiej , snd center of the great water commerce of this valley, 
nut be a leading beneficiary of the basiness coming from those 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



so TRADE AND 

couDti'ics through the Gulf, aud that ita advantages and the reaourceB 
of Missouri should be shown on such occasion. 

Beaolved, That we reBpectrnlly urge oar Senators and Itepresenta' 
Uvea to vole for the bill favorably reported by the Approprialjone 
Committee of the House in Congress, for a national exhibit, to give the 
Government stamp to the enterprise as an encoaragement to those 
Southern countries to co-operate in this movement for the good of both, 
and that a copy of these resolutions be sent to each. 

RAILROAD STRIKE. 

July 2. While the Board of Directors of the Merchants' Exchange 
of St. Louis are heartily in sympathy with all lawful efforts of laboring 
men to improve their condition aud greatly deplores existing differ- 
ences between the.Pallman Car Co. and its employes, they at the same 
time recognize that the observance of the authority of the law of the 
land is the paramount duty of all and that any interruption of free 
commercial intercourse is disastrous to all classes of people. 

We have been told by you that you have uo grievance against your 
employers except in their reJtasa] to comply with yonr demand to dis- 
continue the Ptillmao service. We also have been told by you that 
yoa will enforce your demands, if necesFary, by calling out all labor 
organizations and paralyzing the bnsiness of the country. This sleeplns 
car service is provided by the railroads for the accommodation of the 
public and has grown to be a necessity of travel. We do not know the 
terms of the contract between the different railroad companies and the 
Fallman Co., but what ever those contracts are the law protects them 
and makes their obligations binding upon the parties. When yon de- 
mand the railroads then to discontinue the Pullman car service, yon 
ask tbem to violate their contracts with resulting damages. Although 
we would be very gratified to see an amicable adjustment between the 
Pullman Car Co. and its employes, we cannot comply with your request 
that the company submit to arbitration in view of the &ct that you now 
etandin the position of paralyzing the interests of this city and assert 
the power and intention of repeating tb!s course whenever. In the 
judgment of the power represented by yon, similar conditions exist. 
In other words, you tneist upon the irresponsible power of the boycot 
to bring misery upon thousands of helpless families in thie city and 
elsewhere who have no possible interest in the dispute, The stoppage 
of commercial intercourse means the checking of our reviving iDt«reets 
and the consequent loss of employment for labor from which conditions 
it may take years to recover. From this state of affairs, which yon are 
asserting the right and power to craate, the innocent laborer* will be 
the greatest sufferers. We see no jnatificatlon whatever tor this boycot 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF BT, LOUIS. SI 

of tbe interesU of the couittry. Il ia illegal) tyrannical, and It iovolvcs 
t desputio pover to which no free people can Hobmlt. 

RAIt.ROAD STRIKE. 

JultS. The BoardorDii-ectorsof the Merchants' Exchange of St, 
Louis dlla upon the Congress of the United 8tat«8 to at once enact such 
l»ir! u will prereut unlawful interference with the interBtate cotn- 
loeree of Uie country. 

EDOAR REYNOLDS. 

Jclt9. Beeolntious of respect to the memory of Edgar Reynolds, 
prgpucd bf a Committee consisting of Isaac M. Mason, E. H. BameS) 
£■ S, Walton, Chaa. S. Freeborn and Marcus Berubelmer, were adopted 
byUM8o«i4. 

ANTI-OPTION BILL. 

JnLT 23. To the Committee of AgricnltDTe of the Senate of the 
United States; 

IJKniiMiM.— The Merchants' Exchange of St, Louis, throngh Ita 
™*'^ of Directors, protests against the fiavorable consideration or pas- 
"C* "i the bill known as the " Hatch Anti-Option Bill " nov before 
TonrCaiQuiltfee, for the following reasons, viz.: 
'' It il not a revenue measure. 

^' Itislnefficient, in that it does not reach or prohibit the gambling 
tkaeat of the trade, while virtnallr making legitimate speculation pro- 
MbiUve. 

9. Ilat in prohibiting legitimate speculation, resulting depreaalon 
to sgricDltnre will follow and continne an already orer-depressed con- 
ditfoD. 

i. Itis a rich man's bill, against the producing Intereata, and savort 
of elui legislation which is un-American and will reenlt in monopoly. 
S, That OTer-leglslation has already caused a commercial crisis in 
thit country, and we respectlhlly asV that our snrrlTiDg interests be 
Jinn an opportunity to recuperate, that prosperily to the producing, 
laboring, as well as the commercial clauses may follow. 

We would call your attention to the existing fact that wheat in this 
cODstry, and especially in the markets of the West, Is selling at a parity 
ota cents per bushel over and above the Liverpool values (where our 
SUTplosis largely marketed), taking into consideration the fVeight and 
other eWgee that follow transportation. This in the face of existing 
gieat depression refutes every claim of the advocates of the bill as to 
U>e ill eflecta of legitinate future speculation . 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



Jt2 TRADE AKD COMHEBOE OF 

We Btrongly proteet against &uy actioa tending to tlie passage of aucb 
an abominable bill aud endorse every word of the speech of the Ron. 
S. W- Cobb herewith attached, delivered in the House of Represent- 
ativeB, Jane 21, 1894, which embodies matter preTiously enhmitted to 
our body, and reapectfuily asli that yon give it thorongh consideration 
in your deliberations. 

IIIPROVEHENT TENNESSEE RIVER. 

Ano. 13. The Board approved of the action taken by the Nashville 
Chamber of Commei-ce calling upon Congress for an appropriation of 
4250,000.00 to construct a locic and dam just below the mouth of Hsr- 
peth Biver, and the Board requested iheBepresentatives from St. Lotiis 
Liouis to idd in securing the appropriation desired. 

TARIFF BILL. 

AvQ. IS. The Boai'd of Directors of the Merchants' Exchange of St. 
Louis i-espectfuily i-equests that final action on t^e tariff question be 
taken by Congi-e^B at once, that the country may be relieved of ttie 
preiient state of unceilaiuty. 

TKANS-HISSISSIPPI COMMERCIAL CONOR ESS. 

Sept. 10. Whereas, Tbu Tranamisslssippi Commercial Congress will 
hold its next meeting in this city during the last weelt of November, on 
the invitation of the merchants' Exchange, and 

Whereas, We recognize the importance of audi meeting to tlie baa- 
iness interests of the entire West; therefore 

Resolved, That this Exchange will appoint the full quota of delegates 
to whidi it may be entitled to call, aud earnestly requests the other 
business organizations and the Mayor to do the same. In order that oar 
city may l>e fliUy represented. 

Resolved, That the President of this Exchange and the Presideats of 
otlierbasiness organizations are hei-eby requested to meet and appoint 
a local executive committee, who shall appoint such snt>-committee8 as 
they ma; thinli advisable, to insure the proper entertainment of del- 
egates, and take such other action as may seem calculated to oontribate 
to the success of the Congress. 



Sept. 10. Besolntlons of respect to the memory of Wm. H. Baruett, 
presented by a committee, consisting of Amadee B. Cole, Chas. P. Barr, 
Geo. M. Flanagan, John D. Winn and G. W. Garrels, were adopted by 
the Board. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THB aiTY OF ST. LOUIS. SB 

BRIDOINO THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 

SiPT. 31. The Preaident addresBed the following letter to the Hou. 
Seniton from Mlssoari and the Ilepresentatlvea from St. LouIb: 

Hie Herchanta' Exchange has carafutly examiued H. R. 6646, intro- 
du«d by Mr. Forman, anlhorizing the construclion of a bridge acroae 
tlMUasiasippi River at 8t. Loals, and desire to earnestly protest against 
tbetusage of B^d bill unless »o amended that if a bridge is erected 
betoeen Uie Eads Bridge and Merchants' Bridge It shall not be a pier 
Iridfs, bat shatt I>e a suspension bridge, as the location of piers l>etween 
Umw two bridges wonid absolutely destroy the safe navigation of this 
portioii of the river, which Is tonlay practically the most important 
pi^onofthe river harbor of St. Louis. 

The Merchants' Bxctiange respectfully reqaests you to oppose the 
punge of the bill unless amended as above suggested. 

PEES FOR ORAIN INSPECTION AND VtTEIQHINQ. 

Oct. 1. The Board of Directors of the Merchants' Exchange ot 
St Loais are of the opinion that the recent advance in the charges for 
gtun inspection established by the Board of Railroad and Warehouse 
{JommisBioners is exorbitant, illegal and unjust, and unnecessary if the 
bn^wt of the inspection department is conducted on an economical 
bMli; and protests agfdnst anch advance, believing that the charge of 
40 cents per car for inspection and weighing is eufflcient for the neces> 
niy expense of grain inspection and weighing in St. Louis, that amount 
being more than is charged lu other competing markets for like service ; 
and farther, that If said Board of Railroad and Warehouse Gommia- 
sionera persist in imposing this unnecessary expense on the gr^u trade 
of St. Lonis, this board will use all lawful means to contest same in 
the courts and befoi-e the Missouri Legislature. 

STEAUSHIP "ST. LOUIS." 

Oct. 8. President Boyd issued the following letter: 
^M steamship "St. Louis," named In honor of our city by the Inter- 
Dationai Navigation Company, is to be lannched at Philadelphia about 
the SOtit ofthis month, and it is the dnty, as it should be the pleasure, 
ofonrdlixens to recognize the occasion. A meeting will be held la 
the Directors' room of the Merchants' Exchange on Friday, the 6th 
Instant, at 3 p. m., to take snch aciion in the premises as may seem 
wise. The Presidents of the various oommerclat, social, trade and 
ether organizations of the city, the Mayor and other representatives of 
the municipality, and any citizen interested in the movement, are in- 
vited to be present and participle in the meeting. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



34 TBADE AND COHHEBCE OF 

TRANS- MISSISSIPPI COMMERCIAL CONGRESS. 

Oci. 8. The Board appointed the following delegates to represent 
the Merch&nts' Exchange at the meeting of the TrauB-MjsaiBaippi Com- 
mercial GoDgresH, to be held in this city November 26th; 

Wm. G-. Boyd, Chairman ; W. T. Anderson, D. C. Ball, Alonzo C. 
Church, Seth W. Cobb, Nathan Cole, H. O. Craft, GlTen Campbell, D. 
K. Fergason, D. R. Francis, Louis Fdhz.U. C.Haarstick, Fred Hatters- 
ley, Henry Hitchcock, Geo. A. Madill, H. F. Langenberg, T. H. West, 
R. C. Kerens, F. G. Nledringhans, John W. Noble, Chas. F. Orthwein, 
D. P. Rowland, Web M. Samuel, E. O. Stanard, D. P. Dyer, Charles 
Parsons, Nathan Frank, H. R. Whitmore, O. L. Whitelaw, Geo. D. 
Barnard, L. M^ Ramsey, Isaac U. Mason, Chas. Ctaflin Allen, C. H. 
Smith. 

TEXAS COTTON PALACE AT WACO. 

Oct. 8. The Board of Directors of the Merchants' Exchange of St. 
Louis has recelred with pleasure the invitation of the officers of the 
Texas Cottou Palace at Waco, Tex., and believe that the business men 
of St. Lonis should embrace thia opportunity to visit and become better ' 
Bcqnidnted with the commercial men of onr sister State. 

The President is hereby requested to urge members of the vaiiooa 
Hues of business to visit Waco on November 20, which day has been 
designated as St. Louis day. 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE. 

Oct. 8. To the Voters of St. Lonis : 

At the coming election Jnetices of the Peace and Constables will be 
elected under the new law, known as the " Dovoy Law." Under Ite 
provision the jariediction of the Justices is made concnrrent with that 
of the CIrcnib Court (except in specified cases), is co-ex tensive with tbe 
City and the limit of the amount involved in ca»es which may come 
before them is increased from C300.00 (as heretofore) to 1600.00. 

Tbe great advantage of this new law is the snbstttution of fixed sal* 
aries in the place of fees, thus avoiding the possibility of extortionate 
fees and exorbitant and illegal costs, and removing all the varioiu 
temptations which are the concomitants of the fee system. 

To this end the business associations herein represented desire to call 
Uie attention of good citizens to the necessity ol each one making it his 
business to see the precinct committeemen of the two dominant parties 
(as well as their neighborhood voters), that these confer u^tber and 
determine upon candidates in each of these districts, who have tbe 
requisite knowledge of the law, the character and standiug In the com- 
munity to guarantee that these new courts will strengthen and elevate 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TSE CITY OP ST, LOUIS. 3C 

onr judicial B7steni, instead of being spoils awardecl to pernicious par- 
tiuiiaknovii u " ward hnetlerB." 

Seetbileood worthv men and well qualified are candidates of one 
pirty or the other, and if yonr party fails to select sach, vote and work 
Tor Cbe best man of tbe opposite political party who is duly equipped 
meotillv and morally to discharge the duties of the office. 

Ut etch of ns determine that our dnty to exalt the taw is eapeiior to 
pMr sllegiance. 

We do Dot seek to assume the functions of nominating conveDtions 
in Dunlngcaadidates, for the contests of political parUes are healthful 
to Um community in caaelng them to watch each other, and are con- 
dicrre to having each select its best men. This is what we wish to do, 
to bring the weight of oar nnited action to bear in having each party 
nune good and well equipped men for Justices of the Peace. To pledge 
rachonrBDpport and to oppose with the same force such as we deem 
uDiTDrthy, that ability and character may dominate in these courts, 
Ibit planiieriug our citizens in the name of jnstice may cease, and that 
thli tnt step towards a better judicial system may bring an era of bet- 
ter mnnidpal government to which we pledge onrselves and Inflnence 
vith onr associated bodies. 

PEES FOR QRAIN INSPECTION AND WEIOHINQ. 

Oct. 10. The Board of Directors of the Merchants' Exchange of St. 
I^nile desire to again call the attention of the Railroad and Warehouse 
CommisrionerB to their former aesertiou, that the present cttarges for 
theiDipection and weighing of gr&inare excessive and nnneoessar;, and 
napecthillf call upon the said Commissioners to at once reduce the fbee 
10 the r<mier basis. 

EDW. 8. KOWSE. 

Oct. 10. ResoluUons of respect to the memory of E. S. Bowse prs- 
P*^ by a committee consistiug of Messrs. Isaac M. Mason, Ctias. F. 
OrttaweiD, S. W. Cobb, R. M. Hubbard, Geo. H. Morgan, were adopted 
bj the Board. 

RECIPROCITY. 

Oct. 23. The Board of Directors of the Merchants' Exchange of 8t. 
umlt do most heartily concur in the request of the merciiants, mann- 
^ctnren and millers of St. Louis to the Honorable Secretary of State 
M Wuhington, D. C, urging the opening of negotiations with Spain, 
B'a^iUid other Spanish- American countries, for such new oommerdal 
t''<*tiet as will permit the sale of flonr, g»in, and other American 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



36 TRADE AND COMMEBCR OF 

prodacta Id those countries, a bnsineeB which this coantry (to which it 
leititimatelf belong;e) is deprived of on accoant of the exccBElve duties 
fiUuoed on oar productg by the Latin-American States. 

BURLINGTON FAST MAII^ 

Dec- 6. W. H. BiBsell, Poetmaaler (General, Washington, D. C. : 
The BarlingtoD Fast Mail hae been a great benefit to the city of St. 
lionis and a great accomodation to the people of North Miesonr] and 
£oatbern Iowa, and Eastern Nebraska. We understand the Burlingrton 
have received no compenaatlon from tlie GoTernment for services ren- 
dered. While not fftrailiar with yonr regulations, we respectfnlJy sug- 
gest that as good service has been rendered and no accidents occurred, 
the railroad is entitled to compensation for past service. Onr 
merchants have contributed generously to the expense of this service 
in the past, expecting ttie Grovernmcut would do its part bnt does not 
feel called npon to coutiunt it. 

PATTERSON POOLING BILL. 

Dec- 8. Whereas, The belief of the people of the country at large 
"that the beet interests of the commerce of the country require non- 
dlacriroination between shippers or places la the matter of freight 
«tuirgea and the maintenance by the railroads of their published tariff 
rates, and also demand proper governmental regulation and control, to 
the intent that publicity, stability and reasonableness of rates ehall be 
flecnred and that these rates shall be equal to all, has already been 
expressed and recognized by the enactment of the interstate commerce 
«ct; and. 

Whereas, This board is already on record as approving the anderiy- 
3ag principles of that act and as being desirous of its more effective 
.development and enforcement; and, 

Whereas. The leading commercial organizations of the country 
have well nigh unamlmoualy ezpresscd their belief that the provisions 
of the 80-oatled Patterson bill now before Congrees, as reported May 
31, 1694, (H. B. 7,273) and as approved by the convention of commercial 
'Organisations held In Washington June 13, 1691, will, if enacted into 
law, materially tend to a more efficient enforcement of the interstate 
■commerce act and to the promotion of the objects sotight to be accom- 
iplisbed by that act by securing a better maintenance of rates and more 
■effective regnlation by the constituted governmental authorities; and. 

Whereas, This boai'd is of the opinion that the best interests of the 
commerce of St. Louis will be largely benefitted by those resnlts there- 
4'ore, 

Ilesolved, That this board reaffirms its indorsement of the Patterson 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. I.OOI8. ST 

UU u benslnbefore described and as indorsed by the convention oi 
uxnnieTual orji^nizatioiis held in Washington June 13th, 1694, and 
ncommends Its pasaage by Congress. 

RAMIE PLANT. 

Dec. 10. The easy cullivation and exuberant prodacUTeneas of 
Bunle iu our Sonthera latiindea, ihe growth of two or three crops a 
Ktaon, the beauty, durability, and world-wide usefulness of Bamie^ 
Ulrica, the ioadequacy of ezisiing supplies to meet the large demand 
fbrthiifiber, the adaptatiou of our semi-tropic climate and soil to the- 
prodDction of this textile, and the lately improved methods of stripping; 
I'm ba^ from the stalks and preparing the fiber for mauufaeture eu- 
'Mntige the eetablisbment of a new industry in our Gulf States, b 
doiDMtic cnltiratlon of Bamie would diTorsify Sonthem agriculture, 
■ndesla^ the textile resources of the Uniud States. 

NATIONAL BOARD OF TRADE. 

^K. 10. The Board adopted the following lists of snbjecU for the 
«»<^dentionof the National Board of Trade at the annual meeting bk 
beheldontheMihof January next. 

RECIPROCITY. 

'^nas: It appears Ibat after the reciprocity treaties between th& 
Dniled Suiea and Spanlsli America went into efl'ect in 1890, a very 
'^'PiDdreunmerative trade was established between thebe conntriesr 
Sfflonnting, a.s it is represented, to 3,250,000 barrels of flour (equal to 
li.("»,Ouo buBhels of wheat), and more than 2,000,000 bushels of corn : 
"fgequsntities of other farm products, consiatiiig of oats, baled hay, 
""'I >c«<l, etc.; also large quaulilies of bog products, together with 
^i^QllDrsI implemenlE and other articles of uannfacture, amouuiiDg 
" »alae to about $22,000,000 in exportB aniinaily, and 

"hereag; Since the treaties were ahorgaied by the passage of the 
°*ii>!e]iil| last Augudt, our comniGrcial relations have been almost en- 
~'^|J tliBcoDtinned, whereby the steamship lines connecting with the 

""■Ameiiuttn porta have been obliged to piactically cease operations ; 
tlKrefore, 

''CBoWed, That, under the circumstances indicated, the Katlon&l 
BoirdorTrade urgently request Ihe Government of the United Stales 
totike»lepa for the re-establishment of the old cominercial treaties 
betwMD the United Stales and the Spanish Amedcau Slates, or make 
Mwwmmercial ti-eaties, to the end that such business may again be 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



18 TBADE AND OOUMSKOB OF 

made pouible u existed aader the reciprocity treaties, or to enaot new 
laws if fbnnd necessary, so that biuiiieBS may be promoted t)etireeD the 
United States and the ooantries in question. 

NICARAGUA CANAL. 

Besolred, Tti&t the early coiopletion of the Nicaragua Canal ia of the 
greatest importance to tbo commercialintereBta of the United States, 
and that Congress ihonid grant ench financial aid as will secure the 
control of the canal to the people of this coantry free from foreign inter- 
ference, provided, however, that in granting ench aid the Ciovernment 
of the United States shall acquire snch title thereto as will secure the 
ultimate payment of the bonds gfuaranteed or money advanced, to the 
end tliat the public money or credit shall not innre to the benefit of 
individualB interested in the scheme. 



Resolved, That the passage of an equitable bank rnpt lawdnringthe 
present session of Congress la imperatively demanded in the interest of 
the entire country. 

IMPROVBHBNT OF WESTERN WATER WAYS. 

Resolved, That the improvement of the MisaissippI Birer and its 
navigable tributaries ahonld continne to command the carefai attention 
of the National Qoverument, and that a portion of the appropriations 
therefor should be uaed in the boildlng of dredgeboats and wing dams 
to open the channel over bars during the period of low water. 

QRAIN INSPECTION AND WEIOHINQ. 

Dec. 10. The Board appointed Uesars. B. L. Slack, U. F. L&ngen- 
bei|r and C. H. Spencer, a committee to confer wilh the attorney of the 
Excbange and prepare an amendment to the State law governing the 
fees lor the inspection and weighing of grain, for maximum fbes to be 
charged hy the Board of Railroad and Warehonae Commissioners, the 
committee to report such amendments to the law at the next meeting of 
the Board of Directors. 

BOYS AND OIRLS NATIONAL HOME AND EMPLOYUENT ASSOCIATION. 

Dec. 10. The Board appointed the following gentlemen, viz., Geo. 
H. Small, Isaac M. Mason, B. L. Slack, C. Marquard Foster, John W. 
Eauffman, W. E. Stanard and Geo. H. Morgan, aa delegates from the 
exchange to the Boys' and Girls' National Home and £myloymenl 
Association to be held at Memorial Mali commencing to-day at S 
o'clock. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. IiOVIg. SB 

BRIDOB ACROSS THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER AT ST. LOUIS. 

Dk. 10. The Board indorsed the protest preaeotod to the Senate of 
tbe United States on December 4 by the steamboat men, miUen and 
gnin uportan of St. Lonls, proteatiDg against the passage oT Honse 
UIINo. 5, 6U, relative to conetraction of a bridge across the Ulasls- 
dpiuBiTer at St. Lonie, unless the amendment prepared by Senator 
Cukiell be made a part of tbe bill, to-wit: "That no bridge con- 
ttratted under this act shall be located within a distance of two miles 
■bore or twx> miles below the present bridge known as the Kads 
Uri^" 



MEBTINCS OF THE EXCHANGE DURING 1894. 



DEATH OF PRESIDENT A. T. HARLOW. 

JuuART SI. At 11 :4fi P. M. First Vice-President Wm. G-. Boyd an- 
nonneed tbe death of Alonzo T. Harlow, President of the Exchange. 
The Exchange Immediately adioaiaed and voted to close the Ezchaoge 
n»nu on the day of the faneral. 

FtB, ft. The Ezoh&nge adopted resolatlone in honor of the lata Pres- 
ideot and the Exchange Hall was ordered draped In moBrning for 
tUrtf days. 

GOOD FRIDAY. 

Uabch 13. The Exchange voted to adjoom on Good Friday, the 

SUiDlt. 

PRESS CLUB AND STATE OFFICERS FROM COLUMBUS, OHIO. 

Uabcb 24, The members of the Press Glnb, of Colnmbns, Ohio, 
aceonpanled by a Dumber of State Officers, visited the Exchange and 
Win inlrodnced trota the rostrum by the President. 

PORTRAIT OF SIDNEY R. FRANCIS. 

ina. 17. Ao oil painting was presented to the Exchange by Mr. 
Alex. a. Smith In behalf of the donors, and accepted by Mr. Geo. H. 
SnulS, Pirst Ylce-Presldent, in behalf of the Exchange. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TBADB AMD COHHBRCE OF 
MBMORIAL DAY. 



Hat 26. The Exchange voted to adjonrn on the 30th inst., Uem- 
orial Day. 



PORTRAIT OF ALOHZO T. HARLOW. 



JuNB 6. Mr. Roifer F. Annan presented to the Exchange in behalf 
of himself and associates an oil painting^ of the late Proafdent Alonzo 
T. Harlow, which was accepted by President Boyd on behalf of the 
Exchange. 

AROSNTINE REPUBLIC. 

JtiME 18. Senor Eetanlslao Zeballos, Envoy Extraordinary and Min- 
ister Plenipotentiary of the Argentine Republic, visited the Exchange 
and was introduced to the members by the Pi-esldent and welcomed by 
his Honor, Mayor C. P. Walbridge. 

FOURTH OF JULY. 

Juke 30. The Exchange voted to close on July Sd and 4th, 

TEXAS DBLBOATION. 

JuLT 6. Gov. James S. Hogg and a party of capitalists from Texas 
visited the Exchange and upon introduciiou by the President several 
members of the party addressed the members. 

LABOR DAY. 

Ado. 29. The Exchange voted to adjonrn on Labor Day, the first 
Monday !n September. 



Oct. 1. Hon. Wm. McKinley, Governor of Ohio, was inli-odoced by 
the President and addressed the members. 

ST. LOUIS FAIR. 

On. 2. The Exchange voted to adjourn on Thursday of Fair week 
the 4th inst. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS. 

Ooi. 3. The National Convention of Fnneral Directors visited the 
Exchange. 

Oct. 29. Hon. Thos. B. Reed of Maine visited the Exchange and 
was introduced by the President, and responded briefly. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. : 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER FOR 1894. 



CURRENT ACCOUNT. 



Cub on bind Jannar? Ist, 1S94 ( 2,Sei S3 

RKepti from Tranaferfees 980 OO 

" Assessment does S3,480 00 

" " Rent of Cail Board chairs SW BO 

" Bent of Drawers 7T0 76 

Rent of Telegtsph counten 690 00 

" " Bent ofTraiuportatton desks IM 00 

" Sale of Samples and Sweepings. 61 10 

■' '■ Interest OD Current Account *72 01 

•' Old Furniture sold 2 (* 



Sittrln 






■■ is'ooooo 






































I^sral, Prait. A. T. Harlow 


.;:::: mU 






Lnnobeiror Board o( Directors 

AMSBtmeot National TnnEpoilBtloo Association 


8*100 

300 »0 


Ddegala Nalional Boarf of Trade 


27080 








17171 






Bep^n 










IIBIO 








. ... 70 96 






OwtofCourt 

Httertdnment Gov. Bogg and party 

5itntainiMntMinirtVrArgentiW*RipnbiicV//.'^ 


.... 61 » 
4200 

8800 

3586 

2100 






Bw-Wtt":;;: ■;::;;;::::;::.;;;:;;:;;;::.:::::::;;:::; 





n hand December 31st, 18M (I.ISS 12 

QEO. H. MOBOAN, 

Secretarf and Treasurer. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AKD COUMBBCE OP 



BBAL ESTATE ACCOUNT. 

RECEIPTS. 

Cwh OD hud JaDauT lat $ 8B,S81 82 

BQUPiyablB bO.OOO 00 

Kent« 47.8*8 67 

Fiom Curreot AoMunt 19,000 00 

Intereat 449 64 

•303,180 IS 

BXPBNDITUBBS. 

N»w Improremenls $ lB2,S8Ii 8S 

[nmmiioe 9,966 70 

Tue* 8,«2 8T 

loteren on Loan of ilU,000.oO 7^ 00 

BinptorMa 6383 7S 

BepaiTB ud Altonttoiu, Dud A Co. '• Boom 6,001 90 

Ordliuuy Repatn 4,<97 16 

Oo»l, 80,4O8k bn 2,843 « 

Powar for BunDiDi Etentorg 1,098 60 

Witer License 1,0*6 00 

Intereat on Temporary Lotna 733 89 

Suppltetfor En^ [near and J&ultor 410 49 

Splttoona, Babbar Uata and Gas Stove 321 6T 

KemovlDB- Aabea and Sweepings 396 7ft 

Elevator ^suranco 8(100 

G8B 69B! 

Blectrlo Lla-ht 69 08 

loapeotliir Blevatora and Boilers 87 00 

Printing 2BO0 

Sprinklfng Tax 94 86 |90S,«» « 

Balanee OD hand. Dm. 81st, 1804... $ 921 01 

8L Lonli, Dec. Slat, 1894. 



GEO. H. MOBGAN, Sec'jr A TroH'r. 



We, tbe nnderatgned, a Committee appointed by tbe Preaident, do hereby 
«ertuy tbat we have examined the aocounU or the Secretary and Traaanrer for 
1811, and lltid the same to be oorroot, with the proper voncbon on file for ezpen- 
dltnrea and balauoes In bank as loltowa, viz.: 



WH. K. 8TANABD, 
AMEDEB B. COLE, 
H. B. BILBBO. 
St. LonU, jMiuaiy 4tli, laWI. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



{ OF ST. LOUIS. 



SECRETARY'S REPORT. 



Mescsantb' Exchakqk, 
St. Louis, Mo., Jan. 31, 1894. 
M8.WH. G. BOTD, President. 
DeakSik: 
Id oompliancfi with the rules &Dd in accordance with custom, I have 
{inp&red a statement of the trade and commerce of St. LoqIb for the put 
yeir, and herewith submit same for the coneideration of the members 
oftbeEichange, and for the public generally, trosting that the same 
msf b« found nsefnl in presenting the claims of our city as the com- 
merdal metropolis of the MiasiBSippi Valley. 

The record of the ye&r just passed is not all we might have wished it 
lobe, nevertheifiBB, it is very gratifying in many respects, ae it proves 
wnclotirely that daring the season of commercial depression which 
hag iludowed the entire coantry for the past eighteen months, St. 
Ix>dIi has suffered less than any large city and is, all things considered, 
in 1 Tsry satisfactory condition flnanci&ily and commercially. So mnoh 
» IB this the case, that it has attracted the attention of prominent men 
(hrongfaoDt the coantry wlio have throngh the press made mentiou of 
the hvorable Impressions received as to the commercial conditions of 
£t. Loois. 

Ilie TOlame of business is somewhat less when compared with the 
whole of the year 1898, as the first half of that year was one of general 
prosperity. Bat it can be tratbfnlly stated that In most lines the trade 
nf the last six months of 1894 was largely in excess of the correspond- 
ing period of 1S93. 

The bnsinees of the year as shown by the amount of tonnage handled 
by Tail and by river shows a decrease of 1,769,181 tons or a trifle over 
teQ per cent. Of this amonnt, fi39,979 tons was the decrease in the 
receipts of coal, cansed largely by the coal strike 'in the early part of 
the year. 

The total loss in receipts of all kinds of freight amounted to 911,024 
toils. Dedncting from this amoant the decrease in receipts of coal, 
5S9,9T!l tons and we have a loss of 371,046 tons of general freight for 
the thole year, a very small percentage. 

Inou-bonDdiVeigbt the decrease was 848,167 tons. Deducting from 
Itiii Uie decrease in coal shipmeots, 179,088 tons, and we have a loss in 
t^pmeiKs of general flvight of 669,124 tons, or, of both receipts and 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



44 tba.de akd cohuerce of 

shipments of general t'reifcht, a loss of 1,040,169 tons, a, very favonble 
Bhowing for a year of general depression and of Ibe great railroad 
strike. 

The reports of the clearing hoase present an equally favorable sboir- 
ing, being only about one per cent, lees than the preceding year; while 
dnriug the latter months of the yeai' there was a marked increase. 

In the bailding line also there vas a marked activity, especially in 
the latter part of the year and several large and imposing edifices vera- 
erected. 

The buBinesB ot the postoffice is another indication of business 
activity and tbe reports pabllehed elsewhere show'a very considerable- 
increase in all departments. 

In many of the leading lines in mannfaotores, notably in tobacco, 
and boots and Bhoee, there has been a full bnsiness done, in some In- 
stances larger than ever before, showing that St. Louis in this line is 
more than holding her own. 

Tbe reports from the jobbing lines are encouraging and show a large 
trade, especlallv in the fall months, althnnKh on account of low prices 
the amount in values is less tban some former years. 

There Is less cause for congratulation in tbe lines of business trans- 
acled on 'Change than most others. The year has been a phenomei)al 
one iiftbe grain trade, for with low prices of breadstuff's there has 
been little foreign demand, and basiness has lacked activity. The 
amonnt handled here, as well as in other centres, has been less than 
for some years, and the large stocks held in public elevators have not 
been drawn npou to any large extent. 

The condition of our aBSOcialion hoe been so fully set forth in (be report 
of the Board of Diieclorslhat Inecd not review it here. I may say, 
however, that our Exchange not only looks after tlie interests of its 
members who daily Bssemblo on 'Change for the transaction of basi- 
ness, bnt Is ever watchfnl of Ihe intereot of our city and stale and is the 
source from which originates most of the movements looking to the 
advancement and ptoteetlon of its commercial interests. Its commit, 
tees are acilve and progressive and do not shirk any reEponsibiiitles. 

A report like this cannot cover all the interests of a great city, bat I 
trust the information and statistics given may be of value in setting^ 
forth the commercial greatness of St. Louis. 

With many thanks to yourself, the Board of Directors and tbe mem- 
bership generally for countless kitiduesses shown me dnring tbe thirty 
years I have been permitted to serve the Exchange, I am 

Yours very sincerely, • 

GEO. H. MORGAN, 

Secretary. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



5 CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



COMPARATIVE BUSINESS IN LEADING AETICI-ES 
AT ST. LOUIS FOR 1891, 1892, 1893 £ 1894. 



nMr.uionDtmuabctaredbbli. 

" " buidlad " 

WbMt, total iscsipta buih. 

ftm, " " " 

Om, '■ " " 

Kj*, " " " 

BMler, " « " 

AH OnU ntdTtd (ioelndiiiKJ 

Hon redneed to wheat) .... " 

OMm, ncdpti bale*. 

Bigglig, ■umbetiind fardi. 

Bxj.ntatfM tana. 

^^MMi reertpt* hbda. 

Lead, ncdpti In ptgi SO lb. . .pigi. 
HogPnxtnct, toUl ablpm'tt. .lbs. 

C«l«i weelpti. head. 

Stoep " It 

Hop « " 

HM»MMdl(olM,rocdpto... " 
^«»I>«*L«», " ...fMt. 

8UI**, " ...pea. 

i^ <• ..." 

'"•".touirecelpta Ibi. 

HMm, « .< 

^w.wMiTad. .^'.'^y...l. •• 

"•IWM DmMi« SlattM) Tec'd, gall* . 

^'■'M«MlT«d bags. 

"".WMlpti pkgB. 

C-1' " b«.h. 

^l". " tep. 

™"W.KMlptS bush. 

*Jf' " bbta. 

"^ " aaolu. 

" ...buah. inbulk. 

?•"«« ;....ib.. 

TOM offrrttfit of an kinds recelTed 
-»1*!pp«j 



S,638,lS:i 
1 ,580. MO 
i,432.2ie 



1,1S5.S42 
4,870,862 

3T,483,SBe 
3£, 030 ,030 
10,004,610 

t.ies.uu 
s,6ei,aie 

> S0,6M,18a 



>i8e3,ai3.i< 

>0 171,Ma,til 
W 2Z,»)S,8I 
M »,850,8I 



U,443.9 
33,809,4 
10,0t>0,2 



9,0*6 1,261,3011 
*,717.eS* 

0.003,342 
3,546,945 

0,196,605 



06,348,71 

688.41 

12,000 ,0( 



1,646,405 
812,706 

3,000,000 



7,780 



730, 

S,B00|lO6. 
l,7B0i 81, 
4,436 24, 
l',66e 4S. 
■I,73ell98, 
4,080 5, 



,174,866 
,782.000 
,354,350 
,861,456 
466,970 
,868,450 
,706,901 
246,612 
66.676 

4,614,876 
522,678 

1,. 192,52! 
248,830 
60,787 
6M.600 

4,188,544 



16,420,081 18,383,174 16.618,881 16.239.765 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AKD COMMERCE OF 



THE STATE OF MISSOURI, 



BY J. K. GWYNN. 
ExccatiVE ComminlaDcT Im the State ol HiiH 



The State of Miasaun lies in the very heart of the great Rapnblic of 
the United States. 

It compriseB an area of 69,415 square miles, or 44,42o,600 acres. It 
embraces within its ample area a dlverBity of resoarces aod versatility 
or prodactJve capacity bard to comprehend, yet difflcalt to exaggerate. 
Its Bastem boundary Is the Mississippi Elver, and It lies between mer- 
idians 69 degrees Bnd2minntes, and 9fi degrees and 52 minutes of Weat 
longitude. Itie tionnded on the Sonth by parallels of 36 degrees, and 
36 degrees and 30 minutes, and on the North by 40 degrees and 30 mlo- 
ates of North latltade. It lies directly on the line over which passes the 
great highway of empire. It will be discovered at a glance that the 
gegtaphtcal position of the Slate is sncb as to give it immanlty ftotn 
climatic extremes. It will also be see n that the geograpliicat position ia 
snch as to gnaraniee the most diversified flora, and to snggest the greatest 
possible diversity of economic endeavor — a consideration paramonnt to 
all others In the wellfai-e of a civil commanity. The distribution of 
pridrle and forest, hill and plain, valley and mountain, is snch as to 
challenge the wonder and admiration of alt. 

The distribntioti of water highways throughoat the State presents a 
plexns of commercial arteries of unrivaled availability and conveoieDce, 
and the ramification of streams of great and small magnitude provides 
an nnltdllDg abundance of water for power, and for all domestic uses. 
These water conrsea are flanbed with rich alluvial bottom lands, whose 
aggregated area is about one-fi>nrth that of the entire State, and whose 
fbonndity under the sUmQlating presence of these streams defies the 
ravages of the severest draught, and Is perhaps withont a parallel in 
the world. 

The manner in which nature has lavished her best gifts apou 
Wssouri, long since attracted the notice ol observant men. "The Yal- 
ley of the Mississippi is, npon whole, the most magnificent dwelling 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE OITT OP ET. I.OU1S. 17 

plice prepare b^ God for man's adode," wrote DeTo^neville, many 
jtin igD. In contemplation of its atragetic position, and the marrel- 
omnitnral resources of Missouri, Henry Ward Beecher exclaimed ; 
"In this ocean of land and at nearly its center stands Ibe imperial State 
otUIuoari. All admit that in nalnral resources it leads all the rest, 
mi is tbe crown and glory of the Union." 

Bat, If ihe location of Missoarl attracts the attention of even the most 
BBperfidsl obserrer who glances at the map, he is amazed when be 
wmes to invealighte with intelligence and jndgo with candor her fbture 
poulbililiea. Its admirable location in the heart of the nation gives it 
tbepMition of a distributor to every section. Her economic possibili- 
Hn are indeed difflcuU to exaggerate. It mast of necessity evontnally 
become the central, and the greatest mannfactaring district of the 
Uniled States. It will teem with the population to work its mines, 
fiiiget, iamaces, qnarries and mills, while immediately contignons to 
ill these hires of indnstry is found the soil which will prodace the 
bread and meat, the fmit and vegetables necessary to subsist In com- 
ftrt tbe vut army of operatives. A hasty survey of the State of Mfs- 
Kuiwill at once disclose to tbe world the vast wealth that is hidden 
bcDtath her soil , and the fociiity with which capital and enterprise may 
BDcorer snd ntllize it. 

Krat of all, Missonri possesses a climate that is temperate and agree- 
tbteisndlt Is climate that distinctly controls the migration of the 
homu rece, which has steadily adhered to an Isothermal line around 
the world. ^Nothing can unmake the eternal ordinances of nature, and 
reset the universe to snit local fancies and idle fashion. It is natural 
thst the region of country called Missonri, should be the seat of a vast 
and varied industry, and the home of millions of people. 

Next to climate, in attraction for the human race, is soil. That of 
Kisionri is unequalled for variety, and unsurpassed for prodnctivnese. 
It produces all the edible grains In great abundance. The yield of 
wheat is certain, and frequently as high as fifty bashels an acre. Com 
is > lure crop, season after season, in every portion of the common- 
wealth, the yield being fh>m forty to eighty bushels per acre. Bye 
aid oats are profitable crops in all sections. Tobacco of the ttest qual- 
ity it grown year after year, and hae been a source of wealth to the 
IQawnri planter for half a century. The yield of Irish and sweet 
potatoes U quite as large as In any section of tbe United States, and 
*bsy are of excellent quality. 

^ a fmit growing region Missouri is unsurpassed on the continent, 
^variety includes everything known to the temperate zone. She 
Pndnces the best apples, the most delicious peaches, the sweetest 
''""iM, (he finest pears, plums, apprioots, and tbe best flavored ber- 
^iWbllt ber Tlneyarda are as ftnitfnl as any found in the Old World 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



48 TBADE AND COUMSRCE OF 

Tbeae combine the substantiats and the luxuries of life in which man- 
kind dellghta, bat thef do not comprise all or even half the prodacts of 
Hiseonri. 

Vast forests of all kinds of commercial timber skirt her streams and 
aproadout In almost unbroken areas of pine, cypress, oak, faidcoir, 
poplar and oottonwood in her Sontheaatern quarter. 

Valuable quarries of sandstone, limestone, granite of many TarieUes, 
marble and onyx of the best quality for building purposes ai-e found Id 
many places in the State, 

The mineral resources of the State have both attracted and astonished 
the world. Her coal and iron deposits are very rich, and practioally 
inexhaustible. 

Lead, ziac, copper aud commercial clays of all kinds are found in the 
greatest abundance, and her mialng industry, yet In the infancy of Its 
development is a potent factor in her commercial economy. 

The best practical demonstration of the Irntli of all of the above stato- 
ments is furnished by the Awarding Committees of the World's Colum- 
bian Exposition. In addition to more than fonr hundred other awards, 
the medal for "The Best Generul and Most Varied Exhibit," made at 
the World's Fair, was awarded to the State of Missonri. No higher 
proof of the versatility of her resources conldbe asked or ifiven. 

Missouri has now three millions or more of inhabitants, and Is capa- 
ble of sustaining in comfort and without crowding, six or eight times 
that population. 

In view of the inviting conditions prevuling in Uissom-i, as sbore 
related, the question may be very pertinently asked, why have not 
these wonderfal resources been more fully developed at an earlier date, 
and why have not the attractive lands of Missouri been Jon^f since 
occupied by settlers, instead of remaining comparatively destitute of 
population, as Is true of many localities. There are two principal rea- 
fions to accountfor this state of aflairs. In the first place, Missouri was 
largely peopled at the outset from Virginia and Kentncky, and the 
apathy of people from those localities on the subject of immigration is 
so pronounced, as to need no comment here. In the second place, 
corporate interests secured control of vast areas of land in Kansas, 
Nebraska and other Western States, and by a system of advertising, 
tbe most ^gantic, and the most skillfully executed of any in the history 
of Uie world, attracted to these more distant states, the investor and 
home seeker, who, all unconsciously were tared across and beyond the 
confines of the well watered and fertile lands of Mlsaoari to those of 
less merit toward the setting son. 

As to tbe eligibility of the State of Missonri, as a place of resideooe, 
I feel Uiat I cannot do better than to quote tbe cogent reasons given by 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT 0¥ ST. LOUIB. 49 

Ex-GoT. Farwel), ol WlBoonsln, for eetUiug fn HiHonri, ^hlch an so 
idmtrnbly expraesed in the followii^ langnt^e : 

"1 came to Miasoari to Hcnra, as far aa posilbte, the beneflta of an 
equable climate, a field of diTereified indoetries, and of certain mental, 
rooTal and material advancement, which, fh>m the Tery natnre of 
thiogs, coald knoir no panae. I BOnght a location There the cold or 
winter season was of three, and not of sLz months' dnration, and where 
tntn the contonr of the surface, needful altllade oonld be selected to 
orercome an^ imsginar}- danger to health from change of latitude — 
indeed, where North and 8oath oonld meet on common equality. 

"Where the earth teems with plenty, there Is little cause for oonsum- 
ing anziet)'. Neither wintry blizzard nor sommer cyclone are here to 
molest or make as afraid. 

'fhe State of Missouri occupIeB an exceptional position in certain 
letpeets, even when compared with others in tbe same zone. Generally 
it may be conaidered In itself as a valley, the channel of its great river 
ntrking the centre line of Its greatest depression. The soil of its bob- 
torn land is the product of all the Territories east of the Rocky moun- 
tMina, and this is largely true of its upland. Northern snows seldom 
penetrate below the central line of division. It lies sonlh of the snow 
line, and north of the dry, hot-air regions that reach to the Gnlf of 
Mexico; a zone of precipitation generally qnite stable when years are 
compared together. Crops are neither winter-killed, nor do they per- 
Ishofdronlhor otexceasof moistnre; all forms of agricaltnre thrive, 
and a growing diversity is annually visible. Fralt culture scarce has 
limit to its range of varieties. The graaBBs insure snccossfbl stock- 
raidagto an unlimited extent. Winters ars Bhort, usually without 
great extnmcs of temperature. Summers being withont excessive 
beats; in which respect the climate widely differs ^m r^one farther 
north. Nor is the climate of Missouri enervating, but agrees with new- 
comm, whether from the North or Soutli. 

"la raioenils, Missonri is the equal of any stale in the Union, and the 
most favored portions of Europe. The time Is near at hand, when its 
mauabctares, in extent and variety, will be equal to those of the East- 
era States. Generally, every condition of diver8i6ed IndustrieB is com- 
plelelr dsreloped. In a commercial sense it is the gateway of the 
pl^Di ud mountains, as it is the midway of the continent; a local 
point towsrd which all great public enterprises tend, and from which 
^7nditte. That it is to become and continue the very seat and cen- 
i^of iiteliectnal activity and refinement ie manifest from surrounding 
cooditiDDs. 

"For years I have seen scores ofthousands of people induced to locate 
on tbc cold, naked and treeless plains ot the North, where winter tern- 
Peratnre often reaches Bfy below zero, and which scarce enjoys four 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



flD TRADE AMD OOlfMEBCB OP 

monUu otyevly warmth, all becatiBe no oi^nlied effort is or has been 
made to direct them to a country in every seose more inviting. TUnk 
once of Manitoba and Dakota aa a winter home compared with the mild 
climate of UisBonri. It is as the iceberg to the summer snnshine. 

"The people of Missouri have been wonderfully blessed. Never Im- 
periled or distressed by famine ; capital and labor always in demand ; a 
country underlaid with coal, iron, lead and other minerals and metals, ' 
sufficient to supply the country's demand for all time to come- 

"No better evidence can be given of the great advantage of settle- 
ment here than that the large portion of the preseot population had 
once resided west of the Missouri river, sold out and returned to a 
State which they had merely passed through. This is the substance of 
my experience; if, of the multitudes of personal acquaintances else- 
where, we shall induce some of them to follow, I think they will agree 
that MisBouri embodies in itself more advauta^s of all kinds, in which- 
ever light the subject is considered, than any Western State. I have 
repeatedly visited nearly all and balanced advantages and disadvant- 
ages against each other." 



From what has already been said the inevitable conclusion will be 
drawn tJiat Missouri is of necessity a great Agricultural state, and what 
more potent argument in her favor could be advanced? For does Dot 
agricultural success He at the base of all success? 

We have previously stated that Missouri captured the medal at the 
World's Fair over all competing States, for the "Best General and Most 
Varied" agricultural exhibit. The considerations that governed the 
swarding committee in according to Uissouri this pronounced testimo- 
nial of agricultaral superiority, are not difficult to discover. Heragrl- 
coltural exhibit occupied the largest area in the agrloultnral building 
assigned to any State or Territory in the Union. In this exhibit, she 
displayed in great profusion, and of the finest quality, specimeuB of the 
four great American staples, vie. ; Corn, Wheat, Cotton and Tobacoo. 

It Is indeed a remarkable circumstance, that within the confines of a 
■ingle State, conditions of soil and climate should be found, under the 
influence of which, each and all of these great staples are brongbt to 
their highest individual development, and yield the most remunerative 
crops. In the extreme Southern Counties of the State, cotton raising is 
prosecuted on a large scale, and the fibre of the cotton raised is fullr 
equal to that raised on the bottom lands of the Mississippi Valley states. 
In additiou to the four great staples above mentioned, all the other 
grain, grass and vegetable crops known to temperate latitades, are 
grown with success. Root crops of all kinds, such as Irish potatoes, 



nc.,z.d.vCoOt^lc 



TBR OITV OF BT. LOUIS. 61 

«»eet potatoes, tnmlpa, beets, etc., yield wenderfal retama In tfae rich 

■UnTial bottom laods of the State. Irish potatoes eepeci&llj are a very 

profitable crop. 
Id the sandy bottom lands of Southeastern Mlesoari, the rearing of 

wMermfllons for market has become an Important iDdnstry, and where 
intelligently and IndnBtrioiiBly prosecuted, yields the most gratifying 
retarus. 

But the rersatility of production of Missouri soil can in no way be 
CO elrongly emphasised, as by a statement of her wealth of native flora. 
Uissoori enjoj^s the prond diBtinclion of having more than sixt«en 
handred species of native flora that have been brought to the knowU 
edge of the botanist. Her herbarium at the World's Fair was fully as 
great as the aggregate of all the rest of the herbaria exhibited there. 

Bot in addition to the great natural advantages of Hiasonrl as an 
sgricnltnral state, is her proximity to markete, and her transportation 
hdlities. Within her own borders, is situated the great City of St. 
Lonis, the metropolis of the Mississippi Valley, whose annnal consump- 
tion of agricultural commodities is something enormous, and coDstantly 
incresBing. 

On the opposite edge of the state are Kansas City and St. Joaeph, 
botfa popnlar trade centres— to say nothing of the nnmeroDS other 
imsller dtiea throughout the State, all of which, combined, make a 
home market of great and ever increasiug magnitude. 

Taken all in all, there is perhaps no other country in the world where 
the AgricultDrist can prosecute his avocation under fewer adverse cir- 
comstsnces, and where the rewards are richer or more oerWn. 
Nowhere else will the same exertion secure for himself and &mily 
more of the comforts, not to say luxuries of life — and certainly nowhere 
else do conditions of soil and climate more thoroughly oonaplre to ^ve 
to man the maximum of health, enjoyment and prosperity, with the 
minlmam of labor, suffering and privation. 

LIVE STOCK. 

From what has been said about the agricultural sapremaoy of the 
State, it oatnrally follows that it ia ao ideal Uve Stock country. The 
rich native grasses are admirably adapted for grazing purposes, and 
the eue with which all kinds ot cereal and forage crops may be pro- 
doccd, together with a mild climate and an abundance of pure fresh 
viter, leaves little to be desired as to natural conditions for snceessfiil 
Meek niaing. 

Bone of the most celebrated herds of Cattle, Sheep and Swine in the 
voitd Dkf be foand in Hissonri. This statement is fully coroborated 
^ ibe reports of the committees of award of the live etook department 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



$2 TRADE AND COMUEBCE OF ^ 

of the World's F^ir. Id this department it is abown that Missouri took 
more prizea on Cattle, Sheep and Swine, than any other stale in the 
Union. In the Berkshire Swine and Merino Sheep olasEes, Mlssoaii 
oaprnred the great majority of all the prizes offered. 

Great success has been achieved, and many foKnnes made in breed- 
iug and handling the beef breeds of cattle in Missouri. Tliis is espec- 
ially true of Shorthorn, Hereford, Aberdeen-Angus and Polled-Angus 
breeds. An Aberdeen -An gna cow from Uissouri took the grand swMp- 
etake prize at the World's Fair in a contest of all Beef Breeds. 

Considerable attention has also been paid to rearing the Milk breeds 
of cattle in the State, especially the Jerseys, which has been attended 
with marked snccese. In this connection, it may be obaerred, that the 
situation in Mlasonri, at this time, is especially inviting for the iutelli- 
gent prosecution of the Dairy Industry. Wild and domestic grasses of 
sll kinds floarish to perfection. The markets are abundant, and 
the supply of firnt class Dairy products is rarely equal to and never 
exceeds the demand. Taken all in all there are few avenues to lucra- 
tive occupation so reliably promising, as that of high class dairying in 
. ..Uissouri.- 
"' The Horse, too, finds a congenial home in Missouri, Many of the 
"cracker jacks" of the trotting and racing turf are c>wned in this state. 
But the distinctive feature of the horsfl breeding iudustry in Missbari, 
is her proud pusitiuu as a breeder of Saddle Horses. For many years 
this was an industry peculiar to Kentucky alone, and for which she 
achieved a world-wide repatatlon. But of late years Missouri has, to 
eay the least, divided honors equally with Kentucky in this fascinating 
field of endeavor. At the World's Fair, Missouri captured the medal in 
the sweepstakes Stallion ring, and at the great St. Louis F^r or 1694, 
Hisaouri carried off the prize for the "Champion Saddle Horse" in the 
most fiercely contested ring e^er seen in the West. The breeding of 
theac several classes of Horses is on important and lucrative indaatry in 
the Sute. 

In the Swine iudustry Missouri occupies a high rank. In the breed- 
ing of Berkahii'e Swine ahe headn the list, and has within her borders 
- the most celebrated herd of Berkshire Swiue in America. Many other 
breeds, such as Poland China, Chester White, Duroc Jersey, etc., are 
successfully reared. 

The decadence of the Sheep industry within Iho last few years baa 
reduced this feature of stock raising to the minimum of importance. 

It would be unjust to the prestige of the State, however, were we to 
omit the statement that the finest flock of Merino Sheep in the United 
States is owned at Stauberry, Miaaouri. This flock took nearly all tlie 
premiums offered in the Merino class at the Columbiau £z position. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ET. LOBIB. 



HORTICULTCRI. 



From what has beec said of the abandaiit and wonderfully dfrenl- 
fted flora of MlsBoail, Ibe inlolligent reader wilt at once conclude that 
it most be a great frait State. This conclaaion ia eminently correct. 
Fralts of all kinds, adapted to temperate latitades, floarish in Miuoari. 
Tbe IfiBSonri apple, size, flavor and color coo«idered, can hardly be 
uii to have an equal in ilie world. The available annual crop of thia 
frntt ii purchased with an avidity that Is remarkable. Long before tbe 
■Qtmnn crop is ripe, purchasers from all the gi'eat trade centres of 
tbe country visit the orchards In person, to bid on the maturing crop. 
The tnccesaful bidder does his own picking, packing, and shipping. 
Wlut easier or more delixhtrulocciipaiioi) is open to enterprising man? 
But while frait growing — and especially that of the apple — is attended 
with BQccess, in all parts of the State, a combination of climatic condl- 
tiODB, soil, and the trend of a mountain range have conspired to render 
k portion of the State an ideal location fur fruitgrowing. The slopes 
otthe Ozark mountains in Southern Missouri is the ideal location 
slloded to. Here the peach. In its highest and best development, is a 
reliable crop. Mere the apple attains a coloring and flavor without an 
•qoal, and yields an annual crop surprising in its maguitade. Hero 
"gripes OS luscious as were ever kissed by the ripening suns in the 
vales of Burgundy, or on the slopes of Rliineland" are produced. Hero 
every kind ol small fruit develops a fecnndity, as wall as a richnesa Of 
flavor, that is truly remarkable. Bat, notwithstanding; this natural 
adaptation, commercial orchariliiig in Missouri ia siill in its infancy. 
Bnt while iliis is true, yet the annual proceeds from the sale of surplaa 
frails by our orchardists and farmers, ranges from ten to fifteen mil- 
lions of dollars. lu view of this fact. It will readily be seen, that tbe 
poMlbilitles of the fruit industry, as source of reveDoe are difficult to 
exafrgerate. 

Tbe Snesi peacli orchard in the United States, and presumably tbe 

finestiutheworld, is located in Howell County, MlsBouri. By a strange 

coDMrvaiiem of nature the land In the Ozark regions, so wonderfully 

adapted to fruit culture, is fit for little else, and this industry, being 

still in ils infancy, and also of a nature that requires time, patience and 

•ome money to render it highly remunerative, conspire to make tlila 

land mie at a very low price at tbe present time. Land that under 

jauidoas management when planted to fruit, will yield a princely 

incoDie, may uow be purchased very cheaply. Its price is governed by 

ita proximity lo transportation fiicilitiee and markets, and ranges ilrom 

t3JX)to tl0.00 per acre. Two railroads penetrate tliis irnit region, 

vit: ihe St. Louis & San Francisco and the Kansas City, Memphis ft 

*^iriineg. The latter road runs directly through tbe best portion of 

t^KKfrnit lands, aud many fine orchards, in a more or less advanced 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



H TRADE AMD COKHEBOE OF 

■Ute of developmeiit may be found at different points along thia road. 
In the whole range of inveatment propertie§, there la perhaps nothing 
so abftoMtely reliable aa a prndent inTestment, and one that is so 
eertaln to bring handsome returns, as money invested In these &ait 
lauds. Already the attention of capital has been dlrei^ed to them, and 
a number of large parchasea made. That they will enhance rapidly in 
value within the next few years, is a foregone conclusion when the 
well-anthenUcated statement la made, that a certain orchard In this 
region cleared Its gross iuTestment out of the proceeds of a single crop. 

HIKES AND HINKRALa. 

The lavish band of nature was not stayed when she endowed tJie 
surface of the State of Missouri with an nnwonted wealth of material 
bleasings. But down deep in the bowels of the earth, ahe atored In 
unstinted quantities, all the useful minerala and metals required by 
man In the economy of his highest civDization. Coal and iron, the 
twin hand-maidens of advanced civilization, are stored in unfaiN 
ing abundance, and in multitudinous forms and varieties beneath the 
surface. More than one-third of the entire area of the State la under- 
laid by coal, which is distributed over fiftyseveii counties, in whole or 
in part, while coai ''pockets" occur in many other counties. These 
coal fields are being worlced in a great many localities, and the annual 
output ia in excess of 3,000,000 tons, yielding an annual revenue of 
about $1,000,000, while the total output since the beginning of coal 
mining in the state, has been in excess of 46,000,000 tons, yielding' a 
■ total revenue of over $70,000,000. 

Iron mining occured in the State as early as 1816. For many years 
it was an important Indnslry, and in 1860 Missouri ranked sixth in the 
Union as an iron producer, but for reasons that apace forbids the 
detailing here, the Indnstry has gradually declined since that date. 
Iron Mountain, Pilot Knob and Cherry Vsllsy are all naraea inseparably 
associated witn successful iron mining. From Iron Mountain alone 
there has been dog about 4,000,000 gross tons, and the total ontpnt of 
iron ore produced in the State to this date, is abont 8,000,000 tons, 
yielding a return of more than $30,000,000. 

But of all the minerals Zinc Is Missouri's distinctive product, and ahe 
ranks first among the States in the output of this commodity. Aboat 
one-half the total output of zinc in the United States is mined in Mis- 
souri. This mineral is prodnced priucipally lu the Southwestern por- 
tion of the State, but it occurs In mauy counties In the Central and 
Southern portions. The mineral as it occurs and is mined, in a sul- 
phide of zinc, commonly called "black jack" In the vernacular of the 
mining camp, or "rosin Jack" as Us color may august. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THB CITY OF ST. LOOIS. 6S 

The Minnftl onlpat ia About; 140,000 tODS, and the price ranges from 
tfotr to twenty-foar dollars per ton. Thus it will be seen, that this 
isdnitiy ie au important Boarce of wealth to the State, and yet it is 
■liUin its Inftincf. Until quite recently the ntachinery used Id th« 
mining aud redaction of this metal wa§ of the cradeat oharaoter. With 
Uk nbstitntion of the latest improved machinery for the raining and 
redsction of the cmde ore, better resnits are oblained, and the field 
oret which miaing operations are coudncted, is gradually being en- 
Ivgfid. It is conceded by all acquaiuted with the facts, that the fkitare 
of tk lino minloK industry In Misaoari is very promising. 

Iiisd mining, it wonld seem, antedates ail other established indas- 
triM In the State of Missouri, for we find mention ot lead mining 
opmUons as early as the year 1700, and the lead mines of Southeastern 
Uttouri soon afterwards became fkmons, and hare remained so ever 
■ince. In &ct the lead mines or this locality were a potent &ctor In 
■Uncling immigration, and in developing trade relations with other 
<wlj eettlements. The largest lead concentrating plant in the Union, 
isd the tliird largest In the world, la located at Bonne Terre, St. Fran- 
eiiCoonty, Uissonri. 

Ttiere are two district lead mining regions in 3(isBoari; one Id the 
SoaUnrastem, and the other in the Sontheastern part of the State. The 
on in these two localities occnrs in entirely difierent forms. In the 
SODtfavest it occare co-ordinately with zinc, as galenite, and Is often 
^Dd in large masses ol great pnrity, sometimes yielding more than Sfi 
percent metallic lead. In the Sonthesst it occurs as a "disseminated 
ore," and requires the aid of powerful and complicated machinery in 
ittrednction. The annual output of pig lead In the State is from 
Uiirty to thirty-flve thousand tons, yleldlDg an annnal revenoe of from 
two to two and a lialf millions of dollars. 

I cannot better epitomize the four important mineral industries, 
tbon referred to, Ihan to append a table of the results of operations 
in these iadustries prepared by Prof. Arthur Winslow, State Geologist, 
■ndgiiing ttie achievements of each for the year 1692, and also of the 
endre period from their inception to that date. 

The table is as follows: 

^Production In it^.-^ Tot>I Produced to Date. 

Tods. Valae. Tods. Value. 

S?"'Or» 181,«7 «2,862,476 1,117,600 f 24,086,000 

iV Lesd 33 200 3,l»l,0a9 689,889 aS.OODJUO 

J,^,Ore mWO S8*,flOT 7,716,12* S0,O6O,Wa 

*■*"• 3,011,38t> 8,82S,8!8 44,936,230 67,600,000 

'^tal 8,807,(63 J8,118,989 M,406,e88 5178,138,613 

°^^ these foar important minerals, the State is bountifully sap- 
Vwi wltb granites of several varieties, and bailding stone of ail kinds 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



Sft TBADE AND COMMBBCB OP 

inctadlng marble and onyx. Commercial olayg of t«a or twelve varie- 
ties, and of the beat qaality are also plentiful. From these, building 
brick, vitrified brick, paving blocks and terra cotta ware are made; all 
ofwhich, have a large sale in the adjoining States. Gtasa sand and 
barytes also exist in commercial quantities, and copper, cobalt and even 
idlver are found in limited quantities. 

EDUCATION. 

Ko State in the Union emiMsses Missouri in her zeal iu the cause of 
popular education. Noru her liberality, in contributing to the sup- 
port of education iu all of its best and most enlightened forms, sur- 
passed by any. 

It was the prond boast of oni- Governor Iu bis recent message to the 
legislatnre) that "the available permanent school funds of Missouri are 
the largest of any State In the Union. No State has done or is doing 
more for public education through the agency of the common schools 
than ours, and I feel safe iu saying, that no fact In our history does more 
to honor the people or to exalt the State than this, and nothing should 
fbrnish greater cause for pleasure and pride to every patriotic Mis- 
sourian." 

Our permanent school Ainde aggregate $10,864,869. In addition to 
tbe Interests accraing fVom this large fhnd, one-third of the State rev- 
eune is devoted to the anpport of our system of popular education. 
Local taxes are also levied by district directors, in many instances, to 
supplement the fbnd derived f^m the State I'eveuue. 

The public school system of the State conslstfi first, of the State Insti- 
tutions, and second of tbe public schools proper. The State luetitn- 
tions are, the State University, three State Normal Schools for whites, 
and one State Normal School (Lincoln Institute) for the traiiiiog of 
colored teachers. 

There are 10,000 school houses in the State. In each of these, at 
least one session of school is taught annaally, and iu many of tbem 
regular ten months schools are maintained. The standard of excellence 
as to teaching talent Is constantly being elevated, and there Is a well 
defined, but generous rivalry pervading the ranks of tbe teachers of 
the State for superiority in the line of thorough and np-to-dat« work. 
But in addition to this splendid system of public schools, there are, 
within tbe borders of the Stale, a vast number of academies and col- 
leges, both male and female, where a thorough education In auy de- 
partment of knowledge may be acquired. In short, it may be said, 
that in no State in tlie Union can letter educational fitoiliUes be foDud, 
or where more advanced ideas on the subject obtain than here. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



f OF ST. I.0D18. 



OTHER ADyAMTAGXa. 



The writer uufortniiatelv flnds hiniBelf confWinted with a anrfliit ol' 
toblect matter, and a paacitj of av^table ipnce. The limitalionfi pre- 
scribed for this article have already been transcended. Indeed had the 
entire (pace been devoted to the disciiBaion of any one of the cardinal 
leiDTitcet of the Stale, it woald have been insufficient for an exhanstlve 
preMDtatioQ of that one topic. Tlierefore we cannot speak, even briefly, 
ofMiuonri's vast forest area with its seventy odd species of timber, and 
the immense industries peculiar to these forestry resources. Indnstries, 
in which millione of dollars of capital are invested, and whose finished 
prodnctin the shape of high-class cooperage, and other commodities, 
flndsamarltet in nearly every portlou of the civilized world. France, 
Sptin, Asia Minor and Southern Africa are all customers of the superior 
cooperage establishments of our State. This cooperage goes abroad to 
be Dsed principslly for wine and palm and cocoa oils. 

Ve muet forego the happiness of reconnting to the delectation of 
eporlimeD, the hunters' paradise, within our borders, where bear, deer, 
wild cat, panther, tni^ey , qnail and many other varieties of game 
iboiind. 

We mnet repress tlie clamorous inclinations to dilate upon the thlrty- 
^htvaiiiitieB of fish that live and move and have their being in the 
linipid streams that thread their silvery courses hither and thither 
throoghoat pur State. Suffice it to say, that among others, the boss, 
the perch, the pike, the pickerel, and the trout are all "at home" to the 
I'odsmu that visits the unrivaled streams of our great commonweaith. 

POLiTica USD RELiaioir. 

ialOsBonri the lai^est degree of political and religious freedom obtain, 
^■SOIry and intolerance have no place in the make-up of so broad and 
tl^°oroQsa people. Everyman may entertain and enjoy hia own pol- 
ilittl Tiews, and worship God according to the dictates of his own cou- 
'^nce without lei or hindrance. And the wayfarer of whatever 
^^cdornationaltty is sure to find within her borders some kindred 
■Piritio the realm of religious thought from whose h^art he will receive 
™ Wothjng and comforting ministrations of fraternal love, and at 
"low hospitable hearthstone, he will be made to feel the indescribable 
">'»« or the borne circle. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



> coMHsacB or 



ST. LOUIS IN 1894. 



QBNERAL REVIEW. 



The year 1894 differed trom & financial and commercial atandpoint 
▼«ry laaterially from both of the two years which preceded it. 
Eighteen ninety-two was a year of almost ntilimlted proeperifj and 
activity, with increasing demands for merchandise and manafactared 
goods of every dcBcription. gt. Lonis shared in the general prosperity 
which resnlted and the progress made during the twelve montlis was 
phenomenal in character. SigbtAen ninety-three opened up ftill of 
promise but the national financial difficulties hampered enterprise of 
«Tery description and St. Lonis was considered fortanate In being able 
to hold Its own against adverse circumstances. 

The year jast ended has been far less senaatioual In its commercial 
and financial happenings. In St. Louis at any rate there bas been a 
steady recovery from the depression which succeeded the national 
difficaltiea in 1893. Onr bank clearings, which are often quoted as an 
index of the volume of trade transacted show a decrease of about one 
per cent over the preceding year. When it is remembered that the 
activity of 1893 extended almost into the summer of 1693 it will be seen 
that this return ia eminently satisi^tory. During the last few months 
the gain in clearings every thirty days has been marked, and the year 
1896 starts out with every prospect of increased prosperity. 

We are atill able to point with pride to the fact that there has been no 
bank failure in St. Louis since the year 1886. The official retarns show 
onr banking inatitntioBs to be in a very fiourishiiig condition. The 
capital stock of St. Lonis banks aggregates $16,950,000. The sorplns 
and net profits exceed $8,600,000, and the deposits on time and demand 
are about $50,000,000. The Increase in deposits since October 189318 
aboat $9,000,600, a most gratifying showing. Since the settlement of 
the financial difficulties In the fall of 1898 the cash on band has shown 
a good increase, the loans are much larger and the resources of the 
banks have increased $16,889,948. At the present time there is a large 
amount of capital seeking investment in the city with every prospect of 
a general expansion of onr manafactoring and mercantile operations. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CrrV OF 8T. LOUIS. SQ 

Itifl difflonlt to overestimate the benefit that St. Loais has obtained 
from the enhanced repntatlon it has earned during the troublous times 
ofthe last eighteen mouths. It Is generally conceded throughout the 
conntTf that no large citj suffered so slightly or recovered so rapidly as 
did St. Iionis. Daring the summer, fall and winter this fact has been 
commented upon very generally thronghont the East. Ur. Chaiincey 
Depew was the first prominent visitor to notice the exceptionally sat- 
is&ctory condition of St. Looia commerce and finance. The remarks 
that he made on his return home set people thinking, and St. Loais has 
been talked abont in a most satis&ctory manner during the year. The 
nmnber of inqairies received by the Merchants' Exchange as to the 
fadliUes ofi'ered in St. Lonts for mannfacturing and other enterprises is 
proof positive of the confidence which the city's couservaUsm In finan- 
d^ matters and general protrress has established. 

A New York flnaacial jonmal not generally Kiven to exaggeration or 
(0 the "booming" of cities in tbe central or Western states, said in a 
leeent issue, "St. Louis will this year do the largest business in the his- 
tory of the city. The activity of bnsiness men, the busy look of the 
ttnett, the large accounts in the banks, all indicate great prosperity 
there. The people live economically, and tbe merchants are pressing 
sales of goods at sucfa low prices into the surrounding states to such an 
extent that country merchants do not come further East to buy. I( is 
cheerfnl, to say the least, to look away from some Eastern centers to 
tfait bright spot in the West." 

This nnsolieited tribute of praise to St. Louis is very significant. 
That the expressions are not exaggerated or bordering upon fiattery 
will he understood by those who have given the situation careful 
stody. 

Tarious events Iiave transpired during the year to bring St. Louis 
into promiuence. Tbe opening of the new TJnion Station, a description 
of which will be fonnd in another section of this report, brought to this 
city some of the leading railroad men of the country, all of whom were 
interested in the evidences of prosperity and development which they 
saw in every direction. The value of the new station to St. Loais is 
m obvious that it would be idle to enlarge at any length on the theme. 
Tbe rtilroad service to and from the city is being Improved from time 
lo time. Tbe mnnlng of a new train between St. Louis and Neir York 
cuDot fail to lead to further improvements and schedules in this direc- 
tion. Tbe new Cut mail on the Iron Uountain Road brings the city 
KTsrtl hoQrs nearer a number of points supplied almost exclnsively 
ftom here. Tbe fast mall on tbe Eeokuk road has also been very ben- 
eficial, and it is hoped not only that this service will be made perpetual, 
bat aUo that additional facilities of tbe same character will be provided 
on other lines in other directions. 



sdbvGoO^^lc' 



W TKADB AKD COMMEBOB OP 

The christening of thB ship St. Lonis at Cramp's Yard, Philadelphia^ 
is another eve at to which the fntare historian of the city will hsTC- 
to give mnch prominence. This magnificent vesael is really the first 
high ctoeB Transattaotic steamer ever constructed in thiii country. It 
occupied flfttieu mouths to prepare the Teasel fbr launching. American 
irorlc men 'were employed exclnsiTely, and the ship has been built oat ot 
American material wirh American capital. That this splendid Teasel, 
capable of carrying more than 1,300 hundred passengers, should hare- 
beeu given our city's name is a lasting tribute to that city's greatneea 
and significant evidence of the appreciation felt for it. The reception 
given in Philadelphia to the St. Louis delegation!:, headed by the Mayor 
and the Freeident of the Merchants' Exchange, on the occa^ioo of the 
launchiug, wae of the most hospitable and geoeraus character, and the 
event has doue much to cement a feeling of sincere friendship between 
Philadelphia and St. Louis. 

The Trans- Mississippi Congress, held here during the month of 
November, brought to the city delegates from almost all the Wcetern 
Bud Southwestern stales. With one accord these visitors expi'essed 
gratiflcation at the city's growth, audit is believed that the Congresa 
ha4 already resulted in Iho openlnir of a large nnmber of new accounts 
ill distant states and cities by our manufacturers and Jobbers. 

Efibrts are being taken to secui-e (he holding of one or more or the 
great political conventions in 1896 iu Ibis city. Otiier cnTentions are- 
also expected here and are being invited. During the year the 
Autumnal Festivities Association has been succeeded by the Basiness 
Men's League which is designed to continue the commercial irork 
undertaken by the Festivities Association during its three year« of ex- 
istence. A few weeks ago a lai-ge number of onr merchants and mau- 
ufacturers visited Texas In a body, and on their return organized them- 
selves into an association or dab havingfor its special object the en- 
couragement of excursions Into adjoining and distant stat s and inter- 
change of courtesies between St. Louis houses and those with whom 
they do business. 

The number of associations in the city more or less interested In pro- 
moting its trade and commerce and mailing its greatness known la now 
very large. In adiHtion to the Mercbants' Exchange, the leading com- 
mercial organization, thera is (he Cotton Exchange, Builders' Exchange, 
Lumbermen's Exchange, Mercantile Club, Commercial Club, Real Kr~ 
tate Exchange, Business Men's League, Assoclatpd Wholesale Grocersr 
Paint, Oil and Drug Club, Furniture Board of Trade, Implement and 
Vehicle Assn.'iation, Boot and Shoe Manufacturers and Jobbers ABfK>- 
ciatlon. Saddlery Association, Merchants Assuciation, St. Louis Traffic 
Commission, St. Louis Spanish Club, and the Interstate Commercial 
Club. Their value, on occasions when the co-operation of all classes 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. I.0DI8. 61 

of cidzena required hae beeu proved on soveral occasions and cannot 
be quMtiotied. 

ODfioftbe difficulties ID connection wilh the entertainment oi targe 
-delegattoD* and of national conventions of exceptional e!ze has been 
remoTed dadng the last two or three years, and especially daring the 
lut twelve months, bj the sabstantial additions to onr hotel accomoda- 
tkm. The Planter's Hotel, erected on the site of the historic Planter's 
Boon, joat west of the Chamber of Commerce bailding, was completed 
and opened to the public last fall. It was built in response to the offer 
by tlie Festivities Association of a hundred thousand dollar bonus for the 
erection of an approved hotel to cost npwards of a million dollars. The 
money expended was largely in excess of that figure. The site of the 
hotel, which was originally leased and subseqaently pnrcbased, is 
Tslned at half a million dollars. The cost of construction was one mil- 
lion, three hundred thousand dollars, and the cost of furnishing was 
aboQt two bandred thousand, making a total investment of something 
■neicesBof two millions. The enterprise was entirely a Ibcsl one, and 
it is a Eonrce of special pride to the gentlemen connected with it that 
St. Ixinis capital was used exclusively for the work, and that local con- 
tractors were almost exclusively responsible for every detail of work. 

The St. Nicholas Ho'.el, opposite the Post Office, on Locust street, 
was opened at about l he same time, and affoMs another very valuable 
addition to onr facilities for entertaining large bodies of men and mam- 
moth coDventiouB. In the West End the hotel accomodations have also 
been largely augmented, and should one or both of the large political 
conventions be held here in 1996, little trouble would be encountered 
in tsbing care of the large number of visitors which would be attracted 



Probably one of the most signlGcaut features of the year so far as St. 

Lenis is concerned is the manner in which building enterprise has con- 

tinned in the face of adverse circnmsiauces which have checked work 

ot this character elsewhere. Dnriug the last ninety days of the year 

the increase in the number of bnilding permits issued, and of the value 

of the buildings proposed, was very large as coBipared to 1893, and 

even showed a gain in some respects upon 18S2. Mayor Walbridge, In 

the conree of a speech delivered on December 27th, called attention to 

a drcomstance which he had ofDcially verified. This was, to use his 

ovn words, that "during the financial year of the financial panic, from 

h^, 1H93 to 1894— this includes the active period of the panic— there 

me one hundred more housos built in St. Louis than the year pre- 

^oBi. Iq that year there were houses built in St. Lonie which, if 

F^d iide by side without any space between them, would make a 

Bol'd traot of houses fourteen miles long, to build up both sides of a 

'"Mt seven miles long; if placed about the same dlstauce from each 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



92 TRADE AND COHHBBCE OF 

other u the average modero residence Id this city, the; Toald make a 
street of lioiuee ten and one-half milea long. In other words, there 
were oonttrocted bonaes enongh to solidly Bll the territory extending 
ftam Uie Coart Hooee to Jefferson Avenn^ weit, and to Frsnklia 
Avenne, north." 

The building activity in St. Louia baa been ao continaons that thoee 
living in the city have been apt lo overlook to some extent the giuna 
made in this direction. Daring the laat aeven years more than thirty 
million dollars have been Inveated in large butldinga east of Twelfth ' 
Street. A brief review of the movement which basso completely reorg- 
anised oar office biiildinga is in oi'der here. 

For eeveral years St. Louis waa prejodiced againat lofty ofttce boild- 
inge, and until 1685 little or nothing waa done to secure them. The 
Laclede and Commercial were two ot the flrat fire-proof buildings of 
thia character, and they have been followed by several others of a cosUy 
character. The Commercial Building coat about $S0O;0O0. The Union 
Truet, a much larger and higher stractnre, cost >66O,O0O, and the 
Security Building, which is less lofty, but much more masalve, coat 
more than thres-qoarterB of a million dollars. The other excepUonalty 
costly lai^ office buildings include the Rialto, Wainwright, Odd Fel- 
lowB, Turner, Fagln, Globe-Democrat, Banb of Commerce, Hooser, 
De Uenll, Boe, Columbia and Telephone Baildinga. In addition to 
these, and not atrictly office buildinga, there mnat be mentioned the 
Public Library and Mercantile Library, the Mercantile Club, the 
Plantera' and St Nicholas Hotels, already mentioned, the Boatmen's 
Bank, the Cnpplea' Block, the Collier Building, the Martin Building, 
the Llonberger Bnilding, the Liggett & Myere Building, aa well aa 
othere almost aa large and practically as important. Exteiuive 
improvements !u the Chamber of Commerce Building, coating over 
$160,000, were completed iu September. The change which this 
building activity has produced in the appearance of the city is very 
obvioae to visitors, and is a subject of general comment and congratu- 
lation. It is evident that this work of building ia to be continued 
almost without Interference or reapite. 

The tobacco trade of St. Louia, which has for years been phenomi- 
nally large, ia to have another tribute paid to its magnitude in the 
shape of the largeat tobacco factory in the world. Thia is to be located 
in the southwestern section of the city between the two large parkar 
but a conaiderable distance from each, St. Louia, as ia well known, 
manufactures more tobacco than any other city in the world. Tobacco 
is one of the few industries conceruing which actual reliable data can 
be obtained, as the internal revenue receipts in this industry indicate 
exactly what has been done. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. Irf)in8, 68 

For the entire year tJbe internal revenne from tobacco at this point 
nached 93,435,826, a g^n of almost 9400,000 oTsr 189S. This ia proof 
of the increase in this one man n facta re of nearly 14 per c«dL, a most 
MtbEscLery showinf; foi' a year, which no one expected to develop any- 
thing is the way of inflation or great increase in retarns. 

To compare resalte on another basis, St. Lonls mannfactnres more 
tobacco than any other two cities in the Union. The three cities which 
rank next tu- onrs in this regard are Newark, Louisville and Ctocin- 
Dsti. The agiiregate product from these three cities is bnt slightly in 
excess of the St. Lonis returns alone. The value of the product here 
exceeds twenty million annually, or considerably more than one-flttb 
the entire product of the country. 

Under these circumstances it la not remarkable that the proposition 
thonld be made to add to our factories in this line a million-dollar 
stmcture. The new factory will be exceptionally well equipped so 
tu IS switching accommodation is concerned. It will also intro- 
dDM tbe novelty of a licorice factory, where will be produced the 
fl&VDiiog Ingredient used In chewing tobacco, which has never yet been 
nunnbctared in this country. Another very large (obacoo factory has 
wcnred a permit for a six-story addition to its premises, which will cost 
more than a hundred thousand dollars. When this addition is com- 
plete, tht value of the manufacturing plant owned by this one house 
vill ^tproximate three-quarters of s million dollars. 

Other new factories are expected here during the coming year. The 
propossl to erect one of the largest cotton factories in tho world at this 
point hag received the most enthusiastic indorsement of the press, and 
tppeuB to be having favorable consideration among local investors. A 
CiDdDiiati clothiug bouse employing some four or five hundred hands 
will pennauaiitly locate here. Foreign capital for manafactnring pur- 
poses Is seeking investment here very treely. The possibilities in this 
Une are not easy to estimate. The demand for large down-town build- 
ings has been very great even daring the wintermouths, and increased 
values, not gpecalative, but legitimate in character, are the result. 

In its jobbing trade St. Lonis has made great advance during Uie 
Jtu. A promineut dry goods man states that the jobbing business was 
phenomenal during the greater part of it. During August and Sep- 
tember, ss well as a portion of July, the general desire od the part of 
Tetters to replenish depleted stocks caused an activity in tbe Wash- 
ington Avenue section which was a general surprise to all- St. IjOuIs 
<»inpe(ed successfully with the large Eastern centers for trade, and 
went boldly outside its regular territory. It is very significant that, 
living captured the cream of the West, Southwest and South, the St. 
I«)<iis tnveUng men are pushing North and into the East with muoh 
confidence. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



4H TRADE AKO COVUEKCE OF 

Inqnlries Blon; Wftahlngtoa Avenne indicate that new accounts hare 
been opened in lai^e nambers in extreme pointB in lova. Nebrmaka 
and Colorado. In addition to these, bouQesa is reported from more 
distant states and territories, sncli as Waahing^tOD, Utah, Wyoming and 
Oaliforaia. The stoclcs carried are much larger and more divergent 
tban in previons years, and the admirable railroad facilities enable 
oompetition to be met very easily in these important lines. The general 
report is that in wholesale dry goods bnsineae baa been maintained io 
«Tery department, with very sabetantial gains in qnite a number. Col- 
lections in this line are reported much better than could reasonably tie 
expected, and the namber of bad debts made has been exceedingly 
small. 

As will be seen from the detdled report on another page, there was 
another remarkable Increase in the boot and shoe basiness. The valae 
of shoes manufactarcd in the city exceeded $8,600,000, while the valae 
of the shoes sent here from other centers for distribution to the trade 
was nearly $19,000,000. An increase is apparent in both these retnrns, 
the accuracy of which can bo retled upon, and the jobbing trade is more 
than twice as large as when the census was taken in 1890. 

What is perhaps most remarkable la this connection is that the r^ 
turns show how steadily St. Louis has eocroached npon the trading ter- 
ritory of other large distribntiug points. Bnt a very few years ago 
other cities distributed as many iMOts and shoes as St. Louis. Now 
notwithstanding the immense increase in local manufacture— far greater 
than in any other shoe manufactaring center — St. Louis now recelTes 
more shoes from the Hew England district for distribution than any 
other city. 

The year opens up full of promise In this line of business. One new 
large factory is nearly finished and will In opened iu. a few weeks. 
Keal estate men report inqnirles trom more than one New England foc- 
tory which desires to locate in St. Loais and take advantage of the 
extraordinary facilities for distribution possessed by this city. 

lu other lines of manufacture in Mhlch Si. Louis is prominent the re- 
turns generally are very saUsfactory and indicate a healthy condition, 
with a gradual return to the great prosperity of 1892. The water rates 
collections increased daring the year about twenty thousand dollars. 
This Increase is a source of general astonishment, as it was considered 
that the falling off In the total was inevitable In view of the stagnation 
in the early part of the year. For the first six months of the year 
there was a falling off in the receipts, mainly from factories, of fifteen 
tboasand dollars, but daring the last four or Ave months the revival in 
this department has been extraordinary. Not only were the receipts 
large enough to turn the falling off for the first half of the year ioto an 
increase fbr the entire year, bnt they also showed a gaiu of about ten 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. I.OU18. 65 

tbooauid doilATB over the totals of 1892. The increase of population 
darinf the last two fe&ra has been very large, and hence the i-ecelpts 
bom private honeea have largely increased, itnt even allowing for this 
&ct the iaetory retarne show a gain over 1893, and thne indicate that 
fiili time has become quite general in oianafaotnring qoarters. 

In woodenware St. Louis has continued to hold its own against all 
comen. In hardware the jobbing bvsiness Is infinitely larger than the 
muDfictnring. Thanks to the enterprise of local houses and the faitb- 
falneis of (heir traveling representatives, there has been a large increase 
in Bhipments to distant points. Increased railroad facilities have en- 
■bled St. Liouis to invade remote comers of the oonntry. Estimates 
trom the largest houses, as to the business done, vary from foartesn to 
flfteen millions. The general opinion is that the cash value of business 
tniuacted during the year is practically the same as during 1893. It 
mast not, however, be foi^tten that prices have been gradually falU 
iag, and that values to-day are from ten to flCleen per cent lower 
tban they were a year ago. Hence St. Louis has really distributed more 
hudvare than last year, although the cash returns hare not shown an 
increase. 

The planing mills report a decreased volume of business for the year, 
Itrgely the result of the clearing off of aocamalated stock and general 
mrvoDsness in the signing of new contracts of lai^ amonuta. The 
brick and sewer factories report a fairly satisfactory year; the excellent 
and apparently Inexhaustible supplies of saltable clays in and near Bt. 
Lonig make this industry one of paramount importance. Although the 
total sales id these lines are less than in some preceding years the 
iniinstry continues one of the most important in the city. 

On another page will be found a statement of the wholesale grocery 
basiness. Probably the most significant feature of this trade has 
been tlie expansion of the territory supplied. Becognition of St. 
LodIs as a great railroad anil distributing center during the year 
has been very marked. Iiailroad managers and agents who luve 
been in the habit of discussing the reqnlrements of St. Loola 
traffic in other cities, have h°ld their meetings here, aud the practice 
seems to be coming much mure general. This has brought to the city 
prominent officials of leading lines, ioclnding many of (be great railroad 
magnates of the country. The benefit of this increased familiarity with 
our city by those who regulate the transportation facilities to and from 
it, has already proved very beDeflcIal and is certain to bring increased 
adrantagea tirom time to time. 

A few days before the close of the year the machinery which had 
been operating the cable road on Franklin Avenue and Morgan Street to 
King's Highwsy was shut down aud the line operated for the first time 
rattrely by electricity. This is an additional triumph for rapid transit 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



66 TRADR AND COMMEBOE OF 

in St. Louie, &s tho new eerrice, besidea being vaatly snperior to the 
old, extends thronf;h to t^o citjr limits and does away with the horee car 
exteosioD west of King's Highway. This leaves in Bt. Loais abont 
thtrtr-throe mites of cable road, single-track measnremenl. This 
Includes the Broadway line, about sereii and one-tbtrd miles from end 
to end ; the People's Railroad Company, rnnnine to Tower Groye Park, 
with a little more than five miles of double track, and the Olive Street 
cable to Forest Park, with about four and one-half miles of double 
track. 

In matters of rapid transit the city is now acknowledged to be one of 
Ibe first iu the conutry. The number of miles of single track used for 
rapid transit purposes within the city limits is about 908. In calcu- 
lating this mileage it is asual lo measure each single track. In most 
instances there is a double track on the same street, so that the number 
of miles of streets upon which street car tracks are laid is ahont 165. 
Horses and mules for street car transit purposes are rapidly passing ont 
of existence in St. Louis. At the commencement of the year there were 
four horse car lines or extensions operated by horses or mules. One of 
these, known as the Baden Line, has been for several months operated 
by electricity, and the experiment of the electrical welding of the rails 
was tried for the first time on this road. 

Another of the horse car exteusious was on Easton Avenue west of 
King's Highway which as already explained is now part of the electric 
road system which has taken the place of the old Franklin Avenue 
cable. Work has been commenced on the reconstruction of the Jef- 
ferson Avenue cross town line and when this road is operated by elec- 
tricity there will only remain one short horse car road or extension in 

t. Louis, running for a distance of bat a mile and a half. 

The single track mileage operated by electricity in the city is now 
267 miles. This is one of the greatest mileages reported by any dty in 
the country and at a recent gathering of national street rMlrosd men 
a high tribute of praise was paid to St. Louis for its origiuality and 
enterprise in rapid transit matters. A few weeks ago the first electric 
ambulance car rnnning in the country was placed on the electric road 
connecting the city dispensary with the city hospital. St. Louis was 
also the first city to run an electric mail car on the streets, a tact which 
has been given great promiuence in government retam and reports. 
The running of express cars by electricity on the streets Is another in- 
novation for which this city is entitled to credit, it having solved the 
difScnIty apparently to general satisfaction. 

The magnitude of the street railroad interests in the city is apparent. 
The travel on the roads has increased more rapidly than the amount of 
capital invested. The annual total has not yet reached an average of 
100,000,000 passengers carried, though it approximates that fignra aod 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 67 

ia steadily increasing. Tbe city has derived great benefit in a variety 
of ways from the improvement in its local traosportatlon facilities and 
boiinefla baa been etimalated by the paseing of the borte car in 
&VOT, first of Uiecable car and then later of electricity. 

St. Lonia has also miUntained its reputation dnring the past year as a 
street car manufacturing center. Tbe exceptional advantages of tbe 
city In this r^ard, including the abnndant supply of the best kinds of 
hardwood, made St. Louie a prominent street car bailding center in the 
early days of very short horse cars. The improvement in the grade of 
can used and in the mode of transportation has been more than re* 
fieeled npon manufacturing and to-day St. Lonis makes more street 
cars tlian any other city in the coautry. Large shipments are made to 
cities at a great distance and a majority of the exceptionally comforta- 
ble and easy riding cars on our own lines are made within the city 

Ttie increased street railroad connections with the parks has led to a 
more general appreciation on the part ol the general public and the 
attendance has been far larger than in any preceding year. Concerts 
luve i>een given In most of the parks and varions recreations have been 
provided for. Forest pork with 1971 acres of gronnd has now been 
owned by the city a little more than twenty years. Tlie improvements 
in the eastern section have been nnmeitiue and Include a great increase 
in tlie boating facilities and in the zoological attractions. No accurate 
etiiniate can be obtained as to the actnai number of visitors to this park 
Init on Sundays in particular the crowds both of carriages and of foot 
passengers bare become very iarge- 

The large snm of money which the city Is compelled to spend every 
year on Tower Grove park keeps that smaller but delightful pleasure 
gronnd In magnificent condition. The trees and flowers in this park 
sad the perfect condition of the driveways are matters of general and 
&vorable comment by visitors. The park contains 366 acres bnt owing 
to its great length and comparatively slight width, Its drives ore all 
tliateonid be desired. Shaw's Gardens, adjoining, are kept in the 
same high state of preservation which marked them during the lifetime 
of tlidr generous founder. Botanists and florists from all ports of the 
country have visited the gardens during the last twelve montlis and 
mneh enthusiam prevailed among them. 

(VFallonParkandCarondeletParkitwo other of our large recreation 
groonds, are sitnaled in ttie northern and extreme southern sections of 
the dty. lu neither of them is the costly policy of Tower Grove PaA 
adopted, bnt both are pleasing and of great volne. Among oar smaller 
parks Lafayette is probably the most attractive and tbe most celebrated 
otitside the city. This park consists of about thirty acres of gronnd aitd 
is med for pedestrians only. The improvements are of most exquisite 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



48 TRADE AND COHHEBCG OF 

«haracter, and it is staUd that there are few parks in the world which 
oui compare with this from Lbe standpoint of beauty. 

In connection with these paries, which are a great sonrce of health u 
well as pleasure, it is gratifying to note that St. Lonis has more than 
maintained its repntatlon as a health}' city. The mortality for the year 
1894 was only abont fifteen per thousand. In other large cities, when 
estimating the death rate, it is nsual to accept as accnrate the highest 
local census, whether taken by directory or school officials. On tUe 
basis of calcniation the death rate in St. Lonis in 189i would appear to 
have been hut little in excess of fourteen per thousand. In preceding 
years St. Louis has held the position of the healthiest large city in the 
world, with an average death rate of eighteen, so th^t it will be seen by 
the figures qaoted that the position of oar city la this respect is quite 
unique. 

The year 1894 will also ha conspicaous In St. Lonis history from the 
fact that it witnessed the snccessful establishment of a free tibraiy in 
the city. The library known for years as the Public School Library, 
and more recently ae the Public Library, is now absolntely free. The 
benefit and privilege is appreciated very highly by the general pablic, 
And the attendauoe since the library has been made fVee has been very 
large. 

The pablic schools of the city conUnue to increaw in number, and 
contracu bare lust been let for a forty thousand dollar school in the 
neighborhood of Garrison and St. Lonis avenues. At the close of the 
fall quarter of 1894 the nnmber of scholars enrolled in the district 
schools was 56,936, an increase of 2,117 over the corresponding retam 
of the preceding year. The colored school enrollment was C,046, and 
the Normal and High School enrollment 1,672, showing a gross total of 
£3,644, or an increase for the year of 2,392. The average uamber of 
pnpils belonging to these schools showed a still larger increase, having 
grown during the year from 54,318 to 57,409. The average attendance 
was also much larger, the increase being from 50,646 to 54,057. The 
number of pupils excluded for want of room decreased from 385 in 1893 
to 146 in 1894. As an evidence of ihe good dlBciplino maintained In the 
schools, it may be stated that the number of suspensions of papits 
daring the entire quarter was only 178. 

For the fiscal year ending June 30, 1895, $1,265,113 was appropriated 
for school purposes, of which about $1,000,000 was for salaries. The 
other largest expenditures are for coal, repairs and text books, $10,000 
being now spent annually on free books. The condition of the schoola 
^nenUly seems to be very sali^faclory, and many improvements of 
importance have been eflTected duiing the year. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 
THE SHOE TRADE. 



Uuutoctured in 18941 W,6aa,yto; Jobbed in 1894, 9ig,SMi8i5. 
Total, $iS)a97i33S- 

rrom tbe SHOB AND LEATHER GAZETTE. 

Daring the year 1894 a demand for cheap shoes was experienced ancb 
uwunerer before feltia the history of tbe trade. The panic of 18D3 
tod elMed hctorles and driven wages everywhere to the lowest point. 
Money was scarce ; men were out of worh or earning hardly enough to 
lira on. Tbe reeult has been a widespread call for low-price footwear. 

Thii has had a great influence on tbe trade of St. Louis, working 
direct]]' against its shoe manuractnriag industry, the product of which 
iiibigber-prlced commodity geuerally t.Iian has been demanded. Id 
Uis JobbioK trade it has also bad its effect in diminishing greatly the 
mrage'price per pair received, as well as shrinking the profits, which 
ue imatler on cheap than on higher-priced shoes. It has therefore been 
sHcttsary to transact a much heavier business in cases to bring the 
nne resQits in cash as iu '92 and '93. 

TUb lias been done, and it is gratifying to be able to state that tbe 
ruribows an actual cash gain over 1693. During the year there were 
received in St. Louis no less than 7b3,793 cases of shoes imm outside 
pointa. These cases varied in size from twelve pairs up lo sixty pairs, 
ud it is not too much to say lliat tlieir average value per case was $3&. 
'ndttiiows 

tl9,691,62& WORTH OF SHOES 

Beceived In St. Loals lu 1894. la I89S the value of tbe receipts was 
tlMS0,4S0, showing a gain for 1694 of $864,370. These figures of 
nnipta are compiled from tbe daily returns of the railroad and other 
tnuiiportation companies to the Merchants' Exchange. They show the 
foUoviug comparative receipts for five years, in number of cases: 



.. ITSJSO 

. s9e.oii 



SUpiMiiti, compiled from the same source, show 1694 to have ex- 
(«eded every former year, notwithstanding i-ecelpts were not as large 
u <» 1B9-2. Comparative shipments for five years are : 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



70 TBADB AKD COHHEBCB OF 

Tear. Shlpmeota. 

ISW «Q.ia3 

i«i tM,in 

UBi «WAI» 

IBM , •«."» 

im. -Mfet 

The product of the factories Tor the year, as nearly as can be eati- 
mated, amoantod to fi,3S0,000 ]>a!rs, all kinds. The average pric« of 
this ontpnt WM mach lower in '94 than In previonB years, and whereat 
91^ or 91.90 would have been the correct average in '9i and '9S, 
oxfords, children's shoes and the cheaper lines of " leaders " have sold 
to such au extent that it is donbifnl if 91.66 is too low for an average. 
Based on this price, the five-aud-a-qaarter-million pairs of shoes repre- 
sent a cash value of 

98,662,600 IK KANUFACTDRED GOODS. 

This is only a gain of 9113,500 over the value of product of the bc- 
toriea in 1893, and is below that of 1892— wbich was, however, a 
remarkable year — notwithstanding the fact that more shoes were actn- 
ally made than in either of those years. IjOW price is the only caose 
of the shrinkage. 

WHERR ST. LOtnS STAMPS- 

Un&rtnnately the Boards of Trade of the various cities of the coun- 
try, outside of Boston and St. Louis, do not keep a record of the 
receipts and shipments of shoes, probably becsase the rolnme of the 
trade is not large enough to warrant it, and as a resnlt there is but one 
manner of determining the relative trafflo in shoes of the various dis- 
tributing centers. Depending upon the compiled reports of the ship- 
ments ftom Boston — the shipping point for the myriads of New Eoglsud 
factories — the relative standing of St. Louis with the other cities of the 
country Is truly remarkable, and shows most plainly why it is that the 
East Is looking toward the lilssonri metropolis with startled gaze. The 
following table shows in coses the shipments from Boston to thevarioat 
cities mentioned during 1894 to December 3iiud : 
St. Louis 6»^ 

Chicago. 461 SW 

New York S8S.K7 

Baltimore it;,MT 

Pblladelphta 



UMlS 

NuhTllle «.« 

These figures place 6t. Louis next to Boston as the distributing cen* 
tor of boots and shoes In the United States, without a rival in hailieg 
distance. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TUS CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 
GROCERIES. 



Fran tha mnnual nvtew ol tiM 

Dnring the year which ended with December 31, 1894, the St. Lonu 
grocery market showed & marked increaBe in volnme of sales over 1898, 
notwflhBtadiD^ the fact that many Hues have been very low^ iu price 
and eyen though sales should be larger, the aggregate in money would 
be less thaa former years. As au illestratioD of the ruling low valaes 
may be mentioned sngar, whicb in 189t reached the lowest mark ever 
known iu the history or the trade; canned goods, which have been at a 
Tery low notch, particularly California fruits, which were from 25 to 
3& per ceat lower thau daring 1893 and snch lines as flour, beans, etc., 
lian been at bottom figures during the year. TTotiriths tan ding this 
great rednctiou in "ome of the heaviest lines handled, however, the 
tfTDcery market of St. Louis has shown a marked increase daring 1891. 
A careful canvas among Uie wholesale grocers of St. Loais was mafle 
by the Intkrstatk Gbogbb and the rate of Increase or decrease in their 
hnnnens was confidentially given, which, when combined and averaged 
showed the actual increase in the volnme of business done by all to 
hare been ou the ratio of 107 to 100 per cent, the 100 representing sales 
for 1893 and 107 for 1894, making a net average Increase ot 7 per cent. 
A few houses showed a slight falling off in business, but the majority 
reported very satlafactory increases. It may also be noted as a very 
Battering fact that during the year 1894 there was not a single f^nre 
amoDg the wholesale grocers of St. Louis. 

TIk grocery trade of St. Louis may therefore cony ratulale Itself ou a 
record which can hardly be equalled by any other city in the uulou. 



The passage of tlie bill which took effect Angust 28, placing the duty 
on foreign sugars of 40 per cent ad valorem was expected to increase 
tbeeoetof sugar, but owing to very heavy supplies In growing coun- 
tries this was not the case, and since the passage of the bill, sugar has 
been lower even than l>efare. From the opening of the year antil the 
puoge ot bill refined sugar followed very closely the course of the raw 
sugar mai^et. Buyers loaded themselves up with an invisible supply 
in order to avail tbemselves of the expected duty, and the result was 
some demoralization when sugar went lower after the passage of the 
bill. It has andoubtedly been the policy ot refiners since September 1, 
to prevent foreign sugar* from gaining a foothold in this country by 
lowering the price ol sugar even at a loss to themselves. The average 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



72 TBADE AKD COMMEBCB OV 

piic« of nw oentrinigals from Juiiury 1 to Augast St, woa .0908 cento 
perpoBDdandofimnolated for the Bune time .0408 cento per poand 
lesTing a dUbrence of I cent per poand for refinliiK. From September 
1 to December 81, the arerage of raws wu .03M cento per ponnd and oT 
granolaled .0418 cents per poond, a difference trom reflning of only 
.OOU oeuts per pound. The average difference in 1893 iMtweeo raws 
and refined .0116 per pound. For the iaet four montfaa of the year 
mneh depression was oansed by the knowledge of the extremeijr heavy 
beet sugar crop in Eorope and the consequent demoralization over 
there iiad Its effect In this country. Indications wonld seem to point 
to a oonUnned low price for sugar during 189fi. The entire ing&rcropof 
the year to come Is estimated to be 8^80,000 tons of S,2J0 ponnds eich 
as against 7,i79,fi£7 tons for 1893-9i and 6,658,S29 for 1892-98. The in- 
crease of 1891-9f> over 1893-91 being therefore 1,100,748 tons. 

Tbefollowlngtabltf shows the range of prices for granulated for the 
year by months and the comparative prices in 1893. Also the yearly 
average price for the past seven years. 

'— 189* , isei. 

Highest, Loirogt. HUbest, 

Ooota. Cflntx. (iHnta. 

JaDiury * Kt 



Teariy »ife™ae— ■ 



Hie disparity between receipto and shipments arises throagh recelpto 
belngof green coSbes weighing 19S ponnds to the bag and shipments 
of roasted weighing fiO and 100 pounds. 

Daring the past year Uie trade of St. Loais as a distributing point 
for coffees has grown In a marked degree for both green and roasted. 
Daring this time the demand has greatly increased for roasted, which 
baa increased In popularity with the trade, not only In the North but 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 7ft 

fliroDffbont the Soath >ud SoathweBt. The aectiona which formerly 
took green now call for roasted almost exclnBlvely and althongb pack- 
age goods are in demand, yet a majority of orders are for roasted ia 
biilk. This change frova green to roasted in doe to the inferiority or 
Bradllan coffees, as the better grocery grades of thia variety are almost 
nnohtainahle from the fact Uiat Brazilian growers obtain snch excellent 
profits from their low grades that they have no incentive to improve- 
ment by separating and cleaning. The market daring the year has 
been vithont flnctuatioa, showing throngbont a general steady decline, 
tin total decline on the first of January being abont 3 cents per poand 
leu tlian the same time last year. 

Tlie fntnre is very anpromising, however, for tower prices, as the 
eitimate of the growing crop in Brazil ia that it will be one-third lose 
than iMt year or in other worde 5,500,000 bags ae against 7,000,000 bags 
for 1894. 

STROPS AMD HOLASSEB. 

Receipts, barrels S1.9M 

Becelpta, kege 60S 

ihtmiMiits, barrels 118.814 

ailpneots, kess iS.MT 

Tbe Bymp refiners of St. Louis complain that their business during 
ISMwBsof a very unprofitable character. This was partly owing to 
generally depresaed conditions and to the fact tliat the crop of sorghum 
cane and the conaeqnent production of aorghum molasses was the 
heaviest ever known In the history of the country. Tbeee goods were 
oonaamed by the mafaers and their neighbors and ctit very materially 
into the sales of refined syrups and New Orleans molasses. So iieavy 
was this crop of sorghnm in fact, that it ia stated that it can be bought 
in some sonthem states for 14 cents per gallon. The large diecrep- 
udes noted above between receipts and shipments is accounted for by 
the tact that the glucose &ctories in tbe neighborhood of St. Louis ship 
tbdr goods trom this city largely, thus swelling the shipmente over the 
lecdpls. 

SICE. 

ISM. IBBS. 

Ba^Pts. barrels «6,IH8 M.We 

BhlpmenU, barrels 70.JM BS.Mt 

Business for tbe year 1894 in St. Louis was fully up to the average 
and materially in excess of the year previous. As will be seen hf the 
sbove SgnrcB the shipments were greater than the receipts, but thle is 
■cconnied for by the surplus atocks held over from 1893, which more 
tbanmsdeap the difference. 

"^ pnblEc seems to have looked upon rice as a good "hard times' 
vUcleoffood, and its consumption hae increased accordingly. With 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



74 TRADE AND COHHEBCB OF 

the exception of Uie extremely low prices of 1893 rice has been sor- 
prieln^ly low oonaidering tbe ahortnesB of tfae crop brooght aboat bv 
tbe oout Btonne in the eariy part of the eeuon. Ab the new year pro- 
grsBsei tlM m&rkflt geta more strength, with the demand good, parUcn- 
larly for the better grades of head. Many secttons In the rice growing 
regions report the new crop short. The demand Is folly up to tbe 
snpply, warranting better prices for the 'M-96 crop. 

TEAS- 

S&les for 1894 have andonbtedly been bearter than uanal. Prices 
hare ruled firm, with tbe exception of certain f^radee of China greens, 
ench as Moynnes, 'Hen Kais, ¥y Chows and Ping Sueys, which have 
remained high. This advance was due more to the careful inspection 
at receiriag ports than to any other cause, as many poor and adulter- 
ated teas were thrown out by the inspectorsandkept out of the markets- 
There has been mnch excitement among tea receirers over the partic- 
ular care of late exercised by the customs officials, and Chicago and New 
Tork have endeavored to establish the fact that St. Louis was rec«iving 
large qnaatities of adulterated teas. A careful inspection of the stocks 
of the St. Louis tea honses by a Castoms official tailed to show a single 
package of adulterated tea here. This adulteration of teas is through 
tbe introduction of exhaust leaf or leaves of other similar appearing 
plants, of cerUdn kinds of earth rolled and colored to imitate tea, and Ol 
iron and steel fiUngH, and it is reported that great quantities of these 
adulterated goods have been sent ont from other markets, bat St. Iionis 
tea jobbers and importers are proud to say that none have gone out of 
this market. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 

GROCEKIES. 

RBCUFTS Ain> 8RIPMBI«TS OF BOOAR FOR TWKTr YBAIia. 







.„.™. 




■.„..™. 






Ubds. 
1.97» 

13 887 

B 


Bbl>. 


BozM. 


B.g.. 


Hhda. 


Itbls. 


Bw. 


BM 


SH 

816,211 

iii 

ith.sod 

Ij9J'«1 

ta.Baii 

71,0-28 

te.m 
HMl 
il.t80 


■■»; 
Ma 

'1 

so 

i 


1I.M! 

1UB,U0 

« 

1 
1 


K!1 
\S 

as 

771 
1.B21 

i'.!iao 

7:81)1 


ilS.ISl 
JlS,t6g 
SJillM 

iia.Tsu 

^S 

37S,(7t 

n^uei 

S!;S! 
IS 




IS::: 


M 






ii4,Me 


S;: ■■■■''■■■ 


WJ 


:-S 








MB 
























:l!3 





UCUPIS AND SHtPMBMTS OP UOLA8SB3, OOPFBK x: 



) RICB POR TWKNTT 







.o„.. 


^. 




1 COFTEI. 1 RICR. 


lUlL 




.a.P««™. 


^^ 


...,HT,| Krc-TS. 


BHIP^B 




BbU. 


-- 


Hbda 


BI>18. 


Keg*. 


B 


. : Sk*A bii 


Pkg*. 


Ml 




». 








S4 


>7|| 88.678 






























































































































































24.084 


S7 














































































iw 












30 




31,808 





























































































..lOS.Ul 

...8T,K8 



BBORtPTF, GLUCOSE .. 



.ISSa W.080 

■M9t «,W 

.18ftl H,«W 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TBADB AND COMHRKCB OF 
FURNITURE. 



The year 18B4 has not been one of marked proBperily amoug the 
fninlture end kindred indnstriee auy more than it has In other llneB of 
trade, and It vould Keem from the mo«t an.thentic reports that St. Loala 
ftamilare Interests had snffered leas than those of other cities. 

The apring trade was characterized by epafmodio periods of brisk 
and light demands for gooda, and aboat the time bnyers were making 
pnrchaaea for thtir &11 business the July strikes npon the ndlroada so 
paralyzed trade Itiat it serloaely inleriered with husineas. The fall 
trade has been good, aa a rnle, the active demand having commenced 
at>out the middle of August, with a rneh, bat Ibis was subject to a per- 
ceptible falling off before ibn end of the year. 

The excellent crops of the Southwest encouraged liberal purchaaea 
early in the season, and had it not been that prices for the products 
ruled BO low a most generona trade would have continued, iustead of 
there ha^ng been a diminution. 

A fair estimate ot the year's business is $16,000,00, combining oar 
manufactured product with the sales by jobbers and retailera, the result 
of factory work beiog approximately t4,7fiO,000. The above flgorea 
represent as largo an output of materials as in previous years, bat valu- 
ations have been so much reduced that it regnires the handlings of 
greater qnantltles than formerly to represent an equal value. 

A notable feature is the continued improvement in the quality of oar 
Bunafactarers. Bayers who formerly could find only the commonest 
lines in this market are now supplied by our owu houses with tbe better 
grades, the lines having been greatly added to, and goods are also made 
which satisfy the increasing demand of UiIb territory for l>etter styles 
and bett«r qualities. 

There have been additions to the productive focllitles, especially In 
tbe chair line. One of the large ikctories which has been idle for eev- 
erat yeara was reorganized and renamed upon a large scale. The street 
car fbmlture InduKtry, which a year ago was in its infancy, baa been a 
large producer, finding buyers in the many principal cities of the coun- 
try, and steam car seata are shipped to all parts of the world. 

Specialties among the manufiictnrers continues to produce the best 
results in qnailtiea and proflte, lessening ruinous competition. This 
feature is assisted much by the friendly' relationship existing by reason 
of the thorongb organization of all the furniture and allied intereata in 
the St. Louis Furniture Board af Trade — aeventy-flve firms In all. No 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 77 

tool ettikes of any imporlance bave occurred, tbe 3,500 employes having 
been kept at work quite steadily ttie year tliroagh, ttioiigh a redaction 
ID wageg has in cases been made, bat wages hare not been reduced in 
SkepniporUoa to the reduced price at which goods are sold. 

Birch luu come to the front as one of tbe popntar woods, oalc being 
themoKt in nse, however. Mahogany, cherry and sycamore are also 
gnatlyin dernand> while walnut in mostly osed for export basiness to 
Mexico aad other foreign points. 

St. LodIs continues to be the great hardwood lumber market, and 
fDrnitore mannfactnrers bave an advantage or tbe first Belectiona. 

Pine cabinet woods for tbe East and Northwest are drawn from this 

miriiet. 
ThBoppartanity for capitalists to locate here a manufactory for the 

%hegl grades of furnilure is still open. There has been a noticeable 

teDtcring of the retail houses in one locality within the last year, and 

oor citf CM refer to its establishmenls in this line with Just pride as 

winipwecl with other cities. 
ScTeral exceptionally large orders have been placed within the year 

wibe tiro new snmptous hotels, three handsome clnbs and the new 

UBioa Station, that of tbe latter having been constrnctod entirely by 
one o( OQr local factories. 

Stocks in the territory contlgaons to St. Louis are considered light, 
allhoDgb there is a tendency to stock np for an anticipated increase 
trade for tlie new year. 

We iiave had no large or bad failures among our furniture bouses, 
while tronbloDS times have been the report from many other quarters, 
thus speaking well for tbe financlsl conditions of these industries. 

Isqulriee for opening trade relations bave been received from Turkey, 
Fbillipine Islands, Cuba, Argentine Confederation, Brazil, Honduras 
and Columbia, while Mexico still continues its purchases. 



STOVES AND HARDWARE. 



From the STOVE AND HARDWARE REPORTER. 



With two exceptions, the causes for which are explained in the proper 
pl&cea later on, St. Loats manufacturers and Jobbers— in the lines com- 
ing ander the Beporter't review — have no reason to complain of the 
Ttat 1B94. The volume of business has been maintained in comparison 
irtthisas, and while prices are generally lower, as was to be expected. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



7S TBADE AND COUHEKCE OP 

the Bitnation U regarded as eatisfiictory, and it may be said in pas^ng 
that St. Louis is coDsiderably betUr off than a year ago and has made 
a relalively better showing than any other city in the conntry, popnla- 
tion and resoarces being conridered. 



The hardware bnsineee has branched out more widely than any other 
line. It covera a field reaching to the eastern tranndaries of bidiaoa 
and from there to the Gulf, talcing in all the territory west of the Mis- 
Bissippt to the Pacific coast and extending up through Minnesota to the 
Dominion line. A considerable advance has been effected in the Min- 
nesota field during the past year and also in the Mountain States and 
the Foget Sound territory, this latter gain having been achieved Id part 
through an increase in railway facilities. The value of this busIneBS is 
placed at $14,500,<K)0, approximately, being about the same as lost year, 
but representing a volame that Is 16 per cent in excess of what it was 
in '93. This 16 per cent represents, tiierefore, the difference in prioes 
between those now in force and those of a year ago, ao that if valaea 
had been mointiuned with the volume the gain wonid have beea eqaal 
to the percentage iu question. An especial feature of the year Is the 
growth of the bicycle indastryand the rapidly expanding sales through 
St. Louis aa a distributing point, these having more than doubled and 
representing a valuation of nearly $l,000,00(K ^Novelties and special 
devices have also foand a wider sale, while etill another matter of per- 
tinent trade Interest is in the fact that collections have continned excel- 
lent thronghont the year, thus Indicating a healthy condiUon of the 
retail trade. 

STOVES AKD RAHOBB. 

A carefnl estimate of the sales of cooking stoves, heaters and ranges 
places the total at $1,1SC,000, or a reduction of about 32 per cent from 
the flgnres of last year. It is e&Id on competent authority that tho fy]l~ 
ing off In the stove business for the entire coantry will approximate S& 
per cent, so It can be seen that a better average has been maintained by 
the St. Louis manufacturers. For the first ten months of the year the 
sales were fully equal to those in 1893 during the same length of Ume, 
but a falling off in demand began with November and the decrease in 
the total was confined to the last two months. This decreaise Is ac- 
counted fbr by the unseasonable weather so generally prevalent in St. 
Louis trade territory and also by the drouth in Kansas and Nebraska, 
two states which have generally made excellent returns to the Bt. Hjonis 
foundries. A noticeable feature of the business this year has been au 
increased ontput and demand for sleel ranges, the outlook for these 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 7» 

goods bdoK decidedl; &T0rab1e. The 8t. Louis maniiraotarara coverft 
Said ^tending eutvvftrd into Ohio and down ioto Florida in the «x- 
tKine Motheset, taking in all the Southern States and reaching into 
3UnMMtaon the north. The entire Western field Ib covered ont to the 
Punfie coast and branch agencies and warehoaees are established at 
several of the leading cities. 

FURNACES. 

The Beporttr has had occasion from time to time to refer to the belief 
inotlier cities that St. Louis is not a good field for fnmaces. We en- 
deavored to combat this belief and to prove that the contrary proposi- 
tioD is the trae one, while the attempt in this direction Is now proven 
to be BQCcessfal by the statement, based ou retnrns received from all 
obUnable sources, that the basincss has increased abont 16 per cent 
duriDf the year, or in the neighborhood of two hundred new furnaces. 
AboDt 1^ were sold in 1893 and 1 ,400 in 1894, those figures being ob- 
bined from actual records — including only snch sales as were made In 
U» city limits or by St. Louis houses tn the immediately surrounding 
■ndeicepting the sales made by other houses in such territory. At an 
>nnge valuation of fll26, the sales had a total of tl76,12€. This total 
^1 be very largely increased during the current year if the extent of 
"'^ preparation B uow being made by the mann&cturers can be used as 
'IwiiiofcalcalBtions, one house alone having made arrangements for 
"''ttleof S,000 furnaces from St. Louis alone. 



AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY. 



From FARM HACMtNBRT. 



Hore &rm machinery and agricultural implements were sold in St. 
Louis during 189* than were eold during 189S. Qaite agoodmany more 
—if sceurately known the figures would show an increase of ftiHy 46 
per cent., or a total sale of about <14,500,000 for the year just closed. 

There was also a big increase in the sale of vehicles — the aggregate 
■ales amounting to something like $10,000,000, us compared with 
t7,000.000 for 1893, an increase of 30 per cent. 

There should, and no doabt will, be much encouragement in these 
figures for the implement and vehicle mannfacturera of St. Louie. 
This point has long been known as being moat favorably located for 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



80 . TBADB AND OOHMBBOE OP 

the dlstribaUoD of a^cultnral Implements tbrooghoat the fertile 
region that stratchea awa^ into the distance on everr Bide. More 
Tehioles are bailt here than erer before, and this line of mannfiictnre is 
growing very perceptiblf . 



THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIES OP ST. LOUIS. 



BY WtLUAU H. BRYAN, 

CoDiultliie Uechuieal and Electric*) Eagiacd. 



St. Louis faaG always held an important position in the varied appli- 
«aUonB of electricity, and in the mannfactare of tpparatns, material 
and sapplies for electrical work. For many years It has ranked as one 
of the leading cities of the world in electric lighting: ond raiiwaj work. 
A few years ago it was known positively that St. Lonis ontranked the 
world In these directions, and it is by no means certain that she has 
been ontstrlpped even yet, althongh many of the large cities seem to 
have recently awakened to the advantages of electi'icity, and are now 
making rapid advancement. In St. Lonia, however, the original and 
most extensive work was done, paving the pathway for the Intnre* and 
demonstraUng the practicability and sonndness of electrical investments 
apon a large scale. 

The arc lighting of St. Lonis is done by fonr companies, who operate 
abont *fiO0 lights of a nominal capacity of 2,000 candles each. The 
incandescent lighting is done by three companies, which now have ap- 
proximately 175,000 lights connected. The electrical equipment of 
these several stations aggregate 20,000 horse-power. The service ex- 
tends over the entire city and as far west as Klrkwood. In common 
with other iDterests they have suffered somewhat from the bnsiness de- 
pression of 1894, and their growth, while it has by no means ceased, 
has not been as large proportionately as In former years. The year 
189fi win see extensive eulai^ements made, both to the plants and dis- 
tribntion systems. The most important advancement to be expected in 
the immediate f\itnre is the placing of the major part of the wiring 
under ground, which consummation It is expected will be reached 
within the next twelvemonth. 

St. Louis also ranks high in the distribution of electricity for power 
purposes. Three companies distribute an aggregate of about 4,000 
horse-power throughout the city. Electricity has displaced steam in 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CtTF OF ST. LOOIB. 81 

hnndTeds of Bmatl maoafutariDir eBtabllahments, and has roMiitljr 
tame into qnlw ezteneive use tor elevator eervloe In oar tall baildtngS) 
for which it weins to b« admirably adapted. 

It is in connection with street railways, however, that electricity has 
net its widest field of work in thfs city. Nine companiee, capitalized 
at sboQt ai7,000,000, operate some 376 miles of single track, ranning 
600 motor cars, with 20,000 horse-power of electrical equipment, and 
400 trailers. There are eight power hoasee, with a total electrical 
equipment of aboat 23,000 horse-power. These lines carried 66,000,000 
in 18M, a gain of abont 8 per cent over 1893. These roads have added 
to their equipment duiing the year 18S4 steam and electrical apparatus 
of 8,500 horHe-power, valued at (800,000 and have built dnring the year 
tliiny-lliree milesof single track. The electric railway companies em- 
ploy abont 4,000 meu regularly. Considerable extensions will be made 
daring the coming year, and a nnmber of suburban electric roads, con- 
necting with existing down-town lines, will probably be built. 

In electrical manufactureB St. Loals ranks high. It has always been 
a center of the carbon Industry, and continnes so at this day. The 
nuDQ&ctnre of incaudescenti lamps has also grown to be large and im- 
portant. Becently the manufacture of alternating current motoi-a, fans, 
and converters has been taken up, and is being actively pnshed. The 
product of these lactorlea bos become widely known, and goes to oil 
parts of the globe. 

Five large supply houses famish electrical material and eqnlpment- 
The capital invested is in the neighborhood of 91Sfi,000, and they did a 
grots bosinesB of abont (500,000 during 1894, being Jnat abont the same 
as was done in 1893. These companies carry a stock valued at abont 
9126,000, and the territory covered includes the entire Southwest. 

A large number of contractors for electrical construction operate in 
and near St. Lonit. It baa been impossible to ascertain the volnme of 
Iheh- bnsinesa for 1894, bnt it Is known to be large. 

In interests closely allied to electricity St. Louis also ranks high. 
Foot latge street car factories are now In full operation, the greatfir 
part of their prodnct being fbr electric railways. In this field St. Louis 
has for some years led the world both In quantity and value of output. 

In engines, boilers, abafUng and belts, entering into the eqnlpmont of 
electrical stations, a lai^ business has been done- 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COMHESCB OF 
THE IRON TRADE. 

Pron the IRON AGS. 



A review of the iron and e(eel trade for tlie year Just cloeed Is of 
neceeelty an nnpleaaant task, as prices have declined almost steadily 
from the opening to the closing week. In past years where declines 
have taken place they have generally teen iterspersed with an occa- 
sional improvement in prices, bat prices during the year 1S94 have, as 
above stated, declined with remarkable steadiness. No. I fbnndry pig 
iron was quoted at the opening of 1894 at 9liM; to-day $10.60 Is the 
ruling qaotation, a decline of 91.76 per ton. No. S foundry shows a 
decline of tl-AO per ton. No. S fonndry ii quoted at $1.26 lees to-day 
than at the opening of the year, and gray forge at 11.00 per ton leas. 

During the year freight rates from Southern fnrnaoes have been re- 
duced AOc. per ton, so that the actnal decline in the price of the grades 
enumerated is, as above iodieated, less AOc. per ton. To-day's prices 
of $10,50 for No. 1 fbniidry, $9.7fi for No. 2 foundry, $9.26 ibr Ko. S 
fonndry and $9.00 for gray forge are generally supposed to be nearly 
as low as they can possibly go. The Tennessee Coal and Iron Com- 
pany, the largest producer of pig Iron in the Soath, has positively r^ 
fused to accept less than $7.00 for No. S at the furnace, or $9.76 F. O. 
B. St. Louis. Notwithstanding the persistent efforts of consumers to 
shade this price they have not yet sncceeded in doing so, so that tbe 
prospect for advance early In the new year is considered quite prob- 
able. 

The consnmption of ptg iron during the year has shown an increase 
of at least 10 per cent. In comparison with the year 1893, so that taking 
everything Into consideration the situation Is brighter than the general 
condiUoBB wonld seem to indicate. 

In mannfoctnred iron much the same conditions prevail as in pig 
iron, except that prices have shown a more serious shrinkage, lo Jan- 
nary common bar was quoted at 1.80c., while to-day ic. to l.Ofic. is the 
general asking price, a decline of from $6.00 to $6.00 per ton. The 
volume of buBlness was paseably fair during the year, and with the ax- 
pected improvement In railroad construction and car building then is 
a possibility of better prices very shortly. Ballway supplies are lower 
than ever before quoted. Splice bars, $8.00 per ton lower than ia Jan- 
nary of 1894; spikes, $6.00 per ton lower; bolts, $1S.OO per ton lower; 
links and pins, $7.00 per ton lower. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THB CITY C 



ST. LOUIS MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS. 



B tk« REPORT OP THE COHPTROLLBR. 



OOMDinOM OP THE TBEA8URT. 

Tha tnlance in the trsumy at the close of the Saoal year, April 9, 
IW, vu t8,169,88fi.Sl. AddlDg to this amoant the debit baluiceB OD 
•ccoimt of "Street Opening — Special Fund," "Change of Street 
3ndH," "Street Sprinkling — 8pe<dal Fand," and "BonleTards — 
8pKU Fund," sggrcyatlng $886,663. lA, gives as the reaonrcea of the 
I^tunrr, April 9, 1894. tSJUfi.iSS.lS. Deducting the liabllltieB 
tbugeablt against this amoant, there remains an onappropriated snr- 
JiAn of |S61,S47.SS, belonging to the respectiTe reTenne fkinda. 

BOKDKD DEBT. 

The bonded debt at the close of the fiscal rear, April 9, 18M, 
uuoimled to 921,199,711.56, showing a redaction of $179,809^ daring 
the jsar. The bonds matarlng dnring the year, aggregating 11,130,000, 
were redeemed at maturity— 1179,309.60 out of the reveone of the 
KnUng Fond and tl,SCO,690.60 ont of the proceeds sales of renewal 
bonda. 

To proTide for the tnatorities not covered by the Sinking Fond, 
tl,S60,000 fonr per cent twenty-year gold renewal bonds were ofiered 
at a public letting on Sept«mbar S, 1S9S, bat owing to the atringeacy In 
the money market, no blda were received. Efforts were then made to 
sell the bonds at private sale, bat the price which could have been ob- 
t^ed was below the limit fixed by the Committee of Ways and Ueana 
of the Manlcipal Aaaembly. 

Negotiations were then opened to place the loan by public sabscrip- 
tion u pir In London, and £867,000 four per cent twenty-year sterling 
hoadBjdaUd October 3, 1898, were placed in that manner, Messrs. 
Coatea, Son A Co., of London, acting as the issue houae for the dty. 
The bonds are of the denomination of £100, the principal and interest 

^i^m partble at the National Bank of Scotland, Umlted, London, in 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



84 TBADS AND COMMERCE OF 

sterling, or at the option of the holder, &t the Sational Bank of Com- 
merce In New York, in United Bt&tes gold coin at the rate of (43660 
per ponnd sterling. 

The bouds maturing during the current fiscal year amount to 93,17S,- 
000. 0( this amount $2,000,000 will be provided for by the Issne of 
renewal bonds, and $172,000 will be redeemed ont of the revenue of tiie 
Sinking Fnnd. The (3,000,000 renewal bonds were sold on May IS to 
Messrs. Blake Bros. & Co., and Uesere. Yermily e & Co., of New ToA, 
on joint bid, at IQ5.092 fiat. The bonds are dated Jnne 1, 189S, payable 
twenty years after their date, and bear interest at the rate of 4 per cent 
per annnm. 

SINKING FUND. 

The balance to the credit of the fand at Ihe beginning of the year 
amounted to $18,703.79; the revenue of the fand during the year was 
$183,012.66, and the total available resources were $200,716.6fi. Of this 
amount $179,809.60 was applied iu reducing the debt, leaving a balance 
of $21,407.16 at the end of the year. 

The avfdlable resources of the fund dnring the cnrreut year are esti- 
mated at $S16,000, of which amount $173,000 will be required to meet 
the maturing bonds of the year not provided for by renewal bonds. 

TAXATION. 

The Bssessed valuation of taxable property for the taxes of 1894 
amounts to $810,341,860, an increase of $26,061,060 over the preceding 
year. 

The rates of taxation fbr city purposes, for the year 1894, remain the 
aame as for the preceding year, viz. : 

New Urn Its, 

OldLlmlU. (Object to In- Nev Limit*. 

oreued r&M. 

Forpoyinent of debt and Interest, f 40 t W I 10 

For generta municipal purpoaes.. H SS so 

Total f I S8 list tlO) 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



THE CITY OF 8T. LOUIS. M 

YALUE OF IMPORTS and EXPORTS op the UNITED STATES. 



TMr 


tes 1 ''K" 

.H« Silver «nd 
"'•*- 1 Bullion. 


Tottl 


ImpoTtt 


Import! 


Total 


SA 


Eiporti. 


diw. 


Silver uid 
Bullioo. 


Importa. 


i«i: 


SM,60e.HI « 


855,374, 














mo... 


898,771 ,TB8 U 


450,927. 










*4i,lT7,l>» 71 


524.05fi, 




(i33,479,93! 8< 


Sll7,li88, 












80S,B74, 




M0,834,9T1 N 












m,866,T6l a 


7i8,605. 




TiO,4S9.U] » 


T8fi.48fl, 










901,877.84 19.40«,84i 


921,794, 












ain.e59. 




740,613.80 ffT.lSa.SSl 


807.846, 




742,IS9,7S 42,231, b-iS 


784,421, 










716.183,211 H5,99T,69: 


7S3,180, 










742,401,375 9fl,641,&8.< 


830.042 




857,838,68. 62.148.4» 


909,077. 




884,480,81' 108,BB3.«3 


993,484 










847,665,194:149,418,10! 


fl8T,ne3 




89i. 140. 872* 127.429 34 


1,019.560 



IICPORTSAND EXPORTS FOR THE CALENDAR YEARS 18MAND 189*. 

IW, Exports- MERCHANDISE. 

tiomeMic I80T.31J.BS3 

Foreign 1 7.79lt.lM 

Total leis.iuB.oas 

Importa. «7W11,10» 

EioesaotKiportB over Imports US,T9((,e81 

1991, Export*— 

Domestic 8854,7S9,«1 

Foreign il3'S,Sa7 

ToUl SBT6,HS,10 

Imports t7JH.S48.fH4 

Exceu of Exports overlmpoitu >9,(in,«B 

JSH.GnId- GOLll .\XD SILVER. 

Exports |IOI,Rlll,Bi4 

Import* 2O,S0TJ«l 

Excess Of Exporte over Importa gj,ill,3£3 

BIlTor- 

Eiports. Sn,04*,!l» 

Imports. n42t,4i'a 

Exeeuot Eiporta over Imports. n,!IB,TB7 

19M, Gold- 
Exports. t 78.778.810 

Imports. n,1tXfB» 

Excess ol Exports uverlmporld T.DM.MS 

Silver— 

Exports. |48.»',731 

Eiee«»o(EipoVtVovuriin|JVrVs.".'.V.'.'.V/.'.'.'.'.'.'.' .'.'.".'.'." 17.966,635 



sdbvGoo^^lc 




is 



I- ill I liiiH 



u n If 
III i ji 




I 



„Go(5glc 







.vGoo^^lc 



TBADB AMD OOMUEBCB OF 

CLEAKING-H0U8E STATEMENT. 
BpamBae for thb Year 169 j c 



JuiQfkry... 
February.. 

April. .'.'.■." 

Mb; 

July.;.".'.'!* 

B«p[cm'b«r. 
October,... 

November . 
DeMmber . 



83,E98,U1 

79,43T,7<» 



,014,191 l,m,T01.9Ce 





CLEARINGS AND BALANCES. 


«^,.».. 


Clearinga. 


— 


AiiKregate^ 


CIcnrliiKS. Balano«B. 




|lS9' 014)291 

;Mi;67i;9ra 
;ub;b7»;!io 


t TI.MS.TSS 




1 WJ.M!t.tS»\t leS.Ul.SST 
900,474, e;B 141,B8>.&S» 














1890 





BAKK 6TATBUENTS. 



B. CHASE, Haaager. 



of the Clearing Hona*. 





. 










3 






1 










h 


























if 




















& 






bond*. 


baolu. 


& 






m 










in 






































































































































































































































































































































w 


M.SflO,8i3 













,db,GoOglc 



r OF ST. LOUIH. 



POPULATION OP ST. L0UI9. 
Area 62} Square 3Rlt$. 



B.OUO 

b^ 
MOT 

IS ,040 
18,468 

14,4S8 

H.OWI 



13U isua 

IMS ioi,m 

ISIo-Cnlted Btata Cennu 110,864 

■"" " UOfiN 

400,000 

160.C00 

laOO— UDiteaStBMiOeiiBQS 4fil,TTD 

ie»-s>tim>u 54i,en 

iii93— " a;i.Mo 

IBSt-Dlrectorj Eitinute G9S,U> 



AMOUST OP REAL ESTAl-E AND PERSONAL PROPERTY 

ASSESSED C( THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 





oat or BT. LOCIB 

SeaiSstate 


RealAFera-nal. 


RATB OF TAIAnOR. 




Old Llmlta. 


Sow Umlls. 




W4oe;asa 
si.ssi.Bia 

SffiS 

lis, no. 410 

1» 130 ISO 
148,144,400 
]U,OtI,4S0 

its 

140, 976, MO 
1N,8»7,47U 

1T8,S1«,S90 

SiSii 
III 

K0.JS8,B00 




.40 

i 

:b5 

I. SB 

>.8B 

i:s6 

IS 

S.88.S 

Itt 

i.ee 
s.eo 

*00 

ass 

!l 

1.10 

I.S 

S.IO 

11 

2'.m 










m:'.','.:.'::. 

un 

|;;:r 

im'.'.'.':.'.'.'. 
vlii.".'.'.'.',', 

M7»:;:'.:::: 

IM 

B:;::::: 
MM.;"::: 


•'gsiaso.'ois 

10B,S4S,!10 

{gffiffi 

IBS, ITS, 430 

III 
iiii 

ua Sir 830 

IM.11S,690 

384,013. MO 

m'.in',m 


:» 

1 
1 

-0 

60 
00 
80 
.00 

:«T 




-CllyT.x.tE40:(fU 


F.aSc.; Sohaol,40( 


wot 



Forthoyear 1894 the levy wftB$2.0S on the flOO for all prepatty in 
the new limits situated between iirtiToIs avenae, Tholozon avenue 
and Peraod road on the south, new city Umita on the west, Floris- 
•ant avenae, Bircher street and Survey 381 on the north, find old altj* 
Umlta on the east. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TB&DE AND COMHEBCK OP 



BUILDING IMPROVEMENTS. 



flTATEHENT BhOWIHO THE YaLDK OF BciLDIKa iKFBOTEHEim IM TBI 

CiTT OF St. Louis durino the tear 1894. 



Prepared by Geo. B. bEiD,CoiiiiniBilonerot Public Buildingi. 



BUILDINQ PEBIOTS ISSUBD. 



MONTBB. 


New brick 
bulldlDgt. 


Kew frame 
building*. 


dUloiu and 
alterat-nmo 


TotaL 




So. 


Value. 


Ho. 


Value. 


frame bids* 






171 
197 
846 

sot 

877 

an 

211 

see 

367 

364 
244 
284 


9 611,300 

ftwlsoo 

1,088,000 
1,071,400 
1,14S,7<» 
977,300 
861,800 
791,000 
637,000 
697,000 


A9 
M 
98 

77 
80 
7* 
01 
70 
67 
118 
75 
&3 


1 27,900 

42.000 
4S700 
2S,"00 
WOOO 
91.600 
25,000 
26,000 
81,000 
44,000 
S8 60O 
23,100 


9 36.000 
81, MO 
81.100 

54,200 
S8,9« 
37,600 
48 000 
36,000 

Piss 

83,000 
2»,M» 




Pebroaiy 


1,214,600 






1 ns.soo 














Sepumber 


1,017,000 


Movembir".:::;::: 

December 


l,24*:00(l 

ilooo.ioo 




2,977 


110,891,700 


876 


« 153,700 


i 409.300 









Knmbar of l^ermita Istned During 1894 8,861 



BmLDENQ PERMITS ISSUED FOR NINETEEN YEAKS. 



7,S7e,BlS 

7,ais,6ee 

7.138,8TS 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



THE CITT or ST. IiOIIIS. 91 

STATE OF MtSSOUKI. 

FlHlRCIAL Statbhent Pbepabed bt Ub. Loh T- Stkfhkns, 
State Thkasuber. Jancabt 1, 1S96. 

Total Mieaaed raluatioii of real and penooiil property in HU- 

•ouri tortbe VMr ISM. $eS4,!Be,<ie3 00 

ItallriMMi, Bridge and Telegraph CompanlM 70.898,736 00 

Total $»t,B89,T88 00 

(Bate of taxation tor State pnrpoaet SB oenta on the flOO valaaUon.) 

BAtanoe In Treainry, January 1, 18M $ «7.3oa se 

AmoDnt of reoetpta into tbe State Treasury tor the year ending 

December ftrt, IBM Vi«,422 16 

Amount dlabursed during the year 18H (Including amount uted 

tor retiring bonds) S,!82,9S9 OB 

Balance in Treasury December 8lBt,18M Tia,79S 18 

The bonded debt of the State was reduced four hundred and fourteen 
tbooiand dollars in the year 1891. 

State Bond Debt, Jamuart 1, 1896, 

Me 8 per cent, funded bonds, due January 1, 1896 $ 109,000 

U 8 per cent. Penitentiary boude, due April 1, 1890 31,000 

197 6 per cent. Hannibal ft St. Joseph R. R. bonds, due in 190, '96, 

andW . 197,000 



({109,000 bonds above listed, due January 1, 1890, were paid on date of 
maturity.) 

1013 3K per cent. 5-30 relundinK bonds, due March 1, 1907 $1,013,000 

taeSK percent. 0-20 refunding bonds, due July 1,1907 .. 186,000 

TOO )U per cent. 0-20 refunding bonds, due October 1, 1907 TOO 000 

1S3T8X per cent. 0-20 refunding bonds, dne January 1, 1B08 2,987,000 

to,osa,ooo 

Totalamount outstanding bonds 96,016,000 

The State has an optlov to redeem any part or all of the 8H percent 

bonds at any time. 
State bonds aud interest coupons are paid at maturity at the American 

ExohangeNationalBaml[,NewYork, fiscal agent tor the State of Missouri, 

School aiid Beuimary Cektiticatxs of iKDKBTBDNEae. 

Sclioolcertifloates, 6percent {2,909,000 

aobool cerUficates, per cent 281,000 

$3,110,000 

Seminary oerUflcates, 6 per cent $ 122,000 

Seminary certlUoates, 6 per cent 130,000 

Senunary certificates fUutTerstty endowment) 6 per cent 016,000 

$1,198,968 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TBADB AMD COMMERCE OF 

FIBE R&qORD FOR 1S8<I. 

i» BApOTted b7 tiapt Chab. XvAXt, UnOerwiiMT's Sitlviffe Corpi. 







iSS.'SSf 


Percentage. 




887,lHO0 
411,833 30 
8«m:07S97 
i80,Ni7«6 

ill 

81.t,8» 79 


■831,707 78 

■m.m 86 
8i,«n 21 

sn^iBi 41 

S«,H 10 
111,344 8(1 

eiiw OB 

40,«;0 u 




















































Total! 


»4.308,085 28 


11.184.106 09 


lS.Jg 



inJMBSB OF ALARMS. 



1098 I Third Alarms... 



CLAaSIFICATlO:! OP BtllLDINGS C 
8 Story Brick... 



t Story Stone FroDts. . 



10 Story Brlok.. 



WHICH FIRES OCCCRRED. 

11 Story Frame 8 



Sbeds 187 

Lumber Yanle 8 

A WDlngs 11 



Y«4B. 


No. of ar» 

and 

AUnn*. 


Amonot of 


AmoDU or 
LofsntolD- 






» 

01 

■■s 

407 
81 

37 

i 

i 
1' 


•!:i!:S!! 

3,ie ,880 00 

54 86 

75 (» 

,.91 96 


t 803,887 00 
85S,G»)00 

■Si 

1.473,131 84 

1,281,411 as 

1 007 139 03 

1181880 60 

47J.104 SB 

1,8J3,483I)0 

2.791,939 78 










































































7,.'>4S,3'ui6t j,in(i,nie«6 

















,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OF BT. LODtB. 



THE CLIMATE OF ST. LOUIS. 



By DR. H. C FRANXENFISLD, 
It Official, ^Dltcd SUta Wemlber Bureau, BL Louli, Mo. 



St. Loais is pre-eminent I7 an inland city, and Ita climate preecntfl 
fieveral distinctive featnreH when compared with other large cltiea of 
(he coanti-y located near large bodies of water which ezercife a con- 
trolliog iuflncnce apon their climates. The chief points of difference 
are those of tenaperatnre and raoisture, which in the marine climates 
are controlled largely by the winds blowing from the neighboring 
water sarfaces. The temperature of the water is more aniform than 
that of the land, and consequently in snob cities as Boston, New York 
sod Mew Orleans the temperatnre distribaUon thronghont the year Is 
macb more equable than In St. Ixmls, which receives the tall force of 
the changes In the atmosphere uninflnenced by any local causes. The 
inmmerB are therefore warmer here and the winters colder than those 
of seacoast cities of the same latitude. The temperatnre changes are 
more sudden and decided, and the changes from one season to anotlier 
are not so gradual. Compensation for this disadvantage is found In the 
auristnre supply, which Is considerably greater in the maritime cities 
on account of the excessive amount brought Id by the winds from the 
water surfaces. This pxcesa of moisture also produces more doudi- 
hms, and the amount of sunshine is proportionately lessened. 

A brief description of the climate of St. Louis during the saccessive 
months of the year will perhaps be found to be of some Interest. Dar- 
ing the montlis of January and Febrnary the severest winter weather 
eccBTB. The temperature changes are more sudden and decided than 
in places itartber east, but not so marked as In places further west, In 
the slope region east of the Rocky Mountains. Clear skies and little 
snow ia the rale, while the frequent depressing Ibgs of molster climates 
are absent, cool, dry, Invigorating air prevailing Instead. During 
March the prevailing north winds cause a greater degree of cloudiness 
than at any other time during the year, but even then the sky Is ob- . 
scored only about one-half the time, and bright warm days are com- 
paratively treqoent, foretelling the approach of spring, which breaks 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



M TRADE AHD OOUHKRCB OP 

upon HI abntptly. By the first of April the spring really commetiMs. 
The temiieratiire rises rapidly, canslng rapid serminfttion and growth 
of plants. This growth is fhrther enhaooed by the abundant rainfkll of 
April, Uay and June, daring which months abont one-tUrd of the entire 
aniinal rainfall nsnally ocoars. From Joty to the end of September tlie 
greatest beat occurs, and the sky is UBoally free from cloada, well- 
dereleped storms being annsnally rare, most of the precipltatdoD bdng 
oansed by local thunderstorms, which have a cooling efiect upon the 
atmosphere. During October and Noveraber the sunshine oootinues 
for the greater portion of the time, while the moderating temperature 
combines with it in making those most delightful aatnmne wUch are 
tbechief charm of the climate of St. Louis. Daring November and tlie 
early portion of December frosty nights are freqnent, bat the days are 
Qsoally far flrom nupleasant. During the latter part of December the 
temperatare changes, becoming more marked and frequent, witii an 
occasionBl light snow, herald the approach of winter. 

The following table shows at a glance the average cllmadc conditiona 
at St. Louis for each month of the year, the data having been compiled 
ftom the record of twenty-fonr years' di^ly observations. 





T»-pb^™h-. 


PSBO'TeS. 






Kdmbbr 


OT DlTB. 






MONTH. 


1" 
1 

1 


i 


1 


St 

^1 


1 
1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


53 


|| 




78 

89 
M 
99 
104 

i 


"1 

i 
i 

-.1 


K 
U 

i 

IS 


i 

i 
,1 


i 

1 

60 
4S 


2K 


a 

10 

!) 

IB 
U 


9 
1 

J 

in 

! 

10 


11 


J 

10 

S 

1 






\ 

S 


a 
i 

5 
9 








































IW 


-K 


u 


8T 


M 


!8.M 


188 


ISS 


99 


lU 


s. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 





THE 
1 


01 


TT OF 8T. LODIS 

=ss883»e=sa B 








«ias=as=ssB > 








a 


h :;;::»;:»■: ; 




g 


:i:ve::.8»; i 




A 


*■ > i 1 :« ; i«3 I i 






;:S: :;:-::;■:- 






;;:i::5=;;> i 






;>;;!if.E=:: ; 






■:;:«:!!:,:: 


1 




•^ •>*-.= !/:« • 




-|- 


a 


: • : . : >S :,.S : 1 


K 


;«:?::;»; 




i 




*«Hf hS ;e. ; :e 


: 




•hf.?!. ;»= ;= 








= : ;! ; is ; : ; 




1 




= 


eSCS ISs, : : 








aiSS^5^i.;„: I 






::::=*•: J ;•= ; 


5 




H33=i.=H BS .a ; 




!-«;•»; it- : 1 ; ; 








;i;Hii8:S; ; 


a 


a 




= ■ 1 : i IhS= ;s ; 


2 




if- ; ■■ ■ > : fS ■■ 






: >a : ifS :f,B : 






» ;»s ; i if. i • ■ ■ 






f 






sifiiii:-..* i 


* 






h8 1 : : : : >S3 : 


a 


-^ 


I- 


:? li- ; : ; i : ; ! : 


■^■^^\■^u■ i 






SS* ;b. iS :s iS : : 






^f ;== ; ; 1= ; : i 






>::;;:=s-s»E i 






■ :^ :» ii-a } : is : 




i 








N; inHii 5 




fiS<3nf»^ S 


1 



,db,GoOglc 



S SS - : SQ ' : S$ . : Si's S;: : - SS '. : SS 


s ss : -. es un US sr s$ s» ii ss ss sa 


a S3 : i !iSt Igg KS &S Si S3 SS 33 SS CS 




s: as 3S n& $s se s? ss ss 3£ zs 23 ss 


S S-° sa S= iSS E:S IBS ss ss ESS 33 cs ss 


a 3f S8S as ss as 88 ss se ass ph ss ss 


a -s i:: $s ss ss s? ks ss ss ss s3 3s 


ii ss s:^ ss 89 85 s^ ss ^s ss sES s« ss 


« SE) se: 83 ss S3 s:^ ss SS 33 SS SS ns 


S SX S° ZS 3S 3S Sf: SS S3 SS 1^8 SS SS ^ 


a B3 S3 KS ss S3 SB 88 SS SS SS S8 S5 


3 SS SZi ?S SS 33 S& &S US t:S S3 SS SS 


S iS $S ?3 £S S3 &ES SS SS K^; 3S i;S 9S 


s r!c SS ut SS SS SS Sif ss ss ss ss 3S 


2 S8 SS KS s;s as as ses ss ps ss s= as 


S S5 as 3S KS as ss ss SK PS 3* SZ S3 


3 33 ss e? S3 &S ss CS ss ss S3 S3 St; 


S ss BS ss S3 ZS ss SS SS SS &$ S3 38 


3 3S ss S3 SC SS SS.SS SS S3 SS 3S 3« 


s SB 8E3 ess as ss sc ss ss ss S9 sa sts 


S $R ss S3 SS SS SS ss ss ss S3 SS 3B g 


- «8 S3 SS 33 SS SS S& SS 3S SS 38 ^S j 


« SS S3 SS 33 SS 33 SS SS SS S3 SS g3 g 


>- SS 83 S9 SS SS SS SS SS SS SS S8 S3 | 


• 8S SS SS S9 SS £3 SS SS SS RS 3S SS 


» 8S S3 S3 SS SS SS 38 38 SS 83 38 83 


SS 8S SS 33 SS S3 fiS SS SS SS S3 98 


" S3 SS S3 S3 SS S3 38 SS SS SS SS SS 


" SS 38 S9 S8 83 88 SS 88 SS S8 33 SS 


" SS as es ess ss ss 8s sp ss ss rx 33 





„Go(5glc 



THE CITT OF ST. I.0XTI6. 



CUSTOM HOUSE TBAN8 ACTIONS, 1894. 



CONDENSED CLASSIFICATION OF COMMODITIES iHroRTED r 
Loan nuBiNo tbs yiab xxdikq Dkg. 81, 181 

DDTT PAID.— RlCBARD DALTOM, BURVETOR. 



COMMODITIES. 




Pkln'ti iuid Colon. ,. 



■oaacDOjUgani <H 
W&M, •HiiJinK, el 



BplrlMODt — ,-- 
ektu,dreu(d... 

HlwdlaoMD* If 

Colteetiou bom aU otber m 



1S1I» 



,788 «0 
,18«(ID 
,411 00 
,GT1 OD 
,t8SI» 
,tMOO 



T.aieob 

1,<BB30 

271171 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TBADE AND OOlUfEBOE OF 

TBANSACTIOira AT THE CUSTOU-HOUSE, ST. LOUIS. 
BiCKiBC DU.TON, BnTTeyor of ths Port. 



Oen«ra[ SxhtlHt oj JfcreAandfM brouffht into 
meiUioned pcirti of «rUry, dttring y«ar 
ing foreign valu« and du^tpaidtlurton. 



8t. Louu in bondjirom Mow 
entiing Dec. 81, 1894, *&ov 



PORTS. 


V^ii«. 


BQty. 


Baltimore 

Boiton ■ ■■ 


« 310,414 00 

42,86a OC 

t,MOO0 

I,lb9 00 

966 0*1 OC 

406,143 00 

127,010 00 

884,317 00 

a0,187 00 

4.169 00 

ee,0G7 00 

1S,6«8 00 
81,086 00 


•S:iSS 


KSi-;;;;;;;;;::;;:;::;:;;:;;;:;;;;;::;:;:;;; 


88147 
116,046 9! 
1B4 08T19 


HewportNews 


p^u«J&^;:::::;::::::::::::::;::::::::::::;:::■ 


346;i0fF0 


Portal, N.D 


Taooma 

Direct to St. Louis. 


4;iS5 88 
10,161 63 


ToUI 


$a.279.eo4 00 


*«8,2S8 il 



ocarous WARSHOcsa nuKsicrioita— port of bt. locu— ddiiinq 1 





WAVBHOnSBD. 


WlTHDKAWtr. 


ttoKias. 


Talne. 


DDty. 


Value. 


Dnty, 




taa3,Heoo 

49,88100 

MS 

U.SOODO 
11,017 00 
137,773 00 

silsaeoo 

40,888 00 
80,180 W 

i8,inoo 


«;SfS 

,18! 10 

;»i» 

;ou a 









ST.Ttt 00 

H.tuaoo 

1U3,611 00 

'S;SS 
£;SS 


in*.* 










ass 












•;6e,B!i 00 


foiLsao ID 


IgffiS 




Id WitrahODM D«a. 31, IBM 


iw:»»4o 



8T. LODIS 


DURINO THE 


L4ST TWELVE TEARS. 




TBA>. 


■a,r 




ISSi 


K5S- 


as 


Si 


'^■!SgVlS?S.^2S^iSsl'•Sd 




SI 




784 11 3,404 M 


Is lis Ji 
.as'ffls BIS 

1,83181 77 00 10141 
3,1M« SlDO !«T90 

ffiSi .."."1 S!g 




ig;Er;;;:;; 











,db,GoOglc 



THS OUT or ST. iMVia. 



STATEMENT OF BUSINESS TRANSACTED AT THE ST. LOUIS 
POST OFFICE DURma 1H98 AND 18U. 



FiBST OB Fihahcial DiriSiOK.— Z). B. Saj/i, OaAttr. 



<}tmparati9e Stalanuia of tA< £«««<pU and DithWMUMiat <^ th* Bt. LouU 
Am dfflet iwiHff Tean wuM Dtemibm' Sltt, 1893 and 1894. 





18U. 


1898. 






(1,428^^02 






3,803 S8 
40186 


OoUeoUon D^fts 








Total 


(l,t»,m W|$1,438,4M 6» 



DISBUBSBMBHTS. 



Bt Bslftnoe brouslit forward . . 

" SalaiTof FoAmuMr 

" Speoiat DeUvery " 

" Clerk* Pay Rolls 

" Rent of Btatloiu ... 

" IJghtof Stfttloiu.... 

" Puelot StatioDf..... 

" AdvertMnc Letter ] 

" Office FuniltnrB..... 

" Oenersl Bzpensec . ^ 

' Tnnater DrafUPBld.. 



** BY«e Delivery Serrioe.. 

" Tnntfera from Poetal to M. O. Aooount 

** Collection Draft! Returned to DepiutmeDt.. 



i IB 49 

6,000 00 

8,019 84 

£48,038 87 

3,oae 00 

861 39 

116 83 

8ST99 

163,390 8S 
363,071 eS 

11,068 1& 
383,070 78 

18,400 00 
868» 



{1,480,806 43 $l,438,We 80 



f 6.000 
8,047 M 
307,086 18 
i^SSOOO 

187 M 

188 07 
766 48 

14 00 

8,148 37 

303,158 83 

370,434 83 



Increaeels Rarenue.. 



..$ 80,149 81 

. . Ml,3Sl 88 

. 888,916 B« 

83,86483 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



100 TRADE AHD OOHMBBCB OF 

SECOND DIVISION. 

DlBTRIBUTIOM AND DiSPATCH OP MAILS. 

Comparative Statem"!!! ot Bnilneu Traniacteil for tba Tean 1891 a 
T.B.J t OB ERTS OUT, JR., Svperlntmdent . 





Ibt. 




1*1. 




1,110, IN 

1E,B40,TSS 

8,n».M0 
1,t80.U5 


1.0T0,eH 

11,638,HB 

i.isa.Eis 






i,no.w 


Seoond olaaa mall matter : 


^"fi.^aTIEtcSff""^'.^''' "°- '"'*'°- 












S*,070.BT1 


18,8«.»1 


»Mi,m 







te,6IS 








• M,KT 




Totals In ooanils 


193,3m 


198,800 


• W,«W 






ii,»n,iii 


18.9U,tn 










ISM. 


18«S. 

iu,(n,8» 


U,310,UB 





Tbs aboTe itatemeot has I'efereDoe to outKOloB malU oaty. 
TmRD DIV18ION- 
Bbobift Ain> Dblitcst of Mails. 
OompKratlve Statement ot BQilneai Tranaaoted During isn and IE 





lAt. 


18*8. 


Lbt. 


"tSSSSrwSSSi.Sl Io=l. 


T0,U1 

i,»«.on 
iso.sn 

(80.919 

*.o«,oa8 


■S;S 

188,9(8 

808,10] 
«,B11.19e 


. ';■?£ 




Lettere and Po.lal Caiak Irom outalda aonroaa 
Second elaaa mall matter: 


• u,w 


Third and fonrth cbai niall matter and tranileat 








SMoad, third »nd7onrth olasi mall matter from 


<S1,71S 






ti,SlT,l»l 


5,781,808 


«S,«7» 






ISM. 

lM,10I,aM 


ISM. 

117,7*8,178 


11,8«,0«8 













,db,GoOglc 



THS CITY OF ST. I^CIS. 

Is :iSS ■ 



IS 






K s I s - §■ |- =- S s s 



. ■ 1 a 

:l bI t 
I.J 



" I s 1 1 - 3 



,db,GoOglc 



TKADB AMD COHUBBCS OF 





M 


i 

5 












s s 


s 
1 


S : 




s 












\ i 


s 






1 


1 




















1 






s 






2 




S3 


1 


i 


i 




s 


ass 


i! 1 


1 




s 

•c 


s 


PI 


1 


ii 


S K|| 




do 
1 


i 


1 


m 


3 

i 

1 


IP" 


B S8 

II ?» 

:i :e 


K : 


Oh 


s 


m 


1 


ii 


||!^ 


II 






i 

i 






1 


g 

D 

i 
1 


1; 


i r 

: o ■ 

rj: 

1 1 ■ 

; ■s 

^ 1 
1 

1 1 


ii 



,db,GoOglc 



ri! 



i 


THE CITY OF 8T. LOUIB. 

s s s a S S. = 


i i 

_ s 


? 


5 S S R 8 S S 

S S i s 1 1 5 
- i i s - S 1 


: S 


1 


S S ;: 3 $ $ a 
i i S i 1 S i 

= 1 i s - i 1 


s 
: 1 

8 


i 


S S S S 3 s s 

i i S i § g i 

' 1 !- - ' !- - 


S 

• i' 

8 


i 


1 2 i a g i 3 s 


' Si 


1 


S S 8 S g « 2 
i 1 S 1 S 1 i 

- II 3 "- i ^- 


: E 

i 1 

: i 

i 


* 


S S S S S £ 3 

1 § S g i g 3 

!- i =' ' ^' =' 


I I 


1 


f i i M j 

:ihiill 


i i 
t 



lis 
lis 

III 

i O < 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TBADE AND COHMEBCX OP 



STATEMENT 



Eo™. 


UM. 


im. 


IMS. 


1891. 




ns,MS 

8U,M0 
71.1JS 
8S.su 

M7.8W 

BM.BOJ 
aS2,MI 
BU.DIS 
S68,S9S 

sss.sts 

IW.TM 

SZS,41S 

TIS.SM 
Stt.US 
638,181 

^:S 

m.TGS 

iS4,TM 
388, DSl 

n.w 

11B,'lSS 

u,sw 










4M 

86 
67 


107 
118 

sn 


496 
IM 
fiS 


U4 














«,M1 






lioos 

4M 

«a 

TU 

a« 

tie 

SQT 
4B 

ao 

Wl 

sw 


918 

'£ 

oat 
iss 

729 
US 
US 

1«S 

«■ 

BOO 

aoi 


i,ioe 
9te 

KM 

sst 

193 
US 
391 
900 

tis 
ua 
u 

971 

US 
131 


on 

M7 

TS8 

178 
786 

181 
001 
S16 

BU 

US 

an 

SM 
9« 




aLL.,A.*T.H,R.E.(CtlroShoitUae) 


»U,«9 




4I18,1M 




Chlow, AlWnASt. LoalBB.a. (Hftln Uue).... 
ClBTeluid, OiQoLanUl, Chloago ft 8t. Loali R.B. 


2U,iao 

618,681 
S88,aU 
B17.SB 
TM,»S 
M6,8» 
90,80 






Wabtsh KftUniad (lowm Bnnoh) i 


Chie.«o,Bnr.*Qiilnoj-tt^ .... 


a8,w 

e9S.U8 










IllJ 
w 

u 

M 


710 
KO 

floe 

DOD 

MO 
799 


IS 

a 

98 


W 

no 

066 

aso 


ao,8B 
»aa.<H 
ii,i» 

ui,n9 
















,™ 


' 


TottHnTOM 


10,0M,«0 


n.txa.ut 


11,916,105 


lo.aao^w 


TottlbyB^U 


9,RW,910 




ll,139,m 


io.oa»,7w 

991,119 













,db,GoOglc 



ms oirr op st. locis. 



STATEUBNT 



Hoim. 


UH. 


im. 


ISM. 


lati. 




(78,001 
J7B,M8 
M1.9M 
61, WU 
ll.aM 
]lS,lil 
Ul.TM 

m,tM 
*n,B8t 

1«7,1<» 

1SJ,W 
ut.tn 

£M,eiB 
34S,«S 

tes,(tti 
nt,ni 
leg, 1(1 

w,*sn 

IM.flM 
laS.MB 
SW.(«T 
8.8I8 
11,119 

a.w 

3S1,<IS5 

*.m 


M»,ne 

4U,BR 

SW.Oll 
6t,88< 

u,m 


MS,B3a 

U1,S81 
103,077 

e,ui 








WibuhR.llio«l{We«tLlne) 

ataWOpillOTiASt. L. EE. ("O- DlT.).. 

».IfflUi,KinM« CllT*Ooloi*ioR»Uro«d,..- 


3«>,SS1 

101,810 
8,114 


S. Laeli, iron MoonUin 4 South*™ E.a 

».L.,A.*T. H, a.R (C»lro Short Line' 


m,u9 
ua.TM 

sno.M 

131,768 
1<«,11S 

m,ua 
m.as 

W,St8 

4M,3U 

!Bl,88a 
1S1,0U 
B8.B06 

1»T,97* 
STa,T« 

g,lST 


6ao,m 

»0,M« 
M8,W0 

i»,m 

UT,941 

SU.TM 
307,871 
U1,S1S 
UU.IBS 
SIS,BS> 
10i.M8 
TS.Wl 
89,403 
«»,7M 

4!l»l 


013,414 
313,180 
M7,0M 








Qk^o, UUm * St. Louta K. K. (italn Line) .... 

TtmHiBlaAIiid.B.E.IVuiilBlla Line) 

Vi)MliB>l]nMu].CBMtLlne] 


301,787 

»o,aM 

340,833 
S74,11S 
»I,S31 

143,787 


L«iiirrille.ET»iiii»iUe*9t. L«ii>a.llro«l 










at. LoBli, Keokuk AKaRhiTMtenilUllroad 


411,018 








H,ISO 

m.m 

11.775 


81. SM 

tn,su 

7,7U 
3»,Ut 
1,000 

u.m 
no 


13,030 










10,380 








u,nt 


11,316 


11,438 












TottlinTo 


s.ut,s» 


»^1,4U 


0,471,089 


9,TM,168 




TMilbrBiOl 


4,TB0.»« 
363,080 


a.iiH,im 

Ue,MD 


0.*»9.:S4 
801,1U 


e,iia,»s 







,db,GoOglc 



TIU.DB ASD OOMHEBOB OP 



BUSINESS or THE ST. LOUIS BRIDGES, AND THE FEBBIES 
' FOR 1891. 



AKD OOUPABIBOK WITH PBETIOUB VBABS. 



AXOUNT OF FBCIOHT UT TOK« TBAMBFEBRED ACROSS TBB RITEB AT 



FKOU ST. IX>DIS TO BAST ST. LOUIS, yXNIOK, HADISOK A 



O OAROMDBLBT. 



BY 


Cabb. 


TOKB. 


TOTIL 
TOMi. 




74,878 


8(1, S13 

3U,ooa 

41S,NM 










41,8U 
M,80B 




































Lantts 

1,818, Ml 


" ■' ■■ lau 

" " " 1891.... 

' " 18B1 








" " " " M8T 

'• 1880 




lasj 



FROH EAST ST. LOUU, OABOMDELBT, HADISOM AND TEMICE TO ST. LOUIS. 



BY 




Cabs. 


TOKB, 


Total 


Tll«8l. LOQiB Bridge 

u^J^i«,;:.....!'l7^^°-:::.:::::::::-r::: 


100,8*4 
«>.8M 


'■2!S 


1,878,9» 






By Wagon 






:::;.:.::: 


4H,<m) 
















isn 

BM 

891 




4B9T,tU 


;; ;; •; ;; 


888 






" " •■ " 


m""::""\::::::. 









's-fg'S 








s,aH,i» 

7CBGH 

scagaae 
G.no>i 






" 1868 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OF ST. L0CI8. 

AHOUNT OF COAL RECBIVBD IN ST. LOUIS. 



EODTB. 


WW. 
BmticlB. 


Buibeli. 


IBM. 

Bmbdt 


1(81. 
BiixheU. 




ll,8Sit,97B 

27^876 

7,471,800 

t,m,m 

S,G!i2.9MI 
I.2&7^0 
S,T«1.»00 
l.S3S,EJS 

7»,ais 
a, 700 

•.7H,(»0 
6iB,6» 


M.O«l,B» 
27S,B75 
S3SJ7B 

.,« 

10,O79.«0 
11,180.100 
T.OBO,«» 

e.«s,»M 

7*70,1711 

*,e57,wo 

S.03S,IN) 
4.BW 
10,876 

»,eM,ns 


M.W0.M5 

i,iso,eM 

4,TB8.TDD 

lu.eoo 

ll.lU.tTt 
12,671,416 
7,«,1(00 
«.»H,«7 
9,IU,U6 
4,196,061 
1,711,876 
8,470,060 
111,410 
6,U0 
B,60i,80O 


13,<nS,t7S 

M1,<M 

6,407 ,«» 

83,876 

]I,tM,8G0 






St.LontaMdlnmM'n ■• 

StU,V«nani»*T.H. " 






lOTi»Tlll«4NMllTUle ■• 


o,h:.«:s. 




8,618,050 


























079,600 


2,138,676 










■i4.6u.an 


8a,lM,851 


B3,8K,»S8 






' ■ e.iH6 



^on,— Btceipu ol ADthnclM C0>1 Included in abaiv recalpta: 



1887 


■ISC 


K 


-•iw 




-iS-S 


IBM 


.. .1M,4H 



,db,GoOglc 



TBADE AND OOUHBSCE OF 



BATES OF FREIGHT BT RAIL FROU EAST ST. LOUIS TO 
NEW YORK, DURING- 1894. 



Ditl. 




p;?sis. 


JSsa. 


■As. 


JuiiiAiT Dt to rabniaiy 3Sth. . . . 
B^tember SM to NOT-Mnberllth 


It 

S 


1 


t8 

« 

1 


SO 
K 

m 
m 



Bate on Cotton K 



_- lovor Uuia N. T. n 
w lower thks V. T. n 



ALL BAIL RATES OF FREIGHT IN CENTS FROM ST. LOUIS 
TO SOUTHERN CITIES DURING 1894. 





January 1 


18M to December 31. leu. 




"ST.* 


"'SIE™- 


""£-"■ 




to 

1 


i 

90 
» 





























PUBLISHED ATEBAGE BATE OF FBEIGHT BT BAIL ON GRAIN 
FBOM EAST ST. LOUIS TO NEW YOBK. 



ISnOo Qnln tS.Sl " 

iHeiOn whMt m " 

IsnOaCoin iaii' 



im!!! 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



THE CITY OF BT. L0UI8. 



RAIL TRANSPORTATION. 



Br C. N. OSGOOD, 



In CO jkr u tha commercial deatiniu of the city are conditioned by 
the coDttmction, opermtlon and development of railroad enterprisea in 
tributary coanlry, St. Loaii has daring tbe past yaar made eabstantial 
progreti. Moreover, bat for tbe dUtnrbed flnaucial sitaation wbich 
bu prevailed, directly and Indirectly checking work upon a variety of 
enterpriBeB and rendering many already andertaken more difficnit of 
accompliahment, tbe progress tvonid have been still more marked. 
With tbe altimate removal of tbe check such nndertakingB will nn- 
donbtedly be pmsecated witb renewed vigor. Local terminal develop- 
ments, wide in scope and significant in character, coiistmction of new 
T^lvay mileage In snrronnding territory, improvements In train service 
and in tbe delivery of mails and froights to important sections of tbe 
conntry, extensions by lines whose interests are identified with St. 
Loaii, new and advantageons traffic alliances, increased benefits in re- 
ipect to freight rata adjostinents, new aveniies for the oatlet of export 
sa well u domestic trade — tbeee and kindred events constltnte tbe 
cbroDicie. In aa earlier report facts have been addnced to sabstantlate 
the claim that St. Loole to "tbe beet distribntlog point in the United 
States," Kach year also its importance as a gateway for tiirongh pas- 
eenger travel east and west, north and south, is steadily Increasing, and 
evnta of tbe past year have hastened its progress in that respect no- 
tably. Tbe greatest need for tbe commercial interests ol St. Louis to-day 
is the ndlroad development of the eoaatry more immediately to tbe 
sontb and southwest. That section is at once the despair and hope of 
tbe dtnation. An examiaation of any large-scale, accurate map of tbe 
conntry shows at a glance immense tracts of conntry in Sonth Mlssonrl, 
Nortbero Arkansas, Indian Territory and Oklahoma bare of ndlroads. 
This is all immediately tributary to St. Louis, and yet when contrasted 
with the closely gridironed conntry eait and north of St. Loais or con- 
lignous to any other of tbe cblef cities of the United Stales, tbe signifi- 
cance of tbe situation is plain. It is to compare a bare ontline sketch 
with the finislied picture. From the Missouri River on the north to the 



3dbvCo(>gil'^^ 



110 TBA.OB AMD OOKMSBOK OF 

Axk&Dsu IUT«r (in Arkanus) on the aonth, from the Iron Uoant^ 
Ballway on th« east to the St. Iionis ft San Franoisco Bailwaf on tha 
west) ii a great traot of praeHcallr nndeveloped oonntry, as great Id ex- 
tent approilmately aa two-thirds of the state of Ellnole or th« whole of 
the state of Indiana. Gonntles withont railroads are the mle nther 
than the excoptlon, and in the whole district (and that only In Iti 
northern half) Is only one line of railroad affi>nling direct connectioD 
with St. LooisI Ortainly no other principal city of the Union hssui 
nndeveloped conntry of snch extent at ita very doors. In some secUou 
of this gnat tract, notably in Oklahoma, projects fbr new r^Iroid 
constraction have within the past year been inangarat«d, bat the field 
Is a wide one and Its reaonrces magnificent. Eventually its day will 
come, and its trade relations will center in St. Lonls. Bat the rails of 
iteel are the energizing inflneuce which alone can speed that day. 

The list of railroads now entering St. Lonis', either directly by theii 
-own rails or by proprietary lines. Is as follows : 

Baltimobe & Ohio Soi>thwestebn (formerly Ohio & UUsUsIppi). 

Chicago & Altok. 

Chicaqo, Burlington & Qui»cy ("The Burlington'*). 

Chicago, Pkobia & St. Louis ("J. S. E. Line"). 

Clbvslamd, Cincinnati, Chicago 4 8t. Loma ("Big Four"). 

Illinois Central (via "Vandalla Line"). 

Louisville, Evanstillb & 8t. Lodis. 

Hapison, Alton & Chicago. 

UlSBIBSIPPI BlVEK & BOHMK TBKBE. 

Hissouri, Kansas & Texas. 
Louisville & Nashville. 
UisaorRi Pacific. 
Ho BILK & Ohio. 

Pennsylvania Co. (via "Vanilalla Line"). 
St. Louis A Eastern. 
St. Looib Jt Hahkibal (via "Wabash"). 
St. Louis ft San Francisco. 

St. Louis, Altok ft Tbbbe Haute ("Cairo Short Line"). 
St. Louis, Chicago 4 St. Paul ("Bluff Line"). 
St. Louis, Iron Mountain A Southern. 
St. Louis, Kansas City ft Colorado. 

St. Louis, Keokuk & Nobthwestbkn ("Burlington Ronle"). 
St. Louis Southwrstbrn ("Cotton Belt"). 
St. Louis, Vanualia ft Terse Hautb ("Vandalla Line"). 
Santa Fe System (via St. L. ft S. F. By.j. 
Toledo, St, Louis 4 Kansas City ("Clover Leal"). 
Wabash (Bast sod West System]. 
And in addition the following named companies which fhmish ter- 
minal and transfer facilities : 

Terminal Railroad Association. 

St. Louis Hebchants' Briuoe Terminal. 

Wiggins Fbbry. 

St. Louis TuANsrER By. 

Uadisok Coumty Febby. 

L. E. ft St. L. Fbbby. 

Cabomdelbt Febby. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THX OITT OF ST. LOTIIB. Ill 

TTKXIKIL IHFXOTkliniTB. 

The moat not&blfl ovent of the local iltaation hu been the compladon 
-aftbenewUDlun Station, which on Sept. lat, wu formally opened for 
lb« DM of the tnTelinc pnblic. Ae ia widelf known, the facilities 
heretofore available to the Si. Lonis rallroada for handlinfc their paa- 
senger traffic into and ont of the oit}' have of late years been altogether 
inadequte to the demands of the aitnatton and hare been a slnmbllng 
block in the p&th of progreas. tJndonbtedlf hundreds of the travelers 
who hare experienced the discomforts and nneati a factory amngeroenta 
of the old "Union Depot" hare enbaeqnently avoided St. Louie aa a 
Tsttwaf and temporary resting place in their journey and by their 
nn&Torable adrertiaement have influenced many others to do likewise. 
For ooce, however, the old adage that "patient waiters are no losers" 
bai proved trae. For the new Union Station is nndoabtedly not only 
in point of aize the largest in the world, bat in Its design and in all its . 
appointments is thoronghly abreast of the times, with eqnipmenta the 
most modem and complete in every respect, and la a place In whose 
eoDatmction the comfort of all classes of travel has been carefblly 
stodied. The station proper with the connecting train shed covers an 
ares of eleven acres. Thirty tracks with a total length of nearly four 
miles are ander roof. Other dimensions are aa follows : 

Square tt 
Grand Waiting Room, Main Floor 8,806 



Udlet* WaitlnK Rooms, Main Floor 8,8i» 

GflDtlemea's W^itlngBooiii, tWn Floor e,iS7 

IHDiDg Boom, Blalii Floor 4,600 



Oaneial Conoourte, on Traok Floor 8,791 

Csrrimge ConoouiM, on Track Floor 6,716 

Emicrauts WalUne Room, Track Floor 8,1S3 

LDnoo Boom, Track Floor 8,m 

Main Ticket Offloe,Traok Floor 3,0M 

In order that the relative size of this splendid stmctnre compared 
with other notable railway statioBa of the world may appear, tbe fol- 
lowing statistical table, compiled by the "Railway Age" ia given: 

T™in ah«i. width, Lragth, No. No. 

T«iD BDnu. (^^ f^^ Tr«ok». Oomp'a. 

.at. LotOi Union Station 600 630 SO 31 

Franklort-ou MbIu, Union Station 0B3 600 18 

Uokni Station, Boston 460 600 38 2 

PhUadelphia BUtion, Pennsylvania R. R. . 800 617 16 1 

PbUmdslptils Station , Fbila. Ai ResdluK .... 360 800 U 1 

Jeney City Station, Fenuaylvanla R. R. . . . IM 6M 13 1 

9t.Pviurai Station, London 24S 1 

Onnd Central Station, New York 300 2 

CrandCsntral Station, Chicago 100 600 6 1 

(A more daialled description of the station aa a whole Is to be found 
in tbe Beport for 1892, the year In which the active work of construo- 
■Uon waa begun.) 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



112 TBADE AND COMMERCE OF 

Another notable event in the line of terminal deyelopment has been 
the openinK ap of the BiirlEngton Roate freight and pasaenger facili- 
ties in the north part of the city. These terminals, represeDting an . 
independent inTeetment of millions of dollars, constitute a si^nllicaiit 
atteetation by one of the greatest of Western railroad systems to the 
importance, present and prospective, of the constantly increasing com- 
merce of St, Loais. A detailed description of the varions yards and 
freight warehoases comprising Ibis great property has been given in an 
earlier report. Tbelr formal opening occurred on March 4tb, — the Com- 
pany's new bridge across the Missouri River a few miles north of (he- 
city, affording the means of connection between these yards and the 
main line of the Bt. Loais, Keokuk & Northwestern R. R., having been 
then completed. 

One of the chief Southwestern systems, the Missoarl, Kansas tc 
Texas, having made arrangements for the occupancy of a portion of 
these terminal facilities, celebrated the completion of Its independent 
line into St. Lonis — a matter of large importance to the commercial In- 
teresU of the city — at about the same date. Bimaltaueously a hand- 
some passenger station, adapted for the nse of the suburban sarvlce, 
was thrown open to the public. Shortly afterwards, on May Ist, the 
so-called "Alton Bridge" was completed and pnt into operation. "While 
at some distance from the city, this enterprise may properly be reck- 
oned among the local terminal improvements, affording, as it does, a new 
and direct means of connection between St. Louis and all Illinois and 

orthern lines of the Burlington system, and oonstitutitig a moat Ini- 
portent part of the Bt. Clair, Madison & Bt. Louis B. B., a projected 
belt ndlway to connect all East and West railroads and to deTelop 
saburban mannfactaring sites and towns- 

IMFBOTEUKKTS IN PAB8BM6KK TBAIK SEBTtCB. 

Much progress has been made during 1894 In improving the paMen- 
ger train service, both East and West ft^m St. Louie. Eastwardiy new~ 
fast trains to New York, Boston, etc., have been put In operation, and 
the time of tr^ns previously In service has been considerably short- 
ened. New York, 1,100 miles away, is now reached in twenty-eight 
and one-half hours; Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore and interior East- 
em cities in correspondingly qnick time. Westwardly, marked im- 
provement has also been made, both in the number and speed of trains 
and in their general appointments. The time to Paciflo Coast polnte 
has been rednced twelve hours, so that the traveler proceeding from St. 
Louis can now reach that section in three and a half days' time. A 
new and very direct line to Montana and the North Pacific Coast States- 
has also been opened up, materially expediting the through service in 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOVl». 118 

tliat diiection. Additional trains bfltween St. LobIb and Chicago haT« 
hare ako b«en pnt on, increailng the opportnnltlea for local and throngh 
travel to consult Its convenioace u to the hour at which ita departare 
rrom SL LodIs shall be made. To the Southward al»o uew fkst trains, 
tioth east and west of the Miasi^slppl Biver, hare b«en instltnt«d, ma- 
teiially expediting the dellverf of midls, as well as shortening the hours 
of travel. The most Important and comprehenBiTe of these arrange- 
menta places St. Louis in more immediate connecUon with Arbanaas, 
Tettem Kentucky and Tennessee, Louisiana, Texas and Mexico. 

Added &cilities tat suburban travel in several direclions have also 
bten provided, perhaps the most noteworthy of which has been the 
new line of the "Burlington" between St, Louis and Alton, afiording 
the opportnnity for the development of pleasant snbnrban towns along 
the bank of the river northward from the city. 

FOBKIOK TRADE TIA. OVLT POBTS. 

The natural route for the intercliange of freight between the great 
middle eectiou of the United States and Mexico, the West Indies and 
South America is via Gatf of Mexico ports. St. Lonls, being the ceu- 
(nl dlBtribnting point of this whole great section, is deeply interested 
b the development of these routes. Increase In the volume of export 
and hnport traffic via (julf ports tends to the material benefit of St. 
Loots, both directly and Indirectly, and logically enhances tier im- 
portance as a great commercial centre. The year 1694 has witnessed 
considerable progress In the dlreclion of diverting an increased proper- 
Hon of tlds trade to these more direct and more natural avenues. It is 
a sfgnlflcant foot that the rail distance fh>m St. Louis to the nearest 
considerable Gulf port Is 27ft miles less than the distance from Chicago 
u> New York via the shortest rail line. The importance of this factor 
in the dtuatlon will uudoubtedly be reallied and profited by In the 
coming years much more thau It lias been in the past. Conditions of pro- 
doetlon tod distribntion, the significance of which has been most 
laaAad during the past year, changes In the railroad geography of the 
country, the more rapid development of the country south of the Ohio 
Slvm, the increasing necessity of all sections for reaching the seaboard 
bytlie shortest and cheapest routes — all these and other factors are 
dinctly contributing to that result. The progress recently made in 
that direction has been In many ways exceptional, and Indicative of 
■till greater progress as soon as obstacles which are at present hamper- 
ing and restricting the normal progress of trade shall hare been re- 
moved. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TBADE AKB COMMEECE OF 



TRANSPORTATION . 



THE RIVERS. 



The year 1604 wm more disconrsging fa> the river iiiterests than 1893. 
During the latter year naTigatlon was eertoaelj interrapted for some 
three months on accoant of the low stage of water, while in 1891 the 
period of interruption and praptioal saspenelou as to the larger boats 
was fall 7 five months. 

The river below St. Louie wae not obstructed by ice at any tims 
during the year. 

The tonnage of the year shows a decrease of 89,71C tons as compared 
with 1898, and 242,625 tons as compared with 1892. 

BITER TOMITAOX FOR FAST THREE TEARS. 



TonarMelvedby ■taambOKtIBDd bnrgM MB.17B 

Tons recaJred byrafu 1M,3W 

Tqna ihlppedb; itoamboat and barges MI.OSO 



The bnaineas of all the rivers show a decline, but the laigeat Ealling 
off was iu the shipments to eoDtbern points, which were 60,000 torn 
less than the previous year. 

The business of the upper river, notwithstanding the short seaeon, 
was nearly as lai^e as the previous year, while the Illinois and Hlssouii 
each show a loss of over 10,000 tons, and the Cumberland and Tennessee 
Rivers of about 16,000 tons. 

The necessity of some immediate relief to the steamboat interests, to 
overcome the delays and expenses iucident to low wat«r stages, is ap- 
parent to all, if river transportation is to oontione to be a factor in the 
iteight situation of St. Lonis. In this connection the following stale* 
ment, prepared expressly for this report, showing what is being done 
by the Mississippi River Commission to give the much needing relief 
by the use of dredge boats, will be found interesting : 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OP SI'. LOUIS. 116 

DREDOINQ. 

The bftra, which in the tail of erery year mahe their appearance in the 
Ifisdidppi Btver, affect naTigation and oommerce moBt serionBlj. The 
depth of water on them is at tjmes as little as 5 feet or lees, ho aA to not 
only obBtrnct and endanger navigation, bnt rednce the carrying capacity 
of Bteamerv and barges, by limitiag their draft, daring three or foar 
moDths of the year, to about one-half of that available daring the other 
months. 

Mi. H. C. Haarstick, President of the St. Lonia and UiBsissippi 
Valley Transportation Company, in an address made to the Mississippi 
BWer Commission in November, 1891, stated that while daring a good 
itige of water the trip of a tow of barges from St. Louis to New Or- 
huii could be made within Ave or six days, with a draft of 8 feet, that 
tventy-six days had been required during the low stage and with a 
draft of only 4 feet. It is obvious that the combined effect of retard- 
ilioQ of travel and of carrying capacity greatly increases the cost of 
tnutportation. 

The Secretary of the Mississippi Biver Commiiwiou, in his annual 
report for 1892, shows Irom an analysis of the data furnished tiim by 
parties engaged in the navigation of the Uiseissippi, that the cost of 
tnuportlng (down stream) a ton of coal ftom St. Louis to Kew Or- 
leans Is 4.279 tiroes as great when the available draft is 6' 1", as wben 
the draft Is 8' 8", and the cost of transporting a ton of freight by steam- 
boat ii 4.217 times as great with &' 1" draft as with 8' 8" draft. 

Ai the low water season comes about the time of the year when the 
demud for shipment, particularly of grain, is heaviest, the iujary to 
commerce, in conseqaence of the bars, becomes apparent. 

It became nianifest that, since the permanent Improvement of the 
river could not be completed for many years, an attempt ought to be 
Hide to procure at least temporary relief for uavlgation, by excavating 
practicable channels through the bars during the low water season, and 
ia Kovember, 1891, the Mississippi River Commission appointed a Com- 
mittee of two of its members to study the subject and to report thereon. 
In July, 1892, this committee made a report, in which, after discuss- 
ing the dlfflcnlUes attending the solution of the problem, such as the 
great qoantity of the material to be excavated (roughly estimated at 
1,000,000 cubic yards), Qie brief time available for the execution of this 
worfc, because all the bars appear about the same time, and the uncer- 
tainty as to the quantity which might have to be moved to keep the 
^umnelopen, and after considering the difierent schemes for creating 
funnels which liad been proposed, sach as movable dikes, scouring, or 
stirring, and dredging, expressed their opinion that dredging on a large ' 
■<^. by hydraulic pumps, gave the best promise of success. The 
CommustoD directed them to design an experimental dredge, of saiH- 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



lU TBADB AND COKHEBCE OP 

dent slz« and power to admit of curying out » series of experiroenis, 
with a view to determine the compantive effioioDCf of two different 
■tyles of pnmpe which had beea proposed, the proper way of manip- 
nlating the dredge, and the best method of transporting the dredged 
material to ntch points where its retam to the excavated channel wu 
not to be apprehended, and the many other qneatiooB which had to lie 
■olred before any large expenditure of money for procuring a complete 
dredging plant would be warranted. 

The general plan of the Experimental Dredge, wliich was carried oat, 
may be briefly described as follows: 

The hull of the dredge is rectangular, with a raking bow. It ii 110 
feet in length, 86 ft. beam, 8 ft. deep, and draws about i feet 3 iuches- 
It haB two toDgitndiual bulkheads extending from stem to stern, sad 
three tran»<TerBebnllfheHdH. At the bow and etem are veils open at the 
bottom 12 feet wide, and about 30 and 40 feet long, in which tbe 
suction pipes me located. 

The discharge pipe from the pump passes by a 90 dcgi'ee cnrre into 
the larboard comparlraent of the dredge, and along the center of thit 
compartment through the steru of the boat where it also protindes for 
attaching the floating discharge pipe. To carry off the dredged mateml 
to a distance below or to the side of the line of excavation of the 
dredge, floating pipes 30 inches in dianieler were to be used. Each 
pipe ie about 32 feet long, and is kept afloat by two air chambers con- 
nected with each side of tbe 30 inch floating pipe. A plate on top of 
the floating pipes extends clear across the air chambers, and is con- 
nected with a stiffening 1 beam extending the whole length of the float- 
ing pipe. The baoyancyof the tico air chambers is so adjusted that 
when the floating pipe is fli led with clear water i he top plate ie 7 inches 
above the water surface, and the top of the 30 inch discharge pipe at 
thesDrface, and it cau carry fifty percent, ot sand nlthout sinking. 
The pipes are connected by coupling pins, and the joints are made by a 
80 inch rubber hose 12 inches long, which allows the pipe line to be 
deflected into a curve and the dredged material to be discharged 400 
feet on either side of the proposed channel when 1,000 feet of pipe is 
used. 

To pnll the dredge up stream, anchor piles are set 600 feet to 1,200 
feet above the dredge, tvoat which wire ropes are led to two winches 
placed on either side of the forward well, by means of which a slow 
motion is obtained, varied according to the depth of tbe cut and the 
capacity of the pump. The line of the cut Is staked out from a hydro- 
graphic survey, and the dredge Is kept iu this line by lines attached to 
side piles, so that its direction shall not be affected by winds or car- 
rents. Tbe main anchor piles are 8 Inches in diameter, and 34 feet 
long, and the side piles are 6 inches in diaicflter and 23 feet long. They 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF 8T. LOUIS. 117 

troMt tb»at IS feet in the Mnd, and removed, when neceeiary, by 
pnmping water throngh them, and for these operatione a scow Is pro- 
Tided with leadere for ((aiding the descent of the piles and a pnmp for 
eiDking and raising them. 

A steamboat acting as tender movea the dredge from bar to bar, and 
isalsts in moving the pile setting scow containing the pumps and the 
qoarter boat on which the workmen are housed. If the dredge is to be 
operated both night and day, It will probably be preferable to provide 
qoulers for them on the boat. 

Virions appliances, such as a weighing apparatus for antomatically 
detennlniug Itie weight and conseqaently the percentage of sand non- 
tiined in the dii-obarge pipe, and a velocimeter for measuring the 
velocity of the water discharged, are provided on the dredge. 

The SliFBi»-Gippi lUver Commission in May. lf^92, appropriated 
tSf.OOO for the constractton of the Experimental Dredge, to which, 
soon afterwards, $IO,0i)0 was adtled Before the end of the year ail the 
important parts of the dredge were under contract, and it was hoped 
that by A.pril, 1893, the Experimental Dredge would be completed so 
that it might be practically tested in removing bars. But tbe fact that 
the different pai-ts were bnilt by different contractors at different places, 
and that tlie contractors found considerable difflcnity in obtaininf; 
Biaterial for the work on acconnt of the stagnation of business prevail 
ing at that time. In spite of all efforts, delayed the completion of the 
dredge beyond all expectation. It had been intended to finish the £2- 
perimental Dredge at Jeffersonville, Ind., where the hall was in course 
of construction, but low water setting in during August, 1893, it was 
found necessary to tow Ihe Imll into the Mississippi River as soon as it 
could be lannched, as otherwise it might be shut np at Jeffersonville. 
lilt hull, with nothing on board but the Edwards pump, was launched 
OD the S4tb of Angnst, and with three barges actiug as lighters, loaded 
with Iron ivork. started down the Ohio River and arrived at St. Louis, 
September 18, 1693, afler several mishaps, such as getting aground, 
although none of the barges, the dredge boat, or the tow-boat, 
"Racket," drew over S4 inches, where it was to be finished. Some of 
the iron work and the Reynolds pump, engines and boilers, had to be 
reshlppedby rail t^om Jeffersonville to St. Louis, By pushing tbo 
work as mnch as possible, the Reynolds pnmp and engines, the suction 
pipe in the forward well, and all the heavy 30 inch discbarge pipe, also 
the boilers and steam pipe, were put lu place by October SOtb, and 
some preliminary experiments were made to ascertain whether the 
capacity of tbe pumps was up to the spec Ifl cations, but at first neither 
of ibe twopnmpa seemed to comply with the terms of the contract. 

In order to make some experiments on dredging sand the dredge was 
taken to « sandbar near Arsenal Island, but as the river was then fUling 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



118 



TBADB AND COMUEBOB Q 



teat and a dangerone flow of Ice Mt]D,It was decided to moTO Ibe 
dredge ioto winter quarters and to contlnne the experiments there 
whenever practicable. 

On the way down the dredge and the steamboatB accompan jing It 
were overtakeii by heavy ice and were forced to seek an ice harbor op- 
posite Grand Tower, so it did not arrive at Hemphie until Janaarr Ist, 
1894. For the next five months a number oftests were made on the effi- 
ciency of the engines, and also some experiments to ascert^n their 
capacity for dredging sand and the best method of managing the float- 
ing pipes. 

£arly in July the entire di-edging plant was again brought to St. 
Lonls. After a few days spent in repairs. It was pnt to work on a 
sandbar atwve the Merchants' Biidge, and a regular series of experi- 
meats began. A surveying party was kept at work sounding the bar 
and the cut made by the dredge. Side piles were used for keeping the 
dredge on the line to be excavated, and the dredge was pnlted up-stream 
by two cables attached to anchor piles. The dredge proved to be doing 
well, but the measurements of the quantity excavs ted by soundings 
taken before and after dredging were not very successful, as the sand 
shifted so rapidly as to make the results of measui'ements uncertaEu. 
On the other hand, the experiments on the movement of the dredge by 
two lines attached to anchor piles aud keeping the di-edge on the coi-- 
rect line were very satisfactory. The sinking of the floating pipe line 
which had given trouble before was readily prevented by the applica- 
tion of a baffle plate at the' end of the line. 

About August 8tb, as the river began to fall. It was deemed desirable 
to move tbe dredge and plant to a bar where it could be used in catting 
a channel which abonld be a benefit to navigation, and it was also de- 
sirable to operate the dredge within a reasonable distance of St- Iionis, 
where the Committee on Dredges could readily visit it and direct the 
work, but on account of tbe fact that there was no authority and no 
appropriation of funds for dredging iu the river above Cairo It had to 
be moved to Cherokee Bar, the first available one below Cairo, where 
the line for a new channel about 7,0C0 feet in length was laid out, and 
the dredging of a channel began; bnt while the dredge did excellent 
work in moving sand and In making a fair and practicable channel 
nearly the whole of the distance, the unusual velocity of the corrent 
(5 feet per second) caused the sand to fill up a portion of tbe channel 
Just excavated. Another difflcutty consisted in not having a anffioient 
length of pipe line on baud to admit of discbai^ing the sand at a saffl- 
cient distance to tlie side of the line of excavation. Fifteen additional 
floating pipes bad been contracted for, but had not yet beeu received, 
which wonld have brought the total length of pipe line up to 1,000 feat, 
and would bare permitted the material to be discharged at snoh m dis- 
tance that it could not return to the channel. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THB CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 119 

Tba dredge was fitted op to work onlf during the day, aod to Mve 
fimawu&Dclibredatalght In the channel, which it waa soon dlsooT- 
tni caoied ban to form below it. Of coarse, when this waa discorered 
the dradge waa moTed away from the line of channel at night. Another 
drawback to the Bucceatfal working of the dredge arose from the faot 
that the conntry In the vicinity ofi'ered no facillUes for making tepairi 
or getting Buppliee. Besldefl this, the facilities for communication be- 
Iween the engineer in charge and the Committee were very insnfflcient, 
to that the engineer was left almost entirely to his own resoaroea, and 
eonld not be properly Instructed and directed by the Committee. 

Abont this time aereral bars above Cairo had twcome so shoal that 
BtTigation almost stopped, and the call for relief being lond and urgent, 
particularly for a channel at Devil's Island, a few miles above Cape 
Girardeau, and the authority lor experimental work above Cairo having 
been obtained, the dredge and plant wei-e moved to Cape Girardeau, 
where it arrived on October 17th, 1894, and after a line had been laid 
out for a new channel the dredge was set to work, and within forty-six 
worUug hours (Ave days) had cut a channel throngh the bar, which 
htton dredging bad at its crest only S fiset 6 Inches of water, although 
some unexpected difficulty was oaosed by the presence (in the middle 
of the river) of a ledge of rock, which, while It did not prevent the 
opendou of dredging, reduced the depth to which the plies for holding 
the dredge could be guuk,aud consequently required additional anchors 
to bold the dredge. 

The channel was about 1,600 feet long, and extended from deep water 
on the down-stream side to deep water on the up-stream aide, and 
avoided in fact two ban between Devil's Island and Cape Girardeau. 
Some days were spent in widening and deepening the channel, which 
has since been used by steamboats without interruption. Two surveys 
were nude fonr and six weeks allerward. The first showed that the 
channel had widened at Its lower portion and had deepened consider* 
ably from the efiects of the current Itself; the second, made after a 
sudden rise and tall of one foot, showed that this deepening had been 
partly obliterated by the current without, however, Interfering with 
the available depth of the channel, which Is now 6 feet 6 Inches, 

It had been intended to move the dredge to Liberty Island to repeat 
the operation in cutting another channel, but as the 16 additional 
floating pipes had been received by this time and it was desirable ttiat 
the Commission which was to start on Nov. 8ib, on Its tour of inspec- 
tion down the river, should have a chance to see the dredge at work, 
dlschaiging through 1000 ft. of pipe, it waa concluded to keep the 
dredge at Devil's Island until the Commiasion could arrive. It waa 
hoped that by that time some arrangement could be made to ascertain 
dM exact quantity of sand and water discharged by (he pumps within 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



120 



TBADE AND COlfKEBCE OF 



a ^ven period, but when, on Not. 9th, the tteamer "UI»»fs*ippi" with 
the MiBsIesippi Elver Commission on board Mrlved at Devil's IsUncI, 
tlM meuQi-lnK barge was not jet in proper condition for the experi- 
mentt. Dnrlng their slajr of several boars an addiilonal channel was 
cut Bonth of the one elreadr excavated and the dredge worked withoQt 
Intermission and wlthont a Ringle stoppage ftom any canse, dellveriatt 
the dndge material through 1000 ft. of pipe, so as to discharge it at a 
distance of 40U ft. from the line of the channel, to the perfect satisfao- 
tloD of the Cammiaeion. 

As it was very desirable, however, that the quantity of pand and 
of water should be accnrarely ascertained, orders wci-e left to make 
ench meaanremenis oa soon as practicable. 

The following reenlts were obtained while the dredge was In regnlar 
operation, the time of each test being aboat three and one-half miautes. 

Discharge of water through 517 ft. of floating pipe (average of five 
experiments.) 

Water and sand C9.8 en. ft. per second, and 6.41 en. ft. of sand, or 
per hour 721 cu. yds. of sand or 9.U per cent. 

Discharge of water throngh 1003 ft. of floating pipe (average of dx 
experiments.) 

Water and sand 4d.O cu. ft. per second, 4.01 en. ft. of Band per sec- 
ond, or per honr ASA cu. yds. of sand, (S.Sfi per cent of aand.) 

The cost of the Experimental Dredge proper was about 974,000 In- 
cluding 1000 feet of floating pipe. The ezperimcute cost to date for 
wages, subsistence, steamboat hire, repairs of steamers, coal, oil, re- 
pairs, etc., about $40,000. For alterstions to fit up the dredge for 
running night and day, for qnartern for the employes on the dredge 
for electric lights, and to reset the Edwards pump near the bow so as 
to avoid the many turns in the pipe will cost abont $10,000 more, fbr 
which the money Is already provided. 

In regard to increase of dredge plant, the Commission, in June last 
resolved that a new dredge provided with two pnmps simltsr In gen- 
eral respect to the Experimental Dredge be constructed, but aa tbere 
appeared to be some doubt about getting the plans ready in time, and 
it was, moreover, believed that by Inviting propositions from all con- 
stmotors of dredges and similar apparatns tbronghont the United 
States, some new ideas and perhaps better methods of dredging and of 
disposing of the material coald perhaps be developed, although the 
Szperimental Dredge had done better work than had been expected. 

The Mississippi River Commiseion in August, 1894, Instructed the 
Committee on dredges to Issue a circular letter to all dredge bnllderft 
throughout the United Slates Inviting them to submit plana fbr a 
dredge to be used la removing bars in the Uieslssippl Rinr. lu 
response to this circular, sent to 14 parties, five leplles were reoeired. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF BT. 1.0UIS. 121 

The Committee recommeDded for adoption the plan dabmitted by 
Undon W.Bates. The Secretary' *>f War hu since then approved the 
lelectioD made by the Committee and ordered that a contract be 
entered into wilh Mi-. Bate§ for the conBtmcllon of the dredge. If this 
contnct is faithfully carried out, there will be at the next low water 
Huon two dredges ready for woik on bara, to-wit. the Experimental 
Dredge of a capacity of 700 cu. yds. per bonr and the new Dredge of 
ISOOcn, )-dR. per hoar and both arranged for delivering the dredged 
noierial 1000 feet below or 40i) feet to the eide of the line of excara- 
tion. Tlieee dredger, however, can only be nsed on that portion of the 
river below Cairo. The river between here and Cairo will have to be 
provided for especially, or the authority fur employing the dredges 
■bove Cairo and an appropriation for paying the expenaee of ibe work 
vUl hkve to be obtained. However, to make the whole echeme of 
dredging chaniielB through bars a saccess, two or three additional 
dredges will ultimately have to be conitructed, and wllh the experience 
to be gained from the operations of these two dredges, It wilt be poasi. 
ble to determine more fully what plant and modes of operation are best 
Wited to the work. 



Capt. Austin R. Uoore, Treasurer of the St. Loale and MlssIsBlppt 
Valley Transportation Company, makes the following report of the 
bnriness of the Lower HIssissIppI: 

Uver traffic between this city and southern points during the year 
18M has proved far fW>m satisfactory alike lo shippers and carriers. 
During IS9S there was a complete suspension of boslneas on the part cf 
the larger class of eteamere and bargee for a period of three months, on 
seconnt of low water. This record, altboagh phenomenal, has been in- 
creased in the year 1691 by some sixty days, thus giving five months 
daring which this class of vessels was lying idle. Oommanication has 
been maintained after a somewhat meagre fashion by the employment 
of small, Ilgbt-dranght boats and barges between intermediate points 
or short trades; but this class of carriers Is wholly unfitted for long 
hanls at the prevailing low rates of freight. Following the history of 
navigation back for a few tall or low water seasons, and noting the an- 
mistaksble decrease in channel depth of all rivers carrying silt in large 
qiuntilies, we face the only reasonable solution of the danger^and that 
is diedging the channel across the several bars as they may form and 
appear each succeeding season. We find some enoonragement In the 
hct that the River Commission is, by slow stages, be<»ming convinced 
tbat Imptovement must be looked for In this dlrecdou, combining, as it 
certainly will, efficiency and economy. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



122 



IBADE AHD COMMBBOE OF 



Ui. luac P. Liuk, G«nenl Freight Agent of tbe Diamond Jo line, 
gives the following accon&t of the bnaiaeaB of the upper river: 

Navigation on the Upper HlBdaeippI River opened early la April 
The fir§t steamer for St. Panl left St. Louis April 31st. Daring tbe 
spring months and until July Ist there was a good freight traffic, and 
an increase over the year 1893. There was also an increase in the pas- 
senger traffic, and daring the month of Jaly more passengen wen 
carried on both the through and the local pockets than for the same 
time in several years. 

Early in July tbe water commenced getting low, and steamers were 
unable to carry anywhere near their tonnage capacity or tbe amount of 
freight offbred. 

The water continued getting lower until all previous records were 
broken, and by the Slst dayof July all steamers running from St. Louis 
to St. Paul had been laid up on account of the low water. This vir- 
tually ended tbe season of navigation as fkr as the passenger and freight 
traffic between St. Loaia and St. Paul was concerned, although a feir 
local packets continued to ran in the short trades, also a few rafts and 
tow boats, but there did not occur a safflciont rise in the river after that 
time before navigation was closed by ice, to warrant sending any more 
steamers to St. Paul, thus making the shortest season of navigation on 
the Upper Mississippi for many years. 

Mr. Jno. E. Massengale, Traffic JVIanager of the St. Loais to Tennes* 
seeBIver Packet Co. says of the Tennessee Biver trade: 

In reviewing our record for 189t, are pleased to note a large increase 
over 1898 In the merchandise trade from St. Louis. 

In some commodities we have brought less to St. Louis, uamely lum- 
ber, In others we show an increase, mainly In cotton. Our greatest 
increase, however, has been in groceries, dry goods, traota, shoes and 
general mercbandlBO from St. Lonis up the Tennessee and Cumberiaad 
rivers. 

Aconslderableamount of flour and grain was bandied from points 
below St. Louis so that while our total tonnage for the year was larger 
than in 1893, onr business from the port of St. Loaia shows a decline 
although the way bnaioesa mentioned was mostly St. Louis basiness. 

Tbe bosiness of both the Mlaaonri and Illinois rivers was light and 
like that of the other rivers nnsatisfactory. 

SOCTHWARD. 



Capt. James Good, Superintendent of tbe Barge Line, reports the 
stage of the river out to Cairo and from Cairo south, daring 1691, a> 
follows : 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



JkourrltoM !l feet. Jul; lOtoSl S fMt 

JuiMtorcb. U closed account Ice Miiut 1 to 19 7 " 

fefj. MtDll G " •' IStoSl S *■ 

Ibnk llo'.O 3 " Sw>t. Holt t " 



Jnl7 lloM 12 ■• 

CAIBO TO MEW OBLEAK8, 

JuuiuTltolO ]] fMt. July Itoia IS (ett. 

Jttoll W " " UtOSl 11 " 

Fib'r. 1 to 10 18 " AHEim 1 to 19 10 " 

lOIoSH » '• *' lOtoBl 7 '■ 



is? 



Joiw ItoSO as •' .1 Deo. ItolS 8 " 

I " UtoSl... • " 

For the past thirty seasons navigatiaii sonthwarcl hu been siupeiided 
by ice as follows: 

VIUerl889-0t, from December 13th to Jsnaary lllb 17 dkys 

- IMS-SI, " iJecember Mtb to FebnurT M IS " 

" ISSI-SS, " J«aii»r7 sm to Februnry lilh M " 



»>I>e«mb«rWtti. 
ISTO-Tf - " — ■- ■- ' 



iinnryl3_ 

._. December lit tolsib. uiS rmn JuiULrySOtli toFA. Htti.., 

U7S-78, from NarembeT tBtb to Jiaoary iwb 

lB7S-7<,open»l'-'— - 



WlBlcTUIt-n,rnimI>aoaaiber30tbliiF(bnui7«tli SS 

Ulft-'S, opeD all vJDter. 

" Uta-TT, ftom December Bth Co Febrnery atb It 

" tSn-n, open all irinter 

■■ U»-7S,froB>D«e«mbeTlS(tLtoJuiaai7WthsDdFebnur7l«ht01Tlh.... K 

" K»4». from December I7lb to Deoembet31iliDaliui>e U 

■■ UaO-n. trom KcT. U to Dec. S, ud trom Dec I to 1(, uid horn Deo. M to 

Feb. 18 W 

" ISSl-ai. open all winter. 

" im-8t,ftomDM.7ioES, udArom J*u. ItoFab. 18 » 

" ISBS-M, ftoio Dec IS (0 Feb. S. U 

■* ISH-SS. fMmDFO. IWi toSnh, knd SS day* In Jumirr and Febntarr 11 



d from Dec il to Jen. 17 . . 



" IBBS-8B, open all winter. 

" isaa^a, open all winter. 

" UM-91, 0|>en all winter. 

" uei'M, Iram JanDarT Mb to Febibarr Ut IS " 

*■ 19K-9S, (MmDeo.»ith tcFeb.U »7 " 

" um-M, open all winter. 

" lltM-SO,opentoD(c. SUI. 

STEAMERS AND BARGES 

Permnneatly and lempororilg tnroUed at the Port of St. Louia, on 
the 31jt dan of December, 1894. 

Ko. of VeHcli. QroiB Tonnage. KetTonnage. 

Perm, enrolled ateam (wood) 9T K.ITA.OO tB,701.Hl 

\i%T%f* " SS Bl,12t,;9 8l,0IS.W 

■rum (fmn) 4 l,«e0.18 ljlS».aa 

TeBpnnoysteUDen (wood ) I 664.38 GMJO 

Ferm.llBonMditaani.andBrla tana.... 7 in.Ol «S.ei 

Barges, '• " .... ! 17.79 S7.79 

Yachts under n Cons 1 G.M S.11 

Grand Total WO TatMla. 119.910.11 110,101.87 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TBADE AND OOMMEBCE UF 



Umtb. 


Ulshnt. 


»... 


i...-t 


DU*. 




ft.1Wu. 

S \ 

6 1 
3 7 


11 

ij 

IB 
' t 


//.IWft.. 

I t 

i '' 
I \ 

« e 










^1 
















^I^w:::,::::::-::::.::::;:::;:. 

















HIgheat it*ge of irUer dor 

AbaoluM rtiiB* 

Gremteil nwDthly Twagt . . 



HIGHEST AND LOWEST STAGES OF WATER. 

The record of the higtaeet and lowest water noted at the St. Louis Weather 

Bui-eaa Office Blore its establishment is as followf: Zeroofgaage 

being low water mark of 1863, which Indicates about 12 

feet of water in the channel in the hsrbor of St. 

Louis, and 4 feet of water in sboal places 

between here and Cairo. 



HIGHEST. 


LOWEST, 


Year 


Date. 


BtW. 


Year. 


Date. 


Stwe. 


ffi' 


JS!!::::::.:::::;;;:: 


as It.- S In. 

18 rt- 2111. 
n Ceet. 

nft«t. 

ill 

2S.T IIBt. 
s«.o (eer. 
Jl.» leet, 
J.1.8 (eat. 


■i; 
1; 

K:, 

1681.. 
1881.. 
1888.. 

is8t!! 

188a;: 

isoi!! 

1BSJ.. 
1888.. 

18M.. 


Nov.aoand Dec.l 

DecemberMandSl.... 


4 n.- S in. 








































i!: 


?.7yV' ■"•■■■ 


SoTBmberM 

February 4, itaiide.... 


?R::'?1S: 






















December* and B 


























FebiSSya: 
































m. 


«^""":"""":: 


PebmaryJi 





,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OF BT. LOUIB. 



;\ 



s it 5 g 



5 3 s a a 



ililiHll 



I I 



ii^lc 



126 TBADR AKD C 

ABRIVALS AND DEPARTURES OPSTEAUBOAT8 AND BARGE8,1BM. 



lEM. 


asT 


^C 


lUl- 
noli. 


"i!ri 


ou..|"r 

iTenn. 


IS. 


Si 


Tom of 


TOUdl 

h,T,S 






1 

1 

IW 










Bl 

g 
1 

OS 


1 

40 

1 

98 
81 






» 

i 

5 
M 

1 












I 

i 

U 
11 


! 




lf.« 

Sl.Ott 

ss.wo 

IS, MO 
lO^JM 


















































710 


1.088 








i.oei 


1.2« 


*»,173 

















dbfarturbb. 



ISU. 


as," 


is:; 


■a-^s. 


r«o. 


Olila 


Hi 


feii 


Bbip'd 










1 






i 


U.DM 
U.IM 




1 










1 1 


Z'.'} 


a 

i 

1 








1 

! 

1 

i 


8 
4 

10 

s 
It 

6 

1 




3i-E;::E;;;::v::!;!; 


^•^ 


































Total 


71. 


*M 


lU 


40 


B2 


a 




I,9M 


aai,0M 



ABRIVALS AND DEPABTUBE8 FOR TWENTY-ONE YBABS. 



4«H1VAL« 




T»«ri. 


BmU. 


B>rB«<k 


Ton.nr 
Frel«bt 


Ton* of 


T«r». 


BoMi. 


S 




i 

1881 

iflj; 
n» 
wn 

1 

SMI 
3SS1 


oos 

OH 
274 
144 

i 
1 
1 


oeilsso 

STO.aOB 
4Te,08G 

8«,'m 
ii»|4]a 
^isio 

T14,T«0 

e88,«.i 

739;-S9 


13e,M0 
1S0 2AI 

Si 

117,880 

ss. 

971.490 

sfit.aso 

lea.sis 




awn 

sou 

ISU 

ii 

i 
i 

!U8 


TIS.TOO 




^ 
















































'Si-.™ 
000, su 
























g!::::::::::^ 







,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OF ST. L0D16. 



-RIVER TONNAGE BY MONTHS. 

Rteeipis by Siver in Tons, 1894. 



MonClw. 


a 


1 

Sii 

l,DtlS 

3 


1 
lis 

MS 


1 

II 
s 

1 

l.«60 


1 


































gg^- 


















u a,uo 


a.8T6 


1S,SU 


m,BU 


Sg»,6H> 





TONS OF FREIGHT SHIPPED BY RIVEK, 1894. 



■«. 


DppfT 

Hlu. 


Lower 


lUlDOU 

lUver. 


Hlas'rl 


Obio 






1 

1.776 

::i 

SM 


I9MI> 


i 

MO 

880 


S 

i 


"";: 






i 

a 

1 


i 

s 
i 

776 






,U 




fe:;:;;;;:;;; 


ii 




;" 




gjgte* 


S 






Wil.... 


«.!«. 


SBliffl 


t,m 


■ 4.07H 




ia,BB8] <.1»J8M,0» 









,db,GoOglc 



TBAOB AND COMMEBCS OK 



SHIPMENT OF BULK GRAIN BY ItlVEB TO NEW ORLEANS 
DURING 1894. 



SIdne; Dillon and btigee. 

ISy Choice and bargei 

Sidn«; Dillon and barKes. 

MyljholOG HUd bargoa 

Sidney Dllluii and barges. 



H. M. Hoxle and bargea. . 



:ge8. 



'■■m 



H. U. Hoxle aiid bargea . . '. 

S. H. U. UUtk end 

Henry Louraraad 

". M. Hozle and barges. ■ , 

..... ^ ^^^ barRea 

lark and bar^s. 

iy and bargei... 

Hozle and barges... 

* and barses 

}lark and barges. 



>Bklai 



July'ulFiiton . , 

" ..l»H.M.Hoife and barges.. 

*■ ..37, Oakland and bargea 

Aug.. BiS H. B. Clark and bargei 

'■ ..in My Choice and barges. .. . 
flei)C.20 

" ..20 H. U. Hozle and barges.. 



Not. is 
l>oc. - 



UyC 

My Choice and barges .T. 



a rand Total.. 



is.tao 
an, 000 

U,4BI 

64.900 



M,1I«.. 

H,au\.. 
eo.ns.. 



Tons. Tons. 



I.SOOi 



TM 


4,4a 


S.UI 














t,wo 








1,9) 


1,M0 




i.m 




a.uo 




¥111 
























;Su 




87.108 


10T,4» 














I.SIO 




iiM.m 


i«.ai! 



,db,GoOglc 



t oiTT or art. I.OUIS. 



SHIPMENTS BY SODTHEEN BOATS DURING 1894. 



AETICLE8. 


BoaM. 


tV«v'^t 


BOMI. 




TO 

21,432 

77 


1,189 

81,444 

1,780 

1! 






2,178 
1,941 


tWefpng Pl^. 










138,000 
M,«0 


1,133#I0 

12,69* 

2,068 

140 

12,788 


149,200 














M0,S!8 
1,268,810 
1«,811 










6,952 


















80 

231,786 

40t 

518 

15 

18,886 

6,646 

388,887 

4,884,801 

8,231,681 

4,861 

88,886 

40,000 

844 

1,801 

80 




19,142 

869 

i,aio 

33 

262 

418 

92,610 

2,101,490 

461.166 

176 

6.0B1 






21,»!2 






843 








Poit,Bbla 














KfiH 


)blt,awiki 




6,118 




OnioiH,Fkgi 


878 
6,683 

an 








»T*. "nrkn 












1,886 




TaUow, Lbs 










as 

280,985 
69 

i,m 

187,940 
ST6,»0 






10S,7M 
410 
1,042,193 
8H 
781,000 
246,289 
















WbtoLwid, Lba 


46,749 












168,880 


122,773 


16,663 





,db,GoOglc 



1 
1 

i 


.™,„0-»N 


SES 


■ani'l'VIA 


S8S 


■BJUdUHH 


22S 


if 


■.imiJO«»Ji 


S2g 


■&inqg;aiA 


siTs 


•^TpltTOH 


sss 


i 
1 

1 


■tmauOMSjj 


S5S 


-Sjnqr:)D|A 


sSs 




Si3 


|! 


■.owsiJO*WN 


as3 


■aniqUOTA 


SS9 


■wndmn 


S8S 



TKADB AKD OOHMERCE 

II 



« = l 






14 



5 S a;^5«la,.dS^^F*s,»So ^ 






l=„ 



L s 



f'lvM 



iiiliiiSiiiilil^ 



Si 



if 

---::"•- = = S I ^ 



ill "' i*si« 

as : d3= = = . , = = - = -• SSiSs 

is igi=. „...„. = illr 

J;gjS„.».„i!.sjssr||!|, 

■ 5 : i ; : i : ijl t-J 

ii ffiiii|f|J^ 

2 SJillS-a III I K S £ 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



Z CITY OF 8T. I 






liiiiiiil 



U 

li 

l\ 

sli 

1 

I 



'i 



h 



1^ 



I 



Mi 



11 



« 



II 





; i ii ;i i 



„Go(5glc 



TSADE AND COHUEBCB OV 



RIVER ACCIDENTS. 1894. 



Jan. 


i 


Jan. 


4 


Jan. 


fi 


Jan. 


10 


Feb. 


1 


Feb. 
Feb. 


i 

u 


Feb. 


16 


Feb. 


]8 


Feb. 


23 


Apr 


12 


Apr 


30 


May 


1. 


May 


7. 


May 27. 
June 10 
Jane 12 


Jane 21 


July SO 
July 22 



. — The towboat Bearer exploded her do&key boiler at Hev Or* 

leans, killing one man; damage to boat, 9600. 
.—Steamer W. F. Niabet exploded her donkey boiler In the 

Ohio River, killing one man ; damage to boat, $2,000. 
. — Steamer Smoky City sank two coal boats near Memphis; 

loss, t3,100. 
.— S(eamer John F. Walton sank a coal boat near Mempbis; 

lOBB, tl.fi00. 
—Steamer A. L. Mason struck a snag and sank In the Lower 

MlBsisBippi River: loss, «65, 000. 
. — The Steamer U. P. Scheneck and Louisville harbor boat Fd1> 

ton collided, sinking the tow of the latter; lose, (4,600. 
. — Steamer City of Vevay blew out one of her cylinder heads ; 

dama^, $500. 
.— Steamer Wm. Fowler sank in the Ohio River; loss, $1,000. 
. — Steamer City of Fadocah collided with railroad bridge in 

Teunesse River near Paducah ; damage, $2,600. 
. — Sleam tupr Brierly collided with a coal bai^ at Cairo ; was 

totally demollBhed; lose, $10,000. 
.—Steamer Ohio strnck a enag In the Lower Mississippi and 

sank; loss, $1S,000. 
.—The towboat Coal City struck railroad bridge at Memphis, 

Binking ten boaU of coal ; loss, $60,000. 
.—The towboat Diamond was destroyed by flre In the Lower 

Mississippi River; loss, $36,000. 
. — ^Xhe towboat Time was destroyed by flre atPadacah; loss, 

$50,000. 
,— The towboat IronBnke and a coal bai^ collided at Cairo ; 

bothsnnk; loss, $30,000. 
. — Steamer City of Cairo ran through her larboard cylinder; 

loss, $500, 
, — Steamer Irene sank In the Kentucky River; loss, $9,000. 
. — Steamer Sunshine sank in the Eanawah lUver; loss, $10,000. 
.—Steamer City of Madison sank in the Ohio River; loss, 

$20,000. 
, — Steamer Mountaineer sank In the Kanawha River; was 

raised. 
.— St«amer Montlith sank in the Ohio River; was raised. 
.-Steamer City of Sheffield struck rocks in the Lover Ohio 

River and sank ; was raised. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 188 

Aug. 1.— The raftboat Reindeer Bank at Dabnqae; loss, t3, 600. 
Ang. 8. — Steamer Park Bluff sank In Upper Misiahsippi ; was rtdeed. 
An;;' 10. — Steamer J. E. Gravea sank in the Upper MissUsEppi; lose, 

«5,0OU, 
Bep. 13.— Steamer John H. Woods was damaged by fire at LonisTllIe; 

loss, $5,DU0. 
S«p- U.— Steamer Blue Wing sank in the Lower MisslEsippi; loss. 

«6,000. 
Stp. 21.-~Tbe Goremmeiit steamer Hinnetonka Eank in the Lower 

Missiaaippi; wag raUed. 
S«p. 22.— Steamer Comet w&s destroyed by Are at Cincinnati ; loss, 

•10,000. 
Oct. ).— Tbe U. S. steamer General Gilmore sirnck a hidden obetrne- 

tion ia the Lower Miselssippi and sank ; was raised. 
Oct. ]!.— Steamer £. J. Regon sank near Lonisville ; was raited. 
Oct. 13.— Steamer A. S. Willis glrack a bidden obstruction and sank 

near Cape Girardeau; Iobb, 98,000. 
OcL IE.— Steamer Alien J. Duncan sank in the Ohio EUver; was raised. 
Sot. 1.— Steamer John P. Alien sank in the Yazoo River; loss, 

«10,000. 
Not. 6.— Steamer Mark Winnett struck rocks and sank near PitU- 

bnrg; was raised. 
Sot. 6.— Steamer Jeme was destroyed by flie In the Ohio River; 

toss, «7,000. 
^o"- Wv-Sleamer Geo. L. Bass sank in the Upper UisaiBsippi: loss, 

«700. 
Nov. is.-.xhe tag Wasp sank at New Orleans; loss, *8.000. 
HOT. IE.— Steamer Delta stmck rocks in the Ohio Itiver and sank ; was 

raised. 
Hot. ?9.-,The towboat John P. Thorne was destroyed by Are at Pitts- 
burg ; loss, Cd.OOO. 
Dec. 1 — Steamer Dora struck a snag in the Upper Miesissippi and 

sank; was wrecked. 
Dec. 6.— Steamer John Moren struck her coal tow sgaiast a railroad 

bridge in the Onio River, sinking One hargc; loss, t2,U00. 
Dec. 13,— Steamer City of Paducah struck hidden obstruction in the 

Hissfsaippi River near Chester and sank; was raised; 

damage, $I,fiO0. 
Dec. R— .Steamer Allen J. Duncan sank in the Tennessee lUver; loss, 

»6,500. 
Dec. la.— Steamer I. M. Mason struck a snag and sank in the Monon- 

gabela River; was raised. 
Dec. S8.— The towboat Uarry Brown sank a loaded coal boat at Cairo ; 

loss, 97,000. 
Dec. 38.— The steamer Sentell was totally destroyed by Are at New 

Orleans; lost, (8,000. 
Dec. 30.— Steamer Eefstoue Slate was damaged by Ice In the Ohio 

River; loss, 9(00. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TBADB AKD OOKXEBOE OF 



SPANISH AMERICAN TRADE. 



le St. Loui* Spulili Club. 



Our commerce with onr aoutbern neighbors has not been prosperom 
during the last halfof the year Just ended. 

The continued Tall in the price of silver, maat necsssarilf have cur- 
tailed exportationa to these countt'iea, but when to this were added the 
effects of the widespread fiuancial depression throughout Europe and 
the Dnited States, together with the abrogation of our treaties oi reci- 
procity, the situation is easily understood. 

The flnaacial system of the Spanish American Republics are all based 
upon the value of silver, and Brazil presents to the world the spectacle 
of a country enjoying a fair degree of prosperity with an inconvertible 
paper currency. Exchange has risen iu these countries one hundred 
per cent, which signifies that the imported articles which cost three 
years ago one dollar, now costs these nations two, and that the heavy 
annual payments of interest on their national debts, already burden- 
some, have been doubled. 

Prior to the repeal of the reciprocity acts St. Louis enjoyed a large 
and increasing trade in corn, flour, oats and bran with Cuba. 

Since the 3Sth day of last Aagust, on which date the Spanish Gov- 
ernment announced thq abrogation of the reciprocity treaty with this 
country, very little flour, and not one bushel of corn have left this city 
for Havana, and our exporters are informed that until some modlQci- 
tion of the present rate of duties Is obtained, this branch of commerce 
is at an end. 

We are Informed, however, that the Spanish Government proposes 
to admit -American products to Cuba and Porto Rico on payment of the 
duties contained in the second column of the Cuban Tariff. 

This while it will not restore us to our former position of advantage, 
will enable as to resume in some degree our export trade in flour with 
the Spanish Antilles. 

St. Louis sells to Mexico and other Spanish American Republics, flour, 
grain, hay, vegetables, agricultural implemeut, milling and agricul- 
tural machinery, boots and shoes, hardware, furniture, wall paper. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THB crrr of st. locu. 188 

ttatioaery, wiappin; paper, hkina, tncoo, beer, lumber, bricks, whli- 
kej, lard, dm^, photographic sapplies, c&rria{fea, waftona, and a 
Tarletr of manafftctared articles. 

We Import from the Repnblica of the South, coffee, sngar, wool, hen- 
ueqnen, ixtle, fmlt, woods, indigo, hides and skins, sarsaparilla, herbt 
and drugs, onyx, mbt>er, asphalt, ooooa, tobacco and other prodncts. 

OormanafaoturerBof machinery and hardware commaDd an impor- 
tant tale In Mexico, Cnba and Central America. Onr fTnlt tnde with 
Heiioo was grekter last year than erer before, and will andonbtedly 
eootinne to increase, as orange growers in that country are beginning 
to regard St. Lonis as one of the most favorable markets for tbeir pro- 
ducts. 

The importation of bannanas trom Central America is becoming 
yearly a more important branch of commerce, and sererai fl^nit flrma 
in this city are interested iu banuana plantations from which they Im- 
port the ftult direct. 

Unch of the engraving and printing of Mexico is done in St. Louis, 
and by Judicious adrertisiug this industry could be greatly advanced. 
Orders far photographic supplies are more frequent and have l>een 
received from countries as remote as Chili and the Argentine Republic. 
This last named country has recently appointed a Consul to onr city, 
and has annonnced through Its diplomatic representative the intention 
ofestablisblng more direct and profitable commnnlcation with the Ifis- 
slirippi Valley. 

Already, at least one St. Loaia boose, bas sent a representative to the . 
Biver Plate for the purpose of acquiring trade in that region. 

Onr shoe mann&cturing Interests have an especially and Inviting 
ane lucrative field In Spanish America, but St. Louie boot and shoe 
Biannractnrera have, beretotbre, made but iltilfi effort to obtain this 
trade. 

8t. Louis furniture man nfacturers report a number of sales In Mexico 
■ad Central America, and express themselves as eminently satisfied 
with their business reiatious in these countries. 

American furniture Is better adapted to the taste and reqolrementa of 
oar southern neighbors than any other, and St. Lonls could with little 
effort outstrip all competiLora In this line. 

In truth, there Is scarcely anything which we manufaotare wliicb 
doea not find ready and profitable aale in Spanish America St. Lonis 
should have the lion'* ahare of Mexican trade, as the United States 
sbonld control the commerce of this hemisphere. The geographical 
and Industrial advantages of this city will enable na to defy all rivalry 
andvaoqulsh all competition for thla vast and IncraUve trade If a proper 
effort is made to secure it. The St. Louis Spanish Club was incor- 
porated by the merchants and manufacturers of this city for the purpose 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



ise 



tba.de and oommebob of 



of caltlTBtin; this trade. Uach h&s been don« by thia organization in 
making the name and greatness of St. Lonis known ftom the Bio 
Grande to Fatagonia — mncli in affording fooililiea and informaUon for 
commerce with the Ladu-American nallone — mncti in extending 
among tlie youth of our city ft kaoirledge of the iangnage of these 
conntries, vlilch should be now, and must'inevitably become, our most 
valued eustomers. 

The aims of this organization are not the pnreuit of the purely selfisb 
and aordid interests of Its memlters ; ihe men #ho compose it are pro- 
foundly coDTluced tliftt if by any expenditure of time, money or en- 
deavor they may persuade the commeicial or manufkcturing interests 
of their city of the golden possibilities of this bonndleee field) they will 
be amply rewarded, not less by the sense of patriotic duty than by the 
material benefits conferred upon the community of which they form i 
part. 

The following table shows the amounts of imports and exports of 
Uexico during the past flscal year, and demonstrates that the United 
Stales do more than tiiree>fourths of all the business, both import and 
export, with Mexico: 



IMPORTS. 



United States 

Qreat Britain 

France 

Germany 

Bel^um 

Thirty-eight other countries. . 



1892->93. 



3,874,801 

2,2n,TU 

897,583 



United states 

GreatBritaln 

Germany 

Belgium 

nineteen other countries . . 



(«8,1IW 
$B7,B09,S07 



$60,660,34$ 
11,696^1(1 
3,4t6,S8& 
2,888,070 
HASai 
400,770 
867,666 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. I.OUIS. 



FOREIGN GRAIN TRADE. 



The direct exportation of grain via the Miseiulppl lUrer, which has 
been for so many years an important fkctor in the grain trade of St. 
Lettis, was for the year IS94 of imall proportions. The export bnsi- 
nets of the whole country wa§ less than asnalt bat the decrease was 
less ftom the Atlantic seaboard. The free exportation of grain ftam 
the Uissiasippi Talley depends almost enUrely on the yield of the 
Stales west of the river. Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa and Missonri fnr- 
nisb the bnlk of the enrplns grain for export. When the crops of 
wlieat and com are large in these States a goodly proportion of the 
mrplns will find its way to market by way of the Gnlf. The crops of 
18M were largely deficient In Trans-Mississippi States. In fact, the 
slmoit complete failure of the com crops of Kansas and Nebraska, and 
the partial failure in Iowa and Miesoari, made prices of this important 
staple west of the Mississippi River above export Talae, while the bet- 
ter erops of the States east of the river fhmlshed com to the Eastern 
seaboard at less than it coald be laid down at Hew Orleans or any other 
Gnlf port. The same was true of wheat, but not to so great an extent. 
Another factor was the low rates of freight from Slates east of the river 
to the Atlantic seaboard, and to some extent fVom Missouri River 
points. The average rate of freight on wheat from St. Louis to Liver- 
pool via New Orleans for the year was 11.69 cents per bnshel. sgainst 
18.71 cents via New Yoik. But during June, July, Angust, November 
and December rales were made from tho "West to Liverpool that were 
less than the water rate via New Orleans. This condition, however, 
was excepUoual, and is only possible when freights are scarce and com- 
petition active. A proportionate rate to St. Louis would have diverted 
Ireigbt to the river route, for under normal condltlous the water route 
ia always the lowest. 

The low water that prevailed during nearly five months of the year 
added to the dtfflcnlties of the situation. It Is hoped, however, that by 
another season this difficulty will be at least partially removed by oper- 
ation of the dredge boats now being constntoted by the Mieeissippt 
Biver Commission. 

Hie shipments from St. Lonis amounted to S,S4fi^03 bushels of wheat 
and com, In addition to whioh 308,145 bushels of wheat and 1,175 bush- 
ela of com were taken ^m Belmont, Mo., having been forwarded 
thence by rail. 

Id addition to shipments Southward, 406,776 bushels of wheat and 
1,HS,595 bushels of corn were exported direct via Atlantic ports. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



' TRADE AND COKHEBCB OF 



FOREIGN SHIPMENTS OF P£X)UR AND GRAIN 



Ok Thbodoh Bills • 



OF Ladiito from St. Lodis bt Railboads 

AXD RiVBK 

For thk Yeab 1894. 



Dbbtimation. 


Flour, 
barrels. 


Wheat, 
buiheli. 


Corn, 
buibels. 


buiheii. 




1M,*87 
4,908 

10MB6 

66,900 

136 

8,016 

i<s,m 

12,089 

28,961 

860 

UO 

8,146 

800 

19,870 

1,890 

120,991 

7,789 

a,028 

1,1M 

316 

18,104 


177,280 
421 

329,496 


792,789 

440 

3,68s 
430,385 

716,470 








« France 




















" Norway 






























.... 


















" South America 

" Porto Bico 




" Seaboard (or Export 





Total tor Export bj Rail 

Total (or Export by RItot. . . 


884,682 


407,197 
1,042,197 


1,942,696 
1,268,810 


34.9GJ 




631,661 


1,449,804 




71,fl61 





,db,GoOglc 



r OF 9T. LOUIS. 



EZPOBT8 OF 



FBOU THE UNITED STATES. 



Fbom 


16»1. 
BuibeU. 


189!. 
BnshaU. 


1893. 
Bu«hali. 


18H. 

Bn^eU. 


New York 






1;2 








H»wOrfeMi». 


"'1 




li 






2,0 






l,4a3,7T0 

i,aiQ,9eo 

a;790;221 














108,877,669 


7a,523,8l» 





EXPORTS OF OOBK FBOU THE TTKITBD STATES. 



Fbou 


1S»1. 
Buibeli. 


1691. 
Biuhels. 


1SS3. 
Bu>hel>. 


18&1. 
BiubaU. 




IE 68 
] 73 

4 34 

i 11 

5 78 
iW 

] 38 


is' 18,661,247 

r8! 6,606,333 

1 n. 7,*86,408 

n &,606,96e 

» 8,9e6,«W 
» 2,660,088 
U 7,832,360 
» 683,383 
. 15 9^ 

■7.b«;88ij 6,786",88i 












Bo«M,.. ,":::::;:;:::;::::::::::::: 


8 


Yorktown {Newport News) 


i 
1 






1,044,888 
S.98e,081 


All atber dlMrlcU 


i,8ei.iM 




30,691,851 


77,*7l,179 56,143,918 









,db,GoOglc 



TKAU£ AND COMUEBCE Q 



BTATBUZNT OP B0I.S GBAIN EXPORTED FROM KBW 0SLBAK3, DURIKG 
ISM AND COUPARtSONS FOB FRKVIODS TEARS. 







To 






Com. 
,348,674 

:ii 

317.188 
108,679 

<e,as8 

38:s«0 


T.IH.1. 
























S;Si 






















K 




































1S81 
1891 

188S 
ULK 












8,163,871 

ss 

,941,888 

,W9,MS 

;us;943 

,6»,35; 

0DI8 TO NE\ 

36;B87 

'Sft;960 
89,707 

317;7J1 
888, 7BS 

ffi-S 
»;» 

%S 

»;>>■ 




























•"■iS 


















■S:g 


























SHIPMENTS or I 
Tmt. 


GBAIN, BY RIVER. PROU ST. 1 
FOR TWENTY YEARS. 

1.043,193 1,283,310 

KM SSSS ;:::.::: 

r 1,481,781 48,800 

! IS ■!!» 

\ IS ^s 

< 8,840,710 11,413 
: 1,887,088 609,041 

5;|:S 'J'.-T. 


1- ORLEANS 

T*ta. 












8.414, M 












14,IM,Me 










■(•S!« 




















































!'S« 



















CapooitT for moTlDB to 



,db,GoOglc 



TUS CITY OF ST. L0DI3. 



AVKRAQB B&TB3 OF FBEIQHT ON WHK&T IN CENTS, FEB BUaHEL 

BY STBAHEB FBOM ST. LOUIS TO LITEBPOOL 

TI& NEW OBLSANS, 18U AND IBSS. 



■During September, CKitoberaDd November, navlKHtlon was 



ATERAOE BATES OF FBKIOBT ON WHEAT IN CENTS, PEB BUSHEL 

FBOX ST. LOUIS TO LIVBBPOOL VIA BAIL TO NEW TOBE 

DDBING ISM AND 1888. 





«A.Sj«-^ii:'- 


ToUlSt.L.[o 










19B3. 

i 

1 


im 




^*?J^ 


il 
iii 

11. SO 

si 

17.40 


T.S 
40 
.40 
.40 
40 
.10 
M 
.40 


1 
\1- 


a 

s 
i 

IS 


IB 

f 


S'm 
























Sl:!?lt 












.90 


U 


itTIH 



AvtEAai Satb or FmiioHT os Wbbat pim 
BcasELBT Stbauek raou Niw Obuar* 
TO LimrooL Domuro 1S9I iwp IBM. 


AVBBJUIB KaTI of FBUBHT 0» WhBAT 

Fu Buaau BT Stumkb raoK Niw 

TOB« »0 LrfBBTOOL DDMirO UH iWD 188*. 


Uontli. 


EUC In OenU. 


BatelnCHiW. 


Honth. 


BMe Id Centi. 


B*te Id Oniti. 




liM. 


IBBS. 






DMWber 


9e. tolOe. 
8c. to ele. 

Ei 

Bo: to 4c. 

Ill 

aoTtoso. 


7 tolO 
1 


UbtoIi.... 
JoIt'.'.'".'.' 

Sartmbn 


1 

ii 

«0 




'« 



,db,GoOglc 



TKADE AND COMUEBCK OF 



AVERAGE RATES OF FREIGHT ON GRAIN IN CENTS. 



Fboh St. Locis to Livekfooi. tia Rivkk to New Oblkans abd tu 
Rail to New Tobe. 





To New Orleana by BtTer. 


thi 


To Llverpod. 








m 








On Grain 

In Ike. 

per lOO IbB. 


On Wheat 
Id bulk 


VUNewOrleiuB, 
perbu. 


VUNewYort, 
OnWhtet 
perbn. 
















n« 


8Jf 










S8K 
42 






iseo 


19 








SO 

ao 


6 

6 6-13 


<2 






1883 


23 3-8 


38X 


188S 


17K 


BH 


m 


19 7-12 


37 


18M 


11 


86-6 


S8 


U7-12 


ai3< 


1886 


15 


63-6 


231-7 


IE 1-8 


»jf 


188B 


18 


BW 


SS 


18 1-6 


34 


1887 


lex 


e 


sas-ifi 


15 


MX 


1888 


» 


ejtf 


•2IX 


16 1-6 


BJ» 


1889 


17.88 


6.90 


!SX 


17 1-8 


auT 


1880 


1B.W 


8.68 


«X 


14 1-8 


S1.48 


UBl 


1S.38 


8.KK 


39 


»3>4 


3U6 


1803 


IS^ 


6.60 


38.63 


14 


31 


1898 


17.M 


6.6S 


28.60 


14.71 


31.73 


1894 


n.u 


6.88 


34.78 


11.69 


18.71 



wflcnrM nr 
Tlli01bi.,D 



UlOWMMjlTUO 



n p«i buhel on wbcat. 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



COTTON. 



The cotton bneiuees of St. Lonie for the year ending Augnet SI, 1894^ 
shovB a marked increase over 1893, alUiongh leas tban In 1892. The 
gron receipts reached 625,421 bales, of which 462,082 bates were 
through shipmentB, and I6S,3S9 bales local receipta. The local receipt* 
do not indicate the total amoant of baalneas done b^ St. IiOniB factora 
and bayere, tor the reason that a portion of the throngh shipments 
were for St. Louis account, and were hilled directly tbrongb to the 
•eaboard or to Earope, on account of farorable freight rates. 

The position of all cotton markets is based on the gross receipts, 
therefore St. Louis is entitled to take rank as the largest interior cotton 
market In the country. 

One of nuuiy adrantages that St, Louis offers as a cotton market is 
that Iiere can be obtained all advances necessary to m^e the crop and 
more It to market, and further St. Louis Is the best place in the Missis- 
sippi Valley to purchase the snpplles required by the Senih. 

The question of erecting a large cotton mill in St. Louis has received 
much attention of late. The advantagea to be derived ftom the saving 
of tnnaportatlon, both in receipts of the raw material and dietrlbntion 
of the manafactnred prodoct, are evident. It is highly probable that 
before the close of another cotton year, this project will have taken 
definite shape - 

The statistics of the years buainesi show that as nsaal the largest 
receipts came from Arkansas and Texas, the amuunt being respectively, 
969,857 and 281,924 bales. The reclpU from States east of the river 
ibow considerable increase, The amount reported direct was 178,889 
bales, of which 171,206 bales went to England. Attention is called to 
the details of the movement as given on following pages, which haa 
been carefully compiled. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TB&DH AND COKHBBCB OV 





1* AT 8T. LOOn. 


Smmei. 


«-U2r^ 




»<'«J^P«-. 


1MM4 - - - 


620,431 


462,083 


163,889 


1892-93 - • • 


474,024 


301,186 


172,838 


1891-98 - - - 


7M.688 


426,787 


297,891 


1890-91 - - - 




403,464 


306,016 


1889-90 - - - 


688,910 


811,823 


227,087 


1888-89 - - 


fi84,672 


823,819 


260,963 


1887-88 - - - 


620,292 


271,028 


249,264 


1886-87 - - - 


4U,888 


167,698 


344,134 


1886-8* - - - 


472,683 


246,017 


226,666 


1884-85 - - - 


291,056 


103,313 


187,744 










1882-83 • • - 


456,858 


160,098 


296,760 


1881-82 - - - 


369,679 


129,060 


240,519 


1880-81 - - - 


398,939 


97,686 


301,853 


1879-80 - - - 


496,670 


173,886 


324,284 


1878-79 - - . 


336,799 


117,088 


218,716 











HOMTBLT BEOEIFTS AND SHtFHKHTB FOR SEASOK 1898-94. 









Miotba. 


Local. 


Tbrougb, 


Total. 






li« 


2.029 
M.OUI 

1 








t8 
< 


i 

■no 
m 


1 

M 
11 

1 


5M 


If 


SSr5"i8M-: 


ESS;:^:::::::::::::::::;.:::;:::::::;::: 
6S^::::::::::::::;:::::::::::::::::::::: 


uliti 




KM 














163 m 


«i.m 




«!,»» 













r BACH ROUTB FOR THREE COTTON TKAB8. 



RMIM. 1 laW-M. 


ins-n. 


lR91-n 


8t.U«il«,lK>ttMoniilaln4doutlienkE^R. | m.W! 


■■ii 

1 


3S 






OhlMtgo A Alton Railroad (Wast) " M 


"■S 


•KaokokAKoHbireiteni Railroad » Tt.SW 


'■s 














Total bales i B«5,43t 


474 .014 


mm 



•red b7 ths Evokak Lloe, and a 



., K. A T. R. R. wen dOllT- 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CIT7 OF ST, LOITIB. 



STATEMENT SHOWING THE SOURCES OP SUPPLY OF 
COTTON FOR FIVE TEARS. 





sa*- 


■fflS; 


'ISS- 


«£■ 


■ss- 




28S,«n 

UJ,924 
13, IM 

S!!l 
'I'S 

l,Off 
8* 


S.Ufl 
80 

■'■S 


S8T,4lia 

a8,MT 
49,010 


14M!>u 
























: S&EErrE 


BU 


„ OklAhoiii& 




ToUl RKBlptS 


(e5.«i 


471,0M 


7M.8S8 


7IK,4eS 


688,810 



r BHIFMENTS. 



ISaa-ftl. 1891-98 18Bl-9a. lSW-81. 



SI Kiport to BnglMid . . 
1" Gcnoauy.. 

" „HolIiUid... 



B.SIT 



J9al«. £ala. 
10,081 

8,ei9 

1.690 



]T«,s3g 

Wl,i3S 
3S,9U 



Total ShIpmenW. tU.tSt 



■HtPMBinS OF COTTOK BT BACH BOOTS FOR FOUB COTTON 


rEABS. 


BODTB. 


.ICM-H. 
BAJ,EB. 


iW, 


1891-91. 
BALES. 


1899-9L 




U),0t6 

■S;ffi 

190,791 
1«,8M 

mo 


I™ 

156,764 
TO,!W 

isa 

IS 

m 

iw 

w 

BO 


■"•SS 

1,1,3 

is 

iot 


UTMO 
S99 

1««,808 


O^TtiMi^ Cbi^ ChlMKO * 81. Lonla Bead. . 


CUo^o, Peoria « StLanUBiairo&d' !'.!'!! ' 






im,™ 


S^S«»^;:i;:; 


"iZ 


£SSSe?.«:r^;- 


DIO 


e,tn 

118 




n 


ss 






s 








ToW 


613,Sn 


i)Oo,m 


8»,789 


«»,7» 



,db,GoOglc 



TBADE AKD COKUEBCE OF 



COHFABATITB 8TATBHBNT. 

BBOKIFTS, BHIFMBKTB, STOOX, ASD CONSUUfTIOM OF COTT 



) FOB FIVB YBABB 





isaa-H. 


isa2-Ee. 


«-». 


1380-01. 


U8M(. 




•^iS 


l.tIO 


TS8,«Se 

S.0S1 


7oe.ue 

1,4M 


















Total bales 


<I«,9M 


G2Z,TI3 


TM.IU 


;m,B» 


^ 








BB,8M 


'SI 


IS 

4e,4tii 


MS, 710 

,5S 

l.OW 


■^c 






n,899 

ulssi 














M*,BS» 


52S,7IS 


Tsa,iu 


7(»,IBS 


wa.m 







SBPORT OF COTTON COUPBESSED AT ST. LOUIB. 



Becelpts. 




Slock. 








168,671 


170,201 


17,899 


177,834 


204,734 


19,502 


810,344 


274,677 


46,402 


808,273 


299,112 


10,786 




231,236 


574 


270,848 


274,246 


513 


256,809 


267,044 


8,910 


268,234 


264,110 




240,183 


231,868 


9,924 


203,684 


208.493 


1,609 


228,414 


281,484 


1,518 


804,300 


301,451 


4,588 


249,115 


265,637 


1,739 






8,225 



COICMSBOUL OBOP BT STATES, m THOUSANDS, AS BEFOBTED BT THE 
KBW 0BLEAH8 COTTOK SXCHAKOE. 

I8tS-4. iBse-s. im-1 

Al&bama 925 640 1,000 

Arkansas 626 616 900 

riorida 60 45 60 

Georgia 1,126 830 1,100 

Louisiana 400 446 736 

MisslBaippi 916 870 1,840 

North Carolina 425 826 400 

South Carolina 750 660 700 

Tennessee 276 280 4O0 

Texas and Indian Territory 2,069 2,100 8,400 

Total crops— bales 7,660 6.700 9,086 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TH« CITT OF BT. LOUIS. 



TABLE SHOWING THE HIGHEST AND LOWEST PRICES OF 
UiDPUMQ Cotton each month fob foub tkabs. 



MOMTBS. 


18BS-e<. 


isn-in. 


IBBl-M. 


1890-91. 


LowM. 


HItflM 


i™. 


aiihM. 


Lg-«t. 


Bitwt. 


L.™. 


HUhM. 




.... 


'1" 


-Bie 


11. 


L 

Ts-ie 

IK! 


11... 

I 9- IB 

TS-16 

7 1-W 

ill 


1... 

M-IB 

i" 


1!" 










',■-« 




»^:::::::::-:::: 


8« 


M::=^'^- 












A?*ng« welslit p«i ball.. 

St. LoaU reoslpta I 

CrapotDnltedBtatea 



IXe-SL 18»-S3. IMl-Sa. 1890-81. 



I. 1888-89. 18ST-Bg- 



GOO .87 tae.Ti 



GENERAL CROP MOVEMENT, SEASONS 1892-93 AND 
Prom New Orleans Cotton Bzchonse B«port. 

coNBxmmoH dnitbd states. 

1SBS-S8. ISBS-BI. 

Bales. Bales. 

ToW Crop United Stntea t.lW.StS T, MS, BIT 

Btoebkt Porta bogiiiuliigol year il9,<21 S4t,S31 

Total SuPFti— 7,119,688 

Eipoited dun nx year 4.88S,S6T S,I»,10T 

3«nt(o Canada 08, 9n et,e90 

Burnt at Delivery Porte 483 1.086 

Slock at close of yeai 243,631 188,787 

4,«8S,U1 

Total takliun tor oonsumptioD 2,431,131 

Ot vblch— Token by spinners In Soathein 

States, Tot^ 748,848 

Taken by Honhem iplnnars 1,687,188 



a.47i.7eO 
1,810,688 
718,6U 



sdbvGoO^^IC 



T&ADB AND OOHMBSOB 0¥ 



STATEMENT SHOWING THE ENTIBB 

BECEIPT8. 



bt- 


.Sk 


Kt 


*& 


OatB, 
Bosh. 


a. 


^^■ 


Chloafo * Alton K.K. (Ho. DIt.] 


le.ou 

M 

"SiS 


'•B:SS 

777,909 

g,eno 

141,800 

1i:S 

Bfi,6U 

i^;JS 
ig:!SS 

40;»SC 
IT.UO 
81100 

Si 

1,0M,1B0 
M7,8« 

S£S.«78 


Ms.soa 

3. Me ,290 

■4s 

assiiio 
as.MO 


4U,1T 
1,488,07 

im;So 


18,008 


■"■'SS 




iiT 




1:gS 
w:ioo 

76b|sU 
!!»,«» 
IMTOO 
42i,S0O 

'■is 

S.t,B60 

.ass 

18,860 


is 

297,150 

SSioDO 
?I1,1S0 

17.31 
1,»0 


11,000 

'■"iisoo 

16,100 

IS 

■■■'■si 




LonUtUK.KT.ng'riUe A 8t.L.R.B 
BaJtlmore A Ohio 3.-W. B. B. . .. 




Tandalia k Torre Huite B.B 


"niflii 


-Oblokso, PeorU & 8C Lonls B. B. . 


'■s 


k'iiii'""^'m^".':.'::. 




Dllnola '■ 

^^^b. * Tenn-'BiTsn 

Br#«gon 


no 


600.000 


300,000 




ToutBeoelpta 

sold dipsot rram ooimtry palnta 


l.Ml.SM 
1,800,000 

i.Bse.w 

80,015 


io,oat,m 


28,Ue,HG 


io.i8e,sw 


1W>,» 


1,083,433 












In Btore, Jaimarj IBt, ISH 


e,G7i,sii 


360,068 


Bl.OlT 


S,S68 


■wiw 




•,777,969 


16,e7t,<>M 


lt,BS7,01S 


10,»7,SI3 


1U,1U 


1,117,716 





,db,GoOglc 



THX city 07 ST. L0OI8. 



MOVEMENT IN FLOUR ANT* GRAIN FOR 1898. 



Floor, Wtteat, Corn. Oata, By*, Bailer 
Bbla. Bnsh. Boah. Boab. Bnsli. Bnata, 



Otalcago i Alton B.B. (Mo. DIt) 

llllwHirlPuUloB.B. 

St. Louis and San Franclsoo B.B 

ffituh&a. (West) I 

Bl. Lanla, KuuH at; Jt Col . B. B 
Xluoorl, Kaustia A Texas B. B.' 
St. Lonli Soaltiwcitf rn B. B . ... 
St.LDDlg. Iron Moant.A So.B.B.1 
S^U,A. A T. H^ Cairo Short Line 

Olinoli Central B. K 

LooliTlUi JbNMt]TUleB.B. 

HobtleAOhtoB.B 

LwliTlIle.Ennnmr A Bt. L. B. B 
fialllDiora A Ohio S. W. B. B.... 

UUoago A Alton B.B. 

ClFTe., CIn., Cblcwo & at.L.B. B. 
"—-'-"- ""errcHat;"- 



TandaUaATen?B 

Wabash R. B. {Bast) 

TdMo, 6t. LonU A Ka*. City K. R 



ClilcsgD, Paorla ASt. Louis B.B, 

Chicago, BarUngtoD A QdIdd; 

SeokakASt.IiOala,R.B 

StLools. ChicagoftSt.PaQlB.il. 
Upper Ulaiisslpiii Blver 

lUlnola " 

Mlnoori " 

OhlOL Cam* ft Tenn. Blvers 

Bid. White and Oaocblta 



Total Shipmenti 

old dlreot troia a 
JinoDd lu City MIL. 
Cllr COnSQEQIltlOll . . 



Sold dlreot troia ooontiy poIntA 
Qniand lu City Mills 



Slock on band D' 

. .|4,7TT,9«9J16,S7S,KH{!l,Ba7,01 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



tba.de and COHHBBCR 



RECEIPTS OP LEADING ARTICLES TO THE CLOSE OP EACH 
WEEK FOR THE TEAR 1894. 



Flour, Whet, Com, 



Oftts, Bje, BarUf, 



bash, buiti. Baga. ICan, bbU. Loll I 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



THE CITY or BT. I.01IIB. 



BECEIPT8 OF LEADIMG ABIICLES TO THE CLOSE OF EACH 
WEEK FOB THE YEAR 1894— (Conttnued). 



Digitized bvGoO^^IC 



,db,GoOglc 



THB CITY OF 8T. L0D18. 



SHIPMENTS OF LEADING ABTICLE8 TO THE CLOSE OP EACH 
WEEK FOR THE YEAR 1894— ConUnned. 



Digitized bvGoO^^IC 

I 



TBADB jUTD OOKKEBCE OV 



ELETATORS. 





BulKGnin. 


■J^S. 




1,000,000 bosh. 

700,000 " 

. I.UOiOOO " 

■■S!,«S :; 
1S;SS •-• 

■■sS ^ 

000,000 " 


awtuiuks. 








iaiut'auita 
































,ioo,noo bosh, 
su.ooa <■ 

ISOOlODO " 

,800.000 " 
U.800,000 •■ 


MKnniMki 























CapMltf of PrlTfttc BlevMort aad Wuvhonia... 



,1,U7,000 Boiheli. 



Batu of atone* Adopted hj tho St. Iionti KI«mtoTO to <vplj dnrlas IMS. 



On WbeM, Can, « 
JCof 1 oent per bnibu, _.. 

On OUs, reoelTed on Bind after tl 
for flrat 10 dafi, or pare Uiereof. and 
■ ■ ■ ■ - -,,Jq^g^^^(g_ i.— - 

foreacb ■nbseanent SD dafa,i 
Spcolalbtn.^of r — ' — 
DDinpiDg Miika I 



lO ebarge for ai>«aial 1 



it per btubal 






part tbereof, and 1 oent per bmliel 



Damplns saok* from n 



, „ .1, lof 1 oent perbn*hal. 

SaokeharKeafronirlTaron Com, Wbail and Sfe.Sloenti per caok f or thiSratt 
dayi.and 1 cent per Mok for e*ob mibaequent 10 daya, or put thereof . 

OiUa from rtveT, t ocnta per eaok for llrat B Oxjt, and 1 cent per tack for eaota inb- 
■BqnenHO days, or part tbereof. 

Wbeat, Com, and Rre from rail, I oents per aaok forflrctS dayitand 1 oent p«r Mck 
for eeob aabseqaont 10 da;s, or part tbereot 

Oaa,from rall.B eenuper ««akfDrflrM10daya,andl oent par aacft for eaabnib- 
•eqiunt 10 days, or part thereof. 



Inipsotlon on Anival Uoentiperott 

hupeotlon oat ol Elevators 40eentepere>i'< 

Inspaotlonont of Eleratoia toBarsea SO oenta per IHM 5n«b«»- 

Inspeatlon of Saok Grain X Of 1 oent pet SMk. 

OtaarKet foTirelgblngiTlll be BI eta. per oar In, and SB ots. per oar or oarioadloti 

oat ot EleTacors. 

WetKhlngonttoBargei SB oBnta per 1000 boaheU. 

WeigbinK Sack Qraln In Iota of 100 sacks or leai,N oent* per lot; and In lots OV«r. 

»0 iaoki X of I oent per sack. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TUIB OtTT OF ST; LOUIBi 



FLOUR. 



Tbe floor trade of the psat rear, while Kbont eqnal in rolnme to 
preTiouB eeasooB, has been diuppolntiag in resolta, especially so to 
city milla, which, by reason of a crop large In qnantlty and of excellent 
qnalitj coupled with equal freights under the provisions of the Inter- 
state oommerce law, has enabled ooantry milts East and Bouth while 
baying wheat on a shipping basis (our market being Bpecnlative, as 
erideneed by the lai^e elevator stock accnmnlated here) to supply for* 
dga and home markets at lower prices than city mills could afford. 

Daring the first half of tbe year while hopefUly emerging from the 
floancial distarbancei of tJie previons year, all bosiuess was paralysed 
by the coal strike followed by the railroad strike in June, and the flonr 
trade suffered Id common with other {ndastrles by this anfortunate 
condition. 

The second half of tbe year began with a boontiftil harvest of excel- 
lent wheat at very low prices and millers had this solid basis for large, 
safb and profltablebnainesB ; bnt the repeal of reciprocity arrangements, 
which practically restored former prohibitive datiea levied by Spain on 
American products to Cuba and other Spanish Islands, cnt off a large 
volnme of hitherto good trade in that direction. The immense crops of 
cheaper wheat from Argentine, India and Bussia has enabled foreign 
mills to make very cheap flonrs with which we, with necessarily 
higher wages, have had to compete and also against discriminating 
protective dntiee ag^nst flour and In favor of wheat prevailing in Ger- 
many, France and other countries to which, nnder eqnal conditions, 
we would sell floor largely. 

The volnme of the year's business, however, as before stated, was 
Uitlj satisfactory, the amonnt mannfactnred t>elng abont eqaal to the 
OQtpnt of '98 ; while the receipts show a slight increase. 

As nsnal a laige amonnt of flour was handled by the millers and 
dealers ftom conatry points ; which, while not showing either In re- 
edpts or mannfaotores, properly formed a part of the floor trade ol 
ear dty. 

Notwithstanding the slow demand from abroad, the exports tor the 
year were 631,863 barrels, which was bnt a slight decrease from the 
two previooB years. The bulk of this amonnt went to Europe ; bot 
136,903 was shipped direct to Cuba, the West Indies and Central and 
South America. These flgores do not by any means Indicate the 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



IW 



TBASB AND COUXBBOB OF 



unoont that was sold to these points, for s much groRter smonnt wiu 
shipped to New York and Baltimore, and tntn theae stiipped to 
lonthem pointa, notably to Caba. The amoonts here ^ren were those 
shipped horn St. Loois on through- bills of lading. The amount 
shipped locally to the seaboard and then exported cannot be deter- 
mined. 

Y&loes show a couBtant decline from the befdnning to the end ol the 
year. Extra Fancy opened in January at (3.70 to $2.76, was qnoted 
at 92.16 to tS.30 in October, and closed at $3.35 to $2.86. 

It is believed that the coming year will show an improved oondltioii, 
fb)m the &ct that so large a proportion of the miJs of the country ue 
now idle and ttocks will soon have to be replenished. 

rLOim UAinjPAorDBED at st. ix>nt8 fob three years. 



UlLLBBl. 


Name ofHUl. 


rig 


Baml* 
18W. ■ 


BaireU 

18M. ■ 


BunlB 
18«. ' 




PluiC'i BoUar A 


■•a 
s 




879,171 

MSluo 

lSu!57S 






(K 


401 

i 


4X 
■Kt 

m 

i 






Eagle Bieam.... 
















E«8tSt.LoalB... 










n.a, steam!!!!! 






IS 


















' 


Total 




11. «0 


i.BM.aw 


l.SGD.MS 


i.eB,m 



FLODB MANUFACTURED BY MILLS OUTSIDE OF THE CITY OF ST. LOUH 

BUT OWNED BY CITIZENS OF ST. LOUIS, MEMBERS OF 

THE MEECHANTS' EXCHANGE. 





NmieofMiU. 


Location. 




OWHEB. 


Mtin. 1 lga4 


■» 


K.O StonardMUlingCo.. 
Eaofflnsa UIUIdkCo 


Qrand chain. 

»„r."': 

Wblte Swan.. 




,» ,».m 




SKdS..::. 

KB^^uSTiii."!!! 

LaQranBB, Mo... 
Clinton, Mo 

KaDsaaClty.Ho. 


1,200 
1,000 
TOO 


1:1 


'r^ 


^^h'E:::: 


181 ,(M 


h&f^SS,'"'"^.'!':::. 


loo.sio; itiM 














9,100 















t Dnmed Norrmber <S, ISM, 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 





law. 


1893. 


18B2 


1881 


1880. 


188». 


1888. 


1B8T. 


BeMired 


i.m.m 


1,171,035 


1,US,M2 


l,3fi8.«40 


1.23S,nt 


1,108,803 


8^,178 


i.m.m 




i.m.ea 


1,6W.0« 


1,«»,!71 


1,7*8,180 


i.sra.oos 


i,oee,M2 


i.ou,ei8 


1,9811,717 


©omittyinllH) 


1,800-000 


1,888, 718 


l.TBS,13» 


i,8»,eM 


i.aiLser 


i,aii,2tB 


1.088,388 


Se7,SlD 


rot^BMMla 


«,m,SM 


1.738,838 


1,8T0,IW 


t.«a,ut 


i,ais.[i«7 


4,MS,2ei 


3.B7S,IB 


s,8».m 



r FLOOB IN STORE DEC. SlBT, FOB TWENTY TEARS. 



Yeer. 


BblS. 


Year. 


Bbl*. 












60 

1 
1 






! 


m 


im 







































MOBTaLT STOCK OF FLOOR IN STORE, 1893 AMD 1894. 



Month. 


it&. 


18M. 


Hontb. 


S. 


& 




m,7i7 

S:S! 

80.410 


80,018 
88,681 

S;!!! 




89,886 
82.600 

88',800 
82,678 
















^^EEE 














08.818 



,db,GoOglc 



J 



TBADB JJ(D COmUBOB OF 



JCONTHLT BBOBIPTS AHD SHIPlfXHTS OF FIJOUB FOB TWO YBABS. 



KBOXmi. 


aununiB. 


HODtlU. 


18H. 


init. 


MoQtbi. 


18H. 


IMO, 




BSun 


1 m 


JtniiMT 




l«,«8l 

1H,ITI 




1 
1 


i 


] 


i 

i 




3! 
1 

IBS 

s 

Si 


TSl 
K6 

MO 

710 








A^^.;-.:;-.::::::;:: 


y*y 










I^i;"'--"--- 










IS'S 










IMpMO 






'"■ 




' 






1 171 ois 






i,0M,a: 



















BECBOTS OF PLODS BY CBOF TBAB. 



TurcndtDsJOBsSO/w, 


,»5<l,7Ubbl». 


Tew ending Jni 


Mi;30.'90, 


1.8M,»ITbbll. 




































" 







SOOOCEa OF SUFPLT, AND JflOEUnOS OF SHIFHBNTS FOB TWO YBAKS. 



..«■,«. 


»H™imu 


By 


ISU. 


18BS. 


Direction. 


UM. 


JSM. 


EmUtq Bkilnada 


S7B,38e 


177 ,«J 
1,900 

1 


DIreot for expart 

"|:&"lf;:::::: 






WesMm Railroadl 


'■^■S 


Sontlicni Ballroad* 


97,1109 






























l,Ml,BOe 


i,m,oas 




s,ia,n8 


I,«U,BI 







,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OF BT. LOTUS. 



I 



tn 
ifi 



III 






||i||j||^S 

ft OS a epS qjo o 






iliWi 



Digitized bvGoO^^IC 



TRADE AND OOKMERCK OF 



EXPORTS OF FLOOR FROM THE TINITED STATES. 



Am reported by 9. Q. BaooK, Oblcf of Bnraui of StatiaUo*, Waahinstan. 

""" Bbl«. BbU. BbU. II 

New York 4,128,860 e.OM.ae* 6,*4B,B31 a,» 

BoitoD 1,1^,873 3,0eO,T2O 1,866,471 !,!( 

PbUadelpblft l,lba,St2 1,843.647 1,376,434 1,!^ 

Baltimore 2,703,715 3,661,628 3,331,374 2,ft 

Mew Orle«ni B2.016 226.4S1 117,878 V 

San Frandwo 1,2M,187 1,076,186 B63,M3 71 

Chicago 16,832 1,796 2,800 

Detroit 79,981 184,626 184,136 2! 

Dulutb and Superior 182,612 307,826 848,249 % 

Huron 42,990 lie,3S8 42,412 1! 

Key Well 20,331 104,863 46,681 I 

Portland 81,043 11,045 56,880 ( 

PlWelSound 184,806 166,816 178,4i3 3! 

BidunODd 88,840 26,341 20,418 

WUIamette 876, 123 879,982 859,466 31 

New Port Newa 868,662 913,619 ■843,&37 6' 

Other FoiDta 415,273 363,416 366,638 4 

Tot^ 13,023,693 17,406,713 16,440,608 16,0 



RECEIPTS OF FLOUR AT VARIOUS CITIES. 



St. Loula 

New Tork 

BaltUnorB!.".'! 

Clncinoati 

Milwaukee 

HlDueapollB 

Toledo 

Baffalo 

Chicago 

FhiiadelpUa 

NewOrfBaM 

Detroit 

Peoria 

San Francitoo 

St. Paul 

Honlreal 

Dulutb and Superior. . 

Cleveland 

tndianapoUi 



,2flt 


800 


1,171,025 


1,456,842 


1,361,640 


1,229,979 


741 


464 




7,766,780 


6,122,489 




















3,867,985 


3,055,468 


8,099,339 


8,369,831 




346 




1,908,616 


2,117,784 


1,423,080 


WW 




1,878,166 


2,666,353 


3,637,878 


2,401,2fi 




V04 




164,133 






m 


IM 


604.234 


789,666 


1,818.489 


103,006 


,1W 


B40 ll>,5e3,090 


9,7*6,120 


T,093,840 


8,246,680 














791 


fU 


8,823,685 


8.467,614 


2,321,063 


2,164,12! 




























Mt 


314,800 






123,846 






1,120,487 


1,383,101 


1,470,697 








796,286 


886,886 


1,163,431 










,1117 




4.868,028 








6» 


130 


388,658 


350,704 






168 


888 


127,648 


131,776 


110,390 





,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OF ST, I.0UI9. 



AMOUNT OF FLOUR MANUFACTURED IN VARIOUS CITIES. 

1894. 1893. 1098. 

MhineapoUs 9,400,ftSS 

St. LoDia l,$A6,64fi 

Btltimore 420,S79 

8t.P«Ql 

PhilKielphla 240,000 

Hilvankee I,ft76,0e4 

Bnflklo 1JIOO,000 

Toledo 869,600 

Detroit 287,000 

Cblcago 444,000 

Dolnth sod Snperioi- 3,946,292 

EuiRsaCity 730,390 

Peori« 120,000 

<SndDii&ti 896,821 

CtercUnd 402,000 

Indianapolis 690,096 



Bbli. 

9,377,636 


BbU. 
9,760,470 


1,<69,038 




481,860 


499,989 














1,600,000 


780,000 


760,000 


689,900 


848,600 


889.000 


466,460 


642,900 


2,087,793 


1,063,811 






127,621 


166,000 


804,675 




607,216 




670,106 


689,748 



FLOUR INSPECTION. 



Stport 0/ Flour Injected by the Merchants Exchange Board of 
Flour Intpeclort. 



JanoMT 12,647 

Pebrnarr 19,747 

Haroli 21,U2 

April 18,239 

Hay 19,786 

Jute 20,971 

July 16,784 

Angtnt 27,906 

September 13,680 

October 13,944 

KoTMnber 10,399 

Deeember 8,392 

Totalbbl* 301,396 27C 

runiB QBADiD DtJsiNa ism. 



24,341 


29,768 


27,083 


89,666 


22,978 


41,808 






27,666 




21,464 


80,777 


24,701 


86,437 


18,767 


66,310 


18,047 


47,489 


23,036 


48,048 


19,747 


80,640 


16,813 


30,209 



6,769 bbU. Patent. 
26,980 " Xztnt Fancy, 



VICTOR GOETZ, Preddent. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



KD COMMERCE OV 



■WEEKLY PRICES OF ST. LOUIS WINTER WHEAT FLOUR 
FOR 1894. 





ISM. 


PaUnlK. 


Ext™ 


FMcy. 


ChBlM. 


J«,n»7 








aao.. M 

ill 

11:; 1 

;iSG.. 3S 
a so.. M 

2 M.. BS 
i IG.. S5 
i -M.. SU 

!s'- i 

! lo:: 26 

2 10.. *i 

l£:S 

s w.. so 

:s: i: 

sio.. 2:< 
soij.. 10 
soo.. 

SOD., u 

aoo.. 

»00.. t 

soo" ( 

aoo:: ( 

il i 

ioo:: I 

is:; J 
il: s 


15^: 










(IU..1 u 

Ell 

liii 

00.. S <iO 
90..IICU 
8S..S0I 


sill 

1 ftolissc 










Pehru«7 






10... 


IS!' So 










































9.'i..3 W 2%. .ITS 




















eo.. 9!t 
BO., as 

90.. w 

l;i 

W.. tio 

S:: ! 

1:? 

DO.. 71 
<0.. Ni 

to., u 

■1*0.. K 
i to.. U 
3 40.. S3 

s«.. & 

s«" e 

a 65'.: « 
in!! « 
ISO.. « 


IS:: S 

Is- i 

l|: B 
»:: 60 

40!!3SC 

l-i 

3W'.'. « 
2 11.. S! 

SO..XW 




"'^. 




















































J"'?. 































































































































































,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OF ST. LODIS. 



The grain trade of St. LoDis for the year 1894 shows a very coDsider- 
Able decline f^m former years for the reason that the States from 
which supplies are principally drawn hare no surplus lo ship, or what 
small amounts could be spared were needed in Western localities, 
where the crops of '94 were nearly if not qnite total failures. 

The sappliee which are mostly handled from this point come from the 
Trans-Mieslssippi States, and when there is no surplus in theite States 
the effect is felt more in this than any other primary market. 

The receipts at St. Louis for the past fire years were as follows : 

BSCBIPT8. 

ISM. less. 1S93. isei. law. 

meat, bnahelfl 10,OOS,M2 14,643,999 2T.4S3,Se& 35.G23,1B8 11,780,174 

Com, '• 2S,6M,»4D 8S,»09,40G 33,030,080 21,030,940 45,008,681 

OaU, " .... 10,]9e,a0(> 10,066,226 10,BOi,B10 12,432,216 12,atig,9Se 

Bye, " 110,280 t>83,7e9 1.1S9 158 1,148,490 N)1,0M 

Barley, " 3,088,438 1,988,749 2,691,349 2,108,646 3,794,880 



Total 



4fi,970,UO 81,079,174 78,999,097 62,744,374 73,360,841 



Including flonr reduced to wheat the receipts would be aa follows : 

UH-^TMalieceipts of Floor and Wheat 81,846,406 bnthels 

■' " " " 86,818180 ■' 

80.618,189 



ci,i»,m 

48,T48JWS 

13,918,800 

The relative position of the nine principal primary receiving points is 
shown by the following table; 

BSOBIFTa or QRADI FOB FOUB TSABB. 

1894— biuh. 1893— bush. 1893— bash. 1891— bush. 



Chicaco 188,U0,1CO 



Eansaa Gltr 14,436,060 

UUwaokee 19,608,890 

Toledo 35,066,808 

Dolnth and gnpeitor 80,676,908 

DMroit 9.666,886 



926,988,068 
61,079,174 
67,092,810 
88,670.870 
30,710,400 
36,099,898 
83,870,460 
88,914,990 
18,626,017 



339,306,012 
78,089,097 
88,084,080 
29,001,300 
49.416.100 
86,611,311 
81,8ff7,381 
16.960,494 
13,039,676 



!g,lU,300 
e,807,!00 
!7.8ffr.817 

rT,098,eio 

11,360,860 
.3,184.011 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TBADE AKD COUHEBCB Of 



The crop of 1693 was'tlie amalleat for severftl years, while the crop of 
1894 was of more Ihan average size and of excellent quality. From 
these two cropa came the receipts of 1894, amouiiLing to 10,003,Si2 
bashels, the lightest receipts at this point for twenty years. The ligbt- 
neaa of receipts is accounted for by the tact that the States west of ihe 
river had little or no wheat to spare, and, farther, that the low piicei 
pravaillng resalled in a very considerable amonnt l>eing fed to stock. 
The receipts from this source fell from 19,660,291 bushels in 1892 and 
8,481,959 bushels ]n 1898 to but 4,894,fi54 bushels In 1894, while the re- 
ceipts from other dii-ections sliow a comparatively small decline. 

Notwithstanding the low price prevailing, there was notthensnal for- 
eign demand, as Europe was supplied to a large extent from Itussia, 
India and Argentine at even less prices than prev^led iu this country, 

The lowest price reached was on July 80th, when No. 2 Red sold at 
47i cents per bushel. The exports were 1,042,197 bushels via New 
Orleans and 407,197 bushels via the Atlantic Seaboard ; while, 6,189,407 
bushels were taken by city mills. The receipts at principal western 
points were as follows: 

BECEIPTS OF WHEAT. 

18M, buah. 1893, busb. 189!,biub. 

MlDneipolis 95,000,610 &T,E80,460 72,737,000 

OhicMto 2^M8,90a 36,8Kk,101 Bn,a34,6K 

Dnlnth *nd Superior S2J33b,ia) 8!,B10,39e VlM'fi'i 

Bt.louis 10,008,Ma U,i»*fiat 27,«S,8SS 

Toledo 18,88l),a84 23,498,80e M,*0&,636 

KawasCity 8,B»,000 16,B68,*0l> 8l,iH9,(W) 

MUwsnke 8,101,018 12,806,319 ]*J>W,10l 

Detroit 6,118,096 8,B10,4M 8,M»,08S 

8t.Paul 2,636,000 t,m,(OI 

The crop in the wheat producing slates from which St. Lotds receives 
her principal enpply were as follows : 

1884, bulb. 1898, biuh. 1891, bnsb. 

Hlssonrl S3J53,920 16,287,r»S 94,884,000 

Kanss* 85,SI6,M9 S«,Mi,fl:8 70,831,000 

Nebraska 8,7M,9(fl 10,887,889 lB,e70,«iO 

TsnnsiWe 5^97,788 7,443,021 8,M0.W! 

KentnckT ll,90i,e«8 10,684,481 11,08,000 

Indiana 43,844,08* 89,679,404 8»,8a6,«lt 

minoU 88.W2,870 15,W7,8I8 »8,»7O,O00 

Iowa 10,787,400 8,749,834 7,iaM) 

Stocks at the close of the year in public and private elevafam were 
7,340,976 baiheli. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



t CITY OF ST. LOITia. 



Becefpts of Corn were 83,M6,94S baahals a^raiafit 83,809,406 in 1893. 
Afftln M with wheat the loas was almost entirel; from the west fh>m 
which direction 19,676,086 bnehels were received lu 189S and bnt 
10,700,080 boshels In 1894. The crops of EanBna and Nebraska were 
total failnraB in many parts of these Slates and Iowa raised only 
one-third of a crop. Miasonri was the only State west of the river 
that produced a fair crop and this was only fonr-flflhs of tb« nana) 
yield. 

The crop of the entire country was a short one, being 1,213,770,062 
bnshels, the smailest since 1881. Under these conditions valnes mied 
high, being at times greater than wheat, consequently the moTe- 
ment for export from all points was considerably cartidled. The 
nwTement via the SfisaisBlppI river was 1,268,310 bnshels, less than 
halt the amonnt shipped la 1893 or In 1892—1,608,670 went to Europe 
Tit the Atlantic Seaboard and 480,389 bushels to Cuba via Gnlf point*. 
The bulk ot the shipments went to the sonth for consumption; 
8,181,037 bushels were taken by city mills for the manutacture of com 
meal. 

The crop in the surplns States east of the river was of (air propor- 
tions, consequently receipts at points wUch obtain their enpply there- 
from, show a fair business. 

The receipts at the primary markets during the year were as follows: 

RECEIPTS or CORK. 

IBM. 1B93. 1M2. 1S91. 

Bushels. Bushels. Bushels. Bushels. 

Chicago M,9el,8l0 91,aB5,lM 78,610,888 72,770,80* 

8t Louis. S3,e48,StS 33,809,400 8i,OSO,OS0 21,B30,»4O 

Peoria 13.870,170 ll,Bfil,OaO 11,623,200 n,e60,*00 

Eannu City ]0,938,e00 14,6M,000 13,667,100 10,671,eOO 

Toledo- 6,7B8,68» 7,830,133 7,47S,814 i.4U,212 

Detroit 1,603,810 1,787,881 1 ,820,683 1,177,992 

IGlwaakee l,ele,40n 1,4M,976 1,396,70D 1,140,270 

Clnclnuatt 10,744,761 e,684,M7 4.844,680 0.786,336 

Indianapolis 4,384,400 3,986^ 3,300,200 2 790,800 

The crops of the corn sarplns states for the past and previoDs years, 
u reported by the Department of Agriculture, are as follows: 

1894~-Bush. 1893— Buita. 1882— Buih. 1881- Bush. 

Ohio 71973,737 64,487,266 83,863,000 94,002.000 

Indiana »6.88»,S:7 86,868 .782 103,384,000 128,622,000 

IlUnoU 169,121,401 160JieO,470 160,327,000 234,880,000 

Iowa 81,844,010 261,S32.1S0 200,221,000 300,878,000 

HiMonri 116,011.664 108,197,716 102,488,000 908,310.000 

Xansa* 41,797,728 130,466,702 146,826.000 141.8M,000 

Neliraika 18,866,024 107.278,896 167,140,000 167,662,000 

Total 680,992,621 1,017,171,980 1,008,194,000 1,816,327,000 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TBAI>« ASD COUMEBCE OF 



The oat crop of 1894 was an trerage ooe amonnUng to 662,036,9S8 
bnabele. The receipts at St. Louis were about the average, being 
10,196,605 bushels. The bulk was received from tbe west and nortii. 
Shipments southward were 8,100,536 by rail and 636,776 bustkels by 
liver of which 81,66S bushels weot to Cuba; 26,000 bushels were con- 
sumed by city mills in the manafacture of oat meal. 



Beceipts of rye were 140,286 bushels and shipments 1S0,0S6 bushels 
most of which went to the East. 



Receipts of barley were 3,083,438 bushels, a slight iucrease over 1S93, 
most all of which was takeu by city malaters and brewers. Receipts 
were mainly from Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconaln, only abom 30,000 
bushels being from Canada and practically none from tbe west. St. 
Louis holds a promluent place in the manafacture of beer as shown by 
the following table: 

AMOUKT OF BEER MAKUFAGTUSKD IN ST. LOUIS. 



471.232 bbls.. 


or 14.608,192 galU 


5J1,684 ■• 


" 16,172,204 '■ 


(il3.G67 " 


■• 19,023.677 " 


828,072 " 


" 25.670.232 " 


059.236 " 


" 29.730.313 » 


1,069,715 " 


" 33.6G1.185 " 


1,100.000 " 


" 34,100,000 '■ 


1.122.265 " 


*< 34,700,215 " 


1,080,032 " 


" 33,666,092 " 


1,280,091 " 


" 38.682,821 " 


1,3S3.3C1 '■ 


•' 43,676.872 " 


1,482,888 » 


" 46,710,815 '■ 


1,646,587 " 


" 48,717,490 " 


1, 856,683 " 


" 58,4881, ]4 '■ 


1,810,812 " 


" 68,135,172 ■' 


1.061,449 " 


" 60,814,919 '■ 


2 09:!,903 " 


" 64 879,993 " 


1,031,666 ■' 


" 69,881,646 " 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOTJIS. 
HOKTHLT RECEIPTS Of FLOOR AKD OKAIK FOB 1894. 



Monm. 


'IS: 


Wh««t. 
Buib 


Com. 


OMI. 


la. 


^JK- 


&^^^^^" 


SB ,740 


BM.HO 
I, US ,308 

Si 


11 

i § 

SX3,7M 

SHI, OK 
l,SI8,Tia 


Bn,e8u 

MS.Ml 

S!:!S 

I,<1S3,8S» 

S:SI! 

I.USl.OW 


ffiS 

a,4M 

«,S13 

!:S 

iB.aoo 








}^ - 


u,o<» 










S?^--'-- 


iS'KS 


s^-" 


M1|000 










Total 1 t,Wl,S09 


10,IIW.»« 


iffl.sM.sis iio,u(>.e« 


1M,M5 


S,lW,tW 



UOHTHLI SaiPXENTa OF FLOCR AMD QRADT FOB 1894. 



UOKTHB. 1 Flour. 


K'- 


S: 


& 


,a 


Barley. 


iSS^v.:::;: 

MbtcH..:. 


M3.M7 

11 

11 

iis.tsa 


129,031 

S3 

i&|ui 

3711,118 




(1 

I 


S;5S 

I'S.UH 


W.U7 


«.T8« 
16'SS 


fy :::::::■::::. 










-a 




fliiolm 

Ca;.;:::: 




Total 


a.vis.sss 


a.n.1.17! is.iei.sH 1 s.wM.sw ' iio.ose 


7S,S7l 





lieoelpts. 






sn.ia7.SM 

44.0.17,578 
lkl.l7T.M7 
61,-M,1U3 

lii 

4s;7*9js«i 

M.lH^.lSI 

<S,4U6,SM 
77.793*82 

1 'IM 

6«!iMS.7Se 
fil.<tlS,lUS 






t8.W>7.B01 
2.1.333JW 
»,lSJ,43a 

8a.ew.«4 
sii|!wg;«i8 

4 ,.%40,l(Kt 
!7>j;949 


































r8.S!K.7«0 






m:^i» 










siiOT 





o Wbcat at four >aii o 



sdbvGoO^^lc 




„Go(5glc 



THE CITY OF BT, I.0UI8. 



HONTBLT BECKIPTS AND SHIPUEMTS FOB TWO TEARS. 



B> 


■irr«. 






""""• 


less. 


■•"• 


UQDtb*. 


IGBt. 


isgi. 


J«,.-T 




11 

18l.'ff74 

■■S;S 

El 




S3 

i 

1, M 

i 




^:eei 


sn 
S.atn 

l:S 

l.TBt 

i,o;{ 


ax 

i 

1 


S^:;;;;;;:;: 


41S1W 

BMSM 




July 


llS.OSl 








OeMbar 


























ToMllKubds... 


u.w.m 


ia,<»S,Z41 


Total bnsheli... 


i.m.Ki 


s.i40,m 



SOURCES Of 



3. THREK rSAKS. 



P»o« 


18SS. 


IBM. 


ISM. 










ffiiS|ffiSSS!^:r:':--r::;i;; 




Is 

MO 


1.^ 
1,998 


1 


IK 




S1-!S 

































DIRECTIOK OF eHtPUBNTS FOR THKKB TEARS. 



Eitnipe direct na AUuilio B*«t 
Eqnm Tim Mew OrlHoi, by rl 
Tin East by nil and llllnok an 
Ttu Wat by rail tuid MUMorl 

•TbtSootb byralL 

TbcSoDtlibyilTrrOocall 

Il«Mort h b yntila ndr lTw... 

Total Shipment*, bmbfli .. 



It traustemd to barges at Belmout t< 



,db,GoOglc 



3 COHUEBOE 



CORN. 

MOMTHLT BECKIPTS AKD SHIFXBIIT8 FOR TWO TEARS. 







HodUu. 


law. 


18»1. 


UODth.. 


■"■ 


m 


Stiair 


4, 90 

4,' 00 

1: S 

1, M 

5, 7B 

l.< 9 
I, W 

i; S 

1, w 


1,< « 
S.I «5 

•;; i 

1 s 

1,«1S,7I0 

■«»;m)o 










1 


iS 

MS 
IM 

i 


s 

i 










jjprtl 










































J 


s 














*» 


ToWdbuBheU ,. 


K,90D,*»B 


M,M«,»43 


ToUlbiuhcU... S9.eM.427 


IS.IO 



f SDPPLT FOB THREE TEARS. 



1..0. 


18M. 


1^3. 


1994. 




ie,sa9.a» 

179, W6 
IS.iOD 
3S,40C 

'smImoi 






KISSSfSS.USpTStJ'iSS':"'."""!::::- 


■«>c 


s;^ 


47U,tW 














Total B*oe1pW, bushels 


IH.OSO.OSO 




4ftS 


!S,5W,»tS 



S' OF SHIPMENTS FOR THREE TEARS. 



SUIPFKD TO 


1«9:, 1 IS93 




189. 












8.9Bl[Bg9 8.0X1 


1 

951. 


"1 










»» 
















K,606.;W! 29,6M 


«.1 



It was transferred to barges »l lieli 



,db,GoOglc 



IHI CITY OF BT. I^UIB. 



OATS. 

MOHTHLT RECEIPTS AMD BHtPKEMTt FOB TWO TBAB*. 



ucKim. 




HOnlta. 


im 


1894.- 


Uonthi. 


m>. 


1§H. 




•s 

710. ess 

300.000 


■II 

TS8,4«) 
I,0SI.IM0 

i,iw.£ja 

•■zs 




SliS 

■Si 


' 






HO 
1TB 


































I^i^ 




































Toalbiuheli.... 


10.0M,«B 


10.U6,60S 


Total bnituli. . . . 


4,0B4.rfl 


3,IW»,90e 



SO0BCE8 OF SrPPLT FOB THBEE TEARS. 



„o. 


13M. 


■«. 


1891. 




».„ 

*»i:mo 
aoo.ouo 


.,»,» 




]J;o|^gjg^ft™«iW«tofg^lwl~lppiBlTer 




11, aw 
3a>,u» 


neSooUi bj nU mtmlEut of Hluinlppl River 


;^T. 
















10,]M,6M 


]0,OSe.KB 









DIRECnOK OF SHIP3IENTS. 



I^alpoiDta '. ','. 

loial ihlprnmci, busliels S,»( 



Of tbe sblpoieDts Esat by rail. 1,9. 



South by ratl.'jS.OOJ busbols w 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TBADB AND COMHEBCG OF 



XOKTBLY RECEIPTS AND SHIFIIEMTB FOR TWO TEARS. 
RYE. 



BBOBim. 




SainisMT*. 




Mcmth*. 


lais. 


ISM- 


MoDtbl. 


tsai. 


im. 




IW.KW 

toiuo 

i 

18,100 
U,3IT 

SS 


ass 

IS 

M,SIR 

!;ffi 

18,M0 


f3S?^:::::::::: 


iat,ut 

4.678 




































feifi""-;;- 


«,» 














D«>M"*«f 




M.W 


■raWbotheli... 


.IS,™ 


U0,2:» 


Total basbels... 


sacsn 


i»,MB 



B0CRCE8 OF SUPFLT f 



I THREE TEARS. 



FIOX 


"»• 


m 


lea. 




41 4U 


8W,W> 










l"i 


81 
1.44S 










sg; 






n,m 










140 lU 


tSJ.TW 









,db,GoOglc 



B CITY OF ST. LOOTS. 



BARLEY. 

KOHTHLY RECEIPTS AND BBIFHXKTS FOft TWO TEAKS. 



BBOIFTI. 


BflirnKTB. 


Uoutha. 


isai. 


IBM. 


Uonthi. 


IBM. 


isra. 










'88 




































in, MS 

gf:S! 

WI.OOO 












































Total bMlMU... 


i,B9a,i« 


S,08>,4SS 


Total boihali.... 


]»,«» 


TS,8T1 



SOUBCZS or SUFPLT FOR TBBSB TBABS. 



FBOK 


wes. 


lew. 


1891. 




ni,8n 


tiT.m 


M,eM 


|a|«ipS^"E 


MO 














a,s>i,M» 


1,989,746 









No CuudB barley rooclved Id IStt. 
■•Inolndlng 18A1 boalieU of Uansda Barley. 

I " 2B.8M " 

10,000 boihiU Canada Barter reotlTod la 1804. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TBADE AKD COUUEBCB OF 



DAILY CASH PRICES OF NUMBER 2 GRAIN DURING 180*. 


HATE. 


WHEAT. 


COBN, 


OATS. 


ETE. 




i^ '^'^ 

M «>.' 
60 UOV 

8B!i 
M!i 
M^ 

K^ U.-i 

|k » 

S6V 

KJ^ Qoro. 

K 

MS- bid,, 
S3 S3V 
MS M)i 

(UK AtJi 
M HK 

si 

M 51V 

MM 

M MX 


s "■■■ 
s s 

31 di a; 
am Six 

SijJ S3 
81 3SX 
33 SS>i 
3JT( S8« 
33 333< 
33X 

S-2 Si;, 

ii s! 

sss S3:« 
n^ 83 

i » 

SSH- S3,V 

IS - 

Bin 83 

i »< 
11 i 

3t»( 

p " 

3<.V 

as sj! 

34«( 34V 


1 Sir'" 

28V 

gxss 

28 bid 

2dV S8V 

lav aiv 

28 Si bid 

ll^bid 

28K 2SX b. 

284 asvb 

r „ . 

SB bid 

? - 

313* bid 

il SIS 

5! .»»•"■ 

siv aiv b 

rss 

31 aaked 
31 Mked 


h 


























































J? 


S E!3 














» 






















X « ^ 














§:;::.::::::: 
















f::::::::::: 


S b„» • 














































































:::::;:;■■•.■. 


« " 






















M 


Vbid 


b::;;::;:';:; 


bid 



















-nodi,Go(5glc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIB. 176 

DAILT CASH PRICES OF No. 2 GRAIN DURING ISM— Continued, 



S2ii bid 
Xiii S2!(b 



X7 87K b 

KK bid 

tea BT 

ti!i bid 

M 

3fiX M b 

Mii bid 

sax aixb 



' ''i^'' 



sajib 
bid 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



178 TBADE AKD COMMEBCS OP 

DAHiT CASH PRICES OF No. S GRAIN DURINO lS9i—Confitmid 



DATK. 


WBBAT. 


COBS. 


OATa- 


BYI. 


Joti 




|x 

ix 

1 

«x 
ux 

i 
1 

1 

SIX 

p 

MX 

1 
i 

i 
i 


KX 

wx 

MX 
4IX 

«X 

1 
1 

i 

BIX 

six 

S| 
K 

1 
i 

1 


JJ *1X' 
"X «X 

i S" 

WX «x 

p !!" 

'i "« 
ill i 

M BSX 

MX SI 

1 "^ 
M 

6SX « 

MX bid 

67** 

Sx « 

6S 
U 

HX UX 
SIX SB 

sax 

BSX ss 
n 


1 ii 

M bid 
M Wbid 

|i 

is 

MX 
SOX SI 

k »« 

six"' 

SIX SiXb 

i: 

MX "^ 
WX bid 

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THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 177 

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TBAUE AMD COIIUEBCB OF 



RECEIPTS OF FLOCR AND WHEAT AT ST. LOUIS BV CBOPS; FLOCR REDUCEU 
TO WHEAT AT FOUR AKD ONE-HALF BUSHELS TO THE BARREL. 



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DOMESTIC EXPORTS OF FLOCR AKD ORAIN FROU THE UNITED STATES 

FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 1804, 

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THE CITY OF 8T. LOUIS. 



BECEIPTS OP WHEAT AT ST. LOUIS. 



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BECEIPTS OF WHEAT BT CHOP TEABB. 



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TBADB AND COHUBBCB OF 

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July 


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THB CITY OF ST. IX>mS. 



MILLSTUFF8. 

RICIIPTS AKD BBIPHEinS OF BBiUT AND SHTP 8 
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AKD U>TrB8T HOtTTHLr PRICES OF BBAH AMD SBIP8TU7r8 

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THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



ST. LOUIS IN PUBLIC ELEVATORS, BY GRADES, AT THE 
WEEK, DURING 1891. 





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TRADE AKD COHMEBCB 



STOCK OF OATS, BTE AND BABLET IN BTOBE IN FUBUC 
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THB CTTT OF ST. LOUIS. 



ELBTATOBS IN ST. LOUIS AND EAST ST. LOUIS BY GRADE 
WEEK DURING 1894. 



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TBADB ASD COUUEBCB OF 



STOCK OP CORN IN STORE IN PUBLIC BLEVAT0B8, IN ST. 

LOUIS AND BAST ST. LOUIS, BY GRADES, AT CLOSE 

OF EACH WEEK IN 18M. 







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THE CITY or BT. I.OIIIS. SI 

RECEIPTS OF GRAIN AT YABI0D8 CITIES IN 1894. 

riTt.» Wheat, Cora, OatB, By», Barler, ToUl 

cniu. biuhalB, biuhcli. basheli. bruhalB. btuhtlB. btubeln. 



SBwYwk 

BdAJo 

StLouli, , 

Uiimeapalia.... 

Pteri* 

Btmmore 

KuHu City 

PUtsdelphift.... 
MnwaukM..... 
Toledo , 



KewOrleane 2,i 

Cincinnati | S,i 

Monlreal j 7,' 

Detroit ; 0,: 

Cleveland I 2,! 

IndianapolU | 8,1 

StPinl I I 

GanPniidsco 14,1 



e.Soa M,MI,815 
la 19,909,411 
W £0,078,020 
9,U2 28,MO,Mb 
) 4,090,880 
10 13,870,170 
) 9,S66,9>& 
10 10,988,600 
4,470,539 
3 1,616,400 
6,798,689 
' 7,226, 

24,278 
I 4,239,664 
<t 10,744,781 



S,18 



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,,894,400 
606,000 
610,068 



1,667,614 
1,660,230 
1,196,606 
1,133,980 

1,687,700 
!, 862,641 
1,863,160 
1,799,660 
1,921,760 

663,990 
',814,682 

035,108 
1,409,640 
1,479,437 



148,200 
,703,400 



!6e,S6S 197,679 



l<8,H9,ieO 
61,489,047 
10e,9e9,S7ft 
40,970,61B 
M, 106,240 
30,197,SSO 
20,764,777 
14,426,060 
16,2S9,17» 
10,869,990' 
20.0M,S0e 
21,778,88* 
36,670,969 
11,030,6GT 
19,361,764 
10,984,148 
9,666,336 
6,966,203 
8,888,100- 
8,616,060 
21,820,706. 



BECEIPTS OF FLOUa AND GRAIN AT 7 ATLANTIC PORTS. 



i 1804. 


1893. 


1800. 


1891. 


SK.::;::::: 
aS::.;-.:: 


Barrels. 

BiMheli. 


30,843,266 
61,609,092 
63,069,036 
47,144,734 
684,004 
6,480,877 


64,889,848 
66,911,382 

1:274:090 
6,648.888 


1B,«86,766 
30,282,616 

104,870,686 
64,633,310 


16,780,203 
100,787,574 
68,687,873 
47660 627 
9,091,431 
7,771,862 


B^r:::::.::v.\ ■■ 


6,287,165 



,db,GoOglc 



i 

I 
f 

1 



il 



I! 



it 



IIIIH?l|ll!i 



llllllllllll 



IJIIillllllll 



lyiiyitiii 



iiiiiiiiiii 



tiiiiiiiyii 



llllliipil 



MM 



i : i i : ! 

^ i. \ \ \ 



lUmM 





„Go(5glc 



THE CITY OF 8T. LOOI8. 



VISIBLE SUPPLY OF GRAIN FOB 18M. 

a THE DIFFEBStrT POINTS OP ACCDHULATIOIT IN THB UNITED STATES 
AND nt THE UNITED STATES AND IK TBANSIT DURING 18U, 
AS REPORTED BT THE CHICAQO BOARD OF TRADE. 



Digitized bvGoO^^IC 



204 



TBADE AND COMMERCE OP 



STOCK OF GRAIN AT ST. LOUIS AND EAST ST. LOUIS D 

PUBLIC ELEVATORS 

Bach Saturday Evening Durinq 1894. 



Dau, 
ISM. 


wbfttt. 
bushels. 


Corn. 

busbrlg. 


0>U. 

ba.h«i». 


biubrlK. 


Birlrr 

buhtl 




a,SM,740 

t.mi.m 

3,405,488 
*.S0B,O3l 

b'.ni'.n 

fl;i2u;4T.- 

6.M»,MS 
6,3M,(.93 

6'Mm 

••if 
sisis 


SSJ.TOl 
34E.22T 

1<)9S89G 
S>»,D97 

Sbl.SlO 

II 

■ass 
s« 

■il 

BI,STO 
41.816 

4o:Beo 

If'w 
34, S« 
4t|SB( 

«;*« 

silwj 

ISOMU 

i.oia^Si 


aa.nu 

41.071 

if 

IS 

!!S 

sa.soa 

as 

SS.MO 

ai,4os 

.!JSS 
AS 

!!S,44« 

ss,SDe 

".S 
AS 

J-i 
ii 

BSS.SBl 

ssols:: 

B3S,76t 

en'.W 

6(8,289 

™'^ 
78i;951 
76i,40! 
7BI,441 


>i 

:::::: 
,S 

'S 

™ 

i 

'■Si? 

637 
4,'SI4 

;;iK 
loisw 

il 

4,48B 
4,4W 
















































































































^ : 

































































































biubeli. 

Jui. 1 l,l!6,«Xi 

Feb. 1 1,0S7,M0 

Harcbl Sai.BOa 

AprU 1 838,000 



bushel*. 
....47U.000 SenLl 

....3te,«oo Oci. 1. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



MISSOURI 6ROPS. 



ESTIMATED YIELD AND ACREAGE FOB 1894. 



The acreage sown ia fall of 1893 was eatiusted at 1,652,694, and 
■there was harveBted.l,639,339'acres, yielding S9,0dO,08&bnsbelB, making 
wi sTerage of Ifi bushels per acre. While the acreage harvested in 
1694 had decreased nearly 200,000 acres from 1893, there waa an Increase 
in field of over 4,000,000 bashels. Ii is estimated by farmers and feed- 
en of the State that SO per cent of the crop, or approTlmately 4,600,000 
bnsbels, will be fed to stock. If the winter remains open it Is probable 
that this estimate is largely In excess of what will be nsed In this way. 

There ia a decrease In the acreage sown in the fall of 1894 of about 
100,000 acres; but the seed was put in the gronnd in good condition, 
the conditions have been fkvOrable and the plant loolu well. 

COEK 

Vu never planted under more favorable circumstance s. The season 
was early, the gronnd in excellent condition, the seed germinated well 
and (here was but little complaint from destructive insects. 

Tlie acreage was estimated at 107 per cent as compared with 1S98; 
and this was, to say the least, a conservative estimate, probably below 
the sctoal acreage, but gives us a total area of 6,099,000 acres and yield 
of 140,377,000 bushels. 

^avflrable conditions and the promise oi a phenomenal ylel4 con- 
Unned to July 1st. From this date the drought, which had been but 
IfglitJy felt in localities, became more general and disastrous in its 
effects. August let showed a decline in conditions of 19 points. Sep- 
tember lit, the drought continued unbroken, and was at this time 
pobably unprecedented In the history of the State, with the severest 
damage in the nortlieast, northwest and central sections of the State, 
the southwest section having suffered the least. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



206 TRADE AND 

Reports for October note some improvement in the crop, and final 
reports estimate the yield at 23 bnshels per acre, or a total of 140,277,000 
bashels, and 49 per cent of the |)lant cat for fodder. 

OAT8 

Covered an increaEed acreage ; the conditions for seeding were favor- 
able and the ground in almost perfect condition. lu most ot the State 
the gi-ain had been sowed and had germinated or the plant np when 
came the disastrous freeze of March, which, as our correspondent putt 
it, "eztlugaisbed the crop like the blowing oat of a candle." 

In some of the northern connties the seeding was not so far advanced 
and the grain yet remaining dry and unspronted, was not injared. Bat 
the acreage fbr the Slate bad been materially reduced, and the cold dry 
weather that followed did not stimalate that strong, vigorous growth 
necessary to overcome the damage sustained. 

Final estimates gave an area of 1,116,700 acres, conditions SO per 
cent of an average crop and a yield of 26 bushels per acre, or a total of 
28,000,000 bushels for tbe State. 

HAT. 

Timothy and clover suffered severely by reason of the drought. In 
Bome instances meadows were worthless other than for the pastungs 
they would afford, and no locality was able to report a fall crop. The 
quality was good, was harvested in fine condition, but there was ■ very 
general complaint of an admixture of too much blae grass and red top. 
A good acreage of millet and haugarian was sown, yielding only a fiir 
crop. The acreage for meadows was 2,620,660 acres, with a yield of .R 
of a ton per acre, or a total yield for the State of 2,868,000 tona. 

TOBACCO. 

Plant beds generally produced strong, vigorous planta; fields were 
well prepared, and the estimated acreage was 93 per cent of the crop ot 
Iwt eeaeon, or approximately 10,000 acres, yielding 700 pounds per acre, 
or a total of 7,000,000 pounds for the State. Gienerally tbe cropwai 
matured and was housed without loss. 

COTTON 

la grown In but few counties in the State, but it is of a superior qnaU^, 
and commands a price in advance of fiber grown elsewhere. The area 
for tbie season was 94 per cent, of 1898. Condition, 86 per cent, of an 
average crop, and the yield estimated at 629 pounds per acre. 

FDTATOSB. 

Tbe acreage was large. Some early planted made lai^e yieldi, while 
bugs and drought very seriously injured others. The eetimated acr»- 
age is 94,000 acres ; yield, 69 bushels per acre, or a total for the Sute 
6,490,000 basbels. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. Irf>nia. 



sor 



R AID FALL, 

Each month of the crop-growing Eeason marked a deficiency in pre- 
cipitation except September; tbe greatest departure from the normal 
Deisg in Aagnst and amonntlng 1.81 inches for that month, and the 
locality noting tbe greatest deficiency being the Dorthweet section. 
Tbe following table shows the precipitation by months as compared 
with the normal for thia State: 





April. 


May. 


Jane. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 




a.*n 


4,74 


4.83 


g.SO 


a.K 


Ill 














3B 


,7» 


.n 


'■" 


1.81 


"i.W 










1 











LITE STOCK, 

iDDnmbers ae compared with 1893, is as follows: Horses, 99 per 
cent.; cattle, 91 per cent.; hogs, 98 percent,; breeding sows, 102 per 
cent., and sheep, 90 per cent. 

All stock have been in fiiirly good condition and comparatively free 
from contagions or infectioas diseases. 

ThroQgh tbe late fall and early winter there haa been some loss of 
horses and cattle fVom indigestion. This trouble was confined (o no 
locality, bat was well distributed over the State, and the stock was 
frtqneQily dead before it was known to be affected. In most cases thia 
b nppowd to be the result of too liberal nse of oom fodder, that for 
tome reason is not so digestible this season as nsaal. 

RECAPITCLATIOM. 

fTe have this season, notwithstanding tbe prevalence of an unprece- 
denUd drought, produced 38,090,000 basbeles of wheat of a very superior 
qnality, 140,277,000 bushels of corn, 28,000,000 bushels of oats, 8,868,000 
tons of hay, 7,000,000 pounds of tobacco, 6,490,000 bushels of potatoes, 
and, while we are nnable t« give the acreage of eotton, the yield was 
fair and the quality superior. 

Onr live stock goes into winter in good condition. We have an 
abundance of feed for our own stock, in some localities good pasta r- 
age, but a large portion of the State is scarce of stock water. 

We have supplied three millions of UIsBoarians with an abundance 
of bread, of beef and pork prodncts, dairy products, poultry products, 
finiita and vegetables, and shipped from the State last year, for the con- 
nunpUon of others, $81,250,000 worth of cattle, 920,000,000 worib of 
bogs, •4,000,000 worth of horses, $1,000,000 worth of sheep, 98,000,000 
worth of poultry producto, $1,000,000 worth of wool, and Jl,000,00fr 
worth of d^ry products. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TBADB AMD COHUEBCE C 



CROPS OF THE YEAR 1894. 



Report ol the DspBrtmsDi el Agricultnn, WMhlB(laD. 



WHEAT. 



The area from whicb the crap of 1892 was harvested, according to 
the eetimatee of this office, aggregated In round numbers 38,fiM,000 
acres. The returns from correspondents, as to acreage sown for the 
cropof 1893, showed a reduction of winter wheat acreage of 12.2 points 
«nd of spring wheat 6 points, the reduction for both combined being 
nearly 10.2 per cent. The reported aiea of 1999 for all wheat wa> 
therefore, S4,639,0OO acres. Tbe causes assigned for tills reduction 
reduction were long continued drought and winter killing, the winter 
of 1892-3 having been eitremely cold. The principal part of the redac- 
tion in aci-eage occurred in the winter-wheat States of Illinois, Mis- 
souri, Kansas, and California. The falling off in the spring wheat 
States was principally in the States of Minuesota and North and South 
Dakota. The preliminary retnrns for June, 1894, showed a reduction 
of winter-wheat area sown as compared with that harvested in 1893 of 
1 point. The returns also indicated a reduction of spring wheat area 
of 12.S points as compared with the year before. Thus the average tor 
tbe whole country ot both spring and winter wheat was stated at 9S.3 
per cent of the acreage of 1898, or something over 83,000,000 acres 
in all. 

That there were larger yields of wheat than were accounted for in 
ihe reports of this Department became apparent in the springs of 1893 
and 1894, but while the crops of 1891, 1893 and perhaps 189.1 are 
believed to have been underestimated, partly in respect to acreage and 
partly as to rate of yield, the dlacrepanclea between the figures on 
production and those on distribution may have been dne, In part, ss 
was pointed out In the report of March, 1894, to overestimates of con- 
sumption. 

Since tbe estimate for 1893 was Issned a reinvestigation as to the 
area under wheat and the yield of grain per acre has shown that the 
•earlier retnrns made tbe reduction in area greater than It really was. 

When we consider tbe extraordinary fall In the price of wheat and 
the oompUIats on that soon that have been prevalent among fannen 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 209 

itlinot rarprlsing that correspondents shonid hare exaggerated tbe 
tendeoc]' to rednce the area ander this grain, the seeming imperious- 
nesB of tbe reason for doing so leading them to nnderestimate the 
streogth of the connterrailing force exerted bj fixed h&bit, by the dis- 
posJUoD to regard tbe low prices u a merely temporary phenomenon, 
And finally by that conserratism which in general is a characteristic 
of Che fiumer. 



The com crop of 1894 in rat« of yield is one of the lowest on record. 
Bat one year of the paat thirteen shows a lower record — the year 1S81, 
when tbe yield was 18.6 basbels per acre. The area planted to com 
in 1894 was, in round nambers 76,000,000 acres, an iDcreaae over the 
areaof 1898 of 4,000,000 acres. Severe dronght and devutating winds 
rednced tbe acreage harrested for ite grain Talne from 76,000,000 to 
63,583.000 acres. There were over 18,600,000 acres cat for fodder. 

The rate of yield for 1894 is 19.4, which Is lower than the average for 
the ten years 1870 to 1879 by 7.7 bushels ; lower than that of the decade 
1880 to 1889 by 4.7 bnahela, and lower than for the five year period 
1890 [o 1894 by 3.8 bnshels per acre. The average yalae on the Wm or 
market nearest the fsi-m for 1894 is 4fi.7 cents, which ia an increase of 
9.S cents over the corresponding valtie of 1893. This valne is 3.1 centa 
over the average for the ten yeans 1870 to 1679 ; C.4 cents over that of 
the decade 1680 to 1889, and 3.6 cents greater than the average for the 
five years 1690 to 1894, luclnsiTe. This value has only been exceeded 
once since 1882, namely, in the year 1890 when it was fiO.6 cents per 
bashel. In the fifteen years 1880 to 1894, inclnsive, only three crops, 
vis, those of 1881, 1883 and 1890, have reached a higher price. The 
prodnction, 1,312,770,000 bushels. Is the smallest in volnme since tbe 
year 1874, when it was estimated at 660,146,000. Tbe total value of the 
<;ropisf5&4,719,163. Tills is 60,000,000 greater than tbe annual aver- 
age value for the ten years 1870 to 1879, but is 9114,000,000 less than 
for the decade from 1880 to 1889, inclusive. The crop was 407,000,000 
(round nnmbers) less than that of 1893; the value, however, was only 
937,000,000 less. The average value of the crop per acre Is £8.86. 
This Is 66 cents per acre higher than the valne per acre of 1893, but is 
•3.68 less than the average for the ten years 1670 to 1879; 63 cents less 
than the decade average ol 1860 to 1889, and 70 cents less than the aver- 
age for the qoinquennlal period 1890 to 1694, inclnsive. 



Digitized bvGoO^^IC 



J 



210 TRADE AMD OOMMEBOB OF 

STATEMENT SHOWING THE PRODUCT, AREA AND VALUE 
OF THE WHEAT CROP OF 1894, 

AS REPORTED BT THE DEPABTHEMT OF AOKICCLTPBE, WABHIWOTOll. 



Statu un> TauttTOBiu. 


ACKS. 


Biuhels. 


Tslae. 




B 


...If 






IW^SSB 














1779 0«B 
1.3S1.4M 

7,SlS,iOI 

iffiS! 

an. MS 






.,iS 

S;ffi 

ss6,m 

'"eolwi 
4;i» 

"iM.iia 

S;S 

■■ffi,£! 

S8,iX6 
S,688,3M 

's«:es8 


















S.H«,U) 






-Si 

1,2M,BM 


stoShcIJSISr:::;;::;::::::::::::;:::::::::: 
KSaf.': ■: vv;,::""".:: 


^.■,::::===: 


*15S 

SDisTfl!70G 


30,oss 


S^e::;:;;:::::;;:;:::::::::::::::: 


»,7M,»1 


t^U^?"" :■: ;■•■ 


2:(i81,6S- 






















•s 






S^}^:}zEvEv}EEEE 


fSI 
















S'S 














5;^'| 














Toul 


u,sBi,«e 


MO.W.llS 


ms.wa.oi 



TBiM. 


^u%SS"- 


ToUl wea Totalvalue 
of Crop. o( Crop. 


Average 


Acre. 1 Aci 




M0,M7,41S 


Se.0«7,'lU $3S1,77S,«78 

KiS] |:g| 


CtnJi. 
S3.S 

83.8 


1.4 














M,gaS,«6 M6,B02, 3S; 49.1 








Total 


1,3S3.3M,1U 


184,070,835 SI, B09,4Sl,67fl: 






■ij^e,'^ \y^- 


47«.B8,0W 


se,eu,oB7 tsii,ss6,x»j et.B 


.... 


18 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITV OF BT. LODIB. 



211 



STATESIENT SHOWING THE PRODnCT, AREA AND VALUE 
OP THE COBN CROP OF 1894. 

AS BBPOBTED BT THB DBFARTlieNT 0¥ AQBIODLTCBB, WASHOJOTON. 

9TATM AKD TiKSITOUmS. 

Milu 



GeorrU.. 
no7(a» ... 



rtnolloa. ororop. o/Orep. 'fe'r^r ^ aSI" Ao^rr' 



Totel 

Average forByra., 



l,«ai,lT0,8tI T0,aS4,IM 



», 970,1X10 71, no .701 



iD,eH,is3 s53,4io,e7o 8,sTe,a«,oee .. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TBADE AND flOUHBRCB OP 



STATEMENT SHOWING THE PRODOCT, AREA AND VALUt 
OF THE OAT CROP OP 1894. 



A£ BEPORTED BT THE DEFABTHEin OF AQBlCaLTUKE, WASHWaTON. 




Acm. 


BoBbaii. 


Vtlm. 




118, laa 

1B,S86 

108,047 

M1,;S7 
M.STO 
ST1.99a 

sbIju 
eii.m 

»II,7S9 
■.aw 




, 
























HaryUnd. 












































































w*-.^. 




,^-^EEEEE=B 




















»«wMerleo 






•si 


Et7B,097 

"i',w,im 

8.I97,8S8 




































17,011, SU 


ae2.0M,ms 


WH,81«.« 





a by UBjOOO aom thvi tOT 1881, loalng Kboat vl 

„ J if 18U. The lOM In ■ei«M« bu been more a 

pcnsktod bf the InoMue in vlelditha KT«nga yield pa uiratMlOK U.S, i^ostl 
rear. Itinlibeaeea Hut both yield and aoreage wipToxliiwto thoM of tbe year I 
I mnarkable oloawieM. Tlie loreBBe of 1881 WW S7,0U,BIS, that of the preaoit ji 
njutSJSB. Tbe yield par acre in 1881 waa Si.*, and the total 881ja(l,00ObaiheU,wblle I 
total yfeld ol ttab year WM <Sl,<we,<a8, or a little iiwr 1/I0D,M0 bnibeU mora than for i 
f)>nller year. TherirmTalneor ttaecnp oriBWUt1U,8ie,»0: tbatofisn vaa tlsij; 
DM, and tbaC of 1891 tai9;!S3.«ll. The BTeraM ralne per biubel la St.t oenta, a pin a 
cent* OTCT the value of 1B8S. The aTeage ralne [mt acre. »I.8S, li a k>1d of tLO? per » 
oTer the Bam> THlae or Uit year, asd closely apprazlmatea tbe averan per aere for 
an yeara, 1880 to 1891, whlob waa KM. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



THB orry or sr. locu. 



STATEMENT SHOWING THE PRODUCT, AREA AND VALUE 
OF THE EYE CROP Or 1894. 



BT THE DBPASTHKNT Of AQRIOULTURE, TTASHINOTOH. 



States ahd Tbrritobub. 


i.». 


BnabeU. 


Value. 


„ 


l,Mfi 

iffl 

10, uo 

S3,11S 
3.1U 

ST.fBT 
H«M6 


.Si 
'S 

tKMJ 
«7B,01T 

I^TM 
llH,»lt 

18^ 

eajm 
iiloes 

ira,3S3 

iis.ua 

!:K! 

4^ 11, Bid 
1^128 

17%U2 

ese.TSi 

'K 

68,«U 
8S,UT 

101>B8 


I ".W 


















*sww 






'fd^ 


fS^'EEEEEEI 




3 










n^ 






80,408 

<S1g 












n'^ 










































S^ 














l.BM,T80 


K.-mAJ6 


lI^.tTS 





i» Till be ■een l>y eiamlnrtlon of the »bQTa fble, the arm of IBM li leas than thatot 
m br OCTOIt acres. The field It greater than In the larger aorea^e of luC Tear, being 
2l,7ti.ai6 agalnat aB.BBSMt Ic UM- The Taim f alDe, however, It (omevhat leas than in 
ISO, helmg |tV>MTO agabut ns,«12,ai. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TBADB AND OOHMBBOE OF 



STATEMENT SHOWENG THE PBODUCT, AREA AND VALD 
OF THE BARLEY CROP OF 1894. 



8 REfDBTBD BT THB DBPABTV ENT OF AQRICDLTURB, WASHIHQTOH. 



3TATB8 AHD TBBBIIOBII8. 


x««. 


Bushels. 


v&iDe. 


Maine 


'SS 

2»,J88 
1S,BB1 
!,«» 

Bjsa 

Tfl^ 
7.568 

■ lU^W 

"1 

lfl,1«4 
lU.MS 

soj,»ai 

1,H8 

s.gee 

Tn,8BB 


sTs.sra 
i2s,inH 

11.100 

ijMcxgo 
aTB.ess 

sa;iM 

7,716,4fiS 

711,288 
i,0S8.812 

SVi,*43 

AS 

11.2t*,0« 














*^ 






1M» 








20.K 
















6.ei6,M 








i^f 


































m-^ 










167 ,r 

6.M7.S 












a,iTO,«tt 


«,«0,«I5 


127.111,1 





As witb oaU, tbere hu aJtobeea KndDotloa of the wes planted to barley. Tbeu 
agt of the crop ot ISM U flS-G per oFnt of that oriBU, or S,lia.S<H against 1,120,171. t 
ptoaaot ofiSH is «l,UO,Mt, asaloBl 39,M9,ie9 In IgSS. or 8,1(9,000 bnihell lua. The mo: 
Talne at tb« ftrm market was ttT.lIll,lST against the Ilka valoatlon at the same timi 
1893 of t2a,7tB3S«. The luc oeosaa made the area nf barle; for the year (IS89) a.«0 
aorei, the product T8,SSl,4n basbe Is, orU.S bushels per aora. The yield per acnfar ] 
trai IS. 8 or Ehnshels less tlian thatotlSSt. 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OF 8T. I.ODIS. 



STATEMENT SHOWING THE PRODUCT, AREA AND VALUE 
OF THE HAY CROP OF 1894. 



AS KEPORTED BX THE DEFABTHBNT OF AQKICCLTURE, WA8H1NQTON. 



SUTB8 AKD TlBBlTOUmS. 


Aor«i. 


TODB. 


V.,u.. 


Milne 


l,ltT,7<N 

m 

188,060 

,Ss 
Ss 

1,8<H,73S 

l<in2,64t 

4,893.308 

1,040,833 

424,987 

as 

228,370 


1.W.7B1 

..ffiS 

1)88 443 

••US 

SMMO 

1 

7S»,7ei 
2,8S8,W» 

J,l»48.W7 

8,ai,oii 

«;ts7!s*o 

1,834,897 
3 49D11B 
8;iSJ,«9 

444 Its? 

B6i,87! 
1.788,iWl 

^S 

i,sBt,«oe 

S.21S.S4T 








































Virginia. 


n,Ba7,Bua 




8,893.029 






1S4,2S0 








4,833.884 






TcnneiMe 












MJehl^ 














29,318,990 
J6,83i,S09 

i3,sat,ofia 




















18,4BS,TTe 






































48,341,372 


84,874,408 


48S,a7S,t21 





For rBWDiu polated oat claewbere (Crop Bevlen') the bay crop of 1894 M oompaied iriUi 
tttl«at7e»rhMf«iltiioffl.»l,000«orBa. The area mown InlSiWis shown by the census 
•» S2.»4B,7B7i thai barveslAd IhI year as Mlimated by the Departmeat was 49,eiS.4eB 
■ere*, which was an Inonuc over the esllnutcs o( 1888'-the last year until 1883 for whiob 
u estimate was main— of 11,031 J>8a acres. The preaant year's crop shows an area har- 
niHd conslstlfiK of 48,8^,273 aores, yielding aproduct of M,BT4,4C8 tuns, or 10,891.788 tons 
>M* than [n 18S3. The ralae (tmrnt) aUnds at 1488,878,331, a«iibBt •870,883,873 last year, 
TIk eatimalad yatoe per lOD Is tSM toi thla yaac, agalnat tS.ffi last year. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TBADB AND COMMBBCE 



STATEMENT SHOWING THE PRODUCT, AREA AND VALUE 
OF THE POTATO CROP OF 1894. 



A8 BBPOBTBD BT THE DEFABTMBin' OF AORICULTDBE, WASHIKGTO!!. 



Statbi add txkiutobibb. 


Acres. 


BuBhels. 


VKlae. 




19,786 

s 
i 

*.m 
Bjisa 
i^m 

G^lB 
9,M9 

i!:S 

sg,uw 

» 

18370 
0B,B21 
flS,S79 

ee,407 

94,061 

ffiffi 
"■ffl 

.191 

!£! 

SS 

IS 


»S 

I.OM.BIS 

a;79s:So 

1,113,910 

£iS,271 
W0,028 
1S7,9§0 
194,2fi9 

S:S! 

,664.936 

,t7S.TuS 

1 ,977,S41 

1 J46,740 

Si 

,694.016 
G.ISO.SOS 
,436,731 
40BS74 
,134,590 
,726.W>2 

gjs 
If 

sitIbts 

,.sg 

z,<as,76s 

1,398,873 


'as 


















































































































Sil 




S,37*.9M 






'•SS 






'SS 










•iiSSS 


























730 JK 










1,717,973 


170,787,338 


JB1,B«,7K 





83,000 acrei k^mMi ttaSD -. , _ 

3,S46,oao boBhelB leea. Tbe yalvx ot the orop on tl>o — <iu — •^^^.^•^^•^ » v,u« ,<» >~ 
present year, uwluat $108,661^1 In the tekr 1893. Tbe yield per >ore Is 63.8 boaheli ; Oa) 
of 1898 iTfts Ta.£ The umnal avetwe for tbe nine jura ItSO to leSS, laclusKs, wh 7t.< 
biuhelB. The snnnal avenigs Tield lorlbe ten yeus preceding ItJSO WKa87.7 huBbrlap* 



,db,GoOglc 



B crrv OP ST. Louis. 



COMPARATIVE GRAIN CROPS OP UNITED STATES FOR A 
SERIES OP YEARS. 



UT.ITT.UO S.fll, 

«i,7ia,o(» u.sw, 

ITI.TIT.OOO U388. 

•"" •■" "" 10,14S, 

90,374,300 

si.no.u- 



US,130,fllO 
G71,3(B,M0 
60,638.000 
638,408,000 

09b',81b|000 
7<ll,73S.OD0 

TGl,SI(l,UOa 



HARVEST TIME Off THE WORLD. 

The following shows the months of the Wheat harvest in the different 
wheal^fTOWing sections of the world : 

Janiiar; — Anstralia, New Zealand, Chili and Ai-geatine Republic. 

Febmarr and March— East India and Upper Egypt. 

April— Lower Egypt, Syria, Cyprus, Persia, Asia Minor, India, 
Mexico and Cnba. 

Mav — Algeria, Central Asia, China, Japan, Morocco, Texas and 
Florida. 

Jane— Tnrkey, Greece, Italy, Spain, Portugal, South of France, 
California, Oregon, Louisiana, MlHsisslppi, Alabama, Geoi^a, Caro- 
lioft, Tennessee, Virginia, Kentucky, Kansas, Arliansae, Utah, Col- 
orsdo and Missonri. 

July— Boamania, Bulgaria, Austro-Hungary, South of Russia, Ger- 
many, Switzerland, France, South of Eoglaud, Nebraska, Minnesota, 
WiRconaia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Ohio, 
New York, New England and Upper Canada. 

August— Belginm, Holland, Great Britain, Denmark, Poland, Lower 
Csnsda, Columbia, Manitoba and Dakota. 

September and October — Scotland, Sweden, Norway and North 
of Sossia. 

November— Peru and South Africa. 

I>eeember— Bormah. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TBADB AND OOHMEBCE OF 



1 


■n<iraMd»B 


sssssli&szsisR 


-inanv 


cgsssscgsssassB 


■Sfae 


SSSSESSSXSC&Sf: 


■•oor 


ii|SS3s;:sss^ss& 


i 

6 


-nqowO 






saisssessesBSB 


-.^.y 


PsasssssJistaES 


■itnf 


ssaszs&sssssss 


9 


,«MlOT«d»B 


e-ns:gE.n» . ■ 


SSS8SS£S|:sesS : : 


TmluT 




lEcssssfssssssuse 


■ildf 




3&SSSSS883S8?:S 


■»nni- 


ss§s&sesxs»8Ss 


i 

ft 


•aqarajdes 


S|f5S$S3P8SSS : : 


■Ipir 


ssszsss^s^sstis 


-aniif 




KSSSSEiSKSE^SSeS 


■i«H 




■lUdY 


ssssssssassscs 


^1 




t!88S!!£Sf:&SSSKQ 




S 


iliiillilillli 



,db,GoOglc 



i CITY oy 8T. I.OUI8. 



THE WORLD'S WHEAT CROP OF 1893. 

Complied b; the deputmeDt ot Agrlaullim, WuhlnftoD, In March, 1«H, firom tha 
■mi uUtontTn d>la BmlBbl* at tbiA daM. 



Co^«-. 


issi. 


... 


ISM. 




B«tMt. 

Bii,;go,ooo 


WB.MH.OOO 


S96,1M.OOO 




Ouudti 


4,M1,<N» 


S:S;iS 

i.WB.000 


w.ui.ooo 

10.410,000 

4;ooo,ooo 








Total CWMda 


»,B1,000 


48,181,000 


41,847.000 






12,000,000 


10,000,000 


10.000,000 




Total NMtH America 


aw,Boi,o» 


n4,l!l,000 


447,m,00O 


Sr.""-.-::::::::-::r:::: 


nasi 

8,000,000 


10,000.000 

18,000,000 

a:»a;ooo 


W.7GO.00O 
IB 100,000 

B:a»4;ooo 


W 




Total SontbAnwrloa 


80,000,000 


M,»»,000 . 


8l,«4.000 






U, 071, 000 

wnslooo 

7,000.000 

i,awooa 

18 MO 000 
lOOOS.DOO 

Molatslooo 

•n',Kl',000 
S,616.000 

s,a7i>,ooo 

Ul,4M,O0O 

ws 

IS 071 000 

■lis 

100,000 

8,SOO;000 
80,000,000 
8,000.000 


BO.170.000 

■liffiS 

10 44] 000 

s. 000,000 

iisijislooo 
eo 407 000 

1.3U.O00 
4. 000. 000 

".Sffi 

lis 

Tl.^lM.OOO 

s;ooo:ooo 


41.800,000 

1M,000,000 

JSS 

le.Mi.ooo 

»?:S:S 










S^^ee;;:!:;;;:!::;;;:;;; 










"lar 

00,588,000 

ni 497 000 
llOMOOO 

00,000,000 

B,000;000 


J^^urfa 










B^eeeeeeE 






LKOOIOOO 














1,208,030,000 


1.40a.9»,000 


i.iss,«e8,ooo 





* The TTTlaed BaDnrlan i 
orop fln- ISBJ uw,anojNO bnebel 
of flwMaroknportaaotor' - 



« fln- 18BJ lW,anojNO bnebeli, lnat«id nf 182,37 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TBADB AKD COMIfEBOB OF 

THE WORLD'S WHEAT CKOP OF 1898.— CoKrnniED. 



Countria. 


lESl. 


laet. 


■- 




JM,704.d00 

4»,ouo,ocn 

ass 


309,640,000 
W, 000,000 

la.BCiooo 

38,787,000 


900,806,000 






"•SilS 


*" 




' ' 




8U ,611,000 


iss,Mi,oao 


«*5,B«0,0M 






i;as 


IS.«».000 
2,813,000 

!;Sr 










lolwlSw 

*,600,0») 






Total Atrloi 


M.aM,000 


34,464,000 






' ' 




8,6*0.000 

'l;B:S 

as 


a,9M,000 

18.670,000 
6,430,000 
398 000 
938.000 

io,»s,ooa 
'm;ooo 


0,817,000 








'is:™; 

1,019,(01 










TotalA tril 1 


W,8«9.000 


SS,08S,00O 


41 161 DOO 




' ' 


SxcurnruTioii bt CoimHBHTB; 




«(, 131,000 

siIsm'.ooo 

1,400,033,000 
288,044 000 
31,484,000 
35,083,000 


447.470.000 


















«;i6i;(»i 






a,3M,197,000 


a,3«,7J7,000 


8,Sa,!80,(W) 





,db,GoOglc 



I OITT OP ST. LOTTIB. 



PACKING AND PROVISIONS. 



PORK PRODUCTS, 
Tbe buiinesi of the past year tn pork produoU ibows a hanaiome In- 
orsaM OTBT 1B8S, altbougb lesi tn volume than In leei or 1892. The packing 
for the winter season also slightly tnoreased, a« did the summer paoking of 
IW. The business of the year waa fairly satisfactory, with slight profits, 
altbough tbe general depres«ion of the year was felt in this as In all other 
linei of trade. There was not a oontlnual deollne In prices, but values at 
Uie oloM of the year were oonilderably lower than at tbe opening. The 
bnilnestoIthepaBt four years Is shown In the following table: 

1891. 1892. 1893. 1894, 

BMSlTSd, pounds 391,700,203 2M,841,»60 S09,990,9tA 280,067.191 

aUppsd, pounds 3M,(ie&,6IS 8a9,lll,t>0D 38S,S23,741 340,491.499 

Totlli, pomds eU,8e6,779 888,758,460 496,814,885 G75,B7B,6C9 

The relative positions of the principal packing points is shown by the 
following itatemeDt of the number of hogs packed the past four years as 
reported by tbe Clnoinnati Price Current: 

TOTAL TKARLT FACKINQ AT PBOmmilT PLACES. 

1698-94. 189Z-9S. 1891-92. 1600-01. 

OUcsgo 4,310,587 4,3fi3,00e 5,249,796 8,071,659 

EsDsuatT 1,473,318 1,695,145 1,618,066 2,898,764 

Onsba 1,028,281 1,124,728 1,288,772 1,527,871 

SLLeull 578,878 S80.SS4 664,188 646,100 

IldilBuolls 010,618 539,198 007,002 736,238 

lOhraiikee 845,896 887,977 576,565 718,726 

fflointaty 200,900 818,978 265,068 " 666,298 

CiacJBDsU 3Sa,818 456,806 484,178 528,810 

Ski^al 320,176 218,062 276,240 835,406 

CedsrBaidds 81S,U1 SBS,S45 429,056 661,074 

OerelaiKCr 405,124 449,061 S08,26!l 424,091 

LOQlsTtlie 217,947 118,2G4 161,365 Ul.BlS 

Ottumws 325,000 264,244 241,600 817,300 

HsbntkaCl^ 179-182 131,968 197,433 367,846 

BLJoieph.... 261,500 206,000 IM,000 183,000 

niteen placet 10,566,033 11,333,840 11,703,801 15,600,002 

Another...: 1,086,483 1,166,000 1,755,012 3.112,143 

Aggregate 11,600.000 13,895,8M 14,457,814 17,718,184 

As wUl be seen by the above table, St. Louli still holds tbe fourth place 
as a packing point. 

B£BF. 
In dreaied beef St. Iiouls made a large advance during 1894, the plants at 
the National Stock Yards having largely increased their capacity. The 
■hipments during the year were 196,069,375 pounds, against 103,687,622 pounds 
in 1S98 and 68,071,608 pounds in 1S03. This interest will doubtless continue 
to Increase and result In drawing to this market larger receipts of cattle. 
In addition to the oatput at this point, 64,612,840 pounds were recelred from 
' TTectsm points. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



llp;!|pip|||Ppp-S^ 



rH-i*i3^ps=iplinsp.g 



;5ii 



iP?;i«|i|ilF:» 



mmmmi 

. . : ■ : : : - : : ■■■..■■■ ^ 



U\ 






miiimmmm 







m 



imm 
I— 



„Go(5glc 



THK CITY OF BT. I.01JI8, 



UCUFTS AKD SHIPUEMT8 OF BOO PBODOCT A 



AT ST. LODIS ON DATES HAHBD. 



ArtclM. 


HiTCb 1, 

lew. 


MTChl, 

1B»3. 


Uarohl, 
ISR. 


„»,, 


March S, 

ISM. 




!;S!:S 

TfiO.ono 




!,818 

l.ESl.OOO 
17,151,000 
l.I7B,l»0 






^^~ 


si 



,db,GoOglc 



TRADE AND COKUEBOB OF 



GENERAL 8UMMABY OF PACKING 

Ag BEPORTSD BT THE CINCIMirATI PKICK CDBBENT. 

Packing in ttie Weat dnriDg 1893-91 compared with the precedin 
yen in leading exhibits. 



Number of Iios* packed.. .. 
ATcns* live weight, Iba... 
ATcrage jMd oOud, Ibl. 
PereenUse ;leld of lud. , . 
ATcrage eoat of hoca, »1It« 



A«si;eg»te ll™ welflil, 
To&l grtea mMta, lbs 



AggregMe coat of bon 

niTC«i of lord, $30 lbB.«koh... 
Han Pork made, burcla 

Other Fork, barrels 

Pork uf all klndt, barrols 





















v.'^ 












00 
OD 
00 

ea 


■•6.189,000 











It the same average welgbCaB In leOO-M tbe total ire Ivbl of haga packed 





1S08. 


ISK. 


DecreiM. 


■«™ 




11 

1,SU,8W?0^ 

isi',aBo',ooo 


"li'i 
'■«■•!■« 


I,aS8,lM 


























SSS«'^::-:;;;:: 


i6>,«i,o«^ 

•i:g:8!l 

70,7M,000 














|1S,«U 


TeilWlard, ao Iba. CMh 


tS,«M 



TOTAL n 


3E TWELVE 


MONTHS. 






•Tear ending Maroh 1. 


189«-W. 


ma-ta. 


Deon»»«. 


iDon 


. 


"■•Si's 

a.it 

1,828,0*3.000 
1,E8S,TOS,0()0 
40S0«D00 
1,901766 000 
ilW, 090,000 
1, 190,300 


1,178:600 


f«9,<IH 




















l^i^S.IJfS'.':':::::::;.: 










liolt! 


















It anfflcleotlr Urge to be essential tc 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE OITT OF ST. LPUIS. 



PAOKIHO AT ST. LOUIS FOR TWXKTT-KINE SEASOMS. 



Soawmi. 


«r^' 


-sise 


fflsffli; 


iE'ffi°asr 




....Ko.m... 

....iisi.aM ... 

....3«S,glO.... 

:;::S;S:::: 

...mw.-. 

....S2ft,Kl.... 

ill 


i ;; 
11 : 

B»70 " 

W ." 

tra.is » 

S« " 

no « 

816 " 

i: -i 

lie Net. 

H ij 

IM.ttl •• 


....58.81.... 

:i:ifti:;;: 

... .83.49.... 
....W.M.... 
.,..S4.».... 

....8B.oa.... 

:::.Si!:::: 

....81 JO.... 

....84.50.... 
....86.17..... 


::;::::15 




















































































WJ;^ 








































StTUHEB PACKQIQ AT ST. LOUIS. 



Axnaa Qtou WM^t. 



,db,GoOglc 



TBADE AND COHMEBCB UF 



lano-ui 6i8,ioo ' 



ia85-« «13,1M ■ 

lSM-86. TU.SOl ' 

1SS3-M MT.ISJ ' 



WIKTBB PACKIKO IN THE WBST FOE TWENTY 8BASONB, 

As rfporlpa by the CInolnnMl Prio« Onrrent. 




SBABORB. 


Namber or 
Hogs. 


On>B* Weight 
per Hog. 


S'^'H. 


grOM- 




B.MB,Ka 
4,880, IW 
l>.101,SU8 

ssas 

!:» 


II 

IS] .'si 

100.92 

S3B.7B 

■ai'js 


Is 

Mn 

K.tt 

11 

i 

Is 

aa.OT 








































































i9«=s.:::::-:::;:':."::::;:;: 


£.H 



SDUHBB FACKINO IN THE WE9T FROM UAR. Ist TO 

Ab reported b; the ClndDiwtl l^ice CuiretiL 
^mnbv Bon. A«. no. vt. 

^,»w,M« m5:b . 



8,5*0,008 . 

9,«88,SB3 , 

7,7(17,110 . 

8,781,009 . 

law Estimate 8.850,000 . 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



'II 



li 



ii 



II 



II 



I! 



Ill 



i 



ii 



[:ii:i| 



11:* 






lirppi 



III 



„Go(5glc 



TRADE AND COUHBBC& OF 



WEEKLY PRICES OP PROVISIONS FOR 18M. 



C e. 


• '■ 




ii%isn IS 
































































































13 15 




10 




























































































l!S 





































































































« €. 


• .. 




tnama oo 








































8 75 






















































u 



























































































































































































» c. 


... 1 


e4aesao | 




1*!,' 








































liH 






























«ai 




























































































































B«S 





,db,GoOglc 



i CITY O? ST. liOUIB. 



LIVE STOCK. 



THE C1.TTLE TRADB. 



In common with most other markets cattle receipt! at St. Louie did 
not increase during the year 1894 as compared with 1893, 1892 or 1891, 
bnt were greater thtin any other previous jear. The advance made hy 
St. Louis is in the home slaughter of cattle, which caneed the lai^et 
percentage of arrivals to be sold and eUughtered here. 

The Texas and Indian cattle trade here is the larger end of the bnei- 
aest. This is the natural consequence of being the best located market 
to supply the interior. The early sales of 1894 were mostly fed cattle, 
and tales did not range very high, the best price In January was 94.16, 
in February four cent«, and only in May did a few fancy cattle bring 
94.76. In Jane and Jnly the best fed steers sold at 93.50 to $4.20, and 
in December tlie best fed cattle sold at $4.00 to 94.2&. During the 
grass season prices were nnusn ally steady. The full range for grass 
steer cattle was $2.00 to 9406. The great bulk of all the grass steers 
sold at 92.ca to $9.00, and altbough tboasaiide of the better class sold 
at 93.10 to 98.60 only a few trains were sold at 93.60 to 94 05. The 
grass cows sold largely at $1.85 to 92.36, and the full range was 91.60 
to 92.76. 

THE HOQ TRADE. 

Dniing the year 1894 the hog trade was the most satisfactory end of 
the bnainesB. The arrivals show an increase of 384,748 head over and 
above the receipts of the previous year and the highest figures since 
1681. Although the receipts do not eqnal those of the years 1879, 1880 
and 1881, other markets bait to go back to find their highest records, 
therefore St. Loale is not alone in this respect. It has often been said 
that liog production moved away from St. Louis; If to, it has come 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



280 TBABE AND COUMEBOE OF 

back ag&in, and anotbei- 160,000 head on top of tho 1894 receipts wouli 
pftBB tbe highest mark, and we expect to see it done before long- 
In 1894 hogs sold higher than anj' other claes of stock, bnt not an big 
as in 1893. The Janaarj' hogs sold from $6.00 to (6.66, and not ant 
March did the tops go below 6 cents, and then only for three week: 
April and M&y sold hoga fi-om $5.00 to $5.30, and after anotber thre 
weeks with tops at 94.76 to 94.95 the July hogs i-anged with the bet 
from 96.16 to 96.35. As August went ont the best hogs soid at t5.9f 
and the September hogs at 96.00 to 9G.66 were the highest of tbe yesi 
October closed with the tops at 94.75, and since then it has been a qnef 
tlon whether the tops woald sell at $4.40, 94.50 or 94.60, As a genen 
proposition St. Louis can sell many more bogs to the best advantage c 
the shippers. 

At no time during the year 1894 wee sufficient hogs here to foil 
enpply (he market, and as a general proposition the supplies have bee 
insufficient lo fill all orders for bogs required for the Eant. In additio 
to the numerous regular buyers here there are several large Easter 
houses desirous of buying hogs here and who do buy here occasionaLl} 
They want good heavy weights, not by deck or double deck, but by th 
train load. All this market wants is the supply. The bogs weight a 
S60 to 350 pounds are wauted greatly in excess of current receipt 
This market can sell 200,000 hogs per month and give better satisfacUo 
than if only 80,0C0 to 100,000 are here. The reason no more hogs wei 
sold in ld94 is because no more were here to sell. Orders for hundrec 
of thousands of hogs were neglected for want of supplies to fill th 
orders. This Is the best market in tbe conutry for Eastern buyers t 
purchase t'beir bogs, and there is no limit to the orders that would com 
here if supplies were larger. 

THE SHEEP TRADE. 

The number of sheep sold upon the Si. Louis market was greab 
during the year in review than during any previous year in the btstei 
of tbe establishment. This is due solely to the increased slaughteriu 
capacity of the St. Louis market. There is no longer any difficulty i 
finding buyers for all the sheep within reasonable limits that can con 
here, and the difference between now and during the former years 
that now home consumption disposes of more than the entire receip 
In some former years, whereas formerly the shipping trade parcbas« 
most of the supplies. 

The receipts during the year 1894 were less thau in 1893, but th 
makes no difference. In 1893 a good maity sheep were billed throug 
and in 1894 for months at a time none were allowed to go out fro 
here except to the slaughter houses. The sheep prices averaged lo 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE OITT OP BT. LOUIS. 281 

from one eod of the year to the other, excepting only the month of 
April, vhen larfce numbers of sheep sold at $4.00 to 95.70. From 
Augnst to the end of the year the highest price was 98.75 for ntttlve 
(beep uid the bnll: sold at 92.86 to $3.00 per 100 poanda. The market 
here received no more than it conid handle, bat continnally giatted 
nurkets at Chicago held the valnes of the mutton down. 

BECRIPTS ASD SmPHENTS Of CATTLE, SHEEP AXD H008 TOS 
TWENTY-EIOHT YBAKS. 





..0..™. 


„™„. 




Cattle. ' Sheep. 


Hog.. 


ftUnlea 


CfttUe. 


Sheep. 


aoipi. 


^sss 


UN 


9t 

n 
i 

4! 

i 

41 
X 

r. 

i 


t!, ^ 


w 

i 

M 

i 

71 


li 
J 

^'Vi'la. 
'sBaisii 

87 T. 180 

flTS.Bli 
Tl»,07( 

ne',M: 


12 

i 
i 

BE 

i! 

i 

76 


Ml. WO 
as, we 

tS5,«8 

.-" -91 

06 

i 7S 

OS 

08 

S3 
IS 
88 

7B 

IS 

88 
30 
01 

s 

IS 
48 

m 


i 
i 

2 


78 
BS 
M 

!! 

78 
18 
18 

n 

1 

80 
88 
84 

n 

65 

!! 


1 i 

S 1 
1 1 

78 87 

ii g 

i i 

ill 








IS::;:::::::: 


u 

i 

w 
tt 

9B 

2i 

78 
IH 

1 

ra 


X 

i 

K 

« 

'1 


«:(St 






















S:::: 








S:::.:::::: 


48, ass 

48.764 
















4fiS 

1 


i 

i 













































,db,GoOglc 



=l|Sp||p3|^pSS*»| I 



8g||iip;|S;5p|ppS; ? 



ss ;s 1 1 ns 



16; I 



5S.-S_ ;o, = ,a3S_R_-,«.|«_8,5,5a ; 8_ 









■I 
iuluii 

i 
s 






„Go(5glc 



THK CITY OP ST. I.0UI8. 



AND SmPUENTS OF LITE STOCK AT THI 
STOCK TARDS FOR THE TEAR I 



9T. LOUIS NATIONAL. 



RBOEIPTS AMD 



LIVE STOCK AT THE ST. LOUIS UNION STOCK 
TARDS FOR THE YEAR 1891. 



JBM. 


KccciptB. 




OaWlB. 


Hog*. 


Shsep. 


Horoes 
and 

MUlSB. 


Cattle. 


HOgB. 


Sheep. 


H^e*. 








4 Kin 


1,991 

s 

S,18T 


1:% 


8.48S 
4:!B5 

10 [4;: 

I8>8 


WT 




^a-^y-z:.:: 




1 

»i 

77. 


i 
i 

1 


0« 

tot 


! 


1 




ar:.::::::::::;::.::;; 
JIS:; 


1 

1 


S 


II 




















7M« 
















101 ^Bl 




,.-, 


SO, 880 


36,1Hg 


88,781 




4 471 























,db,GoOglc 



TRA.DB AND COMUEBCE OF 



WEEKLY PRICES OF LIVE STOCK FOE 18M, 

AS BEFOBTED BT THE KATIONAL LIVE STOCK BEPOBTBB- 





1 


CATTLE. 


..!.„. 


BOOB. 


""""■ 


Sill 


T. 

Ste 


In. 


Good to 

choice. 


Torktn. 


PMken. 


Bmshen 


JaDoar; 


( ^ 


loaj 


85 


S.OO & S.66 


i,5a93.a6 


G.003B 


20 


LTsae.so 


6.0096.3! 








70 








4.20 6 








s.w s,r 






10 * 


50 


a;so 






4.50 5 


40 


I'so 5. so 


I.W 11.1 




as..:... 4 




Be 


2.*S 






,.50 1 


40 


4.S5 








2» 3 




no 




s'.l!. 2.75 4.20 






4.75 






Febnur; 








*:«) 












1:00 5.; 




IS.::::: a 


w 4 




3.S6 


3:70 s.n in 


4:90 5 


tffl 


1:75 


:3a 


1.0) i- 




19. 3 




Sb 




a.so i.so s.ss 


4.30 5 


30 


4.76 








26 3 


20 4 






a.7u a.so 8.90 


1.85 1 








I'.u I'. 


iUroh 




IS 4 


05 


a.to 


4.00 ^.75 8.BS 

8.40 ^.ai s.rt 








:i5 


B.OO i 




is:::... s 




.15 






00 


i:a6 




4,M i. 












8.40 Ig.aa 4.00 








:7o 


1.50 1. 




» » 


SO 4 


IS 


2.50 


3.40 13.25 4.C0 


1:2s ■ 






.BO 


I.IO 1. 


AprU 


i a 


»0 ! 






3.30 'S.20 4.50 


1.25 ' 




4:00 


.% 


.70 . 












4.00 |4.» .W 




9S 


l.i6 




.70 . 












8.S6 3.T5 .70 








:3fi 


.00 . 




S3 3 


W i 


10 


■no 


s.es '3.00 .80 


>:aa i 






.50 


6.25 . 




JO J 


TO 4 


35 




8 Gi .i.M .00 










5.10 . 


U«y 




70 4 


26 




4.7S 3.00 .M 








M 


,00 . 




i*::::: a 


■i6 t 


ZS 


2.75 








4:80 


.iO 














3:90 3:7.1 :i5 


LSO < 








:7o : 






at 4 


I'i 


«:t» 


8.75 2. BO SO 






4:30 




l.<0 . 


Jua* 






30 


8, ,6 




>:« : 


SO 


1.25 


'.aa 


i.ao . 




u t 


00 4 






SM i.ii 'en 


I.U ' 


70 






i.n . 












4.10 .M 8.40 






t:4o 








25 ! 




M 


2.0U 








i.no 


'.K 


1:70 


July 




SO 4 






3:50 :» :25 


1:40 1 




4.T8 




i.n . 












4.20 2.W ..W 














Ifl s 






2.40 








1:75 


'20 






M 8 


8U 4 






3:20 :« 00 


[.to 1 


30 




.so 






30 8 








8.45 1 .80 .25 




20 






*"w 


AuRUrt 










8.50 .M .00 






4:so 


:ia 






IS.:;::: » 


» 4 






8.20 .30 .7^ 


4:5'i 5 




1.90 


.45 


5:25 




M 8 








8.25 a.» .no 


1.90 1 


60 


5.00 


,70 


S.M 




■a a 


in ) 


S5 


2.00 


».ac !2.M .15 






6.00 


.95 




aepUmberS | t 






S.23 


3,30 |2 ai .90 






.■1.20 




5.70 








SO 




3.21 h.80 .16 


i:3A < 














vo 1 






3.S0 2.85 .15 






a:oo 


60 


6:30 




Si'. a 






2.25 


3.5S 2.31 .uO 






6.26 


.20 


B.OO 


OcMbei 




M < 


6i 




8.35 2.40 OU 


i:so 1 


90 


6.29 


.00 


6.711 












B..W 2.40 75 




6a 


6.25 




S.4D 




in....:: J 


W I 


00 


3.10 


i.OO 2.50 .50 






4.80 


40 


B.OO 








00 


a.oo 


8. BO i.25 .OCJ 






4.25 A. 10 


6.00 




29:.:::: a 




7S 




4.06 2.2s .68 


i:oo . 


60 




.70 




HoTBrabB 


r 8 B 




65 


s:"o 


8, SO 2.30 .7.1 


l.liO . 






.70 


4:50 4 




13 a 


J5 ( 


00 


1.80 


8.20 12 35 .00 




S5 


4:0a 












85 


3.2s 


3.70 2 as .85 














as::;::: a 


SO 4 


SO 


2.00 


3,.10 2 25 ,00 


i:so ■ 


M 


4.21 






D««ember s 1 9 


3U 4 


35 






a. Oil a.76 


S.75 4 














» < 


69 






i.2S 3.30 


1.75 ■ 


JO 










\r'.'.:V 1 




60 


2:S5 


4:25 


a.at B.«o 




30 






4:30 1 




H a 




00 


i.as 


4.10 


2.40 8.75 


\'.n ■ 


Su 




:so 


i.St 4 






7B B 


00 






2.25 8.35 


S,7S 4 


2E 


1.10 




4.K 4 



,db,GoOglc 



THE OITT OP 8T. LOTTIB. 



LEAF TOBACCO. 



Revisw by EVANS BROTHERS 



The conditioDH of the leaf tobacco industry have not materially 
changed since our review of 1898, and the local trade coaUnaei to drag. 
The effort to re-establish the status of Missonri as a hurley district haa 
met with but poor enoonragemeut from either grower or local buyer. 
The esUmated crop of the State for the season of 1894 Is 4,000 bogs- 
heada, the bnik of which is hurley, and it is of very good quality. The 
seasons have not been all that the planter could desire, and the honest 
inCentioQ of a large number of growers at the plant bed season came to 
naught when the transplanting period came. 

The query naturally arises why the crop of the bnrley districts of this 
State should be sought after and paid for liberally by the operators of 
other States, many of whom have a fall force in operation buying, as- 
sorting and redrylng for other markets. Where our local buyers pay a 
royalty tn many instances for oar own products, this is an unnatural 
condition of aflalrs, and will no doubt be remedied at no distant day, 
as we unquestionably raise as good bnrley as any other section of the 
tODiitry. The crops round at the bam is selling at $3.00 to (fi.OO per 
hundred, which is a very fair price, on the basis ofvalue of other crops. 

BECUFTS AND SHIPHStlTS OT LEAP TOBACCO. 

BcoelpM. UeoelpU. Shipmcntt 

im. is.mbhds. ii,es«pkgi, 

iSU. »,M7 " U,39l •'^ 



MANUFACTURED TOBACCO. 

St. Loals «mi holds first position in the manufticture of tobacco, pro- 
dndng yearly a greater amount than any other city in the world. The 
total manufacture In the United States for the fiscal year endlDg June 
SO, 1891, was 236,461,806 pounds. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



286 



TBADE ANI> COHUEBCE OF 



The oatpnt of the larger districts was as follows: 

HlMoorl FInt Dfatriot. 9t. Loali. W.SlS.Utlbi 

Mew Jetuv Fitth. ■• Newnk. W),ua,U7 " 

Keotuckj rilUi " LoulSTille. ll.SH.SM " 

Hichigan Flrat " Detroit. », 811,307 " 

Ohio First " anBinnatl IS.UO.Mfi " 

Vlrglnl*. ... Second " RIotimODd. lK,0IS,T3a " 

North CarallD& Pillb " Aaheilile. 18, 878,736 " 

Virginia Slztb " Lrnchburg. 10,507,^7 " 

Thas it will be seen that Bt. Louis prodncee 23.66 per cent of all Ih 
tobacco manufactnred, and nearly as mach as the three next larges 
manufaclui'ing districts. 

For the calendar year ending December Slat, the amount mannfai: 
tared was 57,097,445 ponnds, an increase of 13 per cent over 1893. 
this amount 51,634,424 pounds was ping, 5,348,038 ponnda amofeinj 
86,181 pounds fine cat, and 26,807 pounds suufT. 

St. Louis brands are well known in every State and are sold in a 
markets in competition with home productions. The value of lb 
product is placed at $20,000,000. 

The total manafacture of cigars in 1894 was 4,0G6,917,43S, of wbic 
St. Louis produced 61,436,680. 

The receipts of manufactured tobacco in 1 894 were 14,908,766 ponnde 
shipments 64,679,660 ponnds. 

FIRST INTERNAL REVENUE COLLECTION DISTRICT. 



Yl*B. 


liss-r 


Amn.aip.1. 


FUcil, 873 


'.SS 

1,781,689 
6,aW.+08 
4,aj8,147 
t,Wl.«l 

!:SS 

it,eeB,Tsi 
i7;:7n;i» 

S3,ffl5,728 
U,631,1U4 
l8.BI7,t01 

i!;l!S:SJ 


a ,SM,717 

DM, em 


:: S;::::::;:.:::::'::::::;;:::;:::::;:::::::: 

Olendkr, 877 

;; g:::::::::::;:;;;:::;::;::::;:::::::::::;:;;; 
:: S:::::;:::::::::::::::::::::::;;::::::::::::; 


;8I7.68S 

;«o:7ii 

,177,SM 
,063 ,M9 








2,iM.M 






i:s5:j« 


















IBM 


s'.ix.m 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 287 

The Duuiii&ctnres or the paat five years can be closaifled «e follows : 





ISM. 
PonndB. 


Ponni. 


Pound*. 


isei. 

POQUdB. 


ISM). 
Pound*. 


fSSr'-.^^r",:.::: 




4B,ms,n8 

128, 190 
4,SM,BGS 


G3,2ra,«0S 
lU.S.'H 


u,eitt,m 


4s,s84,an 




*,81«.31J 




ToUL 


si.om.M 


«.«!,«« 


»T,BW,SiS 


flO,384,U9 


n.m.wt 





Tbab. 


Murafcofd. 

1 


Amount Of 
cu paid. 








i« 
aw 

s 

IK 

1« 
















































: ^EEEFEE^£EE}:£ 


!SS 












lit 

161 



















18M. 


law. 


18M, 


18»1. 


1880. 


U8». 




iba. 


S;S;g! 

'■"SC 


»,7B7 

iss.aoo 

n.«; 


n, 868,878 




BI.TU.IM 

sslfoi 








sssrr.^ 






ao.Tw 











,db,GoOglc 



TRADE AND COIIMBBCE OF 



III! 



11 



i ^ 
I! 









i :i iliiei 



iiiii 



:-;-SI8iSI?i83l=!6§IEIiBM5iSSI5 




,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOITIB, 



m 

nil 



="l 






:!:iai;isl.i:i33giil;iS::8!iSili 



:|giii;i 
ismfi 



ISI§ 

iiis 






iisiiisiissseii§itsi§si§iigiiss;s 






sti: 






SSiiiSSSliS 



:s|||; 



,db,GoOglc 



TBADE AND COUHBBCE OF 



BAGGING AND IRON TIES. 



The condition of the baggiug and tie trade has remaiaed abonttl 
eame for the past sooson, as fov Beveral years. Prices of both articl< 
hare ranged low, and will now have to contend with free imports and 
the present tariff. 

The manufacture of bagging shows some increase over the previoi 
year. Iron ties, as heretofore, are mainly manufactured at other poini 
but are sold and distributed to most of the cotton districts in connectii 
with bagging. The atock on hand is 6,000 bundles. 

RECEIPTS OF FLAX-TOW AMD JITTE FOR MINK YEARS. 



KICBITTB. 


18W. 


im. 


1882. 


1B9I 


ISW. 


18SB. 


1888. 


isn. 


US 


Flax-tow, bald 
Jul«,lMl«a 


m 
i.m 


640 
W.SM 


361 


U.lBl 


42ft 
*4.01B 


e7,30S 


114 


I.»t4 
37.0M 


1- 



SHIPMENTS OF BAGOIKO FOB TEN TEARB. 



■mPHBHTS. 


1894. 


IBBS. 


WBS. ItW. 


lem. 


ies». 


1888. 


1887. 


use. 1 188 


Baeeiae, pm. 


t»,UBB 


28T.59S 


81T,!06gM,7U 


378,640 


ssi.m 


ISl.UH 


m.mt 


8»,«B^» 



BAOQIKO UANDFAGTDBKD. 

18M , 18,000,0I» r«r 

18SS 1»,000,000 " 

1893 18,000,000 " 

1891 16,000,000 " 

1890 ia,ooo,ooo " 

BTOOK8 OF BAOOme OH HAND. 

Dec 8U1, 18M 1,000,000 y» 

" 1898 100,000 " 

" 1B9S 800,000 " 

1881 60,000 " 

'■ 1800 1,000,000 " 

BBCFIPTS BAQQIKa. 



. 13,MS 6!i. 

. S2,8W 1,141, 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TUS CITY OF S 



St. Louis is favorably loc&tod to hold her aapramftc^ u the latest 
lurdwood market in the vorld; also, a great dlitribating point for 
white pine Inmber. In the first place, the Upper Ulssisilppi, with its 
tributaries, malces It an easy matter to float large rafts of vhite pine 
lunber to the upper levee of the city. From the South, the Ohio, the 
Wabash, the Tennessee and the Cumberland, the Lower Misalssippi, 
with its many tributaries, by steamboats and barges, freight to onr door, 
an immense prodnct at such rates as is satisfactory to all concerned. 

Of the many railroads centerlDg in St. Louis there is hardly one bnt 
what hauls large quantities of lumber. 

No irbere in the ^de world does there exist a single-track railroad 
tliat delivers more Inmber to any city than the St. Louis, Iron Mountain 
& Sonthem Railroad delivers to St. Loals and to points beyond, and 
his l>een doing so for the past fifteen years. 

Once here, the city itself, wittt Its large number of factories maua- 
facturing furniture, handles, well buckets, barrels, eto., and the planing 
mills, work for the many bnlldlngw that have been erected, and now In 
process of erection, packing l>oxes in vast quantities, Is at once k luge 
conenmer. But a large bulk of the receipts before mentioned Is dis- 
tribated not only to nearly every point of the compass in this country, 
bnt large shipments of black walnut, liickory and oak staves are 
exported. 

Bail receipts and shipments for the year were as follows: 

BMelpd, Bblpmanta 

CUMr> * AltoD R«ilro^ (HlMoori IMTlatoD) K '^'m 

HInaari Pwlfl« Bkllrokd. BM g,Tti 

St LobI* A Su rnnolMK) lUllnHul TBI 3 m 

Wabwtt BaUirur (Wvu 9S0 i.W 

St.Loal*,KaBuaOlt7it0oIonKloB«llr(Nu].... 5 wa 

tfliMiiil, K*UM * tcxM BaUrowl i II lU 

Sc limit SMUbwcMarn BaUivnd 4,«83 m 

Bl.LoBli,Ii«uHoiiaM>tik*&OBtlieiDBallnMd ll.SSt Ms 

cunfiboitLiiw i,«ea m 

nuxila Cvatial Railroad 1,00S u 

LoalnillaAHMhHUsBailrawl I.ltft *U 

MoUlaAOIilo BkilroM 1,8TS IM 

LoubnUa, Kmu^la « BL Looli ItollKikd llS ign 

BaltiDure, Oblo ft SoatbWtatani Bidlroitd 88* Ue 

UUo*KoAaltonBallnMd(l(BlaUni) Xt i.sii 

Chlam, CleTBlmd. Olnclnnatl ft Bt. Lonto gallroad 101 8M 

Vw^naUaa 1» i.agt 

WibMli BsSroail (KMt) US I'.TBt 

Toledo, Bt LmiU ft Saitmi CltT Ballroad lis l.IM 

CUwco, F«OTW ft 81. 1.aali BaUriMid Ml 1 MM 

CUeasD, BnrUiwtini ft Qaiuor KiUraid OM l.MT 

St Louis, Se^uk ft NoT^iTctMn Ballioad l.WI s'tjc 

St. Lonto, CUavo ft SL Pnl BUtoMl 1 ' a 

TaUICan 4S,TU 3a,lM 

-lO 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TBADE AND COUHEBCB OF 



r KtVEB, VOR 1893 AND 1891. 



KIKD. 


l8BS-Feet.[l8H-F« 


'K?,'" 


■alraippl 
■ippl rive 




...-»!:• 










;; 


4 
























T 






































.s, 




irer Mlsil 


andMiBBouri 


ITS, 


m upper M 












ioi.m.7SD| 









8 OF SHINGLES LATH AND PICRBTS. 





Number. 


Nunib 




Slfl»MO 
761 ,H0 


K,773 












GB,t;e,iBO 









lECEIPTS OP LOGS BY BIVBB. 



, 10,411,101 ! 
S,S7S,1<» 

. 7,682380 
. C,au7.l80 



0, Superfleial Feet lo.tcs 



BECBIPTS OF I.UMBEB AND LOOS, 





UW-Feet. 


lS8S-Feet. 


18W-F 




11(,227,SM 

uelie^ooD 

8i,oai,ooo 


I01,1SJ.7SO 
7S3,]64,0ua 

ii.ouo,ooo 






'SS 








BM,S9S3M 


856,»7,7S0 


a&fia 





1 OF SHINGLES AND LATH RY BAIL A 





IBM 


ini 


18IB 


1391 




•sss 


'ssass 


m;ms3oo 


7J»< 
S0,23 





,db,GoOglc 



THE OITT or ST. LOUIB. 



STATEMENT 



Or Distribution of Lukbsb Mahdpactoob Alono tbb Upper 
MissistiPPi FBOM M1NNIU.FOL18 TO St. Loots ra 1891. 



From the CHtcioo Timbbkhin. 



LOCIUTT. 


F^n. 


ShlndeB, 
Suaiber. 


Lath, 
Nnmber. 




491,286,798 
a,TM,'0O 
SOMOOO 
'900:000 

16,000,000 
12^M»000 
14,000,000 

1,000,000 
616M00O 

SOSTOOO 
12.OC8,0OO 
101,663,000 
14,120,01 
28,lfl8,0fl0 

eo,M»,ooo 

84.iHin,oao 

86,000.000 

feSS 

21,600,000 
30,000,000 


!:» 

53 000,000 
9000 000 

10,000,000 
4700 000 
900,000 

17,660,000 

■i,«6;ori6 
11,139,000 

7,800,000 
11,174.000 
11,000,000 

6,000000 
12,790.000 

6,000,000 

4,621,000 

io,ooo.oro 

9,600,000 


«!S 














isisss 






as 










































































1464,828,793 


S2S,92t,7eO 









LOICBBR UAHUFACrUBE, UP 

From the 



HIS3I33IPPI BIVXR VALI.ET, 1894. 
tlUBBSMXH. 



MlnnMpolis 

tit. Fknf to St. Ixinli. 

St. Cioiz Btrer 

BiBClcBlTer. 

CUppem Blvei 

Totala 



191,266,798 
678,672,000 
170,440,000 
167,696,000 
281,388,000 



121,323,760 

204,196,000 
62,667,000 
71,040,000 

lU,Le3,000 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TBADE AND COMUEBCE OF 



HIOHWINES AND WHISKIES. 



BMMlpn Hlghwlnc* wia WhiJkWi 


BkrreU. 


SUpmeiiU Wliiikr. 


BunU. 




IS;!!! 

is? 

60,113 










!g 

1 

IN 


ffi 












a:;;:;;;::;;;;;:::;;;;:;;;;;;;: 






g 




£::::::::::::;;:: :: 

g:::::::::::::::::::::::::;:::: 






























The followlDg ia h statement of the amount of araia used, prodact o< 
spirits and tax paid, Sec, of the two distillemB which operated in 
1899, and three in 1891: 





isn. 


im. 




■SlS! 


■ 














■■%s 












AnooDt of tut p^d, UMa. and •tl.lOpergaUon.. 



KEHAnnHO OK HAMD IK DI8TILLERT WABEH0D3M. 





D«c. 81. 18M. 


Dm. si, vm 






Sl.SUgtIl 




























sas,Mi '■ 


las.m " 





ePIBITS RECTIFIED OR 
mi S,B33.8a0 2»I«lB.| igsa 

1SS3 s.iw.on.oo " i«tt. 

\aa s,M7,*ii-n " ws:. 

1»1 8,'i*!,«S.I7 " 1889. 



..S,IH,& 



,BM.18nti 
.M6.ffi ■• 
,MS.ia " 
.887 .» '■ 
,1S6.77 " 

Total number of gallons gauged In three years by TJ. S. OauKera: 

18H. S,nO,U(.eT s^. ISSI 4,S8S,0T».00 gala. IBH >.8i;,ieS.S0 gall 

Total number of wholesale liqaor dealers' stamps Issued on chan^o 
paclEage: 

ISM i»,8(u isss si.ias isn «,ai 

J Aug. ar, 18M; M.IO from Apg. IS to Doc. SI, ISH. 



* Nlnalr ctnu tram Jui. I 



idbiGoOgic 



THB CITY or ST. LOUIS. 



NAVAL STORES. 



Tukl. Bbll. 


BbJi. 
TarpemlDC. 


a. 


MO lb?. 


uidFltOb 


18M,.„i66 1697 


= ]7,814 ... 


67,456 ... 


82,080 .. 


8,170 






44,870 ... 
59,738 ... 
66,822 ... 
48,900 ... 


61, 87 J .. 
76,947 .. 
76,822 .. 
68,699 . 


.12,048 
.10,21S 
. 6,679 
. 6,167 


IMS 




J8S1. .. 




1890 


.. 15,686 ... 






49,897 ... 
47,062 ... 
46,231 ... 

33.742 ... 


69,800 .. 




1888 




. 6^16 
.. 8,67& 
.. 6,095 

. 7,348 
.. 6,818 

.. 6,779 


K87.... 




66,200 .. 

72,000 . 
66,860 .. 


1886.... 


' 


I88S 


' 






1885 


. . . 12,286 . . . 


4»,010 ... 




188a 


... 18,994 ... 


86,882 ... 




. 8,796 






41,717 ... 
48,148 ... 




.. 6,293 
. 4,644 


1880 


.. 8,076 ... 





Tbe saleB of tarpentine and roetn have increased laixely tUa year, 
QOtwitbeUnding the dull times, which shows that the large mantifao- 
tnren are incraaelag their capacity, and that St. Lonis is steadily reach- 
In^oatnnd secaring bnslness In the soap line which it has never haA 
before, and a larger increase is looked for next year. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TBADB AND COUHEBCB OF 



Rtportcd by JOHN WAHL COMMISSION CO. 



' The year 1894 has been rather eretitful In the annals of tbe pig lea^ 
trade, chronicling aa it has tbe line of demarkation from the protectiv 
tariff on lead imported from lie. per ponnd, aa heratoforo existjng.to 
tariffoflc. per pound since the passage of the Wilson bill. In additio 
to this, manufacturers of American pig lead were considerably boj 
prised at the late Treaeury regulations regarding the working of tb 
Mexican silrer lead bullion in bond. 

This ruling has made it possible for lead manufactured out of Uez 
can bnllion, and heretofore exported, to be sold in this country. 

To these two Important transpiring features may be attributed tli 
low prices of lead during the past year. 

At the beginning of the year lead sold round about (3.10 ; the highei 
price was reached during August, when as high as tS.Sfi was roallEct 
The year closes with lead obtainable at t3.77i, which is practically tt 
lowest price recorded in American history. 



WHITE LEAD. 

St. Louis is one oi tbe largest white lead manufacturing centres in U 
world, and its popular brands of Collier, Southern and Red Seal ai 
favorably known everywhere. Probably oue>thirdof thewhiteleadcoi 
sumed in the United States is made In this city, there being three vei 
large factories which are kept constantly in operation. Owing to i 
geographical position, it is advantageously situated for the mauufkctui 
of this commodity and the distribution of the manufactured product. 

Some of the factories have been located here for nearly half a centur; 
and the brands manufactured by them are recognized throughout tl 
country for their purity and general excellence, and are sold from tl 
Pacific to the Atlantic coast, trom Manitoba to the Gulf. 

The volume of trade for 1894 compai'es favorably with previous year 
notwithstanding the general depression in business. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



THB CITY OF ST. IiOU18. 

LEAD. 
UCUFTS AND SHIPHKMTa 07 LKAD IN FIQB OF 8 



LBS. BACH. 



I«.r. 


Bwelpu 


Shlpmn.. 


yew. 


BMwipu 


BUpU'M. 




1,4M,3» 

1:S:5J! 
Ill 

1.044,011 

i.m.sM 

1.1«,SBII 
101409 


•■11 




11 

lt7B.SM 
4TB,448 


























^-£K 










sis,as8 




















is 















SOURCES OF auPPLT OF PIG LEAD FOB FIVE TEARS. 



XZCEIVED Br 


I8M. 


189S. 


18W. 


1B9I, 


18W. 


SiSt^lK.Mf?:.?'.':;!::;:; 


IB.Ul 


IM.MS 

S§,83S 
■■"]» 

T.ore 

i«;«o' 


lli,81B 
1,SS4 

■■» 

m" 

■iV.m 

"i'.ia 


4as;si7 

48 

mo' 

SI 


sii 

IM 

4,esi 


S"aS.r;s:'i;ii-iiiB;s.:;.:.:: 


CUouo & Alton B. B. (MftluriT.l 

Toleilo, St Lonii A K. C. Billwajr 

SSSiSJ^g"^'"-" 










SiSi«1?.???^!^::: 


168",44S 








ir«ffim» W. 


ei,788 


ToWplg« 


i,«»,m 


1,348,5*4 


1.518,484 


1,789,977 


1,TH,SU 



SHIPMEKTS OF WHITE LEAD. 





I^™ 


1SS7 


84.267.489 


polh™^ 




















ISfiO 






»,8W.m5 





MOSTHLT PRICKS OF 


REFINED LEAD- 






1 ,™. 


1 1683. 

11^ 11 


im. 1 1801. 






3IW 


®is?«ir5^® K"^ 








;:;:::::::;:::;:;:::13!l'' ii 




f::::::::: 


;::::;:;:::::;::::JSSk IS 


4 0« koo 10 
4 07K 4 IS S3H 













*Boa KLuonrl aod SejilTcrtiKl. {Chemlcil Hurd oa Eut side lunaU; E 



,db,GoOglc 



TBADE AND COMHEBCE OF 



WOOL. 



The receiptB of wool for the pa«t year show a yeiy large Increi&e ovei 
1893, and nearly equal in amount the receipts of 1892, which were the 
largest ever received in this market. 
Fansten Bros. & Co. give the following review of the trade: 
In the early history of the wool IndoBtry of this country the Eaaten 
cities controlled the wool bnsincHB, due to the fact that 98 per cent o: 
the wool clip was grown east of the MiBSissippi, bnt we find by tin 
6oTemment report that in 1690 sixty-nine per cent of ibe wool raisM 
in the United States was clipped from sheep west of the Mississippi 
The proximity of this city to the wool-growing sections gives St. Loaii 
the advantage of being a central market, not alone to the wool grower 
but also to the Western manntaclurert. The annnal wool clip of tin 
United States amounts to 860,000,000 pounds, of this 250,000,000 ponnd: 
are grown in the West, tributary and adjacent to the city of St. Loais 
but only one-tenth part of it is marketed here. It is true that the prin 
cipal mills are located in tbe Ea^t, and that a large portion of this noc 
eventually has to go there, but St. Louis can be made the distributinj 
point. Although the growth of the wool business has not been as grea 
as It might and should have been, its future is bHght, and the adraii 
tages of a central market are being appreciated by the wool grower 
and our market is gaining in popularity. 



Pram the SHOE AND LEATHER OAZETTE. 



The volume of trade has been larger than that of 1893, shipment 
showing an increase of 7,021,890 pounds, and receipts a gain c 
1,U£,104 pounds. As the year closed a scarcity of stock was claimed 
which better satisfied the trade. The whole year, however, was a poo 
one, low prices having a very depressing effect, notwithstanding th 
larger business done. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



azczms amd ammBjns roB fdtebk teabs. 



nu. 


Wool. 


H»> 


•ISSffi- 




■¥s;ja 


•KSff- 




"iSsr 








if 


gsa 




stSEEEz 


§S!;S 


^EEEEE 




IS:::;::::;::::;:::;:::::' 








IS 


ffi::::::::::::;;-::;;:: 



RECEIPTS OF PEL 
BimDLEe. 


rBlE8 AUD FOBS 


DLBB. 




|:::::::::::;:::;:: 


IfcWl 




J w^ 












tEEEE:; 


EEiEii 


';;:;;:EEEE^;;EE;|i 


..;;:;:::::::::.:::::::::::":;::"" w;S 







RECEIPTS OF LEATHER. 



,. E7,7T8| 1891 M,S» 

,. Biwes levt. «MK 

.. 78,108 I8». 108.08» 

,. Bt,M\ IBM. a9,US 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TRADE AKD COHMERCE OF 



Rcpaitsd by THE ST. U>UIS KAY BXCHANOE. 



The amoant of h&y handled here dnriag 1891 shows a very Batisfac 
tory increase over any previons year, and yet daring the past lix montli 
ve hare been compelled to draw largely from a Boction of country the 
ander ordinary conditions is not tributary to this market. 

Tbe crop west of the river was very short, in many iocalities almoi 
a complete failure ; hence tbe movement from the West and Northwei 
has been far below that of ordinary crop years, the larger portion ( 
the receipts coming from tbe East, with quite a fair amoant from tli 
South and Southwest. 

Till a new crop ia ready for use we wilt have to depend largely upo 
points even forther East probably, and this may give oar maiiet 
higher range of values for the balance of the ci'op year. 

BBCSUTS AKD SHIPMBNTS OF BAT FOS A SERtBS OF TEABS. 



,.„. 


nECiIFn. 


•niPMBErrs. 


IBM 


is^sra 


iMt. 




:::;: SiS:::::: 
:::::: !i:S;;:;:: 
::::;: SS!:::::: 


















;:; SIS 





















,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY or ST. LOUIS. 



SALT. 

aSCEIPTS AND SHIFMEKTB FOR TWKNTT-OITX TmABS. 



T... 


Brciii-re. 


..»™.. 




BMrel* 


SMks. 


BnlklnBiW. 


Birtel*. 


6M>k>. 1 BulklnBni. 


I9K 

aS:::::::: 

i= 

SEE 
SEE- 

B:::::;;: 
B:::::::: 

isn.. 

!S::::- 


if 

IS 

ia,au 

SUSTfl 

11 

Ml .MB 


£:Si 

41,7SO 

IS 


lis 

IM.TOO 

is 

4M.B00 

^:^ 

S14,T10 


3S8,4a4 

51I;S 

iiis 

sisara 

£18,987 

IS 


M.M8 
8!2t3 

1;!?; 
■JiSf 

IS.IM 
UHT 
ISGIS 

1 


«e«80 

Iffi.UlB 

II 

is 

45T,§e3 



RECEIPTS AND 



OF SALT FOB 1 



CblunA AlUnB.B. (Ho.DlT.). 

HKsonrl FmIDo RkUroul 

Be. L. ASu Fnnalioa Ballnad .. 

WibHUIUllniaarWutl .-.-- .. 

Si-L^K.O JtColondoB.B ...... 

Kii..KumATaiuR. B ., 

Dt LooU BoDtbWMtpm B.B ., 

f'l.L.iIninHoniilKln ASD.R.R.. , . 
B'.L., A.n.a. B. B.(Calr* IkMt Uh) . . 

lUlMUOnitnilR.R '. 

laatoTUlc A XuhTlUi B.B 

Uobile*OhtaR.R i. 

!■., R. 4 8t. LddKR.B. .. 

BiltfanonAObloS.-W.R. B 



., C. A St. IxniEi 

'U * Terr* n*u(# R.K.. . 



Chla«D, P«otIb a 8L LonU R. K. . . 
CUago.BarlinponftgiiiBef R.R i 

Knd[Stk8t.L(]nlaB.R I 

SlL.. Chiei^ASt.FaulR.R} .. 
Upper MiaE»li>pl river lioota .... 



iwl s,iu 



11, MS G7,e80 



V^i 


























^ 


(MS 



m, u,0M.. 



.rj; 3is,t3o ffio.wo I g.ea !S8,ui n.seo 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TRADE AKD COHUEBCB OF 

BEANS. 

aBCBIPTS AKD SHIPUENTS FOR TWKMTI-OKK TEARB. 













BHIPMBim 




TK*J1. 


Baokt. 


.n^ulE. 


sSl, 


CKStOT 

Reu». 


'■««<«■ 
Reana 


Sk>.*b 




1 

li 

1W.IV8 

SS,MT 


XfiSO 

9M,K0 
WAD 


£:SS 

as 


1 
SI 

i 

ass 


'i 
1 

i 


8R4 












»! 










































IK 










1BI4 ::::::!:.■.:::; 


K 



CASTOR BEANS. 

HONTHLT RANGE IM PRICE Or PRIUE, IN CAR LOTS, 1894. 
Small IDU aoia E910 eenU 1m«. 

Janoarr »1 aS®! M 1 July •! « 

Ftbruarf 1 SO 1 43 Angiut in 1 

"— *- 1 SO ' 8«ptBmb«r I iS 

IW ' Ootobw 1» 



March... 



IN" 



1 SS I'DMsmbar 

POTATOES AND ONIONS. 

RECEIPTS AND flBIPMENTa FOR TWENTT-TWO TEARS. 



. 


P.TXT. 


1 omo.y.. 


i 












































- - 


Baib. 


Bbli. 








Bull 




BU 












i*m 


RB.K 



























































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































iKilpta ODe-b* l(. 



u of Patalwa baalcd la wafou. wtilota would probabl; nrcll 



,db,GoOglc 



,db,GoOglc 



TBADB AMD COHUSKCE OF 

SEEDS. 

RECEIPTS FOR FOUR TEARS. 





,m. 


- 


189S. 


J£31. 




aMks 


Biub. 


T«.. 


SukB 


Bu.h. 


Tom. 


- 


Bu^ 


Toni. 


S*ek> 


Bnib.TM 


Tiax.... 


»;6H 


ISI.SSO 


>M 


.. 


tXfiOO 




« 


JM,6O0 

:::::; 


'siisB 


» 


TM^ ., 















. of Flaxseed tot 18gS, S.SnS «>Cka uh) SS.WT busbels. 



* m.011 

' lU.StT 



St, Lonis is a prominent market for Flaxseed, b large proportion 
the crop of ttie West being consnmed in oar mills. In the line of Gn 
Seeds, while this is not as prominent a market aa some others, a lai^ 
amonnt of seed is receiyed here. 

FLAXSEED. 

Montblf range in price of Prime in car lota (small lots sold at ! ai 
3c less) for three years. 



Janiiarr.. 
l^bnuiT. 
Xarah... 

^■■■■- 



GEEBN AFPLK8. 

RECEIMS AND SmPMESTS FOR 8BVKM TEARS. 


"=■'""■■•■■ 






- 


tttt. 


"«l""- 


.«. 


««. 


m*. 


!«.. 


UK. 


an. 1 un. 


ISM. 


« 


t».m 


isi,m 


]a,at 


«tmym 


»0.M« 


m.TJi 


n7.87* 


«,M 


1W.W 


-!-- 


m.m 


IS 



LuS« qoBBtltk* of Applet an biDoght In bf iT*BDiu,Dr wMch DO date can bBObttluB 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TUB CITY OP ST. I«UIB. 



CHEESE, BUTTER AND EGGS. 



Piam tha INTERSTATE QROCER. 



CEIEE9E. 



The Btoctr of cheeBe la St. LoniB on Jaaaary 1, 1896, was eatlmated at 
500 boxes, as compared to 4,000 boxes at the corresponding time 1894, 
MO boxes ia 1893 and 5,900 boxes in 1892. The price on fine fall 
earn stock vas 11 cents on the first day of the present fear, against 
I cents the year before. The spring trade started out !□ a healthy . 
Ddition, all tbe old stock having been cleaned np before the new 
ake commenced to come to market, and for a time everything pointed 
a large summer's make, wbicb it was hoped wonld hold prices down 
a point in keeping with other prodacts, tbos admitting of a liberal 
nsmnptive demand. Bat in the middle of the eammer & severe 
ongbt prevailed throughoat the entire cheese-prodnclng territory of 
e United States and Canada. This stimulated speculation, which 
lickly ran prices np to a point where the consumption was largely 
irtailed. 

The annual compilatiou of stocks of cheese at all distriboting points 
the United States, Canada and Great Britain, on January 1, gives a 
and total of 873,178 boxes on hand, against 684,967 boxes for the same 
ne in 1894, 907,436 in 1893, and 837,198 in 1892. These figures are 
mewhat larger than generally expected, the largest incrsase being in 
e quantity held in Canada, which was 90,000 boxes larger than in 
94, and 10,000 boxes more than in 1893. 

rhe receipts at St. Louis were 437 ,£18 boxes, against 353,230 boxes in 
93, and are the largest on record. Shipments increased from 160,188 
xes in 1693 to 193,567 boxes in 1894. 



rhe batter business of the year also shows an increase Arom 12,675,398 
unds In 1893 to 14,138,544 pounds in 1894. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TJIADE AND COHHERCE 



St. Loaia Is a promlneDt point in tlie egg trade of tlie West, Bupplfiii, 

not only tlie citf trade, bat shipping large quantities to Eastern marfceti 

Receipts for the year were fi98,77S packages, a &ir increase orer 1S91 

HECKIPTS AMD BrnPUEKTS OP BITITEB AND CHEESE FOB 1894. 





BinTEB. 


CBW>. 




Receipt., 


",="■ 


Reodpn, 

bOIM. 


ZT. 




isilw 


fa 

cD'.m 




, 




s 


.! 








1,700 

htImo 

sitoo 

ns.Mo 

m.iw 


IS 

i,<is»;7ii 






St.Lonla, a. W. B. R 

St. L. Iron Monn, « Soutta'a B.B 


«■■ 


S 




4fl 
















BiltlmoraAOhloS.-W. B.B 


'Is 

u7;«» 


1 




















ers.an 

1TS,7U 


•■s 


■g 














■ASS 


M,706 


SI 
■"■jj 






















IS.UI.TW 


);S;S 

fl.nS.TTB 

m 

3 911670 


U7.8U 
lt8.su 










Ml 
















» 



BECEUTS AND SHIPHENTS OP EGOS. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



THB OITT OF ST, I/OUI8. 



St. LonlA is one of the greatest candy markets in the United States. 
Fhere are at present in operation seven large manufactories, employing 
in tb« average altogether aboat 600 hands, and p&Flug in wages (250,000 
XT annnm. The yearly outpnt has been estimated at 30,000,000 
pounds, valued at •2,500,000. 

The trade extends over a territory comprising from thirty to thirty- 
ire Stales, east to Sew York and the Atlantic coast States, north to the 
Sritish line, sonth to the Gulf, and west to California and Oregon. 

The long exIstiDg prejadice of Eastern bnyers against making pnr- 
^liasea West, in this line as well as In others, has, by the energy and 
[enlns of our manufacturers, been entirely oyercome, and the trade 
rith Bastem Jobbers has become one of the most important branches 
if the basiuesB. 

There are in St. Louis some of the most expensive and complete ma> 
tiinery plants for the manufacture of candy that can be found anywhere 
a tills country. Every new device that promisea success Is eagerly 
iken up. 8t. Loois and progress have become synonymoas terms 
mong confectioners in the United States. West of the AUeghenies 
t. Lools is viewed as the standard. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TBADE AKD OOMUEBOB 



BECEIPTS AND SHIPUENTS OP SUNDRY ARTICLES 
FOB 1891. 



Asnotxi. 












2lT,ffl 
69,88!.l 




pounds 


18.799,880 

i,ew 

6*,et2.S40 
TB8,T0S 
138,218 
(Me,160 
S41,S0T 
11,6SS 




. barreU and tierce* 
..pounds 


FresbBeef 


186,0B9,»' 
704,1 


Cordage and Rope 


















lt,l 
817,2 


Cranberrlea 


. barrels 


Bg8« 


..packages.. 


896,778 
129,731 






40^ 


Bopi 


.. bales. 


»7.718 
88,688 

6,8*6 
01S,8TS 
41,679 

8,761 

■"66^7112 
iMse 

88.618 
^,162 
47,780 
1.065 
6,287 












15M 
S»,8 






















Orangea sad Lemona. 














Pjg Iron 
















" nan 




Soap 


..boxes 




14,022,860 
88,308 
15,776 
28,906 
















Zino and spelter 


. boxes and case«.. 


i^i 







,db,GoOglc 



,db,GoOglc 



TBADE AKD COXMBRCE OT 





1 


1 


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s. 

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i 




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ill 




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i 

1 


THE CITY OF BT. IMVIB. 


- : £ 


3 


a 


ii it i! :S :l ; i ilSSiSS : : ; i 1 : i i 


1 1 


a 


iBn:ii«si8sia55sii:Si::n: 

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,db,GoOglc 



TSADB AMD COUHBBCB OF 



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TBADB ADD OOMMEBCE OF 



11 



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D„ii„.db,Go(5glc 



THE CITY Q¥ 8T. LOUIB. 



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THE CITY OF 8T, LOUIS. 





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204 


TBADE AND COMMEUOE OF 

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D„ii„.db,Go(5glc 



DIED 1894. 



Allkn, LkwisD., October 34. 

Bain, Wm. B,, October 2. 

Babmktt, Wm. H., August 11, 

BOBCKELER, A., October 87. 

Bluke, p. T., July 18. 

BuscHMAN, L. W., June 16, 

Church, S. C, July 17. 

Cdambkks, ChableS B., July 13. 

Clark, Ben 0., Juue 10. 

CoQHiLL, J. C June 19. 

Davis, John T., April 13. 

DONK. A. P., June 38. 

Fralet, Jbsse April 20. 

Francis, John B., STovember 37. 

Groeninger, B. J., ■ . . May 3. 

Harlow, A. T January 31. 

Henoer, Gl'st, June 11. 

JuNOu, August, August S. 

Lange, Wh. B.. . . , .' Januiuy 39. 

Lionbkrger, John K., May 20. 

LiPi'ELMA N, H. H., February 24. 

LOGBUAN, F. H., February 9. 

LuTZ, Geo. A September 26. 

Lynch, C. A January 30, 

Miller, Fred H., April 37. 

Milne, JofiN, September 3. 

Mdluoon, Patrick October 3. 

MuLFORD, John E., January 17. 

McCarthy, John, July 3. 

NOLTE. Louis, April 28. 

Beynolus, B., July 1. 

BowsK, E. S ' October 7. 

Schebpe, John F., November 31. 

SessinGhaits, Fredk., January 26. 

Skekls, Edwin A., Hay 13. 

Spaun, J. H., June — . 

Sfeab, Wm., December 10. 

TrkvOR, a. Q., ... March 30, 

Wolf, A., September 38. 

Zei.le, Aug. F March 3, 

ZoTT, Armut, Augusts. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



MEMBEE8 

OF THt 

Merchants' Exchange of St. Louis. 



JANUARY 30. 1895. 



NUMBER OF MEMBERS, 2,647. 



■^Hembera are reqneated to examine with reference to th^ own name 
uid addres, and report to the Secretary tf Incorrect ; also to Inform blm of 
lUf tittDgva that occur in atyle of Arm or boslnesa location. 






T^ D.V.'.'.'.' ,".'.* A IimJhio a GordM.'.'V.FMd,., 
. '. '. Wkten-PIcna oii'Co .* . Sea ' t u 



jLrluaI.B M.'.'.'.V.V.'.'.V.'.W. L 

ADuia. W. U Jno. PnrcBll A Co BunsrudC< 

AdltrrBm Adltr. OoliliBui ACD..GotIaii 

AHir, JoMpb Brokar 

Aflir, JiBH F.. Cnlon PulOc BallwBT . Killrosd An 

AboLAng ....RHlEtnlaA 

Alb«n.C, H. ■.■.'.'." !!!!'0.'H.AJi>eri'i'" " 

*ft»«lit. Viator ,. 

Almndir. Qui. H......A1aiudar ALlodham ?ire Ini 

ABiwn, JameaW Amour Puklne Co. 

Allai.O«i. L Fnllon Iron Wortj._ 

"'.'.'.m. T. A a B. AUea''.'.'.'.Liirjii 






Atln. C 

iBeB, Jnhn" ! '. i '. '". 1.'.'.'.'. Carrouieni' 



atCom. Co.'.V.'.'..'. 
A1&1DL % d.'K.' ! ! '.'.'. '. '. '.Wanita B»H U^.' Co'.'saon 

AWxImar^Baii]. ...iil" '.'.'.'." Lok 

AnM, JsMpliB Pacific HarAQr 



!!!"l!!!!!!!!!!!".!'.;'!!!''.iij8ii"'s. vAiiba, h 



AndcnoD. W, B Manwii Commlitlaii Co as Cham, oruommarca 

AManon, W.T ,. Ms Chmnj. of Connnmoe 

Aodcnan, l.t QMigU Br Q.W. Agent Foorlti ud Cbaataul. 



Digitized bvGoO^^IC 



UEMBBBS OF THE 




A B.nnu. Hub G^v.n'd Iron. Mte.C 

ea."-..MeTer»BmiiflriDmD A Co.. timad^ttf..- 
Hindi, Qblu Bui Eiuu Co 



li BuncT DryGoodiOoV.E 



■. E. Prai 



B Stoc 









" ".BUTJ*t- 

DcllarABi 
.'..e't'LaiiVa 8rnp KflOiitng 



.V.'Bunea A BifUeT "!!pork P« 

BealEiliil 

...BteffBn A Bunllo €omiDlHL 

...BroderlckftBucamRopeCo,... 

'.V.MutlnAEIui .'.Lmwren. 



T-Oni AVdiM 



B ritPlna 

DD - eK.MalD 

aii»ai'.'.'.'.".'.'.'.»» Pi'oF I 



UornsOa^II 
> Lociulit. 
7 M. s«Mnd n. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



USBOOANTS' EXCHAMOB OF ST. LOUU. 



BaiQjeli, Jobi 



wtlrjijo... 



BMlM.SiuunlU ^.^-^ — 

BiTrt. It A Mktthew Addy ACo. 



BvT4.lt A 

BcvditBv. C F.. .. 
Beck, HQ!7W... 

"-' j.ir... 



...FICkcrABeiRIlK 






BkIi.HhttO 

Bcdwr. Xdmrd ti... 

^S«rf..";.v.;:-. 



cimnd' BbIapp A BrM.'.Produoa Co. , 

a.B, sann ftca 

J.Q. HSu So»pCo Sow 

H. SloOresni Qn>c*T 



gcini Johittloa Bt.taBlil»B« tluMiw Work* 

Brima^ynderlok H.-.-AlklnUrocer Uo. WbolenlaBn 

Bdiks.AiiKnM BdnkaAWeu. ArchliHU.... 

Btll.T.P T.P BeUABro ttealEiuU... 



Bdiks. 
°-!l,T.. 



Iro tt« 

Bcfl] Jamef wli'.'.'.ii'.i'.illlL.'SataDapiMituid'BiTlu BukV. 

Bell,0». w HteamboilCli 

B«l(. J.H J. H. BcliACo PorkDHlln. 

- . - - - „^, 



--^j, Siepben A.. __„ __ 

Benli, JaduB a Bcmli Broa. BuUo 

" '- — ^ l^^^J 



•dlet^DC. W wlOiSun-lCupplMACt 

•elCliloSui Tlio*. BeniuR i Cs 






BcnaMix, Fcrd A P. A. Bcnsbeii AU>....DlatUlan 

Ktrw. KlelwlH NIcbaluBcn^ Boii....Ininnar' 

R*ri|c«Bta, C, W CommenlalBuk Cutilgr 



"}c Bcrgnua raad Co-.I'asd 1713 CbDuteu 

'.'...J. B. Lawli AOd US Cbeiliint 



Baiiin, J<i}in P...' 

ixmt^pVter "////""".""" "r^\v^\v.v/"."!!i!"!!;!"'!:;";.'.'a8;sSn'»t. 

BrniliBlmcr. l(anu....lI«r«aileHI(hl*adiCo.Ft«ildmit MN.PoDrtbK. 

Bcnr. AltwrlL B*nT-U«ra 0(Ml Co Union TrnM BulldlDi, 

BenebTWu'"' t Banoh Ida AgeasT Innmoee SU OUie it 

BctSsld. JotiDHiuT>y'...Berthi>IdA /eDDlnci... Lumbar PaurchuKl ChMlnntlU 

Btthanc, June* H •"" «<—•••■ 

B«u, B. A R.H. Beiu A Co.^ . 









Btanr, Adolpb.,..'.'. Curlad Hair, ato trTanrit 

Uek«t.Jo)iD3(. J.K. Blakart A<M CommlHlon WZN.Salait. 

Bi;SSSSS!;8lSftSd'.;'.|8.BleMiutok4Co-....Wool Main and Fina >M. 

Blaaar, ri*i..^ BlaMr, Smith Prodiiac Oo IIMSN, Tblrd it. 

Steer. T. J Bt.L. lc«AC«ldBtar*nCo.. ProTlalona 7118. Main •(. 

^ntn, S. I— Slmmona Haidwara Cv. nband WaiklDrtoDaTa 

BSti,rniok „....Kgw yorkUf* laa. Oa. .. .Agent Odd FalloiK BqUdUc. 

BllSra, a. B CnK.enlBAElOT.Co..enln Blalto BuUdHw. 

BUIon, aarF. earlnrd. BlaMlMA Co nroilTcat. 

Micb, TT.T Hj. Praaa M*?:*.,.... ...Odd FaltowiBldK. 



Btad. Jahn .TIoklbanAndlorLllM.Annt foot or Uiealuul at. 

BMheC GnataT Bt.L.D.BFar«FroT. Co m KaniibHier Bead. 

BUnwr.A«ob]r Moond OUta Uabr ^ ■■• S. Tenth it. 

Btibr, W K lfo.C>rAraiindi7Co. >« Cbeiinnt at. _ 

Black. Alex. O Cotton TD Broadwaj.K.T.CItj 

Black, fobnP. WIUtBiii>,BlMk A Co.. .Cotton Broker CotionEicbufia. N.Y. 

BlaekB«r. I.BdaaR.....BIackmatAPaal Bawar Plpa. Sixth and LoondaM. 

MakalT, Joba W BlikalT-Btndaca Hann. Co. , Ll>e Stoak Union Stock Tardi. 

SCrw. Wm BMHanrialtaat. 

Bkake. DrtleTJ Inanmaeo Asent *is Loonit it. 

BlattDcr, Prad Jr Porlitel.Ua, 

Btattaar.W. K i Ilailoo,>Io. 

1— fc""" E. A faod .IIi«N. Broadwar. 

Blearinf. John H ~eHlor<l,Bleaalu*Co.BTOktr M7 0tlf«it. 

narar. B. T Bavin Pimaoa Co. IMS. Clinton it., 

Cblcaco. nil. 
Block, DaTld Block, Don A Co Comialaaloii il7ataiu.o('Caninierca, 



,db,GoOglc 



HKUBEES OF TBK 



...MUOIlTaM. 



BloMom, C. D til S. Thlri au 

liolioml H.' A*. v.'.:;!:}'*- "■"'••*>'" *C<»--'"''™«=« ll7N,TMrd>l. 

BIOHon,'llnMliii.".i\.H.S Blouoin 4 Ca....1iiinrMiM tIT N. Third M. 

Blow, U. W Crown LtuHCdOU Co. Blxlcenlli Aaartui'. 

BlDW. Btclunl T. BlowBrtek Co 41«giliuTlud mM. 

BlUBerer, Connd Srocer. Tinlh Aludl»n*ti. 

BabDttl. *. * "- — •■ ■ 

BobrliiK, J. B 
Bode. Henrr 

Bo«ck, Adin 



...BabilB|tP.U„IIO. 
..JSIlUMtMtMtTHi 
...Ml y.Baooatt. 



....StLanlaDredgloKCo... 

...LonliC, Bobic LlTsn c» iiut.uaii'... .^ 

CODimMtoii IB. M>IdM. 

-Cooper BappUe* HIT WiuTen«(. 

FHiDcr.. Bonbamme, Mo. 

AccounUDt «]*Plnen. 

...J.L.BolmidBook A BtoUoneiT Co «ia Wuhlnctan ST. 



..A.BoIIIdACo 

...BoUdiEd Brog. Co llMOllTett. 

...B. B'.'BosBer looCo ' 

iV BoDuek 'LdiDber Co! 

DlbACo RolEi 

7. Boolfa A Bona VommlHl 
.r. Boolh * Soiu...X^mn ' 

s. Boache ABoD BTodi 

..JH.H. HooHun Qrooer Oo ui n. >uin n. 

...M.r.B. Bonrell Broker lUK.BaeoDdM. 



nDloDTnm Balldla*. 

„ SeaondudGnnel Mi. 

BoolbACo RoIEmiW ai7 CkHtaDtat. 

.. . Boolfa A Bona VommlHloB Co Rlilto Building. 

....J.T. Boolfa * Bona... X^mmlHlon Co BUJIoBntldlna. 



ProTlrioD Broker. lUN.TUrdn. 

UL. UiniDcOo BecreUrr nd Treu ...CwllnTlUe, 111. 

"-» XeUsr BriA Hufalne Co. LKleda Bnlldbw. 



...Cuter ABowmu IltN.FonitfaM 

...nllbHtLa.Slunp'iiCo Second end C" 



. .. Bndy A HoQiiuriy ! '. 



InluOa BecorlCT Bnlldtnc. 

omeii Lulede Bnlldlnc. 

lDBn>ker:;:il!I!.""ll»N.Foartbet. 



Slud. Heaii 



.BelUrd. Heaimor* A Brsun I 



"IVr^hl 



M Market at. 



....'..'.'...'.'.'.'.'.'.'.".'.'.'.'.'.','..'.'.'. Stock Broker'.. ..^' .'.'."! 'Laclede BnlldlBc. 

.V.Chl.M 



M DaHodlauant 



Llppalouum Ha^ A Grain Co 110) N. Broadvi 

. ....aoOCtaBm. of Oo 

.Brlnaon-Judd Onln Co Cbmtm ol Oomtamt. 

,BriiiiB*8hebie'Hii'. co::;:;:!:."';;!!;;!;";;;;:;iwt.o™aT. 

Droad)ivad"chu 7 S^ ^\"Braidh wd A Hriei " .^*Va tton^ 

Brockman. Philip F. Bmckman ACo ... .Commlulon Blallo BbUiUh. 

Brockman. >'. W\ BRKkmauATrauemlahl.PmvUlonaACDni SM N. Tfalrd S. 

Brockman. Artlinr. r. Brockman Con mlailoa Co Blallo BnlldlB^. 

Brockineler. Eiwelko * Fcli.^. ....^... we 8. BnHlwaT- 

Brookmnyen H. ll,'.'.'.'.'.'.'. '.'.AMraaor'a oMce.'.V.V.VConrt Hooea. 

Broderlrk, John J Broderlok-Baacooi Bope Co .ms. Main n. 

Brodhaek, JoBipk H Toya, Candlea, Ao.......miS. Bn^waj. 

Breeder. Henrr Prodnoa A Caninilaa'n.,MBN. TWnl at. 

Broeg. Lonla... J. W. Booth * Sana ....Commlaiton Co KUIto Bntldlnf. 

Brolukl, Harn.Jr Slieldoa Brot. * Brolaakl, Real Balala Walnwrlefat BaUd 

Brolaakl. H. W... Crown Coal Co Beenrltr BnUdlac. 

Kh. FemS Briak and Tile Vlrdcn, III. 

f,.h.F.'. Cumberland Mllla HaaliTllle. Tanm. 

-a. Robert B.... Sam'] Cupplea Wooden A Wlllowware Co. SeTenib and 8pm 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



EXCHANGE OF S 



...Bl.L.O.BmfftFra 



Browne. r.'k.'...'...'."','.Hooimc TuniierLli 

BrTU.FTueli, T.,Jr 

Bnieli, HniT Produce... 

Bmaanwin, Ernat Ploormnd 1 

wnculni, Biiiloliib..wllhBi1iuik>rlrlli-Nolker Brewing Co. 

Braiidi^^S. P....:::::'.:F4DDiiMnonVTamirAC^'.l'Pra^^ 

Bnigaird. Oee. A Muethl P"— -"< h„h.,-.,.j 

Brrdn.Alei. A Brrdeo B 

B..I. » i. 2 V. Bncl 



PMiar Cd.^ 



ibanan ACd, ..Grain . 

Pbwio 

H.M BnckAtio BallwarBDpi 

ickluil A'6d'.'. CoinBii 



ii^.IlM^ E.. .'..'. ...V.j/..^..^..,^..^..^..... '.'.'. Pbwiolan 



leorrj. 



I, Paint Uft. Co... 

'. '. iBoh a uiirMche . '. '.'.'. '. ' '. F™ Ininiri 
...with CamiU A Powell.. Inturaoee. 
.. .NaCl Bank Repnhtlo. . . . Preildsiit . 

...Wm.J.Bnlte A Co Flour aodi 

...Meyer* Bull* 

" -' BDlteACo Flour*"'"' 

I.KeUor*Co...Uomi 



Bardna. J. P St.La.«HI».V>I.Tr.Ca.Frelaht Atet 

BiD«,H(nrT Addbo, Ban* Smith. .Flour Oonn 

Bun. WIIIIhd Sweld Iron Co Beeretarr . . . 

Bm.niilip «rocer 

BuAe, Wm meunboatloi 

Bgraei. Murtln D. Prodiioa..... 

Bsnel. Elalated BmM* WK. Co 



FT* Co CommlnlOD .. 



Banoq. J. A J. A. TarreniCo ..—. ^m™,. ^ 

Bueh. Adolpbui Aaheuaar-BuKh Brew.^Au^i (ProMdaat) NInlh APeil 



h.tA E. A.BuKliACo ^rawen 

'— B.CL CL.B -•- "■•^-■ — 

B,E. L L.W.B 



;:„;- 


L,.-W. Buclimiui Bona. .7 















B N. Becond at 
iti.ociiiKt 
N. Third (t 
S.Tei- ■ 



S. Tenili gl 



Breroft. UcDiT r H. F. B»orort4Co. Mlllera OlllripLe. Ill, 

Byrd.Deonell ....Bentar *0o. Cammtaalon HS. Tlilrdit. 

BTn>e,I>uM P Radmand-ClearyCamiDlulonUa iziCbam.oi' Comn 

BrrncFnakT National Diapauh Asent I.jK;lede Bolldlni 



CaliuM.L.Diitl 



Cafl^Ia, Aniafo 
OaftWj, Fr»ol B 

CWn. l>.™"..'.V.\'.\V.'.'.Bi?riia2™r^ahqbiCo,^ 

&ldwal1. Thomai "" — '■' " ' "- 

CUboan.JumL 



*Co..FrQll 791 N. Third It. 

„ lUlN. Compun 

CaUJ.jBQaae L.A. Coqnwd Broher. IMN. Third it. 

"-- '^ - Biem.UuMjr. ahqblCo,Clolhl«ta Ml Waihlorton 

homai'W. ...wlUi BenterACo Cotton and Caninili'n...Tlilrd A Walnnt 

...Adani>Eipm>Co. .... Rial lo Build log. 

lhjDD.U.Prmther*Co...WlDeiand Liquor* ttlN.Leiee 

MOOCBbBDnaPlai 

...Campbell AByau Lawver rtl Ollre •!. 



Ckmpbetl. Junei 

C^MU. 8am D Geo. D. Capen ACo Iniunnra... 

Ckpeu.Geo.H Geo. D. Capen * Go Ininrance.. 

Carl, ^Ilp Lone Star BrewlDB Co 

Gftrllale. Darid Feed and tli 

OtrUala. Divider BoMdale Bar end Grain Co 

Camlehael, G. W J. E. Oark ft Co Cider 

SSSUr.W.'M."".\'^"Biwanr*Si™ti<™'Coin;ColV(Pr^^^^^^ 

Ckrpmer.Oeo. O. Jr.. Katlooal Lead Co Mananr ... 

'■ — '— e»ll.....*.lI.C»n)eDter4Co....Koal^uw. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



MEMBGBS OF THE 



I.Jr.J. M.CuppnwrAGa....Bek1EiiMte .M» N.Srdn. 

.Mo. 8>f* Utpoctt Co SlilhmDdl.o 

VliUeoi InumoM Oa Uliillo BulMI 

FnnMr uid Binder n> N. Third t 

.... CUTOU JtPowall InnnuiceAitaiU lU H. Tbirdi 

Jonu, Edir4rd«ACo...LlqDort 9»N.)«econ< 

(Jmln IWN. Fonrth 

Flr«LBWAil]ii*tet lULocudat 

T.B.CtmllicraCom. Co > 1MN. PDurtli 

r....i;olOQ WurelioaM Co-.BIorwe ..rnolomortc 

~. IKH.foDrtli. 

OBWiDll A CurMD BroMti.... «« N-5nrt.I_ 

... VTC«rUilACa ReslEctBt*. 

"-rwr A Bowmr- " '— 

mHMuIIdi 



.CKn«r A Bawpmn CommlHlDn lU H. Fuartb n. 

"■ " - . - ,^^ MN.Thlrdn. 

nnc*. Sacnrliv BnlldlDf . 

iMOMOnce 117 N. Third *i. 

. I.tflGoln IVnit Co fit Ch«*tnut >t, 

,. .wllb C. H. Alben A Co..CaRimlu1oii Sit Cham. orCamiiie 

Archlleci »IW( N. Seionlh it 

..l>eii«iiMd. 

}c™idTBr<**Co....{5;j™|^=(t|f^;f,'f,'''_°;:;5J;'a^„'','l-^^^^ 



.r. B. Chumtisi 

Jr.'.'. F.' si. '^nuimtMrUln'Coi 



LD A Bod* 
\ 



*«nrit7 Balldlnf. 
■ON. Mala at. 



Id A'Co'.'.'Connofulon ■.'.'.'.'.'.'.', ll»Ch»inlwro 

in. H. Uiunbtn t Co.PiibU>b*r* 914 Locui at. 



i.: 












:,::}h. W.Cbmdler OommlMoo Ooinp«ir...II 



leurliiTBiilldl 



■lldtnt;. 



...E.R.Ci»pi>"n^Co....<;itr Walfben 



..','.'.'.'W.B.(J^ptU±Co.'..'.Kit.Clbea 

LlBll 

r Uon 













.v.v.:8SSSS-. 















...Uluk JtStDTTeiutaroiMrTOo. JIDN. Bseondu 

...3.K. aark i Co Oder A VIneor HIH. ..TwcnHsthuid Plstni 

...vftan-PltreaOU Co Odd Felluwi Rldi;, 

...TullTftClmrk ArBhtlaet ASnilnsoT.. .BrHdmv A IiOOHtK. 

...CUrkAStorTeHnteracarT Co XB N.BMOndn. 

....K. CttaiJ Oam. Co Commlidoii IM Cham. of CoBIBin<> 



. .B. Claarr Com'n Co. .. . 
"."iMia H'ra Ciiir Co- " 



Dtiondo KpnB(i,Ilo. 
Cntom Honaa. 
IUI Paolo n. 
CarllDTU)«. III. 
n Cham, of CodUMft*. 



■■.',27RS'i^™■ 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



HKRCHAirtS' XXOBANGB OF ST. 







imbU Ho. 

Siuw"itnpeboVw'i'*,TMtl.''Miln»t, 

;^]|CaDDcirBroa_ Commluloa G^ Balldlus. 

.'.'. .Connor Brot. A Co Oommlulon Umr BIIlIIlInE■ 
...J.7.Ulluwl Grooar Co. rMriukUnaTO. 

... -~ ..■ SWunbiMtaun ItMCbsutaaaT. 

■a, EdMnH ponJtBm.Ooal Co Olum. of Camnieror. 

■BU.ThM|iUiii...Cn>ndeii-l[uIln'Wooden*u«Co BKondandCtuluuit. 

_>01WlaBU. ------. Anarfnmn Winn <b mtl f te^ bt. 

CookB.MJSiul... 



CookB, 
goon^ 



b.F.. 



. . .Gnhwn FstHr Go. . . 



..P^r.... 



.'. 'ton 



cSSKf^!M^";":".:v/.v/";//;.■:'. 

^^|f^^^^^„i^-"}TmJJtJ.T.OonwruAOo..ODminKilon 07 K. Tonrtti it 

Oord«,U 7..'..D.0orduAVD flonrand Fwd I«S S^ T^eUUi < 

'.'.'. with piint S«cd Co." " 

,v.RiMe<ul'■a■Tud'anii^(3(I^^J7.7^7^^7'^ 

oojri'FioTjr.V.'.V.V.'.V,'. ' 



Cornell. BeiUuDtnl 
Conwtllu. ^B;^-^ 






■ImvHid Cn 

....JMaMa.Wuh. 

...tUK.lttait. 

...ai»W(lnilt«t. 

...Tbk-dudPloeiu. 



CntfI,HaDrT'a.".........BsnietAt>an .'rianVcamJnli 

Orua,Q». T AmartsuCn. lu.Oo.Fnildent ..... 

<aTi^^. John R. ..... .Zntoa, UeVlalUn A OD..Commlulaa . 

Cr»wIaTd!jno.U...'.V.'.ViJwkBinu'UiiaV.'.V."V..'.'V/,V.'.V.'...' 

Cnwtbrd. i. W B. W.Onvftrd ACo>,.Liimber 

Ckwdlnjt. U. C 

aroBiMa, C.B I.V.CuUn AOo BwlEaMle... 

1, Hanrr.. f SV L. Pkg A FrP <"" 

1. JahnO ....TbaHcFliMMn'n 



...«U WHtalDclonaT. 

ll.Lnelada BnlldlDS. 

...gS.Malnit. 

..,Brp»dw»T*I.oeiut»v 



SSK 



'jUobULJt.'.'.' 



...'OBllenAXeli 



inHornuiat. 
MU N-Brudmr. 



CdbumMu;. W. H... 



aln^bun.DlekaoB,. Block, Dean A Co Commlulan 

ORRUaa. Bam'l Sam'l Cuppleg Wood A WlUowmroCo.. 

OarrlB. W.I Fopa-CnirlaCom. Co 

Carrie. Tlionual. .anlnlnipacWr... 



». .Leourd and Euton ai 
.:.BIiltoBQlldlDf[. 

...lit Cham, of Comman 



ss^n^s^^i- 



;;}DM.r AO--.- 



,db,GoOglc 



...loMH.TwsiraiiL 
.'.Vl.Kl«dF BalldlDt. 









. . . Bt. 1.1. Market Rep'r C 









...,M7S. Tblrt«i 


































Buk<XOeiitRTlaw....Cuhler. 




=*^s§s-sSi;iJi 


...JOIOIlTs.i. 











...Ua7d«a BMdlarjr H. W. Co.... 
,.,D«TOT AFeoerbon>....Coal... 
...DnimmODd TotwoeeCo... 



.'.'.DIckMin'i' Bm I'tlii ! ' I ! ! ! ! L«wr«i 
- " "——•■- .Orafn 



!..B.H.DIdii 

...TbeAlben 

'.'. ', J.F.' bickmuin' A Uo'.'. '.S««d('i 



.TbeAlbwiDl9liinibnCaT.S*«d( 1^ 

CoDiDiiuiou nv.s 



NIOOIHDD 

Dlacknuia . . .Buokan ud BroKen . . .tl) N. »G at. 
~ — milFeed. •"■" "■— - 



k n.. llilcico. 

,. .Ilnth n. 
O'FallDn n. 



.....Fm^ T>takiQaBiiACa...Floiiraiid feed...,....,.m9B. Bro 

JM.DIekmanACo.... JlonraiHlFaed UMBlddU 

, BI.L. Sawing Uuib. Co IIU Final 

Fumar Fern.IUi 

FordADoin CODimlaaKni nTMlbeiH 

.....wlUi K. ClewrCam.Co.CaminlHloD "- "■ — 



_ /.HM N. Mlntli *I. 

Bulldar. UN St. tniarle* it. 

G«lti BUpaun, 111. 

...ThaDodWDABIUiHtt. Co Third ud C«dar ni 

■UDnfalgtaviT A But 
,.^UltoBafld1il(. 



loDd vid SlookCo ThlrduidOllvi- 



...Dank Btoa. Coal Co Goal Dealen ... 

...DonnallHIk, Uo 

...DvnDallTBroi LWart 

...a.H.DoniiawiildACo Coti 

...J.T. UonoTanBaalBaunCo . 



...Broadwaj f 
...SrdudlOnB. 



"lE.DonielolASon ConimlMlan M B. Uain at. 

'..'. fUalEalale auN.EIshtlii 

OrOMT ""' Pl~-.. 

Ttae Knapp, Slont Lnm tiet CDrnpaaT. 

....UoilsrCHckcrCa ■>-'•— 






sdbvGoo^^lc 



EXCHASGB OP ST. LOCUS. 



Don. C. N CIUin«BillWBTOa,..S«OHtUT-. too ZMton »v. 

DBfl^.JowpbA t.A.nartACo BeiUXttMa. ew CbMlnitt it 

Dnlk K. B Dnimmdad TabMCO Co ....Foonb A Bprnoou. 

DuiD,F.R. CommlHlen Ml ^. Fonrtti at. 

Dnam, Tlia* Tboi. Dddd Lam, Btoiwn A Utr.Co '....Wl rrmnkHm n. 

Dora**, Jvnt*. Dmvu A OlcotI Itutni Mill saw N. Broadwu. 

I>aMB.F. W HleuD Luindrr aMChttaatl. 

Dauher, C. O B<l.<irOnlDliilpsot'I..Fr«Nd«it W7ChiuDbcrorCDm. 

Dntehcr, 1. T. W aaflmitjfr. 

UBteber. I. V. W.. Jr..:..R.W. AO. R-ruid Oourlo DcamUh lie N. Tblrd n 



B'r and Oou 
IT wbm Co. 



..SpriiwaT.AP.R.K. 

...IBMN.Sitiat. 

, . . Walowiif bi BDltdlnf. 



coDd al. 



...OnlnBrokar... 



KdauMMD. Wm CoDBiMlAWIraCo... iSUPaplnii. 

EdcBT. T. B. W» WMinilnitar Piace. 

EdmDuda, HnuTi' Crlmliul Cabrt Jgdjca,-.'..-'..^ ...,^eoax Courti. 

Edwirdi. B. r ITMt'lBli.ofCompierce.AMt. Caabter Biwulwa j an J OHt* a. 

■dwarda. LAola Mlaalaalppl uUuCq. ..Oiua UnuKutaren Halaknii Anaelta iia 

■■•• '- '" '■ '— mil l!o OnBBral Jianaier. KawaaCltTTMo. 



a, Bdxwda 4 



Edwarda, Oca. J 

Eimta, F/w../^^v/.v//.HVB^Eg«a■■*cd^^^^^*it1Ue«/.^■^';;:;:::::;:;:;EiK^ 

KUaniiann. CbaiUa Cbaa. nilMnaiui Hnp and Hall Ce Stdal 

DctJer. Ffuk K. &i -" ■ 



IF^ 

«CtniMiweUlBqll«tla mPlnea 
•aMi^amOo 



_ .^ __, Qoadt Taotb A WaahlngioD ai 

xminH. John tinnltold KU Uratlot at. 

naaunrat, Hermann.., ^.,......,,.......,,......,,SoabMaiuir. --.-. ....--101 N Second at. 

"" ~- ' " ._i. Banker Trenton, Ilia 

..8D.111. EKraMFlIIUIntCo .Hiirpb;>ltora, III. 

...KanpADbrMbt .^mmUaton ICltN. Third au 

... Union 0*t.*S<irMTCo,..Pr«aldcnt Walnwrlftii Bnlldlniir. 



,..wllb Ktblor Broa. .. . 



.Tobaeeo Commladon , - .Ulh and Poplar 
-Tea, CoBh and BpUaa. -MM " 

ChamTComme 













Svfcr 




;?;:^i;:;:;:/:;::;;;;:i 



I. Them 



..T.CXratuAOo... 



.Rlalto Building 



GlerKTnan. O. lUi^da, High. 

.-.B.e.Falrb>aiAB»...CaminUtlon no NTThlrdal. 

-.eao G.FalrtuunABiro.-CoainilaatOD .»UN. Tblrd aL 

BMlEatMs Walnwrlgbi HDlldlns. 

'.■:'.i;!!;!!:'.'.'.'.'.*.v.Be«i Eit»i«..v.v.'!'.;i.';.';.'«ichetii)Htii. 

..PialF-Iilau(hwr Co Commlaalon Bd.ofTrw]*, C1iIcb«o. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



UEUBEBS OF THE 



,..Uem.*<Jtu>rlaaiDnlt^ IWN. Browlmj. 

//..ivinii*8oB^6T•l«rdo','.'p'^MMraL.'.^^'^'^.''.^'.'nft^ 

,..t1«c«OIEIei»tor Bl>![o Balldlni. 

...Jm. UeubsrACo Fork Fuken law N. Main •£ 

...V.J. L«[nt>- Clack I9i>i iindCberokM 

...Kninlkc AFelBcr .Soea. BroadwiT. 



...MMUODCoiQ.Oa... 




D.PiitavAO 



ffl-J 



■ jIaIkSSSS:. ■■ 


sn^""" 




















.iaws" r.:"".::::^ 



.WftlDwrlEtal BoUdlBf. 



....nuugu ACQ „.Hl)lan...,..„ I»S SOD<£srd. 

....WeiumCudrudB^mllDJnilTOo tua.nilrdii. 

....«litiO'Ci>niuirA0o....Mufcin(^orMr II) UinlDulil. 



....CalllerShotTawi 



Ewife's; 

l....BCiLinilaBnirliiK An'n. 
. .. . . H. Fantsr Real Bttiu Cc 



!:!B>tl>tiBiTAnaiUuliT 



•Li.:: 



...ComnilHloBCo... 






Uharleig SUi Uiili 



ftUelKnditll 

■.Diwion'ii 

"Wireili 
■*Co.. 



, .Fcelnht 



.3u N. BlEhtb n. 



BuriWlre... 

L.FreoBdinru «>«. 

— .JetteTMii Mulnol PIr* Iniunuice Co. . . 



...DliUUcn'iJienl... 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



ItBBCHAtlTS' EZOHANOE OF BI. LODIB. 



r™ni, joo, J f_ 

rms, Jenmlali \'' 

fmitJowpbP J. P. rook A Co Tillew.Bte. SMBmII 

FDMira. R. R FDu*Un Bratfacn ACo Connnliiloii IM h. n 

FurtoDf, Wm Picker A B««nl(laT.,..CDiBiDtHl<m In N. U 

rarfooi.'niDiiiuJ ArcblMct UOlpW 



ll-Kcu]lslllDlniCo,.FrMld*Dt Secnrliy B 



Uudotro. Jobs B. 
gmMii,Johiil" 



'' }c.l?>brIelABn) FbbJ 

ikV.'.V.V.'. .OtD'I Huuw Bt. I^Dla Bipo«lU«ii. . 
F^ MaldDOnAV'^ ProTWom... 



I. Jr.. 
0«nS!JiSn'w. . . "'. '. '. :^'wfS"™i't*'co'^ .'.■.By.' B 



QirnaD, Juioc* V Am*rtoia BlwiltCa 

0«nMt, JohnW J, W.e. -- - " 

Gunl«.0. W FnmWli 

fivnlL VTra,. Wm-Uurairi «uj tjonper DynpuBi iigui^e&UD ii, 

flHrtMii, O. L BlirMiiildjCoiltlron Co W«tnwrlglil Bi 

GvTtty.r.I HillDiuI CenKlCo zu N. Commar 

gimmg. Rlclurd Sonlhrm Holier Worki l»l B. Becond i 

OmiiJohD H Fvnmn' AManbuiu' Bank, Praaldant KaDnlbil, Uo. 

^my^^wranM L. G»r«eT*i;o..........ProdiKB*CoiBinl«loB .701 N. Third it 



OuLniMkB UnmbyHlDlngAB. Co 

^^.Tinrji aataefMUt. t^ 

Ouu, S. Jr Hmrr euu A Sou ....Box Tut 

«tbbinlt Geo. K Orpsar... 

Oahnar, H ...11.0«bnarDkitl]llD(Co.TblikeT 



Oara^tT, jf(ffi'fc.\V.~'di«iAniCo\.'.\'.V'.V'.\'.'.lIlll ?i 
Oanwr.Cbiuiea OwbarrroltCo 

SetMrd, O. J.T.... 
Omt«t,E.a.,. .... 
eaAut.Oiu. B.... 
Oetc Ji«BrT C 

Oa^ar.' Bmll wV. ■.■.'.■.*.', 

6«a<ar._C. A GeMlw t KnuMnlck. 

?B* }w.P.B«ttTi*8oi 

. .rfr»ei'.'.'.'.'!!..et.I.a. On'""-- 

ehlo, JAnB _....O*0<uad. 



l.'.BION.Mlt 



1, OHO diu.Eblsrmu Hop mndUalt Co... 

WMalman, Fnuik H OliTlaBbkni Uom. Co 

■"--■— lohaF. JohD>.a£lil(jrABro..Fead 

W.J BllbailBook Oo Fnbllaber. 



61 bnlib, Jaba W^-wlOi Uncti FBrfiuod AUo...BookkMp«r ... 

flllkaoB. Jobn H. QI)IaiKiBClaoMCon.Co.CODnolHlon.., 

""■- "*■ euUiBroa CommlH'-- 

n, P. J r. J.eilmHtln*Co...Commlu 

Ua Waitarn Bmrair Va...Br«wen 

10, D aiDocobloBm, ACe..Fnlla.. 



Hoooara. iHorn a. . . . nanm m 'xvaaa \i 

eaddud,a.F \B. Goddard * 8« 

eoddanLJoaapblt....; FIodiMIIICd 

OodtoT*, UMiKB W Om.W.tiodloTWI 

e«dlo*a, L Hallmaa-QodloTa 

OodloTc. Jamaa E UodloTaA Bauer 

q oebel. Fiiu OoalKl * Watten 

SOCU, Oiutc > ii 
Sam, Vtetor.... 



,db,GoOglc 



HEUBICRB OF THK 



eoldmwi. J.l>. Adlcr-GDldmuUam.Co.Calton Puton Ualn ud Elm lU. 

Soldtmlttl. H. B K.K. PalrbukACa....[.udAa RUIto Bolldlni. 

atOttM, RobeitW Qolaui-Colt Commlulan Co Foanb ud PIdc >l 

O0mUr,CbM.O Prlnur am Ptte it. 

eood,Loal(0 ,L.CQDad* Co. Mdse. Broken tMN. eeeondo. 

OMdaaJnaB W. H Uukhun ASon.lniunnca il7.V.Ird u. 

fii^dan. Bt — -' " — "•— ■— ■■ — ■-. — ...„„ ,.™.j_^ .. 



SoMMbaU 



....—Jt, W. E 

Snca,P.F. KuoeA Orue BnlEai 

embUD, BwJ.B. QnhunPiperCo Piger D 

enbHl, fl.JL. antaamlCiKkKU Void. &>.... 

9W??'%.0-K w.-vvj.-!-;;:. ;:_ ^._- 



SSSrSt^s":;;;:. 

CjruL Liui. A 

Grmnt. Alciu-ler II 
Unnmuolc. Will... 



...BukDrBppiibiie.'.i'.'.lcuiiWr'. 



n.JoiiaiiAOnti.Bsgiliig RUl to Building. 



Qrmy. hclTlnL . IjiByer.. WB (HiHrtnaiTi. 

Qimyion. W 81. L. KaTrlFsnilor A Wooden untter Co M»inAP«r»n. 

Or«D,l9ea, S D. I. Bnibiirll A Co. ...BeedgnndOnilii IW N. Secandii. 

fireen, R W BLLoqUC^r Wheel Co, Cw WUeeti BuikCom. Bnlld-f. 

Green,' H.'H,\\V.V.V!:!l^««enCiu--wli.MTte.Cii.PrMl'doni.'.'.'.'.'.'""..*,".'.'.!S(ii» 6. Broulmf. 



-'tOreeaALiMotte Real Ealub 

.!!..Ueliut»cherSlaunI^nnAKomiut Mill Co. ... Nlnib KOd Pine (U 



lhB;T.^l.'aM 



;Komnft M 



Ik. Aeit. Xmgtr 10th Knd Clukav. 

btACd.... ...Bro»d way and Ldct 

nn D...., Rul Eitkte Ceouml, gt.LouUl 

, let, ]r...waMiwoad*C<i .Bwil Eelua W»lD«rirht SuUd 

Htmt, Juuse U „ M) ChaatonCn. 

Greer, Robert C R. O. Greiir Real Balate Co. Ml Cbeatoot n. 

Grant! Wm.*H'.Jr!'.!V.'.Moi>nd<;trP't'* Col Co. ."...."..." !i!!!!!wsl^Sesond at! 

I'lilo'd V.V.' oVlimdVeck A n^^id i« Voni'i^^^ 
xmanl.' 



Bilcnul Brewery Company Blfliuentb 

."." !^....""!!!M»iiin(t'.'.'.'.'.v.v.'.v.*;;;!:;iiuip»ika> 

"iSer... 



. .Ht. Srtaaedleek, Jr....MaIa)Br IllOPatk 

...wltliR. U. Dual Co UBrcantUe AaeocT Cbani. ol 

FroTlHoDa 1701 Anal 

...GrlmmAUItabell , IMN. Fi 

...FI^erACo RaalEatate TI4 Cbeii 



'_".}h. Grone Brew. Co... 

! ! ! 'with' J. P. Qriaeiaeje 
....DroaibelderABro. ,. 



..MInUitl.aDdCutv 
..Broadway and Wall 
..tUK. Fonnhet 
...CommerrlalBiilldlB 
...Laclede ButldlDf. 



sdbvGoO^^IC 



KERCH A NTS' EXCHAKQE OF 8 



Si'cV.5^i* 



A U IH. T1IU7 TnmipoiliiUon Co. V.P, i . '.Ittlu taa Wilnut. 































SSSS^i-:::::::: 






















..... 








gai-.r^S?!":;;;:;:.: 


;:gS3"^d%"^^'rla";fc«^»ci:::::::::: 

















^gffiT:h.;; 


:.Jsd^i^.^*:::.'^S^S?riAM 




l^[l»^'.M«ii^r.. 






Himmsr.L.r. 





;..'lIeriihii]ilTmllor. 



HUtitnlcr. F P- Haiunl.^ _ 

Bkllcnler. JbMplu F. HUUnler Al 



Hndcn.T.F HaTdgnSImu Co 

Uajn. D. J BctoilaHIItliiaCo.,. 



Ba»nu! 






Harnet. W.J Tront Bank Btsel fonimacCo TIS N.Hilr 

Barii«. Wm.A Hush, OordoD AGs.. Bnln. ChgnDiI, III 

BkBTd. Wm. P. wIlhC.U.AIbcnACa..ConimlailoD SlJChmiq.o 

BaaJeT'L B...........,..aienso« Lime A Cement Co,,.-..-.-.....-- -.Odd Fel1<j< 

HraltT.'l- O Oroeer MMBcoii 1 

Btrntb. A.l A. J. Hutb A Co. CommlMlOQ Ill Finn il. 

J&tfon- 

Llbertr BrewlDc Co.... Brewer* iatt Vrlgbt 1 

CoiilCo!' 

.■.'-'.".■Feeii::! 

■ - mouin BDi. ini. Co 

Ed.,lr f -1 

ilellzfoerc. CliM.L...JEd. HelUbciv P. 1 P- Co ^ 

BclUberca*o-C I. J 



w*Ca....Gmi 

-J /In* Co. ...Brew,— — „ 

Haldbnder. ChM. W JSOTtli 

Hclnrlcb, John P- ■ ' " -' 

HelBiiKtwmejer, 

Balnti. Kmll' 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



UEMBEBS OF THE 



;:!SS'ffl 


!'SJ&::: 


SaaWSii;::::: 


::g: 


TSiS 


;»&,"■ 


^»S;:::;;::::" 



,.P«ii(ii<t411ein*nwaT..IiunnuiM a» OIlTen. 

..B. A.HendMACo Undn Buinnell. 1I1>. 

— iBumuwe iir n. 'nilrdit. 

...K.CI«*rr Cam. Co JIT Cholnal It. 

Oil* UO B. ComnitrcUl n. 

..St. Laiil«I>ntTic«Co...TrxB*r«r 10 Brld(e AppnmctL 



..Hnf A Prvricb* CbtmlcM Co UM B. Krowlw^. 

..Kom* Brawar^Co. Caplul bv. A MUmln. 

..CbgrokM PuckttCo .Fool or VInfilt. 

.'.liii«niBdoiuJ'BulE!!'.!'.Oubla-.'.\\V.'.V.V A Ctmnit iti. 

..Olnu^Zlac Co umttlern. 

..111. HTdnollc Brick Co.. Brick Odd F«llnir(Balldln|. 

..H«*er A W1ekliun....CMl .Houcr Building. 

..Th« Knlckarbooker Co IMS H. Comploa it. 

.. — .. n__^ — •..„. .. -Mlon tnS.Tbiti M. 

...rrooacc.................lUL N.Tbtrdiu 

...BiJisr. UllBlddleM. 



II Ferry Co. .CoDlrftcUns Anni. ... 






elUIUliwOo Ulllsn 

,.,Fr«Wit Agtat... 

luerBniidiiif. 
lolaitc BuUdlni. 

Union Trut Bnlldliif. 

fflVJoVCotion ftidtor«.'.".'.'!!!!:!ll8 b'. HiUdm. 

iii1c....Pr«ildent Third ud Pine n*. 

HOo.AKsnt....: Odd Fellon BglldlDf. 

'.".'.V.','.'i'Boiit.V.'.V.V.V.'.'.'.'.V.'.'.'.V.LoQl«Tllle,Kj-. 
oaUurkst*!. 



...PlBkls^ slo Third u 

"-■-■--- ..TSI7e.aizui». 

!^^^^^'^^^^^'^^^^^^^v.^v.v.v.¥™kM■","TT.?^.7"l!'.'iR>■l'lo Bonding. 

Farmer Bockwood, HIT 

LIT* Stock UdIoo Hlock Tudi 

..Hlnimu Flour Co MS Chun, of Oom» 

..HsIneSifttT Boiler Co Bk.orcommeR»Bl 

.VilHlmhiBoiulronARkllCa Sit S. Sacond u. 

..F.D.HInchbargABro.lDtDrmao* IB H. Third at. 

. AttomsT Valnwilcht BBlldli 

.Cryauiaty PliUOluiCo 'WilawrlTht Bnlldu 

^■iL■«TVCoii'co.'.^^'.'.'.'.Vp^eiid•nl.^^^^^^■.V.^V.'.'.'.'Lmla^ia BnllalnK. 
..vltii tLQaarr Com, Oo..Com[ulHlon.,.. ......... lUCtauD. of ComnH 

.J B.U.Sahlor A Co...Orsln 411 Cham. orCommi 

..VhltakerAUodgmaa.. Stock A Bond Brokara. JSO N . roortliit. 



.Buparlorlce AColdBtonwrs Co!! !....'!.. ..Twelfth and Pain. 

Ballder OlobeOem. BoUdlBi 

.KerarAHorman Breweia' Boppllaa nB.Malnal. 

{HofBiannBnM.Prad.Co. Produce and On>oan...TMK.B«eoBdiI. 

..Ronn CommlaalOB Uo IIS N. Kaln It. 

..BrliUa*Beaohlllk.Co..StoTsa KalD and AlDOBd *■ 

,7 rrr. Attorney .SMMOUTeal. 

..BcdameTer-Holllilar CommlHloD Co lOnK.lrd Bt. 

- " "-" •Co. ..Prodao* nK. Main at. 

'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.Eiiita BnlldlDg. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



HEK OH ants' EXCBANQE or S 



,..P«l«r*on ABon 
,..I>Liunon<l MuKli 
...Uaeklrw-Welle 



...Q(i»nlirim 



U) S. Bacui 

...-jtSMsiui 
...LKl«de Bui 



Born, Benjun 



Honnr, WIIIUmK ., 

g«ncr. K. P Allan-VutOom. ( 

aOflUbT.JOKpll L ^ 

Honon, Wm.U Kiilleil«a * Hnrton 

HMpu, RIchuil eermuMBYlngiln 

Hougb. Benrr W 



...Cbu.Hopnii A Son Milling Co 717 Purl 

'.'.BUTelmndH«aing.,'.'.t»tlKClicstiiii 

..Ben], r. Uorn, Coopcnc* E.Si. Loula, 1 



ii.H«kiACi>....Wtiii 






HSii«r wTj .'.■.■.' 

HiiB|riii«T. PninkW... 
Hamphrcjr*. W . H 



Uul. U.K..... 

Hut. H.I. 

Biniler. B. D. .. 



...TNt-APw-CMdUo... 



vt, E. D. 

iiiiii>*r,E.O _. 

BBBier.Tho*. H The AlbartDloklntonCo. 

Hnpperl, W. B wlKUannuBnwfrTCo, 



.OiiilnmdFwd.V. 



BaMedrEilwinl C. .^ 

HoMOB, Sco.lI Q».H.Riulon*C»....Broksn 

IateblDHD, B. R. Heelunlga< Buk CuhMr „.., 
Bleblninn, Junea Bttop AaugwBTOMr.. 

■,e«. A OmTI. H]rDt(ACa....Reitl Eaut« 

■■ B. H PtaTddM 



i5S!;i^hF-.::-.::-.:}j.T.i»b.*oo 

n, B D.R. FnnetiABro 

■.nurisiW at. Loull Hit'lBu 

h Bonne L J. L. lM«i Wall Pai 

wtdnTwin Buk orOommeruc. 

«1, Bmer L H.*L.CIiua 



...BiKhthindasrkar 



Lwninf Ca.,Tuit* '.'...lUCbutnnlit 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



HEUBGB8 OF THE 



KxahunB] 



. . . Mrtliold A Jsunlnc* . ..Lan 






.l,E.G MlBlngEi 

ini«TaV.'.'.V.'.'.'.".'.'.'.V.Br«dvaT Jt 1V*l>it ■■ 

— ..ilmiiiimi ■.:.::".■.■.■. '.'.'.llBK.'Si'ii. 

Jouuon, Olwrle) K. WWBlghliliAH'n.,Annl Lmclcde Bnlldliu. 

Jobwon, Ueo. W K. B, JolinwnltOa....aV WelgliBn KS.VomateniSl. 

JobBHD, Waliar J.B.H.KMilor A Co.... Ill Chun, of OouBMnn. 

*-' — • — "" ° Tla F>>llHuiituteiT...M9)S. Broadwu. 

...HIU.ViaiaTTrnit Co .SecnUJT ns N. FoBrlli aC 

, CryaUlFUwaUHCo Wilnvili^i BBDdliii. 

Jonai, WIu/c.!."!^^^^'^"Wm'G*jVcVjo^e^///.Allo^n^V^'"'.'.V.'.'.V.''.V.'.IJlol*lle Buuiuu. 
'OBM, HsarrT More, JoBM * Co BrmuFonndsn ItU N. BlRbtti uT^ 

onei.L. B Baal KaMlg lit N. lOgliUi it. 

ODM, Ap, r Colton MuTTllle. Ha. 

oas*. Eiekld Jonea-FqiHsPnilucaCo.UomDiLailan >u N. FourUi il. 

oaei, L. F Warren, JoDsa A Unti-^Bainliu Klalu BuUdlu. 

oneM, OeorttV 0«o. P. Jooai A Co. . . . lOUa )1D tJ.lUln *i. 

oneg. SlIuB S.B. JoneaA'WllliaiDl.Lawyar Union Tnal BaUdtac. 

ODBi. Vincent M John MollallTCiniir-'— —'■- — "- '■ =- 

Srfin. J. li, ..■,".■.■,'.'.'.■.'.'.■. Jonl'inriarii'do!.'! 
o;.L«tl _ Hnbbard, Frlca A 

BdMn. F.M..'!! !!!!!! !!!jndton"ATaDnlji.'! LAwyon «i uutbh. 

vndd, V. D.. ^ Bringon- Jndd enln Co J07CtuBi.Csn 

JntDKllag, Eanrr JJadcrknoa Club Utliuid Chan 




,lnlerat«te Daa»Mh... 
,MaOv«. KabniuiiiA'^ 
J. B. KalmeAfiro... 

KalurACo... 



3. KalBor ACo..,.<}nHHr>.., 



M., BaonraotnVrr ! ,'.' 
...Heal BMau Agenti. 

, . — „ .'.'.Jacob Kalaat 

Mr.Jeta>V JohnB.KalL 

b, e.O. e.O. Kalb A 

nnnaa. (tattu^ Com 

S^S; K E... :;}K"ff>iiaa Uming Co...Mimiut 

uoe, Wm. G Wonderir Co*l Co 

TKnanab, Jamai ........lo« ..... 

ane.Wm KaaDeAOnoe R«atBi 

ebia, W. B SaDUrAOa .Commli 

ulcr. HenirF Borden A Bel l««k Bcalea... 



LISH.TIilrlM. 
ianaai atr, Mo. 






Co., Oen'l *st. . . .Union TroatBi 



B^SiUl. 



'.'.'.'.V. D. Hln<i1ib«Ti ABro.'.l'oiunnM 
;;}Keh1arBraa Ullllnf .. 




orOamurca. 



I'.'iialiT'CanimeRlaVBuiietil 

oiii«<4 Kelly JiVlt^- 




: '. '. Jobben ACommiMULJH M. Oomi 

...Jobben ACommisdonljIIlN 

} Carpet) Broadwaj A St. Ghartr. 



,db,GoOglc 



M2RCHAMTS' EXCHAKUE OF BT. LOniB. 



llRU,T:hirl«' 
K«ni, Jicob. , . 



ft.H.N«lM>DF«lII[Co... 



i^Wuiiiuii'iiAOo .CDininl 



Heiioriw Bu 



'. U. Klely JTCo CommlHlon... 

BDUadge'Jtkiiiiaulakr.ltuI Eatale".' 



rr'Fu'rnMil'BgOD'.'V. iraTB. 



mod * JMCUd JcveliT <k 
JlraK 



Slxlti Uld Laoul It). 

ino"i>wVrtt i'coAV///////////.'.','.".'.'.','.'.".'.'.!'.;!ll Old Slip. N»w York. 

Bt. Lo^a TupuUn Co .TupMllDI. IS. Canimerclil n. 

King, Brln>nu3eAOo,IIlll[BaTT -m Wublngton ■• 

Klnnl'dADoitHl*"'^*""'*''*"*^*^'^" ■"*■ I' v-i'v^niii 

CcnSkl UnlOD J 



torlBgCo.... 



VmT.i.tl... 



Klrk^Mrick. r' 'ti'. 

KlMKT. Jiitan ".'.'.'.foikiii'i'iamii^ 



KlMbcr, JoSa 1 . _, w_.n„ 

KlHlMrDutal J A, KIWberA Boi 

Kltla, Jacob CIranltConrt.... 

KMne, Uenir C. 



Klrt.n.P. Ir. Waaaiiar'aKtca Mltllua Co iDclcpBadtaec. K 

■"-"-—"— " '• .ThoAinwiouiLlntwilAtMlorOllCo I. Bl. LonH. lilt 

.lUkibUta eiS CimtDnt n. 

.FMd (MM.Browlvi 

.F«ad UO Tliar«M ■'. 

Urocan and 7eBd MM S. Brrwdwaj 

i>«H<UlCo traSToDTtliit. 

.Jadm CoDrtHouaa. 

, _ Onxn aXB HcNalraT. 

KMaa, Cbarlsa A. Lani Pork Packai lU Ruaaall ar. 

Uiuar, 8. H 8LI.oiilaTraiuf«'Co...UaDa«r IB. Broadwar. 

KltSermun, Wm. A Fe«d IlBCuaaTe. 

K»KuL...\..V.'.'.V.V,V,VLVKn«bW*'Col"!'.!'.!'.fli»ln.,V.V.'.V.V!"'./.'.V.>larron,Illi.' 

Kialiut.II. Wj,ir H.W.KnibaiiaABaiu.CDiniiilBrion lOIt X. Third it. 

Ka^i.^io. ^} BalemuD Fourth ACIaikai 

Eaei.C.e ^f. Hart block Yda...Tlae-Preild — 

Kkoi, WILIR ^At(M*Ua ^ookblnde 

Kock.BnlU InUr 8ml Pa» Oo 

Koek.J. O. Bi«a«MUl*«ntiiCo DrnH,!!!. 

Somklii, Wm Jo*.A.BniikIaBd«Ca,.KHaBdOralD lose.'nilrd it. 

KoaMer.C <;olBmMaBnwtii|cCa.....T. ZOltaAHidlKi 



KoOMnwfc.T. li- HIIUu Wattirloo, llli. 

Koaalii, WUIJaii Wb. Koealc * Co Para^elilDaT mS.EKblh at. 

KolillKT, Loal* FMd MOT Uluonrt it 

KoUbTT. Lcwll, Jr .Lonia Kohlbrr JFtti Mi; Hluoutlat. 

ir..ki ■ ...Kohl ANIan""" wm^A v^ni... Tit. 

,..iC6hDACo... 



...llBN.F«inhal 



Saka. R.D ^Broker Qa* Billdlo^. 

KokilBs, nertiard e. Kohiins • Bra WholcMl* LIqnon mV. Seeond i.. 

Kelb, Adelph » Ftod BM U. BeTenlk it. 

KonfohB, R earr Atlonwr. .L»oIei1a BuUdtu. 



Kraft. %.L 

Kramer, Theodoro. 
Kratk, " 



i.'KiaokoAOik'.ii.'.ietataaadHaT... 



ID Br<irlD>Co.. 

iBravanOiL.Brrnn 

...PauAEnaaM HaaafiLetartni * MlDlur C«... 
"—alar* Sniaunlck.. Broken.. 
I. KnBDlniABoDi.Groeu... 



CommsreUI M. 



KiuaatHB. Jr... 
ErvoaaBlck K.O..... 

Krar.Fred'. .\V.\\Viiin'itim'*BoB'.''.'.'.'.Lpork P»okw».','.'!'.'.'.'.".','jliland Brenieaai 

Iilwitlaiaa. A A.KrtaaklianiACo Hldaa A Cooiialaalon ...tlOH. Haln ii. 

Kfleekhaoa, Arthur A.XrloakhwitACo....III>lTa,ato lUB.MalDit. 

KHlc.F.H HitoimilliwCo. . mht™ t..! h> i,.-!. ni. 

Kr«a(CT. Ualhia* Br.Btjm t Co... 



Kaeake, Hennr. 
Kathna, Pnnk., 



ttiAOo- Prodac 



'.'..M6 Deatreh'an 
.'.■."llSJK. Third. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



:iD*n. HenrfW Eohlmu ft Brol. GrocenndFead... 

1, elm* Heal Eatate 

I,' AUK- H/".'.!!!!!!,A'ri«'liii'B™w■i7""l!!!!!^"^;^'!!l!!!!V/.V.'".'. 

I'c'iJTeVc }h. W.KbIh*Co Orocen * OommJi'i 

['.Henry ...;.'.;''.'. Ualtner 

terle, E. XupRrle Bmi. Mfg. Co , 

I, Paul PnnlKurtiACo ITadnca 






^i 



...J>Bdu(iah,£7. 



fitKI:, 



;; 1'. 1" !;;:;:;."';."!"; .■^.' ..iiSidH. , ;. . .■..'.■. v..'.'.'. v. . »^itri- s 

...LallBAllMtFow^.FovdCT M» N. tWcoua «. 

!."."i!'^UtioBulldlii(. 
HMN.Srdn. 



L. fin«D com. Oo. . 



LuK, (fco.r. oaneiHiia L«ng. ....... rronum.,.. 

Lwut. Qwtm Bnun-Ljuui (;am, Ca..riaaruid Comml 

LmiK.B.Hu,.i. P P. WmUn»ftCo....OammlHl(m 

tiUKdiile, W. a 8t.L.«N,0 An.Llne....pDrobuliwAcuil 

L™«, Wm. A..... Ganainl* Life lo«. Co 

" ""'""|'§*^-''"-}ljHjgBnhergBro.*Oo..Comiiii 




„ JI.CknHnMr*Oo.Kt«lKM«».., 

I.augli1lOal1>a *i*'^*^ 

I^vrenee. Frmat.V."V..BioChemi(uil Co.' .','.'.'.'.' 

LedeKr,^ai'l'M.^'.'^"Menmeo Vwil(iniig!!!,Beat«ttry ud'iitu!!! 

I.ee.W H MoMliMite' Nel. B«iik,.Pr«lilBat,.. 

l«e,irni.H... -.....-.-.-- ™^- 

Irfftwtoh. V 






J UUve 



!!!40 Kxchiuiin places K.T. 

'.V.Kew Orlwu, 

...PoBTthAPlne. 

...llfLocuiIit 

.. .TtalrtMnth * ChcnikM. 

...Tlilrteen 

...SlOLomtairdM. 
...ta Lombwd M. 



.„.-.oh, Morri* wlUiHonWr Bro. , 

Labnen, 8. M LehmaBBroi. OoniniluloD 

LMimer. H.» Iinun.oi» 

LeUhtDD. J. C. 

LalODK.A. A .CitliBn'jBMjk. OuUar^ 

LemcEe, L L.Lemcke ACo Uommlaalon 

Lamclu. U. H. InannuiM 

Lamp. William J WJ.tianipBrow'iCa..BMnrar 

]iZl\'^'J:ii:::::-X 

LSSS;i^^W'.".".'./...Bw<nirMIIIl .MtUiog 

Leonhvdt. S. H...^.*.BucoiiT Mill* flour........ 

I.eoii1ind!,UanlnW gdxoiir IglH _.„___ 

IjCiclien. HeniT A. LeacLSD A Sou Bojie aiii] Oordam «M N.Mal 

rery. Filk Wnolenle OBUen (1* Bt. Uu 

terr.M. rf :;..: r.ire Inniuoa. Snenttmi 

Lswedajr. Ctaai Chaa. LevedacAOo....PraTlaloii* «WN. Toa 

LewSlrlmerT. Maisnuw IronCo Mlulng SMPIiuot 

LawH,J. tt. J. B.Lewi. IC . R-K-E; 

LBwl..joiin Court or Appeali. CKr^j-.v ?'»"^'?r- 

Lirbke, C. Pranll SairHIll ., BecoDd * BaohauB lO. 

Unett. JohnE. Llnett-Uren Tobacso Co UMWaab.sT. 

Undblom. Rotwrt BoSertUadblom A<;o.ComiiilMlon. i»Obmm.oHiata,CUaf 

L nil. Emit - nwKninBlkM. 

LlDler. Eir»H...... Merchant Tit N . Sscood M. 

Uiuuinaa, Henri'" n Drni Broker 4M N. Beeond au 

IABne\t,Q.H.1r'. H.ZIIUaiaii Tents, Ac lOTN. Uala n. 

UWa,U«aw«H. .^. tmEaaton a*. 

■-«. >_ •., .,*iB.C. LltUoABro Bankan aod Broker a .4ltOUTeBt. 

...R.L.LIIUellflr.Oo IIM N. ted at. 

,.Wm.C.UtUB*Bro... .Broken «110UT*at. 



sdbvGoO^^IC 



UERCHAIfTS' EXCHiKOE OF BT. 1 



«ck«. Geo. W... 



ren. i>mTld... 

Loie^u,' r.'u'.'. 
^ofimun, Wm. 1 



, . .Bode A LItisu If er.Oo. .reed. . . . 



', Locke A Co... Real Biuta... 



n;w.''^ 



a H.; ■■ 



K-, . , 8t.'i.oni«'aicl'i Doei' Co.'Pr*iidani.'! .' .'.' 



U.B-.Ji 



..'.nilooUSDppljr* 



I. QlllHrIP "..St. 



,TInlMitBlt«iit«rCo... 



,N. K. rilttwoki A Co. , . 






vii^OasiniiHiaii.', 



...Wklnwrlilit BulldlDg. 
...BecnrtijBulldliu, 
..MS Olive It. 
...IION. Tliir.Jit. 



, . .Chair XannflKkir;, . . 



...lOlCbam.arCc 
..tains. Elfhth 
...siBChet— 



BUeoabe. B.I. Sarlnrd, Blearing ACo 

Bfaodniuiid. D. J Haedeuld ACo Cetton 

Hack, Uemy W Cenner Bro* CommlHlon.. 

MadlU. Oeotn A Unloii Trsat Co Preildeot..... 

lIa«aU'». Aatwilo. ADtoBtoilBMtra*Co,.CommiHloii. 

Eatt. ChartM C. IrDBHannMlnOo 

BSn, Wm.O. RealEilaW... 

MUBtkP. C )ll«warlBallroadCo...PreaIdsBt.... 

llBdKii.Fnuk Unv.lfwInnA Hollman. Innranea 

Xiwlnu*. J4mei A D*ciiao£MMiiuili Saddlerr 0>. . 

IbCBln. Jotan RealEaiaW ... 

l^rMM, CbM. J MafQlnCoalCD 

]lKBlr*.LoBtKT. (Mel aiaM Uo 

iSuniM. J Saloon 

MalllDeiTOilt, Xdw. kUUnckrodt Ctaem.Wlu., Hl>. Cbenib 

HailoB, P.P ManlonBbwkamltbana 

Mum, T. L B.GrioanlAckAO 

Manewnl, Atic Ibnrwsl-LiinnCnckerCo. 

ManlwRl, E. K F.aTulOFAOo Coi 

llaanir. A llannu<-Tebl>elMliiip.Ck>..l'i 

MarUum. W. H Jut u v.,1,1. .ii . 

Markhaa. Oeorf* D. . { w-H. Karkham 4 Bon .Inaii 

■Carta, Darld A. Stable Canal Mllli.... Ubm 

Marta,JabnJ Stable Cereal MUli 

Uariej. T. F Am! 

HarqiiBrd. Qeona H — (tao H.Harq<iarddbBro..Qrocen. 
— — ila. P.B. ..^. f.,?:BS^««S, " ■" 

J-"'- " 

w. Hirrr S ... '^.^'"M»™*'H•»■ ".'.'.'.■'.'.'.'." Wboleiaje'i 

ItVer Packet Co . Wei ' V .'.' .'-'.'.'. 

- . - Jtoliwoa 4 Co. ..MannTTFi 

aCaUier. C. r MenuoJ, Jwcatd Jewelry Co 



Uariej 






Klllal 



iCa.,CotionlUiinr 



...Willi* C. Wslktr 



SCuomiobnH 

IC&rsc^d. Huining!!! 
M«TB*T' <1*0' E- 



Manntal ACcGommlHloD... 



.m Oil re U. 
.Co I (on Eictaaoge. 
InlanTrnitlBiiIldliis. 

SSiag. 



:::R!8 



...BecurItT Bnlldl^. 

.'.Vseoarin BDlldlai. 

.V.'l07N,'Klrtthit, 

.. .Union Tniit BnUdlac. 



...IIHB.TweinhaC 



...Qrocara IIOK. Third at 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



MEUBKB8 or THE 




sdbvGoo^^lc 



HEBGHAMTS' KZCHANaB OF S 



MoFtI*, K.K. CquDberUad Smp I>MHtch. 

HatTl4.It.H L.,a(.L.ATei&'T....AnDt. 

MorrtioDi KubC W.'.^'^'B.' wVHoMioa A''Co^Call[n<M^*.'.'.' 






m. Co .'.v. 



> <f cjupet'Oo 



duMmllj CommliilDQ Co.-.-.--. .......-.---400 Chun- of C< 



...Jna.UDllillrCDni. 



OB Cbun-orConuoerc*. 



■ u™in PlDskaeTilUc, Uli. 

,--...B1r«*tCommluloner--.--- -.-- ...-.Gltr Hall- 

0«o. larlor Com. Co U 8. Uiln •■■ 

Friullng. TUr^ ud Tine itr 

-- KaUon, Uorrl* A Co., Port imdBMf Pr-- — ■'— — ■ — — "— 
....H.B(igenACo Bait 



itoul Htock Tdi., ItU. 



MKAdmin, D. H- . 



...Broulwaj AWili 



!Lacled?Dii] Idinc""* 



BAIllatcr, JiAn UoAUllMrACo PorkPukfrt..- 



cAUincr. B 
■—-»«■,,■ 
■, *! 

eOiArr. Jolu 
cCUl. UnH . 

eClUT. HuTc 
eClalCui, J. H. 
cdaUu.C.n . 
cOmIuf. Bugta. 

tClara. Q E. 



- .. Am. Bafrlmntor Tns*ttCa.. - 



jnsrS.:. 



oOonB 



BunudAGf 



--—iSoil, c"]?, 

?E^ft!Hk" 

cStyn. Mra ,-.'.'.'.."!coiin.Hit.L.Iiu. 

— ^nn, ChH-B H-U.HcKauiAC. 

:hd. U. M M. M-UoKaanACo. 

_ Jular. CTItU- — "'— ■— " '— ' — 



}uichulMcEniilaSoiu.-Ft0Tli1aiu. U Pine it. 

■" """"'J?^il?sr:^-;;;;;;:;;;;;;;;;;:v;;";ffil;K^T'''«- 



.V.M-U'.licKaan' 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



ii«,0.n... 



i.a J.H. UeMihui 

- "" .N.K.F»lrb«uk 

Mo. Cw A Foundrr Co.. 

" ■ "-■■ ■liCo.. 



BeKoRO*. F.J r.J. McHorro<>iCo..Bn)ken Cbkro. orcommcns. 
sNalr, L. U BroKsr BMQrit* Bnildlnir. 

MoNklr, /obn n McNstr. tlurlalteiilEiUteCo 713 Cbutam iL 

S«NaiM«,U. T Pvl.Teiui.ftAlii.RR Buk of CommarcrBld 

JfoKallay, J. A OTentraet ft McNelisT,.LlTe Slock Union ><toek Yh4>. 

lfaPh«e£>n, T. S McPhaeien'WvahiOo.WBrsliouie ilMN.Leree. 

MCPheMon, HsDiT J. BurdtngftCo R. R. Cnntnolor. BoodvUIp. Mn. 

'^IcRm. V. G Real BuiatB Unlan Tmal Bntldlag. 



HcRaa. ^ 



B.J NedderbiiiP.ftP.Co...eraTlUoii., 



Lavrer Bccntllr Bnlldlnf. 

tcDeiutoli... 
t^nnr-— ■— 



. . . Nuiaon CommlHlon Co...^,..;..;.w .aBCUun.ofComi 

V.'.Nuh-amllhTeaftCoffei 



...WhalCHlaOracei 
'.'. ; Koddirhot P. *"pr Co. .^._.V;^|^! !j; .V. ^V ^ '^"; ;." .'wT Ej n"i 
It Wur^mii' 






'!.'V. ftA.R.R...'. '.V.'.Uen'I l.lT« aioflk'i'ii'.'.'. 



.'.'.Vort Olipi 



...NIchDll^RltUrReiltrCo... 

: '.'.Qnia Ttm Brew-y" cb'.iSuSo 



...E()uiiiailaBuf[d[iic. 



St Li. Stxnplnc Co UmunlketBnn.. 

IVmuter Cttr Uill. 

Orocar »t-_... t, 

NIesatiroearCo. Grocei 

„.„ , Mlnsmuft Biyan Port I 

NIpbar, Fnneli K Fniroi 

KKIHkW.W Unt. Llf«IiiK.Co.o(N. Y.... 

Nobla.JabnW Linrje 

NOfl.HennG H.X. Noet ftf^" n—v- 

Noa], HenrTH U.U.Noel ft 



iiiim. '.'.'. '.'.'.' '.'.'.'.OK il. Hmlnit. 
ionofPtaT*la.,J7th ft Wubingun i 



. . .Oenanl A(snt Ponnhuitl Hukat. 

BrawlDK Co ...Brawan ITUOan it. 

'. mi ReMgwstorTniulV Co.V PreildenV V. V. V.'.Com niFrcIa] BIdi. 

ni.ReOuTniiTnBiltCo Commcrclil BiiiTdtnir 

■Tlor MQ. Co IMH. roorthii. 

r. B. UcCm ft Co CommlHloa Bd. of Tndc, Cblaics. 



Horcom, HaniyT... 

HoTlbmp, Raid 

Norttarqp. Buidford. 

NorrlB.E.R 

NonlB, Wm. W 

Noyaa, Wm. A 

Sam!)rnBt...'y//"/.y.a"vam.'?""°^.^::riiii'.\ 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



MEBCHAins' KXCHANGE or ST. LOt'lS. 



...Jerome HlllCotion Co... 



ODcBBcn, John \,„„ „,„, 

Oikicr. bill .lUlnoUHydnDlIc Prm Brisk Co.. 0«B']Hu..O<lri 7i 

«»!«ii.FrKI Te.miter lUeCii 

O'Hin.HinrT Union RcCTnuilll Co.Pretldent Rlillo 

OhndatT Chu. IT HUmUrd Kula Box Mlg.Co awChr 

OUvH.f.V Tndor IronWorl" '~ '• 



ir-aBHT.rf. B» ...,...,,.....,..... .....i.^ain£bor ^luiuiitDia DiiuaiUK. 

O-MIUPtMrA Hotel L'nlon Depot. 

Ooni. CbrinUn Cooixr nil BnlllT«i »t. 

ODWBkeln. J ThaAm UeUlOo Secnnii Building. 

OIMUt. Itob«rtJ FhyitfelM.,... KB N.ii«Tao»eiith it. 

O'IMIlT. Tboviu Pby>lct>nACulUlln..a(a N. BertiiiBeaili it. 

O'BgHlT.M. B ln*ntlinilorafTltl«o....Lui1>deBu11dInf(. 

Ott. KAs.. V.A.Orr&botCo (MS.ElfflitJut. 

Orth«ln.Cli«l«»P...l 

Onhweiii, W.J l-Chur.OnhwsIn ASou.-.CoPunlwtOD Laolcd* BnlldlnK. 

c«iji*»tB.ciMnMC...l 

SnSirSD; FreiPO '.V. }*=>- D- 0'«"'«ln HrmlnOo JMOnm.orCommei™. 

Onliweliu ir«]ttriEV.'....'ff. U. Orthiicln Qnln Co MCbMn. of Commerce. 

Onlt,OUe A BibuoDJndd Ordn <;o lUChwD. vl Camnieree 

OiUmaicr. Pblllp UenenlUtora nnN. BroadwuT. 

OfUnuTir, CMo. Phllli>0«erin(T«r... 

07001*. Vn Juo-IIilUIlT C<mi- C 



..L>WT«. 






„ „ LElar RI>1lo Bolldliv. 

■Ion F O'Connor A Co lUrktt Beponer. lU OiEitnutii, 



facbT. M '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'..rif»A KTUut M4 

fthlMiiiii. Wm. F- P.Jilm«nn. BrorV.V.' 

ninor. Don UcN.- Qnlon Steak Tarda . 

^O.Edwmnl V #. D. Hlraehbarg * B 



Penr. JoliBD ....„ .77^, ,.itV»nrt*MntmP]Beo 

l-enr. In. IimPaRrPleCo FrMldml ai S. Tenth at. 

Pam, Ir«W. InPnirPleCa BeentnT Wi B. TbdiH at. 

Peun, T. W. Petera Drr Good) Co W04tf, Fonneenthal. 

PeW, ATtbnr C... «» Pineal. 

Petri. T.I' HpeneerAHnrlowCooi.Co. M»Ch»ni, ofCooinurc 

Potng. U. C lfenrTC.Petrln«aroc«rCo «I»N. aecond at, 

Peinw. HeorT TT Oroder _ aoOCaaaaT. 

PeupKI, Emeat Panniet AHenien«H'...InaDnnH Amdi S« OlWeai. 

Ptittr, C. ) PJiifferllllUDsCo I-Bbanon. lilt. 



sdbvGoO^^IC 



UEUBEES or THE 



PiBime- Bao'l I 






...FIciHrABsiirdalei. 

...CanUnentslF. Ft Ltiie. Agent. 
....nckelMsFbleudSWneCo... 
.,,W»ier»-Plerco O" 
,.. AltonRolle-'— ■ 

.■.'.■-PlnHiljffS 

...8[.Li>DliPiHrCa 

...WnadnnllTlerDan PrinUiuCi 
;;}ptiu[8ced CompHi)' ...Baedi.... 

;}uaar(«P.rUDlUm.Co.MmBri... 



.'.'.'plutAT^iDr 



.urgh Pi 



.V.Popt-Oiiirle'Cuni'.Co; '.■,','.',.'.!'.!.'.'.V.'.'.V*1 Qtj Bnlldlng' 



■■}p.H.PottflMllUn«tCo..MllleM... 

"..J.R. LewliACo Broken.. 

....BI.Laiili H>rEich....Preildenl 



.■.'.Coon 



>11 A Powell... 



{ Kxctaufe Bldg 



Liclede H. r.Ina.Co Tblrd mad Locut. 

Ice i;9. Btiieentliu. 

wIlhOH.P. PlHlUlll. Co..MiUen H>ln * Cbonieu ». 

!.\\'.\VjDtaD a.''pi*UieV A'Ca'.'.'Wb^*Mila Uijuori.'.'.'.'r.^ta N. KiiM™ "" 

'.'.'.'.'.'.'.Pmuo Com. Co .HS LaSaUs ■(., Chinas. 

PbTBlclui Siai PIdbii. 

■;;::}T.E.Priw«Co,.. 

'.'.'.'.'."i'.i.'. Prtiice' i Co, *.'.'.' .' ^Cotton*] 
.'.'.'.'.'.' .'iiuhiiuiu IJre'ln 



'.'.'.ComnilHlaD 






Quanal. ChM. 1 Chrta.Shin Coni. C«..Ci 

OnenUn. RolEDd Sule Pw!li«t Co 

QDlnlltan, Sol. J SoT.J.U!i1iillTan*8<>ni..» 

Sulnllvaa, Thai. E Ju, F.QulnJlian A Bro.. 






II WaablnclBB 



BMOliB,^ra Kie'BrdV SmmSSl'on" 

.".".'.'.'.'.■Ba«B™«..V.",'.'.'. Cammlulsn.. 

.Ralnmur-HatCo. 

Real Eilale.. 

.!>■ Svray A Co ., 

BMfitri '■lliu J.Bullkr AOo Pun and Htdea t N.lUn n. 

RaHnU, A ....A.BuAldAOo Wbolenle Llqnon UM. lHlrdat. 

Buataur* Lan .--,, .„,.., ...Judca Probata Cout...GoQrt Hoaaa- 

R«iii,Ciua.H DiT«aodi TeaihBL AWaah'iBaT. 

ttaaaoh. Chat. B. 0. Obunbtrlln A Co , ■■ StKaiain.afOoBBave. 

RawUnpn. E. W VUttakar* Uodgnan-Bondaaod BIwika Ponrth * OU*b au. 

Badar.deo. H WalnwrlcU BbIMIm- 

Baardan. Jainai A Reardon GlD* Co 811 LaoM aT«. 

KbMock, Ctaarla Cliaa.Kabal«k AOa....Who)aa*leIil<iiMua an H. Mala U. 
ck, Anton.. MO N. Hall at. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



IfKRCUANTB' EZCHANOK € 



. I^Ctlii 



...aSSN. Third it. 
...IWH.Halnit. 
...in»Alleniir. 
...L«T«* JtBntcwlU. 
- " — -ondiir. 



e B«U*tlUe.lU. 

...QroomlMMtd r<ad...Kn N. BrowtwKT. 
Fmnmr Mexico "" 



irokd*!)' A P«)taloitl. 






ce.Thon 



...BICA-DwyerBnt E 



KlctwrdAon, ArtburF-.'HuriHni-BflrrTCaiii. i 
Rlchu-daon. J. C Vbcmloil Nu'l Bulk. . 

KlctuvdMn, JU. t> _ ■■. 

i>i.h~n. -fbomu CoUlwWh.lJi.Co WHtie 1 

n. W.L ndel1tyLouiABT«.Co.B>cKii 



cchnu 



crick... 



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;j2^-. 



...Vmlee. III*. 
... irnClioutewi tj. 
...8 S. Halo at. 

■■'gS«iSS'!t; 

'.y.mtN.TblrlMnlblt. 
. . ,101 CbUB. or ComiDen 
...litN.SIiUi" 

;"Ti-nUniiaC_ 

...OditFellow.'l 



lU CUrk « 



Larl, O. H.P CommUrion .0«J Bulldidji. 

isr. E.l> KlAwood, Ha. 



UTd nullo Tnm Briak 



Briak rKlDM HI^Iii'it A Naw 
AH't Bipl ...l HuuhHIer Ko4(l. 



SI*). J 
Hlng. J.™ 
Rns. Jim 

Rlfqnf . F 

Rlienoar. 



!'.!k. B. Whit* Qraln Co.V.CommlH 



...WlbnehtRlrta ACo... 



Boblnaon.Oco 

RaMoMa. Arebla... 

—I.e. A 



>1G8 Co rar Sprue* iL 

Uciloo.Mo. 

itiiiVoi' !!'.'.'. '.'.'.'. '.'.'.". Ill N.?£ln It. ■ 

M. ElghUi M. 



KsblBMn. 
- ■ m. 

,Pi— . 

r, Tiwl' 



„ K... 

BsblBloii. Goo. B.. Jr... 
Robrn. Puil 
B(Ma*r, rnd - . 
BiMdat, Cbul**. 
Hoadarer. ■.!.... 
Ss*ah*ld. Wm. 
Boamdcka, bLU 

BanDlBkc. Uw 

Roaulfk*. Vrvd— UalTar gmnCo 

BoaMctn, AnUunr BoMldnAB— 



'co.',' HoJ Eitiu'.'. '.■.'.'.■.■.'.■ 



■oaADurotik Com. Co-OnlB 

ilnABobrn Ininraiioc Bll ChfMniit v 

BroLACo OHumlirtan HI K. Third at 

Bocdar J:Co Bauer and CbctK Ita Harkatal. 

ilPlKUF. r, Une Btilto BDlldli 













RE".-:;: 

»*«l 

.H. Bwara AGs Salt 

.H. A. Bot*'** Co ConualaalDD 



■lBrldit*rd. 



!!Adler,OoldiniBi«'Cto.'.'ColIoil..!,'.'.'.'.V.'.'.V.V.'.'.'.'.',l«B. S 



mdaiTDimUlBCCo ill! a. Hetond IV 

Lonla DriTinCo Brtdm Bniruie*. 

...At-TniBararLla*. S07>rp1iia at. 

} AOmbRoUi Ore. Co Vboleaiil* Gn»er. tBB.Satanlh at. 

....RoHudilldBroi ..HbI*....; IIM Waablngtan h 

....J. H.Ksttniun l>MtUi- 

luCo Liquor* 8I> N. Fourah at. 

....r.T Boto AC* Paad tIMS. BeicuUi at. 

....L. BowuABoo Miller* Slwimaelowu. 111. 

....BaireII«F*Trla LiTjvn. lISOlliaM. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



MEMIIBKS OF THE 



BsasSifel;:;: 





...luoruce 














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E^sHs 


..f'riiidViit 


■I^li^^^iS: 
























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FIrt Brick* 


- j^ 


















"QntaiUjVauii:. 

..Praddcalud Tr«u.. 




i^AT^""- 


MlnlagCo.. ... 






.....F.H.RTmQ*Son 


















■::ffiSiv&,i«„ 


Mblibra, H«ODr.. 


Mie CDmmlHlon Co.. 


;^^i------- 


...WIIDdIiduii. 












'.'p«.M.« 






AdiHii.*jt»SSiti 


...RlmltoBldi^ 
















































enir-Dlufhter (.'omm! 










































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Broolintr-Evmoi B^« ■ 

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I.So^andCiuullu 


...»». 8«on<l«. 




































.i™^ :;;:;:;:;;:;:;. 


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..SuapBuulkclory,... 


...Wt Wuh M. 




: : " : : seiiiiii j Bn>i.'.v '.v. 








■'TSbii^""""*" ■; 








..arocenudFssd.... 


iiiKSwiiliTlT'klrt*.. 




. H..,8ehil«rhoU * ftalti . . . 






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{^nj.''s'^;r»""r';.- 






















■Zo.'KMr*oi..-: 

.... BIlTcrCreek UlnlDfC 
.....HopeMnt-lntCo.... 


- 




f!baiat.O.M..... 






8c1inellli»r>i. fieBr; 


■;.pSSSS7v.v;.v.-.vv.- 


■^■■iV'u.''nrrf;fi''iS'- 











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UXRCHAMTS EXCHANliE OP 8 



.. ™._..._- "-«„deni„'5Bre.»Co.Ooiii«itMl«o 



BubDllDieTcr. Cbrl>UaQ..HiaHDd>ii 

BchaBcMck. UeniT , 

BehanhoC JubD Floor ArMd lUl StSTali st. 

Hekopp.John lit N, am It. 

Seh^, jKob JMobScibappABn>....Pra<liiM Co Sit H. Third it. 

Sekopp. CoDTVl Connd Schopp * Co Third iikI FriDl 

He>opp.»«o-P aM.r.8chappAO...J^odiin eilN.Irdit. 

" H r.. ..jH,c.Schopp«*Boii...CoicnitiH<ni SWN.M^n «. 

.V/Wooi.V." ■'.■.'.■. ■.■.■.■.■.■.'.■.'. ■.'ill b.'m«""*' 

'. ', .'BrsmuBrewi'DJc Co! ! ! 



ibB U.e.8tlf«IBi 

TX MrhsUAUL- 

n.SohotlonAGo... 

...u.^monBrewliiicCo...., 

...Sohreliiar.yiHkanlDCo., CominlHlai 



., Win* Brow»c MU»tiii»iin. Mo. 

...SLLoBliRiMiHator jb^W.B.^^ IMnwid Ful[ ■< 



lit*.-, - - „. 

illi. Hvnrr vlthF. Bebnrli ABn>..Cammlulon MIChun.arComi 

iltM, Ch»rfMO..Wltbaii».F.Ortliwetnur«IiiCo..CootnlMlon Lwlndr - ■ " 

Jz. otto J Z*llaBrw.F,*O.Co.. riHK.T 

WEolBiiii'TobiJJcol KHN, 1 



Hchalt*. n E '..'.."Q*o.i BchDllt 

•— — - " ...wlthF.f— 



} r. Sobwwtm A Bro. Cammligloii Oo. 
. . . Scbwipp* OriKar Co 



Hanri 

I W Muta.,CtaaLASLL.B.K.Killn»dAfenl,.. 



Scott. WiabeLI . . 



iicnicgB, C. 0.'!'',.'!.'.'.'.Vsc'reM».Mc(;li 



, C. O..!,'.'.. .....Vscrndw-MoCluM foul' Co.','.','.'.'.,..',..'......'. .'...'OrleJ Building. 

. RicIULrdH fterqnn. Vand vroil A Itamey I>it Oooda Co..Bn>iutiiaT ALocBitil. 

I.U.D.. Scmct*. HiU A Co LlTeSloci K>oiu Cftr, Mo. 



...'St-UrallAM. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



UBUBEBS OF ' 



Imll B«UetlLieDlit.Ca DUUlLer 

lii-nHrr B. J. w. Booth* Sou Com. Co 

.... Urocliiiieler ASIeTlng..Comiii<Hlaa 

: ■ ■ ■ -BefcttdnirlFl'iicW O riiln 'CoV. V.'.V.V.Vb 

UrMt Weilein Feed Co '. 

Lq^....,......^inmon>UudiT>r«Ua.IlHdirmr«... 

ReniMnUnic'Co.' 

.Con»UdiiMil Cod Co...a<B'l Uuu 
.Ctarlnopber ti BimpioD 

* Co.T." 




...i<jtroraTiia>i..H.o. 

...tS. CoDnKrcId It. 
...BgcnrliT BnUdini. 

...BliatoBldf. 



...Fuff-BUaghMrCii.... 
', '. * Bsiier e'rooer Oo^"!. 
'. .'.Tlcioiia'Hiii &>.'.'.'.".'.'.'. MUTlng" 



Bmllh. r. T... 



ill Bls^Vbeu'Jt Ca'JoomintHiaD'.''. 
irshiBli' Dlipueb 

■Uol at. ffinhonia 

to awrage 



. .417 Cbuubcr of Com. 
...IdclediBnUdLiif. 



...L<«AD Cooperufl Gi 

...Oeo.P.PlanFHIIllaii' 

.i:Dm™6okaS C( *" 



..."B-r. 



'i^ir'.T. 

CuudBSoDthcm Line 

lorn Cooper* a DppllM... 

riKii Y jna kV ." Amnt'. !'.!'.! i !'.!'.".'. 1 

lllhAHlll.. ,..lB>D'>n« 

aircei WtrahoKM 




■}E.O.Bt»ii»r(iMllllii(;Co.fs^^l^'}... 

:;.£. O, Sltuird Milling Co 

. . . .Todd A Slulsr Mb. Co.Mlll FurnlitalDgl. . . 



..IM Ch»m. of Coomrm. 
. .10! Chus . of ComK 
,.,MT N. iwioond mt. 



,db,GoOglc 



UEBCHAMTS' EXCHANGE OF ST. LODIS. 



ttcbMH.L.W J.B.M.KehlarACo 

UhX, jMUbVr JCM. W. BUeIeACo....PrinIer« 

8uaU.J^I(T. Su'le.BMiaiOom.Ca. CommMlon, 

SU^iai,D.H .SiLanliHIdBATiUovCo 

tUlBbtrg. 11.1 -^ „ HUterunyi 

SMniurKft, Uanrr WkbHbK.S 

Btdsvradgr, Hanii-DA-8talnwandar*SBlUi«T..Uqpan 

Btelnwrndir, O. A j>tetB«and«F«S*llDeT..WH^Ia.... 

SlmBdw, QM''V.".V.!'^uVU(>ppe'«'BaniiiidIlii 

tIKptacu.W. S W. B.BIcpbsnaACo....Utli<wiuhei 

Sic^Hu. W.epMd....~Kitlaiu]Buk Qulil«r?T.. 

aurUw, KC .:. HjdnnLPruiBrk.Oci.PreildcDt Odd FflloWi 

reiu.E. R Annul, Biirg A Smith las CheiLnal 

i«mrt,A!c..','.",^.'.'."!iFhUuin,aUw»rt, uin- 

nlDitbuD A Blllatt Lkwren, 4tllM»]L(Ki 



Odmolam* 
FuKmT. 



I, PhlUp... 



■ ---j™' Ai! 

Btvcke Oo, 

i«iton;'Fr'w...V.'.V.VT™3«n' D«uuii', 

W<w*B(r. K*-' r^ ... 

t<idd»n,r. 



dM.'oiMPn'd'k.V.wLC.'ai'SUfBi'iBn 
■"— -^nnrilJ., OM.TijIorCoi 



!.!:::":}■; 



», Geo. C. . , 



...sill 



.NoUrrFoblle IDS 1 

Qnln^rokcr loaN 

R«a WMS IDHC 

CerstlUllla lUe*ToalAVemlc«UI..71i N 

„J UrralorOD R1»H 

men' A«oelatlom..,Jtantai7 Viii 



..'.L«aSlone ACS... 



.-.•.ttS.:. 






...StnoksACHMT. Uq 

. .Rab't B.Btdwd Oil C<>..OIl 
..Ph. H.Po■MlMmlfl«Ca... 
. .lolenutloiiiU Bank-- . ....... 

^..ToddaA SunlajUm.Co... 



mekcn. Ubrittlaii. JrJ. f . Connd Oroocr 00.^ 

tB«ta!wm , .'.'.V.'.V.it Bl'Whf iaOniii Co.' 

' "" " ma BNwlngCo.... 

iMri^naruO'liCa. 



J. A.. 

.John Bent, or Folic* 

■NItui, UUlbcvE WboleaalsLlquBra. 

■uaDa,EmU J. W. Booth A Bon Commlialon Co_. 

Uhfllaiid. Onot O '—'-- 

■UUm. Hcnrr L Laaham A Snllc 

wta^n, W.S HortUatalCo 

irin,W.H Fnl^n^^mbilok Oou-^ 

BTkaa, e» A. 
HATactcr^ \^W. 



. . .Founh and ChciUul ita 
..*17N.Beu>ii<ln. 
..I7I1 FnnUln ar. 

'.'.'.l«l9S.'Tblrd>I. 

"Vv. *&uS™ 

"•Bnlldlng. 
irWMShTgtoDaV, 



WJwfc^l 



15 B. Bnwdwii 
D BolidlBf . 



i..Caiiinilnl(iD 
...RaalEnaU... 

...Castncton... 



TajJfc,B^P. 

Tmaaej' QeoT jV.'.V.V.'. .'.'.'. Linilinn."w ond A Ti 



lUn, U. C... 



...V»tLCom.Tr*T.. 









Dnloo StalloD, 

t' JoalV }'. AJ.Tanaatg Brokera M7 M.llilrdit, 

Jts- J. ..'."''.!'.:. .AbcluATaniatg tinmlWTCommlMon...)M N. Third at, 

TaaaMi, Ad«. BtaplUD A Tanaall .Coal «U Pins it, 

tkoialK. Cluu. B. Joduu A Tuudg Lavym tflQIlTe at. 

TaTlor, W«.H luaanaee BE Chutnat tt. 

55!E;:¥«ffS^.-.:;:)'"- '"'"*'>■ <»»— " illiBSS 



S=Si 



,db,GoOglc 



...T. C.T»larACo... 

...TBrlorHlk.Uo 

, . .TaTlor BrM. A Od... 
..HeUlerOnwOo..... 
,..Ueo. TtylorCommll 











Oammliilon 
ftUa....Drl« 




...^j.V.i^udii 


Frullj*Coai 






.Ter.W. H, 






Ty^ * 


l)...TheMBrch.n 




....Mmmr-Tsblwtulnip.Co., F 





... auN. Third n. 
l.'.'lUN.^aurUiR. 

'—led* ltiiUdlii(. 
*f- ComiDFr^*! A. 



fV 






















Hu^iEiVi^ 


...&»kl(«per 




































..MChm-ofCom-trei 










.■■VMS"?:--------- 


■J"N!^?S7i. 


;;lH^s:;:^'Bir= 


;|S«.^ 


■■•S^SusyS" 


«:AS!3SSv;;-r:; 


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■■ftSilsrii- ■ ■ 


.SSfflS'J'*"" 


:;:.ar*VoSSiS;^5%^Piii«;id Gii 


■.«ShlSSSffii' 



....RTuiCaninilHtDnOa. _ . 

...Ml. LoBli Har Eictauin Maniaruiii 

k...P.TIed«muinACo:T!?MUlen_ JaekaoD. Ifa, 

....Clua.T1ademannUft.Cu O'FaUon. ID. 

....Jiui.C.Tteni«yarl.earTobacco Co IM 8.S«cohI 

...Real Eitiia TKCbcanr" 

..Feed MSK.Twa 



..RanrrTel 





:Tod*^v„v:::;::; 


i^ 








:::;SiI.'';.^?Ul;.«a. 


i\i{-^v"iUibi^-- 


^^^"r^t 








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ss'd'w^n^aaci-. 






SSr-^'ifriK^' 


.<^d^e.».dSo.p... 


-irN'^cr"- 






.Pretldent 








Tniuenilclii,F. C 













,db,GoOglc 



UKRCHAHT8' EXCHAMQE OF ST. LODIS. 



' " ...UsOuIloncbATaBbMli, "'- 



.;. Laclede IlMik .. 



AmIEKU*... 

.OiplMI Hit B«ok. . . '^->■■" 



.. Cbu. H. Tuner * C«. .. : 



Tiitt.rt 

Trier, (fcorgaiiii'ii'lli'.KobLAIUBMiri 



DdeU.C. E. C.E.Dd*1IACo 

UUrtcb, HwiT C H.O.U>inebACo.... 

enUek. Jamet Ju. UnUek FitO >' 

Urqnhart. <i«ene . 1 Pliuiie««dCo.'.. 



TikUunp, HeniT T. J. Lamp Clerk ISIb uid CtierokM tu 

Vkll, J. A.. (^orleM KniTloet .L*«lede Bnlldlic. 

VkicaUB*. Wmltcr D....W. D.VilenUne ACa..U)min.lul(>n Ml EianMon »., Chliixco. III. 

Valla.Jno. F Dstlom Coo. I.,ead Co ..SeeraUrr niPlnaal. 

VaUer, Cliarlei BaWmHaeMllllu Co OrcenTlUe. 111. 

VHiAnd>Ie,B. S Gnlo Carrol Lion, III. 

TmiBIu«bi. J. C Niit.Buikorraiiimar«l)aiiiilDc Broadwar A OlWa n. 

Van Oruftlland, B Crrnalllaap Vorki SIT Park it*. 

TuodoUli i*mn C^tallM. Kaboka. Ho. 

VtinDorn, J W. D. Orttawein Omln Co Mew Orleaiu. 

VIneat, J.P. C. W. SulUi Com. Co Qajr ButlalDS. 

VlrdoD, Bamnal Uomnilialoii .tM Chamber orCoB. 

Vodkar. Otto CToelker A Oa_ Commlialoa - >lt N- BToadnr. 

Vgcaler, Jallsa 6rae*raiidODDml('D.,M N.TbJrdn, 

Totel, CbarlM F BealEilale TW Cbettnnlit. 

Votnl. Jobn Bit CbMUBl H. 

Vonlaaiu. Heorr Habbard A BainlMI Con. Co Fonrtband Fine eu. 

VaSBlMnc.JabaH Jno. H. VoisbaDC A Co., Prorlilcna Foorth and Waata il, 

TooTlilea. C.J lllK.BIrtiitaat. 

v~- ><¥ Abe. curia. NaliinlBnBdAVandeTaiiteraT. 

r^.,^ — ■• D it-j. A_i •r.'-tt* Walnwrifbt BnUdlDE. 



WaeliUr, O. W F. Brookuaa CommlaalBn 

Waddoek. Tcaok O. vllbO'UeBnor ACo. ...Ha 

Wndc, Albert 

Wtde.FaaniaJ Andtnon ft Wade RaalBi 

Wane, Jwnea R .Staadard EleraUr Co 

WaceoDun, AimdJ Clerk Coi 

WMner. CbarlM , ri| 

■— ■ ,_ Hearj H Smlthen A Wagoner.. .Dc 



wS^Tr'.;:::';:::;:::} J**" w-^i o™' 

Wabl, rati.. Wahl Brewarv Co Qnlnojr, III, 

Watal. EdinnL Jno. WatalAOo OommlaaloD 1%. Ualnat. 

S>tD«rt|Hi(, EUla. St. LoBia Braw. AH'n Walnnlibl Balldlu. 
aldeck,jBcBbaC....jM.C.C.WaldMkPraT. 

Od....,j.. PrerlHoiu Ill Market at. 

Wan. NIebolaaR... W^l* WhlK«iiar*....IniBiuaa 3MN. Third at. 

Walab, AuaUn Clerk g)OCb«*iiiiii at. 

ITalib, JdUo* S Mlaa. VaUeTTrutCo..Prealdaiit mM. ToDrtb at. 

5alab. Feur TeameMr .Jitt N.TwBlilhal. 
alab. Bdnrd Jr. )Ilaa.QlaaaCo... .., Praaldent Hatn * Annlloa ati. 

Wmlab. 7.H 8ap*riulT*F.P.Co P, O.Boxmciti. 

WBlUMr.Chaa.r .■,....^. 17a Tarlor aT«. 

«raltka,l.«ila B Wm. Waltkc A Co Soap (ndandGraod ar. 

Wmluoi. K. 8 CommlMlon Laetede RDlldtni. 

Wmnd. Tboa I-tierr JUB. Slithal. 

WuclH, Jouph r .^ ^Botler Hauut IHT N. Nlotb at. 

Waaler. Joaapb A. . ..J.r.WaBiElei'B. AB.W.Cd U«H. HlnlDM. 

Wwd'Tiu^H' IjamMWardftSoD Btalp Cbaadleit SITN. Leree. 

Wara'.T.J ',..'.V.',V.V.'. Bnllder... aWOIWeat. 

Vardrop, lUchard RoDUrBrDi CommlHlOD RepubllB BnUdlnc. 

Wue. Enoch. H AlUre Srocor Co KHB Locuat at. 

Ware. Oao.W Jeneyrllla, ni. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



UEUBBKS OF TBB 



'.'.'.CoH: '■"■ 






n. of Conuunt, 

...SBthMlnnHl. 

...awChKm.orcra 

...UMBBlldlng. 



•. ACO Mlllerg 






W»1U. t.G T. a. WlIU* „_ 

WUU, W. (! 

Web«f.Harmu»V/.'.V.B'niluiBrllOlL*WiuV.<»'l?eM 

W«ber.HsDi7 Aldsn Vin«iiir tie 

Weber. Krciitf. ,77; Feed 

We>>er, L. ^I•Il<l«ADt Wutbouw i;o M>1n and C«tu i 

Wsbw. Henry -Weber Dr«j»w 0« noTlDCM. 

WebitDT.Jno. J RlBbBdiidAlKiillllBR. B Uoiuer Bolldli 

'Weldner,Rii«eiwG...,.E.O'.We1diMr€om.Co..CaminlaMon ■ —-■-■■- 

Welnl, Bugeoe r WelRel* UuiDfleIil....InauniieB 

Well, Iteabe Birnard, BMrACo Produce and Pcoiti... 

gcll, Ao(t^^ I 



Main >i.- . 
lOTlDOI. 
- iHrBo.... 
4. Third n 



L. Walr Pioduc 



WeU.HanryCi... 

Welge, W '.'.!.'!"Gr»ln'.". ui mimiL 

Weir«ilBdKuT Wmuh R. B Vloe PrartdOTit IMBroadwsrtT.I.Cllr 

Warner. L'otila...'...7."i;BI. Lj. Ref. A Wooden <JuusVco!'"!!i'.'.'.\.'.'.'!M>ln " a'F 



SeearltT BnlUlng. 
UU K. tlilrd al. 
•'■OUT eat. 
Killer at. 



Weal, CoDrlai 
Weal, Ttaoma 

Weuel, a. E. 



Wg^or. 
Whipple, 



>i Wb. BooUASboei... 

. B. WeRoott ACo...OoinniLai1on 

_■_. — -Dru^Oo.... ^^^... 



..KoBni^Vfi 

...Bt.L0Dll 

:{g.i: Wi 

.■.■.Wiiwier, 
...S. Hooei 

...JohoWh..., 

...Whippla'alna. Prot. 

, . . Whl luke r '4' Hodimtii ', 
,..a.B.Wh1teQr»lBOo.. 
...Brmdbnr]- Y 
...Skin nor, Wl 



Co-..DtrimtAt Com'n 



,,.Nor1x>rD(^MS; 
...BUllo BnUdliK. 



fWWtelm Broa... 



; '. '. ih^ftii' .'WiiltlBker A Ban 



.11 A Whltlemi 
!'.!wibnu:ht.Riike Ooini 



...S«Clirltr BuUdlog. 
...Himel. IIU. 
...Third and rt 

enUi>Bd(>irrMl 



...Himel. IIU. 
~nilrduid rtni — 

...i«<iienUi>Bd(;uT. 

...)MN. Thlrdau 

"'l«tK. Eliailiat. 
...tWH. roirlbat. 



Tndarlron Worka .4MLO0IUI «. 

B....W1cklUrsBraa Altanau Cltr. Km. 

WIeder Paint Oo MH M. Hala M. 

OrailotBt.WarehoiiaeGo. IK Chun. erConiMicrt 



'"'ll. U. WleneiAUo Brofcers.. 

i." M.V'iiiii' Coi * Gord'gn! :" ; ProiUioo 

W. B.WllliolniAOo 

..... .Oi>TeDaiit MnTiial Life 



. . . WBlBwrlglit BiaUdUe. 
...Oouonr 

...HI1*B. T 



,.,IiiiniaaM MInUi ead 01lT« M 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



IIBBOHAHTS' KXCBAHOX Of ST. LODtS. 



lU^T. T .!.".''!!: SantuACo 

— klEuon.ti«o F, ^ -...-,-,. 

Vllmrd, Wm.O. 

oD.Ohu. WllleniMn BemngOo. 

1. JobaB UbbrAWIUluu^niai 

WUllUIU, JUDM U. .. . 

in!Jiu»,s.F 

vruituuk P. F-.. 



. . . Papar ud Twlna . . , 



^iutaaAOo....ili 



, E. T... 



Wllaon, RobarTK .'.'.'.'.'.' .*Bui'k'< 

""-an. Cbu. A Bl Loot 

^'nUer^ 0.'A.'.*.'..'.'.B1(h» 
iHmeja.Kiolob CAlklre 
itimnjtr. Chrbt'r 



ir.Jnl. I. 



...MiN.Swioiid t(. 
...Hmwifal*. Tann. 

. . . TantS * Wuhl oRloa at . 
....lOSN.FonrtliaC 
...On BaUMtai. 
...luSf.FonrSil. 

;:;!si«Cfaatiniitn. 
....PttrjTlUe, Md. 
....BUlto Bnlldliur. 
...SIBN. ElKhlhri: 
...tlTK.TIilJPdM. 
...4U B. Berantli at. 
....MilObMtaulal. 



1. J. B.. 
ToUMldeii, C. F. 



Woblnukar, Hhtt Frer 

Wolcott, WclUii<]1C.....B.S.DonACo... 
WoUe. DulelK. OniUimtal Wire 



Wla>iii«^UiB9.,Jr....C. WlMmalh ABOD PorkFacklDgCo,.. 

W tbOall, W. W mull i>iiiiuiio<;». 

iniberapwin, T, C OoKon OotioD Xicbuue. 

Wltte.^tsH TTltl* H«Tl*»rBCo....,, TNN.Tnlrrt it. 

Vn^Uto. HUt wlUiBisrA Renl Salenuui 8SS K. Tlilrd at. 

irbalda, A. A.B Uncoln Trnit Co InTeiUmlon tlSOhetoiqlil. 

■ — ' " " — "- "--" Vlse-Prealdaot iOD JCorgM «t, 

lUUouary Co awN. Third it. 

— , UZuun-of Oommercfi, 

WlreCio....IroD, NaUiaod Bleel...LiKilade Bnlldlnfc. 

AOo Ootton Coltou Kxctiufw, 

Wolff. Jolliu. jBt.PaUnanCom. Oe ynCuroUil. 

"-" ■ - '^Bla Fasd ilsrOr»Tola«T. 

Q Beonrtl J Building, 

,.Pe(ar Coal -..MCOCIarkaT. 

Wondertj.caiailaaP mWOllTBal. 

— - -'" .A.N.KrtlogBJJewapanerCo B4 Walniilit. 

.Union DalTT Co. Dalrrinui. Jail A Wublscton ua. 

. LaagtaUn, Wood A Tan- 

saT AttorDBTa. Oommarclal Balldlng. 

.CareBroi.Com.Co....OoinmlaMoii 119 M. BeooDdat. 

I- •> B.-ifv. laU.MUnrt. 

.".■.'.■.■.'.■.■.'.■.'.Vsw a. cSmmerc™'™* ' 

A ProTldoD Co SU N. Founb It. 



Wood, fTi 

Wood', john'it:;:;!" 

Woodlook. Frank D 



'.'.woodiAoo :::"' 

'.'. jno. UiUIally Comznli 



Wrue.Ilaux Tho Hf Wrapa Oo . 

wSSt'FSSl'^'.:";}'"-*-^'*'^'*^'""-'^*"'^"""''^ IMhAWaahlnglon. 

Wr^t,ew.H. Wm^BuTDrrOoDdiCo S!?^ # ""j? !!*- 






,,.B. Claan CommladOD U 



M aum. of Cemmeri 



Zalla, r. ■ 

Zcak,FUUIpJol>ii,.. 
Zeller. Wm.F 



, .ZoUa Broa. PrortilOB A 



...OvoTtUoiua. 



,db,GoOglc 



,db,GoOglc 



INDEX. 



OBtlBBALBETISW... 

Ale Ml 

Applw tni 

^liieiiltDnl Mactiiaerj 7< 

BvikaiilcDMnt 8 

Briiig* niiiifi .'.'.'.'.V.V.V. '.'.','.'.', . . .'. '.'.'.'. lo 
BoMr '.'."','„"",.'.'.'.'.','.'.'.". !!!!!'.i!i! s& 

Biii]illi]g StHiatloa 9 

BfHas M 

Bovd of Direoton, Beport of 1 

" '* Beiolatlona 1 

Ben 19 

B«r. Ml, M 

BooU tnd ShlMfl M, U 

BubedWIre !S 

CommcToe u>d 

Oetae 

CiwluidCokB... 
ClcBriix-Baiuc 81 
OutflD-aoQca Tn 

Con Mwl 

OHnranLiT* Bui 

(Ml Boud TnniKtloiu, . . 

Crop BeporU for IBM we-ii 

Oop Id tba World '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. J) 

ClapaDfHiaaaaii V 

Crop!, kventce oonditloD 11 

CnttoB K 

CODuniiteM for 18M 

ctot .V.'-V.v..!i'"i;";: x 

Calfco 1 

Cnnb«RiM M 

CandlM « 

Cmwnt S 

CordiBe and Bopa V 

OBtorB«wu. a 

CHonto 1 

Cudt«t a 

OoaonMed HmI 9 

Mtdfniit « 

D*T Ooodl < 

EzduDKOi meetings of 1 

Beruon, sMMolty and nttaa U 

e™ .7^. a( 

Blsetrloal Indnstrlea I 

nanr&Qnln, Total movrment. 1< 

- " monthly reoelpts A Bhipm'M 11 
" " total •■ "torMyra... H 

rioiir, Berlew II 

•' BrceipU by Crop Tean II 

" Mant&yreoelptsAaMpniiintB.. U 
" KzpoTtafnnatlieUnltedBtatea. II 

" Rroelptaat vailaui eltlca 1< 

*• weekly pTlE«a li 



. 58. 



•■ haudlwl 

" nuoPd In vaiiODi oi 

of ehlpmeDU . 

■looblDBlDn UT-IW 

leport of Boaid of nooi In* 

■pectorB la 

fotdgn ilklpmenta IW 



FertiUun S« 

rinanoe. tB-88 

ForalKiislilpmBntaTiaNew Orieana... lil 

■^ " TtkAUasttoaeaporblUS 
TrelKtiMtoNewOricusbTrlTer IMI 

'• Memnbla A VIokabniK by riTsr ISO 



Fnmltnn 
Fnraaoes 



from Bt. L. to LlTarpool via 

NswTork... «1 

BoatheTD OiUn by nil 108 



GnUn InapecttoD 

tinin leoeipti and ■hipmnila fbt 



slow ofeaoh 

week 198-100 

■hlpmentaby buinato NewOr- 

leana US 

fbrelvn ablpmentstlHim M, O... IW 
monmly receipt* and Bblpmanta m 

Eerlew Its 

Kecelpta by Crop Teaia ISO 

Ennrts from United Statei..... IW 

Dally Prloea ITltoUB 

Vtofble Bopply IM 

Knelptaat Tadoiuoitlea.. SOI 

Wbeat let, 16B, lOe. 310 

Com 1», ITO, IM, 111 

Oats IM, 171, 119 

Bariey IM, 173, 2U 

Rye IM. m, 218 

leoelpta atarreD Atlantlo porta ZOT 



Bbh and Oaps.... 
Hominy and Qrita 



Id memorlun . ■ 



Honea andifidw... 



,db,GoOglc 



ImporU ud Bxpoito oC the Va 


.... se 


















S9, XU 


























HO 


M. U 






131 W 






















SM»UiT,Be|»nor 


- -:; 






SI 


iM^bii^'or ii>;'iudU;.^'in^ '( 




ESSser^.^ 


^f^^^ ifoaWiV <;^'t^ '^^di' 'bii: '^ 




fWi-tunii 


.... lat 






"^ 
























or- 




**'^SSi2LSS""'*^*^"' 


BUta riDUioet 


.... 91 










.... 8 


fersSiSSSi ;::.:::;:. 




SSir..:;::::::::::::-.::::::::::: 


.... BB 








:;;:g 






o;S;:;::;r:::::::::^::;:::: 




»^ 






T«r»na Pi tohV.'V.'.'.V.'.'.'.r. ".'.'." 






"■•■S 












TBrnperiiii™ .' ''.'.''.'11'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.." 








P..«m«S.»:;-:;::::;- 


128 




?»iii-imp^Ve^-t,-v;.v.: 






















E«£;. rm jKi^to'<^i(;i^k W 


■ek lU 


IjSr.*^."'!^!.::::::"":::: 
Whit* Liiii.;::.;::;;:::::;::::" 

Zlno and Spdter 


:;:::§ 


ItaUilUl.... 


IS 


nt 



,db,GoOglc 



'J 

I 



.t, ■ / 



J^HHUAL^TATEMEHT 




- IJ 

I 
I 



^, 



REPORTED TO THE 

-^OF St. Louis,^- 



Sr 



SECRETARY. 



'5 Prlrtmg Establishment. 



ri-.,iodi,Go(5glc 



D.,i„.db,Go(5glc 



ANNUAL STATEMENT 

Trade and Commerce 
of Saint Louis, 

For the Year 1895. 



aEFORTKD TO TBS 



Merchants' Exchange of Saint Louis, 



GEO. H. MORGAN, Secretary. 



i 



St. Loine, Mo. : 
or Hkkxkl's Vsarnsa Ebtablisbhkht, 
1896. 



m: 



OFFICERS OF THE 

MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE OF ST. LOUIS 

SINCE ITS OUGANIZATION. 



r. PreeldoDt. 

i Henry J. Moore, 

i Geon^e Partridge. 

I Thomas Ricbeson. 

t Barton Able. 

I E. O. Stansrd. 

r C. L. Tucker, 

i John J. Roe. 

i Geo. P. Plant. 

1 Wm. J. Lewis. 

1 Gernrd B. Allen. 

J K. P. Tansey. 

I Wm. H. Scudder. 

1 Web M. Samuel. 

i D. P. Rowland, 

t Nathan Cole. 

r John A. Scudder. 

I Geo. fiain. 

I John Wahl, 

I Alex. H, Smith. 

Michael McEnniB. 

i Chas. E. Slayback. 

t J. C. Ewald. 

i D. R. Francis, 

i TIenry C. Haarstick. 

I S. W. Cobb. 

r Frank Gaienne. 

i Chaa. F. Orthwein. 

I Chaa. A. Cox, 

1 John W. Kauffman. 

Marcus Bernheimer. 

I Isaac M, Mason. 

I W, T. Anderson. 
iJA T.Harlow. j 

' } Wm. G. Boyd. 1 

i ThoB. Booth. 

I C. H. Spencer. 



C. S. Greeley. 
Barton Able. 
E. O. Stanard. 
Alex. U. Smith. 



Geo. P. Plant. 

H. A. Homeyer, 

G. G. Wagi-aman 

R. P. Tanaey. 

Wm. H. Scudder. 

S. M. Edgell. 

L, L. Ashhrook. 

Jno. P. Meyer. 

John Wahl. 

N. Sch&elTer. 

H C. Haarstick. 

Michael McEnuis. _ _ 

Chas. E. Slayback- J. C Ewald. 

John Jackson. A. T. Harlow. 



SIS 

JSS 

H. A. Homeyer. 9M 
D. G. Taylor. IIW 
D.G. Taylor. \m 
H. A. Homeyer. 128B 
Nathan Cole. im 
H. C. Yaeger. IMB 
Geo. Bain. !!E 

C. H. Teichmao. 186(1 
Web M. Samuel .1383 
John F. TolJe. ISOT 
Wm. M. Sealer. UK 
F. B. Davidson- ISB' 
Geo. BatD. IST. 

CraiKAlMander.1290 
W. XLemp. IMO 
' ■■ 130S 



Frank Gaiennie. 35K 
D. P. Grier. 3586 

C. W. Barstow. 35K 

D. P. Slattery. 8505 
•. Will. Boyd. S8M 



Chas. y. Orthwein 
D. H. Francis. 
John P. Reiser. 
,S- W. Cobb. 

Chas. H, Teichmann. - j^. 

Louis FuHZ. Thomas Booth. 3318 

J. H. Teasdale. Chas. A. Cos. 3S» 

Hugh Rogers Alex. Euston. 3!tl 

Marcus Bernheimer. G.M.FIanag&n. 3190 
S- R. Francis. 3118 
Wallace DelatioIdBOOI 
L. C. Domett- 391S 



Geo, H, Plant, 
Wm. T. Anderson. 
Roger P. Annan. 
Wm. G. Boyd. 
Geo. H. Small. 



E. A. Pomeroj. 3807 



Secretary and Treasurer. 
I ■ ■ - - Clinton B. Fisk. 
l-«4 ■ - - J. H. Alexander. 
i-99 - - - Geo. H. Morgan. 



7348^ 



Cc-nodi,Go(5glc 



MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE OF ST. LOUIS. 

OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 189B. 

FBESIDXNT. 

THOMAS BOOTH. 

VIC E-PBESIDEHTB . 

First Vice-President, C. MABQUARD FOESTEE. 
Second Tice-President. GEO. D. DABNAED. 

D1BBCT0B3. 
18W. 1895-M. 

WM. T. ANDEESON. WM. G. BOZD. 

H. L. BILBEO. WM, A. GAEDNER. 

H. F. LANGENBEEG. SOL J. QUINLIVAN. 

WM. K. STANARD. CHEXS, SHAEP. 

C. J. HANEBEINK. CHAS. L. HEITZEBERG. 

SBCttETAKV AMD TRBASUBER. 

GEO. H. MOEGAN. 

ASSISTANTS. 

U. R. WHITMORE. S. H. HEWLETT. 



(.'AXLEK. IKIOB'K 

JOS. P. CARR. JAMES P. NEWELL. 
Attorney— F. N. JUDSO]^. 

COMBIITTEB OF APPEALS. 

ABTHUB BEOCKMAN. J. W. BECK. 

W. P. KESNETT. CHRIS. BEEtNET. 

B. J. McSORLET. HEEMAN BIENENSTOCK. 

BEKJ. ALTHEIMEE. £. E. SCHAEFE'. 

WM. BULL. WM. J. LEMP. Jb. 

H. C. HOLLMANH. WM. P. NELSON. 

couhittbe of abbitratiom. 

rtELST UX MOHTHB. StOOHD SIX MOMTHB- 

THOS. B. GETTYS, GEO. A. ROTH. 

WT4- WOODS. E. L. BDSCHMAN. 

T. R. BALLARD. D. E. POWELL. 

J. K. BUTLEK JOHN M. GANNErT. 

C. 8. FREEBORN. JOHN P. OWENS. 

OFFICXAI. MABKEI REF'B. TELEGBAFH AMD CALL BOABD CLBBS. 

MABU. J. GAUTIER. CHAS. H. WHITMORE. 

BIWB CLEBK. HESSBNOBB. 

E- T. WALTON. FEUNK T. MUDGE. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 1896. 

PBESmKHT. 

C. H. SPENCBK. 



DIBECTOB8. 

WM. G. BOYD, THOMAS BOOTH, 

WM. A. GARDNER, MANLBT G. BICHMOHD. 

SOL. J. QOmLlVAU, H. H. WERNSE. 

CHRIS. SHARP. WM. B. DEAN, 

CHAS. L. HEITZEBERG. JOSEPH A. JBNNELLE. 

BECBKTABT AMD TSEABUBBB. 

GEO. H. MORGAN. 

ASSISTANTS. 

D. B. WHITMORE. S. H. HEWLETT. 

Caller-JOSEPH P. CABB. Doorkeeper- J AMES P. NEWELL. 

Attorney-F. N. JUDSON. 

COHHITTBX OF APPBAU. 

LOUIS J. HOLTHA0S, FESTUS J. WADE, 

G. O. KALB. C. C. ORTHWEIN, 

. ISAAC M- MASON. LOUIS FU8Z, 

NICHOLAS R WALL. J. T. BIRCH, 

P. P. WILLIAMS, THEO. G. MEIER, 

GEO. L. EDWARDS, GEO. F. LANGENBEBG. 

COHHITTEB or AKBITKATION. 

ALONZO C. CHURCH, W. B. HARRISON, 

F. W. HOFMANH, C- A. CUNNINGHAM, 

W. T. HICKMAN. EDWARDS WHITAKER, 

JOSEPH HATTEBSLET, JOHN C. FISCHER, 

J. E. TEASDALE. JOHN J. SCHULTE. 

OFinCUL HAKKKT BBPOBTEB. TBLEQBAPH AND CAIX BOABD CUBK 

MARC. J. GACTIER. CHAS. H. WBITMOBE. 

BIVSB CLEBK. STBNOORAPHBB. KKSSBNGBB. 

E. T. WALl-ON. MISS E. O. GIBSON. i-'BANK T. MUDGE. 

BBAL ESTATE COMMnTBE. 

C. H. SPENCER. CHAntifAK. 
AMEDEE B. COLE, THOMAS BOOTH, 

WM. G. BOYD. W. T. ANDERSON. 

COUHriTEE ON HEUBERSHIF. 



sdbvGoO^^IC 



COMMITTEES AND INSPECTORS FOR 1896. 



WHEAT INSPECTION. 
OHRIH. SHA.BP. OumMAK. W. K. BTANABD. JOHN THTSON. 

ELBBBT HODQKINB. BSDUOND OLEABT. C. H. 8KAUAM. 



H. W. BEOK. T. B. MOBTON. 

MHLST INSPCCTION. 
OBAB. H. TIECHHANN. CBAltOiAV. F. O. OETHWEIN. 
OB AS. BHLGBUANN. 



O.O.DDTCHEB,Chi 

J. E. BOBINEON. 

FLOUR INSPECTION. 
0. BEBNBT, Chaibiun. ANDREW D. HABDIE. SBOBnAHT. 

H. LEfTWIOH. ACQ. J. BULTB. E. E. 80HABFF. 

F. E. EADFPHAN. R. H. LEONHABDT. 



W. P. KBNNETT. 
PROVISrON INSPECTION. 



■EEIW AND CASTOR BEANS. 
WH. B. DEAN. ChAikHah. BOBBBT POMMEB. . BHIL SUUHA. 

AUG. J. BABNIDOE. FRED. B. PLANT. 



W. L. GRKEN. 



WH. O. BOYD. OHAniKAii. B. U. HUDBARD. JOHN P. SMITH 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



COMMITTEES AND INSPECTORS FOR 1896. 

(CONTINUED) 



BOL- J. QTJINLIVAN, Chairmak. CHA3. i. QDE8NEL. WH. H. LEETITICB- 
JOHN B. BLAHOHTEU. THOS. B. TBA8DALE. 

FLOOn. 
JOSEPH W. STEELE, Chaihnah. 
J. W, OOHN. JOHN M. GANNETT. 

JOHN P. WOODS, A, O. KEYNOLIW. 

E. W. 0E8BLEB. TH08. CRIFPtN. 



MIMISSIPPI Kivm. 
HBNBY 0. HAAB8TI0K. ChaIRhAr. 
LEONARD MATTHEWS. D. H, FRANOIS. 

O. HABQOABD POBaTEK. 
HAeonS 8EKNHEIMER. 
Wll. B. ARCHER. 



WM. M. 8BNTER. 
1), P. a LATTERY. 
H. H. WERHHE. 
H. U. WBITMORE. 



JOHN B. BLESSING. 
W. T. BIOEUAN. 
J. H. JANES. 

THOUAB BOOTH. 
H. J. HnRPHY. 
B. O. BTANARD. 
FRANK OAIENNIE. 
JBROUE HILL 



NATIONAL aOARD OF TRAOI. 
CLARK H. BAHP90N, CHAIRMAN. E. O. STANARD. 

HBNBY B. WHITMORE. W T. ANDEBSOtJ. I3AAC M. UASOtt. 

HOSES QBBENWOOD, Jr. HENRY G. GRAFT. NATHAN COLE. 
UUAS. F. ORTHWBIN. LOUIB FUSZ. C. J. HANEMBBINE. 

LEBtSLATIVE. 

W. P. KENNETT, Chairman. 

E. C. SIMMONS. P. N. i DDSON. F. E. KAUFFUAK. 

ADIEL BHEBWOOD. E. B. WHITE. P. p. WILLIAMS. 

JOHN R. LA0QHLIN. WALKER HILL. F, E. FOWLEB. 



W. G. BOYD. Chairvah. 
J. S. LRKDS, SbCretAry. 
THOS. K. NIEDBINQHAU!?. 
SAH-L M. KENNARD. 
JACOB FUBTH. 



EDOENG F. WlLLtAH& WH. T. HAABmcK. 
J. S. HcCLELLAM. D. O. BALL. 

BOGEB P. ANNAN. JOBN M. DENNIS. 

P. P. HENSELEB. O. C. OBTHWKIS 

W. I. CDRRIE. A. L. 8HAPLS10B. 

AND SOUTH AMCniCAN TRADE. 



L. D. KINGBLAND. 



t. DeFIGOEIREDO, 

GEO. U. PLANT. 
W. H.OBAHAH. 
A. H. PIRIE. 
D. M. KEHLOB. 
METEOROLOOV. 
R. U. HDBBABD. 
UOSB3 FRALBY. 



L. GABVBY. 



MANLBY G. RICHMOND, 

F. W. BROOKMAN. 



OTTO L. HEBSHAN. 
JOHN P. WOODS. 
E. D. TILTON, 



WM. Q. HnBLLBB 
O. VDBLSEK. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 



MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE. 
St. Louis, Januaiy 6, 1896. 
To the lleinbere of the Mervli ants' Excliange: 

Gentlemen: —-In cui^pliance with the rules and in accordanca with 
the oKnal custom, jour Board of Directors herewith submit a stato- 
meiit of tho pccnniary condition of the Exchange and also report the 
amonnt fixed as the aimual nssesBinent for the coming' year. 



At ft meeting of the Board, held on December 30th, by unanimous 
vote t^c af«cs.sii;cut to be paid by each member for the year 1696 was 
fixed at twenty dollars. 

UUKEENT ACCOUNT. 

The current accoiut, which covers all receipts and expenditures of 
UieExchange proper, shows a falling off in receipts for membership, 
thelistof members having' been decreased by redemption and forfeit- 
vrm. While therevenueis thus decreased year by year, the remain- 
ing memberships are rendered more 'valuable. The gross receipts of 
the year from all sources were $55,061.04, and the expenditures 
152,615.58, of which sum 17,500 was transferred to the Beal Estate 
accotint and used in decreasing the indebtedness of the Exchange, 
leaving a balance on hand of $S, 446.30. 

REAL ESTATE ACCOUNT. 

Atthe begimkingof the yeartbetotal indebtedness of the Exchange 
*M S305,000, of which $160,000 was for the loan from the New York 
life Insurance Company, and $55,000 owed locally, being balance of 
amomit borrowed to pay for the property in 189S. 

Your Board deemed it wise to continue and finish the work of im- 
jffOTenent inaugurated in 1S93, by renewingtbe entire steam heating 
apparatus as recommended by the Board of ] B94. This was done at 
anexpense of $10,489.18. The property is nowin first-class condition, 
Ud will require only the usual repairs incident to such a large build- 
ing, so that the surplus revenue can be applied to the extinguishment 
of tlie debt. Tbe $7,500 received from current account, with the 
nuploa from rentals, permitted, the payment of $9,000 on the 
debt, thus reducing tbe amount due the litmliB from $5S,000 to (46,000. 
It most be remembered tliat the Exchange pays no rental for the 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



e TRADE AND COMMERCE OF 

Grand Hall and offices. It the former rental of ¥25,000 per year wen 
considered, tho cxcesa of revenue over ordinaiT' eKpensea of msiit- 
tainin? the property would have been $36,089.18. 

The buildiDg Is well rented, there being but two offices, of a rental 
of 926 i>er month each, vacant in the office building. Tlu«e large 
rooms on the first floor at the Chestnut street entrance have been n- 
cant for some time. 

The receipts from rentals were £46,Sfi9.91 as againat $4T,MS.6T ia 
1BB4. Beceipta from all Bources were t54tB86.5fl, and expenditures W,- 
6S2.9T, leaving a I>alance of SflS.SS. The accompanying report of the 
Treasurer gives, in detail, the receipts and expenditurea ol t>otii the 
Real Estate and the Current Accounts. 

1N8CBAN0E. 
The property is insured for $150,000, which amoout your Boud 
deem sufflcient to cover any probable loss. 

HEHBEBSHIP. 

The number of members at the beginning of the year were 2,64T, 
During the year the certificates of 30 deceased members weie le- 
deemed, and 99 memberships forfeited for non-payment of dues, mak- 
ing the present membership 2,618. 

Your association has l>een represented at various commercial con- 
ventions dui'ing the year, it Iieing the wisdom of the Board that our 
Kxohange should have a voice in all matters pertaining to the coift- 
mercial Interests of the country. 

Delegates were sent to the National Hay Convention at Cleveland, 
January 22nd, and at Cincinnati, September 24th; to the Natfauul 
Board of Trade at Washington, JanaarySOth; to a Conference lield at 
Waaliiugton, April ISth, for the purpose of considering plans for laoK 
reliable crop reports; to the National Transportation Association 
meeting at Chicago, May 3rd ; to the "Missouri on Wheels" ConventiM 
atSedalia, Mo., June 13th; to a Eiver Improvement ConventJon at 
UlnneapoUs, June 23rd; to the Waterways Convention at Vickshnrg, 
October 22nd; and to the Trans-Mississippi Commercial Congress at 
Omaha,Noventber 26th. 

Tour Board, iMlievlng that this Exclumge should have a vtrice in alt 
matters of l^slatiou affecting the Stat« or nation, has passed reaoln- 
tiona, favoring the payment of the sugar bounty for the crop of IB94; 
presented for the consideration of the National Board of Trade reso- 
lutions on Finance, Kedproclty, Bankruptcy Laws and Improvement 
of Waterways, and endorsed again the Torrey Bankrupt Bill. 

In local matters the Board, by committee, appeared befoi« the (Sty 
Council and urged the granting of the Llggett-Myers Tobacco Co. pe- 
tition for the vacating of certain streets; joined Washington Univer^ 
aity In an Invitation to the American Economic AasoclaUon to hoU 
its next session in 8t. Louis; apposed, in the intereat of river com- 



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THE CITY OP ST. LOUia 9 

meree, the erection of another bridge At St. Louis, if it was to be & 
pier bridge, located between the E&ds bridge and the Kerchants' 
bridge; endorsed the action of the Wholesale Druggiets for the abol- 
ition by the banks of the mle for making- a charge for country col- 
lections; appointed a committee to net with commlttecB of other 
organizations in an effort to secare cleaner streets; requested the Leg- 
islative Committee to protest against the granting of a franchise for 
a street railroad on Pine street, so far as it would affect the property 
interests of the Exchange; and endorsed the movement to erect at 
Alton, ni., a monument to Elijah Parish Lovejoy. 

The Board heartily endorsed the proposition of Uessrs. Samuel and 
Mason to secure the improvement of the channel of the MiBslsslppi 
Biver bj the nse of dredge boats and portable jetties, and appointed 
scommittee to aid in furthering the scheme. 

The Kxchange has had the pleasure of tendering courtesies to dis- 
tingnlshed visitors during the year, and the following persons have 
been introduced from the rostrum: Kev. Bam Jones on Harch 23rd; 
Mrs. BalUngton Booth on April 1st; the University of Michigan Glee 
Club on April 18th; Hon. Wm. L. WUson , Fostmaster-Oeneral, on 
Jane 13th; Hon. Josiah Patterson of Memphis, July 18th; Oov. J. M. 
Stone, of MiBsiaaippi, and patty, October 4th; Qeneral Carlos Diez 
Gutierrez, Governor of San Luis Potosl, Mexico, on October 26th; 
General O.O.Eowardon November 17th; Mr.J.S. Gordon, President 
Board of Trade of Indianapolis, and party on December 14th, and the 
OberUn Olee Club on December Slst. 

In January a call for help came to the Exchange from the drouth- 
stricken counties of Nebraska and Kansas. In connection with the 
Mercantile Cluta a committee was appointed to solicit subscriptions, 
and the sum of $3,720.75 was raised and distributed to the needy 
■nSererB, and was much appreciated. 

In retnm^g to you herewith the trust committed to them one year 
ago, your Board desires toexpresstheir appreciation of the honor 
conferred and support given them, and to express the hope that in the 
fntore, as in the past, the members will be united in preserving the 
honor and dignity of the Exchange and in promoting the commercial 
intereets of our city. Our Exchange is looked to as the conservator of 
the busineaa interests of the city and is expected to lead in all matters 
of public interest. 

Yoor Board takes pleasure In bearing teatimony to the faithful and 
efficient «ervloes rendered by the Secretary and other employes of the 
Exctuuigre in the discharge of their various duties. 
BespectfuUy submitted, 

THE BOARD OP DIEECT0E8, 



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TRADE AND COHUBRCB OF 



RESOLUTIONS 



ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
DURING 1895. 



NAT ION A I. HAY CONVENTION. 

Jan. 3. The Board appointed Meaats. Henry S. Potter, W. B. Har- 
rison and D. W. Clifton delegates to the National Hay Convention to 
be held in Cleveland, January S3nd. 

UK. E- A. POUEBOY. 
Jan. 14. The Secretary was instructed to convey to )tr. Pomero; 
the regrets of the Board at his continued illness and their best nitks 
for his speedy recoTery, 

MB. W. G. BOYD. 

Jan. 14. The thanks of the Board were tendered to Mr. Boyd, the 
retiring President, for the signal ability and faithfulness vith which 
he had fulfilled the duties of President during the past year. 

NATIONAL BOARD OF TBADE. 

Jan. 14. Messrs. E. O. Stanard, Geo. E. Leighton, H. 0. Haarttick, 

\Vm. G. Boyd, T, B. Boyd, S. \V. Cobb and Kichard Bartholdt were 

appointed delegates to the meeting of the National Board o( Trade to 

be held in Washington, January 29th. 

STATE GRAIN INSPECTION. 
Jan. 14. Amendments to the State law governing the inspeetion 
ftnd weighing of gi tin were approved and referred to the LegislatiTe 
Committee for presentation to the State Jjcgislature. 

SUOAR BOUNTY. 

Jan. 19. The Hoard of Directors of the Merchants' E.tchangewonW 
respectfully request the Honorable Senators for Miasouri and tte 
Honorable Fepreeentatives for St. Louis to aid in securing such leg- 
islation by Congress ns will wcure to the sugar raisers of the couDtry 
such compensation in the way of bounty for the crop of sugar grown 
in 1SB4 as was contemplated by the law fn effect when such crop was 
planted and being gi'own. 



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THE CITY OP BT. LOUIS. 



LIQQBTT-HTERB TOBACCO CO. 



Jul. is. The Legislative Commfttee of the Exchange was requested 
to appear before the Committee on Public ImprovementB of the 
'Some of Delegates to urge the granting of the request of the Liggett- 
Ujen Tobacco Co. for the vacation of certain streets. 



BBII>QE AGHOSa THE MI88IgSIPPI BIVEB. 

Jan. SB. "The Board of Directors of the Merchants' Exchange of St. 
Louis hereby appoints Messrs. Wm. G. Bof d, E. O. Stanard, T. B. 
Bofd and Geo. E. Leighton a committee to wait upon the Honorable 
Senators from MiasDuri and Representatives from St. Louis to urge 
that the bill now before the Seuste granting a franchise for a bridge 
across the Mississippi River at St. Louis shall be amended so as to 
provide that, if a bridge is erect«d between the Eads bridge and the 
Merchants' bridg«, it shall be a suspension bridge, or in lieu of this, 
tliat if it is to be a pier bridge, it shall not be located within a dis- 
tance of two miles above or below the Eads bridge." 

STATE GBAIN INSraCTION. 
Feb. 11. Messrs. H. F. Langenberg, W. T. Anderson and Henry R. 
Whitmore were appointed a committee to visit Jefferson Cltj and 
present the views of the Exchange in reference to the bUl introduced 
in the Senate fixing the maximum charges for the inspection and 
weighing of grain. 

HORAOB W. l]IBBn.BD. 

Feb. 11. Resolutions of respect to the memory of Horace W. Hib- 
bard, prepared by a committee consisting of Messrs. F. A. Wann, Wm. 
Dmican, J. T. Poe, Milton Enight and W. D, HoUiday, were presented 
and unanimously adopted by the Board. 

AUesroAN ECONOUIC ASSOCIATION. 

Feb. 11. The Board voted to join with Washington University, 
Commercial Club, Mercantile Club ni-d the Business Men's League In 
extending an invitation to the American Economic Association to 
hold its next session in this city. 

STATE UNIVEBSITY. 
March 11. The Board of Directors of the Merchants' Exchange 
would respectfally protest against the passage of House Bill No. 39S, 
known as the Murray bill, or any similar bill looking to the dismem- 
bennent of the State University at Columbia by removing to another 
place the College of Agriculture and Alechanic Arts, as extremely 
detrimental to the educational interests of the 8tat«, t>esides Involv-- 
ing an unnecessary increase In expenditures. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AKD COMMBRCS OP 



FHKG BBIDGE. 



Msrcli 11. The following- report of the MiBBiasippi Hlver Improre- 
ment Committee wa* presented and adopted: 

Toot Committee, to whom was referred the petition Baking the ea- 
Operation of this Exchange in a sclieme for the conatraotionoIafRe 
bridge across the Mississippi Siver at this point beg leave to report 
that we fully agree with the petitioners tliat a free bridge acrora tbe 
Hissisatppi River would be greatly advantngeous to the general ttsde 
' and commerce of the city and that the Exchange should at all timei 
aid any practical movement looking to a reduction of Uie tolls whieh 
are exacted upon the commerce of the city crossing the river, bnt 
that they do not see anything practical or feasible in the propodtioDi 
whicb have been presented to this committee by the petition wbieh 
liaa been laid I>efore it. 

OOTBBNUBNT CROP RRPORTB. 

Uarcb 11. The Board appointed Mr. Wm. G, Boyd to represMitthe 
Exchange at a conference to be held in Washington on April Uth, 
with a view to more complete and reliable monthly crop reports. 

OOHHEBOIAL TRATELEBS. 

March 11. Tlje Board passed a resolution oppoaing any forther 
legislation by the State in reference to peddlers' licenses as affecUug 
commercial travelers. 

STATE GRAIN INSPECTION. 
March 16. The Bailroad and Warehouse CommissloneTS, having 
reduced their expenses and expressed their intention of reducingfoea 
for the inspection and weighing of grain at the earliest possible mo- 
ment that eonditions will justify, and to keep them reduced BO long 
as the movement ol grain will produce sufficient revenue to wamnt, 
therefore thia Board will take no further action in pressing the pas- 
sage of Senate Bill No. 297, now before the House of BepresentatiTCs 
at JefFereon City. 

8TEAH8HIP ST. LOUIS. 
March 18. The Board of Directors of the Merchants' Kxdiange, 
having been ofBcially notified tliat the steamship St. Louis, named in 
honor of this city at the request of a committee of citizens appointed 
by the Mayor, will sail tromNew York on her initial trip on JoneMh, 
take pleasure in calling the attention of the people of the dt; who 
have in contemplation a European trip, to this fact, and to express the 
hope that St. Louis may be well represented in its pasaeuger list on 
its first voyage. 

ST. LODIS OLEARINQ HOUSE. 

April S. A oonununlcation was received from the wholesale drag' 
gists of St. Louis, asking the co-operation of the Exchao^ with 



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THE CETT OP ST. lOUIB. 18 

otlier commercial bodies in protesting a^nst tbe action of the St. 
Looia Clearing' House in eetabUiiMug^ charges for the coUection of 
checks on county banks. 

The Board endorsed the action of the wholesale dmgg^ts and 
authorized the appointment of a committee to confer with other 
commercial or^nizatlons In reference ia the abolition of the rule 
for wi^lflTi^ ft char^ for country coIlectionB. 

JOINT OOUHITTBE ON BTHBBT OLEANINQ. 

April 16. The President appointed Meaara. W. W. Culver, H. L 
Drummond and W. A. Stickney to act with committees of the Cont- 
mercial Club, Mercantile Club and Buaineas Men's Lea^e in an effort 
to secore cleaner Btreete. (June 20th Mr.E. H. Barnes was appointed 
on the committee in place of Mr. Btickney, resigned.) 

NATIONAL TKAN8POKTATION A8BO0IATION. 
May 1. Mr. H. F. I^ngenberg was appointed as a delegate from 
the Merchants' Exchange to the meeting of the National Transporta- 
tion Association held in Chicago, Majr 3rd. 

PINE !>TREKT KAIL WAY. 
Uay 13. The Legialative Committee was reqoeated to enter a pro- 
test against the granting of a franchiaB for a street railroad on Pine 
street so tar as it affects property interests of tbe Exchange. 

ST. LODIB BPANIBH OLDB. 

May 13. The Board of Directors of the Merchants' Exchange take 
pleaanre in presenting to the St. Louis Spanish Club a set of Spanish- 
American fiags, which it is hoped may add to the attraction of their 
club room ; and the Board takes this occasion to express ite apprecia- 
tion of the good work which the Spanish Club has done and is doing 
in promoting trade relations between Bt. Louis and the Central and 
South American States. 

MB. FRANK H. BYAN. 

Jane 10. Besolutions of respect to the memory of Frank H. Byan, 
prepared l^ a committee consisting of Messrs. John Thyson, Oswald 
OraTes and P. P. Connor, were presented and nnanimously adopted. 

UB. OUAS. L. THOMPSON. 

June 10. Besolatioua of respect to the memory of Charles L. 

TbompBou, prepared by a committee consisting of MesBrs. Web M. 

Samuel, Samuel N. Holliday and L. L. Prince, were presented and 

on&nimoQSly adopted. 

UB. HILBB BELLS. 

June 10. Besolutions of respect to the memory of Miles Sells, 



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14 TRABB AND COMMERCE OF 

prepared by a committee conBistinsf of Messrs. Joseph 8. NanBOn, C. 
O. J>ut«her and Michael McEnnis, were presented and ananiinouilf 
adopted. 

GRADES OF HAY. 
June 10. The Board established grades of hay of the Btandsrds 
adopted by the National Hay Association, and appointed tlM follow- 
In Hay Committee: John H. Eracke, Chairman, D. W. Clifton, Chris- 
topher HUke, Jaa. F. Quinlivau and T. R. Ballard. 

"UlSSOOBl ON WHEELS." 

Jnly 8. The Board approved the action of the President in i^point- 
ing Mr. B. K- Haynee as a delegate to the "Missouri on Wlirels" 
convention held at Sedalia, June 19th. 

HiaSIBSIPPi R17BR lUPBOTEHENT. 

Jnly 8. The Board approved the action of the President appointinfr 
Capt. Isaac M. Mason as a, dele^te to the Upper Mississippi Kiver Im- 
provement convention held at Minneapolis on June 23rd. 

8TEAUBHIP LINE FROM NEW OBLEANS TO COLON. 

Aog. 12. The Board endorsed the ioaugnration of a regular line of 
steamers between New Orleans and Colon as proposed by thePanami 
Railroad Co. 

NATIONAL HAY CONVENTION, 
Sept. 9- The Board appointed MesBre. Sol. J. Quinlivau, John Uul- 
iallj, Henry Hunter, D. W. Clifton and D. Paule as delegates to th» 
National Hay Convention to be held in Cincinnati, September E4th, 

FLOUB BTANDABDS. 

Sept. 9. On recommendation of the Committee on Flour Inspection 
the Board abolished the grade of "Family" flour. 

JOHN D. PEBBY. 

Sept. 9. Resolutions of respect to the memory of John D. Perry, 
prepared by a committee consisting of Messra. E. O. Stanord, Joseph 
S. Nanson, John Whittoker, Theo. 0. Meier and Chas. A. Cox, were 
presented and unanimously adopted. 

WATEBWAYH CONVENTION. 

Oct. 14. The Board appointed Messrs. Isaac M. Mason, Michael 
McEnnis, Leonard Matthews, Gus. C. Meissonuier and Chris. Sharp 
delegates to the Waterways Convention to be held at Viokibaq;, 
Miea., October 22nd and 23rd. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OP ST. LOUIS. 15 

OEN. CARLOS DIBZ QUTIBBREZ. 
Oct 14. The Board extended &n invitation to Qen. Carlos Diez 
Gutierrez, Governor of San Lnie Potoed, Mexico, then at Atlanta, G&., 
to Tisit St. Loiils. Sabsequently Gen. Gutierrez viBtted St. IioniB and 
was entertained by tbe HercliaittH' Exchange, the Spanish Club, Mer- 
«MiUle Club and other commaroial bodies. 

"HlgSODttl ON WHEELS." 

Oct 14. The Board endoroed the movement, "MiaBouri on Wheels," 
and recommended same to the busineaa commtmity for support, aa a 
good medium for advertising the resources of the city and the State. 

RAILBOAD BRIDOE AOR098 THE MISSISSIPPI BIVER. 

Oct 26. The Mississippi Hiver Committee, to whom the matter 
had been referred, reported that the Committee had considered the 
matter and were of the opinion that the proposition was not feasible, 
and recommended tltat no action be taken thereon. The report was 
KceiTed and adopted by the Board. 

PHILIP BROOKMAN. 
Oct. 26. Besolutions of respect to the memory of Philip Brock- 
man, prepared by a committee consisting of MesBTB. C. Marquard 
FoTGter, Chaa. H. Teichmann, John ThyBon, P. J.McMorrow and John 
Wahl, were presented and unanimously adopted. 

ERNST LINK. 

Oct. 26. Besolutions of respect to the memory of Ernst Llnlc, pre- 
pared by a committee conBisting of Messrs. Philip Stock, Wm. D. 
Orthwein, L. Lemcke, Henry Drone and A. Qriesedieck, were pre- 
sented and unanimously adopted. 

W. S. NUMfHREYS. 

Nov, 11. Besolutions of respect to the memory of W. S. Humph- 
reys, prepared by a committee consisting of MeBsrs. Chaa. P. Burr, 
Bedmond Cleary and Chas. A. Cox, were presented and unanimously 
adopted. 

LOVEJOY UONUMENT ASSOCIATION. 

Not. 11. Beaolved, That we are heartily in accord with the eflort to 
vrcct a monnmeut at Alton, 111., to the memory of Elijah Parish 
Ixivejoj, a true American citizen and a martyr to the cause of free 
speech, a free press and human liberty; that we commend this enter- 
prise to the liberality of the citizens of St. Louis. 

TRANS-MISSISSIPPI COMMERCIAL CONQRESS. 

Nov. 11. The bcfard appointed Messrs, I[enrj- R. Whitmore, Sylvea- 

ler Waterhouse, M. J. Murphy, H, V. Langcnberg and Isaac M. Mason 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



19 TRADE AND COMMERCE OP 

dele^tes to the meeting of the Trana-Mlssiasippi Commercial Con- 
gress to be held at Omaha, Neb., November 25th. 

HOeH BOQESS. 

Dec. 9. Beeolutiona of respect to the memory of Hngb Bogers, 
prepared by a committee conaietiog of MeBsrs. H. F. Langenbers. 
Isaac U. Mason, Heory S. Potter, W. T. Anderson and Horace Ghiw- 
lin, were presented and <iuanimous)y adopted. 

NATIONAL BOABD OF TRADE. 

Dec. 9. The Board adopted the following' resolntions to be sub- 
mitted to the National Board of Trade for cons! deration at the neit 
annual meeting, to be held at Washiti^ton, D. C, January 28, 1996: 

FINANCE. 

Besolved, That the National Board of Trade, repreBenting the lead- 
ing commercial organizations of the United States, and exiatin(rfar 
the furtherance of businesB interests, feels it a duty to declare u 
follows: 

That the maintenance of the public credit at home and abroad, 
and of the good faith and name of the National Government demand 
the payment of all its financial obligations in absolute acoordaiKX 
with the terms of issue. 

That no equivocal or evasive principles shall be considered in cod- 
nedtiug with such obligations; and that the national honor shall be 
preserved unstained in the support and redemption of its pledges. To 
this end, every dollar issued by the Government shall be good tor 
its full value, and whether paper, gold or silver, shall be redeemable 
according to its terms. 

That the money of the Government must always represent the 
truth and integrity of the Government, and each dollar of the cur- 
rency must have parity of value a id equal purchasing power. 

We believe and afBrm that the same moral principles which govern 
in honorable business transactions should control national finance', 
that when a dollar's indebtedness is created, it should be paid by * 
bona fide dollar in value. 

We approve and support the position tahen and m^nt^ned by the 
President of the United States in upholding the credit of the Govern- 
ment of the United States on a sound money basis. And by "sonnd 
money" we mean a currency possessing uniformity of value, whether 
in circulation or offered for redemption. 

This Board is in favor of bi-metallism to the full extent that it can 
be safely maintained, without discrediting any money issued by the 
Government, or lessening its purchasing power. 

We are In favor also of an international conference of the repie- 
sentatives of commercial nations, respecting the value of silver in 



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THE CITT OF 8T. XiOUIS. 17 

reference to a gold standard; wbeneTer sach conference may be pro- 
posed upon such conditions as may offer reasonable prospect of prao- 
tical results. 

EEOIPEOCITY. 

Resolved, That the importance of establishing close commercial 
relations between the United States and the Spanish-American 
States by reciprocal commercial treaties, under which onr products 
may be freely admitted to markets naturally adjacent to our own in 
interest and situation, is earnestly commended to the consideration 
vt Congress. 

The abrog'ation of treaties existing prior to AugriBt, 1894, has been 
followed by a material decrease in bueiuess, and there is urgent de- 
mand for a renewal of the relations calculated to restore it, and to 
Rtrengthen and extend mutual exchanges. These countries are raft- 
idly increasing in wealth and population, and by their position are 
naturally relat«d to the United States and their markets should be 
araiiable for our products. In a sense, they represent a Coast-wise 
trade, which should be ours as against all possible competition, but 
which must largely fall into other hands unless we invite and secure 
it by liberal treity arrangements. Prompt action in thia matter by 
Congress is eamestly solicited, 

BANEBDPTCY LAWB. 

Befiolved, That the National Board of Trade re-afflrm its former 
action in regard to the necessity of the passage by Congress of a Nat- 
ional Bankraptoy Law. That the varying and uncertain provisions 
of the assignment laws of the different States and the delay and ex- 
pense incident to civil suits do not cover the exigencies of business 
and the prompt adjustment of relations between the debtor and cred- 
itor classes. That creditors should be protected against unjust pref- 
erences, and that an honest but insolvent debtor who has been un- 
fortunate in business shonld bave opportunity for freedom, of action 
and renewed energy are incontestable propositions having expression 
and indorsement in the laws of all enlightened nations. Uniformity 
on the subject of bankruptoy is only possible through the power con- 
ferred on Congress by the Constitution, and we believe there is press- 
ing demand at the present for the exercise of that power on fair and 
liberal principles. During our national history, tliis power has been 
exercised three times for brief periods, viz.: the Act of 1800, the Act 
of 1M3, and the Act passed March 2, 1867,and amended andre-enact«d 
in 1874; and a sensible, if temporary, relief was experienced in the 
bnsiiiess world as the result of the action taken. We believe a bank- 
rapUsy system on wiser principles than any of the preceding can now 
be enacted, and we urge its early consideration and passage. 

We again commend the Torrey Bankruptoy Bill to the attention of 
Con^rress as embodying comprehensive and well matured principles. 



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TRADE AND COMMBRCE! OF 
IPROVBMENT OF WATERWAYS. 

e attention of the Natjonal OoTerament ia again 
esaity of continoin^ work for the improvement of 
country! that plana forp^rmanentimprarement 
:d and carried out by regfular appropriations from 
nportant feature in national deTelopment. Anil 
ihould be made to aid the navigation of the Wert- 
rers. That, as a large area of the productive re- 
JB vitally interest«d in theee rivers, it should br 
vemment to prevent or curtail the damages and 
spoitation during seasons of low water byopes- 
ind bars, by means of dredge boats and other ap- 
ling prompt temporar; relief and permitting the 
Ft at alt seasons of the year. The urgency of tbie 
istrated and accentuated during the present and 
the navigation of the Mississippi and Missouri 
Tupted and almost wholly suspended by obBtmc- 
lints, which could have been easily removed by 
. conducted in a practical and vigorous mauner. 

THE NICARAGUA CANAL. 

le National Board of Trade, in view of the ea- 

the commercial interests of the United States 
»ragua Canal, respectfully urge upon Coogreas 
ing the great enterprise by such financial ^ai:~- 
■e its early completion, and secure to the people 

the permanent and indisputable right to control 

international interests involved in this project 
^ that it is hardly a matter of doubt that it wilt 
ed out with or without the co-operation of tbf 
respectfully submit that it would be a very great 

any power other than the United States to bc- 
Qterest in the management ol same, and intrench 

rights which might receive the recognition and 
lationat taw. We believe this should not be al- 
■.toTB advocate such financial aid by the CoTern- 
>ns as will ultimately secure repayment of moo- 
ds guaranteed, provided that the control of thiB 
Dgement shall be a fixed organic feature ol the 

.RLE STEEL JETTIES Olt CAISSONS. 

wing report was made and accept«d: 

1 Mississippi Hiver Improvement, to whom wai 
aication of Mr. O. L. Garrison in reference totlw 
g the channel of the Mississppi Biver by the um 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OP ST. LOUIS. 10 

of 'Tortable Steel Jetties, or CaiBBone," respectfuly report: That a 
meeting of the comimtt«e was held at which Mr. OarriBon and Capt. 
SUelds were present, and at which time the latter explained the de- 
tails of his scheme for the use of the portable jetties. 

A sob-committee was appointed to wait upon Maj. Allen, in chai^ 
of the improTements of the river between the mouth of the Illinois 
and the month of the Ohio River, and ascertain his views In reference 
to the portable jetties. The committee neceriained from !Maj. Allen 
that out of the sum appropriated for the improvement of the river 
over which be has control, the sum of ¥150,000 was made available for 
the trial of the portable jetty plan if so ordered by the Honorable 
Secretary of War. 

Maj. Allen was pronounced In his opinion that the scheme was not 
practicable, and said that he was not willing' to recommend to the 
Secretary of War that the experiment be made. 

As DO action would probably be taken by the Secretary of War, ex- 
cept on the advice and recommendation of Haj. Alien, it would seem 
that no action could be taken in reference to a trial of the portable 
jetty plan under present conditjons, 

TOEEEY BANKBDPTOy LAW. 

Dec 9. The Board endorsed the Torrey Bankmpt«y Law and re- 
quested the Honorable Senators and Bepresentstives from Missouri 
to support the bill in Congress. 

MISSISSIPPI KIVER IMPROVEMENT. 

Dec. IT. This Exchange has at all times recognized the most 
imperatire need of the West for the promotion of its commercial in- 
terests to be the improvement of its ^reat waterways, so as to secure 
their safe navigation at all seasons of the year, and more especially 
have they urged the prosecution of work for the improvement of the 
Mississippi River. 

While the permanent improvement of the River can be safely car- 
ried forward under the direction of the able engineers of the Govern- 
ment, in whose talents we have a just pride, yet the necessarily slow 
proaecution of this work will require an indefinite period to produce 
results beneficial to the commeree of this vast country, now con- 
toning neariy half of the population of the United States, during 
which time the commerce of this valley must suffer the loss of mil- 
lions aunnally by reason of additional cost of moving their heavy 
produce to the markets of the world, and 

Whereas, We believe that early relief can be obtained and a 
navlgnUe depth of water secured and maintained, at an early day, 
by the use of portable jetties and dredge boats if energetically and 
continually used at all shoal places on the river at a cost to the Gov- 
ernment of a small sum aanually as compared with the Immensely 
valuable results to the commerce of this valley; and 



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ao 'trade and couubrcb or- 

Whereas, We believe that such nndertakio^ come witbin the 
province of commercial enterpriHej and 

Whereas, Esperienced men, long identified with the navigation 
of the Mississippi River, are ao wcil assured of the practicability and 
feasibility of this manner of treatment of tbe channel of the river to 
attain the earliest practit^l results, that thej are wUling to under- 
take the work under the condition that their remuneration shall be 
continent on the result obtained, therefore be it 

Kesolved, That we commend the plan of Messrs. Samuel and 
Masoa, and their associates, to the favorable consideration of the 
Congress of the United States, and tliat It is tbe opinion of the Boari 
of Directors of this Exchan^ that its acceptance will secure on terms 
both safe and advantagreons to the Government the earliest attt^- 
menta of a reliable navigable channel between the City of St. Louis 
and the Gnlf . 

Resolved, That the President of this £lxchang« appoint a conuuil- 
tee of eleven to aid in promoting this undertaking, and to thst eai 
ask the co-operotlon and support of the associations in other 
branches of trade in this citj and along the river. 

The following committee was appointed: 

MARCUS BEBNHEIMER, Chairman. 
HENRY C. HAARSTICE. M. J. MURPHY. 

LEONARD MATTHEWS. THOMAS BOOTH. 

WM. M. SENTER. WM. T. ANDERSON. 

JOHN A. SCUDDER. CHRIS. SHARP. 

CHAS. F. ORTHWEEN. T. B. BOYD. 

ONE CENT LETTER P09TAUB. 
Dec. 17. 
To the Board of Directors Merchants' Exchange: 

Gentlemen: Your Committee on Postal affairs, after due esaoJn- 
ation of the question, recommends to the Board an endorsement of 
the proposition advocated by the National Board of Trade to intro- 
duce a bill in Congress providing for an equalization of postal rates 
and the reduction of letter postage from the present rate of l^f 
cents to one cent. Letter postage revenue at one cent, we are reli- 
ably informed.will yield a large profit to the Postal Department 
The deficit in the Postal Department is due to the cost of free mul 
matter and of a favored class of mail matter which only pays one 
cent per pound, when the actual cost of its handling is lorgelv 
above that amount per jmund. We think your endorsement shonld 
recommend charging to each department the cost of transmitting 
its free mail matter, and that the rate on the favored class of mail 
Dtatter be so increased that the Postal Department may be self-ms- 
taining. 

The above report was adopted by the Board, 



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THB OITT OP ST, LOUIH. 31 

OOBAN INDBFENDBNCE. 

Dec IT. It waa the sentiment of the Board of Directors tbat Con- 
gress should grant belligerent rights to the people of Cuba now 
stmggliQg for their independence. 

INDIA.K TEBBITORT. 

Dec 17. The Board endorsed resolutions adopted by the Board of 
Trade of Ardmore, Indian Territory, asking Congress to pass a law 
anthoriztng towns to organize a municipal form of government to 
protect the land tenure in the Territory. 

COL. OHAB. & BUTBB. 

Dec. 26. The following letter waa addressed by the Preaident to 
thelTonorable Secretary of War: 

The Merchants' Exchange of the City of St. Louis, Mo., desires to 
respectfully recommend that Col. Charles B. Suter, Corps of En- 
gineers of United States Army, be not transferred from St. Louts to 
the Pacific Coast. Our chief reason for making this appeal is, that 
the Colonel has dwelt amongst us for the past twenty-six years, with- 
in which time he has become thoroughly familiar with the work of 
improving the Mississippi Bitcf and its tributaries, and has within 
that time gained the unbounded confidence and respect of our ctU- 

Making a specialty as he has in the theoretical and practical study 
of that branch of hydraulic engineering' relating to alluvial rivers, we 
feel that substitution in his place of other engineers with less practi- 
cal knowledge and experience would not be to the best Interests com- 
mercially of the improvements in progress on the MiBsisaippi and 
Missouri Rivers. 

We furth>:r feel that commercial interests, and especially of the 
Missiasippi Valley, would best be served by assigning him to a posi- 
tion of general supervision over the improvements in progress of all 
the alluvial rivers whose waters find their final outlet in the Qulf and 
to the harbors on the Gulf Coast, or to the Division Engineerahip of 
the Southwest, which position is now vacant; retaining, however, his 
membership in both the Mississippi and Missouri Blver Conunissions 
with bis headquarters lu St. Louis. 

AHTON QBIESEDIEOK. 

Dec. 31. BesoluUons of respect to the memory of Anton Oriese- 
dieck, prepared by a committee consisting of Messrs. W. F. Nolker, 
Wm. I>- Ortbwein, Chas. H. TeEchmann, Henry Orone and Otto F. 
Stifel, were presented and unanimously adopted. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COUMBRCB OF 



MEETINGS OF THE EXCHANGE TURING 1895. 



NEBRASKA BELIEF FUNR. 

Jan. IS. At a meeting' of the Exchange beld this day, MeBsrs.B. P. 

Anuau, Chae. A. Cox, H. P. Lan^enberg-, Alex. H. Smith and Fred 

Hnttersley were appointed a committee to solicit donations for tbe 

relief of the droug-ht sufferers in Nebraska. 

NATIONAL FINANCES. 

Jan. 3B. Whereas, The -widespread djatress which prevails over 
the entire country and the general prostration of its commercial, ag- 
ricultural and industrial interests have been so prolonged, that the 
concentrated efforts of our people should be put forth, irrespective 
of party ofHIiation, to restore that confidence and sense of security 
which is the foundation stone ot all prosperity, and, 

Whereaa, It is generally believed that the first step in this direction 
muEt be some positive leg-islation of Congrsess to allay any want of 
confidence in ita financial policy and establish the confidence of our 
people and of other nations in the ability and willingnesa of the Got- 
emment to utilize its abundant resources for the protection of its 
credit at home and abroad and for the promotion of the prosperity 
and happiness of all our people, and, 

Whereas, We believe that the message of the President has made 
recommendations which are timely, wise and patriotic, and if enact' 
ed by Congress will restore general confidence and revive our haltinf; 
commercial, manufacturing and industrial interests; therefore, be it 

Hesolved, That this Exchangp, irrespective of their party predilec- 
tions, recommend to the Congress of the United States the early en- 
actment of a law covering the recommendations of the President. 

BET. BAM JONES. 

March S3. Rev. Sam Jones was introduced by the President, and 
addressed the Exchange. 

OITT ELECTION. 

March S9. The Exchange voted to adjourn on Tuesday, April Snd, 
City election day, 

UBS. BALLIN8TON BOOTB. 

April 1. Mm. Balllngton Booth was presented to the Exchange by 
the President, and addressed the members from the roBtrnm. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 88 

OOOD FRIDAY. 

April 10. The Exchange voted to adjourn on the 12th inat., Qood 
Friday. 

UKITEBfllTY OP MICHIGAN OLEE CLDB. 

April 10. The University of Michi^n Glee Club visited the Ex- 
change and rendered several selections from the rostrum. 

MEMORIAL DAY. 

Uay S7. The Exchange voted to close on Thursday, May 30th, 
Uemotlal Day. 

HON. WH. L. WILSON. 

June 13. Hon. Wm. L. Wilson, Postmaster-General, was introduced 
by the President and delivered a short address. 

HON. JOBIAH PATTKRBON. 

July IS- Hod. Josiah Patterson, M. C., of Memphis, Tenn., was 
introduced by the President and addressed the Exchange. 

LA BOB DAY. 

Aug-. 28. The Exchange voted to close on September Snd, Labor Day. 

GOV. STONE, OF MISSISSIPPI. 

Oct. i. Hon. J. M. Stone, of MiSHiaaippi, and Hon. Murray F.Smith, 
of Vicksbnrg, were presented by the President and addressed the 
members. 

TBUB8DAY. FAIB WEEK. 

n Thursday ,the 10th inat., 



OEN, GUTIEKSEZ. 

Oct. 25. Gen. Carlos Diez Gutierrez, Governor of San Luis Potosi. 
Mexico, visited St. Louis on the invitation of the Itlerchants' Ex- 
change and was introduced by tbe President. 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER Sth. 

Nov. 4. The Exchange voted to adjourn Tuesday, November 5th, 
OD account of general elections. 

OEN. O. O. HOWARD. 

Sot. 17. Gen. Howard was Introduced by the President and ad- 
dressed the members. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



34 TRADB AND COHHBRCB OF 

INDIANAPOLIS PABTY. 

Dec 14. Fresideut Gordon of the Indiukopolie Board of Trade m 
partyviBited the Exctuuig« and were introduced by the President sn 
Beveral of the party terponded. 



Dec. 19. The Excban^ voted to close on December SMth. 

OBERLIN COLLEGE GLEB CLDB. 

Dec. 31. The Oberlin College Olee Club visited the Excbangre and 
Bang several college songB. 



Dec. ST. The Exchange voted to close at 12 m. on December Slst 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OP ST. LOUIR 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER FOR 1895. 



CURRENT ACCOUNT. 



Bern of Uall Bobrd chain 

Bent of Drawers 

Kent of TelsKraph a 



Sklulea. ■U.TttOO 

Tslegrftphlc Account II.OH W 

TniiHfBrnMl to Seal BsMte Account TJWO 00 

KMlemptloD of Uembenhlpi 3,1TB 00 

AnnmTlteport. 1,110 GO 

TelephoDw 700 00 



Bcwp, Towel*, and w 

LuncbcB fi 



170 00 
S«7U 

nan 



" frani-MIsalKslppl Oonsresa, UmaliA. ,. 



IiumraDca OB FuTDltare sod Fixtures 

BDttrtkiDmentaener&lGutierrei 

Judge* or ElectloD 

AueMmeDt National Tramportatlon AiBoclatlaii 

tin Pans 

Broomi. DuaterB. Hops, Oombgaiid Brusbes 

BntenalninODt President Board of Trade, Indianapolis, and 

Partj 

Deleiatea to JefferBOnCIty 

" rrop Beport Conference, WuhlDCton 

Awonment, Waterwayn OoDventloa, Vlckaburs 

Coiainlti«e on Cleaner Streets. 

Careol Fountain 

iMleRateo. Rtrer Improvement OonTentlon. Hlnneapolla.... 

Platform for New fork Blijcb Board 

How Obalrs 

Telephone Box 

I>eleKateaNatlonalTranBportatIon Asenclatlon, Chicago... 

"Hlssourlon Wheels" Convention. Bedalla 

Sacdrles 

Balance on band December U, UtS 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THADE AND COMMBHCB OP 



REAL ESTATE ACCOUNT. 



Cash on handjttiiuiiryl. 1805, t Sltl 

Hecelved from Kanlafs UJUW 

■ la from Ourr - 

IghtKnd Las 

a Account... 



TTOSBterred from Current Account T.ann 

Electrlo Light and Lamps UW 



IM.<WM 



New Steam Heating Apparatus { 10.4SII IB 

Taies B,19SDS 

Bills Payable Paid on (BS.OOO of DemBDd Notes 9.000 00 

Interest on tiao,<X10 Loan T.UO 00 

Emjjloyes „.,., T.US15 

Ordinary Kep&lrs sISlB 78 

Power for Kunnlng Blevatora 3.000 00 

Coal. 27,S33!4 bu LIHl 71 

Taterest on Demand Notes l.*TB 8S 

Water License EiSS SO 

Supplies tor Janitor and Engineer 2(7 9» 

KemovlngAahea and Sweepings 170 00 

nnltorms for Elevator Boys , 98 00 

Elevator Insurance « « 

Inauranceon Steam Heating 36 35 

Inspecting of Boilers and Elevators 27 TS 

Sprinkling Tax 21 B5 



Safe... 



18 SO 

16 87 |U.a!tT 



Balance on hand, December SI. 1695... 
:. Louis. December 31. 189 



GEO. a. UORQAN. 

Secretary and Treasnrer. 



We, ibe undersigned, a Commltue appointed by tbe President, do hereby 
certify tbat we have examined the accounts of tbe Secretary and Treasurer (or 
180$. and Bnd the same to be correct, with the proper vouchers on flleforei- 
pendlturesand balances In bank, as follows, viz.; 



W. K. 3TAHABD. 
St, Louis. January 5. 1896. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OP ST, LOUIS. 2" 

MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE, 

SECRETARY'S OFFICE. 

St. Louis, December 31, 1895. 
Mr. Thomas Booth, President. 

Dear Sir: — I take pleasure in herewith presenting' to you, to the 
members of the Merchants' Exchange, and to the business commun- 
ity, my report of the trade and commerce of the city for the past 
year. 

I have endeavored to present the commercial condition of our city 
fiutlifnlly, and without exag-geration, and have called upon many 
buBiness men for their opinions as to the condition and growth of 
trade in their respective lines, and the conclUBiona are based upon the 
intormatjon thus received, where there are no actual figures to be 
had. 

The statistics of the business transacted on 'Change are made np 
from reports furnished the Exchange daily by the railroads anil 
<teamtxiats, and are compiled from these reports with great care, 
and can be relied on as being as near correct as such atatlstics can be 

Beviewin^ the business of the year as a whole, it will be found to be 
veiy satisfactory. In many lines an increase in volume is reported, 
while in no line, except, perhaps, in the grain trade, has there been n 
falling off. In the receipts of grain there is a large decrease, but 
only in one cereal, com. The same condition prevails, however, in 
Other markets, the cause being the unusually low price of that cereal 
and the consequent unwillingness of holders, both farmers and ship- 
pers, to market the cixip. 

Detailed statements of the various lines of business will be found 
on subsequent pages, to which the attention of all interested is in- 
vited. 

Trusting' that my report will be found satisfactory and of some 

value as setting forth the commercial position of St. Louis, and with 

many thanks to yourself, the Board of Directors, and the members 

generally for continued evidences of confidence and esteem, I am 

Yours very sincerely, 

GEORGE H. MORGAN, Secretary. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COUMBKCB OF 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



The holding of three gr^eX political conventions in St, Louis in 189S 
will naturalljr draw increased attention to the city, and will in a largt 
measure remove erroneoua impressions which are still current asto 
its size and importance. St.Louis is the fifth city in the United StaMs 
in the matter ol population, and it ranks fourth in the order of maC 
nitnde as a manufacturing city. It ia alwnya difficult to estimate 
the population of a, city closely, aix years after the taking of tbe 
Federal census, but estimates made by reliable people, and based up- 
on the nnmber of names in the city directory, and otherdata, place tlK 
population of St. Louis at the present time at a little in excess of GOO,- 
000. This would show an increase of about 33 1-3 per cent, since tJie 
taking' of the census in 1890. That this estimate is reasonable Cda b« 
proved in a variety of ways. The number of fares collected on tlie 
street rnilroadsiu 1895 was inexcees of one hundred mill ions, or more 
than double the number of fares collected ten years ago. I>Dring the 
last five years the actual expenditure uponnew buildings hasexcetded 
3100,000,000, and although the magnificent structures in the ceotrsi 
portion of the city have contributed very largely to this total, thebnik 
of the expenditure has been on private dwelling houses. In two 
years alone, 1863 and 1895, more than sixty miles of street frontage 
were built up in St. Louis and during the year 1895, in spite of the 
immense number of new residence houses, the renting demand \ns 
maintained right into winter, although it is usual for it to fall oS 
very rapidly after September in every year. The increase in the re«- 
enue (or water supply, the increased number of taxpayers and the 
much larger amount received in the way of taxee pnid seem to verifj 
the stat«ment that St. Louis has to-day more than 600,000 inliabi- 

Not only has the population of St, Louis increased with mwkri 
rapidity during the last ten years, and especially during the last fire, 
but the country which is tributary to it hns seen an even greater pro- 
portionate g^in. The Territory of Oklahoma, which is a conuser- 
cial suburb of St. Louis, has been entirely built up during the period 
named. Throughout Texas there hns been a general revival of pros- 
perity with an immense flood of immi)(TBtion. A circle drawn 
around St.Louis with a radius of five hundred miles, encloses a lai^r 
population than a similar circle drawn around any other city in 
America, not excluding either New York or Chicago, which ate 
handicapped in a competition of this kind by the immense aiAount 
of ocean or lakes covered. Within this five hundred mile circle. 



,db,GoOglc 



THB CITY OP HT. LOUIS. !0 

there lias been more prosperity and enterprise than in any other sec- 
tion of the countr7, and the MUsissippi Valley, which re^rds St. 
Louis as its natural metropolis, has made magnificent sUides com- 
mercially and financially during the last decade. 

St Louia is really the most central of the large cities of America. 
It is located about midway between the center of popnlation and the 
geographtcal center of the United States. In 1892 the center of popu- 
lation was at Columbus, Indiana, and it is believed to hare been 
pushed from twenty (« fifty miles further Southwest since then. The 
get^raphical center is at Fort Kiley, Kansas, and hence the po- 
sition of St. Louis geographically is unique. Every ten years the cen- 
ter of population has been forced nearer to this city, which in the 
near future'la likely to become the practical center itself. 

So far as the State of Miaaonri is concerned, St. Louis is its natural 
metropolis, and as such is always in the foreground in movements 
designed to benefit the State and encourage immigration. MisHouri 
is the third State in the Union in agricultural and farm products and 
produces more th.in 200,000,000 bushels of com yearly. In the mat- 
ter of fruite, the State is much more fortunate than Is generally sup- 
posed. The finest peach orchard in America is located in Missouri, 
and a portion of the State has been ofBcially declared the apple or- 
chard of the world. 

In live stock, Missouri is in the front in regard to cattle, sheep and 
hogs. Missouri mines and ships out about one-half of the entire zinc 
ODtput of the country, and it ranks second in lead and iron. Its clays 
are admitted to be among the best in the world, and although its coal 
mines have never Ijeen developed to their fullest capacity, it is also 
exceptionally favored in this respect. 

St. Louis is benefited immensely by the vast natural resources of 
Missouri and of the country tributary to it. It is unique in Its lo- 
cation near the source of supplies for manufactures of almost overy 
description, and its distributing facilities in oil lines of merchandise 
have also materially assisted it. 

The railroad facilities of St. Louis are admirable. Twenty-four 
trunk lines center in the city and the mileage of its railroads exceeds 
sixty thousand. In last year's report, special reference was made to 
the opening of the new Union Station, the largest railway station in 
the world. The wisdom of the designers of this magnificent struc- 
tnre has been well proved. During the year, passenger traffic has 
increased to a marked degree and is still gaining. The popularity of 
St. Louis as the gateway of the West and Southwest has advanced 
and several Improvements have l>een made. Notably among these 
must be mentioned the running of an afternoon train, leaving Kan- 
aaa City at one o'clock and connecting in St. Louis with a train run- 
ning' £ast. This has shortened the time between Kansas City and 
Eastern points five or six hours and has resulted in a great deal of 
traffic being diverted to this route. At the present time, n^Otiatione 
are in progress for accelerating the service from the Pacific Coast 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



30 TRADE AND COMMBRCE: OF 

so ns to connect nith this afternoon tram, and make St Loaja the 
moBt popular, ns well as the moat convenient route between the 
rndflc and Atlantic seaboards. 

Freight buaineaa has also showo a great increase and in conse- 
quence of the efforts made by the Transportation Committee of thr 
Merchants* Exchange, with which the BuBiuess Men's I>eagiie has co- 
operated, rates have been adjusted in a number of instances so w to 
increase the area over which St. Iiouis merchandise can be profitably 
distributed. One marked feature ot the year 1895 in commercial cen- 
ters has been the activity in building in the neighborhood of Cnp- 
plee' Station. Some of the largest wholesale and jobbing eetablisli- 
ments in the city have moved into the new buildings connected with 
this remarkable freight station, which ie the largest single freight 
station in the world and abstolutely unique in several of its features. 
Visitors to the city regni-d it as oneof the most interesting Bights.iui<l 
the method whereby cars are loaded and unloaded on tracks which 
run into the buildings themselves, marks an epoch in the hisforr of 
modem competition and in the reduction of expenses incident U> 
wholesale jobbing and shipping. 

St. Louis ia frequently referred to as the largest city on the largest 
river in the world. The value of the river transportation (eatore of 
St. Louis in the matter ot reg\ilating railroad rates has never tieen 
overlooked and it has been made manifest during past years. Si. 
Louis is the principal port for about 13,000 miles of river, of which 
upwards of 12,000 miles are navigable at certain periods of the year. 
Steps have been taken again and again to secure the deepening of the 
channels in the Mississippi River and ita tributaries, and when deep 
water can be secured all the year round from here to the Qulf — with 
the exception of periods of intense cold — there will be a revival in 
river traffic which will have a marked influence upon trade and com- 
merce and also upon railroad rates to points in sections through 
which the Mississippi River or any ot its tribntariee run. 

The prosperity of St. Louis and the solidity ot its commerual and 
financial institutions has become a national by-word. Its husinesE 
houses withstood the panic of 1893 in such a magnificent mannerthat 
their reputation for conservatism and solidity has become almost in- 
ternational, and nothing has benefited St. Louis more conspicuouEl;' 
than the controst between the way in which the financial diffi- 
culties of two and a half years ago affected this and other cities. 

The perfect confidence felt by our principal business bouses in the 
future of the city is evidenced by the large amount Ot money which 
has been put into these business houses dvtring the year. On another 
page more detailed reference ia made to money spent in this wav. 
but the most casual observer in riding around the city must note 
that in almost every direction he finds lofty, hondsonie structures 
taking the place of much smaller ones, and designed to make it pos- 
sible for the owners to largely increase the scope ot their operstionE 
and the extent ot their output. The area covered by buildings of 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF BT. LOUIS. 81 

this chonuster has expanded month by month durin^r the last two 
years nnti) now the bnsineiu) eectton extends at least a mile further 
from the river than a few years ago. Some of our largest factories, 
indeed.are being built west of Grand Avenue, which bat a few years 
afifl was the dividing line between the city and county. 

The increase in the number of fireproof office buildings of impres- 
sive elevation has been even more conspicuous than the gain in the 
Dumber of buBinesH houses. Including three buildings which will 
be finished during the current year, St. Louis can claim thirty com- 
pamtively new structures which cost more than SSOO.OOO each to con- 
struct, at least four of them costing in excess of a million. It is only 
possible to refer to these in the merest outline. Visitors will Sad 
the Union Trust Building the tallest at present completed, although 
two others will in the course of a few months dispute with it its claiin 
in this regard. The Security Bailding at the corner of Locust and 
Fonrth Street cost upwards of a million dollars and Is regarded as 
the most solid ofBce building in the country. Its plan of construc- 
tion diifered materially from those in gL'neral use, and it is to a great 
extent a mass of solid masonry instead of being built on the usual 
modem plan of iron and steel framework. The Odd Fellows', Wain- 
wright, Commercial, Laclede, Columbia, Turner, Fagin, Deltlenil and 
Roe Buildings are a few of the characteristic structuresof this charac- 
ter which have so completely changed the appearance of St. Louis 
and especially its downtown section during the last ten years. It 
was in the spring of 1386 that a number of foreign capitalist^ pur- 
chased the southwest comer of Fourth and Olive Streets and pro- 
posed to erect upon it one of the largest and most magnificent office 
buildings in the world. The e:tcavationB were dug, but no progress 
was made with the work and finally St. Louis capitalists bought up 
the outsiders and proceeded to erect the Laclede Building, which, 
while not actually the first fireproof office building in the city, was 
practically the first of the modem type and set the example which 
has since been so generally followed, 

iDthematterof hotelnccommodationand the erection of new hotels 
St. Louis baa also made remarkable progress during the last few 
years. It was stated in the formal application for the Republican 
convention that the hotel facilities were three times as great now as 
vrben the Democrats met here in national convention in 1876 and 
even in 1S8S. Strong as this statement seems, careful investigation 
bears it out. With our new hotels, added to the older ones whose 
capacity has in some instances been increased, St. Louis can take care 
ot an immense number of people. The Planters, which has been open 
a little over a year, has 450 rooms and can accommodate about l.SOO. 
gneata. The St. Nicholas, also a little more than a year old, has 70 
rooms which can be used to accommodate 350 visitors. The Southern 
Hot«l has 384 rooms and has often taken care of more than a thous- 
and visitors. The Lindell Hotel has 237 rooms and can provide ac- 
commodation for nt least 800 people. The Laclede and the Hurst's 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



33 TRADE AND COMMEKCB. OF 

can together entertain at least 1,300, a.ad the Moaer'e and Benton, T50. 
The St. James Hotel can accommodate 1,100 vJBitorB and there are 
other hotela in the dowa-towD district. 

The openingr at the Union Station has led to the erection in its 
vicinity of several hotels, some ol which are ftrst-claBs in character. 
The Terminal Hotel has ninety-six roomsand can probably accommo- 
date 500 ^estswithout overcrowding'. The Edison Hotel inclose proi- 
Smity is almost an equal of the Terminal in capacity and there are 
three other large hotels adjoining. Since the last national politicaJ 
conventions were held here, hotels in the extreme West End have 
also increased both in number and capacity. The Beers, the Grand 
and the West End can leather accommodate on an emergency from 
eight hundred to a thousand guests. 

It will be seen that the first-class hotels of the city can be relied 
upon to take care of an immense number of people. There are in 
addition to these hotels upwards of a hundred respectable estab- 
lishments, limit«d in capacity, of which use can be made on the occa- 
sion of lar^ political and commeicini gatherings. Tour or five 
years ago when the hotel accommodation was very inferior towhat it 
is now, it was usual to Iceep a register of boarding houses and as 
many as thirty thousand visitors have been located during the fes- 
tivities in this manner. It will thus be seen that hotels, boarding 
houses and private houses combined, can accommodate an unlimited 
number of visitors to the city, and as this fact becomes more genei^ 
ally known, there will be a further increase in the number of conven- 
tions held here. 

The clubs of St. Louie are among the best in their equipments and 
management in the country. There are fourteen large clubs in the 
city, omitting political organizations. The Mercantile Club is the 
largest. This institution has 1,H5 members and owns a very fine 
building especially erected for the purpose on the comer of Seventh 
and Locust streets on the site of the bouse owned and occupied tor bo 
many years by Mr. Henry Shaw, to whom St. Louis is indebted for 
Tower Grove Park and the Missouri Botanical Gardens, the finest in 
the world. The feature of this club which involves the admission of 
ladies to aectlons of the building, has proven a great success and the 
ladies' rooms on the fourth floor are very well patronized. More than 
six hundred members frequently lunch in the club in a single day, 
and a great number of meetings of a semi-public character are held 
m the building. 

The Noon-Day Club is smaller numerically but ia also a down-town 
business men'a club. It occupies the top story in the Security 
Building and is a representative organization. The Commercial Clnb 
keeps a watchful eye on municipal and other developments and is 
composed of leaders in various lines of finance and commerce, who 
meet from time to time and discuss points of live interest. The Busi- 
ness Men's League, though not strictly a club, has objects very simi- 
lar to those of the Commercial Club. It is an incorporation under 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OP BT. LOUIS. 88 

the laws of Missoiui and its two hundred memberB are banded to- 
gether for the purpose of "standing up (or St. Louis every day in the 
year," making: known its advantages and g'uardinff against discrimin- 
ation on the part of railroads and other corporations and a^^nst 
inimical legfislation of every kind. It succeeded during' the past year 
in obtaining the Republican National Convention and in auperint«nd- 
fng the raising of the fund required for the purpose. It also secured 
from the Courts an injunction to prevent the enforcement of the re- 
cently tnacted in<iurance law, which business men believe to be in- 
jnrioua, and has also achieved other successes. 

The other permanent cluba of St. Jjouis include the St. Louis Club, 
The Union, The University, The Jockey, The Elks, The Columbian, 
The Country, The Otitce Men'a and the Marquette. Each has a strong 
memhership and in many ways is doing good work for the City. 

At the present time St. Loui^ can claim without any boasting, 
priority in a lai^« number of special features and especially in lines 
of manufacture and commerce. In addition to the largest railroad 
atatioD in the world the city has the largest hardware house, the 
largest woodenware house, the largest drug house, the largest brick 
janis, the largest stove and range factories, the largest brewery and 
the largest shoe house in the United States and probably 
in the world. In addition to having the two largest tobacco 
factories in the world, ground has been broken for a third and still 
larger factory which will have a capacity greater than that of any 
other two factories in the United States. This factory will cost up- 
irardB of a million dollars and ia located in what is known as Dundee 
Place, on the Missouri Pacific and the Frisco railroads, alrout two 
miles from the Union Station and about three and one-half milea 
from the river front. It has, in addition, the largest blank book fac- 
tory in the world, the largest shot tower in America, the largest iron 
jail factory in the world, the largest electric arc light plant in the 
world, the largest stamping- plant in the country, the largest cracker 
factory in the country, the largest t«rra cotta factory, the largest 
jeans factory, the largest press brick yard, and the largest white lead 
factory, with other establlsliments which are probably as large as 
any other in their respective lines. 

These are not the only comm.ercial and manufacturing features in 
which St. Louis excels. For example, it is the first city in the United 
States for the manufacture of saddlery and harness, chairs, street 
ears, hags and bagging, and is moreover the best hardwood lumber, 
soft hat, interior cotton, inland coffee, fruit and vegetable market 
in the United States. 

In the matter of manufactures, St. Louis has made remarkable 
strides during the last thirty years and more especially during the 
last ten or fifteen years. A carefully prepared table shows that in 
the year 1860, the value of the manufactured product in St. Louis was 
about faT,O0O,0OO. In that year New York manufactured goods to the 
Talae of 1160,000,000 and Philadelphia to the amount of about {135,- 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



84 TRADE AND COUHBRCB OF 

000,000. In 1899 the value of the manufactured product in St Loois 
was not less than J300,O0O,O0O or about equal to the total product of 
the two great Eastern man ufactu ring cities juBt prior to the war. 
Of still more interest from b comparative standpoint as showing the 
increase in mauufuctures in St. Louis, it maj be mentioned that in 
1860 Cincinnati manufactured about forty per cent, more goods than 
St. Louis. Now the order has been reversed, St, Louie being fully 
forty per cent, in the lead. Again, in 1660 both Pittsburgh and Balti- 
more manufactured about as ^uch as St. Louis; at the present time 
the output of this city is about equal to the combined output of the 
two cities named. In 1S60 Boston was $10,000,000 ahead of St. Louie 
in manufacturing; in 1885, St. Louis led the city of culture by at 
least 130,000,000 and probably {50,000,000. 

Mention has been roa^e in previous repoi-tfi of the remarkable 
showing made by the census of manufacturers taken in 1890. It will 
be remembered that the increase in the number of manufacturing 
establishm'ints in St. Louis showed an increase of eighty-six percent. 
During the decade the number of hands employed increased one 
hundred and seventeen per cent., while the wages paid showed an ad- 
vance of nearly two hundred per cent. The increase in the value of 
the goods manufactured was nearly one hundred per cent. It is well 
known that a large proportion of the increase took place during the 
last two or three years of the decade, and it is equally well known 
that since the census wa^ taken there has been an immense increase 
in almost every manufacturing line in the city. 

There are at the present time more than six thousand 
factories in St. Louis, excluding from the calculations ev- 
ery small shop and productive establishment where the 
process of manufacturing is only partially completed. The 
best estimates of wages paid during the year 1B95 place the total at 
about $70,000,000 and there can be no doubt that the \-alue of the pro- 
duct at the factory whs fully $300,000,000. More than thirty establish- 
ments engaged in manufacturing have moved to St. LoUis from other 
cities during the last twelve months in consequence of advantages 
offered here in the matter of cheap coal, proximity to raw material, 
reasonable rat«s of wages and absence of labor difficulties, the extent 
. of the market and the unique facilities offered in the wny of trans- 
portation and distribution. The establishments referred to are all 
of sufficient importance to be considered high class and each haa 
brought a considerable amount of capital with it. 

In the review of the trade and commerce of the year mention is 
made of several lines of manufactures which have shown excepticmBl 
activity and which have been distinctly prosperous. Detailed reports 
of other industries in this volume go still further into the subject and 
prove that, as a manufacturing stronghold, St. Louis is gaining 
ground month by month, and justifying its right to be known as 
the Philadelphia of the West. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF BT. LOUIS. 85 

St Louis has equal reason to congrmtulate Itself upon Its advaii' 
tag«s as a residence center. St. Louis is without exception, the 
liealthiest large city in Ihe United Stotea. The total number of 
deaths for the year just ended was 9,425. Even estimating the popa- 
IstioD st 560,000, thiB shows a death rate of 16.08 per 1,000 ; on an eatJ- 
mate of 600,000 the death rate was only 1S.75. Taking nine large 
cities of the country located East, Weit, North and South, it is found 
tliat the death rate in them varies from 18 in San Francisco to 22 In 
Boston and S3 in New York and Brooklyn. It will thus be seen that 
the death rate in St. Louis is about one-third lower than in New 
York, and id two per thousand lower than in a city situated in a 
State with a climate of proverbial healthful ness. 

The climate of St. Iiouis is in a measure responsible for this low 
mortality rate. The City is located on high ground and is very free 
from epidemics of a severe cbnracter. The only criticism made 
sgalnet St. Louis as a health resort is the alleged extreme heat during 
the month of June. OfRcial figures from the oJHce of the weather 
Etatistican for the City of St. Louis, show that the mean maximum 
temperatnre in St. Louis since the establishment of the Weather Bu- 
resQ here has been but 81 during the month mentioned. The mean 
monthly temperature for the same month far the same period baa 
been but 71, ahowing that although, as in all cities of this latitude 
there are occasional Bpella of great heat, they are of short duration 
and do not affect the healthfulness of the city and the comfort of its 
inhabitants. The exceptionally good eewer system of St. Louis is 
another reason for its healthfulness. There are more than four hun- 
dred milea of public and district sewers in the city of St. Louis and 
ordinances have been passed during the last few weeks caUing for an 
immense addition to this sy8t«m. 

The parka of St- Louis are also of a character to Increase the healtii 
of the infaabitanta and offer ample breathing space for all. The 
forethought of those who, twenty or thirty years ago, secured ample 
park acreage for the city in anticipation of its stupendous growth 
during recent years has resulted in St. Louis occupying quite a 
unique position in this regard. The park acreage of 8t. Louis is 
exceptionally large and the city compares very favorably with other 
centers of population in this regard. The number of acres In our 
parka is about 2,300 as compared with a practically similar area in 
Chicago, 3,000 acres in Philadelphia, 1,750 acres in Washington, 
1,200 acres in Baltimore, 1.100 acres In San Francisco and but about 
1,000 acres In New York. It will be observed that St. Louis is far 
ahead even of Philadelphia, with its magnificent Falrmount Park, 
in reg&rA to the number of inhabitants to eatih acre reserved in per- 
petuity for recreation purposes. These figures so far as St. Louis la 
concerned, are independent of the Fair Grounds. In these latter the 
Annual Fair is held. This is one of the oldest institutions of its kind 
in the West. The Fair has been held for thirty-five consecutive 
Kosons aud the attendance on Fair Thursday is alwaya largely in 
exoos of 100,000. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



S6 TRADE! AND COMMERCE OF 

Another institution remarkable for ite continued success is the St 
Louis Expoeitioa which has been held thirteen years consecatiTel;, 
realizing' a profit every season. The cost of the building with im- 
proTements has been about a million dollars. The original EUick- 
holders were actuated solely by motives of public spirit in snbscrib- 
itig, as It was not expected there would ever be any profits to divide. 
In 1895, howeTer, a dividend of SO cents per share was dedared and 
this is said to be the first case on record in which a local exposition 
company ha^s been able to pay of! all bonded indebtedness and to 
then commence to pay dividends ont of net profits. 

The streets in the down-town section of St. Louis are well paved. 
There are in the city nearly four hundred miles of fully improved 
streets and about one hundred miles of paved alleys. About SStj 
miles of streets are paved with granite blocks and there ore nearly 
twenty miles of streets paved with asphalt or wood. Brick for pa'- 
ing purposes has been used to some little extent within the last year 
and the Municipal Assembly has before it a number of propositioni 
falling for the free useof this materialfor street purposes. Local sen- 
timent is very strong in fuvor of improved streets regardless ot «- 
pense. Ten or twelve years ago when the policj' of good pave- 
ments was first advocated in a general way, property onaen 
upon whom the expense of the work would fall were far from 
being unanimous in favor of the undertakings, and pro- 
tests of a very bitter character were frequently drawn up and 
signed. As an instance of the increase in local public spiritedness. 
property holders are now complaining because the streets are not 
re-constructed and fully improved at their expense more rapidly. 
Conflicting legal decisions have very much interfered with work of 
this character during the last year or two, but it is now believed that 
all difficulties have been overcome and that a great deal of work in 
this direction will be accomplished during the next few months. 

St. Louis was the first city to introduce the system of street sprin- 
kling by the city authorities, to be paid for by a small special tax. 
The experiment has proved a marked success and the service is, on 
the whole, satisfactory. The expense varies from one-fourth to one- 
tenth of what was willingly paid by property holders when each one 
made his own private contract for the work. It may be added in 
this connection that St, Louis was also the first city in the United 
States to provide for the general lighting of its streets and alleys by 
electricity. This work is economically done and costs the city less 
than any other lorge city in the country in proportion to the amount 
of light furnished and the area covered. 

The water supply of the city has borne the extra strain caused by 
increased population remarkably well. The average daily consump- 
tion of water is now about fifty milliougallons. The new waterworks 
in the course ot construction at the Chain of Kocks and now in par- 
tial use will be among the finest in the world and will have s capac- 
ity of 100,000,000 gallons ot water daily. What is of Still more im- 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THB CITY OP ST. LOUI8, 87 

portanee in connection with this very costly addition to the muni- 
cipal holdings of the city, ia the fact that bj aid of a series of lar^ 
settling basins, the water furnished to consumers will be approxi- 
matelj clear. St. LouU water has stood the most severe teats, both 
on the part of friends and foes of the City. Although at times un- 
pleasant in appearance, it is free from deleterious matter and is re- 
tarded by physiciana as one of the great factors in reducing the 
death rate and keeping away epidemics and disease. 

The consumption of water increases steadily every year, the gain 
in the amount paid for water license in 1S95 over the precedlnjf year 
amounting to more than $14,000. During the last twenty years the 
receipts from this scource have been more than doubled in spite 
of repeated reductions tn the rate per house, or per thousand gal- 
lons when supplied by meter. The revenue Is now in excess of 
tlOO,000 per month, and the water department is one of the very few 
branches of the Municipal Oovemment which is an income earning 
rather than a spending bodj-. 

Among other advantages offered by St. Louis may be mentioned 
the exceptionally desirable residence districts to be found in the out- 
slcirts of the city and in the suburbs. The private places of St. Louis 
eicite favorable comment on the part, of visitors from all sections 
and the large sums of money spentln keeping these ideal home places 
in a perfect stateof repairaud ornamentation give evidence of theap- 
preeiation of home so generally conspicuous among our people. Van- 
deventer Place is the oldest and still the most exclusive of these 
private places. Westmoreland, Portland and Bell Places are among 
Ibe newer featnrea of this character. The houses in these privat« 
places are types of architecture of almost every school, ond resem- 
ble each other only in their costliness and general desirability. The 
owners of these private places keep the roadways in perfect repair 
and the park-like i-eservations in the highest stages of preseri-ation. 

The year just passed has seen St. Louis City and County connected 
by meanaof electric lines In a manner long dreamed of but ncverreal- 
ized. The Clayton electric road, completed and equipped more than 
two years ago, was operated for the first time during the early win- 
ter and the seat of government of St. Louis County is now within 
twenty minntea ride of the city by rapid transit. An electric road is 
also being constructed from the southwest comer of Forest Park 
throng'h Webster Groves and Kirkwood to Meramec Highlands. Cars 
on this line will be running in the course of a few weeks, and as the 
Lindell Company has extended its Chouteau Avenue branch along 
the soathem boundary of the park, the terminus of this road, it will 
be poHsible to connect with It from almost any portion of the city. 
Another electric road through Webster and Kirkwood is in course of 
(x>nBt ruction and it is announced that cars will be running on it dur- 
ing- the summer. These two roads will hare a marked Influence in 
bringrinK' Citj and County together and extending the residence sec- 
tion several miles further weston the picturesqne high ground which 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



88 TRADE AND COMMERCE OP 

borders the city. Already two or three tracts of land have been sub- 
divided into home places each with about an acre of ground. It is 
proposed t« make ideal country homes out of these, and to fnraisb 
suburban resorts of a desirable character. For home-seekers of 
liniited means the electric roads out into the county are offering ei- 
ceptional facilities by bringing' into the market inexpensive siWs 
which rapid transit will make avaOable for the building of comforl' 
able but cheap homes. 

As far as St. Louis property is concerned its rapid transit facili- 
ties are by far the best in the world in proportion to popu- 
lation. Up to the year 1838 horses and mules were used exclusively 
for furnishing power for street railways. Early in that year the 
Locust Street cable road was opened for travel, and shortly atl«T- 
wards the Olive Street and Frankin Avenue Lines were also cabled. 
It appeared as though the cable system would be adopted througli- 
out the entire city, but before the process of reeonBtrucllon was well 
under way experimenta witli electricity demonstrated that the cable 
could not compel* with the newest known force for rapid trnnsil 
purposes. The Franklin Avenue road has been reconstructed as an 
electric road and every other road has abandoned the use of animal 
power. The Jefferson Avenue cross-town line, which clung to mules 
long after other corporations had discarded them, commenced 
running electric ears during Christmas week of 189S, and there is now 
but one very short extension in the suburbs wliich has failed to keep 
up with the procession. 

The number of miles of track in the city is now about three hun- 
dred and t«n, of which nearly three hundred are operated by elec- 
tricity and the remainder by cable. The Olive Street cable line has 
secured an entire new equipment, the Fourth Street cable ie to be- 
come an electric road, and the Broadway line will soon be the on); 
one in the city running- cable trains of the old type. Street railrosd 
building has been exceedingly active during the last two years, and 
at the present time there is so much work under construction that 
the total trackage of St. Louis' street railways will exceed three hun- 
dred and fifty miles within the space of a few months. Not only has 
St. Louis the most complete rapid transit system and some of the 
most luxurious cars ever constructed, but it has also a system of 
transfers by means of which it is possible to ride an immense dis- 
tance for a single fare. The Lindell Company, the Union Depot sj-a- 
tem and the lines controlled by the Hamilton syndicate have the 
most comprehensive systems of transfers. By means of these a pas- 
senger can for a single fare ride from Caronclelet on the South lo 
Baden or the cemeteries on the North, a distance of ten or eleven 
miles, varying according to the route selected, the passenger bar- 
ing great freedom of choice in this respect. It is becoming quite a 
common practice to arrange electric car parties for evenings snd 
holidays, and by taking advantage of the transfer eystem, a great 
deal of pleasure can be derived at a minimum expenditure in the wav 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP BT. LOUIS. 88 

About lour yean ago experts employed by » wealthy Belgian 
ijndicate made a careful iospeotion of the St. Louie Btreet railway 
plants with a view to ascertaining: whether it would pay to build the 
tleTated road for which a charter had been granted. The report 
of thew experts was that while the plan proposed was a feasible one, 
St Louis was so well equipped with surface street railways that an 
elerated road could not be made to pay. The report, white admitting 
that the population was increasing rapidly, said that some years 
would elapse before any increase in the exieting rapid transit facil- 
ities would be required as there was no city In the world, so far as 
their knowledge went, so extravagantly provided for in this respect. 
The street railway mileage now is a little more than twice as great 
uwhen this report was made, and if it was correct at the time, as 
It probably was, St. Louis must at the present time have exceptional 
eauee for self congratulation in regard to its street railway facil- 
ities. 

The educational facilities of Bt. Louis have kept pace with the ma- 
terial growth of the city. The public school system is notoriously 
good and has been imitated in hundreds of cities. The average 
attendance at the public schools alone is nearly 75,000 and the Bystem 
is so perfect that children of every age are provided for. The Kin- 
deifarten branches are very complete and the High School is equal 
in every respect to the most expensive college. The increase in 
population of the city has made it very difBcult to keep up the school 
accommodation to its proper standing. The necessary money for this 
purpose has been forthcoming and although $1,500,000 Is required 
every year to keep up the work, no fund is raised with less difficulty 
or complaining. It requires nearly 1,800 teachers to do the work 
and the cost per pupil is a little less than tlB.OO per year. It is about 
fifty years since the Missouri General Assembly granted a charter 
to the "Board of Presidents and JMrectors of the Public Schools of 
the City of St. Louie." The city has grown during the half century 
from a small town to a great manufacturing, commercial and finan- 
cial center and the educational facilities have more than kept up 
ivith the growth in other respects. The Washington University is 
one of the national seats of learning. It is shortly to provide for 
itself a new home farther west than its present site where its educa- 
rational opportunities will be Etill further increased. There is 
other excellent provision in the city for higher grade education and 

The free library, which is but little more than a year old and 
O'hich is the successor of the public school library formerly run in 
connection with the Board of Education work, has proved of great 
advantage to the city. More than 26,000 names have been registered 
as readers and the number of books issued during the year has ex- 
i-eeded half a million. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COMMERCE 



TRADE AND COMMERCE IN 1895. 



The year 1895 was a prosperous one in nearl;' every line ol business 
tn St. Jjoiiis. Careful inquiries made ot representative men in dif- 
ferent lines ot uianulacturing. jobbing and retailing have resulted 
in almost Hniform answers, the only difference being in the reported 
percentage of increase over the preceding- year. The onlv 
exceptions have been from the saddlery trade and from soii- 
ply bouses directly affected by the demand for, and the price ot, 
building material. The manufacture and sale of high-priced bic^cleE 
may be spoken of aa in large measure a new industry locally. Bi- 
cyt'leH are now being manufactured in the city in large numbers anil 
are being shipped to all parts of the country, with several export or- 
ders being filled. The extent of the jobbing and retail trade in this 
line has been remarkable during the year. Estimates differ so greatlv 
as to the number of what are known aa high grrade bicycles sold in 
St. Louis in 1895, that it is best to give no figures, but the number ol 
dealers increased during the year at least three-fold, and all the old 
established houses report an immense increase in orders. One ship- 
ment of four hundred bicycles, valued at $40,000. was made during 
the summer to Los Angeles, Cal, The saddlery trade has been in- 
juriously affected by the popularity of bicycles, and it is noted that 
some of our largest saddlery and harness men have opened cycling 
departments. 

The brick business and other trades connected with it report a 
poor year, so far as prices are concerned, with but little gain over 
1804. This is explained by the fact that although buUding has been 
very active in oad around St. Louis, there has been very little doing in 
this wu.y in other (ritles, and in consequence there has been an unus- 
ually heavy competition from outside houses. It is not claimed 
that the volume of business transacted has been less than in previous 
years, but it is stated that prices have been exceptionally unsatisfac- 
tory from the manufacturer's and wholesaler's standpoint. 

With these exceptions the year was marked by an increase in bus- 
iness. There have been very few failures, and none of any magni- 
tude. Among the banks and trust companies there has been a grew 
deal of healthy business transacted. St, Louis has had no bank fail- 
ure for ten years, and the solidity of our financial institutions has 
attracted attention among capitaliatB in other points. To^vards the 
close of the year one of the largest insurance companies in the conn- 
try appointed a resident agent in this city for the purpose ot lending 
out its surplus funds on St. Louis property. It is stated that $10.- 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP BT. LOUIB. 41 

000,000 has been set aside for this purpose. Thia addition to the 
large number at wealthy real estate corporation b which are makingr 
heavy loans on improved property in St. Louis is regarded asanevent 
of great importance iu financial and real estate circles. There was 
an abundance of money all the year for legitimate enterpriseB and 
one of the most conspicuous features in the local financial world has 
been the lowering of rates on first-claBS real estate loans. For many 
years 6 per cent, has been the rulin(f rate, and although Uiere have 
been loans made at lesB than that figure, the rate generally has been 
w-eil maintained. During IBBS there have been several million dol- 
lars loaned on St. Louis real estate at rates varying from 4V^ to S% 
per cent. This has atitnnlated legitimate enterprise and It has also 
bad ita effect on general investments. Quite a number of local cap- 
italieta wh<j had been loaning their money at 6 per cent, prefer to in- 
vest it direct to accepting a lower rat«. 

The improved buBlnesB conditions and the general abundance of 
money is reflected in a very conspicuous manner in the bank clearing 
returns for the year. The total clearings for 1895 were $1,244,323,653, 
The largest annual total prior to this was 11,231,571,063 in 1892, 
which haa ever since been referred to as the year during which all 
records in the matter of' building, new enterprises and increased 
hustuesB were eclipsed. It will thus be seen that the year 1695 was 
better in the matter of banking business than the year which is 
always spoken of as marking the zenith of St. Louis' prosperity. 
This indicates clearly that the unfortunate infiuences of the national 
uaeasiness of the spring and summer of 1893 have entirely disap- 
peared. Month by month business has shown a good improvement, 
and the following table which shows the years in which each month 
has made a record for itself in bank clearing totals is very sug- 
gestive as well as encouraging: 

January, 1895 $118,390,714 July, 1895 $103,453,679 

February. 1892 97,370,011 August, 1892 105,280,130 

March. 1893 108,371.973 September. 1893 101,702,686 

April, 1893 107,761.079 October, 1895 112,754,703 

May, 1895 113,645,397 November, 1805 108.450.073 

June, 189S 101,670,035 December, 1893 117.863.598 

The amount of new building commenced or completed during the 
year 1895 was exceedingly large, atjd is another indication of the 
FatiBfaetory condition of the city's finances and the confidence in 
its future. The total amount called for in building permits issued 
in 1895 was nearly SlS.000,000; in 1894 the total was a little less 
tfaan $13,000,000 and in 1803 it approximated $13,000,000. Even in 
1893 when building was phenomenally active in the city, the total 
called for in the permits was only about two million greater than 
last year. It is very interesting to note in this connection that the 
percentage of brick to frame buildings is steadily increasing in St. 
Louis. The number of buildings authorized to be erected last year 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



42 TRA.DB AND COMMERCE OP 

was 3,632 of which more than 2,700 called for brick and atone in cod- 
Btruction. The total frontage covered by new buildings erwted or 
commenced during 1895 woe about 212 city blocks of average length, 
or approxin)at«ly 27 milea of street. When it is remembered that 
from almost every direction reports are received of apatl^ and dull- 
ness in the building trade, these flguree are certainly exceedinglj 
satisfactory. 

Among the nevp buildings referred to there are several whicli niH 
commend themselves to the attention of visitors. These include nbat 
will be the largest tobacco factory in the v»orld, already referred lo, 
a number of very costly wholesale houses in the neighborhood o! 
Cupples Station and on Washington Avenue; the iai^rest blank book 
factory in the Vforld on ^'nndeventer Avenue more than three mil" 
from the river front; three new hotels in the vicinity of the new 
Union Station and the Century and Chemical buildings. These two 
buildings are situated on either side of the Custom House and will 
rank among the finest office buildings in the West, adding lo the 
excellent accommodation in this line, already found in St. Louis. .\ 
third, excepticmally lofty fireproof office building, also on Oliif 
Hlreet and a little farther east is under ^on tract, and work wil' 
commence upon it during the current year. 

It is scarcely necessary to add that these extensive buildin? 
operations have had their influence upon real estate sales and values. 
Property generally has been in better demand especially in the down- 
town districts, and although there is seldom any amount of specula- 
tive buying in St. Ixiuia realty, prices generally have been consider- 
ably better. 

In the jobbing tradeathere has been, as already remarked. a general 
and conapictiouB increase In business. As a hardware center St. 
Louis has always had a high reputation, and for several years it hu 
been in the front rank. During 1895 the St. Iiouis hardware job- 
bers have made a distinct gain upon competitors in other cities. Con- 
servative estimates obtained from the leading jobbers in the city in- 
dicates that the volume of business in this line exceeds $]3,000,0« lor 
the year. In making this estimate care is taken to exclude the larff 
amount of buaineHSdone by iron and steel houses, very muchof which 
is at least indirectly connected with hardware. The gain for the year 
was about fifteen per cent, over 1394, and fully seven and a half |*r 
cent, over the business transacted in 1892, which was of course the 
banner year in the history of the trade. Comparatively little new 
territory was opened up during the year, 'which may be accounted 
for by the fact that the entire Southwest, West aud South bad al- 
ready been well covered. There have, however, been a large number 
of inquiries and orders from Eastern points, and there have also 
been shipments to South America, Alaska and several European 
countries, and to British Columbia. Speaking generally it may be 
said that the hardware business has grown in a very uniform man- 
ner, and that continued progress may be looked for, orders at thii 
date being reported very n 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP ST. IX)TJIB. 48; 

Woodenware is another line in wliif^h Bt. Louis is almost n'ithoulT 
n wmpetitor. Reports from the lar^st woodeuware establishments 
in tbe world iiidicat« that there htis been a marked increase of trade 
in every direction in 1895 over preceding years. Very little new ter- 
ritOTy has been entered, as traveling men have for some years covered 
every State west of the Alleghanies to the Pacific coast. In a 
eoutberlj direction St. Louis shipments are made regularly right 
through into Old Mexico and the Latin-American republics gener- 
ally. There have been no new houses established in the city in this 
line, but those already in business have all done well A new fac- 
tory has been established during the year for the manufacture ot 
bucket pumps, the concern having changed its base of operatiouB to 
Si. Louis in consequence of the marked facilities for the distribution 
of woodenware and similar goods from this city. 

In manufactured tobacco St. Louis still easily leadsall other cities. 
There are about 9,000 people actually employed in the local tobacco 
factories, and it is interesting in this connection to note that the 
nages earned in this line of business are exceptionally high. One 
new factory, with a capacity of about 2,000,000 pounds a year, was 
opened during 1805 and further additions are contemplated which 
will make the total product of plug tobacco in St, Louis about ser- 
entj-flve per cent, of that of the entire nation. The annual sales al- 
ready exceed $30,000,000, and of this immense sum of money a very 
large proportion is distributed among the people of the city. The 
tobacco war which haa attracted attention throughout the entire 
country, haa had quite a favorable influence upon St. Louis trade. 
The Tobacco Trust has purchased one' of our large factories during 
the year and is putting in a large amount of capital in increasing its 
capacity. Cigarette manufacturing has been started during the 3'ear 
on a wholesale plan, and about half a millioa dollars has been in- 
vested in cigarette plants. It isreportedthat both the capitalinvested 
and the output will he largely increased during the current year. 
Reference is made in another article to the fact that St. Louis haa 
the largest brewery in the world. This fact has been so frequently 
stated that its repetition is almost superfluous. There has been 
about the average increase in the beer brewing capacity for the 
year and the exceptionally large breweries have all held their own. 
St, Louis Js the first city from which beer was shipped in refrigera- 
tor cars, and the business built up with countries where the climate 
is too hot to make brewing practicable is steadily on the increase. 
As far as can be ascertained there are about fifty more-exclusive 
agencies for St. Louis beer at the present time than there were a year 
ago, and these are scattered over a very large area. 

la the manufacturing of chemicals, St. Louis is a great deal ahead 
ot any other city, and In the wholesale drug and proprietary medicine 
basiness it stands second only to New York. The amount ot capital 
invested in this business has been increased considerably during the 
year, although the amalgamation of two houses has somewhat re- 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OP BT. LOUIB. 46 

verj large, and has beoii Increased duriog the year by the removal 
here of four eetablishmentsi one from Omaha and others from Cincin- 
nati. At the present time negotiations are in progreaa which will 
probably retult in two other clothinff establishments of ma^itude 
removing to this city, and an interesting' race between the shoe and 
clothing trades may be loolced for. In the manufacttnre of jeans, St. 
LoniH ranks flrst in the country. 

The jobbing bnsincss in hats and caps haa been very satiaf actory 
during the year. St. Louis is the largest market in the United Slates 
for soft felt hats. The amount of capitAl invested in the hat and cap 
business has been increased eonsiderably and the territory covered 
is also much greater in extent. There have been no important addi- 
tions to the number of housea in this line of business, but there have 
been reorganizationa calculated to increase the output. 

The furniture and grocery trades are both reported in detail else- 
where and of the remaining lines of business, few calls for excep- 
tional comment. It has been a year generally of recovery from de- 
pression without special events of marked importance. It was 
rumored during the year that some of our iai^^at street car factories 
intended to move East. In view of the pre-eminence of St. Louis as 
a hard-wood lumber market, and its reputation during the last 
qnarter of a century for street car building, this was regarded as very 
improbable and it has since developed that our leading bouses pro- 
pose to establish branches in the East but to do the bulk of their 
manufacturing here as hitherto. One additional company has been 
JDCorporated during the year for the mannfacture of street cars and 
St. Louis continues to lead all other cities in this line of business, 
retaining the position In this respect which it held in the old days 
when diminutive horse cars were in general demand. 

In the manufacture of st«am railroad cars and in railroad supplies, 
the volume of'bnsinesa has been large. The same spirit of econ- 
omy prevails among railroad managers, and there have not been such 
e.Tceptionally large orders received as was the case three or four 
years ago, when so many roads were opening up new branches. The 
aggregate of buaines is computed to have been from five to ten per 
cent, better than 1894. New territory haa been entered and aome ad- 
ditional roads of considerable size have been added to the list of reg- 
ular costomers. 

In t»ndy and crackers the trade has been well maintained with In- 
crease in certain lines. Competition here has been somewhat re- 
stricted and a more satisfactory return has been made in conse- 

In the shot business there has been a great Increase during the 
year. It having been proved that the work can be done here more 
economically than in other cities, there has been a concentration at 
this point and a great increase in the daily output. Forseveral years 
it faafl been predicted that the settlement of the Western country and 
dimintiltion of the amount of game, and hence hunting, must inevi- 



,db,GoOglc 



46 TRADE AND COUUBRCE OP 

tably greatly reduce the demand for shot. Bo far this predictioD 
has not prevailed. St. Louis coatinuea t« have the largest shot lower 
in the world and buBlness has been active every day Id the jear. 

White lea^ is another industry in which St. Louie has alwajt been 
well to the front. It has the largest white lead factory in the vorld 
and mannfacturea more of this article than any other city. Tbe vol- 
ume of trade shows an increase in excess of the arerage. It has been 
practically impossible to increase the area of territory covered bj 
sales, which have for several years been general through Uie entire 
oountry. 



GROCERIES. 



w ol the "Intentate Gro 



As has been our annual custom for many years, we present an an- 
nual review of the St. Louis grocery market for the year 1895, vrilh 
comparative statistical figures, from the reports of the Merchants' 
Exchange as contrasted with 1894 and 1893: 

Trade for 1895 In groceries at wholesale in St. Louis has in genera] 
volume of distribution been about the same as that of 1894. Goods 
have been exceedingly cheap and the ag-gregate of sales In dollars and 
cents has possibly been no larger than in 1B94, neither have the pro- 
fits of business with wholesale grocers been of a satisfactory charac- 
ter, but the feeling is cheerful and the outlook for the new year is 
promising. 

However, though wholesale grocers of St. Louis may have profited 
to but a small degree during 1895, there seems to be a feeling of sstis- 
faction on their part, which is generally expressed, that they have 
served their customers well and that their retail patrons have ob- 
tained some advantage from conditions. This, however, is a rather 
fictitious basis of congratulations, for the true philosopby of all com- 
mercial transactions is that both buyer and seller should benefit 
thereby; and in transactions where one of the parties obtains no re- 
muneration for the services rendered, there may be a temporary ben- 
efit to the other party, but such conditions always result indirectly to 
the disadvantage of the trade at large. 

STATISTICS. 

The statistics of receipts and shipments, as compiled by the Mer- 
chants' Exchange, are used in the following comparisons of the busi- 
ness of the market for 1895 in the grocery line: 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 47 

SITQAR9. 

Barrels. Ba^. Hhds. 

Beceipts, 1895 419,703 331,848 3,12T 

SeceiptB, 1895 453,439 377,840 1,970 

Shipments, 1895 330,778 2S5.780 1.780 

ShipmentB, 1894 419,121 233,964 1,422 

It is hereby seen tli&t although there was a large fruit crop in sec- 
tioQS tribntary to St. Louis the output of sugsjs was diBapp<^t- 
lug and that there hna been a email decrease in the volume of ship- 
mente. This is the case, howeTer, with ail the marketa of the United 
States to a greater or less extent, and we are informed that the out- 
patof the refineries shows a comparatiTe diminution. All during the 
esrlj part of 1895 a bitter war of sugar prices prevailed and though 
the wholesale grocers lost money, the retail grocers were given good 
Taloe, but even this condition does not seem to have had the effect 
of stimulating sales to any important extent, and it is quite probable 
that the decrease of soles in sugar la directly attributable to 
that cause, as many wholenale houses not only declined to 
pnah sales, but pursued a policy of refusing orders for sugar when 
sold at a loss, and sales were thereby greatly restricted. This goes to 
prove that, after all, the general policy of the trade is becoming set- 
tled as to an indisposition to do business in sjiy article on which a 
profit cannot be made. However, sugars are now being sold in St. 
Louis on the Equality Plan and every one seems to be well satisfied. 
We therefore predict an increased trade in that line for 1S96. 

OOFFEEH. 

Statistics show a very healthy and satisfactory increase in this 
line and are as follows: 

1895. 1S94. 1893. 

Bcceiptfl, sacks S59,289 246,612 248,347 

Shipments, sacks 304,977 309,407 290,920 

Coffee receipts for 1B95 have been exceeded but once in the past 10 
years — in 1892. It is evident tliat St. Louis has not only maintained 
but increased her reputation as a great coOee-distributing market. 
The discrepancy as to packages shipped and received is explained 
by the fact that cofFee is largely distribtited from St. Louis roasted 
and in packages of irregular sizes. The coftee market during 1895 
has been steady and closed about 1 cent per pound lower than at 
the opening of the year. Santos coffees are being very largely 
used in this market, especially for roasting purposes. Javas have 
advanced from 3 to 4 cents per pound during 1895 and the sale of 
them has been greatly restricted. 

Guatemala and Bogota coffees appear to be growing in favor and 
are rapidly superseding Javae with the public taste. The price of 
&Iexicaii coffees have been almost prohibitive. There seems to be 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



48 TRADE AND COUUBRCB OF 

a grreat competition lietween buyers of Arexican cofTe«s who art 
located in the producing' districts and the struggle betn'MD tbtm 
has put prices of such coffees above the views of bujers in llie 
United States as based an their value. A large part of the Guatemslui 
crop goes to San Francisco for use on the Pacific Coast, thoafh in 
Bouthem Guatemala, a railroad being completed, the crop dov 
goes E^t, it however, reaches the United States via AmfiUrdion. 
As the crop is practically controlled by Dutch capitalists, tbis in- 
creases the cost to the people of the United States and renders it 
an uncertain product to handle, for though it is bought on gradingi 
yet it is subject to appraisement at New York after its arri™l ai 
that port. 

The output of the cofCe-roastIng establishments in St Louia lias 
increased, during 1895, from IS per cent, to 20 per cent, and facilitits 
have been increased. 

The war betn'eon large roasters of package coffee whicli hsi 
prevailed during the year and which still continues has preceated 
a larger increase in the roasting business, and as such coffees hnie 
been during the year and still are beiDg sold at about cost, bj 
retailers and Jobbers, this policy has made the price ot package 
coffees very low to consumers and lias injured the busineBs oi 
small manufacturers, who run from one to four roasters. A 
reaction is reported, however, to have set in and the finer grades o{ 
roasted are again being actively inquired for. Betailers who bave 
been selling package coffee at or about cost are again giving atten- 
tion to the more profitable grades of blended bulk roasted coffees. 

GLUCOSE. 



HOLASBES. 

Barrels. Keps. 

Receipts 21,197 3% 

Shipments 71,SS7 2fi,329 

A large proportion of the shipments of molasses consists of 
blended goods, known as "table ayrnp," ai which the base Is glucose 
syrup, and of maple syrup made in this market from tfae maple sugar. 

RICE. 

1805, 189*. 1S93. 

HeceiptB, packages 93,039 66.576 87.9W 

Shipments 62,313 70,254 66,335 

Receipts of rice have been enormously larger than in 189* and 
this is accounted for by the fact that much is being received now in 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



' ST. LOUIS. 



lOfr-pound bags or pockets, a new packa^ taking about three to the 
burel, which was formerly handled. 



The trade in teas has Torled but little from previous seasons and 
seems to maintajn about the same volume as In preceding seasons. 
The number of honses handling this article has increased somewhat 
In a year or so past, but the result has been division of the trade 
rather than an extension of its volume. 

CAKMED GOODS. 

The country at large has not consumed canned goods during 1895 
as in the previous year and the trade in St. Louis has probably fol- 
lowed the course of the general market. We copy from the "Ameri- 
can Qrocer" statistics of the tomato pack for ISS9, of which an ad- 
vanced proof was kindly furnished us, as follows; 



TOMATO PACK. 

The sixteenth annual report of the "American Oroeer," showing 
the total pack of 1895, in comparison with the output of previous 
years, demonstrates that an earnest and successful effort has been 
made to bring supply and demand into their proper relation. The 
acreage was reduced in nearly e^ery tomato-packing State and this, 
coupled with unfavorable iveather, a delayed season and early clos- 
ing, resulted in a pack of 3,844,780 cases, against 6,686,979 cases in 
1S94 — a reduction of 2,84S,199 cases, or 421/1 per cent. 

A careful study of the output for three years indicates that under, 
normal conditions the annual requirements of the United States 
are amply met by a pack of 4,500,000 cases — in fact, the actual con- 
samption has not reached that quantity. The total output in three 
years — 1393 to 1S9S — was 15,166.942 cases— a yearly average of 
5,059,647 cases. Had not this supply been beyond requirements, 
the market would have advanced. The fact that prices throughout 
the year have ruled comparatively steady, at or below the cost of 
production. Is sufficient evidence that the output has l>een enough 
greater than requirements to keep the market down. The law of 
supply and demand is inexorable and if the former ia below the 
latter, it is inevitable that prices improve. They have not advanced 
and the conclusion must be reached that invisible stocks are lai^r 
than estimated. 
The total output in 1895 and 1804 (revised to include districts not 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COUHERCE OF 



894 9,686,979 

4,635,183 

1892 3,366,782 

3,405,365 

3,166,177 

3,976,76! 

3,343,137 

2.81T/H! 

Total (or nine years 34,242,2!6 

Average per year 3,804,6« 

Average per years 1864 and 1895 5,265,879 

The Eastern com market does not improve at alt. Cheap, low- 
grade Harford County com can now be bought as low as at any time 
for months past, and this naturally aflects the values of the better 
grades, which otherwise would probably be in a stronger position. 

The situation of canned com In the West is very similar to the con- 
dition prevailing in the Eastern markets. Purchases have been 
reported recently of a few large blocks of cheap com by jobbers who 
have faith in the future of the market, but the rank and file of both 
wholesale and retail trade are not disposed to place their confidence 
in com, certainly not to the extent of being heavy purchased. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THB CITY OF BT. LOUIB. 



GROCERIES. 

RECEIPTS AND BHIPMENTB OF BCGAB FOE TWENTY YEARB. 





™„™. 


..™.K» 




HhdB. 


Bblc 


Boies. 


Big. 


Hbds. 


BblB- 


BlgB. 




H 

Is 
ii 

B.aw 

ss. 
re 


338.2W 

11 

mass 
«e.iD3 




"iH 

1 

IS 


ii 

11, HS 

1 


S 

1,153 

ii 
l| 
si 

S.S1(I 


g:S 

4IS.4^ 

IIS 

JS8,!ei 

sis 

281,061 

ii 

238. wo 
23a.2T« 














ImISm 






tit,B4a 
























!!'S 














I87( 


43,TGB 





-0.,A«™. 


co™. 


..or 


,^^ 


K-CZIP^. 


..™.„. 


B«™, 


SB.P. 


BECTB, 


BHtP. 




Bble. 


»,> 


Hhda. 


Bbli. 


Kegi^ 


B.g«. 

Z9B,I8S 
24&812 
248 S47 
2a5.D»8 

S:S 

1BZ,M0 
272,119 

ii 

201 .080 
1117,099 
1 191.M3 


304,977 
309:407 
290,920 

^:aio 

1W,«gZ 
2£S,5a3 

S;S 

199.198 

iSg 

154,842 

ii 

1»,BM 


Pkga. 




IS 

sa.40a 

34,371 

er'.eoa 

21.234 


30S 
M6 

ii 

ti,sso 

2j!223 

ss 
'■i 


"a 

■"12 
US 


71.587 

IS 

i 

24.141 

. 60,430 
74,000 

11 

28 524 

2«:kb 


if, 

38.133 

ii 

4e.3H 

i 

117,678 

II 


Ii 

M 
s 

la 


^^ 






ma 


71 — 










































I«80 


w 




; 


im 





RlCriFTSTSA.. 


..''■Ii';.... 


PkES. 

.. ..28.M7 


Teftr. 
1894.... 


34,050 




































" ': 


...1888 


43.920 





,db,GoOglc 



TRAXIB AND COMMERCE OP 



STOVES AND HARDWARE. 



From ''Stores aad Hardir&re Reportar." 



HARDWABE. 

The wholesale hardware trade of St. Louib hae made an excellent 
record duria^r the past year. 

Expressed io dollars and cents, the business done by the wholeMie 
hardware houses has amoanted to about S12,S00,(M)0 the past Jf- 
Let it be clearly understood what these figures represent. Thej' re- 
fer to the sales of the general hardware houses aloue and do not in- 
clude heavy hardware, excepting' such as is carried by the bousea In 
question in the way of bolts and nuts, etc., and does not include bar 
iron, carriage material or any estimate of the busincM 
of the heavy hardware houses. Two of the hardnire 
houses whose business is Included in this estimate hsre 
handled sheet and galvanized iron and tin plates the pa^l 
year, while they did not do ao in 1894. Two handle bicycles, and whila 
they did so in ise4 have expanded their lines during: 1895. The fig- 
ures given show an increase of about 20 per cent, over 1894, about half 
of which is represented in the greater quantity of goods sold and hall 
to increased values. If to this Ggure is added the value of goods oF 
St. Xioais factories in the hardware lines (tin, stamped and granite 
ware, various specialties, etc..) above those distributed through the 
local jobbing houses, the total will be increased to probably tl5,0W, 
000. 

BICyOLE8:ASD SPOETINO GOODS, 

St. Iiouis has the reputation of being the (greatest sporting goods 
market in the world. 

Itoughly estimated, the sporting goods trade the past year has 
amounted to at least $8,000,000. The increase over the business oE 
1894 Is about 25 per cent. As there has been little advance in values. 
this increase has been almost entirely in the actual quantity of goods 
sold. Thesalesof bicycles, which are included in the above estimate, 
are placed at $1,500,000, on increase of 50 per cent, over 1894, 



WIRE AND NAILS. 

The sales for the year are estimated at $2,000,000, repreeenting an 
increase of about 25 per cent, over the previous year, oving entirelj 
to higher prices. Manufactured wire goods show an increase oE 
about 10 per cent, over 1894 and is given at about $600,000. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OP ST. LOUIS. 58 

HEAVY HARDTVABE. 

This head inclndee bar and merchant iron and steel, bolta and nut«, 
horseHhoere', blacksmiths' and carriage-makers' supplies. While a 
year a^ jobbers in these lines were Btnigg-ling with a shrinkage in 
ralucB, a largre percentage of aales has been made at greatlj increased 
Tslues and at an enlarged margin of profit. The business in these 
lineH for the year approximates, according to conservative estimates, 
$5,500,000, an increase of 15 per cent, over the former year, and which 
i« dne in about equal proportions to increased values and the quan- 
tity of goods sold. • 

SHEET HETAL8. 

Under the head of sheet metals arc included sheet and galvanized 
iron, tin-plate, sheet and brass and copper. An increase in the quan- 
tity of goods sold has been made and with the exception of tin-plate, 
which has averaged mnch lower in price than in lS9i, transactions 
have been on a higher basis of value for the year. The business done 
in these lines in St. Louis is very extensive and may be estimated at 
$3,000,000, showing an increase of 15 per cent, over 1SS4. Iron and 
steel roofing and siding are a strong feature of the St. Louis sheet 
metal trade and the value of the year's transactions amounts to about 
9700,000. Prices are about 20 per cent, above those of a year ago. 

STOVES AND RANGES, 

A conservative estimate of the sales of cooking stoves, heaters and 
ranges the past year gives a total of $1,450,000, of which fully $1,250,- 
000 were manufactured in St. Louis. These figures show an increase 
of about 25 per cent, over 1894, and, as there lias been no material ad- 
vance in price, they represent that much greater quantity. This 
brings the St. Louis stove business nearly up to the 1892 mark and 
the manufacturers consequently have every reason to be proud of the 
showing. 

GASOLINE STOVES. 

Fifty thousand gasoline stoves were sold In and from St, Louis the 
past year, the aggregate value being about $000,000. This is about 10 
per cent, below the showing of 1MD4, but the reason is not far to seek 
and ia grounded on conditions over which manufacturers and jobbers 
had no control. The price of gasoline doubled early last year, just 
at tbe time when the season's business was opening. This exercised 
a very real effect in reducing sales, and prices have been sKghtJy be- 
low the level of 1894. 

HEATINQ APPARATUS. 

Tlie sales of furnaces and steam and hot water heating apparatus 
bv St. Louis houses has been materially increased the paat year, both 
in St- Louis and outside. Steam heating contracts have been taken 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



OP 

quite « large buMneeB 
s, in all the llne« men- 
■eased, but the compe- 
if steam and hot ■'Bl*r 
the past jear is ati- 



,266,275— A joBBtsc 

JFACTURINO OF (10,- 



eels of industry hii<e 
B or that the clamor of 
s Bhoe jobbing hooKS 
let them rest easy and 
of the great Weslero 
e and that in no eenu 
elve-month just drawn 
leen more than passed 
second only to Boston 
a her and her nearest 
of minor markets left 



eceipts of shoes at St 
'ding' to reports made 
lag St. Louis, to the 
m those containing' iS 
latter are rare, and a 
age. On this b^s do 
'ed in St. Louis dnring 
was tig,594,82S, whictL 
corresponding figures 
ler years, the receipls 
e: 

387,i05 

578,2» 

828,010 

748,219 

783,793 

8TS,93l 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



THE CITY OP BT. LOUIS. B8 

Id the factories there was a much greater activity sbown in 1805 
than in either *94 or *93 and the output of the banner year, 1893, was 
eren exceeded both in number of pairs made and the average value 
per pair- As nearl; as can be estimated the St. Lonia shoe factoiiea 
made 5,760,000 pairs of shoes in 1895. This Is figuring S0,000 pairs a 
day for 48 weeks to the year— a conservative calculation. These flg- 
nree show an increase over the output in '94 of 510,000 pairs. 

Owing to the advances in leather and consequently in shoes and the 
demand for higher grade footwear, the average per pair value of the 
'65 product was materially greater than that of *94, being not less 
than $1.80, at wbicb price the year shows a total of $10,368,000 In man- 
utsctured goods. During the year 1894 the St. Louis shoe factory 
output was valued at $8,663,500; that of 1893, $8,550,000, and tliat of 
1S93 (the banner year heretofore) $9,375,000; thus the 1896 record 
■taods above all others, and marks the higb tide of the St. Louis shoe 
trade up to the present time 

ET. LODIS AS A SHOE UABKET. 

The total shoe trade of St. Louis for the year 1895, aggregating the 
unprecedented sum of $32,266,275, places the market in even a higher 
position than it haa occupied previously. For several years It has 
been accounted as second in magnitude iu the United States, Boston 
being always first, and New York and Chicago dividing third honors. 

Comparative standing is best indicated by the flgrures showing the 
shipments of shoes from Boston to the various distributing markets, 
Boston being In reality the hub of the shoe trade. No more definite 
statistics can be obtained at present, owing to the fact that St. Louis 
is the only one of the chief markets keeping a record of iMot and shoe 
receipts and shipments. The comparative shipments from Boston to 
the principal shoe markets of the country during 1895 were as fol- 

St Loais 594,935 

New York 336,741 

Chicago 395,903 

Baltimore 177,333 

Philadelphia 168,406 

dnclnnati : . 122,549 

Nashville 100,797 

As the figures In the above table indicate, the showing is very cred- 
itable to St. Louis, her nearest competitor being far in the rear. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COUMERCB OF 



THE ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIES OF ST. LOUIS. 



In reviewing' the progrees of the electrical induetiiea of St. Lonia 
for the past year, the moat suggestive fact encountered is that rnanr 
enterprises which a iew years ago were small affairs have boh bt- 
tatned such mognituile oa to require millions of capital for the trans- 
action of their business and employ thousands of workmen. This 
growth has not yet reached its maximum, but with the constantly 
increasing' uecs for electric current we find all engaged in the distri- 
bution of electric cun:«iit for industrial purposes daily adding to the 
capacity of their plants in order to keep pace with the demand. On 
account of the importance of the interests involved and their eon- 
etant growth and progress, a great deal could be written concerning 
them, but the necessity of brevity in this article will allow only a 
short mention of the more important features. 



TELEOBAPH. 

St- Louis is entered by the Western Union and the Postal Telegraph 
Cable Companies, both of which have numerous branch offices 
throughout the city. On account of the immense commercial and 
manufacturing interests located here, the amount of business tranE- 
acted by these companies is enormous, about 35,000 messages being 
transmitted each day. The duple:c and quadruplex systems arc used 
and the lines are charged by dynamos, the antiquated practice of 
battery charging having been abandoned. About 600 persons are 
employed by these interests throughout the city. 



niSTRIOT TELEGRAPBa. 

The district telegraph, messenger and express service of the city, 
including night watchmen and special signals, is operated by sis com- 
panies with about $46,000 invested in the business. There are about 
6,100 call boxes installed throughout the city in offices, factories, 
stores, shops and many in private residences. 

FIRE AND POLICE TELEGRAPH SYSTEM. 

This system Is operated by the city for flre sigrnals and police calls. 
There are 978 signal boxes located throughout the city and the num- 
ber of fire alarms received during the year is about 1,800. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OF ST. L.OUIS. 57 

TELEPHONES. 

Tbe public telephone aystein of the citj is owned by the MisBonri 
Bell Telephone Co., capitalized at $400,000 and employing 230 persons. 
About 4,400 instruments are connected with the atation and the num- 
ber of messages transmitted each day will aTeregre 90,000. 

The telephone service ol the city suffers greatly from the fact that 
the main lines are grounded, the buzzing sounds heard in the tele- 
phone lielng due to induetion from other grounded circuits. Tbts 
can be remedied by abandoning the practice of grounding the circuits 
and nsing a, metallic circuit entirely, but the telephone company very 
naturally hesitates to go to the labor and expense of doubling the 
present number of its overhead wires when it is anxious to place ita 
wires underground whenever given permission to do so, especially as 
there seems to be a probability of this permission being given in the 
near future. Until this is done there la no probability of St. Louis 
having a connection with a long distance telephone, as this is oper- 
ated only on a metallic circuit. It would take only about three 
mouth to continue the long distance line now at Terre Haute to St. 
Louis, and a slight change in the present transmitter would then en- 
able any subscriber of the local company to talk from his ofBce to 
any station reached by the long distance line- 
Besides the public system operated by the Bell Telephone Co., dur- 
ing the past year, a number of private exchanges, possibly to the 
number of 100, have been iuetalled. These are mostly in ofHce build- 
ings, stores, factories, railroad yards, depots, etc., and prove a great 
convenience In communicating from one department to another. 
Some of these exchanges have been installed and are maintained by 
the Bell Telephone Co., while others have been bought outright and 
are operated by their owners. 

ELECTRIC LIQBTING. 

The electric lighting of the city is done by four companies, two of 
■which are under contract for the public lighting of the city. The 
(»pita] invested in the buBinesB is tS,OD0,OO0, while 390 men are em- 
ployed. In lighting the streets and alleys, 2,461 arc lamps and 3,369 
Incandescent lamps of thirty-two candle power each are employed. 
For the public buildings of this city, 73 arc lamps and 4,92G incandes- 
cent, lamps are in use. On the commercial circuit 2,800 arc lamps 
Bud 170,000 incandescent tamps are connected up. A conservatire 
eatiinate of the total number of lamps connected to the circuits of the 
lig-hting companies of this city would be 5,300 arc and 178,000 incan- 



Many of the arc lamp circuits, all of which were formerly operated 
by direct current with the lamps in series, have during the past year 
been changed to operate on alternating current, the lamps being con- 
nected twenty in series between 1,000 volt mains, or forty In series be- 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COMMERCE OF 



tween 2,000 rolt mains. Moat of the commercial are lamps in use are 
run on alternating' current with the lamp in parallel between U« 
mains and on the same circuit as the incandescent lamps. Tbe 
great«r part of the incandescent lighting of the city, both street wd 
commercial, is done by alternating current. 

During the past year several of the lii^hting companies have im- 
proTcd their plants and greatly increased tbeir capacity by installing 
mammothmacblnesof the mast improved type to take the i^sceoF tbe 
smaller machines formerly in use; and the present tendency 
seems to be toward tbe installation of large slow-speed dynunos di- 
rectly connected U> engines, with the ultimate intention of operating 
arc lamps, incandescent lamps and motors from the same msetune 
and, where desirable, from the same circuit. 

Besides the lights furnished by these lighting companies, many ot 
the large ofQce buildings, hotels and factories operate their own 
plants, some on a very extensive scale. The number of lights fur- 
nished by these plants is quite lai^e, and a rough estimate would be 
1,000 arc lamps and 70,000 incandescent tamps. 



ELBCTtCIC POWER. 



There are in St. Louis three companies engaged in the production 
and distribution of current for power purposes. All the motors in- 



stalled up to this time are 
SOO volte potential, though < 
to install motors to run dir 
Two of these companies ha' 
companies, while the third 
in the distribution of powe 
up at the pre Be 
4,500 horse pow 



direct current at either 220 oi 

e company Is now making preparatJoiiB 

;tly from its alternating current maioB. 

already been listed among the lighting 

ith a. capital of $400,000 is engaged onlv 

The power companies have connected 

about 900 motors with an aggregate of about 

This number is rapidly being augmented and the 



power c 



[istantly adding to their stations to suppilf 
ing demand for current, ifost of the motors yet in use 
are small and are used for almost every conceivable purpose. Tbe 
iuBtatlation of some represents entirely new applications of power io 
the arts, while many have replaced small steam plants. One firm en- 
gaged in printing and book-binding has 52 motors In nse. £ach motor 
is mounted directly on the machine it is intended to run and not only 
are all noise, dirt, complication and danger of shafting and belting 
eliminated, but tests have shown that the work is now done with 3D 
per cent, of the power formerly required for the same purpose. Willi 
the introduction of the electric motor for power purposes, there 
comes an interesting question in industrial economy. Small aliopB 
are now enabled to compete with large ones on a power basis, lor 
shops whose business formerly did not warrant the operation of a 
steam plant with the expensive labor required, may now rent their 
power and thus secure a servant, fully as reliable and capable, yet 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OP ST. I-OOI8. 5B 

not requiring the expert and expensive attention ot the old steam 

With the replacement ot email ateam plants by electric motors 
there has been noticed a marked decrease in the amount of emoke in 
the heart ot the city. These small steam plants were often equipped 
with antiquated apparatus and in charge of incompetent men, and 
their exodus will contribute in no small degwe toward the abatement 
of the amoko nuisance. 



STREET RAILROADS. 

With the advent of the year 1896, there has vanished one of the his- 
toric landmarks of St. Louis. No longer does the modest mule with 
his bobtail car behind him wend his weary way along Jefferson Ave., 
but in his place elegantly equipped -motor cars now bowl along that 
busy thoroug-hfare. This change completes an epoch in the railway 
history of the city, for with the exception of 33.78 miles of tj-ack op- 
erated by cable power, there is now no street ear in the city of St. 
Louis not propelled by electric traction. Including the track con- 
struction now in progress, there are within the city limits 374.61 miles 
of electric single track and outside of the city limits, but connecting 
vrith city lines, 34.81 miles of single track, making a total mileage of 
300.42 miles of single track operated by electric power. 

During the year 1B05, 102,997,T72 passengers were carried, showing 
a gain of 8.19 per cent, over 95,201,770 carried in 1894. The total 
amount of money invested In the street railroads of this city in capital 
stock and bonded indebtedness is $37,000,00 and about 3,900 men ar« 
employed in the business. There are eleven electric railway com- 
panies operating seven power houses of an aggregate output of 2E,000 
horse power. From these power houses 650 motor cars receive their 



l>uring the year two new roads, the Grand Ave. and the South- 
western, have t>een put into service. An ext«nsiou of the Union De- 
pot line on Arsenal Street to Clifton Heights aud an extension of the 
Northern Central on Natural Bridge Koad to Kings Highway have 
been boilt. At the time the Jefferson Ave. line whs converted into 
an electric road, it was extended on the north as far as the Fair 
Grounds. The Citizens' Koad, formerly a cable line, has had its nio- 
tive power cbanged to electricity and now runs through on Easton 
Ave. to tJie city limits. The Taylor Ave. road is now running south 
on Euclid Ave. as far as Manchester Koad. The Forest Park and 
Clayton Boad, which has been built for several years, has during the 
past year been put into operation. Work is now in progress on the 
construction ot a road to Webster, Kirkwood and Meramec High- 
lands, beginning at the southeast comer of Forest Park, and it is ex- 
pected soon to have the road in operation. Work is also being done 
on a line along Manchester Road to Webster, and a road running from 
the southern end of the city to Jefferson Barracks is contemplated. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



so 



TRADE ANDCOMMBBCB OP 



During the past year the Southern Electric Eallnay Co. began 
running its cars over the tracks of other roads as far north as How- 
ard Street. The Fourth Street and Arsena) Hailway, for Beveral 
years dormant, has recently begiin to relay its old track in prepara- 
tion for operation by electricity, and expects to continue north as 
far as Carr Street. The total new construction, counting in the work 
now under headway and nearly completed, has during the past jear 
been 23.55 miles within the city and 19,2T tuilee outside of the city. 

It will be seen that, with the exception of the Southwestern, and 
the Fourth Street and Arsenal roads, none of these new lines run to 
the heart of the city, their purpose being to connect existing roads 
and to reach out into unoccupied territory. There has 'been a gnti 
development in suburban roads and with the work now in progress 
moat of the surburban towns will be directly connected with the cen- 
ter of the city by electric roads. 

Most of the large systems have adopted the practice of giving 
transfers to any of their connecting lines and it is now possible tD 
reach almost any part of the city for a single fare. It should be 
stated that the adoption of the transfer system was entirely volnn- 
tary on the part of the street railway companies. It was not a mat- 
ter of legislation and no concessions have been made to the railroad 
companies on account of the granting of transfers. As an illiutra- 
tion of the extent to which this Bystent-has grown, a very conserva- 
tive estimate of the Tnjml>er of transfers granted is 45,000 each day. 
This means that on the roads issuing transfers, SS.6 per cent, of tlie 
total number of paRsengera, or nearly one passenger out ol every 
four receives and uses a transfer. 

In regard to the apparatus employed, while no startling innova- 
tions have been introduced, many changes of existing methods have 
been made to insure greater continuity and regularity of service ani" 
greater safety and comfort to passengers. The installation of mam 
moth direct connected dynamos and engines, the welding of rail 
joints, and the introduction of electric heaters, are some of the more 
strikinginstances which may be cited. St. Louis has long been noted 
as a city of progressive and level-headed railroad men and it is s- mat- 
ter of just pride, that a great portion of the innovations and improve- 
ments in apparatus, rolling stock, track and general railway prac- 
tice, now in almost universal use, have had their origin and passed 
through esperimentnl stages in this city. 

As an example of the infallibility of the service rendered, it may 
be stated that in one power house in the city, supplying current far 
almost ISO cars, the wheels have not ceased their motion and current 
has not been off the buss-bars for one second, night or day, during 
the last nine months. 

The trolley wire itself, once considered so deadly, has come to be 
regarded as conmionplace. Breaking of the wire ia now quite infre- 
quent, due to the improved construction of overhead lines, and when 
breaks do occur, no harm is done, as most of the large power house* 



11^ 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OP BT. LOUIS. 



61 



are now supplied with antomatic deyicee b^ which the current is im- 
mediatelj cut off the broken section, the moment the trolley wire 
Etrikes the ground. 

Attached to this report will be found a table showing the mileage 
of the different street railroad Bystems of the city and county. This 
table Includes the track construction now actually in progreee. In 
the case of some of the new roods it was difficult to arrive at their 
exact length, and their mileage has been approximated. Where one 
road DRes the tracks of another, the mileage has been credited to 
tbe road owning the tracks. 



ST. LOUIS STREET RAILROAD MILEAGE. 

(CITV AND county), JAN. 13, 1896. 



iNCLUDiiKi Track Conbtructioii Now n 





Within CItj Limits. 


Ouulde 


Total 




Cable. 


Electric. 


Tracli. 




10-10 
9-00 

14-62 


74-6B 
0-78 
69-09 

1-66 

8-40 
16-98 

16-67 
18-14 

10-S8 

84-47 
16-86 
14-13 
6-97 

0-07 


10-00 
2-74 

10-60 

9-37 
3-30 

8-00 




Florissant Avenue Railway 


0-76 


St. Louis & Kirknood Railway 




Forest Park & Clayton Railway.. 


4-80 


Fourth St, & Arsenal Rtulway 












St Lonia & Suburban Railway... 
Manchester Road Railway 


38-64 






Cass Ave. & Fair Grounds R'y. . . 


84-47 






Jefferson Avenue Railway 

St. Looia County R'y (horse) .... 
Delmar & Clayton Railway 


6-97 
8-00 

0-07 








88-78 


274-61 


87-81 


346-20 







Total Cable Track 88-78 

Total Electric Tracks (inside and outside City limits) 800-43 

Total Horse Roads [outside city limits)...: B-00 

Total Miles^ (including construction now in progress) 846-30 

Total New Construction in 189S (including construction now in 

progress) 43-88 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COMMERCE OF 



ELECTKIO MANOFACTCRBS. 



Pre-eminently fl maniifaeturin}!: center, St. Louin in forging rapidly 
to the front in her electric manufactureB. Several cotnpaDies located 
here are engra^d in the manufacture of general electrical supplies, 
while one carbon company has become famous for the superiorit}' of 
Its products. There ia probably $350,000 invested in the manufftcture 
of materials for the electric trade. Of the Tarious articles manuisc- 
tured, one comjmny has acquired a national reputation for the effi- 
ciency of the transformers bearing its name, while another makes a 
specialty of an Ingfenious fan motor, large numbers being sold all 
over the country. 

Besides the companies making general electrical supplies, there are 
in St. Louis three companies engraved in the manufacture ol incan- 
descent lamps. The capital invested in this business Is abonl 
$250,000 and about 200 persons are employed. The capacity of the 
factories of this city is about 7,500 lamps per day, and besides almost 
entirely supplying the trade of the South and West, large numbers of 
these lamps are shipped to New York, Philadelphia and all the East- 
ern cities, competing favorably with the products of the Easteni 
factories. During the past year a radical change has been mtwie in 
the niunufacture of the filament of incandescent lamps, by sabstitul- 
ing a structural, prepared filament made of chemicals, for the one 
formerly made of carbonized silk, bamboo, or some other flbroua lub- 
Btance. This prolongrs the lite of the lamp and greatly increases its 
efficiency and both Its nniformity and maintenance of candle power. 



ELECTRICAL SUPPLY HOUSES. 

Fourcompaniescarrylngastockwhichmay be estimated at $100,000 
mpply the city and the territory tributary to the city with electriesl 
supplies. St. Louis has always had the trade of the Southwest, bui 
during the past year a great many supplies have been sold through- 
out the West, in territory which has formerly been regarded a« be- 
longing to Chicago. Electric apparatus, having passed through its 
transition stage, is rapidly becoming standardized to such an extent 
that the supply houses can now afford to carry a large Gtock of goo^ 
without fear of their liecoming obsolete on their hands They are 
now taking advantage of this fact and constantly augmenting their 

With the expiration of some of the more important telephone pat- 
ents during the past year, the telephone has become an article of 
trade and several of the supply houses have sold large numbers oC 
these instruments. Many of them are used for private lines, while 
many have gone to equip exchanges in the smaller towns, formerly 
without telephonic facilities. 

In addition to the supply houses, there are several large conwms 
in the city which carry a line of electric light fixtures and which also 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THB CITT OF ST. LOUIS. aS 

contract for the wiring of bntldlng^. Their stock may be eBtimated 
at $200,000. All of the supply houses report a much larger business 
throug'hoiit the year than was experienced during the previous year, 
partly due to the more general use of electric appliances and partly 
to the increased territory which the city is now supplying. 

ELEOFBIO WIBINO. 

There are several firms in the city which do a large business in the 
wiring of buildings for electric lights. This business is in a great 
measure dependent upon the building trades, but it should be a mat- 
ter of congrstulatJon that all the important work done in the city last 
year w^s performed by local companies, and that the workmanlike 
and artistic manner in which some of this work was executed has 
been a source of universal comment among those competent to judge. 

8TBEET CAB HANDFACTOBIGS. 

Among ber other electrical interests, St. Lonia ia not«d for her 
street car factories. Four companies capitalized at $1,500,000 and 
employing 1,800 men make this city the largest street car manufac- 
turing point in the world. During the past year 2,600 electric cars 
and 79 cable cars were manufactured as compared with 2,300 cars in 
the previona year. 

UNDEBOBOOKD TCISEB. 

On account of its important bearing on the electrical industries of 
thecityas well as the universal public interest in the matter, it would 
be well to state the present condition of the underground situation. 

A general ordinance formerly gave the Board of Public Improve- 
ments authority to issue permits for wires to be placed overhead or 
untier ground. Ordinance So. 18,157 repealed that portion of the for- 
mer ordinance relating to underground wires, and the condition in 
which the matter stands is that no one now has authority to grant 
permisBion for underground conduits, not even to those companies 
operating under State Charters giving them the right to place their 
wires nndergronnd. An ordinance has been drafted by the Super- 
visor of City I^bting by which all wires between Second and 
Twenty-Second Streets and between Cair and Poplar Streets are to be 
forced underground, authorizing the Board of Public Improvements 
to grant permits, approve plans on application, and compel the re- 
moval of all overhead wires in the district. Until this ordinance or 
one equivalent to it is passed by the Municipal Assembly, all work in 
tbia direction is at a standstill. 

The St. Louis Subway Co. in 1889, acting on a permit issued by the 
Board of Fublio Improvementa, built about a mile of conduit in the 
busiiieas part of the city. After having been for a long time unused, 
tbe Postal Telegraph Cable Co. during the past year rented a portion 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COMMBRCB OF 



of the conduit on Broadway and placed tbeir wires thereiD. Up to 
the preBent time these are the only undergrround wires in the eity. 
cities in the United States in electrical rnatt«rB. In arc lifhlio^. in 
altematinff current lig-htinfr and in electric street railroad practict, 
Bhe has set a pace which other municipalities hare difBcuIty in fol- 
lowing. Much of the early experimenting was done here and msnj' 
of the devices and methods first brought Into use In St. Louis )a.n 
been adopted as standard. Besides the industries already eIlmIle^ 
ated others are continually introduced. Constant experimenfine (or 
the improvement of the service is being performed by all engaged in 
electric enterprises, and workmen are continually being educated 
and trained in the new methods which are daily being developed. 
All of our electrical enterprises have been the fruit of only a tev 
years grafting, and the wonders which are now so familiar as lo hat 
become commonplace, were regarded only a few years ago, to be as 
chimerical as the alchemist's dream. 



DRY GOODS. 

From "81. Loul* Drr Qooda Beporter." 



The year 189i will go into history as a very profitable and success- 
ful one for the dry goods jobbing trade of St. Louis. 

As to volume of business transacted, St. Louis has distributed mow 
dry goods than ever before in the history of the trnde, not evt^p except- 
ing the famous j'ear of 1892. The retailers' stocks had dwindled very 
low after the panic of 1893, and when the spring of J895 began, the re- 
tail trade found their shelves comparatively bare of stock, so that 
they were free purchasers. 

In every department in the jobbing trade, business has been active. 
The sale of staples has been immense, owing to the fact of a con- 
stantly appreciating market. 

In woolen goods the season has been up to any preceding year. 
The disturbance over values on account of the changes in the tatill 
and the prices made by importers did considerable to make the mar- 
ket irregular during the whole year. Even at present in heafj 
woolens there is much uncertainty as to the future course of the 
market. 

In dress goods the year's trade has been phenomenal. It was diffi- 
cult to get sufftcent stocks of desirable fabrics to supply the tnit, 
and this was especially true of all classes of plaid fabrics. Pricet 
have ruled remarkably steady and the season will go into history 
as one of the best ever known in this market. 

White goods, also, have had a remarkable sale and there has been 
a firm and steady market during the whole of 1895. On some classes 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP ST. LODI8. 65 

ol cotton fabrics, advances were made to correspond vrith the in- 
creased cost of raw cotton. In tMa feature of the baaineoa, forei^ 
fabrics cut a very large figure and prices ruled about tbe same as the 
Tear preceding. Managers of the white goods departments are 
yearly adding more fancy goods which has the effect of greatly stim- 
olating sales. 

The notion departments in St. Louis houses exceeded their recotd 
of a year ago, showing that retailers have closely disposed of this 
class of goods. It Is somewhat difficult to write strictly of notiona, 
as many of the departments carry linea such aa hoaiery, oil cloths, 
etc., which are not distinctly classed as notions. Those who handled 
holiday goods, had a remarkable rush during the cloaing of the yeftr 
and stocks have been completely cleaned ont. 

Perhaps the brightest spot in all the departments has been the 
fiimishing goods. From the opening of the year until its close, there 
ba» been a trade in furnishing goods the like of which has never 
been seen in this market. In hosiery and underwear, especially, the 
trade has been at least 35 per cent, greater than ever before. During 
the year St. Louis has made a special record in the hosiery line and 
her leading brands now equal or excel anything placed on the mar- 
ket in this coimtry. 

Summed up as a whole, the year's trade haa been exceedingly aat- 
isfactory. Not only was the volume of business increased in the old 
territory, but much new businets lias been gained from Iowa, Ne- 
braska aad Kansas. More goods have been sold in theae States than 
ever before and the indications are that the coming year will see 
still more merchants from the Northwest coming to this market. 
They are getting their eyes opened to the fact that they can purchase 
to better advantage her* than in any other market in the United 
Stales, East of the Mississippi, also, there have been many gains 
in Kentucky, Tenneseee and Northern Alabama. 

As to the total jobbing bualneae of St. Louis foir 1895, the amount la 
somewhere between $35,000,000 and $40,000,000. The exact figures 
are imposaible to obtain, as jobbers do not care to give their sales for 
publication. We know enough of the volume of sales, however, to 
state that the above estimate is still within the bounds of facts. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COMMERCE OF 



FURNITURE. 



By Geo. T. Fkrker, a«ctetary St. Loula Furniture Bokrd olTrmde. 

Early in tlie year 1895 the furniture and kindred interests realiJfd 
a alight revival. The stocks of country merchants were very low and 
the panic clouds having rolled away to a considerable extent, con- 
aumers' orders were liberally forwarded. In June an ezcellent busi- 
ness commenced and lasted until the fall montha, when the demuid 
assumed a normal condition. The latter months were only fair, 
with n special activity, however, at holiday times. 

In July an advance in prices on many of the manufactured goo3s 
took place. Stocks on hand having been disposed of in the spring 
trade, the factories found the new goods coating them more bj 
reason of advances in raw materials — mirrors, iron, etc., and an ad- 
vance was necessary, which, in a general way, amounted to about 10 
per cent. A concession granted by the railroads in the Western 
freight rates classification, especially applicable to carloads, was 
taken quick advantage of by the larger buyers, and in no prerioaa 
year had ao many carload shipments been made. This rush of bnd' 
nees in the early summer stocked up merchants so that their de- 
mands for fall were comparatively light. 

An estimate of the gross business is $17,000,000, manufactureis, 
jobbers and retailers. The factories produced about S5,'D(}0,000. This 
is a gratifying increase over 1694, and when the great shrinkage in 
prices from those of but two or tliree years back is considered, the 
volume of business was very large. 

A feature of the year was the appearance on the market of SouUitni 
buyers, who had purchased little or nothing for two years. There is 
a greater cultivation^of the trade of Iowa, Nebraska, Colorado, aod 
Northwestern States. The improvement of railroad connections has 
BEsisted in this, as well as the reaching-out policy of our furniture 
houses. Very many points wltich have been persistently drtmuned 
by other cities, no better located, have found that they can boy as 
well in St. Louis, and they give us the preference. 

The shipments in volume to Mexico and Central America ha^c 
about doubled over the previous year. This has excited much inter- 
est in these export markets, and more genuine effort is being mode 
for this trade than ever before, with most satisfactory results. Tbe 
foreign merchants have freely visited this market, and made put- 
chases, which, vrith the rapidly improving railroad facilities and the 
already greatly improved Gulf steanier service, gives them qnick de- 
livery and enables more frequent orders than from Kuropeau markets. 
Inquiries are being received from European markets, as well as from 
African and Australian, and lines of mantifacture of this marfcei 
suitable for export have been listed with all the world's consuls, that 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP BT. LOUIB. 87 

an experiment may be tried in this direction. The success of other 
la^e furniture markets in exporting to European markets have in* 
aUgsted this »t«p. 

Tlie quality of work from onrtactoriee continues to improve in 
deai^ and finish, while St. Iiouls is the world's greatest producer of 
eafefi, wardrobes, tables, etc., of a low grade, and brings custom from 
tlie Atlantic to the Pacific for these special lines; it is also becoming 
tsTorably known for its bett«r makes of goods. 

There is still a most advantageous opportunity for a large factory 
for high-g^rade cabinet work of the best designs, inasmuch as several 
million of dollars per annum now goes to other Diarkets for goods, 
the woods of which are purchased here, — the greatest hardwood lum- 
ber market of the world, and afterwards the manufactured article 
is broaght back. Capital invested here would save to dealers and 
consumerB the donble freight which ifi now a part of the cost of the 
goods. 

St. Louis is a point deficient in the making of school desks, opera 
chairs and church chairs, for of these much used articles there is a 
great demand. The last letting of the Public School Board tor desks 
was for nearly ?10,000, and they were ready to favor home manufac- 
ture. Capital could be well invested in all of these lines. 

The factories during the year have been kept busy; there have been 
DO new factories erected, but some additions to the old. A new manu- 
factory of upholstery and mattress hair is of the year's creation, and 
met with immediate success. 

The 4,000 employes in the furniture factories have been kept quite 
steady at work, and there have been no strikes. Car furniture has 
continued to be a large industry— Hhipmeuta are bounded only by 
the globe, as all parts of the world are purchasers of this product. 
The reputation of the fumisherB of the Union Station has brought 
to the city large orders for furnishing other stations, even to the At- 
lantic coast. The new St. Joseph (Mo.) Union StaUon is the last to 
receive its fittings. 

Greater territory is being covered by traveling salesmen than here- 
tofore, and the catalogrnes used as auxiliaries are the largest sent out 
by firms of any cities, covering a greater variety of articles suitable 
for grenerail store trade, and for exclusive dealers as well. 

In July the National Convention of Ketail Dealers met in this city, 
upon the invitation of the Furniture Board of Trade and the Eetail 
Dealers' Association, who hospitably entertained them. 

Among' the furniture markets St. Zx>uis for 1809 stands as one of 
the moat prosperous, and it is considered there is a decided gain as 
a market and ntanufacturiug center. This is a marked contrast with 
the b«de of another well-known city, whose Board of Trade has ap- 
pointed a special commftt£e of inquiry to investigate the causes of 
the decline in their furniture manufacturing industry. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COMMERCE: OF 



ST. LOUIS MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS. 



Prom tbe report of the Comptroller. 



COSDITION OP THE TREASURY. 

The balance in the Treasury at the close of the fiscal year, Apcil 
8, 1895, was SS ,338,799.76. Adding to this the amousts due on bc- 
count ot "Opening' Streets — Special Fund," "Changing Street Gr»des 
— Special Fund," "Street Sprinkling — Special Fund," "BonleTBidB— 
Special Fund," and "Street Improvements," aggregating f3n,lM^ 
makes the total resources of the Treasury, at the close of the fiscal 
year, $2,665,904.11. 

Deducting the aggregate of balances standing to the credit ot 
special funds and accounts, there remains at the end of this ye«r u 
unappropriated surplus of $376,664.74 belonging to the xeBpectiw 
revenue funds, as follows: 

Interest and Public Debt Revenue $ 81,578 TT 

Municipal Kevenue 182,377 Si 

Wat«r Works Revenue 71,973 94 

Harbor Fund 40.834 52 

$376,664 74 
BONDED DEBT. 

The bonded debt at the close of the fiscal year amounted to $21,DSt.- 
711.55, showing a reduction of $173,01X1 during the year. The out- 
standing debt is composed of $6,111,000 bonds of the late Coontj' of 
St. Louis, $5,808,000 bonds issued for Water Works purposes sod 
S9,105,711.5S of City bonds. 

The bonds which matured during the year amounted to tSt,nt,M 
and were redeemed as they fell due — $70,160 out of the revenue of the 
Sinking Fund, and the remainder out of the proceeds of sale ot 
$2,000,000 of renewal bonds. The renewal bonds are dated June 1- 
1894. due June 1, 1914, and bear interest at the rate of 4 per cent pn 
annum, principal and interest being payable in gold coin of presecit 
standard weight and fineness. The bonds were offered at a public 
letting May 12, 1894, and were sold to Uessrs. Blake Bros. & Co. 
and Alessrs. Vermilye & Co., of New York, on joint bid at lOS.W* 
flat. 

The bonds which mature during the current fiscal ye&r amount to 
$1,352,000. Of this amount $976,000 are provided for b; the Issue ot 
renewal bonds, and $377,000 will be redeemed out of the revenue of 
the Sinking Fund. The renewal bonds of this year are dated Maj L 



sdbvGoO^^ic 



THE CITY OP BT. LODia 



6ft 



1S9S, due Maj 1, 1915, and bear interest at tlie rate of 3.66 per cent, per 
■nnum. principal and interest pRjable in gold coin of present stand- 
ard weight and Hneness. The bonds were offered at a public letting 
and were sold to Mesers, Kuhn, Loeb & Co., of New York, at 103.15 
flat, the best price the Cit j has ever obtained for its bonds. 

The annual interest charges on the debt outstanding April S, 1895, 
amount to $936,459.11, the average rate of interest being 4.454 per 
cent. 

The Cit7 owns its water works, hospitals, insane aaylums and poor- 
bousc, city hcdl, coarthoaee, jail, house of refuge, workhouse, engine 
houses, police stations and public parks. The wat«r works are 
rained at 815,000,000, and all other property belonging to the City 
at tI6,D00,OO0, an aggregate of {31,000,000. 

SINKINO FUND. 

The balance to the credit of the Sinking Fund at the beginning 
of the year was $21,407.15; the revenue of the fund during the year 
amounted to $21S,919.47, making the total available resources $234,- 
SSe.ea. Of this amount the sum of $70,160 was expended in the re- 
demption of maturing bonds not covered by proceeds from the sale 
of renewal bonds, leaving the balance at the end of the year $ld4,- 
066.62. 

The resources of the fund available for the redemption of bonds 
during the current year are estimated at $437,000. Of this amount 
$346,287.50 will be required to meet the maturing bonds of the year 
not otherwise provided for. 

TAXATION. 

The assessed valuation of taxable property for the taxes of 18S5 
amount to $336,463,600, an increase of $16,121,750 over the preceding 

The rates of taxation for City purposes for the year 1S05 remain 
the samo aa for the preceding year, viz.: 





Llmlta. 


BUSi: 


New 
L[mit>. 


For psjmeat of debt aud interest 

For general municipal purposes 


40c. 
»8o. 


40c. 
»8c. 


40c. 
60c. 




$1.88 


•1.88 









,db,GoOglc 



TRADE AND COUM ERCE OF 



COMPARATIVE BUSINESS IN LEADING ARTICLES. 
AT ST. LOUIS FOB 189S, 1S93, 1S94 aod ISOS. 



Digitized bvGoO^^IC 



,db,GoOglc 



,db,GoOglc 



,db,GoOglc 



TBADB AND COUUBRCE OP 



BUILDING IMPROVEMENTS. 



Prepared by J. Uabry Ramdaix, Commissioner of Public Buildings. 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED. 



Hontluk 


No. 


Build logs- 


«.. 


JSz„. 




TouL 


January 

February 


143 
261 
3S6 
341 
99 
230 
24T 
299 
256 
239 
803 
158 

2862 


9 552,696 

523,750 
1,312,029 
1,389.810 

928.537 
1,107,700 

966,296 
2,423,593 

660,081 

844,630 
1,988,865 

693,563 


39 
35 
73 
101 

34 
64 

89 
78 
93 
88 
48 
38 


t 14,975 

10,900 
31,920 
30,344 
186,445 
30,406 
53,689 
31,666 
45,120 
41.8R5 
24,110 
15,290 


$19,330 
20,785 
77,485 
36,670 
50,172 
67,383 
81,781 
42,431 
20,918 
29,714 
15,360 
11,720 


$ 587,001 
ii4.41S 




1,456,8» 


Ma"\v.v.v;;:;: 










Aii^uat 

Soptembet 

October 

November 

December 


2,749.05* 
726.119 
916,249 

2,0Mt,33i 
7»,S73 


Totaia 


$13,390,57(1 


780 


$516,761 


$473,729 


114,381.060 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED FOR TWENTY 
YEARS. 





Brick and 

Bui Id I Hire. 


Bi;K"„. 


Total 
BulldlDn- 


Cost 


1895 

1894 

1893 

1392 

1891 

1890 

1889 

1888 

1887 

1886 

1885 

1884 

1883 

1862 

lafli 

18R0 

1879 

1878 

1877 


2,862 
2.97T 
2,748 
3,496 
8,976 
2,665 
2,453 
2,145 
1,842 
1,733 
2,160 
1,989 
1,881 
1,646 

i,50'7 

1.430 
1.318 
1.677 


780 

876 

1,089 

1,286 

1.459 

1,329 

1,091 

841 

648 

491 

510 

620 

520 

715 

' 347 
534 
369 
438 


3,642 
3,853 
3,837 
4,788 
4,435 
3,994 
3.544 
2,986 
2,490 
2,224 
2,670 
8,609 
2,401 
2,361 
1,966 
1.854 
1.064 
1,687 
2.115 


$14,381,060 
11,844.700 
12,857.667 
16.976,978 
13,259,950 
13,652,700 
9,765,700 
8,029.501 
8,162.914 
7.030,819 
7.376.519 
7.316.685 
7.123.87S 
5,010.554 
4.44«.55S 
3,790,650 
3.821 ,fiSO 
2,579,77? 
3.229.726 



,db,GoOglc 



D„ii„.db,Go(5glc 



TRADE AND COMMERCE OP 



FIRE RECORD FOR 1895. 
As reported by Capt. Ch&s. Evahs, UnderwriWrs' Salvage Corps. 





ON BUILDINGS. 


ON CONTENTS. 






M)ee. 


IHBCBAKCB. 


I.088. 


January 

February 

March 


S291,6TS.0O 
3ei,03S.S9 
268.051.05 
105,189.14 
Z31^S6.36 
192.177.00 
131,S51.O0 
87,754.37 
328,829.64 
303,145.00 
191,470.00 
109,000.00 


126,275 
29,248 
57,047 
39,336 
4.741 
8,986 
8.984 
6,169 
13,443 
13,330 
84.656 
12.631 


ee 

86 
48 
21 
52 
75 
67 
34 
62 
02 
06 
50 


{100,500.00 
769,188.50 
342.162.69 
119,301.04 
30,042.21 
142.171.50 

63|678!o8 
270,776.30 
343,750.00 
216,735.75 
286,945.85 


$ 14.442.31 
37,914.58 
137,686.04 


May :" 










24,636.38 
18,787.14 
37.418.70 
28,671.62 
118,818.86 
67,370.30 


AugTMt 

September .... 

October 

November 

December 


Total 


S2,501,468.15 


$244,851 


92 


$2,679,454.85 


$534,827.05 



Total Ineurance, $5,181,017. TotaJ Lose. $779,678,9' 



CLASSIFICATION OF BUILDINGS IN WHICH FIRES 
OCCURRED. 



« Story S 
S " 
4 " 
8i " 



2i Story Brick 28 

2 •■ ■' 878 

H ■' ■■ S 

1 " ■' U 

2 Story Frame 110 

11 •■ ■' W 

1 ■■ " 164 

Sheds 830 

Lumber Yards S 

Awnings lO 

K.iilroMl Cars i3 

Churches. 5 

Yards, Streets IB 

Boxes Straw 1 

Iroii Clad Buildings 3 

Elevators S 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



,db,GoOglc 



TRABB AND COUHERCB OF 



THE CLIMATE OF ST. LOUIS. 



Dy the casual observer it might be inferred that, owing to the geo- 
graphical locatioD of St. Louis at alrout the center of the enonuoia 
basin between the great mountain ranges of the country, ita cliiMte 
would be characterized by marked estremes in nearly all its fea- 
tures; that In winter the coldest polar blasts would sweep unob- 
structed over it, and that in summer the sun's fiercest rays would be 
concentrated upon it with unceasing energy. A little sober reflec- 
tion will serve to dispel these far fiom pleasant illusions, and sho^ 
that the climate of St. Louis, when compared with those of olfaer 
great commercial centers, will not in the least suffer by the compari- 
son. This is true whether its climate is compared with those of other 
cities in the same latitude, with those of cities further north or Bonth, 
or with those of seacoast cities. A climate is measured by ita m- 
tremes, rather than by its means, and the extremes of St. Louis tem- 
peratures are no greater than those of other cities in the same lati- 
tude. They are less than those of cities further north, particularlj 
in winter when the extremes are most marked and disagreeable. 
The differences are, of course, more marked than in cities further 
south, but for this more than adequate compensation is found in Ihe 
fact that the temperatures of the latter are much higher, and from 
May to October, inclusive, the warm weather is practically unceaaog, 
while in St. Louis periods of more than five successive days of ab- 
normally warm weather are extremely rare. 

The extremes of temperature are also greater in St. Louis than in 
cities near or on the seacoast, but the greater equability of the tem- 
peratures of the latter is counterbalanced by the drier air and clearer 
skies of St. Louis. 

The discussion of temperature conditions may be dismissed with 
the brief statement that those of St. Louis are surpasaed by those 
of few other large cities, and are much superior t« those of manv 
others. When we come to consider the clear skies and brilliant saa- 
shine, St. Louis concedes the palm to none except a few favored 
spots far beyond the centers of commerce. The records of the piM- 
ent year may be consulted to show the extent to which the dtizens 
of St. Louis are favored in the matter of sunshine. The amount of 
sunshine for the year was 69 per cent., or, in other words, the sun 
was obscured by clouds only in 31 hours out of every 100, a rvmart- 
able showing for a locality not situated i^ the arid or semi-arid 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OP ST. LOUIfl, 



79 



i^oDB. The suDBtaine for Ma; was 80 per cent., and that for Septem- 
ber 82 per cent. There la a deflciencj' during November and Decem- 
ber on account of frequent rains and snows, and cold, northeaeteri;' 
winds, the heralds of the approaching' winter. The amount of moist- 
ure in the atmosphere is another very impartant factor, and in this 
respect St. Louis is again fortunate. The average relative humidity 
is 67 per cent., which is about the amount most conducive to perfect 
health. Another advantage lies in the fact that this average amount 
is evenly maintained throughout the year. There are no widely dif- 
ferent extremes at different seasouB, the maximum amount being' 72 
percent, in January, and the minimum 61 per cent, in April, an ex- 
treme range of only 1 1 per cent. 

The precipitation in St. Louie is usually generous, the average an- 
nual amount for the past fifty-seven years being 41.08 inches. Of 
this amount 13.45 inches falls during April, May and June, when it 
is moat needed for the growing vegetation. 

The average number of days in each month with rain or snow to 
an appreciable amount is nine, but rarely does the rain or snow last 
throughout an entire day. Much of it is in the form of brief showers 
followed quickly by cool, Bunshiny conditions. 

The autumns are comparatively dry, but they are by far the most 
delightful months of the year, the bright, pleasant, sunshiny days, 
and the clear, cool and occasionally frosty nights, with the soft 
southerly winds, combining to produce a climatic perfection rarely 
met with in this or in any other country. 

The following table shows at a glance the average climatic condi- 
tions at St. Louis for each month of the year, the data having been 
compiled from the record of twenty-Bve years' daily observations: 





TSMPBtUHDRB. 


PeK- 

CBHTAOB. 


h 


HUMBBaornAys. 




MOMTH. 


1 

B 


f 

= 
S 


1 


4 

3-2 


1 


1 


i 


t 




1% 


Maih"!';:::: 


S 
1 

7( 


1 

i 

S3 

s 


i 

87 

•ta 

i 

3« 


1 

S 

i 


s 

38 

87 


1 

.a 
'.ta 

s 

.37 


W 
10 

il 

10 


It 

IE 

Is 

10 

11 


10 
B 

1 

11 


10 

1 

? 

10 


S 




s- 




1 

1: 


AUKUBI 

SeSfr'"';.. 
S5.7^S:::: 


Extremm... 


IM 


-= 


» 


« 


« 


37. «0 


m 


u, 


w 


114 


B. 



,db,GoOglc 



TRADE AND COMUBRCE OF 
TABLE SHOWING THE 

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM TEMPERATUEES 

..DUBINO 



sdbvGoO^^IC 



THB CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



' 






















a 
s 


? 




1 


^■%% 


;f- 


^: 


i^^35=s^«s ; ; 


>.% 


8 


^ 




1 




'■ 8=8 1 i :S 


^ 


"t- 


^^=^^3 i^e. 




^ 


^ 




1 




If r 










^i^ 


is 


:H ; 


S 






1 




:S -.S 




::::&■ 


i^ 1 




:h ; 


= : 






5 


s 








^r 




8 i : i 


fn i ; 


.^ 


: ;'>•' ; 


^ 




8 


s 

? 






S 


is.r 


|3 


H i i r 


g is 


HE< 


^\^ 


?s_: 


^ 


c 
s 








^i 




issi 


^i8S8S^ 


;3S 


? 


^s. : 


^ 


s 

f 






;2 


:i^3,! 


■M is 


B : i 


=8 






f 




f 


? 




1 


ss 


Hi' 


38S|^S: 


^i-^ 


: ;&■ 


' n^' ; 


:t- i 




^ 




J 


^ 


:5 :« 


iS 


3S3SS 


'■N 


3S 


Pi 


i- 




^ 


ii 






1 


s 


3SS38 i 


H^^^^ 


n *' ; 




if-s : 




3 


^ 




s 


■.^ 


;S2S : 


\^^^^\\\^ 


|n-^ 


: 


S 


s 




8 








SSSS2 




SSS 


drii: 


SKIS 


m9 


S 




1 


i 

1 



D„ii„.db,Go(5glc 



TRADE AND COUMBRCS OF 



CUSTOM HO USE TR ANSACTIONS. 

CoDdensR<l Clasfiification of Commodities imported iato St. Louis, 
during the jear ending December SI. 1895. showing foreign value and 
duty paid. RICHARD DALTON. i^nrveyor of Customs. 



Commodiiies. 
Ale and Ueer 

Books and Printed Matter 

Brick and Tiles 

Brushes 

Bone and Horn Manufactures 

Carpets and Carpeting 

Cement 

Chemicals and Drugs 

China and Earthenware 

Corks and Manufactures of Cork. . . 

Cutlery 

Fancy Goods 

riBh 

Tree Goods 

Glass and Glassware 

Guns and Firearms 

Jewelry Merchandise 

Lead 

Marble 

Manufactured Cotton 

Manufactured Linen 

Manufactured Iron 

Manufactured Leather 

Manufactured Metal 

Manufactured Pajier 

Manufactured Silk 

Manufactured Wood 

Manufactured Wool 

Musical Instruments 

Nuts and Fruits 

Oils 

Paints and Colors 

Granulated Bice 

Rubber Goods 

Seeds, etc 

Dressed Skins 

Steel Wire 

Tin and Teme Plate 

Spirituous Liquors 

Tobaccos. Cigars, etc 

Varnishes 

Vegetables 

Wine, Sparkling, etc 

Window Glass 

Miscellaneous Merchandise 

Collections from all other sources. . 



98,961 

23,584 

53,436 

346,767 

8,734 

97,211 

26,041 

33,004 

5,484 

e,021 

337,034 

124,719 

43,553 

10,422 

39,428 

20,187 

26,661 

13,386 

296.7B7 

6,143 

583 

4,601 



11,798 

77,225 

143J!S8 

6,132 



i 8.931.60 

4,446.00 

832.43 

662.45 

1,324-80 

3,276.70 

1,463.45 

9,688.12 

33.58 

55,610.37 

58,293.60 

7,150.35 

45.801.15 

6,076.58 

6,435.32 

""3.8i(l!63 
30.144.40 
8,758.24 
9,567.14 
2,724.00 
4,476.83 
57,490.67 
44,073.89 
17,018.97 
2,4S5.2» 
13,687.28 
6.8DT.71 
13,418.61 
3,315.90 
94,289.90 
1,535.7S 
85.08 
1,219.39 
1,713.93 
26,131.96 
338.70 
2.979.15 
17,995.73 
2,160.00 
63,569.17 
26,342.17 
29,240.31 
350,786.22 



30,737.13 
32,817.65 
1.6S2.28 
95.112.26 



Total S3,162.126 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 83 

TRANSACTIONS AT THE CUSTOM HOUSE, ST. 
LOUIS. 

General exhibit ot mercbati<lise broaght into St. Louis in bond from 
below meatioDed porta of entry, during ^ear ending December 81, 
1895, sbowing foreign values and duties paid thereon. 

aiCHABD DALTON, Surrejor of Customs. 





$1,079,671 

849,730 

803,149 

5,058 

43,863 

126,376 

126,859 

5,038 

4B,S10 

13,609 

46.319 

1,197 

10,746 


Duty. 

¥410,993.00 
250,476.01 












17,545.20 
50,151.20 
50,743.60 
2,015.20 
















18,527.60 

478.80 
7,898.00 








Total 


t3,16S.126 


*1,1 14,558.01 



CUSTOMS WARHHOUBE TRANBACTIONS-POHT OF AT. LOUIS- 

DURINO iste. 





WAKESOUSBD. 


WITHDEAWN. 




Tftlue. 


Duty. 


Value. Duty. 




*165,437.00 

19.033.00 
24,170.00 
18,432.00 
26.331.00 
25,790.00 
35,024.00 
70,309.00 
28,075.00 
54,036.00 
16,770.00 
23,020.00 
21.364.00 


$186,925.40 
23,815.20 
23,972,30 
19,179.79 
24,452.47 
22,093.08 
22,775.83 
59.475.59 
22,096.52 
49,185.04 
16,185.15 
29,493.23 
20,017.72 






$28,975.00 $27,648.00 




































November, 1896 


25.621.00 25,071.39 






Withdrawn for tranopor- 


















1528,791.00 


$518,668.22 


$335,324.00 $321,870.07 




31. 1896 






$193,467.00 $196,798.15 



,db,GoOglc 



84 TRADE AND COHMBRCB OP 

STATEMENT OF BUSINESS TRANSACTED AT THE 

ST. LOUIS POST OFFICE DURING 

1691 AND 1896. 



FiBaT OR Financial Division.— J. H. Hayt. Catkirr. 



BE0SIPT8. 





1895. 


im 


To Sale of Postage Stampa, etc 

To Sales of Waste Paper, et« 


703.78 

2,051.71 

157.1S 

93.26 

2.20 


$1,466,290.03 
731.58 




















»1,618,307.97 










$1,618,212.42 
1,429,078.25 




Total EeceiptB 18B4 






$189,134.17 


Viz. 13 per ct. 


Net Kevenue to P. 0. Dept. 1B95. . . . 
Net Bevenue to P. 0. Dep't. 1894. . . . 


$1,008,895.81 
021,281.38 





$87,614.43 I Yiz.9^peret. 



DiaBORSBUBNTB. 



By Salary of Postmaster 

By Special Delivery MeBSen^re' Pay Eoll 

By Clerks' Pay Roll 

By Rent of Stations 

By Light of Stations 

By Fuel of Stations 

By Transfer Drafts Paid 

By Advertised Letter List 

By OfUce Furniture 

By Stationery 

By General Expenses 

By Railway Postal Clerks' Pay Boll.... 

By General' Expense, R. M. S 

By Free Delivery Service Expense 

By Transfers from Postal to M, O. Acc't. 
By CoUeetion Drafts returned to Dep't. . 

By Collection Drafts on hand 

By Deposits with Ass't U. S. Treanurer to 

credit of P. O. Department 

By 1.0SS by Burglary at Station "D.".... | 
Total I" 



6,000.00 

3,421.44 

277,054.69 

4,431.90 

139.20 

113.70 

187,186.41 

481.81 

54*74 .. 
2.607.11 
297,354.36 
17,778.69 
314.01 2.6S 
29,400.00 
78.50 . 



ISU. 

6,000.00 

3,047.20 

257.6G6.3S 

2,580 00 

137.54 

138.07 

202,158.62 

766.43 

14.00 

'3,149 J!7 
275,424 83 

11,066:29 
294.447.89 

19.500.00 

78.27 



477,196.35 413,131.6* 

2 6.411 „. 

$1.618.307:971 ti;489:s»6l3 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE cm OP ST. LOUIS. 



SECOND DIVISION. 

DlSTBIBUTlON AMD UlSFATCH OF MAILS. 
T. B. ROBERTSOH. JR.. S*tl- 





ir 


Lba'. 


Lb«. 


First class mail matter: 

Letters originating: at St. Louis 
Postal Cards originatin? at St 


1,43S,M7 
73.a6S 

17.074,559 

4,502,985 
1,838,437 


1,170,160 
65,924 

15,840.783 

3,672,540 

1,330,455 


265.278 


Second class mail matter: 

Nen-Epapers and periodicals to 
regular subscribers, originat- 


1,333.776 

830,445 
607.982 


Third class and transient news- 
Price Currents, Circulars, Books 
etc., originating at St. I^uis.. 

Fourth class mail matter. Merchan- 
dise onginating at St. Louis. . . . 




24,824,693 


22.079.871 









letters. Postal Cards and Circulars. 
Papers and Merchandise 


31,465 
194.632 


36.678 
156,572 


•5.213 
38;060 


Grand Totals in pounds | 25,150,790] 22,731,121 


3,877,669 



Total number pieces handled 1 1 97, 41 S, 997 1 177 .239, 964 [ 30,180.033 



THIRD DIVISION. 

City Delivebt. 

Comparative Statement of Business of 1804 and 189S. 

WILLI A!^ HVDS. Sttp^lmlnidtnl. 





lT 


iS: 


'-I'S.''* 


First class matter: 


390,240 
61,721 

1,269,005 

138,671 

341.830 

4,209,812 


379,435 
70,452 

1,243,531 

130,802 

330,939 

4,043,933 


10 815 


Postal Cards originating at St. Louis. . 
Letters and Postal Cards from outside 


•8,731 


Newspapers and Periodicals to regular 
subscribers: 


7,369 


Third and fourth class matter and tran- 
sient Newspapers, Price Currents, Cir- 
culars, Books, etc., originating at St. 


Second, third and fourth class matter 










6,41 J, 279|fl,] 99,083 








Total number pieces handled ]133,154,92B|12B,101,264 





'Indicates decrease. 



.".Google 



88 



TRADE AND COMHBBCE OF 



FOURTH DIVISION. 

ReCEIFTS and DiSPATCHKa OF Bboibtkatioh Maiu. 

OOKFABATIVE STATEHEtrr OF BuSIMESe TeAKSACIED DuBING 18M 



GSO. B. STKoaP, SuftrrntnJtml. 



Letters registered with fee pre- 

Parcels registered with fee pre- 
paid 

Begistered letters received for 
delivery 

Fourth clasfl parcels 

Eeg-. letters and parcels received 
for dispatch 

Registered packages, St. Louis 
Mo 

Registered packages received 
transit 

R. P. E.'s made up and dispatched. 

Through reg. pouches and inner 
Boclfs received 

Through reg. pouches and inner 
sacks dispatched 

Through reg. pouches and inner 
sacks received in transit 

Ofilcial letters and parcels reg* 
istered free 

Total transactions 



90,138 
44,875 



123,134 
43,669 



94,923 


4,785 




46,249 


1,374 





S52.030 
19,030 




8,877 


4,700 


16,710 


13,214 




332,173 





3.286 


692,567 
137,078 


'l3.914 


461 


49,453 


1,768 





44,308 


1,303 





B46 


482 




40,590 





935 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OP BT. IXtVIB. 






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,db,GoOglc 



TRAD& AND COMUSRCB OF 





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D„ii„.db,Go(5glc 



THE CITT OP ST. LOUIS. 



BUSINESS OF THE ST. LOUIS BRIDGES, AND THE 
FERRIES FOR 1895 

AND COMPARISON Wl 



AMOUNT OF FREIGHT IN TONS TRANSFERRED ACROSS THE RIVER 

AT ST. LOUIS DURING 169S, 

FROM ST. LOUIS TO EAST ST. LOUIS, VENICE, MADISON AND CARON- 

DELET. 



BY 


Cam. 


■tone. 


Total 

TOKB. 




u,m 


3ta,m 










JJ:?a 



































































































































BY 


Oars. 


Toms. 


?r.' 




1»,TM 


"■K 












mm 


'•!K 


















ass 





































































































































,db,GoOglc 



TRADE AND COMMERCE OF 



STATEMENT 



SHOWING AMOUNT OF FREIGHT, IN TONS, RECEIVED A 
EACH RAILROAD AND RIVER FOR FOUR YEA 



sdbvGoO^^IC 



TUB CITY OF BT. LOTJIB. 



STATEMENT 



SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF FREIGHT, IN TONS, SHIPPED FROM ST. LOUIS 
BV BACH RAILROAD AND RIVER FOR FOUR YEARS. 



Boon. 


im. 


IBM. 


im 


utt 




B.vr. 

41 


as 

S27.e00 


IMI.884 


100.077 










It K«rH"SW.»K'EKv.:: 


li 

BB0.M9 


II 




i^uiivuie. KviinaTtiie * su u<ui. K. k::;::.'.: 


OblCMO, Al(OB * St. Louis (M»ln Line) 

OleTsTud.OlaclDnatl. CblckgoABt. LouIb... 
TerreH»iite*Ind. E. a (VandalU) 




'S^ 




151,117 






tss 


?S«1 


St. I.011I1. BellBrtlle i Bouthern E^wiV 




i,4tt 


H,2a0{ 

842, 7W 

S.TSS 








3 










i7.Ba! 


■JS 


ZI^SSS 
















s.m.tsi 




G,W1.4e3 


0.471.9*0 






B.349,3e7 


4,TSD.aM 
383.080 


s.wa.aa 













,db,GoOglc 



3 TRADB AND COMMERCE! OB" 

AMOUNT OF COAL RECEIVED IN ST. LOUIS. 





1S»S. 


ISH. 


iBBa. 


189S. 




Bushels. 


Bushels. 


Bushels. 


BusheU. 


Baltimore* Ohio S. W, B. R 


11.874,7^ 


11,S3»,9TG 


i4.oat,ssa 


u.g80.oe 


OhlciK^o.AIWnft 8t.L. " 


141,076 


(73.875 


273.078 


1.W0.5I5 




i.m.m 


B.U8,SS0 


S.!M,I7S 


4.7«I«.TO) 


Bt. Loula and Iron M-n " 


1W.7B 


4B.850 


*7.iH0 


B8.800 


St.L..VandallB*T.H. ■• 


8.Bfie.7S0 


7,S13.MD 


1O.D7B.40O 


11.183.371 


Cairo Short Line " 


l.t.lU.OfiO 


I4Ji51.97S 


14.180,100 


li.B71.4S 


Wabash - 


9,08T.3!5 


7,4n.800 


7.OSO.M0 


7.ra8.«o 


LoulSTllle & K ash vine " 


8.S71.4» 


M78.10D 


8.I8S.n« 


a.8U.«7 


L. E. * St. Louis ■' 


fl.6IB.aiO 


E.B5£,8S0 


7.»T«.178 


tjsx.m 


MoblleAOhIo " 


a,m.aoii 


2,2S7.300 


4.SU,aES 


4.ias.o<i 


ToiBdo. 8t. U A K. C. " 


1.K8JH0 


B.73S.800 




ITU.STt 


Chicago, Peorta* St. L. " 


4.W8.825 


tB39.32S 


3.a3>,ono 


a47ao6o 


Misuari Pacifl« " ....'... 


W.97B 


ra,s2s 


4,W) 


m.es 


at. L.* San Francisco '■ 


24.B7B 


2S.700 




S.1B0 


St. Louis & Eaatern '■ 


lI,M7.(ra 


6,7SS.0OI) 


f,834,Bn 




St. Loul». Ohlcsgo & at, Paul 










ess.zso 

4CS,a!5 




mjm 






ttB.tSS 










BB.fiB(l.l«l 


74.M1.3TS 


m^m 









Horn.— Becelpts of AnthraalteOoaliDcluded Id above receipts; 1S8T. ISl.MOtc 

IS8e.13t.tS0 " 

18SS. U1.(BD " 

IBM), 124.325 ■' 

1881,130.060 ' 

1882,187.327 * 

1883,173.833 ■ 

18M.Ua.4M * 

ieSS,SD7.7SI • 

Uecelpta of Ooke I87B. 4,173.600 bushels, or 40 lbs. 

'■ 1880, e,M7,100 

. ■■ " 1881, 12,960.700 ■' 

■■ 1882, 10J»«,600 " 

'• 1883, t,S68jm '■ 

'■ 1884, 3,180.160 



B,E84.390 
1888. 6.797.560 
1S8S. 8.646.100 



Not tooladed la receipts of Coal. 



,db,GoOglc 



THE OITT OP ST. LOUIS. 93 

PUBLISHED RATES OF FREIGHT BY RAIL FROM 
EAST ST. LOUIS TO NEW YORK, DURING 1895. 



DATE. 


Gr,ln.ndBlll 


PeTSSTb. 


P^'r^SSi. 


Per 100 IbB. 


Jan. 1st to Feb. 4th 

Feb 5th lo Dec. Slst 


2D 
23 


8S 
,83 


S8 
46 


80 
SO 



'Meats in bnlk 4 to 5 ceats per 100 lbs. hisher. 

Rate on Cotton to Boston Q cents higher t£an N. Y. rate. 

UN OTHBK FRZIOHT. 

To Boston 8 cents higher than N. Y. rate. 

To Philadelphia 2 cents lower than N- Y. rate. 

To Baltimore 8 centa lower tbaa N. Y. rate. 

Rate on gr^n Irom St Louis Elevators l>i centa per 100 pounds 
more than East St. Louis rate. Rate on other freight from l)i cents to 
3 centa per 100 pounds. 

Rate on other heavy freight from St. Louis 3 to S cents per 100 
pounds more than East St. Louis rate. 



ALL-RAIL RATES OF FREIGHT IN CENTS FROM ST. 
LOUIS TO SOUTHERN CITIES DURING 1896. 



ABTICLB8. 


Jaoaary 1 


18K.1.W December n. 1896. 


-a'" 


Vlcksburg. 


New^eaEa. 




80 
50 
13 

IB 
18 

ia 


45 
83 
30 
SO 
80 
20 


4S 








M 




80 















PUBLISHED AVERAGE RATE OF FREIGHT BY RAIL 
ON GRAIN FROM EAST ST. LOUIS TO NEW YORK. 

Par 100 lbs. 



1894.. 



4.78 



__ 3 On Grain 36.63 

18B1 On Wheat 29 ■ 

IseiOnCom 88J4 ' 

___0 On Wheat 37)i ' 

1890 On Corn 2S}4 ■ 

1889 E«cept Corn 28^ ' 

^OnCorn 20 ' 

) 39J4 ' 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COUMORCB OF 



RAIL TRANSPORTATION. 



.By J. B. I.«eds. 

TratBc Haokger BuRlDesa Hen's Leagua aod Secratary Ueichanta' ExctaanrB 

TransportatloD Gomnilttee. 



The importanc^e of railroad transportation to the commerce of the 
City of St. Louia is evidencerl by the fact that over 92 per cent, of Ibe 
movement of all of the commerce of tlie city, exclusive of bitumin- 
ous coal (which moves almost wholly by rail) is performed by the 
railroads serving the city. This, coupled with the further fact that 
the transportation expense in its effect upon the scope of the trade 
of a city, whether in jobbing' or manufacturing' business, cuts more 
of a figure than any other one element Sn the tranBaction of Uie 
business enhances the importajice of giving strict attention to that 
branch ot the general eervice. 

In reviewing the business of the year, by issuing an annual state- 
ment or report, it is customary to direct attention to various con- 
ditions which exist, with reference to the subject under treatment, 
in order that advantage may be taken of those which are favorable, 
as well as that necessary steps may be taken to overcome as far as 
may be any adverse conditions. No attempt will be made in the lim- 
ited scope of this article to deal with statistics or details. 

There have been but few changes of an individual character within 
the past year which can be referred to as producing any material 
change or effect in the commercial status of St, Louis, so far as the 
element of railroad transportation goes. Some improvements have 
been inaugurated in the passenger and mail service, — mostly west- 
ward. Otherwise we might reiterate the report of last year as to the 
literal or physical situation. The year has not been characterised 
by any activity in railroad construction tributary to St. Louis, eith^ 
by new roads or extensions of those already existing. This, however, 
is not alone applicable to the section of coimtry tributary to St. 
Louis, but is true of the whole country, and from causes which are 
general in effect and applicable to all branches of industry. Indlea- 
tions, however, now point to an eorly resumption of more activity in 
that line, and that St. Louis wi?l receive at least its due share of at- 
tention. 

In the territory north and west of St. Louis, as a general proposi- 
tion, our Interests are equitably taken care of by the railroads serv- 
ing this market in that direction, and siich 'will doubtless continue 
to be the case In the future, if we may accept as an indication of their 
int«nt the ample facilities which have been acquired and are con- 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 95 

stttntly being' provided hy those roads. With the proi>er attention 
and neceEsary vi^r there should be uo insurmountable difficulty in 
Becuriugr for this market a fair share of the trade in that district, 
and at the same time be assured ol the co-operation and service com- 
mensurate with the volume of business to be moved. 

The service east of the MiBsiaeippI and north of the Ohio lUver is 
as good and as ample as may be reasonably desired as to the move- 
ment of trafSc, with the exception of the transfer between St. Louis 
and East St. Louis, which, no doubt, could be materially improved by 
the enforcement of more arbitrary rules as to the loadingr and un- 
loading ot cars, and the general dispoaltiou of traffic otherwise. The 
present method has the effect of keeping the tracks and facilities, es- 
pecially on the east bank of the river, in a stjite of more or less con- 
gestion. Efforts are being made to secure the adoption of rigid car 
service rules and other reforms on the east side of the river, which it 
is to be regretted, have as yet produced no very material result. This 
state of affairs, coupled with what is commonly termed "the bridge 
arbitrary,"' serves as a handicap to that extent against the trade of 
this city, with Illinois and Indiana, as welt as Eastern markets. 

Some changes In the adjustment of tariffs in Illinois have taken 
place in the past year, but the basis of rates as between St. Louis and 
oompetitive markets, remains relatively the seme as they were a year 
ago, and it is not likely that any material change will take place in 
tiiat respect while the east bank of the MisGissippi River remains 
the iNuiing line for rate making purposes, for both Eastern and West- 
cm roads. 

While we may consider the territory above referred to as reason- 
ably well provided with transportation facilities, that embraced 
iriljiin the section lying south of the MisBouri River In Missouri, 
the States of Arkansas, Lonisiana and Texas, and Territory of Okla- 
homa, contains large areas of territory undeveloped and unprovided 
vith railroad facilities and yet auscepUble of a high state of develop- 
Daeut and capable of sustaining a largely increased population, pro- 
ducing a vast traflic for railroads and a trade ot immense volume. 
Within the limits of this territory there are, in various stages of 
organ! nation, railroad enterprises, — some new, others extensions of 
roads already existing, a majority of which have St. Louis, either 
directly or through connections, as a principal objective paint. It 
ia to that large developing territory St. Louis should look for a 
lai^T^ly increased future buslaesB, and should take a deep interest In 
every railroad enterprise which seeks to enter it, that it is developed 
in tbe interest of this city, as nature intends it shall be. 

Tbe territory south of the Ohio and east of the Mississippi Biver 
is one to which St. Louis has direct all-rail connection and facilities 
for reaching it, as to service in a measure not enjoyed by any other 
vity north of the Ohio Kiver. But St. Louis, In common with other 
ZOarlcetB north of that river, labors under a double discrimination 
(if it may be ao termed) in reaching that section in what are com- 
monly known as Ohk) Biver differentials; also in what appears to be 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



06 TRADE AND COMUSRCB OF 

an imreBGonable preference in favor of the East, in the adjustment of 
North Atlantic seaboard tariffs, both of which are eepeciallj aevm 
as against manuiactnred goods produced in the upper Hississippi Val- 
ley. Many attempts have been made to secure a readjustment ot 
these rates, and it is the purpose to continue onr efforts to that end. 
An equitable adjustment of the figures in question will redound 
more largely to the benefit of Bt. Louis than any other market, be- 
I'Ause of its closer proximity and natural location for the trade ol 
a larger portion of the district in question, especially that lyiu^ west 
of NashTille, Decatur, Birmingham, and Mont^mery; in fact, by 
mileage we are as near to the trade of the State of Mlsaissippi as we 
are to that of Arkansas, by the Iron Mountain Railway. 

It would therefore appear to be desirable to give especial attention 
to the extension of the tmde of this city in that direction. Tbe 
country is rich in resources for profitable trade, and in the matter 
of raw materials for manufacturing and building purposes, espe- 
cially wood, irou and stone, and is only slightly developed. It pos- 
aesses many elements to invite* immigration and capital, which are 
apparently rapidly becoming recognized, and certainly gives 
promise of becoming a rich field for the business enterprise of 8L 
Louis for the future. 

A railroad which would be the unqualified advocate of the interests 
of St. Louis, extending from this city to the South Atlantic seaboard, 
as far east, at least, us Savannah, Ga., would operate' as a very strong 
factor in guarding the interests of this market against encroach- 
ments of other markets in the territory west of such a line, as well 
as hold a larger share of what ia commonly known as Southeastern 
trade to, from and through St. Louis. It could, and doubtless would 
be used to make this city a basing point for rate making for the 
trafilc to and from the West and Northwest, instead of Ohio Biver 
crossings, as st present. This would enhance our grain market, and 
largely add to the packing-house interests at this point, and place us 
In closer touch with the Iron interests of the Southern country. It 
would also result in fitting the railroads serving the market and 
that territory to changed conditions, which exist in consequence of 
the upbuilding of the extensive manufacturing industries of the Mis- 
sissippi "^'alley and the TVest, which did not exist when the tariff 
bases now in use were promulgated. The present rate adjustment 
to and from the South and Southeast has outlived its day of use- 
fulness to the railroads serving this market, and the territory north 
of the Ohio and west of the Mississippi Itiver, with emphasis on St. 
Ijouis. They must eventually be changed and so adjusted as to best 
meet the requirements of the trade to be served, when the superior 
advantoges of St. Louis will assert themselves, and should naturally 
give to the city a much larger share of the trade than at present. 

Following the opening up of the new Union Station and the com- 
pletion of the necessary facilities for its use, and coupled with s 
season of more or less general buelness depression, the past year has 
not witnessed any very marked additions or improvements in the in- 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THB CITY OP ST. LOTIIB. »7 

temal or terminal facilities of the railroads within the borders of 
the city, beyond tha completion of such things as may have bees in 
progrese, or meeting the ordimry requirements of the traffic. The 
facilities, howeier, are sufficient for preswnt needs, and the disposi- 
tion of the roads appears to be to keep them so. Much property 
Ruitablc for such purposes has been acquired by the Terminal As- 
sociation and the individunl railroad? serving St. Louis, on both 
l^nks of the river, to be called into requisition as their needs require 
it. Large sums of money have been expended in that direction, 
n'hich demonstrates their confidence in the near future 'as to the 
growing trade of the city, as well as their intention to keep pace 
with it. 

The organization of the Joint Traffic Association, composed of 
the iE^astem Trunk lines and their Western connections up to the 
Mississippi Rfver, can only-be touched upon by conjecture as to its 
effect on the market of St. Louis. There is, however, no reasonable 
doubt but nhat St. Louis has more to gain than lose, as against its 
principal competitors in trade, if tlie new organization results in a 
rigid maintenance of tarifC rates. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TBADB AND COMUBRCB OP 



IMPROVEMENT OF WESTERN RIVERS. 



■ The City oi St. Loujs, tbrotiKh the Merchants' Exchan^ and otker 
cominercial organizatioDB and the Hunicipal Government, has been 
for m&ny years pressings upon Con^resB the necessity of inprOTing 
the waterways ot the country, and especially the main arteiy, tbe 
Mississippi Biver. Much has been done towards the permanent iin- 
provement of the river by commiBeioiia In charge of Governnient en- 
gineers, but not as much relief has been given to the improvement ot 
the channel as had been expected. 

The importance of immediate relief, before the navigation of the 
river is entirely abandoned, has been forced upon the attention of 
the Merchants' Exchange, and eteps have been te^ken ta secure froni 
Congress a contract whereby Messrs. Web M. Somnel and Isaac 1L 
Mason, both citizens of St. Iiouis and members of the Merchants' Ex- 
change, and their asBociates shall be authorized to undertake the 
Improvement of the channel by removing sandbars between St, Lonia 
end Vicksburg, and thus keeping tbe channel open at all seasaua at 
the year, except when the river is closed by ice. This movement !■ 
not Intended to interfere with the work of permanent improvement 
by the general government, but to be a temporary relief, keeping the 
channel open and permitting the safe passage of river craft, un^ 
such time as the permanent work shall have advanced to sneh a stage 
that navigation is protected. 

The plan is to place on the river a sufllcient number of dredge boats 
and portable jetties to remove, without delay, any temporary ob- 
struction by saudbata; these dredge boats going from point to point 
as the bars form, removing same, or a sufficient portion of the eame 
to allow the passage of river craft. It will be, in fact, a moving 
patrol, keeping watch for all shoal places, and wherever such places 
are found putting a dredge at work to remove the obstruction. 

This plan is claimed by river men, who are, from years of ex- 
perience, familiar with the shifting channel of the river, to be en- 
tirely practicable and the only one that will afford the relief needed 
until the permanent improvement la completed. 

One feature of this plan which must commend itself to Congren. 
and to everyone who will consider it, is that the promoters thereol 
have so much confidence in the success of the dredge system that 
th^y propose to assume all responsibility as to its success, and not 
to require any compensation until they have secured and main- 
tained for one year a channel six feet deep and 200 feet wide from St 
Louis to Cairo, and seven feet deep and 250 feet wide from Cairo to 
"Vicksburg. 



,db,GoOglc 



THE)_ CITT OP ST. LOUIS. 99 

A bill embodying these featureB and conditione is now before Con- 
gTcBB, and every effort will be made to secure its eitrly passage. 

In tbe meantijiie, the work of permanent improvement wUl be 
prosecuted, and with the two plane in operation, immediate relief 
will W afforded, and in due time the channel will be permanently 
improved and this great highway of commerce be utilized to the 
ffreat benefit of the transportation interests of the whole country . 



PERMANENT IMPROVEMENT. 



The following articles, furnished by request of the Merchants' Ex- 
change, will show what has been and is being done by the Govern- 
ment engineers tn the way of permanent improvement. 

THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 



In reply to yours of November 13, 18BG, I have the honor to g^ve 
you a short statement in regard to the work of improvement that 
ba» been carried on by the United States on the Upper Mississippi 
River, between Minneapolis and the mouth of the Missouri Biver, 
\^th some remarks' on results obtained and on work proposed for the 

The Upper MisBlasippi River within the limits mentioned (about 
TOO miles) is a shallow stream with gentle current, and with numer- 
OQS islands and shifting sandbars. Little earthy matter is carried 
in suspenaion, the sand, which forms the usual obstruction to navi- 
gation, being moved along the bottom by 'the action of the current, 
especially at high stages of water, when the current is generally 
much accelerated. In threading its way between the bars of mov- 
jjig- sand, or in the "crossings," as they are called, the channel is 
most frequently shoal, and at such localities navigation Is often difB- 
eult. Where island chutes occur, dividing the river into two or more 
paxts, and where tbe stream is abnormally wide, trouble is often met 
yritb by navigators. At several localities the waterway is obstructed 
by loose or ledge rock and bowlders, that are being removed from 
time to time, as they encroach upon the changing channel. Caving 
of tbe banks occurs tn the bends and at other places, although not to 
the same extent as in the Lower MisBissippi lliver; but this abrasion, 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



100 TRADE AND COUUBRCS OF 

oomparativelr slight, continually adds material to the bars which ob- 
struct this shallow rlTer. 

There are three localities which form exceptions to the general 
cbarscter of the rirer, namely: the Dea Moines Bspids, the Bode 
Island Bapids, and the rapids between Minneapolis and St. Panl. 

1. The Bes Moines Rapids, extending from Montrose to Keokuk, 
la., about eleven miles, very shallow, with rock bottom, and haTisg 
a fall of 22 feet, have been improved bj the United StaKs, and sncb 
improvement fully meets all the demands of navigation. The work, 
which was begun in 1866 and completed fn 18W3, at a cost of Hfi'JifiiO, 
consists of a lateral canal, with three locks, and eight miles long, 
extending- from £eokuk to Nashville, and a widening and deepening 
of the original channel from NaBhville to Montrose. The grade of 
depth is five feet at extreme low water, but, when needed, six feet in 
depth can be given in the canal, the lock3 of which are 310 feet long 
by 80 feet wide. The canal was opened to navigation in 1877. 

2. The Sock Island Eapids extend from Leclaire to Hock Island, 
about 1* miles, with rock ixittom and a fall of 21 feet. The project 
adopted and carried out in the improvement of these rapids was the 
widening and deepening of the natural channel, so as to furnish a 
width of 200 feet and depth of four feet at low water. Work on 
this project was begun in 1806 and completed in 18S1, the cost 
amounting to $1,166,650. There were excavated and removed from 
the rocky channel during the progress of the work S7,92S cubic yardg 
of rock. Since 1881, a small amount of money has been expended 
each year in further widening the channel at crooked places, thereby 
griving additional facilities to navigation. 

3. The rapids between St. Paul and Minneapolis are to be im- 
proved hy locks and dams, but work has not been commenced, al- 
though a small appropriation has been made. 

The first work to be inaugurated for the improvement of the Cpper 
Mississippi Kiver, like that of most rivers, was the removal of sna£* 
end similar obstructions. The snag-boat service began in 1867, and 
has cost, to June 30, 1BS5, $699,640. It has been, and continues to he, 
of great benefit to navigation. 

The systematic improvement of the Upper Mississippi Biver was 
begun in 1878. The object of the work is to secure a channel ol 
suitable width and from four and one-half to six feet depth at low 
water. The improvement ainis at contraction of the waterway to 
the proper width of channel, which width has been ascertained by 
calculation and experience, and varies as the volume of the river in- 
creases, from 350 feet, in the vicinity of St. Paul, to 1,400 feet in the 
vicinity of the Missouri River. The contraction of the waterway i» 
effected by closing the island chutes with dams of brush and rock, 
and by the construction of systems of wing-dama built of the same 
materials, running out from one or both shores. The vi-ater thoa 
being confined in one main groove, as it were, acquires greater ve- 
locity, and scour and increased depth result. 'Wben this deepeain|r 
becomes sufficient to restore the original area of section, the cu> 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOCI8. 101 

rent loses its acquired velocity, and equilibrium is a^!a established. 
Tlie caving' l>anks are protected ^{'Itti bruBb and rock, which 'work is 
thorougfaiy, permanently and cheaply doae. 

The engriaeer ofllcers, under whole direction the improvements 
have been carried on, have carefully watched their effect, are eatiefied 
as to the propriety of the methods employed and believe that a good 
navigable channel can be secured from St. Paul to the moutii of the 
Missouri Biver if sufHcient appropriations are made to carry the 
work to compleUou. 

It has been the custom in carrying out the work on the Upper 
UissiBaippi Biver to select, when funds are available, such localities 
for improvement as may be at the time most detrimental to naviga- 
tion. Each locality thus improved has a beneficial result on the navi- 
gation of the whole river, and as the shoalest bars have been im- 
proved from year to year, the ruling navigable depth has l>een con- 
siderably increased. . 

Of late years, attention has been given to the compIeM regulation 
of the river in varions localities by means of extensive systems of 
wing and closing dams, in which regulation, the straightening, as 
well as the widening and deepening of the channel, is cared for. A 
complete improvement of the river will probably require a very ex- 
tensive application of this system of regulation,- and many years 
must elapse before it can be fully carried out. 

The season of 189S was one of continuous and very low water; but, 
tmder the circumstances, the channel was remarkably good, there 
being comparatively few badly obstructing bars, some of which were 
improved before the season closed. 

Between St. Paul and the mouth of the St. Croix Htver (32 miles) 
the thorough regulation is nearly completed, and the depth at low 
water has been increased from IS inches to four feet. In former 
years, none but the lightest-draught boats could navigate this stretch 
of river at low stages; but, at present, the largest packets have little 
ciifflculty. The cost of work in this section averages about $20,000 
per mile. 

Between the St. Croix and Lake Pepin (39 miles) the obstructing 
tjars below Preacott, at Island 20, Smiths, Morgans, and above and 
below Diamond Bluff, have been improved, and the depth has been 
increased about two and one-half feet. In 1895 no water Jess than 
ftve feet in depth was found except at Trimbelle Eiver, which cross- 
ing was improved before the season closed. Work between St. Croix 
River and I.ake Pepin has cost alwut S6,500 per mile. 

In Lake Pepin (30 "miles long) through which the river flows with 
a scarcely perceptible current, the depth has always been ample. 

Between Wabasha and Winona (41 miles), formerly one of the 
sboalest and most obstructed portions of the river, the worst liars 
Iiave been improved and the available depth has been increased about 
tvro feet. Among the bars improved are those at Wabasha, Beet 
Slough, above Alma, Pine Islaud Bend, West Newton, Mount Vernon, 
Cfcimney Bock, Fountain City, Betsy Slough, Wilds, and above Wi- 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



102 TRADS AND COMMBRCB OP 

uona. In 1895, in this stretcb of river, only two localitieB offered 
less than four feet depth at low water. Work in this section has 
coHt about SIS.OOO per mile. 

Between Winona and Lacrosse (31 miles) were found several bad 
obstructions — at or near Mlnneowa, Homer, Lamoille, Hlcbmond, 
Queens Bluff, Dakota, and Lacrosse, all of whicb l>ars have been im- 
proved and the depth increaaed about 18 inchee. There remains n 
large amount of work to be carried out in this section to complete 
the improvement. In 18SS only one locality offered less than four 
feet depth. The cost of the work in this section is about $8,000 per 

Between Lacrosse and Prairie du Chien (T2 miles) a generally 
good piece of river, the bars from Lacrosse to Coon Slough have been 
Improved, and the river in gT«at part regulated. Improvement work 
has also been carried out below Bad Axe, at Crooked Slough and 
Prairie du Chien. The available depth has been increased about 18 
inches, at a cost of S6,000 per mile. 

Between Prairie du Chien and Leclaire (153 miles) the obstruc- 
tions at Cassville Slough, Bunker Chute, Spechts Ferry, Eagle Point, 
Beadmans Bar, Bellevue, Santa Fe, Savanna and Fulton have been re- 
moved, but there remain many bad bars, on which work must be 
carried out in the future. At seven localities leas than four feet frere 
found in 189S. The cost of work in this section averages $4,000 per 

Between Bock Island and Keithsburg (58 miles) improvements 
have been made at or near Buffalo, Fairport, Hershey Chute and Illin- 
ois Chute, and a great deal remains to be done to put the river in 
good condition. At six bars there were less than four feet in 1895. 
Only $1,500 per mtle has thus far been expended. 

Between Keithaburg and Des Moines Rapids (60 miles) a laT^ 
amount of improvement work has been performed below Eeithsburg, 
at liiNitoii laland, above and below Burlington, at Pontoosuc and Ap- 
panooce, and below Fort Madison, and excellent results have been ob- 
tained. There are other obstructions in this part of the river need- 
ing attention, as at five points less than four feet were found in 1895. 
Cost of work in this section averages $11,000 per mile. 

Between Keokuk and Quincy (41 miles) only one bar In 1895 gave 
less than four feet. Successful improvements have been macle at or 
near Dea Moinea Rapids, Gregorya, Tully Island, Canton, Wyatsonda, 
Lagrange, Lone Tree, and Quincy, at a coat of $10,000 per mile. 

Between Quincy and Clarksville (58 miles) tlie channel waa re- 
markably good in 1895, there being no crossing or bar as shoal as 
four feet. Improvements have been made below Quincy, at Wbit- 
neys, above Hannibal, at Savertbn, Gilberts Chute, and Hickory 
Chute, below Louisiana, and at Clarksville, at a cost of $11,000 per 
mile. A large amount of work, especially shore protection, is still 
needed. 

Between Clarksville and the Missouri River (S5 miles) shoal water 
nan found in 18Q5 at four localities. Improvement work luu been 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



THB crrr op st. louis. los 

done at Slim, Westport, Stag and Turners IslandH, at Cap au Oris, 
Hatchet Chnte, viidnity of Grafton, Piaaa Island, Hop Hollow and 
Alton. The river in this section is ordinaiily very troubleeome, and 
pxtensive work ia needed to put it in good condition tor nsTigation. 
The STerag^ cost per mile is about tS,JSOO. 

Cost of General Improvement of the Upper Hissiestppl Biver, from 
Minneapolis to Mouth of Mieeouri Itiver, to July 1, IBCS: 

Dams, shore protections, etc $5,B50,362 

Sock Island Bapids 1,169,650 

Des Moines Rapids 4,574,990 

Total 811,591.962 

The aggregate amount of rock and brush put in the work, from ita 
commencement to December 31, 1894, is 4,SB1,154 cubic yards, result- 
ing in the construction of 100 miles of dam and 94 miles of shore 
protection. > 

The total tonnage of the Mississippi Biver between Minneapolis 
and the mouth of the Missouri Kiver was, in 18B5, approiimatelj 
3,500,000 tons. 

The improTement of the Upper MlsBissippi River was in charge 
of Lieut. Col. A. Mackenzie from 1ST9 to 1895. 



THE CENTRAL MISSISSIPPI RIVER. 



In response to jour letters of the 14tb November and llth Decem- 
ber, requesting from me a short article concerning improvement of 
the MiBslBHippi Biver, between the mouth of the niinois River and 
tfae mouth of the Ohio River, I take pleasure in giving you the fol- 
lowing information: 

The improvement of the portion of the Mississippi Biver between 
the mouth of the Illinois and the mouth of the Missouri wao added, 
in 1892, to the Rock Island district, in consequence of the wor4ingf 
of the Act of 1892. That change was made before I took charge, in 
the spring of 1SB3, of the St. Louis district. 

The permanent improvement of the portion of the Mississippi River 
from the mouth of the Missouri to the mouth of the Ohio, has been 
prosecuted since 1881 upon a plan which contemplated carrying the 
improvement downstream from St. LouJs, completing the improve- 
ment aa it progressed, so- far as it was practicable to do so. From 
1882 to 1S92 appropriations were made biennially. 

The Act of Congress, July 13, 1S92, in addition to making an ap- 
propriation for immediate application, provided that on and after 
the paasage of that Act, additional work might be prosecuted, in 



3d by Google. 



104 TRADE AND COUMERCE OF 

order to carry on the ayBtematic improvement of the Mlesissii^ 
Eiver between the pointe mentioned, for three years, commencing 
Jitly 1, 1893, to be paid for aa appropriations mig-ht from time lo 
time be made by law. The appropriation for this fiscal year (yesr 
ending June 30, ISBS) made Mareli 2, 1S9S, for continuingr the im- 
provement, contained a provision thnt, In tbe discretion of the Sec- 
retary of War, not exceeding one hundred and fifty thonaand dollwa 
of the appropriation might be expended in using- steel caissons or 
movable Jetties in removing bars &nd improving the low-water ohan- 
nels of the river between the mouths of the Ohio and Missouri 
Hirers. This will be referred to again. 

The construction work for improvement has been extended to Ste. 
Genevieve, a distance of about 60 miles, by river, from St. Louis. 
Though it is not entirely completed, owing to various causes, amount 
which may be mentioned exhaustion of appropriations prior to ISSS. 
find extremely low stages of water that sometimes prevented move- 
ment of material for work at one locality, thus fo)^;ing the plant to 
be transferred to some other locality equally in need of improvement, 
etc. Upon this stretch of 60 miles of river named (St. Louis to Ste. 
Genevieve) on which the work, however, is not entirely completed. 
navigation has been materially benefited, as shown by the removal 
of several of the worst and most persistent bars that, previously to 
necomplishment of work for improvement, were formidable ob- 
stacles to navigation at times of low water. 

.Among the localities notably benefited ai'c Ilorsetail, Tvrin Hol- 
lows, Pulltight, Chesley Island, Jim Smiths, Sulphur Springs, Luos, 
Ptatin Fock, Cornice Island, Perrys Towhead, Fort Chartre* and 
Turkey Island. Other localities may also be mentioned. 

The latter part of the years 1892, 1893, 1891 and 1895 were low-water 
seasons; in fact, they might be called almost phenomenally so, and 
even during those ]ow stages of water, the result of the work for im- 
provement that was done upon the 60 mites of river mentioned, was 
evident, as it reduced the time and labor that was formerly con- 
sumed in navigating' this extent of river at low water, even if it did 
not secure the uniform depth needed at those low stages. The 
stages of water during those four consecutive low-water seasons 
were, for much of the time, considerably belo^v the stage of standard 
low water, which is the stage to which the improved depths are re- 
in 1883 the officer in charge of this district rendered an eatimate 
of the cost of the work necessary to carry the improvement to the 
month of the Ohio, in order that the probable ultimate expense 
might be fully understood. The appropriations made since that 
time have aggregated a little in excess of one-fourt;h of the estimate 
thus rendered, and a corresponding amount of improvement work 
his been done. The remaining three-fourths of the river cannot, 
of course, be improved until the necessary means are provided. The 
improvement is one of magnitude and commensurate with the Im- 
portance of the commerce to be benefited, and under the best of cii^ 
cunislnncer, time is required for its full accomplishment. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOOIS. 105 

In vieir, however, of the urgency of the needs of commerce, aa 
well as to hasten results from the continuous or permanent improve- 
ment work, trial was made of devices designed to improve the chan- 
nel of the river, during periods of low water, bo as to afford at least 
temporary benefit, and at the same time to aid the permanent work 
when practicable. These devices gave snoh encouraging' results that 
use of them was made during- the past season. 

Thus, du^ng the low-water season of 1894, a portable jetty com- 
posed of grub plank resting a^inst barges, the latter supported 
/igainat' a line of piles about 20 f^et apart, was used at the Fort 
Chartres crossing, where the channel was shoal and variable, having 
a depth of but five feet, with the result that a channel nine feet in 
depth was soon attained, excepting at its lower end, where a short 
bar, about 250 feet across, remained. This bar was removed by lash- 
ing together four Bt«am pile-drivers in such manner that the Jet 
hose of the four drivers could be bound together, so as to make, in 
effect, a single large jet hoae, through which a powerful stream was 
thrown upon the submerged bar, quicklj' cutting through it, and con- 
necting the deep channel produced by the portable jetty with the 
deep wat«r below the bar. In other words, the use of the portable 
jetty and the pile-driver's jet combined, gave a deep channel for the 
rest of the season of 1894. 

It was by the use of water jets of four pile-drivers that a short bar 
(about 300 feet in length) was removed from the foot of Horsetail 
in 1881, thus giving the iinlBhing touch to the improvement which 
resulted in permanent removal of that extensive obstruction to navi- 
gation. 

The results of our trial of the portable jetty in 1894 warranted 
further work of the kind, and in January, ItJOS, steps were taken to 
construct two thousand linear feet of apron for such jetty, which 
-were completed last spring, at a cost of one dollar and thirty-six 
cents ($1.36) per linear foot, and the said device (portable jetty) was 
placed In position at Danbys on the Tth of October, last, that being 
at that time one of the worst obstructions to navigation between St. 
£x>QiB and the mouth of the Ohio Hiver. The portable jetty remained 
In position until about the 16th of November, when it was removed. 
The depth ol water in the channel at Danbys when the portable 
jetty was placed in position on the Tth of last October was but four 
feet, the stage of water at the St. I<ouis Gauge being 3.9 feet. The 
heneficial effect of the jetty was almost immediately apparent, and 
towards the latter part of the month a channel seven (7) feet deep 
ivas secured, which depth was maintained throughout the rest of 
tbe season of operations, thouph the stage of water at the St. Louis 
Gauge had fallen to 2.2 feet. The operation of this jetty was author- 
ized by the part of the Act of March 2, 1895, already referred to, mak- 
ing' the appropriation for continuing the improvement of the Mis- 
sfsaippi Btver between the mouth of the Ohio River and the mouth 
of tbe Missouri River. 

In order to be able to give further temporary relief to navigation 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



106 TRADE AND COUMERCB OP 

diiriD? periods of eztremelf low w»ter, and in particular, at points 
where no permanent improvement has been undertaken, a new and 
Inrge towboat, built tor the work, waa fitted with two powerful 
pumps, designed to act upon the bottom of the river, maldng the 
boat, in fact, a tow and dredg^boat, as well aa hydraulic grader. 
The boat, however, waa sunk on a rolling stump in the latter part of 
September last, but was raised, brought to St. Louis, and docked 
and repaired in October. The time lost by this accident prevented 
the uee of the boat during: the pa«t season of low water, in connec- 
tion with the portable jetty (it having been designed to use them 
conjointly, wheu desirable to do no). The tow and dredge-boat nsa 
used, however, in November, at the shoal crossingjust below Ste. 
Genevieve, where the depth of water was but four (4) feet. About 
10 hours' work of the dredge resulted in deepening the channel to 
five (5) feet, which was depth enough for the time being. The re- 
sult was batisfactory, especially so, as this was the first trial in deep- 
ening the channel with this boat, and its new, hitherto untried 
pumps. 

The devices mentioned can be expanded as deemed expedient 
More or less work for improvement was done, as you know, from 
about 18TS to 1380, at which latter date the use of the present 6ilt 
an-esting devices began to take decided shape. This sUt-arresting 
device consists of rows of piling driven through mattresses of briish, 
the mattresses being laid in order that the piles may not be scoured 
out of place, and of brush wattled around the piles, or of large open- 
meshed screens of brush placed against the piles, thus" constituting, 
in fact, permeable pile jetties. The silt is deposited in the intervals 
between the said permeable pile jetties, thus building up new banla 
out to the lines between which it is desired to confine the low-water 
volume of the river, so as to produce the needed depth by the Bcoar 
of the current. The neve banks to be protected from erosion when 
necessary. These permeable pile jetties (sometimeB- spoken and 
written of aa hurdles) are much less expensive per running or linear 
foot than are brush and stone jetties. 

In addition to the methods already mentioned tor improving the 
river between the mouth of the Ohio Kiver and the mouth of the Mis- 
souri, mention should be made of the two snag-boats that patrol 
from the mouth of the latter named river to Natchez, Uias. 
and aa much further down the river as may be necessary. For con- 
venieoce, the river is divided Into two sectiona, the snag-boat Wright 
generally patrolling the section above Memphis and the snag-boat 
Macomb taking the river below Memphis. The river has been de- 
prived of the senlee of the Wright since the 1st of last August, on 
account of the necessity of replating a portion of her steel bull; and 
the Macomb, in consequence, has had to perform double duty. The 
work of replating, which is done by contract, was to have been com- 
pleted and the boat was to have been restored to the river on or 
before August 1st, but delays in the contract work have kept the 
snag-boat still on the ways. It is expected to be restored to the riwr 
by the 22nd of this month. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



The amount of work accomplished by the two boats during the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 189S, and which will give an idea of their 
captiCitiex is aa tollowa: 



StLtnoot eaagbott. 


«l 


n 
II 


Q03 


Si 

II 


li 




1.365 
1,942 

3,307 


10,666 
6,854 
17,520 


8 3 
14 


6,893 
0,507 
16,402 













The wrecks which were removed by the Wright are as follows: 

AT ISLAND No. 40. A coal barge was entirely removed f^m the 
channel by dynamit«, and by the aid of a diver, January 3 to 9, 189S. 

AT CAPE GIRARDEAU. The wreck of the eteamer Albert S. Willla 
was removed from the channel, March L7 to 20, 1895. The boilers and 
most of the machinery were recovered and brought to St. Louis. 

AT STE. GENEVffiVB. A barge belong^g to the Southern Lum- 
ber and Transportation Company, which was sunk by the steamer 
Polar Wave, was partiaJly destroyed, and the parts dangerone to 
navigation removed March 23, 189S. 

The trees referred to are generally leaning timber in bends of 
the river, or trees that are liable to faJl into the stream and become 
obstmctions. 

The limited space at disposal does not admit of my giving any 
more than the foregoing. For fiirther information. Including esti- 
mates, statistics, etc., I must refer to the printed reports. 

I trust that the Information herein given — some of which may not 
be generally known to memt>ers of the Exchange — will be of in- 
t«rert. 



REPORT OF WORK DONE UNDER THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER 
COMMISSION DURING THE YEAR 1865. 



The Improvement of that portion of the MlBsiasippi Biver between 
Cairo and the Head of Passes, as well as the survey of the entire river 
to its headwaters, is under charge of the MisHiasippi River Com- 
mission, organized by act of Congress, approved June 28, 1879. 

This Commieeion consists of seven members, three of which are 
appointed from the Corps of Engineers, XJ. S. Army; three from civil 
life, and one from the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. 

For the purposes of Improvement, the river is divided Into four dis- 
tricts. These districts extend as follows: The lat district from the 
mouth of the Ohio River to the foot of Island No. 40, the 2nd district 
from the foot of Island No. 40 to Whit« River, the 3rd district from 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



106 TRADE AND COMUEBCB OP 

■Uie mouth of White Bi»er to WBrrenton, Bnd the 4th diatiict from 
Warrenton to the Head of Posaea. 

Three engineer officers are detailed for duty, under orders of the 
CoinmiBSion; one in char^ of the let and 2nd districts, the second 
In charge of the 3rd district, and the third in charge of the 4th dis- 
trict. In addition, another Engineer officer is detailed as Secretaij 
of the Commission, in char^ of surreys and similar work which may 
be directed. After the present year, aleo, the operating of dredges, 
which has been heretofore under the officer in charge of the lat and 
Snd districts, will be transferred to the Secretary. 

The following is a brief summary of the work done during the past 
year: 

REVETMENT. DIKES, ETO, 

HAltBOn OF HICKMAN, KY.— 600 linear feet of bank graded and 

revetted. 
PLUM POINT BEACH.— 8,850 linear feet of revetment mats about 

300 feet wide. 

45,559 square yards of bank paving. 

Seven stone apur dikes put in. 

Gold Dust dam completed. 
MEAIPHIS HARBOR.~1,260 linear feet of revetment, mats 300 feet 

wide. 

3,734 aquare yards of bank paving. 
ASHBKOOK NECK.— 1,464 linear feet of revetment. 

2.S90 square yards of bank paving. 
LAKE PROVIDENCE. — 4,B77 linear feet of revetment, mats 300 feet 

48,800 square yards of bank paving. 
NEW ORLEANS HABBOR.— 3,200 linear feet of bank revetted. 

DREDQIKQ. 

The experimental dredge was remodeled, and b^an work in Sep- 
tember and closed work November 28th. The following channels 
were dredged to a navigable depth of aeven feet or more: 

Wolf Biver 1,S7S feet long 

Cherokee Bar 1,400 feet long 

Sam Phillips Bar 1,700 feet long 

Point Pleasant Bar 1.300 feet long 

Medley'a Bar 1,100 feet long 

Dredge "Gaston" was employed to work at Graves Bayou, and 
moved 4,732 cubic yards. A new channel was dredged from the Mia- 
aissippi Biver to the Bed and Atchafalaya Bivers, giving about seven 
feet of water at the mouth. 

A new dredge, with a capacity of 1,500 cubic yarda per hour, has 
been contracted for and built. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP ST, LOUia 109 

BDEVBTa. 

The general surref from Head of Passea to the headwaters, 
ordered by Congress, has been continued. The triangulation and 
precise levels ore completed to Minneapolis, Minn. The topography 
and hydrographjr are completed to Savanna, 111. The maps of the 
general survey are published from Keithsburg, El., to Donaldson- 
Tille, La., and from New Orleans to Head of Passes. 

A low-water survey from Vicksburg to DonaldaouTille, to ascet- 
ic the changes in bed and banks, is in progress and nearly flnished. 

PLANT. 

The care and repair of plant has been continued. Two towboats 
have beeD rebuilt, and severaLothers have had extensive repairs. 

. LETEES. 

Levee building has been carried on extensively at various points 
between Cairo and Head of Passes, as shown in the following table: 

Cubic Yards. 
Bifht bank, between Point Pleasant, Mo., and Pecan Point, 

Ark. 1,250,730 

Left bank, between Memphis and mouth of White Biver. . , , 144,242 

Walnut Bend, Ark 319,360 

Bight bank, between Helena, Ark., and White Hiver 1,255,S2S 

Left bank, between White Eiver and Vicksburg 778,979 

Sight bank, between Arkansas River and Warrenton, Miss. 3,373,398 

Right bank, between Warrenton and Bed River 527,642 

Btgbt bank, between Bed Biver and Fort Jackson 1,782,713 

Left bank, between Baton Bouge and Fort St. Phillips 1,284,098 

Total yardage of levee work between Point Pleasant, Mo., 
and Head of Passes, La 10,717,880 



GOVERNMENT LIGHTS ON WESTERN RIVERS. 
By Mr. Chaa. H. Alexander. Clerlt IStb Lighthouse DlatrlcC 



The traveler, -who from the boat's deck looks upon those im 
bareges, propelled by the giant towboats whose wheels know no rest 
as they plod patiently down our great river towards the sea, loaded 
with the product of this great Mississippi Valley, the heart from 
which the mig'btj' millions of the world are fed, or he who gives but 
a paasinp g'lance at tbe glittering lights that dot our shores, or to the 
doating* buoy which marks the grave of some ill-fated vessel, seldom 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



110 , TRADE AND COMMBHCB OP 

stops to consider the various ^ids to naTigfttion and glides for the 
direction and satety of the mariner, which the United States bestows 
gratultonaly upon the people of all nations. She has within he.- 
bousdaries an eighth of oil the lights in the world. It is the idea ot 
this GoTernment tliat light shoold be as free aa air; that the beacon 
lights and other aids to nftTigation are not only for the interest of 
commerce, but for the benefit of humanity, as well. 

Navigation of the Western rivers has always been of the most intri- 
cate character, and prior to 1H7S the commerce on these rivers wu 
mainly restricted to motion by daylight, because of the difRcnlty in 
keeping steamboats in the tortuous channel and in avoiding the man; 
obstructions with which they abounded. The hidden obstructiout 
were aumbcrleaa, and in many places barely left roam for the paBsag* 
of large Bteamers. There were many consecutive miles on these 
rivers where the wrecks averaged more than one to the mile. The 
"blind" crossings — ^those places where the banks show no diversity 
of outline— were so numerous in the ever-changing and narrow chan- 
nel that the pilots were frequently delayed, and could not always 
avoid disaster. At many points passage was never attempted on a 
dark night; but when. In the year 1874, the commerce on the Mis- 
sissippi induced Congress to authorize aid for river navigation, there 
was devised and put in operation by the Lighlv-House Board a system 
of lights which revolutionized steamboat navigation, making it so 
safe that boats which were compelled to tie up at night could mn aa 
by day; and this was accomplished at a small cost when compared 
with, the expense of lights on the ocean or on the lakes. 

The Government light consists of a post seventeen feet in lengfth, 
with a diamond-shaped board fastened at the top, to which is securely 
locked a square lantern; a step-ladder resting against the post ren- 
ders the lantern accessible. 

At points where the channel is made very narrow by permanent 
obstructions and passage dangerous, buoys have been placed as day 
marks, to which floating lights are attached at night. In addition 
to these there are many channel marks that designate the crossiDgs. 

The flrst cost of the post light is about ten dollars; and although 
it is temporary as to its life and shifting as to its place, it is claimed 
that they are doing an Immense deal of good, and meet a popalsT 
want quickly and well. 

Keepers for the river lights sre selected from among the people 
living on and owning property along the river, and they have gener- 
ally been found trustworthy and awake to the demands of the Bcnrioe. 

There are three river districts In the light-house establishment 
The Fourteenth District, extending on the Ohio River from Pitta- 
burgh, Pa., to Cairo, 11!., 966 miles; on the Tennessee Fiver 2UH 
miles, and on the Great Kanawha River 73Vi miles, in all a distance 
of 1,295 miles, and containing 530 lights, with headquarters at Cin- 
cinnati. 

The Fifteenth District extends on the Mississippi River from the 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THH CITY OP ST. LOUIS. HI 

head of navigation to Cairo, m.; on the Missonii River to Kansas 
City, and on the Ulinoia River from LaSalle to itB month, a total dis- 
tance of 1,582</, miles, with S:^ lights and 74 channel markB. The 
headquarters are at St. Louie. The Sixteenth District extends on 
the Mississippi River from Cairo, 111., to New Orleans and eight 
miles on the Red River, covering a distance of 1,009 miles. It, con- 
tains 352 lights. Its headquarters are at Memphis, Tenn. 

The Light-House Inspector for each district is an officer in the 
United States Navy, the detail being changed, as a. rule, every three 
years. He ib the disbursing officer, and responsible for large sums of 
money, in the expenditure of which the greatest care and economy Is 
exercised. 

Each district is furnished with a steamboat, called a light-house 
tender, on which the inspector, with his crew, visits the stations, 
supplying and paying keepers, so%nding the channel and moving 
lights where necessary, and locating and establishing new ones. 

The number of lights hare steadily increased until now the pilot is 
seldom out of sight of a beacon, and the dark spaces along the shore 
are few and far between. 

From the testimonials received from officers and managers of dif- 
ferent steamljoat lines,' boards of trade, and others interested in the 
navigation of the Western waters, the river lights and buoys appear 
to be of great benefit to inland commerce. 

During the last twenty years wonderful progress has been made in 
the river lights. In 18T4 an appropriation of $30,000 was made for a 
BOi^ey of the Mississippi, Ohio and Missouri Rivers, and to establish 
temporary lights and buoys. In the year ending June 30, 1875, 
there were established S80 lights and SI buoys, and at the present 
time there are some 1,800 of these lights on the rivers of the United 
States, and the appropriation for lighting of rivers for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 18SS, was S300,000, In the period of twenty-two 
years, from 18T4 to 1SS5, there has been appropriated by Congress for 
ligbting of rivers, the following sums, viz.: 

1B74 $ 50,000 00 18B6 $190,000 00 

1875 100,000 00 1886 190,000 00 

1876 166,000 00 1987 225,000 00 ' 

1877.... 140,000 00 1888 250,000 00 

1878 140,000 00 1889 254,000 00 

1870 130,000 00 1890 280,000 00 

1880 140,000 00 1891 383,000 00 

1881 140,000 00 1882 380,000 00 

188S 150,000 00 1893 300,000 00 

1883 175,000 00 1894 300,000 00 

1884 170,000 00 1395 300,000 00 

or tlie total amount of $4,353,000.00. 

I am indebted to Mr. A. B. Johnson, Chief Clerk of the Light-House 
Board, for much of the information used In preparing this paper. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADB AND COUMBRCB OF 



THE MISSOURI RIVER. 



The initial works undertaken by the Government on the Minoim 
Eiver below the mouth of the Yellowstone were at Kebnska Ci^, 
Neb., and St. Joseph, Mo., under amall appropriatiouB made In 18T6. 
Subsequently other appropriatione were made for these and other 
localities, until in IRRl the number of separate localities on which 
work had been ordered numbered fourteen, and extended from St. 
Charles, Mo., to Vermilion, Dak., a distance of about 830 milea. 

Including the appropriations made in ISHl, the items in the Bhei 
and Harbor Appropriation Acts covering the work on these foartetn 
localities numbered forty-six, of which fift«en amounted to (10,000 
or less, each; twenty-one were between 110,000 and $20,000; BewD 
were between 920,000 and $30,000, whUe there were, three items of 
$40,000, S5O,0OO and $30,000, respectively. 

Obviously there could be no connection between the works ao 
widely separated. The means provided were Inadequate at etery 
point, and while temporary benefit was in all cases afforded, nothing 
was completed. 

In 1861, however, a plan, based on a completed survey, for the tja- 
tematic improvement of the river between the mouth and Slonz 
City. la., was submitted by Maj. Suter (now Colonel), on whose 
recommendations In 1S82 Congress appropriated $S50,000 for the gen- 
eral Improvement of the river, apparently abandoning' the poUcj of 
alloting small sums to widely separated localities. 

For the economical expenditure of such a sum a lai^ floating cod- 
atruction plant became necessary, and while work w^a atilL being' 
prosecuted on some of the more important works commenced under 
previous appropriations, the plant and machinery necessnrj- for ton- 
ducting the work on an increased scale were prepared. 

By tbe act of July 5, 1884, an appropriation of $640,000 wai nude 
and a Missouri Kiver Commission created, who were in the future to 
direct all the works of improvement on the river. 

The Commission Is composed ol three officers of the Corps of Engi- 
neers, U. 8. Army, one of whom acts as President, and two civilians, 
one of whom is a civil engineer. The Secretary Is also an enginpel 
officer, detailed for that duty. 

The office of President of the Commission has be«n filled since its 
organization by Col. Charles R. Suter, lately transferred to the 
Pacific Coast. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 113 

In their first report, mode December 0, 1B84, the CommiBsion out- 
lined their general plan, which "coatemplat«a contracting' the width 
of the river to such limits as will insure stability of regfimen and 
approximate uniformity of slope, width and depth," by thri erection 
of works fixing' the location and direction of the channel, and they 
stated "that the primary object of the improvement is to deepen the 
cbsnnel, and thus to provide cheap through transportation for freight 
by which the country may be developed, and the money paid out 
be finally returned to the Treasury of the United States. • • • " 

Engineering necessities require that the work of improTemen't 
should proceed downstream, and the Commission, departing from 
the previous policy of widely scattered works, decided to concentrate 
their means on the reach at Kansas City, on which a very considerable 
amonnt ol work previously built could be utilized in the general 
scheme of improvement, and they strongly recommended in their re- 
ports that not less than Sl,0O0,00O per year be appropriated for con- 
tinno'us work from Eansae City down. Their well-defined plans and 
recommendations did not receive, at the hands of Congress, the con- 
sideration that they deserved. Due to the terms of the appropriation 
acts of 1884, 1S86 and 1888, less than $G(H),000 of the $g,01S,000 ap- 
propriat«d for the river could be expended on the continuous work. 
In other words, for the six years covered by the above appropriations, 
the Commission had asked $6,000,000 for oontinuous work, and bad 
received for the purpose less than one-tenth of that sum. 

In the act of 1890, Congress directed that the appropriation of $800,- 
000 of that year should, with certain specified exceptions, be ex- 
pended in the systematic improvement of the river from its mouth 
up, in reaches to be designated by the Commission and approved 
by the Secretary of War. This involved the abandonment of the 
work that had been executed in the vicinity of Kansas City, the mov- 
ing, at large expense, of all the Commission's plant several hundred 
miles down the river, and the beginning over again of a systematic 
improvement at a point far distant from their earlier work . 

In accordance with this law, the Commission designated the first 
reach, to the improvement of which the work should be concentrated 
as far as possible, as extending from the mouth of the river to Osage 
Biver. They were, however, compelled to reserve from the amount 
appropriated a large sum in the aggregate, to prevent the serious 
deterioration or destruction of work previo'OBly executed at certain 
up-river potnta. 

Commencing with July 13, 1892, the appropriation for the Missouri 
Biver was made a continuous one (or four successive years, amoun't- 
ing, in the aggregate, to $2,710,000 for the work between the mouth 
and Sioux City; and of this sum about 12,100,000, net, will have been 
expended on the first reach at the end of the present fiscal year, June 
30, 1896. A very considerable amount of the remainder has been 
specially diverted by Congress to upper-river points, and also a con- 
siderable amount expended on plant. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



in TRASH AND COUHBRCB OF 

On the first reach, two field conBtructlon parties, with base ol 
operations at Ewings Landing and at Gasconade, respectively, will 
have carried, by the end of the fiscal year, the systeinatic and con- 
tinuous -work of the Improvement a distance of 45 miles. 

In designing the systematic work of improveinent. two desired 
bank lines are laid down, coutractioK the width of the river to about 
1,000 to 1,100 feet, with easy, sweepfngr cnrrea, aimilu to those of the 
natural river, keeping the impin^ng or concave sides of the bends 
against the line of the blufls as far as possible. 

Radical chang'es in the course of the river are avoided and are 
aeldoni necessary, except occaaionally at the mouths of the trlbu- 

The natural and abrupt crossings are made easy ones, and the con- 
centrated fall or abrupt slope which occurs on them is diatributed 
over a greater length. 

The contraction is secured by pile dikes, generally placed at right 
■mgles to the channel, Bupplemeuted by a revetment of those natoral 
banks against which the new channel la, of necessity, trained. 

The dikes are made of piles, in one, two, three or four rovrs, ac- 
cording to the force of the current they are called on to divert, or to 
the accumulation of driftwood they may be called on to withstand. 
They are braced thoroughly together, and protected from scour by a 
willow brush foot-mat sunk by loading with rock. The dikes are ell 
permeable, and the deposit of the silt is encouraged by attaching to 
the dike acreens or cvirtalns of poles or wire netting. 

The bank revetment is always made of a continuons woven brush 
mat, extending from standard low water to a depth which will secure 
the bank from scour, fastened to the bank by, and interwoven with, 
wire cable and strand. The revetment is sunk by rock, and the 
upper bank riprapped against eddy and wave wash. 

Taken at the right time and under suitable conditions of stage, it 
is not especially difficult, by gentle urging, to move a channel in the 
Missouri River; provided the rectification works can stand the strain 
imposed by one season's high water, heavy deposits form above and 
below the dikes, a corrected channel results, and new banks join the 
ends of the dikes. A too serious coercion attempted by one or two 
dikes unsupported by other protective works naually ends in failure, 
and the dikes become an obstruction. Only by a careful study of the 
natural laws governing the stream and a compliance with them in 
projecting and accomplishing the practical work, can its rectification 
be accomplished. Full results cannot be expected nntil after several 
recurrences of high water, when the new banks beoom«built up to Uie 
proper height, and secure stability from the growth of willows and 
other vegetation, which soon covers the newly acquired land. 

The present results of the improvements on the first reach — s 
Stretch of 45 miles of rectified river, where heretofore existed most 
difficult navigation— demonstrate beyond all cavil that the improve- 
ment of the river for navigation purposes is not only feasible but 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OP ST. LOUIS. US 

certain of accomplishment, when it can be carried on under the sys- 
tem of continuous appropriation which has prevailed lor the last 
toor years. 

Many bars and diiBcult croBBinjfs, on which there was formerly 38 
inches or less, at low water, now exist only in name, as the depth 
has been increased to six or eigrlit feet at the same stage, and the 
former tortuous and changeable channel has been replaced by an 
easy and stable one, navigable by the largest boats. 

As the new bank lines obtain greater heights and the river ac- 
cepts its new conditions, a greater depth can be confidently expected. 

Ab an incident to the improvement work, very large accretions 
have been made, aggregating many thousand acres, which, in a few 
years, will be made to produce crops. Due to the protection afforded 
by the OoTernment works, this fertile land, as well as all other bot- 
tom land, formerly exposed to destruction by the vagaries of the 
unimproved river, will become of great value, and it may be a ques- 
tion whether such increase in acreage and in values does not of ItseU 
Justify the continuous improvement of the river, apart from con- 
siderations of commerce. 

On many European rivers it is well-known that the value of the 
reclaimed acreage has paid many times over the cost of Improve- 
ments; and, indeed, the latter has been In many cases undertaken for 
that sole purpose. 

The results obtained in the last four years on the first reach, under 
the system of continuing appropriations, and with little diversion 
of funds to outside points, contrast strongly with the results of work 
at Kansas City, done under a directly opposite system — if system it 
can be called. In fact, it is now safe to assert that, had the Commis- 
sion's original plans and their recommendations as to apjnvpriatlona 
received aninterruptedly since 1884 the support of Congress, the 
complete improvement of the river from Kansas City to its mouth 
would to-day be an accomplished fact. 

In the vicinity of Jeflerson City, for a distance of 13 miles, the 
acreage of new land formed in the past four years, due to the recti- 
fication works, amounts to S,SO0 acres, or over 300 acres per mile, 
and the area of land protected in the same distance amounte to 12,800 

Only one season of very high water, thot of 1892, has occurred 
during this period, and although some of the new land has already 
been cultivated, the greater part of it has not attained a sufllcient 
heig'ht for f nil cultivation. With another flood in the river, however, 
there is scarcely a doubt that 3,000 acres of the accretions would 
become arable. In the same reach, bottom lands not previonsly 
marketable, on account of insecurity from the ravages of the river, 
are now worth at least S50 per acre, 

A computation has been made which gives 300 acres per mile as 
the average amount of accretion which would obtain were the Im- 
provement works carried continuously from Sioux City to the mouth. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



jjg TBADB AND COMMBaiCB OF 

The cost of 45 milea of improved river m^j be said to have been 
about S44,500 per mUe, but it can be safely stated that at no otter 
locality will the problem of rectiflcation be nearly as difficult and ex- 
pen at ve. 

The experience gfained appears to justify the Commission in ven- 
turing the opinion that the cost of carrying the improvement to the 
mouth of the river, 110 miles, will be between $3,000,000 and $3,500,- 
000, with a strong probability that the lower flgure will not be ex- 
ceeded. 

The Missouri Hiver Commission also operate and maintain one 
sna^boat on the river; this work is a perpetual one on a river with 
caving banks. The boat's work in one season ranges from 1,000 to 
3,500 snags pulled and destroyed, in addition to the removal of other 
obstructions, the cutting "* trees liable to become snags, etc 

Under the act of 1884, creating the Commission, they were charged 
with the improvement and survey of the river from its mouth to its 
headwaters. The act of 1886, however, terminated their jurisdiction, 
so far as the improvement was concerned, at Sioux City, la. The act 
of 188B extended the limit of their work to Fort Benton, Mont., but 
all the subsequent acts again fixed the highest point of their control 
aa Sioux City. The work executed under the Commission on the 
upper river was principally done in the first 40 miles below Fort 
Benton. 

A system of secondary triang^ilation has been carried by the Com- 
mission from Three Forks, Mont., which may be considered aa the 
head of the Missouri River, to its mouth, a distance of 2,55t miles. 

The results of this survey and those of subsequent topographical 
ones made by the Commission and the engineer officers in charge of 
the upper river have been embodied in a series of 84 maps, on a scale 
of one inch to one mile. 

Under the River and Harbor Act of 1894, the Missouri River Com- 
mission were also charged with the improvement of the Gasconade 
and Osage Rivers. The former had an appropriation of $5,000 in that 
year, which was expended in removing snags, in closing chutes be- 
hind islands, and in special contraction and protective works on the 
shoals. The amount of commerce justifies the yearly exipenditure of 
larger sums than has hitherto l>een appropriated for this river. On 
the Osage Eiver, accumulated appropriations since 1892, made under 
an approved project for slack-water narigation, rendered it poaalble 
to commence, this year, the construction of a masonr? lock at Bren- 
nekes Shoal, seven miles aliove the moutti. Under continuous ap- 
propriations, it is expected that it will require about three yeara to 
complete the lock and dam at this point, at a cost of about ^00,000. 
This lock and dam will eftorif a continuous six-feet navigation above 
it for about IS miles, where another lock and dam must be built; and, 
proceeding up the river, the locks and dams will succeed each other 
at distances varying from 15 to 10 miles. The removal of snags, the 
cutting of overhanging timber, and work on the shoals, for affording 
temporary relief to the commerce of the river, pending the comple- 
tion of the slack-wat«r improvement, will be continued each year. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THB Cnr OF BT. LOUIS. 



THE RIVERS. 



The year 1899 added &uottier year of diacouragement to the rirer 
trade. The Heason vaa one of unusually low water, and aft«r Oc- 
tober iBt, navigation Boutliward was practically suspended. The ap- 
rirals and departures show little decrease, but the trips made were 
largely by local packets running to nearby points. The buslnesH of 
the upper river was fairly satiafsctory, although the through StrPaul 
packets were withdrawn on account of low water, about the middle 
of August. The Eeokuk packets were, however, able to run until 
Xovember 5th. 

The volume of businees in the lower river, that is to points below 
Cairo, was extremely light, there being but 54 departures of the N. O. 
Anchor Line PacketB, and but 41 taws sent out by the Barge Line 

The river southward viae closed by ice from January 13th to 
March 1st. 

The total tonnage of the year shows a decrease over previous years, 
as will be seen by the following table: 

1805. 1894. 1893. 
Tons received by steamboats and barges. . . .410,145 455,17$ 473,895 

Tons received by rafta 98.685 188.335 126,510 

Tons shipped by steamboato and barges 303.355 363.080 436.900 

Total 812,185 946,590 1,036,305 

Capt. Austin R. Moore, Treasurer of the St. Louis & Mississippi 
Valley Transportation Co., gives the following account of the lower 
river business. 

Your request for brief notes on tiie lower river trade during the 
year just closing, reached me on the fiftieth anniversary of my con- 
nection with the river; and I can truly say the present season has 
l>een a moat phenomenal exception to all others during the half cen- 
tury. J have known at one season leas than four feet hence to Cairo, 
— at another, teas than four feet between Cairo and Memphis, — at 
another, five feet as far south as Natohez. The extreme low stage of 
water during the seasons referred to was confined to a short stretch of 
river, and often to a single bar; while at all other Intermediate points 
there was to be found a fair boating stage. For this obstacle, which 
existed, as a rule, not more than two or three weeks, there was the 
remedy of either lightening or double-tripping. The e:tception of 
the present year consists in the fact that extreme low water has been 
the rule from St. Paul to Natohez, and covering a period of months 
Initead of weeks, thus placing an embargo on navigation absolutely 
prohibitory. The very natural sequence to sueh a condition was the 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



118 TRADS AND COMMBRCB OF 

diversion of trafflc to other chonnelB, even at U^fher T«tea of or- 
ris^, Tirhne in very many InatanceB certain braochee of comi)i«n% 
confined excluaively to river points, became paralyzed becanse of Ibe 
absence of water transportation. To empliasize tba exceptional 
character of river traffic for 1396, it will only be neceaaary to gif 
the ag'gregute of business as tietween the present, ajid one other, or 
previous year. 

The Bar^ Line transported during* 1S95, southward, 
2,5B9.S9S bushels Grain in bullc, 
47,438 tana in pachagre freight. 

During a previous year; 

14,990,085 bushels Grain in bulk, 
96,S08 tons In package freight. 

Of course there are other factors to cause » difference in volume 
of business, — such as crops and foreign demand ; but the mun i^ 
parity, ae a rule, will follow river conditions. 

To sum up the whole, the conditions prevailing during the yew 
1895 have proved most disastrous to water transportation. 

Mr. I. P. Lusk, G. P. A., Diamond Jo Line, gives the following re- 
port of the business of the upper river: 

Business on the Upper Mississippi River, during the navigable sea- 
Bon of 1895, has been fairly satisfactory, and would liave been much 
more so, provided there had been a fair stage of wat«r from the open- 
ing of navigation in tbe spring, until the close of same; but proIwUT 
not within the recollection of tbe oldest inhabitant has there been 
such a uniform low stage of water during the entire season. 

Not even the spring rains were of aufllcient volume to help tlie river 
much, and our steamers started out in the spring with low water, 
and continued to run during the entir« season with the same trouble 
to contend with. 

In the spring our first steamer left St. Lonia for Keokuk, April IStli, 
and the first steamer for St. Paul, Minn., left St. Louis May IStb. 

The freight and passenger trade were trath very good, but would 
have been better if boats could have run on regular time, but extreme 
low water came abont the middle of August, and all the St. Paul 
st«amer8 had to lay up and were unable U> run through to St Faal 
the balance of the season, although we kept our boats running con- 
tinuously between St. Louis and Eeokuk, until November 5th. 

Considerable government work has been done on the Upper Hlsai*- 
sippi Eiver, the results having Improved the channel, and if aufll- 
cient appropriations are made in the future to continue the woric, we 
believe that ultimately there will be a good boating stage of water 
between St. Louis and St. Paul during the entire seaaon of navlga- 

We are encouraged enough In thla direction, so that, with the p»*- 
specta of business, we are now buiidiug a laig« new aide wbed 
steamer for the St. Louis and Keokuk b'ade, that will be ready for tbe 
trade upon the opening of navigation in 1896. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP ST. L0UI8. 119 

Mr. Jolin T. MsMengale, Freight Manager of the St. LouU & Ten- 
nessee Kiver Packet Company, says of the buHincBs of the past year: 
"The TennesBee Valley, from Chattanooga to Paducah, Is veiy rich 
and productiTe. Large quantitieB of iron, cotton, com, peannts, lain- 
ber, tan-bark, and produce ^nerally, are shipped out annnally. This 
line, with our counectione, is now running regularly through to Chat- 
tanooga, nearly 1,000 mllee, using through bills of lading, and making 
prompt time. We note Increase of shipments from St. Louis in boots 
and shoes and groceries, and increase from the Tennessee River to 
St. Iionis of peanuts, lumber, ties and tan-bark. Upon the whole, the 
year has been fairly satisfactory, and while we hare had a long sea- 
son of low water, it has not materially interfered with our boats. 

Mr. ThoB. Fenlston, General Freight Agent of the Eagle Packet 
Company, gives the following statement as to the business on the 
Illinois Biyer; 

The Eagle Packet Company had the steamer D. H. Pike running 
between this port and Peoria, Bl., from March 1 to November 30, 
making semi-weekly trips, carrying large cargoes of grain, apples 
and stock, largely In excess of last year. In addition, the Str. J. J. 
OdU ran in the trade from early March nutil close of navigation. 
Our company was well pleased with the trade, as it was very largely 
In excess of any year since 1B90. 



DEPTH OF CHANNEL SOUTHWARD. 



Capt. James Good, Saperintendent of Barge Line, reports the stage 
of water during the year as follows : 



8T. LOUIS TO OAIBO. 





No 


navigat 


on. 

Ofeet 

9 ■' 

g " 
10 " 
10 ■' 

g ■' 


Aug. 
Sept 

fS 

Nov. 

Dec. 
Dec. 


























1 to 80. No naviga- 
tion acc't low water, 

lto30 

20 to 81 


June 1 to 80 
July 1 to 81. 
Aug. 1 to 10. 







CAIRO TO NEW OBLEANS. 



Jan. 1 to 10 . . 
Jan. 10 to 81 .. 
Feb. 1 to 10 . , 
Feb. 10 to 28.. 
March 1 to 10 . 
April 1 to 80 . 
May 1 to 81 . 



Aug, 1 to 15 . . 

Aug. IS to 81 . . 

Sept. 1 to IB . . 

Sept. IB to 80 . . 

Oct. 1 to 80 . . 

Nov. 1 to 80 . . 

Dec. 1 to Sa . . 

Deo. S3 to 81 . . 



Use at St. Lonia on December 20tb was unprecedented. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



trade: and comhercss op 



Oll^l 



thirty 



nAvigatioQ southward has been Btupeuded 



1873-78, 

1B78-74. 
1874-70, 
1875-78. 
1876-77, 
1877-78. 
1878-79, 



from December 15th to Januarj IStb S7dajB 

from December 26th to February Sd 88 ■' 

from January 81 h to February 18th 40 '■ 

open all winter. 

from December 31St to December 28th 7 " 

from December aiat to January 28d 32 " 

from December 1st to 18th, and from January 

80lh to February 24th « " 

from November 28th to January 20th 61 " 

open all winter. 

from December 30th lo Febraary 27th 68 " 

open all winter. 

, from December 8th to February 5th 58 '■ 

open all winter. 

from December 16th to January 2Bth and Febru- 
ary 14th to 17th 46 " 

from December 17th to December 81st inclusive. II " 
from November 18th to December 6th and from 
December 7th to 14th, and from December S4th 

to February ISth 78 " 

open all winter. 

from December 7th to 23d and from January let 

to February 18th 28 " 

from December 18th to February 5th 48 " 

from December IBth to 80th and 86 days in Jan- 
uary and February 47 *" 

from December 10th to S3d and from January 

7th to February 16th M " 

from December 1st to I4th and from December 

a4th to January 27th 49 " 

from December l&th to Jaau&ry 81st 48 " 

open all winter, 
open all winter, 
open 0.11 winter. 

from Jaauaiy 0th to February lat 28 " 

from December aoth to February 16th 67 " 

open all winter. 

from January Ist to March 1st 59 " 

open all winter. 



STEAMEBS AND BARGES. 

Permanently and temporarily enrolled and licensed at the Port of St 
Louis on the Slst day of December, 1895 : 

No. ot Qron Net 

Veaaels. Tonnage. Totii>B(C> 

Perm, enrolled steamers (wood) 00 87,746.14 81,174,87 

barges 86 80,867.88 80.777.0* 

steamers (iron) 4 1,690.29 1,6S9.8S 

Temporarily enrolled steamers (wood) 1 68.88 &S.St 

Perm, licensed barges, under 30 tons 2 27.7* 27.79 

" ■' steamers " " (wood)... 8 185.21 101.44 

• (iron).... 1 38.92 18.46 

yachts '■ " 8 80,83 25.77 

Grand total vessels 204 190,678.28 11I»,81S.51 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OP ST. LOUIS. 



Highest and Lowest Stages of Water in the Mississippi River at 
St. Louis, Mo., for each Month of the year iSgs- 



SuMMASY OF THK St. Louu Wbather Borbau Bivbr Gauqs 
Readmos foe the Yeah 1896. 


Uonth. 


Blgheat. 


Date. 


Loirest. 


Date. 




a 
i 


13 and » 
26 

1 

land Z 


.0.S 

11 






% 

27. !&»,!» 






















Ocwbop.. 


30. 1 


Uecember 





Highest Blage of water dur[DS rear A3 teet 

Absolute rantra Z3.S " 

Qresbest monthly range S31 " 

Least " '■ 0.8 " 

Uean Banco 0-4 " 



HIGHEST AND LOWEST STAGES OF WATER. 

The record of the highest and lowest water noted at the St. Lonia 

Weather Bureau Office since ita establishment is as follows: Zero 

of gauge being low w&t«r mark of 1868, which indicates about 

12 feet of water in the chaanel in the harbor of St. 

Louis, and 4 feet of water in shoal places 

between here and Cairo. 



HIQHBST. 


LOWE8T. 


Y«r. 


Date. 


Stage. 


V<>r 


Date. 


atftge, 






n ft.- n. 

axL-i S: 

S2 n.- n- 
XB rt.- n. 
Kft.- n. 

IS: I 

27 feet. 
39.0 feet. 

ZJ.sfe«t. 


1B7II 

is 

1880 

s 

1884 
1887 

1890 

180Z 
18B3 
18M 
1SS6 


Not. 30 and Dec. I.. 
December 30 and ai 




























December 27 

Decern bnrM 

NDvember29 










^:. 


JuljlO.llandi:.... 

?ur/,:::::::.-:.:::;;; 


7 ft.- 7 In: 




















December 18 and 17. 
Declrabe?!8'?iia27: 


































December 30 and si. 






Si?'ii::-.:;;:::;:... 
















V^^\l:::.:::::. 








-as feet. 



,db,GoOglc 



TBABB AND COUMXRCB OF 



BIVER GAUGE READINGS AT ST. LOUIS FOE 1885. 

FBOH WBATBBS BDRKAD I 



^. j,„. 


Feb. 


Mkf 


April 


Mar. 


June 


lulj 


Aug. 


Bept 


.. 


Sot. 


Dm, 




-0.E 
*1 
-0.0 

-0.2 

-0.! 
-0.1 
-0.0 
-0.1 
-0.3 
-0.1 
-0.4 
-0.2 

1.B 
2.S 
8.0 

1.4 
1.E 

0.9 
0.4 
0.1 
-0.7 
-0.4 


^ 


B.2 


7.7 

... 

8.4 

7.6 
7.0 

6.2 
6.G 


E.0 
B.7 


8.1 


12.7 
13.2 

U.B 

12,8 
1E.8 
17.1 
16.8 
16,4 
IE.E 
14,2 
12 4 


13.8 

12.8 
U.4 

11.6 

10.8 
10.2 
9.8 
9.7 
9,6 
9,2 




3.E 
35 
16 

8.7 
38 
19 

19 

3,7 
3,7 
16 

E 

39 

IB 
17 

... 

IE 
14 
18 
12 
11 
10 
t.9 
IS 

r, 

16 
1.6 


3.5 

14 

u 

l> 

li 

13 

14 
16 

1! 
IB 
17 
2,6 

It 

IS 
14 
14 
13 
13 
13 
18 
11 

IS 
16 
14 
11 






10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
9 
9 








, 




1 
6 
S 
1 


7 

7 

8 
9 
10 








• 
• 

• 

4.9 

... 

4.4 












G 
7 
7 




lit 








8.0 
8.0 


HI 




-61 




ni 




E 


2 


n,j 






8.9 
8.4 
7.7 
7.4 
7.0 
6.S 
6.8 
S.3 
6.0 
E.6 


fii 










OJ 




2 

2 
1 
8 
6 

9 

1 
I 
9 

e 
I 


9.8 
8.9 

7.4 

7.3 
7.0 

... 

6.9 
6.7 
6.3 

... 

:; 

6.1 








80 


0.1 






U.1 
12.1 
11.8 

11,8 
11.7 
12.8 
12.6 
12.7 

1S.6 
14.1 

is.e 

1S.0 
U.6 
1L9 
12.8 

122 


f.9 

6.E 
6.4 
6.1 

e.3 

6.E 
7.2 

6.8 
7.S 
7.7 
8.2 

8.3 

8.9 
8,8 


0.7 




ia.0 

18.1 

12.1 
12.4 
12.4 
12.0 
12.S 

12.9 
12.8 
12.4 
12,0 
12.1 
12.5 
12.7 


.. 




o.» 




u 




It 




lU 




V 




lU 




ai 




4 
4 
4 

l 

t 


2 



8 


ai 




m 


28 

(T 

!8 


a.) 
i» 

115 
OJ 






*.E 


13 111* 


31 


an 


I« 




■ BIT 


rfro 
















ta» 


usee 


[>ye 




IvlU 


rouO 





sdbvGoo^^lc 



THE CITT OP ST. LOUIS. 












i 


~^ — 









^ 


1 

a 

1 


1 

s 

1 

2 


i 


1 




i 


i 
1 

1 
1 




1 


Sifp 


































































u 


1W 






1 


n 


IK 


i» 


















































K 


w 


i» 


10 






?i 


■s 








































i 






m 










































































Total .... 


«» 


1.085 


!98 




2.007 


1.1M 


U0,14B 


Sg,S8S 



DBPAETDRKB. 



IM. 


u 


II 


1 


J 


1 


i 


ill 


III! 






100 
109 

m 

BT 
11 

^96J 


































1 

li 
s 

m 


4 

'! 

12 

! 
6 

i 


i 

G 




1 






















^U;IS 














^ K.m 




















1 








Total 


^^(9 


— 7!|-T:r;i t 


i.mmM 



ARRIVALS AND DEPARTURES FOR SEVENTEEN YEARS. 



— 


».PART<TIIEe. 


Tean. 


Boa IS. 


Batges 


Tons of 


Too.or 
Lumber 

HbobIv,..! 


YeacB. Boats. 


Shippod. 




am 

lOGt 

18S1 

USB 

tta. 
awr 

B 


me 

IMS 

lOSO 
019 

m* 
ins 

'S 

1186 

isn 

471 


466,175 
471,895 
666^980 
4HI.DS0 
680,790 
543:990 
697.966 
SGl.SBO 
670,205 
479,086 
690,350 

m.s& 

802,080 
6S8I970 


3S,6S5 

130I2M 
142,080 

S;S 

200,786 

24o;33a 

231.286 

S6B;020 
198,816 


1896 

1884 

1892":::::: 

ISS9:::::::: 
1888 

1SS4:::::::: 

1883 

188! 


ma 

2011 
1846 

i 

2102 
182S 
2018 

2m 








602,216 
612,930 










712,700 
610,116 








ffi'S 






614,910 
S77,840 














1»I» 





,db,GoOglc 



TRABB AND COMUBRCB OF 

RIVER TONNAGE BY MONTHS. 
Reccipta by River in Tons, 1895. 



MONTHS. 


i 

B 

1 


1 

S 

1 


1 


■c 


, 


i 

a 


P 


I 


Janua 




2S0 
335 
23,420 
32,760 
19,410 
^9,920 
40,266 
32,655 
23,550 
23,820 
25.060 
7,615 












EM 
















m 


March 

Sr..;;.:: 

June 

July 

August ... 


1,930 
4,550 

3.9ea 

£1,985 
10,770 
12,305 

7,105 

6,020 

9,295 

345 


2,030 
5,795 
7,290 
4,740 
1,750 
2,965 
3,480 
2,285 
1,220 
45 


100 

580 
640 
500 
940 

■■"530 


5,430 

8.525 

19,405 

560 

20 

1,500 


5,345 

2.090 
3,845 
3,550 
2.670 
2,565 
2,450 
1,060 


■Vi« 

2«;4T0 
13,110 
16,425 


3S.25i 
49,*T» 
59.JSS 
65.Ui 
T4,47S 
78,4«l 
4B,W 




















7.»i 














Total . . 


78,170 


339,090 


30,600 


3,270 


35,440 


23,575 


98,6ftS 


508,830 



TONS OF FREIGHT SHIPPED BY RIVER, 189S. 



tm. 


1 
S 

1 


i 

S 


1 

i 


f 
1 


i 


i 


IS 

II 


i 
I 


Janna 





































March .... 
June 

July 

Augruat . . , 
September 


035 
3,340 
3,570 
11,095 
3,460 
2,653 
1.805 
1.735 
2,185 


37,630 
30,040 

28,370 
19,895 
30,125 
33,225 
23,230 
14,925 
13,370 
15,345 


440 
1,160 

'lis 

l,l.iO 
510 
550 
550 
560 


400 

945 

1,050 

1.330 

610 

50 

1,070 


'.'.'.:::'. 


2,680 
3,180 
3,855 
2,040 
1.615 
1,560 
1,885 
665 
55 


990 


43,0TS 
3S.66J 

3«.4I5 
34.9W 
26.960 
38,000 
33,541 
17,875 


































Total . . 


30,780 


241,155 


7.040 


5,505 





17.535 


1,340 


303,3» 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



SHIPMENT OF BULK GRAIN BY BARGES TO 
NEW ORLEANS, 1896. 



YEAR. 


BOAT. 


II 


d « 


1 


^u 

ssg 


u 


March 3. 


Hy. Lnurey 

MT^Chofce "■ 
M J Chol--6 
8, H H. Clark - 
My Choice 

S. H.H. Clark " 

™" i: 

Oakland 

Hy. Lourey |; 

Jay Gould 
Exporter 




»,a48 




ll 




25.114 


l.«5 


ttiS 






8.S70 












'SSS 


T4.000 


l.OilS 
3.160 






2^20 


April ». 


IU.OH 

100.000 






1.8« 






ii.ai6 


3-S 
















««T I 








S'SliS 


K 




"■5!! 






l.WO 
MS 

1,485 
1:455 
1,Z« 

2,010 
























4.'i.000 


TOO 
1,280 
















'"!?' Ji 












50.000 


480 
l!545 

sao 




*« ,f 




fS 












U.M3 

11 

112.000 

esius 


2.870 

..g 

l.S» 
l.TTO 








1.880 

■"■J!;6io 




«*?> i 




















LOTS 


i.sso 






i.6es 

l.tIO 

440 




























ie.T50 

salooo 


470 
2.T1B 

1,7M 






i.oae 
















ToU 
VlB Beln 

pSi 

if 

is. 


■ from St. LoHls 

ont and Cairo- 


<38.«U 


i.aii,e(8 

4I,7W 


4i.T»t 


48.821 

if 

BO 
22330 


1S.085 


s?*-:;;:;-:;:;;;;;;; 


































^^ 


















embir 




780.11(10 


LOOS 


23.836 


Gra 


d Total 


S88.3VZ 


..^m 


4e.lBS 


T*.81B 


123*85 







,db,GoOglc 



TRADH AMD COUMBBCE OF 



SHIPMENTS BY SOUTHERN BOATS DURING 1895. 



AHTICLES. 


Bouts. 


"&"" 


Boau. 




1,056 
2,T33 


250 

19.966 

2,340 

175 


20 




1,948 




393 












95,100 

3,000 

47.366 

2 

37,086 

1.251,803 

111,842 


604,600 
5,860 
1,219 
16 
494 
1,008 
2,49fl 


113.400 




32S 












6,S13 






























rffi bS :::::::::::::::::: 


893,831 

2,970 

657 

29 

17,790 

7,873 

189,811 

3.107.99B 

6,860,872 

300 

137,062 


23,045 

488 

1,523 

27 

470 

175 

155,272 

925.824 

435,535 

325 

1.905 


22,931 




43 




























345.199 






12,672 








'a^ 

1,393 
10 


394 

4,99E 




































10 

155,790 

5,043 






69,565 
1,402 

438,614 

614 

1.497,850 

234,660 


26.160 
18,458 








1,092 
261,550 
498,375 






47.900 
182,224 








137,205 


103,950 


17.535 





,db,GoOglc 



; CITT OF ST. IrODIS. 



iQiaiao "n| ^aa 







,db,Googlc 



TRADE AKD COHMEBCB OF 



s S = 
8 4^ 



II 


innnnini 


II 


iiilnnn: 


ll 


:|II.S|l|i;i;; 


ll 


iiiiiliin: 




.liHSIil :■■■. 
;.-Sa»SU-SS : : ; ; 


:ligg§i§3IEIi 


mmimmi 


■mmimm 







11111 




iiil.SSiiSi::: 

iS||6BSS86;M 


P 


iiJiSSsiPglEI 


piljpiSiiSS 


1 


iiiiillliiiii 








g"""""" 



D„ii„.db,Go(5glc 



THE CITT OP ST. LOUIS. 



RIVER ACCIDENTS, 1895. 



Jmi. 6. — A wh&rfboat at Bayou Sara, La., sunk; losa, $7,000. 

Jan. 7.— A sudden rise in the Alleg-hany River caused a loss of $40,000 

to coal boats. 
Jan. 7. — The steamer Oneida was B<mk bj the ic« in the Kanawha 

River; lose, $10,000. 
Jan. 11. — The at«amer Paul Tulane strnck anas' "^ Lower Mississippi 

Hirer; damage sltg'ht. 
Jan 13. — The river closed at this port, Sunday, 9:15 a. m. 
Jan. 14- — Steamer Lon^ellow ran into B. R. bridge at Cincinnati; 

slight damage. 
Jan. 15. — The towtioat Boaz struck rocks in the Ohio River, sinking 

23 coal boats; loss, $25,000. 
Jan. IT. — The tovrboat Coat BluQ sank six coal boats in the Ohio 

River; loss, 89,000. 
Jan. 19. — Steamer Nat F, Dartch sank in the Red River; was raised. 
Jan. 20. — Steamer State of Missouri struck rocks and sank In the 

Ohio River; loss, $3,000. Eight passengers reported lost. 
Jan. 27. — The transfer steamer J. F. Joy sank in Loner Mississippi; 

losa, £S,000. 
Jan. 27. — The towboats Thos. Reese, No. 2, and Mariner encountered 

high winds in the Lower Mississippi, and lost 20 coal 

boats; loss $30,000. 
Feb. 8. — Steamer Cyclone wcs partly wrecked by a gasoline ex- 
plosion, in the St. Francois Biver; loss, $4,000. Several 

passengers injured. 
Feb. 25. — Transfer steamer Susie Brown was sunk by the ice in the 

Ohio River; was raised. 
Mm. 1.— The towboat Pacific, ^'o. 1, was sunk by the ice in the Ohio 

River; loss, $8,000. 
Iifar. 1. — The steamer Marcus Collins sank near New Orleans; loss, 

$10,000. 

Mar. 2. — Steamer Nat F. Dartch sank in the Red River; losa, $15,000. 

Mar- 3- — Steamer B, S. Rea burst a steam pipe; three of the crew 
scalded. 

Mar. 3, — Steamer Laura Blanks was destroyed by fire at New Or- 
leans; loss $8,000. 

Mar. S. — The towtxiat Geo. Shiras struck R, R. bridge in the Ohio 
River and sank three coal boats; loss $5,000. 

Mar. 8. — St«amer Longfellow struck R. R. bridg* at Cincinnati and 
sank; loss $25,000. Eleven lives lost. 

Mar. 8. — Steamer RosedaJestruckrocksinOhioRtver and sank; loss, 
$10,000. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



180 TRADE! AND COUHBRCB OT 

Mar. 11. — Steamer Gamma sank in the Bed River; loss, S7,000. 
Mar, 12, — The bargfl La Belle and cargo ■were deatroy ed by fire in the 

St. LotiiH harbor; lose, $7,000. 
Har. IS. — Steamer Olenn Taughen was deetroyed by ftre in the Lower 

MisHiBsippi Biver; loss, $8,000, 
Mar. 25. — The towboat Smoky City sank 20 coal boats in the Mis- 

* siulppi Biver, near Cairo; loaa, (30,000. 
Mar. 23. — The ferryboat Acom was destroyed by Are in £he Ohio 

Biver; loss, $4,000. 
April 3.— The steamer Iron Queen was destroyed by Are in the Upper 

Ohio Siver; loes, $75,000. 
April 2*. — The towboat Ocean Wave was destroyed by fire, in the 

Lower Mississippi Kiver; loBS, $6,000. 
May 3.— Steamer E. B, Weelock sank in the Bed Biver; losa, $20,000. 
May 14.— The towboat Eescue exploded her boilers in the OMo Eiver; 

dama^ to boat, $6,000. 
June 21. — The steamer Alice 8. was destroyed by fire in the DUnoIs 

Kiver; lo«s, $5,000. 
July 6. — The steamer Lady Lee sank near Memphis; loea, $25,000. 
July 14. — The steamer Assumption sank near New Orleans; loss, 

$10,000. 
July IS. — The towboat Uncle Billle sank in the St. rrancois Kver; 

loss, $4,000. 
Aug. S. — The steamers Big Sandy and Carrollton, vrith several wbart 

boats, were destroyed by fire at Cincinnati; loss, $100,000. 
Aug. 20. — The steamer John D. Scully waa destroyed by fij« at Kew 

Orleans; loss, $5,000. 
Aug. 31. — The steamer Benton sank in the Lower Missouri Biver; 

was raised. 
Sept. 1, — The steamer Marco sank in the Lower Mississippi Biver; 

loss, $2,500. 
Sept 19. — The steamer St. T^wrenco sank in the Ohio River; loss, 

$20,000. 

Oct. 16. — The steamer Besolute sank in the Lower Mississippi River; 
loss, $1B,000. 

Oct. 19.— The steamer Alvin sank in the Lower Mississippi Siver; 1o«b, 
$18,000. 

Nov, B. — The steamers S. B. Sue, Sidney Dillon and Scoti& nere de- 
stroyed by fire at Cincinnati; loss, $40,000. 

Nov. 26. — The towboat Jennie Campbell sank in the Lower Mis- 
sissippi River; loss, $30,000. 

Nov. 28. — Filtecn loaded coal boats were destroyed by grrounding in 
the Ohio River; loss, $20,000. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



THE Cinr OF BT. LOUIS. 



SPANISH AMERICAN TRADE OF ST. LOUIS. 



FrepBred b; the Secretary of ihe St. Louis Bptinlab Club. 



St. Louis is aivokening' to an understanding of her great commercial 
situation geof^raphically. Probably in no one year boa tbere been 
as mucb interest taken in tbe export business to Mexico, Central and 
South America as in the current year. 

For a few years, Home pioneers associated at the St. Louis Spanish 
Club, have made St. Louis' commercial features known throughout 
UeKico and Central America, with a persistency impelled by a firm 
belief in a successful end; they have made St. Louis the most favor- 
ably known of the American cities. St. Louis goods are popular in 
these cities, and the sentiment of dealing in them grows fast. A few 
years since it was the exception that anything came from the States, 
bnt now the ties with Europeans are fast being broken, and the Span- 
ish-speaking merchants are placing their confidence and orders with 
their Northern neighbors. 

Am an illustration of this, the Charge D' Affaires of Costa Bica re- 
ports that three years ago 85 per cent, of Costa Rica's trade went to 
Europe, and 15 per cent, to the United States; the last statistics 
show that 85 per cent. Is now done by the United States and Eng- 
land, and Germany gets the 16 per cent. 

The actual business done by St. Louis is difficult to determine, for 
the reason that at the border the payments of duty have to be ar- 
ranged, and the custom prevails of the consignee's having the Con- 
sular invoices prepared at the same time and cleared by the resident 

Therefore, Laredo, El Paso, Eagle Pass, Mobile and New Orleans, 
in the Treasury reports (as recorded by payment of duties, both by 
the United States and Mexican porta) credit the border reshipment 
point with the sale, instead of the city where the shipment originates. 

That the business is rapidly growing tbere is no question, as is 
eridenced in many ways, and it is not unusual that the first pur- 
chases by foreign merchants in the United States, is frequently 
beard of in this city. Acquaintance once made and started it grows. 
The commercial integrity of Spanish- American merchants is unsur- 
passed by those of any nations; failures are few and fraudulent fail- 
ores are almost unknown. The building of railroads, which opens 
up new country, and usually has a connection with us, by rail or 
■teamer.is a most potent factor in the growth of the St.Louis export 
trade. There are five most excellent routes to Mexico, and each one 
of the Central and South American Bepiiblics is reached by our new 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



189 TSADH AND COMMBRCB OF 

commercial marine, the increaGe ol which, in vessels, has been re- 
markable within the past few years. 

The time of delivery of both freight and passeng^ra between our 
citiea and their capitals and business cities of our neig'hbore has bees 
greatly leaaeDed during the year; thus are we drawing nearer to 
each other, and in this way Is the merchant able to buy more fre- 
quently, carry less stock, and pay his accounts in a shorter time. 
The freight and passenger rates have also been reduced. 

The St. Louis Spanish Club has secured, within the year, the ap- 
pointment of two new Consuls, those of Argentine and Costa ffica, 
Honduras, Guatamela and Ificaragua, have each promised the ele<^ 
tion of resident Consuls. These, with Mexico and Brazil represeDted, 
give the Spanish-Americans an able representation in this market, 
and these Consuls are making- it their buEiness to acquaint thnr 
countries with the desirability of this as a market. 

The preparation of the first St. Louis Export and Import Directory, 
by the St. Louis Spanish Club, is now in progress, the object being to 
list all such firms in a neat, attractive work, illustrative and descrip- 
tive of St. Iiouis, and distribute 10,000 to 15,000 copies directly to the 
commercial class of our neighboring Bepublics. 

St. Louis capital and St. Louis men are well-known factors all 
through Mexico, and to some extent in Central America. Bailroads, 
oil companies, breweries, coSee plantations, furniture factories snd 
cotton mills are among the enterprises that are manned by and in- 
vested in by St. Louisans. No other American city is bo strongly 
identified. This, and the fact that the St. Louis merchants and 
manufacturers courteously show an interest in their neighbor, 
paves the way for the transaction of business. The American col- 
onies in the principal cities have created a demand for Americaii 
goods, and the English and German storekeepers have been obliged 
to cater to their fancy; in this way the Mexicans are learning to 
like our styles and makes of goods, which accounts for part of the 
continued growth of the business. In spite of the protests of the 
English and German merchants, who are the most numerous store- 
keepers, not only oiF Mexico, but nearly all the Spanish-speakii^ 
countries with whom we seek business. 

The establishment of St. Louis manufactures sample rooms is a 
subject under serious consideration, and If competently mauafretl, 
would prove a success; and much has already kieen accomplished 
looking toward the collection in St. Louis of a Museum of Commer- 
cial Commodities of Mexico, Cuba and the Spanish and South Amer- 
ican Republics. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 188 

The following statistice, corrected to Jantiarj 11, 1896, lor eleven 
montha of 189S, ending in November, shows a remarkable increase in 

EXPORTS FEOM THE ONITBD 8TATBS TO MEXICO. 

Article. 1894. I8B5, Increase. 

Affricnltnral Implements $ 90,309$ 119,681 I 29,372 

Hogs 5,730 67,910 62,180 

Corn 136,726 194,983 58.257 

Carria^B, Cars, etc 96,50* 398,932 302,428 

Cloths 269,006 377,995 108,989 

Cotton Manufactures 128,117 334,324 106,207 

Fruits, Canned and Dried 49,381 63,678 14,297 

Builders' Hardware 306,551 338,657 32,106 

Machinery 1,519,887 1,794,595 277,708 

Sewing- Machines 133,263 162,336 29,073 

Leather 16,415 21,177 4,762 

Lard 93,916 157,880 63,964 

Seeds 5,382 15,442 10,060 

Lumber 318,476 552,727 234,351 

Pumitnre, Doors, Sashes, etc 188,467 312,339 133,873 

Tobacco Manufactures '. 121,992 153,809 31.817 

Cotton-Seed OH 379,773 354,749 74,976 

Mineral Oil 383,011 390,443 108.432 

EXPORTS FEOM UNITED STATES TO CENTRAL AMERICA. 

Increase. 

Costa Rica $ 918,561 ( 959,549 

Gnatemala 1,903,013 2,633,163 

Honduras 528,621 666,436 

Nicaragua 9*0,514 1,088.871 

Salvador 1,043,276 1,365,642 $1,389,095 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COMUBRCB OP 



FOREIGN GRAIN TRADE. 



The export grain trade ot St. Louie tor the year 1895 waa quite 
aatiafactorj, although the conditions of the biieiness were quite jm- 
usual. Heretofore the movement haa been prlnoipallj by river to 
New Orleans, that being- the cheaper route, but, for various reasons, 
the business was turned into other channels during the past season. 

The principal factor was the low stage of water iu the Mississippi 
River, -which practically suspended all movement by that route. 

Then the failure of the com crop of 1894 in the States west of the 
rirer, from which St. Louis receives the bulk of her supplies, made 
prices, during the first months of 1895, above export value, the States 
east of the river being able to supply the East«m market at less 
prices, 

The immense com crop of 1895, resulting tn extremely low prices, 
did not move -with any freedom from the States west of the river, 
farmers and dealers preferring to crib, rather than accept prevailing 
values. 

In wheat there was little movement, as the short, crop of winter 
wheat did not leave any surplus for export. 

The grain exporters of St. Louis did not, however, abandon the 
field, but looked to other points to fill their engagements. 

The amount of com exported via New Orleans was 8,795,708 bush- 
els, the largest since 1890. A good proportion of this was for St. 
Louis account, having been purchased by St. Louis dealers largely in 
Illinois, Ohio and Indiana, and to some extent in Kansas and Ne- 
braska, and forwarded to New Orleans by rail, thus keeping- up the 
grain trade of this city with foreign countries. 

The position of this city as an exporter of grain ia well established, 
and will be maintained, even when the low stage of the river compels 
shipments to the Gulf ports by rail. 

The movement via the Atlantic Seaboard was, as usual, considei^ 
able, amounting to 455,933 bushels of wheat and 3,005,404 bushels ot 
com, most of which went to Europe. A shipment of £3,573 buahels 
of com went to Cuba, and another of 19,000 bushels to Mexico. 

The export demand for com has been good, and will doutitless con- 
tinue at present low prices. 



3dbvG00t^[c 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIB. 185 
FOREIGN SHIPMENTS OF FLOUR AND GRAIN 

ON THROUGH BILLS OF LADING FROM ST. LOUIS BY RAILROADS AND 
RIVER FOB THE YEAR 1895. 


Destination. 


JiSi. 


.'^'btll 


buBbeii. 


bS^hlW 




983,322 
3.690 
71,345 
S8,S65 
330 
32,735 
5,185 
9.560 
495 
35,555 
2,740 
71,316 
5,884 
7,170 




18,000 








800 














1,800 


















































1,333 


5,171 
33,573 






1.300 




2,000 












19,000 






250 

22,375 








452,600 


1,939,860 






TotollorEiport by Rail.. 


393,217 


455,833 
438,614 


2,005,404 
1,252,811 


3.900 














3,258,215 


3.900 




i 













D„ii„.db,Go(5glc 



TRADE AND COMMERCS OP 



EXP0KT8 OF WHEAT FROM THE UNITED STATES. 



FROM 


1892. 

Bushels. 


1893. 
Bushels. 


1894. 
Bushels. 


1895. 
Busheli. 


New York 


45,312,553 

28,030,572 
16,074,292 
6,876,608 
10,336,196 
1,138,351 
5,920.590 
2,196,782 
1,814,024 
5.600.931 
1,128.915 


18,052,294 
13,0*8.702 
5,657,398 
12,896,734 
648,471 
5,504,970 
3,934,185 
2,079,060 
3,594.375 
1,422,770 
1,310,950 
3,790,221 


22,913,106 
11,876,083 
8,448,448 
4,204,412 
2,925.541 
2,789,432 
6,266,998 
3.861.878 
2,365,402 
4.567.264 
1,544,462 
135,137 
626,369 


20,339,263 
ie,442,60S 




3,977,261 




1.537,236 


New OrlaanB 

Duliitli aod Superior 


836,202 
2,908,590 
8,237,944 




4,810,384 


Newport News 

Popret Sound 


1,185,400 
3.172.S24 






All other districte 


2,881,237 


1,135.287 


Total bushels 


129,638,934 


108.377,5691 73.523,389 





EXPORTO OF CORN FROM THE UNITED STATES. 



FRUM. 


1892. 
Bushels. 


1893. 
Bushels. 


1894. 


1895. 
Bushels. 




18,293,353 
7,380,678 
18.895,907 
2.811,277 
19,454,590 
1,026,098 
2,351,094 
244,433 
14,775 


13,551,247 
6,506,333 
7.486,403 
5,505,966 
3,985,406 
2,560.088 
7,832,350 
882,333 
98,508 








6,441 

7,768 
3,896 
2,629 
4,822 
1,649 
664 
5 
1.044 
a.969 


448 
377 
933 
809 
738 
408 
752 
412 
988 
581 






9.645.753 




3,307,411 






2,10BJ)74 












AH other districts 


7,098,884 


8.735,384 


2.763.438 


Total bushels 


77,471.179 


65,143.918 


41.806 


711 


61,956,638 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUI9. 137 

BTATBMBNT OP BULK GRAIN EXPORTED FROM NEW ORLEANS, 
DURING 1895 AND COHPARITAVE POE PREVIOUS YEAR. 

To 189S. 1895. 

Com. Wheat, 

Enarland 4,336,385 356,333 

France 1,615,100 240,033 

Germany 809,100 15,721 

Denmark 759,975 9a,e?l 

Holland 633,7S3 44,904 

Ireland 465,700 

Belgium 149,125 187,150 

Spain 26,700 

Total bushelB, 1895 8,795,708 848,751 

Total buBhels, 1894 5.263,871 2,88a,670 

Total bushels, 1893 6,257,383 12,791,477 

Total bushels, 1892 - 6,791,233 14,334,498 

Total bushels, 1891 1,941,853 10,014,351 

Total bushels, 1B90 11,978,678 1,358,753 

Total bushels, 1889 13,601,630 1,067,864 

Total bushels, 1838 3,399,663 1.056,892 

Total bushels, 1887 7,201,331 4,390,128 

Total bushels, 18B6 8,155,943 988,636 

Total bushels, 1885 7,529,257 24,148 



Vwr. 








1894 




im 




1892 




1B91 




1890 




1889 








1887 
















1883 




1(W2 




1881 








1879 




1878 












1875 





IVbeiit, bu. 

438,614 
1,042,193 
3,710.360 
9,149,708 
6,940,215 
1,409,440 
1,651,950 
1,247,962 
3,973.737 

743,439 
50,000 
1,318,688 
1,435,043 
5,637,391 
4,197,981 
5,913,272 
2,390,897 
1,876.639 

351,453 
37.142 

135,961 



1,251,803 
1,263,310 
3,293,808 
3,228,645 
1,482,731 
8,717,849 
12,398,955 
5,844,042 
7,365,340 
7,501,730 
8,180,039 
4.496,785 
9,029,509 
2.529,712 
8,640,720 
9.804.392 
3.585,589 
2.857.056 
3.578,057 ■ 
1,737.337 
172,617 



Rye.bu. OatB. bu. 

'.'.'.'.'.'.'. "40,060 

75,430 

36,587 

43,600 

89,960 

17,432 89,707 

160,584 

217,782 

598,755 

36,093 401,787 

344,864 487,221 
205,430 



22,423 



150,3! 



Totals. 
1,690,417 
2,345,503 
7,079,598 
8,414,940 
8,468,546 

10.217,244 

14.158.046 
7,252,578 

11,556.799 
8.834.924 
8,667.919 
6,647,558 

11.059.508 
8,333,417 



132,823 

15,762.664 

30.938 6,164.838 

108,867 5,451.603 

4.101.353 

1,774,379 

308,578 



Tow Steamers 10 

Bar^s 80 

Capacity for bulk irrain, to float at one time 4.000.000 bushels. 

Capacity for moving to New Orleans monthly 2,500,ooo bushels. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADS AND COUUERCE OF 



ATEHAQE BATEH OF FBEIOHT ON WHEAT IS 0ENT9 FEB BUSHEL BT 

STEAUEB PKOU ST. LOIJIS TO LIVEBPOOL VIA 

NEW OBLEANg, ISM AND 18». 





H^'blSttb. 


N. O. to Liver- 
pool pr biub. 


'^EBlfJiS.- 




IBM. 


1S»S. 


ISM. 


1SS6. 


UH. 


IBBt. 




7W 

r 

aw 


p 
r 




P 

nom. 

P 


1 


I51( 




























g^rC:"v.vr.;. ■■:::.. ::::::;■■ 


114 






December 


a 



lurlDK September. Odlotwr and 
ivjgatlon was aUBinDded on ace 



4. and October and HoTember, 



AVERAGE BATES OF PRBIGHT ON WHEAT IN CENTS PER BD5HBL FROM 
ST. L00I8 TO LIVERPOOL VIA BAIL TO NEW YORK 
DORING ISM AND 1SB5- 





A'X 


L.to 


N. Y to Llv. 
pr bush. 


Total SU L. to 
LIT. prbush. 




IB94. 


vm. 


im. 


lan. 


IBM. 


lae. 




ii 
li 

a.§0 

6'zo 
7.40 


il!8 

i 

11 
Is 


11 

1 
1 


g 
1 


la.QS 

'iS. 


w 




K;; ::::::;:;:::;: ;:.:::.::;:::: 


ifci:;v;:::.::-::;;;:::;:;::-;:;:;. 




ki 




December 



AVBHAOB Bate op Freioht on 
Whkai pbk Bubhel BT »rBAIIBR 
Faou New Orlbanb TO Uvbbpool 
DCRINQ 18B4 AND 1895. 


AVBRAOB BaTB op FRBIOBT ON 

Wheat per Borhbl bt Strasrb 
From New YoBit to Lii-xrmml 

DOB1N0 18B4 AND 1886. 




RateBln 

CeoM. 


Rates in 
CeoU. 


Month. 


5lSi" 


■SS 




ISfll. 


18K. ■ 


ISM. 


IM. 


'iiS'r-:. 


Be. to lOc. 


7M to fl 

1 is? 


February .'.".'.' 


8\<C. 

iS 

2KC. 

fJS: 


15 

1 




g|;;;;;; 








&!,ffl^:::: 

October 

NoTeuiber.... 


Decembor!!;: 







,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUI8. 



AVERAGE PUBLISHED RATES OF FREIGHT ON GRAIN IN CENTS. 



I UVEBPOOL VIA BIVSR TO NEW ORLBANS AND Vli 
KAIL TO NEW YOUK, 





To New Orleans by Rivet. 


in 


To LIT 


erpool. 












YlAB. 


On Grain In 


On Wbeat 

In bulk 
per busbel. 


Via New Orleans. 
1)11 Wheut 
per bushel. 


Via New Yorlt, 
on Wheat 




21 


8* 


41 












1870 


18 
19 
30 
20 


74 
8i 
6 

eft 


S3i 
43 
83 
29i 






1880 












1882 


22! 


28J 


1888 


171 


S( - 


88 


19/, 


27 


1884 


14 


S| 


26 


14ft 


31i 


IflSS 


IS 


6j 


3St 


>H 


20+ 


1886 


16 


6i 


39 


m 


24 


1887 


i8i 


» 


82A 


15 


24J 


1888 


16 


6* 


*39i 


15J 


32.96 


1889 


17.98 


6.95 


281 


17i 


24.97 


1890 


15.66 


6.68 


37| 


141 


21.48 


1891 


16.28 


6.87i 


39 


15i 


23.55 


1892 


16.87 


6.50 


26.62 


' 14 


21 


1698 


17. S4 


6.5S 


28.60 


14.71 


21.72 


1894 


17. U 


5.89 


24.78 


11.69 


18.71 


1893 


18.00 


6.95 


28.57 


12* 


18.38 



*TheM SgureB repreaaot iiubllHhed rates. At times 
was ttt low aa SOc. per 100 lbs., making the arerage rate 
New York at times as low as say iTw cenla per bushel oi 

The rail rate for ISDS Is publlsfaed rales. Lower ratee 
but could Dot be ascertained. 



,db,GoOglc 



TRADE AND COHMEBCB OF 



COTTON. 



Tlie cotton trade for St. Louis for the year ending AugTist 31, 1895, 
staowB a mnrked increnae, notwithstanding the fact that the net re- 
ceipts were less than the previous year. The groes receipts were 
926,SS5 bales, the largest by far Id the history ot the cotton trade of 
this city, and 338,631 bales in excess of the receipts at Memphis. 
While it is true that of the receipts, 781,694 bales were through ship- 
ments, it is still a fact that a very material portion of the through 
shipments were for St. Louis account, having been bought in the 
South by St, Louis factors and buyers and forwarded on through bills 
of lading, at less rates than the sum of the locals to St. Louis and 
from St. Louis to East«m points. It is not feasible to ascertain the 
amount thus handled for St. Ixiuis account, but such shipments added 
to the 144,501 bales received locally would show quite an increase in 
the local cotton business of St, Louis. 

The largest receipts were, as usual, from Arkansas, 407,812 bales. 
Texns followed next with 348,695 bales, Tennessee furnished 59,774 
boles; Mississippi, 53,123 lialen; Alabama, 7,364 bates, and Louisans, 
24,337. The balance of the receipts came from Missouri, Indian Tcr- 
rftorj', Kentucky, Kansas and Oklahoma, as will be seen by reference 
to tlie table of receipts on a subsequent page. 

The shipments, as reported, aggregated 91)9,919 bales. Of this 
amount, 39G,455 bales were exported to Europe, 44,415 bales to Canada. 
and the balance shipped locally, mostly to Eastern points. 

The year ending August 31st will be long remembered as the year 
of the lowest value ever reached on this staple. In New Orleans the 
lowest point reached was 4% cents per pound, while in St. Louis the 
minimum price reached was 5 cents per pound, in November and 
December, 1894. 

By reference to the comparative statement on a subsequent page, 
it will l>e seen that, counting receipts and shipments for the year 
and the stock in store at the opening and close of the season, there 
is a discrepancy of 63,406 bales, tlie shipments being that amount 
in excess of the receipts. A most diligent inquiry of the transporta- 
tion companies has failed to locate the error, so the figures of re- 
ceipts and shipments, as furnished the Merchants' Exchange, are 
given with this explanation. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIB. 



, SeBsoD. 


«gsnr' 


"SK""- 


"BE- 




625.4S1 
474.02* 
723,628 
706,469 
538,910 
584,572 
320,292 
411,832 
472.682 
291,056 
297,122 
456.85S 
369.579 
398,939 
496,570 
335,790 
248.856 


781,694 
462,032 
301,186 
425,737 
400,454 
311,823 
323.619 
271,028 
167,698 
246.017 
103,318 

80.599 
160,098 
139,060 

97,586 
172,286 
117,083 

61.561 


144,591 




163.389 








297,891 




306,015 








360,953 




249,264 















































MONTHLY EE0EIPT8 AND SHIPMENTS FOB SEASON 18W-K. 



Months. 






I.cr„!. Through. Totnl. 




September 


2,0S8 6,626 8,714 

28,095 138,979 167,074 

44,658 206.635 351,393 

40,418 155,393 190,316 

10,380 77,72C 88,106 

4.473 59.658 64,131 

7.390 68,235 75,625 

3,941 38,757 42,698 

1,557 14.421 15,978 

806 7.813 8,630 

648 5,501 6,149 

135 1,446 1,581 


15,217 
129,300 
















March 








May .:::::::::::::::;:::::;:::: 




We 










10.866 






144,591 781,694] 936,285 









KecEIITS OF COTTON BY EACH KOCTE FOR THREE COTTON YEARS. 



Routes. [1894-9511893-94 


1893-93 




416,598 

66 

72,789 

77,982 

19,277 

550 

565 


271,267 

20 

114,318 

70,350 

17,306 

51 

347 

75,290 

3,137 
1.308 
35,899 
37.228 


250.465 








56,764 
21,053 


Cairo Short Line and Illinois Central R. R 












744 

7.842 

1.371 

119,682 

308,819 






3,605 
1.259 


Cumberland and Tennessee River Boatn 












926,285 




474.024 





"From September 1. 1893, to January 1. 1894, the receipts from 
M.. K. & T. R. R, were delivered by the Keokuk Line, and are credited 
to that road. 



,db,GoOglc 



TRADE AND COlUfBRCB OF 



STATEMENT SHOWING THE SOURCES OF SUPPLY 
OF COTTON FOR FIVE YEARS. 





ai- 


'IS^; 


'ffij- 


•S£ 


'SS-S 




si 
1i 

"I 


SM),857 
26L»U 


i 

"i 


1B.0IO 

£30 
l,Kl 






mS 












■; Indian Territory 


"IS 
















Total Recelpu 


m.3S6 


SSJt,4!l 


t!4.m 


n3.<IE8 


w,tm 



DIBECTION OF SHIPUENTS. 

lFei-9S. l«&-n. JRV3-tl3. IHBl-U. If 
Biilea. Bales. Bales. Bales. B 

'- Germaur 28.374 6.907 6.S17 IIJ9! 

' ranc6 2.110 61X1 S.97S l.gH 

Belxlum 



BID 



100 . 



S!t . 



1.U 



Austria 

Nova Scutiaaiid N. BruDswIcii Ciu 

Ireland 

Japan 8,1U . 



TotalexportedbyrallvlaAtlanllcaeaboard. Sat.Kt> 178.818 100.073 1BM7« 

SblpmeDtsEHSlward.byrallforcoDSUtu'Cn. H.t.3Sfl 401.22:1 itr«.27S 4lti.7« 

loCunnda 44.*15 28,»44 21,678 X.fU 

Soutbward. by N. Orleans boala 



3E,K4 



6 W 9(fi i§ 
SI 3.BU i.oi3 i-aw M 

Total SfatpmeoU M8.S1S 111.331 S0Q.SS8 Sie.7S9 aaS,» 



SHIPMENTS OP COTTON BY EACH RODTE FOR yOUR OOTTOX YEABR 



HOCTE. 


BS; 


18B3-B4- 
Baleii. 


ia&-iB. 


•zz 




iS:!il 

w.eii 

:.3SB 


10.046 

■isib 

5 


mIom) 
iStw 

1 

i 
















Chicago. Peoria * SI, Louis Ball roud 


,r^? 




^ 


Cairo Hbort Line 












S.l<» 




£av.'n.;:r."a"°""""'''^:: 


























Total 


W».>19 






«a.7» 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OP BT, LOUIS. 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT. 





1894-35. 


1898-84. 


1882-98. 


1891-92. 


1890-81. 




926,886 

i7,ew 


636.421 
19,503 


474.008 
46.402 
2,816 


723.638 

10,766 
2.051 


700,409 


Stock on hand Sept. 1. . . 


674 










Total, bales 


944,184 


644.928 


522,728 


786,414 


709.636 




980,819 


612, 862 


600,898 

872 

19,602 

1,9S1 


685,889 

2.788 

46,403 

356 

1.180 








In compresses August 81 


7,671 


17,899 
14,692 


10.735 
1,059 


















Total bales 


1.007.590 


644,828 


522.723 


786.414 


709.535 



REPORT OF COTTON COMPBBS8ED AT ST. LO0I9. 



Tear ending, 
August 81. 


Receipts. 
Bales. 


Shipments. 
Bales. 


Stock. 
Bales 




161.819 
168,571 
177,834 
810,844 
308.378 
281.288 
270.848 
250,809 
368,234 
840,188 
208.684 
228,414 
804.300 
849,115 
817,195 


171.461 
170,201 
204.784 
274.177 
899,113 
831,306 
274,246 
257,044 
384,110 
281,868 
203,408 
331,484 
301,451 
265,637 
318,687 - 


7,671 




17.899 


1898 


19,502 

46.403 








674 




612 






Ite7 t.. 


4.140 
9.934 








1,618 










1881 


8,236 



1304-95. 


1893-94. 


1898-98. 


Al b 


1,000 
60 
00 

1.800 
000 

1,300 
466 
800 
860 

8.876 


985 
026 
60 

1,125 
400 
916 
425 
760 
876 

8,059 


640 


Arkansas 


615 
45 




630 


Louilana 


446 

870 




32S 




650 


TennesBed 


280 








0.901 


7,660 









,db,GoOglc 



TRADE AND COMMBBCB OP 



TABLE SHOWIKQ THE HIGHEST AKD LOWEST 

PRICES OF MIDDLING COTTON EACH MONTH FOR FOUR YEARS. 





J8M-95. 


I8D3-M. 


lBg2-B3. 


IBSl-IB. 




-• « 


(JighHi 


Lowct 


Highen 


Lo-nt. 


HEg)i«> 


Low«t 


BiEhol 




7-8 
-8 

J. 

-i 
ll-l 


-2 


7 -* 

7 1 -IB 

7 -i 

8 bS 


1-8 
13^19 

?i 

in 


|1 


7-8 
7 6-8 


7 1-2 
7 3-16 

ii 

7 1-4 




SS?^«U 


8 7-1. 







































IBN-IIS. IBra-H. 

AveroKe weight per bole. Iba. lbs- 

St. Louis receipts SIS 607.10 

Crop Dt United States 106.72 498.27 



IBBS-Sa. ISB1-9Z. 1890-1!. 18SB-K. ISSS-M. 



E CROP OF THE DNITED STATES FOR SS YEARS IN BALES. 




1843-44. 2 
1844-4S. 2 
',816-41), 2 



!. 8.17S,3]0 

i. 3.416,214 

I, 3.07 t.vn 

i. 2.083.634 



I8S6-.1T, 3,083.737 



iBto-ei. 3.B4tt,4e 



1866-67. 2,132,680 



1, 4.317,006 

t, 2.V7L3J1 

I. 3,W4.S61I 

I, 4,170.388 

S, 3.827,846 

I. 4,632.313 



1879-80. 6,761,252 



.Bso-si. a.69S«u 



OENEBAL CROP MOVEMENT, SEASONS 1SM-S5AND le^-M. 

From New Orleans Cotton Exchange Beport. 

0ON9DUPTI0N-DNITED STATES. 

18M-05. 16e3-M. 

Bales. Bales. 

Total Crop United States B.dOl.Ml 7.549.817 

Stock at pons beglDnlag of year 183.787 24S.631 

Totaleupply 10,086,038 

Eiported during year 6718.961 5,2!S.19T 

Sent to CBiiiula 99.311 SS.8gO 

Burnt at delivery ports 39.993 1,066 

Stock at close of year 380.091 183.787 

7,138,381 

Total takings tor congumptton 2.940,677 

Of which, taken by spinners in Southern States. 

Total 862,838 

Taken by Northern spinners...,.- 2,083,^30 



!i.4a.IW 
«.SII>.«8 
718J1S 

i.aou:: 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



THE CITY OP BT. LOUIS. 



STATEMENT OF UNITED STATES COTTON 
CROPS AND EXPORTS, 



l«U-t2.. 

f»J3-«.. 

IMt-lS.. 
IH&^S.. 
18M-4-,. 
INT-U. . 
18U-(S.. 

IH31-5S.. 
ISSS-SS.. 
1103-61.. 
JSH-K.. 
lW5-5e.. 
190-97.. 

issr-w. . 

]8AB-5e.. 

tase-oo.. 
laso-ni.. 

188I-8S.. 

tMs-ae.. 

1BW«7. . 
1M7-48.. 

lS»-Tt).. 

isTo-n . 
i87i-re . 
lera-Ta . 

1K3-U.. 

m*-K . 

IbT3-7B . 
l««-77.. 

imr-Ts. . 
i^v-w!' 

1880-t>l.. 

iB8i-(e. . 

1W8-63... 
tS«3-»1... 
!»**-«>.., 

irhs-st": 

1^0-80... 
ll*9ft-St... 
lS91-«!... 
INBS-OT... 



Exclusive of Bftllroad Bhlp- 



TaklDgs TakingB 



;9i 



,db,GoOglc 



TRADB AND COMMERCE OF 



STATEMENT SHOWING THE ENTIRE 

EEOEIPTft 



BY 


Flour 


Wheat 

Busbel*. 


Corn 
BuabelB. 


Oats 
Bowels. 


& 


s'sa.'s. 


CbICBl[o& Alton R. R., Mo-Dlr.. 


1,973 
112.332 


■11 

is 
« 

■« 

87,fi7B 

'!S 

ITLHO 

..SS 

72,900 


2.m!n£ 

II 


547,600 
SW.ISO 
SCOW 

2.524. no 






8t. Loulfl&8aiiPtancIacoR.R... 








S-K-uIlSKitSfS:::::: 


8,«0 


a.m 


j» 




2»:i7i 


li 

153,300 

ffiS 

ii 

454,300 

284.W» 
450,510 
212,075 


1,1X10 


TO 


















11 










lU 










11 

B.800 


•r 








TandBll&'ft Terre Haute K. H. . .. 


,^ 








CblcaKo. PeorlB, & St. Louis K. R. 
ChU Burlington * Qulney R. B.. 
St. L.. Keokuk & NorthWn R. R. . 
St. Louis, Chicago & St. P. R. K.. 


"^ 


'■sa 
S5 








4S 

7,385 
S.i3J 
4« 


BIO, I S3 












11S,3U 


i:lSS 


*«1 


























UJ!!S,m 


«»,O0D 
8.779,290 


300,000 

io,4es.i«a 






Tottil receipts 


1,013,314 


m,asi 


*,»«.» 


Ek>ld direct rrom couDtiy points 


LOOCOW 
1,740.021 
























7.m.9!9 


1,755,973 


750,356 


*.« 








Total moTemeDt 


a,82I,M7 


18.Ml,B5e 


10,635,283 


ii.iie,Gis 


isgjia 


il&5B 







,db,GoOglc 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



MOVEMENT IN FLOUR AND GRAIN FOR 1895. 

SHIPHENTS. 



BY- 


Flour. 
Bbls. 


Wheat. 


Corn. 
Bushels. 


Oats. 


la. 


Barley. 
Buabela. 


















lS.fW4 


4,KI 
z!56> 


IS 

12.1M 

1,711 

7,<»7 
64,178 

io!b« 


es 




SwSk ?:':;::■■ 


310 










1 


'■11 

ii 

13.7B0 










678,81 
115,S78 

irj,au 

S17,7M 

■is 

171, Ttn 

as 








f:S 












LoalSTllle & Nashville K. K 




i-\fi 


Kss-So""i'i*w'\'.r 


sloes 




'en 




Wabaab B. K. (BbsI) 

OhlcajTo. Burl, ft Quincj K. B.... 


4,300 


1.^ 




















im 


















"•a 

S3.3M 
30 








1 












«ta,ii5 


iM.m 


so 










"■'itsao 


ia,Mi 




























1,000,000 


T.ST&ina 


e...^ 


4,«)6,274 


173.S9S 


4i^l 


So d direct from country polnte. 


».imi02 


669,88,'^ 
«378 


G,S92,13! 
6Ze,0(B 


Biw 






C^l.OOZ 




Blocit OD hand Dec. 31. 1B95. 


2.367,1*4 




ToUl morBQienl 


3,eM,297 


IB,SS1,S» 


io,(ias.ws 


II,!iejiI6 


J29,3I0 


8.138,644 







,db,GoOglc 



TRADE AND COMMERCE OP 



RECEIPTS OF LEADING ARTICLES TO THE CLOSE OF EACH 
WEEK FOR THE YEAR 1895. 





bbls. 


Wheat, 
bush. 


Corn. 
busb. 


Oata. 
bush. 


Bye. 

bush. 


Barley. 


Bran. Corn 


CattoD. 


Week 


Mool 


1 


ending 


ftbgB. ICra bbls. 


Loe«l, ThrMil 


J»n. si 




52 500 


IG 


,.J 


lOM 


- li, 2,100 


uiloot 




4,011 


2:.£3 


- IB 4.J00 


2>».5I» 




R27« 


«.W 


26 1 5.U5 






8,373 


B6.3S 


Feb. B! 7.013 






10.631 




" 1b' 9.8* 






ilia: 


u\it: 










IOK» 




3e3.25( 




13!9<7 


i2i.3:t 


March 8i 19.ftlS 






i5.151 


13B.7ti 


■■ 91 23.845 






17.010 


liLlW 


■■ IS 2S.»15 






18.IU2 




- 23' as.2«- 






ao!a5 


»>i,<<in 


" 30 M.(wr 


S?-!^ 




S.34 


aa«5 


April 8, a.'i.TB? 


MftSSC 


t7B 


33L1W 




13 37,187 






2(3> 


=.'4.Fra 


■■ 20 38.0B5 








SH.9M 


'■ CT IftWl 






^ 


SU.1W 


May 4 42.3*16 






».4» 


:iMj;i> 


■' 11 43.804 










"■ 2S MI? 






S7J| 


»4.«6 


June 1 44^27! 


6C«'^i 


« 


2t:« 








S^'SI 


WE 




»<« 


" l< 


44'w 


SSS-^' 


we 




aawT 


a 




*0(i.521 


1 




Wl.^ 


July I 


ill 11 


^■^ 


w^ 


ats,i« 


3 
■' 27 


4:om:745 M-rai 


flOK.WK 
608. EM 


KK 


§i 




Aug. ; 

;: i 

Sept : 
Nov. ; 

■ i 






4.3iu,:e( 

*;863;32( 

B.3:9'07; 
5.742.8S.; 

6l4l7lM< 

ISs 

■'•■ — 'ht 

S 

M 
t 
1i 

S 


1 
II 

11 

'.S4.(Q1 


a™:644 

80(1.641 
«09.M4 
eOS.TBS 

as 

611,061 

.101.508 

■snUu 

.loi-ise 


1 

1 
i 
1 

4& 

IS 
i 

i 


1 

lOCU 


if 
8 

wt.m 
auii 

5MKI 






10.186.160 


"m^ 


2.104,136 




Or. Total 






^ !» 


iie.«x 


S!iS.« 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



^IPTS OF LEADING ARTICLES TO THE CLOSE OF EACH 
WEBK FOR THE YEAR 1895.— (Continued.) 



Digitized bvGoO^^IC 



trade: and coumbrce op 



SHIPMENTS OF LEADING ARTICLES TO THE CLOSE OF 
EACH WEEK FOR THE YEAR 1895. 



Week 




Wheat 


Corn. 


Oats. 


Rje. 


Barlef 


Bra'<. 


Corp 


DotlOD Bu 






Flour. 














Heal. 




ending. 




bu. 


bu. 


bu. 


bu. 


bu. 


aacka 


c« 


bbls. 


bales.! loci 


Jan. 


1! 




TOO 
79, MH 

tiz,«sv 


3.5)15 


57.590 

111.244 

i9e;4g5 


I 


""t.dai. 


io:4-'i 


1 


2.4S 


27.75 L W 




28 




m.»i\ 




m.331 










7:916 


tRjjt' tai 


Feb. 


2 






mIot; 






ii^gK 


13:031 




10.rt« 


K1.S» tss 




1 




i.mMi 






:<tii 


13:29: 


61.» 


« 


li,972 


14J3«, IKl 




It 




i.aft!,<»r 


iwlftl, 


6I8.70J 


1 .32» 






H 




1^^ ;« 








I.6T1,SM 


2r!,m7 


flU9.3« 








18:4H 


Maroh S 




i,T6i>.iae 


4«i.*4a 




is,d 


K»;i7B 


100:83! 


7( 


S1.9S8 


iiuiJi i(« 










l!83.29B 


7»3.'7b; 


W,81i 


21.019 


125,208 


«' 


3o,.Vl: 


aiM\ i.;» 




IB 






K^.OM 


Sll«,l»! 






148,21) 




tt,tm 






12 






ti:«.st 


998.111 


saiooi 


2S:041 






53.8W 


S5.44* lis 




a 






i.!ai,:i 


.049.85S 


38,897 


23.011 


193.1« 




8fti2r 


2!SJMf :>■ 


Aprl 






2..W1.3W 


1.344.450 


.i3a.ai( 


10.731 


23X<41 


1 




7t.tU 


i9i.4» ;» 




i! 




2.7*1.370 


LHinci 






24.427 






Te.98( 


si 1 




X 




S.giS,324 




|232|3B2 


43! m 


28.317 






83.2* 




87 




8,(04,107 


z.m'.ta 


.272.835 


11,47! 


20.317 






92.209 


Mftf 


4 




3.300,S3< 


2.5W.151 


.308.801 




29.740 






97.081 






u 






s.<»H.ua 






3B,4»5 






100.877 






u 






2.753.56 


,4sa:7M 


47:a«7 


30.498 






mflo 






2! 






£.831,15 


1.614.5TC 


17.387 


30.495 






112.524 




Jane 










,813.449 


47.381 








111.977 


rSS '^'' 












.851,418 




3u:i9 






12&237 


aau*« u? 










j-SBolsa 


.878.547 


17:381 


30.196 


il 




111,(8 


S^ B^ 










3.2Ce.ll51 


.n*,aM 


47.387 


30.196 


1; 






3e».K4. lUH 








5,(QI,»(0 


3.^70.189 


,788.188 




30.196 






11039 


Juij 






5,cas,SM 


3.160. IHH 


.81.-1,795 


18:531 


30.496 






lllkTS 




13 


.1.0»I,21T 


3Jl!l.i:7 


.889.544 


18,5^; 


30,496 








amjbii u.» 




20 


5.173.401 


3,tO).IV4 


.»».ir,: 




30,196 






153.611 


sss 






S,!64.«H 


3.677.538 




5i:0Si 


30.196 






1»140 


Auk. 


3| 


5.411,007 


a.KJ».Sll 


'se».ea 


.M.75I 


30.196 






10.513 


KMjffl 1«» 




10 




3.B71.81; 






30.496 






187,062 


«08.7«l| l>^ 






sImsIJoi^ 




'.isa'fiTi 


57:94; 


30,496 






171901 


MB.i;t ^ 






5,700,427 


i.tn.sK 


:357.K99 


(30.42S 


30» 




*1* 


174:»SB 


ittwr* a 




31 


5,845,711 


4.340,341 


.4311.748 


51, res 


30,49e 






175.537 


4t(.7M, a 


Hept 




5,m4,0»J 




2.585,578 


54,327 


30,705 






133:410 


415.071 1 S 






S.003,2S1 


i'.eiM.'iv 


2.h45.682 




30,708 


n 


231 


l«.273 


4W.CT a 




21 


e.i«,*A 


4.79(1.113 


8.079.512 


7i:!0i 


30,706 


IT 




190,498 


«7.B» a 




» 




4.8i1B,457 


.217.962 




30,708 


» 






CLHiii a. 


Oct, 








.xn.iso 




30.708 






1 










b:iB3.I39 


3.S11B31 


78:917 


31.441 














5.283.591 


3.703,91>3 


IOS.49: 


31.44 














5.304.091 


.M2.843 










tiM.aK 


487.754. a 


Not. 




T.D9e!54:i 


^35E.O08 


,9M.n* 




85:36 






lllj« 


Bie-w*, « 






7.!37,06R 


B,432,e»0 


,090,273 


127.717 


35.881 






M,m 


B«i» • 






7.au.m 


6,800.530 


.147.BW 


1*0.74; 


81.86 








MUK n 








5,711,818 










29; 




SAW B 






Tl425!e3!i 


5.811.749 


'.m'M 


m.m 






308 




Su« B 


Dec. 




7,531,01; 


8,D!9,fllO 


.348,82* 


i«i.4o; 


41.901 




313, 




M7J» B 




" : 




A.30t.743 










sm 


tll.HSl 


fn.7ir • 








8.S(B.749 


!449,2G» 


iee.4K 






3W 




■i.NI « 






7,K«.i21 


5.845,064 


,491,278 


17I.1W3 


13.151 




331 


m.S 71IJK H 


'■ 


31 ; 


7,805.410 


8.897,289 


,527,013 


173.298 


*s,m 


" 


312 


B8.01M1 7ast tm 


^.^«l 






































B.495 


9 :.fl 


frK 
















1 


Total. 2,1M,B5» 


7,878.813 


a,oni.380 


4.80.271 


ir3,a)« 


45.SJI 


1.000.515 


312 


H-"'d 



,db,GoOglc 



THE Cmr OF ST. LOUIS. 



SHIPMENTS OF LEADING ARTICLES TO THE CLOSE OF 
EACH WEEK FOR THE YEAR 1895.— (Continbed.) 



¥ 


Lead. 


HOO PRODCCTH, LbB. 


Wool. 


C»ttle- 


Sheep. 


Hoga. 


"s- 


Flax 




Sfi 




1 


Seed. 


1=1 p,„. 


Haras. 


HeaU. Lard. 


LbB. 








Mules. 


Bu. 


-2 fl.08S 


J7 


388.n» 


143,300 




■ 1J83 




71 £(.808 




1,018, M 


321,000 








1TX ».<ua 




1,747.80 


448,000 








XX 5S.194 




Z.6IM.300 


an, TOO 








US M.gU 




3.SW.2O0 


834.600 








SS" t«.0S3 




5.a311,4W) 


:,ioi,BOo 








C9 t6.Wt 


NOH 


s.tiaa.Doo 


1,141,400 








:*» 105.S8 


m 


B.Z7s.ioa 


1,301,700 








W 1S0,43I 


1,07B 


0.811.000 


IJIW.700 








1,020 WB.9K 




7.597.300 


l,eS4.60O 








i.iw iSLOia 


ilfoa 


8.<4«.41I0 


2.0M,U> 








i.s: aw.i«i 


2,S7fl 


9.O03.8S0 


2,158.3a 




19:337 




L3IS S7.JM 


3.523 


e,fll7,250 


2,380,30 




20,M1 




Un 2».31B 


t.m 


ID.Mfl.a» 


2,450.40 








LSa 108.388 


^.m 


ll.SOI^ 


2,811.90 










4,B8 


12,«SSS0 


3,m.20 




23.301 








i3.nB.oa 


3.512.400 




23,93E 


"bbo 




MB 


HMWOB 


:<, 790,200 






5S0 




C.2I' 


18.|i«>.<IO 


4.147,000 




2J.3M 






&.!» 


U.a00.3DO 


4.M4,600 




2(1,007 




2J»t 40^(9 




17,11H,«1 


4,S84.70t 




28,845 




im 1M.W 


ilea 


17.8MJW 












7,82 


i«.osa.oo 


e:.m'.m 




27;7» 




t(Si wLvr 




19,888.000 


fl.8.W.400 


120.07-1 3«,.-i:5 




tJM 478.«S 


8,3« 


30,MMOO 


7,S23.500 






Itoo 


!.M^ U8.3n 


8.513 


3I.740.2I 


B,8M,B00 


12o!8« 




.700 


2.7^ siaw 


9.093 


^Hli.80 


9,977,400 


I3,'SJ« 








S,34 


21 781. in 


UMi.m 






Itoo 




g:4< 




12.19^700 






.700 




S.51 


2ii.mn( 


12.808,™ 


isoias 




,200 


3.SM 58R«a 


g.asa 


S5.7HI.al 


I3.:J73,J00 


1SI1,9.W 




2 .888 


1.387 BI7,3a! 


BB8 




13,731,900 


182,84 




^S9,4.W 


3ja3 n3S3n 


10.1U 




14,230^00 




»2.«j9| 33,481 




3.106 9S7.8S 


10.^ 




u,3».aii 








3,813 ai.t» 






KBUMOI 




Mtieul ^ 




■i-tn m.ei 


lois 


^aS 


U,ttt2.70l 




101.U3 tSM 




4,101 MS-Mt 


11X111 






102,847 StJM 




i.*4i Toa.n 


11,183 






mM 


]04,jWJ a8.« 






ii.*e 






KB.3B 






4,«» naac 


I1.S3 




15,77I,«I 


SO7.70 






4jiaa 738.i( 


11J« 




ia,B7B,nil 


)U,H 






4.710 TSI.9C 






10,70) W 


llS,tl 














mM 


1^^ £'» 




S.UU Tsiln 














^.3M 7«4.«i 






















Z3B,« 


116,123 6«.B7i 




5.588 MS.« 


a,n 








1U.B7I loaso 




5,714 atM 


ILTV 








1 llfiiro^ S1.3TB 




5.78B Sn.U 


12X1 






tSneSI 111.4481 MLSU 




.^fOl g».« 


12,80 






2B8JW3 118,918 70,778 




i.HSI S13.lt 


11.KW 




20. 102.401 


270,478 117.785 74,4.1 






lien 




!0.3U,$00 


2W,597 118.548 77 5i 




5.rt| saaTt 


i^m 


33;424,1M 


20,483,800 




225:24:1 


" 


.« 


1.KB 


.280,932 


1.220,801 


1,3CM.SS7 


1S.3O0 


1,882 623 


2.880 


» 


3.S80 


»^ 


«.i8e 


33.714,082 


M,m..i 


»t,731,08« 




274,738 119,788 605.31 


»,«. 


^.^ 



,db,GoOglc 



TRADB AND COHHERCS OP 



PUBLIC ELEVATORS. 



DeslinatloD. 


Capacity 
Bulk Grain. 


AddtUan.1 




l.GD0.000bush. 
WO.OOO " 

'■ffiffi :: 

ii :i 
■S : 

.ass : 
















1^1,(0(1 HCks. 














































1050.000 bU3h. 

12,100.000 " 
2.SN,000 ■■ 

laS :: 

1,800.000 " 


XM«itu)a. 
















anlow " 










aawoo " 







PRIVATE ELEVATORS. 



St. Loula Victorlu Floor Mills.. . 

Miller Grain A Elevator Co 

H.BogerB&Uo 

Neddethut Warehouse Co 

C. H. Spencer Grain & ElevBtor I 

Orescent Elevator Oo 

Schreluer- Flack & Co 

Ballard. Messmore & Braun 

Harrison- Berry ConimlsBlon Co. 

Henry S. Potter 

etanifard Elevaior Co 

Harrlnon- Berry Com. Co 

Goo. P. Plant Milling Co 

KehlorBro* 

EKcelBlor Grain Co 

GratlotBtreet WarehoueeCo.. . 



Victoria. 
Miller. 

Kosers- 

Nedderhut. 

UadlsoD. 



Bremea Ave, & Main. 



E. St. Loula, m. 



_. _d Ave. & Wabash B.B 
Main A Cbotii«an Ave. 
" St. Loulg. III- 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



THE CITY OP ST, L-OUIB. 



Ratks or Stohaoe Aiwpted by thb St. Louia Elbvatobs to 
Apply Dubiko 1896. 

On Wheat, Com and Eye, 1 cent per bueliel for first ten days, or 
part thereof, and % of 1 cent per bushel for each additional ten days, 
or part thereof. 

On Oats, ^ of 1 cent per bushel for flrat ten dajB, or part thereof, 
and no chargfe for special bin, and % of 1 cent per bushel tor each 
iDbaequent ten days, or part thereof. 

On Barley, 1 cent per bushel for first thirty days, or part thereof, 
and 1 cent per bushel for each subsequent thirty days, or part 

Special bin, H of 1 cent per bushel, except Oats. 

Dumping sacks from river, y, of 1 cent per bushel. 

Dumping' sacks from rail, % of 1 cent per bushel. 

Sack charges from river on Com, Wheat and Rye, SVs centa per sack 
for the first five days, and 1 cent per sack for each subsequent ten 
days, or part thereof. 

Oats from river, 4 cents per sack for first five days, and I cent per 
sack for each subsequent ten days, or part thereof. 

Wheat, Com and Sye from rail, 3 cents per sack for first five days, 
and 1 cent per sack for each subsequent ten days, or part thereof. 

Oats, from rail, S cents per sack for first ten days, and 1 cent per 
sack for each subsequent ten days, or part thereof. 



Fees fob Inspectiso and Weighing Grain, Adopted by the State 
Inspection Depabtuent. and in Force Jan. 1, 1896. 

iDBpection on ArriTal 40 cents per car. 

Inspection out of Elevators .40 cents per car. 

Inspection out of Elevators to Barges 50 cents per 1,000 bushels. 

Inspection of Sack Grain 14 of 1 cent per Sack. 

Cbar^s for weighing will be 35 centa per car in, and 35 cents per car 

or carload lots out of Elevators. 

Wetg-hiug ont to Barges 35 cents per 1,000 bushels. 

Weiffhing Sack Grain in lots of 200 sacks, or less, 20 cents per lot; and 

in lots over 300 sacks. 1-8 of I cent per sack. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COMUBRCG OP 



FLOUR. 



The flour trade of 1896, although slightly less in total amODDt re- 
ceived and manufactured than the previous jrear, vras more Batis- 
factory in reeulta, having been fairly profitable to both millen and 
dealers. The amount manufactured in city mills was l,74O,02S bbU, 
an increase over 1894 of 63,361 bbla. Beceipts were 1,013,344 bbls., 
as against 1,361,309 bbls. the previous year. 

The amount handled from country points shows quite a la^e de- 
crease, the reason given being the falling off of the foreign demand 
for winter wheat flours, values being higher than for spring wheat 
flour. The total amount exported on through bills of lading was 
363,217 bbls., as against 034,862 bbls. in 1894. Of this amount, 2TS,43S 
bbls. went to Europe, 6,790 to Canada and Newfoundland, 71,316 to 
Cuba, and 13,054 to Central and South America. More than the 
amount thus given went to Cuba, having been shipped via Esstem 
ports on local bills of lading, of which no record can be had. Ship- 
ments Eastward for local consumption were light, but 1,495,990 went 
to points in the Southern States. 

Values were subject to rapid and wide fluctuations, as will be seen 
by reference to weekly quotations on another page. During Jannaiy, 
February and 7d!arch prices ranged at S2,4S to $2.90 per bbl. for 
patents and $3.^5 to S2.50 for extra fancy. After that the unfavco^ 
able condition of the growing wheat crop caused a rapid rise in 
values, No. Z red wheat advancing from 54 cents per bushel, on 
April let, to 65 cents in May. Flour In the meantime advanced pro- 
portionat«ly,BboutS1.76perbbl. A natural reaction ensued on the ap- 
proach of the new crop, end later when the spring wheat crop proved 
to be large, the deflciency in quantity of the winter wheat was tem- 
porarily lost sight of and No. 2 red wheat dropped to 59 cents during 
the first week In September, and the price of flour declined propor- 
tionately. After that date, however, the shortage of the winter 
wheat crop, evidenced by diminished stocks and receipts. Inti- 
mately strengthened and advanced winter wheat to a premium of, st 
one time, ten cents per bushel over No. 2 hard in St. Louis and Na 
2 spring in Chica^. Corresponding premium tor winter %vheat flour 
has natnrally restricted trade somewhat, being a rflversal of the 
conditions existing in previous years, when spring wheat floor 
brought the highest price. 

The millers and flour dealers are measurably compensated for the 
slight falling off in volume of business by such sabstantia) recogni- 
tion of the superiority of St. Louis winter wheat flours. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



PI^OB MA.NUPAOTDBED IN ST. LOUIS FOR THREE YEARS. 



MU-LBBB. 


Name of Mill. 




Barrels 

"SK' 


Barrels 


Barrels 


Geo. P. Plant Mllllns Co 


Plant's BollerA 


1,500 

a 

m 
«oo 
soo 

ss 

250 


II 

mOlM 

mioo 


239 

i 

i« 


4ft! 

48t 

Mi 
132 


2T9.3T1 


KSKSSili'SI^"::::::;: 


l*3,l)sr 


VluMria Flour Mill Co 


East St. Louis,. 
Jefferson.'.'.'...!! 
D. aSMam..., 

c\r;oTdek::::: 


mwl 










EGoddara & Sods F^ourMllVCo. 


5'iS 






Toul 




10.BS0 


1.740,023 




1069 043 













FLOCR MANDPACTUBED BY MILLS OUTSIDE OF THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS 
BUT OWNED BY CITIZENS OF ST. LOUIS, MEMBERS OF 

THE MERCHANTS' EXCHANOE. 





Name of Mill 


Location. 


Bbla. Flour manufactured. 


OW>(BflB. 


.M 


IBM. 


»sr 


^^ssin"""°'. 


Alton City.... 
IstHuutrarlan 
Grand Ohaln, 

Pacific Star.. 

il".'!"'':::';..:: 


KedBud.iii::;: 

Dalian, Tex 

KansoaCliv.Mo 


■i 


130,715 


138,783 


ciSfpsprfuBMiii^co.::; 


m.7ttS\ iiUBTO 


?^»^a«^Miiiiii8<>o 


msoo 
ico.aio 

370,200 


1.K.8M 













































tBumed NoTember 0. I8U, and in process of rebuilding during isas. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COMUBRCB OP 



Becelpta. Mauufact, 8I1I 



aDufact-IShlpmsn 



3,3Ce.:tS 

!.ni.tN 





legs. 


18M. 


IBKL 


im. 


IBBl. 


1890. 


1S». 


IFJ*. 


Manufactured 


L013.3H 
1.740.026 

1.000,000 


1,»I,309 

1.8S«,MS 

], 800,000 


1.171,028 
l,flflfl.«8 

1,863,7(15 


1,MS,342 
l,5!B,3n 

1,792,13» 


1.1S3,M0 
1.T4e.IIM 

1.830,631 


1.SSB.B7S 
1.211.587 


l,l«t.«B 
S.066.14t 

1,011416 


i,oi{.as 
i,iK>.a3 


Total Barrels... 


3.753,3:0 


1,717.9H 


1,733,838 


i.B70,852 


l.BS!,*61 


l,313.5«7:i.il9,3ei.i.vrAI» 



STOCK OF FLOUR IN STORE DECEMBER 3l8r, FOR TWENTY YEARS. 


Year. 


BbU. 


Year. 


Bbl. 




'if 

S 

IIB.I.IO 
























18S0 


1 
















896 







MONTHLY STOCK OF FLOUR IN STORE. ia» AND ISH. 




Montb. 


S. 


iZ. 


Month. 


a 


Bto 




60,015 

II 

49.303 


68.927 
1M,B76 

11 




S.-S 






















JuneUt.'.'.V..';.'.V.V.'.*." 








eT.Sff 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



MONTHLY BECEIPTB AND SHIPMENTS OF FLOCH FOE TWO YEAB8. 



n^rrs. 


BHIPM.KXB. 


MouthB, 


ISM. 


1899. 


Months. 


ISM. 


18>S. 




85.390 

12a 6iw 

las 

Si 

SB. 387 

li 


ee.iio 

'li 

HT.aOT 

li 

li 




is 

11 
Si 














2SI.7IT 






























































,.»,.„ 


■.01.3« 


T 


3.168,388 











RECEIPTS OF FLODR BY CKOP YEAR. 




SODBCEB OF SUPPLY. AND DIHBCTION OF SHIPMENTS FOB TWO YEAB8. 



K«« 


PTS. 




8HIPII 


.™. 




By 


IBM. 


jm. 


Direction. 


IBM. 


I8St. 


BasteniRallroBda... 
UIluDla River 


m.BK 

MS 

800.388 


17.735 
S.23 

«,» 

74,75 


?!S£;r,S::: 

Soutbera " ... 
Western ■■ ... 
Northern ■■ ... 


loiTi: 


i.4»,ew 




ii 












Upper River Boats.. 














T t»l 


LSatBOB 


1,013,3M 


Total 


3.168,388 









,db,GoOglc 



TRADB AND COMMERCE OP 



W o 



1 


liPPiii 


1 


iliSiiii 


1 


§i«il!Sii§ 


1 

<1 


i.|l.5.ISiSIS 


essa-s-sis 


T 


II 


lll|i|ii 




s 


iSSiiSiSSE 


t 


§liSiSISW 


1 
1 

s 


§l§Sii§3il 

IjliPii 




1 

£1 





1 

1 


ill! 


1 


iiHiiP 


1" 

3 

1 






1 


III 

m 

llillll 


K 




1 


i 


itt 



,db,GoOglc 



THE cirr or st. uoma. 



EXPORTS OF FLOUE FROM THE UNITED STATED 



1, Ford, Chletof Bare&u of St&tlatlcs, Wuh- 

ISea. 1SS3. IBM. 189S. 

From Bbls. Bbla. Bbls. Bbls. 

New York 6,034,264 6,448,931 6,S9S,106 4,516,145 

Boeton 2,000,720 1,855,471 ^,103,428 1,433,157 

Philadelphia 1,843,647 1,376.434 1,877,777 903,122 

Baltimore 3,661,6S3 3,331,374 2,943,562 2,539,481 

New Orleans 226,432 117,878 133,075 81,140 

San FranciEcO 1,078,256 863,543 756,287 925,066 

Chica^ 1,795 2,300 4,190 

Detroit 184,626 164,135 255,129 146,240 

Dolnth and Superior.. 207,326 348,249 282,748 1.171J180 

Enron 116,353 42,412 132,249 139,596 

Key West 104,652 45,691 61,466 52,971 

Portland 11,046 55,690 60,955 42,616 

Paget Soond 166,616 178,443 328,871 403,191 

Eichmond 25,241 20,416 4,536 

Willamette 370,982 359,466 308,888 489,734 

Newport News 912,619 843,537 673.265 1,274,045 

Otlier Points 363,416 366,633 442,564 398,169 



Total . 



. 17,408,713 16,440,603 16,066,390 14,628,760 



RECEIPTS OF FLOOR AT VARIOUS CITIES. 



St. Louis 1,013,344 l,261,30ff 

New York 6,404,036 7,741,464 

Boston 2,618,339 3,263,359 

Baltimore 3,779,596 3,818,083 

Cincinnati 1,892,545 1,475,345 

Uilnaukee 2,693,270 2,209,403 

Minneapolis 136,046 149,704 

Toledo 374,306 390,195 

Buffalo 8,971,740 11,468,530 

Chicago 3,005,460 4,223,182 

Philadelphia 3,077,335 3,791.824 

New Orleans 666,291 766,068 

Detroit 159,520 162,403 

Peoria 322,139 268,400 

San Francisco 1,300,774 

Bt. Paul 237,500 

Montreal 1,613,544 657,761 

Dnlnth and Superior.. 4,308,252 6,107,215 

CTeveland 661,460 568.130 

Indianapolis 156,312 158,868 



1893. 


1892. 


1,171,025 


1,455,342 


8,190,495 


7,766,780 


3,194,772 


3,287,339 


3,867,985 


3,055,458 


1,879.586 


1,903,846 




2,685,353 


282,732 


164,133 


604,224 


789,656 


10,562,090 


9,746,120 


4,664,424 


5,919,343 


3,823,535 


3,457.514 


766,252 


842,064 


166,433 


178,427 


314.800 


193,825 


1,120.487 


1,333.101 


233.750 


234,770 


709.286 


986,888 


4,868,628 


3,960.035 


288,659 


350,704 


127,648 


127,776 



,db,GoOglc 



THADB AND COMMERCE OF 



AMOUNT OF FLOUR MANUFACTURED IN VARIOUS CITIES. 



1895. 

Bbls. 

Minneapolis 10,581,635 

St. Louia 1,740,028 

Baltimore 401,580 

Philadelphia 240,000 

Milwaukee 1.768,725 

BufFalo 1,355,000 

Toledo 900,000 

Detroit 320,000 

Chicaffo 751,501 

Dulutb and Superior 3,534,093 

Kansas City 342,517 

Peoria 123.200 

Cincinnati 269,839 

Cleveland 379,000 

Indianapolis 544,801 



1894. 


1893. 


Bbls. 


Bbla. 


9,400,535 


9,377,635 


1,650,645 


1,669.039 


420,373 


481,360 


340.000 


240.000 


1,576,064 


1,850323 


1,500.000 


1,600.000 


869,500 


750,000 


287.000 


348.500 


444,000 


4S5,«0 


2.946.292 


2.087.793 


725.390 


420.4R1 


1Z0.0OO 


127,521 


335,821 


304J75 


402,000 


507.215 


690,096 


670,106 



FLOUH INSPECTION. 
Rtpert of Flour Inspecttd by thi Mirthanls' Exchange Board of 



Januarjr 

February 

March 

April 

May 

July .'.'....'.'..'..'.. 

AngTist 

September 

October 

NoTember 

December 

Total bblB 2B3.409 



Fleur Imptclors. 

1895. 
Bbls. 


1894. 
Bbls. 
12.047 
19,747 
21,112 
18,229 
19.785 
20.971 
15.734 
27.906 
12.630 
13.944. 
10.299 
8,398 


1893. 
Bbls. 




27,033 




































17,785 


16,313 



FLOUR OBADED DURING 1) 



VICTOE QOETZ, President. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. I.OUtB. 



WEEKLY PRICES OF ST. LOUIS WINTER WHEAT 
FLOUR FOR 1895. 



18M. 


Fa tea u. 


ffiS. 


Fancj. 


Choice. 


J»n, S 


S:. S 

to.. SO 

1 i 

as!! 01 
81.. t; 

to!! « 
70., » 

90!! K 

J8:: S 

36.. » 

S:: 1 

*o!! « 

S: I 

1; 1 

ID.. 20 

i;: i 
1: 1 

11 
s;l 

211.. W 
30.. 40 

a 30, .3 *o 


E2!>« 

•1 

ii 

i| 

ii 
i| 

ii 

a 70 

■i 

17. 
IS 

ii 
■i 

ii 

ii 


33< 

i 

2ft 

ill 

ii 
1 


ism 

IS 

IS 

ii 

200 

11 

ii 
It 

!i 

2T9 
2 70 
SOS 

270 
2 7S 

ii 
ii 
Ii 
ii 


Is 

ii 

ii 
ii 

ii 

11 

271 

ii 
ii 
ii 

is 




















M»r. i 

■' in:;;::;:::::!;:!:::;!:";:::::::::;;: 

" 23 


il;ii 

IS-if! 






'■ 20.'.'.'.'! 


ills 






:: £ ::;:::;■■: :;:.::;::;::: 


i^i» 


June 1 


3 2B,,3K 










j^,,% ::::;:;■;■: 












■• 2T 


2ss::Its 
























i^-i^ 




































2 4S, !53 


Dec. T 





















,db,GoOglc 



TRADB AND COMHBKCB OF 



GRAIN. 



The grain trodo of St. Louis for the year 1895 was disappoiating', 
the aggregate receipts of all cereals being the smallest for over ten 
years. As in 1894, there -waa no surplus of either -wheat or com from 
the crops of the previous year. The winter wheat crop of 1B95 was 
vary light, and the immense com crop did not begin to move in De^ 
cember, as it usually does, from the trans-Mississippi States. 

RECEIPTS. 

1895. 1894. 1893. 1892. 1891. 

Wheat, bu 11,275,885 10,003,242 14,642,999 27,483,899 25,5^3,183 

Com. b« 8,779,290 23,546,945 33,809,405 32,030,030 81,930,940 

Oats, bu 10,466,160 10,196,605 10,056,225 10,604,810 12,432,215 

Bye, bu 224,821 140,285 583,799 1,189,153 1,149,490 

Barley, bu 2,104,126 2,083,438 1,986,746 2,691,249 2,108,54C 



Total 32,850,282 45,970,515 61,079,174 73,999,097 62,744,374 

Including flour reduced to wheat, the receipts would be as folloffB: 

1B9S — Total receipts of Flour and Wheat 37,410,330 bushels. 

1894— Total receipts of Flour and Wheat 51,646,405 bnahels. 

1893— Total receipts of Flour and Wheat. 66,348,788 bushels. 

1898— Total receipts of Flour and Wheat 80,548,136 bushels. 

1891— Total receipts of Flour and Wheat 68,635,754 bushels. 

1890— Total receipts of Flour and Wheat 77,795,232 bushelB. 

1888— Total receipts of Flour and Wheat 68,466,596 bnshela. 

18S8— Total receipts oi Flour and Wheat 51.105,121 t 

1887— Total receipts of Flour and Wheat 48,748,562 t 

1886 — ^Total receipts of Flour and Wheat 42,918,800 i 

The relative position of the nine principal primary r> 
Is shown 1^ the following table: 

RECTilPTS OF GRAIN FOR FOUR YEARS. 

1895— bu. 1894— bu. 1893— bu. 1898— bn, 
. 175,908,249 168.549,150 225,983,058 229,205,519 



elvlngpdnta 



Chicago 

St. Louis 

Minneapolis 

Peoria 

Kansas City 

Milwaukee 

Toledo .- 

Buluth & Superio 
Detroit 



32,850,282 
73,265,070 
38,164,595 
20,192,900 
31,066,377 
15.697,362 
63.687,433 
7,258,717 



45.970,515 
64,106,240 
30,197,820 
24,426,050 
19,659,990 
25,056,308 
35,675,959 
9,655,336 



35,740,400 
35,099.393 
32,370,460 
33,914,990 
13,528,517 



29,OS1.390 
49,440,100 
36,511,311 
31,867,291 
46.9M.4M 
13,029,976 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIB. ]68 

WHEAT. 

The recipte of wheat during the past year were 11^75,889 bushels, 
againat 10,003,242 bushels in 1894. The winter wheat crop of 1894 
was of excellent quality and of average production. The crop of 
less nas exceedingly light in the winter wheat belt and of inferior 
grade. The normal yield of spring and winter wheat is about one 
bushel of the former to two of the latter. But fcn 1895, while the 
acreage of winter wheat was 22,609,322, the yield waa but 261,242,134 
buahels, or 11.6 bushels per acre. Spring wheat acreage waa 11,438,- 
010, and the yield 205,860,813 bosheU, or IS bushels per acre. Thepe 
was a good home demand at all times, which left little for export. 
There was, however, some movement in that direction, 452,600 bush- 
els having been shipped to Europe, via the Atlantic seaboard, and 
438,614 via New Orleans. 

Prices of No. 2 red ranged, during January and February, from 
48% to 53 cents, reaching 65 cents in April and 85 cents in May, and 
declining to 59 in September, and closing in December at 66^^ cents, 
the lowest quotation being 48%, on Jannary 28th. 

The receipts at principal primary markets were aa follows : 



1894— bu. 


1893— bu. 


55,000,610 


57,890,460 


25,665,903 


35,355,101 


32,225,769 


32,910,398 


10,003,842 


14,642,998 


18,380,284 


23,498,309 


9,550,000 


16,668,400 


8,101,616 


12,806,319 


6,113,09« 


8,810,454 



RECEIPTS OF WHEAT. 

1895~bu. 

ICinneapolis £5,436,390 

Chicago 20,637,642 

Doluth and Superior, 49.599,373 

St, Louis - 11,275,885 

Toledo 7,836,430 

Kansas City 8,230,800 

HUwauliee 9,697,379 

Detroit 2,796,835 



The crop in the wheat producing 8tates from which St. Louis re- 
ceives her principal supply were as follows: 

1895— bu. 1894— bu. 1893— bu. 

Miseoori 18,499,968 23.353,920 15,287,952 

Kansas 22,919,566 35,315,259 23,251,973 

Nebraska 14,787,024 8,754.900 10,687,889 

Tennessee 5,766,728 5,897,788 7,443,081 

Kentucky 9,501,225 11,906,963 10,584,461 

Aldiana 20,894,492 43,644,064 35,579,404 

nilnola 19,060,713 33,312,370 15.507.313 

Jowa 13,654,778 10,737,400 6,749,224 

Stocks at the close of the year in public and private elevators were 
8^7,144 bushels, as against 7,245,975 bushels at the close of 1894. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADB AND COHMBRCOt OF 



CORN. 

The amount of com handled at St. Louis was much leas than hbqbI, 
the receipts amounting to only 8,779,290 bushels. The low Etagt 
of the rifer prevented any large moremeut by that route, coose- 
quently St. Louis exporters were obligred to ship from countr? points 
by rail to New Orleans, to meet their orders. The exports froni 
that port were over eight million buebels, a good portion of wMeh 
waB for St. Louie account, and iiearlj all of it was moved hj rail 
to the seaboard. 

The crop of 189* was the smallest Bince 1881, and the high price 
prevented exportation. The crop of 1805 — 2,151,138,580 bushels— was 
the largest ever grown, and at prices prevailing, there was a good de- 
mand from Europe. But the country was dieincliued to accept the 
low price, preferring to crib and hold; consequently very little of 
the crop was moved In December. The lowest price reached for No. 
2 was 23>4 cents per bushel, on December IBtb, 20th, 2eth, 3Mb and 
Slst. 

RECEIPTS OF CORN. 

ISeS. 1S94. 1893. 1892. 

Bushels. Bushels. Bushels. Bushels. 

Chicago 59,527,718 64,951,815 01,259,154 78,510,335 

St. Louis 8.779,290 23,546,945 33,809,405 32,030,030 

Peoria 15,596,695 13,370,170 11,851,020 11,523,!00 

Kansas City 8,395,500 10,933,600 14,546,000 13,657400 

Toledo 6,845,204 5,798,689 7,820,133 7,472,814 

Detroit 1,903,746 1,602,610 1,787,381 1,320,583 

Hilwankee 1,256,450 1,516,400 1,455,975 1,396,790 

Cincinnati 8,492,763 10,744,781 6,684,547 4,844,630 

Indianapolis 5,221,800 4,394,400 3,688,200 3,300,aO>> 

The crops of the com suT-plua States for the past and previoos years, 
aa reported by the Department of Agriculture, are as follows: 

1895— bu. 1894— bu. 1893~ba. 1892— bu. 

-Ohio 92,783,186 71,973,737 64,487,866 93,853,000 

Indiana 121,435,768 96,888,377 85,368,782 103,334,000 

DlinoiB 255,130,554 169,121,491 160,550,470 I65,3S7J)00 

Iowa 298,502,650 81,344,010 261,832,150 200,221,000 

MlBBOuri 298,072,248 116,011,654 158,197,716 152,489,000 

Kansas 204,759.746 41,797,728 139,456,702 145,825,000 

Nebraska 125,685,069 13,865,524 157,278,895 157,I45J)O0 

Total 1,336,375,221 590,992,521 1,017,171,980 1,008.194,000 

OATS. 

The receipts of oats amounted to 10,466, 160 bushels, about the aver- 
isually received in this market. Receipts were mainly 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OP ST. LOUIS. 



Receipts of rye were 334,B21 bushels, and sMpments, 173,200 bushels. 
BARLEY. 

The larf^e brewing: interest in this city secures large receipts of 
barley. The amount received during 1S95 was 2,104,136 bushels, 
nearly all of which was consumed here. Included In' this amount 
was S,000 bushels of barley from Canada. 

The prominence of St. Louis in the manufacture of beer ie shown 
In the following statement: 

AMOUNT or BEER MANUTACTURED IN ST. LOUIS. 

1877 471,232 bbls., or 14.608,182 galls. 

1878 521,684 bbla., or 16,172,204 ealls. 

1879 613,667 bbls., or 10,023,677 galls. 

1880 828,072 bbls., or 25,870,232 galls. 

1881 050,236 bbla., or 29,739,313 galla. 

1882 1,060,715 bbla., or 33,681,185 galls. 

1883 1,100,000 bbla., or 34,100,000 gallB. 

18S4 1,122,263 bbla., or 34,700,213 galls. 

1885 1,086,032 bbls., or 33.666,962 gallB. 

1886 1,280,091 bbls., or 39,682,321 galls, 

1887 1,383,381 bbla.. or 43,375,872 galls. 

1888 1,482,883 bbls., or 46,710,815 galls. 

1889 1,546,587 bbls., or 48,717.490 galls. 

1890 1,896,883 bbls., or 58.498,114 galls. 

1891 1,810,812 bbla., or 59,133,172 g&lla. 

1892 1.061.440 bbls., or 60,814,010 galls. 

1893 2,092,003 bbls., or 64,870,093 gaUa. 

1894 1,931,666 bbla., or 50,881,846 galls. 

1805 1,962,039 bbls., or 60,823,844 galls. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



trade: AMD COMUERCB OF 
MONTHLY BEOEtPTS OF FLOUR AND OKAIN FOR V 



MONTHLY SHIPMENTS OF FLOUR AND GRAIN FOB 1MB. 



MOHTHB. 


TZ': 


Bu!h,' 


Bush'. 


sa 


SS!i. 


'iS: 






621.307 
744,«1 
6««,U3 
1,«B,7J0 
506.111 
fflO.019 
S14,l» 
460.313 
7ES.Ee3 
361,167 
4S9.416 


g5i;*70 
1.1T6.4H 

652.471 

ii 

1.I4S.M0 


3n,877 
202.481 
280.781 
£23,562 
244,247 
468.075 
760.381 

S:S 

271,9+0 


S,H3 

11.480 
21,063 
7.511 
1.160 


u.m 




261 

m 

8* 
161 

s 

1S9 


727 
088 








l^ 










4.45G 

is 


















ifi!.m 


f.m 


December 


Total 


2.He.65» 


7.878,813 


■.■n.K9 


4,605:274 


173,196 


45kSl 



Ybar. 


Receipts. 


Shipmenta. 




30,835,376 

34.198,700 
36.107,334 
46.037,578 
60.477,547 
51.784,403 
54,693.141 
51,983,494 
52.776,832 
52.579.425 
42.918,800 
48,748.562 
51,195.121 
88.466.596 
77,795,232 
68,835,754 
80.548,136 
66,348,766 
51,646.405 
37.410.330 






25.333.588 
29,432.435 
33,676,484 
48,321,983 
39.509,218 














37,632,949 
41,227.380 








27,690.878 
38.003,822 








56,232,700 
65.155,187 
51,350.319 
53,545.976 
51,487,600 
35.170,487 
29.339,366 

















,db,GoOglc 



THE CITT OP BT. lODIfl. 



II 



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.vGoo^^lc 



TRADE AND COUMERCB OP 

WHEAT. 

MOMTHLT RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS POE TWO YEARS. 



RECEIPTS. 



Months. 


1895. 


1894. 


January 


138,261 


394,560 


February ... 


86,441 


192,478 




177,29C 


S84,152 


April 


158,333 


271,639 


May 


812,8B5 


1B4,674 


June 


316,500 


209,147 


July 


l,902,35fl 


3,348,303 


AngTiBt 


2,353,692 


2,331,038 


September . . 


l,SO2,E60 


1,133,852 




1,508,110 


555,420 


November . . 


I,150,12( 


682,993 


December ... 


957,441 


186,509 


By Wagon... 


54I,88( 


328,478 


Total bu... 


11,275,885 


10,003,242 



SHIPMENTS. 



MoDtha. 

January . . . 
February . . 

March 

April 

May 

July '.'.'.'.'.'. 

August 

September 
October . . . 
November . 
December . 



402,189 
418,140 

599,846 



15,541 
270,118 
124,956 



Total bu...| 3,140,172 7,876.613 



1,089.813 
621,307 
7M,461 
666,523 

1,406,730 
506,111 
310,019 
514,134 
460,319 
758,553 
361,167 
439,476 



BOUBCBS OP SUPPLY POE THSEE YEABS. 



From 



The West by rail and MiaBouri Eiver. . 

The South by rail from west of MIbbIs- 
aippi River 

The South by MissiaBippi Siver boats. . 

The South by rail from east of Missia- 
Bippi Biver 

The Kaat by rail and by IIliuoiB River. . 

The North and Northwest by rail and 

Wagons from near the City 

Total Heceipts7 bushels 



6,481,959 
466,429 



14,642.999|10.003,242|1I.2T5J<S4 



DIRECTION OP SHIPMENTS FOR THREE YEARS. 



Shipped t 



Europe direct, via. Atlantic seaboard. . 
Europe, via. New Orleans, by river . , , . 

The Eastby rail and niinois River 

The West by rail and Missouri River. . 

•The South by rail 

The South by river (local) 

The North by rail and river 

Total Shipments, bushels 

■A portion ot tbis amount wu transferred 



1S9S. 



3,710,419 

8,441,455 

16,553 

915,362 



407,197 

1,042,197 

626,169 

3,472 

799,142 

3,555 

58,440 



452,600 
438,614 

1,857,443 
49,318 

4,979.GSS 
56.031 
44,920 



7.836;664| 3,140;i72| 7.B78.613 



> barjteB at Belmont tor export. 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OP ST, LOUIB. 



CORN. 
MONTHLY RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS FOR TWO YEARS. 



RECEIPT8. 


SHIPMENTS. 


Months. 


1894. 


1895. 


Months. 


1864. 


1896. 


January .... 

February 

March 

5£?'.::;:::: 

June 

Joiy 

Aufrnat 

September .. 

October 

Sovember .. 
December . . 
By Wagons. . 


3.408,105 
2,829,565 
3,365,040 

2,794,280 

3.071,745 

2,015,685 

1,610,500 

666,860 

332,475 

393,745 

940.685 

1,818,710 

S00.000 


1,853,435 
790,405 

641,830 
298,125 
528,835 
285,140 
332,585 
741,630 
711,770 
318,110 
836,920 
1,440,505 
600,000 


January ... 
February . . . 
March 

X".::::::: 

June 

July 

AugTiat .... 
September .. 

October 

November .. 
December .. 


3,019,841 

1,888,134 

3,218,787 

2,485,351 

2,462,572 

2,203,093 

1,415,527 

683,576 

124,751 

89,812 

152,633 

59,786 


21,090 

430,081 
851,470 

1,170,474 
414,059 
403,538 
528,300 
052,474 
430,020 
448,230 
483,093 

1,148,540 


Total bn... 


23,540,945 


8,779,290 


Total bu.. 


18,163,863 


0,981,309 



SOURCES OP SUPPLY FOR THREE YEARS. 



The West by Rail and Misaourt Biver. . 
The South by rail from west ot Misais- 

Bippi Eiver 

The South by MisaiMippi Blver boats. . 
The South by rail from east of MIbhIb- 

sippi Biver 

The East by rail and by Illinois River. . 
The North and Northwest by rail and 

Wafjfons from near the City 600,000 



10,700,030 3,610,505 



2,238,21 
9,429,4: 



Total Receipts, buahela. . 



. 33.finn.4nni23.54fi. (1*51 fl.77n.2no 



DIRECTION OP SHIPUENT8 FOR THREE TEARS. 



Shipped to 



Europe, via. Atlantic seaboard. . 

Europe, via. New Orleans 

Canada 

Cuba and Mexico 

Eastern points by rail 

•Southern points by rail 

Southern poiDta by river 

Local points. . 



Total Shipments, buahela. . 
*A part ol this smount v 



1894. I 1895. 



1 



3,872,2321 1,508,0791 1,957.660 

3,293,808 1,283,3101 1.252,811 

9.3751 3.5321 5,171 

580,7141 430,3351 42,573 
8,039.1281 1,593,4861 ], 109,414 

13,227.051112,532,1531 2,464,991 
449,8801 815.0611 133,353 
1H3,3.W | 16,347| 15„396 

S9",656.427|18,163.853|~67nsi7369" 



ngfarred to 1>crjieB si 



eliDont (or export. 



,db,GoOglc 



TRADB AND COUltERCE OF 



OATS, 
MONTHLY KBCB1PT8 AND BHIPMBNTB FOR TWO TEAfia 



SaiPMINTS. 



1694. 18BS. 



1894. ISBS. 



January , , 
February . 
March ... 

April 

May 

July .'.■."!: 
August . . . 
September . . 
October ... 
November .. 
December . 
By Wagon. 



873,680 
54S,906 
939,230 
841,190 

i,053,ar" 

551.570 
733,440 
1,031.060 
1,106,350 
1,021,370 



597,300 
419,319 

937,620 
666.950 
730,530 



1,850,590 
763,090 
678,080 
300,000 



Total bu.. . 10.196.605 10.466.160 



January . . . 
February . . 

April .'.'.'.'.'. 
May 

July .;;;;;; 

Aiigiut 

September . 
October .... 
November , 
December ,. 



247,807 
164.197 
272,353 



339,364 

377.877 
202,481 
280,781 
223,562 
244,247 
468,075 
760,361 
733,130 



Total bu... 3,909,809 4,605,274 



SOURCES OF SUPPLY FOR THREE YEARS. 




From. 


1893. 


1894. 


1895. 


The West by rail and Miaaouri River. . 
The South by rail from west of Miaaia- 


4,639,880 


2,843,210 4jm,929 


The South by MlaBiaaippl River boata. . 
The South by rail from east of Missie- 


240 
11.280 

871,915 
4,232,930 
300,000 


589 
16,719 

2.654,645 

4,271,990 

300,000 


1,195 
1,470 


The Eaat by raU and by niinoia River. . 
The North by rail and river 


1.056,070 
4,910,875 








10,056,225 


10,196,605 









18B5- 



97,731 


99.929 


3.100,526 


3,428,696 


936.776 


758,285 


172,127 




2,660 


3.523 



DIRECTION OB* SHIPMENTS. 
To 1894. 

The West 

The South by rail 

The South by river 

The East by rail 

Local points ; 

Total ahipmenta, bushela.. 
In 1894.— Of the ahipmenta East by r^l, 1,570 bushels went to Hol- 

Of the sblpmentB South by rail, 33,092 bushels vent to 
Cuba. 
In 1895, 800 bushels oat* went to Oermany, 1,800 to Ireland and 1,300 
bushels to Cuba. 



3,900.809 4.605.274 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THH CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 



RYE. 
MONTHLY RSCBIPTS AND 8HIFUENT8 FOR TWO TBABB. 



Rkceipts. 


Shipments. 


Month.. 


1894. 


1S95. 


Montlia. 


- 


1895. 


Janoory .... 
Pebmary ... 
March ...... 


20,300 
16,800 
10,SOO 
8,508 
8,033 
1,968 
8,308 
8,458 
M,313 
7.907 
7,600 


6,345 
13.300 
15,422 
5,920 
3.202 
1,256 
10.404 
ia,B23 
9,271 
67,474 
52.914 
22,400 


January .... 
February ... 
March ...... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

September' '. '. 
December . . . 


30,147 
10,291 
11,724 
4.954 
6,850 
943 
. 3,408 
6.285 
6,417 
7.883 
12,678 
19,456 


6,143 
11,490 
21.063 
7,511 
1.160 


Jnly 

AxtgMBt 

September .. 

October 

Xorember .. 
December ... 


4,455 

9,970 
10,805 
44,291 
35,188 
21.220 


Total bu... 


140,285 


224,821 


Total bu... 


120,036 


173.206 



BOURCB8 OF BUPPLT FOR THREE TBARa 



Fbom 


1893. 


1894. 


1895. 


The West by rail and MlMouri Biver. . 
The South by rail from west of MisaiB- 


802,600 


44,«5 


09,642 


The South by Hiaaieeippi River boats. . 

The South by rail from east ot UisBis- 

atppi HiTer 


81 
1,445 


176 

■■■"Vs'ss? 

50,258 


329 
104 




79.673 










583,799 


140,285 









,db,GoOglc 



. TRABB ANB COlOf BRCB OF 



HONTHLT RECEIPTS AND SHIPUESNTS FOB TWO TEASa 



BBCBIPTS. 




SHIFHEHTS. 




Months. 


1804. 


lees. 


Mouths, 


1894. 


1895. 


January 

February . . . 
March 


237,000 
144,000 
119,SS0 
35,250 
12,000 


269,500 
173,250 
78,000 
72.750 
15,021 


January 

February . . . 

March 

April 

M-^y - 

June 


26,231 
22.775 
27,167 
11.939 


11,933 
8,258 

6,699 
756 


July 


42 

937 

127,556 

548,549 
357,854 
501,000 


890 

758 

7,840 

622,091 

419.017 

446,009 




August 

September .. 

October 

November . . 
December ... 


Jl 




September . . 

October 

November . . 
December .. 


334 
4,6JS 

5,430 
4.330 


Total bu... 


2,083,438 


2,104,126 


Total bB... 122,613 


45,351 



SOUHCES OF SUPPLY FOR THREE TEARS. 



From 


1893. 


1894. 


ISBS. 


The West by rail and MUnonri Itiver.. 
The South by rail from west of MiBsia- 


217,509 

3,000 

518 

119 

827.750 
937,850 


64,694 

117 
960 


157,544 


The South by rail from east of MiSBis- 


2,903 


The East by rail and liilnols Eiver. . . . 


1.473,417 


1.37^779 






Total Receiptd, bushels 


1,986,746 


1 
2,083,4381 2.1t>4,lSS 



No Canada barley received in 1893. 

30,000 bushels Canada barley received in 1894. 

8,000 buBhelfi Canada barley received in 18S5. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF 8T. liOUIS. 



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THE CITT OP ST. LOUIS. 



RBCBIPTB OF FLOUR AND WHEAT AT ST. LOUIS BT CROPS; 
FLOUR REDUCED TO WHEAT AT FOUR AND ONE-HALF 

BU3HELB TO THE BARREL. 



1,006,448 
9S4.0S1 
921,386 



U,2Z1.6S8 

13,41$,»T2 
I!,H0.809 
15,2fl6.124 

S«.$98,2SS 
2fi.013.eS8 
12.6S3.SM 
10.126,318 



45T,tIS,000 
45«,3S».(Hr 
414,868,00 



33,442,133 
32.301,974 
17, SOB, 081 
16.16a. 687 



tidbfMr. Wcrlkinttun 



kir/n/Burtau ,r/St-r, 



Customa 
Districts 

from which 
Exported. 


IS' 


Corn, 
bush. 


Corn 


Oats, 


Oat 

•!£'■ 


Kye, 
bush. 


& 


Wheat, 


Wheat, 


NewYork 


•s, 


■lis 

3.103,074 
e34,»70 


iaO,2K2 
48:771 

"iKm 


1.34S,48B 
1,520 
50.400 
154.311 
23.790 
53.409 

»S 


4,92S,14.'i 


248 


4,353 


20.339.263 
4,810,384 

i,537jaa 

3,977.S«1 

18.m«W 
332,000 
I3S,(I!8 

looisoi 


4.510,145 
















^ 














3,203.35- 






















30,300 


18T 


15 














i,2as.*7r 

B30.3XI 

4.Bae,33s 
a,MS.38a 


















■'ii 


10.891 

ml 

B80 


80.160 




































^17^V.^'^:. 


40.635 


405.280 






1.18S.400 














ao.oao 

8.237,944 
311,763 




^s;^^^'"''- 




K 














1 




178,W7 


404 


-m 




i>DKe( Sound.. 


2S,0M 


190.945 

07i 

S.018 

123.973 


^^l 




"3 










'"■" 


1.881 


73,038 


S87 


iX 


104,074 


ToCIBip.l«S- 

:■■ ffl: 

" I8S7.. 




Hi 

60,883,181 


II 


11 




1.^ 
7.066.310 

11 

1U85.1 


4,864 
2.403 
6,143 

3:i43 
2,4B4 


i i 

12 141 
12 (94 
4 M 

l i 


I4.S!8,T60 

III 

10,714.780 



,db,GoOglc 



TRADE AND COUMBRCB OP 



RECEIPTS OF WHEAT AT ST. LOUIS. 



Yew. 


Augiut— Buih. 


Juiy-Buih. 


^-%s.r^ 


1896 


2,353,692 
2,331.038 
2,4S8.288 
6,610,977 
5,194,505 
2,169,482 
3,080,862 
4,021,193 
3,094,627 
2.723,037 
3.167.175 
3,463,523 
3,290,267 
3,737,030 
1,828.189 
3,372.201 
a,978,82S 
2,305,441 
1,367.167 
1,068,385 


1.902.360 
3,348,303 
2,207,104 
3.276.424 
3,627,926 
8.476,360 
2,330,065 
2,111,395 
4.419,464 
4,476,270 

984,858 
1.976,134 
1,299,443 
4,023,118 
1,603,423 
4,076,131 
2,900,949 
1,746.245 
1,063.323 

796,285 










9,887,401 






















7,199.307 
3.1S2J)33 








4.589,710 






3.430.61B 






6,979,774 






3.330,390 

1,661,570 


1876 



RECEIPTS OP WHEAT BY CBOP YEARS. 



Year eodlng Jane 30. 18B1 l!.3i:.3a) 

IBBS Mjw.:> 

■■ ■• ins 3s.mi.«- 

JBW i:«wo4 



GRAIN rCTDRES. 
HIOHEST AND LOWEST ST LOL'IS PEICEa IN IBBS. 


W,.*T. 


CORK. 




HiBhMt Lo*e«t. 




HlgbeM. Lovnt. 




83M May 23 XOK Jaii.2» 

M Ml!r29 50 jt^-2B 




IKHtb May 23 !7. Dec-3 

1 Si ■111 




SSSS'::: 






31M Jan. 2jlB OtrT, 



SARLIEST NEW-CKOP GRAIN RECEIPTS DDBINO MW, 

WHEAT — The ilrat arrival o* red-wiiiter waa on June 8. from 
Cofleyrille. Em.; it inspected No. 3, and sold at 95c. per bu.; the fiitt 
car o* MisBOuri growth came June 13tb, from Charleston; it alao was 
No. 2, and sold at rate of $1.00 on trk. 

CORN — The first noted arrival in 1895 waa on October 7th; It in- 
spected No. 2, and sold at 29c. per bu, 

OATS — The first arrival of the 1895 crop waa on July 15th; it in- 
spected no-^ade. and sold at 16c. per bu. on East trk. 

HYP^-The first arrivals o* the 1895 crop noted on July 3rd, and 
sold at 59 to 60c. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 187 

CORN MEAL. 

f ICEIAI4 HOMINT. OBITS AND RTB FLOUR HANUFACTDRBD 
IN 1-" 





NAMEOrUlU. 


sxs'4': 


"S 


Hominy 


Kye 


Engelke&Feiner... 
FlanaganftCo 

National Cereal Co.. 
H. B.Eggeri&Co.. 
H.B. HeFnzelman . . 


Southern... 
P'l Hominj. 

Amazon... , 


3.000 

1,600 

700 


194,613 
177,600 
88.880 


M,088 
188,700 
88,049 


"2^806 


RockSpriDg 


60 


■•"« 


800 


8.624 








365.771 
436,756 
389,660 
411,179 
585,747 
600,730 
580,952 
446,404 
497,989 
415,420 
483,786 
576,370 
441,157 
738.566 
905,704 
660,866 
425,963 
348,695 
388,271 


196,578 
804,859 
134,378 
122,557 
150,144 
164,559 
131,375 
84,216 
64,978 
70,869 
67,118 
78,603 
60,870 
85,201 
122,081 
46,264 
28,595 
19,863 
30,313 


















2,600 
6,049 
6,304 


























10,104 






















5,696 
5,989 
2,517 


























6,160 
18,001 
83,311 
27,631 
20,121 









































RECEPTB AKD HHIPMBWTS OF COHN MEAL, HOMINY AND QRITB. 



YBiR. 


BeceLpls 


ShJmiienta 


H„™.^andOrt.S. 




10,636 
6,921 
3,506 
11,390 
11,185 
26,275 
45.914 
95,233 
96,366 
185,035 
36,260 


529,459 
468,791 
494,125 
372,874 
603,717 
589,516 
488,562 
378.299 
306.837 
396,083 
236.499 


49,772 
61.050 
















109,876 






87.430 
56,733 
78,684 
60,806 











MONTHLY PRICES OF CORN MEAL, PER BBL.. DURINQ 1885. 



Janliarj' S1.95@2.00 

February ' 1.90 2.00 

March 2.00 2.20 

April 8.10 2,20 

M»y 8.80 2.55 

June 2.15 2.55 



July *1.95@S.86 

Aufrust 1.75 1.05 

September 1.55 1.7S 

October 1.45 1.65 

November 1.35 1,50 

December 1.30 1.40 



OAT MBAL, MANUFACTURED. 

Stobie Cereal Mills, 1890 .20,000 bbls. 

Stobie Cereal Mills, 1891 20,102 bbU. 

Stobie Cereal Mills, 1892 22,000 bbla. 

Stobie Cereal Mills, 1893 20,000 bbla. 

Stobie Cereal Mills, 1894 30,000 bbls. 

Stobie Cereal Mills, 1695 25,782 bbla. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRASB AMD COMHBRCB OF 



MILLSTUFFS. 





R«.™. 


Tub. 


BBmmne. 


Y«AB. 


In8Mk«. 


Id Bulk, 
Can. 


luSacki. 


InBoU. 
Can. 


1899 

1694 

1893 

1892 

1891 

1890 

1889 

1886 

1887 

1866 

1888 

1884 

1883 

1882 

1881 

1880 

1879 

1678 

1677 

1876 

1875 

1874 

1673 


434,863 
390,111 
373,842 
363,162 
220,663 
149,432 
148,010 
171,145 
102,548 
110,763 
175,662 
198,700 
232,665 
244,814 
143.753 
123,374 
118,005 
148,844 
220.S64 
179,990 
207,219 
194,345 
82,773 


267 

460 
633 
642 
941 
906 
940 
560 
302 
366 
847 
887 
1,032 
1.121 
644 
447 
463 
336 


1896 

1894 

1893 

1892 

1691 

1690 

1889 

"i; :::::: 

1886 

1885 

1B84 

1883 

1882 

1881 

1860 

1879 

1878 

1877 

1876 

1875 

1874 

1873 


1,000 Ji75 
707,787 
762,483 
743,093 
746,846 
866,521 
891,539 
814,474 
822,650 
767,856 
880,395 
800,881 
711,571 
666.498 
860,115 
602,103 
539,443 
499,481 
680,565 
561,458 
578,062 
558,696 
471,447 


m 

m 

1,01) 

•m 

903 
73« 
g» 
858 

m 

33S 
909 
1.899 
13*1 
1,931 
1,288 
1,936 

i,m 

1.0S8 





BRAH, PBR 100 LBB. 




HORTHa. 


8Mked at 
Mill. 


Backed and 
Delivered. 


Bulk. 
DellTerad. 




January 


60 @ 65 

65 68 
67 70 

66 70 
66 70 
64 70 
62 65 
57 67 

52 57 

53 65 
47 54 
45 48 


62 @ 65 
66 70 
69 72 
66 70 
68 72 
65 70 
64 66 
58 66 

53 68 

54 57 
48 55 
45 50 


87 @60 
57 66 

65 60* 

66 67 
62 65 
62 69 
57 60 
66 61 

49 63 

50 68 
43 SO 
42 45 


75 @80 
75 80 
78 7S 




67 73 


Miy .::::;.■.'::::: 






71 75 




74 80 






September 


60 70 


December 


54 60 

55 60 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OF ST, LOUIS. 



■■no moi 


S2!!8al|? 


MS 


1 






\r 


""i 


" 


■Bran 








"s- 


-^II^e»M 






ll 


- 


■ ■ 


, p.... 


3 


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- 


; ; i j»"«8(51S 


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i 








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* 

i 


i 

i 


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. 










i 


. 






i:: 




« 










ei"JD-oK 






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■paioataa 








» 




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i 


« 


; : ; r ;"='S="B S | 


i 


■pwaeCaa 




ij 




H 


■iniiilON 




5 
T 


1 


. 


- 


S'SliSSiSaSD 


i 


- 


:; i :":;:::: : 




■ 




3 

i 

3 


As.s<s 


1 


i 


I 



as 






D„ii„.db,Go(5glc 



TRADE AMD COMMERCE! OF 



2 S 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIR 



SXOCK OF CORN IN STORE AT ST. LOUIS AND EAST ST. 

LOUIS IN PUBLIC ELEVATORS, BY GRADE, AT THE 

CLOSE OF EACH WEEK DURING 1895. 



,db,GoOglc 



TRADE AND COMUKRCB OF 



STOCK OF WHEAT IN STORE AT ST. LOUIS 
GRADES AT THE CLOSE OF 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OP BT. LOinS. 



AND EAST ST. LOUIS IN PUBLIC ELEVATORS BY 
EACH WEEK DURING 1896. 



■D„ii„.db,Go(5glc 



TRADB A2n> COUUBRCB OF 



STOCK OF OATS, RYE AND BARLEY IN STORE 
ST. LOUIS BY GRADE AT CLOSE 



July «... 

July 11... 

July iO... 

July 21... 

Aug. !... 

Auk. 10- ■. 

Aug. 17... 

Aug. H... 

8ept' l'.'.'. 

Sept. M... 

Sept. a... 

Sept. 28... 

Oct. B... 



2n,E16 
IZ^ffil 
SI1,M« 



1»D,T« 
U7,ffl 

1S1.W 

14E,8I1 

m,06s 



-»,T48 
»,974 

36.7H 



11,958 
U,9G8 
8,0U 

t,GTS 



I,4!e 
8,426 

1,0»S 



SEl.OiS 
Z19.4DT 
Z12.9n 
X6,7W 
308.M1 
»IG,9?7 
a)l,G«l 
11% £19 
111,680 

E0,1S9 
GO,OS 
86,804 



»,G4S 



1!,JS» 
11,174 .. . 

!a.zis... 



KLOSB 
»S,SS3 
124.639 
aOG.406 



18.611 
28.028 
29.297 



8,092 
8,012 
8,091 

E,MI8 
S,1(S 

s,iae 

1,692 
2,666 



1.B1 ... 
L«U... 
1.3U... 



16.164... 
27.961 ... 

6.100 ... 

2.624.. 



17.266 
16,067 
14,408 



6.794 
£.310 

S,8Gi 



6T.ES6 

a.sa 

11.897 

n.497 
16.021 

20.666 

28,214 
48.466 

4],aoi 

I7,7« 
UMl 
S81014 
40,<7S 

w.on 

2S.164 

IS,UO 



18,941... 
16,921-. 
19,6»... 



16,69 

U.SS 

U,SK... 

19,8I&... 

1S,IM., 

i&tn 

11,121 
11,U9|.., 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



THB CITY OP BT. LOUIB. 



IN PUBLIC ELEVATORS IN ST. LOUIS AND EAST 
OF EACH WEEK DURING 1896. 



ife-rg' 


J\ 


i 


111 


|lj 


■ 


c4 

1 


i 


J 


rt 


if 


JS "■■■■■'■ 






1 

91! 

S 

91i 
919 


r«.B5i 

TZ1,«BB 
MI.696 

aa'.taa 
w'.m 

ii 

tW,144 
17B,BS0 

ITWll 
190,210 

ii 

m.mi 
izs.Eoa 

115.081 
101,E9I 

n.EH) 
^«M 

n,Tio 

90.004 

lar.Esi 

1M.4T0 
156,906 

m.22i 

167)991 
170. B98 

£3^543 
H9,06li 


1:^ 

II 

B 
'I 

81^ 
8M 








i 

lines 
'ffi 

S44 
844 


^'^ 








































































































































































































































































































































































































































J 

S.161 

3,701 
%91l 
3.422 
3^112 
3,312 
41881 

7|79! 
S.41I 

7,87! 

r£ 
» 








791 
10,e7S 

isIbtt 
leisM 

14,317 

W,i 

16,935 
13;2S3 




































Aug. 3 


1.2M 


i.m 





2.41G 


















998 
























































] 


S6< 

354 

m 

7ffi 






































979 
978 














53^ 

ilos 

1.088 


""ia 

229 




























i! 
11 
li 
11 






















496 














8,107 








































S£9 
829 






Dec. a 








K 


4T0 


^ 



,db,GoOglc 



TRADE AND COMMERCE OF 



RECEIPTS OF GRAIN AT VARIOUS CITIES IN 1835. 



Oltlea. 


Wbe«t. 
BuhIi, 


Com. 


Oat.. 
Busb. 




a 


m 


m 


Tfl 


































































































































s 


i 


































































15 




s 







RECEIPTS OF FLOUR AND GRAIN AT 7 ATLANTIC 
POETS. 





139B. 


189). 


- 


1S«, 


Flour Barrels. 

Com ..:;:"".'.":.";:;;:.'BuBiiei8: 


lS.608,Effi 
4E,TZ3.51Z 

4S,D£Z.1G2 
B12,re7 
4.893.968 


ai.Gsa.oK 

G2.(e9,a36 

"■as 

5,480,977 


a,18T,llG 
87.077,US 
64.S»,Ug 
5S.9U,ni 

i.n4,DGa 

&.S43;g3S 


ii,as,^ 

30JSZ.CS 

iM,En>,a£ 


Rye Bushels, 

Barley Bushels. 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OP ST. U3UIB. 



i 111111.1.1111.11. 



Hiiiipiiil 

" « s § s s s s* 3" sf s' 



ii.li.iiiill 



liiiiii 

IgssssS 



IlliilHill 



liiliilieii 



i.?i.S.i,i.i.i.l.l.i.i. 









IIIIIIJP- 



lllllllllll 



,db,GoOglc 



TRADE AND COUHERCE OF 



VISIBLE SUPPLY OF GRAIN FOR 1895. 



AT THE DIFFERENT POINTS OF ACCUMULATION IN THE UNITED STATES 
AND IN TRANSIT DURING 1895, 

THE CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE. 



Date. 


Wh«.. 


r^- 


%" 


X: 


V 


jBQuarr 


, 


IS 

7«!>.7a!ooo 
r- — m 

1 DO 
< 00 

1 1 


t2,HK3:000 

IS 

3.3n«.oot> 

.407.000 

'sS 

,B54,O0O 

iflSiooo 

I0.7SiJ.000 

io;™s.ooo 
oiosaooo 

7.BZ3,000 
(1,882.000 
A.Hl.OOO 

|:« 
s:28t:ooo 

6,»O7,000 
4,782.000 

KM 

fl, 4.^ 1.000 
e.47B.OOO 

tss 

4.BS7,Ono 

t.aos.DOO 

4.642,000 

iii 


00 

i 

00 

lis 

S,SIB.OOO 

a. IK .000 

S:!8S 
III 

7|oib!ooo 

ssr 

aieaiiooo 

3.71B.O00 

iS 

3.0tS.OOO 

«r 

4;4S8;000 
4.909,000 

B.Ksg.ooo 

5.971.000 

a.osii.000 

0.397.000 

6.011, (no 

B. 134,000 
B.40S.000 

a.4as,ooo 


te4.«» 

47&.000 

IS 

ii 

ii 
iH 

137.000 

145,000 

Ii 

254!000 
304.000 
390.000 

II 
Ii 

.382.00C 

:«ti.ooa 




















February 














23 


















S::;:::;;:..::- 




April 




a^wi 




|0 


























































July 








.1B.2M.000 

aa,.^i 7.000 

37,8a9,000 

SS:S88 
IS 

3B,3!«,000 

»o:*«i:ooo 

.■H.SSS^OOO 

ill 






















































































• 






































xm.m 







,db,GoOglc 



THE CITT OF HT. LOUIS. 



STOCK OF GRAIN AT ST. LOUIS AND EAST ST. LOUIS 
IN PUBLIC ELEVATORS. 

Each Saturday Evening During 1896. 



Skturdaj Rventag. 



K' 



2.9«<.WI 

2.M8,fi2T 
S.2TS,S10 



ea.eta 

1,090.029 
1.! IB. out 



HIB.IU 

tiB.vn 

ill.S38 

100.144 
ITS300 
[73,113 

leOiZto 
114. B«e 

l44.tOS 

-n.886 

1,TI0 



80,164 
».3I7 
21317 



1S,0M 

iao« 

B,4» 



STOCK OF WHEAT IN UILL8 AND PRIVATE ELEVATORS NOT 



bashela. 

Jan. I W7.O0O 

Feb.l 818,0110 

Msrch 1 708.000 

April 1 aSCJOO 



INCLUDED IN ABOVE. 

bushels- 
May 1 144.000 

Junel a«.Bao 

juiri 0S.100 

Auit.l 43X.O0O 



buBbela. 

Bcpt,l 8»7,000 

Oel.l 97!(,00O 

Nov.! 1D4O.00O 

Decl mO.OOD 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TRADE AND COHHBRCB OP 



MISSOURI CROPS. 



REPORT OF MISSOURI STATE BOARD OF 
AGRICULTURE. 



Corn, — Acreage was increased to 110 per cent., as compared trith 
1894, and the estimated yield was 100 per cent, of an average cn^ 
or an increase per acre from S3 to 38 busliels. This gives ttw totaJ 
acreage of 6.577,000 acres, and a field of 350,000,000 bushels of com ot 
superior quality, estimated at 103 per cent., as compared with aver- 
age quality. 

TCkrat.— Acreage sown in the fall of 1894 was 1,530,000 acres, and the 
estimated yield per acre was 11 bushels, mahtng a total of 17,000/100 
bushels, against 23,000,000 bushels in 1894. The crop suffered a dam- 
age estimated at 9 per cent, in the shock by continued wet weAtbex 
and overflow in vi^ley lands. 

The acreage sown in fall af 1895, as compared with 1894, shows a 
decrease of 18 per cent., or about 260,000 acres, occasioned by a want 
of precipitation, the fanners in some localities being unable to pre- 
pare a seed bed. 

Oafs.— The acreage was increased to 1,140,000 acres, and the yield 
was estimated at 30 bushels per acre. The grain was good, heavy 
and bright. A damage ot 9 per cent., while in the shock, was oc- 
casioned by continued rain. 

Bag. — The acreage in meadows -n-as decreased 10 per cent., leaving 
an acreage for IS95 of 2,360,000 acres, and a total yield of 3,000^ 
tons against 2,358,000 for the last season. 

Ptutwrea were reduced in area by contributing to the acreage 
planted to com, but the State at large never yielded better and am* 
nutritious pasturage than this season. 

CfotUm was only a fair crop, estimated at 80 per cent, of an average, 
and a yield of 3S3 lbs. per acre. The area planted to cotton will ap- 
proximate 48,000 acres, and a total yield of 13,144,000 lbs., or 23,300 
bales, of 480 lbs. each. 



sdbvCoO^^lc 



THE CITT OP BT. LOUIS. 201 

Tobacco woB estimated at 93 per cent, of an average crop, covering 
an area of 10,000 acres, and a yield of 750 lbs. to the acre, or a total of 
7,300,(K)0 Ilia. The quality is reported at 97 per cent, of an avera^. 

Potatoet were increased in acreage 3 per cent., and will t^proxlmate 
96,000 acres. The condition was advanced from 65 per cent., in 1804, 
to 101 in 1895, and indicates a yield of 10,000,000 bushels. 

RECAPITDLATION. 

To place this in a more comprehensive form, we have produced 
iBlS&S: 

250,000,000 bushels corn. 
17,000,000 bushels wheat. 
34,000.000 bushels oats. 
3,000.000 tons of hajr. 
12,000,000 Tbs. of cotton. 
7,500,000 lbs. tobacco. 
10,000.000 bushels potatoes. 
An immense apple crop of only fair quality, and a good yield of 
small fruits, melons, flax, rye, castor beans, broom com, clover and 
sorghum. 

Our pastures have been nutritious, our live stock in good condi- 
tion and unusually healthy, with the exception of hog cholera, by 
reason of which it is estimated we have lost 12 per cent, of the swine 
tn the State. 

The varieties producing the highest yield of wheat for four or 
more years were as follows, and in the order named: Fultz, extra 
early red, Currell's prolillc, Hindoostan, Jones' winter flfe, American 
bronze and Missouri blue stem, all of which had an average yield 
of more than thirty bushels per acre. 

The varieties producing the highest average yield for three years 
was as follows, and in the order named: Wharton's favorite, Ever- 
Itt'e high grade, Michigan amber, red challenge and hybrid Medit- 
erranean, all of which gave an average yield of more than thirty-two 
baehels. 

The Tarieties producing the highest average yield for two years 
only were: Extra early Oalcley, Corlall and Democrat, all of which 
had an average yield above thirty-five bushels. 

Tbe varieties producing the highest yield tor one year were: 
Hubj, valley, swamp and longberry, all of which produced more thani 
thirty-six bushels per acre. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COlUfBRCB OF 



CROPS OF THE YEAR 1895. 



From the Decembar B«port ot tbe Department of Agriculture. WublDiioD- 



BEVIEW OP CHOP CONDITIONS. 

Wheat.— The average date ol seeding for the winter wheat crop ol 
1B9S rRDged from September 16th, for New York, to December IStli, for 
California. This was about the usual time, but the oonditiana were 
not the most favorable, drought having been prevalent in most ot 
the larger winter-wheat States. 

In Tennessee and the valleys of the Ohio, Upper Miaaissippi, and 
Missouri, which comprise the greater part of the winter wheat area 
of the Atlantic slope, the deficiency of moisture in September, Oc- 
tober and November was quite marked, while the last of these months 
showed a temperature below the normal, not only in the regions jnst 
named, but also on the Atlantic and Qulf coasts. The condition ol 
winter wheat December 1, 1394, showed the effect of such ontavonble 
circumstances, the general average for the whole oountry being onlj' 
80, against a mean December average of 93.35 for the eight years from 
1B86 to 1893 inclusive. In no two of these eight years had the De- 
cember condition been lower than in 1894. 

December was comparatively mUd, but during the first three 
months of 1895 the temperature was below normal in almost every 
part of the winter-wheat region, the departures in February, In pat^ 
ticutar, being extraordinary. In the States bordering the Atlantic 
Coast, snow protection, during a portion of the season, extended as 
far as Augusta, Ga., and was aftorded to some extent even farttiw 
•onth, as well aa immediately west of the Allegheny Hountaiiw, and 
over limited tracts extending outward to the Mississippi and beyODd; 
but in practically the whole of Nebraska, the greater parts ot Kanswi, 
Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, Indian Territory, and Texas, and extensiTC 
districts in Illinois, Indiana, Ohio and elsewhere, such protection was 
either wholly wanting or unusually deficient. A fall in average con- 
dition from 89 in December to 81.4 in April, recorded the ellects ot 
the rigorous winter. The eQects of the want of snow protection were 
especially noticeable in Kansas and Nebraska, the average conditiMi 
descending from 73 to S3 in the former, and from 76 to 45 In the 
latter. There was also much damage from freexlng and thawing 
in those portions of the south outside the limits of adequate snon 
covering. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP BT. LOUIS. gOg. 

The report for Ma; 1 showed aa ImproTement of l.B poiDts, tlier 
aversfre condition lor that date being 83.9. Oregon showed an ixt- 
crease from 86 to 102, Nebraska from 45 to 63, and Tenneaaee from 81 
to 90. Kentucky and Virginia advanced 6 points each, Indiana 4, and 
DlinoiB and California 3. 

The report for June 1 was decidedly unfavorable, the general aver- 
age condiUon havings declined to 71.1. The State average declined' 
in Ohio from 65 to TO,*in Indiana from 87 to 56, in Illinois from 90 to 
51, in Missouri from SO to 70, in Kansas from 48 to 37, and <n Nebraska 
from 63 to 37. This decline was due mainly to deficient rainfall, with 
marked fluctuations of temperature. Injuries from rust and insects 
figured to some extent, but atmospheric conditions may have been 
primarily responsible even for these. 

A further decline occurred during June, and the average condition 
for July ist was only 85.8. California fell off twenty points, while New 
York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Ohio and Michigan showed marked 
reductions. Kansaa and Nebraska reported some improvement, but 
yet considerably less than half of a normal erop. Drought during 
June in a large part of the winter-wheat area of the Atlantic Slope, 
hot dry winds in California, and in some localities injuries from the 
Hessian fiy and the chinch bug were the chief causes of this decline in 
the general avera^. In the most important spring^wheat States, 
spring plowing was considerably more forward than usual. The 
average condition of spring wheat on June 1st was 97.8, but favorable 
weather conditions brought the average by July Ist up to 102.2, 
Drovght in some parts of the spring-wheat region, hail and lodging 
storms, or damage from smut or insecta in others, lowered the condi- 
tion doling July, but yet on August 1st It was still high — 96.9. 

With a good crop of spring wheat and a better outturn of winter 
wheat than the last reports of Its condition had promised, the average 
^eld for the entire crop amounted to 13.7 buBhels per acre. 

Com, — The returns as to spring plowing showed that the proportion 
done up to May 1, 1S95, in preparation for the spring crops of that 
year, amounted to 6S.3 per cent, of the whole, against 83.5 at the 
ftatne date in 1894. In the States bordering the Atlantic and Gulf 
coaiits, with the one exception of Louisiana, the work was less for- 
n^rd than usual, but in moat of the important agricultural States of 
tbe interior, the proportion done exceeded the average, the great 
com-producing States, with the exception of Tennessee, being among 
tbose in which the work was most advanced. 

Seeding was effected in good time, and the first report of the eon- 
dition of com, that for July 1st, gave 99.3 as the general average for 
tbe -whole area, against 95 at the corresponding date in 1S94. In 
tbe 'Western Qulf States, Tennessee, and the Ohio Valley, and the 
valleys of the Upper MlBsissippl and Missouri, comprising the great- 
est corn-producing States, the precipitation during the month of 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



20J • TRADE AND COMMERCE OP 

July had been somewhat more, and the temperature somewhat less 
than normal, conditiona which on the whole were farorable to the 
grrowth of the youDg: plant. 
' In Aufcust the conditions for the same districts were reversed, ex- 
cept in the Missouri Valley, where precipitatioD continued to be 
slightly in excess of normal. Increased eTaporation, due to the 
higher temperature, combined with a somewhat deficient rainfall, 
produced its effect on the crop, and the reports for September Ist 
showed a reduction of 6.1 points in average condition during August. 
The report for October Ist showed a further decline, but only of 0.9 of 
■ one point, the gf neral overage for that date Ijeing 95.5. The Septcm- 
l>er temperature, which was almost everywhere in excess of normal, 
had fnvored the maturing of the (Train, and the crop was sufficiently 
advanced to suffer no serious detriment from a deficient rainfall, 
which during that month was about as marlced as the excess of heat. 
November Ist brought in the returns on average quality, and those 
on which to base the preliminary entinjate of yield. The former gfive 
a general average of 02.3, and the latter indicated an average of 26.2 
bushels per acre, which is identical with that derived from the final 
returns. This yield has been exceeded a number of times, the high- 
est average on record being that for 1872, which amounted to 30.7 
bushels per acre. The area is, however, a considerable increase on 
tlint of any previous croi», being over Z% million acres in excess of 
1S89, the highest previous record. The comparatively high yield, in 
connection with the extraordinarily large area, resulted in a total 
<-rop exceeding any other in our agricultural history. So favorable 
result seems somewhat belter than might have been expected in 
view of the long drought which prevailed during the autumn months. 
but in niOHt of the Southern States the crop was substantially made 
l>efore the drought set in, and while it suffered more or less severely 
in the Middle Atlantic States, from New Jersey to Vii^nia inclusire, 
and in States bordering the Great Lnhes, as well as in Kansas, Ne- 
braska, the Dakotas, and several other Western States, it bad in noosl 
cases progressed far enough to escape with mach less injnry than it 
would have suffered if the early part of the season had been leai 
favorable. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OF ST. IX>UIB. 

H 8ENCB V 



Av-ge 'or 10 
years from 
IfflO t0.1S8S 

years Irom 
18W to 18».. 


35.187.4M 
37.279.16! 
3e,3G2.ME 


312.152,728 
476,082.181 


327,«7,258 
307.895.112 


104.9 

82,7 
64.8 


12.4 

13.1 


9.97 
8.47 


84,692,977 27.1 
12S,6t6,709| 28.2 
168.6n,m| •M.S 



■Average For Ave yeara, 1890 to 1834. Inclusive 
In the tables of production and exports of corn and whent, the 
fiscal yean to which the figures on exports relate, are those be^nnin^ 
on July 1 st, in the years indicated. Thus the exports set opposite the 
venr 1894 are not for the calendar year 1804. iior for the fiscal year 
endinff Jui^ 30, 1894, but for the fiscal year bei^nni^f July 1, 1894, 
and end ingr June 30, 1895. In this way the exports are placed on the 
same I ine with the crop out of which they are mainly drawn. As the 
fiflcal yeK'' beginning July 1, ISQS, is incomplete, the corresponding 
space in tbe column of exports is necessarily left blank. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



209 TRADB AND COMUBRCB OP 

STATEMENT SHOWING THE PRODUCT, AREA 

AND VALUE OF THE CORN AND WHEAT 

CROPS OF 1895. 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUIB. 207 

STATEMENT SHOWING THE PRODUCT, AREA 

AND THE VALUE OF THE OATS AND 

RYE CROPS OF 189fi. 



The average condition of tolnter rye on December 1, 1694, was 96.2. 
Like wheat, it suffered from the aeverity of the winter, and its con- 
dition on April 1 waa 87. Its condition on May 1 was 88.7; on June 1, 
85. 7; on July 1, 82.2. The average condition of spring rye on July 1 
n'as T7, and on August 1, S4. The average condition at barrest for 
winter and spring rye t«getlier was 83.7. The average yield per acre 
-was 14.4 bushels. 

OaU through the season averaged aa foliovra: June 1, 84.3; July 1, 
83.2; Angust 1, 84,5, and at harvest, 86. The average yield per acre 
is 29.6 bushels, and the average value, 19.9 cente per bushel. The 
area, rate of yield, and total product are larger than those of any 
former crop, but the total value is considerably below the average 
of the preceding fifteen years, and the average price is less than the 
average for any year within that period. Phenomenal crops of both 
oats and com contribute to depress the price of both of those ce- 
reals- 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



806 TRADB AND COIOCERCIE OF 

STATEMENT SHOWING THE PRODUCT, AREA AND 
VALUE OF THE BARLEY AND BUCK- 
WHEAT CROPS OF 1S9S, 



Btatw and Tib- 


BABLBT. 


BUCKWBKAT. 


""°™ 


A.«.. 


BOBhOlB. 


VHne. 


Acre*. 


Biubali. 


....; 




12,907 


1 


1212,403 

its 

-,:S 


23.780 
3,208 

11.870 
2.498 


• »17,9«e 

til 










'i;^ 




13.6U 
229.^ 

1.662 


as 

18,824 






»« 


G.47S,11> 


4,4».»4 








Pennaj'lvsiila 


li.S14 


:ss.S4i 


106,126 


tOlCH! 


































1:491 


^1541 


28,978 
28:771 






1.312 
15.863 


A^ 










!,ffT2 
2B.M4 
EB.SM 

6,813 

ii 

49;06i 

5.701 
14.230 

1.8B2 
10.1K 

6W 

a.iBO 

10.«06 
62,07( 


8§.8T8 
824.681 

'■SS 

362.900 
10.868,483 
17.4K.284 

12,684.80 

1,393;04* 
2,543.678 
8,839,286 
142. B26 
447.277 
61.866 
261,241 

isolsso 

262.Bn 
1,942:21! 
19.023:671 


33,812 
338,119 
639,708 

40.866 

3,^m 

4.184,948 

'"S 

69,424 
334.332 
483.299 

1,767,867 
81,090 
268.336 
36.262 

74.48J 

738.W0 
307.473 
7,609.471 






12,479 

1;^ 

7,316 
£0,62} 
18,2(8 
16.686 
2,770 
2,766 
8.430 
1.648 
160 


182.193 
629.314 

flOiMl 

27B.600 

SIS 

16.U0 








































g'o'ilSlKtt;;:::: 


IS 










New'M^i^:::::::: 






































Waahlngton 








Hi 

726 


I.B76 
21.780 














1,299,97! 


87.012,744 


»,SI2.4U 


TSI,277 


lS,341.n9 









Barlf-ii on May 1 — winter barley at this date — ebowed an av*raf!e 
condition of 94. On June 1 it was 90.3; on July 1, 91.0; on August 1. 
87.2, and at harvest, 87.6. Avem(fe yield, 28.4 bushela per acr«. 

Buckwheat had an averag'e condition of 85.S on Au^st 1, ST.5 on 
September 1, and 84.B on October 1, which last is the nearest apprnsi- 
mation to its condition when harreated. Averafr^ yield, 20.1 bnsbeU 
per acre, and average quality, 03.0. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF BT. LOUIS. 209 

STATEMENT SHOWING THE PRODUCT, AREA AND 
VALUE OF THE POTATO AND HAY CROPS OF 1895. 



than the large acrea^ of 1804. Tbe condition was 91.5 on Jnly 1, 
S9.7 on August 1, 9D.S on September 1, and ST.4 on 0<?tober 1. But a1- 
tbouiiffa the general average varied within narrow limits, there waa 
considerable fluctuation in the condition (or many of the States — im- 
provement in aome ofTaetting the decline in othera. The average 
aB computed from retnrna made on Novemlier 1 wnB 94.8, and the 
average yield per acre, as shown by the final estimate of area and 
product, was 100.6 bushels, ri'o greater yield per acre is shown by 
the Department records since 1875. 

The Ora^se*— The condition of spring pastures averaged B9,7 on 
May 1. and 88.1 on June 1, but declined materially during the latter 
month. The average on July 1 waa 78.7 and on August 1, 77.8. The 
effects of the drought during the autumn months must have been 
■widely felt, but they are not recorded in figures. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COHMERCB OF 



Crop or 


Wheat, bu. 


Corn. bu. 


Oala, bu. 


Uje. bu. 


Barley, bu- 




2^.884,700 

230,722.100 
21S.»T,100 
31.154,700 
309,102,700 
292.136,000 
389.JM,B00 
304. 194,146 
420.122,400 
448,766,830 
498,640.888 
383.280.090 
604,186,470 
421,086.160 
612,763,000 
^7,112,000 
457.218.000 
466:3^000 
414,868.000 
490.640.O00 
399.26^000 
811.780.000 
616.949.000 
398,131,726 

48T;m»47 


1,094.256.000 

991.898.000 
1.092,719,000 

933:274:000 
, K0,148,600 

i:4S!97o!666 

2,060,154,000 
1,628,464,000 
1.619.496,131 
1. 312.770.052 
2,161,138.580 


247,2n.*00 
256,743.000 
871,747.000 
270,340,000 
240:869 000 
354.317,500 
820,884.000 
406.394.000 
413,678,660 
363,761,320 
417,886.880 
416,481,000 
488,250,610 
671.302.400 
68S.fi28.000 
629,409,000 
624.134.000 
669,618,000 
701.736.000 
761.516.000 
623:a2i:000 
"38,394.000 
6C1.036,000 
638,854.860 
662,038,928 
324,443.637 


^isooiooo 

29 000 000 
36.000.000 


2S.S4G.400 
32.044.490 

82,K2.601 
36.908,809 
38.710.600 
S4.W1.«0 
42.246.630 
«a,283.1IK 
46.166,340 
41.161. SSO 
48.953.926 






























61.206,65! 


































28:727,816 
27.210.070 

















HARVEST TIME OF THE WORLD. 

The following shows the months of the Avheat harvest In the 
different wheat-growing' sections of the world: 

January — Australia, New Zealand, Chili, and Argentine Republic 

February and March — East India and Upper Egypt. 

April — Lower Egypt, Syria, Cyprus, Persia, Asia Minor, India, Mex- 
ico and Cuba. 

May — Algeria, Central Asia, China, Japan, Morocco, Tesas and 
Florida. 

June— Turkey, Greece, Italy, Spain, Portugal, South of France, 
California, Oregon, Louisiana, MissisBippi, Alabama, Georgia, Caro 
lina, Tennessee, Virginia, Kentucky, Kansas, Arkansas, Utah, Col- 
orado and Missouri. 

July — Roumania, Bulgaria, Austro-Hungary, South of Russia, Ger 
many, Switzerland, Prance, South of England, Nebraska, Minnesota. 
WlsconHin, Iowa, niinois, Indiana, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Ohio, 
New York, New Bngland and Upper Canada. 

August— Belgium, Holland, Great Britain, Denmark, Poland, Lower 
Canada, Columbia, Manitoba and Dakota. 

September and October-Scotland, Sweden, Norway and North ol 
Russia. 

November— Peru and South Africa. 

December — Burmah. 



,db,GoOglc 



THB CITY OP 8T. LOUIS. 



Q . 

H Oi 

S ^ 

O H 

Pi -J 






lli.i 



ill. 1.11111.111 

« 0^ ■* m o> et «, "t S ■* S_ ^ 






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1^ 



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r 



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^y^iiiiSuSm 



TfTrmrrf 



"smmnT, 



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TTTTiTTTTSTTi 



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TTTTsTTTimT 

TTTmrmnT' 



iiSi iiiii ill III 



„Go(5glc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



U ntttd Btalei,.., I BII.TSO.OOOI 616.M9.1IIKll i»t,l3g.000i W.JS 



AuBtraia«ia""ii!!i!!!i!i!iiii!iil aaisTBioool afiimiooii' ^ igjiM^oooi JiMnicoo 

Grand total |2.3S9.T48.<)00|Z.4H,««,0l>0!2,<i6.T»l,000|a,l>9ff.m.l>l» 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TBADB AKD CXJlfMERCE OF 



PACKING AND PROVISIONS. 



POBK PB0DUCT8. 
The Tolume of bueiueBS for the past jrear was sllghUy leas Uku 
In 18B4, bDt greater tlian in 1B93. The pBcking of the winter ae«aon 
and also of the twelve months ending' March 1st, Bbowa a decided in- 
crease orer paet seasons. The business of the year was falrlj sat- 
isfactory, and St. Louis still continnes a large distributing market. 
The volume of business during the past four jears is given in the 
following table: 

1802. 1S93. 1894. 1895. 

Received, pounds 264,341,960 209,990,945 230,087,161 215.198,650 

Shipped, pounds 369,411,500 285,323,741 345,491,499 337,911,899 

Totals, pounds 633,753,460 495,314,665 575,578,059 553,110,549 

The relative positions of the principal packing points ia shown bj 

the following statement of the number of hogs packed the past four 

jrears, as reported by the Cincinnati Price Ovrreitl: 

TOTAL YEAELT PACKING AT PEOMINENT PLACES. 

Total number of hogs packed in the West for twelve months ending 

March Ist, at dft«en places mentioned, with comparisons for previous 

1894-5. 1893-4. 1692-3. 1891-3. 

Chicago 6,293,202 4,219,567 4,352,099 5,249,798 

Kansas City 2,105,333 1,473,223 1,695,145 1,813,06« 

Omaha 1,550,821 1,023,261 1,134,723 1,288,771 

St. Louis 869,458 578,873 530,634 664,188 

Indianapolis 663,256 510,813 539,198 607,001 

Milwaukee & Cndahy... 702,877 346,896 387,977 576,663 

Sioux City 336,330 2O0.B00 313,973 255,068 

Cincinnati 536,790 382,818 456,396 484,173 

St. Paul 380,404 229,278 218,982 276,246 

Cedar Rapids 353,808 313,141 299,945 ^6,056 

Cleveland 453,108 405,124 449,081 303,SS2 

Louisville 262,273 217,947 213,264 161,365 

Ottumwa 385,400 225,000 254,244 241,600 

Nebraska City 233.576 179,182 121,983 197,423 

St. Joseph 417,291 261,500 266,000 155,000 

Fifteen places 14,562,917 10,566,623 11,223,640 12,T02,6ia 

All other places 1,440,728 1,038,483 1,166,990 1,755,011 

Aggregate 16,003,645 11,605,006 12,390.630 14,437,614 

As will be seen by the above table, St. Louis still holds the fOnrti 
place as a packing point. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TBS ctrt OP ST. LOUia. 81B 

DRESSED BEEF. 

By P. H. HilLE, Publlabar "LIts Btock B«parter." 

The dreaeed beef trade of Bt. LooIb now amoimts to an important 
IndQBtrjr. The year 1895 exhibits an increased kUllng of 04,629 cattle 
uid ?,TI4 calves over the previous year. AU the four honees engag^ 
in this trade show increased slaughter over the year 1894. The total 
Blaiifht«r of 189S was 450,306 cattle aod 40,333 calves, against 35S,e7T 
cattle and 38,609 calves in 1894. The eblpmeDte of the year, in the 
agtrregate were 238,966,600 pannda, a^inst 196,059,375 pounda in 1894, 
103,837,622 pounda in 1893, and 68,071,698 poimda in 1892. This bosi- 
uesB promisea to increase indeflnitely. Up to 1894 only two houses 
nere sending- shipments to the seaboard, but now four housea make 
regular Eastern ahipmenta. In addition to the output at thia point, 
1£,89S^T0 pounds were received from Northern and Western points, 
Bgainst 64,612,340 pounds received in 1894. 

CATTXE AUD CALVES SLAUQHTEEED AT ST. LOUIS BY 
BRESSED BEEF HOUSES. 
Year. Cattle, head. Calvea, head. 

1895 450,306 40,323 

1894 355,677 32,609 

1893 274,579 29,672 

1892 180,790 8,531 

1891 138,153 2,862 

1890 131,134 2,735 

1889 66.684 1,899 

HECEIFTS DBESSED BEEP FOB YEAR 1895. 

By Chicago & Alton (Mo.Div.) R. B 28,678,500 lbs. 

By Missouri Pacific B. B 10,224,700 lbs. 

By Wabash (West) 477,000 lbs. 

By Chicago & Alton 997,900 lbs. 

By St. Louis, Vandalia & Teire Haute 60,000 lbs. 

By St. Loula, Keokuk & Northwestern 2,467,370 lbs. 



Total pounds 42,895,470 <, 

SHIPMENTS DBESSED BEEF FOB YEAR 189S. 

Chicago ■& Alton R. B., Mo. Div 

Miaaoori Pacific B. B.. 20,400 

St. Louis & San Francisco R. B 92,100 

St. Louis Southwestern B. B 55,600 

St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern B. B 2,292,300 

St. Louis. A. & T. H. E. B. (Cairo Short Line.) 1 1,500 

Louisville & Nashville B. B " 1,682,600 

LonisvUle, Evansville & St. Louis B. B 81,100 

Baltimore & Ohio Southweatem B. B 43,775,100 

Chicago & Alton B. B 67,000 

Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago &. St. Lonle B. B 61,681,400 

Vandalia. & Terre Haut*^ H. B 45,429,800 

Wabash R. H. (Eaat.) 79,193,700 

Toledo, St. Louis & Kansas City B. B 4,547,700 

Chicago, Peoria A St. Louis B. E 50,000 

St. LouiB, Keokuk & Northwestern B. B 30,900 

River 65,400 



Total pounda 238,986,600 

Digitized bvGoO^^IC 



TRADE AND COMHBRCEl OF 



i tmm: 

!^ ' atjgg'gaB : 

^ I 

s mnii 
"i"iiKiif. 
e mnii i 

I |5|KI|' 






l|J|3p33||illslp 



i Hiiw 



,db,GoOglc 



TME CITY OP ST. LOUIB. 



RBCBIPTS AND SHIPUBNTS OP HOG PRODUCT AT 8T. LOUia, 





■HiPMBnrs vOB Twunrr-HKB txabs. 


Ymu 


-«: 


"S 


» 


Teir 


Sffi 


s» 


K- 


1S9S 




187,696,200 


26,939,100 


1895 


. 15.186 


241,814,093 


94,731,066 


1894 


. 36,040 


201,513,000 


27.878,000 


1804 


. 15,668 


352.425,847 


90,088.732 


1893 


. 3,516 


185,886,630 


33,436,385 


1893 


. 10,683 


211.618,018 


71,675,953 


1892 


. 10,S30 


237.703,808 


24,696,352 


1892 


. 20,369 


282,827,819 


82,713,571 


1891 


. 3.658 


354,647,388 


37,417,835 


1891 


. 26,521 


273,174.494 


80,382,032 


1890 


. 6,528 


269,760,823 


32,463,302 


1890 


. 40,989 


294.392,724 


77,575,403 


1889 


. 2,679 


189,601,764 


34,869,848 


1889 


. 29.447 


838,336,860 


80,878,803 


1888 


. 6,431 


133,588,847 


15,187,970 


1888 


. 24,901 


163,353,336 


78,154,931 


1887 


. 5,875 


94,579,080 


18,986,881 


1887 


. 38,281 


143,934,139 


69,406,458 


1886 


. 6,667 


87,853,334 


11,924,131 


1886 


. 46.816 


117,302,729 


48.710,130 


1885 


. 6,632 


81,454,040 


8,906,586 


1885 


. 66,316 


128,709,568 


47,137,038 


1884 


. 9.050 


78,946,821 


10,742,561 


1884 


. 57,194 


132.563,039 


50,445,090 


1883 


. 9.656 


119,365,301 


9,975,552 


1883 


. 75.239 


163,150,959 


43.740,070 


1882 


. 78,502 


92,217,813 


18,480,810 


1882 


. 100,139 


140,785,135 


39,829,146 


1881 


. 17,692 


77,738,968 


16,528,606 


1881 


. 71,826 


139.012.260 


43,449,768 


1880 


. 13,65B 


77,378.418 


S.24B.208 


1880 


. 79,416 


146.362.097 


38,004,829 


1879 


. 33,113 


93,983,380 


8,415,176 


1879 


. 89,386 


159.398.870 


38,985.903 


1878 


. 53,200 


58,611,064 


7,019,741 


1878 


. 112,375 


125,602,088 


40,453,505 


1877 


. 45,482 


48,203,972 


7,087.001 


1877 


. 108,768 


IJB.955,382 


34,725,726 


1876 


. 45,632 


60,290,716 


6,067,325 


1876 


. 86,141 


106,803,076 


29,292,879 


1875 


. 46.547 


51,556,146 


6,732,320 


1875 


. 95,503 


105,809,598 


24,145,176 


1874 


. 55.453 


52,104,380 


6,377,660 


1874 


. 90.343 


133,486,380 


27,112,270 


1873 


. 57,476 


50.071.760 


8,981,820 


1873 


. 105.876 


184,392,770 


37,156,810 


1872 


. 60,207 


63,434,860 


11,388,890 


1872 


. 114,329 


147,141,960 


33,943,860 


1871 


. 88,442 


57,804,350 


10,093.460 


1871 


. 131,732 


123.665,060 


30.750,470 


1870 


. 77,398 


44,494,770 


6,215,150 


1870 


. 115,236 


77,501.130 


15,507,840 


1869 


. 78,236 


47,225,140 


7,778,410 


1869 


. 130,002 


75.755,450 


13,322.900 


1868 


. 85,127 


46,753,360 


5,941,650 


18G8 


. 130,268 


58,229,270 


12.946,490 


1867 


. 93,071 


47,623,450 


7,229,670 


1867 


. 138,226 


70,095,130 


14,318,210 



STOCK OP PBOViaiONB AT 8T. LOUIS ON DATES NAMED. 



Articles. 


March 1, 

ues. 


«-^^. 


March 1, 


Uapcbl. 
1888. 


U&rohl. 




•3.857 
2.441 
1,646,625 
10,857,400 
6,274.080 
1,759.851 


1,468 
2,702 

896,900 
7,325,843 
4,381,731 

750,000 


582 

3,323 

908,000 

7,433,500 

4,931,200 


1 

2,818 

444 

3,591,000 

17.151,000 

7,179,500 




Ijard. tJercee 

Shonldera, pounds.. 

Sides, pounds 

Hams, pounds 


6,490 
1,436,600 
16,578,869 
6,463,000 











,db,GoOglc 



TRADE AJTD COMMBRCB OF 



GENERAL SUMMARY OF PACKING. 

AS RBFOBTBD BT THB CINCINNATI PRICE CDKHBNT. 

Packing in the West during 1894-05 compared witli the preceding 
year in leading exhibits. 

WINTER SEASON. 

November lat to Maivh let— 

Number ol hogB packed 7,191,520 *,884,oa 

IncreoBe 3,307,438 

Average live weight, lbs 233.73 24SiO 

Decrease 15.47 

Average yield of Urd, Ibo 33.62 36.0T 

Decrease 2.45 

Percentage yield of lard 14.44 i(.53 

Decrease .09 

Coat of hoga, 100 lbs, alive 84-28 VX 

Decrease 30.98 

Aggregate live weight, lbs 1,673,702,000 1,212,308,000 

Increase 401,494,000 

GreenmeatB made, lbs 937,273,000 678,836,000 

Increase 258,437,000 

Lard made, lbs 241,801,000 I76,1W,000 

Increase 65,009,000 

Total meats and lard, lbs 1,179,074,000 855,028,000 

Increase 324,046,000 

Aggregate cost of hoga $71,689,000 $63,752,000 

Increase 7,937,000 

Tierces of lard, 330 lbs 732,700 533,700 

Increase 199,000 

Mess pork made, barrels 185,935 14e,e» 

Increase 36,240 

Other pork, Iwrrels 188,975 I28,7» 

Increase 00,255 

Pork of all kinds, barrels 374,910 278,414 

Increase 96,495 

At the same average weight as in 1864-95 the total weight of bags 
packed the past winter wonld be equivalent to 6,743,000 hogs, or *^ 
increase equal to 1,859,000 hogs in nnmber and weight, or 3B per cent. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OP ST. LOUIS. 219 

SUMMED SEASON. 

March let to November ist — 1884. isog 

Number of hogra packed 8.812,125 6 720084 

Increase 2,091 ,201 

Average live weight, lbs 229.98 240 41 



Decre&se . 



10.43 



Average yield of lard, lbs Sslos 34 94 

Decrease ., 1,59 

Percentage yield of lard 14^38 14,41 

Decrease ,03 

Coat of hogs, 100 lbs,, alive J4!b8 $6 33 

Decrease I.35 

Aggregate Uve weight, lbs 3,026,M6,000 1,613,835,000 

Increase 410,811,000 

Green meat« made, lbs 1,134,922,000 904,867,000 

Increase 230,055,000 

Lard made, lbs 291,254,000 232,860,000 

Increase 58,394,000 

Total meats and lard, lbs 1,436,176,000 1,137,727,000 

Increase 288,449,000 

Aggregate cost of hogs $100,990,000 $102,338,000 

Decrease 1,348,000 

Tierces of lard, 330 lbs 882,600 705,600 

Increase 177.000 



TOTAL FOB TWELVE MONTHS. 

Tear ending March Ist— 1894-95. 1893-94, 

Number of hogs packed 16,003,645 11,005,006 

Increase 4.368.639 

Average live weight, lbs 231.22 243.89 

Decrease 12.47 

Average yield of lard, lbs 33.31 35.25 



Cost of hogs, 100 Iba., alive $4.67 $5.87 

Decrease $1.20 

Aggregate live weight, lbs 3,700,348,000 2,828,043,000 

Increase .'., 872,305,000 

Green meats made, lbs. 2,072,195,000 1,583,703,000 

Increase 488,492,000 

Lard made, lbs 633,055,000 409,052,000 

Increase 124,003,000 

Total meats and lard, lbs 2,605,250,000 1,992,755,000 

Increase 612,495,000 

Aggregate cost of hogs $172,679,000 $166,090,000 

Increase $6,589,000 

Tierces of lard, 330 lbs 1,615,300 1,339,300 

Increase 376,000 

There is more or less barreled pork made during the summer sea- 
son each year; in 1894, from March 1st to November, a total of 35,300 
liArrets of mess, and 147,500 barrels of other pork, making in nil 
183,800 barrels, was pnt op. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COMMERCE OF 



PACKING AT ST. LOUIS FOR THIRTY SEASONS. 



SEASONS. 


Number 

UogB. 


Avurage 

Weight. 


>L1 kinds. 


llM-Brtw. 


1894—95 


373,165 


223.61 groBB. 


31.55 


»4.28 


1893-94 


255,084 


2.14.38 " 


33.82 


5.26 


1B92— 93 


226,206 


219.04 " 


31.20 


6.47 


1891— B3 


350,483 


234.39 " 


31.84 


4.08 


1890—91 


291,332 


241.91 " 


33.41 


3.65 


1889—80 


348,810 


241.48 " 


32.16 


3.69 


1888—89 


338,170 


253.43 " 


33.12 


4.95 


J887— 8B 


369.790 


233.0S " 


30.31 


5.14 


1886-87 


370,866 


24S.42 " 


35.49 


4.30 


18B5— 86 


369,130 


257.21 " 


34.29 


3.74 


1884—85 


442,087 


259.74 " 


34.60 


4.35 


1883—84 


382,222 


249.70 " 


33.45 


5J») 


1882—83 


327,004 


259.81 " 




6.33 


1881—82 


316,379 


253.97 *' 


35.13 


&21 


1680—81 


474.159 


" 250.86 " 


35.66 


4.62 


1879—80 


577,793 


258.18 " 




4J» 


1878—79 


629.281 


264 


40.45 


a.83 


1877^78 


509,540 


270 


36.20 


3.96 


1876—77 


414,747 


255 


32.65 


5.70 


1875--76 


329.895 


268.47 " 


36.66 


7.17 


1674—75 


462,246 


240 


30. 


7.00 


1873—74 


463.793 


261.53 " 


34.1B 






538,000 


260 


34.50 








1870—71 


305,600 


216 Net. 






1869—70 


241,316 


1B0.50 " 








231.937 
237,160 


189.27 " 
193.91 " 






1867—68 






1886—67 


183,543 


B22.34 " 








123.335 


208.91 " 












SUN 


MER PAC 


KING AT ST 


LOUIS 




fieaaon. 


Nun 


»ber o* UogB. J 


verage Gn 


w* Weight. 


189S. estimate.. 




480,000 




225 


1894 




496,293 




222.80 








































































1888 




361,048 




245 






244,004 














18B3 




225,000 




235 


1862 




215.176 




217.86 


18B1 




350,000 




235 












1679 




^50,000 




2S0 


IB78 




t42,000 




253 












1876 




[31,158 




226.13 


1675 




102.424 




220 
















132,155 













,db,GoOglc 



THE CITT OP ST. LOUIS. 



PACKINO AT ST. LOUIS POH TWELVE MONTHS. 

March Ito March 1, 1894-95 869,458 hogs. 

1693-94 578,673 " 

" 1892-93 530,634 " 

" 1891-92 664,188 " 

1690-91 * 648,100 " 

1889-00 739.602 " 

" 1888-89 682.457 " 

" 1887-88 083,381 " 

1886-87 721,014 " 

1883-66 613,134 " 

" 1884-85 711,901 " 

" 1833-84 607,122 " 

1882-83 532,180 " 



WINTER PACKING IN THE WEST FOR TWENTY SEASONS. 
As reported by tbe "Ctnolnnatl Price Curreat." 



BIA80NB. 


Number Of 


Gross WeUbt 
per uog. 


Yield of Lard 


M' 




4,880,135 
5,101,308 
0,505,440 
7,460,648 
6.950,451 
0,919.450 
5,747,760 
6,132,212 
5,402,064 
6,460,240 
6,298,995 
6,439,009 
5,921,181 
5,483,652 
8.663,802 
8.173.126 
7,761,216 
4.603,520 
4,864,082 
7,191,520 


217.71 
215.92 
226.04 
217.14 
212.94 
207.71 
210.16 
213.03 
201.15 
206.51 
258.98 
251.31 
242.30 
263.46 
250.92 
339.75 
347.64 
227.73 
248.20 
233.73 ■ 


35.46 
34.08 
38.61 
39.40 
36.32 
35.05 
36.44 
35.43 
33-25 
36.02 
35.32 
33.54 
31.00 
34.76 
36:37 
33.45 
34.64 
31.66 
30.07 
33.63 










3 99 











































































,db,GoOglc 



TRADE AND COUllERCE OF 



BUMMER PACKING I 



THE WEBT. FROM MARCH L 
BER iBt. 



Aa reported by the "Cincinnati Price Current." 

Number HoiM. Av. gro. wt. Av. Yield Lin) 

4,803,689 231.52 32.12 

; 3,210,787 821.40 30.70 

; 3,781,036 245.31 3S.77 

4,058,868 234.58 '. 32.44 

4,964,573 234.S8 32.44 

. 4,644,003 238.93 34.01 

■ 5,611,526 227.00 30.98 

5,315,122 231.88 31.84 

' 6,881,501 246.28 3S.W 

■ 9,540,008 238.47 36.20 

6.896,398 221.76 31J» 

7,757,110 222.42 3L23 

6,721,000 240,41 34.64 

8,813,125 229.98 33J35 

. EBtimate 8,126,000 233.00 



TBARLT COMPARISONS-NUMBER OF HOOS PACKED IN THE 
WEST FOR THE 12 MONTHS ENDING MARCH 1, FOR 16 TEARS. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



t-Sl-SigM-*t02H 












a" 



b5 



a * 

si 

s I 

il 



s ^ 

a 






gESSS 

sSsSs 



SiSaigSIl! 



II 



B*: 



■S-sl 












sills* fi it ii&i 



(iiiiiiiii 

8.8.|8.|S,&||8. 



D„ii„.db,Go(5glc 



TRADE AMD COHUBRCB OF 



/EEKLY PRICES OF PROVISIONS FOR 1895. 




6.87% ^M 

6.75 6^«j- 

6.50 G.fav _ 

6.50 6.74 

ft.75 6-ffIV-^ 

6.62y, ^JO, 
6.a5 tin 
6.00 taa 

6,00 ft2i 



S\ 






,db,tlooglc 



THE CITT OP BT. LOUIS. 



LIVE STOCK. 



By Junea Huccallum. Editor "Union Stock Tardi Jouraal." 



CATTLE. 



The receipts of cattle at St. Louis during' 189B bIiow a gTe,titjizig 
increase, tieing: greater than any prerious year, except 1893, whicb 
showed a phenomenal increase. The extraordinary lacititiee en- 
joyed by our city in the handling of live stock, as well as a greatly 
increased home conaumptloa of beef is, in a nieastire, responsible 
for this. The erection of several lai^e beef dressing plants has in- 
creased the demand, bo that a very large percentage of the cattle 
coming to this market are slaughtered here. As a market offering 
the best inducements to shippers, St. Louis stands pre-eminent. Its . 
location, alone, gives it great advantage, and the progressive lib- 
erality of its people makes it a superior place of final shipment and 
the highest prices am paid to shippers for their stock. 

Sales of native cattle ranged much higher than the previous year, 
running as high as J6.25 per 100, in April, and prices were for the 
most part steady, with no sharp fluctuations; increasing from the 
early part of the year until April, when the highest prices were at- 
biined. Since then, prices on native-fed cattle have slowly declined, 
until December shows steers selling at $4.BS. Generally speaking, 
the quality of the offerings was fair, and during the summer months 
the demand for feeding cattle became very strong, and high prices 
were paid for that class. Prices ranged in January from $3.00 to 
$5.25; during February price« were steady; in March they increased 
to S3.Z5 to (S.SO, and In April attained the highest point, viz.: from 
$4.00 to S6.25. In May and June, prices remained steady, and from 
July until winter, the extreme range on fed bntcher cattle was S3.00 
to $5.2S. Texas and Indian also shared the Increase, ranging from 
$3.00 to $4.10, in the early part of the year, and in April the range was 
from $3.75 to S5.55. The bulk of grass steers brought from $2.90 to 
$4.00, the full range for the year being from $2.30 to $5.S5. 

HOGS. 

The receipts of hogs at St. Louts during 1895 show a net decrease 
of 49,514 head, as compared with 1894. During the year just passed, 
faoga sold at prices generally $1.00 per 100 lbs. less than 1894. The 
early part of the year saw hogs selling from $3.63 to $4.25. and they 
ranged during the first quarter from £3.65 to $4.90. April was the 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



sas trjujb and coiacBRCE or 

beat month Id the year, except July, when prices went fa> S5.40; from 
that time, however, prices have st«adU7 declined, the loweat notch 
bein? reached In December, when top hoga were Belling' at ¥3.40. At 
no time daring the jear was there a glut in the murket, and St. 
Lonia coiild dispose of a great many more bogs to good advantage. 
The old-time packing season is a thing of the past, as the refriger- 
ating: machine enables the packer to kill right along during the en- 
tire year, and there is always a. demand for bogs in St. Iionis which is 
never satiafled. Light bogs, from 180 to 330 ponnds, generally bring- 
more than any other kind; very heavy hogs are no longer in such 
strong demand, and more attention is being paid to quality by 
buyers. The stringent rules enforced by health authorities, slso, 
should be borne in mind by shippers, and cause them to ship only 
the best, if they want top prices. 



St. Louis has made a wonderful advance the paat year as a sheep 
market, handling S10,660 sheep during 1895. This is an increase or 
150,764 sheep over the previons year and 53,991 more than the receipts. 
of 1888, the previous high-water mark. This is most gratityiag. and 
is evidence that as a sheep market, St. Louis stands high. The won- 
derfully increased facilities for slaughtering, as well as a groning 
home consumption of mutton, is responsible for this. At no time 
during the year was the market overstocked to any appreciable ex- 
tent, and prices paid to shippers compare very favorably with any 
other market. 

Prices did not fluctuate much during the year. In January 
choice to fancy muttons sold from 93.00 to $3.50; in March and April 
tiey ranged from $4.00 to $4.85; in Jane prices had lowered some 
and we And choice muttons selling from $S.7S to $3.75. In July anil 
August, when receipts were fairly heavy, prices ranged from $E.SO to- 
$3.40, and from September to the end of the year, not much change 
was manifested, the e:xtreme range being from $2.50 to $3.50. The 
future promises a very good outlook for the St. Louis market. 

HORSES AND MULES. 

St. Louis continues to be the leading horse and mule market ol 
the country. Notwithstanding the decreased local demand for 
street car purposes — all the lines being now run by cable or trolle;^ 
— the receipts increased the past year and reached over 77,880 head, 
the largest on record since 1889. The South was, as usual, the lai^st 
buyer, 68,645 head having been shipped in that direcUon, while 
11,168 head went Eastward. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITT OF ST. LOUIS. 



RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS OF CATTLE, SHEEP, HOGS, HOBSES 
AND MULES FOB TWENTT-NINB TEARS, 



Saipiatrts. 



Digitized bvGoO^^IC 



TRACE AND COMUGRCE OF 





111 


sgig 


189 

1,683 

16,364 

4,149 

8,711 

25,116 

8,238 

787 

3,049 

661 

3,135 

3.100 

1.853 

380 

105 

158 

36 

4 




1 


1 






1 


Jl 


sags 


s 


ss 


i 


iililisij.ii. 




1 


1 




fl 


\%H 






ss 




230 

808 

48,632 

47,185 

121,614 

' 134,377 

51,300 

194,812 

177 

5,180 








s 




11 




§ 


281 

363 

71 

278 

479 

1,369 

14,661 

84,430 

33.805 

25.018 

67,734 

23,360 

3,361 

4,665 

3,349 

873 




1 


i 












i"-EaSllS||lli 



. p BO 

1lllnll3llilllllHlljllliilul 



,db,Go(5glc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS OP LIVE STOCK AT THE BT. LOUIS 
NATIONAL BTOCK TARD8 POR THE YEAR 1S9E. 



RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS OP LIVE STOCK AT THE ST. LOUIS 
UNION STOCK YARDS FOR THE YEAR 189G. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TRADE AND COHUBRCB OF 



WEEKLY PRICES OF LIVE STOCK FOR 1895. 

PNION STOCK TASDa JOORNALu 





jj 










Feb. 


I 




IB 




















April 


5 






























June 














5 














Aug. 


a 


























on 


27 




18 


Nov. 


t:::::::: 




IB 




as 


Dbc. 










27 



iO 1.011 S.1B LOO Ul 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



THE CITY OP BT. LOUIS. 



TOBACCO. 



LEAF TOBACCO. 

The receipts of leaf tobacco ahaw an increase of nearly 5,000 hogs- 
heads, most all of which was brought from other points, the crop of 
Missouri being eBUmated at 2,000 hogHheads. All the receipts were 
taken by local manufacturers. 

MAKUPACTURED TOBACCO. 

The position of St. Louis as the largest manufacturing point for to- 
bacco is still maintained, the output for the year 1895 being 57,476,310 
pounds. Of this amount, S2,4SS,T80 pounds was plug, 4,8SS,121 smok- 
ing, 110,510 pounds fine cut, and S3,899 pounds BnufT. In addition, 
there were 49,073,000 cigars and 25,064,000 cigarettea manufactured. 

The amount of chewing and smoking tobacco manufactured in the 
United States during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1895, was 248,269,- 
638 pounds. Of this amount, St. Louis manufactured 50,347,550 
pounds, or 23.90 per cent., an increase orer the previouB fiscal year. 

The ojitput of the larger districts for the past two fiscal yean 
was as follows: 

ISM. laes- 

Mluoari Flnt Dlatrtet. St. Louia. !».31S,13a lbs. H3<T,HIlitiB- 

NewJeraey. Fltth " Nevark. 30,190,107" 1T,7B8J>U '■ 

Kentucky Flflh •" LouUtHIc. 19.896.00! - 2£.841,7«6 " 

■Icblcsn Flrat " Detroit. IS.m.EOT - 1S.TST,IIU " 

Ohio Flrat " ClncluDBtl. 1S,U0.2«G " llJKOja '■ 

Tlrclnla. Seconil " Richmond. 13,(llfl,7»l " li.SW.BSS " 

North OaraUna Fittb AsbaTiiie. u,8TB.738 ■■ i4,eoe.S«o ' 

TlmbiU Sixth " Lynchburg. mG07,T37 " ll,0H.flT4 " 

The output for the coming year of plug tobacco and cigarettes 
will be largely increased, on account of enlargement of old plants 
and the advent of a new company, which will place St. Louis still 
further in the lead. 

The receipts of manufactured tobacco during 1895 were 18,468,330 
pounds, and total shipments, 72,331,710 pounds, against 14,906,766 
pounds received, and 64,579,660 shipped in 1804. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



trade: Ain> cohhbrcb of 



FIRST INTERNAL REVENUE COLLECTION DIS- 
TRICT. 



YUH. 


^iS^s^^KS: 


AmouatMxp^d. 




6.751,185 
e,441,87S 
4,784,985 
6,324,408 
4,828,147 
5,484,431 
5,990,801 
8,870,4«a 
12,889,784 
17,234.869 
17,170,190 
23,835,729 
22.631,104 
28,517,401 
32.448.936 
40.284.675 
40.009,305 
44.964.667 
51.792,102 
60,384,436 
57,677,351 
60,465,947 
57,097,445 
57,447,310 





































































































The manufactures of the past fire years ci 



e clasaifled as follow: 





Founds 


IBM 

POUDdB. 


ms. 
Poupd* 


Pounds. 


P.S>.. 


Flue Chewing Toba«co 


"Si 


88.181 


4B.6U.18B 


"^^^ 


*;t» 










. -»>.'<»l >^. 








G0.R4.tB 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



Ybar. 


UamilMturad. 


Amount ot tax 
paid. 


1873 


33,082,950 
3S,42S,390 

36.037,683 
31,841,875 
17.588,717 
38,560.500 
35,042,043 
38.390.575 
41.867,917 
40,877,750 
40,021,079 
41,327,500 
41,466.220 
43,586,363 
46,732,973 
47,294,380 
46.289.225 
38,934,800 
53.374,983 
56,964,376 
63,787,160 
S1,43S,S30 
49,073,890 


$165,464 79 

176,808 45 








































































170.953 13 

















TOBACCO, CIOAB8 AND 8NCPP HANCFACTUBED IN 8T. LOUIS FOlt 
SIS TBARB. 





MBS. 


- 


». 


1862. 


■M. 1 ■». 


JfSr-M'-vr.;. 


G7.4t!,411 


11 


"S 


"•W 


"•K 


H3,I0O 
M.104 






•"■'- 


"••» 





,db,GoOglc 



TRADE! AND COHUBBCE OF 



11 



,db,GoOglc 



) CITY OF ST. LOUIS. 




.vGoo^^lc 



TRADE AND COMMERCE OF 



BAGGING AND IRON TIES. 



The businesB in bagging' and tiee tor 18BS was about equal in toI- 
Time to 1S94, nitb remarkable evenness as regards values. Prices 
bave ruled lower tban ever known in the trade, owin^ to the short 
crop of cotton. 

The manufacture of bagging has continued on as large a Bcale aa 
heretofore and stocks left unsold are moderate. 

The coming season will doubtless show increased activitj in this 
line, as the cotton crop is expected to show a large increase in pluit- 
Ing. 

RECBIPTB OF FLAX-TOW AND JUTE FOR NINE TEARS. 



Eacsirre- 


im. 


1894. im. 


ma. 


18»L 


lew. 


188B. 


lesa. 


18W. 


Flsx-tow, bates 
Jute, bale* 


i.ve 


r. 




3U 

33.8t6 


4L1S1 


4S» 


m 

ST.aoa 


114 


1.344 



SHIPMENTS OP BAGOINQ FOR TEN YEARS. 



267,593 31T.9»3a!.Tll 3TS.040 331,330 



\3»i.71\ 3TS.040 3 



181.104 aw-ixw 



BAOGINQ MANUFACTURED. 

895 11,700,000 

13,000J)00 

12,000,000 

13,000,000 

15^00,000 

;890 12,000,000 



































December 31, 1890.. 


RECEIPTS BAOGINQ. 


PieoeB, 


. 1,000.000 
Yards. 
















669,000 














1.141.000 
2,725,400 


1890 




.. S4,S08 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY or ST. LOUIS. 



LUMBER. 



Bj the Lumbsrmen'B Exchange of Bt Louis. 

Among St. Louis lumbermen 1899 was not as bright a ^ear statie- 
tically ah Bome previouB years, but Its good eSecta will be <elt for 
jears to come. Accaunta have been stralgbtened, and imrplua 
Blocks the country over have been reduced to such an ext«nt that 
1896 ent«rs the field with cleaner boolu and lumbermen know better 
how they atSJidthau tor many a long year. One move made during' 
the year toward a change in business methods is that the idea of 
having a central office and making shipment direct from the mill to 
point of sale has gained strong foothold. Such a method of business 
reduces expenses to a inininium by the securing of through freight 
rates and the avoiding of a heavy yard expense in a large city, and 
the result has been the acquisition of many new lumbermen for the 
cfty and a conBequent increase of busincBS. 

Because of its location with reference to the receiving and ship- 
ping of lumber St. Louis has always been the leading hardwood mar- 
ket of the world. As yellow pine comes into importance and the 
vast resources of the South and Southwest are developed St. Louis 
is becoming recognized as the great yellow pine center of the world, 
as more of that commodity is handled through St. Louis than 
through any other city, and the output of the mills is regulated to a 
lai^e extent by our dealers. Many new yellow pine offtcee have been 
established in our city during the year, and many more will be with 
us in the near future, for the location of St. Louia gives her dealers 
in Southern lumber a distinct advantage over any others. 

The idea should not be derived from the above that 1895 was a dull 
year, for the receipts of lumber and logs were 132,000,000 feet in ex- 
cess of 1894, being something more than 827,000,000 feet, which is 
only slightly behind the beet year St. Louis has ever experienced. 
Careful investigation and inquiry has brought out the fact that over 
. 450,000,000 feet of lumber was shipped during the year by St. Louis 
dealers direct from the mills to pointe of sale outside of St. Louis, 
the same not forming a part of St. Louis' recefpta. This brings the 
total of lumber handled by St. Louis dealers up to 1,277,000,000 feet, 
besides local shipmenU amounting almost to 400,000,000 feet. The 
consumption of lumber by St. Louis builders and woodworking fac- 
tories during the year was 430,000,000 feet, a gain of 102,000,000 feet 
on the preceding year. 

An important more made by the Lumbermen's Exchange of St. 
Iioals during the year was the adoption of a new, revised set of 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



988 TRADE) AND COUUBRCB OF 

ioBpection ralea for hardwood lumber. The S7st«m ol hardwood 
Inspection In force in thin city is now recognized by the Itunber preat 
of the country as the fairest and most satisfactory in existence in 
any hardwood market, the new systems recently adopted In other 
cities having' received a scoring at their hands. 

Any one of an obserring turn of mind has noticed the sonthnard 
trend of the lumber producer. Thia has been more noticeable oE 
late than ever before, and it has been the means of giving to St. Louis 
its nnparall^ed prestige as a central market for Southern lumber. 
What UiiB means for the future of St. Louia aa a lumber market can 
hardly be understood by those not conversant with lumber statistics. 
As a rule, we are apt to think of the iron and steel interests as the 
^greatest single mercantile pursuit of tiie country. The census of 
ISOO places the capital employed in this line at (411,441,344, while the 
same census shows the amount of capital employed in the Ininber 
business in the United States at that time to have been tS61,913,t29. 
Since 189D the lumber business hss grown enormonsly, trade has 
been extended to all parts of the world, new producing districts have 
been opened up and a point to be remembered In it all is that more 
than seventy-five per cent of the new capital invested has beea in a 
territory tributary to St. Louis, 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE crrr or ht. louis. 
LUMBER. 

SECBIFTB OF LUMBER, LOOS, ETC., BT RtVER, FOR II 



KIND. 


1894-Peet. 


18«B-Peet. 


?«'fJl',&"ir.'K,'J^"i55?.'.">iSX.^';.';;;: 


8T,m,S!> 
1,302; la 


'"as 






'•ffiU 

ECSOO 
110.000 


Btolcory Lumber (rom Lower MlsslMlppt River 














i.m 












WalDut Lumber from Lower MlsBlBslppl River and 


176.430 
1S.118.7SS 


Gt.SOO 
11,991,100 


Cottonwood Lumber from Upper MIhbIbbIppI River.... 




ui.m.m 


9I.72t.7U 







J8M. 
Number. 


189S. 

Nombw. 


K5S S K'S.'^sS'SJ.'^'SiS'&M.'™::: 


8S,77S,«» 


S 




68,810.860 


44.B0»,O« 





RECEIPTS OP LOOS BY RIVBR. 

1895, SuperAclal Feet 8,«7S,I6I I 1B91, Superflclal Feet G,ZO7,190 

UK, Snperflolal Feet 10.411.I0S 1890. Superllcial Feet 10,095,082 

WS9, Superficial Feet 9.971,100 1889, Superflclal Feet 9,793.770 

139S, SuperflclBl Feet 7,862,380 18S8, BuperSclal Feet 8,318,800 



W)TAL RECEIPTS OF LUMBER AND LOOS. 






IBOi-Feot. 


IBM-Feet. 


Isra-Peet. 




a,ooo.ooo 


ass 

31.000,000 


101133-30 


















&3£,2n,730 









TOTAL. RECEIPTS OP SHINGLES AND LATH BT RAIL AND RIVER. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TRADE AND COMUERCB OF 

HIGHWINES AND WHISKIES. 



■^•""jsass.-"""" 


Barrels. 


Sblpmeuts Whlskj. 


BUTtls. 




86.0B4 
113,110 
113,116 
133,076 
109,040 
86,716 
78.301 
68.111 
63,973 
60.133 
S9,G29 
63.468 
17,674 




1U.30S 

133,718 

iwm 
i5s,m 

117,210 

101.88J 
81,S7S 
88,963 
99,Z» 
99,087 
90.743 


















































102.800 







The following is a stfttement of the amount of g^ain used, prodnct 
of Bptriteand tax paid,et4;., in St. Louis during 1894 and 1895: 





IBM. 


im. 


BuBbtlsot nilo. maab«d and dtsUUed 


480.(97 

tB.ite 

fl 

1.3S1).9C6 
81.3ia 


27M4! 








otcae spirits 


730.1S1 








4.09 gals. 
BSSgalB. 






*.»lg.la 
Uliala 


Amt. of t»s paid at '00c. and tl.IO per gt lion 
Alcohol trithdrawn for aalentiac purposM 


Whiskr allowed bj reaMQ of leakafie aod 







BEUAINIMG ON HAKD IK DISTILLEKY WAKEH0DBE8. 





Doc. 31. iw*. 


Dec-SLIW. 




81,855 gaJs. 

68« ■■ 

None. 

6.476 " 

47.808 " 


175,917 galS- 
S.805 -• 






Pure neutral or cologne spirits 

Whisky 


81.786 •■ 








185,722 " 









,db,GoOglc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



1895 2,282,1SS. 

1894 2,932,860. 

1BS3 3,182,027. 

189B 3,3ST,411. 

1891 3,282,432. 



6PIKIT8 BEOTIFIED OB COUPODNDED. 



3,153,456.98 gols. 

I " 1689 3,257,984.13 " 

I " 1888 3,184,546.82 " 

! " 1887 2,109,342.16 " 

r " 1886 i2,465,68T.09 " 

Total number of gallons ganged in three years by U. S. Qaugera; 
1695, 5.243,688.53 gals, 1894, 5,770,544.07 gals, ISOS, 4,885.0T0.00Kals, 

Total number of wholesale liquor dealers' stamps isBiied on change 
of package: 
1865 a0.19a 1804 19.802 1898 81,199 

■Ninety cents tiom Jan. 1 to Aug. 17, 1894: 11-10 Irom Aug, 3S, ISH, to D«o. SI. 



NAVAL STORES. 






Tbas. 


lull 


Bbls. 


Bbl9. 
TurpeD- 


iKS: 


merclftl 
BblB. ot 

liWlbB. 


•Parana 
Pitch, 




156 


1,597 


17,314 
15,679 
19,890 
19,470 
15,686 
18,900 
17,632 

18^912 
13,125 
9,846 
12,286 
13,994 
5,045 
8,076 


49,350 
57,456 
44,870 
53,738 
56,322 
48,900 
49,397 
47,052 
45,331 
33,742 
48,273 
36,357 
40,010 
36,882 
41,717 
48,148 


73,144 
82,080 
51,375 
76,947 
75,322 
68,699 
69,300 
68,250 
86,200 
72,000 
66,860 


13,240 
8,170 
12,048 
10.213 
5,679 
5,157 




































5,516 
8,675 
5,095 
7,343 

5,818 






































8,796 
6,293 
4,944 





















TURPENTINE. 

VTbile tlie figures aliove show the receipts to be less than last year, 
it does not mean that business has fallen off, as reports show that 
Hales of tnrpentine increased over 600 barrels; but the deficit is 
caused by the fact that a large lot of turpentine was carried over 
from last year, which curtailed the receipts until the surplus stock 
was reduced. Tbere hss been more turpentine sold in St. Louis 
proper during' 1895 than for many years past, and the price during 
the past year lias been more uniform than in any year during the 
past five years. 

ROSIN. 

The same applies to rosin in regard to receipts, that is, a large 
stock was carried over from 1894, which necessitated holding back 
receipts until the old stock was exhausted. The rosin prices were 
more regular, particularly so with the lower grades, which main- 
tained good prices during the whole year. The consumption of 
rosin in St. Louis and adjoining territory has been 10,000 to 12,000 
barrels RTcater than in 1894. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TRADE AMD COHHEBCO OF 



PIG LEAD. 



Keportfld bj JoUd \lmhl OomnlMloti OomiittiiT. 



There really was no eepecially salient feature in tlie pig lead HUJ- 
ket during: the year IStlS, and, like its predecessor, the same denotes 
a^in low prices. The year opened with metal selling at |2.7i to 
S2.7TV,. At the end of the first six months tliere appeared on tbe 
surface Improved conditions and busineaa in point of Tolnine, bnt 
tacking: in elements of uncertainty or speculation and consequently 
the advance recorded during July and August to nomin^ly %3^S and 
$3.40 St. Louis was of short duration. Towtu^s the end of the year 
we And metal again below the ¥3.00 mark and the nominal close is 
32.921/, St. Louia. 

A period of eighteen months has practically elapsed since the doty 
on lead was reduced from a cents to 1 cent per pound. It was p^alif 
feared by many that the production in this country would gerioudj' 
decrease; events, however, have proven the fallacy of this idea, and 
that in spit« of the lower level of prices now ruling, which amount 
In round figures to 26 per cent, of the value which Uie metal farmerly 
had; production has not only held ItB own, but has shown a tendenef 
to increase to a very great ertent. This may be due to the fact iiut 
lead is usually produced as a, by-product when mining gold and 
silver, while the pure lead ores found in South Ulasouri, from all 
appearances, can still be reasonably profitably mined, even at the late 
reduced prices. 

Production of lead in the United States from domestic orea of all 
kinds was about 170,000 short tons, showing an increase of abont 
9,000 tons over 1894. 

The lead smelted from foreign ores end obtained from base bullion 
imported was about TS,000 tons. 

The total production of metal was therefore about 245,000 trais, 
showing a targe increase over tlie previous year. This has been 
chiefly due to the greater amount of foreign metal treated by our 
smelters. 



WHITE LEAD. 



St. Louis Is one of the largest white lead manufacturing centecs 
in the world, and its popular brands of Collier, Southern and Bed 
Seal are favorably known everywhere. Probably one-third of tie 
white lead consumed in the United States is made in thia city, there 
being three very large factories which are kept constantly in opera- 
tion. Owing to its geographical position, it is advantageously ait- 
uated for the manufacture of this commodity and the distriliiition 
of the manufactured product. 

Some of the factories have been located here for nearly half a cen- 
tury, and the brands manufactured by them are recogniEcd throngh- 
out the country for their purity and general excellence, and are Boln 
from the Pacific to the Atlantic coast, from Manitoba to the Gulf. 

The volume of trade for 1895 was large, the amount stiipped oat of 
the city being 42,803,950 pounds, the largest ever reported. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OF ST. LOUia 



RBCSHPTS and SHIPHBNTa OF LEAD IN FIOS OF SO t.BS. BACH. 



YSAR. 


Receipt! SbipDi't* 


r.„. 




Shipm'ts 




1,110,738 887,710 
1,044,012 I2G,38e 

i;ifl7,8»E 6S7;Efl 




228,303 


























478. HI 























































BOURCBB OF 



OF PIO LBAD FOR FIVE TEARS. 





1894. 


1898. 


1892. 






108.513 
289, 13( 


g4;49i 


354. 2E( 

103,953 
128.810 




7»,410 
499;34T 


S-.fc?.^^,^..^"-^''"-"- 


St. LoulB ft Iron Hoantaln R. R 




«0 












88 


1B9 
7,076 


1,E)4 






1,012 










Toledo, SL LjOuIs & K. C. Railway.... 








240 


*■*]; 














900 






















43 




38 






800 






214.349 


6B.J88 


'sum 


80,830 




70,446 
334,071 




374,341 


189,570 






WayotUJ 


'i.a.5 


14,748 


Total PlSB |1,G00, 923 [1,463,229 [1,343, 541 


1,528,484 


1,7»,9T7 





SHIPMENTS OF WHITE LEAD. 










1?^^ 




0,m,ZK 1889 31,211.7(5 

;::;:;;ftK ffi::::::;:::::::Sa!S 






MSB 


1S94 


48,a0!.860 



MONTHLY PRICES OF REFINBD LEAD.* 



January 1.76 Q S.9S 



,.1.30 Z9E 



March 2.90 2.96 I.03M 1.26 

JKorb ISB — '^■- -~ 

Star 3.8B 

June 2.86 t.UK 

July I>.05 g.20 

AtUtuK ]S.K 8.37^ 



September . 

November".'. 
December . . 



t.mi 





«« 


•.Sfli©4-0b 


























l"«^ 


it 


iS 


J'lik 












8.47H 


BO 


3.36 




























S.00 


3.66 


3.50 



a East Side usually 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TBADB AND COMUBRCB OP 



WOOL 



The receipt* of wool for the past year show a decrease from those 
of 1894. The actual amount received and sold in this nukrket dnring 
the Beason of 1895 was 21,593,760 pounds against S4,B61,45S poui^ 
for 1894. 

Funsl«n Bros. & Co., wool commission merchante, of this citj", 
report ae follows: 

The falling off in the receipts of wool in this market durios Qi* 
paat seBBOD has been due to no local causes, or depreciation ss * t«- 
ceirlug and distributing market, but to the decline in sheep rttl^sg) 
the slaughter of sheep and lessening of the sheep induatr;' during 
the past two years having been UDprecedeoted. 

Btrong and combined efforts have been made to bring St I/>^ 
forward as a wool market, and much credit is dne to several leBding 
houses here for their efforts and the money spent and energy dis- 
played in that direction. 

Notwithstanding the present depressed condition of the too! 
trade, and the disheartened feelings of the wool-growers, the time 
will come, and at no distant date, for a reaction. With a reviral of 
this trade strenuous efforts should be made to divert it to this i»*'^ 
ket. The wool clip of the United States is over 300,000,000 pounds, 
of this over 200,000,000 pounds are grown west of the Mississippi. 



HIDES. 



The tratBc in hides Increased largely in 1895. The receipts ihovr 
a slight falling oft from 1894 and 1893, but the shipments sggregsled 
78.039,400 pounds, by far the largest in the history of the trsdf, 
caused by the large increase In cattle slaughtered at this point. 
Values fluctuated greatly and in the early part of the yew there v^ 
B, rapid advance In prices and an unusually good demand. ThU con- 
dition continued until September, when there was a reaction until 
December, so that at the close prices were but slightly above those 
at the opening. 



LEATHER. 

Leather, of course, followed the market for hides with the tsar 
fluctuations in values in all grades. 

The volume of business was large, although the receipts trtao 
abroad were slightly less than in 1894. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP ST. LOUIS. 



BECEIFTS AND SHIPHENTS FOB FIFTEEN YEARS. 





wooi~ 


Hn.«. 




s;r 


X'uTr 


Pound». 


PoliDdi. 


■«» 


21,593,780 

S4,8GI,45S 
13,024,436 
35,830,690 
31,975,954 
30,540.503 
31,0:8,f20 
19,626.629 
17,347,166 
18,563.614 
21,193,031 
12,391,806 
18,868.739 
16,019,836 
11,198,272 
12,387.089 


20,526,100 
34,430,971 
15,736,165 
27,450.378 
21.464,552 
23,826,444 
18.339,236 
21,463.998 
17,392.858 
17,835,630 
25.145,815 
17,665,858 
80.903,974 
14,845.897 
9,817,534 
10,492,524 


44,169,790 
46,456,970 
45,011,866 
38,412,854 
34,744,949 
28,245,828 
29,732,042 
31,814,049 
26,175,972 
19,978,698 
20,864,833 
16,305,415 
17,453,844 
22,135,538 
20,079,814 
18,436,853 


78,039,400 

68.543,869 
61,533,479 
47.596,204 
39,487,732 














36,445,038 
40,296,581 
31,476,338 








85,386,098 
21,797,724 








86,744,094 
28,088,636 
24,114,529 


1881 





HEOEIPTB OF PELTRIES AND FCBS. 















96,355 










125,526 

78,838 
43,316 
45,332 
23.045 

18.839 






















1876 


14.808 



BE0EIPT3 OF LEATHER. 



1889. 
1890. 
1891. 



60,889 I 1898.. 98.896 

73,103 1893 103,032 

84,404 1894 89,533 

92,335 1 1893 83,588 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COMUBBCB OP 



HAY. 

BeiKtrtad by the fit. Louis Haj Bichaage. 



Daring the first half ol the year 189S the markets west of the riTcr 
were very largely dependent upon the Eastern Stat«s for snppUea; 
during the last half the conditions n-ere exactly reversed, owuig, in 
each Initence, to long, extensiTe aud ruinous drouth, -which seiioiulf 
cut Bhort the crop of all grain and graooeo. 

These conditions aided to some extent in largely increaalng the 
Tolnine of business handled in this market. The reo^ptB wen 
nearly 4,000 cars larger than during any previous year. The ship- 
ments also show a large increase. Prices have ruled comparatively 
high during the entire year, and everyone interested in the trade has 
been amazed at the large daily receipts, with liberal sales at steadf , 
well-snstalned prices. Not a little of this steadiness is due 1o the im- 
proved methods of handling sjid selling Iiay in this market, and liai 
given it a vddespread and favorable repntation all over the tributary 
country. The high range of values has been in marked contrast 
with the phenomenally low prices that all Idnds of grain hsre 
brought in the same period, and emphasizes the fact tliat even an 
ordinary crop of hay, in both quality and quantity, shows better net 
results to the producer than any of the grain crops. 



RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS OF HAT FOR A SERIES OF TflAKS. 



Y«AB. 


Becfltpta. 






Tons. 
195,S8S 
159,969 
141,238 
131,148 
141,398 
114.092 
116,34S 
107,884 
88,394 
85,078 
97,975 
78,798 
82,940 


Ton.. 
















38>S3 




























MJT3 


1883 


B2,«9 



Stock Id store December Slat, about 7,500 tons. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



! CITT OP ST. LOUIS. 



BE0BIPT9 &.I1D SHIPMENTS OF HAY DCRINO UBC. 



BY 


Eeceipto. 


Bhlpm-t>. 




3,854 
31,845 
34,900 

18,761 

' 24,173" 
1,905 

140 
2,108 

276 
1,240 
1,427 

841 
3,381 
1,416 
9,043 
8.740 
6,590 
8,630 
4,080 
1S,S85 
22,070 

415 










1,971 




St. L.. Kas. City & Colo. It. R 


224 








S,257 
3,670 


St. L., A. & T. H. E. E. (Cairo Short Line) 




8,202 






1.563 
4.412 


Baltimore & Ohio S.-W. E. E 




7,558 






2,723 






3,380 
























f 1.216 
440 

50 

67 


















I 




J 








195.582 









MONTHLY BANOE OF PBIOSS OV HAY DUBINQ IMS. 




sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADE AND COMMERCB OP 



SALT. 
KBCBIPTS AND aKIFMENTB FOB TWBNTT-ONH TEIARS. 







Becsipts- 








Yeah. 














Bftrrels- 


Sacks 


Bulk In bu. 


BarreU 


Bulu. 


Bui); Id bo 


1896 


aD4.»4 
























































































































































































































ffiSS 






















271,621 




























1OT6 


242.168 
M,1W 


» 








S.S 







g» 


102 





RBCBIPTS AND BHIPMENTB OP SALT FOB 


1S9S. 




Bt 


RiCBIPTB Balt. 


BHiPMsim Salt. 


Sacks 


BWb. 


Bu. 
Sulk. 


Back! 


Bbto- B^o». 
















9.100 




120,680 


.S 










HO 












se 






i.Ga 
ut 

610 
X 












at. L.. A. & T. H. B. B. tCalro Short Line.).. 


960 


86 

"e;T7I 

T2.77. 
»,83a 
101.IOC 


£60 

Ji! 

"'im 

■i8.2« 




Me''i*0*hl?^''B " ^ " 


l.»: 


LouiBvllle. Evansville A St. Louis R. R 




e.0G( 

1,688 

too 

60,740 




Cleveland, Cincinnati. ChloaKO & St. L R. E 


iwim 

186.100 
20,880 
2S1,M0 


■■"981 








Toledo, Bt. Loula & kansaa City B. R 
















9S0 

i,Me 


















IOC 




































sx 








100 






























Driven and Eiprens 












T2.T9S|SM.2IM|gO4.S80 


-i:S« 


aosai-iiSe 



,db,GoOglc 



THfi] CITI OF ST. LOUIS. 

BEANS. 

RBCEIPTB AND SHIPMENTS FOB TWENTY-ONB TEIARS. 





Si 

Bu«h. ■ 






Cmtoc 

Bush. 




















































































































R) 


7U. 


8GE 




«. 


isa 






























































































































































































































i: 


Wb 


» 


wa 






771 



MTB _ _ 

CASTOR BEANS. 

MONTHLT RANOB IN PRICE OF PRIME, IN CAR IXJXa, 1895. 
Small lots sold S ® 10 cenU lei's. 

Jftnuu-7 aiSSiaiSS 1) July 1133® 

"-' 135 Auuust 12S 

IK September I 19 



Februftry. 
Harch. 
April.. 
May... 



October. . . 
[\]IIV.\.^^..JS^^V.V...V.- i 25 II DBoember'.'.V!:V,V."..'"M!;.V la 

POTATOES AND ONIONS. 

RBGBIPTfl AND SHIPMENTS FOR TWENTY-TWO TEARS. 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TRADQ AND COUMBRCB OF 



DRIED FRUITS. 



From tbe "Iiit«ratat« Grocer." 



Early in the jear, trade in domestic dried fruits was very quiet, ta 
deaJerB were tben confined to tbe crop of 1894, which was practi- 
cally a failure in the section trlbatary to this market. 8a[niliee 
were bo Btnall that dealers had to turn to California and foreign dried 
fruita, or do alnooat nothing'. The new crop, therefore, opened with 
Tery small supplies on hand, as there 'were no stocks carried throngh 
tbe summer. The crop of apples raised in 1895 In this section vrss, 
however, one of the largest ever produced, and in the last four 
months of 1B05 conditions in general were just the oppotdte to whst 
they had been early in the year. Green apples were sold in lie 
orchards as low as 5 to 10 cents per bushel — in fact, they got so abe»p 
that it was thought that more fruit was left on the ground to rot than 
was saved. The result was that supplies of dried fruits increased to 
rapidly when the crop began to move that the price went below the 
cost o( production and had a very discouraging effect upon the dry- 
ing interests. The fact that fresh fruits were so abundant and 
cheap in all sections of the country also detracted attention from the 
dried article and cut down the consumption. There has been, hoir- 
ever, a very fair trade, Ixith in the North and South, since coM 
weather set in. The lower prices also started up a big export trade 
in Bun-dried apples, most of which was with Germany, but some 
going to France and England. Some chopped apples also sold for 
export. A good trade, domestic and foreign, was reported in cores 
and skina, which are used altogether in the manufactnre of jellj, 
and supplies proved rather short. Practically nothing was done in 
peaches, as they have been replaced by California peaches and apri- 

OAIJFORNIA DRIED FRDTTS. 
The year on California dried fruita opened on a declining and 
deihoralized market. The trade had bought heavily of the 1894 crop 
and ran along in the hopes of larger demand and better prices. The 
hopes were not realized, however, as inquiry for goods, instead of 
increasing, decreased, and as the summer months approached all bad 
big stocks on hand. Sooner than dispose of their holdings at a ssc- 
riflce, a great amount went into cold storage. When tbe 189S crop 
made its appearance, it had these carried-over stocks to compete 
vrith, and as a consequence the level of values has been exceptionally 
low. Apricots, on account of a short crop, is about the only article 
in the line that has held up In price. Fears also were a short crop. 
Conaumption of this fruit steadily increases year by year as the gen- 
eral pnblic becomes acquainted '\vith its delicious and appetizing 

RECEIFTS AND SHIPMENTS OP DRIED FRUITS. 





Ska, hpS'Sm;.- 


k> 


Zl^Vi^ 






S1S,062 






100,338 












m.m 






ilt,330 




..125,733 


216,801 



,db,GoOglc 



THE CITT OP ST. LOUI8. 

SEEDS. 





RBCBIPT8 FOR FOUR 


rSARl 


3. 








,^. 


1MB. 


IBM. 


IBM. 


laoz. 


SkB. Busb. 


Tos. 


Blu. 


Buah. 


Tds 


SItt. 


Bush. 


TllB. 


Hks. 


BuBb. 


Tn.. 


Sn 


,»»'"•«• 




1,B«7 


4!l,8fiO 



i»93 


iSS 


369,600 




8.7H 
M.496 


».». 









3.41^ 




W 

























Sblpment of Plazoeed 



ahlpment o 
Shipment o 
Bblpment o 
Shipment o 
Shipment o 



for U8S, S.lEe Backs and 
for lSg7. I.OSe sacks uid 
for IS8S. S,ie4 Backs and 
for 1SS9, 2,616 sacks and 

for 1390, 613 Backs and 
tor 1391, TU sacks and 

for 1892. sacks and 

for 18M sacks and 

for 1894 sacks and 

for 1896 socks and 



tO.lSS b' 
Sa,7ES b 
46,976 b 



1«1,S43 
166.667 
2!6.!Ce 



S busbelB. 
.0 bushela. 
I bushels. 
" bushels. 

bushels. 

bushels. 

bushels. 



St. ILoiile is a promiaent market for flaxseed, & Iarg% proportion 
of the crop of the West beln^ consumed in our mills. In the line of 
graaa seeds, while this Is not as prominent a market as some others, 
a large amount of seed is received here. 



r lots (small lota sold at 2 



S^^SS;^:;:::;;;;;::::;;:;;;;::;:::::: 


;S a 1 
A ,.« ! 
■■Jl IS ] 

86U 96 1 


i 

» 






.:Si 

1.25 

if 

.48 

r.4o 


if. ■# 






















92 LOS 






I>ecelnber 


1.16 J.M 



GREEN APPLES. 







BBCBIPTB AND SHIPHBNTB FOR 


9BVBN YBARS. 




BKIKFTS-WILe. 


SmPHKHTS— BBL8. 


1896. 


1894. 


18B3. 


ISK. 


1891. 


- 


- 


1B8H. 


.».. 


1683. 


lees. 


1891. 


1890. 1889. 


4ae«i 


anm 


iB!,vm 


167,476 


»e,8SS 


- 


280.209 


a«l,472 


217.874 


«8,8t4 


128,966 


96,478 


101,111 118.890 



e brought In by wagons, of which no data 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



TRADB Aim COUMBRCB OT 



CHEESE, BUTTER AND EGGS. 



From the "Inleretato Grocer." 



CHEESE. 



The BDaual estimate of the Tisible stocks on January 1, 1S96, in (be 
principal diBtributing points of the world ag^rregate 123,000 twiea 
more than on January 1, 1895, but the party making up the flpires 
states that Canada last year erroneouely reported a stock of only 
300,000 boxes, while there were actually 400,000 boxes in stock at the 
time — this year the Canadian st«ck is placed at 350,000 boxes. Be- 
sides, there were many more small cheeses made last year utd the 
aggregate in 'pounds is therefore much less than the previous ye«r. 
Stocks in the West are certainly much smaller and it is genenllf 
thought that the supply will be limited towards the end of tbe 
season. Receipts at St. Louis were 473,953 boxes — on increase ant 
any former year. 

BUTTER. 

There was more butter consumed in St. Louis during 189S th«n 
ever before, as the rceipts showed another substantial increase tad 
were the largest on record, while the shipments wei% a little less 
than the year before. The stringent laws adopted by the St«te 
Legislature at its last session has reduced the sale of oleomSi^sriBe 
largely, as it must be plainly labeled and cannot be sold ai Bnt- 
terine, Jersey Roll or other elusive names. One notable feature in 
the business was the revival of dairying in this section, and the estab- 
lishments In this immediate neighborhood produced a very saperioi 
article, which met with much favur by the trade. 

EGGS. 

St. Louis is steadily gaining in importance as a market for eggs, 
as both the receipts and shipments of 1895 show a further substan- 
tial increase of business over that of preceding years. There were 
not only more eggs consumed here than ever before, but the east- 
em trade has also been enlarged, as the brands of eggs packed for 
shipment by St. Louis dealers bear an excellent reputation through- 
out the country. The increase in business was due to the enlarge- 
ment of the cold storage facilities of this city, several plants hav- 
ing been put into operation last summer for the almost excln^te 
use of storing eggs. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



THE CITY OP BT. LOUIB. 258 

RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS OF BUTTER AND CHEESE FOR 1886. 



BY 


BDTTKB. 


CHIBBB. 


pauKd..| paundi. 


R«eipu. IShipo-'u. 




89.990 
3,$S1.96I 


2.000 
88,286 








zso 

s 






W 






Uo., Kansas City & Texas R. R 


'■IS 

14.490 

162.S60 


iD,iai 

l,06B;g7B 
117,170 

ss 

14.1S0 

I.7S0 

18:890 

ni2E 

2.727,166 


4a 

U7 

m 

IK 
306 


1.845 


St L., Iron Moun. & Southern R. R.. 
Bt. Louis, A. A T. H. R. R. (Cairo 


tbImS 




6.m 




isizio 

us. 580 
1S.G90 

SB0.1BO 

"l,m',836 
7,168.7a) 




''K 


LoulBvUle. Evansville A Bt. L. R. R... 




IS 

1 




Oeveland, Cln.. Chi. ftBt. tiulB R. R. 
VanaallaA Terre Hauta R. B. 


1.870 
■1.828 






90C 

"'a 






Chi., Burlington & Quincy K. R- 




20 

as 








St. Louts & Bastern R. R 


ilsoG 







RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS OF EGGB. 

.o., ^ . Receipts. 

18S5, Packages K4.KS 

ISW, PackaseB BB8.T78 

1893. Packages 682.SB9 

1S92, Packages 489.218 

1891. Packages 5ltt,il8 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



TRADE AlTD COMMBRCB OB* 



CANDIES. 



St. LouIb is one of tb« greatest candy markets in tbe United States. 
There are at present in operation seven lat^ mannfactories, employ- 
ing on the arerage alto^her about 800 handa, and paying' in wagres 
$250,000 per annum. The yearly output has been estimated at 30,- 
000,000 pounds, valued at $2,500,000. 

The trade extends over a terrlt«ry comprising' from thirty to 
thirty-five Statea, east to New Yorlc and the Atlantic coast States, 
north to the British line, south to the Gulf, and -west to California 
and Oregon. 

The long tsistinqp prejudice of Eastern buyers a^^ainat makin^r pur- 
chaeee West, in this line as well aB in others, has, by the energy and 
geniuB of our manufacturers, been eatirely overcome, and the trade 
with Eastern jobbers has become one of the rooBt important 
branches of the business. 

There are in St. Louis some of the most expensive and complete 
machinery plants for the manufacture of candy that can be found 
anywhere in this country. Every new device that promises success 
is eagerly taken up. St. IjOuIs and progress have become synony- 
mous terms amongr confectioners in the United States. West of the 
Alieghenies St. Louis is viewed as the standard. 

.During 1S95 the confectioners of St.Louis have maintained their re- 
putation for high quality of goods and generally the trade has Bhown 
a gain over 1804 in volume, and the indications are for a fairly pros- 
perous season during 1898, 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



THB CITT OP ST. LOUIB. 



RECEIPTS AMD SHIPMENTS OF SDNDEY ARTICLES 
FOE 1896. 



Ale and Beer, packages 

B&rbed Wire, pounds 

Beef, barrels and tlerceB 

Fresh Beef, pounds , 

Canned Beef, pounds 

Boots and Shoes, cases 

Cordage and Rope, coils 

Cement, sacks 

Cement, barrels 

Cotton Seed Meal, Ions 

Cranberries, barrels 

Candles, boxes 

EgfTB, packages 

Fish, packages 

Fertilizer, tons 

Hops, bales 

Iron and Steel, tons 

Leather, rolls 

Halt, Backs 

NaUs, kegs 

OilB, barrels 

Oils, tanks 

OU Cake, tons 

Otangea and Lemons, packa^ree 

Ore, Iron, tons 

Ore, Zinc, tons 

Pig Iron, tbne 

Itedlroad Iron, tons 

Staves, M 

Slaves, care 

Soap, boxes 

Tallovf , pounds 

Tin, boxes 

TVines and Liquors, barrels 

'Wliies and Liquors, boxes and cases. . 
Zinc and Spelter, slabs 



875,931 
134,605 
639,344 
274,993 
17,076 
10,590 

654,928 



143,02 
83,568 .. 
84,064 
433,042 
46168 .. 
8,495 .. 



14,036,070 
79,573 .. 
19,651 .. 
38,864 .. 



338,966,600 
6,648,770 
686,391 



5,202 
38,435 
65,651 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



■Ji 



TRADE AND COMMERCE OP 

sssssgssassi a 



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D„ii„.db,Go(5glc 



TRADE AXD COiaaSBCB OF 



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TRADB AND COUUBBCB OP 





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THE CITT OP ST. lOUIfl. 



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sdbvGoo^^lc 



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DIED 1895. 



BARRETT, J. R Ati|ruBt 10. 

BROCKMAN, PHILLIP October 17. 

BRUENING, CHARLES April 3. 

CASEY. JOHN F AugTvit 20. 

CHAPMAN. CHA8. L Deeember 29. 

CHASE. WM. L October T. 

COPP. SAMUEL February 9. 

FINItiAN, T. J November 13. 

FRITSCH, C. R March 5. 

nARNEAU, JOSEPH, 8r. July 23. 

GILLI8. JOHN December 8. 

OBIESEDIECK. ANTON December 18. 

HAHN, FERD August 24. 

HALLIDAY, HENRY L September 2. 

HARBEBS, F Au^ruet ». 

HIBBARD, H. W Jonuary 17. 

HILTENBRAND, EUGENE September 8. 

HINSMAN, CHA8. B November ig 

HOWARD, THOMAS October 12. 

HUCH. HENRY Anpist 8. 

HUMPHREYS, W. S. October 80. 

KRAUSS, CHRIST J July 18. 

LAMWERSICK. FRED October 25. 

LANSING. A. B., Jr December S 

LINK, ERNST October 17. 

MATHEY.C. F April 28. 

MULLALLY, DANIEL Junnary 2 

PERRY, JOHN D August 24. 

POWELL. B. W April 4. 

ROGERS, HUGH December 5. 

RUSSELL, THOS. GREER December 3 

RYAN, FRANK H May ! 

SCHEEIBER, W March I. 

SELLS, MILF^ June ^ 

TEMMEYER. PHILIP.. July 16. 

THOMPSON. CHA8. L May 22. 

TIERN.\N. JOSEPH H... September 1. 

TUNSTALL. R. J October 19. 

VAN DORP, J September 13, 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



<i=-.MEMBERS.^=i>-' 

OF THE 

Merchants' Exchange of St. Louis. 

January 13th, 1896. 

NUMBER OF MEMBERS, 2,618. 



(^Members are requested to esamine with reference to their own name and 
address, and report to the secretary if incorrect, also to inform him of any 
cbitDges that occur in style of firm or busiaess location. 

Name. Firm. , Buslneia. Location. 

Abates, J. D Ts^lnal Hotel Union Station. 

Abeles, Robt, Abelea A TauBalr, I4inilrar Blalto BuUdlnB. 

Abbott. AuRliBtus L. . R. O. Dun & Co., Uercantlle Arency £14 Pine Bt. 

Able, BamTr R. O. Dun A Co., Meroontlle Agency . . . Cbam. of Com. 

Abraham, W. D. . . Abraham A Qerdes, Feed B. St. I>ouIb, III. 

Ackerson, J. O. . Cryital Plate Qlau Co. Storekeeper Cnrstal City, Mo., 

Adams, C.M. . . Waters-Pleroe Oil Co., Sec'y and Treag. . Odd Fdlows' Building, 

Adams, R. M 207 Chamber of Commerce. 

Adams, W. H. . . . . Jno. Purcetl A Co., Butter and Com. . . . 22t N. Second Bt. 

Adler, Ben .... Adler, Goldman A Co., Cotton m Oravler at, N. O. 

Adler, Joteph Broker Fort Bmlth, Ark. 

Aglar, Jamee F. . . Union Paa Railway, Railroad Agent . . . . m N. Fourth Bt. 

A£r«na, Aug Real Estate Agent .... HE Market st. 

Akin, Thomas Commission . . iOS Cham, of Commerce. 

Albers, C. H C. H. Albera A Co., Commission . , 40D Cham, of Commerce. 

Albrecht, Victor Burtaper 300 N. Commercial. 

Albrecht, H. 8. . . Schoellhom-Albrecht Mactifne Company filO N. L.ovb«. 

■ 'laway. Jafl. W. . Armour Packing Co. 2030 Clark ave. 

ID, Geo. L. . . . . Pulton Iron Works Sooond and Carr sta. 

:n, Oeorge W. . . Mo. A HI. Coal Co.. RlaJto Building. 

in, Edmund T. . . B. T. A C. B. Allen, Lawyers Walnwrlght Building. 

in, James H. . . Allen-West Com. Co ilk B. Main at. 

tn, ChBs. Claflln Lawyer Security Building, 

en, J. Oran, MeBBniore,Qaiinett A Co. GOD Cham, of Commerce. 

sa, H. W. . . . Allen-West Com. Co IM B. Main st. 

Alexander. Chas. H. . . . Kehlor Bros Chamber of Commerce. 

Allison. James W. IIT N. Third st. 

Alt- tlBOrr Livery W29 Shenandoah. 

AlUiauB, W. B. . Western Brass Mfg. Co, Secretary G15 Walnut st. 

Althelmer, Oustave . Ous Altheimer Co., Broker TU Pine st. 

Althetmer, Ben). Bonds, Stocks and Investm't Secur's . KH N. Fourth at., 

AmbB, Joseph B 

Ames. Henry 803 N. Fourth, 

Amen, "Wm. F Lefflngwell and N. Market St. 

ADde. Geo. Pork Packer . . . 2369 B. Jefferson ave. 

Anderson. W. B. . . . Nanson Com. Co 209 Cham, of Commerce. 

Anderson. W, T. . . United Ellevator Co., Preaident Rialto Building. 

Anderson. J. F Oeorgla Railway. Q. W. Agent .... Fourth and Chestnut. 

Andorson. W. M. . . O. V. Munger A Co., Laundn' 1310 Washington ave, 

Anderson. Lorenxo B. . . . Anderson & Wade Real Bstate Co. Columbian Bldg. 

Andrevrs. Wm. O. Andrews A Robinson nil Washington ave. 

AnnAn. R. P. . . . Annan, Burg A Smith, Commlaaion S25 Chestnut st. 

Antfaonp, Henry . . . Anthony A Kuhn Brewing Co Victor and Tenth. 

Arbu«kle, Jamas, 8r. . Arbuckle A Co., Brokers Bank of Commerce Bld'g. 

ArcheFtW. B !83D Washington ave. 

Arens, Henn C Commission .... 301 N. Commercial st. 

Arnold, C. H. Jno. Wahl A Co., Comrolasion IS. Main sL 

Arnold, Henry . . Joo. O. Haas Boap Co., Soap SOZ Wash st. 

Arp, Elssert Bggert Arp i Co.. 810 a Third St, 

Atkinson, Robt. T. . Anglo-Am. Prov. Co BO) N. Second st. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



HBMBBRB OP THE 



Aufderhelde, F. W ffi S. Commercial st 

Aufderhelde. Walter, F. W. Aufderhelde. CommlBalon t2 S. CommercisI at. 

AuKat, O. A. W. . Fourth National Bank, Cashier RlalUi Building. 

Avery, J. W Fire Insurance 229 Cheetnut Bt, 

Avery, B. H. . . Watera-Plerco OH Co Odd Fellows' Bulldine. 



Backer, Henry 1808 B. Fourteenth st 

Backer. Mathlaa GOl 8. Main st. 

Backer, George H. . . . FuM & Backer, Flour SOI B. Main sU 

Bacon, WllllaniBDn IVIer Estate, President 4D6 Market at. 

Baer, Bernard . . . Bernard Baar & Co., Produce and Provisions ... 114 Elm bL 

Baer. Herman B, Baer & Co., Wholesale OrocerS . . . Ft. Smtth, Ark. 

Ballsy. David Real Estate 9SX Cheamnt st 

Bailey, Chas. H Real Elstate IH N. Seventh St. 

Bailey, H. V.. James HoKan PrlnOng Co JIO Elm st. 

Bain, Walter . W. D. Orthweln Qraln Co Cbamber of Comment. 

Baird, W. J St CharloB, Wa, 

Baker, George A., Continental Nat'l B'k. President Fourth and Olive. 



I. G 4U Olive at. 

Baker, E Patton, Bell & Co., Cotton Cotton ExchaDge. 

Baker, Walter H. . . National I,ead Co. Tenth and Clark ave. 

Baker, J. B Baker Bros., Inaurance «1 Ollvt 

Baker, Jesse T "* ■"--■-"-— "- — -• -- ■ 



Ball, t).C Ball Sc Warren. Commlaalon Co 1(B Walnut 

Ball, PhlHp De C Ice Machlnea 91! N. Main sl 

Ballatlne, John Coey & Co., Fork Packers Keokuk, lo. 

Ballard, T. R. . . . Ballard, Meaamore & Braun, Commission . Republic Building. 

Ballard. J. O., Jr. . Ballard, M. A Braun, Commission Republic Building. 

Bang, Adolphua . . Telchnian Com. Co., Vice-President . . . Republic Bulldln*. 

Bannantlne. Geo. A. Bannantlne Galv'd Iron Mfe. Co 113 Soulord st. 

Bannerroan, Jas. . Meyer. Bannerman & Co.. Baddiery SU N. Sixth at. 

Barada, F. X. Barada-Ghlo Real Estate Co KB Chestnut sL 

Bardenheler, John L,lquDrB BE Market at. 

Barklase, Louis, . Wernse & Dleckman, Brokers S11 N. Fourth SL 

Barnard. Geo. D., Geo. D. Barnard A Co., iitg. Stationers, Vandeventer & L.Bclpde. 

Barnes, E. H 3526 LlndeU a^-e. 

Barnes, B. S .^ SOi Cham, of Commerce. 

Barnes. Chas. W. . Crystal Plats Glass Co., Treasurer . . WalnwrlKht Building. 
Barney, Chas. E. . BcrugS", Vandervoort & Barney D, G. Co., Broadway & LacusI 
Barnhart. Wm. R. . Barnhart Mer. Co., Fancy Groceries ... . SIE N. Thlr^ st. 

Bsmhart, Gary I.. . Barnhart Mer. Co., Fancy Grocers SK N. Third St. 

Bamldge, Aug- 3., with Chas. E. Prunty, Clerk 18. Ualn St. 

Bamldge, Prank J. . . . Chas. E. Prunty, Seeds 18. Main at 

Barret, Arthur B. . Barret-Moore Com. Co la N. Commercial st. 

Barrows. John C. . . Barrows & Karat, Insurance 407 N. Broajjway. 

Barry, Thoa. J. , , Bssroueller & Barry. Mill Builders . Twenty-first & Walnut. 

Boratow, Chas. W Paints and Oila . . . . 817 N. Second si. 

Bartbels, Augr. Bt. Louis Byrup Refining co 14 N. Second st. 

Bsrtlett, Jas. A Bartletl & Miller, Insurance 104 N. Ttiira sL 

Bartlett. A. W, . Bartlett & Concanon. Commission GOT N. Second at. 

Bartley, W. T., Jr. . Bt. Louis lee Mf«. & Storage Co TIS a. Main st. 

Barutlo, B.. Jr. . . . Steflen & BaruUo, Commission EN. Main st. 

Bascom, Jos. D. . Broderick A Bascom Rope Co 7M N. Main st. 

Bascome, Western . . Western Bsscome Se Co.. Insurance Acent ... MS Pine sU 

Bass. BImon 8 Martin & Bass, tjawyers I1I5 Clark are. 

Basye. Chas. P. . . . Basye & Robinson, Commission 116 N. Main st. 

Battalle, L. A. . . . American Ex. Bank, Cashier Third and Pine sts. 

Bauer, A. H Bauer Bros., Brokers JOE N. Third St. 

- . WlKBlns Ferry Go Third and Chestnut b'- 

, , , Bauman Jewelry Co. . «• »t -eu-i-.i. 

Baur, Herman Baur & Regal, 1 

Bayha, George Provision B 

Bayles, Samuel M «» Undvll ave, 

Bayrd, E. A Matthew Addy & Co., Icon Commission . Bank of Com. Bld«. 



BeardBley. C. F. . . Picker & Beardsley, Commission HI N. M«ln «. 

Beck, Geo. J Teamster 1814 0*y*«- »»»- 

Beck Henry W Feed and Seed Store ■ JWth and f 



Beck.' J. W, , .' H. W. Beck & Sons. Feed CTB Mancbest 

Beck, HwryQ.^ " " "" "" ""*" 

'. Mliier" .' 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



MERCHANTa" EXCHANGE OF ST. LOUIB. 



__ liTJ S. Broadway. 

Becker, V, U 

Beckmann. Edward . . Bdw. Beckmann CommlsBloD Co 121 Market a' 

Beckmann. Geo. H Teamster Eighth and Clark av< 

Beckmann, W. E. Bakers' and Confecttonen' Supplies ■ . 13 B. Main si. 

°— r, H. M Broker Security Building. 



Eewa, J 
Belmos, 



.1227 Bell a 



), Frederick H . 

Beinke. Auguat Architect „ , 

Bell, T. P T. P. Bell & Bro., Heal Eetale ....... S1& Chestnut n 

Bell, Nlch. M Peper Tobacco WarehouBe Co 1112 Market a 

. Bell, James O J. Q. Bell & Co., Commission .... !H N. Commercial s 

Bell. James W. . 8. U Safe Deposit and Baving Bank 513 I^icuat s 

Belt, Geo. W Steamboat Clerk .... 105 N. Eighth s„ 

Bell, J. H J. H. Bell & Co., Pork Dealer B601 S. Broadway. 

Bern Is. Staph en A. . B«mls Bros. Bag Co., Bags BDl B. Fourth st 

Bomla. Judson 8. . Bemls Bros. Bag Co 601 S. Fourth s' 

Bendlck, John H Qrocer SSSi Bcanlan avi 

Benedict, Augr. W. . With Bam'I Cupples ft Co.. Woodenware . Seventh & Spruci 

Bennett, Thomas . Thos. Bennett & Co., Com 66 Bd. of Tr. BldK., Chlcagi 

Bensleck. John C Livery 1138 N. Sixth s 

BensberB, Ferd A. . F. A. Bensbere & Co., Distillers 208 Walnut h 

BerK. "Nicholas . . Nicholas Berg &. Son, Insuranee 404 Market a' 

Bergeech. C. W. . . . Commercial Bank. Cashier Fourth and Pine sti 

Bergln, John P J. B. Lewis Com. Co., Secretary . . 1126 Chestnut a' 

Bergmann. Conrad . C. Bergmann Feed Co.. Feed 2718 Chouteau avi 

Bergmann, B. C. . . C. Bergmann Feed Co., Feed 2713 Chouteau avL. 

Bergmann, Robt. J. . C. Bergmnnn Feed Co zns Cbouteau ave. 

Bernet. Christian . . . Bemet & Craft, Flour 8 S. Main at. 

Bemet, Peter SB. Main st. 

Bemhelmer. Marcus Meramec Highlands Co 208 N. Fourth st. 

Beixy, Albert D. . Berry-Hom Coal Co Union Trust Bulldlnff. 

Bcrsch. Edmund . Bersch Ins. Agency. Insurance 311 Oltve st 

Bench, Wm Bersch Ins. Agency, Insurance 311 Olive St. 

Bertholil, John S, . Berthold A Jennlngn, Lumber .... Fourth and Chestnut sts. 

Bethune, James H 114 N. Blith st. 

Berthold, A. . . . Barada-Ghlo R. E. Co 91E Chestnut St. 

Betts. R. A. R. H. Betts & Co., Real Estate 1103 Pine st. 

BevlB, Alfred . . . Uound City DIstllllnK Co., Distillers Zll« S. Second St. 

Bleblnger, Wm RIalto Building. 

Bleblnger, F. W. . . Fourth Nafl Bank, President RIalto Building. 

Bledeasteln, Henry Orocery 1208 B. Broadway. 

Bleger. Adolph Curled Hair, etc 27 Ferry st. 

Blekert. John M. . . J. M. Blekert & Co., Commission 207 N. Main St. 

Btenenstok, Herman . S, Blenenstok ft Co., Wool Main and Pine sts. 

Blenenstok, SIgfrled . . B. Blenenstok ft Co., Wool Main and Pine sts. 

Bleser. Fred 1B46 N. Seve~"- — 



Bigger, T. J. . St D. Ice ft Cold Storage Co., Provlilona 711 S. Main St. 

Blggers. B. D. . Simmons Hardware Co Ninth and Spruce sts. 

Bin>ro, H. B. . Cresc. Grain ft Elev. Co., Oratn Laclede Bulldltig. 



1, Guy P. . Gaylord, Blessing ft Co 80T Olive s_ 

Birch, W. F 3089 Washington a»e. 

Birch, James T. . Farmers' Elevator Co.. President .... Levee and Madison at. 

Bird. John . . . Vlcksburg Anchor Line Agent Foot of Chestnut at. 

Blaclioff. Guatav . . . St. L. D. Beef and Provision Co 800 Manchester rd. 

Bittner, Jacob. Jr Mt, Olive Dairy Co 114 8. Tenth St. 

Bliby, W. K. . Mo. Car & Foundry Co BOS Chestnut st. 

Blackmer, Luclan R. . Blackmer & Post, Sewer Pipe Sixth and Locust sta. 

Blackwelder, Geo. H. . . . Blackwelder- Halbrook Realty Co. . 107 N. Seventh st. 

Blalr, Olet Lawyer .... Bank of Commerce BIdg. 

Rlokely. John W Blakely-Bandera Mann. Co., Live Stock . Union St'k Tds, 

Blakely, Walter J. . . St Louis Sanitary Co 411 Olive st. . . , 

BlanrusB, Wm 2844 HenHetta at. 

Ttlanke, Detlef J Insurance Agent 41S Locuat at. 

Blattner, Fred, Jr. Mexico, Mo. 

Blattoer, W. B Mexico, Mo. 

Bleckman, E. A Feed 2109 N. Broadway. 

Bleaalng. John H. . Gaylord, Blessing ft Co., Broker 307 Olive St. 

Block, David .... Block, Dean & Co., Commission . 417 Chamber of Commerce. 

Block; David, Jr. . . . Smithers & Block, Feed 3015 Olive St. 

Blook. LoulB .... Mueller-Block P. Co S13 N. Third at. 

Blosaom, CD 829 Union avo. 

Blossom, H. M, . . H. M. Blossom ft Co., Insurance 217 N. Third st. 

Bloosom, H. A. . . H. H. Blossom ft Co.. Insurance 217 N. Third St. 

Blow, C. W. . . . Crown Linseed Oil Co Sixteenth and Clark ava. 

Blow, Richard T. . . . . Blow Brick Co 4103 Maryland avo. 

Blumeyer, Conrad Grocer Tenth and Madison sta, 

BobMtt, W. T Pianos and Organs 1114 Olive st. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



MEUBERS OF THE 



Bodenhelmer, Ifox M . . . Bodenhelmer, Landau & Co.. Orocera . G27 N. Second tt 

Boeok, Adam A. Boeck A Co., Real Sstate tlZ Cbeatnut at 

Boesewetter, Richard . Chaa. Q. SUWb Brewmg Co. . . , 1901 N. Fourteenth >l. 

BiMpple, John SauBOse Manuf. . . . . OS S. Second it 

BoffnRer, John N IIB N. Thtnl at 

Bogardj John J. laeurance 8632 B. Broadny. 

Bohle, Louis C. . LoulB C. Bohle Liver? Co 1121 CheBUiiiI bL 

Bohllnser, Joseph Commission Mascoutah, HL 

Bohnenkamp, John Cooper Supplies 1217 WBrren SL 

BolBseller. Chas. L Farmer Bonhomme. Uo, 

BolBseUer, R. W Acoountint BIS Pins «t 

Boland, J. L. . . . J. L. Boland Book and Stationery Co. . . . GIO Washington are. 

"-'"- * . A. BoUln & Co.. Inauranoo lEtl B. Bro»dwW. 

"-" " — "- .... 1100 Olive sL 

„ . 1B09 Bremen STt 

Bonner, B. R B. R. Bonner Ice Co., Ice and Coal .... 1200 WashlD^on ave. 

Bonsack, F. C Architect Dnion Trust Building. 

Bonsack, W. A. . . . The W. A. Bonsack Lumber Co. . . . Second and Grallot its. 

Booth, Wm Wm. Booth & Co., Real Estate nJ Chestnut st 

Booth. Thos J. W. Booth & Sons Conualaslon Co RlHlto BuUdtiv. 

Booth, T, W J. W. Booth & Sons Rlalto Bulldio*. 

Bosche. Oeo., Jr. . . Oeo. Bosche A Son. Produce SOU K. Third iL 

BoHtIck, R. H. . Jas. M. Houston Qrocer Co 800 Spruce st 

BoBwell. M. F. S Broker EIO S. Seveotli st 

Boswell, Oeo. W M. F. S. Boewell, Broker GIO S. Seventh sL 

Bowles, M. A Provision Broker t07 I't Pins W. 

Bowling, Wm. W. . . . SL L, MilllnK Co.. Becretarr and Treas. . . Caiilnviltt^ HI. 

Bowman, Theo. O. . Carter & Bowman. lit N. Fourth st 

Bowman. Chas. Q With St. L. Stamping Co. . . . Second and Cass av*. 

Bowman. Albert Bants . . . Garden City Realty Co Ill N. Fourth it. 

Boyd, Wm Bricklayer 2141 School »L 

Boyd. W. G D. R. Francis & Bra. Commission Co. . . . Laclede BuUdlng. 

Boyd, Truatln B. . - . . T. B. Boyd & Co.. Men's Furnishers 514 Ollvf at 

Boyd, F. J. . . . International Metal Co. Security Building. 

Boyle, Wilbur F. . . . . Boyle & Adams, Attorneys Laclede Bundloe. 

Bradley. Q, Dou^aa . 6. W. Cobb & Co., Comintaslon . . Chamber of Cammerce. 

Bradahaw, Thos. J Oraln Broker 108 N. Fourth it 

Brady, Hugrh J. . . Brady jt HoGroarty, Grain Ninth and Cass STS. 



Bray, \ ___ , 

" — '' " ' ■" n... ,,'^— -,..=..... ■ " -pply Co. . mh St. & Ca»s ■* 



w'K Co., Brewers . ZIOD ChouteanaTt 
A Estr-- ■ ■ 



Brennan. D. B Real Estate gl« Chestnut bI. 

Drentano, H Stock Broker Laclede BuOdlng. 

Brewer. Wm. . . St. L. Drayase Tranar. Co 10 Bridge Approach. 

Brickey, 8. H. . W. C. Wilkinson & Co., Commission Main and Pine its. 



Brlnkmeyer. Edw. H H. H. LIppelmann Feed C. . 1111 N. Broadwar. 

Brinkmeyer, Otto . . H. H. LIppelmann Hay and Grain Co. . UO* N. Broadway. 

Brlnson. H, U. . Brinson-Judd Grain Co SM Chamber of Commerc*. 

Brlnsoi^ L. B. . . BrInson-Judd Qraln Co Chamber of Commem. 



. Brlslln A Sheble Mfg. Co W7 Lucas sTfc 



Brockman, P. W Brockman A Trauemlcht, Provs. & Com., 

Brookman, Arthur . P. Brockman Com. Co Rlalto B 

~ ■ ■ ~ ~ . Bngelke & Felne 



Brockmeyer, H. C 

Broderlck, John J. . „.,™w.^--.~ — ^ -■ 

Brodhack. Joseph H Toys, Candles, «to. . . XBl 8. Braadwar. 

Breeder, Henry Produce ft Com »8 N. Thlr* st. 

Broeg, IiOUls . . . . J. W. Booth & Sons, Commission Co Sialto BuDdloE 

Bronaugh, Perry fl Brick and Tlie Vlrden. m 

Bronson. E, P. . . . . Cumberland Mills NaahvUle. Tenn- 

Brookings, Robt S- . . . . Sam'i Cupples Wooden & WU'ware Co. . Tth A Bpnf*. 

Brookes. John P KSi Lake ave., Chicago g- 

Brooks, B. B. . . St L. D. Beef ft Prov. Co SDO Hanchvler rd. 

Brooks. Charles Fireman ttll Sulilvaa are. 

Brown. P. J. Gr«1n and Prov. Ex. . . lOS N. Third "t- 

Brown, O. W. . . . The Brown Shoe Co., Bleventb and Washington ire- 
Brown, James N. . . . American Central Ina. Ca . . . . Broadway and Locnrt w- 

Brown, Daniel S. . . Pioneer Bteam Keg Works WS DeKslb M- 

Brown, Ben]. . . Brown-Clark Paper Co (UN. Thlro ". 



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1CERCHANT8' EXCHANGE OP ST. LOUIS. 5 

N«me. Flm. Buslneas, Looatlon. 

Brown, BdmuDd M. . . F. Smith A Son, Grocer Co 6S3 N. Second Bt. 

Brown, Joseph Clly Auditor City Hall. 

Brown«,P. E. . . . Sixmo Tunnel Uno, Agent US Chestnut bL 

Brack. Henry Produce 1709 8. Second at 

Bruenemann, Emst Ptour and Feed . . I7GI S. Jefferson &ve. 

Bruenlng, Rudolph . With Brlnckwlrth- Nolker Brewing Co ... . ITU Cass B.ve. 

Bnindage, S. P HsJl Prult Co.. Produce 827 K. Fourth St. 

Bniner, John A. . . . C L. Crane Sc Co., Insurance 22S Chestnut at. 

Bruneard, Geo. A . . Hueth ABrunnrd, Butter and Cheese . . . . IID N. Haln st. 

Bryan, Pranola T., Jr. . Am. Ti^lf Co tM Fine BL 

Bryden, Alex. A. . . Randolph Coke and CoaJ Co Sixth and Liocust ats. 

Buchanan, E. C. . E. C. Buchanan & Co., Oraln SS2 Front at., Mamphla. 

Buck, Thos.'E Physician 86)0 S. Jefferson ave. 

Buck, M. U M. U. Buck A Co., Railway Supplies .... ill N. Third St. 

Buckland. Job. A. . . Jos. A. Buckland & Co.,'Coniintsslon 103 S. Third at. 

Buehler. Henry, Jr. . . . Buehler-Phalen Paint Mfg. Co. . Twelfth & Locust ata. 

Buerkel, F Qrocer i4Sl S. Broadway. 

Bunton, C. M. . . . . Nanaon Com, Co SOt Chamber of Commerce. 

Bull. Wro. Bull A Garesche, Fire Insurance 101) N. Third at. 

Bull, John C. . . With Carroll A Powell, Insurance Agent m N. Third at. 

Builen, C. W. . . . Nat'l Bank Republic, President ZU N. Fourth at. 

Bulte, Aug. J Meyer & Bulle, Flour Laclede Building. 

Bulte. Wm. J. . . . . Wm. J. Bulte A Co., Flour and Commlmlon . . 17 B. Main at. 

Bulte. Henry J. ... W. J. Bulte A Co., Flour 17 B. Main St. 

Burback, W; E. . J. B. M. Kehlor A Co.. Commission ... 410 Cham, of Commerce. 
Burdeau, J. P. . . St. L. A Miss. Val. Tr. Co. Freight Agent . Main & Walnut sts. . 
Burg, Henry ■ . Annan, Burg A Bmlth, Flour Commlsalon .... IS Chestnut at. 

Burg, William Ewald Iron Co., Secretary EMI N. Second at 

Burg, Philip Grocer IHO 9, Broadway, 

Burke, Wm Steamboating Hurst's Hotel. 

Bumes, Martin » Produce 112B N. Third at. 



Bumham, C. B «11 Walnwrlght Building. 

Burton. J. A. J. A Burton A Co SIO Chamber of Commerce. 

Buscta, Adolphna .... Anheuaer-Buaeh Bren. Asa'n (Free.) . . 9th A Peatalosal. 

Buach, A., Jr. . Anheuser-Busch Brew'g Co Ninth and Pestalaial ats. 

Busch, E. A. E. A. BuBCh & Co., Brewers' Bupplles 108 S. Main St. 

Buschman, C. L. . C.L.Bui-hman A Co., Wholesale Qrocera . . . SS3 N. Third st. 

Buachman. E. L. . . L. W. Buschman & Sons, Commission U7 Pine St.. 

Buachman, A. H. . . L. W. Buschman A Sons, Flour 417 Pine at. 



Butler, W. C. Insurance 41S Locust at. 

Butler, L. L. Real Estate SM N. Third st 

Butler, Eldward .... Ed Butler A Son, Horeeshoer IE B. Tenth at 

BuUer, Bdw. O. Btudent SGW Pine at 

Butler, John It James Campbell, Broker US N. Fourth at 

Brcrort, HeniT_P. . H. F. Bycroft A Co ; . ■Gillespie, III. 

Byrd. George H Senter A Co., Commiaslon 2S.S. Third at. 

Byrne, Daniel P Redmond Cleary Commiaalon Co 88 Cham, of Com. 

Byrne, Frank T. . . National Diapatcb, Agent Laclede Building. 

Cabanne, L. Duthlel Fire Inaurance - 3« N. Third at. 

Cabell, Ashley Attorney-at-Law . . ..... £06 Olive at. 

Catfrey, Frank B 1131 N. Compton ave. 

Cehlll, James O L. A. Coquard, Broker . 124 N. Third st 

Cain, P. R. . . Stern, Laner. Shcfbl A Co., Clothiers TOl Washington ave. 

Caldwell, Thoa. W. . With Senter A Co., Cotton and Com. . Third A Walnut ata. 
Calvert BeMn , With Jno. O. Prather & Co., Wines and Uquora . . Bl« N. Levee. 

Campt>ell, R. A 6S00 Cabanne pi. 

Campbell, Given . . . Campbell & Ryan, Lawyer 4Z1 Olive st 

Campbell, Jamea . Bonds and Stock .... Rlalto Building. 

Capen, Sam D. . . Geo. D. Capen A Co., Insurance 107 N. Third at 

Capen, Geo. H. . . Geo. D. Capen A Co., Insurance 107 N. Third at. 

Carl, Philip . . . Lone Star Brewing Co. Ban Antonio, Tex. 

Carllale, David Feed and Grain 114 Chestnut at 

Carlisle. David, Jr. . Rosedale Hay and Grain Co Delmar and Cates avea. 

Carmlchael, G. W. , . . J. B. Clark & Co., Cider 2OO0 Pine et 

Camen'. B. K 80S N. Cardinal ave. 

Carpenter, W. H. . . Bryant A Stratton Com. Col. (Pres.) 4t0 Market st. 

Carpenter, Geo. 0.,Jr. . . National Lead Co., Manager . . Tenth at. and Clark.ave 
Carpenter, James H. . J. M. Carpenter A Co., Real Estate Agents . 108 N. Eighth. 
Carpenter, Jas. M., Jr. . J. M. Carpenter A Co., Real Estate . . 108 N. Eighth St. 

Carr. Paschal . . . Mo. Bate Deposit Co Bfzth and Locust ata. 

Corr, Perton T. . Citlsena' Insurance Co Rlalto Building. 

Carreras, Bv. B Printer and Binder . Id AS t. Charles ata. 

Carroll, C. C Carroll A Powell, Insurance Agents .... 116 N. Third at. 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



MEMBERS OP THE 



Carrol], John F, . Jones, EdwardB & Co., Liquors . 
Carroll, Jami-" " -. — ._ 



,_.roll. Chaa 
Carruthere, 1 
Carruthers, ( 
Carruthers, l 



autiseU & Carson, Brokers 106 S. Seventh at 



Carter. Prank . . Hope Mutual Ins, Co., Inauranoe M N. Third 

Case, Prank C Inaurance m N. Third 

Case. J, B LJncoln Trust Co GIS Chestnut 

Case, B, S. . . With C. H, Albere & Co., CammlBBion . Sli Chamber of Commei 

Case, David W Artihltect ZOTii N. Seventh 

Caaey, William Deoeanad 

Cassldy, Abner C. . Cassidy Bros. & Co., Livestock Com. . 
Cassldy, W. L. . . . Cassidy Bros. & Co., Live Stock .... 

CaHtleman, Oeo. A lawyer in inuo » 

Catlln. £1. F. . . Brlnson-Judd Drain Co 414 Chamber of Commerce. 

Cave, Elmore . L. W. Buschroan ft Sons, Flour Chamber of Commeret 

Cavender, John H Cavender & Thompson, Real Estate ... TOG Pine at 

Chadboume, G. W Security Bulldlaf. 

Chaffralx, D. A. Capitalist ... . 41 N. Rampart at., N. 0. 

Chamberlain, P. B. . F. B.' Chamberlain Com. Co 300 N. MsJn sL 

Chamberlain, Will F. Seed Inspector 300 N. Main bL 

■ ■ ■ . P. B. ChamberlaJn Com. Co. . . BOO N. Main nt 

~ ty Clerk Four Couitt- 

, _. ,. . . . _..,Com. . . 5U Cbam. of Con1m«^% 

Chamberlln, Qeo. B. B. C. Chamberlln & Co., Com. . . EI5 Cham, of Commerce- 
Chambers, Jas. H. . Jas. H. Chambers & Co., Publishers 914 l/ocusl at. 

Chambers, Joseph C UN. Eighth sL 

Chambers, R. S Bradstreet Co., Superintendent .... Security Building. 

Chandler, De Lacy . . Mississippi Valley Trust Co S03 N. Fourth si. 

Chandler, Whately L. . . . New England MuL Accdt. Ass'n . . . . 21 N. Third 91. 

Chandler, H. W. . Miss. Valley Electric Co ISit Olive it 

Chandler, Kelly R 21 N. Second st 

Chapman, Charles L Deceased 

Chappell, E. F. . W. H. Chappell & Co., Mfg. Chemists . 

Charters, Herbert . Annan B. & Smith, Commtsslon . . 

Chase, James E Liquors 41E WalDut at. 

Chase, Wm. L Deceased 

Chassalng, J. H Llndell Hotel ITEt Missouri ave. 

Chestnut, Mathew T Equitable BuUdl«. 

Chlsholm, J. A. H. . J. W. Booth & Sons Commission Co RIalto Bu11<nn(. 

Chouteau, J. Oilman SOS Ch&mtier of Commene. 

Chouteau, Pierre Engineer Security Bunding. 

Church. Alonio C. . Wiggins Perry Co SecurlV Building. 

Churchill, James O Insurance llELocuttat 

Clark, Warren L. . Clark & Btuyvesant Orocer Co. 30G N. Second at. 

Clark, Wm. G SHS Waahlnrlon avt 

aark, Charles Laclede BuUdhu:. 

Clark, Benj. W. . . Clark & Stuyvesant Grocer Co 306 N. Second W, 

Clark, James E J. E. Clark & Co., Cider & Vinegar Mfrs. . SOth A PIntits. 

Clark, Hlnman H. . . Waters-Plorce Oil Co Odd Fellows' BulWUg. 

Clark, C. W Tully & Clark, Architect & Engineer . B'dway A LoenfL 

Clark, Charles C. . Clark & stuyvesant Grocer Co 806 N. Second il 

Clark, J, A Clark Broe., Feed East St. Louis. HI. 

Clarkson, Chas. S Broker 306 PIm ft 

Cleary, Redmond . . R. Cleary Com. Co.. Commission . US Chamber of Commerce 



__ilGrar«' 

Clements, J. B. . . Christy Fire Clay Co Laclede Bulldlog. 

Cleveland, Henry Bl Etarado Springs. ICa 

Cleveland, Henry D Deputy Col. Int. Rev. . . Custom Hou»t 

Clifford JLlfred . Con. Steel & Wire Co 1»S Papin at 

Clifton, Daniel W. . . Nanson Com. Co Xa Chamber of Commena. 



Cobb, feeth W S. W. Cobb & Co., Commlssiuu . . u. ,^iib.>ii. ui •.■^„.^-~~ 

Cobb, C. W. S. Glencoe Lime and Cement Co. . . . Odd Fellows' BuUdBg. 

Cochran, James . P. Whlttaker & Sons, Bookkeeper .... Seventh and Cair au. 
Cochran, Fred G. . . Hewitt, Cochran & Co., Grain & Prove. . . . M6 N. TWt^ *<■ 

Cochran. Geo. J. . International Pub. Co Laclede BnUdlig 

Cockrell. C, W ■„■„..■ ■ i ■ ■ 9S;'*22- 

Cockrell, J. H SOB Chamber of Co2''"'S 



Ellas . 



, Scbrelner-Flack Com. Co., Commission , 



. JeratTTOle, HI 
MSN. Fourth « 



Cohn, J.'W. '..',' Hunter Bros.i Flour and Feed . , Third and Ctestnnl- 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



MERCHANTS' BXCHANQE OP BT. IiOUIS, 7 

Name. Firm. BuUneis, Iiocatlciri. 

Colby. B^ H. Civil Bnslneer Cily Hftll. 

Co by, W. A. . . Allison Commission Co lOS N. Main st, 

Co 8, Nathan . . . Cole Comtnlaslon Co., Commission OS N. Second st 

Co e, Amedee B. . Cole Commission Co., Coimnlsslon Z13 N. Second st. 

Co e, Charles B. . H. C. Cole MIIIIhb Co., Miller Chester, 111. 

Co e, George Bilver Creek, N. T. 

Cole, H. P. Colo Brokerwe Co SOT N. Second st, 

Coloman, H. C. . . H. C. Coleman & Co., Commlaslon . . EIS Cham, of Commerce. 

Co Una, H. B. . . Whltaker ft Hodgman, Brokers 300 N. Fourth at. 

Co llns, Thos. R. . Martin Colllna, Son & Co., InBurance 101 N. Third St. 

Co lins, Martin . Martin Collins. Son & Co., Insurance 101 N. Third st, 

Co llns, C. F. Odd Fellows- Building. 

Co Una, Robt. E. . . Collins & Jamison, Attorneya Union Trust Building, 

Colllster. J. J LACkawanna Line Houaer Building. 

Comfort. C. D Real Bstate 17 N. Tenth St. 

Coropton, Rlch'd J. . . Coropton & Sons Llth. & Printing Co 212 Liocust st. 

Comstock. Thomas G -. . . . Physician S«l Waahington ave. 

Concannon. F. T Bartlett & Conoannon, Fan. Groc. A Prov. 607 N. M. 

Conn. Luther H Mining Union Trust Bulldtne. 

Connor. P. P Connor Eros., CommlsBlon Gay Building. 

Connor, M. J Connor Bros., Commlaaion Gay Building. 

Connor. W. P. . , , Connor Bros. & Co. CommlBalon Gay Building. 

Conrad. J. F. . . J. F. Conrad Grocer Co 2708 Franklin ave. 

Conrad. Peter Steamboatraan ... 1128 Chouteau ave, 

I. Coal Co. Chamber of Commerce. 



Cook, Douglas _. . „^. ^,^.„ . 

Cooke. Michael 2222 Sullivan , 

Coon. D. F Port Soott, 1 

Cooper, A. D. . . . , Graham Paper Co.. Paper 217 N. Mali 

Corbin."F.~M* 



Coquard^L-^A Banker and Broker . 



- _ _ Wm. J. & J. ^W. Corcoran a Co., Com. . 827 N. Fourth st. 

Corcoran. Jbs. W Wm. J. & J. W. Corcoran & Co., Com. . 827 N. Fourth st. . 

Cordes. D D. Cordes & Co,, Flour and Feed . . . 1B2S B. Twelfth st 

Cordea John F ISOl Grand ava. 

Cornelius, N. B Milt Furnishing . . . . U19 N. Siith St. 

Cornell. Ben P. . . Schlsler-Cornell Seed Co 714 N. Fourth st 

Corrlnston. Nelson A. . , Roaedale Hay and Grain Co. . . Delmar and Cates ave. 

Coate, Paul F Lawyer B19 N. Fourth at. 

Coudrey, Harry M. . . Coudrey & Boott. Insurance Third and Pine sts. 

Cousins, George .... Cousina Tea Co G21 Market St. 

Coa, Charlea A Con & Gordon. Pork Fackera lOlB 8. Third St. 

Coyie, James F. . . . . Coyle & Bargent, Wholesale Silks . . E21 Waahlngton ave. 

Coyle. B, H. . . Blue ft Canada So. Line, Cont. Agent 312^4 Chestnut St. 

Crabb, J. D. . . . Consolidated Coal Co Laclede Building. 

Craft. Henry G Bernet & Craft, Flour Commlaaion B 8. Main St. 

Cram, Geo. T. . American Cen. Ina. Co., President . . . Broadway and Locust stB. 

Crawford. G. L. . J. E. Crawford & Son. Bonds and Stocks 305 Fine sL 

Crawford. Jas. E. . . . J. E. Crawford & Son, Stocks and Bonds ... 305 Pine St. 

Crawford. Jolin H. . Lackawanna Lino Laclede Building. 

Crawford. S. W. . 8. W. Crawford ft Co., Lumber DeSoto, Mo. 

Crevellng. H. C H2S Lucaa pi. 



Cromble, C, 8. . . . Wainwright Building. 

Crosman, Henry . B. St. L. Pkg. & Pro. Co 109 Morgan si. 

Crothers. John C. . . . The McPheeters Warehouse Co 1104 N. I,ev 



Crone. C. C Real Estate B602 N. Broadway. 

Crouch. J. N Heal Estate 16 N. Eighth St. 

Cullen. Michael J Cullen A Kelly, Livery 1212 N. Seventh St. 

Culver, W. W. . Wrought Iron Range Co 1901 Washington ave. 

Cummlskey, James . Jaa. Cummlskey ft Co., Broker lis N. Third st 

Cumtnlskey. W. H Feed I*onard and Easton ava. 

Cunningham. C. A. . . . St. Loula United Elev. Co.. Btoraga . . . Rlalto Building. 
Cunningham. E. H. . . St. Loula United Kiev. Co,. Storage . . . Rlalto Building. 
Cunningham, Dickaon . . Block. Dean & CammiaBlon . 41S Chamber of Commerce. 
CupplGS. Sam'l . Sam'i Cupplas Wood & Wlllowware Co. ... 7th and Spruce ats. 

CurHe. W. I. . . . Pope-Currle Com. Co « Gay Building. 

Currle, Thomas L Grain Inspector . . 41S Chamber of Com. 

Dacer. James A. Dacey ft Co., Commlsalon 1904 N. Third st. 

Dacey, Patrick Dacey ft Co., Commission 1204 N. Third st. 

Daly, Femand V Broker 33Si Chouteau ave. 

Dsmeron, Ed C GOO Olive St. 

Damhorsi. Caspar Soda lOSO S. Twelfth st. 

Damhorst, Henry Insurance Agent .... 919 Chestnut st. 

Damke, Henry Teamster ms Lemp ave. 

Damon, Charles P Farmer Laclede Bunding. 



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MEMBERS OF THB 



DftDK, Qtotga D. . . fixcelalor Mtg. Co.. Secretary 06 N. M&ln iL 

Danlorth, X, H Mercbmnl Chojleaton, Uo. 

DantoTth, W. H. . . Robinaon-Danfarth Com. Go. ... . Twdfth and QraUot so. 

Darst, JameB W Real Estate .... WaluwrtB-ht Building. 

Daub, Harry W, , 8cbretn«r-Flack Oraln Co., Commisalon .... 118 N. Fourth bl 

Dausman, ueo. . . . Qeo. Dausman Real Estate Co Btt Cheatnut at 

Davidson, J. M £08 Chamt>ar of Commerce. 

Davis, Jobn D L.awyer 49 Olive at. 

Davis, Thos. W. . . at L. Market Hep'r Co., Reporter HI Cbestnut SL 

Davis, C. R. H. . . C. R. H. Davis A Co., Real Bstate 808 Chestnut sL 

Dawson, James P. . . Frank, Dawaon & Oarvln, L.awrera . . . . lOi N. Eighth BL 

Dean, Charles L. . Ludlow-Baylor Wire Co US 3. Fourth st. 

Dean. O. M Ult N. Third it. 

Dean, Eugene O. Produce 1138 N. Third st 

Dean, Wm. B Block, Dean ft Co., Commlsalon . . ilT Cbam. of Commeree. 

Dean, Muiry Dean Mill Co.. Flour Ava, 111. 

Deaths, E. A- , . . . F. K. Fowler & Co., Inaurance OT N. Third at 

DeBolt. A A. DeBoIt & Co., Printers SU Locust sL 

Decker, John .... John Decker & Co., Livery «1 N. Slith sU 

Debner. Adolpb . Dehner-Wuerple M. B. Co IGll a Third sL 

Delbel, Fred Flour and Feed . . . tan Franklin avo. 

Delbel, Louis P Fred Delbel, Flour and Feed . . . zm Franklin ave. 

Delafleld, Wallace ■ ■ DelaCleld & Snow, Insurance ISO N. Tblrd st 

Delaney, John O'F Real Batate 108 N. Ksbtli St. 

Delaney, W. R. . . Bank of Cantrevlew, Casbler Oentrevlew, Uo. 

Delano, Rufus J Attorney Xiaolede Bulldlnj. 

DeMaIn, Bllas . . . . S. L. Bolt, B. & T. Works 404 S. Leviw. 

DeMary, T. C. . . . T. C. DeMary ft Co., Brokers IS. Main st 

DeMenll, Alexander N Capitalist . . DeMenU Bids.. Ttb & Pine. 

Denehey, John lOOB Cbestnut >t 

Dennig, Loula E. . Anheuser-Buach B'K Co Ninth and Pestalonl sU. 

Dennis, Jobn H. . B. B. White Oraln Co BOO Chamber of Commerce. 

Denton, W Denton Bros., QraJn Leavenwortb, Kai. 

Dealose. P Capitalist m Pine sL 

Denvtr, Jobn B. . . Hayden Saddlery H. W. Co EU N. Main at. 

Devoy, Edward . . Devoy & Feuerbom, Coal OE N. Seventh at. 

DeWItt, L. B Broker 118 N. Fourth it 

De Tonar, A. . . Drumroond Tobacco Co 400 S. Fourth bl 

'■'-'- ' "- " "V. Bayers & Co,, Commisalon HI N. Main rt. 



Dickinson, Chas Seeds , ,. 

DlQkroan, Joseph F. . . J. F. Dlckman A Co., Seeds and Oraln . 1110 N. Third s 

DIeckman, John H Wemse A Dleckman, B'kera & Broken HTN. 4tL. 

Dleckman, Henry Flour and Feed 1611 8. Nlntli tit, 

Dleckroeger, F. 4Bt7 Wabash STa 

DIekenga. I. E Deceased 

Dlekman, Ferd . ■ Ferd DIekman & Co., Flour and Feed .... mt S. Broadway. 

Dlekman, Joseph . Job. Dlekman A Co., Flour and Feed UIO Blddle it 

Dines, W. C. . . St. L. Sewing Mach. Co Illg Pine al. 

Doane, Dana Farmer Perry, HL 

Doan, Oeo. P., Jr Ford & Doan. Commission n? N. Second iL 

Dobson, David . , With R. Cleary Com, Co., Commission . . . ns Cham, of Com- 

Docter, Caaper H. . . St. Louis Fruit Co HOI N. Ninth iL 

Dodd, Sam'IM 41S Locust «t. 

Dodson, Joseph Grain Bhlpman. m. 

Dodaon. J. TC\ . . . The Dodson & Hills Hfg, Co Third and Cedar als. 

DoBxett, Lewis C. . . N. K, Falrhank & Co., Lard Refiners . Tblrd A ConvsntalB 
Donahoe. Martin P. . . S. C. Davis A Co., Dry Ooods . B'dway A WaahlnKton ave. 

Donaldson, A. R. , Donaldson Bond and Stock Co Third and Olive (la 

Donaldson, John W, . Donaldson Btk. & Bd. Co., B'kers & Broker* . . UAfHIn. 
Donaldaon, Wm. R Attorney , , ■ Broadway and Walnut M. 



Donnelly, Bernard . . . , Donnelly Bros., Livery MS Wash it 

Donnewald, C H. . O. H. Donnewald A Co., Coal )0SO Clark ava 

Donovan, J. T. ... J. T. Donovan Real Estate Co. . Seventh and Chestnut rts. 
Donovan, John F. . Llndell Hotel Prop Ltndell HMsL 



Donzelot, Eugene . . E, Donzelot A Son, Commission US. Mala st. 

Donielol, ErP. . . . E.Donaelot & Bon, Commisalon It S. Main «■ 

Dormltser, Jos Rsal Estate W N-.S'fi'* S" 

Dougherty, Matthias .,.,.....,.. Qrocer . , . , 1»1 Pln«.J^ 

EWuglass, John H. . . The Knapp-Stout Lumber Co, . . . Salisbury and HsU sU. 

Doud. Royal H. . . . Doud Packing Co -_. Boons, W. 

Dower John Tracy A Dower, Feed UOl N. Oarrison stt 

DoEler, L. D Doaler Cracker Co. Bakers .... Sixteenth and Morgao so. 

Drown, P. 8. , Mlas, A O. Rlv. Pilots' So., Secretary SB Chsslniitsl. 

Digitized bvGoO^^IC 



UBRCHANTS' EXCHAMOB OP ST. LOUIS. Q 

Name. Finn. Bualness. Iiocatlon. 

Drununond. H. I. ■ Drummond Tob. Co Fourth and Bpruoe sts. 

Drury, James B Cotton Matn and Walnut stu. 

Dryden. Jobn W. Lawyer Union Trust Building-. 

Duffy, C. N. . . . ClUiens' Kallway Co,, Secretary 3820 Baston ave. 

Dotfy. Joa. A. J. A. Duffy A Co., Real Estate 806 CheatQUt it. 

Dula. R. S. . . . Drummond Tobacco Co Fourth and Bpruce sts. 

Dunhun, Jobn 8. . ■ ■ Dunham Mfg.Co., Deaslcated Cocoanut . . . . » Locust sL 

Dunn, T.R Commission BZl N. Fourth st. 

Dunn, Ttaos. . Thos, Dunn Loan, Btoraga 'and Mer. Go SI! Franltlln ave, 

Dunnerman. Cbas. J Dunnerman Realty Co 702 Chestnut st. 

Duroas, James Duross & Oloott, Plonlne UlU 3tOO N. Broadway. 

Dutcber, C. O. . 6d. o( Oraln Inspectors, President . . 4U Cbamber ol Commerce. 

Dutcher. I, V. W tUt Finney ave. 

Dutober, 1. V. W., Jr. . R. W. A O. R'y A Ontario Dlapatob .... 118 N. Third sL 

Dutro, John U. . . St Louis Car Wheel Co Spring ave. & F. R. R. 

Dwyer. John Real Estate TIB CbeB'-- -' 



BaMn, Chea Grain Broker SZ N. Second at. 

Bberle. C. A. Flour S 8. Second st. 

Ebllng, John Produce 103T N. Third st. 

Bdenbom. Wm. . Con. Steel & Wire Co. 19te Papin st. 

Bdxar, T. B S7!S Woatrolnatar pi. 

Edmunds, Henry L. . . . Criminal Court Judge Four Courts. 

Bdwarda. B, P, . . Nat'l Bank of Com., Asst. Cashier . Broadway and Olive ats, 
Edwards, Louis .... Miss. Olass Co., Glass MtErs, . . Ualn and Angelica sts. 

Edwards, Jas. C Rex Mill Co., Qeneral Manager . . . Kansas City. Mo. 

Edwards, Joa. White . Jones, Eidwards & Co.. Liquors GIG N. Second at 

Edwards, Geo. L. . A. G. Edwards & Son Brokerage Co 413 Olive ai 

rs,B.B. , " - - " - 



. Meramec Mills, Millers Eighth and Clark ave 



a & Co., 



Elchlar, Frank B, . St Louie Commercial Bulletin 1I& Pine st 

Bloka, A. W. . Great Western Feed Co 818 Manchester rd. 

■™ — --'n. Wm Security Building. 

I, B Rice, Stix ft Co., Dry Goods . Tenth and Washington ave. 

__ Y.^_ n ..-.J _ 2015 QrBtlot — 

, 101 N, Second ... 

BlbrSSitrGio%r&!"'. Kiwp A'^br'^ht Coro'nSirton '. ', '. !,'.'. lOlTt^Thlrci st! 

Eilertse.C. P. . Union Caa. A Surety Co., President Walnwrlght Building. 

Elllman, T. L. . . D. R. Francis & Bro., Commission Laclede Building. 

Ellia, wm. A. . , Merchants' Life Ass'n Union Trust Building. 

Ellla, Wm. C. . . . . With Keblor Bros. UUIIng .... 401 Chamber of Commerce. 

Elwell, Jobn W Comnuaalon (09 N. Main at 

Elliot, H. . . . Elliot Frog A Switch Co. Bast St Louis, Dl. 

Eng«?. L. P. SB06 Cook ave, 

Engel, Wm Teamster ESDI Wisconsin ave. 

Eno, B. Bates E. B. Eno A Co.. Brokerage Co. . 503 Cham, of Commerce. 

Bppelaheimer, Frank . Plsher Flour Co. ' SD4 Market st 

^^Tlcb. Henry Grocer SOOO Gravola ave. 

Baamueller, Fred . Basmueller A Barry, Millwrights . . , . list and Walnut sts, 

Bapenscfaled, Chas 3600 Waahinston avo. 

Btx, Prank Frank Bta A Co. Commission 009 N. Fourth at. 

BiUBton, Alex. . Crown Linseed Oil Works Sixteenth at. and Clark ave. 

Evans, Jas. W. . McCann-Evans Realty Co 1011 Chestnut st. . . 

Evans, Jos. N Evans Bros., Tobacco Com. . Sixteenth A Poplar Bta. 

Evans, C. O Evana Broa., Tobacco Com. . Sixteenth A Poplar sts. 

Bvana, David G. Teas, Coffee A Bplcea . 604 N. Second St. 

BvlII, Burton K. Hay and Oraln 409 Theresa ave. 

Bvill, John H. . . . Exoelslor Oraln Co. 416 S. Theresa ave 

Bwald, Jacob C. 114 Chamber of Commeroe. 

Kwald, L. P Ewald Iron Co., Iron, ate Ml N. Second st 

Swing, James P. . . Salt Ass'n ot Uich 106 N. Third St 

Bwing, A. B Laclede Building. 

Bwing, W. K 417 Chamber of Commerce. 

Byvter. W. C. . . . . W. C. Byater A Co., Staves, etc H N. Third at 



>. Falrham A Bro., Commission . . . . 9S0 N. Third si 

,«..,., 1 «_- ^ ._.-_ "<■" Third ai 

A Pine ai 



. TOeUPI 
18 N. Pour 



.TsIftr'Thos. P.' ,' ,' .' .' .' .' .' .' .' '.'.'.'. RealEstate .' .' .' ,' . tiil'Cfaestnut at 

Path, Conrad Mil Eada ava. 

Path, Oliver J. Main and Dock sta. 

Faulkner, Wm. R., Jr. tUT Laclede ave. 

Digitized bvGoO^^IC 



10 MEMBBKS OP THE 

Name. Firm. Buelnesa. Location. 

Faust, A. E. . Paust & Bona Oyster Co., President Fifth aod Elm sts. 

Fay, Emory F- C. Taylor ft Co., Commlwlon 208 N. Haln st 

Fears. John C E. B. White A Co GOO Chamber Ot Coroioerce. 

Feanan, Arthur P. . Jas. Meagher Sc Co.. Pork Packers ISOO N. Haln sL 

Felckerl, Louis Wm. J. Lemp, Clerk . . . Thirteenth and Cherokee bU. 

Felner, Geo. Wm. . . Bngelke & Felnar, MlUlny Co KM S. Broadway. 

Felner, Frank .... Engelke ft Felner, Milling Co 804 8. Broadway. 

FeldbuBch, Hermann Teamster SOS Blair ave. 

Felkel, B. E Kanson Com. Co lOi Chamber o( Commerce. 

Fennerty, Edw. 13a R. SUteeuth sL 

Penske, P. B. . . Oilsonlte Roof Ins and Pavlrir Co. .... Walnwright Building. 
PerguBon. Hush . Hugh FerguBon ft Co., Provision Brokera . . . SsN. Third IL 

Ferguson, D. K. . . . Mechanics' Bank, PreBldent Fourth and Pine sti. 

FerKueon. Chas. W. . National I>ead Co Tenth Bt. and Clark ave. 

Ftrguson, Martin Grand Hotel SIS Chestnut it. 

Ferris, Franklin .... Rowell ft PerriB, Lawyers Ilgu Olive Bt 

Feuerbaeher, F. W. . F. W. Feuerbacher & Co., Maltster .... I70B S- Broadway. 

Field, Eugene .... Traders' DeBoatoh Laclede BuUdlnC- 

Fleld, Frank . O. H. Peckbajn Candy Co Seventh and Spruce sta 

'leld, John T Laclade Building. 

. Ife, Chas. R. . Cbas. R. Fife Com. Co., Merchandise Broker . . . Security Bldg. 
Flguelredo, A. de . . Bt. L. Traneter Co., Oenerol Hanager .... * S. Broadway. 



Field, 
Fife. 

Flfiei 



lelredo, F. de . . St. U Transfer Co Second and Poplar st 



Fliley, Chauncey 1. , 

Plllev, John D. . . . St. Louis Tru 

FlncK, J. C., Jr. . J. C. Flnck Mln'l Mfg. Co., Barytes, etc 101 Barton s(. 

Flnty. Thos Grain Xenfs, ni. 



FlBcher.CH. . ^- 

FiBCher, Louis P Chas. Tledman Mllllns Co O'Fallon, Dl. 

PiBcher, Joseph lOB N. Fourth sL 

Fischer, A. H. M. Kotany 411 Olive iL 

FlBher, D. D Lawyer «1 Olive st 

Fisher, John A. ... J. A. Fisher ft Co., Hay Fourth and CheBtuut sU. 

Fisher. John J M. ft M. Q. R. R Laclede Building. 

FlBher, Francis « N. Third «. 

Flsae, Wm. E FiBBe ft Kort]ohn, Attorney Laclede Building. 

Fltigerald, Wm. J. . . T. J. Lonergan ft Co., CommiBslon . Cham, of Commerce. 

Fit! Gibbon. J. D Builder 181S Pine sL 

Flach, Joseph . Naw Athens Milling Co New Athens. 111. 

"■--•- ''•—-'—"■ . Schretner-Flack Grain Co., Com US N. Fourth »t 

Flanagan ft Co., Millers 19U S. Thlid sC. 

c lanasiiii, i^iiiLii. n. . . Flanagan ft Co., Millers 1913 S. Third st 

Flebbe, Hermann . Western Candy and Bakers' Supply Co. . . . n6 S. Third sC 
Fleming, Thos. H. B. . With O'Connor ft Co., MarkeElteporter . lU Chestnut n. 

F' sh, M. M. . . Plesh ft Mook Painting Co «7 N. Thlnl Bt 

Fleah, Edw. M. . Collier Shot Tower Co., Assistant Manager . Security BuUdhu- 
■™" — '• " " ... Circuit Court. Judge Court House. 



Foell, Henry Foell ft Co., Commission U3 Market st 

FoerHtel, Michael 4S3S Clayton ava 

Foley. Daniel J Henderson, Ky. 

Forbes, R. T, . . Stephens Llth. ft Eng. Co til Washington ave. 

Forrester, R- L Forrester Bros., Grain Baynunid, HL 

Porster, Frank J. . American Tripoli Co »| pine »L 

Forster, Otto E Physician 2MG Washington ave. 

Forster, C. August . Hyde Park Brew'y Co. . . Salisbury St. and Florissant avt 

Forster, C. Marquard . St. Louis BreWg Aaaoclatlon 809 S. Slitli rt. 

Forster, Marquard . . . M. Forster Real Estate Co SOS S. Slilh st 

FoHkett, Hosea . . . Foskett ft Klsaner, Feed 4M7 N. BroadwW- 

Fouke, Phi! B. . . Punsten Bros. & Co., CommiBslon 108 N. Main it 

Fowler, Edwin Insurance Odd Fellows' Building. 

Fowler, F. B F. E. Fowler ft Co., Inaurance 31B N. Third st 

Praley, M Mosee Fraley & Co.. Insurance no N. Third ii. 

Francis. David R. . . . D. R. FranclB ft CoromlBslon Co. . . . I^clede Building. 
Francis, T. H. . . With D. R. FranclB ft Bro. Commission Co. . Laclede Building. 

Franclscus, James M Bank of Commerce Building. 

FranclBcus, James M.. Jr. . . . Moflltt ft Franclscua, Real Estate . . 701 CheitnuL 

Frank, Henry B. Baer ft Co., Produce 114 Elm >t 

Frank, John F Grain Okawi'Ule, IlL 

Prank, Joseph 

Frank. L. Pratik ft Hellendall, Hides and Wool 107 Ehs st 

Frank, Max Horses and Mules . . 4J39 N. Market it. 

Frank, Nathan .... Frank, Dawson ft Qarvin, Attorney . . . 301 N. ElghUi »t 
Franklin, Joseph . Wm. Barr Dry Goods Co.. Dry Goods . . . Sixth and Olive "la 

Freeborn, Charles B. . Star Union Line, Freight Agent 309 OHre rt. 

Preeman. C. L Security BuIIdinp 



sdbvGoo^^lc 



MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE OF ST. LOUIS. 



, FreudeiiBteln Qrocer Co SS23 Clarh a 



PritBche, CharlBB E „ , 

Prituchle, Robert Grocer BOOO QravoiB ave. 

Frommann, Paul DlstlllerB' Agent . . . . M N. Second »t. 

Pruln, John J. . . Pru In -Bam brick Con. Co., Contraciora 922 Olive St. 

Fruin, Jeremiah . Fruln-Barobrlck Con. Co., Contractors 922 Olive »l. 

Funk. Joseph P J. P. Funk & Co., Tallow, etc «10 N. Broadway. 

Funaten, B. E. . . Funaten Bros. & Co., Commission lOS N. Main sL 

Furlong, Wm. . . . Picker & Beardsley, Commission 214 N, Main at. 

Furth, Jftcob , . Jscot) Furth Grocer Co 810 Sprues St. 

Fuse, Louis Fubi & Backer, Flour Wl S. Main St. 

Fusi, Paul A. . . Bl-Mctalllc Mlnlns Co., President Security Building. 

Gabriel, Conrad . . . . C. Gabriel & Bro,, Feed 2660 Chouteau ava. 

Gabriel. Wm C. OBbrlel & Bro., Feed 2te0 Chouteau ave. 

Qaertner, Chas. . . Interstate Transp. Co foot Waahlngton av. 

Qalenne. Frank . . Gen'l Manager St. L. Exposition . . Thirteenth ajid Olive sta. 

Galvin, James F. . . James F. Galvln & Co., Provisions 207 S. Main St. 

Ganahf, Jno. J Jno. J. Ganahl Lumber Co 2nd. & Park av, 

Gandoifo, John B. . Qandolfo Flour and Commission Co IS B. Second st. 

Gannett, John M. . Mesamore, Gannett & Co,, Commission . 6W Chamlier of Com. 

Gamner. John A American Oak Leather Co *21 N. Fourth St. 

Gardner, Wm. A. . . . 8, W. Cobb A Co., Commission , 317 Chamber of Commerce. 



LU, Joseph, Jr. . 



Oarrels, Wm Wm. Garreis & Co., Cooper^upplles 2130 Deftalb at. 

Garrison, O. L Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co Walnwrlght Building. 

Garrtty, F. I Naflonal Cereal Co 208 N. Commercial sT, 

Garstang, Richard . . . Southern Boiler Works 1201 S. Second St. 

Garth. John H. . Farmers & Merchants' Bank, President Hannibal, Mo. 

Qarvey, Lawrence . . . L. Q&rvey & Co., Produce and Com 701 N. Third St. 

Gasser, Bmll . . With M. M. MoKeen & Co 6 N. Second st 

Oatch, Ellas B. . Oranby Mining and S. Co Sixth and Locust sts. 

Oaupel. Henry J Qelsel Mfg, Co 12G S. Second St. 

Gaus, H., Jr. ... . Henry Gaus & Sons, Box Factory £100 N. Main at. 

Gebhardt, Geo. E. . Geo.F:. Oebhardt & Bro., Grocer 7830 Ivory ave. 

Oehner, H. . . H. Gehner Distilling Co.. Whiskey m Marke- st. 

Oeroshty, John E Chapin & Co., Mill Feed . . 306 Chamber of Commerce. 

Gelsmann. Otto Flour Highland, 111. 

Oerber. Charles Gorber Fruit Co. BIO N. Third st 

G«rdemann, August 2Z10 Clark ave.' 

Gerhard, O. J Abels & Gerhard Plumbing Co 909 N. Sixth st. 

Gerhkrt, P. G. 8640 Washington ave, 

Oerhart. Chaa. B. . P. H. A C. B. Oerhart, Real Estate 707 Chestnut st. 

Oerke, Henry Teamster «01 N. Ninth st 

Gerl&cb. W Insurance B N. Third st. 

Geaaler. Emil W. . . S, W. Qessler & Co.. Commission 322 Pine at. 

O^aler, E. A. . . . Gessler £ Kraussnlck, Broker 411 Olive St. 

a«tt7B, James M. . . W. P. Oettys & Son Provision Co IIS N. Main St. 

Oettya, ThoB. B. . . . W. P. Gettys A Son Provision Co US N. Main at 

Ota laelin. Horace . . St. L. Grain Elev. Co., Superintendent Rlalto Building. 



Ghto, James C. . . Barada-Ohlo R. E. Co 

Gibbons, John T. . . J. T. Gibbons & Co., Grain . . c-uyunu unu a. rmert bu. i 
Oieaccke, Otto . Chas. Ehlerman Hop and Malt Co. . . . Twenty-second and Bcoii;. 

Oleselnian, Frank H. . Chris. Sharp Com. Co TSS N. Main St. 

Giesler, John F. . John F. Giealer A Bro.. Feed 1B31 Franklin ave. 

Gilbert. W. J Gilbert Book Co., Publisher 20S N. Fourth St. 

Gilbert. W, Je wet t . ■ ArmBtrong-Qllbert Cork Co., Brewers' Sup's . 23 S. Fourth St. 
Gilbert, Sidney L. . . Armstrong-Gilbert Cork Co., Brewers' Sup's . 23 S. Fourth st. 

Gllbmlth, J.W Broker 307 Pins st 

Otlkeson, John M. . Gllkeson A SIobb Com. Co., Commission . . . tlS Cham, ol Com. 

aillf>, John Deceased 

Ollmartln, P, J. ■ ■ P. J. GUmartln & Co., Commission ... EOT Cham, of Commsrca. 

Qlntz, Adam Bettevllle, III. 

Glnocnlo, D Ginoohio Bros. & Co., Fruits 713 N. Third st 

Glnsel, M Merchandise Trenton, III. 

GIraldin, Chas. E OlreJdIn Bros. & Cates, Real Estate . . . 308 N. Eighth st 

OivenB, Jos. W Architect 407 N. Broadway. 

Qlogau. BmSe : Real Estate Sixth and Olive sts. 

Olov«r, A. B A. B. Glover & Co US Chamber of Comerce. 

a«ekel. John J. Grocer S142 Cass av. 

Ooddard, O. F. . . E. Goddard Flour Mill Co., Millers .... Second and Rutger sts. 
Ooddai-d. Jos. H. . B. Goddard Flour Milt Co., Millers .... Second and Rutger Sts. 
Oodlov«, George W. Geo. W. Oodlove ft Co. Commission 114 N. Main st 



:d by Google 



19 MHMBERS OP THB 

Name. Firm. Buslnesa. liocftUou. 

Oodlave. L. .HelHoan-Qodlove MercantUe Co UO N. Utin it. 

Ooebel, FrlCi Qoebel & Wetterau Wholemile Orocers. . . . £T S. Second at 

Qoeke, Fred'k W. . . . F. W, Ooeke & Co, CommlSBlon UN. Becond at. 

Goerger, Wm Maltater 1717 Blngleton »t 

QoertB, AugruHt, . .Oemuinla Life Ina. Co Am. Central Building. 

Goetz. Charlea W, . . C. W. Ooeti & Co. CeraentB fto. . . . Baereath & Walnut lU. 

Gtoetz. Victor. . . Merchants' EichanKe, Bd. of Flour loap SB. Ualnit. 

Qoldman. J. D. . AdlcT'Ooldman Com. Co., Cotton Factors Ill S. Holn at. 

Golaan, Robert W Fourth and Pine *U. 

Gonter, Chas. O Printer tttF! Pok" kva. 

0«od, Iionls C. I^ C. Oood & Co., Merchandise Brokers . . . m N. Becond A 

Ooodoll, John R. . W^. K. Markham & Son, Insurance 117 N. Third it. 

Gordon, Samuel Coi A Gordon, Provisions 1019 S. Third st 

Qorman, A. A Provtslon Broker . SOI Chamber of Cam. 

Gorman, John I iOS Gamtde iL 

Gorman, John .... Jno, Gorman & Bro., Commission 9H N. Third iL 

Qottichalk, Bd L. . P. & B. L. Gottsohalk, Attorneys 404 Market st. 

Orable, W. B <118 Juniata sL 

Grace, P. F K«ane & Grace, Real Estate SB Chestnut it 

Graham. Be^. B. . . . Graham Paper Co., Paper Dealers m "S. Miln it. 

Graham, G. £ B12 Chamber of Cammorce. 

Graham, E. D Mailco, Mo. 

Graham, Wm. H. . . . Bank of Republic, Cashier D4 N. Fourth si. 

OranKer, C. H White Line Rlolto BuUdlns. 

Grant, W. D Fork Packer tSIt Garfield av«. 

Grant, Chas. A. W. D, Grant, Pork Packer SBS Garfield sve. 

Grant, Alex. D. . . . A. O. Bdwards A Bon Brokerage Co OS Olive st 

Grassmuck, Wm Commission 11! N. Fourth «L 

Grata. Ander«on . Warren. Jones & Orats. Ba^grlnB Rlalto BuUdtng. 

Grata. Ben]., Jr. . Warren, Jones A Grata, Basglng' Rlalto Buildinc. 

Graves, Oswald . . . Oswald Graves Grain Co 413 Chamber of Commerce- 
Graves, W. W. . . . at. Louis Crocker Co ISW Chouteau ave. 

Gray. Metvin L, Lawyer . . . .- BOS Chestnut at. 

Grayson, W St. L. Refrlgrerator ft Wooden Gutter Co. . UolD St. ft Park an. 

Green. Geo. S D. I. Buahnell & Co., Beads and Grain KB N. Becond at 

Green. R. W, . . St. Loula Car- Wheel Co.. Car Wheds . . . Bank of Commeros BMf. 

Green, C. C. , . . C. C. Green Lumber Co Temple Bulldhig. 

Green, H. H. . Green Cai^ Wheel Mfg. Co., President lOlS N. Brosdwaj. 

Green, Chaa Oreen ft LoMotle, Real Elstate 714 Chestnut st 

Green, Thomas Oreen & LaHotte, Real Estate 7H Chestnut st 



Green, James . Helmbacher Bteam Forre and RoHIdk Mill Co. . Ninth and P 

Green, Hontraville Bteamboaunc 

Green, W. L., Jr W. L. Green Commission C 

Greene. O. H National Lead Co., AsBt. Manuel . . 

Greenefelder, Joseph B Justice of Peace . . Central, Bt. I«ula Ca 



. Central, Bt. Louis Co. 
, , .... , .... Walnwiisiit BuIldlDS. 

„.^„r. Jamas G KB Chestnut st 

Greer, Robert C. . . . R. C. Greer ft Sons Realty Co SOI Chestnut iL 

GregK. Norrls B. . Mound City PL ft Col. Co., Paints and Oils . , . «« N. Second st 

GresK. Wm. H., Jr. . . . Mound City Pt. ft Col. Co WC N. Second ■!. 

Gregory, James A UIO Horcan it 

Gregory. Clay Gregory Mining and Smelting Co Japlin, Uo. 

Gregory, A, B White Sifl, HL 

Greve, Henry With John Wahl Commission Co. IS. Main st. 

Grler. J. P Allen, Grler ft Zeller Co 8S Board of Trade, CUcaca 

Qrleaedleck, Anton Deceased 

Grtesedleck, Henry . H. Grlesedleck ft Co., Maltser IIM a TweUtb t 

Oriesedieck. Paul H 11S4 B. Twelfth it 



Grlesedleck, Henry C. . Helm Brewing Co Boat St. Louis. nL 

Grlesedleck, Henry, Jr Malting 1110 Park aw. 

QrleBedleck, H. L. . . H. L. Grieaedieck ft Co., Liquors 716 N. Sixth at 

Grlesedleck, Frank . Hy. Grlesedleck, Jr., Malster mV Park ava 

Griffin, John S Ghlo-Griffln Real Bstate Co HO N. Eleventh ft 

Grinin. T Provisions 1701 Aaitu it 

Grimm, Henry J. . . . Grimm ft Mitohell 100 N. Fonrtft ft. 

Grlndon, Alfred J. Fisher ft Co. Real Estate 7U Chestnac it- 

Groenlnger, R. J Deceased ■ 

Qrcne, Bd Grone ft Co., Soda US. Eleventh at 

Orone, Henry , . . H. Grone Brewing Co., Brewery ZIU dark ara 

Grone. John G. . . . H. Grone Brewing Co.. Brewery ""' "•--^ — 



r, J. Ph Grocer 494 Pa» ava 

'er, C. L With J. P. Gronemeyer. Grocer .... Ml dark ava 

er, Aug-. F. . Grosaheider ft Bro., Flour and Food M7 EastM ai* 

[Iram J. . . . . . ._. ._., . . ^ . Lawyer "^^^2" 



Orubbs, H. B Armour Pocking Co 

Gruenstelder, Louis Pork Packer , 



rc.,z.d.vCoOt^lc 



HBRCHANTB' EXCHANQB OF ST. LOUIB. 18 

Name. Firm. Biulnera. Location. 

Oruet, John P. . . WatarB-Plarce Oil Co Odd Fellowa' Bulletin^. 

Qruner, PhUlp . Qruner Bros. Lurob«r Co Ninth Rt. and Cau ave. 

Querdan, N Ouerdan Hat Co. Broadway and Walnut at. 

QuinaburK. H. A. R. R. Ticket Broker . . 118 N. Broadway- 

Ounnlson, 0«o. W Inland Oil Co.Olla Commercial Building 

Guy, W. B MadUon Coal Co., Preeldent Sscurlty Bulldlns 

n and Walnut ats 

. . , n and Walnut eta. 

jiaase, i»ui8 a. . . A. C. Li. Ueaae & Son Fish Co UG N. Second st. 

BBertng, John Teamster 2014 S. Ninth at. 

Hoerlns, John Jacob Teamster SOIS 8, Ninth Bt. 

HaeUSHler, Herman A Lawyer IE N. Fourth at. 

Haeerman, James Attorney Walnwrlsht Building. 

Hagey, H. Given Racey Bros.,<;ommlsalon SS N. Main at. 

HaSii, W. A. Kohn & Co.. Brokers SIS N. Fourth sc 

Halosworth, Jona» 1481 Union av«. 

Hake, LoulB. Jr. . . With Louis Hake A Son. Provisions S19 N. Third at. 

Hall, Chas. B Langenburg Bros., Cammlaalon . 118 Chamber of Commerce. 

Hall, Geo. H. . . . Nanson Commlalon Co 20! Chamber of Commerce. 

Hall, John E Qoddard-Hall Co at Chamber of Comroeroe. 

Hall, L. M.' 

Hall, WUard C Inaurance Walnwrlght BuUdlng. 

Halloran. It. 3. ... E. W. Qeaaler & Co., Commission S2: Pine at. 

Hamilton, R. A. . . . . Whittaker & Sons. Manager of Pork House . . Tth & Carr ats. 

Hamilton, Alexander . Oartatde Coal Co., Coal IIZI Pine at. 

Hamlin, J. R. Sherry & Hamlin. SOt Chamber of Commerce. 

Hammer, L. F Photographer . . Ohio aye. and Miami at. 

Hancock. D. J Inaurance 119 N. Third St. 

Hancock. Wm. P. . MuL Ben. Life Ins. Co ■ Odd Fellows' Building. 

Handlan, A. H.. Jr. . . M. M. Buck ft Co., Railroad Supplies SU N. Third St. 

Hanebrlnk. C. J. . Besalnghaus MUUniT Co., Vlce-P. ft Seo> . Ninth ft N. Market sta. 

Hanson, C, T, . . . P. B. UaCblaaoD & Co 5110 N. Second et. 

Hanson, P. U. . . St. Louis Stamping Co Second st. and Case ave. 

Hardie. Andrew D Kehlor Bros., Mlilera .... 401 Chamber of Commerce. 

Hardin, N. C ' Attorney Louisiana, Uo. 

Harig, Albert J. . . Waverly MUUng Co Wavorly, 111. 



Harlow, J. B Civil Servloo Com. . . . Washington, D. C. 

Harmer, R. M. Abstractor of TlUea Ch«ster, III. 

Harrlgan, L Chief of Police Four Courts. 

Hoj-ris, Ben B. Harris & Co., Hides and Wool iOt N. Main st 

Harris, James R. Farmer Allentown, Mo. 

Harrta. David P Harris Broa.. Coal ISll N. Jefferson ave. 

Harris, Bvan W. . Morris-Harris Wool S. Co 4U7 N. Twenty-first at. 

Harrison, John P, . . CItlsens' Insurance Co., Insurance RIalto Building, 

Harrison, John W. . . . Bhlokle, H. & H. Iron Co Twelfth and Papin sts. 

Harrison, W. B. . . Harrison- Berry Com. Co SU Chamber of Commerce. 

Harrison, W. D Front Bank Steel Pumace Co. 706 N. Main st. 

Harrison, J. P. M. . . . Egypt MlUIng Co Ashley, 111. 

Harsttck. J. C Teamster E S. Seventeenth et. 

Hart, Edward a . . B. P. Studley ft Co., Printing ZU N. Main st. 

Hart, Herman . . . Hart Commlaalon Co 12 S. Main at. 

Hartmann, Brnst . B. Hartmann Hide A Leather Co 19£8 Gravols ave 

Harlmann, Rudolph . R. Hartmann ft Co., Commission 101 N. Main at 

Hartman, John Merchant' Tailor . . . . B12 N. Broadway. 

Harvey, (W, Jr. P. M. Brunner Granitoid Co., Conta. . . Turner Building. 

HatterBley, F. . . . . F. Hattersley ft Co., Plour Brokers ZOS Pine st. 

HatterBley. Joseph . P. Hattersley & Co., Flour Broker 205 Pine at. 

— -— *" " . Hauelsen ft Lang, Produce and Com lOlB N. Third St. 

n.,__ II . n ^ (.Q^ Tobacc- "■" " "■•-■-' -- 



Hawken, Wm. H. . . Cole Bros. Com. Co ... 

Hayden, T. P Hayden Slate Co. Twelfth and Locust Bts. 

Hafea, D. J 8L Louis HlUllw Co Carllnvllle. III. 



Haynea, Wm. A. . Hux. — 

Haiard, Wm. P. . . With C. H. Albere A Co., Commission .... 400 Cham, of Com. 

Healey. B. S. . Qlencoe Lime and Cement Co Odd Fellows' Building. 

Healey, J. D Grocer 2369 Scott ave. 

Healey, Chas. F. . . . The N. K. Falrbank Co RIalto Building. 



BeCfeman. James P. . 

Heldbreder, John H. . . _. . . _ .. _ 

Helnrlcb, John P. . . . Heinrlob Coal Co., Coal GOS Olive si 



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MEMBERS OF THB 



HslnrlachBmeyer, Honrr 

Helnaelmann, H. R Peed 

Heintz, Emil . . . Franklin Mut. Ina. Co. 

HellzeberK. H. 8. . . Ed Heltzeberg P. ft P. Co 

Hellzeberg. Chas. L. . Ed Heltieberg P. & F. Co 

Heltxeberg, Geo. C. . Ed Heltieb«rK P- & P. Co 

Helein, Geo. A Cooperate . . 

Helerr, M. F Restaurant lu 11. inini bl 

Heltenateln, J. P Plant Seed Co 812 N. Fourth »t. 

Hellendall, Quatave . Frank & Hellendall, Hides and Wool lo; Ktm sL 

Hellman, A. M. ... A. M. Hellman ft Co., Wholesale Liquors ... 508 N. Second st 

Hellman, Iduls M EOe N. Second iL 

Hellman, Chas Hell man -Oodlovo Mercantile Co UO N. Ualu «t. 

Heltiell, D. 5 D. B. Heltiell & Co., CommlsBion 10 8. Main bL 

Hellaell, M. D 507 N. FourtH 9t 

Heltiell, Harry D. ... A. J. Chtld £ Son, Commission 21S Markiet st 

Heman, John Henrj' . . . Heman Con. Co L«fflnEwelI ave. and N. Market bL 

Heman. August Heman Con. Go Lefflngwell ave. and N. Market Bt 

Heman, Wm Heman Con. Co L,eflInKwell ave. and N. Mariiet at. 

Heman, John Heman Con. Co Liemngwell ave. and N. Market Bt. 

Heman, Fred Lefflngwell ave. and N. Market sL 

Hemenway, Wra. D Peugnet &. Hemenway, Insurance .... 806 Olli-e sL 

Hendee, S. A. .... B. A. Hendee & Co., Grain BushneU. HL 

HendBen, P. J Insurance U7 N. Third «. 

Henseler, QeorES Oils 120 S. Commercial bL 

Henaeler, F, F. . . St. IjOuIs Drayase Co. Transfer 407 S. Main bL 

Henson, Mark Granite, 111. 

Henze, F. W Baker 417 Lucas ave. 

Herf, O. . Hert & Frerichs Chemical Co tBSS B. Broadwar- 

Horold, Theo 

Herold. Ferd Cherokee Packet Co Foot of Vine sL 

Herthel, Adolph . . ■ International Bank, Cashier Fourth and Chealnut sti. 

Hesse. W. J. ; . Dl. Hydraulic Brick Co., Brick Odd Fellows' Building. 

Hesser. John T Coal and Coke G09 Chestnut st. 

Heaton. Edw. H. . The Knickerbocker Co 3X11 Eads ave, 

Hewitt, O Hewitt, Cochran & Co., Commission aOo N. Third St. 

Heydt, John B Baker 1«13 Biddle st. 

Heyman. Wm lAckawana Line, Agent Houser Bulldloe. 

Hesel, Charles Hesel Mmins Co., Millers East St. LauIb. lU. 

Hesel, Moris Hesel MUllng Co., Millers East Bt. I»uls. lU. 

Hickman, W. T. . . . WisslnB Ferry Co., ContracUDB Agent . . Security Building. 
"■■■•■' '-- '■■-'--■ - " - andlCl: ■ ■ 



Hickel, Joseph. Jr. . . Jos. Hickel ft Son, Butter andl Cheese HO Market st 

Hlgbee, R, B Merchant Laclede Building. 

Hilger, John J S7<H Cook »«. 

HllKe. Christoph Plour and Feed .... XH9 N. Broadwsj. 

Hllke, Christ H Christ HIIke, Feed 1747 N. Braadny. 

S. C. . HHmer-aoheltlin Com. Co 8M N. Third «. 



Hill, Ewlng . . . Western Advertising Co Union Trust Building. 

S1I. G. W Regina Mills, Mlllem SDO 8. Main ■( 
It, Jerome . . . Jerome HUl Cotton Co., Cotton Factors IIG S. Main at 



Hill, Walker .... American Ei. Bank, President Third and P 

Hill, Wm. L. . . N. T. Life Insurance Co., Agent Odd Fellows' Buiiuiug. 

Hin, James A 1841 Washington are. 



jniiiiniu, uLuiiia a Baker, Darst ft Hllllard, Commission .... 108 Market ft- 

HUB, Edward Dodson ft UUs, Picklea, etc Third and Cedar sta 

lUtenbrand, Eugene Deceased 

Itnchtnan, J. O Provision Inspector . It S Commercial it 



Ilnton, fa. H. . . Heine Safety Boiler Co Bank of Conunerc* B— . -. 

Hirsch. I. C. . Cat Hirsch ft Sons Iron A Rail Co HI aark ava 

Hlrschberg, F. D. . . F. D. Hirschberg ft Bro., Insurance m N. Third st 

Iltchcock, Henry Attorney Walnwright Bnitdinc. 

Hitchcock, E. A. . . . Crystal City Plate Qlass Co Walnwright Bulldhig. 

loagland. Wm. T 4«8 N. inneteentli st 

Hobart. B. P K. ft T. Coal Co.. President Ijudede Building. 

lodgklns, Daniel . With R. Cleary Com. Co., Cotnmisslon . SIS Cham, of Commerea 

lodgktne, Elbert . J. B, M. Eehlor ft Co., Grain 411 Chamber of ComfDerca 

fodgman. Chae, . Whltaker ft Hodgman, Stock ft Bond Brokers . 100 N. Fourth iL 

loffman. August . . Hoffman Stave Co., Coopers Second and Hooroa su. 

loffmann, Chr. F. . . . Superior Ice and Cola Storage Co. . Twelfth and Palm sta 



3dbvGooglc- 



MBBCH ANTS' EXCHANGE OP ST. LOUIS. 15 

Name. Firm. BusUiefli. Location. 

Hofman, S. H Builder Qlobe-Dem. BuUdlns. 

Hotm«n, LoulB Merer & Hofman. Brewere" Supplies 81 S. Main St. 

Harmaiu), F. W. . . HoCmann Bro». Prod. Co.. Prod. & QrooerleH . TOO N. Second 8t. 
Hotmann, E. Q. . . Hofmann BrOB. Prod. Co., Prod, ft Orocerles . 700 N. Second it. 
Holland, George H. . . . Bridge ft Beach iltg. Co., Stoves . . Main and Almond sta. 

HallMay, Sam^l N Attorney JOftW Olive at. 

Holllater, Ell T Crescent PtK. Co., Preetdent 904 N. Fourth at. 

Hollmann, Henry C. . H, C. Hollmann & Co., Produce a N. Main Bt. 

: ollmann. Julius . . . Fischer Flour Co 2M Market st. 

olmoH, Jesse H. . . With H. & L. Chase, Bags g N. Main sL 

lolthauH, I«ula J. . . Fourth Nal'l Bank, Vice-Pre«ldent Rialto BulldlnK. 

. {oltsclaw, Frank . . Janis, Phillips ft Co Ninth and Locust Bts. 

lomes, F. B Deceased 

lomes, Charles R. , . Peterson & Homes. Queensware 406 N. Broadway. 

Hopkins, James . . Diamond Match Co., President 1800 8. Second St. 

lopklns. Geo. K. . Hopkins-Weller DrugCo., Wholesale DrugglatB . 603 N. Main st. 

Hopkins, Jnnls Erie Despatch Laclede BuUdlns. 

Hoppe, E. F. . Chas. Hoppe ft Bon luting: Co 717 Park ave. 

Hopptus, Herman F. . Mullen & Hopplus Fainting Co 114 Olive St. 

Horn. Benjamin F Staves and Heading - . nZU Chestnut st. 

Horn. Chas. W BenJ, P. Horn, Cooperage Bast St, Louis, III. 

Horner. William H «7Ba Garner ave. 

Homer. E. P. . . . . Allen-West Com. Co 104 B. Main at. 

Hornsby, Joseph L. Attorney 220 N, Fourth St. 

Horrocka, James B. G. Dun ft Co,, Mercantile Agts. , . Cham, of Commerce. 

Horton, Wm. H Real Estate .... Walnwright Building. 

Hosp«s, Richard . . Qer. Bav, Institution. Caahler Fourth and Pine ats. 

Houaton, Joshua Retired 4013 Delmar ave. 

Houston. J. M. . J. M. Houston Grocer Co., Wholeaale Qrocera 800 Spruce at. 

Houta. Percy .... G. V, Brecht B, 8. Co Twelfth at, and Cass ave. 

Howard, D. J. . . Evans ft Howard Fire Brick Co »20 Market at. 

Howard, W. P. . . . W. P. Howard ft Co,, Commission 40S N. Levee. 

Howard, Thomas Deceased 

Howard. John W Liquors 107 Garrison ave. 

Howard, W. P., Jr. . W. P. Howard & Co., Commission 40S N. Levee. 

Howe, J. C. . . St. L. a IBastem Railway Security Building. 

Hovt. E.R Hoyt Hetal Co., SecreWry 4113 Clayton rd. 

Hubbard, Robt. M. . Hubbard ft Bartlett Commlslon Co. . . . Fourth and Pine sts. 

HulMr, Andrew Grain Bunker Hill, HI. 

Huber, Cbarles .... Huber MlllinB Co Seneca. Mo. 

Hudson, B, F. . . Hudson Bros. Com, Co.. Commission Z12 N. Second st. 

Hudson, Wm. A. . Hudson Bros. Com. Co., CommlBsion 213 N. Second st. 

Hudson, John Cotton 140 Barry st. 

Huff, C. H C. H, Huff ft Son, Insurance . . 101 Chamber of Commerce. 

Hug, Henry Wm, Tepe, Feed 2726 Laclede ave. 

Hun, Leon L, . Leon L, Hull Real Estate Co 804 Cheatnut st. 

Hull. William L, . . . Wm. L. Hull & Co.. Commission RepubMc Building. 

Humphrey, Frank W. . P. W. Humphrey ft Co., Clothing .... Pine and Broadway. 

Humphreys, John D. . HumphrevB Prod. Co., Commiaslon 712 N, Third at. 

Hun^ey, John H. . E. B. Wblte Grain Co EOO Chamber ol Commerce. 

Hunklna, F. P. . . Thom-Hunklns Lime and Cement Co I0S14 N, Eighth bL 

Hunn, Eugene P Kehlor Bros.. Millers .... 401 Chamber of Commerce, 

Hunt. H. M Physician Pioneer Preaa Bldg., St, Paul, Minn. 

Hunt. H. L. Grain Ramsey, 111. 

Hunter, H. D. . Tei. and Pacific Coal Co Fort Worth, Tex. 

Hunter, E. D Hunter Bros 70 Broadway, N. T. 

Hunter, E. O Hunter Broa. Grain and Feed . Third and Chestnut ats. 

Hunter. Henry . . . . R. Cleary Com. Co 318 Chamber of Commerce. 

Hunter, Thos. U. . The Albert Dickinson Co. . . Sixteenth and Clark sts.. Chicago. 
Huppert. W. E. . With Klausman Brewery Co., Book-keeper .... 8839 S, Broadway. 
Huae. William L. . . . Huse ft Loomis Ice Co.. Ice Security BulldlnK. 

lussey, Thos. C Hussey ft Co., Grain CarrolUon, lil. 

luasmann. Henry Flour 10 B. Main at. 

lusted, Edward C. ... St. Joe Lead Co Laclede Building. 

lulchinson, R. R. . , . MecbanlcB' Bank, Cashier Fourth and Pine Bts. 

lutctilnson, James Byrup and Sugar Broker . . 71S Bpruce at. 

lutchinson, W. I. . E, St. L. Packing Co 409 Morgan st. 

luttlg, C, H. . . HutUg Bash and Door Co 3900 Chouteau ave. 

lynes, Geo. A. . . . Geo. A. Hynee A Co.. Real Estate 8D4H Chestnut St. 

Hypea. B. M Physician , . 2005 Victor st. 

Imlw. Joseph F. J. F. Imbs ft Co.. Flour Commission 120 S. Main st. 

ImbM, Joseph J J. F. Imbs A Co., Flour Commission UO S. Main at. 

Tnman, B, . . . D. R. Francis & Bro, Com. Co Laclede Building. 

Inaaes. Charles W. . St. Louis Nat'l Bank, Cashier 207 N. Broadway. 



Sugene 1 
1, Wm. . 



sdbvGoO^^lc 



UBHBBRS OF THE) 



iBTBel, Elmer !>. H. ft L, Chase.BagB, etc S N. Main st. 

Ittner, Antbony Ittner BroB.. Brick ManufacturinK ■ 29 TeleptioDe Bids. 

Ittner, Wm. B Unk, Rosenh^m ftlttner, Architects . . . Union Trust Bids. 

Ives, Halsey C. Nlnetaentti st. and Lucas pL 

Jacoby, Hugo . . . . H. B. Egtrera ft Co., Ulllera BiKhtli st. and Cl&rk ave. 

Janes. J. M US N. Fourth bl 

Jacob, Joseph W. . . . Continental Une Ill N. Third st, 

James, Li, a, M. Rumair ft Co UUI Clarlc ave. 

Jannopoulo, D. . . Mo, Tent and Awning Co., Tents EU Chestnut St. 

Jarvls, Wm. W. Bxchanga Bank Troy, ni. 

Jasper, Louis A. . . Jasper ft Sellmeyer, Com tl8 8. Main st. 

Jacoby, F Jacoby Comtnlsalon Co SIB N. Main st 

Jennelle. J. A. Red Line. Agent Fourth and Chestnut sta 

Jennings, Curtis H Berthold ft Jennln^. Lum. Com. . . St N. Fourth sL 

Jenkins, Hunter Ben Steamboat Agent . . Foot of Wash'n ave. 

JInklnH, B. C Broker . , . Bank of Commerce Building. 

Joerger, Q. A Teamster .... Eleventh and Papin su. 

Johnson. A. C. . 8t. Iiouis Com'l Bulletin U6 Pine si. 

Johnson, John D. . . , , Chaa. P. & J. D. Johnson, Attorneys . B'dway ft Walnut 



Johnson, Qeo. W. . . U. B. Johnson & Co,, City Welghen .... 12 3. Commercial st 

Johnson, Walter . J. B. M. Kehlor ft Co. 1U Chamber at Commerci. 

Johnston, Qeo. 8 Tin Foil Manufactory . 609) 8. Broadway. 

Jones, Breck . . . Miss. Valley Trust Co., Secretary MS N. Fourth st 

Jones, Chas., Jr. Farmer 3D!S Lucas are. 

Jones. Ezeklel . Jones-Pope Produce Co,, Commission SIS N. Fourth at 

Jones, Qeo. P Geo. P. Jones ft Co.. OH TIO N. Halo >L 

Jones, Henry T More. Jones ft Co,, Brass Founders 1608 N. Bl^th it 

Jones, H. R. L., . Mermod-Jaccard Jewelry Co Broadway and Liocust a. 

Jones. James B. . Crystal Plate-GIas- "- "■-' '-■-' '>-"-■■ — 

Jones. L. B 

Jones, L. F. . . . Warren, Jones ft Q , „„...„ , 

Jones, Paul Q Block, Dean ft Co., Commission ... 117 Cham, of Commerce. 

Jones, Vincent M. • . John Mullally Com. Co 406 Chamber o( Conunerce. 

Jones, Wm. C. . . Wm, C, ft J, C. Jones, Attorneys Liaclede Building. 

Jordan, J. M Jordan Floral Co 708 Olive sL 

Joy, Levi 101 S. Main st 

Joy. Chas. F Lawyer . . Bank of Commerce Bulldlnr 

Judson, F. N. Judson & Taussig, Lawyers W Olive st 



Kaehler, B Interstate Despatch, Agent 118 N. Tblid sL 

Kahmann, Geo. H. . MoQee, Kahmann & Co., Manufacturer .... Tf"""« City, Ma 
Kalme, Sdwln F. . . J. E. Kalme & Bro,, Real Estate OS Chestnut st. 



KAlser, John O. . . Jno. O. Kaiser ft Co., Orocers 901 Franklin ava 

Kaiser, Henry . . . Jno. Q, Kaiser ft Co., Grocers 901 Franklin are. 

Kaiser, Jacob , . . . Jacob Kaiser ft Co. Manufacturers 104 8. Pourtb sL 

Kaiser, John H. . John H. Kaiser ft Co.. Grocers Eighth and Wash sta 

Kalb, 0,0 O, O, Kalb ft Elon, Insurance 130 f. Third st 

Kalter, A M. A. Kalter, Hay and Grain »« N. Fourth sc 

Kammerer, ,L. G. . , Mullanphy Savings Bank Cashier 1451 N. Broadway. 

Kaufman, Nathan , Conn. Mut. Ben. Life Ins. Co., Gen'l Agt. . Odd Fellows' Bldg, 
Kauffman, John W, . . Kauf fman Milling Co., Milling . . lOtI Chamber of Conunercc 

Kauffman, F. E Kauffman Milling Co., Milling . . 400 Chamber of CommeioB, 

Kaune, Wm. O Wonderly Coal Co Breese. to. 

Kavanaugh, James Ice ITU dmrk ave. 

Keane, Wm Keane ft Grace, Real Estate an Chesmut si. 

Keeble. W, B Senter & Co., Commission B 8. TUrd st. 

Keeler, Henry F. . . . Borden ft Belleck, Scales MI N. Third st 

Kehoe, C. J. . . F. D. Hlrschberg & Bro., Insurance Ut N. Thlnl *f- 

Kehlor. D. M Eehlor Bros.. MlUlng .... 401 Chamber of Comoarca. 

Kehlor, J. B. M Kehlor Bros., Milling .... 401 Chamber of Cammslte. 

Kehrmann, S B. Kehrmann ft Co., Insurance . . . Broadway and H^cet st. 

Kelm. Philip Pork Packer BEO DeEalb sL 

Kelfleln, John M. . Consolidated Coal Co., Agent Foot of Locost st 

Kelrsey, W. H. . . C. H, Albers Com. Co SI! Chamber of Comjoerc* 

Kelser. John P AT Pine st. 

Kelser. C. J. . . Kelser Bros. Milting Co.. Flour ML Olive. Ill 

Keleher, P. F P. F. Kaleber £ Co.. Bankers and Brokers . . . IWi Olive st 

Kellar, John A. St. Chsily, Mo 

Kolley, Geo. D. L. . . Dally Commercial Bulletin ; U t Pine sL 

Kelly, Patrick J Cullen ft Kelly, Uvery . . i- «* Casa aw- 

Kemper, Henry , . . G. H, Kemper ft Co., Grain and Flour .... Bast Bt. LojUa. m. 
Kendrlck, Albert B. . With H. ft L. Chase, Salesman »V. Halo sL 



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MERCHANTS- BXCHANQS! OF ST. LOUIS. 17 

Name. Eirm. Bu Bin ess. Locaticin. 

Kennard. John . Kenoard A Sons Carpet Co., CftrpetB . Broadway and St. Charles. 
Kennard, Samuel M. . . Kennard ft Sons Car. Co., Carpets . B'dway & St. Charles. 

Kennedy, U. A. . . M. A. Kennedy & Co., CammliiBlon MS* K. Third at. 

Kennedy, T. D. . . . . Jeremiah Murphy, Pork Packer 23IE Morgan at. 

D- .. Tw— T. -ri T. B. 1. o. *.._ ^ — r.- a . — y _ Laolodo Building-. 

. ma N. Jefferson ave. 
, Union Trust Bulldlny, 



KesBler. Anthony . . Anthony Keasler & Son, Tanneni Sa7 N. Broadway. 

Kerea, S. P Livery IIOO St. Aiiffe ave. 

Kidder. Edward M. . Kidder & Wlgglnii, Brokers . . Bank of Commerce Building, 

Klely, P. M F, M. Klely £ Co., Commission SIB N, Thlr^ A. 

Kler. Wm. F Physician tOO S. Broadway. 

Kilcullen, Thos, B. , Francis Young Feed Co SSZl Cass ave. 

Kllpatrlck, Claude RuUedge ft KUpatrlck. Real BeUte . T17 Chestnut St. 

Kimball. Benjamin Insurance 411 Olive st. 

Kins', Goodman .... Mermod & Jaocard Jewelry Co. . . Broadway and Locust Ht. 

King, Lawrence L Fire Insurance • . • Sixth and Locust ats. 

King, Wra. M John r>wlKht ft Co 11 Old Slip, New York. 

King, D. H. . . . King. Brlnemade & Co., Millinery 709 Washington ave. 

Ktogsland, L. D. . Klngsland & Douglass Mfg. Co IB21 N. Eleventh st. 

Klngsland, Qeorge . Central Union Brass Co S2S N, Second st 

Kinnan, A. B Pack-g-house Sup. . . Bank of Com. BIdg. 

Klnsella, James Kinaella ft Co., City Weighers .... 23 S. Commercial St. 

Klnsella, Wm. J. . . . Hanley & Klnsella CoSee and Spice Co. TOT Spruce st. 

Klnaky, Oeorge J. . Geo. J. BJosky ft Co., Stocks and Bonds . . . Security Building. 

Klrby, E, B 12% West Betle pi. 

KIrcher, Jacob 6» N. Eighth st., Qulncy, III. 

Kirk, B. P^ Jr Waggoner-Oates Milling Co Independence, Mo. 

Klrkham, J. H Carhondale, 111, 

KIsener, John Foskett ft Klssner, Feed IMS N. Broadway. 

Klalber, Fred J Poultry SSOS Manchester ave. 

Klauslng. Aug, F. Qrocetiea and Feed , . 6034 N. Broadway. 



t Court, Judge Court House. 

Grocer . . . ""■ "-"-<- — 

A- Laux, Pork Pack< 

. St. Louis Transfer Co,, Manager . 



KlDstermann, Wm. A. Feed . 

Knebel, L. . . ._..._-. 

Knelians, H. 1 



Knoblauch, d. O '....''.. . . .T . Boiieblack .~ 27 S. Main si 

Knox, C. G, . SL L, National Stock Yards, Vice-President . NaUonal Stock Tarda, ill. 

Koch, J. O. . . Breese Mill and Oraln Co Breese, 111. 

KoecbIg, Wm. . . Jos. A. Buokland ft Co,, Hay and Grain IDS 8. Third st. 

Koehler. C Columbia Brewing Co Twentieth and Madison at*. 

Eoehler, O. C. . . American Brewing Co ISU S. Seventh at. 

Koehler, Henry, Jr. . . American Brewing Co 2818 S, Seventh St. 

Koelngsmark. T. Milling Waterloo. HI. 

Koenlg, William . . . Wm. Koenig & Co., Farm Machinery ISO 8. Eighth st. 

Kohlbry, Louis Peed 8407 Miss ■ — - 

KohlbTT. Louis, Jr Louis Kohlbry, Feed S40T M'-- 

Kobl, F Kohl & Niemann. Feed venice. in. 

Kohn, Wm. H Kohn ft Co., Brokers 816 N. Pourtli st. 

Kohn, R. D. 815 N, Fourth St. 

Kohrlng. Gerhard . . . G. Kohrlng ft Bro., Wholesale Liquors .... SOS N. Second sL 

Kolb, Adolph Feed 309 S. Seventh st. 

Konta, Alexander Stocks and Bonds HI Pine at. 

Kortjobn, Henry , . . Flsse ft Kortjohn, Attorney Laclede Building. 

Kotany, M Stock and Bond Broker .... 411 Olive St. 

Kracke, J. H J, H. Kracke A Co.. Grain and Hay ... 200 N. Commercial st. 

Kraft, C. L. . . .' 2310 Walnut St. 

Kramer, Theodore Feed 2S10 Oregon a — 

Krath, C. " 

Krausa, John 
Krausae, E. B., u 

Kraussnlck, B. C. . . 

Krennlng, H. B. . F. H, Krennlng ft Sons, Grocer 818 N. Third st. 



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MEMBERS OF THE 



Krey, Fr^ John Krey & Son, Pork Packera . . . Slst and Bremen ave. 



, ... A. Krieokhai . 

Krite, F. H Hrael MlUlne Co., Mlllera Bast St. Louis. III. 

Kroe^r, Mathlas . . . Hy. Bayera & Co., Commlaslon aS N. Male at 

Kron, A Livery BCable im N. Tenth aL 

Kruegor. W. P Feed Luitemburg. Mo. 

KrUBe. .E. C. . . . Wtllemsen Belting Co 206 Destrehui at. 

Kuenke, Henry Flour and Peed iSSl Qravols ave. 

Kuehne, Prank . . . Frank Kuahne & Co., Produce UK N. Third aL 

Kuhlman, Henry W. . Kuhlman & Broa., Grocers and Feed .... 2S0O Bremen arc. 

Kuhn, Charles Real Estate 521 Pine at 

Kuhn, FranolH . . Kavenswood Distillery Co 28rd and Madison IL 

Kuha, Aug. H AraenaJ Brewery Twelfth and L.Tnch ats. 

KuhB, H. W H. W. Kuhs & Co., Grocers and Com 28 8, Third at. 

Kuni, Henry Maltster ISD Ann are. 

Kupferle. E. . . . Kupferle Bros. Mis. Co 600 N. Second at. 

Kurti, Paul Paul KurU ft Co., Produce 1018 N. Third it. 

Kurtzebom, Aug. . . Aug. Kurtaebom &. Sons, Jewelry 4U N. Broadway. 

Lackland, R, J Boatmena' Bank. President 4tti ft WaablitBton ave. 

Lackland. Edear C Laclede Building. 

Lackland, Rulua J. Jr . . Laclndn Building. 

Lacrolx. Louis B Flanagan ft Co.. MUlers isu S. Third ai. 

Ladenberger, Chas. . . . Wurst Coal and Hauling Co. £13G,I>eKalb St. 

Lahey, Thos. P T. B. Price ft Co., Brokers 118 N^ Fourth at. 

Lalne, Michael Builder 40M N. Ormnd ave. 

Laflin, Addison H i3a lat at.. Ban Dlegt). Cal. 

Lahee, Eugene H Alton, lU. 

Lamb, H. P Insurance MS N. Iri at, 

Lambrecht. Adolph . Huch. Lambrecht A Co. Columbia, ni. 

Lamping. W. C. ■ . • . Crescent Elevator Laclede Building. 

Lamping, C. M. . . . W. L. Qreen Com. Co 301 N. Third ai. 

Lancaster, R. D Real Estate 202 N. ElKblli St. 

Landau, Loula . . . Bodanhelmer, Landau ft Co.. Grocers G2I N. Becond St. 

Lang, Geo. P Hauelaen & Lang, Produce 1016 N. Third st 

Lang, George . . . Braun-Lang Com. Co.. Flour and Commlsslan . . 6 N. Second SL 

Lang. B. H P. P. WllllamH ft Co., CommlsHloa . . . Cham, of Com. Buildtng. 

Langan, L Langan Livery Co Thirty-fourth and Locust sts. 

Langdale, W. H. . . , St. L. & N, O. An. Lina, Purchasing Agent . 118 N. Com. «. 

Latige, Wm. A. , . German Life Ina. Co Bank of Commerce Building. 

Langenbergr, Geo. F. . L&ngenberg Bro. & Co., Coromlaslon .... US Chain, of Com. 
Langenberg. H. F. . . Langenberg Bro. ft Co., Commission ... 418 Cham, of Coio. 

Langton, J. J. P. . . Reid Bros. Pkg. Co e N. Commeicial »t 

Lanitz, George Grain Fourth and pine at. 

Lanley. John W. , Carondelet Milling Co T0!0 8. Broadway. 

Lansing. E. W Broker Cham, of Commerce. 

Lanaing. A. B.jJr Deceased 

Larkin. Thos. H Larkin A Scheffer, Mfg. Chemists .... Main and Anna su, 

Larlmore. N. G LArlmore, N. Dakou- 

Xjital, John J. . . J. 3. Latal Roofing Co 1618 K. Tenth it. 

LaTourette, James Columbia Zinc Works Marlon. Ind. 

Laughlln, j! R. . Jas. M. Carpenter & Co., Real Estate 108 N. Eighth st. 

Laughlln, Julian Lawyer Gil Ptne st 

LawDin, Job. D Lumber 807 N. Levee. 

Lawrence, Prank ... Rio Chemical Co. 401 N. Main sL 

Lederer, Samuel M, . . Plokel Stone Co laai old Manchester Road. 

. Lee. W. H. . . . Merchants' Laclede Nat. Bank, President .... 4th and Olive st 

Lee, Wm. H W. H. Lee ft Co., Wholesale Liquors .... 713 Lucas ave. 

Leftwtch. W. M. , . . Leftwich Com, Co Republic Building. 

Ledwich, Morris . . Leitwich Com. Co Republic Buliding. 

Lehman. 8. M Lehman Bros.. Commission II William at. If. T. 

Lehmer. H. Q. . . . Bcholten Photo Co., 1114 Olive st 

Leiehton. Oeo. E. . . . Bridge and Beach Mfg. Co., President . . . Rialto Building. 

Leighton. J. F. 4tl Olive st 

Leiong. A. A. Citizen's Bank, Caahler New Orleana. 

Lemcke. L L. Lemcke ft Co.. Commission Fourth and Pine. 

Lemcke. M. H Insurance Id N. Third st 

Lemp, William J. . W. J. Lemp Brewing Co., Brewer . . Thirteenth and Chra^ik**- 

Lemp, Louis V. Thirteenth and Cherokee. 

Lemp. Wm. J., Jr. Thirteenth and Cherokee. 

Lemp, Carl A Thirteenth and Cherokee. 

Leonliardt, E. W Saxony Mills, Milling no Lombard st 

Leonhardt. R. H Baiony Hills, Flour JU Lombard St. 

Leonhardt Martin W Kehlor Mills East SI. Louis, m. 

Lesch en, Henry . . . A. Leschen ft Son, Rope and Cordage .... aiON. Malnat 



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UERCSANTS' EXCHANGE OF ST. LOUIS. 19 

Name. Firm. BusInesB. Location. 

L«iT. F«lk WholesUe Cutler? ... 618 St. CharleB at. 

Levy, M. W Lite InHurance Seventh and Plna ats. 

LewedBC, Cbas. . . Chas. I^edewas; £ Co., Provlaloiia 903 N. Fourth st.' 

Irfwis, Turner T. . . Maramac Son Co,, MlnlnK WalnwrlKht Building. 

Lewis, J. B. . . . . J, R. Lewla Com. Co., PreBldent 203 N. Third at. 

Lewis, John Court o( Appeals, Clerk Courthouse, 

Liebke, c, Frank Saw Mill . , . . Second and Buchanan ata. 

LtBgett, John E. . LIgffelt-Myere Tobacco Co TIB Chestnut at. 

Uithlner, C. B Schrelner-Flack Grain 'Co 118 N. Fourth at. 

Ill ndUom, Robert , . Robert Lljidblom & Co., Com. . . IS Cham, of Com., Chicago. 

Unk. Ernst Deceased 

Unley, Ewa H Merchant 7M N. Second at. 

l.lnneman. Henry J Druer Broker 409 N. Second at. 

Llppelt. O. H.. Jr. . , . Zlttlosen Mfg. Co., Tents, etc 106 N. Broadway. 

Lltile, Oeorge H 4CZ2 Eoslon eve. 

Utile. Wm. C, . , Wm. C, Little & Bro., Bankers and Brokera 411 Olive at. 

LItile, R. L Street Com, office City Hall, 

Llllle, H, J Wm. C. Little & Bro„ Brokers . "' "*' 

LlppelQiann, John H. . . . Benton Hey and Qrali 

Littler, Joseph W Broker tu cia< 

Uliau, August H. . Bode & Lltiau Mar. Co., Feed 6J1 Manehealei 

Locke, Geo. W. . . Geo. W. Locke ft Co., Real Estate ... 

Lockwood, James Y. . Miss. Riv. & Bonne Terre Trans. Co. 

Lockwood, Wm. M. . . . St. L. A A. & M. Asa'n. Treasurer HTJ Ullve at. 

Loeb, CM American Metal Co Security Building. 

Loehr, F Saloon 110 N. Third at. 

Loewen, Elavld D. Loewen A Son, Broom Com BH N, Main st. 

LoEeman, C. A. . . . . Log-man Chair Co 2000 N. Main at. 

Lohmann, Wm. H Hay and Grain en Ann ave. 

Lohmeyer, Loula H. . . Lohmeyer & Co., Real Estate AKsnts . , . 709 Chestnut at. 

Loker, Geo. H. . . Carbo-Alumlna Metal Co tOS Washington ave. 

Lonergan, T. J GOI Chamber of Commerce. 

Loudennsn, James H 510 Pine st. 

Louderman, John H 610 Pine St. 

Louderman, John H., 2nd , Plows Candy Co. 20) N. Main sL 

Louderman, Henry B 610 Pine st. 

Louderman, H. B., Jr Broker Roe Building. 

Love. J.